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Full text of "recital programs 1927-1928"

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List of Concerts and Lectures 

Inaugural Recital, Casimir Hall Josef Hofmann, Piano 

December 3, 1927 

Faculty Recitals 

First Felix Salmond, Violoncello November 9, 1927 

Second *The Curtis Quartet December 14, 1927 

Third Lucile Lawrence, Harp January 4, 1928 

Fo^^th Lea Luboshutz, Violin h^^^^^ n, 1928 

Josef Hofmann, Piano / 

Fifth Emanuel Zetlin, Violin January 25, 1928 

Sixth Moriz Rosenthal, Piano February 8, 1928 

Seventh Carl Flesch, Violin February 15, 1928 

Eighth Emilio de Gogorza, Baritone February 29, 1928 

Ninth Lea Luboshutz, Violin March 7, 1928 

Tenth Horatio Connell, Baritone March 21, 1928 

Eleventh Carlos Salzedo, Harp April 12, 1928 

Twelfth Louis Bailly, Viola April 18, 1928 

Thirteenth, . Harriet van Emden, Soprano. . . April 23, 1928 

Fourteenth. . Abram Chasins, Piano Jvlay 16, 1928 

Fifteenth. . . Josef Hofmann, Piano .May 24, 1928 

Complimentary Recital: 
La Societe des Instruments Anciens April 25, 1928 

Special Lecturc'-Recitals: 

{November 13, 1927 
November 20, 1927 
December 4, 1927 



Students' Concerts 

November 10, 1927 

December 5 and 19, 1927 

Students of Mr. Bailly in Ensemble /February 6, 1928 

April 2 and 19, 1928 

May 14 and 28, 1928 

Students of Mr. Connell May 3, 1928 

Students of Mr. de Gogorza April 26, 1928 

Students of Mr. Farnam May 19, 1928 

November 17, 1927 

December 12, 1927 

January 16, 1928 

Students of Mr. Flesch (February 2 and 20, 1928 

March 9, 1928 

April 30, 1928 

May 2, 1928 

Students of Mr. Hofmann May 22, 1928 

Students of Miss Lawrence May 21, 1928 

Students of Madame Luboshutz March 19, 1928 

Students of Mr. Rosenthal March 5, 1928 

_ , , - . _ (February 17, 1928 

Students of Mr. Salmond < 

(April 20, 1928 

Students of Mr. Salzedo .May 18, 1928 

Students of Madame Sembrich < ' 



1 



May 11 and 12, 1928 



Students of Madame Vengerova ) ' 

(April 27, 1928 

Students of Mr. Zetlin May 4, 1928 

Concert of Students' Orchestra December 21, 1927 



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CJonataOAppassionaia. Qp-S? Weethoven 

Q>T.llegro assai 
Qfindante con moto 
Cin-llegro Tna non iroppo 
C^resto 

OSallad in Q minor. Op. 52 (Shopin 

^yalse in 6 minor (CTosthumous) Qhopin 

(Snodurne in($) myor, Op.62, S¥o. 1 QJiopin 

oLa QampanAia dPaganiniJ^isTl 



The Curtis Institute of Music 



Fourth Season— 1927-1928 



Felix Salmond Violoncello 
Carl Flesch Violin 

Collaborating 
Harry Kaufman at the Piano 



V/ednesday evening, T^ovemher J^inth 
at 8:15 o''chc\ 



First Faculty Recital 



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The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 
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Programme 



Johannes Brahms Trio in B major, Opus 8, for Violin, 

Violoncello and Piano (revised version) 
Allegro con brio 
Scherzo — Allegro molto 
Adagio 
Allegro 



Johannes Brahms Sonata in E minor, Opus 38, for 

Violoncello and Piano 
Allegro non troppo 
Allegretto quasi menuetto 
Allegro 



Johannes Brahms Concerto in A minor, Opus 102, for 

Violin and Violoncello 
Allegro 
Andante 
Vivace non troppo 



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The Curtis Institute of Music 



Fourth Season — 1927-1928 



THE CURTIS QUARTET 

Carl Flescii, First Violin 

Emanuel Zetlin, Second Violin 

Louis Bailly, Viola 

Felix Salmond, Violoncello 



V/ednesday evening, December Fourteenth 
at 8:1S o'cloc\ 



Second Faculty Recital 



The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 
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*The Curtis Quartet also played this programme as follows: 

The Chamber Music Association — 

Penn Athletic Club, Philadelphia January 8, 1928 

Library of Congress — 

Washington, D. C March 4, 1928 

Town Hall — 

New York City March 8, 1928 



Programme 



LuDWiG VAN Beethoven Quartet in C sharp minor, Opus 131 

Adagio ma non troppo e molto 
espressivo — ^Allegro molto vivace — 
Allegro moderate — Andante ma non 
troppo e molto cantabile — Presto — 
Adagio quasi un poco andante — 
Allegro 



Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. .Quartet in B flat major, (Kochel 458) 

Allegro vivace assai 
Menuetto 
Adagio 
Allegro assai 



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Programme 



LuDWiG VAN Beethoven Quartet in C sharp minor, Opus 131 

Adagio ma non troppo e molto 
espressivo — Allegro molto vivace — 
Allegro moderato — ^Andante ma non 
troppo e molto cantabile — Presto — 
Adagio quasi un poco andante — - 
Allegro 



Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. .Quartet in B flat major, (Kochel 458) 

Allegro vivace assai 
Menuetto 
Adagio 
Allegro assai 



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The Curtis Institute of Music 



Fourth Season — 1927-1928 



LuciLE Lawrence, Harpist 

Carlos Salzedo at the Piano 



V\/^ednesddy evening, January Fourth 
at 8: IS o'cloc\ 



Third Faculty Recital 



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The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



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Programme 



I — pRANgois CouPERiN Sarabande 

1668-1733 

Arcangelo Corelli Giga 

1658-1713 

Josef Haydn Theme and Variations 

1732-1809 

JoHANN Sebastian Bach Bourree 

1685-1750 
(Transcribed for harp from the originals by Carlos Salzedo) 



II — Maurice Ravel Introduction and Allegro 

(1906) 

with piano accompaniment 



III — Selim Palmgren '. May Night 

(Transcribed by Florence Wightman) 

Carlos Salzedo Mirage 

(1918) 

Casper Reardon Nocturne 

(1926) 

(Dedicated to Mary Louise Curtis Bok) 



IV — Carlos Salzedo Sonata for Harp and Piano 

<J^22) (by request) 



Miss Lawrence uses the Lyon (f Healy Harp exclusively 

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The Curtis Institute of Music 



Fourth Season— 1927-1928 



Lea Luboshutz, Violinist 
Josef Hofmann, Pianist 



'Wednesday Evening, January Eleventh 
at 8:15 o'cloc\ 



Fourth Faculty Recital 



The Steinwat is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



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Edvard Grieg Sonata in F major, Opus 8, No. 1, 

for Violin and Piano 
Allegro con brio 
Andante 

Allegretto quasi andantino 
Allegro molto vivace 

LuDWiG VAN Beethoven. . .Sonata in A major, Opus 47, (Kreut2;er) 

for Violin and Piano 

Adagio sostenuto — Presto 
Andante con varia^ioni 
Finale — Presto 



Max Bruch Concerto in G minor, Opus 26, 

for Violin and Piano 
Allegro moderate 
Adagio 
Finale — Allegro energico 

(By Request) 



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The Curtis Institute of Music 



Fourth Season — 1927-1928 



Emanuel Zetlin, Violinist 

Harry Kaufman at the Piano 



Wednesday Evening, January TwentyFifth 
at 8:15 o'doc\ 



Fifth Faculty Recital 



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The Steinwav is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 
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Programme 



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Ottorino Respighi Sonata in B minor 

Moderate 

Andante espressivo 
Passacaglia (Allegro 
moderate ma energico) 

(Composed in 1917) 



Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart Concerto in D major, No. 4 

Allegro 

Andante cantabile 

Rondo 



Karol Szymanowski Notturno 

Modest Moussorgsky Hopak* 

Maurice Ravel Rapsodie Tzigane 

♦Arranged by Sergei Rachmaninoff 



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The Curtis Institute of Music 



Fourth Season — 1927-1928 



MoRiz Rosenthal, Pianist 



V\/ednesday Evening, February Eighth 
at 8: IS o'cloc\ 



Sixth Faculty Recital 



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The Steinwat is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



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Programme 
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LuDwiG VAN Beethoven Sonata in E major, Opus 109 

Vivace ma non troppo 

Prestissimo 

Andante con varia2;ioni 



Franz Schubert Wanderer Fantasy, Opus 15 



Frederic Chopin Nocturne in D flat major, Opus 27, 

No. 2 
Barcarole in F sharp major. Opus 60 
Two Etudes 
Mazurka 
Waltz in A flat major. Opus 42 



Isaac Albeniz Triana 

Franz Liszt Hungarian Rhapsody, No. 2 



Mr. Rosenthal uses the Kkabe Piano 



The Curtis Institute of Music 



Fourth Season — 1927-1928 



Carl Flesch, VioIi?ii5t 

Harry Kaufman at the Piano 



Wednesday Evening, February Fifteenth 
at 8: IS o'cloc\ 



Seventh Faculty Recital 



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The Steinwat is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 

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Programme 



I. 

JoHANN Sebastian Bach Concerto in E major 

Allegro 
Adagio 
Allegro assai 

HandeL'Flesch Prayer 

Pastorale 
March 



II. 

Erich Korngold Sonata, Opus 6 

Ben moderato ma con passione 
Allegro molto (confuoco) 
Adagio 

Allegretto quasi andante 
(con grazia) 

(First performance in the United States) 

III. 

PaganinI'Flesch Caprice in Octaves 

BartoK'Szekely Rumanian Dances from Hungary 

DE FallA'Kochanski Suite Populaire Espagnole 

El pano moruno 
Berceuse 
Chanson 
Jota 



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The Curtis Institute of Music 



Fourth Season— 1927-1928 



Emilio de Gogorza, Baritone 

Helen Win slow at the Piano 



Wednesday Evening, February Twenty-ninth 
at 8: IS o'cloc\ 



Eighth Faculty Recital 



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The Steinway is the oflScial piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 

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Programme 



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I 

Christoph Willibald Gluck Recitative and Aria 

"Diane Impitoyable" 
from "Iphigenie en Aulide" 

Old French En Venant de Lyon 

Arranged by Julien Tiersot TamboUXin 



II 

Johannes Brahms Die Mainacht 

Standchen 

Meine Liebe ist Griin 



III 

Alexander Gretchaninoff The Wounded Birch 

Modest P. Moussorgsky The Goat 

Sergei Rachmaninoff In Silent Night 



IV 

Cesar Franck La Procession 

Ninon 



V 

Fermin Maria Alvarez La Partida 

Manuel de Falla Seguidilla Muricana 

Jota 



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"Diane Impitoyable" 

Diane impitoyable! En vain vous I'ordonnez cet 

afifreux sacrifice, 
En vain vous promettez de nous etre propice, 
De nous rendre les vents par votre, ordre en- 

chaines. 
Non, la Grece outragee des Troyens a ce prix ne 

sera pas vengee, 
Je renonce aux honneurs qui m'etaient destines, 
Et dutil m'en couter la vie. 
On n'immolera point, ma fille Iphigenie, 
Diane impitoyable 1 En vain, en vain, vous 

rordonnez! 
Brillant auteur de la lumierel 
Verrai tu sans palir — le plus grand des forfaits? 

Dieu — ^bienfaisant I — exauce ma priere, — 
Et remplis les voeux que je fais! 
Sur la route de Mycene dirige le fidel Areas 
Que prompant ma fille et la reine! 
Elles pensent qu' Achille, oubliant tant d'appas 
Songe a former — une autre chaine, 
Quelles retournent sur le pas. — 
Brillant auteur de la lumierel 
Verrais tu sans palir — le plus grand des for- 
faits? 
Dieu — bienfaisant! exauce _ma priere, 
Et remplis les voeuz que je fais! 
Si ma fille arrive en Aulide, 
Si son fatal destin la conduit en ces lieux, 
Rien ne peut la sauver du transport homicide, 
De Calchas, des Grecs, et des dieux. 



(Translation) 

Pitiless Diana, in vain you ordain this hor- 
rible sacrifice; in vain you promise us to be pro- 
pitious, to let loose for us the winds shackled by 
your command. No, outraged Greece will not 
be revenged on the Trojans at this price. I re- 
nounce the honors that were destined for me; if 
it costs me my life, my daughter Iphigenia shall 
not be sacrificed. 

Splendid creator of light, will you see without 
turning pale, the greatest of all crimes? Benefi- 
cent God, oh, hear my prayer and fulfill ray 
wish. Direct the faithful Areas on the road of 
Mycenae so that, deceiving my daughter and the 
Queen, they may think that Achilles, forgetful 
of so great allurement, dreams of forming an- 
other alliance; that they may turn back their 
steps. If my daughter comes to Aulis, if her 
fate brings her to this place, nothing can rescue 
her from the murderous frenzy of Calchas, the 
Greeks, and the gods. 



En Venant de Lyon 

En venant de Lyon de voir tenir le pas, 

Je rencontrai trois dames qui dansaient bras a 

bras, 
La la la, la la — a — a, la la la la la lere. 
Trois mignons les menaient robustes et gaillards, 
Pourpoints d'orfevrerie et manteaux de damas. 
La la la, la la — a — a, la la la la la lere. 
Les chaines en echarpe trainantes jusqu'en bas, 
Et faisaient des gambades plus haut que leurs 

plumas, 
La la la, la la — a — a, la la la la la lere. 

J'y avisai ma dame qui ne me voyait pas, 
Faisant chere moyenne, et a son rang chanta, 
La la la, la la— a — a, la la la la la lere. 
Mon cceur n'est pas en joie pourtant sy je 

m'ebats: 
Mon ami est en cour qui avecques lui I'a, 
La la la, la la — a — a, la la la la la lere. _ 
Mais jai bonne esperance que bientot reviendra 
En depit qui qu'en grogne, toujours il m'aimera, 
La la la, la la — a — a, la la la la la lere. 



(Translation) 
Coming from Lyons 

In coming from Lyons where I attended the 
jousts, I met three ladies who, arm in arm, were 
dancing — La la la la le lire. Three minions led 
them, robust and full of life, doublets studded 
with jewels and mantles of damask — La la la la 
le lire. Their gold chains thrown over their 
shoulders, and dragging on the ground, on they 
went, gambolling and kicking higher than their 
hats. Among these ladies, to my surprise, I saw 
my lady love. She seemed enjoying herself fairly 
and when her turn came she sang. La la la la 
le lire. 

My heart is not joyful ever, if I seem happy. 
My friend is at court — who is with him? La la 
la la le lire. But I have good cheer that soon 
he will return, regardless of gossips, always he'll 
love me. La la la la le lire. 



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Tambourin 

Ce Tambourin, comme la precedente Musette, 
est tire d'un recueil de 1732, et n'est pas moines 
caracteristique du style de son temps. 

Viens dans ce bocage, belle Aminte, sans con- 

trainte Ton y forme des voeux, Viens, 
Viens dans ce bocage, belle Aminte, il est fait 

pour les plaisirs et les jeux, Viens 1 
Le ramage des oiseaux, le murmure des eaux, 

tout nous engage 
A choisir ce beau sejour pour offrir a I'amour 

un tendre hommage. 
Viens dans ce bocage, belle Aminte, sans con- 

trainte Ton y formes des voeux, Viens, 
Viens dans ce bocage, belle Aminte, il est fait 

pour les plaisirs et les jeux. 
A I'ombrage des forets, goiitons les biens secrets 

d'un amiable badinage; 
Nous sommes tous deux dans le bel age, de nos 

chaines resserrons les noeuds: 
Vives ardeurs, moments flatteurs, que vos dou- 
ceurs a jamais charment nos coeurs! 
Viens dans ce bocage, belle Aminte, sans con- 

trainte Ton y forme des voeux, Viens, 
Viens dans ce bocage, belle Aminte, il est fait 

pour les plaisirs et les jeux. 



(Translation) 

Come to this grove, dear Aminta. Without 
restraint, wishes can there be uttered. This 
grove is made for pleasure and games. — The 
chirping of the birds, the murmur of the springs; 
everything calls us to choose this heavenly place, 
to offer to love a tender homage. Come to this 
grove, dear Aminta, without restraint, wishes 
can there be uttered. 

In the shadows of forests let us taste the sweet 
fruits of amiable frolic. Now youth invites us 
to tighten the knot of our chains, flattering mo- 
ments that your sweetness doubly charms. Come 
to this grove, dear Aminta, without restraint, 
wishes can there be uttered. 



Die Mainacht 

Wenn der silberne Mond durch die Gestrauche 

blinkt, 
Und sein schlummerndes Licht uber den Rasen 

streut, 
Und die Nachtigall flotet, 
Wandl' ich traurig von Busch zu Busch. 

Uberhiillet vom Laub girret ein Tauben-paar 
Sein Entziicken mir vor. 

Aber ich wende mich, suche dunklere Schatten, 
Und die einsame Thrane rinnt. 

Wann, O lachelndes Bild, welches wie Mor- 

genroth 
Durch die Seele mir strahlt, find ich auf Erden 

dich? 
Und die einsame Thrane bebt mir heisser, 
Heisser die Wang' herab. 



(Translation) 

That Night in May 

When the moon silver-bright 
Shines thro' the tangled trees. 
And her languorous light 
Shimmers on cluster'd leaves, 
And the nightingale sings, 
Sadly I wander from glade to glade. 

Hiding there in the shade 
I hear the turtle-doves 
Softly cooing of love. 
Leaving them far behind, 
I press on to deeper shadows; 
And I weep for utter loneliness. 

When, O maid of my heart. 

Fair as the smiling morn 

Thy love-radiant face 

When shall I look upon? 

See, the tears of my great loneliness pour, 

Burning, burning, my cheeks along. 



Standchen 

Der Mond steht iiber dem Berge, 

So recht fiir verliebte Leut'; 

Im Garten rieselt ein Brunnen, 

Sonst Stille weit und breit. 

Neben der Mauer im Schatten, 

Da steh'n der Studenten drei, 

Mit Flot' und Geig' und Zither, 

Und singen und spielen dabei, 

Singen und spielen dabei. 

Die Klange schleichen der Schonsten 

Sacht in den Traum hinein, 

Sie schaut den blonden Geliebten und lispelt: 

"Vergiss nicht mein'." 



(Translation) 
The moon hangs over the hilltops. 
And now is the time for love. 
A fountain plays in the garden. 
No creature there doth move: 

Till to the foot of the terrace 
Three students come in the shade. 
With mandolins and a zither, 
A-singing a serenade. 
Singing a dulcet serenade. 

The music floats to the maiden. 
And in a vision fair 
She sees the face of her lover, 
And murmurs, "Forget me ne'er I' 



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Meine Liebe 1st Griin 

Meine Liebe ist griin wie der Fliederbusch, 
Und mein Lieb ist schon wie die Sonne, 
Die glanzt wohl herab auf dem Fliederbusch, 
Und fiillt ihn mit Duft und mit Wonne. 

Meine Seele hat Schwingen der Nachtigall, 
Und wiegt sich in bliihendem Flieder. 
Und jauchzet und singet von Duft berauscht, 
Viel liebestrunkene Lieder. 



(Translation) 

My Heart is in Bloom 

Oh, my heart is in bloom like the lilac tree, 
And my Love like a sunbeam gloweth, 
She has but to glance at my lilac tree, 
And lo! into blossom it bloweth. 

And my soul has the wings of a nightingale; 

He lives mid the lilac flowers, 

In ecstasy singing his madding lay, 

For joy of his perfumed bowers. 



The Wounded Birch 

By the hatchet wounded. 

See the birch-tree languish; 

From its bark of silver 

Fall the tears of anguish. 

Do not weep, do not weep, O birch-tree. 

Cease thy mournful crying! 

Summer soon will heal thee; 

Birch, thou art not dying 1 

In thy lofty glory, 

Thou shalt greet the morrow; 

But a heart once wounded 

Fades beneath its sorrow. 



The Goat 

Through the meadows lightly tripping. 
Went a maiden gaily skipping. 

When suddenly a goat she spied. 
Dirty, bearded, frightful creature. 
Shaggy, foul in every feature. 

Demon-eyed! 
Then the maiden helter-skelter, 
To a friendly wood for shelter 

Safely fled. 
And hid there breathless, faint with terror, 
All but dead. 

That same girl, no longer worried. 
Soon to church as gaily hurried. 

And was married. 
Foul and crooked, old, bald-headed. 
Is the creature she has wedded. 

Demon-eyed! 
But, you think the maiden shuns him? 

Hm! Nay, nay. 
With caresses she must please him. 
Feign a love sincere and true. 
Hum! She knows the thing to do! 
She's the best of wives, they say! 



In Silent Night 



Ah, how long shall I hear, in silent night 

enfolding, 
Thy voice enticingly, thy tender glance still 

beholding. 
While yet thy tresses in my hands with flashing 

sunlight seem to burn. 
And mem'ries of thy smile now fade and now 

return — 
And then I whisper low, the words of old 

recalling. 
That once did hold us fast within their spell 

enthralling; 
Then all bewilder'd, as breaking thro' a cloud. 
Into the silent night I call thy name aloud — 
I call thy name aloud into the silent night — 



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La Procession 

Dieu s'avance a travers les champs I 

Par les landes, les pres, les verts taillis de 

hetres. 
II vient, suivi du peuple et porte par les 

pretres: 
Aux cantiques de rhomme, oiseaux, melez vos 

chants 1 
On s'arrete. 

La foule, autour d'un chene antique 
S'incline, en adorant, sous ostensoir mystique: 
Soleill darde sur Eui tes longs rayons couchants! 
Aux cantiques de rhomme, oiseaux melez vos 

chants! 
Vous, fleurs, avec I'encens exhalez votre arome! 
O fete! tout reluit, tout prie et tout embaumel 
Dieu s'avance a travers les champs. 



(Translation) 
God is coming across the fields! 
O'er rich pastures and meadows, by shady beech 
trees' thickets, he comes, followed by devout 
throngs and borne by worshipping priests. The 
birds mingle their joyous songs with hymns 
praising the Lord. They stop! The multitude 
around a primeval oak, kneeling in adoration, 
beholds the Host uplifted. O sun ! rest upon 
him thy mystic setting rays! With joyous 
hymns of praise ye birds mingle your songs. 
O flowers! Send forth as incense your lovely 
fragrance. Behold ! How man and nature com- 
mune as one with God! God is coming across 
the fields! 



Ninon 

Ninon, Ninon, que fais-tu de la vie? 
L'heure s'enfruit le jour sucede au jour; 
Rose ce soir demain fletrie. 
Comment vis-tu toi qui n'as pas d'amour? 

Regards toi, la jeune fille. 

Ton coeur bat et ton ceil petille, 

Aujourd'hui le printemps, Ninon, demain I'hiver 

Quoi tu n'as pas d'etoile et tu vas sur la mer. 

Au combat sans musique, en voyage sans livre, 
Quoi tu n'as pas d'amour et tu paries de vivre, 
Moi pour un peu d'amour je donnerais mes jours. 
Et je les donnerais pour rien sans les amours. 

Ninon, Ninon, que fais-tu de la vie? 
L'heure s'enfruit le jour sucede au jour; 
Rose ce soir demain fletrie. 
Comment vis-tu toi qui n'as pas d'amour? 

Qu'importe que le jour finisse et recommence, 
Quand d'une autre existence le coeur est anime, 
Ouvrez-vous jeunes fleurs, si la mort vous enleve. 
La vie est un sommeil, I'amour en est le reve. 
Et vous aurez vecu si vous avez aime. 



(Translation) 

Tell me, Ninon, to what end art thou living? 
The hours are passing, and day follows day; 
Tomorrow finds withered the rose of this evening; 
How do you live without loving, I pray? 

Only see what a slip of a maid thou art 
With thy sparkling eyes and thine eager heart. 
Today it is Spring, Ninon, — soon it will snow, 
Wouldst thou brave the sea with no beacon 
aglow? 

Plunge into battle without a hymn, or, 
With no book to guide, on a journey go? 
Thou knowest not love, yet thou pratest of living ! 
For love I would lay down my life,^-or live it. 
Or give it away — were it worth the giving. 

Tell me, Ninon, to what end art thou living? 
The hours are passing, and day follows day; 
Tomorrow finds withered the rose of this evening, 
How do you live without loving, I pray? 

Evening and dawn are to thee the same; 
But if thy heart to another's were tuned 
Thou wouldst bloom like a flower, though death 

had called. 
And that is the dream; and Life but the sleeping. 
Only through love can it be worth the keeping. 



La Partida 

Sierras de Granada, Montes de Aragon, 
Campos de mi patria. 
Para siempre adios, adios. 
Para siempre adios. 

De la Patria los ultimos ecos, 
Los ultimos ecos 
Resonando en mi pecho estaran. 
En mi pecho estaran, 

Y mis ojos llorando pesares, 
Llorando pesares, 

Sus dolores, ay! sus dolores al mundo di ran. 
A destierro y ausencia constante, 

Y ausencia constante. 

Me condenan tiranos de amor. 
Tiranos de amor, 

Unos oos del alma enemigos, 

Del alma enemigos 

Mensageros, ay! mensageros de um pecho 

traidor, ah! 
Cuandoa, tus playas vuelva, suelo adorado, 
Las aguas del olvido me habran curado, 

Y si asi no suceede, triste de mil 
Triste de mi! 

A la patria que de jo vendre a morir, vendre a 
morir. 

Sierras de Granada, Montes de Aragon, 
Campos de mi patria. 
Para siempre adios, adios. 
Para simpre, adios! 



(Translation) 

Sierras of Granada 

Mountains of Aragon 

Fields of my country 

Good-bye forever! 

To exile and constant absence 

I am condemned by the tyrant love, 

These eyes, avenues of my soul. 

Messengers, alas, of a treacherous heart. 

Oh! when to thy shores I shall return, adored 

fatherland, 
The waters of forgetfulness will have healed my 

wounds. 
And if it does not happen thus, my only hope 

is in death. 



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Seguidilla Muricana 

Cualquiera que el tejado 
Tenga de vidrio. 
Cualquiera que el tejado 
Tenga de vidrio. 
No debe tirar piedras 
Al del vecino. 

Arrieros semes; 
Puede que en el camino 
Puede que en el camino 
Nos encontremosl 

Per tu mucha inconstancia 

Yo te comparo 

Por tu mucha inconstancia, yo te comparo 

Con peseta que corre 

De mano en mano; 

Que al fin se borra, 

Y creyendola falsa 

Nadie le toma! 

Nadie le toma! 



(Translation) 

People who live in glass houses shouldn't throw 

stones. 
The race is not always to the swift. 
All is not gold that glitters. 



Jota 



Dicen que no nos queremos 
Dicen que no nos queremos 
Porque no nos ven hablar; 
A tu corazon y al mio 
Se lo pueden preguntar. 
Dicen que no nos queremos 
Porque no nos ven hablar. 

Ya ma despido de ti, 
Ya ma despido de ti, 
De tu casa y tu ventana 
Y aunque no quiera tu madre, 
Adios, nina, hasta manana. 
Adios, nina, hasta manana. 
Ya me despido de ti. 
Aunque no quiera tu madre. 



(Translation) 

They say we do not love each other because they 

do not see us talk; 
Of your heart and of mine, they may ask it. 
Now I take leave of you, of your house and 

your window. 
And, although your mother may not wish it. 
Good-bye, little girl, good-bye, until I see you 

again. 



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The Curtis Institute of Music 



Fourth Season — 1927-1928 



Lea Luboshutz, Violinist 

Harry Kaufman at the Piano 



V/ednesday Evening, March Seventh 
at 8 AS o'cloc\ 



Ninth Faculty Recital 



The Stein WAY is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 

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Programme 



I 

JoHANN Sebastian Bach .... Concerto in A minor, No. 1 

Allegro moderato 
Andante 
Allegro assai 

BacH'Kreisler Praeludium 

Assisted by students of 
Madame Luboshutz, Mr. Bailly and Mr. Salmond 



II 

Serge Prokofieff Concerto in D major, Opus 19 

Andantino 

Scherzo (Vivacissimo) 

Moderato — Allegro moderato 



III 

Henri Vieuxtemps Concerto in A minor. Opus 37 

Allegro non troppo — Adag 
Allegro con fuoco 



IV 

HandeL'Flesch Prayer from the "Te Deum" 

Rubin Goldmark Witches' Sabbath 

Alexander Gretchaninoff . Berceuse 

DE FallA'Kreisler Danse Espagnole from "La Vida Breve" 



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The Curtis Institute of Music 



Fourth Season— 1927-1928 



Horatio Connell, Baritone 

Ellis Clark Hammann at the Piano 



Wednesday Evening, 'March Twenty-first 

at 8: IS o'chc\ 



Tenth Faculty Recital 



The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 
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Programme 



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I. 



Franz Schubert From the Song-Cycle "Die 

Winterreise" 
Gute Nacht 
Die Wetterfahne 
Gefror'ne Thranen 
Der Lindenbaum 
Die Post 



11. 



Fruhlingstraum 

Die Krahe 

LeUte Hoffnung 

Der Leiermann 

Der Stiirmische Morgen 

Die Nebensonnen 

Muth 



III. 

Giuseppe Verdi "Eri tu" from "The Masked BalP 

IV. 

Cecil Cameron Lavender Gown 

Roger Quieter "It was a Lover and his Lass" 

Sigurd Lie Soft-footed Snow 

Arthur Sullivan "O Mistress Mine" 



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"CCHUBERT'S wonderful song-cycle, 'Die Winterreise,' was composed in the year 1827. 
O It consists of twentyfour songs, the poems by Wilhelm Miiller. 

It has been well and truly said that 'it is as the monarch of the Lied that Schubert's great' 
ness and individuality shine forth most distinctly.' While these exquisite songs were still 
only in course of publication, Schubert died — one of his last acts being the revision of the 
proofs of them. 

"The Wanderer's winter wayfaring is a drama of emotion expressed in a lyrical sequence. 
The background shifts in each song, and each drop-scene of the journeying is the setting 
of an emotional episode. Night follows dusk, and day dawn, and the hour-hand of time 
points to each landmark of the road. With every change of background, with every passing 
hour, the note of emotion changes. The simple, personal utterance of despair for joy fore- 
gone becomes the voice of a wider and deeper sorrow, and grief outsteps the narrow limit 
of the lover's heart to seek in death the release of a soul in exile." 

These songs are sung commemorating the centenary of Franz Schubert's death. 



Gute Nacht 

Fremd bin ich eingezogen, fremd zieh ich wieder 

aus. 
Der Mai war mir gewogen mit manchetn Blumen- 

strauss. 
Das Madchen sprach von Liebe, die Mutter gar 

von Eh', 
Nun ist die Welt so triibe, der Weg gehullt in 

Schnee. 

Was soil ich langer weilen, das man mich trieb' 

hinaus? 
Lass irre Hunde heulen vor ihres Vaters Haus! 
Die Liebe liebt das Wandern, Gott hat sie so 

gemacht, 
Von Einem zu dem Andern, Fein Liebchen, 

gute Nacht! 



(Translation) 

Good Night 

A wanderer I came hither, a wanderer I go 
hence. Coming May welcomed me with flower- 
garlands; the maiden spoke of love; the mother 
of bridal. Now the world lies shrouded in snow; 
the dusk of winter falls. Why tarry to be 
driven forth? Love loves wandering — God made 
Love so? 



Die Wetterfahne 

Der Wind spielt mit der Wetterfahne 
Auf meines schonen Liebchens Haus, 

Da dacht' ich schon in meinem Wahne, 
Sie pfiff' den armen Fliichtling aus. 

Er hatt' es eher bemerken sollen 
Des Hauses aufgestecktes Schild, 

So hatt' er nimmer suchen wollen 
Im Haus ein treues Frauenbild. 

Der Wind spielt drinnen mit den Herzen 
Wie auf dem Dach, nur nicht so laut. 

Was fragen sie nach meinen Schmerzen? 
Ihr Kind ist eine reiche Braut. 



(Translation) 

The Weathercock 

Over my Love's house the wind blows the 
weathercock to and fro. In my folly I thought 
it would blow the vane away. It should have 
taught me to seek no woman's faith in that 
dwelling. . . The wind plays over the roof, 
within, more silently, with hearts. "Those hearts 
heed not my sorrow — my love is a rich bride. 



Gefror'ne Thranen 

Gefror'ne Tropfen fallen 
Von meinen Wangen ab, 

Ob es mir denn entgangen, 
Dass ich geweinet hab' ? 

Ei Thranen, meine Thranen, 
Und seid ihr gar so lau 

Dass ihr erstarrt zu Eise 
Wie kuhler Morgenthau? 

Und dringt doch aus der Quelle 
Der Brust so gliihend heiss, 

Als wolltet ihr zerschmelzen 
Des ganzen Winters Eis. 



(Translation) 

Frozen Tears 

Frozen fall my tears! Would they make 
semblance that I wept them not? Tears, my 
tears, are you so chill that swiftly as dew at 
dawn you are frosted over? You, who spring 
from the fount of the heart's lire to melt a 
winter-world of ice! 



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Der Lindenbaum 

Am Brunnen vor dem Thore 

Da steht ein Lindenbaum; 
Ich traumt' in seinem Schatten 

So manchen siissen Traum. 
Ich schnitt in seine Rinde 

So manches liebe Wort, 
Es zog in Freud' und Leide 

Zu ihm mich immer fort. 

Ich musst' noch heute wandern 

Vorbei in tiefer Nacht; 
Da hab' ich noch im Dunkel 

Die Augen zugemacht. 
Und seine Zweige rauschten 

Als riefen sie mir zu: 
"Komm' her zu mir, Geselle, 

Hier find'st du deine Ruh'!" 

Die kalten Winde bliesen 

Mir grad' in's Angesicht, 
Der Hut flog mir vom Kopfe, 

Ich wendete mich nicht. 
Nun bin ich manche Stunde 

Entfernt von jenem Ort, 
Und immer hor' ich's rauschen: 

"Du fandest Ruhe dort!" 



(Translation) 

The Linden' tree 

By the gateway of the little town is a well, 
beside the well a Linden-tree. Beneath its 
shadow I dreamed; on its bark graved love- 
words; in joy and grief it called me to it. . . 
Black is the night, but I cover my eyes as I 
pass. The boughs stir in the darkness, they 
whisper — "Come up hither. Comrade, death is 
peace." . . . Eyes, look not back; feet, hasten 
onwards! Let the ice-blast blow, but turn not 
back — return not. . . Past, long past, that hour, 
far, far off, that place, yet still _ the Linden- 
boughs whisper in my ear, "Here is peace." 



Die Post 

Von der Strasse her ein Posthorn klingt. 
Was hat es, dass es so hoch aufspringt, mein 
Herz? 

Die Post bringt keinen Brief fijr dich. 

Was drangst du denn so wunderlich, mein Herz ? 

Nun ja, die Post kommt aus der Stadt, 

Wo ich ein liebes Liebchen hatt', mein Herz ? 

Willst wohl einmal hinuberseh'n 

Und fragen, wie es dort mag geh'n, mein Herzl 



(Translation) 

The Post 

From the distant road the post horn rings. 
O, why springs my heart with mingled emotion? 
The post has no message for thee, poor heart. 
Yes, from out the town the post is here, where 
I have left a love so dear. Wilt ask if it can 
news impart of her thou lov'st so well? 



FriihHngstraum 



Ich traumte von bunten Blumen, 
So wie sie wohl bliihen im Mai; 

Ich traumte von griinen Wiesen, 
Von lustigem Vogelgeschrei. 

Und als die Hahne krahten. 

Da ward mein Auge wach; 
Da war es kalt und finster, 

Es schrieen die Raben vom Dach. 

Doch an den Fensterscheiben, 

Wer malte die Blatter da? 
Ihr lacht wohl uber den Traumer, 

Der Blumen ira Winter sah? 

Ich traumte von Lieb' und Liebe, 

Von einer schonen Maid, 
Von Herzen und von Ktissen, 

Von Wonne und Seligkeit. 

Und als die Hahne krahten, 

Da ward mein Herze wach — • 
Nun sitz' ich hier alleine 

Und denke dem Traume nach. 

Die Augen schliess' ich wieder, 
Noch schlagt das Herz so warm. 

Wann griint ihr Blatter am Fenster? 
Wann halt' ich dich Liebchen ira Arm? 



(Translation) 

A Dream of Spring 

Sleeping I saw dream-blossoms and the green 
fields of spring; sleeping I heard the May birds' 
song. At cockcrow my eyes opened — dark the 
dawn, bitter the cold, shrill the raven's cry. 
Yet — whence came the frost-flowers there on the 
window-pane? Let jest who will at the dreamer 
whose flowers bloom in the snow! . . . Sleeping 
I dreamed of lips that meet and of the heart's 
joy. At cockcrow I wakened. I sit alone. 
Heart, re-dream your dream; eyes, re-close, for 
spring is still warm at my heart. . . Flowers of 
frost and of sleep, when you blossom, my Love 
shall lie in my arms! 



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Die Krahe 

Eine Krahe war tnit mir 

Aus der Stadt gezogen, 
1st bis heute fiir und fiir 

Um mein Haupt geflogen. 

Krahe, wunderliches Thier, 
Willst mich nicht verlassen? 

Meinst wohl bald als Beute hier 
Meinen Leib zu fassen. 

Nun es wird nicht wait mehr geh'n 

An dem Wanderstabe, 
Krahe lass mich endlich seh'n 

Treue bis zum Grabe. 



Let2;te Hoffnung 

Hie und da ist an den Baumeti 
Manches bunte Blatt zu seh'n, 

Und ich bleibe vor den Baumen 
Oftmals in Gedanken steh'n. 

Schaue nach dem einen Blatte, 
Hange meine Hoffnung dran, 

Spielt der Wind mit meinem Blatte, 
Zittr' ich was ich zittern kann. 

Ach, und fallt das Blatt zu Boden, 
Fallt mit ihm die Hoffnung ab, 

Fair ich selber mit zu Boden, 

Wein' auf meiner Hoffnung Grab. 



Der Leiermann 

Driiben hinterm Dorfe steht ein Leiermann, 
Und mit starren Fingern dreht er, was er kann. 
Barfuss auf dem Eise wankt er hin und her, 
Und sein kleiner Teller bleibt ihm immer leer. 
Keiner mag ihn horen, keiner sieht ihn an, 
Und die Hunde knurren urn den alten Mann, 
Und er lasst es gehen alles wie es will, 
Dreht, und seine Leier steht ihm nimmer still; 
Wunderlicher Alter, soil ich mit dir geh'n ?_ 
Willst zu meinen Liedern deine Leier dreh'n? 



Der Stiirmische Morgen 

Wie hat der Sturm zerrissen des Himmels 

graues Kleid, 
Die Wolkenfetzen flattern umher in mattem 

Streit. 
Und rothe Feuerflammen zieh'n zwischen ihnen 

hin, 
Das nenn' ich einen Morgen so recht nach 

meinem Sinn. 
Mein Herz sieht an dem Himmel gemalt sein 

eignes Bild, 
Es ist nichts als der Winter, der Winter kalt 

and wild. 



Die Nebensonnen 

Drei Sonnen sah ich am Himmel steh'n, 
Hab' lang und fest sie angeseh'n. 

Und sie auch standen da so stier 
Als wollten sie nicht weg von mir. 

Ach, meine Sonnen seid ihr nicht — 
Schaut Andern doch in's Angesicht! 

Ja, neulich hatt' ich auch wohl drei. 
Nun sind hinab die besten zwei. 

Ging' nur die dritt' erst hinterdrein — 
Im Dunlceln wird mir wohler sein! 



(Translation) 

The Raven 

A raven followed me from the town and never 
yet departed. Raven, still around me flying, 
dost thou look on me as food, when I fall by 
the wayside? Well the journey is nearly ended, 
so, raven, let me see you remain true till the 
grave. 



(Translation) 

The Last Hope 

On the bare boughs some laggard leaves yet 
hang. One leaf I watch — watch long; in it I 
behold my hope. The wind stirs the leaf — it 
shivers — with it my heart is shaken. Let it 
drop and my hope falls also, and I, too, fall 
weeping, weeping upon the grave of hope. 



(Translation) 

The Organ Player 

Behind the village stands an organ man, 
grinding his organ with stiffened fingers. On 
the cold ground barefoot sidles here and there 
and his small saucer shows few rewards. No 
one listens to him, no one seems to care, snarl- 
ing dogs pursue him, still he smiles. No dis- 
appointment does he portray, still his organ he 
grinds and grinds. Wonderful old minstrel, 
shall I go with you? Will you with your organ 
accompany my songs? 

(Translation) 

A Stormy Morning 

The stormy-blast rends heaven's gray cloak; 
red fires flash in the battle-ranks of the clouds. 
O fiery Dawn, made in my own heart's likeness 
—not as the winter frozen and chill! 



(Translation) 

Three Suns 

Three suns shine in the mist. Long I look on 
them — they will not away from me! Red mist- 
suns, mine you are not. Go, shine for other 
men! . . . Once I, too, had three suns — two, 
the best beloved, sank. When the third is set 
in the darlcness it will be well with me. 



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Muth 

Fliegt der Schnee mir in's Gesicht, schutt'l ich 

ihn herunter. 
Wenn tnein Herz im Buseu spricht, sing' ich 

hell und munter. 
Hore nicht, was es mir sagt, habe keine Ohren, 
Fiihle nicht, was es mir klagt, klagen ist fiir 

Thoren. 
Lustig in die Welt hinein gegen Wind und 

Wetter ; 
Will kein Gott auf Erden sein, sind wir selber 

Cotter. 



(Translation) 

Courage 

Sleet blown in my teeth; I shake it from me. 
A cry at my heart; I sing and drown its voice. 
Hearken I will not, lamenting is a fool's pas- 
time. Against wind and weather I go with good 
cheer. When God forsakes earth let men be 
as gods. 



Eri Tu 

Alzati! la, tuo figlio a te concede riveder, nell' 
ombra e nel silenzio, la, il tuo rossore I'onta mia 
nascondi. 

Non e su lei, nel suo fragile petto che col pi r 
degg' io; altro, ben altro sangue a terger dessi 
I'ofFesa il sangue tuo! e lo trarra il pugnale dallo 
sleal tuo core: delle lacrime mie vendicator, 
vendicator, vendicator! 

Eri tu che macchiavi quell' anima, la delizia 
del' anima mia, che m'affidi, e d'un tratto ese- 
crabile I'universo avveleni per me, avveleni per 
me! 

Traditor! che compensiin tal guisa dell' amico 
tuo primo, dell' amico tuo primo la fe! 

O dolcezze perdute, o memorie d'un amplesso 
che I'essere india! quando Adelia si bella, si 
Candida sul mio seno brillava d'amor! E finita: 
non siede che I'odio, la morte nel vedovo cor I 
O dolcezze perdute! o speranze d'amor. 



(Translation) 

Is it thou? 

Up! arise! And thy son there do I allow thee to 

behold ; 
In darkness and in silence there awhile thy 

shame and my dishonor hiding I 
But not on her, on yon fragile existence be my 

blow directed; 
Elsewhere I'll seek atonement to purge the stain 

from my honor, it is thy life blood! 
Ere long my vengeful dagger from thy base 

heart shall bid it flow; 
Retribution exacting for all my woe. 

Is it thou who has sullied a soul so pure, 

In whose virtue my spirit delighted. 

Hast betray'd me, whose affection I deem'd so 
secure? 

Of ray life thou hast poison'd the stream! 
Traitor vile! 

It is thus I'm requited, who the first in thy 
friendship, yea, the first in thy friendship 
did seem! 

O the grief for a joy now departed. 

For caresses that made life a heaven! 

When Adelia, an angel pure-hearted. 

In my arms lay transported with love! 

All is over; and hate's bitter leaven, and long- 
ing for death fill my torn, aching heart! 

O grief for joy departed ! 

Hope supports me no more. 



Lavender Gown 

Tell me, has a comely maid 

Pow'r to make a man afraid? 

Tho' he be a gallant blayde, 

Such, forsooth, as I ? 

Yet when I espy her dressed in her daintiest and 

best, 
I become, I do protest, most monstrous shy! 
When Mistress Prudence walks abroad in 

Lymington Town, 
She wears the dearest, queerest, old-world 

lavender gown. 
With hoops that gently sway, and somehow seem 

to say: 
"Should he pass by, pray keep your eye demurely 

cast down!" 
How she would blush dared I to crush that 

lavender gown! 
Yet, should she steal one glance, I feel the 

veriest clown; 
My courage dies away: Ah, lack-a-day! 
When Mistress Prudence walks abroad in 

Lymington Town. 



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It was a Lover and his Lass 

It was a lover and his lass, with a hey, and a ho, 
And a hey nonino, that o'er the green cornfield 

did pass. 
In the springtime, the only pretty ring time. 
When birds do sing, hey ding-a-ding, ding-a- 

ding, ding. 
Sweet lovers love the spring. 

Between the acres of the rye, with a hey, and a 

ho, and a hey nonino, 
These pretty country folks would lie, in the 

springtime. 
The only pretty ring time, when birds do sing, 

hey, ding-a-ding, ding-a-ding, ding. 

This carol they began that hour, with a hey, 

and a ho, and a hey nonino, 
How that life was but a flow'r in springtime. 
In springtime, the only pretty ring time. 
And therefore take the present time, with a hey 

and a ho, and a hey nonino. 
For love is crowned with the prime in the 

springtime. 
The only pretty ring time, when birds do sing, 

hey, ding-a-ding, ding-a-ding, ding. 



Soft'footed Snow 

There is nought on earth so still, as the snow! 

Shrouding all the world in silent glamor; 
Muffling ev'ry sound on the frozen ground, 

Hushing ev'ry footfall's noisy clamor. 

There is nought on earth so pure as the snow! 

Swan's down loosed from winter's pinions 
spreading. 
On the hand a flake doth a tear-drop make. 

Through the crystal air white dreams thread- 
ing. 
Nought so lulling on the earth as the snow! 

Falling light as slumber on the weary, 
Fine as silver bells Mystery it wells 

Deep into the soul like woodland fairy. 



O Mistress Mine 

O mistress mine, where are you roaming.' 
Oh stay and hear: your true love's coming. 

That can sing both high and low. 
Trip no further, pretty sweeting; 
Journeys end in lovers' meeting, 

Ev'ery wise man's son doth know. 

What is love? 'Tis not hereafter; 
Present mirth hath present laughter; 

What's to come is still unsure. 
In delay there lies no plenty ; 
Then come kiss me, sweet and twenty; 

Youth's a stuff will not endure. 



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The Curtis Institute of Music 



Fourth Season — 1927-1928 



Carlos Salzedo, Harpist 

William M. Kincaid, Flutist 

Felix Salmond, Violoncellist 

Collaborating 



Thursday Evening, April Twelfth 

at 8:1S o'cloc\ 



Eleventh Faculty Recital 



The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



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Programme 



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Jean-Philippe Rameau Pieces en Conceit 

1683-1764 

for Flute, Violoncello and Harp 

La Pantomime 
La Timide 
L'Indiscrete 
La Cupis 
Tambourins 



Carlos Salzedo Variations on a Theme in Ancient Style 

(1911) 

for Harp 

Carlos Salzedo Fifteen Preludes for Beginners 

(1927) 

for Harp 

Preludes 1, II. Ill, IV, V, VI, VII, VIII, 

IX, X, XI have no title 
Prelude XII — Fanfare 
Prelude XIII— Cortege 
Prelude XIV — La Desirade 
Prelude XV — Chanson dans la nuit 
(First Public Performance) 



Claude Debussy Children's Corner 

1862-1918 

Transcription for Flute, Violoncello and Harp 
by Carlos Salzedo 

Doctor Gradus ad Parnassum 
Jimbo's Lullaby 
Serenade for the Doll 
The Snow is Dancing 
The Little Shepherd 
Golliwogg's Cake-Walk 



Mr. Salzedo uses the Lyon ^ Healy Harp exclusively 
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The Curtis Institute of Music 



Fourth Season — 1927-1928 



Louis Bailly, Viola 

Harry Kaufman at the Piano 



Wednesday Evening, April Eighteenth 
at 8;i5 o'cloc\ 



Twelfth Faculty Recital 



The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute o/ Music 

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Programme 



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I. 



Georges Hue Theme Varie 

1858 

II. 

Johannes Brahms Sonata in F minor, Opus 120, No. 1 

1833-1897 Allegro appassionato 

Andante un poco adagio 
Allegretto grasioso 
Vivace 

(by request) 



III. 

Karl Stamitz Concerto in D major, Opus 1 

1746-180! Allegro 

Andante moderato 
Rondo 



IV. 
Jeno Hubay Morceau de Concert, Opus 20 

1858 



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The Curtis Institute of Music 



Fourth Season— 1927-1928 



Harriet van Emden, Soprano 

Harry Kaufman at the Piano 



Monday Evening, April Twenty-third 
at 8:1 S o'cloc\ 



Thirteenth Faculty Recital 



The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



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Programme 



I 

Francesco Durante Vergin, tutta amor 

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart . . . . Un moto di gioja 
Franco Faccio Air from "Amieto" 

II 

Franz Schubert Gretchen am Spinnrade 

Ungeduld 

Johannes Brahms Am Sonntag Morgen 

Vergebliches Standchen 

Richard Strauss Breit iiber mein Haupt 

Edvard Grieg Ein Traum 

III 

Georges Hue "J'ai pleure en reve" 

Claude Debussy Green 

Air from "L'Enfant Prodigue" 

IV 

Earl Cranston Sharp Japanese Death Song 

Winter Watts Wings of Night 

Percy Grainger Sprig of Thyme 

Abram Chasins Dreams 

Richard Hageman At the Well 



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Vergin, tutto amor 

Vergin, tutto amor, 

O madre di bontade, o madre pia, 

Ascolta, dolce Maria, 

La voce del peccator. 

II pianto sue ti muova, 
Giungano a te i suoi lamenti, 
Suo duol, suo tristi accenti, 
Senti pietoso quel tuo pietoso cor. 



(Translation) 

Virgin, Full of Grace 

Virgin, full of grace!! 
O Mother of compassion, o Madre pia, 
O hear me, contrite and lowly. 
Scarce lifting my weeping eyes to Thy 
face. 

O, that my tears may move Thee, 
Open Thy heart to my lamenting. 
In grief, in sorrow repenting; 
Mary, have pity, send me peace. 



Un moto di gioja 

Un moto di gioja 
Mi sento nel petto, 
Che annunzia diletto 
In mezzo il timor! 

Speriam che in contento 
Finisca 1' affanno, 
Non sempre e tiranno 
II fato ed amor. 



Amleto 

Ophelia: 

Principe Amleto! 

Tuto mesto e nero 

Fragli splendori del regal connubio, 

Rassomogli alia larva del Mistcro. 

Hamlet : 

O al fantasma del Dubbio! 
Ophelia: 

Dubita pur che brillino 

Degl'astri le carole, 

Dubita pur che il sole 

Fulga e che sulla rorida zolla, 

Sulla rorida zolla germogli il fior; 

Dubita delle lagrime, 

Dubita del sorriso, 

E dubita degl'angeH, 

Che sono in paradiso. 

Ma credi, ma credi nell'amor, 

Nell'amorl 



(Translation) 
My heart in my bosom is bounding with pleasure 
Of anguish the presence is lighten'd by joy; 

From Hope's gentle whispers 

Some solace we borrow, 
Not always of love is sorrow the alloy. 



(Translation) 

Hamlet 

(Entrance-song of Ophelia) 
Ophelia : 

Your Royal Highness! 

Clad in gloomy mourning. 

Amid the splendors of the nuptial rout. 

You resemble the very mask of Mystry. 

Hamlet : 
Or the phantom of Doubt! 

Ophelia: 

Tho' I may doubt the ray of dawn. 

Or of the stars the gleaming. 

Doubt that the sunlight beaming, 

Doth shine, or e'en on the dewy lawn, 

Sparkles many a flow'r; 

Tho' I doubt that one ever weeps, 

Tho' I doubt there are laughing eyes, 

Or even doubt the angels pure. 

That tarry in Paradise, 

Yet love I'll doubt nevermore. 

Nevermore! 



Gretchen am Spinnrade 

Meine Ruh ist hin, mein Herz ist schwer; 
Ich finde sie nimmer und nimmermehr. 
Wo ich ihn nicht hab, ist mir das Grab, 
Die ganze Welt ist mir vergallt. 
Mein armer Kopf ist mir verriickt, 
Mein armer Sinn ist mir zerstiickt. 

Meine Ruh ist hin, mein Herz ist schwer; 

Ich finde sie nimmer und nimmermehr. 

Nach ihm nur schau ich zum Fenster hinaus, 

Nach ihm nur geh ich aus dem Haus. 

Sein hoher Gang, sein edle Gestalt, 

Seines Mundes Lacheln, seiner Augen Gewalt, 

Und seiner Rede Zauberfluss, 

Sein Handedruck, und ach, sein Kuss! 

Meine Ruh ist hin, mein Herz ist schwer; 
Ich finde sie nimmer und nimmermehr. 
Mein Busen drangt sich nach ihm hin. 
Ach, diirft ich fassen und halten ihn! 
Und kiissen ihn, so wie ich wollt. 
An seinen Kiissen vergehen sollt. 

— Goethe 



(Translation) 

Gretchen at the Spinning Wheel 

My heart is lead, my peace is o'er, 
'Twill never return to me, nevermore! 
Since my love is not mine, for death I pine; 
The world with woe — doth overflow. 
INIy aching head is sore distressed, 
My heart is lead, my peace is o'er. 

My heart is lead, my peace is o'er, 

'Twill never return to me, nevermore! 

For him alone from the lattice I stare, 

For him alone abroad I fare. 

How manly his stride, his bearing how high, 

And his merry laughter, and the might of his 

The magic flow of speech that is his. 
His clasp of hand. Ah me! his kiss! 

My heart is lead, my peace is o'er, 

'Twill never return to me, nevermore! 

I fain would follow on his track: 

Oh, would I might seize him and hold him back! 

And kiss him again, as kiss I long, 

Although that kissing were grievous song! 

My peace is o'er, my heart is lead! 



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Ungeduld 



Ich schnitt' es g^ern in alle Rinden ein, 

Ich griib' es gern in jeden Kieselsteiu, 

Ich mocht' es sa'n auf jedes frische Beet, 

Mit Kressensamen, der es schnell verrath, 

Auf jeden weissen Zettel mocht ich's schreiben: 

Dein ist mein Herz, dein ist mein Herz, 

Und soil es ewig, ewig bleiben. 

Ich mocht' mir ziehen einen jungen Staar, 
Bis dass er sprach die Worte rein und klar. 
Bis er sie sprach' mit meines Mundes Klang, 
Mit meines Herzens vollem, heissen Drang, 
Dang sang' er hell durch ihre Fensterscheiben : 

Dein ist mein Herz, dein ist mein Herz, 

Und soil es ewig, ewig bleiben. 

Ich meint', es miisst' in meinen Augen steh'n, 
Auf meinen Wangen miisst' man's brennen seh'n, 
Zu lesen war's auf meinem stummen Alund, 
Ein jeder Athemzug gab's laut ihr kund: 
Und sie merkt nichts von all' dem bangen Treiben. 

Dein ist mein Herz, dein ist mein Herz, 

Und soil es ewig, ewig bleiben. 

— Miiller 



(Translation) 

Impatience 

I'd carve it on the bark of ev'ry tree. 
On ev'ry stone it should engraven be; 
1 fain would sow it in each garden green, 
In early cress it should be quickly seen. 
On ev'ry page should be inscrib'd forever: 
Thine is my heart, thine is my heart. 
And shall be thine forever, everl 

I'd train a young and tender starling dear. 
And he should speak those words in tones so 

clear. 
As if my lips had said that tender word. 
Whose echo in my ardent heart is heard, 
And he should sing it at thy window ever: 
Thine is my heart, thine is my heart, 
And shall be thine forever, everl 

Within mine eyes I deem my love doth speak. 
And all must see it on my burning cheek, 
And even read it from my silent mouth, 
And ev'ry breath I draw doth bear it forth. — 
And yet she seems to mark my sorrow never: 
Thine is my heart, thine is my heart, 
And shall be thine forever, everl 



Am Sonntag Morgen 

Am Sonntag Morgen zierlich angetan, 
Wohl weiss ich, wo du da bist hingegangen, 
Und manche Leute waren, die dich sah'n, 
Und kamen dann zu mir, dich zu verklageu. 

Als sie mir's sagten, hab' ich laut gelacht, 
Und in der Kammer dann geweint zur Nacht, 
Als sie mir's sagten, fing ich an zu singen. 
Urn einsam dann die Hande wund zu ringen. 

— Heyse 



(Translation) 

On Sunday Morning 

To whom it was you went quite well I knew. 

So beautifully dressed on Sunday morning; 
And certain folk there were who saw you go, 

Who hurried then to me to give me warning. 
While they were telling me I laughed outright. 

And in my room alone I wept that night. 
While they were telling me I trolled a ditty. 

But when alone I wrung my hands for pity. 



Vergebliches Standchen 



Er: 



Guten Abend, mein Schatz, guten 

Abend, mein Kind! 
Ich komm' aus Licb' zu dir, 
Ach, mach' mir auf die Thur! 



Sie: 



Mein' Thiir ist verschlossen, ich laMs' 

Dich nich ein; 
Mutter, die rath' mir king, 
Warst du herein mit_ Fug, 
War's mit mir vorbeil 



Er: 



So kalt ist die Nacht, so eisig der Wind, 
Dass mir das Herz erfriert, 
Mein Lieb' erloschen wird, 
Oflne mir, mein Kind! 



Sie: 



Loschet dein' Lieb', lass sie loschen nurl 

Loschet sie immerzu, 

Geh' heim zu Bett, zur Ruh', 

Gute Nacht, mein Knab! 

Folk Song of Lower Rhine 



(Translation) 

Serenade 

He: 

Good evening, my sweet, and good evening, my 

dear! 
I come for love of thee. 
So lift the latch for me, 
Prithee, lift the latch for me I 

She: 

My door it is bolted, I'll not let thee in, 

Mother she spoke the truth, 

Shouldst thou come in, forsooth, 

All were o'er with me! 

He: 

The night is so cold, the wind is so wild. 
Soon will they freeze my heart. 
Then will my love depart. 
Let me in, dear child ! 

She: 

If it must go, let thy love he gone! 

That it should go were best, 

Go home to bed, to rest, 

So good night, my lad! 



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Breit' uber mein Haupt dein 
schwar^es Haar 

Breit' iiber niein Haupt dein schwarzes Haar, 
neig' zu mir dein Angesicht, 
da stroint in die Seele so hell und klar 
mir deiner Augen Licht. 

Ich will nicht droben der Sonne Pracht, 
noch der Sterne leuchtr-nden Kranz, 
ich will nur deiner Locken Nacht 
und deiner Blicke Glanz. 

— von Schack 



(Translation) 
Droop o'er my head thy raven hair, 
Bend to me thy face divine, 
And the light of thy soul through those eyes so 

rare 
Softly shall enter mine. 

I care not though heav'n's sunlight fade 
Nor no silver stars shine at night, 
I ask but thy raven locks' deep shade, 
Thy glorious eyes' soft light. 



Ein Traum 

Mir traumte einst ein schoner Traum: 
Mich liebte eine blonde Maid, 
Es war am grunen Waldesraum, 
Es war zur wavmen Friihlingszeit. 

Die Knospe sprang, der Waldbach schwoll. 
Fern aus dam Dorfe scholl Gelaut' — 
Wir waren ganzer Wonnevoll, 
Vertunken gauz in Sehgkeit. 

Und schoner noch, als einst der Traum, 
Begab es sich in Wirklichkeit: 
Es war am griinen Waldesraum, 
Es war zur warmen Friihlingszeit. 

Der Waldbach schwoll, die Knospe sprang, 
Celaiit' erscholl vom Dorfe her: 
Ich hielt dich fest, ich hielt dich lang! 
Und lasse dich nun nimmermehr! 

O frijhlingsgruner Waldesraum, 
Du lebst in mir durch alle Zeit! 
Dort ward die Wirklichkeit zum Traum, 
Dort ward der Traum zur Wirklichkeit ! 

— von Bodenstedt 



A Dieam 

(Translation) 
In dreams I had a vision fair: 
I wooed a maid with golden hair; 
We met in lovely forest glade, 
Where spring had spread her verdant shade; 

The wood-bird sang, the streamlet flow'd, 
We heard the distant village chime; 
In cv'ry look our rapture glow'd. 
Our hearts were held in bliss sublime. 

That golden dream was not so fair 

As waking joys imparted there: 

Again we stood in forest glade, 

Where spring had spread her verdant shade; 

The streamlet flow'd, the wood-bird sang, 
A sound of bells the breezes bore; 
I held thee fast, I held thee long. 
And I shall leave thee nevermore! 

O forest, warm with sunny beam, 
Thro' life thou'rt ever dear to me! 
Here did the truth become a dream, 
Here dreams became reality! 



"J'ai pleure en reve" 

J'ai pleure en reve: 
J'ai reve que tu etais morte, 
Je m'eveillai et les larmes coulerent de mes 
joues. 

J'ai pleure en reve: 
J'ai reve que tu me quittais; 

Je m'eveillai et je pleurai amerement longtemps 
apres. 

J'ai pleure en reve: 
J'ai reve que tu m'aimais encore; 
J'ai reve que tu m'aimais encore; 
Je m'eveillai et le torrent de mes larmes coule 
toujours-tou jours. 

(After Heine) 



(Translation) 

"I Wept, Beloved" 

I wept, beloved. 

As I dreamed thou hadst gone to Heavenly 
spheres 
And when I awoke, there burst from my eyes 

A burning flood of tears. 

I wept, beloved. 

As I dreamed thou hadst forsaken me; 
And when I awoke, I sobbed and cried 

All the gray morn, my love, for thee. 

I wept, beloved, 

As I dreamed thy heart was still aglow. 
And when I awoke, blind were mine eyes 

With tears that ever, ever flow and flew. 



6^ 



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Green 

Voici des fruits, des fleurs, des feuilles et des 

branches 
Et puis voici mon coeur, qui ne bat que pour 

vous 
Ne le dechirez pas avec vos deux mains blanches, 
Et qu' a vos yeux si beaux I'humble present soit 

doux. 

J' arrive tout couvert encore de rosee 
Que le vent du matin vient glacer a mon front 
Souffrez que ma fatigue a vos pieds reposee 
Reve des chers instants qui la delasseront. 

Sur votre jeune sein, laisser rouler ma tete 
Toute sonore encore de vos derniers baisers 
Laissez la s'apaiser de la bonne tempete, 
Et que je dorme un peu puisque vous reposez. 

— Verlaine 



(Translation) 

Green 

Accept these ruddy fruits, this foliage from the 

bower. 
And this my loving heart, a timid, blushing 

flovi'er. 
But hurt it not, O love, and cast it not adrift: 
Let fondly rest thine eyes upon the humble gift. 

On my brows the trembling dew-drops still are 
shining: 

Chill they felt when the cool wind of morning 
arose . . . 

Allow me, love, to rest. At thy feet now re- 
clining, 

I would fain dream of long and wonderful 
repose. 

I would against thy bosom dwell awhile, my 

darling. 
And lean awhile the brows that have throbbed 

to thy kiss. 
And forgetting all care, I would rest as thou 

restest. 
And close my weary eyes on a fond dream of 

bliss. 



Air from "L'Enfant Prodigue" 

Recitative 

L'annee en vain chasse I'annee. 

A chaque saison ramenee. 

Leurs jeux et leurs ebats m'attristent malgre 

moi: 
lis rouvrent ma blessure et mon chagrin 

s'accroit. . . . 
Je viens chercher la greve solitaire. 
Douleur involontaire ! Efforts superflus! 
Lia pleure toujours I'enfant qu'elle n'a plus! . . . 

Air 

Azael ! Azael ! 

Pourquoi m'as tu quittee? . . . 

En mon coeur maternel 

Ton image est restee. 

Azael 1 Azael ! 

Pourquoi m'as tu quittee? . . . 

Cependant, les soirs etaient doux, dans la plaine 

d'ormes plantee, 
Quand, sous la charge recoltee. 
On ramenait les grands boeufs roux. 
Lorsque la tache etait finie, 
Enfants, vieillards, et serviteurs, 
Ouvriers des champs ou pasteurs, 
Lnuaient de Dieu la main benie. 
Ainsi les jours suivaient les jours; 
Et dans la pieuse famille, 
Le jeune homme et la jeune fille 
Echangeaient leurs chastes amours. 
D'autres ne sentent pas le poids de la vieillesse; 
Heureux dans leurs enfants, 
lis voient couler les ans 
Sans regret comme sans tristesse. 
Aux coeurs inconsoles que les temps sont pesants ! 



Azael ! Azael ! 

Pourquoi m'as tu quittee? 



(Translation) 
The years roll by, no comfort bringing. 
Spring comes smiling, gay flowers flinging; 
The bird's sweet song but makes my heart the 

sadder pine; 
My wounds bleed fresh, my heart cries for joys 

that once were mine. 
Along this silent shore I wander lonely. 
My grief God knoweth only. 
Evermore Lia mourns her child, the child that 

once she bore. 

Azael ! Azael ! 

Oh! wherefore didst thou leave me? 
On my heart thou art graven; 
I sorrow for thee. 

Happy days to my memory start when, the elm- 
tree waving o'er us. 
Homeward the ruddy oxen bore us. 
Weary of toil, but light of heart. 
Then, as the shadows began to fall. 
We all the evening hymn did sing 
Thankfully to God our King, 
To God the Lord who giveth all. 

Sweetly we slept, and glad repose. 

Youths and maidens wandered free. 

Plighted vows in sincerity, 

Evening shades brought rest and calm repose. 

Happy ye parents! when to earth your children 

bind you 
How glad your lot appears! its joys, its tender 

fears, 
W'th their lives hath their love entwined you; 
Sadly must I alone drag out the leaden years! 



-Guinand 



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Japanese Death Song 

Seaweed and sinking sands, 
Willowwood in mourning-bands. 
Whose is the voice so high, 
Calling? 

Grey sky and greyer clouds, 
Grey ghosts in snowy shrouds, 
Is it the sea-gull's cry. 
Calling? 

White hands that beckon me, 
I kiss my hands to Thee, 
I know Thy voice, O Death, 
Calling? 



-H. K. S. 



The Sprig of Thyme 

Wunst I had a sprig of thyme. 

It prospered by night and by day 
Till a false young man came acourtin' te me. 

And he stole all this thyme away. 

The gardiner was standiddn by; 

I bade him che-oose for me: 
He chose me the lily and the violet and pink. 

But I really did refuse them all three. 

Thyme it is the prettiest thing. 

And time it e will grow on, 
And time it'll bring all things to an end 

Addend so doz my time grow on. 

It's very well drinkin' ale. 

And it's very well drinkin' wine: 

But it's far better sittin' by a young man's side 
That has won this heart of mine. 
English Folk-song 



Wings of Night 

Dreamily over the roofs 

The cold spring rain is falling; 

Out in a lonely tree 

A bird is calling, calling. 

Softly over the earth 

The wings of night are falling; 
My heart, like the bird in the tree. 

Is calling, calling, calling. 

— Teasdale 



Dreams 

Lonely, I watch at my darkened window. 

It is night and I cannot sleep. 

My thoughts run riot and restless dreams. 

Chained through-out the day. 

Now break their bonds. 

To flutter like timid birds. 

Somewhere under this same dark mantel. 

Beats a heart I love, 

I do not ask that heart 

To beat for me 

I could not bear such happiness 

Enough that the same stars shine on him, 

That sleep untroubled fall on the head I love! 

It is enough to dream. 

— Fitzgerald 



At the Well 

When the two sisters go to fetch water. 
They come to this spot and they smile. 
They must be aware of somebody 
Who stands behind the trees 
Whenever they go to fetch water. 
The two sisters whisper to each other 
When they pass this spot. 

They must have guessed the secret of that some- 
body 
Who stands behind the trees 
Whenever they go to fetch water. 
Their pitchers lurch suddenly. 
And water spills 
When they reach this spot. 
They must have found out 
That somebody's heart is beating, 
Who stands behind the trees 
Whenever they go to fetch water. 
The two sisters glance at each other 
When they come to this spot, and they smile. 
There is a laughter in their swift stepping feet. 
Which makes confusion in somebody's mind, 
Who stands behind the trees. 
Whenever they go to fetch water. 

— Tagore 



6^0 



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The Curtis Institute of Music 



Fourth Season — 1927-1928 



Abram Chasins, Pianist 

Member of Faculty and Student of Mr. Hofmann 



Wednesday Evening, May Sixteenth 
at 8: IS o'cloc\ 



Fourteenth Faculty Recital 



c<^ 



The Steinvay is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 
d^ ^ 



d^ «^ 



Programme 



I 

JOHANN Sebastian Bach Prelude, No. 1, in C major 

J. S. BacH'Godowsky Violoncello Suite in C major 

Prelude — Allemande — Sarabande 
Bourree I — Bourree II — Gigue 

II 

Johannes Brahms Rhapsody in G minor, Opus 79 

Alexandre Scriabine Two Etudes : C sharp minor. Opus 2 

D sharp minor. Opus 8 
Sonata in F sharp major, Opus 30 



III 

Abram Chasins Keyboard Karikatures: 

Rachmaninoff 

Godowsky 

Bachaus 

Eight Preludes: 
C major 
A minor 
D minor 
D major 
A flat major 
F minor 
E flat minor 
G minor 

(Played without interruption) 



e^ — c^ 



(5^ c<^ 



The Curtis Institute of Music 



Fourth Season — 1927-1928 



Josef Hofmann, Fianist 



Thursday Evening, May Twenty ^fourth 

at 8:1S o'cloc\ 



Fifteenth Faculty Recital 



The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



(^ 



.cS^ 



Programme 



«^» 



Robert Schumann, 



I. 



.Phantasie, Opus 17 

Durchaus fantastisch und leidenschaftlich 

vor2;utragen 
Massig — Durchaus energisch 
Langsam getragen-Durchweg leise zn halten 



II. 



Frederic Chopin .Twenty-four Preludes 



Anton Rubinstein, 
StrausS'Godowsky , 



III. 

Barcarolle in F minor 
, Fledermaus Walt? 



Mr. Hofmann uses the Steinway Piano 



(5^, 



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.r<^ 



The Curtis Institute of Music 



Fourth Season — 1927-1928 



La Societe des Instruments Anciens 

OF PARIS 
Founded in 1901 by Henri Casadesus 



v^ 



Marius Casadesus Henri Casadesus 

Quintan Viole d'amour 

Madame Lucette Casadesus Maurice Devilliers 

Viole de gamhe Basse de viole 

Madame Regina Patorni-Casadesus 
Clavecin 



Wednesday Evening, April Twenty^fifth 

at 8 -.IS o'chc\ 

This concert is tendered by 

The Library of Congress 

"Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge Foundation" 



d^ -^ ^ '^ 



Programme 

1. Jean-Joseph Mouret Le Jardin des Amours (Divertissement) 

('^8^'^''«> Pavane 

Gaillarde 
Menuet tendre 
Canarie 

Quatour des Violes et Clavecin 

2. LuiGi ToMASiNi Suite pour Qmnton 

<''^»'»8°«> Tempo di Gavotte 

Rigaudon 
Adagio et Tambourin 

M. Marius Casadesus 



3 . Leopold Mozart Variations 

(1719-1787) 

Alessandro Scarlatti .... Sonata 

(1659-1725) 

Henri Desmarets Fileuse 

(1662-1741) T) r-i 

^ Pour Clavecin 

Madame Regina P.^TORN^CASADESUS 



4. BoNiFAZio AsiOLi Concert pour Viole d'amour 

(>'^^-^«") Polacca 

Menuetto 
Largo 
Rondo 

M. Henri Casadesus 



5 . Jean-Franqois Le Sueur . . Une Fete a la Cour des Miracles 

(1760-1837) Divertissement represente en 1803 a la 

Malmaison 
Carillon dominical de I'figlise Saint-Merri 
Entree du Roi des Ribauds au son des 

accordeons 
Danse des Gitanes 
Cortege des Boiteux 
Ronde des Bohemiens 

Quatour des Violes et Clavecin 



The Steinwat is the official piano of The Cuitis Institute of Music 

(f^ h;^ 



e^ H^ 



The Curtis Institute of Music 



Fourth Season— 1927-1928 



Wanda Landowska 
Harpsichordiste and Pianiste 



Sunday afternoon, J^ovemher Thirteenth 
at 4:00 o'cloc\ 



First of Three Lectures on Ancient Music 



The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



(5^ _ ,^ cs^ 

Programme 

Descriptive Music of the 
Sixteenth, Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries 



1. JoHANN KuHNAU . . The Combat Between David and Goliath 

(Musical Representation of a Bible Story 
in Sonata Form— Published in 1700) 

a) The stamping and defying of Goliath. 

hj The terror of the IsraeUtes and their prayer to God at sight 
of the terrible enemy. 

c) The courage of David, his desire to humble the pride of the 

giant, and his childlike trust in God. 

d) The contest of words between David and Goliath, and the 

contest itself in which Goliath is wounded in the forehead 
by a stone so that he falls to the ground and is slain. 

e) The flight of the Philistines and how they are pursued by the 

Israelites and slain by the sword. 
/,) The exultation of the Israelites over their victory. 
g) The praise of David, sung by the women in alternate choirs. 
h) And, finally, the general joy expressing itself in hearty 

dancing and leaping. 

2. Martin Prerson . . . The Primrose 
William Byrd .... The Bells 
Martin Peerson . . . The Fall of the Leaf 
John Bull The King's Hunt 

3. FRANgOIS COUPERIN LE 

Grand Les Folies Francaises ou Les Dominos 

a) La Virginite sous le domino couleur d'invisible. 

h) La Pudeur sous le domino couleur le rose. 

c) L'ardeur sous le domino incarnat. 

d^ L'Esperance sous le domino vert. 

e) La Fidelite sous le domino bleu. 

f) La Perseverance sous le domino gris de lin. 

g) La Langueur sous le domino violet. 
h) La Coqueterie sous differens dominos. 

i) Les Vieux Galans et les tresorieres suranees sous des dominos 

pourpres et feuillcs mortes. 
j) Les Coucous benevoles sous les dominos jaunes. 
\) La Jalousie taciturne sous le domino gris de maure. 
I) La Frenesie ou le Desespoir sous le domino noir. 

4. Johann Sebastian Bach Capriccio on the Departure of his 

Beloved Brother 

a) Arioso: His friends persuade him not to undertake this voyage. 
h) Moderato: They picture him the various adventures that may 
befall him abroad. 

c) Adagissimo: General lamentation of his friends. 

d) Recitativo: His friends, seeing their pains useless, take leave 

of him. 

e) The Postillion's Tune. 

f) Fugue in Imitation of the Posthorn. 



d^ r<^ 



d^ r^ 



The Curtis Institute of Music 



Fourth Season — 1927-1928 



Wanda Landowska 
Harpsichordiste and Pianiste 



Sunday afternoon, J^ovemher Twentieth 

at 4:00 o'doc\ 



Second of Three Lectures on Music of the Past 



Harpsichord Pleyel, Paris 
The Steinwav is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



(<^ c^ 



Programme 



t-a^ 



JoHANN Sebastian Bach and His Relations to His 
Predecessors and His Contemporaries 



JoHANN Pachelbel Vespers 

Nicholas de Grigny Dialogue 

JoHANN Caspar Kerll Capriccio — "Kukuk" 

JoHANN Jakob Froberger Plainte 

JoHANN Sebastian Bach Chromatische Fantasie und Fuge 

(according to the original) 

Vivaldi-Bach Andante from Concerto in D minor 

JoHANN Sebastian Bach Concerto nach Italienischen Gusto, 

vor ein Clavicembel mit Zweien 
Manualen 
Allegro — Andante — Presto 

(according to the original) 



d^ cS^ 



The Curtis Institute of Music 



Fourth Season— 1927-1928 



Wanda Landowska 
Harpsichordiste and Pianiste 



Sunday afternoon, December Fourth 
at 4:00 o'cloc\ 



.c<^ 



d^- 



Last of Three Lectures on Music of the Past 



Harpsichord Pleyel, Paris 
The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



d^- 



.H^ 



Programme 

Old Dances — How They Were Danced and Played 

1. J. K. F. Fischer Passacaglia 

2. Louis Couperin Chaconne 

3. Andre Campra Rigaudons from "L'Europe 

galante" 

4. LullY'D'Anglebert Gavotte: "Ou estes vous alle" 

(Air Ancien) 

JoHANN Sebastian Bach Gavotte 

Padre Martini Gavotte des Moutons 

5. WiLLL^M Byrd Volta 

Anonymous Volta polonica 

Jacques Champion Chambonnieres . Volte et Ronde 

6. Johann Sebastian Bach "Dreher" from the Cantata 

"Mer hahn en neue 
Oberkeet" 
Allegro from Concerto in D 
major (Dreher) 

7. WiLHELM Friedemann Bach Polonaise 

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart Landlerische Tanze 

8. Johann Sebastlan Bach Bourrce 

Bourree d'Auvergne 



(5^. 



c^ 



(5^— f^ 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

Fourth Season — 1927-1928 

First Students' Concert 

Thursday evening, T^ovemher 10, 1927, at 8:15 o'cloc\ 
By Students of Mr. Bailly in Chamber Music 

Johannes Brahms Sonata in G major, Opus 78, for 

Violin and Piano 

Vivace ma non troppo 

Adagio — Piu andante — Adagio 

Allegro molto moderato 

Lois zu Putlitz, Violin Angelica Morales, Piano 



Johannes Brahms Trio in C minor. Opus 101, for 

Piano, Violin and Violoncello 
Allegro energico 
Presto non assai 
• Andante grasioso 

Allegro molto 

Yvonne Krinsky, Piano Iso Briselli, Violin 

Orlando Cole, Violoncello 



The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



(5^ H^ 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

Fourth Season— 1927-1928 

Second Students' Concert 

Thursday evening, T^ovemher 17, 1927, at 8:15 o'cloc\ 

By Students of Mr. Flesch 

Mr. Hartzer, Assistant Instructor 

Theodore Saidenberg, at the Piano 

t^ 

Max Bruch Concerto in G minor, Opus 26 

Vorspiel — Allegro moderato 
Adagio 
Finale 
Iso Briselli 

Ernst von Dohnanyi Concerto in D Minor, Opus 27 

Molto moderato 
Andante sostenuto 
Molto vivace 

Tempo del primo pezzo rubato 
Lois zu Putlitz 



The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute oj Music 

(5^ r(^ 



d^- 



.H^ 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

Fourth Season— 1927-1928 

Third Students' Concert 

Monday afternoon, December 5, 1927, at 4:30 o'doc\ 
By Students of Mr. Bailly in Chamber Music 



Josef Haydn , 



Quartet in D major, Opus 64, No. 5 

Allegro moderate 
Adagio cantabile 
Menuetto — Allegretto 
Finale — Vivace 

Dorothy Hodge \ .. ,. Sheppard Lehnhoff, Viola 

Celia Gomberg j Florence Williams, Violoncello 



Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. .Quartet in B flat major, (Kochel 458) 

(Dedicated to Josef Haydn, 1784) 
Allegro vivace assai 
Menuetto — Moderato 
Adagio 
Allegro assai 



Iso Briselli 
Robert Levine 



Ivioln 



Max Aronoff, Viola. 
Stephen Deak, Violoncello 



e^- 



The Steinwav is the official piano of The Curtis Institute oi Music 



-^^ 



d^ cS^ 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

Fourth Season — 1927-1928 

Fourth Students'* Concert 

Monday Afternoon, December 12, 1927, at 4:30 o'cloc\ 

By Students of Mr. Flesch 
Mr. Hartzer, Assistant Instructor 

Johannes Brahms Sonata in G major, Opiis 78 

Vivace ma non troppo 

Adagio 

Allegro molto moderate 

Gama Gilbert 

Eakl E. Fox, at the Piano 

Karol Szymanowski Notturno e Tarantella 

Dorothy Hodge 

Muriel Hodge, at the Piano 

Johannes Brahms First movement from 

Concerto in D major. Opus 77 

Ernst Neufeld 

Earl E. Fox. at the Piano v 



The Steinwat is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



(^ c^ 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

Fourth Season — 1927-1928 

Fifth Students' Concert 

Monday afternoon, December 19, 1927, at 4:30 o'cloc\ 
By Students of Mr. Bailly in Chamber Music 

Franz Schubert Quartet in D minor, Opus posthumous 

Allegro 

Andante con moto 

Scherbo 

Presto 



Lois zu Putlitz ) ,. Gordon Kahn, Viola 

Ernst Neufeld j "^ ' John Gray. Violoncello 



Camille SainT'Saens Quartet in B flat major, Opus 41, for 

Piano, Violin, Viola and Violoncello 
Allegretto 

Andante maestoso ma con moto 
Poco allegro piu tosto moderato 
Allegro 

Jeanne Behrend \^ Paul Gershman, Violin 

Mary Marzyck j Alexander Gray, Viola 

John Gray, Violoncello 



*Miss Behrend will play the first three movements 
and Miss Marzyck will play the last one 



The Steinwat is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 
d^- C<^ 



(^ c^ 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

Fourth Season— 1927-1928 

Sixth Students' Concert 

Monday Afternoon, January 16, 1928, at 4:30 o'cloc\ 

Henri Temianka, Violinist 

Student of Mr. Flesch 
Mr. Hartzer, Assistant Instructor 
Mr. Harry Kaufman, at the Piano 

Georges Enesco Sonata in F minor, Opus 6, 

for Violin and Piano 
Assez mouvemente 
Tranquillement 
Vif 

Felix Mendelssohn-B.^rtholdy . . . Concerto in E minor, Opus 64 

Allegro molto appassionata 
Andante 

Allegretto non troppo 
Allegro molto vivace 

HandeL'Flesch Prayer from the "Te Deum" 

Camille SainT'Saens Introduction and Rondo 

Capriccioso 

GlucK'Kreisler Melody 

Henri Wieniawski Scherzo-Tarantelle 



The Steinway is the ofEcial piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 

(5^ cs^ 



d^ f<^ 



The Curtis Institute of Music 



Fourth Season — 1927-1928 



Seventh Students' Concert 

Thursday Evening, February 2, 1928, at 8:15 o'cloc\ 

Judith Poska, Violinist 

Student of Mr. Flesch 

Mr. Hartzer. Assistant Instructor 

Theodore Saidenberg, at the Piano 



Cesar Franck Sonata in A major, for Violin and Piano 

Allegretto ben moderato 

Allegro 

Recitativo — Fantasia 

Allegretto poco mosso 

Jean Sibelius Concerto for Violin, Opus 47 

Allegro moderato 
Adagio di molto 
Allegro ma non tanto 



The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



d^ f<^ 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

Fourth Season — 1927-1928 

Eighth Students' Concert 

Monday afternoon, February 6, 1928, at 4:30 o'clocX 

By Students of Mr. Bailly in Chamber Music 
«^> 

Vincent dIndy String Quartet, Opus 3 5 

I. Lent et soutenu — Moderement 

anime 
II. Lent et calme 

III. Assez modere (dans le senti- 
and ment d'un chant populaire) — 

IV. Assez vite 

Assez lent et Hbrement declame 
— Vif et joyeusement anime 

Gama Gilbert, Violin Sheppard Lehnhoff, Viola 

Benjamin Sharlip, Violin Orlando Cole, Violoncello 



Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart . . Symphonie Concertante in E flat 

major, for VioHn, Viola and 
Orchestra (Piano Version) 

Allegro maestoso 

Andante 

Presto 

Henri Temianka, Violin Max Aronoff, Viola 

Joseph Levine. Piano 



The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute oj Music 



d^ cs^ 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

Fourth Season — 1927-1928 

Tenth Students' Concert 

Friday Afternoon, February 17, 1928, at 3:30 o'cloc\ 
By Students of Mr. Salmond 

Johannes Brahms First movement from Sonata in E minor, 

Opus 38, for Violoncello and Piano 

TiBOR DE MaCHULA 
Earl E. Fox at the Piano 

Jean Hure Sonata in F sharp minor, No. 1 , for 

Violoncello and Piano 
Stephen Deak 

Muriel Hodge at the Piano 

Johannes Brahms First Movement from Double Concerto in 

A minor. Opus 102, for Violin and 
Violoncello 
Dorothy Hodge 

Student of Mr. Flesch 

Katherine Con ant 

Theodore Walstrum at the Piano 



The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



(^ c^ 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

Fourth Season — 1927-1928 

Eleventh Students' Concert 

Monday Ajtcrnoon, February 20, 1928, at 4:30 o'cloc\ 

Iso Briselli, Violinist 

Student of Mr. Flesch 

Mr. Hartzer, Assistant Instructor 

Mr. Harry Kaufman, at the Piano 

Ernst von Dohnanyi Sonata in C sharp minor, Opus 21 

Allegro appassionata 
Allegro ma con tenere^za 
Vivace assai 

GuiSEPPE Tartini Sonata in G minor (Devil's Trill) 

DvoraK'Kreisler Slavonic Dance in G minor 

Pablo de Sarasate Spanish Dance 

Brahms-Joachim Hungarian Dance 

NiccoLO Paganini Concerto in D major, Opus 6 



The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 

(5^ c^ 



d^^ c^ 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

Fourth Season — 1927-1928 

Twelfth Students' Concert 

Monday Afternoon, March 5, 1928, at 4:30 o'cloc\ 

By Students of Mr. Moriz Rosenthal 

«<^ 

Frederic Chopin Ballade in F minor. Opus 52 

Etude in C major. Opus 10, No. 1 

Grace Berman 

Johannes Brahms Variations on a Theme by Paganini, 

Opus 35 

Mary Marzyck 

Frederic Chopin Nocturne in C sharp minor, Opus 

27, No. 1 

PaganinI'Liszt Two Etudes, Nos. 2 and 6 

William Harms 

Franz Liszt Mephisto Walt2; 

(Episode from Lenau's "Faust" — 
Arranged for Piano) 

Xenia Nazarevitch 



The Ste:nway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Musio 

(5^ c<^ 



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w 



The Curtis Institute 0/ Music 

Fourth Season — 1927-1928 

Thirteenth Students' Concert 

Friday Afternoon. March 9, 1928, at 3.30 o'cloc\ 

Lois zu Putlitz, Violinist 

* Student of Mr. Flesch 

Mr. Hartzer, Assistant Instructor 
Mr. Harry Kaufman, at the Piano 

I. Ernest Bloch Suite — "Baal Shem" 

Vidui (Contrition) 

Nigun (Improvization) 
Simchas Torah (Rejoicing) 

Ernest Ch.^usson Poeme 

II. Ernst von Dohnanyi Concerto in D minor, Opus 27 

Molto moderate 

Andante sostenuto 

Molto vivace 

Tempo del primo pezzo rubato 

III. W. F. Bach — Kreisler Grave 

DE Falla — Kreisler Danse Espagnole from 

"La Vida Breve" 

Pablo de Sarasate Introduction et Tarantelle 

The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 

(j^ c<;;vp 



d^ cS^ 



The Curtis Institute of Music 



Fourth Season — 1927-1928 



Fourteenth Students' Concert 



Monday Afternoon, March 19, 1928, at 4:30 o'cloc\ 

By Students of Madame Luboshutz 
Ilsa Reimesch, at the Piano 

Giuseppe Tartini Sonata in G minor 

Adagio 

Presto non troppo 
Largo 

Allegro commodo 
James Bloom 

Camille SainT'Saens Concerto in B minor, Opus 61 

Allegro non troppo 
(First movement) 

Henry Siegl 
Johannes Brahms Concerto in D major, Opus 77 

Adagio 

Allegro giocoso, ma non troppo vivace 
(Last two movements) 
Louis Gesensway 

Cesar Franck Sonata in A major, for Violin 

and Piano 

Allegro ben moderato 
Allegro 

(First two movements) 

Celia Gomberg 
Jeanne Behrend 

(Student of Ms.. Hofmann) 



The Steinwat is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 
(^^ ^ 



e^ r<^ 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

Fourth Season — 1927-1928 

Fifteenth Students' Concert 

Monday Afternoon, March 26, 1928, at 4:30 o'cloc\ 

By students of Madame Vengerova 

<^» 

Frederic Chopin Variations in B flat major, Opus 12 

Franz Schubert Impromptu in E flat major 

Cecile Geschichter 

Johannes Br^^hms Intermezzo in A minor, Opus 118, No. 1 

Intermezzo in A major. Opus 76, No. 6 
Rhapsodie in B minor. Opus 79, No. 1 
Samuel Barber 

Frederic Chopin Ballade in F minor, Opus 52 

Schubert-Liszt Gretchen am Spinnrade 

Franz Liszt Gnomenreigen 

Florence Frantz 

Ludwig van Beethoven ... Sonata in A major, Opus 101 

Allegretto ma non troppo 
Vivace alia marcia 
Adagio ma non troppo 
Allegro 

Franz Liszt Etude de Concert in F minor 

Claude Debussy Reflets dans Teau 

Sergei Rachmaninoff .... Moment Musical, Opus 1 6, No. 4 

Eleanor Fields 

The Steinway is the o£Ecial piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



(^ ^^ 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

Fourth Season — 1927-1928 

Sixteenth Students' Concert 

Monday afternoon, April 2, 1928, at 4:30 o'cloc\ 
By Students of Mr. Bailly in Chamber Music 

Josef Haydn Quartet in D major, Opus 20, No. 4 

Allegro di molto 
Un poco adagio affettuoso 
Menuetto — Allegretto alia zingarese 
Presto scherzando 

Henri Temianka ) ... ,. Max Aronoff, Viola 

John Richardson j David Freed, Violoncello 

G. Francesco Malipiero . . Rispetti e strambotti — String Quartet in One 

Movement * 

Un poco ritenuto — Calmo — Alquanto mosso — 
Andante — Un poco piu mosso — Molto piu mosso-r- 
Allegro vivace — Lento, triste — Alquanto 
mosso — Un poco ritenuto — Piu lento — 
Abbastansa mosso, ma ben marcato il ritmo — 
Non troppo ritenuto — Lento — Piu mosso — 
Piu Ipnto — Molto gaio e mosso assai — 
Un poco meno mosso — Ancora un poco meno 
mosso. 
Iso Briselli \ .. J. Max Aronoff, Viola 

Robert Levine J Stephen Deak, Violoncello 

Johannes Brahms Quintet in F minor. Opus 34, for String 

Quartet and Piano 

Allegro non troppo 

Andante, un poco adagio 

Scherzo 

Finale (Poco sostenuto) — Allegro non troppo 

Henri Temianka ) „. ,. Gordon Kahn, Viola 

John Richardson ) David Freed, Violoncello 

Sylvan Levin, Piano 

•"The title 'Rispetti e Strambotti" has given occasion for numerous mistaken conceptions. The 
Rispetti is a kind of ottava of a folk character, whose first verse is rhymed alternately, while 
the second contains successive rhymes. Strambotti are rustic love-songs. The twenty stanzas 
which form this quartet are united one another by a theme which almost resembles a Ritornello 
but which is meant above all, to express the joy of one who loves to listen to the vibrations of 
the open strings." 

d^ '^ 

The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



d^ e^ 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

Fourth Season — 1927-1928 

Seventeenth Students' Concert 

Thursday Evening, April 19, 1928, at 8:15 o'cloc\ 
By Students of Mr. Bailly in Chamber Music 
«^» 
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart . . . Trio in G major, Kochel No. 496 

Allegro 

Andante 

Allegretto 

George Pepper, Violin Orlando Cole, Violoncello 

Irene Peckham, Piano 

Camille SainT'Saens Trio in F major, Opus 18 

Allegro vivace 
Andante 
Scherzo — Presto 
Allegro 

Eugene Lamas, Violin Tibor de Machula, VioJoncello 

Grace Berman. Piano 

Cesar Franck Quintet in F minor 

Molto moderato quasi lento — Allegro 
Lento, con molto sentimento 
Allegro non troppo, ma con fuoco 

Judith Poska) y. j. Paull Ferguson, Viola 

Lily Matison ( Adine Barozzi, Violoncello 

Eleanor Fields, Piano 

The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



(f^ _ <^ 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

Fourth Season — 1927-1928 

Eighteenth Students' Concert 

Friday Afternoon, April 20, 1928, at 3:30 o'clock 

By students of Mr. Salmond 

*^ 

LuDWiG VAN Beethoven . . . Seven Variations on a Theme of Mosart, 

from "The Magic Flute" 

Edvard Grieg First movement from Sonata in A minor. 

Opus 36 

Orlando Cole 

*YvoNNE Krinskt at the Piano 

£douard Lalo First movement from Concerto in D minor 

Adine Barozzi 

*Earl Fox at the Piano 

Gabriel Faure filegie 

Katherine Conant 

•Yvonne Krinsky at the Piano 

LuiGi BOCCHERINI First movement from Concerto in B flat 

major 

Stephen Deak 

•Florence Frantz at the Piano 

*Students of Mr. Kaufman in Accompanying 



The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



d^ r<^ 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

Fourth Season — 1927-1928 

Twentieth Students' Concert 

Friday Afternoon, April 27, 1928, at 3:30 o'cloc\ 
By students of Madame Vengerova 

Cesar Franck Variations symphoniques 

Muriel Hodge 

(With orchestral part played on a second piano by Florence Franti) 

Alexander Glazounov Prelude in D flat major, Opus 49 

GlinkA'Balakireff The Lark 

Franz Liszt Etude in D flat major 

Florence Morseman 

BacH'Busoni Organ Choral Prelude in G minor 

Organ Choral Prelude in G major 

Frederic Chopin Scherzo in B minor 

Saidee McAlister 

Frederic Chopin Fantaisie in F minor 

Etude in A minor, Opus 25 

Anna Levitt 

Johann Sebastian Bach Fantaisie in C minor 

Frederic Chopin Scherzo in B flat minor 

Robert Schumann Intermezzo in E flat minor 

Vassily Sapelnikov Danse des Elfes 

Bella Braverman 



The Steinvay is the ofEcial piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 
(^- <^ 



d^ r(^ 



w 



The Curtis Institute 0/ Music 



Fourth Season — 1927-1928 



Twenty-First Students' Concert 



'Mond.a'^ A.\xe,rnoon, April 30, 1928, at 4:30 o'cloc\ 

Students of Mr. Flesch 

Mr. Hartzer, Assistant Instructor 

Theodore Saidenberg, at the Piano 

t^ 

Camille SainT'Saens Concerto in B minor, Opus 61 

Allegro non troppo 
Andantino quasi allegretto 
(First two movements) 
George Pepper 



JoHANN Sebastian Bach Chaconne 

Ernst Neufeld 



Niccolo Paganini Concerto in D major, Opus 6 

Allegro maestoso 
(First movement) 
Paul Gershman 



The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 

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The Curtis Institute of Music 

Fourth Season — 1927-1928 

TWENTY^SECOND StUDENTs' CoNCERT 

V/edyiesday Afternoon, May 2, 1928, at 4:30 odoc\ 

Students of Mr. Flesch 
Mr. Hartzer, Assistant Insnuctor 

£douard Lalo Symphonie Espagnole, Opus 21 

Allegro non troppo 
(First movement) 
Lily Matison 
♦Theodore Walstrum at the Piano 

Arcangelo Corelli La Folia: Variations serieuses 

Francis E. Jones 
*Florence Morseman at the Piano 

Camille SainT'Saens Concerto in A major, Opus 20 

Allegro 

Andante espressivo 
Allegro 
John Richardson 
*WiLLiAM Harms at the Piano 



*Students of Mr. Kaufman in Accompanying 



The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute 0/ Music 



d^ cS^ 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

Fourth Season — 1927-1928 
TWENTY^THIRD StUDENTs' CoNCERT 

Thursday Evening, May 3, 1928, at 8:15 o'cloc\ 
By students of Mr. Conn ell 
♦Florence Frants 



4_ „, r "«- '■he Piano 

*Theodore Walstri" 



[at th 
t,UM j 



Salvatore Rosa Star Vicino ) 

Marc' Antonio Cesti Ah! Quanto e vero ipor tenor 

Richard Strauss Stiindchen j 

HERMAN GATTER 

Arrigo Boito "Dai campi, dai prati" from^ 

"Mefistofele" f 

Johannes Brahms Feldeinsamkeit / 

Franz Schubert Die Post / 

ROSS LOCKWOOD 

Johannes Brahms Die Mainacht ) 

Botschaft ^For soprano 

Amilcare Ponchielli Suicidio from "La Gioconda" ) 

FLORENCE IRONS 

Stefano Donaudy Vaghissima Sembianza 

Gaetano Braga "Bella del suo Sorriso." from 

"Reginella" 
George Frederick Handel . . . "Thou shalt break them" from "TheV ,, 

Messiah" / ^°' ^^"'"' 

(With organ accompaniment 
played by 

Alexander McCurdy, Jr.) 
DANIEL HEALY 

GiACOMO Puccini "In quelle trine morbide" from 

"Manon Lescaut" 

Richard Hageman At the Well }For soprano 

Joseph Marx Wie einst 

Barkarole 
HELEN JEPSON 

Ludwig van Beethoven "In questa tomba oscura" \ 

GiACOMO Carissimi Vittoria mio core L^^ hass^haritone 

Franz Schubert Der Wanderer | 

Johannes Brahms Verrat / 

CLARENCE REINERT 

* Students of Mr. Kaufman in Accompanying 

The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute o/ Music 



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The Curtis Institute of Music 

Fourth Season — 1927-1928 

TWENTY^FOURTH StUDENTs' CoNCERT 

Friday Afternoon, May 4, 1928, at 4:00 o'doc\ 
By students of Mr. Zetlin 

JoHANN Sebastian Bach Sonata in G minor, for violin alone 

Adagio 
Fuga 

(First and second movements) 
Robert Levine 

Max Bruch Concerto in D minor, Opus 44 

Adagio ma non troppo 
(First movement) 
Helen Hall 
*Elizabeth Westmoreland at the Piano 

Johannes Brahms Sonata in A major, Opus 100 

Allegro amabile 
Andante tranquillo 
Allegretto grazioso (quasi andante) 
Benjamin Sharlip 
'•'Florence Frantz at the Piano 

PugnanI'Kreisler Praeludium und Allegro 

Felix Mendelssohn Concerto in E minor. Opus 64 

Allegro molto appassionato 
(First movement) 
Leopold Shopmaker 
*Helen Hall at the Piano 

Max Bruch Concerto in G minor. Opus 26 

Allegro moderate 
Adagio 

Allegro energico 
Marjorie Fulton 
*Eli2Abeth Westmoreland at the Piano 

*Students of Mr. Kaufman in Accompanying 

The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



(^ c^ 



The Curtis Institute of Music 



Fourth Season — 1927-1928 



TWENTY^FIFTH StUDENTs' CoNCERT 



Friday evening, May 11, 1928, at 8:1 S o'cloc\ 



Students of Madame Sembrich 



The Stein WAY is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



tf^- ^^ 



Programme 



Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. . . Quando Miro 

Georges Bizet Aria from 'Xes Pecheurs des Perles' 

PauL'Antonin Vidal Ariette 

Louis Campbell-Tipton The Spirit Flower 

GiACOMO Puccini Musetta's Walts Song from 

"La Boheme" 

Edna Hochstetter 

Henri Bemberg La mort de Jeanne d'Arc 

Erich Wolff AUe Dinge haben Sprache 

Cesar Cui La statue de Tsarkoie 

Richard Hageman The Cunnin' Little Thing 

GiACOMO Meyerbeer ''Nobles Seigneurs Salut" from 

"Les Huguenots" 

Jane Pickens 

Franco Faccio Aria from "Amleto" 

George Frederick K'^ndel Qual farf alletta 

Erich Wolff Irmelin Rose 

A. Walter Kramer The Swans 

Charles-Fran gois Gounod Juliet's Waltz Song from 

"Romeo and Juliet" 

Charlotte Simons 



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e^ cs;^ 



Programme 



HandeL'Bibb Bel piacer! 

GucoMO Meyerbeer Shadow Song from "Dinorah" 

Franz Schubert Auf dem Wasser zu singen 

Werner Josten The Windflower 

Ambroise Thomas "Je suis Titania" from "Mignon" 

Henriette Horle 

Claudio Monteverdi Ahi, troppo e duro 

Franz Schubert Der Doppelganger 

Johannes Brahms Sapphische Ode 

Der Schmied 

Camille SainT'Saens "Amour viens aider" from "Samson 

and DeHlah" 

Josephine Jirak 

Pietro Cimar.\ Non piu 

Pietro a. Tirindelli Portami via! 

Erich Wolff Ich bin eine Harfe 

Richard Strauss Cacilie 

Richard Wagner Du Theure Halle 

Elsa Meiskey 

Viola Peters at the Piano 
(S^ ^c^ 



d^ c^ 



The Curtis Institute of Music 



Fourth Season — 1927-1928 



TWENTY^SIXTH StUDENTs' CoNCERT 



Saturday afternoon, May 12, 1928, at 3:00 o'cloc\ 



Students of Madame Sembrich 



The Steinwat is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 

(5^ cs^ 



d^ CS^ 



Programme 



•^o^ 



Antonio Caldara Sebben Crudele 

Sergei Rachmaninoff The Answer \ 

Lilacs /Sung in Kuisian 

Floods of Spring ; 

Vera Resnikoff 



Giovanni Battista Pergolesi. . . Se tu m'ami 

Giuseppe Sarti Lungi dal caro ben 

Old English Shepherd, thy demeanor vary 

Frank La Forge Song of the Open 

Luigi Arditi II Bacio 

Natalie Bodanskaya 



L6o Delibes Duet from Lakme | f^ ^°'(>^°-''<^ ^'^d 

Charlotte Simons and Jane Pickens 

Georges Bizet Letter Duet from \For Soprano 

"Carmen" (and. Tenor 

Edna Hochstetter and *Louis Yaeckel 



d^ r<^ 



dNN)j — «S^ 



Programme 



VlJ?^ 



GiACOMO Puccini Duet — "Tutti I Fior" 



Butterfly" 
Henrietta Horle and Jane Pickens 

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. . .Duet — 'Xa ci darem 



r I'-K ,r J I Por Sobrano and 

from Madame > Mezzo^Soprano 



ki' r ''•T>v V Por Sobrano 

mano from Don > „^ g ^^„„^ 



Giovanni" 

Charlotte Simons and *Conrad Thibault 



CHARLES'pRANgois GouNOD Duet — "Ange Adorable") 

r t-n J I For Soprano 

from Romeo and > „j cj-^^^^ 

Juliet" ; 

Henrietta Horle and *Louis Yaeckel 



Jacques Offenbach Duet — "Belle Nuit" ) 

r 'IT /-I ^ I Por Soprano 

from LesContes)^,,^ Co%atraIto 
d'Hoffmann" ; 

Charlotte Simons and Josephine Jirak 



Viola Peters at the Piano 



*Students of Mr. de Gogorza 



d^ cS^ 



(j^ H^ 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

Fourth Season — 1927-1928 

TWENTY'SEVENTH StUDENTs' CoNCERT 

Monday Evening, May 14, 1928, at 8:15 o'cloc\ 

Centennial Commemorative Recital 

of Compositions by 
Franz Schubert 

By Students of Mr. Bailly in Chamber Music 
String Quintet in C major, Opus 163 

Allegro ma non troppo 
Adagio 

Scherzo — Presto 
Allegretto 

Henri Temianka } Tibor de Machula ) 

John Richardson f^''^''"' David Freed |VfoZoncent 

Max Aronoff, Viola 

Octet in F major, Opus 166, for Clarinet, Bassoon, Horn, 2 Violins, 

Viola, Violoncello, and Double Bass 
Adagio — Allegro 
Andante un poco mosso 
Scherzo — Allegro vivace 
Andante with Variations 
Menuetto — Allegretto 
Andante molto — Allegro 

Francis Jones) Oscar Zimmerman, Double Bass 

Esther Hare j '° '"* Robert McGinnis. Clarinet 

Gordon Kahn, Viola Frank Ruggieri, Bassoon 

David Freed, Violoncello James Thurmond, Horn 



The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



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The Curtis Institute of Music 

Fourth Season - 1927-1928 
TWENTY^EIGHTH StUDENTs' CoNCERT 

Friday Afternoon, May 18, 1928, at 4:00 o'cloc\ 
By students of Mr. Salzedo 

I Carlos Salzedo Five Preludes for Harp alone 

(1917) 

Lamentation 
Quietude 
Iridescence 
Introspection 
Whirlwind 
Emily Hepler 

II Carlos Salzedo Variations on a Theme in Ancient Style 

(1911) 

Theme — Double— Tempo di Bourree — 

Staccati — Butterfly — Chords and Flux — 

Racing in C. P. — Trills — Scales and Arpeggios — 

Theme (Conclusion) 

William Cameron 
III Carlos Salzedo Five Poetical Studies 

(1918) 

Flight 
Mirage 

Idyllic Poem 
Inquietude 
Communion 
Marion Blankenship 

Lyon and Healy Harp 



The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute oj Music 



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The Curtis Institute of Music 

Fourth Season— 19274928 

TwENTY^NlNTH StUDENTs' CoNCERT 

Saturday Afternoon, May 19, 1928, at 3:00 o'clocX 
By students of Mr. Farnam 

JoHANN Sebastian Bach . . . Passacaglia and Fugue in C minor 

SiGFRiD KarG'Elert "The Reed-Grown Waters" from 

"Seven Pastels from Lake Constance' 
Carl Weinrich 

JoHANN Sebastian Bach . . . Fantasia in G minor 

Charles M. Widor Adagio from Sixth Symphony 

Howard Ralston 

Cesar Fr.'^nck Choral No. 2 in B minor 

Johann Sebastian Bach . . . Vivace from Sixth Trio-Sonata 

in G major 
Robert Cato 

Robert Schumann Sketch in D flat major 

Ces.ar Fr.\nck Finale in B flat major 

Alexander McCurdy, Jr. 

The organ is an Aeolian 



The Steinwat is the oflScial piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



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I 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

Fourth Season — 1927-1928 

Thirtieth Students' Concert 

Monday Afternoon, May 21, 1928, at 4:00 o'cloc\ 
By students of Miss Lawrence 

I Robert Schumann Petite Etude 

Carlos Salzedo Prelude Intime, Number 3 

Marion Van Laningham 

II Carlos Salzedo Preludes Intimes, Numbers 2 and 5 

Ruth Pfohl 

III Josef Haydn Theme and Variations 

Carlos Salzedo Mirage 

Alice Chalieoux 

IV A. Durand , . . Chaconne 

Marcel Grand jany French Folk Song 

Victoria Murdock 

V Flora Greenwood Three Impressions 

(192S) (First performance) 

Flora Greenwood 

VI Charles M. Widor Chorale and Variations 

(With piano reduction of the orchestra) 

Edna Phillips 

Carlos Salzedo at the piano 

Lyon and Healy Harp 



The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 

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The Curtis Institute of Music 

Fourth Season — 1927-1928 

Tkirty'First Students' Concert 

Tuesday Eveyiing, May 22, 1928, at 8:15 o'cloc\ 
By students of Mr. Hofmann 

Johannes Brahms Sonata in F minor 

Allegro maestoso 
Andante 

Scherzo — Allegro energico 
Intermezzo 

Finale — Allegro moderate ma rubato 
Theodore Saidenberg 

Frederic Chopin Ballade in A flat major 

Etude in E major 
Polonaise in A flat major 
Vera Resnikoff 

Robert Schumann Carneval 

Joseph Levine 

Jeanne Behrend Theme and Variations 

Robert Schumann First Movement from Concerto in A minor 

(Mr. Kaufman at the second piano) 
Jeanne Behrend 



The Steinway is the ofBcial piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



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The Curtis Institute of Music 

Fourth Season— 1927-1928 

Thirty-second Students' Concert 

Monday Evening, May 28, 1928, at 8:1$ o'cloc\ 

By Students of Mr. Bailly in Chamber Music 

«^» 

George Antheil Second String Quartet (1927) 

Allegro 
Lento 

Rondino — Scherzino 
Cadenza finale (Presto) 
(First Performance) 
Gama Gilbert Iv?- Sheppard Lehnhoff, Viold 

Benjamin Sharlip j Orlando Cole, Violoncello 



Johannes Brahms Trio in E flat major, Opus 40, for Piano, 

Violin and Horn 
Andante 

Scherzo (Allegro) 
Adagio mesto 
Finale (Allegro con brio) 

Ercelle Mitchell, Piano 
Lois zu Putlitz, Violin James Thurmond, Horn 

Ernest Chausson Concert in D major. Opus 21, for Piano, 

Violin and String Quartet 
Decide 
Sicilienne 
Grave 
Finale (Tres anime) 

Jeanne Behrend, Piano Iso Briselli, Solo violin 
Lily Matison ) Max Aronoff, Viola 

Louise Palmer Walker) ^° '"* Tibor de Machula, Violoncello 



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The Curtis Institute of Music 



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Fourth Season — 1927-1928 



The Students' Orchestra 

Arthur Rodzinski, Conductor 



Wednesday Evening, December Twentyfirst 
at 8:15 o'cloc\ 



The Academy of Music 



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Programme 

Carl Maria von Weber Overture from "Oberon" 



Antonin Dvorak "From the New World" — Symphony 

No. 5, in E Minor 

Adagio — Allegro molto 

Largo 

Scherzo — Molto vivace 

Allegro con f uoco 



Intermission 



Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart . . .Aria : "L'Amero Saro Costante" from 

"II Re Pastore" for Soprano with 
Violin Obligato 

Charlotte Simons, Soprano 

(Student of Madame Sembrich) 

Lois zu Putlitz, Violinist 

(Student of Mr. Flesch) 



Franz Liszt "Les Preludes" — Symphonic Poem 

No. 3 



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positively that real Negro melodies had been used in the work, but in a later 
letter (1900) to Oscar Nedbal, the conductor who led the first performance of 
the symphony in Berlin, and one of the original members (viola) of the famous 
Bohemian String Quartet, the composer was equally insistent that he had made 
no direct use of Negro or Indian tunes, saying: "I tried to write only in the 
manner (spirit) of these national American melodies." 

The exact truth of the matter has never been definitely learned, nor, at this 
late day, is it likely to be. Nevertheless, it is positively known that during his 
stay in the United States, Dvorak was immensely interested in the possibilities of 
both Negro and Indian music, and that these influenced him powerfully in some 
of the most important works which he composed in this country. Among the 
works, excluding this symphony for argument's sake, are the so'called "American" 
string quartet in F major. Opus 96, the sextet in A major for strings (two violins, 
two violas, and two violoncelli) the quintet in A major for piano and strings and 
several other compositions of nearly as great importance. 

But the extent to which the composer was indebted to Negro or Indian, or, 
more generally speaking, to "American" music, although this last is rightly a 
moot point, need not greatly concern the listener to any of these compositions. 
The outstanding fact for the audience is that the music carries its own message, 
as it does in the case of every masterpiece of composition, and, that this is the 
best of the symphonies of Dvorak, just as the "American" quartet is the best 
and the most frequently played of his works in the string quartet form, and that 
the piano quintet stands among the four leading compositions of the world in 
this form. Not so much, however, can be said for the sextet for strings. 

It might also be noted in passing that the rhythms of his symphony, of which 
so much has been said and written, are as typically Bohemian as they are Negro. 
The second theme of the first movement has a decided resemblance to the Negro 
spiritual, "Swing Low, Sweet Chariot", but here the direct musical resemblance 
seems to end. Despite this, there is, in the general atmosphere of the symphony, 
something decidedly "American", although it must be admitted that this effect 
may be purely a psychological one. But, in any event, the entire work repre' 
sents what is doubtless the finest example in all music of a composer of one 
nationality writing what now appears to be a permanent piece of music, in the 
spirit of another country. 

The late Henry E. Krehbiel, who was intimately acquainted with Dvorak 
during his stay in the United States, and was closely associated with the com' 
poser during the period when this symphony was in the course of composition, 
gave an authoritative analysis of the work at the time of its first production: 
an analysis which has never been equalled in the thirtyfour years which have 
elapsed since the first performance. The analysis, doubtless made with the full 
approval of the composer, reads as follows: 

"The symphony (wrote Mr. Krehbiel), had a long, beautiful, and highly im' 
pressive introduction, unmarked by any national characteristics. The principal 
subject of the first Allegro, however, is in a different case. It has two elements 
common to the music which has a popular charm in the United States. First, 
it employs that form of syncopation commonly known as the 'Scotch snap' 
(a short note on the accented part of the measure followed by a longer one on 
the unaccented part, which thus takes the greater part of the stress). This is 
pervasive of the popular ballads of the United States, of the music created by 
the Negroes when they were slaves, and of the American Indians. In its 
abused form, it gave rise to what was known as rag-time. The second element is 
melodic; the phrase is built upon the Pentatonic or fivcnote scale which omits 
the fourth and the seventh of our usual diatonic series. This feature (common 
also to Scotch, Chinese and Irish music) is also prominent in our popular ballads 
and in the original music of our Negroes. 

"Though Dr. Dvorak copied no melody of the many sung to him by some of 
his Negro pupils (Mr. Henry T. Burleigh, for instance), he showed plainly that 
the familiar melody "Swing Low, Sweet Chariot" was in his mind when he wrote 
the second subject of the first movement. A short, subsidiary subject connecting his 



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first and second principal subjects, derives a markedly characteristic tinge from 
the use of the flattened seventh, a very popular device in the Negro spirituales, 
as well as in the secular tunes of the Negroes, but which is now dying out. 

"In the slow movement, we are estopped from seeking forms that are native and 
are thrown wholly upon a study of the spirit. According to Dr. Dvorak's state 
ment to this writer, the Largo is a musical publication of a mood which came 
over him when he was first reading the story of 'Hiawatha's Wooing'. He was 
fond of Longfellow's poetry, and even thought of 'Hiawatha' as an opera sub' 
ject. In the principal melody (of the Largo) which is sung with exquisite effect 
by the English horn over a soft accompaniment by the divided strings, there is 
a world of tenderness, and possibly also a suggestion of the sweet loneliness of 
night upon the prairies; but such images are best left to the individual imagina' 
tion. The movement has several melodies which vary in sentiment, but the 
transition is never violent. There is a striking episode, constructed out 
of a little staccato melody, first announced by the oboe, and then taken up by 
one instrument after another, which seems to suggest a gradual awakening of 
animal life on the prairie; and a striking use is made of trills exchanged be' 
tween the various instrumental choirs as if they were voices of the night or of 
the dawn in converse. 

"From the swing-away of this peaceful movement, to the end of the symphony, 
all is bustle and activity, — eager, impetuous, aggressive in the principal parts of 
the Scherzo, sportive in the trio with its graceful waltZ'like second part, and 
full of tremendous dash in the Finale, which again has a purely Pentatonic 
principal subject." 

Aria "L'Amero, Saro Costante" Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart 

from "II Re Pastore" (i 756-1791 ) 

THIS FAMOUS ARIA, virtually all that remains of the opera "II Re Pastore" 
(The Shepherd King), of Mozart, occurs in the second act. The opera 
itself was composed as a "dramma per musica" in two acts by Mozart on a com' 
mission from the Archbishop of Salzburg, and was first given in the celebrations 
arranged by that dignitary of the church for the visit to his court of the Arch' 
duke Maximilian, younger brother of Marie Antoinette. Mozart was at that time 
(1775) the musical director of the Archbishop. 

The opera was composed early in April, the subject having been selected by 
the Archbishop, and the first performance took place on April 23, 1775. "II Re 
Pastore" was composed to a text by Metastasio, originally in three acts but cut 
down to two for the purposes of this opera. This text was a great favorite with 
the composers of the Eighteenth Century and was set by several lesser musicians 
than Mozart. Metastasio wrote the original text in 1751 for a court festival, the 
music of which was written by Joseph Bonno. At this performance almost 
twenty-five years before Mozart took the subject, the roles were filled by four 
Maids of Honor of the Austrian Court and a Cavalier. 

The story of "II Re Pastore" is laid at the time of the conquest of Sidon by 
Alexander the Great and concerns itself with the elevation to the throne of 
Andalonymus (named Aminta in the libretto of Metastasio). Andalonymus or 
Aminta, was a son of the last rightful king of Sidon and has been secretly brought 
up as a shepherd. Aminta is deeply in love with Elisa, who returns his affection 
but he is ordered by the Conqueror to renounce Elisa and to marry Tamiri, 
daughter of the Tyrant, Strabo, who was slain in the war which brought Sidon 
under the dominion of Alexander. Aminta, rather than give up Elisa and be 
lieving that true love is more to be desired than earthly riches and power, returns 
the crown which Alexander proferred him, declaring that, rather than renounce 
Elisa, he will remain a shepherd. Moved by such devotion Alexander with- 
draws his demand, unites the lovers and establishes Aminta upon the throne 
of Sidon. 



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Mozart's setting of the opera contains fourteen numbers of which this aria, 
which is rondo form, is the tenth. It is sung in the second act when Aminta 
signifies his intention of remaining true to Ehsa, even though he has to give up 
a throne to do so. In the original performance of the opera the role of Aminta 
was taken by Consoli, a famous male soprano of Munich, for whom the part 
was written. The orchestral accompaniment of the aria includes a violin obli' 
gato. The text, the translator of which is unknown, is as follows: 

I will love her, constant ever. 
As a husband, as a lover. 
For her alone heats my heart. 
In so dear, so sweet a treasure, 
Joy I'll find, joy without measure 
Love shall claim me all her own. 



"Les Preludes" — Symphonic Poem No. 3 Franz Liszt 

(1811—1886) 

THE BIOGRAPHERS of Liszt do not agree as to the exact date of the composi' 
tion of this, the third of his twelve symphonic poems and the most popular 
of any of his orchestral works. This popularity is doubtless due to the wealth 
of melody with which the composer has invested this work, although like "Tasso" 
(No. 2 of the symphonic poems) "Les Preludes" is a series of variations on a 
single theme. The variations, however, are in the freest style and are replete 
with various melodic forms. 

According to Richard Pohl, "Les Preludes" was begun at Marseilles in 1834 and 
was completed sixteen years later (in 1850) at Weimar. Mme. Lina Ramann, 
however, in her chronological catalogue of Liszt's works, declares that it was 
composed in 1854 and published in 1856; while Theodore Miillcr-Reiter says 
that it was composed at Weimar in 1840'50 from sketches made in earlier years. 
This last statement is now believed to be the correct one as to the date of the 
composition. 

Mme. Ramann, however, in her biography of the composer, gives some inter' 
esting information as to the earlier sketches. Liszt, it appears, about 1844, while 
in Paris, began to compose a choral work to a poem of Aubray, entitled "The 
Four Elements" (la Terre, les Aquilons, les Flotes, les Astres). This work, 
which was to be in the largest form, was designed for male chorus and 
orchestra (the matter of soloists being still undecided), and was to include an 
overture. According to the dates on the manuscript, "La Terre" was composed 
in 1845; "Les Flotes" on Easter Sunday of 1845; "Les Astres" on April 14, 
1845; while the manuscript of "Les Aquilons" which is now in the Liszt Museum 
at Weimar, is undated. In January of 1850, Joachim Raff, then a young man 
of twenty-eight and closely associated with Liszt, who assisted him materially, 
as he did many other young and promising talents, wrote to Mme. Reinrich, 
telling her of the work and his (Raff's) part in the orchestration; sending her 
at the same time, the score of a new overture entitled "Les 4 Elements." But 
in 1851, Liszt wrote to Raff as to renaming the overture the "Meditation Sym' 
phony" and this name stands today in handwriting (either Liszt's or Raff's) on 
the manuscript of the score. 

Liszt, however, disgusted with the "cold stupidity" of Aubray's poem, did 
not finish the cantata. He told Victor Hugo of his predicament and of his desire 
to write a choral work, evidently in the hope that the great French poet would 
take the hint and write a text for him; but Hugo either did not or would not 
understand the implied suggestion and Liszt put aside the music he had already 
written. Nearly ten years later, he conceived the idea of using the music in 
another form for the Pension Fund concert of the Court Orchestra at Weimar. 
Accordingly he enlarged and materially changed the musical content of what he 



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had already composed and based the new composition on a passage from the 
fifteenth of the Meditations Poetiques of Alphonse Lamartine, which is entitled 
"Les Preludes." The result was the symphonic poem "Les Preludes" as we 
know it today. The work was first performed at Weimar at the Pension Fund 
concert in February, 1854, Liszt conducting, and the orchestra played from 
manuscript. It is interesting to note the similarity of the name of the Lamartine 
Meditation and the new title Liszt suggested to Raff three years previously, for 
the original overture of "Les 4 Elements." 

The passage from Lamartine's Meditation No. 15, which served Liszt as his 
poetic basis, was written in the composer's own hand'writing on the first page 
of the original orchestral score. It reads as follows: 

"What is our life, but a series of preludes to that unknown 
song, the first solemn note of which is sounded by Death? Love 
forms the enchanted daybreak of every life: but what is the destiny 
where the first delights of happiness are not interrupted by some 
storm, whose fatal breath dissipates its fair illusions — whose fell 
lightning consumes its altar? And what wounded spirit, when one 
of its tempests is over, does not seek to rest its memories in the 
sweet calm of country life? Yet man does not resign himself long 
to enjoy the beneficent tepidity which first charmed him, on 
Nature's bosom, and, when 'the trumpet's loud clangor has called 
him to arms' he rushes to the post of danger, whatever may be 
the war that called him to the ranks, to find in battle, the full con- 
sciousness of himself and the complete possession of his strength." 

The first melody, given out after a very short introduction, is almost identical 
but in a different key, with the opening phrase of Cesar Franck's symphony in 
D minor. Then comes a very important passage by the trombones; later a beau' 
tiful theme for French horns with divided violas and violoncellos and the ex' 
quisite cantilena for the violoncellos. The composition then develops into a 
magnificent piece of stirring variations and climax, subsiding into a repetition 
of the unadorned theme and closing with one of the most powerful and sonorous 
passages that Liszt has ever written. 



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Personnel of the Orchestra 



Arthur Rodzinski, Conductor 



First Violins 

Jay Savitt 
Louis Gesensway 
Eugene Lamas 
Lois zu Putlit? 
Henry Temianka 
Judith Poska 
Gama Gilbert 
Francis Jones 
John Richardson 
Dorothy F. Hodge 
Henry Siegl 
Paul Gershman 
Benjamin Sharlip 
Ernst Neufeld 
Ruth Perssion 
Lily Matison 
Ethel Stark 
Robert Levine 
Leopold Shopmaker 
Gabriel Braverman 



Flutes 

Richard Townsend 
Walter Coleman 
Maurice Sharp 
Richard Cameron 
Harry Hirsh 



Oboes 

*Marcel Tabuteau 
Lloyd Ullberg 
**Louis di Fulvio 
Irving Bloom 



Clarinets 

*Daniel Bonade 
Robert McGinnis 
**Lucien Cailliet 
Frank Schwartz 



Bassoons 

♦Walter Guetter 
Ervin Swenson 
**John Fisnar 



Violoncellos 

John Gray 
Tibor de Machula 
David Freed 
Katherine Conant 
Orlando Cole 
**Milton Prinz 
**Adrien Siegel 
Florence Williams 
Francis Giannini 
Adine Barozzi 



Violas 

Alexander Gray 
Max Aronoff 
Gordon Kahn 
Leon Frengut 
Sheppard LehnhofF 
Abraham Krainis 
Joseph FischofF 
Paull Ferguson 
Louis Wyner 
Aaron Molind 
Abraham Robofsky 
Lahn Adohmyan 
Sam Zeritsky 
Nathan Shumsky 



Horns 

*Anton Horner 

H. W. Johnston 
**Joseph Horner 

James Thurmond 
**Otto Henneberg 

Arthur Simmers 
** Albert Riese 

Robert Simmers 



Trumpets 

*Sol Cohen 
Melvin Headman 
**Harold W. Rehrig 
Maxwell Marks 



Trombones 

Ralph Binz 
Guy Boswell 
Donald Reinhardt 
John Coffey 
**C. E. Gerhard 



Second Violins 

Iso Briselli 
Alfred Boyington 
B. Frank Noyes 
Marjorie Fulton 
James Bloom 
George Pepper 
Helene Hardsteen 
Robert Gomberg 
Celia Gomberg 
Carmen Rondinelli 
Louise Walker 
Max Epstein 
Esther Hare 
Sabina Kowalska 
Matilda Balkin 
Christine Colley 



Basses 

*Anton Torello 
Harold Garratt 
John Varallo 
Oscar Zimmerman 
Sigmund Hering 
Alfio Lazzaro 



Harps 

William Cameron 
Marion Blankenship 
Emily Hepler 



Tuba 

**Philip A. Donatelli 

Tympani 
*Oscar Schwar 



Battery 

Muriel Hodge 
Henry Whitehead 
Irving Bloom 
Frank Schwartz 



Librarian 
Charles N. Demarest 



* Member of the Faculty of The Curtis Institute op Music and Member of the Philadelphia Orchestra 
** Member of the Philadelphia Orchestra 



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