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Full text of "Recital programs 1938-1939"






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The Curtis Institute of Music 

CASIMIR HALL 
Fifteenth Season 

FACULTY RECITAL 

Monday EimiKg, November 21, 193S, at ^:}0 o'doik 

MR. FELIX SALMOND, Violoncellist 

'•■Ralph Berkowitz at the Piano 



Tlic Curtis Instifute of I^Iusic congratulates I^lr. Salmoncl on «i.e 

celetration of Lis Fiftietk BirtLtlay and tke Tkirtietli 

Anniversary of nis DeLut in London 



PROGRAMME 

I 

Sonata in F major, Opus 99 Johannes Brahms 

Allegro vivace 
Adagio aflfettuoso 
Allegro passionate 
Allegro molto 

II 

Prelude, Sarabande and Gigue in D minor Johann Sebastian Bach 

(from Suite No. 2 for unaccompanied violoncello) 

III 

Sonata in D minor Claude Debussy 

Prologue 

Serenade et Finale 
(Composed in summer of 1915) 

IV 

Sonata in A major. Opus 69 Ludwig van Beethoven 

Allegro ma non tanto 
Scherzo. Allegro molto 
Adagio cantabile 
Allegro vivace 

■Graduate pupil of Mr. Kaufman in Accompanying 
The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 






THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

CASIMIR HALL 
Fifteenth Season— 1938-39 

FACULTY RECITAL 

Thursday Evening, April 27, 1939, at 8:30 o'clock 

MADAME ELISABETH SCHUMANN, Soprano 
MR. LEO ROSENEK at the Piano 

PROGRAMME 
I 

"L'amero" from "II re pastore" Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart 

Violin obbligato played by Frederick Vogelgesang* 

n 

Der Hirt auf dem Felsen Franz Schubert 

Clarinet obbligato played by William McCormick** 

III 

An den Sonnenschein ^ 

Roselein, Roselein! f Robert Schumann 

Marienwiirmchen I 
Er ist's / 

IV 

Nachtigall ^ 

Der Gang zum Liebchen f Johannes Brahms 

Lerchengesang i 

Blindekuh ) 

*Student of Mr. Zimbalist 
** Student of Mr. McGinnis 

The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



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The Curtis Institute of Music 

CASIMIR HALL 
Fifteenth Season — 1938-39 

RECITAL 

BY 

LESTER ENGLANDER, Baritone 
Graduate Pupil of Mr. de Gogorza 



Thursday Evening, December 1, 1938, at 8:30 o'clock 



Vladimir Sokoloff at the piano 



The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



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PROGRAMME 



I 

Mark, o my heart, evermore only this Johann Sebastian Bach 

Two EHzabethan Love Songs 

The Charm Thomas Campion 

What if I speede where I least expected Robert Jones 

Thou art gone up on high (from "The Messiah") 

Georg Friedrich Handel 



II 

Winternacht Richard Strauss 

Welcome, moon of rainy and stormy December, and lead me to my lady's 
dwelling. Never did I greet the blossoms of May so gladly as I today greet 
thy snowflakes, for through them my love blossoms secretly in the winter 
night. 

Ach, weh mir unglixckhaftem Mann Richard Strauss 

Ah! woe is me, unlucky man, without money or fortune! Else would I 
drive to fetch you in a coach and four. You would look out of your 
window and ask, "What do you want?" "You," I would answer, and you 
would quickly kiss your parents goodbye, and come with me. Ah! woe 
is me, unlucky man, without money or fortune! 

Heimliche Aufforderung Richard Strauss 

Come, lift the sparkling cup to your lips, and secretly nod to me; I will 
smile and drink silently also. Let us not despise the convivial babblers 
about us, butf after the meal, steal out into the garden, where I shall be 
waiting as often before. 

Cacilie Richard Strauss 

If you knew what it is to dream of love, your heart would assent. If you 
knew what it is to live surrounded by the creative breath of God, to soar 
up to blessed heights — if you knew that, you would dwell with me. 



Ill 

Danse macabre Camille Saint-Saens 

Zig! Zag! Death, at midnight, plays the violin, rhythmically stamping 
on a tombstone. The skeletons arise and begin to dance, choosing partners 
regardless of rank. The baroness dances with the carpenter, the king 
gambols beside the serf. But, suddenly, all flee away — the cock has 
crowed. What a wonderful night for the poor. Long live death and 
equality! 



Illlllllllllllllllllinillllllllliiniiiiiiiiini iiiiiiillllllllillm lilliiiiiinirn 



PROGRAMME 



Clair de lune Gabriel Faure 

Your soul is a choice landscape, peopled by masqueraders playing the lute, 
dancing and singing in a minor mode of victorious love; their song mingles 
with the moonlight. 

Tambourin (18th Century Folk Song) Arranged by Julien Tiersot 

Come into the woods, fair Aminte, made for pleasures and games. There 
let us plight our troth, and offer to Love a tender homage. 

La Vague et la Cloche Henri Duparc 

Once, overcome by a powerful drink, I dreamt that I was drifting at night 
on the ocean, without a light, buffeted by huge waves and an icy wind. 
Then it all vanished, and I was alone in an old bell-tower astride a bell, 
frantically tugging at the rope. Why, o dream, did you not tell whither 
it all leads, and whether there is ever an end of useless struggle and eternal 
tumult? 

Chanson a boire Maurice Ravel 

A rollicking tavern song from "Don Quichotte a Dulcinee" in which the 
hero humorously drinks to his lady-love. 



IV 

chansons Madecasses (for voice, flute, 'cello and piano) Maurice Ravel 
Burnett Atkinson, Flutist Samuel Mayes, 'Cellist 

1. It is night. A Madagascan lover impatiently awaits his beautiful 
Nahandove. She appears, and they embrace. As she leaves, he begs her to 
return again in the evening. 

2. Aoua! Beware of the white men inhabiting the coast. In our fathers' 
time, they landed on this island. They were given land and treated as 
brothers, but soon began to raise forts and tried to enslave us. The 
carnage was frightful, but heaven helped us, and with the aid of the 
elements we remain free. Aoua! Beware of the white men inhabiting 
the coast. 

3. It is pleasant to recline under a tree in the afternoon heat. Women, 
approach; sing and dance for me. The song pleases my soul; the dance is 
almost as sweet as a kiss . . . Now the moon is rising through the trees of 
the mountain. Go prepare the meal. 



V 

Aria from the opera "Attila" Giuseppe Verdi 



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THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

CASIMiR HALL 
Fifteenth Season— 1938-39 

RECITAL OF MUSIC FOR THE HARP 

by 
STUDENTS OF MR. SALZEDO 

Friday Evening, December 9, 1938, at 8:30 o'clock 

PROGRAMME 
I 

Sonata in C minor Giovanni Battista Pescetti 

Allegro vigoroso 1704-1766 

Andantino 

Presto 

Gavotte from "Iphigenia in Aulis" Christoph Willibald von Gluck 

1714-1787 

Giga Arcangelo Corelli 

1653-1713 
Anne Lois Greene 

II 

Gavotte from "The Temple of Glory" Jean-Philippe Rameau 

1683-1764 
The Harmonious Blacksmith Georg Friedrich Handel 

1685-1759 
Theme and Variations Josef Haydn 

1732-1809 
Bourree Johann Sebastian Bach 

1685-1750 
Eleanor Mellinger 

III 

Variations on a theme in ancient style (1911) Carlos Salzedo 

Theme — Double — Tempo di Bourree — Staccati — Butterflies 
Chords and Flux — Jumps — Trills — Scales and Arpeggios 
Barcarolle — Prelude — Fugue — Cadenza — Conclusion 

Marilyn Thompson 

Lyon & Healy Harps 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

CASIMIR HALL 
Fifteenth Season— 1938-39 

CLASS CONCERT 

by 

SOLFEGE STUDENTS of MADAME MIQUELLE 
in Sight Reading*, Part Reading** and Score Reading*** 

Tuesday Afternoon, January 24, 1939, at 5:00 o'clock 

PROGRAMME 

I 

Quartet, Opus 18, No. 5 in A major Ludwig van Beethoven 

1st movement: Allegro 

(Played from string quartet score) 

"■*John Simms 

Overture to "Manfred" Robert Schumann 

(Played from orchestral score) 

"■"""■David Stephens 
II 

Quartet, No. 7(), No. 2 in D minor Josef Haydn 

1st movement: Allegro 

(Played from string quartet score) 

"■"■Mary Norris 

Serenade, Opus 16, in A major Johannes Brahms 

1st movement: Allegro moderate 
(Played from orchestral score) 

"■■""""Leo Luskin 
III 

Aux premieres clartes de I'aube Roger DuCASSEf 

For solo children's voices, mixed chorus and orchestra 

Children: Diane Steiner, Abigail Rachlin, Charlotte Cohen, Margot Ros, 

Rudolf Favaloro, Charles Libove, Nathan Goldstein, Seymour Lipkin 

Choral Croup: Misses Carol, Dean, Gruhn, Kuehne, Lilly, Nisbet, Norris, Robertson. 

Messrs. Hultgren, Ruoss, Tamburini, Winsor. 

'^"■"■Waldemar Dabrowski at the piano 

(Playing from orchestral score) 

Veni creator spiritus (for 4 parts mixed chorus) Cl audio Casciolini 
Crucifixus (for 8 parts mixed chorus) Antonio Lotti 

Soprani: Misses Carol, Kuehne, Lilly, Morse, Robertson, Stewart, Wahlberg, Worrilow. 

Alti: Misses Dean, Gruhn, Larson, Mellinger, Mitchell, Nisbet, Norris, Robinson. 

Tenors: Messrs Cauler, Duer, Gilbert, Lutz, Maciejewicz, Shill, Snyder, Wohl. 

Basses: Messrs Baumel, DeLancie, Garstick, Gibson, Gomberg, Rettew, Ruoss, Vanderburg. 

Chansons de Charles d'Orleans (for mixed voices) 

Claude Achilles DEBUSsvf 

L Dieu! q'il la fait bon regarder 

in. Yver, vous n'estes qu'un villain 

"■Jeanne Lawrence ijrElsie MacFarlane 

* Howard Vanderburg ""Robert Grooters $Fritz Krueger 

IV 

Overture to "Oberon" Carl Maria von Weber 

(Played from orchestral score) 

Quartet Maurice Ravel 

Last movement: Vif et agite 
(Played from string quartet score) 

***Walter Hendl 

tFirst performance in Philadelphia. 
^iGraduate student. 

The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

CASIMIR HALL 
Fifteenth Season— 1938-39 

GRADUATION RECITAL 

of 

SOL KAPLAN, Pianist 
Student of Madame Vengerova 

Monday Evening, February 13, 1939, at 8:30 o'clock 

PROGRAMME 
I 

Chromatic Fantasy and Fugue Johann Sebastian Bach 

Sonata in E major, Opus 109 Ludwig van Beethoven 

Vivace, ma non troppo — Adagio espressivo 

Prestissimo 

Thema con variazioni — Andante molto cantabile ed espressivo 



II 

Capriccio in F sharp minor, Opus 7G, ^-.u. ^ ■ 

^ Johannes Brahms 



;, No. n 

5, No. 5/ 



Capriccio in C sharp minor. Opus Id, 

Toccata Robert Schumann 

Nocturne in E major 

Etude, Opus 10, No. 6 \^ Frederic Chopin 

(Arranged for left hand alone by Leopold Godowsky) 

Polonaise in A flat major 

m 

Alborada del gracioso Maurice Ravel 

Suite: Presto — Andante — Vif Francis Poulenc 

Triana Isaac Albeniz 

Canqo i dansa Frederic Mompou 

Etude transcendante in F minor Franz Liszt 

The SiEiNWAY h the o0icial piano of The Curtis Institute of Music. 



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THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

CASIMIR HALL 
Fifteenth Season— 1938-39 

RECITAL OF CHAMBER MUSIC 

by 

STUDENTS OF DR. BAILLY 

Thursday Evening, February 16, 1939, at 8:30 o'clock 
PROGRAMME 



Quartet in E flat major for piano, violin, viola 

and violoncello (K.493) Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart 

Allegro 

Larghetto 

Allegretto 
Phyllis Moss, Piano Bernard Milofsky, Viola 

Noah Bielski, Violin William Saputelli, Violoncello 

II 

Trio in E flat major. Opus 100, for piano, violin and violoncello 

Franz Schubert 

Allegro 

Andante con moto 
Scherzo — Trio 
Finale 

John Simms, Piano 
George Zazofsky, Violin True Chappell, Violoncello 

m 

Sextet in B flat major, Opus 18, for two violins, two violas 

and two violoncellos Johannes Brahms 

Allegro, ma non troppo 
Andante, ma moderate 
Scherzo — Allegro molto 
Rondo — Poco allegretto e grazioso 

Marguerite Kuehne / ^7- ;• George Brown ) ,,. , 

T) J tr 1 f Violins cut' f Violas 

Broadus Erie \ Stephen Katsaros^ 

Joseph Druian I tr- t ii 
Vaiiam Saputelli [ V/o/a«c.//a. 

The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

CASIMIR HALL 
Fifteenth Season— 1938-39 

RECITAL OF MUSIC FOR THE HARP 

by 
STUDENTS OF MR. SALZEDO 

Thursday Evenine, March 2, 1939, at 8:30 o'clock 
PROGRAMME 



Three Short Stories in Music (1934) 

On Stilts 

Madonna and Child \ CaRLOS SaLZEDO 

Memories of a Clock 

Ballade (1910) 

REBA ROBINSON 



II 

Five Poetical Studies (1918) Carlos Salzedo 

Flight 
Mirage 
Idyllic Poem 
Inquietude 
Communion 

JUNE NANSON 



III 

Three Short Stories in Music (1934) '\ 

At Church I 

Pirouetting Music Box V CaRLOS SaLZEDO 

The Mermaid's Chimes ( 

Variations on a theme in ancient style (1911) / 

Theme — Double — Tempo di Bourree — Staccati — ^Butterflies 
Chords and Flux — Jumps — Trills — Scales and Arpeggios 
Barcarolle — Prelude — Fugue — Cadenza — Conclusion 

LYNNE WAINWRIGHT 

Lyon ^ Healy Harps 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

CASIMIR HALL 
Fifteenth Season— 1938-39 

RECITAL OF MUSIC FOR THE PIANO 

by 

STUDENTS OF MR. KAUFMAN 

Wednesday Evening, April 19, 1939, at 8:30 o'clock 

PROGRAMME 
I 

Sonata in C major, Opus 5 3 (Waldstein) . . . Ludwig van Beethoven 

Allegro con brio 

Molto adagio 

Rondo: Allegretto moderate 

LOUIS SHUB 

II 

Chorale: "Jesu, joy of man's desiring" Bach-Hess 

Toccata and Fugue in D minor Bach-Tausig 

EUGENE BOSSART 

III 

Ballade in G minor, Opus 23 Frederic Chopin 

LOUIS SHUB 



IV 

Perpetuum Mobile from the Sonata in C major 

Carl Maria von Weber 
Scherzo in B minor. Opus 20 Frederic Chopin 

EUGENE BOSSART 
The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

CASIMIR HALL 
Fifteenth Season— 1938-39 

RECITAL OF MUSIC FOR THE VIOUN 

by 
STUDENTS OF MADAME LUBOSHUTZ 

Eugene Helmer* at the Piano 
Thursday Evening, April 20, 1939, at 8:30 o'clock 

PROGRAMME 
I 

Prelude in E major Bach-Kreisler 

Concerto in D minor for two violins Johann Sebastian Bach 

Vivace 

Largo, ma non tanto 
Allegro 
NATHAN GOLDSTEIN and CHARLES LIBOVE 

II 

Passacaglia in G major Giuseppe Sammartini 

ZELIK KAUFMAN 

III 
Concerto in C major Vivaldi-Kreisler 

Allegro energico, ma non troppo 
Andante doloroso 
Allegro molto 

ISABELLE KRALIK 

IV 

First movement of Concerto in D minor Henri Wizniawski 

NATHAN GOLDSTEIN 

V 

Chaconne Vitali- Auer 

First movement of Concerto in A major . . Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart 

CHARLES LIBOVE 

VI 

First movement of Concerto in D major Peter Ilich Tschaikovsky 

HERBERT BAUMEL 

VII 

Fugue (For 9 stands of 1st violin section) Arcady Dubensky 

HERBERT BAUMEL, ISABELLE KRALIK, ZELIK KAUFMAN, MORRIS SHULIK, 

RUTH GRISZMER, HELEN WITTE, CHARLOTTE COHEN, 

NATHAN GOLDSTEIN and CHARLES LIBOVE 

*Graduate pupil of Mr. Kaufman in Accompanying 
The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 

■tS ^ ., „ ., , .,„ , ,,. , , ..}% . 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

CASIMIR HALL 
Fifteenth Season— 1938-39 

RECITAL OF MUSIC FOR THE PIANO 

by 
STUDENTS OF MADAME VENGEROVA 

Tuesday Evenins, May 2, 1939, at 8:30 o'clock 

PROGRAMME 
I 

Romance in F sharp major, Opus 28, No. 2 Robert Schumann 

Impromptu in A flat major. Opus 29 Frederic Chopin 

Perpctuum mobile, Opus 24a Carl Maria von Weber 

BIANCA. POLACK 



II 

Nocturne in B major, Opus 9 
Scherzo in B flat minor, Opus 



> Frederic Chopin 

31 / 



EILEEN FLISSLER 

III 

Papillons, Opus 2 Robert Schumann 

Etude in G flat major, Opus 24, No. 1 MoRiz Moszkowski 

BARBARA ELLIOTT 

IV 

Prelude, Choral and Fugue Cesar Franck 

LUCAS FOSS 

V 

Sonata in F minor, Opus 57 (Appassionata) Ludwig van Beethoven 

Allegro assai 
Andante con moto 
Allegro ma non troppo 
PHYLLIS MOSS 

VI 

Concerto in E flat major Franz Liszt 

Allegro maestoso. Tempo giusto 
Quasi adagio 
Allegretto vivace 
Allegro marziale animato 
ANNETTE ELKANOVA 
Orchestra accompaniment played on a second piano by Ralph Berkowitz* 

*Graduate 

The Steinway h the official piatw of The Curtis Institute of Music 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

CASIMIR HALL 
Fifteenth Season— 1938-39 

RECITAL of MUSIC for the DOUBLE BASS 

by 
STUDENTS OF MR. TORELLO 

Leo Luskin at the Piano* 
Wednesday Evening, May 3; 1939, at 8:30 o'clock 

PROGRAMME 
I 

Largo, Sarabande and Gavotte for Violin and Double Bass, 

Arcangelo Corelli 

Arranged by Anton Torello 

MARGUERITE KUEHNE, Violin** 
JANE TYRE 

II 

Allegro scherzando Robert Fuchs 

HARRY SAtSTROM 

III 

Sonata in G minor Giorgio Antoniotti 

Adagio molto sostenuto 

Allegro 

Adagio 

Vivace 

Harmonized by E. Meriz 
First performance 

ROGER SCOTT 

IV 

First movement of Concerto, Opus 3 Serge Koussevitsky 

FERDINAND MARESH 

V 
Suite for 4 Double Basses Bernhard Alt 

Grave 
Menuett 
Adagio 
Humoreske 
FERDINAND MARESH, ROGER SCOTT, HARRY SAFSTROM 
and RUSSELL BRODINE 
*Student of Mr. Kaufman in Accompanying 
**Student of Mr. Zimbalist 

The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

CASIMIR HALL 
Fifteenth Season— 1938-39 

RECITAL OF MUSIC FOR THE VIOUN 

by 

STUDENTS OF MR. HILSBERG . 

Friday Evening, May 5, 1939, at 8:30 o'clock 

PROGRAMME 
I 

Ciaconna in G minor Tomasso Vitali 

GEOPvGE ZAZOFSKY 
Louis Shub at the piano* 

II 

Concerto No. 2 in D minor, Opus 22 Henri Wieniawski 

Allegro moderato 
Romanza 

Allegro moderato (alia zingara) 

JACOB KRACHMALNICK 

Ralph Berkowitz at the piano** 

III 

Poeme, Opus 25 Ernest Chausson 

MILTON WOHL 
Louis Shub at the piano 

IV 

Concerto in D major, Opus 3 5 Peter Ilich Tschaikovsky 

Allegro moderato 
Canzonetta 
Allegro vivacissimo 

PAUL C. SHURE 
Ralph Berkowitz at the piano 

*Pupil of Mr. Kaufman in Accompanying 
** Graduate pupil of Mr. Kaufman in Accompanying 

The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



HISTORICAL 

SERIES 

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PRESENTED BY A COMMIHEE OF 
CURTIS INSTITUTE GRADUATES 

RALPH BERKOWITZ JOSEPH S. LEVINE VLADIMIR SOKOLOFF 



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TUESDAY EVENING, OCTOBER 18, 1938 

AT 8:30 O'CLOCK 

CASIMIR HALL 

The STE/NWAy is the Official Piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



'caa^LdPH 



JOHN DOWLAND Prom Silent Night 

1563-1626 Praise Blindness, Eyes 

A Shepherd in a Shade 
Woeful Heart 
I Must Complain 
Go Nightly Cares 

ROBERT GROOTERS, Baritone EUGENE BOSSART, Viano 

Assisted by 

FREDERICK VOGELGESANG, V/o//« NATHAN STUTCH, Violoncello 



GIROLAMO FRESCOBALDI Capriccio Pastorale 

1583-1644 Toccata per TElevazione 

Canzona 
CLARIBEL GEGENHEIMER, Organ 



ORLANDO GIBBONS Two Fantazias for String Quartet 

1583-1625 

RAFAEL DRUIAN, Violin ALBERT FALKOVE, Viola 

PAUL SHURE, Violin NATHAN STUTCH, Violoncello 



CLAUDIO MONTEVERDE Ecco di Dolci Raggi 

1567-1643 Quel Sguardo Sdegnosetto 

Maledetto Sia I'Aspetto 

BARBARA THORNE, Soprano JAMES SHOMATE, Piano 



ARCANGELO CORELLI Concerto Grosso in C minor 

1653-1713 Opus 6 No. 3 

Largo — Allegro — Grave — Vivace — Allegro 

EZRA RACHLIN, Conducting 

FREDERICK VOGELGESANG and KURT POLNARIOFF, Solo Violins 

NATHAN STUTCH, Solo Violoncello 

First Violins Violas 

Rafael Druian Marguerite Kuehne Albert Falkove Milton Lipshutz 

Milton Wohl Noah Biclski Jerome Lipson Stephen Katsaros 

Second Violins Violoncellos 

Jacob Krachmalnick Paul Shure True Chappell Esther Gruhn 

Isabelle Kralik Baruch Altman Hershy Kay 

Bass 
Russell Brodine 



By CURTIN WiNSOR I 

IF WE had been students at a music school at the end of the 17th Century — let us say 
in the year 1699 — and this program had then been presented before us, the odds are 
even that most of the compositions listed would have been just as unfamiliar to many 
of us as they are today. Who were we in 1699? 

Most of us probably lived in Naples and were subjects (but not very loyal subjects) 
of the imbecile King Charles II of Spain. In Naples the first real music schools had been 
established in 153 5 as institutions where poor orphans were "fed, clothed, and instructed 
in Musick." They were called "Conservatori" (from the Latin, conservare, to preserve), 
the origin of which term is doubtful, some learned authors claiming that it meant places 
where music was to be "preserved from corruption," others asserting that it was the 
orphans themselves who were to be preserved (but whether from corruption is not 
stated). At any rate, in the year 1699 there were four privately endowed Conservatori 
flourishing in Naples. We were all attending this concert dressed in costume, for each 
Conservatorio had its particular costume embodying the colors of the Institution. The 
courses we took at our Conservatorio, so far as we can judge, were pretty much like 
those we take today, although far less emphasis was placed on technique. 

I. Some of us were probably familiar in 1699 with at least the name JOHN 
DOWLAND (1563-1626), who had a considerable reputation, even as far away as 
Naples, as a composer of peerless songs, a writer of madrigals, a good singer, and a 
magnificent performer on the lute. Indeed this cultured Irishman had come at an early 
age to study in Italy and had later travelled to most of the courts in Europe, finally 
settling in England. English madrigals and lyrics (the latter ancestors of the i^rt Song 
of Schubert) were often superior, because they were musical settings of the gems of 
English literature which at that time (with Shakespeare not long in his grave) shone 
with a fire bright enough to dazzle even the continent. 

In 1699 memories of Dowland's performances in Italy may still have lingered. Since 
courses in ear training were not emphasized in those days, the ears of his listeners were 
perhaps not offended by the fact that his lute with its six pairs of strings was almost 
impossible to tune or to keep tuned accurately. As the leader of that school of English 
lutanists which had no counterpart on the continent, his music would be heard with 
respect and with considerable astonishment at his daring harmonies and use of chromatics. 

II. The last of the English madrigalists (among whom were Byrd, Morley, Weelkes 
and Wilbye) was ORLANDO GIBBONS (1583-1625), of whom few of us in 1699 
had probably ever heard, for much of his music was written for services of the Church 
of England and the Holy Inquisition might well have interested itself in anyone who 
would dare perform such heretical music in Italy. Moreover, Gibbons died at an early 
age. However, the directors of our Conservatorio probably had no qualms in listing his 
Fantazias for performance because these were purely secular compositions. Those of us 
who were particularly interested in instrumental music would welcome the oppor- 
tunity of hearing some fine contrapuntal writing, though we could scarcely have fore- 
seen that these Fantazias with their exploitation of the device of imitation, were the not 
too distant harbingers of the Bach fugue. 

III. The most familiar name on the program would undoubtedly be CIAUDIO 
MONTEVERDE (1567-1643). As music director at the Court of Mantua and later at 
St. Mark's, Venice, Monteverde spent most of his time in northern Italy. If there had 
been any opera class at our Conservatorio his achievements in the operatic field would 
have occupied a large part of the class' time. For Monteverde had perfected the work 
of the "Camerati," those enterprising Italian composers who had sought to develop a 
Monophonic (as opposed to Polyphonic) style of music to accompany dramatic perform- 
ances in what they conceived the style of the ancient Greeks to have been. "Making the 
text the master of the harmony," he laid the foundations for recitative (declamation) 
and the aria or formal melody, and he invented the orchestral prelude. 



By 1699 even the most conservative professor of harmony would have tolerated 
the unprepared discords used by Monteverde, so at our Conservatorio we would have 
"gotten away" with dominant sevenths resolved upwards to the tonic. Those of us 
who were instrumentalists would still be discussing Monteverde's revolutionary reform 
of the orchestra, which he greatly enlarged, at the same time eliminating instruments 
not suited for ensemble. Moreover, he actually scored his works — a startling innovation. 
And the string players would be practising those modern effects such as tremolo, and 
pizzicato which he introduced so successfully. 

While Monteverde's operas and madrigals offer the best opportunity for appreciating 
his unique talents, his songs are also representative and sound as fresh today as they must 
have in 1699. 

IV. The name GIROLAMO FRESCOBALDI (1583-1644) was probably known 
in 1699, as it is in 193 8, only to organ students. As a special privilege, the organ 
students at the Conservatorio some generations ahead of us might have been permitted 
to don their colorful robes and make the two-day journey to Rome to hear Frescobaldi 
play the organ at St. Peter's, where he spent much of his life. But they would have 
been oUiged to arrive at his recitals early, for as many as 30,000 people are said to 
have attended individual concerts of this great virtuoso. They would have been struck 
by Frescobaldi's use of the strict fugue in those of his compositions which he called 
Fantasias or Ricercare by which he paved the way for Bach. 

V. If in 1699 an evening's concert at a Neapolitan Conservatorio had closed with 
a composition by ARCANGELO CORELLI, any embryo music critic'^ present would 
have praised or censured the authorities of the Conservatorio (depending on his tempera- 
ment) for their daring in including on the program a work''"' fresh from the pen of 
a man who was acknowledged to be the first great violinist, but whose theories of com- 
position were ultramodern. Corelli was then 46 years old and living in Rome. He had 
travelled widely in Europe, giving performances at the various courts. He seems to have 
been less accomplished as a conductor, for it is related that when Handel came to Italy 
he was so dissatisfied with Corelli's conducting of one of Handel's concertos that he 
snatched the baton from the hand of the remonstrating Italian. 

Needless to say, the theories of this radical composer were not taught at the Con- 
servatorio. For Corelli actually wrote sonatas intended solely for performances by the 
youngest member of the family of strings, the violin, which had just been perfected by 
men like Stradivarius, and was now threatening to dominate its older relatives. This 
music was truly violinistic in style, a concept previously unheard of. Before Corelli 
showed the way, music was just written, with no heed as to what instruments were 
to perform it, or (in some cases) as to whether it was to be sung or played. Consequently, 
Corelli's second great principle, that instrumental polyphony demanded a different treat- 
ment from choral polyphony, was also revolutionary. 

These were not the first concertos but they became the models which later com- 
posers (Vivaldi, Handel, Bach) followed. In them the instrumental body was divided 
into two parts: the solos were given to two violins and a cello; the secondary parts or 
"concerto grosso" (from which the form took its name) were carried by a number of 
accompanying instruments. 

The concerto played at this concert is a Concerto di Chiesa (church concerto) as 
opposed to a Concerto da Camera (chamber concerto, really a dance suite). The church 
concertos were designed for performance in churches with alternating polyphonic and 
sometimes fugal passages for organ and strings, the solo strings later replacing the organ. 
The solos state the solo subjects, the ensemble the tutti subjects. 

We could not have realized in 1699 that this notion of contrasting themes was the 
germ of the sonata form to be developed in the 18th Century by the Mannheim school, 
which led to the symphonies of Haydn and Mozart. 



* Music critics were probably non-existent in 1699, as many performers would wish them to be today. Con- 
certs, however, were given at the conservatories when royalty or distinguished visitors were on hand. 

**The concerto on this program was one of 6 published in 1712, one .year before his death. It is not 
known when it was written, but we assume for purposes of these notes that it had been written by 1699. 

Next concert in the series will be on November first. 



2il 5i5 



HISTORICAL 
SERIES 

<=z^'ccm tlte 17 tit ta tke 20 tit ^cnti 



M-t 



PRESENTED BY A COMMIHEE OF 
CURTIS INSTITUTE GRADUATES 

RALPH BERKOWITZ JOSEPH S. LEVINE VLADIMIR SOKOLOFF 



<^ecokiJL K^oncctl 



TUESDAY EVENING, NOVEMBER 1, 1938 

AT 8:30 O'CLOCK 

CASIMIR HALL 

The STEINV/AY is fhe Official Piano of The Curtis Insfifute of Music 



'iB 



p- 



toata^i 



1 



DIETRICH BUXTEHUDE Prelude, Fugue and Chaconne in C Major 

1637-1707 Two Chorale Preludes: 

"Von Gott will ich nicht lassen" 
"Vater unser im Himmelreich" 
Fugue in C Major 

WALTER BAKER, Organ 



FRANgOIS COUPERIN, 
1668-1733 



1. Lulli and the spirits of music hold concert 
in the Champs-Elysees. 

2. Flight of Mercurj' to the Champs-Elysees to 
announce the descent of Apollo. 

3. Descent of Apollo, who comes to offer liis 
violin to Lulli and likewise his place on 
Purnassus. 

4. Subterranean rumbling caused bj- Lulli's con- 
temporaries. 

5. Removal of Lulli to Parnassus. 

6. Long-faced and studiously polite reception 
accorded Lulli by Corelli and the Italian 
muses. 

EUDICE SHAPIRO, Violin 
TRUE CHAPPELL, Violoncello 



. .L'Apotheose de Lulli 
For 2 violins, violoncello and piano 

7. Apollo persuades Lulli and Corelli that the 
reunion of French and Italian taste would 
bring about the perfection of music. 

8. Lulli plays a subject and Corelli accom- 
panies. 

9. Corelli in his turn plays a subject and Lulli 
the accompaniment. 

10. The peace of Parnassus made on the condi- 
tions, owing to the remonstrance of the 
French muses, that in speaking their lan- 
guage the words Sonade, Cantade, shall from 
that moment on be pronounced the same as 
Ballade, Serenade, etc. 

11. General rejoicing. 

MARION HEAD, Violin 
JAMES SHOMATE, Piano 



FRANQOIS COUPERIN Vingt-deuxieme Ordre 



1. Le Trophee. 

2. Premier Air pour la Suite du Trophee. 

3. 2me Air. 

4. Le Point du Jour. Allemande. 

MARTHA MASSfiNA, Piano 



5. L'Anguille. 

6. Le Croc-en-jambe. 

7. Menuets Croises. 

8. Les Tours de Passe-passe. 



HENRY PURCELL Three Rounds 

My Lady's Coachman John 
Prithee Ben't So Sad 
Once in Our Lives 

FRITZ KRUEGER, DONALD HULTGREN, DONALD COKER, Tenors 
EUGENE BOSSART, Piano 

HENRY PURCELL A Serenading Song 

FRITZ KRUEGER, Tenor LEONARD TREASH, Bass 

ELEANOR MITCHEL, Flute JOHN KRELL, Flute 

EUGENE BOSSART, Piano 



HENRY PURCELL Sonata No. 6 in 3 parts 

For 2 violins, violoncello and piano 



EUDICE SHAPIRO, Violin 
TRUE CHAPPELL, Violoncello 



MARION HEAD, J'iolin 
JAMES SHOMATE, Piano 



By Edward O'Gorman 



A CONVENIENT way to pigeon-hole the seventeenth century in music is to remember that it 
began with the year generally given to the birth of opera (Peri's "Euridice" was 
. produced in 1600 and Montiverdi's "Orfeo" in 1607) and ended with the appearance 
on the musical scene of Johann Sebastian Bach. 

If Bach had only waited fifteen more years to be born, in other words until the next 
century, we could safely say that the most jmportant event that took place in the musical world 
between 1600 and 1700 was the birth, in 1658, of the English composer, Henry Purcell. During 
this century English music, despite the fact that it suffered a relapse when, for twenty years, 
its public use was banned, reached a lofty height which it has hardly since attained. That 
delightfully readable historian, Charles Burney, who wrote his General History of Music close 
on the heels of seventeenth century music and a scant hundred years after Purcell's death, 
though he suffered at times from a pardonable lack of perspective, hit the nail on the head 
when he compared Purcell to Shakespeare in productions for the stage, Milton in epic poetry, 
Locke in metaphysics, and Sir Isaac Newton in philosophy and mathematics. 

However, a sizeable portion of the seventeenth century had been consumed before Purcell 
began composing, and in it were contained a number of important musical figures, together 
with their works and the influence they exerted on the times that succeeded them. 

Pre-eminent among them was Orlando Gibbons, organist at the Chapel Royal, who wrote 
exclusively for the church. Gibbons, who unfortunately died young, displayed, for his 
antiquity, an amazing fluency and freedom in composition, and his "services" for the church 
rank among the finest ever composed. 

During this period the English court showed a reluctance to indulge in the practice or 
enjoyment of music, and the only extra-church use to which it was put was in the masques 
which were performed for the amusement of the royal family. These masques, which con- 
tained occasional songs and dances, were elaborate entertainments in dialogue, acted on a stage 
witli benefit of colorful scenery, dancing and both vocal and instrumental music. They were 
the forerunners of opera in England. They were revived with royalty in the Restoration, but 
were more on the order of mere masked balls. The early masques lacked recitative, but, in 
1607, "Lovers Made Men," by Ben Jonson, was set to music in the Italian manner, stilo 
recitativo, by Nicolo Laniere, an Italian composer living in England, who, by the way, also 
executed the scenery for this particular masque. So, in this piece, thanks to the stilo recitativo, 
airs were distinguished from recitation and all was operatically happy. 

At the beginning of the seventeenth centurj', madrigals, which had enjoyed a considerable 
vogue in the chamber and had been the mainstay of the repertoire, took a turn for the worse 
when a sudden preference for so-called "Fantasias" was exhibited. These were composed in 
from three to eight parts for viols and other instruments without vocal assistance. 

The suppression of music occurred in 1643 and the Restoration in 1660. During the reign 
of Charles II the music most in favor was in the French style which had been made famous 
by the French-Italian composer, Baptiste Lulli, who was master of music in the French court. 
English composers vied with each other and Lulli in writing pieces in the French manner. 



Henry Purcell, like any number of other famous composers, began his musical career as 
a chorister. His particular position was in the Chapel Royal, where he sang until his voice 
changed and was then given a job as copyist. At the tender age of twenty-one he was given 
the enviable position of organist at Westminster Abbey, succeeding the famous oi^anist, John 
Blow. Shortly after acquiring this position he began the series of pieces for plays for which 
he became famous. At the same time he wrote some odes and "occasionar' songs. He was 
then made organist at the Chapel Royal and his first published works appeared. They were 
twelve sonatas for string trio. In 1691, when he was thirty-three, he was associated with 
Dryden in the production of "King Arthur." The name "opera" which was given to this sort 
of work was slightly incongruous, as the pieces of music are incidental to the scheme of the 
play and the vocal numbers which were sung by "extras" were not connected in any way with 
the drama. Aside from his purely musical compositions, he revised an adition of Playford's 
"Introduction to the Skill of Music" and rewrote a good bit of the end of it. Purcell is best 
known outside Great Britain for his music to the play "Dido and Aeneas." His works are 
made up of : incidental pieces to plays ; fantasias, in from three to eight parts, for strings ; 
sonatas in three and four parts; pieces for harpsichord and organ; and innumerable composi- 
tions for the church. 



Delving into the music produced in other countries during this century unearthi little new 
except personalities, and those we are interested in at the present concert are FrangoJs Couperin 
and Dietrich Buxtehude. 



Buxtehude, though he was born (1637) in Helsingborg, Sweden, of a Danish father, is 
generally considered a German composer, since, from the age of thirty-one until his death, he 
was the organist at the famous Marienkirche in Luebeck. This was a famous position, and 
Buxtehude's ability and extraordinary flare for improvising created widespread attention. In 
fact, Bach walked as far as from New York to Washington to hear him play. Buxtehude 
inaugurated concerts of orchestra, chorus and vocal music vvhich were performed at the 
Marienkirche during Advent and which, in a manner of speaking, put Luebeck on the map. 
Buxtehude is famous for his "free" organ compositions; that is, free from the restraint of a 
choral-tune as the central subject. His works include sonatas for striiigs, church cantatas, 
organ pieces and arrangements of chorales. 

***** 

Frangois Couperin is named "Le Grand" to distinguish him from his eight or nine relatives 
who were musically famous. Born in 1668, of an organist father with whorn he studied, he 
became, at the age of seventeen, the organist in the church of St. Gervais, Paris. He received 
an appointment as harpsichord player and instructor to the royal family and had a great 
reputation as a performer on the clavecin. His fame as a composer spread throughout Europe, 
and his music had an unmistakable influence on that of Johann Sebastian Bach. The suites 
and partitas of Bach, as well as his solo works for violin and cello, are frequently imitations 
of the French style then in vogue. Couperin's pieces in turn were influenced by the Italian 
style which was popular during this period, and he was a great admirer of the Italian composer, 
Corelli. 

Whereas Couperin's forerunners wrote for the organ as well as the harpsichord, he 
confined himself solely to compositions for the latter instrument. His music is curious, since 
he went to great pains to write out in musical long-hand all the grace-notes and embellishments 
which were necessary to augment the short-lived tone of the harpsichord. Beside his music 
for this instrument, he wrote numerous compositions for various combinations of string in- 
struments, four instrumental suites with bass, and several trios, among them sonatas and suites 
dedicated to LuUi and Corelli. Couperin first introduced in France trios for two violins and 
bass. His works also contained a few compositions for the church. 



The Words of the Three Purcell Rounds 



My lady's coachman, John, 
Whose sight is almost gone. 
He cannot drive his horses; 
His useful life is done. 
This poor old coachvian, John. 

My lady said: " 'Tis irue 

A pension is his due; 

I'll give him half his ivagcs, 

Since his rcntaining years of life 

Are surely very feiv!" 

'Tis tivenly years ago. 

And noiv he'd have you knoiv 

He's got a gouty toe: 

He die? 

Oh, dear, no! 



II 



III 



Prithee hen't so sad and serious. 
Nothing's got by grief or cares; 

Melancholy's too imperious, _ 
When it comes, still domineers. 

But if bus'ness, love or sorrow 

Tha't possesses thus thy mind. 
Bid 'em come again tomorrow; 

We are now to mirth inclin'd. 

Let the glass run its round 

And each good fellow keep his ground; 
And if there be any flincher found. 

We'll Jwvc, zvc'll have his soul neiv-coin'd. 



Once in our lives 

Let us drink to our wtives. 

Though their number be btiit small; 

Heaven take the best. 
And the Devil take the_ rest, 
And so we shall get rid of them all. 

To this hearty wish _ 
Let each man take his dish 
And drink, drink till he fall. 



Next concert in the series ivill he on November 23 



^l 5iS 



.•'^ 



HISTORICAL 
SERIES 

^ly'ccym tlte lit It t^ tke 20tk ^eniuxu 



PRESENTED BY A COMMIHEE OF 
CURTIS INSTITUTE GRADUATES 

RALPH BERKOWITZ JOSEPH S. LEVINE VLADIMIR SOKOLOFF 



J^liLtJi L^ancetl 



WEDNESDAY EVENING, NOVEMBER 23, 1938 

AT 8:30 O'CLOCK 

I 

CASIMIR HALL | 

The STE/NWAY is the Official Piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



P' 



'coatam 



ANTONIO VIVALDI Concerto in F major 

1675-1743 for Three Violins and Piano 

Allegro — Andante — Allegro 

HERBERT BAUMEL, MORRIS SHULIK, ISABELLE KRALIK, Violins 
LOUIS SHUB, Viano 



DOMENICO SCARLATTI Four Sonatas 

1685-1757 

F minor D minor 

A minor B flat major 

ANNETTE ELKANOVA, Piano 



JOHANN SEBASTIAN BACH Choral Prelude: 

1685-1750 Christ lag in Todesband 

Prelude and Fugue in B minor 
HENRY BEARD, Organ 

JOHANN SEBASTIAN BACH English Suite No. 2 in A minor 

Prelude Sarabande 

Allemande Bourres I and II 

Courante Gigue 

BARBARA ELLIOT, Viano 

JOHANN SEBASTIAN BACH ='The Peasant Cantata 

JOSEPH S. LEVINE, Conducting 
FLORENCE KIRK, Soprano LESTER ENGLANDER, Baritone 

Burnett Atkinson, Flute; Elwood Cauler, French Horn; Noah Bielski, Herbert Baumel, Violins; 
Albert Falkove, Viola; Nathan Stutch, 'Cello; Russell Brodine, Bass. 

* English Translation by Henry S. Drinker, Jr. 



d^to-atam J Mate^ 



By John Briggs 

THE eighteenth century witnessed a sharp cleavage between polyphony and homo- 
phony. In 1700 Bach and Handel were both fifteen and not yet seriously launched 
as composers. In 1800, Beethoven's first symphony appeared, while in between 
occurred the "Pigtail Period," a transitional phase culminating in the sonata. The Bach- 
Handel fugue, though representing the highest development of polyphonic writing, was 
also its last stand against Beethoven and his successors. Even in his own lifetime Bach's 
sons considered his music hopelessly old-fashioned and tried to open his eyes to the 
grandeur of Modern Music. 

Essentially the fugue is a single unified musical thought, its parts multiplied in 
infinity. The sonata, on the other hand, contains two conflicting thoughts. "When 
reconciled," observes the erudite Leo Smith, "the result is comedy; when they end in 
disaster, tragedy. Borrowing a simile from literature, we may say that the fugue is to 
the sonata what the psalm is to the drama." 

Opera during the eighteenth century made rapid strides toward the heights which 
it was to attain in the following century. Noteworthy are the achievements of Handel, 
who, in addition to making of the oratorio a medium characteristically his own, also 
made his impress on operatic development. Three schools were contributing their 
thought to music drama — the Italian Opera Buffa, the French Opera Comique, and the 
school of Gluck and Mozart. Works of three men active at this time — Pergolesi, Gluck, 
and Mozart — are still being heard today. 

The close link of eighteenth century composers with our own time is shown by the 
fact that when the Declaration of Independence was signed. Bach had been dead twenty- 
six years, Handel only seventeen. As an index of England's cultural impact on the 
colonies, it is interesting to note Handel's ascendancy over Bach; for if contemporary 
recital programs are a criterion. Bach was a comparative stranger to Philadelphia audi- 
ences, while Handel figured prominently on most concerts of that day. 



Vivaldi (1675-1743) celebrated violinist and composer, was by birth a Venetian. 
Having been at one time a priest, he was called "il prete rosso" for his red beard. Vivaldi 
exercised a strong influence on Bach's development. His compositions gave Bach the 
idea of writing concerti for piano and orchestra — at least for this form. The "concerto- 
form" with many hitti-ritornelle seems to have been developed by Vivaldi. 



Domenico Scarlatti (16S5-1757) son of the famous Alessandro, wrote 545 sonatas. 
He concerned himself, however, neither with archetonic arrangement, contrasting fast 
and slow movements, nor the problem of form. Most of his sonatas have only one move- 



ment, generally an allegro. The form, too, is almost invariably two-paragraph or binary, 
with the double bar nearly at the middle of the composition. The same order of keys 
occurs at beginning and ending. Scarlatti, however, advanced the art of subject-writing 
considerably, developing a true keyboard style, and emancipating instrumental music. 
He is one of the first composers whose works show neither dance nor fugal influence. 



Bach (1685-1750) belongs by rights to the preceding period of polyphonic music. 
His lifetime fell in a period of change, a time in which the old imitative style had not 
yet lived itself out, and the new was still in the first stages of its development and bore 
the stamp of unreadiness. Bach, however, combined the best of the materials at hand 
into an ideal form which is still a mark for composers to shoot at. In his hands counter- 
point becomes eloquent. Although not without his ups and downs (as what composer 
from Beethoven down to Barber isn't) his name still emerges as the most significant in 
creative music of his time. 

Of the two "homage" cantatas which Bach wrote, the one on this program cele- 
brates the advent of Carl Heinrich von Dieskau, Chamberlain of the Saxon Exchequer 
as Lord of the Manor of Klein Zschocher and Knauthain, near Leipzig, to which he suc- 
ceeded on his mother's death. 

Charles Sanford Terry has this to say of the work: 

"It is generally known as the 'Peasant Cantata,' for its characters are a couple of 
peasant lovers, and its language, in parts, the dialect of Upper Saxony. Bach evidently 
delighted in a text thoroughly natural and abnormally negligent of the stilted demigods 
of mythology. It is lightly scored, in the style of a village orchestra, has only two 
singers, a soprano and bass, and is unique in the possession of an overture (a Quodlibet), 
and in Bach's quotation of folk-melodies. There is no action, but, in short movements, 
many of them popular dance measures, the young sweethearts praise the new Lord of the 
Manor and his wife, deplore the exactions of the taxman and recruiting-sergeant, are 
grateful to the new squire for lightening them, and, with a final duet, retire to a drink- 
ing booth to dance and be merry. In no other work is Bach's wig so evidently removed 
from his brow, in none his zest for the melodies of the countryside so generously dis- 
played." 



Next concert in the series will be on Decetnber seventh. 



3ii : $is 



/*> 



HISTORICAL 
SERIES 

^i^cm tlte ntk ta t/te 20tlt L^entH 



PRESENTED BY A COMMIHEE OF 
CURTIS INSTITUTE GRADUATES 

RALPH BERKOWITZ JOSEPH S. LEVINE VLADIMIR SOKOLOFF 



<=:yai^Lttlt L^ancett 



WEDNESDAY EVENING, DECEMBER 7, 1938 

AT 8:30 O'CLOCK 

CASIMIR HALL 

The STE/NWAY h fbe Official Piano of The Curfis Institute of Music 

pw , _ . 



/i 



taatdHt 



1 



GIUSEPPE TARTINI String Quartet In D major 

1692-1770 

Allegro Assai — Larghetto — Allegro 
KURT POLNARIOFF, Violin ALBERT FALKOVE, Viola 

GEORGE ZAZOFSKY. Violin JOSEPH DRUIAN, Cello 

BENEDETTO MARCELLO Sonata in F major 

1686-1759 for flute and piano 

Adagio — Allegro — Largo — Allegro 
BURNETT ATKINSON. ¥hitc LEO LUSKIN, Viano 

CARL PHILIPP EMANUEL BACH Sonata in E flat major 

1714-1788 

Allegro di molto — Adagio — Allegretto 
MARY NORRIS, Viano 

GEORG FRIEDRICH HANDEL Sonata in A major Opus 5 No. 1 

1685-1759 for two violins and piano 

Andante — Allegro — Larghetto — Allegro — Gavotte allegro 
RAFAEL DRUIAN and MARGUERITE KUEHNE, Violin% 
LEO LUSKIN, Viano 

GEORG FRIEDRICH HANDEL "Cuopre tal volta il cielo" 

Cantata for one voice and strings 
ROBERT GAY, Baritone SYLVAN LEVIN. Conducting 

Violins Celli 

Frederick Vogelgesang Jacob Krachmalnick True Chappell 

Rafael Druian Paul Shure William Saputelli 

Marguerite Kuehne George Zazofsky Esther Gruhn 

Noah Bielski Isabelle Kralik 

Basses 
Ferdinand Maresh Harry Safstrom 

GEORG FRIEDRICH HANDEL Concerto in F major Opus 4 No. 5 

for Chamber Orchestra and Organ 

Larghetto — Allegro — Alia siciliana — Presto 
SYLVAN LEVIN, Conducting 
CLARIBEL GEGENHEIMER, Organ 
Violins Violas 

Frederick Vogelgesang Jacob Krachmalnick Albert Falkove 

Rafael Druian Paul Shure Stephen Katsaros 

Marguerite Kuehne George Zazofsky Philip Goldberg 

Noah Bielski Isabelle Kralik Milton Lipshutz 

Colli Basses 

True Chappell Ferdinand Maresh 

William Saputelli Harry Safstrom 



Esther Gruhn 



Oboes Bassoon 

Martin Fleisher Manuel Zegler 

Perry Bauman 



By CURTIN WlNSOR 

DURING the first half of the 18th Century, to which the works listed on this pro- 
gram belong, two opposing currents swept the world of music. One, typified 
by Sebastian Bach and Handel, continued the best traditions of the age of poly- 
phony which was then drawing to a close. The other, embodied by men like Emanuel 
Bach and Tartini, represented paths previously untrod, where the emphasis was on 
exploiting the resources and color possibilities of the musical instruments employed, 
rather than on contrapuntal treatment. Out of this eternal conflict between the old and 
new, when the two currents finally joined together, came the music of Haydn and 
Mozart. 



I. GIUSSEPE TARTINI (1692-1770) of Padua was equally famous as a violinist, 
theorist, teacher and composer. In his youth he wavered between fencing and fiddling 
as occupations. He was adept at both, but music won out as a result of his two years in 
the Church of St. Francis at Assisi, where he had taken refuge from arrest after eloping 
with the niece of a Cardinal. Here the monks were accustomed to hide him behind a 
heavy curtain so that none of the worshippers and pilgrims were able to identify the 
source of the lovely strains that filled the Monastery Chapel, till by accident the curtain 
M'^as pulled aside one day when a number of Paduans who recognized him were present. 
This 18th Century publicity stunt insured the successful start of a career that became 
a triumph. In 1714 Tartini accidentally discovered what he called the "third sound," a 
phenomenon which he could not explain, but which we know as "differential" or "result- 
ant tones." He also effected improvements in the violin boM' and strings which have 
been used ever since. In 1728 he founded his famous Violin School of the Nations at 
Padua, which turned out a score of virtuosos in half that number of years. 

The following analysis of Tartini as a composer is given by Burney, the 18th Cen- 
tury English historian: 

"Tartini made Corelli his model in the purity of his harmony and in the simplicity 
of his modulations, but he greatly surpassed that composer in the fertility and originality 
of his invention, not only in the fresher subjects of his melodies, but in his truly cantabile 
manner of treating them. Many of his adagios want nothing but words to be opera 
songs. His allegros are sometimes difficult but the passages fairly belong to the instru- 
ment for which they were composed and were suggested by his consummate knowledge 
of the fingerboard and powers of the bow. These passages are always good and never 
seem unmeaning or fortuitous." 

II. BENEDETTO MARCELLO (1686-1739) was a Venetian best known for his 
choral compositions and for his famous satirical essay on the degeneration of Italian 
opera, "The Theatre a la Mode," in which he ridiculed the extravagant and arbitrary 
liberties taken by opera singers with their scores and other follies which were degrading 
the operatic stage. 



III. CARL PHILLIP EMANUEL BACH (1714-88), second son of Sebastian 
Bach, was taught to play and compose by his father. In 1740 he became piano accom- 
panist to that illustrious flutist, Frederick the Great of Prussia, a post which he held for 
26 years. He was treated handsomely by Frederick, but his job was a difficult one, for 



his royal master (who was a real virtuoso) was about as arbitrary in his observance of 
rhythm as he was in his treatment of his non-musical subjects. In 1766 Emanuel suc- 
ceeded Telemann as Cantor of the leading churches of Hamburg. 

Burney writing of him in 1788 says: "He has long been regarded as the greatest 
composer for and performer on keyed instruments in Europe. He used to be censured 
for his extraneous modulations, cruelties and difficulties, but like the hard words of 
Dr. Samuel Johnson to which the public by degrees became reconciled, ever}-^ German 
composer now takes the same liberties as Emanuel Bach and every English writer uses 
Johnson's language with impunity." 

Burney made a special visit to Hamburg to meet him and he quotes Emanuel as 
follows: "Of all my works those for the piano-forte are the chief in which I have 
indulged my own feelings and ideas. My principal wish has been to play and compose 
in the most vocal manner possible. Music ought to touch the heart, which can never 
be done by drumming or scrambling, or by rattling arpeggios." 

Today we see that Emanuel Bach was important also for the influence that he 
had upon his successors. Haydn studied his works carefully and Emanuel maintained 
that Haydn was the only man who really understood him. Emanuel's essay, "On the 
True Way to Play the Clavier," led Mozart to observe "that he had learned from this 
Bach everything he did on the piano that was right." The slow movement of the Sonata 
on the program this evening shows that even Chopin was influenced by him. Emanuel 
has been justly termed "the father of modern piano playing." 



IV. GEORG FRIEDRICH HANDEL was born in 168 5 (the same year as 
Sebastian Bach) and died in 1759. He began his brilliant and diversified career as an 
organist at Halle and he remained a virtuoso on this instrument all his life. After hear- 
ing his first opera produced at Hamburg, he spent three years in Italy absorbing much 
music and meeting all the musicians of the period, including Corelli, Alessandro Scarlatti, 
et. al. (many of whom belonged to the famous Arcadian Academy (an organization of 
nobles, priests, painters, poets and musicians which did much to stimulate the cultural 
life of the period), who referred to him invariably as "the Saxon." The productions of 
his operas at Florence and Venice were so successful that he was invited to come to 
London in 1710. Despite the opposition of Addison and Steele in their celebrated paper, 
"The Spectator," Handel scored a great success. When his master, George of Hanover, 
became George I of England in 1714, Handel resided permanently in London, where his 
opportunism and adaptability enabled him to emerge unscathed from the ups and downs 
of his well known checkered career as composer and producer of operas and oratorios. 

This program presents the lesser known Handel. The Sonata for two violins and 
piano is one of seven published in London in 1739. The authorities differ as to whether 
they are in the style of old dance suites or represent a step forward in the development 
of the Sonata Form, but agree as to their freshness and delicacy of expression. The 
Cantata to be heard this evening is one of many early works in his form written in Italy. 
According to Romain Rollans's "Handel," they show the influence of the Arcadian group. 

The Organ Concerto heard tonight is one of several published in 173 8. As Streatfeild 
points out in his book on Handel, these organ concertos differ from and are not com- 
parable to Sebastian Bach's organ works because: (1) as printed they are merely skele- 
tons to which Handel gave flesh by his brilliant improvisations; (2) the English organs 
for which they were written lacked pedal boards, so Handel was obliged to write for 
manuals only; (3) they are secular, not religious in nature, since they were designed for 
performance between the acts of his oratorios. 

Burney remarks that these concertos were so popular that English organists "sub- 
sisted on them exclusively for 3 years." 

Next concert in the series will be on January fourth. 



-— — _ — _ — — ^^ 



HISTORICAL 
SERIES 

^^tant tke lltk ta tke 20tk ^enti 



MX 



1 



PRESENTED BY A COMMIHEE OF 
CURTIS INSTITUTE GRADUATES 

RALPH BERKOWITZ JOSEPH S. LEVINE VLADIMIR SOKOLOFF 



cziyMk L^oncett 
WEDNESDAY EVENING, JANUARY A, 1939 

AT 8:30 O'CLOCK 

CASIMIR HALL 



The STEINV/AY is fhe Official Piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



/i 



toata^m 



1 



PIETRO NARDINI Sonata in D major 

1722-1793 for Violin and Piano 

Adagio — Allegro — Allegretto 



EUDICE SHAPIRO, Yiolin 



VLADIMIR SOKOLOFF, Viauo 



FRANZ JOSEF HAYDN String Quartet in F minor 

1732-1809 Op. 20 No. 5 

Allegro moderato — Menuetto — Adagio — Finale. Fuga a due Soggetti 



RAFAEL DRUIAN, Yiolin 
MARGUERITE KUEHNE, Violin 



ALBERT FALKOVE, Yiola 
JOSEPH DRUIAN, Violoncello 



WOLFGANG AMADEUS MOZART Sonata in F major K. 497 

1756-1791 for Piano, 4 Hands 

Adagio — Allegro di molto — Andante — Allegro 
RALPH BERKOWITZ and VLADIMIR SOKOLOFF, Pianisfs 



WOLFGANG AMADEUS MOZART. 



Violins 

Frederick Vogelgesang 
Rafael Druian 
Marguerite Kuehne 
Jacob Krachmalnick 
Paul Shure 
Isabelle Kralik 



Adagio in E major K. 261 

for Violin and Chamber Orchestra 



EUDICE SHAPIRO, Violin 
SOL KAPLAN, Conducting 

Violas 
George Brown 
Philip Goldberg 
Stephen Katsaros 

Celli 
William Saputelli 
Hershy Kay 



Flutes 
Burnett Atkinson 
John Krell 

French Horns 

Elwood Cauler 
James Chambers 

Bass 
Russell Brodine 



WOLFGANG AMADEUS MOZART Divertimento in D major K. 205 

Largo- Allegro — Adagio — Menuetto — Finale. Presto 
SOL KAPLAN, Conducting 



Violins 
Frederick Vogelgesang 
Rafael Druian 
Marguerite Kuehne 
Jacob Krachmalnick 
Paul Shure 
Isabelle Kralik 



Violas 
George Brown 
Philip Goldberg 
Stephen Katsaros 

Celli 
William Saputelli 
Hershy Kay 



French Horns 
Elwood Cauler 
James Chambers 

Bassoon 
Albert London 

Bass 
Russell Brodine 



d^taatam JVote^ 



By Ralph Berkowitz 

THE end of the 18th century marked the close of a magnificent experience in certain forms of 
reality. Vanishing perhaps forever was the combination of economic and cultural forces which had 
produced Voltaire and Franklin, Johnson and Rousseau, Haydn and Mozart. 
For toward the end of this great age there appeared below the surface the undertones of coming revo- 
lution; the ever more vigorous agitation which was to bring to the fore the problems and art-works of the 
19th century. 

This reaction to a world consumed by a love of exact thinking, clarity and logic was destined to set 
forth in the timeless art of Beethoven, a communication which for many is far more valid than all 
philosophy and wisdom. | 



The music on tonight's program was written between 175 5 and 1785 — thus shortly before this signifi- 
cant revolutionary period in European history. These thirty years are in a sense akin to those of the 
previous century in which there was a reaction by men like Montcverde and Purcell to the contrapuntal 
masters of the 16th century. In this case the transition from the art-forms of Bach and Handel tended 
toward an artistic ideal which was already expressing itself during their lifetime. This was due to the 
emergence of a great aristocratic class which created the need of an art peculiar to, and expressing its 
mode of life. 

The outstanding aspect of instrumental music in this era is the vigorous growth of sonata-forms and 
at the same time the sound relationship between form and content. For just as in the earlier period the 
characteristics of the art had changed by a revaluation of harmony and polyphony, so at this time a 
further step was made by a new consideration of the problems of form. 

This is immediately apparent in Nardini's Sonata in D major which is heard at this concert. There is 
here a more spacious form and a wider use of musical materials than in similar works of earlier composers. 

Today however, Pietro Nardini is little more than a name. Despite a characteristic grace and charm 
in his music, he has suffered the fate of those who have developed a certain province in their art only to 
be succeeded and overshadowed by a more universal genius, who incorporates in his own works that which 
has gone before. 

Nardini follows in a direct line from Tartini, with whom he studied in Padua. He is thus another in 
the long line of Italian composer-violinists of the 17th and 18th centuries whoes experiments with the 
natural resources of their instrument produced a peculiarly interesting phase of musical history. 

Much importance is attached to Nardini's influence on violin playing in Germany, where he lived for 
fifteen years as musician in the ducal court of Stuttgart. 

In company with most of his contemporaries, Nardini's style is already far removed from fugal 
influence. An expressive lyricism marks the melodic line of his music, to which he adds a simple harmonic 
background. Here is an art which speaks from its time and place as certainly as the plays of Congreve 
and Sheridan speak from theirs. 



One of the fascinating properties of all art is that the artist may express profundity by the simplest 
means. What appears on the surface as an innocent matter may ingeniously contain a remarkable artistic 
expression. 

This anomaly contains an ironic side. For it sometimes happens that an artist's qualities are thus 
falsely interpreted. In literature this has happened to Jonathan Swift and in music to Josef Haydn. In 
the former case a man whose bitter indictment of society is positively vitriolic, retains the reputation of a 
pleasant writer for children, while similarly with Haydn, a good deal of his music has not been considered 
important for those above the age of thirteen. 

Haydn's musical career was similar to that of a great number of his contemporaries, who lived as 
part of the servant-staff in an aristocratic household. To reach this stage in one's early years was a piece 
of good fortune. Haydn at first suffered the usual trials of a poor student and once hired himself as a 
valet to Porpora, in the hope of receiving instruction from him. When the old Neapolitan's vocabulary 
occasionally changed from invective and abuse, he did help Haydn's musical development. 

But in his early twenties Haydn began his years of service in the homes of noblemen. At the age of 
twenty-nine he became assistant-Kapellmeister to the Esterhazy family and remained in their employment 
until his death forty-eight years later. 

One may still read the agreement which Haydn signed upon taking up his new duties. It mentions 
such points as the necessity of a circumspect and polite demeanour, the duty of seeing that the musician's 
uniforms and wigs were neatly worn and that all necessary music be composed within a stipulated time. 

In his early years Haydn was much influenced by the works of Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach and it is 
from this foundation that many of his departures and experiments took place. Although he was more 



than forty when he first came to know the works of Mozart, his modest and unassuming devotion to 
music enabled him to accept a great deal from the younger master. Needless to say he in turn exerted a 
strong influence upon Mozart, who at one time said, "It was from Haydn that I first learned the true way 
to compose quartets." That astute critic Donald Francis Tovey has spoken of the relation of these men 
in the following words: 

The mutual influence of Haydn and Mozart is one of the best-known wonders of musical 
history; and the paradox of it is that while its effect on Mozart was to concentrate his style 
and strengthen his symmetry, the effect on Haydn was to set him free, so that his Urge 
movements became as capricious in their extended course of events as his minuets had always 
been in the cast of their phrases. 
The Haydn quartet on this program is the fifth of the set of six so-called "Sun" quartets and was 
composed in 1771. The last movement is a fugue with two subjects and clearly shows Haydn's obligation 
to older masters whom he was studying at the time. 

In 1791 Haydn was in London. For the first time in his sixty years he forsook for a while his duties 
to the Esterhazy family and went abroad to accept the homage which his fame brought from all the 
capitals of Europe. 

In the same year, at the age of thirty-five, Mozart died as the direct result of poverty. He had been 
unable to obtain any position of security despite the great popular success of much of his music. 

The callous society of Vienna seems to have been little impressed by this fate of a musical genius, for 
only thirty-eight years later it allowed Schubert to die in exactly similar circumstances. 

Critics and historians have ever marveled at the matchless genius of Mozart. At the fertility which 
produced the E flat, G minor and C major symphonies within six weeks, one can only stand amazed. And 
one can but rejoice in the realization that there is included in our heritage of music the results of a 
musical mentality which poured forth remarkable works in every conceivable form, from opera to 
quartet and from motett to concerto. 

Donald Francis Tovey has this to say of the beautiful work for four hands on this program: 
This sonata in F is a superb piece of chamber-music in no way inferior to the great quar<tets 
and quintets of its period in Mozart's career (it was written soon after Figaro): . . . The 
adagio introduction is as impressive as any before Beethoven . . . The slow movement is also 
in full sonata form, and is one of Mozart's broadest and most polyphonic designs . . . The 
finale is a Rondo on fully the same symphonic scale as the rest of the work. Its first theme 
may take rank with the phrase in the finale of his C minor concerto which impelled 
Beethoven to exclaim to a friend: "Oh, my dear Ries, things like that will never occur to the 
likes of us." 
The Adagio for violin and orchestra was written for the violinist Brunetti. He was to perform the 
A major concerto but asked for another slow movement in place of the one already written. Mozart com- 
posed this work for him, which despite its beauty is infrequently heard. 

The Divertimento on this program was written in 1773 and is also quite unknown. Mozart used the 
terms Divertimento, Serenade and Cassation indiscriminately, for a work in anywhere from four to ten 
movements, and scored for various combinations of wind and strings. To these works as a whole one may 
apply the statement of a critic who observed that Mozart often wrote without thought but never, even 
when he was six, without mastery. 



The number of years between John Dowland and Mozart is as great as that between Mozart and 
Hindemith. It is however often gratuitously assumed that more advance has been made in the latter than 
in the former period. In this connection one must realize that the passage of time does not bring con- 
comitantly a progressive development toward some ever receding horizon. This evolutionary conception 
can best be exemplified by the following statement from a work on "The Musical Faculty" by "William 
Wallace: 

If we contrast the highest musical achievement of even a hundred years ago with the music 
we have today, we shall see an advance in thought and imagination which is almost incon- 
ceivable . . . practically every bar of a modern music student would have been a gigantic 
achievement had it been written in 1762 . . . 
But is it not a foreshortening of historical perspective which gives this impression of progress? 
For a consideration of music's growth between 1600 and 1775, namely between Dowland and Mozart, 
will show an unparallelled and remarkable enlargement in the use of musical materials, which were 
organized to a point where the richest and most varied conditions of the human mind could find utter- 
ance; where the subtlest psychological nuance could be expressed by the turn of a phrase or with some 
modulation which even now remains as breath-taking as at the moment it was conceived. And with this 
aesthetic property related by beautiful balance to a vital sense of organization, music was composed to 
which we can refer with but one term — Classic. 



Next concert in the series ivill be on Janiuiry twentieth. 



c^ — — ■ — /%» 



HISTORICAL 
SERIES 

<z=^^cm tke 17 tit ta tlte 20 tit K^ettt 



MX 



PRESENTED BY A COMMIHEE OF 
CURTIS INSTITUTE GRADUATES 

RALPH BERKOWITZ JOSEPH S. LEVINE VLADIMIR SOKOLOFF 



FRIDAY EVENING, JANUARY 20, 1939 

AT 8:30 O'CLOCK 

CASIMIR HALL 



The STE/NWAy is fhe Official Piano of The Cvrtis Institute of Music 



fi' 



'cc^atiim 



1 



FRANZ PETER SCHUBERT Cantata "Fruhlingsmorgen". Op. 158 

1797-1828 For three voices and piano. 

FLORENCE KIRK, Soprano DONALD HULTGREN, Tenor 

HOWARD VANDERBURG, Baritone VLADIMIR SOKOLOFF, Piano 



LUDWIG VAN BEETHOVEN Septet in E flat major. Op. 20 

1770-1827 

Adagio. Allegro con brio — Tempo di Menuetto — Tema con Variazione. Andante. 

Scherzo. Allegro niolto e vivace — Andante con moto alia Marcia. Presto. 

KURT POLNARIOFF, YioUn; GEORGE BROWN, Viola; SAMUEL MAYES, Violoncello; 

IRVEN WHITENACK, Doublebass; WILLIAM McCORMICK, Clarinet; 

ALBERT LONDON, Bassoon; ELWOOD CAULER, French Horn. 



FRANZ PETER SCHUBERT Meeres StUle 

Der Einsame 
Der Leiermann 
Rastlose Liebe 

ROBERT GROOTERS, Baritone VLADIMIR SOKOLOFF, Piano 



LUDWIG VAN BEETHOVEN Three Equale 

For 4 trombones 

WILLIAM GIBSON, GEORGE A. GARSTICK, ROBERT LAMBERT, HOWARD COLE, Trombones 



LUDWIG VAN BEETHOVEN Sonata in E major. Op. 109 

Vivace, ma non troppo — Prestissimo — Andante molto cantabile ed espressivo 
YVONNE KRINSKY, Piano 



By CURTIN WlNSOR 



I. INTRODUCTION 

With this program we have arrived at the 19th Century after pursuing our pilgrimage through the 
music of two centuries. We have scaled certain peaks, at least one of which represented by Sebastian Bach, 
stands preeminent in the recollections of the journey. We now reach two summits so lofty that many 
question whether the path of music has reached or can ever reach such twin heights again. Those summits 
are Beethoven in the field of instrumental music, and Schubert in the field of vocal music. 

II. BEETHOVEN 

Men of great genius are not accidents, but, like accidents, they are often produced by events of a 
catastrophic nature. Beethoven and (to a lesser extent Schubert) was the product of the French Revo- 
lution — that upheaval which had such profound consequences in every field of art. The watchwords of 
the Revolution, "Liberte, Equalite, Fraternite," influenced both Beethoven, the man, and Beethoven, the 
composer. Beethoven, the man, was an ardent Democrat who tore up the dedication from the title page 
of his Eroica Symphony when he heard that his idol, Napoleon, the apostle of the Revolution, had made 
himself Emperor. In the houses of the Viennese aristocracy he regarded himself, and he was treated, as 
an equal with genius more than counterbalancing low birth. As has been said by Hugo Leichtentritt in 
"Music, History, and Ideas" Beethoven was truly Napoleonic in the magnificence of his style, the boldness 
of his conceptions, and his unshaken belief in himself. 

In keeping with the spirit of the times, Beethoven was the first great composer who throughout the 
greater part of his life held no post as Kapellmeister or Music Director to any court or church, supporting 
himself largely by his great talents as a pianist (he was noted especially for his phenomenal ability to 
improvise) and later by the proceeds from the publication of his works. 

Beethoven's genius in music found its counterpart in the literature of Goethe and especially Schiller, 
which reflected the philosophy and aesthetics of Kant. The influence of Schiller is largely responsible for 
the dramatic and moral aspects which form so important a part of Beethoven's art. The most concrete 
example of this influence is the 9th Symphony with its finale designed as a setting for Schiller's "Ode to 

Like Schubert, Beethoven was no orthodox Christian. The serenity and lofty exaltation ol many of 
his adagios are sufficient musical proofs that he believed in a supreme being, but his beliefs, thoujjh benevo- 
lent, are vaguely pantheistic. There have been other composers who put humor into their treatment of 
music (one recalls Haydn's "Farewell" Symphony and Bach's "Peasant Cantata") but none who could on 
occasion capture the essence of humor — sometimes coarse, boisterous farce — and put it into the actual notes. 

Like Bach. Beethoven invented no new forms but developed and enlarged existing ones. Into the 
mold of the sonata form he poured the golden treasures of a Shakespearian mind that was universal in 
character, embracing every variety of emotion. His use of modulations, dissonance and tone color were 
among the vessels by which this transfer was accomplished. 

Beethoven's talents secured him innumerable acquaintances but his irascible temper and suspicious 
nature, together with that deafness which became complete in his last years, effectually isolated him from 
many intimate friendships. No one could long endure his fits of fury, his jealousy, ingratitude, and 
resentment of the slightest criticism. The number of cooks he discharged and patrons he alienated are 
sufficient to justify the conclusion that he would not have been "a nice man to know." 

III. SCHUBERT 

Grove observes that "apart from his music, Schubert's life was little or nothing, and that is 
its most interesting fact. Music . . . was to him all in all. It was not only his principal mode of 
expression, it was his only one." Everyone knows what few facts of any importance about Schubert the 
man there are to know, and everyone can visualize the ridiculously short, stumpy figure with tousled hair 
and frog-like spectacles, who led the life of a half-starved Viennese Bohemian, mingling only with his 
middle class friends, inconspicuous and almost unknown. 

Like Beethoven, he never held any official court position, but unlike him, he was too poor a performer 
to even attempt to support himself by giving concerts. When Schubert did attach himself to an aristo- 
cratic household like the Esterhazy's he was perfectly content to be treated like a servant. He took no 
interest in politics, was no great aesthetic, and had such quiet reserved ways and friendly manners that 
not even his friends recognized that he was a genius. Beethoven carried notebooks with him everywhere 
and jotted down themes which he used sometimes years later and spent months on individual works which 
were often laboriously revised; Schubert wrote his music as fast as his hand could cross the paper, 
seldom changing, never recopying. While Schubert's output was therefore enormous, it was uneven in 
quality and often showed that lack of a sound training in counterpoint which nearly every other great 
composer received. 



Like Beethoven, Schubert wrote in every form. His operas are forgotten because of the absurd 
librettos he set. and his cl oral works are little known, but his instrumental works, pianistic, chamber 
music and orchestral, are more and more coming into favor. He was not content as Beethoven had been 
to take the old forms as he found them; he created two new forms — the informal piano piece (such as 
the impromptus) and the art song. 

Generally speaking, before Schubert, the song as a serious form was the stepchild of the family of 
music. Schubert elevated it to a station of the first rank. Some of Schubert's predecessors wrote songs 
but with a few exceptions none of them wrote great songs. No one had seriously attempted to set lyric 
poems for solo voice in such a way that music and words were fused into one mass; formerly, the poetry 
had been merely the frame on which music of a vaguely similar mood could be hung. Schubert's harmonies 
and modulations often faithfully reflect the individual words of the poem as well as its general character. 
He threw his whole soul into his songs, nearly six hundred of them, of which at least half are good, while 
perhaps a hundred odd are masterpieces that have never been surpassed. He wrote three song cycles, 
two of these being settings of cycles of poems by Wilhelm Muller — "Die Schone Mullerin" and "Die 
Winterreise," while the third "Schwanengesang" comprises poems by various authors published after 
Schubert's death as a collection. These cycles include some of Schubert's finest lyrics which he sold to a 
publisher for twenty cents a piece. 

The fountains of melody that poured from Schubert flowed so copiously and easily that he could set 
eight songs in a single morning or pick up a poem of Shakespeare or Goethe, read it through carefully 
once or twice, and write down the music in final form on the spot wherever he happened to be. The 
gift came early. He wrote the lovely "Gretchen am Spinnrade" in 1814 at the age of 17, but, generally 
speaking, his later songs are his finest. Among the very last are six superb settings of poems by Heine whose 
poems (unfortunately) he had not previously encountered. 



IV. THIS EVENING'S PROGRAM 

The CANTATA on this program, "Fruhlingsmorgen" (Spring Morning) was composed in August, 
1819, for performance at Linz at an informal birthday party to Vogl, the great tenor, with whom 
Schubert was travelling through upper Austria. Doubtless it was dashed off in a couple of hours as a 
tribute to his friend, who was the first interpreter of Schubert's songs and who did his best to make them 
known to the indifferent Viennese. 

MEERES STILLE (Calm Sea), a setting of a little poem by Goethe is an admirable example of 
Schubert's power to capture and underscore the essential mood of a lyric, in this case one of profound 
tranquillity. 

DER EINSAME (The Solitary One), poem by Carl Lappe, is in modified strophe form with a figure 
of four sixteenth notes much repeated, suggesting the cheery hearthside where the solitary one reflects 
in peace and comfort. 

DER LEIERMANN (The Hurdy-Gurdy Man), the concluding and one of the finest songs in the 
cycle of poems "Der Winterreise" (The Winter Journey) by Wilhelm Muller, was written by Schubert in 
1827. "The fifths in the accompaniment suggest the drone bass of the hurdy-gurdy as the lovesick 
wanderer encounters another human wreck and asks if he will accompany his songs. The analogy to 
Schubert's own life is painfully apparent. 

RASTLOSE LIEBE (Restless Love) is a setting composed in 181 J of a lyric by Goethe describing the 
wanderings of a lover driven half mad by his passion, who roams the countryside defying wind and snow. 
The constant rhythm of the piano accompaniment emphasizes the driving power of a passion which will 
not leave him a moment's rest. 



Beethoven's music really does seem to fall into the three periods into which it is customarily divided. 
All the authorities agree that the SEPTET on this program (written before 1880) dates from his first 
period when he was under the influence of Mozart. It was one of the works which first established his 
popularity in Vienna, but this fact seems to have annoyed him for he once remarked to Czerny that he 
"could not endure this Septet" and was "angry because of the great applause it received." 

The EQUALE for trombones on this program were written during Beethoven's stay at Linz in 1812 
for performance on All Soul's Day. Rearranged for trombones and voices, they were performed at his 
funeral which Schubert attended as one of the honorary pall bearers. 

The SONATA on this program dates from Beethoven's last period when his total deafness had cut him 
off almost entirely from the rest of the world, resulting in an isolation which is clearly reflected by the 
"other world" character of this music. To paraphrase Wordsworth's sonnet on sonnets one may say that 
in his last works Beethoven unlocks the gates of his soul and reveals the thoughts of a man who is no 
longer concerned with earthly problems, and who has suffered so much that he can no longer feel earthly 
sorrows. 

Next concert in the series ti/ill be on February twenty-fourth 



?il _SiS 



/%» 



HISTORICAL 
SERIES 



<^:^aia an^Ji \^kambet y 1/ Li 



itiic 



<=iy>cam tke lltlt ta tke 20tk ^entuxu 



PRESENTED BY A COMMIHEE OF 
CURTIS INSTITUTE GRADUATES 

RALPH BERKOWITZ JOSEPH S. LEVINE VLADIMIR SOKOLOFF 



FRIDAY EVENING, FEBRUARY 24, 1939 

AT 8:30 O'CLOCK 

CASIMIR HALL 



The STEINV/AY is the Official Piano of The Curtis Insfifufe of Music I 

5^1 i In 



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ROBERT SCHUMANN Frauenliebe und -Leben. Song-cycle. Op. 42 

1 8 1 0- 1 8 J 6 Sgjj i^h ihn gesehen. 

i Er, der Herrlichste von Allen. 

j Ich kann's nicht fassen, nicht glauben. 

\ Du Ring an meinem Finger. 

\ Helft mir, ihr Schwestern. 

\ Siisser Freund, du blickest. 

I An meinem Herzen, an meiner Brust. 

Nun hast du mir den ersten Schmerz gethan. 

ELSIE MacFARLANE, Contralto VLADIMIR SOKOLOFF, ?iano 



FELIX MENDELSSOHN Sonata in D minor. Op. 65 No. 6 

1809-1847 Chorale and Variations 

Fugue 
Andante 

\ 



WALTER BAKER, Organ 



FREDERIC CHOPIN Ballade in A flat major. 

1810-1849 Largo and Finale, Presto non tanto; 

from the Sonata in B minor. 

Mazurka in A minor. 

FRANZ LISZT Etude de Concert in D flat major. 

1811-1886 Paganini Etude in E flat major. 

ZADEL SKOLOVSKY, Viano 



ROBERT SCHUMANN Trio in F major. Op. 80 

Sehr lebhaft 
', Mit innigem Ausdruck 

\ In massiger Bewegung 

i Nicht zu rasch 

RAFAEL DRUIAN, Violin JOSEPH DRUIAN, Violoncello 

\ RALPH BERKOWITZ, Viano 



By Ralph Berkowitz 



ROMANTICISM 

A Romantic period occurs in art when idealistic and spiritual forces express them- 
selves unhindered by contemporary material problems. 

After years of political and social upheaval from the French Revolution to the 
July Revolution of 1830, a comparative calrr^ followed, which ushered in a dazzling 
array of artists in literature, painting and music. It was this liberated intellectual force 
in men like Hugo, Delacroix, Schumann and Chopin which created that fascinating and 
virile period known as 19th century Romanticism. 

In music Romanticism manifested itself by an overwhelming of classical form by 
subject-matter. The mutual influence of all arts upon one another released those domi- 
nant and favorite ideas of imaginative and emotional expression, which at the time 
seemed irreconcilable with the art-forms of the immediate past. 

But from a proper perspective it becomes apparent that it is not possible to draw 
as clear a line between Romanticism and Classicism as some theorists of that day believed. 
Schumann, who as editor of the "Neue Zeitschrift fur Musik" was the most audible of 
all the enthusiastic, progressive-minded artists, realized this when he wrote: "A new and 
as yet undeveloped school is being founded on the basis of the Beethoven-Schubert 
Romanticism, a school which we may venture to expect will mark a special epoch in the 
history of art. Its destiny seems to be to usher in a period which will nevertheless have 
many links to connect it with the past century." 

For just as in all ages, so was there here, where the dominant tendency seemed to 
be in the direction of new and revolutionary thought, a strong undercurrent which 
reverted to the older art-forms and sought to carry them forward, either intact, or with 
some modified elements. 

With the exception of the Renaissance, perhaps no other period in European art- 
history has been productive of more controversial and critical commentary than the 
short space of time in which Romanticism flourished. Oddly enough, the most con- 
troversial point of all seems to be concerned with a definition of the term "Romanticism." 
Depending on the author's view, it has appeared as everything from a "thinly- veiled 
naturalism" to "the aesthetic fostering of the ugly." 

In comparison with classical art, Romanticism has generally been awarded a lesser 
position. Hugo Leichtentritt, for instance, speaks of the "objective, orderly, positive, 
clearly assertive classical manner" as compared to the "subjective, irregular, hypothetical, 
and vague romantic statement." 

But perhaps the most conclusive words concerning this problem are those which 
Ludwig Tieck, one of the founders of German Romanticism, spoke, when he said: "If I 
were challenged to give a definition of Romanticism, I could not do it. I cannot make 
out any difference whatever between the Romantic and the poetic in general." 

Nevertheless there are certain recognizable elements in music which we generally 
define as Romantic. Though impossible to adequately communicate with the written 
word, they yet bear unmistakable characteristics of their own. For instance, where can 
we find a more complete Romanticism than in some remarkable pages of Haydn, which 
certainly contain expressions formulated with the use of a Romantic vocabulary. 

Basically, then, it is the characteristic quality, the texture, which allows us to recog- 
nize the romantic spirit. We are suddenly confronted with a vista of intense emotional 
expression; with an art in which nature, the folk-song and a new spiritualism play roles 
of importance. Above all we are aware, as a modern historian has keenly qbserved, of 
"new spheres of harmonic interest." I 



TONIGHT'S PROGRAM 

"William S. Rockstro, the great English scholar, was a pupil of Mendelssohn and he 
has spoken of him in the following interesting manner: 

"Mendelssohn's title to a place among the great composers of the century is incontestable. His 
style, though differing little in technical arrangement from that of his classical predecessors, is 
characterized by a vein of melody peculiarly his own. ... In less judicious hands the rigid 
symmetry of his phrasing might, perhaps, have palled upon the ear; but under his skillful man- 
agement it serves only to impart an additional charm to thoughts which derive their chief beauty 
from the evident spontaneity of their conception. . . . Though caring nothing for rules, except 
as a means for producing a good effect, he scarcely ever violated them, and was never weary of 
impressing their value upon the minds of his pupils. His method of counterpoint was modelled 
in close accordance with that practiced by Sebastian Bach. This he used in combination with 
an elastic development of the sonata-form, similar to that engrafted by Beethoven upon the lines 
laid down by Haydn. ... It is thus that Mendelssohn stands before us as at the same time a 
champion of conservatism and an apostle of progress. . . ." 

The Organ Sonata on this program is one of a set of six composed in 1844-4S and 
serves as an excellent example of the validity of Professor Rockstro's observations. 

:.<• =:- * * :> * 

Very little need be said here of the tremendous contribution to the literature of the 
piano which was made by Chopin. It is only necessary to think of the artistry which 
conveys to us such peculiarly individual expressions as are found in the Preludes, Etudes 
and Mazurkas (to mention only some of the smaller forms) to realize the authenticity 
of Schumann's enthusiasm when he wrote: "Hats off, gentlemen, a genius!" 

Even among the great characters of the 19th century the figure of Liszt stands out" 
as something unique. A giant among giants, his influence can be felt in musical thought 
down to our own time. In addition to a formidable list of original compositions and 
transcriptions, he has left interesting literary work, particularly a biography of Chopin 
and a volume on Hungarian Gipsy music. 

The musical world will perhaps never forget its heritage of great piano-playing 
which stems directly from him, nor the idealism and nobility of purpose with which he 
aided the cause of his son-in-law, Richard Wagner. 

* s:- s;- 't s^ * 

Many of Schumann's songs, because of their imagination, instinctive poetic feeling 
and penetrating lyricism, are among the most beautiful expressions in all music. Some 
of these are in the song-cycles "Frauenliebe und -Leben," "Liederkreis," "Dichterliebe" 
and "Myrthen," all of which Schumann composed in 1840. In that year alone he pro- 
duced about one hundred and fifty songs; a truly astonishing feat in itself, and more so 
when we consider that he had devoted the preceding ten years solely to compositions for 
the piano. 

The Trio in F major dates from 1847, and as an example of Schumann's later 
style, clearly shows that interesting combination of classic and romantic tendencies which 
is found also in much of Mendelssohn and Brahms. 

ROMANTICISM AND WHAT FOLLOWED 

Once again it is important to emphasize the fact that an art-period in history is 
closely related, either as an expression of, or a reaction to, political and material mani- 
festations of the time. Without this broad view a true conception of any phase of art is 
not possible. 

Just as Romanticism quickly emerged because of certain problems of the early 
19th century, so was it in its turn overwhelmed, after the Revolution of 1848, when 
forces and currents of a diflferent nature became vital to the minds of men. 

It is the contribution to musical art engendered by the realism and nationalism of 
the later 19th century Europe which will form the program of the next concert in this 
Historical Series. 

Nexi concert in the series will be on March eighth 






HISTORICAL 
SERIES 

<:z^cyLa and ^^Itamhet ^ ^ Li 

^riJtom. tke ntk ta tlte 20tk \^ent 






PRESENTED BY A COMMIHEE OF 
CURTIS INSTITUTE GRADUATES 

RALPH BERKOWITZ JOSEPH S. LEVINE VLADIMIR SOKOLOFF 



a^Lalttk K^oncetl 



WEDNESDAY EVENING, MARCH 8, 1939 

AT 8:30 O'CLOCK 

CASIMIR HALL 

The STEINV/AY is the Official Piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



\^^ 



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*cC0*cap^H 



1 



JOHANNES BRAHMS 



Intermezzo in B flat minor, Op. 117 No. 2 
Ballade (Edward) in D minor, Op. 10 No. 1 
Rhapsody in E flat major, Op. 119 No. 4 



WILLIAM HARMS. ?'iano 



GABRIEL FAURfi 



Mandoline 

Prison 

Toujours 



LESTER ENGLANDER, Baritovc 



RALPH BERKOWITZ, Viano 



JOHANNES BRAHMS Two Choral-Preludes. Op. 122 No. 9-10 

I Herzlich thut micli verlan^cn 

CESAR FRANCK ChonU No. 2 in B minor 

I CLARIBEL GEGENHELMER, Or^av 



ALEXANDER DARGOMISZKY To Her 

ALEXANDER GLAZOUNOV Oriental Song 

SERGEI RACHMANINOFF The Answer 

PETER TSCHAIKOWSKY ._ Again Alone 

ALEXANDER GRETCHANINOFF Cradle Song 

MODEST MOUSSORGSKY Hopak 



VERA RESNIKOFF, So^vauo 



RALPH BERKOWITZ, VUvo 



CAMILLE SAINT-SAENS Fantaisie, Op. 124 

! MARIAN HEAD, Violin LYNNE WAINWRIGHT, Harii 



HUGO WOLF 



RICHARD STRAUSS 



LESTER ENGLANDER, Baritone 



Der Tambour 

Anakreons Grab 

Trunken miissen wir alle sein 

Ach weh mir ungliickhaf tem Mann 

Heimliche Auflforderung 

Wie soUten wir geheim sie halten 

RALPH BERKOWITZ, Viano 



NICHOLAS MEDTNER Ein Marchen, Op. 20 No. 1 

ALEXANDER SCRIABIN Etude in D sharp minor 

ISAAC ALBENIZ Triana 

, WILLIAM HARMS, Piano 



By CURTIN WiNSOR 

THE latter part of the 19th Century was remarkable in the field of European 
politics for the rise of nationalism, evidenced by the fusion of many petty 
kingdoms into modern states, Germany and Italy being outstanding examples. 
As generally happens, the arts show parallel developments. There arose schools, highly 
national in style — in painting and music the French impressionists and in literature 
and music the Russian school. 

The composers on this program have been chosen as representative of their 
national schools. The music of Brahms and Strauss could only have been written by 
German speaking men. Albeniz is as Spanish as a bull fight and Faure is as unmis- 
takably French as good champagne. If these men be compared to the cosmopolitan 
Bach, Handel, and Couperin, it can be seen that music in the 17th and 18th Centuries 
was far more international in character. It is significant that until recent times 
scholars have attributed works by the Englishman Purcell, and the Italian Vivaldi to 
the German Bach. Can one imagine authorities of the 21st Century attributing piano 
works by the Russian Scriabin to Albeniz? 
SPANISH SCHOOL— ISAAC ALBENIZ (1860-1909) 

This Catalonian pianist and composer is known chiefly today for his piano works 
in which, while showing the influence of Debussy, he succeeded in capturing the spirit 
and color of Spanish folk music to an extent equalled only by da Falla. Collet, in his 
book "Albeniz et Granados," observes: ' Thanks to Albeniz, for the first time since the 
1 6th Century Spain was accorded a place in the world of music." 

An English writer, I. B. Trend, says of Albeniz: "At the back of his mind there is 
generally a guitar player who ends with a Phrygian cadence, a dancer whose castanets 
are always syncopating against each other, and sometimes the shake and bang of a 
tambourine." 
FRENCH SCHOOL— CfiSAR FRANCK (1822-90) 

Though much Flemish blood was in his veins, his music was French. He was one 
of those composers whose talents were entirely unappreciated by his contemporaries, 
although his abilities as an organist gained him the teaching post in this field at the Paris 
Conservatoire. Franck's music images the man to an extent not found with most com- 
peers. It reflects his worthy but sometimes commonplace character and his deeply 
religious nature. Writing in every field, he was much addicted to the use of chromatics 
and to the chord of the diminished seventh. His best known works are the symphony, 
quartet, quintet, violin sonata, organ preludes, and tone poems such as "Redemption." 
CAMILLE SAINT-SAENS (1835-1921), pianist, organist and composer, successfully 
defended the independence of the French school against the Wagnerian invasion. Tech- 
nically, he had music at his finger tips, and his wonderful mind lacked only that spark 
of inspiration and invention we call genius. He wrote in all fields but is best known 
today for his opera "Samson et Delilah," his piano and violin concertos, and tone poems 
such as "Danse Macabre." 

GABRIEL FAURfi (1845-1924) was equally famous as organist at the Madeleine, 
professor at the Paris Conservatoire and as a composer of songs, choral, and chamber 
mwsic. Among his pupils were Ravel, Enesco, Roger-Ducasse and Mile. Boulanger. 
Faure's songs are notable for their Gallic refinement and intimacy, sometimes approach- 
ing sentimentality, but often deeply moving. 
RUSSIAN SCHOOL— 

The rise of the Russian school for which Glinka had laid the foundations earlier in 
the century brought noteworthy results in the field of song. ALEXANDER DAR- 
GOMISZKY (1813-69) introduced the spirit and colors of the East into his songs. 
Then came "The Five," a group of talented composers who championed Russian 
nationalism in music: Balakirev, Cui, Borodin, Rimsky-Korsakov and MODESTE 
MOUSSORGSKY (183 5-81). The amazing if untrained talent of Moussorgsky created 
art songs (comparable to those of the greatest German masters) which are remarkable 



for their realism. Moussorgsky's fondness for setting the emotional experiences of those 
in the humbler walks of Russian life is illustrated on tonight's program by his "Hopak," 
in which a peasant woman while performing the hopak, a wild Cossack dance, proclaims 
her hopes of escaping from her drunken old husband. The later Russian song writers 
(all romanticists) include: 

TSCHAIKOWSKY (1840-93), GLAZOUNOV (1865-1936), RACHMANINOFF 
1873 — ), and GRETCHANINOFF (1864 — ). Their songs are more cosmopolitan and 
therefore less original in style but retain a considerable amount of Russian color. 
ALEXANDER SCRIABIN (1872-1914), pianist, composer and mystic, believed that 
the arts could be combined to serve religion. He worked unsuccessfully with a machine 
(a ""keyboard of light") to project colors corresponding to his tones. He devised a 
harmonic system based on a synthetic chord composed of intervals of a fourth. His 
orchestral works were intended to express such concepts as the joy of creation (""Poem 
of Ecstasy") and the emancipation of the soul ("The Divine Poem"). His piano 
works are more enduring and less philosophical contributions and are often remark^ 
able for the joyous ecstatic moods they evoke. 

NICHOLAS MEDTNER (1879 — ) is noted chiefly for his piano sonatas which depart 
somewhat from classical form. Fond of employing complex rhythms which offer dif- 
ficulties to the performer, he avoids realism in favor of absolute music and dilutes the 
romantic tendencies of his predecessors. 

GERMAN SCHOOL— JOHANNES BRAHMS (1833-97) 

His life flowed through channels relatively smooth, for he was one of those fortunate 
composers who was never seriously troubled by monetary cares. His early career as a 
pianist raised him from the Hamburg slums where he was born and Schumann's public 
recognition of his genius for composition launched his career as a composer when he was 
scarcely in his twenties. He settled ultimately in Vienna. 

One of the most remarkable accomplishments of Brahms, the musician, was the 
mature style he achieved at an early age. While there are of course differences between, 
let us say, his early piano compositions and his last works for organ, they are less strik- 
ing than those that can be found in almost any other great composer. This is doubtless 
due in part to Brahms' infinite capacity for relentless self-criticism which led him, for 
example, to destroy many string quartets until he had perfected himself in this form. 
It is due also to that self-imposed discipline in counterpoint which caused him to 
exchange daily a contrapuntal exercise with the violinist Joachim for fifteen years. He 
was careful also not to attempt large forms till he had mastered smaller ones. Thus he 
wrote two serenades for orchestra to prepare himself for his first symphony. 
HUGO WOLF (1860-1903) 

Wolf's life is not of major interest. He disliked the music of Brahms as much as 
he admired that of Wagner, whose influence is discernible in Wolf's fondness for 
chromatics and modulation. Wolf was the last of those masters of the Romantic school 
(Schubert, Schumann, Mendelssohn and Brahms) who enriched the music of the 19th 
Century with their priceless art songs. None of these great predecessors was so suc- 
cessful in welding words to music. Herein lies his strength and weakness, for often 
he seems to sacrifice the general mood of a song to catch the exact shade of meaning of 
a single word. He wrote his songs "'for voice and piano" — an accurate characterization 
of the importance of the part played by the keyboard instrument. Like Schubert, Wolf 
could dash off songs that were masterpieces in an incredibly short time, but unlike 
Schubert months would pass when he wrote nothing and sulked morbidly — an early 
symptom of the insanity which became complete in 1897. r 

RICHARD STRAUSS (1864— ) 

It is often asserted today that Strauss is the last and somewhat decadent representa- 
tive of the Romantic school, that he has outlived his era and that his orchestral works 
(excepting the ageless ""Till Eulenspiegel") are not holding their ground in the concert 
halls, while his songs mark a decline from the peaks reached by his predecessors. Cer- 
tainly the present popularity in America of "Salome" and "Elektra" is remarkable, 
although it should be noted that they have been unheard in this country until recently 
because they posed problems of alleged moral turpitude and admitted vocal difficulties. 
Next concert in the series will be on March thirty-first. 



m _5iS 



HISTORICAL 
SERIES 

cz^^/^ and K^^/tam.pet y ^ Litiic 

<:=^o^Ht tke lit It t(^ tke 20 tk L^ettti 



nt 



f 



PRESENTED BY A COMMIHEE OF 
CURTIS INSTITUTE GRADUATES 

RALPH BERKOWITZ JOSEPH S. LEVINE VLADIMIR SOKOLOFF 



yVintk y^^oncetl 



FRIDAY EVENING, MARCH 31, 1939 

AT 8:30 O'CLOCK 

CASIMIR HALL 



1\\9 STEINV/AY is the Officio/ Piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



A 



'ccyatdnt 



ALFREDO CASELLA Tre Canzoni Trecentesche 

1883- 

Selma Amansky, Soprano Ralph Berkowitz, ?iano 



CLAUDE DEBUSSY 
1862-1918 



. Masques 

La Puerta del Vino 
General Lavine — eccentric 
La Terrasse des audiences du clair de lune 
La Serenade interrompue 
Mouvement 



Jorge Bolet, Picmo 



MAURICE RAVEL Sonata for Violin and Violoncello 

1875-1937 

Allegro — Tres vif — Lent — Vif, Avec entrain 



Eudice Shapiro, Violin 



Victor Gottlieb, Violoncello 



CLAUDE DEBUSSY. 



Selma Amansky, Soprano 



Ariettes oubliees 

L C'est I'extase 
IL II pleure dans mon coeur 

III. L'ombre des arbres dans la riviere 

IV. Paysages Beiges. Chevaux de bois 
V. Aquarelles: No. 1 Green 

VI. Aquarelles: No. 2 Spleen 

Ralph Berkowitz, Viano 



OTTORINO RESPIGHI Sonata in B minor 

1879-1936 

Moderate — Andante espressivo — Passacaglia — Allegro moderato ma energico 



Eudice Shapiro, Violin 



Ralph Berkowitz 



By CURTIN WiNSOR 



A 



THE dawn of the Twentieth Century silhouetted on the world's landscape many- 
figures representing diverse musical styles. Among them was Debussy whose 
impressionism followed the chromatic romanticism of Wagner and the realism of 
Strauss. The impressionist painters in France, interested primarily in treating problems 
of light, had broken up their colours to achieve dazzling effects. In a somewhat 
similar manner, Debussy did not confine himself to the diatonic and chromatic scales 
and conventional harmonies but experimented with the more primitive modal and 
pentatonic systems, and devised novel chord combinations, producing a wealth of new 
colours for the tonal palette. Such poets as Verlaine, Mallarme and Maeterlinck 
obtained similar results in literature. 

Somewhat later Schonberg introduced atonality in music while cubism and surreal- 
ism made their appearance in art. Although they flourished for several decades all these 
radical tendencies now seem to be waning. 

Foremost among the impressionists in music was CLAUDE DEBUSSY (1862-1918) 
who made his debut in 1884 by emerging from the Conservatoire with the Prix de Rome 
bestowed upon him for his cantata "The Prodigal Son," a good but conventional French 
work. The transition to his second and greatest period came with his setting of Rossetti's 
Pre-Raphaelite mystery poem "The Blessed Damozel" (1887). Thereafter followed 
the string quartet, the celebrated "Afternoon of a Faun," the Nocturnes and "The 
Sea" (La Mer) for Orchestra, many of the best songs and piano pieces, and the opera 
"Pelleas and Melisande." This incomparable setting of Maeterlinck's drama is con- 
sidered by many to be Debussy's most outstanding achievement. In the "Afternoon 
of a Faun" he caught and successfully conveyed the mood of Mallarme's poem; in 
"Pelleas" he does more, for many of Maeterlinck's most subtle images are reflected in 
the music which, like the text, suggests much and declaims little. Many "Wagnerian 
ideas (such as the use of leading motives) are adapted but modified and a relatively 
small orchestra is employed. 

Debussy's final period, doubtless influenced by the inroads of the malignant cancer 
which killed him, begins with the music to D'Annunzio's "Martyrdom of St. Sebastian" 
(1911) and shows, generally speaking, growing craftmanship and waning inspiration. 
Technically, Debussy's music combines the use of the old modes and parallel perfect 
intervals with the exploitation of the whole tone scale and of chords of the ninth. It 
is still too early to determine the security of his present eminent rank in the music 
world. 

The songs on this program "ARIETTES OUBLIEES" are settings of poems by 
Verlaine. Written in the late eighties, they are Debussy's first truly original works and 
are remarkable for the manner in which the most fleeting imagery of the poetry is 
captured by the composer. The analysis of these songs which follows is taken in part 
from Oscar Thompson's "Debussy, Man and Artist:" 

(1) C'est I'extase langoureuse — The poet finds his mood of dreamy passion reflected 
in the shadows and echoed in the murmvurs of the forest. 

(2) ll pleure daus mon coeur — Rain falls upon the city as tears flow from the poet's 
heart. 

(3) L'ombre des arbres — A solitary disillusioned traveller broods by the river over 
which the trees cast shadows while doves coo in the branches. There are many 
modulations in the accompaniment. 

(4) Chevaux des hois. — The poem describes a merry-go-round at a fair in Belgium 
thronged with people riding the wooden horses. A lumbering uneven theme out- 
lines the merry-go-round and various figures in the crowd are suggested. Finally, 
the machine slows down; all is quiet, and the first star appears. The realism is 
unusual for Debussy. 

(J) Green. This, one of Verlaine's "Aquarelles" or water colours in verse, is a passion- 
ate love song. i 



(6) Spleen. The poet doubts the constancy of his lady, and nature and all other 
things of beauty depress and disgust him. 

MAURICE RAVEL (1875-1937) is generally linked with Debussy as an impres- 
sionist. In the early years of the century he wrote many of his best songs following 
the well known "Pavane" for piano in 1899. Other piano works (later orchestrated) 
were "Mother Goose" and"Alborada del Gracioso" and "Le Tombeau de Couperin" 
while of the purely orchestral compositions, the best known are "Rhapsodic Espagnole," 
"La Valse," the fine ballet suites for "Daphnis and Chloe" and (much later) the 
"Bolero." A superb orchestrator, (his setting of Moussorgsky's piano pieces "Pictures 
at an Exhibition" must be mentioned) he sometimes says little in his music but he 
always says it well and in the most refined and delicate French manner, frequently 
going back to Rameau and Couperin for inspiration. 

The sonata on this program for the unusual combination of violin and cello 
(unaccompanied) was written in the early twenties. 

ALFREDO CASELLA (1883 — ) has been a leading figure in Italian musical life 
for years as composer, conductor, pianist, and writer. 

OTTORINO RESPIGHI (1879-1936), well known ItaHan composer, studied for 
a while with Rimsky-Korsakow and acquired much of his master's skill in orchestration. 
His most familiar works are two tone poems "The Pines of Rome" and "The Fountains 
of Rome." The sonata on this program dates from 1918. Both these composers have 
absorbed many styles. 

Arnold Schonberg (1874 — ) was the first of the so-called "Modernists" of 
the Twentieth Century. Born in Vienna, he retained that city as a headquarters 
until a few years ago when he settled in America. His sextet "Verklarte Nacht" 
dating from 1899 is his first outstanding work and remains the best known. It stems 
unmistakeably from "Wagner, whose addiction to the use of chromatics was extended by 
Schonberg to the very limits of tonality. This tendency became even more evident in 
"Gurrelieder" an enormous work for soloists, chorus and orchestra begun by Schonberg 
in 1901 and scored in 1910, which was given its first American performance in Phila- 
delphia by Mr. Stokowski in 1932. A symphonic poem "Pelleas and Melisande" was 
followed by the chamber music which introduced his second period, when by the use 
of vacillating dhords he made his music definitely atonal in style while employing 
classical forms. In this period also are a number of works of a dramatic nature includ- 
ing "Die Gliickliche Hand," an opera (also given here by Stokowski) and "Pierrot 
Lunaire," this last a set of poems for a "reciter" and instrumental group. A third period 
commencing in 1920 is remarkable for his use of a twelve-tone scale which he arranges 
into patterns which are inverted, reversed or transposed and used both horizontally 
and vertically. He thus goes back to the Gothic polytonal technique for his tools. 

Schonberg's intellectual approach to music, which makes his later compositions 
always logical but utterly devoid of beauty, has inspired him to write a number of text 
books on harmony which have had much influence on current musical thought and 
have gained him pupils and disciples of whom the late Alban Berg ("Wozzeck") is 
the best known. One of his most recent works a Concerto for violin and orchestra 
is listed for its world premiere under Mr. Stokowski in Philadelphia this week. 

In the meantime the French, German, Italian, and Russian national schools con- 
tinued, while new ones emerged, notably in England (Delius, Vaughan Williams and 
Walton) and in Hungary (Bartok and Kodaly). Finland produced Sibelius, (1865 — ) 
the master-symphonist of our time who in his later works builds his flowing themes 
from tiny germ motives instead of propounding broad melodies and then breaking them 
up as did his predecessors. 

Igor Stravinsky (1882 — ) who studied with Rimsky-Korsakow carried on the 
best traditions of the Russian school with his three most famous compositions for 
the Russian Ballet, "The Fire Bird," "Petroushka" and "Le Sacre du Printemps" which 
demonstrate progressively his transition from romanticism to realism (1910-13) while 
retaining strong national characteristics. Since the War he has resided in Paris and 
his music has been characterized by a cosmopolitan neo-classicism which has influenced 
the younger French composers. 



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THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

CASIMIR HALL 
Fifteenth Season— 1938-39 

PIANO AND VIOLA RECITAL 

by 
MISS GENIA ROBINOR, Pianist 
DR. LOUIS BAILLY, Violist 

Wednesday Evening, December 14, 1938, at 8:30 o'clock 

PROGRAMME 
I 

Sonata No. 5 Antonio Vivaldi 

(Harmonized by W. Morse Rummel) 

Largo 
Allegro 
Largo 
Allegro 

II 

"Sonata Opus 3 Egon Kornauth 

Fest und bestimmt 
Langsam, sehr ausdrucksvoll 
Wild und sturmisch 

III 

*Sonata Karl Klingler 

Moderate 

Allegro 

Adagio 

Finale — Allegro 

IV 
*Phantasy Arnold Bax 

(In one movement) 
* First performance 

The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 






-iO), 



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THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

CASIMIR HALL 
Fifteenth Season— 1938-39 

RECITAL 

by 
RUDOLF SERKIN, Pianist 

Guest Artist 
Tuesday Evening, February 7, 1939, at 8:30 o'clock 

PROGRAMME 
I 

Sonata, Opus 81a Ludwig van Beethoven 

Les adieux — I'absence — le retour 
II 

Phantasie, Opus 15 Franz Schubert 

Allegro con fuoco — Adagio — Presto — Allegro 
III 

Rondo capriccioso, Opus 14 Felix Mendelssohn-Bartholdy 

IV 

Two Etudes Claude Debussy 

Pour les degres chromatiques 
Pour les notes repetees 

V 

Two Etudes, Opus 25 Frederic Chopin 

B minor 
A minor 

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The Curtis Institute of music 

PHILADELPHIA 

CASIMIR HALL 

Season 1938—1939 



THREE recitals 

of Music for the Piano by 
AMERICAN COMPOSERS 



JEANNE BEHREND, Pianist 

Wednesday, February ISth, at 4:30 P.M. 

Wednesday, February 22nd, at 4:30 P.M. 

Wednesday, March 1st. at 8:30 P.M. 



4)ca£ 



First Programme 
FEBRUARY 15, 1939 



Alexander Reinagle Sonata in E major 

Allegro 
Adagio 
Allegro con brio 

Daniel Gregory Mason Cloud Pageant 

The Whippoorudll 

Edward MacDowell Elfin Dance 

March Wind 

Edgar Stillman Kelley Polonaise in B flat minor 



John Powell Sonata Noble 

Allegro raoderato 
Andante con moto 
Minuetto 
Allegretto sostenuto 



John Alden Carpenter Three Diversions 

Charles E. Ives "The Alcotts" 

Mrs. H. H. A. Beach Improvisation 

Leo Sowerby The Lonely Fiddle-Maker 

Arthur Shepherd Exotic Dance 

Arthur Farwell Sourwood Mountain 



* * * 



Miss Behrend uses the Baldwin Piano 



The Steinway is the Official Piano of the Curtis Institute of Music 



Second Programme 
FEBRUARY 22, 1939 



Ernest Block Five Sketches in Sepia 

Prelude 

Smoke over the City 

Fireflies 

Hesitation 

Epilogue 

George Gershwin Three Preludes 



Charles T. Griffes Sonata 

Feroce — Allegretto con moto — Molto tranquillo 
Allegro vivace 



Leopold Godowsky SiciUenne 

Allemande 

Sarabande 

(for the Left Hand alone) 

David Guion Country Jig 

Frederick Jacobi Two Preludes on Traditional Melodies 

Abr.\m Chasins Six Preludes 

C major — A minor — D minor 
D major — G flat major — B minor 

Charles Haubiel Capriccio 

Frances McCollin Sarabande 

Isadore Freed March 

Aaron Copland The Cat and the Mouse 

Marion Bauer White Birches 

Arthur Farwell Navajo War Dance 



Third Programme 
MARCH 1, 1939 



Jeanne Behrend Pastorale 

Scherzo 

Emerson Whithorne New York Days and Nights 

On the Ferry 

Chimes of Saint Patrick's 

Pell Street (Chinatown) 

A Greenwich Village Tragedy 

Times Square 

Samuel Barber Two Interludes 



Boris Koutzen Sonatina 

Vivo 

Andante pensieroso 

Allegro vivo 



R. Nathaniel Dett "When thou commandest me to sing . . ." 

Ulric Cole Vignette 

AuRELio GiORNi Etude in E minor 

Beryl Rubinstein Whirhgig 



Amedeo de Filippi Prelude, Passacaglia and Toccata 



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INTRODUCTORY NOTES 
By Alexander Kelherine 

It is said of Edward MacDowell that he never willingly permitted his music to be 
performed on programs exclusively devoted to American music. He argued that his 
music should be judged regardless of his nationality. That was more than thirty 
years ago. Since then, much has happened in the world at large and in the world of 
music. The American composer no longer needs to be on the defensive. Although 
not having the deeplyrooted historical and racial background of the European 
nations, he already has travelled far on the road of nationalism. American national' 
ism, however, is something apart from the usual. It is a conglomerate culture, com- 
posed of conflicting geographical, racial and social trends and schools of thought, and 
it is precisely this which makes it such a fascinating subject for study. 

Contrary to the impression prevalent among musical performers that there is not 
enough good American music for the piano to warrant even one fulMength recital 
program devoted to it, Jeanne Behrend, through her extensive search, found that not 
even a dozen complete programs would exhaust the material sent to her by generous 
publishers as well as by some fifty composers. 

It became a matter of elimination and of selection, a matter of finding herself 
distinctly in sympathy with some of the music, or distinctly at odds with the rest. 
Only a few works were not worthy of consideration. 

The limited scope of only three recitals, and consideration of matters of program- 
building, naturally limited also the quantity of the music chosen. To her great 
dismay, Miss Behrend found herself compelled to postpone the performance of some 
music of most excellent quahty to some other occasion. She trusts that those appar- 
ently neglected will understand the very difficulties her task has imposed upon her. 
She also wishes it to be known that the absence of many a prominent name on 
these programs is also due to the fact that many a composer had avowedly not 
written for the piano. 



ALEXANDER REINAGLE ( 1756-1809) Sonata in E major 

A few years after the American Revolution this country saw a wholesale immi- 
gration of foreign musicians, who dominated its musical life until the early part of 
the 19th Century, thus laying the foundation for American music. Alexander 
Reinagle, of Scotch-German descent, was one of them. He was a well-trained 
musician, and is known to have been an intimate friend of Philipp Emanuel Bach, 
whose influence is evident on every page of the Four Piano Sonatas, the manuscripts 
of which are now in the Library of Congress in Washington. The Sonata which 
is to open this series was probably written in about 1800. 



DANIEL GREGORY MASON (born in 1873) Cloud Pageant 

The Whippoorwill 
American music owes a debt of gratitude to Daniel Gregory Mason, who did much 
in its behalf as composer, writer, and teacher. Himself a distinguished disciple of 
Chadwick and of dTndy, he always fought valiantly for his principles and beliefs, 
even willing to risk the reactionary label. His music is of the frankly classic-romantic 
type, and it is individual rather than national, although he has also experimented 
with folk-songs. 

The two pieces, "Cloud Pageant" and "The Whippoorwill", are from the Suite 
"Country Pictures", Opus 9, published in 1914. 



The affixed poem by Mary Lord Mason describes the characteristic cry of the 
Whippoorwill of the Virginia land: 

"O bird who in the twilight shadows 
Thy note of mystery sings, 
"Who art thou in thy tender moc\ing. 
Thy half'revealing of infinite beauty, 
Life's secret joy outpouring. 
Deaf to our futile pain?" 

EDWARD MacDOWELL (1861-1908) Elfin Dance 

March Wind 

When we glance at the list of Edward MacDowell's teachers and of all the men 
who influenced his development into maturity, we read as follows: Juan Buitrago, 
his first teacher, a South American; Marmontel of Paris Conservatoire, where a lad 
named Debussy was his classmate; Heymann of Frankfort, Ehlert of Wiesbaden, 
Joachim Raff, and last but not least, the great Franz Liszt. In America it was 
Teresa Carreno who first established his reputation as a composer. 

MacDowell divided his time between teaching, conducting, playing in public, and 
composing, until finally his health gave out and he broke down. A dream of his, 
a place where a composer would have quiet to write down his music, has been 
reahzed through the efforts of his wife — but Peterboro is only part of the heritage 
he left to the young American composer. 

The Twelve Virtuoso Studies, two of which are included in this series, were 
written in 1894 and show the real MacDowell as a composer for the piano. Here 
is MacDowell at the height of his powers — healthy, dynamic, and brilUant. 

EDGAR STILLMAN KELLEY (born in 1857) Polonaise in B flat minor 

Edgar Stillman Kelley belongs to the distinguished group of Chadwick, Foote and 
Parker, for he dates from the time when the American composer had to work very 
much harder than he does to'day to make himself heard. His works reflect the 
models of his student days abroad, and the "Polonaise" for the piano. Opus 35, 
published in 1916, inspired by the composer's reading of the Polish author Sienkic 
wicz's romance "With Fire and Sword", is slightly reminiscent of the Polonaises 
of Liszt and Chopin. 

JOHN POWELL (born in 1882) Sonata Noble 

John Powell's "Sonata Noble", a work teeming with unaffected melody, true 
American optimism and squarccut form betraying thorough European training, was 
published in 1921. At first reading, this statement signifies nothing of singular 
importance. But during this particular decade such contemporary music was de' 
cidedly not in vogue. In what may have been a kind of self-defense against the 
inevitable tag of "unoriginality", Powell prefaced his Sonata with the following 
quotation from Sidney Lanier (incidentally one of his ancestors): 
"Vainly might Plato's head revolve it. 
Plainly the heart of a child could solve it." 

The theme of the 2nd movement is reminiscent of the old hymn-tunes which fig' 
ured so prominently at the beginning of the white man's music history in America. 
There is a hint of shuffling feet in the dance-like opening of the last movement. 

JOHN ALDEN CARPENTER (born in 1876) Three Diversions 

John Alden Carpenter was once called by Walter Damrosch "one of the most 
American of our composers" — and this in spite of the fact that his music is frankly 
leaning toward the French school. Carpenter studied with Paine at Harvard, and 
later with Elgar. Music with him is an avocation, for he is a most successful busi' 
ness man. 

As a composer he is best known for his "Skyscrapers", in which he sought to 
portray the age of rivets and mechanism, for his "Krazy-Kat", in which he cari' 
catured the comic strips of the newspapers, and for his settings of Tagore's poetry. 



In the latter he showed a warmth of color and a penetrating sensitivity to moods. 

The "Five Diversions", from which Miss Behrend plays three, are just that — 
exquisite little pastels of refinement and elegance. They were published in 1923. 

CHARLES E. IVES (born in 1874) "The Alcotts" 

Charles E. Ives, at the age of 65, is one of the most paradoxical figures in Amer* 
ican music. "This extraordinary artist is one of the pioneers of modern music, a 
great adventurer in the spiritual world, a poet, a visionary, a sage, and a seer", 
says of him the erudite and admirable Lawrence Oilman. Ives is equally enthusiast!' 
cally upheld by the left'wingers who understand him least of all. He is shunned 
and distrusted by the conservatives, and to the general public he is hardly known. 
The latter is due partly to the fact that his works bristle with all sorts of difficulties, 
making their performance somewhat a hazardous adventure. When Ives was still a 
pupil of Parker at Yale, whence he graduated in 1898, he heard certain harmonies 
which would not be denied. Nor did he stifle them, but stubbornly adhered to his 
own mode of expression, in which he unwittingly anticipated the formulae of Stra' 
vinsky, Schoenberg and Bartok by at least a decade. Ives has been most prolific in 
his avocation (for he, like Carpenter, has followed a business career as well), com' 
pletely indifferent to recognition of his talents. There is no questioning Ives' sin' 
cerity, nor the healthy vigour in much of his music, nor the range and versatility 
displayed in his songs. The Concord Sonata, published in 1920, is in four parts: 
"Emerson," "Hawthorne," "The Alcotts" and "Thoreau." It carries with it copious 
annotations, showing their author's literary scholarship and his thorough New Eng' 
land culture. Of "The Alcotts", Ives says in part: 

". . . Concord village, itself, reminds one of that common virtue lying at the 
height and root of all the Concord divinities. As one walks down the broad' 
arched street, passing the white house of Emerson — ascetic guard of a former 
prophetic beauty — he comes presently beneath the old elms overspreading 
the Alcott house. It seems to stand as a kind of homely but beautiful wit' 
ness of Concord's common virtue — it seems to bear a consciousness that its 
past is living, that the "mosses of the Old Manse" and the hickories of 
Walden are not far away. Here is the home of the "Marches" — all per* 
vaded with the trials and happiness of the family and telHng, in a simple 
way, the story of "the richness of not having". Within the house, on every 
side, lie remembrances of what imagination can do for the better amusement 
of fortunate children who have to do for themselves — much-needed lessons 
in these days of automatic, readymade, easy entertainment which deaden 
rather than stimulate the creative faculty. And there sits the little old 
spinet-piano Sophia Thoreau gave to the Alcott children, on which Beth 
played the old Scotch airs, and played at the Fifth Symphony. . . . All 
around you, under the Concord sky, there still floats the influence of that 
human faith melody, transcendent and sentimental enough for the enthusiast 
or the cynic respectively, reflecting an innate hope — a common interest in 
common things and common men — a tune the Concord bards are ever play 
ing, while they pound away at the immensities with a Beethovenlike subli' 
mity, and with, may we say, a vehemence and perseverance — for that part 
of greatness is not so difficult to emulate." 

Mrs. H. H. A. BEACH (born in 1867) Improvisation 

This charming little waltz, one of "Six Improvisations," from Mrs. Beach has been 
a happy inspiration, particularly from one who is better known among musicians for 
her more grandiose conceptions. Mrs. Beach hails from New England and is a prod' 
uct of that school. 

LEO SOWERBY (born in 1895) The Lonely Fiddle-Maker 

Leo Sowerby is inseparably identified with the northern Middle West. "The 
Lonely Fiddle-Maker" is an excerpt from the suite "From The Northland," Impres' 
sions of the Lake Superior Country. In his prefacing note, Sowerby says: "Shall I 
ever recall the half-sad, half-gay tune the old hermit is playing on his own pitifully 
wailing violin? His tune is not always wistful, for he makes it tell of rough joy and 



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gaiety. It speaks, as through a mist, of the long ago, when he fiddled and fiddled as 
the simple country folk danced the reel at time of harvest." 

ARTHUR SHEPHERD (born in 1880) Exotic Dance 

Arthur Shepherd, another member of the New England group, is a composer of 
unusual sensitivity. Certain works, such as his "Horizons," are written in breezy 
American style. Others, such as his "Triptych" for soprano and string quartet, and 
the "Exotic Dance," are more sensuous in their appeal. 

ARTHUR FAR WELL (born in 1872) Sourwood Mountain 

Arthur Farwell did not decide to become a composer until after he had graduated 
from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Four years later he went to Europe 
and studied with Humperdinck, Pfitzner and Guilmant. At present he lectures on 
Music History at Michigan State College, and can look back with prideful gratification 
on many years of pioneering in the cause of American music. He says he gets "a great 
kick out of a rip'snorting development of a good old American tune." "Sourwood 
Mountain" gives ample proof of it. The melody of this work, beginning at the 
twentyfirst measure, is one of the various versions of a well'known Tennessee Moun' 
tain "Cracker" tune, the first stanza of which runs: 

"Chic\ens ccrowing on Sourwood Mountain, 
Heydenng-ddng, doodle oily day, 
So many jpretty girls I can't count 'em, 
Heyde-ing'dong, etc." 

The original song contains only eight measures, the composer having provided a 
corresponding number to make a sixteen-measure melody. The rest is pure Farwell. 

ERNEST BLOCH (born in 1880) Five Sketches in Sepia 

Although born in Switzerland, Ernest Bloch is an American by adoption and 
naturalization. It was in America that recognition of his genius came first and it was 
here that his orchestral scores were first published. His gifts and mastery are such 
that he ranks with the most outstanding composers not only of today but of all times. 
In "Five Sketches in Sepia" he has portrayed his impressions of New York, for it 
was there that he wrote them in 1923 — during the days when he was still in the 
process of becoming known. 

GEORGE GERSHWIN (1898-1937) Three Preludes 

George Gershwin went through life carrying the stigma of immense popularity, 

success and material wealth. He is under-estimated by "ivorytower" musicians who 

allow this fact to influence their appraisal of him, and bHndly adored by the jitter' 

bugs and jazz'maniacs who are convinced of his worth because of this same fact. 

Time will reveal that Gershwin was a truly great artist, a genuinely native one, 

struck down on the eve of greater things to come. 

The "Three Preludes" are his only compositions for piano alone, and they are 

unmistakably Gershwin, with their lively Cuban rhythms and poignant melodies. 

The second of the group, a kind of "Blues," has the direct, half'primitive appeal of 

his opera "Porgy and Bess," and there are fleeting moments in the third actually 

approaching the soaring lyricism of Schumann. 

CHARLES T. GRIFFES (1884-1920) Sonata 

Charles T. Griffes died in 1920 at the age of 36, of pneumonia brought on by 
over-work and malnutrition. The story would probably have been different today, 
but the fact remains that the indifferent, materialistic America of the Twenties 
allowed its potentially greatest composer to starve. He left only a handful of com- 
positions, all pointing to a steady growth in style and expression, all shot through 
with a blazing sincerity. Earlier works, such as "The White Peacock" and "The 
Fountain of Acqua Paola," show the influence of Debussy. Later works, such as 
"The Pleasure Dome of Kubla Khan" for orchestra and the Piano Sonata, are in' 
tensely individual. Griffes has found himself in them, and speaks with feverish seal. 



The Piano Sonata was written in December 1917 and January 1918. Dark months 
were these, and they are reflected in this restless, brooding, tortured music. Although 
the general feeling is pessimistic, there are exultant cries, notably at the conclusion 
of the last movement. The sonata form is treated very freely in the first movement, 
which includes a slow episode taking the place of the usual slow movement. 

The Sonata is built on a scale of Oriental derivation — B flat, C sharp, D, E flat, 
F, G sharp, A. 

LEOPOLD GODOWSKY (1870-1938) Sicilienne 

AUemande 
Sarabande 

Leopold Godowsky's gift to the piano literature is as great as Liszt's — perhaps 
greater. Following in the tradition of Chopin, he built further, enlarging the scope 
of the piano'technic, revealing its contrapuntal possibilities. For Godowsky's was 
essentially a contrapuntal mind, and prodigious were the complexities assumed in his 
transcriptions and paraphrases, as well as in his original compositions such as the 
"Java Suite" and the "Passacagha on a theme of Schubert." But what a rare sim- 
plicity was his when he so chose! His art is sheer perfection in the simple "Minia- 
tures" for four hands. 

He was fond of writing for the left hand alone, his opinion being that "the piano- 
forte, being apart from its strongly individual character in a sense a miniature orches- 
tra, should benefit by the important strides which modern composition and instru- 
mentation have made in the direction of polyphony, harmony, tone-coloring and the 
use of a vastly extended range in modern counterpoint. If it is possible to assign 
to the left hand alone the work done usually by both hands simultaneously, what 
vistas are opened to future composers, were this attainment to be extended to both 
hands!" 

The "Sicilienne," "AUemande" and the "Sarabande" are from a Suite for the Left 
Hand Alone. In the "Sarabande," we glimpse the true Godowsky, his warm, kindly 
smile, his nobility and utter selflessness. 

DAVID GUION (born in 1895) Country Jig 

David Guion, well-known for his "Turkey in the Straw," as a composer is self- 
taught. His interest in cowboy songs and in Negro music stems from his life in the 
Southwest, where he was brought up to know both the cowboy and the Negro. 

Most of his compositions are based on the national idioms of that region. This 
"Country Jig" is as indigenous to the American soil as the Czardas is, let us say, to 
the Hungarian. 

FREDERICK JACOBI (born in 1891) Two Preludes on Traditional Melodies 

Probably the best known work of Frederick Jacobi is his String Quartet on 
American Indian Themes. During his sojourn in the West he made an exhaustive 
study of the music of the Pueblo Indians of New Mexico and Arizona. Jacobi also 
shares with Bloch, one of his teachers, the distinction of having written music which 
is authentically Jewish, such as the "Sabbath Evening Service." The Two Preludes 
for the piano are based on traditional Hebrew chants, Yigdal ("May He be magni- 
fied") and Rachem na alav ("Have mercy upon him, I pray Thee"), and are veritable 
gems in masterly settings. 

ABRAM CHASINS (born in 1903) Six Preludes 

Abram Chasins, scholastically a product of Rubin Goldmark and temperamentally 
a product of sophisticate New York, has derived much of the liquid flow and ease of 
his pianistic style through his sincere admiration for the piano compositions of 
Godowsky and Rachmaninoff. In the delicate fashioning of a miniature, he is a skill- 
ful and consummate craftsman. The Twenty-Four Preludes for the piano, written 
in 1927, therefore show him to best advantage. Frankly melodious, ingenuous har- 
monically, representing a curious mixture of the highly glittering West with the 
warm sensuousness of the Orient, they are well made, at times superficially brilliant 
but always sounding well. 

Chasins has enriched the piano literature with his Preludes and Etudes, the per* 



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formance of which will challenge the virtuosity and musicianship of any of the con- 
temporary pianists. 

CHARLES HAUBIEL (born in 1894) Capriccio 

The music of Charles Haubiel is that of a dreamer and a mystic. It is reticent, 
even when impassioned. In its flowing polyphony and striving for concrete form, 
we see the hand of a serious artist. Haubiel studied with the great Rosario Scalero. 
Recently he has won for himself an enviable place among the contemporary Ameri' 
cans in music. 

FRANCES McCOLLIN (born in 1892) Sarabande 

Although Frances McCollin has won recognition primarily for her choral and 
orchestral compositions, she has written extensively also for the piano and other 
instruments. This "Sarabande" is from the Suite in F. It possesses a calm dignity 
and many "juicy sevenths," as she herself is wont to call them. 

ISADORE FREED (born in 1900) March 

This March, from the Five Pieces for Piano, fairly represents the militant Isadore 
Freed, well-known for his championship of the young contemporary composer. Freed 
studied with Bloch in New York and with d'Indy in Paris. 

AARON COPLAND (born in 1900) The Cat and the Mouse 

Aaron Copland, who should not be mistaken for a revolutionary, is, nevertheless, 
strongly on the left. One of so many American disciples of Mile. Nadia Boulanger, 
he always manages to be well represented in the press and on programs of festivals 
of various kinds. "The Cat and the Mouse" stems from his understandable early 
period. It is an engaging piece of satire. The proverbial grace and nonchalance of 
the cat is depicted in a ballet-like theme, and the intrepid mouse begins the com' 
position with a more banal squeak. There are the usual feints and skirmishes, then 
evidences of a terrific pursuit. Its result can be guessed from the doleful dirge 
toward the end. Cat emerges victorious — limping slightly but as always dainty, 
fastidious and sly. 

MARION BAUER (born in 1887) White Birches 

A native of Walla Walla, Washington, Marion Bauer holds the dubious distinc- 
tion of having been the first American pupil of Mile. Nadia Boulanger, teacher and 
mentor of virtually all those American composers who make of cacophony their spe- 
cial language. It is greatly to the credit of Miss Bauer's inherent taste and musical 
integrity that she has not succumbed entirely to the blandishments of this prophet 
from Paris. 

"White Birches," published in 1922, is from a piano suite entitled "From the New 
Hampshire Woods." Composed apparently before the advent of the more modern 
style in her work, it portrays effectively these lines by William Rose Benet: 
"What is the meaning of their secret gleaming, 
What language is in their leaves, that glitter and whisper 
Where the ghostly birches glimmer under the moon?" 

ARTHUR FARWELL (born in 1872) Navajo War Dance 

Arthur Farwell was one of the first to act upon Dvorak's advice to American com- 
posers—to explore the music of the Indians and the Negroes. He has made ex- 
tensive studies and research in Indian music. The "Navajo War Dance," with its 
merciless rhythm and accumulating excitement is comparable to de Falla's "Ritual 
Dance of Fire." 

JEANNE BEHREND (born in 191 1) Pastorale 

Scherzo 

Jeanne Behrend is not only a pianist of exceptional gifts but a composer of strong 

and original talent. American born and educated, she was a pupil of Rosario 

Scalero. The 1936 Beams Prize was awarded to her for a suite of children's pieces. 



"From Dawn until Dusk," and for a cycle of Teasdale songs. She has written a set 
of Piano Variations, a Piano Sonata quite amazing in its strength and conception, a 
String Quartet, and various works for chamber music, as well as organ and choral 
compositions. 

The "Pastorale" and the "Scherso" date from 1933 and belong to a Piano Suite. 

EMERSON WHITHORNE (born in 1884) New York Days and Nights 

When it comes to mixing colors, evoking images and the very smell of famiHar 
scenes, there are few in this country who can equal Emerson Whithorne. In this 
respect he can be compared perhaps to Deems Taylor, who has given us the delight' 
fully descriptive "Through the Looking Glass" and great splashes of color in his 
opera "Peter Ibbetson." But Taylor writes with a nostalgia for the past and for the 
fantastic. Such is the spell of Whithorne's music, however, that when he uses an 
old hit like "The Love Nest" in his sketch "Times Square," it brings a reminiscent 
smile, as of something from the dim past, with also the realization that it is very 
much of today. Whithorne is never wholly the objective observer in these scenes: 
he almost becomes a ferry-boat chugging through oily water, and there is real sym' 
pathy in his depiction of some unfortunate souls of Greenwich Village. Of course 
he has his Achilles heel — structural weakness. But the rare charm of his music more 
than compensates for this. His own annotations for these pieces are as follows: 

L "A murky autumn morning; the river teeming with scurrying small craft; 
moaning horns and shrieking whistles sounding through the vibrant mist; and 
always the rhythmic chugging of paddle wheels. Mendicant musicians strum 
their weary instruments. Tunes — some sad, some gay; then the clink of coin 
dropped in suppliant cap. Cargoes of humanity, toilers with eager faces, 
these daily voyagers to the mighty towers of Manhattan." 
n. "The tumultuous chiming of bells high in the twin steeples; a great organ 
intoning the solemn Dies Irae; vivid patches of color stretching in rich pat' 
terns across the pavement of the nave, dropped down from high warm-hued 
windows. And always we hear the noble Gregorian chant, a Gothic column 
of melody reaching upward to support the mighty dome of sound of massive 
bells." 

IIL "It is night in Pell Street. Out from a little oriental cafe floats an ancient 
Chinese melody, The Fifteen Bunches of Blossoms, a song which has regaled 
many a feast in the land of lanterns. There in the smoky haze, swaying with 
the rocking of his bow, sits an old Chinaman, playing this strange tune on 
his singlc'stringed fiddle." 

IV. "Greenwich Village — that verdant Italian pasturage south of Washington 
Square where long'locked male and short-cropped female graze the long 
nights through. A strange region of highly dramatized lives, of mockery and 
jest. There an episode becomes an epic; from a trysting burgeons a tragedy. 
Such a one was this: it had its vernal days, passed through summer, autumn, 
and to a wintry, somewhat maudlin end." 

V. "And now to a bazaar of the Occident — Times Square, that riotous mart of 
pleasure and of folly. Flashing colors, swirling crowds, sounds of ribaldry 
and mirth. Amidst the din of nocturnal revelry are heard snatches of tunes 
of the day: La Veeda, Alice Blue Gown, Whose Baby Are You, The Love 
y^est. A dynamic scene, a tonal projection of The Great White Way with 
all its fantastic movement of kaleidoscopic lights and seething streams of 
humanity." 

SAMUEL BARBER (born in 1910) Two Interludes 

These two pieces, composed during the winter of 1931'32, are all that Samuel 
Barber has contributed to the literature of the piano, so far. This is a pity, for 
although Barber is only 29, he has a technical and emotional maturity many an 
older composer might well en\y. He has composed much, achieved much, and is 
unswerving in his allegiance to his own high standards. Having served his appren' 
ticeship with the eminent Scalero. whose influence on American creative talent is 
being felt more and more, much is expected of him, as he is, no doubt, the most 
outstanding among the younger generation. 

Barber comes from Pennsylvania, of American stock which can be traced many 



generations back, yet he scorns the arid and acrid dissonance which certain gentlemen 
would have us believe is American music. 

The first Interlude was performed by Miss Behrend in recital in 1933, the second 
will have its first performance in this series. 

BORIS KOUTZEN (born in 1901) Sonatina 

This so'called "Sonatina" — for it transcends the limits of a Sonatina and is really 
a Sonata-— is built with a most extraordinary economy of means. The whole work 
has been spun out of the three segments of the opening theme, four bars in length. 
All the tricks of the contrapuntal trade are there — diminution, augmentation and 
inversion. The movements are all well connected, and the transition from the second 
movement to the third is a fine change of color. The third movement concludes 
with a long coda, summing up all three movements. 

Koutzen's style has changed since the completion of this Sonatina (it was written 
in 1931) becoming more free, less geometrically precise. He has composed much 
and with distinction, including a Symphony, two String Quartets, a Sonata for 
Viohn and Piano, and other chamber music for various combination of instruments. 
He is a naturalized American, having been a native of Russia and there a pupil of 
Gliere. 

R. NATHANIEL DETT (born in 1882). "When thou commandest me to sing . . ." 
R. Nathaniel Dett is one of the most distinguished of the Negro composers, among 
whom the best known are William Grant Still, William Dawson and H. T. Burleigh. 
Although Tagorc's lines have inspired this piece (an excerpt from the suite "Cinna' 
mon Grove"), the religious fervor of the Negro Spiritual shines through it. Here 
is the complete quotation: 

"When thou commandest me to sing 

it seems that my heart would brea\ 

with pride; and I loo\ to thy face, 

and tears come to my eyes." 

ULRIC COLE (born in 1905) Vignette 

Among the young women composers of today, Ulric Cole is perhaps the most 
individual. She displays a sparkHng humor and excellent workmanship. The 
"Vignette" is one of a group of three, published in 1936. She studied in New York 
with Goldmark. 

AURELIO GIORNI (1895-1938) Etude in E minor 

A musician of sterling qualities and a composer of great abiUty, Aurelio Giorni 
succumbed to discouragement and ended his life several months ago. This Etude is 
one of the "Twentyfour Concert Etudes" in all the Major and Minor keys, a mon' 
umental achievement. Giorni was a pupil of Humperdinck. 

BERYL RUBINSTEIN (born in 1898) Whirligig 

This Etude is one which should delight "the vicious virtuoso", a name given our 
exhibitionistic brethren by the irrepressible Daniel Gregory Mason. We plead that 
this piece be substituted for at least one or two overworked war-horses of the con- 
cert hall. Beryl Rubinstein is the composer of a Piano Concerto, of the opera "The 
Sleeping Beauty," and of many more scores. 

AMEDEO DE FILIPPI (born in 1900) Prelude, Passacaglia and Toccata 

The name of Amedeo de Filippi has a 16th Century ring, as of some old, half' 
forgotten master. The unassuming and virtually unknown owner of this name is 
the answer to the somewhat skeptical question raised by pianists — "What is being 
written for the piano today?" De Filippi, a pupil of Goldmark, has written six 
Sonatinas, diversified essays in the sonata-form, exquisitely simple; a Partita, and the 
Prelude, Passacagha and Toccata premiered on this program. His works show an 
abiding love for the old traditions, a firmness and seriousness of purpose. There 
are traces of the influence of Franck and Ravel, only natural in a young man con' 
cerned with expressing himself logically and concretely. All these pieces are in 
manuscript, as yet unpublished. 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

CASIMIR HALL 
FiFteenth Season— 1938-39 

RECITAL 

by 

TRIO OF NEW YORK 

CARL FRiEDBERG, Piano 

DANIIL KARPiLOWSKY, Violin 
FELIX SALMOND, Violoncello 

Tuesday Evenins, March 21, 1939, at 8:30 o'clock 

PROGRAMME 

I 

Trio in C minor, Opus 101 Johannes Brahms 

Allegro energico 
Preito lion assai 
Andante grazioso 
Allegro molto 

II 

Trio in D major, Opus 70, No. 1 (Geister) Ludwig van Beethoven 

Allegro vivace e con brio 
Largo arsai ed espressivo 
Presto 

III 

Trio in B flat major, Opus 99 Franz Schubert 

Allegro moderato 
Andante un poco mosso 
Scherzo. Allegro 
Rondo. Allegro vivace 

The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



=^?9» 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

CASIMIR HALL 
Fifteenth Season— 1938-39 

SONATA RECITAL 

by 

EDITH EVANS BRAUN, Pianist 

LEA LUBOSHUTZ, Violinist 

Tuesday Evenins, March 28, 1939, at 8:30 o'clock 
PROGRAMME 



I 

Sonata in A minor G. Valentini 

(1681-17 ? ) 
Praeludio. Largo 

Allegro moderato 
Adagio sostenuto 
Allegro 

II 

Sonata in D minor, Opus 12 RosARio Scalero 

Allegro 
Adagio 
Vivace, ma appassionato 

III 

Sonata in C minor, Opus 30, No. 2 LuDwiG van Beethoven 

Allegro com brio 
Adagio cantabile 
Scherzo. Allegro trio 
Allegro. Presto 

The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



The Philadelphia Forum 

ACADEMY OF MUSIC PROGRAM 




APRIL 10, 1939 



From the April Philadelphia Forum 
Magazine 

MONDAY TO THURSDAY Inclusive 

The May Philadelphia Forum Magazine will 
contain the preliminary announcement of The 
Forum's nineteenth season, October 1939 to 
April 1940. 

We can promise confidently that the coming 
season's program will be at least as interesting 
and as high in quality as any that has preceded it. 

All Forum events next season will be on 
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday or Thursday 
evenings. In response to the request of many 
members there will be no Friday evening events. 

Watch for the May announcement, and mean- 
while you might tell your friends about The 
Forum's pleasant evenings. 



Academy of Music 

APRIL 10, 1939 

THE PHILADELPHIA FORUM 

PRESENTS 

JOSEF HOFMANN, Pianist 

and 

THE CURTIS SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

Fritz Reiner Conducting 



^ 



'Progra 



m 



Egmont Overture, Opus 84 Beethoven 

Concerto No. 5 in E flat major, Opus 73 Beethoven 

Allegro 

Adagio un poco moto 

Rondo: Allegro 

Mr. Hofmann 

INTERMISSION 

Navarra Alheniz 

Habanera Auhert 

The Swan of Tuonela Sibelius 

March from the Karelia Suite Sibelius 

Wiener Blut (Valse) Johann Strauss 

Steinway Piano 

This is the final event of the season. 



THE PHILADELPHIA FORUM 

1124-1126 LINCOLN-LIBERTY BUILDING 



PRESIDENT 

CHARLES E. BEURY 

VICE-PRESIDENT 

THOMAS RAEBURN WHITE 

TREASURER 

CLARENCE GARDNER 



CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD 

CURTIS BOK 

HONORARY PRESIDENT 

ROLAND S. MORRIS 

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR 

WILLIAM K. HUFF 



The Board oj Governors 



CHARLES E. BEURY 

MRS. EDWARD W. BIDDLE 

FRANCIS BIDDLE 

CURTIS BOK 

MRS. CURTIS BOK. 

MRS. EDWARD BOK 

MRS. JAMES CHADWICK COLLINS 

WILLIAM H. FINESHRIBER 



CLARENCE GARDNER 
JOSEPH H. HAGEDORN 
LUTHER A. HARR 
EARL G. HARRISON 
GEORGE W. NORRIS 
SAMUEL B. SCOTT 
S. P. WETHERILL, JR. 
THOMAS RAEBURN WHITE 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE 
OF MUSIC 

Presents a 

RECITAL OF COMPOSITIONS 

by 

ROSARIO SCALERO 

Thursday Evening, May A, 1939, at 8:30 o'clock 



AT THE PLAYS AND PLAYERS 

1714 Delancey Street 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 



The Steinway m the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



PROGRAMME 



I 



Sonata for Violin and Piano, Opus 12 

Allegro — Adagio — Vivace ma appassionato 

Lea Luboshutz, Violin 
Edith Evans Braun, Piano 



II 

String Quartet with Voice, Opus 31 

(Rain in the Pine Woods) 

The Curtis String Quartet 

Jascha Brodsky^ Max Aronoff, Viola 

Charles Jaffe j '"'*' Orlando Cole, Violoncello 

Selma Amansky, Dramatic Soprano 



Ihis work was first performed in 1922 by the Flonzaley Quartet, but has since been 
entirely rewritten by Mr. Scalero. The text is from "Alcione," the third book of 
Gabrielc d'Annunzio's "Laudi," which posterity will undoubtedly recognize as an enduring 
work of genius. The poem is a marvel of human sensitiveness, in which a woman whom 
he calls Hermione and the poet himself are described. Walking in the pine woods in the 
rain, they arc so identified with nature that they become one with it. Owing to the fact 
that a literal translation into English of d'Annunzio's classic Italian is not possible, the 
following version was prepared by Ronald Clark, in the attempt to translate, at best imper- 
fectly, the pervadinj, atmosphere of the poem. 



1 

Be still! On the threshold of the forest I no longer hear the words that you utter, 
but those of a new and unfamiliar language which the rain-drops and leaves of the forest 
are murmuring. 

Listen! The rain is falling from scattered clouds on the arid and brackish tamarisk. 
It falls on the rugged and bristling pines — on the sacred myrtle, and golden gorse with its 
clustering flowers, and it falls on the juniper, laden with pungent berries. It falls on our 
faces tanned by the sun and on our hands that are bare to the rain. It falls on our thin 
raiment — on the budding thoughts which the soul, newly born, has revealed — on the 
beautiful dream that yesterday was yours and is mine today, O' Hermione! 



Dost hear? In the lonely forest the rain is falling, its unending song varying in tone 
as the drops fall on the denser foliage or on the sparse verdure. 

Listen! The cicada answers the plaint of the forest, and is not alarmed by the threaten- 
ing sky. One hears the melody of the pine and the myrtle, and that of the junip^er tree, 
separate instruments each, played upon by fingers innumerable. The woodland magic 
enfolds us — we arc living the life of the trees. 

And your radiant face is moist with the rain, like the leaves of the forest. 
And fragrnnt your hair with the scent of the gorse, 
O earth-born child called Hermione! 



Hark! Hark! the song of the crickets grows fainter and fainter as the plaint of the forest 
increases. Eut now from the shadowy distance a harsher note is borne to our ears and 
mingles its hoarse lament with the song of the forest. Now duller, now fainter, it lingers, 
and then expires. One note still trembles — grows faint, only to revive, then quiver and 
die. Stilled is the voice of the sea. 

Again one hears the downpour of the rain, the silvery, cleansing rain, its unending song 
varying in tone as the drops fall on the denser foliage or on the sparse \ierdure. Listen! 
the cicada, daughter of the air, is mute, but the frog, offspring of the distant swamp, 
cro.iks in the shadows — who knows where? Who knows where? And the raindrops fall 
on your lashes, 
O Hermicne! 



The raindrops fall on your dark lashes, and it is as though you wept — but for joy. 

Not pale but almost transparent, you seem like the vital essence of the trees. 

And within our souls life is fragrant and new. Our hearts are fresh, like fruit still 

untouched. 

Your eyes 'neath their eyelids are like pools in the grass; 

And your teeth like almonds white tipped in their shell. 

And we wander from bush to bush, now together, now parted. 

While the rude undergrowth entangles our ankles, and the growing vines brush our knees. 

Who knows whither? Who knows whither? 

And the rain falls on our faces tanned by the sun, and on our hands that are bare to the 

rain. It falls on our thin raiment — on the budding thoughts which the soul, newly born, 

has revealed — on the beautiful dream that yesterday was mine, and is yours today, 

O Hermione! 

Ill 

Eight Preludes (Canons in all intervals from octave to unison) 
for Piano, Opus 21 

Jeanne Behrend 



IV 

Seven Songs in Cyclic Form for Voice and String Quintet, 

Opus 32 

Selma Amansky 

Jascha Brodsky| Orlando Cole ^ 

Charles Jaffe f^'^^"^' Nathan Stutch/^'^^^^^^^^^ 

Max Aronoff, Viola 

1. T FORZIERI 

{The Shrines) Text by Peter Rosegger, 1843-1918 

In three divine shrines we lie: in a cradle of dreams, in a bed of joys, on 
a bier of peace. 

2. PEGNO 

(Forgiveness) Anonymous 

Desires for which I yearned, sacred pledges, winged dreams, all are burned 
in the adverse flame lighted by a blindly cruel hand. 

Now swallow your bitter tears and forgive, O my soul, the one who broke 
faith, despised joy, laughed at pain, then forgot and did not regret. 



3. MESSAGGIO 

{The Message) Text by Paul Gauguin 

O gentle wind from the south that plays about my head, hurry to the 
neighboring highlands. Lying in the shadow of his favorite tree, there you will 
find the one who abandoned me. Tell him that you have seen me in tears. 



4. O CROCEVIA 

(O Crossroad) Text by Stefan George, 1868-193 3 

O crossroad! we have reached the end. The night has fallen. Brief 
pilgrimage; who is tired? To me the way was long. I suffer; I am tired. You 
have refused my outstretched hands; you have not heard my sighs. My own 
road you will not see again. Tears are falling; you do not see them. 



5. PRIM A VERA D'AMORE 

(Springtime of Love) Text by Frederich Riickert, 1788-1866 

Thou art my life, my soul and heart, my joy and sadness, my world of bliss, 
my matchless lover. Through thy love rest and peace come to me. Thou art 
the grave in which I cast my sorrows. Through thy love, my inner self is 
revealed. 



FIABA 

(A Tale) Text by Gustav Falke, 1859-1916 

Near you, my dearest, I am happy; close to you in the shadow of your 
lovely presence, I return to my gay and ardent youth. I love you! Outside the 
roses are already in bloom. So it was once, O my love! O, dream of a golden 
day! In the sky, clouds float across the valley of my past. 



7. I.A NOTTE 

{TJoe Night) Text by von Eichendorflf, 1788-1857 

The night is a silent sea. Joy and love, sorrow and pain, are blended as 
the soft beating of the waves. 

My desire is like a cloud, floating through the sky in the soft night wind. 
I cannot tell if it is a dream or a thought. I long to tell the sky of my pain, 
which lies deep in my heart, like the soft beating of the waves. 



V 

Suite for String Orchestra and Quartet, Opus 20 

Conducted by Alexander Hilsberg 

Frederick Vogelgesang"1 George Brown, YioJa 

Marguerite Kuehne I ' Samuel Mayes, Violoncello 



STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 
KutztoViHi, Pennsylvania 

Wednesday, October 19, 1933 at 10:30 A.M. 

Frederick Vogelgesang, Violin 
Howard Vanderburg, Baritone 
Louis Shub, Accompanist 

of 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 
Programme 
I 



Fugiae in A major 

Romance in G major. Opus 40 

Tambourin Chinois 



Tartini-Kreisier 

Beethoven 

Kreisler 



Frederick Vogelgesang 
II 



Dank sei Dir, Herr 
liebliche Yvangen 
Die beiden Grenadiere 
Chanson du Toreador 



n 

Handel 

Brahms 

Schumann 

Bizet 



Howard Vanderburg 
III 

Alt-Wien Godowsky-Heifetz 

Moto perpetuo. Opus 11 Paganini 

Introduction et Taran telle, Opus 43 Sarasate 

Frederick Vogelgesang 

IV 



The green-eyed dragon 
The bonnie Earl of Moray 
The hills of home 
Deep river 
Land uv degradashun 



arr. 



arr, 



Wollesley 

by Kreisler 

Fox 

by Burleigh 

MacGimsey 



Howard Vanderburg 



STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 
Millersville, Pennsylvania 

Wednesday, October 26, 1938 at 8:00 P.M. 

Joint Recital 
by 
Noah Bielski, Violin Sol Kaplan, Piano 

of 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 
Programme 



First movement of Sonata in A major (K305) Mozart 
Allegro raolto 



II 



Grand adagio Glazounov, arr. by Zimbalist 
Valse Tschaikovsky 

Etude in thirds Scriabin, arr. by Szigeti 
Noah Bielski 



III 



Polonaise in A flat major, Opus 53 
Can^o i dansa 

Etude d' execution transcendante, 
No. 10 in F minor 

Sol Kaplan 

IV 

Sonata in F major, Opus 24 
Allegro 

Adagio molto espressivo 
Scherzo 
Rondo 



Chopin 

Morapou 

Liszt 



Beethoven 



WOMAN'S CLUB AUDITORIUM 
LYNCHBURG, VIRGL^IA 

Friday, November 4, 1936 at 3:50 P.M. 

Sol Kaplan, Piano 
Noah Bielski, Violin 
Nathan Stutch, Violoncello 

of 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

PrograiQjne 

I 



First movement from Trio in B flat 
major, Opus 99 
Allegro raoderato 



Schubert 



II 



Grand adagio 

Valse 

Etude in thirds 



Glazounov, arr. by Zimbalist 
Tschaikovsky 
Scriabin, arr. by Szigeti 
Noah Bielski 



III 



Polonaise in A flat major. Opus 53 
Canco i dansa 

Etude d' execution transcendante, 
No. 10 in F minor 

Sol Kaplan 

IV 

Trio in C minor, Opus 101 
Allegro energico 
Presto non assai 
Andante grazioso 
Allegro molto 



Chopin 
Mompou 

Liszt 



Brahms 



JUNIATA COLLEGE 
Huntingdon, Pennsylvania 

Saturday, November 5, li^Sd at 6:15 P.M. 

Sol Kaplan, Piano 
Noah Bielski, Violin 
Nathan Stutch, Violoncello 

of 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

Prograrame 

I 



First movement from Trio in B flat 
major, Opus 99 
Allegro moderato 



II 



Schubert 



Grand adagio 

Valse 

Etude in thirds 



Glazounov, arr. by Zimbalist 

Tschaikovsky 

Scriabin, arr. by Szigeti 



Noah Bielski 

III 

Polonaise in A flat major, Opus 53 
Can^o i dansa 

Etude d' Execution trans cendante, 
No. 10 in F minor 

Sol Kaplan 

IV 

Trio in C minor. Opus 101 
Allegro energico 
Presto non assai 
Andante grazioso 
Allegro molto 



Chopin 
Mompou 

Liszt 



Brahms 



THE CONVENT OF THE SACRED HEART 
Overbrook, Pennsylvania 

Tuesday-, November 8, 1928 at 3:4£ P.M. 

Noah Bielski, Violin 
Donald Hultgren, Tenor 
Eugene Bossart 
Louis Shub ) Accompanists 

of 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 
Programme 



Grand adagio Glazounov, arr. by Zimbalist 

Valse Tschaikovsky 

Etude in thirds Scriabin, arr. by Szigeti 

Noah Bielski 



II 



"Che gelida manina" from "La Boheme" 
del mio amato ben 
Vaghissima serabianza-' 

Donald Hultgren 

III 



Puccini 
Donaudy 



La fille aux cheveux de lin 
Tzigane 

Noah Bielski 



Debussy 
Ravel 



IV 



Where e'er you walk 

The star 

My lady walks in loveliness 

Roadways 

Donald Hultgren 



Handel 

Rogers 

Charles 

Rose 



WASHINGTON COLLEGE 
Chestertown, Maryland 

Thursday, November 10, 1938 at 11 A.M. 

Sol Kaplan, Piano 
Noah Bielski, Violin 
Nathan Stutch, Violoncello 

of 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF wlUSIC 

Programme 

I 

First movement from Trio in B flat 
major. Opus 99 Schubert 

Allegro moderato 

II 

Grand adagio Glazounov, arr. by Zimbalist 
Valse Tschaikovsky 

Etude in thirds Scriabin, arr. by Szigeti 
Noah Bielski 



III 



Polonaise in A flat major. Opus 53 
Cancjo i dansa 

Etude d' execution transcendante, 
No. 10 in F minor 

Sol Kaplan 

IV 

Trio in C minor, Opus 101 
Allegro energico 
Presto non assai 
Andante grazioso 
Allegro molto 



Chopin 
Mompou 

Liszt 



Brahms 



WESTTOVvN SCHOOL 
Westtown, Pennsylvania 

Saturday, November 12, 1938 at 7:30 P.M. 

Frederick Vogelgesang, Violinist 
Donald Hultgren, Tenor 
Annette Elkanova, Pianist 
Eugene Bossart, Accompanist 

of 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE Of MUSIC 

Programme 
I 



Fugue in A major 

Romance in G major. Opus 40 

Tambourin Chinois 

Frederick Vogelgesang 



Tartini-Kreisler 

Beethoven 

Kreisler 



II 



^Che gelida manina" from "La Boheme" 
del raio amato ben 
Vaghissima sembianza) 

Donald Hultgren 



Puccini 
Donaudy 



III 



Berceuse 

Scherzo in C sharp minor^ 

Annette Elkanova 



Chopin 



IV 



Alt-Wien 

Moto perpetuo, Opus 11 

Introduction et Tarantelle, Opus 43 

Frederick Vogelgesang 



Godowsky-Heifetz 
Pagan in i 



Sarasate 



V/here e'er you walk 


Handel 


The star 


Rogers 


My lady walks in loveliness 


Charles 


Roadways 

Donald Hultgren 
VI 


Rose 


Prelude in E flat major 


Rachmaninov 


L'isle joyeuse 


Debussy 



Annette Elkanova 



DuPONT COUNTRY CLUB 
PennsgTove, New Jersey 

Sunday, November 13, 1958 at 5:00 P.M. 

Mary Norris, Piano 

Howard Vanderburg, Baritone 

James Shomate, Accompanist 

of 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 
Programme 

I 



Symphonische Etuden in Form von 
Variationen, Opus 13 

Mary Norris 

II 

Dank sei Dir, Herr 
liebliche Vvangen 
Die beiden Grenadiere 
Chanson du Toreador 

Howard Vanderburg 

III 

Poissons d'or 

Prelude in G major, Opus 32, No. 5 

Andaluza 

Mary Norris 

IV 



Schumann 



Handel 

Brahms 

Schumann 

Bizet 



Debussy 

Rachmaninoff 

de Falla 



The green-eyed dragon 
The bonnie Earl of Moray 
Deep river 
Land uv degradashun 



Yvollesley 
arr. by Kreisler 
arr. by Burleigh 

MacGimsey 



Howard Vanderburg 



UNIVERSITI OF DELAV^ARE 
Newark, Delaware 

Thursday, November 17, 193cj at 6:00 P.M. 

Sol Kaplan, Piano 
Noah Bielski, Violin 
Nathan Stutch, Violoncello 

of 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

Programme 

I 



First movement from Trio in B flat 
major. Opus 99 
Allegro moderato 



Schubert 



II 



Grand adagio 

Valse 

Etude in thirds 



Glazounov, arr. by Zimbalist 

Tschaikovsky 

Scriabin, arr. by Szigeti 

Noah Bielski 



III 

Polonaise in A flat major, Opus 63 
Canco i dansa 

Etude d' execution transcendante. 
No. 10 in F minor 

Sol Kaplan 

IV 



Chopin 
Mompou 

Liszt 



Trio in C minor. Opus 101 
Allegro energico 
Presto non assai 
Andante grazioso 
Allegro molto 



ijrahms 



Um CENTURY CLUB 
Kennett Square, Pennsylvania 

Tuesday, November Z2, 1938 at 6:15 P.M. 

Robert Gay, Baritone 

Eugene Bossart, at the Piano 

of 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

Programme 

I 



Nacht und Traume 
Ich grolle nicht ) 

Die Rose, die Lili% die Taube) 
V.enn ich in deine Augen seh ) 
M or gen I 

Robert Gay 
II 

Jesu, joy of man's desiring 

Etude in E major 

Rondo from Sonata No. 1 in C major 

Eugene Bossart 

III 

"Vision fugitive" from "Herodiade" 
Nebbie 

Robert Gay 

IV 

Homing 

Do not go, my love 

Kills of home 

Blo7v, blow, thou winter wind 

The sleigh 

Clouds 

Robert Gay 



Schubert 

Schumann 

Strauss 



Bach-Hess 

Paganini-Liszt 

von T^eber 



Massenet 
Respighi 



Del Riego 

Hageman 

Fox 

Quilter 

Kountz 

Charles 



LINDEN HALL 
Lititz, Pennsylvania 

Monday, November 28, 1938 at 3:00. P.M. 

Howard Vanderburg, Baritone 
Annette Elkanova, Pianist 
Louis Shub, Accompanist 



of 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF .^SIC 



Programme 



Dank sei Dir, Herr 
liebliche Vitangen 
Die beiden Grenadiere 
Chanson du Toreador 

Howard Vanderburg 
II 

Berceuse 

Scherzo in C sharp rainor^ 

Annette Elkanova 
III 

The green-eyed dragon 

The hills of home 

The bonnie Earl of Moray arr. 

Deep river arr. 

Land uv degradashun 

Howard Vanderburg 

IV 

L'isle joyeuse 

Prelude in E flat major 

Toccata 



Handel 

Brahms 

Schumann 

Bizet 



Chopin 



Wollesley 

Fox 

\}y Kreisler 

by Burleigh 

MacGimsey 



Debussy 

Rachmaninoff 

Ravel 



Annette Elkanova 



V,OMAN'S CLUB 
West Pittston, Pennsylvania 

Tuesday, November 29, 1938 at 2:50 P.M. 

Reba Robinson, Harp 
Burnett Atkinson, Flute 
Nathan Stutch, Violoncello 

of 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

Programme 



Pieces en concert 



Rameau 



II 



Le cygne 

Menuet 

Serenade espagnole 



Saint-Saens 

Debussy 
Glazounov 



Nathan Stutch 
III 



Sonata in C minor 
Allegro vigoroso 
Andantino espressivo 
Presto 
Gavotte from "Armide" 
Theme and variations 



Pescetti 



Gluck 

Haydn 



Reba Robinson 

IV 

First and second movements of Sonata 
in F major 

Adagio 

Allegro 
Habanera 
En bateau 

Burnett Atkinson 



Marcello 



Ravel 
Debussy 



WiAM'S CLUB 
West Pittston, Pennsylvania 
(continued) 



V 



First movement of Trio Sonata in 

B minor 

The little windmills 

Menuet 

Dorienne from "Divertissement grec" 



Loeillet 

Couperin 

Valensin 

Mouquet 



THE MARY GASTON BAR1JV\'ELL FOUNDATION 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

Thursday, December i, 1938 

Phyllis Moss, Piano 
Robert Gay, Baritone 
Frederick Vogelgesang, Violin 
Louis Shub, Accompanist 

of 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

Programme 

I 

Ballade in A flat major, Opus 47 ) 
Nocturne in F sharp major. Opus 15, No. Z) 
Waltz in A flat major. Opus 42 ) 

Phyllis Moss 

II 



Chopin 



On the road to Mandalay 

Homing 

Without a song 

Hills of home 

The sleigh 

Robert Gay 

III 

Variations on a theme by Corelli 
Ave Maria 
Alt-V,ien 
Tambourin chinois 



Speaks 

del Riego 

Youmans 

Fox 

Kountz 



Tartini-Kreisler 

Bach-Gounod 

Godowsky-Heifetz 

Kreisler 



Frederick Vogelgesang 



ELIZABETHTOlft'N COLLEGE 
Elizabeth town, Pennsylvania 

Friday, December Z, 1938 at 3 P.M. 

Howard Vanderburg, Baritone 
Frederick Vogelgesang, Violin 
Louis Shub, Accornpanist 

of 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

Programme 
I 



Dank sei Dir, Herr 
liebliche Viiangen 
Feldeinsamkeit ) 
Der Husar, trarai 



Howard Vanderburg 
II 



Handel 

Brahms 
Schumann 



Bach 



Arioso 

Variations on a theme by Corelli Tartini-Kreisler 

Mo to perpetuo, Opus 11 Paganini 

Frederick Vogelgesang 
III 



Tu lo sai 

del mio amato ben 

Sotto il ciel 

"Quand'ero paggio" from "Falstaff" 

Howard Vanderburg 

IV 

Romance in G major, Opus 40 
Hymn to the sun 
Introduction et Tarantelle 



Torelli 

Donaudy 

Sibella 

Verdi 



Beethoven 

Rimsky-Korsakov 

Sarasate 



Frederick Vogelgesang 
V 



Pilgrim's song 
None but the lonely heart) 
Little David, play on your harp 
Land uv degradashun 



Tschaikovsky 

arr, by Johnson 
MacGimsey 



Howard Vanderburg 



VvOMN'S CLUB AUDITORIUM 
Lynchburg, Virginia 

Friday, December 9, 1933 at 3:30 P.M. 

Florence Kirk, Soprano 
Eugene Bossart, at the Piano 

of 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 
Programme 



Gretchen am Spinnrade 

Marienwurmchen 

Ein Schwan 

Hat dich die Liebe beruhrt 

Florence Kirk 

II 

Madchenlied ) 

Auf dera Kirchhofe ) 

Der Tod, das ist die kuhle Nacht) 
Vergebliches Standchen ) 

Florence Kirk 

III 

Jesu, joy of man's desiring 

Etude in E major 

Rondo from Sonata No. 1 in C major 

Eugene bossart 
IV 

Viiild geese 

Danny boy 

The little shepherd's song 

The daisies 

At the well 

Florence Kirk 



Schubert 

Schumann 

Grieg 

Marx 



Brahms 



Bach-He ss 

Paganini-Liszt 

von 7iieber 



Rogers 

Old Irish Air 

v;atts 

Barber 
Hageman 



II pleure dans mon coeur 
Green ) 

"Ritorna vincitor" from "Aida" 



Debussy 
Ravel 



Florence Kirk 



DuPONT COUNTRY CLUB 
PENNSGROVE, UEW JERSEY 

Sunday, December 11, 1938 at 5:00 P.M. 

Reba Robinson, Harp 
Burnett Atkinson, Flute 
Nathan Stutch, Violoncello 

of 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

Programme 

I 

Pieces en concert 



II 



Le cygne 

Menuet 

Serenade espagnole 



Rameau 



Saint-Saens 

Debussy 

Gla2,ounov 



Nathan Stutch 
III 

Sonata in C minor 

Allegro vigoroso 

Andantino espressivo 

Presto 
Gavotte from "Armide" 
Zephyrs 

Reba Robinson 

IV 

First and second movements of 
Sonata in F major 

Adagio 

Allegro 
Habanera 
En bateau 

Burnett Atkinson 

V 

First movement of Trio Sonata in B minor 

The little windmills 

Dorienne from "Divertissement grec" 



Pescetti 



Gluck 
Salzedo 



Marcello 



Ravel 
Debussy 



Loeillet 
Couperin 

Mouquet 



SLEIGKTON FAMS 
Darling P.O., Pennsylvania 

Thursday, December 15, 1938 at 7:50 P.M. 

Robert Gay, Baritone 

Phyllis Moss, Piano 

Eugene Bossart, Accompanist 

of 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

Programme 

I 

Tu lo sai Torelli 

Donzelle, fuggite Cavalli 

Nebbie Respighi 

"Quand'ero paggio" from "Falstaff" Verdi 

Robert Gay 

II 

Ballade in A flat major. Opus 47 ) 
Nocturne in F sharp major. Opus 15, No. 2) Chopin 
TJaltz in A flat major. Opus 42 ) 

Phyllis Moss 

III 

Preach not me Arne, arr. by Endicott 

Drink to me only with thine eyes arr. by Quilter 



Passing by 

Blow, blow, thou winter wind 

Robert Gay 

IV 

Prelude in A minor 
Clair de lune / 
Gncraenreigen 
Polonaise in E major^ 

Phyllis Moss 

V 

Homing 

Do not go, my love 

Pilgrim's song 

None but the lonely hearth 



Edward Purcell 
Quilter 



Debussy 
Liszt 



Del Riego 
Hageman 

Tschaikovsky 



Robert Gay 



GEORGE SCHOOL 
George School, Pennsylvania 

Saturday, January 7, 1939 at 8:00 P.M. 

Robert Grooters, Baritone 

Phyllis Moss, Piano 

Eugene Bossart, Accompanist 

of 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

Programme 

I 

Recitative and Aria from "The Messiah": 

"Thus said the Lord." "But who may abide" Handel 

Have yoa seen but a whyte lillie grow? Old English 

A shepherd in a shade 

I must complain ) Dowland 

Robert Grooters 
II 



Chopin 



Ballade in A flat major, Opus 47 ) 
Nocturne in F sharp major. Opus 15, No, 2) 
Vnaltz in A flat major, Opus 42 ) 

Phyllis Moss 

III 

Aui dem Viasser zu singen Schubert 

Mondnacht Schumann 

V»enn du zu den Blumen gehst vVolf 

Robert Grooters 
IV 



Prelude in A minor 
Clair de lune ) 
Gnomenreigen 
Polonaise in E major' 



Pilgrim's song 

Jean 

The glory road 



Phyllis Moss 
V 



Debussy 
Liszt 



Tschaikovsky 
Spross 

Wolfe 



Robert Grooters 



SOROPTIMIST CLUB 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

Saturday, January 7, 1939 at d:50 P.M. 

Howard Vanderburg, Baritone 
Frederick Vogelgesang, Violin 
Louis Shub, Accompanist 

of 

Tffi CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

Programme 

I 



Dank sei Dir, Herr 
Fischervveise 
Ruhe, meine Seele 
Der Kusar, traral 



Handel 

Schubert 

Strauss 

Schumann 



Howard Vanderburg 

II 

Arioso Bach 

Variations on a theme by Corelli Tartini-Kreisler 

Hymn to the sun Rimsky-Korsakov 

Introduction et Tarantelle Sarasate 



Frederick Vogelgesang 



PALMYRA HIGH SCHOOL 
Palmyra, New Jersey 

Tuesday, January 51, 1939 at 6:40 A.M. 

Noah Bielski, Violin 
Louis Shub, at the Piano 

of 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

Programme 

I 

Concerto in D major Paganini-Kreisler 

(a transcription of the original concerto by 

Fritz Kreisler) 

Noah Bielski 

II 

First movement of Waldstein Sonata, Opus 53 

Beethoven 
March from "The love of three oranges" Prokofiev 
Gnomenreigen Liszt 

Louis Shub 

III 



Nocturne in C sharp minor 
Hungarian dance 
Etude in thirds 
Tzigane 



Chopin-Milstein 

Brahms-Kreisler 

Scriabin-Szigeti 

Ravel 



Noah Bielski 



UNIVERSITY OF DELA\URE 
Newark, Delaware 

Thursday, February 16, 1939 at 6:00 P.M. 

Robert Gay, Baritone 
Frederick Vogelgesang, Violin 
Eugene Bossart, Accompanist 

of 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 
Programme 
I 



Tu lo sai 

Che fiero costume 

Sotto 11 ciel 

Nebbie 

Robert Gay 

II 

Arioso 

Variations on a theme by Corelli 
Romance in G major. Opus 40 
Praeludium and Allegro 



Torelli 
Legrenzi 

Sibella 
Respighi 



Bach 

Tartini-Kreisler 

Beethoven 

Kreisler 



Frederick Vogelgesang 

III 

"Credo di lago" from "Otello" 

Robert Gay 

IV 

Concerto No, 1 in D major 

Frederick Vogelgesang 

V 

Eifersucht und Stolz 
Der Neugierige ^ 
Traum durch die Daramerang 
Du bist so jung 



Verdi 



Paganini 



Schubert 

Strauss 
Violff 



Robert Gay 



JEPTHA ABBOTT CHAPTER OF THE D.A.R. 
International House 
University of Pennsylvania 

Friday, February' k4, 1939 at 8:15 P.M. 

Herbert Baumel, Violin 
Louis Shub, Accompanist 

of 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 
Programme 



Second and third movements from 
Concerto in D major, Opus 6 

Lar ghetto 

Rondo 

Allegretto 

Nigun 

Roumanian folk dances 



Beethoven 



Kreisler 

Bloch 

Bartbk-Szekely 



PEMbERTON MUSIC CLUB 
Pemberton, Nev; Jersey 

Thursday, March 9, 1939 at 8:15 P.M. 

Veda Reynolds, Violin 

Donald Coker, Tenor 

Eugene Bossart, Accompanist 



of 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



Sonata No. 4 in D major 
Adagio 
Allegro 
Larghetto 
Allegro 



Handel 



Veda Reynolds 

II 

Tu lo sai 
Donzelle fuggite 
Lasciatemi morire 
Spirate pur, s pirate 

Donald Coker 
III 

Andante 

Variations on a theme by Corelli 



Torelli 

Cavalli 

Monte verde 

Donaudy 



J. S. Bach 
Tartini-Kreisler 



Veda Reynolds 




IV 




"E lucevan le s telle" from "Tosca" 


Puccini 


Donald Coker 




V 




Impromptu 

La fille aux cheveux de lin 
Caprice after the etude in form of 
a waltz of Saint-Saens 


Aulin 
Debussy 

Ysaye . 



Veda Reynolds 



PEMBERTON MUSIC CLUB 
Pemberton, New Jersey 
(continued) 



VI 

Drink to me only arr. by Quilter 

The sailor's life Old English 

Now sleeps the crimson petal Quilter 

The sleigh Kountz 

Donald Coker 



STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 
Kutztovm, Penns;, Ivania 

Wednesday, iyiarch 29, 1939 at 10:50 A.M. 

Reba Robinson, Harp 
Burnett Atkinson, Flute 
'True Chappell, Violoncello 

of 

THE GJRTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 
Programme 



Adagio from Sonata No. 8 


Leclair 


Andante grazioso 


Haydn 


First and second movements of Trio 




Sonata in B minor 


Loeillet 


Largo 




Allegro 





II 

Ballade 

Reba Robinson 
III 
First and second movements of Sonata 



Salzedo 



in F major 




Mar cello 


Adagio 






Allegro 






En bateau 




Debussy 


Chanson 


Burnett Atkinson 
IV 


Camus 


Menuet 




Ravel 


Traumerei 




Strauss 


Russian songs 




Glinka 



STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 
Millersville, Pennsylvania 

V.ednesday, April Ik:, 1939 at 6:00 P.M. 

Reba Robinson, Harp 
burnett Atkinson, Flute 
Nathan Stutch, Violoncello 

of 

THE CURTIS liNSTITUTE OF ivrjSIC 

PrO£,ramine 

I 

First and second movements of Trio Sonata 

in B minor Loeillet 

Largo 

Allegro 

II 



Prayer from "Jewish life" 

Menuet 

Serenade espagnole 



Bloch 

Debussy 

Glazounov 



Ballade 



Nathan Stutch 
III 

Reba Robinson 
IV 



Salzedo 



First and second movements of Sonata 



in F major 




Marcello 


Adagio 






Allegro 






En bateau 




Debussy 


Habanera 


Burnett Atkinson 
V 


Ravel 


Russian songs 




Glinka 


Menuet 




Ravel 



WOMAN'S CLUB AJDITORIUM 
Lynchburg, Virginia 

Friday, April 14, 1939 at 3:30 P.M. 

Donald Coker, Tenor 

Eugene Bossart, at the Piano 

of 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF wIUSIC 

Programme 

I 

"But Thou didst not leave His soul 

in hell" from the "Messiah" Handel 

Donzelle, fuggite Cavalli 

Lasciatemi morire Monteverde 

Donald Coker 



II 



Toccata and fugue in D minor 

Jesu,_joy of man's desiring 

The music box 

Scherzo in B minor 

Rondo from Sonata No. 1 in C 



major 



Bach-Tausig 

Bach-Hess 

Liebach 

Chopin 

von Weber 



Eugene Bossart 



Note: Mr. Coker was unable to sing his complete 
program because of laryngitis. 



THE MARY GASTON BARUV/ELL FOUNDATION 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

Friday, April 14, 1939 

Marguerite Kuehne, Violin 
Annette Elkanova, Piano 
Howard Vanderburg, baritone 
Louis Shub, Accompanist 

of 

THE CaRTIS INSTITUTE OF ;;IUSIC 

Progranirne 

I 

Praeludium and Allegro 

La fille aux cheveux de lin 

Zigeunerweisen 

Margiaerite Kuehne 

II 



Kreisler 

Debussy 
Sarasate 



Fantaisie-Improinptu, Opus 66 
La valse oubliee 
L'isle joyeuse 



Chopin 

Liszt 
Debussy 



Annette Elkanova 

III 

He, Zigeuner ) 

Lieber Gott, du weisst ) 
Roslein dreie, in der Reihe) 



Brahms 



"Nemico della Patria" from "Andrea Ch^nier" Giordano 



Gwine to Hebb'n 
Down to de river 



Wolfe 

MacGimsey 



Howard Vanderburg 



ALL-URSINUS CONFERENCE 
Collegeville, Pennsylvania 

Sunday, April 16, 1939 at ^:00 P.iVi. 

Marguerite Kuehne, Violin 
Howard Vanderburg, Baritone 
Louis Shub, Accompanist 

of 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE Of MUSIC 
Progratnrae 



Romance in G major, Opus 40 
Praeludiura and Allegro 

Marguerite Kuehne 

II 

Dank sei Dir, Herr 
He, Zigeuner ) 

Lieber Gott, du weisst ) 
RBslein dreie, in der Reihe) 
Rote Abendwolken zieh'n ) 

Howard Vanderburg 

III 

La Folia 



Beethoven 
Kreisler 



Handel 



Brahms 



Corelli-Kreisler 



Marguerite Kuehne 

IV 

Preach not me Arne, arr. by Endicott 

Sheila Kellogg 

y.hen I think upon the maidens Head 

Gwine to Hebb'n Wolfe 

Dovm to de river i'^cGimsey 

Howard Vanderburg 



V70MAH'S CLUB 
Bryn Mawr, Permsi^lvania 

Monday, April 17, 1939 at 2:4£ P.M. 

Annette Elkanova, Pianist 

of 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

Programme 

I 

Organ choral prelude - "Ich ruf'zu 
dir, Herr" 

Prelude in E minor, Opus 35, No. 1 
Rondo capriccioso. Opus 14 ' 

II 

P'antaisie-Impromptu, Opus 66 ) 
Waltz in A flat major. Opus 69, No. 1) 
Waltz in D flat major. Opus 64, No. 1) 
Scherzo in C sharp minor. Opus 39 ) 

III 



Bach-Bus oni 
Mendelssohn 



Chopin 



Rush hour in Hong Kong 
La valse oubliee 
L'isle joyeuse 



Chasins 

Liszt 

Debussy 



RAVENHILL ACADEVII CHAPEL FUND 

Recital at the home of Mrs. Langdon 

GermantoiMi, Pennsylvania 

Saturday, April ^2, 1939 at 4 o'clock 

Lynne Wainwright, Harp 
Burnett Atkinson, Flute 
Nathan Stutch, Violoncello 

of 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 
Programme 

I 

First and second movements of Trio Sonata 
in B minor 

Largo 

Allegro 

Flute solos: Chanson 

Allegretto 

The little windmills 



Loeillet 



Camus 
Godard 

Couperin 



II 



Ave Maria 

Harp solos: Bourree 

Fraicheur 

Panis angelicus 



Bach-Gounod 

Bach 
Salzedo 

Franck 



III 



Violoncello solos: Praver from "Jewish life" Bloch 

Serenade espagnole Glazounov 



Menuet 

Adagio from Sonata No. 8 

Tambour in I and II 



Bach 

Leclair 

Rameau 



BETHLEHHVI FRIENDS OF MUSIC 
Bethlehem, Pennsylvania 

Tuesday, ApriQ 25, 1939 at 3:30 P.M. 

Reba Robinson, Harp 
Burnett Atkinson, Flute 
Nathan Stutch, Violoncello 
Donald Coker, Tenor 
Eugene bossart, Accompanist 



of 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



Programme 



Adagio from Sonata No. 6 in D major 
Andante grazioso 

First and second -movements from Trio 
Sonata in B minor 

Largo 

Allegro 



Leclair 
Haydn 

Loeillet 



II 



Where e'er 


you wal 


k 


Handel 


Lasciatemi 


morire 




Monteverde 


"E luce van 


le stelle" from "Tosca" 


Puccini 






Donald Coker 








III 




Ballsde 
Zephyrs) 




Reba Robinson 
IV 


Salzedo 


Drink to me only 
Sea fever 




arr. by Quilter 
Ireland 


A sailor's 


life 




Old English 


The sleigh 




Donald Coker 
V 


Kountz 


Menuet 






Ravel 


Russian songs 




Glinka 



WOODbaRI MLE CHORUS 
Woodbury, New Jersey 

Thursday, April 27, 1959 at 3:15 P.M. 

Lynne Wainwright, Harp 
Burnett Atkinson, Flute 
Nathan Stutch, Violoncello 

of 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 
Programme 
I 



First and second movements of Trio 
Sonata in B minor 

Largo 

Allegro 

Flute solos: Chanson 

Allegretto 

The little windmills 



Loeillet 



Camus 
Godard 

Couperin 



II 



Menuet 

Harp solos: Bourree 
Giga 

Divertissement grec 



Vaiensin 

Bach 
Corelli 

Mouquet 



Deep river 



III 



arr. by Sal7.edo 



Violoncello solos: Prayer from "Jewish life" Bloch 

Serenade espagnole Glazo^onov 



Menuet 



Ravel 



SCHUI^NN CLUB 
VVildiNood, Nevv Jersey 

Tuesday, May k, 1939 at 8:30 P.M. 

Nathan Stutch, Violoncello 
Howard Vanderburg, Baritone 
Louis Shub, at the Piano 

of 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF ivIUSIC 
Programme 



Handel 

Leoncavallo 

Torelli 

Verdi 



Second and first movements from Concerto 

in B flat major Boccherini 

Adagio (non troppo) 

Allegro moderate 

Nathan Stutch 

II 

"Ombra mai fu" from "Xerxes" 

Mattinata 

Tu lo sai 

"Quand'ero paggio" from "Falstaff" 

Howard Vanderburg 

III 

Rondo from Sonata in C major, Opus 53 Beethoven 
Ballade in G minor, Opus 25 Chopin 

Louis Shub 

IV 

Prayer from "Jewish life" Bloch 

Menuet Debussy 

Serenade espagnole Glazounov 

Nathan Stutch 

V 



Preach not me 

Myself when young 

Sheila 

Gwine to Hebb'n 

Down to de river 



Arne, arr. b> Endicott 

Lehraann 

Kellogg 

Wolfe 

MacGimsey 



GIRARD COLLEGE 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

Saturday, Ma;^ 6, 1939 at 8:15 P.M. 

Noah Bielski, Violin 
Howard Vanderburg, Baritone 
Louis Shub, Accompanist 

of 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 
Programme 
I 



Grand adagio 

Valse 

Etude in thirds 



Glazounov, arr. by Zimbalist 

Tschaikovsky 

Scriabin, arr. by Szigeti 



Noah bielski 

II 

"Orabra raai fu" from "Xerxes" 

Mattinata 

Sotto il ciel 

"Quand'ero paggio" from "Falstaff" 

Howard Vanderburg 

III 

Noah Bielski 
IV 



Tzigane 



Handel 

Leoncavallo 

Sibella 

Verdi 



Ravel 



The blind ploughman 
The green-eyed dragon 
The trumpeter 
Gwine to Hebb'n 



Clarke 

Wolleeley 

Dix 

Vkolfe 



Howard Vanderburg 



WOMM'S CLUB 
Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania 

Monday, May 15, 1939 at 2:30 P.M. 

Howard Vanderburg, Baritone 
Eugene Bossart, Accompanist 

of 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

Programme 

I 

"Blick' ich uraher" from "Tannhauser" 
He, Zigeuner ) 

Lieber Gott, du weisst ) 
RSslein dreie, in der Reihe) 
Rote Abendwolken zieh'n ) 

II 

"Orabra mai fu" from "Xerxes" 

Mattinata 

"Quand'ero paggio" from "Falstaff" 



Wagner 



Brahms 



Handel 

Leoncavallo 

Verdi 



III 



Song of the open road 

My message 

Deep river 

Down to de river 



Malotte 

d'riardelot 

arr. by Burleigh 

MacGirasey 



Note: As part of the above program, the Vnoman's 
Club presented a Reader, who was assisted 
by Phyllis Moss, Piano. 



f 



POLYPHONIC GKOIR 
Gernaantown, Pennsylvania 

Tuesday, May 16, 1939 at 3:30 P.M. 

Veda Reynolds, Violin (assisting) 
Eugene Bossart, Accompanist 

of 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF mSlC 
Programme 
I 



Rondo 

Zephir 



Mozart-Kreisler 
Hubay 



II 



Nigun 

Sea-murraurs 

Caprice, after an etude 

in form of a waltz by Saint-Saens 



Bloch 
Castelnuovo-Tedesco-Heifetz 



Isaye 



WOMAN'S CLUB 
Downing town, Pennsylvania 

Wednesday, May 17, 1939 at 2:50 P.M. 

Robert Grooters, Baritone 
Frederick Vogelgesang, Violin 
Eugene Bossart, Accompanist 

of 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 
Programme 



Caro mio ben 

del mio dolce ardor 

"Infelicel e tuo credevi" from "Ernani" 

Robert Grooters 

II 



Giordani 
Gluck 
Verdi 



La Folia 



Corelli-Kreisler 



Frederick Vogelgesang 

III 

Have you seen but a whyte lillie grow? 
Blow, blow, thou winter wind 
A maid of Alcala 
Birthday song 

Robert Grooters 

IV 

Romance in F major, Opus 50 
Rondo capriccioso. Opus 28 



Old English 

Quilter 

Messager 

MacFadyen 



Beethoven 
Samt-Saens 



Frederick Vogelgesang 



The Curtis Institute of Music 
Radio Programme 

Monday, October }, 193 8 — 3.00 to 3.45 P. M. 

CURTIS STRING QUARTET 

Tascha Brodsky/^,. ,. Max Aronoff, Viola 

•' >• Violins 

Charles Jaffe ) Orlando Cole, Violoncello 



I 

Quartet, Opus 18, No. 1 Beethoven 

Allegro con brio 

Adagio aflettuoso ed appassionato 
-)f Scherzo 
Allegro 

II 

First and second movements from Quartet in Jp minor Barber 

Allegro appassionata 
Adagio 

III 

Second movement from Quartet No. 1 , Opus 10 Debussy 

Assez vif et bien rhythme 

Columbia Broadcasting System 

•Jt- Not played 



The Curtis Institute of Music 
Radio Programme 

Monday, October 10, 193 8 — 3.00 to 3.45 P. M. 

Sol Kaplan, Pianist 
Frederick Vogelgesang, Yiolinist 



I 

Chromatic fantasy and Fugue in D minor J. S. Bach 

Sol Kaplan 

II 

Chaconne in G minor VlTALi 

Frederick Vogelgesang 



III 

Nocturne in E major. Opus 62, No. 2 f Chopin 

Polanaise in A flat major. Opus ^^3) 
Sol Kaplan 

IV 



Malagueiia, Opus 21, No. 1 , 

.Sarasate 



Introduction et Tarantella, Opus 43 f 

Frederick Vogelgesang 



Louis Shub, Accompanist 
Columbia Broadcasting System 



The Curtis Institute of Music 
Radio Programme 

Monday, October 31, 1938 — 3.00 to 4.00 P. M. 

Barbara Thorne, Soprano 

Samuel Mayes, Violoncello 

Genia Robinor, Piano 

I 

"Quando mj'n vo" from "La Boheme" Puccini 

Caro, caro el mio bambin Guarnieri 

Barbara Thorne 
II 

Concerto in A minor Schubert 

Allegro moderato 

Adagio 

Allegretto 

Samuel Mayes 

Genia Robinor 

III 

Sonata in D major f Scarlatti 

Sonata in C major ) 

Prelude in G minor Bach-Siloti 

Genia Robinor 
IV 

L'oasis FOURDRAIN 

"Depuis le jour" from "Louise" Charpentier 

In the silent night Rachmaninoff 

I am the wind Calbreath 

Barbara Thorne 

James Shomate, Accompanist 
Columbia Broadcasting System 



The Curtis Institute of Music 
Radio Programme 

Monday, November 7, 1938 — 3:00 to 4:00 P. M. 

Noah Bielski, Violin 
Robert Gay, Bfiriione 

Eugene Bossart ( Accompanists 
Louis Shub ) 

I 

Grand adagio Glazounov, arr. by Zimbalist 

Valse TscHAiKOVSKY 

Etude in thirds Scriabin, arr. by Szigeti 

Scherzo from "L'Oiseau de feu" Stravinsky, arr. by Dushkin 

Noah Bielski 
II 

"Vision fugitive" from "Herodiade" Massenet 

"Quand'ero paggio" from "Falstaff" Verdi 

Robert Gay 
III 

Jesu, joy of man's desiring Bach-Hess 

Etude in E major Paganini-Liszt 

Rondo from Sonata No. 1 in C major voN Weber 

Eugene Bossart 
IV 

Tu lo sai ToRELLi 

Donzelle, f uggite Cavalli 

Sotto il ciel Sibella 

Nebbie Respighi 

Robert Gay 
V 

Kaddisch (, Ravel 

Tzigane ) 

Noah Bielski 
VI 

Drink to me only with thine eyes arr. by Quieter 

Air from "Comus" Arne, arr. by Endicott 

Passing by Edward Purcell 

Blow, blow, thou winter wind Quieter 

Robert Gay 
Columbia Broadcasting System 



The Curtis Institute of Music 
Radio Programme 

Monday, November 14, 1938 — 3:00 to 4:00 P. M. 

Annette Elkanova, Piano 
Donald Hultgren, Tenor 



Prelude and Fugue in A minor Bach-Liszt 

Annette Elkanova 

II 

"Che gelida manina" from "La Bohcmc" Puccini 

O del mio amato ben ) Donaudy 

Vaghissima sembianza C 

Donald Hultgren 

III 

Berceuse, Opus W I Chopin 

Scherzo in C sharp minor, Opus 3 9 j 

Annette Elkanova 

IV 

Where-e'er you walk Handel 

The lament of Ian the proud * Griffes 

My lady walks in loveliness Charles 

Roadways Rose 

Donald Hultgren 

V 

Prelude in E flat major. Opus 23, No. 6 Rachmaninoff 

L'isle joyeuse / Debussy 

Reflets dans I'eau ^ 

"Toccata" from "Tombeau de Couperin" Ravel 

Annette Elkanova 

Eugene Bossart, Accompanist 

Columbia Broadcasting System 



The Curtis Institute of Music 
Radio Programme 

StuJenfs in Clkamljer Music of Dr. Louis Bailly 

Monday, November 21, 193 8 — 3:00 to 4:00 P. M. 

I 

Quintet in A major, Opus 114 Schubert 

Allegro vivace 
Andante 
Scherzo — -Presto 
Thema con variazioni 
Finale — Allegro giusto 
Annette Elkanova, Piano 
Rafael Druian, Violin True Chappell, Violoncello 

George Brown, Viola Ferdinand Maresh, Double Buss 

II 

La oracion del torero Turina 

Marguerite Kuehne / y;o//,/J ^^^^ Chappell, Violoncello 

Broadus Erle ) Bernard Milofsky, Viola 

III 

Trio in E flat major, Opus 1, No. 1 Beethoven 

Allegro 

Adagio cantabile 
Scherzo. Allegro assai 
Finale. Presto 
Thelma Cohen, Piano 
Marguerite Kuehne, Violin True Chappell, Violoncello 

Columbia Broadcasting System 



New programme 

THE CUHTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

Radio Prograjiiiie 

Monday, November 23, 1938 - Z'.ji.' to 4:00 P.M. 

Eudice Shapiro, Violin 
John Simms, Piano 



I 

Adagio in E major (K261) Mozart 

(Originally for violin and orchestra) 
Sonata No . 6 in G minor Bach 

Allegro 

Adagio 

Allegro 

Eudice Shapiro 

II 

Sonata in E flat major, ^pus 27,No.l.... Beethoven 

Zephyr Saperton 

Toccata from "Le tombeau de Couperin" Ravel 

John Simms 

III 

Symphonie espagnole Lalo 

Ariette Martinu 

Pantomime from "El a^nor brujo"..De Falla-Kochanski 
Rondo in E flat Hummel-Heif etz 

Eudice Shapiro 



Vladimir Sokoloff , Accompanist 
Columbia Broadcasting System 



The Curtis Institute of Music 
Radio Programme 

Monday, December 5, 1938 — 3:00 to 4:00 P. M. 

Howard Vanderburg, Barifone 
John Simms, Piano 
Herbert Baumel, Violin 

I 

Dank sei Dir, Herr Handel 

Fischerweise Schubert 

Ruhe, meine Seek Strauss 

Der Husar, trara! Schumann 

Howard Vanderburg 
II 

u major. Op us ^27, No. 1 Beethoven 

Zephyr ^^^^~'~~~~^~~— ^— — ________^^^ Saperton 

Toccata from "Le tombeau de Couperin" 
John Simms 
III 

"O vin, dissipe la tristesse" from "Hamlet" Thomas 

The Bonnie Earl o' Moray Arr. by Kreisler 

Gwine to Hebb'n Wolfe 

Land uv degradashun MacGimsey 

Howard Vanderburg 
IV 

Allegretto Porpora-Kreisler. 

Baal Shem Bloch 

Roumanian Folk-dances Bartok-Szekely 

Herbert Baumel 

Ralph Berkowitz, Accompanist 
Columbia BROAncASTiNc Svsthm 

^fU-, l . i . - — _^ 

Toccata and Fugue in D minor... Bach-Tausig 
Ballade in A flat, Opus 47 ) 
Nocturne in F sharp major, ) 

Opus 15 ,No . 2 ) . . . . .Chopin 

Waltz in A flat major. Opus 42) 

Phyllis Moss 






The Curtis Institute of Music 



CURTIS SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
Fritz Reiner, Conductor 



Radio Programme 

Monday, December 12, 193 8 — 3:00 to 4:00 P. M. 



Three Choral Preludes Bach 

Transcribed for orchestra by Vittorio Gui 



II 

Symphony No. 5 in E minor. Opus 9 5 

"From the new world" Dvorak 

Adagio 

Largo 

Scherzo. Molto vivace 

Allegro con fuoco 



Columbia Broadcasting System 



The Curtis Institute of Music 
Radio Programme 

Monday, December 19, 1938 — 3:00 to 4:00 P. M. 

I 

Silent niglit Gruber-Purvis 

II 

While all things were in quiet silence Bishop 

A babe lies in a manger Arr. Davies 

Glory be to God on high Karg-Elert 

III 
The little Jcsu of Braga Arr. Gaul 

IV 
Electa ut Sol Dallier 

V 

See amid the winter's snow Olmsted 

Fantasy on old Christmas carols Holst 

VI 

Dormi Jesu Rubbra 

Christians rejoice J. S. Bach 

While good St. Joseph slept Maryyott 

VII 

An old carol Quilter 

VIII 
Many years ago Sharpe 

IX 
Sleep Holy Babe McCollin 

X 

In dulci jubilo J. S. Bach 

The holly and the ivy Boughton 

XI 
Masters in this hall Arr. Candyln 

Programme arranged by Dr. Alexander McCurdy 

Ensemble of mixed chorus, string orchestra, organ, bells and celeste 
St. James's Choir Boys Dr. John Mockridge, Reader 

Columbia Broadcasting System 



The Curtis Institute of Music 
Radio Programme 

Monday, December 26, 193 8 — 3:00 to 4:00 P. M. 

Martha Halbwachs Massena, Pianist 
Samuel Barber, Baritone 

1 

Vingt-deuxieme ordre Franqois Couperin 

1. Le trophee J. L'anguille 

2. Premier air pour la suite 6. Le croc-en-jambe 
du trophee 7. Menuets croises 

3. 2e air 8. Les tours de passe-passe 

4. Le point du jour. Allemande 

Martha Halbwachs Massena 

II 
O waly, waly English Folk-song 

The deaf woman's courtship t Kentucky Folk-song 

Brother Greene, or. The dying soldier ) 

2u dir Tyrolean Folk-song 

Batti, batti f Tuscan Folk-song 

Chi ti ci fa venir ) 

Samuel Barber 

III 

Etude No. 9 in D flat major Liszt 

Jeux d'eau Ravel 

Etude in C minor, Opus 25, No. 12 Chopin 

Martha Halbwachs Massena 
IV 

In der Fremde Schumann 

1st es wahr? Mendelssohn 

Nonnelied C. P. E. Bach 

Der Gang zum Liebchen f Brahms 

Der Tod, das ist die kiihle Nacht ) 

Der Jiingiing am Bache: An der Quelle Schubert 

Samuel Barber 

Mr. Barber plays his own accompaniments 

Columbia Broadcasting System 



1 



The Curtis Institute of Music 
Radio Programme 

Monday, January 9, 1939 — 5:00 to 4:00 P. M. 

Victor Gottlieb, Violoncello 
William Harms, Piatio 

1 

Sonata in C major Havdn' 

Allegro 
Menuctto 
Moderato 
Victor Gottlieb 

II 

Intermezzo in B flat minor. Opus 1 17, No. 2 Brahms 

General Lavinc-eccentric ( , Debussy 

Poissons d'or S 

Funcrailles Liszt 

William Harms 

III 

Adagio in E flat major (K.2 87) Mozart 

Transcribed by Ralph Berkowitz 

The little white donkey IberT 

Valse sentimentale Tschaikovskv 

Guitarre Moszkowski 

Victor Gottlieb 
IV 

Rhapsody in E flat major, Opus 119, No. 4 Brahms 

Pastourelle I PouLEXC 

Toccata \ William Harms 

Ralph Berkowitz, Accompanist 
Columbia Broadcasting System 



The Curtis Institute of Music 
Radio Programme 

Mondnv, Janu-iry 16, 1959 — 3:00 to 4:00 P. M. 

Abbey Simon, Pidiio 
Marguerite Kuehne, Violin 
DoxAi.D Coker, Tenor 

I 

Abcgg v.iri.uioMN, Opus 1 StllLMANX 

Abbey Simox 
II 

Lasciaicmi morire Mox i e\ erue 

Spiratc pur, spirate Donaldy 

"M'appari tutt' amor" from "Martha" Flotow 

DoxAi D Coker 

III 

Siciliano J. S. Bach 

Gavotte from Sonata in E major Bach-Kreisler 

Romance in G major Beethoven' 

Hungarian dance in F minor Brahms-Kreisler 

Marglerite Kuehne 
IV 

Sea fever Ireland 

Sailor's life Old English 

The sleigh Kouxrz 

DoxAiD Coker 
V 

Music box GoDOw SKY 

Xocturne in F sli.irp minor, Opus 4S, Xo. 2 Chopix 

Alborada del gracioso Ravel 

Abbey Simon 

Vladimir Sokoloff ( . , . , 

t- r> I Arco III pit lusts 

Eugene Boss art ) ' 

Columbia Broadcasting System 



The Curtis Institute of Music 
Radio Programme 

Monday, January 23, 1939 — 3:00 to 4:00 P.M. 

Nathan Goldstein, Charles Libove, Violinhts 
BiANCA PoLACK, Gary Graffman, Dtio-Pianisfs 

I 

Concerto in D minor for two violins Bach 

Vivace 

Largo, ma non tanto 
Allegro 
Nathan Goldstein and Charles Libove 
II 
Prelude in E major (from the Sixth Sonata for violin 

solo arranged for two pianos) . . Bach-Saar 

First and third movements from Sonata in D major for 

two pianos Mozart 

Allegro con spirito 
Allegro molto 
BiANCA Polack and Gary Graffman 
III 

Chaconne Vitali-Auer 

Charles Libove 
IV 

Siciliano and Rigaudon Francoeur-Kreisler 

Nathan Goldstein 
V 
Third Suite (Variations for two pianos in C major) Arensky 

Theme. Dialogue 
Valse 

Marche triumphale 
Menuet 
Scherzo 

Hopak Moussorgsky-Hesselberc 

Bianca Polack and Gary Graffman 

Eugene Helmer, Accompanht 

Columbia Broadcasting Sy'stem 



The Curtis Institute of Music 
Radio Programme 

Mjnd.iy, January 30, 1939 — 3:00 to 4:00 P. M. 
Students in GnamDer Music of Or. JLouis Bailly 

I 

Six Dances of the Renaissance Claude Gervaise 

Revised and adapted for string ensemble by Rosario Scalero 
Branle de Bourgogne Branle gai 

Branle de Poitou Branle double 

Branle de Champagne Gaillarde 

II 

String Quintet in C minor Mozart 

Allegro 

Andante 

Menuetto in canone 

Allegro 

Frederick Vogelgesang f yjolim George Brown f VioLn 
George Zazofsky ) Stephen Katsaros ) 

Nathan Stutch, Violottccllo 

III 

First three movements from Piano Trio in 

E flat major, Opus 100 Schubert 

Allegro 

Andante con moto 
, Scherzo — Allego moderato 
John Simms, Piano 
George Zazofsky, Violin True Chappell, Violoncello 

Columbia Broadcasting System 



The Curtis Institute of Music 
Radio Programme 

Monday, February 6, 1939 — 5:00 to 4:00 P. M. 

CURTIS STRING QUARTET 

Jascha Brodsky r Yigiiij^ Max Aronoff, Viola 

Charles Jaffe ) Orlando Cole, Violoncello 

and 

Edith Evans Braun, Piano 



I 

Piano Quintet in E flat major. Opus 44 Schumann 

Allegro brillante 

Un poco largamente (in modo d'una marcia) 

Molto vivace (Scherzo) 

Allegro, ma non troppo 

II 

Quartet in B flat major ("The Hunting") (K. 45 8) Mozart 

Allegro vivace assai 
Menuetto 
Adagio 
Allegro assai 

Columbia Broadcasting System 



The Curtis Institute of Music 



CURTIS SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
Fritz Reiner, Conductor 



Radio Programme 

Monday, February 13, 1939 — 3:00 to 4:00 P. M. 



I 

Overture from "Rouslane ct Ludmila" Glinka 

II 

Der Schwan von Tuonela ' Sibelius 

III 

Marche from "Karelia Suite" SlBELIUS 

IV 

Habanera < Aubert 

V 

First movement of Violin Concerto in D major. 

Opus 61 Beethoven 

Allegro ma non troppo 
Oscar Shumsky, Soloist 

VI 

Prelude to "Die Meistersinger von Nurnberg" Wagner 

Columbia Broadcasting System 



New Programme 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

RADIO PRbGRAMME 

Monday, February 20, 1959 - 3:15 to 4:00 P. M. 

Robert Cornman, Pianist 

Jacob Krachraalnick ) Violinists 

Paxil Shure ) 

I 

La Folia Corelli-Kreisler 

Jacob Krachmalnick 

II 

Ondine Ravel 

Nocturne in C sharp minor. Opus 27,No.l) 
Three Etudes ) 

A minor. Opus 10, No. 2 ).. Chopin 

F minor (posthumous) ) 

C sharp minor. Opus 10, No. 4 ) 

Robert Cornman 

III 

Two movements of Concerto in D major 

Opus 56 Tschaikovsky 

Canzonetta 

Allegro vivacissimo 

Paul Shure 

Ralph Berkowitz, Accompanist 

Columbia Broadcasting System 



The Curtis Institute of Music 
Radio Programme 

Monday, February 27, 1939 — 3:00 to 4:00 P. M. 
Siudenis of Dr. Louis Bailly in Cnamter Music 

I 

Quartet in E flat major for piano, violin, 

viola and violoncello Beethoven 

Grave — Allegro, ma non troppo 
Andante cantabile 
Rondo — Allegro, ma non troppo 
Mary Norris, Piano Albert Falkove, Viola 

Veda Reynolds, Violin Nathan Stutch, Violoncello 

II 

Trio in E flat major, Opus 100, 

for piano, vijlin and violoncello Franz Schubert 

Allegro 

Andante con mote 
Scherzo — Trio 
Allegro moderato 
John Sfmms, Piano 
George Zazofsky, Violin True Chappell, Violoncello 

Columbia Broadcasting System 



i 



The Curtis Institute of Music 
Radio Programnae 

Monday, March 6, 1939 — 3:00 to 4:00 P. M. 

Lynne Wainwright, Harpist 
Nathan Stutch, Violoncellist 
Bernard Milofsky, Violist 
Ensemble of 9 Violinists 

I 

Variations on a theme in ancient style Salzedo 

Lynne Wainwright 

II 

rirst and second movements of Concerto in B flat major Boccherini 

Adagio (non troppo) 

Allegro moderato 

Nathan Stutch 

III 

Arioso et allegro de concert Golestan 

Bernard Milofsky 
IV 

Short stories in music Salzedo 

At church 

Goldfish 

On donkey-back ^ 

Night breeze 

Pirouetting music box 

The mermaid's chimes 

Skipping rope 

Lynne Wainwright 
V 

Prayer from "Jewish life" Bloch 

Menuet Debussy 

Spanish serenade Glazounov 

Nathan Stutch 
VI 

Fugue (For 9 stands of 1st violin section) Dubensky 

Ensemble of 9 Violinists 



Genia Robtnor I Accompanists 
Ralph Berkowitz ) 

Columbia Broadcasting System 



The Curtis Institute of Music 
Radio Programme 

Monday, October 17, 1938 — 3:00 to 3:45 P. M. 

FoLRENCE Kirk, Soprano 
Richard Purvis, Organist 

I 

Vergebliches Standchen ) Brahms 

Auf dem Kircbhofe J 

Ein Schwan Grieg 

"Voi lo sapete" from "Cavalleria Rusticana" Mascagni 

Florence Kirk 

II 

Prelude and Fugue, in G major J- S. Bach 

Chorale Prelude "Thy will be done" Karg-Elert 

Sortie from "Messe basse" Vierne 

Richard Purvis 

III 

A brown bird singing Wood 

My laddie Thayer 

The star Rogers 

At the well Hageman 

Florence Kirk 

IV 

O Lord most holy Franck 

Florence Kirk and Richard Purvis 

Joseph Levine, Accompanist 

Columbia Broadcasting System 



The Curtis Institute of Music 
Radio Programme 

Monday, October 24, 193 8 — 3:00 to 3:45 P. M. 
Robert Grooters, Baritone 
Lynne Wainwright, Harp 
Burnett Atkinson, Flute 
Nathan Stutch, Violoncello 

I 

Mondnacht \ 

Die Meerfee > Schumann 

Du bist wie eine Blume/ 

Dcr Ton Marx 

Robert Grooters 
II 
Pieces en concert Rameau 

Lynne Wainwright 

Burnett Atkinson 

Nathan Stutch 
III 

Have you seen but a whyte lily grow Anonymous 

A shepherd in the shade I Dowland 

I must complain ) 

Trottin' to the fair Stanford 

The birthday song MacFaydex 

Robert Grooters 
IV 

First movement of Trio Sonata in B minor Loeillet 

The little windmills Couperin 

Menuet Valensin 

Dorienne from "Divertissement grec" MouQUET 

Lynne Wainwright 

Burnett Atkinson 

Nathan Stutch 
Elizabeth Westmoreland at the Piano 
Columbia Broadcasting System 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

CURTIS SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
Fritz Reiner, Conductor 

Radio Programime 

Monday, March 13, 1939 — 3:00 to 4:00 P. M. 

I 

"Egmont" Overture, Opus 84 Beethoven 

II 

She never told her love Haydn 

Wie froh und frisch mein Sinn Brahms 

Allerseelen Strauss 

Soloist: 
Conrad Thibault, Baritone 

III 

Symphony No. 6, Opus 68 ("Pastorale") Beethoven 

Allegro ma non troppo 

Andante molto moto 

Allegro 

Allegro 

Allegretto 

Columbia Broadcasting System 



The Curtis Institute of Music 
Radio Programme 

Monday, March 20, 1939 — 3:00 to 4:00 P. M. 

Veda Reynolds, Violinist 
Zadel Skolovsky, Pianist 

I 

Sonata No. 4 in D major Handel 

Adagio 
Allegro 
Larghetto 
Allegro 
Veda Reynolds 

II 

Ballade in A flat major f Chopin 

Mazurka in A minor ) 

Etude in D flat major Liszt 

Etude in E flat major Paganini-Liszt 

Devotion Godowsky 

Ballet music from "Rosamunde" Schubert-Godowsky 

Jeux d'eau Ravel 

Feux d'artifice Debussy 

Zadel Skolovsky 

III 

Impromptu Aulin 

The girl with the flaxen hair Debussy-Hartmann 

Caprice (After an etude in the form of a waltz 

by Saint-Saens) Ysaye 

Veda Reynolds 

Eugene Bossart, Accompanist 

Columbia Broadcasting System 



The Curtis Institute of Music 
Radio Programme 

Students oi ^Ir. i^larcel TaLufeau in 
W ooawina Ensemble 

Monday, March 27, 1939 — 3:00 to 4:00 P. M. 

I 

Quintet in E flat major, Opus 16 

for piano, oboe, clarinet, French horn and bassoon . Beethoven 

II 

Serenade in E flat major. Opus 7 

for two flutes, two oboes, two clarinets, four French horns, 

two bassoons and contrabassoon R. Strauss 

III 

"Les petits moulins a vent" 

for flute, oboe and bassoon Couperin 

"Tourbillon" from "Pastorale variee" 

for flute, oboe, clarinet, French horn and two bassoons Pierne 

"Aubade" 

for flute, oboe and clarinet DE Wailly 

Allegro scherzoso. Opus 90 

for two flutes, oboe, clarinet and bassoon HuGUES 

IV 

Prckidio et Fughetta, Opus 40, No. 1 

for two flutes, oboe, clarinet, French horn and 

two bassoons Pierne 

Columbia Broadcasting System 



The Curtis Institute of Music 
Radio Programme 

Monday, April }, 1959 — 3:00 to 4:00 P. M. 



Phylms Moss, Pianist 
Robert Gay, Baritone 



I 



"Hear me, ye winds and waves" from "Scipio" f Haxdel 

"Wlierc-c'cr you walk" from "Scmcle" ) 

Robert Gay 

II 

Fantasie and Fugue in G minor Bach 

Phyllis Moss 
III 

Eifersucht und Stolz Schubert 

Am Sonntag Morgen Brahms 

Rulie, meine Secle R. Strauss 

Du bist so jung Erich Wolff 

Robert Gay 

IV 

Rondo capriccioso } Mendelssohn 

Spinning song i 

Ballade in D minor Brahms 

Scherzo in C sharp minor Chopin 

Phyllis Moss 

V 
Deep river ^ 

Swing low, sweet chariot )■ Arr, by 

Didn't it rain ) H. T. Burleigh 

Sweet little Jesus boy MacGimsey 

Robert Gay 

Eugene Bossart, Accompanist 

Columbia Broadcasting System 



The Curtis Institute of Music 
Radio Programme 

Monday, April 10, 1939 — 3:00 to 4:00 P. M. 

Vera Resnikoff, Soprano 
Frederick Vogelgesang, Violinist 

I 

Bergere legere Arr. by Weckerlin 

The sleep chat flits on baby's eyes Carpenter 

Heimkehr vom Feste Blech 

Fiocca la neve Cimara 

Caro, caro el mio bambin Guarnieri 

Fa la nana bambin Sadero 

Dos cantares populares Obradors 

Vera Resnikoff 

II 

Praeludium Bach-Kreisler 

Sicilienne Paradis-Dushkin 

Caprice No. 20 Paganini-Kreisler 

Frederick Vogelgesang 
III 

The answer Rachmaninoff 

Oriental song Glazounov 

Again alone Tschaikovsky 

Snowflakes Gretchaninov 

Cradle song Gretchaninov 

Hopak MoussoRGSKY 

Vera Resnikoff 

IV 

Concerto No. 1 in D major Paganini-Wilhelmj-Zimbalist 

Frederick Vogelgesang 

Vladimir Sokoloff, Accompanist 
Columbia Broadcasting System 



The Curtis Institute of Music 
Radio Programme 

Monday, April 17, 1939 — 3:00 to 4:00 P. M. 

Marian Head, Violinist 

Donald Coker, Tenor 

I 

Recitative and Aria: "He was cut off out of the land 

of the living" and "But thou didst not leave His 

soul in Hell" from "The Messiah" Handel 

Tu lo sai ToRELLi 

Donzelle, fuggite Cavalu 

Donald Coker 

II 

Sonata in C sharp minor, Opus 21 Dohnanyi 

Allegro appassionato 

Allegro ma con tenerezza 

Vivace assai 

Marian Head 

Eugene Helmer at the Piano 

III 

Drink to me only with thine eyes Arr. by Quieter 

The happy lover / ^ t- 

. ., I J I > Old English 

A sailor loved a lass \ 

Donald Coker 

IV 

First movement of Concerto No. 9, in D minor, Opus 5 5 Spohr 

Nana (Berceuse) de Falla 

Danse espagnole from "La vida breve" de Falla-Kreisler 

Marian Head 

V 

Blow, blow thou winter wind Arr. by Quilter 

Old Mother Hubbard Hely-Hutchinson 

(Set in the manner of Handel) 

When I think upon the maidens Head 

Donald Coker 

Eugene Bossart, Accompanist 

Columbia Broadcasting System 



The Curtis Institute of Music 
Radio Programme 

Monday. April 24, 1939 — 3:00 to 4:00 P. M. 

An Ensemble of Ten Harps 

Marian Head, Violinist 

Lynnl Wainwright, Solo Harpist 

Robert Grooters, Baritone 

Henry Beard, Organist 

I 

Sixth French Suite Bach 

Allemande Polonaise 

Courante Gavotte 

Sarabande Mcnuet 

Bourree 
The Harp Ensemble 
II 

"God is my Shepherd" from "Biblische Liedcr" Dvorak 

Thanks be to thee Handel 

RouuRT Grooters 
with organ accompaniment by Henry Biaru 

Fugue in B minor Bach 

Henry Beard 

"Lord God of Abraham" from "Elijah" Mendelssohn 

Robert Grooters 

with organ accompaniment by Henry Beard 

III 

Fantaisie for harp and violin Saint-SaI^ns 

Lynne Wainwright and Marian Head 
IV 

On wings of song Mendelssohn 

Snow Lie 

Sylvelin Sinding 

Robert Grooters and The Harp Ensemble 
V 

Clair de lune Debussy 

Spanish dance No. 5 Granados 

Behind the barracks Salzedo 

The Harp Ensemble 
Columbia Broadcasting System 



The Curtis Institute of Music 
Radio Programme 

Monday, May 1, 1939 — 3:00 to 4:00 P. M. 

CURTIS MADRIGAL CHORUS 
Directed by Samuel Barber 

AND 

RALPH BERKOWIT2 AND VLADIMIR SOKOLOFF, Pianists 

I 

Sonata in F major for one piano, 4 hands (K. 479) Mozart 

Ralph Berkowitz and Vladimir Sokoloff 

II 

Lasciatemi morire 

A' un giro sol 

Amor: the lament of a nymph 

For soprano solo and men's chorus with 

harpsichord accompaniment ( Monteverdi 

Hor ch'el ciel e la terra 

For six-part chorus with 2 violins, 'cello, 
double-bass and harpsichord 
III 

Trois beaux oiseaux du Paradis Ravel 

For chorus with soprano, contralto, tenor 
and baritone soli 

Now is the month of maying Morley 

The Virgin Martyrs Barber 

For women's voices 
(First time on air) 

Echo Song di Lasso 

For double chorus 
Eugene Bossart at the Harpsichord 

Comments by Gama Gilbert of The New York Times 

Columbia Broadcasting System 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

CURTIS SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
Fritz Reiner, Conductor 

Radio Programme 

Tuesday, May 2, 1939 — 3:00 to 4:00 P. M. 



I 

Overture to "Der Freischutz" Weber 

II 

Concerto No. 4 in G major. Opus J 8 

for piano and orchestra Beethoven 

Allegro moderato 
Andante con moto 
Rondo: Vivace 
Ezra Rachlin, Soloisi 

III 

Navarra (Orchestration by Arbos) Albeniz 

IV 

Wiener Blut Johann Strauss 

Columbia Broadcasting System 



4 



The Curtis Institute 0/ Music 



SIXTH COMMENCEMENT 

AND 

CONFERRING OF DEGREES 



CASIMIR HALL 

Tuesday, May the ninth 

One Thousand, Nine Hundred and Thirty-nine 
at Three o'clock in the Afternoon 



Order of Ceremonies 



♦ 



Organ Prelude 



Chorale Vorspiel Johannes Brahms 

"O Welt, ich muss dich lassen" 



Prelude and Fugue in A major J. S. Bach 



Alexander McCurdy, Mus.D. 



Order of Ceremonies 



Graduate Procession 

Triumphal March Sigfrid Karg-Elert 

Introduction 

President Mary Louise Curtis Bok, Mus. D., L.H.D. 

Address 

The Right Reverend Joseph M. Corrigan, S.T.D. 
Rector of the CathoUc University of America 

Awarding of Diplomas of The Curtis Institute of Music 

Conferring of Degrees in Course 

President Mary Louise Curtis Bok, Mus.D., L.H.D. 
Secretary Cary W. Bok, A.B. 

Hymn — The Star-Spangled Banner 

Graduate Recession 

Finale from "Grande piece symphonique" Cesar Franck 



[4] 



DIPLOMAS OF THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

Piano 



Mary Addison Norris 



Abbey Simon 



Accompanying 
Oscar Eiermann 



Isidore Gralnick 

(in absentia) 



Violir 



Frederick Lawrence Vogelgesang 



Viola 
George Brown 



Composition 



Charles Bacharach 

(in absentia) 
Miriam Farnsworth Brunner 
Marvin Duchow 



Andre Constant Vauclain 
Hugo Weisgall 
Frederick Charles Werle 
(m absentia) 



Carl Bowman 
Sol Kaplan 



Conducting 



Vincent Ludwig Persichetti 
Irven Andrew Whitenack 
(in absentia) 



Music Criticism 
John Gurney Briggs, Jr. Edward O'Gorman 

(in absentia) 



Flute 
Burnett F. Atkinson 
Albert Nevin Tipton 



Oboe 
Martin Fleisher 



Clarinet 
William McCormick 



Trombone 
William Gibson 



French Horn 
El WOOD S. Cauler 



[5] 



DEGREES IN COURSE 



Bachelor of J^usic — in Organ 
Walter Benjamin Baker 



Bachelor of M^usic — in Composition 

Charles Bacharach Andre Constant Vauclain 

(in absentia) 



Bachelor of .M.usic — in Conducting 

Irven Andrew Whitenack 
{in absentia) 



Marshal 

Hans Wohlmuth, Ph.D. (_Vitnnj') 

Assistant Marshals 

Henry Beard, A.B. (iPmnsyUania Start Collect') 

Lester EnGLANDER, A.B. (Umversirj of Pmosjlvaniay, MuS.B. 

CuRTIN WiNSOR, A.B. {Princeton Univtrsitx)', LL.B. (_Umptrsilj of Pmnsylpanij Law Scheef) 



[7] 



(1) 

LIST OF CONCERTS 
FACULTY RECITALS 
Casimir Hall 



First.... Mr. Felix Salmond, Violoncellist 

November 21, 1938 



Second. . .Madame Elisabeth Schumann, Soprano 

April Zl, 1959 



(2) 

STUDENTS' CONCERTS 
Casimir Hall 

Student of Mr. de Gogorza 

(Lester Englander) December 1, 1958 

Students of Mr. Salzedo December 9, 1958 

Students of Madame Miquelle January 24, 1959 

Student of Madame Vengerova 

(Sol Kaplan) February 15, 1959 

Students of Dr. Bailly February 16, 1959 

Students of Mr. Salzedo March 2, 1959 

Students of Mr. Kaufman April 19, 1959 

Students of Madame Luboshutz April 20, 1959 

Students of Madame Vengerova May 2, 1959 

Students of Mr. Torello May 5, 1959 

Students of Mr. Hilsberg May 5, 1959 



(5) 

SPECIAL CONCERTS 

The Historical Series 

9 concerts ( October 18, 1958 

(November 1, 1958 

(November 25, 1958 

(December 7, 1958 

( January 4, 1959 

( January 20, 1959 

(February 24, 1959 

( March 8, 1959 

( March 51, 1959 

Miss Genia Robinor and 

Dr. Louis Bailly in a 

Piano and Viola recital December 14, 1958 

Mr. Rudolf Serkin, Pianist February 7, 1959 

Miss Jeanne Behrend, Pianist (February 16, 1959 

(February 22, 1959 
( March 1, 1959 

Trio of New York March 21, 1959 

Carl Friedberg, Pianist 
Daniil Karpilo?;sky, Violinist 
Felix Salmond, Violoncellist 

Mrs. Edith Evans Braun, Pianist and 

Madame Lea Luboshutz, Violinist. .March 28, 1959 



CONCERTS ELSEV.TIERE 

The Philadelphia Forum, Philadelphia 

The Curtis Symphony Orchestra. . .April 10, 1959 

Compositions of Rosario Scalero 
At the Plays and Players 
Philadelphia May 4, 1959 



(4) 

CONCERT COURSE 

State Teachers College, 

Kutzto^Ti, Pennsylvania (October 19 

( -March 29 
State Teachers College, 

Millersville, Pennsylvania (October 26 

( April IE 
Woman' s Club Auditorium, 

Lynchburg, Virginia (November 4 

(December 9 
( April 14 
Juniata College, 

Huntingdon, Pennsylvania, ..... .November 5 

The Convent of the Sacred Heart, 

Over brook, ■'Pennsylvania November 8 

Washington College, 

Chestertovjn, Maryland November 10 

Westtown School, 

If^'esttoTMi, Pennsylvania..,. November 12 

The duPont Country Club, 

Pennsgrove, New Jersey (November 13 

(December 11 
University of Delaware, 

Newark, Delaware (November 17 

(February 16 
New Century Club, 

Kennett Square, Pennsylvania. . .November 22 
Linden Hall, 

Lititz, Pennsylvania November 28 

Woman* s Club, 

West Pittston, Pennsylvania. ., .November 29 
Central High School, 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, . . , (December 1 

( April 14 
Elizabethtovna College, 

Elizabeth town, Pennsylvania. .. .December 2 
Sleighton Farms, 

Darling P.O., Pennsylvania December 15 

George School, 

George School, Pennsylvania January 7 



(5) 

CONCERT COURSE (continued) 



Soroptimist Club, 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania January 7, 1939 

Palmyra High School, 

Palmyra, New Jersey January 31, 1939 

Jeptha Abbott Chapter of the D.A.R. 

International House, 

University of Pennsylvania February 24, 1939 

Peraberton Music Club, 

Pemberton, New Jersey...., March 9, 1939 

All-Ursinus Conference, 

Collegeville, Pennsylvania April 16 , 1939 

Woman' s Club, 

Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania , , (April 17, 1939 

( May 16, 1939 

Raven Hill Academy Chapel Fund, 

At the home of Mrs. Langdon, 

Germantown, Pennsylvania April 22, 1939 

Bethlehem Friends of Music 

Bethlehem, Pennsylvania April 26 , 1939 

Woodbury Male Chorus, 

Woodbury, New Jersey April 27, 1939 

Schumann Club, 

Wildwood, New Jersey May 2, 1939 

Girard College, 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania May 6 , 1939 

Polyphonic Choir, 

GermantoY.n, Pennsylvania May 16 , 1939 

Woman* s Club, 

Downingtovm, Pennsylvanifi * * . * . . i^/iay 17 , 1939 



RADIO PROGRMMES 
October 3, 1938 to May 2, 1939 



Sixth Commencement and Conferring 

of Degrees May 9, 1939 



BOUND BY 
3PPRT C FtHR 



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