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Full text of "Recital programs 1939-1940"



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THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

CASIMIR HALL 
Sixteenth Season— 1939-40 

FACULTY RECITAL 

by 

MR EFREM ZIMBALIST, Violinist 

MR VLADIMIR SOKOLOFF at the Piano 
Wednesday Evening, January 24, 1940, at 8:30 o'clock 

PROGRAMME 
I 

Suite in A minor Christian Sinding 

Presto 
Adagio 
Tempo giusto 

Sonata in A major Max Reger 

(For violin alone) 

Allegro 

Andantino 

Presto 

Sonata in G minor Efrem Zimbalist 

Adagio sostenuto — Allegro moderato 
Andante amoroso 
Allegro vivo 

II 

Concerto Gregoriano Ottorino Respighi 

Andante tranquillo 

Andante espressivo e sostenuto 

Allegro energico 

III 

Dance of the reed flutes | 

Arab dance \ Tschaikowsky-Thare 

Chinese dance ) 

Concert phantasy on 

Rimsky-KorsakofPs "Le coq d'or" Efrem Zimbalist 

Stein 1 * ay Piano 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

CASIMIR HALL 
Sixteenth Season— 1939-40 

FACULTY RECITAL 

MR STEUART WILSON, Tenor 
MR HARRY KAUFMAN, Pianist 

Collaborating 
Monday Evening, February 12, 1940, at 8:30 o'clock 

PROGRAMME 



Arias with violoncello obbligato Johann Sebastian Bach 

"Woferne Du," from Cantata 41 

"O Seelen-Paradies," from Cantata 172 

Mary Wilson, Violoncello 

II 

Total eclipse George Frederick Handel 

Evening hymn (on a ground bass) Henry Purcell 

Momus to Mars William Boyce 

III 

L'amour de moi XV century, edited by Tiersot 

Le papillon et la fleur ) ^ t 

, f , \ Gabriel Faure 

Clair de lune J 

Comment, disaient-ils Franz Liszt 



Schwanengesang 

Auflosung 

Die Forelle 

Das verlassne Magdelein 
Auftrage 



IV 



Franz Schubert 



Robert Schumann 



V 
Lutenist songs (1600-1620) 

Come away, come sweet love 

Farewell, unkind! 

Weep you no more, sad fountains 

Farewell to arms 

When from my love 

Whither runneth my sweetheart 

Steinway Piano 



John Dowland 



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John Bartlett 



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THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

CASIMIR HALL 
Sixteenth Season — 1939-40 

FACULTY RECITAL 

MADAME ELISABETH SCHUMANN, Soprano 
MR LEO ROSENEK, at the Piano 

Thursday Evening, February 15, 1940. at 8.30 o'clock 

PROGRAMME 



Ridente la calma 

Oiseaux, si tous les ans 

Das Veilchen 

Meine Wiinsche 



Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart 



An Silvia 

Der Schmetterling 

Erlafsee 

Fischerweise 



II 



Franz Schubert 



III 
Auch kleine Dinge konnen uns entziicken 

Frage und Antwort 

Friihling ubers Jahr 

Du denskt mit einem Fadchen mich zu faneen . 



> Hugo Wolf 



IV 

Ich atmet' einen linden Duft ....) Gustav Mi 

Wer hat dies Liedlein erdacht?' 
Frieden ) 
Gretel ..)" 

STEINTTAY PIANO 



AHLER 



Hans Erich Pfitzner 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



CASIMIR HALL 
Sixteenth Season— 1939-40 

FACULTY RECITAL 
DR ALEXANDER A/cCURDY, Onanist 

Wednesday Evening, February 21, 1940.. at 8:30 o'clock 

PROGRAMME 
I 

Prelude and Fugue in E minor 

Vivace from Second Trio-Sonata 

Three Chorale Preludes 

Alle Menschen miissen sterben 
Vater unser im Himmelreich 
Erbarm' dich mein, O Herre Gott 

Prelude and Fugue in A minor 



JOHANN SEBASTL\N BaCH 



II 



Canon in B minor, Opus 5 6, No. 5 



Robert Schumann 



Three Chorale Preludes, Opus 122 Johannes Brahms 

Es ist ein' Ros' entsprungen, No. 8 
O Welt, ich muss dich lassen, No. 1 1 
O Welt, ich muss dich lassen, No. 3 

The Tumult in the Praetorium 

from the Passion Symphony Paul de Maleingreau 

III 

Communion Richard Purvis 

Veni Emmanuel Arthur Egerton 



AEOLIAN-SKTNNER ORGAN 



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THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

CASIMIR HALL 
Sixteenth Season — 1939-1940 

FACULTY RECITAL 

Madame EUFEMIA GIANNINI GREGORY, Soprano 
Mr LEO ROSENEK, at the Piano 

Tuesday Evening, March 5, 1940, at 8:30 o'clock 

PROGRAMME 

I 

"Casta Diva" from "Norma" Yixcenzo Believe 

n 

O kuhler TTald j Johannes Brahms 

Ach, wende diesen Blick ) 

Lob des Leidens i Richard Strauss 

^Tiegenlied ' 

ni 

"Green" from "Aquarelles" j Claude Debussy 

"Fantoches" from "Fetes galantes" | 

Sleep now Samuel Barber 

Love went a-riding : Frank Bridge 

IV 

Nana Manuel de Falla 

Al amor Fernando Obradors 

Poesie persiane, No. 3 .) Francesco Santoliqutdo 

Biflessi | 

SXBNWAT PLVNO 

— 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

CASIMIR HALL 
Sixteenth Season — 1939-40 

FACULTY RECITAL 

by 

DAVID SAPERTON, Pianist 

Tuesday Evening, March 26, 1940, at 8:30 o'clock 

PROGRAMME OF COMPOSITIONS 
BY LEOPOLD GODOWSKY 



PassacagUa 

Composed as a tribute to the memory of Franz Schubert on the eve of the 
hundredth anniversary of his death. The theme is based on the first eight 
bars of the Unfinished Symphony. 

II 

Four selections from Phonoramas — Java 

Gamelan 

The gardens of Buitenzorg 

Chattering monkeys at the sacred Lake of 'VTendit 

In the streets of old Batavia 

III 

Ten studies on Chopin's Etudes 

Opus 2 5. No. 1 in A flat major, third version 

Opus 10, No. 2 in A minor, second version — Ignis jatuus 

Posthumous etude in E major, first version. Originally in A flat major 

Opus 2 5, No. 6 in G sharp minor 

Opus 25, No. 5 in E minor, first version 

Opus 10, No. 5 and Opus 25, No. 9 combined, in G flat major — Badinage 

Opus 10, No. 6 in E flat minor for the left hand alone 

Opus 10, No. 11 and Opus 2*. No. 3 combined, in F major 

Opus 10, No. 7 in G flat major, second version. Originally in C major — Nocturne 

Opus 10, No. 7 in C major, first version — Toccata 

IV 

Triana (transcribed from Albeniz) 



Symphonic metamorphosis on theme from the "Artist-Life" waltz of 
Johann Strauss 

STEINWAY PIANO 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

C A SI MIR HALL, SIXTEEN' TH SEA SOX IQ3Q-4O 

FACULTY RECITAL BY 
MR JORGE BOLET, PIANIST 

SATURDAY AFTERNOON, APRIL 27, 1940, AT 4:00 O'CLOCK 



PROGRAMME 

I 
Prelude, Aria and Finale Cesar Franck 

II 
Sonata in A Major Franz Schubert 

Allegro 

Andantino 

Scherzo. Allegro vivace 

Rondo. Allegretto 



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Seven etudes 



C major, Opus 10, No. 1 

E major, Opus 10, No. 5 

C major, Opus 10, No. 7 

F major, Opus 2 5, No. 5 FREDERIC CHOPIX 

C minor, Opus 10, No. 12 

F minor (Posthumous) 

F major, Opus 10, No. 8 

Ballade in G minor, Opus 23 

Mr Bolet is a graduate of Mr Saperton in Piano 

STEEWTAY PL\NO 



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THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

CASIMIR HALL 
Sixteenth Season— 1939-40 



GRADUATION RECITAL 

of 

ZADEL SKOLOVSKY, Pianist 
Student of ISABELLE VENGEROVA 

Sunday Afternoon, December 3, 1939, at 4:00 o'clock 

PROGRAMME 
I 

Toccata in C major Bach-Busoxi 

Prelude 

Intermezzo 

Fugue 

Variations serieuses in D minor. Opus 54 Mexdelssohn 

Sonata in B minor. Opus 58 Chopix 

Allegro maestoso 

Scherzo: Molto vivace 

Largo 

Finale: Presto non tanto 

II 

Intermezzo in E flat major. Opus 117, No. 1 Brahms 

Jeux d'eau Ravel 

La terrasse des audiences du clair de lune 



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Debussy 
Feux d'artifice 

Ballet music from "Rosamunde" Schubert-Godc* sky 

Devotion Godottsky 

Mephisto Walzer Liszt 

The Steixway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



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THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

CASIMIR HALL 
Sixteenth Season— 1939-40 

GRADUATION RECITAL 

of 

LYNNE WAINWRIGHT, 

Harpist 
Student of CARLOS SALZEDO 

Tuesday Evening, December 5, 1939, at 8.30 o'clock 

PROGRAMME 

I 

Sonata in C minor Giovanni Battista Pescetti 

1704-1766 

Allegro vigoroso 
Andantino espressivo 
Presto 

Gavotte from "Iphegenia in Aulis" Christopher W. von Gluck 

1714-1787 

Theme and Variations Josef Haydn 

1732-1809 

Bourree Johann Sebastian Bach 

1685-1750 

II 

Chorale and Variations Charles M. "Wtdor 

Vith piano accompaniment reduced from the orchestra score 

Carlos Salzedo at the piano 

III 

Concert Variations on Adeste Fideles (1938) Carlos Salzedo 

Divertissements Andre Caplet 

a la franchise 
a l'espagnole 

IV 
Scintillation (1936) Carlos Salzedo 

Lyon- & Healy Harp 
The Steix\fay is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



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THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

CASIMIR HALL 
Sixteenth Season— 1939-40 

RECITAL OF MUSIC FOR THE HARP 

by 
Students of Carlos Salzedo 

Tuesday Evening, December 12, 1939, at 8:30 o'clock 



PROGRAMME 

I 

Lamentation 
Quietude / 

Iridescence (1917) Carlos Salzedo 

Introspection \ 
Whirlwind / 

Janet Putnam 

II 
Short Stories in Music (1934) Carlos Salzedo 

On Donkey-back 
Rain Drops 
Madonna and Child 
Night Breeze 
Pirouetting Music Box 
At Church 
Goldfish 

The Mermaid's Chimes 
Behind the Barracks 

Ruth Dean 

III 

Prelude in C major Serge Prokofieff 

Brahms' Lullaby transcribed by Carlos Salzedo 

Scintillation (1936) Carlos Salzedo 

AXX XlSBET 
Lyon 2c Healy Harps 



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THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

CASIMIR HALL 
Sixteenth Season— 1939-40 

Wednesday Evening, January 31, 1940, at 8:30 o'clock 

AN EVENING OF OPERA 

by 

STUDENTS OF DR. WOHLMUTH 

JOSEPH S. LEVINE) 
EZRARACHLIN } dt the P iano 

PROGRAMME 

I 
IMPROVISATIONS 

II 

FRAGMENTS FROM MOZART OPERAS, sung in English 

"the abduction from the seraglio" 

Osmin James Cosmos 

Belmonte Donald Hultgren 

"DON GIOVANNI" 

Giovanni Howard Vanderburg 

Donna Anna Muriel Robertson 

Leporello Gordon S ayre 

Commendatore Robert Grooters 

"THE MAGIC FLUTE" 

Papageno Thomas Perkins 

Papagena Margaret Lily 

First Boy Helen Worrilow 

Second Boy Hilda Morse 

Third Boy Velm a Caldwell 

Mr. Levine graduated in 193 J under Dr. Josef Hofmann 
Mr. Rachlin graduated in 193 7 under Mr. David Saperton 

Steixvay Piano 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

CASIMIR HALL 
Sixteenth Season — 1939-40 

Thursday Evening, February 8, 1940, at 8:30 o'clock 

RECITAL 

by 

SOL KAPLAN, Pianist 

Graduate Pupil of Madame Isabelle Vengerova 

PROGRAMME 

I 

Variations and fugue on a theme by Handel, Opus 24 Brahms 

II 

Sonata in A flat major, Opus 110 Beethoven 

Moderato cantabile molto espressivo 

Allegro molto 

Adagio, ma non troppo; Allegro, ma non troppo 

Impromptu in F sharp major, Opus 36 /J Chopin 

Three etudes, Opus 25 j 

No. 8 in D flat major 
No. 4 in C sharp minor 
No. 12 in C minor 

III 

Etude in C minor, Opus 2, No. 4 ~) 

Vision fugitive, Opus 22, No. 16 V Prokofiev 

Suggestion diabolique, Opus 4, No. 4 ) 

Nine preludes Shostakovich 

C sharp minor, E major, F sharp major 
E flat minor, D flat major, A flat major 
F minor, D major, D minor 

Islamey Balakirev 

Steinvay Piano 



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THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

CASIMIR HALL 
Sixteenth Season— 1939-1940 

GRADUATION RECITAL 

of 

NOAH BIELSKI, Violin 
Student of Mr Zimbalist 

VLADIMIR SOKOLOFF, at the Piano 
Monday Evening, March 4, 1940, at 8:30 o'clock 

PROGRAMME 

I 

Sonata No. 2 in A major, Opus 100 Johannes Brahms 

Allegro amabile 
Andante tranquillo 
Allegretto grazioso 

II 

Concerto in D major (K. 218) Tolfgang Amadeus Mozart 

Allegro 

Andante cantabile 

Rondeau 

III 

Concerto in D major Pagan ini-Kreisler 

(an original transcription) 

IV 

La plus que lente Claude Debussy 

Tzigane .Maurice Ravel 

Mr Sokoloff was graduated in 1936 under Mr Harry Kaufman 
Stein-stay Piano 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

CASIMIR HALL 
Sixteenth Season — 1939-40 

GRADUATION RECITAL 

of 

Abbey Simon, Pianist 
Student of Mr Saperton 

Thursday Evening, March 14, 1940, at S:3 o'clock 

PROGRAMME 

I 

Toccata, Adagio and Fugue in C major Bach-Busoni 

Abegg variations Robert Schumann 

n 

Sonata in E major, Opus 109 Ludttig van Beethoven 

Vivace 

Prestissimo 

Andante molto cantabile ed espressivo 

HI 

Nocturne in F sharp minor, Opus 48, No. 2\ 
Etudes: I 

D flat major, Opus 25, No. 8 Frederic Chopin 

F major, Opus 25, No. 3 

F minor (Posthumous) 

C sharp minor, Opus 10, No. 4 



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Prelude in E flat major, Opus 23, No. 6 Sergei Rachmantnov 

Alborada del gracioso Maubicb Ravel 

Music box Leopold Godo^sky 

Islamey Mily Balakxrev 






STEINUWY PIANO 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

CASIMIR HALL 
Sixteenth Season — 1939-40 

RECITAL OF MUSIC FOR THE VIOLIN 

by 
Students of Mr Zimbalist 
Vladimir Sokoloff at the Piano 

Wednesday Evening. March 27, 1940, at 8:30 o'clock 

PROGRAMME 

I 
Prelude in E major Bach-Kreisler 

Diana Steixer 

II 
Rcndo capriccioso, Opus 2S Camille Saixt-Saexs 

Eugene Campioxe 

III 

Tzigane Maurice Ravel 

Laura Archera 

IV 

Variations on a theme by Corelli Tartixi-Kreisler 

Scherzo — Tarentelle Hexri ^Tiexlvstski 

Sauxdra Maazel 

V 

Concerto Xo. 1 in D major, Opus 6 Niccolo Pagaxixi 

Allegro maestoso 

Elliott Fisher 

VI 
First movement from 

Concerto in D major, Opus 3 5 Peter Ilich Tschaikovskv 

Allegro moderato 

Marguerite Kuehxe 

VII 

Poeme, Opus 25 ... Erxest Chaussox 

Caprice, d'apres l'etude en forme de valse 

Opus 5 2. Xo. 6 Saixt-Saexs- Ysa Ye 

Veda Reyxolds 

VIII 
Concerto Xo. 2 in D minor. Opus 44 Max Bruch 

Adagio, ma non troppo 
Recitativo: Allegro moderato 
Finale: Allegro molto 

Rafael Drulax 






steixvay pl\xo 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

CASIMIR HALL 

Sixteenth Season — 1939-40 

RECITAL OF MUSIC FOR THE DOUBLE BASS 

by 

Students of Mr Torello 

Leonard Bernstein at the Piano 

Friday Evening, March 29, 1940, at 8:30 o'clock 

PROGRAMME 

I 
Sonate Jean Baptiste Loeillet 

Largo 
Allemande 
Gavotte 
Gigue 

Harmonized by E. Meriz 
(First Performance) 

Jake Tyre 

II 
Sonate in G major Johann Ernst Galliard 

Lento 

Allegro 

Andante teneramente 

Allegro spiritoso 

Harmonized by E. Meriz 
(First Performance) 

Roger Scott 
III 

Per questo bella mano — Aria for bass 

with contrabass obbligato Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart 

James Cosmos, Baritone 
Harry Safstrom 

IV 

Chanson triste Serge Koussevttzky 

Elegia Giovanni Bottesini 

Roger Scott 

V 

Concerto, Opus 3 Koussevttzky 

Allegro 
Andante 
Allegro 

Henry Portnoi 

VI 

Tarentella in A minor Bottesini 

Ferdinand Maresh 

Mr Bernstein is a student of Mme Vengerova 
Mr Cosmos is a student of Mr Wilson 

STEINVAY PIANO 



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THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

CASLMIR HALL 
Sixteenth Season — 1939-40 

RECITAL OF MUSIC FOR THE PIANO 

by 

Students of Mr Saperton 

Monday Evening, April 8, 1940, at 8:30 o'clock 

PROGRAMME 

I 

Toccata and Fugue in D minor Bach-Tausig 

EDNA LARSON 

II 

Second and third movements of Concerto 

in D major, Opus 21 Joseph Haydx 

Larghetto 

Rondo all' ongarese. Allegro assai 

(Second piano part played by Margot Ros) 
RUDOLF FAVALORO 

III 
First movement of Sonata in E flat, 

Opus 31, No. 3 Lud-wtg van Beethoven 

Allegro 

Reflets dans l'eau Claude Debussy 

Andaluza Manuel de Falla 

FLORENCE CAPLAN 

IV 

Variations serieuses, Opus 54 Felly. Mendelssohn 

MARGOT ROS 

V 

32 Variations in C minor Beethovex 

SEYMOUR LEPKLN 



VI 

Nocturne in B major, Opus 62, No. 1 j Frederic Chopin 

Scherzo in C sharp minor, Opus 39 j 

JOHN SIMMS 



VII 

Capriccio in G minor, Opus 116, No. 3 Tohannes Brahms 

Intermezzo in B flat minor, 



is 116, No. 3 ) Johannes 

:, Opus 117, No. 2 ) 



Etude in G sharp minor, Opus 2>, No. 6 ^ Chopin 

Etude in E flat major, Opus 10, No. 11 j 

Ondine, from Gaspard de la mat Maurice Ravel 

ROBERT CORNMAN 

STEIXTAY PIANO 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

CASIMIR HALL 
Sixteenth Season — 1939-40 

RECITAL OF VOCAL MUSIC 

by 

Students of Mme Schumann 

Miss Elizabeth Westmoreland at the Piano 
Tuesday Afternoon, April 9, 1940, at 4:00 o'clock 

PROGRAMME 

I 

Vo' cercando in queste valli Emanuele D'Astorga 

Shepherd! Thy demeanour vary Old English 

(Arranged by H. Lane Wilson) 

Helen Worrilow 

II 

Rugiadose odorose Allesandro Scarlatti 

La pastorella Franz Schubert 

Maria Manski 

III 

Se tu m'ami se sospiri Giovanni Battista Pergolesi 

Spirate pur, spirate Stefano Donaudy 

Margarette Godwin 

IV 
Leise, leise, fromme Weise, 

from Der Frehchiitz Carl Maria von Weber 

Barbara Troxell 

V 

He shall feed His flock, from The Messiah George Frederick Handel 

Deh, contentatevi Giacomo Carisslmi 

Velma Caldwell 

VI 

Saper vorreste, from Un hallo in maschera Giuseppe Verdi 

Bra vour- Variations, on a theme from Mozart Adam-Schmidt 

(Flute obbligato by Burnett Atkinson) 
Margaret Lilly 

VII 

Ah, mai non cessate Donaudy 

Sommi Dei, from Kadamisto Handel 

Ancora un passo or via, from Madam Butterfly Giacomo Puccini 

Willa Stewart 



VIII 

Wer rief dich denn. \ Hugo Wolf 

Nun lass uns Frieden schliessen. J 

Spl een Claude Debussy 

Nicolette Maurice Ravel 

I hear an army Samuel Barber 

Hilda Morse 

Mr Atkinson is a student of Mr Kincaid 
Miss Westmoreland was graduated in 1934 under Mr Kaufman 

STEINWAY PIANO 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

CASLMIR HALL 
Sixteenth Season — 1939-40 

GRADUATION RECITAL 

of 
Frederick Vogelgesang, Violin 

Student of Mr Zimbalist 
Vladimir Sokoloff at the Piano 

Thursday Evening, April 11, 1940, at 8:50 o'clock 

PROGRAMME 

I 

Chaconne in G minor Tommaso Yitali 

n 

Fugue from Sonata No. 5 in C major Johanx Sebastian Bach 

III 
Concerto in D major, Opus 5 5 Peter Llyttch Tchaikovsky 

Allegro moderato 
Canzonet ta 
Allegro vivacissimo 

IV 

Moto perpetuo, Opus 11 Niccolo Pagaxest 

Tango Efrem Ztmbalist 

Fantasv on airs from Bizet's Carmen Sarasate-Zembalist 



Mr Sokoloff was graduated in 193 6 under Mr Kaufman 



STEEWAY PIAXO 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

C A SI MIR HALL, SIXTEENTH SEASON 7 " I939-40 

RECITAL OF MUSIC FOR THE VIOLONCELLO 

BY STUDENTS OF MR SALMOXD 

Ralph Berkowitz at the Piano 

TUESDAY EVENING, APRIL 16, 194c, at 8:33 O'CLOCK 

♦ 

PROGRAM M E 
I 

Two movements from the Sonata in A minor, Opus 36 Edvard Grieg 

Andante molto tranquillo 
Allegro agitato 

Esther Gruhn 

II 

Arioso Johaxn Sebastian Bach 

Siciliana Francesco Veracint 

(arranged by Joseph Salmon) 

Vivace Jban Baptiste Senaiixe 

(arranged by Jostpb Salmon) 
True Chappell 

III 

Requiem for three violoncellos, Opus 66 David Popper 

True Chappell, Esther Gruhn and Winifred Schaeffer 

IV 

Variations symphoniques, Opus 2.3 Leon Boellmann 

W ini Fred Schaeffer 

V 

String trio in C minor, Opus 3, No. 3 Ludwig van Beethoven 

Allegro con spirito 
Adagio con espressione 
Scherzo. Allegro molto e vivace 
Finale. Presto 
Herbert Baumel, Violin Julius Weissman, Viola 

Nathan Stutch, Violoncello 

VI 

First movement from the Double Concerto in A minor, Opus 101 Johannes Brahms 

Allegro 
Herbert Baumel, Violin Nathan Stutch, Violoncello 

STEIXWAY PIAXO 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

CASIMIR HALL, SIXTEENTH SEASON 1939-40 



RECITAL OF MUSIC FOR THE VIOLA 
BY STUDENTS OF DR LOUIS BAILLY 

Genia Robinor at the Piano 
WEDNESDAY EVENING, APRIL 17, 1940, AT 8:30 O'CLOCK 

♦ 

PROGRAMME 
I 

Concerto No. 3 George Frederick Handel 

(transcribed by William Strasser) 

Grave 
Allegro 
Sarabande 
Allegro 

Stanley Solomon 

II 

Sonata in E flat major, Opus 110, No. 1 Johannes Brahms 

Allegro amabile 
Allegro appassionato 
Andante con moto 

Philip Goldberg 

III 

Concerto in D major Joseph Haydn 

Allegro moderato 

Adagio 

Allegro 

Bernard Milofsky 

IV 

Suite Joseph Jongen 

Poeme elegiaque 
Final 

Albert Falkove 

V 

Concerto Tibor Serly 

(first performance) 

Risoluto 

Andante sostenuto 
Allegro vivace 

Bernard Milofsky 

Miss Robinor is a graduate of Dr Louis Bailly in Chamber Music 

STEINWAY PIANO 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

CASIMIR HALL, SIXTEENTH SEASON 1939-40 

RECITAL OF MUSIC FOR THE VIOLIN 

BY STUDENTS OF MR HILSBERG 

Louis Shub at the Piano 

THURSDAY EVENING, APRIL 18, 1940, AT 8:30 O'CLOCK 



PROGRAMME 

I 

Sonata in G minor — Devil's trill Giuseppe Tartini 

Larghetto 
Allegro energico 
Grave — allegro assai 

Baruch Altman 



II 

Concerto in A minor, Opus 53 Anton DvoXak 

Allegro ma non troppo 
Adagio ma non troppo 
Finale. Allegro giocoso, ma non troppo 

Jacob Krachmalnick 

III 

Tzigane Maurice Ravel 

Paul Shure 



IV 

Concerto in D minor, Opus 47 Jean Sibblius 

Allegro moderato 
Adagio di molto 
Allegro, ma non tanto 

Baruch Altman 



V 

Concerto in E minor Jules Conus 

Allegro molto 
Andante espressivo 
Allegro subito 

Paul Shure 
Mr Shub is a student of Mr Kaufman in Accompanying 

STEINWAY PIANO 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

CASIMIR HALL, SIXTEEXTH SEASOX 1939-40 

RECITAL OF MUSIC FOR WOODWIND ENSEMBLE 

CONDUCTED BY MR TABUTEAU 

assisted by Mr Jorge Bolet, Pianist 

FRIDAY EVENING, APRIL 19, 1940, AT 8:30 O'CLOCK: 

♦ 

PROGRAMME 

I 

Fuga William Strasser 

Britton Johnson \pt m ^ s Charles Gilbert. English Horn Sanford Sharoff, Bassoon 
Eleanor Mitchel James King David Hall 

John Krell. Piccolo Nathan Brvsilow -Clarinets Jambs Chambers v _ u r, 

John DeLancie \ ohoes Jambs Rettew Joseph White >tTencn "orns 

Ralph Gomberg Manuel Zegler. Bassoon Joseph Eger 

Walter Maciejewicz. Contrabassoon 

II 

Quintet in E flat (K452) Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart 

Largo. Allegro moderato Larghetto Rondo. Allegretto 

Jorge Bolet, Piano John DeLancie, Oboe James King. Clarinet 

Manuel Zegler. Bassoon David Hall, French Horn 

III 
Variations on the theme, La ci darcm la mano, 

from Mozart's Don Juan Ludwig van Beethoven- 
John DeLancie, Oboe Perry Bavman, Oboe Charles Gilbert, English Horn 

IV 

Allegro scherzoso, Opus 92 Luigi Hugues 

Eleanor Mitchel \pi uU . John DeLancie. Oboe Nathan Brvsilow, Clarinet 

John Krell primes Sanford Sharoff, Bassoon 

Aubade Paul De Wailly 

Britton Johnson, Flute John DeLancie, Oboe James King, Clarinet 

V 

Sonata Vittorio Rieti 

Allegretto Adagio doloroso Vivace ed energico 

Jorge Bolet, Piano John DeLancie, Oboe 

Eleanor Mitchel, Flute Manuel Zegler, Bassoon 

VI 
La gitane amoureuse, Opus 73, No. 1 Joaquin Turina 

(transcribed for wind instruments by William Strasser) 
Britton Johnson I pi utf . Charles Gilbert. English Horn Walter Maciejewicz, Contrabassoon 
Eleanor Mitchel tiules James King \ — ■ . David Hall \j7._-t w^.,- 

John Krell. Piccolo Nathan Brvsilow ^tartne^s j.^ MES Chambers tTencn aorns 



John DeLancie ,-,, Mr Manuel Zegler 'h,,,^.. 
Perry Bavman . °"" Sanford Sharoff j 5 *" 00 '" 



Menuet, from Sonatine Maurice Ravel 

(transcribed for vrind instruments by Hershy Kay) 
Britton Johnson ^ r;„,„, Ralph Gomberg, Oboe Manuel Zegler 1 d_ c „__. 

Eleanor Mitchel tiuus James King rl ■._ Sanford Sharoff Iiasso ° ns 

John DeLancie, Oboe James Rettew ^ l ^ rtnels Joseph White. French Horn 

James Chambers, French Horn 

La sevillane joyeuse, Opus 73, No. 3 Joaquin Turina 

(transcribed for wind instruments by William Strasser) 
Britton Johnson U . James King \ ri ■ . Charles Gilbert. English Horn 

Eleanor Mitchel James Rettew { ~ lcr,n " 1 Walter Maciejewicz. Contrabassoon 

John Krell, Piccolo Manvel Zegler \b_„-_., David Hall ■ jr.— ,t ri„„<- 

John DeLancie;,.. . Sanford Sharoff ;B*ssootu James Chambers French Horns 

Perry Bavman j UOoes 

The compositions in the sixth group were arranged for wind 
instruments with the kind permission of Elkan-Yogel Company. 

.Mr Bolet is a graduate of Air Saperton in Piano 
Air Kay is a student of Dr Thompson in Orchestration 

STEINWAY PIANO 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

CASIMIR HALL, SIXTEENTH SEASON IQ3Q-4.O 

RECITAL OF MUSIC FOR THE PIANO 
BY STUDENTS OF MADAME VENGEROVA 

THURSDAY EVENING, APRIL 2 5, 1940, AT 8:30 O'CLOCK 

♦ 

PROGRAMME 

I 

Prelude, aria con variazioni and capriccio 

from Suite No. 2 in D minor George Frederick Handel 

Etude in F minor (Posthumous) Frederic Chopin 

Five bagatelles Alexander Tcherepnin 

Gary Graffman 

II 

Sonata in E flat major, Opus 81a Ludwig van Beethoven 

Les adieux 
L'absence 
Le retour 

Eileen Flissler 

III 

Two movements from Concerto in F sharp minor, 

Opus 1 Sergei Rachmaninoff 

Barbara Elliott 

(orchestra part played on a second piano by Waldemar Dabrowski) 

IV 



':} 



Ballade in F minor, Opus 47, No. 

Etude in E minor, Opus 25, No. 5 ^ Chopin 

Mazurka in F minor, Opus 68 

Waldesrauschen Franz Liszt 

Lukas Foss 

V 

Etudes symphoniques, Opus 13 Robert Schumann 

Phyllis Moss 

VI 

Sonata in B minor Liszt 

Annette Elkanova 

Mr Dabrowski is a student of Mr Reiner in Conducting 
STEINWAY PIANO 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

CASIMIR HALL, SIXTEENTH SEASON IQ3Q-4O 

RECITAL OF PIANO AND CHAMBER MUSIC 
BY STUDENTS OF MR KAUFMAN 

FRIDAY EVENING, APRIL 26, 1940, AT 8:30 O'CLOCK 
* 

PROGRAMME 

I 

Trio in C minor, Opus 1, No. 3 Ludwig van Beethoven 

Allegro con brio 
Andante cantabile con variazioni 
Menuetto: Quasi allegro 
Finale: Prestissimo 

Louis Shub, Piano 

Noah Bielski, Violin 

Esther Gruhn, Violoncello 

II 
Berceuse, Opus 57 
Three etudes: 

F major, Opus 10, No. 8 

D flat major, Opus 25, No. 8 

B minor, Opus 25, No. 10 ) Frederic Chopin 

Two movements from Sonata in B minor, Opus 5 8 
Largo 

Finale: Presto non tanto 
Louis Shub 

III 

Aria from Sonata in F sharp minor, Opus 11 Robert Schumann 

Nocturne in B major, Opus 62, No. 1 Chopin 

Variations serieuses in D minor, Opus 54 Felix Mendelssohn 

Eleanor Harshman 

IV 

Two movements from Sonata in B flat minor, Opus 35 Chopin 

Grave 

Scherzo 
Rhapsodie in F sharp minor Ernst von Dohnanyi 

Intermezzo in B flat minor, Opus 117, No. 2.. (. Johannes Brahms 

Rhapsodie in E flat major, Opus 119, No. 4..) 
Eugene Bossart 

V 

Three movements from Trio in D minor, Opus 49 Mendelssohn 

Molto allegro agitato 
Andante con moto tranquillo 
Scherzo: Leggiero e vivace 

Eugene Bossart, Piano 

Noah Bielski, Violin 

Esther Gruhn, Violoncello 

Mr Bielski is a student of Mr Zimbalist in Violin 
Miss Gruhn is a student of Mr Salmond in Violoncello 

STEINWAY PIANO 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

CASIMIR HALL, SIXTEENTH SEASON I93Q-4O 



RECITAL OF VOCAL MUSIC BY 
STUDENTS OF MME GREGORY 

Mr Eugene Bossart at the Piano 
TUESDAY, AFTERNOON, APRIL 30, 1940, AT 4:00 OCLOCK 

PROGRAMME 

I 

Quella fiamma che m'accende Benedetto Marcello 

O! Had I Jubal's Lyre from Joshua George Frederick Handel 

Und Gestern hat er mir Rosen gebracht Joseph Marx 

Eleanor Murtaugh 

II 

Qual farfalletta from Partenope Handel 

Deb, rieni non tardar from Nozze di Figaro Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart 

Beau soir Claude Debussy 

Les papillons Ernest Chaussons 

Doris Luff 

III 

Heimliche Aufforderung \ -, „ 

... , I Richard Strauss 

Allerseelen ' 

En Drom Edvard Grleg 

Questa o quella from Rigoletto Giuseppe Verdi 

Donald Hultgren 

IV 

Von ewiger Liebe Johannes Brahms 

Er ist's Robert Schumann 

Kitorna vhtcitor from Aida Verdi 

Muriel Robertson 

V 

Dank sei Dir, Herr Handel 

I attempt from love's sickness to fly Henry Purcfti 

Tu lo sai Giuseppe Torelli 

Danza, danza fanciulla gentile Francesco Durante 

Donald Coker 
Mr Bossart is a student of Mr Kaufman 

STEINWAY PIANO 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

CASIMIR HALL, SIXTEENTH SEASON I939-4O 

RECITAL OF CHAMBER MUSIC 
BY STUDENTS OF DR LOUIS BAILLY 

TUESDAY EVENING, APRIL 30, 1940, AT 8:30 O'CLOCK 
♦ 

PROGRAMME 

I 

Quartet in B flat major, Opus 76, No. 4 

for two violins, viola and violoncello Joseph Haydn 

Allegro con spirito 

Adagio 

Menuetto: Allegro 

Finale: Allegro ma non troppo 
Charles Libove f v . ,. Julius Weissman. Viola 

Nathax Goldstein ) Winifred Schaefer, Violoncello 

II 
Trio in B major, Opus 8, 

for piano, violin and violoncello Johannes Brahms 

Allegro con moto 
Scherzo: Allegro molto 
Adagio non troppo 
Finale: Allegro molto agitato 
Barbara Elliott, Piano 
Solomon Ovcharov, Violin William Saputelli, Violoncello 

III 

Septet in E flat major, Opus 20, for violin, viola, 
violoncello, contrabass, clarinet, bassoon and 
French horn Ludwig van Beethoven 

Adagio: Allegro con brio 

Adagio cantabile 

Tempo di Menuetto 

Tema con Variazioni 

Scherzo: Allegro molto e vivace 

Andante con moto: Presto 
Noah Bielski, Violin James King, Clarinet 

Albert Falkove, Viola Sanford Sharoff, Bassoon 

Nathan Stutch, Violoncello David Hall, French Horn 

Ferdinand Maresh, Contrabass 

IV 

Fourth movement from Sextet in D major, Opus 110, 
for piano, violin, two violas, violoncello and 
contrabass Fellx Mendelssohn 

Allegro vivace 
Eileen Flissler, Piano Philip Goldberg, Viola 

Morris Shulik, Violin Esther Gruhn, Violoncello 

Albert Falkove, Viola Ferdinand Maresh, Contrabass 

STEINWAY PIANO 






THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

C A 51 MIR HALL, SIXTEEN" TH SEASON" IQ^Q— 40 

AN EVENING OF OPERA BY 
STUDENTS OF HANS TTOHLMUTH 

THURSDAY EVENING. MAY 2, 1*40, AT 1:30 O'CLOCK 

PROGRAMME 
PASTORELLES FROM THE XIII. XVII. XVIII CENTURIES 

sung in English 

I 
Battka md Bawr i pnnr Wolfgang Amadeus 11 

(1756-1791) 

:•- ::;: ::.— :i; C-tr— x- by Mia - l- ~--^ 
Btstien tud Btstienne, composed by Mozart in bis twelfth Tear, tells of 
toe quarrel of 1 rustic couple and their reconciliation through the good 
offices of a traveling conjurer. 

B-ts::S* DONALD HCLYGXEN 

Btsticnne :»iil 

Cain Roszat Giootejs 

conducted by Mb. Ezra Rachltn 

D 

A dialog between Thirsis and Daphne Henry Pltrceu. 

(16J8-1695) 

This pastoral duo by Henry Puree'!, the outstanding opera com p oser of 
England, was chosen from the Collection of ti's tnd odes composed for 
the tbettre tnd upon other occasions. 

Tbirsis Howaad Vaxdebbubg 

Dtpbne Hilda Morse 

conducted by Mr S. Joseph Li 

in 

Robin and Marion Adam de la Hate 

(1240-12S7 

: H:!e was one of the most ingenious poets and compos; 

: - ; :::■_:;::■.:■ ~ . -". '•:'.-:.- . - : - :::::.-.. ; : : : - • e : ; : . .-.:.:- 

spersed with contemporary folksongs and dance tunes. The original ac- 
:-: — ;-: -^n WBuwei —-•;::; i~i :r;i:ii scram. In 

this performance the reconstructed and somewhat modernized version by 
Dr Jean Beck is used. 

Robin 

'■:.- - 

A Knigbt Thomas Fi 

Btndoa 

Cotter John Haryet 

Hutrt IXTXN BcSBilAN 

Feronell Helen Toueot 

r> it mil _/ Velma Caldwell 

\ Margarette Goowrs 

condncted by Mr S. Joseph Levine 
THE ORCHESTRA 

RAFAEL DlULAN 1 EOWAiLD ArIAN, CoutrtbtSS 

Veda Reynolds \ KnJ 1 iolins Bubmmb Mitckel. 

t Campione I Second tiolins *** Sha * off ' b * si< ><" 

Ckasloyte Cohen J I Chambers 1 

PHn.tP Goldberg \ Vin i„ scHESt J "r»ro *©r»I 



HzXSEiT VoRTREICH J RALPH GoMBERG \ 

Kav \ Violoncellos Robery Davison J Oboes 

■". SCBAEFEB / REBA RoSINSON, HtTp 



Mr Rtcb'.in is t grtdutte of Mr Stperton in Pisno tnd Mr Reiner in Conducting 
Mr tnine is t grtdutte of Dr Hofmtnn in Piano tnd Mr Reiner in Conducting 

STEIVSWY PIANO 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

CASIMIR HALL, SIXTEENTH SEASON I939-4O 

GRADUATION RECITAL BY 

RICHARD PURVIS, ORGANIST 

Student of Dr McCurdy 

TUESDAY EVENING, MAY 7, 1940, AT 8:30 O'CLOCK 



PROGRAMME 

I 

Chorale in A minor Cesar Franck 



II 

Two chorale preludes: 

Allein Gott in der Hoh' sei Ehr' 

T . , _ . . , , . \ Johann Sebastian Bach 

Liebster Jesus, wir sind ruer 

Prelude and fugue in G major 



III 

*•• Ave Maria, from Cathedral windows Sigfrid Karg-Elert 

3. La Nativite Jean Langlais 

Z, Scherzo from Symphony No. 2 Louis Vierne 

4. Tu es Petra, from Byzantine sketches Henri Mulet 

AEOLIAN-SKINNER ORGAN 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

CASIMIR HALL, SIXTEENTH SEA SOX I939-4O 

RECITAL OF MUSIC FOR THE VIOLIN 

BY STUDENTS OF MADAME LUBOSHUTZ 

Eugene Helmer at the Piano 

THURSDAY EVENING, MAY 9, 1940, AT 8:3 O'CLOCK 

♦ 

PROGRAMME 

I 

Sonata No. 3 in G minor 

for two violins and piano George Frederick Handel 

Larghetto 
Allegro 
Adagio 
Allegro 

Charlotte Cohen and Ruth Griszmer 

II 
Partita in E minor Bach-Siloti 

Prelude: Maestoso 
Adagio ma non troppo 
Allemande 
Gigue 

Zelik Kaufman 

III 

First movement from Concerto in E minor, 

Opus 64 Felix Mendelssohn 

Allegro molto appassionato 

Nathan Goldstein 

IV 

Poeme, Opus 25 Ernest Chausson 

Morris Shulik 

V 

Second and third movements 

from Concerto in G minor, Opus 26 Max Bruch 

Adagio 

Finale: Allegro energico 

Charles Lfbove 

VI 

Second and third movements from Concerto No. 2 

in G minor, Opus 63 Serge Prokofiev 

(first performance in Philadelphia) 
Andante assai 
Allegro, ben marcato 

Herbert Baumel 

Mr Helmer is a graduate of Mr Kaufman in Accompanying 
STEINVAY PIANO 






HISTORICAL 
SERIES 

<z^>ala ana K^kanwet y v L 



lULC 



Presented by 

RALPH BERKOWITZ 

Assisted by 

JOSEPH S. LEVINE and VLADIMIR SOKOLOFF 
GRADUATES OF THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



<=zstxst y^soncett 



MONDAY EVENING, OCTOBER 30, 1939 

AT 8:30 O'CLOCK 

CASIMIR HALL 

The STE/NWAY is the Official Piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



Sti 



t a at am 



THOMAS CAMPIAN Tune thy music to thy heart 

Author of light 

JOHN DOWLAND Behold a wonder here 

Flow not so fast, ye fountains 
Say, love, if ever thou didst find 

Robert Grooters, Baritone Leo Luskin, Piano 

II 

HENRY PURCELL The Golden Sonata 

for two violins and piano 
Largo 
Adagio 

Canzona. Allegro 
Grave 
Allegro 

Noah Bielski and Marguerite Kuehne, Violins Leo Luskin, Piano 



III 

DIETRICH BUXTEHUDE Prelude, Fugue and Chaconne 

GIOVANNI da PALESTRINA Ricercare 

LOUIS CLERAMBAULT Prelude in D minor 

DIETRICH BUXTEHUDE Fugue in C major 

Walter Baker, Organ 

IV 

FRANCOIS COUPERIN Concerto in G major 

for two cellos, unaccompanied 
Prelude 
Air 

Sarabande 
Chaconne 

Esther Gruhn and True Chappeil, Cellos 

V 
ARCANGFJLO CORELLI Concerto Grosso No. VIII in G minor 

Vivace. Grave. Allegro. 

Adagio 

Vivace. Allegro. 

Largo 

Ezra Rachlin, Conducting 

Rafael Druian and Marguerite Kuehne, Solo Violins Nathan Stutch, Solo Cello 



1st Violins 

Noah Bielski 
Jacob Krachmalnick 
Zelik Kaufman 
Milton Wohl 

Cellos 

True Chappell 
William Saputelli 



2nd Violins 
Paul Shure 
Broadus Erle 
Baruch Altman 
Veda Reynolds 



Violas 

Albert Falkove 
Jerome Lipson 
Philip Goldberg 

Bass 

Wilfred Batchelder 



/yteqtant J \ete± 



By Ralph Berkowitz 

Cannot a man live free and easy 

Without admiring Pergolcsi, 

Or through the uvrld in comfort go 

That nei er heard of Doctor Blow? . . . 

I would not go four miles to visit 

Sebastian Bach (or Batch, which is it?) . . . 

ONE naturally assumes that the serious student of music does not share Charles 
Lamb's reflections concerning the gentlemen whom he mentions in the lines 
printed above. 

But amusing as is the conceit, there is a warrantable suspicion that many music 
students as well as musicians proceed on some fairly similar assumptions, which proclaim 
(with Lamb's ingenuousness) that the music of certain periods can be brushed aside 
with the simple statement that it lacks "interest" or "beauty." Much pre-Bach music 
generally receives darts of this kind and is accused of being merely a huge mass of 
music-paper, undistinguished, unimportant, or at best, experimental. 

It is necessary r o remember, however, that all art is in many ways an illuminating 
expression of its milieu, and is never considered by its producers as an experimental 
step toward something which only later artists will clearly define and accomplish. It 
is almost always based upon an aesthetic premise or some large historical force which 
can naturally be used as the key to its appreciation. In this sense the art of the 17th 
century is the 17th century, and did not come into existence simply as a preparation for 
that of the 18 th. 

This Concept can be realized by considering the first three composers on this pro- 
gram. 

Campian and Dowland are representatives of England's enormous material suc- 
cesses in the Elizabethan and Jacobean periods as fully as their contemporaries Shake- 
speare, Edmund Spenser and Ben Jonson. Viewed in a proper perspective, the art- 
works of these men can only impress us as solidly linked to their age. 

The English School of Lutenist Song-Writers, to which Campian and Dowland 
belong, also included such talents as Philip Rosseter, Thomas Ford and Francis Pilking- 
ton. Although their music is rarely heard there is reason to believe that the day is not 
far off when it will be removed from an undeserved obscurity. 

Henrv Purcell, the third Englishman on this program, follows the other two by 
more than fifty years; years which were full of political strife and religious bitterness. 
He appeared at a time when the Great Rebellion and its consequent reaction had already 
created an entirely new attitude toward music. 

Discussing Purcell's art, Sir Hubert Parry writes: "Applying the views of art 
which were in the air in a typically English way, he produced characteristic effects of 



harmony in both choral and instrumental music, which were without parallel till J. S. 
Bach began to enlarge the musical horizon in this respect . . . The source of his artistic 
generalisations can be traced, as is inevitable even with the most pre-eminently 'inspired' 
of composers; but isolation was entailed by the peculiarly characteristic line he adopted, 
and the fact that almost all the genuine vitality dropped straight out of English art 
directly he died. . ." 

The musical culture of England in the 17th and early 18th centuries was on an 
incomparably higher plane than at any other period. Only at the present time does 
it seem possible that another great musical age like it may appear. 

For an example of the state of music in England in the middle of the last century 
it is interesting to read the credo of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood, formulated by 
Dante Gabriel Rossetti, Holman Hunt and John Millais, in which they name the great 
figures of literature and the arts whom they wish to emulate. The one musician they 
chose was none other than Bellini. 



The remainder of the program represents some of the great moving spirits of 
Italian, French and German music before the age of Bach and Handel. 

It is hardly necessary to speak of the position which Palestrina holds in the devel- 
opment of music. Simplicity and devotional beauty are qualities which keep his art 
living and vital from one age to another. 

Similarly, the Gothic art of Buxtehude — although certainly not on the level of 
Palestrina — still exerts its compelling force. Buxtehude strongly influenced Bach, who 
as a young man once walked twenty miles to Liibeck in order to hear him play the organ. 

Francois Coupeiin is to music what Watteau is to painting. Even though the 
Concerto on this program is not quite so characteristic as the Clavecin Suites, one still 
feels the unmistakeable charm and elegance of the rococo spirit. 

Corelli stands at a unique point in the development of instrumental music. His 
complete output was only sixty works (all for strings), but he produced in them the 
first truly mature instrumental style. The movements of either the Sonate da Chiesa, 
Sonate da Camera or the Concerti Grossi are noteworthy for their thematic material 
which is quite removed from what had been the universally prevalent vocal idiom. 

For the first time in Italian music a pure feeling for the nature of instrumental 
music makes its appearance and leads from Corelli and some of his immediate predeces- 
sors like Vitali and Bassani to Vivaldi, Tartini and Nardini as well as to French and 
German composers. 

As one final example of the connection between various aspects of a period it is 
only necessary to mention the obvious relationship which exists between the string 
composers just mentioned and such great contemporary instrument makers as Joseph 
Guarnerius and Antonio Stradivarius. 



Next concert in the series November 27th 



HISTORICAL 
SERIES 

d^Wa and K^lianivet -/ v liuic 



Presented by 

RALPH BERKOWITZ 

Assisted by 

JOSEPH S. LEVINE and VLADIMIR SOKOLOFF 
GRADUATES OF THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



c^econJi C c-ncttt 



MONDAY EVENING, NOVEMBER 27, 1939 

AT 8:30 O'CLOCK 

CASIMIR HALL 

The SrE/NWAV is the Officio/ Piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



(V 



SIS ^ 



A 



taatam 



i 



JOHANN SEBASTIAN BACH Brandenburg Concerto No. 3 



1685-1750 



in G major 

For Strings and Cembalo 

Allegro moderato — Adagio — Allegro 
Max Goberman, Conducting 



Violins : 

Rafael Druian 
Paul Shure 
David Pessin 
George Zazofsky 
Marguerite Kuehne 
Broadus Erie 
Sidney Sharp 
Morris Shulik 
Jacob Krachmalnick 
Zelik Kaufman 
Milton Wohl 
Veda Reynolds 



Violas : 

Albert Falkove 

Julius Weissman 

Philip Goldberg 

Joseph dePasquale 

Jerome Lipson 
Stanley Solomon 



II 



Cellos : 

Hershy Kay 
Esther Gruhn 
Winifred Schaefer 



Bass: 

Henry Portnoi 



Cembalo: 

Ralph Berkowitz 



GEORG FRIEDRICH HANDEL Concerto in C major 

168 5-1759 for Recorder and Strings 

(Realization of the Figured Bass by Alfred Mann) 

Larghetto — Allegro — Larghetto — A tempo di Gavotti 

Alfred Mann, Recorder Ezra Rachlin, Conducting 



Violins I: 

Rafael Druian 
Paul Shure 
Jacob Krachmalnick 
Milton Wohl 



Violins II : 

Marguerite Kuehne 
Zelik Kaufman 
Morris Shulik 
Broadus Erie 

III 



Violas : 

Albert Falkove 
Jerome Lipson 



Cellos: 

Winifred Schaefer 

Esther Gruhn 
Bass: 

Henry Portnoi 

Das Musikalische Opfer 



JOHANN SEBASTIAN BACH 

(Arranged by Dr. Hans David) 
I. RICERCAR a 3 (three-part fugue). Oboe, English Horn, Bassoon and Cembalo. 

II. FIVE CANONS with the theme as Cantus Firmus. 

1. CANON PERPETUUS (canon at the double-octave). Violin, English Horn and Cello. 

2. CANON IN UNISONO (Canon at the unison). Two Violins and Bassoon. 

3. CANON PER MOTUM CONTRARIUM (canon in contrary motion). Oboe, Violin and 
Viola. 

4. CANON PER AUGMENTATIONEM, CONTRARIO MOTU (canon by inversion and 
augmentation). Violin, English Horn and Cello. 

5. CANON PER TONOS (canon modulating a tone higher at each repetition). English Horn, 
Viola and Cello. 

III. SONATA (Trio) for Flute, Violin, Cello and Cembalo. 

Largo — Allegro — Andante — Allegro 

IV. FIVE CANONS on the theme. 

1. CANON PERPETUUS (mirror canon). Flute, Violin, Cello and Cembalo. 

2. CANON a 2 (crab canon). Two Violins. 

3. CANON a 2 (canon by inversion). Viola and Cello. 

4. CANON a 4 (canon in four-part counterpoint). Two Violins 

5. FUGA CANONICA IN EPIDIAPENTE (fugue in canon at the fifth). 
Cello and Cembalo. 



Viola and Cello. 

Flute, Violin, 



V. RICERCAR a 6 (six-part fugue) , 



Rafael Druian, Violin 
George Zazofsky, Violin 
Albert Falkove, Viola 
True Chappell, Cello 

Ralph Berkowitz, Cembalo 
Max Goberman, Conducting (for the Ricercar a 6) 



Oboe, Violin, English Horn, Viola, Bassoon and 

Cello. 
John deLancie, Oboe 
Burnett Atkinson, Flute 
Charles Gilbert, English Horn 
Sanford Sharoff, Bassoon 



ft 



li 



'tc-atant J Mote* 

By Curtin WlNSOR 

IT is a remarkable fact that although before the year 1700, painting, sculpture, 
architecture, and probably literature, had reached heights that have never since 
been attained, music alone among the arts had not then approached its highest 
peaks, except in a limited field of choral polyphony. In the middle of the 18th Century, 
Bach and Handel, two musical giants, dared to work in large scale forms in nearly 
even- branch of the art, and brought music for the first time to a level of true greatness. 
Born the same year, in the same part of Germany, both were violinists, kapellmeisters, 
and great organists as well as composers, but they never met personally, and their 
music is quite different. Neither developed a new style, but each represents, in different 
aspects, the perfection of the grand polyphonic style. Nothing further could be done 
with this style when they had finished; music was obliged to strike out in new directions. 

I. BACH— BRANDENBURG CONCERTO No. 3 in G Major 

This, the third of six concertos written for the Margrave of Brandenburg in 1721, 
employs three string trios of violins, violas and cellos together with bass and continue 
Bach here enlarges on the strict concerto grosso form of Corelli (which Handel adopted 
without change) and alternates freely between passages for tutti in three parts and soli 
sometimes in nine parts. He employs nearly every possible grouping of the instruments. 
The opening Allegro is followed by two adagio chords which, according to Donald 
Tovey in "Essays in Musical Analysis, Vol. 2," represent the close of a slow movement 
to be improvised on the cembalo. 

It has been aptly said that these Brandenburg Concerti stand on the border between 
chamber music and orchestra music. :: ' :: ' 

II. HANDEL— CONCERTO FOR RECORDER AND STRING ORCHESTRA 

In its original form this concerto was Handel's sonata for recorder and figured 
bass, Opus 1 No. 7. In the present arrangement by Alfred Mann, the bass is realized 
for a four part string orchestra with divisions for tutti and soli which follow the 
structure of the movements as strictly as possible. The original score has not been 
changed except for the omission of the fourth movement, a short minuet. Handel's 
own arrangement of two of his other recorder sonatas as concertos for organ and 
string orchestra served as a model for the version to be heard tonight. 

III. BACH— THE MUSICAL OFFERING 

On May 7, 1747, Germany's greatest organist (if not composer) paid a visit zo 
Germany's greatest monarch (but not composer) when Sebastian Bach arrived at the 
Potsdam palace of Frederick the Great of Prussia at the invitation of the King, whose 
accompanist was Emmanuel Bach. Frederick was an accomplished flutist and he com- 
posed flute concertos which are still played today. Knowing "Old Bach's" reputation 
as an organist and harpsichordist (he had none as a composer during his life) the 
King persuaded him to improvise on all of his new pianos. He then asked the King to 
** Schweitzer, Bach, Vol. 1. 



give him a theme for a fugue, which Bach immediately developed in three parts. When 
the delighted monarch asked his guest to work it out in six parts, Bach replied modestly, 
and without flattery, that the theme though excellent did not lend itself readily to 
such treatment. 

Immediately upon his return to Leipzig, however, Bach wrote fugues (ricercari) 
in three and six parts and sent them together with some canons and a sonata, all employ- 
ing the royal theme, to Frederick as "a musical offering." The King's theme is in C 
minor and is as follows: 



jA+. 1 1 |Pfy;W*PiW7rr»rrliiriiJ1r \ IP 



The sonata is written for flute, violin, and figured bass. For three of the ten 
canons Bach designates the instruments to be employed but he gave no indications 
as to how the fugues and the remaining canons were to be performed. Dr. Hans 
David, the musicologist, has arranged the whole work in the form in which it is 
heard tonight. He has also "solved" the canons, which are merely stated by Bach 
though generally with an indication as to where the other voices are to enter. In two 
of the canons, however, even this hint is omitted and Bach writes on the margin in 
Latin: "Seek and ye shall find." The order in which the various parts of the Offering 
are heard this evening (an order which seems more logical than that employed in the 
original engraving and subsequent editions) has been worked out by Dr. David to 
form the basic pattern A, B, C, B, A* as follows: 

A. Three part fugue (or ricercar) probably, in part at least, the actual improvi- 
sation played by Bach before the King. It is headed by a Latin inscription: "Regis 
Iussu Cantio et Reliqua Canonica Arte Resoluta," meaning "By Command of the King 
the Theme Resolved by Canonic Art," the Latin initials forming the word "Ricercar." 

B. Five canons using the theme as cantus firmus with two voices moving 
canonically: 

( 1 ) Perpetual canon 

(2) Canon in unison 

(3) Canon in contrary motion. 

(4) Canon by augmentation in contrary motion bearing on the margin in 
Latin the phrase: "As the notes grow so may the King's prosperity." 

( 5 ) Circular canon ascending a tone with each repetition. This bears the 
words: "As the modulation rises so may the King's glory." 

C. Sonata for flute, violin, cello and cembalo. 

B. Five canons in which the royal theme is itself treated canonically: 

(1) Perpetual canon 

(2) Two part crab canon (the line of which is to be read simultaneously 
forwards or backwards). 

(3) Two part inverted canon, the second part being the inversion of 
the first. 

(4) Four part canon. 

(5) Fugal canon at the fifth. 
A. Six part fugue (ricercar). 

* This order is advocated and the Offering analyzed by Dr. David in the Musical Quarterly, Vol. 33, p. 314. 



Next concert in the series December 8th 



n JB 

HISTORICAL 

SERIES 

<z~>clc and K^lianwet s 
c i r 




Presented by 

RALPH BERKOWITZ 

Assisted by 

JOSEPH S. LEVINE and VLADIMIR SOKOLOFF 
GRADUATES OF THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



J-lutA L^oncett 



FRIDAY EVENING, DECEMBER 8, 1939 

AT 8:30 O'CLOCK 

CASIMIR HALL 

The STEINWAY is the Officio/ Piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 

is *ra 



•S-! 



A 



t&atatti 



1 



JOSEPH HAYDN 
1732-1809 



String Quartet in D minor 

Opus 76 No. 2 (Quinten) 

Allegro 

Andante o piu tosto allegretto 
Menuetto. Allegro ma non troppo 
Finale. Vivace assai 



Herbert Baumel, Violin 
George Zasofsky, Violin 



Julius Weissman, Viola 
Winifred Schaefer, Cello 



II 



JOSEPH HAYDN 



Sonata in F major 
Peters edition No. 21 



Allegro moderato 

Larghetto 

Presto 

Barbara Jane Elliott, Piano 



III 



WOLFGANG AMADEUS MOZART. 
1756-1791 



Hilda Morse, Soprano 



.Als Luise die Briefe ihres ungetreuen 

Liebhabers verbrannte 
Abendempfindung 
Sehnsucht nach dem Fruhlinge 
Der Zauberer 

James Shomate, Piano 



IV 

WOLFGANG AMADEUS MOZART 

Lucas Foss, Piano 



Fantasia in C minor 
K. 475 



V 

WOLFGANG AMADEUS MOZART Quintet in E flat major 

K. 452 for Piano, Oboe, Clarinet, 
French Horn and Bassoon. 

Largo — Allegro moderato 

Larghetto 

Rondo. Allegretto 

Jorge Bolet, Piano James King, Clarinet 

John deLancie, Oboe David Hall, French Horn 

Manuel Zegler, Bassoon 



By Leo Luskin 



HAYDN 



String Quartet in D minor — This, one of the best loved of Haydn's quartets, 
is called Quintcn, because of the descending fifths in its opening theme. The set 
of six quartets, opus 76, from which it comes, was written at Vienna in 1799, 
in the interval between the composition of the oratorios, The Creation and The 
Seasons. The opening allegro is serious, but far from tragic; the characteristic 
fifths appear continually throughout the movement. The floridity of the first 
violin part in the andante gives it the leading role. The famous minuet has a two- 
part canon with a strongly contrasted trio. A vivacious, rhythmic Finale closes 
the work. 

Piano Sonata in F — This sonata is one of six written in 1773 and dedicated 
to Haydn's patron, Prince Nicolaus Esterhazy. Its first movement is gay and 
sprightly, while the larghetto, in F minor, is similar in its melodic nature to some 
of the great slow movements of the string quartets. The humorous presto is in 
sonata form. 



MOZART 

The Songs — These worthy forerunners of the romantic Lied have fallen 
into undeserved neglect. The setting and accompaniment of Als Luise make it 
a drama in miniature. Abendempfindung is considered by Eric Blom to be Mo- 
zart's finest song, for all remnants of the operatic aria are carefully eliminated. 
The other two are simple, resembling folk-songs in their rhythmic charm. 

fantasia in C minor — This is the second of two Fantasias in C minor and 
was published together with the C minor sonata (K. 457), to which it can very 
well be linked. But it is certainly a work which can stand by itself. Its dramatic 
feeling and pianistic brilliance anticipated Beethoven's style while its improvisatory 
structure was a model for the fantasias of Schubert, Schumann and Chopin. The 
striking opening in octaves, followed by sections alternating between serenity and 
passion, returns in the close. 

Quintet in E flat — The composer was very proud of this work. After its 
first performance in 1784, he wrote his father that "the quintet is the best which 
I have as yet written in my life. I wish you could have heard it." It has set 
the style of chamber music for piano and other instruments, by such effects as 
the antiphony between the wind group and the piano and the contrasting natures 
of the winds themselves. The piano part is much like that of the Mozart piano 
concertos, with the additional task of simulating the string section of an or- 
chestra in contrast to the winds. 



Next concert in the series, Jamiary 19th, Beetlxtven and Schubert 






HISTORICAL 
SERIES 



Presented by 

RALPH BERKOWITZ 

Assisted by 

JOSEPH S. LEVINE and VLADIMIR SOKOLOFF 

GRADUATES OF THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



<=yc-iittn C- on cczt 



FRIDAY EVENING, JANUARY 19, 1940 

AT 8:30 O'CLOCK 

CASIMIR HALL 

The STE/NWAV is the Official Piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



cv - 



fi 



t&atam 



1 



LUDWIG VAN BEI 
1770-1827 



Allegro con spirito 
Adagio con espressione 
Scherzo. Allegro molto e vivace 
Finale. Presto 

Herbert Baumel, Violin Julius Weissman, Viola 

Nathan Stutch, Cello 



String Trio in C minor 
Opus 9 No. 3 



FRANZ SCHUBERT 
1797-1828 



Im Abendrot 
Geheimes 
Nachtstuck 
Der Schiffer 



Meryl Ruoss, Baritone 



Louis Shub, Piano 



FRANZ SCHUBERT 



The Twenty-third Psalm 
Opus 132 



Barbara Troxell, Soprano Muriel Robertson, Alto 

Willie Stewart, Soprano Velma Caldwell, Alto 

Elizabeth Westmoreland, Piano 



LUDWIG VAN BEETHOVEN 



Allegro 
Scherzo. Assai vivace 
Adagio sostenuto 
Largo — Allegro risoluto 

Fuga a tre voci, con alcune licenze 

Jorge Bolet, Piano 



Sonata in B flat major 
Opus 106 (Hammerklavier) 



/f^taqtant J VoteA 



By Ralph Berkowitz 



'Men of genius are brothers, but they do not look alike." — Jean Auguste Ingres 



SCHUBERT'S entire creative life was passed during years when Beethoven's huge 
shadow fell athwart the road followed by every composer. Twenty-seven years 
younger than Beethoven, with a modest, quiet temperament, and continually con- 
fronted with the adulation and success which greeted most of Beethoven's new works in 
Vienna, Schubert, along with many other musicians, must have felt that the times were 
difficult for a composer to establish his own individuality. It is recorded that on one 
occasion when his friend Spaun praised some of his songs Schubert replied, "I often think 
to myself that I may amount to something — and yet, coming after Beethoven, who will 
still be able to do much?" 

Schubert, however, was neither envious of the appreciation and homage Beethoven 
received, nor was he a revolutionary, choosing a new path simply as a reaction to the 
artistic credo of the older master. There are many indications, incidentally reflecting 
the beauty of his character, which prove that Schubert was among the most ardent and 
intelligent of Beethoven's admirers. To his friend Braun von Braunthals, Schubert once 
said, "He can do everything; but we cannot as yet understand everything, and a great 
deal of water will run under the bridge before what this man has called forth will be 
generally understood. Not alone that he is the loftiest and most lavish of all tone-poets; 
he is also the most exuberant. He is equally so in dramatic as well as epic music, in 
lyric as in prosaic; in a word, he can do everything. Mozart compares to him as Schiller 
to Shakespeare; Schiller already is understood, Shakespeare is far from being compre- 
hended. All by now have grasped Mozart; no one really completely understands Beetho- 
ven, unless he has a great deal of intelligence and even more feeling, and is terribly un- 
happy in love or otherwise wretched." 

Beethoven's personality must have been ever-present to Schubert and even his daily 
habits not unknown. For Friedrich Rochlitz in speaking of a visit to Vienna in 1822 
writes, "... I was about to go to dinner when I met the young composer Franz Schubert, 
an enthusiastic admirer of Beethoven. 'If you want to see him unconcerned and happy,' 
said Schubert, 'then you should go this very moment and eat in the restaurant, where he 
has gone with the same intention.' " 



Actual personal relationship between the two men was, in spite of the years of 
proximity, almost non-existent. According to Schindler, Schubert came to Beethoven 
in April i822 with a set of variations, opus 10 for four hands, dedicated to him from 
"his worshipper and admirer." Schubert, Schindler goes on to say, completely lost his 
self-possession in the presence of the great man and ran out of the house in utter bash- 
fulness and humility. 

In Beethoven's estimation, Schubert's stature was probably not greater than that 
of many other musicians such as Benedict, Mayseder or Bohm, more or less known to him 
and occasionally seen at the music shop of Steiner and Company or in some Viennese 
tavern. Only during the last few months of his life did he come to view Schubert in a 
different light. Schindler reports that Beethoven spent hours of several successive days 
reading through a collection of Schubert lieder with surprise and astonishment, fre- 
quently remarking, "Truly, there is a divine spark in this Schubert! — Had I had this 
poem I, too, would have set it to music!" Writing of this period, Schubert's first bi- 
ographer, Kreissle, says, ". . . the respect which Beethoven conceived for Schubert's 
talent was so great that he now wished to see all his operas and his piano compositions 
as well; but his illness already had made such headway that this wish could no longer be 
gratified. Yet he often spoke of Schubert, and prophesied "that he would yet make a 
great noise in the world,' regretting as well 'that he had not made his acquaintance at 
an earlier date.' " 

On March 29, 1827 in Beethoven's funeral procession there were eight pall-bearers 
and thirty-six torch-bearers. One of the latter, with some white flowers bound to his 
left sleeve and black crepe hanging from the torch was Franz Schubert. After the cere- 
monies at the grave he and some friends went to a restaurant, the "Schloss Eisenstadt," 
where, during the course of the evening, he is said to have proposed two toasts. The 
first was "To him whom we have just buried!" and the second, "To the one who will be 
the next to follow him!" It probably did not seem likely that within twenty months, 
and at the age of thirty-one, Schubert himself would be buried only a few feet away 
from the grave they had seen Beethoven lowered into that very day. 

It was left for future generations to dream of the untold masterworks which 
would have come from the hand of Schubert. Shortly before his death he said to a 
friend, "There are absolutely new harmonies and rhythms running through my head." 



Next concert in the series February 20th 
From Chopin to Debussy 



a* SiS 



/%» 



HISTORICAL 

SERIES 
H 



iea*on 



Presented by 

RALPH BERKOWITZ 

Assisted by 

JOSEPH S. LEVINE and VLADIMIR SOKOLOFF 
GRADUATES OF THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



TUESDAY EVENING, FEBRUARY 20, 1940 

AT 8:30 O'CLOCK 

CASIMIR HALL 

STEINWAY PIANO 
<v' . ' \*» 



FREDERIC 

1810-1849 



taatant 



:hopin 



Nocturne in B major, Opus 9, No. 3 
Ballade in A flat major, Opus 47 



Eileen Flissler, Piano 



II 



ROBERT SCHUMANN 
1810-18 5 6 



Er und Sie 
Liebesgarten 
In der Nacht 
Unterm Fenster 



Mu 



riel Robertson, Soprano Donald Hultgren, Tenor 

Louis Shub, Piano 



III 

JOHANNES BRAHMS Quartet in C minor 

183 3-1897 for piano and strings, Opus 60 

Allegro non troppo 

Scherzo. Allegro 

Andante 

Finale. Allegro comodo 

Julius Weissman, Viola 
Nathan Stutch, Cello 



Annette Elkanova, Piano 

Herbert Baumel, Violin 



IV 



CESAR FRANCK 
1822-1890 ; 



CABRIEL fAURE 

1845-1924 



Choral No. 3 in A minor 



Clarence Snyder, Organ 



V 



Mandoline 

En priere 

Les Roses d'Ispahan 

Prison 

Fleur jetee 



Robert Grooters, Baritone 



Louis Shub, Piano 



VI 

CLAUDE DEBUSSY Sonata for violin and piano 

1862-1918 

Allegro vivo 

Intermede. Fantasque et leger 

Finale. Tres anime 



Noah Bielski, Violin 



Louis Shub, Piano 



Astoatam > I ;/ t v 

B\ Cumin ^"ixsor 

If one plunges deeply into the depths of Webster, or of any other dictionary weigh- 
ing more than ten pounds, in quest of a definition of the word Romanticism, one 
emerges gasping for breath, and grasping the notion that Romanticism means something 
opposed to Classicism, art that emphasizes feeling rather than form. Curiously allitera- 
tive abstract nouns like nature, nemesis, and nationalism, and adjectives such as pic- 
turesque, passionate, and poetic swim around in those depths. Generally, such research 
tires the eyes, seeking to read the dictionary's fine print, and the arms, trying to support 
the dictionary's massive weight. One's own fairly clear ideas as to the meaning of 
Romanticism are scarified. It is perhaps wiser and certainly easier to remember merely 
that in music the term Romanticism refers to the stream of crea:: ight which 

tlooded the 19th Century and overflowed into the 20th. The composers whose work 
on this program were chosen as representative of the Romantic Movement. 

FREDERIC CHOPIN 

The perfection of the modern grand piano inspired Chopin to wrice music that was 
pianistic — with such success that after one hundred years many piano virtuosi today 
subsist on little else but the works of "the sentimental Pole." Frequently using dance 
rhythms, Chopin vastly enlarged the field of short piano pieces first explored by Schubert. 
Even his technical studies are works of art. Like his friend Delacroix, the pointer, he was 
a pioneer of Romanticism. It must not be forgotten that although Chopin failed to 
master any form other than the short piano piece, his influence was not confined to this 
restricted field. His bold chromatic explorations anticipated the work of L.szt. ^Tagner 
and Debussy, and resulted in the discover}" of new tone colors that were applied to every 
kind of musical canvas. 

ROBERT SCHUMANN 

A fine dramatist who first perfected his style of writing in the field of music criti- 
cism is quoted in "Men and Music" by Brockway and ^Teinstock as follows: Te all have 
a deep regard for Schumann; but it is really not in human nature to refrai- from occa- 
sionally making it clear that he was greater as a musical enthusiast than as a construe 
musician." Mr. George Bernard Shaw thus implies that Schumann's work is the editor 
of an influential musical periodical (in which he wrote an article on Chop:". "Hats off, 
Gentlemen, a Genius," and one on Brahms, hailing him as one who will ead German 
music into "new paths") outranks his musical compositions. Compare Lei.htentritt in 
"Music History" and Ideas": "There is hardly anything in . . . music that e:uals certain 
Schumann melodies in the power of evoking strong emotion, of making iMrs rush to 
the eyes, of arousing outbursts of delight — and all this is accomplished witi a touching 
clarity and sincerity, a chasteness of feeling very different from Chopin's sensuous refine- 
ment, from ^Tagner's burning passion and voluptuous impetuosity." 

Most of us feel today that Schumann wrote masterworks in nearly every form and 
we like to think of him as "the verv gentle, part ait" Knight of Romance, one of the gal- 
lant leaders of the Romantic Movement. 

JOHANNES BRAHMS 

Some writer once drew up a genealogical tree representing Brahms' mu>::al ancestry. 
Bach was his great-grandfather. Mozart and Beethoven his grandparents. >:hubert his 
uncle, Mendelssohn a cousin, and Schumann his father. This quaint no::c~ contains a 
kernel of truth. Moreover, it hints at the fact that Brahms like his "great -crandfather" 



was a conservative. His genius lies not in the discovery of new forms or the creation 
of new stylejs, but in the perfection of those used by his predecessors. The very first 
works of Brahms show an astonishing maturity and all through his life a relentless 
capacity foil self-criticism insured the destruction of everything he wrote that was 
not of the highest rank. Other great composers (one thinks of Schubert and Sibelius) were 
less scrupulous — to the misfortune of their reputations. Many authorities claim that 
Brahms' contribution to chamber music surpass those of any other musician. 

The quartet on this program is based in part on material written as far back as the 
days of Brahms' passion for Clara Schumann and sorrow over the death of her husband. 
Brahms said of the first movement, "Now think of a man who is just going to shoot 
himself because there is nothing left for him to do," adding that the music does not 
represent, but arose out of such thoughts. The second part of the movement consists of 
Aariations on the first piano theme. Some writers claim the piano figure of the last 
movement represents "Fate Knocking at the Door." Brahms silenced one who remarked 
that this figure resembled the opening theme of Mendelssohn's Trio in C Minor by growl- 
ing in his most formidable manner: "Any fool can see that.""' 

There can no longer be any doubt that Brahms was really an incurable romanticist, 
but except in his earliest works, he kept his feelings in control with the discipline of a 
true North German burgher. The elegiac strain that pervades his compositions seems 
sometimes to be tinged with the colors of an autumn sunset and to emphasize "the 
transitory nature of all worldly pleasures." 

:: See Henry S. Drinker Jr.'s valuable book "Brahms' Chamber Music." 



CESAR FRANCK 

was one of those rare creative artists whose personal character was as beautiful as 
his music. His larger works are remarkable for the use of the so-called cyclic form — the 
constant recurrence of themes in different movements, as a means of unifying the compo- 
sition as a whole. His organ works (he was a great organist) are among the best in this 
field. The choral on this program, one of three dating from the last year of his life, 
relies on the variation form rather than conventional thematic development. 

GABRIEL FAURE 

Best known for his songs which are characterized by Gallic refinement and sensi- 
bility, Faurie was also a fine organist and teacher of composition at the Conservatoire. 
Among his pupils were Debussy, Ravel, Enesco, and Nadia Boulanger. 

CLAUDE DEBUSSY 

With Debussy, the chromaticism first exploited by Chopin reached its fullest devel- 
opment. Impressionist painters like Monet and Renoir sacrificed design, draughtmanship, 
and broke up their colors to obtain extraordinary effects of light. Similarly, Debussy 
jettisoned form, counterpoint, and broke up tonality to get his unique harmonic effects. 
When he w>as through no one could follow him; music had to strike out in new directions. 

He was almost through when he wrote the sonata on this program in 1917, playing 
the piano part in its first and his last public performance. Fatally ill with cancer, "his 
face was like wax and the colour of ashes. His hand dragged from his shoulder and his 
head pressed on his whole body. In his eyes there was no light — only the dull reflections 
of silent pools. There was not even bitterness in his gloomy smile." (Oscar Thompson, 
in "Debussy, Man and Artist" quoting Andre Suares.) 

Next concert March lUh, Early American Music 






2*2 S£ 



-^- 



HISTORICAL 
SERIES 

<z$>alo and L^uanipet y I iiutc 



Presented by 

RALPH BERKOWITZ 

Assisted by 

JOSEPH S. LEVINE and VLADIMIR SOKOLOFF 
GRADUATES OF THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



<=^i\:t/i C ottcext 



FRIDAY EVENING, MARCH 15, 1940 

AT 8:30 O'CLOCK 

CASIMIR HALL 

STEINWAY P/ANO 



<*W 



stf as 



ft 



taatam 



JOHN ANTES Go, Congregation 

1740-1811 

JEREMIAH DENCKE Meine Seek erhebet den Herrn 

1725-1795 



Barbara Troxell. Soprano 



Leo Luskin, Piano 



II 



JOHANN FRIEDRICH PETER String Quintet in D major 

1746-1813 

Rafael Druian, Violin Julius Weissman, Viola 

Baruch Altman, Violin Warren Signor, Viola 

Esther Gruhn, Cello 

III 

FRANCIS HOPKINSON The Garland 

1737-1791 My Love is Gone to Sea 

With Pleasures Have I Passed My Days 
Velma Caldwell, Contralto Leo Luskin, Piano 

IV 

WILLIAM BILLINGS Funeral Anthem 

1746-1800 Majesty 

Methinks I See a Heavenly Host 
A Virgin Unspotted 

Barbara Troxell, Soprano Norman Rose, Tenor 

Margaret Lilly, Soprano Irvin Bushman, Baritone 

Elizabeth Lettinger, Contralto James Cosmos, Bass 

V 

ALEXANDER REINAGLE Adagio from the Sonata in E major 

1756-1809 

JAMES HEWITT The Battle of Trenton 

1770-1827 A Favorite Military Sonata 

Dedicated to Gen. Washington 
Jeanne Behrend, Piano 

VI 

KENTUCKY MOUNTAIN SONGS The Swapping Song 

Arranged by Howard Brockway John Riley 

The Toad's Courtship 

NEGRO SPIRITUALS Ma Brudder's Died 

Were You There 
Git On Board, Little Chillen 
Ride On, King Jesus 
Thomas Perkins, Baritone Leo Luskin, Piano 

VII 

LOUIS GOTTSCHALK The Dying Poet 

1829-1869 

EDWARD MACDOWELL Elfin Dance 

1861-1908 

Jeanne Behrend, Piano 

VIII 

ARTHUR FOOTE First and second movements from the 

1853-1937 Trio in C minor, Opus 5 

Allegro con brio 
Allegro vivace 
Noah Bielski, Violin Louis Shub, Piano 

Esther Gruhn, Cello 



A 



t&atam ^ Volt* 



r 

1 llizabeth Llewellyn Lettinger 

THE Puritans came to New England in 1620 for relig: :r. paradox- 

ical fervor, they established a r :ical mode of Life. The] eluded all cultural 

expression for they believed artistic occupation condemned a soul to everlasting torment. 
New England remained a musical -wilderness until the middle of the eighteenth century, 
bv which time Puritanical bigotry had waned. Fortunately, conditions were different 
in the South. Secular music flourished in Charleston and Williamsburg. In fact, the 
first record of a concert in the colonies is a song recital at Charleston in 17J1. 

While musical life in the South, Philadelphia, New York and Boston was a result of 
English influence, German musical culture predominated in the Moravi ny founded 

at Bethlehem, Pennsylvania in "."-'. It soon became famous for its :r:r.e>::a and cham- 
ber music. Franklin's, Wa sh in g t on's, and Samuel Adams' letters and diaries prove their 
interest and knowledge of the Moravian culture. In a letter written by a little girl 
attending the Moravian boarding school in '."•" ::' i thorough musical edu- 

cation. She mentioned that she was taught vocal and instrumental music: "I play the 
guitar twice a dav; am taught the spinet and forte piano and sometimes I play the 
organ." John Frederick Peter, organist of the congregation, was one of tfce group of 
composers who lived there. The extant manuscripts of these men show their musician- 
ship was far in advance of composers in other parts of the country. But l r Moravians 
stood aloof from other colonies and did little for the cultural advancement of the 
country as a whole. 

Francis Hopkinson, now considered the first native American com:: is born, 

lived and died here in Philadelphia. He is known as musician, poe:. pa anW, inventus 
and statesman. He was i member of the firs: dasa '."'" :: ... :re bachelor's 
degree from the College of Philadelphia, now the University of Pen i He was 

secretary of the Library Company, a member of the Continental Congress, signed the 
Declaration of Independence, and held the post of Secretary of the Navy. Altogether he 
was a remarkable person. Some authorities even give h i m credit for designing the Amer- 
ican Flag. John Adams in a letter to his wife thus described him: "He is one of your 
prettv, little, curious, ingenious men. His head is not bigger than an apple. I have not 
met anything in natural history more amusing and entertaining than his personal appear- 
ance, yet he is genteel, and well bred and is very social." 

But Hopkinson's activities did not distract him from music. He was the nucleus of 
musical life in Philadelphia. As a harpsichordist, he possessed such intimate know 
of his instrument that he invented and perfected a new method of quillmg. Thomas 
Jefferson tried to influence European manufacturers to adopt its use. Among his compo- 
sitions are anthems, satirical ballads, a dramatic cantata and numerous songs. "The 
Garland" is among his earliest compositions. 

In a letter to his friend George Washington, to whom he had dedicated "Seven 
Songs" (1788) Hopkinson wrote: "However small the Reputation I shall derive from 
this work, I cannot, I believe be refused the Credit of being the first Xitive of the 
United States who has produced a Musical Composition. If this attempt should not be 
too severe.;, treated, others may be encouraged to venture on a path, yet --.trodden in 
America and the Arts in succession will take root and flourish amongst us. . . .' "^ ash- 
ington replied to this ". . . But, my dear Sir, if you had any doubts about die reception 
which your work might meet with . . . you have not acted with your usual good judge- 
ment, for, what alas, can I do to support it? I can neither sing one of me songs nor 
raise a single note on any instrument to convince the unbelieving. But, I have, however, 
one argument, which will prevail with persons of true estate, (at least in America ) I can 
tell them that it is the production of Mr. Hopkinson." 

Both Alexander Reinagle and James Hewitt, though English by birth, made America 
their home and participated in the development of music in this coun:ry. Reinagie 
came from London to Philadelphia about 1 7 S 6 . He was instrumental in organizing many 
subscription concerts, and introduced four-hand piano music to this country. In style. 



his piano sonatas resemble those of Johann Christian Bach, the "London" Bach, with 
whom he had studied. James Hewitt was particularly active in developing the concert 
field in New York. Many of his compositions figured on his programs. "The Battle of 
Trenton, A Favorite Military Sonata dedicated to General George Washington" is repre- 
sentative of his style. It has an elaborate program: "Lento, Introduction; Pin vivo, The 
Army in motion — General Orders — Acclamation of the Americans — Drums beat to 
Arms; Maestoso, Washington's march — The Army Crossing the Delaware — Ardor of the 
Americans at landing — Trumpets sound the charge; Presto, Attack — cannons — bombs. 
Defeat of the Hessians — Flight of the Hessians — Begging Quarter — General Confusion; 
Andantino semplice, The Hessians Surrender; Lento cott espressione, Grief of the Amer- 
icans for loss of their comrades killed in the engagement; Allegro, Drums and Fifes — 
Trumpets of Victory; Allegro, General Rejoicing." 

In 1770 William Billings of Boston produced "The New England Psalm Singer." 
Billings rebelled against the slow paced psalms and hymns and composed what he called 
"fuguing pieces . . . more than twenty times as powerful as the old slow tunes. Each 
part striving for mastery and victory." In spite of his own eloquence, these fuguing 
pieces are crude attempts at imitative counterpoint and can be appreciated only in view 
of the circumstances in which he lived. He was quite a character, blind in one eye, with 
a withered arm, and legs of uneven length, and possessing a loud, powerful voice made 
harsh and rasping by the excessive use of snuff. Perhaps his real contribution to American 
music was in making the first attempt to establish singing classes and trained church 
choirs. 

No survey of American music, early or late, can be complete without recognition 
of existing folk music. True folk music is to be found among the mountaineers in Ken- 
tucky, among the Negroes, the cowboys and the lumberjacks. Many people refuse to 
accept Negro "spirituals" as native music. This attitude seems rather absurd when 
one realizes the influence of revivalist and camp meeting music on the "spiritual." As 
a matter of fact, all religious folksongs, both white and Negro, have been loosely termed 
"spirituals" from the early American connotation "spiritual songs." There are folk- 
songs that are unquestionably American, for example, "Yankee Doodle," "Sucking Cider 
Through A Straw," "The Arkansas Traveler" and "Zip Coon" ("Turkey in the 
Straw") which Carl Sandburg described "as American as corn-on-the-cob." 

Louis Moreau Gottschalk was the first American virtuoso to be given European 
recognition.; Chopin declared he was a "king of pianists." Berlioz, with whom he had 
studied, said he possessed all the different elements of a consummate pianist. And Bar- 
num offered him a twenty thousand dollar contract after his New York debut in 185 5. 
Gottschalk, a romantic figure, was probably the first matinee idol in America. Women 
rushed to the piano after concerts, literally flung themselves upon him, seized his white 
gloves and tore them to bits as souvenirs. As a composer he excelled in sentimental salon 
music. Witty the nostalgic "Last Hope" and "The Dying Poet" he achieved great vogue. 

New Ehgland compensated for its earlier musical wilderness by producing the first 
ie.i! school df American composition. The relationship of this group is one of similar 
background, geographic origin and sympathy rather than any particular style in music. 
John K. Paine was the first of the New England "academics," to be followed by Chad- 
vick, Arthiir Foote, Parker, Whiting, Hadley, Converse, MacDowell, Carpenter and 
many othersj Arthur Foote was one of Paine's earliest students at Harvard. He wrote for 
orchestra, chprus, organ, piano, voice. Foote himself said that it was due to the interest 
of Theodore Thomas that his works were first heard. 

Edward MacDowell, though a New Yorker by birth, went to Boston after his re- 
turn from Europe, and thus became associated with the New England school. Mac- 
Dowell's compositions include works for orchestra, chorus and voice, but he is best 
known for his piano compositions. He is the first of our creative musicians for whom 
we need no excuses for lack of early training and limited technical development. We 
need not justify him as an American composer. Nationalism has little significance in 
true art. Edward MacDowell can be judged simply on his own merits as a composer. 

Next concert, April 2)rd, Contemporary American Music 



»? S£ 

HISTORICAL 
SERIES 

_ 

c^alo and \^liamvet y I Litiic 



Presented by 

RALPH BERKOWITZ 

Assisted by 

JOSEPH S. LEVINE and VLADIMIR SOKOLOFF 
GRADUATES OF THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



_t* event It L c-ncett 



TUESDAY EVENING, APRIL 23, 1940 

AT 8:30 O'CLOCK 

CASIMIR HALL 

STEINWAY P/ANO 

<-- ——————— _____ ____________________________________________________ «n 

511 tK 



h 



t&cpzciwiwie 



CARLOS SALZEDO Sonata for harp and piano 

1885- in one movement (1922) 

Lynne Wainwright, Harp Ralph Berkowitz, Piano 

II 

CHARLES IVES Maple Leaves (1920) 

1874- Ann Street (1921) 

The Side Show (1921) 
1-2-3 (1921) 
Charlie Rutlage (1921) 
Theodore Uppman, Baritone Ralph Berkowitz, Piano 

III 

QUINCY PORTER Sonata No. 2 for violin and piano (1932) 

1897- 

Allegro 
Andante 

Allegro con f uoco 
Rafael Druian, Violin Vladimir Sokoloff, Piano 

IV 
SAMUEL BARBER Rain Has Fallen (1935) 



1910- 



Willa Stewart, Soprano 



Sleep Now (1935) 
I Hear an Army (1936) 
The Composer at the Piano 



V 



SAMUEL BARBER A Stopwatch and an Ordnance Map. 

For Men's Chorus and Kettle-drums (1940) 

{first performance) 

Men's Voices from the Curtis Institute 

Madrigal Chorus 

David Stephens, Kettle-drums 

Conducted by the Composer 

VI 

RANDALL THOMPSON Suite for oboe, clarinet and viola (1940) 

1899- 

(first concert performance) 
Allegro 
Adagio 
Allegro 

Lento religioso 
Andante — Allegretto 
Ralph Gomberg, Oboe James King, Clarinet 

Albert Falrove, Viola 

VII 

RANDALL THOMPSON Americana. A Sequence of Five 

Choruses for Mixed Voices (1932) 

May Every Tongue 

The Staff Necromancer 

God's Bottles 

The Sublime Process of Law Enforcement 

Loveli-lines 

Members of the Madrigal Chorus 

Eugene Bossart, Piano 

Conducted by the Composer 



A STOPWATCH AND AN ORDNANCE MAP 



A stopwatch and an ordnance map. 
Ac five a man fell to the ground 
And the watch flew off his wrist 
Like a moon struck from the earth 
Marking a blank time that stares 
On the riies erf change beneath. 
All under the olive trees. 

A stopwatch and an ordnance map. 

He stayed faithfully in that p^ 

From his living comrade split 

By dividers of the bullet 

That opened wide the (hsta : ; . i 

Of his final loneliness. 

All under the olive trees. 

A stopwatch and an ordnance map. 

And the bones are fixed at five 

Under the moon's timelessness; 

But another who lives on 

"ft ears within his . 

The space split open by the bullet. 

All under the olive trees. 

(This poem deals with the death of a soldier in the recent Spanish 
fought in the war, ;:"•; the poem to Samuel Barber in London last June.) 







AMERICANA 

(Text used by kind permission of the American Mercury) 



MAY EVERY TONGUE 

( Washington — Christian sentiment of the Rev. Dr Mark Matthews, veteran instrument of the Lord in 
Seattle, as reported by the Post-Imtelligencer.) 

May every tongue be paralyzed and every hand palsied that utters a word or i es a r. .-.;;: 
this pulpit in advocacy of Modernism. 

II 

THE STAPF NECROMANCER 

York — The St*f Necromsmcer of the Earning Graphic comes to the aid of troubled readers of that 
great family newspaper.) 

(Q.) — ymi I e my stolen . . A. M. 

A.' — "iour jewelry was taken to Xew Orleans and sold. You can recover it in part. 
(Q-) — My children made me break up my home and come to Xew York : tdrasetts; and 

now I am lonesome, and can't pay my room rent. \That can I do? . . . E. T. 
(A.) — You will get a position as nurse to three small children in Pelham. N. Y. It will give you a 

source of income, and something easy to do. I see you will marry again liter and go back to 

M::::::: ; e::;. 

(Q.) — Is my husband, Charles V , alive? ... A. \T. 

A. — No, he is not. I see him drowning in deer water. 
(Q.) — Will it be advisable for me to go into the laundry business with my boy friend before we ire 

married? . . . F. I. B. 
(A.) — Yes, the two of you will be very successful. I see you will marry very soon. 
(Q.) — Vill I ever have any children? I have been married nearly two yea.-i. . . . A. F. W. 
(A.) — You will have three children, the first one in about two years. That is plenty of time. 



Ill 

GOD'S BOTTLES 

(Leaflet Issued by the N. W. C. T. U.) 

; APPLES ARE GOD'S BOTTLES: The sweet juice of the apple God has placed in His own bottle. 
What a beautiful rosy-red bottle it is! These red bottles hang on the limbs of a tree until they are all 
ready for us to use. Do you want to open God's bottle? Bite the apple with your teeth and you will 
taste the sweet juice God has put in His bottle for you. 

GRAPES ARE GOD'S BOTTLES: These purple and green bottles you will find hanging on a pretty 
vine. See! So many little bottles are on a single stem! Put a grape in your mouth and open God's bottle. 
How nice the juice tastes! Some men take the juice of apples and grapes and make drinks that will harm 
our bodies. They put the drinks in glass bottles, but we will not drink from such bottles. We will DRINK 
FROM GOD'S BOTTLES. 



IV 
THE SUBLIME PROCESS OF LAW ENFORCEMENT 

(Arkansas — The Sublime Process of Law Enforcement, described by Joseph B. Wirger, deathhouse re- 
porter of Little Rock Gazette, in Startling Detective Adventures.) 

One scene in the death chamber was particularly unpleasant, even gruesome. That occurred the morn- 
ing four white men were executed a few minutes apart. The condemned men were Duncan Richardson, 
Ben Richardson, F. G. Bullen and Will DeBord. The first three had been convicted of the murder of one 
man; DeBord was condemned for murdering an old couple. 

Preparations for this unusual execution were not as complete as they might have been. There were 
no accommodations for the undertaker who was to take the four bodies away. The death chamber was 
too small for the four coffins and the augmented crowd of witnesses, and there was no other room con- 
venient. 

Hence the four coffins were deposited in the run-around of the death house, directly in front of the 
cells in which the four men were confined awaiting their turn in the chair. It was an unintentional 
cruelty on the part of the officials. If the doomed men looked through the doors of their cells, the grim 
row of coffins was directly in view. If they looked ont the windows, they could see the hearses waiting to 
carry them away after the execution. So they sat on their bunks with their faces in their hands and 
waited the execution. 

Duncan Richardson was the first to go. After it was all over for him, his body was carried back and 
laid in the coffin where the other three could see if they lifted their heads. And when Ben Richardson 
started his deatli march, he passed by the row of coffins, one of which contained all that remained of 
his brother. 



V 

LOVELI-LINES 

(California — Literary intelligence: Announcing) 

LOVELI-LINES 

by Edna Nethery 

Laveli-lincs is composed of thirty-three Individualistic Verse poems all abrim with Joy, Love, Faith, 
Abundance, Victory, Beauty and Mastery. 

Each one will lift you to the Heights of Consciousness. 

Bound in cloth of Happy blue: trimmed and lettered in gold. 

Order from 

Edna Nethery 
Riverside, California 

One Dollar 



^oT- 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

CASIMIR HALL 
Sixteenth Season— 1939-40 

SONATA RECITAL 

by 

LEA LUBOSHUTZ, Violinist 
EDITH EVANS BRAUN, Pianist 

Friday Evening, November 10, 1939, at 8.30 o'clock 

PROGRAMME 
I 

Concert sonata after Pugnani (1731-1798) Rosario Scalero 

(American premiere) 

Andantino 

Adagio 

Moderate ma con spirito 

II 

Sonata in B minor Ottorixo Respighi 

Moder2to 

Andante espressivo 
Passacaglia 

III 

Sonatine in E major, Opus 80 Jean Sibelius 

Lento. Allegro 
Andantino 
Lento. Allegretto 

The Siuhwa t is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



^ 



*«? $$? 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

CASIMIR HALL 
Sixteenth Season— 1939-40 

RALPH BERKOWITZ and VLADIMIR SOKOLOFF 

in a 

RECITAL OF ORIGINAL MUSIC 
FOR FOUR HANDS AT ONE PIANO 

Thursday Evening, January 4, 1940, at 8:30 o'clock 

PROGRAMME 

I 

Variations in C major 

on a theme by Count Valdstein Ludwig van Beethoven 

Sonata in C major (K. ^21) Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart 

Allegro 

Andante 

Allegretto 

II 

Fantaisie in F minor. Opus 103 Franz Schubert 

III 

Allegro brillant in A major, Opus 92 Felix Mendelssohn 

Jeux d'enfants Georges Bizet 

Trompette et Tambour. Marche 
Petit mari, petite femme. Duo 
La Toupie. Impromptu 
Les quatre coins. Esquisse 

Six epigraphes antiques Claude Debussy 

Pour invoquer Pan, Dieu du vent d'ete 

Pour un tombeau sans nom 

Pour que la nuit soit propice 

Pour la danseuse aux crotales 

Pour l'egyptienne 

Pour remercier la pluie au matin 

Pupazzetti Alfredo Casella 

Marcietta 

Berceuse 

Serenata 

Xotturnino 

Polka 

The Stein^jtay is the official piano of The Curtis Institute or Music 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

CASIMIR HALL 
Sixteenth Season— 1939-40 



THE FIVE SONATAS FOR PIANO AND VIOLONCELLO 

by 
LUDWIG VAN BEETHOVEN 



FELIX SALMOND, Violoncellist 
assisted by 

RALPH BERKOWITZ Pianist 



Wednesday Evenins, January 10, 1940, at 8:15 o'clock 



The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



m 



"©< 



PROGRAMME 



Sonata in F major, Opus 5, No. 1 



Adagio sostenuto. Allegro 
Allegro vivace 



II 



Sonata in C major, Opus 102, No. 1 



Andante. Allegro vivace 
Adagio. Tempo d'andante. Allegro vivace 



III 



Sonata in G minor, Opus 5, No. 2 



Adagio sostenuto ed espressivo 

Allegro molto piu tosto presto 

Rondo. Allegro 



INTERMISSION 



IV 



Sonata in D major, Opus 102, No. 2 



Allegro con brio 

Adagio con molto sentimento d'affetto 

Allegro fugato 



V 



Sonata in A major, Opus 69 



Allegro, ma non tanto 

Scherzo. Allegro molto 

Adagio cantabile. Allegro vivace 



PROGRAM NOTES 

By Ra*ph Berkoiuz 

Beethoven composed the two son J fas Opus J in 1796 for a perform- 
ance with the cellist Duport at the court of the genial, music-loving King 
of Prussia. Frederick "^Tilliam II. 

The King, himself a cellist, like so many other monarchs of the ISth 
century, was not averse to taking part in performances of music and often 
played in a string quartet or even at rehearsals of Italian opera. He was 
much impressed by these sonatas and as an indication of pleasure at hav- 
ing :hem dedicated to him, presented Beethoven, upon his departure from 
Berlin, with a gold snuff-box filled with Louis d'or. Oi this mark of 
favor Beethoven was fond of saying that "it was no ordinary box. but 
one of the kind customarily given to amb . 

The two sonatas are the work of a confident, happy and vigorous 
master, who at the age of twenty-six already had four years : adulation 
from both the musical public and the aristocracy of Vienna. Aware of 
his own power and dominated bv a sense of superiority even to the aristo- 
cratic families who befriended him, he was the first composer of modern 
times to alter the musician's social status. Because of this inner convic- 
tion of his own worth, his demeanour as a young man seemed strange 
enough to make Haydn — the perfect example of the musician as depend- 
ant — refer to him as "grand mogul" and "Turkish pasha." 

The long, slow introduction with which each sonata begins is a 
beautiful, thoughtful expression of "weltsehmerz" more easOy traced to 

the general cultural feeling of the epoch, rather than to any per 
experience of the composer. As in many of the early piano sonatas the 
quick movements here seem to have an endless flow of melodic be 
and contain great contrasts of charm, humor and youthful strength. 

"^Thile these sonatas certainly belong to the first period of Beethoven's 
cr e a tive Kfe, and many passages show indebtedness to Mozart and Haydn, 
there is at the same time, as for instance in the wonderful D flat section 
in the development of the first sonata's Allegro, an easily discernible 
stamp of mastery and originality. 



It would be interesting to discover how many musical masterworks 
are responsible for their creation to some outward circumstances far re- 
moved from the processes of purely musical inspiration. 



7WL- 



Beethoven's two sonatas Opus 102 probably owe their existence to 
the fact that a great fire destroyed the palace of Prince Rasoumovsky in 
December 1814 and dispersed the members of a string quartet in the 
Prince's service. The cellist of this quartet, Joseph Linke, spent some 
time near Beethoven during the following summer and it is for him that 
these works were written. The first bears the date "towards the end of 
July," the second, "beginning of August." 

The C major, which Beethoven called a "free sonata" consists of two 
movements, each with a slow and quick section. Particularly beautiful 
is the reappearance of the sonata's opening theme in the course of the 
second movement, while the combination of pages of spiritual introspec- 
tion with others which are vigorous and bold is typical of the late Beetho- 
ven. 

The D major sonata is a wonderful example of that integrated artistic 
beauty which Beethoven achieved in his later works. It contains the only 
full-sized Adagio in all the cello sonatas, a movement of profound char- 
acter with a strong kinship to the slow movements of the last string 
quartets. It is in the nature of a funeral march with an elegiac, 
passionless middle section. The mysterious coda allows us to glimpse, as 
over an abyss, a shadowy vision of the superhuman. 

The last movement, a strict fugue (the first in all the forty-seven 
sonatas Beethoven had written thus far) is marked by tremendous energy 
which drives on relentlessly page after page. 



Beethoven's A major sonata Opus 69 is probably the best known of 
all cello sonatas. It was sketched in 1807 and completed in the following 
year, thus being near in style and spirit to the fifth and sixth symphonies. 
In the positive quality of its emotional content and masterly treatment 
of simple material it is characteristic of the composer's middle period. 

The one tragic note connected with the work is the phrase, in 
Beethoven's hand, scribbled on the title-page: Inter Lachrymas et 
Luctum, (amid tears and distress). This was Beethoven's reference to 
the advance of the French army, which was soon to bombard Vienna 
and drive him to the cellar with pillows over his already somewhat deaf- 
ened ears, in order to escape some of the painful noise. 

But neither this sonata nor other works of the period reflect Beetho- 
ven's tortured state of mind. It is another example of the astonishing 
aloofness which some good spirit creates for a great artist, allowing him 
to produce great music even though he be in poverty or despair. 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

CASIMIR HALL 

5 .:•:■:- - : : — ^ : ~: 



" ~i- z-z- ~: v:'.:-, "z 'r-0 -:: z z ~_ : : ::• 



THE TRAPP FAMILY SINGERS 

Baroness Maria Auguste, Agathe, Maria, Hedwig, 
Joan, Martine, Rupert and Werner von Trapp 



Directed bv DR FRANZ WASNER 



'©r 



— $gr 



PROGRAMME 



Introitus — Cibavit eos 



Gregorian 



This chant is taken from the Graduate Romanum. The Introitus is the 
first song in the Catholic Mass. It begins with an Antifon, followed by 
a verse taken from a Psalm with the Gloria Patri. The Antifon is then 
repeated. Immediately after the Introitus, the Kyrie eleison is sung. 

Four parts from the Missa Brevis 

Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina 
(1526-1594) 

Kyrie 
Sanctus 
Benedictus 
Agnus Dei II 

Palestrina's Missa Brevis originally appeared in the First Book of Masses 
in 1570, dedicated to King Philip II of Spain. The Kyrie and Sanctus ire 
written in four parts, the Benedictus in three, and the Agnus Dei in five, 
the two soprano voices being composed as a canon. 



II 



Trio Sonata in F major 



Georg Philipp Telemann 
(1681-1767) 

For two alto recorders in F and basso continuo (Spinet) 

Affettuoso 
Allegro 
Adagio 
Allegro vivace 



Suite in G major 



JOHANN KASPAR FERDINAND FlSCHER 

(c. 1665— c. 1738) 

For recorder ensemble and basso continuo (Viola da gamba and Spinet) 

Ouverture 
Intrade 
Chaconne 
Menuett 



in 



Frohlich will ich singen 



Innsbruck, ich muss dich lassen 



Johannes Eccard 
(1553-1611) 

Heinrich Isaac 
(1445-1517) 

Heinrich Isaac was Emperor Maximilian's choice as director of the royal 
orchestra in Vienna and Innsbruck. ''SThen he had to leave Innsbruck with 
the Emperor, he dedicated the indescribably ardent farewell song, Innsbruck, 
ich muss dich lassen, to his sweetheart, who remained in Innsbruck. It is 
one of the loveliest compositions in old German music. The melody was 
later used for the chorale, Nun ruben alle Wilder, and J. S. Bach used 
the melody in the St. Matthew's and St. John's Passions, and one of the 
chorale preludes, as well as in several cantatas. It is also sung with other 
religious texts and survives as a hymn in many countries. 

Tanzen und Springen Hans Leo Hassler 

(1564-1612) 

A five-part ballet, first issued in the Lustgarten neuer teutscber Gesinge 
at Nurnberg in 1601. 

Freunde lasset uns beim Ziehen, (K. 560) 

"Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart 
(1756-1791) 

A canon 



Im Fruajahr 

Wia mei Diandle, mei kloans 

Viel Freuden mit sich bringet 

In einem kiihlen Grunde 

Der spate Abend 
Die lustige Bauring 



IV 

Austrian folksong from Steiermark 
Austrian folksong from Carinthia 

German folksong, arranged by Dr Wasner 

German folksong, arranged by Dr "VTasner 

Austrian folksong from Carinthia 

Yodel from the Austrian Alps 



Yodels are songs without words. In yodeling the mountaineers give free 
expression to the feelings and emotions which they cannot easily express 
in words. Not only do they express feelings of joy, but also of sorrow, 
grief, longing and devotion. Many yodels even resemble chorales and were 
formerly used at divine services. Profane and unbecoming yodeling in 
places of amusement brought the real art into disrepute. The Trapp Family 
Singers seek to acquaint those who have not had the opportunity of hearing 
the real yodels of the mountains with the true yodeling technique. 



Landler 



Austrian folkdances 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

CASIMIR HALL 
Sixteenth Season — 193 9-40 

RECITAL 

by 

Mr Sigurd Rascher, Saxophone 
Mr George Robert, at the Piano 

Guest Artists 
Friday Evening, March S, 1940. at 8:30 o'clock 

PROGRAMME 

I 
Sonata Xo. 3............ ........... ........... G. F. Handel 

(original for violin or flute, arranged by Mr Rascher) 
Aiagio 
Allegro 
Largo 
Allegro 

n 

Prelude to Cantata Xo. 12 J. S. Bach 

(original for oboe d'arnore, arranged by Mr Ratchet 

Variations on a gavotte A. Corelli 

(arranged by Glaser-Rascher) 

III 

Sonata, Opus 1. A. Berg 

La nlle aux cheveux de lin ( C. Debussy 

Feux d'artiiice I 

Mr Robert 

IV 
*Introduction and Capriccio ;ms., 1934) E. Borck. 

(Borck was born in Silesia, Germany, in 1906. He used the saxophone 
in his earnest works for orchestra and wrote the Capriccio played today, 
as wefl ii - Concerto* at the request of Mr Rascher.) 

^Sonatine (ms., 1932) V. Jacobi 

(Jacobi was born in 1896 on the island of Ruegen in the Baltic Sea. He 
composes and teaches in Munich.) 

Allegro ma non troppo 

Sarabande 

Allegro 

A group of Swedish Folk Songs, unaccompanied 

"Danse du Satyr F. Swain 

Ifia S^ain lives in Oxfordshire, England, and is a teacher at the Royal 
Hnflfge — Ifnsic in London. This piece was written for Mr Rascher after 
the composer heard him at a Promenade Concert in Qaeem Hall. cond. . 
by Sir Henry- Vood.) 
'dedicated to Mr Rascher 

STEIN\TAY PIANO 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

CASIMIR HALL 
Sixteenth Season — 1939-40 

PIANO AND VIOLA RECITAL 

by 

Miss Genia Robinor, Pianist 
Dr Louis Bailly, Violist 

Wednesday Evening, March 13, 1940, at 8:30 o'clock 
PROGRAMME 



I 

Sonata No. 1 in G minor Johann Sebastian Bach 

Vivace 
Adagio 
Allegro 



II 

Sonata in F sharp minor Jean Hure 

(In one movement) 

III 

Sonata in F minor, Opus 120, No. 1 Johannes Brahms 

Allegro appassionato 
Andante un poco Adagio 
Allegretto grazioso 
Vivace 



IV 

Sonata in D major, Opus IS Paul Juon 

Moderato 

Adagio assai e molto cantabile 

Allegro moderato 



STEINWAY PIANO 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

C A SI MIR HALL, SIXTEEXTH SEA SOX 19^9-40 

SONATA RECITAL BY 
MR ADOLF BUSCH, VIOLINIST 
AND MR RUDOLF SEREIN, PL^NIST 

SUNDAY AFTERXOOX, APRIL 28, 1940. AT 4:00 O'CLOCK 



PROGRAMME 



Sonata No. 1 in G major, Opus 78 Johannes Brahms 

Vivace ma non troppo 

Adagio 

Allegro molto moderato 



II 

Sonata No. 1 in G minor 

for violin alone Johann Sebastian Bach 

Adagio 
Fuga 
Siciliano 
Presro 

in 

Sonata in C minor. Opus 30, No. 2 ..... Lutj^og van Beethoven 

Allegro con brio 
Adagio cantabile 
Scherzo 
Finale: Allegro 

STELXTTAY PLAXO 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

CASIMIR HALL, SIXTEENTH SEASON IQ3Q-4O 

SONATA RECITAL BY 
MR ADOLF BUSCH, VIOLINIST 
AND MR RUDOLF SERKIN, PIANIST 

WEDNESDAY EVENING, MAY 1, 1940, AT 8:50 O'CLOCK 



PROGRAMME 



(K 526) 

Sonata in A major (K 331) "Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart 

T««--A«*»K- g r«iwrT MoltO allegro 

Mumctui Andante 

Rando i-A rhi - miu .- All c gim TT *restO 



5 1 " 

Sonata No. % in B minor 

for violin alone Johann Sebastian Bach 

Aticmji.de, I 'iial If- Grave 

etmra me , I mid " H Fuga 

fcnrbiuJe, i amt-H- Andante sostenuto 

Teinpo-tfr-bonrrS5rt"3S-d-n Allegro 



III 

Sonata in G major, Opus 96 Ludwig van Beethoven 

Allegro moderato 

Adagio espressivo 

Scherzo 

Poco allegretto 

STEINWAY PIANO 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

CASIMIR HALL, SIXTEENTH SEASON' I 9 ^9-40 

SONATA RECITAL BY 
MR ADOLF BUSCH. VIOLINIST 
AND MR RUDOLF SERRTN, PIANIST 

WEDNESDAY EVENING, MAY i. 1940, AT *:30 O'CLOCK 



PROGRAMME 



Sonata No. 3 in D minor, Opus 108 Johannes Brahms 

Allegro 
Aiagio 
L'- poco pres:o e con sentimento 

Presto agitato 



II 
Sonata No 3 in C major 

for violin alone Johann Sebastian Back 

Adagio 
Fuga 

Li.-;; 
Allegro ii = ;: 



ni 



Sonata in G major. Opus 30, No. 3 Lud\tig van Beethoven 

Allegro assai 

Tempo di — ^n'je::o 
Allegro viv;ce 



STEINTTAY PLANO 



WILDWOOD CIVIC CLUB 
Wildwood, New Jersey 

Tuesday afternc n, . £2, 1939, at 2:50 o'clock 

Howard Vanderturg, Beritone 
Lee Luskin, Accompanist 

of 

im :trtis hstitoti :~ msic 

Programme 
I 



Invocation of Orpheus 
del mio amato ben 
aey 



Pen 
Dana 

Lecucna 



II 



"Tcreadcr song" 
froir. "Car 



Bizet 



III 



Deep river 
Little David, 

play on your harp 
Land uv degradashun 



arranged by Burleigh 

arranged by Johnson 
KacGinsey 



IV 



g of the open ro: : 
lav carol 
fhen I think upon the maidens 



Malctte 

Ta7lor 

Head 



FOREMEN'S AND SUPERVISORS' CLUB 
Gibbstown, New Jersey 

Thursday evening, September 21, 1939, at 6:00 o'clock 

Howard Vanderburg, Baritone 
Lynne Kainwright, Harp 
Leo Luskin, Accompanist 

of 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

Programme 

I 

Just for today Seaver 

Gwine to Hebb'n I olf e 

Land uv degradashun MacGimsey 
Howard Vanderburg 

II 

Bourree Bach 

Y.altz in A flat major Brahms 

Short stories in music Salzedo 

Pirouetting music box 

Night breeze 

Behind the barracks 
Chanson de Guillot-Martin Perilhou-Millcr 

Lynne kainwright 

III 

"Toreador song" 

from "Carmen" Bizet 

Howard Vanderburg 

IV 

Theme and variations Haydn 

"Barcarolle" 

from "Tales of Hoffmann" Offenbach 

Gigue Wainwright 

Believe me, if all those 

endearing young charms) transcribed by Salzedo 
Deep river ) 

Lynne Wainwright 



FOREMEN'S hxiD SUPERVISORS' CLUB 

Gibbstown, New Jersey 

(continued) 



Song of the open road Malotte 

My little mule wagon Schwartz 

Captain Stratton's fancy Taylor 
Howard Vanderburg 

VI 

Invocation of Orpheus Peri 

Howard Vanderburg 
Lynne >Va in w right 
Leo Luskin 



THE nOMEN'S £LUE OF LYNCHBURG 
Lynchburg, Virginia 

Friday afternoon, October 13, 1939, at 3:30 o'clock 

Howard Vanderburg, Baritone 
Louis Shub, Piano 

of 

TEE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF WJSIC 

Programme 

I 

Invocation of Orpheus Peri 

Che fiero costume Legrenzi 

Gondoliera veneziana (in Sicilian) Sadero 

Ricordati di xe? Tosti 
Howard Vanderburg 

II 

"Vision fugitive" 

from "Herodiade" Massenet 

Howard Vanderburg 



III 

Ballade in A flat major, Opus 47 
Prelude in G major, Opus 32, No. 5 
La campanella 

Louis Shub 



Chopin 

Rachmaninov 

Paganini-Li s z t 



IV 



In the silent night 

Passing by 

re it bright day 

Ho?.ard Vanderburg 



Rachmaninov 

E. Purcell 

Tschaikcvsky 



Eleanore 

I heard a forest praying 

For you alone 

Howard Vanderburg 



Coleridge-Taylor 

DeRose 

Geehl 



[ 

- 






= 



i : 



- 



- : 
3 2 ] jor ] 

E 



" 






i 









.3 in E No. 1 

i 

- 






STATE ..7 .CHERS COLLEGE 
Kutztovm, Pennsylvania 
(Continued) 



Drink to me only 

ih thine eyes arranged by Quilt er 

Long ago in Alcala Hessager 

Lomen Wolfe 

Pilgrim' s song Tschaikovsky 

Robert Grooters 



' 



SOMEN'S CLUB OF 1TCNCOTE 
T.yncote, Pennsylvania 

r.ednesday afternoon, October 18, 1939, at 3:00 o'clock 

Donald Coker, Tenor 
Reba Robinson, Harp 
Burnett Atkinson, Flute 
Nathan Stutch, Violoncello 
Eugene Bossart, Accompanist 

of 

TEE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 
Programme 



Lasciatemi morire Monteverdi 

Danza, danza, fanciulla gentile Durante 

Tu lo sai Torelli 
Donald Coker 



II 



First and second movements 

of Sonata No. 8 in D major Leclair 

Adagio 
Allegro 
Menuet Bach 

Second and third movements of 

Trio Sonata in B minor Loeillet 

Allegro 
Adagio 

Reba Robinson 
Burnett Atkinson 
Nathan Stutch 

III 

Adagio from the organ toccata in C major Bach 

Serenade espagnole, Opus £0, No. 2 Glazounov 

Rondo in A major t»eber 
Nathan Stutch 



WOMBPS CLUB OF KINCOTE 

Wyncote, Pennsylvania 

(continued) 



IV 

I attempt from love's sickness to fly H. Purcell 

Clorinda Morgan 

A sailor's life Old English 

The sleigh Kountz 
Donald Coker 



Serlnade Arensky 

Minatures Bridge 

Romance 
Salterello 
"Dorienne" 

from "Divertissement grec" Mouquet 

Reba Robinson 
Burnett Atkinson 
Nathan Stutch 



WASHINGTON COLLEGE 
Chestertown, Maryland 

Thursday morning, October 26, 1939, at 11:00 o'clock 

Reba Robinson, Harp 
Nathan Stutch, Violoncello 
Burnett Atkinson, Flute 

of 

• THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

Programme 



First and second movements 

from Sonata No. 8 in D major 
Adagio 
Allegro 
Menuet 

T^o movements from Trio Sonata 
in B minor 
Adegio 
All egro 

Reba Robinson 
Nathan Stutch 
Burnett Atkinson 



Lecl?:ir 

Bach 
Loei" 



II 



Adagio from the organ toccata in C major 
Rondo in A major 

Nathan Stutch 



Bach 
Weber 



III 



Waltz in A flat major 

y night 
Zephyr 

Reba Robinson 

IV 

Sonata in F major 
Menuetto 

Burnett Atkinson 



Br: 
Palragren 
Salzedo 



Marcello 
Mozart 



WASHINGTON COLLI GE 
Chester-town, Maryland 
(Continued) 



Arabesque No. 1 
Petite suite 
Berceuse 
Souvenance 
"Dorienne" from 

"Divertissement grec" 

Reba Robinson 
Nathan Stutch 
Burnett Atkinson 



Debussy 
Dukas 



Mouquet 



HARCUM JUNIOR COLLEGE 
Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania 

Thursday morning, November 2, 1959, at 11:00 o'clock 

Noah Bielski, Violin 
Louis Snub, Piano 

of 

THE: CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

Programme 

I 

Concerto No. 2 in D minor Wieniawski 

Allegro moderato 
Romance 

Allegro moderato alia zingara 
Noah Bielski 

II 

Ballade in a flat major, Opus 47 ) 
Berceuse, Opus 57 ) 

La campanella 

Louis Snub 

III 

La gitana ) 

Caprice viennois ) Kreisler 

Tambourin chinois ) 

Noah Bielski 



Chopin 

Paganini-Lisst 



JUNIOR OCTAVE CLUB 
Norristown, Pennsylvania 

Thursday evening, November 2, 1939, at 8:00 o'clock 



Lynne Wainwright, Harp 
Hilda Morse, Soprano 
Leo Luskin, Accompanist 

of 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

Programme 

I 

Bourree 

"Gavotte" from "Iphigenie in Aulis" 
Concert variations on Adeste Fideles 
Lynne Wainwright 

II 

Nimmersatte Liebe ) 
Das verlassene Magdlein ) 
Vergebliches Standchen 

Hilda Morse 



Bach 

Gluck 

Salzedo 



Wolf 

Brahms 



III 



Brahms lullaby arranged by Salzedo 

Deux chansons populaires francaises Grandjany 

Le bon petit roi d'Yvetfrt 

Et ron ron ron, petit patapon 
En bateau Debussy 

Chanson de Guillot-Martin Perilhou-Miller 
Lynne V-ainwright 



IV 



11 Un bel di 1: from "Madame Butterfly" 
Ohie Menechel 

Hilda Morse 



Puccini 
Gianni ni 



FRIENDS' SELECT SCHOOL 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

■Friday morning, November 5, 1939, at 10:30 o'clock 

Veda Reynolds, Violin 
Nathan Stutch, Violoncello 
John Simms, Piano 

of 

THE CURTIS INSTITJTE OF MUSIC 
Programme 



Praeludium and allegro 
La fille aux cheveux de lin 
Variations on a theme by Corelli 
Veda Reynolds 



Kreisler 
De bus sy-Har tmann 
Tartini-Kreisler 



II 



Adagio from the organ toccata in C major Bach 
Serenade espagnole, Opus 20, No. 2 Glazounov 
Rondo in A major ,,eber 

Nathan Stutch 



III 

Trio in C minor, Opus 1, No. 3 
Allegro con brio 
Andante cantabile con variazioni 
Menuetto. Quasi allegro 
Finale. Prestissimo 

Veda Reynolds 
Nathan Stutch 
John Simms 



Beethoven 



SAINT ANDREWS SCHOOL 
Middle town, Delaware 

Saturday evening, November 4, 1939, at 8:00 o'clock 

Veda Reynolds, Violin 
Nathan Stutch, Violoncello 
John Simms, Piano 

of 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

Programme 



Trio in C minor, Opus 1, No. 3 Beethoven 

Allegro con brio 

Andante cantabile con variazioni 
Menuetto. Quasi allegro 
Finale. Prestissimo 

Veda Reynolds, Nathan Stutch and John Simms 

II 

Adagio from the organ toccata in C major Bach 

Serenade espagnole, Opus 20, No. 2 Glazounov 

Rondo in A major Weber 
Nathan Stutch 

III 



Chopin 



Waltz in E minor (posthumous) ) 
Scherzo in C sharp minor, Opus 39 ) 
John Simms 

IV 

Praeludium and allegro Kreisler 

La fille aux cheveux de lin Debus sy-Hartmann 

Variations on a theme by Corelli Tartini-Kreisler 
Veda Reynolds 



Trio in C minor, Opus 101 Brahms 

Allegro energico 
Presto non assai 
Andante grazioso 
Allegro molto 

Veda Reynolds, Nathan Stutch and John Simms 



^4 ^ 



UNIVERSITY OF DELAWARE 

NEWARK. DELAWARE 
(Under the auspices of the Newark Musk Socict] 

Thursday evening, November 9th, 1959. at S:00 o'clock 

ROBERT GROOTERS. Bantam 
MARGUERITE KUEHXE. Yioim 
LOUIS SHUB, Piano 
of 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

PROGRAMME 

I 

Have you seen but a whyte lillie grow? Old English 

Flow not so fast, ye fountains Dowlaxd 

Die Rose, die Lilie Schumaxx 

Venn du zu den Blumen gehst Hugo ^Tole 
E>er Leiermann 



1 



Sc HUBERT 

Rastlcs« Liebe 

ROBERT GROOTERS 

II 

Gavotte from sonata in E major Bach-Krejsler 

Romance in G major. Opus 40 Beethoven 

Rondo in G major Mozart-Kreisler 

MARGUERITE KUEHXE 

III 
Berceuse, Opus 57 J 

Etude in F major, Opus 10, No. 8 / Chopin 

Ballade in A flat major, Opus 47 ' 

LOUTS SHUB 

IV 

Pilgrim's song Tschatrovsry 

Jean SvBOSS 

The hills of home Fox 

A maid of Alcala Messager 

Glory road "STolfe 

ROBERT GROOTERS 

V 

Rondo capriccioso Salnt-Saens 

MARGUERITE KUEHXE 



SLEIGHTON FARM SCHOOL FOR GIRLS 
Darling Post Office, Pennsylvania 

Tuesday evening, November 14, 1939, at 7:30 o'clock 

Robert Grooters, Baritone 
Marguerite Kuehne, Violin 
Louis Snub, Accompanist 

of 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

Programme 

I 

Have you seen 

but a whyte lillie grow? Old English 

Flow not so fast, ye fountains Dowland 

Die Rose, die Lilie Schumann 

Wenn du zu den Blumen gehst Wolf 
Der Leiermann ) 

Rastlose Liebe ) Schubert 

Robert Grooters 

II 

Gavotte from sonata in E major Bach-Kreisler 

La fille aux cheveux de lin Debussy-Hartmann 

Rondo in G major Mozart-Kreisler 
Marguerite Kuehne 

III 

Pilgrim's song Tschaikovsky 

Jean Spross 

The hills of home Fox 

Long ago in Alcala Messager 

Glory road Wolfe 
Robert Grooters 

IV 

Rondo capriccioso Saint-Saens 

Marguerite Kuehne 



^sSk 




^§2^ 



£eba ftoiringon, 


Harp 


Rattan &tutd), 


Violoncello 


^Burnett Atkinson, 


Jflute 


Houia £>fmfc, 


gUcompantet 



of 



Cfje Curtis institute of jflustc 



Wednesday Afternoon 

November fifteenth 
Nineteen Hundred Thirty-nine 



Montgomery County 
Medical Society 
Building 



quasi Axxegro 

Noah Bielski 
Morris Shulik 
Stephen Katsaros 
"William Saputelli 



®f)t t^ctabe Club 

Norristown, Pennsylvania 
MRS. J. LAWRENCE EISENBERG, President 

Wednesday Afternoon at Two-Thirty O'clock 



Mrs. Charles W. Miller, Chairman of the Day 

PROGRAMME 

I 

First two movements of Sonata No. 8 in D major. . . .Leclair 
Adagio 
Allegro 

Menuet Bach 

Two movements from Trio Sonata in B minor Loeillet 

Adagio 
Allegro 

Reba Robinson, Nathan Stutch and 
Burnett Atkinson 

II 

Adagio from the organ toccata in C major Bach 

Serenade espagnole, Opus 20, No. 2 Glazounov 

Rondo in A major Weber 

Nathan Stutch 



ill ck 

Waltz in A flat major Brahms 

Believe Me. If All Those Endearing Young Charms. .Salzedo 
May Xight Palmgren 

Night Breeze ) „ , 

Behind the Barrack? i 

Reba Robinson 

IV 

Sonata in F major Marcello 

Sicilienne Bach 

Menuetto Mozart 

Birnett Atkinson* 

V 

Deux Arabesques Debussy 

Petite Suite Dukas 

Berceuse 

Souvenance 111 

Dorienne from ''Divertissement grec" Mouquet 

Reba Robinson. Nathan Stutch and 
BrRXETT Atkinson 



211 



quasi A-u.egro 

Noah Bielski 
Morris Shulik 
Stephen Katsaros 
William Saputelli 



MRS. CLARENCE R. PALMER 

MRS. E. FRED BROUSE 
MRS. WILLIAM D. HUNTER 
MRS. CLARENCE G. LAND 

MISS MARION SPANGLER Chairman of Programs 

MRS. JOHN LOCK LARZELERE. .Chairman of Decorations 



Mtxt iWeeting -- December &toentietf) 

CAROLYN FOX— Violinist 

& Jfrem!) ^eafiaut Cftr&tmatf 

OCTAVE CLUB CHORUS 
Mks. Harold V. Sturtevant — Chairman of the Day 

JR. OCTAVE CLUB 

November 18th at 10 A. M. Y. W. C. A. Auditorium 

MISS MARJORY WILSON 

and her 

SHEPHERD PIPES 

Mrs. Wm. D. Hunter 

Mrs. Harold V. Sturtevant 

in charge 



URSINUS COLLEGE 
Collegeville, Pennsylvania 

Thursday evening, November 16, 1939, at 8:00 o'clock 

Noah Bielski, Violin 
Morris Shulik, Violin 
Stephen Katsaros, Viola 
William Saputelli, Violoncello 
Louis Shub, Piano 

of 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

Programme 



Concerto No. 2 in D minor, Opus 22 Wieniawski 
Allegro moderato 
Romance 

Allegro moderato alia zingara 
Noah Bielski 



II 



Berceuse, Opus 57 ) 

Etude in F major, Opus 10, No. 3 ) 
Ballade in A flat major, Opus 47 ) 
Louis Shub 

III 



Chopin 



Quartet in B flat major, Opus 13, No. S Beethoven 
Allegro con brio 
Adagio ma non troppo 
Scherzo. Allegro 

La Malinconia. Adagio. Allegretto 
quasi Allegro 

Noah Bielski 

Morris Shulik 

Stephen Katsaros 

William Saoutelli 



ftOfiiAtf'S CLUB OF LYNCHBURG 
Lynchburg, Virginia 

Friday afternoon, November 17, 1939, at 3:30 o'clock 

Reba Robinson, Harp 
Nathan Stutch, Violoncello 
Burnett Atkinson, Flute 

of 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

Programme 



First and second movements 

of Sonata No. 3 in D major Leclair 

Adagio 
Allegro 
Menuet Bach 

Two movements from Trio Sonata in B minor Loeillet 
Adagio 
Allegro 
Reba Robinson, Nathan Stutch and Burnett Atkinson 

II 

Adagio from the organ toccata in C major Bach 

Serenade espagnole, Opus 20, No. £ Glazounov 

Rondo in A major Weber 
Nathan Stutch 



III 

Waltz in A flat major 
Believe me, if all those 

endearing young charms 
May night 

Night breeze ) 
Behind the barracks ) 

Reba Robinson 



Brahms 

Salzedo 
Palmgren 

Salzedo 



IV 

Sonata in F major Marcello 

Sicilienne Bach 

Menuetto ioaart 
Burnett Atkinson 



WOMAN'S CLUB OF LYNCHBURG 

Lynchburg, Virginia 

(continued) 



Deux arabesques Debussy 

Petite suite Dukas 

Berceuse 

Souvenance 
"Dorienne" from 

"Divertissement grec" Mouquet 

Reba Robinson, Nathan Stutch and Burnett Atkinson 



SCHUMANK CLUB 
lildiftood, New Jersey 

Tuesday evening, November £8, 1939, at 6:50 o'clock 



Hilda Morse, Soprano 
Donald Coker, Tenor 
Louis Shub, Piano 

of 

THE CDRTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

Programme 

I 

Das verlassene Magdlein ) 
Nimmersatte Liebe ) 
Der Schmied ) 

Vergebliches Standchen ) 

Hilda Morse 

II 

Lasciatemi morire 
Danza, dansa fanciulla gentile 
I attempt from love's sickness to fly 
"Total eclipse!" from "Samson" 
Donald Coker 



Wolf 
Brahms 



Monteverdi 

Durante 

H. Pur cell 

Handel 



III 

Ballade in A flat major, Opus 47 ) 
Berceuse, Opus 57 ) 

Etude in F major, Opus 10, No. 8 ) 
La carcpanella 

Louis Shub 



Chopin 
Pa ganini-Li s 2 1 



IV 



"Un bel di" from "Madame Butterfly" 
Ohie Menechel 

Hilda Morse 



Puccini 
Gianinni 



"Vesti la giubba" from "I Pagliacci" Leoncavallo 
Clorinda Morgan 

A sailor's life Old English 

Old Mother Hubbard, 

set in the manner of Handel Hely-Hut chins on 
Donald Coker 



NET. JERSEY STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 
Glassboro, New Jersey 

Thursday morning, November 30, 1939, at 10:30 o'clock 



Robert Grooters, Baritone 
Louis Snub, Piano 

of 

TEE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

Programme 

I 

Recitative and air from the "Messiah" ) 

"Thus saith the Lord, but who may abide") 

Caro mio ben 

Caro laccio, dolce nodo 

Non piu 

Robert Grooters 

II 



Handel 

Giordani 

Gasparini 

Cimara 



Ballade in A flat major, Opus 47) 
Etude in F major, Opus 10, No. 8) 
La cempanella 

Louis Shub 

III 



Chopin 
Pagan ini-Liszt 



Pilgrim's song Tschaikovsky 

Blow, blow, thou winter wind ) _ , -.-. 
Drink to me only with thine eyes) ^ranged by Quilter 
Birthday song MacFadyen 

Robert Grooters 



3H00L 
1, Peni _ 

- Lock 

- - - - .• 

of 

"_ F IK EC 

: 
..-.-._ 



HilcU Ho] 



" 



:: 



. . bl - _ _th 

i 

- _■-- 

III 

_ L 
) 

Dei _ . ) 

" . . . , 









rv 



i - . - ^ 



% 

\ ti] a 






"_ 



GASTON PRESEYTFRIAN CHDHC 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

Sunday evening, December 17, 1939, at 7:20 o'clock 

Lvnne iTain^right, Karp 
Herbert Baiuael, Violin 
Nathan Stutch, Violoncello 



of 

TEE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

Programme 

I 

Trio Sonata in B minor Loeillet 

Largo 
Allegro 
Adagio 

Allegro con spirito 
Menuet Bach 

Lvnne T.'ainnright, 
Herbert Baumel and Nathan Stutch 

II 

"Gavotte" from "Iphegenia in Aulis" Slack 
Concert variations 

on Adeste Fideles (1955) Sal 

Lynne lainvright 

III 

First movement frofl Sonata No. E 

in D major Leclair 

Adagio 
"Dorienne" from "Divertissement grec" Moucuet 
Lynne 7.a in v> right, 
Herbert Eaumel and Nathan Stutch 



IV 



Arioso Bach 

Serenade espagnole, Opus 20, No. k. Glazounov 
Lynne Ysainwright and Nathan Stutch 



WOMAN'S CLUE OF ALLENTOVvN 
Allentown, Pennsylvania 

Tuesday afternoon, January 2, 1940, at £:45 o'clock 

Howard Vanderburg, Baritone 
Eugene Bossart, Piano 

of 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

Programme 

I 

Dank sei Dir, Herr 

He, Zigeuner ) 

Lieber Gott, du weisst ) 

Roslein dreie, in der Reihe ) 

Du bist so jung ) 

Ewig ) 

Howard Vanderburg 



Handel 
Br aims 

E . I olf f 



II 



"Nemico della patria" 
from "Andrea Chenier" 

Howard Vanderburg 

III 

Rhapsody in E flat major, Opus 119, No 
Hungarian rhapsody, No. 11 

Eugene Bossart 



Giordani 



4 Brahms 
Liszt 



IV 



Yarmouth fair 

Passing by 

Be it bright day, Opus 47, No. 6 

Silent strings 

Good ale 

Howard Vanderburg 



Oarlock 

E. Purcell 

Tschaikovsky 

Bantock 

Warlock 



MOORESTOM HIGH SCHOOL 
Moorestown, New Jersey 

Thursday morning, February £2, 1940, at 9:00 o'clock 

Reba Robinson, Harp 
Nathan Stutch, Violoncello 
Burnett Atkinson, Flute 

of 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF alUSIC 

Programme 

I 



Trois pieces en concert 
La laborde: Rondement 
La boucon: Andante 
L'agacante: Rondement 

Reba Robinson, 
Nathan Stutch and Burnett Atkinson 



Rameau 



II 



Sonata in F major 
Andante in C major 

Burnett Atkinson 

III 

Waltz in A flat 
Pirouetting music box ) 
Fraicheur ) 

Le bon petit roi d'Yvetot 

Reba Robinson 



Marcello 
Mozart 



Brahms 

Salzedo 

Grand j any 



IV 



Adagio from the organ toccata in C major 
Rondo in A major 

Nathan Stutch 



Bach 
V.eber 



First movement of Trio Sonata in B minor Loeillet 

Largo 
Arabesque No. 1 Debussy 

"Dorienne" from "Divertissement grec" Mouquet 
Reba Robinson, 
Nathan Stutch and Burnett Atkinson 



THE NEIGHBORS 
Hatboro, Pennsylvania 



Wednesday afternoon, February 23, 1940, at 2:15 o'clock 



Laura Archera, Violin 
Leo Luskin, Accompanist 



of 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

Programme 

Air on the G string uiattheson 

Tzigane Ravel 

Laura Archera 



earcul; juhior COLLI,! 
Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania 

Thursday coming, February 29, 1940, at 11:00 o'clock 

John Sl—ftj Piano 
Veda Reynolds, Violin 
Nathan Stutch, Violoncello 

of 

THE C T JRTIS INSTITOTE OF MUSIC 

Programe 

I 

Trio in C minor, Opus 1, No. 3 Beethoven 

Allegro con brio 
Andante cantabile con variazioni 
Mennetto. yuasi allegro 
Finale. Prestissimo 

John Simms, 
Veda Reynolds and Nathan Stutch 

II 

Adagio from the organ toccata in C major Bach 

Serenade espagnole, Opus 20, No. 2 Glazounov 

Rondo in A major Weber 
Nathan Stutch 

III 

Trio in G minor, Opus 101 Brahms 

AllegrD energico 
Presto non assai 
Andante grazioso 
Allegro molto 

John Simms, 
Veda Reynolds and Nathan Stutch 



PORCH CLUB 

RIVERTOX, NEW JERSEY 

Tuesday Afternoon, March 5, 1940, at 2:30 o'clock 

Villa Stewart, Soprano 
Nathan Goldstein, Violin 
Charles Libove, Violin 
Louis Shub, Accompanist 
of 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

PROGRAMME 

I 



Bel piacere e godere fido amor 
Sommi Dei 



Spirate pur, spirate 
Ah, mai non cess3te 



) 



Handel 
Donaudy 



Willa Stewart 
II 



Romance from Concerto in D minor, Opus 22 
Scherzo-Tarantelle 



WlENIAWSKl 



Nathan Goldstein 



III 



"Elle est la, pres de lui" from Mignon Thomas 

Wauk Stewart 

IX 

Adagio from Concerto in G minor, Opus 26 Bruch 

Praeludium and Allegro Pugnani-Kreisler 

Charles Libove 



Spirit flower Campbell-Tipton 

Ecstasy Rummel 

Slee P now I Barber 

I hear an army J 

Willa Stewart 

VI 

Concerto for two violins in D minor Bach 

Allegro 

Andante 

Allegro 

Perpetuum mobile, Opus 34, No. 5 Ries 

Nathan Goldstein and Charles Libove 



Pembcrlott, 5fcfn -Jersey 

(Lnesbav ^fetttng, April 9, 1940 

8.15 o'clock 

Eleanor Mitchel, Flute 
Marguerite Kuehne, Violin 
Esther Gruhn, Violoncello 

OF THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

PROGRAMME 

I 

Sonata Corelli 

(Arranged by Hershy Kay) 
Grave 

Andante 

Allegro 

Largo 

Allegrc 

Divertissement in D major, Opus 100 .... Haydn 

Adagio cantabile 

Allegro 

Tempo di minuetto 

Divertissement in G major, Opus 100 .... Haydn 

Allegro 
Adagio 
Allegro 

II 

Trio in C major, Opus 87 Beethoven 

Trio in B flat major Schubert 

Little Shepherd Debussy 

III 

Sonata in F major Wagenseil 

Allegro 
Minuetto 
Allegro assai 

COMPLIMENTS OF 

Lewis J. Mantel, Pemberton; J. G. Montgomery & Co., Inc., Pemberton; 

The People's National Bank and Trust Company, Pemberton; 

B. Ney Ridgway, Pemberton; Piatt's General Store 



* w ■ » 



UNIVERSITY OF DELAWARE 

NEWARK, DELAWARE 
(Under the auspices of the Newark Music Society) 

Thursday evening, April 11, 1940, at 8:00 o'clock 

WILLA STEWART, Soprano 
HERBERT BAUMEL, Violin 
NATHAN STUTCH, Violoncello 
LEO LUSKIN, Accompanist 
of 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

PROGRAMME 

I 

O sleep why dost thou leave me? \ 

Bel piacere e godere fido amor > Handel 

Sommi Dei I 



} 



Spirate pur, spirate .. | Doxaudy 

Ah, mai non cessate 



WILLA STEWART 

II 
Concerto in A minor, Opus 102 Brahms 

Allegro 

Andante 

Vivace non troppo 

HERBERT BAUMEL and NATHAN STUTCH 
III 

Spirit flower Campbell-Tipton 

Ecstasy Rummel 

Slee P now I Barber 

I hear an army J 

The sleigh Kountz 

WILLA STEWART 



The Somerville Committee of Swarthmore College 

Swarthmore, Pennsylvania 

Thursday Evening, April 18, 1940, at S:3C o'clock 

Noah Bielski, Violin 
Morris Shulik, Violin 
Albert Falkove, Viola 
William Saputelli, Violoncello 
Eugene Bossart, Piano 
of 

The Curtis Institute of Music 

Beethoven Program 

i 

Quartet in B flat, Opus IS, No. 6 

Allegro eon brio 
Adagio, ma non troppo 
Scherzo. Allegro 
La malinconia 

Adagio. Allegretto quasi Allegro 

Messrs Bielski, Shulik, Falkove and Saputelli 

II 
Sonata in C minor, Opus 30, No. 1 

Allegro con brio 
Adagio cantabile 
Scherzo. Allegro 
Finale. Allegro 

Messrs Bielski and Bossart 

III 
Quartet in E flat. Opus 74 

Poco adagio 

Adagio ma non troppo 

Presto 

Allegretto con variazioni 

Messrs Bielski, Shulik, Falkove and Saputelli 



HOMQUIST SCHOOL 
New Hope, Pennsylvania 

Saturday evening, April 20, 1940, at 3:00 o'clock 

Reba Robinson, Harp 
Nathan Stutch, Violoncello 
Burnett Atkinson, Flute 

of 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

Programme 

I 

Menuet Bach 

Two movements from Trio Sonata 

in B minor Loeillet 

Adagio 
Allegro 
First and second movements of Sonata 

No. 3 in D major Leclair 

Adagio 
Allegro 

Reba Robinson, 
Nathan Stutch and Burnett Atkinson 



II 



Trois pieces en concert 
La laborde: Rondement 
La boucon: Andante 
L ' agacante : Rondement 

Reba Robinson, 
Nathan Stutch and Burnett Atkinson 

III 

Mirage 

rtaltz in A flat 

Zephyr ) 

Pirouetting music box ) 

Night breeze ) 

Behind the barracks ) 

Reba Robinson 



Rameau 



Salzedo 
Brahms 



Salzedo 



HOL.\iQUIST SCHOOL 
New Hope, Pennsylvania 
(continued) 



IV 

Arabesque No. 1 Debussy 

"Dorienne" from "Divertissement grec" Mouquet 

"Menuet" from "Sonatine" Ravel 

Spanish dance Granados 
Reba Robinson, 
Nathan Stutch and Burnett Atkinson 



THE ROTARY CLUB OF ftlLiilNGTON 
.Imington, Delaware 



Tuesday afternoon, April 23, 1940, at 2:00 o'clock 

Barbara Elliott, Piano 

of 

TEE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

Programme 

Rondo capriccioso, Opus 14 Mendelssohn 
Clair de lune Debussy- 
Etude in G flat Moszkowski 
Barbara Elliott 



NEVv JERSEY SCHOOL WOMEN'S CLUB 
Trenton, New Jersey 

Saturday evening, ivlay 4, 1940, at 3:00 o'clock 

Veda Reynolds, Violin 
Hilda Morse, Soprano 
Eugene Bossart, Accompanist 

of 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

Programme 



Praeludiura and allegro 
Zephyr, Opus 30, No. 5 

Veda Reynolds 



II 



Kreisler 
Hubay 



Vergebliches Standchen 
Das verlassene Magdlein ) 
Nimmersatte Liebe ) 

Hilda Morse 

III 

La fille aux cheveux de lin 
Caprice, d'apres 1' etude 
en forme de valse, 
Opus 52, No. 6 

Veda Reynolds 



Ohie Menechel 
I hear an army 



IV 



Hilda Morse 



Brahms 
Wolf 



Debus sy-Hartmann 
Saint-Saens-Ysaye 



Gianinni 
Barber 



NEW JERSEY STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 
Glassboro, New Jersey- 
Tuesday norning, tway 7, 1940, at 10:30 o'clock 



Nathan Stutch, Violoncello 
Eugene Bossart, Piano 

of 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

Programme 

I 

Two movements from Concerto 

in B flat major Boccherini 

Adagio non troppo 
Allegro moderato 

Nathan Stutch 

II 

Perpetuum mobile V.eber 

Rhapsodie in E flat, Opus 119, No. 4 Brahns 

Hungarian rhapsody, No. 11 Liszt 
Eugene Bossart 

III 

Adagio from the organ toccata 

in C major Bach 

Slrlnade espagnole, Opus 20, No. 2 Glazounov 

Rondo in A major Weber 

Nathan Stutch 



EMILIE KRIDER NORRIS SCHOOL 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

Yvednesday evening, day 3, 1940, at 8:00 o'clock 

Reba Robinson, Harp 

of 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

Programme 



Sonata in C minor 
Allegro vigoroso 
Andantino espressivo 
Presto 
"Gavotte" from "Amide" 
Theme and variations 



II 



Three poetical stadies 
Mirage 
Idyllic poem 
Inquietude 



III 



Waltz in A flat 

Believe me, if all those 

endearing young charms 
Fraicheur 

Pirouetting music box 
Night breeze 
Behind the barracks 



Pescetti 



Gluck 
Haydn 



Salzedo 



Brahms 



Salzedo 



^f& 



UNIVERSITY OF DELAWARE 

NEWARK, DELAWARE 
(Under the auspices of the Newark Music Society) 

Thursday evening, February 15 , 1940, at 8:00 o'clock 
May 9th, 
WOODWIND ENSEMBLE 

Conducted by 

JORGE BOLET 

JOHN DeLANCIE, Oboe 
BRITTON JOHNSON, Flute 
JAMES KING, Clarinet 
DAVID HALL, French Horn 
SANFORD SHAROFF, Bassoon 
JORGE BOLET, Piano 

of 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

PROGRAMME 
I 

Aria from prelude No. 10 in E minor 



, 



Bach-Mapes 

Choral "Meine Seele erhebt den Herren' 

Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, Bassoon and French Horn 

Les petits moulins a vent Couperin 

Flute, Oboe and Bassoon 

Aubade De Wailly 

Flute, Oboe and Clarinet 

II 

Quintet in E flat major (K. 452) Mozart 

Oboe, Clarinet, French Horn, Bassoon and Piano 
Largo. Allegro moderato 
Larghetto 
Rondo. Allegretto 

III 

Caprice on Danish and Russian Airs, Opus 79 Saint-Saens 

Flute, Oboe, Clarinet and Piano 

Dance suite, Opus 53 Blumer 

Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, Bassoon and French Horn 
Rigaudon 
Sarabande 
Menuett 

Ungaris e liei ' Tanz 
Valse Boston 
One step 



REVIEW CLUB OF OAK LA 
Oak Lane, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

Wednesday afternoon, May 15, 1940, at 2:50 o'clock 

Reba Robinson, Harp 
Nathan Stutch, Violoncello 
Eleanor Mitchel, Flute 

of 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF iSUSIC 

Programme 

I 

dienuet Bach 

Third movement from Trio Sonata 

in B minor Loeillet 

Adagio 
L'agacante: Rondement Rameau 

Reba Rod in son, 
Nathan Stutch and Eleanor Mitchel 



II 



Waltz in A flat major 
Believe me, if all those 

endearing young charms ) 

it oreeze ) 

Pirouetting music box ) 

Behind the barracks ) 

Reba Robinson 

III 

Menuet 
The swan 
Arabesque No. 1 
Spanish dance, Opus 5, No. 5 
Reba Robinson, 



Brahms 



Salzedo 



Valensin 

Saint-Saens 

Debussy 

Granados 



Nathan Stutch and Eleanor Mitchel 



NEW CENTURY CLUB 
Wilmington, Delaware 



Wednesday afternoon, fiday 15, 1940, at 2:30 o'clock 



.-villa Stewart, Soprano 
Eugene bossart, Accompanist 



of 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

Programme 

"Un bel di" from "Madame Butterfly" Puccini 

Spirit flower Campbell-Tipton 

Sleep now ) 

) Barber 

I hear an army ) 

Villa Stewart 



NEW JERSEY STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 
Glassboro, New Jersey- 
Tuesday morning, May 21, 1940, at 10:30 o'clock 

Hilda Morse, Soprano 
Eugene Bossart, Piano 

of 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

Programme 



Wer rief dich denn ) 

Nun lass uns Frieden schliessen ) 
Das verlassene Magdlein ) 
Nimmersatte Liebe ) 

Hilda Morse 



Wolf 



II 



Nocturne in F sharp major, Opus 15 
General Lavine (eccentric) 
Hungarian rhapsodie 

Eugene Bossart 

III 

"Salce" from "Otello" 
I hear an army 
Nicolette 
Ohie Menechdl 

Hilda Morse 



Chopin 

Debussy 

Liszt 



Verdi 

Barber 

Ravel 

Gianinni 



PRINCETON UNIVERSITY 
Princeton, New Jersey 

Sunday afternoon, November 5, 1959, at 4:00 o'clock 

Broadus Erie, Violin 
Veda Reynolds, Violin 

ilton Kohl, Violin 
Stephen Katsaros, Viola 
True Chappell, Violoncello 
John DeLancie, Oboe 
Perry Bauman, Oboe 
vvaldemar Dabro\vski, Conductor 

of 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

and 

Alice Hufstader, Soprano 
Katherine Ellis, Piano 

MOZART PROGRAM 



String quartet in C major (K465) 
Adagio. Allegro 
Andante cantabile 
Menuetto 
Allegro 

Broadus Erie 

Veda Reynolds 

Stephen Katsaros 

True Chappell 

II 

Ridente la calma 

An Chloe 

"Dove sono" from "The Marriage of Figaro" 

Alice Hufstader 

Katherine Ellis 



PRIUCETaH OHIVERSITX 

Princeton, Hew Jersey 
(Continued) 



III 



Quartet for oboe and strings in F major (K370) 
Allegro 
Adagio 
Rondo . Allegro 

John DeLancie 

Veda Reynolds 

Stephen Katsaros 

I rue Chappell 



IV 



"Exultate, jubilate" (K165) 
Alice Kufstader 
Katherine Ellis 
Milton Wohl 
Broadus Erie 
Stephen Katsaros 
True Chappell 
John DeLancie 
Perry Baunan 
Waldemar Dabrowski 



THE HAGERSTOYvN SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
Hagerstown, iferyland 

Thursday evening, December 7, 1939, at 3:30 o'clock 

Russell Gerhart, Conductor 



Noah Bielski, Violin 
of 
THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 
Programme 

I 

Overture to "Creations of Prometheus* 

II 

Symphony in D minor 
Allegro non troppo 

III 

Concerto No. 2 in D minor 
for violin and orchestra 
Allegro moderato 
Romance 
Allegro moderato alia zingara 

Noah Bielski, Soloist 



IV 



Beethoven 



Franck 



V\ieniawski 



Mock morris 



Grainger 



Summer night 



Sailor's dance 



VI 



Rhodes 



Gliere 




llfelcmne**$eui Ctttnens 



<Thr phtlomustan Club 
3944 Walnut &tmt 

$tiUaiiduliia 

lUtanrsbau lEuemng, ®e cember 13th 
1939 



$llpbgF uf Allnjianr* 

"I pledge allegiance to the flag 
of the United States of America 
and to the Republic for which 
it stands; one nation indivisible, 
with liberty and justice for all." 



3Ihp Amrriran'a (Jlrrrn 

1 believe in the United States of America as a 
government of the people, by the people, for the 
people, whose just powers are derived from the 
consent of the governed; a democracy in a republic: 
a sovereign Nation of many sovereign States; 
a perfect Union, one and inseparable, established 
upon those principles of freedom, equality, justice, 
and humanity for which American patriots sacri- 
ficed their lives and fortunes. 

I therefore believe it is my duty to my country 

to love it; to support its Constitution; to obey its 

laws; to respect its flag; and to defend it against 

all enemies. 

— William Tyler Page 



.^nigram... 



.NLlLTON WOHL Violinist 

Leo Luskin Pianist 

of the Curtis Institute of Music 
BlLLIE LESSIG . \'ocal Soloist 

Violin Solo — 

Malaguena. Opus 21 Sarasate 

Hopak Moussourgsku-Dushkin 

Piano Solo — 

Prelude in G-sharp minor. Opus 32. No. 12 Rachmaninoff 

Impromptu in C-sharp minor. Opus 66 ( Chin'n 

Waltz in E minor 5 

Violin Solo — 

Mazurka in A minor. Opus 68. No. 2 Chopin 

Hejre Kati Hubay 

Invocation Rev. D. Wilmot Gateson, D.D. 

Greeting Mrs. Walter Willard 

President of Philomusian Club 

Pudge of Allegiance Mrs. I. L. Vansant 

Vocal Solo — "God Save America" Irving Berlin 

BlLLIE LESSIG 

Address D. Mont fort Melchior 

Supervisor of High School Instruction at Cirard College 

Welcome J. L. Hughes 

Director of Immigration and Naturalization 

Awarding of Certificates of Naturalization Henry L. Mulle 

District Director of Immigration and Naturalization 



PRINCi DIVERSITY 
Princeton, New Jersey 

Sunday afternoon, February 11, 1940, at 4:00 o'clock 

Baruch Altman, Violin 
Albert Falkove, Viola 
Nathan Stutch, Violoncello 

of 

THE CURT1 1C 

and 

Madame Marta Pacsu, Piano 

Ernest DeV.ald, bass 

Celius Dougherty, Accojipanist 

£ART PROGL 

I 

Trio in C major (K54d) 
Allegro 

Andante cantabile 
• Allegro 

rta Pacsu 
barach Altman 
Nathan Stutch 

II 

"0 Isis und Osiris" 

from "Die ^auDerfiote" 
"'. ,er ein uiebchen hat geiunden" 

from "Die Entflinrung aus dem Serail" 
iamina" from "Don Giovanni' 1 
Ernest DeWald 
Celius Dougherty 

xil 

rtet in G minor (K47o) 

Allegro 

Andante 

Rondo 

Madame marta Pacsu 

Baruch Altman 

Albert Falkove 

Nathan Stutch 



Fifth Annual Concert 

Abington Senior High School 

Combined Glee Clubs 



Direction o£ Carroll O'Brien 

Assisted by 

Robert Cornman, Pianist 

Robert Borges, Violinist 



Auditorium 
Friday evening, March fifteen 

eight-twenty-five o'clock 
nineteen hundred forty 






Program 

Girls' Glee Club 

Romance, Debussy 

Ave Maria, Bach-Gounod 

Violin obbligato Robert Borges 

I Couldn't Hear Nobody Pray, Spiritual 

Accompanist - James Yost 

Verse Speaking Choir 

She Walks in Beauty, Byron 
Tarantella, Hilaire Belloc 

Piano - Robert Cornman 

Ballade in G minor, Opus 1 18, No. 3, Brahms 

Elizabethan Singers 

Cargoes, Lutkin 

Rhapsody, Banks 

Emitte Spiritum tuum, Schuetky 

Hospodi Pomilui, Lvovsky 

Boys' Glee Club 

Abington Song 

Drink To Me Only With Thine Eyes, Old English 

Accompanist - Katharine Wieder 

Piano - Robert Cornman 

Nocturne in B flat minor, Opus 9, No. 1, Chopin 
Etudes: 

G Sharp minor, Opus 25, No. 6 

E flat major, Opus 10, No. 1 1 

A minor, Opus, 25 No. 1 1 

Mixed Glee Club 

O Lord Most Holy, Franck 
Spirituals 

a. Ezekiel Saw De Wheel 

b. Roll, Jordan, Roll 

Soloists 
Doris Smith, Max Pincus, Betty Kidd 
and Robert Solly 
The Three Kings, Willan 
Italian Street Song, Herbert (requested) 

Accompanist - - A. Erna Grabner 



Glee Club Members 



Evelyn Allen 
Marie Ambler 
Maryellen Anderson 
Barbara Barrow 
Beatrice Bates 
Margaret Becker 
Dorothy Bradley 
Lorena Brasier 
Mary Bubeck 
Sara Cardillo 
Antoinette Cavallaro 
Kathryn Cawley 
Virginia Chatterton 
Marjorie Chupp 
Ethel Clark 
Ruth Clyde 
Jane Cook 
Eleanor Cooney 
Alice Cornell 
Barbara Coyle 
Patricia Coyle 
Irene Cox 

Alexa Dannenbaum 
Aldine Denby 
Edith Dinlocker 
Angie DiPalantino 
Margaret Dixson 
Barbara Djorup 
Jean Doane 
Lorraine Doyle 
Geraldine Dubin 
Jean Durand 
Miriam Engard 
Doris Fleurer 
Alice Frantz 
Audrey Garey 
Jean Garrison 
Helen Gellert 



Girls 

Evelyn Gibbs 
Janet Graham 
Jeanne Habhegger 
Barbara Hamilton 
Phyllis Hampshire 
Peggy Hanline 
Betty Hermanson 
Jane Hoffman 
Blanche Hofstetter 
Marjorie Holmes 
Natalie Howley 
Anne Ireland 
Helen Jenks 
Verna Johnson 
Edna Kapral 
Roberta Kenyon 
Betty Kidd 
Inez Kneece 
Catherine Krieder 
Betty Kritler 
Florence Kulp 
Sybilla Kurtz 
Ida Landenburg 
Viola Lang 
Grace Laning 
Patsy Leonhard 
Edna MacArthur 
Mary Maroney 
Mary Mast 
Dorothea Mobley 
Betty Morrison 
Eleanor Nehlig 
Mae Nehlig 
Rita Ortalani 
Phyllis Oxman 
Helen Pierce 
Shirley Porter 
Marjorie Postle 



Florence Pyle 
Doris Reading 
Gloria Reber 
Nancy Renninger 
Adele Ritchie 
Nancy Roberts 
Regina Rodgers 
Eleanore Rogers 
Ruth Rummel 
Irene Ruzicka 
Jane Saddington 
Marion Scalfaro 
Mary Helen Scanlon 
Miriam Scanlon 
Doris May Smith 
Edna Smith 
Marilyn Smythe 
Mary Jane Snyder 
Ruth Swartley 
Alice Sweisfurth 
Doris Taylor 
Bertha Theurer 
Florence Theurer 
Alice Thomas 
Gladys Thornton 
Betty Turner 
Marion Van Buskirk 
Gloria Wall 
Peggy Wall 
Louise Welsh 
Margaret Whitaker 
Katherine Wieder 
Gene Williams 
Madge Williams 
Natalie Williams 
Helen Wilson 
Hope Young 



Glee Club Members 



Boys 



Edward Bartlam 
Fred Becker 
Robert Borges 
Robert Borell 
Charles Brackbill 
Raymond Brandt 
John Burn 
Perry Burton 
Norwood Collins 
Russell Collmer 
Charles Corwin 
Robert Cragg 
John Davey 
Robert Doane 
Maur Dubin 
Louis Fisher 
Ralph Gibbs 
Jack Gillingham 
Fred Harrer 
Robert Hesse 
Robert Hilliard 
Howard Hudson 
Newton Hunsberger 
William Hutter 
Tom Hyndman 
Carlton Krout 
Donald Lewis 
Robert Marple 
Joseph McDowell 
Royer McGlade 
Henry McKay 



Sherman Meschter 
Harold Miller 
Harry Mills 
Charles Moore 
Alan Myler 
Max Pincus 
George Pletcher 
Robert Quay 
Burton Ramsey 
Christie Rau 
David Reber 
John Reichard 
Robert Reisen 
Ken Ritter 
John Rodenhausen 
John Schneider 
Rothwell Shelley 
Arthur Shields 
John Shields 
Richard Shook 
Edward Smith 
Leonard Smith 
Edward Snyder 
Robert Solly 
Joseph Strick 
Creston Sutch 
Sidney Walker 
Bruce Wall 
Robert W T eldon 
James Yost 



product of A. Sr. H. S. class in printing 



COLORED MOTION PICTURES OF BIRDS 

presented by 

Randolph Ashton 
FLUTE DUETS 

by 
Eleanor Mitchel and John Krell of the Curtis Institute of Music 



PROGRAM 

I 



Allegro Minuetto 
Sonate 1 

Tempo Guisto 
Allearetto 



Miss Mitchell and Mr. Krell 
II 



Woodpeckers, Orioles 
Ospreys, Terns, Skimmers 
Finches 



Sonate 1 1 

Adagio 
Allegro 

Duette, Opus, 75 

Allegro vivace 
Rondo 



Mr. Ashton 
III 



Miss Mitchel and Mr. Krell 
IV 



"Denizens of Stream and Woodland" 
Herons 



Beethoven 
Handel 



Naudot 



Mozart 



Mr. Ashton 



April 5th, 1940 

Benefit of 
The Woman's Medical College of Pennsylvania 



PATRONS AND PATRONESSES 



Dr. Helen M. Angelucci 

Dr. Ann Catherine Arthurs 

Mrs. George T. Ashton 

Mrs. Herbert Ashton 

Mrs. Leonard C. Ashton 

Mrs. John C. Atwood, Jr. 

Mrs. Horace Avery Jr. 

Dr. Emily P. Bacon 

Mrs. James B. Bailey 

Dr. Eleanor Balph 

Dr. Isabel M. Balph 

Mrs. Harry H. Battles 

Dr. Frieda Baumann 

Mrs. Everett H. Brown 

Dr. Miriam Butler 

Mrs. Edward Cox 

Dr. Jean Crump 

Mrs. William M. David 

Mrs. William Drayton, Jr. 

Mrs. Henry P. Erdman 

Dr. Marion Fay 

Dr. Harriet Felton 

Dr. Faith S. Fetterman 

Dr. Wilfrid B. Fetterman 

Mrs. William C. Fownes 

Mrs. Vida Hunt Francis 

Dr. Mollie Geiss 

Dr. Esther M. Greisheimer 

Mrs. Charles F. Griffith 

Dr. Roberta Hafkesbring 

Dr. Ellen Haines 

Dr. Julia H. Hardin 

Mrs. John S. C. Harvey 

Mrs. Alvin E. Hellmich 

Dr. Helen Ingleby 



Mrs. William T. Johnson 

Mrs. John B. Kelly 

Miss Gertrude Knapp 

Mrs. John C. Martin 

Dr. Catherine Macfarlane 

Mrs. Duncan Maclnnes 

Miss Gertrude McCormick 

Dr. Alma Morani 

Dr. Ellen C. Potter 

Mrs. Earl B. Putnam 

Dr. Bernadine Quinn 

Miss Varginia Rath 

Dr. John Stewart Rodman 

Mrs. Herman Rothenhausler 

Dr. Martha G. K. Schetky 

Dr. Eleanor Scott 

Mrs. Nessie Haig Sheldon 

Miss Louise Smyth 

Dr. Mary M. Spears 

Mrs. James Starr 

Miss Ethel Stilz 

Mr. Irvin Stone 

Mrs. Francis R. Strawbridge 

Dr. Margaret C. Sturgis 

Miss Evelyn Swain 

Miss Olga Tattersfield 

Dr. Ann Gray Taylor 

Dr. Martha Tracy 

Mrs. Jessie Tricker 

Dr Emily Lois Van Loon 

Mrs. Joseph Wasserman 

Dr. Elizabeth Waugh 

Mrs. Thomas Raeburn White 

Mrs. Raymond D. B. Wright 

Mrs. Samuel Woodward 



SECOND UNITED BRETHERN CHURCH 
York, Pennsylvania 

Thursday evening, April 18, 1940, at 7:4-5 o'clock 

FIFTH ANNUAL SPRING CONCERT 

assisted by 

Iynne Wainwright, Harp 

of 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

and 

Edythe Wareheim, Organ 

Programme 

I 



Rigaudon 
Bourree 



Rameau 
Bach 



II 



Gavotte from "Iphigenia in Aulis" 
Concert variations on Adeste Fideles 

III 

Clair de lune 

(with Edythe Wareheim) 



Gluck 
Salzedo 



Debussy 



THE LITTLE SYMPHONY SOCIETY 
of PHILADELPHIA 

"An American Debut Orchestra Dedicated to the Purpose of Creating More 
Opportunities for Young American Soloists, Conductors and Composers." 

JOSEPH BARONE 

Founder-Conductor 



CONCERT 

April 18, 1940, at 8.30 o'clock 

in the Foyer of the 

ACADEMY OF MUSIC 

Broad and Locust Streets 



GUEST ARTISTS 

EZRA RACHLIN 

Guest-Conductor 

HILDA MORSE 

Soprano 

HERBERT BAUMEL 

Violinist 

NATHAN STTJTCH 

'Cellist 



THE LITTLE SYMPHONY SOCIETY OF PHILADELPHIA 

PROGRAM 

JOSEPH BARONE, Conducting 

I. Beethoven Overture to "Egmont" 

II. Mahler "Wenn Mein Schatz Hochzeit Mach" 

from "Songs of a Wayfarer" 

Verdi "Salce, Sake" 

from "Otello" 
HILDA MORSE, Soprano 

III. Wagner Siegfried Idyll 



INTERMISSION 



EZRA RACHLIN, Conducting 

I. Mozart The Musical Jest 

Allegro 
Menuetto 

Adagio Cantabile 
Presto 

II. Brahms Concerto in A Minor for Violin and Violoncello 

Allegro 
Andante 

Vivace non troppo 

HERBERT BAUMEL, Violinist 
NATHAN STUTCH, 'Cellist 

III. Alvin Etler Music for Chamber Orchestra 



Tentative plans call for a series of six concerts during the 
1940-'41 season. Candidates wishing to make an appearance 
with the LITTLE SYMPHONY SOCIETY are asked to com- 
municate with Mr. Joseph Barone, Bryn Mawr, Fenna. Appli- 
cations must be accompanied by a letter of recommendation 
from a teacher, an eminent musician, or a school of music. 



THE LITTLE SYMPHONY SOCIETY OF PHILADELPHIA 



harl Mcdonald 

Advisory Board 
Horace Alwyne 
James Francis Cooke 
Frederick E. Hahn 
Guy Marriner 
Konrad Neuger 
Paul Nordoff 
Charles O'Connell 
Thaddeus Rich 
Randall Thompson 



OLGA SAMAROFF STOKOWSKI 
SKonorary directors 



DEEMS TAYLOR 



EUGENE ORMANDY 

LEOPOLD STOKOWSKI 

Honorary Advisers 

JOSEPH BARONE 
Founder-Director 

HERBERT J. TILY 
Sponsor 



Honorary National Board 

Walter Damrosch 
Rudolph Ganz 
Vladimir Golschmann 
Eugene Goosens 
Howard Hanson 
Ernest Hutcheson 
Pierre Monteux 
Fritz Reiner 
Artur Rodzinski 
Fabien Sevitzky 
Nikolai Sokoloff 



NOTES 



HERBERT BAUMEL— Born in New York City in 1920. 
Lea Luboshutz at The Curtis Institute of Music. 



Pupil of Madame 



ALVIN ETLER — Born in Battle Creek, Iowa, 1913. Attended University 
of Illinois, Cleveland Institute of Music, and Western Reserve Univer- 
sity of Cleveland, Ohio. Member of Indianapolis Symphony. Has re- 
ceived Guggenheim Fellowship for 1940-'41. 

HILDA MORSE — Born in New York City in 1920. Pupil of Madame Elisa- 
beth Schumann at The Curtis Institute of Music, graduating in May. 

EZRA RACHLIN — Born in Los Angeles in 1916. Graduated from The Cur- 
tis Institute of Music in 1937, having studied under Fritz Reiner. 



NATHAN STUTCH— Born in Pittsburgh in 1920. 
at The Curtis Institute of Music. 



Pupil of Felix Salmond 



Violins 
Yasha Kayaloff 
George Beimel 
Dayton M. Henry 
David Madison 
John W. Molloy 
M. Roth 
Anthony Zungolo 

Violas 
Leonard Mogill 
Simon Asin 

Violoncellos 
Benjamin Gusikoff 
Morris Lewin 

Bass 
Irven Whitenack 



ORCHESTRA PERSONNEL 

Harp 

Marjorie Tyre 

Flutes 

John Fischer 
Hans Schlegel 

Oboes 
John Minsker 
Louis Di Fulvio 

Clarinets 
Robert McGinnis 
Leon Lester 

Bassoons 
Sol Schoenbach 
John Fisnar 

MEN OF PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA 



English Horn 
John Minsker 

Horns 
Clarence Mayer 
Mason Jones 

Trumpets 
Harold W. Rehrig 
Sigmund Hering 

Trombone 
Charles Gusikoff 

Percussion 
Oscar Schwar 

Personnel Manager 
Benjamin Gusikoff 



PATRONS AND PATRONESSES INCLUDE: 



Mrs. Francis H. Adler 

Mr. Joseph Allard 

Miss Gertrude Baratin 

Mrs. Frederic L. Ballard 

Mr. Michael C. Barone 

Mrs. H. C. Bazett 

Mr. Charles L. Beck 

Dr. Moses Behrend 

Mrs. Charles G. Berwind 

Mrs. Arthur Biddle 

Mrs. Thomas Blackadder 

Miss Evelyn Blaine 

Mrs. Charles Bond 

Mrs. H. W. Breyer 

Mrs. Ralph S. Bromer 

Mrs. Charles Bruneel 

Mrs. J. Mahlon Buck 

Mrs. Thomas A. Budd 

Mrs. Horace Bullock 

Mr. Orville H. Bullitt 

Miss Marie A. Bush 

Mrs. D. C. Carmichael 

Mrs. Charles Carver 

Mrs. H. C. Carr 

Mrs. F. D. Casanave, Jr. 

Mrs. Leander C. Claflin 

Mr. and Mrs. Samuel D. Clyde 

Mr. B. Hubert Cooper 

Mrs. Edmund G. Cooke 

Miss Mary E. Converse 

Mrs. A. B. Coxe 

Mr. Arthur U. Crosby 

Mrs. Matthew H. Cryer 

Miss M. Dana 

Mrs. C. H. Davis 

Mrs. Meyer Davis 

Mr. Henry C. Diller 

Mrs. James Mapes Dodge 

Mrs. George W. Childs Drexel 

Mrs. S. Naudain Duer 

Mrs. W. P. Dunnington 

Mr. and Mrs. Lewis W. Easby 

Mrs. Edward S. W. Farnum 

Mrs. Charles A. Fife 

Dr. John B. Flick 

Dr. Romeo Franceschetti 

Mr. Stanley Folz 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert A. Franks 

Miss Ellen S. German 

Miss Elizabeth Gittlen 

Miss Lotta Greenup 

Mrs. Morris W. Green 

Mrs. Arthur C. Hampson 

Mrs. John Hansel 



Mrs. John S. C. Harvey 

Mrs. Nathan Hayward 

Mr. and Mrs. Melvin H. Hendren 

Mrs. E. Munson Hill 

Mrs. Harrison Hires 

Mr. W. Russell Hood 

Mrs. Edward Ingersoll 

Mrs. George Wayne Jacobs 

Mr. Walter M. Jeffords 

Mr. William A. Johnson 

Mrs. G. J. Keady 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank J. Keller 

Mrs. S. Leonard Kent, Jr. 

Mrs. Charles J. Kieferle 

Mrs. W. H. Lamb 

Mr. Samuel M. Langston 

Mrs. Dwight Latta 

Mrs. S. T. Learned 

Miss Jane S. Ligget 

Mrs. Arthur Littleton 

Mrs. Esmund R. Long 

Mrs. George U. Maryott 

Dr. Fred. J. Masciangelo 

Miss Frances McCollin 

Miss Bette C. Montgomery 

Mr. William R. Mooney 

Mrs. H. McKnight Moore 

Mrs. D. B. Moorhouse 

Miss Sophie Morris 

Mrs. Herbert C. Morris 

Mrs. S. H. Newhall 

Mr. Paul Nordoff 

Mr. and Mrs. Nelson Ogden 

Miss Esther B. Palmer 

Mr. Wilson H. Pile 

Mr. Harold G. Pile 

Mrs. Walter E. Rex, Jr. 

Mrs. J. R. Rhoads 

Mrs. John F. Rich 

Mr. Samuel R. Rosenbaum 

Mrs. Lewis C. Scheffey 

Mrs. Horace Stern 

Mrs. W. D. Stroud 

Mr. Roland L. Taylor 

Mr. and Mrs. H. Teamer 

Miss Carol H. Thomas 

Dr. Herbert J. Tily 

Mrs. Clarence A. Warden 

Mrs. Wm. Edward Warrington 

Mr. Charles N. Welsh, Jr. 

Mr. Alexander J. Williamson 

Mrs. G. E. Willey 

Mrs. Alan D. Wood 

Mrs. Samuel Woodward 

Mrs. Granville Worrell, 2nd 

Mr. and Mrs. Sydney L. Wright 



La Salle College 
Glee Club 



UNDER DIRECTION OF 



Mr. William J. Kavanagh '39 



PRESENTS ITS 



Annual (concert 



FEATURING 

Miss Doris Luff 

Soprano 



College Hall April 19, 1940 



Program of the La Salle College Glee Club 

I. GLEE CLUB 

1. Songs My Mother Taught Me Dvorak 

2. Sylvia Speaks 

3. Moonlight Madonna Fibisch-Scotti 

4. Fireflies Traditional Russian 

II. MISS LUFF 

1. "Deh vieni, non tardar" from the "Marriage of Figaro" Mozart 

2. Le Charme Chausson 

3. Le Nil Leroux 

III. GLEE CLUB 

1. Autumn Sea Gericke 

2. Chorus of Peers Gilbert 

3. The Old Refrain Kreisler 

4. Zieh' Mit Nestler 

5. Soldier's Farewell Kinkel 

IV. PIANO SELECTIONS Mr. Kavanagh 

I. Sonata, Opus 48, No. 2 Beethoven 

II. Waltz in E Flat Durand 

V. GLEE CLUB 

1. O Bone Jesu Palestrina 

2. Where'er You Walk Jamdel 

3. Still As The Night Bohm 

4. Lift Thine Eyes Logan 

VI. MISS LUFF 

1. Alleluia Mozart 

2. Night and the Curtains Drawn Ferrata 

3. Last Rose of Summer Von Flotow 

VII. 

1. Golden Days J 

2. Deep in My Heart I Medley from the 

3. Drinking Song ( Student Prince by Romberg 

4. Serenade ] 

5. Stout-hearted Men Romberg Soloist, Mr. Grady 

Miss Luff and the Glee Club 
Italian Street Song Herbert 



PERSONNEL 

William J. Kavanagh Conductor 

Brother E. Anthony Moderator 

President Joseph Grady 

Vice-President Joseph Dougherty 

Treasurer Andrew O'Keefe 



Edwin Arroyo 
Owen Breen 
Alexander Calomeni 
Robert Carroll 
J. Hartley Christie 
Joseph Coogan 
Robert Courtney 
Robert Dean 
Joseph Dougherty 
James Eigo 

Charles 



John Eigo 
Joseph Fitzpatrick 
Ludwig Frank 
Joseph Grady 
Francis Ignaszewski 
Francis Keimig 
Lawrence Kelly 
Walter Lion 
John Mason 
Michael Meno 
Silverthom 



William Mulroy 
Joseph McDonald 
Charles McDonald 
John McEvoy 
Edward McLaughlin 
John McMenamin 
Joseph No j unas 
Andrew O'Keefe 
Charles O'Keefe 
Daniel Rodden 
William Smith 



Chairman: William M. Mulroy 

Program: Robert J. Courtney Publicity: John McMenamin 

Ticket: Ludwig Frank Floor: John Mason 

The Glee Club wishes to extend thanks and appreciation 
to the following 

Mr. Joseph Sprissler, The Masque, James Gallagher 

George Brookes, John Goode, Vincent Buggy 

Edward Davis, John McEvoy, Lawrence Kelly, Owen Breen 



PATRONS 



Freshman Class 

Sophomore Class 

Junior Class 

Senior Class 

The Collegian 

II Circolo Italiano 

The Explorer 

The Masque 

Varsity Club 

Special Ethics "A" 

The La Salle Mothers Club 

Sigma Phi Lambda 

John P. Boland, Esq. 

Mr. John Carlson 

Mrs. Anna Carlson 

Mr. and Mrs. William J. Christie 

Mr. and Mrs. Michael Coogan 

Mr. Joseph Coogan 

Mr. and Mrs. John H. Courtney 

Mr. and Mrs. Ugo Donini 

Mrs. Joseph P. Dougherty 

Mr. Timothy Eigo 

Mr. Christopher Fitzpatrick 



Mrs. Eleanore Frank 

Miss Margaret Geary 

Mrs. Marie Holland 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Ignaszewski 

Mr. and Mrs. James Jordan 

Mr. and Mrs. N. P. Kavanagh 

Mr. Vincent F. Kavanagh 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter A. Lion 

Rev. James V. McEnery 

Mr. and Mrs. A. L. McLaughlin 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph D. Mulroy 

Miss Marie O'Keefe 

Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Rodden 

Mr. and Mrs. E. A. Schneider, Sr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Silverthorn 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Sprissler 

Ellis Drug, 5th and Godfrey 

Mr. and Mrs. D. J. McDonald 

Mr. and Mrs. John A. McDonald 

Dr. and Mrs. Lawrence J. Kelly 

Mr. and Mrs. Owen J. Breen 

Brother G. Charles 



JUNGEi- HOR 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

Friday evening, May 10, 1940, at 3:15 o'clock 

Junger Lviaennerchor 
Walther iueller, Piano 
Louis Gress and his string orchestra 

assisted by 

Hilda Morse, Soprano 
Eugene Bossart, Piano 

of 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

Programme 

I 

Brandenbarg concerto No. 4 Bach 

String orchestra, flutes, and piano 

II 

Chorus from "Die Zauberflote" Mozart 

Junger Maennerchor and orchestra 



III 



Der Schmied Brahms 

Das verlassene .viagdlein H. Wolf 

"The Jewel Song" from "Faust" Gounod 

Hilda Morse 
Eugene Bossart 



IV 



Orfeo ed Euridice 

Largo 
Waltz in A flat 
Gypsy rondo 



Orchestra 



Gluck 

Brahms-Groer 
Haydn 



JUHGER .aAENNERCHOR 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
(Continued) 



Klingendes jahr Siegl 

Symphonic poem for male chorus, 
soprano solo, string orchestra, 
and piano 

Autumn 
h inter 
Spring 
Summer 
Fugue 



Eighth Season - - - 

THIRD CONCERT 
of the 

ROXBOROUGH 
SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

LEONARD DeMARIA, Conductor 




Under Auspices of the 

PARENTS' ASSOCIATION AND LYCEUM 
of the 21st Ward 

ROXBOROUGH HIGH SCHOOL AUDITORIUM 

May Twenty-Seventh 

1940 



PROGRAMME 
+ 

LEONARD DeMARIA 
Conductor 
JOSEPH TYBESKEY NATHAN STUTCH 

Concert Meister Violoncellist 

+ 

1. Beethoven - - - "Egmont" - - - Overture 

2. Beethoven 5th Symphony 

3. Haydn - Concerto in D Major - Allegro Moderato 

Violoncello with Orchestra 
Nathan Stutch 

4. Brahms Hungarian Dances 5 and 6 

+ 

INTERMISSION 
Short Address on the 250th Anniversary - W. B. Forney, Jr., 

+ 

5. Gounod - Ballet Music from "Faust" 

6. Bach ... Adagio from the Organ Toccata in C Major 

Glazounov - - - Serenade Espagnole, Opus 20, No. 2 

Weber Rondo in A Major 

Violoncello with Piano 
Nathan Stutch, Violoncello Leo Luskin, Piano 

7. A Round of Country Dance Tunes - Arr. by Dorothy Berliner 

8. Sibelius - - - Finlandia - - - Tone Poem 

Finale 



MEMBERS OF THE ORCHESTRA 



Mr. Carl A. Anderman 

Mr. Ulla Bauers, Jr. 

Mr. E. C. Beckley 

Mr. David T. Berlizheimar 

Miss Clara M. Brower 

Miss Ellen Chappell 

Mr. Charles F. Cole 

Miss Mildred Dawson 

Mr. G. S. Dunn 

Miss Roslyn Givotovsky 

Mrs. Meta E. Hall 



STRINGS 

Mr. Charles S. Hartman 
Mr. William Hohlfeld 
Mr. Robert S. P. Homer 
Miss Elizabeth Jackson 
Mr. Marvin Jacoby 
Mr. Franz Z. Kelman 
Mr. P. J. Kimble 
Miss Geraldine M. Klaczak 
Mr. G. W. Krocker 
Miss Margaret D. Lewis 
Mr. L. M. Newbaker 



Mr. Ronald M. Pyle, Jr. 
Mr. Harmon Robinson, Jr. 
Mr. Charles A. Ruby 
Mr. Pasquale Santoro 
Miss Betty Straub 
Mr. George R. Stubblebine 
Mr. Harold A. Sutton 
Dr. Edgar W. Tully 
Mr. Joseph Tybeskey 
Mr. Albin Voigt 
Mr. Frank Wiltshire 



WOOD-WIND 

Mr. R. Bruce Hall 

Miss Barbara A. Harkins 

Miss Doris M. Kelly 

Mr. John Tarbuck 



Miss Bette Laws 

Miss Bette Pile 

Mr. Herman Schlimm 



BRASS 



Mr. Robert L. Adams 
Mr. Charles J. Bienkowski 
Mr. George M. Bovard 
Mr. Conard K. Donnell 
Mr. J. Edward Holgate 



Mr. Paul E. Kurzenberger 
Mr. Ernest F. Miller 
Mr. Norman Schaller 
Mr. F. Engle Taylor 
Mr. Gordon J. Will 



TYMPANI 

Mr. Oscar M. Patton 



DRUMS 

Mr. John T. Schmidt 



LIBRARIAN 

Mr. J. Edward Holgate 



OFFICERS 

Mr. Ernest F. Miller, President 
Mr. Geo. M. Bovard, Vice President 
Mr. Conard K. Donnell, Secretary 
Mr. William Hohlfeld, Treasurer 
Mr. G. S. Dunn, Recording Secretary 



WOMEN'S AUXILIARY 

Mrs. Charles W. Neeld, President 
Mrs. A. Sutton, Vice President 
Mrs. H. V. Tarbuck, 2nd Vice President 
Mrs. L. M. Newbaker, Secretary 
Mrs. Harmon Robinson, Jr., Treasurer 



PATRONS AND PATRONESSES 



Mr. & Mrs. Herbert L. Adams 

Mr. <S Mrs. John S. Adelhelm 

Mrs. Bertha B. Aspden 

Mr. Jules Baron 

Mr. J. Ellwood Barrett 

Mr. Le Roy E. Beaver 

Miss Alice Berry 

Mr. Ernest Black 

Dr. & Mrs. David J. Boon 

Mr. Thomas F. Boon 

Mr. & Mrs. Geo. M. Bovard 

Miss Elizabeth E. Britton 

Mr. Wallace Bromley 

Dr. Jacob Brown 

Mr. David Burchuk 

Mr. <S«Mrs. S. H. Busslnger 

Mrs. Fred E. Carbaugh 

Miss Katharin W. Cassin 

Mrs. Ethel M. Chappell 

Mr. S. A. Cochrane 

Mrs. Charles F. Cole 

Mrs. C. Daniel Coppee 

Miss Ethel M. Coster 

Dr. Ella B. Custer 

Mr. & Mrs. James H. Cute 

Mrs. Elizabeth Dearnley 

Mrs. Leonard DeMaria 

Mr. Randolph W. DeWald 

Mrs. L. B. Douglas 

Miss Catharine M. Dwyer 

Mr. & Mrs. David P. Earnshaw 

Mr. & Mrs. Wm. H. Eddleman 

Mr. Price B. Engle 

Mr. Harry D. Evans 

Mr. & Mrs. Hilbert S. Felton 

Mr. John C. Fitzpatrick 

Mr. Andrew Flanagan, Jr. 

Mr. Charles A. Flanagan 

Dr. & Mrs. H. Franklin Flanagan 

Mrs. J. Elliott Flanagan 

Mr. George Flint 

Mrs. George Flint 

Mrs. Edward G. Ford 

Miss Ruth J. Frame 

Mr. Louis Freyling 

Dr. & Mrs. Hans C. Funch 

Mr. Felix A. Gaines 

Rev. & Mrs. Z. M. Gibson 

Mr. and Mrs. James Gilmore 

Mrs. Henry Grossmiller 

Mrs. Wilford C. Hagaman 

Mrs. William R. Haggart 

Mr. & Mrs. Robt. S. Hamilton 

Mr. & Mrs. W. J Hamilton, Jr. 



Mrs. Henry L. Hansell 
Mr3. Earl E. Harlan 
Miss Blanche L. Heldinger 
Drs. Robert & Rose Hirsh 
Mr. Walter M. Hodson 
Mrs. Jessie K. Hodson 
Mrs. Frank H. Hoffman 
Mr. John Hohen-adel 
Mr. Sam'l F. Houston 
Mrs. Samuel F. Houston 
Mr. Russell Howarth 
Miss Mary M. Hynds 
Mrs. Robert H. Jackson 
Mr. Paxson V. James 
Mrs. Viola James 
Mr. Edward A. Jeffries 
Mr. Raymond V. John 
Mr. J. Langdon Jones 
Mr. & Mrs. Russell C. Keely 
Mr. & Mrs. El wood Kelly 
Mr. John B. Kelly 
Mr. Samuel P. Kenworthy 
Mrs. Lee Kester 
Mr. Roy L. Kester 
Mrs. Barbara Koethe 
Mr. Adolph Lang 
Layre Coal Co. 
Mr. & Mrs. John Park Lee 
Mrs. Joseph Lees 
Dr. Joseph D. Lehman 
Mr. W. T. Llewellyn 
Miss Ethel E. Lush 
Miss Mary C. Lyster 
Dr. Bruce V. MacFadyen 
Mr. & Mrs . G. E. MacFarland 
Mr. & Mrs. Wm. J. Martin 
Mr. Francis E. McGill 
Miss Margaret McHenry 
Miss Edith McKinny 
Mrs. Joseph S. Miles 
Mr. & Mrs. Ernest F. Miller 
Mrs. Henry F. Miller 
Dr. A. A. Mitten 
Miss Carolyn J. Moore 
Miss Anne M. Morrisey 
Mr. James R. Morrison 
Mr. Clarence E. Moyer 
Miss Edith C. Moyer 
Mr. H. S. Murphy 
Mr. <S Mrs. Adolph Myers 
Mrs. Charles W. Neeld 
Mrs. L. M. Newbaker 
Mrs. W. R. Nicholson, Jr. 
O'Connell Motors 



Mr. & Mrs. Wallace F. Ott 

Mr. James Petrellis 

Mrs. Emilie O. Pyle 

Mr. & Mrs. H. A. Robertson 

Mrs. Harmon Robinson, Jr. 

Rox. Male Chorus 

Rox.-Myk. Lions Club 

Mr. Alexander Russell, Jr. 

Mr. Charles G. Schaller 

Mr. Oscar Schellenberger 

Mrs. Charles S. Schofield 

Miss Irene R. Schofield 

Mr. & Mrs. Wm. L. Schofield 

Mrs. Gilbert E. Sell 

Mr. W. E. Shappell 

Mr. & Mrs. George L. Shirley 

Mr. Edward S. Siddall 

Mr. & Mrs. A. F. Skrobanek 

Mrs. Edgar B. Slater 

Mrs. H. Spelse 

Mr. Erwin G. Stein 

Mr. Arthur M. Stetler 

Dr. & Mrs. Edwin G. Stork 

Mr. Jay F. Strawlnski 

Mr. & Mrs. Norman C. Struse 

Mr. and Mrs. A. Sutton 

Mr. & Mrs. Harold A. Sutton 

Dr. John W. Sykes 

Mr. Joseph H. Sykes 

Mr. & Mrs. Henry V. Tarbuck 

Mr. & Mrs. Carroll R. Thompson 

Mr. R. Ellison Thompson 

Mrs. Deborah A. Thorpe 

Mrs. Raymond E. Trainer 

Dr. & Mrs. Linton Turner 

Mr. William Jay Turner 

Mrs. William Jay Turner 

Mrs. S. G. von Bosse 

Mr. & Mrs. R. A. Wahl 

Mrs. Louis J. Walker 

Mr. Ernest G. Weber 

Mrs. Richard R. Weir 

Mr. F. Earl Westcott 

Mr. & Mrs. Lee R. Wetherlll 

Dr. Howard K. White 

Mr. Charles H. Whiteman 

Miss M. E. Wilkinson 

Mr. <S Mrs. Harry S. Williams 

Rev. Edmund B. Wood 

Senator Geo. H. Woodward 

Miss Anne Wright 

Dr. Carl B. Young 

Mr. & Mrs. Clarence E. Young 

Miss Rahel Zaiser 



HELP1 The Roxborough Symphony Orchestra 

By becoming a patron or patroness at once. $3.00 entitles you to three tickets for 
each of the next three concerts. We will be happy to call upon you, at your conven- 
ience, if any details might be of interest; or call Roxborough 0566; or enclose check to 
the following: CONARD K. DONNELL, 4351 Lauriston St., Roxborough, Phila., Pa. 



We thank The Suburban Press for Publicity 



MUSICALE 

AUSPICES OF THE CHOIR 

FIRST METHODIST CHURCH 

OF HADDON HEIGHTS 

TUESDAY EVENING, MAY 28, 1940 

EIGHT-TWENTY O'CLOCK 




'Make a joyful noise unto the Lord, all the Earth, 
Make a loud noise, and rejoice, and sing praise. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

ARTISTS 

EMILY MICKUNAS - - Coloratura Soprano 



NATHAN STUTCH - - - - 
CHARLES SCHILLING LINTON 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

ACCOMPANIST 
DR. ROWLAND RICKETTS - 

♦ ♦ ♦ 



Cellist 
Pianist 



Organ 



JOHN H. HECKMANN - Organist- D.rector 
REV. OLIVER C. APGAR - - - - Pastor 



PROGRAMME 

Choir — "Salutation" Gaines 

"Cherubim Song" Bortnyanski 

Piano — "First Movement from the Concerto in 

A Minor" Grieg 

Soprano — "Nymphs and Fauns" Bemberg 

"Una voce poco fa" Rossini 

(From "Barber of Seville") 

Cello — "First Movement from the Concerto in 

D Major" Haydn 

Allegro Moderato 

Choir — "When to Thee Our Saviour Went" ... Wagner 
(From "Die Miestersinger") 

"The Lord Now Victorious" Mascagni 

(From "Cavalleria Rusticana") 



PROGRAMME 



Piano — "Staccata Caprice" Vogrich 

"Valse in E Major" Moszkowski 

Soprano — "The Fields are Full" Armstrong- Gibbs 

"Mantle of Blue" Bridge 

"Je suis Titania" Thomas 

(From "Mignon") 

Cello — "Adagio" • Bach 

(From "Organ Toccata in C Major") 

"Serenade Espagnole" (Opus 20, No. 2) ■ • Glazounow 

"Gavotte in D Major" Popper 

Choir — "The Omnipotence" Schubert 

Solo : Emily Mickunas 

9TEINWAV PIANO LEASED FROM N. STETSON CO. 



ATLANTIC FUEL OIL 

I/'REH Y REH 

I\OAL WEBSTER OIL BURNERS AND COAL STOKERS 1XOAL 

BUILDING MATERIALS 

HENRY M. KREH-PHONE HADDON HEIGHTS 3600 

m. a. evoy jv[ a. EVOY &- SON WM - B - EVOY 

Funeral Directors 

HADDON HEIGHTS 820 
205 SECOND AVENUE HADDON HEIGHTS. N. J. 

RITZY FLORIST 

Flowers for All Occasions 

240 WHITE HORSE PIKE AUDUBON, N. J. 

PHONE, AUDUBON I203A/V 

Visit our 5000 square feet of greenhouses 

ROHLFS BAKERY 

PASTRY— PIES— CAKES-BREAD— ROLLS 

609 STATION AVENUE, HADDON HEIGHTS 
FREE DELIVERY PHONE 1078 

OAKWOOD CHEVROLET CO. 

SALES AND SERVICE NEW AND USED CARS 

1130 WHITE HORSE PIKE, OAKLYN, N. J. 

COLL1NGSWOOD 461-462 

MURRAY £r SON 

114 WHITE HORSE PIKE 

HADDON HEIGHTS, N. J. 

FRED G. LOWDEN 

GROCERIES FRUIT AND PRODUCE FRESH MEATS 

711 STATION AVENUE, HADDON HEIGHTS 

F. A. BARTHOLOMAY & SONS 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 
ORGAN INSTALLATIONS 

THE ORGAN TO WHICH YOU ARE LISTENING THIS EVENING IS ONE OF OUR INSTALLATIONS 
ALSO THE FOLLOWING RECENTLY INSTALLED 

First Baptist Church, Haddonfield, N. J. First Presbyterian Church. Sayre. Pa. 
First Methodist Church, Nichols. N. Y. 



THE 
PHILADELPHIA AWARD 

FOUNDED IN I 9 2. 1 BY EDWARD W. BOK 



MtJal DuigniJ by Violit OMij 



THE ACADEMY OF MUSIC 

PHILADELPHIA 

THURSDAY EVENING, MARCH SEVENTH 

NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FORTY 

AT EIGHT-THIRTY O'CLOCK 



THE PHILADELPHIA AWARD was founded in 
June, 1921, by Edward W. Bok who created a fund 
from the annual revenue of which a prize of Ten 
Thousand Dollars is conferred each year upon that man or 
woman living in Philadelphia, its suhurhs or vicinity, who 
during the preceding calendar year, shall have performed or 
Drought to its culmination an act or contributed a service 
calculated to advance the hest and largest interests of the 
community of which Philadelphia is the center. 

In other words, The Philadelphia Award is a Nohel Prize 
adapted to Philadelphia, and as such it has been characterized 
by writers the country over. 

it was bestowed in former years upon 

LEOPOLD STOKOWSKI CORNELIUS MCGILL1CUDDY 

I9XI I92.9 

RUSSELL H. CONWELI. PAUL PHILIPPE CRET 

I92.2. I93O 

SAMUEL S. FLEISHER THE UNKNOWN CITIZEN 

I92.3 I93 1 

CHARLES C. HARRISON EARL D. BOND 

I9i4 I93I 

SAMUEL YELLIN LUCY L. W. WILSON 

19X5 I933 

CHEVALIER JACKSON CHARLES M. B. CADWALADER 

19X6 I934 

W. HERBERT BURK FRANCIS FISHER KANE 

I9X7 I935 

ELI KIRK PRICE GEORGE W. WILKINS 

19x8 I936 
ALFRED NEWTON RICHARDS 

J 937 

RUFUS M. JONES AND CLARENCE E. PICKETT 

I938 



"Do 


you 


covet distinction? 


You 


will 


never 


get 


t by 


serving 


yourself. 


Do 


you 


covet honor? 


You 


will 


get it 


only 


as a 


servant 


of mankind." 
























— From Woodrow Wil 


row' % 


address 


at Swarthmore College 


















October, 191}. 



PROGRAM 

(Under the Auspices of The Philadelphia Forum) 



Introduction 



Doctor Charles E. Beury 

President of The Philadelphia Forum 



Address by Chairman 



Philip C. Staples, Esquire 

Chairman, Board of Trustees 
The Philadelphia Award 



Tone Poem, "Finlandia' 



Sibelius 
The Curtis Symphony Orchestra 

Alexander Hilsberg, Guest Conductor 



Address 



Honorable Francis Biddle 

Solicitor General of the United States 



Prelude to Act I, "Lohengrin" .... Wagner 

The Curtis Symphony Orchestra 



Presentation — The Philadelphia Award 

Honorable Roland S. Morris 



Overture, "Romeo and Juliet" . . . Tchaikovsky 

The Curtis Symphony Orchestra 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



Philip C. Staples 

CHAIRMAN 

Earl G. Harrison 

VICE CHAIRMAN 

Charles G. Berwind Samuel S. Fels 

Curtis Bok Samuel S. Fleisher 

Mrs. John Cadwalader Herbert F. Goodrich 

Mrs. James Chadwick Collins Livingston E. Jones 

Mrs. John Frederick Lewis, Jr. 

Mrs. Thomas Raeburn White 



Depository Secretary 

Girard Trust Company Clarence Gardner 



Barlj (Cantata Jeattual 



St. James's Protestant Episcopal Church 

22nd and Walnut Streets, Philadelphia 



May 3rd and 4th, 1940 



The Philadelphia Bach Festival Chorus 

Under the Direction of 

JAMES ALLAN DASH 

Instrumentalists from 

The Curtis Symphony Orchestra 

SOLOISTS 

Sopranos Altos 

BARBARBA THORNE VIRGINIA KENDRICK 

ALICE HUFSTADER VERONICA SWEIGART 

FLORENCE KIRK ANNE SIMON 

Tenors Basses 

STEUART WILSON EDWARD RHEIN 

GEORGE LAPHAM MARK DAWSON 

HARRY DANNER LEONARD TREASH 

RANDALL WILKINS, Organist ROBERT B. MILLER, Harpsichord 

Program Notes by 
HENRY S. DRINKER 



FRIDAY, MAY 3d— 8:15 P. M. 

Cantata No. 198 — The Trauerode (see p. I of Insert). 

Cantata No. 65 — "From Sheba shall many men be coming" (see p. 
II). 

Cantata No. 79 — "God the Lord is Sun and Shield" (see p. III). 

SATURDAY, MAY 4th— 4:30 P. M. 

Cantata No. 4 — "Christ lay by death enshrouded" (see p. IV). 

Cantata No. 6 — "Bide with us" (see p. V.). 

Cantata No. 64 — "See ye! Behold what love" (see p. VI). 

SATURDAY, MAY 4th— 8:15 P. M. 

The Magnificat — (See p. VII.) 

Cantata No. 27 — "Who knows how near is my last hour" (see p. 
VIII). 

Cantata No. 50 — "Now is the Hope and the Strength." 

After the performance of each of the Cantatas, except the last, the 
audience will rise and sing, with the Chorus and Orchestra, the appro- 
priate Chorale, reproduced in the Insert in the middle of this pamphlet. 

There will, of course, be no applause. 



The Philadelphia Bach Festival Society 

In the fall of 1931 James Allan Dash, with a small group of Bach 
enthusiasts, founded the Bach Society of Delaware County. Initially 
it comprised 25 singers. Its stated purpose was "to study and to per- 
form the choral masterpieces of Johann Sebastian Bach, particularly 
the lesser known works". 

The first public performance was in an Upper Darby church and 
comprised the three Cantatas, "Sleepers Wake" (Cantata No. 140), 
"The Sages of Sheba" (No. 65), and "God's Time is Best" (No. 106), 
with accompaniment of organ and volunteer instrumentalists. While 
during its early days the Society took part in the performance of works 
of other masters, of late years it has devoted itself exclusively to Bach's 
Church Cantatas. 

In June 1938, the Conductor, James Allan Dash, was the recipient 
of a grant-in-aid by the Carnegie Corporation to enable him to go to 
Leipsic, the fountain-head of Bach tradition, and study Bach there with 
Dr. Karl Straube, the Cantor of the St. Thomasschule, the position 
occupied by Bach himself from 1723 to 1750. 

During his year under Dr. Straube, — recognized as perhaps the 
greatest living authority on the interpretation of Bach's Church Can- 
tatas, — Mr. Dash studied, exhaustively, upwards of 70 Cantatas. Re- 
turning to Philadelphia in the fall of 1938, fired with renewed zeal for 
Bach and with added determination to present his music in accordance 
with authentic tradition, Mr. Dash secured the necessary funds and 
support to prepare the three performances comprising the 1939 Festival, 
which he had planned in Leipsic. 

On Friday evening, May 5, 1939, the performance comprised the 
three Cantatas, Nos. 140 (Sleepers Wake), 1 (How Bright and Fair 
the Morning Star), and 142 (For Unto Us a Child is Born) ; on Sat- 
urday afternoon, May 6, Cantata No. 106 (God's Time is Best), No. 
54 (Stand Ye Firm Against All Evil), and No. 180 (Deck Thyself, My 
Soul, with Gladness) ; and on Saturday evening, May 6, Cantata No. 21 
(My Heart and Soul were Sore Distressed), and Cantata No. 11 
(Praise to God on High in Heaven). 

The enthusiasm of singers, orchestra, and audience (several hun- 
dred had to be turned away on each of the two days, owing to lack of 
seating space) made it apparent that the Bach Festival should become 
a permanent feature of Philadelphia's musical life. A grant was ac- 



cordingly secured from two of the Foundations to enable Mr. Dash to 
give up his position in Reading, move permanently to Philadelphia, and 
devote the major part of his time to the development of the Bach 
Chorus and Festival. The Bach Society of Delaware County and the 
Bach Choir of Philadelphia were merged into The Philadelphia Bach 
Festival Society, legally organized to provide for both Singing and 
Sustaining Members. For this season, subscriptions have been re- 
ceived from the Sustaining Members, to whom will be allotted reserved 
seats for the three 1940 performances, to the extent of the seating 
capacity. The balance of the expense of the 1940 Festival is under- 
written by a small group of enthusiasts. Mr. Dash has never received 
any compensation (except for the Foundation grants referred to). 

The 1940 Festival and Plans for the Future 

Bach's Sacred Cantatas were always performed by Bach in Church, 
as part of a Church Service. They can command the necessary atmos- 
phere only when heard in Church. By the great courtesy of Dr. Mock- 
ridge, Dr. Priest, and the vestry, St. James's Church has been made 
available for the present performances, as it was for the Festival in 

1939- 

For this Festival, we have the cooperation of members of the 
Curtis Institute Orchestra and of eminent soloists. The nine Cantatas 
chosen for performance are among the most beautiful of the 199 
Church Cantatas of Bach which have come down to us. The Chorus, 
the Soloists, and the Orchestra have studied them with Mr. Dash, not 
only with thoroughness and intelligence, but with the cumulative en- 
thusiasm which the actual participation in Bach's music engenders and 
which is bound to communicate itself to the hearers. 

Mr. Robert B. Miller, who will play the Harpsichord at the Festi- 
val, has been the Accompanist at rehearsals and has been untiring in 
his devotion and able assistance in preparing the performances. 

The Hammond Organ, used to accompany the Chorus, is by 
courtesy of John Wanamaker. The Harpsichord is loaned by N. 
Stetson & Co. 

When the Chorus met last fall for the first rehearsal of the works 
to be done at this Festival, there were approximately 200 applicants. 
Since the Chorus has been restricted to 150 singers, there has developed 
a considerable waiting list. With this waiting list as a nucleus, and with 
other applicants for the Chorus who will be continually applying and 
members of the present Bach Chorus who crave even more choral sing- 
ing, it is proposed, at the conclusion of the present Festival, to form a 



second chorus which will at once begin rehearsals * for a two-day Schu- 
bert Festival in February 1941. This chorus will perform, with an 
appropriate orchestra, a number of choral works by Schubert, including 
the Masses in Ab and E(j. These magnificent works have, it is believed, 
never before been heard in Philadelphia, although they are on a par 
with the Schubert symphonies which are so well known. 

With the second chorus we will plan to have a Mozart Festival in 
February 1942. 

Thereafter, we hope to maintain the two choruses, each working 
toward an annual Choral Festival. That held the first week in May 
will always be a Bach Festival; the other Festival, held in February, 
will on each occasion perform the works of one composer, — February 
1941, Schubert; February 1942, Mozart; February 1943, perhaps 
Brahms; February 1944, perhaps Handel; etc. Eventually it may be 
even possible to organize a third chorus for an annual Festival in 
November. 

The development of the Bach chorus has convinced us that there 
is no musical experience more thrilling or satisfying than the intensive 
study by the singers of a group of the major works of one composer. 
We are also convinced that there is a large section of the music-loving 
public of Philadelphia which is seriously interested in hearing the mas- 
terpieces of choral music, which, comparatively speaking, have been 
neglected in Philadelphia. 

The Works Performed at This Festival 

Of the nine works in the present programs (all of which were 
composed during the first 17 years of Bach's Cantorship at Leipsic), 
two, — Nos. 4 and 2j, — are Choral Cantatas, in which one or more of 
the movements are based on an old Choral Melody. These melodies 
were very familiar to the congregations of Bach's time, who could 
readily recognize them amid the maze of Bach's counterpoint. In 
performing them, we sing the simple Chorale first, so as to give our 
audience at least an approximation of the familiarity which Bach could 
take for granted. Before the performance of Cantata No. 4 and of No. 
27, the Organist will play the Choral Preludes by Bach based on these 
Chorales. 



* Monday evenings, 8 o'clock, at 161 7 Spruce Street, Philadelphia. 
Rehearsals will be held from May 6 to June 17, inclusive. After the 
summer vacation the chorus will resume activity September 16. The 
Bach Chorus will begin rehearsals for the 1941 Festival September 17 
(same place), and meet every Tuesday evening (8 o'clock) thereafter. 



In the case of four of the Cantatas (Nos. 65, 79, 6, 64), while they 
contain no chorus based on a Choral Melody, they all have one or more 
of these old Lutheran Chorales, in simple form and in Bach's harmoni- 
zation, inserted between the other movements. 

Of Cantata No. 50 we have but a single movement (probably 
there were other movements which have been lost) in the form of a 
magnificent double fugue, with large orchestral accompaniment. 

The Magnificat is sung in Latin, the other works in English. 

With Bach, the text of his vocal works was of the utmost impor- 
tance. Constantly we find the emotional content of his music changing 
with the text, phrase by phrase, and often word by word. It is, how- 
ever, believed to be much more feasible for the average American 
chorus and audience to appreciate the significance of a Bach Chorus, 
Vocal Solo, or Duet when sung to English words, provided the transla- 
tion does not alter Bach's musical phrasing and is always careful to 
preserve the juxtaposition of significant passages in the text to the corre- 
sponding musical phrases. In the performance of seven of the Cantatas, 
Mr. Dash will use translations which I have made in an endeavor to 
present readily the meaning of the text, while adhering to Bach's phras- 
ing, emphasis, and accents. Also, in the case of numbers obviously 
derived from Bible passages, I have attempted to cut back, as far as 
possible, to the words of the English Bible, instead of translating into 
English "verse", the paraphrase, in German "verse", of the Lutheran 
Bible, which formed most of Bach's texts. 

Discriminating critics will find frequent discrepancies in the Eng- 
lish translations presently quoted. They must remember that these 
English words are not made as poetry, but to go into the subtle 
ryhthmic patterns of this particular music, the music being always of 
first importance. It is much easier to change Bach's musical rhythms 
than it is to find English words which will exactly fit into them. The 
fault of many translations is that, in order to make their verses look 
and sound smooth and pretty, the translators frequently take it upon 
themselves to make convenient alterations in Bach's rhythm or musical 
diction, which is wholly contrary to my canons of musical ethics. 






Cantata No. 198 
The Trauerode 

The Trauerode, also known as Cantata No. 198, was composed 
by Bach for the memorial service of Queen Christiane Eberhardine of 
Saxony, who died September 7, 1727. The service was held in St. Paul's 
Church at Leipsic on October 17th. The text for the Ode, by J. C. 
Gottsched, as well as the music by Bach, were specially commissioned 
by Hans Carl von Kirchbach, the organizer of the ceremony. The 
fact that this commission was given to Bach instead of to Gorner, the 
regular musical director at the Church, caused quite a ruction. 

At the close of Bach's autograph score stand the words "SDG (So 
Danke Gott) ao 1727. d Oct. 15 J. S. Bach". There were thus but 
two days between the completion of the composition and the perform- 
ance, for the copying of the parts and the rehearsal ! 

Forkel, Bach's first biographer, was enchanted with the music of 
the Trauerode. "The choruses of this work", he says, "are so delight- 
ful that he who has begun to play one of them, will never quit till he 
has finished it" (p. 61, English Edition, 1920). 

Spitta says that it is "one of Bach's finest works" ; also that the 
Weimar Cantata, "Komm du siisse Todesstunde" (No. 161) is an "un- 
developed sketch" for this work. Wilhelm Rust, the distinguished 
editor of the Bachgesellschaft from i860 to 1881, has proved that 
the music from the Trauerode was adapted by Bach to a St. Mark's 
Passion. The text of this St. Mark's Passion was written for Bach by 
"Picander" in 1731. The music has unfortunately been lost. Rust also 
added to the Trauerode, for the Bachgesellschaft Edition, a new poetical 
version of Gottsched's text, for All Souls' Day, since every perform- 
ance of the Trauerode cannot be given in memory of Queen Christiane 
Eberhardine. The text here used is the English version by George L. 
Osgood of Rust's text. 

The Ode opens with an impressive chorus, asking the Father for 
hope and comfort in sorrow. 

Then comes a short Recitative by the Tenor, "All flesh is grass", 
and "death must surely come", followed by an Aria for Soprano. 

In Rust's Edition he inserted five splendid Bach Chorales between 
the verses of the text, and a sixth at the end. Five of these are sung in 
the present performance. The first, "Es ist gewisslich an der Zeit" 
(melody by Jos. Klug, 1525, Bach's Choralgesange, B. & H. Edition, 
Nos. 262, 263), follows the Soprano Aria. The second, "Wer nur den 
lieben Gott lasst walten", is the same as that on which is based the open- 



ACADEMY OF MUSIC 



MAY 13, 1940 




JOSEF HOFM ANN 



Benefit for Commission for Polish Relief 




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To You and You: 

Money has been raised through contri- 
butions, concerts, etc., by our Commission 
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sent to the American Representatives in 
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Hungary to care for the 1,200,000 Polish 
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The Curris Jrasrirule of Music 
Radio Programme 

Monday, October 16, 1939 — 4:00 to 4:30 P.M. 

THE CURTIS STRING QUARTET 

Jascha Brodsky, Violin 
Charies Jaffe, Violin 
Max Aronoff, Viola 
Orlando Cole, Violoncello 

I 
Quartet, Opus 64, No. 5 in D major (Lark) Haydn 

Allegro modcrato 
Adagio cantabilc 
Mer.uetto 
Finale 

II 

Second movement from Quartet in A minor. Opus 29 Schubert 

Andante 

III 
Tliiiu" iiiu i unuu i r om Quartet in E flat m a jo r DiTTEBinngF 

Columbia Broadcasting System 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

ivt nlio Pro-groiimiic 

Monday, October 23, 1939 — 4:00 to 4:30 P.M. 

FREDERICK VOGELGESANG, Violin 

Gavotte in E major Bach-Kreisler 

Andante from Sonata No. 3 in A minor Bach-Siloti 

Fugue from Sonata No. 5 in C major (for Violin alone) Bach 

Etude-caprice Kreutzer-Kaufman 

Polichinelle Kreisler 

Caprice No. 24 Paganini-Auer 

VJ-ADIMIR SOKOLOEF, AcCOVl patlht 

Columbia Broadcasting System 



THe Ciarfis Instiiuic of ^lusic 

Monday, October 30, 1939 — 4:00 to 4:30 P.M. 

JORGE BOLET, Pianist 

Three interme/zi, Opus 117 Brahms 

£ flat major 
B flat minor 
C slurp min or 

Sonata in E fiat., Opus 81a Beethoven 

Les adieux — Adagio. Allegro 
L 'absence — Andante espressivo 
Le retour — Yivacissimamente 

Columbia Broadcasting System 



The Curtis Institute of Music 
Radio Proaramme 

Monday, November 6, 1939 — 4:00 to 4:30 P.M. 

NATHAN STUTCH, Violoncellist 
RALPH BERKOWITZ, Pianist 
HILDA MORSE, Soprano 
EUGENE BOSSART, Accompanist 

I 

First and second movements from Sonata No. 1 

in E minor, Opus 38 Brahms 

Allegro nor. troppo 
Allegretto quasi menuetto 

Nathan Stutch 
Ralph Berkowitz 

II 

Das verlassene Magdlein \ Rugo Wqlf 

Nimmersatte Liebe ) 

La Chevelure ) Debussy 

Mandoline ) 

Hilda Morse 
Eugene Bossart 

Columbia Broadcasting System 



The Curiis InsHtule of Music 

unme 

Monday, November 13, 1939 — 4:00 to 4:30 P.M. 

ROBERT CORNMAN, Piano 
VEDA REYNOLDS, Violin 
NATHAN STUTCH, Violoncello 
JOHN SIMMS, Piano 



Two preludes and fugues from the Well-tempered 

Clavichord, Book 1 Bach 

No. 17 in A flat major 
No. 16 in G minor 

Robert Cornman 

II 

Trio in C minor, Opus 101 Brahms 

Allegro energico 
Presto non assai 
Andante grazioso 
Allegro molto 

Veda Reynolds 

Nathan Stutch 

John Simms 

Columbia Broadcasting System 



Tike Curtis Ii-aglifni'© of Music 
Radio F 



Monday, November 20, 1939 — 10:30 to 11:00 P.M. 

CURTIS SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

FRITZ REINER, Conductor 



Prelude in E major Bach 

(Orchestrated by Pick-Mangiagalli) 

II 

Symphony No. 95 in C minor Haydn 

Allegro 

Andante cantabile 
Menuetto 
Finale. Vivace 

Columbia Broadcasting System 



The Curtis Institute of Music 
Kadio Progrfirnme 

Monday, November 27, 1939 — 4:00 to 4:30 P.M. 

NOAH BIELSKI, Violin 
MORRIS SHULIK, Violm 
STEPHEN KATSAROS, Viola 
WILLIAM SAPUTELLI, Violoncello 
CURTIN WINSOR, Commentator 



Comments 



Curtin ^INSOR 



Quartet in B flat major, Opus 18, No. 6 Beethoven - 

Allegro con brio 
Adagio ma non troppo 
Scherzo. Allegro 
La Malinconia. Adagio. Allegretto quasi Allegro 

Noah Bielski 
Morris Shulik 
Stephex Katsaros 
William Saputelli 

Columbia Broadcasting System 



The Curtis lusHlwlc ©£ Music 
Ro ill o Pio(Tiair,m c 

Monday, December 4, 1939 — 4:00 to 4:30 P.M., E.S.T. 

I 

Concerto in G major for two violoncellos, unaccompanied... Couperin 
Prelude 
Air 

Sarabande 
Chaconne 

Esther Gruhn I T ,. , „ 
True Chappell \ *"*«**** 

II 

Das musikalische Opfer Bach 

Ricercar a 3 

John DeLancie, Oboe 
Charles Gilbert, English Horn 
Sanford Sharoff, Bassoon 
Ralph Berkowitz, Cembalo 

Canon perpetuus 

Burnett Atkinson, flute 
Rafael Druian, Violin 
True Chappell, Violoncello 
Ralph Berkowitz, Cembalo 

Canon a 4 

Rafael Druian, Violin 
Herbert Baumel, Violin 
Albert Falkove, Viola 
True Chappell, Violoncello 



Ricercar a 6 

John DeLancie, Oboe 
Rafael Druian, Violin 
Chartes Gilbert, English Horn 
Albert Falkove, Viola 
Sanford Sharoff, Bassoon 
True Chappell, Violoncello 

Columbia Broadcasting System 



The Cur lis Institute of Music 

Radio Prorjxainimc 

Monday, December 11, 193 9 — 10:30 to 11:00 P.M., E.S.T. 

ALFRED MANN, Recorder 

RAFAEL DRUIAN, Violin 

MARGUERITE KUEHNE, Violin 

NATHAN STUTCH, Violoncello 

and 

STRING ORCHESTRA, Conducted by 

EZRA RACHLIN 



Concerto for recorder and strings Handel 

(arrangement from the figured bass by Alfred Mann) 

Larghetto 

Allegro 

Larghetto 

A tempo di gavotti- 
Alfred Mann and String Orchestra, conducted by Ezra Rachlin 

II 

Concerto Grosso No. VIII in G minor Corelli 

Vivace. Grave. Allegro 
Adagio. Allegro. Adagio 
Vivace. Allegro 
Pastorale ad libitum. Largo 
Rafael Druian 
Marguerite Kuehne 
Nathan Stutch 
and 
String Orchestra, conducted by Ezra Rachlin 

Columbia Broadcasting System 



The Curtis Institute of Music 
Radio Programme 

Monday, December 18, 1939 — 10:30 to 11:00 P.M., E.S.T. 

STRING ORCHESTRA, Conducted by 
EZRA RACHLIN 

I 
Brandenburg Concerto No. 3 in G major Bach 

Allegro moderato 

Adagio 

Allegro 

II 

Aus Holbergs Zeit — Suite Grieg 

Praludium 

Sarabande 

Gavotte 

Air 

Rigaudon 

Columbia Broadcasting System 



The Curfls InsHlulc of Music 

RoiIi-d Program me 

Monday, January 8, 1940 — 4:00 to 4:}0 P. M., E.S.T. 

PHYLLIS MOSS, Viano 
ROBERT GROOTERS, Baritone 

I 

Sonata in F minor, Opus 57 Beethoven 

Allegro assai 
Piu allegro 
Andante con moto 
Allegro ma non troppo 

Phyllis Moss 

II 

Wenn du zu den Blumen gehst H. Wolf 

Nacht und Triiume Schubert 

Die Lotosblume Schumann 

Rastlose Liebe Schubert 

Robert Grooters 

Eugene Bossart, Accompanist 

The Columbia Broadcasting System 



The Curris Institute of Music 
Radio Programme 

Monday, January 15, 1940 — 4:00 to 4:30 P.M., E.S.T. 

NATHAN GOLDSTEIN, Violin 
CHARLES LIBOVE, Violin 
RALPH BERKOWITZ, Piano 
DONALD HULTGREN, Tenor 

I 

Sonata in E major for two violins and piano Handel 

Adagio 
Allegro 
Adagio 
Allegro 

Nathan Goldstein 
Charles Libove 
Ralph Berkowitz 

II 

Jeg elsker dig (I love thee) 

Med en vandlilje (With a waterlily) > Grieg 

En svane (A swan) I 

Tonerna (Visions) Sjoberg 

The lament of Ian the proud Griffes 

Donald Hultgren 
Ralph Berkowitz, Accompanist 

Columbia Broadcasting System 



Tike CurHs Institute of Music 
Radio Programme 

Monday, January 22, 1940 — 10:30 to 11:00 P.M., E.S.T. 



BURNETT ATKINSON, Flute 

LYNNE WAINWRIGHT, Harp 

and 

ORCHESTRA, conducted by 

EZRA RACHLIN 



Concerto in C major for flute and harp (K. 299) Mozart 

Allegro 
Andantino 
Rondo. Allegro 



Columbia Broadcasting System 



The Curiis InsHHite of Music 
Radio Programme 

Monday, January 29, 1940 — 10:30 to 11:00 P M„ E.S.T. 

WOODWIND ENSEMBLE, conducted by 
MARCEL TABUTEAU 

I 

Variations on the theme "La ci darem la mano" 

from Mozart's "Don Juan" Beethoven 

John DeLancie, Oboe 

Perry Bauman, Oboe 

Charles Gilbert, English Horn 

II 

Sonata R IE ti 

Allegretto 
Adagio dolororo 
Vivace ed energico 
Jorge Bolet, Piano John DeLancie, Oboe 

Eleanor Mitchel, Flute Manuel Zegler, Bassoon 

III 

Aubade de Wailly 

Allegro 
Britton Johnson, Flute 
John DeLancie, Oboe 
James King, Clarinet 

Three Chinese impressions Kameneff 

(arranged for wind instruments by Joel Spector) 
In old Pekin 
The forbidden city 
Fireworks 
Britton Johnson, Flute James Rettew, Clarinet 

John Krell, Flute Manuel Zegler, Bassoon 

John DeLancie, Oboe Sanford Sharoff, Bassoon 

Ralph Gomberg, Oboe David Hall, French Horn 

Charles Gilbert, English Horn Joseih White, French Horn 
James King, Clarinet 

Columbia Broadcasting System 



The Curtis Institute of Music 
Radio Programme 

Monday, February 5, 1940 — 4:00 to 4:15 P.M., E.S.T. 

ELEANOR MELLINGER, Harp 

Impromptu-Caprice Pierne 

Chancon do Gui l len Mart i n . . Prr.iLiiov 

Pirouetting Music Box 



} 



Salzedo 
Concert Variations on ' Adeste Fideles" 



Columbia Broadcasting System 



The Curtis Institute of Music 
Radio Programme 

Monday, February 12, 1940 — 4:00 to 4:30 P.M., E.S.T. 

MITCHEL LURIE, Clarinet 
JACOB KRACHMALNICK, Violin 
PAUL SHURE, Violin 
JEROME LIPSON, Viola 
NATHAN GERSHMAN, Violoncello 



Clarinet quintet in A major, (K.581) 

Allegro 

Larghetto 

Menuetto 

Allegretto con Variazioni 



Mozart 






Columbia Broadcasting System 



The Curtis Institute of Music 
Radio Programme 

Monday, February 19, 1940 — 10:30 to 11:00 P.M., E.S.T. 



MADRIGAL CHORUS, conducted by 
MR SAMUEL BARBER 



I 

tO/ Ave Maria Josquin de Pre's 

6) II est bel et bon Passereau 

4) Era l'anima mia Monteverdi 



. . II 

\^J Adieu, sweet Amarillis Wilbye 

Now is the month of Maying Morley 

The nightingale Philips 



S 



III 

A slop waiLli and an ordna n ce map (fiwt performance) Baixde r. 

for men's ehorns and kcttledr n m s 
Da v id Stepiiens5 Tympun i 

Elegischer Gesang, Opus 118 Beethoven 

for mixed chorus and string quartet 
Baruch Altman, Violin Julius Weissman, Viola 

Herbert Baumel, Violin Nathan Stutch, Violoncello 

Columbia Broadcasting System 



The Curtis InsHrule of Music 
Radio Programme 

Monday, February 26, 1940 — 10:30 to 11:00 P.M., E.S.T. 

THE CURTIS SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

and 

CHORUS 

Conducted by 

FRITZ REINER 

Utrecht Jubilate (1713) Handel 

(1685-1759) 

I "Oh, be joyful in the Lord" 

II "Serve the Lord with gladness" 

III "Be ye sure that the Lord He is God" 

IV "Oh, go your way into his gates with thanksgiving" 
V "For the Lord is gracious" 

VI "Glory be to the Father" 
VII "As it was in the beginning" 



The Curtis Institute of Music 
Radio Programme 

Monday, March 11, 1940 — 4:00 to 4:30 P.M., E.S.T. 

JACOB KRACHMALNICK, Violin 
LOUIS SHUB, Piano 

Ptjlprminii niubili, O p m 3 1, No. ?. Rifs 

Sonata for violin and piano Franck 

Allegretto ben moderato 

Allegro 

Recitativo — fantasia 

Allegretto poco mosso 



Columbia Broadcasting System 









THE CURTIS INSTITUTE 

OF MUSIC 

RADIO PROGRAMME 

Monday, March 18, 1940 — 4:00 to 4:30 P.M., E.S.T. 

REBA ROBINSON, Harp 
NATHAN STUTCH, Violoncello 
BURNETT ATKINSON, Flute 
THOMAS PERKINS, Baritone 
JAMES COSMOS, Baritone 
IRVIN BUSHMAN, Baritone 
NORMAN ROSE. Tenor 
RALPH BERKOWITZ, Accompanist 

I 

Three poetical studies Salzedo 

Mirage 
Idyllic poem 
Inquietude 

Reba Robinson 

II 

"Let the fifes and the clarions" 

from the "Fairy Queen" Purcell 

Thomas Perkins and James Cosmos 
The angler song Laves 

Norman Rose and Irvin Bushman 
Sound the trumpet Purcell 

Thomas Perkins and James Cosmos 

III 

La laborde: Rondement I 

La boucon: Andante > Rameau 

L'agagante: Rondement \ 

Reba Robinson, Nathan Stutch 
and Burnett Atkinson 

Columbia Broadcasting System 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE 

OF MUSIC 

RADIO PROGRAMME 

Monday, April 1, 1940 — 4:00 to 4:30 P.M., E.S.T. 

CLARENCE SNYDER, Organ 
MILTON WOHL, Violin 
LOUIS SHUB, Piano 

I 

Chorale Prelude: Bach 

Alle Menschen miissen sterben 
Fugue in G minor (Great) Bach 

Clarence Snyder 



II 

Concert sonata after Pugnani Scalero 

Andantino 

Adagio 

Moderato, ma con spirito 

Milton Wohl 
Louis Shub 



Columbia Broadcasting System 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE 

OF MUSIC 

RADIO PROGRAMME 

Monday, April 8, 1940 — 4:00 to 4:30 P.M., E.S.T. 

I 

Trio in C major for Piano, Violin 

and Violoncello (K. 548) Mozart 

Allegro 

Andante cantabile 
Allegro 

EILEEN FLISSLER, Piano 
BARUCH ALTMAN, Violin 
NATHAN STUTCH, Violoncello 

II 

Serenade in D major, Opus 2 J, 

for Flute, Violin and Viola Beethoven 

Entrata. Allegro 

Tempo ordinario d'un menuetto 

Andante con variazioni 

ELEANOR MITCHEL, Flute 
SOLOMON OVCHAROV, Violin 
PHILIP GOLDBERG, Viola 



Columbia Broadcasting System 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE 
OF MUSIC 

RADIO PROGRAMME 

Monday, April 15, 1940 — 10:30 to 11:00 P.M., E.S.T. 

STRING ORCHESTRA 
conducted by Alexander Hilsberg 

Suite in E major Corelli 

Sarabanda. Largo 

Giga 

Badinerie. Vivace 



First, second and fourth movements of 
Concerto Grosso, for string orchestra 
with piano obbligato Bloch 

Prelude. Allegro energico e pesante 
Dirge. Andante moderato 
Fugue. Allegro 

assisted by Jorge Bolet, Piano 



Columbia Broadcasting System 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE 
OF MUSIC 

RADIO PROGRAMME 

Monday, April 22, 1940— 10:30 to 11:00 P.M., E.S.T. 

CHAMBER ORCHESTRA 
conducted by David Stephens 

NOAH BIELSKI, Violin 

I 

Canzonetta, Opus 62 A Sibelius 



II 

Concerto No. 4 in D major (K 218) Mozart 

Allegro 

Andante cantabile 

Rondeau. Andante grazioso 

Noah Bielski, Violin 



Columbia Broadcasting System 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE 

OF MUSIC 

RADIO PROGRAMME 

Wednesday, April 24, 1940 
10:30 to 11:00 P.M., E.S.T. 

MADRIGAL CHORUS 

conducted by 

Mr Samuel Barber 

and 

Dr Randall Thompson 

I 

A stopwatch and an ordnance map Samuel Barber 

(for men's chorus and kettle drums) 

(first radio performance) 

David Stephens, Tympatiist 

II 

Americana Randall Thompson 

(for mixed chorus) 
May every tongue 
The staff necromancer 
God's bottles 

The sublime process of law enforcement 
Loveli-lin.js 

Eugene Bossart, Accompanist 
Columbia Broadcasting System 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE 
OF MUSIC 

RADIO PROGRAMME 

Monday, April 29, 1940 — 4:00 to 4:30 P.M., E.S.T. 

CURTIS SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
Fritz Reiner, Conductor 

I 

Prelude to Act III of Lohengrin Wagner 

First movement of the Second Symphony Thompson 
Allegro 

The Earl of Oxford's March Byrd-Jacob 

Scherzo from Octet, Opus 20 Mendelssohn 

Roman carnival overture Berlioz 



Columbia Broadcasting System 



The Curtis Institute of Music 



SEVENTH COMMENCEMENT 

AND 

CONFERRING OF DEGREES 



CASIMIR HALL 

Friday, May the tenth 

One Thousand Nine Hundred and Forty 
at Three o'clock in the Afternoon 



Order of Ceremonies 



Organ Prelude 



Chorale Vorspiel Johannes Brahms 

"O Welt, ich muss dich lassen" 

Prelude and Fugue in E minor (Cathedral) J. S. Bach 



Alexander McCurdy, Mus.D. 



3l 



Order of Ceremonies 



* 

Graduate Procession 

Triumphal March Sigfrid Karg-Elert 

Invocation 

The Reverend Alexander MacColl, D.D. 

Hymn 

Prayer of Thanksgiving Netherland Folk-Song 

arr. by Kremser 

Introduction 

Director Randall Thompson, A.M., Mus.D. 

Address 

Walter Damrosch, Mus.D. 
"Our Musical Future" 

Awarding of Diplomas of The Curtis Institute of Music 

Conferring of Degrees in Course 

President Mary Louise Curtis Bok, Mus.D., L.H.D. 
Director Randall Thompson 

Hymn — The Star-Spangled Banner 

Benediction 

Graduate Recession 

Finale from "Grande piece symphonique" Cesar Franck 



[4] 



DIPLOMAS OF THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



Piano 
Thelma Cohen 



Robert E. Grooters 

Noah Bielski 
Zelik Kaufman 



Accompanying 
Louis Shub 

Voice. 



Violi 



Hilda Morse 

Ruth Lucille Griszmer 
Milton Jacques Wohl 



Viola 
Bernard Milofsky (in absentia) 

Double Bass 
Ferdinand Maresh Henry Portnoi 

Harry Theodore Safstrom 



Organ 



Henry Kaseman Beard, A.B. 

(Pennsylvania State College) 

Richard Irven Purvis 

Harp 
Lynne Wainwright 

Composition 
Lela Maki 

Conducting 
Waldemar Dabrowski 

Composition and Conducting 
Lukas Foss 

Conducting, Tympani and Percussion 
David Glenn Stephens 

Flute 
Britton G. Johnson 



James Bernard Williamson, Jr, A.B. 
(University of North Carolina) 



Oboe 
John Sherwood de Lancie 

English Horn 
Charles Everett Gilbert 

Bassoon 
Manuel Zegler 

Trumpet 

Joseph E. Fischer 

Leo A. Gomberg 

James Joseph Tamburini 

Trombone 
Howard Cole (in absentia) 
George Andrew Garstick 



Tuba 
James Martin Emde 



\5) 



DEGREES IN COURSE 



Bachelor of Music — in Piano 
Florence Fraser 



Master of Music — in Composition 
Andre Constant Vauclain 

Thesis : An April Overture 
for full orchestra 



6] 



Marshal 
Hans Wohlmuth, Ph.D. (Vimna*) 

Assistant Marshals 
Jorge Bolet, Mus.B. 

LESTER EnGLANDER, A.B. (University of Pennsylvania}; MuS.B. 

Joseph Samuel Levine, Mus.B. 



[7] 



(1) 

LIST OF CONCERTS 

FACULTY RECITALS 

Casimir Hall 



First.... Mr. Efrem Zimbalist, Violinist 

January 24, 1940 

Second... Mr. Steuart Wilson, Tenor 

February IE, 1940 

Third ... .Madame Elisabeth Schumann, Soprano 

February 15, 1940 

Fourth... Dr. Alexander McCurdy, Organist 

February 21, 1940 

Fifth. .. .Madame Eufemia Gregory, Soprano 

March 5, 1940 

Sixth.... Mr. David Saperton, Pianist 

March 26, 1940 

Seventh. .Mr. Jorge Bolet, Pianist 

April 27, 1940 



(2) 

STUDENTS 1 CONCERTS 
Casimir Eall 



Student of Madame Vengerova 

(Zadel Skolovsky) December 3, 1939 

Student of Mr. Salzedo 

(Lynn T/ainwright) December 5, 1939 

Students of Mr. Salzedo December 12, 1939 

Students of Dr. Wohlmuth January 31, 1940 

Student of Madame Vengerova 

(Sol Kaplan) February 8, 1940 

Student of Mr. Zimbalist 

(Noah Bielski) March 4, 1940 

Students of Mr. Salzedo March 11, 1940 

Student of Mr. Saperton 

(Abbey Simon) March 14, 1940 

Students of Mr. Zimbalist March 27, 1940 

Students of Mr. Torello March 29, 1940 

Students of Mr. Saperton April 8, 1940 

Students of Madame Schumann April 9, 1940 

Student of Mr. Zimbalist 

(Frederick Vogelgesang) . .April 11, 1940 

Students of Mr. Salmond April 16, 1940 



(3) 

STUDENTS* CONCERTS (continued) 

Students of Dr. Ballly April 17, 1940 

Students of Mr. Hilsberg April 18, 1940 

Students of Mr. Tabuteau April 19, 1940 

Students of Madame Vengerova. .... ....April £5, 1940 

Students of Mr. Kaufman. April 26 , 1940 

Students of Madame Gregory April 30, 1940 

Students of Dr. Bailly April 50, 1940 

Students of Dr. Wohlmuth May 2, 1940 

Student of Dr. McCurdy 

(Richard Purvis) May 7, 1940 

Students of Madame Luboshutz May 9, 1940 



(4) 

SPECIAL CONCERTS 

The Historical Series 


( October 30. 1939 




(November 27, 1939 
(December 8, 1939 
( January 19, 1940 
(February 20, 1940 
( March 15, 1940 
( April 23, 1940 



Sonata recital by 

Madame Lea Luboshutz, Violinist 

Mrs. Edith Evans Braun, Pianist... November 10, 1939 



Recital of original music for 
four hands at one piano by 
Mr. Ralph Berkowitz and 
Mr. Vladimir Sokoloff , 



.January 4, 1940 



Recital of five Sonatas for 
violoncello and piano by 
Mr. Felix Salmond, Violoncellist 
Mr. Ralph Berkowitz, Pianist...., 



-January 10, 1940 



The Trappe Family Singers ...February 16, 1940 



Recital by 

Mr. Sigurd Rascher, Saxophonist 
Mr. George Robert, Pianist , 



.March 8, 1940 



Piano and viola recital by 
Miss Genia Robinor, Pianist 
Dr. Louis Bailly, Violist.., 



.March 13, 1940 



Sonata recitals by 

Mr. Adolf Busch, Violinist 
Mr. Rudolf Serkin, Pianist, 



(April 28, 1940 
( May 1, 1940 
( May 8, 1940 



(5) 
CONCERT COURSE 

Wildwood Civic Club, 

Wildwood, New Jersey August 22 

Foremen's and Supervisors 1 Club, 

Gibbstown, New Jersey September 21 

Women's Club of Lynchburg, 

Lynchburg, Virginia ( October 15 

(November 17 

State Teachers College, 

Kutztown, Pennsylvania .October 18 

Woman's Club of Wyncote, 

Wyncote, Pennsylvania October 13 

Washington College, 

Chestertown, Maryland October 26 

Harcum Junior College, 

Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania (November 2 

(February 29 

Junior Octave Club, 

Norristown, Pennsylvania November 2 

Friends' Select School, 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania November 5 

Saint Andrew' s School, 

Middletown, Delaware .November 4 

University of Delaware, 

Newark, Delaware (November 9 

( April 11 
( May 9 

Sleighton Farms, 

Darling P.O. , Pennsylvania. November 14 

Octave Club, 

Norristown, Pennsylvania November 15 

Ursinus College, 

Collegeville, Pennsylvania November 16 

Schumann Club, 

Wildwood, New Jersey November 28 

New Jersey State Teachers College 

Glassboro, New Jersey (November 30 

( May 7 
( May 21 






(6) 

CONCERT COURSE (continued) 



George School, 

George School, Pennsylvania. .....December 9 

Gaston Presbyterian Church, 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania December 17 

Woman's Club of Allentown, 

Allentown, Pennsylvania January 2 

Moorestown High School, 

Moorestown, New Jersey February 22 

The Neighbors, 

Hatboro, Pennsylvania February 28 

Porch Club, 

Riverton, New Jersey March 5 

Pemberton Music Club, 

Pemberton, New Jersey April 9 

The Sommerville Committee of Swarthmore 

College, Swarthmore, Pennsylvania. . .April 18 
Holmquist School, 

New Hope, Pennsylvania April 20 

The Rotary Club of Wilmington, 

Wilmington, Delaware April 23 

New Jersey School Women' s Club, 

Trenton, New Jersey .May 4 

Emilie Krider Norris School, 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania May 8 

Review Club of Oak Lane, 

Oak Lane, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. .May 15 
New Century Club, 

Wilmington, Delaware May 15 



1939 
1939 
1940 
1940 
1940 
1940 
1940 
1940 
1940 
1940 
1940 
1940 
1940 
1940 



(7) 

SPECIAL CONCERT COURSE 

(Programs in v.hich 

Curtis students collaborated) 



Princeton University, Proctor Hall, 

Princeton, Mew Jersey (November 5, 1959 

(February 11, 1940 

Hagerstown Symphony Orchestra, 

Hagerstown, Maryland December 7, 1959 

The Philomusian Club, 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania December 15, 1959 

Fifth Annual Concert Abington Senior 
High School Combined Glee 
Clubs, Abington, Pennsylvania March 15 , 1940 

Woman* s Medical College of Pennsylvania, 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania April 5 , 1940 

Spring Concert of the Second United 

Brethern Church, York, Pennsylvania. .April 18, 1940 

The Little Symphony Society of 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania April 13, 1940 

La Salle College Glee Club Annual Concert, 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania..... April 19, 1940 

Junger Maennerchor, 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania May 10, 1940 

Rpxborough Symphony Orchestra, 

Roxborough, Pe.insylvania May 27, 1940 

Musicale of the First Methodist Church, 

Haddon Heigh is, iiev* Jersey May 28, 1940 



(8) 

CONCERTS ELSEV-HERE 



The Philadelphia Forum, Philadelphia, 

The Curtis Symphony Orchestra March 7, 1940 

Bach Cantata Festival, 

St. James Protestant Episcopal 

Church, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ..(May 3, 1940 

(May 4, 1940 

Benefit for Commission for the Polish 
Relief, Academy of Music, 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania May 13, 1940 



RADIO PROGRAMMES 
October 16, 1939 to April 29, 1940 



Seventh Commencement and Conferring 

of Degrees May 10, 1940 






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