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Full text of "Recital programs 1940-41"

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THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

CAS1MIR HALL, SEVENTEENTH SEASON I94O-4I 



FACULTY RECITAL BY 
MR JORGE BOLET, PIANIST 

TUESDAY EVENING, OCTOBER 1$, 1940, AT 8:00 O'CLOCK 



PROGRAMME 

I 

Sonata in A major (Posthumous) Franz Schubert 

Allegro 

Andantino 

Scherzo. Allegro vivace 

Rondo. Allegretto 

II 

Seven etudes Frederic Chopin 

C major, Opus 10, No. 1 
E major, Opus 10, No. 3 
C minor, Opus 10, No. 12 
F major, Opus 25, No. 3 
C major, Opus 10, No. 7 
F minor (Posthumous) 
F major, Opus 10, No. 8 

Mr Bolet plays these etudes according to the manuscript version published 
by the Oxford University Press. 



Ill 

Intermezzi, Opus 117 Johannes Brahms 

E flat major, No. 1 
B flat minor, No. 2 
C sharp minor, No. 3 

Three preludes Claude Debussy 

La puerta del vino 

La terrasse des audiences du clair de lune 

General Lavine: eccentric 



IV 
Etudes symphoniques, Opus 13 Robert Schumann 

STEINWAY PIANO 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

CASIMIR HALL, SEVENTEENTH SEASON I94O-4I 

FACULTY RECITAL BY 
MR RUDOLF SERKIN, PIANIST 

TUESDAY EVENING, JANUARY 7, 1941, AT EIGHT O'CLOCK 



PROGRAMME 



Fantasia and Fugue in C, Kochel 394 

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart 



II 
Sonata in C, Opus 53 (W aid stein) . . Ludwig Van Beethoven 

Allegro con brio 

Introduzione. Adagio molto 

Rondo. Allegretto moderato. Prestissimo 



III 

Variations and Fugue on a theme by 

Johann Sebastian Bach, Opus 81 Max Reger 



STEINWAY PIANO 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

CASIMIR HALL, SEVENTEENTH SEASON I94.O-4I 



FACULTY RECITAL BY 
DR ALEXANDER McCURDY, ORGANIST 

TUESDAY EVENING, JANUARY 14, 1941, AT EIGHT O'CLOCK 



PROGRAMME 

WORKS OF JOHANN SEBASTIAN BACH 

Prelude and Fugue in A major 

Allegro, from First Trio Sonata 

Three Chorale Preludes: 
Lord, hear me call 
Christ lay in the arms of death 
In Thee is joy 

Prelude and Fugue in E minor 

Three Chorale Preludes: 

Hark, a voice saith, All are mortal 
Our Father who art in Heaven 
O God have mercy 

Vivace, from Second Trio Sonata 

Prelude and Fugue in A minor 



AEOLIAN-SKINNER ORGAN 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

CASIMIR HALL, SEVENTEENTH SEASON IQ4O-4.I 

FACULTY RECITAL BY 
MR EFREM ZIMBALIST, VIOLINIST 

Mr Vladimir Sokoloff at the Piano 
WEDNESDAY EVENING, JANUARY 15, 1941, AT EIGHT O'CLOCK 



PROGRAMME 

I 
Sonata in D major Vivaldi-Respighi 

Moderato (a fantasia) 
Allegro moderato 
Largo 
Vivace 



II 

Sonata in G minor (for violin alone) Eugene Ysaye 

Grave 

Fugato 

Allegretto poco scherzoso 



III 

Concerto in D minor Max Bruch 

Adagio ma non troppo 

Recitativo 

Finale 

IV 

Poeme Ernest Chausson 

Sarasateana (Suite of Spanish dances) Efrem Zimbalist 

Tango 
Polo 

Habanera 
Playera 

Malaguena 
Zapateado 



STEINWAY PIANO 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

CASIMIR HALL, SEVENTEENTH SEASON I94O-4I 

FACULTY RECITAL BY 
MR STEUART WILSON, TENOR 
assisted at the Piano by 
MR HARRY KAUFMAN 

WEDNESDAY EVENING, JANUARY 22, 1941, AT EIGHT O'CLOCK 



PROGRAMME 

I 

Song cycle for voice and piano: 

Dichterliebe Robert Schumann 

(poems by Heinrich Heine) 
II 

Two English ballads: 

Phillida flouts me (1600) arranged by Beryl Price 

Yarmouth Fair (1900) arranged by Peter Warlock 

Three songs of satire on: 

The Bachelor arranged by Zoltan Kodaly 

The Inconstant Man W. A. Aikin 

The Parasite on Society Modeste Moussorgsky 



III 

Song cycle for voice, string quartet, and piano: 

On Wenlock Edge Ralph Vaughan Williams 

(poems from A Shropshire Lad by A. E. Housman) 

Herbert Baumel ) T7 . ,. Joseph de Pasquale, Viola 

)■ Violins __. , „ 

Rafael Druian ) Arthur Winograd, Violoncello 

Ralph Berkowitz, Piano 



STEINWAY PIANO 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

CASIMIR HALL, SEVENTEENTH SEASON I94O-4I 

FACULTY RECITAL BY 
JEANNE BEHREND, PIANIST 

WEDNESDAY EVENING, MARCH 19, 1941, AT EIGHT O'CLOCK 

PROGRAMME 

I 
Sonata Alexander Reinagle 

(Composed in U. S. about 1800. Ms. at Library of Congress) 
Allegro 
Adagio 
Allegro 

Sonata, Opus 90 Ludwig van Beethoven 

Mit Lebhaftigkeit und durchaus mit Empfindung und Ausdruck 
Nicht zu geschwind und sehr singbar vorzutragen 

II 

Sonata Charles T. Griffes 

Feroce. Allegretto con moto. Molto tranquillo 
Allegro vivace 

III 

Two preludes (canons) Rosario Scalero 

Intermezzo, Opus 118, No. 3 

(in form of canon) Johannes Brahms 

La puerta del vino { 

Pastourelle Francis Poulenc 

Three preludes George Gershwin 



Claude Debussy 
Feux d artifice 



IV 

Scherzo Jeanne Behrend 

Nocturne, Opus 51, No. 3 Jan Sibelius 

Prelude, Opus 32, No. 8 Serge Rachmaninov 

Three Brazilian folk songs: Heitor Villa-Lobos 

A Condessa 

Passa, passa, gaviao 

Senhora Dona Sancha 

Miss Behrend uses the Baldwin Piano 
The Steinway is the Official Piano of The Curtis Institute 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

CASIMIR HALL, SEVENTEENTH SEASON IQ4O-4.I 

AN EVENING OF BACH 
presented by 

Lea Luboshutz Marian Head 

Edith Evans Braun William Kincaid 

Chamber Orchestra conducted by 
Curtis Bok Louis Vyner 

THURSDAY EVENING, MARCH 20, 1941, AT EIGHT O'CLOCK 

PROGRAMME 



Concerto in D minor for two violins 

Vivace 

Largo, ma non tanto 
Allegro 
Mme Luboshutz 

Mr Vyner 



Miss Head 



II 



Concerto in A minor for violin 

Allegro 
Andante 
Allegro assai 
Mme Luboshutz 



Judge Bok 



III 

Brandenburg concerto in D for violin, flute and piano 

Allegro 

Affettuoso 

Allegro 
Mme Luboshutz Mrs Braun 

Mr Kincaid Mr Vyner 



PERSONNEL OF THE CHAMBER ORCHESTRA 



First violins: 
Herbert Baumel 
Baruch Altman 
Sidney Sharp 
Alvin Herlich 
Veda Reynolds 
Tibor Zelig 



Second violins: 
Morris Shulik 
Charlotte Cohen 
Ernest Goldstein 
Alfred Breuning 



Violas: 

Joseph de Pasquale 
Abraham Cherry 
Francis Tursi 
Herbert Wortreich 



Violoncellos: 
Esther Gruhn 
Rohini Coomara 
Richard Kapuscinski 



Contrabasses: 
Edward Arian 
Harry Safstrom 



STEINWAY PIANO 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

CASIMIR HALL, SEVENTEENTH SEASON I94O-4I 



FACULTY RECITAL BY 
MR RUDOLF SERKIN, PIANIST 

SUNDAY AFTERNOON, MARCH 30, 1941, AT FIVE O'CLOCK 

PROGRAMME 



Variations and fugue on a theme of Handel, Opus 24 

Johannes Brahms 



II 

Two impromptus, Opus 90: \ 

No. 3 in G flat / Franz Schubert 

No. 2 in E flat ) 

Rondo capriccioso, Opus 14 Felix Mendelssohn 

III 

Two Czech dances: \ 

A minor / Bedrich Smetana 

F major " 

Barcarolle in F sharp, Opus 60 
Polonaise in A flat, Opus 5 3 



steinway piano 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

CASIMIR HALL, SEVENTEENTH SEASON I94O-4I 

FACULTY RECITAL BY 
MADAME ELISABETH SCHUMANN, SOPRANO 

MR LEO ROSENEK at the Piano 
THURSDAY EVENING, APRIL 17, 1941, AT EIGHT-THIRTY O'CLOCK 



PROGRAMME 

I 
Abendempfindung v 

_ __ .. , ) Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart 

Das Veilchen ( 

Der Zauberer / 

II 

Das Madchen \ 

Der Timeline und der Tod f _ _ 

. > Franz Schubert 

Geheimes I 

Das Lied im Grunen / 

III 

Abendlied { T 

> Ivan Langstroth 

wiegenlied ; 

Rain comes down 1 

Mariposa / Efrem Zimbalist 

One, two, three / 

IV 

Gluckes genu^g 

Ich schwebe 

\ Richard Strauss 

Morgen 

Mein Vater hat gesagt 



STEINWAY PIANO 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

CASIMIR HALL, SEVENTEENTH SEASON IQ4.O-4I 

GRADUATION RECITAL BY 
MR SIDNEY FOSTER 
Student of Mr Saperton 

TUESDAY EVENING, OCTOBER 22, 1940, AT 8:00 O'CLOCK 

PROGRAMME 

I 
Sonata in A flat, Opus 110 Ludwig van Beethoven 

Moderato cantabile molto espressivo 

Allegro molto 

Adagio, ma non troppo 

Fuga. Allegro, ma non troppo 

II 

Four ballades, Opus 10 Johannes Brahms 

No. 1 in D minor (Edward) 
No. 2 in D major 
No. 3 in B major 
No. 4 in B minor 

III 
Waltz in A flat, Opus 34, No. 1 ) 

Mazurka in B minor, Opus 33, No. 4 / Frederic Chopin 

Five etudes from Opus 10 / 

No. 4 in C sharp minor 
No. 9 in F minor 
No. J in G flat major 
No. 6 in E flat minor 
No. 8 in F major 

IV 

Prelude and fugue in D from The Well-Tempered Clavichord , 
Book II Johann Sebastian Bach 

Poissons d'or j 

La terrasse des audiences du clair de lune / Claude Debussy 

General La vine: eccentric / 

Naila waltz Delibes-Dohnanyi 

STEINWAY PIANO 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

CASIMIR HALL, SEVENTEENTH SEASON — IQ4.O-4I 

AN EVENING OF SHAKESPEARE IN OPERA 
BY STUDENTS OF DR WOHLMUTH 

Mr Joseph Levine at the Piano 

THURSDAY EVENING, NOVEMBER 21, 1940, AT EIGHT O'CLOCK 

♦ 

PROGRAMME 

I 
The Tempest Henry Purcell 

Ariel MURIEL ROBERTSON 

Fernando GORDON SAYRE 

Off-stage chorus of members of the Opera Class 

Conducted by Mr Levine 

Mr Leo Luskin at the Piano 

II 

Hamlet Ambroise Thomas 

Hamlet GORDON SAYRE 

King JAMES COSMOS 

III 

Romeo and Juliet Charles Gounod 

Romeo DONALD COKER 

Juliet MARGARET LILLY 

Tvbalt DONALD HULTGREN 

Capulet THEODORE UPPMAN 

Mercutio ROBERT GROOTERS 

Paris JAMES COSMOS 

IV 

Otello Giuseppe Verdi 

Desdemona WILLA STEWART 

Emilia MARGARETTE GODWIN 

V 

Falstaff Verdi 

Lady Alice ELEANOR MURTAUGH 

Falstaff THOMAS PERKINS 

VI 
The Taming of the Shrew Hermann Goetz 

Petruchio GORDON SAYRE 

Catharine DORIS LUFF 

VII 

Macbeth Verdi 

Lady Macbeth BARBARA TROXELL 

Physician ROBERT GROOTERS 

Court Lady MURIEL ROBERTSON 

VIII 

The Merry Wives of Windsor Carl Otto Nicolai 

Lady Anna MARIA MANSKI 

Fenton DONALD HULTGREN 

Dr Caius ROBERT GROOTERS 

Sparrow NORMAN ROSE 

All the scenes this evening are sung in English. The translations of Hamlet, 

The Taming of the Shrew and The Merry Wives of Windsor have been 

made by Mr Steuart Wilson. 

STEINWAY PIANO 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

CASIMIR HALL, SEVENTEENTH SEASON IQ4.O-4I 

RECITAL OF MUSIC FOR THE HARP 
BY STUDENTS OF DR SALZEDO 

WEDNESDAY EVENING, NOVEMBER 27, 1940, AT EIGHT O'CLOCK 



PROGRAMME 

I 

Impromptu-caprice Gabriel Pierne 

May Night Selim Palmgren 

Prelude in C, Opus 12, No. 7 Serge Prokofieff 

La Desirade 



} 



. (1927) Carlos Salzedo 

Chanson dans la nuit ; 

ANNA BUKAY 



II 

Variations on a theme in ancient style (1911) ...Carlos Salzedo 

Theme — Double — Bourree 
Staccati — ■ Butterfly — Flux and Chords 
Jumps — Trills — Scales and Arpeggios 
Barcarolle — Prelude — Fugue 
Cadenza — Conclusion 

RUTH DEAN 



III 

Sonata in C minor Giovanni Battista Pescetti 

Allegro vigoroso 1704-1766 

Andantino espressivo 

Presto 

Ballade (1910) Carlos Salzedo 

JANET PUTNAM 

LYON & HEALY HARPS 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

CASIMIR HALL, SEVENTEENTH SEASON I94.O-4I 



RECITAL OF MUSIC FOR THE HARP 
BY STUDENTS OF DR SALZEDO 

THURSDAY EVENING, JANUARY 30, 1941, AT EIGHT O'CLOCK 



PROGRAMME 



I 

The Harmonious Blacksmith Georg Friedrich Handel 

1685-1759 

Giga Arcangelo Corelli 

1653-1713 

Bourree Johann Sebastian Bach 

1685-1750 
CHERYLL YODER 

II 

Five poetical studies (1918) Carlos Salzedo 

Flight 
Mirage 
Idyllic poem 
Inquietude 
Communion 
ELEANOR MELLINGER 



Lamentation 
Quietude 
Iridescence 
Introspection ' 
Whirlwind 



III 



(1917) Carlos Salzedo 



REBA ROBINSON 



LYON & HEALY HARPS 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

CASIMIR HALL, SEVENTEENTH SEASON I94O-4I 



AN EVENING OF OPERA BY 
STUDENTS OF HANS WOHLMUTH 

THURSDAY EVENING, FEBRUARY 13, 1941, AT EIGHT O'CLOCK 

PROGRAMME 

I 
Act three of Armide Christophe Willibald Gluck. 

Armide Muriel Robertson 

Hate, a fury Barbara Troxell 

Phenice Helen Worrilow 

Sidonie Margarette Godwin 

Apparitions and furies 

Leo Luskin at the piano 

II 

Finale of The knight of the rose Richard Strauss 

Princess von Werdenberg Barbara Troxell 

Octavian, Count Rofrano Katharine Harris 

Faninal, a wealthy parvenu Robert Grooters 

Sophie, daughter of Faninal Willa Stewart 

Joseph Levine at the piano 
III 

The false Arlecchino C. Francesco Malipiero 

Donna Rosaura Doris Luff 

The false Arlecchino Thomas Perkins 

Don Trifonio Gordon Sayre 

Don Florindo Donald Coker 

Don Ottavio Theodore Uppman 

Don Paoluccio Norman Rose 

Colombina, maid to Rosaura Margaret Lilly 

Characters without speaking parts: 

Brighella Kathryne Kero 

The tailor Mary Davenport 

Assistant to the tailor Helen. Worrilow 

The dancing master Muriel Smith 

The hairdresser Margarette Godwin 

Guests 

Chamber orchestra conducted by Mr Levine 
STEINWAY PIANO 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

CASIMIR HALL, SEVENTEENTH SEASON I94.O-4I 

GRADUATION RECITAL BY 
PHYLLIS MOSS, PIANIST 
Student of Madame Vengerova 

FRIDAY EVENING, MARCH 21, 1941, AT EIGHT O'CLOCK 

PROGRAMME 



Prelude and fugue in E minor 

Sonata in C major, 

Opus 53 (W aid stein) 



Felix Mendelssohn 



Ludwig van Beethoven 



Allegro con brio 
Introduzione: Adagio molto 
Rondo: Allegretto moderato 



Polonaise in E flat minor 
Waltz in G flat major 
Nocturne in E major 
Scherzo in B minor 



II 



Frederic Chopin 



III 

Rhapsodie in B minor Johannes Brahms 

The little white donkey Jacques Ibert 

Prelude in E flat major Serge Rachmaninov 

Two etudes: Paganini-Liszt 

E major 
A minor 



STEINWAY PIANO 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

CASIMIR HALL, SEVENTEENTH SEASON 1940-41 

GRADUATION RECITAL BY 
ROBERT GROOTERS, BARITONE 

Graduate Student of Mr de Gogorza 
MR VLADIMIR SOKOLOFF AT THE PIANO 

MONDAY EVENING, MARCH 24, 1941, AT EIGHT O'CLOCK 

PROGRAMME 

I 

Thanks be to Thee Georg Friedrich Handel 

A shepherd in a shade _. _ 

_ . , e , ,. , r , f John Dowland 

Say love, 11 ever thou didst nnd ; 

II 



Anakreons Grab ^ 

Wenn du zu den Blumen gehst > Hugo Wolf 

Auf dem griinen Balcon 

Die Mainacht 

O liebliche Wangen 



/• Johannes Brahms 



III 

Les yeux , . 

, r . .,, . , f Jacques Aubert 

Vieille chanson espagnole ) 

Phidyle Henri Duparc 

Camaval Felix Fourdrain 

pnere 1 Gabriel Faure 

Fleur jetee J 



IV 

I hear an army Samuel Barber 

Night and the curtains drawn Giuseppe Ferrata 

When you go David Guion 

The captive Alexander Gretchaninov 



STEINWAY PIANO 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

CASIMIR HALL, SEVENTEENTH SEASON IO4O-4.I 

RECITAL OF VOCAL MUSIC 
BY STUDENTS OF MME SCHUMANN 

Miss Elizabeth Westmoreland at the Piano 
TUESDAY AFTERNOON, APRIL 1, 1941, AT FOUR O'CLOCK 

PROGRAMME 

I 

Se tu m'ami Giovanni Battista Pergolesi 

The lass with the delicate air Michael Arne 

KATHRYNE KERO 

II 

Chi vuol la zingarella Giovanni Paisiello 

Ich liebe dich Edvard Grieg 

MURIEL SMITH 

III 

Star vicino Salvator Rosa 

Non so piu, from 

The marriage of Figaro Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart 

MARGARETTE GODWIN 

IV 

Tu lo sai Giuseppe Torelli 

Depuis le jour, from Louise Gustave Charpentier 

KATHARINE HARRIS 

V 
O luce di quest' anima, from 

Linda di Chamounix Gaetano Donizetti 

Les oiseaux dans la charmille, from 

Tales of Hoffmann Jacques Offenbach 

MARGARET LILLY 

VI 

Die Forelle Franz Schubert 

Auf Fliigeln des Gesanges Felix Mendelssohn 

The wren Julius Benedict 

(With flute obbligato played by Eleanor Mitchel) 
HELEN WORRILOW 

VII 

Dich, theure Halle, from Tannhauser Richard Wagner 

Marienlied ) Joseph Marx 

Hat dich die Liebe beruhrt ) 

BARBARA TROXELL 

VIII 

Wieder mocht ich dir begegnen [ Franz Liszt 

Oh! quand je dors ) 

C'est des contrebandiers, from Carmen Georges Bizet 

WILLA STEWART 

Miss Mitchel is a student of Mr Kincaid 

Miss Worrilow and Miss Stewart are candidates 

for the Diploma, Commencement, 1941. 

STEINWAY PIANO 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

CASIMIR HALL, SEVENTEENTH SEASON IO4O-4I 

RECITAL OF MUSIC FOR THE PIANO 
BY STUDENTS OF MR SAPERTON 

WEDNESDAY EVENING, APRIL 2, 1941, AT EIGHT-THIRTY O'CLOCK 

PROGRAMME 

I 
First movement of Sonata in C minor, 

Opus 10, No. 1 Ludwig van Beethoven 

Allegro molto e con brio 

Waltz in A flat major, Opus 64, No. 3 Frederic Chopin 

RUDOLF FAVALORO 



Intermezzo in B flat major, 
Opus 76, No. 4 



II 

r, - ■ ) 

Three capnccios: ^ Johannes Brahms 

F sharp minor, Opus 76, No. 

B minor, Opus 76, No. 2 

C sharp minor, Opus 76, No. 5 

FLORENCE CAPLAN 



: 



in 

Choral prelude, Ich ruf zu dir, Herr Bach-Busoni 

Two pieces from Triakontameron: Leopold Godowsky 

Sylvan Tyrol 

Music-box 

Scherzo in C sharp minor, Opus 39 Chopin 

EDNA LARSON 

IV 

Two three part inventions: Johann Sebastian Bach 

B flat major 

G minor 
First movement of Sonata in B flat major, Opus 22 Beethoven 

Allegro con brio 

Two mazurkas: Chopin 

A flat major, Opus 24, No. 3 
B flat minor, Opus 24, No. 4 

SEYMOUR LIPKIN 

V 

La cathedrale engloutie 

La fille aux cheveux de lin Claude Debussy 

La serenade interrompue 

La danse de Puck 

Alborada del gracioso Maurice Ravel 

ROBERT CORNMAN 

Miss Caplan, Miss Larson and Mr Cornman are 
candidates for the Diploma, Commencement, 1941. 

STEINWAY PIANO 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

CASIMIR HALL, SEVENTEENTH SEASON I94O-4I 

RECITAL OF MUSIC FOR THE PIANO 
BY STUDENTS OF MR KAUFMAN 

THURSDAY EVENING, APRIL 3, 1941, AT EIGHT-THIRTY O'CLOCK 

PROGRAMME 

I 

Concerto in the Italian style Johann Sebastian Bach 

Allegro moderato 

Andante 

Presto 

VIRGINIA PARKER 

II 

Reflets dans l'eau Claude Debussy 

Nocturne in F minor, Opus 5 5, No. 1 ) 

Etude in F minor, Opus 25, No. 2 > Frederic Chopin 

Scherzo in B minor, Opus 20 ) 

LEO LUSKIN 

III 

Sonata quasi una fantasia in E flat major, 

Opus 27, No. 1 Ludwig van Beethoven 

Andante 

Allegro molto e vivace 
Adagio con espressione 
Allegro vivace 

Sonatine in F sharp minor Maurice Ravel 

Mod ere 

Mouvement de menuet 

Anime 

ELEANOR HARSHMAN 

IV 

Variations on the name, Abegg, Opus 1 Robert Schumann 

Fantaisie in F minor, Opus 49 Chopin 

EUGENE BOSSART 

V 

Sonata in F minor, Opus 5 Johannes Brahms 

Allegro maestoso 

Andante espressivo 

Der Abend dammert, das Mondlicht scheint, 

Da sind zu/ei Hersen in Liebe vereint 

Und halten sich selig umjangen. (Sternau) 

Scherzo: Allegro energico 

Intermezzo: Andante molto (Riickblick) 

Finale: Allegro moderato ma rubato 

WALTER HAUTZIG 

STEINWAY PIANO 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

CASIMIR HALL, SEVENTEENTH SEASON I94O-4I 

RECITAL OF ORGAN MUSIC 
BY STUDENTS OF DR MC CURDY 

MONDAY EVENING, APRIL 7, 1941, AT EIGHT O'CLOCK 

PROGRAMME 



Toccata, Thou art Peter and the gates of 

Hell will not prevail against thee Henri Mulet 

Scherzo, from Symphony No. 2 Louis Vierne 

Chorale prelude, Nun freut euch Johann Sebastian Bach 

Vivace, from Second Trio Sonata Bach 

Cortege et litanie, Opus 19, No. 2 Marcel Dupre 

WILLIAM WORMAN 



II 



Prelude and fugue in D major Bach 

Pastorale Jean Roger-Ducasse 

Toccata, from Suite, Opus 5 Maurice Durufle 

CLARENCE SNYDER 



AEOLIAN -SKINNER ORGAN 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

CASIMIR HALL, SEVENTEENTH SEASON I94.O-4I 

RECITAL OF MUSIC FOR THE VIOLIN 
BY STUDENTS OF MR HILSBERG 

Vladimir Sokoloff at the Piano 
WEDNESDAY EVENING, APRIL 9, 1941, AT EIGHT-THIRTY O'CLOCK 

PROGRAMME 

I 

Poeme, Opus 25 Ernest Chausson 

JACOB KRACHMALNICK 

II 

Concerto in A minor, Opus 82 Alexander Glazounov 

PAUL SHURE 



III 

Concerto in D major, Opus 3 5 Peter Ilich Tschaikovsky 

Allegro moderato 
Canzonetta. Andante 
Finale. Allegro vivacissimo 

JACOB KRACHMALNICK 



IV 

Concerto No. 1 in D major, Opus 6 Niccolo Paganini 

BARUCH ALTMAN 

STEINWAY PIANO 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

CASIMIR HALL, SEVENTEENTH SEASON IQ4.O-4I 

RECITAL OF MUSIC FOR WOODWIND ENSEMBLE 
CONDUCTED BY MR TABUTEAU 

THURSDAY EVENING, APRIL 10, 1941, AT EIGHT-THIRTY O'CLOCK 

PROGRAMME 

I 

Serenade in E flat (K. 375) Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart 

Allegro maestoso Menuetto 

Menuetto Allegro 



Adagi 

Ralph Gomberg 1 James Chambers \ 

MacLean Snyder jOboes Joseph Eger J 

Nathan Brus 
James Rettew 



Nathan Brusilow 1 Sanford Sharoff 1 

^Clarinets Walter Maciejewicz )' 



II 

Trio Francis Poulenc 

Presto Andante Rondo 

Ralph Gomberg, Oboe Sanford Sharoff, Bassoon Waldemar Dabrowski, Piano 

III 

Quintet in E flat, Opus 71 Beethoven-Stark 

Adagio. Allegro Menuetto. Quasi allegretto 

Adagio Rondo. Allegro 

Eleanor Mitchel, Flute Sanford Sharoff, Bassoon 

Ralph Gomberg, Oboe James Chambers, Horn 

Mitchell Lurie, Clarinet 

IV 
Serenade in E flat, Opus 7 Richard Strauss 

John Krell 1 ; James Chambers \ 

Eleanor Mitchel J f '"'« Joseph Eger I 

Ralph Gomberg \ Marcus Fischer (Horns 

MacLean Snyder J Oboes Boone Shaw 



Nathan Brusilow \ Sanford Sharoff 

James Rettlu / Clarinets Walter Maciejewicz 

John Shamlian 



Pastorale variee dans le style ancien, Opus 30 Gabriel Pierne 

John Krell, Flute Marcus Fischer, Horn 

Ralph Gomberg, Oboe Sanford Sharoff 1 

Nathan Brusilow, Clarinet Walter Maciejewicz j Bassoons 
James Tamburini, Trumpet 

VI 
Petenera (Spanish Ballet Scene) William Strasser 

Allegro vivace Andante molto Allegro vivace 



Eleanor Mitchel ) James Chambers "J 

John Krell > Flutes Joseph Eger l 

Anton Winkler ) Marcus Fischer f norns 

Ralph Gomberg \ , Boone Shaw / 

MacLean Snyder j Oboes Sanford Sharoff ) 

Charles Gilbert, English Horn Walter Maciejewicz > Bassoor, 

Nathan Brusilow ) John Shamlian J 

James Rettew > Clarinets Jack Behrend, Tambourin 

Mitchell Lurie ) Joseph Friedman, Castagnettes 

STEINWAY piano 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

CASIMIR HALL, SEVENTEENTH SEASON IQ4O-4.I 

CHAMBER MUSIC RECITAL BY 
STUDENTS OF MR KAUFMAN 

FRIDAY EVENING, APRIL 18, 1941, AT EIGHT-THIRTY O'CLOCK 

PROGRAMME 



Three movements from Quintet in A major, 

Opus 114 (Forelle) Franz Schubert 

Allegro vivace 

Andantino mit Variationen 

Allegro giusto 

Veda Reynolds, Violin Robert Ripley, Violoncello 

Warren Signor, Viola Harry Safstrom, Contrabass 

Phyllis Moss, Piano 



II 

First movement of Trio in B, Opus 8 Johannes Brahms 

Allegro con moto 

Sol Ovcharov, Violin 
Esther Gruhn, Violoncello 
Eugene Bossart, Piano 



III 

Quartet No. 2 in G minor, Opus 45 Gabriel Faure 

Allegro molto moderato 
Allegro molto 
Adagio non troppo 
Allegro molto 

Morris Shulik, Violin Arthur Winograd, Violoncello 

Joseph de Pasquale, Viola Waldemar Dabrowski, Piano 

IV 

Quintet No. 2 in E flat minor, 

Opus 26 Ernst von Dohnanyi 

Allegro non troppo 
Intermezzo: Allegretto 
Moderato 



/ v . ,. Joseph de Pasquale, Viola 

^ Violins WlNIFRED Schaefer, V ioloncello 



Rafael Druian 
Marguerite Kuehne I 

Barbara Jane Elliott, Piano 



steinway piano 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

CASIMIR HALL, SEVENTEENTH SEASON IQ4O-4.I 



RECITAL OF COMPOSITIONS 

by 

STUDENTS OF MR SCALERO 



MONDAY EVENING, APRIL 21, 1941, AT 8:30 O'CLOCK 



STEINWAY PIANO 
AEOLIAN-SKINNER ORGAN 



PROGRAMME 



Sonata in G minor for violoncello and piano 

Moderate*. Allegro 
Andante appassionata 
Allegro con moto 



LELA MAKI 



Orlando Cole, Violoncello 
Ralph Berrowitz, Piano 



II 



Compositions for voices: 
Two rounds: 



RUDOLPH SCHIRMER 



1. 

Heigh-ho! sing, heigh-ho! 
Unto the green holly. 
Most friendship is feigning, 
Most loving mere folly. 
Then heigh-ho! the holly! 
This life is most jolly. 



— William Shakespeare 



I fear thy kisses, gentle maiden, 
Thou needest not fear mine. 



— Percy B. Shelley 



Canon: 



CURTIN WINSOR 



(An old time Western gambler and his partner, Bill 
Nye, attempt to fleece a Chinaman, Ah Sin, at a 
game of cards — euchre — with unexpected results.) 

Which we had a small game 

And Ah Sin had a hand: 

It was euchre, the same 

He did not understand, 

But he smiled as he sat by the table 

With a smile that was childlike and bland. 

But the hands that were played 

By that heathen Chinee, 

And the points that he made 

Were quite frightful to see; 

Till at last he put down a right bower, 

Which the same Nye had dealt unto me. 



Then I looked up at Nye, 

And he gazed upon me, 

And he rose with a sigh, 

And said: "Can this be? 

We are ruined by Chinese cheap labor!" 

And he went for that heathen Chinee. 

— Bret Harte 

Round: CURTIN WINSOR 

DRUM TAPS 

Beat! beat! drum! 

Blow! bugles! blow! 

Over the traffic of cities, 

Over the rumble of drums in the streets; 

Through the windows, through the doors, 

Burst like a ruthless force into the school, 

Into the church, into the school. 

Beat! beat! drums! 

Blow! bugles! blow! 

— Walt Whitman 

Two rounds: ROBERT KELLY 



ELISHA JOE 

Elisha Joe, the parson's right hand man, I know, 
Elisha Joe, whose life was ebbing mighty low, 
Was sent to dig a grave a little, little bigger. 
No task too hard for this old kindly, cheerful nigger. 
Elisha Joe, the parson knew would be no mo'e, 
And now, I know, who dug the grave for Elisha Joe. 

— Robert Kelly 

2. 

TO CHERRY BLOSSOMS 

Ye may simper, blush and smile, 

And perfume the air awhile, 

But, sweet things, ye must be gone; 

Fruit ye know is coming on. 

Then, ah! then, where is your grace, 

Whenas cherries come in place? 

— Robert Herrick 

Barbara Troxell Muriel Robertson 

Helen Worrilow Margarette Godwin 

Katharine Harris Martha Flynn 

Willa Stewart Gordon Sayre 

Eleanor Murtaugh Theodore Uppman 

Doris Luff Thomas Perkins 

Conducted by Samuel Barber 



in 



Chorale preludes for organ: 

Nun lasset uns den Lieb begrab'n ALFRED MANN 

O Herzensangst, O Bangigkeit RUDOLPH SCHIRMER 

William Worman, Organ 

Freu' dich sehr, O mcine Seek / __-..- „.^.,^^» 

tv. ^ u w i u- a C FRANCESCO CARUSO 

Du, O schones weltgebaude ) 

Clarence Snyder, Organ 



IV 



Three songs: CONSTANT VAUCLAIN 

Proud Maisie — Sir Walter Scott 

The Miller's Daughter — Alfred Lord Tennyson 

Song — Richard Le Gallienne 

Barbara Troxell, Soprano 
Eugene Bossart, Piano 



Eight variations for strings and piano on a theme 
by Antonio Caldara (1670-1736) 

EDITH EVANS BRAUN 

THE CURTIS STRING QUARTET 

Jascha Brodsky i Max Aronoff, Viola 

Charles Jaffe \ Viol " ts Orlando Cole, Violoncello 

The Composer at the piano 



Messrs Kelly, Winsor, Schirmer, Mann and 
Caruso are in the second year of their 
composition course. Miss Maki, Mrs Braun 
and Mr Vauclain are graduates of Mr Scalero. 






THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

CASIMIR HALL, SEVENTEENTH SEASON IQ4.O-4I 

RECITAL OF MUSIC FOR THE VIOLIN 

BY STUDENTS OF MADAME LUBOSHUTZ 

Ralph Berkowitz at the Piano 

TUESDAY EVENING, APRIL 22, 1941, AT EIGHT-THIRTY O'CLOCK 

PROGRAMME 

I 

Sonata in A major Antonio Vivaldi 

Ballade in D minor for violin alone Eugene Ysaye 

HERBERT BAUMEL 

II 
Havanaise, Opus 83 Camille Saint-Saens 

SIDNEY SHARP 

III 

La campanella Niccolo Paganini 

Etude in thirds Scriabin-Szigeti 

TIBOR ZELIG 

IV 

Finale of Fantasy, Opus 46 (Scotch) Max Bruch 

Allegro guerriero 

NATHAN GOLDSTEIN 

V 

Sonata in B flat for violin and viola unaccompanied (K. 424) 

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart 

Adagio 

Allegro 

Andante cantabile 

Tema con variazion: Andante grazioso 

MORRIS SHULIK and JOSEPH DE PASQUALE 

VI 

Sonata No. 3 in D minor, Opus 108 Johannes Brahms 

Allegro 

Adagio 

Un poco presto e con sentimento 

Presto agitato 

HERBERT BAUMEL 
Mr de Pasquale is a student of Mr Aronoff in Viola 

STEINWAY PIANO 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

CASIMIR HALL, SEVENTEENTH SEASON I94O-4I 

RECITAL OF MUSIC FOR VOICE 

BY STUDENTS OF MADAME GREGORY 

Eugene Bossart at the piano 

WEDNESDAY EVENING, APRIL 23, 1941, AT EIGHT-THIRTY O'CLOCK 

PROGRAMME 



I 

Care selve Georg Friedrich Handel 

Gebet 1 Hugo Wolf 

Fussreise j 

O Lisbona, from Don Sebastiano Gaetano Donizetti 

Gordon Sayre, Baritone 



II 

Poesia persiane, No. 3 Francesco Santoliquido 

In quelle trine morbide, from Manon Lescaut... Giacomo Puccini 
Eleanor Murtaugh, Soprano 

III 

Recitatif et air, from Uenfant prodigne) Claude Debussy 
Chevaux de bois j 

At the well Richard Hageman 

Doris Luff, Soprano 

IV 

Vaghissima sembianza) Stefano Donaudy 

Spirate, pur, spirate j 

Che gelida manina, from La Boheme Puccini 

Donald Coker, Tenor 

V 

Der Tod das ist die kuhle Nacht Johannes Brahms 

Wohin? Franz Schubert 

Ozean! Du Ungeheuer!, from Oberon... Carl Maria von Weber 
Muriel Robertson, Soprano 

VI 

The tryst Jan Sibelius 

Visions SVANTE SjOBERG 

Cielo e mar!, from La Gioconda Amilcare Ponchielli 

Donald Hultgren, Tenor 

Mr Bossart is a student of Mr Kaufman in Accompanying. 
STEINWAY PIANO 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

CASIMIR HALL, SEVENTEENTH SEASON I94O-4I 



RECITAL OF CHAMBER MUSIC 
BY STUDENTS OF DR LOUIS BAILLY 

THURSDAY AFTERNOON, APRIL 24, 1941, AT FIVE O'CLOCK 



Sol Ovcharov ) Albert Falkove, Viola 

Morris Shulik j Arthur Winograd, Violoncello 



PROGRAMME 



Quartet in E flat major, Opus 76, No. 6 Joseph Haydn 

Allegretto 
Fantasia. Adagio 
Menuetto. Presto 
Finale. Allegro spirituoso 



II 

Quartet in A minor, Opus 132 Ludwig van Beethoven 

Assai sostenuto. Allegro 

Allegro ma non tanto 

Molto adagio 

(Canzona di ringraziamento, in modo 
lidico, offerta alia divinita da un guarito.) 

Alia marcia, assai vivace. Allegro appassionato 



III 

Quartet in B flat major, Opus 67 Johannes Brahms 

Vivace 

Andante « 

Agitato 

Poco allegretto con variazioni 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

CASIMIR HALL, SEVENTEENTH SEASON I94O-4I 

THE BEGGAR'S OPERA 

by 
JOHN GAY and JOHANN PEPUSCH 

performed by the Opera Class 
of Dr Hans Wohlmuth. 

Conducted by Joseph Levine 
THURSDAY EVENING, APRIL 24, 1941, AT EIGHT-THIRTY O'CLOCK 

Dramatis Personae 



Mr Peachum Thomas Perkins 

Lockit Robert Grooters 

Macheath Gordon Say re 

Filch Norman Rose 

Jemmy Twicher ...Robert Grooters 
Crookfinger'd Jack... James Cosmos 
Robin of Bagshot... Thomas Perkins 
Mat of the Mint... Theodore Uppman 

Beggar Muriel Smith 

Player Kathryne Kero 



Mrs Peachum Muriel Robertson 

Polly Peachum Margaret Lilly 

Lucy Lockit Doris Luff 

Diana Trapes Mary Davenport 

Women of the town: 

Mrs Coaxer Barbara Troxell 

Dolly Trull Kathryne Kero 

Mrs Vixen Willa Stewart 

Betty Doxy Eleanor Murtaugh 

Jenny Diver Helen Worrilow 

Mrs Slammerkin Martha Flynn 

Suky Tawdry Katharine Harris 
Molly Brazen. .Margarette Godwin 



Act I — Peachum's house 

Act II — A tavern near Newgate 
Newgate 

Act III — Newgate 

A gaming house 

Newgate 

The condemn'd hold 



Personnel of the Orchestra 



Jacob Krachmalnick 
Charlotte Cohen 
Warren Signor, Viola 
Robert Ripley, Violoncello 



lv* 



Violins 



Roger Scott, Contrabass 
Eleanor Mitchel, Flute 
MacLean Snyder, Oboe 
Joseph Levine, Cembalo 



COSTUMES BY VAN HORN AND SON 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

CASIMIR HALL, SEVENTEENTH SEASON I94O-4I 

GRADUATION RECITAL BY 

ALBERT FALKOVE AND PHILIP GOLDBERG 

Students of Dr Louis Bailly 

GENIA ROBINOR AT THE PIANO 
FRIDAY EVENING, APRIL 2 5, 1941, AT EIGHT-THIRTY O'CLOCK 

PROGRAMME OF MUSIC FOR VIOLA AND PIANO 
BY CONTEMPORARY COMPOSERS 



Sonata No. 4, Opus 11 (played without pause) 

Paul Hindemith 

Fantasie 

Thema mit Variationen 

Finale (mit Variationen) 

Albert Falkove 
II 

Sonata Rebecca Clarke 

"Poete, prends ton luth; le vin de la jeunesse 

Fermente cette nuit dans les veines de Dieu." 

Alfred de Musset — La nuit de Mai 

Impetuoso 

Vivace 

Adagio. Allegro 

Philip Goldberg 

III 

Suite Ernest Bloch 

Lento. Allegro (In the jungle) 
Allegro ironico (Grimaces) 
Lento (Night in Java) 
Molto vivo (In the sun country) 

Albert Falkove 
STEINWAY PIANO 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

CASIMIR HALL, SEVENTEENTH SEASON I94O-4I 

RECITAL OF MUSIC FOR CHAMBER ORCHESTRA 
CONDUCTED BY DR FRITZ REINER 

MONDAY AFTERNOON, APRIL 28, 1941, AT FIVE O'CLOCK 

PROGRAMME 
I 

Symphony in A, Kochel 201 Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart 

Allegro moderato 

Andante 

Menuetto 

Allegro con spirito 

II 

Siegfried. Idyll Richard Wagner 



.Alfredo Casella 



III 
Pupazzetti (Five pieces for marionettes) 

Marcetta 

Berceuse 

Serenata 

Notturnino 

Polka 

IV 

The bourgeois gentleman (after Moliere) Richard Strauss 

1. Overture to Act I (Jourdain, the bourgeois) 

2. Minuet 

3. The fencing master 

4. Entrance and dance of the tailors 

8. Introduction to Act II (Intermezzo) 

9. The dinner. Dinner music and dance of the scullery boys 



PERSONNEL OF THE ORCHESTRA 



First violins : 

George Zazofsky 
Herbert Baumel 
Jacob Krachmalnick 
Sidney Sharp 
Sol Ovcharov 
Eugene Campione 

Second violins : 
Baruch Altman 
Morris Shulik 
Tibor Zelig 
Charlotte Cohen 
Ernest Goldstein 
Elliott Fisher 

Violas : 

Albert Falkove 
Philip Goldberg 
Joseph de Pasquale 
Francis Tursi 



Violoncellos : 

Arthur Winograd 
Esther Gruhn 
Winifred Schaefer 
Rohini Coomara 

Contrabasses : 
Roger Scott 
Jane Tyre 

Flutes : 

Eleanor Mitchel 
John Krell 

Oboes : 

Ralph Gomberg 
MacLean Snyder 

Clarinets : 

Nathan Brusilow 
James Rette\t 
Mitchell Lurie 



Bassoons : 
Sanford Sharoff 
Walter Maciejewicz 

Horns : 
James Chambers 
Joseph Eger 

Trumpet : 

Leo Gomberg 
Trombone : 

Richard Shill 
Tympani : 

Irvin Duer 
Battery : 

Edgar Curtis 

Walter Hendl 

Piano .' 

Leonard Bernstein 
Walter Hendl 



STEINWAY PIANO 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

CASIMIR HALL, SEVENTEENTH SEASON I 94O-A I 

RECITAL OF MUSIC FOR THE PIANO 
BY STUDENTS OF MADAME VENGEROVA 

WEDNESDAY EVENING, APRIL 30, 1941, AT EIGHT-THIRTY O'CLOCK 

PROGRAMME 

I 
Nocturne in C sharp minor, } 

Opus 27, No. 1 I , , 

Etude in F major, Opus 10, No. 8 i Fran ?ois Frederic Chopin 
Scherzo in B minor, Opus 20 / 

JACOB LATEINER 

II 

Impromptu in B flat major, Opus 142 Franz Schubert 

Etude in D flat major { Franz Liszt 

Waldesrauschen ) 

BARBARA JANE ELLIOTT 

III 

Two movements 

from the Concerto in E minor, Opus 11 Chopin 

Allegro maestoso 
Rondo: Vivace 

EILEEN FLISSLER 
Leonard Bernstein at the second piano 

IV 

Two pieces from Le tombeau de Couperin: Maurice Ravel 

Prelude 

Rigaudon 
Fifth sonata (in one movement) Alexander Scriabin 

Timid, trembling whisperings of life — 
Mysterious forces deeply, darkly drowned 
In creative will, — I summon you to being; 
I bring you strength; I make you manifest! 
From The Poem of Ecstasy 
LEONARD BERNSTEIN 

V 

Passacaglia Lukas Foss 

Apres une lecture du Dante. Fantasia quasi sonata Liszt 

LUKAS FOSS 

VI 

Two movements 

from the Concerto in C major, Opus 26... Serge Prokofd2FF 

Andantino (Theme and variations) 
Andante. Allegro 

ANNETTE ELKANOVA 
Leonard Bernstein at the second piano 

STEINWAY PIANOS 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

CASIMIR HALL, SEVENTEENTH SEASON IO4O-4.I 

RECITAL OF MUSIC FOR THE PIANO 
BY STUDENTS OF MR SERKIN 

THURSDAY AFTERNOON, MAY 1, 1941, AT FIVE O'CLOCK 

PROGRAMME 

I 

Prelude and fugue in D minor, from The Well-Tempered 

Clavichord, Book II Johann Sebastian Bach 

SHERMAN FRANK 

II 

Sonata in F, Kochel 332 Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart 

Allegro 
Adagio 
Allegro assai 

VIVIENNE KESSISSOGLU 

III 

Sonata in F sharp Ludwig van Beethoven 

Adagio cantabile. Allegro, ma non troppo 
Allegro assai 

EUGENE ISTOMIN 

IV 

Ballade in F minor Francois Frederic Chopin 

BYRON HARDIN 

V 
Three intermezzi from Opus 119: Johannes Brahms 

No. 1 in B minor 
No. 2 in E minor 
No. 3 in C major 

Scherzo in B minor Chopin 

MYRA GHITIS 

VI 

Phantasie in F minor Chopin 

Etude in A minor Paganini-Liszt 

RUTH HILDE SOMER 

STEINWAY PIANO 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

CASIMIR HALL, SEVENTEENTH SEASON I940-4I 



HISTORICAL SERIES 

of 
SOLO AND CHAMBER MUSIC 

presented by Ralph Berkowitz 



THIRD SEASON— FIRST CONCERT 



PURCELL-BACH 



♦ 



WEDNESDAY EVENING, NOVEMBER 6, 1940 
AT EIGHT O'CLOCK 



AEOLIAN-SKINNER ORGAN 
STEINWAY PIANO 



Programme 



HENRY PURCELL — 1 6 5 8 - 1 69 5 

1. Fantasia in five parts, upon one note 1 StH orchestra 

rantasia in four parts, No. 3 1 

Conducted by Joseph Levine 

2. When Myra sings t 

Let the fifes and the clarions > Vocal duets 

I spy Celia ) 

Barbara Troxell, Soprano Donald Coker, Tenor 

Thomas Perkins, Baritone James Cosmos, Bass 

Leo Luskin, Piano 

3. He that drinks is immortal ) 

Since time so kind to us does prove / Rounds for voices 

I gave her cakes j 

Steuart Wilson, Tenor Theodore Uppman, Baritone 

Norman Rose, Tenor Thomas Perkins, Baritone 

James Cosmos, Bass 

4. The Bell Anthem: Rejoice in the Lord alway 

Voices, strings and organ 

Barbara Troxell, Soprano Steuart Wilson, Tenor 

Margaret Lilly, Soprano Donald Coker, Tenor 

Mary Davenport, Contralto Thomas Perkins, Baritone 

Ann Nisbet, Contralto James Cosmos, Bass 

William Worman, Organ 

Conducted by Joseph Levine 



JOHANN SEBASTIAN BACH — 1685-1750 

1. Sonata in G Flute, violin and piano 

Largo — Vivace — Adagio — Presto 

Eleanoi Mitchel, Flute Paul Shure, Violin 

Leo Luskin, Piano 

2. Chorale prelude: Vor deinen Thron tret' ich hiemit \ Or a 
Fugue in E flat (St Anne) f ° 

William Worman, Organ 

3. Concerto in D minor Piano and string orchestra 

Allegro risoluto — Adagio — Allegro moderato 
Played and conducted by Joseph Levine 



MEMBERS OF THE STRING ORCHESTRA 

First Violins: Second Violins: Violas: Violoncellos: 

PAUL SHURE BARUCH ALTMAN PHILIP GOLDBERG ESTHER GRUHN 

VEDA REYNOLDS ELLIOTT FISHER JOSEPH DE PASQUALE ROBERT RIPLEY 

JACOB KRACHMALNICK CHARLOTTE COHEN WARREN SIGNOR RICHARD KAPUSCINSKI 

SIDNEY SHARP EUGENE CAMPIONE FRANCIS TURSI 

sol ovcharov Contrabass: 

MORRIS SHULIK ROGER SCOTT 






Programme Notes 

by Ralph Berkowitz 
HENRY PURCELL 

The Restoration is the second period in England when music reached 
heights which nearly three centuries of later English composition have not 
succeeded in equalling. 

As a reaction against Puritanism which had ruled England for two bit- 
ter decades, the Restoration of the Monarchy ushered in an era of vigorous 
political and artistic activity. But so effective had the Puritans been in their 
hostility to music, with their banishment of it in churches and their destruc- 
tion of organs and other musical instruments, that by 1660 when new forces 
arose in political life, the continuity of English music had already been broken. 

With the renewal of the art, the old polyphonic style which had flowered 
during Elizabeth's reign was now superseded by a type of music in which 
the solo was of prime importance. Charles II, the Merry Monarch, who had 
been attracted by the new music of France, indoctrinated his Royal Band 
and the choir of the Chapel Royal with methods more 'tuneful and sprightly' 
than had existed earlier in the century. 

Purcell, as a student in the Chapel, came under the influence of Pelham 
Humphrey (1647-74), a musician who had gone to France with the express 
purpose of bringing back the newest developments of Lully's French ballet 
and opera. 

The freshness of this style immediately achieved an enormous success 
and the impulse it gave to men like Matthew Locke (1630-77), John Blow 
(1648-1708) and Purcell, allowed England, at about the time of Bach's birth, 
to stand in the forefront of European music. 

The anthem and duets on tonight's program, like the Sonatas for two 
violins and piano heard on former programs of the Historical Series, are 
examples of Purcell's use of what was for him the newest contemporary 
musical thought. 

Polyphonic music, however, had not completely lost its attraction for 
musicians, and part-songs, as Pepys reports, continued as a pleasant feature 
of social life. Therefore, it is not surprising that Purcell, even though his 
music 'in the new style' was achieving much success, should turn, as in the 
Fantasias on this program, to the characteristics of the Elizabethan poly- 
phonists. Here, in purely instrumental music of startling originality, he 
reverted to a type of composition which in his opinion must have appeared 
of permanent value. But modern as this music sounds to us, listeners in Pur- 
cell's day thought it old-fashioned. They demanded tunes unhindered by old 
contrapuntal devices and would have nothing but the latest works patterned 
on Italian and French models. 

Roger North, in his Memoires of Music, speaks sadly of the older works 
which were then being ignored: "Of these Fancies whole volumes are left, 
scarce ever to be made use of but either in the air for kites or in the fire 
for singeing pullets." 

The Fantasia as an art-form is well described in Thomas Morley's, A 
Vlaine and Easie introduction to Practicall Musicke (1597): "The most 
principal and chiefest kind of music which is made without a ditty is the 
fantasie, that is when a musician taketh a point at his pleasure, and wresteth 
and turneth it as he list, making either much or little of it according as 
shall seem best in his own conceit." 

With Purcell's death at the age of thirty-seven the outburst of musical 
accomplishment faded rapidly and soon English music was to pass, as one 
historian has remarked, 'under the splendid but alien domination' of Handel. 

With all musical geniuses who have died at an early age, such as Mozart, 
Schubert and Purcell, it is impossible to imagine what their music, and what 
the history of music would have been, had they lived longer. George Dyson, 
in a recent work, is probably near the truth in his belief that "If Purcell 
had had the opportunities of some of his contemporaries in Italy and France, 
every opera-house in Europe would have clamored for his music. He might 
in due time have been imported back into England, and given the status 
rarely bestowed on an Englishman-born." 



JOHANN SEBASTIAN BACH 

Bach composed two Sonatas for flute, violin and continue The one in 
C minor is part of Dai Musikalisches Opfer and was heard in last season's 
performance of that work. The other, in G major, which is heard on to- 
night's program dates from Bach's Cothen period (1717-23) when the greater 
part of his sixty-seven chamber-music compositions were written. Apart from 
the Sonata's inherent beauty it is interesting to observe that the bass through- 
out the work is identical with that of a Sonata, also in G major, for violin 
and continue 

The Sonata's construction follows the usual plan of alternating slow 
and quick movements which is characteristic of the so-called Sonata da 
chiesa. This and the Sonata da camera (all the Bach Suites and many of the 
Partitas belong in this category) are forerunners of the classical sonata. 

The chorale-prelude Vor deinen Thron tret' ich hiemit is reputedly 
Bach's last work. It was dictated by him to his son-in-law Altnikol, and 
the, scene of this occasion has been left us in the touchingly simple words 
of Anna Magdalena Bach. 

"Our dear son-in-law Christoph [Altnikol] told me later that Sebas- 
tian, after he had for perhaps an hour lain so still that he seemed 
asleep, suddenly lifted himself up in bed and said: 'Christoph, go and 
fetch paper. I hear music in my head; pray write it down for me.' 
Quickly Christoph fetched paper, a goosequill, and an inkwell, and 
wrote according to Sebastian's dictation. When he had finished, Sebas- 
tian lay down again, with a sigh, and whispered, so softly that Chris- 
toph could only just make out what he was saying: 'That is the last 
music I shall make in this world.'" 

Bach's ability to instill the utmost expressiveness into any of the con- 
ventional forms with which he worked is one of the miracles of art. Per- 
haps nowhere in his music is this more remarkable than in his Fugues. The 
mechanically rigid construction which this type of music can acquire is 
always avoided by Bach and in its place arises a singularly vivid and expres- 
sive work. 

The title St Anne, which the E flat major Fugue bears, was given to it 
because of the resemblance of its theme to the first line of St Anne's Tune, 
a famous English Hymn published in 1708. 

The D minor Piano Concerto was originally a concerto for violin. This com- 
position has been lost and we know it only from an editor's version, of which 
Professor Donald Francis Tovey has said: "The restored text of the work 
as a violin concerto unfortunately was done in the Dark Ages as regards 
Bach-scholarship, and it is demonstrably wrong in every possible way besides 
several impossible ways." 

There are also in existence two earlier keyboard versions which clearly 
point to the work's origin. But of greater interest is the fact that Bach 
used the first movement as an overture to the Cantata, Wir miissen durch 
viel Triibsal. Referring to the second movement, Professor Tovey says: 

"This is one of the most stupendous tours de force in) all musical 
history. The slow movement is arranged with the transposition of 
the solo part an octave lower and with additional wind-parts; but 
all this is the mere accompaniment to a totally independent four-part 
chorus! If the result were confused or unnatural there would be 
little more to be said for it than for Raimondi's four complete simul- 
taneous fugues in four different keys, or for his three simultaneous 
oratorios, or for many other scholastic tomfooleries which may be 
played backwards and upside down without sounding noticeably more 
sensible than when played rightend foremost. But Bach's result is 
of the same Greek simplicity, for all its ornamentation, as his orig- 
inal; in fact, it is just as much an original inspiration as if no earlier 
or simpler version had existed." 

The finale was also used by Bach as the prelude to the Cantata, Ich 
habe meine Zuversicht, and here again extra instrumental voices were added 
to the texture of the original work. 

This concerto, aside from being one of the most interesting works in all 
music from the historical point of view, is also one of the noblest and most 
arresting. It is of a quality which can only be associated with one composer — 
Johann Sebastian Bach. 

Next concert in the Historical Series December 12th 
HAYDN-MOZART PROGRAMME 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

CASIMIR HALL, SEVENTEENTH SEASON IQ4O-4.I 



HISTORICAL SERIES 

of 
SOLO AND CHAMBER MUSIC 

presented by Ralph Berkowitz 



THIRD SEASON— SECOND CONCERT 



HAYDN-MOZART 



THURSDAY EVENING, DECEMBER 12, 1940 
AT EIGHT O'CLOCK 



P r o .2 r a m m e 



FRANZ JOSEF HAYDN— 1732-1809 

I 

String quartet in F major. Opus 77, No. 2 

Allegro moderato 

Menuetto. Presto ma non troppo 

Andante 

Finale. Vivace assai 



Rafael Druian, Violin 
Sol Ovcharov, Violin 



Julius Weissman, Viola 
Winifred Schaefer, Violoncello 



II 

London trio in C major. No. 1 

Allegro moderato 
Andante 
Finale. Vivace 

Eleanor Mitchel, Flute 



John Krell, Flute 



Winifred Schaefer, Violoncello 



WOLFGANG AMADEUS MOZART— 175 6-1791 

I 

String quintet in G minor. Kochel 516 

Allegro 

Menuetto. Allegretto 

Adagio ma non troppo 

Adagio 

Allegro 

Herbert Baumel, Violin Julius Weissman, Viola 

Baruch Altman, Violin Joseph de Pasquale, Viola 

Francis de Pasquale, Violoncello 

II 

Divertimento in F major. The Musical Jest. Kochel 522 

Allegro 
Menuetto 
Adagio cantabile 
Presto 

Ezra Rachlin, Conductor 



♦ 



MEMBERS OF THE CHAMBER ORCHESTRA 



First Violins: 

GEORGE ZAZOFSKY 

PAUL SHURE 
MARGUERITE KUEHNE 
SIDNEY SHARP 
SOL OVCHAROV 
CHARLOTTE COHEN 



Second Violins: 

BARUCH ALTMAN 
MORRIS SHULIK 
EUGENE CAMPIONE 
ELLIOTT FISHER 
NATHAN GOLDSTEIN 
ERNEST GOLDSTEIN 



Violas : 

JOSEPH DE PASQUALE 
PHILIP GOLDBERG 
FRANCIS TURSI 
■WARREN SIGNOR 

Violoncellos: 

ESTHER GRUHN 
RICHARD KAPUSCINSKI 
ROHINI COOMARA 



Contrabass: 

WILFRED BATCHELDER 

Horns: 

* 

JAMES CHAMBERS 
MARCUS FISCHER 



Programme Notes 

by Ralph Bf.rkowitz 



'Could I only impress in the soul of every music-lover, the 
inimitable uorks of Mozart as deeply and with such musical under- 
standing as I myself feel and comprehend them. . . .' 

. Franz Josef Haydn 

The extent to which one musical genius can influence another has 
always been a fascinating problem in musical aesthetics. Great interest 
has surrounded the relationship of Haydn and Mozart, and 
various interpretations have been set forth by many authorities in an 
effort to weigh the products of each man in the light of the other's art. 
Analyses of chamber-works produced at about the same time by both 
have led to interesting generalities. Professor Donald Francis Tovey 
once remarked that, 'the mutual influence of Haydn and Mozart is one 
of the best-known wonders of musical history; and the paradox of it 
is that while its effect on Mozart was to concentrate his style and 
strengthen his symmetry, the effect on Haydn was to set him free. . . .' 

Musicians have also found truth in Dr Ernest Walker's famous 
epigram which claimed that 'Haydn first showed Mozart how to write 
string quartets, whereupon Mozart showed Haydn how string quartets 
should be written.' But it is unlikely that we can ever subscribe to 
Charles Lamb's view. He writes: 

Some cry up Haydn, some Mozart, 
Just as the whim bites; for my part, 
I do not care a farthing candle 
For either of them, or for Handel. * 

Haydn was born twenty-four years before Mozart and outlived 
him by eighteen. But through some peculiar chain of circumstances, 
during a whole decade neither composer wrote for string quartet — 
Haydn from 1772 to 1781 and Mozart from 1773 to 1782. 

Haydn's first quartets after resuming work in this form, are the 
six of the so-called Russian set, opus 33, dedicated to the Grand Duke 
Paul. These quartets, incidentally, are the first in which Haydn used 
the term, scherzo, in place of the usual minuet. 

Mozart was apparently stimulated by these works, for between 
1782 and 1785 he composed six quartets, dedicated to Haydn, which he 
himself described as the fruit of 'langen, beschwerlichen Arbeit.' It 
was upon hearing some of these for the first time that Haydn said to 
Mozart's father, 'Your son is the greatest composer known to me, 
either personally or by reputation.' 

Analysis points out, and our ears prove, that from then on Haydn 
willingly sought Mozart's influence. He was far too great a man not 
to be willing to learn from a much younger artist. 

*To show that Haydn, Mozart and Handel were not the only composers he found 
uncongenial, Lamb continues: 

The devil, with his foot so cloven, 
For aught I care, may take Beethoven; 
And, if the bargain does not suit, 
I'll throw him Weber in to boot. 



Haydn and Mozart lived lives typical of the 18th century musician, 
but with one enormous difference. Haydn was always employed as 
Kapellmeister by some princely family — such as the Esterhazys, for 
whom he worked for twenty-nine years — and was thus enabled to 
compose without the constant fear and insecurity that Mozart faced 
throughout his mature life. For after Mozart's years as a Wundcrhiud, 
during which he was the darling of every European capital, he never 
succeeded in obtaining a position such as Haydn's which would have 
saved him from being overwhelmed by the tyranny of poverty. 

The two men knew each other fairly well and at times spent an 
evening together making music. Michael Kelly, the singer, speaks in 
his memoirs of attending a 'quartett party' at someone's home in 
Vienna; his experience that evening has undoubtedly been the envy of 
many generations of musicians. He writes: 'The players were tolerable, 
not one of them excelled on the instrument he played; but there was 
a little science among them, which I dare say will be acknowledged 
when I name them. The first violin, Haydn, the second violin, Ditters- 
dorf, the viola, Mozart and the cello, Vanhall. ... I was there and a 
greater treat or a more remarkable one cannot be imagined.' 

The last years of Haydn's life were filled with honours and adul- 
ation; he was, in fact, one of the most renowned figures of the time. 
It is doubtful whether any composer since then has been so adequately 
complimented as Haydn was on one occasion by an admirer who sent 
him six pairs of stockings into which were worked favorite themes from 
his compositions! Toward the end of his life he could well say: 'I 
know that God has bestowed a talent upon me, and I thank Him for it; 
I think I have done my duty, and been of use in my generation by my 
works; let others do the same.' 

Compare this with a letter of Mozart written a few months before 
his death. 'My head is confused, I reason with difficulty. ... I go on 
because composition wearies me less than resting. ... I know from 
what I feel that the hour sounds; I am on the point of expiring; I have 
finished before having enjoyed my talent. Life was so beautiful, my 
career began under such favourable auspices, but none can change his 
destiny. . . .' 



The works on tonight's program need little comment. The quartet 
of Haydn and Mozart's quintet are among the truly remarkable ex- 
pressions in all the art of music. 

Haydn's C major Trio dates from 1794, the year of his second 
visit to London and is thus contemporaneous with several of the great 
Salomon symphonies. 

The F major Divertimento Mozart himself called Ein imisikaliscbcr 
Spass. It is suggestive of a performance by a village band, but at the 
same time points a scornful finger at the formulas and devices of some 
well-known composers of Mozart's day. The close of the final move- 
ment is a humorous use of polytonality 125 years ahead of its time. 



Nc\t concert in the Historical Scries January 2 1st 
BEFTHOY I. N - B R A H M S PROGRAMME 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

CASIMIR HALL, SEVENTEENTH SEASON I94O-4I 



HISTORICAL SERIES 

of 
SOLO AND CHAMBER MUSIC 

presented by Ralph Berkowitz 



THIRD SEASON— THIRD CONCERT 



BEETHOVEN-BRAHMS 



TUESDAY EVENING, JANUARY 21, 1941 
AT EIGHT O'CLOCK 

AEOLIAN-SKINNER ORGAN 
STEINWAY PIANO 



Programme 



LUDWIG VAN BEETHOVEN— 1770-1827 

I 

Scotch, Irish, and Welsh folksongs 

Up! Quit thy bower Scotch 

Love without hope \ 

The damsels of Cardigan > Welsh 

Waken lords and ladies gay \ 

The sweetest lad was Jamie \ 

Again my lyre \ Scotch 

Oh! Thou art the lad of my heart ) 

Since greybeards inform us \ 

The kiss, dear maid > Irish 

Paddy O'Rafferty ) 

Duncan Gray Scotch 

Barbara Troxeii., Soprano George Zazofsky, Violin 

Norman Rose, Tenor Rohini Coomara, Violoncello 

Thomas Perkins, Baritone Waldemar Dabrowski, Piano 

II 

Variations and Fugue in E flat, Opus 35 

Jorge Bolet, Piano 

III 

Recording of the Finale from Symphony No. 3 in E flat, Opus 5 5 

Felix Weingartner, conducting the 
Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra 



JOHANNES BRAHMS— 1833-1897 

IV 

Two chorale-preludes, Opus 122: 

Herzlich tut mich verlangen 
Es ist ein Ros' entsprungen 

Clarence Snyder, Organ 



Quartet in C minor, Opus 51, No. 1 

Allegro 

Romanze. Poco adagio 

Allegretto molto moderato e comodo 

Allegro 



Herbert Baumel, Violin 
Baruch Altman, Violin 



Julius Weissman, Viola 
Arthur Winograd, Violoncello 



Programme Notes 

by Ralph Berkowitz 

George Thomson holds a place in music history as the most 
enthusiastic collector and publisher of Scotch, Welsh, and Irish folk- 
music. He began this work in his youth and for forty years con- 
tinued the search for what he described as 'all the fine airs both of the 
plaintive and lively kind, unmixed with trifling and inferior ones.' 

Thomson engaged men like Sir Walter Scott, Sir Alexander Bos- 
well, and Robert Burns to supply poems for those melodies having no 
English text, while he obtained instrumental accompaniments from 
some of the finest musicians of Europe. From 1791, when he started 
this enterprise, Thomson had Pleyel, Kozeluch and Haydn writing 
folksong settings for voices, piano, violin, and 'cello, and after long 
negotiation finally persuaded Beethoven to undertake the same type of 
work. At first Beethoven's interest was mainly commercial, for he 
hardly ever refused a sound offer if his artistic integrity permitted, 
but soon after commencing work on these pieces he developed a whole- 
hearted enthusiasm for them. 'The Scottish songs show how uncon- 
ventionally the unusual melody can be harmonized,' he once remarked. 

Shortly afterward Beethoven submitted an idea to Thomson calling 
for similar treatment of Portuguese, Spanish, Italian, and Russian folk 
music, but this Thomson declined and Beethoven's collection of music 
from these countries was later published by Schlesinger of Berlin. 
Beethoven was also willing to compose a piano sonata or chamber work 
based on Scotch and Irish folk music, but this Thomson also declined 
because of Beethoven's high fee. Between 1809 and 182 3 Beethoven 
finished 164 folk settings, of which Thomson published 120. For this 
Beethoven received a total of £5 50. 

These works are not, by and large, masterpieces comparable to 
those we associate with Beethoven's name. They are nonetheless a 
charming and little known side of a composer of whom we gen- 
erally think as occupying some remote Olympian height. The folk 
songs unquestionably exerted a strong influence upon Beethoven for 
the remainder of his life; this can be felt in such works as the Opus 59 
quartets as well as in the last four symphonies. 



In 1801 Beethoven wrote a ballet, The Men of Prometheus, which 
was produced with much success at the Court Theatre in Vienna. 
For one of the contredanses in the work Beethoven felt great affec- 
tion. The following year he used it as the theme for the set of varia- 
tions that we hear on tonight's program, and a year or two later he 
apparently was still sufficiently fond of it to incorporate the theme and 
much of the material from the variations into the finale of the Eroica 
Symphony. 

The variations begin with the bare bass of the theme, a bass 
which is probably the best-known in all music. Despite being made 
from less than a handful of notes it is somehow unmistakably charac- 
teristic of its creator. There follow three short sections marked a 2, a 3 
and a 4 (i.e. duet, trio, and quartet) in which contrapuntal material 
is added to the reiterated bass. The theme itself then appears with an 
innocent dance-rhythm accompaniment, and fifteen variations full of 
brilliance, humor, and beauty are built upon it. The final fugue is 
constructed along lines different from the fugue passages in the finale 



of the Eroica. It is founded upon the first four notes of the bass — 
later employing them in inversion — and brings to a wonderful climax 
one of Beethoven's true masterpieces for the piano. 



The eleven chorale-preludes for organ are Brahms' last works. 
They were composed in May and June of 1896 in memory of his 
dearest friend, Clara Schumann. It is strange that both Brahms and 
Bach should have expressed their final musical thoughts in organ 
chorale-preludes. * 

Walter Niemann has written beautifully of these last Brahms 
works. He says: 'They are a retrospect and an epilogue, a salutation 
to youth and its musical ideals, and a farewell to this world, which is, 
in spite of all, so fair. And over all this — both retrospect and pros- 
pect — Brahms throws that fine, tender veil of resignation which is all 
his own. It is from this personal point of view that we shall most 
readily learn, not only to understand and deeply love these chorale- 
preludes, but also to feel for ourselves what it is that distinguishes them 
essentially from the organ chorales of Bach and his predecessors: 
namely, the whole subjective modern art of atmosphere and resigned 
Weltschmerz.' 

* Bach's final chorale-prelude, Vor deinen Thron tret' ich hiem'it, was heard at the 
first concert of this season's Historical Series. 



Brahms once said that he had sketched out at least twenty string 
quartets before completing one which fully satisfied him. 

His natural tendency was to express himself in terms of what a 
recent writer has called his 'massive harmony and polyphony' and 
the enormous difficulty Brahms faced was the necessity to reduce these 
to the limits of four stringed instruments. Brahms himself said that 
'it is not hard to compose, but what is fabulously hard is to leave the 
superfluous notes under the table.' 

The C minor quartet and its companion in A minor, Opus 51 
No. 2, were composed during the summer of 1873. 

In the construction of the C minor, his first published quartet, 
Brahms used cyclic elements as an important means of dramatic expres- 
sion. It is a device Beethoven brought to artistic perfection in his 
later years and its influence upon Brahms is unmistakable. The open- 
ing themes, for example, of the first, second, and fourth movements 
are all derived from the same motive, and throughout the work many 
subtle uses of this cyclic material serve to create a beautiful sense of 
unity. Thus the second subject of the last movement, though based 
on the same notes as the first subject, is of an entirely different nature. 
Only the allegretto is without thematic relationship to the other move- 
ments, making it serve as an effectively contrasting intermezzo. 

The quartet, as a whole, is one of the most wonderful in all 
chamber-music literature and, as an expression of the fusion of 
classicism and romanticism, is perhaps a perfect example of nineteenth- 
century art. 



Next concert in this series February 19 

Mr Felix Salmond will collaborate in a programme of French 

chamber music which will include the Faure piano quartet in 

C minor, the Debussy sonata for violoncello and piano, and the 

Franck piano quintet. 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

CASIMIR HALL, SEVENTEENTH SEASON I94O-4.I 



HISTORICAL SERIES 

of 
SOLO AND CHAMBER MUSIC 

presented by Ralph Berkowitz 



THIRD SEASON— FOURTH CONCERT 



FRENCH CHAMBER MUSIC 



WEDNESDAY EVENING, FEBRUARY 19, 1941 
AT EIGHT O'CLOCK 

STEINWAY PIANO 



Programme 



Gabriel Faure Quartet No. 1 in C minor, Op. 15 

1845-1924 for piano and strings 

Allegro molto moderato 
Scherzo. Allegro vivo 
Adagio 
Allegro molto 



Rafael Druian, Violin 
Joseph de Pasquale, Viola 



Felix Salmond, Violoncello 
Ralph Berkowitz, Piano 



II 



Claude Debussy Sonata for violoncello and piano 

1862-1918 

Prologue 
Serenade et Finale 



Felix Salmond, Violoncello 



Ralph Berkowitz, Piano 



III 



Cesar Franck Quintet in F minor 

1822-1890 for piano and strings 

Molto moderato quasi lento — Allegro 
Lento, con molto sentimento 
Allegro non troppo ma con fuoco 



Herbert Baumel, Violin Julius Weissman, Viola 

Baruch Altman, Violin Felix Salmond, Violoncello 

Ralph Berkowitz, Piano 



Programme Notes 

by Ralph Berkowitz 

A great musical work can, in some mysterious fashion, convinc- 
ingly express that nebulous quality which we call the soul of a people 
— the atmosphere of a time and a place; it conveys a clear impression 
of the mental climate which nurtured and brought it forth. An opera 
like Boris Godounov, for instance, could hardly have sprung from any 
culture but that of Czarist Russia, just as a certain form of religious 
life was necessary to permit the creation of a Palestrina Mass. 

The three chamber-works on tonight's program are all highly 
personalized expressions. The reticent delicacy of Faure, the impas- 
sioned voice of Franck, and Debussy's charm and color are indelibly 
marked in these compositions, yet at the same time, and above all in- 
dividual eloquence, there is an element through all the works which 
speaks of what is most secret and intimate in the French soul of 

their time. 

* * * 

No composer has been more successful than Faure in solving the 
problem of a natural balance between strings and piano in chamber- 
music. The writing in the C minor Quartet is always characteristic- 
ally transparent and the whole work glows with a fresh and utterly 
beautiful lyricism, which, like a painting of Renoir, seems to be 
bathed in sunlight. 

Although the new poetic currents of Baudelaire and Verlaine in- 
fluenced him greatly, Faure in many ways remained a classicist. 'He 
accommodates himself,' wrote Roger Ducasse, 'with the greatest ease 
to the simplest traditional forms. . . . How is it that, in this novelty- 
seeking age, he never disappoints us? The reason is that, with Gabriel 
Faure, the one important thing is the music itself. The scheme he 
follows is well-known? Granted; but he was endowed by the Muses 
with the gift of ideas full of youth and beauty. Be the flask of cry- 
stal, earth, or gold, what matters it if the imperishable scent be there?' 

* * * 

After his string quartet, which he composed in his thirty-first 
year, Debussy wrote no chamber-music until, toward the end of his 
life, he completed three of a projected group of six sonatas; the Sonata 
for viola, flute and harp, the violin and piano Sonata, and the one on 
tonight's program, for violoncello and piano. This, which was com- 
pleted first, Debussy finished during the summer of 1915. He at first 
intended to call it Pierrot fdche avec la lune, which allows us to be- 
lieve that the work is more directly related to the main body of De- 
bussy's music than that it is, as some critics have claimed, an effort 
to return to the French classicism of Couperin and Rameau. In fact, 
Leon Vallas, the biographer of Debussy, rightly considered the cello 
Sonata as 'the supreme musical expression of the doctrines Debussy 
preached as a critic and illustrated as a composer for over thirty years.' 



At the time these sonatas were composed Debussy wrote a par- 
ticularly touching letter, (as doubtless many French artists are writing 
today) , which he sent to his publisher, Durand. 'I want to work, not 
so much for myself, but to give proof, however small it may be, that 
even if there were thirty million Boches French thought will not be 
destroyed.' 

;:- # * 

The Franck Quintet, like the Faure Quartet, was composed in 
1879. Thirty-six years before, Franck had written four piano trios, 
but since then no other chamber-music had come from his pen. The 
appearance of a work so masterly in its construction as the Quintet is 
indicative of an inward development of style which Vincent d'Indy 
calls 'a phenomenon almost without parallel in the history of music' 

The work is built on several cyclic themes which appear in each 
movement. This is a device Franck used in most of his larger com- 
positions, and permits an intensely dramatic, unified structure to be 
evolved. 

The first performance of the Quintet was given in 1880 by the 
Marsick Quartet with Saint-Saens playing the piano part. 'At the end 
of the concert,' d'Indy writes, 'good old Father Franck, in great de- 
light (he was always pleased with any performance, however poor, of 
his works) went up to Saint-Saens and, handing him the manuscript 
of the Quintet, exclaimed with generous warmth, "Thank you, my 
friend! Since you have interpreted my work so wonderfully, it is 
yours; accept my dedication of it and keep my manuscript in memory 
of this delightful evening!" Saint-Saens with a wry smile — grimacant 
tin sourire — twirled round and made off towards the exit, leaving the 
precious score on the piano. Long afterwards, an employe of the firm 
of Pleyel found it among a heap of waste paper.' 



Next concert in this series: March 8th at 2:30 in 

the Foyer of the Academy of Music, as part of the 

Philadelphia Schubert Festival. 



SATURDAY AFTERNOON, MARCH 8th, 1941—2:30 P. M. 

CHAMBER MUSIC PROGRAM 
(See page 28) 

The Curtis Institute of Music 

Historical Series 

Under the Supervision of 

Ralph Berkowitz 

Cantata, "Sanger, der von Herzen singet" 

(For Solo Soprano, Tenor and Bass with Piano) 
Barbara Troxell, Soprano Donald Hultgren, Tenor 
James Cosmos, Bass Eugene Bossart, Piano 

Piano Solos — 

Two Impromptus: B flat, Opus 142, No. 3 

F minor, Opus 142, No. 4 
Barbara Jane Elliott, Piano 
Quintet in C Major for Strings, Op. 163 
Allegro ma non troppo 



Adagio 
Scherzo : 


Presto 




Allegretto 






Herbert Baumel 


!■ Violins 




Baruch Altman 




Julius Weissman 


Viola 




Winifred Schaefer 
Esther Gruhn 


I Violoncellos 




Steinway Piano 




Program 


Notes 




by 






Henry S. 


Drinker 



The Philadelphia Choral Festival Society 

In the Fall of 193 1, James Allan Dash, with a group of about 25 
Bach devotees, founded the Bach Society of Delaware County, which 
later merged with the Bach Choir of Philadelphia to form the Phila- 
delphia Bach Festival Chorus. 

In 1939 the Philadelphia Choral Festival Society was organized, 
consisting of Singing Members (including the Bach Chorus and the 
present Schubert Chorus) and Sustaining Members. The Constitution 
and By-laws provide for membership branches to perform and support 
Choral Festivals from time to time in Philadelphia comprising the 
Choral Works of the great composers. 

The Bach branch of the Society has organzed and conducted two 
Bach Choral Festivals on May 5th and 6th, 1939, and on May 3rd and 
4th, 1940, at St. James's Church, at the first of which were performed 
Cantatas 1, 11, 21, 54, 106, 140, 142 and 180, and at the second Can- 
tatas 4, 6, 27, 50, 64, 65, 79, 198 and the Magnificat. 

The expenses of these Festivals were met through the dues of the 
Sustaining Members and by a growing list of Guarantors and Patrons 
— who are given first choice of available seats for the performances. 
Mr. Dash's modest salary has so far been provided through grants from 
the Oberlaender Trust and the Carnegie Corporation. 

At the close of the 1940 Bach Festival, Mr. Dash organized, from 
the waiting list for the Bach Chorus, the nucleus of the present Schu- 
bert Chorus and during May and June, 1940, began rehearsals of the 
Ab Mass. When rehearsals were resumed in September the member- 
ship of the Schubert Chorus had increased to 1 70. 

Coincident with the rehearsals for the present Schubert Festival, 
the Bach Chorus of 150 members has been rehearsing for the Third 
Annual Bach Festival, to be held May 2nd and 3rd, 1941, in St. James's 
Church, 22nd and Walnut Streets, Philadelphia, at which will be per- 
formed choruses and movements from seven Cantatas done at the two 
previous Festivals (Cantatas 11, 21, ij, 50, 65, 140 and 180), and five 
entire Cantatas not heretofore performed at these Festivals (Cantatas 
34, 68, 104, 105 and 150). 

For the present Festival our Society has the cooperation of the 
Philadelphia Orchestra, which on Friday afternoon and Saturday eve- 
ning, March 7th and 8th, will play (Eugene Ormandy conducting) the 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

CASIMIR HALL, SEVENTEENTH SEASON — I94O-4I 



HISTORICAL SERIES 

of 
SOLO AND CHAMBER MUSIC 

presented by Ralph Berkowitz 



THIRD SEASON— SIXTH CONCERT 



MODERN AMERICAN MUSIC 



FRIDAY EVENING, APRIL 4, 1941 
AT EIGHT THIRTY O'CLOCK 



STEINWAY PIANO 
LYON & HEALY HARP 



Programme 
I 

Roy Harris Passacaglia from the Quintet 

1898- for piano and strings 

BaruchAltman I V V Albert Falkove, Viola 

Ernest Goldstein \ '° ms Rohini Coomara, Violoncello 

Waldemar Dabrowski, Piano 

II 

Samuel Barber A nun takes the veil 

1910- Sure on this shining night 

The secrets of the old 
Nocturne 

( first performances ) 
Barbara Troxell, Soprano Eugene Bossart, Piano 

III 

Charles Martin Loeffler Rhapsodie for viola, oboe, 

1861-1935 and piano 

L'Etang (The Pool). After the poem 
of Maurice Rollinat 

Albert Falkove, Viola Ralph Gomberg, Oboe 

Renee Longy Miquelle, Piano 

IV 
Randall Thompson Little prelude 

1899- Song after sundown 
David Guion Country Gig 

1895- 

Jeanne Behrend, Piano 

V 
Jeanne Behrend Five songs (Sara Teasdale) : 

1911- Faults 

The look 
Late October 

I shall not care 

Hilda Morse Debt 

Will a Steweb.t, Soprano 
The composer at the piano 

L&J^im^ ??^ V ^.. B ..^ 

4.9^) — Jewish theme 

Eudice Shapiro, Violin VnnavrG'i'lTi.ihu'rVioiaTTreHv 

The composer at the piano 

Carlos Salzedo Concerto for harp and seven 

1885- wind instruments (1926) 

Prelude. Allegro vivo 
Nocturne 
Quartre danses: 

Menuet, Farandole, Pavane, Gaillarde 

Janet Putnam, Harp 
Anton Winkler, Fhi/e Sanford Sharoff, Bassoon 

Ralph Gomberg, Oboe Marcus Fischer, Horn 

Mitchell Lurie ( clarinets Joseph Fischer, Trumpet 

James Rettew \ 

Conducted by the composer 



Programme Notes 

by Ralph Berkowitz 

The music on tonight's program represents forty years in the 
process of creating an American musical art. In these decades, after 
a long history of composition in this country, composers finally be- 
gan to feel that they were taking part, as Americans, in the world- 
scene of music. They not only wished to express themselves in terms 
of music's great heritage, but at the same time sought to speak of 
America's life and spirit. 

It is possible to consider the composers on this program — varied 
as their artistic tendencies may appear — as largely belonging to that 
group which a recent writer has called the Eclectics, the artists who 
maintain that all groups or schools contribute to music as a universal 
language. 

The same writer, Dr Randall Thompson, in an article in The 
Musical Quarterly for January, 1932, speaks with an insight which 
has done much to clarify our position toward the American composer. 
He says: 

'When viewed from a distance, the process of the world's 
composers resembles a vast spectrum in which one color blends im- 
perceptibly into the next. But if an American composer ventures to 
join the procession, he is caught in the act and disqualified. On one 
hand, he is condemned if his work reveals a similarity to that of any 
other American. How then shall we ever create an American School? 
And on the other: woe to the American composer who exhibits any 
kinship with the musical lights of Europe! Yet a glance at musical 
history will show that many composers, working at the same time but 
in different countries, reveal the most striking resemblances. Indeed 
it is with their uninhibited use of current artifice that they have ex- 
pressed the spirit of their times and, sometimes, achieved universality. 
Is it not then patently absurd to be blinded in the appreciation of 
our own music by the presence of this natural process of evolution?' 

It is just fifteen years that Roy Harris' name has been known 
in American music. During this period he has been fairly prolific, 
producing much orchestral and chamber-music. 'The music of Har- 
ris,' writes Arthur Farwell, one of his teachers, 'rests upon form as its 
securest stronghold. He creates and brings up a profoundly earnest 
and authentic art of music, wherein music shall speak of and for 
itself, and weave its own dreams and messages out of its own material 
and in its own terms. And what, by the nature of the case must be 
his chief weapon in this strife? Certainly it can be nothing else than 
form. . . .' 

The Piano Quintet was composed in 1937 and published last year. 

Loeffler was born in Alsace and lived as a boy in Russia and 
Hungary. He at first intended to become a professional violinist 
and studied with Joachim in Berlin, and Massart in Paris. Coming to 
America he joined the Boston Symphony Orchestra and from 188 5 
to 1903 shared the first violin desk with Franz Kneisel. Composition 
soon became the sole interest of his life, and retiring to Medfield, 
Massachusetts, he devoted himself to it until his recent death. His 
art has been described as the cultivation of 'the mystical, the macabre 
and the idyllic' Although a naturalized American, he remained to 
the end under the influence of French impressionism as well as of 
East European music which he heard in his youth. 

Little need be said here of the work of Dr Thompson and Mr 
Barber. Both composers are in the forefront of today's American 



music and their works are frequently performed by the leading or- 
chestral associations and choral societies. 

Dr Thompson's pieces are from a set published by Carl Fischer 
called Masters of Our Day, to which several composers have con- 
tributed. Mr Barber's songs have just been published by G. Schirmer 
and are here heard for the first time. 

Jeanne Behrend, a pupil of Rosario Scalero, has become well- 
known for her pioneer work in the study and performance of Amer- 
ican piano music, both old and modern. She has devoted many recitals 
to this music and recently recorded an album of it for the Victor 
Company. 

Miss Behrend's piano suite, Prom Dawn until Dusk, was recently 
played in San Francisco in her own orchestration, and the Curtis String 
Quartet earlier this year gave the first performance of a new quartet. 

The Teasdale songs on tonight's program were composed between 
the years 1932 and '38. 

Aaron Copland studied with Rubin Goldmark and Nadia Boulan- 
ger. He was among the first of America's younger composers to 
utilize music of the early twenties' Jazz Age. Virgil Thompson has 
said of him: 'Copland's music is American in rhythm, Jewish in 
melody, eclectic in all the rest. ... The subject matter is limited 
but deeply felt. Its emotional origin is seldom gay, rarely amorous, 
almost invariably religious.' 

Dr Salzedo gives the following notes on his Concerto for Harp 
and wind instruments: 

'Like other works of mine in which the harp plays a leading 
part (The Enchanted Isle, symphonic poem for harp and orchestra; 
Preambule et Jetix, for harp and chamber orchestra; Sonata for harp 
and piano) sonorously, this Concerto is based upon the new orchestral 
balance that can be obtained by taking advantage of all the resources 
of the harp, which today can produce thirty-seven tone colors and 
effects, as described in my Modern Study of the Harp. I have chosen 
the concerto form for this work because the contemporary literature 
of the harp did not possess a concerto. This work, however, does not 
adhere strictly to the traditional form of concerto any more than 
my Sonata for harp and piano adhered to the traditional sonata form. 
My Concerto is in three movements. The first movement is divided 
into three connected parts: Prelude, Cadenza, Allegro vivo. The second 
movement is a Nocturne. The third movement is made up of four 
dances on the same theme: Menuet, Farandole, Pavane, Gaillarde. The 
Gaillarde is written in its usual 6/8 time. The Menuet, the Farandole 
and the Pavane, which are traditionally in 3/4, 2/4 and 4/4 respec- 
tively, are all written in 5/4 time. I have written these dances in a 
rhythmical medium which I have employed in most of my works 
since 1917. The character of a dance is to be determined by its 
rhythmical motion and not by the number of beats contained between 
two measure bars. The rhythmical motion of these dances is in ab- 
solute accord with their respective characters represented by the old 
titles.' 

This Concerto is scored for harp, flute (alternating with pic- 
colo) , oboe, two clarinets, bassoon, horn and trumpet. It was com- 
posed in 1926 and was played for the first time at a concert of the 
International Composers' Guild (Edgar Varese, founder) at Aeolian 
Hall, New York, April 17, 1927, by the composer and the first wind 
players of the Philadelphia Orchestra, Artur Rodzinski conducting. It 
has since been played by other contemporary music societies as well 
as by leading symphony orchestras. 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

CASIMIR HALL, SEVENTEENTH SEASON 1 940-4 I 



RECITAL 

by 

MR JOSEPH BONNET 

Organist of the Grand Orgue de Saint Eustache in Paris 



SUNDAY EVENING, OCTOBER 6, 1940, AT 8:00 O'CLOCK 



AEOLIAN-SKINNER ORGAN 



PROGRAMME 



WORKS OF JOHANN SEBASTIAN BACH (1685-1750) 



Prelude and Fugue in D major 

In this pompous Prelude there is somewhat of the majesty of the 
French Overture. The Fugue is a piece whose clarity and brilliance of 
movement remind one of a joyous fanfare. 



II 

Choral Prelude, O Lamm Gottes, unschuldig (Grand Agnus Dei) 

This monumental composition comprises three versets in which the 
liturgical melody is sung first by the soprano, then by an inner voice, 
and last by the pedal, which affirms it with an authority all the more 
engaging because it has until then kept silence. 

In the first two versets varied contrapuntal figures, wherein the 
theme appears in diminution, are entwined around the cantilena. The 
third is reinforced by melodies declaimed with greater breadth, in 
which every detail of the suppositious text is set forth. A pathetic 
motive, repeated in all the voices, brings to mind the burden of the 
sins of mankind, under which the Saviour succumbs. A descending 
chromatic figure, ending with a cry of anguish, plaintively typifies the 
thought, "Without Thee we were lost indeed." But at the conclusion, 
"Dona nobis pacem", the rising and falling scales recall the angels 
ascending and descending on Jacob's ladder, and the work ends with 
an upward soaring into the light. 



Ill 



Passacaglia and Fugue 



The names, Passacaglia and Chaconne, are applied to measured 
compositions in triple time constructed upon a basso ostinato. This 
latter does not necessarily remain in the bass, in the primitive form, 
but may pass over to the other parts and into related keys. Upon the 
theme of this Passacaglia by Bach, which theme is found still earlier 
in the works of the French organist, Andre Raison (see Guilmant, 
Archives des Maitres de I'Orgue, vol. II, page 37), there flourish, like 
branches of the tree of Jesse, twenty variations crowned by a fugue 
on the same theme. 



IV 

Sonata No. 3 in D minor 

Andante 
Adagio e dolce 
Vivace 

Bach's aim in composing his Sonatas for the organ was to make 
his son, Wilhelm Friedemann, an accomplished organ virtuoso. As a 
good father, and an expert in the matter, he chose a type of difficulties 
whose mastery would give the virtuoso the key to all the problems of 
organ-playing. Therefore, he did not hesitate to select the form of 
the Trio for two manuals and pedal. This species of composition gives 
an equal amount of technical work to each hand and to the feet, and 
obliges the player to acquire, in the midst of the most delicate com- 
plications, that independence and clarity which form the touchstone of 
organ-playing. 

But while there is nothing in organ literature more difficult of 
execution than these Sonatas, it must be added that they are full of 
musical charm and poetry. The third, in D minor, is one of the most 
perfect. 



V 

Two Preludes on Liebster Jesu, wir sind heir 

(a) Four part harmonization of the chorale 

(b) Canon at the Fifth (in five parts) for three manuals and 
pedal 

To perform this Canon, Mr Bonnet uses a cornet on the soprano, 
a cromorne for the alto, the right hand playing on two different 
manuals. In the three other parts, the left hand and pedal accompany 
with softer stops. 



VI 

Fantasia and Fugue in G minor 

In the Fantasia, of a highly varied character, recitatives, entreaties, 
and the most audacious harmonic progressions are opposed one to the 
other amidst a formidable unloosing of sonorous resources. The Fugue 
contrasts with the Fantasia by the uninterrupted flow of its virile good 
humor. The wonderfully clean-cut subject of this splendid piece was 
already famous some years before the Fugue appeared. 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

CAS1MIR HALL, SEVENTEENTH SEASON I94O-4I 

PIANO RECITAL BY 
MR SHURA CHERKASSKY 

FRIDAY EVENING, OCTOBER 11, 1940, AT 8:00 O'CLOCK 



PROGRAMME 

I 

Passacaglia Bach-d'Albert 

Sonata in F minor, Opus 57 

( Appassionato ) Ludwig van Beethoven 

Assai allegro 
Andante con moto 
Allegro, ma non troppo 



II 

Scherzo in E major, Opus 54 \ 

Nocturne in E minor, Opus 72, No. 1 / 
Valse in F minor, Opus 70, No. 2 Frederic Chopin 

Andante spianato et grande polonaise 
brillante, Opus 22 



III 
Sonatine Maurice Ravel 

Modere 

Mouvement de menuet 

Anime 

Autrefois Cecile Chaminade 

Toccata Francis Poulenc 

Wine, women and song 

( Waltz-paraphrase ) Strauss-Godowsk y 

STEINWAY PIANO 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

CASIMIR HALL, SEVENTEENTH SEASON IQ4O-4.I 

VIOLIN RECITAL BY 
MR HENRI TEMIANKA 
assisted at the Piano by 
MISS GENIA ROBINOR 

THURSDAY EVENING, NOVEMBER 14, 1940, AT EIGHT O'CLOCK 



PROGRAMME 

I 

Sonata in E flat major, 

Opus 12, No. 3 Ludwig van Beethoven 

Allegro con spirito 

Adagio con molt' espressione 

Rondo. Allegro molto 

II 
Partita in B minor for violin alone Johann Sebastian Bach 

Allemande 

Double 

Corrente 

Double 

Sarabande 

Double 

Tempo di bourree 

Double 

III 

Rondo in A major for violin with 

string quartet accompaniment Franz Schubert 

Assisted by 
Solomon Ovcharov, Violin Albert Falkove, Viola 

Morris Shulik, Violin True Chappell, Violoncello 

This almost unknown work was composed by Schubert in 1816. 
It bears the title of Rondo fiir Violine mit Begleitung des 
Streichquartetts, and was published by Breitkopf and Hartel in 
the supplement to the Gesamtausgabe. 

IV 

Notturno e tarantella, Opus 28 Karol Szymanowski 

Un poco triste 



: 



Burleska 

Introduction et Rondo capriccioso, 

Opus 28 Camille Saint-Saens 



STEINWAY PIANO 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

CASIMIR HALL, SEVENTEENTH SEASON I94O-4I 

RECITAL OF ORIGINAL MUSIC 
FOR FOUR HANDS AT ONE PIANO BY 
RALPH BERKOWITZ and VLADIMIR SOKOLOFF 

WEDNESDAY EVENING, DECEMBER 18, 1940, AT EIGHT O'CLOCK 



PROGRA MME 

I 



oni \ 

. 501) I 

S 



Andante con variazioni 

in G major (K. 501) 

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart 
Fantasie No. 1 in F minor 

(K. 594) 

Variations sur un theme original 

in A flat major, Opus 35 Franz Schubert 

II 

Sonata (1918) Francois Poulenc 

Prelude 

Rustique 

Finale 

Paraphrases on a well-known theme. 

Valse Cesar Cui 

Fughetta on B. A. C. H.) NlCHO]LAS Rimsky-Korsakoff 

Menuetto \ 

Gigue An atole Liadow 

Mazurka Alexander Borodin 

Valse Liadow 

Sonata (1938) Paul Hindemith 

Massig bewegt 
Lebhaft 
Ruhig bewegt 

III 

Five Hungarian dances Johannes Brahms 

F minor, No. 4 

F major, No. 3 

D minor, No. 11 

A minor, No. 8 

F sharp minor, No. 17 

steinway piano 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

CASIMIR HALL, SEVENTEENTH SEASON I94O-4I 






AN EVENING OF 
MODERN MUSIC 
presented by members of the 
TWENTIETH CENTURY MUSIC GROUP 

SECOND SEASON 

FIRST ANNIVERSARY CONCERT 



THURSDAY EVENING, JANUARY 9, 1941, AT 8 O'CLOCK 



STEINWAY PIANO 



PROGRAMME 



I 

Three pieces WALTER PISTON 

(1894- ) 
Albert Tipton, Flute 
Bernadette Giguere, Clarinet 
Sanford Sharoff, Bassoon 

Walter Piston is one of those composers whom America may be 
proud to call a master. He has not been prolific (what professor at 
Harvard could be?), but every work of his has shown the same 
impeccable taste, rich invention, sensitive orchestration and formal 
clarity. He is above all a great contrapuntist, a fact well demon- 
strated in the three woodwind pieces (1923) on tonight's program. 
(L. B.) 

II 

Variations AARON COPLAND 

(1900 - ) 
Leonard Bernstein, Piano 

The piano variations (1930) have been called by some the great- 
est work yet penned by an American, and by others an impossible 
sequence of intolerable dissonance. This much can safely be said, how- 
ever: it is futile to accept the amazing sounds that come from the 
piano as mere sounds; every note has its preordained function in the 
formal pattern. Intelligent listening is particularly essential, therefore, 
and can be rewarded by a thrilling emotional experience. (L. B.) 



Ill 

Litanies a la vierge noire FRANCIS POULENC 

(1899- ) 
First Soprano Mezzo Soprano Alto 

Doris Luff Sally Pestcoe Elsie MacFarlane 

Helen Worrilow Margarette Godwin Rosamonde Cole 

Renee Longy Miquelle, Piano 

Francis Poulenc first came into prominence as one of a young 
group of French composers known as les Six, which also included 
Milhaud, Tailleferre, Honegger, and so forth. Poulenc's earliest composi- 
tions are motivated by facile inventiveness and a return to simple 
charm and pleasure in music, eschewing all profundities. More recently 
he has turned towards the religious, as exemplified by the work on 
tonight's program. La vierge noire is a statue in Rocamadour in cen- 
tral France, whose reputed miraculous powers have attracted pilgrims 
for many centuries. (L. L.) 



IV 
Three pieces IGOR STRAVINSKY 

(1882 - ) 
Bernadette Giguere, Clarinet 

One commonly hears that Stravinsky's art has been on the down 
grade ever since Le sacre dti printemps. The charge is sterility, result- 
ing from the absence of the orchestral lushness and post-Debussyan 



harmony that characterized his early ballets. This has given way in 
Stravinsky's later works to a neo-classic approach to music, a reversion 
to the "stringent freedom" of the eighteenth century. It is a mistake 
to regard this metamorphosis as backsliding; it has provided a new 
impetus for many contemporary composers and indicates a healthy 
reaction to the overdressed Romanticism of the first years of this 
century. 

The clarinet pieces heard tonight, dating from 1919, display in 
the very choice of medium that uncluttered, terse, elegant and 
minutely calculated style of which Stravinsky is the greatest living 
master. (L. B.) 

V 

String quartet No. 3, Opus 22 PAUL HINDEMITH 

(1895 - ) 
Largo 

Allegro. Molto energico 
Tranquillo. Sempre mosso 
Allegro moderato 
Commodo e con grazia 

Raphael Druian, Violin Albert Falkove, Viola 

Broadus Erle, Violin Hershev Kay, Violoncello 

Paul Hindemith is internationally known as a vigorous teacher of 
practice and theory, as a composer of the first rank, and author of 
an important theoretical work. As a composer, Hindemith has been 
amazingly prolific. However arduous the task in hand, however bold 
the wager he may have made with himself in the case of a particular 
composition, music seems to flow from the man in an effortless stream. 

The third Quartet was completed in 1922 and dates from Hinde- 
mith's early-middle period. It is among his most inspired creations and 
contains some of his finest pages. There are five movements, of which 
all but one are characterized by great freedom of metric design. Except 
in the case of the third movement, which is in 6/4 time, signatures 
are omitted. Tyranny of the bar-line plays no part in this music, 
yet the general impression is one of metric integration and rhythmic 
force. No detailed analysis is necessary in order to recommend to the 
listener the abundant contrast of mood and movement which the five 
sections afford. The work also belies the accusation sometimes leveled 
at Hindemith's idiom, that it is devoid of melos. Those who hold 
even to the most conventional interpretation of this term will find in 
the third Quartet much that is worthy of their further examina- 
tion. (C. B.) 



TWENTIETH CENTURY MUSIC GROUP 

In January 1940 a group of students and music lovers with eager 
and inquisitive minds joined forces for the performance and discussion 
of music written since 1900, whence the name under which the group 
has since become known. Five evenings of live and recorded music and 
discussion were presented, and memorable arguments enlivened several 
of the meetings. From its inception the Group has received the 
enthusiastic support of listeners, composers and performers alike, and 
now boasts an advisory committee consisting of Randall Thompson 
and Aaron Copland. 

Tonight's anniversary concert, which in large measure owes its 
realization to Dr. Thompson's friendly interest, has for its aim the 
presentation of a few highlights of last season's programs. The Group's 
plans for the current season include four concerts of modern music at 
the Art Alliance, dates and programs to be announced. 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

CASIMIR HALL, SEVENTEENTH SEASON IQ4.O-4I 

RECITAL BY 
THE CURTIS STRING QUARTET 



Jascha Brodsky J .. Max Aronoff, Viola 

Charles Jaffe j Orlando Cole, Violoncello 

assisted by 
Felix Salmond, Violoncello 



WEDNESDAY EVENING, JANUARY 29, 1941, AT EIGHT O'CLOCK 



v 



PROGRAMME 



Quartet in E flat, Opus 127 Ludwig van Beethoven 

Maestoso. Allegro 

Adagio, ma non troppo e molto cantabile 

Scherzando vivace 

Finale: Allegro 



II 



Quintet in C, Opus 163 Franz Schubert 

Allegro non troppo 
Adagio 

Scherzo: Presto 
Allegretto 



THE BALDWIN SCHOOL 
Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania 

Saturday evening, October 5, 1940, at 8:00 o'clock 

Janet Putnam, Harp 
Esther Gruhn, Violoncello 
Eleanor Mitchel, Flute 

of 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

Programme 

I 



La pantomime ) 
La timide ) 
Tambourin ) 

First movement from Trio Sonata 
in B minor 

Largo 
First and second movements from 
Sonata No. 8 in D major 

Adagio 

Allegro 

II 

Impromptu-caprice 
"Gavotte" from "Armide" 
La fille aux cheveux de lin 
Chanson dans la nuit 

Janet Putnam 



Rameau 



Loeillet 



Leclair 



Pierne 

Gluck 

Debussy 

Salzedo 



III 

Arabesque No. 1 
"Dorienne" from 

"Divertissement grec" 
Spanish dance, No. 5 



Debussy 

Mouquet 
Granados 



FOREMEN'S AND SUPERVISOR'S CLUB 
Gibbstown, New Jersey 

Thursday evening, October 17, 1940, at 9:00 o'clock 

Doris Luff, Soprano 
Donald Coker, Tenor 
Waldemar Dabrowski, Accompanist 

of 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

Programme 

I 

I'll sing thee songs of Araby Clay 

Le Nil Leroux 

Les papillons Chausson 

"Vissi d'arte" from "Tosca" Puccini 
Doris Luff 

II 

Dank sei Dir, Herr Handel 

Sea fever Ireland 

The sleigh Kountz 

Roll along cowboy King 
Donald Coker 

III 

"Deep in my heart dear" 

from "The student prince" Romberg 

Miss Luff and Mr Coker 



SALEM COUNTY FEDERATION OF MEN'S BIBLE CLASSES 
Woodstown, New Jersey 

Sunday afternoon, October 20, 1940, at 2:50 o'clock 

Theodore Uppman, Baritone 

of 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

Programme 



He that dwelleth in the 

secret place (Psalm 91) 

II 

Come ye to the mountains 
of the Lord 

III 

The Lord is my shepherd 
(Psalm 23) 



MacDermid 



Spross 



Liddle 



CONTEMPORARY CLUB 
Trenton, New Jersey 

Tuesday afternoon, October 22, 1940, at 2:30 o'clock 

Barbara Troxell, Soprano 
Eugene Bossart, Piano 

of 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



Programme 

I 

Tu lo sai 

Vo' cercando in questa valli 

Tre giorni son che Nina 

Ungeduld ) 

StSndchen ) 

Die junge nonne ) 

Barbara Troxell 



Torelli 
D'Astorga 
Pergolesi 

Schubert 



II 



"Leise, leise" from 
"Der Freischiitz" 

Barbara Troxell 



Weber 



III 

Fantasie in F minor, Opus 49 
Eugene Bossart 



Chopin 



IV 



Love's philosophy 
The unforseen 
Animal crackers 
Lilacs ) 

Floods of spring ) 

Barbara Troxell 



Quilter 

Scott 

Hageman 

Rachmaninov 



DELAWARE COUNTY TEACHERS' INSTITUTE 
Media, Pennsylvania 

Monday afternoon, October 28, 1940, at 1:30 o'clock 

Donald Hultgren, Tenor 
Eugene Bossart, Accompanist 

of 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 
Programme 



Musica proibita 
del mio amato ben 
Non piu 
La danza 



Gastaldon 

Donaudy 

Cimara 

Rossini 



II 



Roadways 

In the steppe 

In the silent night 

The star 



Rose 

Gretchaninov 

Rachmaninov 

Rogers 



WASHINGTON COLLEGE 
Chest ertown, Maryland 

Thursday morning, October 31, 1940, at 11:00 o'clock 

Herbert Baumel, Violin 
Thomas Perkins, Baritone 
Phyllis Moss, Piano 

of 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 
Programme 



First movement from 

Concerto No. 7 in D major Mozart 

Allegro maestoso 

Herbert Baumel 

II 

"0 du, me in holder Abendstern" 

from "Tannhauser" Wagner 

"Toreador song" from "Carmen" Bizet 

Thomas Perkins 

III 

Prelude in E minor, Opus 35, No. 1 Mendelssohn 
The little white donkey Ibert 

Waltz in C sharp minor, Opus 64, No. 2) 
Waltz in G flat major, Opus 70, No. 1 ) Chopin 
Scherzo in B minor, Opus 20 ) 

Phyllis Moss 

IV 

Arioso Bach-Franko 

Two etchings Spalding 

Hurdy gurdy 

Ghosts 
Presto from Suite in A minor, Opus 10 Sinding 
Herbert Baumel 



The swapping song 

John Riley Kentucky Mountain Songs 

Toad's courtship 

Thomas Perkins 



VILLANOVA COLLEGE 
Villanova, Pennsylvania 

Wednesday evening, November 6, 1940, at 7:30 o f clock 

Eileen Flissler, Piano 
Marguerite Kuehne, Violin 
Winifred Schaefer, Violoncello 

of 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



Programme 

I 

Second and third movements from 
Trio in D minor, Opus 49 

Andante con moto tranquillo 
Scherzo: Leggiero e vivace 



Mendelssohn 



II 



Apres un reve 
Serenade espagnole 

Winifred Schaefer 



Faure* 
Glazounov 



Arioso 
Gypsy airs 



III 

Marguerite Kuehne 
IV 



Bach-Franko 
Sarasate 



Trio in D major, Opus 70, No. 1 
Allegro vivace e con brio 
Largo assai ed espressivo 
Presto 



Beethoven 



FRIENDS' SELECT SCHOOL 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

Thursday morning, November 7, 1940, at 10:30 o'clock 

Phyllis Moss, Piano 
Thomas Perkins, Baritone 

of 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



Programme 

I 

Waltz in C sharp minor, Opus 64, No. Z 

Waltz in G flat major, Opus 70, No. 1 

The little white donkey 

Clair de lune 

Danse rituelle du feu 

Phyllis Moss 



Chopin 

Ibert 

Debussy 

de Falla 



II 



"0 du, mein holder Abendstern" 

from "Tannhauser" Wagner 

"Toreador song" from "Carmen" Bizet 

The swapping song ) 

John Riley ) Kentucky Mountain Songs 
The toad's courtship ) 

Thomas Perkins 







THE JUNIOR OCTAVE CLUB 



OF NORRISTOWN, PA. 



Annual Ewtttng dJonrrrt 



e^rs 



Y. W. C. A. Auditorium 
Thursday Evening, November the Seventh 



Nineteen Hundred and Forty 
At 8.15 O'clock 



Program 
t 

"NOCTURNE" 

A One Act Play (Excerpt from the life of CUopia) 

by 
Sheldon Sackbtt 

Characters 
Madam Aurore Dudevant (George Sand) Betty O'Hara 

Selange Dudevant (her daughter) 

Mary Lou Mulhelland 

Frederick Chopin William Rehrer 

Time 1847 
Place, Madam Dudevant'* Study 



Presented by 
"The Dramateurs" 

Directed by Miss BettyMary McCloskey 



Part II 

Phyllis Moss, Piano 
Thomas Pbbkins, Baritone 

of 
THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

FROGRA/A 

Waltz in C sharp minor, Opus 64, No. 2 

Waltz in G flat major, Opus 70, No. 1 

Nocturne in F sharp major, Opus 15, No. 2 ( " Chopin 

Scherz© in B minor, Opus 20 

Phyllis Moss 



" 



O du, mein holder Abendstern, from Tannhauser 

Wagner 
Toreador song, from Carmen Bizet 

Thomas Perkins 

Dance 

1 Variations from Swan Lake 

2 Entff'act 

Fern Sironi 

The swapping song ~) 

John Riley > . Kentucky Mountain Songs 

The Toad's courtship J 

Thomas Perkins 



Patrons and Patronesses 



Mr. and Mrs. John K. Johnson 
Mr. and Mrs. Walter Jones 

Mr. and Mrs. Wallace M. Keely 
The Rev. and Mrs. J. Garrett Kell 
Mr. and Mrs. Karl K. Kite 
Mr. and Mrs. Walter A. Knerr 
Hon. and Mrs. Harold G. Knight 
Mr. and Mrs. Oscar F. Krebs 

The Rev. and Mrs. Wm. Lanigan 
Mr. and Mrs. John L. Larzelere 
Mr. and Mrs. Victor Lawrence 
Miss Sue B. Lees 
Mr. and Mrs. W. Nolan Leonard 
Mr. and Mrs. Edward E. Long- 
Mr. and Mrs. John A. Longacre 
Mr. and Mrs. H. J. Longenecker 
Mr. and Mrs. J. Walton Lysinger 

Dr. and Mrs. B. J. Martin, Jr. 

Miss Bettvmary McCloskey 

Mr. and Mrs. Earl L. McCoy 

Mrs. Joseph B. McDivitt 

Mis. Elbridge McFarland 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles W. Miller 

Miss Catharine Morgan 

Mr. and Mrs. Eugene Muller 

Dr. and Mrs. Kenneth E. Neiman 

The Rev. James M. Niblo 

Dr. and Mrs. S. Lehman Nyce 

Mr. and Mrs. Earl Oberholtzer 

Dr. and Mrs. Frank C. Parker 
Dr. and Mrs. Richard Parry 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph A. Ranck 

Mr. and Mrs. Donald K. Rittenhouse 

Mr. and Mrs. L. K. Rothermel 



Mr. and Mrs. John W. Royer 
Mr. and Mrs. W. Arthur Runk 

Mrs. Harry B. Scattergood 

Dr. Charlotte Seasongood 

Dr. Eleanor Seidler 

Mr. and Mrs. M. Eugene Seltzer 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert E. Sheldon 

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. J. Shilliday 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Ralph Shuler 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Silliman 

Mr. and Mrs. Harlow C. Simpson 

Mr. and Mrs. R. G. Sironi 

Mis. Charles C. Smith 

Miss Lillian Smith 

Mrs. C. N. Snyder 

Miss Marion G. Spangler 

Mr. and Mrs. Lylburn H. Steele 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold Steinbright 

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. M. Stout 

Mrs. Henderson Supplee 

Mr. and Mrs. Aaron S. Swartz 

Mr. and Mrs. Percy Teal 

Dr. and Mrs. H. Ernest Tompkins 
The Rev. and Mrs. James L. Tonkin 
Mr. and Mrs. Henry W. Topley, Sr. 

Miss Dorothy Wagner 

Misses Isabella and Hannah Walker 

Mrs. J. J. Webster 

Miss Mary R. Webster 

Miss Anna D. Whitcomb 

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. L. White 

Dr. and Mrs. Wm. R. Wiedinmyer 

Mrs. Walter A. Wilson 

Mr. and Mrs. Nathan H. Wolf 

Mr. and Mrs. H. Walton Wood 

Mr. and Mrs. Franklin L. Wright 

Mr. and Mrs. Herbert S. Wyers 

Lt. and Mrs. E. J. Youngjohns, Jr. 



THE CONVENT OF THE SACRED HEART 
Overbrook, Pennsylvania 

Tuesday afternoon, November 12, 1940, at 3:45 o'clock 

Veda Reynolds, Violin 
Gordon Sayre, Baritone 
Leo Luskin, Accompanist 

of 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 
Programme 



The happy lover ) 
The pretty creature ) 
"Preach not me your musty rules" 

from Milton's "Comus" 
Blow, blow, thou winter wind 
Gordon Sayre 



Old English arranged by Wilson 



Arne-Endicott 
Quilter 



II 



Sarabande (English suite) 
Praeludium and allegro 

Veda Reynolds 



Bach-Heifetz 
Pugnsni-Kreisler 



III 



"Notte e giorno faticar" ) 
from "Don Giovanni" ) 

"Den vieni alia finestra" ) 
from "Don Giovanni" ) 

With rue my heart is laden 

Pilgrim's song 

Gordon Sayre 

IV 

La fille aux cheveux de lin 

Scherzo tarantella, Opus 16 

Veda Reynolds 



Mozart 

Barber 
Tschaikovsky 



Debus sy-Hartmann 
Wieniawski 



YOUNG MUSICIANS SERIES 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

Tuesday afternoon, November 12, 1940, at 4:00 o* clock 

Phyllis Moss, Piano 

of 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

Programme 



Romance in A flat major Mozart 

Etudes symphoniques Schumann 

II 

Waltz in G flat major, Opus 70, No. 1 ) 

Nocturne in F sharp major, Opus 15, No. 2) Chopin 

Scherzo in B minor, Opus 20 ) 

III 

The little white donkey Ibert 

Clair de lune Debussy 

Danse rituelle du feu de Falla 



THE NEW CENTURY CLUB 
Wilmington, Delaware 

Wednesday afternoon, November 13, 1940, at 3:00 o'clock 

Paul Shure, Violin 
Leo Luskin, Accompanist 

of 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 
Programme 



Prelude in E major 
Rondo, Opus 53 
La fille aux cheveux de lin 
Perpetuum mobile 



Bach 

Schubert-Friedberg 

Debus sy-Hartmann 

NovaSek 



WOMEN »S CLUB 
Allentown, Pennsylvania 

Tuesday afternoon, November 19, 1940, at 2:00 o'clock 

Barbara Troxell, Soprano 
Eugene Bossart, Piano 

of 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 
Programme 



Ich trage meine Minne 

Cacilie 

Morgen 

StSndchen 

Barbara Troxell 



Strauss 



II 



Fantasie in F minor, Opus 49 
Eugene Bossart 

III 

Tell me, oh blue, blue sky 

Lullaby 

Little brother's lullaby 

Sea moods 

Barbara Troxell 



Chopin 



Giannini 

Scott 

Broeckx 

Tyson 



MUHLENBERG COLLEGE 
Allentown, Pennsylvania 

Thursday morning, November 21, 1940, at 11:30 o'clock 

Janet Putnam, Harp 
Esther Gruhn, Violoncello 
Eleanor Mitchel, Flute 
Leo Luskin, Accompanist 

of 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 
Programme 



La pantomime ) 
La timide ) 
Tambourin ) 

First movement from Trio Sonata 
in B minor 

Largo 
First and second movements from 
Sonata No. 8 in D major 

Adagio 

Allegro 



Rameau 



Loeillet 



Leclair 



II 



"Dance of the blessed spirits" 

from "Orpheus and Euridice" 
Piece en forme de Habanera 
Orientale 

Eleanor Mitchel 



Gluck 

Ravel 

Gaubert 



III 

Arioso 

Mazurka No. 1, Opus 11, No. 3 
Esther Gruhn 



Bach 
Popper 



IV 

Ballade (1910) 

Janet Putnam 



Salzedo 



MUHLENBERG COLLEGE 
Allentown, Pennsylvania 
(continued) 



Arabesque No. 1 Debussy 
"Dorienne" from 

"Divertissement grec" Mouquet 

Spanish dance, No. 5 Granados 



WESTTOWN SCHOOL 
Westtown, Pennsylvania 

Saturday evening, November 23, 1940, at 7:30 o'clock 

Norman Rose, Tenor 
Theodore Uppman, Baritone 
Thomas Perkins, Baritone 
James Cosmos, Bass 
Eleanor Mitchel, Flute 
Eugene Bossart, Accompanist 



of 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

Programme 

I 



The pilgrim's song 

James Cosmos 
The vagabond 

Theodore Uppman 
"0 ruddier than the cherry" 
from "Acis and Galatea" 
Thomas Perkins 
Flute obbligato by Eleanor Mitchel 



Tschaikovsky 
Vaughan Williams 



Handel 



II 



"Dance of the blessed soirits" 

from "Orpheus and Euridice" 
Piece en forme de Habanera 
Orientale 

Eleanor Mitchel 

III 

My bonny lass 

The trysting place 

"0 Isis and Osiris" 

from "The Magic Flute" 
Messrs Rose, Ur>pman, Perkins and Cosmos 



Gluck 

Ravel 
Gaubert 



Morley 
Brahms 

Mozart 



WESTTOWN SCHOOL 
Westtown, Pennsylvania 
(continued) 



IV 



Zueignung R. Strauss 

Norman Rose 
All day on the prairie Guion 

Theodore Uppman 
The toad T s courtship Kentucky Mountain Song 

Thomas Perkins 



Now is the month of Maying 

He that drinks is immortal ) 

I gave her cakes and I gave her ale ) 

Messrs Rose, Uppman, Perkins and Cosmos 



Morley 
Purcell 



YOUNG MUSICIANS SERIES 
Ritz Carlton Hotel 

Monday afternoon, November 25, 1940, at 1:30 o* clock 

Herbert Baumel, Violin 
Phyllis Moss, Piano 

of 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 
Programme 



Sonata in A major 

Preludio a capriccio 

Corrente 

Adagio 

Giga 

Herbert Baumel 

II 

Prelude in E minor, Opus 35, No. 1 
Rhapsody in G minor, Opus 79, No. 2 
Waltz in A flat, Opus 34, No. 2 
Phyllis Moss 

III 

Rumanische Volkstanze 

Herbert Baumel 



Vivaldi 



Mendelssohn 
Brahms 
Chopin 



Bart<5k 



RELIGHTING THE 




LAMPS OF CHINA 



CHINA AID 
CONCERT 



THE FOYER OF THE ACADEMY OF MUSIC 

Wednesday Evening, November 27, 1940, 8:30 o'clock 

• 

AMY MAYE WANG, Pianist 
HILDA MORSE, Soprano 
MARGUERITE KUEHNE, Violinist 
MACKEY SWAN, Baritone 
EUGENE BOSSART, Accompanist 

• 

I 

From the sonata in A, Opus 2, No. 2 Beethoven 

3. Scherzo. Allegretto 

4. Rondo 
Nocturne in F sharp, Opus 15, No. 2) 

Impromptu in F sharp, Opus 36 \ Chopin 

Amy Maye Wang 

II 

Visi a" arte from Tosca Puccini 

Ohie meneche ! Giannini 

Hilda Morse 

III 

La folia Corelli-Kreisler 

From the concerto in G minor Bruch 

2. Adagio 

3. Finale: Allegro energico 

Marguerite Kuehne 
— INTERMISSION — 

IV 

Vision fugitive from Herodiade Massenet 

My lady walks in loveliness Charles 

Mackey Swan 

V 

La ci darem la tnano from Don Giovanni Mozart 

Miss Morse and Mr. Swan 

steinway piano 

• 

Please visit our office FIRST for your Christmas cards and gifts. 



THE PEDDIE SCHOOL 
Hightstown, New Jersey 

Sunday afternoon, December 1, 1940, at 4:30 o* clock 

Jean Seward, Contralto 
Eugene Bossart, Accompanist 

of 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

Programme 

I 



Ave Maria 

Laughing and weeping 

Who is Sylvia? 



Schubert 



II 



Deep river ) 
Swing low ) 
The old maid's song 
Kishmul's galley 



Negro spirituals 

Kentucky Mountain Song 
Song of the Hebrides 




EARL HENSON, Director 
H. OLIVER WILLIAMS, Accompanist 



EIGHTEENTH SEASON 



EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL 
FALL CONCERT 

given by 

The Roxborough Male Chorus 

Assisted by 

MATHILDE LEHMANN, Soprano 

WINIFRED SCHAEFER, Violoncello 

ELIZABETH DICKINSON, Piano 



MEMBER CLUB 




ASSOCIATED GLEE CLUBS 

OF 

AMERICA 



ROXBOROUGH HIGH SCHOOL 

Tuesday evening, December Third 

Nineteen Hundred Forty 



...Program... 



3. 



OFFICIAL SALUTATION OF THE 
ASSOCIATED GLEE CLUBS OF AMERICA 

"Hail, Friends of Music! In her praise we gather 
To do her honor in fellowship together; 
Music's fair muse each human heart rejoices, 
We join our voices here in praise of song!" 

Wm. Bentz. 

"SONGS AFTER SUN-DOWN" 



(a) 


Winter Song 


Bullard 


(b) 


All Through the Night Old Welsh Melody 


(c) 


I Hear a Thrush at Eve 

The Chorus 


Cadman 




Two Movements from Sonata in G 


Sammartini 




Grave Allegro 






Miss Schaefer 






Ballatella (from "Pagliacci") 


Leoncavallo 




Miss Lehmann 






"IN PRAISE TO GOD" 




(a) 


Pilgrims' Chorus (from "Tannhauser"; 


) Wagner 


(b) 


Steal Away 


Johnson 


(c) 


Ave Maria (with Miss Lehmann) 
The Chorus 


Bach-Gounod 


(a) 


Menuett in C 


Haydn 


(b) 


Apres un reve 


Fuure 


(c) 


Etude-Caprice 

Miss Schaefer 


Goltermann 


(a) 


Morning Hymn 


Henschel 


(b) 


A Brown Bird Singing 


Wood 


(c) 


Since First I Met Thee 


Rubinstein 


(d) 


Venetian Song 


Tosti 



Miss Lehmann 

"LIFE AND LOVE" 

(a) Vagabond Song Protheroe 

(b) Liebestraum Liszt 

(c) Italian Street Song (with Miss Lehmann) Herbert 

The Chorus 



CHORUS SELECTIONS 

Program Annotations by Stanley Hart Cauffman 

Winter Song Frederick Field Bullard 

This is a song of good fellowship. A Scandinavian concep- 
tion of the comaraderie about the roaring Are while the 
demons of frost and cold struggle vainly without. 

Ho, a song by the fire! Pass the pipes, pass the bowl; 

Ho, a song by the fire! With a skoal, with a skoal! 

For the wolf-wind is wailing at the doorways, 

And the snow drifts deep along the road, 

And the ice-gnomes are marching from their Norways, 

And the great white cold walks abroad. 

But here by the fire we defy frost and storm. 

Ha, Ha! we are warm, and we have our hearts desire. 

For here we're good fellows, and the beechwood and the bellows, 

And the cup is at the lip in the pledge of fellowship. 

Pile the logs on the fire! Fill the pipes, pass the bowl; 

Pile the logs on the fire! With a skoal, with a skoal! 

For the fire-goblins flicker on the ceiling, 

And the wine-witch glitters in the glass, 

And the smoke-wraiths are drifting, curling, reeling, 

And the sleighbells jingle as they pass. 

Oh, a god is the fire! Pull the pipes, drain the bowl; 

Oh, a god is the fire! With a skoal, with a skoal! 

For the room has a spirit in the embers, 

"Tis a god, and our fathers knew his name, 

And they worshipped him in long forgot Decembers, 

And their hearts leaped high with the flame. 

All Through the Night Arr. by F. J. Smith 

For centuries Wales has been celebrated as producing the 
most beautiful male voices of any country in the world. 
This is no doubt due to the climate, and the melodic Welsh 
language. This traditional song is well over a thousand 
years old. It had been preserved in the Welsh musical 
terminology, the key to which was not discovered until 
about two hundred and forty years ago. The song was 
then introduced in a light opera in England about 1725, 
under the phonetic title of "Ah, Hide Your Nose!" The 
Welsh words for "All Through the Night" are "Ar hyd y 
nos." 

Sleep my love and peace attend thee, all through the night; 

Guardian angels God will lend thee, all through the night. 

Soft the drowsy hours are creeping. 

Hill and vale in slumber sleeping, 

Love alone his watch is keeping, all through the night. 

Though I roam a minstrel lonely, all through the night; 

My true harp shall praise thee only, all through the night. 

Love's young dream alas! is over, 

Yet my strains of love shall hover, 

Near the presence of my lover, all through the night. 

Hark a solemn bell is ringing, clear through the night; 

Thou my love art heavenward winging home through the night. 

Earthly dust from off thee shaken, 

Soul immortal thou shalt waken 

With thy last dim journey taken home through the night. 



I Hear a Thrush at Eve Charles Wakefield Cadman 



Charles Wakefield Cadman haa devoted much of his life to 
the study of American Indian music. His setting of this 
madrlgal-llke poem by Eberhart Is unusual in that the 
melody Is always introduced on the second half of the 
initial beat of the bar. 

I hear a thrush at eve wild noteB upfiinging; 

Twilight and rapture weave snares for his singing. 
Yet soars his song afar seeking his golden star; 

I hear a thrush at eve, thrilling and singing. 

So through the dark to thee my song is springing; 

Throbbing with ecstasy, love notes are winging. 
Lean from thy tower above, lean forth with eyes of love, 

For through the dark to thee, my heart is singing! 



Pilgrims' Chorus Richard Wagner 



This celebrated chorus is sung in the second scene of the 
first act of the opera "Tannhauser," the setting being a 
lovely valley near Wartburg, where a shepherd boy watches 
the passing of a group of pilgrims traveling to Rome. As 
they pass, chanting their deep-toned harmonies, the child 
kneels, and begs them to carry with them his earnest 
prayers to the Holy See. 



Once more, with Joy, Oh my home 1 may meet. 

Once more ye fair flowery meadows I greet ye; 

My pilgrim staff henceforth may rest, 

Since heaven's sweet peace is within my breast. 

The sinner's plaint on high was heard, 

Accepted by a gracious Lord, 

The tears I laid before His shrine. 

Are turned to hope and joy divine, 

Oh Lord, eternal praise be Thine! 

The blessed source of Thy mercy o'er flowing, 

Our soul repentant who seek Thee bestowing, 

Of hell and death I have no fear, 

My gracious Lord is ever near. 

Hallelujah! Eternally. 



Steal Away Arr. by Hall Johnson 



One of the most beautiful of all Negro spirituals. 

Steal away to Jesus, steal away home; 

aln' got long to stay here. 

My Lord, He calls me by de thunder! 
De trumpet soun's with-in-a my soul; 

1 aln' got long to stay here. 

Green trees abendin', po* sinner stan' atremblln' 
De trumpet soun's wlth-ln-a my soul; 
I ain' got long to stay here. 



There is not any musick of instruments whatever compared 
to that which is made of Voices, when ye voices are good and 
ye same are well sorted and ordered. — William Bird (1542-1623) 



Ave Maria Bach-Gounod 

This composition has a very remarkable history. The ac- 
companiment was written about 1720 by John Sebastian 
Bach, a German, as his "First Prelude for Clavichord." 
The melody for the voice was composed over this Prelude 
by Charles Gounod, a Frenchman, almost a century and 
half later. It represents the collaboration of two men of 
genius, one born in 1685 and the other In 1818. 

Lord, O Lord my God, be not far from me, 
O God I trust In Thee, unto Thee 1 lift my soul; 
Show me Thy way Lord, lead me In Thy truth. 
O save me for Thy mercy's sake, 
O hear my prayer, O Lord. 

Lord, O Lord my God, be not far from me, 

O God I trust in Thee, unto Thee I lift my soul; 

Lord make haste to help me. 

Hide not Thou Thy face from me O Lord. 

Pardon my iniquity, all my hope I rest on The*. 

Save for Thy Name's sake; 

O Lord be Thou my help forever. Amen. 



Vacabond Song Daniel Protheroe 

It's ho! for a song as wild and free 

As the swash of the waves in the open sea; 

It's ho! for a song as unconflned 

As the hawk that sails in the summer wind; 

A song for a vagabond's heart and brain, 

Refreshing and sweet as the roving rain 

That chants to the thirsty earth. 

A song of rollicking mirth, 

A song of the grass and grain! 

It's ho! for a vagabond's life say I! 

A vagabond live, and a vagabond die; 

It's ho! to roam in the solitudes. 

And chum with the birds in the vagrom woods, 

To sleep with flowers, and wash In dew, 

And dream of love that is ever new, 

A love that never grows stale, 

Like a cask of rum or ale. 

It's ho! for a stretch of the dusty road, 
Or here a meadow, or there a lode; 
It's ho! to hear in the early morn 
The yellow allegro of tasselled corn; 
To sail in fancy the golden main 
Where breezes billow the seas of grain. 
And the swallows that skim the tips 
Are richly cargoed ships, 
Outbound for the ports of Spain. 

It's ho! for the smell of the sap that swims, 
When the maples sweat like an athlete's limbs; 
It's ho! for the joys that crowd the spring, 
The brawl of brooks, the birds that sing; 
To wander at will the summer through, 
Indifferent to blame, careless of due; 
In winter the kiss that slips, To ho! 
From a nut-brown naiad's lips, Yo ho! 
And the love that lies in her eyes of blue! 



"Such is Thy Power Divine, 
Oh Music, Heavenly Art!" 

I greet you, well beloved and trusty, 
Assembled here from far and wide. 

Goethe. 



LlEBESTRAUM (DREAM OF LOVE) Franz Liszt 

My Dream of Love will linger on forever 

Although we are far apart. 

My Dream of Love will linger, though I know 

It may not come true, sweetheart. 

When nights are dark and still 

I feel your magic thrill; 

Feel your nearness dear, 

Until, comes the dawn, 

I awake and find you are gone. 

My Dream of Love is filled with tender kisses, 

Close to your heart you hold me it seems. 

Each night is bliss beneath the pale moonbeams; 

I'm happy with my Love Dreams. 

Italian Street Song Victor Herbert 

Although the flag of Ireland is probably the only national 
standard which has a musical instrument as its principal 
design, the harp, and while this land has produced many 
beautiful traditional folk melodies, the names of but two 
Irish-born composers are in any way well known, Michael 
William Balfe and Victor Herbert. Both were prolific com- 
posers of melodic light operas; but both left Ireland to 
study, and made their success away from their native land: 
Balfe in Paris and Herbert in America. "Naughty Mari- 
etta," the opera in which this composition was sung was 
written by Herbert while he was conducting the Pittsburgh 
Symphony Orchestra in 1904. 

Ah! my heart is back in Napoli, 

And I seem to hear again in dreams her revelry, 

The mandolinas playing sweet, 

The pleasant fall of dancing feet, 

Oh! could I return, 

Oh! joy complete! Napoli! 

Zing, boom, aye, mandolinas gay. 



PAST PRESIDENTS 

1923 T. W. Schofleld 1932 Leon Birkmlre 

1924 T. W. Schofleld 1933 Mortimer W. Blair, M.D. 

1925 T. W. Schofleld 1934 Albert R. Frame 

1926 T. W. Schofleld 1935 Paul D. Missimer 

1927 Ellwood G. Dungan 1936 Paul D. Missimer 

1928 D. W. Bussinger, Jr. 1937 Paul D. Missimer 

1929 D. W. Bussinger, Jr. 1938 Robert C. Williams 

1930 Wayne R. Moyer 1939 William C. Cooper, Jr. 

1931 William R. Ambler 



Roxborou&h JMale Cn 



orus 



Three classes of membership 

First: The Active (or Singing Members) who are admitted 
by application to our Secretary. Such applicants 
must be proposed by a member and pass an exam- 
ination by our Director and Membership Commit- 
tee. Dues are $1.00 a year. 

Second: Membership in the Ladies' Auxiliary (recently or 
ganized) which is open to any friend of the Chorus 
— more especially relatives and friends of the Active 
Members. Dues are $1.00 yearly and meetings are 
held monthly. 

Third: Associate Members or the Patrons of the Chorus, who 
by payment of annual dues of $3.50 receive six tick- 
ets to each of our two concerts. Applications should 
be addressed to Melvin E. Marple, 461 Flamingo 
Street; or to Miss Ruth G. Fleischer, 4351 Freeland 
Avenue; or to any member of Chorus or Auxiliary. 



THE LADIES' AUXILIARY 



Mrs. Mathilda Ley 
Mrs. Earl Henson 
Miss Ruth G. Fleischer 
Mrs. Gordon R. Virkler 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 



MEMBERS 



Mrs. Mortimer W. Blair Mrs. 

Mrs. D. W. Bussinger, Jr. Mrs. 

Mrs. J. Raymond Christy, Jr. Mrs. 

Miss Jane C. Clemens Mrs. 

Mrs. E. Virgil Cooper Mrs. 

Mrs. "William C. Cooper, Jr. Mrs. 

Mrs. Thomas E. Coyle, Jr. Mrs. 

Mrs. John C. Dotter, Jr. Miss 

Mrs. James E. Eckersley Mrs. 

Mrs. Harry D. Evans, Sr. Mrs. 

Miss Ruth G. Fleischer Miss 

Mrs. Walter Gaily Mrs. 

Mrs. William H. Goshow Mrs. 

Mrs. Kathleen M. Grow 



Ralph E. Helss 
Earl Henson 
Mathilda Ley 
Melvin E. Marple 
Paul D. Missimer 
P. S. Parkinson 
Frank Robinson 
Lily V. Smith 
Helen L. Smith 
Gordon R. Virkler 
Grace Williams 
H. Oliver Williams 
Robert C. Williams 



OFFICERS OF THE CHORUS 



Oliver W. Grow 
E. Virgil Cooper 
Gordon R. Virkler 
Melvin E. Marple 
William H. Goshow 
John G. Carley 
Harry D. Evans, Jr. 
Earl Henson 
H. Oliver Williams 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Secretary for Associate Members 

Treasurer 

Librarian 

Assistant Librarian 

Musical Director 

Accompanist 



ACTIVE MEMBERS 



TENORS 



Elmer A. Barthold 
Mortimer W. Blair 
John G. Carley 
J. Raymond Christy, Jr. 
E. Virgil Cooper 
William C. Cooper 
Thomas E. Coyle, Jr. 
James E. Eckersley 
Vinton A. Fish 
Alfred P. Fleischer 
John J. Fry 
Walter H. Gaily 



Frank Beswick 
Howard Blackburn 
John G. Breyer 
D. W. Bussinger, Jr. 
Walter Candlin 
Ellwood G. Dungan 
Harry D. Evans, Jr. 
Wm. H. Goshow 
Oliver W. Grow 
J. William Heath 
Ralph E. Heiss 
William J. Hendren 
Richard C. Henry 



Alfred A. MacMoran 
Paul D. Missimer 
P. S. Parkinson 
George B. Radcllff 
Frank Robinson 
William Robinson 
Leon H. Smith 
William T. Smith 
William N. Snyder 
Fletcher D. Street, Si 
W. Edward Voss 
J. Clifford Williams 



BASSES 



Herbert C. Hunsworth 
F. Oliver Keely, Jr. 
Paul T. Levins 
Robert W. MacMoran 
Melvin E. Marple 
J. Singleton McGee 
William H. Smith 
Fletcher D. Street, Jr. 
Martin A. Suhy 
Harry H. Sykes 
Gordon R. Virkler 
Robert C. Williams 



Associate Members 



Mrs. Thomas Acaster 



Mr. Samuel F. Houston 



Misses Grace & Esther Allebach Mr. George E. Hunter 



Mr. & Mrs. O. W. Ames 
Mr. J. Ellwood Barrett 
Mrs. George Barthold 
Dr. Mortimer W. Blalr 
Mrs. Mortimer W. Blair 
Mr. George W. Blumenauer 
Mr. Thomas F. Boon 
Mr. George M. Bovard 
Mrs. D. W. Busslnger, Jr. 



Mr. Dunton J. Irwin 
Mr. Edward A. Jeffries 
Mr. & Mrs. Harry T. Jones 
Mr. & Mrs. H. Wilson Knoelke 
Dr. Leon Adam Kowalskl 
Mr. Wm. R. Kurtz 
Mr. Adolph Lang 
Mr. & Mrs. Wm. M. Lange 
Mrs. Matilda Ley 



Mr. & Mrs. Stanley H. BusslngerMrs. Melvln E. Marple 



Rev. & Mrs. N. H. Caley 

Mr. & Mrs. B. F. Calverley, Jr. 

Mr. Walter Candlln 

Mr. Stanley Hart Cauffman 

Mrs. Warren Chllds 

Dr. & Mrs. Raymond Christy 

Mrs. E. Virgil Cooper 

Mrs. Wm. T. Cooper, Jr. 

Mr. Randolph De Wald 

Mr. G. Alfred Dietrich 

Mrs. Ellwood G. Dungan 

Mrs. Elmer E. Dungan 

Mr. James E. Eckersley 

Mr. Harry E. Elsenhardt 

Mr. Harry D. Evans, Sr. 

Mr. Hllbert S. Felton 



Mr. George B. McClennen 
Mrs. George Mlsslmer 
Mr. G. Dundore Mlsslmer 
Mrs. Paul D. Mlsslmer 
Mrs. Reed A. Morgan 
Miss Margaret H. Oliver 
Mr. & Mrs. Wallace F. Ott 
Mrs. P. S. Parkinson 
Miss Almeda Probasco 
Mr. Albert S. Propper 
Mrs. John H. Robinson 
Mrs. George B. Radcllff 
Rox.-Myk. Lions Club 
Rox. Symphony Orchestra 
Mr. Russell P. Schofield 
Mr. William E. Shappell 



Mr. & Mrs. J. Elliott Flanagan Mr. & Mrs. Edward S. Siddall 



Mr. Wm. B. Forney, Jr. 
Mr. Wm. W. Frazler, 3rd. 
Mrs. John J. Fry 
Dr. Hans C. Funch 
Mr. J. Wesley Glanding 
Mr. & Mrs. W. Heath Gordon 
Mr. Wm. H. Goshow 
Mrs. Roy B. Greene 
Mr. Albert W. Grow 
Mrs. Kathleen M. Grow 
Mr. Wilbur H. Hamilton 
Mr. & Mrs. William J. 

Hamilton, Jr. 
Mr. & Mrs. George Hansell 
Mr. Charles G. Hauschlld 
Miss Blanche L. Heldlnger 
Mr. & Mrs. Ralph E. Helss 
Mrs. Arthur Henson 
Mrs. Earl Henson 
Dr. Robert H. Hirsh 



Mr. B. Mitchell Simpson 

Mr. A. F. Skrobanek 

Mr. & Mrs. Leon E. Smith 

Mr. Wm. T. Smith 

Mr. Edgar S. Stafford 

Mr. Arthur M. Stetler 

Captain J. G. Strain 

Mr. & Mrs. F. D. Street 

Mrs. Albert H. Virkler 

Mrs. Gordon R. Virkler 

Mrs. S. G. von Bosse 

Mr. Charles H. Whlteman 

Mr. F. A. Wilkinson 

Mr. & Mrs. H. Oliver Williams 

Mr. Harry S. Williams 

Wlssahickon Home & 

School Council 
Mr. Charles A. Woerner 
Rev. & Mrs. Edmund B. Wood 
Dr. Carl B. Young 



Our Nineteenth Annual Spring Concert will be given in this 
Auditorium on Tuesday evening, May 6, 1941. We will be 
assisted by the Boys of St. Timothy's Choir under the direc- 
tion of Edward S. Siddall, Choirmaster. 



THE FESTIVAL FOUNDATION CHORUS 
Moorestown, New Jersey 

Wednesday evening, December 4, 1940, at 8:15 o* clock 

Marguerite Kuehne, Violin 

of 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

Programme 

I 

"Walther f s prize song" 

from "Die Meistersinger" Wagner-Wilhelmj 

Tango Zimbalist 

Burleska Suk 

II 

La folia Corelli-Kreisler 



YOUNG MUSICIANS SERIES 
Feasterville, Pennsylvania 

Saturday evening, December 7, 1940, at 9:00 o'clock 

Herbert Baumel, Violin 
Phyllis Moss, Piano 

of 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 
Programme 

I 

Sonata in A major Vivaldi 

Preludio a capriccio 

Corrente 

Adagio 

Giga 
Rumanische Volkstanze Bart ok 

Herbert Baumel 

II 

Prelude in E minor, Opus 35, No. 1 Mendelssohn 
Rhapsody in G minor, Opus 79, No. 2 Brahms 
Waltz in C sharp minor, Opus 64, No. 2) . 
Waltz in G flat major, Opus 70, No. 1 ) Chopin 
Etude in A minor Paganini-Liszt 

Phyllis Moss 

III 

Sonata in A major Franck 

Allegretto ben moderato 
Allegro 

Recitative - fantasia 
Allegretto poco mosso 

Miss Moss and Mr Baumel 



THE FESTIVAL FOUNDATION CHORUS 
Burlington, New Jersey- 
Wednesday evening, December 11, 1940, at 8:15 o'clock 

Veda Reynolds, Violin 
Leo Luskin, Accompanist 

of 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 
Programme 



Sarabande (English suite) 
Rondino on a theme 

by Beethoven 
Variations on a theme 

by Corelli 



II 



Carmen fantasy 



Bach-Heifetz 

Kreisler 

Tartini-Kreisler 

Sarasate-Zimbalist 



THE YOUNG MUSICIANS MUSICALES 
Main Line Afternoon Club 

at the home of 
MRS. HOWARD SELLERS 

Wynnewood, Pa. 
Thursday, December 12th, at 3.30 o'clock 



WINIFRED SCHAEFER, Violoncello 
WALDEMAR DABROWSKI, Piano 
NORMA MacIVOR, Voice 



PROGRAMME 

Concerto No. 1 in A minor, Opus 33 Saint-Saens 

Allegro non troppo 
Allegro con moto 
Allegro non troppo 

Fir s t movem e nt from Sonata in G Samartini 

All e gro 

Winifred Sckaefer 

Non so piu cosa son 

The marriage of Figaro Mozart 

Vorborgenheit Wolf 

Vergebliches Standchen Brahms 

Norma MacIvor 

Menuett in C Haydn 

Apres un reve Faure 

Etude— Caprice Qoltermann 

Winifred Schaffer 

The Nightingale and the rose Korsakoff 

The night has a thousand eyes Hageman 

I dream of Jeanne Foster 

Norma MacIvor 



The Committee for Young Musicians wish to inform you that our 
artists are available for private engagements at a nominal fee. Please 
apply to Mrs. Howard Longstretb, Telephone Ardmore 249. 



YOUNG MUSICIANS SERIES 
Chestnut Hill, Pennsylvania 

Thursday afternoon, December 12, 1940, at 3:00 o'clock 

Janet Putnam, Harp 
Esther Gruhn, Violoncello 
Eleanor Mitchel, Flute 

of 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



Programme 

I 

La pantomime ) 
La timide ) 
Tambourin ) 

First movement from Trio Sonata 
in B minor 

Largo 
First and second movements from 
Sonata No. 8 in D major 

Adagio 

Allegro 

II 

Sonata in C minor 
Impromptu-caprice 
Night breeze 

Janet Putnam 



Rameau 



Loeillet 



Leclair 



Pescetti 

Pi erne* 

Salzedo 



III 

Arabesque No. 1 
"Dorienne" from 

"Divertissement grec" 
Spanish dance, No. 5 



Debussy 

Mouquet 
Granados 



GEORGE SCHOOL 
George School, Pennsylvania 

Saturday evening, December 14, 1940, at 8:00 o'clock 

Gordon Sayre, Baritone 

Esther Gruhn, Violoncello 

Robert Cornman, Piano 

of 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 
Programme 



The happy lover ) ~, , _ , . . jvtt-t 
The pretty creature ) 01d ^ llsh arr9n S ed * w ^ lson 
"Preach not me your musty rules" 

from Milton's "Comus" Arne-Endicott 

Blow, blow, thou winter wind Quilt er 

Gordon Sayre 

II 



Arioso 

Sonata in D minor, Opus 5, No. 8 
Esther Gruhn 



Bach 
Corelli 



III 



Preludes : 

C major, Opus 28, No. 1 

D flat major, Opus 28, No. 15 

G major, Opus 28, No. 3 

B flat minor, Opus 28, No. 16 

Rhapsody in G minor, Opus 79, No. 2 

Alborada del gracioso 

Robert Cornman 



Chopin 



Brahms 
Ravel 



GEORGE SCHOOL 

George School, Pennsylvania 

(continued) 



IV 



The swan 

Mazurka No. 1, Opus 11, No. 3 
Allegro appassionato, Opus 43 
Esther Gruhn 



Saint-Saens 

Popper 

Saint-Saens 



"Notte e giorno fat i car" ) 
from "Don Giovanni" ) 

"Den vieni alia finestra" ) 
from "Don Giovanni" ) 

With rue my heart is laden 

The birthday of a king 

Gordon Sayre 



Mozart 

Barber 
Neidlinger 



VI 



None but the lonely heart 

Mr Sayre, Miss Gruhn and Mr Cornman 



Tschaikovsky 



STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 
Kutztown, Pennsylvania 

Wednesday morning, January 8, 1941, at 10:30 o'clock 

Willa Stewart, Soprano 
Robert Cornman, Piano 

of 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

Programme 



Wohin? ) 
Nacht und TrSume) 
Wir wandelten ) 
Vergebliches Standchen) 

Willa Stewart 

II 

Ballade in G minor ) 

Etude in A minor, Opus 25, No. 11) 
Alborada del gracioso 

Robert Cornman 

III 

"The last rose of summer" 

from "Martha" 
Floods of spring 
Sleep now 
The sleigh 

Willa Stewart 



Schubert 
Brahms 



Chopin 
Ravel 



von Flotow 

Rachmaninov 

Barber 

Kountz 



NEW JERSEY STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 
Glassboro, New Jersey- 
Thursday morning, January 9, 1941, at 10:30 o'clock 

George Zazofsky, Violin 
Annette Elkanova, Piano 

of 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 
Programme 

I 

Sonata No. 5 in F, Opus 24 Beethoven 

Allegro 

Adagio molto espressivo 
Scherzo 
Rondo 
Miss Elkanova and Mr Zazofsky 

II 

Prelude in E major Mendelssohn 

La soiree dans Granade) 

L'isle joyeuse ) Debussy 

Annette Elkanova 



III 



Second movement from 

Concerto No. 2 in D minor, Opus 22 Wieniawski 
Romance 
Burleska Suk 

George Zazofsky 



YOUNG MUSICIANS SERIES 
Chestnut Hill, Pennsylvania 

Thursday afternoon, January 9, 1941, at 3:00 o'clock 

Willa Stewart, Soprano 
Eugene Bossart, Piano 

of 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



Programme 

I 

Spirate pur, spirate ) 
Ah, mai non cessate ) 
Sommi Dei 

"Che fiero costume" 
from "Eteocle" 

Willa Stewart 



Donaudy 
Handel 

Legrenzi 



II 



I call on Thee, Lord ) 
Rejoice, beloved Christians ) 
Variations on the name, "Abegg" 
Eugene Bossart 

III 

Wohin? ) 
Macht und Traume ) 
Wir wandelten ) 
Vergebliches Standchen ) 

Willa Stewart 



Bach-Bus oni 
Schumann 



Schubert 
Brahms 



IV 



Fantasie in F minor, Opus 49 
Eugene Bossart 



Chopin 



YOUNG MUSICIANS SERIES 
Chestnut Hill, Pennsylvania 
(continued) 



Sleep now Barber 

Floods of spring Rachmaninov 

Spirit flower Campbell-Tipton 

The sleigh Kountz 
Willa Stewart 



YOUNG MUSICIANS SERIES 
Feasterville, Pennsylvania 

Saturday evening, January 11, 1941, at 9:00 o'clock 

Theodore Uppman, Baritone 

Eugene Boss art, Piano 
Solomon Ovcharov, Violin 
Esther Gruhn, Violoncello 

of 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

Programme 

I 



Trio in B flat (K. 502) 
Allegro 
Larghetto 
Allegretto 
Miss Gruhn, Messrs Ovcharov and Bossart 



Mozart 



II 



From the "Dichterliebe" 

Im wunderschonen Monat Mai 
Aus meinen Thranen spriessen 
Die Rose, die Lilie, die Taube 
Wenn ich in deine Augen sen* 
Ich grolle nicht 

Minnelied ) 

Die Mainacht ) 

Weigenlied ) 

Bright is the ring of days ) 

Vagabond ) 

Silent noon ) 

Theodore Uppman 

III 



Schumann 



Brahms 



Vaughan Williams 



Three movements from Trio in D minor, 
Opus 49 

Molto allegro agitato 
Andante con moto tranquillo 
Scherzo. Leggiero e vivace 
Miss Gruhn, Messrs Ovcharov and Bossart 



Mendelssohn 



YOUNG MUSICIANS SERIES 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

Tuesday afternoon, January 14, 1941, at 4:00 o'clock 

Janet Putnam, Harp 

Esther Gruhn, Violoncello 

Eleanor Mitchel, Flute 

of 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

Programme 

I 

La pantomime ) 

La timide ) Rameau 

L'agacante ) 

Third movement from Trio Sonata 

in B minor Loeillet 

Adagio 
Sonata in G minor Marcello 

Adagio 

Allegro 

Largo 

Allegro 

II 



"Gavotte" from "Armide" 
Sonata in C minor 
Impromptu-capr i ce 

Janet Putnam 



Gluck 

Pescetti 

Pierne 



III 

Arabesque No. 1 
"Dorienne" from 

"Divertissement grec" 
Spanish dance, No. 5 



Debussy 

Mouquet 
Granados 



^s^ 







3Ttoentp=jFifti) glnmfaevgarp 



is>ong; Recital 



partmra GTroxell 
Robert (grooter* 
Cugene JSoasart 



- Soprano 

- baritone 
Accompanist 



of 



flE&e Curtis Jtostitute of JfluSic 



Wednesday, two-thirty o'clock 

January Fifteenth 

Ninteen Hundred Forty-one 



Montgomery County 

Medical Society 

Building 



Ehe <£ctabe Club 

Norristown, Pennsylvania 
MRS. STANLEY B. DIETRICH, President 



ULtomty-tf iftfj &nntoeraarp 

Mrs. Benjamin F. Evans - - - Chairman of the Day 
Fourth President— 1925-1928 



PROGRAM 

I 

Die Lotosblume 1 

Schumann 

Widmung 

Morgen 

Y R. Strauss 

Standchen 



}• 



Dich, theure Halle from Tannhailsey Wagner 

Miss Troxell 

II 

L'invitation au voyage Dtiparc 

En priere Faitre 

Les yeux 1 

> Aubert 

Vieille chanson espagnole J 

Vision fugitive from Herodiade Massenet 

Mr. Grooters 



PROGRAM 



III 

The Unforeseen Scott 

The Little Shepherd's Lullaby Somervell 

Spendthrift Charles 

Sea Moods Tyson 

Miss Troxbll 



IV 

Drink to Me Only with Thine Eyes arr. Quitter 

At Night Rachmaninov 

For You Alone Geehl 

Glory Road Wolfe 

Mr. Grooters 



V 

La ci darem la mano from Don Giovanni Mozart 

I Passed by Your Window Brae 

Trot Here, Trot There from Veronique Messager 

Miss Troxell and Mr. Grooters 



MRS. KARL KENT KITE 



MRS. CHARLES H. BRUNNER 
MRS. E. FREDERICK BROUSE 
MRS. ALLAN M. HAAS 
MRS. WILLIAM C. SKEATH 



Next Meeting, February Nineteenth 

Explanatory Piano Forte Recital 

HORACE ALWYNE 

Mrs. Warren L. Irish Chairman of the Day 



SLEIGHTON FARM SCHOOL FOR GIRLS 
Darling, Pennsylvania 

Sunday evening, January 19, 1941, at 7:30 o f clock 

Eleanor Mellinger, Harp 

of 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

Programme 



The harmonious blacksmith 

Giga 

Theme and variations 

II 

Impromptu-caprice, Opus 9 
Chanson de Guillot-Martin 
Le bon petit roi d'Yvetot 

III 



Handel 

Corelli 

Haydn 



Pierne 

Pe*rilhou-Miller 

Grand j any 



Mirage 
Idyllic poem 

Concert variations on Adeste Fideles 
(1938) 



Salzedo 



FOREMEN'S AND SUPERVISOR'S CLUB 
Gibbstown, New Jersey 

Thursday evening, January 23, 1941, at 9:00 o'clock 

Norman Rose, Tenor 

Theodore Uppman, Baritone 

Thomas Perkins, Baritone 

James Cosmos, Bass 

Waldemar Dabrowski, Accompanist 

of 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

Programme 



The trysting place Brahms 

"0 Isis and Osiris" 

from "The Magic Flute" Mozart 

My bonny lass Morley 

Messrs Rose, Uppman, Perkins and Cosmos 



II 



All day on the prairie 
The vagabond 

Theodore Uppman 

III 

Let the fifes and the clarions 

Messrs Perkins and Cosmos 

The angler's song 

Messrs Rose and Uppman 

Sound the trumpet 

Messrs Perkins and Cosmos 



Guion 
Vaughan Williams 



Purcell 

Lawes 

Purcell 



IV 



The swapping song ) 
The toad's courtship ) 

Thomas Perkins 



Kentucky Mountain Songs 



FOREMEN'S AND SUPERVISOR'S CLUB 

Gibbstown, New Jersey 

(continued) 



He that drinks is immortal ) 

I gave her cakes and I gave her ale ) rurcell 

Now is the month of Maying Morley 

Messrs Rose, Upoman, Perkins and Cosmos 



SAINT JAMES SCHOOL 
Washington County, Maryland 

Saturday evening, January 25, 1941, at 8:30 o'clock 

Eileen Flissler, Piano 
Marguerite Kuehne, Violin 
Winifred Schaefer, Violoncello 

of 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

Programme 



Trio in B flat (K. 502) 
Allegro 
Lar ghetto 
Allegretto 

II 

Apres un reve 
Etude-caprice 

Winifred Schaefer 

III 

Second and third movements from 
Trio in D minor, Opus 49 

Andante con moto tranquillo 
Scherzo: Leggiero e vivace 



Mozart 



Faure 
Goltermann 



Mendelssohn 



IV 



Scherzo in B flat minor, Opus 31 ) 
Mazurka in A minor, Opus 17, No. 4) 
The little white donkey 

Eileen Flissler 



Chopin 
Ibert 



"Walther's prize song" from 

"Die Meistersinger" 
Tango 
Burleska 

Marguerite Kuehne 



Wagner-Wilhelmj 

Zimbalist 

Suk 



SAINT JAMES SCHOOL 

Washington County, Maryland 

(continued) 



VI 

Trio in D major, Opus 70, No. 1 Beethoven 

Allegro vivace e con brio 
Largo assai ed espressivo 
Presto 



THE YOUNG MUSICIANS' 
LUNCHEON MUSICALES 

Ritz-Carlton Junior Ball Room 
Monday, January 27, 1941, at 1 o'clock 



|v, 



VEDA REYNOLDS , . 

)■ Viol i 
PAUL SHURE 

PHILIP GOLDBERG, Viola 

ROHINI COOMARA, Violoncello 

of 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



PROGRAMME 

Quartet in G, Opus 76, No. 1 Haydn 

Allegro, con spirito 

Adagio sostenuto 

Menuetto: Presto 

Finale: Allegro ma non troppo 

First movement from Quartet in G minor, 

Opus 1 0, No. 1 Debussy 

Anime et tres decide 



The Committee for Young Musicians wishes to inform you that our 
young artists are available for private engagements at a nominal sum. 
Please apply to Mrs. Philip W. Amram, Telephone, Somerton 8212, or 
Mrs. William W. Arnctt, Locust 12} 1. 



czSiitu— 



<=?4-tUtL\ 



NEW CENTURY CLUB 



f 




Wednesday, January twenty-ninth 

Nineteen hundred forty-one 



Programme 
o 

Invocation - The Rt. Rev. Arthur R. McKinstry 
O 
LUNCHEON 
Welcome .... Mrs. William T. Hughes 
Presentation of Guests ... Mrs. Hughes 
Introduction of the Toastmistress, 

Mrs. L. Mulford Taylor - - Mrs. Hughes 
Greetings .... Mrs. S. Blair Luckie 
Message .... Mrs. J. Paul Green 

Greetings .... Mrs. Clarence Fraim 
Greetings . . . Mrs. John L. Whitehurst 
Address ... Mrs. Horace Bonar Ritchie 
O 
PRESIDENT'S TABLE 

Mrs. John L. Whitehurst, First Vice-President, General 

Federation of Women's Clubs. 
Mrs. Horace Bonar Ritchie, Recording Secretary of the 

General Federation of Women's Clubs. 
Mrs. Clarence Fraim, President of Past State Presidents' 

Club, General Federation of Women's Clubs. 
The Right Reverend Arthur R. McKinstry, Bishop of 

the Protestant Episcopal Diocese of Delaware. 
Mrs. A. D. Warner, Sr., Honorary President of Delaware 

State Federation of Women's Clubs. 
Mrs. L. Mulford Taylor, Director for Delaware, General 

Federation of Women's Clubs. 
Mrs. J. Paul Green, President Delaware State Federation 

of Women's Clubs. 
Mrs. S. Blair Luckie, Pioneer Clubwoman of Pennsyl- 
vania. 
Mrs. Henry J. Stubbs, President Board of Directors. 
Mrs. Frank L. Frost, Jr., President of Junior Section. 
Mrs. William T. Hughes, President. 



Programme 
o 

MUSIC - 2.30 P. M. 
Anna Bukay, Harpist 

Impromptu Caprice ..... Pierne 

May Night Palmgren 

Prelude inC Prokofiejf 

La Desirade ....... Sahedo 

Chanson dans la nuit ..... Sahedo 

O 

"HEART ATTACK" 
o 

A Comedy in One Act 

by 

Frances Homer 

o 

Cast of Characters 

Alice Pennock, socially prominent - Mrs. George E. Cox 

Sidney Kelsey, her sister - Mrs. Emmett S. Hickman 

Carol Pennock, her daughter - Mrs. J. Morton Baxter 

Virginia Pennock, her youngest daughter 

Mrs. J. Robert Frederick 

Emilie Tomlinson, her mother - - Mrs. Edgar Hare 

Mamie, the family servant - Mrs. Irvin S. Taylor 

Place: The reception room of Emilie's home. 

Time: Summer 

Stage setting courtesy of Ellwood Souder & Sons Co. 



ition 



dUSIC 



Play under the direction of 
Mrs. Charles F. Wentz, Chairmanof Dramatic Committee 
assisted by 
Mrs. Edgar Hare, Vice-Chairman 
and 
Mrs. A. J. Abrams Mrs. John G. Leach 

Mrs. W. C. Blatz Miss Jessie Seaman 

Mrs. George E. Cox Miss Ruthanna Taylor 

Mrs. Ivan Culbertson Mrs. Henry M. Chambers 



ANNIVERSARY COMMITTEE 
o 

Mrs. A. J. Abrams, Chairman 
Mrs. Ella C. Mode, Vice-Chairman 
Mrs. H. R. Bartenslager Mrs. Fin Sparre 
Miss Marian B. Gray Mrs. Charles F. Wentz 

Miss Edith N. McConnell Mrs. Ernest S. Wilson 
Mrs. Alice P. Negendank Miss Helen E. Woodward 



®tj? ulyninr (Emtrrrt AsBorialtmt 

Tyrone, Pennsylvania 



Presents 

JlttHtrumPtttal (Frio 

JANET PUTNAM, Harp 
ESTHER GRUHN, Violincello 
ELEANOR MITCHEL, Flute 

of 
THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

of 
Philadelphia 

f . m. (£. A. Airimnrimn 

January 30th 1941 
8:45 P.M. 



i$Irngramnt£ 



i 

La pantomime ) 

La timide >• Rameau 

L'agacante \ 

First movement of Trio Sonata in B minor Loeillet 

Largo 

Sonate No. 8 in D major Leclair 

Adagio 
Allegro 

The Trio 



II 

The swan Saint-Saens 

Miss Gruhn and Miss Putnam 

Minuet, from L'arlesienne suite Bizet 

Miss Mitchel and Miss Putnam 

III 

Sonata in G minor Marcello 

Adagio 
Allegro 
Largo 
Allegro 

The Trio 



flrngramm? 



IV 

Gavotte, from Armide Gluck 

Sonata in C minor • Piscetti 

Allegro vigoroso 
Andantino espressivo 
Presto 

Impromptu-caprice Pierne 

Miss Putnam 

V 

Dorienne, from Divertissement grec • Mouquet 

Intermezzo, from Carmen Bizet 

Spanish dance, No. 5 • Granados 

The Trio 

LYON & HEALY HARP 



THE HILL SCHOOL 
Pott st own, Pennsylvania 

Saturday afternoon, February 1, 1941, at 12:30 o'clock 

Baruch Altroan, Violin 
Robert Cornman, Piano 

of 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

Programme 



Praeludium and allegro 
Air on the G string 
Rigaudon 

Baruch Alt man 

II 

Ballade in A flat, Opus 38, No. 3 
Alborada del gracioso 

Robert Cornman 

III 

Second movement from Concerto 
in E minor 
Andante 
Burleska 

Baruch Altman 



Kreisler 

Bach-Wilhelny 

Kreisler 



Chopin 
Ravel 



Mendelssohn 
Suk 



NEW JERSEY STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 
Glassboro, New Jersey 

Thursday morning, February 6, 1941, at 10:30 o 1 clock 

Theodore Uppman, Baritone 
Barbara Jane Elliott, Piano 

of 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

Programme 



Care selve 
Silent noon 

11 Di Proven za" from "La Traviata" 
Theodore Uppman 



Handel 

Vaughan Williams 

Verdi 



II 



Rondo capriccioso 
Arabesque in E major 
Etude in D flat major 

Barbara Jane Elliott 

III 



Mendelssohn 

Debussy 

Liszt 



The vagabond Vaughan Williams 

The sailor's life Old English arranged by Wilson 
Love went a-riding Bridge 

Theodore Uppman 



THE YOUNG MUSICIANS' 
LUNCHEON MUSICALES 

Ritz-Carlton Junior Ball Room 
Monday Afternoon, February 17, 1941, at 1 o'clock 



PHYLLIS MOSS, Piano 
GEORGE ZAZOFSKY, Violin 
ARTHUR \TINOGRAD, Violoncello 



PROGRAMME 

Trio in G Major Mozart 

First movement 
Allegro 

Trio in A Minor TsCHAIKOWSKY 

First movement 
Moderato assai 



The Committee for Young Musicians wishes to inform you that our 
young artists arc available for private engagements at a nominal sum. 
Please apply to Mrs. Philip W. Antrum, Telephone, Somerton S212, or 
Mrs. William W. Arnett, Locust 1231. 



• - * 

UNIVERSITY OF DELAWARE 

NEWARK, DELAWARE 

(Under the auspices of the Newark Music Society) 

Monday evening, February 24, 1941, at 8:00 o'clock 

MURIEL ROBERTSON, Soprano 
DONALD HULTGREN, Tenor 
WALDEMAR DABROWSKI, Accompanist 

of 
THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

PROGRAMME 

I 

Musica proibita Gastaldon 

O del mio amato ben Donaudy 

Non piu Cimara 

La danza Rossini 

DONALD HULTGREN 

II 

Von ewiger Liebe Brahms 

Wohin? Schubert 

Lust der Sturmnacht Schumann 

Dich, theure Halle, from Tannhauser Wagner 

MURIEL ROBERTSON 

III 

Where-e'er you walk Handel 

Iris Wolf 

Do not go, my love Hageman 

The star Rogers 

DONALD HULTGREN 

IV 

Heart cry Giannini 

When children pray Fenner 

At the well Hageman 

MURIEL ROBERTSON 
• • 



KAPPA DELTA PI 
Atlantic City, New Jersey 

Tuesday evening, February 25, 1941, at 6:50 o 1 clock 

Eleanor Mellinger, Harp 

Theodore Uppman, Baritone 

Waldemar Dabrowski, Accompanist 

of 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

Programme 

I 

The harmonious blacksmith Handel 

Mirage Salzedo 

Impromptu-caprice, 

Opus 9 Pierne* 

Eleanor Mellinger 

II 



Silent noon 

"Deh vieni alia finestra" 

from "Don Giovanni" 
I attempt from love's sickness 

to fly 

Theodore Uppman 



Vaughan Williams 

Mozart 

Purcell 



WOMAN'S CLUB 
Swarthmore, Pennsylvania 

Tuesday afternoon, February 25, 1941, at 2:30 o'clock 

Winifred Schaefer, Violoncello 
Eugene Bossart, Piano 

of 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

Programme 

I 



Sonata in G major 
Allegro 
Grave 
Vivace 



Sammartini 



II 

Concerto in A minor 

Allegro non troppo 
Allegretto con moto 
Allegro non troppo 

III 

Variations on the name, 

"Abegg", Opus 1 
Fantaisie in F minor, Opus 49 
Etude in C sharp minor, Opus 2 ) 
Etude in D sharp minor, Opus 8, No. 12) 
Eugene Bossart 

IV 

Menuetto, from Sonata in C 
Apres un reve 
Etude caprice 



Saint-Saens 



Schumann 
Chopin 

Scriabin 



Haydn-Piatti 

Faure 

Goltermann 



THE 
HAGERSTOWN 

SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

BART WIRTZ, CONDUCTOR 



SEASON 1940-41 



Eleanor Mitchell and Reba Robinson 

Flutist Harpist 



THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 27th 



8:30 P. M. 



PROGRAM NOTES 



PART I 



THATCHER .... March of the Gargoyles 

(1870- ) 

Howard Rutledge Thatcher has spent most of his life in his native city, 
Baltimore. He studied at the Peabody Conservatory and later became a 
teacher there. Composer of church music and a string- quartet, he has 
also written a number of piano pi< c< - 

"The March of the Gargoyles," one of Mr. Thatcher's earliest composi- 
tions, is considered one of his best. It was written in 1905, soon after the 
composer returned from a trip to Europe where he had seen the gargoyles 
thai decorate so many <>f" th>- building's there. Although the march con- 
tains little of the grotesquery associated with the gaping gargoyles, it is 
pleasingly varied and rhythmic. 

BIZET L'Arlesienne Suite 

(1838-1875) 

Daudet's drama, "The Woman of Aries." is uniquely developed around 
tin- contrasting themes of furious passion and pure love. The play is con- 
spicuous in literature because i is heroine, who gives the work its title, is 
never seen on the stage. George Bizet wrote a good deal of descriptive 
music for the drama and he himself later arranged certain portions of it 
as a suite. 

The four movements heard tonight are a complete suite, although 
another movement entitled "Dance Provencale," is often heard following 
the Adagietto. 

The PREMDE tells of a French peasant. Frederi, who is compellingly 
infatuated with L'Arlesienne: gay, dancing, honorless L'Arlesienne. Real- 
izing the undesirability of his passion, Frederi turns to Vivette, a friend 

of his child! d who lias always loved him. This first movement describes 

the thrilling poignancy of Frederi's memories as he recalls L'Arlesienne 
to his mind. 

In the MIMETTO two new characters emerge. They are Mere 

Renaud and Balthazar, the sheep herder. Romantically interested in each 
other for the oast fifty years, these two meet after a long separation, at 
the festivities being held to announce the betrothal of Vivette and Frederi. 

The ADAfilKTTO, for strings alone, continues the tender mood of the 
older couple's love. 

True to its title, the ("Alt II, I, OX movement is marked by the joyous 
bells that ring to celebrate the coming wedding of Vivette and Frederi. 
There is a temporary return to the farandole rhythm which recalls the 
dancing woman of Aries, and it is here that we are given a suggestion of 
the tragedy which climaxes the drama; Frederi, unable to discard his 
passion for L'Arlesienne and obsessed with thoughts of her, casts himself 
from the loft of a farmhouse, crushing his skull on the pavement below - . 

IN TE RM ISS ION 

PART II 

MOZART . . Concerto in C for Flute and Harp 

(1756-1791) 

Eleanor MITCHELL, Flute 
Reba ROBINSON, Harp 

Allegro 
AiHluiitino 
Rondo: Allegro 

From his endless, incredible store of melody, Mozart selected sixteen 
golden, scintillating themes to fashion this concerto for a ducal patron who 
liked to play the flute and whose daughter was an accomplished harpist. 
Although the flute had already been recognized by composers as a versatile 



instrument, it had never previously found favor with the incomparable 
Mozart who \vrote concertos at the command of his own inspiration or at 
the demand of his purse. 

Now, however, once the Concerto in C was completed, the young' 
genius turned serious attention to the flute and composed five major 
works for it. 

The harp was destined to remain in the composer's disfavor, for the 
harp of the eighteenth century had such limited possibilities that its 
adaptability was practically nil. It is interesting to note that Mozart, 
true to his inherent gift for visualizing the progress that was to come 
many years later, wrote passages for the harp that the instrument could 
not then attempt to encompass. Some of the passages in the Rondo are 
even now considered unplayable, the physical limitations of modern harps 
being what they are. 

It is in the Andantino that the harp is at its luxuriant best. 

SAINT-SAENS Le Deluge 

(1835-1921) 

Lyric, molten melody for strings by the composer of "Samson and 
Delilah." Influenced by the Liszt tone poems, Saint-Saens has written 
much chamber music and many concert pieces that are overshadowed by 
his success as a composer of operas. 

"Le Deluge," a number for strings, is marked by a hauntingly beauti- 
ful solo for violin. 

SIBELIUS WalseTriste 

(1865- ) 

Written as incidental music to the drama "Death," from the pen of 
Sibelius' brother-in-law, Arvid Jarnefelt, this waltz has a ghostly, fantastic 
program as given to us on the score by Rosa Xewmarch: 

"It is night. The son who has been watching by the bedside of his sick 
mother has fallen asleep from sheer weariness. Gradually, a ruddy light 
is reflected through the room; there is a sound of distant music; the glow 
and the music steal nearer until the strains of a valse melody float dis- 
tinctly to our ears. The sleeping mother awakens, rises from her bed, and 
in her long white garment, which takes the semblance of a ball dress, 
begins to move slowly and silently to and fro. She waves her hands and 
beckons in time to the music, as though she were summoning a crowd of 
invisible guests. And now they appear, these strange, visionary couples, 
turning and gliding to an unearthly valse rhythm. The dying woman 
mingles with the dancers; she strives to make them look into her eyes, 
but the shadowy guests, one and all, avoid her gaze. Then she sinks ex- 
hausted on her couch, and the music breaks off. Presently, she gathers 
all her strength and invokes the dance once again with more energetic 
gestures than before. Back come the shadowy dancers, gvrating in a 
wild, mad rhythm. The weird gaiety reaches a climax; there is a knock 
at the door, which flies wide open; the mother utters a despairing: cry; the 
spectral guests vanish; the music dies away — Death stands on the 
threshold." 

BRAHMS Hungarian Dance No. 5 

(1833-1897) 

Exposed to the influence of Hungarian Magyar-gipsy music when he 
became a protege of Franz Liszt, and again when he toured Germany with 
the gipsy violinist. Remenyi, Johannes Brahms arranged a number of 
Hungarian dances as piano duets and a book containing twenty-one of 
them was issued in 1869. 

These dances won immediate and immense popularity — one of the first 
times in the history of music that a musician had actually realized a size- 
able monetary profit as a result of his artistic endeavors. The success of 
these dances furnished the foundation for Brahms' accumulation of a not 
inconsiderable fortune. 

The Dance Xo. 5, sometimes listed as No. 3, is thought to be one of the 
three which Brahms himself orchestrated. 

The Orchestra wishes to express its appreciation to the Tryad Club, the 
Junior Chamher of Commerce, the Hotel Alexander, the Chamber of Com- 
merce and Potomac Edison Company for their various acts of cooperation. 



SPONSORS 



Mrs. E. P. Alexander 
Mrs. Lewis T. Byron 



Mr. .1. Fred Fechtig 
St. James School 



Treble Plef Club 

PATRONS 



Mr. and M.rs. Willis L. Altenderfer 

Mr. and Mrs. C. Walter Baker 

Mrs. Joseph C. Byron 

Mr. and Mrs. William D. Byron 

Mr. and Mrs. Elmer N. Funkhouser 

Mr. and Mrs. J. O. Funkhouser 

Mrs. Emraett W. Gans 

Mr. and Mrs. L. Vinton Hershey 

Mrs. Harvey Heyser 

Mr. and Mrs. Harvey H. Heyser, Jr. 

Mr. J. V. Jamison, Jr. 

SUBSCRIBERS 



Mr. and Mrs. J. V. Jamison, 3d. 

Mr. and Mrs. Edgar C. Jones 

Mr. and Mrs. William P. Lane 

Mr. R. D. McKee 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles McKee 

Mr. and Mrs. John J. Porter 

Mr. and Mrs. R. Paul Smith 

Mr. and Mrs. Philo A. Statton 

Mr. and Mrs. George F. Updegraff 

Mr. George W. Updegraff 



Mr. and Mrs. Meyer Berkson 

The Misses Bester 

Miss Marguerite A. Campbell 

Mr. and Mrs. C. Merritt Campbell 

Dr. and Mrs. W. Ross Cameron 

Miss Helen Crahan 

Mrs. V. M. Cushwa 

Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Dagenais 

Dr. and Mrs. ('. O. Diehl 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles H. Eyerly 

Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Feaster 

Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Fulde 

Mr. and Mrs. Maxwell Greenwald 

Mr. and Mrs. M. S. Grossman 

Mr. Li. S. Hamilton 

Mr. and Mrs. Howard Hawbaker 

Mr. and Mrs. Roger C. Hershey 

Mr. and Mrs. Edwin C. Hook 

Mr. and Mrs. Chester Hays 

Mr. Simms Jamieson 

Mr. John W. Jones 

Mr. and Mrs. Martin B. Keener 

Dr. and Mrs. J. E. Kempter 

Mr. and Mrs. N. B. Kurzenknabe 

Mr. and Mrs. T. C. Lindsey 

Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Long 



Mr. and Mrs. Leslie Manners 

Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Mathias 

Mr. and Mrs. Leo H. Miller 

Dr. and Mrs. N. E. Osborne 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward Oswald, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Pangborn 

Dr. and Mrs. H. L. Porterfield 

Mrs. Charles J. Powles 

Mr. and Mrs. H. K. Ramsburg 

Mr. J. Henry Reisner 

Mr. and Mrs. Brayden Ridenour 

.Mr. and Mrs. C. H. Roderick 

Mr. and Mrs. I von D. Rohrer 

Mr. and Mrs. Aaron Ruben 

Mr. and Mrs. E. O. Shulenberger 

Mr. and Mrs. R. H. Smith 

Dr. and Mrs. \V. H. Smith 

Mr. Arley O. Sica 

Mr. and Mrs. Brewer L. Stouffer 

Mr. and Mrs. Palmer Tennant 

Mr. and Mrs. F. M. Thomas 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert C. Triesler 

Dr. and Mrs. L. L. Watkins 

Mr. and Mrs. Roger Whipple 

Dr. and Mrs. Peregrine Wroth 



THE HAGERSTOWN SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 



VIOLINS 

Coulbourne Jones, 
Coneertmaster 

Phillip Statton 
Joseph Einbinder 
Regina Glover 
Lillian Huep 
Kathryn Alsip 
Robert Wallace 
Asher Edelman, Jr. 
Barry Berkson 
Mason Bell 
David Poole 
Miriam Buehalter 
Tillie Kravitz 
Carolyn I'lattnik 
Anna Ruth Stouffer 
Doris •'. Sturgeon 
A. G. Zam.lT 
Violet Boldogh 
Ponas Vassilades 

Gilson Shockey 
Dorothy Heckman 
Lucille Wolfkill 
Harry Beckley 
Sarah Jane Blume 
Dorothy McCullough 
Robert Martin, Jr. 
Charles Morrison 
Hugo DiCenze 
Clyde Mitchell 
Evva Noel 

VIOLAS 

Paul Hogan 
Janet Baltzley 
Herbert Warrenfeltz 
J.rnest Sharo 
Edwin Prevost 
Merle Baughman 

The Hagerstown 
Washington Sinfoniett 



VIOLONCELLOS 

Victor Wills 
Kurt Lande 
Wilbur Bostetter 
Earl Over 
Anne Golz 
David Taub 
Donald Reed 
Boleslaw Zucowski 

CONTRABASSES 

Norman B. Kurzenknabe 

Robert Diehl 

Emil Bietsch 

Martin B. Keener 

N. E. Osborne 

Melvin Walter 

PICCOLO 
G. F. Windley 

FLUTES 

F. H. Matthews 

Betty Fries 

A. G. Gumprecht 

oboes 

Charles McKee 
Oswald G. Ragatz 

CLAKINETS 

D. E. Wills 
George Buys 
Frances Pierce 

BASS CLARINET 

Sydney Jaynes 

BASSOONS 

J. C. Lochbaum 
Ruth Brown 
Ralph Burge 
Theodore Norton 



FRENCH HORNS 

Aldus Franz 
Kenneth Fleagle 
Samuel Murray 
John Frey 
Barbara Hill 
Basil Britten 

TRUMPETS 

Wilfred Dean 
Roger Harp 
William Fraley 
William Myers 
Charles P. Turwilliger 

TROMBONES 

A. N. Fleagle 
Clarence H. Earl 
Philip Pierce 

TIMPANI 

Fred Matson 

PERCUSSION 

Albert Hedden 

HARP 

Mary B. Bowman 

LIBRARIANS 

Robert Diehl 
Dorothy McCullough 



Orchestra gratefully acknowledges the cooperation of 
a and its director, Van Lier Lanning. 



HARCUM JUNIOR COLLEGE 
Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania 

Thursday morning, February 27, 1941, at 11:00 o'clock 

Waldemar Dabrowski, Piano 
Morris Shulik, Violin 
Joseph de Pasquale, Viola 
Arthur Winograd, Violoncello 

of 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

Programme 



Fourth movement from Quartet No. 1 
in C minor, Opus 15 
Allegro molto 



Faure" 



II 



Arioso et allegro de concert 
Joseph de Pasquale 
Waldemar Dabrowski 

III 

Quartet in E flat major, Opus 87 
Allegro con fuoco 
Lento 

Allegro moderato, grazioso 
Finale: Allegro ma non troppo 



Golestan 



Dvorak 



YOUNG MUSICIANS SERIES 
Feasterville, Pennsylvania 

Saturday evening, March 1, 1941, at 9:00 o'clock 

Phyllis Moss, Piano 

of 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 
Programme 



Prelude and Fugue in E minor, 

Opus 35, No. 1 Mendelssohn 

Sonata in C major, Opus 53 Beethoven 

Allegro con brio 

Introduzione: Adagio molto 

Rondo: Allegretto moderato 



II 



Polonaise in E flat minor, ) 

Opus 26, No. 2 ) 

Waltz in G flat major, Opus 70, No. l) Chopin 
Nocturne in E major, Opus 62, No. 2 ) 
Scherzo in B minor, Opus 20 ) 



III 



Rhapsody in B minor, Opus 79, No. 1 Brahms 
The little white donkey Ibert 

Prelude in E flat major Rachmaninov 

Two <Studes: Paganini-Liszt 

E major 

A minor 




WOMAN'S CLUB of LANSDALE 

Lansdale, Pennsylvania 

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON, MARCH 12, 1941 

Phyllis Moss, Piano 
George Zazofsky, Violin 
Arthur Winograd, Violoncello 

of 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 
Programme 



Trio in G Major (K. 496) Mozart 

Allegro 

Andante 

Allegretto 

II 

Arioso Bach 

First movement from Sonata in D minor Debussy 

Prologue 

ARTHUR WINOGRAD 
III 

Nocturne in E major, Opus 62, No. 2 

Waltz in G flat major, Opus 70, No. 1 [ . .. Chopin 

Scherzo in B minor, Opus 20 

PHYLLIS MOSS 



IV 
Second movement from Concerto No. 2 
in D minor, Opus 22 

Romance Wieniawski 

Burleska Suk 

GEORGE ZAZOFSKY 

V 

First movement of Trio in A minor, Opus 50 Tschaikowsky 

Elegy. Moderato assai 



Reba Robinson 



YOUNG MUSICIANS SERIES 
Chestnut Hill, Pennsylvania 

Thursday afternoon, March 13, 1941, at 3:00 o'clock 

Alfred Mann ) Recorders 
Anton Winkler) 
Reba Robinson, Harp 

of 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 
Programme 



Sonata for two alto recorders Telemann 

Siciliano 
Vivace (Fuga) 
Andante 
Allegro 

II 

First movement from Sonata in C minor Pescetti 

Allegro vigoroso 
Giga Corelli 

Reba Robinson 



III 



Trio sonata for alto recorder, 

viola d T amore and harp Telemann 



IV 



"In dulci jubilo" for tenor and 

bass recorders Praetorius 

Three pieces for soprano and 

alto recorders Mann 



Fraicheur 
Pirouetting music box 

Night breeze 
Behind the barracks 

Reba Robinson 



Salzedo 



YOUNG MUSICIANS SERIES 
Chestnut Hill, Pennsylvania 
(continued) 



VI 

Sonata for two alto recorders 

and harp Schickhard 

Allegro 
Adagio 
Allegro 
Gigue 
Presto 



HARCUM JUNIOR COLLEGE 
Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania 

Thursday morning, March 20, 1941, at 11:00 o'clock 

Reba Robinson, Harp 
Esther Gruhn, Violoncello 
Eleanor Mitchel, Flute 

of 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 
Programme 



First movement from Trio Sonata 

in B minor Loeillet 

Largo 
First and second movements from 

Sonata No. 8 in D major Leclair 

Adagio 
Allegro 



II 



The swan 

Esther Gruhn and Reba Robinson 

"Dance of the blessed spirits" 

from "Orpheus and Euridice" 
Piece en forme de Habanera 

Eleanor Mitchel and Reba Robinson 



Saint-Saens 



Gluck 
Ravel 



III 



Sonata in G minor Marcello 

Adagio 
Allegro 
Largo 
Allegro 



HARCUM JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania 

(continued) 



IV 

First movement from Sonata in C minor Pescetti 

Allegro vigoroso 
Giga Corelli 

Fraicheur ) 

Pirouetting music box ) 

Night breeze ) Salzedo 

Behind the barracks ) 

Reba Robinson 



"Dorienne" from 

"Divertissement grec" Mouquet 

Arabesque No. 1 Debussy 

Spanish dance, No. 5 Granados 



THE YOUNG MUSICIANS MUSICALES 
Main Line Afternoon Club 

at the home of 

MRS. CARY W. BOK 

Skyline Farm 
Ardmore, Pa. 

Thursday, March 27th, 1941 at 3.30 o'clock 



MARGUERITE KUEHNE, Violin 
PHYLLIS MOSS, Piano 

OF 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

PROGRAMME 

I 

Nocturne in E major, Opus 62, No. 2 \ 

Waltz in G flat major, Opus 70, No. 1 > Chopin 

Scherzo in B minor, Opus 20 ; 

Phyllis Moss 

II 

Walter's prize song from Die Meistersinger Wagner 

Tango Zimbalist 

Burleska Suk 

Marguerite Kuehne 

III 

Rhapsodie in B minor, Opus 79, No. 1 Brahms 

The little white donkey Ibert 

Prelude in E flat major, Opus 23, No. 6 . . . . Rachmaninov 

Etude in A minor Paganini-Liszt 

Phyllis Moss 

IV 

Polonaise in A Wieniawski 

Marguerite Kuehne 



The Committee for Young Musicians wish to inform you that our 
artists are available for private engagements at a nominal fee. Please 
apply to Mrs. Howard Longstreth, Ardmore 249. 



Femberton A/lusic Uub 

Pemberton, New Jersey 

V(/ec!nesclay Evenings /\pnl 2, 1941 
8:15 o'clock 

Ruth Dean, Harp 

Jacob Krachmalnick, Violin 

Leo Luskin, Accompanist 

Of The Curtis Institute Of Music 

PROGRAMME 



Bourree 


Bach 


Gavotte, from Armide 


Gluck 


Gavotte, from Iphigenia in Aulis 


Gluck 


Giga 


CORELLI 


Ruth Dean 




II 




La folia 


Corelli-Kreisler 


Jacob Krachmalnick 





III 

Theme and variations in the ancient style Salzedo 

Ruth Dean 



IV 



Sicilienne 

Minuet 

Siciliano et rigaudon 



Paradis-Dushkin 

Mozart-Heifetz 

Francoeur-Kreisler 



Jacob Krachmalnick 

V 

Introduction and allegro 

Ruth Dean 



Ravel 



Printed and Contributed by Howard L. Roberts, Mt. Holly, N. J. 



WOMEN'S COMMUNITY CLUB 
Cape May, New Jersey 

Thursday afternoon, April 3, 1941, at 2:00 o'clock 

Helen Worrilow, Soprano 
Eleanor Mitchel, Flute 
Robert Grooters, Baritone 
Eileen Flissler, Piano 

of 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



Programme 

I 

Lachen und Weinen) 
Die Forelle ) 
Auf Fliigeln des Gesanges ) 
Frtlhlingslied ) 

(Jetzt kommt der Friihling) ) 
Helen Worrilow 



Schubert 
Mendelssohn 



II 



Phidyle 


Duparc 


Vieille chanson espagnole 


Aubert 


En priere 


Faure* 


Carnaval 


Fourdrain 


Robert Grooters 





III 

Ballade in A flat major, Opus 47) Ch . 

Scherzo in B flat minor, Opus 31) 
Eileen Flissler 

IV 

Windflowers Josten 

The wren Benedict 

(with flute obbligato by Eleanor Mitchel) 
Helen Worrilow 



WOMEN'S COMMUNITY CLUB 
Cape May, New Jersey 
(Continued) 



Drink to me only 

with thine eyes arranged by Quilter 

Why Tschaikovsky 

Clouds Charles 

Old Mother Hubbard, 

set in the manner of Handel Hely-Hutchinson 
Robert Grooters 

VI 

"La ci darem la mano" 

from "Don Giovanni" Mozart 

I passed by your window Brae 

Sweethearts Romberg 

Miss Worrilow and Mr Grooters 



YOUNG MUSICIANS SERIES 
Torresdale, Pennsylvania 

Thursday afternoon, April 17, 1941, at 3:00 o'clock 



Arthur Winograd, Violoncello 
Waldemar Dabrowski, Accompanist 

of 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

Programme 

I 

Arioso 

Minuet, from Concerto in A minor 

Habanera 

II 

Sonata No. 1 
Prologue 
Serenade et finale 



Bach 

Saint-Saens 

Ravel 



Debussy 



UNIVERSITY OF DELAWARE 
Newark, Delaware 

(Under the auspices of the Newark Music Society) 

Tuesday evening, April 22, 1941, at 8:00 o'clock 

Reba Robinson, Harp 
Esther Gruhn, Violoncello 
Eleanor Mitchel, Flute 

of 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

Programme 



First movement from Trio Sonata 

in B minor Loeillet 

Largo 
First and second movements from 

Sonata No. 8 in D major Leclair 

Adagio 
Allegro 

II 



The swan 

Esther Gruhn and Reba Robinson 

"Dance of the blessed spirits" 

from "Orpheus and Euridice" 
Piece en forme de Habanera 

Eleanor Mitchel and Reba Robinson 

III 



Saint-Saens 



Gluck 

Ravel 



Sonata in G minor Marcello 

Adagio 
Allegro 
Largo 
Allegro 



UNIVERSITY OF DELAWARE 
Newark, Delaware 
(continued) 



IV 

First movement from Sonata in C minor Pescetti 

Allegro vigoroso 
Fraicheur ) 

Pirouetting music box ) 

Night breeze ) Salzedo 

Behind the barracks ) 

Reba Robinson 



Arabesque No. 1 Debussy 
"Dorienne" from 

"Divertissement grec" Mouquet 

Spanish dance, No. 5 Granados 



YOUNG MUSICIANS SERIES 
Gladwyne, Pennsylvania 

Thursday afternoon, April 24, 1941, at 3:30 o'clock 

Reba Robinson, Harp 

Esther Gruhn, Violoncello 

Eleanor Mitchel, Flute 

Anton Winkler, Recorder 

Alfred Mann, Recorder and Viola d T amore 

of 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 
Programme 

I 

La pantomime 

La timide Rameau 

L'agacante 

Misses Mitchel, Gruhn and Robinson 

II 

Sonata for two alto recorders and harp Schickhard 
Allegro 
Adagio 
Allegro 
Gigue 
Presto 
Miss Robinson, Messrs Mann and Winkler 

III 

Sonata in G minor Marcello 

Adagio 
Allegro 
Largo 
Allegro 
Misses Mitchel, Gruhn and Robinson 

IV 

Piece en forme de Habanera Ravel 

Misses Mitchel and Robinson 



YOUNG MUSICIANS SERIES 
Gladwyne, Pennsylvania 
(continued) 



Trio Sonata for alto recorder, 
viola d'amore and harp 
Largo 
Vivace 
Miss Robinson, Messrs Mann and Winkler 



VI 



Telemann 



Three pieces for soprano and 
alto recorders 
Miss Mitchel and Mr Winkler 



Mann 



VII 



First movement from Trio Sonata 
in B minor 
Largo 
First and second movements from 
Sonata No. 8 in D major 
Adagio 
Allegro 
Misses Mitchel, Grahn and Robinson 



Loeillet 



Leclair 



NEW JERSEY STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 
Glassboro, New Jersey- 
Tuesday morning, April 29, 1941, at 10:30 o'clock 

Reba Robinson, Harp 
True Chappell, Violoncello 
Eleanor Mitchel, Flute 

of 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

Programme 

I 



First movement from Trio Sonata 
in B minor 
Largo 
First and second movements 

from Sonata No. 8 in D major 
Adagio 
Allegro 



Loeillet 



Leclair 



II 



"Danse of the blessed spirits" 

from "Orpheus and Euridice" 
Piece en forme de Habanera 

Eleanor Mitchel and Reba Robinson 



Gluck 
Ravel 



III 



Sonata in G minor 
Adagio 
Allegro 
Largo 
Allegro 



Marcello 



NEW JERSEY STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

Glassboro, New Jersey 

(continued) 



IV 

Fralcheur 

Pirouetting music box _ _ 

w U4. u Salzedo 

Night breeze 

Behind the barracks 

Reba Robinson 

V 

La cinquantaine Gabriel-Marie 

The little shepherd Debussy 

Spanish dance, No. 5 Granados 



THE SHIPLEY SCHOOL 
Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania 

Wednesday afternoon, April 30, 1941, at 3:45 o'clock 

Marguerite Kuehne, Violin 
Eugene Bossart, Piano 

of 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

Programme 



Sonata in D major, Opus 12, No. 1 
Allegro con brio 
Them8 con variazioni 
Rondo . Allegro 

Marguerite Kuehne 



Beethoven 



II 



Variations on the name, "Abegg" 
Fantasie in F minor, Opus 49 
The music box 

Eugene Bossart 

III 

La folia 

"Vvalther's prize song" 

from "Die Meistersinger" 
Tango 
Burleska 

Marguerite Kuehne 



Schumann 

Chopin 

Leibeck 



Corelli-Kreisler 

Wa gner-Wilhelm j 

Zimbalist 

Suk 



ROXBOROUGH MALE CHORUS 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
Tuesday evening, May 6, 1941, at 8:15 o'clock 
Eleanor Mellinger, Harp 
of 
THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 
Programme 



The harmonious blacksmith 

Giga 

Theme and variations 



Handel 

Corelli 

Haydn 



II 



Impromptu caprice, Opus 9 
Behind the barracks ) 



Night breeze 



Pierne 



Salzedo 



NEW JERSEY STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 
Glassboro, New Jersey 

Thursday morning, May 8, 1941, at 10:30 o'clock 

Helen Worrilow, Soprano 
Phyllis Moss, ^iano 
Eleanor Mitchell, Flute 

of 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 
Programme 



Lachen una Weinen ) 
An die Nachtigall ) 
Die Forelle ) 
Geheimnis ) 

Vergebliches Standchen) 



Schubert 



Brahms 



Helen ^orrilow 



II 



Waltz in C sharp minor ) 
Waltz in G flat major ) 
Nocturne in *' sharp major) 
Scherzo in B minor ) 



Chopin 



Phyllis Moss 
III 



The windflowers 
The wren 



Josten 
Benedict 



Helen Worrilow 
Flute obbligato, Eleanor Mitchell 



JUNGER MAENNERCHOR 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

Wednesday evening, May 21, 1941, at 8:30 o 1 clock 

Junger Maennerchor 

Leopold Syre, Conductor 

A dolph Merta, Bass 

assisted by 

Reba Robinson, Harp 

of 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

Programme 



Impromptu caprice, Opus 9 
The girl with the flaxen hair 
Le bon petit roi d'Yvetot 



Pi erne 

Debussy 

Grand j any 



II 



Waltz in A flat 

May night 

Zephyrs ) 

Pirouetting music box ) 

Night breeze ) 

Behind the barracks ) 



Brahms 
Palmgren 



Salzedo 



WOMAN'S CLUB OF BALA-CYNWYD 
Bala-Cynwyd, Pennsylvania 

Wednesday afternoon, May 28, 1941, at 3:00 o'clock 

Thomas Perkins, Baritone 

Reba Robinson, Harp 

Waldemar Dabrowski, Accompanist 

of 

THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 
Programme 



Impromptu caprice, Opus 9 

The girl with the flaxen hair 

Zephyrs 

Three short stories in music 

Pirouetting music box ) 

Night breeze ) 

Behind the barracks ) 

Reba Robinson 
II 

Toreador song from Carmen 
I heard a forest praying 
Captain Mac 

Thomas Perkins 

III 

Chorale and Variations 

Reba Robinson and Waldemar Dabrowski 

IV 



Pierne 
Debussy 
Salzedo 



Salzedo 



Bizet 

de Rose 

Sanderson 



Widor 



Sailormen 

Deep river 

Ich grolle nicht 

The toad 1 s courtship 



Wolfe 

Spiritual 

Schumann 

Kentucky Mountain Song 



Thomas Perkins 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 
ELEVENTH ANNUAL SERIES 1940-1941 

RADIO PROGRAMME 

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 1940 
5:30 TO 6, EASTERN STANDARD TIME 

I 

London trio No. 1 in C Haydn 

Allegro moderato 
Andante 
Finale. Vivace 

Ei f.anor Mitchei., Flute 

John Krell, Flute 

Winifred Schaefer, Violoncello 



II 



Octet in E flat (K 375) 

for winds Mozart 

Allegro maestoso 

Menuetto 

Allegro 

Conducted by Mr Marcel Tabuteau 



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THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 
ELEVENTH ANNUAL SERIES 1940-1941 

RADIO PROGRAMME 

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 2 3, 1940 

5:30 to 5:55, eastern standard time 

Clarence Snyder, Organ 
Chamber Orchestra, conducted by Max Goberman 

I 

Organ concerto in F, 

Opus 4, No. 5 Handel 

Larghetto 

Allegro 

Alia siciliana 

Presto 

II 

Divertimento in D (K 251) Mozart 

Allegro molto 

Menuetto 

Andantino 

Menuetto. Tema con variazioni 

Rondo. Allegro assai 

Marcia alia francese 

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THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 
ELEVENTH ANNUAL SERIES 1940-1941 

RADIO PROGRAMME 

saturday, november 30, 1940 
5:30 to 5:55, eastern standard time 

I 

Duo No. 3 in B flat Beethoven 

Allegro sostenuto 
Aria con variazioni 
Allegro assai 

Nathan Brusilow, Clarinet 
Sanford Sharoff, Bassoon 

II 

Quartet in D (K 285) Mozart 

Allegro 
Adagio 
Rondo 

John Krell, Flute 
Solomon Ovcharov, Violin 
Albert Falkove, Viola 
Arthur Winograd, Violoncello 

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THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 

RADIO PROGRAMME 
COMMEMORATING THE 75TH 
BIRTHDAY OF JAN SIBELIUS 

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 7, 1940 

5:30 to 6:00, eastern standard time 

I 

Sonatine in E, Opus 67, No. 2 
Allegro 
Andantino 
Allegro 
Barbara Elliott, Piano 
II 

The first kiss 

An den Abend 

But my bird is long in homing 

Rosenlied 

Willa Stewart, Soprano 
Eugene Bossart, Accompanist 

III 

Sonatine in E, Opus 80 

Lento. Allegro 

Andantino 

Lento. Allegretto 
Tibor Zelig, Violin 
Leonard Bernstein, Piano 

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THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 

ELEVENTH ANNUAL SERIES 1940-1941 

RADIO PROGRAMME 
5:30 to 6:00, eastern standard time 

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 14, 1940 

THE 
CURTIS SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

Fritz Reiner, Conductor 

I 

Overture, La gazza Jadra Rossini 

II 

Overture, Franccsca da Rimini Tschaikovsky 



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THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 

ELEVENTH ANNUAL SERIES 1940-1941 

RADIO PROGRAMME 

saturday, december 21, 1940 
5:30 to 6:00, eastern standard time 

I 

Sixth French suite in E Bach 

Allemande Gavotte 
Courante Menuet 

Sarabande Bourree 

Polonaise 

Ensemble of eight harps, conducted by 
Dr Carlos Salzedo 

II 

Pastorale, Cpus 13, No. 4 Vivaldi 

Ralph Gomberg, Oboe 

Francis DePasquale, Violoncello 

Waldemar Dabrowski, Piano 

HI 

Liebeslieder. Walzer Brahms 

Vocal ensemble, conducted by 
Mr Steuart Wilson 

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THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 
ELEVENTH ANNUAL SERIES 1940-1941 

RADIO PROGRAMME 

saturday, december 28, 1940 
5:30 to 6:00, eastern standard time 

I 

Fantaisie, Opus 124 Saint-Saens 

Marguerite Kuehne, Violin 
Janet Putnam, Harp 

II 

Six Biblical songs, Opus 99 Dvorak 

No. 1 Clouds and darkness 
No. 2 Lord, Thou art my refuge 
No. 4 God is my shepherd 
No. 8 Turn thee to me 
No. 9 I will lift mine eyes 
No. 10 Sing ye a joyful song 

Robert Grooters, Baritone 
Leo Luskin, Accompanist 

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THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 

ELEVENTH ANNUAL SERIES 1940-1941 

RADIO PROGRAMME 

saturday, january 4, 1941 
5:30 to 6:00, eastern standard time 

RALPH BERKOWITZ 

VLADIMIR SOKOLOFF 

Original music for four 
hands at one piano 

I 

Sonata (1938) Hindemith 

Massig bewegt 
Lebhaft 
Ruhig bewegt 

II 

Five Hungarian dances Brahms 

F minor, No. 4 

F major, No. 3 

D minor, No. 1 1 

A minor, No. 8 

F sharp minor, No. 17 

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THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 

ELEVENTH ANNUAL SERIES 1940-1941 

RADIO PROGRAMME 

SATURDAY, JANUARY 11, 1941 

J: 30 to 6:00, eastern standard time 

CHAMBER ORCHESTRA 
Conducted by Ezra Rachlin 



Concerto grosso in C minor Corelli 

Largo. Allegro 
Grave 
Vivace 
Allegro 

II 

A musical joke (K. 522) Mozart 

Allegro 
Menuetto 

Adagio cantabile 
Presto 

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THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 
ELEVENTH ANNUAL SERIES 1940-41 

RADIO PROGRAMME 

SATURDAY, JANUARY 18, 1941 
5:30 TO 6:00, EASTERN STANDARD TIME 

En een Flissler, Piano 
Marguerite Kuehne, Violin 
Winifred Schaefer, Violoncello 



Second and third movements from 

Trio in D m nor, Opus 49 Mendelssohn 

Andante con moto tranquillo 
Scherzo: Leggiero e vivace 



II 



Trio in D major, Opus 70, No. 1 Beethoven 

Allegro vivace e con brio 
Largo assai ed espressivo 
Presto 



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THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 
ELEVENTH ANNUAL SERIES 1940-1941 

RADIO PROGRAMME 

SATURDAY, JANUARY 25, 1941 

5:30 to 6:00, eastern standard time 

BEETHOVEN PROGRAMME 
I 

Irish, Welsh and Scotch folksongs 

Barbara Troxell, Soprano 
Norman Rose, Tenor 
Thomas Perkins, Baritone 
George Zazofsky, Violin 
Rohini Coomara, Violoncello 
Waldemar Dabrowski, Piano 

II 

Eroica variations in E flat, Opus 3 5 
Jorge Bolet, Piano 

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THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 
ELEVENTH ANNUAL SERIES 1940-1941 



RADIO PROGRAMME 

saturday, february 1 , 1941 
5:30 to 6:00, eastern standard time 



KANOVA ) 

\ Di 

NSTEIN ) 



Annette Elkanova 

f Duo pianists 
Leonard Ber^" 



Concerto for two pianos solo (1935) Stravinsky 

Con moto 

Notturno. Adagietto 
Quattro variazioni 
Preludio e fuga. Lento 

II 

Requiebros Cassado-Berkowitz 

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THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 
ELEVENTH ANNUAL SERIES 1940-1941 



RADIO PROGRAMME 

saturday, february 8, 1941 
5:30 to 6:00, eastern standard time 



iVi 



Solomon Ovcharov . 

'iolins 
Morris Shulik 

Albert Falkove, Viola 

Arthur W'ixograd, Violoncello 



Quartet in B flat, Opus 67 Brahms 

Vivace 

Andante 

Agitato 

Poco allegretto con variazioni 



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THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 
ELEVENTH ANNUAL SERIES 194 0-41 

RADIO PROGRAMME 

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 1941 

5:30 to 6:00, eastern standard time 

STRING ORCHESTRA 

conducted by 

iMR ALEXANDER HILSBERG 

I 
Concerto for 

four violins and organ Locatelli 

Allegro 
Largo 

Herbert Baumel \ 

Jacob Krachmalxick [ T ,. ,. 
Morris Shulik f Vlo! '" s 

Baruch Altman J 

Clarence Snyder, Organ 

II 

Variations on a theme 

by Tschaikovsky Arensky 



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THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 
ELEVENTH ANNUAL SERIES 1940-1941 

RADIO PROGRAMME IN HONOR 
OF IGNACE JAN PADEREWSKI 

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 1941 

5:30 to 6:00, eastern standard time 

I 

Address by Mrs Mary Louise Curtis Bok, 
President of The Curtis Institute 

II 

Sonata in A minor, Opus 13 Paderewski 

Allegro con fantasia 

Intermezzo. Andantino 

Finale. Allegro molto quasi presto 

Rafael Druian, Violin 
Robert Cornman, Piano 

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THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 
ELEVENTH ANNUAL SERIES 1940-41 



RADIO PROGRAMME 

saturday, march 1, 1941 
5:30 to 6:00, eastern standard time 



Quartet in E flat, Opus 87 Dvorak 

Allegro con fuoco 

Lento 

Allegro moderato, grazioso 

Finale: Allegro ma non troppo 

Morris Shulik, Violin 
Joseph De Pasquale, Viola 
Arthur Winograd, Violoncello 
Waldemar Dabro'wski, Piano 



THE RED NETWORK 
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THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 
ELEVENTH ANNUAL SERIES 1940-1941 

RADIO PROGRAMME 

SATURDAY, MARCH 8, 1941 

5:30 to 6:00, eastern standard time 
WORKS OF JOHANNES BRAHMS 

I 

Der Tod, das ist die kiihle Nacht 
Meine Liebe ist griin 

Barbara Troxell, Soprano 
Eugene Bossart, Accompanist 

II 

Trio in A minor, Opus 114 

Allegro 

Adagio 

Andantino grazioso 

Allegro 

James Rettew, Clarinet 
Barbara Jane Elliott, Piano 
Winifred Schaefer, Violoncello 

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THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 
ELEVENTH ANNUAL SERIES 1940-1941 

RADIO PROGRAMME 

SATURDAY, MARCH 15, 1941 

5:30 to 6:00, eastern standard time 

WORKS OF FRANZ SCHUBERT 

I 
Sonatina in D major, Opus 137, No. 1 

Allegro molto 

Andante 

Allegro vivace 
Baruch Altman, Violin 
Eileen Flissler, Piano 

II 

Impromptu in B flat, Opus 142, No. 3 
Barbara Jane Elliot, Piano 

III 
Cantata, Opus 158 

Barbara Troxell, Soprano 
Donald Hultgren, Tenor 
James Cosmos, Bass 
Eugene Bossart, Piano 

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THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 
ELEVENTH ANNUAL SERIES 1940-1941 

RADIO PROGRAMME 

SATURDAY, MARCH 2 2, 1941 

5:30 to 6:00, eastern standard time 

WORKS OF J. S. BACH 

I 
Two arias: 

Komm, leite mich 

Muriel Robertson, Mezzo soprano 
Alfred Mann \ 

Anton Winkler \ Recorders 
Eleanor Mitchel / 
Waldemar Dabrowski, Piano 

Schafe konnen sicher weiden 

Katherine Harris, Soprano 

Alfred Mann / „ . 

r. . . [ Recorders 

Eleanor Mitchel \ 

Walijemar Dabrowski, Piano 

II 

Brandenburg concerto No. 4 in G 

Alfred Mann I „ , 

a xvr r Recorders 

Anton Winkler \ 

George Zazoisky, Violin 

Ezra Rachlin, Conductor 

and String Orchestra 

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THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 
ELEVENTH ANNUAL SERIES 1940-1941 

RADIO PROGRAMME 

SATURDAY, MARCH 29, 1941 

5:30 to 6:00, eastern standard time 
EARLY AMERICAN MUSIC 

I 

Funeral anthem ) 

Heavenly vision > William Billings 

Majesty ) 

Barbara Troxell, Soprano Norman Rose, Tenor 

Margaret Lilly, Soprano Thomas Perkins, Baritone 

Muriel Robertson, Contralto James Cosmos, Bass 

II 

The Battle of Trenton James Hewitt 

Jeanne Behrend, Piano 
III 

Quintet No. 1 in D 

JOHANN FRIEDRICH PETER 

Allegro con brio 

Andante amoroso 

Allegro brilliante 

Herbert Baumel 1 Francis Tursi 1 

Jacob Krachmalnick / Violins Warren Signor } Viola 

Robert Ripley, Violoncello 

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The Curtis Institute of Music 



EIGHTH COMMENCEMENT 

AND 

CONFERRING OF DEGREES 



CASIMIR HALL 

Saturday, May the third 

One Thousand Nine Hundred and Forty- one 
at Eleven o'clock in the Morning 



Order of Ceremonies 



Three Choral Preludes: 

Ich ruf zu dir, Herr Jesu Christ) T „ ~ 

J V J. S. Bach 

Vater unser im Himmelreich J 

O Welt, ich muss dich lassen Johannes Brahms 

Graduate Procession 

Triumphal March Sigfrid Karg-Elert 



Alexander McCurdy, Mus.D. 



[3 



Order of Ceremonies 



Invocation 

The Reverend Joseph Fort Newton, D.D., Litt.D., LL.D. 

Hymn : St. Anne 

Our God, our Help in ages past, A thousand ages in Thy sight 

Our Hope for years to come, Are like an evening gone; 

Our Shelter from the stormy blast, Short as the watch that ends the night 

And our eternal Home. Before the rising sun. 

Before the hills in order stood, Our God, our Help in ages past, 

Or earth received her frame, Our Hope for years to come; 

From everlasting Thou art God, Be Thou our Guide while life shall last, 

To endless years the same. And our eternal Home. 

Introduction 

Director Randall Thompson, A.M., Mus.D. 

Address 

The Reverend Joseph Fort Newton 

Awarding of Diplomas of The Curtis Institute of Music 

President Mary Louise Curtis Bok, Mus.D., L.H.D., Litt.D. 
Director Randall Thompson Secretary Cary W. Bok, A.B. 

Conferring of Degrees in Course 

Conferring of Honorary Degree 

Doctor of Music — Frederick E. Hahn 

Conferring of the Curtis Award 

Hymn — The Star-Spangled Banner 

Benediction 

Graduate Recession 

Finale from "Grande piece symphonique" Cesar Franck 

[4] 



DIPLOMAS OF THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

* 



Piano 

Florence Caplan Edna Larson 

Robert Cornman Phyllis Moss 

Annette Elkanova Ruth Hilde Somer 

A ccompanying 
Eugene Bossart 
Waldemar Dabrowski Leo Samuel Luskin 

Voice 

John Donald Coker 

Donald Everett Hultgren Willie Elizabeth Stewart 

Muriel L. Robertson Helen Adelaide Worrilow 

Opera 
Gordon Earl Sayre, A.B. (University of Akron) 

Violin 
Jacob Krachmalnick George Zazofsky 

Viola 
Albert Samuel Falkove Philip Rudolph Goldberg 

Violoncello 
True Chappell Nathan Stutch (in absentia) 

Double Bass 
Wilfred Joseph Batchelder Roger Morris Scott 

Oboe French Horn 

Ralph Lewis Gomberg David A. Hall 

Clarinet Bassoon 

Nathan Brusilow Sanford Jerome Sharoff 

James Bernard King, Jr. 

Trombone 
Richard Widmer Shill Gordon Miller Pulis (in absentia) 

Conducting 

Leonard Bernstein Max Goberman 

Walter John Hendl 



[5] 



DEGREES IN COURSE 



Bachelor of Music — in Accompanying 
Leo Samuel Luskin 

Bachelor of Music — in Voice 
Robert E. Grooters 

Bachelor of Music — in Viola 
Albert Samuel Falkove 



[6] 



Marshal 
Hans Wohlmuth, Ph.D. (Vienna) 

Assistant Marshals 

LESTER EnGLANDER, A.B. (.University oj Pennsylvania); MuS.B. 

Thomas Perkins 
Rudolf Schirmer 



[?] 



(1) 

LIST OF CONCERTS 
FACULTY RECITALS 
Casimir Hall 



Mr, Jorge Bolet, Pianist 

Mr. Rudolf Serkin, Pianist 

Dr. Alexander McCudry, Organist 

Mr. Efrem Zimbalist, Violinist 
Mr. Vladimir Sokoloff, Accompanist 

Mr. Steuart Wilson, Tenor 

Mr. Harry Kaufman, Accompanist 

Miss Jeanne Behrend, Pianist 

Madame Lea Luboshutz, Violinist 
Miss Marian Head, Violinist 
Mr. William Kincaid, Flutist 

assisted by 
Mr. Louis Vyner, Conductor 
Judge Curtis Bok, Conductor 

Mr. Rudolf Serkin, Pianist 

Madame Elisabeth Schumann, Soprano 
Mr. Leo Rosenek, Accompanist 



October 15, 1940 

January 7, 1941 

January 14, 1941 

January 15, 1941 

January 22, 1941 

March 19, 1941 



March 20, 1941 
March 50, 1941 

April 17, 1941 



(2) 

STUDENTS 1 CONCERTS 
Casimir Hall 

Mr. Sidney Foster, Pianist 

(Graduation recital) . . . October 22 

Students of Dr. Wohlmuth November 21 

Students of Dr. Salzedo November 27 

Students of Dr. Salzedo. January 30 

Students of Dr. Wohlmuth February 13 

Miss Phyllis Moss, Pianist 

(Graduation recital) March 21 

Mr. Robert Grooters, Baritone 

(Graduation recital) March 24 

Students of Madame Schumann April 1 

Students of Mr. Saperton April 2 

Students of Mr. Kaufman April 3 

Students of Dr. McCurdy April 7 

Students of Mr. Hilsberg April 9 

Students of Mr. Tabuteau April 10 

Students of Mr. Kaufman. .April 18 

Students of Mr. Scalero April 21 



(5) 

STUDENTS' CONCERTS (continued) 

Students of Madame Luboshutz April 22, 1941 

Students of Madame Gregory.... April 23, 1941 

Students of Dr. Bailly (afternoon) April 24, 1941 

Students of Dr. Wohlmuth (evening) April 24, 1941 

Mr. Albert Falkove, Violist 
Mr. Philip Goldberg, Violist 

(Graduation recital) April 25, 1941 

Students of Dr. Reiner April 28, 1941 

Students of Madame Vengerova April 30, 1941 

Students of Mr. Serkin May 1, 1941 



(4) 

SPECIAL CONCERTS 



The Historical Series 

Purcell and Bach November 6, 1940 

Mozart and Haydn .December 12, 1940 

Beethoven and Brahms January 21, 1941 

Modern French Chamber Music February 19, 1941 

Schubert (at the Foyer of the 

Academy of Music) March 8, 1941 

Modern American Music April 4, 1941 



Organ recital by 

Mr. Joseph Bonnet October 6, 1940 



Piano recital by 

Mr. Shura Cherkassky October 11, 1940 



Violin recital by 

Mr. Henri Temianka, Violinist 

Miss Genia Robinor, Accompanist 

and String Quartet November 14, 1940 



Recital of original music 
for four hands by 

Mr. Ralph Berko?dtz, Pianist 

Mr. Vladimir Sokoloff, Pianist.. December 18, 1940 



An evening of Modern Music by 
The Twentieth Century Music 

Group January 9, 1941 



Recital by 

The Curtis String Quartet January 29, 1941 



(5) 

CONCERT COURSE 

The Baldwin School, 

Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania October 5 , 1940 

Foremen's and Supervisor's Club, 

Gibbstown, New Jersey (October 17, 1940 

(January 23, 1941 



Salem bounty Federation of Men' s 
Bible Classes 

Woodstown, New Jersey October 20, 

Contemporary Club, 

Trenton, New Jersey.. October 22, 

Delaware County Teachers' Institute, 

Media, Pennsylvania .....October 28, 

Washington College, 

Chestertown, Maryland October 31, 

Villa Nova College, 

Villa Nova, Pennsylvania November 6, 

Friends' Select School, 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania November 7, 

Junior Octave Club, 

Norristown, Pennsylvania November 7, 

The Convent of the Sacred Heart, 

Overbrook, Pennsylvania November 12, 

Young Musicians Series, 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (November 12, 

November 25, 1940 (December 7, 
2 programs December 12, 



January 9, 1941 

January 14, 1941 

February 17, 1941 

March 13, 1941 

April 17, 1941 



( January 11, 

( January 27, 

( March I, 

( March 27, 

( April 24, 



1940 

1940 

1940 

1940 

1940 

1940 

1940 

1940 

1940 
1940 
1940 
1941 
1941 
1941 
1941 
1941 



The New Century Club, 

Wilmington, Delaware, 



(November 13, 1940 
( January 29, 1941 



(6) 

CONCFRT COURSE (continued) 

Women 1 s Club, 

Allentown, Pennsylvania November 19 

Muhlenberg College, 

Allentown, Pennsylvania November 21 

West/town School, 

Westtown, Pennsylvania November 23 

China Aid Concert, 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania... November 27 
The Peddie School, 

Hightstown, New Jersey December 1 

The Roxbc rough Male Chorus, 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.. (December 3 

( May 6 
The Festival Foundation Chorus, 

Moorestown, New Jersey December 4 

The Festival Foundation Chorus, 

Burlington, New Jersey •• December 11 

George School, 

George School, Pennsylvania.. December 14 
State Teachers College, 

Kutztown, Pennsylvania January 8 

New Jersey State Teachers College, 

Glassboro, New Jersey. ..... ..( January 9 

(February 6 
( April 29 
( May 8 
Octave Club, 

Norristown, Pennsylvania January 15 

Sleighton Farms School for Girls, 

Darling, Pennsylvania January 19 

Saint James School, 

Washington County, Maryland... January 25 
The Tyrone Concert Association, 

Tyrone, Pennsylvania January 30 

The Hill School, 

Pottstown, Pennsylvania February 1. 

University of Delaware, 

Newark, Delaware (February 24 

( April 22 



(7) 
CONCERT COURSE (concluded) 

Kappa Delta Pi, 

Atlantic City, New Jersey February 25, 1941 

Woman' s Club, 

Swarthracre, Pennsylvania February 25, 1941 

Hagerstown Symphony Orchestra, 

Hagerstown, Maryland February 27, 1941 

Harcum Junior College, 

Bryn Maw, Pennsylvania (February 27, 1941 

( March 20, 1941 
Woman's Club of Lansdale, 

Lansdale, Pennsylvania March 12, 1941 

Pemberton Music Club, 

Pemberton, New Jersey,. April 2, 1941 

Viomen's Community Club, 

Cape May, New Jersey • April 3, 1941 

The Shipley School, 

Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania. April 30, 1941 

Junger Maennerchor, 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.. May 21, 1941 

Woman' s Club of Bala-Cynvvyd, 

Bala-Cynwyd, Pennsylvania May 28, 1941 



Radio programmes 

November 16, 1940 to May 3, 1941 



Eighth Commencement and Conferring 

of Degrees May 3, 1941 













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