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RECOLLECTIONS of 

SIXTY YEARS in the 

SHOE TRADE 



JOEL C, PAGE 



ILLUSTRATED 



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RECOLLECTIONS 

OF SIXTY YEARS IN THE 

SHOE TRADE 




JOEL C. PAGE 

Hale, hearty, cheerful, glad-of-life, Joel C. Page celebrated his eighty- 
third birthday Monday, December 20, 1915. Mr. Page is the "Grand 
Old Man" of the shoe trade's traveling fraternity. 
Many friends joined in offering to him, on this most interesting and 
happy occasion, the heartiest of greetings and every good wish for 
continued blessings won by a long, earnest life of usefulness. 
Mr. Page was the first to sell the retail trade from samples on the road. 
He spent many years in this service. His life spans the whole era of 
the shoe trade since the first machine applied to shoemaking. 
We salute Joel C. Page as a gentleman, a man of honor and finest stan- 
dard of integrity, an adornment to his profession, a friend and com- 
patriot of distinguished career and unsullied repute. Long may he wave! 



RECOLLECTIONS 

OF SIXTY YEARS IN 
THE SHOE TRADE 



BY JOEL C PAGE 

J . 

The Pioneer of Traveling Shoe Salesmen 



PORTRAITS AND BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 
BY A W GAGE 



Edited by ARTHUR L. EVANS 



Originally Published in Issues 
of THE SHOEMAN 



BOSTON MASS USA 

THE ARTHUR L EVANS COMPANY 

PUBLISHERS OF THE SHOEMAN 




.//.J> 77 s-7 



Copyrighted, 1916. by 
ARTHUR L. EVANS 



Prtsswork by 

THE TUDOR PRESS 

BOSTON 



P 



re 

7i ATR. PAGE'S "Recollections of Sixty Years in 
/ yl the Shoe Trade" were published originally in 
issues of THE SHOEMAN and were widely 
read by the new and older generations of the trade. 

Mr. Gage's sketches of well-known traveling sales- 
men of this and former trade eras, illustrated with old- 
time portraits, appeared in THE SHOEMAN sim- 
ultaneously with Mr. Page's recollections. Many addi- 
tions to these have been made for this volume. 

This book unites in permanent form these interesting 
and historically valuable contributions to the literature 
and records of the trade. 

Did space and time permit, many more portraits 
could and should be added to the collection portraits 
of men who served well their time and generation, earned 
a warm place in the memory of friends and comrades, 
achieved an honorable record in the annals of our trade, 
and passed, finally, over the Last Journey alone. But 
alas! The portraits are not at hand. These here 
shown are typical of the high quality and genial person- 
ality of that band of commercial heralds the Pioneers 
of Progress! Long live the memory of each and all. 

ARTHUR L. EPANS. 
Boston, Mass., Jan. i, 1916. 



M86261 



RECOLLECTIONS OF 
SIXTY YEARS - 



I 



I WAS born in Lancaster, New Hampshire, 
December 20, 1832, and will, therefore, be 
eighty-four years old next December. I am 
thankful to say that I still have good health, 
barring a bit of difficulty in walking, have a 
clear mind, and enjoy these declining years 
of my life, surrounded by comfort and many friends, 
and living largely in the recollections of these four 
score years, over sixty of which were in the shoe 
trade. 

My parents were Mr. and Mrs. Silas D. Page, 
and they were good old New England stock. 

During these eighty-three years most wonderful 
changes have taken place in our country, and nothing 
more remarkable than in the shoe trade. I shall 
have something to tell about these changes as my 
story grows. 

They tell me that I was a most successful baby, 
weighing eleven pounds. I was born (so they say) 
about three o'clock in the morning, and my father 

11 



RECOLLECTIONS OF SIXTY YEARS 

did not see me until seven o'clock. He then came 
into the room, saying, "I want to see my boy." 
Taking me in his arms, he carried me to the window 
and pointing to the famous "Old man of the moun- 
tain," visible in the distance, he said, "My son, I 
want to introduce you to the first man in New 
Hainipst.n'e." I was then four hours old. 

My father was one of a family of twelve children, 
all of whom lived to maturity, and all of whom 
are, of course, now dead. I am the very last of the 
name, and as I have no sons, the family name will 
pass away with me. My father's family was one 
of the pioneer families of Lancaster, dating back 
to 1760. 

When I was two years old my father and 
mother moved to Lowell, Mass., where father 
engaged in the lumber business. His health was 
poor and within a year he died suddenly at Salis- 
bury, N. H., where he had gone on business. As an 
evidence of the great change that has taken place, 
I need only tell you that a week passed before my 
mother learned of father's death. I cannot remem- 
ber him at all. 

While at Lowell, I remember very well seeing 
the first train of cars run into that city. It was a 
great day for the city, and everybody gathered near 
the tracks to see the wonderful sight. That must 
have been about 1835, when I was three years old 

12 



RECOLLECTIONS OF SIXTY YEARS 

or thereabouts. After my father's death mother 
returned to Lancaster with me. I was the only 
child. 

While living at Lancaster, when I was about 
four years old, I made my first visit to "district 
school." This was at Hardwick, Vt., near by where 
I was visiting. I was taken to visit the school. 
It was, of course, an old-fashioned school, as we judge 
nowadays. My recollection of that visit is still 
vivid, chiefly because the teacher, chancing to look 
my way, found me valiantly hugging a little red- 
headed girl! I wish I could remember her name. 
That was nearly eighty years ago. 

My mother had some sisters and a brother in 
Montpelier, Vt. Being under the necessity of earn- 
ing her living, she decided to remove thither and 
open a dressmaking business. This she did when 
I was about five years old. A year and a half later 
mother married Abner B. Hunt, and we removed 
with him to Warren, twenty-five miles away. Mr. 
Hunt was in the cooperage business. 

In Montpelier I earned my first money. My 
friends will be amused when I tell them that this 
was as a professional singer. I was only a little 
fellow, but I used to go about the streets singing 
songs such as "Jim Crow," etc., and was rewarded by 
receiving coppers from the bystanders. I also made 
and sold molasses candy. I spent eight years in 

13 



RECOLLECTIONS OF SIXTY YEARS 

Warren, going to school, growing to boyhood, and, 
I suppose, doing about the same things as all New 
England boys of that day. 

In 1844 my family moved to Randolph, where the 
cooper trade was better. I was now reaching the 
age when I began to be anxious to go to work. 
Some of my folks wanted me to be a farmer, but 
that didn't appeal to me. I wanted to be a shoe- 
maker from the very start. My mother wanted me 
to be a printer. Finally, I went to Montpelier 
to learn the printing trade, and secured apprentice 
work on the Montpelier Vermont Patriot, C. G. 
Eastman, editor. I was given a "case" and an 
item to "set up." But I wasn't cut out to be a 
printer. I think it took me four weeks to "set" 
that item, and it wasn't correct then. I didn't take 
to the business. My heart wasn't in it. I wanted 
to be a shoemaker. 

In those days there was no shoe machinery. 
The shops made all kinds of shoes. In Mont- 
pelier was the shop of N. Harvey, well known 
thereabouts at that time. This was about 1846. 

The shop was up-stairs, and a shoe store was 
on the ground floor. The shop employed thirty or 
forty men. Women's shoes were here made. To 
the store I came one cold morning. I asked Mr. 
Harvey's son, who was in the room, for a job as ap- 
prentice. He said, "We haven't had an apprentice 

14 



RECOLLECTIONS OF SIXTY YEARS 

for ten years. I don't believe father will take 
you." Near by was the foreman, named Bickford, 
with his feet up on the stove. He seemed to like 
me somehow, and went up-stairs to see if one of the 
boys would take me. One of them looked me over 
and said, "I don't know but I'll take you." The 
next morning I went to work. At noon I went to 
dinner with my new boss. His wife didn't like it. 
She stood it a week, then made so much fuss that my 
boss told Mr. Harvey about it, and Mr. Harvey 
said he'd take me to his house. 

Things went along nicely for a spell, until I was 
taken sick with a fever. I had learned shoemaking 
rapidly. I seemed fitted for it. I liked it. This 
sickness seemed likely to put an end to the Harvey 
job anyhow, for nobody appeared to want a 
young man in the house who was going to have a 
run of fever. They even talked of sending me to 
Harry Richardson, who would welcome me. But 
when Mr. Harvey had hitched up to drive me there 
his son said that would never do. So they let me 
stay that night at Mr. Harvey's. The next day 
I felt better, and fortunately was soon ready for 
work. Mr. Harvey said when I returned, "I am 
afraid you are going to be a sickly boy and I don't 
believe I want you here." 

The foreman, Ebenezer Bickford, had become 
interested in me, and at this crisis spoke up and 

15 



RECOLLECTIONS OF SIXTY YEARS 

said, "I'll take him, myself." And he did. He 
took me home to dinner and I kept going there. 
I liked the Bickford family and eventually Mr. 
Bickford's daughter became Mrs. Joel C. Page, 
and she is still with me, after nearly sixty years of 
happy life together. So, perhaps, my sickness 
wasn't such bad luck after all. The turn of our 
lives hinges often on matters that we don't under- 
stand as blessings at the time. 

The succeeding year, under Mr. Bickford's 
guiding care, I got along finely. I was then eighteen 
years old. My mother came to Montpelier about 
this time and arranged for me to stay at Harvey's 
shop until I was twenty-one. My salary was 340 
a year! Times have changed, you see! But I was 
permitted to attend school three months each year. 

In the shop I was supposed to learn to make 
everything. Well, I felt that I need not learn to 
make all kinds of shoes, so I made a deal to secure 
my freedom for the balance of the time. I paid 
$300 for this. Meanwhile, this permitted me to 
work along at the bench as I wanted to. 

One day Mr. Stone said: "Wouldn't you like to 
learn to cut shoes? You ought to learn to do that." 
I said that I would like it. "If you'll pay a quart of 
beer I'll see if I can't get you in to learn to cut," 
said he. So the deal was made and I began this 
end of the work. 

16 




JOEL C. PAGE AT TWENTY-TWO 

From an old Daguerreotype 




JOEL G. PAGE AT SEVENTEEN 

From an old Daguerreotype 




An old-fashioned "tintype" picture showing Mr. Page sel'ing shoes to a dealer. Mr. 
Page is the silk-hatted gentleman, standing, who looks Kke Lincoln. The buyer faces 
him, and the clerk (whiskers!) is in the background. Mr. Page calls this picture <: Go 
Get 'Em." 




Mr. Page and family at Randolph, Vt., fifty vears ago. Mr. Page is seated at the left. 
His mother is next to him, his stepfather in the center, a guest next and Mrs. Page at 
the right. The younger daughter, now Mrs. E. W. Cobb, is near Mr. Page, and the 
elder daughter, now Mrs. Nellie Frost, is near Mrs. Page. 



R E C QLLECTIONS OF SIXTY YEARS 

During all this time I was employed at intervals 
to wait on customers in the store, which, as I said 
before, was on the first floor of the shop. Then for 
three years I was constantly occupied in clerking. 
So you see I have been a regular retail clerk. I 
learned all I could about the selling of shoes, and it 
was a valuable experience. They told me that I was 
a very successful clerk. I kept the stock shipshape, 
knew where every pair of every kind was and exactly 
the condition of the stock. 

The Harvey shop made three kinds of buskins 
at that time welts, turns and spring heels. Mr. 
Harvey had a regular route of customers. When a 
certain amount of shoes were made he would hitch 
up and drive around the country to the various towns 
and sell the shoes to the local stores. 



II 

Of course I got the Boston fever. Every New 
England boy in those days had one big ambition to 
visit Boston. I guess this is so to-day, too. In the 
summer of 1852 I told my boss I had made up my 
mind to try my luck in Boston. He was kind enough 
to say he was sorry to have me go, and gave me 
several letters of introduction and recommendation 
to Boston folks. 



19 



RECOLLECTIONS OF SIXTY YEARS 

I reached Boston on a Saturday night and went 
to the home of an uncle of -mine for over Sunday. 
Monday morning I came down-town, and saw a 
boyhood acquaintance who was employed in a butter 
and cheese store. He told me of an opportunity 
with a shoe house James A. Estabrook, who had a 
retail store on one corner, and a jobbing house on 
the other that was at the corner of North Street 
and Merchants Row. That was then the heart of 
the shoe district. It had not moved to the Lincoln 
and South streets sections, as is now the case. 

Mr. Estabrook told me to come to work the next 
day. I did so, and thus began the second part of 
my business life. The Vermont days were over. 
Through life I have always retained a great affection 
for the scenes of my birth and boyhood. 

My job was in the wholesale department of the 
business, located on the second floor, across the 
street from the retail store. I went in as the youngest 
of the force. My salary was $7 a week, considered 
good wages at that time, sixty years ago. My 
board and room cost 33 a week. The understanding 
was that I should have a raise at the end of six 
months if my work was satisfactory. I guess it must 
have been, for I was raised to $11 a week when the 
time came. 

My work was that of a salesman and porter. 
Toward the latter part of the first six months I began 

20 



RECOLLECTIONS OF SIXTY YEARS 

to assist in the buying and soon was entrusted with 
this important end of the business to a large extent. 

The customers upon whom I waited at this time 
came from all over New England. Mostly they 
were general store-keepers, a bit like one sees in little 
country towns at the present time, selling something 
of everything. 

The salesman would go around to the different 
hotels, hunting up customers the Quincy, Ameri- 
can and Central hotels were the places where the 
dealers mostly stopped. He would see them in the 
morning and make dates for the afternoon. I did 
the same thing frequently, and often entertained the 
dealers for dinner and theater in the evening. You 
see the same principles practised right here in Boston 
to this day; the methods only have changed. 

Dealers then would pick out the exact goods 
they wanted, handling every pair, often. Goods 
were not sold from sample, remember. Of course, 
immediate shipment was made. 

One forenoon a man came in and wanted a case 
of a certain kind of calkskin boots. We were sold 
out on that style, but expected some of these and I 
told him to come back at two o'clock and I would 
have some. Half an hour before the time set, our 
expected goods had not yet arrived. Growing 
anxious, I went to S. G. Damon's on Hanover 
Street I knew he had some of these boots and 



21 



RECOLLECTIONS OF SIXTY YEARS 

as Mr. Estabrook and Mr. Damon occasionally 
exchanged goods, I hoped to secure a case of Nash's 
boots this particular kind was made by Mr. Nash 
of Weymouth. Fortunately Mr. Damon could 
accommodate. Not waiting for a wagon, I shoul- 
dered the case and carried it to Estabrook's. My 
customer happened to see me carrying the case. 
About two o'clock he came in, and made his pur- 
chase. Afterwards he complimented me to Mr. 
Estabrook for this display of enterprise. 

Goods were bought by the jobber on six months' 
credit those days, and sold on four and six months' time. 

Some ideas of prices and styles then prevailing 
may be interesting now. 

A side-lace cloth gaiter sold for $1 to 31-50. 
Congress goring came in soon. Women's congress 
were sold as well as men's. Colored goods sold from 90 
cents to $1 .50. A patent leather foxed boot was popu- 
lar then. There was no japanned leather then. Bright 
goat was used for pegged boots. Jenny Lind, the 
famous singer, had been here about that time, and 
a boot named for her was very popular. This was 
a bal., of a bit higher cut than usual, with gusset 
or goring, no seam, only in back. Button shoes had 
not yet come in. Some calfskin bals. were sold. 
Grain leather was much in use. Women's, misses' 
and children's shoes were of the pegged variety, as 
well as men's. 

22 




In current bttlrf^WRmisrWetired with our cUeoks 
in sums of even dollars 



Vt, -es/I^U*. /, </$$&.. V 




bills, whenBented with our c 
in. sum a ol^v&a. dollars. 



t|< 



*4 



o 







Here is reproduced, full size, the "script" or " fractionalcurrency "used by 
Mr. Page in 1862, when the Civil War rendered specie almost valueless. 
Mr. Page was the first man in America to use "fractional currency." 
It was his idea and later came into general use. 




BY-LAWS 



8801 tf stoe TUBBIER' leas 



Fac-simile, reduced in size, of the Constitution and By-Laws of the 
first association of traveling shoe salesmen the Boot and Shoe Trav- 
elers' League, founded in Boston, April 10, 1885; membership about 
two hundred. 

Joel C. Page was the second president of the League. E. F. Sawyer 
was first president. 



RECOLLECTIONS OF SIXTY YEARS 



Turn shoes were about twenty-five per cent of 
the output, welts about twenty-five per cent, and 
pegged about fifty per cent. Oak sole leather was 
much used. Heels in pegged shoes were nearly all 
of the spring variety. Turns were made plain heels, 
not spring. Calf bootees were made with low heels. 
It was a long time before heels anywhere near as high 
as is common nowadays came into use. Slippers 
were made of kid, and sold from 50 and 75 cents 
to 1.00. 

The calf boots we carried were mostly made at 
Weymouth. They were packed in long boxes with 
the leg-tops standing. There were no such things 
as cartons at that time. 

Our women's turn shoes came mostly from Lynn. 
The pegged shoes were made in Stoneham. Kip 
boots were made in Milford. Farmers' boots were of 
kip, that is, light cowhide, with half-double sole, 
pegged. These cost us from $28 to $33 a twelve-pair 
case. Men's brogans were of grain, goat and kip, 
lower pattern, lace. B. E. Cole manufactured kip 
boots those days. I used to go to his loft, pick out 
ten or twelve cases, open them all up, and look care- 
fully over every pair. I recollect the firms of Nash 
& Co., Weymouth, Vining & Ingalls, Lynn, Sprague 
& Co., Stoneham, Z. Graves & Brother, and many 
others. 

25 



RECOLLECTIONS OF SIXTY YEARS 

III 

I went to Estabrook's in July. When Christmas 
came I wanted to make a visit home. Mr. Esta- 
brook consented. I suggested to him that as I had 
been in Nehemiah Harvey's, a retail shoe store at 
Montpelier, three or four years and knew something 
about the kind of goods needed there, I believed we 
had some shoes that Mr. Harvey could use to good 
advantage, and that I would like to take some 
samples home and show Mr. Harvey. "Do you 
think he would buy any that way?" said Mr. Esta- 
brook. "Yes, I think so," said I. "Take anything 
you want and I'll give you half the profit made on 
anything you sell," said he. So I took a few single 
samples with me. After the holiday, I called on 
Mr. Harvey. After talking socially awhile I said, 
"I have some goods I think you could use." He 
said, "Well, boy, you ought to know." I opened my 
valise and took out a sample. Mr. Harvey was very 
tall and stately. I can see him now as he straight- 
ened up and said, "Joel, isn't this something new 
to sell shoes by showing one shoe?" "Yes," said I, 
"but I thought as I was coming up for Christmas 
I might as well bring along ten or twelve and show 
you." "Well, well, I'll look at them," said Mr. 
Harvey. "If they are just what I want can you 
get them to me right away?" I told him that we 

26 



RECOLLECTIONS OF SIXTY YEARS 

could. He looked over the samples and selected 
$180 worth from these. I was much pleased, the 
profit paid my expenses home. 

Thus was consummated what I believe was the 
first sale to a retail shoe store from sample. This 
was late December, 1852, when I was twenty years 
old. The order consisted of women's, misses' and 
children's pegged shoes and bootees. I had no men's 
samples with me. 

Emboldened by this good luck, I tried the same 
thing on three or four others in Montpelier. They 
never did such a thing before, never heard of such a 
thing, they said, but three of them gave me orders. 

When I returned to Boston Mr. Estabrook, 
much pleased at the success of my Montpelier 
efforts, advanced me to $11 a week, and said that it 
might pay to go up again in the summer. 

During the first six months of my employment 
at $7 a week I had saved $75, which I took home at 
Christmas. 

The Massachusetts Central Railroad was being 
built at that time. It had gone as far as Blackstone. 
At that place was quite a railroad workers' settle- 
ment. Here an Irishman kept a boarding house. 
He saved his money. One day he came in to look 
over some of our shoes, saying he believed he could 
make some money selling his boarders their shoes. 
After looking the stock over for awhile, he said he 

27 



RECOLLECTIONS OF SIXTY YEARS 

thought he'd look around a bit, and if he found 
nothing that suited him better he would come back. 
Sure enough, back he came, and I sold him quite 
an order. He asked for his bill when he had com- 
pleted his purchase. I gave it to him he paid it, 
3885, out of a bag of gold he carried. I put the gold 
in the safe it was after the bookkeeper had gone 
for the day. When Mr. Estabrook returned and 
learned of this unusual transaction he was greatly 
pleased, I recollect. 

Mr. Estabrook went to California five or six 
years later, and, I believe, died out there. 

Among the boys at Estabrook's was one named 
Lincoln, whom I grew to know very well. He later 
became one of the founders of the famous wholesale 
house of Bachelder & Lincoln. Mr. Bachelder was 
then with a concern opposite Faneuil Hall Market. 



IV 

In the previous recital of the events of my life 
I had covered the years up to about 1855, when I 
was with James A. Estabrook. 

At that time, as now, shoe manufacturers had 
Boston offices, but there was this difference now 
only samples are shown in the Boston offices, whereas 
then the actual shoes were carried. The offices were 

28 



RECOLLECTIONS OF SIXTY YEARS 

really stockrooms. We used to look over the goods, 
select what we wanted and have the goods shipped 
at once. Most of the Boston offices were on Pearl 
Street. Kilby Street, now given over to insurance, 
was also quite a shoe district. The adjacent streets 
had some shoe offices, of course. 

The Quincy House and the American House 
were great headquarters for the shoe men at that time. 

Wednesdays and Saturdays were the great trade 
days then, and this custom has continued ever since. 

Gilmore & Cole was one of the well-known shoe 
manufacturing houses with Boston offices in those 
days. 

The leather men held forth a bit farther north, 
down in the "North End," north of Merchants Row 
and the old market. Reynolds & Wait was one of 
the kid leather houses of that day. Lee Claflin & Co. 
were prominent in sole leather dealing. A. L. 
White handled sole and upper leather, and imported 
calfskin. 

I remember once that a manufacturer friend of 
mine in Vermont asked me to buy for him a ton of 
sole leather. I had never bought any leather, but 
I went out and looked around, and finally went into 
the store of Lee Claflin & Co., looked over their 
goods and bought what my friend wanted. So you 
see, I added the science of leather buying to my 
experience at that early date. 

29 



RECOLLECTIONS OF SIXTY YEARS 

About this time my acquaintance with a Ver- 
mont man, Horace Herrick, who came from my 
home town, Montpelier, led to a change in my 
affairs. Mr. Herrick had been a schoolteacher and 
preacher in Vermont. Failing eyesight compelled 
him to give up preaching, and he came to Boston to 
sell the first wax thread sewing machine ever made. 
The agent for this machine was a brother-in-law of 
Mr. Herrick, Elmer Townsend, then one of the best- 
known auction shoe men in Boston, a member of the 
influential firm of Townsend, Mallard & Cowing. 

Mr. Herrick came to me one day and asked me 
how I would like to buy out the store of Nehemiah 
Harvey, at Montpelier, where I had formerly been 
employed. Mr. Harvey had sold the business, but 
the purchasers were anxious to sell out. I knew 
everybody in Montpelier, and knew also that this 
fifty-year-old business was sound, and with good 
management would be profitable. So I said I would 
be glad to go back to Montpelier in this way. I 
didn't have much money, but through Mr. Herrick 
and Mr. Townsend, this was no hindrance, and the 
deal was made. 

In the middle of March, 1856, I found myself 
back in Montpelier, a member of the firm of Herrick 
& Page, shoe retailers, manufacturers and jobbers - 
in the very store where a few years before I had 
begun to learn the business, a young, friendless boy. 

30 



RECOLLECTIONS OF SIXTY YEARS 

We employed twenty-five or thirty shoemakers 
and produced women's turns and welt buskins, and 
boots and other kinds of custom work, doing quite 
a business in the near-by territory. 

I should mention in passing that ever since Decem- 
ber, 1852, when I took the first order ever taken from 
sample shown to a dealer, I had annually gone out 
with samples and sold shoes to dealers that way. 

This work of traveling salesmanship I kept up 
after entering business for myself, covering parts of 
New England and New York with our own shoes, 
and also a line of rubbers I secured from Jonathan 
Pierce, agent for the Haywood Rubber Company. 

We bought our shoes from manufacturers and 
jobbers who treated us very well in the matter of 
credit. Some of the jobbing houses of that day were : 
Henry L. Daggett, George L. Thayer, John H. 
Rogers, C. & M. Cox, Amos Tapley and J. Ireson & 
Son. At that time Blanchard & Groce were manu- 
facturing men's shoes at East Abington, now Rock- 
land. Daniel S. Howard and Howard & Washburn 
were prominent pioneer manufacturers in North 
Bridgewater, now Brockton. 

Mr. Herrick was not a shoe man, but worked 
in the store, on the books, etc. 

And now I must digress for a moment and make 
mention of a happy event in my life my marriage. 

31 



RECOLLECTIONS OF SIXTY YEARS 

\% 

I was married, September 15, 1855, to Miss Addie 
L. Bickford of Montpelier, daughter of Ebenezer 
Bickford, who taught me the business whenl first 
started in at Montpelier, nearly ten years before. 
I came up to Montpelier Saturday night and we were 
married Sunday evening, at the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, by the Rev. Alonzo Webster. We had both 
sung in the choir for several years. Sunday morning 
we took our places in the choir as usual. That even- 
ing our marriage was solemnized at the beginning of 
the evening services, and when the nuptial knot was 
tied we took our places in the choir as usual, and 
doubtless sang with a great spirit of happiness. 

That was fifty-nine years ago last September, 
and we are both grateful to Divine Providence for 
these long years of wedded happiness. Mrs. Page 
and I have journeyed down the years together, far 
past the usual time given to us here, and are to-day 
enjoying fair health and the fullness of memory of 
these many happy years together. v 

We came immediately to Boston, and lived there 
until the following March, when, on the purchase 
of the Montpelier business, we made our home there. 



In March 1857, I was in Boston on business, and 
met Jonathan Pierce. Said Mr. Pierce, "Joel, there 

32 



RECOLLECTIONS OF SIXTY YEARS 

is a new machine coming out that I want you to see 
and give me your opinion on. I have been asked to 
invest in the company back of the machine, and I'd 
like your views as to whether it is practical or not." 

We climbed four flights of stairs to a room in a 
building at the head of Pearl Street, and there I 
beheld the first McKay sewing machine. 

I looked it over. They sewed a few samples on it 
for me. Said I, "If you will make two changes in 
this machine and make them right, it will revolu- 
tionize shoe manufacturing." 

The two changes were these: A smaller needle 
must be used and the thread must be thoroughly 
waxed. This was necessary to insure against 
ripping. The sewing must be as tight as hand- 
sewing. 

They experimented along these lines and made 
the changes, and we all know what a success the 
McKay process has been. Mr. Pierce bought some 
of the stock. 

My business life in Montpelier lasted until 1864, 
when I sold out to Calvin Fullerton and brother, two 
young men who had been in my employ. I had 
bought out Mr. Herrick in 1862. 

When I was in the retail shoe business in Mont- 
pelier, Vt., in 1862, the Civil War was well under way. 
Specie was worth twenty per cent premium, and we 

33 



RECOLLECTIONS OF SIXTY YEARS 

had to depend on postage stamps to make change. 
On ordinary days we storekeepers got along very 
well, but I recollect election day that year as a serious 
problem for us. The voters would come to town 
that day in large numbers, and it meant a big day's 
business for us. 

Mr. Ellis, a dry goods merchant in Montpelier, 
came to me and asked what we would do for change. 
I asked him if we couldn't use postage stamps as 
usual. He said that we couldn't get any more from 
the post office. "What will we do?" says he. 
"Well," said I, "maybe we can issue fractional 
currency on our own account. Let's go to the bank 
and see." 

The banker couldn't do a thing for us the law 
prevented him from assisting us. But he said he 
would do this he would honor our personal checks, 
if drawn on the bank in fractional denominations of 
five cents, ten cents, twenty cents, fifty cents, etc., 
if presented in quantities of even dollars. This was 
my plan. 

I went to the printer and had printed the checks 
illustrated elsewhere, just as soon as he could get 
them out. I got about $50 worth. 

The next day was election day. The first thing in 
the morning a man came in and bought a pair of shoes 
for $1 .50, and offered a $2 bill in payment. I tendered 
him in change one of my "fractional currency" 

34 



RECOLLECTIONS OF SIXTY YEARS 

checks, and after explanations to him, he readily 
took it the same as money. The whole 350 worth 
were gone by noon. That night I had $50 worth 
more printed, and soon the idea was in general use 
in Montpelier, and in fact throughout the state and 
elsewhere; and later the United States government 
got out fractional currency of its own. 

I had never seen or heard of "fractional cur- 
rency," and believe that I was the very first to issue 
this form of small money for convenience sake and 
use during that trying time. 

VI 

A matter of interest at that time, in which I had 
a part, was a change in the arctic overshoe style of 
the period. 

Thomas C. Wales was agent for a rubber com- 
pany that made a rubber overshoe with a cloth top 
that laced up the front a clumsy affair, red wool 
lined. Oldtimers will remember this overshoe. The 
common overshoe of the time was a calfskin with 
hair on I sold this sort. 

A friend of mine in Montreal sent me a pair of 
overshoes, practically a fac-simile of the present-day 
cut and style, good-looking, easily adjusted, buckled. 
I went to Montreal, bought five cases, twenty-four 
pairs to the case. I went to Boston, putting a pair 

35 



RECOLLECTIONS OF SIXTY YEARS 

of the new-fangled overshoes in my carpet bag. I 
saw John H. Rogers and showed them to him. He 
was much pleased and asked me to send him a case. 
When he got the case he showed a pair to Mr. Wales, 
who bought them, took them to his factory, and 
copied the pattern and idea. 

This was the first arctic overshoe, about as we know 
them to-day, and I was the first to bring this into 
America. This was about 1857. This style has 
remained, with improvements of course, in general 
use ever since. 

In 1864 I sold out my Montpelier retail business 
to Calvin Fullerton & Brother, intending to go South 
and engage in business. Ben Butler's affairs in 
Louisiana at that time made this inadvisable, so I 
had to give up that idea. 

For a season I sold a rubber sole shoe, made by 
the Heywood Rubber Company, Maiden. This was 
a rubber sole nailed onto a regular leather boot. The 
idea seemed good, but after being out with it for 
three or four months, and the shoes not coming 
right, I gave up the effort and went on the road with 
Holbrook, Hobart & Porter, who made men's calf 
boots. They put in a line of shoes to job, but didn't 
know the jobbing business. They had a chance to 
sell out at the close of the war to Jackson, Richards 
Haven. Mr. Jackson had made money in Canada 

36 



RECOLLECTIONS OF SIXTY YEARS 

during the war. Mr. Richards was a brother of 
Mr. Richards of the firm of Edwards, Richards & 
Nichols, Boston dry-goods merchants. Mr. Haven 
had worked for Henry L. Daggett, then a prominent 
shoe jobber. 

Jackson, Richards & Haven hired myself and 
one other salesman. I worked three years for them; 
traveling through New York State, Troy, Utica, 
Syracuse, Auburn and Rochester to Buffalo. 



VII 

One man that I sold largely on these trips was 
John L. Dodge, who had a retail shoe store in Troy. 
He was the father of Harry D. Dodge and Chandler 
Dodge, now prominent shoe manufacturers in 
Newburyport. He was also a brother of Nathan 
D. Dodge, Elisha P. Dodge and Moses Dodge, all 
of whom became successful and prominent shoe 
manufacturers in later years.. 

E. P. Dodge learned to cut shoes, and went to 
Lynn and began to manufacture cacks, going to 
Newburyport in 1869 to make women's shoes for 
the retail trade. He became one of the most suc- 
cessful shoe manufacturers in the country, making 
women's shoes. He died about ten years ago. 

Mr. Dodge began to come along nicely, but 
needed a salesman who knew how shoes ought to be 

37 



RECOLLECTIONS OF SIXTY YEARS 

made as well as to sell them properly. John L. 
Dodge told E. P. that they ought to hire Joel Page. 
He sent for me to come to see them. This was in 
the fall of 1869. Nathan D. Dodge had also started 
to manufacture misses' and children's shoes in 
Newburyport, and wanted to sell his output along 
with E. P. Dodge's. Said E. P. Dodge to me: "We 
don't know exactly what the trade wants; John L. 
says you can tell us. What will you work for us 
for?" I named my price 32,000 and expenses. 
A Mr. Balch, who was identified with Mr. Dodge 
in the venture, said they couldn't pay that much. 
"Why," said he, "we don't have to pay over $15 a 
week for our best cutters." He was scared. 

E. P. asked me to wait a week before decision. 
They wrote to John L. He told them the price 
ought not to make any difference, and to hire me 
at once. 

So they wrote me to come on again. I did so. 
"How many shoes can you sell?" they asked me. 
It was a new thing, this idea of selling the trade 
direct from the factory. The jobbers had heretofore 
handled that end of the business. I had sold 
375,000 for my house, a jobbing concern, Jackson, 
Richards & Haven. In answer to the question I 
said: "I don't know." "Will you agree to sell 
350,000 for us the first year?" they asked. "No, I 
won't agree to that. I'll do the best I can." "Well," 

38 



RECOLLECTIONS OF SIXTY YEARS 

said E. P. Dodge, "John says to hire you. We'll 
try it. It can't more than ruin us in one year." 

So I went to work for E. P. Dodge & Co. I 
stayed around two or three weeks and helped get 
out the line of samples I wanted. 

I had twenty-five samples of E. P. Dodge's 
shoes and thirty-five samples of Nathan D. Dodge's. 
I was to carry both lines. 

In February, 1870, I started out. I worked 
from Troy to Buffalo, then by the "Lake Shore," 
to Cleveland, Toledo, Detroit, Kalamazoo and 
Chicago. I was out eight or nine weeks, and made 
a good success of the trip. My houses were much 
pleased with results. 

In June, 1870, I made another trip as far as 
Chicago, and two more trips in the fall. When 
January 1, 1871, came around I was pleased to learn 
that my sales had totalled 125,000. Mr. Dodge 
asked me if I didn't want more money, and I re- 
ceived an advance of $500 a year right away. I 
sold as high as $160,000 a year during the next three 
years, and had my salary substantially advanced 
twice. 

At the conclusion of the three years' service my 
contract called for, in 1872, we were unable to come 
to terms for another period, and our connection was 
mutually severed. I took out a line very similar to 
Dodge's, on commission. That was the year of the 

39 



RECOLLECTIONS OF SIXTY YEARS 

big fire in Chicago, where I had a large trade. I 
held a good percentage of my regular trade, with 
the new lines I carried. 

John L. Dodge sold his Troy business and went 
to Newburyport late in the '70's, and worked for 
E. P. Dodge. He was anxious to have me back 
again, and sent for me to come down and talk it over. 
I went down and told them I couldn't come with 
them for another year, and said that at the end of the 
year I would talk. This was about 1877, and in the 
mean time I had been selling shoes on commission 
through my old territory. 

When a year passed by I again engaged with the 
Dodge interests, and when 1880 came along, I was 
again selling my old line in my old territory, to which 
St. Louis had been added. 

When I sold out my retail shoe business in 
Montpelier I came to Boston to engage in business, 
but made my home in Cambridge, across the Charles. 
Here for three years was my home. My family 
consisted of Mrs. Page and myself and our two 
young daughters, and I am happy to say that the 
little family circle has been unbroken all these many 
years. One of my daughters is Mrs. Elisha W. 
Cobb, wife of the former president of the Boston 
Boot and Shoe Club, and a member of the 
leather firm of Beggs & Cobb. 

40 



RECOLLECTIONS OF SIXTY YEARS 

After three years' residence in Cambridge we 
moved to Boston, where we bought a house on West 
Canton Street, and made our home there for eight 
or nine years. About 1877 we traded our West 
Canton Street home for a house in Melrose, at 
136 Vinton Street, and there we have ever since 
resided. 

During these nearly forty years of life in Melrose 
I have been identified with the public affairs of that 
city, in some measure. I was a member of the 
Republican town committee for sixteen or seventeen 
years, and was a delegate to Republican state con- 
ventions many times, and twice was a delegate to the 
national convention of Republican clubs, once in 
Cincinnati and once in Cleveland. I have been a 
member of the Melrose Lodge of Masons for many 
years, also the Chapter and Hugh de Payne Com- 
mandery. Am also a member of the Melrose Club, 
the Home Market Club, and the Middlesex Club. 
For fifteen years I was on the board of trustees of the 
First M. E. Church in Melrose, and for six years 
chairman. In 1904 I was elected an alderman of the 
city of Melrose and served four years in this capacity, 
one term being alderman-at-large. 

I am proud to record that I voted for John 
C. Fremont, the first Republican candidate for 
president, in 1856, and have voted the Repub- 
lican ticket ever since. 



41 



RECOLLECTIONS OF SIXTY YEARS 

As this is written about Lincoln's birthday, I am 
reminded of the day that Abraham Lincoln was shot. 
I was in Cincinnati at the time, and was in the store 
of J. M. Potter when the news came that the Presi- 
dent had been shot. Mr. Potter was the first to 
tell me. It created tremendous excitement, and 
everywhere were evidences of grief and mourning. I 
do not recollect ever knowing the nation more filled 
with sorrow than this sad event brought. 



But to get back to shoe-talk. In 1879 I returned 
to road service with E. P. Dodge, and traveled my 
old territory New York, part of Pennsylvania, 
large cities in Ohio and Michigan and Illinois, in- 
cluding Chicago. I also made St. Louis and other 
sizable towns down that way, as St. Joseph, Joplin, 
Springfield and Kansas City, and stopped at some 
other cities on the way back to Boston. I never 
made many of the small towns in my travels, but 
visited, year after year, the larger cities in the terri- 
tory I covered. 

I was with E. P. Dodge until 1900 and represented 
him for nearly twenty-five years, all told. 

Mr. Dodge was one of the very finest men in the 
trade, and it was a pleasure to work for him. In 
all the years I was with him I never had an unkind 
or ungenerous word from him. He was all that was 
just and fair and honorable, and I am glad at this 

42 



RECOLLECTIONS OF SIXTY YEARS 

time to pay this tribute to his memory. His 
partner was Henry B. Little, and Mr. Little was 
truly one of God's noblemen. Mr. Little is in 
business now as a member of the shoe manufacturing 
firm of Ireland-Graf ton Company at Dover, N. H. 
These two men were the highest type of business 
men, and no man ever was associated with better. 

John L. Dodge, brother of E. P. Dodge, was also 
a high-minded gentleman and a splendid man, and 
I can speak of him in the very highest terms. As 
stated before it was through him that I happened to 
make a connection with E. P. Dodge. John L. 
Dodge's sons, Harry D. Dodge and "Chan" Dodge, 
have maintained the high standard of the name, as 
members of Dodge Brothers at Newburyport. 

As this book is in preparation for the press I learn 
with deep regret of the sudden death of Nathan D. 
Dodge, at Los Angeles, Cal., May 8, 1915. Mr. 
Dodge was a man of sterling integrity and finest 
character, "a gentleman of the old school," whom 
I long knew and respected. His son, William G. 
Dodge, is head of the present Nathan D. Dodge 
Shoe Company at Newburyport. 

VIII 

In recalling the many trips I made during this 
period from 1879 to 1900, memory naturally brings 

43 



RECOLLECTIONS OF SIXTY YEARS 

the names and recollections of many of the buyers 
I called on and sold. I well recall among these, 
without going into an extended list, the following 
gentlemen and houses, then widely known as repre- 
sentative shoe merchants of their day and generation : 
C. D. Packard, Troy; Mr. McDougall, Syracuse; 
William Eastwood and George Gould, Rochester; 
N. O. Stone, Cleveland; James H. Jewett, Buffalo; 
Mr. Nettleton (a brother of A. E. Nettleton), 
Toledo; A. R. Morgan and Richard H. Fyfe, Detroit; 
Bullock Brothers, N. B. Holden, B. F. DeMuth, D. 
L. Streeter, Chicago; Bradley & Metcalf, Milwaukee; 
J. P. Schnellbacher and H. Thielbar, Peoria; J. G. 
Brandt, T. J. Reid, C. E. Hilts, Mr. Cristman, The 
Famous, The Grand Leader, St. Louis; J. M. Potter, 
and Mablew & Carew, Cincinnati. 

Many others I knew well and deeply, and counted 
as my friends. Most of them have retired or passed 
to the Great Beyond, for Time reaps his sure harvest, 
and when a man reaches four-score years he has seen 
the going out of many, many friends he knew and 
valued in the years gone by. 



In 1900 I decided to retire from such active work 
as the Dodge line required, and I severed my con- 
nection with reluctance and regret, after nearly a 
quarter of a century of service. 



44 



RECOLLECTIONS OF SIXTY YEARS 

Here I wish to say a word of appreciation for the 
many warm friendships I made among my fellow 
shoe traveling men. A bit later I shall have some- 
thing to say by way of recollection of some of these 
royal good fellows and companions in the work. 

For four years after 1900 I engaged in buying and 
selling shoes on my own account, dealing in about the 
same grade of goods made by E. P. Dodge & Co. My 
office was at 25 Lincoln Street. I made several 
trips and carried a stock of shoes at Lincoln Street. 
This I continued until 1904. In 1905 I was obliged 
to cease active work, on account of trouble with my 
knees which prevented travel or hard work; and I 
have since "taken life easy." 



IX 

The recent organization of the National Shoe 
Travelers' Association brought back to my memory 
the recollection of the first association of traveling 
shoe salesmen The Boot and Shoe Travelers' 
League. This was founded in the spring of 1885. 
The circumstances were as here related. 

A dozen or more of the boys happened to be to- 
gether in Boston, and the suggestion was made that 
an organization be formed. The idea was well re- 
ceived, and after talking it over we decided to meet 
later at the "boot and shoe exchange" and effect a 

45 



RECOLLECTIONS OF SIXTY YEARS 

temporary organization. This was done a few days 
later, with a temporary membership list and officers. 

Some of the boys who participated in that first 
gathering for the purpose of organization were: 
J. Harry Colburn, Fred Lemon, David Williams, 
James Estabrook, Joel C. Page, Frank Wilder, 
Oliver M. Fisher, R. W. Fitzpatrick, Rush Green, 
George W, Hall, J. C. Hunt, E. H. Lewis, E. J. 
Pierce, S. Preston Moses, C. C. Robinson, Fred 
Weldon, and, I think, Harry Ripley and Charles 
J. Shriner, William Noll and A. W. Gage. 

We formed a temporary organization, April 10, 
1885, and adjourned to a week later, when a perma- 
nent organization was accomplished. 

The first officers of the "Boot and Shoe Travelers' 
League," as we called the new association, were: 
president, Robert Sawyer; vice-president, Joel C. 
Page; secretary, Frank L. Wilder; treasurer, George 
W. Hall. 

Here I wish especially to speak of the objects of 
the new organization, as set forth in the consitution 
and by-laws: 

" The object of this organization is to adopt plans 
which shall promote and maintain a high standard of 
business integrity, w effect which it shall strive to co- 
operate between its members and manufacturers and 
jobbers in the boot and shoe trade, and for the benefit of 
manufacturers, 10 keep a list of honest and straight- 

46 



RECOLLECTIONS OF SIXTY YEARS 

forward boot and shoe salesmen; also a list of manu- 
facturers and jobbers whose names are larnished by 
unfair and dishonest dealings" 

It will be seen that the underlying purpose of our 
"League" was the uplifting of the standard of 
traveling shoe salesmanship as a profession, and the 
elimination of the evils that injured the calling, both 
on the part of the boys and the manufacturers. I 
have always felt that the profession of shoe sales- 
manship is a high and honorable work, and have 
always advocated everything tending to preserve a 
high standard among the men who travel. 

We had several meetings, and affairs progressed 
nicely. Pretty soon, however, we were obliged to 
leave on our spring trips, and matters necessarily 
were at a standstill until the boys began to return to 
Boston in the summer. 



The first social gathering of any consequence 
was an outing and dinner down the harbor that 
summer of 1885. We chartered a boat and, ladies 
included, made the sail to Downer's Landing on the 
south shore of Boston Harbor. Here we enjoyed a 
fine dinner. 

There were present between seventy-five and one 
hundred. Several of the boys were called on to make 
speeches and a general good time was enjoyed. 

47 



RECOLLECTIONS OF SIXTY YEARS 

In February, 1886, new officers were elected, and 
I have always been proud of the fact that the boys 
honored me by making me president at that time, 
and I served two terms. W. H. Huntington was 
elected secretary then. 

There had been considerable agitation for club 
rooms. This crystallized into action, and we soon 
had accomplished this purpose by securing rooms, 
well fitted up, on Devonshire Street. The boys 
patronized these rooms regularly, and they soon 
became too small for our needs. I think we had 
about two hundred members at that time. The 
membership fee was raised from $5 to $7. 



We had quite a spirited election in 1887, a good- 
natured contest resulting in unusual interest. The 
boys who could not be present were allowed to 
vote by proxy. These officers were elected: presi- 
dent, Joel C. Page; first vice-president, J. Rush 
Green; second vice-president, Fred P. Baker; secre- 
tary, William H. Huntington; treasurer, George W. 
Hall; executive committee, Fred Lemon, N. H. 
Redpath, G. F. Blake, D. F. Williams, J. B. Spencer, 
W. H. Balkam, Jr., T. H. Chamberlin, A. H. Ather- 
ton. 

That year we moved from Devonshire Street. 
These quarters had been outgrown. A committee 
was appointed to investigate, and we finally secured 

48 



RECOLLECTIONS OF SIXTY YEARS 

a location on Bosworth Street, off Tremont Street, 
not far from the "Old Granary" burying ground. 
These rooms were larger and fitted up more elabor- 
ately. We had billiard and pool tables and plenty 
of card tables, chairs and other furniture for our 
comfort and convenience. 

We raised about $1,500 by subscription to fit 
up the new rooms. I have a list of these subscrip- 
tions and the payments of the money. Some of the 
subscribers to the fund were: George Strong, W. W. 
Spaulding, J. S. Turner, Lilly, Bracket & Co., J. E. 
Donallen, George N. Coburn, William Porter & Son, 
Kimball Brothers, Woodbury Brothers, Boyd & 
Gary, Ora Cushman & Co., Houghton, Coolidge 
& Co., J. W. Brigham, Packard & Grover, Dunn, 
Green & Co., J. C. Bennett & Barnard, Church, 
Brown & Co., Shoe and Leather Reporter, Hosmer, 
Codding & Co., Miller & Foster, Moody, Estabrook 
& Co., Crapley & Co., Pfister & Vogel, John O'Con- 
nell & Son, Alexander Torrey, Johnson, Moody & 
Co., Samuel Hanna, R. G. Salamon, J. M. Lee & 
Co., J. H. Torrey, Terrill, Church & Co., E. P. 
Dodge & Co., Parker, Holmes & Co., M. C. Dizer 
& Co., Isaac Prouty & Co., Redpath Brothers, 
Peninsular Novelty Company, Hayden, Gardiner 
& Co., Cox, Gardner & Dorr, Rice & Hutchins, 
Batchelder & Lincoln, etc. We remained in Bosworth 
Place three years, and many good times we all enjoyed 

49 



RECOLLECTIONS OF SIXTY YEARS 

there. I often wish the Boston shoe trade had a 
social club headquarters like that now. We would 
all enjoy such a club. 

George Ahl succeeded me as president, and 
later N. H. Redpath was president. George Strong 
was the last head of the League. In 1893 I was 
sent to the World's Fair at Chicago as the League's 
delegate to the convention of traveling salesmen 
then held. I was the only shoe trade delegate at 
this convention. 

In 1893 a feeling grew up in the League that the 
club rooms were too far away from the shoe and 
leather district, and after considerable looking about, 
quarters were secured on Bedford Street, not far 
from Summer and Lincoln streets. 

Here our rent was pretty high and soon we found 
we couldn't stand it, together with other increased 
expenses, etc., and so the League finally suspended 
activities, in 1895, I think it was. 



I am glad to know that there is such a strong 
movement in the organization of the National Shoe 
Travelers' Association and I wish this organization 
the greatest success. 

X 

My whole business life was devoted to shoes, and 
while I naturally made the acquaintance of hun- 

50 



RECOLLECTIONS OF SIXTY YEARS 

dreds of retail shoe dealers, manufacturers, and 
others, the traveling salesmen form the central 
place and chief remembrance of the long years of my 
active business career. 

The recollection of the traveling shoe salesmen 
is constantly with me. Daily I recall the faces and 
figures of well-remembered friends of the road. 
Many have journeyed on across the border into the 
silent land of the beyond, and those of us that are 
left will never forget that good company, the com- 
panions of another and an earlier generation. 

These memory-sketches would be incomplete 
without at least a fleeting reference to some of the 
comrades of the road. I wish I might record fit- 
tingly something of every one, but neither space nor 
time permits. Indeed, memory is so fitful that I 
shall likely fail to put down here some of the things 
that I ought not to overlook and that will occur to 
me later. 

Naturally enough, the more than sixty years 
that I traveled brought me in active contact with 
two generations of traveling salesmen, and I am to- 
day mingling occasionally with the young men that 
I know are the third generation. 

As I have written before, I was a charter mem- 
ber of the first association of traveling shoe sales- 
men, the Boot and Shoe Travelers' League, and was 
its second president. When I retired as president 

51 



RECOLLECTIONS OF SIXTY YEARS 

of the league, the boys presented me with a very 
valuable gold-headed ebony cane. I still have that 
cane and prize it highly as a treasured memento of 
other days and friends of long ago. At the dinner at 
which this cane was presented to me, the then Gov- 
ernor Brackett was our guest and sat at my right; 
and the famous clergyman, Rev. Dr. Minot, was on 
my left. It was a splendid occasion. 

Later, when the Boston Shoe Travelers' Asso- 
ciation was formed, I was on the committee to nom- 
inate the first set of officers. I remember well 
that I suggested William Noll for secretary, and he 
was elected and has remained ever since the popular 
and efficient incumbent of that office. The late 
Thomas D. Barry was the first president of the Bos- 
ton Shoe Travelers' Association. 



XI 

Who were some of my comrades and friends of 
the road? Out of the multitude, I recall to-day 
some of the conspicuous figures, and will add just a 
line or two of their names. 

The first traveling salesman that I recall was 
Edward Ray. He began traveling in 1855, abput 
three years after I started. He represented Pan- 
coast, Sage & Moore of Rochester, and was for 

52 



RECOLLECTIONS OF SIXTY YEARS 

years a landmark among shoe salesmen. I do not 
recollect any other salesmen earlier than 1860. After 
that the figures multiply rapidly, and I can only refer 
to a few. 

In the sixties and seventies I remember such men 
as W. H. Stacy, Harry Adams, James Richardson, 
Harry H. Gray, J. Harry Colburn, John Davy, 
John G. Earl, Newton H. Redpath, John Laird, Ham 
Mead and George Strong. 

In the eighties and thereabouts I call to mind 
such men as A. W. Gage, Henry A. Loomis, A. E. 
Little, E. J. Pierce, George Smith, E. H. Lewis, J. C. 
Hunt, Frank L. Wilder, E. F. Tibbetts, George Ahl, 
George W. Hall, Herbert A. Harrington, Harry H. 
Ripley, T. H. Chamberlin, A. W. Dubois, Oliver M. 
Fisher, Charles J. Shriner, A. C. Walker, C. C. 
Robinson, Wickliffe A. Hill, Harry D. Dodge, Fred 
Lemon, and W. P. Plummer. 

Some of these no doubt lap over into the seven- 
ties a bit, and some were in the later eighties. Of 
the traveling men since 1890, I have known a very 
great many. 

Fred Welden traveled for J. C. Bennett & Bar- 
nard, of Lynn. He is now dead. He was a splen- 
did man. 

W. H. Stacy represented Gray Brothers, and 
Harry Adams traveled for Burt's men's shoes. 
These two men united to form the men's fine shoe 



53 



RECOLLECTIONS OF SIXTY YEARS 

manufacturing house of Stacy, Adams & Co., in 
Brockton, in 1875. Mr. Stacy is active in that busi- 
ness to-day. Harry Adams died several years ago 
and is remembered most kindly for his genial good 
nature. 

James Richardson traveled for the then well-known 
Reynolds Brothers, of Utica, N. Y., and is now in 
Chicago. 

Harry H. Gray, now deceased, I first knew in 
Little Falls, N. Y., where he had a shoe store. I 
sold him shoes in 1865. About 1869 he went to 
Syracuse and started the women's manufacturing 
business that now bears his name as "H. H. Gray's 
Son," and is owned by his son, John S. Gray. 
Harry Gray was known as the "dancing man." 

J. J. Cromwell traveled for a New York house. 
He is now dead. 

J. Harry Colburn now represents Hanan & Son 
on the Pacific Coast, and is a brother of Frank M. 
Colburn, who travels for Hazen B. Goodrich & Co. 
Harry Colburn traveled in the early days for Henry 
Damon, and at a later period was with Hathaway, 
Soule & Harrington. 

J. G. Earl, now dead, was the poet of the trav- 
eling salesmen of the earlier generation. He repre- 
sented Krippendorf-Dittman, of Cincinnati. 

Newton H. Redpath, who died several years ago, 
sold goods for Redpath Brothers, Boston, of which 

54 



RECOLLECTIONS OF SIXTY YEARS 

firm he was a member. He was a brother of E. W.. 
Redpath. 

John Laird traveled for Laird, Schober & Mitch- 
ell, of Philadelphia. 

Hamilton Mead was a salesman for Krippen- 
dorf-Dittman. He is dead now. 

A. W. Gage was on the road in the later eighties 
for his own firm of Hayes, Gage & Loomis. Henry 
A. Loomis,. of the same firm, died in California, 
over twenty years ago. Both were also on the 
road for George F. Daniels. 

E. J. Pierce, now in Chicago, represented Alex. 
Torrey & Co. 

George Smith traveled for E. P. Dodge. 

George Strong carried his own shoes, and is 
still active as the head of his factory at East Wey- 
mouth, Mass. 

E. F. Tibbetts, now dead, sold his own shoes, 
made in Newburyport. He was a big-hearted man. 

F. L. Wilder, who died some years ago, was for 
several years with E. P. Dodge, later for himself. 

J. C. Hunt traveled for Cox, of Philadelphia, and 
died a number of years ago. 

W. P. Plummer was one of the first salesmen with 
E. P. Dodge & Co. 

George W. Hall was one of the well-known sales- 
men during the eighties. He died at his home in 
Rockland, Mass., a year or two ago. 

55 



RECOLLECTIONS OF SIXTY YEARS 

Wickliffe A. Hill was for years on the road for, 
and a partner of, A. E. Nettleton, of Syracuse. He 
lives in Syracuse. 

A. C. Walker was with P. Ware, Jr., & Co. 
Herbert A. Harrington sold shoes for Hathaway & 
Soule, and later became a member of the firm, as 
Hathaway, Soule & Harrington. He was later with 
the J. G. Brandt Shoe Company, retail dealers, St. 
Louis. 

Harry D. Dodge, a son of John L. Dodge, first 
carried shoes on the road for his uncle, N. D. Dodge, 
and managed a jobbing store in New York for the 
same uncle. Later he came back to Newburyport 
and helped establish Dodge Brothers, with which 
house he is still connected. 

Fred Lemon, well known in his day, died several 
years ago. He had the first named shoe, I believe. 

Oliver M. Fisher, now president of the M. A. 
Packard Company, Brockton, was on the road in the 
eighties, for this company. 

Harry Ripley was then with J. C. Bennett & 
Barnard, of Lynn. He is now traveling South for L. 
B. Evans' Son Company. 

Charles J. Shriner and Milton Urner I remember 
first as traveling for a Baltimore house, and later for 
French & Hall, of Rockland, and still later they 
established the men's fine shoe manufacturing firm 
of French, Shriner & Urner, in Boston. Mr. Urner 

56 



RECOLLECTIONS OF SIXTY YEARS 

died two or three years ago. Mr. Shriner died Feb- 
ruary 21, 1915. 

A. W. Dubois is now with Charles K. Fox, Inc., 
in New York. 

John Davy, then in Cincinnati, was with Rice 
& Hutchins, at New Orleans, but died recently. 

C. C. Robinson, now with P. J. Harney in Cin- 
cinnati, I understand, was with P. Ware, Jr., & Co., 
in those days. 

XI 

The close of the war in 1865 brought about a big 
revival in the shoe business. No less than ten new 
jobbing houses started up in Boston in 1865-1866. 



As now, the boys on the road used to meet at the 
different points en route and fraternalize. There 
has always been a very good feeling of comradeship 
among the traveling shoe salesmen. 



Hotels always have played a big part in the life of 
the traveling men. Great changes have taken place 
in this particular, and the accommodations and con- 
veniences now afforded the shoe boys are vastly 
superior to the conditions fifty years ago, and I am 
glad of that. Life on the road is hard enough, and 

57 



RECOLLECTIONS OF SIXTY YEARS 

the boys are entitled to all the comfort first-class 
hotels can give. 

In the old days I recall that we used mainly to 
stop at the Gibson House, Cincinnati; the Tremont 
Hotel, in Chicago, before the fire and later at the 
Palmer House; at the Planters' and the Lindall, in St. 
Louis. I was at the Lindall in St. Louis at the time of 
the great storm over fifteen years ago. At Louisville 
we stopped at the Louisville, and at Kansas City it 
was the St. James, first, and later the Midland. 



XII 

Now I come to the concluding chapter of this ac- 
count of my sixty years of service in the shoe trade. 
The telling of this life's history has been a source of 
pleasure to me, and as the many years have passed in 
review I have found enjoyment in the contemplation, 
and have in some measure lived again these fruitful 
and pleasant years. I hope the readers of this 
account have had as much pleasure in the reading as 
I have had in the writing. 

The main thought that is present, as I reach the 
conclusion, is one of wonderment at the many and 
vast changes that have transpired in these sixty years 
and more since I first ventured forth to sell shoes 
from sample, the pioneer of that long and disting- 
uished line of men who have constituted the army of 

58 



RECOLLECTIONS OF SIXTY YEARS 

traveling shoe salesmen with whom I have always 
been proud to count myself an associate and com' 
panion in the work. 

Think of the change from the shoemaker of 
seventy-five years ago, working away in his chimney 
corner, bent over his work, the tub of water by his 
side, his tools handy to reach! He was a complete 
shoemaker, fashioning the entire shoe from cutting 
to finishing. He made all the shoes for his own 
family and for as many others as time permitted. 

The few "factories," or shops, making a few hun- 
dred barrels of low-cut shoes, and shipping these to 
cities, such as Boston, New York, Philadelphia, have 
grown to a thousand modern factories and great 
firms, some making as many as fifty thousand pairs 
a day. Just think of it fifty thousand pairs a 
day! It is almost past belief. From supplying a 
few neighbors and shipping a few barrels away to the 
cities, the American shoemaker now supplies a hun- 
dred millions of his fellow citizens, and also furnishes 
footwear to every civilized nation on earth. No in- 
dustry can show greater progress and development 
than the shoe trade. I could go on making compari- 
sons that would be astonishing, and still barely touch 
on the wonders of it all. 

As I have previously said, I believe that I was the 
very first man ever to sell shoes to the retail trade 
from sample on the road. From such humble be- 

59 



RECOLLECTIONS OF IXTY YEARS 



ginnings, one salesman, with a 
an old-fashioned valise, to-day 
men, with heavily laden samp] 
one hundred to five hundred 
season, visiting every city, t< 
land. 

What other business has 
advancement in two generat 

I believe this progress wi 
years to come. As new pro 
can shoe manufacturer and t 
man will solve them all with 
telligence, ability and integi 



w samples in half of 
i thousand shoe sales- 
runks, carrying from 
mples, go forth each 
n and hamlet in the 

lade such wonderful 

oe maintained in the 
ms arise, the Ameri- 
American shoe sales- 
urage, persistence, in- 



Now I want to say a ft 
comrades of the road, and c 
ates in the trade. I have a 
friendships I have enjoyed 
and it is my desire to give 
evidences of good-will, c 
Many of the old friends ha 
good memories of other yean 
tion now living, and the y^ 
privileged to know in these 
wish to thank for generoi 
continually am reminded 
and these reminiscences a 
blessing to my old age. 



words to all my old 
er friends and associ- 
ays valued deeply the 
mong the shoe men, 
anks to all for many 
rtesy and kindness. 

passed away, leaving 
\11 of the older genera- 
iger men I have been 
ter years of my life, I 
kindnesses to me. I 
old friends and new, 
indeed a light and a 



60 



RECOLLECTION OF SIXTY YEARS 

The trade journals 1 ve grown, in my remem- 
brance, to become powe ill influences in the trade, 
and I appreciate their lany courtesies to me and 
recognize the large place hey occupy in the estima- 
tion of the traveling salsmen. The Boot and Shoe 
Recorder was the first to^tart. I remember it very 
well, over thirty years ^o. The Boots and Shoes 
Weekly , now the Shoe Railer, followed soon after, 
then the Footwear Fashic and others came into ex- 
istence later. And THE SDEMAN, in whose pages have 
appeared these reminisceres of a long life, has earned 
a very high place in the fcces for good in the trade. 

The various manufaci rers' and salesmen's asso- 
ciations have come into b<ng in the last generation, 
and have been great faors in the development of 
our trade, especially in bnging together the various 
interests and individuals. and have created a wide 
and deep spirit of fendship, good-will and 
co-operation that has complished much good, 
and will continue to be >f much more benefit in 
the future. These associ. ions have honored me by 
electing me to honorary lembership, and I warmly 
appreciate their kindness id signal courtesy. May 
they all live long and pnper and all good fortune 
attend the members! 

In conclusion, my heariest, best wishes go out to 
all my good friends in the tide, for all the good things 
of life, success well won ad prosperity enjoyed. 





A. W. GAGE 

Mr. Gage, one of the pioneer traveling shoe salesmen, collected the old- 
time photographs of veteran shoe salesmen originally published in The 
Shoeman, and has assisted in the further compilation for this volume; 
he has also written the brief sketches accompanying these portraits. 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SHOE SALESMEN 
O F TWENTY- OR-MORE- YEARS' STANDING 
AND WHOSE PORTRAITS ARE HERE SHOWN 



BY A. W. GAGE 



NOTE. These sketches are in the order in which the portraits are published else- 
where, grouped according to the plate numbers. No attempt is made to give complete 
biographical data. Editor. 



JOEL C. PAGE 

I hardly dare say how long ago he first began to 
travel selling shoes, but he was the first to show sam- 
ples to the retail trade. I believe it was some fifty 
years ago. I cannot remember all the houses he rep- 
resented, but all his old friends associate him with the 
old firm of E. P. Dodge & Co., of Newburyport, Mass., 
whom he represented for many years. He has now 
retired, and at the age of eighty- three is still hale and 
hearty, and comes to Boston from Melrose about 
once a week or so, to meet those who are left of his 
old friends, and to talk over old times. 

A. W. SARGENT 

This is A. W. Sargent, better known as "Pop" 
Sargent. There was no better known man in those 
days than "Pop" Sargent. He sold for A. F. Smith, 
of Lynn, and probably sold more shoes for them than 
any of the "ten-thousand-dollar men" of these days. 
He will be remembered by many of the old buyers. 
He died in Chicago about twenty years ago. 

63 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

CHARLES W. NEWHALL 

You will all probably recognize the portrait of 
Charlie Newhall. He looks just the same to-day, 
only his hair has grown. We all remember him as of 
Newhall & Barbour of Lynn, then with Whitman, 
& Keith ; also Mrs. A. R. King Corporation, Lynn. He 
is now with the Burdett Shoe Company, Lynn, and is 
just as lively as ever. Nobody knows how old he is 
and he doesn't care ; but how he does enjoy his summer 
home in Maine! 

THOMAS S. SLACK 

You will have to guess who this is. The original 
of this picture was once with P. Cox & Co., Rochester, 
and later with the Dalton Shoe Company. Now he 
has settled down in New York City, representing the 
Bliss & Perry Company of Newburyport, and the 
Miller Shoe Company of Cincinnati. He has now a 
smooth face and a fat stomach and his name is 
Thomas S. Slack. He is responsible for the nucleus 
of this collection. 

R. J. PRINCE 

Here is Rod. J. Prince of Portland, Ore.; but 
seeing this photo with whiskers you would hardly 
know him now with his smooth-shaven chin. 

He is well known from Michigan to the Coast, 
where he is now selling M. A. Packard shoes and has 

64 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

a jobbing house in Portland, Ore. In the old days 
he will be remembered by the old dealers in Michi- 
gan, when he was selling for Redpath Brothers and 
traveling with his old friend Hatch. 

WALTER S. ALDRIDGE 

Walter Aldridge was so well known that we can 
say little. His sudden death, December 9, 1910, was 
such a sad blow to his friends that we need say no 
more. We all remember him as with Wright & 
Peters, and at his death, a member of the firm. This 
picture, taken over twenty-five years ago, shows little 
change, only he was stouter at the time of his much- 
regretted death. 

GEORGE L. HALE 

We now have Uncle George L. Hale, from a pic- 
ture taken in the early 80's. Can't see that he has 
changed much, for now at seventy-nine he looks 
about the same and is as active selling Louns- 
bury & Soule's shoes in New York State and New 
England as he was for Lounsbury & Matthewson and 
John J. Lattemann and a few other lines. He is indeed 
one of the "old boys." Probably he is the second old- 
est salesman next to Joel Page. 

E. M. HUTCHINSON 

This is "Old Hutch, " but, to be more respectful, 
his name is E. M. Hutchinson, for we must be respect- 

65 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

ful, as he has retired and has a retail store in Portland, 
Me. He is best known by his old friends as traveling 
for Adam B. Robbins, Wallace Elliot and later for 
E. & G. Wallace. When you see this, I bet you'll 
remember him. 

DAVID WILLIAMS 

There are many in the middle West and on the 
coast who will remember this face Little Dave 
Williams, who traveled for E. P. Dodge and made so 
many friends by his witty sayings. He died about 
twenty years ago in Boston, but we will never forget 
him. 

II 

WILLIAM M. KILEY 

You may not recognize this picture, yet he is 
still one of the best-known salesmen of the country, 
"Billy" Kiley. He began, we believe, in Newark, 
N. J., with Johnston & Murphy, and was with the 
Dorsch Shoe Company, and originated the "bull dog" 
shoe. He was with Gordon & Kiley and McDonald 
& Kiley of Cincinnati. He is still, selling shoes from 
Cincinnati, now with the Manss Shoe Manufacturing 
Company. Nuf sed. 

C. B. SLATER 

Here we have another guess, but it is C. B. Slater 
or "Bert" Slater, as he is known by his old friends; 

66 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

now of the firm of Slater & Morrill, Inc., South Brain- 
tree, Mass. Would you know him now, with his 
gray hair and smooth face? The history of his past 
life is not hard to write, but as we remember him he 
was with C. H. Fargo, Chicago, for some years, then 
with Whitman & Keith, and several years ago formed 
the present firm of Slater & Morrill. 

JAMES A. LAWRENCE 

To see this picture you would not think that it 
was our gray-haired friend, James A. Lawrence. As 
we remember him he was once in the retail and job- 
bing shoe business in Marshalltown, la., then with P. 
Cox & Co., and the Dalton Shoe Company, and later 
opened up a jobbing house in Chicago. He is now 
with Burley & Stevens, and as lively as ever. 

A. W. GAGE 

This is not a picture of Justice Hughes, but of A. 
W. Gage, mostly known as "Gagey." He has had 
quite a career, beginning his shoe experience with 
Geo. F. Daniels in 1878, being in the firm until he re- 
signed to form the firm of Hayes, Gage & Loomis. 
Then after a severe sickness he traveled for P. A. 
Wadleigh, remaining with him for twelve years. 
After being out of the shoe game for two years (to his 
sorrow) he returned to the road. We can only say 
that he is slightly changed, but still in the ring. 

67 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

CLARE A. BENEDICT 

Now we come to the sublime; in this picture of the 
"Beau Brummell" of the days past Clare Aubert 
Benedict. We can never forget him. He traveled 
for Hanan & Son, Selz-Schwab and Williams-Knee- 
land Company. Of late years he has retired from the 
shoe game, and last heard from was selling automo- 
biles in Buffalo, and we hope and believe successfully. 

HENRY A. LOOMIS 

I fear that not many will remember this face. It 
is the junior member of the formerly well-known firm 
of Hayes, Gage & Loomis, Henry A. Loomis, 
better known as "the Professor" because he looked 
more like a professor than a shoe salesman, but all he 
professed to sell was shoes and he sold a lot of them 
in his day. He began his career with George F. 
Daniels. He passed over the Great Divide about 
twenty years ago at Gault, Cal. He was a prince of 
good fellows and will be remembered, among many 
splendid qualities, for his quaint sayings. 

HERBERT HILL 

This looks like some good old sport and perhaps 
it is, for it represents little "Herb" Hill as he looked 
twenty-five years ago, when he was selling a lot of 
shoes for John Foster of Beloit, Wis. We remember 

(Continued on page 81} 
68 



" Should Auld Acquaintance Be Forgot, 
And Never Brought to Mind ? 
Should Auld Acquaintance Be Forgot, 
And the Days oj Auld Lang Syne ? " 




u To know, to esteem, to love, and then to part 
Makes up the tale of many a feeling heart." 




II 



" Life! We've been long together, 
Through pleasant and through cloudy weather" 




Ill 



The thought of our past years in me doth breed 
Perpetual benediction." WORDSWORTH 




IV 



" / knew him, Horatio: a fellow of infinite jest, 
of most excellent fancy." HAMLET 




Harr/H.Rtp/ey 






V 



'My never failing friends are they, 
With whom I converse every day." SOUTHEY 




VI 



Thy courtesies about thee play 

With no restraint, but such as spring 

From quick and eager vistings. " WORDSWORTH 



r 







C./T 





VII 



" The friendship I have conceived will 
not be impaired by absence" - GEORGE WASHINGTON 




?/7/y Samers 



Herbert M.Pu//fer\ 



George PY. Cook 



Ma* 



*J 



7 * &, * 



"What strange disguise hast now -put on ? " 

COLERIDGE 






' 



'Wallace T Grow 





' 



James 



Oliver M.F/sher 




IX 



' ' Tis greatly wise to talk with our past hours, 
And ask then what report they .bore to heaven" YOUNG 




X 



We spend our years as a tale that is told." PSALMS xc: 9 




XI 



*' The friends thou hast, and their adoption tried, 
Grapple them to thy soul with hooks of steel" SHAKESPEARE 







Win fields. Bacon 





Gzorm T, Chase 









Wiffia.mJ.Sf. Louis 







J. Rush Green 




XII 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

(Continued from page 68) 

him first with Rumsey Brothers of Lynn. For some 
years he was in poor health, but lately has come back 
to earth, and we often meet him at the Essex Hotel. 

JAMES A. WALLACE 

We hope you haven't forgotten James A. Wallace 
who made his mark years ago selling Upham Brothers' 
shoes in the middle West and on the Coast. He died 
in Providence, after a long sickness, fifteen years ago. 

MATT MULLEN 

We think you will all recognize this handsome 
face looking just as happy and genial to-day as he did 
twenty-five years ago, only there are a few more gray 
hairs. Matt Mullen we remember first with Newhall 
& Barber and also the Mullen Shoe Company, and he 
is now still with the Mullen Shoe Company, 22 High 
Street, Boston, one of the greatest shoe salesmen 
of the time. 

Ill 

EUGENE BALDWIN 

Many of our old friends will be glad to see this 
happy face again, for Eugene Baldwin, although he 
died about twenty years ago in Cambridge, is still 
remembered in the Northwest, where he traveled for 
many years. Who could forget his witty sayings? 
Wish space allowed us to repeat some of them. We 

81 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

remember him as being with C. W. Copeland, Burley 
& Usher and R. T. Wood & Co., and when he passed 
away he was with W. L. Douglas. He was the 
"noblest Roman of them all." 

GEORGE LANE 

George Lane is well remembered in Indiana and 
parts of the South. We remember him with Wallace 
Elliott and now with Williams & Kneeland. He 
looks about the same to-day, only gray hairs come to 
one of his age. What that is, no one knows, but ask 
Old "Hutch" he can give a history of his past life. 

RALPH MEARS and E. W. MEARS 

This is not a vaudeville sketch, but a photo of two 
well-known salesmen. You will be surprised when I 
tell you the one on the left is Ralph Mears, long 
identified with selling the jobbing trade, and very 
successful in that day as he is in the present. 

The one with the whiskers all over his face is our 
old friend, E. W. Mears. He was at this time with 
Tibbetts & Couch and later with James A. Banister 
& Co., but for the past ten years has sold lots of 
rubbers in New England. This picture was taken 
about thirty years ago. Observe the dinky little 
hats and the Seymour coats. 

82 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

The shoe Ed. has in his hand was a woman's Curico 
Kid McKay, selling for $2.25. Guess you could get a 
better one in these days of higher prices at 31.60. 

MESSRS. HUNT, SARGENT and KURD 

This is not a gang of hold-up men, but was taken 
for Charlie Hunt on right, "Pop " Sargent on the left 
and "Al" Hurd in the center. Hurd was at that time 
with Strong & Carroll. Now he is in the leather busi- 
ness in Brockton. The others have been described. 

J. C. HUNT 

J. C. Hunt, familiarly known as "Charlie" Hunt. 
He was best remembered selling N. B. Cox & Co.'s 
line of cacks and he sold a lot of them in his active 
days. You would scarcely recognize him during his 
long, lingering sickness, of which he died about three 
years ago at Richmond Hills, New York. He was a 
stockbroker, and retired some years ago. 

WILLIAM NOLL 

This is not a photo of Emperor William, but, 
being German, he looks the part, for here we see 
"Billy "Noll, the hard-working secretary and treas- 
urer of the Boston Shoe Travelers' Association. He 
was pretty lively in the days this picture was taken, 
selling for E. P. Dodge, and, after a short, successful 
stay in journalism, he is now with the Foster Rubber 
Company, promoting the "Cat's-Paw" rubber heel. 

83 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

HAMILTON MEAD 

Our old friend "Ham" Mead is not forgotten, 
although he died in Cincinnati about fifteen years ago 
after a lingering illness. He was a jolly fellow, and 
loved by everybody when with Hart, Mead & Co.; 
later salesmanager with Krippendorf, Dittman & Co., 
Cincinnati. 

FRANK M. COLBURN 

Frank Colburn still on deck selling for Hazen B. 
Goodrich & Co., in the South, and you can meet him 
at the Goodrich office, 183 Essex Street, Boston, any 
day between seasons, along with Clarence P. Waide, 
Frank Lord, Ernest Rankin, Tommy Johnson, Arthur 
Brooks, John McElaney and others. He will also 
be remembered as being with E. P. Dodge and P. N. 
Wadleigh, selling out on the Coast. 

JOHN CURRY 

Here we have a well- remembered face: John Curry, 
who was for years with James A. Banister & Co., of 
Newark, selling the line in the middle West. He died 
in the Palmer House, Chicago. He used one quaint 
expression so often that he was called "Bloody John." 

IV 

WALTER HART 
Who would know this as Walter Hart? He was, 

84 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

years ago, with E. P. Dodge, then with the Newbury- 
port Shoe Company. 

He retired from the shoe business a few years ago, 
and enjoys life doing nothing, and he has plenty of 
money, so he can afford to. 

CHRISTOPHER MCDERMOTT 

Now here we have "Chris" McDermott, one of 
the best old boys that we have. This picture was taken 
at least twenty years ago. He was well remembered 
as the first salesman who traveled, selling a foreign 
line of slippers. He represented an Austrian line. 
He was with the East New York Shoe Company, and 
has lately represented several lines. Now he is sell- 
ing Strout & Stritter shoes in New York City. 

EDWARD STEBBINS 

This is another E. P. Dodge salesmen, our old 
friend Ed Stebbins. After having the Dodge line 
he went out to Los Angeles, where he died about five 
years ago. 

THOMAS D. HARLOW 

This is little Thomas D. Harlow, who for several 
years in the past was with Usher & Sons. He is now 
still active, selling for Brockton People's Shoe Com- 
pany and the Calumet Shoe Company. Many of 
the old-timers as well as the younger shoe men know 
him well. 

85 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

W. M. OAKMAN 

Now we have another of the old-timers, and you 
can guess who it is but who would say it was 
"Oakey," or W. M. Oakman, who was first with 
J. S. Turner, and then with W. L. Douglas, and 
then formed the firm of Oakman & Low. After- 
wards he was with George G. Snow and with J. 
E. French, also. He is now with the' Pels Shoe 
Company, Brockton, and is president of the 
Boston Shoe Travelers' Association. Everybody 
knows "Oakey," and he has a warm place in all of our 
hearts. 

ROBERT SPRUNT, JR. 

Who would recognize this picture? Well, it is 
the only real poet we have in the shoe trade we be- 
lieve a direct descendant of Robert Burns. This is 
Robert Sprunt, Jr. He is best remembered as the 
salesman who sold Joseph Caunt's shoes to the retail 
trade. Now he is selling A. Fisher & Son's line. We 
all know him as a jolly good fellow a ready wit 
and a cordial good friend. 

FRANK ARMITAGE 

Frank Armitage will be well remembered by many 
in the West, where he was selling for Williams-Knee- 
land years ago. I believe he has been in politics in 

86 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

the late years, but I have lost track of him. Does 
anybody know about him? 

CHARLES F. SNOW 

Charles F. Snow has been connected with the 
jobbing trade for many years, but may be better re- 
membered as of the firm of Irving & Snow. Now he 
is manager of Smith & Herrick of Albany, and many 
of his old traveling friends meet him frequently. 

N. REDPATH 

We have here an old-timer named "Nute" Red- 
path, who was with Redpath Brothers, and traveled 
in the West. Many of the old buyers will remember 
him. He died about fifteen years ago in Newton, Mass. 

V 

TIM HOGAN 

Here was a prince. How well we remember jolly 
Tim and mourned his death in 1900! He had friends 
every place he went. We remember him best with 
P. Cogan & Co. and Blake-Allen Company. I am 
pleased to publish this picture and show his good face 
to his old friends in the South and elsewhere. 

D. B. MUNROE 

D. B. Munroe was well known all through New 
England years ago when he sold for Baldwin & Lam- 

87 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

kin. He is still living in Middleboro, Mass., hale and 
hearty. I know that many of his friends will be 
pleased to see his face again. 

GEORGE S. DWINNELL 

Here we have George S. Dwinnell. He has been 
so long with J. J. Grover & Sons that we cannot pic- 
ture him selling another line; in fact, he has been so 
long selling the same line that he looks comfortable, 
and every one is glad to see him when he comes 
around twice a year to get his sizes. I hear he began 
his career selling shoes for Hunt, Holbrook & Bar- 
bour, Hartford, Conn. 

CHARLES F. LUSCH 

Who would recognize the young fellow repre- 
sented in this picture? But Charlie is still young, al- 
though his hair is gray. He has been selling Hanan 
shoes so long that one would think he never sold 
another line, and I guess he hasn't. Good boy, 
Charlie, keep it up for years to come. 

F. H. BRADSTREET 

I am pleased to publish this picture of my old 
friend, familiarly known as "Hope" Bradstreet. He 
was best known when he sold for years Curtis & 
Wheeler's line of Rochester, N. Y. For a while he 
was with John J. Lattemann, and at the time of his 

88 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

death, in Indianapolis, about five years ago, was selling 
for the Rice & Hutchins Chicago house. He was a jolly 
good old fellow, full of quaint ways and sayings. 

S. PRESTON MOSES 

We cannot think of "Pres" selling any line but 
Edwin Clapp's, although he has his own jobbing line, 
but I remember him in the old days in Washington, 
D. C., when he was in the commission shoe business, 
at the time one had to take out a license to sell. I 
well remember having to borrow his license at $5 per 
day or be arrested. We are all glad to know how 
successful "Pres" has been in all his endeavors. 

HARRY H. RIPLEY 

Well, Harry was a nice looking boy in the days of 
those side whiskers, and he has not got over it yet. 
He is so well known that I need not write much, only 
that I remember him as being with Batchelder & 
Lincoln, J. C. Bennett & Barnard, A. F. Smith, Mrs. 
A. R. King, and now with the L. B. Evans' Son Com- 
pany. We are all glad to see Harry, even if he now 
has gray hair and no "sideburns." 

E. M. COLLINS 

Here we have our old friend E. M. Collins, one of 
the best of the old-timers. He was with Forbush & 
Brown of Buffalo forty-five years from the time he 
started in the shoe business until F. & B. went out of 

89 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

business, and then he had several lines and worked 
hard until he died, about six years ago, on the train 
going to Buffalo. He was high up in Masonry, 
thirty-third degree. How well we old fellows remem- 
ber him! 

CHARLES I. PETHERBRIDGE 

Charles I. Petherbridge was first known in the 
South, thirty-two years ago, selling for Banister & 
Tichnor of Newark, N. J., now the James A. Banister 
Company, and that name is so old you can judge how 
old Charlie is. He was with Banister nineteen years. 
I have lost track of him lately, but he is still active 
selling the Felter line of Newark. 

VI 

WICKLIFFE A. HILL 

Here we have a picture of "Wick" Hill not an 
old picture as I remember him years ago when he 
traveled for A. E. Nettleton, in the Northwest, with 
his old friend, Dubois. "Wick" worked in A. E. 
Nettleton's retail shoe store, Fulton, N. Y., in 1872-3, 
then traveled for James R. Barrett, of Syracuse. 
When Mr. Nettleton bought out the Barrett business 
in 1878, W. A. went along as part owner and sales- 
man, traveling until 1893, when he bought Gray 
Brothers of Syracuse, and consolidated this with 
Baker & Bowman, making the Syracuse Shoe Manu- 

90 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

facturing Company, producing women's shoes. You 
can bet he is as lively and genial as ever. Stop off at 
Syracuse and see him, you old fellows. 

A. W. DUBOIS 

I had a hard time getting this picture, for his wife 
did not want to give it up, showing what a handsome 
little boy he was years ago, but "Duby" is still on 
his job, and good looking. I remember him first 
with J. & T. Cousins of Brooklyn, and then, after a 
few changes, he settled down selling for Charles K. 
Fox of Haverhill, where he is now. We are all pleased 
to know of his success, and wish him lots more. 
"Duby" says he's been selling shoes over forty 
years. Who can beat that? 

HARRIS M. BARNES 

I bet he was pleased with that tie in this picture. 
Harry started in the shoe business with the Warren 
Boot & Shoe Company, and he was for years with 
Burley & Stevens. He is now with the George Melan- 
son Shoe Company of Lynn. I bet every one of those 
little short steps he made to sell a bill meant a sale of 
one pair of shoes, and he is still keeping them up. 
One of the finest men on the road is Harry Barnes. 

R. E. HARRISON 

I hardly dare call him "Bob," but every one in 
the South knows "Bob" Harrison. I believe he first 

91 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

started with Cosgrove, and then with M. Felix & Co. 
But he has been so long with Wolf Brothers, that only 
the oldest-timers know the history of his past life. 

TILL BUSH 

"Till" was first with his brother in the shoe busi- 
ness, and for years with Stribley & Co., also well 
known as one of the firm of Sullivan, Mead & Bush. 
Lately, I hear he has retired in Cincinnati, and we 
learn of him going fishing much. 

WALTER E. CRANDALL 

Walter has been so long with E. P. Reed that I 
don't know where else to locate him. This picture 
shows him when he was young, but you ought to 
look at him now. 

WM. H. CANNON 

Here is W. H. Cannon whom many of us remem- 
ber as long with Zeigler Brothers in the South, and 
many of you will remember these whiskers. 

THOMAS T. MERRILL 

I could not get an old picture of Tom, but he is 
the same little Tom, and has not changed any from 
the old times when he first sold J. S. Turner's fine 
shoes. Then, I believe, he went with J. E. Tilt of 
Chicago. Now with The Regal Shoe Company, and 
is as lively as ever if you don't believe it, ask him. 

92 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

WILLIAM CRAWFORD 

Will Crawford was well known in the West selling 
J. S. Turner's shoes, and he sold a lot of them in those 
days. I was pleased to get this picture from Tom 
Merrill, and I know that many will remember this 
familiar face, although he died about fifteen years ago. 

VII 

ALBERT GOULD 

Here was a jolly good fellow, and although I can 
hardly call him one of the old-timers, he traveled for 
some years in the Northwest for E. P. Dodge, and I 
know many of his old friends in that territory will be 
pleased to see his face again. He died in Newbury- 
port about twelve years ago. 

GEORGE A. BACKUS 

George has been so long traveling in the South for 
Laird, Schober & Mitchell, now Laird, Schober & 
Co., that you cannot locate him elsewhere; but who 
would recognize this young fellow for the present 
George ? 

C. F. OAKLEY 

First with Tibbetts & Couch, then went South for 
a while in the retail business, but later he was on 
the road selling for Faunce & Spinney. This picture 
was taken about fifteen years ago, but now those gray 
hairs are very becoming, and Charlie is still young. 

93 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

A. ERWIN RANKIN 

Once of Hunt & Rankin and with Marcey & Co., 
Hartford, Conn. Now we all know him with the 
Matchless Shoe Company, selling their shoes in the 
South, and Erwin sells a lot of them. 

FRED W. STANTON 

He has been such a national character of late years 
that he needs no introduction, for he is now the able 
secretary of the National Shoe Travelers' Association 
and the Southern Shoe Salesmen's Association. As a 
salesman, I remember him with Hathaway, Soule & 
Harrington, and then with E. P. Dodge of Newbury- 
port. He now calls on his trade with Leonard & 
Barrows line. Outside of those sideburns he looks 
just as young as ever. 

JAMES H. MAYBURY 

Who doesn't know Jim? Although he spends 
most of his time in New York City, he is well known 
in the middle West. I will not attempt to give a 
history of his past life, but first remember him as of 
the firm of Maybury & Dana, specialty jobbers in 
New York. Now he is selling for Mitchel-Caunt 
Company, Lynn, and he sure does sell some shoes. 

94 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

JOHN L. SAGE 

Here indeed is a picture of an old-timer, although 
this is a recent photo. I know many will pleasantly 
remember his face. I remember him first with Ban- 
croft, Sage & Morse of Rochester. Then after sev- 
eral changes of lines, he took up fire insurance in 
Rochester, and developed into one of the largest in 
his line. He died about five years ago. 

JOHN C. NUGENT 

I have known John so long that I can hardly tell 
all about him, and it is just as well, for everybody 
knows him. This photo was taken in 1888. He 
traveled for John Kelly for twenty years, and has 
been with Jerry Menihan for several years. It is 
interesting to note that this picture was once pub- 
lished over John's obituary notice. But he's still 
very much alive. 

J. H. COLBURN 

Here we have our old friend, Harry Colburn. I 
remember Harry when he was with Hathaway, Soule 
& Harrington, then with J. H. Putnam & Co., and he 
is now with Hanan & Son, selling out to the Coast. 
He was a nice young man from this picture, and he is 
still young, for he was recently married. Harry and 
Frank Colburn are brothers. 

95 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELLING SALESMEN 

VIII 
JOHN H. HANAN 

We now can see how John Hanan looked when he 
was traveling for Hanan & Redish, and many of us 
old boys remember him, for he was always a friend of 
the boys as he is to this day. I think he remembers 
the time we "caned" him at the old Sherman house in 
Chicago. 

GEORGE W. COOK 

Here is a familiar face of an old-time shoe sales- 
man, George W. Cook, or, as he was familiarly 
named, G. "Whiskers" Cook. He traveled for 
years for Stacy, Adams & Co., on the Pacific Coast, 
where he was well known, and at that time he owned 
one of the largest shoe stores in Omaha. The last part 
of his traveling was for Krippendorf & Dittman. He 
died several years ago in his home town in New York 
State. 

J. J. CROMWELL 

Well, see who is here J. J. Cromwell, or "little 
Jake." There were few so well known and liked as 
Jake when he traveled in the middle West for Sailer, 
Levin & Co. of Philadelphia. After they went out of 
business he sold several times to New York City 
trade, until his death several years ago. We miss 
his jolly sayings to this day. 

96 



'// is not what he has, nor even what he does, 
which directly expresses the worth of a man, but 
what he is." AMI EL 




XIII 



"A reputation for good judgment, for fair dealing, 
for truth, and for rectitude is itself a fortune." BEECHER 




EB.Sfocum 



G.H. White 




Thos* C. Johnson, v 





CApen Brown 




. S *Tread we// 



XIV 



'Every traveler has a home of his own, and he 
learns to appreciate it the more from his wander- 
ings." DICKENS 



Arrhur H, (Jenkins 



Arthur r/.Jenk/ns 
Robert L Summers 




XV 



I have, beside all this, a great love 'for the past." VON HUMBOLDT 




XVI 



'Opportunity makes us known to others; but more 
to ourselves. " LA ROUGH EFOUCAULD 




Howard P/dffs 




Wm. 





J. A. Warrenc/er 




Charle s Brand/nan 




A.L. Chase 





G&orye Gregory 




XVII 



" The heart to conceive, the understanding to 
diieci, or the hand to execute." - JUNIUS 




XVIII 



" There is always room for a man of force, and he 
makes room for many." EMERSON 




XIX 



" The Talent of Success is nothing more than doing 
what you can do well without a thought of 
fame." LONGFELLOW 




XX 



" It is easy to say how we love new friends, and 
what we think of them, but words can never trace out all 
the fibres that 'knit us to the old." GEORGE ELIOT 




XXI 



'Sincerity, truth, faithfulness, come into the very 
essence of friendship." CHANNING 




XXII 



"Memory is not so brilliant as hope, but it is more 
beautiful and a thousand times more true." PRENTICE 




XXIII 




XXIV 



" The curtains of Yesterday drop down, the cur- 
tains of To-morrow roll up; but Yesterday and To- 
morrow both an'.' 1 '' CARLYLE 



I 

H.E.Decatur. 






T-H.Chamberf/n 




XXV 



"Let me be remembered for the gentler things of the heart, rather than for the mere 
material of such success as may have been my lot, " 




XXVI 



" What^s a year, forsooth? Or a decade? Or even a lifetime, since memory's on 
her eternal throne?" 




XXVIi 



" The change of face betokens passing years. It is a wise providence that keeps the 
heart young and thus conquers years. " 




XXVIII 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

NATT F. STEVENS 

Here we have Natt in his younger days, and judg- 
ing from this picture, he was a rival of Clare Aubert 
Benedict. I remember him first with the old firm of 
Emery & Holmes, of Biddeford, Me., and then Eddy 
& Webster, Rochester. He traveled a number of 
years for James A. Banister & Co., Newark, N. J., on 
the Pacific Coast, but at times he stopped off in Chi- 
cago to see a few friends, but that is another story. 
Of course we all know he was with Faunce & 
Spinney. Now with Dunn McCarthy & Co. 

HERBERT M. PULKER 



Here is Herbert M. Pulker, or "Bert," as we all 
know him. I can't say he is one of the "old-timers," 
but he has been on earth quite a time, and this photo 
shows him when he was a young man. I remember 
him first when he was a clerk with A. Richardson & 
Brother, Janesville, Wis. He began his traveling 
career with the old firm of A. W. Clapp & Co., Boston 
jobbers, but he has been so long with Howard & 
Foster that we almost forget the past. 

FRANK QUIN 

Frank Quin is another member of the Boyden 
firm that has retired and is on "easy street." I re- 

113 



SKECTHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

member him first with Banister and then with Boy- 
den. He traveled mostly on the Pacific Coast. He 
is the same big-hearted man as ever, and likes to 
meet the old boys. 

HERBERT SOMERS 

Henry Somers was locally known with Drew- 
Selby, and he was loved by every one that he met so- 
cially or in business, and his death, after a long sick- 
ness, was mourned by all his friends. 



GEORGE AHERNS 

George Aherns, of Boyden Shoe Co., trav- 
eled for years for that firm, making the large cities in 
the middle West, and also making a fortune, for he 
has retired and doesn't have to worry about shoes. 

JOHN G. LUSCH 

John G. Lusch can only be remembered as with 
Hanan & Son, and I don't dare quote figures as to 
how many millions he sold for that firm. He re- 
tired some time ago and we were all deeply grieved 
to learn of his death the past winter. 

114 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

IX 

WALLACE T. GROW 

Wallace T. Grow, an old-time traveling sales- 
man, well known in Ohio, Indiana, and Pennsylvania 
for about twenty-five years up to 1905, when he 
died at his home in Newton, Mass. 

One of the first lines that he carried for many years 
was the Stoneham Co-operative Shoe Company, of 
Stoneham, Mass. Afterward he went to Vinton & 
Jenkins, Stoneham, Mass. After some time he went 
with C. Grose & Son, Ridge Hill, Mass., makers of 
medium fine men's welted shoes. 

He traveled for them many years until the firm 
went out of business. 

He was one of the original members of the Boot 
and Shoe Travelers' League, and a good friend of all 
Boston shoe salesmen traveling in his territory. 
His face will be recognized by a large circle of friends 
still living. 

OLIVER M. FISHER 

Oliver Fisher is a man who has graced the pro- 
fession of shoe salesmanship and crowned his efforts 
with fine success. He has been in the shoe business 
since 1875 with M. A. Packard Company since 
1883. He is now president of that company. By 
nature given to leadership, he has always played a 
prominent part in whatever activities engaged. To 

115 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

day he is active not only in the shoe business but in 
many forms of charitable, church, club and fraternal 
work and varied business interests. We find him 
nearly every day at the Packard Boston office, 60 
South Street, an honored and respected member of 
the craft of shoe men. 

JAMES D. SHERIDAN 

Who would believe this picture to be of little 
Jimmie Sheridan or "Phil" Sheridan as he is some- 
times known. Well, he has been selling P. Cogan 
& Sons' boys shoes so long that he looks like one 
of their little gent's shoes. 

Jimmie is past president of the Boston Shoe 
Travelers' Association and one of the very popular 
"boys." Lives in Randolph, Mass. 

FRANK C. KELLOGG 

Here we have our old college chum, Frank Kel- 
logg. He has been lost to sight, but to memory 
dear, for several years and we are glad to see his face 
again. 

Frank was one of the pioneers of the selling force 
of D. Armstrong, where he put in the best efforts 
of his life. Then he was a member of the firm of 
Fonda, Kellogg & Snow. His last appearance was 
selling for Krippendorf-Dittman. Later he was in 
the hotel business in Detroit. He died last winter. 

116 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

B. F. PAGE 

B. Frank Page you wouldn't know him from 
this picture started with G. Lamkin Company, 
then was with G. W. Herrick & Co., and has been 
with M. A. Packard Company for a long time, cover- 
ing the middle West and Pennsylvania. 

J. B. McCuNE 

"Jack" McCune everybody who has had any- 
thing to do with shoes on the Pacific Coast for the 
past twenty-five or thirty years knows "Jack" 
McCune. He has sold many hundreds of thousands 
of dollars worth of shoes out there and is still at it r 
and we all wish him the best of luck. This picture 
was taken out in Colorado forty years ago, whea 
Jack was a slim youth. Started shoe business with 
J. J. Hutcheson, Greenville, Pa. 

COL. A. C. WALKER 

One of the oldest traveling men in the U. S. - 
born in 1833. After leaving school in Boston, went 
to work for Penniman Foster & Russell on Pearl 
Street. He was continually a shoe salesman until 
1890. His last active work was with Lilly Bracket. 
He then located on his Bartlett pear ranch at North 
Yakima, Wash. 

117 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

F. J. DOAN 

F. J. Doan was one of the pioneers of Pingree's 
traveling force, but left them for a while going into 
the coal business in Chicago, but I guess it was cold 
business, for I hear he is back on his job on his old 
territory. 

E. J. PIERCE 

E. J. Pierce is so well known that I need not 
write his life. He is still active in his Chicago office, 
where he sells the local trade his several lines. 

Some may not recognize this picture, as it was 
taken years ago. I don't dare say how old he is, 
for he is, so to speak, a twin brother of the writer. 

X 

W. H. STACY 

Mr. Stacy is known everywhere as the head of the 
men's fine shoemaking house, Stacy- Adams Com- 
pany, Brockton. He was for a good many years 
one of the best known and most popular of the "old 
guard" of traveling shoe salesmen. He started 
traveling for James M. Burt & Co., of New York 
and Gray Bros, of Syracuse, in 1866. His friend 
and, later, partner, Harry L. Adams, started with the 
same firms at the same time. In 1875 the firm of 
Stacy, Adams & Jones was formed (later Stacy-Adams 
Company). Mr. Stacy, respected and esteemed by 

118 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

all, lives quietly at his home in Braintree. He has 
traveled some each year up to 1916, visiting New 
York and Philadelphia customers. He was seventy- 
three years old last August. 

HARRY L. ADAMS 

Many old-time friends will be most glad to see 
this picture of Harry Adams, who died in 1897. He 
belonged to the "old guard" of traveling salesmen, 
sure enough, and was immensely popular. He began 
in 1866, as stated above, with W. H. Stacy and con- 
tinued as a member of the firm of Stacy-Adams 
until 1886, when he retired. 

CLARENCE P. WAIDE 

We are glad to have Clarence Waide's old-time 
picture on the same page with Mr. Stacy and Mr. 
Adams, for he has been with this house since Febru- 
ary 1882, never missing a trip likely a record for 
years of service with one house. Now a member of 
the firm and the possessor of the unbounded esteem 
and respect of every person who ever knew him. 

HARRY H. GRAY 

The late Harry Gray belongs in any list of veteran, 
old-time, "old guard" shoe salesmen. He was a 
great friend of Mr. Stacy, Harry Adams and others 
of "the boys" of a generation ago. He is best 

119 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

remembered as a shoe manufacturer in Syracuse, 
N. Y., and the business he established years ago is 
now widely known as the successful "H. H. Gray's 
Son," carried on by his son, John S. Gray, at Syra- 
cuse. 

HUBERT H. GARDINER 

We all remember this grand man. He was one 
of the best salesmen that ever packed a trunk, and 
he knew how to make shoes, too. He started a fac- 
tory in Philadelphia, then moved to New York, form- 
ing the firm of Gardiner & Estes. Then we find him 
of the firm of Wichert & Gardiner. His sudden 
death, at the height of his success a few years ago, 
was a great loss to the shoe trade. 

J. P. SMITH 

J. P. Smith, head of the J. P. Smith Shoe Com- 
pany, of Chicago, made his first trip in 1868 
forty-eight years ago, so he goes up to near the 
head of the class. That first trip was for R. P. 
Smith & Son, of Bloomington, and was in the whole- 
sale trade. Mr. Smith still sells shoes for the 
J. P. Smith Shoe Company but his customers 
mostly call at the factory. William H. Stacy of 
Stacy-Adams was one of the men selling shoes on 
the road when Mr. Smith started in 1868. A para- 
graph from a letter of Mr. Smith's is interesting 
reading: 

120 



11 Fill to the niter most rim the cup of everlasting 
memory and pledge you all our friends!" ANON. 



/^f us-son. J. A. C. Emerson 




XXIX 



Time has laid his hand upon my heart, gently, not 
smiting it. LONGFELLOW. 




XXX 



Such is the patriot' s boast, where e'er we roam, 
Hjs first, lest cLunlry ei'cr is at home. 

OLIVER GOLDSMITH 




XXXI 



" Your face, my thane, is as a book, where men may 
read strange matters. SHAKESPEARE. 




XXXJi 



A wit's a feather, and a chief a rod; 
An honest man's the noblest work of God. 

ALEXANDER POPE 




XXXlli 



"Oh Life! how pleasant is thy morning." 

ROBERT BURNS. 





Frank J. Brac//ey 



C Carpenter 








" Tomorrow* and tomorrow, and tomorrow, 
Creeps hi this petty pace from day to day." 
SHAKESPEARE. 




XXXV 



"On his bold visage middle age 
1 1 ad slightly pressed its signet sage." 
SIR WALTER SCOTT. 




Walter Scott 
T. J. Yates 
J. T. Fitzpatrick 
H. B. Schweitzer 
Jack Henry 



Maurice Kornsand 
Ralph J. Saxe, Fred C. Church, 
Billy Martin, Clendennin, Jr. 
R. L. Wall 
H. Goller, Fred Wesner 



XXXVI 



6. 

7. 

8. 
9. 
10 Herman Schocke 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

"In my time, I have sold every class of merchants 
dealing in shoes, from the smallest to the largest re- 
tailer; from the smallest to the largest jobbers in 
this country; I have displayed samples in cross- 
road towns on the top of sugar and salt barrels; 
I have displayed samples in the best hotels in the 
United States; I have made the wagon trips, the 
freight-train trips, and of late years a Pullman is none 
too good for me. See no reason now why I could 
not cover a regular route, if it were necessary." 

JIM Cox 

Jim (nobody calls him James) is an old "wheel- 
horse" - says so himself. Used to make trips 
with Joel Page. Mrs. Cox says this photo of Jim 
ought to fill the bill, for he was (she says) then 
about as homely a man as lived through the war. The 
picture is thirty-one years old, and makes Jim look 
like Prince Katamuro. Jim sells shoes for Wright 
& Peters and isn't as old as he tries to make out, 
and can travel after an order as fast as the best 
of 'em. Lives in Rochester. 

CLINTON C. ROBINSON 

Clint began his career traveling from Boston, 
but he migrated to Cincinnati so many years ago 
that he has almost forgotten Boston. No dealer 

129 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

in the South needs an introduction to him. He was 
at one time a manufacturer in Cincinnati, but now 
we find him with hts old love, still selling shoes in 
the South. 

T. FRANK METCALFE 

Frank was so long with Boyden of Newark that 
it is hard to remember him selling any other line, 
and if he should ever stop traveling, all his friends 
will miss him. Lives in comfort and happiness in 
Newark. Picture taken years ago. 

XI 

W. E. GERRISH 

Every dealer in New England knows "Pink" 
Gerrish and when they saw that "Pink" come to town 
they knew they had to buy shoes from P. J. Harney. 
Now he is with Hoag & Walden. 

A. M. CENTER 

This photo of A. M. Center was taken in 1881, 
the year he started on the road. He traveled thirty- 
three years, then ill health compelled him to quit. 
He lives in Grand Rapids and we wouldn't be sur- 
prised to hear that he had again heard "the call of 
the grip." 

130 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

E. H. STETSON 

Here is "Ed" Stetson, one of the best-known 
and deeply esteemed traveling shoe men in America 
incidentally, he is president of the Stetson Shoe 
Company. This picture was taken over forty years 
ago when Ezra H. was twenty-one some boy, 
too, wasn't he? He came from Maine, worked for 
H. B. Reed in the factory at South Weymouth, 
Mass., for seven years, then with A. C. Heald he 
started the Stetson Shoe Company, twenty-nine 
years ago. He has traveled twenty-eight years. 

E. S. WlLLMARTH 

E. S. has sold shoes on the road for thirty-six 
years started with C. M. Henderson in 1876, 
inside, and went out in 1880. Has been with Dag- 
gett, Bassett & Hills, Sidwell-DeWindt, J. P. Smith, 
Tilt-Kenney, Regal, and is now with John Ebberts. 
Covered the middle West always, until his present 
connection, which includes eastern territory. 

HUGH M. DEYO 

This picture of well-known Hugh Deyo was 
taken twenty-four years ago when he was with 
G. & D. Silver. He began with Dake & Hamilton, 
and has been with Ziegler Bros, for seventeen years. 

131 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

C. R. BEACH 

You can hardly imagine him a regular drummer 
of shoes, but he surely was, for I remember him 
with Adams & Pettingel and with J. F. Swain - 
"Swain's Solid, Serviceable Shoes." Can you 
imagine such a big fellow selling little shoes? 
Now a prominent Boston jobber. You will find 
him now at his Boston place of business. 

B. F. WETHERBY 

Here is a real old-timer sure enough. B. F. 
has sold shoes on the road for forty-five years 
think of it! Started with P. Ware. At various 
times B. F. has sold for Edwin C. Burt, Lewis A. 
Crossett, Goodger & Naylor, and for the past 
twenty-four years has represented Charles K. Fox 
on the Pacific Coast. We greet you, old friend, 
a tried and true representative of the "old school!" 
Long may you wave! 

CHARLES A. MCCARTHY 

Mr. McCarthy is widely known as the presi- 
dent of Dunn & McCarthy, the extensive shoe 
manufacturers of Auburn, New York. He began 
traveling in 1876 for Dunn, Salmon & Co., of Syra- 
cuse. Mr. Dunn of this concern afterwards became 

132 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

Mr. McCarthy's partner in Dunn & McCarthy. 
Dunn, Salmon & Co. had the Auburn prison shoe 
contract, and in 1889, when the state abolished 
the contract system, a women's factory was started 
by Mr. Dunn and Mr. McCarthy the beginning 
of the present great business. Mr. Dunn died 
about three years ago. Mr. McCarthy continued 
as a salesman from 1876 until Mr. Dunn died, cov- 
ering a period of about thirty-seven years. After 
the first two or three years he sold the large retail 
and jobbing trade, the very cream of both branches. 
Mr. McCarthy's personal sales since 1900 ran to 
the amount of several million dollars a year, one of 
the largest, if not the largest, volumes written in this 
country by any salesman. Needless to say, Mr. 
McCarthy is one of the most respected shoe men 
in the country. 

C. E. BAIRD 

Thirty summers and probably as many winters 
have passed over the head of C. E. Baird since this 
picture was first taken. He has been on the road 
all that time and is good for a half century more. 
During this period he has successively and suc- 
cessfully represented Reed & Classon, Gibby & 
Allen, Myron L. Thomas and M. A. Packard Com- 
pany. 

133 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

XII 

GEORGE L. STARKS 

George Starks is one of the veteran shoe sales- 
men that it is a delight to know, and to know him 
is to esteem and honor him. He started in this 
profession February 15, 1885, with Aaron Claflin 
& Co., and saw service successively with John W. 
Heart & Co., Waverley School Shoe Company, 
Preston B. Keith Shoe Company, then five years 
with George Strong Company, and again with P. B. 
Keith where he now is. George was president of the 
Southern Shoe Salesmen's Association in 1913-1914. 

E. M. DANIELS 

E. M. began his career on the road for Charles 
A. Raymond, a jobber of men's shoes. This was 
over thirty years ago. This picture is a corker. 
You'd never know it, would you, for E. M. Daniels? 
He went South for M. A. Packard for twenty years. 
Now with Three K Shoe Co. of Stoughton. 

J. RUSH GREEN 

Rush has been out of selling shoes so long that 
he has almost forgotten all about it, but he is helping 
the game along by selling the shoe factories racks; 
and some boy pushing shoe racks around the factory 
may, some day, be the big shoe salesman that J. 
Rush was. He is a brother-in-law of Preston Moses. 

134 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 
W. J. ST. LOUIS 

I don't think we need go further than P. Cogan 
to know whom Bill has sold shoes for. He succeeded 
Tim Hogan with the line and has always traveled 
South. Bill has grown some since this picture 
was taken. 

GEORGE T. CHASE 

Every one South knows George, so there is no 
need of going back in ancient history; but the trade 
all knows Richard & Brennan's shoes when George 
comes and he has not grown thin over it. He 
never changes same old likeable George. 



A. L. GREENWOOD 

"Al Greenwood is one of the most popular men 
that ever sold shoes, as witness his presidency of 
the Boston Shoe Travelers' Association for two 
terms and last year was president of the National 
Shoe Travelers' Association. As you will note by 
this picture Al was a brave soldier, out in Newton, 
Mass. member of the Claflin Guards, in his 
blooming youth back in 1886. Al sells shoes 
out west for Williams-Kneeland, and has been on 
the road nearly thirty years. 

135 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

LAWRENCE B. CUBBISON 

"Cubby" began his road career at the tender 
age of seventeen years. This picture was taken 
at that time. He has been traveling twenty-eight 
years, so you can figure out his age for yourself if 
you are good at addition. Started for J. T. Wood 
Company, then with Lilly-Brackett for nine years, 
and for past sixteen years has been with Preston 
B. Keith Shoe Company. 



W. S. BACON 

"Win" Bacon has traveled for twenty-five years 
seven years with Chipman & Calley, eighteen 
years with M. A. Packard. So he qualifies as one 
of the veterans of the road whom we are glad to 
include in this galaxy of representative salesmen. 
Recently went with Knox Shoe Co. and Rochester 
Shoe Co. 

DAVID R. GOODIN 

Dave started with Lamkin & Foster, and has for 
years been with M. A. Packard. We all know he 
is a live wire a true salesman, quiet, unostenta- 
tious, loyal we all think a great deal of D. R. 

136 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

XIII 

E. F. SAWYER 

Many of us remember Col. Bob Sawyer, although 
we have not seen him in the shoe district for several 
years. He traveled South for the old firm of Alex. 
Torrey and then Torrey, Curtis & Terrill. He retired 
from the shoe business several years ago, and lives in 
Newton, Mass. 

HARRY P. LYNCH 

Harry has been on the road for Howard & Foster 
since April 1, 1893, a period of twenty- three years, 
so that lets him into the select circle. He travels 
parts of Illinois, Ohio, West Virginia, and Pennsyl- 
vania. Is a brother of Hector E. Lynch. 

ARTHUR L. BROOKS 

Another handsome and genial gentleman, Arthur 
Brooks, of Wellesley, Mass., and the Stetson Shoe 
Company. Been with Stetson sixteen years. 
Nine years with D. A. Caldwell & Co., and two years 
with H. B. Reed, before coming to Stetson. Al- 
ways in Dixie Land. A brother of Charles J. Brooks. 

W. I. KENDALL 

Will Kendall does not resemble this picture 
these days. He is better looking now. I remember 
him first as selling Herrick 's "Hard Hitters" for years. 
He is now with Thomas G. Plant Company for life. 

137 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

GEORGE H. WILKINS 

George Wilkins has been with George E. Keith 
for thirty years twenty-nine on the road, covering 
various parts of the country. One of the greatest 
salesmen the shoe trade has produced. Now travels 
the large cities in the East and middle West. 

HARRY D. DODGE 

Harry D. Dodge is of the famous family of shoe 
men of that name. Started traveling for his uncle, 
the late Nathan D. Dodge, about 1885, and later 
traveled for his own firm, Dodge Bros., of New- 
buryport, Mass. Since 1897, his selling work has 
been largely in the jobbing trade. A gentleman in 
very truth, whom we all respect and honor. 



J. RALPH BAKER 

Here's Ralph Baker, one of the heavy-fire guns 
of Churchill & Alden and incidentally the pride and 
joy of that dear East Bridgewater, where he has a 
baronial mansion and estate. Ralph is all right. 
Brother of Wallace D. Baker. Son of M. F. Baker. 

138 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

F. T. DEXTER 

Was with Burley & Usher in 1897, and with 
Chas. K. Fox. Then he was in the jobbing business 
in Minneapolis with Glomsted. He now has an 
office in Minneapolis representing Harrison Bar- 
ton of Chicago. One of the well-known northwestern 
salesmen. 

E. E. GLOMSTED 

Was in the retail business in Minnesota until 
our old friend Gene Baldwin discovered him; then 
he started traveling for Burley & Usher in 1890, 
where he remained until his lamented death in 1912. 

F. M. BARKER 

Frank Barker has been selling shoes for thirty 
years. He was first with the American Shoe Com- 
pany and Feary's boys' school shoes (the latter were 
the first advertised boys' shoes). Then with Aaron 
F. Smith, then with Hazen B. Goodrich and Frank 
E. Hutchinson. For the past seventeen years with 
Thomas G. Plant Company. Lives in Washing- 
ton, D. C. 

XIV 

JOHN S. TREADWELL 

John Treadwell's active selling life covers forty 
years. Was president of the New York Shoe Manu- 

139 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

facturing Company, and sold their goods on the 
road. Has traveled for J. F. Swain & Co., Dalton 
Shoe, G. W. Herrick Shoe Company. He is now 
with the last-named house and has been for fifteen 
years, and covers a part of New England. One 
of the "grand old men" of the road. 

GEORGE H. WHITE 

George White has sold shoes en route for 
thirty-five years. Was with Hudson River Shoe 
Manufacturing Company nine years. Then with 
Charles Faust of Havre de Grace, Maryland, for 
a year, then took the Charles K. Fox line, and also 
carried the R. T. Wood line for thirteen years. 
Still sells the Fox line. Several years ago established 
the Griffin- White Shoe Company in Brooklyn, 
where he is to-day. 

E. B. SLOCUM 

Chicago is the headquarters of E. B. Slocum, 
but we see him in Boston frequently. E. B. has 
traveled since February 2, 1885. Started with 
C. H. Fargo & Co., then with R. P. Smith & Sons. 
Went with Thompson Bros, in 1894, and continued 
with this line until this winter, when he became 
associated with the Dalton Company, the new 
Brockton concern. A man esteemed and respected 
by everybody. 

140 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

L. R. RECORD 

L. R. Record first went on the road in 1892, 
for Sharood Shoe Company, and continued with 
them until 1909, when he went with Burley & Ste- 
vens; and has continued with this line ever since. 
Lives in St. Paul, spends summers in Boston and 
Onset Bay, Mass. 

J. J. KALTENBRUN 

Jimmie Kaltenbrun, vice-president of the Na- 
tional Shoe Travelers' Association, is one of the 
" live wires " of the middle West. Travels for Charles 
A. Eaton Company, and is one of the most popular 
boys on the road. 

W. T. YORK 

W. T. has sold the same line of shoes for the 
past twenty-two years Bliss & Perry of New- 
buryport. The firm name when he started was 
N. D. Dodge & Bliss Company, then became Dodge, 
Bliss & Perry, and a few years ago Bliss & Perry. 
He was one of the pioneer shoe salesmen in the 
Oklahoma territory, then wild and wooly. Now 
travels Colorado, Utah, Wyoming, New Mexico, 
Arizona, El Paso and Amarillo. Lives in Denver. 

141 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

CAPEN BROWN 

Capen traveled West years ago with slippers. 
Lately has been in New England and we have not 
seen much of him. 

FRED J. VAN SICKLE 

Here is one of the Ohio boys Fred J. Van 
Sickle of Columbus. This picture was taken in 
1894 when Fred was with J. S. Nelson. He was 
later with Helming, McKenzie Shoe Company, 
and for the past few years has represented the 
Neenah Shoe Company and J. F. Budd. He was 
the first president of the Ohio Shoe Travelers' 
Association. 

THOS. E. C. JOHNSON 

Hello, Tommy, when did you look like this pic- 
ture? Must have been about twenty- two years ago, 
when you started on the road for Packard & Field. 
Tommy also traveled for J. S. Turner and Stacy- 
Adams before going with his present house, A. E. 
Nettleton Company, five years ago. Tommy is 
a great favorite with everybody and is just the kind 
of a fellow we like to boost. Remember that ban- 
quet when we china-cabinetted you, Tom? 

142 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

XV 

JOHN DAVY 

Our old friend John Davy started, I believe, 
traveling from Cincinnati for Stribley & Co., re- 
maining with them for many years. After travel- 
ing West for several firms he went down to New 
Orleans, representing Rice & Hutchins, where he 
died about two years ago. His son has taken his 
place, and we all hope he will be the same grand 
man as his father. 

R. L. SUMMERS 

Edwin Clapp will cover the ground of history, 
for Bobby and he has covered considerable ground 
for this firm, and Edwin Clapp shoes are pretty well 
known wherever he has gone. Able, popular, suc- 
cessful. 

HARRY P. DYER 

Harry didn't have as many gray hairs when 
this picture was taken as now. He has been trav- 
eling thirty years Field, Thayer & Co., twelve 
years; J. J. Grover's Sons, ten years; Mrs. A. R. King, 
four years; J. & T. Cousins, four years. Harry is one 
of the men the traveling fraternity is proud to 
recognize. 

143 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

WARREN C. PIERCE 

"W. C." has been one of us for twenty-nine 
years. Began with A. P. Tyler & Co. In leather 
business a while. Then on road for Tuttle-Smith 
Company and Scotsmith Company, and for the past 
twelve years has been one of the popular Preston B. 
Keith salesmen, traveling middle West. Picture 
taken several years ago. 

FRED C. BRIEL 

Fred doesn't change much, as this picture proves. 
He was in the retail shoe business at Natchez, Miss., 
before going with Lewis A. Crossett about twenty- 
five years ago. Fred is a southerner, all right, and 
has always traveled that sunny and hospitable ter- 
ritory. Brother of Christy Briel, the famous song- 
bird. 

ARTHUR H. JENKINS 

Arthur Jenkins belongs in the select class of suc- 
cessful shoe salesmen. He started in the shoe busi- 
ness at the age of fifteen with Cox, Young & Gardner 
and when only seventeen made his first trip for them. 
Next year he went with W. L. Douglas (as one of the 
first three salesmen to travel for him). Ten years 

144 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

with Douglas. Now with George E. Keith and is 
making his sixty-sixth trip into the South a long 
and honorable record. 

J. P. BURNS 

Few will recall James P. Burns as a traveling 
salesman, thinking of him rather as a prominent 
shoe retailer in Los Angeles. Truth to tell, however, 
he did travel for Boston wholesale houses a good 
many years ago, before he went to California to 
make his fortune, which quest, we are glad to say, 
was successful. J. P. is always glad to see "the 
boys" especially from Boston. 

GEORGE J. LOVELEY 

Most of our readers will be loath to believe that 
George Loveley has traveled for over twenty years, 
for George doesn 't look it. So, nevertheless. Began 
when he was nineteen, with Batchelder & Lincoln - 
one of "Uncle Joe's boys." Later was with Walton, 
Logan & Co., for several years, then with Thomp- 
son Bros, for some time, and now he is prominently 
identified with the new Dalton Company, Brockton. 
George likes to play golf and is good at it. Used to 
be a crack baseball player. Every inch a man and 
everybody respects and esteems him. Need say 
no more. 

145 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

XVI 
B. H. COGAN 

Barney, I know, will be glad to be among the 
old shoe boys even if he is a shoe manufacturer, for 
he enjoys meeting old friends on the road. Head of 
P. Cogan & Son. 

ED. T. SHIPP 

Here's handsome Ed. Shipp, a picture taken 
back in his salad days. But Ed. is one of the boys 
who seem to grow handsomer with the passing 
years. Never represented but one house Burt 
& Packard, and he has been traveling for them for 
twenty-seven years, covering southern territory. 
Ed. lives in Paris, Ky., his native town. So 
we'll call him Colonel Shipp, suh, hereafter. 

P* B. KERRIGAN 

Phil Kerrigan would you ever know him 
from this picture? started on the road with 
Nathan D. Dodge in 1885 then with Dodge 
Bros., and in 1890 he went with Hazen B. Good- 
rich. In 1910 he took Hervey E. Guptill's slippers 
into the southern territory, and is at the same work 
now. 

146 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

BERTON O. WETMORE 

Bert's fine voice has charmed all of us for 
many years. Bert surely can sing. This picture 
shows him in 1890. He started selling shoes for 
J. W. Brigham, then was with J. S. Nelson several 
years; lastly, with Nat Packard. He quit the road 
about ten years ago to go in the moving picture 
business on the executive end, and has made a suc- 
cess of it. We see Bert once in a while and know 
he doesn't forget his days on the road. 



CHARLES E. DAVIS 

One of the noblest old Romans in the business. 
Charles has been selling shoes for, lo, these many, 
many years, and to look at him you'd never sus- 
pect it. This picture was taken a long, long time 
ago. He has represented several concerns during 
this period and is one of the real veterans, and still 
as young as any. He has been with Burt & Packard 
for sixteen years and before that was with Johnson 
Bros., French, Shriner & Urner, and Mrs. A. R. King. 
He started on the road for Bennett & Howland 
(later Denham & Howland), and was later with 
Dearborn & Kendall (later Dearborn & Shaw, then 
Dearborn & Day). 

147 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

JAKE J. BEAHR 

Jake Beahr we must put down as "just one of 
the old salesmen. " Been traveling out of Cincinnati 
a good many years and belongs with the younger 
element as well as with the older, because active, 
alive, energetic. Good luck! Jake, for a hundred 
years, say we. 

B. A. ST. JOHN 

Bennie St. John traveled for Moore-Shafer Shoe 
Company, Brockport, N. Y., for twenty years but, 
a year or so ago, surprised his many friends by going 
with the Menman Company, with which house he is 
keeping up his record. 

PETER McGEOucn 

Peter McGeough is a breath of the "ould sod," a 
wit, a humorist, a satirist, a philosopher, a soldier 
of fortune, a man in whom the old-fashioned notions 
of friendship and comradeship never have failed. 
Now on the road for Piehler of Rochester. Peter 
has been on the road since the battle of the Boyne. 

W. F. NYE 

This handsome young man we identify as "one 
of the boys," namely, W. F. Nye ("Bill" Nye.) 

148 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

Still as lively and friendly as ever and glad to be 
reckoned with the shoe immortals. 

XVII 

W. H. H. JAMES 

He is remembered first as a clerk with the old 
firm of A. Knoblauch & Sons, Minneapolis, and 
was a lively boy in those days as he is now. With 
Stacy-Adams & Co. Lives in Braintree. 

GEORGE GREGORY 

George Gregory was the same old George when 
this photo was taken twenty-five years ago he 
was then with the Newburyport Shoe Co.; before 
that he was with the Niagara Shoe Co. of Buf- 
falo. After twelve years with Newburyport, George 
went with Val Duttenhofer, and later was one of 
the founders of the Rickard-Gregory Shoe Company 
(later the R. & G. Shoe Company, of which company 
he was president and general manager). He was 
with E. P. Reed a while and is now with the George 
R. Jones Company at Manchester, N. H. 

HOWARD PLATTS 

Handsome Howard has been right there in the 
shoe game for thirty years. This picture was 

149 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

taken about a quarter of a century ago. Howard 
used to manufacture shoes in Holbrook, Mass., 
where he now lives, first as Hanna & Platts, then as 
Howard Platts & Payne. He has been with Isaac 
Prouty for the past eight years. 

W. H. HUNTINGTON 

Does not belong to the traveling salesman class, 
but, as he was the secretary of the former Shoe 
Travelers' League, years ago, he is entitled to be 
one of us. He is on deck every day at Isaac Prouty 's 
office on Essex Street, Boston. 

HARRY M. HAMILTON 

Harry Hamilton counts his friends only by the 
limit of his acquaintances. He has been traveling 
thirty-four years. He was with Lilly-Brackett 
fifteen years, and for nearly twenty years with 
Thompson Bros. He is now with the new Brock- 
ton concern the Dalton Shoe Company. For 
thirty-three years he has made principal cities in 
the South and Southwest and western Pennsylvania. 

A. L. CHASE 

A. L. is a popular fixture in the Charles K. 
Fox sales organization. Been with this line for 
twenty-three years, excepting 1902, when he was 

150 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

with T. G. Plant. Previously with Berry, Chase 
& Milliard, Hazen B. Goodrich, Chase, May & Co., 
and Ellis & Connor. Began in 1886. Always sold 
Haverhill shoes, excepting one year. Would you 
recognize this picture? 

J. F. FLINT 

"Winch Bros, hired man" that was John 
Flint's familiar cognomen for years. Represented 
them for thirty-six years, traveling twelve months 
a year. Rested up Christmas day. Covered Ohio 
and Pennsylvania. Never changed territory. Now 
with A. M. Creighton. We hereby hand the medal 
for continuous traveling to John F. Flint of 
Rochester, New York. 

CHARLES BRANDMAN 

Charles B. is one of the Napoleons of shoe sales- 
manship. He has made one of the greatest records 
ever accomplished, and is a real one, and always a 
modest, earnest, good-fellowship sort of a guy is 
Charlie. Been selling "Just Wright" shoes for 
years. Lives in Port JerviS-on-the-Erie Railroad. 

JOE A. WARRENDERN 

We remember him first selling for Harry K. Childs 
in Chicago. He was so long with Thomson Bros. 

151 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

that he probably has forgotten those old days; but 
the trade in Indiana and Ohio know him well, and 
I guess he will get his share of trade on his new line 
the Dalton Company, of Brockton. 



XVIII 
OSCAR JACOBI 

"Oscar the Only" has been a shoe salesman 
for thirty-five years, and has made as few changes 
in that long period as about anybody. He started 
with Cohen & Sons, New York, and later saw ser- 
vice with A. E. Little & Co., French Shriner & Ur- 
ner and Harney Bros. He now carries the Wil- 
liamson and Knox lines. Oscar loves to fish and 
is always one of "the boys." 



W. G. BRIDGED 

Our old friend "Billy" Bridgeo started selling 
shoes a good many years ago for Edmunds & Mayo, 
then with Todd, Bancroft & Co., Rochester, for 
nine years; later with William Porter & Sons and 
Welch and Landregan. "Billy" has been with 
Allen-Foster-Willett for the past few years. 

152 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

JOHN M. MEGGETT 

Genial John Meggett thirty years of shoe 
selling with J. A. Manning, E. P. Dodge and P. 
J. Harney. Charter member and past president 
of the Boston Shoe Travelers' Association. John 
is one of the well-known and best-liked men in the 
eastern trade. Now with Plant Bros. 

FRED C. CHURCH 

Fred is the original "I'm from Missouri" shoe 
salesman. Lives still in Jefferson City and sells 
Williams-Kneeland shoes down that way. This 
classic photograph was taken in 1889. First trip 
in 1884. That lets Fred in as an old-timer. 

CHARLES A. ESTES 

For nineteen years Charles A. Estes has traveled 
for Krippendorf-Dittman. He began his shoe career 
with M. A. Palmer, of Portland, Me. Here for 
eighteen years. Then became partner of Hubert 
Gardiner, in New York, as Gardiner & Estes, and 
traveled West and New England. One of the men 
whose road life would fill a volume. 

WILLIAM H. DUNN 

Mr. Dunn, well-known member of the firm of 
Utz & Dunn, sold shoes for his company in its 

153 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

early history in about forty states, and also has 
sold in Hawai, Cuba, Porto Rico, Venezuela, West 
Indies, etc. Many dealers, manufacturers and 
traveling salesmen know and respect Mr. Dunn 
for the fine, courteous gentleman that he surely is. 

E. A. TERHUNE 

This picture of Ed was taken "somewhere in 
Maine," years ago, and as will be noticed Ed was 
a gallant youth and still is the same. He began 
his road career with W. L. Douglas in 1885, manu- 
factured shoes for a while, and for the past eight 
years has been with the Matchless Shoe Company, 
Ed once was a retail store magnate, having stores 
in Boston and Brockton. 

ARTHUR I. BENEDICT 

Arthur Benedict, now president of the N. Y. 
Shoe Travelers' Association, is the most extensive 
shoe traveler we know anything about. He has 
sold shoes in every state in the Union but three, 
in all of Europe, Australia, New Zealand, the Pa- 
cific islands, Cuba, Porto Rico, etc. Comes of a 
family of shoe men son of J. Irving Benedict. 
Family shoe history goes back to 1752. Has a son 
also on the road selling shoes. Who can beat that 
record? Mr. Benedict has been with the following 

154 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

firms as member, sales manager, salesman, etc.: 
J. Irving Benedict & Son, Faunce & Spinney, Morse 
& Rogers, Edwin C. Burt Company. Now with 
Whitman & Keith. Been on the road thirty-seven 
years. 

F. GARRETT FISHER 

Mr. Fisher is now treasurer of the Stone-Fisher 
Company, the large Tacoma, Wash., depart- 
ment store. He is smooth shaven now. When 
he was a traveling shoe salesman he looked like this 
over twenty years ago. 

JOHN J. WALSH 

John Walsh is one of the best-known southern 
shoe salesmen traveled for Julian & Kokenge, 
down in Dixie, a good many years and, is deservedly 
popular and a true southerner in every respect. 
Long may he flourish. 

XIX 

GEORGE STRONG 

If there is a pioneer shoe manufacturer and sales- 
man who is more esteemed than George Strong, we 
don't know who he is. Mr. Strong is seventy-nine 
years old and is the owner of the George Strong Com- 
pany, East Weymouth, Mass., and still sells many 

155 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

shoes every year. He was in the retail shoe business 
in New London, Conn., in 1864. He sold this to 
his nephew, George C. Strong, in 1875. In 1876, 
he traveled for Clark & Holbrook, and for Walker, 
Short & Co. In 1878, John Carroll, W. O. Walker 
and Mr. Strong formed the manufacturing firm of 
Walker, Strong & Carroll, which continued until 
1885, when it became Strong & Carroll. In 1895, it 
became Strong & Garfield (Henry S. Garfield) and 
in 1906 the firm became George Strong Company. 
Always men's fine shoes. Mr. Strong, respected 
and loved by all, has traveled for forty-one years. 
This picture was taken many years please note the 
facial adornment. 

D. M. CORBIN 

Brother Corbin, one of Utz & Dunn's real 
veterans, has been a "knight of the grip" for almost 
forty years. Started for J. Miller & Co., September 
1876, when manufacturers' agents were as scarce 
as Democrats in Vermont. This picture is twenty- 
one years old, but D. M. hasn't changed very much 
in that time. 

J. FRANK CREHAN 

J. Frank has been so long (over six feet) with 
French, Shriner & Urner that we cannot think of 

156 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

him as ever with another house. He had his growth 
when this picture was taken and has not lost an 
inch since. Past-president Boston Shoe Travelers' 
Association. Lives in Hingham. 

JOHN L. LAIRD 

Probably in his day John Laird sold more fine 
shoes on the coast than any one, and Laird, Schober 
& Mitchell was the line. I don't think he is for- 
gotten out West, even though he has lived in England, 
for many years. He is still selling the old line in 
that country, and I don't think at his age they will 
call him to the trenches. 

G. TOWNES GAINES 

Townes Gaines looks as young as he did twenty 
years ago. Been traveling for thirty-five years. 
Sells "Krip's" and "Just Wright" shoes down 
South, where everybody knows him. Used to live 
in Lynchburg and now is in Knoxville. Brother 
of "Am" Gaines. 

AMBROSE GAINES 

"Am" Gaines, how-dy-do? Understand you're 
in politics now, down in old Knox County, Tennes- 
see. Election Commissioner, eh? Good work, Am. 
We all know Am and like him. Been selling shoes 
down South for, lo, these many years. 

157 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

C. S. PIERCE 

If you ask any shoe man in Washington or Ore- 
gon or western Canada or away up in Alaska who 
C. S. Pierce is, they'll tell you pretty quick that he 
represents Utz & Dunn out that way and is a real 
man. Here's a picture of C. S. taken twenty years 
ago. He lives in Seattle. 

HERBERT N. LAPE 

This picture of Herbert Lape was taken when he 
was fifteen years old and is the record for this book. 
Once upon a time our friend was on the stage in a 
light opera company and now, behold! he is sales 
manager for Julian & Kokenge and a strenuous, 
hustling, driving, clear-headed able sales manager, 
he is. Also makes his regular trip. 

D. E. KlTTREDGE 

"Kit" has been on the road for over thirty years. 
Started shoe-life as a clerk in St. Louis. On road 
for Curtis & Wheeler in 1885. Dugan & Hudson, 
1890. Since then with R. T. Wood, covering 
Illinois, Wisconsin, Nebraska. One of Rochester's 
enthusiastic association members. 



158 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

W. H. BALKAM 

W. H. Balkam occupies an honored position in 
the history of this great trade. For many years he 
has held the respect and high regard of all who knew 
him. He was with J. W. Brigham & Co., of Boston, 
for twenty-four years, fifteen on the road; five years 
with Ellis & Connor of Haverhill, two years with 
Bryant Boot & Shoe Company, of Randolph, Mass., 
and for the past eighteen years he has been with 
A. E. Little & Co., of Lynn, in the office. 

XX 

B. T. HUDSON 

We miss this kind face to this day, for "Brynie" 
was loved by us all. His sad death came in the 
midst of his success, for he was making the name of 
Dugan & Hudson a house-hold name. He was for 
a while in charge of the firm's New York branch, 
and then traveled to many of the large cities. 
Many buyers remember him well. 

FRED S. ELWELL 

Fred Elwell has been off the road for twenty-six 
years, and has become one of the most successful 
life insurance men in the country, and an expert 
on insurance legislation. Often called into counsel 

159 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

by governors and legislators on insurance laws. 
Has one of the largest insurance businesses in Boston. 
He was Lamkin & Foster's first salesman was 
with Church, Brown & Co. until 1890, when he 
went into the insurance field. 

E. H. CUSHING 

Mr. Cushing is well known as house salesman 
with Thomson-Crooker. He traveled for fifteen 
years, beginning in 1890, for E. P. Dodge before 
going with Thomson-Crooker. He has, therefore, 
been selling women's shoes for twenty-six years. 

W. P. FRANCIS 

Bill can consider himself a salesman, for I know 
he has made several trips selling shoes, but it is 
as a factory superintendent that he made his rep- 
utation with Nat Packard and Snow and Emerson. 
Now is in Canada, running a factory. 

CHARLES H. SMITH 

Well, well, who would believe this callow youth 
was Charlie Smith, now the pride of the Los Angeles 
Hollywood moving picture devotees. This photo 
was taken for Barnum & Bailey's show about thirty 
years ago. Everybody on the coast knows Charlie 
and buys L. B. Evans' shoes from him. So Charlie 
is a plutocrat and as popular as they make 'em. 

160 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

S. M. PRITCHETT 

The familiar figure of S. M. has an honored 
place in this galaxy of shoe immortals. He's been 
selling Smaltz-Goodwin shoes for many a year, and 
is everybody's friend and vice versa. 

JOHN S. SPAULDING 

This photo of John Spaulding was taken nearly 
thirty years ago. Do you recognize it? He has 
been with Preston B. Keith for a long time. Lives 
in famous old Lexington. 

SAMUEL COOK 

Mr. Cook is of the real "old school" of traveling 
shoe salesmen a fine old gentleman of strictest 
integrity and beloved by all. He sold Harvey B. 
Evans' shoes for years. Has retired and lives at 
Woburn, Mass. 

WILLARD H. JAMES 

We are glad to be able to include in this collection 
a photo of Willard H. James, who represents Foss- 
Packard Company of Auburn, Me., in the West, and 
lives in Chicago. 

161 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

XXI 

EDWIN H. MATHEWSON 

Mr. Mathewson started selling shoes on the 
road for Lounsbury Bros. & Rockwell in 1872, 
and continued for Lounsbury Bros. & Co. and 
Lounsbury, Mathewson & Co. until about eight 
years ago, a period of thirty-six years. This pic- 
ture was taken about 1890. Mr. Mathewson died 
eight years ago. A gentleman in every sense of 
the word and an honor to this great trade. He 
was a brother of Herbert A. Mathewson. 

HERBERT A. MATHEWSON 

Mr. Mathewson is the present Mathewson of 
the well-known manufacturing house of Lounsbury, 
Mathewson & Co., and is a brother of the late 
Edwin H. Mathewson. This photo was taken in 
1887. Mr. Mathewson began his sales career for 
Lounsbury Bros. & Co., and still attends to some 
of the firm's trade. 

J. F. KNOWLES 

Most of us think of "Cy" Knowles as a success- 
ful retailer treasurer of the W. G. Simmons 
Corporation, Hartford, but, as a matter of fact, 
he "served time" on the road. He traveled 
southern New England for Batchelder & Lincoln 

162 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

for twenty-one years until he became credit man 
for the same house, and finally became a dealer. 
Mr. Knowies was born in famous Provincetown, 
and followed the sea from the age of twelve to 
twenty-one years. Secretary of The Associated 
Shoe Company now, as well as head of the Simmons 
business. A genial, courteous, deeply respected 
gentleman. 

MARC W. REED 

Marc Reed made his first trip forty-four years 
ago next July, so he belongs in the front rank of 
veteran and pioneer shoe salesmen. Hasn't missed 
a trip since 1874, covering always Ohio and Indiana, 
a record for this territory, we believe. He has 
been with Krohn-Fechheimer for over thirty years 
and can still go a few fast miles. This photo was 
taken twenty-five years ago. 

AMOS F. BAILEY 

Amos cannot pose now as a shoe salesman, 
although several years ago he traveled in the West, 
but later developed into a Lynn shoe manufacturer. 
Now, we find him a pattern maker getting us in 
trouble with his latest styles. 

JOHN E. O'BRIEN 

" Silver- tongue " John, one of the very popular 
shoe salesmen take a look at this prehistoric 

163 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

picture. John is past president of the Boston 
Shoe Travelers' Association, and was the first 
president of the National Shoe Travelers' Asso- 
ciation. Has in his active career represented these 
houses: H. A. Royce & Co., J. E. Dayton & Co., 
J. B. Lewis, Kellam-Goller-Land, Hurley Shoe Com- 
pany, and for the past few years has been with 
Commonwealth. 

C. A. MCLEAN 

If any one would call Charley one of the old boys 
he would resent it, but I know he is, even if he does 
step around as lively as some of the kids. He has 
traveled so long for J. P. Smith that I don't dare go 
further back. 

W. McMuLLEN 

"Mac" has traveled continuously for forty-eight 
years, and in all that time has never missed a train 
nor lost a day's work. Step to the head of the class. 
This picture was taken forty years ago. Last 
with Preston B. Keith Shoe Company. Lives in 
Albany. A long and useful life, respected by all. 

P. A. RlTTER 

P. A. Ritter started with Selby in 1882 and, to 
use his own expression, "expects to sell them fifty 
more years." This photo is only ten years old. 
Wish we had one when P. A. was a boy. 

164 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

HERBERT A. HARRINGTON 

Traveled for years for Hathaway, Soule & Har- 
rington of New Bedford, but of late years has man- 
aged the shoe store of J. G. Brandt Shoe Company 
St. Louis. I believe he has retired now. 

XXII 
HECTOR E. LYNCH 

Few in these days remember him when he was 
selling a jobbing line. When he left that line and 
went with Howard & Foster it was the turning-point 
of- his career, and now every one knows Hector and 
is pleased to know of his fine success. 

HENRY S. GARFIELD 

Years ago a tall young man with very light hair 
left a retail job in Minneapolis and took his first 
trip on the road selling men's shoes for Walker, 
Strong & Carroll and Stoneham Co-operative 
(children's shoes), and he made a success of it from 
the first. He then was of the firm of Strong & 
Garfield for several years. The few hairs are now 
gray, but Henry is the same Henry and we find 
him working hard with Nettleton of Syracuse. 

165 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

JOHN H. HUNT 

John was for years with J. & T. Cousins and 
Davis Shoe Company in New England, and in his 
quiet way sold a great many shoes and was very 
well liked. His death a few years ago was a source 
of sorrow to all of us. 

HARRY KIDD 

A highly successful salesman for Johnston & 
Murphy for many years, having an interest in the 
firm and also with Snyder & Kidd, retail shoe 
dealers in Washington, D. C. His sad death in an 
automobile accident a couple of years ago was a 
great blow to his friends and a great loss to the shoe 
trade. 

JOHN MCELANEY 

John has sold for Stacy-Adams so many years 
that we can forget the rest. One of the most popu- 
lar boys on the road. Is now president of the South- 
ern Shoe Salesmen's Association. 

CHARLES J. SHRINER 

Charlie Shriner, who died February 21, 1915, was 
one of the strong men of the trade a fine salesman, 
a successful shoe manufacturer, a big man. His 
sudden death last year was a great sorrow to all 

166 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

of us. Traveled for Hanan for years, then with 
French & Hall, then he and the late Samuel P. Urner 
became members of the firm of French, Shriner & 
Urner and achieved success as fine shoe manufacturers. 

CHARLES F. STORY 

We remember Charlie Story as being with Burt 
& Packard for years; then went with Nettleton a 
few years ago and has been a great success. C. F. 
is one of the younger generation of "veterans." 
A full-fledged Syracuse Nettletonian now. 

SAMUEL SHAW 

Of Leonard, Shaw & Dean. Sam can hardly 
call himself a traveling shoe salesman now, as he 
devotes most of his time to the factory, but in the 
old days, this young fellow surely did sell some shoes, 
and we are all glad to know of his success as Henry 
Dean's partner in the manufacturing business. 

ED. SKINNER 

Ed. traveled for years from Rochester, but of 
late years has been in the men's game traveling 
to the coast for Burt & Packard. The trade will 
miss him for he resigned lately, and probably is into 
something big. 

167 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

XXIII 
W. H. ANDERSON 

"Andy," as he is well known to all his old friends, 
is known no more to the shoe trade, as he has for- 
saken us for the automobile, as he was last heard 
of in St. Louis selling auto trucks; but he made 
himself heard in the days past representing Edwin 
Clapp in the middle West. I wish I could print 
some of his funny sayings and stories. 

FRANK H. LAND 

We remember the late Frank Land as with Hank 
Goller, first selling Lewis' Wear Resisters. Poor 
health took him out to Colorado for a short time, and 
then we find him forming the shoe manufacturing 
firm of Kellam-Goller-Land, of Lynn. We all 
remember his hearty good nature, and he was cheer- 
ful and hopeful to the last. 

C. A. WILLETS 

Began his shoe career as a shoe merchant and is 
liable to end it, as he has now a store in Kansas 
City, but he is well remembered as selling Stetson 
shoes in the West. 

168 



But if the while I think on thee, dear friend, 

All losses are restored and sorrows end. SHAKESPEARE. 




JAMES P. BEATTY 

Here is J. P. Beatty, the popu- 
lar ex-president of the Rochester 
Association of Trave'ing Sales- 
men, and one of the best known 
men on the road. J. P. tells me 
that this picture was taken thirty- 
four years ago, so you can imagine 
the change. He was with Dake 
& Barrett, 1886-1<*91, going with 
C. P. Ford & Co., twenty-four 
years ago, and still with them. 

FREEMAN D. BLAKE 

Many shoe folks know F. D. 
Blake. He has been selling shoes 
for over twenty years. He was 
brought up in the leather business 
in Woburn, Mass., spent ten 
Years in California in the leather 
trade and was with the Z. C. M. 
I., at Salt Lake City for a while. 
He is perhaps best remembered 
as a member of the Stetson Shoe 
Company for many years. 






EDWARD EVARTS 

I am pleased to show another 
of our Rochester friends Ed- 
ward Evarts, well known as one 
of John Kelly's long-time sales- 
men. This picture was taken 
about thirty years ago and you 
would never recognize Edward 
E. from this picture. 



A. H. ATHERTON and 
F. M. COLBURN 

Here are two old cronies 
Bert Atherton and Frank Co- 
burn. This was sna'pped in Se- 
attle, twenty years ago. Every- 
body knows that Bert is one of 
the big men of the Lewis A. 
Crossett line, and Frank Colburn 
has long been with Hazen B. 
Goodrich & Co. 



A. S. MAcFARLANE 

This is an old-time picture of A. S. MacFarlane, whose untimely death is reported the very day this por- 
tion of this book goes to press a most sorrowful announcement. "Sunny Jim" was with E. T. Wright 
& Co. for many years, always successful, always genial. Picture taken when he was with Hanan. 



SOUTHERN SHOE SALESMEN'S ASSOCIATION, 1890 







TOP Row, left to right: Lester Stevens, E. F. Sawyer, Arthur Stetson, 
B. O. Wetmore, Frank Ferguson, Harris M. Barnes, Fred J. Welden, 
Lincoln, Frank M. Colburn, Hector E. Lynch, George R. Jacobs, James 
Casey. 

SECOND Row: Arthur H. Jenkins, David S. Childs, Natt F. Stevens, 
Samuel Shaw, Ed. T. Shipp, Henry M. Currier, William L. Haynes, 
Fred C. Briel. 

THIRD Row: Clarence P. Waide, A. Erwin Rankin, Robert Lee, 
Summers, S. Preston Moses, George T. Chase, Frank M. Barker, Fred 
Werner, Charles F. Lusch, J. Rush Green. 

BOTTOM Row: Ralph J. Saxe, G. Townes Gaines, Harry H. Ripley, 
A. H. Atherton, Arthur L. Brooks, W. Harry Dudley, Walter May. 



SALESMEN'S GROUP, PLANTERS' HOTEL, ST. LOUIS, 1898 




This interesting photograph belongs to Walter 
I. Perry, of the Bliss & Perry Company, Newbury- 
port, Mass. 

Taken at the Planters' Hotel, St. Louis, eighteen 
years ago, many old familiar faces and forms will 
readily be recognized. 

Unfortunately we are unable to identify all of 
the folks in the group. 

Among the others here shown are the following: 
George H. Harrington, Charles H. Foster, Joel C. 
Page, Harris M. Barnes, George Ahrens, Lou Wood, 
Frank B. King, George S. Dwinnell, Fred J. Wei- 
den, C. A. McLean, J. C. Hunt, A. L. Chase, Walter 
I. Perry, W. Harry Dudley, Robert Sprunt, Jr., 
James Musson, L. M. Gerson, James D. Sheridan, 
A. W. Gage, A. W. Dubois, H. L. Gabell, Meier 
Swope, Messrs. Lynch, Aber, Elkins, Dwyer, Wolf, 
Powers, Davenport, Phelps, Weaver. 



THE "BIG FOUR" 



SIX HUISKAMP SHOE PEOPLE 




H. H. RIPLEY 

M. J. MULRYAN 



UDSON 

WELDEN 



Fred J. Welden, M. J. Mulryan, Harry H. 
Ripley and W. H. Judson were the "big four" 
that sold shoes for the old firm of J. C. Bennett 
& Barnard, and they surely did sell some shoes 
in those days. Harry Ripley we know all about. 
Fred Welden was last with Thomas G. Plant, 
until his failing health caused him to resign. He 
passed away a few years ago, at his home down 
Cape Cod way. 

Judson died many years ago. Mulryan, 
after several good positions on the road and as 
manager, is now filling a factory position in Lynn. 

This photograph, taken forty-four years ago, 
was sent to us by John M. French of Keokuk, 
la. It is a group of Huiskamp Bros. Com- 
pany folks. 

H. W. Huiskamp is now president of the 
company. Eldest son of the founder of the 
business. 




Taken i 



A, E. MATLESS 
H. W. HUISKAMP 
W. S. FLETCHER 



JOHN M. FRE: 

L. T. P? 

THOMAS REE 



John M. French was with Huiskamp f; 
1872 to 1905. He was the No. 1 membei 
the great Iowa Traveling Salesmen's Associat 
and offered the resolution leading to organ 
tion, in 1880, and paid in the first dollar. 
000 members now. 

A. E. Matless was former vice-presic 
and treasurer of the company. Mr. Mat 
has passed away. 

W. S. Fletcher retired in 1900, after twei 
five years of Huiskamp service. 

Thomas Reddie, house salesman, has b 
with Huiskamp forty-four years. 

L. T. Pyles is deceased. He represer 
Huiskamp Bros. Company for many yc 
beginning in 1876. He died in 1913. 



SKETCHES OF T R A V E L I N G SALESMEN 

TONY E. JOHNSON 

Tony has traveled for several years to the coast, 
but lately is representing Williams-Kneeland in the 
South. He may retire before many years to his 
farm in Michigan, where, I believe, he is raising 
blooded cattle. 

JOSEPH C. KIMBALL 

We think of Joe Kimball as a big leather buyer 
for Lewis A. Crossett, Inc., and a gentleman of 
standing in North Abington and South Street, but 
as a matter of fact he was a successful shoe salesman 
on his own account in Haverhill, twenty-five years 
ago, and has sold a great many Crossett shoes. Pic- 
ture taken at twenty-five years of age. 

ORAN McCoRMiCK 

Everybody who knows anything about shoes 
knows about Oran McCormick. Oran has always 
been a shoe man from "bench" days down in Fort 
Worth, thirty years ago, until now. He traveled 
a while for J. S. Turner down South, but being by 
nature an artist, he turned to journalism and shoe 
illustration. He founded the Illustrated Footwear- 
Fashion in 1899, selling this in 1910. He was the 
pioneer in high-class shoe illustration. Now the 
owner of Modern Shoemaking, a handsome publica- 

173 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

tion, for a fact. Oran McCormick is a man of unique 
personality, strong likes and dislikes and an artist 
clear through. When we write the history of the 
shoe trade we will have to have a whole chapter for 
O. M. He is proud to be enumerated as "one of the 
boys." 

ED. MAURER 

Well, here's Ed. Maurer, back in his palmy, 
youthful days twenty-eight years ago. Ed's been 
on the road about thirty years, first for W. N. Gokey. 
Represented different houses until his connection 
with Preston B. Keith several years ago. Now 
travels the coast. Popular salesman with his trade 
and compatriots. Past president of Indianapolis 
Shoe Travelers' Association. 

"HANK" GOLLER 

One of the three Gollers well known in the shoe 
trade. Brother of Harry and Charles F. Went 
with J. B. Lewis in 1884. Formed partnership with 
Frank Land as Kellam-Goller-Land Company, in 
1902. We see "Hank" frequently, and he's one of 
the best-known men in the Boston trade. 

D. J. TOBIN 

Here's another of the famous bunch of E. P. 
Dodge salesmen; with that house eighteen years. 

174 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

Then with Rickard-Gregory five years. Two years 
with P. J. Harney. Now with H. H. Gray's Son. 

XXIV 

E. A. KENDALL 

Here is a genuine veteran E. A. Kendall 
who has sold shoes for many years. Born in Hud- 
son, Mass., in 1841, he worked in shoe stores in 
Chicopee Falls, Hartford, Springfield, 111., and 
finally came to Boston a good many years ago, and 
was connected with these firms at different times: 
Clark & Warren, Warren Boot & Shoe Company, 
Lamkin & Foster, Haynes & Sparrell, Congress 
Shoe and Rubber Company, and lastly with Lane 
Bros. He traveled New England territory. He 
is now living quietly at his home in Hyde Park, Bos- 
ton. 

CHARLES R. McWiLLiAMS 

Charlie has traveled to the coast for Nettleton 
so many years that he has almost forgotten the few 
lines he had before and he has reason to for he has 
made a big success. Everybody is strong for " Mac. " 

E. L. RITSON 

E. L. Ritson has been " hitting the trail" of 
shoe selling for the past thirty-three years, having 

175 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

started with Tirrell Church in 1883. He is with 
W. L. Douglas, traveling the Pacific coast territory. 

FRED S. TODD 

We remember him best when traveling for Har- 
ding & Todd, and he surely sold some shoes in those 
days, and also for F. S. Todd & Co. He retired and 
now is living a life of ease on his farm near Rochester. 

GEORGE T. HIPFLE 

Well, there are lots of good things to be said of 
George, and if I had space I would say them; but 
we all know him and he has traveled so long from 
Cincinnati that he doesn't know that shoes are 
made in any other city. 

C. J. BROOKS 

Every buyer and I guess every one else on the 
Pacific coast knows Charlie, but perhaps may not 
recognize this young fellow, for it is a long time 
since he was of Brooks & Wells, but of late years 
he is well known, selling F. M. Hoyt & Co. and 
A. Fisher & Son shoes. He has no seasons of making 
his trips, for they say that he starts so late that 
he meets himself coming back. Some day he will 
get his well-earned rest on that farm of his, up in 
Oregon somewhere. Brother of Arthur L. Brooks. 

176 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 
CHARLES H. FOSTER 

Mr. Foster began his shoe selling as a jobber of 
men's shoes on Lincoln Street, Boston, and then 
helped to form the firm of Howard & Foster. He 
traveled some years for this firm and was beloved 
by all, for his was, indeed, a noble character and his 
death two years ago was a great blow to all. 



C. A. INGALLS 

We were all sorry to learn, a few months ago, of 
the death of Charlie Ingalls, one of the veterans of 
the road. He traveled the coast territory many 
years for Edwin Clapp, and was known and liked 
by all. 



E. T. WRIGHT 

We are glad to include "Pop" Wright in this 
honorable list of veteran knights of the shoe-grip. 
While he is famous for making "Just Wright" shoes, 
he has sold his share thereof. One of the deservedly 
esteemed and highly regarded men of the trade. 
May "Pop" flourish for a thousand years, say we. 

177 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

XXV 

W. HENRY DEAN 

Who does not know Henry Dean in the South? 
They ought to know him, for he has traveled down 
there long enough. First with Hathaway, Soule 
& Harrington, and now with his own line; also Hervey 
Guptill's slippers. There is no need of giving a 
history of his past life, for you all know Henry and 
like him. Leonard, Shaw & Dean is his firm's name. 

T. H. CHAMBERLIN 

Tom traveled for years for Hathaway, Soule 
& Harrington and opened a store for them in Chicago, 
being in the retail line for some time. For several 
years he sold Chicago trade, and at the time of 
his death, two years ago, he was selling for G. Edwin 
Smith of Columbus. All his old friends miss him these 
days, for he was a good fellow and the soul of honor. 

FRANK C. KELLOG, FRED L. SMITH, A. W. GAGE 

These three young fellows happened to meet in 
Detroit, after not having seen each other for years, 
and this picture was taken. Kellogg and "Gagie" 
you know something about. Fred Smith was one 
time in the shoe game, but later drifted into news- 
paper business at Cincinnati, where he is at 
last accounts. 

178 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

WILLIAM M. HURLEY 

Will Hurley, one of the famous Hurley Brothers, 
still keeps up his end selling Hurley shoes, and also 
inventing shoemaking improvements. He is a ver- 
satile man executive, superintendent, foreman, 
operative, yachtsman, automobilist, farmer and an 
artist on top of all that. Lives in Rockland. Helped 
establish Hurley Shoe Company in 1893. 

W. HARRY DUDLEY 

I wish I could express the love every one that 
knew Harry Dudley had for him, and how they miss 
his happy, genial presence. He came from an old 
shoe family in Newark, N. J. We remember him 
first with Williams & Hoyt. Bert Atherton and 
Harry were making children's shoes for a short time 
in Lynn; then Harry went with J. Phelan & Sons. We 
all know what a responsible position he occupied 
with Thomas G. Plant Company, up to the time of 
his death. It will be a long time before he is for- 
gotten. 

H. E. DECATUR 

Here's an old-time picture of H. E. Decatur, 
one of the real boys of the road, that we delight to 
know and honor. He sells shoes lots of 'em 
for Whitman & Keith. 

179 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

J. B. McKEE 

J. B. sold shoes many years for Thomson-Crooker, 
with whom he was when he died two years ago, 
deeply regretted by many friends. 

XXVI 

H. W. CROOKER 

Harry Crooker began the shoe business as a 
boy with Geo. F. Daniels & Co., and as a young 
man started traveling for the above firm, working 
into an interest in the business. Then opened 
up a specialty business and now as we all know is 
doing a very successful business as The Thomson- 
Crooker Company. Everybody is strong for Harry. 
This picture is an old one, sure enough. 

ALLEN V. HOLBROOK 

Al. began selling for Hosmer Codding, Boston 
jobbers, but he soon graduated from selling shoes for 
$12 a dozen, to $60 a dozen! quite a jump, but he 
got there with Stetson's shoes. He has been in- 
terested in the retail shoe business in Columbus for 
several years. Now he is interested in several spe- 
cialty Stetson stores. Still travels, selling fine shoes 
and is very active in the National Shoe Travelers' 
Association work. 

ISO 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

CHARLES O. QUIMBY 

Charley has sold Bliss & Perry's shoes so long 
in the South and West that there is no need of going 
further back for his history. He is one of the most 
widely-known traveling men in the country. 

J. W. ESTABROOK 

Jim traveled in the Northwest many years ago, 
and if he could talk he would tell you all about it. 
I know many of the old boys and dealers will be 
pleased to see his face again. We don't see much 
of him in late years, for he spends most of his time 
in Worcester at his G. A. R. post, telling how he 
fought, bled (but not died) for his country. He is 
happy in his good old age and we are glad of it. 

W. A. PATTERSON 

Began I believe with Batchelder & Lincoln and 
of late years has traveled for L. B. Evans and has 
made a success. "Pat" is one of the live "young- 
sters." 

WILLIAM DORSCH, JR. 

Every one knows Billy Dorsch of the old firm of 
William Dorsch & Sons, the line made famous by 
the "bull dog" shoe. Billy is now traveling for 
Slater & Morrill and we are always glad to see him. 

181 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

JOHN M. QUIN 

Once upon a time Utica cut a big figure in the 
shoe business. John Quin was with H. J. Holbrook 
& Co., of Utica, from 1884 to 1889. Traveled for 
Daniel Green Felt Shoe Company for the past 
seventeen years. Now on jobbing end. A big- 
hearted, able, fine man. Brother of Frank Quin. 



E. L. DESCHAMPS 

One of Harry Crooker's right bowers. Been on 
the road for thirty-three years. Picture taken 
twenty years ago. We all are glad to count E. L. 
in with the real "boys." 



S. A. McOMBER 

Here's one of the genuinely popular shoe men - 
S. A. M. represents Utz & Dunn in New York. 
Nuf sed. Has helped to put Rochester on the shoe 
map for thirty years. Former treasurer of National 
Shoe Travelers' Association. Needless for us to 
add our mite to the good will that everybody ex- 
presses for this gentleman. 

182 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

XXVII 

B. K. FARNHAM 

I don't know how Ben got in this old class, for 
he is only a kid. It was only yesterday he started 
selling for C. H. Alden; but he has seen considerable 
of this country since, and must be glad to settle 
down in New York with less traveling to do. 
Nephew of Harry Crooker. 

GEORGE H. FERGUSON 

George began his traveling in the West for the 
old firm of Eddy & Webster of Rochester; was sev- 
eral years with Krippendorf-Dittman, and now 
has a New York office for Julian & Kokenge. If 
he was a little younger he might be in the trenches 
with the Canadian troops, but I guess he prefers 
digging potatoes on his farm, near Batavia, N. Y. 

C. A. SHAW 

Here is another former Stetson salesman and 
you will remember him by the name of " Chicken" 
Shaw but he is no chicken now. 

WALTER I. PERRY 

His first road job was with the Newburyport 
Shoe Company; then he helped to found the firm 
of N. D. Dodge & Bliss Company, which was suc- 

133 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

ceeded by Bliss & Perry Company. Walter when 
not selling shoes may be found on his beautiful farm 
raising apples, as his friends know. One of the 
most popular men in the trade. 

JAKE SMITH 

Jake Smith traveled for J. P. Smith & Co. in 
the West and was, and is, a jolly good fellow. I 
don't hear of his traveling now, but he is still on 
earth and glad to see his old friends. 

FRED EARL 

Fred has sold fine shoes in the West so long 
that he can surely be called a fine shoe salesman. 
His big record was made with McDonald & Kiley, and 
Manss-Kiley. 

FRANK HELMERS 

This picture of Frank Helmers was taken about 
twenty years ago. Frank is one of the famous 
Cincinnati shoe men and is head of the Helmers- 
Bettmann Shoe Co., makers of men's shoes. 

JOHN S. SNOW 

John Snow sold Harry Gray's shoes for twenty- 
seven years and was a fixture with that house, and 
one of the ablest and most popular men on the road. 
His death in New York City three years ago brought 
lasting sorrow to us all. 

184 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

CLARK F. BRESEE 

Another man long associated with H. H. Gray's 
Son was Clark F. Bresee, whose death last year 
occasioned widespread regret throughout the whole 
circle of his extensive acquaintance. Popular in the 
best sense and beloved by all, Clark Bresee graced 
the profession of shoe salesmanship. This charac- 
teristic picture shows how he looked many years ago. 

XXVIII 

HENRY M. CURRIER 

I remember him first as with W. E. Putnam & 
Co. of Boston and traveling in the South, where 
he continues selling his own line, and besides he 
is interested in several retail stores. Headquarters, 
Albany Building, Boston. 

C. H. HENDERSON 

Charley traveled so long for Burley & Usher 
and Burley & Stevens that I need only say that 
every one on his territory was glad to see him each 
season that he called on them and sorry to have him 
quit, but he had other plans and now he is taking 
his ease on his Beverly farm. Note the whiskers. 

185 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

B. FRANK HALLETT 

B. F. for many years traveled in the South for 
several Cincinnati factories but of late years he 
changed his territory to the West, making many 
sales and friends. Now we find him back in his 
home city, Boston, traveling for B. E. Cole & Co., 
not looking much older than when this picture was 
taken years ago. 

DAN FULLER 

Our old friends are always remembered, and we 
cannot forget that noble fellow, Dan Fuller, who 
traveled South for Charles H. Alden, until his 
sudden death several years ago. 

WILLIAM JACKSON 

Every one on the coast knew Billy and loved him. 
He had his ups and downs, but made a success of 
every line he represented, from Johnston & Murphy 
to The Carlisle Shoe Company, the line he had when 
he died a short time ago. 

W. J. PARKER 

Like many other salesmen Billy began selling 
for a shoe jobbing house; then with French, Shriner 
& Urner. The young firm of Parker & LeFaver 
was formed but died in its infancy; then he traveled 
for Jerry Menihan. 

186 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

T. A. DELANY 

Tom is some orator, but his speech making is 
mostly confined now in telling the fine points of 
T. D. Barry's shoes. I believe he tried for a short 
season to sell shoes to Indians and Mexicans, but he 
wants to forget it. 

GEORGE RUSSELL AND J. A. LAWRENCE 

This interesting picture of two old pals, 
George Russell and Jim Lawrence, taken in the 
long ago. More detailed mention is made of each 
of these well-known shoe men elsewhere in this book. 

ED. W. HUGHES 

Ed. has been traveling thirty-five years or more 
five years with Hugh McKenzie, of Cincinnati, 
five years with J. W. Brigham & Co., of Boston, 
and twenty-six years with his present house, 
Helmers, Bettmann & Co., of Cincinnati surely 
a long and honorable record. 

XXIX 

WILLIAM L. RATCLIFFE 

As this book is preparing for the press we learn 
with great sadness of the death of Will RatclifTe. 

187 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

A great figure of a man in mind, body, heart and 
soul. A doer of big things, yet not despising the 
lesser things of life. He has written his name large 
in the history of this trade. He was Thomas G. 
Plant's first salesman. He rose from a shoe clerk 
in Elmira, N. Y., to the presidency of the Thomas 
G. Plant Company. Now he rests in peace and 
awaits us for the final home-coming on our brief 
earthly trip. His memory shall endure, green and 
fine. 

W. W. BOHR 

Will Bohr has been selling John Cramer shoes 
for many years and is a big salesman. A brother 
of the late well-known N. C. Bohr. Has the confi- 
dence and esteem of all who know him. 

JOHN S. DAVIES 

John Davies, step forth and receive the laurel 
wreath of honor forty-six years, ninety-two trips 
to the coast for C. P. Ford & Co., of Rochester!! 
A record of great distinction, and we are proud 
with you. May you make one hundred more such 
trips. 

FRED BAKER 

He has been out of shoes for years but will 
be well remembered as with Hanan & Son, 

188 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

traveling from Denver to the coast. He died a 
couple of years ago, but his memory will always be 
with us. 

GEORGE A. MITCHELL 

This is another member of the firm of Laird, 
Schober & Mitchell and in the old days was a strong 
member, for he sold a lot of shoes in the middle West 
and will be well remembered by many. What a 
happy fellow he was. Gone, but held in happy 
memory. 

HERBERT P. GLEASON 

Known to his familiars as "Pop" Gleason, and 
to everybody as the president of Johnston & Mur- 
phy, the famous Newark men's fine shoemakers. 
Has sold J. & M. shoes for a good many years and 
we all expect him to be doing the same thing for 
a half century longer, at least. 

ARTHUR EARL 

Arthur can't quite forget that he was once a 
retail clerk in Springfield, but I remember. Well, 
he has been so long with Laird, Schober & Co. that 
there is no other line in this country to him. May 
he contiuue for many years. 

189 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

JAMES MUSSON 

Jim knew no other line than John Cramer's 
children's shoes and that was his only line for about 
forty years. Every one knows how he was beloved 
by the trade and are sad, thinking of his death only 
last November. His son succeeds him, making the 
third generation to sell John Cramer shoes. 

J. A. C. EMERSON 

Jack was of the trio made up of himself, Hank 
Goller and Frank Land. Was several years with 
John H. Cross. Now we find him selling for Wise 
& Cooper and making a success as usual. Picture 
taken when Jack was some boy. 

XXX 

R. T. ROLLINS 

"Dick" has been so long with Hoag & Walden 
that he believes it is the only line on earth; but this 
season he has got into the five-dollar class. Dick 
is past president of the Southern Shoe Salesmen's 
Association, and every inch a real man. 

J. L. WILLET 

Jack was for years with Utz & Dunn, Rochester, 
placing that line in large and small cities in the mid- 
190 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

die West. He retired some years ago and opened 
a cigar store in his home town of Flint, Mich., where 
he died a few years ago, regretted by all. 

BEN STOUT 

Ben Stout is one of the popular Rochester boys, 
and helped to put the "stir" in Rochester. Ben 
has been on the road for a quarter of a century, and 
can trot a fast heat with any of them. 

G. E. FRAZEE 

Gentlemen, G. E. Frazee of Rochester. We are 
glad to include this sterling salesman with the men 
who have done so much to put Rochester shoes where 
they are. 

G. W. HERR 

This is Herr and it's a "he. " G. W. traveled for 
Williams, Hoyt & Co., for many years, having begun 
forty years ago. Wish we had a better picture of 
brother Herr, but are we glad to have even this. 

J. H. KINNE 

Drop into C. P. Ford 's factory any day between 
seasons and you '11 find one of the best men you ever 
met in your life John Kinne right on the job. 
John has been a fixture with Ford shoes for, lo, these 
many years, and I hope he'll be there very many 
more. 

191 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 
J. E. SCHOFIELD 

Here's another Rochesterite J. E. Schofield. 
He began with Diamond & Disbrow, of Utica. 
Has sold shoes for Williams & Hoyt for twenty-three 
years. On the road forty years all told. Welcome 
to the upper row, J. E. 

A. C. EDSON 

Another Williams, Hoyt & Co., veteran salesman 
A. C. Edson. On road for them twenty-two 
years. Now with Joy, Clark & Nier. Picture 
made in 1903. 

F. H. Foss 

Here is a well-known figure F. H. Foss. F. H. 
thought he'd quit selling men's shoes a year or so ago, 
but the lure of the old game got him and he's now 
with Foss-Packard. He used to be with Kelly- 
Buckley and T. D. Barry. This picture was taken 
twenty-five years ago. 

WALLACE D. BAKER 

W. D. is a brother of J. Ralph and a son of M. F. 
Baker three of a kind. Well-known Preston B. 
Keith salesman. Began selling on the road for 
his father, then at Stoneham, in 1894. Then he 
(W. D.) was but sixteen years old. One of the 
young veterans, you see. 

192 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

XXXI 

F. M. MONTGOMERY 

February 1, 1916, marked the completion of 
thirty-nine years of F. M. Montgomery's service 
with the Selby Shoe Company. Brother Mont- 
gomery, you are hereby awarded the honorary medal 
of Distinguished Service. Picture taken in 1888. 
He began road work for Irving Drew (now Selby) 
in 1877 and F. M. can look back over these thirty- 
nine consecutive years of selling, through discourage- 
ment and hard work and on to success, and now, at 
sixty, is in his very prime. And may he long con- 
tinue so. 

JAMES H. MULLIGAN 

"Jim" Mulligan, one of the popular royal rooters 
for Rochester, has traveled the middle West for 
John Kelly, Inc., thirty-five years. This picture 
shows Jim with a mustache which, I believe, time 
has brushed away. 

J. P. BYRNE 

This young and sprightly soul has also been 
peddling John Kelly shoes for thirty-five years. He 
can tell a story, sing a song, or crack a joke as well 
as he can sell a bill of shoes, which is Al. Popularity 
is J. P.'s middle name. 

193 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

CHARLES J. VEGIARD 

Take a look at this picture of Charlie "Veegyard" 
and tell me, honestly, if you believe he has been 
selling shoes for forty years. Fact. Now with 
Blum Shoe Mfg. Co., and can travel with the best 
of 'em. 

SANDY C. GLOUD 

Thirty-four years constitute Sandy's road ex- 
perience. Was with Utz & Dunn several years. 
Now with Leach Shoe Company. One of Rochester's 
best. 

"Bos" PARSONS 

"Bob" Parsons died two years ago, deeply 
mourned by his many friends in the shoe traveling 
fraternity. Best known through his connection 
with Dugan & Hudson of Rochester. 

C. E. MEADE 

C. E. Meade is now a prominent Rochester 
shoe manufacturer, but forty years ago he sold 
shoes on the road for Williams & Hoyt. 

HENRY McGouGHRAN 

For several centuries Henry has been selling 
D. Armstrong shoes and has certainly sold a raft 
of them. He is one of the big men of the road, and 

194 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

a whole-souled gentleman. One of the reasons for 
Rochester's place in the shoe sun. 

JOHN G. TOWNSEND 

Everybody down South knew John Townsend, 
who traveled that section for Williams & Hoyt of 
Rochester for years. He has joined the "great 
majority'' and leaves a splendid memory. 

XXXII 

ELMER J. BLISS 

When a New York Central passenger train got 
into a wreck some twenty-six or seven years ago, 
and Elmer J. Bliss was dug out of the scrambled 
wreckage of the Smoking car, with his scalp full of 
broken glass, his career as a traveling shoe salesman 
really started right there. For, after he had re- 
covered, he collected some real money from the rail- 
road and engaged in the selling of shoe jobs on the 
road. Then he formed the Regal Shoe Company, 
of which he is president and live-wire general mana- 
ger. 

GEORGE M. RUSSELL 

We are glad to see our old friend George's face 
again, for he has been lost to the shoe trade 
several years, but we remember him with Hazen 

195 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

B. Goodrich, then manager for J. A. Lawrence, jobber, 
in Chicago. He traveled a few years for Val Dut- 
tenhofer & Sons, but is now out of shoes and lives 
in California. 

DAVID S. CHILDS 

Dave traveled for A. E. Nettleton in the South 
for many years, but like many other young men, 
the call of the West got him, and of late years he 
had made many friends from Denver to the coast, 
selling Johnston & Murphy, and now Slater-Morrill 
shoes. Dave lives in Flint, Mich. 

W. F. EBBETT 

"Ted" has not grown any since he went to work 
for Parker, Holmes & Co. as a kid, but he grew in 
experience, so they put him on the road in New Eng- 
land. Then was with Packard & Field until Hazen 
B. Goodrich & Co. discovered him. He remained 
with that firm many years until Cincinnati tempted 
him, but he could not forget New England and 
turned shoes, so Chas. E. Wilson captured him. 
Ted has recently become a partner in the George C. 
How Company, Haverhill, and we wish him all luck. 

H. L. GABELL AND W. F. GABELL 
H. L. Gabell and his brother, W. F. Gabell, are 
members of the firm of Reynolds, Drake & Gabell, 

196 



SKETCHESOF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

and sell their share of the output. We see both of 
the Gabells at 183 Essex Street, almost daily, be- 
tween seasons, and are glad to note the success of 
these veteran shoe salesmen. 

JAMES L. ESTEY 

We cannot call Jim one of the old boys; still 
he has made quite a record with Tuttle & Smith, 
T. D. Barry Co., and is now with N. B. Thayer & Son, 
selling shoes down Texas way. 

JOHN M. FRENCH 

John French is one of the most famous and 
respected traveling shoe salesmen in the country. 
Went with Huiskamp Bros., Keokuk, in 1872, and 
traveled until 1905, when he retired. This picture 
is an old one, sure enough. He was Member No. 1 
of the I. S. T. M. A., which now has 50,000 members. 
Mr. French is enjoying a retired life at his home in 
Keokuk. 

R. W. FlTZPATRICK 

"Bob" used to be a good salesman to the retail 
trade years ago, when he looked like this picture, 
but he graduated to wholesale and now knows no 
other line but Jonathan Brown. We all know he 
surely sells some children's shoes. 

197 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

H. A. ANDERSON 

Here we have another "Andy" for "Herm" 
and "Wills" Anderson; both sold men's shoes in 
the good old days. Now we have Herm selling for 
Thomson-Crooker Company in all the large cities 
on the coast. We know he is happy, for he is making 
a big success. 

XXXIII 

J. WARREN MURRAY 

Warren Murray is well known as the head of 
the Murray Shoe Company for twenty years. Now 
with Val Duttenhofer. Warren sold a great many 
fine shoes during his time. A square man whom 
we all wish well. 

W. S. ROGERS 

As these lines are penned, I learn of the death of 
W. S. Rogers, who had represented Utz & Dunn for 
a good many years, and was one of the highly re- 
garded older salesmen going out of Rochester. Thus 
Time takes his steady toll. 

LEE F. GOODMAN 

Lee sells rafts of "Just Wright" shoes on the 
coast and is one of the justly popular shoe salesmen 
in that genial territory. Lee is young in years, 
comparatively, but old in experience and long in 
ability. 

198 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

E. F. RICE 

This photo was taken about thirty years ago, 
and time certainly flies. E. F. went with Utz & 
Dunn shortly after this photo was added to the 
archives of shoe trade portraits, so he must rank as 
a genuine Utz & Dunn veteran, having been with 
them ever since. He lives in Denver. 



ED. A. TOBEY 

Who would ever believe this flossy picture to 
be our old side-kick Pittsburg Ed. Tobey? None 
other, just the same. Who would ever believe Ed. 
traveled? But as he claims he did, we are glad to 
embalm his phiz in this galaxy of greatness. Ed. is 
now the famous buyer for Kauffman-Baer, Pittsburg. 

JOHN F. WHEELER 

This picture of J. F. was taken in 1890. He has 
been on the road for forty-one years, having seen 
road service with such houses as P. Ware & Co., 
Lilly, Young, Pratt & Brackett, Boston & Sandwich 
Shoe Company, Emerson Shoe Company, T. D. 
Barry Company. He now represents the Boston 
office of several factories. 



199 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

J. A. RICHARDSON 

Every one knows "Dick" Richardson, but don't 
know where he got the name of Dick. The shoe 
history of Dick is just Commonwealth Shoe Company, 
and if they went out of business, he would quit, too. 
Well, you will have to step lively to get ahead of 
J. A. R. Headquarters in Fifth Avenue Building, 
New York City. 

A. F. SlMONDS 

He will be remembered as traveling for Woodman 
& Howe of Haverhill, and he could sure sell the 
German trade, for he spoke German like a native. 
Perhaps in these days he might be taken for a Ger- 
man spy, but he is now too busy selling for Lewis 
A. Crossett in "York State." 

CHARLES S. MURRAY 

Charlie Murray, the sweet singer of the salesmen, 
has gray hair, but is, nevertheless, the youngest of 
the three Murrays. Just gets into the twenty-year 
class. Sold Murray shoes down South for years. 
Now with Hanan. 

XXXIV 

FRANK J. BRADLEY 

I cannot realize that Frank Bradley was once 
a traveling man; still he was, and with Hazen B. 

200 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

Goodrich with whom he has been an active partner 
and head of the business for years, and one of the 
most highly esteemed manufacturers in the country. 
Picture taken many years ago. 



ED. DONALDSON 

Ed has been out of the travelman class for so 
many years that he almost forgets those old days 
when he traveled for W. E. Smertz, Pittsburg, 
and then for Williams & Hoyt; but he left us cold, 
and went on the other side as buyer of shoes. He 
held many big positions as buyer of shoe departments 
in Pittsburg, Brooklyn, New York, Rochester, 
Newark and Toledo; but now he has settled in Bos- 
ton as manager and buyer of one of the large jobbing 
houses here. 

WILLIAM GILLESPIE 

Sometime called Bill and there is a reason, for 
he has his original way of selling shoes, and he gets 
there as he has shown in selling for Wallace Elliott, 
Charley Case, Forbush & Brown and at present 
with Alden, Walker & Wilde. All are glad to see 
him when he arrives in town and if you can get him 
to talk you are liable to learn something. 

201 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

A. F. JONES 

"Jack" Jones, that's all for what can we say 
more than he has been so long with T. D. Barry 
that he knows no other line and all buyers and 
salesmen know Jack and his line. 

JOHN E. LANGLEY 

Honest John did not begin the shoe business as 
a traveling shoe salesman, for he was for some years 
a manufacturer of children's shoes in Detroit! It 
was at the same time Governor Pingree was in the 
shoe business. Field-Thayer, P. N. Wadleigh and 
Hervey E. Guptill kept John busy for years, but 
now we find him jobbing shoes for himself in De- 
troit and making a success of it. 

WILL WEBSTER 

Will Webster was well known as being of the 
firm of Eddy & Webster, but of late years with 
Krippendorf & Dittman, traveling out West. I 
hear that he has now retired and having a well- 
earned rest. 

A. C. CARPENTER 

Al succeeded the late Dan Fuller in the South 
for C. H. Alden, and has made a fine success. He 
hails from down Florida way and is fond of spinning 

202 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

yarns that could only get by as originating in Florida. 
Al is popular with all the boys. You can find him 
at the Alden Boston office, 105 Summer Street, any 
time between seasons. His real name is Alfred. 

W. L. HAYNES 

Will Haynes has traversed Southern territory 
twenty-five years and is well known as Parker- 
Holmes 7 representative, and a man whom we are 
glad to include in our series of sketches of veteran 
shoe salesmen. 

W. H. SHELBY 

It is a pleasure to have this picture of W. H. 
Shelby in our collection. Mr. Shelby represents 
Sutherland-Pedigo-Farwell Shoe Company, of St. 
Louis, in the Southwest. Has been on the road 
thirty-six years, starting with Claflin Allen Shoe Com- 
pany in 1881. Has also been with Shafer-Swarts 
& Co. and Hamilton-Brown. Was vice-president 
of Friedman-Shelby Shoe Company, up to five 
years ago. Lives in Roswell, N. M. 

XXXV 

J. E. STEVENS 

I believe Jack was the first to make a success 
of a Cincinnati line in New York City, for he 

203 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

surely did sell a lot of Krippendorf & Dittman's 
shoes in that city. Previous to that he had made a 
success with Wright & Peters line. His death in 
New York several years ago was mourned by all 
his many friends. 

ALBERT A. MEAD 

We hardly think of Albert as an old timer but 
he has made a record for a few years and has helped 
to make Upham Bros. Company, of which concern 
he is now president. 

HORACE W. MURRAY 

Horace is, of course, known as of Murray Shoe 
Company, and you may be sure he made that line 
known in the West. Since the firm gave up business 
we find him manufacturing shoes in Haverhill. 



L. H. DOWNS 

Lurad Downs is now the "high gun" at the 
Charles K. Fox factory, but has done his share as a 
road salesman. We see him in Boston frequently 
and are glad to know of his fine success. 

204 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

THOMAS F. BYRNES 

Thomas F. Byrnes, as everybody knows, travels 
for the Thomas G. Plant Company, and, moreover, 
has five sons who do likewise, this being a record in 
itself. Picture taken twenty years ago and cer- 
tainly T. F. has changed in looks, but he's the same 
popular "boy" he always has been. A real veteran. 

C. L. ANDERSON 

Charley only knows how long he has sold Whit- 
man & Keith's shoes in New England, and he won't 
tell. This picture shows what a fine looking young 
man he is. Sorry we haven't a boyhood picture 
of him. 

CAL HERSOME 

Cal Hersome did not travel long selling shoes 
for Emerson & Sons of Wakefield, but he made his 
name celebrated by the patented Hersome Gaiter, 
which was a decided departure from the regular 
shoe style of those days. There was quite a sale 
for this shoe. Mr. Hersome has been out of shoes 
for some time and is enjoying life on a farm. The 
family, however, is still represented in shoes, for 
his son Jack sells for Kelly-Buckley and is a good 
salesman, but I don't think he can talk as fast and 
long as his dad. 

205 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

W. H. WARE 

Here is a long-ago picture of W. H. Ware that 
his many friends will appreciate. He sure was some 
spruce those days and incidentally knew how to 
land the good orders. 

BARTLETT SEARS 

Bartlett Sears is one of the veteran Boston sales- 
men. Began with Henry Damon, the original 
C. O. D. man, and after service with various houses 
(including six years with the Erie R. R,) he landed 
with the Worcester Slipper Company, jobbing trade, 
with whom he has been for twenty years. The 
whiskers have disappeared. 

XXXVI 

T. J. YATES 

Tom should be ashamed of himself for not 
having a better picture of his handsome self. Twenty- 
three years for T. J. on the road. Excelsior first, 
then Podan Bros., and Lewis A. Crossett, and for 
the past sixteen years he has been with Thomas G. 
Plant Company in the Southwest. Tom is a great 
boy and is from Philadelphia and doesn't care 
who knows it. 

206 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

J. F. HENRY 

Jack Henry tries to tell us that he hasn't been 
selling shoes for twenty years, but Bob Roberts 
says he sold Mrs. Methuselah her first pair of boots, 
so here goes. This snapshot shows Jack in a rem- 
iniscent mood, shortly after returning from Ireland 
where he kissed the Blarney Stone twice. We all 
know he's with Maetrich-Eyre. Past president 
New York Shoe Salesmen's Association. "Same's 
B4," Jack. 

R. L. WALL 

Here's R. L. Wall, one of the big men on the 
Pacific coast where he sells a carload or so of 
Sherwood shoes every season. Started in the 
shoe business in Memphis, with Brown Shoe Com- 
pany, 1893. Then with J. W. Jenkins Company 
(now the Sherwood Shoe Company), on the Coast 
where he has been ever since. 



HARRY B. SCHWEITZER 

This is a little twenty-year old picture of Harry 
Schweitzer, but we all know him for a big-hearted 
fellow. Harry was then traveling for Schwab Bros. 
He has been with T. D. Barry for many years. 
Lives in Chicago. 

207 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

MAURICE KORNSAND 

This picture of Maurice Kornsand was taken 
thirty-four years ago, when he was seventeen. He 
has been on the road for thirty-three years. For 
several years he was with Whitman & Keith, in 
charge of the New York office and territory and has 
been with T. D. Barry for several years in the same 
location. Maurice is one of the most successful 
salesmen in the New York territory. 

HERMAN SCHOCKE 

Traveled for years for Charles W. Strohbeck and 
now with Wichert & Gardiner. I guess about 
every city in the South has welcomed jolly, good- 
natured Herman and he surely has sold some shoes. 

J. T. FlTZPATRICK 

John has traveled so long in New England and 
New York State for French, Shriner & Urner and 
J. E. French that if he should go west of Buffalo 
he would think he was out of the United States. 
He manages to sell rafts of the Knox shoes. Lives 
in S tough ton. 

HARRY GOLLER 

Here is a playful picture of Harry Goller taken with 
his friend Fred Wesner, the well-known buyer for the 
Powers Mercantile Company of Minneapolis. Harry 
is a brother of "Hank" and C. F. Goller and is with 
Allen-Foster-Willet. Traveled twenty-two years. 

208 



SKETCHES OF TRAVELING SALESMEN 

WALTER SCOTT 

Traveled a good many years selling misses' 
and children's shoes with Allen & Company, Phila- 
delphia. He is interested in the business, and we 
all know that Walter has sold a great many shoes. 

RALPH SAXE 

When Ralph passed away a few years ago, we all 
mourned the loss of a good friend and fellow trav- 
eler. He traveled South for several years and was 
one of the original members of the Southern Shoe 
Salesmen's Association. In this old tintype picture 
are also Fred Church, Clendennin, Jr., and Billy 
Martin. 




209 



INDEX 

TO PORTRAITS AND SKETCHES 

The roman numerals after each name indicate the plate on which the portrait 
appears; the plain figures denote the page where the sketch appears. 



HARRY L. ADAMS, X, 
GEORGE AHERNS, VIII, 
WALTER S. ALDRIDGE, I, 
C. L. ANDERSON, XXXV, 
H. A. ANDERSON, XXXII, 
WILSON H. ANDERSON, XXIII, 
FRANK ARMITAGE, IV, 
A. H. ATHERTON, 



WINFIELD S. BACON, XII, 
GEORGE A. BACKUS, VII, 
AMOS F. BAILEY, XXI, 
C. E. BAIRD, XI, 
FRED BAKER, XXIX, 
J. RALPH BAKER, XIII, 
WALLACE D. BAKER, XXX, 
EUGENE BALDWIN, III, 
W. H. BALKAM, XIX, 
FRANK M. BARKER, XIII, 
HARRIS M. BARNES, VI, 
C. R. BEACH, XI, 
J. J. BEAHR, XVI, 
J. P. BEATTY, 

ARTHUR I. BENEDICT, XVIII, 
CLARE A. BENEDICT, II, 
F. D. BLAKE, 
ELMER J. BLISS, XXXII, 
W. W. BOHR, XXIX, 
FRANK J. BRADLEY, XXXIV, 
F. H. BRADSTREET, V, 
CHARLES BRANDMAN, XVII, 
CLARK F. BRESEE, XXVII, 
WILLIAM G. BRIDGED, XVIII, 
FRED C. BRIEL, XV, 
ARTHUR L. BROOKS, XIII, 
CHARLES J. BROOKS, XXIV, 



PAGE 
119 
114 

65 
205 
198 
168 

86 
169 

136 

93 
163 
133 
188 
138 
192 

81 
159 
139 

91 
132 
148 
169 
154 

68 
169 
195 
188 
200 

88 
151 
185 
152 
144 
137 
176 



CAPEN BROWN, XIV, 

J. P. BURNS, XV, 

TILL BUSH, VI, 

J. P. BYRNE, XXXI, 

THOMAS F. BYRNES, XXXV, 



PAGE 
142 
145 
92 
193 
205 



W. H. CANNON, VI, 92 

ALFRED C. CARPENTER, XXXIV, 202 
A. M. CENTER. XI, 130 

T. H. CHAMBERLIN, XXV, 178 

A. L. CHASE, XVII, 150 

GEORGE T. CHASE, XII, 135 

DAVID S. CHILDS, XXXII, 196 

FRED C. CHURCH, XVIII, XXXVI, 153 
BERNARD H. COGAN, XVI, 146 

FRANK M. COLBURN, III, 84, 169 
J. HARRY COLBURN, VII, 
E. M. COLLINS, V, 
GEORGE W. COOK, VIII, 
SAMUEL COOK, XX, 

D. M. CORBIN, XIX, 
JIM Cox, X, 

W. E. CRANDALL, VI, 
WILLIAM CRAWFORD, VI, 
J. FRANK CREHAN, XIX, 
J. J. CROMWELL, VIII, 
HARRY W. CROCKER, XXVI, 
L. B. CUBBISON, XII, 
HENRY M. CURRIER, XXVIII, 
JOHN CURRY, III, 

E. H. GUSHING, XX, 



95 

89 

96 

161 

156 

129 

92 

93 

156 

96 

180 

136 

185 

84 

160 



E. M. DANIELS, XII, 134 

JOHN S. DAVIES, XXIX, 188 

C. E. DAVIS, XVI, 147 

JOHN DAVY, XV. 143 



211 



INDEX 



W. HENRY DEAN, XXV, 
H. E. DECATUR, XXV, 
THOMAS A. DELANY, XXVIII, 

E. L. DESCHAMPS, XXVI, 

F. T. DEXTER, XIII, 
HUGH M. DEYO, XI, 
F. J. DOAN, IX, 

H. D. DODGE, XIII, 

EDW. DONALDSON, XXXIV, 

WILLIAM DORSCH, JR., XXVI, 

LURAD H. DOWNS, XXXV, 

A. W. DUBOIS, VI, 

W. HARRY DUDLEY, XXV, 

WILLIAM H. DUNN, XVIII, 

GEORGE S. DWINNELL, V, 

HARRY P. DYER, XV, 



ARTHUR EARL, XXIX, 
FRED EARL, XXVII, 
W. F. EBBETT, XXXII, 
A. C. EDSON, XXX, 
FRED S. ELWELL, XX, 
J. A. C. EMERSON, XXIX, 
J. W. ESTABROOK, XXVI, 
C. A. ESTES, XVIII, 
JAMES L. ESTEY, XXXII, 
E. E. EVARTS, 



BENJAMIN K. FARNHAM, XXVII, 183 

GEORGE H. FERGUSON, XXVII, 183 

F. GARRETT FISHER, XVIII, 155 

OLIVER M. FISHER, IX, 115 

J. T. FITZPATRICK, XXXVI, 208 

R. W. FITZPATRICK, XXXII, 197 

W.S.FLETCHER, 172 

JOHN F. FLINT, XVII, 151 

F. H. Foss, XXX, 192 
CHARLES H. FOSTER, XXIV, 177 
W. P. FRANCIS, XX, 160 

G. E. FRAZEE, XXX, 191 
JOHN M. FRENCH, XXXII, 172, 197 
M. D. FULLER, XXVIII, 186 



H. L. GABELL, XXXII, 
W. F. GABELL, XXXII, 



PAGE PAGE 

178 A. M. GAINES, XIX, 157 

179 G. TOWNES GAINES, XIX, 157 
187 A. W. GAGE, II, XXV, 62, 67, 178 
182 HUBERT H. GARDINER, X, 120 
139 HENRY S. GARFIELD, XXII, 165 
131 W. E. Gerrish, XI, 130 
118 WILLIAM GILLESPIE, XXXIV, 201 
138 H. P. GLEASON, XXIX, 189 
201 E. E. GLOMSTED, XIII, 139 
181 S. C. GLOUD, XXXI, 194 
204 HANK GOLLER, XXXVI, 174 

91 H. H. GOLLER, XXIII, 208 

179 DAVID R. GOODIN, XII, 136 

153 LEE F. GOODMAN, XXXIII, 198 

88 AL GOULD, VII, 93 

143 HARRY H. GRAY, X, 119 

J. RUSH GREEN, XII, 134 

189 A. L. GREENWOOD, XII, 135 
184 GEORGE GREGORY, XVII, 149 

196 WALLAC , T. GROW, IX, 115 
192 

159 GEORGE L. HALE, I, 65 

190 B. FRANK HALLETT, XXVIII, 186 
181 HARRY M. HAMILTON, XVII, 150 
153 JOHN H. HANAN, VIII, 96 

197 T. D. HARLOW, IV, 85 
169 H. A. HARRINGTON, XXI, 165 

R. E. HARRISON, VI, 91 

WALTER HART, IV, 84 

WILLIAM L. HAYNES, XXXIV, 203 

FRANK HELMERS, XXVII, 184 

C. H. HENDERSON, XXVIII, 185 

J. F. HENRY, XXXVI, 207 

GEORGE W. HERR, XXX, 191 

CAL HERSOME, XXXV, 205 

HERB. HILL, II, 68 

WICKLIFFE A. HILL, VI, 90 

GEORGE T. HIPPLE, XXIV, 176 

TIMOTHY HOGAN, V, 87 

A. V. HOLBROOK, XXVI, 180 

BRYANT T. HUDSON, XX, 159 

ED. W. HUGHES, XXVIII, 187 

H. W. HUISKAMP, 172 

196 J. C. HUNT, III, 83 

196 JOHN H. HUNT, XXII. 166 



212 



INDEX 



PAGE 

W. H. HUNTING-TON, XVII, 150 

AL. KURD, III, 83 

WILLIAM M. HURLEY, XXV, 179 

E. M. HUTCHINSON, I, 65 



:. A. INGALLS, XXIV, 



177 



WILLIAM JACKSON, XXVIII, 186 

OSCAR JACOBI, XVIII, 152 

WILLARD H. JAMES, XX, 161 

W. H. H. JAMES, XVII, 149 

ARTHUR H. JENKINS, XV, 144 

THOMAS E. C. JOHNSON, XIV, 142 

TONY E. JOHNSON, XXIII, 173 

A. F. (Jack) JONES, XXXIV, 202 

W. H. JUDSON, 172 

J. J. KALTENBRUN, XIV, 141 
F. C. KELLOGG, IX, XXV, 116, 178 

E. A. KENDALL, XXIV, 175 
W. I. KENDALL, XIII, 137 
PHILIP B. KERRIGAN, XVI, 146 
HARRY KIDD, XXII, 166 
WILLIAM M. KILEY, II, 66 
JOSEPH C. KIMBALL, XXIII, 173 
JOHN H. KINNE, XXX, 191 
D. E. KITTREDGE, XIX, 158 
J. F. KNOWLES, XXI, 162 
MAURICE KORNSAND, XXXVI, 208 

JOHN L. LAIRD, XIX, 157 

F. H. LAND, XXIII, 168 
GEORGE LANE, III, 82 
J. E. LANGLEY, XXXIV, 202 
HERBERT N. LAPE, XIX, 158 
J. A. LAWRENCE, II, XXVIII, 67, 187 
HENRY A. LOOMIS, II, 68 
GEORGE J. LOVELEY, XV, 145 
CHARLES F. LUSCH, V, 88 

JOHNG. LUSCH, VIII, 114 

HARRY P. LYNCH, XIII, 137 

HECTOR E. LYNCH, XXII, 165 



A. S. MACFARLANE, 169 

E. H. MATHEWSON, XXI, 162 



PAGE 

H. A. MATHEWSON, XXI, 162 

A. E. MATLESS, 172 

ED. MAURER, XXIII, 174 

JAMES H. MAYBURY, VII, 94 

C. A. MCCARTHY, XI, 132 

ORAN McCoRMicK, XXIII, 173 

J. B. McCuNE, IX, 117 

CHRIS. McDERMorr, IV, 85 

JOHN MCELANEY, XXII, 166 

PETER McGEOUGH, XVI, 148 

HENRY McGouGHRAN, XXXI, 194 

J. B. McKEE, XXV, 180 

C. A. MCLEAN, XXI, 164 

W. MCMULLEN, XXI, 164 

S. A. MCOMBER, XXVI, 182 
CHARLES R. McWiLLiAMS, XXIV, 175 

ALBERT A. MEAD, XXXV, 204 

HAMILTON MEAD, III, 84 

C. E. MEADE, XXXI, 194 

E. W. MEARS, III, 82 
RALPH MEARS, III, 82 
JOHN M MEGGETT, XVIII, 153 
THOMAS T. MERRILL, VI, 92 
T. FRANK METCALFE, X, 130 
GEORGE A. MITCHELL, XXIX, 189 

F. M. MONTGOMERY, XXXI, 193 
S. PRESTON MOSES, V, 89 
MATT MULLEN, II, 81 
JAMES H. MULLIGAN, XXXI, 193 

M. J. MULRYAN, 172 

D. B. MUNROE, V, 87 
CHARLES S. MURRAY, XXXIII, 200 
HORACE W. MURRAY, XXXV, 204 
J. WARREN MURRAY, XXXIII, 198 
JAMES MUSSON, XXIX, 190 



CHARLES W. NEWHALL, I, 
WILLIAM NOLL, III, 
JOHN C. NUGENT, VII, 
W. F. NYE, XVI, 



C. F. OAKLEY, VII, 
W. M. OAKMAN, IV, 

J. E. O'BRIEN, XXI, 



64 

83 

95 

148 

93 

86 

163 



213 



INDEX 



PAGE 

B. F. PAGE, IX, 117 
JOEL C. PAGE, I, 63 
WILLIAM J. PARKER, XXVIII, 186 
ROBERT PARSONS, XXXI, 194 
W. A. PATTERSON, XXVI, 181 
WALTER I. PERRY, XXVII, 183 

C. I. PETHERBRIDGE, V, 90 
C. S. PIERCE, XIX, 158 
E. J. PIERCE, IX, 118 
WARREN C. PIERCE, XV, 144 
HOWARD PLATTS, XVII, 149 
R. J. PRINCE, I, 64 
S. M. PRITCHETT, XX, 161 
H. M. PULKER, VIII, 113 
L.T. PYLES, 172 

CHARLES O. QUIMBY, XXVI, 181 

FRANK QUIN, VIII, 113 

JOHN M. QUIN, XXVI, 182 

A. ERWIN RANKIN, VII, 94 
WILLIAM L. RATCLIFFE, XXIX, 187 

L. R. RECORD, XIV, 141 

THOMAS REDDIE, 172 

N. REDPATH, IV, 87 

MARC W. REED, XXI, 163 

E. F. RICE, XXXIII, 199 

J. A. RICHARDSON, XXXIII, 200 

HARRY H. RIPLEY, V, 89, 172 

E. L. RITSON, XXIV, 175 

P. A. RITTER, XXI, 164 

C. C. ROBINSON, X, 129 

W. S. ROGERS, XXXIII, 198 

R. T. ROLLINS, XXX, 190 
GEORGE M. RUSSELL, XXVIII, 

XXXII, 187, 195 

JOHN L. SAGE, VII, 95 

A. W. SARGENT, I, III, 63, 83 

E. F. SAWYER, XIII, 137 

R. J. SAXE, XXXVI, 209 

HERMAN SCHOCKE, XXXVI, 208 

J. E. SCHOFIELD, XXX, 192 
HARRY B. SCHWEITZER, XXXVI, 207 

WALTER SCOTT, XXXVI, 209 



BARTLETT SEARS, XXXV, 
C. A. SHAW, XXVII, 
SAMUEL SHAW, XXII, 
W. H. SHELBY, XXXIV, 
JAMES D. SHERIDAN, IX, 
ED. T. SHIPP, XVI, 
CHARLES J. SHRINER, XXII, 

A. F. SIMONDS, XXXIII, 
E. W. SKINNER, XXII, 

C. B. SLATER, II, 
T. S. SLACK, I, 

E. B. SLOCUM, XIV, 
CHARLES H. SMITH, XX, 

F. L. SMITH, XXV, 
JAKE SMITH, XXVII, 
J. P. SMITH, X, 
CHARLES F. SNOW, IV, 
JOHN S. SNOW, XXVII, 
HERBERT SOMERS, VIII, 
J. S. SPAULDING, XX, 
ROBERT SPRUNT, JR., IV, 

B. A. ST. JOHN, XVI, 
WILLIAM J. ST. Louis, XII, 
WILLIAM H. STACY, X, 
FRED W. STANTON, VII, 
GEORGE L. STARKS, XII, 
ED. STEBBINS, IV, 

EZRA H. STETSON, XI, 
J. E. STEVEN*, XXXV, 
NATT F. STEVENS, VIII, 
CHARLES F. STORY, XXII, 
BEN STOUT, XXX, 
GEORGE STRONG, XIX, 
ROBERT L. SUMMERS, XV, 

E. A. TERHUNE, XVIII, 
E. A. TOBEY, XXXIII, 

D. J. TOBIN, XXIII, 
FRED S. TODD, XXIV, 
JOHN G. TOWNSEND, XXXI, 
J. S. TREADWELL, XIV, 



F. J. VAN SICKLE, XIV, 
CHARLES J. VEGIARD, XXXI, 



PAGE 
206 
183 
167 
203 
116 
146 
166 
200 
167 

66 

64 
140 
160 
178 
184 
120 

87 
184 
114 
161 

86 
148 
135 
118 

94 
134 

85 
131 
203 
113 
167 
191 
155 
143 

154 
199 
174 
176 
195 
139 

142 

194 



214 



CLARENCE P. WAIDE, X, 

A. C. WALKER, IX, 
R. L. WALL, XXXVI, 
JAMES A. WALLACE, II, 
JOHN J. WALSH, XVIII, 
W. H. WARE, XXXV, 

J. A. WARRENDER, XVII, 
WILL WEBSTER, XXXIV, 
FRED J. WELDEN, 
BERTON O. WETMORE, XVI, 

B. F. WETHERBY, XI, 



INDEX 

PAGE PAGE 

119 J. F. WHEELER, XXXIII, 199 

117 GEORGE H. WHITE, XIV, 140 

207 GEORGE H. WILKINS, XIII, 138 

81 J. L. WILLETT, XXX, 190 

155 C. A. WILLETTS, XXIII, 168 

206 DAVID WILLIAMS, I, 66 

151 E. S. WlLLMARTH, XI, 131 

202 E. T. WRIGHT, XXIV, 177 

172 

147 THOMAS J. YATES, XXXVI, 206 

132 W. T. YORK, XIV, 141 



215 




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