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Full text of "The Record almanac for the year .."

GOODS 

Shipped 

to all 

Parts of the 

World 



FINLEY ACKER & CO. 

MANUFACTURERS - IMPORTERS - RETAILERS 

121, 123, 125 N. 8th St. and Market St. below 12th 

PHILADELPHIA 





MiuifUiiru Sair.ple. "hER DEBUT." See Opposite Page (CT 

"J/Z CELEBRATED PAINTINGS ^:rfyt:"'T^:iS^^'^ 

^^ been made from 300 BEAUTIFUL SUBJECTS. They are suitable for Drawing- dj f 
room, Library and Bedroom. We will mail the 25, ready for framing, on receipt of *P * 
In stamps or money order. ^p^g gg^j^ ENGRAVING COMPANY, 

Ai)DKi:ss Art ISukeau. 147-49-51 North TENTH Street, PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



R. HOE & CO. 

Manufacture and Supply 

Pi^ifiting Pi^esses 

To Meet Almost Every Conceivable Requirement, 

ALSO 
PRINTERS' 
LITHOGRAPHERS' 
STEREOTYPERS' 
ELECTROTYPERS' and 
PHOTaENGRAVERS' 

Machinery and Materials 

^ '" IN GREAT VARIETY 

AS WELL AS 

CIRCULAR SAWS AND LETTER COPYING PRESSES AND STANDS 

504 to 520 Grand Street, New York, U. S. A. 




ALso, 1 92 Devonshire Street, 
BOSTON, MASS. 



258 Dearborn Street, 
CHICAGO, ILL, 



Mansfield St., Borough Road, 
LONPON, ENG. 



tio 



BECK 

ENGRAVINa COMPANY 



147 149 151 Ntn. iOtn.Si, 

Philadelphia 

jKa/Ceiy gf/j/ie fhOraV/n^sydr a// 
C/asses of /^uA/icat/ons 

PROMPT 5ERVICE 



T/iree Co/orWorA- 
Zmc£tc/i/ng & 
/)es/0n/n0 . . . . 



" Send^5^m Stamps 

Jvr our catalogue 

q/5oosu^ectsm 

/^a/f'tone &j^n€'FtcAm0 



J. I. LENHART, 



TelepHone 12-34 



PAPER 
STOCK 



215 ^ 217 N. Front St. 

PKiladelpHia 



UNIVERSITY 

OF PITTSBURGH 

LIBRARIES 




,,t^^u*: 



Darlingt| 
AY67 
P5P54 
1901 




See Opposite Page Cj" 

produced on heavy plate paper, 
; 9 >' 12. This selection has 
re suitable for Drawing- d? 4 
■>T framing, on receipt of 4* ' 

:OMPANY, 

eet, PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



o. 



Manufacture and Supply 



Pi^inting Pi^esses 

To Meet Almost Every Conceivable Requirement, 

ALSO 

PRINTERS' 
LITHOGRAPHERS' 
STEREOTYPERS' 
ELECTROTYPERS' and 
PHOTO-ENGRAVERS' 

Machinery and Materials 

IN GREAT VARIETY 
AS WELL AS 

CIRCULAR SAWS AND LETTER COPYING PRESSES AND STANDS 

504 to 520 Grand Street, New York, U, S. A. 




Also, J 92 Devonshire Street, 
BOSTON, MASS, 



258 Dearborn Street, 
CHICAGO, ILL, 



Mansfield St., Borough Road, 
LONPON, ENG, 



"\io 



BECK 

ENGRAVING COMPANY 



147 149 151 Ntn. lOtn.vSt. 

Philadelphia 

JCa/Cers e^/vne fiiOraV/n^sydjr a// 
C/asses of /^iiA/icat/ons 

PROMPT SERVICE 



T/iree Co/or WorA- 
Zmc £tc/i/ng & 
Des/0n/n0 • . . . 



■" Send ^5 ^m Stamps 

Jvr our catalogue 

q/Joosi/3/ectsm 

/^al/^'tone &j^eFtcAm0 



J. I. lenhart. 



TelepKone 12-34 



PAPER 
STOCK 



215 ^ 217 N. Front St 

PHiladelpKia 



GREEN'S Hotel 



EUROPEAN PLAN 



For . . . 



Gentlemen 



Special attention 

given to 
THeatre 

Parties 

in Restaurant 



255 Rooms 

FROM 

$1.00 to $1.50 

PER DAY. 




This hotel is 
Centrally 
L>ocate<l 

in the very heart 
of the business 
district of the 
city. Thorough- 
ly first-class in 
all its appoint- 
ments, and one 
of the best 
known in the 
United States. 
One square from 
Post OflBce, and 
convenient to all 
Theatres and 
Railroad Sta- 
tions. 



GREEN'S HOTEL, 



MaHlon \V. Newton. 
Proprietor. 



EigHtK and CHestnut Sts. 



SOARS ABOVE ALL OTHERS 



7^ 







|HE sympathetic and powerful tone of THE MATCHLESS CUNNINGHAM PIANO 
reaches the highest point of perfection, and soars above all others. 

As manufacturers in Philadelphia, we can sell you one of these beautiful instru- 
ments at a price even less than is usually asked for cheap grade Pianos made outside of our 
city. With us you save the jobbers', dealers' and agents' profits, also freight and expenses. 
Our terms are cash, if you can spare it; time, if you want it. 

THE CUNNINGHAM PIANO COMPANY, 
1105 Chestnut Street, PHILADELPHIA. 



PVtflttfl^ IN ALL ITS BRANCHES 



MODE RN PLANT 

Type- Setting Machines, Perfecting 
Presses, Book-Folding Machines 



DUNLAP 

PRINTI NG 
COMPANY 

1 18-126 North Juniper Street 
I J J 2 - 1336 Cherry Street 

PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 

Machine Composition for the Trade 

Blank Book Makers 



The American Fire 
Insurance Company 

OFFICE, COMPANY'S BUII^DING, 

308 and 310 Walnut Street, Philadelphia. 




CHARTER PERPETXTAI^. 



Cash Capital - - - $500,000.00 



THOMAS H. MONTGOMERY, President. 

RICHARD MARIS, Sec'y and Treas. 

\YU. F. WILLIAMS, Asst. Sec'y. 

W^I. B. KELLY, General Mgr. 



DIRECTORS : 

Thomas H. Montgomery. Charles S. Whelen. 

Israel Morris. Edward F. Beale. 

Pemberton S. Hntchinson. John S. Gerhard. 

Joseph B. Gillingham. Edward Lowber Welsh. 

Archibald R. Montgomery. 



The 



PKiladelpKia 
Record 

Almanac, 1901 



T Jlries—HEAD AND t/\-^T 



U Gemini 

THE ARMS 



i'lLeo 

THE HEART 



^ Libra 

THE REINS 



I Sagittarius 

THE THIGHS 



~ Aquarius 

THE LEGS 




Taurus 

THE NECK 



Cancer 

THE BREAST 



np Virgo 

THE BOWELS 



ni Scorpio 

THE SECRETS 



l/> Capricornus 
THE KNEES 



H Pisces-THE FEET 



Published 
^ by ^?' 



TKe Record FxiblisKing Co. 
Nos. 917 (SL 919 Chestniat Street 



The PKiladelpHia Record 

JiVEKJiGE ClRCVLJtriON FOR THE YEMR 1900 

DAILY OVER 190.000 

SUNDAY OVER 100,000 

The Cheapest Advertising Medium in the United States 



ADVERTISING RATE-S 



Daily— General Advertising 
Sunday— General Advertising 



25c. per line Business Mention (Agate) ... 30c. per I'ne 
20c. per line Reading Notices (Agate), $1.00 per counted iine 



DISPLAY CLASSIFICATIONS 

Amusements (no discount) . . . . 25c. per line Turf (no discount) 25c. per line 

Financial 25c. per line Horses and Carriages (no disc.) . 12^.c. per line 

Publications (no discount) .... 15c. per line Medical 4dc. per line 

No extra charge for the use of cuts, borders, breaking eolumii rules, or display type. 
Length of " Record " columns, 330 lines ; width, 28;4 agate ems ; full page, 2640 lines. 

YEARLY DISCOUNTS 



Daily 

2^> per cent, on 26 insertions 
5 " per cent, on 52 insertions 
6*4 per cent, on 78 insertions 

7 per cent, on 91 insertions 
7 ' .. per cent, on 156 insertions 

8 percent, on 208 insertions 
10 percent, on 312 insertions 



Sunday 

2V2 per cent, on 13 insertions 
5 per cent, on 26 Insertions 
7^.; per cent, on 39! insertions 
10 per cent, on 52 insertions 

Daily or Sunday 
2)2 per cent, on 2.500 lines 
5 per cent, on 5,000 lines 



per cent, on 7,500 lines 

percent, on 10,000 lines 

percent, on 20.000 lines 

percent, on 30,000 lines 

percent, on 40,000 lines 

percent, on 50,000 lines 

per cent, on 75,000 lines 

per cent, on 100,000 lines 



SPECIFIED POSITION CHARGES 

Specified page 10 per cent, 

Next to reading matter 10 per cent, 

IMextto and following reading matter, 

or top of column next to reading 

matter 20 per cent, 



Bottom of column following and next 

to reading 30 per cent. 

Top of column alongside and fol- 
lowed by reading 40 per cent. 

First in column following and next 

reading matter 40 per cent. 



BREAKING OF COLUMN RULES 



"WHen Accepted for 
Top of Page 

50 lines across 2 columns 

75 lines across 3 columns 

100 lines across 4 columns 

125 Uies across 5, 6, 7, 8 columns 



"When Accepted otHer than 
Top of Page 

25 lines across 2 columns 

50 lines across 3 columns 

75 lines across 4flr 5 columns 

100 lines across 6, 7, 8 columns 



CLASSIFIED PAGES 

No discount ; single column and without borders. Advertisements set in Agate, except 
those marked * in which display limited to two lines may be used. Those marked t are 
classified on tinancial page. 

Per Liue 



Annual Meetings . 

Agents Wanted 

Building Assoc. Notices . 
Building Materials . . . 
Business Opportunities . 
Boarding and Rooms . . 

Bicycles 

Carpet Cleaning . . . . 
Dividend Notices . . . . 

Dogs, Birds, etc 

Dressmaking 

Employment Agencies , 



Per Line 
t20c. For Sale or Rent (Misc.) . 15e. 

15c. Funeral Notices . each 25e. 
t20c. Help Wanted lOe. 

15e. Lost and Found .... 15c. 

15e. Laundries 15c. 

15e. I Mortgages 15e. 

15c. Marriage Notices . each 25c. 

15e. Money to Loan 15c. 

t20c. , Memoriam Notices . . . lOc. 

15e. Machi lery. Tools, etc. lOe. 

15c. School^ . (30 times 10c. 1 »15e. 

10c. Steamships . (312 t. 12c.j *15c. 



Per Line 
Summer Resort8(30t.l0e.) *15o. 

Personals *15e. 

Printing 15c. 

Proposals f20c. 

Public Sale *20c. 

Heal Estate *10e. 

Religious Services . . . 12c. 
Sewing Machines .... 15c. 

Special Notices t20c. 

Storage 15c. 

Situations Wanted . . . lOc. 
Wanted, Miscellaneous . 15o. 



The following are the Subscription Rates to the Record by Mail. 
Terms: Cash in Jtduance 

One Year $3.00 Foir Months $1.00 - Two Months 50 

Six Months 1.50 Three Months 75 One Month 25 

SATURDAY RECORD 

One Year, Mailed Separately 50 Six Months, Mailed Separately 25 

SUNDAY RECORD 

One Year $1.00 Four Months 35 Two Months 20 

Six Months 50 ! Three Months 25 One Month 10 

Liberal Commissions Allowed Subscription Agents 



Address: TKc Rccord PtiblisHiiig Company 

Nos. 917 (SL 919 Chestnut Street, PKiladelpKia, Pa. 



THE 



PHiladelpKia Record, 

^ >«» ^ ^i? 
Averag'e Circulation 190,000. 

^ »? »? 1? 



FOR nearly a quarter of a century Thk Record has had the 
remarkable good fortune to go steadily forward in a career of 
undeviating prosperity. In good years and bad years, and 
under circumstances of peculiar peril, it has steadily kept the good 
will of its constituency and broadened its field of influence. 

It will continue to build and to spread itself upon the founda- 
tion of independence, truthfulness and decency it has already 
established, so as not only to keep its place but deserve to keep it. 

j^ j^ jS/ 

THE RECORD especially appeals to business men bec£.use of 
the completeness of its financial and trade news. Its market 
reports have achieved such a reputation among business men for 
fullness and accuracy as to make its quotations the standard for 
buying and selling. 

The circulation of The Record in all parts of Pennsylvania, 
New Jersey, Delaware and Maryland makes it the best advertising, 
medium in those States, and there is no part of the country in 
which it does not have readers. It has rivals, but no equals in 
affording to the advertiser the largest measure of publicity. 



THE RECORD is printed every day in the year, and sent, post- 
age free, to all parts of the United States, Canada and Mexico 
for Four Dollars per year, payable in advance ; or for Three Dollars 
per year, or Twenty-five Cents per month, without the Sunday issue. 
To subscribers in Philadelphia or its suburbs The Record is 
delivered at Eight Cents per week, or without the Sunday paper at 
Six Cents per week — payable to the carrier. 

Address all communications to 

THe Record Publishing Co., 

917-919 CKestnvit St., PHiladelpKia. 






Jantiary. 


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February. 


Marcb. 


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■ _ — .'_ 

Record Almanac 


1901 


Jtily. 


August. 


September. 


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1 


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Ll^ 


1 1 


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1 1 II 1 1 j 


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— 


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October. 


November. 


December. 


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— ' — '. — ^ — 


■■■•I 


....|....,....,....,....|....|....| 


1 |.-.-|.-.- 


— 


— 


— ' 



Postage Rates and Regulations 



First-Class Matter.— hetters; postal cards 
having anything attached or any writing or 
printing on the face other than the address ; 
matter wholly or partly in writing; inclosed 
matter; type-written matter: two cents 
per ounce or fraction. Drop letters at non- 
letter-carrier offices: one cent per ounce or 
fraction. 

Seco«rf-C/ass.— Newspapers and periodicals 
to regular subscribers : one cent per pound ; 
ininsient newspapers : one cent for each four 
ounces or fraction thereof. 

Third-Class. — Printed matter in unsealed 
wrappers, address ta.^s, labels, corrected proof 
sheets and manuscript copy accompanying 
the same, business and visiting cards, paper 
valentines, blue prints, photographs, engrav- 
ings, heliotypes, hektograph prints, or simi- 
lar mechanical processes easy of recognition, 
lithographs, maps, plans, charts, and similar 
articles of print : one cent for every two 
ounces or fraction. Seeds, cuttings, bulbs, 
roots, scions and plants are now sent at this 
rate, but are subject to fourth-class regula- 
tion. 

fourt/7-C/ass.— Envelopes, blank bills, letter 
heads, blank and playing cards, paper sacks, 
wrapping paper with or without printing, 
blank books, metals, minerals, merchandise, 
samples, drawings, blotters with or without 
printing, and other matter not included in 
the first, second or third classes: one cent 
per ounce or fraction. 

Letters and packages may be registered for 
a fee of eight cents each in addition to 
postage. 

Re-forwarding, — Letters may be re-forward- 
od without payment of additional postage. 

Unmailable— Matter injurious to the mails, 
explosives, poi.sons, or exhaling bad odor, or 
liable to decomposition ; ardent, malt, vinous, 
spirituous or inflammable liquids. 

All matter is limited to four pounds, ex- 
cept single books and first and second-class 
matter, which may weigh more. 

Fees Charged for Money Orders. 

F()roi-dcrsf(.rsumsnotexceeding32 50 . Sets. 
Over 32.50 and not exceeding 5 00. 5 els. 
" 5.00 " " 10 00 . Sets. 

" 10.00 " " 20 00.10cts. 

" 20.00 " " 30 00.12cts. 

" 30.00 " " 40 00.15cts. 

" 40.00 " " 50 00.18cts. 

" 50.00 " " 60 00.20cts. 

" 60.00 " " 75 00 . 25cts. 

" 75.00 " " lOOOO.SOcts. 

A single Money Order may include any 
amount from one cent to one hundred dol- 
lars inclusive, but must not contain a frac- 
tional part of a cent. 

Money Orders are issued payable in Mexico, 
upon which the fees are one-half the rate of 
International Money Orders. 

Rates for International Orders. 

Not exceeding SIO 00 10 cts. 

20 00 20 cts. 

30 00 30 cts. 

40 00 40 cts. 

50 00 50 cts. 

60 00 60 cts. 

" 70 00 70 cts. 

80 00 80 Cts. 

90 00 9t) cts. 

100 00 100 cts. 



Money Orders payable in British India, 
Hong Kong (China), and "Egypt, the Britisli 
Post Office Department will deduct for its 
services additional fees, as follows : 
For sums not exceeding £2 . . . 3d., sterling. 
£5. . . 6d., 
£7. . .9d., 
£10. . . Is., 

Postage to Foreign Countries. 

Mexico.— Same as United States. Limit of 
weight of printed matter, 4 lbs. 6 oz., except 
single printed books, whicli may weigli 
more. Merchandise must be sent by Parcel 
Post. Limit of weight, eleven pounds. 

Canada.— Same as United States, excepting 
seeds, cuttings, bulbs, roots, scions and 
plants— the rate is one cent per ounce or 
fraction thereof. 

Other Countries.— Letters, five cents for each 
half ounce or fraction ; jjostal cards, two 
cents each ; reply postal cards, four cents 
each ; newspapers and other printed matter, 
one cent for each two ounces or fraction ; 
commercial papers, five cents for ten ounces 
or less ; over ten ounces, one cent for each 
two ounces or fraction ; samples of mer- 
chandise, two cents for four ounces or less ; 
over four ounces, one cent for each two 
ounces or fraction. 

Jamaica, Barbadoes, Bahamas, British Hon- \ 
duras, Costa Rica, Germany, Hawaiian Republic, 
j Republic of Colombia, the Danish West Indies, 
1 Leeward Islands, Salvador, British Guiana, 
I Windward Islands, Newfoundland, Mexico, Re- 
public of Honduras, New Zealand, and Nicaragua 
1 —Merchandise may be sent by parcel post, 
twelve cents a pound or fraction thereof. 
! C/)///— Twenty cents a pound or fraction 
thereof. Limit of weight, eleven pounds. 

Shanghai : letters, five cents. Articles of 
merchandise which are admitted in domes- 
tic mails and allowed in mails for Shanghai : 
one cent an ounce. 

Approximate Time of Post from New York by 
Shortest Routes (with the distance in 
statute miles in parentheses) : 
To London (3740) and Paris (4020) . . 8 days. 
Glasgow (3375), Rotterdam (S'tSo), Ber- 
lin (4385) and Genoa (4615) .... 9 " 

Rome (5030) 9 " 

Shanghai (9920) 25 " 

Ambriz, Africa (9785) 31 " 

Postal Information. 

Articles of merchandise may be registered 
at the rate of eight cents a package, subject 
to proper examination before registration. 
The name and the address of sender must 
be indorsed in writing, or in print, on each 
j package offered for registration. 

Write 5'our name and address on the upper 
left-hand corner of letters and packages you 
mail. This will insure return if not delivered. 

Don't send money or articles of value 
without registering the same. This will in- 
sure safe delivery and acknowledgment of 
receipt by addressee. 

In addressing mail matter write the street, 
number and postal station to insure prompt 
delivery. 



Record Almanac. 



ECLIPSES, I90I. (Standard Time.) 

In the year 1901 there will be two Eclipses of the Sun, one of the Moon, and a Lunar 
Appulse : 

I.— A Ltniar Appulse, May 3, 4. Invisible. Visible more or less to Europe, Asia, Africa, 
Australia, the extreme eastern tip of South America, and the Indian Ocean. 

II.— A Total Eclipse of the Sun, May 18. Invisible. Visible to Australia, souiheni 
Asia, the eastern part of Africa, and to the Indian Ocean; the path of totality passing 
through the Islands of Mauritius, Sumatra, Borneo and New Guinea. 

III.— A Partial Eclipse of the Moon, October 27. Visible in part to the western coast 
of North America, Europe, Africa; and to Asia, Australia and the North Pacific and Indian 
Oceans. Occurring as follows : 



PACIFIC STANDARD. 



Moon enters Penumbra 5h. 4m. M. 

Moon enters Shadow 6h. 25m. M. 



t of the Moon's limb toward the east. 

IV.— An Annular Eclipse of the Sun, November 11. Invisible. Visible to the greater 
part of Europe, Asia, northern Africa, the extreme northern edge of Australia, and to the 
Indian Ocean ; the path of annulus passing through Arabia, the Island of Ceylon, the Malay 
Peninsular, to the Island of Luzon. 



MORNING AND EVENING STARS. 1901. 

Mercury will be Evening Star about Febru.nry 19, June 15, and October 12 ; and Morn- 
ig Star about April 4, August 2, and November 20. 

Venus will be Morning Star till April 30 ; and then Evening Star the rest of the year. 
Jupiter will be Morning Star till June 3U ; and then Evening Star the rest of the year. 



PLANETS BRIGHTEST, 1901. 



Mercury, February 16, May 18, August 14, 
October 20, and November 17. 

Venus Not during vear 

Mars February 21 



Jupiter June 30 

Saturn July 5 

Uranus June 5 

Neptune December 22 



CHRONOLOGICAL CYCLES, 1901. 

F. j Solar Cycle .... 

10 Roman Indiction . . 

Lunar Cycle, or Golden Number 2 | Julian Period 6614 



bominicai Letter F. j Solar Cycle ii 

Kiiact 10 Roman Indiction 14 



THE SEASONS, 1901. 

(Eastern Standard Time.) 



Spring begins . . . March 21, 2h. 23m. A. M. [ Autumn begins . . . Sept. 23, Ih. 9m. P. M. 
Summer begins . . . June 21, loh. 27m. P. M. | AVinter begins . December 22, 7h. 36m. A. M. 



LEGAL HOLIDAYS, 1901. 

New Year Day .Tanuarvl Independence Day Julv 4 

Lincoln's Birthday February 12 [ Labor Day September 2 

Spring Election Februar'v 19 Full Election Novemlier5 

Washington's Birthday . . . . February 22 ! Thanksgiving Day (by app'tment) Nov. 28 (?) 

(lood Friday April 5 I Christmas Dav December 25 

Decoration Day May 30 ! Every Saturday, half holiday. 



The Philadelphia Record Jllmanac. 



PLANETARY CONJUNCTIONS, I90I. 

Mekcury will be in conjunction with Saturn, Jannary 7 ; with the Sun (superior), Jan- 
uary 21- with the Sun (inferit>r), March 7 ; with Venus, March IB; with the Sun (superiori, 
MayU; with Venus, Mav IS; with Neptune, May 31; with Venus, July 1 ; with the Sun 
(inferior), July IB; with the Sun (superior), August 27 ; with the Sun (inferior), November 
1 ; with Uranus, December 18. 

Venus will be in conjunction with Uranus, January 3 ; with Jupiter, .January 15; with 
Saturn, January 24; with 'Mercury, March 13; with tlie Sun (superior), April 30; with Mer- 
cury, May 18; with Neptune, Juiie 9; with Mercury, July 1 ; with Mars, October 10; witli 
Uranus, October 25 ; with Jupiter, November 18 ; with Saturn, November 19. 

Mars will be in conjunction with Venus, October 10; with Uranus, November 4; with 
Saturn, December 14 ; with Jupiter, Decemberl7. 

Jupiter will be in conjunction with Venus, January 15 ; with Venus, November IS ; 
with Saturn, November 28 ; with Mars, December 17. 

Saturn will be in conjunction with Mercury, January 7 ; with Venus, January 24 ; with 
Venus, November 19 ; with Jupiter, November 28 ; with Mars, December 14. 

Uranus will be in conjunction with Venus, January 3 ; with Venus, October 25; with 
Mars, November 4; with the Sun, December 9 ; with Mercury, December 18. 

Neptune will be in conjunction with Mercury, May 31 ; with Venus, June 9 ; with the 
Sun, June 20. 



PLANETARY OPPOSITIONS. 1901. 

Mars will be in opposition to the Sun. February 22. 
Jupiter will be in opposition to the Sun, June 30. 
Satui^n will be in opposition to the Sun, July 5. 
Uranus will be in opposition to the Snn, June 6. 
Neptune will be in opposition to the Sun, December 22. 



CHRONOLOGICAL ERAS, 1901. 

The vear 1001, which comprises the latter part of the 125lh and the beginning of thi 
126th year of the Independence of the United States of America, corresponds to ;— 
The vear 0614 of the Julian period ; 

The year 7409-7410 of the Byzantine era, the vear 7410 commencing on September 1st ; 
The year 5661-5662 of the Jewish era, the year 5662 commencing on September 14th, or 

more exactly, at sunset on September 13th ; 
The year 2654 since the foundation of Rome, according to Varro ; 
The vear 2648 since the beginninir of the era of Nabonassar, which has been assigned ti 

vVednesdav, the 26th of Februarv of the 3067th vear of the Julian period ; corresjiond- 

iiig, in the notation of chronologists, to the 747th ; and, in the notation of astronomers, 

to the 746lh vear before the birth of Christ ; 
The year 2677 of the Olympiads, or the first vear of the 670th Olympiad, commencing in 

July, lnOl, if we fix "the era of the Olympiads at 775>4' years before Christ, or near the 

beginning of July of the year ;1938 of the .lulian periorl ; 
The year 221:^ of the Grecian era, or the era of the Seleucidje ; 
The vear 1617 of the era of Diocletian ; 

The year 2561 of the Japanese era and to the 34th year of the period entitled " Meiji." 
The year 1 il9 of the Mohammedan era, or the era of the Hegira, begins on the 20th day of 

Ai.ril, 1901. 
The first day of January of the year 1901 is the 2,415,386th day since the commencement o!' 

the Julian period. 

FIXED AND MOVABLE FESTIVALS. 1901. 

Epiphany January 6 ] Low Sunday April 14 

Septuagesima Sunday February 3 Rogation Sunday May 12 

Quinquagesima— Shrove Sunday February 17 | Ascension Day— Holy Thursday . . May Hi 

Ash Wednesday February 20 i Pentecost— A\'hit Sunday May 26 

First Sunday in Lent .• . . . . February 24 [ Trinity Sunday June 2 

St. I'atrick March 17 . Corpus Chri.sti Jinie 6 



Annunciation IMarch 25 

Palm Sunday March 31 

(lOod Friday April 5 

Easter Sunday April 7 



St. John, Baptist June 21 

Michaelmas Day September 29 

First Sunday in Advent . . . Di cember 1 
Christmas Day December ^5 



NOTE. — The Calculations of this Almanac .^re giuen in local or mean solar time when not otherwise 
expressed : the Risings and Settings of the Sun and Moon being for the upper limb, corrected 
for parallax and refraction. To change to STANDARD TIME four minutes are to be SUB- 
TRACTED for euery degree of longitude the place is EAST of one of the Standard Meridians, 
ard four minutes ADDED for every degree WEST of the same. 



Party Platforms in 1900. 

Declarations of Principles Upon >vKicK tKe 
Varioxis Presidential Candidates Stood. 



Appended will be found the formal enunciation of principles made by the various party 
National Conventions which named candidates for the Presidency last year: 



RE-PtJBLICAN. 

William McKinley, of Ohio, for President, and 

Theodore Roosevelt, of New York, for 

Vice-President. 

The Republicans of the United States, 
through thfir chosen representatives, met in 
Xational Convention, looking back upon an 
unsurpassed record of achievement and 
looking forward into a great field of duty 
and opportunity, and appealing to the judg- 
ment of their countrymen, make these 
declarations: 

The expectation in which the American 
people, turning from the Democratic partv, 
intrusted power four years ago to a Republi- 
can Chief Magistrate and a Republican Con- 
gress, has been met and satisfied. When 
the people then assembled at the polls, after 
a term of Democratic legislation and admin- 
istration, bushiess was dead, industry par- 
alyzed and the national credit disastrously 
imiiaired. The country's capital was hidden 
away and its laVjor distressed and unem- 
ployed. The Democrats had no other plan 
with which to improve the ruinous condi- 
tions which they had themselves produced 
than to coin silver at the ratio of sixteen to 
one. The Republican party, denouncing 
this plan as sure to produce conditions even 
worse than those from which relief was 
sought, promised to restore prosperity by 
means of two legishitive measures — a Pro- 
tective Tariff and a law making gold the 
standard of value. The people by great 
majorities i.ssued to the Republican parly a 
commission to enact these laws. The com- 
mission has been executed, and the Repub- 
lican promise is redeemed. Prosperity more 
general and more abundant than we have 
ever known has followed these enactments. 
There is no longer controversy as to the 
value of any Government obligations. Every 
American dollan is a gold dollar or its as- 
sured equivalent, and American credit 
stands higher than that of any nation. Capi- 
tal is ftilly employed and labor everywhere 
is profitably occtjpied. No single fact can 
more strikingly tell the story of what Re- 
publican government means to the country 
than this— that while during the whole 
period of one hundred and seven years from 
1790 to 1897 there was an excess of exports 
over imports of only S383,028,497, there has 
been in the short three years of the present 
Republican administration an excess of ex- 
ports over imports in the enormous sum of 
*1,483,537,094. 

And while the American people, sustained 
by this Republicao. legislation, have been 
achieving these splendid triumphs in their 
business and commerce, they have con- 
ducted and in victory concluded a war 
for liberty and htiman rights. No thought 
of national aggrandizement tarnished the 
high purpose with which American stand- 
ards were unfurled. It was a war unsought 
and patiently resisted, but when it came the 



American government was ready. Its fleets 
were cleared for action. Its armies were in 
the field, and the quick and signal triumph 
of its forces on land and sea bore equal 
tribute to the courage of American soldiers 
and sailors, and to the skill and foresight of 
Republican statesmanship. To ten millions 
of the human race there was given " a new- 
birth of freedom," and to the American 
people a new and noble responsibility. 

We indorse the administration of President 
William McKinley. Its acts have been es- 
tablished in wisdom and in patriotism, and 
at home and abroad it has distinctly ele- 
vated and extended the influence of the 
American nation. Walking untried paths 
and facing unforeseen responsibilities, Presi- 
dent McKinley has been in every situation 
the true American patriot and upright 
statesman, clear in vision, strong in judg- 
ment, firm in action, always inspiring and 
deserving the confidence of his coimtrymen. 

In asking the American people to indorse 
this Republican record and to renew their 
commission to the Republican party, we re- 
mind them of the fact that the menace to 
their prosperity has always resided in Demo- 
cratic principles and no less in the general 
incapacity of the Democratic party to con- 
duct public affairs. The prime essential of 
business prosperity is public confidence in 
the good sense of the Government and in its 
ability to deal intelligently with each new 
problem of administration and legislation. 
That confidence the Democratic party has 
never earned. It is hopelessly inadequate, 
and the coinitry's prosperity, when Demo- 
cratic success at the polls" is announced, 
halts and ceases in mere anticipation of 
Democratic bhmders and failures. 

We renew our allegiance to the principle 
of the gold standard and declare our confi- 
dence in the wisdom of the legislation of the 
Fifty-sixth Congress by whicti the parity of 
all our money and the stability of our cur- 
rency upon a gold basis has been secured. 
We recognize that interest rates are a potent 
factor in production and business activity, 
and for the purpose of further equalizing 
and of further lowering the rates of interest, 
we favor such monetary legislation as will 
enable the varying needs of the sea-son and 
of all sections to be promptly met in order 
that trade may be evenlv sustained, labor 
steadily employed and commerce enlarged. 
The volume oV money in circulation was 
never so great per capita as it is today. 

We declare our steadfast opposition" to the 
free and unlimited coinage of silver. No 
measure to that end could be considered 
which was without the support. of the lead- 
ing commercial countries of the world. 
However firmly Republican legislation may 
seem to have 'secured the country against 
the peril of base and discredited currency, 
the election of a Democratic President could 
not fail to impair the country's credit and to 
bring once more into question the intention 



Janxiary, 1901 


1st Month. 
31 Days. 


Calculated for Latitude 40^^ N. Adapted to the States of Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware, 


Maryland, Virginia, Kentucky, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Missouri and Kansas. 


of: 

J. z 

Si 






THE SUN 


THE MOON 


THE TIDES, Philadelphia 


RISES 

A. M. 


SETS 

P. M. 


RISES 

P. M. 


SETS 

A. M. 


< 


HIGH 


TIDE 


LOW TIDE 1 


A. M. 


P. M. 


A. M. 


p. M. 








H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


D. 


H, M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


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3 5111 


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5 


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7 52 


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58 


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8 17 


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1114 


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9 
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19 
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21 


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22 


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5011 34 23 


7 16 


7 41 


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14 


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1 47 p. M. 24 


8 8 


8 38 


3 


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15 


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7 204 58 


2 45' 4925 


9 9 


9 40 


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16 


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1 3326 


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4 4111 


11 19 


11 48 6 6 


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MOON'S PHASES. (Eastern Standard Time) 


^ TKe ^ 


fv; Full Moon 4d. 7h. 13m. P. M. 


PK 


iladelpKia Record 


J Last Quarter 12d. 3h. 38m. P. M. 






® New Moon 2Cd. 9h. 36m. A. M. 




ryustworthy Commercial 


5 FirstQuarter 27d. 4h. 52m. A. M. 




Reports. 



The Philadelphia Record Almanac. 



of the American people to maintain upon 
the gold standard the parity of their money 
circulation. The Democratic party must be 
convinced that the American people will 
never tolerate the Chicago platform. 

We recojtnize the necessity and propriety 
of the honest co-operation of capital to meet 
new business conditions and especially to ' 
extend our rapidly increasing foreign trade, j 
but we condemn "all conspiracies and com- 
bina ions intended to restrict business, to 
create monopolies, to limit production, or to 
conirol prices, and favor such legislaiion as j 
will efl'ectively restrain and prevent all such 
abuses, proect and promote competition 
and secure the rights of producers, laborers 
and all who are engaged in industry and ! 
commerce. I 

We renew our faith in the policy of Pro- 
tection to American labor. In that policy 
our industries have been established, diver- 
sified and maintained. By protecting the 
home market competition has been stimu- 
la;ed and production cheapened. Oppor- 
tunity to the inventive genius of our people 
has been secured, and wages in every de- 
partment of labor miiintained at high rates, 
higher now than ever before, and always 
disiingui-hing our working people in their 
better conditi(m-; of life from tliose of any 
competing country. Enjoying the blessinss 
of the American common school, secure in 
the right of self-government and protected 
in the occupancy of their own markets, tlieir 
constantly increasing knowledge and skill 
have enabled thera to finally enter the mar- 
kets of the world. We favor the associated 
policy of reciprocity so directed as to open 
our markets on favorable terms for what we 
do not ourselves produce in return for free 
foreign markets. 

In the further interest of American work- 
men we favor a more etiective restriction of 
the inimiyraiion of cheap labor from foreign 
lands, the exten>ion of opportunities of 
education for working children, the raising 
of the age limit for child labor, tlie protec- 
tion of free laljor as against contract convict 
labor, and an eftccdve system of labor in- 
surance. 

Our present dependence upon foreign 
shipping for nine-tenths of our foreign carry- 
ing trade is a great los to the industry of 
thiscoiintrv. It is also a serious danger to 
our trade, for its sudden withdrawal in the 
event of European war would seriously 
cripple our expanding foreign commerce. 
The national defense and naval efficiency 
of thi-. country, moreover, supply a compel- 
ling reason lor legislation which will enable 
us to recover our former place among the 
trade-carrying fleets of the world. 

The naiion owes a debt of profound grati- 
tude ti) the solJiers and sailors who have 
fought its battles, and it is the Government's 
duty to provide for the survivors and for 
the widows and orphans of those who have 
lallen in tlie country's wars. The pension 
laws, lounded on this just sentiment, should 
be liberal and should be liberally adminis- 
tered, and preference should be given where- 
ever practicable with respect to employment 
in the public service to soldiers and sailors 
and to their widows and orphans. 

We commend the poUcy of the Republican 
party in maintaining the ethciency of the 
Civil Service, The Administration has acted 
wisely in ii.s efforts to secure for iiublic ser- 
vice in Cuba, Porto Rico, Hawaii and the 
Philippine Islands only those whose fitness 
has been determined by training and expe- 



rience. We believe that employment in the 
public service in these territories should be 
confined as far as practicable to their inhabit- 
ants. 

It was the plain purpose of the fifteenth 
amendment to the Constitution to prevent 
discrimination on account of race or color 
in regulating the elective franchise. De- 
vices of State governments, whetlier by 
statutory or constitutional enactment, to 
avoid the purpose of this amendment, are 
revolutionary, and should be condemned. 

Public movements looking to a permanent 
Improvement of tlie roads and highways 
of the country meet with our cordial ap- 
proval, and we recommend this subject to 
the earnest consideration of the people and 
of the Legislatures of the several Slates. 

Wefuvor the extension of the Rural Free 
Delivery Service wherever its extension may 
bejustitied. 

In further pursuance of the constant policy 
of the Republican party to provide free 
homes on the public domain, we recommend 
adequate national legislation to reclaim the 
arid lands of the L'nited States, reserving 
control of the di>tribution of water for irri- 
gation to the respective States and Terri- 
tories. 

We favor home rule for and the early ad- 
mi sion to Sta eliood of the Territories of 
^ew Mexico, Arizona and Oklahoma. 

The Dingley Act, amend(d to pr..^ide suf- 
ficient revenue for the conduct of the war, 
has 60 well perfurmed iis wi rk that it has 
been possible to reduce the war debt in the 
sum of §40,000,000. So ample are the Gov- 
ernment's revtnues and so gieut is the pub- 
lic confidence in ihe iniesirity of its obliga- 
tions that its newlv-fimded two per cent, 
bonds sell at a premium. TIjc country is 
now justified in expecting, and It will be 
the policy of the Republican jiarty to bring 
about, a ieduction of the war taxis. 

We favor the construction, ownership, 
control and protiction of an Isthmian canal 
by the Govtrnment of the United Stales. 
New markets are necessary for the increa.s- 
ing surplus of our faim products. E\iry 
etiort shot, Id be made to open and obtain 
new markets, especially in the Client, and 
the admini.traiion is to be warmiy com- 
mended for its successful effi ri lo con.mit 
all trading and colonizing nations to the 
pcOicy of the open door in China. 

In the interest of our expanding com- 
merce we recommend that Congress cr. ate 
a Department of Commerce and Industries 
in the charge of a Sccre ary with a seat in 
the Cabinet. TIjc United Siutes consular sys- 
tem should be reorganized under the super- 
vision of this new department upon such a 
basis of appointment and tenure as will 
render it still more serviceable to the na- 
tion's increasing trade. 

The American government must protect 
the person iind property of every citizen 
•wherever they are wrongfully violated or 
placed in peril. 

We congratulate the women of America 
upon their splendid record of public service 
in the volunteer aid association and as 
nurses in camp and hospital during the re- 
cent campaigns of our armies in the East 
and Western Indies, and « e appn ciale their 
faithful co-operation in all works of educa- 
tion and industry. 

President McKinley has conducted the 
foreign affairs of the United States with dis- 
tinguished credit to the American people. 
In releasing us from the vexatious condi- 



February, 1901 IsoaTl^' 


Cateulated for Latitude 40° N. Adapted to the States of Pennsylvania, New Jersey. Delaware, 


Maryland, Virginia, Kentucky, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Missouri and Kansas. 


0^ 


2^ 


If 
1 


THE SUN 


THE MOON 


THE TIDES. Philadelphia 


RISES 

A. M. 


SETS 

P. M. 


RISES 
P. M. 


SETS 

A. M. 


S 


HIGH TIDE 


LOW TIDE 


A. M. 


P.M. 


A.M. 


p. M. 








H. M. 


ii. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


D. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


1 


Fr 


m 


7 9 


5 18 


3 41 


5 28 


12 




15 


7 7 


7 34 


2 


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7 8 


5 19 


4 44 


6 8 


13 


39 


1 


7 58 


8 19 


3 


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8 40 


9 1 


4 


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7 6 


5 22 


6 45 


7 15 


15 


2 2 


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5 


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m 


7 5 


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7 46 


7 43 


16 


2 42 


3 210 110 21 


6 


W 


m 


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8 11 


17 


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3 40 10 40 10 59 


7 


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m 


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p. M. 


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MOON'S PHASES. (Eastern Standard Time.) 


»? The 1^ 


©Full Moon 3d. T Oh. 30m. A.M. 

g Last Quarter lid. 1h. 12m. P. M. 

® New Moon Ud, 9h. 45m. P. M. 


PKiladelpHia Record 


Fearless and Independent. 


5 First Quarter 25d. 1h. 38m. P. M, 


Bright and Sparkli7ig . 



The Philadelphia Record JUmanac. 



tions of a European allianoe for the s^overn- 
ment of Samoa, his course is especially to be 
commerKied. By securing to our undivided 
conirol tlie most important island of the 
iSamoan group and the best harbor in the 
Southern Pacific, every American interest 
has been safeguarded. 

We approve the annexation -of the Ha- 
waiian islands to the United States. 

We commend the part taken by our Gov- 
ernment in the Peace Conference at The 
Hague. We assert our steadfast adherence 
to the policy announced in the Monroe 
Doctrine. The provisions of the Hague 
Convention were wisely regarded when 
President McKinlev tendered his friendly 
offices in the inte'iest of peace between 
Great Britain and the South African Repub- 
lie. While the American government must 
continue the policy prescribed by Washing- 
ton, attirmed by every succeeding President 
and imposed upon us by The Hague treaty 
of non-intervention in European controver- 
sies, the American people earnestly hope that 
a way may soon be found, honorable alike 
to both contending parties, to terminate the 
strife between them. 

In accepting, by the Treaty of Paris, the just 
responsibility of our victories in the Spanish 
war, the President and the Senate won the 
undoubted approval of the American people. 
No other course u as possible than to destroy 
Spain's sovereignty throughout the West 
Indies and in the Philippine islands. That 
cour-e created our responsibility before the 
uoild, and with the unorganized population 
whom our intervention had freed from 
Spain, to provide for the maintenance of 
law and order, and for the establishment of 
good government and for the performance 
of international obligations. Our authority 
could not be less than our responsibility, 
and wherever sovereign rights were ex- 
tended it became the high duty of the Gov- 
ernment to maintain its authority, to put 
down armed insurrection and to confer the 
blessings of liberty and civilization upon all 
the rescued peoples. The largest measure 
of self-government consistent with their 
welfare and our duties shall be secured to 
them by law. 

To Cuba independence and self-govern- 
ment were assured in the same voice by 
which war wa« declared, and to the letter 
this pledge shall be performed. 

The Republican party upon its history, and 
upon this declaration of its princijiles and 
)iolicies, confidently invokes the considerate 
and approving judgment of the American 
people. 



DEMOCRATIC. 

William J. Bryan, of N '.braslia, for President; 

Adiai E. Steuenson, of Illinois, 

for Vice-President. 

We, the representatives of the Democratic 
party of the United States, assembled in Na- 
tional Convention on the anniversary of the 
adoption of the Declaration of Independence, 
do reaifirm our faith in that immortal procla- 
mation of the inalienable rights of man, and 
our allegiance to the Constitution framed in 
harmony therewith by the fathers of the 
Republic. We hold, with the United States 
Supreme Court, that the Declaration of Inde- 
pendence is the spirit of our government, of 
which the Constitution is tlie form and 
lotter. 



We declare again that all governments in- 
stituted among men derive their just powers 
from the consent of the governed ; that any 
government not based on the consent of the 
governed is a tyranny ; and that to impose 
upon any people a government of force is to 
substitute the methods of imperialism for 
those of a republic. 

We hold that the Constitution follows the 
flag, and denounce the doctrine that an Ex- 
ecutive or Ccmgress, deriving their existence 
and their powers from tlie Constitution, can 
exercise lawful authority beyond it or in 
violation of it. 

We assert that no nation can long endure 
half republic and half empire, and we warn 
the American people that imperialism 
abroad will lead quickly and inevitably to 
despotism at home. Believing in tliese fun- 
damental principles, we denounce the Porto 
Rican law, enacted by a Republican Con- 
gress, against the protest and opposition of 
the Democi-atic minority, as a bold and open 
violation of the nation's organic law t id a 
flagrant breach of the national good laith. 
It imposes upon the people of Porto Rico 
a government without their consent and 
taxation without representation. It dis- 
honors the American people by repudiating 
a solemn pledge made in their behalf by the 
commanding General of our army, which 
Porto Ricans welcomed to a peaceful and 
unresisted occupation of their land. It 
doomed to poverty and distress a people 
whose helplessness appeals with pecular 
force to our justice and magnanimity. In 
this, the first act of its imperialistic pro- 
gramme, the Republican party seeks to com- 
mit the United States to a colonial policy in- 
consistent with republican institutions and 
condemned by the Supreme Court in numer- 
ous decisions. 

We demand the prompt and honest fulfill- 
ment of our pledge to the Cuban people and 
the world, that the United States has no dis- 
positionmor intention to exercise sovereign- 
ty, jurisdiction or control over the island of 
Cuba, except for its pacification. The war 
ended nearly two years ago, profound peace 
reigns over all the island, and still the Ad- 
ministration keeps the government of the 
island from its people, while Republican 
carpetbag officials plunder its revenues and 
exploit the colonial theory to the disgrace 
of the American people. 

We condemn and denounce the Philippine 
policy of the present Administration. It has 
involved the Republic in unnecessary war, 
sacrificed the lives of many of our noblest 
sons, and placed the United Slates, previous- 
Iv known and applauded throughout the 
world as the champion of freedom, in the 
false and un-American position of crushing 
with military force the eftbrts of our former 
allies to achieve liberty and self-government. 
The Filipinos cannot be citizens without en- 
dangering our civilization ; they cannot be 
subjects without imperiling our form of 
government, and as we are not willing to 
surrender our civilization or to convert the 
Republic into an empire, we favor an imme- 
diate dechiration of the nation's purpose to 
1 give to the Filipinos: first, a stable form of 
' government; second, independence, and 
third, ])rotection from outside interference, 
such as has bten given for nearly a century 
to the republics of Central and South 
America. 

The greedy commercialism which dictated 
the Philippine policy of the Reptiblican Ad- 
ministration attempts to justify it with the 



March, 1901 ^ %iv::t- 


Calculated fot Latitude 40° N. Adapted to the States of Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware, 
Maryland, \/irgihia, Kentuchy, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Missouri and Kansas. 


1- 

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THE SUN 


THE MOON 


THE TIDES, Philadelphia 


RISES 

A. M. 


SETS 
P. M. 


R'SES 

'^. M. 


SETS 

A. M. 


o 

< 


HIGH TIDE 


LOW TIDE 1 


A.M. 


P. M. 


A. M. 


P. M. 


1 


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6 34 


H. M. 

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H. M. 

2 35 


H. M. 1 D. 

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H. M. 

11 23 


H. M. 

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19 


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20 


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2 


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p. M. 125 
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16 


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m 


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10 391 4 55 


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MOON'S PHASES. (EASTERN Standard Time.) 


^ TKe yf 1 


©Full Moon 5rf. 3h. 4m. A. M. 

^ Last Quarter t^n oh a». a u 


arc 


iladelpKia R< 


scord 


® New Moon... 


20d. 


7/1. 53m, ^ *• 


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First Q 


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Infli 


lence the ( 


'Greatest 



14 



The Philadelphia Record JUmanac. 



plea that it will pay ; but even this sordid 
and unworthy plea fails when brought to 
the test of facts. The war of criminal ag- 
gression against the Filipinos, entailing an 
annual expense of many millions, has al- 
ready cost more than any possible profit that 
could accrue from the entire Philippine trade 
for years to come. Furthermore, when trade 
is extended at the expense of liberty, the 
price is always too nigh. 

We are not opposed to territorial expansion 
when it takes in desirable territory, which 
can be erected into States in the Union, and 
whose people are willing and fit to become 
American citizens. We favor expansion by 
every peaceful and legitimate means ; but 
we are unalterably opposed to seizing or 
purchasing distant islands, to be governed 
outside the Constitution, and whose people 
can never become citizens. 

We are in favor of extendingthe Republic's 
influence among the nations, but believe 
that influence should be extended not by 
force and violence, but through the persua- 
sive power of a high and^honorable example. 

The importance of other questions now 
pending before the American people is in no 
wise diminished, and the Democratic party 
takes no backward step from its position on 
them ; but the burning issue of Imperialism 
growing out of the Spanish war involves 
the very existence of the Republic and the 
destruction of our free institutions. We re- 
gard it as the paramount issue of the cam- 
paign. 

The declaration in the Republican plat- 
form adopted at the Philadelphia Conven- 
tion, held in June, 1900, that the Republican 
party "steadfastly adheres to the policy an- 
nounced in the Monroe Doctrine," is mani- 
festly insincere and deceptive. This profes- 
sion is contradicted by the avowed policy of 
that party, in opposition to the spirit of the 
Monroe Doctrine, to acquire and hold sov- 
ereignty over large areas of territory and 
large numbers of people in the Eastern 
Hemisphere. We insist on the strict main- 
tenance of the Monroe Doctrine in all its in- 
tegrity, both in letter and in spirit, as neces- 
sary to prevent the extension of European 
authority on this continent, and as essential 
to our supremacy in American affairs. At 
the same time, we declare that no American 
people shall ever be held by force in unwill- 
mg subjection to European authority. 

We oppose Militarism. It means conquest 
abroad and intimidation and oppression at 
home. It means the strong arm which has 
ever been fatal to free institutions. It is 
what millions of our citizens have fled from 
in Europe. It will impose upon our peace- 
loving people a large standing army and un- 
necessary burden of taxation and will be a 
constant menace to their liberties. 

A small standing army and a well-disci- 
plined State militia are amply sufficient in 
time of peace. This Republic has no place 
for a vast military service and conscription. 
In time of danger the volunteer soldier is 
his country's best defender. The National 
Guard of the United States should ever be 
cherished in the patriotic hearts of a free 
people. Such organizations are ever an ele- 
ment of strength and safety. 

For the first time in our history and co- 
eval with the Philippine conquest has there 
been a wholesale departure from our time- 
honored and approved system of volunteer 
organization. Vve denounce it as unAmeri- 
can, undemocratic and unrepublican, and 



as a subversion of the ancient and fixed 
principles of a free people. 

Private monopolies are indefensible and 
intolerable. They destroy competition, con- 
trol the price of all material and of tlie 
finished product, thus robbing both producer 
and consumer. They lessen the employment 
of labor, and arbitrarily fix the terms and 
conditions thereof and deprive individual 
energy i nd small capital of their oppor- 
tunity for oetterment. 

They are the most eificient means yet de- 
vised for appropriating the fruits of industry 
to the benefit of the tew at the expense of 
the many, and, unless their insatiate greed 
is checked, all wealth will be aggregated in 
a few hands and the Republic destroyed. 

The dishonest paltering with the Trust 
evil by the Republican party in State and 
national platforms is conclusive proof of 
the truth of the charge that Trusts are the 
legitimate product of Republican policies ; 
that they are fostered by Republican laws, 
and that they are protected by the Republi- 
can Administration in return for campaign 
subscriptions and political support. 

We pledge the Democratic party to an un- 
ceasing warfare in nation. State and city 
against private monopoly in every form. 
Existing laws against Trusts must be en- 
forced, and more stringent ones must be en- 
acted providing for publicity as to the af- 
fairs of corporations engaged in interstate 
commerce, requiring all corporations to 
show, before doing business outside of the 
State of their origin, that they have no water 
in their stock, and that they have not at- 
tempted and are not attempting to monopo- 
lize ciny branch of business or the produc- 
tion of any articles of merchandise. And 
the whole constitutional power of Congress 
over interstate commerce, the mails and all 
modes of interstate communication, shall be 
exercised by the enactment of comprehen- 
sive laws upon the subject of Trusts. 

Tariff laws should be amended by putting 
the products of Trusts upon the free list, to 
prevent monopoly under the plea of protec- 
tion. 

The failure of the present Republican Ad- 
ministration, with an absolute control over 
all the branches of the national government, 
to enact any legislation designed to prevent 
or even curtail the absorbing power of 
Trusts and illegal combinations, or to en- 
force the anti-Trust laws already on the 
statute books, proves the insincerity of the 
high-sounding phrases of the Republican 
platform. 

Corporations should be protected in all 
their rights, and their legitimate interests 
should be respected, but any attempt by 
corporations to interfere with the public af- 
fairs of the people or to control the sov- 
ereignty which creates them, should be for- 
bidden, under such penalties as will make 
such attempts impossible. 

We condemn the Dingley TariflF law as a 
Trust-breeding measure, skillfully devised 
to give the few favors which they do not de- 
serve and to place upon the many burdens 
which they should not bear. 

We favor such an enlargement of the scope 
of the Interstate Commerce law as will en- 
able the Commission to protect individuals 
and communities from discriminations and 
the public from unjust and unfair transpor- 
tation rates. 

We reaffirm and indorse the principles of 
the National Democratic platform adopted 
at Chicago in 1896, and we reiterate the de- 



April, 1901 ^ toDaTf 


Calculated for Latitude 40° N. Adapted to the States of Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware, 


Maryland, Virginia, Kentucky, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Missouri and Kansas. 


y. Z 

Si 




li 


THE SUN 


THE MOON 


THE TIDES, Philadelphia 


RISES 

A. M. 


SETS 

P. M. 


RISES 

P. M. 


SETS 

A. M. 


a 

< 


HIGH TIDE 


LOW TIDE 1 


A. M. 


P. M. 


A. M. 


p. M. 








¥7^7 


"hTmT 


H. M. 


H. M. 1 D. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


1 


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m 


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12 




2 


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2 


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m 


5 43 


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MOON'S Phases, (eastern standard time.) | ^ tk*> j? 


© Full Moon... 


Q(J_ 


8h. 20m. P. M. 
70/). 57m. P. M. 


PHiladelphia Record 


(?■ Last Quarte 


r lid. 


® New Moon 18d. 4h. 37ni. P. M. 




■^ First Quarter 25d. 11 h. 15m. A. M. 


LaUst Telegraphic News. 



The Philadelphia Record Jtlmanac. 



maud of that platform for an American 
financial system made by the American 
people for themselves, which shall restore 
and maintain a bimetallic price level, and as 
part of such system the immediate restora- 
tion of free and unlimited coinage of silver 
and gold at the present legal ratio of 16 to 
1 without waiting for the aid or consent of 
any other nation. 

We denounce the Currency bill enacted at 
the last session of Congress as a step forward 
in the Republican policy which aims to dis- 
credit the sovereign right of the National 
Government to issue all money, whether 
coin or paper, and to bestow upon national 
banks the power to issue and control the 
volume of paper money for their own ben- 
efit. A permanent national bank currency, 
secured by the government bonds, must 
have a permanent debt to rest upon, and if 
the bank currency is to increase with popu- 
lation and business the debt must also in- 
crease. The Republican currency scheme 
is. therefore, a scheme for fastening upon 
the taxpayers a perpetual and growing debt 
for the benefit of the banks. We are opposed 
to this private corporation paper circulated 
as money, but without legal tender qualities, 
and demand the retirement of the national 
bank notes as fast as this government paper 
and silver certificates can be substituted for 
them. 

We favor an amendment to the Federal 
Constitution providing for the election of 
United States Senators by direct vote of the 
people, and we favor direct legislation 
wherever practicable. 

We are opposed to government by injunc- 
tion ; we denoimce the blacklist, and favor 
arbitration as a means of settling disputes 
between corporations and their employes. 

In the interest of American labor and the 
uplif'ing of the workingman, as the corner- 
stone of the prosperity of our coinitry, we 
recommend that Congress create a Depart- 
ment of Labor, in charge of a secretary, with 
a seat in the Cabinet, believing that the ele- 
vation of the American laborer will bring 
with it increased prosperity to our country 
at home and to our commerce abroad. 

We are prond of the courage and fidelity 
of the American soldiers and sailors in ill 
our wars ; we favor liberal pensions to tiem 
and their dependents, and we reiterate the 
position taken in the Chicago platform in 
1896. that the fact of enlistment and service 
shall be deemed conclusive evidence agai ist 
disease and disability before enlistment. 

We favor the immediate constructi. n, 
ownership and control of the Nicaragua 
Canal by the United States, and we re- 
nounce the insincerity of the plank in tiie 
late Republican platform for an Isthmirin 
Canal in face of the failure of the Republi- 
can majority to pass the iiending bill in 
Congress. 

We condemn the Hay-Pauncefote treaty 
{IS a surrender of American rights and in- 
terests not to be tolerated by the American 
people. 

We denounce the failure of the Republi- 

tfi party to carry out its pledges, to grant 
atehood to the Territories of Arizona, 
New Mexico and Oklahoma, and we promise 
the people of those Territories immediate 
Statehood and home rule during their con- 
dition as Territories; and we favor home 
rule and a territorial form of government 
for Alaska and Porto Rico. 

We favor an intelligent system of improv- 
ing the arid lands of the West, storing the 



waters for purposes of irrigation, and the 
holding of such lands for actual settlers. 

We favor the continuance and strict en- 
forcement of the Chinese Exclusion act and 
its application to the same classes of all 
Asiatic races. 

Jefferson said: "Peace, commerce and 
honest friendship with all nations ; entang- 
ling alliances with none." We approve this 
wholesome doctrine and earnestly protest 
against the Republican departure which has 
involved us in so-called world-politics, in- 
cluding the diplomacy of Europe and the 
intrigue and land-grabbing of Asia, and we 
e--pecially condemn the ill-concealed Repub- 
lican alliance with England, which must 
mean discrimination against other friendly 
nations, and which has already stifled the 
nation's voice while liberty is being stran- 
gled in Africa. 

Believing in the principles of self-govern- 
ment, and rejecting, as did our forefathers, 
the claim of monarchy, we view with indig- 
nation the purpose "of England to over- 
whelm with force the South African Repub- 
lic. Srieaking as we do, for the entire 
American nation, except its Republican 
officeholders, and for all free men every- 
where, we extend our sympathies to the 
heroic burghers in their" unequal struggle 
to maintain their liberty and independence. 

We denounce the large appropriations of 
recent Republican Congresses, which have 
kept taxes liigh and which threaten the per- 
petuation of oppression in war levies. 

We oppose the accumulation of a surplus 
to be squandered in such barefaced frauds 
upon the taxpayers as the Shipping Subsidy 
bill, which, under the false pretense of pros"- 
pering American ship-building, would put 
unearned millions into the pockets of fa- 
vorite contributors to the Republican cam- 
paign fund. We favor the reduction and 
speedy repeal of the war taxes and a return 
to the time-honored Democratic policy of 
strict economy in governmental expendi- 
tures. 

Believing that our most cherished institu- 
tionsarein great peril; that the very existence 
of our Constitutional Republic is at stake, 
and that the decision now to be rendered 
will determine whether or not our children 
are to enjoy those blessed privileges of free 
government which have made the United 
States great, prosperous and honored, we 
earnestly ask for the foregoing declaration 
of principles the hearty support of the lib- 
erty-loving American people, regardless of 
previous party affiliations. 

PEOPI^E'S. 

William J. Bryan, of Nebraska, for President, 

and Adiai E. Steuenson, of Illinois, 

for Vice-President. 

The People's party of the United States, in 
convention assembled, congratulating its 
supporters on the wide extension of its 
principles in all directions, does hereby re- 
affirm its adherence to the fundamental 
principles proclaimed in its two prior plat- 
forms, and calls upon all who desire to avert 
the subversion of free institutions by cor- 
porate and imperialistic power to unite with 
it in bringing the government back to the 
ideals of Washington, Jefferson, Jackson 
and Lincoln. 

It extends to its allies in the struggle for 
financial and economic freedom assurances 



May, 1901 >^ ^ ffn^r^ 


Calculated for Latitude 40° N. Adapted to the States of Pennsylvania. New Jersey, Delaware, 
Maryland, Virginia, Kentucky, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Missouri and Kansas. 


> 2 

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THE SUN 


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The Philadelphia Record Almanac. 



of its loyalty to the principles which ani- 
mate the allied forces and the promise of 
honest and hearty co-operation in every ef- 
fort for their succfss. 

To tile people of the United States we offer 
the following platform as the expression of 
our unalicrable convictions : 

Resolved, That we denounce the Act of 
March 14, 1900, as the culmination of a long ' 
series of conspiracies to deprive the people | 
of their constitutional rights over the money 
of the nation, and relegate to a gigantic 
money trust the control of the purse, and 
hence of the people. 

We denounce this Act, First, for making all 
money obligations, domestic and foreign, 
payable in gold coin or its equivalent, thus 
enormously increasing the burdens of the 
debtors and (^nricliing the creditors. 

Second.— For refunding "coin bonds " not 
to mature fur years into longtime gold bonds, j 
so as to make their payment improbable and ' 
our debt perpetual. I 

Third.— For taking from the treasury over | 
$50,000,000 in a time of war, and presenting it 
at a premium to bondholders, to accomplish 
the refunding of bonds not due. 

Fourth.— For doubling the capifal of bank- 
ers by returning to tliem the face value of 
their bonds in current money notes, so that 
they may draw one interest from the Govern- 
ment and another from the people. 

Fifth.— For allowing banks to expand and 
contract their circulation at pleasure, thus 
controlling prices of all products. 

Sixth. — For atithorizing the Secretary of 
the Treasury to issue new gold bonds to an 
unlimited amount whenever he deems it 
necessary to reiileni^h the gold hoard, thus 
enabling usurers to secure more bonds and 
more bank currency, by drawing gold from 
the treasury, thereby creating an " endless 
chain" for perpetually adding to a per- 
petual debt. 

Seventh.— For striking down the greenback 
in order to force the people to borrow 8346,- 
OOO.noo more from the banks, at an annual 
cost of over S20,000,000. 

While barring out the money of the Con- 
stitution, this law opens the printing mints 
of the treasury to the free coinage of bank 
paper money, to enrich the few and impov- 
erish the many. 

We pledge anew the People's party never 
to cease the agitation until this eighth finan- 
cial conspiracy is blotted from the statute 
books, the Lincoln greenback restored, the 
bonds all paid, and all corporation money 
forever retired. 

We reaffirm the demand for the reopening 
of the mints of the United States to the free 
and unlimited conage of silver and gold at 
the present legal ratio of 16 to 1, the imme- 
diate increase in the volimie of silver coins 
and certificates thus created to lie substituted, 
dollar for dollar, for the bank notes issued by 
private corporations under s|iecial ijrivileges 
granted by law of March 14, 190.1. and prior 
national banking laws, the remaining por- 
tion of the bank notes to be replaced with j 
full legal tender government paper money, 
and its volume so controlled as to maintain 
at all times a stable money market and a 
stable price-level. 

We demand a graduated income and in- 
heritance tax, to the end that aggregated 
wealth shall bear its just proportion of taxa- 
tion. 

We dfmand that postal savings-banks be 
established by the Government for the *afe 



deposit of the savings of the people and to 
facilitate exchange. 

With Thomas Jeffer.'^on, we declare the 
land, including all natural sources of wealth, 
the inalienable heritage of the people. Gov- 
ernment should so act as to secure homes for 
the people, and prevent land monopoly. 
The original homestead policy should he en- 
forced and future settlers upon the public 
domain should be entitled to a free home- 
stead, while all who have paid an acreage 
price to the Government under existing 
laws should have their homestead rights re- 
stored. 

Transportation, being a means of exchange 
and a public necessity, the Government 
should ov\ n and operate the railroads in the 
interest of the people, and on a non-partisan 
basis, to the end that all may he accorded 
the same treatment in transportation, and 
that the extortion, tyranny, and political 
power now exercised by the great railroad 
corporations, which result in the impair- 
ment, if not the destruction, of the political 
rights and personal liberties of the citizen, 
may be destroyed. Such ownership is to be 
accomplished in a manner consistent with 
sound public policy. 

Trusts, the overshadowing evil of the age, 
are the result and culmination of the private 
ownership and control of the three great 
instruments of commerce — money, transpor- 
tation, and the means of transmission of 
information- which instruments of com- 
merce are public functions, and which our 
forefathers declared in the Constitution 
should be controlled by the people through 
their Congress for the public welfare. The 
one remedy for the Trusts is that the owner- 
ship and control be assumed and exercised 
by the people. We further demand that all 
tarifis on goods controlled by a Trust shall be 
abolished. 

To cope with the Trust evil, the people must 
act directly, without the intervention of 
representatives, who may be controlled or 
influenced. We therefore demand direct 
legislation, giving the people the law-making 
and veto power under the initiative and re- 
ferendum. A majority of the people can 
never be corruptly influenced. 

Applauding the valor of our army and 
navy in the Spanish war, we denounce the 
conduct of the Administration in changing a 
war of humanity into a war of conquest. 
Tb" «ction of the Administration in the 
PL._ , ., is in conflict with all the prece- 
dents' of our national life, at war with the 
Declaration of Independence, the Constitu- 
tion, and the plain precepts of humanity. 
Murder and arson have been our response to 
the appeals of the people whoaskeii only to 
establish a free government in their own 
land. We demand a stoppage of this war of 
extermination by the assurance to the 
Philippines of independence and protection 
under a stable government of their own 
creation. 

The Declaration of Independence, the 
Constitution, and the American flag are one 
and inseparable. The island of Porto Rico 
is a part of the territory of the United States, 
and by levying special and extraordinary 
customs duties on the commerce of that 
island, the Administration has violated the 
Constitution, abandoned the fundamental 
principles of American liberty, and has 
striven to give the lie to the contention of 
our forefathers, that there should be no tax- 
ation without representation. 

Out of the imperialism which would force 



June, 1901 >^ r^r."^ 


Calculated for Latitude 40° N. Adapted to the States of Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware. 


Maryland, Virginia, Kentucky, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Missouri and Kansas. 


S5 

il 


2* 


i 


THE SUN 


THE MOON 1 


THE TIDES, Philadelphia | 


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SETS 

A. M. 


u 

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< 


HIGH TIDE 


LOW TIDE 1 


A. M. 


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A. M. 


P. M. 








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MOON'S PHASES. (Eastern Standard Time.) 


^ TKe li* 


© Full Moon 2d. 4h. 53m. A. M. 


PhiladelpHia Record 


^ Last Quarter 9d. 5h. Om. P. M. 




® New Moon 16d, 8h. 33 n. A. M. 


The Cheapest Advertising 


5 First Quarter 23d. 3h. 59m. P. M. 


Medium. 



The Philadelphia Record JUmanac. 



an undesired domination on the people of 
the Philippines springs the un-American 
cry for a large standing army. Nothing in 
the character or purposes of our people 
justifies us in ig;noring tlie plain lesson of 
history and putting our liberties in jeopardy 
by assuming the burden of militarism vvliich 
is crushing the people of the Old World. We 
denounce the Administration for its sinister 
efforts to substitute a standing array for the 
citizen soldiery, which is the oest safeguard 
of the Republic. 

We extend to the brave Boers of South 
Africa our sympathy and moral support in 
their patriotic struggle for the right of self- 
government, and we are unalterably opposed 
to any alliance, open or covert, between the 
United States and any other nation that will 
tend to the destruction of human liberty. 

A further manifestation of imperialism is 
to be found in the mining districts of Idaho. 
In the Cceur d'Alene soldiers have been used 
to overawe miners striving for a greater 
measure of industrial independence. We 
denounce the State government of Idaho 
and the Federal government for employing 
the njilitary arm of the government to 
abridge the civil rights of the people, and to 
enforce an infamous permit system which 
denies to laborers tiieir inherent liberty and 
compels them to forswear their manhood 
and their right before being permitted to 
seeli employment. 

The importation of Japanese and other 
laborers under contract to serve monopo- 
listic corporations is a notorious and flagrant 
violation of the immigration laws. We de- 
mand that the Federal government take cog- 
nizance of this menacing evil and repress it 
under existing laws. We further pledge our- 
selves to strive for the enactment of more 
stringent laws for the exclusion of Mongo- 
lian and Malayan immigration. 

We indorse municipal ownership of public 
utilities, and declare that the advantages 
which have accrued to the public under that 
system would be multiplied a hundredfold 
by its extension to natural interstate mono- 
polies. 

We denounce the practice of issuing in- 
junctions in cases of dispute between em- 
ployers and -employees, making criminal 
acts by organizations which are not criminal 
when performed by individuals, and demand 
legislation to restrain the evil. 

We demand that United States Senators 
and all other officials, as far as practicable, 
be elected by direct vote of the people. 

Believing that the elective franchise and 
untrammeled ballot are essential to a gov- 
ernment of, for, and by the people, "the 
People's party condemns the wholesale sys- 
tem of disfranchisement by coercion and 
intimidation adopted in some States as un- | 
republican and undemocratic, and we de- | 
Clare it to be the duty of the several State 
legislatures to take such action as will secure 
a full, free and fair ballot and an honest 
count. 

We favor home-rule in the Territories and 
the District of Columbia, and the early ad- 
mission of the Territories as States. 

We denounce the expensive red-tape sys- 
tem, political favoritism, cruel and unneces- 
sary delay, and criminal evasion of the 
statutes in the management of the pension 
office, and demand the simple and honest 
execution of the law, and the fulfillment by 
the nation of its pledges of service pension 
to all its honorably discharged veterans. 



PEOPLE'S 
( Middle-of-tbe-Road) . 

Wharton Barker, of Pennsylvania, for President, 

and Ignatius Donnelly, of Minnesota, 

for Vice-President. 

The People's party of the United States, 
assembled in National Convention this 10th 
day of May, 1900, affirming our unshaken 
belief in the cardinal tenets of the People's 
party as set forth in the Omaha platform, 
and pledging ourselves anew to. continued 
advocacy of those grand principles of human 
liberty until right shall triumph over might 
and love over greed, do adopt and proclaim 
this declaration of faith : 

First.— We demand the initiative and re- 
ferendum, and the imperative mandate for 
such changes of existing fundamental and 
statute law as will enable the people in their 
sovereign capacity to propose and compel the 
enactment of such laws as they desire, to re- 
ject such as they deem injurious to their inter- 
ests, and to recall unfaithful public servants. 

Second.— We demand the public owner- 
ship and operation of those means of com- 
munication, transportation and production 
which the people may elect, such as rail- 
roads, telegraph and "telephone lines, coal 
mines, etc. 

Third.— The land, including all natural 
sources of wealth, is a heritage of the people 
and should not be monopolized for specula- 
tive purposes, and alien ownership of land 
should be prohibited. All land now held by 
railroads and other corporations in excess of 
their actual needs, and all lands now owned 
by aliens, should be reclaimed by the Gov- 
ernment and held for actual settlers only. 

Fourth. — A scientific and absolute paper 
money, based uywn the entire wealth and 
population of the nation, not redeemable in 
any specific commodity, but made a full 
legal tender for all debts and receivable for 
all taxes and public dues, and issued by the 
Government only, without the intervention 
of banks, and in sufficient quantity to meet 
the demands of commerce, is the best cur- 
rency that can be devised ; but until such a 
financial system is secured, which we shall 
press for adoption, we favor the free and un- 
limited coinage of both silver and gold at 
the legal ratio of 16 to 1. 

Fifth.— We demand the levy and collection 
of a graduated tax on inconies and inherit- 
ances, and a constitutional amendment to 
secure the same, if necessary. 

Sixth.— We demand the election of Presi- 
dent, Vice-President, Federal Judges and 
United States Senators by direct vote of the 
people. 

Seventh.— We are opposed to Trusts, and 
declare the contention between the old par- 
ties on the monopoly question is a sham 
battle, anci that no solution of this mighty 
problem is possible without the adoption of 
the principles of public ownership of public 
utilities. 

.SILVER. REPUBLICAN. 

William J. Bryan, of Nebraska, for President, 
and Adiai E. Stevenson, of Illinois, 
for Vice-President. 
We, the Silver Republican party in Na- 
tional Convention assembled, declare these 
as our principles, and invite the co-opera- 
tion of all those who agree therewith : 

We recognize that the principles set forth 
in the Declaration of American Independ- 



jviiy, 1901 ^ itn^r*^ 


Calculated for Latitude 40° N. Adapted to the States of Pennsylvania, New Jersey. Delaware, 
Maryland, Virginia. Kentucky, Ohio, Indiana, llli/wis, Missouri and Kansas. 


of 
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11 


THE SUn| 


THE MOON 1 


THE TIDES, Philadelphia 


RISES 

A. M. 


SETS 
P. M. 


RISES 
P. M. 


SETS 

A. M. 


< 


HIGH TIDE 


LOW TIDE 1 


A. M. 


P. M. 


A. M. 


p. M. 


1 


Mo 


m 


H. M. 

4 35 


H. M. 

7 32 


H. M. 

7 14 


H. M. D. 

4 23 15 


H. M. j 

1 2 


H. M. 

1 23 


H. M. 

8 21 


H. M. 

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9 8 


7 2718 


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MOON'S Phases, (eastern standard time.) 


ii» THe ^ 


©Full Moon Id. 6h. 17m. P.M. 

§ Last Quarter 8d. lOh. 20m. P. M. 

® New Moon 1 5d. 5h. 10m. P. M. 

5 first Quarter 23d. 8h. 58m. A. M. 

© Full Moon 31d. 5h. 34m. A. M. 


PHiladelpKia Record 

A Welcome Visitant in the 
Home. 



The Philadelphia Record Jtlmanac. 



ence are fundamental and everlastingly true 
in their application to governments among 
men. We believe the patriotic words of Wash- 
ington's Farewell Address to be the words of 
soberness and wisdom inspired by the spirit 
of right and truth. We treasure the words 
of Jefferson as priceless gems of American 
statesmanship. We hold in sacred remem- 
brance the broad philanthropy and patriot- 
ism of Lincoln, who was the great inter- 
preter of American history and the great 
apostle of himian rights and of industrial 
freedom, and we declare, as was declared 
by the convention that nominated the great 
emancipator, that the maintenance of the 
principles promulgated in the Declaration 
of Independence and embodied in the Fed- 
eral Constitution, "that all men are created 
equal : that they are endowed by their 
Creator with certain unalienable rights; 
that among these are life, liberty and the 
pursuit of happiness; that to secure these 
rights governments are instituted among 
men, deriving their just powers from the 
consent of the governed"— is essential to 
the preservation of our Republican institu- 
tions. 

We declare our adherence to the principle 
of bimetallism as the right basis of a mone- 
tary system under our national Constitution, 
a principle that found place repeatedly in 
Republican platforms from the demonetiza- 
tion of silver in 1873 to the St. Louis Repub- 
lican Convention in 1896. 

Since that convention a Republican Con- 
gress and a Republican President, at the 
dictation of the Trusts and money power, 
have passed and approved a Currency bill, 
which in itself is a repudiation of the doc- 
trine of bimetallism advocated theretofore 
by the President and every great leader of 
his party. 

This Currency law destroys the full money 
power of the silver dollar, provides for the 
payment of all Government obligations and 
the redemption of all forms of paper money 
in gold alone, retires the time-honored and 
patriotic greenbacks, constituting one-si.\th 
of the money in circulation, and surrenders 
to banking corporations a sovereign func- 
tion of issuing all paper money, thus en- 
abling these corporations to control the 
prices of labor and property by increasing 
or diminishing the volume of money in cir- 
culation, thus giving the banks ijower to 
create panics and bring disaster upon busi- 
ness enterprises. 

The provisions of this Currency law making 
the bonded debt of the Republic payable in 
gold alone change the contracts between 
the Government and the bondholders to the 
advantage of the latter, and are in direct op- 
position to the declaration of the Matthews 
resolution passed by Congress in 1878, for 
which resolution the present Republican 
President, then a member of Congress, voted, 
as did also all leading Republicans, both in 
the House and Senate. 

We declare it to be our intention to lend 
our efforts to the repeal of this Currency 
law, which not only repudiates the ancient 
and time-honored principles of the American 
people before the Constitution was adopted, 
but is violative of the principles of the Con- 
stitution itself; and we shall not cease our 
efforts until there has been established in its 
place a monetary system based upon the free 
and unlimited coinage of silver and gold into 
money at the present legal ratio of 16 to 1 by 
the independent action of the United States 
under which system all paper money shall 



be issued by the Government, and all such 
money coined or issued shall be a full legal 
tender in payment of all debts, public and 
private, without exception. 

We are in favor of a graduated tax upon 
incomes, and, if necessary to accomplish 
this, we favor an amendment to the Con- 
stitution. 

We believe that United States Senators 
ought to be elected by a direct vote of the 
people, and we favor such amendment of 
the Constitution and such legislation as 
may be necessary to that end. 

We favor the maintenance and the exten- 
sion wherever practicable of the merit sys- 
tem in the public service, appointments to 
be made according to fitness, competitively 
ascertained, and public servants to be re- 
tained in office only so long as shall be com- 
patible with the efficiency of the service. 

Combinations, trusts and monopolies con- 
trived and arninged for the purpose of con- 
trolling the prices and quantity of articles 
supplied to the public are unjust, unlawful 
and oppressive. Not only do these unlawful 
conspiracies fix the prices of commodities 
in many cases, but they invade every branch 
of the State and National Government with 
their polluting influence, and control the 
actions of their employees and dependents 
in private life until the'ir intluence actually 
imperils society and the liberty of the citi- 
zen. We declare against them. We de- 
mand the most stringent laws for their de- 
struction, the most severe punishment of 
their promoters and maintainors, and the 
energetic enforcement of such laws by the 
courts. 

We believe the Monroe Doctrine to be 
sound in principle and a wise nntional 
policy, and we demand a firm adherence 
tliereto. We condemn acts inconsistent with 
it, and that tend to make us parties to the in- 
terests and to involve us in the controversies 
of European nations, and to recognition by 
pending treaty of the right of England to 
be considered in the construction of an In- 
teroceanic canal. We declare tliat such 
canal, when constructed, ought to be con- 
trolled by the United States in the interests 
of American nations. 

We observe with anxiety and regard with 
disapproval the increasing ownersliip of 
American lands by aliens and their grow- 
ing control over our international trans- 
portation, natural resources and public 
utilities. We demand legislation to protect 
our public domain, our natural resources, 
our franchises and our internal commerce, 
and to keep them free and maintain their 
independence of all foreign monopolies, in- 
stitutions and influences, and we declare our 
opposition to the leasing of the public lands 
of the United States whereby corporations 
and syndicates will be able to secure control 
thereof and thus monopolize the public do- 
main, the heritage of the people. We are 
in favor of the principles of direct legisla- 
tion. 

In view of the great sacrifice made and 
patriotic services rendered, we are in favor 
of liberal pensions to deserving soldiers, 
their widows, orphans and otlier de- 
pendents. We believe that enlistment and 
service should be accepted as conclusive 
proof that the soldier was free from disease 
and disability at the time of his enlistment. 
We condemn the present administration of 
the pension laws. 

We tender to the patriotic people of the 
South African republics our sympathy and 



Aug'ust, 1901 ^ Ifo^T^- 


Calculated for Latitude 40° N. Adapted to the States of Pennsylvania. New Jersey, Delaware, 
Maryland, Virginia, Kentucky, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Missouri and Kansas. 


OS 


o5 




THE SUN 


THE MOON 


THE TIDES, Philadelphia 


RISES ' SETS 

A. M. j P. M. 


RISES 

P. M. 


SETS 1^ 

A. M. < 


HIGH TIDE 


LOW TIDE 1 


A. M. 


P. M. 


^A^ M. 


P. M. 


1 


Th 


m 


H. M. H. M. 

4 58 7 14 


H. M. 

7 42 


H. M. 1 D. 

6 2017 


H. M. 

2 7 


H. M. 

2 29 


H. M. 

9 26 


H^ M. 

9 48 


2 


Fr 


^ 


4 58 7 13 


8 16 


7 2618 


2 51 


3 13 


10 10 


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3 


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^ 


4 59 7 12 


8 50 


8 36 19 


3 36 


3 59 


10 55 


11 18 


4 


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5 07 11 


9 23 9 44 20 


4 22 


4 46 


11 41 




5 


Mo 




5 1 7 10 


10 0105321 


5 10 


5 33 


5 


29 


6 


Tu 


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5 27 9 


10 40 p. M. l22 


5 57 


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7 21 


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7 54 


8 29 


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9 


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17 3 17 25 


9 6 


9 42 


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5 1 


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11 21 


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6 9 


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12 


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18 


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2 29 


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1 9 48 


10 11 


MOON'S Phases, (eastern standard time.) 


^ The 1^ 1 


S^ Last Quarter 7d. 3h. 2m. A. M. 

® New Moon 74rf. 3h. 27m. A. M. 


PKiladel, 


aKia R 


ecord 




irst Q 
'ull M 


oon ... 




22d 

29d 


2h. 52m. 
3h. 21m. 


A. M 
P. M 




AV 


mMe Fine 


mcial Sta 


ements. 



The Philadelph a Record JUmanac. 



express our admiration for them in their 
heroic attempts to preserve their political 
freedom and maintain their national inde- 
pendence. We declare the destruction of 
those republics and the subjugation of their 
people to be a crime against civilization. 
We believe this sympathy should have been 
voiced by the American Congress, as was 
done in the case of the French, the Greeks, 
the Hunyarian', the Polanders, the Ar- 
menians and the Cubans, and as the tradi- 
tions of this country would have dictated. 

We declare the Porto Rican Tariff law to be 
not only a serious but adangerous departure 
from the principles of our form of govern- 
ment. We believe in a republican form of 
Kovernmeiit, and are opposed to monarchy 
and to the whole theory of impi'riali.stic 
control. We believe in self-government— a 
government by consent of the governed, and 
are unalterably opposed to a government 
based upon force, It is clear and certain 
that the inhabitants of|the Philippine archi- 
pelago cannot be made citizens of the United 
States without endangering our civilization. 
We are, therefore, in favor of applying to 
the Philippine archipelago the principle 
we are solemnly and publically pledged to 
observe in the case of Cuba. 

There being no longer any necessity for 
collecting war taxes, we demand the repeal 
of the war taxes levied to carry on the war 
with Spain. 

We favor the immedinte admission into 
the Union of States of tlie Territories of Ari- 
zona, New Mexico and Oklahoma. 

We demand that our nation's promises to 
Cuba shall be fulrilled in every particular. 

We contend that the Natiotial Government 
should lend every aid and encouragement 
and assistance toward the reclamation of 
the arid lands of the United States, and to 
that end we are in favor of a comprehen- 
sive survey thereof and an immedinte ascer- 
tainment "of the water supply available for 
such reclamation, and we believe it to be 
the duty of the General Government to pro- 
vide for the construction of storage reser- 
voirs and irrigation works, so that the water 
supply of the arid region may be utilized to 
the greatest possible extent in the interests 
of the people, while preserving all rights of 
the State. 

Transportation is a public necessity, and 
the means and methods of it are maiters of 
public concern. Railway companies exer- 
cise a power over industries, business and 
commerce which they ought not to do, and 
should be made to serve the public interests 
without making unreasonable charges or 
unjust discrimination. We observe with 
satisfaction the growing sentiment among 
the people in favor of the public ownership 
and operation of public utilities. 

Peace is the virtue of civilis^ation and war 
is its crime. War is only justified when the 
oppressors of humanity will heed no other 
appeal, and when the enemies of liberty 
will respond to no other demand. However 
high and pure may be the purposes of an 
appeal to arms in the beginning, war be- 
comes immoral when cuntiinied for the pur- 
pose of subjugation or for national aggran- 
dizement. 

We are in favor of expanding our com- 
merce in the interests of American labor 
and for the benefit of all our people, by 
every honest and peaceful means ; but when 
war is waged to extend trade, fune com- 
nierce, or to acquire wealth, it is national 
piracy. Our creed and our history justify the 



nations of the earth in expecting that 
wherever the American flag is unfurled in 
authority human liberty and political free- 
dom will be found. We protest against the 
adoption of any policy that will change in 
the thought of the world the meaning of our 
flag. We insist that it shall never float over 
any vessel or wave at the head of any col- 
umn directed against the political indepen- 
dence of any people or of any race, or in any 
clime. 

We are opposed to the importation ol 
Asiatic laborers in competition with Ameri- 
can labor, and advocate a more rigid enforce- 
ment of the laws relating thereto. 

The Silver Republican party of the United 
States, in the foregoing principles, seeks to 
perpetuate the spirit and to adhere to the 
teachings of Abraham Lincoln. 

PR.OHIBITIONIST. 

John 6. Woolley, of Illinois, for President, and 

Henry B. Metcalf, of Rhode Island, 

for Vice-President. 

The National Prohibition party, in con- 
vention represented at Chicago, June 27 and 
28, 1900, acknowledge Almighty God as the 
supreme source of all just government, real- 
izing that this Republic was founded upon 
Christian principles and can endure only ns 
it embodies justice and righteousness, and 
asserting that all authority should seek the 
best good of all the governed, to this end 
wisely prohibiting what is wrong and per- 
mitting only what is right, hereby records 
and proclaims : 

1. We accept and assert the definition 
given by Edmund Burke that " a party is a 
body of men joined together for the purpose 
of promoting, by their joint endeavor, the 
national interest upon some particular piin- 
ciple upon which they are all agreed." We 
declare that'there is no principle now advo- 
cated by any other party which could be 
made a fact in government with such benefi- 
cent moral and material results as the prin- 
ciple of prohibition applied to tlie beverage 
liquor traffic; that the national interest 
could be promoted in no other way so surely 
and widely as by its assertion, through a 
national policy and the co-operation therein 
of every State, forbidding the manufacture, 
sale, exportation, importation and transpor- 
tation of intoxicating liquors (or beverage 
purposes; that we stand for this as the only 
principle proposed by any party anywhere 
for the settlement of a question greater and 
graver than any other before the American 
people, and involving more profoundly than 
any other their moral future and financial 
welfare : and that all the patriotic citizen- 
ship of this country, agreed upon this prin- 
ciple, however much disagreement tliere 
may be upon minor considerations and 
issues, should stand together at the ballot- 
box, from this time forward, until prohibi- 
tion is the established law of the United 
Stales, with a party in power to enforce it 
and to insure its moral and material ben- 
efits. 

We insist that such a party, agreed upon 
this principle and policy, having sober 
leadership, without any obligation for suc- 
cess to the saloon vote and to those demoral- 
izing political combinations of men and 
money now allied therewith and suppliant 
thereto, cotild successfully cope with all 
other and lesser problems of government, in 
legislative halls and in the legislative chair. 



September, 1901 



9tK Month. 
30 Days. 



Calculated for Latitude 40° N. Adapted to the States of Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware, 
Maryland, Virginia, Kentucky, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Missouri and Kansas. 



1 

2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 

10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
30 



Su 

Mo 
Tu 
W 
Th 
Fr 
8a 
Su 
Mo 
Tu 
W 
Th 
Fr 
8ti 
Su 
Mo 
Tu 
W 
Th 
Fr 
8h, 
Su 
Mo 
Tu 
W 
Th 
Fr 
Sa 
Su 
AFo 



^ 
f?**^ 









THE SUN 



RISES SETS 

A. M. ! P. M. 



H. M. H. M. 

5 27 6 38 

3 28 6 32 

29 6 30 

306 28 

316 27 

32 6 25 

33 6 24 

34 6 22 

35 6 20 

36 6 19 
366 17 
37:6 16 
38 6 14 
396 12 
406 11 

5 416 
5 426 
5 436 
5 44 6 
5 45 6 2 
5 46 6 1 
5 47 5 59 
5 48'5 57 
5 49 5 55 
5 505 54 
5 51 5 52 
5 52 5 51 
5 535 49 
5 54 5 47 
5 555 46 



THE MOON 



RISES 

P. M. 



SETS 

A. M. 



8 8 

8 39; 9 

9 2411 

10 14 p. 

11 10 

A. M. 

10 

1 12 
16 

18 
21 
21 

22^ 
21 
19 
16 



4118 
5119 

120 
M. 21 
lli22 

723 
57'24 
4125 
1826 
52J2 
23'28 
51 
20 
50 
22 



10 11 

11 6 
11 57 

p. M. 

1 35 

2 17 

2 57 

3 34 

4 10 

4 44 

5 19 

5 56\ 

6 36 

7 19 



55 
30 
10 
55 
45 
40 9 
M. 10 
3811 
4012 
4613 
5514 
6|15 
20116 
32|17 
4518 



THE TIDES 



15| 

55\ 
46 

4ll 
43 
53 



3 39 

4 29 

5 20 

6 13 

7 11 

8 17 

9 27 



Philadelphia 


LOW TIDE 


A. M. P. M. 
H. M. H. M. 

10 3410 58 


11 23 11 48 


H 



9 59;i0 30 

10 5911 26 

11 52| 

16' 

581 



1 

2 
2 
3 
4 
4 
5 
6 
7 

8 8 

9 12 

10 14 

11 13 



38 

1 17 

54| 
33! 

12| 
51 
32' 

15 



39 

1 32 

2 30 

3 36 

4 46 

5 49 

6 45 

7 35 

8 17 

8 55 

9 32 



2 ( 

12 

18 
18 
11 



33 

1 18 

2 6 
2 56 



5 58 


34 


6 46 


1 17 


7 38 


2 5 


8 41 


2 57 


9 43 


4 


10 44 


5 2 


11 41 


6 3 


7 


7 


56 


7 52 


1 42 


8 37 


2 31 


9 25 


3 22 


10 15 



w 
16 
9 13 
9 52 
10 11 10 31 

10 5011 10 

11 3011 51 
12 

55 

1 40 

2 30 

3 27 

4 31 

5 33 

6 32 

7 26 

8 15 

9 ] 
9 5() 

10 41 



MOON'S Phases, (eastern standard time.) 

ff Last Quarter 5d. 8h. 27m. A. M. 

^NewMoon 12d, 4h. 18m. P. M. 

5) First Quarter 20d. 8h. 33m. P. M. 

© Full Moon 2Sd. Oh. 36m. A. M. 



^ The li* 
PhiladelpHia Record 

Household Knoivledge . 
Social Happenings. 



The Philadelphia Record JUmanac. 



and that it is useless for any party to make 
declarations in its platform as to any ques- 
tions concerning which there may be serious 
differences of opinion in its own member- 
ship and as to wliich, because of such differ- 
ences, the party could legislate only on a basis 
of mutual concessions when coming into 
power. 

We submit that the Democratic and Re- 
publican parties are alike insincere in their 
assumed policy toward trusts and monopo- 
lies. They dare not and do not attack the 
most dangerous of them all— the liquor 
power. So long as the saloon debauches 
the citizen and breeds the purchaseable 
voter, money will continue to buy its way to 
power. Break down this traffic, elevate 
manhood, and a sober citizenship will find 
a way to control dangerous combinations of 
capital. 

\Ve propose as a first step in the financial 
problems of the nation to save more than a 
billion dollars every year now annually 
expended to support the liquor traffic and 
to demoralize our people. When this is 
accomplished, conditions will have so im- 
proved that with a clearer atmosphere the 
country can address itself to the questions 
as to the kind and quantity of currency 
needed. 

2. We reaffirm as true, indisputably, the 
declaration of William Windom, when Sec- 
retary of the Treasury in the Cabinet of 
President Arthur, that, " considered socially, 
financially, politically or morally, the li- 
censed liquor traffic is, or ought to be, the 
overwhelming issue in American politics," 
and that "the destruction of this iniquity 
stands next on the calendar of the world's 
progress." We hold that the e.xistence of 
our party presents this issue squarely to the 
American people, and lays upon them the 
responsibility of choice between liquor par- 
ties, dominated by distillers and brewers, 
with their policy of saloon perpetuation, 
breeding waste, wickedness, woe, pauper- 
ism, taxation, corruption and crime, and our 
one party of patriotic and moral principle, 
with a policy which defends it from domina- 
tion by corrupt bosses and which insures it 
forever against the blighting control of 
saloon politics. 

We face with sorrow, shame and fear the 
awful fact that this liquor traffic has a grip 
on our government, municipal. State and na- 
tional, through the revenue system and 
.saloon sovereignty, which no other party 
dares to dispute— a grip which dominates the 
party now in power, from caucus to Con- 
gress, from policeman to President, from the 
rumshop to the White House — a grip which 
compels the Chief Executive to consent that 
law shall be nullified in behalf of the 
brewer, that the canteen shall curse our 
army and spread intemperance across the 
seas, and that our flag shall wave as the sym- 
bol of i)artnership, at home and abroad, be- 
tween this government and the men who 
defy and define it for their own profit and 
gain. 

3. We charge upon President McKinley, 
who was elected to his high office by appeals 
to Christian sentiment and patriotism al- 
most unprecedented and by a combination 
of moral influences never before seen in 
this country, that, by his conspicuous ex- 
ample as a wine drinker at public banquets, 
and as a wine-serving host in the White 
House, he has done more to encourage the 
liquor business, to demoralize the temper- 
ance habits of young men, and to bring 



Christian practices and requirements into 
disrepute, than any other President this 
Republic has had. We further charge upon 
President McKinley responsibility for the 
army canteen, with all its dire brood of dis- 
ease, immorality, sin and death, in this 
country, in Cuba, in Porto Rico and the 
Philippines ; and we insist that, by his atti- 
tude concerning the canteen and his ap- 
parent contempt for the vast number of 
petitions and petitioners protesting against 
it, he has outraged and iiisulte<l the moral 
sentiment of this country in such a manner, 
and to such a degree, as calls for its right- 
eous uprising and his indignant and ef- 
fective rebuke. 

We challenge denial of the fact that our 
Executive, as commander-in-chief of the 
military forces of the United States, at any 
time prior to or since March 2, 1899, could 
have closed every army saloon, called a can- 
teen, by executive order, as President Hayes 
did before him, and should have closed 
them for the same reasons which actuated 
President Hayes; we assert that the Act of 
Congress passed March 2, 1899, forbidding 
the sale of liquors "in any post, exchange 
or canteen," by any "officer or private 
soldier " or by " any other person," " on any 
premises used for military purposes by the 
United States," was and is as explicit an act 
of prohibition as the English language can 
frame ; we declare our solemn belief that 
the Attorney (General of the United States, 
in his interpretation of that law, and the 
Secretary of War, in his acceptance of that 
interpretation and his refusal to enforce the 
law, were and are guilty of treasonable nul- 
lification thereof, and that President ^Ic- 
Kinley, through his assent to and indorse- 
ment of such interpretation and refusal on 
the part of the officials apjiointed by and 
responsible to him, shares responsibility in 
their guilt; and we record our conviction 
that a new and serious peril confronts our 
country in the fact that its President, at the 
behest of the beer power, dare and does ab- 
rogate a law of Congress, through subordin- 
ates removable at will by him and whose 
acts become his, and thus virtually confesses 
that laws are to be administered or to be nul- 
lified in the interest of a law-defying busi- 
ness by an Administration under mortgage 
to such business for support. 

4. We deplore the fact that an Administra- 
tion of this Republic, claimnig the right 
and power to carry our flag across the seas 
and to conquer and annex new territory, 
should admit its lack of power to prohibit 
the American saloon on subjugated soil or 
should openly confess itself subject to liquor 
sovereignty under that flag. \\q are humil- 
iated, exasperated and grieved by the evi- 
dence painfully abundant that this Adminis- 
tration's policy of expansion is bearing so 
rapidly its fruits of drunkenness, insanity 
and crime, under the hot-house sun of the 
tropics, and when the President of the first 
Philippine Commission says "it was unfor- 
tunate that we introduced and established 
the saloon there to corrupt the natives and 
to exhibit the vices of our race." We charge 
the inhumanity and unchristianity of this 
act upon the Administration of President 
McKinley and upon the party which elected 
and would perpetuate the same. 

5. We declare that the only policy which 
the Government of the United States can of 
right adopt as to the liquor traffic under the 
National Constitution, upon any territory 
under the military or civil control of that 



October, 1901 >^ ^3?L^r^ 


Calculated for Latitude 40° N. Adapted to the States of Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware, 
Maryland, Virginia, Kentucky, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Missouri and Kansas. 


o t- 
>. z 

Si 


> u 

2* 


.1 


THE SUIM 


THE MOON 


THE TIDES, Philadelphia 


RISES 

A. M. 


SETS 
P. M. 


RISES j SETS j^ 

P. M. A. M. « 


HIGH TIDE 


LOW TIDE 


A. M. 


P. M. 


A. M. P. M. 


1 


Tu 


^. 


H. M. 

5 56 


H. M. 

5 44 


H. M. H. M. 1 D. 

8 91 9 55119 


H. M. 

3 48 


H. M. 

4 15 


H. M. 1 H. M. 

11 71184 


2 


AY 


^ 


5 57 


5 43 


9 411 2 20 


4 42 


5 10 




1 


3 


Til 


i^?\ 


5 58 


5 41 


10 4 p. M. |21 


5 87 


6 4 


29 


56 


4 


Fr 


^ 


5 59 


5 89 


11 6 55 22 


6 31 


6 59 


1 28 


1 50 


5 


Sa 


^ 


(3 


5 88 


A. M. 1 40 28 


7 27 


7 58 


2 18 


2 46 


6 


Su 


m 


6 1 


5 36 


9; 2 1924 


8 80 


9 2 


8 17 


3 49 


7 


Mo 


m 


6 2 


5 85 


1 18: 2 5425 


9 33 


10 1 


4 21 


4 52 


8 


Tu 


^ 


6 3 


5 88 


2 15! 8 25 26 


10 27 


10 53 


5 20 


5 46 


9 


W 


«ef 


6 4 


5 81 


3 16 3 55 27 


11 19 


1148 


6 12 


6 38 


10 


Th 


^ 


6 5 


5 80 


4 15 4 28 28 




6 


7 2 


7 25 


11 


Fr 


^ 


6 6 


5 28 


5 11 


4 52 29 


26 


46 


7 45 


8 5 


12 


Sa 


^ 


6 7 


5 27 


6 11 


5 22 


1 5 


1 23 


8 24 8 42 


13 


Su 


2^ 


6 8 


5 25 


7 7 


5 54 1 


142 


2 2 


9 1 921 


14 


Mo 


^ 


(3 9 


5 28 


8 4 


6 30 2 


2 21 


2 41 


9 4010 


15 


Tu 


^ 


6 10 


5 22 


8 59: 7 9| 3 


3 2 


3 23 


10 21 10 42 


16 


W 


1to> 


6 11 


5 20 


9 52! 7 52: 4 


3 44 


4 5 


11 31124 


17 


Th 


^ 


6 12 


5 19 


10 42 8 39 


5 


4 26 


4 48 


1145 





18 


Fr 


m 


6 13 


5 17 


11 28 9 80 


6 


5 10 


5 33 


7 


29 


19 


Sa 


m 


6 14 


5 16 


p. M. 10 26 


I 


5 55 


6 18 


52 


1 14 


20 


Su 


m 


6 15 


5 14 


52 


11 26 


8 


6 42 


7 7 


1 87 


2 1 


21 


Mo 


m 


6 17 


5 18 


1 28 


A. M. 


9 


7 34 


8 2 


2 26 


2 53 


22 


Tu 


m 


6 18 


5 11 


2 3 


2810 


8 32 


9 5 


8 21 


3 51 


23 


W 


^ 


6 19 


5 10 


2 87 


1 83 11 


9 36 


10 6 


4 24 


4 55 


24 


Th 


^ 


6 20 


5 9 


8 11 2 41 


12 


10 37 


11 7 


5 25 5 56 1 


25 


Fr 




6 21 


5 8 


8 46 8 51 


13 


11 36 




6 26 


6 55 


26 


Sa 


ta*' 


6 22 


5 6 


4 25 5 4 14 


4 


31 


7 23 


7 50 


27 


Su 


f?« 


6 28 


5 5 


5 8 6 18 15 


57 


1 22 


8 16 


8 41 


28 


Mo 


f?« 


6 24 


5 4 


5 57 7 82 16 


146 


2 13 


9 5 


9 32 


29 


Tu 


^ 


6 25 


5 8 


6 52 8 48 17 


2 40 


3 7 


9 59 


10 26 


30 


W 


^ 


6 26 


5 1 


7 51 9 49|18 


3 85 


4 3 


10 54 


11 22 


31 


Th 


^ 


6 28 


5 


8 55 10 47 19 


4 30 


4 57 


11 49 




MOON'S Phases, (eastern -standard time.) 


ii» TKe W? 1 


(f Last Quarter 4d. 3h. 52m. P. M. 

® Neui Moon 12d. 8h. Urn. A. M. 


Ph 

A 


iladelpHia R« 


scord 




irst Q 
uil Mc 


mrtei 
on.... 






20d. 

27d. 


Oh. 57m. 
lOh. 6m. 


p. M 
A.M 




gricultural and Scie 
Information. 


ntific 



28 



The Philadelphia Record JUmanac. 



government, is the policy of prohibition ; 
that "to establish justice, secure domestic 
tranquillity, provide for the common defense, i 
promote the general welfare and insure the I 
blessings of liberty to ourselves and our 
posteritv," as tlie Constitution provides, the [ 
liquor traffic must neither be sanctioned nor 
tolerated, and that the revenue policy which 
makes our government a partner with dis- 
tillers and brewers and barkeepers is a dis- 
grace to our civilization, an outrage upon 
humanity and a crime against God. i 

We condemn the present Administration ! 
at Washington because it has repealed the 
prohibitory laws in Alaska and has given 
over the partly-civilized tribes there to be 
the prey of the American grog shop, and be- j 
cause it has entered upon a license policy 
in our new possessions by incorporating the 
same in the recent act of Congress in the | 
code of laws for the government of the Ha- 
waiian islands. 

We call general attention to the fearful 
fact that exportation of liquors from the 
United States to the Philippine islands in- j 
creased from 1337 in 1898 to 8467,198 in the i 
first ten months of the fiscal year ending j 
June 1, 1900, and that, while our exportation 
of liquors to Cuba never reached 130,000 a \ 
year previous to American occupation of ! 
that island, our exports of such liquors to | 
Cuba during the fiscal year of 1899 reached ; 
the sum of 8629,65=). 

6. One great religious body (the Baptists) 
having truly declared of the liquor traffic 
'•that it has no defensible right to exist, 
that it can never be reformed, and that it ; 
stands condemned by its unrighteous fruits 
as a thing un-Christiau, un-American and 
perilous utterly to every interest in life;" 
anotliergreat religious body (the Methodists) 
having as truly asserted and reiterated that 
"no political party has a right to expect, 
nor should it receive the votes of Christian 
men so long as it stands committed to the 
license system or refuses to put itself on re- 
cord in an attitude of open hostility to the 
saloon ;" other religious bodies having made 
similar deliverances in language plain and 
unequivocal as to the liquor traffic and the 
duty of Christian citizenship in opposition 
thereto, and the fact being plain and uude- 
niable that the Democratic party stands for 
license, the saloon and the canteen, while 
the Republican party, in policy and admin- 
istration, stands for the canteen, the saloon 
and revenue therefrom, we declare ourselves 
justified in expecting that Christian voters 
evervwhere shall cease their complicity 
with" the liquor curse by refusing to uphold 
a liquor party, and .shall unite themselves 
with the only party which upholds the pro- 
hibition poliev, and which for nearly thirty 
vears has been the faithful defender of the 
church, the Siate, the home and the school, 
against the saloon, its expanders and per- 
petuators, their actual and persistent foes. 

We insist that no difl'erences of belief as 
to any other question or concern of govern- 
ment" should stand in the way of such a 
union of moral and Christian citizenship as 
we hereby invite, for the speedy settlement 
of this parami)unt moral, industrial, finan- 
cial and political issue which our party pre- 
sents ; and we refrain from declaring our- 
selves upon all minor matters as to which 
difTerencfS of opinion may exist, that hereby 
we may otter to the American people a plat- 
form so broad that all can stand upon it who 
desire to see sober citizenship actually sov- 
ereign over the allied hosts of evil, sin and 



crime in a government of the people, by the 
people and for the people. 

We declare that there are but two real 
parties to-day concerning the liquor traffic— 
Perpetuationists and Prohibitionists— and 
that patriotism, Christianity and every in- 
terest of genuine republicanism and of pure 
democracy, besides the loyal demands of 
our conmion humanity, require the speedy 
union in one solid phalanx at the ballot-box 
of all who oppose the liquor traffic per- 
petuation and who covet endurance for this 
republic. 

Altogether there were ten Presidential 
tickets in the field in 1900. Those of which 
the nominees are not already enumerated, 
and of whose platform no summary is given, 
are : 

UNION REFORM. 

Seih Ellis, of Ohio, for President, and Samuel T. 

Nicholson, of Pennsylvania, for 

Vice-President. 

UNITED CHRISTIANS. 

Rev. Dr. S. C. Swallow, of Pennsylvania, for 

President, and Rev. Charles M. Sheldon, 

of Kansas, for Vice-President. 

SOCIAL DEMOCRATS. 

Eugene V. Debs, of Indiana, for President, and 

Job Harriman, of California, for 

Vice-President, 

DE LEON SOCIALISTS. 

Joseph F, Malloney, of Massachusetts, for 
President, and Valentine Remmel, of Penn- 
sylvania, for Vice-President. 



Police-Magistrate Vote. 

At the Spring election in Philadelphia- 
February 20, 190O— sixteen Police Magistrates 
were elected, the majority being entitled to 
ten, or two-i birds of the sixteen to be chosen. 
For these places the Republicans nominated 
Thomas W' . South, T. W. Cunningham, Frank 
H. Smith, R. Gillespie, Frank S. Harrison, 
W. S. Kochersperger, Henry R. Stratton, 
Ambrose Pullinger, A. C. Ackerman. and 
Fred. M. Wagner, all but the last two being 
incumbents. The Democrats nominated 
John M. O'Brien, Richard C. Lloyd, James 
H. Totighill, John B. Friel, Patrick Donoliue, 
and E. F. Ternan. The Municipal League 
also named ten candidates, including Mr. 
O'Brien, a Democratic nominee, and Magis- 
trates J. M. R. Jermon (Rep.), J. F. Keall 
(Rep.), William Eisenbrown (Dem.), ami 
A. H. Ladner(Dem.),who had been dropped 
by their respective parties, and F. M. Rogers, 
H. L. Hendei-son, H. N. Millets, John M. 
Patterson, George A. Drovin. 

The vote resulted : Cunningham, 101,187 : 
South, 96,959 ; Gillespie, 96,958 ; Smith, 96,903 ; 
Harrison, 96,899 ; Kochersperger, 95,543 ; Wag- 
ner, 95,233 ; Ackerman, 94,843 ; Pullinger, 92.- 
924 ; Stratton, 92,773 ; O'Brien, 55,600 ; Ladner, 
47,213; Eisenbrown, 44,281; Jermon, 39,095; 
Lloyd, 34,317 ; Toughill, 32,033; Friel, 31,563; 
; Donohue, 31,370; Ternan, 30,210; Neall, 30,- 
I 046; Patterson, 28,329; Rogers, 27,470; Hen- 
; dcrson, 27,347 ; Willets, 26,618; Drovin, 25,3:51. 
Prohibition candidates were also voted for, 
I the highest receiving 1132 votes. 



November, 1901 "o d"!;:!^ 


Calculated for Latitude 40° N. Adapted to the States of Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware, 


Maryland, Virginia, Kentucky, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Missouri and Kansas, 


a S 


0^ 

> u 

2? 




THE SUN 


THE MOON 


THE TIDES, Philadelphia | 


RISES 

A. M. 


SETS 

P. M. 


RISES 

P. M. 


SETS 

A. M. 


S 


HIGH TIDE 


LOW 


TIDE 


A. M. 


P. M. 


A. M. 


pTwC. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


D. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. H. M. 


1 


Fr 


^ 


6 29 


4 58 


10 oil 36 


20 


5 23 


5 49 


16 42 


2 


Sa 


m 


6 30 


4 57 


11 5 


P. M. 


21 


6 14 


6 40 


1 8, 1 33 


3 


Su 


m 


6 31 


4 56 


A.M. 


56 


22 


7 5 


7 31 


1 59 2 24 


4 


Mo 


^€ 


6 32 


4 55 


8 


1 28 


23 


7 57 


8 26 


2 501 3 16 


5 


Tu 


^ 


6 34 


4 54 


1 10 


1 58124 


8 56 


9 23 


3 45| 4 15 


6 


W 


^ 


6 35 


4 53 


2 8 


2 26 


25 


9 49 


10 15 


4 42 


5 8 


7 


Th 


^ 


6 36 


4 52 


3 6 


2 54 


26 


10 40 


11 5 


5 34 


5 59 


8 


Fr 


^ 


6 37 


4 51 


4 3 


3 24 


27 


11 29 


11 52| 6 24 


6 48 


9 


Sa 


^ 


6 38 


4 50 


4 59 


3 57 


28 




15 


7 11 


7 34 


10 


Su 


<^ 


6 40 


4 49 


5 56 


4 30 


29 


36 


56 


7 55 


8 15 


11 


Mo 


2^ 


6 41 


4 48 


6 53 


5 7 





1 15 


1 34 


8 34 


8 53 


12 


Tu 


<« 


6 42 


4 47 


7 46 


5 49 


1 


1 55 


2 16 


9 14 


9 35 


13 W 


^ 


6 43 


4 46 


8 37 


6 35 


9 


2 37 


2 58 


9 56 


10 17 


14 


Th 


^ 


6 44'4 45 


9 26 


7 26 


3 


3 19 


3 40 


10 38 


10 59 


15 


Fr 


m 


6 45|4 44 


10 10 


8 21 


4 


4 2 


4 24 


11 21 


11 43 


16 


Sa 


m 


6 46 


4 43 


10 50 


9 18 


5 


4 46 


5 8 




5 


17 


Su 


m 


6 47 


4 42 


11 28 


10 17 


6 


5 29 


5 51 


27 


48 


18 


Mo 


m 


6 48 


4 41 


p. M. 


11 19 


7 


6 14 


6 37 


1 10 


1 33 


19 


Tu 


^ 


6 49 


4 41 


36 


A. M. 


8 


7 1 


7 27 


1 56 


2 20 


20 


W 


^ 


6 51 


4 40 


1 8 


23 


9 


7 55 


8 26 


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10 


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22 


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11 


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23 


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12 


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1138 


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8 


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MOON-S PHASES. (Eastern Standard Time.) 


W* The yf 


6: Last Quarter 3d. 2li. 24m. A. M. 


PHiladelphia Record 


^ New Moon lid, 2h. 34m. A. M. 




$ First Quarter 19d. 3h. 23m. A. M. 


T/ie News of the World in 


© Full Moon 25d. 8h. 17m. P. M. 


Compact Form. 



History of tKe Electoral Vote, 



From tKe Foxindation of tKe Government Up 
to tKe Last Official Count. 



Article 11 of the Constitution of the United 
States declares that "the Congress may de- 
termine the time of choosing the electors, 
and the day on which they shall give their 
votes, which day shall be the same through- 
out the United States." 

The historical record of the electoral vote 
from the foundation of the Government 
forms an interesting study. For the tirst 
term three States did not vote— New York, 
which had not seasonably passed an elec- 
toral law, and North Carolina and Rhode 
Island, which had not yet adopted the Con- 
stitution. The growth in the number of 
voting States from ten to forty-tive has 
been accompanied by a growth in the num- 
ber of electoral votes from 69 to 447. 

The first Presidential election was held 
January 7, 1789. As is well known, from 
1789 to 1804 the electors voted for President 
and Vice-President on the same ballot, the 
person receiving the highest vote being an- 
nounced as President and the one next 
highest as Vice-President. In 1789 the total 
number of votes was 69, all of which were 
cast for George Washington. They were dis- 
tributed in this way : Massachusetts, Penn- 
sylvania and Virginia, 10 each ; Connecticut 
and South Carolina, 7 each ; Maryland and 
New Jersey, 6 each ; Georgia and New Hamp- 
shire 5 each ; Delaware, 3. John Adams, for 
the second place, had 34 votes ; the rest were 
divided among ten candidates. Adams thus 
became Vice-President. 

In 1792 the whole number of electors was 
132, and all voted for George Washington. 
Adams, for second place, got 77 votes ; George 
Clinton, 50; Jefferson, 4; Burr, 1. Adams 
was again chosen Vice-President. Vermont 
and Kentucky had now come into the 
Union, making fifteen States. The votes 
were distributed thus: Virginia, 21; Massa- 
chusetts, 16 ; Pennsylvania, 15 ; North Caro- 
lina and New York, 12 each; Connecticut, 
9, and so on down. 

In 1796 Tennessee had come in, and the 
whole number of electors was 138. John 
Adams received 71 votes; Jefferson, 68; 
Pincknev, 59 ; Burr, 30 ; Samuel Adams, of 
Massachusetts, 15 ; Oliver Ellsworth, of Con- 
necticut, 11, and the rest were divided 
among seven candidates. Adams therefore 
became President and Jefferson Vice-Presi- 
dent. 

In 1800 occurred the memorable tie vote. 
The total number of electors was again 138. 
Jefferson and Burr each received 33 votes ; 
Adams hail 65, and Pinckney, 64; Jay, 1. 
It was quite evident that the parties had 
now consolidated upon regular nominees 
for President and Vice-President, and that 
the Constitutional provision for election was 
such as to make the winning party alu ays 
put its own two candidates in rivalry for 
the higher place. On appealing to the Con- 
gressional vote, as provided for by the Con- 
stitution, Jefferson, on the thirty-sixth bal- 



lot in the House of Representatives, became 
President, and Burr became Vice-President. 
Then the twelfth amendment to the Consti- 
tution was made, guarding against such pre- 
dicaments thenceforth. 

For twenty-four years thereafter there was 
little in the electoral voting out of the com- 
mon. In 1804 Jefferson and Clinton were 
elected President and Vice-President by 162 
votes each, against 14 each for C. C. Pinckney 
and Rufus King. Ohio had now entered the 
Union. In 1808 the vote was Madison 122 
and Clinton 113, against 47 each for Pinck- 
ney and King, with some scattering— the 
total vote being 176, as before, except that 
there was one vacancy. In 1812 the vote was 
128 for Madison and 131 for Elbridge Gerry, 
against 89 for De Witt Clinton and 86 for 
Jared IngersoU. In 1816 it was 183 for Mon- 
roe and D. D. Tom]3Tiins, against 34 for Rufus 
King, and a scattering of candidates for Vice- 
President, John E. Howard being highest. 
Louisiana and Indiana had now come in. 
In 1820 occurred the overwhelming vote of 
231 for Monroe, against 1 for J. Q. Adams, 
cast by New Hampshire, whose other 7 votes 
went to Monroe. D. D. Tompkins received 
218 for Vice-President, with 14 scattering. 
Alabama, Mississippi, Illinois, Missouri and 
Maine had now been taker in. 

In 1824 a memorable stn:- occurred. The 
whole number of electors was 261— no new 
States, but a new census aj-oortionment. 
Andrew Jackson, for President, iiad 99 ; J. Q. 
Adams, 84; W. H. Crawford, 41 ; Henry Clay, 
37. The election for the second time weiit 
into the House of Representatives, where the 
race was not to the swift, for the second 
candidate, Adams, was elected on the first 
ballot bv States. John C. Calhoun had re- 
ceived 182 electoral votes — Virginia, Ohio, 
Connecticut, Missouri and Georgia casting 
all their votes against him, and a few other 
votes from divided States going to other 
candidates; but he had been elected Vice- 
President by a large majority. 

In 1828 the vote was Jackson, 178, and 
Calhoun, 171, against 83 each for Adams and 
Rush, and 7 for Smith as Vice-President. In 
1832 it was 219 for Jackson and 189 for Van 
Buren, against 49 for Clay and John Sergeant, 
while Pennsylvania cast her 30 for Vice- 
President on William Wilkins. That year 
South Carolina gave her 11 votes to Floyd, 
of Virginia, and Lee, of Massachusetts, while 
Vermont gave her 7 to William Wirt and 
Amos Ellmaker. The Anti-Mason party was 
tlien active. 

In 1836 there was another unusual occur- 
rence. Arkansas and Michigan had come in. 
The total number of electors was now 294, 
with 148 a majority. For President, Van 
Buren had 170, against 73 for Harrison, 26 for 
Hugh L. White, 14 for Webster, and 11 for 
W. P. Mangum ; but R. M. Johnson got only 
147 for Vice-President, or 1 less than a ma- 
jority, on account of Virginia, with her 23 



December, 1901 aTof^r^ 


Calculated for Latitude 40° N. Adapted to the States of Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware, 


Maryland, Virginia, Kentucky, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Missouri and Kansas. 


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THE SUN 


THE MOON 


THE TIDES, Philadelphia 


RISES 1 SETS 

A. M. I P. M. 


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P. M. A. M. < 


HIGH TIDE 


LOW TIDE 1 


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P. M. 


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58' 1 18 


MOON'S PHASES. (Eastern Standard Time.) 


*? TKe >{? 


J Last Quarter 2d. 4h. 49m. P. M. 


PKiladelpKia Record 


® New Moon lOd. 9h. 53m. P. M. 




■^ First Quarter 18d. 3h. 35m. P.M. 


S/oriifi^ and Drainatit 


© Full Moon 25d. 7h. 16m. A. M. 


Events. 



The Philadelphia Record JUmanac. 



, boltin? bim. The Senate, however, 
::d liim by So votes against 16 for 



4er. 



Jii 1840 the Whigs made a sweep, and the 
V(jte was ii:;4 tor Harrison and Tvler, against 
liO lor Van Buren as Fr.sident, witli -JS fur 
.)(jhnson as Vice-Presidi-nt, 11 for Tazewell 
and 1 for I'olk. In isil it was 170 for Polk 
and Dallas, against 105 for Clay and Freling- 
hiivsen. New York's 36 votes turning the 
M ale. In 1848 it was 163 for Taylor and Fill- 
more, against 127 for Cass and Butler. In 
18.j2 it was 254 lor Pieice and King, against 
42 for Scott and Graham, In 1856 it was 174 
for Buchanan and Breckinridge, against 114 
lor Fremont and Davton, and S for Fillmore 
and Donelson. In 1860 it was 180 for Lincoln 
and Hamlin, 72 for Breckinridge and Lane, 
39 for Bell and Everett, and 12 for Douglas 
and Johnson. That year the peculiarities of 
the electoral system were strikingly illus- 
trated in the fact that Douglas, with 1,375, 157 
popular votes, got only 12 electoral votes, 
while Breckinridge, with 845,763 pojmlar, got 
72 electoral, and Bell, with 589,581, got 39 elec- 
toral. That year New Jersey gave Lincoln 4 
of her electoral votes and" Douglas 3, the 
latter in addition receiving only those of 
Missouri. Lincoln's election inaugurated 
the reign of the Republican party, which 
continued through six terms. 

In 1864 the vote was taken amid the war 
for secession. There were 81 vacancies in 
the electoral vote. The remainder went 212 
for Lincoln and Johnson and 21 lor McClel- 
ian and Pendleton. In 1868 the electoral 
vote was 214 for Grant and Colfax, and 80 for 
Seymour and Blair, \\ iih 23 vacancies— the 
latter being the votes of Mississipiii, Texas 
and Virginia. In 1872 Grant and Wilson re- 
ceived 286 votes and were elected. The death 
of Greeley between the popular and the elec- 
toral vote broke his electoral vote into 42 for 
Hendricks, 18 for B. Gratz Brown, 2 for C. J. 
Jenkins and 1 tor David Davis. For Vice- 
President B. Gratz Brown had 47, and seven 
other candidates got a few votes each. Three 
votes of Georgia. 6 of Arkansas and 8 of Lou- 
i.-^iana for Greeley were rejected. Missouri 
gave 6 votes for Hendricks, 8 for Brown and 
1 for Davis. 

In 1876 occurred the unprecedented Elec- 
toral Commission, by whose operation 185 
electoral votes were counted for Hayes and 
Wheeler, and 184 for Tilden and Hendricks. 

In 1880 the Democrats lost one elector in 
California through the mistaken nomination 
of Ji'dge Terry. This gentleman was so un- 
popular, in consequence of his having, many 
years ago, slain Senator Broderick in a duel, 
that he lost votes enough to be beaten by 
the highest name on the Republican ticket. 
In Indiana General Bennett had been origin- 
ally put on the Republican ticket, btit he 
was withdrawn and B. S. Parker substituted. 
Mr. Parker's name, however, was not placed 
on the Republican poll-books in five coun- 
ties, and this accident resulted in the ap- 
parent choice of W. Chambers, the lead- 
ing name on the DemocrMtic ticket, by 5000 
majority, though advantiige was not taken 
of the blunder, which was declared a cleri- 
cal mistake, and the whole vote of Indiana 
was cast for the Republican candidates. 

In 1884 the Democrats again came into 
power, after having been out for twenty-lour 
years consecutively, by the election of (J rover 
Cleveland and Thimias A. Hendricks over 
James G. Blaine and J(.hn A. Logan, the 
electornl vote being 219 to 182, tlie vote of 
New York, which turned the scale, having 



been given to Cleveland by a mnjority of 
less thim 1200. The electoral vote had been 
increased to 401 by the apportionment under 
a new census. 

In a total poi)ular vote cast of 10.035,731 
Blaine had a plurality of 1025. For B. F. 
Butler, Gieeiioacker, 175,365 votes were 
thrown, and J. P. St. John, Prohibitionist, 
got 150,369. 

Again the whirligig turned in 1888, and 
the Republicans came back to power in the 
person of Benjamin Harrison as President 
and Levi P. Morton us Vice-President, al- 
though Grover ( leveland, the Democratic 
incumbent and candidate for re-election, 
had a plurality of 110,476 in the poptilar 
vote of 11 ,376.622. Of the electoral vote Har- 
rison received 233 and Cleveland 168. The 
count of electoral votes took place under 
the act of February 3, 1SS7, and it was the 
first in the history of the Government under 
the Constitution which was regulated by a 
general law not requiring previous conciu-- 
rent action by the two Houses of Congress 
for the time being. This law of February 
3 was the outcome of a long struggle — nearly 
ten years— to remedy the apparent defects 
of the old law, the necessity for which w as 
emphasized bv the crisis reached in the 
counting of the electoral vote in 1887 by the 
Electoral Commission. 

By the electoral vote of 1892 Grover Cleve- 
land, Democrat, a second time became 
President— the only ex-President ever sum- 
moned by the people to a second term of duty 
—and Adlai E. Stevenson was chosen \'ice- 
President. Of the electoral vote cast — w hich 
had now become by reapportionment under 
census and admission of new States 444— 
Cleveland and Btevenson received 277 ; Ben- 
jamin Harrison (the Republican incumbent i 
and Whitelaw Reid, 145, and James B. 
Weaver and James G. Field, candidates of 
the first National Convention of the Peo- 
ple's Party, 22 — 4 Irom Colorado, 3 from 
Idaho, 10 from Kansas, 3 from Nevada, and 
1 each from North Dakota and Oregon. 

Forty-five States voted in the Electoral Col- 
lege of 1896 (Utah having been admitted to 
Statehood since the jirevious election), the 
total vote being 447. In this campaign tlicre 
were six separate and distinct parties in the 
field with candidates, and the t(ital poi'tilar 
vote cast was 13.952,179; but the electoral 
vote was divided altogether between William 
McKinley and Garrett A. Hobart and William 
J. Bryan and Arthur Sewall, McKinley and 
Hobart receiving 271 each, while Bryan re- 
ceived 176 and Sewall 149, the latter having 
opposition in Thomas E. Watson, Populist, 
though there had been iusion between the 
Democrats and Populists on Bryan and 
Sewall in most of the States. Watson, how- 
ever, received 27 votes— 3 from Arkansas, 4 
from Louisiana, 4 from Jlissouri, 1 from Mon- 
tana, 4 from Nebraska, 5 from North Caro- 
lina, 2 from South Dakota, 1 from Utah, 2 
from Washington and 1 from "\^■yoming. The 
principal issue in the campaign was the 
Democratic proposition for tiie free coinage 
of silver at the ratio of 16 to 1. One of the 
half dozen tickets in the field was that of 
Palmer and Buckner, ]>ut up by the " Gold " 
Democrats, and the vote thrown for it was a 
factor of no mean ])roriortions in the defeat 
of Bryan, Democrat, by McKinley, Repub- 
lican." 

The vote cast at the election in November, 
1900, will not be officiallv counted until Feb- 
ruarv, 1901, though the rnofficial result will 
be found elsewhere in these pages. 



HouseHold Recipes. 



stuffed Onions. — Boil five white onions in 
slightly salted water for one hotir, changing 
the water three times. Lift them out into a 
cloth and scoop out a portion from the cen- 
ter. Fill the cavity with a dressing of two 
tablespoon fuls bread crumbs, one large tea- 
spoonful grated cheese, one teaspoonful cat- 
chup, a little cream, salt and pepper. Mash a 
little of the onion with these. Wrap each 
onion in a piece of buttered tissue paper and 
twist the paper securely at the ends. Bake 
in a buttered pan in a moderate oven nearly 
an hour more. Remove paper, put into a 
deep dish, sprinkle a little salt and pepper 
over and pour melted butter over the tops. 

Wild Cherry and Almond Sorbet.— One 

quart water, one pint wh te suKar, juice of 
one lemon, six sweet almonds blanched and 
pounded, one bitter almond, a wineglassfnl 
of wild cherry syrup. Freeze in a freezer. 
Serve in glass'cups. 

Beet Mayonnaise.— Pulp freshly boiled 
licets to the amount of a cupful; add one- 
eiirlith of a cup of vinegar and beat in slowly 
liall a cupful of salad oil. Season with a 
heaping saltspoonful each of . salt, celery salt 
and cayenne, and beat until smooth. Serve 
very cold with cold lamb and cold boiled 
potatoes cut in dice, 

The Prophet's Punch.— One-quarter of 
the amount called for in the following re- 
cipe will be stifficient for one meal for a 
family of five ; Put one quart of grape juice 
in a double boiler. Heat it and add the 
iuice of four lemons, four dried speannint 
leaves rubbed tine in the fingers, and a poinid 
of sugar. To this put four quarts of hot 
water. In every glass put a dust uf powdered 
cinnamon and pour the hot juice on it. 

Grape Sauce for Ducklings.- Cook to- 
gether one tablespoonful of butter and three 
of flour. Add one and a half cupfuls of 
stock, and a tablespoonful each of chopped 
ham, celery, carrots and onion, a bit of bay 
leaf and a half teaspoonful (scant) of salt. 
Cook for thirty minutes, strain into it the 
liquor from the pan in which the duckling 
was cooked and then add one cupful of 
green grajies. which have been cooked until 
soft in a little stock and pressed through a 
sieve. 

Sultana Roll.— Scald one pint of milk, 
add one cupful of sucar, one tablespoonful 
of flour rtibbed smooth in a little cold milk 
and one beaten egg. Stir and cook lor twen- 
ty minutes, add a pinch of salt, strain and 
cool. Flavor with one teaspoonful each of 
vanilla and almond extract, add one quart 
of whipped cream, color leaf green and 
freeze. When frozen line a mould with the 
prepared cream and sprinkle thickly with 
sultana raisins, which have been soaked for 
several hours in brandy. Fill the center of 
the mould with one pint of cream whipped 
to a solid froth, adding to it one-half of a 
cupful of powdered sugar and one teaspoon- 
ful of vanilla. Pack in ice and salt and let 
slaiid for two hours. For the claret snuce 
.served with this put one cupful of sugar and 
one-qn;irter of a cupful of hot walerovcr the 
fire. Stir until tlie sugar is dissulvrd, then 
boil until it thickens slightly. When culd 
add four tablespoonfuls of claret and chill 
on ice. 



Potatoes Souff led .—Boil a quart of peeled 
and washed potatoes with one tablespoonful 
of salt and one quart of water. When done, 
drain off the water, mash the potatoes fine 
and mix them with one cupful of milk, one 
ounce of butter and the yelks of two eggs; 
add the whites, beaten to a stiff froth ; put 
the potatoes in a dish ; make six dents with 
a knife on top of the potatoes; put in each 
dent a small piece of butter, set the dish in 
a hot oven and bake light brown ; set the 
dish into a silver souffle dish and serve. 

Frozen Pineapple Custard.— Scald one 
]iint of milk, pour it over three eggs beaten 
until light with one cupful of granulated 
sugar. Return to the double boiler and stir 
until smooth and slightly thickened; strain 
and cool. Add one cupful of cream and 
freeze until quite thick; add medium-sized 
pineapple which has been eyed, chopped 
fine, mixed with one cupful of sugar and 
allowed to stand for two hours or over night. 
Finish freezing, repack with ice and salt and 
set aside for iw o hours to ripen. 

Virginia Ark Cakes (a bread much used 
one hundred years ago and said to be sweet 
and wholesome).— The old negro cooks 
baked these on the clean hearth and covered 
with hot wood ashes. Sometimes they 
placed cabbage leaves under and over the 
cakes before covering with a.shes. Sift a 
quart of cornmeal. add a teaspoonful of salt 
and warm water to make a stiflf dough. 
Work well, form into round, flat cakes and 
bake on soapstone griddle. Properly served 
with broiled bacon or small game. 

Prune Rolls.— One-half pound of prunes 
(silver, red or golden). Wash and soak as 
directed for dried apples; cook in as little 
water as possible until tender enough to re- 
move the stones. Cut each prune into quar- 
ters and add one-half cup of sugar. Cook as 
dry as possible without scorching. Make 
dough as for baking powder biscuits, only 
use half water in place of milk. Roll out 
thin and so that the length is twice the 
breadth. Spread the prunes over the center 
of this, keeping within an inch and a half 
of the edges. Begin atone end and roll like 
jelly cake, pressing the ends and lap firmly, 
so that the fruit cannot escape. Place the 
roll in one side of a granite pan, pour over 
and around it one-half cup of sugar and a 
pint of hot water. To this add a tablespoon- 
ful of buttei into which have been rubbed 
two tablespoonfuls of flour. Grate nutmeg 
over the top ; bake in oven, basting frequent- 
ly and watching closely to prevent burning. 
It may be necessary to add more water from 
time to time. Serve with its own sauce or 
with the addition of cream. Any fruit may 
be substituted for the prunes. 

Lemon Sandwiches (half the recipe for 
one luncheon).— Cream thoroughly one cup 
of butter and \\ork gradually into it the 
hard-boiled yelks of two eggs rubbed to a 
paste, Avith one raw yelk, one-fourth of a 
teaspoonful ofsnlt, one teaspoonful of French 
mustard or one-quarter of a teaspoonful of 
dry, two tablespoonfuls of strained lemon 
juice, and one-half teaspoonful of freshly- 
grated rind. Beat and work all together 
well and spread on thin slicesof white bread. 
Delicate luncheon sandwich. 



33 



The Philadelphia Record Jtlmanac. 



Rice Cooked with Milk.— The rice is par- 
boiled for live minute.-, tlien drained and 
put into a double boiler, with sufficient milk 
to cover, and isiooked until tender, without 
stirring. Season with salt. When tender 
and the milk entirely absorbed, it should be 
poured into a buttered mould and set in a 
warm oven for about hve minutes before be- 
ing turned out on a hot platter. It may be 
eaten with a hard sauce or with butter and 
shaved maple sugar. 

California Tapioca.— Soak a small teacup- 
ful of tapioca in two cupfuls of water over 
night. Cook until clear in the juice of tuo 
oranges and a half cup of sugar. Serve cold 
on flat saucers, placing half of a canned j 
peach in the center of each dish and fill tlie 
cavity in the peach with whipped cream, 
sweetened and flavored. 

Mexican Meat Balls.— If fresh beef is 
used, buy a pound and a half of round steak 
(but a cupful and a half of cold meat of any ' 
kind can be utilized) and grind to a pulp, i 
Mix meat with one-half cup of boiled rice, 
one tablespoonful of vinegar, one teaspoon- 
ful of salt (less if cooked meat is used), one 
saltspoonful of pepper, three leaves of china 
parsley, two small leaves of peppermint, 
one-half clove of garlic and a little piece of 
onion, all minced fine. Make up into mar- 
ble balls and drop into boiling broth for 
three minutes. Serve with a sauce thick- 
ened in the broth after the balls are taken 
out by using two or three tomatoes cut up, 
one-half a green pepper chopped, a bit of 
onion and a dash or two of salt. 

Virginia Peanut Soup.— Roast and shell l 
sufficient peaiuus to measure three cups. 1 
Pound them to a paste, adding a level tea- 
spoonful of salt. Place this paste in a sauce- 
pan and add, very gradually, two guarts of 
boiling water. Season wiih a dusting each 
of black and red pepper and simmer until it 
thickens. Just before serving add a pint of I 
oysters and a saltspoonful of celery seed and 
cook until the oysters ruffle. Crisp crackers j 
should accompany the soup. 

Snow Balls.— Beat one egg light, add a ; 
saltspoonful of salt, add one-half cupful 
flour, in which stir one-half teaspoonful 
baking powder. Add the flour slowly to the { 
egg ; when stiff enough roll out as "thin as 
noodle dough ; cut into oblong pieces three 
inches long; make gashes across with a 
knife ; cook in boiling fat until yellow ; then 
sprinkle with sugar. 

Roast Beef (filled).— This is a very eco- 
nomical and savory roast, besides "being 
cheap. Have the bones removed from a 
blade of beef weighing four pounds; then 
have an opening made across the inside. 
Pack this pocket with one-fourth pound 
finely-chopped beef fat, mixed with one 
and a fo\irth pounds of chopped raw meat ; 
season with two teaspoonsful of salt, one- 
eighih teaspoonful of cayenne pepper and 
juice of one onion. Put into a dripping 
pan a tablespoonful of fat ; lay the roast 
in, brown on all sides, then sprinkle with a 
teaspoonful each of salt, pepper and ginger ; 
add one sliced onion and one cupful of hot 
water. Roast in the oven and baste often. 
This is enough for two meals, and is very 
good cold. 

Fried Qreen Melon.— Pare and remove 
the seeds from a green canteloupe. Cut in 
thick slices, dip in egg and seasoned bread 
crumbs and fry in butter as if it were egg- 
plant. 



Chicken Fritters.- Cutenough cold chick- 
en into small pieces to make a large cupful, 
season with half a teaspoonful of salt and 
a saltspoonful of pepper, and let the meat 
stand lor an hour in an earthenware dish, 
with the juice of one lemon squeezed over it. 
Make a batter of one cup of milk, a table- 
spoonful of melted butter, two cups of flour 
and two beaten eggs. Stir the meat into 
this, then drop a spoonful at a time into 
boiUng fat and fry brown. 

Hazel-Nut Torte.— Grind six ounces of 
blanched hazelnuts. Use an almond grinder. 
Add three-eighths of a cupful of powdered 
sugar ; sift a half teaspoonful baking powder 
in the nut meal. Beat the yelks of two eggs 
and mix with sugar and nuts. Lastly, add 
whites of three eggs beaten stiff. Use the 
remaining yelk for a lemon sauce. Bake in 
a small cake-tin. 

Swedish Rolls.— Take enough light dough 
to make a small loaf; roll out one-fourth of 
an inch thick, spiead with one tablespoonful 
of soft butter, sprinkle with two tablespoon- 
fuls of sugar, a half teaspoonful of cinnamon 
and a third of a cupful of cleaned dried cur- 
rants. Roll like jelly roll. Cut in one-half 
inch slices, lay flat in a greased breadpan, 
put in a warm"place for one-half hour to rise, 
and bake twelve to fifteen minutes in a 
moderate oven. 

Fish Cutlets.— Put one cupful of milk to 
heat in a double boiler; rub together one 
tablespoonful of butter and three tablespoon- 
fuls of flour, stir into the boiling milk, add 
the beaten yelks of two eggs, a grate of nut- 
meg, a teaspoonful of minced parsley, ten 
drops of onion juice, a half teaspoonful of 
salt"and a pinch of cayenne pepper. Remove 
from the fire and stir in two cupfuls of cold 
boiled fish cut into small pieces. When cold 
form into small cutlets, dip in beaten egg, 
then in bread crumbs, and fry in boiling fat. 
Drain on brown paper and serve very hot, 
with cream sauce. 

Stuffed Dates.— Take large, fresh dates, 
remove the stones, and lay in the cavity a 
q^uarter of a large walnut, ora small blanched 
almond. Roll the dates so prepared in 
powdered sugar. 

Potatoes a la Tortoni.— Peel, wash and 
boil eight medium-sized potatoes in one 
quart of water and one tablespoonful of 
salt. When done, drain and press through 
a sieve or a potato press; mix with one 
tablespoonful of butter the yelks of two 
eggs, season with one-quarter teaspoonful of 
white pepper, the same of nutmeg and salt. 
Form the preparation into balls, then into 
pyramids, brush over them with beaten egg ; 
set on a buttered tin and bake to a golden 
color in a hot oven. 

Lettuce Salad.— Cut off the stalks from 
two heads of lettuce, pick off" all the de- 
cayed leaves, break the tender green leaves 
apart one by one and remove the thick 
veins ; put the lettuce into cold water, rinse 
well and lay it in ice water for one-half hour 
or longer. "Shortly before serving drain the 
lettuce in a colander ; then put it in a nap- 
kin, shake well and lay it in a salad dish. 
Next prepare a salad dressing described be- 
low : For two large heads of salad put six 
tablespoonfuls oil in a small bowl ; add one 
teaspoonful salt, one-half teaspoonful white 
pepper, and six tablespoonfuls white vine- 
gar; stir this to a creamy sauce, pour it 
over the lettuce, sprinkle over a little shaved 
ice, and serve. 



The Philadelphia Record Almanac. 



Talmouses.— Put together in a saucepan 
one cup of hot water, one-half teaspooiiful 
of salt, und one-fourth of a pound of butter. 
When the mixture boils stir quickly iuio it 
one and a half cupi of sifted pustry flour and 
commence stirring until it draws away from 
the sides of the pan, then cover and set aside 
until lukewarm. Break into it un unbeaten 
egg and work it gradually into the stiff bat- 
ter ; when thoroughly blended add a second | 
and third, taking care to thoroughly incor- 
porate each. It should now be soft, yet too 
stifl' to drop. If the eggs were small ones, 
another half may be needed. Add a dasli of 
cayenne and three tablespoonfuls of grated 
chee.-ie and set away in a cold place for a 
couple of hours. Roll out some puff paste 
very thin and cut it in small circles about I 
two and a half inches. On the center of I 
each place a half teaspoonful of the paste, 
moulding it round with the spoon. Sprinkle 
thickly with grated cheese, then draw up 
the pastry from three sides and pinch it to- 
gether like a cocked hat, Bake in a moder- 
ate oven until well puffed up and browned. 

Mexican Cake.— Put twelve eggs into a 
stewpan with one pound of caster sugar, set 
the pan in another three parts full of bulling 
water on the stove, and whisk the eggs and 
sugar together till warm, then lift them off" 
the fire and continue the whipping till they 
are cold and as light and thick as well- 
whipped cream. Now stir in fourteen ounces 
of rice flour or creme de riz, four ounces 
very finely-shredded mixed candied peel, 
four ounces tinely-chopped almonds and five 
ounces butter beaten to a cream. When all 
these ingredients are worked to a smooth 
paste, bake in a moderate oven. To deserve 
thfir name these cakes should properly be 
baked in quaint pagoda-shaped tins, but for 
ordinary purposes they may be baked in a 
plain mould, sliced, spread with apricot jam 
mixed with cream and shred almonds, built 
back into shape and iced with royal icing, 
made with Kirsch, either liquor or sirup, 
instead of lemon juice. 

Breakfast Rol!.— Bone about four pounds 
of ribs, brisket or thin flank of beef, skin it 
and beat it out Hat. Spread it with sau.sage 
meat, rattier highly seasoned, hard-boiled 
eggs (sliueuj, gherkins (.-liced), and dice of 
tongue or ham, with some filleted and well- 
washed anchovies. Roll this up, tie it into 
shape with broad tape, and fry it for twelve or 
fifteen minutes in hot fat till nicely browned : 
then add to it a pint of stock, a gill of light 
wine, and half a gill of vinegar. Let it C(;ok 
very slowly for two to three hours, let it get 
cold in the liquor in which it was cooked, 
after vvhich press it, brush it well over with 
a glaze, f.nd serve plain or garnished. 

Qreen=Pepper Catchup.— Take a quart of 
green peppers, cut off the stalks and split the 
pods into halves, slice into them one onion, 
one ripe large apple, and one-eighth of a 
clove of garlic ; cover with half a gallon of 
water, boil until the pepper is soft enough to 
run through a sieve. There should be about 
three pints of the mixture. To this add one 
tablespoonful of salt, two tablespoonfuls of 
sugar, a teaspoonful each of black pepper, 
ground cloves and celery seed, two teaspoon- 
fuls of coriander seed, one grated nutmeg, 
one-halfounce of tumeric and half of a grated 
lemon peel ; stir the seasonings well through 
the catchup, add a pint of best cider vine- 
gar, return to the fire, bring slowly to the 
boiling point, then pour into small bottles, 
cork and seal. 



Vanilla Souffle and Plums.— Heat one cup- 
ful of milk in a double boiler; cream until 
smooth one tablespoonful of butter and three 
tablespoonfuls of flour ; stir this into the hot 
milk. Cook until a thick paste, stirring all 
the time. Take from the fire, add while hot 
the beaten yelks of three eggs, a pinch of 
salt and three tablespoonfuls of sugar; beat 
for three minutes, set away to get cold. About 
half an hour before time to serve fold lightly 
into the mixture the whites of the eggs 
beaten very stiff, and flavor with one tea- 
spoonful of vanilla. Cover the bottom of a 
well-buttered baking dish with stewed plums, 
which have been seeded and sweetened, 
pour over them the souffle mixture and bake 
in a moderate oven thirty minutes. 

Haricot of Mutton.- Remove the skin and 
surplus fat from two pounds of mutton chops. 
Melt a tablespoonful of butter in a saucepan, 
put in the chops and let them get brown on 
both sides, then cover the meat with one 
pint of hot water and simmer fifteen minutes. 
Peel and slice one large onion, three carrots, 
one turnip, and put them in the meat ; add a 
head of celery, chopped, a teaspoonful of 
salt, a saltspoouful of pepper, and boil half 
an hour longer. Take up the meat on a hot 
platter, anange the vegetables around it; 
thicken the gravy with a tablespoonful of 
browned flour and serve with the meat. 

Sour Cream Pie. — Line two pie-plates wi(h 
puff' paste rolled out very thin, prick well 
with a fork and bake in a quick oven. Mix 
together one-half of a cupful of siigar, three 
tablespoonfuls of flour, a pinch of salt and 
the grated rind of one lemon. Add gradu- 
ally to this four well-beaten eggs, one pint 
of thick sour cream and the strained juice 
of one-half of a lemon. Pour into tlie baked 
crusts and return to the oven, which should 
be cooler than before, until the mixture is 
firm in the center. Serve very cold. 

Filled Peach Pickle.— This will be found a 
good and seasonable recipe. Select firm, 
solid peaches, cut out a quarter and remove 
the seed. Make a filling of seeded raisins, 
dates and almonds, all chopped fine, one- 
third of each; fill this mixture into the 
cavities, fit the parts together, and tie se- 
curely. Make a sirup of three pounds of 
sugar, one pint of cider vinegar, one ounce 
of stick cinnamon, one tablespoonful of whole 
allspice and a teaspoonful of whole cloves. 
Tie the spices in a bag, heat the sirup to the 
boiling point and pour over seven iiounds of 
fruit. Cover closely and set away in a cool 
place until the next morning. Then drain 
off the sirup, boil for ten minutes and pour 
again, boiling hot, over the fruit. Continue 
this process for three successive mornings, 
and the last morning add the fruit to the 
boiling sirup and cook gently until it is 
tender enough to pierce easily with a fork. 
Fill into glass jars, boil down the sirup some- 
what, pour hot over the fruit and seal. 

Quince Cake.— Pare, quarter and core four 
quinces, put in a;baking dish with two-thirds 
cup of sugar, one-third cup of water and one 
teaspoonful of butter, cut into bits; cover 
the vessel and bake until tender, remove 
the cover and simmer over a slow fire until 
the fruit is nearly dry. When cold add one 
tablespoonful of lemon juice and beat with 
a wire egg-whip until light and smooth. 
Make a plain sponge cake and bake in two 
rather thick layers; just before serving, 
spread the cakes between and on top with 
the jelly, and cover the top and sides with 
Btiflay-whipped and sweetened cream. 



Home Hygienics. 



Emergency Uses.— There is nothing more 
comforting in a household than to have a 
self-contained helpful man or woman who 
understands what to do, and goes ahead ad- 
ministering relief in case of sudden illness 
or in an emergency. A gentleman of much 
experience thus writes: 

"Having been reared in a large family, 
and my father being a physician, I have had 
a number of experiences, nnd perhaps some 
of them may be useful to mothers with 
young children. One simple medicinal 
remedy that my father set great store to was 
borax. He had my mother keep a solution 
of salt water and borax constantly on hand, 
and if the slightest irritation or sore throat 
developed among us he had us gargle three 
times a day, and lave our mouths and tonsils 
freely. He thought our good health and 
freedom from fevers and contagious diseases 
was owing to the use of borax. In the case 
of a burn he had us wet cloths dipped into 
a strong solution of borax water, and was 
very careful to exclude the air in putting 
them off and on. It is very cooling and 
healing, and a child does not rebel so much 
against it as with other remedies. One very 
great thing in its favor in using it among 
children is, it is so harmless, while other 
gargles, with carbolic acid and such, are 
often taken by mistake, and cause great dis- 
tress. I often think if every young mother 
only knew the virtues of borax she would 
be thankful, and, having once adopted it, 
would never give it up. As a disinfectant it 
is excellent. One should keep it on the 
kitchen shelf. If you awaken in the night 
coughing and cannot stop, get a small por- 
tion of powdered borax and place on your 
tongue, and let it slowly dissolve, and it 
will almost instantly stop the cough, as it 
will also relieve an ulcer in the throat. 

"There are a few simple remedies that 
are invaluable. Witch hazel is one of them. 
I know of nothing so helpful to a tired brain 
as to bathe the eyes and forehead, and apply 
a cloth wet with it at the back of the neck. 
It will soothe and restore you like magic. 

"In emergencies such things are harmless, 
and yet wonderfully healing. In case of 
sudden pains in the lungs or side from cold 
I think mustard is about the best medicine. 
It burns quickly, and gets you.warmed up, 
and relieves the terrible pain. I keep mus- 
tard leaves, borax and witch hazel where I 
can lay my hands upon them in a minute in 
the darkest night. I have been with young 
mothers on several occasions, where they 
were helpless and knew nothing whatever 
of medicinal remedies, and my sympathy 
for them and the little sufterer was aroused, 
and it made me learn what was helpful."— 
United States Health Reports. 

Germ Breeders. — Bacteriologists devote 
themselves to the detection, isolation and 
destruction of bacteria, and, strange to say, 
they do not appear to have given much at- 
tention to the danger that lurks in the or- 
dinary articles of household use. For ex- 
ample, the common house-broom is both 
the habitation and breeding-place for whole 
colonies of bacteria, and cases of disease 
have been traced to this apparently inoflfien- 
sive article. At Konigsberg a course in bac- 
teriology is being given by a physician, in 



which he maintains that the strictest sani- 
tary and hygienic condition in things per- 
taining to the house should be inculcated ; 
and in this country, in the Boston Cooking 
School, and doubtless elsewhere, there are 
many lectures given on bacteriology. The 
refrigerator is one of the danger spots, for 
bacteriologists tell us that the minutest or- 
ganism may thrive even in melted ice, and 
putrefactive bacteria once gaining access to 
the household refrigerator will breed and 
contaminate butter, milk, meat and other 
foods kept therein. Cupboards and closets 
also afford an excellent breeding-place for 
the ever-present microbe, and housekeepers 
will do well to look to such articles as re- 
frigerators, brooms, dusters, etc.— The Scien- 
tific American. 

The Frying Pan and Indigestion.— No one 

who has taken the trouble to scan the aver- 
age American bill of fare can fail to recog- 
nize the importance of the frying pan with 
us ; fried ham or bacon and eggs, fried oy- 
sters, fried potatoes, fried steaks, and so on 
ad nauseam, seem to be staple articles of food, 
particularly in city restaurants, in which so 
many business and professional men get 
their" noonday luncheons. The cause of 
this is probably mainly hurry. The customer 
wants something hot and fresh immediately, 
and the restaurant keeper can supply this 
demand with less expense in time, trouble 
and fuel by serving fried meats and potatoes 
than by serving the more wholesome broiled 
or baked foods. The result is the develop- 
ment of an abnormal, depraved appetite and 
a ruined digestion for a lamentably large 
number of people. 

Don't Eat wlien Over=Tired,— There is, 

perhaps, no more frequent cause of trouble 
among workers than that of eating when 
over-tired. They return in the evening from 
their labors exhausted, and flatter them- 
selves that a good meal will set them up 
again. Their hopes are seldom realized, for 
their stomachs, like the rest of their bodies, 
being thoroughly tired, cannot do their 
work effectually, and the result of giving 
them a solid meal to tackle is an attack of 
indigestion. Of course, when one comes in 
from the day's wor.'i, a meal is necessary ; 
the only thing to guard against is taking it 
when one is too fatigued to digest it. If, in- 
stead of sitting down as soon as possible 
after entering the house to dinner or supper, 
the weary worker were first to take a cup of 
beef tea, or even of weak tea, with a little 
piece of bread and butter, which would act 
as a stimulant, she would, by the time she 
had made her toilet for the evening, be sutti- 
ciently rested and refreshed to eat a hearty 
meal with benefit. And right here comes a 
word as to the importance of dressing for 
the evening. It is not merely a habit of refine- 
ment, but it helps one to overcome fatigue, 
to get rid of the dust of the day, and to put 
on fresh, cool garments, instead of those one 
has worn since morning. The donning of 
some sort of evening dress — be it only a well- 
worn silk blouse— has a tonic effect on both 
mind and body, and should by no means be 
omitted, even by the weary business woman 
living alone in a boarding-house.— CAicayo 
News. 



The Philadelphia Record JUmanac. 



Ten Uses of Lemons.— Lemon juice re- 
moves stains from the hands. 

A dash of lemon in plain water is an ex- 
cellent tooth-wash. It not only removes 
tartar, but sweetens the breath. 

Two or three slices of lemon in a cup of 
strong tea will cure a nervous headache. 

Lemon juice (outward application) will 
allay the 'irritation caused by the bites of 
gnu ts and tlies. 

No family should be without lemons. 
Their uses are almost too many for enumera- 
tion. 

A teaspoonful of the juice in a small cup 
of black coffee will certainly relieve a bilious 
headache. 

Lemon peel (and also orange) should he. 
all saved and dried. They are a capital sub- 
stitute for kindling wood. A handful will 
revive a dying fire. 

The juice of a lemon, taken in hot water 
on wakening in the morning, is an excellent 
liver corrective, and for stout women is 
better than any anti-fat medicine ever in- 
vented. 

Glycerine and lemon juice, half and half, 
on a bit of absorbent cotton, is the best thing 
in the world wherewith to moisten the lips 
and tongue of a fever-parched patient. 

The finest of manicure acids is made by 
putting a teaspoonful of lemon juice in a 
cupful of warm water. This removes most 
stains from the fingers and nails, and loosens 
the cuticle more satisfactory than can be 
done by the use of a sharp instrument. 

Lemon juice and salt will remove rust 
stains from linen without injury to the fab- 
ric. Wet the stains with the mixture and 
put the article in the sun. Two or three ap- 
plications may be necessary if the stain is 
of long standing, but the remedy never fails 

How Much Water to Drink.— When it is 
considered that the body is made up very 
largely of water it can readily be understood 
how important to health is a constant supply 
of this fluid. Many people have a notion 
that the drinking of water in any amotint 
beyond that actually necessary to quench 
thirst is injurious, ami, acting on this belief, 
they endeavor to drink as little as possible. 
The notion, however, is wide of the truth. 
Drinking freely of pure water is a most effica- 
cious means not only of preserving health, 
but often of restoring it when failing. All 
the tissues of the body need water, and water 
in abundance is necessary also for the proper 
performance of every vital function. Clean- 
liness of the tissues within the body is as 
necessary to health and comfort as cleanli- 
ness of the skin, and water tends to insure 
tlie one as truly as does the other. It dis- 
.solves the waste material, which would 
otherwise collect in the body, and removes 
it in the various excretions. Tliese waste 
materials are often actually poisons, and 
many a headache, many rheumatic pains 
and aches, many sleepless nights and listless 
days and many attacks of the "blues" are 
due solely to the circulation in the blood or 
deposit in the tissues of these waste materials, 
which cannot be got rid of because of an in- 
sufiicient supply of water. Water is accused 
of making ftit, and people with a tendency 
to corpulence avoid it for that reason. But 
this is not strictly true. It does undoubtedly 
often increase the weight, but it does so be- 
cause it improves the digestion, and there- 
fore more of the food eaten is utilized and 
turned into fat and flesh. But excessive fat 
—what we call corpulence— is not a sign of 
health, but of faulty digestion and assimila- 



tion, and systematic water drinking is often 
employed as a means of reducing the super- 
fluous fat, which it sometimes does with as- 
tonishing rapidity.— row</i's Companion. 

Care of the Skin.— The skin should be 
thoiouglily cleansed once a day. Have the 
room warm, and the water only a few de- 
grees cooler. Slay in the bath Ave minutes, 
keeping yourself eitlier under water or pour- 
ing wet all the time. But it is after you 
leave the tub that tlie really important part 
of the bath begins. Dry yourself thoroughly 
with two towels, then take a stiff flesh brush 
and try witli all your might to rub your skin 
off. A coeoanut-flbre brush is the best, 
and to get at your back it is a good plan 
to have a cocoannt-fibre mat hung on the 
wall to rub yourself against. Keep up this 
friction for at least ten minutes. You could 
not invest the same amount of time more 
usefully. There is no such practice for a 
feverish habit as this, notliing like it to je- 
lieve the internal organs from undue heat 
and congestion of tlie blood, and to free the 
lungs from oppression. Moreover, it actually 
increases the size of the muscles and makes 
them firmer by causing the blood to circulate 
more vigorously in tliem. As to its effects 
upon the elasticity and beauty of the skin 
itself, that will be obvious enough at a glance. 
It is the brush, not the toilet bottle, that fur- 
nishes tlie only true bloom of youtli. But 
the morning bath and rubbing down alone 
are not sufficient. If during the day you get 
into a jierspiration, do not allow the moisture 
to dry on the skin. Never come in from a 
walk or a horseback ride or a row and sit 
down as you are. Go to your room, take oft" 
everything and use the brusli. It may seem 
inconvenient at first, but when it is done you 
will rejoice, and soon it will become a mat- 
ter of course to you. This friction after ex- 
ercise is of great importance, so much so 
that it may be affirmed tliat three-fourths of 
the benefit of any exercise is lost without it. 
If you foresee that it will be impossible, after 
your exercise, to take a rub-down, then it will 
often be better to choose the rub-down in- 
stead of the exercise.— t'Wi^ed States Health 
Reports. 

Poisonous Pantries.- It is very desirable 
that the conditions under which food may 
become poisonous should receive more prac- 
tical consideration than they do. Dr. W. W. 
Stainthorpe, of England, has called attention 
, to some glaring defects in the location of 
! food storerooms, which are worthy of alten- 
1 tion. In house construction the position of 
the pantry is too often treated as of minor 
importance. In some houses the space under 
the stairs, or some equally unsuitable and 
inadequately lighted and "ventilated place, 
is thought gbod'enough for the purpose. In 
a great number the pantry is a small ofl- 
shoot from the house, the ceiling, floor and 
walls often being damp, owing to faulty con- 
struction. In some of these, matters are ren- 
dered worse by the water taps being placed 
therein without any provision being made 
for currying away the droppings from the tap 
or overflow from vessels into which the water 
is run. Frequently the closet-ordinary or 
pail — is only a few feet from the pantry win- 
dow. One of the most frequent entries in 
the inspector's note-book is "defective yard 
pavement," permitting of soakage of filth 
into tlie soil underneath. Not only is the 
soil thus rendered a good breeding-ground 
for pathogenic microbes, it also supplies those 
conditions requisite for increased virulence. 



The Philadelphia Record Jtlmanac. 



Biliousness.— It is probable that in a great 
majoriiy of cases biliousness, so-L-al ed. has 
no relation to trouble with the liver, but is, 
in faet, iiotliiiig more than an attack of dys- 
pepsia. On this supposition the asgravaied 
phenomena, such as headache, vomiring, 
feveri-hness and general indi>posilion, which 
are present in bilious attaclis, are ensily ex- 
plained by whai is known as anto-infeclion. 
As we all know, if the food laken into the 
stomach is not properly cared lor. it under- 
goes putrefaction. It is the absorption of 
tlie>ie germs of putrefaction by the blood 
which gives rise to the familiar phenomena 
of biliousness; and becausi^ the poison is 
generated and exerts its influence in the 
same body, the process is called auto-infec- 
tion—that is, self-infection. To ihe presence 
of these germs of pitrefaction in the blooil 
are due also the bad taste in the mouth and 
the muddy complexion which characterize 
so-culled bilious people. The presence of 
bile is not necessary to the production of 
such disorders. In short, every phenomenon 
conuecti-d with a typical case of biliousness 
may be satisfactorily explained as re.^ultnig 
from the v)resen(e of the germs of poisi.n in 
the blood. This being true, much can be 
done in the way of preventing such attacks 
by regulating the diet and keeping the 
bowels open. In treating an acute at tack of 
biliousness the digestive canal must be im- 
mediately relieved of its unmanageable bur- 
den by an emetic or a bri-k ca hartic— or in 
some cases by both. After this has been 
thoroughly done, we may allay the irritation 
of the stomach, which has caused the vom- 
iting, by swallowing bits of ice or draughts 
of some acid drink, like unsweetened lem- 
onade. The headache and feverishmss will 
usually di>appear with the relief of the stom- 
ach and bowels. Rest and quiet will com- 
plete tlie cure. Repeated attacks of bilious- 
ness are liable to be excited by some organic 
disorder, especially of the heart or liver, and 
affections ot these organs should be carefully 
excluded by amedicalexamiuatiou.— l'oitWi's 
Compaiiiun. 

Something About Medicine.— Bear these 
things in mind when giving medicine: 

Read the label on the bottle. 

Shake the bottle belore voti pour it out. 

Even if the bottle is riiarked, it is safer 
to measure the dose in a properly-marked 
glass. 

A medicine glass should be in every 
house. One can be bought for a few cent-. 

Medicine ordered three times a dav should 
be given at 10 A.M., 2 P. M., and 6 P". M. 

If the direction is that it is to be taken 
every four hours give it at 8 A. M., 12 noon, 
4 P. M. and 8 P. M. 

Do not give medicine in the night unless 
the doctor has told you distinctly to do so. 

Iron is always best taken after food. 

Quinine should be taken before food. 

Hot milk and coffee disguise the taste of 
cod liver and castor oil better than any- 
thing else. Pour a little coffee and milk 
into the cup tirst, then the oil, then more 
coffee, and one will hardly know he has 
taken the medicine. 

Air Within the House the Cause of Colds. 

—Dr. Ward has recently published a paper 
in the Boston Medical and Surgical Journal, 
in which he calls attention to the artiticial 
character of the climate of American houses, 
this being in the winter many degrees warm- 
er and drier than that in the" streets. This is 
true in all homes, including those of physi- 



cians, for Dr.Ward, experimenting in his own 
house du in^ thn e w<'tk> in November, 
found that when the mean leLitive humidity 
of the inner air was ao (It gr es. and that of the 
outer 71 decrees, the temperattire inside was 
69 degrees and that outside 36 degrees, thus 
showing that the atmosphere ot the room 
was drier than that of many desert regions. 
This has a very deleterious influence ujon 
health, owing to the great efforts made by the 
body to adapt itsell to the sudden changes 
experienced in passing from Ihe house into 
the street and lice versa, and is the common 
cause of tlie frequency of colds, and more 
or less serious complications. 

Removing Various Kinds of Stains.— For 
fresh tea and cotiee stains u^e boilnig water. 
Place the linen stained over a large bowl 
and pour tl rough it boiling water from the 
teakettle he.d at a hetghi to iusine force. 
Old tea and i of^ee s ains « hich have become 
"set" should be soaked in cold water first, 
then in boiling water. 

For peach siaius a weak solution of chlor- 
ide of lime (ombined with intiniie patience. 
Long soaking i> an e-si niial. 

Grass stains may be removed by cream of 
tartar and water. 

For scorch, hang or spread the article in 
the sun>hine. For mildew, lemon juice and 
sunshine, or, if obstinau-, dissolve one tal le- 
spofinful of chloric.e of lime in four quarts 
of cold water and soak the article until mil- 
dew disappears. Rinse very thoroujjhly to 
avoid any chemical action u| on the linen. 

For wine stains sprinkle well with salt, 
moisten with boiling water and then jiour 
boilingwaier tlirough until stain disapi ears. 
For blood stains, use cold water first, then 
soap and water. Hot wMier .«eis ih3 stain. 

For chocolate stains, use cold water first, 
then bi'iling water from the teaketile. 

Fruit stains will usually yield to boiling 
water, but, if not, oxalic acid may be used, 
allowing tliree ounces ot the crys'ta^ to cue 
pint of water. Wet the stain with the solu- 
tion, place over a kettle of hot water in the 
steam or in the sunshine. The instant the 
stain disappears, rinse well ; wet the stain 
with ammonia to counteract the acid re- 
maining. Then rinse thoroughly again. This 
will many times save the linen, which is apt 
to be injured by the oxalic acid. Javelle 
water is excellent for almost any white 
goods.— Bulletin of Pharmacy. 

Don'ts for the Eyes.— Someone has com- 
piled iin exeellent set oi "don'ts for the eyes," 
and while not wholly applicable to childien 
alone, mothers will find them well worth 
heeding : 

Don't allow a cold wind to strike the eyes. 

Don't try to do eyework with the light 
shining in the face. 

Don't go directly from a warm room into a 
cold, raw atmosphere. 

Don't have colored shades on the lamps. 
Use white or ground glass. 

Don't open the eyes under water in bath- 
ing, especially in salt water. 

Dnn't let any stiong liiiht, like that from 
electricity, shine directly into the eyes. 

Don't strain the eyes by reading, sewing, 
or any like occupation with an imperfect 
light. 

Don't bathe inflamed eyes with cold water; 
that which is as warm as it can be borne is 
better. 

Don't sleep opposite a window in such a 
manner that a strong light will strike the 
eyes on aw akening. 



The War in the Transvaal. 



The Boer war, which began on October 12, 
1899, with the investment of Ladysmith, was 
virtually tevminated on June 5, when Field 
Marshal Lord Roberts— "Bobs"— en tered 
Pretoria and proclaimed British sovereignty. 
This victory of British arms was foreseen 
from tue outset, but it proved to be a far 
bloodier and costlier triumph than Secretary 
Chamberlain, his short-sighted diplomats 
and the Uitlander British subjects in the 
Transvaal (who had fomented the hostili- 
ties) could ever have dreamt. The Tory 
press sneered at the presumption of the Boer 
burghers for daring to defy the great British 
Empire, and when Sir Kedvsrs Buller left 
England for Cape Colony to go to the relief 
of Ladysmith it was confidently prophesied 
that his troops would be eating their Christ- 
mas dinners in Pretoria, Johanaesburg, and 
Bloemfontein. Queen Victoria it reported to 
have even issued specially stamptd cakes of 
chocolate to be eaten by Tomrty Atkins 
along with his Transvaal Christnas plum 
pudding. It was supposed that thi Dutch 
farmers, drawn up into commandoes under 
their big-booted, big-bearded Generalswould 
run away from the British artillery. But at 
the start of the year 19D0 the diminitive 
Republic, which Dr. Jameson had thoui^t to 
overawe and conquer with a mere handfU of 
five hundred raiders, had the entire Brit -.h 
forces in South Africa at bay, had plungU 
the British Empire into the deepest grief and 
gloom, and caused the once scoflting Tory 
press to declare that the British people were, 
indeed, engaged in a desperate struggle for 
life or death as a world power. Immediately 
there was a remarkable awakening of na- 
tional patriotism, even the Colonies respond- 
ing in a manner to cheer the sad heart of John 
Bull. Canada and Australia came to the 
fore, while the brunt of the fighting on the 
South African veldt and kopjes was borne by 
the Irish soldiers and the Highlanders. In 
recognition of the valiant Hibernian service, 
the Queen issued a special order, later on, 
calling upon every Irishman to wear the 
shamrock on St. Patrick's day as a decoration 
of honor. Rudyard Kipling, who celebrated 
this gracious decree in a short poem, also 
wrote (during the night of gloom before 
the dawn of victory for British arms) his 
now famous "Absent-Minded Beggar," ap- 
pealing to the British people to " pay, pay, 
pay " for the war relief fund. Generals 
White, Gatacre, Methuen and Buller having 
been all outgeneraled, criticism of British 
military methods was rife, volunteers and 
yeomanry militia were being eagerly pressed 
into service in which all the reserves had 
been ordered, and, at last, on December 17, 
Baron Roberts, of Kandahar and Waterford, 
was made commander-in-chief in South 
Africa, with Lord Kitchener, of Khartum, as 
chief of staff. The exact events that led up 
to and followed this move will be noted 
below, but with the advent of "Bobs" on 
the scene came the dawn of victory for British 
arms. The relief of Kimberley was the first 
achievement to arouse British enthusiasm, 
which broke forth later into a tumultuous 
home ovation for Colonel Baden-Powell, the 
hero of Mafeking. The march of " Bobs " 
on Pretoria will rank next to his great march 
to Kandahar. The death of General P. J. 
Joubert from illness came at a critically un- 
fortunate time for the Boers, who not only lost 



their beloved commander-in-chief (whom 
the British press also honored in obituaries 
of high esteem), but who soon after saw, as 
well, their next great military communder, 
Peter J. Cronje, surrender to the foe and 
go to his exile and captivity on St. Helena, 
the island where the great Napoleon was 
once caged and died. 

Victory finally rested with the British, but 
it had cost them dear in prestige, money and 
blood. Even now the world cannot but 
sympathize to a certain extent with the 
crushed South African Republic and Orange 
Free State. They were "republics," how- 
ever conservative, and the Boers are de- 
scendants of the Dutch heroes and white 
Protestants in brotherhood with their Eng- 
lish conquerors. To be sure, the Boer dele- 
gates sent to the United Slates and other 
governments could not secure compromis- 
ing administrative pledges : but there existed 
a widespread popular sympathy only recent- 
Iv voiced in Brvan's letter of acceptance. 
The Boers made the Great Trek from Cape 
Colonv, in 1835, to escape British rule, found- 
ed Natal, and quitted that country when it 
was annexed to the British crown. They 
fought the war of 1880-1 to secure indepen- 
dence, and after Majuba Hill the British 
Government consented to a suzerainty which 
restricted British interference to the control 
of the Transvaal's foreign relations. Presi- 
dent S.J. Paulus (" Oom Paul ") Kruger, who 
had made the Great Trek, is regarded by his 
fellow-countrymen as an Afrikander George 
Washington. By his antagonists he is cen- 
Sired as a diplomatic double-dealer and an 
umcrupulous hater of the British, in whose 
serV'ce he once was at a small pay. It is 
true 'hat the Boers made the Johannesburg 
gold mines pay a heavy sum into their treas- 
ury. This has since been aptly styled " an 
adVanCt war indemnity," and it would seem 
to be true that, whatever the abstract merits 
of the issue, the real aggravating cause of 
the war la; in those diamond pits and gold 
mines, me^ punctures on the vast veldt. 
Hon. Jamef Bryce has thus (in the Korth 
American Efview for December) expressed 
his verdict upon the origin of hostilities : 

"Under th« convention of 18S4, which 
fixes the relation of Britain and the South 
African Repub'Jc, the latter had the most 
complete control of its internal afl'airs, and 
Britain possessed no more right of interfer- 
ing with those atRiirs than with the afl'airs of 
Belgium or Porfagal. Assuming that the 
grievances (which were real, but in my 
opinion not so serious as has been frequently 
alleged) and the behavior of the Transvaal 
did amount to a, emus belli, neither of these 
questions arose. That which caused the 
war was the discussion of another matter 
altogether which was admittedly not a griev- 
ance for the redress of which Britain had 
any right to interfere, and which, therefore, 
cotild not possibly amount to a cams belli. 
This matter was the length of time which 
should elapse before the new immigrants 
into the Transvaal could be admitted to 
citizenship, a matter which was entirely 
within the discretion of the Transvaal legis- 
lature. The Boers made concessions, but 
the British Government held these conces- 
sions insufficient. In the course of this dis- 
cussion the British Ministry u^ed langtiage 
which led the Transvaal people to believe 



The Philadelphia Record JUmanac. 



that they were determined to force the Boer 
Government to comply with their demands ; 
and they followed np their dispatches hy 
sending troops from England to S- luth Africa. 
Theyjustifiedthisaction by pointing out (and 
the event has shown this to have been tlie 
fact) tiiat the British garrison in South Africa 
was insufficient to defend ihe Colonies. But 
tlie Boers very naturally felt that if they re- 
mained quiet till the British forces had been 
raised to a strength they could not hope to 
resist, they would lose the only military ad- 
vantaL'e they possessed. Accordingly, when 
they knew that the reserves were being 
called out in England and that an array 
corps was to be sent to South Africa, they 
declared war, having been for some time 
previously convinced, rightly or wrongly, 
tliattlie British Government had resolved to 
coerce them. They were in a sore .strait, 
and they took the course which must have 
been expected from them, and indeed the 
only course which l^rave men who were nut 
going to make any further concessions could 
have taken." 

War was declared by Kruger, abetted bv 
President Steyn, of the Orange Free State, oh 
October 12, 1899. Kimberley, the stronghold 
of the speciiilly-hated CecilRhodes, was the 
first place to be invested, its siege beginning 
on October 20. General Roberts was not to 
lift this siege (of which a Kimberley surgeon 
has given the record in extracts from his 
diary) until 118 days had passed. The siege 
of Ladysmith, the British depot of military 
supplies, with General White in command, 
began seventeen days later (October 29). 
Mafeking was invested on October 13, with 
Colonel Baden-Powell inside its walls, and 
destined to be the English hero of the siege. 
The ;Boers tlius held the British at bay i,Q 
three posts. The forces seeking to relieve 
the besieged failed for four months to efifect 
entrance into one of these invested string- 
holds. The Boers intrenched themselves 
along the crnggv eminences, kno\ni as 
" kopje-," and held the rocky passasros like 
modern heroes of Thermopyise. T'ley used 
smokeless powder. The British soldiers were 
without the proper military mfps of the 
country, nor did their Generals icem to ap- 
preciate the Boer method of fghting any 
more than Braddock did that of the Ameri- 
can Indians. The British troops fell into 
ambush after ambush. 

Lord Methuen, with a main force of 
12,000 men, was making equally una- 
vailable eftbrts to relieve JJmberley. He 
met his most crushing rer.ulse at Magers- 
fontein on December 11. On the very day 
previous General Gata(tre, who was seeking 
to open a line of communication between 
Lord Methuen's troops and a large base of 
supplies at De Aar, suffered defeat at Storm- 
btrg, empiiasized by the humiliating loss of 
several regiments. It vas also Gatacre's 
mission to protect Cape Colony from the 
hordes of Orange Free-3taters. Colonel 
Pliimer, with British forces from Rhode- 
sia, marched for the reliffof Mafeking, but 
was speedily checked bv the Boers at Gaba- 
rones, 100 miles to the north of the beleng- 
ured city. When Sir Redvers Kuller ar- 
rived in South Africa (October 31) he did 
not instantly march on either of the Boer 
capitals. Abandoning his own plans to the 
wishes of Sir Alfred Milner, the British Com- 
missioner, he at once settled his camp at 
Chieveley, south of the Tugela river, and 
strove lo effect the rescue of General White, 
penned up in the upper part ofNatal, lest 



there should be a forced surrender of Lady- 
smith. Four times Buller attempted to cross 
the Tugela near Colenso (December 15, Janu- 
ary 10, February .5 and February 2o i. It was 
not until February 28 that Ladysmith was 
relieved. 

Buller's unexpected first defeat (December 
15), coming as it did on top of the Methuen 
and Gatacre disasters, was for the time a 
staggering blow between the eyes to the over- 
confident British. They had anticipated 
assured victory on the part of that cool- 
headed veteran. His forces numbered about 
20,000 men. He (iefermined to try a crossing 
of the Tugela a: two different fords. Gen- 
eral Hart was t-iiven command of the left 
brigade and General Hildyard of the right. 
Colonel Long was ordered to support Hild- 
yard with twel ve pieces of artillery, but he 
moved his guns so close to tlie river that he 
was caught in a Boer ambush and the rest of 
Buller's army had to fair back to the camp 
at Chieveley. It was not until January 10 
that Buller was prepared for a secimd at- 
tempt. Thien hesouglit to outflank the Boers 
on the w«^t. He moved his army to Pot- 
gieter's Iffift, or ford, jnst as Lord Roberts 
reached ,Cape Town. Lord Dundonald ef- 
fected a. swift seizure of the bridge across 
the LiJtle Tugela and General Warren's 
forces crossed on pontoon bridges. On Jan- 
uary 23 General Warren bravely captured 
SpioB Kop, deemed to be a valuable strategic 
position. But Spion Kop proved to be com- 
manded by the Boer artillery located on 
otJier heights. General Warren found the 
crag too steep an ascent up which to haul 
the British guns, and there wa^^, furthermore, 
no supply of water for his men. So he 
abandoned his hard-won position, the entire 
movement being afterwards severely criti- 
cized by Lord Roberts. As it was, Buller's 
second attempt had proved a flat failure. 
The new commander-in-chief hurried at 
once to the British headquarters on the Mod- 
der, east of Kimberley, and left Buller to 
work out his Natal problem at leisure. The 
third attempt to cross the Tugela occurred 
on February 5. This time Buller succeeded 
in getting his troops over the Potgieter and 
Shiet Drifts onto the Vaalkrantz-ridge, on 
the direct road to Ladysmith, but again he 
was forced back over" the river. On Feb- 
ruary 20, however, after Roberts had been 
for one week inside Kimberley, Buller cap- 
tured Colenso, and on February 28 accom- 
plished the relief of Ladysmith. 

Meanwhile, as stated, Kimberley had been 
relieved. The movement in that direction 
had been inaugurated by Lord Methuen. 
who, with 12,000 men, had fought almost 
every foot of the way from the Orange river 
to the Modder and crossed it. But his ad- 
vance had been halted by the severe defeat 
at Magersfontein, four miles north of that 
river. The Boers lay intrenched along a 
kopje and the Britis"h could not dislodge 
them. Several ambushes were sprung on 
the unsuspecting British, and among the 
officers lost was Brigadier-General Wauchope, 
who led the Highland Brigade. General 
Hector Macdonaid succeeded to that com- 
mand. As soon as Lord Roberts arrived on 
the scene (February 11) he started an inva- 
sion of the Orange iPree State. To divert at- 
tention from his real purpose. General Mac- 
donaid was ordered to move to Koodesberg. 
On Febrtiary 12 General French, with the 
force of cavalry which he had brought from 
the south to the aid of Methuen, made a 
dash across the Riet river at Dekiel and 



The Philadelphia Record JUmanac. 



41 



Waterval Drifts, 15 miles east of tlae British 
camp on the Modder. He forced the Modder 
passage at Klip and Rondeval Drifts and on 
February 15 entered Kimberley in triumph, 
Lord Roberts occupying Jacobsdal, the Boers' 
base of supplies southeast of that city of dia- 
monds. General Piet J. Cronie, in command 
of the Boers, who had been besieging Kim- 
berley, was in full retreat. Leaving Methuen 
at Magersfontein and General Kelly-Kenny's 
division in control of the Modder drifts east 
of the city, Roberts gave hot pursuit to the 
flying Cionje, whom he overtook and de- 
feated (February 18) at Paardeberg Drift. 
On February 27 Cronje surrendered, with 
4000 men. 

Briefly epitomized the events of the war 
thus recapitulated stood as follows: 

October 9. — Boer ultimatum. 

October 11.— Enemy invade Natal. 

October 13.— Newcastle abandoned. 

October 13. — Kimberley invested. 

October 13.— Mafeking"ln vested. 

October 20.— Victory at Glencoe. Battle 
of Dundee. 

October 21.— Victory at Elands Laagte. 

October 22.— Boers attack Dundee. Brit- 
i.sh evacuate Dundee. 

October 24.— Victory at Rietfontein. 

October 25.— Boers enter Dundee. General 
Symons' death. 

October 28.— General Yule enters Lady- 
smith. 

October 30.— Battles of Farquhar's Farm 
and Nicholson's Nek. Two British regiments 
and a mounted battery captured. Lady- 
smith invested. 

October 31.— Buller arrives at Cape Town. 

November 1. — Colenso and Stormberg 
evacuated. Free-Staters seize Colesberg. 

November 2. — Ladysmith isolate d. 

November 15. — Armored train derailed at 
E.stcourt. 

November 2.3.— Victory at Belmont. 

November 25 —Victory at Graspan. 

November 28. —Boers driven from positions 
at Modder River. 

December 10.— General Gatacre defeated at 
Stormberg. 

December 11. — Lord Methuen is repulsed 
at battle of Magersfontein. 

December 15.— Buller repulsed at Tugela. 
Eleven guns abandoned. 

December 31. — General French defeats 
Boers at Colesberg. 

January 6.— Sutiblk regiment loses 113 men 
at Rensbiirg. 

January 10.— Roberts and Kitchener ar- 
rive at Cape Town. 

January 11 .—Buller seizes Potgeiter's Drift. 

January 23.— Capture of Spion Kop. 

January 25.— Abandonment of Spion Kop. 

January 25. — Buller retires across the 
Tugela. 

February 6.— Buller takes Vaal Krantz. 

February 7. — Buller retires across the 
Tugela. 

February 12.- Battle of Rensburg. 

February 12.— Attack on Boers at Croco- 
dile river by Colonel Plumer. 

February 13.— Rensburg evacuated. 

February 15.— Relief ot Kimberley. 

February 15.— Cronje flies. 

February is.— Victory at Paardeberg Drift 
by Roberts over Cronje. 

February 19. — Dordrecht re-occupied. 

February 20.— Colenso seized. 

February 22.— Battle near Arundel. 

February 27.— Rensburg re-occupied. 

February 27.— Buller captures Boer posi- 
tions near Pieters Hill. 



February 27.— Surrender of Cronje with 
4000 men at Paardeberg. 
February 28.— Colesburg occupied. 
February 28.— Ladysmith relieved by Bul- 
ler. 

When General French had thus by his 
brilliant forced march relieved Kimberley 
(February 15), General Cronje determined 
to withdmw his besieging force as Joubert's 
ibrces had been withdrawn from around 
Ladysmith. He hoped to steal through the 
gap between French's cavalry and the Brit- 
ish inl'antry division, moving more slowly 
northward. But hi.s oxen were not swift 
enough forsuch a transportation emergency, 
and he was entrapped by the converging 
lines of the cavalry and Macdonald's High- 
land Brigade. Cronje's last stand was made 
in the bed of the Klip river, near Paarde- 
berg. His ammunition was soon spent, and 
resistance became useless. His surrender oc- 
curred curiously enough on February 27, the 
anniversary ot the British defeat by the 
Boers at Majuba Hill. The cpincidence was 
a noiable circumstance of fate. Cronje's 
surrender was inevitable. He had but 4000 
men to a British force of 40.000. The " Old 
Lion of South Africa," as Piet Cronje was 
styled, was put in a British cage at St. 
Helena, Napoleon's one-time island prison, 
where he still is captive. Cronje is 65 years 
old, and he is said to have been a silent, 
masterful statesman as well a.s ^oldier. He 
captured Sir John W'illoughby and the other 
Jameson i aiders in '96. Mafeking and Kim- 
berley were both Invested by him. He 
seized the armored train, and broke the com- 
munications between Rhodesia and Cape 
Town. Severely did he punish Methuen, 
eiurapping also the Highland Brigade, and 
he held Paardeberg against Roberts for 
twelve days. 

Kimberley and Ladysmith were now free 
from siege. The relief of Ladysmith was 
welcome news to England, but it meant 
little more than the ending of the distressful 
condition of its garrison of 12,000. The Boers 
had by their move succeeded in keeping the 
British forces divided and in delaying the 
invasion of their own republic. General 
Joubert had long kept the British line at 
bay. But now this great Boer commander 
in-chief was himself removed from the 
scene. His death from illness (on March 
27) called forth euloiiistic obituaries in the 
British press and Queen Victoria sent his 
widow her royal condolences. Pietrus 
Jacobus Joubert was the highest type of 
Boer chivalry. He loved peace, but was 
ready to tight for his country to the bitter 
end. As a youth he won the sobriquet 

j of "Sliem Het" (Clever Peter). In the 
Boer war for independence of 1881 it Wiis 
he who was the victor of Majuba Hill. 
He scaled that almost perpendicular height, 
surprised General Colley's troops in their 

I intrenchments, and killed 500 British with 

I the loss of only five Boers. He was called 
upon to enter this second war against the 
British at the age of 68, nor was his old-time 
skill and vigor lacking. The Transvaal had 
been divided by him into seventeen military 

I districts. He himself invested Ladysmith, 
held Buller at bay, and made the daring 

j raid south of the Tugela with 3000 riflemen 
and six guns, isolating one British regiment 

! at Estecourt and another at Moi.i. General 
Louis Botha succeeded this old hero as com- 

I mander-in-chief, but could not keep back 
Buller from advancing in Natal. After work- 
ing through the Drakensberg Mountains, 



The Philadelphia Record JUmanac. 



Buller seized Botha's Pass on June 8, and on 
June 11 captured Lains's Nek and Majiiba, I 
thus becoming master of Natal. Bothahad, | 
however, disiinauished himself early in the 
war by his victory at Coleiiso and by his re- 
taking of Spion Kop from General Warren. 
Thirty-einht years old, he had previously 
seen military service in the Kaffir campaign 
and had achieved reputation as a member 
of the Volksraad. i 

BuUer's campaign, successful at it proved 
in its outcome, can thus be recorded with 
some slight anticipation, since it was non- 
pivotal The vital events of the war were 
occurring meanwhile in the two Dutch re- 
publics. Lord Roberts accomplished the i 
march on Johannesburg and Pretoria, Kru- 
ger and Steyn were both put to flight, the 
siege of Mafeking was raised, and the British 
flag was unfurled in the conquered territory. [ 

'Jhe following chronological digest of the , 
war completes that given above in easy ref- 
erence form : ; 

January 15.— George Warrington Steevens, 
W. C, of London Daily Mail, dies of enteric 
fever at Ladysmith. " | 

• February 19. — Boers evacuate Colenso. 

February 23. — Severe fighting between [ 
Buller and Boers on way to Ladysmith. 

February 27.— Cronje surrenders; 46U0 pris- 
oners and 6 small guns are taken. 

February 28.— Lord Dundonald's force en- 
ters Ladysraiih. 1 

March" 5.— General Brabant captures Boer 
fort at Dordrecht. | 

March 7 and 10.— Roberts drives Boers from i 
path of march. I 

March 13. — Bloemfontein, capital of 
Oranse Free State, entered by British troops. \ 

March 13.— In Brit ish House of Commons a | 
le'ter from Presidents Kruger and Steyn i 
relating to possible terms of peace, and Lord 
Salisbury's reply rejecting the proposition 
for the independence of the two republics 
are made public. The offer of the United 
Sta'es to act as a peace negotiator declined. 

March 27.— Death of General Joubert. 

March 27.— Mafeking is heavily bom- \ 
barded. 

March 2S.— Resolutions passed by Kimber- 
ley Town Council in favor of annexation of 
the two Dutch republics. 

March 31.— British convoy, commanded by 
Colonel Bradwood, and consisting of the ' 
Tenth Hussars, the Household Cavalry, two 
horse battel ies, and a force of mounted in- 
fantry, ambu.-hed at Korn Spruit, twenty- 
two miles east of Bloemfontein : 400 men 
and seven pieces of artillery in all captured. 

March 31.— Colonel Plumer repulsed near 
Mafeking. 

April 4.— Three companies of the Irish 
Rifles and two companies of the Ninth 
Mounted Infantry, numbering over 500 men, 
captured by the Boers at Reddersburg, 
thirty-eightmilus north of Bloemfontein. 

April 5.— Small scouting party of Boers 
captured by Methuen near Boshof. Colonel 
de Villebois-Maieuil killed. He was the 
French military expert who had been Gen- 
eral Joubert's chief-of-stalT. 

April 9.— British garrison at Wepener be- 
sieged. ■ 

April 10.— Buller attacked at Elands- Laagte ; 
in Natal. 

Afiril 11.— General Gatacre recalled to j 
England, owing to Stormberg disaster and I 
his inability to prevent General Oliver from 
joining the Northern Boer forces. General 
Chermside appointed as his successor. i 

April 14.— Cronje sets foot in St. Helena. 



April 20.-General Rundle drives Boers 
from Dewet-sdorp ; occupied on 25th. 

April 22.— General Carrington arrives at 
Beira. 

April 24.— Boers attack Wepener, but are 
repulsed. Siege lifted next day. 

April 26.— E.tplosion at smokeless powder 
magazine, Johannesburg. 

April 27.— Sir Charles Warren is appointed 
Governor of Griqnaland West. 

April 28— Phaba N'Chu occupied, the Boers 
retreating from southeastern part of Orange 
Fiee State. 

May 3.— Boer peace delegates sail from 
Rotterdam for the United States. 

May 5.— Hunter crosses Vaal ; engagement 
with Boers at Rooidam. 

May 12.— Roberts occupies Kroonstad. 
Boers" withdraw without making a delense. 

May 12— Another fierce assault on Mafeking 
reimrsed. 

May 16.— Mafeking relieved after a siege of 
217 davs. 

May 26.— Roberts' advance force crosses 
the Vaal. 

Mav 27.— Roberts proclaims the annexation 
of the Orange Free (State) Colony. 

May 28.— Heavy flgliting at Senekal. 

May 30. — Johannesberg entered by British. 
Kruger leaves Pretoria in par^ ir car". 

May 31. — While British flag being raised in 
Johainiesburg the Boers capture the Thir- 
teenth Battalion (Irish) Imperial Yeomanry, 
near Lindley, O. F. C. 

June 4— Boers resist Roberts' advance at 
Six Miles Spruit, but are repulsed. 

June 5.— Roberts enters Pretoria ; formally 
surrendered. 

Jtine 7.— British sustain losses at Roodeval. 

June 8.— Buller forces Botha's Pass. 

June 11.— Buller seizes Laing's Nek and 
Majuba. 

June 12.— Boers under Botha defeated near 
Pretoria. Boers under De Wet defeated on 
the Rhenoster river. 

June 15.— Kruger transfers the seat of gov- 
ernment to Alkmaar. 

June 19.— DeWet again defeated at Heil- 
bron. 

July n.— British surprised atNitral's Nek ; 
two guns and 200 troops captured. 

July 23.— General Carrington and his 
Rhodesian Field Force carry Boer position 
at the Seloiis river by assault. 

July 29.— General Prinsloo and 3348 Boers 
surrender at Naauwpoort. 

Augu.st 18.— Roberts' proclamation that all 
Boers who do not take the oath will be 
treated as prisoners of war. 

August 19.— About 700 Boers surrender to 
General Rundle nearHarrismith. 

Lord Roberts' advance was splendidly ex- 
ecuted, and is worthy to be placed beside his 
famous Kandahar expedition. It settled the 
fate of the Boer republics, made " Bobs "the 
hero of South Africa as of India, won him 
the commandership-in-chief of the British 
army (a birthday anniver.-^ry honor, by the 
way), and led to the proclamation on Sep- 
tember 1 of the British annexation of the 
conquered Transvaal. At first Lord Roberts' 
great forward movement was hindeied by 
the lack of fresh horses after his swilt march 
upon Kimberley, but once supplied wiih 
proper horseflesh his grand army from moved 
steadily on its victorious way. It u as given 
to General Buller to redeem his earlier re- 
verses by the capture of Machadodorp, the 
last Boer capital. This blow broke the back 
of the Boer resistance. Abandoning their 
big guns and releasing their British prisoners 



The Philadelphia Record Jtltnanac. 



thev stopped their stubborn, strenuous dis- 
pute of the British advance, and weak, semi- 
guerrilla warfare became the order. General 
Christian De Wet did escape capture by 
Roberts' troops, to be sure, and entered the 
Orange Free Colony. His daring raids and 
rapid movements distinguished him as one 
of the greatest of the Boer Generals of the 
entire war. But General Olivier, called by 
Roberts the moving spirit of the Boer de- 
fense, was captured, and General Botha re- 
tired from chief command in despair, being 
succeeded by General Villjoen. 

General Olivier, his three sons, and about 
■1000 Boers were captured by General Bruce 
Hamilton at Winburg, August 26. On the 
next day General Buller's troops captured 
Bergendal, a strong Boer position, and on 
August 28 marched upon and occupied Ma- 
chadodorp. General Botha released 1800 
British prisoners at Nooitgedacht, and re- 
treated to Lydenburg, which retreat caused 
the proclamation of the British annexation 
of the Transvaal (in accordance with a 
Royal Warrant dated July 4 — of all days). 
Lydenburg was also soon captured by Bul- 
ler's troops and tlie Boers scattered for good 
and all, although the irreconcilable Villjoen 
continued a guerrilla campaign. 

It was from his army headquarters at the 
Transvaal town of Belfast that I>ord Roberts 
issued the proclamatiou annexing the Trans- 
vaal. The Orange Free State had been, several 
months before, converted into the " Orange 
River Colony." The Transvaal is now the 
" Vaal River Colony." Kruger had first sent 
out the special South African envoys, Messrs. 
C. W. Wessels, A. D. Wolmorans, and A. D. 
Fischer, and later had appointed Dr. William 
Johannes Leyds as a diplomatic agent in 
Europe, Dr. Leyds (born at Magelang, Java, 
and a graduate of the University of Amster- 
dam) had long been Kruger's adviser. Now, 
however, the aged " Oom Paul " gave up the 
tight and all kope. His headquarters had 
been "on wheels" for some weeks, and on 
September 12 he was reported to be at the 
Portuguese seaport of Lorenzo Marques, on 
the Delagoa bay. To avoid a possible at- 
tack from the Boer refugees, he was secretly 
taken on board the Dutch cruiser "Gelder- 
land," lying oflF Lorenzo Marques, at five 
o'clock on the morning of October 19, and 
sailed for Holland, via Suez and the Medi- 
terranean Sea, next day. The British per- 
mitted Kruger to depart in peace, probably 
glad to see him thus eliminated from the 
practical problem. They did not choose to 
deport him to St. Helena, whither they had 
sent a part of the Boer prisoners, nor to Cey- 
lon, where another part are living in a 
guarded prison camp. General Schalk-Bur- 
ger, Vice-President under Kruger, is still 
.somewhere in the Transvaal, as is also 
Steyn. 

It was on the sixty-eighth anniversary of 
Lord Roberts' birth that the field marshal 
was raised to be commander-in-chief. His 
record of " Forty-One Years in India" had 
received a brilliant crowning in South Africa. 

General Buller also redeemed his prestige 
somewhat by his latest exploits. He even 
defended his plan for the relief of Lady- 
smith in response to the presentation of a 
sword by the people of Natal. Speaking of 
his landing at Capetown, he said that he 
was a General without an army, but doubted 
whether a General without an army had 
ever faced so ditScult a situation. The ques- 
tion became what he was to do, to sit still 
for the seven weeks, or to make Bome effort 



at advance. It would take five weeks to 
reach Bloemfontein, or a point far enough 
north to influence the situation in Natal. 
Those twelve weeks would have left the 
Boers free to occupy the whole of Natal, and 
the effect of this upon Europe and the peo- 

I pie at home would have been most unfortu- 

I nate. As for perfecting the plans that he 

i had made before leaving England, that, he 
said, was impossible, as the circumstances 

I had entirely altered. 

Lieutenant Colonel R. S. S. Baden-Powell 
became the second popular hero to " Bobs," 

] however. London went delirious with joy 
over his plucky defense of Mafeking. That 
siege, begun by Cronje with about 3000 

I Boers and 3 guns, lasted from October 14, 

j 1899, to May 16, 1900 (217 days). 

, Colonel Plumer's force, approaching Mafe- 
king from the north, had been repulsed and 

j obliged to fall back upon Lobatsi after a 

! narrow escape from a Boer tnip. Lord Me- 
thuen had been checked on the Bechuaua 
border, 

j Colopel R. G. Kekewich was the defender 
of Kimberley during the siege of 123 days. 
His garrison numbered 2500 men, equipped 
mostly by Cecil Rhodes. Colonel Dalgetty 

I was the defender of Wepener, sixty miles 
southeast of Bloemfontein, where he was 
finally relieved by Generals Brabant and 

! Rund'le, assisted by General Pole-Carew. 
General White was the defender of Lady- 
smith. When Lord Dundonald and his fly- 
ing cavalry column entered Ladysmith they 

■ found the"garrison living on half a pound 

I of meal a day, with a supplement of horse 
and mule fare. Disease had been worse 
than Boer shell fire. Counting Buller's 
losses the British dead, wounded and cap- 
tured in Natal numbered 7000. 

In Cape Colony there occurred a Boer 
rising in March last serious enough to bring 

, Lord Kitchener to the spot, but it was quickly 

quelled. The Australia Bushmen's Corps 

worked in Rhodesia under General Carring- 

ton. 

Disregard of the usages of civilized war- 

' fare has been charged against the Boers. 
Lord Roberts himself sent dispatches to 
Presidents Kruger and Steyn declaring : 

' " Another instance having occurred of gross 

' abuse of the white flag, and of the signal of 

I holding up hands in token of surrender, it is 
my duty to inform you that if such abuse 
occurs again I shall most reluctantly be 

' compelled to order my troops to disregard 
the white flag entirely. ... A large 
quantity of explosive bullets of three dif- 
ferent kinds was found in Commandant 
Cronje's laager, and this has been the case 
after every engagement with your honors' 
troops. Such breaches of the recognized 
usages of war and of the Geneva Convention 
are a disgrace to any civilized power." 

The Boer war had cost England nearly 15,000 
men before Lord Roberts' final movement 
north. Financial experts figure the British 
money loss at $500,000,000. A war loan for 
8150,000,000 was is!-ued (at 1% per cent.), 
American subscribers taking a notable share 
and exciting widespread European com- 
ment. 

George Steevens' death at Ladysmith, Lieu- 
tenant Winston Sp)encer Churchill's capture 
and escape from the Boers, and Mary 
Kingsley's death while serving as a nurse, 
were notable incidents, as was also the plot 
to abduct Lord Roberts and the consequent 
executiop of Lieutenant Hans Oordua, shot 
at Pretoria on Atigust 24. 



TKe War in tKe PKilippines. 



-The attempt lo capture the elusive Agui- 
iialdo and pacify the Filipinos has dragged 
its weary length along throughout another 
year, and opinions still difl'er decidedly as to 
the exact amount of progress made by the 
McKiiiley Administration in its eft'orls.'both 
military and civil. Tlie irue aspects of 
tlie situation in the archipelago have been, 
no doubt, somewhat blurred by the political 
campaign issues. A new order of regime 
lias beyond controversy been instituted in 
tliat troublesdme region of unfortunate an- 
nexation. Since our resume in the previous 
i-sue of this Almanac, General Stephen El- 
well Otis has been superseded, at his own 
request, by General Arthur MacArthur, and 
the civil government on the islands has 
passed from the military governor into the 
hands of a Commission appointed by the 
President in March last. On September 1 
Judge William H. Taft practically became 
I lie real civil governor of the Philippines. 
Judge Taft is the head of the Commission, 
the other members of which are Professor 
Uean C. Worcester, of the University of Micli- 
igau ; Luke 1. Wright, of Tennessee ; Henry 
(J. Ide, of Vermont, who was Chief Justice of 
Samoa in 1891-2, and Professor Bernard 
Moses, of the University of California. The 
Commission exercises the entire legislative 
authority of the government. It has control 
of the revenue, the appropriations, and civil 
appointments. It was directed by tlie Presi- 
dent to establish an educational system, an 
etlicient civil-service system, courts, munici- 
pal and departmental governments, and to 
appoint officers in all these department^. 
Only the military operations remain with 
the military governor. 

The first duty of the Commission was to 
establish municipal governments in which 
the natives should manage their local affiaiis 
to the fullest extent practicable, subject to 
the least degree of supervision consistent 
with law aud order. The President directed 
that all the guaranties of the Bill of Rights 
in regard to life, liberty and property should 
be made the "inviolable rules" for every 
division and branch of the government. 

President McKinley declared in his letter 
of accep.ance of the candidacy for President 
that it has been his " purpose to establish in 
the Philippines a government suitable lo the 
wants and conditions of the inhabitants and 
to prepare them for self-government, and to 
give them self-government when they are 
ready for it and as rapidly as they are reaiiy 
for it. That I am aiming to" do uiideV 
my constitutional authority, and will con- 
tinue to do until Congress 'shall determine 
the political status of the inhabitants of the 
archipelago." 

One of the first acts of the Commission was 
the establishment of a stringent civil-service 
law, giving preference to such Filipinos as 
showed qualiflcafions ecjual to American 
applicants. Advancements are to be made 
from the lowest ranks by promotion to the 
heads of departments. Jud^e Tatt was for 
many years the pn sident of the civil-service 
reform organization in Ciiciunati and one 
of the reform's most earnest advocates in 
the whole country. Ihe National Civil-Sf-r- 
vice Reform Commission detailed a man to 
establish a bureau in the inlands. 

The full report of the Taft Commission, 
dated August 31, described in some detail 



the present conditions of the islands. Ac- 
cording to that document nearly ail the 
prominent Generals except Aguinaldo have 
already surrendered and taken the oath of 
allegiance. Disturbances in various parts 
of the islands do not indicate an unfriendly 
attitude of a majority of the people, but 
simply the activity of small insurgent bod- 
ies issuing from the mountains for night at- 
tacks. All Northern Luzon, except two 
provinces, is substantially tree from insur- 
gents, and distribution of the United States 
troops is by contact largely dispelling hos- 
tility and steadily improving the temper of 
the people, large numbers of whom are re- 
ported as desirous lor peace. The railway 
and telegraph lines from Manila to Dagupan, 
122 miles, had not been molested for five 
months. In other districts unsettled condi- 
tions continued, which, however, native 
constabulary and militia may bring to 
an end before long. Natives desire to 
enlist in such org:anizations for this purpose. 
Economy and etficiency of military govern- 
ment had accumulated a surplus fund of 
6,000,000 Mexican dollars, which should be 
expended in much-needed public work, 
Spanish taxes had been inequitable, and 
the Commissioners are formulating laws for 
the improvement of taxation, providing 
judicious customs laws, reasonable ad va- 
lorem land tax and proper corporation fraii 
chise tax, which will be sufficient to pay all 
the expenses of the government. They are 
also preparing .stringent civil-service laws 
giving equal opportunity to Filipinos and 
Americans, with preference for the former. 

The Commissioners wound up their report 
by declaring their belief that " the creation 
of a central government within eighteen 
mouths, like that of Porto Rico, under which 
substantially all rights descrihed in the bill 
of rights in the Federal Constitution are to 
be secured to the people of the Philippines, 
will bring to them contentment, prosperity, 
education, and political enlightenment." 

The Commission has already appropria'ed 
$l,000,OtiO for the construction of highways 
and bridges. The money was taken from 
the revenues of the islands. Forty-five miles 
of railroad extension are underway, giving 
further employment and opening a province 
said to be ricli in minerals and healthful in 
climate. The Commission is also establish- 
ing schools with English teachers and high 
schools for teaching English to adults. This 
educational work is in the hands of Dr. \V. 
F. Atkin-son, of Springfield, Mass., who is 
Superintendent of Public Instruction in the 
islands. His willingness to accept the post 
has been cited as a striking instance of pa- 
triotic devotion to public duty, similar to 
that given by Judge Taft when he resigned 
his position on the bench of the United 
States Circuit Court in obedience to tlie 
President's call to duty in the Philippines. 

In appointing this Commission, President 
McKinley believed (to quote his own w ords) 
" that the insurreciion wa- practically ended 
and desired to promote the establishment of 
a stable government." But since the Com- 
mission's report was made, the hostility of 
the insurgents has continued. The total 
los-es of American troops by disease and 
batilehave been distressingly great. Senor 
Felipe Agoncillo still declares that absolute 
independence will alone satisfy the iusur- 



The Philadelphia Record JUmanac. 



gents. In an article in the National Revieiu 
for September, John Foreman (a resident in 
the Philippines for eleven years) affirmed 
that "the total area of the archipelago is 
computed to be 52,500 square miles, of which 
the Americans barely occupy one five-hun- 
dredth part in places inaccessible by water;" 
that the small United States detachments 
stationed here and there "do not dominate 
a radius larger than the range of their mus- 
kets ; " and that " the Americans occupy in 
fact just as much as they can defend by force 
of arms." It is scarcely probable, however, 
that any serious attempt to extend the 
peaceful operations of the Commission will 
be undertaken at a distance from Manila, 
or beyond easy reach of a strong Federal 
force of armed troops. 

The Record's own editorial opinion has 
been stated as follows : " It is certainly 
doubtful whether any material progress 
toward pacification has been made since the 
beginning of liostilities, over a year and a 
half ago. In Northern Luzon, where Fede- 
ral troops overrun and command the country, 
the military power is able to enforce its de- 
crees. In Southern Luzon, on the con- 
trary, life is unsafe outside of the garrisoned 
towns; travelers are ambushed daily by 
guerrillas, and fighting between Federal 
troops and motley bands of well-armed na- 
tives is chronic and deadly. The islands 
which are tranquil are islands compara- 
tively destitute of populations. 'Los Ameri- 
canos ' are feared and hated no less than 
were the Spaniards under Castilian power, 
and to fight them to the death has become a 
touchstone of Filipino patriotism." 

Candidate W. J. Bryan, in his letter of ac- 
ceptance, denounced the McKinley Admin- 
istration for having made " an assault upon 
the Monroe doctrine." 0*i the other hand, 
President McKinley made an elaborate de- 
fense of the Philippine policy from the be- 
ginning. 

" We are asked," he stated the problem, " to 
transfer our sovereignty to a small minority 
in the islands without consulting the majority 
and to abandon the largest portion of the 
population, which has been loyal to us, to 
the cruelties of the guerrilla insurgent 
bands. This would require an army and 
navy far larger than is now maintained in 
the Philippines and still more in e.xcess of 
what will be necessary with the full recog- 
nition of our sovereignty. Would our op- 
ponents surrender to the insurgents, abandon 
oursovereigntyorcedeit tothem? If that be 
not their purpose, then it should be promptly 
disclaimed, for only evil can result from the 
hopes raised by our opponents in the minds 
of the Filipinos— that with their success at 
the polls in November there will be a with- 
drawal of our army and of American sov- 
ereignty over the archipelago, the complete 
indepeiidence of the Tagalog people recog- 
nized, and the powers of government over 
all the other people of the archipelago con- 
ferred upon the Tagalog leaders. The effect 
of a belief in the minds of the insurgents 
that this will be done has already prolonged 
the rebellion, and increases the necessity for 
the continuance of a large army. It is now- 
delaying full peace in the archipelago, and 
the establishment of civil governrnents, and 
has influenced many of the insurgents 
against accepting the liberal terms of am- 
nesty offered by General MacArthur, under 
my direction. But for these false hopes a 
considerable reduction could have been had 
in our military establishment in the Philip- 



pines, and the realization of a stable gov- 
ernment would be already at hand." 

Whatever may be thought of this direct 
accusation of the so-culled Anti-Imperialists 
as factors in the prolongation of the insur- 
rection, it is a matter of history that, in 
October, 1899, in announcing the release of 
certain American prisoners, Aguinaldo is- 
sued a proclamation in which he said that 
in America there was a great party insisting 
on the Federal Government's recognition of 
Filipino independence. " That party," he 
declared, " will compel the United States to 
fulfill the promises made to us in all solemn- 
ity and good faith, though not put into 
writing. Therefore we must show our grati- 
tude and maintain our position more reso- 
lutely than ever. We should pray to God 
that the great Democratic party may win 
the next Presidential election and Imperial- 
ism fail in its mad attempt to subjugate us 
by force of arms. There are some Americans 
in the Philippines who have joined us be- 
cause they disapprove a war of what Mr. 
Atkinson "calls criminal aggression. When 
offered a chance to return to their own camp 
they declined." 

At the close of our previous Almanac re- 
view the successful campaign against Tarlac, 
the insurgent capital, was being inaugurated. 
General MacArthur was in charge of the 
general movement and co-operated with 
General Lawton's column, which moved 
northward. San Isidro was again occupied, 
Lieutenant-Colonel Guy Howard, a son of 
General O. O. Howard, falling in this en- 
gagement, being killed on the firing line. 
This brave young Colonel had already served 
with conspicuous gallantry in two" Indian 
campaigns. San Isidro being established as 
a base. General Young's column moved to 
Cabanatuan, a few miles north. Aguinaldo 
was supposed to have 12,000 men at Tarlac, 
and less than half that number stationed in 
the intervening region. General Ma.^Ar- 
thur's division now set on direct march for 
the Filipino stronghold, starting from Ange- 
les (about 35 miles northwest of Manila, on 
the Manilaaud Dagupan Railway) and mov- 
ing north on the railroad. Tarlac lies mid- 
way between its two termini. Meanwhile, 
after some fighting by General Wheaton, 
with a brigade carried by our warships and 
transports from Manila to San Fabian, Dagu- 
pan, on the Gulf of Lingayen, was occupied. 
Thus the American Generals believed that 
they had cooped the slippery eel of a Fili- 
pino chieftain at last. General Wheaton 
was to cut off his retreat to the mountains, 
and General Lawton was to block any at- 
tempt of Aguinaldo's to e.scape around the 
right flank and join the insurgents in the 
southern part of the island. Retreat to the 
west would shut in the Filipino army against 
the coast. General Lawton accomplished 
his march with General Young's cavalry 
leading the way. Wheaton's forces operated 
east of Dagupa"n and San Jacinto. MacAr- 
thur's main column passed through Gerona, 
where it received an ostensibly friendly 
welcome, and Colonel Bell's advance party 
entered Tarlac on November 12, 1899, with- 
out opposition. But Aguinaldo had fled. 
When the eagerly expected fight to the finish 
seemed at hand, the cage was found empty 
and the wily bird flown. General Young's 
forces continued pursuit in the direction of 
Pozorubbio, while General Wheaton's forces 
won a serious fight near San Jacinto on 
November 14, in which seven Americans 
were killed, among them being Major John 



The Philadelphia Record JUmanac. 



A. Logan, son of the late General Logan, of 
Illinois, General Young's advance was re- 
ported lo have twice come up with the rear- 
guard of the north ward- tleeing Aguinaldo, 
reported to be at the head of 1000 men. But 
Aguinaldo's actual whereabouts remained in 
the dark. Boambang aud Bayombong were 
both suspected to be his ultimate destination, 
and the latter place was speedily occupied by 
the American troops. Lieut. Munro, with 
fifty men, simply telegraphed ahead to Gen- 
eral Conon, the Filipino commander there, 
that he was coming with a large force. The 
easily-frightened commander promptly sur- 
rendered his eight hundred men by return 
telegraph. Munro marched his fifty men 
into Bayombong as the advanced guard of 
the mythical large army nearby. 

Large stores of ammunition and several 
important captures of prominent Filipino 
insurgents had been effected at any rate. 
Buencamino, Aguinaldo's Secretary of State, 
often styled " the brains of the revolution," 
gave himself up and was imprisoned at 
Manila. He is the author of the Filipino 
constitution and most of the Filipino ap- 
peals and proclamations. Senor Bautista, 
President of the Filipino Congresss, also fell 
Into American hands, and most of the mem- 
bers of the Congresij were either captured or 
set to final flight. Vigan, a port 35 miles 
north of Dagupan, was relieved by forces 
from the Oregon and other ships after a nard 
march and much desultory fighting ; and in 
the mountains near the ocean Col. Bell de- 
feated, on November 28, two insurgent brig- 
ades, capturing their artillery aud supplies. 
In Vigan, Col, Parker, with a" small body of 
men, mostly ill, had gallantly held the 
town against a fierce Filipino attack, in- 
volving house-to-house fighting. 

Half-a-dozen separate American columns 
cleaned out the Filipino bands elsewhere in 
Northern Luzon. On December 3 Major 
March's troops defeated one of these bands 
aud killed its commander, General del Pilar, 
who was regarded as the ablest military 
leader of the Filipinos, although little more 
than a boy. Another insurgent leader, 
Alejandrino, surrendered. Major March's 
troops abandoned their pursuit of Aguinaldo 
after reaching Baguen, in the heart of the 
Grand Cordillera (a 10,000-foot high range). 
Aparri, on the north coast, surrendered, 
however, to Captain McCalla, of the Newark, 
and along with it the entire province of Caga- 
yan. Major Batchelder's detachment ac- 
complished a daring march straight north 
through the island and established a post at 
Aparri, commanding th» Rio Grande valley. 
General MucArthur held the eastern central 
Isabella province and General Young the 
western and central regions. All that re- 
mained was to conquer the mountain 
stronghold beyond Montalban, which the 
iusurgeuts deemed imjiregnable. And it 
was in effecting this climax victory that 
General Lawton. .)', e of the heroes "of the 
army, who had just achieved the notiible 
march in the Tarlac campaign, fell a martyr 
to the war. 

The stronghold in question lay some dis- 
tance northe^^^t of San Mateo, a village in 
the Mayaguez valley, about 15 miles north- 
east of Manila, which was at once attacked. 
While bending to aid a wounded comrade 
Lawton was laid low by a sharpshooter's 
bullet that pierced his heart. His was the 
only life lost on the American side in the at- 
tack, buc it was the most serious loss yet 
sustained b' our army iu the Philippines. 



A brave and brilliant leader, Lawton in- 
spired his men. As President Schunnan 
said of him, he was "fearless, impetuous, 
ana always successful, so that his very name 
was in itself the strength of legions." His 
march from Angeles to Lagupan was noth- 
ing short of an exiraorduiary feat. Men 
dropped out sick to struggle back on the ter- 
rible roads. Horses died in numbers. Sol- 
diers and officers marched barefoot and half- 
naked, their clothes having been torn to 
pieces in the jungles. Six feet three inches 
in height, Lawton looked every inch the 
soldier. He has been called the most pic- 
turesque and dashing United States army 
officer since the death of Custer. His Indian 
campaigns were brilliant, his most notable 
exploit on the plains having been his pur- 
suit and capture of the Apache chief Gero- 
nimo in 1886. He held the rank of Major 
General of ^'oluntee^s, but the promotion to 
the rank of Brigadier General in the regular 
army had been decided upon and was sent 
to the Senate, despite his death, as a fit 
honor to his memorj\ In the war with 
Spain he had commanded a division during 
the siege of Santiago, aud became for a 
time military governor of that province. 
After thirty-five years memorable service 
to his country he died a poor man. But iid- 
mirers in the army and out of it promptly 
started a subscription in aid of his family, 
and in a few weeks nearly ^100,000 iu cash 
was turned over to his widow. 

The capture of Montalban, after some 
sharp fighting, and General Young's later 
driving back of General linio's forces, lelt 
General Otis free to turn his attention to a 
campaign in Southern Luzon, where the 
insurgents had been active around Imus 
and along the southern shore of Laguna de 
Bay. On Januarj- 7, 1900, an advance from 
Imus resulted in the loss of 3 Americans 
killed and 20 wounded. The American 
forces were divided into seveial columns, 
pushed in rapid marches, and with sliglit 
resistance and small losses killed many in- 
i-urgeuts and captured considerable sup- 
plies One serious reverse was suflerta by 
our troops, nevertheless, when, on January 
19, a pack-irain escort of 50 men under Lieu- 
tenant Ralston, Thirteenth Infantry, were 
ambushed in Laguna province, 2 men being 
killed, 5,wounded, ana 9 missing. 

General Schwan fought many light en- 
gagements, in one of his fights on Janutirj- 
20 defeating the largest insurgent foice in 
Southern Luzon. 

A marked increase in hostilities in Lu- 
zon occurred about the middle of Sep- 
tember last. General Young, in command 
in the llucan provinces, called loudly for 
more forces, while General MacArlhnr's 
detachments of the Fifteenth and Thirty- 
seventh Kegimeiits, numbering 135 soldiers, 
bravely withstood a serious attack by a 
[ thousand Filipinos at Siniloan, at the east 
I end of Laguna Bay; 24 Americans were 
■ killed (including Captain David D. Mitchell 
and Second Lieutenant George A. Cooper) 
and 26 were wounded— a loss of 33 per ci nt. 
I And on October 6 came the severest blow 
I inflicted on the army during the season— 
I fifty-one men of Company F, Twenty-ninth 
Regiment, captured by the enemy, together 
with their leader. Captain Devereux Shields. 
They had left Santa Cruz in the island of 
Marinduque (of!' the south coa-t of Luzon) by 
a gunboat for Torrejos. They were recap- 
tured, however, in a few days by Colonel 
Luther Hare's command. 



The Philadelphia Record JUtnanac, 



" Non-combatants, as the inhabitants pro- 
fess to be," states Phelps Whitmarsh, special 
commissioner for The Outlook (New York), 
" they are still in sympathy with the insur- 
rectos. Many of them are st'ill paying money 
into the insurgent exchequer, and many a 
so-called amigo in white clothes has a rifle 
hidden waiting for the tide to turn in Agui- 
naldo's favor. In villages not occupied by 
Americans, gentry of the latter class formed 
into little bands and tired upon trains, tore 
up a rail or two of track, or tried to bolo out- 
posts." 

The Philippine archipelago has now been 
made into a distinct new military Division 
of the Pacific, divided into four departments. 
The trial and execution of Filipinos as ban- 
dits is carrying out the intention to make a 
distinction between organized bodies of in- 
surgents and companies of bandits or indi- 
vidual marauders. Nevertheless, in the 
autumn Captain Brandle and Lieutenant 
Perkins were convicted by court-martial of 
torturing Filipino prisoners at Mariguana. 
They were merely reprimanded. 

Other events in the archipelago, not noted 
in the above resume of the campaigns in 
Northern and Southern Luzon were as fol- 
lows : The Charleston was wrecked on a 
hidden and uncharted coral reef on the 
north coast of Luzon, near Kamiguin island, 
in a monsoon, November 2. In the island of 
Panay, General Hughes drove the insurgents 
twenty miles inland to the mountains. In 
Negros the chief insurgent leader surren- 
dered, and sugar planting and mills began. 
A supposed mutiny of native police led, how- 
ever, to the death of Lieutenant A. C. Led- 
yard, of the Sixth Infantry who originally 
enlisted for the war in Cuba while still a j 
Yale student. Eleven oflicers of the autono- 
mous government were lodged in jail on a 
charge of treason. Zamboango, the chief | 



town of Mindanao, was occupied by a naval 
party from the Castine. Half of the island 
later surrendered to Commander Very. 

On December 12 Gen. Otis announced that 
some of the Philippine ports would soon be 
opened for trade. Their opening later al- 
lowed the export of hemp, the most im- 
portant product of the island, to be re- 
sumed. Colonel Kobbe was placed in 
charge of a military force to free the islands 
of Samar and Leyte of insurgents and to re- 
store the hemp trade. He met resistance 
only at Legaspi, where 5 American soldiers 
were wounded, while 45 insurgents were 
killed and 15 wounded. About 200,000 bales 
of hemp were found in Catanduanos. The 
closing of the hemp trade and hemp rai.sing 
for two years past had seriously disturbed 
commerce in tirst-quality cordage. There 
are nearly 150 hemp ports in the archi- 
pelago. 

The arrival at Manila of Archbishop Cha- 
pelle, the Apostolic Delegate to the Philip- 
pines, led to rumor that the friars were to 
be reinstalled in the parishes. General Otis 
issued a proclamation that " if the Church 
authorities assign friars to curacies who are 
obnoxious to the people they will not be 
compelled to accept them." 

On December 18 Lieutenant Gilmore of 
the Yorktown and 19 other American prison- 
ers were recaptured by Colonel Luther Hare 
from the Filipinos. The Lieutenant stated 
that Aguinaldo treated them with consid- 
eration, but that General Tino had used 
harsh treatment, leaving orders for them to 
be shot before he took his flight. 1 he Ameri- 
can flag was raised over the little isle of 
Sibutu, under treaty with the Sultan of Sulu. 
It is not far from Borneo. 

A number of cases of the bubonic plague 
were reported from Manila, and San Fran- 
cisco was put under strict quarantine. 



TKe Boxer Uprising' in China 



All Christendom and modern civilization 
was astounded and alarmed when in June 
last the yellow peril suddenly burst forth 
defiant in its face. China, the sleeping, had 
unexpectedly awakened in fury while the 
foreign Powers were busily squabbling over 
her supposed political corpse. They had 
already cut off portions of the ancient em- 
pire for their own occupation. And now 
ihe long-enduring Chinese had turned upon 
the very legations in Peking, thought to 
have been thoroughly safe under the pro- 
tecting aegis of the various Powers. Baron 
von Ketteler, the German Minister, had been 
killed in the street on his way to the Tsuug- 
li-Yamen on June 19. United States Minister 
Conger and all the representatives of the 
Old World Powers were cooped up in their 
shell-like legation houses and at the mercy 
of the fanatic Boxers. The Empress Dowa- 
ger protested that she could not control 
these Boxers (members of secret societies); 
but common opinion suspected that this 
scheming old woman was in reality behind 
the entire outbreak. There can be no doubt 
that she encouraged, if she had not inspired, 
it. Prince Ching, favorable to foreigners, 
and in command of the Imperial troops, 
was said to be powerless to oppose Prince 
Tuan, a hater ol the foreign devils, who was 



the right hand of the Empress Dowager and 
who was leading the horde of Boxers in 
their repeated assaults on the besieged min- 
isters, missionaries and native converts in 
China. The aspect of affairs was certainly 
very distressing, and speculation became 
rife as to the hope of relieving the besieged 
in Peking or of quelling the outbreak before 
the whole, vast, unwieldy Middle Kingdom 
should be in chaotic uproar. China was 
computed to have one million men at call 
for war, with 300,000 soldiers active under 
the eight banners and green flags. No one 
could prophesy what terrible forces this 
heathen empire might bring to bear on that 
civilization which she had seemingly de- 
cided at last to oppose. The general anxiety 
was not lessened by the subsequent capture of 
the Taku forts, the Powers thus antagonizing 
the Manchurian dynasty and practically de- 
claring war on the Chinese Government. 
Admiral Kemptf, of the United Stales Navy, 
refrained from Joining in what he deemed a 
diplomatically indiscreet step, and Secretary 
of State Hay upheld him in this course. 
Our Government pursued a consistent policy 
on this same line throughout the ensuing 
events and won signal prestige for its states- 
manship in this vexed crisis. 
But the actual situation In China demanded 



The Philadelphia Record JUmanac. 



instant action on the part of all the allied 
Powers. The ("hineseGovernmentrefusedto 
give adequate information regarding the true 
state of ati'airs in Peking, and from Shang- 
hai came constant reports of a startling 
character, culminating at last in the asser- 
tion that the legations had been burnt down 
and all the plucky defenders been killed in 
a final desperate sortie and engagement. 
The British Admiral Seymour headed a small 
relief band and started at once for Peking, 
but was attacked, himself woiuided and 
compelled to return to Tientsin, where later 
the allies were repulsed with severe loss in 
their first attack upon the Cliinese within 
iis walls. The defeat of Admiral Seymour's 
expedition encouraged the Boxers and de- 
pressed the civilized world more than ever, 
it was plain that a difficult task confronted 
them and that a second repulse, such as 
Seymour's, could not be risked. In the 
face of the yellow peril, the quarreling Pow- 
ers—even Russia and Japan — consented to 
suspend temporarily their rivalries. Russia 
was permitted to begin operations in Man- 
churia and along the Amur river, the 
Chinese having attacked Blagovestchensk ; 
and Japan was assigned a principal role in 
the contemplated luaneuvres towards Pe- 
king. When that movement, destined to 
be successful, began, another surprise was 
in store for the allies. Unexpected as the 
repulse of Seymour's advance proved to be 
the fierce fighting of the Chinese at Peitsang. 
Their guns were better than those of the 
Europeans, and Europe began to wonder 
more and more what fearful kind of a hor- 
net's nest she had aroused. But then the 
Chinese demonstrated their unexpected way 
of doing things by instantly dropping their 
fierce aspect ; a panic seemed to settle over 
the Boxers ; the entrance of Peking was ef- 
fected with more ease than anticipated, 
and the Dowager Empress and her Manchu 
court fled to the far West. 

According to Dr. Martin the Boxers were 
originally exasperated by Kaiser Wilhelm's 
seizure of a seaport on pretext of avenging 
the murder of certain German missionaries 
a few years ago. The Chinese Government 
encouraged the Boxers and eventually in- 
corporated them among the Imperial troops. 
Mandarins, princes and even tlie Empress 
Dowager had fanatic belief in the miracu- 
lous powers of these Boxers. Their mani- 
festo charged foreiguers with seizing Chinese 
territory, getting possession of the maritime 
customs, building railways and insulting the 
gods. 

The story of the besieged legations in 
Peking has been told by Dr. W. A. P. Mar- 
tin, President of the Imperial University at 
the Chinese capital, in a letter dated August 
24, to the New York Independent. His ac- 
count, greatly abridged, of the little foreign 
colony's experiences during a siege of two 
months is as follows : 

" For more than a year the fanatical Box- 
ers had been killing Christians and burning 
their villages with secret connivance of the 
mandarins. They threatened to come to the 
capital and drive out all the foreigners. Bnt 
noDody believed they would make the at- 
tempt. Early in June the storm-cloud burst 
on ns with startling suddenness. The rail- 
way to the South was torn up and our lega- 
tions ordered a guard of mari'i<;s from Tien- 
tsin. The little guard, only M for some 
eight legations, arrived in the nick of time, 
as the next day the track from Tientsin was 
also torn up. Their arrival certainly pre- 



vented a massacre, though it did not prevent 
war and bloodshed. Appeals to our naval 
authoiilies were made, and as a first step to- 
ward rescue the forts at Taku were captured. 
This led the Chinese to declare war against 
all the Powers concerned. On June 19 the 
German Ministi^r was killed in the street 
while going to the Foreign Office. This 
showed that there was no hope of protection 
from that quarter, and the people in most of 
the legations fled to that of Great Britain, 
which was large and capable of defense. 
There we were at once attacked by fire and 
artillery, the government buildings being 
reduced to ashes, in the hope of involv- 
ing us. We fought the tires, however, with 
success, so that they did not reach the lega- 
tion, and as to the artillery it was so poorly 
served that it did no great execution. 

" Our guards and vohinteers kept watch 
day and night, and now and then made a 
sortie to drive back the enemy. In these 
engagements we lost heavily, and in the 
course of eight weeks one-third of our force 
had been killed or wounded. Our food sup- 
ply was reduced to the lowest ebb. Horses 
and mules to the number of eighty-eight 
were eaten, and we feared we should have 
to try the virtues of dog meat, which some 
of the Chinese aftect to relish. In two weeks 
our bread would have run out, and we 
thought the Chinese, despairing of storming 
our castle, counted on starving us to death. 
I say to death, for with such a foe there can 
be no surrender. We were wild with joy 
when, at 2 A. M. on the 14th of August, we 
heard the machine guns of our deliverers 
outside of the city wall. In the forenoon of 
the same day the Americans, under General 
Chaffee, came in through the water gate un- 
der the wall. The key of the situation was 
the wall between the Tartar and Chinese 
cities— all the legations being on the Tartar 
side, within easy range. On the outbreak of 
hostilities it was held by Chinese soldiers, 
but the Americans and Germans, whose 
legations were nearest, aided by English and 
Russians, drove them back and camped on 
its top. There they had a continual fight to 
keep their ground, but there was no thought 
of retreat, as that meant destruction in de- 
tail to the whole foreign quarter. Though 
valiant deeds were done by men of other 
nationalities, the glory of holding the -wall 
belongs chiefly to Captain Myers, of the 
United States Marines, and to H. G. Squiers, 
Secretary of the United States Legation. 

"About 1700 Roman Catholic and 400 
Protestant natives sought protection in the 
British legation. Some 2000 more of the 
Roman Catholic Church Ibund refuge in a 
cathedral two miles away. Bishop Favier, 
aided by forty marines, undertook to hold 
the position, and, though cut ott' from us as 
completely as if he had been at the North 
Pole, he succeeded in keeping the enemy at 
bay. Some of the buildings were under- 
mined and blown up with nearly a hundred 
converts in them. There is no brighter page 
in the history of the war than the defense 
of the Peitiing Cathedral." 

The Japanese held the northern half of 
the Tartar city. The Russians held the in- 
ner city, where the palaces are situated, and 
their batteries were mounted on a beautiful 
hill in the imperial gardens. British troops 
were camped in the Temple of Heaven, 
United States troops in the Temple of Earth, 
and the whole city was divided into dis- 
tricts imder the banrers of the invaders, 
who, while protecting life, did not scruple to 



The Philadelphia Record JUmanac, 



pillage. Half the people fled and the 
abandoned property was too strong a temp- 
tation. 

The "Boxers" is the English name for a 
Chinese secret organization, literally to be 
translated as The Righteous Harmony Fists, 
or as the Great Swords. They Issued all 
sorts of manifestoes against the " foreign 
devils." But they were undoubtedly used 
as a tool by the Empress Dowager. General 
Tung Puh Siang aided Prince Tuan in Pe- 
king against Prince Ching and General 
Wang Weng Shao, while General Ma led 
10,000 Chinese troops against the allies sta- 



ordered troops were detached for Chinese 
service, and Secretary Root at once made 
provisions to have 15,000 of our soldiers on 
the scene. On July 10 the allies numbered 
8o49 Russians, 5224 Japanese, 2575 British, 
1400 Americans, 1036 Germans— a total (with 
Austrians and Italians) of 21,304. From India 
came General Sir Alfred Gaselee, with two 
regiments, to command the British forces, 
and finally, on August 10, Field Marshal 
Count von Waldersee, nominated by Em- 
peror William, was accepted as commander- 
in-chief of the army of the allies. Emperor 
William had made a bloodthirsty address to 



PEKING 



Fengteu 



"cTy' 



O 5" 10 1^ 

JUNCCHAU ••• Marth la Peking 



Changh 



va^^^ 



fi^9' 



9 



\°Hwingiun 



, Anting 



Mat I 
JVganp-nj' 






Lofo 



ARTAR crrr 



\^^ 



Ch,hho Calt 

JllONS 

Tunjpien Caft 



ha,huo CaU 



3 



>e>tsang 






Ms/-*' 

Tientsin 



THE MARCH TO PERING. 



tioned at Tientsin. Viceroy Li Hung Chang 
was later called from Canton to rule in the 
province of Chili (containing Peking) and 
entered on his difficult task as chief peace 
commissioner. 

McCalla's marines, from the Newark, were 
the first Caucasian troops to reach Tientsin. 
Colonel Emerson H. Liscum and the Ninth 
United States Infantry regiment arrived 
from Manila on July 9. Admiral George C. 
Reraey arrived at the same time to assume 
United States naval charge, and landed 350 
marines from the Brooklyn. Major-General 
Adna R. Chaffee was put in control of the 
American soldiers. From the Philippines 



his troops, July 3, demanding revenge for 
Baron von Ketteler's murder. He later of- 
fered 1000 taels (about S720) as a reward for 
every foreigner rescued from the Boxers. Dr. 
Mumm von Schwarzenstein was appointed 
as Baron von Ketteler's successor. W. W. 
Rockhill was made by President McKinley 
a special envoy to China On June 28 the 
U. S. battleship Oregon ran ashore on a small 
isle in the Gulf of Pechili, 35 miles northeast 
of Chefoo, but was soon floated and taken to 
the Japanese drydock at Kure. 

Commandant McCalla led the first Ameri- 
can marines ashore, and aided in the cap- 
ture of the arsenal n ear Tientsin, But before 



50 



The Philadelphia Record JUtnanac. 



Tientsin was captured, the allies stormed 
the Taku forts. At a quarter to one in the 
morning of June 17 the Taku forts declared 
war on the allied squadron in the harbor by 
opening lire on them. The squadron was 
composed of one English warship, the Lyon 
(French), the Atago (Japanese), ihe Koreetz 
(Russian), the Itlis (German), the Monocacy 
(American). The land forces, which com- 
prised about 1560 of the combiued British, 
Russian and German contingents, together 
with the Japfinese contingent from the tor- 
pedo depot-ship Toyo Hashi, made their 
attacks from the rear of the forts and cap- 
tured them. 

June i!6.— Vice Admiral Sir Edward Sey- 
mour returns to Peking. His international 
force of 2000 had lost 62 killed and 230 
wounded, and were forced back. i 

June 27. — Chinese arsenal northeast of j 
Tientsin captured by Allies. I 

July 3. —Foreign settlements at Tientsin | 
shelled for eleven consecutive days. j 

July 4.— Chinese under General Ma retake 



July 13.— Allies storm native city of Tien- 
tsin in two columns, but repulsed with heavy 
losv. Among American killed were Colonel 
Emerson H. Li^cum, of the Ninth United 
States Infantry, a gallant commander, and 
Capiain Austin R. Davis, of the United 
Slates Marine Corps. 

July 14.— Allies resume attack and succeed 
in making breach in walls, capturing all the 
forts and 62 guns. American loss, 215 in 
killed and wounded. Rest of allies sutler 
560 loss. 

July 15.— Chinese force invades Russian 
territory and bombards Blagovestchensk, 
capital of Amur province. 

July 20.— United States Minister Edwin H. 
Conger's letter received at Washington, 
D. C, declaring legations safe on July 18. 

July 22.— Chinese evacuate Tientsin neigh- 
borhood. Colonels Bower, Wogak and Aoki 
put in command of Tientsin. 

July 26.— Russian troops capture forts at 
Newchwang. 

August 2.— Peking relief column, 16,000 
strong, starts from Tientsin. 

August 5. — Chinese defeated by allies at 
Peitsang, eight miles from Tientsin, in a bat- 
tle lasting seven hours ; allies lose 1200 men. 

August 7.— Allies again rout Chinese at 
Yanjitsun, losing about 250 men. 

August 14.— Allies enter Peking in two 
columns: Japanese and Russians by two 
gates north of canal ; Americans and British 
by gates south of canal. 

As the forces approached the city the 
Chinese redoubled their eflbrts to overpower 
the legations, but the barricades held good. 
The four armies deployed along the walls, 
the English and Americans being nearest 
the legations. General Gaselee found a 
sewage canal, and, with his staff and a com- 
pany of Sikhs, waded up it into the canal 
under ihe Tartar wall, where were the lega- 
tion barricades. 

While only 11 of the 414 civilians and 54 
of the 3U4 marines who defended the lega- 
tion were killed, the Chinese lost fully oOuO. 
In the full of. Peking, the Japanese alone 
lost WO men. 

With the flight of the Manchurian court 
and Prince Tuan's alleged escape from China 
came the opening of peace negotiations. 
The United States siood against a partition 
of China. Russia sought to have all the 
foreign troops withdrawn from China, which 
would have been a decidedly ruinous and 



perilous policy. Germany insisted that the 
Chinese Government should surrender the 
arch offenders in the Boxers' movement be- 
fore entering on a discussion of terms of 
peace. But American advice prevailed. The 
troops lingered, China was to be allowed to 
punish her own culprits, and a list of those 
to be so punished was submitted, but re- 
ferred back for revision. The Chinese court 
was also obliged to keep a certain foreign- 
hating Celestial off the Peace Commission. 
Meanwhile the foreign armies fought and 
marched in China and the Boxer insurrec- 
tion increased in the southern part of the 
Empire. Russia, too, added to the vexed 
problem by a seeming inclination to annex 
the territory in which her troops had won 
battles over the Chinese. Kwei Chun, the 
Governor of Szechuen, sent 10,000 picked 
troops to protect the Empress Dowager at her 
new capital, Sian. A large number of " Black 
Flags" were sent from the Kwangtung pro- 
vince of Li Hung Chang, who also had a 
bodyguard of 3000 foreign-drilled soldiers 
sent to Peking. Orders were issued by the 
court for the recapture of Peking and Tien- 
tsin. General Voyron, commander-in-chief 
of the French troops in China, with the allies 
under his command, purged the villages 
around those cities. 

This scheming Empress Dowager is of a 
noble Manchu family, a sister of the late 
Duke Chao and aunt of the Manchu Prime 
Minister Yung Lu. Her career may best be 
traced by beginning the tale with the Em- 
peror Taokw'ang, who was reigning at the 
I time of the treaty of Nanking. Taokwang 
I had a number of sons, among whom were 
Yih Hwan (Prince Chun), Wen Tsung Hien 
(who became the next Emperor, under the 
I title of Hien Feng), and Prince Tun. Em- 
1 peror Hien Feng married Tze-An, but hav- 
ing no issue by her took to himself the con- 
cubine, Tze-hsi-tuan-yu, now of infamous 
notoriety as the scheming, double-faced 
Empress Dowager. By Tze-hsi the Emperor 
had one son, Tung-che, who ruled as his 
successor, dying in 1875. His widow, Em- 
press Ahlute, died suddenly, being mur- 
dered (it is now claimed in China) in order 
to prevent her giving birth to a posthu- 
mous heir and thus becoming Empress 
Dowager, in place of the ambitious Tze-hsi. 
Having killed her daughter-in-law, the 
childless Dowager Empress looked around 
fora new minor to adopt as Emperor under 
her rule. She fixed upon her nephew, who 
was proclaimed under the title of Kwangsu. 
Hien Feng and Prince Chun, brothers, had 
both taken consorts from the same family. 
Prince Chun's wife was a sister of Tze-hsi. 
Hence Chun's son, now called Kwangsu, is a 
nephew both by blood and by marriage of 
the Empress Dowager, who has since tried 
to depose and perhaps to kill him. 

In China it is necessary that every empe- 
ror should have an heir. It was therefore 
agreed that Kwang.'^u's first son should be 
proclaimed heir of Tung-che, who died 
childless, in order that the proper ancestral 
rites might not be neglected. Kwangsu did 
not give a son to the world, however, and 
early this year the Empress Dowager had 
Pu Chun adopted as Tung-Che's heir. Pu 
Chun, who thus became a dangerous rival 
to Kwang.su, and whom the Empress Dow- 
ager sought to make Emperor in the too 
progressive Kwangsu's stead, is a grandson 
of Prince Tun, Prince Chun's brother. 
Prince Tun had a son. Tsai Yi (Prince Tuan) 
and the Prince Tuan's son is Pu Chun. 



PHILADELPHIA. 



CITY OFFICERS. 

3ra»/or— Samuei, H. Ashbridge, H. Salary, S12.000. Term expires, April, 1903. 
Citij Solicitor— Soh:^ h. Kinsey, iJ. Salary, 110,000. Term expires, April, 1902. 
Iteeeiver o/ Taxes— William J. Roney, Ji. Salary, SIO.OOO. Term expires, April, 1901. 

COUNTY OFFICERS. 

CowfroHer— John M. Walton, R. Salary, S8000. Term expires, January, 1902. 
Treasurer— 3. Hampton Moore, R. Salary, 110,000. Term expires, January, 1904. 

(Jacob Wildemore, R. ) (Soi„-;p„ ) 

Commissioners— < Hugh Black, R. > „^„u «.cnnn ^Terms expire, January, 190:! 

(Thomas J. Ryan, D. J ^^^^ '^"""- ( 

Sftert/f— Wencel Hartman, R. Salary, §15,000. Terra expires, January, 1903. 
Jiecovder of Deeds— JoHy: ViRDiN, R. Salary, SIO.OOO. Term expires, January, 1902. 
District Attorney— V. F. Rotheemel, R. Salary, S10,000. Term expires, January, 1902. 
Kegisterof Wills— JACOB SiNGER, R. Salary, S5000 and fees. Term expires, Jan.," 19(4. 
Clerk of Quarter Sessions— B.ENRY Brooks, R. Salary, $5000. Term expires, Jan., 1902. 
Coroner— THOMA.S DUGAN, R. Salary, S5000. Term expires, January, 1903. 
CITY COXTNCIl^S-Select Branch. 

[To be reorganized April, ]901. Councilmen are not salaried.] 

Pces/ffCT^- James L. Miles, R. Clerk— Joseph H. Paist, R. ; salary, S3500. Assistant Clerk— Uemy 
W. Robertson, R.: salary, S2500. Sergeant-at-Arins—Jiime>i Franklin, R.; salary, S2.500. 
Ste7iographer—R&To\d Godfrey, R. ; salary, 11200. 



WARDS. 

1. Wm. S. Vare, R. 

2. Harry C. Ran^Iey, R. 

3. Henry J. Trainer, R. 

4. William McMullen i>. 

5. James B. Anderson, R. 

6. James Nolan, D. 

7. Charles Seger, R. 

8. Geo. W. Sunderland, R. 

9. R. R. Bringhurst, R. 

10. James P. McNichol, R. 

11. Joseph H. Klemmer, R. 

12. Geo. W. Joerger, R. 

13. James L. Jliles, R. 

14. W. J. St. Clair, R. 



WARDS. 

15. /.lex. Crow, Jr., R. 

16. Henry Clay, R. 

17. Geo. T. D'Autrechy, R. 

18. Isaac D. Hetzel, R. 

19. Edward Buchholz, R. 

20. Geo. W. Kucker, R. 

21. Joseph M. Adams, R. 

22. George B. Edwards, R. 

23. J. Emory Bvram, R. 

24. Thos. S. Wiltbank, R. 

25. Wilbur F. Short, R. 

26. James A. Briggs, R. 

27. Edward W. Patton, R. 

28. Samuel P. Town, R. 



WARDS. 

i 29. Henry R. Shoch, R. 

30. William McCoach, R. 

31. Watson D. Upperman, R. 

32. Franklin M. Harris, R. 
4 33. Samuel Lamond, R. 

34. B. S. C. Thomas, R. 
\ 35. Joseph H. Brown, R. 

36. Samuel K. Stinger, R. 

37. Ed. W. Saybolt, R. 

38. Thomas T. Joret, R. 

39. R. F. Scofield, R. 

40. Samuel Crothers, R. 

41. Sextus C. Pursell, R. 



CITY COUNCII/S-Common Branch. 

[To be reorganized April, 1901.] 

Pre«i*n<— Geo. McCurdy. Cto-t- George W. Kochersperger, i?.; salary, $3500. Assistant Clerks— 
William Bartley, R. (salary, S2500) and Gavin Neilson, R. (salary, 82000). Clerk of Finance 
0>»/??ii«ce— William H. Baker, R. ; salary, S1800. Committee ««(*- William H. Felton, R.; 
salary, S1600. Sergeant-a*-Arms—CheiT\es B. Hall, R.; salary, $2500. Stenograjiher—'W iWi&m 
H. Lelar, R. ; salary, S1200. 



WARDS. 

1. Joseph R. C. McAllister, R. 
James M. Hazlett, R. 
Albert A. Ardis, Jr., R. 
Thomas C. Smith, R. 

2. Andrew W. Falbey, D. 
Jas. J. Hagan, D. 
David Phillips, R. 

3. John H: Remig, R. 

4. Harry Quinn, D. 
Daniel J. Ryan, D. 

5. John R. Lloyd, R. 
R. C. Horr, R. 

6. William Van Osten, D. 

7. John S. Hammond, R. 
Cha-'. H. Johnson, R. 
Ed. P. Macken, R. 
Chris. J. Perry, R. 

8. H. R. Kneass, R. 
Alfred R. Gratz, R. 

9. Charles Roberts, R. 

10. George McCurdv, R. 
Bennett L. Smedley, R. 
William H. Garrett, R. 

11. Edwin E. Smith, R. 
12 John M. Klang, R. 

13. Albert Moore, R. 
Ellsworth H. Hults, R. 
John Lukenheimer, R. 

14. John T. Staufl'er, R. 
Thos. H. Zimmerman, R. 



WARDS. 

14. Alex. Abrahams, R. 

15. John J. Daly, R. 
Theodore Borden, R. 
M. B. Parker, R. 

H. L. Montgomery, R. 
Thos. B. Price, R. 
Charles Ouram, R. 

16. Samuel B. Gilpin, R. 

17. August Hohl, R. 
C. F. Gramlich, R. 

18. Richard T. Irwin, R. 
Jacob F. Henderson, R. 
INIartin W. Rougher, R. 
Wm. H. Mingle, R. 

19. Jno. R. McLean, Jr., R. 
Joseph A. Eslen, R. 
Elmer S. Little, R. 
James M. Crawford, R. 
R. W. B. Cornelius, R. 
W. H. Seltzer, R. 
John Doak, Jr., R. 
Charles K. Smith, R. 
Thomas J. Morton, R. 
Morris M. Caverow, R. 
William Shane, R. 
George Hawkes, R 
George \V. Conrad, R. 
William F. Dixon, R. 
Josiah Linton, R. 
Geo. W. Rumney, £. 



20. 



21. 



WARDS. 

22. Thomas Meehan, R. 
Jesse S. Shepard, R. 
Jacob J. Seeds, R. 
John W. Davidson, R. 
Frank H. Massey, R. 
Wilson H. Brown, R. 
E. W. Hellerman, R, 

23. Robert T. Corson, R. 
Alfred L. Oat, R. 
Elwood S. Davis, R. 

24. Frank Richards, R. 
Jos. P. Hughes, R. 
3. F. Neill, R. 

Alex. M. DeHaven, R. 
Frank Stevens, R. 
Johr Lang, R. 
J. It. Smyser, R. 
2.5. William R. Knight, Jr., R. 
Albert Webster, R. 
Richard E. Tongue, R. 
Ezekiel Gordon, R. 
John H. Woodhead, R. 
G. L, Thomas, M.D., R. 

26. Edward A. Anderson, R. 
t Robt. McFadden, R. 

I Thos. D. Cummings, R. 

Geo. H. Kelley, R. 
I Wm. Harkness, R. 

27. Basil H. Brown, R. 

I Charles M. Swain, R. 



31 



The Philadelphia Record JUmanac. 



WARDS. 

27. Thomas Randall, -R. 

28. L. S. Merer, R. 
Geo. J. Jewill, R. 
Harry J. Stone, R. 
.John J. Wtes, R. 
David Fi.sh, R. 

29. Daniel H. Buck, R. 
Anton F. Miller, R. 
Wilmer R. Batt, if. 
George W. Edmonds, R. 
Richard A. Whiley, R. 
Walter Graham, R. 

' Samuel Noar, R. 
SI). Robt. McFetridge, R. 

W. H. Fimston, R. 

Frank McCuUough, R. 
ai. Roberts. Leithead, R. 

John Pallatt, R. 

Walter Si radling, R. 



WARDS. 

31. Edward W. Richards, R 

32. Hugh Carlon, R. 
W. N.Stevenson, R. 
N. E. Henderson, R. 
J. H. Shaw, R. 
Frank B. Martin, R. 

33. Stanley G. Miller, R. 
Charles H. Sayre, R. 
Thomas Wagner, Jr., R 
Geo. W. Ruch, R. 
George T. Thackara, R. 
R. J. Patton, R. 

Robt. Rodijers, M.D., R. 

34. Frank H. Caven, R. 
John T. Jordan, R. 
W. S. Rutland, R. 
Arthur B. Eaton, R. 
James H. Pearson, R. 

35. Chas. B. Barton, R. 



3G. John J. Orr, R. 

Thomas J. Henry, R. 
Jas. D. Chambers, R. 
W. ;. W. Moore, R. 
Geo. A. Furnival, R. 

37. John H. B. Amick, R. 
A'acancy. 

Arthur D. Brenner, R. 

38. Wm. L. Miller, R. 
Donald I.. Harris, R. 
James Thompson, R. 

39. John C. Sieger, R. 
William A. Miller, /?. 
William H. Crane, R. 
Geo. Lucas, R. 

40. Charles E. Connell, I.'. 
Harry D. Beaston, R. 

41. Peter E. Costello, R. 



MAYOR'S OFFICE. 

CITY HALL, ROOMS 202, 203, 204, 206, 206, 208. 

Appointments by the Mayor are subject to 
confirmation by Select Council. 

jl/aj/o)-— Samuel H. Ashbridge, R. Salarv, 
812,000. 

Secretary— Vacancy. ?3000. 

Chief Clerk— Geo. W. Seeds, R. 81500. 

Contract and License Clerk — Joseph F. Jones, 
R. 81200. 

S^enoprap/ier— Miss Jeanne L. Locke. 81200. 

aerfc— William W. Gamble, R. $900. 

Assistant Staiopraplier ami Typewriter— M. 
W. Keely, J?. $600. 

Messenger— \N. W. Webb, R. 8720. 

Secretary of Civil Service Board— \. R. H. 
Morrow, R. 82500. 

Stenographer— Joseph jSIarcus, R. 8900. 

aerA:— William Weaver, R. 8750. 

DEPARTMENT PUBI,IC SAFETY. 

ROOMS 217-225. 

Director— A. L. English, R. Salary, 810,000. 
Seo-etari/— James Hoyt, R. 82400. 
JSoofcfceeper— Hiram Horter, Jr., R. 82000. 
CTert— Lewis Hopper, R. 81200. 
Slenograplier— Edgar E. Petit, R. 8900. 
3/e.sse».aer— Robert P. Grouse, R. 8821.25. 
Asst. Messenger— John H. Besson, R. 8300. 

Bureau of Police. 

ROOM 227. 

Superintendent of Police— HdTvy M. Quirk, 
R. Salary, $4500. " 

Fire 3Iarshcd— (Acting) John Lattimer, J?. 
$1800. 

Police Surgeon— Di. Thomas H. Andrews, R. 
81800. 

Chief Clerk— ChSLTles Henry, R. $1800. 

Assista7it Clei-ks— George Rubicam, R., and 
Samuel Heim, R. 8110U each. 

Central Station Clerk— John B. Moffitt, R. 
81500. 

Clerk to Superintendent of Police— Samuel 
W. Roop, R. 81200. 

Assistant Clerk to Superintendent of Police— 
Nathan M. Griffiths, R. $1100. 

Storehouse Clerk— Isaac W. Lanning, R. $900. 

Clerk to Detectives— John Townsend,i?. $1500. 

Complaint Clerk— J. W. Delaney, R. $1000. 

i/ess«i(7ec— William J. Foster, R. 8821.25. 

Driver Supply irajrow— Edgar Latelle, R. 
8750. 

Captains of Police— Virst Division, Charles 
B.Edgar. Second,Edward W. Malin. Third, 
John Lattimer (acting). Fourth, Thomas 
Brown. Fifth, George W. Thompson. $2100 
each. Headquarters, Room 629, City Hall. 



/)e^ec<n'fs— Peter Miller, Captain in charge, 
$2100: James P. Hamm, Kerlin Bond, Thos. 
tirawford, R. J. McKenty, Henry Whitcomb, 
James I. Donaghy, Frank P. Geyer, John Mur- 
ray. James Tate, Adam Ulrick. Thomas Alex- 
ander, vVm. Almendiiiger, 81450 each ; George 
A. Tall, 81350; Frank Gallagher and Tim 
O'Learv, $1200 each. 

Court Detective— H. T. Stanwood. 81350. 

Night Detective— ysLCancy. 8912 50. 

Meat and Cattle Insjjector—Frankhn K. 
Lowrv, R 81350. 

Assistant— Wm. C. Fox, R. 81000. 

Veterinariati—A. F. Schriber. 81000. 

Assistant Veterinarian— J onenh B. Deitter 
$500. 

CAPTAINS, DISTRICTS AND STATION-HOUSES. 

First Z)n'isw?!— Captain Charles B. Edgar 
Comprises the section of the city bounded by 
Delaware river. Chestnut street, Schuylkill 
river, South and Broad streets, including the 
Second, Third, Fifth, Nineteenth and Twenty 
fifth Districts. 

Second Division— CeLpt&m Edward W. Malin. 
Comprises all the territory between the Dela- 
ware and Schuylkill rivers and between 
Chestnut and Poplar streets, including the 
Fourth, Sixth, Seventh, Eighth, Ninth and 
Twentieth Districts, and the Reserves. 

TJiird Division— John Lattimer (acting). 
Comprises all the territory bounded by Pop- 
lar, Broad, Montgomery avenue, Eleventh, 
Susquehaima avenue, Germantown avenue, 
Wingohocking and Tacony creeks. County 
line and the Delaware river, including the 
Tenth, Eleventh, Twelfth, Fifteenth, Eigh- 
teenth, Twenty-fourth, Twenty-sixth, Twenty- 
seventh and Thirtieth Districts. 

Fourth Division— Capt&in Thomas Brown. 
Comprises the territory bounded by Poplar 
street. Broad, Montgomery avenue, Eleventh. 
Susquehanna avenue, Germantown avenue, 
Wingohocking and Tacony creeks, County 
line and Schuylkill river, including the Thir- 
teenth, Fourteenth, Twenty-secoad, Twenty- 
third and Twenty-eighth Districts. 

Fifth Division— Ca.pla.in Geo. W. Thompson. 
Comprises all of West Philadelphia and the 
territory south of South street between Broad 
street and the Schuylkill river, including 
the First, Sixteenth, Seventeenth, Twenty- 
flr.st and Twenty-ninth Districts. 

Magistrates at Central Station— W. S. Koch- 
ersperger and Thomas W. South. 

DISTRICT STATION-HOUSES AND OFFICERS IN 
CHARGE. 

Reserve Coips—City Hall. Lieutenant, Syl- 
vester Keyser. 



The Philadelphia Record Jtlmanac. 



First District— StCition-house, Fitzwater, be- 
low Twentieth. Lieutenant, David McCoacli. 
Secovd District— Stiition-huuse.Secon(i,&ho\e 
Christian. Lieutenant, Jolmson Roney. 

Third i;/»<r(rf— Station-house, 321 Delancey 
street. Lieutenant, Patrick J. O'Brien. 

Fourth Z)(s«rtc<— Station-house, Fifth, above 
Race. Lieutenant, Jeremiah Burke. 

Fifth Z)is.'?-ic<— Station-house, Fifteenth, be- 
low"\Vahiut. Lieutenant, John Mitohell. 

Sixth Dis<)-trt— Slation-house, Eleventh, 
above Race. Lieutenant, Andrew Eagan. 

Seventh i)(VfiW— Station-house, Fairmount 
ave., above Third. Lieutenant, Charles H. 
Heaton. 

i';/fir/itt£)isi:/-id— Station-house, Butt on wood, 
aboveTenth. Lieutenant, Edward T.Fulmer. 
Ninth /)is<rid— Station-house, Twenty-third 
and Brown. Lieutenant, A. M. Richards. 

Tenth Disfric^— Station-house, Front and 
Master. Lieutenant, W. T. Little. 

Eleventh District— Station-houae, Girard ave- 
nue, near Otis. Lieutenant, Henry Tuttle. 

Twelfth i)is<r/d— Station-house, Tenth and 
Thompson. Lieutenant, Wm. Nippes. 

Tidrlecnth i>is(rR'<— Station-house, Mana- 
yunk. Lieutenant, Wm. H. Lush. 

Fourteenth District— S(ation-house, rear of 
Germantown Hall. Lieutenant, Alexander 
Buchanan. 

Fijlcenik Z>is(ric<— Station-house, Frankford. 
Lieutenant, Albert Hanson. 

Sixteenth Disiric^— Station-house, Thirty- 
ninth and Lancaster avenue. Lieutenant, 
John B. Taylor. 

Seventeenth i)(.sir!d— Station-house, Twen- 
tieth, below Federal. Lieutenant, Benjamin 
A. Tomlinson. 

Eighteenth X>2s<ric<— Station-house, Fourth 
and York streets. Lieutenant, John L. Coon. 
Nineteenth />!S<rtc<— Station-house, Lombard, 
below Eighth. Lieutenant, Wm. C. Steck. 

'Jhventieth I»is<i-ic;— Station-house, Fifteenth, 
below S^ine. Lieutenant, R. C. Atkinson. 

Twenty-first i»ts<r/c<— Station-house, Thirty- 
seventl; and Woodland avenue. Lieutenant, 
L~aac Ward (acting). 

Twenty-second Dts^cfd— Station-house, Le- 
high and Park avenues. Lieutenant, Harry 
Wolf. 

Twenty-third Z)i«<;-(V«— Station-house, Jeffer- 
son, above Twentieth. Lieutenant, E. M. 
Lyons. 

Twenty-fourth Dish/d— Station-house, Bel- 
grade an'd Clearfield. Lieutenant, Samuel 
Clase. 

Twenty-fifth District — Station-house, 1507 
Moyamensing avenue. Lieutenant, Robert 
T. Smith (acting). 

Twenty-sixth />iis<cjc<— Station-house, Dau- 
phin and Trenton avenue. Lieutenant, 
Leonard McGarvey. 

Twenty-seventh Dislrict—Tsicony. Lieutenant 
Wm. L.Dungan. 

Tivenly-eighth Dt's^cici— Station-house, Twen- 
tieth and Berksstreets. Lieutenant, vacancy. 
Twenty-ninth District — Station-house, Sixty- 
first and Thompson streets. Lieutenant, 
James B. Robinson. 

Thirtieth />isfnc«— Station-house, Front and 
Westmoreland streets. Lieutenant, Harry 
Enders. 

Thirty-second Z)!'s</-tc<— Station-house, Sixty- 
fifth and Woodland avenue. Lieutenant, 
Francis Callahan. 

Thirty-third DiHricL-Slnt'ion house, Sev- 
enth and Carpenter streets. Lieutenant, 
John W. Lyneh. 

Delaware Harbor— \ine street wharf. Lieu- 
tenant, William Warnock. 



Delaware Harbor, No. 2— Washington avenue 
wharf Sergeant, Purnell Smith. 

Sc/nuM-ill JJarbor—Sansom. street wharf, 
Schuylkill. Lieutenant, Wm. H. Francis, Sr. 

The force consists of 5 Captains, 17 Detec- 
tives, 85 Lieutenants, 86 Sergeants, 114 House 
Sergeants (telegraph operators), 52 Patrol Ser- 
geants, 52 Patrol Drivers, 52 Patrol Otlicers, 8 
Pik)ts, 6 Engineers, 6 Firemen, 6 Van Drivers, 
17 Hostlers, 17 Matrons, 2141 Policemen and 
200 substitute Policemen. 

Salaries of Lieutenants, S1700 and $75 for 
uniforms; Sergeants, 81300 and $50 lor uni- 
Jbrnis; House and Patrol Sergeants, tllOO 
and 140 for uniforms; Policemen, first year, 
ifr2.25 per day : second year, $2.40 per day ; 
third year, 5*2.50 per day ; fourth year, $2.(i0 
] er day ; fifth year, S2.75 per day— :40 lor 
uniforms, $50 for mounted men ; Substitute 
I'olicemen, $1.75 per day. 

PATROL STATIONS AND DISTRICTS. 

No. 2— Station, Queen street, below Second. 
Comprises the Third and Fourth wards. 

No. 3— Station, Union street, below Fourth. 
Comprises from South to Vine street, east of 
Seventh. 

No. 7— Station, Mintzer street and Fair- 
mount avenue. Comprises from Vine to 
Poplar street, east of Broad. 

No. 9— Station, No. 1725 Wood street. Com- 
prises from Vine to Poplar street, west of 
Broad. 

No. 10— Station, Front street, above Master. 
Comprises from Poplar street to Oxford, east 
of Sixth. 

No. 11— Station, Montgomery avenue and 
McClellan street. Comprises from Laurel 
street to Lehigh avenue, east of Frankford 
avenue and Aramingo canal. 

No. 12— Station, Warnock and Berksstreets. 
Comprises from Poplar street to Susquehanna 
avenue, between Sixth and Broad streets. 

No. 13— Station, Manayunk. Comprises 
the Twentv-first Ward. 

No. 14— Station, Lafayette, near Main street, 
Germantown. Comprises the Twenty-second 
Ward. 

No. 15— Station, Frankford. Comprises the 
Twenty-third and Thirty-fifth Wards. 

No. 16— Station, Thirty-ninth street and 
Lancaster avenue. Comprises all of West 
Philadelphia, north of Market .street and 
east of Forty-fourth street. 

No. 17— Station, Twentieth street, below 
Federal. Comprises from South street south 
and west of Broad. 

No. 18— Station, Fourth and York streets. 
Compri-ses from Oxford street north to Lehigh 
avenue, east of Sixth street. 

No. 19- Station, 824 Lombard street. Com- 
prises from Chestnut street to South, and 
Seventh to the Schuylkill. 

No. 20— Station, Fifteenth, below Vine 
street. Comprises from Vine to Chestnut, and 
Seventh to the Schuylkill. 

No. 21— Station, Thirty-seventh street and 
Woodland avenue. Comprises the Twenty- 
seventh ward. 

No. 22— Station, Twenty-second and Y'ork 
streets. Comprises north of Montgomery 
avenue to School lane and Wissahickon ave- 
nue, west of Eleventh street, and German- 
town avenue to the Schuylkill. 

No. 23— Station, No. 1630 North Twentieth 
street. Comprises from Poplar street to 
Montgomery avenue, and west of Broad 
street to the Schuylkill. 

No. 24.— Station, Cambria and Stouten 
streets. Comprises from Lehigh avenue to 



The Philadelphia Record JUmanac. 



Frankford creek and east of Kensington 
avenue. 

No. 2.5— Station, Taylor street and Passyunk 
avenue. Comprises from Wharton street 
south and east of Broad street. 

No. 26— Station, Trenton avenue and Dau- 
phin street. Comprii-es the district bounded 
by Norris street, Aramingo canal, Lehigh 
avenue, Kensington avenue and Front street. 

No. 27— Station, Tacony. Comprises tlie 
Thirty-fifth ward. 

No. 29— Station, Sixty-first and Thompson 
streets. Comprises West Philadelphia norfh 
of Market and west of Forty-fourth street. 

No. 30— Station, Front and Westmoreland 
streets. Comprises from Lehigh avenue to 
Winixohocking creek, between Germantovvn 
and Kensington avenues. 

No. 32 — Station, Sixty-fourth street and 
Woodland avenue. Comprises the Fortieth 
ward. 

No. 33— Station, Seventh and Carpenter 
streets. Comprises the Second ward. 

Police Station i/a^ions- Central, Kate Kal- 
bach, S60 per month. Second, Mary V. Chest- 
nut. Third, Mary Moore. Fourth," Mrs. Kate 
Chism. Fifth, vacancy. Sixth, Mrs. L. W. 
Fletcher. Seventh, MarvE. Cannon. Eighth, 
Emily Sibley. Tenth, Annie L. McCloskey. 
Thirteenth, Mrs. A. A. Kimple. Seventeenth. 
Nellie R. Bryan. Eighteenth, Catharine ^'eal. 
Nineteenth, Mrs. M. J. Pool. Twentv-sixth, 
Ellen Boardman. Twenty-eighth, Mrs. Z. P. 
Cavender. Thirtieth. M. A. Bonner. Thirtv- 
third, Sarah C. Selfridge. Salaries, '$50 per 
month. 

Police Magistrates. 

Twenty-eight Magistrates, elected by the 
people for five years— two-thirds by the 
majority party and one-third by the minority. 
Salaries, jfSOOO per year, fixed by Act of As- 
sembly. The date in each case shows when 
the term expires. 
No. 1— James S. Rodgers, /. R., 1425 S. 

Twelfth St. 1903. 
No. 2— R.J. Moore, if., 700 S. Broad St. 1902. 
No. 8— Jas. H. Toughill, D., 912 S. Eighth st. 

1905. 
No. 4— Frank H. Smith, R., N. E. cor. Sixth 

and Fitzwater sts. 1905. 
No. 5— Frank S. Harrison, R., 121 S. Seventh 

St. 1905. 
No. 6— John H. Keenan, X*. , 36 S. Fifth st. 1902. 
No. 6— J. M. R. Jermon, I. R., 503 Chestnut 

St. 1905. 
No. 7— W. S. Kochersperger, R., 1613 Pine st. 

1905. 
No. 8— Ed.A. Devlin,if.,713Sansomst. 1901. 
No. 9— John B. Lukens, R., 23 N. Juniper st. 

1904. 
No. 9— William Eisenbrown, D., 16 S. Broad 

St. 1905. 
No. 10— Thomas W. Cunningham, R., 1331 

Arch St. 1905. 
No. 11— A. H. Ladner, D., 501 Green st. 1905. 
No. 12-M. F. Wilhere, i).,832 Callowhill st. 

i5oi. 

No. 13— John M. O'Brien, D.,332 N. Broad st. 
1905. 

No. 14— C. Harry Fletcher, R., 1335 N. Second 
St. 1904. 

No. 15— Richard C. Lloyd, D., 244 E. Girard 
ave. 1905. 

No. 16— R. Gillespie, /?., N. E. cor. Hancock 
St. and Susquehanna ave. 1905. 

No. 17- V.ncant. 

No. 18— Thomas W. South, 7?., Thirteenth 
and Poplar sts. 1905. 

No. 19— Amlirose PuUioser, i?., 1226 N. Nine- 
teenth St. VJOd. 



No. 20— A. C. Ackerman, R., 2526 N. Tenth 
St. 1905. 

No. 21— David T. Hart, R., 4437 Frankford 
ave. 1903. 

No. 22— Chas. P. Donnelly, D., 4 E. Chelten 
ave., Germantown. 1902. 

No. 23— John A. Thornton, I)., 3917 Lancas- 
ter ave. 1904. 

No. 24— Henrv R. Stratton, R., 3726 Market st. 
1905. 

No. 25— David S. Scott, R., 1512 Moyamensing 
ave. 1902. 

No. 26— Robert E. Henderson, R., 1406 Federal 
St. 1902. 

No. 27— Fred. M. Wagner, R., 2839 Kensing- 
ton ave. 1905. 

No. 28— Vacant. 

Bureau of Health. 

CITY HALL, ROOMS 513-517 610-617. 

Chief— J. Lewis Good, R. Salary S4000. 

Members of the Board— 3. Lewis Good, R. 
(President); Bvron E. Wrigley, R.; Rev. 
J. Grav Bolton. 

HeaUh Officer— Chas.. H. Heustis, R. Salary, 
$7100. 

Clerk to Health Officer— Thos. Sailer,iJ. S1200. 

Assistant Clerk— John B. Green, R. $800. 

Chief Clerk of Bureau— John J. McCay, R. 

Assistant Clerks— Ch&s B. Quigley, R. $1500. 
Morris L. Keen, R.; John J. Jack, R.; James 
W. Jones, R. S1200 each. B. D. McCaughn, 
R. $1000. 

Stenographer— 'Licara. V. McConnell. 8720. 

Messenger— D&xid. Brown. R. $800. 

Chief Medical Inspector— J. Howard Taylor, 
M.D., R. $2300.(includes keep of horse). 

Assistant Medical Inspectors— Drs. William 
M. Angney, A. C. Butcher, J. A. Davis, 
Walter D. Green, G. R. Hulsizer, Charles W. 
Karsner, Edmund H. Kase, Charles P. Mercer, 
Oliver H. Paxson, Randolph Jairies, George 
E. Stubbs and L. C. Wessels. All Republi- 
cans. $1200 each. 

*fe»oprap/ter— Elizabeth P. Wallace. $600. 

Chief I)isi7ifector— Edwin S. Cooke, M.D., R. 
$1400. 

Assista)it Disinfectors— John C. :Monteith, 
Samuel L. Morrow, John F. Prial, Richard 
L. Fox, Harry W. Arthur. All Republicans. 
$900 each. 

Chief Inspector of Nuisances— ChAT\es F 
Kennedy, R. $1900 (including carriage hire). 

Assistant Inspectors— John W Cobb. Lincoln 
E. Leeds, Henry A. Perkins, Wm. F. Myers, 
Oscar Borneman, Jacob Rothman, George 
W. Givin, John W. Andrews, H. G. Coles- 
berry, Winfield S. Sackett, Roland Evans, 
John P. Whipple, F. J. W. Smullen, Wm. 
K. Clement, Wm. Gallagher, A. C. Brower, 
W. J. Elleford, Daniel Fitzgerald, Geo. H. 
Smith, Robert S. Baymore. All Republicans. 
$1000 each. 

Pondretie Inspectors— ThomaA Ashton, R.; 
Edwm N. Rue, R. 1900 each. 

Clerk— \\m. R. Davis, R. $1000. 

Vessel Inspector— Kmry Roberts, R. $900. 

Chief Injector of House LHainage — George 
S. Hughes. R. $2000 and $400 for horse hire. 

Assistant Inspectors — James Mellon, John 
Callioun, A. H. Hr>wn, S. L. Marcer, John 
S. Bross, George Shegog, John Mactague, W. 
S. Reed, Jos. R. \Aalker, Jno. McCaugliey, 
Jas. W. Temple, Clavton R. Walker. All Re- 
publicans $1200 each. 

Clerk— James, W. Nutt, R. $1200. 

Chi^ Milk Inspector— WWham J. Byrnes, R. 
$1900 (includes carriage hire). 

Assistant Inspectors— Davii C. Clegg, Frank 



The Philadelphia Record JUtnanac. 



L. Smith, G. R. Hartman, Thaddeus Maguire. 
All Republicans. $1020 each. 

Collectors of Milk Hamjjles—GeoTge K. Jack, 
Jos. Caldwell, Jos. L. Fortescue, John H. 
Stoklev. James Stewart. All Republicans. 
S720 each. 

Chief Registration Cleric (acting) —Samuel 
S. Shaw, R. S1500. 

Assistant Registration Clerks— 3. V. P. Tur- 
ner, Chas. W. Murray, G. W. Atherholt, 
Theo. M. Carr, Jno. C . Addis, Chas. F. Ker- 
l)augh, Alfred Vogel, J. H. Caldwell, Jacob 
Clouds. All Republicans. SIOOO each. 

Collectors of VUal ^'/atesfe'cs— VVm. J. Shaw, 
R.: Wm. E. Peterson, R. $1000 each. 

Chief Bacteriologust—A. C. Abbott, M. D., 
R. 82000. 

^s*isi!onte— Vacancy. 2000. Alonzo H. Stew- 
art, M.D., R. $1200. John B. Stetson, M.D., R. 
$900. Marv B. Garvin, M.D. $700. 

CTerJfc— William Borneman, R. $1000. 

//e/po-s— Casper Dougherty, R. $600. Sid- 
ney Wilkinson, R. :f480. 

Jlostters—S. B. Lukens, R. $720. Samuel 
Kershaw, R. $600. 

Physician in Charge of Municipal Hospital— 
Wm. M. Welch, M.D., R. $2500. 

Resident Physicians— RichSivd Reeser, M.D., 
R. $800. Howard A. Sutton, M.D.,iJ. $660. 
H. A. Smith, M.D , R. $r)40. 

Steward— 3. W. Morgan, R. $700. 

Matron— Emma. Gilliams. $480. 

Druggist— W. E. Krewson, Jr. S600. 

Vaccine Physicians. 

First District— Dr. Philip P. Turner, Fifth 
and Jackson streets. 

Second District— Bt. Alonzo P. Charlton, 234 
Federal street. 

Third Dislrict—Dr. W. S. M. Fields, 734 S. 
Second street. 

Fourth District— Dr. Jas. F. Wallis, 245 Pine 
street. 

Fifth District— Dt. E. H. Green, 302 S. Tenth 
street. 

Sixth District— Yacancy. 

Seventh District— Dr. F. S. Ferris, 1516 Dick- 
inson street. 

Eighth District— Dr. G. A. Knowles, 2211 
Federal street. 

Ninth District— Di. C. W. Cobum, 2308 Fed- 
eral street. 

Tenth District— Dr. Chas. E. Rankin, 2104 
Fitzwater street. 

Eleventh District— Br. Geo. D. Morton, 2048 
Locust street. 

Tuielfth District— Dr. M. O'Hara, Jr., 31 S. 
Sixteenth street. 

Thirteenth District— Dr. J. A. Fischer, 319 
Green street. 

Fourteenth District— Dr. F. B. Hazel, 841 N. 
Broad street. 

Fifteenth District— Dr. C. P. Franklin, 1633 
Fairmount avenue. 

Sixteenth District— Dr. Thos. Bradley, 960 N. 
Fifth street. 

Seventeenth District— Dr. David Henry, 1921 
E. Dauphin street. 

Eigldemth District— Dr. J. A. Krug, 2437 N. 
Fifth street. 

Nineteenth District— Tit. F. O. Gross, 1506 N. 
Seventh street. 

Twentieth District— Dr. L. C. Peter, 2136 Ox- 
ford street. 

Twenty-first District— Dr. Laura S. Chapin, 
1724 Diamond street. 

Twenty-second District— Dr. J. A. Cramp, 1921 
Susquehanna avenue. 

Twenty-third IXstrict-Vacancj. 

Twenti/'fourth District— Dr. J. H. Dobbs, 2722 
N. Tweil'th street. 



Twenty-fifth District— Dr. Robert Rodgers, 
2903 N. Fifth street. 

Twenty-sixth District— Vacancy. 

Twenty-seventh District— Dr. Thos. H. Price, 
2621 Bridge street, Bridesburg. 

Twenty-eighth District— Dt. J. H. Witzel, 7169 
State road, Tacony. 

Twenty-ninth District— Va,cancy. 

Thirtieth District— Dr. A. J. Matthews, York 
road and Spencer street. 

Tliirty-first District— Dr. Clarence W. Lin- 
coln, 5348 Wayne avenue. 

Thirty-second District— Dr. Warren Funk, 
Chestnut Hill. 

TIdrty-third District— Dr. Wm. C. Barrett, 
3939 Powelton avenue. 

Thirty-fourth District— Dt. Chas. H. Harvey, 
4821 Lancaster avenue. 

Thirty-fifth District— Dr. John J. Robrecht, 
6 S. Thirty-eight street. 

Thirty-sixth District— Dt. Geo. E. Dahis, 4900 
Woodland avenue. 

Bureau of Building Inspectors. 

CITY HALL, ROOMS 313-319. 

Chief— noht. C. Hill, R. Salary, $3500. 

Deputy Chief— Wm. J. Gillingham, R. $2500. 

Dispeetors— First District, Thos. R. Allen ; 
Second, J. H. Kessler; Third, Frederick G. 
Myhlertz ; Fourth, Harman M. Boorse ; Fifth, 
Charles D. Supplee ; Sixth, Samuel H. Col- 
lom; Seventh, George W. Payne; Eighth, 
William G. Button ; Ninth, Paul J. Esbick, 
Jr.; Tenth, Edwin H. Hannum; Eleventh, 
•ieo. W. Bourne ; Twelfth, Arthur T. Wads- 
worth. All Republicans. $2000 each. 

Structural Engineer— Edwin Clark, R. $2000. 
M. E. Hibbs. 

Chief Clerk— John Mecleary, R. $1600. 

Recording Clerk— H. L. Davenport, R. $1200. 

Permit Clerk— Wm. Nickell, R. $1000. 

j»/esse7i^er— Charles E. Whiteside, R. $720. 

Typeivriter— John W. Sheerer, R. $600. 

Soiicitor— Assistant City Solicitor Norris S. 
Barratt. 

Elevator Inspectors— hincoln Von Gilder, R. 
Thos. W. Jenkins, R. $1200 each. F. M. 
Beamer, R. $1000. 

Messenger to Elevator Inspectors — Henry F. 
Keyser, R. $700. 

Bureau of Boiler Inspectors. 

CITY HALL, ROOMS 301, 303, 305. 

Chief Inspector— Jo\m M. Lukens, R. $3000. 

Assistants— h. A. Madden, R.; Wm. Hodge.s, 
R.; Charles Deininger, R.; Thomas Simpson, 
R. One vacancy. $1200 each. 

Chief Clerk— Fraiik W. Getz, if. $1300. 

Registering CferA— Charles H. Simpson, R. 
$800. 

Messenger— Wm. W. McAnaney, R. $700. 

£>rit)er— Henry L. Hoeltzel. $700. 

Electrical Bureau. 

CITY HALL, ROOMS 620-626. 

Chief— David R. Walker, R. Salary, $5000. 

Manager— John C. Sager, R. $3000. 

Assistant Managers— Edward Burk^, R. 
$1600 ; R. W. Jaggard, R. $1500. 

Clerk— John S. Wetter, R. $2000. 

Assistant Clerks— Frank W. Williams, jR., 
$900; John S. Tittermary, R., $750. 

Stenographer and Typewriter — Clement Mc- 
Mahon, R. $600. 

Chief Line Inspector— D. J. McNamara, if. 
$1220. 

Inspectors— Frank E. Maize,Chas. V. Leiteh, 
Wm. E. Moore, Elmer J. Titus, John A. Kelly, 
Geo. J. Wells, Leo D. Firman, Frank Steiii- 
ler. All Republicans. $1220eacli. 

Draughtsman— S-dmue\ L. Leary, R. $1000. 



The Philadelphia Record JUmanac. 



Operators— William H. Carpenter, William | 
M. Stuard, William H. Uber, Fred. W. Young, 
Joseph E. Weiss, Joseph Zavorski, Alex- 
ander Ct. McCallum, Thomas A. Kerney, 
Charles T. Edwards, Amos S. Casey. James 
W. Lindsey, William Koons, Frank Jillard, 
Hugh Blaney, William C. Ash, William R. j 
Harmsttid, Horace McClintock, Nicholas T. 
Gilbert, Charles S. Ciilp, Wilmer G. Daniels, ! 
Wm.Gault, Lawrence A. Snively. $1140 each. ] 

Battery J/on— Frederick J. Frey. 8900. 

Assistant Battery Man— Jos. \V. Haiina, if. 
fTOO. I 

Electrical Plumber— Edward Bra.Q'ken. $1040. 

Assistant Electrical Plumbers- John Miller 
and John A. Boyd. 5940 each. I 

/breman— John Mohler. $940. ; 

I,ine/?M'n— Charles Peters, Wm. S. Burn- 
man, Jas. W. Fitzpatrick, Wm. Erickson, 
Frank C. Gregg, Wm. Hunter, Harry B. Mil- 
liken, John J. Fitzpatrick. $S90 each. 

Bureau of Fire. 

HEADQUARTERS, S. W. CORNER JUNIPER AND RACE ST3. 

Chief Engineer— James C. Baxter, R. Salary, 
$3600. 

Assistant Chief Enffiyieer— Edward A. Waters, 
B. $2500. 

Inspector— J. T. Hammond, P. $1200. 

Assistant Engineers— Samuel Duiilap, John 
J. Meskill, Samuel Graham, Henry Holl- 
warth, John Smith, George Nallinger, .la- 
cob B. Andrews, Joseph B. Fav, John 
Leithear. All Republicans. SlSOOeach. 

Secj-etorj/— William C. Zane, R. $1350. 

Messenger— John Spence, R. $700. j 

The Fire Department consists of fifty steam 
engines, five chemical engines, twelve 
trucks, one water tower, and one fire boat, 
operated by sixty-four foremen, at a salary ; 
of 81250 each ; sixty-six assistant foremen 1 
and twelve tillermen, at $3 per day each; j 
fifty-two enginemen,fifty-twotiremen, eighty- 
one drivers and 494 hose and ladder meii, 
at the following per diem pay : First vear, 
$2.25; second, $2.40; third, $2.50; fourth, 
$2.60; fifth, $2.75. 

Bureau of Fire Escapes. 

NO. 1328 RACE STREET. 

Consists of Chief Engineer of Bureau of 
Fire, Fire Marshal, and the members of the 
Bureau of Building Inspectors. 

President— Yac.ancy. 

Cferfc— William C. Zane. 

Bureau of Markets and City Property. 

CITY HALL, ROOMS 111-119. 

CVw'e/-Geo. G. Pierie, R. Salarv, $3900. 

Chief Cleric— Isaac B. Elliot, R. $1650. 

Superintendent of Docks and Real Entate—S. 
W. Bookhammer, R. $2000. 

License Clerk— Wm. H. Chambers, R. $900. 

Clerk and Messenger— D. Oram Young, R. $900. 

Typewriter— 'P. I. Patton. $500. 

City /brester— John C. Lewis, R. $1500. 

Superintendent Independence Hall — S. S. 
Reev*, R. $720. 

Special Officer Independence Hall— Edward 
H. Rice, R. $800. 

Clerks of Mai-kets— John J. Bergen, Caspar 
Fite, John Lyons, James G. Clark, Herman 
Silberman, George J. Bartholomew, Albert 
Shoening, Geo. Bailey, Francis^ Harding, 
John Hardy, John J. Flahertv, Harry W. 
Seybert ($375 each), W. S. T. Werntz (.*335), 
Joseph E. Uallowell ($200), Jonathan T. Gil- 
ton ($150), one vacancy. All Republicans. 

Superintendent oj Morgue — Thomas Robin- 
son, R. $700. 

Deputy Superintetident— Vacancy. $470. 



Engineer at Morgue— John Drienbach, R. 
$900. 

Superintendents of Halls and Public Squares- 
National Museum, Sarah A. Wilson. $450. 
City Burial Ground, Isaiah Conrad. $500. 
Passyunk Square, Elijah Hammond. $700. 
Pair Hill, P. Ritten house. $500. Germantown 
Hall, Chas. H. Wolff. $600. Franklin Square, 
Sam'l Therlaeker ; Independence Square, Da- 
vid Fleet; Washington Square, Wm. Wood- 
ruff; Rittenhouse Square, W. S. Beatty; Lo- 
gan Square, John Weakley: Jefferson Square, 
Peter Tranchetella ; Norris Square, John H. 
Meyers; Penn Treaty Square, Henry C. Mer- 
ritf, Edwin H. Fitter Square, R. R. Barton. 
$700 each. Vernon Park, Chas. J. Muschert : 
Bartram Garden, Robert J. Rule; Ontario 
Park, William Fusselbach ; Disston Park, 
Samuel Bushnell ; Gorgas Park, Thomas Lee- 
sor; Weccacoe Square, George Manderfield ; 
John Dickinson Square, George W. Mintzer; 
Wharton Square, James W. Smith ; McPher- 
.son Square, L. A. Haspel ; Star Garden Park, 
John McConlev ; Allegheny Park, William 

F. Campbell; Clarence H. Clark, P. J. 
Welsh. $500 each. All Republicans. 

Superintendents of Bath Houses — Twelfth 
and Wharton streets, S.G. Lawrence; Twenty- 
seventh and Master, T. J. White ; Thirty- 
second street and Ridge avenue, L. P. Way ; 
Beach and Laurel, Theodore McPherson ; 
Eighth and Mifflin, M. J. Chamberlain ; 
Second and Cumberland, George Fleurer; 
Waterview Park, Hobart Dodd ; Frankford, 

G. W. Cocker; Manayunk, James Green; 
Howard and Oniario streets, Henry F. 
Creellv. 1600 each. All Republicans. 



DEPARTMENT PUBI^IC WORKS. 

OFFICE, CITY HALL, ROOMS 210-218. 

Director— William C. Haddock, R. Salary, 
$10,000. 

Asst. Director— Rany W. Quick, R. $4000. 

Chief Clerk— yv nils Shehle, R. $1500. 

Clerk— Ernest T. Hanefeld, R. $1000. 

Asst. CferA;— Andrew L. Teamer, R. $1000. 

Stenographer and Clerk— UarTy A. Stoy, R. 
$900. 

Stenographer— B.. C. Lockwood, R. $900. 

Genercd Inspector— Roht. C. Hicks. R. *900. 

Messenger— John P. Junior, R. $720. 

Bureau of Gas. 

OFFICE, CITY HALL, ROOM 330. 

The Philadelphia Gas Works has been 
leased to the L'nlted Gas Improvement Com- 
pany for a term of thirty years, from January 
1, 1898. It may be terminated at the end of 
ten years by an ordinance passed not later 
than July 1, 1907. Main office of United Gas 
Improvement t'ompany, Drexel Building. 

Chief Inspector of Mdtrs i appointed by'tbe 
Mavor)— Dr. N. Wiley Thomas, R. Salarv 
$.5000. 

First Assistant Ivsjyrctor—J. S. Stewart, R. 
$1200. 

Second Assistant Inspector— Alexander Mc- 
Cauley, R. $900. 

Clerk and Asdstanl Inspector- A. C. John- 
ston, R. S900. 

Photometer Inspector— Thomas J. Duffv, R. 
$750. 

Messenger and Assistant Inspector — C. \\. 
Kaeser, R. $750. 

Bureau of Water. 

ROOMS 190-196; 701 704 AND 784-796, CITY HALL. 

Chief Engineer— Eran^ L. Hand, R. Salary, 
$6000. 

General Superintendent of Works — Allen J. 
Fuller, R. $3500. 



The Philadelphia Record JUtnanac. 



Assistant Snjringers— William Whitby, R. 
52000. One vacancy. S1600. 

Dratigfitsmeti— John E. Codman, R. S1800. 
Martin'Murphv, R., and John R. Gorman, R. 
SIOOO each. James H. Hand, Jr., R. S900. 

Chief Clerk— J. T. Hickman, R. $2000. 

Assistant Cto-fc— Thomas Spencer, R. . $1200. 

Correspondence Cfecfc— Pauline De Haven. 
S900. 

General Stiperintendent's Clerk — Vacancy. 
fllOO. 

Assistant Clerk to General Superintendent — 
John B. Wright, R. 8900. 

Search Clerk— H. J. Johnston, R. 81200. 

Assisla7it Search Clerk— W. J. Duffv, R. 81000. 

Time Cto'A;— William J. Innes, R. 81000. 

aerfc— George G. Whitby, R. 81000. 

Assistant CTerte— Kennedy McNeal, R. 8900. 
J. J. Barney, R. 8850. 

Pipe Inspector— Theo. S. S. Baker, R. 81350. 

Pipe Clerk— Ch&Tles H. Pvrah, R. $850. 

Permit Cfeffc— Thomas Orr, R. $1200. 

Assistant Permit CTerfc— Charles H. Russell, 
R. 81100. 

C7He//rtspector— Edward Harshaw, R. 81200. 

inspectors— Harrison D. Bates, Henry Hom- 
iller, W. A. Agnew, L. Obermiller, Geo. W. 
Eckert, Thomas G. Morris, John Simon, 
Theo. Yeager, James Buchanan, Geo. Crooks, 
W. J. Reed, A. McConnell, John Vandusen, 
Geo. Hoifman, Hillary Conner, J. A. Brown, 
George Spence, Frank Sloan, Daniel J. 
Colgan. All Republicans. $1000 each. 

ifesenpc)-— Haines Lewis, R. 8720. 

Telephone Operators— Jennie Hanning. 8500. 
Calvin Cramer, 8600. 

Superintendent of Sftop— James H. Dean. 

Clerk to Superintendent of Shop—M. P. Getz, 
R. 8900. 

PHruei/ors- First District— John H. Holmes ; 
office, Wharton street, above Eleventh. Sec- 
ond—David A. Craig; office, 918 Cherry street. 
Third— Charles J. Lowry ; oflfice. Beach street, 
corner East Susquehanna avenue. Fourth- 
John Montgomery ; office. Twenty-sixth and 
Master streets. Fifth— Chas.F. Preston; office, 
Lyceum Building, Roxborough. Sixth— 
Geo. W. Bardens; office, Germantown Hall. 
81480 each, excepting that of Mr. Muntgom- 
ery, which is $1800. 

Purveyors' Clerks— Vfm. J. Mackey, Charles 
H. Green, Arthur B. Cook, vacancy, J. A. 
Spanagle, F. J. Cornman. 8800 each. 

General Foremen— Geo. W. Showaker, 81000. 
Thomas Preston, Michael Young, E. Abrams, 
James Hutchinson, Charles Frank, Samuel 
Loeb. 89.39 each. 

Foremen of Repairs— W. W. Wellington, 
William Magee, James W. De Hart, John 
Richards. $780 each. 

Engineers at Pumping Sta<tows— Fairmount, 
John Bronson, W. F. Cubbler, Abram Sott, 
81000 each. Spring Garden, H. A. Gideon, 
David Pyke, A. P. Broadbent, Clarence D. 
Willason, 81000 each ; George W. Pinker, 
Herman Hildebrand, $900 each. Belmont, 
George Flanagan, \Vm. Lawrence, Charles 
Teal, 8100U each. Belmont Anxiliarv, Jo- 
seph B. Fauuce, 8900; William S. McElwee 
and John Young, S.s.'iO each. ' Roxborough, 
vacancy, 8900; Samuel Moore and Archie 
Weir, 8810 each with a house. Roxborough 
Auxiliary, John Williams, 8900; Samuel D. 
Evans and William K. Rudolph, 8850 each. 
Queen Lane. Henry Harbenson and Thomas 
Seddon, $1000 each ; one vacancy. Mt. Airv, 
James Kerr, $900; H. W. Everlv and Wm. 
Fletcher, $810 each. Chestnut Hill, Thos. 
Matthews, $800 ; Lewis Gulp, 8800 and helper ; 
Charles White, 8750. Frankford, Charles 



Douglass, William Maxwell, 81000 each; 
Charles Pendlebury, $900. 

Foreman Machinist— Uohert Bromiley. 81500 

Foreman Carpenter — Henry Guest. 81000. 

Foreman Bricklayer— Xacancy. 81100. 

Foreman Stonemaso?i— M. Farrell. $900. 

Foreman Rigger— Jumes Forrest. $900. 

Foreman idftorer— AVilliam Calhoun. $840 

Foreman Painter— Joseph Work. 8900. 

General Storekeeper— Y&c&ncv. $1000. 

Eleetrician—nemy F. IMorga'n. $1200. 

Bureau of Surveys. 

CITY HALL, ROOMS 410-418. 

Chief— George S. Webster, R. Salary, 88000. 

Principal Assistant Engineer— Geo. E. Dates- 
man, R. 83500. 

Assistant Engineer on Sr/dgr/s— Charles M. 
Mills, R. 82000. 

Assistant Engineers— Chas. H. Ott, R. ; Hugo 
Trik,J2. 81800 each. N. J. Wilmer, iJ. $1600. 
Benj. A. Haldeman, R. $1500. 

Engineer on Subway— T>. Jones Lucas, R. 
82100. 

Draughtman—Ti. V. B. Osborne, R. $1200. 

Engineers on Harbor Improvement — Norman 
L. Stamm, R. $1800. Silas G. Griffiths, R. 
$1500. 

Inspector on Harbor Wor*— Jos. E. Kester, R. 
$1020. 

Inspector of Cements— W. P. Taylor, R. 
81200. 

Recording Clerk— Jos. R. Scott, R. $1600. 

Assistant Recording Cferfc— Robert McFad- 
den, R. $1000. 

Sewer Registrar— Vfim&m Calvert, R. 81500. 

Sewer Clerk— Robert M. Downing, R. 81000. 

Draughtsmen— Jas. W. Phillips, $1500 ; Chas. 
Jacobson, 81400; William L. Just, Lewis R. 
Snow. All Republicans. 81000 each. 

ii'i:eno(;)-ap/iers— Katharine A. Denney. 8720. 
Bentley W. Reilly, R. 8900. 

Rodman— Nesil C. Briggs, R. 8820. 

Janitor- Isaac Holland, R. 8720. 

Inspectors of Drain ConHections- William S. 
Molineaux, R.; James H. Hendrickson, R.; 
George F. Uber, R. $1200 each. 

Siipervisor of Intercepting Sewer— Samuel E. 
Knapp, R. 8900. 

REGISTRY OFFICE. 

Registrar— John W. Frazier, R. $2000. 

Registry Clerk— James H. Roberts, R. 81100. 

Search Clerk— RoUa. Dance, R. 81100. 

Draughtsmen — S. Crawford Smith, Isaac E. 
Shallcross, William H. Wester, Chas. From- 
mer, $1000 each. O. S. Stallman, Geo. L. 
Jelden, John J.;Houston, Louis F.Wehmeyer, 
Wm.K.Gorham. $900 each. All Republicans. 

District Surveyors (appointed by the Direc- 
tor of Public Works)— First District, Thomas 
Daly, D.; Second, C. W. Close, R.: Third, 
W. C. Cranmer, if.; Fourth, Frits Block, i?.; 
Fifth, Walter Brinton, R.; Sixth, Jos. Mercer, 
R.; Seventh, W. R. Carlile, R.; Eighth, C. A. 
Sundstrom, R.; Ninth, Joseph C. Wagner, R.; 
Tenth, John H.Webster, Jr.. R.: EleventlL Jos. 
Johnson, R.; Twelfth, J. H. Gillingham, R.; 
Thirteenth, Herbert M. Fuller, R. 83000each. 

aistodian of Books— Frank Purnell, R. 8800. 
Temporary Corps. 

Draughtsmen— F. H. Cubberle, Chas. A. 
Andre, S. B. KnowUon, $1200 each; J. J. 
Brennan, Edward Gushee, H. B. Hughes, 
Semi Brandeis, 81000 each ; A. G. Hallowell, 
8900; N. B. Morrell, $840: George P. Tomlin- 
son, W. H. Snnford, E. H. Sickels, 8720 each ; 
J. G. Maries, 8500. All Republicans. 

Bridge Draughtsmen— Fran'k H. Burns, R., 
$13.50; Geo. M. Heller, R., George E. Tyler, 
R., 81000 each. 



The Philadelphia Record JUtnanac. 



Sewer Drmightsmen—HeLUS J. Beck, R. SIOOO ; 
Percy T. Osborne, R. 89(J0. 

On Filtration Work. 

Assistant Engineer in Charge-— S&rnuel T. 
Wagner, R. S3300. 

Assistant Engineers— 3 . H. Gregory, R. ; R. I. 
D. Ashbridge, R. 81800 each. J. W. Weaver. 
R. ; Stephen Harris, R. ; Chas. G. Hyde, R. ; 
Geo. E. Howe, R. 81500 each. Theo. M. 
Spencer, R. SI 200. 

Engineer in Charaeof Testing Station — Morris 
Knowles, R. 92500. 

Draughtsmen— L. M. Lloyd, S. M. Swaab, 
Fred. C. Dunlap. $1500 each. W. J. Klein, 
J. T. Ninesteel. S1200 each. G.R. McKenzie, 
Ed. Hazleton. $1000 each. All Republicans. 

Bactenologist—W. G. Toplis, R, $1200. 

Chemist— G. E. Thomas, R. $1200. 

Assistant Chemist— Cl&Tence A. Hall, R. $900. 

Laboratory Assistant— Philip Burgess, R. 
$900. 

Stenographer— J. W. Lee, R. $720. 

Bureau of Highways. 

CITY HALL, ROOM 232. 

C%te/— William H. Brooks, R. Salary, $4000. 

Assistants— First District, William Godfrey ; 
Second, Samuel J. Shannon ; Third, Thomas 
F. Durham ; Fourth, George W. Fox ; Fifth, 
Geo. B. Anderson; Sixth. William B. Scott; 
Seventh, Wm. R. Ash; Eighth, Wm. Terry; 
Ninth, John E. Manship; Tenth, John L. 
Flood; Eleventh, R. B. Williams; Twelfth, 
Matthew Patton ; Thirteenth, Wm. A. Fred- 
erick. Office Assistant, Frank E. Smith. All 
Republicans. $1800 each. 

Chief CTerfc— Malcolm M. Coppuck, R. $2000. 

Chief Clerk's Assistant— B. B. Brennan, R. 
$1000. 

Bill aerk— Walter R. Berry, R. $1000. 

Contract Clerk— U. L. Finckel, Jr.,ii;. $1200. 

License Clerk— Rich' A D. Westphal, R. $1170. 

Miscellaneous Clerks— U. A. Macready, R., 
T. Wallace Aitken, R., $900 each ; J. C. Ma- 
teer, R., $810; Elizabeth Burroughs, $720. 

Draughtsman— Frank C. Watson, R. $900. 

Reference and Complaint Clerk— ino. A. 
Worn; R. $800. 

Stenooraphers and Typeuiriters— Samuel Col- 
lins, $720 : Ralph Rosenfeld, R. $600. 

Superintendent of Bridges— Jos. H. Cofrode, 
R. $18U0. 

Assistant Superintendent of Bridges- Harrison 
Souder, R. $1200. 

Inspector of Repairs to Setvers — John D. Hev- 
ener, R. $1200. 

Tnspectors of Electrical Connections— Frice 
I. Patton, Geo. Betts, Tho.s. McKay, Andrew 
KelstT. All Republicans $1100 each. 

Inspectors of Repairs to Asphalt Streets— Wm. 
Laniond, R., Milton G. Brljigs, R. $900 each. 

Tnsptctors of Streets— Joseph R. Ash, Geo. 
W. Mink, Geo. A. Gillespie, Richard Wildv, 
H. T. Stackhouse, Joseph Franklin, Jacob H. 
Trumbauer. J. Henry Gercke, Alonzo Knight, 
Will. G. Houston, Jamison Lott, H. A. Mark- 
ley and Robert W. Fagau. All Republicans. 
$900 each. 

Messenger— Andrew W. Costello. R. $600. 

Board of Highway Supervisors. 

Tbi' Board is composed of the Director of 
Public WorUs, President, and tlie cliiels of 
the Bureaus of Highways, Surveys, Water, 
City Pr(iperty and Electrical Bureau. 

Secretary — M. M. Coppuck. 

Chief lirauiildsman — Jules T. Jollivet, R. 
$1350. 



Bureau of Street Cleaning. 

CITY HALL, ROOM 336-338. 

CViie/— Sylvester H. Martin, R. Salary, $2500. 

Clerk— Wm. H. McCov, R. $1000. 

Assisiint aerfe— William H. Jones, R., $800 ; 
Edward G. Sterne, R., $720. 

Inspectors— First District, Aaron F. Stull, 
William Buchanan; Second, John K. Myers, 
Wm. H. Berkleback ; Third, Robert W. Scott, 
Edward K. Cole; Fourth, Henry S. Myers, 
Samuel L. Moure ; Fifth, Thos. R. Firtirand 
Samuel SutoUlTe. All Republicans. $1300 
each. 

Bureau of Wghting. 

C.TY HALL, ROOM 334. 

Chief— John J. Kirk, R. Salary, $2000. 
CTe;*— Jno. J. Hoerr, R. $900. 
Inspectors— John H. Hopkins, R.\ Peter H. 
Smith, R. $900 each. 

City Ice Boats. 

CITY HALL. ROOM 391. 

Superintendent— James S. Jefferson, R. Sal- 
ary, $1650. 

DEPARTMENT OF CHARITIES 
AND CORRECTION. 

CITY HALL, ROOM 396A. 

Directors (appointed by the Mayor)— Dr. 
John V. Shoemaker, R. "(President); Albert 
H. Dingee, R.; Dr. C. S. Middleton, R.: Dr. 
Ellwood R. Kirbv, R.; William J. McLangh- 
lin, R. 

Secretary— FAwin Palmer, R. Salary, $1800. 

Clerk and Typewriter— Edmundi C. Dunn, R. 
$800. 

General Superintendent of House of Correction 
—Edwin A. Merrick, R. $2500. 

Master Trarrfe?i— Robert McBride, R. $1500. 

Captain of Guard — John McCafferty, R. 

Visiting Physician— H. A. P. Neel, R. $900. 

Resident Physician^-Geo. Robinson, R. $900. 

Bookkeeper— Robert Lindsey, R. $900. 

Chief Engineer— Charles J . Smith, R. $1000. 

Matron— Susan H. Swayne. $675. 

Superintendent of Almshouse— William M. 
Geary, R. $3000. 

Chief Resident Physician— Daniel E. Hughes, 
R. $2500. 

Out-door Agent— A. D. W. Caldwell, R. $1650. 
Office, Thirty-fourth and Pine .streets. 

Storekeeper- A. F. Randolph, R. $1400. 

Bouse Agent— Oliver P. Bohler, R. $1400. 

Chief Apothecary— Yacancy. $1200. 

CMe/iVwrse- MarianE. Smith. $1000. 

TAXES. 

Assessment of Taxes. 

CITY HALL. ROOMS 177-188. 

Board of Revii-ion (appointed by the Board 
of Judges)— Simon Gratz, if.; Isaac H. Shields, 
R.; Rinaldo A. Lukens, D. Salaries, $4000 
each. 

Chief aerk— James W. Sayre, R. $2250. 

Assistant CTcrA-— Tlieodore James, R. 82000. 

Diiision and Locality Clerk — Frank E. Snow, 
R. 81500. 

Appeal Clerk— W. J. Osborne, D. $1000. 

Certificate Cto-fc— Clias. Van Dusen, R. $1000. 

Record C7«A:— William A. Bosler, R. $lu00. 

MiscfVaneous Clerks— Joseph Obeiidorf, R.: 
Charles C. Baker, R.; B. A. Irwin. R.\ Ricliard 
J. Loudenslager, D.: Pliilip A. Allen, A'., W. 
W. Alcorn, K.: A. S. Vadukin, R.\ M. V B. 
Mclntyre, R.\ J. Tyndale, A'.; Smith Cozens, 
R.; Wm. C. MacKav, D.: John N. Haines, ij.; 
Henrv C. Miles, R.; Wm. P. Fairmau, R. 
$1000 each. 



The Philadelphia Record JUmanac. 



Assessors— First District (First and Thirty- 
ninth Wiirds)— Albert List, 1322 South Fifth 
sirt'et : Geo. K. Siiowden, 1118 Pine street. 

Second (Twentv-sixth Ward and that part 
of Thirtieth Ward east of Twentv-lirst street) 
—Louis Bregy, 1001 Chestnut street; A. H. 
Harris, 1420 Chestnut street. 

Third (Second, Third and Fourth Wards) — 
Samuel Lamond, 445 East Somerset street; 
James J. King, 230 Spruce street. 

Fourth (Fifth, Sixth, Eleventh and Twelfth 
Wards)— J. W. Durham, 1739 Park avenue; 
H. G. Cassidy, southeast corner of Fifteeiith 
and Market streets. 

Fifth (Seventh and Eighth Wards)— Edward 
K. Thomas, 1603 North Thirteenth street; 
Wm. H. R. Lukens, northwest corner Sec- 
ond and Brown streets. 

Sixth (Ninth, Tenth and Fourteenth Wards) 
—James E. Ritchie, 608 North Twenty-third 
street; Cornelius Haggarty, 1318 Pine street. 

Seventh (Thirteenth, Sixteenth and Seven- 
teenth Ward.s, and part of Twentieth Ward 
south ot Master)— Wm. L. Beitler, 6624 Wood- 
land avenue ; F. P. Haggerty, 1511 North 
street. 

Eighth (Fifteenth Ward and that part of 
the Twenty-ninth south of Master street)— 
Geo. Hawkes. 1508 North Seventh street: 
John W. Boileau, Jr., 1535 North Fifteenth 
street. 

Ninth (Thirty-sixth Ward and that part of 
Thirtieth west of Twenty-tirst street)- H. N. 
Stokley, 2010 North Broad street; John Dunn, 
3329 Ridge avenue. 

Tenth (Eighteenth Ward and part of 
Thirty-first east of Frankford avenue)— Jo- 
seph W. Kerr, The Gladstone ; JohuGormley, 
635 West York street. 

Eleventh (north side of Master street, east 
side of Broad, south side of Lehigh avenue, 
west side of Sixth street and Germantown 
avenue)— Jacob Crouse.21 16 East Cumberland 
street ; Jas. O'Harra, 832 North Nineteenth 
street. 

Twelfth (north side of Master, south side 
of Susquehanna avenue, west side of Broad 
street to Schuylkill river)— Jno. K. McCarthy, 
213 Girard Building; John V. McManus, 
1429 North Eighteenth street. 

Thirteenth (Nineteenth and part of Thirtj'- 
first Ward west of Frankford avenue i— John 
T. Finletter, 1510 Oxford street ; B. F. Gaskill, 
710 W. Cumberland street. 

Fourteenth (Twentv-fifth Ward, south of 
Wheatsheaf Lane)— Robt. K. Idler, 111 South 
Eleventh street , John O'Donuell, 2311 West 
Thompson street. 

Fifteenth (Thirty-third Ward, east of Fifth 
street)-Benj. S. C. Thomas, 1492 North 
Fifty-fifth street; William. H. Wright, 1420 
North Fifteenth street. 

Sixteenth (Thirty-fifth and Forty-first 
Wards)— William H. Rushworth, 4514 Mul- 
berry' street, Frankford ; Albert J. Bloom, 992 
North Sixth street. 

Seventeenth (part of Twentv-second Ward) 
south of Washington lane and west of Sten- 
ton avenue) — Fountain Ward, 142 Queen 
street, Germantown; Robt. J. Wright, 1108 
Land Title Building. 

Eighteenth (Twenty-second Ward north of 
Washington lane, west of Stenton avenue) 
Albert Webster, 3733 Frankford avenue; 
Richard Shevlin, 2301 North Nineteenth 
street. 

Nineteenth (part of Twentv-second Ward 
east of Stenton avenue)— John S. Warner, 56 
East Coulter street, Germantown ; Thomas 
K. Arnold, 2152 Uber street. 

Twentieth (Twenty-fourth Ward)-Frank 



L. Irwin, 4547 Webster street, Manayunk; 
John Brady, 808 South Tenth street. 

Twenty-first (Thirty-fourth Ward)— Adam 
Everly, 401 Harrison Building ; John Bovle, 
2017 North Broad street. 

Twenty-second (Fortieth Ward)— Charles 
E. Connell, Sixtieth street and Kingsessing 
avenue ; Edward F. Bennis, 641 East Chelten 
avenue, Germantown. 

Twenty-third (Twenty-seventh Ward)— Ja- 
cob Whitaker, 1526 North Nineteenth street ; 
Albert A. Dunton, 860 North Twenty-fourth 
6treet. 

Twenty-fourth (Twenty-eighth and Thirty- 
eighth Wards)— Josephus Yeakel, Center 
street, Manayunk; D. Frank Collins, 1719 
South Thirteenth street. 

Twenty-fifth (Twenty-third Ward and part 
of Twen'ty-fifth north of Wheatsheaf Lane 
and east of Frankford avenue) — William 
McMurray, 1345 Arch street; G. Frank 
Lever, 4430 Frankford avenue. 

Twenty-sixth (Thirty-third Ward west of 
>ifth street and part of Thirty-seventh north 
c- Lehigh avenue)— Wm. T. Seal, 405 Wister 
street ; Thomas J. Fay, 717 Fitzwater street. 

Twenty-seventh (Twenty-first Ward)- Ed- 
ward Bnchholz, 2007 Germantown avenue; 
Thomas F. Byrnes, 708 Crozer Building. 

The first named in each district is a Re- 
publican and the second a Democrat. 82000 
each. 

Collection of Taxes. 

CITY HALL, ROOMS 102-106. 

Receiver of jTaxes- William J. Ronev, H. 
Salary, 810,000. Term expires April, 1901. 

Chief Clerk— J. F. Morrison, B. S2500. 

Assistant Chi^ CTerfc— John L, Bowers, R. 
$1400. 

Cashier— Ij. H. Raser, R. 82500. 

Deputy Receiver— \\e.\teT L. \\ard, R. 82000. 

Collector for Twenty-third, I'hirty-fiJ'th and 
Forty-first Wards— Q. Lloyd Fleming, R. Paid 
by comtnissions. 

Assistants— WiWmm H. Neville, R.; Robert 
Irwin, R. 81200 each. 

Discount Clerk— J&mes F. Needham.i?. 81500. 

Receiving Ctofa— W. M. Waldeck, R., and 
S. Mehafty, R. 81200 each. 

Bill Clerks— Benry Bissex, John 0. Smyth, 
Thos. Rowbotham, Geo. Kister, John J. 
Maxwell, Chas. K. Weckerley, Henry N. 
Carter, Geo. W. McNabb, Jacob Abrams, 
Harrv Bierman and Bernhard Strouse. All 
Republicans. 81000 each. 

Bill, Poll-lax and Delinquent Clerk— yv. F. 
Gorton. R. 81200. 

AuuL.?" and Assistant Cashier— John J. 
Hogan R. 81200. 

RepisteriuQ Clerks for Miscellaneous Receipts— 
Harry W. McNamee, R., and B. F. Allen, 
R. 81000 each. 

Registering Clerks— G. W. Ruhl, John H. 
Parker, Lewis D. Wall, Jr.. John Spence, 
George Crouse, Henry Hollwarth, Jr., John 
H. Glenn and Constantine Keyser. All Re- 
pulilicans. 81000 each. 

Judicial Sales Clerk— Frank G. Shipper, R. 
81200. 

ChiefSearch Clerk— Jacob G Bunn.i?. 81350. 

Assistant Search Clerks— George Bltmdin, 
Wm. T. Binder, Martin Adler and Harry D. 
Burman. All Republicans. 81080 each. 

Stenographer and Typewriter— Walter Mc- 
Gowan, R. 81000. 

Messenger— John Siner, R. 81000. 

Assistant Messenger— Barrison Spence, R. 
8660. 

Watchman— D. Crawford, R. 8600. 

Janitor— Levi Oberton, R. 8600. 



The Philadelphia Record Almanac. 



Delinquent Tax Bureau. 

CITY HALL, ROOMS 110-112. 

Chief Depntii CuUector— J nmes McCormick, 
R. Salary, S12500. 

Cashier— Andrew P. Chism, R. S1800. 

Lien acik-W. F. Preston, R. S1800. 

AssistaiH Lien Clerks — E. A. Burkhardt, 
James H. Herron, Charles F. Edme, Irvin 
Setzler, Edward A. Eberhard. SIOOO each. 

Sujieri'isiiig A tidUors— Robert Graham, R. ; 
John Kellev, R. 81350 each. 

Refjintering aerfc— Jas.W. Harshaw,i?. S1200. 

mh r/frA-— Charles C. Sutcliffe, R. 812U0. 

LmaUhj CTo-fc— Vacancy. S1320. 

Dpinitu CoUeclors— First, Second and Thirty- 
ninth Wards— Samuel Strien and Henry 
Wilson. 

Third, Fourth, Fifth and Sixth Wards- 
John F. Reidenbach. 

Seventh and Eighth Ward>— William J. 
Wray. 

Ninth, Tenth, Twelfth, Tliirtcenth and 
Fonrtcenth Wards— George W. Clement and 
John H. Fiilmer. 

Fifteenth Ward— Anthony A. Duke. 

Eleventh, Sixti^enth, Seventeenth and 
Eighteenth Wards— Isaac S. Doherty and Jo- 
seph S. Bley. 

Nineteenth and Thirty-first AVards— Wil- 
liam W. Turner and John T. Garman. 

Twentieth. Twenty-ninth and Thirty-sec- 
ond wards— Wni. H. Shuwan, James Clark 
and Frank Glading. 

Twenty-first Wan! — Nathan L. Jones. 

Twenty-second Ward — Francis S. Stall- 
man, Maurice P. Livezey and John J. CoUom. 

Twenty-third, Thirty-fifth and Forty-first 
Wards— Tliomas Shallcross and Louis Reu- 
ben. 

Twenty-fourth and Thirty-fourth Wards- 
Samuel R. Jamison, Albert Forderer, Jr., and 
Benjamin A. Phifer. 

Twenty-fifth and Thirty-third Wards— Sam- 
uel Rowen, Frederick H. Woodhead and J. 
S. N. Ewing. 

Twenty-sixth Ward— A. Lincoln Matchett. 

Twenty-seventh and Fortieth Wards— El- 
viii O. Siiiith, Edward E. Cullen and Lyman 
B. Childs. 

Twenty-eighth, Thirty-seventh and Thirtv- 
cighth Wards— John Eichner, Millard F. 
Snyder and Bentley Muft'. 

Thirtieth and Thirty-sixth Wards— James 
Quinu and Lawrence Farrell. 
Bureau for Collection of Water Rents. 

CITY HALL, ROOMS 114-116. 

Chief Clerk— Barry I. Yohn, R. Salary, 
S1800. 

Cas/iier— George B. Binin, R. $1500. 

Chief Bill Clerk— Jamea A. Ru.ssell, R. $1300. 

Registering Clerk— Theo. Y. DeKlvne, R. 
S1200. 

Assistant Registering Clerks — Wm. S. Jones, 
John H. Jones, Wm'. Langhlin and Benj- 
Gotthold. All Republicans. SIOOO each. 

Search Clerk— Roht. W. McCav, R. $1200. 

Entry Clerks-Fred. W. Eggling, Jr., R., 
11200; James T. Carson, R.. SHOO. 

General CTerts— Robert P. Shrivcr, John R. 
Cody, P. J. Becker, John F. Graeff, Philip 
Munkeubeck and Julius P. Tedler. All Re- 
publicans. $900 each. 

Perynit Receiving Clerk— J. Bartley, R. SUOO. 

Permit Registering Clerk— ioh.n R. Gordon, 
R. $1100. 

jl/essenpe)-— William Stackhouse, R. 8900. 
Department of City Controller. 

CITY HALL, ROOMS 142-148. 

O mtroUcr— iohn M. Walton, R. Salary, 
S8000. Term expire.s, January, 1902. 



Deputy Controller— \Mm& R. Fortescue, R. 

Chief Auditor— Fdwin A. Pue, D. 8250f}. 

£ooA-teepe)— Edward Hatch, R. 81800. 

General Auditor— Jmu\s J. Bush, R. 81500. 

Department Auditors— B. A. Hyde, R.. 
Charles H. Schell, R.\ Chas. H. Worman, R.. 
Jas. F. Mahonev, D.; G. T. R. Knorr, R.: Jos. 
S. Hall, R.; John J. Waterhouse, R. 81350 
each. 

Tax Auditors-Joseph H. Krouse, John A. 
Boger, Samuel C. Dingee, William H. Off, 
Louis J. Bailey, A. H. Loeb and George W. 
Cobb. All Republicans. 81200 each. 

Water Auditors— S. C. Burnside, R.; John 
G. Frey, R.; James A. McMullen, R.) Roberts 
L. Roberts, R. 81200 each. 

Registers of Jiills— George T. Fisher, Daniel 
V. Masterson, C. Otto Ackerman. All Repub- 
licans. 81200 each. 

jVisceKa«eoMS Cto-fc— Samuel Mills, R. 81200. 

Return aerfc- Christian Fuhrman, R. 81200. 

Warrant Delivery Clerk— Charles J. Boyle, 
D. 81200. 

Assistant Warrant Delivery C'feifc- Harrv 
jSIohr. R. $1000. 

Register of iran-ante- Henry Werner, R. 
81100. 

Gas Auditors— C. D. B. Balbirnie, Charles 
Getzinger, Fred. Silber. All Republicans. 
81000 each. 

Typewriter— W. W. Mintzer, R. 81000. 

Custodian of Records— C. G. Wilfong, R. 8900. 

Messenger— John Tripple, D. 8800. 

Sinking Fund Commissioners. 

Cffm7nissioners — The Mayor, Samuel H. .\sh- 
bridge ; the Controller, John M. Walton— by 
virtue of their offices ; Louis Wagner, elected 
by Councils. 

Cto-A-- William H. Winter. R. 81200. 

City Treasurer. 

CITY HALL, ROOM 143. 

Citi/ Treasurer— J. Hamp:on Jifoore, R Sal- 
ary. 810,000. Term expires, 1904. 

Chief Cfert-Samuel Bell, Jr., R. 82500. 

Receiving Teller— Hurry S. Wright, R. 82000, 

First Assistant Receiving Teller— George W. 
Morrison, R. 81800. 

Second Assistant Receiving Telle)- — William 
Radcliflfe, JJ. 81200. 

Paying Teller— J eaaes McConnell, 7?. 82000. 

First Assistant Paying Teller— A. H. Nichols, 
R. 81400. 

Second Assistant Paying Teller— Roht. Hast- 
ings, R. 81100. 

Bookkeeper— Samuel C. Henry, Jr., R. 81800. 

Assistant Bookkeeper — W. W. Summers, R. 
81000. 

Wairant Clerk— B. W. McDaniel, R. 81500. 

Assistant Warrant CTecA-s- William H. Mor- 
riss, R.; Wm. Swift, R. 81000 each. 

State CferA-- Adam T. Ranch, A'. 81500. 

Assistant Slate Clerks— Wm. Hulme, R. ; 
Wm. E. Corson, R. ; Andrew Campbell, R. 
81000 each. 

Miscellaneous Clerk— J. S. McKee, R. 81000. 

Miscellaneous Clerk and Watchman— George 
Gransback, R. 8800. 

J/fssen.ge)— Jesse Shiber, R. 81000. 

1 1 'i5i<c/imen— Leslie Milligan, R., Henry i\Iy- 
ers, R. 8800 each. 

Office Messenger— Wilhnr Lowber, R. 8480. 

Janitress — Mrs. Florence Lowber. 8300. 

Park Commission. 

CITY HALL ROOMS 127 129. 

(In charge of Fairmount and Hunting Parks.) 

David W. Sellers, D.; Wm. S. Stokley, R.; 

A. Loudon Snowden, R.; Thomas D. Pearce, 



The Philadelphia Record JUmanac. 



D.; Samuel G. Thompson. D.; Charles W. 
Henry, J?.; A. J. Cassatt, D.; P. A. B. Widener, 
R. ; John G. Johnson, R. ; James Pollock, R. 

Ex-officio i/ojihers— Samuel H. Ashbridge, 
R. ; Frank L. Hand, R. ; Geo. G Pierie, R. ; 
George S. Webster, R.: James L. Miles, R., 
and George McCurdy, R. 

President— David W. Sellers. 

Vice-President— James L. Miles. 

Treasurer— Ch&s. W. Henry. 

Secretary— Thomas S. Martin. 52600. 

Park Solicitor— ScLmnel C. Perkins, R. 81200. 

Chief Engineer and Superintendeyit— Jesse T. 
Vogdes, iJ. 83750. 

Captain of Park Guard— Louis M. Chasteau, 
R. 81825. " 

City Trusts. 

STEPHEN GIRARD BUILDING. 

Directors— Joseph L. Caven, R.; John H. 
Converse, R.; John M. Campbell, D.; Wil- 
liam L. Elkins, R.; Alfred Moore, R.; John 
H. Michener, R.; Louis Wagner, R.; Wm. H. 
Lambert, i?.; Edward S. Buckley, i?.; Dallas 
Sanders, D.; John K. Cuming, R.; Edwin S. 
Stuart, R. 

Ex-officio: Mayor Samuel H. Ashbridge, R.; 
President of Select Council, James L. Miles, 
R.; President of Common Council, George 
McCurdy, R. 

President— Loms Wagner, R. 

Vice-President— Joseph L. Caven, R. 

Secretary— Frank M. Highley, R. 

Superintendent of Girard Estate— George E. 
Kirkpatrick, R. 

Engineer (out of city)— H. S. Thompson, R. 

City Commissioners. 

CITY HALL, ROOMS 134-138. 

Jacob Wildemore, R.; Hugh Black, R.; 
Thomas J. Ryan, £>. Salaries, 85000 each. 
Terms expire Jauuarv, 1903. 

Chief Clei-k-Joseph H. Winters, R. 82500. 

Election Clerks — Harry Kuenzel, R. ; James 
Dawick, R. $1200 each. 

J/fsseng-er— William Harvey, R. 81250. 

Assistant Messenger— Chas. Pommer, R. 8840. 

Public Building Commission. 

CITY HALL, ROOM 453. 

(The Board has authority to fill vacancies.) 

Commissioners— William Brice, D.; Charles 
Seger, R.; William S. Stoklev, R.; Samuel H. 
Ashbridge, R.; Thomas E.Gaskill, !>.; Frank 
M. Harris, R.; Richard Peltz, R.; Samuel C. 
Perkins, R.; George McCurdy, R.; James L. 
Miles, R.; William H. Wright, D.; John S. 
Stevens, R. 

President— Samuel C. Perkins, R. 

.Secrefar;/— William B. Land, R. $2750. 

jPreaswrer— Clayton McMichael, R. 

Architect— \y. B. Powell, R. 81000. 

Superintendent— LynfoTd D. C. Tyler, R. 
83000. 

SoMc/tor— Samuel Peltz, R. 8900. 

Assistant Superintendent— John M. Bunker, 
R. $1500. 

Clerk— Jno. C. Thompson, R. 81200. 

Architect's Draughtsmen— C Remington, R., 
81800 ; Thomas C. Peterson, R., 81080. 

Clerk and Messenger— Wm. J. Greene, R. 
81200. 

Superintendent of Electric Lighting—Ed-wSiTd 
Davis, R. $2500. 

Chief Engineer— James Bannister, R. 81100. 

Board of Public lEducaticn. 

SECOND FLOOR CITY HALL, N. W. CORRIDOR. 

Members of the Board— First Section, Chas. 
E. Davis, R. Second, Geo. N. Lowery, D. 
Third, Jos. D. Murphy, D. Fourth, Wm. J. 



Manning, D. Fifth, John M. Campbell, D. 
Sixth, Wm. Bergan, D. Seventh, Miss Anna 
Hallowell. Eighth, Simon Gratz, Ji. Ninth, 
Thomas G. Morton, M.D., R. Tenth, Thos. A. 
Robinson, R. Eleventh, Wm. H. R. Lukens, 

D. Twelfth, Thomas A. Grace, R. Thir- 
teenth, Dr. Martin H. Williams, R. Four- 
teenth, Joel Cook, R. Fifteenth, H. R. Ed- 
munds, R. Sixteenth, Thomas G. Barrett, 
R. Seventeenth, James Hughes, D. Eigh- 
teenth, Alex. Adaire, R. Nineteenth, Dr. 
Matthew J. Wilson, R. Twentieth, Thomas 

E. Merchant, R. Twenty-first, vacancy. 
Twenty-second, Wm. T. Tilden, R. Twenty- 
third, Richardson L. Wright, D. Twenty- 
fourth, Edward Lewis, R. Twenty-fifth, 
Wm. H. Ziegler, M. D., D. Twenty-sixth, 
Paul Kavanagh, R. Twenty-seventh, Samuel 
B. Huey, R. Twenty-eighth, John Oughton, 
R. Twenty-ninth, Mary E. Mumford. Thir- 
tieth, Joseph W. Catharine, Jr., R. Thirty- 
first, William Mclntyre, R. Thirty -second, 
Harvey H. Hubbert, R. Thirty-third, William 
Wrigley, R. Thirty- fourth, Joseph R. Rhoads, 
R. Thirty-fifth, Thomas Shallcross, R. Thir- 
ty-sixth, George Haig, R. Thirty-seventh, 
Charles H. Van Fleet, R. Thirty-eighth, 
Mary T. Mason. Thirty-ninth, Wm. F. De- 
frates, R. Fortieth, Samuel G. Dixon, M.D., 
R. Forty-first, H. A. P. Neel, M.D., R. 

President— Samuel B. Huey, R. 

. Vice-P)-esident— Henry R. Edmunds, R. 

Secreta7-y— Andrew F. Hammond, R. 82500. 

Assistant Secretary— Wm. Dick, R. 81800. 

Snperinte7ident—'Edv,'aTd Brooks, LL.D., R. 
85000. 

Assistant Superintendents — Edgar A. Singer, 
R.; C. Henry Kain, R.; Lydia A. Kirby, Marv 
Wright,Wm. C. Jacobs, R. ; John P. Garber, R. 
82500 each. 

Director ofDraiving—W. A. Mason, R. 82500. 

Assistants to Director of Drawing— Elizabeth 
Barnes, Martha Walters and Caroline Van 
Gilder. flOOO each. 

Director of J/Msic— Enoch W. Pearson, R. 
82500. 

Assistants to Director of Music— Mrs. F. H. 
Duncan, Ella C. Fitzpatrick, Katharine E. 
Murphy, Ida M. Pecht, Helen Pulaski, Mary 
J. Wiibraham and Kate H. Bright. 8900 
each. 

Clerk to Director-Catharine E. Seeler. 8600. 

Director of Kindergartens— Anna W. Wil- 
liams. 81500. 

Clerk to Svperintejident—Addie S. Hover. $800. 

Clerk, Compulsory Education— Josephine B. 
Esler. $600. 

Architect and Supervisor of School Buildings— 
J. H. Cook, R. 82600. 

Assistant Architects— J. L. Titus, R. 81800. 
James Gaw, R. 81350. W. P. M. Mumford, R. 
81100. L. P. Hoopes, R. 8750. 

Inspector of Heaters— J. D. Cassell, R. 81500. 

Warrant Clerks— Edw. Merchant, R. 81325. 
Thomas A. Hughes, R. 81000. 

Clerks— Albert B. Beale, R. 81500. L. E. 
Drake, R. $1325. Harry Moore, R. 81000. J. 
D. Hardin, R. 8950. Rulif Van Brunt, R. 
8800. John G. Large, R. $1000. 

il/esse?i(;e)-— William S. Rutt', R. 81000. 

Ste)iographer—Lena A. Humphries. 8600. 

Port Wardens. 

NOS. 350, 351 BOURSE. 

Members of the Board (terms expire May, 
1902)— Murrell Dobbins, John J. McCloskey, 
Frank M. Chandler, M. B. Wood, Thomas 
M. Hammett, George Egolf, George J. El- 
liott, J. S. W. Holton and Charles E. Scott. 
(Terms expire May, 1901)— Joel Cook (Presi- 
dent), Samuel Disston. Matthias Seddinger, 



62 



The Philadelphia Record JUmanac. 



W. L. Martin, H. C. Long, Edmund L. Levy, 
John Fountain, J. J. Stoer, one vacancy. 

Master TFordcri— William R. Tucker, jB. Sal- 
ary. $2500. 

Secretary— Geor^Q F. Sproule, R. S1080. 

Vessel CTerfc— Arthur F. Renner, if. $720. 

Harbor Master— Jos. H. Klemmer.iS. Corner 
Walnut and Dock streets. 82500. 

Sheriff. 

CITY HALL, ROOMS 467-487. 

Sheriff— Weucel Hartman, R. Sala-y, 
$15,000. Term expires, January, 1903. 

Real Estate Deputy — James L. Miles, R. 
$6000. 

Personal Depuiy—GeoTge DeB. Myers, R. 
S2000. 

Solicitor to Sheriff— 'Eenvy F. Walton, R. 
S2000. 

Assistant Solicitor to Sheriff— WUlmm Grew, 
R. jSOOO. 

Cl&-k to Real Estate Deputy— S. Hoxsie God- 
win, R. S1500. 

Execuiion CTerfc— Robert Grier, R. $1200. 

Appearance Cferifc— John E. Engel, R. $1000. 

Assistant Appearance Clerk— Chris. J. Perry, 
R. $900. 

Deputy Sheriffs— Geo. K. Hozg, Peter Say- 
bolt, John Ertel, William J. Harris, John H. 
Bunting and Harry R. Wildey. All Repub- 
licans. $1000 each. 

Clerks to Deputy Sheriffs— UArry W. Mace, 
Thos. P. Murgitrovde, Thomas Gavit, Frank 
Widener, Robert S. McElroy and Louis E. 
Sutton. All Republicans. $900 each. 

Writ Serines— William Milligau, Williatn 
Leedom, Harry Martin, Wm. Eisenhower, 
William A. Shipps, Ferd. G. Zweig, J. Frank 
Peterson, Geo. A. Orr, Joseph C. Root, James 
Brown. Hugh Wiley Matthew Scarlett, Mark 
Fleming, Robert H. Roy, Taylor Johnson, 
W. J. Donohugh, Peter Giffear and Edward 
J. Plant. All Republicans. $720 each. 

Fee aerk-John \V. Mosley, R. $1000. 

Quarter Sessions Deputy—Vian^ K. Bruner, 
R. $700. 

Assistant Quarter Sessions Deputy— Harry B. 
Ander-on, R. $700. 

Stenographer— yia.son C. Christie, R. $900. 

Messenger— J Sicoh Borrillion, R. $700. 

BiU Poster— ThomsiS L. Jennings, R. $1000. 
Use and Driver of I'aji— Wm. C. Felton, R. 
SIOOO. 

Auctioneer— A. G. Lippincott, R. $600 

Janitor— Michael JlcLanghlin, R. $600 
Van Guards— D. A. Kelly, George A. 
Smith, Joseph Klang and George Hilsee. All 
Republicans. $720 each. 

Driver of New 1 'a?!— William J. Doran, R. 
1720. 

Coroner. 

CITY HALL, ROOMS 602-608. 

CoroTier— Thomas Dugan, R. Salary, 85000. 
Term expires, January, 1903. 

Deputy Coroner — John S. Hammond, R. 
$2500. 

Pht/sicians—\V. L. Wadsworth, R.; Thomas 
J. Morton, R. $1800 each. 

Clerk— Jas. G. Woodrow, R. $1500. 

Assistant Clerk— Sa,m\. H. Edgar, R. $1100. 

District Deputies— John Kurtz, John P. Wolf, 
James C. Dorsett, Thomas R. Neflf. All Re- 
publicans. SIOOO each. 

Detective— Uoht. McKinney, R. $1200. 

Wagon Driver— John W. Schuman, R. 81800. 

Unaci-tofce?-— Armstrong Sons, R. 

Stenographer — Jennie Holden. $800. 

Janitor— Geo. Hugg, R. $600. 



Department of I/aw. 

CITY HALL, ROOMS 462-488. 

City Solicitor— John L. Kinsey, R. Salary, 
$10,000. Term expires, April, 1902. 

First Assistant— J a.mes Alcorn, R. $4500. 

Second Assistant— Ro-wa.vd A. Davis, R. 
$3000 

Road Assistants— F. L. Wayland, R. $4000. 
J. Lee Patton, ;?. $2500. 

Assistant in Charge of Bonds and Contracts- 
John C. Sheahan, R. $2500. 

Assistant'i-E. Spencer Miller, R., Joseph 
W. Catharine, Jr., R., Leonard Finletter, R , 
Chester N. Farr, Jr., R., Thomas E. Merchant, 
R. $2000 each. George E. Fill, R., Robert 
B-annan, R., John H. Maurer, R. $1500 each. 
David Lavis, J?., Frank F. Sorver, R., Chas. 
S. Wood, R. S1400 each. Wm. H. List, R., 
Chas. E. Perkins, R., Albert B. Kellev, -R., 
Saml. Chew, R. $1200 each. Ernest Lowen- 
grund, R. $1000. 

Lien Solicitor-Alfred S. Miller, R. $2500. 

Solicitor for Gvardians of the Poo?-— Samuel 
E. Gavin, R. $2000. 

SoUcitor for Bxdlding Inspectors— 'Morris S. 
Barratt, R. $2000. 

Tax SolieUor— Jos. T. Taylor, R. $1550. 

Lien Clerk and Cashier— Jos. L. Hopson, R. 
81500. 

Lien Oerk-John Cameron, R. $900. 

Chief C'to-fc— Thomas S. Stout, R. $1500. 

Road OrA-— William J. Kerns, R. $1500. 

Assistant Road Clerk— Lewis D. Bach, R. 
$1200. 

Cto-A;s— Charles A. Clark, R. $1200. Jos. 
Th-jrne, R., Martin H. Ettinger, R., Thos. H. 
Boardman, R. $1000 each. W. B. Yocum, 
R., L. Lejjlie, R., Wm. A. Ma.son, ii..and Ed- 
ward F. Davis. R. $900 each. Charles H. 
Rhoads, R. $720. 

Stono(7rop/!e)S— Spencer R. Weston, R., and 
Charles McGlathery, R. $1500 each. 

Superintendent of Road Jury Rooms— Isaiah 
Conrad, R. $1000. 

Clerk and Oudodian of iJecords- Josiah C. 
Musick, R. $1000. 

Road Jurors' Rooms: Nos. 329 East Corridor; 
377, 381 and 387 West Corridor ; 571, 577 and 
581 West Corridor, City Hall. 

Prothonotary Common Pleas Courts. 

CITY HALL ROOM 268. 

Prothonotary— U.Rw'seUThAver. R. Salary, 
810,000. (Appointed bv the Judges.! 

i>epi(<(/— Charles B. Roberts, R. $3.'i00. 

Second Deputy-J&s. W. Fletcher, R. $2100. 

Chief aerfc— Charles N. Mann, R. $2000. 

Second Clerk— R. F. Clay, R. $1500. 

Judgment Search Clerks— Charles F. Tyer, 
Frank M. Carter, S. B. Hoppin, Charles R. 
Van Dusen. All Republicans. $1200 each. 

Locality Clerks— TS.nos P. Jefieris, R., Samuel 
i B. Vandusen, R., Stephen Green, R. $1200 
each. 

Appearance Clerks — Isaiah Kenderdine, R., 
john Briggs, R., H. C. Pennypacker, R., 
Philip H. \Vhite, R. $1200 each. 

Mechanics' Lien aerk— Jos. Kneass, R. $1200. 

Writ aerks-J. U. G. Hunter, R., F. M. May- 
hew, R., Sol. Rains, R. $1200 each. 

Index Cferfcs— Robert Turnbull, R., Wm. 
R. Thomson, R. $1200 each. 

Fee CZerits- Frank R. Burbank, R. $1500. 
Joseph Haines, R. $1200. 

First Exempli tication Clerk— C. G. McCul- 
lough, R. $1500. 

Second Exemplification Clerk— John L. Burns, 
R. $1000. 



iing I 
r, Jol 



Fletcher, John J. Moffett, Geo. H. Thomson, 
Charles Mears, W. B. Severn, C. M. Bur- 



The Philadelphia Record JUmanac. 



63 



bank, A. C. Gardiner, Thos. F. Stewart, S. B. 
Boyd. All Republicans. S975 each. 

Otistodiam of Records— V. G. Watmough, R., 
Frederick Hartman, R. SHOO eacli. 

Custodians of Books — W. N. Browning, R. 
8900. John H. Scotield, R. $3(i0. 

Copuists-W. W. Widdilield, A'., H. C. Gas- 
kill, R. $800 each. 

Messenger— John Browning, R. S800. 
District Attorney. 

OFFICE, CITY HALL, SIXTH FLOOR. 

District Attornei/— P. F. Rothermel, Jr., R. 
Salary, $10,000. Term expires, Januarv, 1902. 

Special ^(-s/sta?!* — Samuel A. Boyle, R. 
$5000. 

First Assistant— ThoxasiS D. Finlelter, R. 
$5000. 

Second Assistant— Samuel M. Clement, Jr., 
R. $4000. 

Third Assistant — J. Howard Rhoads, R. 
$3000. 

Special Assistant— Keniy J. Scott, R. $3000. 

Murder Detective— Chas. F. Mvers, R. $1500. 

General Detective— Geo. W. Painter, R. $1200. 

Indictment Clerk— Feter H. Evans, R. Jf2000. 

Asst. Indictment Clerk— L. B. Fife, R. $1200. 

Office Cterk-J. U. Clark, R. $1200. 

Fee Clerk— 1. P. Black, R. $500. 

Girard College. 

RIDGE AND GIRARD AVENUES 

Presideni—\. H. Fetterolf. 
riee-Pces-iiden^— Winlhrop D. Sheldon. 

COURTS. 

Quarter Sessions. 

CITY HALL, ROOMS 646-687. 

Clerk— ^envy Brooks, R. Salary, $5000. 
Term expires, January, 1902. 

Deputy Cteri-— Richard Peltz, R. $2500. 

Court Cfej'As— Charles H. Good, R. (Room 
646.) $2000. A. Wilson Henszev, R. (Room 
676.) $!'.500. 

Asst. Court Clerk— Robert Birchell, R. $800. 

Assistant Clerk— Geo. W. Hutchinson, R. 
$1200. 

Record aerk—'&en]. N. Faunce, R. $1400. 

Fee Clerk— Vim. Renter, R. $1200. 

Road CtoA:— Robt. Graham, R. $1200. 

Search Clerk— UaTiy A. Consalvi, R. $1000. 

Subpcena CTfcfc— John L. O'Brein, R. $1000. 

Miscellaneous Clerk— John Reiser, R. $1000. 

Custodian— Ellwood Siringfield, R. $1000. 

Assistant Custodian— 1. C. White, R. $800. 

Messenger— E-Ugh Peacock, R. $600. 

Stenographer— Uem-y T. Bauerle, R. $900. 

Common Pleas Courts. 

Judges elected for ten years. Salaries. 
$7000 each. 

No. 1. — CITY HALL, ROOMS 243-246. 

Pi-esident Judge— Ciaig Biddle, R. Term 
expires, January, 1906. 

Associate Judges— F. Amadee Bregj', R. 
Term expires, Januarv, 1908. A. M. Beitler, 
R. Term expires, January, 1907. 

Cterfc— George T. Diess, R. $1400. 

CVier— Horace D. Gaw, R. $1252. 

Assistant Crie)— Oscar F. We.st, J?. S1252. 

No. 2. — CITY HALL, ROOMS 263-254. 

President Jiidge— Samuel W. Pennypacker, 
R. Term expires, January, 1910. 

Associate Judges — Maver Sulzberger, R. 
Term expires, January, 1905. Wm. W. Wilt- 
bank, R. Term expires, January, 1908. 

Clerk— Wm. J. MacCain, R. $1400. 

Crier— A. Jackson Reilly, R. $1252. 

Assistant Crier— W. B. Reed, R. $1252. 



No. 3.— CITY HALL, ROOMS 275-285. 

President Judge— Thomas K. Fmletter, R. 
Term expires, January, 1911. 

Associate Judges— CharlesB. McMichael, 7i\ 
Term expires, January, 1907. Henry J. Mc- 
Carthy, D. Term expires, January, 1910. 

Clerk— J. Penn MacCain, is". $1400. 

One?-— Henry Mclntyre, R. $1252. 

Assistant Crier— John Yard, R. $1252. 

No. 4. — CITY HALL, ROOMS 443-446. 

Pi-esident Judge— ^lichael Arnold, D. Term 
expires, January, 1903. 

Associate Judges— Robert N. Willson, R. 
Term expires, January, 1905. Charles Y. 
Audenried, R. Term expires, January, 190S. 

C'to-fc— Charles H. White, R. $1400. " 

Oner— Eli G. Sellers, R. $1252. 

Assistant Crier— W. B. Hart, R. $1252. 

Orphans' Court. 

CITY HALL, ROOMS 416-421. 

Pi-esident Judge— WiUiam B. Hanna, R. 
Salary, $7000. Term expires, January, 1905. 

Associate Judges— Clement B. Penrose, R. 
Term expires, January, 1909. William N. 
Ashman, R. Term expires, January, 1'J09. 
Joseph C. Ferguson, R. Term expires, Jan- 
uary, 1908. $7000 each. 

Register of Wills— Jacob Singer, R. (ex- officio 
clerk). 

First Assistant Clerk— A. J. Fortin, R. $2500. 

Second ^ss/sio/i^- Edward Nichols, R. $2000. 

Third Assistant- James S. Biid, R. $1400. 

Fourth Assistant— Robert E. Ferguson, R. 
$1200. 

Fifth Assistant— Harvard S. Bear, R. $1200. 

Sixth Assistaid-Frank Wildemore, R. $1200. 

Seventh Assistant— J as. B. Sheehan, R. $1200. 

Eighth Assistant -Geo. J. Murphy, R. $1200. 

Mnth Assistant— John Leonard, R. $1200. 

Tenth Ass-istant—Theo. Smithers, R. $1200. 

Eleventh Assistant — Thomas Brannix. R 
$1200. 

Custodian of Records— S.. M. Oliver, R. $800. 

Orier—R. M. Wadsworth, R. $4 per day. 

Supreme Court of Pennsylvania. 

CITY HALL, ROOMS 464-458. 

Chief Justice— J. Brewster McCollum, D. 
Term expires, January, 1910. 

Justices— James T. Mitchell, R. Term ex- 
pires, January, 1910. John Dean, R. Term 
expires, January, 1914. D. Newliii Fell, R. 
Term expires, Januarv, 1915. J. Hay Brown, 
R. Term expires, Jaiiuary, 1921. S. Leslie 
Mestrezal, D. Term expires, January, 1921. 
Wm. P. Potter, R. Term expires January, 
1902. Salaries, Chief Justice, 18500; Justices, 
each $8000. 

Prothonotary— Charles S. Greene, £. 

Chief Clerk— Lewis C. Greene, R. 

Cte?-A— Alexander M. Smith. 

Orier— Thomas S. White, R. 

Tipstaffs— S. B. Evans, D.: L. W. Moore, R : 
Robert Liberton, R.; Albert B. Allen, R. 
Salaries, $3.50 per day. 

Superior Court. 

CITY HALL, ROOMS 464-468. 

President Judge— Charles E. Rice, R. Term 
expires, January, 1906. 

Judges— James A. Beaver, J?. Term expires, 
January, 1906. George B. Orlady, R. Term 
expires, January, 1906. Peter P. Smith D. 
Term expires, January^ 1906. WilUam D. 
Porter, R. Term expires, Januarj', iyu9. 
W. W. Porter, R. Term expires, Januarv, 
1909. John I. Mitchell, R. Term expires, 
January, 1910. Salaries, $7500 each. 



The Philadelphia Record JUmanac. 



CWer— William K. Taylor, R. 
Tipstaffs— QamnA Collins, Daniel Ahern 
and John T. Qon\y. All Republicans. 

Register of Wills. 

CITY HALL, ROOMS 162-170. 

Register — ^ia.coh Singer, R. Salary, S5000 
and fees. Term expires, January, 1904. 

Deputy Register— ChSirles Irwin, R. $2500. 

State Appraiiier— Geo. W. Conrad, R. Paid 
by the Register. 

Assistant Appraiseis — Jesse W. Pallatt, R., 
Arthur F. Conly, R. Paid by the Register. 

Transcribing Clerks—Koh&n T. Harvey, R. 
S1500. James J. Cooper, R. $1000. 

Bookkeeper— U. Webster Myers, R. $1000. 

Compare Cferfe— Harry J. Walton, R., Thos. 
Harbot, R. $1000 each. 

Account C/erte— Joseph Beckman, R., Chas. 
Love, R. $1000 each. James T. Hand, R. 
$900. 

Recording Cferi-s— Charles B. MacNeal, R., 
J. A. C. Goebel, R., J. L. Cooper, R. $1000 
each. 

Index Clerks— ThoraBS A. Spence, R., Harry 
C. Broomall, R. $1000 each. 

Miscellaneous Clerks— Jos. L. Baldwin, R., 
Geo. Rabe, J?., Wm. J. Harrington, R. $1000 
each. 

Record Clerk— Geo. J. Van Houten, R. $900. 

Inventory Clerk— Wesley F. Piatt, R. $1000. 

Jtfessen^er— Thomas Harbot, R. $800. 

Janitor— George Williams, R. $500. 

Custodians of Records -Thos. G. Hall, R., 
Robert Irwin, R. $800 each. 

Stenographer and Typewriter— Robert M. 
Boyle, iJ. $1000. 

Recorder of Deeds. 

CITY HALL, hOOMS 154-160. 

Recorder— John Virdin , £. Salary, $10,000. 
Term expires January, 1902. 

Deputy Recorder— Jos. K. Fletcher, R. $2750. 

Chief Clerk— Joseph Berry, R. $2000. 

Chief Search Clerk— Wm. G. Combes, R. $2000. 

Search Clevks—U.. E. Shaw, R., J. M. Stacker, 
R., Samuel R. Cline, R. $1500 each. 

Mortgage Index Clerk— jACoh Adler, R. $1800. 

Conveyance Index Clerk— W. S. Eidgway, R. 
$1600. 

Assistant Index Clerk— Wm. H. Beideman, 
R. $1200. 

Bookkeeper— &a.myxe\ Sparhawk, R. $1750. 

Conveyance Search Clerks— Chris. F. Grau- 
lich, R., Henry Doebley, R. $1200 each. 

Special Index Clerks — James Bawn, Jno, 
Scanlin, William J. Kelly, Ed. J. Flannigan, 
Geo. W. Brown and Wm. C. Dewees. All 
Republicans. $1000 each. 

Superintendent of Transcribing Room — Chas. 
R. Dietz, R. $1400. 

Miscellaneous Clerks— B. F. Gaunt, R. $1300. 
John A. Maugle, R., Jacob F. Lodge, £., 
Edward G. Lee, R. $1100 each. 

Compare Clerks— D&vid Mcllwain, jB,, Chas. 
A. Morrison, R., Harry C. Glenn, R., William 
Spence, R. $1350 each. 

Messeiiger-Geo. Hilton, R. $700. 

Jomttors— Richard Everett, J?., EUwood E. 
Conner, R. $600 each. 

Custodian of Records— Rdbt. Glenn, R. $1000. 

Assistant Custodian— Wm.. Hushwood, R. 
$800. 

Recorder's Transfer Clerk— Hsmy Weichsel- 
baum, R. $1200. 



Clerks Recopyinq Old JJccot-c/s— Superinten- 
dent, Ed. B. Cottrell, R. 81400. Abram H. 
Dunliip, Jr., Andrew J. Lvtle, Richard Lan- 
caster, John F. Shank, Andrew Ebert, Jas. 



Orr, Jr., E. N. Stewart, Harry A. Raw, Henry 
Murray, E. C. M. Rawlings, G. E. Cook, J.B. 
Ireland, H. F. Ulrick, J. S. Murray, C. F. 
Lott, J. T. McAvoy, Harry Loveless, F. W. 
Gerker, R. M. Greenman. All Republicans. 
$900 each. 

Typewriter— Wm. C. T. Bauerle, R. $600. 

ll'ate/iwwwi— Charles Seeburger, R. $600. 

Transcribing Clerks— J ncoh Barron, Robert 
J. Clifton, Wm. L. Childs, George W. Can- 
ning^ W. G. Essick, Wilson Lentz, Nicho- 
las F. English, Charles B. Freeman, Wm. S. 
Games, C. Harry Hoot, Alexander Haus.s- 
man, 0. A. Hulton, John E. Jones, John H. 
Moore, George J. Pollock, Samuel B. Priest, 
George M. Clifton, Fred. Wolf, John H. 
Schoutz, Charles Siner, S. N. Snell, Thomas 
Smith, Charles J. Still, Wm. C. Smith, Rob- 
ert J. Thompson, Edward Trenwith, Joseph 
F. Weldon, Wm. Wood, Edward B. Cramp, 
Michael Farrell, Wm. T. Martin, Frank M. 
McDevitt, Theodore Rees, Samuel Dufl'y, 
Jacob Aschenbrand, Edward J. H&yman, 
Jos. C. Conley, Albert Henry, Theo. Homan, 
Warren Jordan, T. W. Hoppin, Jas. J. Mc- 
Namee, R. A. Leathen, Oscar E. Rother, F. 
Weingard, J. T. Johnson, Jas. C. Vansciver, 
Robt. T. Kemble, Frank Redman, and T. C. 
Smith. All Republicans. $900 each. 

County Prison. 

MAIN PRISON, PASSYUNK AVENUE AND REED STREET. 
CONVICT DEPARTMENT, HOLMESBURG. 

/;ispecto;-s— Richard D. Barclay (President), 
Robert R. Corson, Ralph F. Cullinan (Treas- 
urer), George W. Hall, Emlen Hutchinson 
(Secretary), Wm. B. Hackenburg, Samuel H. 
Cramp, W. Fred. Snyder, Amos C. Shallcross, 
Wm. J. Kelly and M. S. French, M.D. 

Superintendent— Robert C. Motherwell, Jr., 
R. $2600. 

Assistant Superintendents — A. P. Richardson, 
at Reed street prison, and Chas. A. Abel, at 
Holmesburg. Both Republicans. $1500 each. 

Clerk— Fred. A. Cooke, R. 11500. 

P/i2/s/ciaws— Benjamin F. Butcher, R. $1500. 
Anna R. Osmond. $900. 

Apothecary and Assistant Physician— F. A. 
Sharp, jR. $1000. 

Physician in Convict X'«par<?M€?i<— Benjamin 
Pennebacker, M.D., R. $1000. 

Prison Agent— J ose\)h J. Camp, R. $1500. 

i/atron— Anna B. Harsh aw. $850. 

Assistant il/a<ro;i— Elizabeth Matthews. $700. 

DBastern Penitentiary. 

TWENTY-FIRST STREET AND FAIRMOUNT AVENUE. 

Inspectors— Conrnd B. Day, D. (President), 
Geo. Vaux, Jr., R. (Secretary), Henry Tat- 
nall, R. (Treasurer), Dr. John J. Healey, D., 
Alexander Balfour, R. 

(rardeji— Daniel W. Bussinger, R. $3000. 

Resident Physician— H.. M. Goodrich, M.D. 
$2000. 

Moral Instructor— Joseph Welch. $2000. 

Clerk— Jas. McConnell, R. $1500. 

House of Refuge. 

BOYS' DEPARTMENT, GLEN MILLS, DELAWARE COUNTY. 
GIRLS' DEPARTMENT 22D AND POPLAR STS. 

il/a?ia(7e?-s— William H. Vodges, Amos Bon- 
sall, F. W. Lewis, M.D., N. Dubois Miller, 
George Watson, Thomas L. Gillespie, John 
H. Watt, Charles Richardson, Henry Cope, 
Jno. J, Henry, Jos. W. Hawley, Thomas E. 
Baird, William H. Staake, Morris Earle, 
Henry H. Collins, Alfred C. Harrison, Robert 
T. Cornwell, Monroe Smith, J. Dundas Lip- 
pincott, Benjamin Brooke, George Vaux, Jr., 
William H. Castle, George M. Booth, Ed- 
mund G. Hamersly and J. Henry Bartlett. 



The Philadelphia Record JUmanac. 



Freskknt— George M. Troutman. 

Vice-Presidents— J a.mes V. Watson, Joseph 
G. Rosengarten. 

Tteasure)-— Thomas A. Robinson. 

Sccretarif—'Richa.Td A. Lewis. 

C'')it».seto/'s— Jno. G. Johnson, Geo. Tucker 
Bispham. 

Sdlicitor—'ii . Dubois Miller. 

( nnsaUing Surgeon— Dr. Leon Briukman. 

ConsulUng Physician— Dr. J. Harvey Frone- 
field. 

Superintendent Boys Department— F. H. Ni- 

Phijsician— Philip N. Eckman. 

t^uperinlendent Girls' Department— Mary A. 
Campbell. 

Physician Girls' Departmoiit-Dr. Clara Mar- 
shall. 

Age7it and Bookkeeper— J . M. Schwartz, 1116 
Girard street. 

State Board of Health and Vital 
Statistics. 

EXECUTIVE OFFICE, 1420 CHESTNUT STREET. — ROOM 
916 CR02ER BUILDING, PHILADELPHIA. 

President— Saml. T. Davis, M.D., Lancaster. 

.SecrdKiv/— Benjamin Lee, M.D., Philadel- 
phia. 

Mnnbers of the Boa?-d— Richard Y. Cook, 
Philadelphia; J. H. McClelland, M.D., Pitts- 
burg; Charles E. Harvey, M.D., Philadel- 
phia ; .Samuel T. Davis, M.D., Lancaster; Jno. 
Kulton, C. E., Johnstown. 

State Quarantine Board. 

OFFICE. NOS. 264-266 BULLITT BUILDING. 

J/f»i6t)>— Richard A. Cleeman, M.D., D. 
(President), Benjamin Lee, M.D., P. (Secre- 
tary), Thomas Winsmore, D., Henry D. Hel- 
ler, M.D., P., J. L. Forvvood, M.D., P., 
Henry U. DuBois, P., Chas. H. Heustls, P. 

Quarantine Physician — Renry D. Heller, 
.M.D., P. Salary, $5000. 

Miscellaneous Ofl&cials. 

Marriage License Clerk (office. No. 41S City 
Hall)— James S. Bird, P. 

Oil Inspectors— James A. Briggs, P., Peter 
Lane, Jr., P. Paid by fees. 

Mercantile Appraisers— \Vm. S. Vare, P. 
(President), Harry J. Trainor, P., Wm. H. 
Miirphy, D., W. H. Redheflfer, P., Aug. S. 
Roberts, P. 

Cterfc— William H. Shober. Office, Room 
148, City Hall. 

Society for the Pelief of Poor and Distressed 
Masters of Ships, their Widows and Children — 
Sec, Capt. Wm. G. Muudy, 216>^ Walnut st. 



U, S. OFFICERS IN PHII/ADEI<- 
PHIA. 

XT. S. Circuit Court. 

THIRD FLOOR OF POST OFFICE BUILDING. 

./(tr/(/ej;— Supreme Court Justice, Geo. Shiras, 
Jr.. «. Salary, SIO, 000. Circuit Court Judges. 
MarcusW.Achesou,i?., Geo. M.Dallas,!*., Geo. 
Gray, D. $6000 each. 

Cfert— Samuel Bell, P. Paid by fees. 
U. S. Circuit Court of Appeals. 

THIRD FLOOR OF POST OFFICE BUILDING. 

./(((/(7ts— Supreme Court Justice, Geo. Shiras, 
Jr., 1 lie two Circuit Judges and the four Dis- 
trict Judges included in the Circuit. 

Cterk—Vfm. H. Merrick, P. 13000. 
U. S. District Court. 

THIRD FLOOR OF POST OFFICE BUILDING. 

Judge— John B. McPherson, P. Salary, 
f5UOO. 



Cfect— Charles S. Lincoln, D. Paid by fees. 

U. S. District Attorney- James B. Holland, 
P. 84500. 

Assistants — J. Whitaker Thompson, P. 
82500. Wm. M. Stewart, Jr. $2000. 

U. S. Marshal— John B. Robinson. P. 84000. 

Chief Deputy Marshal— Thomas Marjile, A'. 
82500. 

Deputy Marshals— Ahram B. INIycr', I)-. Jos. 
H. Huddell, P. 81500 each. Robt. S. Helms, 
P. $1200. 

U. S. Mint. 

Superintendent— Renry K. Boyer, P. Salary, 
$1500. 

^l.ssa(/fc— Jacob Eckfeldt, P. 83000. 

Melter and Peflner— David K.Tuttle, P. 83000. 

Cot?ier— John H. Landis, P. 83000. 

£;(o/'arer— Charles E. Barber, P. $3000. 

Chief Clerk-A. A. Norris, P. 82250. 

Weigh, aerk— John Z. Jones, D. 82000. 

Cashier— Jos. D. Murphy, D. 82500. 

Post Office. 

Postmaster— Thomas L. Hicks, P. Salary, 
86000. 
Assistant Postmaster— Chas. W. Zieber, P. 

OQQQn 

Cashier— Geo. H. Wagner, P. 82600. 

Superintendent of Mails— IS,. W. Alexander, 
P. $2700. 

Saperintendent of City Delivery Division- 
James O'Sullivan, D. 82500. 

Saperintendent of Registry Division— L. P. 
Ashmead, D. $2100. 

Superintendent of Money-Order Division — 
Thomas Martin, P. 82100. 

Superintendent of Stalions—Gnst&y A. Wimer, 
P. $1400. 

Pension Agency. 

SECOND FLOOR OF NEW COURT HOUSE AND POST OFFICE 
BUILDING, NINTH STREET, ABOVE CHESTNUT. 

Pension. A(ient—St. Clair A. MulhoUand, P. 
Salary, 84000. 

Clerk— B.. V. Sickel, P. $1500. 

Examining Surgeons— First Board: W. H. 
Hutt, M.D., P., J. P. Patterson, M.D., P., one 
vacancy. Second Board : J. J. Healy, M.D., 
D., Samuel Starr, M.D., P., S. Thompson 
Banes, M.D., D. Third Board: Michael 
O'Hara, M.D., D., Napoleon Hickman, M.D., 
D., Robert Kilduflfe, M.D., Z>. Fourth Board : 
Joseph A. McFerran, M.D., D., E. Stanley 
Perkins, M.D., D., Dennis J. Loughlin, M.D., 
D. Paid by fees. 

HarUor Commissioners. 

Charles Piatt (President), W. R. Tucker 
(Secretary), Geo. S. Webster, Joel Cook, Wm. 
D. Winsor, jidwin H. Cramp, C. A. Griscom. 

Consulting Engineer— Lt. Col. C. W. Ray- 
mond, U. S. A. 

lii':etnal Kevenue. 

SS-^ND FLOOR OF POST OFFICE BUILDING. 

Co -,_vor— Penrose A. McClain, P. Salary, 

ChiefDepuiy-Wm.J. Milligan, P. $2000. 

Outside Deputies— Edward A. Beaumont, 
John B. Friel, Wm. M. Frost, Henry John- 
son, Samuel S. Maloney, Daniel J. McNichol, 
Robt. D. Patterson, James H. Wilkes and 
William McDowell, Philadelphia. All Repub- 
licans. $1400 each. Fred. W. Cranston, P., 
Reading. 81200. Washington Friday, P., 
Phoenixville. 81200. Charles E. Fries, P. 
Norristown. $1200. J. W. Evans, P., Potts- 
ville; James Patterson, P., BriMol, and 
Samuel B. Berger, i?., Alleiitown. 81100 each. 



The Philadelphia Record Jtlmanac. 



Custotns Service. 

Collector— C. Wesley Thomas, R. Salary, 
88000. 
Secretary— G&orge. Barton, R. 82500. 
Special Deputy— h. G. Martin, R. $1500. 
Deputy for Ca»irfcH— Frank F. Patterson, R. 

Chief Clerk— B.. K. Lathy, R. S3000. 

Chief of Warehouse Division— W . R. Schuyler, 
R. 82500. 

Surveyor— v. M. Lytic, R. 85000. 

Deputy— Wm. McDonald, R. 82500. 

Special Deputy— W. R. Carson, R. 81800. 

Naval 0#«)-— Walter Merrick, R. 85000. 

i)ep?«<!/— Leslie JeflFeris, R. 82500. 

Chief Clerk— John J. Hoffman, D. S1600. 

^ppra/ser— Linn Hartranft, R. 83000. 

Assistants — Frederick Vincent, R., M. J. 
Brown, R. 82500 each. 

Inspector of Drugs— Dr. Benj. P. Ashmead, 
R. 81000. 

Special Agent— John C. Gallen, D. $6 per 
diem. 

XT. S. Immigration Service. 

NO. 1225 SANSOM STREET. 

Commissioner — John J. S. Rodgers. 
Inspectors— J a.'i. L. Hughes, Jas. P. Robhins. 

XT. S. Assistant Treasurer. 



Bureau of Animal Industry. 

Chief Inspector— 1£.A\\' 6. H. Flood, Jr., D.V. S. 
U. S. Revenue Marine. 

ADDRESS, CARE OF CUSTOM HOUSE. 

Revenue Cutter "Onondaga." Captain O. 
S. Hamlet; Revenue Cutter "Washington," 
Lieutenant W. S. Howiand. 

IT. S. Weather Bureau. 

FOURTH FLOOR, POST OFFICE BUILDING. 

Local Forecast Official (in charge) — L. M. 
Dey. Salary, 81800. 

TJ. S. Observer in Charge of Climate and Crop 
Service, Penna. Section— T. F. Townsend. 

XT. S. I,ighthouse Offices. 

FOURTH FLOOR, POST OFFICE BUILDING. 

/?wpfC/or— Lieut. Com. A. Marix, U. S N. 
Chief Clerk.— J. Parsons Smith, R. $1800. 
£7i(7meer— Lieut. Col. W. A. Jones. U. S. A. 
Chief Clerk— Wm. B. Liddell. 81800. 

XT. S. Inspectors of Steam Vessels. 

FOURTH FLOOR, POST OFFICE BUILDING. 

Inspector of Hulls — Harrison A. Thompson, 
D. Salary, 82250. 

Assistant Hull Inspector— R. A. Sergeant. 
$1800. 

Boiier/?wpertor— Christopher Vert, D. 82250. 

Assistant Boiler Inspector— DsiYid H. Howard, 

D. 81800. 

CTeri-s— John J. McKernan, D. 81200. Jas. 

E. Gallagher, D. 8100C. 

XT. S. Shipping Comiii^£:~"r>ner. 

600 SOUTH DELAWARE AVENUc. 

Ellwood Becker, A'. Paid by fees. 
XTnited States Navy Yard. 

LEAGUE ISLAND. 

Commandant — Rear Admiral Silas Casey, U. 
S. N. 

Secretary to Commandant— \Ym. C. Besse- 
lievre. 

Captain of the Yard and Head, of Depart- 
ment Yards' and Dorks— Ca.-f>t»m. C. E. Clark: 
Lieutenant Commander, V. S. Nelson ; Chief 
Roaiswain, 1\I. Wogan ; Boatswain, E. V. 
Sandstrom, Chief Carpenter, E. W. Smith ; 



Warrant Machinist, J. J. Fuller; Civil En- 
gineer, C. C. Wolcott. 

Department, of Equipment— llenten&nX Com- 
mander, H. Hutchins ; Chief Sailmaker, J. 
C. Herbert. 

Department of 0/•d^^a?^ce— Commander, W. 
P. Potter ; Chief Gunner, T. M. Johnston ; 
Chief Gunner, C. H. Venable, Naval Maga- 
zine, Fort Mifflin. 

Department of Construction and Repair — Na- 
val Constructor, J. H. Linnard ; Assistant 
Naval Constructor, S. F. Smith ; Carpenter, 
E. P. Kirk. 

Department of Steam Engineering— Chief En- 
gineer A. B. Bates. 

Department of Supplies and Accounts— Rny- 
master, J. N. Speel ; Passed Assistant Pay- 
master, E. W. Bonnaffon; Pay Clerk, J. C. 
Palmer ; Chief Carpenter, J. S. Waltemeyer. 

Fay X»epa)f?7ieni— Paymaster, R. Frazer; 
Pay Clerk, J. W. Caum. 

Department of Medicine and Surgery— Medi- 
cal Director, W. G. Farwell ; Pharmacist, F. 
T. Gordon. 

Board of Labor Employment— Lieuteneint 
H. M. Dombaugh, Recorder. 

Marine Barracks— Colonel, James Forney ; 
Captain, J. C. Breckinridge ; First Lieuten- 
ant, R. P. Williams ; First Lieutenant, L. B. 
Purcell ; Second Lieutenant, J. T. Buttrick. 

U. S. Receiving Ship " Richmond" — Captain 
J. J. Read, Lieutenant Commander S. P. 
Comly, Lieutenant J. T. Tompkins, Lieu- 
tenant P. Williams, Paymaster J. R. Mar- 
tin ; Chaplain, W. F. Mo"rrison ; Surgeon, E. 
H. Marsteller ; Chief Boatswain, Alexander 
McCone; Boatswain, A. Whipkey. 

Branch Hydrographic Office— Bonxse. Lieu- 
tenant C. F. Hughes. 

Marine Rendezvous — 1628 Market street. 
Philadelphia Medical Director, W. K. Sco- 
iield ; Medical Inspector, F. Rogers. 

Officers at Cramps' Shipyard— Cdpt&in W. H. 
Brownson, Commander W. S. Moore, Lieu- 
tenant Commander A. V. Zane, Lieutenant 
Commander C. J. Badger, Lieutenant L. A. 
Bostwick, Lieutenant H. B. Wilson, Lieu- 
tenant A. Gleaves, Lieutenant J. G. Doyle ; 
Naval Constructor, J. F. Hanscom ; Assist- 
ant Naval Constructor, R. F. Robinson ; 
Boatswain, T. Sullivan ; Carpenter, G. W. A. 
Bailey ; Carpenter, C. S. Taylor ; Acting 
Gunner, T. S. Ave.son ; Acting Gunner, C. 
Hierdahl ; Warrant INIachinist, J. T. Brlggs. 

Officers at Neafie & Levy's Shipyard— Lieu- 
tenant Commander A. Vs Zane, Lieutenant 
Commander S. Potts, Lieutenant H. B. Wil- 
son, Lieutenant L. A. Bostwick, Naval Con- 
structor J. F. Hanscom, Assistant Naval Con- 
structor R. F. Robinson. 

Officer at Midvale Steel Ubrts— Captain C. 
Andrade. 

Naval Home. 

GRAY'S FERRY ROAD. 

Governor— Cs.\^t&in J. H. Sands, U.S.N. 
Exendive Officer— Commander R. M. Berry, 
U. S. N. 
Faymaster-hTthux Peterson, U. S. N. 
Chaplain— A. L. Royce, U. S. N. 

Naval Hospital. 

GRAY'S FERRY ROAD. 

Medical Director— R. A. Marmion, U. S. N. 
Passed Assistant Surgeons— J. R. Blackwood, 
U. S. N., and M. S. Guest, U. S. N. 

XT. S. Navy Pay Office. 

SECOND FLOOR OF POST OFFICE BUILDING. 

Pay Director— Roht. P. Lisle, U. S. N. 



The Philadelphia Record Almanac. 



United States Army. 

Corps of Engineers. 

NO. 816 WITHERSPOON BUILDING. 

Officer in 6'/iargre— Lieutenant Colonel C. W. 
Raymond, U. S. A. 

Assist. Officer— lAeni. Spencer Cosby, U. S. A. 

Chief Cterfc— Stephen Lynch. 

Assistant Engineers— Ellis D. Thompson, 
Thomas M. Farrell, D. Guy Anderson and 
F. C. Warner. 

Quartermaster's Department. 

1438 ARCH STREET. 

Depot Quartermaster— Lt. CoL John V.Furey, 
Dep. Quar. Mas. Gen. 

Assistant to Depot Quai-termaster—Ueut. CoL 
C. A. H. McCauley, Dep. Quar. Mas. Gen. 

■United States Arsenal. 

BRIDESBURG. 

Commanding Officer— M?iioT Frank Heath, 
Ordnance Department, U. S. A. 

GRAY'S FERRY ROAD. 

Commanding Officer— Ceipt. George McK. 
Williamson, A. Q. M. ; Assistant, Captain 
Robert Sewell. 

Recruiting Officers. 

Major David J. Craigie, Twenty-fifth In- 
fantry, No. 1316 Filbert street ; Captain H. B. 
Moori, Twentieth Infantry ; Captain Silas A. 
Wolfe, Fourth Infantry. 



I,ibraries. 

Academy of Natural Sciences (free)— Nine- 
teenth and Race sts. E. J. Nolan, Librarian. 
Apprentices' (free)— Broad and Brandvwiue 
streets. Incor. 1821. Joseph Griffith, Sec. 
Book-lovers' Library— Vi23 Walnut street. 
Charter Oat— 6313 Germantown avenue. 
I»i««to7i— Edmund street, north of Long- 
shore, Tacony. 

Drexel Institute (free)— Thirty-second and 
Chestnut streets. 

Franklm Institute (free)— 15 South Seventh 
street. H. L. Heyl, Librarian. 
Free Library of Philadelphia— V2\9 Chestnut. 
Wagner Institute branch. Seventeenth 

and Montgomery avenue. 
Broad and Federal branch, Broad and 

Federal streets. 
Kensington branch, 1858 Frankford ave. 
Roxborough branch, Roxborough. 
West Phila. branch. Fortieth and Ludlow. 
Germantown branch, Vernon Park. 
Evening Home branch, 25 South Van 

Pelt street. 
Chestnut Hill branch. Main op. Rex ave. 
Nicetown branch, 4013 Germantown ave. 
McPherson Park branch, Indiana ave. 

and F street. 
Port Richmond branch, Richmond and 

Neff streets. 
Paschalville branch. Seventieth street 

and Woodland avenue. 
Thomas Holme branch, Holmesburg. 
H. Josephine Widener branch. Broad 

street and Girard avenue. 
Frankford branch, Unitv and Franklin 

streets. 
Blind Department of Free Library. 1219 
Chestnut street, formerly the Free Cir- 
culating Library for the Blind, at 701 
Walnut street. 
Friends' (free)— Germantown avenue, above 
Coulter, Germantown. Wm. Kite, Librarian. 
Friends'— 'N. Sixteenth street, south of Race. 
"Instituted 1742. J. H. Dillingham, Librarian. 
Qermantovm Library Association and His- 
torical Society— Germantown ave.. cor. East 
[School street. Miss C. N. Weygandt, Sec. 



Hahnemann Medical College Library— 'Soith 
Broad street, near Race. 

Hirst Free Law Library— Drexel Building. 

Historical Society of Pennsylvania— 13W Lo- 
cust street. Fred. L. Stone, Librarian. 

Keneseth Israel Library (free)— Broad street, 
north of Columbia avenue. 

Laiv Library— Room 600, City Hall. 

Library Association of Friends— lb20 Race 
street. James Gaskill, Treasurer. 

Philadelphia Tumgemeinde—4Z3 N. Sixth st. 

Library of the University of Pennsylvania— 
Thirty-fourth and Locust streets. 

Library Company of Philadelphia— Locust 
street, corner South Juniper. Incorporated 
1731. James G. Barnwell, Librarian. 

Memorial Fi-ee Library— Germ a.ntov;n ave- 
nue, corner Sedgwick street, Mt. Airy. 

Mercantile Library Company— 16 S. Tenth St. 
Organized 1821. John Edmunds, Librarian. 

New Church Book Room, F^-ee LihraryandRead- 
tnp' -Room— Twenty-second and Chestnut sts. 

Philadelphia City Jflstt^u^e (free)— Eighteenth 
and Chestnut. M. L. Fell, Librarian. 

Ridgway Branch of the Philadelphia Library 
— S. Broad street, corner Christian. Founded 
1869. James G. Barnwell, Librarian. 

Sjjring Garden Institute Library — Northeast 
corner Broad and Spring Garden streets. 

Southwark Library Company— 7&b South Sec- 
ond street. Incorporated 1830. 

Wagner Free Institute of Science— Seven- 
teenth street and Montgomery avenue. 
Thomas L. Montgomery, Librarian. 



Foreign Consuls at Philadelphia. 

Argentine Republic— William P. Wilson, 
233 South Fourth street. 

Austria-Hungary — Alfred J. Ostheimer. 900 
Chestnut street. 

Belgium— C. W. Bergner, 424 Walnut street. 

Bolivia— W. H. Schoff, 233 S. Fourth street. 

Brazil— A. M. Alvarengo, 209 S. Third st. 

Chile— W. P. Wilson, 233 S. Fourth street. 

Corea— Dr. R. H. Davis, 1212 Race street. 

Costa Rica— Gustavo Niederlein, 233 S. 
Fourth street , Vice-Consul, H. C. Potter, 37 

Denmark— J.' N. Wallem, 122 S. Second st. 

Ecuador— C. A. Green, 233 S. Fourth street. 

France — Edouard Pesoli. 524 Walnut street. 

German Empire— G. F. Ferdinand Ritschi, 
532 Walnut street. 

Great Britain— Wilfred Powell, 219 S. Sixth 
street ; Vice-Consul, C. R. Clipperton. 

Greece— S. Edwin Megargee (acting), 502 
Walnut street. 

Guatemala-Chas. C. Sherf, 306 Chestnut st. 

Honduras— R. J. Winsmore, 109 Walnut st. 

Italy— Count Angioio Dall 'Aste Brando- 
lina, 259 S. Fourth street. 

Japan— Alfred J. Ostheimer, 900 Chestnut St. 

Liberia— Thomas J. Hunt, 623 Walnut street. 

Mexico— E. Subikurski, 236 S. Third street. 

Netherlands— Arnold Katz, 128 Walnut st. 

Nicaragua— C. A. Green, 233 S. Fourth st. 

Norway— J. N. Wallem, 122 S. Second street. 

Paraguay— A. A. Rutis, 257 South Fourth st. 

Peru— W. H. Schoff, 233 South Fourth st. 

Portugal— John Mason, Jr., 319 Walnut st. 

Russia— W. R. Tucker, The Bourse. 

San Salvador— R. J. Winsmore, 109 Walnut 
street. 

Spain— H. C. Newcomb, 302 Walnut street. 

St. Domingo— Thos. B. Wanamaker, Thir- 
teenth and Market streets. 

Swedeii-J. N. Wallem, 122 S. Second st. 

Switzerland— Rud. Koradi, 314 York ave. 

Uruguay— (acting) M. L. de Mello, 302 Wal- 
nut street. 

Venezuela— J. Diaz Barcenas, 614 Spruce st. 



NATIONAL GOV ERNMENT, 

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT. 

J"rc*ide«e— William McKinley, of Ohio. Salary, $50,000. 
Vice-President— * Theodore Roosevelt, of New York. Salary, 88000. 
Secretary of State— John Hay, of District of Columbia. Salary, 88000. 
Secretary of the JVeaswj/— Lyman J. Gage, of Illinois. Salary, 88000. 
Secretary of TFar— Elihu Root, of New York Salary, 88000. 
Secretary of the Navy— JoHS D. LoNG, of Massachusetts. Salary, 88000. 
Postmniiter fJrnfjvfJ— CHARLES Emory Smith, of Pennsylvania. Salary, $8000. 
Secretary of the Interior— E. A. Hitchcock, of Missouri. Salary, $8000. 
Attorney Ot'ncral^JoHy \V. GRIGGS, of New Jersey. Salary, $8000. 
Secretary of Ayriciiltnre—jAiiiES Wilson, of Iowa. Salary, 88000. 
Commissioner of General Land Office— BiiiGER Her.mann, of Oregon. Salarv, 84000 
Commissioner of Patents— CH.KRLEfi li. Duell, of New York. Salary. 84500. 
Commissioner of Pension.s—11. Clay Evans, of Tennessee. Salary, 85000. 



1901. 



V. S. SUPREME COURT. 

Cliief Jagtice—yiFA.\\]A.E W. Fuller, of 
Illinois. Appointed 18\S. Salary, $10,500. 

There are eight Associate Justices, who each 
receive 810,000 a year salary. Their names, 
with date of appointment, "follow: John M. 
Harlan, Kentuckv, 1877; Horace Grav, Massa- 
chusetts, 1881 ; D. J. Brewer, Kansas, 1890; H. 
B. Brown, Michigan, 1890 ; George Shiras, Jr., 
Pennsylvania, 1892 ; Edward D. White, 
Louisiana, 1894; Rufus W. Peckham, New 
York, 1895; Joseph McKenna, California, 1898. 

CT. S. ARMY. 

Lieutenant General— }^elson A. ]SIiles. Sal- 
ary, 811,000. 

Major Generals— John R. Brooke, Elwell S. 
Otis. Salary, $7500. Adjutant General Cor- 
bin also has the rank of Major General. 

Brigadier Generals— J nmei F. Wade, Henry 



I C. Merriam, Samuel B. M. Young, Arthur 
MacArthur, Wm. Ludlow. Salary, 85500. 
Gen. JNIacArthur is a Major General of Vol- 
unteers. 

U. S. NAVY. 

Admiral— George Dewey. Salary, 813,,t00. 

Rear Adr7nral^ — Salaries, tirst nine, sea duty, 
87500; shore dutv, 8G375. Second nine, sea 
duty, 85.500 ; shore duly. 84675.— Frederick V. 
McNair, John A. Howeli, .Albert Kautz, Geo. 
C. Remey. Norman H. Farquhar, John C. 
Watson, Winfleld S. Schley, Silas Casey, Wil- 
liam T. Sampson, Bartlett J. Cromwell, Fran- 
cis J. Higginson, Frederick Rodgers, Louis 
Kempff. Geo. W. Sumner, 'Albert S. Barker, 
Chas. S. Cotton, Silas W. Terrv, Melville 
Miller. 

Captains receive, sea duty, *;%00; shore 
duty, $2975. Commanders receive, sea dutv, 
8;MOO ; shore duty, 82.550. 



FIFTY-SIXTH CONGRFSS. 

SENATE. 

Salary, $5000 each and mileage. President, SSUDO. Tlie figures following each name show when the 
term expires. Names of Democrats in Roman, Repiil)licans in Italic, Populists in small caps. 



J. T. Morgau. . . 
E. W. Pettus . , 

ARKANSAS. 

J. H. Berry . . . 
J. K. Jones . . . 

CALIFORNIA. 

Geo. C. Perkins . . 
Thos. B. Bard . . 

COLORADO. 

E. 0. WolcoU . . . 
H. M. Teller . . . 

CONNECTICUT. 

0. H. Piatt . . . . 
J. R. Hawleij. . . 

DELAWARE. 

R. R. Kenney . . 
Vacancy. 

FLORIDA. 

S. R. Mallorv . . 
J. P. Taliaferro . 

GEORGIA. 

A. O. Bacon . . . 
A. S. Clay . . . . 

IDAHO. 

Georqe L. Shoup . 
H. Heitfeld . . 

ILLINOIS. 

S. M. CuUom . . . 
Wm. E. Mason . . 

INDIANA. 

C. W. Fairbanks . 
A.J. Bereridge . . 



1901 



IOWA. 

J. P. Dolliver . . 1907 
W. B. Allison . . 1903 

KANSAS. 

Lucien Baker . . 1901 
W. A. Harris . . 1903 

KENTUCKY. 

William Lindsav. 1901 
IF. J. Deboe . .".1903 

LOUISIANA. 

Donelson CaflFery 1901 
S. D. McEuery . . 1903 

MAINE. 

IF. P. Frye .... 1901 
Eugene Hale . . . 1905 

MARYLAND. 

6(0. L. Wellington 1903 
Louis E. McComas 1905 



MONTANA. 

T. H. Carter . . 
Vacancy. 

NEBRASKA. 

J. M. Thurston . . 

W. V. ALLEN . . 
NEVADA. 

J. P. Jones. . . . 
W. M. Stewart . 

NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

W. E. Chandler . . 
J. H. Gallinger . . 

NEW JERSEY. 

W.J.Sewell . . . 
John Kean .... 



RHODE ISLAND. 

1901 Geo. P. Wetmore . 1901 
A". IF. Aldrich . . 1905 

I SOUTH CAROLINA. 

1901 B. R. Tillman . . 1901 
j J. L. McLaurin . 1903 

SOUTH DAKOTA. 

iQns R- F. Pettigrew . . 1901 
1903 



MASSACHUSETTS. 

George F. Hoar . 
H. C. Lodge . . 

MICHIGAN. 

James McMillan 
J. C. Burrows . 



NEW YORK. 

Thomas C. Piatt . 1903 
Chaun'yM. Depew 1905 

north carolina. 
Marion Butler 1901 
J. C. PrUchard . . 1903 

NORTH DAKOTA. 

1901 I H a Hansbrough. 1903 



1901 
1905 



1901 
1905 



1901 



J. H. Kyle 

TENNESSEE. 

T. B. Turley . . 
William B. Bate 

TEXAS. 

Horace Chilton 

C. A. Culberson . 1905 

UTAH. 

Jos. L. Rawlins . 1903 
Vacancy. 

VERMONT. 

IF. P. Dillingham 1903 
'^ " ■ 1905 



R. Proctor 



1905 j P. J. McCumber . 1905 



washington. 
Geo. Turner . . 1903 
A. G. Foster . . . 1905 

WEST VIRGINIA. 

S. B. Etkins . . . 1901 
N. B. ScoU .... 1905 

WISCONSIN. 

J. a Spooner . . . 1903 
Chas. V. Quarles 

WYOMING. 

F. E. Warren . . 
C. D. Clark. . . 
Recapitul.ation.— Democrats, 25; Republicans, 53 ; Populists, 8; vacancies, 4. 



1901 
1903 



1901 
1903 



MINNESOTA. 

KniUe Nelson . 
C. K. Davis . . 

MISSISSIPPI. 

W. V. Sullivan 
H. D. Money . 

MISSOURI. 

G. G. Vest . . . 
F. M. Cockrell . 



1901 
1905 



. 1901 
. 1905 



OHIO. 

■Jos.,B. Foraker . . 

M. A. Hanna . . . 

OREGON. 

G. W. McBnde . . 

Joseph Simon . . 

PENNSYLVANIA. 

Boies Penrose . . 
Vacancy. 



VIRGINIA. 

T. S. Martin . . .1901 
John W. Daniel . 1905 



1905 



The Philadelphia Record JUmanac. 



house; of representatives. 

Salary of members, S5000 each and mileage. Speaker, $8000. By the apportionment under the 
Census of 1890 the House consists of 357 members. 



ALABAMA. 

G. W. 'I'aylor. 
Jesse F. Stallings. 
H. D. Clayton. 
W. F. Aldrich. 
Willis Brewer. 
J. H. Bankhead. 
John L. Burnett. 
Joseph Wheeler. 
O.W. Underwood. 

ARKANSAS. 

P. D. McCulloch. 
John S. Little. 
Thos. C. McRae. 
William L. Terry. 
H. A. Dinsmore. 
Steph. Brundidge 

CALIFORNIA. 

John A. Barham. 
Marion DeVries. 
Victor H. Melcalf. 
Julius Kahn. 
E. F. Loud. 
R.J. Waters. 
J. C. Needham. 

COLORADO. 

/. F. Shafroth, S.R. 
J. C. Bell. 

CONNECTICUT. 

E. Stevens Henry. 
N. D. Sperry. 
Charles A. Russell. 
E. J. Hill. 

DELAWARE. 

W. 0. Hoffecker. 

FLORIDA. 

S. M. Sparkman. 
R. W. Davis. 

GEORGIA. 

Rufus E. Lester. 
J. M. Griggs. 
E. B. Lewis. 
W. C. Adamson. 
L. F. Livingston. 
C. L. Bartlett. 
J. W. Maddox. 
W. M. Howard. 
Farish C. Tate. 
W. H. Fleming. 
W. G. Brantley. 

IDAHO. 

Edgar Wilson. 

ILLINOIS. 

J. R. Mann. 
W. Loriiner. 
Geo. P. Foster. 
Thos. Cusack. 
Ed. T.- Noonan. 
H. S. Boulell. 
O. E. Foss. 
Albert J. Hopkins. 
Robert R. HUt. 
Oeo. W. Prince. 
W. Reeves. 
Joseph G. Cannon. 
V. Warner. 
J. V. Graff. 
B. F. Marsh. 
Viva. E. Williams. 
B. F. CaldwelL 
Thos. M. Jett. 
Jos. B. Crowlev. 
Jas. R. Williams. 
W. A. Rodenberg. 
George W. Smith 



INDIANA. 

/. A. Hemaiivay. 
R. W. Miers. 
W. T. Zenor. 

F. M. Griffith. 
O. W. Faris. 
James E. Watson. 
Jesse Overstreet. 
George W. Cromer. 

C. B. Landis. 

E. D. Crumpacker. 

G. W. Steele. 

J. M. Robinson. 
Abraham L. Brick. 

IOWA. 

Thomas Hedge. 
Joseph R. Lane. 

D. B. Henderson. 
Gilbert N. Haugen. 
Robert G. Cousins. 
John F. Lacey. 

J. A. T. HuU. 
W. P. Hepburn. 
W. I. Smith. 
J. P. Connor. 
Lot Thomas. 

W. J. Bailey. 
Charles Curtis. 
J. A. Bower sock. 

E. R. RlDGELEY. 
/. M. Miller. 

W. A. Calderhead. 
W. A. Reeder. 
Chester I. Long. 

KENTUCKY. 

C. K. Wheeler. 
Henry D. Allen. 
John S. Rhea. 

D. H. Smith. 
Oscar Turner. 
Albert S. Berry. 
J. W. Gayle. 
Geo. G. Gilbert. 
S. J. Pugh. 

T. Y. Fitzpatrick. 
Vincent Boering. 

LOUISIANA. 

Adolph Meyer. 
R. C. Davey. 
R. F. Broussard. 
Phanor Brezeale. 
J. E. Ransdell. 
S. M. Robertson. 

MAINE. 

A. L. Allen. 
C. E. Littlefleld. 

E. a Burleigh. 
Chas. A. Boutelle. 

MARYLAND. 

//. L. Kerr. 
Wm. B. Baker. 
F-ank C. Wachter. 
Jas. W. Denny. 
S. E. Mudd. 
George A. Pearre. 

MASSACHUSETTS. 

G. p. Lawrence. 

F. H. GiUett. 
J. R. Thayer. 

G. W. Weymouth. 
W. S. Knox. 

W. H. Moody. 
E. W. Roberts. 



MASSACHUSETTS. 

S. W. McCall. 
J. F. Fitzgerald. 
H. F. Naphen. 
C. F. Sprague. 
W. C. Leveling. 
W. S. Greene. 



J. B. Corliss. 
Henry C. Smith. 
Wash. Gardner. 

E. L. Hamilton. 
W. A. Smith. 

S. W. Smith. 
Edgar Weeks. 
Jos. W. Fordney. 
R. P. Bishop. 
R. 0. Crump. 
W. S. Mesick. 
C. D. Shelden. 

MINNESOTA. 

James A. Tawney. 
James T. McCleary 
Joel P. Heatwole. 

F. C. Stevens. 
Loren Fletcher. 
P. Morris. 

F. M. Eddy. 

MISSISSIPPI. 

John M. Allen. 
Thomas Spight. 
T. C. Catchings. 
A. F. Fox. 
John S. Williams 
F. A. McLain. 
Patrick Henry. 



Jas. T. Lloyd. 
Wm. W. Rucker. 
John Dougherty. 

C. F. Cochran. 
W. S. Cowherd. 

D. A. DeArmond. 
J. Cooney. 
D.W.Shackleford 
Champ Clark. 

R. Bartholdt. 
C. F. Joy. 

C. E. Pearce. 
Ed. Robb. 

W. D. Vandiver. 
M. E. Benton. 

MONTANA. 

A. J. Campbell. 

NEBRASKA. 

Ehner J. Burkeit. 

D. H. Mercer. 
J. S. Robinson. 
Wm. L. Stark. 
R.D.Sutherland 
Wm. Neville. 

NEVADA. 

F. G. Newlands,S.E. 

NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

C. A. Sulloway. 
F. G. Clarke. 

NEW JERSEY. 

H. C. Loudenslager. 
John J. Gardner. 

B. F. Howell. 
J. S. Salmon. 
J. F. Stewart. 
R. W. Parker. 



NEW JERSEY. 

A. L. McDermott. 

C. N. Fowler. 

NEW YORK. 

T. Scudder. 
J. J. Fitzgerald. 
Ed. H. Driggs. 
Bert. T. Clayton. 
Frank E. Wilson. 
Mitchell May. 
Nicholas Muller. 

D. J. Riordan. 
T. J. Bradley. 

A. J. Cummings. 
Wm. Sulzer. 
G. B. McClellan. 
Jeffersson M.Levy. 
W. AstorChanler. 
J. Ruppert, Jr. 
J. Q. Underbill. 
A. S. Tompkins. 
JohnH. Ketcham. 
A. V. S. Cochrane. 
Martin H. Glynn. 
John K. Stevjart. 
L. N. Littauer. 
L. W. Emerson. 

A. D. Shaw. 
James S. Sherman. 
George W. Ray. 
Sereno E. Payne. 
M. E. Driscoll. 
Charles W. GUlet. 
J. W. Wadsworth. 
J.M. E. 0' Grady. 
W. H. Ryan. 

D. A. S.Alexander. 

E. B. Vreeland. 

NORTH CAROLINA. 

John H. Small. 
0. H. White. 
Chas. R. Thomas. 
J. W. Atwater. 
W. W. Kitchin. 
John D. Bellamy. 
T. F. Kluttz. 
R. Z. Linney. 
R. Pearson. 

NORTH DAKOTA. 

B. F. Spalding. 

OHIO. 

Wm. B. Shatiuc. 
J. H. Bromwell. 
J. L. Brenner. 
RobertB. Gordon. 
D. Meekison. 
.y. W. Brown. 
W. L. Weaver. 
A. Lybrand. 
J. H. Southard. 
Stephen Morgan. 

C. H. Grosvenor. 
J. J. Lentz. 

J. A. Norton. 

W. S. Kei-r. 

H. C. Van Voorhis. 

Jos. J. Gill. 

J. A. McDowell. 

R. W. Tayler. 

Charles F. Dick. 

F. 0. Phillips. 
T. E. Burton. 

OREGON. 

Thos. H. Tongue. 
M. A. Moody. 



PENNSYLVANIA. 

Galusha A. Grow. 
S. A. Davenport. 
H. H. Bingham. 
R. Adams, Jr. 
W. McAleer. 
J. R. Young. 
E. D. V. MorreU. 
T. S. Butter. 
I. P. Wanger. 
L. H. Barber. 
Henry D. Green. 
Marriott Brosius. 
W. Connell. 
S. W. Davenport. 
J. W. Ryan. 
M. E. Olmsted. 
Charles F. Wright. 
H. B. Packer. 
Rufus P. Polk. 
Thad. M. Mahon. 
Edw. D. Ziegler. 
Joseph E. Thropp. 
S. M. Jack. 
John DalzeU. 
Wm. H. Graham. 
E. F. Acheson. 
J. B. Shoivalter. 
AthelstonGaston. 
Joseph C. Sibley. 
J. K. P. Hall. 

RHODE ISLAND. 

M. Bull. 

A. B. Capron. 

SOUTH CAROLINA. 

Wm. Elliott. 
W. Jasper Talbert. 
A. C. Latimer. 
S. Wilson. 

D. E. Finley. 
James Norton. 
J. W. Stokes. 

SOUTH DAKOTA. 

R. J. Gamble. 
Charles H. Burke. 

TENNESSEE. 

W. p. Brownlow. 
H. R. Gibson. 
John A. Moon. 
C. E. Snodgrass. 
J. D. Richardson. 
J. W. Gaines. 
N. N. Cox. 
T. W. Sims. 
R. A. Pierce. 

E. W. Carmack. 

TEXAS. 

T. H. Ball. 
S. B. Cooper. 
R.C.DeGraffeiirieiJ. 
John L.Sheppard. 
Joseph W. Bailey. 
R. E. Burke. 
R. L. Henry. 
S. W. T. Lanham. 
A. S. Burleson. 
R. B. Hawley. 
Rud. Kleberg. 
J. L. Slayden. 
J. H. Stephens. 

UTAH. 

, W. H. King. 



70 


The Philadelphia Record Almanac. 




VERMONT. 

H. H. Powers. 
VV. W. Orout. 

VIRGINIA. 

W. A. Jones. 
n. A. Wise. 
John Lamb. 


VIRGINIA. 

F. R. Lassiter. 
C. A. Swanson. 
P. J. Otey. 
James Hay. 
J, F. Rixev. 
W. F. Rhea. 
J. M. Quarles. 


WASHINGTON. 

W. I,. Jones. 
F. W. Cushman. 

WEST VIRGINIA. 

B. B. Bovener. 
A. G. Dayton. 
IX E. Johnston. 
K. H. Freer. 


WISCONSIN. 

H. A. Cooper. 
H. B. Dahle. 
J. TC. Babcock. 
T. Otjen. 
S. S. Barney. 
J. H. Davidson. 
John J. Each. 


WISCONSIN. 

E. S. Minor. 
Alex. Stewart. 
J. J. Jenkins. 

WYOMING. 

Frank If. Mondell 



TERRITORIAL DELEGATES. 
F. Wilson. I New Mexico . . . Pedro Perea. 



Oklahoma . Dennis T. Flynn. 



Republi 



{Italic), 191; Democrats (Roman), 160; Populists (small caps), i 



FIFTY-SBVENTH CONGRESS.-HOUSE OF RFPRESFNTATIVFS. 

Republicans (fli(/ic), 200; Democrats (Roman), 151; Silver- Republicans and Populists (small caps),!-;. 



ALABAMA. 

G. W. Tavlor. 
A. A. Wiley. 
H. D. Clavton. 
S. J. Bowie. 
C. W. Thompson. 
J. H. Bankhead. 
John L. Burnett. 
Wm. Richardson. 
O.W. Underwood. 

ARKANSAS. 

P. D. McCulloch. 
John S. Little. 
Thos. C. ]\IcRae. 
C. C. Reid. 
H. A. Dinsmore. 
Steph. Brundidge 

CALIFORNIA. 

F. L. Combs. 
S. D. Woods. 
Victor H. Melcalf. 
Julius Kahn. 
E. F. Loud. 
J. MacLachlan. 
J. C. I^'eedharn. 

COLORADO. 

J. F. Shafroth. 
J. C. Bell. 

CONNECTICUT. 

E. Stevens Henry. 
N. D. Sperry. 
Charles A. Russell. 
E. J. Hill. 

DELAWARE. 

L. H. Ball. 

FLORIDA. 

S. M. Sparkman. 
R. W. Davis. 

GEORGIA. 

Rufus E. Lester. 
J. M. Griggs. 
E. B. Lewis. 
W. C. Adamson. 
L. F. Livingston. 
C. L. Bartlett. 
J. W. Maddox. 
W. M. Howard. 
Farish C. Tate. 
W. H. Fleming. 
W. C. Brantley. 

IDAHO. 

James Glenn. 

ILLINOIS. 

J. R. Mann. 
J. J. Feelv. 
Geo. P. Foster. 
J. MacAndrews. 
W. P. Malonev. 
H. S. Boutell. ' 
O. E. Foss. 
Albert J. Hopkins. 
Robert R. Hitt. 
Geo. W. Prince. 



ILLINOIS. 

W. Reeves. 
Joseph G. Cannon. 
V. Warner. 
J. V. Graff. 
J. R. Mickey. 
T. J. Shelby. 

B. F. Caldwell. 
Thos. M. Jett. 
Jos. B. Crowley. 
Jas. R. Williams. 
F. J. Kern. 
George W. Smith 

INDIANA. 

J. A. Hemenway. 
R. W. Miers. 
W. T. Zenor. 

F. M. Grifiith. 
E. S. Holloway. 
James E. Watson. 
Jesse Overstreet. 
George W. Cromer. 

C. B. Landis. 

E. D. Crumpacker. 
a. W. Steele. 
J. H. Robinson. 
Abraham L. Brick. 

IOWA. 

Thomas Hedge. 
J. N. W. Rumple. 

D. B. Henderson. 
Gilbert N. Haugen. 
Robert G. Cousins. 
John F. Lacey. 

J. A. T. Hull. 

W. P. Hepburn. 

W. I. Smith. 
J. P. Connor. 
Lot Thomas. 

KANSAS. 

C. F. Scott. 
Charles Curtis. 
J. D. Bowersock. 

G. W. Wheatley. 
J. M. MiUer. 

W. A. Calderhead. 
W. A. Reeder. 
Chester I. Long. 

KENTUCKY. 

C. K. Wheeler. 
Henrv D. Allen. 
John S. Rhea. 

D. H. Smith. 
H. S. Irwin. 
D. L. Gooch. 
South Trimble. 
Geo. G. Gilbert. 
J. N. Kehoe. 

J. B. White. 
Vincent Boering. 

LOUISIANA. 

Adolph Meyer. 
R. C. Bavey. 



LOUISIANA. 

R. T. Broussard. 
Phanor Breazeale 
J. E. Ransdell. 
S. M. Robertson. 

MAINE. 

A. L. Allen. 
C. E. Littlefield. 

E. C. Burleigh. 
Chas. A. Boutelle. 

MARYLAND. 

W. H. Jackson. 
A. A. Blakeney. 
Frank C. Wachter. 
Chas. R. Schirm. 
S. E. Mudd. 
George A. Pearre. 

MASSACHUSETTS. 

G. p. Lawrence. 

F. H. Gilletl. 
J. R. Thayer. 
C. Q. Tirrell. 

W. S. Knox. 

W. H. Moody. 
E. W. Roberts. 
S. W. McCall. 
J. A. Conrey. 
H. F. Naphen. 
S. C. Powers. 

W. C. Lovering. 

W. S. Greene. 

MICHIGAN. 

J. B. Corliss. 
Henry C. Smith. 
Wash. Gardner. 

E. L. Hamilton. 
W. A. Smith. 

S. W. Smith. 
Edgar Weeks. 
Jos. W. Fordney. 
R. P. Bishop. 
R. 0. Crump. 
A. B. Darrar/h. 
C. D. Shelden. 

MINNESOTA. 

James A. Tawney. 
James I. Mc Clear y. 
Joel P. Heatwole. 

F. C. Stevens. 
Loren Fletcher. 
P. Morris. 

F. M. Eddy. 

MISSISSIPPI. 

E. S. Chandler. 
Thomas Spight. 
Patrick Henry. 
A. F. Fox. 
John S. Williams. 

F. A. McLain. 
C. E. Hooker. 

MISSOURI. 

Jas. T. Lloyd. 
Wm. W. Rucker. 



John Dougherty. 

C. F. Cochran. 
W. S. Cowherd. 

D. A. DeArmond. 
J. Coouey. 
D.W.Shackleford 
Champ Clark. 

R. Bartholdt. 
C. F. Joy. 
J. J. Butler. 
Ed. Robb. 
W. D. Vandiver. 
M. E. Benton. 

MONTANA. 

C. Edwards. 

NEBRASKA. 

Elmer J. Burkett. 

D. H. Mercer. 
J. S. Robinson. 
Wm. L. Stark. 
A.C.Shallenb'rg'k 
Wm.- Neville. 



NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

C. A. Sulloway. 

F. D. Currier. 

NEW JERSEY. 

H.C.Loudenslager. 
John J. Gardner. 

B. F. Howell. 
J. S. Salmon. 
/. F. Stewart. 
R. W. Parker. 

A. L. McDermott. 

C. N. Fowler. 

UE*I YORK. 

Fi-ed Stm-m. 

J. J. Fitzgerald. 

H. Brisfow. 

H W. Hanbury. 

Frank E. Wilson. 

G. H. Lindsay. 
Nicholas Muller. 
T. J. Creamer. 
H. M. Goldfogle. 
A. J. Cummings. 
Wm. Sulzer. 

G. B. McClellan. 
O.H.P. Belmont, 
W. H. Douglas. 
J. Ruppert, Jr. 
C. A. Pugsley. 
A. S. Tompkins. 
John H. Ketcham. 
W. H. Draper. 
G. N. Southwick. 
John K. Stewart. 
L. N. Littauer. 
L. W. Emerson. 
A. D. Shaw. 
James S. Sherman. 



NEW YORK. 

George W. Ray. 
M. E. Driscoll. 
Sereno E. Payne. 
G- W. Gillet. 
J. W. Wad^vorlh. 
J. B. Perkins. 
W. H. Ryan. 

D. A. S.Alexander. 

E. B. Vreeland. 

NORTH CAROLINA. 

John H. Small. 
C. Kitchin. 
Chas. E. Thomas. 
E. W. Pou. 
W. W. Kitchiii. 
John D. Bellamy. 
T. F. Kluttz. 
Spencer Blackburn 
J. H. Moody. 

NORTH DAKOTA. 

T. F. Marshall. 



Wm. B. Shattuc. 
J. H. BromweU. 
R. N. Kevin. 
Robert B.Gordon. 
J. S. Snook. 
C. Q. Hildebrand. 
T. S. Kyle. 
W. R. Warnock. 
J. H. Southard. 
Stephen Morgan. 
C. H. Gh-osvenor. 
E. Tom.pkins. 
J. A. Norton. 
C. E. Skiles. 
H C. Ian Voorhis. 
Jos. J. Gill. 
George Adams. 
R. W. Tuyler. 
Charles F. Dick. 
J. A. Beidler. 
T. E. Burton. 

OREGON. 

Thos. H. Tongue. 
M. A. Moodu. 

PENNSYLVANIA. 

R. H. Foerderer,Jr. 
Galusha A. Grow. 
H. H. Bingham. 
R. Adains, Jr. 
Henry Burk. 
J. R. Young. 
E. D. V. Morrell. 
T. S. Bulla: 
I. P. Wanger. 
H. Mutehler. 
Henry D. Green. 
Marriott Brosius. 
W. Connell. 
H. W. Palmer. 
G. R. Patterson. 
M. E. Olmsted. 



The Philadelphia Record Jtlmanac. 



PENNSYLVANIA. 

Charles F. Wright. 
Elias Deemer. 
Rufus K. Polk. 
Thad. H. Malum. 
R. J. Leviis. 
Alvin Evans. 
S. M. Jack. 
John Dalzell. 
Wm. H. Graham. 
E. F. Arheson. 
J. B. Shoiralter. 
A. A.Bates. 
Joseph C. Sibley. 
J. K. P. Hall. 

RHODE ISLAND. 

M. Bull. 

A. B. Capron. 

SOUTH CAROLINA. 

Wm. Elliott. 



SOUTH CAROLINA. 

W.JasperTalboit 
A. C. Latimer. 
J. T. Johnson. 
D. E. Flnley. 
R.B. Scarborough 
J. W. Stokes. 

SOUTH DAKOTJk. 

Charles Burke. 
^ E. ir. Martin. 

TENNESSEE. 

W. p. Broinilow. 
H. R. Gibson. 
John A. l\roon. 
C. E. Snodgrass. 
J. D. Richard.son. 
J. W. Gaines. 
L. P. Padgett. 
T. W. Sims. 
R. A. Pierce. 
M. R. Patterson. 



I TEXAS. 

T. H. Ball. 
S. B. Cooper. 
R.C.DeGraffenried. 
JuhnL.Sheppard. 

C. B. Randall. 
R. E. Burke. 
R. L. Henrv. 

|S. W. T. Lanham. 

A. S. Burleson. 

G. F. Burgess. 
I Rud. Kleberg. 

J. L. Slaydeu. 

J. H. Stephens. 

UTAH. 

Geo. Sutherland. 

VERMONT. 

D. J. Foster. 
Kiltridge Haskin s. 

VIRGINIA. 

VV. A. Jones. 



VIRGINIA. 

H. L. Maynard. 
John Lamb. 
F. R. Lassiter. 
C. A. Swanson. 
P. J. Otey. 
James Hay. 
J. F. Rixey. 
W. F. Rhea. 
H. D. Flood. . 

WASHINGTON. 

W. L. Jones. 
F. M^. Cushman. 

WEST VIRGINIA. 

JS. B. Dovener. 
A. G. Dayton. 
, J. H. Gaines. 
>Jas. A. Hughes. 

I WISCONSIN, 

In. A. Cooper. 
I H. B. Bahle. 



WISCONSIN. 

J. W. Babcock. 
Theo. Otjen. 
S. S. Barney. 
J. H. Davidson. 
J. J. Esch. 
Ed. S. Minor. 
Web. F. Brown. 
J. J. Jenkins. 

WYOMING. 

F. W. Mondell. 

ARIZONA. 

J. F. Wilson. 

NEW MEXICO. 

B. S. Rodey. 

OKLAHOMA. 

D. T. Flynn. 
R.W.Wilcox, iJoy. 

PORTO RICO. 

Federico Degetau. 



UNITED STATES REPRESENTATIVES ABROAD. 



AMBASSADORS. 

' COUNTRIES. NAME. 

j Germany . Andrew D. White 
1 Italy. Vacancy. 

MINISTERS. 



*PP. I COUNTRIES. NAME. 

1897 1 Russia . Charlemagne Tower 



Arg. Rep . 
Austria . 
Belgium . 
Bolivia . 

Chile ". '. 
China . . 
Colombia . 



Wm. P. Lord . 1899 , Ecuador 
Addison C. Harris 1899 Greece . 
L. Townsend . . 1899 Rouman 
G. H. Bridgeman 1897 Servia . 
Chas. P. Brvan . 1885 i Hayti . 
H. L. Wilson . . 1897 i Japan. 
E. H. Conger . . 1897 Liberia 
Chas. B. Hart 



H. N. AUe 

L. S. Sven 

■JW. G. Hui 



. 1897 Nicaragua . 

. 1897 Costa Rica . 

. 1897 Salvador. . 

iQQT Netherlands. 



A. S. Hardy. . 

W. F. Powell . 
A. E. Buck . . 
O. L.W.Smith. 

Iw. L. Merry . 

Stanf d Newel . 



Persia . H. W. Bowen . . 
Peru . . Irving B. Dudley. 
Portugal . J. M. Irwin \ . . 
Siam . . Hamilton King . 
Spain . . Bellamy Storer . 
t'olZ :}W.W. Thomas . 
Switzerland J. G. A. Leishman 
Turkey . Oscar S. Straus . 
Uruguay . 
Paraguay. 
Venezuela F. B. Loomis 



Finch 



State of Penns ylvania. 

Governor— William A. Stone. R. Salary, 810,000. 
Lieutenant-Ooverno)' — J. P. S. Gobin, R. Salary, S5500. 

Secretary of the Common wealth— WihhiAU W. Griest, R. Salaries, 85700 and fees. 
Attortieiz-Oeneral—iouN P. Elkin, R. Salaries, 85200 and fees. 
State Treasurer— James E. Barnett, R. Salaries, 87400. 
Secretary of Inttrnal Affairs— J. W. Latta, R. Salaries, 85100. 
*Auditor General— IjEVI G. McCauley, R. Salaries, 86400. 
Superintendent of t'uhlic Instruction— ^ATHAii C. ScHAEFFEE, D. Salary, 84000. 
Adjutant (Teneral-TnoMAS J. STEWART, R. Salary, 84600. 
Insurance Commissionei — ISRAEL W. DURHAM, ii. Salary, 83000 and fees. 
State Librarian— George E. Reed, R. Salary, 82500. 
Commissioner of Banking— FRAt^K Ref.de'r, R. Salary, 86000. 
JTactory Inspector— 3 AilE'H CAMPBELL, R. Salary, 83000. 

Superintendent Public Grounds and Buildlnr/s-T. L. Eyre, R. Salary, 83000. 
Superintendent of Public Printinf/—THOiIAS G. SAMPLE, R. Salary, 82000. 
State Printet — WM. Stanley Ray, R. 

♦E. B. Hardenbergh, after May 1, 1901. 

STATE SENATE. 

The Senate consists of fifty members. Each Senator receives $1500 per session and mileage ; 
President pro tanpore, 81 per day extra. The names of Democrats are in Italics, Repub- 



licans in Roman ; ''G.G." is for Good Governmenl. 



1— George A. Vare. 13— M. Heidelbaugh. 
2— Henry Gransback. 14— J. A. Stober. 



3— F. A. Osbourn. 
4— J. Bayard Henry. 



15— John E. Fox. 
in— Harry G. Stiles. 



5— Wm. Berkelbach. 17— Samuel Weiss, (?.G. 



6— John M. Scott. 
7— John C. Gradv. 
8— David Marti 
9— Wm. 0. Sproul. 



18 — Jacob B. Kemerer. 
19— Wm. P. Snyder. 
20— James C. Vaughan. 
21— William Drury. 



10— Hampton W. Rice. 22— David S. Lee. 
n—E. M. Herbst. I 23— R.S.Edmiston,G.& 

12— John A. Wentz. I 2^—J. Henry Cochran. 
1 25 — Myron Matson. 



E.B.Hardenbergh. 39— Cyrus E. Woods. 
" " " ■ ^Q— Albert D. Boyd. 

41— A. G. Williams. 

42— C.A.Muehlbrunner. 

43- Chris L. Ma gee. 

44— William Flinn. 

45— John W. Crawford. 

46— John F. Budke. 

47— J. D. Emery. 

48— H. H. earnings. 

49— A. E. Sisson. 

50—0. R. Washburn. 



26 

27— B. K. Fucht 
28 — Haiv y W. Haines. 
29— Charles E. Quail. 
30 — John F. Higgins. 
31— J. W. McKee. 
32— H'm. E. Miller. 
33— Alex. Stewart. 
■■'A— Wm. C. Heinle. 
35— Jacob C. Stineman. 
36— John S. Weller. 
37— J. S. Fisher. 
38— ^yred M. Neely. 



The Philadelphia Record JUmanac. 



HOUSB OF RIEPRBSENTATIVES. 

The House has 204 members, who receive S1500 each per session and mileage ; Speaker, $1 per 
day extra. Democrats in Italics; Republicans in Roman ; "F." is for Fusion ; 

"G.G. ~ ' 



Republi' 
for Good Government. 



ADAMS. 

M.-A. Garvin. 
D. P. McPherson. 

ALLEGHENY. 

C. W. Neeb. 
R. M. Kopp. 
W. T. Marshall. 
John H. Henderson. 
J. P. McTighe. 
G. P. McCandless. 
J. J. Sweeney. 
G. M. Hosack. 
William W. Nisbet. 
C. F. Heselbarth. 
Henry Hall. 
R. McWhinney. 
John P. Moore. 
W. B. Kirker. 
Thomas J. Ford. 
Harry M. Scott. 

ARMSTRONG. 

Joel Crawford, /■'. 
J. Frank Graff. 

BEAVER. 

\V. H. Bricker. 
T. L. Kennedy. 

BEDFORD. 

VV. L. Miller. 
T. C. Sanderson. 

BERKS. 

Hetiry E. Drase. 
Daniel K. Hoch. F. 
Elmer E. S'quiib. 
Lot W. Reiff. 
Frank H. Naftzivger. 

BLAIR. 

Edward P. Gamble. 
Geo. M. Patterson. 

BRADFORD. 

Joseph E. Hamilton. 
Franklin F. Loma.x. 
Fred. K. Taylor. 

BUCKS. 

William P. Winner. 
Frank G. Edwards. 
Harry Wilkinson. 

BUTLER. 

James B. Mates. 
N. H. Thompson. 

CAMBRIA. 

Thomas Davis. 
James M. Shumaker. 

CAMERON. 

F. X. Blumle. 

CARBON. 

W. R. St rob. 

CENTRE. 

W. M. Allison. 
J. K. Thompson. 

CHESTER. 

Wm. P. Corvell. 
Thos. Lack." 
Fred. H. Cope. 
James G. Fox. 

CLARION. 

John A. F. Hoy. 
Thomas Broim. 

Recapitulation, 
House: Republicans, 
on joint ballot, 132. 



CLEARFIELD. 

Frank G. Harris. 
Joseph Alexander. 

CLINTON. 

W. T. Young. 

COLUMBIA. 

W. T. Oreasey. 
F. T. Ikeler. 

CRAWFORD. 

\A.J. Palm. F. 
L. D. Brown, F. 
John L. Wilson, F. 

CUMBERLAND. 

Edgar .S. Manning. 
Robert L. Myers. 

DAUPHIN. 

H. L. Calder. 
S. H. Rutherford. 
J. B. Seal. 
W. H. Ulrich. 

DELAWARE. 

Ward R. Bliss. 
Thos. V. Cooper. 
Robert M. Newhard. 

ELK. 

George R. Dixon. 

ERIE. 

C. A. Mertens. 
j F. L. Hoskins. 
J. R. Mulkie. 

I FAYETTE. 

Adley C. McCune. 
L. F. Arensberg. 
Richard Davis. 

FOREST. 

A. M. Doutt. 

FRANKLIN. 

A. N. Pomerov. 

B. F. Welty. 

FULTON. 

.S. Wesley Kirk. 

GREENE. 

John H. Smith. ' 

HUNTINGDON. 

T. W. Montgomery. 
J. C. Taylor. 

INDIANA. 

H. J. Thompson. 
M. K. Leard. 

JEFFERSON. 

3. Hamilton. 



LACKAWANNA. 

T. J. Reynolds. 
J. J. Scheuer. 
Edward James, Jr. 
P. A. Philbin. 

LANCASTER. 

Frank B. McClain. 

W. H. Brosins. 

J. G. Homsher. 
! B. W. Weaver. 

H. B. Cassel. 
:d. W. Graybill. 

j LAWRENCE. 

M. McConnell. 

I James McAnlis. 

—Senate : Republicans, 



LEBANON. 

Samuel Groh, O. Q. 
E. B. Bierman, G. G. 

LEHIGH. 

Jeremiah Roth. 
J. W. Mayne. 
Jonas F. Moyer. 

LUZERNE. 

Geo. J. Hartman. 
E. A. Coray, Jr. 
W. T. Mahon. 
Harry W. Haworth. 

E. J. Burke. 
Philip L. Drum. 

LYCOMING. 

L. M. Costlier. 
D. W. Osier. 
H. G. Troxell. 

M'KEAN. 

P. R. Cotter, F. 
I E. A. Boyne, F. 

I MERCER. 

1 Levi Morrison. 
Joseph C.Gibson. 
H. K. Daugherty. 

MIFFLIN. 

Samuel H. Rothrock. 

MONROE. 

Rogers L. Burnett. 

MONTGOMERY. 

T. H. Barker. 
i Wm. De Haven. 
1 1. R. Haldemnn. 
1 G. R. McGlathery. 
j W. H. Murphey. 

i MONTOUR. 

James Foster. 

NORTHAMPTON. 

B. Frank Miller. 
Inuin N. Johnson. 
Philip H. Heil. 

NORTHUMBERLAND. 

/. T. Fisher. 

F. A. God Charles. 

PERRY. 

J. S. Arnold. 

PHILADELPHIA. 

Charles N. Selby. 
Joseph Maclver. 
John F. Slater. 
William Reed. 
William Kayser. 
Samuel M. Ray. 
David J. Smyth. 
Thomas Orr. 
David S. B. Chew. 
Edw. D. Wads worth. 
Charles E. Voorhees. 
Edwin H. Fahey. 
Samuel Ripp. 
Theodore B. Stulb. 
Leslie Yates. 
.John H. Fulmer. 
Alexander Colville. 
Herman G. Hutt. 
William F. Stewart. 
Elias Abrams. 
P. H. Hess. 
James Clarency. 
Charles Shane. 
37; Democrats, 13 



PHILADELPHIA. 

William M. Turner. 
William H. Keyser. 
John H. Riebel. 
G. von Phul Jones. 
John T. Harrison. 
Robert A. Linton. 
Mahlon L. Savage. 
J. Claude Bedford, F. 
Mickle a Paul. F. 
Thomsis J. Henry. 
William J. Cook" 
B. Frank Bonham. 
John Hamilton. 
Walter Willard. 
Thomas F. Connell. 
Walter D. Stone. 

PIKE. 

J. D. Westbrook. 

POTTER. 

D. L. Raymond. 

SCHUYLKILL. 

W. J. Galvin. 
Alfred B. Garner. 
A. D. Guenther. 
HA. Hoag. 
Chas. E. Kerrebee. 
H. E. Leib. 

SNYDER. 

A. M. Smith. 

SOMERSET. 

William IL Koontz. 
Samuel A. Kendall. 



E. G. Rodgers. 

SUSQUEHANNA. 

Geo. C. Hill. 
George B. Tiffany. 

TIOGA. 

A. B. Hitchcock. 
W. E. Champaign. 

UNION. 

A. W. Jolmson, F. 

VENANGO. 

J. P. Emery. 
George Moloney. 

WARREN. 

L. C. Baker. 

WASHINGTON. 

J. V. Clark. 

J. H. McLarn. 

D. M. Anderson, F. 



1.56 : Democrats, 48 ; Republican majority. 



WAYNE. 

L. Fuerth. 

J. D. Brennan. 

WESTMORELAND. 

(Jeorge H. Stevens. 
J. S. Beacom. 
W. S. Van Dyke. 
L. C. Thomas, F. 

WYOMINQ. 

A. H. Squier. 

YORK. 

Harry B. Shutt. 

J. B. Kain. 

M. M. Hay.^. 

!.. S. Fake. 
Republican majority, 24. 
108. Republican majority 



The Philadelphia Record JUmanac. 



VOTE or PENNSYLVANIA, 
November O, 1900, -witK Comparisons. 



Adams 

Allegheny 

Armstrong 

Beaver 

Bedford 

Berks 

Blair 

Bradford 

Bucks 

Butler 

Cambria 

Cameron 

Carbon 

Centre 

Chester 

Clarion 

Clearfield 

Clinton 

Crawford 

Cumberland... 

Dauphin 

Delaware 

Elk 

Erie 

Fayette 

Forest 

Franklin 

Fulton 

Greene 

Huntingdon... 

Indiana 

Jefferson 

Juniata 

Lackawanna.. 

Lancaster 

Lawrence 

Lebanon 

Luzerne 

Lycoming 

McKean 

Mercer 

Mifflin 

Monroe 

Montgomery .. 
Montour....;... 
Northampton 
NorthumbTd 

Perrv 

Philadelphia.. 

Pike 

Potter 

Schuylkill 

Snyder 

Somerset 

Susquehanna. 

Tioga 

Union 

Venailgo 

Warren 

Washingtjn... 

Wayne 

Westmorel'nd 

Wyoming 

York 

Totals 

Pluralities.. 



3718: 

riTso 

H443 



3967 
273U 
3438 
407H 



9749, 

8r)25 
9263; 
6303 

104761 
971 
42221 
4684: 

13809' 
30021 
7955 
3157 
2954 
7705 1 
5587 

14673 

13794 
3254 

11816 
9637 
1309 
6483 



19013; 

4528 
4211 

7287, 
4465; 49: 
7168 32'. 



398 



195 



514 
4149 



401 

i5o; 

43391 215 
62141 7881 
34721 2351 



3105 

72811 
7650 ' 
714; 
4500 
1224; 
36741 



116 9 
6241 291 
607: 59 



5687; 1767 334, 50 

5950 3063 480 1 24 

I8O5; 1621 77| ... 

14728! 806^ 121 



16763 
23230 

6343 2754; 911! 

7089 3050 1 461 

977 



21793 
7750 
6319 
6950 i 
2594 
1264! 
17051; 
1292 1 
9849; 
8366! 
3400 
173657 



5019 
7458 
2810 
5931 
5609 

10408 
3229 

16014 
2247 

1 2327 
712665 



104381 

16470 : 
7427 
3427 1 
4916 
18421 
30541 

1120a; 
1875 

11412 



1376 


138 


3527 


51(1 


2638 


373 


1359 


97 


4014 


1284 


2500 


472 


6380 


639 


2647 


435 


11010 


725 


1875 


142 


13732 


428 


424232 


27908 



3665! 3843 
70661 ; 26553 



4703 
13354 
9416 

8537 



4.387 i 
12448 
2920, 
7544 
2930 

2860 ; 4962 
7486! 6996 
53271 , 5427 
137731 7388 
13406 4256 
27361 3332 
112981 7092 
9531 1 7520 
1237 654 
6286; 4573 
996 1209 
2396; 3660 
4400 2021 
1728 
3071 
1600 
14954; 12974 
231021 8514 
5539, 2144 
2776 
10494 
11913 
7531 
3353 
5010 
1882 
2685 
11375 
1734 
9527; 11306 
8038 7698 
3308; 2449 
163169 56202 
663 1180 
2947 2082 
14657 13656 
2479 

2109 
1320 
3434 
2485 
1338 
3630 
2458 



5574, 
5735; 
16901 



6481 
1190 



9750 
2678 
15381 
2192 
11781 
676846 410746 
266130 j I 



13308 



Congressmen-at-Larqe. 



6141 60051 



4708 



3344 
4094, 
3415 
18891 
4531 
4009 



4541 



4734; 

13428 13365 
9540; 9489 
8612 1 8561 
9091 ; 9048 
6190 ! 6143 
10158 101081 7243 
8571 849 523 
4122' 4031 3931 
4532 i 4511 4371 
12510 1 6110 
3446 
6134 



2933! 2917 

7661 7606 

3029 2978 

2880 2861 



13558 
2773 
11377 



2914 
4962 
7015 
5435 
13750! 7335 
13486; 4154; 
2759; 3336; 
11335i 7112 
9561 7543 
1242; 665 
63071 4573 



2404 2400, 

4486 4448 

5620 5594 

5793 5751 

1723 1698, 

15601! 14953' 13149' 

231661 22782^ 8477 

5611 5542; 21071 

6337; 6018; 2773; 

9561; 9537; 10522 10492 



1726' 
3064; 

1607 



19958' 19628' 121041 11861 

7500 i 7433; 7443 7592 

5240 5058 33481 3336 

6799 6713 502 

2507 2484 1874; 1874 

1170 1122! 2631 2544 

16294! 160941 11300 11252 



1176; 

9622 

8051 ; 

3339 



1199 


1165 


4990 


4816 


7267 


7203 


2529 


2450 


5611 


5495 


5387 


5293 


9792 


9742 


2915 


2825 


15474 


15394 


2232 


2201 


11851 


11806 



1165; 1768; 1742 
113071 11279 

7844 

2430' 2420 
56147! 5666: 

1187 1183 

2107 2103 
147701 14108! 13682 

1305 

2113 

1314 

3412 



2947 



1344 
3794 
2483 
6027 
2712 



1304 



249: 
1335 
3759 
2459 
6027 



683941 675099 411552 409918 

I I 



5621 
4365 

3777 
5661 

5040 



2912 
3814 

8021 
1750 
4842 
2332 
1824 
6578 
4581 
8504 
6650 



852' 
4820, 
717 1 

1706; 

2615! 
36171 
3765 
1473 

8576 
13128 
3187 



9058 9845 

655 1217 

6011 80;« 

5624 6783 

2487 1 2340 

.10035, 40585 

345 779 

2172 1830 

11936! 14199 

1994! 1088 

3508 1430 

1000 1159 

4053 3206 

4085 1769 

1515 1001 

3913 3100 

3052 1876 

6770 4936 

133561 11719 

1918' 1917 

_8010!jl^354 
4380001328169 
109831 ! 



4170 3814 
76691 30003 
6325 3823 
6842 4322 
49831 3605 
14318 18099 
10382 4775 
9422 1 4453 

6821 1 5127 



7395 

3486 

3280 

7851 

6178 
14752 
13979 

2807 
11819 

9268 

1224 

6848 

1083 

2453 

4969 

5818 

5500 

2059 
18737 
24337 

6228 

9507 1 9369 
22718! 17305 
7340 



4097 
6460 
3053 
4904 



4169 
2717 
9210 



4198 
2305 
2752 



5077 
7262 
2662 
1449 
17329 
1384 
9762 
8659 
3537 
176462 

3281 
17045 
2572 
5861 
1215 
5310 
7922 
2585 
5130 
4846 



14928 
2373 
12258 



3074 
5500 
2051 



1747 
10032 
7370 
2477 
63323 
1123 
2446 
14745 
1329 
2295 
1300 
3618 



7444 
2474 

11029 
1951 

13054 



728300 133230 

95070! 



For the Socialist-Labor candidate for President (Malloney) there was a total of 2936 votes 
cast in the State— 1187 in Allegheny county and 290 in Philadelphia. For the Middle-of-the- 
Road Populist candidate (Wharton Barker) 638 votes were cast in the State. 



PHILADELPHIA VOTE BY WARDS, NOVEMBER O. 1900. 
'WITH COMPARISONS. 



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The Philadelphia Record Almanac. 75 


PHII^ADEI/PHIA VOTE BY 


DIVISIONS.-November 6, 1900. 




Presi- 


City j 


i 


Presi- 


City j 




Presi- 


City 1 




Presi- 


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177 


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104 161 103 


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188 


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42 


292 


35 




160 


46 


156 


52 


29 


164 


102 


157 


82 




174 




161 


21 1 




130 15 


130 


15 


31 289 


58 


252 






72 


72 


60 


77 


30 


115 


48 


109 




12 


180 


61 


163 


34 




71 140 


63 


135' 


4' 344 


31 


324 


32 






55 


76 


53 


l3I 


186 


71 


105 


156 


13 


187 


59 


141 


50 




84 81 


86 


80 


51 114 


19 








71 


72 






32 


171 


76 


159 


69 


14 


147 


70 


117 


69 




46 36 


45 




6 119 


27 


87 


19 




104 


35 


87 


30 


33 


149 


45 


100 


39 


15 


198 


99 


163 


85 




179 39' 165 


38 


1 7 187 


18 


176 














34 


114 


76 


94 


76 


16 


169 


94 


145 


78 




103 31 95 




8 160 


17 


lis! 11 




1587 


829 


1400 


833 


35 
36 


91 


95 

58 


65 
63 


86 


17 






151 


81 




175 48 164 




9 184 


27 


118' 25 


] 


57 


18 


132 


72 


101 


45 
58 
56; 
44 

?^1 




238, 27; 234 


28 


10 217 


23 


1071 21 


13THWARD. j 


37 


119 


53 
59 
111 
76 
70 
93 


119 


48 


19 
•20 


128 
166 


70 
64 


121 
138 
146 
115 
100 


! 


1707 1146 1601 


1129 


11 107 
121 170 


11 
13 


66' 9 
106 15 




162 
76 


00 


163 
74 


r.\ 


41 

42 


114 
207 
179 
166 


71 
95 
174 
143 
135 


57 
104 
110 
66 
86 


21 
22 
23 


152 
138 
121 


96 


ETH WARD. 


13 150 

14 170 

15 83 


32 
23 
44 


105 19 
70 53 




140 
171 

170 
177 


25 


140 


36 
64 


24 
25 


103 
151 


146 
86 


98 
130 


151i 

75 




16 174 


40 


128 41 


69 169 
65 168 

35 186 
38 126 
69 191 
25 143 

36 151 
50 121 
211 162 
26, 149 
29; 149 


'1^ 


197 

170 


96 
56 


158 
134 


89 
55 


i 1 


43 


55; 47. 64 


26 
27 
28 
29 
30 
31 


176 
185 
135 
133 
274 
103 

4584 


72 
106 
70 

70 
83 

2363 


173 
182 
102 
144 
227 
90 

3945 


60' 
99 
56 
105 
54 
70| 

2063 


! 2 


61 
96 
113 

78 
91 
76 
85 
107 
182 


149 35 1311 
91 71' 91! 
711 33 142 
50 i 78 47 
16 73 17 
34 40 33 
23 76 23 
64 100 57 
23; 181 22 




3080 


I45 


2406 399 




191 
165 
193 
157 
154 
163 
183 
157 
152 


i' 

67 

25 
29 
52 
23 
26 
25 


















H WARD. 




4740 -.,.. , 


91 


16TH WARD. 1 


T 
2 

4 
5 


90 
77 
129 
130 


To 

25 
12 
33 


54 6 
69 17 

70, 25 
114 16 
l''l 26 


11 57 

2l 93 

3| 118 

1 4| 126 


108 
45 
71 
49 
66 


52 104 
88, 45 
111 67 
114; 53 
96 71 




5 


103 


2D WARD. 




157 

l^f 
33 


51 155 51 
19 20: 20, 
32 105 36 
12 32 12 


7 
9 


122 
171 
75 
107 


27 
15 
20 


87! 26 
145 17 
56 19 
89 15 
100 30 
41 27 
86 60 




150 
189 


25 153 

_l!ii!? 


23 
17 


6 

7 
1 8 
9 


106 

87 
99 


42 

33 
43 


1001 48 
69, 69 

79 33 

91 49 


! 


«3 


30 


59 


27 i 


•^ 


91 


57 


85 


57 




238 


8 229 8, 


w 




!io 


126 


34 


123 33 


3 


98 


48 


99 






215 


15 217 14| 




41 
109 


27 
42 




11 


128 


41 


112| 40 


I 


116 

96 


30 


94 


26 




94 
85 


64 69, 62 
40 66! 40 


12 




132 


— 5r-i2^6' 


12 

13 


126 
143 


47 
75 


112 58 
116 72 


6 


123 


15 


114 


10 









j 


Tvao 


268 


1032 284 




223 


36 


218 34 


14 


126 


62 


101 1 68 


7 


125 


49 


112 






1967 


817 1627' 870 






159 


54 


167 47 


15 


77 


102 


67! 99 


8 


113 


45 


114 


46 




1 


1 




77 


42 


75, 42 


16 


162 


34 


157; 25 


9 


110 


61 


108 


58 




I 10 


H WARD. 




125 


56 


112 


56 


17 


122 


62 


95' 58 


10 


75 


56 


75 


56, 


6th ward. I 








107 


47 


90 


45 










\l 


124 
126 


33 
44 


114 
124 


33 
40 


T 


75 


81 


50; 87| 


} 


150 


38 
38 


147 


35 




81 


49 


70 


45; 


1891 


983 


1683, 992 


2 


54 


133 


46! 136 






149 


56 


150 


56! 


■ 1 


13 

1^ 

1? 
18 
19 
20 


84 
1.36 
107 
146 
166 

51 
146 
142 


37 
66 

57 
49 
107 
10 
35 


74 
108 
107 
129 
1B3 

49 
144 
141 


31 
61 
32 
55; 
48' 
106; 
10, 
34 


1 '^ 


39 


198 


.37| 199 




141 


30 


140 


1 

18 
23 
61 
50 




193 


63 


126 


58 


17TH WARD. 1 


w 

8 
9 


113 
48 
67 
127 
107 
136 


195 
40 
122 
102 
107 
121 


531 1251 
110 107j 
93 103 

_i28,_m 


10 


210 
168 
208 
235 
191 
209 


26 
17 
24 
25 
87 
61 


201 
169 
200 
209 
194 
203 




147 
138 
235 
141 
196 
122 
110 


53 
50 
61 
53 
56 
42 
56 


118 
106 

120 
180 
81 
96 


52; 

50, 
43 
71 
59 1 
45' 
52 


2 
3 

5 
6 


129 
135 
167 
125 
106 
70 


77 
41 
93 

ll 
93 


110 
124 
141 
111 
94 
63 


89 
32 
95 
60 
56 
94 


21 

22 


91 

137 


46 

55 


87 
129 


*i\ 




766 


1099 


64911130 


11 

12 


257 
115 


78 
102 


298 
117 


23 
113 




122 
139 
167 


31 


110 
126 
154 


29 


7 

8 


97 


106 
HI 


94 

38 


102 

104 


23 


183 


56 


180 


59 j 




13 


147 


26 


131 


26 


71 


83 


9 


69 


116 


59 


119 


24 


134 

2783 


58 
1141 


124 
2625 


J6j 
1080 ' 


7th WARD. 


ll 


212 
200 
159 
126 
134 
132 


20 
23 
28 
49 
50 
29 


158 
100 

81 
130 
126 


16 
20 
27 
36 

53 
30 


20 


196 
2959 


41 
1017 


184 
2644 


41 

1005 


10 
11 
12 
13 


89 
103 
135 
117 


134 
83 
67 


118 
HI 


141 

90 
68 


1 


177 


14 


177 


12! 


3d ward. 


2 


242 
235 
206 


17 

22 
13 


224 
184 
164 


17, 
20, 

13 


!l9 


ISth WARD. 


1'^ 
IB 

17 

18 


147 
76 
110 
109 
92 


ll 
108 
66 
70 
116 


133 
59 
95 
89 


84 
109 
72 
71 
'127 




I 


196 

271 


8 
14 


191 

244 


gl 

13! 


I20 

21 


162 

177 


43 

J!! 


154 
171 


38 
14! 




86 
69 


79 87 




78 


78 


72 


73 


1 2 


93 


103 


56 




69 


63 


70 




7 


195 


7 


189 


61 












3 


103 


99 


79 


93 






120 


44 


122 


40 


h 


232 


16 


205 


16 




3598 


810 3272 


710 


4 


193 


32 


80 


32 




IQ-M 


1557 


~" 


1573 




70 


70 


49 


67 


9 


221 


12 


192 


36 






5 


166 


36 


88 


39 










80 


55 


73 


52 


10 


210 


12 


196 


12 




TH WAKU. 


6 


189 


50 


125 


48 


181H WARD. 




50 

78 


73 
41 


48 
74 


67 

36' 


11 

12 


189 
158 


9 
13 


120 
155 


6 
9 






8 


128 
191 


43 
26 


115 
169 


^t 




132 


80 


123 


76 


ll 84; 58, 83i 55 




70 


69 


52 


67 1 


il3 


206 


9 


192 


8 




63 


30 


68 


30 


9 


147 


38 


119 


35 




130 


60 121 


58 




48 


73 


43 


661 


iW 


146 


12 


93 


9 




147 


45 


143 


40: 


10 


167 




129 


47 




172 


40' 155 


37 


10 


94 


33 


93 


28 


|15 


309 


14 


284 


14 




136 


60 


124 


56 


11 




60 


112 


59 




152 


42 117 


35 




8S 




76 


64 


16 


152 


17 


87 


15 




112 


61 


104 


65 


12 


189 


45 


141 


95 






54 


159 


40 


12 


131 


.30 


129 


25 1 


17 


215 


13 


204 


131 




len 


41 


154 


40, 


13 


138 


37 


113 


37! 




151 


45 


105 


36 


13 


73 


58 


68 


58j 


118 


140 


31 


190 


28 




218 


63 


212 


62 


114 


175 


15 


56 


12 




138 


35 


107 


25 




174 


78 


168 






166 


33 


157 


33 




U7 


46 


140 


46 


15 


137 


26 




27! 




220 


59 


169 




15 


220 


42 


215 


45J 


120 


148 


12 


83 


" 




112 


49 


106 


50 


16 


212 


86 


168 


79 




155 


71 


131 


67 


16 


295 


72 


292 


68 


21 


157 


50 


U7 


42 


iO 


126 


52 


123 


50 


1'' 


104 


64 


80 


69 


10 


101 


29 




40 










1 




115 


119 


120 


127 












18 


76 


135 


70 


130 




217 


40 


183 






1738 


948 


1644 


881 


23 


93 


67 


93 


67 1 




1353 


I27 


12971 5151 


Il9 


87 


96 


78 


sol 


12 


160 


51 


142 


42 


1 



The Philadelpht i Record Almanac. 



PHII,ADE1^PHIA VOTE BV DIVISIONS.— November 6, 1900. 





Presi- 1 


City 1 




dent 1 


freL 




o; 






^ 


.2 
.2 


1 

-a 


=» 
>> 


0- 


1 


a 


>i 


a 






ISTH WARD. 1 


13 


207 


39 


173 39' 


14 


251 


7K 


167 j 54 


15 






1541 36 


16 


21(1 




188 54 


17 


214 


39 


169 30 








190 32 


lU 


178 


31 


159 29 


■m 


K6 


39 


81] 40, 




157 


33 


146 32 


I.I 


205 


46 


216i 47 


Ti 


74 


50 


72 49 




7J 


11(1 


73. 100 


Sft 


HI 


96 


80 1 84 


•:b 


11^ 


89 


116] S8 


21 


Hi 


ISO 


91] 182 


■» 




IH 


147, 5 


29 


150 


20 


131 15; 




4542 


1592 


3908 1432 


10 


TH WARD. 


1, 117 


. 51 


114, 45 




55 




3: -195 




186 10 


i\ 9( 


96 


72 97 


5j U. 


UH 


127 120 


6! 241 


45 


HO 44 


7 15! 


54 


130 50 


e 112 


105 


105 102 


9 151 


5S 


114: 53 


10! 16! 


61 


158 57 


11] 13: 


m 


127 70 


12 9 


6( 


82 55 


13, 14 




128 62 


14 1 re 




111, 102 


15 26 


4? 


59 4(1 


16| 15 


45 


132 43 


171 14 


5' 


96 51 


18 16 


6; 


158 81 


19' 19 


45 


142 42 


20' 17 


11 


148 20 


21. 22 


4: 


165 66 


221 23 


4: 


96 41 


23, 38 


4t 


228 46 


24 18 


4(, 


116 61 


25i 17 


3H 


161, 35 


26 18 


1 5' 


128' 63 


27 17 


6. 


98 66 


28 18 


K 


140 63 


29 19 


Ti 


163 103 


30 20 


?! 6( 


18S 67 


SI 21 


li 4: 




32 17 


' 4. 


• 90 50 


S3 17 




136 66 


34| 18 


1 6 


148 61 


35 1 16 


■< 61 


128 67 


361 23 


1 6 




37 1 20 


■ 5 


144 55 


38 16 


;■ H' 


! 158 81 


391 2C 


1 5: 


58 210 


40 16 


H 7 


152 65 


41] 2a 


1, 5' 


182 55 


42 17 


1 4 


154 50 


43 19 


8, 4 


166 53 










!784 


2 251( 


591 


8 2720 



Presi- 
dent. 



City 
Treas. 



2OTM WARD. 



■.56 


177 


27 


IIH 


64 


171 


52 


163 


47 


142 


41 


119 




113 


If 


116 


42 


96 


24 


107 


45 

47 


169 
174 



187 

204] 47; 174 50 

123 33 106i 31 

122 109 113| 106 

190 581 1.591 65 

215 36] ISOl 37 

I20I 66l 88l 56 



!S 


123 
172 


69 
45 


1211 
161 




183 


35 


166 


21 


KM) 


75 


7:> 


22 


120 


88 


96, 


23 


162 


40 


116 


24 


137 


60 


119 


25 


149 


43 


128 




203 




189 


27 


2?0 


78 


177 




208 


49 


152 


■'9 




6(1 


176 


30 


174 


44 


145 


31 


I.l4 


30 


13!l 




1IIM 


56 


179 


33 


1.59 


20 


1.33 


34 


1.10 


411 


98 


35 


142 


3H 


102 


36 


177 


56 


143 


37 


123 


35 


117 


31- 


191 


25 




■M 


197 




I.S6 


40 


165 


36 


140 




6442 


1939 


5527 



; 


134 
157 


51 
46 


123 
139 


50 

45 


8 


101 


32 


103 


32 






53 




6(1 


10 


140 


34 


127 


33 


11 


240 


62 


221 


64 


12 






204 




13 


1.55 


51 


143 


47 


14 


161 


38 


131 


41 




215 


40 


193 




16 


241 


26 


221 


24' 


17 


1,55 


27 


147 


30! 


18 


229 


41 


207 


41' 


19 


177 


35 


1.59 


371 


20 


147 


36 


KHI 


.38 


21 


234 


30 


210 


32 




18 


147 




23 279 


34 


231 


31 


24 298 


4(1 


261 




25 


221 


31 


172 


43 






35 


117 


34, 


27 


117 


39 


90 


39 


28 


172 


26 


130 


31 












4918 


1337 


4232 1381 


22 


D W 


^RD. 1 


] 


179 


28 


137 


27 


2 


189 


67 


146 


61 


' 3 


383 


77 


194 


70 


4 


222 


67 


183 


61 


^ 


356 


1.3H 


26!) 


118 


6 


227 


29 


165 


W 


7 


259 


37 


157 


27 i 


8 


219 


fil 


l«(i 


.54 


9 


204 


4a 


162 


74, 


1(1 


31(1 


3(1 


233 


23 


11 


12? 


42 


104 


33 


12 


2.55 


12(1 


I9>1 


107 


la 


342 


74 


23f 


68 


14 


27f 


61 


12s 


.5? 


15 


363 


75 


285 


74 




196 


4f 


H^ 


35 


17 


265 


31 


106 


27 




197 


Ti 


M 


15 


IS 


104 


67 


9S1 


48 


2(, 


23( 


45 


172 


27 


21 


172 


52 


166 


.50 


22 


221 


4C 


135 


37, 


2J 


171 


46 


141 


41 


24 


1.5« 




14C 


24 


125 


20:- 


42 


14;- 


87 


l36 


229 


29 


111 


1321 




1 


1651 


40 


160 


45 




2371 


26 


219 




3 


191 


43 


1H2 


41 




167 


61 


174 


64 


5 


151 


66 


131 


52 


6 


149 


37 


121 


43 


7 


277 


3(1 


19(1 


35 


8 


179 


28 


136] 




9 


202 


32 


160' 


74 


10, 


2IM 


43 


190 






215 


14 


193 


17 


12 


145 


26 


128 


2^ 


13 


17" 


32 


166 


36 


14 


179 


26 


135 


24 


15 


230 


42 


220 


3M 


16 


230 


42 


204 


4,1 






38 


167 






173 


31 


138 


31 


19 


129 


.50 


117 


55 




1 08 


64 


94 


M 


21 


133 


46 


119 


45 


22 


I8.T 


43 


148 


63 


23 


162 


35 


140 


37 












1 


4206 


874 


3612 


971 


24 


HW 


.„. 1 


1 


217 


32 


92 


162 


2 


193 


79 


107 


81 


3 




66 


120 


61 


4 


152 


75 


98 


71 


5 


232 


77 


124 


76 


6 


153 


82 


121 


110 


7 


188 


12(1 


149 


115 


8 


208 






6^ 


9 


214 


83 


161 


77 


10 


21c 


63 


115 


6(1 


11 


149 




104 


119 


12 


W 


1(12 


58 


1(14 




134 




96 


132 


14 


162 




112 


40 


115 


203 


61 


133 


61 








165 


206 




175 


7? 


105 


7.H 


18 


146 


8!i 


96 


84 


(19 


22s 


13t 


164 


137 


12(1 


20( 




122 


84 


j21 


25f 


77 


145 


81 




204 


54 


137 


49 


!23 


12:- 


65 


73 


63 


24 


22<i 


41 


123 


6 




182 


41 


98 


41 


■,'6 


16? 


41 


114 


4.1 




17S 


25 




26 


28 


231 


7? 


162 


65! 


29 


162 


31 


63 


31! 


3(1 


221 


4( 


118 


62, 


31 


14? 


3( 


10(1 


3!, 


32 


477 


9! 


240 


1(13 


33 


176 


46 


11(1 


41 


34 


126 


66 


92 


51 






61 


100 


60 


36 


296 


1(1( 


213 


96 


37 


17t 


3( 


68 


31 


38 


97 


13 


.78 


14 












1 


7352 


2611 


4653 


2808. 



19 241 

20 206 

21 179 



24 229| 32 17 



25I 227 ^3^ 200' 76 

26 198] 55 182 64 

27] 1721 34 107 36 

28 213 63 166 53 

291 150 30 126 28 

30 306 50 257' 53 

31 158, 44 139 49 

32 242, 26 197 27 

33 156' 19 126 21 
34' 185' 88 160 88 
35j 101' ■ 30 72 40 

16379 2532 5381 2673 



1 143 74 124 

2 127 62 82 

3 162 88 127 

4 124 85 114 791 
I 6 136 86, 128 77 

I 6 140: 135 135 131 

7 147: 60 136 66 

] 8 153 68 138 64 

9 193 50! 148 48; 

10 168 94 131 92 

11 110 62 102 58] 

12 176 77 137 132 

13 213 82 143 82 

14 129 46 96 37 

15 186 59 121 68 



19 179 75 163 82 

20 138 67 104 52 

21 158 57 143 56 

22 196 96, 138 97 



I 253 117] 210 110 
|1 283 1831 320 166 
I 238 166] 199 162, 

5461 2441 4485 2.336^ 



7 192 46 138 34 

8 147' 47 91 48 



12 
13 


185 
296 


37 
.53 


160 

284 


30 
.50 


14 




54 


145 


.50 


15 


236 




162 


42 


16 


138 


44 


101 






191 


81 


115 


72 


18 


254 


47 


184 


60 


19 


211 


49 


141 


49 




248 


61 


165 


59 




238 


53 


1.58 


65 


22 


239 


m 


213 


78 






74 


135 


99 


24 


223 


96 


175 


88 


25 


396 


115 


236 


105 





88 
143 


25 
17 


82 1 
131 ! 




227 


38 


197 




158 


34 


90 




266 


39 


126, 




1.50 


27 


93 




1.57 


52 


146 




212 


18 


136 




176 


43 


168 


10 


191 


20 


131 


11 


238 


84 





27 238 63 1711 63 

28 174 57 137; 51 

29 254 58 186 48 



,6365 1038 4467 157 



29TM WARD. 



1 


195 


41 


129, 






39 


219] 




1,56 


41 


116| 




97 




80 [ 


5 


m 


83 


72,' 




772 


27 


133 


7 


175 


23 


91 


8 


296 


66 


1371 




197 


41 


99 


10 




39 


128 




1.56 


41 


117 


12 


175 


26 


113 


13 


1,58 


91 


98' 




106 


47 


85, 


15 


231 


43 


133 


16 


224 


68 


206 


17 


193 


55 


164 


18 


137 


49 


]?3 




178 


32 


170 


20 


233 


63 


190 


21 


21(1 


45 


192 




19(1 


32 


179 




174 


46 


142 


24 


172 


45 


127 




186 


50 


178 


26 


140 


38 


142 


27 


1S7 


69 


133 


28 


168 


6(1 


160 


29 


I1U 


68 


93 


30 


172 


60 


165 




■m 




143: 


32 


14!1 


64 


147 




137 


7H 


117 


34 


216 


7H 


185 


36 


111 


10(1 


92 


,36 


17S 


43 


174 


137 


260 


48 


213 



The Philadelphia Record Almanac. T7 


PHII/AD]SI,FHIA VOTB BY DIVISIONS.— November 6, 1900. 




Presi- 


."'y i 




Presi- 


City 1 




Presi- 


City 




Presi- 


City 




Presi- 


s, 1 




dent 


Treaa. | 




dent. 


Treaa. | 




dent 


Treis. 1 




dent. 


_Tr_eis. 1 




_dent. 


<«i 






si 


£«■ 






si 


03 






si 


0? 






si 


ftj 






C^ 


1 


i 


C5 

i 


05 
1 


i 


J 


.2 





aj 


if 


H 


1" 


q 


05 


1 

1 


1 


.1 


si 

i 


i4 

i 


a 

1 


g 
1 


1 

5 


1^' 




1 


a 


a 


n 


a 


K 


Q 


s 


n 


3 


m 


5 


s 


M 


s 


a 


s 


s 


M 


a 




5 


s 


m 


s 


n 




29th ward. 


31ST ward. 1 


330 WARD. 


SOTH WARD. 


1 38TH WARD. 1 


38 


215 


45 


177 


37 


26 


130 


35 


124 


37 


27" 


198 


55 


175 


62 


4 155 


~9r 


135 


T08 


2ir 


335 1 65 


187 


64 


39 


139 


42 


135 


32 




137 


24 


128 




28 


272 


95 


270 


96 


5 


195 


64 




57 


21 


251 


60 


171 


55 


40 


122 


49 


91 


44 


28 


1.30 


26 


110 


21 


29 


183 


56 




53 


6 


163 


62 


140 


57 












♦1 
i2 


168 
127 


29 
66 


128 
105 


25 
64 




sisi 


1368 


4662 


1482 


30 
31 


132 

123 


66 

56 


113 
110 


66 
56 


7 


5?? 


72 


169 


67 




4628 


1242 


3060 


1220 




Inl 




135 


58 




43 


202 


86 


161 


84 


1 


32 


238 


40 


210 


43 


9 


201 


43 


189 


41 


39TH WARD. 


44 


259 


76 


185 


74 


32D WARD. 1 


33 


132 


42 


101 


35 


10 




90 


110 


87 




45 


237 


50 


171 


45 


T 


224, as. lO'r. ■.■! 


34 


148 


40 


110 


42 


11 


152 


41 


149 


32 


1 


176 


72 


164 


59 


46 


252 


41 


142 


43 




201 1 V, 


115 


114 
51 
40 
26 
24 
35 
45 
48 


35 


236 


61 


216 


62 


12 


143 


120 


130 


108 


2 


169 




187 


66 


47 


2;i0 


43 


196 


35 


^ 


36 


149 




140 


60 


13 


162 


110 


138 


88 


3 


161 


86 


139 


72 
















^ 


281 
194 


"' 


132 
134 
83 
126 
154 
190 




193 


60 


173 


66 


14 


219 




203 


85 


t 
6 


239 


50 


218 


45 




8512 


2429 


6575 


2295 


5 


31 
28 
46 
43 

48 


39 


185 
266 


108 
121 


166 
219 


108 
110 


15 
16 


255 
217 


94 

123 


194 
213 


74 
122' 


196 
106 


92 

75 


174 
98 


80 
72 




30TM WARD. 


7 
I 


24e 

285 
329 


1? 
42 


193 
126 
146 


73 
51 
46 


178 
106 
133 


66. 
102' 

451 


17 
18 
19 


168 
152 
154 


95 
103 

63 


150 
128 
146 


90 i 
100; 


I 
9 


145 

148 
219 


50 
64 

82 


1.35 
132 
216 


46 
81 
69 




290 


45 


2R0 


40 




194 


37 


147 


.331 


ho 


236 


21 


87 


24 













1 


20 


155 


45 


141 


44 


10 


198 


79 


179 


63 




197 
217 
221 
213 


56 

47 
18 
51 


173 
201 
209 

181 


131 

47 1 


ill 
12 

13 
|14 


206 
181 
180 
1.54 


28 
39 
27 
37 


118 
121 
100 
133 


30 
36 
21! 
36 1 




772312651 


6857 


2740! 


21 
22 
23 
24 


183 
262 
201 
184 


95 
79 
72 
73 


156 
240 
147 
161 


85 
76 
61 

70 


11 
12 
13 
14 


176 
179 
145 
172 


61 

87 
119 
65 


161 
165 

134 
162 


49 

78 
125 
52 


34TH WARD. 1 


'l 


155 


54 


133 






232 


36 


209 


36 i 


lis 


218 


37 


121 


38 


2 


130 


72 


93 


71 


25 


195 


101 


160 


81 


15 


206 


80 


188 


69 




152 


82 


137 




16 


195 


52 


188 


43 


3 


213 


103 


167 


102 


26 


140 


57 


112 


50 


16 


112 


loa 


102 


74 




209 


44 


157 


41 


17 


275 


57 


171 


60 


4 


131 


95 


137 


90 


27 


126 


78 


117 


73 


17 


185 


100 


178 


89 




139 


61 


116 


57 


18 


182 


35 


134 


30 


5 


189 


66 


161 


92 


28 


154 


93 


144 


91 


18 
19 


179 
197 


85 
64 


157 
182 


106 




167 


33 


122 


34 


jl9 


168 


38 


110 


.39 1 


6 


105 


113 


67 


108 














187 
112 


49 
62 


162 
102 


^^i 


20 

21 


213 

222 


68 
71 


128 
172 


68 
59 


7 
8 


209 
283 


134 
72 


153 
142 


126 
67 




4967 


2238 


4395 


21291 


20 
21 


167 
126 


94 
69 


129 
115 


122 
60 






144 
95 


III 


126 

88 


101 

1251 


22 

23 


267 
219 


69 

63 


210 

157 


67 


9 

10 


70 
152 


98 

78 


51 
119 


81 

79 


37th WARD. 


22 
23 
24 
25 


273 
162 
206 
164 


95 
73 
63 
62 


259 
147 
182 
138 


73 
61 


] 


206 


104 


126 


llOi 




216 


89 


171 


87' 


24 


154 


51 


139 


41 


u 


260 


79 


205 


132 


2 


141 


67 


108 


631 


53 
54 




197 


68 


142 


63: 


25 


251 


53 


1.36 


46 


12 


309 


103 


212 


100 




118 


73 


61 


73 




202 


92 


175 


85] 


'26 


291 


54 


249 


49 


13 


153 


34 


107 


33 


4 


219 


76 


137 


71 


26 


298 


75 


285 


65 




180 


132 


162 


1261 


27 


180 


65 


147 


49 


14 


no 


32 


87 


31 




230 


105 


183 


99 
















■20 
21 


151 
179 


119 

87 


114 

186 


1161 
87 


'28 
29 


229 
195 


r. 


165 
153 


48 
36 


15 
16 


158 
174 


72 
50 


98 
105 


70 
49 




242 
275 


65 
57 


201 
186 


61 
59 






1848 






22 
23 


228 
193 


97 
41 


212 
169 


94 
43 


30 

31 


325 
285 


67 
64 


204 
211 


64 

60 


17 
18 


125 


77 
84 


67 
198 


75 
80 




261 
165 


92 

50 


172 
90 


42 


40TH WARD 






244| 65, 186 


"fi9 
























19 


296 


104 


208 


94 




188 


29 


119 


28| 




181 44 162 39 




4315 


1573 


3741 


1556 




7044 1417 


4592:1418:1 


20 


77 




65 


76 




185 


44 


137 


401 




218 42 I6OI 40 






21 


223 


54 


124 


43 




347 


70 


227 


65 




195 39i 138' 41 




33d ward. 


22 


288 


107 


258 


193 




334 


60 


221 


59 




99 7 77: 10 


315T WARD. 




23 


69 
213 
330 
220 
205 

5130 


127 
85 
55 
88 

2188 


64 


71 




217 
301 
239 

3668 


48 
103 
38 

1081 


177 






1311 41: 119^ 35 


1 1 


1421 41 1 1211 45 1 


2 
3 

5 
6 

7 


216 
178 
222 
237 
203 
148 
191 


35 
18 
32 
29 
55 
99 
27 


208 
168 
169 
205 
149 
133 


31 1 
21 
38, 
35 
63 
114 
27 


I2 

4 

5 

7 
8 


219 52! 203 51 
2161 57i 1931 57 
129| 481 1251 48 


24 

11 
27 


158 
195 
87 
141 

3602 


122 
56 

2258 




204 
178 

2527 


61 

35 

10781 


1 


162 49 
1.37 40 
169 1 54 
2461 62 


136 44 

122, 50 
147: 52 
2031 63 
180! 55 
207 71 


147 39 
263 66 
134 37 


139 

232 
129 


34 
66 
36 


88TH WARD. 1 


197 
239 
119 


55 

77 
57 


35TH WARD 1 


~Y 


"mT 


64 


191 


71 


110 


54 




159 






37 

32 


9 
10 


126 59 
166 57 


120 
149 








160 
150 


1^2 


138 
125 


48 
122 




180 


31 


162 


26 


9 


192 


31 


162 


58 


TTm 


21 


91 


24 












10 
11 


147 
231 


41 
48 


140 
210 


38 


11 
12 


213 65 
no! 70 


171 
142 


fo 


2I 121 
3' 116 


66 


86 
92 


67 
34 




313 
270 


73 
25 


223 
149 


66 




2517 


663 


2109 


642 






12 
13 


212 
150 


28 
24 


192 
125 


59! 
23 


13 
14 


177 
217 


71 
72 


171 
176 


69 

78 


5 


74 
113 


39 
48 


61 
81 


41 




l^ 


It 


123 
161 


39 

47 


41 ST WARD. 




1 


109 1 19: 86 


16 


1* 


185 


26 


162 


31 


15 


187 


90 


158 


87 


6 


141 


17 


135 




150 


20 


69 


22: 


2 


193 


17 


150 


20 


15 


250 


38 


202 


42 


16 


209 


67 


189 


66 


7 


160 


41 


143 


s 




218 


81 


154 


76 




147 


49 


134 


45 


16 


176 


66 


165 


75 


17 


200 


106 


185 


121 


I 


93 


17 


72 


20 [ 




206 


62 


140 


60 i 


^ 


87 


51 


79 


54 


17 


208 


65 


190 


58 


18 


160 


61 


144 


62 


231 


41 


79 


.S61 




166 


56 


121 


60 


5 


175 


33 


157 


33 


18 


206 


34 


188 


36; 


19 


152 


40 


141 


42' 


10 


201 02 


131 






246 


33 


106 


34 


6 


128 




113 


11 


19 


204 42 


180, 


*'^i 


20 


85 


58 


75 


60 1 









—\ 




241 


58 


190 


521 


7 


128 


28 


111 


29 


20 


220' 51 


188 


50 


21 


160 


50 


143 


49] 


_ i.a 6. 971 


_394: 




243 


118 


186 


122 


8 


132 


92 


119 


92 


21 


239; 37 


231 


37 


22 


192 


54 


154 


54 


ScrH w rfD. 1 




190 


61 


126 


55! 


9 


1S2 


33 


172 


22 


•■'2 


1.53! 36 


148' 


32 


23 


230 


83 


202 


82 1 




67 


7 


54 


8 


10 


166 


13 


142 


14 


23 


133 1 108 


126 


107 


24 


226 


61 


210 


58 


TTl J7 1 ~4 j7l6or"4"7 




208 


69 


176 


68 


11 


126 


40 


102 


43 


24 


174 131 


166j 


129 


25 


252 


77 


213 




2 195 80 1741 06 


18 


205 


73 


165 


70 












25 


200 168 


175 


183 


26 


276 


67 244 


99' 


3 1841 107 .681 104 


19 


125 


57 


105 


58 


1 


1573 


l82 


1365! 379 1 


Note :— The foregoing division vote only shows the total cast for Mr. Hartranft for Citv Treasurer on the 


Democratic ticket. He was also the Municipal League and the Prohibition candidate, and the total of the 


combined ward votes on those tickets cast for him is shown by the difference between the totals in the division 


count and the total in the table of Vote by Wards on page 74. 


PHII^ADBI/PHIA COMMERCIAI/ MUSEUM. 


The Philadelphia Commercial Museum i.s a dei.artment of the Philadelphia Museums, 


established by ordinance of Councils in June, 1894. The purpose of the Museum is to 


bring the resources of the world b'efore American manufacturers and business men, and 


to guide them properly towards the extension of foreign markets for their products. 


The Museum is located at No. 233 South Fourth street, and is open every week-dav. 



State of NeAV Jersey. 

Oovernor— Foster M. Voorhees, R. Salary, $10,000. Term expires, January 13, 1902. 

Secretary of State— George Wurts, B. Salary, $6000 and fees. Term expires, April 1, 1902. 

Assistant Secretary of State— ALEXANDER H. Rickey, D. Salary, 13000. Term expires, 
April 1, 1902. 

Attorney-General— 'S.x^iVE^, H. Grey, R. Salary, $7000. Term expires, April 5, 1902. 

Treasurer— George B. Swain, R. Salary, S6000. Term expires, March, 1903. 

Comptroller— \Nihh\KU S. HANCOCK, R. Salary, S6000. Term expires, March, 1903. 

Clerk of Supreme Court— WILLIAM RiKER, Jr., R. Salary, $6000. Term expires, Novem- 
ber 2, 1902. 

Supreme Court Reporter— CD. W.YROOisi, D. Salary, $1000. Term expires, January, 1903. 

Chancery Itcportci — S. M. DICKINSON, D. Salary, $1000. Term expires, January, 1905. 

MaJor-Oeneral—\^lLUKSl3. Sewell, R. During life. 

Quart! rtiiiistcr Oeneral—RlCKKR\> .\. DONNELLY, -D. During life. Salary, $1200. 

A(r)iit<int-(l(»i'ral—\i.EXkViDER C. Oi.iPHANT, R. During life. Salary, $2500. 

Clerh hi C/,ini<-rry— Lewis A. THOMPSON, R. Salary, $6000. Term expires, March 30, 1901. 

Chancellor-W'iLLlA-M J. Magie, R. Salary, $10,000. Ad-interim. 

Vice-chancellors— HEiiRY C. Pitney, R.; Alfred Reed, B.; John R. E.mery, R.; Fred- 
erick VV. Stevens, D.: Martin P. Grey, R. Salaries, $9000 each. Pitney's term expires, 
March, 1903; Reed's, June, 1902; Emery's, January, 1902; Stevens', March, 1903; Grey's, 
March, 1903. 

Chief Justice— T> AVID A. Depue, R. Salary, $10,000. Ad-interim. 

Associate jMstices- Jonathan Dixon, R., 1903; Bennet Vansyckel, D., 1904; Charles 
G. Garrison, D., 1902; William S. Gummere, R., 1902; George C. Ludlow, D., 1902; Gil- 
bert Collins, R., 1904. John Franklin Fort, R., ad-interim; Abram Q. Garretson, I)., 
ad-interim. Salaries, S9000 each. 

Xaiy Judges of the Court of Errors and Appeals— .Ions W. BOGEBT, D.; Charles 

E. Hendrickson, D. ; Frederick Adams, R. ; William H. Vredenburgh, R. ; Peter V. 
Voorhees, £., 1906; Gottfried Krueger, Z>. 1903. Salaries, about $1000 each. 

State Librarian— HEyiRY C. Buchanan, R. Salary, $2000. Term expires, February, 1904. 
State Superintendent of Public Instruction— CnARhES J. Baxter, R. Salary, $2500. 
Term expires, March 29, 1902. 
Board of State Prison Inspectors— "Si. E. Staples, D.; Lysander E. Watson, R.\ Thomas 

F. Brennan, D.\ Wm. H. Carter, R.\ Jacob Van Winkle, D.; S. F. Stanger, R. All in 1904. 
Salaries, $500 each. 

Keeper of the State P/'i.«o»i— Samuel S. Moore, R. , 1902. Salary, $3500. 

Supervisor of State Prison— E. J. ANDERSON, R. Salary, $2500. Term expires, 1903. 

State Geologist— Jony C. SMOCK. 

State Board of A.'isessors— Bird W. Spencer, R., 1901; Robert S. Green, B., 1904; 
Stephen J. Meeker, B., 1904 ; Amos Gibbs, R., 1901. Salaries, $2500 each. 

Chief of the Bureau of Statistics— WiLUAM Stainsby, R. Salary, $2500. Term ex- 
pires, 1903. 

Trustees of the School JFitMd— Governor, Secretary of State, President of the Senate, 
Speaker of the Assembly, Attorney General, Comptroller and State Treasurer. 

State Dairy Commissioner— GEORGE W. McGuiRE, B. 

Inspector of Factories— J OKyi C. Ward, R., 1901. Salary, $2500. 

Secretary of Board of Assessors — Irvine E. Maguire, B. Salary, $2500. 

Biparian Commissioners — GOVERNOR Voorhees, R.; Willard C. Fiske, D.; William 
Cloke, R.; John I. Holt, R.\ John J. Farrell, B. All in 1904. Salaries, $1500 each. 

Custodian of the State House— Jons H. BoNNELL, R. Salary, $2000. 

Commissioner of Banking and Insurance— Wlhl.lA'SI Bettle, i?., 1903. Salary, $4000. 

State Board of Taxation— Ckarles C. Black, B.; Carl Lentz, R.; Henry J. West, R.; 
Joseph Thompson, B. Secretary, Thomas B. Usher, B. Salaries, $2000 each. 



TH:e i<i^gisivatur:k. 

THE SENATE. 

Salary in each House, $500. No mileage. 



COUNTIES. 

Atlantic . . 
Bergen . . . 
Burlington. 
Camden . . . 
Cape May. . 
Cumberland 
Essex .... 
Gloucester . 
Hudson . . . 
Hunterdon . 
Mercer . . . 



TERM EXPIRES. 

Lewis Evans, R 1902 

Edmund W.Wakelee,fi . 1902 
Nathan Haines, R. . . . 1904 
Herbert W.Johnson, R. . 1903 
Robert E. Hand, R. . . . 1904 
Edward C. Stokes, R. . . 1902 
T. N. MeCarter, Jr., R. . 1903 

. Solomon H. Stanger, R. . 1903 
Robert S. Hudspeth, B. 1902 

, William G. Gebhardt, B. 1904 
Elijah C. Hulchinson.U. 1902 



COUNTIES. TERM EXPIRES. 

Middlesex . . Theodore Strong, R. . . 1904 
Monmouth . . C. Asa Francis, R. . . . 1903 
JIORRis .... Mahlon Pitney, R. . . . 1902 

Ocean George G.Smith, /v".. . .1902 

Passaic .... Wood McKee, R 1904 

Salem Richard C. Miller, R. . . 1903 

Somerset . . . Charles A. Reed, R. . . . 1903 

Sussex Lewis J. Martin, B. . . . 1904 

Union Joseph Cross, R 1903 

Warren. . . . Joiinston Cornish, B. . 1903 
Republicans, 17 ; Democrats, 4. 



The Philadelphia Record JUmanac. 



THE ASSEMBI,Y. 



ATLANTIC. 

Chas. T. Abbott, R. 

BERGEN. 

Jos. H. Tillotson, R. 
James W. Mercer,/?. 

BURLINGTON. 

Charles Wright, R. 
John G. Horner, R. 

CAMDEN. 

\Vm. J. Bradley, R. 
Ephraim T. Gill, R. 
George A. Waile, R. 

CAPE MAY. 

Lewis M. Cresse, R. 

CUMBERLAND. 

Jesse S. Steel man, R. 
Wm. J. Moore, R. 

ESSEX. 

W. R. Garrabrants, R. 
J. H. Bacheller, R. 
John Howe, R. 
Robert W. Brown, R. 
R. G. Schmidt, R. 
K. E. Guichtel, R. 
W. G. Sharwell, R. 
Edgar Williams, R. 
Fredk. Cnmmings, R. 
Robert M. Boyd, R. 
William A. Lord, R. 

HUDSON. 

Maurice Marks, D. 
Geo. G. Tennant, D. 
P. Anthony Brock, i». 
John A. Dennin, D. 
John H. Vollers, D. 
Pat. H. Connolly, D. 
Leon .\bbett, D. 
John J. Fallon, D. 
Peter Stillwell, D. 
Kilian V. Lutz, D. 
Edward J. Rice, D. 



GLOUCESTER. 

Wm. P. Buck, R. 

HUNTERDON. 

O. L Blackwell, D. 
W. O. Laudenb'ger, D. 

MERCER. 

George \V. Page, R. 
Fred P. Rees, R. 
J. W. Flemming, R. 

MIDDLESEX. 

Adrian Lyon, R 

3. E. Montgomery, R. 

H. R. Groyes, R. 

MONMOUTH. 

S. W. Kirkbride, R. 
William Hyres, R. 
Chas. R. Snyder, R. 

MORRIS. 

S. L. Garrison, R. 
C. R. Whitehead, R. 

OCEAN. 

Courtney C. Clark, R. 

PASSAIC. 

E. G. Stalter, R. 
i Vivian M. Lewis, R. 

Wm. B. Davidson, R. 
I Hiram Keasler, R. 

[ SALEM. 

Henry J. Blohm, R. 

SOMERSET. 

H. W. Hoagland, A'. 

SUSSEX. 

Theodore M. Roe, R. 

UNION. 

Ellis R. Meeker, R. 
Chester M. Smith. R. 
Charles S. Foote, R. 

WARREN. 

Jacob B. Smith, D. 
Hiram D. White, D. 



United States Officials. 

Circuit Justice— GeoTgs Shiras, Jr. 

Circuit Judges— Marcus W. Acheson, George 
M. Dallas, George Gray. 

District Court Judge— Andrew Kirkpatrick. 

District Attorney— I>eivid O. Watkins. 

it/ars/icrf— Thomas J. Alcott. 

Clerk of District Court— George T. Cranmer. 

Clerk of Cimdt Court— S. D. Oliphant. 

Internal Revenue Collectors— First and Sec- 
ond Districts. Isaac Moffett, Camden. Third 
and Fourth Districts, H. C. H . Herold, Newark. 
State Institutions. 

The Capitol Building and State Library, 
Trenton ; the Arsenal, Trenton ; State Hos- 
pital for Insane, near Trenton ; Morris Plains 
State Hospital ; Normal and Model Schools, 
Trenton ; Reform School for Boys, James- 
burg ; Industrial School for Girls, Trenton ; 
State Prison, Trenton ; Soldiers' Home, 
Kearny, Hudson county ; School for Deaf 
Mutes, Trenton. 

Vote of New Jersey. 



Republicans, 45 ; Democrats, 15. 
Republican majority on joint ballot, 43. 



Counties. 


Pbks. 


-1900. 


Gov. —1898. 


PRES.-1896. 






Voor- 


Or„„., 


Rep. 


Dem. 




ley. R. 


b. ' 


been.K 


i>. 








2566 


4107 


2830 


5005 


2233 




9086 


6456 


6964 


6355 


8545 


4531 


Burlington . 




5476 


6819 


5437 


9371 


4610 


Camden . . 


16148 


7281 


10919 


6807 


16395 


6380 


Cape Mav . 
Camberlind 


2241 


1110 


1726 




2136 


929 


6780 


4036 


5443 




7018 


3877 


Essex . . . 


45318 


25735 


32262 


27575 


42587 


20509 






2829 


3772 


2958 


4727 


2981 




32.341 


38025 


22134 


33023 


33626 


28133 


Hunterdon . 


3873 


5136 


HI 82 




4264 


4992 


Mercer . . . 


13874 


7858 


111028 


8711 


13847 


5970 




9348 


7191 




764- 


9304 


5976 


Monmouth . 


10363 


8568 


8108 


919: 


10611 


7799 


Morris . . . 


7739 


5793 


6526 


.5791 


8190 


4936 




3182 


1414 


2753 


131!; 


3384 


1068 


Passaic. . . 


15619 


12891 


11147 


1041c 


15437 


9280 


Salem . . . 


3398 


2981 


31 OS 


292- 


3717 






4438 


3183 


3,52!l 


3182 


4388 


2608 


Sussex . . . 


2874 


3395 


2452 


3165 


3045 


2975 


Union . . . 


12522 


7665 


9272 


703; 


11707 


6073 


Warren . . 


3589 


5219 


2857 


4393 


4063 


5013 




221707 


164808 


164051 


158552 


221.367 


133675 


Pluralities 


56899 




5499 




1 87692 





CAMDEN COUNTY AND 

. Wesley Sell, R. Fees. Term ex- 



Sheriff- 
pires November, 1902. 

Regider of Deeds— Jsilslc W. Coles, R. Fees. 
Term expires November, 1905. 

Coxmty Collector— MnUon P. Ivins, R. $2500. 

County Clerk— Robert L. Barber, R. Fees. 
After February 23, 1901, F. F. Patterson, Jr., 
R., for five years. 

Director of the Board of Freeholders— Dr. J. 
B. Davis, R. 

Coroners— Dr. S. G. Bushey, R.; Dr. F. N. 
Robinson, R. ; Henry S. Gaskill, R. 

Surrogate— George S. West, R. Fees. Term 
expires November, 1902. 

President Judge— Ch&r\es G. Garrison, D. 
Terra expires 1902. 

Circuit Judge— Ja,raes H. Nixon. Term ex- 
pires 1907. 

Law Judge— E. A. Armstrong, R. Term ex- 
pires 1901. 

Prosecutor of the Pfeos— Frank T. Lloyd, R. 
S6000. Term expires 1906. 

Assistant Prosecutor— F. M. Archer. S2000. 

Judge of District Court— C. V. D. Joliiie, R. 
$2500. Term expires 1901. 

3/a.vor— Cooper B. Hatch, Reform. $2500. 
Term expires March, 1901. 

Recorder—J. G. Nowerv, Ref $1000. Term 
expires 1901. 

Receiver of Taxes— R. F. Wolf, R. $2500. 
Term expires March, 1902. 

Highway Comm'r.—h. Mohrman, R. $2000. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 

City Trea.mrer—R. R. Miller, R. $2500. 
Term expires 1902. 

Citi/ Comptroller— Samuel Hufty, R. $1800. 
Term expires 1903. 

City Counsel— B.. M. Snyder, R. $2000 and 
fees. Term expires 1903. 

City Clerk— H. C. Kramer, R. $1200 and 
fees. Term expires 1903. 

Superintendent of Schools— M&rtin V. Bergen, 
R. $900. Term expires ISIarch, 1901. 

Chief of Police— John Foster, R. 

Supenntendent of Water Department— F . 'Wal- 
ter Toms, Ref. Term expires 1903. $2000. 

Chief Engineer of Fire Department— Samuel 
S. Elfreth, R. $1200. 

Sealer of Weiahis and Jfraswres— Geo. Kruek, 
R. $600. Term expires 1902. 

City Surveyor— Levi Farnham, R. $2000. 
Term expires 1903. 

President of City Council— Ren]. E. Mellor, R. 

President of Commissioners of Public Instruc- 
tion— C. S. Magrath, D. 

Secretary of Commissioners of Public Instruc- 
tion— \Y. b. Brown, R. $1200. Term expires 
1903. 

Chief Inspector of the Board of Health— 3. F. 
Leavitt, M. D., R. $1000. 

Clerk of District Court— Edwin Hillman, R. 
$1200 and fees. Term expires 1901. 

Excii'p Commissioners— Arthur Bedell, R., 
Wm. H. Kolb, R., L. Stebr, R., John Cleary, 
D., Edw. H. Nilland, D. Terms exp. 1902. 



State of Delaware. 



llr 



;, R. Salary, J2000. Term expires, January, 1905. 

-—Philip L. Cannon, J?. Salary, per diem, by Legislature.- Term 



Lifiittniint-d: 

expirt's, .Jaiiiiarv. l',«i.i. 

Serritdrif of St<it<~T() be appointert. Salary, $1000 and fees. Term expires, January, 190.0 

Attov)t<ii-(i<-ti<'f(tl-^^YiBY.RT H. W.ARD, /?. Salary, 82000. Term expires, 1905. 

St<it<- 7'/-(<f.s(f /•*•/■— Martin B. Burris, R. Salary, $1950. Term expires, January, 1905. 

Stair Attilitot — PUKNALL B. NoRMAN, JR., R. Salary, $1200. Term expires, January, 1905. 

Insiirmiri' ('oDiinitisionf t'—l)R. GEO. W. MARSHALL. R. Salary, $1400. Term expires, 1905. 

Ch h'f ./(».sf (•<•<■— Charles B. Lore, D. Salary, $3800. Term expires, 1909. 

As.socintr ,rii.stices—^evf Castle Co., Ignatius C. Grubb, I)., W. C. Spruance, R.; Kent Co., 
James I'knnewill, R.: Sussex Co., W. H. Boyce, D. Terms expire, 1909. Salary, $3600. 

€haiti)'Uor—JoH^ R. Nicholson, I). Term expires, 1909. Salary, $3800. 

Court Stenoffrapher—ED^WSD C. Hardesty, /'. Salary, $1400. 

UNITED STATES OFFICIAIvS. 



Circuit and District Court Judge— Edward G. 
Bradford, R. 

District Attorney — William M. Byrne, R. 

Clerk of Circuit and District Courts— S. Rod- 
mond Smith, -R. 



Uii ilrd States il/ars/mZ— John CannonShort, i? 
Collector of the Port—W. H. Cooper, D. 
Deputy Collector of Internal Revenue — C. M. 
Leitch, i?. 
Postmaster— K. C. Browne. R. 



Sheriffs. A. ilcDaniel, R. 

Coroner— John L. Fri(;k, R. 

Count!/ Treasurer and Receiver of Taxes — • 
Horace G. Rettew, R. 

County Comptroller— George D. Kelley, R. 

Levy Court Commissioners— John Lynn, R.; 
Philemma Chandler, R.; Charles Meggiuson, 
R.; John J. Mealey, D. ; Wm. L. Armstrong, D. 



Sheriff— Frank Reedy, R. 
Coroner— C. W. Baynard, R. 
County Treasurer— Fennel Emerson, R. 
Clerk of the Peace and Clerk of the Levy Court 
-Roberts S. Dowues, E. 

Sussex 

Sheriff— Peter J. Hart, D. 
Coro?^er— Samuel P, Marsh, D. 
Count!/ Treasurer— Ca.leh L. McCabe, D. 
Clerk of the Peace and Clerk of the Levy Court 
-John B. Dorman, D. 



COUNTY OFFICERS. 

New Castle County. 

Clerk of the Peace and Clerk of the I^vy Court 
— Winfield S. Quigley, R. 

Prothonotary and Clerk of the Superior Court 
—Frank L. fcjpeakman, R. 

Recorder of Deeds— T>e]a,\\- are Clark, J?. 

Register of Wills— Calvin W. Crossan. /). 

Clerk of the Orphans' Court a7id Register in 
Chancery— Colen Ferguson, D. 
Kent County. 

Prothonotan/ and Clerk of the Superior Court 
-W. H. Moore, R. 

Recorder of Deeds— James Lord, D. 

Register of Wills— J). M. Wilson, R. 

Clerk of tlie Orphans' Court and Register in 
Chancery— James Smith, D. 
County. 

Prothonotary and Clerk of the Superior Court 
— Stansbury J. Wheatley, D. 
, Recorder of Deeds— J. B. Hems, D. 

Register of Will.s—W. F. Causey, D. 

Clerk of the Orphans' Court and Register in 
Chancery — Charles W. Jones, D. 



WIIvMINGTON CITY GOVERNMENT. 



Mayor— John C. Fahey, D. 

City Treasurer — W. L. Ham an n, D. 

City Auditor— Isaac C. Pyle, D. 

Receivers of City Taxes— T. S. Lewis, R.; 
Eugene Sayers, D. 

Building Inspector — John J. Cassiday, -D. 

Plumbing Inspector— F^dwavd F. Kane, D. 

Inspector of Meats— George Abele, D. 

Inspector of Oite— Michael J. Kellv, D. 

Clerk of the Markets— U. F. Connell, D. 

Registrar of Births, Deaths and Marriages— 
A. J. Cahill, D. 

Judge of Municipal Court— E. R. Cochran, 
Jr., D. 

C'erk of Municipal Court— Sam '1 S. Adams, D. 

^■ity Solicitor— a. C. Conrad, R. 

President of City CouncU—W. S. Alexander, D. 

Members of City Council (one from each Ward) 
—George A. Willis, D.; M. F. Cannon, D.; T. 
M. Monaghan, D.', James Kane, D.; W. H. 
Pierson, P.; George M. Fisher, R.; Hamilton 



Stewart, i?,; W. T. Johnston, D.; Prince A. 
Mousley, D.; John K. Healev, A; Henry R. 
Smith, D.; James B. Oberly, D. Total- 
Democrats. 10; Republicans, 3. 

Clerk of Council— W. P. Morrison, D. 

Water CommiSisioners — William T. Porter, D. ; 
Dr. J. P. Pyle, D.: Alfred Betts, R. 

Chief Engineer Water Department — Jo.'-eph A. 
Bond, R. 

Street and Sewer Directors— A. S. Webster, 
D.: William Simmons, R., President; J. D. 
Carter, R. 

Street Commissioner— Yranli W. Pierson, if. 

Chief Engineer— G. H. Boughman, D. 

Engineer in Charge of Sewers— T. Chalkley 
Hattoii, P. 

Police Commissioners — J. B. Clarksou, R.; A. 
J. Hart, D.; William M. Pyle, R. 

Chief of Police— Eugene Mas.sey, R. 

Superintendent of Police and Fire Alarm Tele- 
graph— J. W. Ayd'on, D. 



DEI/AWARE I.:eGISI/ATURB. 



NEW CASTLE COUNTY. 

Samuel M. Knox, R. 
Francis J. McNultv, D. 
We.bster J. Blakelv, R. 
Robert McFarliu, 'R. 
Benjamin A. Groves, R. 
George M. D. Hart, D. 



SENATE. 

» Harry C. Ellison, R. 

KENT COUNTY. 

James R. Clements, D. 
G. D. Harrington, D. 
J. Frank Allee, R. 
S. John Abbott, R. 
Republicans, 9 ; Democrats, 8. 



Stephen Slaughter, /). 

SUSSEX COUNTY. 

S. S. Pennewell, R. 
E. H. F. Farlow, D. 
I. J. Braznre, R. 
Charles Wright, D. 
Franklin C. Maull, D. 



The Philadelphia Record JUmanac. 



HOUSE OF REPRBSBNTATIVES. 



NEW CASTLE COUNTY. 

James Hitchen, R. 
Samuel H. Baynard, R. 
.lames W. Robertson, R. 
Thomas M. Monaslian, D. 
.lohn W. Healey, D. 
Frank P. Ewin?, R. 
William R. Flinn, R. 
Richard T. Pilling, R. 
William Chandler, R. 
Chaunoev P. Holcomb, D. 
John W. Dayett, R. 
Theodore F. Clark, R. 



James T. Sballcross, D. 
Richard S. Hodgson, J?. 
Andrew J. Wright, D. 

KENT COUNTY. 

Thomas C. Moore, R. 
J. L. Scotten, D. 
John W. Hutchinson, D. 
James P. Aron, R. 
(\ B. Hope, R. 
Herman Gooden, D. 
J. V. McCommons, R. 
W. G. Hardesty, D. 
David Vineyard, D. 



John White, R. 

SUSSEX COUNTY. 

W. B. Clendaniel, R. 
R. R. Layton, A'. 
Wm. Hearn, D 
William J. West, D. 
David W. Ralph, D. 
Shadrach Short, R. 
David J. Long, R. 
H. S. Prettyman, J?. 
Eli Pepper, D. 
E. W. Warren, D. 



Republicans, 21 ; Democrats, 14. On joint ballot— Republicans, 30 ; Democrats, ; 





OFFICIAi; 


VOTE OF 


DFI.AWARF, 


1900. 








PRESIDENT. 


GOVERNOR. 


CONGRESS. 


CONGRESS, 1898. 


PRESIDENT, 1896. 


COUNTIES. 


MCKINLEY, 
REP. 

BRYAN, 
DEM. 


u 


li 


u 


u 




\i 


i . 


i- 


li 


m 


Newcastle . 
Kent .... 
Sussex . . . 


13646, 10644 
3930; 3857 
4959^ 4362 


13485 
3978 
4819 


10636 
3815 
4357 


13481 
3923 
4939 


10880 
4383 


9726 
3577 
4263 


8486 
3236 
3331 


234 

75 
145 


12263 
3567 
4542 


9632 
3157 
3890 


778 232 
90! 115 
101 120 


Totals . . . 
Pluralities . 


2253.5! 18863 

3672[ 


22282 1 18808 
3474 


22343 
3186 


19157 


17566 
2513 


15053 


454 


20372 
3693 


16679 


969 467 



The Prohibitionists polled 537 votes in the State and the Social Democrats 57. 



No 



State of Maryland. 

Goveruot — JOHN WALTER SMITH, i>. Salary, $4500. Term expires, January, 1904. 

Sirrctiiri/ of State— Wilvred Bateman, I). Salary, $2000. Term expires, January, 1904. 

Atloi-iit;/ <7<'uc*-«i— IsiDOR Rayner, X*. Salary, S3000. Termexpires, January, 1904. 

7'/-pn.s«»v*'~MruKAY Vandiver, X). Salary, $2500. Term expires, January, 1902. 

Coin ptroU /■)■—.] I tnnvx W. Herino, D. Salary, $2500. Term expires, January, 1902. 

(terk of Court of Appeals— J. Frank Ford, i>. Salary, $3000. Term expires, 1901. 

State lieportei—W'iLhiA^i T. Brantly, B. Salary, $2000 and fees. 

Aiijiitant-<T,'>ie,-til—Jso. S. Saunders, D. Salary, $2000. Term expires, 1904. 

Brif/iKner-Goiierals—THO^IAS M. MUMFORD, ALF. E. BoOTH, R. B. WarfieLD. 
salary attafhed. Terms expire with that of Governor appointing them. 

Chief Justice Court of Appeals— J xyms McSherry, J). Salary, $4,500. Term expires, 1902. 

Associate iTustices-UKyRY Page, I>. Term expires, 1908. David Fowler, B. Term 
expires, 1904. A. Hunter Boyd, D. Term expires, 1908. I. Thomas Jones, B. Term ex- 
pires, 1914. John P. Briscoe, B. Term expires, 1906. Samuel D. Schmucker, R. Term 
expires, 1914. James A. Pearce, B. Term expires, 1912. Salaries, $4500 each. 

State Librarian— '^iRS. ANNA B. Jeffers. Salary, $1500. Term expires, January, 1904. 

Chief of Bureau of Statistics— Thos. A. Smith, B. Salary, $2500. Term expires, 1904. 

Superintendent of State House— CnxRLES W. Haslup, B. Salary, $1000. Term ex- 
pires, 1904. 

Land Comniissionei — E. Stanley Toadvin, B. Salary, $1500. Term expires, 1904. 

Tax Commissione) — R. P. Graham, R. Salary, $2500. Term expires, 1902. 

Insurance Commissioner— LhOYD W1LKIN.S0N, B. Salary, $2500. Term expires, 1902. 

Hoard of Public Works — Governor, Treasurer and Comptroller. 

State Board of Health— Br. John Morris, Wm. H. Welch, Howard Brattan. Terms 
expire, 1902. (One vacancy.) 

State Board of Education— Clw'jo^ Purnell, John G. Rogers, Joseph M. Gushing, 
Zadoc C. Wharton. 

Comtnissioners of Fharmacy—DAmBh R. MILLARD, J. Webb Foster, Ernest Quandt. 

Examiners of Dental A'wrgrerj/— Albert King, Wm. T. Kelly, Fred. F. Drew, A. C. 
McCURDY, Edward Nelson, P. Ernest Sas,sceb. 

Fish Commissioners— Jesse W. Downey, Clarence L. Vincent. Terms expire, 1904. 

State Tax Appeal Board— Comptroller, Treasurer and State Tax Commissioner. 

Commander of State Fisheri/ Force— T. C. B. Howard. Salary, $1500. Clerk, L. 
Lowndes. Salary, $700. Terms expire, 1904. 

TJNITFD STATES OFFICIAI/S. 

Bistrict Judge— Thomas J. Morris, R. I Marshal— WWIislto. F. Airey, R. 

Bistrict Attorney— John C. Rose, R. \ Clerk of Bistrict Court— James W. Chew, B. 

Intemai Revenue Collector— Benj. F. Parlett, R. 



The Philadelphia Record JUmanac. 



THE I/EGISI.ATTJRE. 

Salary in each House, $.t per diem for ninety days. 
THE SENATE. 



COUNTIES AND CITY. 

Allegany David E. Dick, R. 

Anne Arundel. . . Dr. Elijah Williams, D. 
Baltimore City . . Jacob M. Moses, D. 

Olin Bryan, D. 

Louis Putzel, R. 

Baltimore John Hubner, D. 

Calvert Charles L. Marsh, R. 

Caroline Robert M. Messick, R. 

Carroll Johnzie E. Beasraan, D. 

Cecil Austin L. Crothers, D. 

Charles George T. C. Gray, 



Dorchester 
Frederick . 



W. F. Applegarth, D. 
Jacob Rohrback, IK 



COUNTIES. 

Garrett Robert A. Ravenscroft.i?. 

Harford Stevenson A.Williams, A\ 

Howard William B. Peter, D. 

Kent James H. Baker, R. 

Montgonierv . . . W. Viers Bouic, Jr., D. 
Prince George's . . W. B. Clagett, D. 
Queen Anne's . . . James E. Kirwin, /). 

Somerset Lemuel E. P. Dennis, R. 

St. Mary's WashingtonWilkinson,/?. 

Talbot H. Clay Dodson, Jf. 

Washington . . . . B. Abner Betts, D. 

Wicomico Marion V.Brewington,/>. 

Worcester John P. Moore, D. 



ALLEGANY. 

Albert Frenzel, R. 
Joseph Kadclifle, R. 
William Clo.se, R. 
J. H. Critchfleld, R. 
E. Earl Graff, R. 

ANNE ARtJNDEL. 

Jlilton Ditty, R. 
3. Frank Krems, R. 
Byron Phelps, R. 
Jas. D. Feldmeyer, R. 

BALTIMORE CITY. 

H. B. Scrimger, D. 
Christ. J. Dunn, I). 
Frank J. Gately, D. 
George L. Brown, D. 
August C. Mencke, D. 
Forrest Bramble, D. 
A. Leo Knott, D. 
Martin Lehniayer, D. 
Ferd. C. Latrobe, D. 
John L. Sanford, 1). 
Francis P. Curtis, D. 
William Duncan, D. 
Oscar C. Martenet, D. 
Chas. E. Siegmund,Z>. 
William L. Cover, D. 
A. J. Robinson, D. 
John Real, D. 
Wm. A. Johnson, D, 



HOUSE OF DEI/EGATES. 

BALTIMORE COUNTY. | FREDERICK. 



Edw. S. W. Choate, D. 
R. C. Stewart, D. 
George W. Truitt, D. 
Henry P. Mann, D 
Joseph Sandman, D. 
Joseph Jeffers, D. 

CALVERT. 

Oliver D. Simmons, R. 
Samuel L. Gibson, R. 

CAROLINE. 

Calvin Satterfield, D. 
J. Frank Lednum, D. 

CARROLL. 

E. M. Anderson, D. 
Millon M. Norris, D. 
Sam. H. Hoffacker, D. 
Michael E. Walsh, D. 

CECIL. 

Frank H. Mackie, D. 
Samuel J. Kevs, 1>. 
John H. Kimble, D. 

CHARLES. 

Jas. DeB. Walbach, R. 
S. S. Lancaster, R. 

DORCHESTER. 

Francis P. Corkran,D. 
J. B. Andrews, R. 
Benj. J. Linthicnm,Z>. 



Arthur D. Willard, D. 
Roscoe Svveadner, D. 
J. Edward Lutz, D. 
Lorenzo S. Gardner,!*. 
J. P. T. Mathias, D. 

GARRETT. 

Merritt Wilson, R. 
Patrick E. Finzel, R. 

HARFORD. 

Noble L. Mitchell, D. 
Howard Proctor, D. 
Wm. B. Hopkins, D. 
James W. Foster, D. 

HOWARD. 

Humph. D. Wolfe, D. 
Grosvenor Hanson, D. 

KENT. 

A. M. Kendall, R. 
C. Preston Norris, R. 

MONTGOMERY. 

Oliver H. P. Clark, D 
James E. Deets, D. 
Josiah J. Hutton, D. 

PRINCE GEORGE'S. 

George B. Merrick, J?. 
Clay D. Perkins, R. 
John B Contee, D. 



On joint ballot : Republicans, 36 ; Democrats, i 
VOTE OF MARYI^AND. 



QL'EEN ANNE'S. 

Eugene L. Dudley, D. 
John T. Norman, D. 
William D. Smith, D. 

SOJIERSET. 

William E. Ward, R. 
Walter W. Dryden, i?. 
H. C. Disharoon, R. 

ST. JIARY'S. 

Francis V. King, D. 
John R. Garner, D. 

TA LBOT. 

WilHaiii Collins, D. 
William C. DwWvxJ). 
William Willis, D. 

WASHINGTON. 

Albert J. Long, D. 
Daniel H. Staley, D. 
Charles G. Biugs, R. 
Jos. W. Woltihger, R. 

WICOMICO. 

JonathanH. Waller,!). 
Thomas S. Roberts, !». 
Isaac S. Bennett, D. 

WORCESTER. 
Lloyd Wilkinson, D. 
Henrv J. Anderson, D. 
Charles F. Truitt, D. 



Tounties and Clt}-. 



Allegany 

Anne Arundel.. 
Baltimore City. 
Baltimore Co... 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charle.s 

Dorchester 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery 

Prince George'? 
Queen Anne's .. 

Somerset 

St. Mary's 

Talbot 

Washington .. .. 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



Totals 13621 



President, 1900. 



Dl'Kin 
ley 
K.p. 



1414 
1798 
4105 
2960 
2271 
3309 
6393 
2264 
3146 
1800 
2426 
335.5 
3456 
1873 
2855 



3298 
51979 
9147 



1368 
2734 
5824 
1283 
3509 
1905 
2077 
3679 
2787 
2553 
2019 
1585 
2233 



285 
103 
1261 
349 



(jovernor, 1899. 
Lowndes Smith 



3877 
2609 
2129 
3150 
.5741 
1940 



1677 
2782 
1766 
2329 
4998 
2325 
1588 



4190 
3564 
5.5419 
9547 
955 
1803 
4065 
3127 
1341 
3244 
5867 
1265 
3410 
2050 
2284 
3397 
2936 
2549 
2696 



122271 4582 | 391 908 116286 128409 100026 93731 136978 104746 2507 



4521 2.527 

37464 38126 
5969 6528 
1219 761 
1.503 1462 
3442 3043 
2458 2315 
2665 1083 
2600 2559 
5477 1 4318 
1408] 969 
2597 2687 
1286 1639 
2089 2024 
2818 2647 
2827 2304 
1628 1 2150 
20611 2166 



1285 



2158 1876 
4654 3911 
21651 2267 
1619 2244 



President, 189C. 
jrKin-i_ fill- 

ley I «!;•"" n.er 
Rep. I 1""°- S.M.D 



5464 
4030 
61965 

1294 
1686 
4047 
3128 
2117 



1651 
3841 

2908 



3219 
32.50 
1917 
2044 
2646 
2542 



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American Turf. 



Trotting in Harness. 

Fastest mile, 2.033=^ (against time): The Ab- 
bott, b. g. (7), by Chimes, he by Election- 
eer, dam Nettie King, by Mambrino King. 
Time by quarters, 313.^, I.O214, 1.31%, 
2.0334. Time of each quarter, 31^^, 30j|, 
29%, 31K. Terre Haute, Ind.,Sept. 29, 1900. 
The Abbott, b. g. (6), by Chimes, trotted 
the la^t quarter of a slow mile in 29 sec- 
onds, at Louisville, Ky., Sept. 29, 189^. 

Fastest mile by a mare, 2.03% (against time) : 
Alix, b. m. (6), by Patronage, he byPan- 
coast, dam Atlanta, by Attorney, he by 
Harold. Time by quarters, 30>^, 1.01%, 
1.32%, 2.03%. Galesburg, 111., Sept. 19, 1894. 

Fastest mile by a stallion, 2.04 (against time): 
Cresceus, ch. s. (6), by Robert McGregor, 
he by Major Edsall, dam Mabel, by Mam- 
brino Howard. Time by quarters , 31%, 
1.01>^, 1.33, 2.01, Cleveland, Ohio, Oct. 
6, 1900. 

Fastest mile by a stallion in a race, 2.05% 
(third heat): Directum, blk. s. (4), by Di- 
rector, dam Stemwinder, by Venture, 
beating Hazel Wilkes and Nightingale. 
Nashville, Tenn.,Oct. 18, 1893. In atrial 
against time at Fleetwood Park, N. Y., 
Sept. 4, 1893, Directum trotted the first 
half in 1.00i%, finishing the mile in 2.07. 

Fastest mile by a gelding in a race, 2.05>^ 
(second heat): Azote, b. g. (8), by Whips, 
beating Beuzetta, Klamath and Dandy 
Jim. Fleetwood Park, New York, Aug. 
28, 1895. 

Fastest mile by a mare in a race with other 
horses, 2.05% (third heat): Alix, b. m. (6), 
by Patronage, dam Atlanta, by Attornev, 
beating Rvland T., Pixley, Belle Vara 
and Walter E. Terre Haute, Ind., Sept. 
17, 1894. 

Fastest mile to a high-wheel sulky, 2.08% 
(against time over a kite-shaped track): 
Sunol, b. m. (5), by Electioneer, dam 
Waiana, by General Benton. Stockton, 
Cal., Oct. 20, 1891. 2.08K (circular track): 
Maud S., ch. m. (11), by Harold, he by 
Rysdyk's Hambletonian, dam Miss Rus- 
sell, by Pilot, Jr. Cleveland, Ohio, July 
30, 1885. 

Fastest mile over a half-mile track, 2.09% 
(against tirje): Cresceus, ch. s. (6), by 
Robert McGregor. Toledo, Ohio, Oct. 13, 
1900; 2.1034 (third heat): Dandy Jim (12), 
g. g., by Young Jim, dam Capara, by 
Daniel Lambert, beating McW., West 
Wilkes and Pilot Boy. Crawfordville, 
lud., Sept. 11, 1897. 

Fastest two consecutive heats, 2.06%, 2.05% 
(second and third heats): Alix, b. m. (6), 
by Patronage, dam Atlanta, by Attorney, 
beating Ryland T., Pixlev, Belle Vara 
and Walter E. Terre Haute, Ind., Sept. 
17, 1894. 

Fastest three consecutive heats, 2.06, 2.06%, 
2.0534 : Alix, b. m. (6), by Patronage, 
dam Atlanta, by Attorney, beating Ry- 
land T., Pixley, Belle Vara and Walter 
E. Terre Haute, Ind., Sept. 17, 1894. 

Fastest three consecutive heats by a stallion, 
2.073^,2.06,2.06: Cresceus, ch. s. (6), ly 
Robert McGregor, dam Mabel, bv Mam- 
brino Howard, beating Grattan Boy and 
Charley Herr. Columbus, O., Aug. 2, 
1900. 

Fastest three heats over a half-mile track, 
2.12%, 2.103^, 2.11%. Won by Pat L., b. 8. 
(4), by Republican, dam Nellie, by Pat 



McMahon, beating Dandy Jim, Colonel 
Dickey and Hurlbert. Huntington, Ind . , 
Sept. 11, 1896. 

Fastest four-heat race, 2.09, 2.0^%, 2.075f 
2.08. Won in the first, second and fourtli 
heats by Fantasy, b. m. (6), by Chimes, 
dam Homora, by Almonarch, beating 
Kentucky, Union, Onoqua, Beuzetta and 
William Penn. Readville Track, near 
Boston, Mass., Aug. 27 and 28 (last heat> 
on 28th), 1896. 

Fastest five-heat race, 2.07%, 2.07%, 2.07%, 
2.07%, 2.08%. Won in last three heats 
by Cresceus, ch. s. (•;), by Robert Mc- 
Gregor. $20,000 stallion race. Charley 
Herr, b. s., by Alfred G , won first and 
second heats. Grattan Boy, Arion, Loni 
Vincent, Benton M. and J"iipe also com- 
peted. Readville, Mass., Sept. 27, 1900. 

Fastes-t six-heat race, 2.06%, 2.073-;;, 2.10V„, 
2.09%, 2.12%, 2.11%. Won in first, fourth 
and sixth heats by Bingen, br. s. (o), by 
May King, dam Young Miss, by Young 
Jim, beating Caid, Georgianna, Tommy 
Britton, Captain Jack, Cut Glass, Hans- 
McGregor, Caryle Carne and Fred. H. 
Louisville, Ky., Sept. 26, 1898. 

Fastest seven-heat race, 2.07%, 2.083^, 2.10>i, 
2.09%, 2.10%, 2.12, 2.1034. Won in the lasl 
three heats by Pat L., b. c. (4), by Repub- 
lican, dam Nellie, by Pat McMahon, beat 
ing Fantasy (winner of second and third 
heats), William Penn (winner of fourth 
heat), and Beuzetta (winner of first heat). 
Lexington, Ky., Oct. 16, 1896. 

Fastest eight-heat race, 2.I234, 2.11, 2.12, 2.12, 
2.13, 2.133^,. 2.13%, 2.14%. Won in tlie 
fourth, seventh and eighth heats by 
Bouncer, b. f. (4), by Hummer, dam 
Musette, by Mambrino Patchen, beating 
Altao, Bertie R., Geneva, Maggie Sher- 
man, Gretchen, Token and Sixty-six. 
Detroit, Mich., July 24, 1895. 

Fastest mile by a 2-year-old in a race, 2.13^^ 
(second heat): Jupe, b. c, by Allie Wil- 
kes, dam by Mambrino Patchen, beating 
Mikado. Readville, Mass., Sept. 29, 1896. 
Time of first heat, 2.26%. Best by a 2- 
year-old filly, 2.14 (second heat): Janie T., 
b. f , by Bow Bells, dam Nida, by Monon. 
beating Dutchman, Charley Herr, Lady 
Geraldine, Weightmau, Leonard Bell and 
Kate. Lexington, Ky., Oct. 15, 1897 
Time of first heat, 2.17 ; also won bv 
Janie T. 

2 miles, against time, 4.27^^: Caid (2.07%) 

br. s. (7), by Highwood, dam Nikita Cos- 
sack, by Don Co.'^sack, beating Colonel 
Kuser, Athanio, Bonnatella and Royal 
Baron. Vienna, Austria, Sept. 27, 1900. 
4.32: Greenlander, blk. s. (11), by Prin- 
cess, dam Juno, by Hambletonian. Terre 
Haute, Ind., Nov. 4, 1893. In a race, in 
America, 4.363^: Nightingale, ch. m., by 
Mambrino King, dam Minnequa Maid, 
by Wood's Hambletonian, beating Green- 
lander. Buffalo, N. Y., Aug. 9, 1894. 

3 miles against time, 6.553., : Nightingale, ch. 

m. (8), by Mambrino King, dam Minne- 
qua Maid, by Wood's Hambletonian. 
Nashville, Tenn., Oct 20, 1893. In a 
dash race, 7.19%: Bishop Hero, b. g. 
(10), by Bishop, dam Lida Kendall, by 
Hereof Thorudale. Oakland, Cal., Oct. 
7, 1893. 

4 miles, against time, 9.58 : Polly G., b. m , 



The Philadelphia Record Jtlmanac. 



(11), by Wilkomouiit, he hv Almont Tilot. 
Blackpool track, England, Sept. 7, 1899. 

.5 miles in a race, 12.30% : Bishop Hero, b. g. 
(10), by Bishop, dam Lida Kendall, by 
Hero of Thorndale, beating Robert L., 
Little Witch and Antaire. Oakland, 
Cal., Oct. 4, 1893. 

10 miles, against time, 26.15: Pascal, blk. g., 
bv Pascarel, dam by Imp. Leamington. 
Fleetwood Park, New York, Nov. 2, 1893. 
Time by miles : First mile, 2.32>^ ; second 
mile, 5.04^4; third mile, 7.37; fourth mile, 
10.13; fifth mile, 12.51%; sixth mile, 
15.3134; seventh mile, IS.IO^^ ; eighth 
mile, 20.49%; ninth mile, 23.32)^ ; tenth 
mile, 26.15. Average, 2.37%. 

20 miles, 58.25: Captain Megowen, r. g., by 
Sovereign. Riverside Course, Boston, Oct. 
31. 1865. 

30 miles, against time, 1.47.59: General Tay- 
lor, g. s., bv Morse Horse, darji Flora. 
San Francisco, Cal., Feb. 2), 1857. 

50 miles, 3. .55. 40^2: Ariel, b. m. Albany, N. 
Y., Mav 5, 1846. 

100 miles, 8.56.01: Conqueror, b. g., by Bell- 
founder, dam Lady McClaire, by Imp. 
Bellfounder. Centreville, L. I., Nov. 12, 
1853. 

Trotting Stallion Performances. 

2 07^2, 2.06, 2.06. Won by Cresceus, ch. s. (6), 
b"y Robert McGregor, dam Mabel, by 
Mambrino Howard, beating Grattan Boy 
and Charley Herr. Columbus, O., August 
2, 1900. 

2.0714, 2.O7I4', 2.0714, 2.071,, 2.08%. Won in 
the last three heats by Cresceus, ch. s. 
(6), by Robert McGregor. Charley Herr, 

b. s., by Alfred G., won first and second 
heats. Grattan Boy, Ariou, Lord Vin- 
cent, Benton M. and Jupe also started. 
$20,000 stallion race. Readville, Mass., 
Sept. 27, 1900. 

2.O814, 2.08%, 2.O814. Won by Tommy Brit- 
ton, br. s. (6) by Liberty Bell, dam Keep- 
sake, by Pancoast, beating Cresceus, 
Elloree, Bouncer, Pilatus, Caracalla and 
Louise Mac. Columbus, O., Aug. 4, 1899. 

2.09, 2.08, 2.09. Won by Tommy Britton, br. s. 
(6), by Liberty Bell, beating Copeland, 
Little Edgar, Vendor and Brown Dick. 
Hedrick, la., Aug. 12, 1899. 

2.06%, 2.071^, 2.103^, 2.091^, 2.121^, 2.11%. 
Won in first, fourth and sixth neats by 
Bingen, br. s. (5), by May King, dam 
Young Miss, by Young Jim, beating 
Caid, Georgianna, Tommy Britton, Cap- 
tain Jack, Cut Glass, Hans McGregor, 
Caryle Came and Fred B. Louisville, 
Ky., Sept. 26, 1898. 

2.C7%, 2.09, 2.09. Won by William Penn, b. s., 
by Santa Claus, dam Lulu M., by Daunt- 
less, beating Pilot Boy, Dandv Jim and 
Foxmont. Springfield, 111., Oct. 1,1897. 

2.13%, 2.14, 2.05%. Won by Directum, blk. c. 
(4), by Director, dam Stemwinder, by 
Venture, beating Hazel Wilkes and Night- 
ingale. Nashville, Tenn., Oct. 18, 1893. 

2.1014, 2.07%, 2.08%. Won by Directum, blk. 

c. (4), by Director, dam Stemwinder, by 
Venture, beating the pacer Mascot (2.04) 
in a match race. Fleetwood Park, New 
York, Nov. 2, 1893. 

2.0914 2.O814, 2.081-^, 2.08. Won by Directum, 
blk. s. (4), by Director, dam Stemwinder, 
by Venture, in the first, third and fourth 
heats, beating Pixley, Pamlico, Walter 
E., Magnolia and Greenleaf Lexington, 
Ky., Oct. 11. 1893. 

2.07%, 2.O814, 2.10},^, 2.0914,- 2.101;^, 2.12, 2.10%. 
Won in the last three heats by Pat L., b. 



c. (4), by Republican, dam Nellie, by Pat 
McMahon, beating Fantasy, William 
Penn and Beuzetta. Lexington, Ky., 
Oct. 16, 1896. 
I,ist of Champion Trotting Stallions. 
18,i8— Ethan Allen, by Black Hawk . . 2.28 
1860— George M. Patehen, by Cassius M. 

Clav 2.23K 

1868— Fearnaught, by Morill 'i:i?,% 

1868— George Wilkes, by Hambletonian 2.22 
1872- Jay Gould, by Hambletonian . . 2.2 IJ^ 

1874— Smuggler, by Blanco 2.20% 

1874— Mambrino Gift, by Mambrino 

Pilot 2.20 

1876 — Smuggler, bv Blanco 2.1514 

1884— Phallas, bv Dictator 2.13i4 

1889— Axtell, by William L 2.12 

1890— Nelson, by Young RolCe 2.10% 

ISOl—Nelson, bv Young Rolfe 2.10 

1S91— Allerton, by Jay Bird 2.0914 

1S91— Palo Alto, by Electioneer " '" ' 



i'^ 



-Kremlin, by Lord Russell 

1893— Directum, bv Director 2.0514 

1900— Cresceus, by Robert JIc(;regiir . 2.04 

Trotting- Double Teams. 

2.12%: Belle Hamlin, b. m., by Hamlin's 
Almont, Jr., and Honest George, b. g., by 
Albert. Providence, R. I., Sept. 23, 1892. 

2.121^ (against time, amateur driver): Boral- 
ma, ch. g., by Boreal and Senator L., b. g., 
by West Cloud, driven by John Shep- 
ard. Readville, Mass., Oct. 24, 1900. 

2.13: Belle Hamlin, b. m., and Globe, br. g., 
both bv Hamlin's Almont, Jr. Detroit, 
Mich., july22, 1892. The same team trotted 
a mile over the Kirkwood, Del., kite- 
j shaped track in 2.12, July 4, 1892. The 

flnisli was four feet lower than the start, 
making the track down hill all the way. 

2.13: Belle Hamlin and Justina, bay mares, 
! both by Hamlin's Almont, Jr. Inde- 

pendence, la. (kite track), Oct. 27, 1890. 

2.13%: Aubine, br. m., by Young Rolfe and 
Zembia, br. m., by Almont. Terre Haute, 
Ind., Oct. 25,1893. 

2.15%, best in a race: Sallie Simmons, br..m, 
by Simmons and Roseleaf blk. m., by 
Goldleaf, beating Azote and Answer. 
Columbus, Ohio, Sept. 27, 1894. Happv 
Medium, dam Lady Jenkins, by Black 
Jack and Neta Medium, b. m., by Happy 
Medium, dam Sally, by Yankee Tricks. 
Chicago, 111., Sept. 25, 1885. 

2.19, to top road wagon, agaipst time: Lynn 
W., br. g., by Sponseller Tuckahoe, dam 
Topsy, by Rollman Horse and Clayton, 
b. g..'by Harrv Clav, dam Star MaiVl, by 
Jupiter Abdaliah. Fleetwood Park, New 
York, May 28, 1891. 

Trotting to Wagon. 

1 mile, 2.051^ (against time) : The Abbott, b. 
g. (7), by Chimes, dam Nettie King, by 
Mambrino King. Time by quarters, .3314, 
1.05, 1.36, 2.053/2- Hartford, Conn., Sept. 
7, 190O. 2:07 (amateur driver) against 
time: Lucille, b. m., by Brummel, dam 
Fanny K., by Major Benton, driven by 
C. K. G. Billings. Lexington, Ky., Oct. 
6, 1900. 2.10, 2.11, fastest two consecu- 
tive heats in a race : John A. McKerron, 
b. s. (5) by Nutwood Wilkes, dam Ingar, 
'by Director, driven by his owner, H. K. 
Devereux, beating Senator L., Temper, 
Burlington Boy, Miss Whitney and 
Nemoline. Readville, Mass., Sept. 19,1900. 
2.13% (against time, over a half-mile 
track): Cresceus, ch. s. (6), by Robert 
McGregor, dam Mabel, by Mambrino 
Howard. Toledo, Ohio, Oct. 13, 1900. 



The Philadelphia Record JUmanac. 



Fastest three consecutive heats, 2.163^, 2.17, 
2.17: Hopeful. Chicago, 111., Oct. 12, 1878. 

2 miles, 4.56;^: General Butler, blk. g., by 

Smith Burr. Long Island, June 18, 1863. 
Dexter, br. g., by Rvsdyk's Hambleto- 
nian. Long Island, Oct. 27, 1865. 

3 miles, l.bZ%: Prince, ch. g., by Woodpecker. 

Centreville, L. I., Sept. 15, 1857. 
5 miles, 13.13>^: Little Mac. Fashion Course, 

L. I., Oct. 29, 1863. 
10 miles, 28.02ii; John Stewart, b. g., by Tom 

Wonder. Bo.ston, June 30, 1868. 
20 miles, 5S.57: Controller, b. g., by May Boy. 

San Francisco, Cal., April 20, 1878. 
50 miles, 3.58.W: Spangle, r. g. Union Course, 

L. I., Oct. 15, 1855. 

Trotting under Saddle. 

1 mile, 2.15-^^: Great Eastern, br. g., by Walk- 

ill Chief, by Rysdyk's Hambletonian ; 
ridden bv Charles S. Green. Fleetwood 
Park, N. Y., Sept. 22, 1877. 

2 miles, 4.533>^: George M. Patchen, b. s., by 

Cassius M. Clay. Union Course, L. I., 
June 12, 1860. 

3 miles, I.Z'2%: Dutchman, b. g., by Tippoo 

Sahib, Jr. Beacon Course, Hoboken, N. J., 
Aug. 1, 1839. 

4 miles, in. 51: Dutchman, b. g., by Tippoo Sa- 

hib, Jr. Centreville Course, L.I., May,1836. 
Trotting with Running Mate. 

1 mile, 2. 03'. 2: Ayres P., ch. g., by Prosper 
Merimee, dam Annie, by Rustic. Kirk- 
wood, Del. (kite track), July 4, 1893. 

1 mile, 2.06: H.B. Winship, blk. g.,by Aristos, 
dam by Colonel Moulton, Gabe Case as 
mate ; driven by J. Golden. Narragansett 
Park, Providen(;e, R. I., Aug. 1, 1884. 

1 mile, 2.08^2: Frank, b. g., by Abraham (son 
of Daniel Lambert), J. O. Nay as mate; 
driven by John Murphv. Prospect Park, 
Brooklyn, N. Y., Nov. 15, 1883. 

The best record to harness of these horses at 
the time of these performances was as 
follows: Ayres P., 2.23; Frank, 2.23%; 
H. B. Winship, 2.20>4. 

Tandem Trotting. 

1 mile, 2.32: Mambrino Sparkle, b. m., and Wil- 
liam II., b. g. Cleveland, O., Sept. 16,1886. 
Trotting Three Hooked Together. 

1 mile, 2.14: Belle Hamlin, Globe and Jus- 
tina, all by Hamlin's Almont, Jr. ; bred, 
owned and trained by C. J. Hamlin, 
Buflalo, N. Y. ; driven bv E. F. Geers. 
Cleveland, Ohio, July 31, 1891. 
Four-in-Hand Trotting. 

1 mile, 2.30 (against time): Damiana, Bellnut, 
Maud V. and Nutspia; property of James 
Stinson. Washington Park, Chicago, 111., 
July 4, 1896. 

Six-in-Hand Trotting. 

1 mile, 2.58V2: Driven by Lawson N. Fuller. 
Fleetwood Course, New Y'ork, June 24, 
1897. 

Eight-in-Hand Trotting. 

1 mile, 3.183^: Driven by Lawson N. Fuller. 
Fleetwood Course, New Y'ork, June 24, 



2.153^ (first heat), Lilly Y'oung, 
by Young Fullerton, dam Novi 



Philadelphia Track Records. 

BE^I^MONT COURSE. 

TKOTTING. 

Against time, 2.08^4 : Alix, b.m.by Patronage; 

driven by Andy IMcDowell. Nov. 7, 1894. 
Inarace, 2.1314 (third heatj: Bemni,br.s.(7), 

by Artillery ; driven by John E. Turner. 

Oct. 17, 1893. 
To bicycle-wheel road wagon, in a race, 



ch. m.. 
Nova C, by 
Ten Broeck, driven by Michael Sulli- 
van, beating Molo. Oct. 27, 1900. 

To high-wheel road wagon, in a race, 2.2\y^: 
Captain Lyons, b. s., by Sweepstakes"; 
driven by Fred. Gerker. June 20, 1894. 

To bicycle-wheel road wagon, against time, 
2.15%: Sylvester K., b. g.,by Lambertus ; 
driven by James W. Cooke. Oct. 25, 1895. 

To .saddle, 2.19>2: McLeod, br. g., by Hemp- 
hill's Patchen ; ridden bv George A. Sin- 
gerly. Sept. 28, 1885. Rider weighed 
149 pounds. 

Double team, 2.133^: Belle Hamlin, b.m., and 
Globe, b. g., both by Almont, Jr. ; driven 
by Ed. Geers. May 25, 1892. To road 
wagon, 2.15 : Red Bee, b. g., by Redtield 
and Ackerland,b.g., by Warlock ; owned 
by E. T. Stotesbury, driven bv George 
M. Webb. October 11, 1898. To road 
wagon, with amateur driver, 2.18'., 
(against time): King Harry, b. g., by 
Red King, and John P. Siewart, b. g., by 
Belmont Jr.; owned and driven bv Frank 
Bower. Oct. 26, 1899. In a racei 2.183^ : 
Dttinger, br. g., 2.09%, by Dorsey's Nephew 
and Jacksonian, b. g.. 2.133-^, by Auto- 
graph ; owned and driven by Jacob Jus- 
tice ; beating D. P. S. Nichols team 
Paragon and Kapolina. Sept. 22, 1899. 

With running mate, 2.10%: Ayres P., ch. g., 
by Prosper Merimee. Oct. 5. 1893. 

Tandem, 2.52% (against time): Lady Lorain, 
ch. m., and Wiltonene, blk. m., by Wil- 
ton ; driven by R. Cortland Horr. Oct. 
13, 1897. 

Four-in-hand coach, 4.24% : driven by S. 
MegargeeWright. Oct. 15, 1896. 

PACING. 

Against time, 1.59% (.283^, .5734:, 1.283^): Star 
Pointer, b. s. (91, by Brown Hal; driven 
by David McClary. Sept. 17, 1898. 
a race, 2.(143^ (lirst heat): Star Pointer, 
b. s. (7), by Brown Hal, dam Sweep- 
stakes ; driven by David McClary, heal- 
ing Joe Patchen. Nov. 17, 1896. 

three consecutive heats, 2.043<;, 
2.053-^, 2.06: Star Pointer, b. s. (7), by 
Brown Hal : driven by David McClary, 
beating Joe Patchen. Nov. 17, 1896. 

To bicycle-wheel road wagon, against time, 
professional driver, 2.II34. Patsy K., b. 
g., by Billy Sherman, Jr., dam untraced, 
driven bv Stote R. Clark, Nov. ], 1900. 
Time by quarters, 33, 1.0534', 1.37%, 2.II3/4. 

To bicycle-wheel road wagon, i;.13 (first heati: 
Claus Forester, b. s., bv Santa Clans; 
driven by John T. Strickland, beating 
Robert W. Oct. 30, 1897. 2.123^ (against 
time): Bright Light, b. m., by Dark 
Night ; driven by M. H. Goodin. Oct. 
20, 1898. Time by quarters, .323^0, 1.05, 
1.393^, 2.1234. 

Withoutriderordriver, 2.073^ (against time): 
Marion Mills, b. m., by Harry Mills. 
Oct. 28, 1897. 

Double team, 2.09: John R. Gentry, b. s., by 
Ashland Wilkes, and Robert j"., b. g., by 
Hartford ; driven by E. R. Bowne. Sept. 
22, 1897. 

Mixed tandem te:im, 2A1% (agninst time) : 
Helen M. (trotter), b.m., by ^'argrave, and 
Dolly B. (pacer), blk. m., by George B. : 
driven by Robert A. Smith. Nov. 18, 1897. 

POINT BRBE3E COURSE. 

TROTTING. 

Fastest mile, 2.10 (third heat) : Azote, b. g., by 
Whips, beating Nightingale and Phoebe 
Wilkes. Nov. 2, 1894. 



In 



The Philadelphia Record JUmanac. 



Fastest three consecutive heats. 2.10%, 2.10?4, 
2.10. Won by Azote, b. g., by Whips, 
beating Nightingale and Phcebe Wilkes ; 
driven by Andy McDowell. Nov. 2, 1894. 

Double team, 2.1534: Belle Hamlin, b. m., and 
Justina, b. ra., both by Hamlin's Almont ; 
driven by Ed. Geers. Sept. 20, 1890. 

2.19% (against time, amateur driver) : King 
Harry, b. g., by Red King and John P. 
Stewart, b. g., by Belmont, Jr., driven by 
Frank Bower. Aug. 2, 19t)0. 

To road wagon, 2:2.0^^ (second heat) : Carl 
Carney, g. g., by Hanibletonian Mam- 
brino, beating Capt. Jack ; driven by 
Robert A. Smith. Nov. 16, 1898. 

2.20 (exhibition against time, 2.20}^) : Rob 
Roy, b g., by Pilot Chief, dam Nancy, 
by Lancewood. Driven by R. A. Smith, 
Aug. 15, 1900. 

PACING. 

Against time, 2.06 : Robert J., b. g., by Hart- 



In 



ford ; driven by Ed. Geers. Nov. 2, 1894. 

a race, 2.08: Mascot, b. g., bv Deceive; 

driven by John E. Turner. Sept. 13, 1894. 

Robert J., b. g., by Hartford; driven 

by Ed. Geers. Nov. 2, 1894. 
Fastest three consecutive heats, 2.08, 2.123-2. 

2.06: Robert J., beating John R. Gentry. 

Nov. 2, 1894. 
With running mate, 2.063^: Flying Jib, b. g., 

by Algona ; driven by Monroe Salisburv. 

Nov. 2, 1894. 
To road wagon, 2.2134 (second heat) : Happi- 
ness, b. m., by Judge Salisbury ; driven 

by M. H. Goodin, beating New York Cen- 



tral. Nov. 7, 1895. Time of first heat, 2.22. 
Against time, 2.173^ : Bright Light, b. m., 
by Dark Night ; driven by M. H. Goodin. 
Oct. 24, 1898. 

Charter Oak Stakes. 

TROTTED AT HARTFORD, f'ONN. — BEST THREE 
IN FIVE HEATS. 

2.19 CLASS. 

1883— Director 2 20 2.18 

2.20 CLASS. 

1884— Harry Wilkes . . 2.17 2.19% 

1885— Joe Davis .... 2.18V< 2.19 

1886— Oliver K 2.16% 2.1634 

1887- Patron 2.17% 2,17 

1888— Spoiford 2.18% 2.1934 

1889— Alcvron 2.1634 '2-173| 

1890— Prince Regent . . 2.193^ 2.1934 
1891— Nightingale (Ham- 
lin's) 2.21% 2.21 

1892— Nightingale (An- 
derson's) .... 2.133-^ 2.143-^ 

2.18 CLASS. 

1893— Harrietta .... 2.12 2.13 
1894— Ralph Wilkes . . 2.l;^>-2 2.13% 

2 17 CLA.SS. 

1898— John Nolan . . . 2.10% 2.09>^ 

2.10 CLASS. 

1809— Lord Vincent . . 2.093 i 2.103^ 

2.15 CLA.SS. 

1900— Gcorgena .... 2.073 .^ -.09i<^ 



2.1934 



2.21% 

2.23% 

2.18 

2.18 

2.18% 

2.193^ 

2.193i 

2.2534 

2.1434 



2.16^ 
2.10^4' 



2.10% 
2.1034 



The Following Horses have in Succession I,owered the Mile Trotting Record. 



1810, 
1824, 
1830, 
1834, 
1843, 
1844, 
1852, 
1853, 
1856, 
1859, 
18(55, 
1866, 
1867, 
1871, 
1872, 



Yankee (saddle) 2..59 

A horse from Boston (saddle) . . 2.483^ 

Topgallant (saddle) 2.40 

Burster (saddle) 2.32 

Edwin Forrest (saddle) 2.3134 

Lady Suffolk (saddle) 2.28 

Lady Suftblk (saddle) 2.263^ 

Tacony (saddle) 2.26 

Taconv (saddle) 2.2534 

Flora temple 2.2434 

Flora Temple 2.19% 

Dexter 2.183| 

Dexter 2.18 

Dexter 2.1734 

Goldsmith Maid 2.17 

Goldsmith Maid 2.16% 

Goldsmith Maid 2.14 



1878, Rarus 2.1334 

1879, St.Julien 2.1134 

1880, Maud S 2.10% 

1881, Maud S 2.IO34 

1884, Jav-Eve-See (Aug. 1) 2.10 

1884, Maud S. (Aug. 2) 2.09% 

1884, Maud S. (Nov. 11) 2.09% 

1.S85, Maud S. (July 30) 2.08% 

1891, Sunol (kite-shaped track) .... 2.O834 

PNEUMATIC TIRED SULKY. 

1892, Nancy Hanks (Aug. 17) 2.0734 

1892, Nancy Hanks (Aug. 31) 2.0534 

1S92, Nancy Hanks (Sept. 28) 2.04 

1S94, Alix (Sept. 12) 2.04 

1894, Alix (Sept. 19) 2.03% 

1900. The Abbott (Sept. 25) 2.03% 



Precocious Trotters and Pacers. 

The fastest age records of trotters and pacers, irrespective of sex, is as follows : 

TROTTERS. 
AGE. NAME, DESCRIPTION AND SIRE. PLACE AND DATE. RECORD. 

Yearhng . . Adbell, b. c, by Advertiser San Jose, Cal., Sept. 28, 1894 . . .2.23 

Two years. . Arion, b. c, by Electioneer Stockton, Cal., Nov. 10, 1891 . . . 2.10% 

Three years. Fantasy, b. f, by Chimes Nashville, Tenn., Oct. 17, 1893 . *2.08% 

Four years . Directum, blk. c, by Director Nashville, Tenn., Oct. 18, 1893 . *2.05% 

Fivp vPflrs ^ Kalph Wilkes, ch. s., bv Red Wilkes . . Nashville, Tenn., Oct. 19, 1894 . 2.06% 

^ IBingen, b. s., bv May King Louisville, Ky., Sept. 26, 1898 . *2.06% 

Six years. . Alix, b. m., by Patronage Galesburg, 111., Sept. 19, 1894 . .2.03% 

PACERS. 

Yearling . . Belle Acton, b.f., by Shadeland Onward. Wichita, Kan., Sept. 29, 1893 . . 2.2(^ 

Two years. . Directly, blk. c, bv Direct Galesburg, 111., Sept. 20, 1894 . .2.07% 

Three years. Klatowah.b. c, by Steinwav Louisville, Ky., Sept. 28, 1898 . *2.05>^ 

Four years . Online, b. s., by Shadeland Onward . . Sioux City, Oct. 12, 1894 2.04 

Five years . Coney, blk. g., by McKinney Cleveland, Ohio, July 24, 1900 . *2.02% 

Six years . . Robert J., b. g., by Hartford Terre Haute, Ind., Sept. 14, 1894 . 2.01 34 



The Philadelphia Record JUmanac. 



Trotters 


that h 


NAME. DESCRIPTION. 


AGE. 


The Abbott . . 


b. g. . 


{7).t 


Alix 


. b. m. 


• (6) . t 


Nancy Hanks . 


b. m. 


. (6).t 


Cresceus . . . 


ch. s. 


. (6) . I 


Azote 


. b. g. . 


. («).t 


Direct\ira . . . 


. blk. s. 


• l-iJ ■ t 


Fantasy . . . 


. b. f. . 


. (4). I 




b. s. 


(6) . 1 


Tommy Britton 


br. s. . 


. (7) .1 


Beuzetta . . . 


. b. m. 


. (4).l 


Ralph Wilkes 
Lord Derby . . 


. ch. s. 


. (5) . t 


b.g. 


. (5).l 


Charley Herr . 


br. s. 


( 5) . 1 


Lucille 


b. m. 




Dioiie .... 


b. m. . 


(S) . 1 


Peter the Great 


. b. s. . 


. U).> 


William Penn 


. b. s. . 


. (5) . 1 


Kentucky Lnion ch. m. 


. (6) . I 


Caid 


. br. s. 


• (5) . 1 


Eagle Flanagan 


b.g 


... I 


Klamath . . . 


. b. g. . 


. (11) . 1 


Stamboul . . . 


. br. s. 


. (10) . 1 




. b. s. . 


■ (5) . 


Georgena . . . 


. ch. m. 


. (9) . t 


Fred Kohl . . 


. blk. s. 


. (V) . 


Kremlin . . . 


. b. s. . 


. (0). 


Ryland T. . . 


. b. g. . 


. l9) .1 


Arion .... 


. b. c. . 


. (4) . 


Martha Wilkes 


. b. m. 


. (9) . 


Nightingale . 


. eh. m. 


. (10) . 


Grace Hastings 


. ch. m. 


. (9). 


Grattan Boy . 


. b. s. . 


. (5) . 


John Nolan . 


. b. g. . 


. (4) . 1 








Bolalma . . . 


. ch. g. 


. (4) 



by Chimes 

by Patronage . . . 
by Happy Medium 
by Rob. McGregor. 

by Whips 

by Director .... 
by Chimes .... 
by May King . . . 
by Liberty Bell . . 
by Onward .... 
by Red Wilkes . . 
by Mambrino King 
by Alfred G. . . . 
by Brummel . . . 

by Eros 

by Pilot Medium . 
by Santa Claus . . 
by Aberdeen . . . 
by Highwoorl . . 
by Eagle Bird . . 
by Morookus . . . 

by Sultan 

by Allie Wilke.s . . 
by Epaulet .... 
by Guy Wilkes . . 
by Lord Russell . . 
by Ledger, Jr. . . 
by Electioneer . . 
by Alcyone .... 
by Mambrino King 
by Bayoune Prince 
by Grattan .... 
by Prodigal . . . 
by Kentucky Star 
by Boreal .... 



Terre Haute, Ind. 

Galesburg, 111. . 

Terre Haute, Ind. 

Cleveland, O. . 
, Galesburg, 111. . 

Nashville, Tenn. 
, Terre Haute, Ind. 

Glens Falls, N. Y 

Galesburg, 111. . 

Buffalo, N. Y. . . 

Nashville, Tenn. 

Yonkers, N. Y. . 
, Lexington, Ky. . 

Lexington, Ky. . 
. Santa Rosa, Cal. 

New York. . . . 

Detroit, Mich. . 
, Indianapolis, Ind 

Louisville, Ky. . 

Terre Haute, Ind. 

Columbus, Ohio . 

Stockton, Cal. . 

Hartford, Conn . 
, Hartford, Conn . 
. Columbus, Ohio. 

Nashville, Tenn. 
. Cleveland, O. . . 
. Lexington, Ky. . . 
. Independence, la. 
. Terre Haute, Ind 
. Readville, Mass. 
. Lexington, Ky. . 

Louisville, Ky. . 
. Yonkers, N. Y. . 
. Lexington, Ky. . 



DATE. 

Sept. 25, 1900 
. Sept. 19, 1894 
. Sept. 28, 1892 
. Oct. 6, 1900 . 
. Sept. 5, 1895 
. Oct. 18, 1893 
. Sept. 13, 1894 
. Aug. 17, 1899 
. Aug. 23, 1900 
. Aug. 9, 1895 
. Oct. 19, 1894 
. Sept. 10, 1900 
. Oct. 5, 1900 
. Oct. 6, 1900 
. July 4, 1900 
. Sept. 7, 1899 
. July 25, 1895 
. Aug. 20, 189C 
. Sept. 26, 1898 
. Sept. 21, 1898 
. Aug. 5, 1896 
. Nov. 23, 1892 
. Sept. 1, 1899 
. Sept. 3, 1900 
. Aug. 2, 1899 
. Nov. 12, 1892 
. July 26, 1894 
- Oct. 11,1893 
. Sept. 1, 1892 
. Oct. 4, 1895 . 
. Aug. 26, 1897 
. Oct. 10, 1898 
. Sept. 28, 1898 
. Sept. 10, 1900 
. Oct. 4, 1900 



RECORD. 

. 2.03>4 
. 2.03% 
. 2.04 
. 2.04 
. 2.04% 
. *2.05}4 
. 2.06 
. *2.0()i4 
. 2M\o 
. *2.06% 
. 2.06% 
. *2.07 
. *2.07 
. t2.07 
. 2.071.4 
. *2.07% 
. *2.07i| 
. *2.07i4 
. *2.07% 
. *2.07i^., 

. *2.o-yl 
. 2.01 y^ 
. 2RnVi 

. *2.07y^ 
. 2.07% 
. 2.07% 

:1:S1 

. 2.08 
. *2.08 
. '-2.08 
. *2.08 
.*2.08 
. *2.08 



Fastest Race Records by Heats. 



HEAT. 

1st heat , 
2d heat , 



4th heat. 
5th heat. 
6th heat. 



1st heat . 
2d heat . 
3d heat . 
4th heat. 
5th heat. 
6tb heat. 



NAME. AGE. 

Alix, b. m (6) 

Azote, b. g (8) 

: Alix, b. m (6) 

Directum, blk. s. . (4) 
^ Beuzetta, b. f. . . (,4) 

John Nolan, b. g. . (4) 
, Countess Eve, b.m.(6) 



Star Pointer, b. s. . (8) 
JohnR.Gentry,b.s.(7) 
JoePatchen, blk.s.'8) 
Star Pointer, b. s. . (--) 
Robert J., b. g. . . (8) 
Frank Agan, b. g. (6) 
. Planet, b. s. ... (6) 



by Patronage 
by AVhipt 
by Patronage 
by Director 
by Onward 
by Prodigal 
byNorval . 



PLACE. 

Terre Haute. Ind. 
New York, N. Y. 
Terre Haute, Ind. 
Nashville, Tenn. 
Buffalo, N. Y. . . 
Louisville, Ky . 
Terre Haute, Ind. 



by Brown Hal . . Chicago, HI. . . . 

by Ashl'd Wilkes . Glens Falls, N. Y. 

by Patchen Wilkes Columbus, Ohio . 

bv Brown Hal . . Springfield, 111. . 
, by Hartford .... Columbus, Ohio . 
, by Mikagan .... Providence, R. I. 
. bvBonnieM'GregorColumbus, Ohio . 



DATE. RECORD. 

Aug. 17, 1894. 2.06 
Aug. 28, 1895. 2.0534 

Aug.l7,1894)2 0>SV 
Oct. 18,1894M-"^>» 
Aug. 9, 1895 . 2.06% 
Sept 28, 1898 . 2.08 
Sept. 30, 1897. 2. 09 Ji 



Aug. 21, 1897 . 2.02 

Sept. 30, 1896 U mi/ 
, Aug. 6,1897;-°^^ 

Oct. 1, 1897 . 2.00y. 
. Aug. 6, 1896 . 2.02% 

Sept. 11,18% .2.06 
. Aug. 7, 1897 . 2.06% 



Merchants' and Manufacturers' Stakes. 



DRIVER OF 



1890. 

1891 . 

1892 . 

1893 . 
1894. 

1895, 



1899. 
1900 . 



TROTTED AT DETROIT, MICH 
WINNER. SECOND HORSE. 

Hendryx .A.my Lee H. A. Hills 

Walter E Suisun Bob Stewart 

Temple Bar .... Prodigal Geo. Spear 

Nightingale . . . George Pickett 

Siva Miss Lida 

J. M. D. . . . 
The Corporal 
Emma Offut 



BEST THREE IN FIVE HEATS. 

NER. BEST TIME. 

2.18% . 

2.18%. 

2.17i|. 

2.17j|. 

Ino. Goldsmith 2.13 



:i5i| 
. 2.133^ 



Claymore Frank 

„^„ T rj.C. Chandler and \ 

^on L, I j.^ p (jggrs j 

Red Star Joseph Rea 2.12% . 

Rilma Oratorio W. O. Foote 2.11% . 

Directum Kellv . . Belle J John Kelly 2.11%. 

Royal Baron . . . Kingmond Geo. Spear 2.101^ 

Lady Geraldine . Annie Burns ^ ^ <-ino,.c 9 ijs . 



E. F. Geers 



2.14? 



VALUE. 

. 810,000 

. 10,000 

. 10,000 

. 10,000 

. 10,000 

. 10,000 

. 10,000 

. 9,720 

. 10.000 

. io;ooo 

. 11,700 

K'.OOO 



The Philadelphia Record JUmanac. 

other Trotters that have Gone in a.io or Better. 



NAME, DESCRIPTION AND SIRE. RECORD. 

Askey, br. s.,byMcFarland 2.08M 

Directum Kelly, br. c. (4), by Direct . 2.08!4 

Gayton, b. s., by AUerton 2M% 

Nico, b. g. (4), by Arion 2.08^4 

Onoqua, b. m., by Keeler 2.08^:^ 

Pixlev, b. m., by Jay Gould 2.08,1:4 

Sunol", b. m., by Electioneer 2.08'4 

Trevilian, b. s., by Young Jim .... 2.083^ 

The Monlf, b. g., by Chimes 2.08>4 

Derby Princess, blk. m., by Charles 

Derby 2.0Si^ 

Elloree, ch. m.,bv Axtell 2.083^ 

lliilda, b. m., by Guy Wilkes 2.08'.^ 

Lockheart, b. s., by Nutwood 2.08)-^ 

I'hioebe Wilkes, br. in., by Hambletonian 

Wilkes . 2.08>^ 

Belle Vara, b. m., by Vatican 2.08->| 

Lord Clinton, blk. g., by Denning Allen 2.0854 
Lord Vincent, b. s., by St. Vincent . . 2.08'% 

.Maud S., ch. m.. by Harold 2.08% 

Palo Alto, b. s., by Electioneer .... 2.08% 

Bouncer, b. m., by Hummer 2.09 

Dare Devil, blk. s., by Marabrino King 2.09 

.fasper Ayres, b. g., by Iris 2.09 

Kingmoiid, b.g. (5), by King Darlington 2.09 
Lamp Girl, b. m., bv Walker jrorrill . 2 09 
Lesa Wilkes, br. m., by Gay Wilkes . . 2.09 

Nelson, b. s., by Young Rolfe 2.09 

Allerton, br. s., by Jay Bird 'J.iiOVi 

Alameda, by Altamont 2.09% 

Bessie Wilton, blk. m., by Wilton . . . 2.0;i% 

Copeland, br. g., by Del Mar 2.09J4 

David B., ch. g.. by Young Jim . . . .2 09% 
Hazel Kinney, b. m., by JIcKinney . 2.09% 
Magnolia, b.m., by Hawpatch . . . . 2.09I4 
Mattie Patterson, b. m., by Vilandcr . 2.09% 

Monterey, ch. s., by Sidney 2.09% 

Pat L., b. s., by Republican 2.09V:^ 

Countess Eve, b. m., by Norval .... 2.09% 

Mosul, b. g., by Sultan . . . , 2.09% 

Oakland Baron, b. s., by Baron Wilkes 2.09% 

Pilatus, ch. s., by Onward 2.09% 

Pilot Boy, g. g., by Pilot Medium . . . 2.09% 

Toggles, b. g., by Strathway 2.09% 

Alves, b. g., by Allerton 2.09>| 

Bush, blk. m., by Alcyone 2.093^ 

Captain Jack, blk. g., by Black Wilkes 2.093^ 



"& 



NAME, DESCRIPTION AND SIRE. RECORD. 

Cheyenne, b. s., by Nutboume .... 2.09i^ 

Dr. Leek, ch. g., by Sidney 2.09V^ 

Georgianua, br.m.,bv Messenger\Vilkes2.0934 

Praytell, ch.g., by Axtell 2.09] 

James L., b. g., by Dexter Prince . . .2.""' 
Letah S., b. m., by Fred. Keys .... 2.uy>2 

Neeretta, blk. m., by Neerut 2.091;; 

Sarah S., b. m., by Tangent 2.09% 

Strader H., b. s., by Squire Talmadge . 2 1191.^ 

Rilma, b. m., by King Wilkes 2.ii',)i., 

Valpii, b. m., bv Dark Night 2091., 

Y'ork Boy, b. g.', bv Wilkes Boy . . . .2.09'., 

Altao, b. s., by Altamont 2.09% 

B. B. P., b. s.," by Pilot Medium .... 2.09% 
Battleton, b. g. (4), bv Rex Americus 2.09'/4 
Dan Cupid, b. s., by .Barney WMlkes . . 2.09% 
Dandv Jim, gr. g., by Y'oung Jim . . 2.09;4 
Dan Wilkes, ch. g., by Kitchell's Red 

Wilkes 2.09% 

Ellard, b. s., bv Charlev Wilkes .... 2.09% 
Early Reaper, b. s, by Highwood . . .2 09% 

Harrietta, br. m., by Alcyone 2.09'4 

Lecco, blk. s., by Bonny Boy 2.09% 

Louise Mao, ch. m., by Little Corporal 2.09% 
Ottinger, br. g., by Dorsey's Nephew . 2.09% 

Page, b. g., by Polouius 2.09:*| 

Baron Rogers, br. s., by Baron Wilkes 2.09% 
Dick Hubbard, b. g., by Allandorf . . 2.09% 
Que Allen, b. s., by Champion Medium 2.09% 

Athanio, blk. s., bv Junio 2.10 

Bonnatella, b. m., by Rostok Cossack . 2.10 
John A. McKerron, b. g., by Nutwood . 2.10 
Contralto, b. m., by The Conqueror . . 2.10 

Caracalla, br. m., by Patron 2.10 

Ethel Downs, blk. m., by Boodle . . 2.10 
Benton M.. ch. s., bv Governor Benton 2.10 

Earlv Bird, ro. s., by Jay Bird 2.10 

Jay-Eve-See, blk. g., bv Dictator . . . .2.10 
Little" Albert, ch. g.. by Albert W. . . . 2.10 

Moquette, b. s., by Wilton 2.10 

Pamlico, b. s., bv Meander 2.10 

Rubber, blk. m., by Wilton 2.10 

Senator A., gr. s.. by Tram Panic . . . 2.10 

Surpol, g. s., by Electricity 2.10 

Tomah, ch. g., by Edgardo 2.10 

Walter E., b. g., by Patchen Manibrino 2.10 



Fast Double-Gaited Horses. 

Horses whose average record at the two gaits, trotting and pacing, is faster than 2.15 are 

AVERAGE. 
2.14% 

2.14 



as follows: trotting, pacin 

Jay-Eve-See .... 2.10 . . 2.06' 

Heir-at-Law. . . .2.12 . .2.07 

Ottinger 2.09% . . 2.11i-^ 

Direct 2.18% . . 2.(ir)X 

George St. Clair . . 2.15% . . 2.10% . . 2.12)4 

San Pedro .... 2.14>| . . 2.10'% . . 2.I23/5 



. 2.09% 

,/.^ . . 2.103/g 

■-yy^ . . 2.11% 



Monbars . 
Bert Oliver 
Red Bud . 
Connor . . 

Vassar . . 



trotting. PACING. 

. 2.11% . . 2.16% 

. 2.19% . . 2.08% 

. 2.14% . . 2.121'^ 

. 2.131 J. 2.U " 

. 2.21% . . 2.07 



YEAR. 

1889. 
1890. 

1891 . 

1892 . 
1893. 
1894 . 



Transylvania Stakes. 

TROTTED AT LEXINGTON, KY.— BEST THREE IN FIVE HEATS. 
WINNER. SECOND HORSE. DRIVER OF WINNER. BEST TIME. 

Jack Geneva S Budd Doble 2.15 . 

McDoel Allerton Budd Doble 2.15i< . 

Cheyenne Miss Alice John Dickerson 2.15% . 

Kremlin H's Nightingale. . . E. D. Bither 2.11%. 

Harrietta Cartridge Crit Davis 2.09% . 

Azote Dan Cupid A. McDowel 2.08% . 

" .2.10%. 

. 2.10 . 



Bouncer Lynne Bel 

Senator A (4ov. Strong. . . 

Rilma The Monk . . . 

John Nolan .... Eagle Flanagan 
, Lord Vincent . . . Peter the Great . 
. Boralma York Boy . . . . 



W. J. Andrews . 

C. E. Alexander 

W. O. Foote 2.0814 

W. O. Foote 2.07% 

. C. Doble 2.08% 

. J. Gittcomb 2.08 



2.14V^ 



85,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 

10,000 
5,000 



90 


The Philadelphia Record JUtnanac. 










Kentucky Futurity Stakes. 








FOR 3-YEAR-OLDS.— TROTTKD AT LEXINGTON, KY.— BE.ST THREE IN FIVE HEATS. 




YEAR. 


WINNER. 


SECOND HORSE. DRIVER OF WINNER. BEST TIME. 


VALUE. 


*1893 


. Oro \\'ilkes . . . 


. Me<li.) J. A. Goldsmith. . . . 


2.14K. . . 


811,&'i0 


1894 


. Beuzetta .... 


. Futurity Gus Maeey 

. Katrina Bel W. \V. Milam 


2.14>| . 




26,430 


1895 


. Oakland Baron . 




20,000 


189tJ 


. Rose Croix . . . 


. Fred S. Moody . . . M. E. McHenry .... 


2.14 * . 




15.000 


1897 


. Thorn 


. Preston 0. A. Hickok 


2.1314 . 




15,eiO0 


1898 


Peter the Great . 


Charley Herr . . . .P.Johnston 


2.12/1. 




10.000 


1899 


. lioralnia .... 


. Fxtasy B.Tracy 


2.11}-.^ . 




IG.OOO 


19U0 


. FYtcuo 


. Susie J E. Bcnyon 


2.10% . 




ic,(;OL) 






* lu IS.U cullu>l ih ■ Sialliuii I'loJuco Slaki.s. 










Two-year-old Futurity. 






FOR TWO-YEAR-OI.DS, 


TliOTTED XT LEXINGTON, KY.— BEST TWO IN THREE HEATS 




YEAH. 


WINNER. 


SECOND HORSE. DRIVER OF WINNER. BEST TIME. 


VALUE. 


1893 


. Nellie A 


. Ella Woodline . . . Jno. F. Payne .... 


2 23>., . 




86,000 


1894 '. 


. Bermuda Girl . . 


. Impetuous Scott Hudson .... 


'^■n<A . 




5,000 


1895. 


. Fred S. Moodv . 


. Electrophel .... J. Dickerson 


2.18^' . 




8,750 


1896 . 


. China Silk .'. . 


. Preston B. B. Kennv 


2.16^4 . 




5.000 


1897. 


. Janie T 


. Peter the Great . . . Geo. A. Fuller .... 


%\b% . 




5,000 


1898 . 


. The Merchant . 


. * Scott McCoy 


2 20 . 




5,000 


1899 . 


. Fereno 


. The Tramp Ed Benvon 


2.17 . 




5,000 


1900 . 


. Walnnt Hall . . 


. Mary P. Leyburn . . Ed Benyon 


2.20M . 




5,000 




* Hai 


ilspring niij Bnralniadivideti second and third mone.y. 






Age Race Records. 






TROTTERS. 










YEARLINGS. 






SEX. 


NAME. 


SIRE. PLACE. 


DATE. 


RECORD. 


Colt. 


. Adbell, br. c. . . 


. . . . by Advertiser Woodlawn.Cal. . Aug. 27, 1894 


. 2.26 


Filly 


. Pansy McGregor, 


eh. f. . by Fergus McGregor. Haltun, Kan. . . Nov. 18, 1893 


2.2334 






TWO-Y'EAR OLDS. 






Colt. 


. ,Tupe, b. c. ' . . . 


. . . . bv Allie Wilkes. . . Readville, Mass. Sept. 29, 189G 


2.13?^ 


Filly 


. Janie T., b. f. . . 


. . . . by Bow Bells .... Lexington, Ky. Oct. 15, 1897 


2.14 






THREE-YEAR OLDS. 






Colt. 


f Directum, blk. s. 
( Crescens. oh. s. . 


.... by Director Nashville, Tenn. 


3ct. 18. 1893 


[2.IP/. 


. . . . by Robert McGregor. Kcadville, Mass. Aug. 28, 1897 


Filly 


. Fantasy, b. f. . . 


.... by Chimes Na!5hville, Tenn. 

FOUR-YEAR OLDS. 


3ct. 17, 1893 


2.0334 


Colt. 


. Directum, blk. .s. 


.... by Director Nashville, Tenn. 


Oct. 18, 1893 


;ISi|| 


Filly 


. Beuzetta, b. f. . 


. ... by Ouward Buflalo, N. Y. . . 


A.ug. 9, 1895 






AGED HORSES. 






Stallio 


n . Crescens, eh. s. 


. (6) . by Robert McGregor Columbus, Ohio. 


Aug. 2, 1900 


. 2.06 


Mare 


. Alix, b. ni. . . 


. (G) . by Patronage .... Terre Haute, Ind. Aug. 17, 1894 


. 2.05i< 


Geldin 


g . Azote, b. g. . . 


. (8) . by Whips New York, N.Y. . 

PACERS. 

YEARLINGS. 


<Vug. 27, 1895 


. 2.05)1 


Colt. 


. Ambulator, b. c. 


. . . . by Ambassador . . . Sturgis, Mich. . Sept. 28, 1893 


. 2.ZZ% 


Filly 


. Mill Lady, b. f. . 


.... by Count Wilkes . . Nashville, Tenn. Oct. 18, 1892 


2.30 






TWO-YEAR OLDS. 






Colt. 


. Symboleer . . . 


. . . . by Campbell's Elec'r Dallas, Tex. . .Nov. 3,1894 


2.11 


Filly 


. Ecstacy, br. f. . 


.... by Baron Wilkes . . Lexington, Ky . Oct. 15, 1898 


2.10>'^ 






THREE-YEAR OLDS. 






Colt. 


. Klatownh, b. c. . 


. . . . by Steinwav . . . . Louisville, Kv. . Sept.28, 1898 


2.051^ 


Filly 


. Little Squaw, blk 


f. . . by Kewanee Boy . . Dallas, Tex. . . Oct. 14, 1899 


2.09)1 






FOUR-YEAR OLDS. 






Colt. 


. Searchlight, br. c 


. . .bvDarkNieht . . . Dubuoue. la. . .Aug. 23.1898 


ISi 


Filly 


. The Maid, b. m. (4) . . . by Hal Index . . . ColumLus, U. . . 


Aug. 2, 1899 






AGED HORSES. 






Stallio 


n . Star Pointer, b. s. 


(8) . . by Brown Hal . . . Springfield, 111. . Oct. 1, 1897 
c. (5), by Mambrino Kine . (ilensFalls. N. Y. Aug. 18. 1899 


ISJil 


Mare 


. Ladv olthe Manor 


Geldin 


g. Robert J., b.g.. (G) . .. bV Hartford . . . . Ind'napolis, Ind. Sept. G, 1894 


ixil 



The Philadelphia Record JUmanac. 



Reduction of the Pacing Record. 

The reduction of the pacing record from 1839 follows: 

NAME. PLACE AND DATE. RECORD. 

Drover, b. g New Jersev, Oct. 3, 1839 2.'J8. 

Fanny Ellsler.gr.m Albany, N. Y., Aug. 2, 1844 2.273^ 

Un known, ch. g New Jersey, Aug. 2, 18-14 2.23 



Pet, rn. g Long Island, N. Y., Aug. 2, 1851 '2..2V4 

Pet, rn. g Long Island, N. Y., Sept. 9, 1852 2.19>| 

Pet, rn. g Long Island, N. Y^, Sept., 1852 2.18% 

Pocahontas, ch. ra Long Island, N. Y'., June 21, 1&55 2.17>| 

Yankee Sam, dn. g UrichsvlUe, O., Oct. 21, 1869 2.16}^ 

Sweetzer, gr. g Cleveland, O., Oct. 3, 1877 2.16 

Sleepv George, b. g Rochester, N. Y., Aug. 7, 1879 2.15 

Sweetzer, gr. g Oakland, Cal., Dec. 25, 1878 2.15 

Sleepv Tom, ch. g Columbus, O., July 16, 1879 2.14J^ 

Sleepy Tom, ch. g Chicago, 111., July 25, 1879 2.1214 

Little Brown Jug, br. g Hartford, Conn., Aug. 24, 1881 2.11}^ 

Johnston, b.g Chicago, 111., Oct. 9, 1883 2.10 

Johnston, b.g Chicago, 111.. Oct. 9, 1884 .2.06^ 

Direct, blk. s Independence, la., Sept. 4, 1891 2.06 

Hal Pointer, b. g Chicago, 111., Aug. 18, 1892 2.053^ 

Mascot, b. g Terre Haute, Ind., Sept. 19, 1892 2.01 

Flving Jib. b. g Chicago, 111., Sept. 1-5, 1893 2.04 

Robert J., b.g Fort Wavne, Ind., Aug. 31, 1894 2.03% 

RobertJ., b. g Indianapolis, Ind., Sept. 5, 1^94 2.03>| 

R..bert J., b. g Terre Haute, Ind., Sept. 14, 1894 2.01U 

John R. Gentry, b. s Glens Falls, N. Y\, Sept. 10, 1896 2.01% 

John R. Gentry, b. s Portland, Me., Sept. 24, 1896 2.00>| 

Star Pointer, b. s Read vi He, Mass., Aug. 28, 1897 1.5934 



Pacers that have Gone in 2.05 or Better in Harness. 



NAME. 



DESCRIPTION. 



Star Pointer . 
John R. Gentry 
Joe Patchen 
RobertJ. . . . 
Prince Alert . 
Anacoma . . . 
Coney .... 
Connor .... 
Directly . . . 
Bumps 



(8) 



hv Brown Hal I Readville, Mass. . Aug 28, 1897. ) . ,„w 

0} crown tiai . . i Pf,i„mhiis nhir. Antr fi 1,t;q« f >-^^A 



(Columbus, Ohio, .Aug. 
b. s. . . (7) . by Ashland Wilkes . Portland, Me.. . . Sept. 24, 1896 
blk =; (81 hv P-itchen Wilkes / "l'*^"*^ Haute, Ind . Sept. 28, 1897. 
blk. s. . (8) . t)j Patchen Wilkes | ottumwa, Iowa . . Oct. 5. 1897 . 
b. g. . . (6) . by Hartford .... Terre Haute, Ind . Sept. 14, 1894 
b. g. . . (8) . by Crown Prince . . Cleveland, Ohio . Julv 28, 1900 

b. g. . . (7) . by Knight Readville, Mass. . Aug. 24, 1900 

blk. g. . (5) . bv McKinney . . . . Cleveland, Ohio 
blk. g. (11) . by C. F. Clay .... Yonkers, N. Y. . 

blk. s. . (6) . bv Direct Louisville, Ky. . 

b. g. . . (8) . by Baron Wilkes . . Louisville, Ky 



2.003^ 
2.OIV4 



Anaconda . . . b. g. . . (6) . by Knight New Y'ork 



br. 

b. g. . 
br. s. 
b. c. . 
b.g.. 
b.g. . 
blk. s. 



Searchlight 
Frank Agan . 
Frank Bogash. 
Online .... 
Mascot .... 
Flying Jib . . 
Chehallis . . 
Lady of the M'or eh. ra 
Fred Bond . . . b. g. 

Hal B b. g. . 

Hal F'ointer . . b. g. . 

Fidol b. s. . 

Indiana . . . . b. g. 

Planet b. s. . 

Strathherrv . . . b. s. . 



(5) . by Dark Night . . . Columbus, Ohio 

(6) . by Mikagan .... Columbus, Ohio . 
(8) . by Atlantic King . . Providence, R. I. 
(4) . by Shadel'd Onward Sioux City, la. . 

(7) . by Deceive Terre Haute, Ind. 

(8) . by Algona Chicago, IH. . . 

(8) . by Altomont .... Columbus, Ohio 

(5 ) .by Mambrino King . Glens Falls, N. Y 
. (6) . by Simon Y'onkers, N. Y. . 

(6) . by Hal Dillard . . . Cleveland, O. . . 

(9) . by Tom Hal, Jr. . . Nashville, Tenn. 



2.OIV2 
2.02 
2.02^ 
Julv 24, 1900 . *2.02% 

. Sept. 11, 1900 . *2.0334 

. Sept. 29, 1898 

. Sept. 27, 1899 

. Sept. 8, 1899 

. Aug. 2, 1899 

. Aug. 6, 1896 



*2.03^ 
*2. 



(8) . by Idol 

(6) . by King of Belair 



Aug. 30, 19IJ0 . *2.03% 
Oct. 12, 1894 . 2.04 
Sept. 29, 1892 . *2.04 
Sept. 15, 1893 . 2.04 
Aug. 6, 1898 . *2.04i4 
Aug. 18, 1899 . *2.04i4 
. Sept. 15, 1900 . 12.041. 
July 27, 1899 . *2.04>| 
Oct. 18, 1892 . 2.0434 



(6) . by Bonnie McGregor. Readville, Mass 
(6) . by Roseberrv .... Ottumwa, la. . . 

Hal Dillard . . b. s. . . (7) . by Brown Hal . . . Nashville, Tenn. 

Roan Wilkes . . r. s. . . (8) . by Tennessee Wilkes Portland, Me. . . 

Ananias . . . . br. s. . (6) . by Patron Cleveland, O . . 

Guinette . . . . b. g. . . (8) . by Gambetta ^Vilkes. Louisville, Ky . 

Rubinstein . . . b. s. . . (6) . by Baron Wilkes . | H^^^jp^' \a' " ' 

f Providence, R. I. 



Terre Haute, Ind. . Aug. 9, 1895 . *2.043^ 

" " ' " " ■2.04'^ 

2.0f'i 



Hartford, Conn. 



Royal R Shel'n blk. g. 



(6) . by Baron Wilkes 
(5) . by Constantine . 



Yonkers, N. Y. 

t To wagon. 



Sept. 6, 1900 
, Aug. 25, 189"' , 
. Sept. 25, 1895 , 
. Oct. 19, 1894 , 
, Aug. 6, 1898 , 

July 2S, 1899 
, Oct. 26, 1897 . 
. Aug. 21, 1896 1 
. Aug. 27, 1896 J 
. Aug. 29, 1900 1 
. Sept. 11, 1900 J 



Other Pacers that have Gone in 3.08 or Better. 



NAME, DESCRIPTION AND SIRE. RECORD. 

Ace, b. s., by Delmarch 2.05J4 

Bonnie Direct, blk. c. (4), by Direct . . 2.0.534 

Coleridge, b. s., by C. F. Clay 2.05i| 

Giles Noyes, br. g., by Charles Caflfrey. 2.0b\i 
Johnny Agan, b. g., by Dignus .... 2.053^ 



NAME, DESCRIPTION AND SIRE. RECORD. 

Hettie G., b. m. by Egghot 2.0534 

Lena N., b. m., by Sidney 2.053| 

William Mc, blk. g. (5) by Alcvmont. . 2Mb% 

Direct, blk. s., by Dictator 2.0.534 

Klatawah, b. c. (3), by Steinway . . . 2.0534 



The Philadelphia Record JUmanac. 



NAME, DESCRIPTION AND SIRE. RECORD. 

W. W. p., ch. g., by Ben Lamond, Jr. . 2 05K 

Saladin, br. s., by Sultan 2.05J4 

Bfissie Bonehill, g. m., by Empire 

Wilkes 2.05?^ 

Lottie Lorraine, b. m., by Gambetta 

Wilkes 2.05K 

Heir-at-Law, blk.s., by Mambrino King 2.05% 
Sherman Clav, ch. g., by Clav Dust . . 2.0.554 
The Maid, b.f. (4), by Hal Index . . . 2.05% 

Clipper, b. g., by Diablo 2.0tj 

Courier Journal, blk. s., by Wilkes Boy 2.0(1 
Harrv O., br. g., by Atlantic King . . 2.06 
B;ihv Ruth, b. m., by Tommy Wilkes. 2.O614 
Edith W., ch. m., bv Ben Lomond, Jr. 2.06K 
Arlington, b. s., bvAllie Wilkes. . . . 2.O614 

Egozen, b. s., bv Egotist 2.O614 

Fanny Dillard, b. m.. by Hal Dillard . 2mv. 
Johnston, b. g., by Joe Brtssett . . . . 2.0i)^ 
Jay-Eye-See, blk. g., by Dictator . . . 2.06V:r 
Island Wilkes, Jr., b. s , by Island Wilkes 2M}Z 
Little Boy, b. g , bv Kenton ...... 2.06ii 

Badge, br. g., by Silas Wright 2.0Gi| 

Bright Regent, ch. s., by Prince Regent. 2.06^ 
Palmyra Boy, blk. s.. bv Grattan. . . . 2.06^ 
Riley B., blk. e. (4), by Happy Riley . 2.06j| 
William Wallace Scribner, b. s., by Sir 

William Wallace 2.06V 

Billy Andrews, b. c. (4), by Bow Bells. 2.06K 

Choral, b. ra., by C. F. Clay 2.0(3i| 

Dumont W., b. g, bv Dupignac . . . .2.06!^ 
Eyelet, g. m., by Gambetta Wilkes . . 2.06)^ 
Miss Logan, b. in., by General Logan . 2.063-^ 
Pearl Onward, b. m., bv Onward . . . 2.00% 
Roy Wilkes, br. s., bv Adrian Wilkes . 2.06>| 
Pearl C, b. m., by Rov Wilkes .... 2 06 Vo 
Parker S , g. g., by Temple Bar ... . l.dCM 
Woodland Boy, br. s., bv Gusto .... 2.06>| 
Dan T., b. s., by King of Bellaire . . . 2.00% 

Be Sure, ch. s., by Bessemer 2.06% 

Ben D., ch. s., by Red Buck, Jr 2.06% 

Guy, g. s.,by Shiloh 2.06% 

King of Diamonds, b. g., by Velocity . 2.06% 

Manager, g. s., by Nutwood 2.06% 

Bentonica (3), br. g., by Azmoor . . . 2.06% 
Lady Nottingham, b. m., by Notting- 
ham 2.06% 

Sallie Toler, b. m., by Ashland Wilkes . 2.06% 
Wiltranby, g. s., by Jim Wilson .... 2.06% 

AngieD., b. m., by Mikagan 2.07 

Moth Miller, r. g., by Alcantara . . . 2.07 
Tom Ogden, b. g., by Bacon 2.07 



Pacing in Harness. 

Faste.st mile, l.o'Ji^ (against time). Star 
Pointer, b. s. (8), by Brown Hal, dam 
Sweepstakes, by Knight's Snow Heels. 
Readville Track, near Boston, Mass., 
Aug. 28, 1897. Star Pointer equaled his 
record at Columbus, Ohio, Aug. 28, 1898, 
and beat 2 minutes in three other subse- 
quent trials against the watch. At Bel- 
mont course, near Philadelphia, Sept. 
17, 1898, Star Pointer paced to the half 
mile pole in 'Sl% seconds, finishing the 
mile in l.,59%. At Terre Haute, Ind., 
Sept. 28, 1897, Star Pointer paced the third 
quarter in 28 seconds, last half in 58%, 
the time for the mile being 2.00!^. The 
time by quarters of Star Pointer's five 
trials in which he beat 2 minutes fol- 
lows : Readville, Aug. 28, 1897, .30. .59%, 
1.29, 1.59% ; Columbus. Aug. 6, 1898, .29, 
.581^, 1.28%, 1.59% ; Joliet, Aug. 28, 1898, 
.30, .59%, 1.29, 1.5934 ; Readville, Sept. 1, 
1898, .291^, .59, 1.28'%, 1.59%; Philadel- 
phia, Sept. 17, 1898, .28>^, .57%, 1.28>^, 



NAME, DESCRIPTION AND SIRE. RECORD. 

Silkwood, blk. s., bv Blackwood Mam- 
brino " 2.07 

Vassar, b. s., by Vatican 2.07 

W. Wood, b. s., by Steiuway 2.07 

Anne Lee, br. m., by Alfred G 2.0J% 

Aileen, br. m., by Gazette 2.vn% 

Bell Boy, ch.g., by Hill Boy 2.Ql% 

Democracy, g. s.. bv Happv Partner . . 2 07% 
Hal Braden, b. s., by Brow-n Hal . . . 2.07>4 
Lady Pipes, ch. m., by Dan Wilki'S . .2.07% 
Little Thorne, b. g., by Hawthorne . 2.07% 
Major Muscovite, br. s., by Mu.'^covite . 2.07% 
Mazette, b. m., by Tennessee Wilkes . 2.07% 
Maxine, ch. ra., bv William C. P. . . . 2.07% 

Paul, ch. g., by Bald Hornet 2.073| 

Phenol, gr. m., by Jersey Wilkes . . . 2.07% 

Gazette, h. s., bv Onward 2.07% 

Much Better, b. f. (4), by Charles Derby 2.0714 

Redina, b. m., by Red Wald 2.07% 

Rov-the-Kid, ch.g., by Abdella Swigert 2.07>| 
The Admiral, b. s., bv Be Sure .... 2.07% 
Will Leyburn, blk. g., by Wilton . . . 2.07% 
Belwood A., b. m., by Bow Bells . . . 2.07% 

Colbert, ch. s., by Onward 2.07% 

Dariel, b. m., by Oleander 2Xn% 

Dan Q., b. s., by Simmicolon 2.07% 

Flirt, blk. m., by Armont 2.07^1 

Jo He, ch. g., by Brooke's Ned Forrest, 

Jr 2.07% 

Joe Wheeler, blk. g., by Sidney .... 2.07% 
Ontonian, b. s., by Shadeland Onward 2.07% 
Paul Revere, b. g., by Brandon .... 2.07)| 
Steel Prince, br. s., s. t. b. by Steel Nail 2.07% 
The Private, b. g., by William Hill . . 2.07>| 

Vera, blk. m., bv Wilton 2.07% 

Will Kerr, blk. g., by Ethan Wilkes . . 2.07% 
Bob Fitzsimmous, b. c. (4), by Judge 

Norval 2.07% 

Charlie B., blk. g., bv Octoroon .... 2.07% 
Charlie Hayt, b. s., by Allerton .... 2.07% 
Crawford, b. s., by Favorite Wilkes . . 2.07% 

Don, br. g., byEggnog 2.07% 

Hydrogen, b. s., bv Nitrogen 2.07% 

Hail Cloud, br. s., by Herschel .... 2.07% 

Reflector, b. s., by Duplex 2.07% 

Rex Atto, by Atto Rex 2.07% 

Alpha W., b. m., by Judge Norval . . 2.08 
Barney, b. g., by Barney Wilkes. . . .2.08 
Del Norte, blk. s., by AUamont . . . .2.08 
Rowdy Joe, ro. g., by Telegraph . . .2.08 
Walter K. (ringer) b. g 2.08 



mile to high-wheeled sulky, 2.06 
(against time, kite-shaped track) : Direct, 
blk. s. (6). by Director, dam Echora, by 
Echo. Independence, la. Sept. 4, 1891. 
2.06% (agaiust time, circular track): 
Johnston, b. g. (7), by Joe Bassett, dam 
by Ned Forrest. Chicago, 111., Oct. 3, 
1884. 

Fastest mile in a race, 2.00% (third heat): 
Star Pointer, b. s. (8), by Brown Hal, 
dam Sweepstakes, beating Joe Patehen. 
Springfield, 111., Oct. 1, 1897. Joe Patehen 
\\on the first heat in 2.14, Star Pointer 
the second in 2.06 and the third in 2.00%. 
Time by quarters, 29%, 1.00, 1.30%, 2.00%. 

Fastest mile by a gelding, 2.01% (against 
time): Robert J., b. g. (6), by Hartford, 
dam Geraldine, by Jay Gotild. Terra 
Haute, Ind., Sept. 14, 1894. 

Fastest mile by a mare, 2.04%: Lady of the 
Manor, ch. m. (5), by Mambrino King, 
dam Princess Chimes, by Chimes. Glens 
Falls, N. Y., Augtist 18, 1899. 

Fastest mile over a half-mile track, 2.04% 
(against time): Joe Patehen, blk. s. (7), 



by Patchen Wilkes, dam Josephine 
Young, by Joe Young. Combination 
Park, Medford, Mass., Oct. 28, 1896. In a 
race, 2.04% (first heat) : John R. Gentry, 
b. 8. (11), by Ashland Wilkes, dam Dame 
Wood, by Wedgewood, beating Jdc 
Patchen. Time bv quarters, 303^, 102iii, 
1.34, 2.04%. Lima, Ohio, July 4, 1900. 
Gentry also won the second heat in 2.063^2- 

Fastest mile, wearing hopples, 2.02 (second 
heat): Prince Alert, b. g. (8), by Crown 
Prince, dam Till, untraced, beating 
Anaconda and Indiana, 2.04 class. 
Cleveland, Ohio, July 28, 1900. Time of 
first heat, al>o won by Prince Alert, 2.08. 

Fastest mile without rider or driver, 2.04 J/4: 
Del Norte, blk. s., by Altamont, dam 
Tecora, by Cassius M. Clay. Salem, Ore., 
Sept. 29, 1898. Time by quarters, .30, 1.00, 
1.31, 2.04^^. Best by a mare, 2.0134: 
Marion Mills, b. m., by Harry Mills, dam 
Nellie, by Joe Bassett. Detroit, Midi., 
July 15, 1897. Over a half-mile track, 
2.05% : Marion Mills. Combination Park, 
Medlord, Mass., July 6, 1S97. 

Fas est two consecutive heats, 2.03^4, 2.01>^ 
(first and second) : John R. Gentry, b. s. 
(7), by Ashland Wilkes, dam Dame Wood, 
by Wedgewood, beating Star Pointer. 
Glens Falls, N. Y., Sept. 10, 1896. 

Fastest two-heat race, 2.033^, 2.0234: Joe 
Patchen, blk. s. (10), by Pa"tchen Wilkes, 
<lam Josephine Young, beating John R. 
(Jentry. Wichita, Kan., Sept. 26, 1899. 

Fastest three consecutive heats, 2.023>^, 2.033'2, 
2.03^i, Won by Star Pointer, b. s. (7), by 
Brown Hal, dam Sweepstakes, by Knight's 
Snow Heels, beating Frank Agau and 
Robert J. Mystic Park, Medford, Mass., 
Sept. 18, 1896. 

Fastest four-heat race, 2.03%, 2.043^, 2.043^, 
2.02%. Won in the second, third and 
fourth heats, by Robert J., b. g. (8), by 
Hartford, dam Geraldine, by Jay Gould, 
beating Frank Agan and Rubenstein. 
Columbus, Ohio, Aug. 6, 1896. 

Fastest five-heat race, 2m%, 2.05, 2.053^, 
2.05%, 2.06. Won in the last three heats 
by Frank Agan, b. g. (6), by Mikagan, 
dam Flora (untraced), beating Robert J. 
and Sphinxetta. Narragan.sett Park, 
Providence, R. I., Sept. 11, 1896. 

Fastest six-heat race, 2.043-^, 2.04%, 2.05%, 
2.053/^, 2.07, 2.08%. Won by Anaconda, 
b. g. (5), by Knight, dam Haggin, mare 
by Algona, in the last three heats, beat- 
ing Bumps, Directly, Rubenstein, Ana- 
nias, Parker S., Giles Noyes, Frank Bo- 
gash and William Mc. Terre Haute, 
lud., Sept. 21, 1898. 

Fastest seven-heat race, 2.06%, 2.07, 2.06, 2.08, 
2.06%, 2.0834, 2.1034. Won by Giles Noyes, 
b. g. (6), by Charles Caffrey, dam Viola, 
by George P. Tucker, in fourth, sixth and 
seventh heats, beating Ananias (winner 
of first two heats). Planet (winner of 
third and fifth heats) and Frank Bogash. 
Terre Haute, Ind., Sept. 30, 1897. 

Fastest eight-heat race, 2.05Vi, 2.06%, 2.0734, 
2.07%, 2.0734, 2.08%, 2.10, 2.1134. Won by 
Direction, blk. s. (8), by Director, dam 
Lulu Wilkes, by George Wilkes, beating 
Ben D., Coleridge, Guinette, Susie G., 
Paul, Atlantic King, Dolly Spanker, 
Moonstone, Ethel A., Dudley and Joe 
He. Cleveland, O., Aug. 2 and 5, 1895. 

Fastest two consecutive heats by a 2-year-old, 
2.14%, 2.12 ; Will Leyburn, b.c, by Wilton, 
dam by Crittenden, beating Manuella. 
Lady Moyra, John Durrett and Crystal 
Wilkes. Lexington, Ky., Oct. 8, 1897. 



2 miles, 4.1934 (against time): Chehalls, blk. 
s. (7) , by Altemont, dam Fecora, by Stra- 
der's C. M. Clay, Jr. Salem, Ore., Oct. 7, 
1897. Time by quarters, 323^, 1.0534, 1.37, 
2.09,2.39,3.14,3.46,4.1934. 

2 miles, 4.47%: Dead heat between Defiance, 
b. g., by Chieftain, and Longfellow, ch. g., 
by Red Bill. Sacramento, Cal., Sept. 26, 
1872. 

8 miles, 7.44: James K. Polk, ch. g. Centre- 
ville Course, L. I., Sept. 13, 1847. 

4 miles, 10.3434: Longfellow, ch. g., by Red 

Bill. San Francisco, Cal., Dec. 31, 1869. 

5 miles, 12.54%; Ladv St. Clair, b. m., by Old 

St. Clair. San Francisco, Cal., Dec. 11, 1874. 

Pacing with Runuiugf Mate. 

Imile, 1.58^4: Flying Jib, b. g., by Algoma, 
dam by Middleton. Chillicothe, Ohio, 
Oct, 4, 1894. Time of first half, 59 sec- 
onds. 

1 mile, 2.01%: Westmont, ch. g., by Almont 
(b. g. Firebrand as mate). Chicago, 111., 
July 10, 1884. 

1 mile, 2.0334: Minnie R., b. m., by J. C. 
Breckinridge (b. g. Firebrand as mate). 
Chicago, 111., Oct. 3, 1884. 

Double Team Pacing. 

1 mile, 2.08 (against time): John R. Gentry, 
b. s., by Ashland Wilkes and Robert J., b. 
g., by Hartford. Glens Falls, N. Y., Oct. 
8, 1897. 

1 mile, 2.0934, against time: Miss Rita, ch. m. 
(4), by J. J. Audubon, dam Lady Garfield, 
by Young Jupiter, and Josie B., b. m., by 
Chatterbox. Lexington, Ky., Oct. 15,1896. 

1 mile in a race, 2.163^: Belle Button, br. m., 
by Alexander Button and Tom Reader, 
beating Our Dick and Turk Franklin. 
Oakland, Cal., Oct. 22, 1892. 

Pacing to Wagon. 

1 mile, 2.03% (against time): Bumps, b. e, 
(8), by Baron Wilkes, dam Queen Ethel, 
by Strathmore. Louisville, Ky., Sept. 
27, 1899. 2.0334: Coney (against time), 
blk. g. (5), by McKinney, dam Grace 
Kaiser, by Kaiser ; driven by M. E. Mc- 
Henrv. Empire City track, Yonkers, N. 
Y., Sept. 15, 1900. 2.03% (against time, 
amateur driver): Coney, blk. g. (5), by 
McKinney, dam Grace Kaiser, driven by 
Edward Gay lord. Terre Haute, Ind., 
Sept. 25, 1900. 

1 mile, 2.04% (against time): Joe Patchen, 
blk. s., by Patchen Wilkes, dam Jose- 
phine Young, bv Joe Young. Joliet, 111., 
Oct. 20, 1897. Time of each quarter, 323^, 
31, 303^, 30?:^. 

1 mile, 2.08 (against time): W. W. P., ch. g. 
(10), by Ben Lamond, Jr., dam Bonner 
Maid, by Martinet. Hamline, Minn., 
Sept. 1, 1896. 

Pacing tinder Saddle. 

1 mile, 2.13: Johnston, b. g., by Joe Bassett. 

Cleveland, O., Aug. 3, 1888. 

2 miles, 4.5734: James K. Polk, ch. g., and 

Roanoke, r. g., by Old Pilot. Philadel- 
phia, June 10, 1850. 

3 miles, 7.44 : Oneida Chief, ch. g., by Ken- 

tucky Hunter. Beacon Course, Hoboken, 
N. J., Aug. 14, 1843. 

Double Team Running. 

1 mile, 1.45%; Major Banks and Evergreen; 
driven by M'me Maiantette. BuflTalo. 
N. Y., Aug. 4, 1887. 



The Philadelphia Record JUtnanac. 



FASTEST RUNNING RECORDS. 



4>^ furlongs 



53^ furlongs 



63^ furlongs 
ly^ furlongs 

1 



1 m. 20 yds. 
1 m. 50 yds. 
1 m. 70 jds. 

1-^5 miles. 

Im. 500 yds. 

\% 

X% miles. 



ii 



29. 

24 

Wa 
3 



TIME. 



•21M 

.34 

.46 

A^y, 
1.0a 

1.06 

1.06 
t 1.06 
f 1.08 

1.08% 

1.0'd 

1.12 

1.12J 

1.19 

■ 1.25^ 
1.231^ 

■ 1.3214 
1.35>^ 

1.3714 
1.38 

' 1.40 
1A2% 
1.34% 
1.45 
1.51i 
1.58M 

■ 2.03% 
2.04 

" 2.103^ 

218% 

2.31)31 

2.48 

2.59i 

3.19 

3.273^ 

3.42 

3.49J 

4.2434 

4.58^ 
5.24 
' 7.11 

26.18 



NAME, AGE i 



Bob Wade, 4 . . . . 

Fashion, 4 

Red S., a, 122 ... . 
Geraldine, 4. 122 . . 
Bessie Maelilln, 2, 100 
Handpress, 2, 10i> . . 
Maid Marian, 4, 111 . 
Tormentor, 6, 121 . . 

Howard, 4, 118 .. . 
Gold Or, 3, 102 .. . 
Duelist, 2, 99 .... 
Kingston, a, 139 .. . 
Firearm, 4, 120 . . . 
Domino, 2, 128 .. . 
Bummer, 4, 80 ... 
Voter, 6, 123 .... 

Sly, 6, 109 

Clifford, 4, 127 . . . . 
Bella B., 5, 103 .. . 
Dunois, 5, 105 . . . . 
Salvator, 4, 110 .. . 

Kildeer, 4, 91 ... . 
r Voter, 6, 122 .... 
[ Orimar. 6, 109 . . . . 

Macv, 4, 106 . . 

John Bright, 4, 122 . 

Lilian Lee, 3, 95 . . 

Carnero, 5, 107 ... 

Watercure, 3, 100 . . 

Boanerges, 4, 110 . . 

Banquet, 3, 108 .. . 

Charentus, 6, 106 . . 

Ben d'Or, 4, 115 . . . 

Sir John, 4, 116 .. . 

Sabine, 4, 109 ... . 

Goodrich, 3, 102 . . 

Hindoocraft, 3, 75 . . 

Imp, 6, 113 

Julius Csesar, 5, 108 . 
fTenBroeck, 5, 110. . 
I Judge Denny, 5, 105 . 

Joe Murphy, 4, 99 . . 

Ethelbert, 4, 124 . . 

Kyrat, 3, 88 

Ten Broeck, 4, 104 . . 

Hubbard, 4, 107 .. . 

Drake Carter, 4, 115 . 

Lueretia Borgia, 4, 85 

The Bachelor, a, 113 

Mr. Brown, 6, 160 . . 



Butte, Montana 

Lampas, Texas 

Butte, Mont 

N. Y. J. C. (straight course) 

Dallas, Tex 

N. Y. J. C. course 

Morris Park 

N. Y. J. C. Futurity Course (170 

feet less than % mile) .... 

Los Angeles, Cal 

Kinloch Park, St. Louis .... 
Kinloch Park, St. Louis .... 
Sheepshead Bay (C. L J. C). . 
Morris Park (straight course) . 
New York Jockey Club .... 
Kinloch Park, St. Louis .... 

Brighton Beach 

Chicago (Harlem) 

Sheepshead Bay (C. I. J. C). . 
Monmouth P'k (straight course) 

Oakland, Cal 

ISIonmouth Park (against time, 

straight course) 

Monmouth P'k (straight course) 

Brighton Beach 

Washington Park, Chicago . . 
Washington Park, Chicago . . 

Louisville 

Harlem, Chicago 

Hawthorne 

Brighton Beach 

Washington Park, Chicago . 
Monmouth P'k (straight course) 

Empire City Track 

Saratoga 

New York Jockey Club . . . 
Washington Park, Chicago . 
Washington Park, Chicago . 
New York Jockey Club . . . 

Sheepshead Bay 

New Orleans, La 

Louisville (against time) . . 
California Jockey Club . . . 

Harlem, Chicago 

Brighton Beach 

Newport 

Lexington 

Saratoga 

Sheepshead Bay 

Oakland, Cal. (against time) 

Oakland, Cal 

Rancocas, N. J. ...... . 



Aug. 20, 1890 
Aug. 15, 1891 
July 22, 1896 
Aug. 30, 1889 
Oct. 3, 1899 
May 26, 1897 
Oct. 9, 1894 



Oct. 10, 1893 
Oct. 26, 1895 
Oct. 12, 1900 
Oct. 4, 1900 
June 22, 1891 
Oct. 3, 1899 
Sept. 29, 1893 
Oct. 17, 1900 
July 6, 1900 
June 20, 1900 
Aug. 29, 1894 
July 8, 1890 
Feb. 21, 1899 

Aug. 28, 1890 
Aug. 13, 1892 
July 17, 190U 
July 21, 19i 
July 2, 1898 
May 15, 1901 1 
July 31, 1894 
Sept. 5, 1899 
June 18, 1900 
July 7, 1898 
July 17,1890 
Oo.i 22, 1901' 
Ju.y 25, 1892 
June 9, 1892 
July 5, 1891 
July 16,1898 
Aug. 27, 1889 
June 30, 1900 
Feb. 21, 1900 
May 29, 1877 
Feb. 12, 1898 
Aug. 30, 1894 
Aug. 4, 1900 
Nov. 18, 1899 
Sept. 16, 1876 
Aug. 9, 1873 
Sept. 6, 1884 
May 20, 1897 
Feb. 22, 1899 
March 2, 1880 



Over Hurdles. 

1 mile (4 hurdles), 1.49: Bob Thomas (5), 140 

lbs. Chicago, 111., Aug. 13, 1890. Mile 
heats (4 hurdles), 1.50%, I.5034: Joe Rhodes 
(5), 140 lbs. St. Louis, Mo., June 4, 1878. 

134 miles (5 hurdles), 2.16 : Jim McGowan (4). 
127 lbs. Brighton Beach, Nov. 9, 1882. 

13^ miles (6 hurdles), 2.47 : Kitty Clark (3), 130 
lbs. Brighton Beach, Aug. 23, 1881. 

2 miles (8 hurdles), 3.473^ : Tom Leathers (a), 

117 lbs. New Orleans, La., April 16, 1875. 

Steeplechase, full course, 4.15 : Disturbance 

(a), 155 lbs. Jerome Park, 1883. 4.21: Jim 

McGowan (5), 160 lbs. Jerome Park, 1883. 

Distance and High Jumping. 

For Distance.— 37 ft. over water : Chandler, 
ridden by Capt. Broadley, Leamington, 
Eng., March 22, 1847 ; 84 ft. over hurdles: 
Calver Thorpe, England; 33 ft. over wall: 
Lotterv, Liverpool, Eng. 

For Height.— 7 ft. 63^ in.: Tycho Brake, b. g. 
(a), 15.1. by Billet, Central Park Riding 



Academy, Chicago, 111., July 18, 1896; 
ridden by Richard Donnellv, weighing 
145 lbs. 

Burns Handicap. 

RUN AT SAN FRANCISCO.— 134 MILES. 
YEAR. NAME, AGE AND WEIGHT. TIME. VALUE. 

1898— Satsuma, 6, 122 2.07>^ $6,850 

1899- *Fleur de Lis, 116 ... . 2.1234 6,850 
1900— Imperious, 94 2.10 6,850 

* Name changed lo Maxinc. 

l/ouisville Futurity. 

FOR 2-YEAR-OI.DS.— RUN AT LOUISVILLE, KY. 

43^ FURLONGS. 
YEAR. NAME AND WEIGHT. TIME. VALUE. 

1897— Bannockburn, 115 .. . 0.563^ 85,825 
St. I/ouis Derby. 

FOR 3-YEAR-OLDS.— RUN AT ST. LOUIS.— 13^ 

MILES. 
YEAR. NAME AND WEIGHT. TIME. VALUE. 

1898— Pink Coat, 107 2.87 $6,725 

1899— Prince McClurg, 125 .. . 2.40 6,020 



The Philadelphia Record JUmanac. 



I/atouia Derby. 

FOR 3-YEAR-OLDS.— RUN AT LATONIA, KY., 1)^ 

MILES. 

YEAR. NAME AND WEIGHT. TIME. VALUE. 

1887— Libretto •Z.ZUli 84,39U 

1888— Los Angeles 2.3934 4,270 

1889— Ilindoocraft 2.41 4,300 

1890— Bill Letcher, 11.5 .... 2.43 6,380 

1891— Kingman, 1128 2.453^ 4,540 

1892— Newton, 117 3.14 3,700 

1893— Buck McCann, 117 .. . 2.14 4,470 

1894-^Lazzarone, 117 2.51 6,555 

1895— Halma, 127 2.3414 6,720 

189f.— Ben Brush, 122 2.403| 12,290 

1897— Ornament, 127 2.3514 8,740 

1898- Han d'Or, 114 .... 2.32j| 7,620 

1899— Prince McClurg, 122 . . 2.36V^ 6,925 

1900— Lieutenant Gibson, 127 (\V. O.) 4,715 

Nursery Stakes. 

FOR 2-YEAR-OLDS. 

Run at Jerome Park until 1890, when it 

was transferred to Morris Park. % of a mile. 

YEAR. NAME TIME. VALUE. 

1882- Kinglike 1.19}^ 14,450 

1883— Himalaya 1.20 3,960 

1884— Hopeful" 1.191^ 4,080 

1885— Dew Drop 1.18^ 3,320 

1886— Firenzi 1.17 4,200 

1887— Fordham 1.19i< 3,940 

1888— King Ernest-Mimi filly . 1.17K 5,000 

1SS9— King Ernest-Cyclone colt 1.183| 6,910 

is: ID— Nellie Bly 1.163| 6,070 

IS'Jl— Yorkville Belle 1.11 13,880 

1892— Runvon 1.13 4,290 

1893— Patrician 1.13 6,980 

1894— Brandvwine 1.12 5,390 

1«95— Ben Brush 1.11% 2,787 

1896— Celoso 1.14 3,200 

1897— Plaudit, 123 1.15 4,000 

1898— Ethelbert 1.12i< 4,000 

1899-King's Courier, 108 . . . I.IOV; 4,000 

1900— Bellario, 123 1.103^^ 5,920 

Tidal Stakes. 

FOR 3- YEAR-OLDS. — RUN AT SIIEEPSHEAD BAY'. 

1 MILE. 

YEAR. NAME. TIME. VALUE 

1882— Runnvmede 1.43% 83,960 

1883— Barnes 1.46K 4,320 

18,84- Young Duke 1.48% 4,180 

*iss=i J Joe Cotton 1 1 1,11/ f 2,655 

lS«n Pardee /^--^^M | ^^^^ 

1886— Inspector B 1.46% 5,810 

1887— Hanover 1.41% 6.740 

1888— Defense 1.42% 7,720 

1889— Salvator 1.44§ 7,000 

1890— Burlington 1.45 8,480 

1891— Porchester 1.42| 5,770 

1892— Charade 1.41 J 6,690 

1893— Sir Walter 1.43 6,330 

1894— Dobbins 1.40 7,900 

1895— Keenan 1.42 6,300 

1896— Margrave 1.43 5,690 

1897— Buddha, 117 1.42i 3,090 

1898— Handball, 122 .... 1.41| 3,770 

1899- Filon d'Or, 123 ... . 1.41^ 4,660 

1900— McMeekin, 118 .... 1.4o| 4,900 

* Dead heat ; purse divided. 

Matron Stakes. 

FOR 2-Y'EAR-OLDS.— RUN AT AVEST CHESTER, 

N. Y.— % MILE. 

YEAR. NAME AND WEIGHT. TIME. VALUE. 

1892— Sir Francis, 118 1.10 $36,770 

1S93— Domino, 128 1.09 24,560 

1894— Agitator, 111 1.11 31,310 

1899— Indian Fairv, 111 ... . l.\QM 17,000 

1900— Beau Gallant, 125 ... . 1.10% 14,000 



Great Bclipse Stakes. 

FOR 2-YEAR-OLDS.— RUN AT MORRIS PARK.— 

% MILE.* 

YEAR. NAME AND WEIGHT. TIME. VALUE. 

1889— El Rio Rev 1.14 $23,750 

1890— Sallie McClelland, 115 . 1.14 24,135 

1891— Tammany, 118 1.123^ 24,3.')5 

1892— Sir Walter, 118 1.153^ 16,7.50 

1893— Domino, 118 1.12% 16,750 

1894— Connoisseur, 119 ... . 1.15 16,7.=S0 

1896— Don de Oro, 113 I.IS^^ 4,025 

1897— Frohman, 118 1.043^ 7,700 

1898— Jean Beraud, 127 ... 1.05 7,760 

1899— His Royal Highness, 122. 1 06% 9,,845 

1900— Irritable, 122 1.0631 8,510 

•Distance reduced to S'j furlougs in 1897. 

I/orillard Stakes. 

FOR 3-YEAR-OLDS. — P.UN AT MONMOUTH PARK. 

IJ2 MILES. 

YEAR. NAME. TIME. VALUE. 

1882— Runnymede 2.40 87,400 

1883— George Kinney 2.39V2 7,800 

1884— Ecuador 2.403^ 9.515 

1885— Wanda 2.393^ 1S,.530 

1886— Inspector B 2.40 13,890 

1887— Hanover 2,403.^ 13,080 

1888— Sir Dixon 2.373^ 17,800 

1889— Salvator 2.373^ 18,525 

1890— Torso 2.363i 20.500 

1891— ■'^Montana 2.26 17.255 

1892— Tammany 2.20^^ 17,560 

1893— Sir Walter 2.21 13,990 

• Reduced to \% miles aud run at Morris Park. 

Detroit Derby. 

FOR 3-Y'EAR-OLDS. — RUN AT DETROIT, MICH. 



13^ MILES. 
NAME AND WEIGHT. 



1897— Ornament, 125 . 
*1898— Isabey, 122 . . , 



2 36 
2.0834 



87,350 
1,400 



liles. 



Oakley Derby. 

FOR 3-YEAR-OLDS.— RUN AT OAKLEY. 

134 MILES. 

YEAR. NAME AND WEIGHT. TIME. VALUE. 

1896— Prince Lief, 117 ... . 2.08^4 89,745 



1897- Ornament, 12' 
1898— Plaudit, 



2.08' 
2.08:'4 



Wheeler Handicap. 

CHICAGO, 



RUN AT WASHINGTON PARK, 
1^4 MILES. 
YEAR. NAME, AGE AND WEIGHT. TIME. 

1893— Morello, 3, 117 2.05 

1894— Yo Tambien, 6, 123. . . . 2.O614 



1898— Algol, 4, 107 
1900— The Roman, 104 



:.04i 
2.04% 



8,790 
7,660 



VALUE. 

86.880 
5,785 
4,415 
4,315 



Hawthorne Steillion Stakes. 

FOR 2-YEAR-OLDS.— RUN AT HAWTHORNE 

PARK, CHICAGO.— % MILE. 

YEAR NAME AND WEIGHT. TIME. VALUE. 

1898- Alpin, 118 ....... 1.1832 818,970 

Columbus Handicap. 

RUN AT WASHINGTON PARK, CHICAGO, ILL.— 

ly^s MILES. 
YEAR. NAME, AGE AND WEIGHT. TIME. VALUE. 

1893— Rudolph, 5, 107 . 
1894— Henry Young, 4, 



1.59»i 819,800 
1.583^ 11,800 



The Philadelphia Record Jtlmanac. 



Great American Stakes. 

FOR 2-YEAR-OLDS.— RUN AT GRAYESEND, L. I. 

% MILE. 

YEAR. NAME AND WEIGHT. TIME. VALUE. 

18S9— St. Carlo \m% $17,6r)0 

18;)0-Russell 1.02 17,050 

1891— St. Florian IMAV^ 16,650 

1892- Sir Walter, 118 1.01>| 16,650 

1893— Domino, 118 1.01?| 18,675 

1894— Waltzer, 118 1.043/| 15,600 

1895— Applegate, 118 . . . . 1.02 16,400 

1896— George Kesslar, 118 . . lM},i 9,750 

1897— Previous, 113 LUl^l 9,750 

1898— Jean Beraud, 122 ... . l.OI^ 9,750 

1899— Vulcaiu, 112 . 1.021-^ 13,305 

1900— Prince Charles, 122 . . . 1.02| 9,750 

Metropolitati Handicap. 

RUN AT MORRIS PARK.— 1 MILE 1 FURLONG. 

YEAR. NAME, AGE AND WEIGHT. TIME. VALUE. 

1892— Pessara, 4, 117 1.54 812,220 

1893— Charade, 4, 107>^ .... 1.521^ 13,740 

1894— Ramapo, 4, 117 1.52>| 6,145 

1896— Counter Tenor, 4, 115 . . 1.53 3.850 

1S97— Voter, 99 1.40)^ 3,850 

1898— Bowling Brook, 3, 102 . . 1.44 4,280 

1899— Filigrane, 102 1.39% 6,750 

19iJ0—Ethelbert, 4,126 ]-ll}-4 <i,'290 

Belmont Stakes. 

FOR 3- YEAR-OLDS.— RUN AT JERO.ME PARK 
UNTIL 1890, WHEN IT WAS TRANSFERRED TO 
MORRIS PARK.— 1>^ MILE.S. 

YEAR. NAME. TIME. VALUE. 

1882— Forester 2.43 $2,600 

1883— George Kinney .... 2.423-^ 3,070 

1884— Panique 2.42 3,150 

18^— Tyrant 2.43 2,710 

18S6— Inspector B 2.41 2,720 

1887— Hanover 2.43}^ 2,900 

]8a8— Sir Dixon 2.401^ 3,440 

1889— Eric. Diablo 2.47 4,960 

*1S90— Burlington 2.08?4 8,560 

1891— Foxford 2.08% 5.070 

1892— Patron 2.17 6,610 

tl893— Comanche 1.53% 5,310 

1894— Henrv of Navarre . . . 1.56^ 6,680 

tl895— Belmar i^.llK 2,700 

111896- Hastings 2.2431 3,025 

1897— Scottish Chieftain . . . 2.23i.| 3,550 

1898— Bowling Brook, 122 . . 2.23 8,810 

1899— Jean Beraud, 122 ... 2.23 9,445 

1900— lldrim, 126 2.213^ 15,940 

• Reduced to 1)4, miles, t Reduced to 1^ miles. } In- 
creased to 1^4 miles. || Increased to l^a miles. 

Kentucky Derby. 

FOR S-Y'EAR-OLDS. — RUN AT LOUI.SVILLE, KY". 

1>^ MILES.— WINNERS SINCE 1884 : 

YEAR. NAME AND WEIGHT. TIME. VALUE. 

1881— Buchanan, 110 2.40K $3,990 

1885— ,Toe Cotton. 110 2.371? 4,630 

1886— Ben Ali, 118 2.3631 4,890 

1887— Montrose, 118 2..39>| 4,200 

18S8— Macbeth II, 115 ... . 2.3834 4,740 

1889— Spokane. 118 2.343| 4,970 

1890— Rilev, 118 2.45 5,460 

1891— Kingmiin, 122 2.523< 4,680 

1892— Azra, 122 2.41>| 4,230 

1893— Lookout. 122 2.393| 4,090 

1894— Chant, 122 2.41 4,020 

1895— Hahna, 122 2.373-< 2,970 

1896— Ben Brush, 117 . . . .2.07% 4,850 

1897— Typhoon II, 117 . . . .2.123^ 4.850 

1898— Plaudit, 117 2.09 4,850 

1899— Manuel. 117 2.12 4,8.50 

*1900— Lieut. Gibson, 117 .. . 2.06% 4,850 

* Distance \}^ miles. 



Brooklyn Derby. 

FOE 3-Y'EAR-OLDS.— RUN AT GRAVESEND. 

1% MILES. 

YEAR. NAME. TIME. VALUE. 

1887— * Hanover 2.433^ $2,675 

1888— Emperor of Norfolk . . 2.08% 3,740 

1889— Cynosure 2.103^ 4.790 

189l»— Burlington 2 12% 6,960 

1891— Russell 2.10 5,270 

1892— Patron 2.103^ 5,240 

1893— Rainbow 2.0934 4,3.50 

1894— Dubbins 2.14% 5,340 

1895— Keenan 2.103^ 4,640 

1896— Handspring 2.103^ 7,800 

1897— Octagon, 122 2.10% 7,960 

1898— *The Huguenot, 122 . . 2.573i 7,750 

1899— Ahom, 119 2.36 7,750 

1900— Petruchio, 108 2.34 8,475 

* Distance, IH miles. 

National Stallion Race. 

FOR 2-Y EAR-OLDS. —RUN AT MORRIS PARK.— 

LAST 5 FURLONGS OF ECLIPSE COURSE. 

YEAR. NAME AND WEIGHT. TIME. VALUE. 

1898— Jean Beraud, 113 ... 0.59 $15,502.-50 

1899-Pupil, 122 0..58% 14,527.50 

1900— Bonnibert, 122 .... 1.00% 15,352.50 

Hyde Park Stakes. 

FOR 2-YEAR-OLDS.— RUN AT WASHINGTON 

PARK, CHICAGO, ILL.— % MILE. 

YEAR. NAME AND WEIGHT. TIME. VALUE. 

1884— Verano 1.19 $5,165 

1885— Ban Fox 1.15% 4,375 

1886— Grisette 1.20 3,705 

1887- Emperor of Norfolk. . . 1.16% 5,610 

1888- Caliente 1.18% 5,560 

1889— EI Rio Rey 1.14% 3,540 

1890— Balgowan 1.16 11,005 

1891— Curt Gunu 1.15 10,550 

1892— G. W. Johnson 1.163^ 11,505 

1893-Domino, 123 1.14 16,900 

1894- Handsome, 118 1.143^ 12,875 

1898- Toluca, 110 I.I41I 2,600 

1900— Alard Scheck, 116 ... 1.1334 2,320 

American Derby. 

FOR 3-Y'EAR-OLDS.— RUN AT WASHINGTON 

PARK, CHICAGO.— 1% MILES. 

YEAR. NAME AND WEIGHT TIME. VALUE. 

1884— Modesty, 117 2.42% $10,700 

1885— Volante, 123 2.493| 9.570 

1886— Silver Cloud, 121 ... . 2.37% 8,160 

1887— C. H. Todd, 118 2.363| 13,640 

1888— Emperor of Norfolk, 123 . 2.40% 14,340 

1889— Spokane, 121 2.413| 15,440 

1890-Uncle Bob, 115 2.55% 15,260 

1891— Strathmeath, 122 ... . 2.493| 18,610 

1892-Carlsbad, 122 3.04% 16,930 

1893— Boundless, 122 2.36 49,500 

1894— Rey El Santa Anita, 122 . 2.36 19,750 

1898— Pink Coat, 127 2.42% 9,225 

1900— Sidney Lucas, 102 ... 2.40% 9,425 

Great Trial Stakes. 

FOR 2-YEAR-OLDS.— RUN AT SHEEPSHEAL BAY. 

% MILE. 

YEAR. NAME AND WEIGHT. TIME. VALUE. 

1891— His Highness, 118. . . . 1.12^ $.52,095 

1892— Mr. Pickwick, 111. . . . 1.15 23,600 

1893— Domino, 125 1.14 23,100 

1894— Waltzer, 125 1.15 16,700 

1895— Handspring, 118 .... I.IOJ 16,800 

1896— Winged Foot, 122 . . . . I.IOJ 17,350 

1897— Hamburg, 122 1.12J 16,550 

1898— Jean Beraud, 120 .... 1.13 15,550 

1899— David Garrick, 115 .. . 1.12^ 17,140 

1900— Cominando, 122 l.llj 15,550 



Brooklyn Handicap. 



RUN AT GRAVESEND, L. I.— 1^4 MILES. 

YEAR. WINNER AND WEIGHT. TIME. VALUE. 

1887— Dry Monopole, 106 .. . 2.07 $5,850 

1888— The Bard, 125 2.13 6,920 

1889— Exile, 116 2.07}-^ 6,900 

IS90— Castaway II, 100 2.10 6,900 

1891— Tenny, 128 2.10 14,800 

1892— Judge Morrow, 116 .. . 2.08% 17,750 

1893— Diablo, 112 2.09 17.500 

1894— Dr. Rice, 112 2.0734 17,750 

18. 5— Hornpipe, 105 2.11i| 7,750 

1896— Sir Walter, 113 2.0832 7,750 

1897— Howard Mann, 106 . . . 2.09% 7,750 

1898— Ornament, 127 2.10 7,800 

1899— Banastar, 110 2.06'^ 7,800 

I9U0— Kinley Mack, 122 .... 2.10 7,200 

Suburban Handicap. 

RUN AT SHEEPSHEAD BAY.— 134 MILES. 

YEAR. NAME, AGE AND WEIGHT. TIME. VALUE. 

1884— General Monroe, 6, 124 . 2.11% ?4,945 

1885— Pontiac, 4, 102 2.093| 5,855 

1886— Troubadour, 4, 115 .. . 2.1234 5.697 

1887— Eurus, 4, 102 2.12 6.065 

laSS— Elkwood, 5, 119 2.073^ 6,812 

1889- Kaceland, 4, 120 .... 2.09* 6,900 

1890- Sal vator, 4, 127 2.0fiJ 6.900 

1891— Loantaka, 5, 110 2.07 9,900 

1892— Montana, 4, 115 2 07| 17,750 

1893— Lowlander, 5, 105 . . . . 2.061 17,500 

1891— Ramapo, 4, 120 2.06^ 12,070 

1895— Lazzarone, 4, 115 ... . 2.07| 4,730 

1896— Henry of Navarre, 5, 129 . 2.07 5,850 

1H97— Ben Bru.sh, 4, 123 .... 2.07J 5,850 

1898— Tillo, 4, 119 2.084 6,800 

1899— Imp, 5, 114 2.05^ 6,800 

19'J0-Kinley Mack, 125 . . . 2.06| 6,800 



Championship Stakes. 

RUN AT .^lONMOUTH PARK.— 13^ MI 
YEAR. NAME, AGE AND WEIGHT. TIME. 

1879— Spendthrift, 3, 102. . . . 2.41 
188t)— Luke Blackburn, 3, 102 . 2.34 

1881— Hindoo, 3, 105 2.39 

1882— Eole, 4, 118 2.4334 

1883-Monitor (n), 118 2.36>2 

1884— Miss Woodford, 4, 113 . . 2.403| 

1885— Freeland, 6, 118 2.36 

1886— Volante, 4, 118 2.45 



18S7— Hanover, 3, 109 . . 
1888— Firenzi, 4, 115 . . . 
1889— Los Angeles, 4, 117 
1890— Sal vator, 4, 122. . ' . 
1891— Firenzi (a), 120. . . 
1892— Lamplighter, 3, 109 



2.38 
2.35 
2.54 
2.35>^ 
2.3831 
. 2.32% 



53,350 
3,325 
3,525 
4,425 
4,950 
4,300 
4,375 
3,000 
4,000 
3,750 
4,600 



Futurity Stakes. 

FOR 2-YEAR-OLDS.— RUN AT SHEEPSHEAD 
BAY.— 6 FURLONGS. 
YEAR. NAME AND WEIGHT. TIME. 

1888— Proctor Knott, 112 . . . 1.15^ 

1889— Chaos, 109 1.164 

1890— Potomac, 115 1.14i 

1891— *His Highness, 130 .. . 1.15i 

1892— Morello, 118 1.12i 

1893— Domino, 130 1.12* 

1894— Butterflies, 112 1.11 

1895— Requital, 115 1.11§ 

1896— Ogden, 115 1.10 

1897— L'Alouette, 115 1.11 

1898— Martimas, 118 1.12| 

1899— Chacoinac, 114 l.iol 

1900— Ballyhoo Bey, 112 . . . .1.10 

finished second, but was ignored as 



C. I.J. C. 



VALUE. 
^0,900 

54,500 
67,675 
61.675 
40.450 
49,350 
48,710 
53,190 
43,790 
34,840 
36,760 
30,630 
33,790 
taner bj 



Note.— Until 1892 the race was run at ex- 
actly six furlongs, when the change was to 
the Futurity Course, "about six furlongs." 



Junior Champion Stakes. 

FOR 2- YEAR-OLDS.— RUN AT MONMOUTH PARK. 

RESUMED AT GRAVESEND, L. I., IN 1898. 

6 FURLONGS. 

YEAR. NAME AND WEIGHT. TIME. VALUE. 

1884— ^^'anda, 107 1.183.^ 810,000 

1885— Ban Fox, 115 1.15 8,500 

1886— Tremont, 115 1.173^ 8,800 

1887— Kingfisher, 115 1.15% 18,895 

1888— Proctor Knott, 112. . . .1.14 20,785 

^889— Protection, 115 1.2034 22,120 

1890— Strathmeath, lis . . . .1.16% 24,420 

1891— Sir Matthew, 118 ... . 1.1334 23,800 

1892 -Don Alonzo, 118 1.123| 16,105 

1893— Senator Grady, 118 . . .1.1334 20,775 

1898— Armament, 107 1.1434 9,600 

1899— Mesmerist, 122 1.15 9,600 

1900— Commando, 127 .... 1.13^ 10,510 

Great Eastern Handicap. 

FOR 2-YEAR-OLDS.— RUN AT SHEEPSHEAD BAY. 

% MILE. 

YEAR. NAME. TIME. VALUE. 

1883— Dutch Roller 1.17 ?6,137 

1884— Ten Stone 1.163^ 7,710 

1885— Dew Drop 1.16% 7,692 

1886— King Fox 1.15 7.298 

1887— Raceland 1.15% 7,508 

1888— Diablo 1.17 6,920 

1889— Tournament 1.17 8,337 

1890— *Sallie McClelland . . . l.llf 8,274 

1891— Ludwig l.lOf 8,663 

■ 1892— Lady Violet I.IOJ 7,340 

1893— Jack of Spades 1.13 7,900 

1894— Gutta Percha 1.10 3,900 

18'.)5— One-I-Love I.IOJ 3,925 

1896— Ogden 1.10 3,850 

1897-Hamburg, 138 I.IOJ 3,975 

1898— Black Venus, 113 ... . 1.09^ 3,900 

1899— Mesmerist, 130 l.lOf 3,970 

1900— Beau Gallant, 105 .... 1.12| 5,850 

•Reduced to Futurity Course. 

Realisation Stakes. 

FOR 3-YEAR-OLDS.— RUN AT SHEEPSHEAD BAY. 

1% MILE. 

YEAR. NAME AND WEIGHT. TIME. VALUE. 

1889- Salvator, 122 2.51 834,100 

1890— Tournament, 1123^ . . . 2.51 25,300 

1891— Potomac, 119 2.51 30,850 

1892— Tammany, 119 2.51? 28,475 

1893— Trt)ubador-Sunbeam— 

colt, 107 2.50g 24,100 

1894— Dobbins, 122 2.55 33,400 

1895— Bright Phoebus, 115 .. . 2.54| 29,700 

1896— Requital, 119 2.49§ 17,365 

1897— The Friar, 115 2.4,s§ 18,125 

1898— Hamburg, 122 2.51i 13,875 

1899-Ethelbert, 118 2.51§ 12,890 

1900— Prince of Melbourne, 126 . 2.49| 14,325 

Treniont. 

FOR 2-YEAR-OLDS.— RUN AT GRAVESEND, L. I. 

% MILE. 

YEAR. NAME. TIME. VALUE. 

1887— Guarantee i.l5V^ $2,605 

1888— Oregon 1.22% 4,560 

1889— Padisha 1.16 6,620 

1890— Chatham 1.1.5% 6,400 

1891— Spinalong 1.18'34 '.280 

1892— Don Alonzo 1.173^ 5,740 

1893— Dobbins 1.163^; 5,620 

1894— Gotham 1.1,5% 5,640 

1895— Handspring 1.15 7,800 

1896— Don de Oro 1-1534 8,525 

1897— Handball, 118 1.15 7,750 

1898— Jean Beraud, 125 ... . 1.15 8,895 

1900— Blues, 115 . 1.131 7,750 



The Philadelphia Record Almanac. 



Annual Champion Stakes. 

FOR THREE-YEAR-OLPS AND UPWARDS. — RUN 

AT PHEEHSHEAD BAY, 2% MII.ES. 
YEAR. NAME AND WEIGHT. TIME. VALUE. 

1900-navid Garrick, 123 . . . S.oO ]9,fi50 
Heat Races (Running). 

J^mile, .2P,<, .221;^: Sleepy Dick (a). Kiowa, 
Kan., Nov. 24, 1S88. 

% mile, .48, .48, .48: Eclipse, Jr. (4). Dallas. 
Tex., Nov. 1, 1890. Al'^i, A7% : Quirt (3), 
122 lbs. Vallejo, Cal., Oct. 5, 18U4. 47i'2, 
481-^: Bill Howard (5), 122 lbs. Anaconda, 
Mont., Aug. 17, 1895. 

% mile, 1.00, 1.00: Kitty Pease (4). Dallas, 
Tex., Nov. 2, 1887. l.OOg, 1.01^: Fox (4), 
113 lbs. San Francisco, Cal., Oct. 31, 1891. 

% mile, 1.13K. LISJ^: Lizzie S. (5), 118 lbs. 
Louisville, Sept. 28, 1883. l.lOJi, l.V2% 
{ straight course) : Tom Hayes (4 ) , 107 lbs. 
New York Jockev Club, June 17, 1892. 

1 mile, 1.41}^, 1.41 : Guido (4), 117 lbs. Wash- 

ington Park, Chicago, July 11, 1891. 1.43, 

1.44, 1.47% (3 in 5) : L'Argentine (6), 115 

lbs. St. Louis, June 14, 1879. 
It's miles, 1.50>^, 1.48: Slipalong (5), 115 lbs. 

Washington Park, Chicago, Sept. 2, 1885. 
Ui miles, 1.56, 1.51% : What-Er-Lou (5). 119, 

Ingleside. San Francisco, Feb. 18, 1899. 
11 :i miles, 2.10, 2.14: Gleumore (5), 114 Ibn. 

Sheepshead Bay, Sept. 26, 1880. 

2 miles, 3.3:?, 3.31 '^ : Miss Woodford (4), 1071;^ 

lbs. Sheepshead Bav, Sept. 20, 18^. 

3 miles, 5.273^, 5.29'^: Norfolk (4), 100 lbs. 

Sacramento, Cal., Sept. 23, 1805. 

The English Derby. 

First run nt Epsom, Jlay 4, 1780. In 1784 
the distiince was increased from 1 mile to IV^ 
miles. The winners of the Derby since 1867 
have been as follows : 

year' winner. I JOCKEY. 

1867 H. Chaplin's Hermit .... J. Daley. 

1868 Sir J. Hawley's Blue Gown . Wells. 

1869 L. Johnstone's Pretender. . J. Osborne 

1870 Lord Falmouth's Kingcraft. iT. French 

1871 Baron Rothschild's Favonius|T. French 

1872 Savine's Cremorne Maidment 

1873 Merry's Doncaster F. Webb 

1874 Cartwright's George Fred'ck Cuslance 

1875 Prince Batthyany's Galopin iMorris 

1876 A. Baltazzi's Kisber Maidment 

1377 Lord Falmouth's Silvio . . . F.Archer 

l878|Crawford'sSeftou Constable 

1879'Acton Sir Bevis Fordham 

1880 DukeofWestm'ster'sBend'Or F. Archer 

1881 Lorrillard's Iroquois .... F.Archer 

1882 Puke of Westminster's ShotoverT. Cannon 

1883 Sir F. Johnstone's St. Blaise !C. Wood 
icjo.1 f#r*Hammonfl's St.-«fatien . Ic. Wood 
1°°*' \ Sir J. Will'ghby's Harvester S. Loates 

1885 Lord Hasting's Melton . . . IF. Archer 

1886 Dukeof Westm'ster'sOrmondiF. Archer 



1887 Abington's Merry Hampton J. Watts 

1888 Duke of Portland's Ayr.shire F. Barrett 

1889 Dukeof Portland's Donovan S. Loates 

1890 Sir James Miller's Sainfoin . J. Watts 

1891 Sir F. Johnstone's Common . G. Barrett 
189i>,Lord Bradford's Sir Hugo. . F. Allsopp 

1893 McCalmont's Isingla.* . . . S. Loates 

1894 Lord Roseberv's Ladas ... J. \\'atts 

1895 Lord Roseberv's Sir Visto . . S. Loates 

1896 Prince of Wales Persimmon . J. Watts 

1897 J. Gubbin's Galtee More . . C. Wood. 

1898 J. W. Larnaeh's Jeddah . . 

1899, Dukeof Westm'rsFlvingFoxiM. Cannon 
1900|Prince of Wales' Diamondl 

Jubilee !m. Cannon 



The Melbourne Cup. 

The Melbourne Cup, the great race of thp 
ycnr in Australia, is a two-mile contest, anci 
is run in November. The winner.-s sincb IHSO 
follow : 

Y.AR. NAME, AGE AND WEIGHT. T!VF. 

1880— Grand Planner. 3, 94 S/Si^ 

1S81— Zulu, 4, 80 3.32' n 

1882— The Assvrian, 5. Ill 3.40 ' 

1?S:3— Martini-Henry, 3, 103 3,30K 

1884-Malua, 5, 135 3.31% 

1885— Sheet Anchor, a, 109 3.29i^ 

1886— Ar.<enal, 4, 103 3.31 

1887— Dunlop, 6, 115 Z.2»^4 

1,S88— Mentor, 4, 115 3.30% 

18H9— Bravo, 6, 119 3.32i% 

1890— Carbine, 5, 145 3.28I4 

ISiil— Malvolio, 4, 116 3.29'.j 

l.sitj— Glenloth, 5, II2; 3..3tiii 

189;-!— Tarcoola, a, 116 3.30'| 

1894— Patron, 4, 131 3 31 

1895— Auraria, 3, 102 3.29 

1896— Newhaven, 3, 111 3.28>^ 

1897— Gaulus, 6, 106 3 31 

1898— The Grafter, 5, 128 3.29^4 

1899— Meriwee, 3, 104 S.SGU 

1900— Clean Sweep 

Interesting Facts in Turf History. 

The greatest American winning three-year- 
old was Hanover, bv Hindoo. In 1887 he" won 
twenty races and $89,^27. 

The Kentucky-bred' hnrse Abbotsford, for- 
merly Mistake, is the only horse that has ever 
won races in England, France and America. 

In 1886, P. Lorillard'sold 27 hrad of horsiB 
in training for S149,050, the highest price 
being 829,000 for the filly Dewdrop, and the 
lowest S300. 

The Lanca'^hire plate, run at the Manches- 
ter, Eng., September meetingof 1889, and won 
by the Duke of Portland's b. c. Donovan, was 
w;orth nearly S80,000 to the winner. 

Largest amount ever won by an American 
two-year-old, S180,U85, Domino, blk. c, by 
Himvar-Mannie Gray, owned bv J. R. & F. P. 
Iveerie, 1893. The Keenc stable won ^282,987 
in stakes and purses in 1893. 

Highest priced horse ever hronght to 
America, Ormonde, b. b., by Ben d'lir, dam 
Lilly Agnes; purchased by William O'B. 
IMacDonough, of San Francisco, Cal., from 
Scnor Bocan, of Buenos Avres, South Amer- 
ica, for 1150,000, October, 1892. 

Highest price ever paid for a horse, 37,0nn 
guineas (S191, 618.44), for Flying Fox, b. c. 
(4), by Onne- Vampire ; purchased by Ed- 
mund Blanc, of Monte Carlo, France, at 
auction sale of Duke of Westminster's horses 
at Kingsclere, Eng., March 8, 1900. 

Highest price ever paid for a trotter, $125,- 
000, for Arion, bay colt, two-year-old, trot- 
ting record 2.10%, by Electioneer, dam 
Ma'nette, by Nutwood ; purchased by J. IMal- 
colm Forbes, of Boston, from Leland Stan- 
ford. Palo Alto Stock Farm, California, 1892. 

The highest price ever paid for a yearling 
in England was S32,000, for Childwick, by St. 
Simon, dam Plaisanterie, purchased by Blun- 
dell Maple in 1891. Mf. Maple also purchased 
Common, by If<onomy, for 175,000, the highest 
price ever paid for a 3-year-old thorough- 
bred. 

Horseback ride from Vienna to Berlin, 
^bout 400 miles, won by Lieutenant Graf 
Starhemberg, Seventh Austro-Hungarian 



The Philadelphia Record JUmanac. 



Hussars, 71 hours 20 minutes (rate of about 
5/5 miles per hour for tliree days), Oct. 2 to 
5, 1892. Horse, Athos, died soon after the 
finish after intense suffering. 

Greatest amount ever won by a trotter in a 
single race, 822,340, Kentucky Futurity, for 
3-year-olds, trotted at Lexington, Ky., Oct. 9, 
1894 ; won by Beuzetta, c. f., 3, by Onward, 
dam Beulah, by Harold, beating Futurity, 
Celaya, Axinite, Nellie A., Lyric, Alkaran, 
Billy Parks and Narvadine in three straight 
heats. Time, 2.1614,2.16}^, 2.143^. Thesiake 
was worth $26,430. 

The greatest sale of thoroughbreds ever 
held in America was that of the late August 
Belmont's Nursery Stud collection, $641,51") 
being realized on 131 head, as follows: fl23,- 
600 for 28 horses in training, sold Dec. 27, 
1890 ; $203,525 for 48 brood mares ; S72,325 for 
27 weanlings; 8124,550 for 24 yearline;s; 
S117,500 for four stallions. Sold at New York, 
Oct. 16 and 17, 1891. St. Blaise brought SlOO,- 
000. 

The sale of the late Lord Falmouth's stud 
in England, held likewise in two divisions, 
April 28 and July ], 1884, realized 111,880 
guineas, or about S.559 400 for 79 head. The 
horses in training fetched 36,440 guineas, and 
the breeding stock, including stallions, brood 
mares, sucklings and yearlings, brought 
75,440 guineas. 

King Thomas, by King Ban, was the high- 
est-priced yearling ever sold at auction, L O. 
Appleby paying $38,000 for him at the Haggin 
sale in New York, June 25, 1888. The follow- 
ing day Mr. Appleby sold the colt to Senator 
Hearst, of Califi)rnia, for $40,000. A chestnut 
colt, by St. Blaise— Ladv Primrose— brought 
$30,000 at the Nursery Stud sale, New York, 
Octolier 17, 1891, Jacob Ruppert being the 
purchaser. 



Twenty-six thoroughbreds, including nine- 
teen horses in training, comprising the Ehret 
stable, winners of $157,789 in stakes and 
purses in 1892, and seven yearlings, also 
owned by Frank Ehret, sold at auction for 
$•223,250, at New York, Nov. 12, 1892, giving 
an average of 88587 per head. The seven 
yearlings brought $52,500 and the nineteen 
horses in training S170,225. The two-vear-old 
Cdlt Don Alonzo brought $30,000, the top 
figure. 

Tlie richest stake ever run in America was 
the Futurity stake of 1890, run at Sheepshead 
Bay, L. I., August 30, and won by August 
Belmont's ch. c. Potomac (2), by St. Blaise, 
dam Susquehanna, by Leamington. The 
value of the stake was $77,700, of which 
$08,450 went to the winner, and $4500 to the 
second horse. Masher, b. c, by 111 Used, also 
owned by Mr. Belmont, who in addition 
received $2500 for breeding first and second, 
making his winnings $75,450. Strathmeath, 
the third horse, received $'2250. 

Nine horses have earned "triple honors" 
in England by winning the Two Thousand 
Guineas, the Derby and the St. Leger, the 
same season. In 19U0 Diamond Jubilee, 
owned by the Prince of Wales, won the 
triple crown. The list of winners together 
with the value of each race iu pounds ster- 
ling follow : 

GUINEAS DERBV LEQER TOTftL 

1853— West Australian 194U 5'250 2100 9,290 



1,86,5— Glad iateur . 
1SG6— Lord Lyon . 
1886— Ormonde . . 
1891— Common . . 
1893— Isinglass . . 
1897— (ialtee More 
1899— Flying Fox 



5100 6825 6950 17,875 

4850 73r,0 5825 18,025 

4000 4700 4450 13,150 

4250 5510 4300 14,060 

4250 5.515 5300 15,065 

3700 5450 5425 14,575 

42.50 5450 4050 13,750 



1900— Diamond Jubilee 4700 5450 5125 15,275 



FASTEST RAII^ROAD RECORDS. 







MILES 


ACTUAL JACT'L 










MILES. 


TIME. 
H. M. S. 


PER 
HOUR. 


RUNNING 

TIME. 
H. M.S. 


MILES 
PER 
HOUR. 


NAME OF ROAD. 


FROM. 


TO. 


DATE. 


1 


.32 


112.5 


.32 


112.5 


New York C.&H.R. . 


Batavia . 


On line . . . 


5-10-93 


5 


8.00100.0 


3.00 


100.0 i 


Loon'yv. 




5-19-93 


5.1 


3.00:102.0 


3.00 


102.0 1 Penna. R. R 


Lando'er Anacostia . . 


9-18-99 


6 


4.00 90.0 


4.00 


90.0 IBaltimore & Ohi^ . . 


Belmont \\'arnock . . 


6- 7-84 


6.9 


4.00 103.5 


4.00 


103.5 Penna. R.-R 


Odenlon Bowie. . . . 


9-18-99 


11 


7.15 91.0 


7.15 


91.0 jPhiia. & Reading . . 


Rydal . :Langhonie . 


10-11-90 


17.6 


12.00! 88.0 


12.00 


88.0 1 Lehigh Valley .... 


Hector . 


Kendaia . . 


11-11-97 


18.7 


12.00 93.5 


12.00 


93.5 


Penna. R. R 


Ham't'n 


Absecon . . 


9-11-99 


24.9 


18.00 83.0 


18.00 


83.0 




Wins low 


Absecon . . 


7-31-00 


34.0 


23.00 89.0 


23.00 


89.0 


Lehigh Val lev. . . . 


Alpine . 


Kendaia . . 


7-21-00 


.56.0 


42.00' 80.0 


42.00 


80.0 


Lon. & N. W. (British) 


Staftbrd . 


Rugby 


12- -92 


58.3 


45.00 76.5 


45.00: 76.5 


Penna. R. R 


Camden 


Atlantic City 


4-21-95 


69.4 


LIO.OO 59.4 


1.10.00; 59.4 


Penna. R. R 


Ph.Bd.St 




5-24-00 


129.34 


1.50.53 70.48 


1..50.53 


70.48 New York C. & H. R. . 


Schene'y,Svraeuse tun. 


9- 5-95 


137.05 


2.22.00 57.64 


2.22.00 


57.64 Penna. R. R 


Philad'aiWasbington 


9-18-99 


•200.00 


3.12.00 62.40 


3.12.00 


62.40! A. T.& Santa Fe . . 


La Junta Dodge City . 
Toledo. Buffalo C.eek 


3-29-00 


288.06 


4.26.08 65.06 


4.22.22 


65.99 Lake Shore & Mich. S. 


10-24-95 


380.01 


5.52.19 64.72 


5.46.071 65.88 


K'ndalv. 


11 4. 


10-24-95 


422.07 


6.35.41 j 64.14 


6.29 50' 65.13 


Elkhart . 




10-24-95 


510.01 


8.01.071 63.61 


7.50.20! 65.07 


Chicago. 


" " 


10-24-95 


721.00 


13.09.00! 54.80 


12.14.00 .58.95 Chicago, Bur. & Q. . 


Maxoh . 


Denver . . . 


2-15-97 


102.5.00 


18.53.00: 54.25 


17.27.00^ 58.74 


Chicago . 




2-15-97 


1937.00 


48.00.001 40.30 


. . . 1 . . Penna., C. B. & 0. . . 


Jer. City. 


" 


2-14,15-97 


2265.00 


68.30.00 3.3.00 68.30.00; 33.00' A. T. & Santa Fe' . . 


L'sAngl. 


Chicago . . . 


3-'29-00 


2802.00 


77.09.00i 36.32; ..... Canadian Pacific . . 


Vanc'v'r 


Brockville . 


8-29-31-97 


3311.<X) 


83.45.00 39.53 . . . 1 . . |P., C. &N.W.,U.P.,C.P. 


Jer. City. 


Oakland, Cal. 


6- -76 



Fastest Schedule- Reading Railroad, 60- 
between Camden and Atlantic City, 55.5 mil 



inute Atlantic City flyer for the season of IS 
, 50 minutes, equal to 66.6 miles per hour. 



running schedule 



Aquatic Events. 



Rowing. 

Single Sculls—^ mile, 57 seconds, straight- 
away: Edwin fftdley (amateur), Newark, 
N. J., July 11, 1891. % mile, 3.08J: Edwin 
Hedley (amateur), Toronto, Out., Aug. 5, 
1893. 1 mile, 4.45: straightaway with tide, 
George Bubear, Thames River. Eng., April 
23, 1894. 1% miles, straight, 8.36: Jos. Laing 
(amateur), Lachine, Canada, Aug. 19, 1882 ; 
9.16|: Edwin Hedley (amateur), Toronto Bay, 
Toronto, Ont., July 21, 1892. 2 miles, turn, 
13.21^^: James H. Riley (amateur), Saratoga, 
N. Y., Aug. 9, 1876. 3 miles, turn, 19.06, with 
one turn: J. G Gaudaur, Austin, Tex., June 
8, 1893; 3 miles 330 yards, straightaway, 
17.26}^: James Stansbury, Paramatta River, 
Sydney, N. S. W., May 2, 1892; 19.23 (against 
time): Edward Hanlan, Lake Quinsigamond, 
Aug. 14, 1886; 19.30: Jacob G. Gaudaur in 
race with Edward Hanlan, Calumet Lake, 
Pullman, 111., May 30, 1887; 20.53^ best 
time over the National Course, Schuylkill 
River, Philadelphia : Daniel Galanaugh in 
race with P. A. Dempsey, Aug. 27, 1887. 3 
miles 330 yards, 19.53j^: Henry E. Searle, 
Paramatta River, Australia, July 13, 188S. 4 
miles, turn, 27.02: dead heat between James H. 
Reillv and Edward Hanlan Barrie, Ontario, 
1879 ; 27.57J^: Edward Hanlan, Ogdensburg, 
N. Y., July 18, 1883. 5 miles, turn, 33.5614: row 
over, Edward Hanlan, Chautauqua Lake, N. 
Y., Oct. 16, 1879. 10 miles, turn, 1.23.00: Joshua 
Ward, Poughkeepsie, N. Y., Nov. 5, 1860. 12 
miles, 1.45.30: C. A. Barnard, near Chicago, 
111,, May 12, 1877. 50 miles, 8.55.20: C. A. Bar- 
nard, near Chicago, 111., Mav 12, 1877. New 
Y'ork to Albany, 32 hours: J. A. Ten Eyck, 
June 24 and 25, 1896. 

Double Sculls~l^ miles, straight, 7.59: J. 
Buckley and W. O'Connell (amateurs), La- 
chine, Canada, Aug. 21, 1882. 2 miles, turn, 
12.16:CharlesE. Courtney and F. E. Y'ates, Sara- 
toga, N. Y., Aug. 8, 1876. 3 miles, turn, 17.40: 
George Bubear and W. T. Barry, Austin, 
Tex., Nov. 6, 1895. 

Pair Oars—1% miles, straight, 8.41: J. H. 
Clegg and F. D. Standish (amateurs), Lachine, 
Canada, Aug. 19, 1882. 2 miles, straight, 
12.20%: J. H. Reilly, J. A. Kennedv (amateurs). 
Greenwood Lake, N. Y., Oct. 9, 1876. 3 miles, 
turn, 20.28: G. Faulkner, P. Reagan (profes- 
sionals), Philadelphia, Sept. 5, 1876. 5 miles, 
turn, 32.01: John and Barney Biglin (profes- 
sionals), Philadelphia, May 20, 1872. 

Four Oars—l}.^ miles, straight, 7.46% : Wat- 
kins (N. Y'.) crew, at Detroit, Mich., Aug. 15, 
1877; best time over the National Course, 
Schuylkill River, Philadelphia, 8.33: lona 
crew, June 25, 1887. 3 miles, straight, 15.37%: 
Argonauta Rowing Association (amateur). 
Kill von KuU, N. J., Sept. 8, 1875. 3 miles, 
turn, 17.20;^ : George Bubear, W. T. Barrv, W. 
Haines ancf J. Wingate, Austin, Tex., Nov. 7, 
1895. 4 miles, turn, 24.40: Ward Brothers, Sara- 
toga, N.Y., Sept. 11, 1871. 5 miles, turn, 30.44%: 
John, James and Bernard Biglin and Denny 
Leary, Harlem River, N. Y'., Sept. 10, 1860. 

Six Oars— 3 miles, straight, 16.32f : Amherst 
University crew (amateurS),Springfield,Mass., 
July 24, 1872 ; 17 40^ : Ward Brothers, Lake 
Quinsigamond, Mass., July 22, 1868. 

Eight Oars—iy^ miles straight, still water, 
7.33J^ : Wachusetts Boat Club crew, Saratoga 
Lake, N. Y'., July 17, 1895; best time over 
National Course, Schuvlkill River, Phila- 
delphia, 6.40 (strong current) : Cornell Uni- 
versity, 1889. 7.;-;9g (fair conditions) : Vesper 
B. C, July 4, 1900. 2 miles, 9.41, straight- 
away : Columbia College, Freshmen crew. 



New London, Conn., June 24, 1891. 3 miles, 
14.271^, straightaway: Cornell University 
crew. New London, Conn., June 25, 1891. 
4 miles, 20.10, straightaway : Y'ale Univer- 
sity crew. New London, Conn., June 29, 1888. 

Intercollegiate Boat Races. 

Eight-oared shells, straightaway course, on 
the Hudson River, at Poughkeepsie, N. Y'. 

I 'V.\RSITY EIGHT.?— FOUR MILES. 

WINNER. SECOND. THIRD. 

1895— Columbia . 'Cornell . . U. of Penna. 
Time, 21.46|. 
j 1S9G— Cornell . .Harvard. . U. of Penna 
I Time, 19.29. Columbia fourth. 

1897— Cornell . . Columbia . U. of Penna. 
1 Time, 20.47J. 

*1898— U. of Penna Cornell . . Wisconsin. 
! Time, 15.51% Columbia fourth. 

1899— U. of Penna Wisconsin . Cornell. 
Time, 20.04. Columbia fourth. 
1900— U. of Penna Wiscon.-.iu . Cornell. 
Time, 19.441. Columbia fourth. 
Georgetown fiftli. 

*Distauce, three miles. Race at Saratoga Lake. 
I FRESHMEN EIGHTS— TWO MILES. 

1896— Cornell . . Harvard . . U. of Penna. 

Time, 10.18. Columbia fourth. 
1897— Cornell . . Columbia . U. of Penna. 

Time, 9.21J. 
1898— Cornell . . Columbia . U. of Penna. 

Time, 10.51|. 
1899— Cornell . . Columbia . U. of Penna. 

Time, 9.55. 
1900— Wisconsin U. of Penna . Cornell. 

Time, 9.45J. Columbia fourth. 

'VARSITY FOURS— TWO MILES. 

1 1899— U. of Penna . Cornell 

I Time, 11 12 

; 1900— U. of Penna . Columbia . Cornell 



Time, 10.31^. 

Cornell— Yale— Harvard. 

Eight-oared shells, straightaway, Hudson 
River, Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 

'VARSITY EIGHTS— FOUR MILES. 

1897— Cornell . . Y'ale .... Harvard. 

Time, 20.34. 
*1 898— Cornell . . Y'ale .... Harvard. 
Time, 23.48. 

FRESHMEN EIGHTS— TWO MILES. 

1897— Y'ale .... Harvard . . Cornell. 

Time, 9.1914 
*1898— Y'ale .... Harvard . . Cornell. 
Time, 11.22^ 

* Race at New London, Conn. 

College Freshmen Boat Races. 

The eight-oared Freshmen boat races on 
the Thames at New London, since 1887, have 
resulted as follows : 

YEAR. WINNER. TIME. LOSER. TIME. 

1887 . Columbia . 11.13% . Harvard . . 11.35 

1887 . Yale . . . 9.55 . Penna . . . 10.28>^ 

1888 . Columbia . 11.54 . Harvard . . 12.08 

1888 . Yale . . . 11.32 . Penna . . . 11.44 

1889 . Harvard . 12.21 . Columbia . 12.28 

1889 . Penna . . 10.08>^ . Y'ale .... 10,11^^ 

1890 . Columbia . 10 54 . Harvard . . 10.57 

1890 . Cornell . . 11.16}^ . Y'ale .... 11.25 

Columbia . 11.29 

1891 . Columbia . 9.41 . Yale .... 9.53i-^ 

Harvar.l . . y.56 



The Philadelphia Record JUmanac. 



YEAR. WINNER. 

1891 . Cornell 

1892 . Yale . 

1892 . Cornell 

1893 . Yale . 

1893 . Cornell 

1894 . Yale . 



1899 . Harvard 

1900 . Harvard 



TIME. LOSER. 

. 10.38 . Columbia 
. 12M% . Columbia 

Harvard . 
. Columbia 
. Harvard . 

Columbia 
. Columbia 
. Columbia 

Harvard . 
. Harvard . 

Columbia 
. Yale . . . 
. Yale . . . 



, 10.56 
, 10.23 



. 10.08 
. 11.15 



. 10.28 



).33K 
!.01 "■ 



TIME. 

. 10.42 
. 12.20 
. 12.28 
. 11.24 
. 10.47 
. 11.02 
. 10.42 
. 11.12 
. 11.56 
. 10.33 
. 11.18J4 
. 9.40 
. Vl.Ut 



Boat Races Between University of 
Pennsylvania and Cornell. 

DATE. WINNER. DIS. PLACE. TIME. 

1890 . Cornell . 3 . New London. . . . 11. •13 

1891 . Cornell 3 . New London .... 14. 27^^ 

1892 . Cornell . 3 . Ithaca 17.26 

1893 . Cornell . 4 . Lake Minnetonka . 23..52 

1894 . Cornell . 4 . Philadelphia . . . 21.121/5 

Harvard-Yale Boat Races. 

Of the twenty-one match races between 
the Harvard arid Yale College eight-oared 
shell crews, Yale has won thirteen and Har- 
vard eight. In 1876 and 1877 the races were 
rowed at Springfield. All the others have 
been decided at New London. The course 
at each place is four miles. The record is as 
follows ; 

DATE. WINNER. TIME. 

1876, June 30 Yale 22.02 

1877, June 30 Harvard .... 24.36 

1878, June 28 Harvard. . . .20.45 

1879, June 27 Harvard. . . .23.48 

1880, July 1 Yale 24.27 

1S81, Julvl Yale 22.13 

1882, June 30 Harvard. . . . 20.47>^ 

1883, June 28 Harvard. . . .25.46% 

1884, June 26 Yale 20.31 

1885, June 26 Harvard. . . .25.lb% 

1886, July 2 Yale 20.41^1 

1887, July 1 Yale 22.56 

1888, June 29 Yale 20.10 

1889, June 28 Yale 21.30 

1890, June 27 Yale 21.29 

1891, June 26 Harvard. . . .21.23 

1892, July 1 Yale 20.48 

1893, Juiie 30 Yale 25.013^ 

1894, June 28 Yale 23.47 

1895, June 28 Yale 21.30 

1896, Yale 'Varsity crew went to England. 

1897* Yale 

1898* Yale 

1899, June 29 Harvard. . . . 20.52J^ 

1900, June 28 Yale 21.12J 

*In 1897 and 1898 the Cornell crew competed with Yale 
and Harvard, winning in 20.34, at Poughkeepsie, and in 
23. -18, at New London. Yale was second both years anl 
Harvard third. 

FRESHJI.iN EIGHTS— TWO MILES. 
DATE. WINNER. SECOND. TIME. 

18',t9 . . . Harvard . . Yale 9.33>^ 

l'„00 . . . Harvard . . Yale 12.01 



1899 
1900 



FOUR-OARED SHELLS— TWO MILES. 

. . Harvard . . Yale 10..^1 

. . Harvard . . Yale 13.22 



American Oarsmen in Bngland. 

The eight-oared shell crew of Cornell Uni- 
versity competed for the Grand Challenge 
Cup, one mile, 550 vards, at the Henley Re- 
gatta, England, July 9, 10 and 11, 1895. The 
other competitors were : Leander Boat Club, 



Thames Rowing Club, London Rowing Club, 
New College (Oxford), Trinity Hall (Cam- 
bridge) and Eaton College Rowing Clubs. 
Cornell won a trial heat in a row-over, the 
Leander crew failing to start when the word 
was given. In the second round, Trinity Hall 
beat Cornell by eight lengths in 7.15. Trinity 
Hall beat New College in the final heat by 
one-third of a length in 7 minutes 30 seconds. 

In 1896 the Yale University crew competed 
at Henley, being beaten iii the first trial 
heat by the Leander crew by one and three- 
quarters length. Time, 7 minutes 14 seconds. 

1897— Edward Hanlan Ten Eyck, 18 years 
old, of the Wachusett Boat Club, Worcester, 
Mass., won the diamond sculls at Henley, 
beating H. T. Blackstaflfe, of England, in the 
final heat by a length and a half. Time, 
8 minutes 35 seconds. 

1898— B. H. Howell, an American, edu- 
cated at Trinity Hall, Cambridge University, 
won the Diamond Challenge Sculls at Hen- 
ley, creating a new record for the Henley 
Course. He beat H. T. Blackstaffe by three 
and a half lengths in 8 min. 29 sec. 

1899.— The Argonaut Boat Club, of Toronto, 
Ont., sent a fonr, an eight and two singles 
to the Henley Regatta, but all were beaten. 
Howell, an American, again won the dia- 
mond sculls. 

1900— The senior eight-oared shell crew of 
the Vesper Boat Club, Schuylkill Navy, 
Philadelphia, won the race for senior eiglits 
at the International Regatta, rowed on the 
river Seine, at Paris, France, August 25 and 
26. The regatta was open to amateur oars- 
men of the world, and four crews reached 
the final heat. The Vespers winning by 
about three lengths. The course was 1 
mile 153 yards in length, and the time was 6 
minutes "7^ seconds. This was the first 
victory on record for an American crew 
in Europe. The Americans, after the first 
200 yards had been traversed, always had 
the race at their mercy, and won easily. 

FINAL HE.4T. 

Vesper B. C, U. S. of America 1 

Club Nautique de Gand ((ihent), Belgium . 2 

Minerva, Amsterdam, Holland 3 

Germania R. C, Hamburg 4 

The Vesper crew was made up of Roscoe 
Lockwood, bow ; E. Marsh, E. Hedley, W. 
Carr, J. Geiger, J. B. Juvenal, H. DeBaecke ; 
J. O. Exley, stroke; L. Abell, coxswain. 
P. A. Dempsey was coach and trainer. 

The race for the diamond sculls was estab- 
lished at Henley-on-the-Thames in 1844, and 
the winners since 1884 will be found ap- 
pended : 



WINNER. 




M. 8. 


W. S. Uinvin 


Oxford 


944 


W. S. Unwin 


Oxford 


9 22 


P. I. Pilman 


Cambridge . . . 


9 05 


J. C. Gardner 


Cambridge . . . 


8 51 


GuyNickalls 


Oxford 


8 56 


Guy Nickalls 


Oxford 


8 56 


Guv Nickalls 


Oxford 


8 57 y„ 


V. Nickalls 


Oxford 




J. J. K. Ooms 


N.R.C., Amste'm 


10 09K 


Guy Nickalls 


Oxford 


9 12 


Guv Nickalls 


Oxford 


9 32 


R. Guinness 


Leander R. C. . 


9 11 




Leander R. C. . 


9 36 


E.H.Ten Evck 


Wachusett B.C. 


8 35 


B. H. Howell 


Cambridge . . . 


8 29 


B. H. Howell 


Cambridge. . . 


8 06 


E.G.Hemmerde 


Oxford 


8 42 



The Philadelphia Record JUmanac. 



International Sculling Matches. 



YEAR 



WINNER. 



LOSER. 



1880 E. C. Lay cock 
1880 E. C. Laycock 
1S80E.C. Lavcock 
1880 E. Hanlanf. 

1880 W. Ross. . . 

1881 :E. Han Ian . 

1882 E. Han Ian . 
1882! E. Hanlanf. 
1882,E.C. Lavcock 
1882lj. Largan . . 
1884iw. Ross. . . 
18841 E. Hanlan . 



W. Beach 
E. Hanlan . 
W. Beach . . 
W. Beach . . 
G. J. Perkin.s 
G. Bubear. . 
G. ,1. Perkins 
G. Bubear . . 
N. Matterson 
G. W. Lee . . 
W. Beach . . 
W. Beach . . 
J. Largan . . 
G. Bubear . . 
C.E.Coxirtnev 
W. Beach . . 
E. Hanlan . 
Peter Kemp . 
Peter Kemp . 
W. Beach . . 
H. E. Searle. 
N. Matter.son 
Peter Kemp. 
J. Stansbury. 
T. Sullivan . 
C.W. Harding 
C.W. Harding 
J. Stansbury. 
J. Gaudaur . 
G. Towns . . 
W. Barry . . 
J. Gaudaur . 



Th.Blackm'n 
G. H. Hosmer! 
J. H. Rik-y . 
E. A. Trlckott 
E. A. Trickelt 
E. C. Laycock 
R. W. Boyd . 
E. A.Trickett 
R. W. Boyd . 
H. Pearce. . ' 
G. Bubear * . 
E. C. Laycock 
E. Hanlanf . 
T. Clifford . 
T. Clifford . 
E. Hanlanf . 
N. Matterson 
C. Xeilson . 
Peter Kemp. 
Peter Kemp. 
G. W. Perkins 
N. Matterson 
J. Gaudaur . 
W. Rossf . . 
C. Neilson. . 
W. Ross . . . 
G. Bubear . . 
E. Hanlanf . 
E. A.Trickett 
E. Hanlanf . 
E. Hanlanf . 
E. Hanlan f . 
\V. O'Connorf 
G. Bubear . . 
N. ISIatterson 
W. O'Connorf 
G. Bubear . . 
T. Sullivan . 
T. Sullivan . 
C.W. Harding 
J. Stansbury. 
W. Barry . . 
G. Towns . . 
B. Johnson . 



I DIST. [ Til 

\m. y. m. 
k 440 21) : 
'4 300 2G ( 
4 440 25 ( 
4 440 20 : 
4 4J0 2:; - 
4 440 2') ■ 

3 563 21 ; 

4 440 27 i 

3 88017 ; 

4 440 24 • 
4 440 26 

3 330,20 ; 

3 330:21 I 
13 330 26 I 
Is 330 22 i 
|4 -1401 — 
'4 440 — 

4 410 24 ■ 
4 410 21 : 
4 44IJ 25 
4 440 24 



19 

3 33 
3 33 

3 330 ■- 

4 440122 
4 4-10 22 
3 330 '21 

3 330122 

4 440 — 

3 713 21 

4 440122 
4 4-10|21 
4 440 23 
4 440 22 
4 440 123 
3 20 



X Course short c 

Ozford-Cambridge Boat Races. 

The record of boat races between Oxford 
and Cambridge now stands 32 to 24 in favor 
of Oxford, with one dead heat. 



YEAR 


DATE. 


WINNER. 


TIME 


WON BY 


1829 




Oxford . . 


14.30 


Easily. 


1836 




Cambridge 


36.00 


1 min. 


1«39 




Cambridge 


31.00 


1 mill. 45 see. 


1810 




Cambridge 


29.30 


■% length.s. 


1841 


. . . 


Cambridge 


32.30 


1 mm. 4 sec. 


1842 


June 11 


Oxford . . 


30.45 


13 seconds. 


1840 


Mar. 15 


Cambridge 


23.00 


30 seconds. 


1846 


Apr. SiCambridge 


21.05 


2 lengths. 


18-19 


Mar. 29, Cambridge 


22.00 


Easily. 


1849 


Dec. 15 


Oxford . . 


. . 


Foul. 


1S52 


Apr. 3 


Oxford. . 


21,36 


27 seconds. 


1854 


Apr. 8 


Oxford. . 


25.29 


11 strokes. 


1856 


Mar. 15 


Cambridge 


25.50 


Vi length. 


1857 


Apr. 4 


Oxford . . 


22,55 


35 .seconds. 


1858 


Mar. 27 


Cambridge 


21.23 


22 seconds. 


18oy 


Apr. 15 


Oxford. . 




Ciimb'gesank 
1 length. 


1860 


Mar. 31 


Cambridge 


26.05 


1861 


Mar. 23 


Oxford . . 


23.28 


48 second?. 


1862 


Apr. 12 


Oxford . . 


24.41 


30 seconds. 


1863 


Mar. 28 


Oxford . . 


23.10 


43 seconds. 


IM64 


Mar. IS 


Oxford . . 


22.15 


26 seconds. 


1865 


Apr. 8 


Oxford . . 


21.50 


4 lengths. 



L 

1866, Mar. 24 Oxford . . ! 
lS67jApr. 13. Oxford . . ! 
1868'Apr. 4!0xford . . 
1869; Mar. 17 'Oxford . . i 

1870 Apr. 6 1 Cambridge 

1871 Apr. llCambridge 

1872 Mar. 23 Cambridge 
1873' Mar. 29 Cambridge 
18741 Mar. 28iCambridge 
1875' Mar. 20 Oxford . . 
1876! Apr. 8 Cambridge 
1877 Mar. 21 Dead heat. 
1878!Apr. 13 Oxford . . 
1879 Apr. 5'Canibridge 
188U Mar. 22! Oxford . . 
1881! Apr. 8!Oxford. . 
1882 Apr. l! Oxford . . 
18b3 Mar. 15 Oxford . . 
1884 Apr. 7iCambridge 
1885^ Mar. 28 Oxford . . 
1886 'Apr. 3, Cam bridge 

1887 Mar. 26^Cam bridge 

1888 Mar. 21iCambridge 
18S9iMar. 30, Cambridge 
1890 Mar. 26 Oxford . . 



25.50 

22.39 

20.37 

20.06 

22.05 

23.093^ 

21.14 

19.36 

22.35 

22.02)^ 



1891 Mar. 21 
1802 Apr. 9 

1893 Mar. 22 

1894 Mar. 17 

1895 Mar. 30 

1896 Mar. 28 

1897 Apr. 3 
1898!Mar. 26 
1899 'Mar. 25 



Oxford . . 

Oxford . . 

Oxford . . 

Oxford . . 

Oxford . . 

Oxford . . 

Oxford . 

Oxford . . 
Cambridge 



1900 1 Mar. 3l|Cambridg( 



2 lengths. 
K length. 

3 lengths. 
3 lengths. 

1 length. 
34 length. 

2 lengths. 

3 lengths. 

3 lengths. 
30 si,<conds. 

20.19 " 5 lengths. 
24.06>^ 

23.12 37 seconds. 
21.18 314 lengths. 
21.23J4 3% lengths. 
21 52 2 lengths. 
20.12 20 seconds. 
21.18 |3>^ lengths. 
21.39 2K lengths. 
21.37>^'3 lengths. 
22.291 ,% length. 
20.52 |3>^ lengths. 
20.48 6 lengths. 
20.14 1 2 lengths. 
22.03 ]1 length. 
21.48 3^ length. 
19.21 [214 lengths. 
18.47 II length. 

3>^ lengths. 

2>i lengths. 

Klength. 

21enKths. 

15 lengths. 

4 lengths. 
20 lengths. 



21.39 
20.50 
20.01 
19.12 
22.15 
21.04 
1S.47 



1816 — The first university race rowed in 
outripgers. Mortlake Church to Putney. 

1856— Barker's Rails to Putney. 

1857— The first race in which either univer- 
sity rowed in the present styleof boats with- 
out keel ; also the first time either rowed 
with round oars. Both used the same kind 
of oars and boats. 

1873— Both crews used sliding seats for the 
first time. 

1877— The Oxford bowman damaged his 
oar. 

1887— No. 7 in the Oxford boat broke his 
oar. 

National Amateur Association. 

Races a mile and a half straightaway. 
Winners since 1890: 

SENIOR FOURS. m. ?. 

1890— Bradford B. C 8 

18U1— Kairmount R. A 8 

1892— Wyandotte B. C 9 



40 
54§ 
00 

1893— Minnesota B. C 9 25 

1894— Argonaut B. C* 8 48 

1895— Institute B. C* 8 43U 

1S90— Winnipeg R. C 8 59>2 

1S97— Institute B. C* 9 my, 

1898— Argonaut B. C 9 02 

1899— Penna. B. C 8 iS%, 

1900— Detroit R. C 9 18 

JUNIOR FOURS. 

1890— Crescent B. C 9 30 

1891— Arlington B. C 9 U 

1892— Ariel B. C 9 25 

1893— Wvandotte B. C 9 23>^ 

1894— Excelsior B. C R. O. 

SENIOR SINGLE SCULLS. 

1890— W. CaflVey, Lawrence C. C. . . 10 I8I4 

1891— W. Caffrey, Lawrence C. C. . .10 03§ 

1892— J. J. Ryan, Sunny side B. C. . . 10 24 

1893— J. J. Rvan, Sunnyside B. C* . 10 243^ 

1894— Fred. Koenig, Western R. C* . 9 4l1% 

♦Races rowed with a turn. 



The Philadelphia Record JUmanac. 



1895— A. S. McDowell, Delaware B.C.* 9 50 

1896— J J. Whitehead, Riverside B C.*10 11 

1897— Jos. Magiiire, Bradford B. C* . 9 59 
1898— E. H. Ten Eyck, Wachusett 

B. C 9 59 

1899— E. H. Ten Eyck, Wachusett 

B. C 10 \&A 

1900— John Rumohr, Harlem R. C, 

New York E. 0. 

J0NIOB SINGLE SCULLS. 

18oo_w. L. Bennett, Worcester B. C. 10 05 

1891- Joseph Wright, Toronto B. C. . 10 I6i 

1892— P. Lehiinev, Albany R. C* . . 11 25 

la'J3-W. E. F. Paine, Argonaut B. .C* 10 mi 

1894— J. R. McCormick, Albany R. C* 10 OSJ-^ 

DOUBLE SCULLS. 

1890— A. Cameron, R. Curran, Bay- 
side B. C 9 14 

1891— E. J. Mulcahev, M. F. Mona- 

ghau, Albany R. C 8 39 

1892— J. Y. Parke, E. Hedley, Vesper 

B. C* 9 5314 

1893— J. Gray, R. Ciirran, Star B. C*. 9 44% 
1894— G. W. Van Vliet, F. R. Baltz, 

Vesper B. C* 9 06>^ 

1895— J. E. Nagle, F. Hawkins, Har- 
lem R.C.* 8 43 

189G— P. L. Howard, R. II. Crawford, 

N. Y. A. C 9 103^ 

1897— G. W. Van Vliet, H. Mouoghan, 

Penna. B. C* 9 27% 

1898— C. H. Lewis, bow ; E. H. Ten 
Eyck, stroke. Wachusett B. 

C. . 9 09 

1S99— C. H. Lewis, bow, E. H. Ten 

Eyck, stroke. Wachusett B. 

C 9 19% 

1900- C. H. Lewis, bow ; E. 11. Ten 

Eyck, stroke, Wachusett B. C. R. O. 

SENIOR EIGHTOARED SHELLS. 

1890— Atalanta B. C 8 12% 

1891— New York A. C 7 47^ 

1892— New York A. C 7 55 

1893— Atalanta B. C 7 55% 

1894— Triton B. C 7 Z&% 

1.S95— Bohemian B. C* 7 39i^ 

1896— Baltimore A. C 7 48>| 

1897— Penna. B. C 8 Ol^i 

1898— Penna. B. C 7 iOH 

1899— Penna. B. C 7 40i., 

1900— Vesper B. C 9 01% 

PAIR OARS. 

1890— F. D. Standish, F. A. Lyon, 

Detroit B. C 10 15}^ 

1891— J. A. Dempsey, G. C. Derapsey, 

Atalanta B. C 10 12J 

1892-M. Law,W.Law,AtalantaB.C.* 10 14% 

1893— F. D. Standish, F. A. Lyon, De- 
troit B. C* 10 05 

1894— G. W. Van Vliet, F. R. Baltz, 

Vesper B. C* 10 24 

1895-P.J. Mulqueen,bow; J.Wright, 

stroke. Toronto B. C* . . 9 03 

1896— D. J. Hagerty, bow ; H. H. 

Hughes, stroke. Penna. B.C. 10 05^^ 

1897— F. J. Thompson, bow ; J. 
Wright, stroke. Argonaut R. 
C* 10 \l\ 

1898— H. G. Scott, bow ; John O. Ex- 
ley, siroke. Penna. B. C . . 9 59 

1899— Hugh Monaghan, bow; J. O. 

Exley, stroke. Penna. B.C . 10 50}^ 

1900— H. DeBaecke, bow ; J. O. Ex- 
ley, stroke. Vesper B. C. . . 9 33>^ 



INTERMEDIATE EIGHT-OARED SHELLS, m. S. 

1893- Dauntless B. C 7 39V 

1894— Riverside B. C 8 49% 

1895- Wachusett B. C 7 33>2 

1896— New York A. C 8 26 

1897— Worcester High School A. A . 8 07 

1898— Fairmouut R. A 8 02% 

1899— Boston A. A 8 04 

1900- Dauntless B. C, New York . . 10 02 

SENIOR SINGLE SCULI.S— 410 YARDS. 

1890— E. J. Carver. Institute ]{. 0. . . 1 22>i 
1891— J. W. Bergen, Bradford B. ('. . 1 29 

INTERN.ATIONAL FOUR-OARKU SHELLS. 

1893— New York A. C 8 07 

1896— Winnipeg B, C 8 15% 

1897— Argonaut R. C 8 52 

1898— ."Vrgonaut B. C 8 17 

J899-Broekville R. C 9 10 

1900— \\'achusett B. C 7 36% 

INTERMEDIATE SINGLE SCULLS. 

1895— A. Jurv, Jr., Toronto B. C* .10 30 
1896— E. H. Ten Eyck, Wachusett 

B.C 9 59 

1897— C. H. Lewis, Wachusett B. C* 10 17 

189S— A. Kubick, Springfield B. C. . 10 28)^ 
1899— F. B. Greer, JetJiies Point R. 

A 10 49 

1900— F. Demourelli.Y. M. G. C, New 

Orleans 8 53^^ 

INTERMEDIATE FOUR-OAREI) SHELLS. 

1895— Winnipeg B. C* 9 03 

1896— Ariel B. C, Baltimore 9 11 

1S97— Vesper B. C* 9 18 

1898— Western R. C 9 20 

]S99— New York A. C 9 42 

I'JOO— Nassau B. C, New York ... 9 14>4 

INTERMEDIATE DOUBLE SCULLS. 

1896— P. L. Howard, bow; J. P. Craw- 
ford, stroke. N. Y. A. C. . . 9 21 

1897— Charles Devery, bow ; Thumas 
Skellv, stroke. Faiiinuunt 
R. A.* 10 29 

1808— G. H. Smith, bow ; James Bond, 

Jr., stroke. Bachelors' B. C. . 9 42 

1899— E. T. Brown, bow ; F. B. Greer, 

stroke. Jeffries Point R. A. . 10 02% 

1900-C. F. Bunth, bow ; R P. Smith, 

siroke. Crescent B. C, Phila. 8 '^2 

ASSOCIATION SENIOR SINGLE. 

1899— John Ruhmor, Ratportage R. 

C 10 25 

1900— F. B. Greer, Jeffries Point R. A. 8 17 

PARIS FOURS— 1 MILE 153 YARDS. 

1900— Vesper B. C, Philadelphia . . 5 13' .j 

PARIS EIGHTS— 1 MILE 153 Y'ARLS. 

1900— Vesper B. C, Philadelphia . . 09^j 

PARIS SINGLE.?- 1 MILE 153 YARDS. 

1900— E. H. Ten Eyck, Wachusett B. 

C, Worcester, JMass 6 131-^ 

» Races rowed with a turn. 

Cup and People's Regatta. 

National Course, Schuylkill River, Phila- 
delphia, V/i miles straightaway, until 1894, 
when all but eight-oared shell race were 
rowed with one turn : 

FOUR-OA 

1887— Institute B. C, Newark 

1888— Cornell U. B. C, Ithaca .... 9 30 

1889— New York A. C 8 01 

1891)— Triton B. C, Newark 8 4Sy^ 

1891— FairmountR. A., Philadelphia 9 27 

1892— FairmountR. A., Philadelphia 8 2-li 

189.3— Pennsylvania B. C No time. 

1894— New York A. C 9 32 



SHELLS— DOWNING CUP. 

9 46 



The Philadelphia Record JUmanac. 



1895- Crescent B.C 9 27 

lS9t;— Institute B. C, Newark, N. J. . 9 23 

1897— Ariel R. C 9 16'-^ 

isgs— Vesper B. C 10 02% 

1899— Penna. B. C 9 07 

19U0— Vesper B. C Row over. 

JUNIOR FOUR-OARED GIGS. 

1S87— Penna. B. C, Philadelphia . . — — 

1S88— Triton B. C, Newark 10 10?^ 

18.S9— College B. C, Philadelphia . . 7 52 

1890— RavenswoodB. C 8 32V^ 

1891-Triton B. C, Newark 9 35 

1K92— Atalanta B. C, Newark .... 8 04 

1H93— Institute B. C, Newark .... 9 nV^ 

1894— Triton B. C, Newark 9 58 J 

1895— Grav's Ferry B. C, Phihid'a . . 10 00 

1S97— Ariel R. C 9 i&% 

1898— Central Ui?h School 9 16 

1H99— Crescent Br C 9 50 

19U0— Crescent B. C 8 55| 

SENIOR DOUBLE-SCULL SHELLS. 

1887— G. Gotpfert, J. O'Reagan, Me- 
tropolitan B. C 10 04>^ 

1888— G. H. Delanev, H. Zin Zwiuger, 

Nonpareil B. C 10 19 

1889—0. J. Stephens, E. Hanbold, N. 

1890— G. A. Weiss, 0. J. Stephens, N.' 

Y A C . . 9 00 

1S91— G. W. 'van Vliet,' E. Hedley', 

Vgsdgt B C 9 34 

1892— John Y. Parke,' EdwinHedley', 

Vesper B.C 8 4-l| 

1893-G. W. Van Vliet, G. W. Megow- 

en. Vesper B. C R. O. 

1894— G. W. Van Vliet, bow ; F. R. 

Baltz, stroke. Ve.«per B. C. . 10 12| 

1895— G. W. Van Vliet, bow; J. B. 
Juvenal, stroke. Pennsylva- 
nia B. C 9 19 

189fi— F. Cresser, bow; E. Marsh, 

stroke. Vesper B. C Foul. 

1897— G. W. Van Vliet, bow; H. 

Moiiaghan, stroke 9 24 

1898— H. Monaghan, bow : Ed Marsh 

stroke. Penna. B. C .... 10 V)% 

1899 — James Henderson, bow ; W. 
Weinand, stroke. Delaware 

B. C 9 35 

1900— Edwin Hedley, bow ; J. B. Ju- 
venal, stroke. Vesper B. C. R. O. 

SENIOR SINGLE SHELLS. 

1887— F. R. Baltz, Pennsylvania B. C. — — 

1888-C. G. Psotta, Cornell Navv . . 10 54 

1889-E. J. Canity, Institute B. C. . . 8 46 

1890— E. J. Carney, Institute B. C. . . 9 SO^o 

1891— Edwin Hedley, Vesper B. C. .10 40 " 

1892— Edwin Hedlev, Vesper B. C. . 9 24 

189:5— Edwin Hed lev, Passaic B. C. . 9 39 

1894 -Edwin Hedlev, Vesper B. C. .10 30g 

1895— W.S.McUoweil, Delaware B.C. 10 00 

189i;— F. Cresser, Vesper B. C 10 34 

1S97— J. B. Juvenal, Penna. B. C. . No time 

1898— Fred Cresser, Vesper B. C. . . 10 05 

1899— J. B. Juvenal, Penna. B. C. . . 10 33 
19U0— J. B. Juvenal, Vesper B. C. . No time. 

PAIR-OARED SHP.LLS. 

1888-G. J. Etty, R. Schile, Union 

B. C 10 40 

1889-W. J. Runk, T. Reath, Undine 

B. C 8 46 

1890-W. E. Codv. J. J. Delaney, Non- 
pareil B. C 9 59 

1891— E. Valentine, W. H. Pinckney, 

New York A. C 10 48 

1892— M.Law,W. Law, Atalanta B.C. 8 54 

1893-P. E. Huneker, H. B. Burchell, 

lona B. C 8 48^ 



1894— F. R. Baltz, bow ; G. W. Van 

Vliet, stroke. Vesper B. C. . 11 52| 

1895— A. J. Ingraham, bow; C. B. Dix, 

stroke. Pennsylvania B. C. 10 14 

1896— A. J. Ingraham, bow; C. B. Dix, 

stroke. Pennsylvania B. C. . 10 56| 

SENIOR EIGHT-OARED SHELLS— SHARPLESS CUP. 

1884— Columbia B. C 8 06% 

lS85—Fairmount Rowing Association 8 32 

1886— Malta B. C 8 063^ 

1887— Malta B. C 8 bZ% 

1888— College B. C 8 Z&% 

1889— Cornell University 7 03 

1890— College B. C 7 56 

1891— College B. C. 8 15 

1892— New York A. C 7 47J 

1893— Malta B. C 8 05 

1891— Triton B. C, Newark 8 32 

1895— Triton B. C, Newark 8 06V^ 

1896— Baltimore A. C 8 05 

1897— Pennsylvania B. C 7 57 

1898- Pennsylvania B. C 8 21 

1S99— Pennsylvania B. C 8 14!^ 

1900— Vesper B. C 7 391' 

.tUNIOR EIGHT-OARED SHELLS. 

1890— FairmountB. C, Philadelphia 8 41 

1S91— Institute B. C, Newark B. C. . 9 01 

1S92— Palisade B. C 8 014 

1893— Passaic B. C, Newark 8 12% 

1894— Fairmount B. C, Philadelphia 8 16^ 

lS95-Montrose B. C, Manayunk . 8 50 
1896— Fairmount R. A., Philadelphia. Foul. 

1897— Fairmount R. A 8 303^ 

1898— Fairmount R. A 8 12 

1899— Vesper B.C 8 50 

1900— Passaic B. C, Newark .... 8 11^ 

JUNIOR SINGLE SHELLS. 

1888— E. C. Brown, Farragut B. C. . . 11 48 

18S9— W. E. Codv, Nonpareil B. C. . 8 5:5>^ 

1890-J. J. Schjle, Union B. C 9 59 

1891— F. W. Howard, N. Y. A. C. . . 11 28 

1892— S. Rogers, Excelsior B. C. . . . 9 24 

1893— A. L. Harris, Crescents. C. . .10 10>^ 

1894— Chas. Coupe, Gray's Ferry B. C. 12 05 
1895— John O. Exley, Gray's Ferry 

B. C 10 51 

1896— James Patrick. Newark B. C. . 11 09 

1897- B. G. Wilson, N. Y. A. C. ... 10 47% 

1898— Frank Marsh, Penna. B. C. . . 10 2.si2 

1899— W. Myers, Bachelors' B. C. . . 10 50 
1900— A. Asdale. Columbia B. C, 

Pittsburg 9 39J 

INTER.MEDIATE SINGLE SHELLS. 

1807— J. Patrick, Newark R. C. ... 10 49^ , 

1898—1. H. Hooper, Institute B. C. . 10 34'., 

1S99—R. Harlfinger, Vesper B. C. . .11 22" 

1900-George W. Engle, Malta B. C. . 9 lu| 

JUNIOR DOUBLE SHELLS. 

1897— T. Skelly, bow ; E. F. Brownell, 

stroke. Fairmount R. A . .10 05 
1898— G. H.Smith, bow ; James Bond, 

Jr., stroke. Bachelors' B. C. 10 05 
1899— G. F. Haertrich, Jr., bow : G. 

Root, Jr., stroke. Malta B. C, 10 04 
1900— R. H. Smith, bow; C. F. Bunth, 

stroke. Crescent B. C. . . . 8 48? 

INTERMEDIATE DOUBLE SHELLS. 

1897— H. Wilson, bow ; C. Young, 

stri.)ke. Penna. B. C 11 46^;, 

1898— C. H. Margerum, bow : D. Hal- 
stead, Jr., stroke. Crescent 

B. C 10 051.; 

1899— W. Wark, bow ; R. Harlfinger, 

stroke. Vesper B. C 10 14!^ 

1900— W. G. Myers, bow ; R. R. Zane, 

stroke. Bachelors' B. C. ... 8 44 



The Philadelphia Record JUmanac. 



Schuylkill Navy Regatta. 

Rowed annually on the Schuylkill River, 
\% miles straightaway, except in 1896, when 
the distance was one mile straightaway. 
Winners since 1890 : 

SENIOR SINGLE SCULLS. m. S. 

1890— John Y. Parke, Vesper B. C. . . No time 
1S91— Edwin Hedley, Vesper B.C.. . 10 04 
1S92— Edwin Hedley, Vesper B. C. . 9 57 
189:3— Geo. W. Van Vliet, Vesper B. C. 9 53 
1894— Edwin Hedlev, Vesper B. C. . 9 34^^ 

1895- F. Cresser, Vesper B. C 9 29 

1896— J. B. Juvenal, Penna. B. C. . . R. O. 
1897— J. B. Juvenal, Penna. B. C . . .10 25 
1S98— Fred Cresser, Vesper B. C . . .11 51i 
1899— J. B. Juvenal, Penua. B. C:. . . 9 48 
1900- J. B. Juveual, Vesper B. C. . . 9 40 

JUNIOR SINGLE SCULLS. 

1890— B. p. Elliott, lona B. C 10 20| 

1891— A. D. Whitney, Crescent B. C. . 11 05 

1S92-E. C.Taylor. Philadelphia B.C. 9 57 

1893- C. B. Dix, Penna. B. C 9 311^ 

1894-C. G. Phillips, Jr., Malta B. C. .9 49J 

1895— E. Marsh, Malta B. C 9 57 

1896— Guslav Roehm, Vesper B. C. . 6 47 

1897— J. C. Barret, Vesper B. C. . . .11 203-^ 

1.S98— John McC. Binder, Malta B. C. 11 28^ 

1900— G. W. Engle, Malta B. C. ... 9 47,1., 

DOUBLE-SCULL SHELLS. 

1890— Chas. Saenger, John Y. Parke, 

Vesper B. C 9 03 

1891- George W. Van Vliet, Edwin 

Hedley, Vesper B. C R. O. 

1892— John Y. Parke and Edwin Hed- 
ley, Vesper B. C 8 45' 2 

1893- George W. Van Vliet, George W. 

Megowen, Vesper B. C. . . . R. O. 

1894— G. W. Van Vliet, F. R. Baltz, 

Vesper B. C 9 03 

1895— G. W. Van Vliet, J. B. Juvenal, 

Pennsvlvania B. C 9 03 

1896— F.Cresser,E. Marsh, Vesper B.C. 5 36 

PAIR-OARED SHELLS. 

1890— T. Diggles, Thomas Whitney, 

College B. C 10 263 

1891— J. Fred. Tov, W. N. Myers, West 

Philadelphia B. C 10 36 

1892— Paul E. Huneker, S. D. Hecht, 

lona B. C 9 14 

1893— Geo. W. Van Vliet, Geo. W. Me- 
gowen, Vesper B. C 9 32I2 

1894— Frank R. Baltz, bow, G. W. Van 

Vliet, stroke. Vesper B. C. . 9 45? 

1895-G. W. Van Vliet, P. J. Wall. 

Pennsylvania B. C 9 40 

1898— H. G. Scott, bow ; John O. Ex- 
ley, stroke. Penna. B. C. . . 11 30 

1899— G. Loeffler, bow; W. Carr, 

stroke. Vesper B. C 9 b?,\ 

1900— H. DeBaecke, bow ; J. O. Ex- 
ley, stroke. Vesper B.C.. 9 25 

SENIOR FOUR-OARED SHELLS 

1890— College B. C. . . ' R. O. 

1891— Pennsvlvania B. (' 9 22 

1892— Pennsylvania B. C R.'O. 

1893— Crescent B.C 8 41 

1894— Pennsylvania B. C No time. 

1895— Crescent B. C 8 41 

1896— Pennsvlvania B. C 5 37 

1897— Philadelphia B. C No time. 

1898— Pennsylvania B. C 9 20§ 

1899— Pennsylvania B. C No time. 

1900— Vesper B. C 8 34J 

SENIOR FOUR-OARED GIGS. 

1890— College B. C 9 20 

1891— College B. C 9 25 

1892-Iona B. C 8 53 

1893— Malta B. C 8 50 



JUNIOR FOUR-OARED GIGS. 

1890— Pennsylvania B. C 

1891— College B. C 

1892— lona B. C 

1893— Pennsylvania B. C 

1894— Crescent B. C 

1895— Pennsylvania B. C 

1896— Malta B. C 

1897— Vesper B. C 

1898- Vesper B. C 

1899— Pennsvlvania I 
1900— Bachelors' B. C. 



1. c. 



9 06 

9 33 

8 50 

9 06 
9 07 
9 06 
6 00 

10 13% 

10 04% 

8 56f 



14 

SENIOR EIGHT-OARED SHELLS. 

1890— College B. C R. O. 



1891-Malta B. C. 
1892— College B. C. ... 

1893— Malta B. C 

1894— Vesper B.C 

1895 — Pennsylvania B. C. 
1896— Pennsylvania B. C. 
1897— Pennsylvania B. C. 
1900— 



. . 8 14 

. . 7 50 

. . 9 \W% 

. . 8 18| 

. . 8 11 

. . 5 11 

. . 8 52i 

. No race 

JUNIOR EIGHT-OARED SHELLS. 

1898— Vesper B. C 8 36§ 

189.9— Pennsvlvania B. C 8 18 

1900— Vesper B. C 8 21^ 

JUNIOR DOUBLE-SCULL SHELLS. 

1894— Chas. P. Lawrence, bow; Frank 
Lawrence, stroke. Vesper 
B. C 9 42 

1895— E. F. Taber, bow; A. McKee- 

ver, stroke. Crescent B. C. . 8 50§ 

1897— H. Wilson, bow; C. Young, 

stroke. Penna. B. C 10 19'^ 

1898— C. H. Margerum, bow ; D. Hal- 
stead, Jr., stroke. Crescent 
B. C 8 10 

1899— W. Wark, bow ; R. Harlfinger, 

stroke. Vesper B. C 9 03^ 

1900— G. W. Engle, bow ; C. H. Reed 

Jr., stroke. Malta B. C. . . 9 22 

QUADRUPLE SCULL SHELLS. 

1891— Vesper B. C 8 33 

CANOE RACE— HALF MILE. 

1892— W. H. Fleischman, Q. C. B. C. . 4 22 

INTERMEDIATE DOUBLE SHELLS. 

1897— W. M. Myers, bow ; M. Black- 
burn, stroke. West Philadel- 
phia B. C 10 00 

1898— Gus Roehm, bow ; H. M. 

Hughes, stroke. Vesper B. C. 10 41 i 

1899— R. C. Lock wood, bow ; W. Pur- 
viance, stroke. West Phila. 
B. C 9 25 

1900— C. H. Reed Jr., bow; J. M. Root, 

Jr., stroke. Malta B. C. . . 9 41^ 

i INTERMEDIATE FOUR-OARED GIGS. 

j 1900— University B. C 9 09J 

[ Middle States Regatta. 

[ All races rowed over a course of one and a 

half miles, straightaway, except where 

otherwise stated. 

SENIOR SINGLE SCULLS. 

1890— J. F. Corbet, Iroquois B. C, 

Chicago 8 50 

1891— F. Hawkins, Manhattan A. C. 9 36 

1892— E. Hedlev, Vesper B. C 8 45% 

1893— E. Hedley, Passaic B. C . . . . 8 46>| 

1 1894— E. Hedley, Vesper B. C* . . . 5 3314 

i 1895— C. Donnegan, Passaic B. C*. . 6 21>i 

I 1896— J. B. Juvenal, Penna. B. C*. . 6 12 

1897— J. B. Juvenal, Penna. B. C*. . 5 49 

1898— J. B. Juvenal, Penna. B. C*. . 6 26 

1899— E. Hedley, Vesper B. C.f . . . 6 06 

1900— W. Mehrhoif, Nassau B. C. . No time. 

*These racss were one mile straightaway. 
tThese races were one mile with turn. 



The Philadelphia Record Jtlmanac. 



JUNIOR SINGLE SCULLS. 

1890— T. McManus, Metropolitan R. m. s- 

7 10 

1891— E. Morgan, Excelsior B. C. . . 10 Vl% 

1892— H. H. Seaton, Institute B. C. . 9 55 

1893— J. H. Bowan, Albany R.C. . . 9 22 

1891— J. S. Hall, Albany K. C* . . . 5 52^^ 

1895— E. W. Galliard.AtalantaB. C* 6 13 
1896- A. P. Weizenegger, Passaic B. 

C* 6 25 

1897— J. F. Dempsey, Penna. B. C* . G 10 

1S98— Jos. Dempsey, Penna. B. C*. . G 58 

1890-\Vm. MehrhotT, Nassau B. Ct G mii 

1900— JI. Hirsch, Harlem R. C, ... G 03 

INTERMEDIATE SINGLE SCULLS. 

1890- E. Martin, Jr.. Palisade B. C. . 10 00 

1891-P. W. Howard, New York A. C. 9 56>^ 

1892— R. E. L. Vansant, Ariel B. C. . R. O. 

1893— Wm. Mulcare, Dauntless B. C. 12 OQi^ 

1891—0. J. Wirtz, Passaic B. C*. . . 6 03 
1895— H. Monaghan, Gray's Ferry B. 

C* 6 08}^ 

1896— L. N. Mackev, Nassau B. C* . 6 25 

1897— J. O. Exley, Penna. B. C* . . . 6 29V 

1898— F. Marsh, Penna. B. C*. . . 6 21^1 

1899— Jos. Dempsey, Penna. B. C.f . 6 46% 

1900— Henry Hilbers.Wahnetah B. C. 6 29 

SENIOR DOUBLE SCULLS. 

1890— G. Freeth and J. Piatt., Jr., 

Veruna B. C 9 02 

1891- M. Quill and C. Belger, Veruna 

B. C 8-17 

1892— G. Freeth and M. Quill, Ver- 
una B. C 8 27 

1893— M. Quill and C. Belger, Veruna 

B. C 10 13 

1891— G. W. Van Vliet and F. Baltz, 

Vesper B.C.* 5 -n'o 

1895— E. A. McCoy and C. Donnegan, 

Passaic B. C* 6 06^^ 

1896-G. W. Van Vliet and H. Mona- 
ghan, Pennsylvania B. C* . 6 23 

1897— H. Monaghan and J. B. Ju- 
venal, Pennsylvania B. C* . 5 30 

1899— R. Halfinger and E. Hedley, 

Vesper B. C.f " . 5 36 

JUNIOR DOUBLE SCULLS. 

1892— D. R. Ward and J. S. Vinson, 

Triton B. C s 26' i 

1893— H. P. Cashion and W. H. Da- 
vidson, Atalania B. C. . . . • — 

1891— C. McD. Willis and G. E. Clif- 
ford, Triton B. C* 5 38' a 

1896— J. A. Barkentine and W. A. 

Grant, Metropolitan R. C* . 5 52 

1897— J. Topping and P. A. Schaefer, 

Harlem R.C.* 5 47'.i 

18'j8— G. Lffiffler and W. Carr, Ves- 
per B. C* 6 30 

1899— C. Schvvimm and J. L. Mason 

Passaic B. C.f 5 Al^i 

1900— J. C. Anderson and B. L. Gimm, 

N. Y. A. C 5 40" 

INTERMEDIATE FOUR-OARED GIGS. 

1892- Institute B. C 8 59 

1893— Astoria A. C 9 55^ 

1894— Institute B. C* 5 27 

1895— Metropolitan R. C* 5 33 

1897— Newark B. C* 5 33}^ 

1898— Pennsylvania B. C. ■■<■ .■> 44 " 

1899-Union B. Cf 5 55 

1900— New Rochelle B. C G 40 

SENIOR F0l!R-l>AREU SHKl.LS. 

1890— Atalanta B. C 8 06 

1891— Albany R. C 8 27 



1892— Atalanta B. C 

1893— Atlantic B. C 7 57 

1894— New York A. C* R. O. 

1897— Harlem B. C* 5 55>< 

1898— Pennsylvania B. C* 5 17i| 

1899— Pennsylvania B. C.f 5 14 

1900— Institute B. C, Newark .... 5 19 

SENIOR FOUR-OAEEU GIGS. 

1890— Ravenswood B. C 8 09 

1891— Atalanta B. C 8 40 

1892— Dauntless B. C 9 01 i 

1893— Veruna B. C 8 27 

1895— Veruna B. C* 

1S96— Veruna B. C* 5 35>^ 

JUNIOR EIGHT-OARED SHELLS. 

1890— Staten Island A. C 7 54J 

1891— Staten Island A. C 8 12>^ 

1892— Staten Island A. C 8 1QJ4 

1893— Institute B. C 7 40 

1894— Riverside B. C* 8 46 

1895— Palisade B. C* 5 023^ 

1896— Union B. C* 5 15 

1897— First Bohemian B. C* . . . . 4 55 

1898— Palisade B. C* 

1899— Potomac B. C 8 QbM 

1900— Metropolitan R. C 5 24>^ 

SENIOR EIGHT-OAKKIi SHELLS. 

1890— Atalanta B. C 8 15^ 

1892— Palisade B. C 7 32 

1893— Atalanta B. C 7 48 

1894— Triton B. C* 7 40?^ 

1895— First Bohemian B. C* .... 5 24 1| 

1896— Daunt/less R. C* 5 O714 

1897— Institute B. C* 5 21% 

1898— Bohemian B. C* 

1899— Pennsylvania B. C 7 46 

1900— Dauntless R. C 4 49Ji 

JUNIOR FOUR-OAKED SHELLS. 

1890— Arthur Kull B. C 8 16 

1891— Arthur Kull B. C 9 OIK 

1893— Eureka B. C 8 41>| 

1894— New York A. C* 5 35 

1895— Noupariel B. C* 5 41M 

INTERMEDIATE EIGHT-OARED SHELLS. 

1891— Passaic B. C 7 51 

1892— Atalanta B. C 7 50 

1893— Passaic B. C 8 43 

1899— Vesper B. C 7 49 

P.UR-OARED GIGS. 

1890— R. H. Muller and F. Van Sin- 

derin. L. G. Seamans, cox., 9 33 

1892— M. Lan and W. Lan. J. Keely, 

cox., Atalanta B. C 9 Vl^i 

SINGLE SCULLS— (440 YARDS). 

1890-J. p. Corbet, Iroquois B.C. . . 1 08| 

1891— E. Hedley, Vesper B. C. . . 57 

1898— J. B. Juvenal, Penna. B. C. . . 1 16 

I INTERMEDIATE DOUBLE SCULLS. 

1895— W. P. Kellv and 0. E. Fox, 

I Institute B. C* 5 i-% 

1896— J. A. Barkentine and W. A. 

Grant, Metropolitan R. C* . 6 32 
I 1897— H. G. Scott and J. O. Exley, 
! Pennsylvania B. C* . . . . 5 t,\% 
I 1898— G. Loefiler and M. Carr, Ves- 
per B. C* 5 301^ 

1899— C. Schwimm and J. L. Mason, 

Passaic B. Ct 5 47 

1900— W. C. Chrastill and Joseph Be- 

herski, Bohemian B. C. . . . 6 22 

» These races were oue milu stniightaway. 
t These races were one mile with turn. 



,v- ;<>..-- 



•s^s^ 



The Philadelphia Record JUmanac. 



JUNIOR FOUR-OARED GIGS. TO. S. 

1897— Pennsylvania B. C* 5 30 

1X98— Atalanta B. C* 6 01 

1899— Quaker City B. C.f 6 bVi 

1900— Metropolitan R. C 5 39 

INTERMEDIATE FOUR-OARED SHELLS. 

1X96- Harlem R. C* Foul. 

SENIOR FOUR-OARED BARGES. 

189.5— Veruna B. C* .5 443^ 

isys— Atlantic B. C* 5 40 

JUNIOR CENTIPEDE. 

1900— New York A. C 4 4ii>^ 

JUNIOR PAIR-OARED SHELLS. 

1900-Union B. C No time. 

*These races were one mile straightaway. 
tThese races were one mile with turn. 

Steam I^aunches. 

800 yards, straightaway, with tide, 49>^ sec. : 
Norwood, against time. Thames River, 
near New London, Conn., July 1, 1892. 

1 mile, straightaway, with current, 2 miii. IJ 

sec. : Yankee Doodle, against time. 
Schuylkill River, Philadelphia, Pa., 
July 4, 1892. 

2 miles, straightaway, with tide, 4 min. 28* 

sec: Norwood. Thames River, near New 

London, Conn, July 1, 1892. 
12 miles (about), 32 min.: Norwood, Fort 

Hamilton to dock at Sandy Hook, N. J. 

New York Bay, Aug. 18, 1891. 
80 knots, 4 hrs. 11 min. : Vamoose, time trial, 

less than 200 lbs. of steam. Race Rock, 

harbor of New London, Conn., to Milton 

Point, N. Y., June 29, 1895. 



I/ake Championship. 

1896.— Sailed between Canadian and Ameri- 
can half-rater sloops on Lake Erie, August 24 
and 2.5. First race, 12 miles over a triangular 
course, four miles to a leg. Canada beat Ven- 
cedor in 5h. 14m. and 23s. Second race, 20 
miles, twice over a course, five miles to lee- 
ward and return : Canada beat Vencedor in 
2h. 40m. .38s. 

1897.— Races sailed on Lake St. Louis, Dor- 
val. Que., near Montreal, Can., for the Sea- 
wankaka Challenge Cup, August 14, 16, 17 
and 18. First race, 12 miles, two miles to wind • 
ward and return, three times over. Momo 
(Amer.) beat Glencairn II (Can.) in 2h. 40m. 
25s. Glencairn II won the next three races, 
two over a triangular course, one and one- 
third miles to a leg, three times over in Ih. 
56m. 35s., and 2h. 4m. The third race was 
over a straightaway cour.-e, six miles to wind- 
ward and return. Time, 2h. 21m. 10s. 

1898.— Dominion, the boat selected by the 
Royal St. Lawrence Yacht Club to meet tlie 
American Challenger, was of the Catamaran 
type and therefore not eligible to compete, 
but the protest of the Seawankaka-Corin- 
thian Club was overruled. Dominion fin- 
ished first in every race, but was disqualified 
in the first for fouling Challenger. The races 
were again sailed on Lake St. Louis. 

1899.— What promised to be the most inter- 
esting series of races in the annual Seavvan- 
kaka-Corinthian international competitions, 
on Lake St. Louis, River St. Lawrence, at 
Dorval, Que., came to a most unsatisfactory 
ending, August 3, when, with two races to 
the credit of each boat, Mr. Crane's American 
challenger, Constance, ran aground in man- 
oeuvring for the start, striking bottom with 
her centerboard, and the Canadian defender, 
Mr. Duggan's Glencairn III sailed over the 



course alone and was awarded the series. 
Mr. Crane protested, but the regatta com- 
mittee decided that there was not suificient 
grounds to order the race sailed over, and 
thus the matter ended. Summary : 

First race, twelve miles over a windward 
and leeward course of four miles, three times 
over: 

Start. Finish. Elapsed Time 

Constance . . . 1.55.03 4.13.28 2.18.26 

Glencairn III . . 1.55.03 4.15.43 2.20.40 

Second race, triangular course of four 
miles, three times over : 

start. Finish. Elapsed Time 

Constance .... 1.25.09 3.29.00 2.03.51 

Glencairn III . . 1.25.16 3.29.55 2.04.39 

Third race, a beat to windward and return, 

two miles each way, sailed three times over : 

start. Finish. Elapstd Time 

Glencairn III . . 1.25.00 3.53.26 2.28.26 
Constance. . . .1.25.16 3.56.32 2.31.16 

Fourth race, triangular course, each leg 1% 
miles, sailed three times over: 

start. Finish. Elapsed Time 

Glencairn III . .1.55.27 4.15.15 2.19.48 
Constance .... 1.55.25 4.20.54 2.25.29 
1900. — International half-rater contests for 
the Seawankaka-Corinthiiin challenge tro- 
phy, on Lake St. Louis, River St. Lawrence, 
August 3 to 7. Competitors, Royal St. Law- 
rence Yacht Club's defender, Red Coat, and 
the White Bear Yacht Club's challenger, 
Minnesota. Four races were sailed. The 
second race, August 4, was not completed, 
as the wind died out when tlie American 
boat was within half a mile of the finish 
mark, then leading the Canadian by more 
than a mile. Summary : 

First race, twelve miles, sailed (lirec times 
over a triangular course : 

start. Finish. Elapsed Time 

Rod Coat 1..30 3.15.18 1.45.15 

Minnesota 1.30 3.21.38 1.61.38 

Third race, twelve miles, two miles to 
■windward and return, three times over : 

start. Finish. Elapsed Time 

Red Coat 3.00 6 48.15 3.48.15 

Minnesota 3.00 6.51.20 3.51.20 

Fourth race, twelve miles to windward : 

Start. Finish. Elapsed Time 

Red Coat 3.40 5.22.30 1.42.30 

Minnesota 3.40 5.24.47 1.44.47 



Races for the America Cup. 

The AiiHTica Cu|. wa'; nilernl a.s the"One- 
Hundrc(l-(iuinca Cup" )>y tlic lioval Yacht 
Squadron, of Cowes, for competition, open 
to yachts of all nations, in 1851. It was won, 
over a coursearound the Isle of Wight, by 
the keel schooner America, August 22, 1851. 
The race was without time allowance, Amer- 
ica sailing against a fleet of fnurtccn yachts, 
four of which were of greater tuniiauc, and 
one, the three-masted schooner I'.rilliant, of 
I 392 tons, Rgainst her 170 The American 
I schooner won by eight minutes, the forty- 
I seven-ton cutter Aurora being second, and 

the fleet far behind. 
I Twenty-five races have been sailed in 
United States waters in defense of the cup, 
which was offered on July 8, 1S57, as a per- 
petual challenge trophy, to be raced for 
under the auspices of the New York Yaclit 
Club. On only one occasion ha a challenger 
won a single race, viz. : October 19, 1871, Co- 
lumbia having been disabled. 

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•ds. 


PROFESSIONAI, 


AGAINST TIME, PACED.-Accepted by N. C. A. | 




TIME. 


HOLDER. 


PLACE. 


DATE. 


14 mile . . 
>|inile . . 
kmile . . 


. 0.20 . . 


. M. Taylor . . . 


. Garfield Park, Chicago .... 


. Nov. 9, 1899 


. 0.271 . . 


. J. S. Johnson . 


. Nashville, Tenn 

. Garfield Park, Chicago .... 


. Oct. 29, 1896 


. 0.41^ . . 


. M. Taylor . . . 


. Nov. 10, 1899 


simile . . 




. W. W. Hamilton 


. Coronada Beach, Cal 


. Mar. 2, 1896 


Imile . . 


. M. Taylor . . . 


. Garfield Park, Chicago .... 


. Aug. 3, 1899 


2 miles . . 


. 2.51§ . . 


. VVm. C. Stinson 


. Brockton, Mass 


. Oct. 24, 1900 


2 miles , . 


'' 51? 


. Harry D. Elkes . 


. Brockton, Mass 


. Nov. 7, 1900 


3 mUes . . 


. 4.18 . . 


. Harry D. Elkes . 


. Brockton, Mass 


. Nov. 7, 1900 


4 miles . . 


. 5.44f. . 


. Harry D. Elkes. 


. Brockton, Mass 


. Nov. 7, 1900 




. 7.11f. . 


. Harry D. Elkes . 


. Brockton, Mass 


. Nov. 7, 1900 


<; miles . . 


. 8.37^. . 


. Harrj'D. Elkes. 


. Brockton, Mass 


. Nov. 7, 1900 


7 miles . . 


. lO.OSi . . 


. Harry D. Elkes . 


. Brockton, Mass 


. Nov. 7, 1900 


Smiles . . 


. 11.31 . . 


. Harry D. Elkes. 


. Brockton, Mass 


. Nov. 7, 1900 


9 miles . . 


. 12.57^ . . 


. Harry D. Elkes . 


. Brockton, Mass 


. Nov. 7, 1900 


10 miles . . 


.14.25 . . 


. Harry T>. Elkes . 


. Brockton, Mass 


. Nov. 7, 1900 


11 miles . . 


. 15.52 . . 


. Harry D. Elkes . 


. Brockton, Mass 


. Nov. 7, 1900 


12 miles . . 


. 17.21 . . 


. Harry D. Elkes . 


. Brockton, Mass 


. Nov. 7, 1900 


13 miles . . 


. I8.495 . . 


. Harry D. Elkes. 


. Brockton, Mass 


. Nov. 7, 1900 


14 miles . . 


. 20.19e . . 


. Harry D. Elkes . 


. Brockton, Mass 


. Nov. 7, 1900 


15 miles . . 


.22.04 . . 


. Harry D. Elkes . 


. Brockton, Mass 


. Oct. 27, 1900 


16 miles . . 


. 23.33 . . 


. Harry D. Elkes . 


. Brockton, Mass 


. Oct. 27, 1900 


17 miles . . 


.25.03 . . 


. Harry D. Elkes . 


. Brockton, Mass 


. Oct. 27, 1900 


18 miles . . 


.26.33 . . 


. Harry D. Elkes . 


. Brockton, Mass 


. Oct. 27, 1900 


19 miles . . 


.28.04 . . 


. Harry D. Elkes . 


. Brockton, Mass 


. Oct. 27, 1900 


20 miles . . 


. 29.33 . . 


. Harry 1). Elkes . 


. Brockton, Mass 


. Oct. 27, 1900 


21 miles . . 


.31.03 . . 


. Harry D. Elkes . 


. Brockton, Mass 


. Oct. 27, 1900 


22 miles . . 


. 32.33^ . . 


. Harry D. Elkes . 


. Brockton. Mass 


. Oct. 27. 1900 


23 miles . . 


. 34.03? . . 


. Harry D. Elkes . 


. Brockton, Mass 


. Oct. 27, 1900 


24 miles . . 


.35.32i. . 


. Harry D. Elkes. 


. Brockton, Mass 


.Oct. 27,1900 


25 miles . . 


.37.021. . 


. Harry D. Elkes . 


. Brockton, Mass 


. Oct. 27, 1900 


26 miles . . 


. 38.48s . . 


. Wm. C. Stiuson 


. Brockton, Mass 


. Oct. 25, 1900 


27 miles . . 


. 40.194 . . 


. Wm. C. Stinson 


. Brockton, Mass 


. Oct. 25, 1900 


28 miles . . 


.41.47 . . 


. Wm. C. Stinson 


. Brockton, Mass 


. Oct. 25, 1900 


29 miles . . 


. 43.18 . . 


. Wm. C. Stinson 


. Brockton, Mass 


. Oct. 25, 1900 


30 miles . . 


.41.49 . . 


. Wm. C. Stinson 


. Brockton, Mass 


.Oct. 25,1900 


31 miles . . 


.46.19 . . 


. Wm. C. Stinson 


. Brockton, Mass 


. Oct. 25, 1900 


32 miles . . 


. 47.49i . . 


. Wm. C. Stinson 


. Brockton, Mass 


. Oct. 25, 1900 


33 miles . . 


. 49.18b . . 


. Wm. C. Stinson 


. Brockton, Mass 


. Oct. 25, 1900 


34 miles . . 


. 50.47b. . 


. Wm. C. Stinson 


. Brockton, Mass 


. Oct. 25, 1900 


35 miles . . 


.52.16b. • 


. Wm. C. Stinson 


. Brockton, Mass 


. Oct. 25, 1900 


36 miles . . 


. 53.47 . . 


. Wm. C. Stinson 


. Brockton, Mass 


. Oct. 25, 1900 


37 miles . . 


.55.16b. . 


. Wm. C. Stinson 


. Brockton, Mass 


. Oct. 25, 1900 


38 miles . . 


.56.45 . . 


. Wm. C. Stinson 


. Brockton, Mass 


. Oct. 25, 1900 


39 miles . . 


. 58.141 . . 
. 59.43 . . 


. Wm. C. Stinsou 


. Brockton, Mass 


.Oct. 25,1900 


40 miles . . 


. Wm. C. Stinson 


. Brockton, Mass 


. Oct. 25, 1900 


45 miles . . 


1.14.091 . . 


. Harry D. Elkes 


. Cambridge, Mass 


. Sept. 22, 1900 


50 miles . . 


1.22.22b • 


. Harry D. Elkes 


. Cambridge, Ma.ss 


. Sept. 22, 1900 
. July 14, 1900 


55 miles . . 


1.38.51b. • 


. Burns W. Pierce 


. Cambridge, Mass 


59 miles . . 


1.45.53b ■ • 


. John Nelson . . 


. Cambridge, Mass 


. July 14, 1900 


60 miles . . 


1.47.40 . . 


. John Nelson . . 


. Cambridge, Mass 


. July 14, 1900 


61 miles . . 


1.49.22f. . 


. John Nelson . . 


. Cambridge, Mass 


. July 14, 1900 


62 miles . . 


1.51.011. . 


. John Nelson . . 


. Cambridge, Mass 


. July 14, 1900 


63 miles . . 


1.52.41 . . 


. John Nelson . . 


. Cambridge, Mass 


. July 14, 1900 


64 miles . . 


1.54.22J. . 


. John Nelson . . 


. Cambridge, Mass 


. July 14, 1900 


65 miles . . 


1.56.05f. . 


. John Nelson . . 


. Cambridge, Mass 


. July 14, 1900 


66 miles . . 


1.57..50f. . 


. John Nelson . . 


. Cambridge, Mass 


. July 14, 1900 


67 miles . . 


1.59.31-1 . . 
2.10.231. . 


. John Nelson . . 


. Cambridge, Mass 


. July 14, 1900 


70 miles . . 


. B. W. Peirce . . 


Manhattan Beach, N. Y. . . . 


. July 29, 1899 


75 miles . . 


2.29.131. . 


. B. W. Peirce . . 


Manhattan Beach, N. Y. . . . 


. July 29, 1899 


100 miles . . 


3.24.43g . . 


. B. W. Peirce . . 


. Manhattan Beach, N. Y. . . . 


. July 29, 1899 


150 miles . 
65 mik-s 185 y 


5.19.2;5 . . 
ATds, 2 hours 


. B. W. Peirce . . 
. C. Huret .... 




. July 3-4, 1899 
. Oct. 6, 1898 


. Paris, France 


94 miles 880 y 


ards, 3 hours 


. C. Huret .... 


. Paris, France 


. Oct 10. 1898 


40 miles 33 


yards world's one hour record 


, W. C. Stinson, Brockton, Mass 


, Oct., .;... 1900. 




RECORDS UNDER SPECIAI, CONDITIONS. 






MOTOR 


TANDEM-PACED, WITH WIND SHIELD ATTACHED. 




MILES. 


TIME. 


HOLDER. 






% mile . . . 
}|mile . . . 
y^mile . . . 


0.18? . . . 


. E. A. McDuffee 


. Garfield Park, Chicago .... 


. Nov. 13, 1899 


0.27^ . . . 


. M. Taylor . . . 


. Garfield Park, Chicago .... 


. Nov. 16, 1899 


0.4U^ . . . 


. M. Taylor . . . 


. Garfield Park, Chicago .... 


. Nov. 16, 1899 


Imile . . . 


1.19 . . . 


. M. Taylor . . . 


. Garfield Park, Chicago .... 


. Nov 15, 1899 




LOCOMOTIVE-PACED, WITH 


HOODED PASSENGER COACH. 




1 mile . . . 


.0.571 . . . 


. C. M. Murphy . 


. Long Island Railroad 


. June 30, 1899 




MOTOR TANDEM-PACED, STRAIGHTAWAY ON PUBLIC HIGHWAY. 




1 mile . . . 


1.121 . . . 


. C. Stuart Bolting 


. New Orleans 


. Mar. 23, 1900 



The Philadelphia Record JUmanac. 



TH^ WORI/D'S ONB-HOUR RECORD. 

RIDER. PLACE. DATE. 

. F. L. Dodds Cambridge, England Mar. 25, 1876 

. John Keen Lillie Bridge, England Dec. — , 187fi 

. C. H. F. Christie Oxford, England June 9, 1879 

. H. L. Cortis . Stamford Bridge, Knglnnd . . . . Sept. 21, 1880 

. H. L. Cortis Stamford Bridge, England .... July 27, 1S82 

. H. L. Cortis Stamford Bridge, England .... Aug. 2, 1882 

. Robert H. English Newcastle, England Sept. 11, 18S4 

. W. A. Rowe Springfield, Mass Oct. 19, 1885 

. W. A. Rowe Springfield, Mass Oct. 25, 1886 

. H. E. Laurie Long Eaton, England Aug. 31, 1888 

. S. G. Whittaker Bordeaux, France Aug. 15. 1888 

. R. J. Mecrcdv Paddington, England July 29, 1890 

. R. A. Lloyd ■ Paddington, England Sept. 6, 1890 

. H. Parsons Paddington, England Sept. 17, 1890 

.R. L. Ede Heme Hill, London July 14,1891 

.F.J. Osmond Heme Hill, London July 15, 1H91 

.R. L. Ede Heme Hill, London May 24,1892 

. H. Fournier Buffalo, Paris Aug. 13, 1892 

. J. Dubois Buffalo, Paris Sept. 23, 1892 

.G.E.Osmond Heme Hill, London July 27, 1893 

. J. W. Stocks Heme Hill, London Aug. 28, 1893 

. J. W. Stocks Heme Hill, London Aug. 30, 1893 

. L. S. Meintjes Springfield, Mass Sept. 14, 1893 

. A. V. Linton BnflFalo, Paris Aug. 12, 1894 

. J. Dubois Bordeaux, France Aug. 23, 1894 

. E. Bouhours Bordeaux, France Sept. 17, 1894 

. A. V. Linton Bordeaux, France Nov . 1, 1894 

427-^ . A. V. Linton Bordeaux, France Nov. 3, 1894 

— . L. Lesna Dijon, France June 29, 1895 

. James Michael Paris, France Sept. 26, 1895 

. E. Bouhours Bufl'alo, Paris Aug. 25, 1895 

. J. W. Stocks Catford, Loudon Oct. 14, 1895 

. A. A. Cha^e "Wood Green, London May 14, 1896 

. Tom Linton Seine, Paris May 20, 1896 

. Tom Linton Catford, London July 7, 1896 

. J. W. Stocks ..••.... Crystal Palace, London Oct. 3, 18!!6 

. Tom Linton Crystal Palace, London Oct. 21, 1896 

. J. W. Stocks Crystal Palace, London June 10, 1897 

. J. W. Stocks Crystal Palace, London Sept. 27, 1897 

. Ed. Taylore Philadelphia, Pa July 5, 1898 

. H. D. Elkes Philadelphia, Pa Aug. 6, 1898 

\ *Ed. Taylore Paris, France Aug. 3, 1899 

VlG'^n *P. Bor Paris, France Sept. 8, 1899 

"~ *H.D. Elkes Philadelphia, Pa Sept. 13, 1899 

*Ed. Tayloie Paris, France Sept. 11, 1899 

*Ed. Taylore Paris, France Apr. 8, 1900 

38 1265i% *Ed. Tavlore Paris, France Apr. 29, 1900 

39 621 *E. Bouhours Paris, France May 20, 19U0 

39 1131i% *Bauge Paris, France June 3, 1900 

39 1453 *W. C. Stinson Brockton, Mass Oct. 20, 1900 

40 330 *W. C. Siinson Brockton, iMass Oct. 25, 1900 

Records made previous to 1888 were on ordinaries. Pacemaking was first used when 

Cortis rode 19 miles 1420 yards in the hour. 

* Motor paced. 

THE WORLD'S ONE-HUNDRED-MII,E RECORD. 

TIME. RIDER. PLACE. DATE. 

7.18.55 F. Appleyard England June 10, 1878 

5.50.U5§ F. R. Frve Loudon, England July 27, 1883 

5.38.43i F. E. Dihglev Lynn, Ma.ss Sept. 22, 1887 

5.30.121 Leslie Newland London, England Oct. 5,1891 

5.05.031 F. W. Shorland London, England July 21, 1892 

5.04.18? J. H. Adams London, England Aug. 13, 1892 

4.34.13^ A. V. Linton London, England , 1893 

4.15.29J A. A. Chase London, England Sept. 22, 1894 

4.14.39f A. V. Linton Pari.s, France , 1894 

4.01.30J Jas. Michael London, England July 13, 1895 

3.54.29g A. E. Walters London, England Sept. 7, 1895 

3.53.041 Jas. Michael Paris, France — ■ — , 1895 

3.46.39J L. Lesna Paris, France - ■ , 1896 

3.41.2IJ C. Huret London, England July 22,1896 

3.37.571 R. Palmer London, England Aug. 8, 1896 

3.25.21J R. Palmer London, England Oct. 14, 1897 

3.24.41 E. <ionld London, England Aug. 11, 1898 

3.13.121. . . . *A. E. Walters Paris, France July 8, 1899 

3.07.47i, . . . * Bauge Paris, France Aug. 6, 1899 

* Motor paced. 



MILES. 


YARDS. 


15 


1480 


18 


487 


18 


1530 


19 


1420 


20 


300 


20 


325 


20 


560 


20 


1012 


•?^ 


105 


21 


125 


21 


126 


21 




21 


1150 


22 


620 


22 


1450 


23 


1260 


23 


1520 


24 


1384 


24 


1426 


24 


1723 


25 


360 


25 


690 


26 


107 


26 


116 


26 


1620 


27 


816 


28 


405 


^8 


698 


28 


1034 


28 


1612 


29 


45 


29 


295 


30 


214 


31 


5 


31 


548 


31 


582 


32 


448 


32 


1086 


33 


936 


34 


1220 


35 


698 


36 


126, 


36 


747 


36 


1142 


36 


16941 



The Philadelphia Record Jtlmanac. m 

*HS WORIVD'S ONE-MII,:^ R:eCORD. 

TIME. RIDER. PLACE. DATE. 

s .... II. M. Pope. . America Oct. 19, 1878 

,<!... . Wni. R. Pitman Brockton, Mass July 4.1878 

s . . . . Sanrlcrs tellers Hartford, Conn Sept. 9, 1884 

p . . . . R. Howell Grimsb)', England Sept. 29, 1885 

s . . . . \V. A. Rowc Springfield, Ma.=s Oct 22, 1896 

,<= .... \V. W. Windle Peoria, 111. . . .• Sept. lb. 1890 

s . . . . W. C. Jones England 1890 

^ . . . . F.J. Osmond England July 13, 1891 

s . . . . W. W. Windic America Oct. 7, 1891 

f .... A. A. Zimmerman Springfield, Mass Sept. 9, 1892 

s .... II. C. Tyler Springfield, Mass Sept. 15, 1892 

r I. S. Johnson Independence, la Sept. 22, 1892 

s . . . . W. W. Windle Springfield, Mass Oct. 8, 1892 

r . . . . M. F. Dirnberger Birmingham, Ala Dec. 12, 1893 

f T. P. Rliss Springfield, Mass Sept. 6, 1894 

f . . . . Otto Ziegler Sacramento, Cal Oct. 16, 1894 

f . . . H. C. Tyler Waltham, Mass Oct. 27, 1894 

f . . . . M. F. Dirnberger Louisville, Ky June —, 1895 

J. S. Johnson Louisville, Ky Oct. 21. 1895 

A. (xardiner Louisville, Kv Nov. 11, 1895 

f .... P. J. B -rlo New Orleans, La Dec. — , 1895 

f 
f 



3.45 

ihf. 

2.29$ 

2.263 

2.20^ 

2.15 

2.15 

2.0fi§ 

2.08J 

1.561 

2.06? 

1.51 

1.52g 

1.50 

1.48g 

1.46 

1.44J f 

1.421 f 

1.40? 

1.39A 

1.351 

1..35f f 

1.35 f 

1.3U f 

1.31j f 

1.31t f 

1.31 f 

1.31 f 

1.2? f 

1.22§ f 

0.571 f 



\V. W. Hamilton Coronado, Cal JNIar. 2. 

J. W. Stocks Crystal Palace, London Sept. 8, 1897 

, K. A. McDnlTee Philadelphia, Pa Oct. 28, 1897 

J. Platt-Betts Crystal Palace, London May 9,1898 

*Ma]ur Tavlor Philadelphia, Pa Nov. 15, 1898 

*E A. McUuftec New Bedford, Mass June .30, 1899 

^'■J. Platt-Betts Crystal Palace, Loudon July 7, 1899 

*II. D. Elkcs Washington, DC Inly 19, 1899 

*E. A. McDnflec New Bedford, ISfass Tuly 29, 1899 

I K. A. Moimflec New Bedford, iMass July 29, 1899 

*Maior Tavlor Cliicago, 111 • . . . Aug. 3, 1899 

tCharlfs ^r. Murphy Maywood, L. I June 30, 1899 

All reci.ipls prcvinn>< to is'.io were made on ordinaries. 
All records since I^lin wi-n- made with motor pace. 

Among the records named previous to .lones' mile in 2.20i?, only Edlin's 2.4G'-2 is posi- 
tively known to have been a world's best. But there is no douln that the figures credited to 
Messrs. Pope, Pitman, Kieth-Falconer, Sellers, Howell, Rowe, Mccredy, Osmond and AVindle 
were the best in their respective countries at the time they were made. 

9— standing start. f— Flying start. * Kode a chainless wheel. 

t Murphy's mile in 57 4-5 seconds was made behind a steam locomotive on a specially prepared straight- 
away hoard track on a siding of the Long Island Railroad. Murphy followed an engine and a day coach, 
the latter being provided with a hood, which acted as a wind shield for the rider. The hoard track, which was 
laid near Maywood, Long Island, and extended from that station two miles east, was as nearly perfect on a 
level as skill could make it. 

BEST SIX-DAY RECORD. 

Six-dav races at Madison Sqnarc <iardrn. New York. Dec. 6 to 11, 1897, and Dec. 4 to 10, 
1898: 



Miller— 1897. 
h. m. yds. 
1 . 23 . 1279 
2. 40. TOG 

3 . 67 . 1677 

4 . 80 . 1493 

5 . 100 . 99 

6 . 12G . 1480 

7 . 146 . 203 
Rivcrre— 1897 

S . 161 . 1702 
Waller— 1897. 



Pierce- 
/(. m. 



182 . 1138 
201 . 1319 



257 . 850 
279 . 1143 



■1898. 
yds. 
170 
170 
880 
701 
170 
170 
1108 
1056 
176 

880 
528 
1056 
704 



37 . 049 . 1584 

38 . 666 . 

39 . 684 . 352 



316 . 1387 
335. 652 
352 . 1213 

365 . 1608 ' 43 
383 . 409 44 
24 45 



402 



Pierce— 1S98. ; 40 . 



716. 
733 . 
749. 

759 . 880 
773 . 704 
790 . 1234 



22 . 419 . 176 ! 47 . 804 . 6'28 



Pierce— 1898. 
yds. 
704 



m. 
812 
830 
846 . 176 
848 . 1684 



52 . 80.5 
63 . 880 . !■ 
Miller-lSg7. 

54 . 895 . lOOl 

55 . 914 . 135 

56 . 932 . 10 

57 . 949 . 971 
58. 962.1551 
59 . 979 . 830 
00 . 997 . 

61 . 1014 . ,661 

62 . 1016 

63 . 1034 

64 . 1062 

65 . 1060 . 198 

66 . 1076 . 1652 

67 . 1092 

68 . nil 

69 . 1118 

70 . 1135 

71 . 1149 



704 



559 



737 
552 
79.6 
1541 
173 



Miller— 1897. | Miller— 1897. | Miller— 1898. 
h. m. vdx. I h. m. vds. h. m. -, yds. 
72.1159. '859 I 97.1506. 434 121 . 1. SCO .. 1408 

73 . 1177 . 1507 98 . 1523 . 1178 I Miller— 1897. 

74 . 1194 . 220 99 . 1627 . 791 122 . 1811 . 1047 
76 . 1194 . 220 I 100 . 1527 . 791 , 123 . 1818 . 183 

76 . 1208 . 159 ] 101 . 1539 . 1283 1 124 . 1834 . 666 

77 . 1224 . 1118 I 102 . 1565 . 748 ' 126 . 1850 . 1313 
581 1 103 . 1570 . 1408 i 120 . 1858 . 890 



78 . 1239 , 

79 . 1260 

80 . 1266 , 

81 . 1274 

82 . 1274 



620 ! 104 , 1688 . 1501 ' 127 . 1869 , 



1024 
819 



1613 
1613 

83 . 1304 . 1275 

84 . 1323 . 1455 

85 . 1335 

86 . 1346 

87 . 1364 . 736 

88 . 1381 . 935 

89 . 1390 . 1640 

90 . 1404 . 1100 

91 . 1422 , 

92 . 1439 , 

93 . 1446 

94 . 1462 , 

95 . 1478 



1648 , 105 . 1605 . 954 128 . 

106 . 1614 . 1208 1 129 . 1895 . 348 

107 . 1629 . 115 130 . 1913 . 768 

108 . 1645 . 218 ; Miller— 1898. 

109 . 1653 . 364 1 131 . 1923 . 1234 
1206 ' 132 . 1936 . 352 
1309 , 133 . 1960 . 1U56 

921 1 134 . 1902 . 1056 

113 . 1705 . 1024 135 . 1968 . 352 

114 . 1720 . 1224 ; 136 . 1970 . 1234 

115 . 1724 . 836 1 137 . 1976 . 704 
641 116.1741. 842 138.1970. 704 
831 117 . 1757 1315 139 . 1990 . 1050 
469 118 . 1760 . 1392 140 . 2000 . 176 

72 Miller— 1898. , 141 . 2006 . 528 
22 119 . 1772 . 142 . 2007 . 704 



110 . 1669 

111 . 1685 

112 . 1689 



96 . 1489 . 1720 i 120 . 1786 . 1534 



Six-day Relay Team Race.— No rider being on the track more than twelve hours in 
the twenty-four— 2733 miles 4 laps : Charles W. Miller (1348m. 21.) and Frank Waller (1386m. 
2l), Madison Square Garden, New York, December 3 to 9, 1899. 



The Philadelphia Record JUmanac. 



AMERICAN COMPETITION HOUR RECORDS-PACED. 



39 1045 vds. 
67 455 yds. 

1C7| 

2101 
240-1 

2sa| 

312i^ 

327 

3481/ 

37ll| 

384^1 

400 

416 

432 

450J^ 

466 

485^^ 

507% 

528 925 yds. 



50% 
66% 



Oct. 5, 
July 13, 
July 3-4, 
July 3-4, 
July 3-4, 
July 3-4, : 



HOLDER. WHERE MADE. 

Harry Elke.s . . . Brockton, Mass. 

John Nelson . . . Cambridge, Mass 

B. W. Pierce . . . Waltham, Mass. 

B. W. Pierce . . . Waltham, Mass. 

B. W. Pierce . . . Waltham, Mass. 

B. W. Pierce . . Waltham, Mass. 

B. W. Pierce . . Waltham, Mass July 3-^, 

B. W. Pierce . . . ^\■altham, Mass July 3-4, 

B. W. Pierce . . . Waltham, Mass Inly 3-4, 

B. W. Pierce . . . Waltham, Mass. ... July 3-4, 

B. W. Pierce . . . Waltham, Mass July 3-4, 

B. W. Pierce . . . Waltham, Mass July 3-4, 

John Lawson . . Los Angeles, Cal June 10, 

John Lavvson . . Los Angeles, Cal June 10, 

John Lawson . . Los Angeles, Cal June 10, 

John Lawson . . Los Angeles, Cal June 10, 

John Lawson . . Los Angeles, Cal June 10, 

John Lawson . . Los Angeles, Cal Tune 10, 

John I,awson . . Los Angeles, Cal Tune 10, 

John Lawson . . Los Angeles, Cal June 10, 

John Lawson . . Los Angeles, Cal June 10, 

John Lawson . . Los Angeles, Cal lune 10, 

John Lawson . . Los Angeles, Cal June 10, 

John Lawson . . Los Angeles, Cal June 10, 



WORl^D'S HOUR RECORDS-COMPETITION. 



HOURS. 


MILES. 


YARDS. 


HOLDER. 


WHERE MADE. 


DATE. 


1 


39 


1045 . . . 


. . . Elkes .... 


. . . Brockton, Mass. . 


. . Oct. 5, 1900 


2 


67 


■ibb . . . 


. . . Nelson . . . 


. . . Cambridye, Mass. 


. . Julv 13, 1900 


3 


97 


932. . . 


. . . Elkes .... 


. . .Berlin 


. . May 29, 1900 


4 


124 


526. . . 


. . .Walters. . . 


. . . Paris 


. . Sept. 15, 1900 


5 


154 


6S5 . . . 


. . .Walters. . . 


. . . Paris 


. . Sept. 15, 1900 


6 


1K3 


879 . . . 


. . . Walters . . . 


. . . Paris 


. . Sept. 15, 1900 


7 


210 


288. . . 


. . . Walters . . . 


. . . Paris 


. . Sept. 15, 1900 


8 


238 


1704 . . . 


. . . Walters . . . 


. . . Paris 


. . Sept. 15, 1900 


9 


266 


529 . . . 


. . .Walters. . . 


. . . Paris 


. . Sept. 15, 1900 


10 


294 


301 .. . 


. . .Walters. . . 


. . Paris 


. . Sept. 15, 1900 


11 




1491. . . 


. . . Walters . . . 


. . . Paris 


. . Sept. 15, 1900 


12 


349 


1447 . . . 


. . . Walters . . . 


. . . Paris 


. . Sept. 15, 1900 


13 


372 


1535 . . . 


. . . Walters . . . 


. . . Paris 


. . Sept. 16, 1900 


14 


398 


902. . . 


. . . Walters . . . 


. . . Paris 


. . Sept. 15, 1900 


15 


424 


137 .. . 


. . . ^\'alters . . . 


. . . Paris 


. . Sept. 15, 1900 


16 


450 


606 .. . 


. . . Walters . . . 


... Paris 


. . Sept. 15, 1900 


17 


472 


245 .. . 


. . . Walters . . . 


. . .Paris 


. . Sept. 15, 1900 


18 


493 


1291. . . 


. . .Walters. . . 


. . . Pans 


. . Sept. 15, 1900 


19 


514 


128. . . 


. . .Walter.s. . . 


. . . Paris 


. . Sept. 15, 1900 


20 


537 


r-38 . . . 


. . . Walters . . . 


. . . Paris 


. . Sept. — , 1899 


21 


561 


760. . . 


. . . Walters . . . 


. . . Paris 


. . Sept. -, 1899 


22 


584 


108. . . 


. . .Walters. . . 


. . . Paris 


. . Sept. -, 1899 


23 


607 


1319. . . 


. . . Walters . . . 


. . . Paris 


.. . Sept. — , 1899 


24 


634 


774 .. . 


. . .Walters. . . 


. . . Paris 


. . Sept. — , 1899 



MILES. 


YARDS. 


361 


1440. 




1590 . 


374 


1605 . 


418 


332. 


426 


440. 


4H2 


1392 . 


452 


1715. 


457 


1612. 


460 


1296. 


494 


1173. 


515 


750. 


523 


997 . 


529 


576 . 


533 


1.378 . 


.545 


1310. 


564 


1510. 


616 


340. 


634 


774. 



THE WORI^D'S TWENTY-FOUR-HOUR RECORD. 

RIDER. PLACE. DATE. 

.M.A.Holbein London, England Nov. 18-19, 

. Frank Waller California June 9-10, 

. F. Ed. Spooner Chicago, 111 July 8-9, 

. E. Stephane Paris, France Sept. 13-14, 

. F. W. Shorland Loudon, England luly 22-23, 

. L. Lesna Paris, France Sept. 18-19, 

. Louis Grimm Cleveland, Ohio Aug. 25, 

. Constant Huret Paris, France June 15-16, 

. F. W. Shorland London, England July 27-28, 

. Frank Waller Baltimore Md Sept. 

. Constant Huret I'aris, France June 19-20, 

. Gaston Rivierre ' . Bordeaux, France July — , 

. CoiLstant Huret Bordeaux, France Sept. 12-13, 

. Gaston Rivierre Paris, France July .2-3, 

. Constant Huret Paris, France- Oct. 15-16, 

. Constant Huret Paris, France Aug. 13-14, 

. M. Cordang London, England Sept. 15-16, 

♦A.E.Walters Paris, France ' .^ Sept. — , 

*.\fotor paced. 



The Philadelphia Record JUmanac. 



W mile . . 


. . 0.2(5^ . . 


% mile . . 


. . 0.34J . . 


M mile . . 


. . O.S.i . . 


% mile . . 


. . 1.1-JJ . . 


imile . . 


. . 1.55J . . 


2 miles . . 


. . 4.16 . . 


3 miles . . 


. . 6.821 . . 


4 miles. . 


. . 8.50 . . 


5 miles . . 


. .11.05^ . . 



PROFESSIONAI, COMPETITION— PACED. 

IE. HOLDER. WHERE MADE. DATE. 

Jimile. . . . 0.2.si A. 1. Brown. . . . Decatur, la Oct. 13,1894 

mile. . . . 0.38§ E. C Bald Cliarlotteville, X. C Nov. 3,1897 

mile. . . . 0.55 P. O'Connor . . . Minneapolis, Minn. . . . ..July 10,1895 

mile .... 1.U9I M. Taylor Manhattan Beach Sept. 3, 1898 

% mile .... 1.25 J. Michael .... Manhatian Beach Sept. 25, 1897 

1 mile .... 1.34§ C. McCarthy . . . Cambridge, Mass Sept. 16, 1899 

2 miles, 3.15f ; 3 miles, 4.44 ; 4 miles, 6.13| : 5 miles, 7.42 ; 6 miles, 9.10 : 7 miles, 10.39 ; 8 

miles, 12.08; 9 mile.*, 13.36J ; 10 miles, 15.06^ ; 11 miles, 16.36^ ; 12 miles, 18.06? ; 13 
miles, 19.363 ; 14 miles, 21.07; 15 miles, 22.37§ ; 16 miles, 24.08 ; 17 miles, 25.38; 18 
miles, 27.08^ ; 19 miles, 28.39 ; 20 miles, 30.11 ; 21 miles, 31.40^ : 22 miles, 33.12 ; 23 
miles, 34.411 ; 24 miles, 36.13J ; 25 miles, 37.44 ; 26 miles, 39.15i ; 27 miles, 40.46^; 28 
miles, 42.17 ; 29 miles, 43.47§ ; 30 miles, 45.18§ ; 31 miles, 46.51g ; 32 miles, 48.24 ; 33 
miles, 49.551 ; 34 miles, 51.28| ; 35 miles, 53.00 ; 36 miles, 54.31i : 37 miles, 56.03| ; 38 
miles, 57.33f ; 39 miles, 69.06| ; 1 hour, 39 miles, 1045 yards : H. D. Elkes, Brockton, 
Mass., Oct. 6, 1900. 

PEOFESSIONAL, AGAINST TIME— UNPAGED. 

. A. Gardiner Denver, Col Dec. 3, 1896 

. W. W. Hamilton . . . Coronado, Cal Mar. 2, 1896 

. W. Martin Indianapolis, Ind. . . . Aug. 24, 1898 

. W. C. Sanger .... Denver, Col Nov. 16, 1895 

. W. W. Hamilton . . . Denver, Col June 18, 1898 

. A. B. Hughes .... Denver, Col July 9, 1898 

. F. J. Titus Woodside Park, Phila. . July 2, 1898 

. F. J. Titus Woodside Park, Phila. . July 2, 1898 

F. J. Titus Woodside Park, Phila. . July 2, 1898 

6 miles, 13.50J ; 7 miles, 16.10 ; 8 miles, 18.31| ; 9 miles, 20.50 ; 10 miles, 23.09g ; 11 miles, 
25.311 ; 12 miles, 27.55§ ; 13 miles, 30.17^ ; 14 miles, :i2.39J ; 15 miles, 35.U3 ; 16 miles, 
37.28 ; 17 miles, 39.53| ; 18 miles, 42.1s| ; 19 miles, 44.42f ; 20 miles, 47.08f ; 21 miles, 
49.341 ; 22 miles, 52.00? ; 23 miles, 54.26g ; 24 miles. 56.534 ; 25 miles, 59.13f ; 1 hour, 
25 miles, 600 yards: W. W. Hamilton, Denver, Col., July 9, 1898. 

TANDEM COMPETITION. 

Imile .... 1.46J N. and T. Butler . . Cambridge, Mass July 31,1897 

2 miles .... 4.02 Plummer-White . . . Kansas City, Mo Aug. 11, 1899 

TANDEM, AGAIN.ST TIME— PACED. 

1 4 mile. . . . 0.23? Randall-Schofski . . Coronado, Cal April 11, 1895 

';. mile. . . . O.olf Randall-Schofski . . Coronado, Cai, April l.o, 1896 

^-gmile. . . . 0.47g Kaiidall-Schofski . . Coronado, Cal April 15, 1896 

% mile .... l.llg N. and T. Butler . . Boston, Mass July 4, 1896 

% mile .... 1.20 N. and T. Butler . . Boston, Mass July 4, 1896 

1 mile .... l.;?7^ McCarthy-Monroe . . Brockton, Mass Oct. 3, 1899 

5 miles .... 9.25^ Flower-Church . . . Philadelphia, Pa Nov. 6, 1897 

10 miles .... 19.02J Flower-Church . . . Philadelphia, Pa Nov. 6, 1897 

TANDEM, AGAINST TIME— UNPAGED. 

\i mile .... 0.23g Phillips-Wing .... Nashville, Tenn Oct. ?0, 1896 

>|mile. . . . 0.311 Staver-Winsett . . . Coronado, Cal April 11, 1896 

% mile .... 0.51i Phillips-Bradis . . . Nashville, Tenn Oct. 30, 1896 

'%m\\e . . . . ].12i Staver-Winsett . . . Coronado, Cal April 15, 1896 

%mile. . . . 1.25J Sager-Swanbrough . Denver, Col Dec. 5,1896 

1 mile .... 1.51f Svvanbrough-Hughes, Denver, Col Oct. 4, 1897 

5 m.les . . . 10.25 Sager-Swaubrough . Denver, Col April 9, 1898 

10 miles .... 21.38% Sager-Swanbrough . Denver, Col April 9, 1898 

15 miles .... 33.33§ . ... Sager-Swanbrough . Denver, Col April 6, 1898 

20 miles .... 44.53 Sager-Swanbrough . Denver, Col April 6, 1898 

25 miles .... 56.11 Sager-Swanbrough . Denver, Col April 6, 1898 

1 hour— 26 miles, 1292 yards, Sager-Swanbrough, Denver, Col. 

QUADRUPI/ET COMPETITION. 

1 mile . . 1.604 • • Waller-Leonart-Pierce-Sharer Boston, Mass. . . Julv 31, 1897 

miles . . 9.39^2 • ■ Church-McCurdy-Turville-Turville . . Philadelphia, Pa . July 7, 1898 

QUADRUPLET, AGAINST TIME. 

>4 mile . . 0.23 . . Wein'g-Davis-Steenses-Phillips .... Nashville, Tenn. . Oct. 30, 1896 

Vi mile . . 0.314 ■ ■ Waller-Myers-Bradis-Staver Nashville, Tenn. . Oct. 29, 1896 

S mile . . 0.49 . . Hause-Marbarger-Hall-Hall Indianapolis, Ind. Aug. 5, 1898 

1 mile . . 1.40 . . Schinneer-Newkirk-Bohman-Bradis . Chicago, 111. . . . Aug. 2(i, 1898 
5 miles. . 9.1Sf . . PhiUips-Boone-Turville-iNfcCurdv . . . Philadelphia, Pa . Nov. 3,1897 

10 m:les . . 18.49* . . Phillips-Boone-Turville-McCurdy . . . Philadelphia, Pa . Nov. 3, 1897 

QUINTUPI/ET COMPETITION. 

Imile. .1.401 . . Sager-Eckberg-Watts-Swaubrough-Casey . . Boston, Mass. . July 30, 1898 

QUINTUPLET, AGAIN.ST TIME. 

1 mile . . 1.46f . . Callahan-N. Butler-Pierce-Walsh-Coleman . Boston, Mass. . Aug. 1, 1898 



The Philadelphia Record Jflmanac. 



TRIPI,ET COMPETITION. 

HOLDER. WHERE MADE. DATE. 

. Michael-Stone-Bainbridge . . Boston, Mass July 31, 1898 

. Johnson-Steenses-Becker . . Philadelphia, Pa Sept. 18, 1897 

TRIPLET, AGAINST TIME— PACED. 

. McDuffee-Church-Flower . . Philadelphia, Pa Oct. 26, 1897 

. Jack-C'hurch- Vernier Philadelphia, Pa Nov. 3, 1897 

. Jack-Church-Vernier Philadelphia, Pa Nov. 3, 1897 

TRIPLET, AGAINST TIME— UNPACED. 

. Fornwalt-Monroe-Johnson . Philadelphia, Pa .July 30, 1898 

. Fornwalt-Monroe-Johnson . Philadelphia, Pa'. .... July 30, 1898 

. Phillips-Bradis-Myers .... Nashville, Tenn Oct. 29, 1896 

. Fornwalt-Monroe-Johnson . Philadelphia, Pa July 30, 1898 

. Phillips-Bradis-Myers .... New Orleans, La Nov 6, 1896 

. Fornwalt-Monroe-Johnson . Philadelphia, Pa July 30, 1898 

. Kaser-Miller-Gardiner .... Bellair, Fla Mar. 16, 1898 

. Kaser-Miller-Gardiner .... Bellair, Fla IMar. 16, 1898 

. Kaser-Miller-Gardiner .... Bellair, Fla Mar. 16, 1898 

. Kaser-Miller-Gardiner .... Bellair. Fla Mar. 16, 1898 

. Kaser-Miller-Gardiner .... Bellair, Fla Mar. 16,;i898 

75 yards, Kaser-Miller-(Jardiner, Bellair, Fla. 

SEXTUPI,ET COMPETITION. 

McDuftee-Caldwell-Sullivau-Mayo-Barnaby- 

Saunders " *. Boston, Mass. . July 31, 1897 

SEXTUPLET, AGAINST TIME. 

Saunders-Pierce-F. Butler-Caldwell-r'rooks- 

Coleman Boston, Mass. . Sept. 26, 189G 

MOTOCYCI^E RECORDS. 

MOTOR BICYCLE. 

. . Champion .... Cambridge, Mass. 
. . Champion .... Cambridge, Mass. 





TIME. 


1 mile . 


. 1.46 


5 miles 


. lOMt 


Imile 


. 1.41 


5 miles 


9.15? 


10 miles 


. 18.52 


li mile . 
V, mile . 
34 mile . 


. 0.241 


. 0.33 


. 0.481 


% mile . 


. 1.05 


^ mile . 


. 1.19 


1 mile . 


■ I.4O5 


5 miles . 


. 10.34 


10 miles . 


. 21.07 


15 mile.s . 


. 31.50 


20 miles . 


. 42.36 


25 miles . 


. 53.26 



1 hour— 28 miles, 



1 mile . . 1.451 



1 mile . . 1.41' 



1 mile . 

5 miles . 



1.26s 
7.161 



July 31, 1900 
Julv 31, 1900 



MOTOR TRIC-i 

Champion . 



Imile l.isj Champion. . . . Chicago, 111 Sept. 25, 19C0 

5 miles 6.49J Champion .... Chicago, 111 Sept. 25, 1900 

10 miles 14.21^ Champion .... Chicago, 111 Sept. 25, 1900 

50 miles 15.57^ Champion. . . . Chicago, 111 Sept. 25, 1900 

1 hour — 14 miles, 1256 yards, Demester, Paris, Oct. 25, 1900. World's record. 

MOTOR TANDEM, AGAINST TIME. 

^4 mile 0.19J Crooks-Sherer . . New Bedford, Mass. . . June 9, 1900 

>2 mile 0.40 Crooks-Sherer . . New Bedford, Mass. . . June 9, 1900 

% mile l.OOf Crooks-Sherer . . New Bedford, Mass. . . J\me 9, 1900 

1 mile 1.20§ Miller-Judge . . Montreal May 24, 1900 

5 miles 7.08^ Duer-Sinclair . . Buffalo July 25, 1900 



MOTOR TANDE.M, COMPi: 

mile 1.26i Miller-Judge . 

miles 2.56g Miller-Judge . . 

miles 4.20 Crooks-Sherer . 

miles 5.45 Crooks-Sherer . 

miles 7.09 Crooks-Sherer . 

miles 8.52 Miller-Judge . . 

miles ]0.21§ Miller-Judge . . 

miles 11.51 Miller-Judge . . 

miles 13.22 Miller-Judge . . 

miles 14..50 Miller-Judge . . 

miles 16.23f Miller-Judge . . 

miles 17.56 Miller-Judge . . 

miles 19.271 :SIiller-Judge . . 

miles 20.57 ■ Miller-Judge . . 

miles 22.22f Miller-Judge . . 

miles 24.59§ Miller-Judge . . 

miles 26.35f Miller-Judge . . 

miles 27.08s Miller-Judge . . 

"es 29.40 Miller-Judge. . 



miles 
miles 
miles . 
miles 
miles 
miles , 



31.10? Miller-Judge . . 

33.25^ Miller-Judge . . 

34.56g Miller- Judge . . 

36.36 Miller-Judge . . 

. 38.11s Miller-Judge . . 

39.46J Miller-Ju^ge . . 



ITITION. 

Cleveland, O Mav 30, 1900 

Cleveland. O May 30, 1900 

Philadelphia, Pa July 4, 1900 

Philadelphia, Pa luly 4, 1900 

Philadelphia, Pa Tuly 4, 1900 

Cleveland, O Mav 30. 1900 

Cleveland, O May 30, 1900 

Cleveland, O May 30, 1900 

Cleveland, O May 30, 1900 

Cleveland, O May 30, 1900 

Cleveland, O May .30, 1900 

Cleveland, O Mav 30, 1900 

Cleveland, O May 30, 1900 

Cleveland, O May 30, 1900 

Cleveland, O Mav 30, 1900 

Baltimore, Md Sept. 7, 1899 

Baltimore, Md Sept. 7, 1899 

Baltimore, Md Sept. 7, 1899 

Baltimore, Md Sept. 7, 1899 

Baltimore, Md Sept. 7, 1899 

Manhattan Beach, N. Y. . Sept. 4, 1899 
Manhattan Beach, N. Y. . Sept. 4, 1899 
Manhattan Beach, N. Y. -Sept. 4, 1899 

Baltimore, Md Sept. 22, 1899 

Baltimore, Md Sept. 22, 1899 



The Philadelphia Record JUmanac. 



AMATEUR BICYCI/E RECORDS. 

Accepted by National Cycling Association. 

AMATEUR, AGAINST TIME, PACED. 

J^^-mile, 20^ seconds : C. C. Holzel, Spokane, 
Wash., Sept. 4, 1899. 

%-mile, 29| seconds : C. C. Ilolzel, Spokane, 
Wash., Sept. 26, 1899. 

K-mile, 45 seconds : Walter Smith, Berkeley 
Oval, N. Y., June 15. 1900. 

%-mile, *44# seconds: George Leander, In- 
dianapolis, Ind., Sept. 28, 1900. 

1 mile, 1.28 : Walter Smith, Berkeley Oval, 

June 15, 1900. 

2 miles, 3.26§: ¥. A. Staples, Chicago, 111., 

Aug. 26, 1899. 

3 miles, 5.53J : 4 miles, 7.52 : Rav Duer, Buf- 

falo, N. Y., Oct. 23, 1897. 

5 miles, 9.00: J. R. Dubois, Brockton, Ma?s., 

Oct. 11, 1899. 

6 miles, 11.59'; 7 miles, 13.58^ ; 8 miles, 16.02? ; 
9 miles, 18.05 ; 10 miles, 20.04f ; 11 miles, 
22.06 ; 12 miles, 24.17 ; 13 miles, 26.16 ; 14 
miles, 28.24?; 15 miles, 30.26-i; 16 miles, 
32.28f ; 17 miles, 34.29 ; 18 miles, 36.31 ; 19 
miles, 38.33 ; 20 miles, 40.32 : John Nel- 
son, Chicago, 111., Oct. 6, 1898. 

21 miles, 35.54; 22 miles, 37.42|: 23 miles, 
39.32^ ; 24 miles, 41.21f ; 25 miles, 43.08§ ; 
26 miles, 44.55i; 27 miles, 46.43|; 28 
miles, 48.51g ; 29 miles, 50.43J : 30 miles, 
52.31f ; 31 miles, 64.17^; 32 miles, 56.04|; 
33 miles, 57.54J ; 34 miles, 58.39^ ; one 
hour, 34 miles 400 yards: Ray Duer, 
Berkeley Oval, N. Y., Sept. 9, 1899. 

* Not yet passed upon. 
AMATEUR COMPETITION. 

J^-mile, 29% seconds : G. F. Royce, Paterson, 
N. J., July 4, 1894. 

i^-mile, 58| seconds: G. H. Collett, Buffalo, 
N. Y., July 15, 1899. 

3^-mile, 39| seconds : F. L. Kramer, Berke- 
ley Oval, N. Y., Aug. 25, 1899. 

%-mile, 1.23: F. L. Kramer, Waterbury, 
Conn., July 20, 1899. 

1 mile, 1.49§ : Ray Duer, Berkeley Oval, N. Y., 

Sept. 9, 1899. 

2 miles, 3.24^ ; 3 miles, 4.56 ; 4 miles, 6.28 ; 5 

miles, 7.59f ; George Leander, Indianapo- 
lis, Ind., Sept. 28, 1900. 

6 miles, lO.lOf; 7 miles, 11.51f: Ray Duer, 

Berkeley Oval, N. Y., Sept. 9, 1899. 

8 miles, 13.08? ; 9 miles, 14.51g : 10 miles, 
16.361 : John Lake, Berkeley Oval, N. Y., 
July 4, 1900. 

11 miles, 18.31; 12 miles, 20.09| ; 13 miles, 
21.49; 14 miles, 23.29t : Ray Duer, Berke- 
ley Oval, N. Y., Sept. 9, 1899. 

15 miles, 25.12| ; 16 miles, 27.02J : E. Ryan, 
Berkeley Oval, N. Y , Sept. 9, 1899. 

17 miles. 28.48t ; 18 miles, 30.31| ; 19 miles, 
32.17t; 20 miles, 34.021 : Rav Duer, Berke- 
ley Oval, N. Y., Sept. 9, 1899. 

21 miles, 39.51; 22 miles, 41.49t; 23 miles, 
43.48 ; 24 miles, 45.40 ; 25 miles, 47.37 ; 26 
miles, 49.32; 27 miles, 51.28; 28 miles, 
53.23; 29 miles, 55.28g; 30 miles, 57.28? ; 
31 miles, 59.30; 32 miles, 1.01.29i ; 33 
miles, 1.03.23; 34 miles, 1.05.18f ; 35 miles, 
1.07.76^ ; 36 miles, 1.09.18§ ; 37 miles, 
1.11.18^; 38 miles, 1.13.24; 39 miles, 
1.15.28 ; 40 miles, 1.17.31J; 41 miles, 1.19.44; 
42 miles, 1.21.50g ; 43 miles, 1.23.581; 44 
miles, 1.26.041; 45 miles, 1.28.14*; 46 
miles, 1.30.19i ; 47 miles, 1.32.26 ; 48 miles, 
1.34.24; 49 miles, 1.36.254; 50 miles, 
1.38.261; 51 miles, 1.40|; 52 miles, 1.42.351 ; 
53 miles, 1.44.41^ ; 64 miles, 1.46.46 ; 55 
miles, 1.48.57f; 56 miles, 1.51.21i; 67 
miles, 1.53.08|; 58 miles, 1.55.10i; 59 



miles, 1.57.291; 60 miles, 1.59.35| ; 61 
miles, 2.01.48; 62 miles, 2.03.57^; 100 
kilometers, 2.04.131 ; one hour, 31 miles, 
460 yards ; two hours, 59 miles 430 yards : 
J. Nelson, Montreal, Can., Aug. 10, 1899. 

AMATEUR, COMPETITION, UNPACED. 

5 miles, 11.31t; 10 miles, 23.31' ; 15 miles, 
35.32; 20 miles, 47.39: G. H. Collett, 
Berkeley Oval, N. Y., May 30, 1900. 

25 miles, 1.02.00| ; W. S. Fenn, Hartford, 
Conn., Oct. 1, 1900. 

30 miles, 1.13.36 ; 40 miles, 1.39.56f ; 50 miles, 
2.05.001 : J. P. Jacobson, Berkeley Oval, 
N. Y., Aug. 25, 1899. 

75 miles, 3.30.36| ; 100 miles, 4.57.24? : W. Tor- 
rence, Berkeley Oval, New York, Aue. 

25, 1900. 

One hour, 24 miles 1472 yards : G. H. Collett, 
Berkeley Oval, N. Y., May 30, 1900. 

AMATEUR, AGAINST TIME, UNPACED. 

1^-mile, 25^ seconds; J4-mile, 33| seconds: 
A. B. Simons, Demmg, N. Mex., May 

26, 1899. 

J^-mile, 58 seconds : C. Y. Dasev, Denver, 

Col., July 9, 1898. 
%-mile, 1.21J : J. G. Heil, Denver, Col., July 

31,1897. 
%-mile, 1.37 : F. B. Stowe, Springfield, Mass., 

Oct. 20, 1894. 

1 mile, 2.02g : W. F. Wahrenberger, Berkeley 

Oval, N. Y., Aug. 5, 1899. 

2 miles, 4.25; Smiles, 6.39J: F. S. Dusenberg, 

Ottumwa, la., July 24. 1899. 

4 miles, 9.31§ ; 5 miles, ll.SCf : O B. Hacken- 

berger, Denver, Col., Dec. 13, 1895. 

AMATEUR, TANDEM, AGAINST TIME. 

34-mile, 231 seconds: Kramer-Schucber, 
Berkeley Oval, N. Y., Aug. 25, 1899. 

3^-mile, 34| seconds : Finn-DeTemple, Buf- 
falo, N. Y., Oct. 27, 1897. 

Ja'-mile, 513 seconds: Casey-Eckberg, Spring 
lield, Mass., Sept. 16, 1897. 

%-mile, 1.131; %-mile, 1.25: Hagerty-Wil- 
liams, Waltham, Mass., Oct. 27, 1894. 

1 mile, 1.47J ; 2 miles, 3.541 ; 3 miles, 5.59| : 4 
miles, 8.041 ; 5 miles, 1U.07| ; Kusel-Good- 
win, Woodside Park, Phila., Aug. 3, 1899. 

AMATEUR, TRIPLET, AGAINST TIME. 

1 mile, 1.54|: Conner-Russell-Holland, Water- 
bury, Conn., June 22, 1898. 

AMATEUR, TANDEM, COMPETITION. 

J^-mile, 20§ seconds ; Kusel-Goodvvin, Wood- 
side Park, Phila., Pa., July 5. 1899. 

3/;^-mile, 34g : Haggerty-Williams, Waltham, 
Mass., Nov. 2, 1396. 

}^-mile, 56 sec. ; ^.mile, 1.17 : Davisworth- 
Mitchell, Louisville, Ky., July 4. 1896. 

1 mile, 1.521 : Hausman-Rutz, Berkeley Oval, 

N. Y., Aug. 2.5, 1899. 

2 miles, 4.06 : Hausman-Rutz, Vailsburg, N 

J., July 30, 1899. 

AMATEUR HANDICAP RECORDS. 

J<-mile, 23 seconds : Jos. Szparadowski, New 

Haven, Conn., July 17, 1900. 
3^-mile, 38| seconds : W. S. Fenn, Hartford, 

Conn., Sept. 3, 1900. 
3^-mile, 58§ seconds : G. H. Collett, BuH'alo, 

N. Y., July 15, 1899. 
%-mile, 1.20f : W. S. Fenn, Hartford, Conn., 

Aug. 20, 1900. 

1 mile, 2.00f ; G. H. Collett, Berkeley Oval, 

N, Y., May 30, 1900. 

2 miles, 4.15? : A. B. Goejiler, Buffalo, N. Y., 

July 3, 1897. 

3 miles, 7.25: R. A. Carnl, Brookside Park, 

Mass., Sep. 11, 1900. 

5 miles, 11.30^ ; F. J. Cadwell, HillBgrove. 

R. I., Aug. 26, 1900. 



Baseball CKampionsKip. 



Baseball was played without much regard 
to rule previous to 1857. From that year to 
the close of the season of 1875 the laws of the 
National Association governed. In 1871 the 
first regular championship schedule was 
played. In 1876 tlie National League was 
organized, and in 1881 a rival was born in 
the American Association. The Union Asso- 
ciation was organized in 1884, ostensibly in 
opposition to the working of the reserve rule 
in the National League and American Asso- 
ciation. It lasted but one season, the St. Louis 
Club winning the pennant. 

In the fall of 1889 the Players' National 
League was organized as the outcome of the 
Brotherhood of Baseball Players. It proved 
a financial failure. The Boston Club won the 
pennant with a percentage of .628. Brooklyn 
was second, and then followed New York, 
Chicago, Philadelphia Pittsburg, Cleveland 
and Buffalo in the order named. The gate 
receipts did not pay salaries, and the capi- 
talists were obliged to go deep down into 
their pockets to satisfy the players. A joint 
meeting between representatives of the Na- 
tional League, Players' League and American 
Association, at the close of the season of 1890, 
resulted in a compromise. It was plain that 
New York, Brooklyn, Pittsburg and Cleve- 
land would not support two clubs, and the 
Players' League clubs of those cities were 
consolidated with the National League 
clubs by means of deals or purchases, while 
the Chicago Players' club was bought out. 
The Boston and Philadelphia Players' clubs 
joined the American Association. A new 
national agreement between the clubs of 
the National League, American Association 
and Western Association was drawn up and 
signed, only to be broken a few days later by 
the American Association because of the 
action of the National Board in awarding 
the services of star Association players to 
League clubs. The Association went through 
the season of 1891 on an independent basis. 
This resulted in increasing salaries of ball 
players, there being sharp competition for 
the services of the stars. 

A twelve-club organization, styled the 
National League and American Association 
of Baseball Clubs, was organized at Indian- 
apolis, Dec. 15, 1891. It included the best 
baseball cities of the country, and virtually 
marked the burial of the American Associa- 
tion, which had been in existence since 

In" 1900 the National League was again 
reduced to eight clubs. The Baltimore, 
Washington, Louisville and Cleveland fran- 
chises being purchased by the League. 

The standing of the clubs in the National 
League and American Association of Base- 
ball Clubs at the close of the seasons of 1892, 
1893, 1894, 1895, 1896, 1897, 1898 and 1899 
follows : 



1892. 

Boston . . 
Cleveland . 
Brooklyn . 
Philadelphia 
Cincinnati. 
Pittsburg . 
Chicago . . 
New York 
Louisville . 
Washington 
St. Louis . 
Baltimore . 



WON. 


LOST. 


in2 


48 


»H 


56 


95 


59 


H7 


66 


HI 


71 


m 


73 


70 


7fi 


71 


m 


6.1 


89 


.TO 




58 
47 


93 

102 



1893. 

Boston . . . 

Pittsburg . . 

Cleveland . . 
Philadelphia. 

New York . . 

Brooklyn . . 

Cincinnati . . 

Baltimore . . 

Chicago . . . 

St. Louis . . 

Louisville . . 

Washington . 



Baltimore. . 


89 


39 


Boston . . . 


9.^! 


39 


NewYork . 




44 


Baltimore . 


90 


40 


Boston . . . 


KH 


49 


New York . 


83 


48 


Philadelphia 


71 


.56 


Cincinnati . 


76 


.56 


Brooklyn . . 


70 


61 


Cleveland. . 


69 


62 


Cleveland . 


HH 


61 


Washington . 


61 


71 


Pittsburg . . 


65 


65 


Brooklyn . . 


61 


71 


Chicago . . 


57 


75 


Pittsburg . . 


60 


71 




M 


75 


Chicago . . 


.59 


73 


St. Louis . . 


56 


76 


Philadelphia 


.55 


77 


W^ashington . 


45 


87 


Louisville . . 


.52 


79 


Louisville . 


36 


94 


St. Louis . . 


29 


102 


1895. 






1898. 






Baltimore . . 


87 


43 


Boston . . . 


102 


47 


Cleveland. . 


84 


46 


Baltimore . 


96 


53 


Philadelphia. 


78 


53 


Cincinnati . 


92 


60 


Chicago . . 


7-2 


.58 


Chicago . . 


85 


65 


Brooklyn . . 


71 


60 


Cleveland . 


81 


68 


Boston . . . 


71 


60 


Philadelphia 


78 


71 


Pittsburg . . 




61 


New York . 


77 


73 


Cincinnati . 


66 


64 


Pittsburg . . 
Louisville . 


72 


76 


NewYork . 


66 


65 


70 


81 


Washington . 


AA 


8.5 


Brooklyn . . 


.54 


91 


St. Louis . . 


39 


92 


Washington 


51 


101 


Louisville. . 


35 


96 


St. Louis . 


39. 


111 




90 


,39 


Brooklyn . . 


101 


47 


Cleveland. . 


80 


48 


Boston . . 


95 


58 


Cincinnati . 


77 


,50 


Philadelphia 


94 


,57 


Boston . . 


74 


57 


Baltimore 


87 




Chicago . 


71 


.57 


St. Louis . 


84 


67 


Pittsburg . 


66 


63 


Cincinnati 


83 


67 


New York 


64 


67 


Pittsburg . 


76 


74 


Philadelphia 


62 


68 


Chicago . 


76 


73 




.58 


73 


Louisville 


75 


78 


Washington 


.58 


73 


New York 


60 


90 


St. Louis . . 


40 


90 


Washington 


,54 


98 


LouisvUle. 


38 


93 


Cleveland 


20 


134 



The standing of the clubs of the various 
organizations at the close of the season of 
1900 follows : 

NATIONAL LEAGUE. 



CLUBS. 


Brooklyn. 

Pittsburg" 

Philada. 

Boston. 

Chicago 

St. Louis. 

Cincinnati 

NewYork 

Won! 


1 


Brooklyn . . . 
Pittsburg . . . 
Philadelphia . . 
Boston .... 
Chicago .... 
St. Louis .... 
Cincinnati . . . 
NewYork . . . 


.. 8 10 16 10 13 15 10 82 

11 . . 11 15 12 11 8 11 79 
8 9 .. 11 11 12 11 13 75 
4, 5 9. . 12 12 13 11S66 

10, 8 9 8. .' 9 9 12 65 
7! 91 81 8 1l!..| 7,14,65 
4,12 91 7 1lil2!.. 7 62 

10|9 7|7, 8|6|13..,60 


.603 
.568 
.543 
.478 
.464 
.464 
.446 
.435 


Games lost . , 


54 60:63 72 7575,77178 





1900— POST SE.^SON SERIES FOR SILVER CUP. 

AT PITTSBURG. WON. LOST. PER C. 

Brooklvn 3 2 .600 

Pittsburg 2 3 .400 

EASTEBN LEAGUE. 



Providence , 
Rochester . 
Hartford 
Worcester 
Springfield 
Toronto . 
Montreal 
Syracuse . 



a; ,T3 ,.S 0) 
1 1| I ,« 



1^ 



hS 



^^ 



n 13 12 83 

11 10 17 77 

12 7 10 68 

8 13 12 60 
. .!12,12 63 

9 . . 8,53 



6772'82| 



The Philadelphia Record JUmanac. 



AMEKICAN LEAGUE. 





^[1 


1 


.^• 


5 


= 


° t 




1 


CLUBS. 




1 


1 




1 




c 


1^ 


Chicago .... 


...12 


12 


10 


7 


13 


ii:i7 


82 


.607 


Milwaukee . . 


fi'... 


13 


11 


16 


11 


913 


79 


.572 


Indianapolis 


5 7 


... 


12 


16 


5 


14 12 


71 


.526 


Detroit .... 


10 9 


7 




11 


12 


11:11 


VI 


.511 


Kansas City . . 


Ki ft 


4 


t 




10 


15 13 


69 


.493 


Cleveland . . . 


7; H 


14 


> 


9 




91 i 


64 


.467 


Buffalo .... 


911 


6 


t 


5 


11 


...lU 


61 


.439 


Minneapolis . . 


3 7 
53 59 


8 
64 


9 


i 


11 
73 


9!... 
78185 


54 


.388 


Games lost . . 





COLLEGE BASEBALL GAMES. 

Making just comparisons between college 
baseball team.s is no easy matter. No two 
college teams play the same opponents, and 
only a few of the recognized best teams play 
one another. Trifling differences keep many 
teams apart, while geographical location is 
the cause of other teams not playing. 

Counting all college games played, as well 
as the quality of the games, Princeton fairly 
won first place in the college baseball world 
for the season of 1900. The Tigers won 19 of 
the 22 games played, beating Georgetown 
twice, Yale twice, Cornell twice. Harvard, 
Holy Cross, Brown, Fordham, Lehigh, Co- 
lumbia, Lafayette, Manhattan and Virginia 
once each, besides taking other college 
teams into camp. 

The following table shows the work of the 
leading teams of 1900 where they played 
against the same nines : 



Percent. 


.647 

.294 
.545 
.385 
.400 
.556 
.286 

.000 


\ 


Won . . . 
Vermont. 


S^'-SISS"'-"-"*-" "»''"--'"=■ 




00000-0000-00-00000 : 


« 


Lafayette 
Columbia 


-c.--o^.ooooc<^ooo--o |0 


2 


-0----00000---000 :oo 




Annapo'9 |ooooo«oooooooooo :ooo 


-^ 


Indians . 
VirginiiT 


0-000-000-00000 :oooo 


m 


-0- -0-00000-00 lOOOOO 


.n 


Manhafn 1 -="= = ^ = =>="=»<= o-^ ;oooooo 


" 


Wesleyan |°o = --o = - = o-o :-oooooo 




Lehigh., l-'-oo-'-ooooo :o-.c-=, = -o 




Fordham. |-oo--«oooo locoooo-oo 


.n 


Cornell ..|^-oo---c^oo :...o«---ocoo 


2 


Chicago .|oMoooc.^=, :-oooooooooo 


« 


Michigan | ooooo o :o-'e^oooooooooo 




Penna...|o--oo : .. ^ ., ^ oo o o - 00 = oo 


a. 


HolyCr'sl : -0 00 0^00 


» 


Yale ...!'''">• :ooocooo-oooooooo 


» 


Harvard .|'"'- :-«oor.ooo<=oooac.ooo 


<o 


Qeorgefn |" :=>--oooooooooooc,ooo 


- 


Princeton | .--oooo-oooooooooooo 


" 








n 

i 


Princeton . 
Georgetown 
Harvard . . 
Yale . . . 
Holy Cross" 
Pennsylvania 
Michigan . 
Brown . . . 
Chicago . . 
Cornell . . 
Fordham . 
Lehigh . . 
Wesleyan . 
Manhattan . 
Virginia . . 
Indians . . 
Annnpolis . 
Columbia . 
Lafayette . 
Vermont . . 


1 

i 



Tie games were played by Pennsylvania 
and Georgetown, Pennsylvania and Manhat- 
tan, Holy Cross and Brown, Chicago and 
Michigan. 



In games won and lost, counting all college 
contests of 1900, the season's record is as fol- 
lows : 



Princeton 


IH 


.S 


.864 


Virginia 


Georgefn 


21) 


4 


.k;^:^ 


Naval Cad 


Holy Cross 


IK 


ft 


.792 


Lehigh . 


Manhattan 


!t 


.^ 


.7M 


Weslevan 


Harvard 


!,■) 




.714 


Cornell 


Pennsyl'a 


17 


y 


.e,hi 


Lafayette 


Yale . , 


15 




.625 


Columbia 



7 12 .368 



THE CHAMPION BATSMEN. 

The leading batsmen of the League since 
1876 have been as follows : 

YEAR. CLUB AND CITY. AVERAGE. 

1876 Barnes, Chicago 403 

1877 White, Boston 385 

1878 Dalrymple, Milwaukee 380 

1879 Anson, Chicago 407 

1880 Gore, Chicago 365 

1881 Anson, Chicago 399 

1882 Brouthers, Buffalo 367 

1883 Brouthers, Buffalo 371 

1884 O'Rourke, Buffalo 350 

1885 Connor, New York 371 

1886 Kelly, Chicago 388 

1887 Maul, Philadelphia 343 

1888 Anson, Chicago 343 

1889 Brouthers, Boston 313 

1890 Luby, Chicago 342 

1891 Hamilton, Philadelphia 338 

1892 Brouthers, Brooklyn . ■. 335 

1893 Stenzel, Pittsburg 409 

1894 Duffy, Boston 438 

1895 Burkett, Cleveland 423 

1896 Burkett, Cleveland 419 

1897 Keeler, Baltimore 432 

1898 Keeler, Baltimore 381 

1899 Delahanty, Philadelphia 408 

1900 Wagner, Pittsburg 380 

LEAGUE PENNANT WINNERS. 
The winners of the National League pen- 
nant and their records from 1876 to 19U0, in- 
clusive, are as follows : 

YEAR CHAMPION CLUBS. WON. LO»T. PER CENT. 

1876 Chicago 52 14 .788 

1877 Boston 31 17 .648 

1878 Boston 41 19 .707 

1879 Providence 55 23 .705 

1880 Chicago 67 17 .798 

1881 Chicago 56 28 .667 

1882 Chicago 65 29 .655 

1883 Boston 63 35 .643 

1884 Providence 84 28 .750 

1885 Chicago 87 25 .776 

1886 Chicago 90 34 .725 

1887 Detroit 79 45 .637 

1888 New York 84 47 .641 

1889 New York 83 43 .659 

1890 Brooklyn 86 43 .667 

1891 Boston 87 51 .630 

1892 Boston (first half) . . 55 22 .703 

1892 Cleveland (second half) 53 23 .697 
1892* Boston (whole season) 102 48 .680 

1893 Boston 86 44 .662 

1894 Baltimore 89 39 .695 

1895 Baltimore 87 43 .669 

1896 Baltimore 90 39 .698 

1897 Boston 93 39 .705 

1S98 Boston 102 47 .685 

1899 Brooklvn lul 47 .682 

1900 Brooklyn 82 54 .603 

• In the final championship series Boston beat Cleve- 
land five straight games. 



The Philadelphia Record JUmanac. 



NATIONAL LEAGUE AVERAGES, 1900. 



Wagner, Pitts . . . 


134 


528 


107 


201 


302 


.380 


4 


36 


Flick, Philadelphia 


138 


547 


106 


207 


302 


.378 




37 


Keeler, Brooklyn . 


137 


568 


106 


208 


259 


.366 


19 


39 


Burkett, St. Louis 


142 


560 


88 


202 


264 


.360 


19 


31 


Lajoie, Philad'a . . 


102 


451 


95 


156 


234 


.346 




25 


Selbach, New York 


141 


524 


99 


181 


249 


.345 




33 


Becklev, Cincinnati 138 


559 


99 


192 


243 


.343 


12 


22 


Tennehill.Pittsb'g 


32 


117 


19 


40 


50 


.342 




3 


McGraw, St. Louis 


98 


341 


84 


115 


139 


.337 




28 


Hamilton, Boston 


135 


524 


103 


174 


204 






29 


Hartzell, Cincinnat 


18 


64 


10 


21 


31 


^328 




g 


Donlin, St. Louis 


77 


275 


40 


90 


140 


.327 




12 


Davis, New York . 


113 


425 


70 


1.38 


175 


.325 




32 


Thomas, Philad'a 


139 


529 


131 


172 


183 


.325 


14 


36 


Donovan, St. Louis 


127 


509 


78 


165 


181 


.324 




44 


Clarke, Boston . . 


71 


265 


35 


85 


98 


.320 







Van Haltren, N. Y 


141 


568 


113 


181 


229 


.319 


13 


45 


Delahanty, Phila. 


130 


542 


82 


173 


231 


.319 


14 


14 


Kelley, Brooklyn . 


118 


453 


92 


144 


220 


.318 




26 


Schriver, Pittsb'g 


23 


85 


U 


27 


36 


.317 







Barrett, Cincinnati 


138 


544 


115 


172 


213 


.316 


10 


46 


Daly, Brooklyn . 


98 


345 


70 


108 


143 


.313 




26 


Hickman, New York 125 


473 


66 


148 


231 


.313 




11 


Dunn, Br. & Phila 


18 


55 


4 


17 


18 


.309 




1 


Jones, Brooklyn . 


136 


556 


108 


172 


213 


.309 


11 


34 


Mercer, New York 


72 


247 


31 


76 


82 


.308 




14 


McFarlaud, Phila 


90 


342 


50 


105 


133 


.307 


11 


12 


Orth, Philadelphia 


35 


127 


7 


39 


48 


.307 






Douglass, Phila . 


45 


160 


23 


49 


68 


.306 




8 


Sheckard, Brooklyn 


75 


269 


74 


82 


121 


.305 




34 


Chance, Chicago . 


48 


151 


26 


46 


62 


.304 




9 


Kennedy, Brooklyn 


.16 


123 


10 


37 


49 


.303 







McGann, St. Louis 


124 


450 


79 


136 


175 


.302 




22 


Heidrick, St. Louis 


83 


339 


53 


102 


132 


.301 




15 


Freeman, Boston . 


109 


520 


56 


126 


189 


.300 




8 


Collins, Boston . 


142 


585 


104 


175 


229 


.299 




20 


Green, Chicago . 


100 


387 


62 


116 


160 


.299 




32 


Slagle, Philad'a . 


141 


578 


115 


173 


211 


.299 




36 


DuHy, Boston . . 


50 


181 


28 


54 


73 


.298 




12 


Zimmer, Pittsburg 


80 


275 


28 


82 


110 


.298 






Keister, St. Louis 


128 


500 


78 


149 


200 


.298 




35 


McCarthy, Chicago 


123 


503 


67 


149 


177 


.296 


11 


23 


Ritchey, Pittsburg 


123 


475 


62 


144 


177 


.295 


18 


18 


Mertes, Chicago . 


125 


483 


71 


143 


196 


.294 


22 


39 


O'Brien. Pittsburg 


94 


374 


60 


110 


154 


.294 




11 


Cross, St. L.&Br'n 


133 


519 


79 


152 


194 


.293 




21 


Stahl, Boston . . 


134 


552 


88 


162 


233 


.293 




25 


Bradley, Chicago 


120 


445 


64 


128 


181 


.288 




16 


Dinnen, Boston . 


36 


122 


14 


35 


36 


.287 




7 


Foster, New York 


20 


84 


18 


24 


30 


.286 






Tennev, Boston . 


111 


437 


75 


124 


150 


.284 


10 


16 


Kitson, Brooklyn 


33 


113 


21 


32 


18 


.283 




2 


Beaumont, Pittsb'g 


138 


556 


107 


160 


212 


.282 


21 


19 


Clarke, Pittsburg 


103 


398 


85 


112 


161 


.281 




18 


McGuire, Brooklyn 


68 


239 


20 


67 


86 


.280 




1 


Lowe, Boston . . 


127 


473 


65 


132 


163 


.279 




18 


Smith, Cin. &N. Y 


116 


425 


61 


118 


163 


.278 




20 


Wolverton, Phila. 


101 


386 


42 


107 


144 


.277 




5 


Farrell, Brooklyn 


73 


274 


34 


76 


98 


.277 




3 


McBride, Cincinl 


109 


432 


57 


120 


162 


.277 




11 


Ryan, Chicago . . 


106 


416 


66 


115 


163 


.276 




17 


Strang, Chicago . 


25 


94 


15 


26 


29 


.276 




4 


Powell, St. Louis 


37 


109 


14 


30 


43 


.275 




2 


Quinn, Cin.&St. L 


94 


339 


29 


93 


107 


.274 




11 


Geier, Cincinnati 


20 


110 


20 


30 


38 


.273 




3 


Doyle, New York 


130 


504 


69 


138 


166 


.273 




45 


Ganzel, Chicago . 


78 


287 


29 


78 


112 


.272 




3 


Wallace, St. Louis 


129 


489 


72 


133 


187 


.272 




10 


Irwin, Cincinnati 


85 


332 


59 


90 


-il9 


.271 




9 


Jenning.s Brooklyt 


112 


440 


62 


119 


155 


.270 




35 


Crawford, Cincini 


. 96 


385 


67 


104 


172 


.270 




15 


Warner, New York 


31 


104 


14 


28 


31 


.269 




•2 


Sullivan, Boston . 


66 


232 


36 


62 


89 


.267 




5 


Williams, Pitts'g 


106 


414 


67 


110 


160 


.266 




16 


Criger, St. Louis 


76 


282 


30 


75 


101 


.266 




9 


Piatt, Philadelphii 


19 


64 




17 


19 


.265 






AVood, Cincinnati 


34 


140 


18 


37 


47 


.264 




2 


Barry, Boston . . 


66 


253 


40 


66 


92 


.261 




10 


Dahlen, Brooklyn 


134 


485 


87 


126 


168 


.259 




31 


Gleason, New York 


111 


320 


60 


108 


128 


.2,57 




25 


Fraser, Philada 


26 




8 


22 


27 


.257 




2 


Long, Boston . . 


124 


483 


80 


124 


185 


.256 




26 


Bowerman, N. Y . 


. 73 




25 






.256 




11 


Robinson, St. Loui 


56 


212 


•2C 


54 


63 


.255 




9 


PeiU, Cincinnati 


. 84 


295 


35 




94 


.251 




5 


Griffiths, Chicago 


30 


96 


16 


2^ 


34 


.250 




2 


Demont, Bn^oklyn 


63 


232 


32 


58 


69 


.250 




20 



Name. Club. 



■ 


S 

si 


K 


5 


i 


'o 


->• 


i 


o' 






o 


< 


_« 


_E 




m 




K 




Murphy, New York 


21 


72 


12 


18 


~19~ 


.250 


2 




Steinfeldt, Cinn'i . 


136 


513 


58 


127 


174 


.217 


19 






Childs, Chicago . . 


138 


538 


70 


131 


158 


.243 


20 






Bernard, New York 


19 


70 




17 


20 


.243 








Corcoran, Cinncin'i 


128 


523 


66 


127 


166 


.242 


15 






Ely, Pittsburg . . . 


1,30 


474 


61 


115 


130 


.242 


10 






Donahue, Chicago . 


65 


209 


21 


50 


62 


.239 








OCon'r,St.L.&Fit 


48 


181 


20 


43 


48 


.237 








Dillard, St. Louis . 


44 


177 


24 


42 


51 


.237 








Everett, Chicago . . 


23 


93 


10 


22 


26 


.236 








Callahan, Chlcigo . 


33 


118 


17 


28 


36 


.236 








Doheny, New York 


18 


55 


17 


13 


14 


.236 








Donahue, Philada . 


26 


85 




20 


20 


.235 








Taylor, Chicago . . 


25 


80 


8 


18 


26 


.225 








Hawley, New York 




111 


9 


25 


31 


.225 








McCreery, Pittsburg 


33 


130 


20 


29 


42 


.223 








Grady, New Y'ork . 


75 


252 


36 


57 


73 


.222 








Chiles, Philad'a . . 




109 


15 


24 


37 


.2-20 


3 






McCormick, Chicago 


110 


376 


35 


81 


112 


.215 


18 






Leach, Pittsburg 


45 


158 


20 


34 


42 


.215 








Br'fs'n, Cincinnati 


33 


115 


12 


23 


32 


.210 








Hughey, St. Louis . 


15 


43 


6 


93 


9 


.209 









Nichols, Boston . . 


28 


87 


14 


18 


22 


.207 




2 




Leever, Pittsburg 


27 


87 


9 


18 


25 


.207 









Hahn, Cincinnati . 


40 


117 


12 


24 


35 


.205 









De.\ter, Chicago . . 


35 


124 


7 


25 


35 


.201 








Clingman, Chicago 


46 


159 


15 


32 


39 


.201 








Cooley, Pittsburg . 


65 


250 


30 


50 


6fl 


.200 


12 






Cross, Philadelphia 


130 


465 


59 


93 


122 


.200 




23 




Newton, Cincinnati 


30 


86 


10 


17 


19 


.198 








Dolan, Philad'a . . 


70 


257 


39 


50 


65 


.194 








Sudhotr, St. Louis 


32 


100 


15 


19 


22 


.190 








Kahoe, Cincinnati 


49 


177 


18 


33 


46 


.186 








McGinnity, B'klyn 


41 


146 


18 


27 


33 


.185 








Young, St. Louis . 


39 


124 


13 


23 


33 


.185 








Philippi, Pittsburg 


32 


105 


7 


19 


24 


.181 








Jones, St. Louis . 


38 


118 


14 


21 


23 


.178 








Carrick, New York 


41 


114 


12 


19 


23 


.167 








Phillips, Cincinnat 


27 


78 


8 


13 


13 


.167 








Chesbro, Pittsburg 




85 


10 


14 


10 


.165 








Waddell, Pittsburg 


22 


81 


6 


13 


21 










Bernhard, Philada 


28 


95 


7 


15 


16 


!l58 








Garvin, Chicago . 


28 


90 


12 


14 


15 


.155 








Scott, Cincinnati. 


39 


123 


9 


19 




.1,54 








Willis, Boston . ; . 


26 


88 


8 


12 


16 


.136 








Lewis, Boston . . . 


26 


72 


10 


9 


9 


.125 










FIELDING. 










FIRST BASEMEN. 













Kelley, Brooklyn .... 28 241 
Bradley, Chicago .... 

McGann, St. Louis ... 124 1228 

Jennings, Brooklyn ... 110 1052 
Ganzel, Chicago .... 

Tenney, Boston 108 1030 

Delahanty, Philadelphia . 130 1293 

Beckley, Cincinnati . . . 138 1388 

Everett, Chicago 23 tX 10 

Freeman, Boston .... 15 147 14 

Mertes, Chicago 31 342 16 

O'Brien, Pittsburg. ... 65 673 24 

Doyle, New York 130 1281 95 

Coolev, Pittsburg .... 65 681 21 

Donlin, St. Louis .... 21 208 4 

SECOND BASEMEN. 

Lowe, Boston 127 318 330 

Lajoie, Philadelphia . . . 102 283 345 

De Montreville, Brooklyn 47 1'29 131 

Steinfeldt, Cincinnati . . 66 208 214 

Quinn, St. L. & Cincinnati 87 181 198 

Ritchey, Pittsburg . . . 123 298 354 

Childs, Chicago 138 334 425 

Keister, St. Louis .... 119 213 312 

Gleason, New York ... Ill 325 331 

Daly, Brooklyn 95 231 233 

Dolan, Philadelphia . . . 29 64 72 

Murphv, New York ... 21 44 45 

Barry, Boston 15 31 25 

THIRD BASEMEN. 

Cross, St. L. & Brooklyn . 133 184 317 

Steinfeldt, Cincinnati' . . 67 108 175 

Dolan, Philadelphia ... 30 47 91 



1 12 


2 


255 .91 


i 13 


1 


137 .91 


\ 54 


14 


1296 .9 


i 74 


18 


1144 .9 


2 35 


15 


872 .9 


) 85 


19 


1134 .9 


1 69 


25 


1387 .9 


8 92 


31 


1511 .9 



43 1419 .969 



12 224 .946 



21 443 .955 
18 397 .954 



11 147 .924 



31 532 .941 
23 306 .924 



The Philadelphia Record JH/nanac. 



THIRD BASEMEN. 





i 


1 


i 


2 


1 




Name. Cli;b. 








£ 








5 


1 


< 




H 


B 


Collins, Boston .... 


7U2 


252 


323 


IT 


622 


.924 


MoGraw, .St. Louis . . . 


. 98 


106 


216 


29 


351 


.917 


Bradlep, Chicaso . . . 


.105 


166 


301 


52 


519 


.899 


McCormick, Chicago . . 


. 21 


28 


58 


10 


96 




Williams, Piusburg . . 


. 104 


154 


257 


49 


460 


'.mz 


Dillard, St. Louis . . . 


. 20 


32 


42 


9 


83 


.891 


Wolvertoh, Philadelphia 


. 101 


126 


233 


45 


404 


.888 


Leach, Pittsburg. . . . 


. 31 


45 


70 


19 


134 


.839 


Hickman, New York . . 


. 118 


181 


283 


91 


555 


.836 


Wood, Cincinnati . . . 


. 15 


13 


24 




46 


.804 


Mercer, New Vork . . . 


. 18 


« 


51 


18 


86 


.791 


SHORT STOPS. 










Davis, New York . . . 


. 113 


276 


455 


45 


776 


.942 


Dahlen, Brooklyn . . . 


. 134 


317 


515 


51 


883 


.942 


Long, Boston 

Wallace, St. Louis . . . 


. 124 


260 


456 


45 


761 


.941 


. 127 


328 


447 


49 


824 


.940 


Kly, Pittsburg 


.130 


244 


509 


51 


804 


.936 


Corcoran, Cincinnati . 


.125 


270 


440 


56 


766 


.927 


McCormick, Chicago . . 


. 85 


160 


398 




516 


.924 


Cross, Philadelphia . . 


.130 


340 


456 


65 


861 


.924 


Irwin, Cincinnati . . . 


. 16 


35 


61 




104 


.923 


Barrv, Boston 


. ir 


2t 


40 


7 


74 


.905 


Clingman, Chicago . . 


. 46 


82 


154 


33 


269 


.877 


OUTFIELDERS 










Barry, Boston 


. 23 


36 


5 


1 


42 


.975 


Wagner, Pittsburg . . . 


. m 


177 


13 


6 


196 


.969 


Heidrick, St. Louis . . 


. 83 


220 


24 


8 


252 




Thomas, Philadelphia . 
Donovan, St. Louis . . 


.139 


303 


18 


11 


332 


:966 


.127 


181 


12 


8 


201 


.960 


Jones, Brooklyn .... 


.136 


315 


13 


14 


342 


.959 


Selbach, New York . . 


. 141 


325 


30 


16 


371 


.957 


Freeman, Boston . . . 


. 94 


129 


4 


7 


140 


.957 


Kellev, Brooklvn . . . 


. 78 


181 


13 




293 


.955 


Dillard, St. Louis . . . 


. 22 


39 


a 


2 


44 


.954 


Hartzell, Cincinnati . . 


. 18 


21 





1 


22 


.954 


Crawford, Cincinnati . 


. 96 


230 


16 


12 


258 


.953 


Stahl, Boston 


.134 


227 


22 


13 


262 


.950 


Duffy, Boston 




107 


5 


6 


118 


.949 


Beaumont, Pittsburg . 


;i38 


270 




15 


294 


.949 


McCarthy, Chicago . . 


.123 


230 


22 


14 


266 


.947 


Van Haltren, New York 


.141 


322 




19 


364 


.947 


Hamilton, Boston . . . 


.135 


325 


13 


19 


357 


.947 


Keeler, Brooklyn . . . 


.137 


229 


24 


14 


267 


.947 


Green, Chicago .... 


. 100 


217 


13 


13 


243 


.946 


Clarke, Pittsburg . . . 


.103 


263 


9 


16 


288 


.944 


Smith, Cinolu'i&N. Y 


.116 


151 


14 


10 


175 


.943 


OBrien, Pittsburg . . 


. 24 


46 


1 


3 


50 


.940 


Burkett, St. Louis . . . 


. 142 


345 


16 


23 


384 


.940 


Barrett, Cincinnati . . 


. 138 


285 


25 


22 


332 


.936 


Sheckard, Brooklvn . . 


. 75 


170 


14 


13 


197 


.934 


McBride, Cincinnati . . 


.109 


166 


15 


13 


194 


.932 


Bernard. New York . . 


. 18 


23 


2 


2 


27 




Slagle, Philadelphia . . 


.141 


318 


18 


28 


364 


;923 


Geier, Cincinnati . . . 


. 27 


55 


4 


5 


64 


.922 


Flick, Philadelphia . . 


. 138 


237 


19 


23 


279 


.918 


Ryan, Chicago 


. 106 


175 


15 


17 


207 


.918 


Mertes, Chicago .... 


. 86 


175 


12 


19 


206 


.908 


.McCreery, Pittsburg . . 


. 33 


62 


10 


10 


82 


.878 


CATCHERS. 











Warner, New York . . 


30 


96 


.50 


6 


5 


1,56 


9?6 


Sullivan, Boston . . . 


64 


227 


65 


7 


14 


313 


933 


Zimmer, Pittsburg . . 


.78 


323 


101 


15 


16 


455 


932 


Robinson, St. Louis . . 


.,56 


199 












Criger, St. Louis . . . 


75 


279 


103 


19 


19 






Schriver, Pittsburg . . 


. 23 


92 


20 


4 


6 


122 


.918 




7H 


3(14 


128 


20 


19 






Kahoe, Cincinnati . . 


4K 


206 


81 


15 


12 






Wood, Cincinnati . . . 


19 


62 


32 




6 


103 


.912 


















McFarland.Philadelphin 


.90 


272 


1.37 


15 


25 


449 


911 


McGuire, Brooklyn . . 


. 68 


212 


80 


19 


10 


321 


909 


Dexter, Chicago . . . 


. 20 


67 


32 


6 


4 


109 


908 


Donohue, Chicago . . . 


. 64 


225 


70 


21 


14 


3.30 




Chance, Chicago . , . 


48 


160 


64 


17 


10 


251 


89? 


O'Connor, St. L. & Pitt 


,48 


137 


60 


9 








Grady, New York . . . 


40 


122 




13 








Clarke, Boston .... 


.66 


248 


104 


28 


19 


.399 




Bowerman, Ne-v York . 


. 73 


22« 


128 




29 


407 


,875 


Douglass, Philadelphia 


. 45 


139 


60 


13 


27 


239 


.832 



Longest baseball games— Grand Forks vs. 
Fargo, 25 innings; to ; Devil's Lake, S. D., 
July 18, 1891. Harvard College Nine vs. Jlan- 
eliester (profes.sional) Club, 24 innings ; score 
to ; Boston, Mass., May 11, 1877. Tacoma, 
6; Seattle, 5; 22 innings; Tacoma, Wash., 
May l(i, 1891. 

Quickest played game, 47 minutes— Dayton 
vs. Ironton, Dayton, Ohio, Sept. 19, 1884. 

Remarkable pitching.— James Hughes, of 
the Baltimore Club, shut out Washington 
without a hit, April 18, 1898, in his lirst game 
in the National League. On April 22 Hughes 
duplicated the trick against the Bof-ton team. 
Frank Donahue, of the Philadelphia Club, 
shut out Boston without a hit at Philadel- 
phia, July 8, 1898. C. Young, of the Cleve- 
land Club, shut out the Cincinnati team 
without a hit at Cleveland, September 18, 
1897. Frank Hahn, of Cincinnati (;iub, shut 
out Philadelphia team without a hit, July 
12, 1900. 

Throwing regulation ball, 134 yards 1 foot 
8 inches— Hans Wagner, Louisville Club, 
Louisville, Ky., Oct. 16, 1898. 

Longest League championship game, 20 in-' 
nings ; 7 to 7 ; Chicago vs. Cincinnati, at Cin- 
cinnati, June 30,1892. 



Fast Ocean Steamships. 

The decrease in the time consumed in cross- 
ing the Atlantic from 1819 until the present 
has been very marked, as the following will 
show : 

YEAR. VESSEL. 0, H. M. 

1819 — Savannah, N. Y. to Liverpool . 22 

1839— Great Western, Liverp'l to N.Y. 18 

1845— Britannia, Liverpool to N. Y. . 14 

1851— Persia, Liverpool to New York 9 20 ... 
1852— Baltic, Liverpool to New York 9 19 ... 
1866— Scotia. Liverpool to New York 8 2 48 
1869- C'yofBrussels,N.Y.toQueensfn7 18 2 
1873— Baltic, New York to Liverpool 7 20 9 
1875— City of Berlin, N.Y. to Liverpool 7 15 48 
1876— Germanic, Liverpool lo N. Y. . 7 11 34 
1877— Britannic, Liverp'l to New York 7 10 53 
1879— Arizona, Liverpool to New York 7 9 23 
1882— Alaska, Liverpool to New York 6 22 10 
1883— Oregon, Liverpool to New York 6 10 10 
1884— America, Liverp'l to New York 6 10 31 
1885— Etruria, Liverpool to New York 6 5 — 
1887— Umbria, Liverpool to New York 6 4 42 
1888— Etruria, Liverpool to New York 6 1 55 
1888— Etruria, Liverpool to New York 6 1 36 
1889— City of Paris, Liverpool to N.Y. 5 23 7 
1890— City of Paris, Liverpool to N.Y. 5 19 18 
1890— Teutonic, Liverpool to N. Y.;, . 5 19 5 
1891— Majestic, Liverpool to N. Y. . 5 18 8 
1891— Teutonic, Liverpool to N. Y. . 5 16 31 
1891— Teutonic, N. Y. to Queenstown 6 21 3 
1892— CityofN.Y.,N.Y.toQueenstown5 19 57 
1892— City of Paris, QueenstowntoN.Y. 5 15 58 
1892— City of Paris,QueenstowntoN.Y. 5 14 24 
1893 — Lucania, N. Y. to Queenstown . 5 13 30 
1893— Campania, Queenstown to N. Y. 5 13 13 
1893— Lucania, Queenstown to N. Y. . 5 12 54 
1893— Campania, N. Y. to Queenstown 5 12 7 
1894— Lucania, N. Y. to Queenstown .5 7 48 
1894— Lucania, Queenstown to N.Y. .5 7 23 

BETWEEN NEW YORK AND SOUTHAMPTON. 

lS99— Kaiser Wilhelm der Grosse 

(westward trip) 5 17 27 

1897— St. Paul (westward trip) .... 6 00 31 

BETWEEN NEW YORK AND PLYMOUTH. 

1900— Deutschland (westward trip . . 5 12 29 
1900-Deutschland (eastward trip) . . 5 7 38 



CricKet Records. 



The Halifax Cup. 

■ The Halifax Cup series of cricket games 
in 1900 resulted in a tie for first place be- 
tween Germantown and Merion, and by 
winning the deciding match Germantown 
retained possession of the trophy. The cup 
has been won in former years as follows : 
1880— Young America 1891— Germantown. 
1881— Xot awarded. 1892— Germantown. 



1882- Belmont. 
1883— Young America 
1884— Belmont. 
1885— Young America 
1S8() — Germantown. 
1887— Belmont. 
1888— Merion. 
1889— Germantown . 
1890— Belmont. 

The standing of the clubs for 1900 fol- 
lows : 



1 893— German town . 
1894— Belmont. 
189.5 — Germantown. 
1 S9(>— Germantown . 
1897— Germantown. 
1898— Germantown. 
1 899— Germantown. 
1900— Germantown. 



CLUBS. 


1 

a 

"i 


1 

4 

■3 


7 


i 
1 


\ 

4 
2 

U 


i 

16 
10 
9 

3- 


P 


Germantown 

Merion 

Belmont 

Philadelphia 


.640 
.588 
.562 
.125 


Lost 





The Philadelphia Cup. 

The Merion Cricket Club placed two teams 
in the field for this trophy in 1900 and won 
easily, as follows: 

Unfin- Per ct. 
Lost. Ished. won. 



Won. 

Merion 20 

Belmont 7 

Germantown ... 5 

Linden 4 

Belfield 4 

Moonstone .... 4 
Philadelphia ... 4 



Matches between Philadelphia and 
Foreign Elevens. 

1895— Team of English cricketers from Cam- 
bridge and Oxford Universities, captained 
by F. Mitchell, won at New York (twelve 
men on each side) by eight wickets, scor- 
ing 323 and 58 for three wickets against 
112 and 167. Drawn game at Toronto, 
Ont, on account of cold weather ; game 
in favor of Englishmen, 189 and 15 for 
one wicket against 137 and 86 for Canada. 
Beaten by the University of Pennsvlvania 
Eleven at ^Vissahickon Heights" by 101 
runs— 138 and 307 against 284 and 61. 
Beat an All-Philadelphia Eleven at Man- 
heim bv two wickets— 156 and 220 against 
234 and 130. Beaten by an All-Phila- 
delphia Eleven at Haverford by an in- 
ning and 39 runs— 404 against 198 and 
167. Matches played, 5; won, 2; lost 2; 
drawn, 1. 

1896— Australian team, captained by 6. H. S. 
Trott, played three games at Philadel- 
phia, winning the first by 123 runs, the 
second by an inning and "71 runs, while 
Philadelphia won the third by an in- 



ing and 60 runs. Scores: First game 
played at Manheim— Australia, 192 and 
180; Philadelphia, 123 and 126. Second 
game, played at Elmwood— Australia. 
422; Philadelphia, 144 and 207. Third 
game, played at Haverford- Philadel- 
phia, 2S2; Australia, 121 and 101. The 
Au^^tralians beat the New Jersey Ath- 
letic Club team at Bergen Point, N. J., 
by an inning and 90 runs. Score : Aus- 
tralia, 253; N. J. A. C, 28 and 126. At 
Chicago the Australians beat a team of 
fifteen by an inning and 37 runs. Score : 
Australians, 235; All-Chicago, 105 and 
93. At San Francisco, Cal., beat team 
of eighteen by an inning and 80 run<. 
Score: Australians, 193; All-California, 
43 and 70. 

7— A team of Philadelphia cricketers, cap- 
tained by George S. Patterson, visiied 
England, playing fifteen games, of which 
two were won, nine lost, while three of 
the remaining four, whicli were left un- 
finished and drawn, would doubtless 
have resulted in victories for the visitors 
had they been played out. The largest 
total in an inning credited to the Phila- 
delphia Eleven was 421, against Notting- 
hamshire, and the smallest total in an 
inning was 86, against Hampshire. 

Later in the season of 1897 an English 
Eleven, captained by P. F. Warner, vis- 
ited this country and played five games, 
winning two and losing one, while two 
ended in draws. The first game was 
played at New York against an All-New- 
York Eleven, the Englishmen winning, 
445 to 201— 196 and 249 against 78 and 123. 
In Philadelphia the Englishmen played 
three matches. The first occurred at 
Manheim against twenty-two Philadel- 
phia " colts," and resulted in a draw— de- 
cidedly in favor of the voungsters. The 
"colts" scored 149 and 240 for thirteen 
wickets, a total of 389, against 159 and 
134 for five wickets, a total of 2i»3. The 
third match, which occurred at Balti- 
more, was a draw in favor of the English- 
men, who scored 252 in their first inning, 
against 147 and 41 forfourwickets— a total 
of 188 for Baltimore. Against an All- 
Philadelphia Eleven, at Elmwood, the 
visitors were beaten by five wickets, 
Philadelphia scoring 242 and 194 for five 
wickets, a total of 436, against 63 and 372, 
a total of 434 for the English. The Brit- 
ons won the last match of the tour, 
played at Haverford against practically 
the same Philadelphia Eleven, by seven 
wickets, scoring 322 and 70 for three 
wickets (392), against 132 and 256 (388) 
for Philadelphia. 

8— P. P. Warner's team of English ama- 
teurs won at Montreal by 88 runs and at 
Toronto by an inning aiid 140 runs. In 
Philadelphia the Englishmen won the 
first match, plaved at Wissahickon, by 8 
wickets— 84 and 70 against y4 and 59; 
drew with nineteen "Colts" at Haver- 
ford, 1.33 and 3o for nine wickets against 
77 and 159, and won at Manheim by four 
wickets, scoring 133 and 161 against 143 
and 147 At Staten Island, against an All- 
New York Eleven, the Englishmen won 
by an innings and 247 runs; at Balti- 
more, against fifteen, they won by nine 



The Philadelphia Record JUmanac. 



wickets, while at Chicago the match 
ended in a draw in favor of the visitors, 
295 against 74 and 83 for seven wickets. 

1899— A teflm of Enelish amateurs captained 
by the Indian Prince, Kumar Shri Ran- 
jitsinhji, visited America late in Sep- 
tember and played five games— winning 
three, while two ended in draws, one 
very much in favor of the visitors. The 
first game wa* with twenty-two Phila- 
delphia colts at Elm wood, and was started 
the day after the Englishmen landed. 
The result was a draw. Score : Colts, 205 
and 95 for nine wickets ; Ranjitsinhji's 
team, 185. At Haverford, against an All- 
Philadelphia Eleven, Ranjitsinhji's team 
won by an inning and 173 runs. Score: 
435 to 156 and 106. At Manlieim, against 
a similar team, the Englishmen won by 
an inning and 131 runs. Score : 363 to 
85 and 147. The game in New York re- 
sulted in a draw owing to lack of time to 
finish. Score: Englishmen, 330; New 
York Fourteen, 149 and 132 for eleven 
wickets. The concluding game was 
played at Toronto against a Canadian 
Eleven, Ranjitsinhji's team winning. 
Score : 267 to 87 and 174. 

1900— An eleven from Haverford College 
visited England and played fourteen 
games, winning from Malvern, 379 to 
187 ; Cheltenham, 176 to 124, and Rugby, 
204 to 80 ; losing to Clifton, 201 to 198 ; 
Marylebone, 263 for six wickets to 176; 
Winchester 156 for six wickets to 125, iind 
Harrow, 276 for eight wickets to 129. 
Seven games were drawn, as follows : 
Haverford, 27 ; Marlborough, 222 and 167, 
for four wickets ; Haverford, 212 ; Haley- 
bury, 28, for five wickets ; Haverford, 
174, tor nine wickets: Eton, 214; Haver- 
ford, 222; Shrewsbury, 130, for four 
wickets ; Haverford, 101 and 98, for eight 
wickets; Oxford, 114 and 213; Haver- 
ford 37 and 208, for eight wickets ; Cam- 
bridge, 276. 

United States vs. Canada. 

The twenty-eighth annual game between 
representative elevens of the United States 
and Canada was played at Manheim, Phila- 
delphia, September 21 and 22, 1900, and was 
won by the United Slates team by two 
wickets, the Canadians scoring 10^ and 120 
against 119 and 124 for the United Siates. 
Twelve of these games have been played 
at Toronto, eight at Philadelphia, three at 
Hoboken and one each at New York citv, 
Ottawa, Long Branch, Hamilton and Haver- 
ford. The games were started in 1844, but 
in 1855, 1887 and 1889 the annual contest 
did not take place. In the twentv-eight 
games the teams representing the "United 
States have scored a total of 5680 runs for the 
loss of 456 wickets, while the teams repre- 
senting Canada have made a total of 5424 
runs for 520 wickets. 



Largest totals for an inning, 1094: Mel- 
bourne University eleven against Essendon, 
Melbourne, Aust., March 5, 12, 19 and 21, 
1898. 920: Orleans Club against Rickling 
Green, England, Aug. 4-5, 1882. 887: York- 
shire again.st Warwickshire, at Edgebaston, 
Eng., May 7 and 8, 1896. 845: Australian 
team against Oxford and Cambridge Past 
and Present, Portsmouth, Ens;., 1893. 801: 
Lancashire against Somerset, Taunton, Eng., 
July 16, 1895. 745 (for 4 wickets): West of 
Scotland vs. Chichester, Eng., July, 1885. 
794 (for 8 wickets): Royal Engineers, Chat- 



ham, Eng., 1875. 689 (largest in America): G. 
S. Patterson's Eleven vs. A. M. Wood's Eleven, 
August 21 and 22, 1895, Philadelj)hia. 631: 
Germaniown Eleven against Rusedale Club, 
of Toronto, Manheim grounds, Philadelphia, 
July 2 and 3, 1891. 

525 (largest inning in an international 
match): Philadelphia Eleven apainstan Aus- 
tralian team, Belmont Cricket Club grounds. 
Elm wood, Philadelphia, Sept. 29 and 30, Oct. 
2, 1893. 

Largest individual score, 485; A. E. Stod- 
dart. Hempstead, Eng., Aug. 4, 1886; 424: A. 
C. Maclaren, Lancashire Eleven against Som- 
erset, England, July 16, 1895: 417. not out 
(highest in Australia): John Worrall, Carlton 
again.st University, 1896 ; 360, not out, C. Hill, 
Adelaide, Australia, Dec. 7 and 8, 1893; 278, 
not out (highest in United States): A. M. 
Wood, playing for the Pennsylvania Rail- 
road team against Roanoke (Va.) Eleven, 
Philadelphia, July 3, 1893; 182, not out: C. S. 
Farnnm, Philadelphia, July 11, 1885; 180, not 
out: Geo. M. Newhall, Young America Club 
against Baltimore, Philadelphia, 1880. 109: 
K. J. Kev English Gentlemen Eleven, Phila- 
delphia, Sept. 24, 1886; 107: Rev. R. T. Thorn- 
ton, English Gentlemen Eleven, Philadelphia, 
September, 1885. 238. not out (highest in 
Canada): G. S. Lyon, Toronto, Ont., Aug. 24, 
1894. 

Highest aggregate in a fir.st-class match, 1402 
runs, made June 18, 19 and 20, 1891: Sussex 
and Cambridge University, Brighton, Eng. 

Greatest number of runs made by an in- 
dividual in one season, 3054 in 58 innings: 
Kumar Shri Ranjitsinhji, 1899. 

Bowling average, 20 wickets for 59 nins: E. 
Peate, Shaw's Eleven against U. S. Eifjhteen, 
at Philadelphia, 1881. Seven wickets for 13 
runs: A. E. Trott for Middlesex against York- 
shire, Leeds, Eng., Aug. 16, 1898. Nine wickets 
for 25 runs: J. B. King, All-Philadelphia 
Eleven against P. F. W arner's English team, 
Belmont Cricket Club grounds, Elmwood, 
Sept. 24 and 25, 1897. 

Throwing regulation ball, 132 yards; W. F. 
Forbes, Eton, England, March 16, 1876. 

Largest score for fall of one wi<'ket, 605: A. 
H. Trevor and G. F. Vernon, Rickling Green, 
Eng., Aug. 4-5, 1882; 554 (Brown 300, Tunni- 
cliffe 243, extras 11 , best in afirst-class match; 
Yorkshire vs. Derbyshire, Chesterfield, Der- 
byshire, Eng., Aug. 18, 19, 20, 1898. 220, 
largest in America: Joseph Hargrave and 
John Large, Philadelphia, Aug. 11, 1876. 

Largest score by two batsmen in partner- 
ship, 623: Captain Gates (313), not out, and 
Private Fitzgerald (287), not out, Curragh 
Camp, Ireland, June 12, 1895 ; 340 (largest in 
America): W. Robertson, A. B. Sheath, both 
not out, San Francisco, Julv 29, 1894; 302: H. 
Tyers (170) and R. Cobb (126) (9 extras), of 
the New Jersey Athletic Club against Eliza- 
beth Club, Bergen Point, N. J., Aug. 17, 
1893; 267: A. M. Wood (182) and G. S. Patter- 
son (132), Amateurs vs. Professionals, Phila- 
delphia, Sept. 5 and 6, 1892. 



GRAND AMERICAN I,IVE PIGEON 
SHOOTING HANDICAP. 

1893— Robert" A. Welsh. 
1894— Thomas W. Morfey. 
1895— John G. Messner. 
1896—0. R. Dickev. 
1897— Thomas A. Marshall. 
1898— E. D. Fulford. 
1899— Thomas A. Marshall. 
1900— Howard D. Bates. 



General Sports. 



TRACK AND Fi:ElvD. 

Running:. 

20 yards.— 2| seconds, E. B. Bloss (amateur), 
Boston. Mass., Feb. 22, 1892. 

40 yards. — Ig seconds (amateur), E. B. Bloss, 
Boston, Mass., Feb. 13, 1892; F. H. Bige- 
low, Worcester, Mass., March 28, 1896 ; C. 
Kensington, Boston, Mass., March 6, 1897; 
Bernard J. Wefers, Boston, Mass., Feb. 6, 
1897. (In-doors), L. W. Redpath, Boston, 
Mass., Feb. 5, 1898 ; A. F. DufFev, Boston, 
Mass., March 4, 1899, and Feb. 3, 1900 : F. 
B. Schenber, Feb. 16, 1899, and J. Corco- 
ran, South Bend, Ind., Feb. 8, 1900. 

50 yards.— 5^4 seconds, H. M. Johnson, New 
York, ^fov. 22, 1884; 5| seconds, Frede- 
rick Morris, Marietta, Ga., May 14, 1895; 
bl4 seconds, L. E. Myers (amateur), New 
York, Dec. 12, 1884; 5J seconds, E. B. Bloss 
(amateur), Boston, March 12, 1S92. 

60 yards.— 6f seconds, J. W. B. Tewksbury 
(amateur). New York City, Jan. 13, 1899 ; 
A. F. Duffey (amateur), New York City, 
Nov. 30, 1899, and March 10, 1900. 

75 y&Tds.—T^ seconds, James Quirk, Park- 
hill, Can., Oct. 30, 1888; 7§ seconds, B. J. 
Wefers (in-doors race). East Boston, Jan. 
25, 1896; 7% seconds, L. H. Gary (amateur), 
Princeton, N. J., May 9, 1891 ; F. G. Sapor- 
tas (amateur), New York, Jan. 5, 1878 ; A. 
Ing, New York, Sept. 14, 1878, and Nov. 
28, 1878 ; M. McFaul (amateur). New York, 
Jan. 5, 1879 ; H. H. Lee (amateur). New 
York, April 5, 1879; L. E. Myers (ama- 
teur). New York, Jan. 31, 1881, and J. B. 
White (amateur). New York, Mar. 16, 1883. 

100 yards.— 9f seconds, Edward Donovan, 
Natick, Mass., Sept. 2, 1895; 9| seconds, 
J. H. Rush, Chicago, 111., June 18, 1898 ; B. 
J. Wefers (amateur), Washington, D. C, 
Nov. 8,1896; H. M. Johnson, Cleveland, O., 
July 31, 1886 ; H. Bethune, Oakland, Cal., 
Feb. 22, 1888; John Owen, Jr. (amateur), 
Washington, D.C., Oct. 11, 1890; W. T.Mac- 
pherson (amateur), Auckland, New Zea- 
land, Feb. 6, 1891 ; J. H. Hampton, Can- 
terbury, Eng., Feb. 6, 1892; C. W. Stage 
(amateur), Cleveland, O., Sept. 2, 1893 ; 
John V. Crum (amateur), Chicago, 111., 
June 15, 1895 ; Bernard J. Wefers (ama- 
teur), Manhattan Field, New York, Sept. 
21. 1895; James H. Mavbury (amateur), 
Chicago, 111., June 5, 1897. 

120 vards.— 113^ seconds, George Seward, Eng- 
land, Mav 3, 1847; llg seconds, C. A. Brad- 
ley (amateur), England, Aug. 12, 1893 ; 
llf seconds, B. J. Wefers (amateur), Wor- 
cester, Mass., August 20, 1897. 

120 yards over ten hurdles, each 3 ft. 6 in. 
high.— 15J seconds, A. C. Kraenzlein, 
Chicago A. C, Chicago, 111., June 18, 
1898; 153^ seconds (in doors), A. C. Kra- 
enzlein (amateur). New York City, March 
10, 1900 ; 15| seconds (grass), A. C. Kra- 
enzlein (amateur), Stamford Bridge 
grounds, London, England, July 7, 1900. 

130 yards.— 12ig seconds, W. Johnson, Fen- 
ham Park,'Eng., Feb. 9,1867; 12i^ seconds, 
H. M. Johnson, Pittsburg, Pa., Julv 12, 
1886 ; 13 seconds, Wendell Baker (ama- 
teur), Cambridge, Mass., May 23, 1886. 

13134 yards.— 1234 seconds, Harry Hutchens, 
Sheffield, Eng., Feb. 21, 1882. 

150 yards.— 14^2 seconds, Harry Hutchens, 
Sydney, Australia, March 2, 1887; 14| sec- 
onds, B. J. Wefers (amateur), with wind 
at his back, Travers Island, New York, 



Oct. 2, 1897; 14f seconds, C. G. Wood 
(amateur), Stamford Bridge grounds, 
England, July 21, 1887; C. H. Sherrill 
(amateur). New York, May 17, 1890, and 
John Owens (amateur, twice the same 
day), Detroit, Mich., Sept. 13, 1890. 

200 yards.— 1934 seconds, George Seward, 
England, March 22, 1847; 194 seconds, 
E. H. Belling (amateur), London, Eng., 
Sept. 28, 1889; 20 seconds, Wendell Baker, 
Berkley Oval, Nov. 8, 1890. 

220 yards.— 21 seconds, B. J. Wefers (ama- 
teur), Toronto, Ont., Sept. 25, 1897; 21| 
seconds, James H. Maybury (amateur), 
Chicago, 111., June 5, 1897, around a turn ; 
21| seconds, Luther H. Cary (amateur), 
Berkley Oval, May 30, 1891 ; J. V. Crum 
(amateur), circular track, Chicago, 111., 
Aug. 30, 1895; C. G. Wood (amateur), 
London, June 25 and July 22, 1887; H. 
Hutchens, London, May 11, 1885. 

220 yards, over ten hurdles, each 2 ft. 6 in. 
high, 24g seconds (with wind), J. L. 
Bremer (amateur). New York, May 25, 
1895; 24f seconds, J. P. Lee (amateur), 
Cambridge, Mass., May 22, 1891 ; 25 sec- 
onds. A. C. Kraenzlein (amateur). New 
York, Aug. 28, 1897; 251 seconds, F. C. 
Puffer (amateur), circular track, Wor- 
cester, Mass., Oct. 8, 1892. 

250 yards.— 24f seconds, W. T. ]\Iacpherson 
(amateur), Auckland, New Zealand, Feb. 
7, 1891 ; 2534 seconds, Harry Hutchens, 
Botany, Australia, Jan. 24, 1887 : 25| sec- 
onds, C. H. Sherrill, Jr. (amateur). New 
Haven, Conn., June 15, 1888. 

300 yards.— 30 seconds, Harry Hutchens, Ed- 
inburgh, Scotland, Jan. 2, 1884 ; 30f sec- 
onds, B. J. Wefers (amateur), Washing- 
ton, D. C, Nov. 8, 1896 ; 31j seconds, A. R. 
Downer, Glasgow, Scotland, June 10, 1895. 

350 vards, straightaway.— 36| seconds, M. W. 
Long, New York Athletic Club, Gutten- 
burg race track, October 4, 1900. 

One-fifth of a mile over 10 hurdles, 2 ft. 6 in. 
high. — 44J seconds, F. C. Puffer (amateur), 
Travers Island, N. Y., Sept. 22, 1894. 

400 yards, straightaway.— 42i seconds, M. W. 
Long, New York Athletic Club, Gutten- 
burg race track, October 4, 1900; 43 sec- 
onds, W. C. Downs (amateur, on a 
straight track), Boston, Mass., July 9, 
1890 ; 43? seconds, H. C. L. Tindall (ama- 
teur), London, June 29, 1889. 

Quarter mile.— 47 seconds, straightaway. 
Maxwell W. Long (amateur), Guten- 
burg, N. J., Oct. 4, 1900; 47% seconds, 
straightaway, W. Baker (amateur), Bos- 
ton, Mass., July 1, 1886; 47f seconds, cir- 
cular track, Maxwell W. Long (ama- 
teur), Travers Island, Sept., 28, 1900; 483i 
seconds, Richard Buttery (professional), 
England, Oct. 4, 1873. 

Quarter mile, over ten hurdles, each 2 ft. 
6 in. high.— 56| seconds, Jerome Buck, 
New York City, Sept. 19, 1896j 57| sec- 
onds, P. J. Finneran, Cambridge, Slass., 
Oct. 16, 1891. 

600 yards.— 1.11, Thomas E. Burke (amateur), 
Columbia Oval, N. Y., Sept. 19, 1896. 

Half mile.— 1.531, Charles J. Kilpatrick (ama- 
teur), Manhattan Field, New York, Sept. 
21, 1895 ; 1.5334, Frank Hewitt, Australia, 
Sept. 21, 1871 ; l.Mg, F. J. K. Cross (ama- 
teur), Oxford, Eng., March 9, 1888. 

1000 yards.— 2.13, L. E. Myers (amateur). New 
York, Oct. 8, 1881. 



The Philadelphia Record JUmanac. 



% ipile.— 3.02f , Thomas P. ConneflF (amateur), 
New York, Aug. 21, 1895. 

1 mile. — 4.12%, W. G. George, London, Eng., 

Aug. 23, 1886 ; 4.15J, G. E. Tincler, beating 
T. P. Conneff, Worcester, Mass., Aug. 21, 
1897; 4.151, T. P. Connefif (amateur). New 
York, Aug. 28, 1895. 

1)4 miles.— 5.30, W. Lang, Manchester, Eng., 
July 18, 1863 ; 5.38|, Thomas P. Conneff 
(amateur), Bergen Point, N. J., Sept. 2,1895. 

1>^ miles.— 6.42>^, H. R. Barrett, Sidney, 
N. S. W., Oct. 5, 1896; 6.46|, Thomas P. 
Conneff (amateur), Bergen Point, N. J., 
Sept. 2, 1895 ; 6.43%, W. Cummings, Pres- 
ton, Eng., April 17, 1880; 6.53g, Sidney 
Thomas (amateur), Stamford Bridge, 
London, Eng., May 13, 1893. 

2 miles.— 9.111^, Wm. Lang, England, Aug. 1, 

1863 ; 9.17t, W. G. George (amateur), Lou- 
don, April 26, 1884; 9.32i, W. D. Day 
(amateur), New York, May 17, 1890. 

3 miles. — 14.193/2' P- Cannon, Govan, Scotland, 

May 14, 1888 ; 14.24, Sidney Thomas (ama- 
teur), England, June 3, 1893 ; 14.39, W. D. 
Day (amateur), Bergen Point, N. J., May 
30, 1890 ; Jas.Grant (professional). Holmes- 
field, Cambridge, Mass., Aug. 20, 1890. 

4 miles.— 19.25|, P. Cannon, Glasgow, Scot- 

land, Nov. 8, 1888; 19.33t, C. E. Willers, 
England, June 10, 1893 ; 20.12 1^, J. Grr.nt, 
Cambridge, Mass., Aug. 20, 1890; 20.15^, 
W. D. Day (amateur), Bergen Point, N. J., 
Nov. 16, 1889. 

5 miles.— 24.40, J. White, England, May 11, 

1863 ; 24.53g, Sid Thomas (amateur), Rom- 
ford, Eng., Sept. 24, 1892; 25.03, W. H. 
Morton (amateur), Dublin, Ireland, May 
7, 1892 ; 25.2234, James Grant, Cambridge, 
Mass., Aug. 20, 1890 ; 25.23?, E. C. Carter 
(amateur). New York, Sept. 17, 1887. 

10 miles.— 51.0.5^, Harry Watkins (against 
time), Richdale, Eng., Sept. 16, 1899; 
51.06|, William Cummings (professional), 
London, Eng., Sept. 18, 1885; 51.51, Sid 
Thomas (amateur), London, Eng., Oct. 
22, 1892; 52.38i W. D. Day (amateur). 
West New Brighton, S. L, Oct. 26, 1889. 

15 miles.— 1.22.00, J. Hewitt, England, March 
22, 1852 ; 1.22.15|, Sid Thomas (amateur), 
London, Eng., April 11, 1892; 1.26.593^, 
C. Price, New York, May 28, 1881 ; 1.27.11g, 
Sidney Thomas (amateur). New York, 
Nov. 30, 1889. 

20 miles.— 1.51.54, G. Crossland (amateur), 
Stamford Bridge, London, Eng., Sept. 22, 
1894 ; 1.54, Patrick Byrnes, Halifax, N. S., 
Oct. 4, 1879; 2.13.05, J. Gassman, Brooklyn, 
N.Y.,Feb.22,1884. 

25 miles.— 2.30.10 (road race), M. Champion, 
France, June 26, 1898 : 2.33.44, G. A. Dun- 
ning (amateur), London, Dec. 26, 1881 ; 
2.36.34, G. Mason, England, March 14, 
1881 ; 2.41.32, P. Hagelman, Philadelphia, 
March 5, 1887 ; 2.52.24, J. Gassman (ama- 
teur), Brooklyn, N. Y., Feb. 22, 1884. 

30 miles.— 3.15.09, G. Mason, England, March 
14, 1881 ; 3.17.363^, J. A. Squires (amateur), 
London, Mav 2, 1885; 3.28.42, D. Donovan, 
Providence, R. I., Aug. 6, 1880; 3.36.03>^, 
J. Gassman (amateur), Brooklyn, N. YT, 
Feb. 22, 1884. 

40 miles.— 4.34.27, James Bailey, England, 
March 14, 1881; 4.46.54, J. E. DJxon (ama- 
teur), Birmingham, Eng., Dec. 29,1884; 
5.20.30, W. C. Davies (amateur), New 
York, Feb. 21, 1882. 

50 miles.— 5.55.043^, George Cartwright, Lon- 
don, Feb. 21, 1887.; 6.18.26^ J. E. Dixon 
(amateur), London, April 11, 1885; 6.19, 
Dennis Donovan, Providence, R. I., Aug. 



6, 1880; 7.29.47, Peter Golden (amateur), 
Brooklyn, N. Y., Feb. 22, 1883. 

75 miles.— 9.48.30, George Littlewood, Lon- 
don, Eng., Nov. 24, 1884; 10.57.33, W. C. 
Davies (amateur), London, Sept. 9, 1890 ; 
12.20.10, J. Saunders (amateur), New York, 
Feb. 21 and 22, 1882. 

100 miles.— 13.26.30, Chas. Rowell, New York, 
Feb. 27, 1882 ; 17.36.14, J. Saunders (ama- 
teur). New Y'ork, Feb. 21 and 22, 1882. 

1 hour.— 11 miles, 1286 yards, Harrv Watkins, 
Rochdale Track, England, Sept. 16, 1899 ; 
11 miles, 970 yards, L. Bennett (Deerfoot), 
England, April 3, 1863. 

Record Holders by Hours.— George Lit- 
tlewood, from 1 to 3 hours and from 127 
to 142 hours, having covered 623 miles 
1320 yards in 142 hours. George Hazael, 
from 4 to 9 hours— 68 m. 880 yds. ; 99 
hours— 450 m. 1540 yds. ; 123 to 126 hours 
—560 m. 170 vds. Charles Rowell, from 
10 to 25 hours- 150 m. 395 yds. ; from 27 
to 78 hours— 374 m. 175 yds., and for 80 
hours— 381 m. 1100 vds. John Hughes, 
26 hours- 153 m. 880 vds. James Albert, 
from 80 to 98 hours— 450 m. 220 yds.; for 
110 hours— 501 m. 880 vds.; from 112 to 
113 hours— 514 m. 880 yds., and from 117 
to 122 hours- 545 m. P. Fitzgerald, from 
100 to 109 hours— 498 m. 660 yds. ; 111 to 
112 hours— 510 m., and from 114 to 116 
hours— 528 m. 660 yds. 

Walking. 

i mile.— 1.07, F. P. Murray (amateur). New 

York, Oct. 27, 1883. 
% mile.— 1.23, H. L. Curtis (amateur). New 

York, Sept. 19, 1891. 
yi mile.— 3.02|, F. P. Murray (amateur). New 

York, Oct. 22, 1883. 
i mile.— 5.10i, F. P. Murray (amateur). New 

Yfirk, Oct. 27, 1883. 

1 mile.— 6.23, W. Perkins, Loud .i, Eng., June 

1, 1874; 6.29§, Frank P. Murray (amateur). 

New York, Oct. 27, 1883. 
134 miles.— 8.05, J- W. Raby, London, Aug. 20, 

1883. 
IVo miles.— 9.47J^, J. W. Raby, London, Aug. 

20, 1883. 

2 miles.— 13.14, J. W. Raby, London, Eng,, 

Aug. 20, 1883 ; 13.33, W. J. Sturgess (ama- 
teur), England, 1896 ; 13.48§, F. P. Murray 
(amateuri, Williamsburg, L. I., May 30, 
1884. 

3 miles.— 20.213^, J. W. Raby, England, Aug. 

20, 1883 ; 21.09J, F. P. Murray (amateur), 
New York, Nov. 6, 1883. 

4 miles.— 27.38, J. W. Raby, England, Aug. 20, 

1883 ; 28.423^, John Meagher, New York, 
Nov. 29, 1882; 29.40|, T. H. Armstrong 
(amateur). New York, Nov. 6, 1887. 

5 miles.— 35.10, J. W. Raby, London, Eng., 

Aug. 20, 1883; 36.08, John Meagher, New 
York, Nov. 29, 1882 ; 38.005^, W. H. Purdv 
(amateur). New York, May 22, 1880. 

10 miles.— 1.14.45, J. W. Raby, London, Eng., 
Dec. 3, 1883 ; 1.17.38|, W. J. Sturgess (ama- 
teur), Stamford Bridge, England, Oct. 3, 
1896 ; 1.17.40%, E. E. INIerrill (amateur), 
Boston, Mass., Oct. 5, 1880. 

15 miles.— 1.55.56, J. W. Raby, England, Dec. 
3, 1883. 

20 miles.— 2.39.57, W. Perkins, England, July 
16, 1877. 

25 miles.— 3.35.14, W. Franks, England, Aug. 
28, 1882. 

50 miles.— 7.54.16, J. Hibberd, Loudon, Eng., 
July 14, 1888. 

100 miles.— 18.08.15, William Howes, London, 
May 15, 1880. 



150 miles.— 30.36.28, George Littlewood, Eng- 
land, March, 1882. 

200 miles.— 40.46.30, George Littlewood, Eng- 
land, March, 1882. 

400 miles.— 96.51.03, George Littlewood, Eng- 
land, March, 1882. 

500 miles.— 130.34.50, George Littlewood, Shef- 
field, Eng., March 7 to 11, 1882. 

1 hour.— 8 miles, 302 yards, John Meagher, 

New York, Nov. 29, 1882. 

2 hours.— 15 miles, 824 yards, Wm. Perkins, 

London, Eng., July 16, 1877. 

3 hours.— 22 miles, 456V^ yards, H. Thatcher, 

London, Eng., Feb. 20, 1882. 

4 hours.— 27 miles, 440 yards, W. Franks, Lon- 

don, Eng., Aug. 28, 1882.. 

24 hours.- 127 miles, 1210 yards, Wm. Howes, 
London, Eng., Feb. 23, 1878. 

139)^ hours.— 631 miles 677 yards, Geo. Little- 
wood, Sheffield, Eng., March 6 to 11, 
1882. 

Greatest distance walked without rest. 122 
miles, 25 hours, 58 minutes, Chas. A Har- 
riman, Truckee, Cal., April 6 to 7, 1883. 

Greatest distance walked in 72 hours (12 hours 
each day), 363 miles, C. Faber, Pittsburg, 
Pa., June 28 to July 3, 1880. 

6000 quarter-miles in as many consecutive 
periods of 10 minutes each, W. Gale, New 
York, June 28 to Aug. 8, 1881. 

5000 miles in 100 days, Sundays excluded, 50 
miles daily, 1699^^ miles on high roads, 
and 3300^^ miles in halls and inclosures, 
Edward Payson Weston, England, Nov. 
21, 1883, to March 15, 1884. 

Jumping. 

Running Bro.vd Jump.— 24 ft. 1}^ in. (favored 
by the wind), Mever Prinstein (amateur), 
Franklin Field, Philadelphia, April 28, 
1900 ; 24 ft. 4>-2 in., A. C. Kraenzleiu (ama- 
teur), University of Pennsylvania, Man- 
hattan leld, New York city, Mav 26, 
1899; 24 it. 3^ in., J. M. Newburn (ama- 
teur), Dublin, July 16. 18'.)8 ; 23 ft. 8% in., 
Meyer Prinstein, Syracuse University, 
Travers Island, N. Y., June 11, 1898; 23 
ft. 8 in., J. J. Mooney (amateur), Mit- 
chellstown, Ireland, Aug. 29, 1894; 23 ft. 
71^ in., M. M. Roseingrave, Sydney, N. S. 
W., Oct. 5, 1896; 23 ft. 6% in., C. S. Reber 
(amateur), Detroit, July 4, 1891; €. B. 
Fry (amateur), England, March 4, 1893 ; 
P. Remington, University of Pennsyl- 
vania, Philadelphia, May 21, 1898* with 
weights, 29 ft. 7 in., John Howard, with 
5-lb. dumb-bells, England, 1854; 23 ft. 
3% in., Charles Biggar, Guelph, Ont., 
Oct. 13, 1879. 

Standing Long Jump.— With 22-lb. weights, 
14 ft. 53^ in., G. W. Hamilton, Romeo, 
Mich., Oct. 3, 1879; with 16- lb. dumb- 
bells, 12 ft. 9>^ in., Louis Helwig (ama- 
teur), Brooklyn, Nov. 20, 1884 ; without 
weights, 12 ft. 1^ in., J. Darby, Dudlev, 
Eng., May 28, 1890; 11 ft. 3 'in., R. 0. 
Ewry, Syracuse, N. Y., April 27, 1900. 

Running High Jump.— Without weights, 
6 ft. 5% in., M. F. Sweeney (amateur), 
Manhattan Field, New York city, Sept. 
21, 1895 : 6 ft. 4 in., William Byrd Page 
(amateur), Philadelphia. Oct. 7, 1887; 6 
ft. 33^ in., Wm. Bvrd Page, Stourbridge, 
Eng., Aug. 15, 1887; with 12-lb. weights, 
6 ft. 63^ in., R. W. Baker, Cambridge, 
Mass., Aug. 31, 1895. 

Three Standing Jumps.— With weights, 41 
ft. 7 in., J. Darby, London, Eng,, Oct. 14, 
1888; 41 ft. 2 in., P. J. Griffin, Hartford, 
Conn., Sept. 8, 1896; 35 ft. 9 in., W. S. 



Lawton (amateur), San Francisco, CaL, 
May 13, 1876; without weights, 38 ft., J. 
Chandler, Bansha, Ireland, Sept. 26, 1897; 
34 ft. 6 in., B. Doughertv (in-doors), Bos- 
ton, Ma-^s., Feb. 10, 1894; 34 ft. 4)^ in., M. 
W. Ford (amateur), Brooklyn, N. Y., 
April 10, 1885. 

Pole Vaulting for Height.— 11 ft. 10>^ in., 
R. G. Clapp, N. Y. A. C, Chicago, 111., 
June 18, 1898; 11 ft. 7 in., E. L. Stones 
(amateur), Southport, Eng., June 2, 1888; 
11 ft. 5% in., W. S. Rodenbaugh (ama- 
teur), Philadelphia, Sept. 17, 1892. Pole 
vaulting for distance, 27 ft. 5 in., A. H. 
Green (amateur), Chicago, 111., Sept. 16, 
1893. 

Standing High Jump.— With weights, 5 ft. 
8^4 in., T. F. Kearney, Oak Island, Mass., 
July 25, 1S89 ; without weights, 5 ft. 5 
in., RajTtiond C. Ewrj% Paris, France, 
Julv 10), 1900 ; 5 ft. 4 in., R. C. Ewry (ama- 
teur), Syracuse, N. Y., April 27, 1900. 

Standing Hop, Step and Juthp.- With 15-lb. 
weights, 37 ft. 13^ in., John F. Hartnett, 
Lawrence, Mass., May 11, 1889 ; without 
weights, 35 ft. 6 in., J. Courtney (ama- 
teur), Dublin, Ireland, Aug., 1898; 31 ft. 10 
in., M. W. Ford (amateur), Brooklvn, N. 
Y., July 26, 1886; 30 ft. 3 in. (in-doors), 
John Cosgrove, Albany, N. Y., 1894. 

Running Hop, Step and Jump.— 49 ft. 234 in., 
W. McManus, Svdney, N. S. W., Feb., 
1893; 48 ft. 8 in., Thomas Burrows, Wor- 
cester, Mass., Oct. 18, 1884, 48 ft. 6 in., E. 
B. Bloss (amateur), Chicago, 111., Sept. 
16, 1893; 48 ft. 3 in., John Purcell (ama- 
teur), Limerick, Ireland, June 9, 1887. 

Hitch and Kick.— 9 ft. 2 in., M. F. Sweeney, 
Ambrose Park, Brooklyn, Sept. 5, 1898. 
9 ft. 1 in., C. D. Wilbur (amateur), An- 
napolis, Md., June 6, 1888, and E. W. Golf, 
Albanv, N! Y., April 22, 1892. 

Running High Kick.— 9 ft. 8 in., C. C. Lee 
(amateur). New Haven, Conn., March 19, 
1887. 

Feats of Strength. 

Throwing 56-lb. ^^'EIGHT.— From a 7-foot 
circle. 35 ft. 10' ^ in., J. S. Mitchell (ama- 
teur), Bergen Point, N. J., Sept. 2, 1895 ; 
with unlimited run and follow, 38 ft. 1 
in., T. F. Kiely, Cork Park, Ireland, Aug. 
13, 1898 ; 36 ft. 6 in.. J. S. Mitchell, Phila- 
delphia, Oct. 25, 1888 ; between legs, with- 
out follow, 26 ft. 83^ in., J. Delaney, 
Cork Park, Ireland, Aug. 13, 1898. For 
height, 15 ft. 6% in., James S. Mitchell, 
Bayonne, N. J., Sept. 6, 1897. 

Putting the Shot.— 24 lbs., 33 ft. 11% in., G. 
R. Gray, Boston, Mass., April 12, 1890 ; 16 
lbs., 47 ft. 1 in., Dennis Horgan, Gla.«gow, 
Scotland, Aug. 12, 1899 ; 47 ft., G. R. Gray, 
Chicago, 111., Sept. 16, 1893. 

Hammer-Throwing.— 21-lb. hammer, 90 ft. 3 
in., C. A. J. Queckberner, Staten Island, 
Nov. 17, 1888. 112 ft. 134 in. (reported), T. 
Carroll, San Francisco, Cal., July 21, 1897. 
16-lb. hammer (including head and 
handle), handle 4 ft. long, thrown from 
a 7-foot circle, 169 ft. 4 in., John Flanagan, 
N. Y. A. C, Travers Island, N. ¥., Sept. 29, 
1900. With one hand, 7-foot circle, 121 
ft. 1134 in., W. L. Condon, Elkton, Md., 
Oct. 10, 1889. 

14-lb. hammer (exclusive of handle), 
total length 4 ft., thrown from a stand 
with two hands, 115 ft. 4 in., W. L. Cou- 
don. Wilmington, Del., May 10, 1888. 

12-lb. hammer (exclusive of handle), 
total length 4 ft., thrown from a 7-foot 
circle with two hands, without follow. 



The Philadelphia Record Jilmanac. 



184 ft. 1 in., Dewittr (amateur), Pottstown, 
Pa., May 20, 1900; 183 ft. 6 in., Thomas 
Carroll. Sacramento, Cal., July 10, 1890 ; 
from a 7-foot circle with one hand, with- 
out follow, 164 ft. 2 in., W. L. Coudon. 
Elkton, Md., Nov. 5,1892; from a stand 
with one hand, 124 ft. 11 in., W. L. Cou- 
don, Wilmington, Del., May 10, 1888. 

10-lb. hammer, from 7-foot circle, one 
hand, 134 ft. 7 in., VV. L. Coudon (ama- 
teur), Wilmington, Del., May 10, 1888. 

8-lb. hammer (handle included), 7-ft. 
circle, one hand, 210 ft. 3 in., W. L. Cou- 
don, Elkton, Md., Nov. 5, 1892. 

Dumb-Bells.— 10-lb. bell, put up 8431 times 
in 4 h. 34 min., H. Pennock, New York, 
Dec. 13, 1870 ; 12-lb. bell put up 14,000 
times, one hand, shoulder to arm's length 
above shoulder, A. Corcoran, Chicago, 
111., Oct. 4, 1873; 100-lb. bell, put up 20 
times, one hand, shoulder to arm's length 
above shoulder, G.M.Robinson, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal., Nov. 25, 1875; 201-lb 5-oz. bell, 
using both hands to raise to shoulder, 
then put up with one hand, R. A. Pen- 
nell, New York, Jan. 31, 1874; 250-lb. 
bell, using both hands to raise to shoul- 
der, then pushing up with one hand, 
Eugene Sandow, London, Feb. 11, 1891. 

Club Swinging.— Thomas Burrows, of the 
English army, swung a pair of two-pound 
clubs, 24 inches long, without a mo- 
ment's rest, 30 hours, London, Eng., May 
25, 1897 ; Homer W. Crawford swung a 
pair of Indian clubs weighing 10 pounds, 
7 hours. New Lisbon, 0., March 12, 1891. 

Discus Throwing.— 4| lbs. 119 ft. 414 in., 
Bauer Hungary (amateur), Paris, France, 
July 15, 1900. 

Weight-lifting. 

56-lb. weight raised with middle finger of 
each hand to shoulder, then pushed up 
to arm's length above shoulder with 
either hand six times, W. Prance, Lon- 
don, Eng., Feb. 27, 1892. 

242>^-lb. man, seated in 10-lb. chair, with 
dumbbell weighing 25}-^ lbs. in his lap— 
a total weight of 278 lbs.— lifted with one 
hand and placed on a platform raised 
183^ in. from the floor, Wm. Kennedy, 
Housatonic, Mass., April 28, 1892. 

512 lbs., dead weight, lifted with one finger, 
unprotected, William Conture, Howard 
Hall, Allston, Mass., Feb. 12, 1894. 

560 lbs. lifted clear off the floor with one 
finger unprotected, without artificial aid, 
Charles Hanson, Minneapolis, Minn., 
March 6, 1900. 

987 lbs. lifted clear off the floor with one 
hand, without help of knees or artificial 
aid, Louis Cyr, Chicago, 111., May 7, 1896. 

144214 lbs., David L. Dowd, Springfield, 
Mass., March 27, 1883. 

1571Ji lbs., Charles G. Jefferson (amateur), 
Clinton, Mass., Dec. 10, 1890. 

1897K lbs. lifted clear off the floor with both 
hands, without help of knees or artificial 
aid, Louis Cyr, Chicago, 111., May 7, 1896. 

3239 lbs., with harness, W. B. Curtis, New 
York, Dec. 20, 1868. 

3242 lbs., with harness, J. W. Kennedy, Lynn, 
April 2, 1892. 

4300 lbs., live weight, raised by Louis Cyr, 
pushing up with back, arms and legs un- 
til the platform was lifted clear of its 
trestles, Boston, Mass., May 27, 1895. 



C. 0. Breed lifted, with one hand, from the 
floor a barrel of flour weighing, with fix- 
tures, 2193^ lbs., 240 times in one minute, 
Lynn, Mas's., Dec. 13, 1884. 
Intercollegiate Athletic Champions. 
The University of Pennsylvania scored 
most points at the Intercollegiate Athletic 
Championships of 1897, 1898, 1899 and 19U0. 

The winners of the various events since 
1892 are as follows : 

3^-mLE RUN. 
DATE NAME AND COLLEGE. JJ'"^ 

1892— W. H. Wright. Harvard 503 

1893— L. Sayer, Harvard 50| 

1894— S. M. Merrill, Harvard 50| 

1895-W. H. Vincent, Harvard 50| 

1896— T. E. Burke, Boston University . . .5i I 
1897— T. E. Burke, Boston University . . .5( I 

1898— F.W. Jarvis, Princeton 50J 

1899— M. W. Long, Columbia 49§ 

1900— D. Boerdman, Yale 49f 

3^-Mn,E RUN. 

1892— T. B. Turner, Princeton 1.594 

1893— T. Corbin, Harvard l.,59| 

1894— C. Kilpatrick, Union 1.59i 

1895— E. Hollister, Harvard 2.00 

1896— E. Hollister, Harvard 1.56| 

1897— E. Hollister, Harvard 1.58i 

1898— John F. Cregan, Princeton . . . 1.5.4 

1899— E. T. Burke, Harvard 1.58| 

1900— J. M. Perry, Princeton 2.03| 

1-MILE RUN. 

1892— G. Lowell, Harvard 4.33j 

1893— G. 0. Jarvis, Wesleyan 4. 

1894— G. O. Jarvis, Wesleyan 4. 

1895— G. W. Orton, U. of Pa 4.23! 

1896-G. O. Jarvis, U. of Pa 4.28* 

1897— G. W. Orton, U. of Pa 4.26 

1898— John F Cregan, Princeton .... 4.23| 
1899— John F. Cregan, Princeton . . . . 4.25| 
1900— John F. Cregan, Princeton .... 4.24| 

100-VARD RUN. 

1892— W. Swayne, Y'ale lOi 

1893— W. Richards, Y'ale lol 

1894— E. S. Ramsdell, U. of Pa 10 

189.5— J. V. Crum, U. of Iowa 10 

1896— B. J. Wefers, Georgetown 094 

1897— B. J. Wefers, Georgetown 10» 

1898— J. W. B. Tewkesbury, U. of Pa . . .10 
1899— J. W. B. Tewkesbury, U. of Pa . . .10 
1900— A. C. Kraenzlein, U. of Pa lOJ 

3^-MILE RUISt 

1892— W. Swayne, Yale 22 

189:3— W. Richards, Yale 22J 

1894-E. S. Ramsdell, U. of Pa 22 

1895— J. V. Crum, U. of Iowa 22 

1896— B. J. Wefers, Georgetown 21i 

1897— J. H. Colfelt, Princeton 22* 

1898— J. W. B. Tewkesbury, U. of Pa . . .2n 
1899— J. W. B. Tewkesbury, U. of Pa . . .2ll 
1900— E. W. Jarvis, Princeton 22i 

120 YARDS OVER TEN HURDLES. 

1892— H. T. Harding, Columbia 16 

1893— McL. Van Ingen, Y'ale 161 

1894— E. H. Cadv, Y'ale 16 

189.5— S. Chase, Dartmouth 1,5* 

1896— E. C. Perkins, Yale 164 

1897— E. C. Perkins, Yale 16 

1898— A. C. Kraenzlein, U. of Pa. . . .15# 

1899— A. C. Kraenzlein, U. of Pa 15| 

1900— A. C. Kraenzlein, U. of Pa 15§ 

1-MILE WALK. 

1892— A. F. Borcherling, Princeton . . . 6.52f 

1893— C. A. Ottley, Princeton 6.57§ 

1894— H. F. Houghton, Amherst .... 7.141 

1895— F. C. Than, Yale 7.03g 

1896-F. C. Than, Yale 6.54J 



The Philadelphia Record JUmanac. 



1897— W. B. Fetterman, U. of Pa . . . . 6.55| 
1898— W. B. Fetterman, U. of Pa 6.45J 

220 YARDS, HURDLE. 

1892— G. R. Fearing, Harvard 25| 

1893— McL. Van Ingen, Yale 25| 

1894— J. L. Bremer, Harvard 25^ 

1895— J. L. Bremer, Harvard 2o^ 

189&— J. L. Bremer, Harvard 25 

1897— E. C. Perkins, Yale 25| 

1898— A. C. Kraenzlein, U. of Pa 2:'.g 

1899— A. C. Kraenzlein, U. of Pa 23t 

1900— A. C. Kraenzlein, U. of Pa 25J 

RUNNING LONG JUMP. 

1892— E. B. Bloss, Harvard . . 22 ft. Ol^X in. 
1893— E. B. Bloss, Harvard . . 22 ft. 0951 in. 
1894— E. S. Ramsdell, V. of Pa. 22 ft. 01 in. 
1895— L. P. Sheldon, Yale ... 22 ft. 08% in. 
1896— L. P. Sheldon, Y'ale . . . 22 ft. 03>| in. 
1897— P. J. Remington, U. of Pa. 22 ft. 04% in. 
1898— M. Prinstein, Syracuse. . 23 ft. 07% in. 
1899— A. C. Kraenzlein, U. of Pa. 24 ft. 043^ in. 
1900— M. Prinstein, Syracuse . . 23 ft. 08 in. 

RUNNING HIGH JUMP. 

1892— C. R. Fearing, Harvard . 6 ft. 00>< in. 

1893— C. R. Fearing, Harvard . 5 ft. Iff^ in. 

1894— C. J. Paine, Jr., Harvard . 5 ft. \QV„ in. 

1895— N. T. Leslie, U. of Pa. . 5 ft. ml in. 

189&— J. D. Winsor, U. of Pa. . 6 ft. 01 in. 

1897— J. D. Winsor, U. of Pa. . 6 ft. 01 in. 

1898— C. W. Powell, Cornell . . 5 ft. 11>^ in. 

1899—1. K. Baxter, U. of Pa. . . 6 ft. 02 in. 

1900— S. S. Jones, N. Y. Univ. . . 5 ft. 10>^ in. 

PUTTING THE 16-POUND SHOT, 7-FEET RUN. 

1892— S. H. Evans, Harvard . . 39 ft. 09 in. 

1893— W. O. Hikok, Yale ... 41 ft. 00% in. 

1894— W. O. Hikok, Yale ... 42 ft. 00 in. 

1895— W. O. Hikok, Yale . . . 42 ft. llj^in. 

1896— L. P. Sheldon, Yale ... 42 ft. 0Z% in. 

1897— R. Garret, Princeton . . 41 ft. 10% in. 

1898— J. G Mccracken, U. of Pa. 43 ft. 08)| in. 

1899— J. C. McCracken, U. of Pa. 42 ft. 00% in 

1900-F. BecL-, Y'ale 44 ft. 03 in. 

POLE VAULTING. 

1892—0. G. Cartwright, Yale . 10 ft. 05% in. 

1893— C. T. Buckholz, U. of Pa. 10 ft. 10% in. 

1894— M. S. Ker-shaw, Yale . . 10 ft. 09 in. 

1895— C. T. Buckholz, U. of Pa. 11 ft. 02% in. 

1896— F. W. Allis, Yale .... 11 ft. 01% in. 

1897— B. Johnson, Yale .... 11 ft. 03J^ in. 

1898— W. W. Hoyt, Harvard . . 11 ft. 04% in. 

1899— R. G. Clapp, Yale .... 11 ft. 05 in. 

1900— B. Johnson, Yale .... 11 ft. 03% in. 

THROWING 16-POUND HAMMER, STANDING. 

1892— S. H. Evins, Harvard . . 104 ft. 00% in. 
1893— W. O. Hikok, Yale ... 110 ft. 04% in. 
1894— *W. O. Hikok, Yale . . .123 ft. 09 in. 
1895— *W. O. Hikok, Yale ... 135 ft. 07% in. 
1896— *C. Chadwick, Yale . . . 132 ft. 06% in, 
1897— *W. G.Woodruff, U. of Pa. 136 ft. 03 in. 
1898— J. C. McCracken, U. of Pa. 149 ft. 05 in. 
1899— J. C. McCracken, U. of Pa. 144 ft. 01 in. 
1900— A. Plow, U. of California 154 ft. 04% iu. 

»With seven-foot run. 
2-MILE RUN. 

1899— Alexander Grant, U. of Pa ... 10.03| 
1900— Alexander Grant, U. of Pa . . . 9.51f 

Individual Championships. 

AMATEUR ATHLETIC UNION CHAMPIONS. 



Malcolm W. Ford . . . -^ 
Malcolm W. Ford ... 45 

A. A. Jordan 36 

Malcolm W. Ford ... 26 
Malcolm W. Ford ... 30 

A. A. Jordan 41 

A. A. Jordan 80 



YEAR. . 

1892. . 


. . M. O'Sullivan . . 


. . .45 


1893 . . 


. . E. W. Goflf .... 


. . *4860 


1894. . 


. . E. W. Goflf .... 


. . 5748 


1895 . . 


. . J. Cosgrove .... 


. . 4406 


1896. . 


. . L. P. Sheldon . . . 


. . 5380 


1897 . . 


. . E. H. Clark .... 


. . 6244% 


1898 . . 


. E. C. White 


. . 5243 


1899 


. . J. Fred Powers . . 


. . 6203 


1900. . 


. . Harrj' Gill 

• New style of count. 


. . 6360% 



Swimming. 

25 yards— America— Straightaway, still 
water, 12f seconds, H. A. Widemann, Lur- 
line Baths, San Francisco, Cal., July 15, 
1898. 60 yards, on the back (bath), one 
turn, 36J seconds, E. Carroll Schaeffer, 
New York city, March 14, 1900. Eng- 
land— 24% yards, straightaway, still 
water, 14% seconds, W. Henry, Marvle- 
bone Baths, Oct. 2, 1883. Australia— 33 
yards 4% inches, straightaway, still 
water, 18 seconds, J. H. Hellings, Sydney 
Natatorium, Feb. 19, 1895. 

50 yards — America — Straightaway, open 
water, 314 seconds, W. B. Izard, Annapo 
polls, Md., May 20, 1893. Bath— \\ith 
two turns, still water, 28J, H. A. Wide- 
mann, San Francisco, Cal., Lurline Baths, 
July 9, 1898. England— With one turn, 
still water, 26f , J. H. Derbyshire, Exeter 
Baths, Aug. 20, 1898. Australia— 66 yards 
9 inches, one turn, still water, 36|, J. H. 
Hellings, Sydney Katatorium, New South 
M'ales, Feb. 16, 1895. 

75 yards— America— Straightaway, still water, 
52| seconds, W. C. Johnson, Cropsy Villa, 
L. I., Aug. 10, 1890, Gravesend Bav. 
Bath— With three turns, still water, 42, 
H. A. Widemann, Lurline Baths, San 
Francisco, Cal., July 6, 1898. England— 
80 yards, with one turn, still water, 52, 
W. Knowles, Lambeth Baths, London, 
Oct. 7, 1889. Australia— 77 yards 1 foot 
9 inches, with two turns, 48, J. H. Hel- 
lings, Sydney Natatorium, May 2, 1893. 

100 yards— America— Straightaway, across 
tidal salt water, 1 minute 5g seconds, 
E. C. Schaeffer, Travers Island, N. Y., 
Sept. 29, 1900. Bath— With four turns, 
still water, 1.06, H. A. Widemann, Lur- 
line Baths, San Francisco, Cal., July 6, 
1898. England— Straightaway, Stillwater, 
1.12, Joey Nuttall, Hollingsworth Lake, 
Aug. 1, 1887. Bath— With two turns, 
still water, 60J sec, J. H. Derbyshire, 
Victoria Baths, Nottingham, July 9, 1898. 
Australia— 99 yards 4 inches, with seven 
turns, still water, 1 minute, T. Mead- 
ham, Sydney Natatorium, Sydney, New 
South Wales, Dec. 4, 1892; straightawav, 
1,7, G. R. Tyler, Graving Rock, Auck- 
land, March 12, 1898. 

150 yards (bath), five turns, 51f seconds, E. 
Carroll Schaeffer, Boston, Mass, March 3, 
1900. 

200 yards— (in-door) 2 minutes 30? seconds, E. 
C. Schaeffer, Boston, Mass., March 3, 1900. 

220 yards — America — One turn, across 
stream, 2 minutes 53| seconds, E. C. 
Schaeffer, Travers Island, N. Y., Sept. 
23, 1899. Bath— With nine turns, still 
water, 2.51, H. F. Brewer, Lurline Baths, 
San Francisco, Cal., Julv 6, 1898. Eng- 
land—With eight turns, 2..38, F.C. V. Lane. 
Corporation Baths, Brighton, Eng., Aug. 
5, 1899. 2.381, J. H. Tyers, Nottingham, 
Sept. 25, 1897. Australia— With one turn, 
Etill water, 2.53f, W. J. Gormley, Calli- 



The Philadelphia Record JUmanac. 



ope Graving Dock, Auckland, New Zea- 
land, Jan 15, 1894. 

440 j'ards— America — With three turns, across 
stream, 6 minutes 48f seconds, E. C. 
Schaefl'er, Travers Island, N. Y., Sept. 23, 
1899. Bath— With eighteen turns, still 
water, 6.10>^Howard F. Brewer, Lurllne 
Baths, San Francisco, Cal., July 6, 1898. 
England— Bath— With turns, still water, 
5.43i, J. H. Tyers, llanchester, May 11, 
1896. Australia— With two turns, still 
water, 6.24^, W. J. Gormley, Calliope 
Graving Dock, Auckland, N. Z., January 
17, 1894. 

% mile— America— With seven turns, across 
stream, 14 minutes 8 seconds, F. A . Wenck, 
Travers Island, N. Y., Oct. 1, 1898. Bath 
—With thirty-seven turns, still water, 
12.45g, H. F. Brewer, Lurline Baths, San 
Francisco, Cal., July 9, 1898. England- 
Open water, with three turns, 12.52, J. 
A. Jarvis, Abbey Park, Leicester, Aug. 2, 
1898. Bath— With thirty-five turns, still 
water, 12.17, J. A. Jarvis, Paisley, Oct. 7, 
1898. Australia— With twenty-six turns, 
12.40, Percy Cavill, Bronte Baths, New 
South Wales, Feb. 2, 1898. 

1 mile— America— With fifteen turns, across 
stream, 29 minutes 513 seconds, F. A. 
Wenck, Travers Island, N. Y., Oct. 1, 
1898. Bath — With seventv-five turns, 
still water, 26.19f, H. F. Brewer, Lurline 
Baths, San Francisco, Cal., July 9, 1898. 
England— Open water, 25.13§, J. A. Jarvis, 
Abbey River, Leicester, Eng., Aug. 8, 1899. 
Australia— With thirty-nine turns, still 
water, 26.52i, Percy Cavill, George Ear- 
ner's Domain Baths, Sydney, New South 
Wales, Jau. 10, 1898. 

33 miles (about), 21.45, Captain Matthew 
Webb, across the English Channel, Do- 
ver, Eng., to Calais, France, Aug. 24 and 
25, 1875. 

94 miles, 32 laps, 60 hours, restricted to 10 
hours per day, W. Beckwith, London, 
Eng., June 20 to 25, 1881. 

60 hours floating, without touching any- 
thing, Captain Matthew Webb, at Scar- 
borough, Eng., June 29 to July 1, 1880. 

Staying Under Water. — i min. 46| sec, 
Prof. Enoch, Lowell, Mass., March 28, 



I,ist of Pugilistic Champions. 

Following is a list of pugilistic champions, 
or men who have been credited as such, 
from the earliest days of English and Ameri- 
can pugilism down to the present time: 
1719— Figg. 1730— Pipes and Greeting. 1731 

—Geo. Taylor. 
1740— Jack Broughton. 1750— Jack Slack. 

1760— Bill Stevens. 
1761— George Meggs. 1764— Bill Darts. 1769 

—Lyons. 
1777— Harry Sellers. 1780— Harris. 1785— 

Jackling Tom (alias Johnson). 
1790— Ryan (Big Ben). 1792— Mendoza. 1795 

—Jackson (retired). 
1803- Jem Belcher. 1805— Pearce ("Game 

Chicken"). 
1808— Gulley (declined title). 
1809— Tom Cribb received a belt, not trans- 
ferable, and cup. 
1824— Tom Spring received four cups and re- 
signed title. 
1825— Jem Ward received a belt, not trans- 
ferable. 
1838— Deaf Burke claimed the title. 
1839— Bendigo (W. Thompson) beat Deaf 



Burke, claimed championship and 
received a belt from Jem Ward. 

1841— Nick Ward (brother to Jem) beat Caunt, 
February 2. Caunt beat Nick Ward 
and received a belt by subscription. 
The belt was transferable. 

1845— Bendigo beat Caunt and got the belt. 

1849— Tass Parker beat Conn Parker for $600 
a side and the championship. 

1850— Perry (the Tipton Slasher), after his 
fight with Paddock, claimed the title. 

1851— Harry Broome beat Perry and suc- 
ceeded to the title. 

1853— Perry again claimed the title, Harry 
Broome having forfeited $100 to him 
in a match, and retired from the ring 
on August 13. 

1857— Tom Sayers beat Perry for $1000 a side 
and the new belt. 

1860— Tom Sayers retired after his fight with 
Heenan, leaving the old belt open 
for competition. 

1860— Sam Hurst (the Stalybridge Infant) 
beat Paddock. Both claimed the title 
of champion. The belt handed to 
Hurst. 

1861— Jem ]\Iace beat Hurst. 

1862— Jem Slace beat Tom King (January) 
for $1000 and the belt. 

1863— Tom King beat Mace (November) and 
claimed the belt, which he subse- 
quently gave up, declining again to 
meet Mace. Mace again claimed the 
belt. 

1865— Joe WormaldbeatMarsden, $1000 a side 
and the belt, both having claimed the 
championship. Belt handed to Wor- 
mald. Forfeited to Mace, who again 
claimed. 

1866— Jem Mace and Joe Goss, a draw, $1000 
a side and the belt. 

1866— Joe Wormald received forfeit fromE. 
Baldwin, $1000 and the champion- 
ship. Baldwin absent at the starting 
place. Wormald claimed the belt. 

1867— Jem IMace and E. Baldwin, a draw, 
$1000 a side and the championship. 
The belt in abevance. 

1868— J. Wormald and "e. Baldwin, a draw, 
SIOOO a side and the title, in America. 

1869— McCoole beat T. Allen, in America, for 
the championship of the world. 

1870— Jem Mace beat T. Allen, in America, 
for championship of the world. 

1872— Jem Mace and J. Cobum fought a draw 
for $2500 and the championship. 

1882— John L. Sullivan defeated Paddy Ryan, 
championship of America, Missis- 
sippi City, Miss. (London prize-ring 
rules), 9 rounds, Feb. 7. 

1885— Jem Smith beat Jack Davis for $500 a 
side and championship of England. 

1887— Jake Kilrain and Jem Smith, a draw, 
- 106 rounds, $10,000 and the cham- 
pionship belt, Isle des Souverains, 
Dec. 19. 

1889— John L. Sullivan beat Jake Kilrain for 
$10,000 a side and the belt, at Rich- 
burg, Mississippi, Julv 8. 

1889— Jem Smith and Frank P. Slavin fought 
to a draw, 14 rounds, for $2500 a 
side and cl)ampiou.ship of England, 
Purges, Dec. 23. 

1891— Robert Fitzsimmons defeated Jack 
Dempsey, middle-weight champion- 
ship of the world, 13 rounds. New 
Orleans, Jan. 14. 

1891— James J. Corbett and Peter Jackson 
fought their memorable draw, 61 
rounds, San Francisco, Cal., May 21. 
Declared "no contest " by referee. 



The Philadelphia Record JUmanac. 



1892— James J. Corbett beat John L. Sullivan, 
championship of America, 21 rounds. 
New Orleans, La., Sept. 7. 

1894— James J. Corbett beat Charles Mitchell, 
of England, 3 rounds, Jacksonville, 
Fla., .Jan. 25. 

1895— Peter Maher, by gift. He beat Steve 
O'Donnell in 1 round in 1 minute 
3 seconds, at Maspeth, L. I., Nov. 11, 
and was given the championship by 
James J. Corbett, who retired. 

1896— Robert Fitzsimmous beat Peter Maher 
in 1 round, in 1 minute 35 seconds, 
in Mexico, opposite Langtry, Texas, 
Feb. 21. 

1897— Robert Fitzsimmons won undisputed 
title from James J. Corbett, at Carson, 
Nev., in U rounds, March 17. 

1899.— James J. Jeffries beat Robert Fitzsim- 
mons at Coney Island, N. Y., in 11 
rounds, June 9. 

1899— James J. Jeffries won from Thomas 
Sharkey on points. Coney Island, N. 
Y., in 23 rounds, Nov. 3. 

1900 — James J. Jeffries knocked out James J. 
Corbett, 23 rounds. Coney Island, 
N. Y., May 11. 

Pugilistic Records— First ring fight in 
America, Jacob Hyer and Thomas Beas- 
ley, 1816. Longest battle on record, 6 
hours, 15 minutes, James Kelley and 
Jonathan Smith, Australia, November, 
1865. Longest glove fight, 7 h. 19 min., 
A. Bowen and J. Burke, 110 rounds, draw. 
New Orleans, La., April G, 1893. Largest 
stake ever fought tor, S45,000 ($10,000 a 
side and a purse of 825,000), James J. 
Corbett and John L. Sullivan, 21 rounds, 
New Orleans, La., Sept. 7, 1892. 

PIGBON FI,YING. 

ONK-DAY RECORDS AND AVERAGE SPEED. 

100 miles— Red checker cock, flown by A. 
Whatten, Newark, N. J., May 9, 1897; 
speed, 1970 yards per minute. 

200 miles— Red checker cock, tlown by G. H. 
Watchman, Baltimore, Md., May 23, 
1897 ; speed, 1893.59 yards per minute. 

300 miles— Blue cock, flown by Geo. How- 
arth, Harrison, N. J., May 23, 1897 ; speed 
1569.07 yards per minute. 

400 miles— Bhie checker cock. Dandy Jim, 
flown by W. B. Garrabrants, Newark, N. 
J., June 10, 1894; speed, 1131.09 yards per 
minute. 

500 miles— Black checker cock. Admiral 
Dewey, flown by Connell and Sloan, 
West Philadelphia, Jui.e 25, 1898; speed, 
1603 yards per minute. 

600 miles— Blue checker cock C. 16111, owned 
and flown bv C. Rothacker, Newark, 
N. J., June 27, 1900 ; average speed, 1441.94 
yards per minute. Second-best speed, 
1363.98 yards per minute, made by blue 
checker cock T. 8159, owned and flown 
bv Gns. Filler, Jr., Newark, N. J., Jvme 
27, 1900. Third-best speed, 1341.4 yards 
per minute, made by blue hen, Lady 
Gainesville, owned and flown by James 
McGaughey, Philadelphia, July 4, 1896. 

700 miles— Blue checker cock, Charles H. 
Jones, and blue checker hen, Katharine, 
both flown by Joseph H. S. Milligan, 
Lan>-dovvne, Pa., July 12, 1897 ; time re- 
ported, third day out at 8.40 A.M. 

940 miles— Pensacola, Fla., to Philadelphia, 
7 days 17 hours 3 minutes, red checker 
cock St. Clair, flown by Edward Mason, 
Frankford, Pa., July 16 to 23, 1897. 

Greatest distance in one day, 014 miles— Blue 



hen. Lady Gainesville, flown by James 
McGaughey, Philadelphia, and blue cock, 
Gaine.sville, flown by Arthur McGinn, 
Philadelphia, July 4, 1896. 

Best long di-taiice race ever flown, 1250 
miles— Commodore, flown bv Fred Bow- 
ers, Fall River, Mass., July 12, 1898. 
Time out, 13 days 5}^ hours. 

Longest distance flown 1318.63 miles— Cock 
bird owned by J. M. Skites, Pittsburg, 
Pa., July 6, ly'OO. Time out, 22 days 8 
hours lu minutes. 

Longest d. stance ever flown by a hen bird, 
1212 miles— Sadie Jones, blue checker 
hen, flown bv M. F. Sullivan, West 
Philadelphia, j"u]y 31, 1897 ; time, 16 days 
3 hours 2 minutes. 

Best speed ever made from any distance- 
Red checker cock, flown by A. Whatien, 
Newark, N. J., May 9, 1897 ; speed, 1976 
yards per minute. 

Mcst successful 500-mile fly— 101 out of 263 
birds of the Frankford, Pa., District, N. 
A. A. H. P. F., homed the same day from 
Spartansburg, Va., June 21, 1900. 

PIGEON AND GI/ASS-BAI^I, 
SHOOTING. 

100 pigeons, straight, 30 yards rise, 50 yards 
boundary, J. A. R. Elliott, beating Dr. W. 
F. Carver, who killed 99, Kansas City, 
Mo., Oct. 12, 1894. 300 glass balls, broken 
in succes.sion, A. H. Bogardus, Lincoln, 
111., July 4, 1877 ; 500 glass ballsout of 514 
broken in 24 min. 2 sec, J. C. Haskell, 
Lvnn. Mass., May 30, 1881.; 990 glass balls 
out of 1000, 3 traps, 14 yards rise, A. H. 
Bogardus, Bradford, Pa., Nov. 20, 1879; 
1000 glass balls broken in 1 h. 1 min. 54 
sec, loading own gun, changing barrels 
every 100 shots, 15 yards rise. 2 traps, 12 
feet apart,. A. H. Bogar(Jus, New York, 
Dec. 20, 1879 ; 5500 glass balls out of 5854, 
7 h. 19 min. 2 sec, 2 traps, 15 yards rise, 
changing barrels about 54 times, A. H. 
Bogardus, New York, Dec. 20, 1879 ; 5500 
glass balls out of 6222, 7 h. 30 min. 30 sec, 
using Winchester repeating rifles, assist- 
ants loading, W. F. Carver, Brooklyn, 
N. Y., July 13, 1878; 60.016 small pieces of 
coal and wood out of 64,881, 5 rifles, 4 
helpers, W. F. Carver, New Haven, Conn., 
Jan. 12 to 17, 1885. 

RIFI,:e SHOOTING. 

75 out of 75 at 1000 yards: W. H Jackson, 
Boston, Mass., August 13, 1879; J. K. 
Milner, Creedmoor, L. I., September 14, 
1876; C. H. Laird, Washington, D. C, 
Oct. 18, 1879 ; at 200 yards off-hand : Dr. W. 
F. Wilcox, Catskill, N. Y., May 3, 1882. 

75 out of 75 at 200 yards, German ring target, 
3 shots ott-hand : L. C. Buss, New York, 
September 2, 1899. 

82 out of 84. at 200 yards, Massachusetts tar- 
get (bull's-eyes, 12) : G. H. Wentworth, 
Dover, N. H., June 14, 1884. 

93 out of 105, 7 shots each at 800, 900 and 1000 
yards : T. J. Dolan, Creedmoor, L. I., Sep- 
tember 20, 1883. 

98 out of 100, 10 shots at 200 yards oft'-haiid, 
standard target, score by shots, 10, 10, 10, 
10, 10, 10, 9, in, 10, 9—98: Bert Wentworth, 
Dover, N. H., October 27, 19U0. 

98 out of 100 at 200 and 500 yards, military 
rifle, six-pound pull: .lohn D. Cameron, 
Car.son City, Nev., September 14, 1883. 

100 out of 100 at 200 vards off-hand : W. M. 
Farrow, Boston, Mass., October 15, 1882 ; 
H. G. Bixby, Boston, April 6, 1880. 



The Philadelphia Record JUmanac. 



120 (.ut of 120 at 200 vards, standard Aiueii- 
tan taiget: W. L. Wilhird, Walnut Hills, 
Ma-s., June 22, 18'JJ. 

145 out of 150, at 1000 yards, 30 shots : W. INI. 
Farrow, C'reedmodr, L. 1., September 17, 
1880. 

150 out of 150 at 800, 900 and 1000 yards: Cale 
-Maudlin, \\'osiern L'u ion Junction, Wis., 
August 27, 1884. 

155 out of 155 (31 consecutive bull's eyes), 200 
yards off-hand, 35 calibre Mayna'rd ritic: 
E. T. Kicbardsun, Lawrence, Mass., July 
11, 1885. 

224 out of 225, 15 shots each at 800, 900 and 
1000 yards : William Gerish, Boston, 
Mass., September 15, 1880; C. W. Hin- 
man, Boston, An.uu t 24, 1881: C. M. 
Bell. North westenrKiBe Kunge, Chicago, 
111., October 1, 1^81. 

250 out of possible 25u ring targets, 25 vards 
range: Lewis Flach, Zetiler's Gallery, 
New York, November 4, 1899. 

250 out of possible 250, 25 vards, ring taiget, 
10 shots ofi-hand : L. P. llansen, Jersev 
City, April 1, 1899. 

995 out of lOUO, standard American target, 
reduced to 40 yards, 22 calibre rifle, any 
position, shooting from shoulder: Dr. 
Heber BLshop, Massachusetts Kifle Gal- 
lery, Boston, Mass., I8,s9. 

1107 out of 1200. at 200 and 500 yards, military 
rifle: Georgia team, 12 men. Sea Girt, 
N. J., September 2, 18'J7. 

1292 out of 1350, 15 shots each, at 800, 900 and 
llJOO yards: Ameican team, six men, 
Dollymount, Ireland, June 29, 1880. 

Individual championship of 1900, 100 shcls 
ott'-hand, 200 yards, German ring target, 
possible 2500 points: Michael J.'Dorrier, 
2257 ; Fred. C. Ross, 2243 : Dr. W. G. Hud- 
son, 2221. Greenville, N. J., Nov. 6, 1900. 

10 shots, 50.1 yards, po-sible 50, November 6, 
1899, at Denver, Col.: C. C. Ford made 
the following scores: 60. 48, 48. ,50; on 
November 13 : 49, 50, 50, 50. These w ere 
consecutive scores. 

RIEVOl^VBR SHOOTING. 

75 points out of possible 75 : M. J. Dorrier, 
German ring target, 200 vards, otf-hand, 
Brooklyn, N. Y., Mav 14, 1894. 

100 out of possible 100, ten consecutiye sliots 
within circle of:3>^ inches in diameter, 
523i yfti"(^s : C. H. Taylor, Philadelphia, 
I'a., November 8, 1898. 

125 out of pos.vible 125, armv revolver, 25 
shots ,it 50 yards: C. S. Richmond, Sa- 
vannali, <ia.. July 8, 1899. 

903 oiu of KiiHi— 10(1 shots, 50 vards: Thomas 
Audi Tti.ii. flostou, Mass., June 30, 1900. 

260(3 poiiiis ill :;oo shots and :«78 in 400 shots 
(100 daily) standard American 200 vards 
rifle target, 50 yards: Ira A. Paine, Spring- 
held, Mass., and Providence, R. L, Jnlv 
4-7, 1S8S. 

4350 pohits in 500 shots (100 dailv), 200 yards 
rifle target, 50 yards : F. E. Bennett, 
i-'pringtield, Mass., and Providence, R. I. 
Jiuie4-8, 1888. 

5279 points in 600 shots (100 daily), standard , 
American 200 yards rifle target, 50 yards : 
Ira A. Paine, Providence, R. I., Decem- 
ber 13, 1887. 

i^AWN te;nnis championships 

ISSl— Champion, R. D. Sears ; runner-up, W. 

E. Glyn. 
1882— Champion, R. D. Sears: runner-iip, C. 

M. Clark. 
1883— Champion, R. I), .-^enrs; runner-uji, 

James Dwight. 



all-comers' 
runner-up' 

all-comers' 
runner-up, 

all-comers' 
runner-up, 



1884— Champion R. D. Sears; all-comers' 
winner, H.A.Taylor; runner-up, W. 
V. S. Thorne. 

188.5— Champion, R. D. Sears ; all-comers' 
winner, G. M. Brinlev ; runner up, 
W. P. Knapp. 

1886— Champion, R. !>. Sears; all-comers' 
winner, R. L. Beckman ; runner-up, 
H. A. Taylor. 

1887— Champion, R. D. Sears; all-comers' 
winner, H. W. Slocum, Jr.: runner 
up, H. A. Taylor. 

1888— Champion, H. W. Slocum, Jr. ; all-com- 
ers' winner. H. W. Slocum, Jr. ; run- 
ner-up. H. A. Taylor. 

1889— Champion. H. W. Slocum, Jr. ; all-com- 
ers' winner, Q. A. Shaw, Jr. : runner- 
up, O. S. Campbell. 

1890— Champion, O. S. Campbell; all-com- 
ers' winner, O. S. Campbell : runner- 
up, W. P. Knapp. 

1891— Champion, O. S. Ciimpbcll; all-comers' 
winner, C. Hobart ; runner-up, F. H. 
Hovey, 

1892— Champion, O. S. Campbell ; all-comers' 
winner. F. H. Hovey ; riuiner-up, W. 
A. Earned. 

1893— Champion, R. I). Wrenn ; all-comers' 
winner, R. D. Wrenn : runner-up, F. 
H. Hovey. 

1894— Champion, R. D. Wrenn 
winner, M. F. Goodbody 
W. A. Earned. 

189.5— Champion, F. H. Hovey ; 
winner, F. H. Hovey ; 
W. A. Earned. 

1896— Champion, R. D. Wrenn 
winner, R. D. Wrenn ; 
W. A. Earned. 

1897— Champion. R. D. Wrenn ; all-comers' 
winner, W. V. Eaves ; runner-up, 
H. A. Nisbet. 

1898 — Champion, M. D.Whitman ; all-comers' 
winner, Jf. D. Whitman; runner-up, 
D. F. Davis. 

1899— Champion, M.D.Whitman; all-comers' 
winner, J. P. Paret : runner-up, D. 
F. Davis. 

1900— ChamiHon, M. I). Whitman: allcomers' 
winner, \\'. A. Lamed; runner-up, G. 
L. Wivnii, Jr. 

Doubles. 

1.881— C. M. (;lark and F W. 'faylor. 
1882— R. D. Sears and James Dwight. 
1883— R. D. Sears and James Dwight. 
1884— R. D. Sears and James Dwight. 
1<S8.') — R. I). Sears and James Dwight. 
is.so— i;. n. Sear^ and James Dwight. 
18,s7-l;. H. s.iirs and James Dwight. 
],s.s,s_(.. s ( aiiii.l.cll and V. G. Hall. 
1.S.S0— H. W. ,-^lucum and H. A. Tavlor. 
1890— V. G. Hall and C. Hobart. 
1S91— (). S. Campbell and R. P. Huntingiou, 

l.S92-(). S. Campbell and R. P. Hnntington, 

Jr. 
1893-0. Hobart and F. H. Hovev. 
1891— C. Hobart and F. H. Hovev. 
189.5— M. G. Chace and R. D. Wrenn. 
1896— C. B. Neel and S. R. Neel. 
1897— L. E. Ware and G. P. Sheldon, Jr. 
1898— L. E. Ware and G. P. Sheldon, Jr. 
1.S99— Holcombe Ward and D. F. Davis. 
1900— Holcombe Ward and I). F. Lavis. 

BII/I,IARDS. 

Best run 3-ball carom rail game, '2.572, 
Harvev McKeuna, Boston, Mass., Dec 
21, 1887. Average, 4162c,. Best at J-bnll 
carom game, 14.s3, J. McDevitt, New 



The Philadelphia Record JUmanac. 



York, Jan. 8, 1808. Best at Champion's 
game, .S-ball carom, 14x28 lines, 398, Geo. 
Slosson, Paris, France, February, 1882. 
Best in America, 351, J. R. Heiser, New 
York, Feb. 14, 1884. English spot-stroke 
game, 3304, \V. J. Peall, 15,000 up, London, 
Eng., Nov. 3 to 8, 1890. English game, 
\''ith spot-stroke barred, 1392, John Rob- 
erts, Jr., Manchester, Eng., May, 1804. 
Fourteen-iuch balk-line game, ftWi, in a 
game of 600 points, Jacob Schaefer, beat- 
ing Frank Ives, New York, Dec. 16, 1893. 
Schaefer ran out in six innings, aver- 
aging 100. Frank Ives also averaged 100 
in a game with George Slosson at Chi- 
cago, 111., Jan. 9, 1891. Highestrun, 487. 
Fourteen-inch balk-line game, anchor- 
nurse barred, 359, F. Ives, in game witli 
Jacob Schaefer, Chicago, 111.. Dec. 6, 1894. 
Eighteen-inch balk-line anchor barred, 
except for 5 shots, bO in 600 up, F. Ives, 
New York, ^pril 2, 189(5. Eighteen balk- 
line, one shot each in balk and in 
anchor, 400 up, average 40, Jacob Schae- 
fer, Chicago, 111., Feb. 21, 1898. Cushion 
carroms, 300 points up, average 85, Frank 
Ives, Boston, Mass., April 14, 1896. 



SKATING. 

50 yards, 6 sec, S. D. See and C. B. David- 
son, Courtlandt Lake, N. Y., December 
28, 1885; 75 vards, 8| sec, S. D. See, 
Courtlandt Lake, N. Y., Dec. 30, 1883; 100 
yards, 7 sec, flying start (with strong 
wind), A. Mosher and H. Davidson, Red 
Bank, N. J., Jan. 27, 1895 ; 9 sec. (standing 
start), straightawav (with wind), H. Da- 
vidson, Red Bank, N. J., Jan. 27, 1895; 
94 sec, John S. Johnson, Minneapolis, 
Minn., March 1, 1893; 120 yards, llg sec, 
John S. Johnson, Minneapolis, Minn., 
March 1, 1893; 150 yards, 14J sec. (with 
wind),G. D. Phillips, Courtlandt Lake, N. 
Y., Dec. 26, 1885; 200 yards, IGg sec, 
straightaway(withwind),J.C.Hemment, 
Red Bank, N. J., Jan. 24, 1895; 17f sec, 
circular track, John S. Johnson, Minnea- 
polis, Minn., Feb. 26, 1893; 220 yards, 17| 
sec, straightaway (with wind), H. David- 
son, Red Bank, N. J., Jan. 24, 1895; 300 
vards, 29% sec. (with wind), G. D. Phil- 
lips, Courtlandt Lake, Jan. 17, 18*5; 320 
metres (.349 yards, 2 ft., 10 in.), 28 sec, A. 
Van Den Berg, Silkkerveer, Holland, 
Feb. 17, 1887 ; 440 yards, 30§ .sec. (flying 
start), J. F. Donoghue, Newburgh, N. Y., 
Jan. 26, 1892; half a mile, 1.05f, straight- 
away (wiih winii), J. F. Donoghue, New- 
burgh, N. v., Jan. 22, 1892; 1.22, John S. 
Johnson, Minneapolis, Minn., Feb. 25, 
1893; 1 mile. 2.12|, T. Donoghue, Jr., 
straightaway (with wind), on the Hudson 
river, at Newburgh, N. Y., Feb. 1, 1887; 
2.35g, John S. John.son, circular path 
(against time), Montreal. Can., Feb., 1899; 
(indoor): 9-lap track, 2M}'n, John Neil- 
son, Pittsburg, Pa., March^ 7,1899; \)u 
miles, 4.24, E. Halversen, Hamar, Norway, 
Jan. 3, 1892; 4.28, J. S. Johnson, Mon- 
treal, Can., Feb. 26, 1894 ; 2 miles, 5.33^, 
John Neilson, Montreal, Can.. Feb. 3, 
19L0; 3 miles, 8.321, H. P. Mosher, Mon- 
treal, Can., Feb. 5, 1897 ; 5 miles, 14.24, O. 
Rndd, Minneapolis, Minn., Feb. 20, 1896 ; 
6 miles, 18.38 ; 7 miles, 21.43 ; Smiles, 24.,55; 
9 miles, 28.04; 10 miles, 31. lU: John S. 
Johnson, Montreal, Can., Feb. 26, 1894. 
11 miles, 35.43J; 12 miles, 38.59t; 13 miles, 
42.27^; 14 miles, 4.5.51^; 15 miles, 49.17f ; 
16 miles, .52.42J; 17 miles, 56.09J ; 18 miles, 



59.34J; 19 miles, 1.03.04f ; 20 miles, 1.06.36§ : 
A. D. Smith,against time, St. Paul, Minn., 
Jan. 26, 1894. 21 miles, 1.16.414 ; 22 miles, 
1.20.311; 23 miles, 1.24.18; 24 miles, 1.27.55; 
25 miles, 1.31.29; SOmiies, 1.53.20; 35 miles, 
2.13.35 ; 40 miles, 2.34.46 : 45 miles, 2.56.20 ; 
50 miles, 3.15.59§; 75 miles, 5.19.16|; 100 
miles, 7.11.38^: Joseph F. Donoghue 
(amateur), Stamford, Conn., Jan. 26, 1893. 
1 hour, 18 miles 215 vards : A. D. Smith, 
St. Paul, Minn., Jan. 26, 1894; 2 hours, 
31 miles 1540 yards ; 3 hours, 45 miles 
1735 yards ; 4 hours, 58 miles 865 yards ; 
5 hours, 70 miles 1757 yards ; 6 hours, 83 
miles 1500 yards ; 7 hours, 97 miles 220 
vards: Joseph F. Donoghue (amateur), 
Stamford, Conn., Jan. 26, 1893. 150 miles, 
44.57.45; 200 miles, 63.44.35; 300 miles, 
92.04.00; 400 miles, 138.35.00; 421 miles, 
141.47.00 : E. St. Clair Millard, 9-lap track, 
Chicago, 111., Feb. 21 to 26, 1876. 

Jumping on Sk.\tes.— Running broad, 21 ft. 
9 in., J. E. Andrews, natural ice, Mc- 
Cusick Lake, Stillwater, March 6, 1899. 
Running high, 4 ft. 1 in., Fred B.Gerner, 
artificial ice, Brooklyn, N.Y., March 8, 
1899. 

Roller Skating.— 1 mile, 2 min. 50? sec; 2 
miles, 6 min. 4| sec. : Frank Delmont, 
London, Eng., July 26, 1890. 3 miles, 9 
min. 293^ sec; 4 miles, 12 min. 43 sec : 
Kenneth A. Skinner, Boston, Mass., June 
17, 1885. 5 miles, 15 min. 41 sec, W. 
Curtis, London, Eng., Aug. 2, 1890; 15 
min. 50J4 sec: Kenneth A. Skinner, 
Boston, Mass., June 17, 1885. 1091 miles, 
660 yards, in six days— actual skating 
time, 117 hrs. 6 min. : \V. Donovan, New 
York, March 1 to 7, 1885. 



WORI,D'S CHAMPION GAMIES. 

Championship games open to the amateur 
I athletes of the world were held at Paris, 
France, July 14 to 22, 1900, in connection 
with the Paris Exposition, and the Ameri- 
cans won sixteen of the twenty-one world's 
I championships. Of this number members 
1 of the University of Pennsylvania team won 
eight championships, or half as many as all 
the other Americans combined. Alvin C. 
Kraenzlein, captain of the Pennsylvania 
team, won four championships himself— 110- 
nietres hurdles, 15| seconds; 60 metres flat, 
I 7^ seconds ; running broad jump, 7 metres 
i 18}^ centimetres; 200-metres hurdles, 25i 
i seconds. His time in the 60-raetre race and 
also in the 200-metre hurdle race are new 
i world's records. 

; 100 Metre,s Run.— Final heat. Won by F. 
I W. Jarvis, Princeton ; second, W. B. 

j Tewksbury, University of Pennsylvania ; 

I third, Stanley Rowley, New South 

j Wales. Time", 11 seconds. Arthur F. 

Duffy, Georgetown University, while 
' leading in this race, fell after covering 

fiftv metres. Best time in the heats was 
10|s., and was made by Jarvis in the 
trial heat and Tewksbury in the semi- 
final. 
110 Metres Hurdle Race on Turf.- Won by 

A. C. Kraenzlein, University of Pennsyl- 
; vania; second, John McClaiu, University 

of Michigan ; third, W. A. Maloney, Uni- 
versity of Chicago. Time, 15§. 
60-Metres Run.— Final heat, won by A. C. 
Kraenzlein, Pennsylvania ; second, W. 

B. Tewksbury, Pennsvlvaiiia ; Iliinl. 
Stanley Rowley, New South Wales. Time. 

I 7 secoiids. 



The Philadelphia Recor-d Almanac. 



(OO-Metres Run.— Won bv Maxwell Long, 
New York A. C. : Wiiliam J. Holland, 
Georgetown University, second ; Schultz, 
Denmark, third. Time, 49? second.s, 
breaking the French record time of 50j| 
seconds. 

1.50(>-Metres Run.— Won by C. Bennett, Eng- 
land ; De Loge, France, second ; John 
Bray, Williams College, Williamstown, 
Mass., third. Time, 4 minutes 6 sec- 
onds. 

Running High Jump.— Won by I. K. Baxter, 
University of Pennsylvania, 1 metre 90 
centimetres; P. J. Leahy, Ireland, sec- 
ond, 1 metre 76 centimetres : Goenzy, 
Hungary, third, 1 metre 75 centimetres". 

Throwing the Discu,s.— Won by Bauer, Hun- 
gary, 36 metres 4 centimetres; Jauda, 
Austria, second, 35 metres 14 centime- 
tres ; Richard Sheldon, New York A. C, 
third, 3t metres 60 centimetres. 

Putting 16-pound Shot.— Won by Richard 
Sheldon, New York A. C, 14 metres 10 
centimetres, a new world's record ; J. C. 
McCraeken, Pennsylvania, second, 12 
metres 85 centimetres ; Robert Garrett, 
Princeton, third, 12 metres 37 centime- 
tres. Sheldon's put is the equivalent of 
4x feet 84 inches. 

4110 Metre.>s Hurdle Race.— Won by Walter 
B. Tewksbury, Pennsylvania: M. Tau- 
zin, France, second ; George W. Orton, 
Pennsylvania, third. Time, 57f seconds. 

2500 Metres Steeplechase, Handicap.— 
Won by George W. Orton, Pennsvlva- 
nia; Robinson, England, second; A. L. 
Newton, New York Athletic Club, third. 
Time, 7 minutes 34§ seconds. 

Pole Vault.— Won by I. K. Baxter, Penn- 
sylvania, 3 metres 30 centimetres; M. B. 
Colket, Pennsylvania, second, 3 metres 
21 centimetres; Anderson, Norway, third, 
3 metres 20 centimetres. 

Running Broad Ju.mp.— Won by A. C. Kraenz- 
lein, Pennsylvania, 7 metres 18>^ centi- 
metres ; Meyer Prinstein, Syracuse, N. 
Y., second, 7 metres 173^ centimetres ; P. 
J. Leahy, Ireland, third, 6 metres 83 
centimetre*. 

Standing High Jump.— Won by Ray Ewry, 
New York Atliletic Club, 1 metre 05 centi- 
metres ; I. K. Baxter, Pennsvlvania, 
second, 1 metre 52J4 centimetres ; Rich- 
ard Sheldon, New York Athletic Club, 
third, 1 metre 50 centimetres. Ewry's 
jump is equal to 5 feet 5 inches. 

Standing Long Jump.— Won by Rny Ewry, 
New York Athletic (;iub, 3 metres 21 
centimetres; I. K. Baxter, Pennsvlva- 
nia, second, 3 metres l:?V^ centime'tres; 
Torchboeuf, France, third, 3 metres 3 
centimetres. 

Three Standing Jump.s. — Won by Ray 
Ewry, New York Athletic Club, 10 
metres 58 centimetres ; I. K, Baxter, 
Pennsylvania, second, 9 metres 95 centi- 
metres ; Robt. Garrett, Princeton, third, 
9 metres 50 centimetres. 

Running Hop, Step and Jump.— Won bv 
Meyer Prinstein, Syracuse, 14 metres 47 
centimetres; Connelly, Boston, second, 
13 metres 97 centimetres ; Richard Shel- 
don, New York Athletic fUub, third, ]3 
metres 64 centimetres. 
200 Metres Hurdle Race.— Final beat, won 
by A. C. Kraenzlein, Pennsylvania; se- 
cond, N. G. Pritchard, India; third, 
Walter B. Tewksbury, Pennsylvania; 
fourth, T, B. McClain, Pennsylvania. 
Time, 2f>i seconds. 
4000 Metres Steeplechase.— Won by J. F 



Rimmer, England ; C. Bennett, England, 
.second ; S. J. Robinson, England, third. 
Time, 12 minutes, 58§ seconds. 

800 Metres Flat Race.— Final heat won by 
A. E. Tysoe, English champion half-mile 
runner ; John F. Cregan, Princeton, sec- 
ond ; David C. Hall, Brown Universitv 
third. Time, 2 minutes, 1^ seconds 

Tug of War.— Won by American scratch 
team, defeating Scandinavians, who had 
beaten the French. 

Throwing 16- pound Hammer.— Won by John 
Flanagan, New York Athletic Club, 167 
ieet 4>^ inches; T. T. Hare, University of 
Pennsylvania, 151 feet 9 inches ; J. C. 
McCraeken, University of Pennsvlvania, 
146 feet. 

Marathon RArE-(Fortv kilometres, mak- 
ing a circle of Paris and finishing on the 
ground of the Racing Club).— Won by 
Theatre Michel, France ; Emile, France, 
second ; Fast, Sweden, third. Time, 2 
hours 49 minutes. 
Standing of countries in the three days' 

sports : 

FIRSTS. SECONDS. THIRDS. 

America 17 13 11 

England 3 2 1 

Hungary 1 i i 

France — 2 3 

India — i ] 

Denmark — ] i 

Ireland — i ] 

Australia — — 2 

Sianding of the American teams in the 
three days' sport : 

FIRSTS. SECONDS. THIRDS. 

Pennsylvania ... 8 s 3 

N. Y. A. (' 6 — 3 

Princeton l 1 2 

Syracuse l 1 _ 

Michigan — 1 — 

Georgetown .... — 1 _ 

B. A. A — 1 — 

Chicago — _ 1 

Williams — _ 1 

Brown _ _ 1 

On the system of scoring, but three places 
counting, giving 5 for firsts, 3 for seconds, 1 
for thirds, Pennsylvania scored 67 points 
and all the others 63 points. 

One week before the Paris games the 
Americans competed at the English Cham- 
pionship games in London and won eight 
of the thirteen events on the programme. A. 
F. Duffey, Georgetown, won the 100-yards- 
dash in 10 seconds ; M. W. Long, New York 
Athletic Club, won the 440-yard6-nm in 49t 
seconds; A. C. Kraenzlein, University of 
Pennsylvania, won the 120.yards-hurdle-race 
in 15S seconds, and the running broad jump 
with 22 feet 10)4 inches. I. K. Baxter, Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania, won running high 
jump with 6 feet 2 Inches ; B. Johnson, New 
York Athletic Club, won the pole vault with 
11 feet 4 inches; Richard Sheldon, New 
York Athletic Club, won the shot-put with 
45 feet 10'4 inches, and John Flanagan, New 
York Athletic Club, won the l6-pouud-ham- 
mer throw with 163 feet, 



POOI<. 

Continuous pool, 57, made up of 11, 15, 15, 15, 

I, Jerome Keough, Syracuse, N. Y,, Dec. 

II, 1896. Seventy-five balls scored with- 
out a miss, Samuel Barnes, in match 
Dallas, Texas, Jan. 10, 1897. 



Intercollegiate Football, 1900 



VALE.— TWEJ.VE (VAMES. 

Oppnneiits, Pl:ice aud Date. Score. 

Trinity, New Haven, Seiit. 29 22-0 

Amherst, New Haven, Oct. 3 27-0 

Tufts, New Haven, Oct. li 30-0 

Brtte.s, Now Haven, Oct. 10 50-0 

Dartiuouih, New Haven, Oct. 13 . . . 17- 

liowdoin, New Haven, Oct. 17 .... 3U- 

Weslevan, New Haven, Oct. 20 ... . :iS- 

ColuiiiliiM. New Vnrk, Oct, 27 12-5 

Wfst I'oiiit, W.vst Point, Nov. 3 . . . . IS- 
Carlisl." Imliaii-. New Haven, Nov. 10. 3.5- 

Princetuii. l'iiiic.,'ton,Nov. 17 .... 29-5 

Hai-vanl, New Haven, Nov. 21 ... . 28- 

Totals 336^ 

HARVARD. — ELEVEN <;A.ME8. 

Wesleyan, Cambridge, Sept. 29 .... 24-0 

Williams, Cambridge, Oct. 3 12-0 

Bovvdoin, Cambridge, Oct. 12-0 

Amherst, ("amliridge, Oct. 10 18-0 

(.'oluml.ia. Caiiiln-i.lge, Oct.l:', .... 24- (I 

Balep. iiiiiil.i-i.l-". (let. 17 11- o 

WfSt I'l.iiil, \\(-t Point, Oct. 20 .... 29-0 

Indian-, I anil. ri.lKe, Oct. 27 17-5 

Prnn-\ Ivaiiia. ( aiiibridge, Nov. 3 . . 17-5 

Brown, (ami. ri.l-c. Nov. 10 11-6 

Vale, New Haven, Nov. 24 _ 0-28 

Totals 205-44 

PENNSYLVANIA.— THIRTEEN CAMES. 

Leliigb, Pbiladel]ihia. i^ept. 29 ... 27- 6 

Franklinand .Nbirshall, Phila.. Oi't. 8 . 47-0 

Haverlor.l, Philadeli.hia, Oct.O ... 38-0 

Dickinson, Philadelphia, Oct. 10 ... 35- 

Brown, Pbila.lelphia, Oct. 13 12-0 

Stale College. Pbiladelphia, Oct. 17 . . 17-5 

Columbia, Philadelphia, Oct. 20 ... 30- 

Chicago, Philadelphia, Oct. 27 ... . 41- 

Harvard, Caintiridge, Nov. 3 5-17 

LaCaveit,., I'hil.i.l.lpliia, Nov. 10 ... 12-5 
Carlisle In.l ans, Philadelphia, Nov. 17 10- 

Naval Ca.l.-ts, .\iina|.olis. Nov. 21. . . 28-6 

Cornell, Philadelphia, Nov. 29 ... . 27- 

Totals 335-45 

I OKNELI..— TWELVE (iAMES. 

Colgate, Ithaca, Sei.t. 26 16-0 

Sviaen-.. I niv.. Ithaca, Sept. 29 . . . 6-0 

Kochest.'l' llliaea, Oct. 3 6-0 

Biicknell. Ilha.-a.oct. 6 6-0 

Washinun.n A .ietlerson, Ithaca, Oct. 13 16- 5 

rnioli, Ithaca, (let. 20 11-0 

Dartni..uth, Itl/aea, Oct. 27 23-6 

Prinecton, Princeton, Nov. 3 12-0 

Oberlin, Ithaca, Nov. 10 29-0 

Lafayette, Easton, Nov. 17 0-17 

Vermont, Ithaca, Nov. 24 42- 

Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Nov. 29 0-27 

Totals 167^5 

PRINCETON.— ELEVEN CAIMES. 

Stevens, Princeton, Oct. 3 40-0 

Lehigh. Princeton, Oct. 6 12-5 

Penna. State College, Princeton, Oct. 10 26- 
Baltimore Med. Col., Baltimore, Oct. 12 11- 

Naval Cadets, Annapolis, Oct. 13 . . . .5-0 

Syracuse, Princeton, Oct, 17 43-0 

Lafayette, Easton, Oct, 20 5-0 

Brown, Providence, Oct. 27 17- 5 

Cornell. Princeton, Nov. 3 0-12 

Cohniiliia, .N'ew York, Nov. 6 ,5-6 

Vale, Princeton, Nov. 17 5-29 

Totals 169-57 

LAFAYETTE.— ELEVEN GAMES. 

Ursinns, Easton, Oct. 13 35- 

Sn-qnehanna, Easton, ( let. (■) 35-0 



Opponents, Place aud Date Score. 

Manhattan, Easton, Oct, 10 11-0 

Swarthmore, Easton, Oct. 13 34-2 

Princeton, Easton, Oct. 20 0-5 

Newark A. C, Easton, Oct. 27 16-0 

Lehigh, South Bethlehem, Nov. 3 . . . 34-0 

Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Nov. 10 . 5-12 

Cornell, Easton, Nov, 17 17-0 

Lehigh, Easton, Nov, 24 18-0 

Dickinson, Easton, Nov. 29 10- 6 

Totals. 215-25 

BROWN.— El-EVEN GAMES. 

Colby, Providence, Sept. 29 27- 

Holy Cross, Providence, Oct. 6 . . . . 18-0 

Mass. Inst. Tech., Providence, Oct. 10 . 22- 

Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Oct. 13 . 0-12 

Chicago, Chicago, Oct. 20 11-6 

Princeton, Providence, Oct. 27 ... . 5-17 

Need ham. Providence, Nov. 3 .... 12-5 

Tufts, Providence. Nov. 6 2G- 5 

Harvard, Cambridge, Nov, 10 6-11 

Dartmouth, Hanover, Nov. 17 12- 5 

Syracuse, Providence, Nov. 24 6-6 

Totals 145^7 

COLUMBIA.— ELEVEN GAME.S. 

Rutgers, New Brunswick, Oct. 3 ... 11- 

Weslevan, New York, Oct. 6 12-0 

Williams, New York, Oct. 10 0-0 

Harvard, Cambridge, Oct. 13 0-24 

Stevens, New York. Oct. 17 45-0 

Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Oct. 20 . 0-30 

Y'ale, New York, Oct. 27 ii-12 

Princeton, New York, Nov. 6 6-5 

Buffalo, Buffalo, Nov. 10 17-0 

Naval Cadets, Annapolis, Nov. 17 . . . 11-0 

Carlisle Indians, New York, Nov. 29 . 17- 6 

Totals 124^77 

NAVAL CADETS —NINE GAMES. 

Baltimore Med. Col., Annapolis, Oct. 6 6-0 

Princeton, Annapolis, Oct. 13 0-5 

<ieorgetown, Annapolis, Oct. 20. ... 6-0 

Lehigh, Annapolis, Oct. 27 15-0 

Wash, and Jeff., Annapolis, Nov. 3 . . 18-0 

Pa. State College, Annapolis, Nov. 10 . 44- 

Columbia, Annapolis, Nov, 17 ... . 0-11 

Pennsylvania, Annapolis, Nov, 21 . , 6-28 

Military Cadets, Philadelphia, . . , . 1 1- 7 

Totals 96-.51 

MILITARY CADETS.— TWELVE GAMES. 

Tufts, West Point, Sept. 29 .5-0 

Pa. State College, West Point, Oct. 6 . 0-0 

Trinitv, West Point, Oct. 13 28-0 

De Salle, West Point, Oct. 17 11-0 

Harvard,West Point, Oct. 20 0-29 

Williams, West Point, Oct. 27 6-0 

N. V. fniversitv, West Point, Oct. 31 . 6-0 

Yal.'. Wl-I l'..i]it, Nmv. 3 0-18 

Kniuei-. U. q IN.int, Nov. 7 2:^-0 

llaniiltnn. West Point. Nov. 10 .... 11-0 

Bncknell, West Point, Nov. 17 18-10 

Naval Cadets, Philadelphia, 7-11 

Totals 115-68 

HAVERFORD.— TEN GAMES. 

Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Oct, 6 . . 0-8 

Rutgers, New Bnniswick, Oct. 13 . . . 0-11 
Frankl. and Marsh.. Lancaster, Oct. 10 6- 

Maryland, Haverford, Oct. 24 12- 

Dickinson, Carlisle, Oct. 27 0-27 

Jefferson Med. Col., Haverford, Oct. 31 6- 

Delaware College, Haverford, Nov. 7 . 5-5 

Lehigh, Haverford, Nov. 10 10-11 

Ursiinis, Haverford, Nov. 14 17-12 

Swarthmore, Swarthmore, Nov. 24 . . 10-17 

Totals 66-121 



The Philadelphia Record JUmanac. 



CARLISLE INDIANS.— ELFAEN GAMES. 

I )pponents, Place aud Date. Score. 

Lebanon Valley Col., Carlisle, Sept. 22 34- 

Dickinson, Carlisle, Sept. 26 21- 

Susquebanna Univ.. Carlisle, Sept. 29 -10- 

GettysburK. Carlisle, Oit. -l.V o 

Virginia, Wa.shiii'jttiu, Oct. 13 .... 1(1-2 

Maryland, li.iltiiiioM', del. 1.3 27-0 

Harvard, Caiubrid;^e, (ict. 27 5-17 

Vnle, New Haven, Nov. 10 0-35 

Pennsvlvania, Philadelphia, Nov. 17 . 6-16 

Wash, and Jeff., Pittsbnrg, Nov. 21 . . 5- 5 

Columbia, New York, Nov. 29 . . . 6-17 

Totals 211-92 

CHICAGO.— THIKTEEN GAMES. 

Lomliard College, Chicago, Sept 22 . . 21- 

Monmouth, Chicago, Sept. 26 2.- 

Knox, Chicago, Sept. 29 HI- (I 

Di.xon, Chicago, Oct. 3 23-5 

Purdue, C;hicago, Oct. 6 17-5 

Rush Medical, Chicago, Oct. 9 .... 10- () 

Mhmesoia, Minneapolis, Oct. 13 ... 6- (l 

Brown, Chicago, Oct. 20 C.-II 

Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. Oct. 27 ' . o-ll 

Iowa, Chicago, Nov. 3 (|-17 

Northwestern, Chicago, Nov. 10. . . . 0- 5 

Wisconsin, Chicago, Nov. 17 ;5-39 

Michigan, Chicago, Nov. 29 1.5-6 

Totals 



SWARTHMORE.— TWELVE GAMES. 

Alumni, Swarthmore, Sept. 29 .... 27- 5 

Dickinson, Swarthmore, Oct. 6 . . . . 0-12 

Lafayette, East on, Oct. 13 2-34 

Ursinus, Swarthmore, Oct. 17 5-17 

St. John, Swarihmore, Oct. 20 .... 5-5 

Penna. Mil. College, Chester, Oct. 24 . 28- 5 

Chester High School. Oct. 27 6-2 

(Jeorgetown, Washington, Nov. 3 . . 16-16 

Frank. & Marsh., Swarthmore, Nov. 10 24-10 

Hahnemann, Swarthmore, Nov. 17 . . 5-10 

Haverford, Swarthmore, Nov. 24 . . . 17-10 

Lehigh, Bethlehem, Nov. 29 0-17 

Totals 125-143 

PENNA. ST.ATE COLLEGE.— ELEVEN GA.MES. 

Susquehanna, Bellefonte, Sept. 22 . . 17-0 

Western U. of Pa., Bellefonte, Sept. 29. 12- 

West Point, West Point, Oct. 6 . . . . t)- 

Princeton, Princeton, Oct. 10 0-26 

Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Oct. 17 . 5-17 

Dickinson, Carlisle, Oct. 20 0-18 

Duquesne C. & A. C, Pittsburg, Oct. 27 0-29 

Bucknell, Williamsport, Nov. 3 . . . . 0-*6 

Naval Cadets, Annapolis, Nov. 10 . . . 0-44 

Oettysburg, Bellefonte, Nov. 17 ... . 44- 

Buffalo, Buffalo, Nov. 29 6-10 

Totals .'v4-150 

* Forfeited, 
LEHIGH.— TEN GAMES. 

Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Sept. 29 
Princeton, Princeton, Oct. 6 . . . . 
Bucknell, South Bethlehem, Oct. 13 
Rutgers, South Bethlehem, Oct. 2 ) . 
Naval Cadets, Annapolis, Oct. 27 . . 
Lafayette, South Bethlehem, Nov. 3 
Haverford, Haverford, Nov. 10 . . . 

Dickinson, Carlisle, Nov. 17 

Lafayette, Easton, Nov. 24 

Swarthmore, Bethlehem, Nov. 29 . . 

Totals 78-122 

WESLEYAN.— NINE GAMES. 

Harvard, Cambridge, Sept. 29 0-24 

Union, Hanover, Oct. 6 0-0 

.\mherst Aggies, Amherst, Oct. 13 . . 17-0 

Vale, New Haven, Oct. 20 0-38 

Trinity, Hartford, Oct. 27 0-5 

Dai tnioutli, Hanover, Nov. 3 16-5 



6-27 

12- 6 

21- 
0-15 
0-34 

11-10 
6- 
0-18 

17- 



TInlv Cross, Middletown, Nov. 10 . . . 11- 5 

W iliiams, Williamstowii, Nov. 17 . . . oiV 

A nilieibt, Middletown, Nov. 24 . ... 17-0 

Totals 96-77 

DICKINSON— ELEVEN GAMES. 

Indians, Carlisle, Sept. 26 (i-21 

Swarihmore, Swarthmore, Oct. 6 . . . 12-0 

Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. Oct. 10 . 0-35 

Slate College. Carlisle, Oct. 20 .... 18-0 

Haverford, Carlisle, Oct. 27 27-0 

Cettysburg, Carlisle, Nov. 3 49-0 

Syracuse, Syracuse, Nov. 10 0-6 

Lehigh, Carlisle, Nov. 14 0-6 

Frankl. and Mar.sh., Lancaster, Nov. 21 7- 5 

Wyoming, Williamsport, Pa , Nov. 24 0-16 

Lafayette, Easton, Nov. 29 6-10 

Totals 119-99 

GROKGETOWN.— NINE GA.MES. 

St. John's. Washington, Oct. 13 ... . 6- o 

Xaval Cadets, Annapolis, Oct. 20 . . . 0-6 

KichmoiidColle-c.Wa-liinmdn.Oct.Sl 84- 

Swarthmore. Wasliiii-i, 111, N,,v. 3 . . . 16-16 

(Jcttv.sburi;. (;e(iii^et<i\Mi. Nov. 7 . . . 23-5 

Va. Mil. lust., Uicliniuii.l, Xov.lO . . 15-10 

Virginia, (ieorgetown, Nov, 17 .... 10-0 

(iallaudet, (ieorgetown, Nov. 21 . . . 5-5 

North Carolina, Georgetown, Nov. 29 . 0- 

Totals 159-42 

BUCKNELL.— NINE GAMES. 

Wyoming, Lewisburg, Sept. 29 ... . 36- 

Cornell, Ithaca. Oct. 6 0-6 

Lehigh, SoiUh Bethlehem, Oct. 13 . . 6-12 

Duquesne C A: A. C , Pittsburg, Oct. 20 0-29 
Williamsport \\'heelmen, Lewisburg, 

( )ct. 27 39-0 

State College, Williamsport, Nov. 3 . . *0- 6 

Susquehanna, Lewisburg, Nov. 10 . 35- 

Military Cadets, West Point, Nov. 17. . 10-18 

Villa Nova, Villa Nova, Nov. 24 . . . 0-0 

Totals 126-71 



FRANKLIN 



*Forteitwl. 

MARSHALL. — NINE GAMI 



Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Oct. 3 . . 0-38 

Delaware, Lancaster, Oct. 6 28-10 

Lebanon Valley, Annville, Oct. 13 . . 10-6 

Haverford, Lancaster. Oct. 20 0-6 

Ursinus, Collegeville, Nov. 3 6-0 

Swarthmore, Swarthmore, Nov. 10 . . 10-24 
Jefferson Med. Col., Lancaster, Nov. 17 34-11 
Dickinson, Lancaster, Nov. 21 ... . 5-7 
(iettysljurg, Lancaster, Nov. 29 ... . 0-6 
Totals 93-108 

GETTYSBURG.— TEN GAMES. 

Western Maryland, Gettysburg, Sept. 29 13- 

Indians, Carlisle, Oct. 6 0-46 

Villa Nova, Villa Nova, Oct. 13 . . . . 0-12 
Baltimore Med. Col., Baltimore, Oct. 20 0-11 
St. John's, Gettysburg, Oct. 27 ... . 0-0 

Dickinson, Carlisle, Nov. 3 0-49 

Georgetown, Georgetown, Nov. 7 . . . .5-23 
Pa. State College, Bellelonte, Nov. 17 . 0-44 
Lebanon Val. Col., Gettysburg, Nov. '24. 22- 
Franklin &,M., Lancaster, Nov. 29 . . 6- 
Totals 46-185 

VIRGINIA.- SEVEN GAMES. 

Wash, and Lee, Charlottesville, Oct. 6. 29- 
Carlisle Indians, Washington, Oct. 13 . 2-16 
Johns-Hopkins, Charlottesville, Oct. 20 40- 
Va. Mil. Inst., Lexington, Va., Oct. 24 . 0-0 
Georgetown, Georgetown, Nov. 17 . . 0-10 
North Carolina, Norfolk. Nov. 24 . . 17-0 
University of South, Richmond, Nov. 29 17- 5 



lotals . 



The Philadelphia Record JUmanac. 



Big College Games from 1883 to 1899. 

Following will be found the results of the 
big College games since 1883 : 

UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA— PRINCETON. 

188&— U. of Penna., <>; Princeton, 39. 
1884— U. of Penna., 0; Princeton, 30. 
1885— U. of Penna., 0; Princeton, 51. 
1886— U. of Penna., (i ; Princeton, 28. 
1887— U. of Penna., 0; Princeton, 95. 
1888— U. of Penna., 0; Princeton, 4. 
1889— U. of Penna., 4 ; Princeton, 72. 
1890— U. of Penna., 0; Princeton, 6. 
1891— U. of Penna., 0; Princeton, 24. 
1892— U. of Penna.. 6; Princeton, 4. 
1893- U. of Penna.. 0: Princeton, 4. 
1894— U. of Penna., 12: Princeton, 0. 
1895 to 1900- No Oaraes. 

UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA— HARVAP.D. 

1883—1". of Penna., 0; Harvard, 4. 
1884— U. of Penna., 4 ; Harvard, 1). 
1886— U. of Penna., ; Harvard, 28. 
1889— U. of Penna., 0; Harvard, 35. 
1893— U. of Penna., 4 : Harvard, 26. 
1894— U. of Penna., 18 ; Harvard, 4. 
1895— U. of Penna., 17: Harvard, 14. 
1896-U. of Penna., 8: Harvard, 6. 
1897— U. of Penna., 15; Harvard, 0. 
1898— U. of Penna,, 0; Harvard, 10. 
1899— U. of Penna., 0; Harvard, 16. 

UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA — YALE. 

1885— U. of Penna., 2; Yale, 52. 
1886— U. of Penna., 0; Yale, 76. 
1887— U. of Penua., 0; Yale, 48. 
1888— U. of Penna., 0; Yale. 50. 
1889— U. of Penna., 10; Yale, 20. 
1890— U. of Penna., ; Yale. 60, 
1891— U. of Penna., ; Y'ale, 48. 
1892— U. of Penna., 0; Yale, 28. 
1893— U. of Pen.ia., 6 ; Yale, 14. 
1894 to 1900— No games. 

UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA— CORNELL. 

1893— U. of Penna., 50; Cornell, 0. 
1894— U. of Penna., 6; Cornell, 0. 
189.5— U. of Penna., 46; Cornell, 2, 
1896— U. of Penna., i2\ Cornell, 10. 
1897— U. of Penna., 4 ; Cornell. 0. 
1898— U. of Penna., 12; Cornell, 6. 
1899— U. of Penna., 29 ; Cornell, 0. 



YALE— PRINCETON. 

1883— Y'ale, 6 ; Princeton, 0. 
1884— Y'ale, 6; Princeton, 4 (draw). 
1885- Yale, 5; Princeton, 6. 
1886- Y'ale, 4 : Princeton, (draw). 
1887— Y'ale, 12 ; Princeton, 0. 
1888— Yale, 10; Princeton, 0. 
1889— Yale, 0; Princeton, 10. 
1890— Yale, 32 ; Princeton, 0. 
1891— Y'ale, 19 ; Princeton, 0. 
1892— Yale, 12 ; Princeton, 0. 
1893— Yale, 0: Princeton, 6. 
1891— Yale, 24 : Princeton, 0. 
1895— Yale, 20; Princeton, 10. 
1896— Yale, 6: Princeton, 24. 
1897— Y'ale, 6; Princeton, 0. 
1898— Yale, ; Princeton, 6. 
1899— Yale, 10; Princeton, 11. 

YALE— HARVARD. 

1883— Yale, 23 ; Harvard, 2. 
1884— Yale, 52 ; Harvard, 0. 
1886— Yale, 29 ; Harvard, 4. 
1887- Yale, 17 ; Harvard, 8. 
1888— No game. Harvard forfeited. 
1S89— Yale, 6 ; Harvard, 0. 
1890— Yale, 6 ; Harvard, 12. 
1891— Yale, 10; Harvard, 0. 
1892— Yale, 6 ; Harvard, 0. 
1893— Yale, 6; Harvard, 0. 
1894— Yale, 12 ; Harvard, 4. 
1897— Yale, ; Harvard, 0. 
1898— Yale, ; Harvard, 17. 
1899— Yale. ; Harvard, 0. 

PRINCETON- HARVARD. 

1883— Princeton, 26; Harvard, 7. 
1884- Princeton, 34 ; Harvard, C. 
1886— Princeton, 12; Harvard, 0. 
1887— Princeton, 0; Harvard, 12. 
1888— Princeton, 18; Harvard, 6. 
1889— Princeton, 41 ; Harvard, 15. 
1895— Princeton, 12; Harvard, 4. 
1896— Princeton, 12; Harvard, 0. 
1897 to 1900— No games. 

ARMY AND NAVY. 

1890— .-Vt West Point— Navy, 24 ; Army, 0. 
1891— .-it Annapolis— Armv, 32 ; Navy. 16. 
1892— At West Point— Navy. 12: Army, 4. 
1893— At Annapolis— Navv, 6; Army, 4. 
1899— At Philadelphia— Army 17 ; Navy, 5. 



GOI/P. 

AMATEUR CHAMPIONSHIP— THIRTY-SIX HOLES. 
YEAR. WINNER. RUNNER-UP. WO 

1896. . . . H. .1. Whigham .j.G. Thorp 8 up ; 

1897 .... H. .1. Whigham W. R. Belts 7 up; 

1898 . . . . F. S Douglas W. B. Smith 5 up ; 

1899. . . . H. M. Harriman F.S.Douglas 3 up; 

1900 .... W. J. Travis • F. S. Douglas 2 up. 

OPEN CHAMPIONSHIP— SEVENTY-SIX HOLES— MEDAL PLAY. 

1900 . . . . H. Vardon J. H. Taylor 313 to 

WOMEN'S CHAMPIONSHIP— EIGHTEEN HOLES. 

*1895 .... Mrs. V. S. Brown Miss N. C. Sargent 132 to 

1896 .... Miss B. Hovt Mrs. A. Turnure 2 up ; 

1897. . . . Miss B. Hovt Miss N. C. Sargent 5 up ; 

189S .... Miss B. Hoyt j Miss M. K. Wetmore 5 up ; 

1899 .... Miss R. Underhill Jlrs. C. P. Fox 2 up. 

1900. . . . Miss F. C. Griscom Miss M. Curtis 6 up; 

» Medal play. 

WOMEN'S CHAMPIONSHIP OF PHILADELPHIA— EIGHTEEN HOLES. 

*1S97 .... Miss H. B. Davids 117+2 

1898 .... Miss E. F. Cassatt Mi.-^s Cnleb F. Fox 1 up. 

1899. . . . Miss E. F. Ca.ssatt Mrs. Walter M. Gotham . . .4 up: 

1900 .... Miss F. C. (iriscom Mrs C. F. Fox 5 up ; 

* The first championship. 18U7, was at medal pla.v, Miss Daviiis, with a handicap of plus 2, winning. 
CHAMPIONSHIP OF PHILADELPHIA— THIRTY-SIX HOLES. 

*1897 .... A. H. Smith J. D. Windsor, Jr 1 up. 

1898 .... W. P. Smith H. M. Forrest 2 up. 

1899. . . .F. H. Bohlen W.P.Smith 6 up; 

1900 . . . . F. M. Mackie A. J. P. Gallagher 6 up ; 



7 to play 
6 to play 
3 to play 
2 to play 



315. 

1:34. 

1 to play 
4 to play 

3 to play 

4 to ])lay 



3 to pla\ 

4 to plaj 



5 to play 
5 to play 



Game La-ws. 



Pennsylvania. 

Open season for game birds, game mam- 
mals and game fish, and number and size 
lawful to take : 

ANIMALS AND BIRDS. 

Black, Gray or Fox Squirrel— From October 
15 to December 15, inclusive. 

Elk. Wild Deer or Fawn (two in any one 
season)— During month of November only. 

English, Mongolian or Chinese Pheasant— 
From October 15 to December 15, inclusive, 
but not until during that period in the year 
1902. 

Grou.se (Ruffed, commonly called Pheas- 
ant, and Pinnated, commonly called Prairie 
Chicken) (ten Ruffed Grouse "in any one day) 
—From October 15 to December 15, inclu- 
sive. 

Hare or Rabbit— From November 1 to De- 
cember 15, inclusive. 

Quail or Virginia Partridge (15 in any one 
day)— From October 15 to December 15, in- 
clusive. 

Rail birds and Reed birds— During months 
of September, October and November. 

Upland or Grass Plover — Between July 15 
and January 1. 

Web-footed wild fowl— From September 1 
to May 1. 

Wild Pigeon— Except while on or within 
one mile of nesting grounds. 

Wild Turkey (two ir any one day)— From 
October 15 to December 15,"inclusive. 

Woodcock (ten in any one day)— From 
October 15 to December 15 and during 
month of July. 

Unprotected — English or European House 
Sparrows, the various species of Hawks, 
Owls and Crows, Kingfishers, Cooper's Hawk, 
Sharp-shinned Hawk, Duck Hawk, Pigeon 
Hawk, Great Horned Owl, Barred Owl, Green 
Heron, Night Heron and Red or Pine Squir- 
rel. 

Premium for the following slain animal or 
pelt thereof— Wolf, WO : Wild Cat, m : Red 
or Gray Fox, $1 ; and Mink, 50 cents. 

FISH. 

Black Bass, Rock Bass or Walleyed Pike 
(commonly known as Susquehanna Salmon) 
—Between May 30 and January 1, Lake Erie 
excepted. Size lawful to kill, not less than : 
Black Bass, six inches, except in Delaware 
river, and there nine inches, and in I>ake 
Erie, within one mile of shore, IJ^ pounds to 
catch with net ; Rock Bass and Susquehanna 
Salmon, five inches, except Salmon in Dela- 
ware river, and there nine inches. 

Green Bass, Yellow Bass, Willow Bass and 
Lake Erie or Grass Bass (six inches) — Be- 
tween June 1 and January 1, Lake Erie ex- 
cepted, save in ponds on tfie island or penin- 
sula forming the north and east shores of 
Erie harbor. 

Lake Trout— From January 1 to Septem- 
ber 30. 

Pike or Pickerel— Between June 1 and 
February 1. 

Penobscot Salmon, or Grilse (not under 
three pounds)— From March 1 to August 15. 

Sea Salmon— From April 1 to August 1. 

Speckled Trout (if for sale, 5 inches) — 
Prom April 15 to July 15. 

Sturgeon — Between December 31 and 
June 30. 



Shad and Herring (unlimited, except by 
size of meshes of nets) — In any waters of 
the Commonwealth (including the Delaware 
river below and excluding it above the 
Trenton Falls), from Decemljer 31 to June 
20 ; and above Trenton Falls from December 
31 to June 15. Excepting in the Delaware 
river from sunset Saturday night to 12 
o'clock Sunday night in each week of said 
periods, and in the Susquehanna and Juni- 
ata rivers, from sunset on Saturday till sun- 
rise on Monday of any week from March 15 
to June 20. 

G erman Carp— Unprotected . 

Market hunting, buying, selling and the 
shipment of game birds and mammals are 
prohibited. 

Sunday gunning is prohibited. 

Decoys may be used in hunting Duck or 
Geese only. 

All game must be shot with a gun. 

The ]ienalty for hunting Deer with dogs or 
in the waters of any stream or pond is SlOO 
for each offense and imprisonment of one 
day for each dollar of penalty impo.sed. 

the u.se of ferrets in hunting game is pro- 
hibited. 

Killing, wounding or taking any game 
birds or animals with trap, net, snare, bird- 
lime, poison or drugs is prohibited. 

Fifteen days' time is allowed after expira- 
tion of season to dispose of game. 

New Jersey. 

BIRDS. Lawful to Kill. 

Quail Nov. 1 to Jan. 1. 

Partridge, Grouse or 
Pheasant Nov. 1 to Jan. 1. 

^Voodcock Y^TW^I^t 

Gray, English or Wilson I ^tl^^ot^Maixh. 

*'"'^® j Jan. 1. 

Reed Bird, Rail Bird ) .„„ or .„ t„ -, 

and Marsh Hen ... J ^"&- ^ ^^ "J*"- ^■ 
Grass or Upland | Months of August 

Plover and Dove . . . f and September. 
Geese, Duck and other 

web-footed wild fowl . Sept. 30 to May 1. 

ANIMALS. 

Hare and Rabbit .... Nov. 1 to Jan. 1. 

Gray, Black and Fox ) t^^ , , . , 

Squirrel I^*^^- Ho -'a"- 1- 

FISH. 

Brook Trout April 1 to July 15. 

Black Bass, Pike Perch, i 

Yellow Perch and Wune 15 to Dec. 1. 

White Bass ) 

Pike and Pickerel ... May 1 to Dec. 1. 

Killing of Deer and Ring-necked Pheas- 
ants prohibited until 1902. 

WHAT IS ALWAYS UNLAWFUL. 

To remove or attempt to remove any Part- 
ridge, Quail or Rabbit, English Pheasant, 
Woodcock or Squirrel from the State except- 
ing when the same were killed in preserves 
stocked by the owner Fine, S20. 

To take or attempt to take any game ex- 
cept by the use of guns held at arms' length. 
Fine, *50. 

To take or attempt to take any fish in any 
manner excepting with hook and line, ex- 
cepting spearing of Eels, Suckers and Carp, 
taking Jlinnows for liait with a seine not 



The Philadelphia Record JUmanac. 



more than twenty-five feet long, and taking 
Eels with pots or baskets, or weirs, between 
the 15th of September and the 1st of Novem- 
ber, and excepting also, but only as to the 
tributaries of the Delaware above Trenton 
Falls, and the streams flowing into such 
tributaries, the taking of Catfish and Eels 
with eel weirs and baskets, and set-lines be- 
tween the 15th of August and the 1st of 
November. Fine, 850. 

To have trapped game in possession. Fine, 
520. 

To pollute streams or use medicated bait 
or explosives of anv kind for the taking of 
fish. Fine, «100 to S500. 

To draw off water to take fish. Fine, from 
J25 to §250. 

To use set-lines in waters inhabited by 
Pickerel, Bass, Perch or Trout. Fine. SL'."). 

To permit the erection or maintenance ( it un- 
lawful contrivance for taking game and iisli : 
applies to les.sees or tenants of lauds. Fine, 125. 

To capture, kill, injure or to have in posses- 
sion any birds excepting English Sparrows, 
Cranes, Hawks, Crows, Ravens, Crow-Black- 
birds, Kingfishers and Red-Winged Black- 
birds. Fine. S20. 

To hiuit Geese, Ducks or any web-footed 
wild fowl, excepting beiw cell one liourbrl'ore 
sunrise and one hour :ili. i -ui;-<t. l-'ine, >_'5. 

To catch or keep Troll I |.~- tli:in six imhes 
in length, or Black F.a-- 1.^- ihan nine inciirs 
in length. Fine, $20. 

Maryland Ducking I,aws. 

Maryland State law allows the shooting 
of wild ducks from November 1 to Ajiril 10, 
and prohibits shooting at any other time 

The shooting on what is' known as tlie 
" Susquehanna Flats," from Nov. 1 to Marrli 
31, is restricted to an area of not less than a 
quarter of a mile from shore, northward of a 
line beginning at Turkey Point Lighthouse, 
Cecil cotnity, and drawn westward to a 
point half a mile north of the most northern 

Eart of Spesutla Island ; thence westward 
alf a mile north of the adjacent mainland 
to the shore of Harford county, at or near 
Oakington, and south of a line drawn east 
from Concord Point Lighthouse, in Harlbrd 
cotnity, to Carpenter's Point, Cecil county. 

The shooting days until January 1 within 
the lines above described are Monday, Wed- 
nesday and Friday of each week, .\fter 
January 1 shooting is allowed on .Saturday 
also. The law prohibits night sliootiug and 
anchoring of boats on any but gunning days. 
or going over the waters on gunning days 
before 5 o'clock A. M. 

Persons desiring to shoot Ducks on the 
flats of the Susquehanna must do so from 
licensed sink boxes or sneak boats. These 
licenses are i.ssued only to actual residents 
of Harford and Cecil comities. 

It is lawful to shoot Teal, Mallards, Black 
Ducks, Baldpate and other Wild Ducks, 
known as "Marsh Ducks," from one hour 
before sunrise to one hour after sunset every 
day from August 15 to October 1 on the Sus- 
quehanna Flats. 

The law prohibits the .shooting of water- 
fowl while bedded in flocks on their roost- 
ing or feeding grounds, the use of a booby 
blind or artificial point more than 100 yards 
from the shore, and the use of big gnus or 
swivel guns from any boat in any part of the 
State. 

Bona-fide citizens of Cecil and Kent 
counties may shoot from sink boxes in Sas- 
safras river," upon obtaining a license, on 
Mondays, Wednesdays. P'ridays and Satur- 



days between November 1 and March 31. 
The same shooting days are allowed for Elk 
and Bohemia rivers, in Cecil county. 

In TiiUiot county il is unlawful to shoot or 
shoot at wild wate'rlbwl between May 1 and 
October 10 in Great ClioptanU river and 
tributaries lying wholly in Trappe district 
of Talbot county. 

Dorchester county allows shooting from 
sink boats at waterfowl in Choptank river 
and tributaries tVc.m davlneak until dark on 
Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays. 

Tlie shooting days tbr Middle and Lower 
Hooiier's Island, Dorclies'er county, are 
Mondays, Wednesdays and nidays. 

Somerset county jiermils Wild Duck shoot- 
ing from October i to April 1, and the shoot- 
ing of Wild (ieese from November 1 to April 1. 

Worcester county prohibits the .shooting 
of wild waterfowl between April 10 and 
November 1. Non-residents of the State 
must obtain license to .shoot. 

In Caroline county shooting Blackbirds 
and other game in the tidewater marshes is 
prohibited between January 1 and Septem- 
ber 20. 

Patuxent river — Non-residents of Anne 
Arundel, Calvert, Charles, Prince George's 
and St. Mary's counties are prohibited from 
shooting or trapping Geese, Ducks, Snipe, 
(irtolan or other waterfowl on Patuxent 
waters, tributaries or marshes, unless by per- 
mission of a majority of the citizens living 
contiguous to the marshes, or unless they 
shall employ only such boats for the shoot- 
ing as are licensed. Ortolan shooting dates 
from September 5 to November 1. 

Anue Arundel shooting days for wild 
ducks from booby blinds, between October 1 
and IMay 1, are a-s follows : 

South river— Mondays, Wednesdays and 
Fridavs. 

Severn river— Mondays, Wednesdays and 
Saturdays. 

Magothy river— Tuesdays and Fridays. 

M.\RYL.\ND COUNTY I,.\WS FOR OTHER G.\ME. 

Wild Turkeys : Allegany, October 15 to 
December 31 ; Baltimore city, November 1 
to December 24 ; Baltimore county, No- 
vember 1 to Decemlier 24 ; Frederic k— Novem- 
ber 15 to January 14 ; (Barrett, all of Novem- 
ber; Howard, November 1 to December 24; 
Montgomerv, November 1 to February 1 ; 
Washington", November 1 to January 14. 

Deer: .\llegany, .\ugust 1 to December 
31 : (iarrett, suspended till end of UiOo; 
Washington, November 1 to January 14. 

Squirrels: Anne Arundel, September 1 to 
November 30; Baltimore city, September 1 
to November 30 ; Baltimore county, Sep- 
tember I to November 30 ; Caroline, No- 
vember 15 to December 24 ; Carroll, Septem- 
ber 1 to November 30 ; Frederick, June 15 to 
November 1; IMontgomery, August 1 to De- 
cember 15 ; Somerset, .September 1 to Decem- 
ber 1 ; Wasliington, June 1 to June 30, Sep- 
tember 15 to November 30 ; Wicomico, Sep- 
tember 1 to February 14. 

Doves : Baltimore city, August 15 to De- 
cember 24 ; Kent, August 1 to December '24 ; 
Somerset, August 15 to January 1 ; Washing- 
ton, .\ugust VI to December 24. 

Snipe or I'lover : Baltimore city, August 
15 to December -1-i ; Carroll, September 1 to 
April :;o; Kent, Marcli 15 to .lune 1 (snipe), 
August 1 to December 24 (plover) ; Wicomico, 
November 15 to January 14. 

Rail : Baltimore city, September 1 to Oc- 
tober 30; Caroline, September 20 to January 



The Philadelphia Record Jtlmanac. 



1 ; Cecil, September 5 (o March 31 ; Harford, 
September 1 to December 15; Kent, Septem- 
ber 1 to October 30 ; Prince George's, Septem- 
ber 5 to October 30 ; Tulbot, September 10 to 
De<ember31. 

Reed birds : Baltimore city, September 1 to 
Octoher :'.ii ; ( 'icil, Septembe'r 5 to March 31 ; 
Harford, Srj. tnidierl to December 15 ; Kent, 
Sepleinlirr \ u> ( ictober 30. 

\\'il<l ri^Loii : Kent, August 1 to December 

Rubin: St. Mary's, October 1 to February 
2S-29. 

Wild Duck: Anne Arundel, October 1 to 
>hiy 1 ; Baltimore city, November 1 to April 
11); Baltimore county, November 1 to April 
10 ; Caroline, September 20 to April 1 : Cecil, 
November 1 to ^iarch ;31 ; Garrett, November 
1 to .\pril 1(1 ; Howard, November 1 to April 
10; SoiiuTset. October 1 to April 1 ; Worces- 
ter, November 1 to April 9. 

Wild Geese : Somerset, November 1 to 
March 31. 

Wood or Summer Ducks: Montgomery, 



September 1 to December 31 : Talbot, Sep- 
tember 10 to December 31 : Wicomico, Sep- 
tember 10 to December 31 ; Worcester, Sep- 
tember 1 to February 28-20 ; Somerset, Sep- 
tember 1 to January 1. 
Muskiat : Caroline, December 1 to March 

14 ; Dorchester, January 1 to March 31 ; Som- 
erset, I)eeeml)er 1 to March 15: Talbot, De- 

■endjer 1 to March 15; Wicomico, December 

15 to March 1 1. 

Otter: General law, .lanunry 1 to April 1 ; 
Dorchester, January 1 to IMarch 31 ; Talbot, 
December 1 to March 15. 

Fo.\ : In Montgomery a I'enalty is pro- 
vided for anyone shootin.u a Fo.x while it is 
being chased by hounds in ehar.ye of fox 
hunters. In Somerset fox huntinK is iiro- 
hibited between Minch 10 and November 1. 

Raccoon: General law , .lanuary Ito April 1. 

Mink : General law, .lannary 1 to April 1. 

Partridge and Ralibit : Following is a table 
of .shooting dates for Partrid.ce, Woodcock. 
Rabbits and Pheasants, which form the 
principal game stock of Maryland: 



COUNTIES. QUAIL. 

Allegany I Oct. 1 — Dec. 

Anne Arundel I Nov. 1.5— Dec. 

Baltimore City ... Nov. 1 — Dec. : 

Baltimore Co Nov. 1— Dec. 

Calvert I Nov. 1— Jan. 

Caroline [ Nov. 1.5— Dec. 

Carroll i Nov. 10— Dec. 

Cecil Nov. 1— J:in. 

Charles Nov. 1— Deo. 

Dorchester , Nov. 1— Dec. 

Frederick | Nov. 1.5— Dec. 

Garrett : All of Nov. 

Harford i Nov. 1.5 — Dec. 

Howard i Nov. 1— Dec. 

Kent j Nov. 1— Dec. 

Montgomery ■ Nov. 1 — Dor. 

Prince Georges... I Nov. I — Deo. 

Queen Anne's Nov, 15 — Dec. 

Somerset \ Nov. 20— I.in. 

St. Mary's ' Nov. I— Dec. 

Talbot Nov. 1 — Dec. 

■Washington Oct. 211— Dec. 

Wicomico 1 Nov. 1.5 — .Ian. 

Worcester ' Nov. 1.5— Ian. 





WOODCOCK. 


RABBITS. 


PHEASANTS. 


.SI 


July I— Dec. 31 


Oct. 


1.5_Dec. 31 


Sept. l.-Dec. ;il 


■,^4 


Nov. 15— Dec, 24 


Nov. 


1.5— Dec. 24 


Nov. 1.5-Dec. 24 


24 


Nov, 1— Dec. 24 


Nov. 


1-Dec. 24 


Oct. 1— Dec. 24 


24 


Nov. 1— Dec. 21 


Nov. 


1— Dec. 24 


Nov. 1— Dec. 24 


10 


Nov. 1— Deo. 24 


Nov. 


1— Dec. 24 


Nov. 1-Dec. 24 


24 


July 4— I'el>. I 


Nov. 


15— Dec. 24 


Nov. 1— Dec. 24 


24 


.Julv 1.5— Dec. 24 


Nov 


10— Dec. 24 


Nov. 10— Dec. 24 


9 


,lune 111— Dec. :U 


Nov 


1— Jan. 9 


Sept. .5— Mch;il 


24 


Jul,, J— Fell. 24 


Oct. 


15— Jan. 14 


Nov. 1— Dec. 24 


■n 


Julv 1— Jan. 15 


Nov 


1— Dec. 24 


Nov. 10— Jan. 31 


1,5 


Nov. 1— Dec. 24 


Nov 


1.5— Dec. 1.5 


Nov. 15— Dec. 15 




All of Nov. 


Nov 


1— Jan. M 


All of Nov. 


14 


June ID— Aug. 9 


Nov 


1.5— Dec. 14 Nov. 1.5— Dec. 14 


24 


Nov. 1 -Dec. 24 


Nov 


1— Dec. 24 Nov. 1— Dec. 24 


24 


Nov. 1— Dec. 24 


Nov 


1— Dec. 24 ; Nov. 1— Dec. 24 


'21) 


July 1— Jan. 1 


Nov 


1— Dec. 20 Sept. 1— Jan. 1 


24 


Nov. l—Dcc. 24 


Nov 


1— Dec. 24 


Nov. 1— Dec. 24 


24 


July .5— ,Tan. .'U 


Nov 


1.5- Dec. 24 


Nov. 10— Dec, 24 


20 


June 15— Jnn. 1 


Nov 


10— .I.in. I 


Su.=pended,3vrs. 


•u 


Julv .5— Krli L'l 


Sr|.t 


1— Jan. 14 


Nov. 10— Dec. '24 


■M 


JulV .5-1..., :X 




1 -Dec. 31 


Nov. 1— Dec. 24 


24 


July 12—1)..... -t 


I 1. t. 


20— Dec. 24 


Aug. 12— Dec. 24 


14 


June 1.5-Jau. :il 


Nuv 


1— Jan. 14 


Nov. 10— Jan. :^1 


15 


Sus. till Je. 1.5, 'U2 ' Nov 


1.5— Jan. ir. Nov. 10— Jan. 31 



Delaware. 

Reed and Rail, September 1 to January 31. 

Woodcock, July 1 to September 15, Novem- 
ber 15 to December 31. 

Qnail and Rabbits, November 15 to De- 
cember 31. 

Swan, Geese and Ducks (excepting Sum- 
mer Ducks), October 1 to April 15. 

Penalty, $5 for each bird or animal. 

Non-residents desiring to shoot in Dela- 
ware must first npply for and procuie cer- 
tificates of membership in the Delaware 
Game Protective Association. Fee, 15 for 
the first year ; fl for each successive year. 
Penalty for non-compliance, f.50. 

IT I.S UNLAWFUI. 

To hunt Qnail. Woodcock or Rabbits at 
night, or when the ground is covered with 
snow. Penalty, S5. 

To trap or net Quail, Woodcock or Rabbits. 
Penalty. f5. 

To shoot Swan, (^ecse or Ducks, except 



with a giui raised at arm's length and fired 
from the shoulder. Penalty, .*50. 

'I'o Iniiit on Sunday. Penalty, flO. 

To buy game for purpose of profit. Pen- 
alty, 850. 

To ship game out of the State for purpose of 
profit. Penalty, $5 for each bird or rabbit. 

The " Lacey Game Law," passed by Con- 
gress and approved May '25, 1900, makes it 
unlawful to ship from one State to another 
animals or birds which have been killed in 
violation of local laws, and requires that all 
packages containing animals or birds be 
plainly marked, so that the name and ad- 
dress of the shipper and the nature of the 
contents may be aseertaine<l by inspection 
of the outside of such packages. It imposes 
a fine not exceeding $200 on the shipper, the 
consignee and the common carrier violating 
the law. As the shipment of game from 
Delaware for the purpose of profit is ex- 
pressly prohibited, violation of the law 
comes' within the notice of the United Stales 
ofticials. 



Pennsylvania 


\rote for Congress. 




1900. 


First District. 




Sixth District. 


BINGHAM, DOYLE, 


RAMSEY, 


BUTLER, ELLIS, HUSTON, 


PHILADELPHIA. R. D. 


PRO. 


R. D. PRO. 


1st Wiird . . . 4310 2076 


34 


Chester .... 12759 5924 Ml 


2d '• ... 2748 1063 


4 


Delaware . . . 13620 4174 352 


7th •• . 


. . 4593 715 


14 




2fith " 


. . 5085 2:387 


43 


Totals. . . 26379 10098 993 


30th '■ 


. . 4036 1514 


21 


Butler's plurality, 16281. 


36th '• 


. . 4644 2162 


31 




39th •' 


. . 4557 1848 


42 










Totals . . . 2997:! 117r.5 


1S9 


Seventh District. 


Bingham's jihirality, 1S208. 




WANGER, VANARTS- MCKINLAY, 
R. DALEN, D. PRO. 


Second District. 




Buc-ts 9100 7:«0 187 

Montgomery . . . 16322 11152 :i35 


ADAMS, 
PHILADELPHIA. R. 


HOOPER, 
D. 


8th Ward 2946 


386 


Totals .... 25422 18.542 522 


9th " 1198 

10th '• :S88 


263 
730 


Wanger's jjlurality, 6880. 


i:^th '■ 2914 


666 




14th " 2877 


972 




20th " 6134 


1981 


Eighth District. 







STEWART, MUTCHLER, DIXON, 


Totals 19659 


4998 


R. D. PRO. 


.Adams' plurality. 11659. 




Northampton . . 10189 10926 429 


"Third District. 




Monroe 1396 2,569 212 

Pike 688 1182 7 


BURK. NCALEER, McALEER, MARSH, FROST. 


Carbon 4480 ;i771 103 


3d ■\Vd. 1()50 94:; k» 5 
4th •• . 1572 1-2:^9 33 2 
5th " . 1560 1(«5 -2.53 W 


U 


Totals .... 16753 18448 751 





Mutchler's plurality, 1695. 


6th " . 6:e 11.S6 65 1 


(', 




11th '• .1'272 568 -24 3 


r, 




12th ".1286 1127 64 5 


32 


Ninth District. 


16th " . 1550 1216 112 2 


16 


STEVENS, GREEN, MERKEL, 


17th " . 1573 1745 149 5 


9 


R. D. SOC. 


Totals 11095 90.59 7.so 3:! 
Bark's i)lnrality. 1'256. 


92 


Berks 13491 188:« '255 

Lehigh 9267 10324 10 


Fourth District. 




Totals .... 22758 29160 '265 




EAVEN- 


Green's plurality, 6402. 


PHILADELPHIA. R. D. 


SON.PRO. 




15th\^•ar(l . . . .5941 2606 


67 




2Ist •• ... 4714 1:^22 


75 


Tenth District. 


•24th •' ... 6694 '2493 


138 


BROSIUS, SPENCER, VON 


27th •• ... 3923 823 


39 


R. ' D. NEIDA, PRO. 


28th " ... .5700 1551 
29th " ... 77:W 2232 
32d " ... 6311 1300 


92 


Lancaster .... 23143 8502 576 


91 


Brosius' plurality, 14641. 


34th '■ ... 4812 2071 


90 




37th •• ... :J273 1061 


19 




38tll '■ ... 4099 1238 


31 


Eleventh District. 


40th " ... '2442 633 


'28 








CONNELL, CONRY, RICHMOND, SPEN- 


Totals . . . ,55648 :7:):!0 


733 


R. D. PRO. CER, 1. C. 


Young's plurality. :«31,S. 




Lackawanna, 15536 13598 753 1392 




Connell's plurality, 1938. 


Fifth District. 






MORRELL, CARTER, 


BENSON, 




PHILADELPHA. R. D. 


PRO. 


Twelfth District. 


18th Ward . . . 4184 1447 


50 


PALMER, HOUSER, DAVENPORT, PURNELL, 


19th •• 




. 7662 2390 


72 


R. PRO. ANTI-TRUST, WKMEN. 


2'2d 




. 8288 1880 


127 


Luzerne . 18931 779 13698 1063 


23d 
25th " 




3885 920 
.5964 2495 


.8.1 
45 


Palmer's plurality, .5'2,33. 


31st " 




. 6001 1388 


48 




33d " 
35th " 




7:546 2620 
1286 385 


109 


Thirteenth District. 


41st •• 




1473 373 


21 


PATTERSON, RYAN, SCHWENK, 






R. D. PRO. 


Totals . . . 45089 13S9,S 


568 


Schuylkill .... 1.5519 13895 222 


Morrell's plurality, 31191. 




Patterson's plurality, 1624. 



The Philadelphia 


Record Jtlmanac. i''^ 


Fourteenth District. 


Twenty-First District. 


OLMSTED, FORSTER, MOLLY, 


JACK, R. GREGG, D. SHAFFER, PRO. 


R. D. PRO. 


Westmoreland . 1.5286 11121 .579 


Lelmiion .... 6168 298 aSts 


Armstrong . . . 6166 3252 . . 


Danphin .... 14191 566 777 


Indiana .... 5684 1716 '272 


ferry 3372 471 76 


Jefferson .... 5773 3067 4.84 


Totals . . .23731 133.5 14.=.! 


Totals . . 32909 19156 1335 


Olmsted's plurality, 22280. 


Jack's plurality, 137.53. 


Fifteenth District. 


Twenty-Second District. 


WRIGHT, PACKARD, REYNOLDS, LANE, 


DAL- MIL- M'CRORY, RUPP, 


R. D. PRO. PEO. 


ZELL, R. LER, D. P. S. L. 


Bradford . . JU38 4228 .526 4 
Susquehanna 5001 3381 466 23 


Allegheny (part) 36409 14343 807 615 
Dalzell's plurality, 22066. 


Wayne . . . 2608 2928 409 17 




Wyoming . . 2214 1859 117 


Twenty-Third District. 


Totals . . 18261 12396 1518 44 
Wright's plurality, 5865. 


GRA- HUCKIN- MIL- HUNT, 
HAM,R. STINE, D. LER, P. S. L. 

Allegheny (part) 19957 6142 440 216 




Graham's plurality, 13815. 


Sixteenth District. 




DEEMER, R. KAUPP, D. SHOLL, PRO. 


Twenty-Fourth District. 


Tioga .... 7027 2790 329 


ACHE- CARR, BUB- THOMAS, 


Potter .... 2891 2208 269 


SON, R. D. BETT, P. S. L. 


Lvcoming . . 7117 8314 6.56 
Clinton . . . 2809 3197 109 


Favette 9518 7635 278 24 


Greene 2399 3674 99 1 


Totals . . 19,844 16.509 1363 
Deemer's plurality, 3335. 


Washington . . 9785 6041 539 18 
Allegheny (part) 14237 6218 445 292 




Totals .... 35939 23568 1361 3:55 


Seventeenth District. 


Acheson's plurality, 12371. 


HUTH, R. POLK, 0. MURRAY, PRO. 




Northumberland 8201 7862 389 


Twenty-Fifth District. 


Columbia . . . '2810 5090 407 


SHOWALTEH, R. LOCKWOOD, 0. 


Montour .... 901 2191 41 


Beaver &491 4662 


Sullivan .... 11.59 1472 85 


Lawrence 5473 4026 


— . — . 


Mercer 6569 5707 


Totals . . . 12891 16623 923 


Butler 5939 5246 


Polk's plurality, 3732. 






Totals 24472 19641 




Showalter's plurality. 4831. 


Eighteenth District. 




MAHON, R. HEADING, D. 


Twenty-Sixth District. 


Franklin 6215 4746 




Fulton . . 1021 1209 


BATES. GAS- MONDER- BLACK, HEY" 


Mifflin 2472 1960 


R. TON, D. ALL, P. 8. L. ORICK, S. 


Huntingdon 4460 2104 


Crawford 74.38 7390 490 3 5 


.luuiata' 1661 1720 


Erie . . . 11'285 7528 474 112 209 


Snyder 2441 1340 




Cniou 2486 1385 


Totals . 18723 14918 964 115 214 




Bates' plurality, 3805. 


Totals 207.56 14464 




Mahon's plurality, 6292. 


Twenty-Seventh District. 




SIBLEY, EMERY, MILWARD, EMERY, 


Nineteenth District. 


R. D. PRO. LIN. 


LEWIS, R. GITT, 0. MULLIN PRO. 

Cumberland. . . .5503 5315 300 


Venango . . 6014 4202 767 
Warren . .4812 3374 .329 
McKean . . 4242 4314 264 1305 


Adams 3961 3540 91 

York 12802 12425 299 


Cameron . . 730 700 16 11 




Totals . 15804 12590 1376 1316 


Totals .... 22266 21280 690 
Lewis' plurality, 986. 


Sibley's pluraUty, 1998. 




Twenty-Eighth District. 


Twentieth District. 


CLEARWATER, HALL, BIRD, CRITCH- 


EVANS, WALTERS, CLARK, ROWLEY, 


R. D. PRO. LEY, S. L. 


R. D. PRO. S. L. 


Clarion . . .29-30 3498 


Cambria. . . . 102U9 7291 245 52 


Forest .... 1242 724 80 


Blair 9535 4.541 372 62 


Elk 2405 3990 59 8 


Somerset . . . 6365 2148 242 5 


Clearfield . . 7510 6399 555 106 


Bedford. . . . 4668 3470 67 1 


Centre. . . . 4424 4521 171 1 


Totals . . . 30777 17450 926 120 


Totals . 18511 19132 865 115 


F.vans^ plurality, 13327. 


Hall's plurality, 621. 



CENSUS or 1900. 

Population of tKe United States, 70,295,220. 



1900. 1890. 

Alabama 1,828,G97 ], 513,017 

Arkansas 1,311,564 1,128,179 

Calilornia 1,485,053 1,208,130 

Colorado 539,700 412,198 

Connecticut 908,355 746,278 

Delaware 181,735 168,493 

Florida 528,542 391,422 

(ieorgia 2,216,329 1,837,353 

Idaho 161,771 84,385 

Illinois 4,821 550 3,826,351 

Indiana 2,516,463 2,192,41)4 

Iowa 2,251,829 1,911,896 

Kansas 1,469,496 1,427,096 

Kentueliy 2,147,174 1,858,635 

Louisiana 1,381,627 1,118,587 

Maine 694,366 661,086 

Maryland 1,189,946 1,042,390 

Massachusetts .... 2,805,346 2,238,943 

Michigan 2,419,782 2,093,889 

Minnesoia 1,751,395 1,301,826 

Mississippi 1,551,372 1,289,600 

Missouri 3,107,117 2,679,184 

Montana 243,289 132,159 

Nebraska 1,068,901 1,058,910 

Nevada 42,334 45,761 

NewHamp^liiij . . . 411.588 376,530 

New Jersey 1,883,6:9 1,444,933 

New York" 7,208,009 5,997,853 

North Carolina . . . 1,891,992 1,617,947 

North Dakota .... 319,040 182,719 

Ohio 4,157,545 3,672,316 

Oregon 413,532 313,767 

Pennsylvania .... 6,301,365 5,258,014 

Rliode" Island .... 428,550 345,506 

South Carolina . . . 1,340,312 1,151,149 

South Dakota .... 401,559 328,808 

Tennessee 2,022,723 1,767,518 

Texas 3,048,828 2,235,523 

Utah 276,505 207,905 



1900, 1890. 

Vermont 343,641 332,422 

Virginia 1,854,184 1,655,980 

Washington 517,672 349,390 

West Virginia .... 958,900 762,794 

Wisconsin 2,068,963 1,686,880 

Wyoming 92,531 60,705 

Total for 45 States . 74,627,907 62,116,811 

Tekritories, Etc. 

Alaska (estimated) . . 44,000 32,052 

Arizona 122,212 59,620 

District of Columbia . 278,718 230,392 

Hawaii 154,001 89,990 

Indian Territory . . . 391,960 180,182 

New Mexico 193,777 153,.593 

Oklahoma 398,245 61,834 

Persons in the service 
of the United States 
stationed abroad (es- 
timated) 84,400 

Indians, etc., on In- 
dian reservations, 
except Indian Ter- 
ritory 145,282 

Total for seven Ter- 
ritories, etc 1,667,313 9.32,945 

Total for all States 
and Territories .... 76,295,220 

Indians Not Taxed in 1900.— California, 
1,.549 ; Colorado, 597; Idaho, 2,297; Minne- 
sota, 1,768 ; Montana, 10,746 ; Nevada, 1,665; 
New York, 4,711; North Dakota, 4,692 ; South 
Dakota, 10,932; Utah, 1,472; Washington, 
2,531; Wisconsin, 1,657. Total for 45 States, 
44,107. Arizona, 24,644; Indian Territory, 
50,033 ; New Mexico, 2,937 ; Oklahoma, 5,927. 
Total for seven Territories, etc., 80,541. 



Cities Having 23,000 InHabitants or More. 



New York, N. Y. . 
Chicago, 111. . . . 
Pliiladelphia, Pa. . 
St. Louis, Mo. . . 
Boston, Mass. . . . 
Baltimore, Md. . 
Cleveland, Ohio . 
Buflalo, N. Y. . . 
San Francisco, Cal. 
Cincinnati, Ohio. . 
Pittsburg, Pa. . . 
New Orleans, La. . 
Detroit, Mich. . . 
Milwaukee, Wis. . 
Washington, D. C. 
Newark, N. J. . . 
Jersey City, N. J. . 
Louisville, Ky. . . 
Minneapolis.Minn. 
Providence, R. I. . 
Indianapilis, Ind. 
Kansas City, Mo. . 
St. Paul, M'inn. . . 
Rochester, N. Y. . 
Denver, Colo. . . 
Toledo, Ohio . . . 
Allegheny, Pa. . . 



1900 

3,437,202 
1,1)98,575 
1,293,697 
575,238 
560.892 
508,957 
381,708 
352,387 
342,782 
325,902 
321,(il6 
287.104 
285,704 
285,315 
278,718 
246,070 
206,433 
204,731 
202,718 
17,5,597 
169,164 
103,752 
103,065 
162.608 
133,859 
131,822 
129,890 



2,492,.591 
1,099,850 
1,046,964 
451,770 
448,477 
434,439 
261,353 
255,064 
298,997 
296,908 
238,617 
242,039 
205,876 
201,468 
230.392 
181,830 
103,003 
161,129 
164,738 
132,146 
1(\5,436 
l:W,716 
133, 150 
l:«,.S90 
106,713 
,H1,434 
105,287 



INC. P. C. 
37.8 
54.4 
23.5 
27.3 
25.0 
17.1 
40.0 
37,8 
14.6 
9.7 
34.7 
18.6 
38.7 
39.5 
20.9 
35.3 
2(i.6 
27.0 
23.0 
32.8 
0(1.4 
23.3 
22.4 
21.4 
25.4 



Columbus, Ohio . 
Worcester, Mass. . 
Syracuse, N. Y. . . 
New Haven, Conn. 
Paterson, N. J. . . 
Fall River, IMass. . 
St. Joseph, Mo. . . 
Omaha, Neb. . . . 
Los Angeles, Cal. . 
Memphis, Tenn. . 
Scranton, Pa. . . . 
Lowell, Mass. . . . 
Albany, N. Y. . . 
Cambridge, Mass. . 
Portland, Oreg. . . 
Atlanta, Ga. . . . 
Grand Rapids, Mich. 
Dayton, Ohio . . . 
Richmond, Va. . . 
Nashville, Tenn. . 
Seattle, Wash. . . 
Hartford, Conn. . 
Reading, Pa. . . 
Wilmington, Del. 
Camden, N. J. . . 
Trenton, N.J. . . 
Bridgeport, Conn. 



125,500 
118,421 
108,374 
108,027 
105,171 
104,803 
102,979 
102,.555 
102,479 
102,320 
102,026 
94,909 
94,1.51 
91,886 
90,426 
89,872 
87,565 
85,333 
85,050 
80,805 
80,671 
79,850 
78,961 
76.308 
75,935 
73,307 
70,996 



88,1.50 
84,655 
88,143 
81,298 
78,347 
74,398 
52,324 



32.8 
34.2 
40.9 
96.8 



140,452 *26.! 



50,3 

64,495 

75,215 

77,696 

94,923 

70,028 

46,385 

65,5.33 

60,278 

61,220 

81,388 

76,108 

42,837 

53,230 

58,661 

61,431 

58,313 

57,4.58 

48,806 



103.3 
58.6 
35.6 



94.9 
37.1 
45.2 
39.3 
4.4 



50.0 
34.6 
24.5 
30.2 
27.5 
45.2 



The Philadelphia 


Record JUmanac. 




141 




1900 


1890 1 


■JC. p. c. 




1900 


1890 INC. P. C. 1 


Lynn, Ivlass. . . . 


68,513 


55,727 


22.9 


Quincy, 111. . . . 


36,252 


31,494 


15.1 


Oakland, Cal. . . 


6G,960 


48,682 


37.5 


South Bend, lud. . 


35,999 


21,819 


64.9 


Lawrence, Mass. . 


62,559 


44,654 


40.0 


Salem, Mass. . . 


35,956 


30,801 


16.7 


New Bedford.Mass. 


62,442 


40,733 


53.2 


Jolinstown, Pa. . 


35,936 


21,805 


64.8 


Des Moines, Iowa. 


62,la9 


50,093 


24.0 


Elmira, N. Y. . . 


35,672 


30,893 


15.4 


Springfield, Mass. . 


62,059 


44,179 


40.4 


Alleutown, Pa. . 


35,416 


25,228 


40.3 


Somerville,Mass. . 


61,643 


40,152 


53.5 


Davenport, Iowa . 


35,254 


20,872 


31.1 


Trov, N. Y. ... 


60,651 


60,956 


*0 5 


McKeesport, Pa. . 


34,227 


20,741 


05.0 


Hoboken, N. J. . . 


59,361 


43,648 


36.0 


Springfield, 111. . 


34,159 


24,963 


36.8 


Evansville, Ind. . 


5J,007 


50,756 


16.2 


Chelsea, INIass. . . 


34,072 


27,909 


22.0 


Manchester, N. H. 


56,987 


44,126 


29.1 


Chester, Pa. ... 


33,988 


20,226 


68.0 


Ulica, N.Y. . . . 


50,383 


44,007 


28.1 


York, Pa 


33,708 


20,793 


62.1 


Peoiia, 111 


56,100 


41,024 


36.7 


JIalden, Mass. . . 


33,664 


23,031 


46.1 


Charleston, S. C. . 


55.807 


54,955 


1.5 


Topeka, Kan. . . 


33,608 


31,007 


8.3 


Savannah, Ga. . . 


54,244 


43,189 


25.5 


Newton, Mass. . . 


33,587 


24,379 


37.7 


Salt Lake City, Uh. 


53,531 


44,843 


19.3 


Sioux City, Iowa . 


33,111 


37,806 


*12.4 


San Antonia, Tex. 


53,321 


37,673 


41.5 


Bayonnc,"N. J. . . 


32,722 


19,033 


71.9 


Duluth,Minn. . . 


52,969 


33,115 


59.9 


Knoxville, Tenn. 


32,637 


22,535 


44.8 


Erie, Pa 


52,733 


40,634 


29.7 


Chattanooga,Tenn. 


32,490 


29,100 


11.6 


Elizabeth, N. J. . 


52,130 


37,764 


38.0 


Schenectady, N.Y. 


31,682 


19,902 


59.1 


Wilkesbarre, Pa. . 


51,721 


37,718 


37.1 


ritchburg,Mass. . 


31,531 


22,037 


43.0 


Kansas City, Kan. 


51,418 


38,316 


34.1 


Superior, Wis. . . 


31,091 


11,983 


159.4 


Harrisburg, Pa. . 


50,167 


39,385 


27.3 


Rockford, 111. . . 


31,051 


23,584 


31.6 


Portland, Me. . . 


50,145 


36,425 


37.6 


Taunton, Mass. . 


31,036 


25,448 


21.9 


Yonkers, N. Y. 


47,931 


32,033 


49.0 


Canton, Ohio. . . 


30,667 


20,189 


17.0 


Norfolk, Va. . . . 


46,624 


34,871 


33.7 


Butte, Mont. . . 


30,470 


10,723 


184.1 


Wateibury, Conn. 


45,859 


28;646 


60.0 


Montgomery, Ala. 


30,346 


21,883 


38.6 


Holyoke, Mass. . 


45,712 


35,037 


28.2 


Auburn, N. Y. . . 


30,345 


25,858 


17.3 


Fort Wayne, Ind. 


45,115 


35,393 


27.4 


East St. Louis, 111. 


29,655 


15,169 


95.4 


Youngstown, 0. . 


44,885 


?,?.,'>9I^ 


35.1 


Joliet, 111 


29,353 


23,264 


26.1 


Houston, Tex. . . 


44,633 


27,557 


61.9 


Sacramento, Cal. . 


29,282 


20,386 


10.9 


Covington, Ky. . 


42,938 


37,371 


14.8 


Racine, Wis. . . . 


29,102 


21,014 


38.4 


Akron, Ohio . . . 


42,728 


27,001 


5L8 


La Crosse, Wis. . . 


28,895 


25,090 


15.1 


Dallas, Tex. . . . 




38,067 


12.0 


Williamsport, Pa. . 


28,757 


27,132 


5.9 


Saginaw, Mich. . , 


^',345 


46,322 


*8.5 


Jacksonville, Fla. 


28,429 


17,201 


65.2 


Lancaster, Pa. . . 


41,459 


32,011 


29.5 


Kewcastle, Pa. . . 
Newport, Ky. . . 


28,339 


11,600 


144.3 


Lincoln, Neb. . . 


40,169 


55,154 


*27.1 


28,301 


24,918 


13.5 


Brockton, Mass. . 


40,063 


27,294 


46.7 


Oshkosh, Wis. . . 


28,284 


22,836 


23.8 


Biughamton, N. Y. 


39,647 


35,005 


13.2 


Woonsocket, R. I. 


28,204 


20,830 


35.4 


Augusta, Ga. . . 


39,441 


33,300 


18.4 


Pueblo, Colo. . . 


28,157 


24, .558 


14.6 


Pawtucket, R. L . 


39,231 


27,633 


41.9 


Atlantic Ciiv, N. .1. 


27,838 


13,055 


113.2 


Altoona, Pa. . . . 


38,973 


30,337 


28.4 


Passaic, N.J. . . 


27,777 


13.028 


113.2 


Wheeling, VV. Va. 


38,878 


34,522 


12.6 


Bay City, Mich. . 


27 628 


27,839 


*0.7 


Mobile, Ala. . . . 


38,469 


31,076 


2:3.7 


Fort Worth, Tex. . 


26,'6S8 


23,076 


15.6 


Birmingham, Ala. 


38,415 


2;,178 


46.7 


Lexington, Ky. . . 


26,369 


21,567 


22.2 


Little Rock, Ark. . 


38;i'07 


25,874 


48.0 


Gloucester, Ma's. . 


26,121 


24,651 


5.9 


Springfield, Ohio . 


38,253 


31,895 


19.9 


South Omaha, Neb. 


26,001 


8,062 


222.5 


Galveston, Tex. . 


37,789 


2i),084 


29.9 


New Britain, Conn. 


25,998 


16,519 


57.3 


Tiicoma, Wasli. . 


37,714 


36,005 


4.7 


Council Bluffs, la. 


25,802 


21,474 


20.1 


Haverhill, Mass. . 


37,175 


27,412 


35.0 


Cedar Rapids, la. 


25,656 


18.020 


42.3 


Spokane, Wash. . 


36,818 


19,922 


84.9 


Easton, Pa 


25,238 


14,481 


74.2 


Terre Haute, Ind. 


36,673 


30,217 


21.3 


Jackson, Mich. . . 


25,180 


20,798 


21. n 


Dubuque, Iowa . 


36,297 


30,311 


19.7 










Popul 


ation 




* Dec 


rease. 


293,097. 




of Phila 


delpHia, 1,S 


First Ward .... 






::7,'.il'.i 


'j'weutv-seconil Wa 


•d . . . . 




04,055 


Second Waul . . . 






35i2u6 


Twenty-third Ward 






20,109 


Third Ward .... 






24,093 


Twenty-fourth War 
Twenty-fifih Ward 
Twentv-sixth Ward 
Twenty-seventh Wa 
Twenty-eighth War 
Twenty-ninth Ware 


i '.'.'. '. 




.53,200 


Fourth Ward . . . 






22,562 
16,868 
8,042 






51,753 


Fifth Ward 










45,615 


Sixth Ward .... 






rd' '. '. '. 




32,204 
43,931 


Seventh Ward . . . 






28,137 


i . . . . 




Eighth Ward . . 
Ninth Ward .... 






15,7.57 






60,096 
28,864 
33,139 






6,953 


Thirtieth Ward . . 
Thirty-first Ward . 
Thirl v-second Ward 
Thirty-third Ward 






Tenth Ward .... 






19,967 


Eleventh Ward 






11 843 






39,889 


Twelfth Ward . . . 






13,8.50 






65,372 


Thirteenth Ward . 
Fourteenth Ward 






17,427 


Thirty-fourth Wnrd 
Thirty-fifth Ward . 






43,700 






19,405 






8,014 


Fifteenth Ward 






50 379 


Thirty-sixth Ward 
Thirty-seventh War 






46,811 
22,445 


Sixteenth Ward. . 






15,788 


i. .' .■ .' .■ 




Seventeenth Ward 






17.908 


Thirty-eighth Ward 






33.104 


Eighieenth Ward . 
Nineteenth Ward 
Twentieth Ward 
Twenty-first Ward 






29,643 
55,246 
43,276 
32,168 


Thirty-ninth ^^'ard 
Fortieth Ward 






40,377 

10,4?8 






Forty-first Ward 






11,328 















The Philadelphia Record JUmanac. 



Population of Pennsylvania by Counties. 





1900. 


1890. 




leoo. 


1880. 


Adams 


. . 34.496 


33,486 


Lackawanna . . . 


193,831 


142,088 


Allegheny . . . 


. . 775,058 


531,959 


Lancaster 


. 159,241 


149,095 


Armstrong . . . 


. . 52,551 


46,747 


Lawrence 


. . 57,042 


37,517 


Beaver 


. . 56,432 


50.077 


Lebanon 


. . 53,827 


48,131 


Bedford 


. . 39,468 


38,644 


Lehigh 


. . 93,893 


76,631 






137,327 
70,866 






201,203 
70,579 


Blair 


. . 85,099 


Lycoming 

McKean 


. . 75,663 


Bradford .... 


59,403 


. 59,233 


. . 51,:M3 


46,863 


Bucks 


. . 71,190 


70,615 


Mercer 


. . 57,387 


55,744 




. . 56.962 
. . . 104,<S37 


55.339 
66.375 


Mifflin 






Cambria 


Monroe 


. . 21,161 


20,111 


Cameron .... 


7,048 


7,238 


Montgomery . . . 


. . 138,995 


123,290 


Carbon 


. . . 44,510 


38,624 


Montour 


. . 15,.526 


15,645 


Centre 


. . 42,8M 


43,269 


Northampton . . . 
Northumberland . 


. . 99,687 


84,220 


Chester 


. . 95,695 


89,377 


. . 90,911 


74,698 


Clarion 


. . 34.283 


36,802 


Perry 


. . 26,263 


26,276 


Clearfield .... 


. . 89,614 


69,565 


Philadelphia . . . 


. . 1,293,697 


1,046,9()4 


Clinton 


. . 29,197 


28,685 


Pike 


. . 8,766 


9,412 


Columbia .... 


. . 39,896 


36,832 


Potter 


30,621 


22,778 


Crawford .... 


. . 63,643 


65,324 


Schuylkill 


. . 172,927 


154,163 


Cumberland . . . 


. . 50,344 


47,271 


Snyder 


. . 17,304 


17,651 


Dauphin .... 


. . 114,443 


%,977 


Somerset 


. . 49,461 


37,317 


Delaware .... 


. . 94,762 


74,683 


Sullivan 


. . 12,134 


11,620 


Elk 


. . 32,903 


22,239 


Susquehanna . . . 


. . 40,043 


40,093 


Erie 


. . 98,473 


86,074 


Tioga 


. . 49,086 


52,313 


Favette 


. . 110,412 


80,006 


Union 


. . 17,592 


17,820 


Forest 


11,039 


8,482 


Venango 


. . 49,648 


46,640 


Franklin .... 


. . 54,902 


51,433 


Warren 


. . 38,946 


37,585 


Fulton 


. . 9,924 


10,137 


Washington .... 


. . 92,181 


71,155 


Greene 


28,281 


28,935 


Wayne 


. . 30.171 


31,010 


Huntingdon . . . 


. . 34,650 


35,751 


Westmoreland . . 


. . 160,175- 


112,819 


Indiana 


. . 42,556 


42.175 


Wyoming 


. . 17,152 


15.891 


Jefferson 


59113 


44,005 
16,665 


York 


116 413 


99,489 


Juniata 


. . 16,054 







Population of Ne^w Jersey by Counties. 













19O0. 


1890. 














1900. 


1890 


Atlantic 48,402 


28,836 


Middlesex 79,762 


1il,754 


Bergen . . . 










78,441 


47,226 


Monmouth 












82,057 


67,128 


Burlington . 










58,211 


56,757 


Morris . . . 












65,156 


54,101 


Camden . . . 










107,643 


87,687 


Ocean . . . 












19,747 


17,745 


Cape May . . 










13,201 


11,268 


Passaic . . 












155,202 


105,046 


Cumberland 










51,193 


45,438 


Salem . . . 












25,530 


25,151 


Essex .... 










359,058 


256,098 


Somerset . 












32,948 


28,311 


(iloueester . . 










31,905 


28,649 


Sussex . . 












24,134 


22,259 


Hudson . . . 










386,048 


275,126 


Union . . . 












99,353 


72.467 


Hunterdon . 










34,507 


35,355 


Warren . . 












37,781 


36,553 


Mercer . . . 










95,365 


79,978 





















1900. 


1890. 


Asbury Park . 


. . . . 4,148 


*8,333 


Boonton .... 


. . . . 2,167 


2,981 


Bordentown . . 


. . . . 4,110 


4,232 


Bridgeton . . . 


. . . . 13,913 


11,424 


Burlington . . 


. . . . 7,392 


7,264 


< ape Mav . . . 


. . . . 2,257 


2,136 


East Orange 


. . . . 21,506 


13,282 


Englewood . . 


. . . . 6,383 


4,785 


Freehold . . . 


. . . . 2.034 


2,932 


Gloucester . . 


. . . . 6,840 


6,5lU 


Guttenberg . . 


. . . . 3,825 


1,947 


Hackensack . 


. . . 9,443 


(),004 


Hackettstown . 


. . . . 2,474 


2,417 


Hammonton . 


. . . 3,481 


3,833 


Harrison . . . 


. . . 10.596 


8,338 


Kearney . . . 


. . . . 10,986 


7,064 


Key port .... 


. . . 3,413 


3,411 


Lambertville . 


. . . . 4,637 


4,142 


» Included old borouKh linos. 





Cities and To-wns over 2,000 and less tHan 25,000. 

1900. 1880. 

Ix)ng Branch 8,872 7,231 

Millville 10,583 10,002 

Montclair 13,962 8,656 

Morristown 11,267 8,156 

New Brunswick .... 20,006 18,603 

Newtown 4,376 3,003 

Orange 24,141 18,844 

Perth Amboy 17,699 9,512 

Phillipsburg 10.052 8.644 

Plaintield 15,369 11,267 

Rah way 7,935 7,105 

Red Bank 5,428 4,145 

Salem 5,811 5,516 

Sonierville 4,843 3,861 

South Orange 4,608 3,106 

Union 15,187 10,643 

WestHoboken .... 23,094 11,065 

■West Orange 6,889 4,358 

Woodbiirv 1.087 3,911 



The Philadelphia Record Jtlmanac. 



Population of Maryland by Coxinties. 

Harford 28,269 

Howard 16.715 

Kent 18,786 

Montgomery 30,451 

Prince George 29,898 

Queen Anne 18,364 

St. Mary 18,136 

Somerset 25,923 

Talbot 20,342 

Washington 45,133 

Wicomico 22,8.52 

Worcester 20,865 



Alleganv 53, i 

Anne Anmlel 40,018 

Baltimrre 90,7d5 

Baltimore city 508,957 

Calvert 10,223 

Caroline 16,248 

Carroll 33,860 

Cecil 24,662 

Charles 1«,316 

Dorchester 27,962 

Frederi ,k 51,920 

Garrett 17,701 



Population of Delaware by Minor Civil Divisions. 



1900 

Kent C^ounty 32,762 

Duck Creek hundred, inclu- 
ding Smyrna town and 
part of Clayton town . . . 4,228 
Clayton town (part of) . . . 303 
Total for Clayton town, in 
Duck Creek and Kenton 

hundreds 770 

Smyrna town 2,168 

East Dover hundred .... 5,450 

Dover town 3,329 

Kenton hundred, including 
Kenton town and parts of 
Cheswold and (;layton 

towns 3,144 

( heswold town (part of) . . 182 

Total for Cheswold town,* in 
• Kjnton and Little Creek 

hundreds 201 

Clayton town (part of) ... 467 

Kenton town 192 

Little Creek hundred, in- 
cluding Leipsic and Little 
Creek towns and part of 

Cheswold town 1,629 

Cheswold town (part of) . . 19 

Leipsic town 305 

Little Creek town 259 

Milford hundred, including 

part of Milford town . . . 3,118 
Milford town (pnrt of) . . . 1,192 
Total for Milford town, in 
Milford hundred, Kent 
county, and Cedar Creek 
hundred, Sussex county . 2,500 
Mispillion hundred .... 4,784 

Harrington town 1,242 

North Murdcrkill hundred, 
including Camden and 
Wyoming towns 3,829 



Camden town 

Wyoming town 

South Murderkill hundred . 

Feltoii town 

Frederica town 

Miiguolia town 

West liov.-r Hundred-- .■ . . . 

NEWCAsri,].: ri][\TY .... 

Appi>(|iiiiiiiiiiiik hundred, in- 
cluiliiii; liiwiiscnd town 

Towiiseiid t(,wn 

Blackbird hundred 

Bratidywine hundred . . . 

Chri-stiana hundred, inclu- 
ding Newport town . . . 

Newport town 

Mill Creek hundred .... 

Newcastle hundred .... 

Newcastle city 

Peneader hundred 

Red Lion hundred 



536 

450 

4,160 

400 

706 



1,338 
3,899 

4,736 
6.57 
3,728 
5,407 
3,380 
1,999 
!,425 



Delaware City 1,132 



4,372 



540 
2,455 
5,125 
3,061 



355 
285 



3,364 
1,226 



2,.565 
4,679 



3,954 
553 
497 

4,608 
403 
621 
216 

1,9.55 
97,182 

2,336 

387 

1,514 

3,994 

6,144 
711 

3,786 



St. George town 325 

St. George hundred, inclu- 
ding Middletown, Odessa 

and Port Penn towns . . . 4,455 

Middletown town 1,567 

Odessa town 575 

Port Penn town 205 

White Clay Creek hundred, 

including Newark town . 3,061 

Newark town 1,213 

Wilmington 76,508 



Ward 
Ward 
Ward 
Ward 
Ward 
Ward 
Ward 



3,041 
5, .560 
5,375 
4,037 
8.966 
6,061 
12,816 

Ward 8 8,848 

Ward 9 7,304 

Ward 10 6,409 

Ward 11 3,800 

Wardli 4,291 

SfSSEX Col'NTY 

Baltimore hundred 

Broad Creek hundred, inclu- 
ding part of Laurel town . 

Laurel town (part of) ... . 

Total for Laurel town, in 
Broad Creek and Little 
Creek hundreds 

Broadkill hundred, inclu- 
ding Milton town .... 

Milton town 

Cedar Creek hundred, in- 
cluding part of Milford 
town 

Milford town (part of)t . . . 

Dagsboro hundred 

Dagsljoro town 

Frankford town 

Millsboro town 

Georgetown hundred, inclu- 
ding Georgetown town . . 

Georgetown town 

Gumboro hundred 

Indian River hundred . . . 

Lewes and Rehoboth hun- 
dred 

Lewes town 

Rehoboth town 

Little Creek hundred, inclu- 
ding Delmar town and part 
of Laurel town 

Delmar town 

Laurel town (part of) . . . 

Nanticoke hundred 

Northwest Fort hundred, 
including Bridgevilletown 

Bridgeville town 

Seaford hundred 

Seaford town 

t Giveu as Soulh MUford iu 1890. 



42,276 
4,117 



1,825 



4, -572 

1,308 

3.575 

191 

423 

391 

2,874 
1,658 
1,161 
2,090 



2,259 
198 



1,645 
1,996 

3,456 

613 

3,779 

1,724 



4,785 

1,4.54 

640 

310 

2,870 
1,191 
61,431 



38,1-47 
3,913 



519 
324 

r,353 
1,355 
1,756 

2,997 



4,511 

360 

2,164 

2,025 

2,793 

576 

3,223 

1,462 



General and Local Events 



December, 1899. 

1.— Dr. Isaac <;. Smcdley, clinical instruc- 
tor in tryniL'CoIOiry at Hahnemann College, 
PhilaiU'lpliia, was killed at Bryn Mawr, Pa., 
in alteniptlng to hoard a moving train. 

2.— J. Warner Goheen, lawyer and coun- 
cilman, ami Kdwiii T. Toy, ex-Deputy 
Sberitt; <lied at Pliiladelphia.— John I. Blair, 
raihoad owner and philanthropist, died at 
Blairstown, N. .J.— Charles Potter, printing 
press inventor, died at Plaintteld, N. J. 

4.— The Fifty-sixtli Congress began its 
sessions, and Brighani H. Roberts, of Utah, 
was denied permission to qiinlify when 
he appeared at the bar ol" the House because 
of his practice of polygamy, and his rejec- 
tion was subsequently made permanent by a 
vote of 268 to 50. 

5.— M. L. Hayward, United States Senator- 
elect from Nebraska, died at Nebraska City. 
—Canadian steamer Niagara foundered 
eight miles east of Long Point, I,ake Erie, 
and the crew of si.\feen was lost. 

6.— A mob at Maysville, Ky., tortured and 
burned at the stake Richaid Coleman, 
negro, charged with the murder of Mrs. 
James Lash brook.— The President again ap- 
pointed Leonard Wood, Governor of San- 
tiago, Cuba, a Major-tieiieral of Volunteers. 
—.James McConnell, editor, died at Phila- 
delphia. 

7.— .-\nnouneement made by Peter A. B. 
Widcner, at Philadelphia, that he proposed 
to erect and endow an industrial home for 
crippled <'hildren at a cost of S2,000,000.— 
Fire in a stocking mill at Heading, Pa., cost 
one woman's life and resulted in the injury 
of probably fifty girls.— James P. Reed, for- 
merly champion checker-player of the 
world, died at Pittsburg, Pa. 

8.— David W. Sellers was elected President 
of thePairmount Park Commission at Phila- 
delphia. 

9.— Thirty-two miners were killed by an 
explosion of coal-damp in a Southern Pa- 
cific Railway mine at Carbonado, Wash. 

10.— Dr. Wax Lange, famous chess master, 
theoretician and problemist, died at Leipsic. 
—Fire in the old Green Tree Hotel and 
stables, Gloucester, N. J., resulted in the 
death of David Young and wife, care-takers. 

11.— William R. West. Sr., retired stnir- 
builder, died at Philadelphia.— Commander 
E. P. Wood, U. S. N., died at Washington, 1). C. 
—James P. Wilde, retired Judge of the Pro- 
bate and Divorce Courts, famous as having 
tried, at London, the Mordaunt divorce 
case, in which the Prince of Wales was 
named as co-respondent, died at London. 

12.— W. S. Taylor, Republican, was inau- 

furated as Governor of Kentucky.— Dr. 
fephen G. Beale, dentist, died at Philadel- 
phia.— Julia Brennan and Kate Brady were 
sentenced at Baltimore to seven years each 
in the penitentiary for placing on a red-hot 
stove the naked baby son of Joseph Burns, 
causing its death, as a punishment for hav- 
ing cried during its mother's absence.— Clin- 
ton Rorer, ex-Sherirt', died at Wyndmoor, 
Montgonierycoiinty, Pa.— William Y. Leader, 
joiirnalisi, (lied at Philadelphia. 

13.— Mjij()r-(;eneral Leonard Wood was ap- 
poinied Military Governor of Cuba. — The 
Governor of Nebraska appointed ex-Senator 
W. V. .Mien to the vacancy in the United 
Slates Senate caused by M. L. Havward's 
death. 



14.— Three persons were killed and six in- 
jured by a collision on the Jersey Central 
Railroad between Siegfried and Treichler's. 
—The one-hundredth anniversary of George 
Washington's death was celebrated by 
Masons at his grave and by Masons and 
others throughout the country. — The United 
States Senate voted, 41 to 20, in favor of su.s- 
taining President McKinley's policy in the 
Philippines.— A national organization of 
Spanish war veterans was chartered at Tren- 
ton, N. J., of which General Willis J. Hulings, 
of Pennsylvania, was chosen commander-in- 
chief. 

15.— The Republican National Committee, 
in session at Washington, D. C, decided 
upon Philadelphia as the site of the Repub- 
lican National Convention. — Thomas W. 
Wright, builder, died at (iermautown, Phila- 
delphia. 

16.— John \. RuV)le, famous as a trap and 
wing shot, died at Beloit, Wis.— General W. 
F. Rogers, ex-Congressman and ex-Mayor, 
died at Buflalo, N. Y'. 

17.— Lieutenant Thomas M. Brumby, who 
was Dewey's flag lieutenant, died at Wash- 
ington, D. C— Former Congressman James 
N. Pidcock died at White House, N. J.— 
William Jacobs, retired butcher and promi- 
nent Mason, died at Philadelphia. 

18.— The Gold Standard bill was passed in 
the House by 40 majority in .340 votes. — Ex- 
Senator George Gray, of Delaw are, was con- 
firmed as United States Circuit Judge for the 
Third Judicial Circuit. 

19. — Major-General Henry W. Lawton was 
killed at San Mateo, in the Philippines.— 
Seven lives were lost in a tenement-house 
fire at Third avenue and One-hundred-and- 
second street. New Y'ork. 

20.— Paul Deroulede was convicted by the 
French Senate, sitting as a High Court, of 
libeling Senators and law officers, and sent 
to prison for two years.— The 1- ree Museum 
of Science and Art at the University of Penn- 
sylvania, Philadelphia, was formally ( ipened, 
and a bronze statue of the late Dr. William 
Pepper was presented to the trustees of the 
University. 

21.— Announcement made of the disap- 
pearance of Representative Abraham L. 
Allen, of Philadelphia, charged with em- 
bezzlement as Deputy Collector of Delin- 
quent Taxes. — Dr. Edward H. Williams, a 
memUerof the Baldwin Locomotive Works 
firm, of Philadelphiii, died at Santa Barbara, 
Cal.— Col. L. P. Milligan, who, in 1865, was 
sentenced m Indiana to be hanged for trea- 
son, his sentence comnmtcd, and who was 
subsequently di.scharged by the United States 
Supreme Court (James A. Garfield, after- 
ward President, being his attorney), died at 
Huntingdon, Ind., aged 87 years. 

22.— Rev. Dwight L. Moody, evangelist, 
died at East Northfield. Mass.— Eleven chil- 
dren were burned to death at Quincy, 111., 
and seven others injured at a Christmas en- 
tertainment, 

23.— Thirty-two men were killed by an ex- 
plosion of gas in the Biaznell coal mine, 
near Brownsville, I'ayctte county, Pa. — A 
decision of acquittal wa>- renderecl at Pitts- 
burg in the case of a suit ot that city 
against Senator William Flinn and others 
for S200,0U0. 

24.— The British steamer Ariosto went 
ashore in a storm south of the Hatteras Life 



The Philadelphia Record JUmanac. 



.-Saving Station, and twenty-one of her sailors 
perished in trying to reach shore. 

25.— Southern end of California was shaken 
by an earthquake. 

26. — Allen B. Rorke, builder, died at 
Philadelphia.— J. C. Coon, veteran jour- 
nalist, died at Danville, Pa. 

27.— Emily H. Blake, the nurse who killed 
Mrs. Robert Lane, her employer, throuRh 
jealousy of the mother's love for the chil- 
dren, was hanged at Brandon, Manitoba. 

28.— W. H. Parker, boys' grammar school 
principal, and Adam Mann, confectioner 
and real estate operator, died at Philadel- 
phia. 

29.— Dr. Thomas MacKellar, senior mem- 
ber of the American Type Founder.-;' Com- 
pany, died at Philadelphia. 

30. — Four men were killed at Elizabeth- 
town, Lancaster county. Pa., by the bursting 
of a boiler among a railroad" construction 
gang. — Benjamin Eakins, retired writing 
master, died at Philadelphia. 

January, 1900. 

1.— Chief Justice James P. Sierrett, of the 
Pennsylvania Supreme Court, completed his 
term and retired.- ' Kid" McCoy knocked 
out Peter Maher in the fifth round at the 
Coney Island Club. — Announcement of the 
disappearance of E. H. Hershey, Treasurer 
of Lancaster countv, Pa., short in his ac- 
counts 865.000.— George V. Metzel, founder 
of the Improved Order of Heptasophs, died 
at Stewartstown, York county. Pa. — Carl Mil- 
loeeker, light opera composer, died at Vi- 
enna. — Ex-State Senator Jacob S. Serrill, 
reputed to be the oldest native-born resi- 
dent, died at Darby, Pa.— Samuel Johnson, 
colored, serving a life sentence in the East- 
ern Penitentiary, at Philadelphia, for the 
murder of John Sharpless, in Chester county, 
was found dead in his cell.— Six hundred 
lives were lost by an earthquake in the gov- 
ernment of Tifiis, Ru.ssian Caucasia. 

2. — Thomas W. Marchment, real estate as- 
sessor, who left a fortune to the Philadel- 
phia Skating Club, and John Albert, violin 
maker, died at Philadelphia. 

3.— Elias Rosenwig, hat manufacturer, and 
Freeman D. Somerby, last Supreme Presi- 
dent of Iron Hall, died at Philadelphia. 

4.— MM. Deroulede and Buffet, convicted of 
conspiracy against the Republic of France, 
were sentenced to ten years' banishment 
each, and M. Guerin to ten years' imprison- 
ment in a fortified place. 

5.— John Kennedy was sentenced at Phila- 
delfjhia to eighteen years in the Eastern 
Penitentiary for the murder of Thomas 
Ashworth, and Albert Kelly and John H. 
Daly, also implicated, to seventeen years 
each in the same orison. 

7.— Rev. Dr. Edward McGlynn, a priest 
noted for his association with the late Henry 
George in promulgation of the latter's ideas, 
died at New York. 

S.— Rev. Victor L. Conrad, editor emeritus 
of the Lutheran Observer, died at Philadel- 
phia.— Deputy Coroner Samuel Salter and 
others, indicted for ballot frauds in Phila- 
delphia, forfeited their bail when called to 
plead. 

9. — Terry McGovern whipped George 
Dixon, at New York, winning the feather- 
weight championship held by Dixon for 
eight years.— W. W. Bache, restaurateur, 
died at Philadelphia. 

10. — Julia Morrison, actress, was acquitted. 



at Chattanooga, Tenn., of the murder of 
Frank Lindenheimer. 

11.— Bills were passed by Philadelphia 
Councils authorizing the Department of 
Public Works to carry out plans for the " ex- 
tension, filtration and improvement of the 
water supply."— Spotted Tail, noted Sioux 
Indian chief, died at Paris, France.— Ger- 
man steamer Heligoland was lost with thirty- 
eight men on Gull Ledge Reef, St. Mary's 
Bay, coast of Newfoundland. 

13.— Former Judge Joseph E. Hughes died 
at (;ape May, N. J. — Manlio Garibaldi, 
youngest son of the Italian liberator, died at 
Bordighera, Italy. 

14.— General George H. Sharpe, who was 
on Grant's staff' at Appomattox, died at 
Kingston, N. Y.— Thomas Firth, cotton yarn 
dyer, and Sarah D. Terrv, aged 108, died at 
Philadelphia. 

15.— Dempsey D. Butler, the richest c.,i- 
ored man in New Jersey, died at Camden. 

16.— Robert M. McWade, of Philadelphia, 
was appointed Consul at 'Canton, China. 

18.— Municipal League at Philadelphia 
named a full Magisterial ticket. — A bronze 
sfatue of Daniel Webster, a gift to the nation 
by Stilson Hutchins, was unveiled at Wash- 
ington, D. ('. 

19.— Martin Bergen, once a noted ball 
player, in a fit of" insanity, at North Brook- 
field, Mass., killed his wife, two children 
and himself.— Cannon Henry Twells, an 
English hymn writer, died at London.— 
W. M. Fuller, prominent in the abattoir 
business, died at Philadelphia. 

20.— Reports were made to the National 
House of Representatives adverse to the 
seating of Brigham H. Roberts, polygamist, 
from rtah.— John Ruskin, England's most 
famous writer on art, died at London. 

21. — W. H. Shelmire, ex-pension agent: 
Arthur Stewart, textile manufacturer, and 
Rev. J. Henry Sharpe, Presbyterian, died at 
Philadelphia'.— The body of"(^ef rge B. Eyre, 
of Chester, was found in the Del uvare river, 
after a month's disappearance, .'howing that 
he had been murdered. 

22.— John P. Stockton, formei United States 
Senator and for twenty years Attorney Gen- 
neral of New Jersey, "arid Dr. Alfred Watts, 
inventor of crystal gold used in dentistry, 
died at New York. 

23.— Charles L. Graf, lithographer, and Al- 
bert Heilig, jeweler, died at Philadelphia.— 
Prof, H. A. Hazen, meteorologist, died at 
Washington. D. C. 

24.— James and Amos Pierce, rivermen and 
brothers, were arrested at Chester, Pa., for 
George B. Eyre's murder.— Lewis B. Havens, 
Philadelphia builder, died suddenly at 
Lenoir, N. C. 

26.— Fifteen girls were injured in a fire at 
the Angora Manufacturing Co. 's mill. Sixty- 
first and Baltimore avenue, Philadelphia. — 
State Auditor John A. Lingo died at Mills- 
boro, Del. 

29. — Theodore Hosmer, a Philadelphian 
who laid out the town of Tacoma, Wash., 
died there. 

30.— Senator William Goebel was shot by 
an assassin in the State House yard at Frank- 
fort, Ky.— Judge Thomas J. Clayton died at 
Thurlow, Delaware county, Pa. ; Frederick 
W. Gunster, additional Law Judge of Lacka- 
wanna county, at Scrantou; ex-President 
Judge James Ryou, at Pottsville, Pa.; George 
T. Barnes, iron merchant, and George W. 
Dallas, lawyer, died at Philadelphia. 

31.— William Goebel, on his death-bed, 
was sworn in as Governor of Kentucky, a 



The Philadelphia Record Jklmanac. 



contest before the Legislature having re- 
sulted in a decisiou that W. S. Tflvlor, the 
incumbent, liad not been elected.— James 
Gillingham, deputy tax collector, died at 
Philadelphia. 

February, 1900. 

1.— Cardinal Vicar 1). M. Jacobini, Papal 
secretary, died at Rome. 

2. — Elwood Griest, postmaster, died at 
Lancaster, Ph.— H. Henderson St. John, re- 
tired stock broker, died at Philadelphia. — 
Mrs. Annie VVittenmeyer, a famous nurse of 
the civil war, died at Sanatoga, Pa.— Half a 
dozen children were hurt by jumping from a 
burning school-house at Trenton, N. J. — 
Samuel R. Markley, Joseph S. Hckan and 
Frank Taylor were convicted at Philadel- 
phia of fraud at the election polls of the 
r-velfth division of the Fifth ward. 

a.— William Got'bel, Governor of Ken- 
tucky, died. — Governor Stone appointed 
Isaac Johnson, of Media, Pa., to the vacancy 
on the Delaware County Bench created by 
Judge Clayton's death. —Judge David M. 
Key, who was Postmaster General in the 
Cabijetof President Hayes, died at Chatta- 
nooga, Tenn.— Hugh Duj^an, crippled, 12 
years old, was beaten to death at Phila- 
delphia by Charles VVeissenborn, 18 years 
old. 

4.— The new Home of the Young Women's 
Union, Fourth and Bambridge streets, Phila- 
delphia, was de<iicrtted.— A treaty was signed 
by Secretary of State Hay and British Am- 
bassador Pauncefote which abrogated the 
Clayton-Bulwer treaty. 

5. — John Morton, horseman, and J. G. 
Waterhou.se, artists' model, died at Phila- 
delphia.— \V. H. Gilder, Arctic explorer, died 
at Morristown, N. J. 

6.— H. Swoboda, pioneer horse-hide tan- 
ner, died at Philadelphia. 

7.— Rev. A. M. Stirk, Presiding Elder of 
the Harrisburg district of the United Evan- 
gelical Chnrcli, died at Lebanon, Pji. 

8.— Three trainmen were killed and three 
hurt by a head-on collision on the Beech 
Creek Railroad at Gordon Heights, Pa.— 
George H. St. Clair, colored, was hanged at 
Philadelphia for the murder of Alice White, 
colored . 

9.— Richard W. Thorn p?on, who was Sec- 
retary of the Navy in President Hayes' Cabi- 
net, died at Terre Haute, Ind., aged 91 years. 
— The remains of Major-General H. W. Law- 
ton were interred at Arlington Cemetery, in 
the presence of the President of the United 
States and his Cabinet and both Houses of 
Congress.— Jerome Clas.son, noted Union 
scout in the civil war, died at Philadelphia. 
—Frederick Phillips, chemical manufac- 
turer, died at Philadelphia. 

10.— Roland B. Molineux was found guilty 
of murder in the first degree, at New York, 
for having sent poison to Harry Cornish, 
which caused the death of Mrs. Kate J. 
Adams, December 28, 189S.— Prof. W. H. 
Green, head of the Princeton Theological 
Seminary, died at Princeton, N. J. 

12. — Samuel C. Forker, ex- Con!>re>sman, 
died at Edgewater Park, N. J.— William G. 
Cramp, shipbuilder, died at Philailelphia. 

13.— John S. Peach and his wife were found 
dead in their dwelling at Philadelphia sut- 
focated by coal gas.— H. H. Wells, formerly 
Military Governor of Virginia, died at 
Rochester, N. Y.— The corner-stone of the 
gateway and tower of the dormitories of the 
University of Pennsylvania, designed as a 



memorial to the University men who fell in 
the war with Spain, was laid by General 
Nelson A. Miles. 

15. — The Financial bill passed the Senate, 
46to29.— George Weeks, colored, was hanged 
at Philadelphia for the murder of Mrs. Alice 
White, colored.— H. J. McCloskey, journalist, 
died at Philadelphia. 

16.— General J. D. F. French, of the British 
army, raised the siege of Kimberley after 
122 days. 

19.— Edwin Mayo, actor, died suddenly at 
Quebec- John Schraeder, historical painter, 
and Carl T. R. Luhr, astronomer, died at 
Berlin. 

20. — Henry Vatden, English golf cham- 
pion, was "defeated at urmond, Fla., by 
Bernard Nichols, professional, of the Phila- 
delphia Country Club, in a 36-hole match.— 
The widow of former President MncMahon, 
of France, died at Paris. 

21.— The Law School Building of the Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania was dedicated at 
Philadelphia, A.ssf)ciate Justice Harlan, of 
the United Slates Supreme Court, delivering 
the address. — Dr. L. E. Keeley, who devel- 
oped the " gold cure " for drunkards, died at 
Los Angeles, Cal.— Benjamin Wood, ex-Con- 
gressman and prop>rietor of the Vailn JS'ews, 
died at New York,— Dr. James H. Smart, 
President of Perdue University, died at La- 
fayette, Ind. 

22.— Dan. Rice, veteran clown, died at 
Long Branch, N. J.— Henry C. Miner, theatri- 
cal manager and ex-Congressman, died at 
New York.— General John McNulta, Chicago 
lawyer, known as " (he Great American Re- 
ceiver," died at Washington, D. C. 

•23.— The case of M. S. Quay, of Pennsyl- 
vania, claiming a seat in the United Stales 
Senate by appointment of the Governor 
after the Legislature had failed to elect, was 
tir.st taken up in the Senate for considera- 
tion.— Fire at 721 and 723 Arch sireet, Phila- 
delphia, resulted in loss of a girl's life and 
the injury of eleven persons, and eleven 
firemen were hurt in a tire at 1401 and 1406 
Ridge avenue. 

24.— William H. Addicks, lawyer, died at 
Philadelphia.— Colonel 'Bill' S. King, ex- 
Congressman from Minnesota, who was 
prominent in Credit-Mobilier atlairs many 
years ago, died at Minneapolis.— Colonel W. 
C. Elam, a noted "Readjuster" editor, died 
in Louisa county, Virginia. 

25.— George W. Allen, editor, and A. V. 
Zane, lawyer, died at Philadelphia. 

26. — Captain Joseph Malatesta, retired 
liquor dealer, died at Philadelphia. 

27.— General Cronje surrendered his Boer 
army at Paardeberg, South Africa, to Gen- 
eral Roberts.— Fire in the dry goods district 
of Newark, N. J., re.sulted in a loss estimated 
at 81,000,000. 

28.— An attempt was made by an unknown 
assassin to shoot General Ciprinno Castro, 
President of Venezuela.— Ladysmith siege 
was raised by General Buller. 

March, 1900. 

L— J. E. Mehrer, Atlantic City hotel-keeper, 
died on board a Lehigh Valley liailroad 
train —Charle'< L. Davis, actor and theatre 
manager, died at Pittsburg.— Thomas H. 
Walker, formerly Judge of Schuylkill county, 
died at Pott.svilte, Pa 

2.— Chart.es F. Bates, horseman, died at 
New York.— S. M. Rodgers, hour manufac- 
turer, died at Philadelphia. 



The Philadelphia Record JUmanac. 



5.— Benjamin Harper, conveyancer, died 
at Philadelphia. 

6.— A fund of 898,432.07, contributed by 
the public, was paid to the widow of General 
Henry W. Lawton. — Congressman Alfred C. 
Harrner and Enoch A. Trymby, furniture 
dealer, died at Philadelphia.— An explosion 
of flre-riamp in the Red Ash coal mines, 
near Thurmond, W. Va., killed forty-seven 
miners. 

7.— Queen Victoria issued this: " Her Ma- 
jesty is pleased to order that in future upon 
St. JPatrick's Day all ranks in Her Majesty's 
Irish regiments shall wear, as a distinction, 
a sprig of shamrock in their headdress to 
commemorate the gallantry of her Irish 
soldiers during the recent battles in South 
Africa." 

8— The Theatre Francais was burned at 
Paris. 

9.— E. J. Phelps, Professor of Law at Yale 
University, who was Minister to England 
during President Cleveland's first term, died 
at New Haven, Conn. 

10.— Leon ,T. Stern, hat manufacturer, died 
at Colorado Springs, Col. 

11.— Guydo, an Italian boxer, died at 
Paris from the effects of sparring with Jefl- 
ries, the American champion. 

12.— Colonel T. H. McCalla, real estate 
dealer, and William Gleason, contractor, 
died at Philadelphia. 

13.— Gold Standard bill passed the House, 
166 to 120.- Charles H. Coster, of the firm of 
J. Pierpont Morgan & Co., died at New 
York. 

14.— Nathaniel B. Boyd, Mint employee ; 
Richard W. Kerswell, retired journalist, and 
Michael J. Cassidy, warden of the Eastern 
Penitentiary, died at Philadelphia. — Mrs. 
Frances Hodgson Burnett, authoress, was 
married in London to Stephen Townsend, 
lawyer.— Mrs. Lucinda H. Stone, known as 
"the mother of clubs," died at Kalamazoo, 
Mich. 

IS.^Calvin Stout, farmer, and wife, of 
Hetlerville, Pa., were gored to death by a 
bull. 

16. — Sir Frederick William Burton, water- 
color painter, died at London. 

17.— Lady John Scott Spottiswoode, com- 
poser of "Annie Laurie " and other familiar 
melodies, died at London, aged 91 years.— 
All England wore green in honor of Ire- 
land's patron saint ; the bells in the curfew 
tower of Windsor Castle, by the Queen's 
edict, welcomed the day, and from London's 
Mansion House floated an Irish flag.— Mrs. 
Hannah Phillips Eaches, the oldest Daughter 
of the American Revolution, died at Phcenix- 
ville. Pa. 

18.— John G. Heft, highway inspector, died 
at Philadelphia. 

19.— John A. Bingham, who had been 
Congressman and Minister to Japan, was 
special Judge Advocate in the trial of the 
assassins of President Lincoln, and was one 
of the managers of the impeachment of 
President Johnson, died at Cadiz, O,— Her- 
man E. Taubeueck, of Illinois, who had 
been National Chairman of the Populist 
party, died at Seattle, Wash.— Stephen P. M. 
Tasker, mechanical engineer, and Dr. Amy 
S. Barton, known as the first woman opthal- 
mologist in Pennsylvania, died at Philadel- 
phia.— W. W. Biddle, wool merchant, died at 
Philadelphia. 

20. — Augustus Heaton, retired rubber 
dealer; P. J. McCarty, ex-Magistrate, and 
John Haworth, photographer, died at Phila- 
delphia. 



21.— Fire at Third and Race streets, Phila- 
delphia, caused a loss of 8250,000.— William 
I. Schaffer, of Delaware county, was ap- 
pointed Reporter of the Supreme Court of 
Pennsylvania. — John Boie, composer, died 
at Hamburg, Germany.— Lewis D. Vail, law- 
yer, and Charles Bullock, drug manufac- 
turer, died at Philadelphia. 

22.— An explosion of chemicals in a photo- 
graphic establishment at 123 South Eleventh 
street, Philadelphia, resulted in two men 
being killed and several persons injured. 

23.— Mahlon H. Dickinson, former Com- 
missioner of Highways and a member of the 
Public Buildings Commission, died at Phila- 
delphia. 

24.— Work was begun on the tunnel for an 
underground railroad at New York. 

26.— Dr. Isaac M. Wise, noted Jewish di- 
vine, died at Cincinnati, O.— Robert B. 
Davidson, retired stock broker, died at 
Philadelphia 

27.— General Petrus J. Joubert, commander- 
in-chief of the Boer army, died at Pretoria. 
—Ex-Senator John J. Coyle, of Schuylkill 
county, was acquitted at Harrisburg, Pa., of 
an attempt to bribe Representative John J. 
Engler, of Lycoming county, in the United 
States Senatorial contest in the Pennsyl- 
vania Legislature in the winter of 1899. 

28.— W. J. Rainey, extensive coke pro- 
ducer, of Cleveland, O., died at Baltimore, 
Md. 

29.— Phiietus E. Sawyer, ex-United States 
Senator and millionaire lumberman, died at 
Oshkosh, Wis.— Frederick L. Ballard, iron 
dealer, died at Philadelphia. 

30.— Benjamin B. Comegys, bank presi- 
dent, and N. B. Young, sporting editor, died 
at Philadelphia.— Archibald Forbes, war 
correspondent, died at London. 

31.— Ex-United States Senator Charles H, 
Gibson, of Maryland, died at Washington, 
D. C— Mgr. Thomas R. Moran, Vicar-Gen- 
eral of the Trenton Roman Catholic Dio- 
cese, died at Trenton, N. J. 

April, 1900. 

1. — The arrival was announced of the 
Newnes South Polar Expedition at Campbell 
Town, near Bluff Harbor, New Zealand, 
bearing the news of the location of the 
magnetic pole. — Dr. St. George Mivart, 
famous biologist, died at London. 

2.— Queen Victoria started on a visit to 
Ireland. 

3.— Admiral George Dewey announced his 
candidacy for President of the United 
States. 

4.— An Anarchistic youth, named Sipide, 
fired twice at the Prince of Wales, in a car 
at Brussels, without hitting him.— The Con- 
vention Hall at Kansas City, Mo., in which 
the Democratic National Convention was to 
have Ijcen held, was burned to the ground. 
— Osman Pasha, the Turkish hero of Plevna, 
died at Constantinople.— General John Bid- 
well, Prohibition nominee in 1892 for Presi- 
dent of the United States, died at Chico, 
Cal. 

5.— Lambert Lare, the first letter-cairier 
ever employed at Germantown, died at 
Philadelphia. 

7.— A cloudburst in the Colo'ido River 
Valley of Texas resulted in the ^oss of forty 
lives. — Five murderers were garroted at 
Ponce, P. R.— General Arthur Mac Arthur 
was designated for supreme military com- 
mand in the Philippines. — Frederick E. 
Church, scenic painter, died at New York. 



The Philadelphia Record JUmanac. 



9.— Daniel INIcNichol, contractor, and Cap- 
tain H. E. Melville, superintendent of the 
city ice boats, died at Philadelphia. 

10.— W. H. Allison, real estate assessor, 
died at Philadelphia. 

11.— The Porto Rican Tariff and Govern- 
ment bill was passed by the House as it 
came from the Senate.— Dr. Willis H. Hunt, 
phvslcian, died at Camden, N. J. 

12. — A four-story building collapsed at 
Pittsburg, killing three persons and injuring 
half a dozen. 

13.— John Addison Porter, Secretary to the 
President of the United States, resigned, and 
George B. Cortelyou was appointed to the 
vacancy. — George H. Scripps, pioneer jour- 
nalist, died at Mirando, Cal. 

14. — Exposition was opened at Paris. — Mrs. 
Louisa Lattridge shot and killed Rufus 
Wright, a famous tire maker, in a Chicago 
hotel. 

15.— Ciiarles E. Smith, former President of 
the Reading Railway Company, died at 
Philadelphia. 

17.— Prof. S. O. GaiTison, founder and prin- 
cipal of the New Jersey Training School lor 
Feeble-minded Children, died at Vineland, 
N. J. — Assistant Secretary of the Navy 
Charles H. Allen, of Massachusetts, was ap- 
pohited Governor of Porto Rico. 

20.— Marie Diuse jumped from the Brook- 
lyn bridge and escaped serious injury. 

21.— N. Ferree Lightner, coal dealer, died 
at Philadelphia. — Alexander T. McGill, 
Chancellor of New Jersey, died at Jersey 
City.— Alphou^e Milne-Edwards, Director of 
the Museum of Na'.ural History, died at 
Paris, France.— Ex-Congressman D. G. Col- 
son was acquitted, at Frankfort, Ky., of hav- 
ing shot and killed Lieutenant E. Scolt.- 
The Ecumenical Council of Evangelical 
Churches was opened at New York, ad- 
dres.ses being made by the President of the 
United States and by ex-President Harrison. 

22.— Bishop Tobias Mullen, Roman Catho- 
lic Church, died at Erie, Pa. 

23. — George Schleicher, restaurateur of 
Philadelphia, died at Asheville, N. C— James 
M. Kreamer, civil engineer, and Edward W. 
Barker, grain merchant, died at Philadel- 
phia.— Jesse Engle, Bishop of the River 
Brethren Church, died near BuUowayo, 
South Africa. 

24.— The United States Senate voted, 33 to 
32, against the admission of M. S. Quay as a 
Senator from Pennsylvania upon the ap 
pointnient of Governor Stone after the Legis- 
lature had failed to elect. 

2,5.— The Republican Convention of Penn- 
sylvania, at HarrisVjurg, nominated Edmund 
B. Har<ienl)ergh, of Wayne county, for 
Auditor General, and Galusha A. Grow, of 
Susquehanna county, and Robert H. Foer- 
derer, of Philadelphia, for Congressmen-at- 
Large. 

26. —Fire at Hull and Ottawa, Ont. (on op- 
posite sides of the river), caused a loss of 
fourteen live^ and $15,000,000 in property. 

27.— Chief Justice W. J. Magie was ap- 
pointed Chancellor of New .Jersey.- Fifteen 
lives were lost by flood about Waeo, Texas. 
—Clarence E. Cook, bank teller, and N. 
Chapman Mitchell, President of the Phila- 
delphi.* Hubher Company, died at Philadel- 
phia.— He viand Croft, worsted yarn manu- 
facturer, dicil at Camden, N. J. 

28.— The wife of General James H. Wilson, 
Military Governor of Matanzas, Cuba, was 
burned to death by stepping upon a match 
which ignited her clothing.— H. N. Pills- 
bury, chess ciiampiun, blindfolded, played 



twenty games at the Franklin Club, Phila- 
delphia, won fourteen, drew live and lost 
one. — Felix Fabian, card manufacturer, died 
at Philadelphia. 

29. — Harry W. Purchase, hotel manager, 
died at Atlantic City, N. J.— Charles Ripka, 
dealer in artists' supplies, died at Philadel- 
phia. 

30. — Twenty thousand workingmen pa- 
raded at Philadelphia. 

May, 1900. 

1. — Over 2.30 miners were killed by an ex- 
plosion in the Pleasant Valley Coiapany's 
coal mines at Schofield, Utah. 

3.— Abraham Keiter, retired shoe manufac- 
turer, and Alexander H. McFadden, iron 
master, died at Philadelphia. 

4.— Crown Prince William, of Germany, 
became of age (18). — Isaac C. Wears, promi- 
nent colored man, died at Philadelphia.— 
John L. Murphy, publisher, died at Trenton, 
N.J. 

5.— General Silas M. Bailey, former State 
Treasurer, died at Uniontown, Pa. 

6.— William C. Endicott, who was Secre- 
tary of War during President Cleveland's 
tir;~t term, died at Boston, Mass. 

7.— Real Estate Asses.sor Joseph L. Nobre 
died at Philadelphia. 

8.— Mayor Ashbridge, of Philadelphia, ap- 
proved the ordinance granting extensive 
privileges to the Keystone Telephone Com- 
pany. 

9.— Levi Wells. Dairy and Food Commis- 
sioner of Pennsylvania, resigned. 

10.— The Regular People's Party National 
Convention at Sioux Falls, Dak., nominated 
W. .1. Bryan, of Nebraska, for President of 
the United Slates, and Charles A. Towne, of 
Minnesota, for Vice-President. — The Na- 
tional ('(juveulion of the " Middle-of-the 
Road" Populists, at Cincinnati, O., nomi- 
nateil W hartciu Barker, of Pennsylvania, for 
Prc~icliiit of the United States, and Ignatius 
Donnelly, of Minnesota, for Vice-President. 

11.— .lames J. Corbett was knocked out in 
the twenty-third round by James Jeffries, at 
the Seaside Athletic Club, Coney Island.— 
James Dougherty, retired iron founder, died 
at Philadelphia.— By a collision of freight 
trains in the Twenty-fifth street tunnel of 
the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, at Phila- 
delphia, two men were killed and twenty- 
five injured. 

12.— The United States Pavilion at the 
Paris Exposition was formally handed over 
to the Exposition authorities. 

13.— Four blocks were fireswept in Cam- 
den, N. J., involving a loss of ilGO,000 and 
rendering thirty families homeless.— State 
Senator George "W. Holzwarth and Thomas 
Reynolds, retired grocer, died at Philadel- 
phia. 

14. — Alexander E. Outerbridge. retired 
shipping merchant, died at Philadelphia. 

15.— United States Senator W. A. Clark, ot 
Montana, resigned in face of a committee 
report against the retention of his seat, and 
the I;ieutenant-Governor of Montana (in 
the temporary absence of the Governor) ap- 
pointed Mr. Clark to fill the vacancy caused 
by his resignation. 

16.— (ieorge J. Wadlinger. Judge of the 
Court of Common Pleas, died at Pottsville, 
Pa. 

19.— Media, Pa., celebrated its semi-cen- 
tennial by a parade and oriitcjrical e.xercises 
I —Roy W. White, instructor in tlie Law 
I School of the University of Pennsylvania, 



The Philadelphia Record Almanac. 



was murdered on the street by three colored 
men— Henry Ivory, Charles Perry and Amos 
Sterling. 

21.— The United States Supreme Court re- 
fused to interfere with the Gubernatorial 
contest in Kentucky as settled by the Legis- 
lature under the State law. 

21.— Estes G. Rathbone, Director of Posts 
in Cuba, was suspended from office in conse- 
quence of scandnls connected with his ad- 
ministration, resulting in the arrest of C. W. 
F. Neeley, W. S. Reeves and others. 

22.— Twenty-tiiree men were killed in the 
Cumnock coal mines in North Carolina.— 
Thomas J. Murrey, a noted caterer known 
as "Terrapin Tom," committed suicide at 
New York. —Rev. Dr. J. \V. Hamilton, of 
Boston, Mass., and Rev. Dr. D. H. Moore, of 
Cincinnati, were chosen Bishops by the 
General Conference of the Methodist Epis- 
copal Church, in session at Chicago. — Nathan 
P. Hill, formerly United States Senator, died 
at Denver Col.— Henry Barnett, file manu- 
facturer, died at Philadelphia. 

23.— Mrs. W. \V. Morrison was murdered in 
her home on the Miiishall Sharpless farm, in 
Birmingham township, Chester county, Pa., 
by iin unknown person —Frank J. Krause 
was hanged at Allentown, Pa., for tlie mur- 
der of Maggie J. Guth and Owen A. Kern at 
Cedarville, Match :1, 1899.— Frank B. Carpen- 
ter, arti.st, died at New York. 

24.— Charles Williams was fined twenty 
dollars and costs, at Philadelphia, for hand- 
ling tickets of a citizens' indignation meet- 
ing called to criticise acts of the Mayor and 
Director of Public Safety. 

25.— Dullnian, Nolin and Walsh, convicted 
at Welland, Out., of attempting to blow up 
the Welland canal locks with dynamite, 
were sentenced to life imprisonment.— Sig- 
nor G. Del Puente, baritone, and John Fuller- 
ion, brass smelter, die<l at Philadelphia — 
Homer D. Ely, Superintendent of the Volun- 
tary Relief Department of the Pennsylvania 
Railroad, died at New York.— Captain Page 
McCarty, noted duellist, died at Richmond, 
Va.— A mass meeting was held at the Acad- 
emy of Music, Philadelphia, by citizens who 
considered an alleged attempt by Director A. 
L. English, of the Bureau of Public Safety, 
to blackmail John Wanamaker. 

27.— Mrs. W. S. Stokley, wife of the former 
Mayor, and William Wynne Wi.ster, Jr., law- 
yer, died at Philadelphia. 

28.— Total eclipse of the sun occurred.— 
Dr. William Holloway, wholesale druggist, 
and James A. Irwin, retired bank president, 
died at Philadelphia, 

29.— William Glading, retired merchant 
and well-known hor-seman, died at Phila- 
delphia. 

31.— Charles Engel, retired Philadelphia 
brewer, died at Rheinpfalz, Germany. — 
Samuel T. Fox; real estate dealer, died at 
Philadelphia. 

Jxine, 1900. 

1.— Dr. E. (). Shakspeare, Simon Netter, 
wholesale clothier, and William S. Allen, 
retired builder, died at Philadelpliia. 

2.— The National House of Representatives 
passed the Littletield bill to amend the Sher- 
man Anti-Trust law with but one dissenting 
vote in 274 (Mr. Mann, Republican, of Il- 
linois).— The L.ew Russian cruiser Variag, 
built at Cramps' shipyard, Philadelphia, and 
said to be the flnosl warship of her type in 
the v/orld, finishea mr successful trial at sea. 

4 - -Seth '^'aldwed, Jr.. retired bank presi- 



dent, and John Wister, iron master, died at 
Philadelphia.— James Brown Potter was 
granted a divorce at Newport, R. I., from the 
actress, Mrs. Cora Urquhart Potter, with 
custody of his daughter.— The President 
nominated Prof. L. S. Rowe, of the Wharton 
School of the University of Pennsylvania, on 
the Commission to Revise the Laws of Porto 
Rico, and Prof. M. ^^. Brumbaugh, of the 
Department of Pedagogy, in the same Uni- 
versity, as Commissioner of Education for 
Porto Rico. 

.">.— W. D. Bynum, of Indiana, former Na- 
tional Chairman of the Gold Democratic 
party, \\as rejected by the United States 
Senate on a tie vote for General Appraiser 
of Merchandise.— The wife of John Sherman. 
ex-Secretary of State, died at Mansfield, O.— 
Stephen Crane, author and war correspon- 
dent, died at Baden weiler, Baden.— Rev. Dr. 
Richard S. Storrs, pastor emeritus of the 
Church of the Pilgrims, died at Brooklyn. 
N. Y. 

6.— Nathan Kraus was murdered at Phila- 
delphia by his invalid brother, Maurice. — 
John P. Foley, new.sdealer, died at Phila- 
delphia.— Gen. Charles Miller, of Franklin, 
was elected ( ommander of the Pennsylvania 
Department of the Grand Army of "the Re- 
public. 

7.— The first session of the Fifty-sixth Con- 
gress adiourned. — Francis D. Worley, retired 
Philadelphia flour dealer, died near Gwyn- 
edd, Montgomery county. Pa. 

8.— T. Elwood Potts, conveyancer, died at 
Philadelphia. 

9.— Richard C. Kerens, Republican Na- 
tional Committeeman Irom Missouri, was 
presented with a loving cup by reprcsenta- 
tives of Philadelphia Republican Clubs for 
his casting vote in bringing to Philadelphia 
the Republican National Convention of 1900. 
—Robert Hill shot and killed his wife at 
Camden, N. J. 

10.- Df. Paul (iibier, who established the 
Pasteur Institute at New York, was killed in 
that city by being thrown fiom a buggy he 
was driving.— James Pierce, one of two bro- 
thers indicted at Media, Pa., lor the murder 
of George B. Eyre, hanged himself in the 
Delaware County Jail.— Four rioters in a 
street-car strike were killed by the Sheriff's 
posse at St. Louis.— Joseph Allison, Great 
Sachem of the Great Council of Pennsyl- 
vania, Improved Order of Red Men, died at 
Philadelphia. 

12.— Charles K. Landis, founder of Vine- 
land, Hammonton and Sea Isle City, N. J., 
died at Vineland.— Robert C. Floyd, Secre- 
tary of the Department of Charities and Cor- 
rections, and Thomas Henry, hosiery yarn 
manufacturer, died at Philadelphia.— Belle 
Boyd, noted as a Confederate spy, died at 
Kilbourne, Wis. 

13. — Horace C. Disston, saw manufacturer, 
died at Philadelphia.— The change in the 
Hawaiian government went into effect at 
midnight. 

14.— Right Rev. Richard H.Wilmer. Episco- 
pal Bishop of Alabama, died at Mobile. 

15.— David D. Wells, author and playwright, 
died at Norwich, Conn.— James C. Wignall, 
noted boat builder, died at Philadelphia — 
Two families of eleven persons lost their lives 
in a tenement-house fire at No. 34 Jackson 
street. New York. 

IC— Congressman John H. Hofl'ecker, died 
at Dover, Del. 

17. — An explosion in a fireworks factory at 
621 Schell street, Philadelphia, killed four 
persons and injured half a dozen.— Old 



The Philadelphia Record JUtnanac. 



Swedes P. E. Church, at Philadelphia, cele- 
brated its two-hundredth anniversary. —The 
allied fleet took the forts at Takn, China, 
with the loss of two British .varships. 

18. — Great parade of Republican Clubs at 
Philadelphia on the eve of the assembling of 
the National Convention. — Baron Von Keite- 
ler, German Minister toChina, was murdered 
by "Boxers" at Pekin.— H. Walter Webb, 
railroad official and financier, died at Scar- 
boroughon-the-H\idson, N. Y.— Carl Theo. 
Maver, editor of the German Dailt/ Gazette, of 
Phfladelphia, died at Atlantic City, N. J. 

19.— The Republican National Convention 
began its sessions at Philadelphia. 

20.— William Fewsmith, teacher and author 
of an English grammar, died at Merchant- 
ville, N. J.— D. H. S. Lucas, the first scientist 
to produce Epsom salts, died at Franklin, 

21.— William McKinley was nominated for 
President and Theodore Roosevelt for Vice- 
President by the Republican National Con- 
vention at Philadelphia.— Count Michael 
Mouravieff, Rnssiati Minister of Foreign Af- 
fairs, died suddenly at St. Petersburg.— Gen. 
MacArthur, by the President's order, issued 
a proclamation of amnesty in the Philippines 
to all who should take advantage of it with- 
in ninety days.— Real Estate Assessor G. T. 
Mills died at Philadelphia. 

23.— Dr. John V. Shoemaker was appointed 
by Mayor Ashbridge, of Philadelphia, Presi- 
dent of the Department of Charities and 
Corrections. 

24.— Thirty-five persons (chiefly railroad 
employees) were killed in a wreck near 
McDonough, Ga., on the Southern Railway, 
caused by the train running into a washout. 
— ExCongressman B. H. Roberts, of Utah, 
was convicted at Salt Lake City, Utah, of un- 
lav'ful cohabitation, and fined 8150. 

25.^0fficial announcement made that 
Archduke Ferdinand, the Austrain heir-ap- 
parent, had formally renounced the right of 
succession in order to wed Countess Sophie 
Chotek.— Emil C. Geyelin, engineer, who 
built the famous turbine water works at 
Niagara Falls, died at Philadelphia. 

26.— Gus Ruhlin, the Ohio pugilist, knocked 
out Tom Sharkey, the .sailor, in the fifteenth 
round, at the Seaside Athletic Club, N. Y. 

27.— W. ,J. Pollock, Mercantile Appraiser, 
died at Philadelphia. 

28.— The Prohibition National Convention, 
at Chicago, nominated John G. WooUey, of 
Illinois, for President and H. B. Metcalf, of 
Rhode Island, for Vice-President of the 
United States. 

29— The battleship Oregon went ashore on 
Pinnacle Rock, fifty miles northwest of Chee- 
foo, China. 

30.— Rear Admiral John W. Philip, U. S. N., 
died at Brooklyn Navy Yard.— Nearly 300 
lives were lost and property worth 810,000,000 
(including three steamers of the German 
Lloyds Company), by a fire at Hoboken N. J., 
whicli started on a pier of the steamship line. 
—Henry L. Bonsall, veteran editor, died at 
Delair, N. J. 

July, 1900. 

1.— The National Saengerfest began at 
Brooklyn, N. Y.— W. B. Curtis, founder of 
the New York Athletic Club, was frozen to 
death on Mt. Washington, N. H. 

3. — An equestrian statue of Washington, 
the work of American sculptors and the 
contribution of Americans, was unveiled in 
Jena Square, Paris. 



4.— Eight children were killed and twenty- 
four injured by an explosion of fireworks in 
front of No. 755 South Eighth street, Phila- 
delphia.— Seven persons were killed and 
fifty-two injured at Parkersburg, W. Va , by 
the explosion of an oil tank in the jhio 
River Railroad yard, caused by a collision of 
trains.— Prof W. J. Solly, business educator, 
died at Philadelphia.— Thirty-three persons 
were killed in a trolley accident at Tacoma, 
Wash. — A statue of Lafayette, contributed 
by the school children of America, was un- 
veiled at Paris. 
; 5.— W. J. Bryan, of Nebraska, was nomi- 
I nated for President of the United States by 
the Democratic National Convention at Kan- 
sas City, Mo. 
\ 6.— The Democratic National Convention 
; nominated Adlai E. Stevenson, of Illinois, 
I for Vice-President. 

7.— Dr. John Ashhurst, Jr., and President 
J. Wesley Supplee, of the Corn Exchange 
Bank, died at Philadelphia. 

8.— Twenty men killed by an explosion in 
a coal mine near Gloucester, O. — Letter of 
Mayor Ashbridge made public at Philadel- 
phia in which he declined to take any action, 
as requested lay a mass meeting of citizens, 
' looking to an inquiry into a charge of at- 
! tempted blackmail brought by John Wana- 
] maker against Director of Public Safety A. L. 
English.— T. Ehvood Potts, conveyancer, and 
John R. Savage, former manufacturing che- 
mist, died at Philadelphia.— Capt. A. W. Ei- 
clielberger, of Hanover, Pa., presented the 
1 town with a high school building which cost 
; $40,000.— Edward Oswald, who slew his wife 
and child at Camden. N. J., and was convict- 
j ed of murder in the first degree, was granted 
I a new trial by Justice Garrison. 
! 9.— One "Bowser" successfully navigated 
i Niagara whirlpool rapids in a boat called 
I "Fool Killer."— Edward S. Conner, journal- 
ist, Pav Director George Cochran, U. S. N., 
and Dr. W. W. Gardiner died at Philadelphia. 
10.— Frank P. I^eech, real estate assessor, 
{ died at Philadelphia.— James H. Fisher, of 
Jamestown, N. Y., was elected Exalted Ruler 
of the Order of Elks in National Convention 
assembled at Atlantic City, N, J. 
j 11.— Rev. Dwight Galloupe, who won the 
1 title of "Fighting Parson" at Santiago, died 
at Newark, N. J.— James M. Beck, United 
I States District Attorney at Philadelphia, re- 
signed his office and announced that he was 
: no longer a Democrat.— David A. Frey, 
1 veteran newspaper publisher, died at Y'ork, 
I Pa.— Frank R. Torrington, a canal engineer 
from Fernwood, Pa., died on the Isthmus of 
I Darien. 

12.— President McKinley was formally no- 
tified, at his home in Canton, O., of his 
I nomination for a second term.- A tank-car 
j of oil exploded at New York, killing one and 
I injuring sixty persons.— James M. Beck, of 
Philadelphia, was appointed Assistant Attor- 
I ney General of the United States.— Governor 
Theodore Roosevelt was officially notified at 
his Oyster Bay home of his nomination by 
, the Republican National Convention as his 
party's candidate for Vice-President.— Four 
men were killed on the Delaware, Lacka- 
wanna and Western Railroad, near Cresco, 
i Pa., by a train of forty ice-laden cars crashing 
into a wild-cat train.— Dr. C. Wesley Lyon, 
j expert in development of petroleum pro- 
ducts, died at Philadelphia.— Allied forces 
in front of Tientsin, China, repulsed with 
I great loss, Col. E. H. Liscum, of^ the Ninth 

U. S. Infantry, being among the killed. 
1 14.— John H. Gear, United States Senator 



The Philadelphia Record Jhlmanac. 



from Iowa, died at Washington, D. C— Allied 
forces captured Tientsin, China. 

15.— Christian Endeavor Convention of the 
world opened at London.— George P. Chance, 
a noted labor leader, died at Philadelphia. 

20.— W.W. Rockhill, of Washington, D. C, 
was appointed a Special Commissioner to 
China.— John Bennington, at Media, Pa., 
celebrated his one-hundredth birthday anni- 
versary. 

22.— L. E. Chittenden, who was Register of 
the Treasury during the Lincoln Administra- 
tion, died at Burlington, Vt. 

2-i.— Franklin Piatt, geologist, died at 
Piiiladelphia. 

2.5. — (ien. Charles Miller, of Venango, was 
appointed Major General of the National 
Guard of Pennsylvania, vice George R. Snow- 
den, fommission expired.— By unanimous 
vote of the National Committee of the Na- 
tional ((xokl Standard) Democrats, at Indian- 
apolis, Ind., it was decided inexpedient to 
put up a ticket lor President and Vice-Presi- 
dent of the United States. 

26.— Capt. James S. Biddle, a retired naval 
officer who had been the Democratic nomi- 
nee for Mayor, died at Philadelphia. 

27.— Four policemen and three citizens 
were killed at New Orleans in a three-day 
race riot brought about by an attempt to ar- 
rest Robert Charles, a negro thief, who killed 
the seven persons and was then himself 
shot down.— Mary Yardley, a native of Phila- 
delpbia, died at Chicago, aged 105 years, 

28.— Lady Randolph Churchill and Lieut. 
George ornwallis-West were married at 
Londor 

29.— K.:i„ Humbert of Italy was shot and 
killed at Monza by an Italian a.ssassin named 
GaetangBresci. from Paterson, N. ,1. — Howard 
S. Janney, wholesale grocer, died at Philadel- 
phia. 

31. — Four young ladies. Misses Lowe, of 
Germantown", Philadelphia, and Misses Lons- 
dale, of Montgomery County, Pa., were 
drowned in the surf at Ocean City, N. J.— 
Congressman W. D. Daly, of the Seventh New 
Jersey District, died suddenly at Far Rock- 
away, L. I.— Lewis C. Vandegrift, former 
United States District Attorney, died at 
Wilmington, Del.— John Clark Kidpath, the 
historian, died at New York.— George Dixon, 
the colored pugilist, broke his left arm in a 
tight with Tommy Sullivan, at Coney Island, 
and had to quit a"t the end of the sixth round. 

Axigxist, 1900. 

1. — King Alexander, of Servia, was shot at 
by a would-be assassin at Belgrade.— Rev. 
Alexander Jaster, aged 80 years, was ac- 
quitted at New London, Mo.," of the murder 
of Gilbert Gates twenty years before. 

2.— Dr. Chas. Tanner wais suspended- from 
House of Commons for insulting the Speaker 
in a discussion of a question. — An unsuccess- 
ful attempt was made at Paris on the life of 
the Shah of Persia by an unknown man. 
— The final signatures were affixed at 
Paris, France, in the .settlement of the con- 
tested will of the late Dr. T. \V. Evans, den- 
tist, by which a large sum accrues to Phila- 
delphia for a public in.stitution. 

3.— Robert Dunlap, hatter, died at New 
York. 

4.— William D. Gardner, Philadelphia, 
bank president and carriage builder, died at 
Ocean Grove, N. J.— Job S. Haines, promi- 
nent in the work of the New Jersey Grange, 
died at Paulsboro, N. J.— Elias Wolf, retired 
Philadelphia clothing manufacturer, died at 



Atlantic City, N. J.— Gen. Jacob D. Cox, of 
Ohio, ex-Governor and ex-Secretary of the 
Interior, died at Magnolia, Mass.— Nineteen 
persons were hurt at Scranton, Pa., by a 
mysterious explosion which wrecked the 
Merchants' and Mechanics' Bank buildings. 

5.— Capt. Henry A. Call, retired uphols- 
terer, died at Philadelphia. 

6.— Dr. Clarence S. Mclntire, professor at 
Temple College, died at Philadelphia.— Wil- 
liam Clark, of Newark, N. J., President of 
the William Clark Thread Company, died at 
Watch Hill, R. I. 

7.— The Adams cigar-shaped train ran from 
Philadelphia to Baltimore in 1 hour and 41 
minutes.— Charles A. Towne, of Duluth, 
Minn., announced his declination of the 
Vice-Presidential nomination on the Popu- 
list ticket.— Charles Page, formerly a teacher 
in the School of Design for Women, died at 
Philadelphia. 

8.— William J. Bryan and Adiai E. Steven- 
son, Democratic nominees for President and 
Vice-President, were otSeially notified at 
Indianapolis.— J. Simpson Africa, President 
of the Union Trust Company of Philadelphia, 
died at Huntingdon, Pa.— Henry Hotlman, 
aged 105 years, died at East Butler, Pa. 

9.— Capt. Charles H. Tuft, steamboat man, 
died at Philadelphia. 

10.— Robert Fitzsimmons knocked out Gus 
Ruhlin, in the fifth round, at Madison 
Square Garden, New York.— Arthur B. Ayers, 
noted as "the Welsh Mountain constable. " 
died at Lancaster, Pa.— John Braun. hard- 
ware manufacturer, died at Philadelphia. 

11.— Samuel Buchanan, general storekeeper 
of the Water Bureau ; John W. Wise, leather- 
belting manufacturer, and George W. Reed, 
theatre doorkeeper, died at Philadelphia. 

12. — Fourteen persons were killed and 
eight seriously injured by a collision at a 
grade crossing near Statington, Pa., between 
a passenger train and a funeral party in an 
omnibus. 

13.— David G. Yates, Philadelphia nursery- 
man, died at Poland, Me.— Gen. Robert K. 
Scott, a Union veteran who was twice Gov- 
ernor of South Carolina, died at Napoleon, O. 
—Michael Corr, retired liquor dealer, and 
Rev. Richardson Graham, former Chinese 
missionary of the P. E. Church, died at 
Philadelphia, 

14.— Collis P. Huntington, railroad mag- 
nate, died in the Adirondacks.— The Ham- 
burg-American liner Deutschland made 
the run from Sandy Hook to Plymouth, Eng., 
in 5 days 11 hours and 45 minutes, breaking 
the record for the eastern passage, held by 
herself, and she now holds all records except 
one— 580 knots, made by the Kaiser Wil- 
helm.— The six-masted schooner George W. 
Wells, the only vessel of her class in the 
world, was launched at Camden, Me. — 
Francis K. Linder and wife celebrated at 
Philadelphia the fiftieth anniversary of their 
marriage in St. Peter's Roman Catholic 
Church, the first couple married in that edi- 
fice to celebrate their golden anniversary.— 
Ex-Congressman George W. Shonk, of 
Wilkesbarre, Pa., died at Washington, D. C. 

15. — The once notorious filibustering 
steamer Bermuda, laden with fmit, was sunk 
at her wharf, Philadelphia, by a mysterious 
explosion on board.— Augustus S. Barker, 
Jr., Secretary of the Republican State Com- 
mittee of New Jersey, died at Woodbury. 

16. — Chief Justice Henry D. Cireen, of the 
Pennsylvania Supreme Court, died at Atlantic 
City, N J. —John J. Ingalls, former United 
States Senator from Kansas, died at Las Ve- 



The Philadelphia Record JUmanac. 



gas, N. M.— William H. Lex, lawyer and ex- 
President of Council, died at Philadelphia. 
— W. H. Folwell, Philadelphia dress goods 
manufacturer, died at Sharon Hill, Pa. 

17.— Matole Monesa and Michael Gaudii, 
Italians, were arrested at New York, upon 
their arrival from Naples, charged with 
being on their way to attempt the assassina- 
tion of President McKinley. — An attempt to 
wreck an express train oiit of Atlantic City 
was discovered in tune to avoid trouble. — 
The Supreme Court of California made a de- 
cision which g:ivi's a new trial t(^ Mrs. Corde- 
lia Kodkin. wlio was convicted of causiuf; 
the deatlis of Mrs. .iohii P. Dnnnini,' and 
Mrs. John 1). iH-ane, at Hover, Del., by slikI- 
ing poisoned Cdudy through the mails.— Il 
was announced that American exhibitors at 
the Paris Exposition had 1)een awarded 19H1 
prizes, including 220 grand prizes and 4.s(i 
gold medals. — Three men were killed at 
Palm Station crossing of the Perkiomen 
branch of the Philadelphia and Reading 
Company, below Allentown, Pa., by a pas- 
senger train striking a wagon in which they 
rode.— John H. Bateman, veteran editor, 
died at Dover, Del. 

19.— Seraeant '-Buck' Taylor," a noted 
"Rough Rider," died at Washington, D. C. 
—Patrick Mehan, grocer, and Harry E. Gem- 
rig, surgical instrument maker, died at 
Philadelphia.— Capt. John W.Wilson, Arctic 
explorer, died at Brooklyn, N. Y. 

21.— Harry B. Yerger, lawyer, and Joseph 
Smith, restaurateur, died at Philadelphia. 

22.— Thirteen hundred Cuban teachers, of 
both sexes, were landed at Philadelphia from 
ff)ur army transports and snent two days in 
sight-seeing, chaiJeroniMl liv ladies iind gen- 
tlemen of Philadelphia, win- liad vulun- 
teered for the duty. ItiutholMnnw Ruello, 
expert counterfeiter, \\a^ con \iiieil at Phila- 
delphia. — Fairman Rogers, civil ( ngiiieer 
and fotmder of the Philadelphia Coaching 
Club, died at Vienna. Austria. 

2:',.— .A. mob at Akron, seeking (he life of 
Louis Peck, negro, accused of as>anlting a 
child, but who had been removed from 
town, fired into the public building, killing 
two children and wotniding a score of po- 
licemen, detectives and civilians, and blew 
up the City Hall and the Columbian build- 
ing with dynamite, causing S.oOO.UUO prop- 
erty loss. 

25— T. Lalimer Potts, Hour broker, died at 
Philadelphia. 

26.— The Vesper (Tew, of Philadelphia, 
won the eight <rirc(l shell i;u-e .11 Paris for 
the champiunshipoi' the wciild.— Cell. siint)n 
P. Kase, railway ImiMer, and Cliarles 8. 
Davis, retired builder, died ai l'hiladeli)hia. 

29.— Gaetano Bresei, the assassin of King 
Humbert, was foinid guihy at Milan and 
sentenced to imprisonment for li's.- Benja- 
min Schofield, a retired manufacturer, died 
at Philadelphia. 

30.— Thomas J. Powers, of Philad(dphia. 
Banking Commissioner of Pennsylvania, fell 
from an Atlantic City train and was killed. 
—James J. Corbett, in the fifth round, 
knocked out " Kid " McCoy at New York.— 
Judge Leo Rassieur, of St. Louis, Mo., was 
elected National Commander in Chief of the 
Grand Army of the Republic. 

September, 1900. 

1.— Hamburg-American liner Deutschland 
arriveil at Sandy Hook from Clierbourg in 5 
days 12 honrs aii<l 29 minutes, lireaking all 



records, besides Vireaking the record for one 
day's run, making 584 miles. 

2.— By a collision between an excursion 
train and a milk train on the Bethlehem 
branch of the Reading Railroad, at Hatfield 
Station, 13 persons were killed and about CO 
injured. — Amos Dotterer, brick manufac- 
turer, died at Philadelphia. 

4. Zachariah Montgomery, who was .As- 
sistant Attorney General d'uring President 
Cleveland's first administration, died at Los 
Angeles, Cal. 

.'). — ArthurSewall, who wasthe Democratic 
nominee in l,s9() for Vice President, died at 
Bath, Me— .1. I'. Ward, arain merchant, died 
at Philadelijhia— The National (or Gold) 
party, at .New York, nominated Donelson 
Cattery, of Louisiana, for President, and A. 
Miiriay Howe, "f Massachusetts, for Vice- 
President, but both declined. 

6. — Announcement made that Prince 
Luigi Amadeo, of Savoy-Aosta (Duke of 
Abruzzi), had attained the highest North 
yet reached— SS degrees 33 minutes. 

8.— A ciinibinalion of tidal wave and 
cyclone struck Galveston, Texas, causing 
a loss of aboiu CiKio lives and t20,000,000 in 
property in that vicinity. 

9.— Stiainer Deutschland beat the Wil- 
helni del' < iiu-se in a race from New York to 
the Scill> Islands by 3 hoursand 25 minutes, 
breaking all records.— John J. Halliwell, po- 
lice lieutenant, died at Philadelphia. — As- 
sistant Fireman James Sowney, of Engine 
Company No. 48, was killed at a" fir' in Phila- 
delphia. 

11.— State Senator Samuel A .:-sch, of 
Schuvlkill Haven, Pa., died ai Atlantic 
I City, N. J.— Dr. J. M. Da Costa died at Phila- 
delphia. 

12.— Nine members of the Duncan Clark 
Female Minstrels were killed at Mounds, 
111., by their special car being crushed in a 
j collision.— Republican City Convention at 
! Philadelphia nomin.iteil .1. Hampton Moore 
for City Treasurer. Jacoli Singer for Register 
I of Wills, and Thomas K. Finletter, to suc- 
ceed himself as Common Pleas Judge. 
I 14.— Rear Admiral Montgomery Sicard, 
I U. S. N., retired, died at Westernville, N. Y.— 
Frank Bacon, photographer, died at Phila- 
delphia. 
16.— John P. Shannon, Supreme Dictator 
, ofthe Knightsof Honor.died at Elberton, Ga. 
17.— .\ strike of the anthracite coal miners 
was inaugurated by the order of President 
Mitchell, of the United Mine Workers of 
■ America. 

j 19.— Dr. Hunter McGulre, who was Stone- 
wall Jackson's medical director during the 
I Civil War, died near Richmond, Va. 

20.— Frank A. Hartranft was nominated 
by the Democratic Convention at Philadel- 
phia for City Treasurer, Edward F. Ternan 
for Register of Wills, and Thomas K. Finlet- 
ter for Judge ofthe Court of Common Pleas. 
—Belle Mingle Archer, actress, died at War- 
ren. Pa. 

21.— At the request of the Sheriff of Schuyl- 
kill eouiuv. Pa., three regiments of militia 
j (the FoiH-tli. Kiglith and-Twelfth) were or- 
I dered to Slienandoah. besides the Governor's 
! Troop and Battery C— Dr. Louis A. Sayre, 
I famous surgeon, died at New York. — Father 
Telion, founder of La Salle College, Philadel- 
phia, died at Washington, D. C. 
i 23.— Gen. Martinez de Campos, former 
j Captain General of Cuba, died at Zaranzo, 

Spain. 
; 24.— G. Harry Davis, Republican, and 
Frank ,A. Hartranft, Democrat, were nonii- 



The Philadelphia Record JUmanac. 



iiated by the Municipal League at Philadel- 
phia for Register of Wills and City Treasurer 
respectively, Edward F. Ternan, who had 
been nominated by the Democratic City 
Convention for Register of Wills, consenting 
to withdraw in order to make a fusion ticket. 
— Eight persons who took refuge in a saloon 
at Morristown, Minn., during a cyclone, 
were killed by the demolition of the build- 
ing.— Dr. Alfred Stille died at Philadelphia. 

■A5.— Gen. John M. Palmer, who was the 
Gold Democratic candidate for President of 
the United States in 1896, died at Spiingfleld, 
111.— Miss Elizabeth Van Lew, noted as a spy 
for Gen. Grant at Richmond, Va., during the 
Civil War, died at Richmond.— William B. 
Potter, of Pittsburg, was appointed to the 
Supreme Bench of Pennsylvania. 

26.— Three persons were" killed in a tornado 
at Ferguson, Marshall county, Iowa.— A mob 
at Victor, Col., threw eggs at Governor Theo- 
dore Roosevelt, Republican candidate for 
Vice-President. 

27.— John J. Metzger, President Judge of 
the Twenty-ninth Jndicial District, died sud- 
denly at Williamsport, Pa. 

28.— Joseph R. Adams, lawyer, died at 
Philadelphia. 

oO.— Field Marshal Lord Frederick S. 
Roberts, on his 70th birthday, was appointed 
commander-in-chief of the British Army. — 
Beriah E. Jones, general contractor, died at 
Philadelphia. 

October, 1900. 

1.— James S. Thompson resigned as Fire 
Marshal of Philadelphia.— George Rehfuss, 
who invented the first practical buttonhole- 
making machine, died at Philadelphia. 

2.— Two men were drowned as the result 
of a collision between the steamer Major 
Barrett and the tng Fleetwing, in the Dela- 
ware river, at the mouth of the Schuylkill. 
—Prof. George F. Barker resigned the chair 
of physics at the University of Pennsylva- 
nia, after twenty-eight years' service. — John 
Heins, auditor, died near Media, Pa.— First 
vessel of new Southern steamship line to 
Savannah sailed from Philadelphia. 

3.— Gen. Frank Reeder, of Easton, Pa., 
was appointed State Banking Commissioner. 

4.— Benjamin B. Campbell, who struck the 
first oil well in the United States, died at 
Pittsburg, Pa. 

6.— John Kellerman, Port Warden, and 
James Henry, florist, died at Philadelphia. 

8.— George R. Blancliard, former Com mi s- 
.sioner of the Joint Trathc Association (trunk- 
line railroads), died at New York.— The Su- 
Ereme Court of Pennsylvania dismissed the 
ill of certain members of the Junior Order 
of United American Mechanics who sought 
to set aside the jurisdiction of the State and 
National Councils in the matter of collect- 
ing taxes.— The commission of Chief Justice 
J. Brewster McCollum, of the Supreme 
Court of Pennsylvania, was read upon the 
opening of October term of court at Pitts- 
burg.— Col. J. P. Wright, Assistant Surgeon 
General, U. S. A., died at Washington, D. C. 

9.— Ex-Chief Justice Edward M. Paxson 
was elected President of the Board of Trus- 
tees of the Medico-Chirurgical College at 
Philadelphia.— Discovery made that William 
Schreiber (then two months absent), confi- 
dential clerk of the Elizabethport (N. J.) 
Banking Company, was a defaulter to the 
amount of $107,000.— Henry E. Saulnier, 92 
years old, was re-elected President of the 



Rose Tree Fox Hunting Club at Media, Pa.— 
Dr. R. R. Bunting died at Philadelphia. 

10.— Ralph Mills, a deputy sheriff, was 
shot and killed in a fight between striking 
miners and guards and employees of Coxe 
Bros. & Co.'s colliery at Oneida, Luzerne 
county. Pa.— Capt. M. E. Jones, credited 
with having fired the first shot in the battle 
of Gettysburg, died at Wheaton, 111.— A con- 
vention of women's clubs of Pennsylvania 
was opened at Williamsport.— The Railroad 
Department of the Y. M. C. A. began its ses- 
sions at Philadelphia. 

12— United States Judge George Gray, of 
Delaware, and Benjamin HarrLson, ex-Presi- 
dent of the United States, were selected as 
members of The Hague Arbitration Board. 

13.— Henrietta Robbins, colored, 1U6 years 
old, died at Easton, Pa. 

l.'i.— John Hev, ma.ster gilder, died at 
Philadelphia. 

16.— David Foy, old-time minstrel, and 
Benjamin H. Andrews, commission mer- 
chant, died at Philadelphia. 

17.— A committee of twenty citizens, ap- 
pointed at a town meeting to investigate 
charges of blackmail and intimidation made 
by ex-Postmaster General Wanamaker 
against Director Englisli, at Philadelphia, 
decided against impeachment proceedings, 
but censiired both Director English and 
Mayor Ash bridge. —Count Von Zeppelin's 
air-ship made a successful trial at Fried- 
richshafen, Wurtemburg. — Eight persons 
were burned to death in a tenement-house 
fire at No. 45 Hester street. New York.— Wil- 
liam L. Wilson, ex-Postmaster (;eneral, died 
at Lexington, Va.— Isaac W. Kahn, jouniiil 
ist, aied at Philadelphia.— Jlrs. p:iiza))ith 
Stranahan, aged 101 years, died in I-:ast 
Lackawannack township, Mercer county. 
Pa.— Major M. R. Peterson, Commissarv, 
U. S. A., died of yellow fever at Los Animas, 
Cuba, whereupon his wife, who had gone 
there previously from Cincinnati to nurse 
him, killed herself. 

18.— Count von Buelow was appointed 
Chancellor of the German Empire, vice 
Prince von Hohcnlohe, resigned.— Philip 
H. Klohse, retired contractor and former 
Councilman, died at Philadelphia. 

19.- Charles Jones, retired wholesale sad- 
dlery dealer and prominent as a Prohibi- 
tionist, died at Philadelphia. 

20. — Charles Dudley Warner, author and 
editor, died at Hartford, Conn. 

21.— A tornado west of Lodi, Texas, killed 
fifteen persons. — Fire in a slaughtering 
house at St. Paul, Minn., resulted in four 
deaths.— Rev. John K. Murpliy, P. E. Church, 
and Dr. W. II. Badger, journalist, died at 
Philadelphia. 

22.— John Sherman, ex-Senator and ex- 
Secretarv of the Treasury, died at Washing- 
ton, D. C. 

23.— The discovery was made that Charles 
L. Alvord, Jr., note teller of the First Na- 
tional Bank of New York, was a defaulter 
for about 8:700,000.— Col. George P. McLean, a 
Civil War veteran and retired manufacturer 
of picture frames, died at Philadelphia. 

21.— Dr. Laurence Turnbull, physician, 
died at Philadelphia. 

25.— The anthracite coal strike was de- 
clared off by President John Mitchell, of the 
United Mine Workers.— Henry Ivory, col- 
ored, was convicted at Philadelp!iia of the 
murder of Boy White, law professor of the 
University of Pennsylvania. 

26.— Charles Perry," colored, was convicted 
of the murder of Professor Roy While at 



The Philadelphia Record JUmanac. 



Philadelphia, and the case of Amos Stirling, 
indicted for the same crime, was postponed. 
—Robert Develon, carpet manufacturer, died 
at Philadelphia. 

27.— John D. Hcins, Common Councilman, 
died at Philadelphia.- Dr. E. R. Squibb, 
noted manufacturiug chemist, died at Brook- 
lyn, N. Y. 

28 —Dr. M. J. Grier, retited specialist in 
nervous diseases, died at Philadelphia. 

29.— Earthquake at Caracas, Venezuela, 
killed fifteen persons.— Fire in Tarrant's 
drug manufacturing warehouse resulted in 
explosions which wrecked tlie entire block, 
at New York, lx)uuded by Washington, 
Warren, Greenwich and Murray streets, 
causing a loss of fl, 500,000 and two or three 
lives.— W. S. Stryker, Adjutant General Of 
New Jersey, died at Trenton.— Rev. M. L. 
Smyser, presiding elder of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church, died at Alto^ma, Pa. 

30— William Hosier, of Mt. Pleasant, Pa., 
paymaster of the Southwest Connellsville 
Coal and Coke Company, was shot and 
killed near Alverton, Westmoreland county, 
Pa., by four highwaymen, twoof whom (John 
Servic and Tony Tolka) were killed, a third 
(John Vrosky) badly woinided, and a fourth 
named Swensky was captured and impris- 
oned.— By an explosion of gas in No. 1 Shaft 
of the Kingston Coal Company, at Edwards- 
ville. Pa., five miners were killed and ten 
injured.- James Buchanan, ex-Congress- 
man, died at Trenton, N. J. 

November, 1900. 

1. — Dr. Lewis W. Reed, former Surgeon 
General of PennsylviUiia, died at Norris- 
town.— Professor I'l. V. Hilprecht, of the 
University of Pennsylvania, returned from 
making excavations "at Ni]>pur, where he un- 
earthed tombs over 7000 years old and dis- 
covered the great Babylonian Temple li- 
brary. 

2.— Ex-Mayor William L. Strong died at 
New York. 

3.— Eleven men were killed by an explo- 
sion in a mine at Barrysburg, W. Va. — Ninety 
thousand men parad"ed at New York with 
the Business Men's Republican Sound Money 
Association. — Henry M. Daly, wholesale 
liquor merchant, and Jesse Kerrick, retired 
brick manufacturer, died at Philadelphia. 

5. — Announcement made at Philadelphia 
that John Wanamaker had given 150,000 
to be used in prosecuting election frauds. — 
Benjamin Robinson, Assistant Superintend- 
ent of the Morgue, died at Philadelphia. 

6.— Joseph R. Teller, real estate dealer, 
died at Philadelphia. 

8.— Dr. Kahn, of a party of Arctic scien- 
tific explorers, arrived on a whaler at Dun- 
dee, Scotland, bringing information of the 
movements of Lieut. Peary up to August, 
1900.— Thomas K. Gill, retired dry goods 
connnission merchant died at Philadelphia. 

9. — Thomas P. Lonsdale, architect, died at 
Philadelphia. 

10.— R. fi. Dun, head of a commercial 
agency, died at New York.— Rudolph S. 
\Valtoh, retired hatter and member ot the 
Board of Public Edtication, died at Philadel- 

Ehia.— J. B. Ferguson, turfman and noted 
orse-race starter, died at Lexington. 
11.— Thomas G. Hood, wholesale dry goods 
merchant, and W. C. Smith, retired" sugar 
refiner, died at Philadelphia. 

12.— Marcus Daly, turfman, and copper 
king of Montana, died at New York. — Henry 



Villard, ex-President of the Northern Pacific 
Railroad, died at Dobb's Ferry, N. Y.— 
Erasttis Poulson, pension claim agent, died 
at Philadelphia.— Frank J. Patton, inventor 
of the multiplex telegraph system and of the 
gyroscope, died at New York. 

13.— Thomas H. Caswell, Grand Com- 
mander of the Southern Jurisdiction of 
Scottish Rite Masons, died at San Francisco. 
— Col. John I>. Halt, well known in connec- 
tion with ( nliaii lililmstering expeditions 
Ijefove the S| i:i uish war, died at Philadelphia. 
14.— Judge .lereniiah Lyons, of the Juniata- 
Perry district, died suddenly at Philadel- 
phia.— W. S. Reyburu, lightning-rod manu- 
facturer, died at Philadelphia. — The Evening 
Call, at Philai'ielphia, ceased publication. 

15.— The Navy Department announced an 
agreement to pay S420 a ton for armor plate 
for battleships, with a proviso concerning 
the Krupi) yirocess which made the price 
about ?4.55.32.— Eben C. Javne, chemist, died 
at Philadeljihia.- The United States auxili- 
ary cruiser Yosemite was wrecked in a ty- 
phoon which drove her on a reef off the 
harbor of San Luis d'Apra, island of Guam, 
and five of her crew were drowned in at- 
tempting to reach shore in a launch ; a collier 
rescued the remainder of her crew and offi- 
cers. 

16.— Preston Porter, Jr , a colored youth 
who confessed having assaulted and mur- 
dered little Louise Frost, was burned at the 
stake by a mob at the spot where the mur- 
dered child was found, near Lake Station, 
Colorado.— Serma Schnapke, a crazy trades- 
woman of Breslau, Prussia, threw an axe at 
Emperor William of Germany, as the latter 
was passing in a carriage.— Charles A. Tyler, 
who had been a letter carrier for fifty-five 
years, died at Brooklyn, N. Y.— Frederick 
W. Royce, telegrapher, inventor and elec- 
trician^ died at Washington, D. C— William 
Elder, brush manufacturer, died at Phila- 
j delphia.— John Stackhouse, a former Phila- 
delphia Councilman for the Twentieth 
Ward, died at Langhorne, Pa. 

18.— The McGonigal House, at Oswayo, 
Potter county. Pa., was burned and lour 
lives were lost. 

20.— Charles H. Hoyt. playright. died at 

Charlestown, N. H.— Lieut. F. J. Haeseler, 

ordnance exjiert, U. S. N., died at New York. 

—State rally of Christian Endeavorers began 

at Philadelphia. 

I 21.— A tornado which extended from Luln, 

I Miss., fifty-six miles south of Memphis, and 

passed through Batesvllle, Miss., Columbia, 

Teun., and fifteen other towns to La Grange, 

1 Tenn., killed more than ninety persons and 

destroyed pro]>erty of great value. 

i 22— Former President Kniger, of the 

Transvaal, arrived at Marseilles, France, on 

a Dutch steamer.- Sir Arthur Stdlivan, the 

famous musical composer, died at London. 

' — W. M. Meredith, of Chicago, was appointed 

'. chief of the National Bureau of Engraving 

^ and Printing.— E. (i. Carlin, special postal 

agent, died nt Philadelphia. 
i 23. — Annouueeiueiil made that the Turk- 
ish Government hail refused to recognize 
Dr. Norton as tlie American Consul at Har- 
poot, objecting to the establishment of the 
considate.— Governor Roosevelt, of New 
York, refused to remove Mayor R. A. Van 
Wyck, of New York city, liecause of the 
Mayor's purchase of stock in the ice trust. 

24. — President McKinley and several mem- 
niers of his Cabinet, together with Vice- 
President-elect Roosevelt, were guests of the 
I uion League Club at Philadelphia, which 



The Philadelphia Record JUmanac. 



celebrated Founders' Day.— The monitor 
Nevada was launched at the Bath (Me.) Iron 
Works, Miss Annie C. Boutelle officiating by 
severing with a silver hatchet a rope which 
held the vessel on the shore, at the same 
time breaking on the bow a bottle of Ameri- 
can wine.— John L. Johnston, noted British 
diatetic expert, died at Cannes, France. 

26.— Samuel K. Wilson, millionaire woolen 
mill owner, died at Trenton, N. J.— Samuel 
Mast, retired surgical instrument manufac- 
turer, died at Philadelphia. 

27.— Cushman K. Davis, United States 
Senator from Minnesota, and chairman of 
the Committee on Foreign Affairs, died at 
St. Paul.— R. E. A. Dorr, President of the 
Mail and Express Publishing Company, died 
at New York.— George W. Wilson, of Hamil- 
ton, O., Commissioner of Internal Revenue, 
died at Washington, D. C. 

28— Senior Rear Admiral F. V. McNair, U. 
S. N., and Nathaniel Wells, chemist, aged 
107 years, died at Washington, D. C— John 
Fegely, bank president, died at Pottstown, 
Pa.— J. W. Christman, retired coal and lum- 
ber dealer, died at Philadelphia. — James 
Beasley, a West India negro sailor, for whom 
German officials had searched for three 
years, In order to present him with a gold 
medal (and pay him his share of salvage as 
a member of the crew of the American 
schooner M. A. Achorn, for saving the Ger- 
man bark William Link), was found In Phila- 
delphia. 

29.— A roof fell at San Francisco on which 
200 boys were watching a football game, and 
20 were killed and about 80 Injured. 

30.— Joseph B. Butterworth, retired hotel 
keeper, died at Philadelphia.— Oscar Wilde 
died at Paris, France. 



ADDENDA. 

Lieutenant Harry Wolf, of the Twenty- 
second district, was removed November 19. 

Magistrate Thomas W. Cunningham ap- 
pointed Committing Magistrate at the Cen- 
tral Station in place of Thomas W. South, 

Miss Anna Hallowell and Mrs. Mary E. 
Mumford, members of the Board of Educa- 
tion from the Seventh and l^venty-uinth 
Sections, resigned November 15. 

Joseph Winkel has been appointed Assist- 
ant Superintendent of the Philadelphia 
Morgue, vice Robinson, deceased. 



bi;ectorai« votes. 



Alabama . . . 
Arkansas. . . . 
California . . . 
Colorado . . . 
Connecticut , . 
Delaware . . . 
Florida .... 
Georgia .... 

Idaho 

Illinois .... 
Indiana .... 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky . . . 
Louisiana . . . 

Maine 

Maryland . . . 
Massachusetts . 
Michigan . . . 
Minnesota . . . 
Mississippi . . . 
Missouri . . . . 
Montana . . . . 
Nebraska . . . 
Nevada . . . . 
New Hampshire 
New Jersey . . 
New York . . . 
North Carolina . 
North Dakota . 

Ohio 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania . 
Rhode Island . 
South Carolina . 
South Dakota . 
Tennessee . . . 

Texas 

Utah 

Vermont . . . . 
Virginia . . . . 
Washington . . 
West Virginia . 
Wisconsin . . . 
Wyoming . . . 





,£ 


o 


> 






5 


i 






S 




11 




8 






8 


4 




... 


6 


... 


3 


4 




'! 


... 





15 






13 


10 


13 


12 


1 


8 


■•fi 


8 


... ' 8 




15 




14 






9 





Total 



292 I 155 I 271 



INDEX OE CONTENTS. 



American Turf 84-Q3 

Aquatic Events 100-108 

Baseball 116-110 

Bicycle Records 109-115 

Camden Officials 70 

Census Statistics 140-143 

Chinese Boxer Uprising 47-50 

Commercial Museum 77 

Congress Vote 138-131) 

Consuls at Philadelphia 67 

Cricket Records I30, lai 

Delaware Officials 80, 81 

Division \'ote of Philadelphia 75-77 

Eclipses, etc (> 

Electoral Vote History 30-33 

Electoral Vote Cast in iqoo 155 

Fast Railroading 99 

Fast Steamships 119 

Football 133-134 

Game Laws i35-i37 



General and Local Events '44-'55 

General Sports 133-131 

Home Hygienics 36-38 

Household Recipes 33-35 

Legal Holidays 6 

Libraries of Philadelphia 67 

Live Pigeon Shoots 131 

Maryland Government 81, 83 

National Government 68-71 

New Jersey Government 78-79 

Party Platforms 8-38 

Pennsylvania Government 7', 72 

Pennsvlvania Vote 73 

Philadelphia Officials 51-O7 

Philadelphia Ward Vote 74 

Philippines War 44-47 

Planetary Conjunctions 7 

Police Magistrate Vote 38 

Postage Rates 5 

State and Territorial Governments ... 83 



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THE BEST KNOWN 
SYSTEM OF 



LLUMINATE 



j ARTISTIC 

ATTRACTIVE 

WITH ELECTRIC SIGNS L SAFE 



Il[ MM [IKIRK HI (0. 

OF PHILADELPHIA 

TENTH AND SANSOM STREETS 



TELEPHONE 



IF YOU WANT CHEAP POWER USE AN ELECTRIC MOTOR 



Godfrey (gL Co. 



ESTABLISHED IN l&e>3 



PRINTERS - 
ROLLERS 

No. 909 Sansom Street 
PHILADELPHIA 



LORD'S 
BOILER 
COMPOUNDS 



are used and endorsed 
in every steam-using 
district throughout the 
civilized world. 

The genuine formu- 
las are made 
only by 



GEO. W. LORD, 2238 to 2250 N. Ninth St., 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

Send for our book on water contamination and other valu- 
able information to steam users. 




R. W. BARKER, Proprietor. 

Hess & Barker 

Engineers and Machinists, 

810 Sansom St., Phila. 



-U THE IMPROVED KELLAM DAMPER REGULATOR 

The Simplest and Cheapest Made. 
Thousands of Them in Use. 

No Diaphragm to Get Out of Order. 

All Working Parts are Made of the Best Gun 

Metal, and Workmanship Guaranteed 

to be First Class. 

We Make a Specialty of Repairing Kellam 

Dampers of any make. 

Engines, Boilers, Steam Pumps, etc., etc. 

Steam Fitting in all its Branches. 

Shafting and Hangers Erected. 

Special Machinery Built from Plans. 
Dynamo and Motor Commutators Repaired 

Without Removing, if Necessary. 
General Repairing a Specialty. 

Estimates Furnished. 



Zenola 

A Modem Powder for Cleaning Purposes — 

CLEANS EVERYTHING AND YOU 




Since the advent of Zenola, the testimonials on the 
merits of this powder have been so numerous that we are 
safe in saying — 

AS LONG AS THERE^S DIRT YOU WILL 
FIND ZENOLA IN USE. 



ZENOLA iot the TOILET 

PRICE, 25 CENTS PER PACKAGE 

Leaves the skin soft and white and does not chap the skin. 



Zenola is also prepared in 5 and tO cent packages — 
for cleaning dishes, tin-ware, etc., and anything that can be 
stained with dirt. 

Carpets can be cleaned by Zenola without removing 
from the floor, and without affecting the color. 



The Best White Glove Cleaner on the Market. 




For sale by . . . 

ALL GROCERS AND DRUGGISTS 



The Zenola Co. 

Philadelphia 



TELEPHONE GONNEGTIONm 



Walter S. ^radkn ^o. 



(Successors to JOSEPH B. HANCOCK.) 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS IN 



ANTHRACITE... OO Jl # 
...BITUMINOUS t# €##■!- 



MAIN OFFICE AND YARD: 

Ninth Street below Girard Avenue 

Sales Agent for the Philadelphia & Reading Coal and Iron Company's 
Coals; also Frick's 72-Hour Foundry Coke and Crushed Coke. Family 
Orders for Coal or Frick's Coke will receive prompt attention. Contracts 
made by the year for all sixes of Coal and Coke. When ready to contract, 
kindly ask for prices. 

We sell Honeybrooh, Hazelton, Gilberton, and lihe grades of Coal. Two tons of this Coal will last 
longer than three tons of cheap and inferior Coal, with no preparation. Buy now, and get benefit of 
popular prices. 

Frick's Grushed Poke for 

■ Range 

and Hcatei- use, tohcn both are small, is 



Large Pea Goal especially prepared 

at 25 cts. per ton 

above regular Pea Coal price. This must 
be especially noted when ordering. 



an economical fuel. 



Do not confuse with Gas-house Cohe, as one bushel will last as long as three. No dust, smell, 
smoke. Delivered in chute wagons. When ordering be sure to ask for FRICK'S COKE. 

ONLY RETAIL YARD IN PHILADELPHIA DELIVERING FRICK'S CRUSHED COKE. 



lime for Ghemi^ Containing 98 
. _ per cent, pure 

cal Purposes m m \. c., -^ . 

=- li/ne. Shipments 

made by cars or casks. Also, manufactu- 
re7-s of Building Lime. 



Builder's Su/»plies, oe^m enj^,^ 

TER, FIRE-CLAY, MORTAR COLORS, FIRE-BRICK. 

Jl'e are importers of English and Ger- 
man Cements, and Sales Agents for Ameri- 
can, Portland and Rosendale Cements. 



FORT DELAWARE, DEL., February 23, 1900, 
Report of tests on sample barrels of HEMMOOR GERMAN PORTLAND CEMENT submitted in con- 
nection with bids for furnishing construction materials for rapid-fire batteries at Fort Mott, New 
Jersey, and Fort Dupont, Delaware : 



FINENESS. — 100 per cent, passes No. 50 sieve 

91 percent, passes No. 100 sieve 

SETTlNa TIME.— Initial Set . 1 hour, 40 min. 

Final Set . 4 hours, 10 min. 

SOUNDNESS.— In air, satisfactory. In water, 

satisfactory. 
coLOf?. light gray. 



TENSILE STRENGTH PER SQUARE INCH. 

Neat Cement. 1 part Cement, 3 parts Sand 



1 day . . 266 lbs. 7 day 

7 day . . 765 lbs. 28 day 

28 day . . 820 lbs. 
Water— 17-4 per cent. 
RESPECTFULLY SUBMITTED, 

F. C. WARNER, Ass. engineer, 



164 
219 



Water— 9-6 per cent. 



Walter 9. ^radku-Cc. 



RIDGE AND COLUMBIA 
AVENUES. 



OFFICES CONNECTED BY WIRE. 



Main Office and Yard: QHf Street bclow Girard Avenue 



NEW CURE For 




' Not to take a cure for an otherwise fatal disease Is to commit suicide. ' 




THE ABOVE ILLUSTRATION SHOWS OR 



LABORATORY. 



If you suffer from Epilepsy, Fits, Falling Sickness, or St. Vitus' Dance, have 
children, relatives, friends that do so, or know people that are afflicted, my New 
Discovery will immediately relieve and PERMANENTI/Y CURB them, and 
all you are asked to do is to send for my FREE TREATMENT and try it. It has 
CURED thousands where everything else failed. Will be sent in plain package 
absolutely free, express prepaid. My Illustrated Book, " Epilepsy Explained," 
FREE by mail. Please give AGE and full address. All correspondence pro- 
fessionally confidential. 

IV. H. MA Y, M. D., 94 Pino St., New York Gity 

When writing please say that you saw this offer in the Record Almanac. 



Incorporated Third MontH 22, 18&5 ^ ^ ^ CHarter Perpetual 

^hQ PROVIDENT 
Life and Trust Company 

of Philadelphia 

OrricE, No. 409 Chestnut Street 



Capital stock $1,000,000 00 

Surplus and Undivided Profits, belonging to 

the Stockholders, over 3,600,000 00 

Surplus, belonging to Insurance Account, over 4,600,000 00 

Assets of the Company, over 51,800,000 00 



INSURES LIVES, GRANTS ANNUITIES, RECEIVES MONEY ON 
DEPOSIT, returnable on demand, for whicli interest is allowed, and 
is empowered by law to act as EXECUTOR, ADMINISTRATOR, 
TRUSTEE, GUARDIAN, ASSIGNEE, COMMITTEE, RECEIVER, 
AGENT, Etc., for the faithful performance of which its Capital and 
Surplus Fund furnish ample security. 

ALL TRUST FUNDS and INVESTMENTS ARE KEPT SEPA- 
RATE AND APART from the Assets of the Company. 

OWNERS OF REAL ESTATE are invited to look into that branch 
of the Trust Department which has the care of this description of prop- 
erty. It is presided over by an officer learned in the law of Real Estate, 
seconded by capable and trustworthy assistants. Some of them give 
their undivided attention to its care and management. 

The income of parties residing abroad carefully collected and duly 
remitted. 

OFFICERS: 
SAMUEL R. SHIPLEY, President. J. ROBERTS FOULKE, Trust Officer. 

T. WISTAR BROWN, Vice-President. DAVID 0. ALSOP, Actuary. 

ASA S. WING, Vice-President. J. BARTON TOWNSEND, Assistant Trust 

JOSEPH ASHBROOK, Hanager of Insurance Officer. 

Department. SAMUEL H. TROTH, Treasurer. 

C. WALTER BORTON, Secretary. 

DIRECTORS: 

Samuel R. Shipley. Asa S. Wlag. Edward H. Ogdea. 

T. WIstar Brown. Israel Morris. Thomas Scattergood. 

Henry Haloes. Philip C. Qarrett. J. Preston Thomas. 

Richard Wood. James V. Watson. Robert M. Janney. 

Charles Hartshorne. William Longstreth. Marriott C. Morris. 

TTHe Ne-w Safe Deposit Vaults of tHe Company, -witK tHe latest 
de'vices for secxirity and con'venience. Have been completed, and are 
open for inspection. Boxes rented at $5 and vip-ward. 



IT MAKES ^^ 

BUSINESS ^^Aim 



WILL SEE YOUR ADVERTISEMENT 




OF PHILADELPHIA 

AMERICA'S GREATEST 
AFTERNOON NEWSPAPER 



He Readers 

Have Money 

to 

Spend 



CIRCUUTION REACHES 

100,000 

F-iXIVIII-l 



GROWING EVERY DAY 



Write fbr 
Statements 

and 

Advertisers' 

Rates 



IT SELLS FOR 



ONE CENT 




Gold Medat Awarded at Paris Exposition, 1900 

peirce: 

SCHOOL 



JN business, tHe difference bet-ween 
¥ I tHe man -wHo Kno-ws and tHe man 
-wKo doesn't Kno'W marKs tKe di- 
viding line betiween profit and loss. 
Opportunities are le^ion» but to 
perceive an opportunity, seize 
upon it, and maKe tKe most of it, 
requires a mind specially trained 
and fully alive "witH tKe business instinct. 
XKis comes not by nature but by experience 
and practice » it is fostered by tKe influence 
of tKose -wKo are tKemselves adept, jt^ J^ 
S^e student at Peirce ScKool is trained 
by successful business men -wKo Kave prac- 
ticed -wKat tKey teacK, and enters tKe com- 
mercial -world bacKed by tKe prestige of an 
institution ^wKose indorsenient is alone a 
guaranty of favorable recognition. Students 
may be examined and enrolled any scKool- 
day tKrou^K tKe year. J^ J^ J^ J/^ J^ 
Call or send for 36th Year Book. 

PEIRCE SCHOOL 

917-919 Chestnut Street 

(RECORD BUILDING) PH ILADEI^PHIA