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Full text of "The record of the class of 1934"

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1934 





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THE RECORD 



OF NINETEEN HUNDRED 
AND THIRTY-FOUR 
AT HAVERFORD COLLEGE 
HAVERFORD • PENNSYLVANIA 





COPYRIGHT 1934 
B- S, LOEWENSTEIN, Editor 

P. B RICH ARDSON. Sujinci! Mandse' 






FOREWORD 

n the hope that this 
record book will crysta - 
ize pictorially the common 
interests of the past anc 
future, we, the editors, 
present this book . . . 







CONTENTS 

Campus Views 10 

Faculty 16 

Centenary Celebration 24 

Seniors 34 

Ex-Members 99 

Other Classes 101 

Activities 106 

Junior Prom 116 

Athletics 122 

Features 1 38 




DEDICATION 

We dedicate this book 
to the Alumni of the past 
century with as deep 
and genuine a sincerity 
as they have dedicated 
themselves to our College 



RUFUS M. JONES 



There are four major events in life: Get- 
ting born, getting married, selecting the 
right center of education and finding a 
career that fits one's aptitudes. 

I was born at the right spot and time, 
married the right person, chose the ideal 
college and have had a perfectly happy 
career of forty-one years as a teacher 
of Haverford men whom I have both 
admired and loved. 



DON C. BARRETT 



LiFe at Haverford is full of interest and 
helpfulness and enjoyment. One feels a 
sense of deep regret in separating him- 
self from its active duties, yet he wishes 
to retire with as much grace and con- 
tentment as lies within him so to do. 
Fortunately, retirement does not mean 
inactivity — only opportunity to pursue 
many interests crowded out hitherto. 





MA 



LEGH W. REID 



Having been asked to write a few words for tfiis 
Record on the eve of my retirement after thirty-four 
years' service as a member of tfie Faculty of 
Haverford College, I am glad to do so. 

The recollection that I have known and taught 
every man who entered Haverford as a Freshman 
for thirty years will always be a great satisfaction 
to me, and I only regret that it has been possible 
for me to know and teach only a portion of the 
students now in college. The memories of these 
associations will always be precious to me, and I 
can soy truthfully that among my happiest hours 
hove been those passed in my classroom. 

May I hope that all of you, alumni and students, 
whom I have known, con say "Forsan el /laec olim 
nieminisse juvabit." 



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page sixteen 



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A,B. 



WILLIAM WISTAR COMFORT, President 

Haverlord College, AB,, A.M., and Ph D , Harvard Universily, 

University o( Pennsylvaniai LL.D., Universily of Maryland and 

Lake Forest College 



Lill.D., 



LYMAN BEECHER HALL 

A.B., Amherst College, A.M. and Ph D., University of Gottingen 
John Fainum Professor of Cfomistry, Emeritus 



ALBERT SIDNEY BOLLES 

Ph D., Middlebury College, LL D., Lafayette College 
Lecturer In Commerciol Law and Banking, Emeritus 



HENRY SHERRING PRAH 

A B , University of Michigon; A.M. and Ph D., University of Leipzig 
David Scull Professor of Biology, Emeritus 



JAMES ADDISON BABBIH 

A.B., Yale University^ A.M., Haverford College/ 

M.D , University of Pennsylvania 

Professor of Hygiene and Physical Education, fmeritui 



RUFUS MATTHEW JONES 

AB. and A.M., Haverford College; 
A.M. and D.D., Harvard Universityj Litt.D., 
Penn College, LL.D , Haverford College, 
Swarthmore College, and Eorlhom Col- 
lege; D. Theol., Universily of Marburg 
Professor of Philosophy 



LEGH WILBER REID 

SB., Virginia Military Institute, A.B., 

Johns Hopkins University; S M., Princeton 

University; Ph.D., Universily of Gbtlingen 

Professor of Molhemalics 



DON CARLOS BARRETT 

A B. and A.M., Earlham College; A.M. 

and Ph.D., Harvard University 

Professor of Economics 







WILLIAM EDWARD LUNT 

A.B. and LH.D, Bowdoin College; 

AM. ond Ph.D , Horvord University 

Wallet D. ond Edilh M. L. Scull Ptofenor 

of Engliih Conillturionol History 



FREDERIC PALMER, JR. 

A.B., AM,, and Ph.D., Harvard Univeriily 
Profmor ol Phyilci 






ELIHU GRANT 

B., AM, PhD., and STB., Boston 
University 

Proleiior of Biblical Llleralur* 

Absent on leave, second half 
year, 1933-34 



FRANK DEKKER WATSON 

SB. in Economics and Ph.D , 

University of Pennsylvania 

Profefior of Sociology 

and Social Work 



RAYNER WICKERSHAM KELSEY 

Ph.B., Earlham College, M.L. and Ph.D., 

University of Colifornia 

Professor of History 





LEON HAWLEY RITTENHOUSE 

M.E., Stevens Institute of Technology 
Professor of Ensineerlng 



DEAN PUTNAM LOCKWOOD 

A.B., A M., ond Ph.D., 
Harvard University 
Professor of Latin 






page twenly-four 



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"And two morihats ihall ctear the woy" 



Every one agreed that Centenary Day was a glorious success. Its campus crowded with 
worthy old grads and their families and educational leaders From all America, Haverford 
forgot its famed modesty and retirement for at least twenty-four hours. Polite under- 
graduates, all wearing neckties, and in nearly all cases coats to match their pants, were 
seen everywhere, like plain clothes men, shadowing their eminent elders. The sun 
shone graciously all day long, and the belfry of Founders carried on the good work 
with a battery of spotlights at night. We realized, that day, that hiaverford is more 
than a place where we happen to spend four years of our lives. 





Preiidsnt Comfort 

Prvsident Angell 
President Lewis 




"Leaving thoie who were to 
remain at the Institution 
to their own reflections" 



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"Morching along 
together" 



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"Now, where did thee 
get Ihy Ph.D.?" 




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Und*r th* Big Top 




And thou, O Time, though strong 
thou art, 
Yet never, never sholt thou port 
The ties that ever bind the heorts 
Of every son of Haverford. 



Fireman- 
Save my child 



"Can you led me where?" 




poge thirty-four 




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CLASS OFFICERS 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

FIRST HALF SECOND HALF 

RICHARD R. PLEASANTS .... President PHILIP B.RICHARDSON 

JAMES D. LOCKARD Vice-President .... CHARLES M. BANCROFT 

GERARD HOLZRICHTER .... Secretary JAMES H. COWAN 

JAMES A. MACCOLL Treasurer GERARD HOLZRICHTER 



FIRST HALF 

JOHN MONSARRAT . . 
CHARLES M. BANCROFT. 
ROBERT H. BEAVEN . . . 
ROBERT B. JONES . . . . 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 

SECOND HALF 

. . . President .... RICHARD R. PLEASANTS 

. . . Vice-President ROBERT H. BEAVEN 

. . . Secretary ... LOUIS W. FLACCUS, JR. 

. . . Treasurer HENRY G. RUSSELL 




page thirty-six 




PERMANENT CLASS OFFICERS . . . Atmoi* ar*oiurw), RIehl* (Vlcc-Pratldtnl), Flaeegt (Pietident), Plaaranli (SKitlarv) 



CLASS OFFICERS 



FIRST HALF 

ROBERT C. ATMORE . . 
WILLIAM H. HAINES, III 
ROBERT H. BEAVEN . . 
LOUIS W. FLACCUS, JR. 



JUNIOR YEAR 

SECOND HALF 

President RICHARD O'B. GIBBS 

. Vice-President ARTHUR T. RICHIE 

. Secretary EDWIN P. TRIPP, JR. 

. Treasurer .... LOUIS W. FLACCUS, JR. 



SENIOR YEAR 

FIRST HALF SECOND HALF 

LOUIS W. FLACCUS, JR President .... LOUIS W. FLACCUS, JR. 

ARTHUR T. RICHIE Vice-President ARTHUR T. RICHIE 

ROBERT B. JONES Secretary .... RICHARD R. PLEASANTS 

NORMAN J.RUSH Treasurer ROBERT C. ATMORE 



page (hirly-sev«n 





ROBERT CRAIG ATMORE 

314 LOUELLA AVENUE WAYNE PA. 

Born 1912, Enlerod (rom William Penn Charter School in 1930. 

Class President (3); Permanent Class Treasurer; CIoss Execu- 
tive Committee (3, 4); Freshman-Junior Dance Committee; 
Soph-Senior Dance Committee; Class Day Committee; Student 
Council (4); News Board (3, 4); Glee Club (1, 2, 3, 4); Cap 
and Bells (2, 3, 4), Vice-President (4); Founders Club (4). 

German Major. 



To my d-d-darling S--5-sue: 

Ever since y-y-you have spurned me for that 
f-f-f-fillhy Princeton man I have b-b-been unable 
to s-s-sleep or to e-e-eat, . . . w-w-well, anyway, 
I haven't slept. You are u-u-unaware of my - my - 
my possibilities and just because I do not look like 
C-c-c-clark Gab— b— ble you scorn me. 

Did it ever o-o-occur to you that I am the 
b-b-biggest man on my c-c-compus? It Is possible 
for m-m-me to sit any place in a theatre and s-s-see 
without the slightest trouble . . . and I c-c-could 
hold you in my l-l-lop with e-e-e-ease. 

I have b-b-been actively connected with the 
G-Glee Club ever since I have been in c-c-college. 
I probably know more about M-m-music than Bach, 
but not as much as H-H-hHunt Bach J-Jones, my 
friend here. I a-a-adore Bridge in all forms but 
S-S-Spin-the-Plate is what I am b-b-best at. I like 
horseback rrrriding and have spent some ssssum- 
mers at D-D-Dude Ranches although now I am 
interested in a B-Boys' Camp. 

I might not bbbbe as intel-tel-tellgent as that 
guy from P-P-Princeton but then, it is an admitted 
fact that 1 ttttake snap courses such as MMMUsIc 
2; German something-or-other and L-L-Logic. I 
have deliberately sssshunned all hard courses but, 
hhhheck, it doesn't ttttake hard c-c-courses to make 
mince-meat, which is where I will end up when I 
finish h-h-here. 

I am a g-g-god-send to women for I can dan- 
dan-dance great and think Shubert's Works are 
just ggggreat but DO N-N-NOT compare with 
Gilbert and Sullivan at all!! The lost g-g-girl I 
had thought G & S were l-l-lousy and that is why 
I want to go w-with you . . . S-S-Sue. You dont 
mind if I call y-y-you SSSSSSue, d-d-do yyyou???? 

I am nnnot much of an aaathlete although I do 
hove athlete's feet and can j-j-jump at ccconclu- 
sions. I l-l-love to do Indian DDDDances when 
everybody is in bbbed and go Whoooooo - 
Whooooo and jijump up and dddown. 

I am interested in Animal LLiiife and while at 
College have been taking care of a C-C-Crow's 
NNNNest. I am interested in BBBBr/n Mawr 
College and voted fffor Hoover. PPPPIease write 

to me. 

Your Bob 

P.S. I wear Size 14 ssshoes. 




page thirty-eight 



Stenographic report of telephone conversation 
between the president of Notre Dame and a well- 
known track coach. Lent to the Record by Bell 
Telephone. 

President: What do you know about Charles 
Bancroft? Well-Knowr] Trsck Coach: You mean 
Charles . . . Charles . . . you mean Charles Ban- 
croft? Pres.: Yes, I mean Charles Bancroft; we 
wont a new football coach because Layden just 
resigned. W-K.T.C: Oh, that's loo bad. That's 
too bad. Charles is a funny fellow . . . a fun . . . 
fun . . . funny . . . Bancroft's a funny fellow. He 
sleeps the dorndest hours . . . Sometimes he sleeps 
through sup . . . sup . . . sometimes he sleeps 
through dinner . . . The other day I went to see 
him to ask him why he didn't go out for track that 
afternoon ... to ask him v^hy he didn't go out 
for track that afternoon. And he says "Pop" . . . 
he soys "No kiddin'. Pop, I was goin' out, but I 
fell asleep." Charley's a funny fellow, what do 
you want to know about him? Pres.: Is he on 
athlete? W-K.T.C: He and I coached a football 
elev . . . elev . . . eleven . . . Charley and I 
coached a football team last year. As fast as I 
took men out, he put them bock. Charley's a funny 
fell. . . Bancroft's a funny boy. He doesn't smoke 
cig . . .cigar. . . cig . . . Charley doesn't smoke; 
he only chews the ends of 'em. (Laughter from 
W-KT.C). Pres.: How good on athlete Is he? 
That's what I asked you. W-K.T.C: Well, well, 
Charley's won the hard luck prize for othlel . . . 
for athletics. He works terribly hard and he's 
good . . . he's good . . . but he never seems to 
get to the t . . . t . . . to a letter. Pres.: How are 
his personal habits? W-K.T.C: Ban . . . Bon . . . 
Well, Charley never seems to get very good marks 
in French. Dear, dear, I shouldn't have said that. 
You'd better ask somebody else all these ques- 
tions. Pres.: That's all right, but could you get 
Mr. Bancroft to the 'phone, please. W-K.T.C: 
Why this is only a week after vocation, and 
Charley nev . . . nev . . . seldom gets back to 
college that soon. He's at his girl's house, he's 
over at Anne Murphy's. Pres.: What was the 
girl's lost name? W-K.T.C: Murph . . . Murph 
. . . why, it's Murphy, Murphy like in potato. 
Pres.: Are you sure it's Murphy? W-K.T.C: Posi- 
tiv . . . posi . . . Why sure it's Murphy. Prej..'Tel! 
Charley he has the job once held by the great 
Knute Rocknel 




CHARLES MARCH BANCROFT 

562 MOHAWK AVENUE 
NORWOOD, DELAWARE COUNTY, PA. 

Born 1911. Entered from Brown Preparatory School in 1930. 

Class Vice-President (1, 2), Football, Numerals (1, 2, 3); 
Track, Numerals (1, 3), H (2, 4), Captain (4), Hjverlotdiin 
Board (3, 4); Record Board (4),- Triangle. 

Pre-Medical Major. 



page Ihirty-ni 





ROBERT HADDON BEAVEN 

1 122 SOUTH GOODMAN STREET ROCHESTER, N. Y. 

Born 1913. Entered from Peddle Preparatory School in 1930. 

Class Secretary (2, 3); Class Vice-President (2); Permanent 
Class Executive Committee; Chairman Soph-Senior Dance Com- 
miltee; Junior Prom Committee; Football Dance Committee (4); 
Class Day Committee, Chairman, Freshman Tennis Team; Glee 
Club (1); Band (1); Instrumental Club (1, 2, 4); Cap and Bells 
(1, 2, 3, 4); Record Board (4). 

English Major. 



Dear Alumni Editor 
Haverford News 
Haverford, Pa. 

Dear Sir: 

I found the following clipping in the American 
Mercury under the heading "American," a column 
devoted to revealing the weaknesses and foibles 
of the American body politic. 

NEW YORK 
Religion up to the minute and very vital as por- 
trayed by the Rochester (New York) Post-Scimitar; 

Last week a new minister, Dr. Robert Beaven, 
burst into town, and he has since stirred the town's 
spiritual forces to their depths. The new divine, 
a disciple of Rufus Jones and a follower of the 
Inner Light, preached his virgin sermon on the 
topic of "CornettingyourWay to Heaven," accom- 
panying his remarks by appropriate snatches of 
lively tunes on his own cornet. 

A Post-Scimitar reporter asked Dr. Beaven what 
his sermon next Sunday would be about. A great 
punner and man of humour, he pulled the old one, 
"Oh, about twenty-five minutes." "But seriously," 
he added, "1 have prepared a sermon on the 
subject of 'Getting to Heaven by Making Funny 
Faces.' This will be accompanied by extremely 
uproarious grimaces which I have spent long years 
in mastering. Then, the following Sunday, 1 intend 
to dish it out (the same old stuff, of course), under 
the title 'Getting to Heaven by Funny Noises,' 
which, you may rest assured, will be a howl. 
Other subjects which should also fill the house are: 
'Dancing My Way to Heaven,' 'Sunday School 
Teaching My Way to Heaven,' Getting to Heaven 
on 'Very Little Food, Even as Do the Birds of the 
Air,' 'Philosophizing My Way to Heaven via Rapt 
Attention to Haverford's Man from Maine and 
His Ethics Course.' In that sermon I will give 
visual illustrations of how a man may integrate 
himself although made up of two conflicting char- 
acteristics, as I am, being very serious and at the 
same time very frivolous." The reporter asked 
Dr. Beaven if he believed in Heaven. The minister 
replied, "Yes, if you define it in certain terms," 
and went on to a dissertation concerning Logic 
with which we won't bother the reader. 




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page forty 



Harold dear: 

I just had to write and tell you to take good care 
of yourself on account of the track meet tomorrow, 
and get to bed early. Of course, you always do 
get to bed right after your nightly trip to Doc's, 
unless you're out with me — at least your room- 
mates say so — and the Lord only knows when you 
get in. I'm sorry I've made you miss the last train 
so often. 

We were driving Hoverford way and I stopped 
in lo see you yesterday, but you were at track 
practice. How neat your room is — such a methodi- 
cal person I never did see! No wonder they call 
you Uncle Podger! One of the boys said that you 
usually remake your bed after Lou is finished 
because he doesn't do it just righf. My, Oh My. 

But you're not an old maid, even if some people 
do think so. I felt a little that way until last year 
when you suddenly appeared in brown end white 
sport shoes, instead of those everlasting brown 
ones. It was quite encouraging. Now please 
don't blow up at what I've said. You've got a 
quick temper, but I will say, you cool down quickly 
and are good-humored and playful again. 

Dearest, I do want to thank you again for the 
Orchestra the other night. It was wonderful, 
especially the Wagner we both love so well. Do 
you remember last summer at the Dell? I'm awfully 
lucky to have a boy friend who loves good music, 
but I still think it's a pity you don't dance. 

Now remember, Harold, early to bed, and win 
that race tomorrow. I'll be rooting for you. If 
you had a milk-shake instead of breakfast this 
morning, you'd belter omit the afternoon one and 
just get your evening one at Doc's. Don't study 
too hard — I know that's one of your failings — 
and if you win, I'll take you to see Janet Goynor 
next week. 

Always, 




HAROLD FORT BODINE 

6723 EMLEN STREET PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Born 1912. Entered from Germantown Friends School in 1930. 

Track, Freshman Team, H (2, 3, 4); Cross-Counlry Squad 
(3, 4), H (4), Captain (4). 
English Moior. 



Your own, Susie 




page forty-one 




LEWIS HOWARD BOWEN 

LANSDOWNE, PA. 

Born 1910. Entered from Georae School in 1930. 

Student Council (4), Monager Cooperative Store (4)/ News 
Service (4); News Board (1. 2, 3, 4), News— Make-up Editor 
(1)i News Editor (2)) Monaging Editor (3); Editor (4); Record 
Board; English Club (4), Liberal Club (2, 3, 4). 

English Moior. 



Mr. Arthur Brisbane 
Journalistic Heights 
New York City 

Dear Mr. Brisbane: 

I cm the editor o( the Haver(ord News, and I 
have news for you. I cm going to graduate. It is 
practically a sure thing. In spite of the very fine 
advantages of this college, my term is drawing 
toward a close, and it looks as if^'m going to 
get an honorable discharge. 

You are getting old, Mr. Brisbane. You can't 
keep that stuff up forever. Longfellow died even- 
tually. So did Wordsworth. Edgar Guest will, too. 
They're all the same, and you're no exception, no 
matter which way you put it. 

My point is this. In view of the hold you have 
put on the public with your platitude pounding, 
no one should gainsay the existential aspect of 
your column, or deny that you have figured out a 
way to sell the same old product with no change 
in price. But this country is changing, Mr. Brisbane. 
The American Public isn't so dumb as you think. 
I've got a product that can match it. I think 
I con confidently say that given enough office 
room, time, salary, and cigarettes, I'll be able to 
dictate stuff that will make your head swim, though 
to be sure, you wouldn't duck if you got caught 
in it. What do you think I worked on the H^verlord 
News for? Nothing? 

But before you mail me any papers to fill out, 
I want a few things put straight. All transactions 
are to be carried on in office hours and right in 
the Tribune Building. Nobody's going to know 
where I live or what I do in my spare time. If I 
like to do Settlement work now and then, or read 
Browning to my girl as we sit on the banks of a 
woodland stream, or go watch 'em do it at the 
Burlesque, well — that's my own business. And 
by "It," at the Burlesque, I don't mean "read 
Browning. " 

I'd like a reply at once. And by the way, could 
you let me have a five? My room-mates cleaned 
me out again last night. 

Yours truly, 

Lewis Bowen 




page forty-two 



Director of Record Office 
London, England 

Dear Sir: 

This introduces my fairest-haired boy, Thomas 
Shipley Brown, a prophet with honor even in his 
own hamlet, the inspiring educational center of 
Westtown, Pa. I have great faith in Tom's making 
some brilliant discoveries in your office since he 
made a marvelous find here, which was, that if a 
student laughs at all of his professor's jokes, he is 
bound to make perfectly swell marks. 

One thing which leads me to think he will be a 
success as a bookworm is the remarkable rapidity 
with which he turns out term papers of an extreme 
degree of erudition. On the same day that I 
announce a choice of topics, he hands me a 
finished essay of some 25,000 words. He intends 
to teach English somewhere, but his genius would 
only be wasted in such an arid occupation (you're 
asking me?). I suggested that he tackle the 
problem of what was, say, the influence of Petrarch 
on the third assistant printer's devil in Heminge 
and Condell's printing establishment. The result 
of such a study performed in Brown's painstaking 
manner would be an addition of indubitable value 
to the world's present knowledge of Shakespeare. 

Besides that, the boy is no slouch at cricket. Who 
on earth wants to play that game, I don't know, 
nor care much, but Brown plays it. And, in 
England, it pays big dividends to be able to 
cavort occasionally on the crease, eh what? 

An important aspect about my progeny is his 
Ouaker make-up which shows clearly in his face, 
his robustness, and above all in his swearing 
which, while manly, is nevertheless the refined 
cursing of a gentleman who has glimpses of the 
Inner Light. 

Please oblige by permitting this young man (who 
also plays soccer, and instructs little tots in athletics 
at a nearby Ouaker grade school, if you care to 
know) to browse through your mass of . . . mate- 
rial. I am sure he will turn up something worth- 
while or grow gray-haired and impotent in the 
attempt. 

Sincerely, 

J. Beslie Batson 




THOMAS SHIPLEY BROWN 

WESnOWN, PA. 

Born 1912. Entered from Wesllown School in 1930. 

Cap and Gown CommiHee, Chairman; Soccer, Junior Varirty 
(1), Numerals (2), H (3, 4), Cricket, H (2, 3, 4), Captain- 
Mnnager (4); Corporation Scholarship (4), Poetry Prize (3), 
Associate Editor Record, Secretary English Club (ht). 

English Major, 




page forty-three 








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FRITZ K. DOWNEY 

5717 ROCKHILL ROAD KANSAS CITY, MO. 

Born 1913. Entered (ram Pembrake School in 1930. 

Corporation Scholorship (2, 3, 4); Phi Beta Kappa (3, 4). 
Latin Moior. 



Dear Jack: 

You call me a fool for taking Greek. You said 
the some when I started Hebrew (and in that 
specific case I agree. Of all the confounded 
languages, Hebrew is the worst.) I'll not answer 
you by tabulating the values of the classics. 
Instead I'll explain why / did it. Your philosophy 
of life and mine ore different. Yours is based on 
religion and on the ethics ladled out by our 
reverend Gunga Din to poor damned souls burn- 
ing in the hell of insensibility. I have cut that 
Gordian knot and my philosophy is based on 
vanity. It pleased my vanity to take Hebrew and 
now Greek. Everything that I have done since 
my attainment to the age of reason has been done 
in accordance with this standard. To please 
myself is my highest aim. 

Don't mistake me. I am no misanthrope. Com- 
mon sense dictates that I conform in many respects 
to the usage of the times. I find it very pleasant 
to be friendly and agreeable to others and I 
hope my attempts have been successful and have 
lit the fires of friendship in the hearts of others. 
To my fellows I must appear as one who is fond 
of company, who studies for the sheer joy of 
intellectual effort, who does things quietly and 
cheerfully, who lends a helping hand to those 
less gifted. Indeed they might equate the word 
"altruistic" with my name. These things I have 
done for mine own pleasure. 

I know not whether in my heart I actually believe 
this doctrine, or whether I believe it only when 
defending it in argument, but this I do know: 
my life thus far has followed a pattern whose 
principle is hedonistic. 



Most sincerely. 



Fritz 




-cj:j/:?5mj:4-, 



page forty-four 



Mr. H. J. Nichol 
The Lick Observatory 
Lickville, England 

Dear Herbie: 

Jeez it's been a long time since I've had a letter 
from you. What the hell's the matter over there 
in England? Are you working on another of those 
vile, uncompromisingly degrading, half cocked, 
superficial mathematics books? My God, it's been 
twenty years now since the days when I could 
drag you back to any kind of normal, untrammelled, 
existence at hiaverford by making you brew me a 
cup of tea and listen to my reasons for thinking 
that Nothing Matters. Bah! Pooh! There ain't 
no God. 

I don't know why the hell I've been working 
at English literature all my life. It's a disease with 
me. Can't quit it. One of the most ponderously 
pretentious, enervating, diabolically stultifying 
works I've had to read for YEARS was one I just 
finished this morning — E. K. Chambers' new work on 
Shakespeare. It's called What We Perhaps Know 
About The Man Shakespeare. God! It's in seven 
huge volumes and I've taken ASSIDUOUS notes 
on the whole thing. It'll go into my thesis, but 
I'm not iust sure where. My thesis is going to be 
on Chaucer, but I figured I could use a lot of this 
blasted scholarship iust as well. 

Classes are terrible. Some of the professors that 
are highly spoken of here are so fundamentally 
and egregiously STUPID that they don't know 
which is third base. But I should worry. I've got 
my ov/n classes to worry about, and I've got them 
oil sewed up. I make my students write a thousand 
word theme for each class and correct each other's. 
This gives me more time to work on my thesis. You 
can say what you bloody please about duty to 
undergraduates, but I have found that the numb- 
skulls aren't worth it. Let 'em talk. I used to 
myself. They'll find out when they start teaching 
the stuff. 

Got another offer from the Atlantic Monthly 
to do an article on Shakespeare. I hate it, but 
I think I'll do it. 



y 



>^ 




A 



f 



\ / 



k 



JOHN LAFONTAINE DUSSEAU 

EAST LANSDOWNE, PA. 

Bom 1913. Entered from luinsdowne High School in 1930. 

Classical Club (1, 2), Debolino (1, 2, 3). 
English Maior 



iee you. 



Yours, 



John 



page forly-five 





OLIVER FLETCHER EGLESTON 

922 CHURCH STREET INDIANA, PA. 

Bom 1912. Entered (ran Schenley High School in 1929. 

Hiverfordidn Board (3, 4)/ Editor (4); Record Board (3, 4)) 
Associate Editor (4). 
English Major. 



New Yorker Publishing Co. 
New York, N. Y. 

Dear Sirs: 

I hereby make application for Thurber's job 
on your magazine. You might say that that's on 
extraordinary request. Well, I am an extraordinary 
man. I have brilliant ideas/ in fact, I think they are 
swell. Here's what I can do — 

(1) Ploy the banjo — and sing a lot of long 
and scrimy songs, all of which will enliven your 
already rather ribald editorial sanctum. (Thai 
reminds me — here's one I will let you use for 
nothing. "An editor gave me fifty thousand dol- 
lars for an essay on 'Cigarettes'. I generally write 
on cigarettes, so I sanctum and took the fifty 
thousand dollars.") 

(2) Keep a diary. Out of this I get a lot of 
ideas and approximately twenty-five approximately 
humorous essays a year. When I don't write about 
cigarettes, I write about my diary. 

(3) Collect books. This is really my passion, 
picking up books of all sorts and descriptions. 
My prize is one that ten cents bought from Leary's, 
a copy of "Ala Baba and The Forty Thieves" 
given to Uncle Bill when that estimable gentleman 
was a mere child prodigy. 

(4) Think up all sorts of systems. Say, you should 
see my desk. All I hove to do is think of an object, 
put my finger where it ought to be — and then 
look for hours until I find the darned thing. 

(5) Write in Old English. If you ever think of 
putting out a whole issue written in Chaucerian 
language, I'll do it for you, given a couple of 
rye highballs and being allowed to stay up all 
night. 

Well, look for me on June 10, for, Good old 
Father Knickerbocker bless you and keep you, 
I need a job. Get rid of Thurber by that time, 
for when the Gods arrive, you know, the half- 
gods must scram. 

Sincerely, 

O. F. E. 





page forty-six 



This is an excerpt from the pages oF Samuel 
Pepys' diary in his seventh reincarnation: 

14lh. Walking through Whitehall I heard the 
Duke of Wistar was gone to watch the Tennis, 
so I down to the New Tennis Court, and saw 
Sir Louis Flaccus play against my Lord of Hogenauer 
for the Virginia Cup. My Lord beat three, and 
lost two sets, they both, and he particularly 
playing well, I thought. Sir Louis, is very popular 
among his fellows and is Permanent Class President 
and Captain of the Tennis and basketball teams. 
Quite astounding. 

15th. Comes our company to dinner/ my Lord 
Wistar, Sir L. Read, Lord Gene and Sir Louis, my 
wife and daughter. At nine to sup and then to 
cards, and last of all to have a flagon of ale and 
apples, drunk out of class mugs, which made all 
merry/ and they full of admiration for the presenta- 
tion of the cup to Lord Gene. Sir Louis bore his 
defeat manfully. 

Must see to it that he meets my niece for do 
feel they would come off splendidly, hie is slim 
and very graceful/ dances well, but in large 
company is shy and reserved unless the talk turns 
to Tennis. Learned from an intimate that Sir 
Louis is being pushed for an Ambassadorship to 
Germany, hlis command of the language is un- 
common. Was greatly astonished to find his bridge 
so good, shows much practice and knowledge 
of the rules, hie bid and made grand slam 
with poor cards well played. Sir P. Richards has 
failed to corrupt him, though certain low beings 
attempted to slander Sir L. by telling me that he 
strayed late at night and other frivolities to which 
I turned deaf ears. But after the company left me 
again, my wife nagging at me, begs for a new 
car. So, away to bed in a great huff, and feeling 
martyred but both agreed on Sir L. for our niece 
if possible. 




LOUIS WILLIAM FLACCUS, JR. 

109 BRYN MAWR AVENUE 
l^NSDOWNE, PA. 

Born 1913. Entered from Wesltown School in 1930. 

Closs Secretary (2); Class Treasurer (3); Class President 
(4), Permanent Class President; Executive Aftiletic Committee 
(4); Soccer, Numerals (1, 2)/ Basketball, Numerals (1), H 
(2, 3, 4), Captain (4), Tennis, Numerals (1), H (2, 3, 4); 
Captain (4); Founders Club (4). 

German Major. 



librup ot AobfTforb Collritt 



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t^fa* .i%^:^i«>arM 



III! II I I m mill I 



page torty. seven 





GRANT VAN LEER FRAZER 

7102 HILLTOP ROAD BYWOOD. PA. 

Born 1913. Entered from Upper Darby High School in 1930 
Philosophy Major. 



The Lurid Library Association 
New York City 

Dear Sirs: 

For a long time you have been sending me 
advertisements of books. It isn't entirely that I 
am getting sick of them; they do bore me, and 
I do throw them into the library waste-basket 
here, but they also have made me think of o way 
for you and me to make some money. 

Have you ever really sat down and thought 
about your advertising methods? If you have, 
I'm ashamed of you. It is no wonder that the 
overage sex book company can't make as much 
money as it ought to. You pound away in the 
same old style. A while ago I had the oppor- 
tunity to sell an inexpensive pants presser. By 
sheer mellifluous verbal chicanery I managed to 
knock off a goodly number of sales. 

I don't preen myself when I say I'm fairly 
familiar with the book racket. I've been working 
in this library, watching the habits of students and 
librarians, for years. I know pretty well the 
subtle relationship between book and peruser. 
Let me give you a few suggestions: Instead of 
saying "Aphrodite, complete and unexpurgoted, 
with twenty-five full page drawings by Wm. 
Le Nude. Limited edition. Order at once," why 
don't you take a more conservative spirit and say, 
"Aphrodite/ be sure to mark down her accession 
number before you go." All you sex hawkers 
sweat away to make yourselves glamorous. What 
you need to do is to moke your prospects imagine 
that the book is already theirs. Say "three cents 
fine is charged for all books overdue," and your 
customers will realize at once that there is no 
time to waste. 

I've studied philosophy here at Haverford and 
I know a thing or two about human nature. 
'T ain't all honey, t ain't all jam. There's con- 
servatism in it. I'm conservative myself. I don't 
shout or scream or refuse to eat my supper. I 
take life as it comes, and earmark the seasons 
and ears that seem to sound a note of profundity. 
Remember what 1 say and quit your blatancy. 
Attain calm, even as 1 have done. 



Yours truly. 



Grant Frazer 




j..i«ti!Hc^i.ip»Kw:.vv.r^?i»BKirB*«sHta»',r,.:;'-*.<*'iiini«««M^ 




page torty-eighl 



AMERICAN AIRWAYS 

CHICAGO, ILL. 

Special to Business Manager: 
re: Jack Morton Fultz, 2nd 

Following orders from the main office, I wish 
to report that a special investigation at the Col- 
lege attended by the above mentioned applicant 
for Pilot with American Airways brings a most 
favorable reply. 

Fultz is a tall, well-liked fellow greatly inter- 
ested in airplanes and fully qualified for accep- 
tance. He is not athletic and restricted his college 
activities chiefly to the Glee Club, an organization 
of which he was a very capable and very active 
member. Fultz was interested in [i\s studies and 
obtained above-average grades without being 
a severe student. Engineering was his Major 
subject and it is interesting to note that he was 
farsighted enough to enroll in Astronomy, a 
knowledge of which subject will greatly increase 
his value to the American Airways. 

f-le is a direct descendent of one of the signers 
of The Declaration of Independence although he 
does not make very much ado about the fact. At 
college he always arose on time and never was 
addicted to night life until his Senior year. His 
previous years had seen him living in Barclay 
Hall but when he moved to Lloyd Hall, for his 
last year, he took up quarters with two men named 
Haines and Bancroft. Suddenly, for no apparent 
reason, he began to stay out nights and was even 
frequently seen holding a lighted cigarette in 
his lips. In spite of these handicaps, he plugged 
on and maintained his usual high ideals and 
standards. 

The report is to the effect that Fultz was of 
varying degrees of success as far as his private 
love lives were concerned. He keeps all his 
friends, and the girls, too, wondering just what 
the outcome will be. A most notorious affair was 
held with a Mile. A-L. from Br/n Mawr who is 
reported to have caused him much loss of sleep 
during the early years at College. However, 
Sulphur and Molasses plus the intervention of a 
smoothie from the class above, dispelled the 
illusion and Fultz began his spasmodic wanderings 
for fairer game. 

Agent 198 advocates acceptance of Fultz. 




JOHN MORTON FULTZ, 2ND 

44 SOUTH WYOMING AVENUE ARDMORE, PA. 

Born 1913. Entered from Episcopal Academy in 1930. 

Senior Prom Commiriee; Glee Club (2, 3, 4), Cap and Bells 
(3, 4), Enoineerino Club (1, 2, 3, 4). 
Engineering Major. 




tf'^^'.MK^rtv.t ;w-ir*MP.i'j«!S*;~ 




page Forty-nine 




RICHARD O'BRIEN GIBBS 

497 LARCH AVENUE BOGOTA, N. J. 

Born 1911. Entered from Bogota High School in 1929. 

Class President (3)j Class Executive Committee (4)j Student 
Council (4); President (4), Football, Numerals (3), H (4), 
Tennis, Junior Varsity (3), H (4); News Board (2); Business 
Manager of Musical Clubs (4); Cop and Bells (4)/ Founders 
Club (3, 4), Secretary (4); Triangle. 

Economics Maior. 



Mayor O'Kelly 
Bogota, N. J. 

Dear Snail Fingers: 

Listen, crocodile, I've had enough of your lip. 
When ya goin' to quit tryin' to play bass viol 
with a fiddle bow? You rat. I told ya once 
who was goin' to run Bogota, and if I hear any 
more of this stuff about poyin' hush money to the 
dicks, I'll give Lead Pants the word and he'll put 
the finger on ya. GET ME? 

I suppose ya think the citizens of Bogota have 
enough guts to object to my conscription of school 
children into machine gun practice. Where the 
hell do you think I am goin' to get guys to run 
my show? — breed 'em from a flamingo? Or / 
suppose you think because I had to bump off the 
Spider that the W. C. T. U.'s going to fan me 
with a necktie. You must be avi'ful dumb. Snail 
Fingers. Why when I went to Haverford, there 
wasn't a mug on the campus that didn't know 
where to pay his fines, OR ELSE. The sheep in 
Founders hardly dared come out of their boxes 
when I ran that joint. Heh heh. When I think 
how those chicken-livered baboons tried to break 
up my manager system on the musical clubs. 
Heh heh. Why I had everybody that ever tied 
a boiled shirt on his chest pay me a rake-off 
without ever knowin' it. And as for the dances, 
they was all graft. How do you suppose I man- 
aged to live in the only Penthouse on the Campus? 
I knew enough dope about all the librarians 
and stenogs to put any professor on the spot, and 
I had 'em all payin' me hush money. YOU! Why 
I'll tear ya LIMB FROM LIMB if I hear any more 
fair/ stories about who's king of Bogota. 

Now get this. Tell Lefty to call up the Editor 
of the Bogota Bugle and make him run a serial 
story of my life as one of Bogota's leading citizens. 
I got to cover up after that orphan and widow 
deal. Then arrange a free picnic for all the kids 
in the city. Gel Horse Mouth to stick up a few 
filling stations to pay for some balloons and stuff 
for the kids. And arrange to have my picture 
taken with my Haverford football "H". 

Boss Gibbs ... OR ELSE 




pao e fifty 



Dear Miss Baltimore: 

Since I am to marry you in a very short time, 
I think it best that we should understand each 
other in all particulars. First of all, this marriage 
will be a (ifty-Fifty affair: in other words, we will 
each shore the cost of the household. Another 
thing, I must know more about your family, how 
they made their money, and, incidentally, how 
much money they have. 

Another thing, I must be allowed to read your 
moil, because if there is anything I hate it is to 
have someone (especially someone as intimate 
as you will be with me) know something that I do 
not. Another thing, I must be permitted to place 
my pictures all over the house — no high-toned oils 
or etchings for us — all the pictures will be my 
artistic photographs, many of which as you know, 
have taken first prizes in contests all over the 
country. 

Another thing, I am going to wear the type of 
clothes I desire to wear/ no wife of mine is going 
to criticize my suits, shirts or general appearance. 
I will have you know that the clothes I have been 
wearing since my father started to manufacture 
clothes are the best that money con possibly buy. 
And if I wont to wear "race-track" clothes, I am 
going to do so as often as I please, so there, 
there, and there. 

And another thing, if the above does not con- 
vince you as to who is going to be boss in our 
household, I will take the privilege of telling 
you — it is to be your future husband, lord and 
master, Leonard L. Greif. 

And another thing, our library will be composed 
from within and without of Boccacio, Balzac, de 
Maupassant, and twenty copies of "Aphrodite." 
And another thing, — oh, I forget what it was just 
now, but I will tell you at the altar. 




Sincerely, 



LEONARD LEVI GREIF, JR. 

3 SLADE AVENUE BALTIMORE, MD. 

Bom 1913. Entered from The Pork School in 1930. 

News Board (2, 3)j Photooraphic Editor (3), Record Boord/ 
Glee Club (2, 3); Liberal Club (4),- Camera Club (2, 3), 
International Relations Club (3). 

Economics Major. 



Leonard 




page fifty-one 



m- 




WILLIAM HENRY HAINES, 3RD 

THE CAMBRIDGE GERMANTOWN, PA. 

Born 1911. Entered from the Choate School In 1930. 

Class Executive Committee (2); Class Vice-President (3); 
Junior Prom Committee; Personnel Manager Musical Clubs 
(4); Assistant Treasurer Cap ond Bells C4); Advertising Man- 
ager Record) Beta Rho Sigma. 

History Moior. 



Dear Cynthia: 

I have never written to you beFore but I feel 
I must turn to someone now for advice since I 
am at a very important cross-road in my life. My 
dreams have all been blasted to teenie-weenie 
bits. 

Four years ago I met a most charming boy at a 
Society Bridge Carnival. Our meeting soon 
blossomed into friendship ond everything was 
beginning to look rosy. But, Cynthia, dear, this 
Bridge habit of his I fear does work evil. Is it 
wrong, Cynthia dear, for a boy to look so expert 
at such a game as Bridge? Maybe he slips cards 
out of his sleeves or something. Ever since that 
first night it has been my ambition to reform him. 
At first the experience was thrilling, the thrill of 
building up humanity and planning a better, richer 
life for both of us. Every Sundoy evening he came 
to our house for supper. I cooked while Mother 
and he talked of inspirational matters. Then he 
and I went to Christian Endeavor where his rich 
voice soon won him recognition as leader of the 
group singing of hymns. 

But, this Fall he stopped coming to see me. 
Can it be my cooking? Some of his college mates 
told him he was socially prominent and he prob- 
ably thinks he Is a little too good for me, although 
that does not seem like his true self. I love him 
so, worship everything he does. He has such a 
pleasant smile and -cuts his hair such a cute way. 
His excuse for staying away is that he has to 
study history and chemistry but I am almost certain 
he is out with a Betty Rho. I had much higher 
hopes tor him, too, maybe, someday he could 
be a big business man, a broker, a plumbing 
manufacturer, a book-seller, a teacher — all these 
ambitions teemed through his fertile brain. I fear 
that wine, woman and song will exact their toll 
and dim the Inner Light of his soul. What should 
I do? 

Ever hopefully thine, 

Miss Chestnut Hill 

P. S. Cynthia, it was those evenings alter C. E. 
that got me!! 




page fifty-two 



Madame Ecks, Mesmerist 
Pacific Ghost, Calif. 

Dear Madame Ecks: 

I am writing to you In weariness and disil- 
lusionment. I am tired of the life of an actress, 
and I am sick of the people I have to work with. 
I wonder if you can help me. 

Madame Ecks, I need a husband, a real husband. 
Not one of these flashy song-and-dance papas, 
and not one of these half-baked personality 
boys. I want someone natural, quiet, courteous, 
and dependable. Are there any of these left in 
the world? I wonder if there are any who don't 
smoke or drink or waste time in extra curricular 
activities? I wonder if there are any, even, who 
don't have slick black hair, or arr/ who have nice 
healthy complexions? Madame Ecks, I'd like 
that kind of a husband — a strong rawboned 
husband who wouldn t bat an eye at all my 
tantrums and funny ideas. 

Some men are constantly shooting off their 
mouths about what they expect from marriage. 
I don't want that. Heavens, I'd like to have a 
man who would take his marriage as plainly as 
he'd eat Shredded Wheat. But I guess they were 
all killed off in the Boer War. Then again some 
men keep telling me "I love you, I love you." 
None of that fake stuff for me. Why couldn't 
I meet a man who would say "Hello" when he 
sees me, and nothing else? Oh, I am sick of life. 

Please look into your crystal ball and tell me 
where to hunt for my dream husband, my strong, 
tousle-headed, silent man. 

Hopefully, 

Jean Scarlot 




ELLWOOD MEACHAM HAMAKER 

53 WEST GREENWOOD AVENUE 
LANSDOWNE, PA. 



Miss Jean Scarlot 
Hollywood, Calif. 

Dear Miss Scarlot: 

I hove looked into my crystal ball and I have 
seen your heart's desire there. Go to Havertord 
College, in Pennsylvania, and get an introduction 
to a sandy-haired chap named Hamaker. Allah 
is great. Wire me fifty dollars. 

Happily, 

Madame Ecks 



Born 1912 Entered From Lansdowne High Sctiool in 1930. 

Chemlslr/ Club 0, 2, 3, 4)f Secfetary (3), President (4). 
Chemistry Maior. 



PQOe fifty-three 






fi 



\ 



JOHN OGDEN HANCOCK 

2708 HARRISON STREET WILMINGTON, DEL. 

Born 1913. Entered from Wilminglon Friends School in 1930. 

Spoon Commitlee (3)j Engineering Club (1, 2, 3, 4). 
Engineering Major. 



Lonely Hearts 
Philadelphia Times 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

Dear Miss Lonely Hearts: 

Since you hove so graciously aided other poor, 
lonesome souls find solace for their restrained, 
but, nevertheless pronounced desires, I pray that 
you may be able to relieve mine. 

Miss Lonely Hearts, I want a WOMAN! And 
when I say I want a woman that's what I wants! 
No beating about the bush by saying that I should 
bury myself in work. No beating about the hedge 
by reminding me that I am too young to appreciate 
the full meaning of giving one's soul and body 
(tsk! tsk!) to a chosen mote. Ah, is me! 

Miss Lonely Hearts, such insinuations from you 
would be mere twiddle-twaddle. 

I wants me a woman! Some gorgeous, divine, 
statuesque-like creature with the form of a 
Goddess! A harmony of ethereal spirit! Truly, 
o paragon of the Gods. 

The ver/ personification of devotion to one 
man, namely, John Ogden Hancock, which Is I, 
the writer. • 

For all these demands I have not so very much 
to offer. I will graduate (the Administration being 
willing) from my college in the spring of 1934. 
Nor am I an athlete, though I con jump at an idea 
or leap at a chance. I doubt if I would simply 
slay all the women who shall meet me in response 
to this my fervent plea as typified by this letter 
and which I hope you will print in your daily 
column. But, Miss Hearts, I know my Jtuff, if you'll 
pardon the common vernacular, when it comes 
to Engineering and even English. All the boys 
think I am just peachy. 

1 could write more but then I would be leaning 
towards bragging. 

With sincere wishes for prompt attention to 
this little matter, 

I close, 

John Ogden Hancock 

P. S. But, I am a devil with the slide-rule. 



.s'^ 




a-SMSS^fP^f^^vT 



po ge fiMy-four 



Manager Reading Ball Team 
Reading, Penna. 

Dear Sir: 

You oFfered me $10,000 a year to play for 
your poohedout team! You have as much chance 
of signing me up as a man in a leaky canoe in the 
middle of the ocean has of staying alive. It 
doesn't take any magnanimous mind to see that 
I am worth more than that. And as to your claim 
that I should play for you simply because my 
present woman lives in Reading, you know what 
you can do with that idea. Anyhow, Dean Brown 
who Is my po/ says he con get me a job with the 
Yanks, and if I keep up my wise-cracks (?) I will 
probably take Nick Altrocks place on the Senators. 
Did you hear the one I pulled on George Rice 
last year at training table? Boy, boy, was he 
mod, was he mad! 

About that money you loaned me. Listen, 
Charley, I mean Sam, I'll get that to you next 
week, sure. No kidding, next week, I'll have 
that dough right in your mitts. Sure Joe, and say, 
my father and mother want you to come out for 
dinner some time, and as a favor, will you bring 
Madge down with you. 

If you are still selling gasoline, could you let me 
have a couple of tankfulls on the cuff. The old 
man says he refuses to run a free bus line to 
Reading any more, and I'll have to buy my own 
gas from now on. And it doesn't take any mag- 
nanimous mind to figure out that that's impossible, 
does it Jack, Joe, I mean George? 

Have you seen Penn Charter play ball lately? 
Boy, they re going strong, going to win the pen- 
nant this year, nobody's close to them. I know 
that Montgomery shouldn't have beaten them, 
and that Penn Charter should hove had more 
than six points, but Sam's got them going like hell 
on wheels now. 

Listen Bill, I mean Charley, I have to go to a 
German class tonight, and then to an art gallery 
in the city. I'm very fond of art — in fact I hove 
written an editorial on the subject. So I'll close 
now — but you'll have to pay more than $10,000 
to get me! 

Your friend, 

Bill, I mean Fred 




FREDERICK HANNES HARJES, 3RD 

VAUEY FORGE, PA. 

Born 1912. Enlered from Penn Charier School in 1930. 

Student Council (4); Executive Athletic Committee (4), 
Baseball, H (2, 3, 4), Captain (4), New, Board (2, 3, 4); 
Sports Editor (3); Editor (4). Record Board. 

German Maior. 



pace fifty-fi 







w- r:> 





SAMUEL HASSMAN 

4318 WYALUSING AVENUE • PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Bom 1911. Entered from Overbrook Hioh School in 1930. 
French Major. 



The prize-winning essay for 1933 on 

WHAT COLLEGE HAS DONE FOR ME 

AND WHAT I HAVE 

DONE FOR THE COLLEGE 

is herewith reprinted with the kind permission oF 
the writer, Samuel Hassman, and The Haverford 
College Board of Managers. 

When 1 started attending college all my Friends 
gave me the bird and five of my friends from the 
Bronx were on hand to give me a cheer. But, 
now, I may laugh at them and I may say to myself 
at any time, since I am a pseudo-Frenchman, 
"Laugh, froggie, laugh." 

What has this marvelous college done for me? 
This divine institution founded in the year of our 
Lord 7833? Let me list the actual benefits: 

1. I once kibitzed at Bridge; always the boy 
who kept the score but never a player. Now I 
play Bridge . . passionately, fondly and ador- 
ingly. To me, Ely Culbertson is Allah, before 
whom there is no other. Allah be praised! 

2. Gasping a long sigh of shuddering ecstacy, 
I was formerly addicted to the smoking of Russian 
cigarettes. All this with exquisite tenderness. 
Now, I have learned to smoke ordinary weeds. 
My prosaic nature is affected neither one way 
nor the other by this acclimation. 

3. For three years I was voted the worst waiter 
in the college dining -hall. This obiurgatory 
epithet bothered me not a jot nor tittle. I served 
them one and all with perfunctory tenderness 
and remained aloof in my precocious wisdom. 
Vive la France! Then, after years at Haverford 
I soon attained a skill rarely seen anywhere. 

These three accomplishments testify to the 
great value of what I have done for the college 
and what the college has done for me. More- 
over, I have saved enough money to make my 
first trip to the 6i/ou (ooohhh . . la. LA). Even- 
tually, to a "SPEAK" and finally WEBER'S 
(Camden). 

I owe all to Haverford. 




page fifly-si 



Actual interview, translated From the original 
Czech. The scene is poorly arranged in the 
bedroom oF Edward Hendrickson. Edward is 
there oF course, and there is the poor, sweating 
interviewer From the 1934 Annual. The whole 
aFFair went something like this: 

Man from the Annual: . . . Now certainly you 
must have other interests than your chosen 
Field, Engineering. Do you ever do any 
reading? Some people have favorite authors 
or authoresses. How about yourselF? Is 
there some book you have enjoyed more 
than others? 

Ed. the Engineer: . . . Well, I do not do much 
reading, only like along engineering or 
such. No, I hove not done enough reading 
to talk about it . . . 

Man from Annual: . . ■ Well, is there anything you 
can tell me about yourselF? Everyone on the 
campus calls you one of the "Rope and 
Pulley Boys" but they cannot say anything 
else. Certainly you must have other interests? 

Ed. the Engineer: . . . Oh, gosh, eh, heck, no, 
. . . that is, oh . . . shucks . . . well, I like 
to ice-skate . . . see those Figure-skates? 
. . . they keep you From Falling . . . and I 
have nosebleeds a lot and . . . oh, gosh, 
gee, heck . . . no, there really isn't anything 
I do . . . eh, oh, gosh, gee, heck . . . 

Man from Annual: (who by now is beginning to 
realize the hopelessness oF it all) ... I see. 
Isn't there some peculiar trait? What kind 
oF pie do you like? Or, do you hove a 
favorite movie-star? ANYTHING? . . . 



Ed. 



the Engineer: . . . Oh, gee, gosh, I don't 
know . . . sometimes I like apple and some- 
times mince, but, you can't eat so much mince 
. . . I, oh, gee, gosh, I saw Lillian Harvey 
lately but, oh, gee, gosh ... I guess I have 
no Favorites . . . oh, gee. 




EDWARD MIDDLETON HENDRICKSON 

CROSSWICKS, N. J. 

Born 1912. Entered from Westlown Sctiool in 1930. 

Engineering Club (3, 4). 
Engineering Major. 



And so, aFter an interview like that, the Man 
from the Annual slinks home to his room ... a 
physical wreck. 




page Fit 



"pyw 




BYRON THOMAS HIPPLE, JR. 

517 SOUTH HIGH STREET WESTCHESTER, PA. 

Born 1913. Entered from West Chester Hioh School in 1930. 

Glee Club (1); Orchestra (1); Bond (1); Cap and Bells 
(1, 2, 3, 4); Track Manager (4); Field Club. President (3); 
Founders Club (4). 

Economics Major. 



West Chester, Pa. 

6^5-54 

Editor PaciFic Weekly 

10 S. Milk Street 
Boston, Mass. 

Dear Sir: 

In your letter of the 18th of last month you ask, 
For the benefit of my reading public, how much 
of my "Collegiate Rhapsody" is autobiographical. 
Since I did not write the poem with the thought 
that any one would take such an intimate interest 
in myself, it is with reluctance that I confess that 
the section beginning "Another one there was" 
L. 695 down to "he sweats like other men" L. 727 
is largely autobiographical. 

Sincerely yours 

Byron T. Hippie 

EDITOR'S NOTE — For the convenience of our readers 
we have extracted this section and print it here 
below: 

"Another one there was, a timid Texan lad; 
A oentle, only naughty, never bod 
Young man with curly hair and handsome face; 
A young Don Juan, but without a trace 
Of that great man's low dominating taste; 
He was like sad, unchosed Diana, chaste. 
He drank his beer and smoked a borrowed butt 
With some degree of grace, ond though he cut 
The cards at bridge with certain dash and style, 
He spoiled the main effect. For his shy smile 
Betrayed his inner, nervous perlurbaiion; 
In deed, in Fact, he lacked sophistication. 

The right to censor books he'd never read. 
The right to dump another Fellow's bed, 
The right to wear a derby thus on all occasions, 
He felt were sacred, safe against invasions 
By any power less than God the Father, 
(And even he was ordered not to bother). 

Now Byron knew the economic world 

Wcs run by statesmen who just sat and twirled 

Their thumbs in tearful, FeorFul, impotence. 

And so to prove the grand omnipotence 

Of youth and theory, he rode the horse 

Of economics, ond by meniol force 

He solved the world's distress in one long paper, 

A clever, senseless, intellectual caper. 

This great work did, in College dialogue, 

Replace our old Sears-Roebuck catalogue 

Beside the seats of learning in the halls 

Of Center Barclay. But, alas, those colls 

To service for mankind have ceased since then; 

Down to earth, he sweats like other men." 




•-. ■•^:.**-^ 'i,Ttt:>.-_*.i 5 




page fifty -eight 



Mr. Bernarr McFladden 
Bleep Apxarlments 
New York City 

Dear Bernie: 

Thanks very much for the silver cup. Gee, I, — 
it was darn nice of you to go to all that trouble 
packing the thing up and everything, because 
Christmas, it really must have been a job. You say 
you'd like to have a story from me about How I 
Got That Way for your new magazine to go along 
with the announcement? I really don't have time 
to write a whole story, but I could give you some 
hints. 

I won the Berserker Memorial Cup for Strong 
Men because 1 have spent years conditioning my 
body for it. There are certain things I believe in 
doing every day. (1) Eat just as much as possible/ 
(2) Think seriously about it while eating/ (3) Take 
good care of the digestive tract/ (4) Take exercise 
which your stomach would never think you had 
nerve enough to take/ (5) Gargle often/ (6) Go 
to the first show so you can get back in time to 
get plenty of sleep/ (7) Eat as much as possible. 

To conclude your story, you might give a resume 
of my intentions In life. I mean to follow along 
the suggestions I got from a certain course in 
ethics given by a man named Rufus Jones. 1 believe 
In the harmonious use of all one's potentialities. 
I believe that the subordinate aims of life — 
play, altruism, the aim at knowledge, and the 
aim at completion — should be fulfilled without 
stinting. I have fulfilled the first by playing foot- 
ball and tennis with all my heart and motor cue. 
The second I have realized by doing my bit In 
the college dining-room, carrying fodder to 
starving classmates. The third and fourth have 
been combined in my painstaking determination 
to land that college diploma. I believe In the 
Importance of "the beloved community" and have 
found spiritual release in that direction by singing 
In the glee club, as well as leading that organiza- 
tion. But above all 1 believe humon emotion 
reaches its height in married love. That's why I 
mail a letter every day to St. Augustine. 

With all good wishes, 

Eugene Hogenauer 




EUGENE FRANCIS HOGENAUER 

2640 MORRIS AVENUE BROIMX, NEW YORK CITY 



Born 1909. Entered (rom Evander Ctiilds High School in 1927. 

Tennii, H (1, 2, 3, 4), Captain (3), Football, Numerall 
(1, 2), H (3)j Editor Handbook (.3), Glee Club (1, 2, 3, 4); 
Leader (4), Cap and Bells Club (3, 4), Triangle. 

German Maior. 




poge fifty-nine 





HENRY HOTZ, JR. 

WYNNEWOOD, PA. 

Born 1912. Entered from Haverford School in 1930. 

Spoon Committee, Chairman; Chairman Blazer Commitfeo 
(3); Soccer, Numerals (3), H (4); Track (2, 3, 4), H (3, 4); 
Glee Club (4), Record Board; Everett Oratorical Contest (1). 

Economics Major. 




Manager Ponsystitch 

The Give-ond-Stretch Underwear Co. 

Peoria Corners, Iowa 

My dear Mr. Ponsystitch: 

As Agent No. — .07, I beg leave to report: 
Business conditions here in the nasty, nasty East 
are simply dreadFuI. 

Report Closed. 

But, I do have good news For you, Mr. Pansy- 
stitch. Remember reminding me to keep on the 
look-out for an illustrator? Well, never in all 
my experiences of girdling the globe have I 
stepped — into such an experience as I am now 
going to tell you. 

I was seated in the train reading the recent roporf of 
Aoent No. 91, "BALI BRASSIERES, their good pomts," 
which was not such a bloomer as I first thought, when, 
suddenly a young chop slipped down beside me. h-te 
hod been oitroctod by the title oF the report, ond, 
introducing himself as on Art Student from (he school 
near Peoria Corners, we soon were engaged in 
exchonging confidences. His name is something Itlce 
BLOTZ , . SNotz ... no, I have it . . . HOTZ. I 
sow some samples of his real-life poses (although he 
is shy when it comes to showing his work) and from 
these proofs, I om convinced he is our man. 

What is all the better, from our point of view, is that 
he has evidently had much experience with women. 
In fact, he assures me that each one has been more 
divine and more perfect than the previous ones, either 
collectively or individually. Of course — it sounded 
lilce exaggeration, but, we'll guard against such stuff. 

I learned from a slip that he pants for the essence of 
ChrJstion Science, as a religious dogma. He was 
inclined to argue upon ony phase of the creed. In fact 
he seemed inclined to argue about anything, not caring 
which side he favored, as long as he could argue. 

And, Mr. Pansystirch, he was on athlete oi college, 
playing soccer (some horrid kicking game) and tossing 
a slick called the javelin. He attempted to croon a 
song to show me that he reolly was in the Glee Club 
at Haverford. (Note: Get Miss Pantibodie to find 
out in what country Haverford is.) Fortunately, my 
sample-case fell from the rock over our seal and covered 
him with what-nots and ihing-mo-bobs, successfully 
stifling him for the time. 

I hope this thumb-nail sketch will let you know 
that I have had my mind on the company's business. 

Most devotedly, 

Anthony C. hiemise 

P. S. He is very thick when it comes to catching 
jokes, and, when you interview him, under no 
conditions should you pull his little finger at his 
suggestion. I assure you, Mr. Ponsystitch, the 
result will be very disillusioning. 



page sixty 



Mr. John Hazard 

The Old Clipper Ship Line 

Dear John: 

No I won't go to sea with you. Since you left 
college, I've got bock to the style of life I like — 
no romance and sea adventure, but good old 
economics, governmental studies, sociology, and 
banking. I admit I can still lick you, and I keep 
in condition by running around the track every 
day and chinning myself in the showers, — but 
I've got better things to do than to go hand over 
hand up the ropes on the mainmast, or to bring 
back the second mate after he's got dead drunk. 
I'm going to live right here in the U. S. A. and 
I'm going to make some dough. 

You had me bamboozled for-a long time, I'll 
admit. You used to make me think that the end 
of life was romance and adventure, and you 
persuaded me to major in English so 1 could get 
a good background tor appreciating Conrad. 
It's lucky for me that you graduated a year before 
me after all. During this last year I've hod enough 
time to grind away at my practical subjects and 
thirty years from now when you are yelling "Thar 
she blows! " through grey whiskers I'll be telling 
my private secretary to buy me another thousand 
shares of Consolidated. Then see who's happier. 
Yah! 

As for that trip we mode to Philadelphia when 
we slept in the jail and found out how the unem- 
ployed live — I've managed to study economics 
long enough to get over all your enthusiasm. The 
poor we always have v^\th us, John. Why don't 
you give Conrad a rest now and then and read 
the Bible? You'll never moke any money your 
way. I'm sick of all your blather about an exciting 
life with no fears about material security. How 
will you ever support the 2.381 children that 
statistics say you must have a dozen years from 
now? Answer me that. 

Black Jock Ike wrote me from Panama the other 
day. He says there's going to be a revolution 
down there in a couple of months. On the whole 
I think you might as well overlook what I have 
just written. Sign me up as a deck-hand and I'll 
be with you in forty-eight hours. 

Yours, 

Ray 




RAY BERTHOLF HOUSTON 

LONG HOUSE FARM BELL VALE, N. Y. 

Born 1912. Entered from Worwick t-tigh Sctiool in 1929. 

Commencement Day Committee, Ctioinnonj Track, Freshman 
Team, Cross-Counlry (3)/ Chemistry Club (2), English Club 
(3)) Corporation Scholarship (2, 3, 4); Phi Beta Kappa (3, 4). 

Economics Maior. 



E 



poge $ixt¥-on« 




r 



Mi 




HUNT BRECKINRIDGE JONES 

49 CASTLEWOOD LOUISVILLE, KY. 

Born 1914. Entered from Culver Mililarv Academy in 1930. 

News Board (1, 2, 3, 4); News Editor (2); Instruinenlal 
Club (1, 2, 3, 4), Leader (3, 4); Glee Club (4); Cap and 
Bells (3, 4); Cap and Bells Play Cortimilleo (2, 3). 

Pre-Medical Moior. 




New York Times 
New York, N. Y. 

Dear Sirs: 

In response to your request For samples of my 
musical criticisms, I herewith enclose one week's 
output for the Haverford News. This is to sup- 
plement my application for the position of music 
critic on your paper. My column, incidentally, was 
the best part of the paper every week. 

Besides knowing an awful lot about the 
history and about the appreciation of music (I 
hate modern music/ it irritates the nerves sol) 
I am a connoisseur of beautiful women, ticket seller 
supreme for bum concerts, and a promising young 
medico (note the use of Latin derivatives showing 
extreme culture) I am very frugal, hitch-hiking to 
and from my home in Louisville, Kentucky. Here 
is the sample: 

Dear Music Lovers Everywhere, 
just everywhere, 

Perhaps we were expecting too much lost 
night at the Bijou orchestra concert, for it seemed 
to us that the orchestra lacked completely the pep 
that they showed the lost time I was there. The 
pieces, all well known and often played, pre- 
sented no great difficulty but the output gave me 
a pain in my aesthetic feeling. 

Gershwin's "I Got Rhythm" overture which 
opened the program, is a piece of little import. 
Therefore, we paid little attention to it, except 
once or twice when the roggedness of the horns 
was almost too evident. 

We're not so fond of Irving Berlin's works on 
the whole, and weren't overly pleased with 
"All Alone," a tone poem. The counterpoint, 
what there was of it, was not at all clear (whether 
it was the fault of the orchestra or of Berlin, we 
can't say) and there was a great deal of unneces- 
sary blaring by the brass, we thought. The idea 
of the piece is fine — the meditations of a poet 
brooding by the telephone and his ultimate 
curseword, and his finally getting the right 
number, but it all needs better music. 

Don't expect a review next week, for we 
intend to stay away from the Bij until they stop 
playing these modern "hotcha" songs such as 
"You Got to Be a Football Hero," and "I've 
Got the Jitters." I guess we're too old-fashioned, 
but anyhow we're not going." 

Sincerely, 

H. Bach Jones 




;te: 



\<t^i-i&i$i'J&^iiUij^:4i'i.^yi 



page sixry-iwa 



Dear Nan: 

Since I saw you only last night, I have very 
little to report — except that I had the usual 
heavenly time followed by the usual long walk 
back. That campus — and you — would drive even 
Bill Carter to poetry. Away, however, with such 
drivel. Let me tell you about the paper I am 
writing for one of my English profs. The subject is 
"The Prenatal Influence of Godwin on Shelley." 
I am trying to make it as hypnotic and satiric as 
possible, because this particular prof likes things 
that way. Up to this minute I have written exactly 
738 words/ when I get to 1738, I shall take time 
out for Guy Lombardo. It has been ages since 
I danced with you! 

Did you know I was cost in another college 
ploy? You will be proud of me yet, for this time 
I have six whole lines to say, and I wear a full 
dress suit for three of them. They offered me the 
lead, but when it dawned on me that the hero 
was a seducer of innocent maidens, I could not 
bring myself to accept the honor. 

Sometimes my yearning for you becomes almost 
unendurable. I am so lonely in this world of men, 
and half the time even the men are not here or 
are here in such a way that you would not notice 
them. You see, one of my roommates studies every 
moment of his time that he isn't running around 
that fool track, and the other is always up at 
Reading, so I am generally very lonely. Your 
gracious allotment of some of your time to me 
means more than you will ever know. 

Only fifteen seconds are left for completing 
this epistle, and then my schedule calls for memoriz- 
ing some more poetry — these prep school teachers 
of ours are driving me to drink with their outworn 
Ideas! Well, as Keats said to Fanny Brice, Time's 
up now! 

Always, 

Bruce 

P. S. I'll come at 7.30 Wednesday. O. K. ? 




ROBERT BRUCE JONES 

5538 WAYNE AVENUE PHII^DELPHIA, PA. 

Born 1912 Entered trom Germantown Friends School in 1930. 

Gitt Committee; Class Treasurer (2); Class Secretary (4); 
Soccer, Junior Varsity (1); Numerals (2, 3), H (4); Freshman 
Tracl< Team; Tennis, Junior Varsity (2), H (3, 4); Tennis Man- 
ager (4)/ Record Board (3, 4), Handbook Editor (4); English 
Club (3, 4); Secretary (4), English Club Play (3); Cap and 
Bells Spring Play (2); Fall Play (3); Founders Club (4); Biblicol 
Literature Reading Prize (3). 

English Major. 




page sixty-Ihr 



I rta^ h . .. . t . h.11 » M i n i 






FRANK LEE KENNEDY 

610 SHADELAND AVENUE DREXEL HILL, PA. 

Born 1913. Entered from Penn Charter School in 1930. 

News Board (1, 2)/ English Clob (3); English Club Play (3). 
French Major. 




The Following Is o French letter intercepted by the Post Office 
Department for no reason at oil except that Farley felt inclined 
to check up on something- They translated it and sent it to the 
Record. 

Dear Le Petit Chose; — 

This is indeed a strange country, and Philadelphia 
is its strangest city! Yesterdoy I was strolling 
across the Delaware River Bridge behind a very 
despondent looking young man. He was mutter- 
ing to himselF, and it sounded as if he were talking 
in French. Naturally interested in hearing my 
native tongue, I walked a little faster and soon 
caught up with him. 

He kept repeating five or six sentences in 
French, while looking straight ahead, and walk- 
ing with thoughtless but steady steps. "J'oime 
voyager en France. Jaime filles jollies. Jaime 
envoyer les fleurs aux filles jollies. J'aime la 
Penn Charter. J'aime etudier le francais. J'aime 
Ben Bernie." 

"Beg your pardon, ' said I politely. The 
stranger gave no reply, nor did he even glance 
at me, but in the same monotonous monotone, 
insisted on repeating those six loves of his. 

A fairly good-looking fellow, he attracted my 
deepest attention all the more since I sensed some 
impending disaster. He wore exquisite clothes, 
including a striking Blue and Gold blazer. But 
on he walked, never turning his head one way 
or the other, but continually mumbling to himself. 
When we reached the middle of the bridge, he 
turned to me suddenly and said something that 
sounded like "Yowsoh." 

I laughed in his face, and his face turned black, 
and he bellowed (still in a monotonous monotone) 
"Not even you appreciate my genius. "Ah," 
said 1, "what then is your genius?" 

He replied, "1 con imitate Ben Bernie, have 
spent two summers in France, send many flowers 
to many pretty girls, bring the best-looking dames 
to the dances, and, above all, went to Penn 
Chorter whose emblem is embroidered on the 
breast of my beautiful blazer." 

Upon completing this list of his talents, he said 
dejectedly, "But you have to do more than that 
to be somebody, " and jumped gracefully over 
the railing. His body floated ephemerally through 
the air and was in my sight through its entire 
downward course. But, mirabile dictu, when it 
reached the river, there was no splash of water, 
not a ripple — the body made no impression on 
the liquid, nor could I hear it. It just silently dis- 
appeared. Is this not a strange country? 
Bon Soir, 

Jacques Renar 




page sixty-four 



The Erector Toy and Doodad Co. 

Dear Sirs: 

This letter will introduce my kinsman, Thomas 
Knight, who, I am of the firm opinion, will do you 
much good if you adopt him on your designing 
staff. It has always been my opinion that a great 
company like yours should pay more than cursory 
attention to the qualifications of the men it hires 
— In other words, that you should find out not 
only whether your prospective employees can 
think up Doodads, but whether or not they love 
to do so. Now I con unequivocably say that Tom 
does love this kind of work. From the cradle on 
through college this boy has been tinkering away 
at knick-knacks like nobody's business. 

But I have further reasons. Thomas is the man 
for you, for he understands the psychology of 
children who like toys and adults who like gim- 
crocks. Tom likes to sit in a big overstuffed chair 
smoking a special kind of pipe with his own Tom 
Knight (Middleton's) mixture/ as he sits there, his 
eye is liable to travel up the wall from the floor 
to the ceiling and bock again. "Good place to 
run a cord and o couple of rheostats for that old 
electric cigar lighter of mine, " he will likely be 
thinking. Before the day is out, the chances are 
that Tom will be able to sit in the same choir, with 
the same pipe between his teeth, and in the some 
position, and be able, without so much as moving 
a great toe, to throw a switch, adjust a rheostat, 
and light his pipe. (You see the lighter operates 
by a spark gap between the lighter and the silver 
stem core of the pipe. The rheostat is to control 
the violence of the bombardment of sparks on the 
tobacco.) 

Perhaps others could show as much inventive 
acumen, but few could show it combined with 
such ideal philosophy — namely, that of ease, com- 
fort and pleasure. Give this man a whacking good 
salary so he con buy himself the eases, the comforts, 
and the pleasures of life, and you will see a 
Newer and Better Doodad Company. 




THOMAS MAY KNIGHT, III 

e/o HAWAIIAN TRUST CO. HONOLULU, T. H. 

Born 1913. Entered from Punahau Academy in 1930. 

Glee Club (3, 4); English Club (1, 2); Enoineerino Club 
(2, 3, 4), Secretory-Treasurer (3). 
Engineering Major. 



Yrs. etc., 



Thomas' Kinsman 



page sixty-tive 





HERMAN ADAM LINGERMAN 

226 FOURTH STREET BUTLER, PA. 

Born 1907. Entered from Wyoming Seminary in 1930. 

Cop and Gown CommiHee; Track (1, 2, 3, 4). 
Philosophy Major. 



Lamia Simple McFlercewoman 
Foursquare and a half 
California 

Dear Lamia: 

Well, well! It's been a long time, hasn't it 
Lamy? I've wanted to write you a letter for 
months, but my Theological work has kept me 
on the ball every minute. You know, by Jeez, 
it's a funny thing how I got into this racket in the 
first place. Twenty or so years ago when I was 
just a kid starting in college, I thought I wanted 
to be a minister. No stuff! That was before I 
came under your influence. Of course, then, there 
was a time when I thought I wanted to gel a 
Ph.D. in Government and take bar examinations 
and teach in college and maybe go into public 
life. Public career! That's what I'm doing, all 
right, but being head of the First Faithhealing 
Spiritualist Union is something different from being 
state legislator. Last week I cured a couple of 
coses of paralysis by laying on of hands. She 
was some looker, too, by Jeez. 

Lamy, I thought you and I could do each other 
some good. Why don't we team up? I'm getting 
rather sick of this territory around Philadelphia, 
and I'm also getting a little conscience-struck. 
Sometimes I think it would be better even at this 
late date, if I turned to something clean like 
politics. Don't get me wrong. I don't want to 
chisel in on you. I'll sell my outfit down here very 
reasonably to one of your bunch/ then I'd come 
down to Los Angeles and do just enough work 
For you — stenographic if you want to — to carry 
me along quietly for a while. You may think I'm 
crazy, but I want to read some philosophy — espe- 
cially Nietzsche and Tolstoy and Bergson. I'd 
also like to hove you introduce me to some of the 
babes there in Hollywood. In other words, I 
wont a little peace and meditation. If at the end 
of a year or so of it, I want to decide to go bock 
to my original plan of economics and government, 
I'll do so. If not, I'll reserve the right to buy back 
my old outfit and tell the public I've been away 
to the Holy Land. 

Let me know. 

Yours, 

Herman 




page sixty-six 



TO THE READERS OF THIS ANNUAL! 

AHENTION! PLEASE! 

Dear Reader: 

We, the dear editorial staff, tiave called to 
your attention the fact tfiat you are now touching 
a page hallowed by its consecration to one of 
our class-mates, Douglas Lockard, the Baltimore 
Chemist with an eye on The Pennsylvania Medical 
College, God-willing. We are awed by the 
futile attempts at writing an appropriate persons! 
letter for this likeable young man for no one seems 
able to handle the delicate job. 

To get a good mental image of Doug, just draw 
a short, straight line. There you have this young 
chap. For, he is as keen-wilted and as neat- 
appearing in manner and mannerisms as the care- 
fully plotted line. But, we cannot devote a full 
page to that. 

Doug is delightfully dumpy and would easily 
pass at a masquerade for a pudding-dumpling, 
with gravy. Yet, we cannot write an entire page 
over somebody being dumpy, or looking like a 
dumpling with gravy. 

He studies an awful, awful lot and when he 
finishes, he studies some more. He did next year's 
work, last year, and last week's assignments two 
years ago and he had all his Ethic's papers written 
^hen he was a Sophomore. You know, and can 
see the point, Doug is like that. Always days and 
days and years ahead of everybody else in getting 
his homework done. But, you can't v^rite a whole 
page because a guy does his homework, can you? 

He likes baked beans. Finish that yourself. 
A regular shark at Bridge. 

Heck, all we can think of is to call him cute 
and lovable. 

The staff admits defeat on this assignment and 
offers a reward for persons calling at the Staff 
Headquarters, said persons being able to do 
better than this. 

Love to you all, 

THOSE LinLE DEVILS 
FROM THE EDITORIAL BOARD 




4^ 



t 




JAMES DOUGLAS LOCKARD 

964 MADISON AVENUE, APT. H COLUMBUS, OHIO 

Born 1912. Entered from Forest Park High School in 1930. 

Class Vice-President (1); Chainnon Freshman-Junior Donee 
Commitfeej Soph-Senior Donee Commtttee; Chairman Basket- 
boll Dance Committee; Glee Club (1, 2, 3, 4); Cop ond Bells 
(3, 4); Chemtstry Club (3, 4); Freshmon Track Team. 

Pre-Medicol Major. 



page sixty-seven 






BENJAMIN S. LOEWENSTEIN 

580 PELHAM ROAD GERMANTOWN, PHILA., PA. 

Born 1912. Entered from Germantown High School in 1930. 

Freshman-Junior Dance Committee; Tennis, Freshman Teom; 
Junior Varsity (2); Ivy Committee (3); News Board (1, 2, 3), 
Make-up Editor (1), News Editor (2), Managing Editor (3)j 
News Service Board (1, 2, 3, 4), Director (4), Record Board, 
Editor-in-Chief; Basketball Manager (4); Debating (1, 3)/ 
Everett Orotoricol Contest (1); Classical Club (2); inter- 
national Relations Club (2, 3); Founders Club (3, 4); Centenary 
Committee (4). 

History Major. 



Dear Bennie Loewenstein, Jr.: 

You have been at college two months and It 
is about tiine for you to have a little advice on 



HOW TO BE SUCCESSFUL WHILE 
AT HAVERFORD 

From experience I know just what I am talking 
about so don't you go asking me silly questions. 

In your first place, be friends with everybody 
who is of importance: professors, students or 
anyone else on the campus. There are, of course, 
various and divers ways of creating valuable 
friendships, but, since you are a chip off the old 
block, you have Inherited a natural tendency 
along these lines. 

In the first year, do not study too hard, but get 
out after the big campus activities. This will moke 
your marks extremely low at first, but then you 
can work more assiduously in the last two years 
and, maybe, win the Improvement Prize. 

Do not bother with a girl until your senior year 
and then choose her only from Vassar or some 
other high-class college. She herself should be of 
the first water and to her you should devote 
yourself with all your heart. Do not go in for any 
rough stuff, son, for sex is a beautiful thing and a 
man must have a happy family life, with plenty 
of incomes, substantial insurance, and healthy 
children. 

Guard your tongue carefully and even though 
you may find it in your power to know fully what 
the entire campus is doing in its spare moments, 
do not be a "news-dispenser." 

The one thing you must positively not do is to 
edit your class annual. I have many reasons for 
this warning; you lose all friendships you so 
carefully established and "nobody wants to 
write-you-up" for the blame thing. 

Please give much thought to this advice from a 
loving papa, 

Father Benjamin 




J 



poge sixty-eight 



I 



Hello! Clarence: 

Without a doubt I owe you an apology for 
letting this letter go as long as it has but you 
know how things have been at Dad s place and 
I hove been head over heels in work trying to 
get the muddle straightened out. 

With regard to this fellow Loomis, about whom 
you wrote, let me assure you that I believe he 
will be the man needed and most suited for the 
job you have at hand and I am delighted that 
he mentioned my name for reference. 

While at college he was a Physics Major and 
since you yourself failed to pass your Physics I 
Final Exam, you are aware of what stuff this fellow 
has in him. He was extremely good-natured 
while at school and I con say without exaggerat- 
ing that Dave did not have on enemy during his 
four years there. In fact, he was the focal point 
for much good-natured teasing, all of which 
would hove driven you or me or hundreds of 
others to seek for means of revenge. Instead, 
Dave seemed to laugh most heartily when the 
joke was on him. 

He is, though, a little bit shy and I never saw 
him pal around with many of the fellows. He is 
gifted with a friendly nature, however, and will 
gladly talk when once started. He is content to 
mind his own business and faithfully performed 
any tasks assigned to him, a fact which you will 
be especially glad to hear and have doubtless 
observed for yourself by this time. 

He is not a rapid-fire boy and takes his time 
In whatever he does, reaching the ultimate goal 
at his own speed, but he always reaches what 
he goes after. I hope you will be able to get 
him to work a little more rapidly than when he 
was at College for while he has efficiency he 
certainly must combine it with speed if he wishes 
♦o stay with you. 

The thing I remember most about him is the day 
he occidenriy set his hair on fire. It happened in 
the Chem. Lab. and caused much excitement. The 
Chem. Prof, rushed in and surprised Loomis by 
charging him fifty-cents for a SINGE! 

This letter isn't much but it tells you as much as 
I know and I hope it helps. 

Sincerely, 

Ray 




DAVID GREENE LOOMIS 

275 MONTCLAIR AVENUE NEWARK, N. J. 

Born 1912. Entered (rom Barringer High School in 1930. 

Glee Club (4), Inslrumenlol Club (2), Mothemalics Club 
(4); Field Club (1, 2), Radio Clob (1). 
Physics Major. 



page sixty-nine 




r ^"^^^^ 





FREDERICK REIMER LYDECKER 

48 LINCOLN STREET GLEN RIDGE, N. J. 

Born 1913. Entered from Glen Ridge High School in 1930. 
Engineering Maior. 



Bryn Mawr 
12-1-32 



Dear Jean: 



I haven't told you about my boy friend at 
Haverford have I? He's positively the sweetest 
thing. He's got curly black hair, fair skin, and 
SUCH eyes . . . He likes me to call him "Don 
Juan" — vvhy, God only knows — but it seems to 
please and when he looks pleased he is ABSO- 
LUTELY irresistible. He gets all flustered and 
smiles In a sheepish way and says in a big gruff 
voice "Cut it out." 

He tells me he's quite an aviator too. He's 
got ever so many hours of solo flying to his credit 
towards his commercial license or some such thing. 
It's all very complicated. He knows such a lot 
about flying — wing spreads, and radio engines, 
and slip seams, and stream lines, all of which he 
tries to get across to me, and in self defense I 
nod and brightly say, "Yes. Of course." 

And you know, he's o budding AUTHOR. 
The other night he finally opened up and let 
me in on the great secret. His next story is almost 
bound to be accepted by some pulp magazine/ 
I've forgotten its name . . . "Hell-Birds Awing" 
or some such title. But he's the most self-conscious 
boy about it. He won't show me the stories. 
He says, "Aw, you wouldn't like them. Anyway, 
there's too much swearing in them." Pardon me. 
He tells me he's quite convinced the boys at 
college that he's never been drunk. Well, I 
suppose it is a matter of definitions. 

He's a nice kid but he certainly does choose 
the wettest set of bosom pals. There was one 
from Norristown. All he talked about was 
Bulcks. Can you imagine? 

Well, write me soon. 



Yours truly. 



Bettie G. 




Dear Mother and Dad: 

College is great and you would never recognize 
your young son now since he is all rigged out 
in an attire commonly, and I mean commonly, called 
the Rhinie Outfit. But everything is done in fun 
and no one seems to mind so very much, realizing 
that the Rhinies get their chances on the next 
class that comes in. 

Dad asked me to look up about his friend's son, 
Bob McKee, and I hove met Bob several times. 
He is a large, good-natured egg, full of fun and 
almost always laughing with a most enormous 
chuckle that sounds like the bull we have down 
in the pasture. This Bob is really huge in size, 
built In the form of a rectangle with light hair. 
I have learned already that he has two pet 
hobbies, namely. Photography and Golf. Not 
only is he playing a big role along photographic 
lines for the year-book of his Senior Class, but 
Bob has played with a marked degree of success 
in many golf tournaments. You should get to 
know him, Dad, in spite of the fact that you just 
broke "two hundred." 

His size, bellowing voice and good-nature 
have all helped to give him such nicknames as 
"Mac," "Dotten," "Bruggy," "Lord Plushbottom" 
and a host of others which it would be too 
difficult to remember. When he isn't tied around 
a camera, he is driving a golf ball up and down 
a nearby lawn with several of his friends. 

I understand that he loves to tour the country 
in his Ford and has made several trips out West. 
One of them was a regular camping trip with a 
Hinkie Haines, whose father you know also. 
Dad. Hinkie and Bruggie must have had the 
time of their lives for 1 have often heard them 
speak about their journey. 

I almost forgot to tell you that Bob is the Captain 
of the 1934 Golf Team, having received this 
distinction following three years of splendid 
play. That is positive proof that he has a host 
of friends. 

Well, I must have this off in a few minutes to 
catch the mailman. 




I 



ROBERT WILSON MCKEE 

414 SOUTH 47TH STREET PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Born 1911. Enlerod from Episcopal Academy in 1930. 

Spoon Committee; Chairman Ivy Committee (3); Golf (2, 3, 4), 
H (3, 4), Captain (4); News Board (2, 3, 4); Photographic 
Editor (3, 4); Record Boards International Reloiions Club (3). 

History Major. 



Much Love, 



Your Son 





page seventy-one 




WILLIAM FRANCIS MAXFIELD 

217 SOUTH CASSINGHAM ROAD 
COLUMBUS, OHIO 

Born 1913. Entered from Columbus North School in 1930. 

Gill Committee, Chairman/ Instrumental Club (1, 2, 4),- Band 
(1, 2); Cap and Bells (2, 3, 4); Engineerina Club (1, 2, 3, 4), 
Chairman (4). 

Engineering Major. 



Resting in a corner of an old closet a Diary was found, relic 
of another day. A fev/ whisks of the handkerchief and a slow 
thumbing of the pages, then to stop at: 

To my Diary: 

Well, old diary, I have left Bill Maxfield at 
the station for his trip back to Columbus, Ohio. 
I hated to see him go. Somehow he was so much 
fun and so sincere and conscientious in whatever 
he tried. I can remember loads of things about 
"Mox" as so many of us called him. 

He was greatly interested in Engineering even 
though his father is a Psychology Prof, at Ohio 
State U. And speaking of that University reminds 
me of the way Bill used to praise it. You often 
wondered why he never went there. Everything 
the gang used to argue about would be greeted 
with Bill's "Now, out at Ohio State they do . . " 
and then would follow a glistening tale of that 
apparent paragon of all colleges. And he was 
pretty good at German, too, altho' he was 
better on the Sax. Gosh, that Sax. He was 
kinda all pepped up with that thing. Diary, when 
we were Rhinies, but we gradually talked him 
out of it. It wasn't seen after the middle of our 
Soph. year. 

Yes, and I remember the way he loved to 
skate. Morning, noon and night . . . heaven 
only knows when he got his work done . . . 
the Mox would be down skating. He was fairly 
clever on stunts with those steel blades. Outside 
of ice skating he wasn't so very much In athletics 
although in his Senior year he showed consider- 
able promise as a Football player. There, as in 
everything else, he gave all he had. 

I have often wondered. Diary, whether that 
girl over in Germantown was really a cousin as 
he claimed. Gosh, for a cousin he was sure inter- 
ested in her. Although another girl named after 
a cigar and The World War began to rear her 
head into what had been peaceful harmony. 
But, there used to be a girl from Swarthmore 
College. I wonder whatever became of her. 
Do you know. Diary, I used to like her myself a 
little. 

He was a fit companion for Lord Plushbottom 
McKee and Shorty Atmore when it came to doing 
Indian War whoops. Good old "Mox." 

Goodnight, Diary 




M 



page seventy-two 



Mr. Edgar Blest 

The Great Middlewest 

America 

Dear Eddie: 

I am enclosing some verse I recently discovered 
in the Journal of Profound Matf)ematics. It is by 
a young graduate of Haverford, one Nichol. 
I think it has unity, coherence and emphasis. It 
is an unusual thing for poetry to appear in a 
mathematical publication, and I think the implica- 
tions are great for you and myself. Here is the 
poem: 

SONG OF THE PARABOLA 

Surd of rhe North rhol rests in quadratic gloom, 
Where are your asymptotes, your fiery binomials? 
The focal points that hung on function's bosom 
From the mathematical womb to the mathematical tomb. 
Awaken! 

Think v^hat has gone into that poem! Think of 
the scope of sympathy a man must have to produce 
such an effect of love, forgiveness, hesitancy, 
challenge — all in the ineffable realm of numbers! 
I tell you we have made a find. Of course I found 
out what I could about this Nichol. He studied 
mathematics when he was at Haverford, developed 
a reputation for puns (something you and I will 
have to look into and suppress), and got many 
letters from a young Spanish girl. Putting these 
facts together, I determined to meet him, but 
when I went to his rooms in New York, I couldn't 
find him. They say he is so short that he often 
escapes notice, so I haven't exactly given up 
hope. 

But bock to this poem. I feel that it is a lesson 
for both of us, especially you. I'd like to see you 
get a little of the same rich spiritual suggestion 
into the poems you write about raisin pie and 
the kitchen range. Nichol shows that it is pos- 
sible to be at once a student of that most abstract 
and rigorous thing, mathematics, and yet to be 
thoroughly human. I wager the rascal uses pro- 
fanity. I know the type. And he would be one 
to complain about the food. Composers of verse 
never did bow to the status quo. 

Yours, 

Amy Slowell 




HERBERT JAMES NICHOL 

43 SOUTH CLIFTON AVENUE • ALDAN, PA. 

Born 1913. Entered from Overbroolc High School in 1930. 

Gift Committee; H^veifordidn Board (2), English Club 
(1, 2); Everett Oratorical Contest (2), Poetry Prize (1). 
Mathematics Maior. 



page s e v e n t y - 1 h r e e 





RICHARD RUNDLE PLEASANTS 

DARBY ROAD PAOLI, PA. 

Born 1912. Entered from Montgomery School in 1930. 

Class President (1, 2); Permanent Class Secretory (4)^ 
Student Council (1, 2, 3, 4); Football, H (1, 2, 3, 4), Captain 
(4)i Track (1, 2), Numerals (3, 4); English Club (1, 2), Play 
(1, 2),- Glee Club (1 , 2, 3, 4)i Cap and Bells Club (4)j Founders 
Club (4). 

French Major. 



A gentleman with the air of a newspaper 
man, in fact smelling of printer's ink is interviewing 
young man who persists in holding a football. 
The young man's stand-offish air implies that he 
is from some very respectable place, perhaps 
even Bryn Mawr. If we listen to what is going 
on, I may not have to fell you anything further 
about the young man. If may even get to be 
dramatic before it is over. 

N. P. M.: Do you like football? Y. M.: Well, 
uh, football is, uh . . . N. P. M.: Thanks, Coptoin 
Pleasants. Now, is it also true that you hold the 
record of making the longest run on Walton Field? 
Was it ninety-eight yards or something like that? 
Y. M.: Why, uh, the way it happened was, uh . . . 
N. P. M:. Yes, I thought so. Thank you. Now the 
readers of our paper would like to know just 
what you think of pep talks by coaches before 
the game. Do you personally approve or disap- 
prove of them? Do you think they are juvenile? 
y. M.: Well, there's certainly a lot of . . . N.P.M.: 
Thank you, Captain Pleasants. I am sure our 
readers will be glad to hear such an unbiased 
opinion. Ahem! It is true, is it not, that you have 
held numerous class offices and that you are 
actively connected with the Student's Council? 
/. M. (determinedly grinding his nails through the 
pigskin cover): . . . Well, uh, football has been 
a . . . N. P. M.: Thanks, sir. It is so nice to meet 
a young fellow such as yourself who possesses 
the ability of uniting sports and studies without 
impairing either himself or his proficiency in com- 
petition. Y. M. (his eyes have a funny store) 
Football is, uh . . . N. P. M.: Captain Pleasants, 
since I understand that your chosen field is French 
literature, is it true that you desire to teach your 
favorite sport and study at Montgomery School, 
your former alma mater? /. M.: (his biceps 
stiffening) Football . . . N. P. M.: Thank you for 
your time, Capt. Pleasants, and I assure you that 
the article will be printed just as you wish. Is 
there anything more you'd like to add? /. M. 
(roaring and drawing a revolver with which he 
kills the reporter) Football is no good, don't let 
me hear you mention it again, or I'll make you 
suffer! 




J 



page seventy-four 



Dean Falnall Clown 
Haverford College 
Haverford, Penna. 

Dear Sir: 

We have, in our so-called jail, a young man, 
claiming to be a Senior in your so-called college. 
He says to write to you for reference and bail; 
he says if you can't give him a clean bill and boil, 
God in heaven above only knows. We nabbed 
him for going through a red light, and smashing 
into the car of our so-called mayor. Oh yes, his 
name is Asa Wing Potts (so-called Si, for short). 
Now, Si pulls a long cock-and-bull stor/ about 
how he is slightly color blind, says he can't tell 
the difference between red and green. 

Well, it all looks rather fantastic to my way of 
thinking, to say the leost. Si soys he tells whether 
to go ahead or stop by looking at the light and 
seeing whether the upper space is lit or the lower 
one; soys he can tell that way. Well, Dean, it so 
happens that in our town things in general are 
reversed, and the lights in particular, and so he 
crashed, with little doubt existing as to whether 
or not he crashed. Anyhow, he crashed. 

Now, Dean, can you tell me whether Si, as 
you know him, is telling the truth about himself. 
To further identify him in your mind, I might add, 
that at the time we apprehended him (and we 
had to run pretty fast and jump rather high to catch 
him) he was unshaven, wearing the damndest- 
looking gold rim glasses that 1 ever saw, dressed 
in a horrible combination of red shirt, green tie 
and corduroys, the latter being extremely sloppy 
and held up by polka-dot suspenders. 

Not only is he held on charges of so-called 
assault and battery by automobile but we also 
think he is a trifle daffy. His conversation is a 
terrible jargon of principles of economics, chem- 
istry and socialism. He keeps repeating, "1 should 
never hove changed Majors/ but maybe 1 should 
have. Well, 1 can play soccer and 1 can ploy soccer, 
and I can high jump. Do you wont to subscribe 
to Charity, a little bit, mister?" It all befuddles 
us, Dean, can you help? By the way. Si mentioned 
that you might need a good detective around 
your campus, how's about it? 

Sincerely, 

So-Called Police Commissioner 




ASA WING POTTS 

254 WEST WALNUT LANE • GERMANTOWN, PA. 



Bom 1912. Entered from Germantown Friends School in 1930. 

Commencement Day Committee^ Track Squad (1, 2), Numerals 
(3, 4)i Soccer, Junior Varsity (1, 2, 3, 4), Numerals (4), Record 
Board (4), Liberal Club (1, 2, 3, 4), Executive Committee 
(4)i Chemistry Club (1, 2)i International Relations Club (3)) 
Chairman Charity Chest Committee (4). 

Economics Major. 




ISFT" 



page seventy-five 





PHILIP BURTT RICHARDSON 

236 VAN HOUTEN AVENUE PASSAIC, N. J. 

Born 1911. Entered from Westtown School in 1930. 

Closs President (1); Closs Executive Committee (1, 2, 4); 
Permanent Committee (4); Class Day Committee; Student 
Council (1, 2, 3, 4), Executive Athletic Council (4),- Secretory 
(4); Customs Committee (2, 3, 4); Choirman (4); Soccer, 
Numerals (1), H (2, 3, 4); Basketball, Numerals (1), Track, 
Numerals (1), H (2, 3, 4); Business Manager Record} 
Engineering Club (1, 2); Everett Oratorical Contest (1)j 
Founders Club Award (1). 

Economics Major. 



Miss Elizabeth Wiswall 
Wellesley College 
Wellesley, Mass. 

Dear Miss Wiswall: 

Do you, or do you not, know Mr. Philip Richard- 
son? This is the reason we ask: Early in the fall 
of his Senior year, Philip who has a charge 
account with us, ordered some stationery — 200 
sheets and 200 envelopes, with your name and 
address printed on the front of the envelopes. 
He charged the order — $4.50 — but he makes so 
many trips to Wellesley (to see a girl he knows 
up there) and to Falmouth (to see a girl he knows 
up there) that he cannot pay our bill. Could 
you pay us the sum,- after all, the things had your 
name on them, and you have most of them by this 
time. Could you, Miss Wiswall, would you? 

There, that's our business letter, now let me 
tell you about this fellow Richardson. He is 
naturally a reticent boy, so probably doesn't tell 
you all about himself. In fact, if he acts around 
your house like he acts here, he no doubt sleeps 
95 per cent of the time — and comes to meals late, 
never uses soap, and charges you for rides in 
that big, beautiful Buick of his. First of all — he is 
the dirtiest soccer player in the Eastern League. 
Then again (the thing about which he boasts 
most often) he took French 2 for so many years 
that he was eventually made Professor of Romance 
Languages-(where he would obviously be quickly 
forgotten) but he was fired soon thereafter. The 
president asked him one day who wrote Com- 
fort's "French Composition" and your Hero (ours 
also, confidentially) didn't know! 

He has never brought the same girl to any of 
the college dances. Among one-fourth of the 
Student Body he is the most unpopular man on 
the campus because of the fiendish tortures he 
perpetrates on the Rhinies. He has darling black 
wavy hair, and the nicest skin — but, of course, 
you know all of his physical attributes, so we 
won't bother you with them. 

In closing may we repeat our first plea — could 
you, would you. Miss Wiswall? 

Sincerely, 
Manager of the Haverford 

Co-Operative Store 




page seventy-six 



The following letter was intercepted by the 
Year Book's own mystic and is herewith presented 
minus Mr. Foxy's quaint misspelling — mainly because 
we're too lozy to try an imitation of his style . . . 

Dear Thomas: 

Much doth thy activity on Haverford's greens- 
ward warm the cockles of my heart. Never have 
I seen such wholehearted support of the Inner 
Light since my early connections with the Seekers. 
Thomas, believe an old hand at the game of 
righteousness when I tell thee thot thee hath oil 
the characteristics necessary to make a name for 
thyself in Quakerdom. Thy determined chin, thy 
quiet manner till thee is aroused, thy belief in a 
pure body and a pure mind, and thy distrust of 
war as a means of international policy — all these 
i had, and my predecessors before me. Thee 
should go far in thy chosen profession of Quaker 
— and those mild blue eyes which at times hove 
a divinely earnest glint! 

Oft hath my spirit watched over thee in the 
Students' Council meetings. Amidst all the 
ungodly clamour in those meetings, thee hath 
kept thy head and insisted on clear and concise 
interpretations of the rules. Although other 
members are intent on getting out of the conclave 
as early as possible, thee hath continually insisted 
on getting things right. Might I odd that some 
county in the kingdom of heaven will be set aside 
for those rare and square-jawed men who take 
their jobs seriously? 

And I am glad, Thomas, that unto thy heart 
thee has taken a virgin for love and admiration. 
She'll odd years unto thy life, even though she 
bothers thee now with eight- and ten-page letters. 

Thomas, I am deeply interested in thy fight 
against the CMTC. That institution must go, and 
your breaking off diplomatic relations with a 
dear friend because he signed up with that arm 
of the devil will help destroy it. 

Inner Lightly thine, 

George Foxy 




ARTHUR THOMAS RICHIE 

154 EAST MAIN STREET MOORESTOWN, N. J. 

Born 1511. Entered from Moorestown Friends School in 1930. 

Class Vice-President (3, 4), Permanent Vice-Presidentj 
Class Executive Committee (1, 2); Senior Prom Committee; 
Student Council (4); Customs Committee (4), Soccer, Numerals 
(1), H (2, 3, 4), Captain (4); Baseball, Numerols 0, 2), H 
(3, 4), Liberal Club (3, 4),- Engineering Club (1, 2, 3, 4); 
Chairman Executive Committee (3); President C4); Founders 
Club (4). 

Engineering Maior. 






m 




NORMAN JOHNSON RUSH 

1110 MILLCREEK ROAD JOHNSTOWN, PA. 

Born 1913. Entered from Wesllown School in 1930. 

Class Treasurer (4); Soccer, Junior Varsity (2), Numerals 
(3), H (4); Track Squad (2, 3, 4); Basketball, Junior Varsity 
(2); Chemistry Club (1, 2, 3, 4), Cap and Bells Spring Play 
(1). 

Pre-Medical Major. 



WHOOSIS MEDICAL COLLEGE 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Admiral Byrd 

Little America, South Pole 



5-6-40 



Dear Sir: 

I received your radiogram asking my help in 
getting a young man to help you in your work. 
I recommend most highly one of our youngest and 
most able graduates. His name is Norman J. 
Rush. I consider him mentally and physically fitted 
for the tasks you mention. In the first place he is 
chubby. Those extra layers of blubber will keep 
him warm, and in case of necessity would furnish 
you a great many units of energy if taken internally. 
(Shake well before using.) Also you might find 
it convenient to disguise him as an Eskimo Fuller 
Brush man in order to obtain detailed informa- 
tion about the private lives of your native neigh- 
bours. In the second place he plays bridge with 
a persistency which is matched only by his rashness 
in bidding. He has played through so many long 
evenings here at college that I am sure you would 
find him willing to make a fourth at any time during 
your Antarctic night. In the third place think of 
having a pole-vaulter in your party, airily jumping 
from floe to floe on his way to get food and sup- 
plies for your wrecked party! In fourth place he's 
clever with his feet/ yes, a soccer player. He 
might possibly train a couple of seals for you with 
those nimble feet of his. 

So you see. Admiral Byrd, I think you'll find 
this young man one of the most enticing bargains 
you'll ever run across in a day's shopping. 

Sincerely yours, 

Agatha T. Quack 

P. S. He's a good doctor. What a bedside 
manner! 




J 



pogo s«venly-eight 



Dear Henry: 

Mrs. Dhandi and I were extremely glad to get 
your letter, and we thank you for all the good 
recommendations from your philosophy professors, 
your college president and your society friends. 
Granted that there were the kind of position here 
that you want — teaching philosophy and tutoring 
thirteen-year-old girls, — I have no doubt that you 
would fill the bill perfectly. I con see that your 
problem is a real one — whether to stay in the 
U. S. and to get a good job in business so you 
con marry and settle down, or to return to Egypt. 
From what your professors say, I have no doubt 
that you have enough moral stamina to combat 
these difficult conditions in Egypt, or even in 
India. But, Henry, it takes more than that: you 
need to be religious. Have you got religion? 
Have you lost your faith? If I didn't have religion, 
I don't know where I'd be. I think you'd better 
stay in America another year and try to pull 
your ideas together. But let me give you a few 
suggestions. 

Throw your Rubiayat into the waste-bosket, 
and put Stevenson's Apology for Idlers into an 
old bureau drawer where you won't find it. 
Hang up your tuxedo for a year, put on your 
overalls and go back to the fields of Nebraska 
and pitch hay. See if you can go for a whole 
year without falling in love. Quit the cigarettes, 
and the pipes, too. Give movies and burlesque 
shows a rest for a twelvemonth. Spend so little 
money that you won't even have to think about 
that careful expense account. Leave your com- 
rades when you can and go off by yourself and 
meditate. Then, and only then, should you think 
about coming to India and studying Indian 
philosophy. Am I the voice of your conscience, 
Henry? I have a sneaking notion that I am. 

I don't want to be a wet blanket, but I have 
another sneaking notion that you'll end up with 
a good steady job with Vacuum Oil or Provident 
Mutual. But that's all right. You'll make a good 
family man. 

Happy birthday, and don't take my words too 
seriously. 

Yahatma Dhandi 




HENRY GIFFEN RUSSELL 

ASSUIT COLLEGE ASSUIT, EGYPT 

Born 1912. Entered from Hotchltiss School in 1930. 

Class Treosurer (2), Sophomore-Senior Donee Committee, 
Junior Prom Committee; Cooperative Store Committee (1, 2, 
3, 4), Choirmon (4); Tennis, Junior Varsity (2, 3X H (4J; Cross 
Country Squad (4); News Board (4)/ Glee Club (1); Liberol 
Club (3, 4), Vice-President (4). 

Philosophy Major, 



page seventy-nine 





ROGER SCATTERGOOD 

AWBURY, GERMANTOWN, PA. 



Born 1912. Entered from GermonJown Friends School in 1930. 

Senior Prom Commilleej Track, Freshman Team, Numerals 
(2), H (3, 4), Cross Couniry Squad (2, 3), H (4), Liberal 
Club (1, 2, 3, 4), Secretary (3); President (4). 

History Major. 




! iim 

SOClALlSr lALI 

Mil"): 




"PEACE MARCHES ON" 
ACT I 

Setting oFf stage can be heard the roaring oF 
cannons as they fire a nineteen hundred and 
one-half gun salute. A military band is playing 
■LONG LIVE THE DEMOCRATS". Twenty 
million and seven fully armed soldiers stand with 
bayonets drawn. Suddenly a bugle is blown. 
Then another bugle is blown. Then, to make it 
even, two blowns are bugled and a path exactly 
seven-eighths of an inch wide appears through 
the angry mob of drawn bayonets and a young 
man is seen walking on his hands across the 
bellies of the dead and wounded, collecting 
postage stamps before him. 

It would be foolhardy to say he appears war- 
like, as he places on the floor his revolvers and 
two gas-masks. From around his neck hangs a 
chain of withered human skulls. Roger Scatter- 
good, for 'tis none other, has been doing some 
tall skull-duggery. In an instant, in an instanter 
instant, he is before the microphone. He speaks: 

I am Scaltergood, leader of the movements for 
peace. I am against everything concerned with 
War . . . War . . . Wars. Crimes and Wars . . . 
Wars you there, Charrlie? (/lere Roger ducks a 
rotten pineapple plant which explodes with a 
bang, blowing oft the back of the auditorium) . . . 
' have done much peace carovaning for my cause 
and should be made the head of all Peace Move- 
ments . . . Drop your arms . . . Might will not 
make right . . . My experience in the College 
Liberal Club has shown me that ... I am the 
head of my College Club, (so there) (someone 
stabs him in the leg with a penknife, but Roger, 
does not seem to mind since the doctor told him 
he was to have as much iron in his blood as he 
could stand. Roger is still standing.) . . . What 
if I am a Quake? ... I can hold my own with 
the white people ... I am equally at home with 
the common people and the conventional types 
. . . Down with Capitalism . . . Hurray for Cap- 
italism . . . (notice how he plays with the mob!) 
. . . I am a man of many interests, and have been 
on my college track team ... I am ever awake 
. . . (But, here Roger is interrupted by a voice 
reminding Roger of the night he, Roger slept out 
all night when his car became frozen, Roger not 
even telling his Dad. Roger, at this unexpected 
attack on his good name, wilts like a lily, and 
tlys thru the ceiling). 




page eighty 



Somewhere in Tabasco, Mexico 
December 22, 1933 
Dear Father: 

I meant to call up before leaving for Mexico 
to tell you I was going and why, but a card game 
got going in Fifth Entry (incidentally, my luck 
changed, and that's where I made enough money 
to take the trip) and it continued so far into the 
night that by the time it was over I knew you'd 
be in bed. 

This is why I came down here — last week I 
read about the convention of the National 
Revolutionary Party in Queretaro in which Senor 
Perez, a delegate, said/ "There is no God. God 
exists only in petrified souls. Down with God. " 
Says I to myself, that Perez son-of-a-gun is a 
genius, for I have noticed that all genii have 
been atheists. So I hopped off by plane from 
Camden (after stopping at Weber's for a beer or 
two) and am now in Tabasco at Perez's home, 
having a darn fine time. Already I know enough 
of the language to talk about calculus to his son's 
tutor/ in fact beginning next week I am going 
to be the tutor. 

I plan to go back to college in time for the com- 
prehensives, and since I am only taking two of 
them, there will be no trouble from that quarter. 
What I am worrying about is the Math Club/ 
what they and Little Al will do without me is 
more than I know. But I will write to them often. 

Senor Perez has asked me to join his party, but 
you know how much I detest ioining any organiza- 
tion/ the only reason I joined the Math Club was 
because I couldn't help it. 

This will have to be a short note I fear, because 
some of those lousy Mexicans are shooting things 
up to beat all hell down in the town below our 
hacienda. Senorita Perez (what a babe she is, 
too) says they are clearing the way for a new 
president, and I want to be there at the finish 
of the present administration. 

As Einstein says in "Relativity," xi, x", =pi, Q', 
or "Merry Christmas to you. Pop, and three good 
glasses of beer." 

The blessings of Ingersoll on you, 

Ernie 




ERWIN SCHMID 

1529 GERMANTOWN AVENUE 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



Born 1912. Entered from Northeosl Higti School in 1930. 

Soccer, Junior Varsity (4), Crickol (3, 4); President Math- 
ematics Club (4), Corporation Scholarship (1, 2, 3, 4), Phi 
Beta Kappa (3, 4). 

Mathematics Maior. 




page eighty 






M.V.CLINTON SCILIPOTI 

BOX 143 TOWACO, N. J. 

Born 1913. Entered from Newark Academy in 1930. 

Liberal Club (3, 4), Secretary (4). 
Government Major. 



To my adorable Dr. Horsedon: 

Do you realize that the ape can catch your 
cold and you can catch his? 

That sentence means nothing, and I only put it 
there to catch your eye and to attract your atten- 
tion to that bit of composition which I am now 
writing to you, so to speak, that Is to say, as it 
were. 

I have always admired you and respected your 
opinions and it is For those reasons, mainly, that 
I am taking the Government Major. Your thoughts 
and ideals spur me on to better thoughts and 
reasoning and it is for your own good and my 
personal benefit that I am interested enough in 
you to remind you tactfully that you con catch the 
ape's cold and he can catch yours! It is from your 
guidance and inspiration that I once carefully 
decided to go out and conquer the world, although 
I have long since given the idea up as a bust. 
(You Mae-West assured I do not hold it against 
your dogma. Get it? The pun, I mean? About 
Mae West and — ?) 

I wish I could find your romantic side, fori, too, 
am a little romantic and the boys take secret sport, 
some of them do, anyway, in making sport of my 
marcellishly shaped hair. I do wish you would 
find time to drop into my room for a cup of coffee, 
which I frequently brew. Romance is a great 
thing. Even horses have romance and sex, I am 
told. 

You can see how our minds run in different 
lanes together. I am also interested in automobile 
designing and I would be very glad to show you 
my drawings at any time you mention. Added to 
this will be found my passion for horses since 
they are such dumb but understanding animals. 
1 love them. Do you? 

I am not much of a one for athletics but do adore 
indoor sports and games. I think "Scratch-as- 
scratch can" is swell. Don't you play that some- 
times? 

But, there goes Founder's Bell for dinner, and 
with this I leave. 

Anticipatory, 

Clinton Scilipoti 




page eighty-lwo 



Scalpwell Medical School 
Scolpwell, Pa. 

Dear Sir: 

You ask me for a recommendation of Frank 
Siebert to your Medical School. I believe I can 
throw both light and mud on the subject. This 
Siebert, it should be said at the outset, has a 
passion for the art of medicine, he is serious, and, 
without a doubt, it could be said that he is a boy 
of irrefutable probity. He also wears glasses. 
But there are details I must come to in a minute 
which may put rust on these golden words. 

This Siebert boy loathes women, and he abhors 
English literature, especially Byron, Kelly and 
Sheets. Do you think it is right for the American 
public to have such a one-sided whippersnapper 
learning the art of needle, scalpel, saw and 
axe? He might very well be called to the bedside 
of a bleeding poet or a jitter/ woman and throw 
over all his art merely to cash in on, consummate, 
and materialize his theories. He might kill. 
Think of that. 

But let me not to the marriage of true minds 
admit predicaments. If Frank Siebert doesn't 
cultivate the humanitarian graces, he certainly 
cultivates flowers. Was denken Sie? Quien 
sobe? Et la! A heart that goes out to leaf and 
tendril cannot be adamant to vein and artery. 
A man whose ground-swell ideal goes deep 
enough to include xylem and phloem, cannot, I 
state, be wholly destitute of the bowels of Com- 
passion. And may I add. Sir, that I am having 
a hell of a swell time writing this letter. 

To conclude briefly with pertinent facts. 
Siebert likes Indian archaeology. Siebert hurdles 
on the track team. Siebert likes to work in the 
laboratory. Siebert is a gangling youth, but has 
faith, hope, and charity. Can you say the same 
of yourself? 

Yours awfully truly, 

H. Hatnall Pink, Dean 




FRANK THOMAS SIEBERT, JR. 

127 MERBROOK LANE MERION, PA. 

Born 1912. Entered from Episcopal Academy In 1930. 

Track Squad (1, 2, 3, 4), Numerols (3), Chemistry Club 
(1, 2, 3, 4), Field Club (2, 3, 4). 
Pre-Medicol Major. 



page eighty. three 





ARTHUR GREGG SINGER, JR. 

4661 LEIPER STREET PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Bom 1912. Entered from Frankford High School in 1930. 

Spoon CommilteSi Baseball Squad (1, 2, 3, 4), Numerals 
(3), H (4); Basketball Sqoad (1, 2), Numerals C3)i Enoineering 
Club (2, 3, 4); Vice-President (4)i Band (1, 2)j Corporation 
Scholarship (3). 

Engineering Major. 




MR. BUGGER SINGER 

HAVERFORD COLLEGE ■ HAVERFORD, PA. 

Mr. Daniel C. Roper, Sec'y 
U. S. Department of Commerce 
Woshington, D. C. 

Dear Sir: 

I understand that the Bureau of Fisheries is in 
your department. If so, you are the people I 
would like to talk to. My personal ambition is 
to have installed in the Federal Government o 
Bureau of Buggeries. If fishes have fisheries, 
certainly bugs may have buggeries. That is only 
logic, pure and simple. 

For the head of this new/ bureau I recommend 
my roommate/ I am modest myself and would only 
desire to be Administrator of Firecrackers and 
Water Fights. The directing personnel of this 
bureau should be extremely youthful in order to 
carry on the necessary arduous labors entailed 
in thinking up novel and annoying buggeries to 
be carried out. We two are admirably fitted for 
the jobs in that direction, being very youthful 
indeed — for reference, write to the Haverford 
Students' Council or the Hsverford News. 

I would suggest that the new bureau be called 
BIA. The government has already installed the 
NRA, ECPC, FCA, CWA, CCC, AAA, HOLC, 
and the new part of the "alphabetical soup" 
could be called, as I said before, the BIA — 
Buggery Inception Administration. Win Smith 
and I have already thought of a slogan from these 
three letters out of which and around which a 
propagandical poster might be drawn. The 
slogan is, "Bia firecracker and blow up the 
whole contraption." This attention to the smallest 
details shows how thoroughly we have delved 
into the plan we propose. 

Haverford graduated me as an engineer/ Win 
is planning to be a preacher of no mean repute 
for "slinging it," so you may be sure, Mr. Secretary, 
that our plan is both technically, and spiritually 
perfect. 

I must close now since someone outside my 
room is yelling "Fire," the call to arms that tingles 
the blood of every true Bugocrat. 

Sincerely yours. 

Singer 



Doge eighty-four 



Haywire Sweater Co. 
Pumpkin Center 
Iowa 

Dear Mr. President: 

My name is Bruce Smith, BRUCE DONNAN 
SMITH and I am a student at Haverford College 
In Pennsylvania. I am quite an athlete at Haver- 
ford, participating in almost all of the Major 
Sports and being an interested spectator to those 
sports which are not fortunate enough to have 
me participating In them. All the coaches will 
gladly make mention to you of my athletic skill 
and ability. I am directly connected with the 
Football, Basketball and Baseball Teams and only 
the other day told the coaches that I was undoubt- 
edly the Greatest Athlete ever to attend Haver- 
ford. Besides that I play Bridge and even Mr. 
Culbertson says I am a card. (Do you gel it, 
Mr. President?) 

Now, Mr. President, what I want to write to 
you about Is one of your sweaters. Since i cm a 
Varsity man, I hove many Varsity Insignia to 
display. At the present time I am wearing two 
letters on the front, two on the back and one on 
the front inside. I have a set of numerals sewed 
on under the right arm-pit. Now, I wear this 
sweater practically all the time so that the boys 
will know I am an athlete and of late I hove 
noticed that one of the sleeve's knitted threads 
has started to give. Mr. President, isn't there some 
way your company will make amends for this 
imperfection? 

I am also connected with other activities at 
College, namely the Day-Students League/ The 
Bridge Playing Club/ Howard Comfort's Latin 
Guild/ Haverford College Bounders Club/ Attend- 
Every-Dance Club/ Be-a-Big-Shot Union/ and The 
l-Am-for-Smith Propaganda Society, among many 
others. I am well known to all the boys and played 
an Important port in the celebration of the Cen- 
tenary of the College. Naturally, I put your 
sweater to the most severest of tests and am a 
splendid ad for the Haywire Sweater Company. 

Please let me know, Mr. President, as soon as 
possible, your Intentions. 

Authoritatively, 

B. D. S. 

P. S. I am a devil with the women, too, Mr. 
President. 




BRUCE DONNAN SMITH 

2715 OVERBROOK TERRACE 
MERIOIM GOLf MANOR ARDMORE, PA. 

Born 1912. Entered from Haverford Sctiool in 1930. 

Football Squad (1, 2), H (3), Numerals (4)i Boseboll Man- 
ager (4); Basketball Junior Varsity (1, 2, 3); Centenary 
Committee (4). 

History Major. 



page eigfity-tive 




fe;.' ::■ 




WILLIAM WHARTON SMITH 

535 CHURCH LANE GERMANTOWN, PA. 

Bom 1912. Entered from Germantown Friends School in 1930. 

Track, Freshman Team, Numerals (2, 3, 4),- Chemistry Club 
(1, 2, 3, 4)i Mathematics Club (4). 
Chemistry Major. 



Dear Bill: 

What time are you coming home this week-end? 
I've got a couple of your Main Line debs on the 
line, and you're in for a sure-fire evening. Save 
all your energies — let Pop fume a day or so. Of 
course I know the aim of your life is to make good 
in your track efforts, but for the sake of our passion 
flowers, take just one day off. Don't take your 
lap on the track this time. 

I stopped by to see you last Sunday. Asked a 
Freshman where you lived, but he needed a 
graphic description before realizing you were 
one of the denizens of Quaker hieaven. I said 
you were the Quake with the convict haircut, 
the beaming smile, the brownish brown suit, and 
the pigeon-toed bouncing walk. Then he caught 
on. "Oh I know who you mean. I generally see 
him walking down to the Chem. Lab., but some- 
times I see him walking back." 

Now I know where you spend your time. How 
do you get along at Newport in the summers 
without a laboratory'' Your sister told me you 
go sailing all day, and steer by slide-rule. She 
said your suit has a specially designed slide-rule 
pocket. Then when you want to know what time 
it is or which way the wind is blowing, your 
instrument is right handy. 

But you can leave your slide-rule behind this 
time, Smeese my boy. You won't need it with 
these Main Liners, so let Norm play with it. He'll 
wonder at your leaving it behind, but he always 
wonders about your week-ends. Sometimes I 
even do myself. Your nonchalance is utterly 
mystifying, but perhaps someday I'll be able to 
figure you out. 

This note is getting longer and longer, so I'll 
stop and let you finish that Math, problem. Let 
me know when to expect you. 

Ike. 




pago eighty-six 



PEREAU'S GARAGE 

EAST HARTFORD CONN. 

r, I L 9-4-33 

Dear Johnny: 

You needn't put on airs just because Miles 
traded me in, me, a perfectly good 1921 Franklin 
whose speedometer was just about to turn 200,000 
and who hod three trips across the Continent to 
my credit, for you, you a 1933 Plymouth with noth- 
ing but o shiny coat of paint to recommend you. 
With all your polish you haven't got Miles a new 
girl yet. He dropped the last one because of 
her paint job, so watch your step. 

Yes, he learned o lot in me. I helped him all 
I could. I've coughed and died as though I 
hadn't seen a gallon of gas for a month, even 
though the gauge said Ji and there was an 
emergency gallon beside. I nearly split a gasket 
one night. She said, "Oh, Miles, please don't 
park here." And then "Oh, Miles, please don't 
park." And then "Oh, Miles, please don't." 
And So On. 

On the other hand I've run five miles with 
nothing but a faint odor in my gas tank when 
we've been off on trips to Vermont or to Stanford. 
We had great fun roaming back country roads 
that you'll not see till a little of your pertness is 
worn off. He knew I could take it and believe 
me he put it on. I suppose you think you've seen 
life on your trips to get hunks of rock for his 
geology course. Never mind, youngster, you'll 
learn. Write me some time and tell me how you 
like Mount Mansfield. Of course all your weak- 
nesses are congenital and you can't help it. But that 
makes it all the more incredible to me that Miles 
should pull such a boner. After all he's supposed to 
have benefited by a four-year Engineering course. 
While he was under my management all went 
well. He stuck to the road. Since he lost his 
head, he's got some crazy notion about osteopathy 
instead of aviation. If he thinks he can jack 
peoples bones around according to rope and 
pulley principles he learned in College, he hasn't 
learned as much anatomy as I thought he had. 

Well, drop me a line v^hen he trades you in 
or a car. I'll be very interested. 

Sincerely yours. 
Your Respectable Predecessor, 
Frankle 




HORATIO MILES SNYDER 

GREENSBORO • VERMONT 



Bom 1911. Entered from Leiand Stanford Jr. University in 1931. 

Cap and Gown Comrritfeei Glee Club (3), Engineering 
Clob (2, 3, 4). 

Engineering Major. 



page eighty-sc 





MATTHEW WYNN STANLEY 

PARK MANSIONS PIHSBURGH, PA. 

Bom 1912. Entered from Shady Side Academy in 1930. 

Soph-Senior Dance Committee; Junior Prom Committee; 
Chairman Senior Prom Committee; Track Squad (1, 2); News 
Board (1, 3); Secretary (3); Haverhrdhn Board (1, 2, 3, 4), 
Business Manager (4); News Service (2, 3, 4), Editor (4); 
Football Manoger (4); Golf Manager (4); Glee Club (3, 4); 
International Relations Club (3); Founders Club (3, 4); Vice- 
President, Secretary (4); Centenary Committee (4). 

Economics Major. 



ALUMINUM COMPANY OF U. S. A. 

General Offices 
PinSBURGH, PENNA. 

Who's Who Publishing Co. 
New York, N. Y. 

Dear Sirs: 

I am astonished to find that one has to pay to 
get his name in your yearly publication. But I 
am truly angered to find that I must pay double to 
customary price because my activities take up so 
much more room than the ordinary man's. Enclosed 
please find the check, however/ you have a 
monopoly on this sort of thing, and n\y name must 
be included. 

There are several mistakes in your listings which 
I desire to correct. For your convenience I will 
write out the activities which you have published 
incorrectly. The Sounders' Club of Pittsburgh is 
the thing I cherish most highly, and you have 
omitted it altogether. To be in that club one must 
have several important offices, a host of minor 
posts, and, above all, a character above repute 
for the two years prior to admittance. In order 
to join that organization I have taken on a great 
many little jobs for which I am now paying double 
to have listed in your book. 

The other corrections as corrected are: Business 
Manager of the Pittsburgh Literary Magazine/ 
Manager of the Pittsburgh National League 
Football Team/ Secretary of the Pittsburgh Press 
Association (for two months or less)/ Manager 
of the Pittsburgh-Mellon Golf Team/ one of the 
founders of the Pittsburgh International Relations 
Club/ and founder of the Pittsburgh Anti-War 
Society. 

If you will pardon the intrusion, I would sug- 
gest that you delete from your book the name of 
that fabricator who wrote "Mellon's Millions." 
I thank you. 

You wouldn't want to buy some aluminum 
would you? I thought not. 

Sincerely, 

Matt. Stanley 

P. S. Almost forgot — be sure to include Grand 
High Master Penna. Gamblers' Association. 




page eighty-eighl 



WILLIAM J. BURNS DETECTIVE AGENCY 
Interdepartmental Report 

Case— No. L9-H34 
Name — Samuel Taylor 

Address — God knows, chief, I can't find it, 
chief. 

History — This man is wanted for one and only 
one simple reason. That reason, chief, is that his 
classmates at Haverford College would like to 
see if there really is such a man. And if there Is 
such a person as Samuel Taylor (calling all cars) 
they would like to know [ust who he is. There 
are two conflicting reports concerning his identity, 
both of which are very plausible though neither 
have any real basis in facts. One theory is that he 
is the ghost of Bayard Taylor who also come from 
Kennet Square, Pa., and uses Sam merely as a 
clever alias. This theory receives support from 
all those who have made a study of American 
Literature, for to these people Bayard come very 
suddenly into the midstream of American Literature 
and then as quickly disappeared. The other theory 
is that he never came to College at all, but Mr. 
Chase thinks he did and still has his mail sent to 
No. 35 Lloyd Hail, and has a seat reserved for 
him at every meal. 

FACTS: re. — Samuel Taylor 

(A) Subject likes blonde women as well as he 
likes anything. 

(B) Intends to go to a medical school when he 
evaporates from Haverford. 

(C) Was host to a lot of tea-parties in his Fresh- 
man year, with real brass kettles and all sorts of 
chic accessories to serve the steaming liquid. 

(D) Subject walks about the campus as if in a 
deep trance, looks up once in a while with a 
faint glimmer of intelligence. 

REMARKS: Those facts are pretty good, chief, for 
never having seen subject nor found anybody else 
who had. 

Agent No. 34 




JOHN SAMUEL TAYLOR 

359 NORTH UNION STREET KENNEn SOUARE, PA. 

Bom 1912. Entered from Kenneft Higli Scliool in 1930. 
Pre-Modical Maior. 




page eighty -nine 








\l 



HARCOURT NEWELL TRIMBLE, JR. 

1307 BEECHWOOD BOULEVARD 
PinSBURGH, PA. 

Bom 1912. Entered from Shady Side Academy in 1930. 

Chairman Junior Prom Committee (3)j Chairman Football 
Dance Committee (4); Track, Freshman Team; Soccer Manager 
(4); Record Board (4); Haverlordian Board, Advertising 
Manager (3, 4) International Relations Club (3). 

Government Major. 



To The Editor of the Nation: 

All these dirty old capitalists give 'me a pain 
in the place where pains are really trenchant. 
There they are in their beautiful homes (those 
Mellons in Pittsburgh are the worst) while we are 
forced to live in one or two rooms. There they 
are in their magnificent cars equipped with 
luxurious radios, while we poor unfortunates 
must walk. Are they blind that they see not our 
poverty, our want and our misery? Are they deaf 
that they hear not our heart-rending grumblings, 
our soul-twisted prayers to unheedful Gods, the 
whimperings of our hungry children? 

I have slaved for three years (maybe it's four, 
if so, it is worse yet) and what do I get — nothing 
but God-forsaken managership of soccer. Can 
we not arouse the masses, compel them to do 
something about their down-trodden condition? 
Must we remain dumb and humble as the beasts 
in the field, must we, I ask you? Think of those 
people working in glassware factories/ my heart 
goes out to them especially. And their bosses, 
what do they do, but go out and play the stock 
markets! 

This whole civilization is about to crumble/ 
war is inevitable/ laissez-faire economics are 
running rampant as is sex and other sins — Socialism, 
Communism and Marxism will help this deplorable 
state of affairs, because they will do away with 
rugged individualism. I may be sort of rambling 
in this letter, but the strong force of righteous 
indignation is coursing through my blood. What 
I want for this country is dames and beer for 
everyone/ a car with a radio for everyone/ and 
a girl like my Anne for everyone — Heil Stalin, 
Lenin, Trotsky and Norman Thomas — the heroes 
of today. 

Comradishly yours, 

H. N. Trimble 




-, Mi q ii . iiy PI y ay y_>T .»T>^y ^ i . aii^ ^ i ^^ .4^»^i^iaai^mmif^fg^ffi 




page ninely 



(This is a scrap of a letter Found in an old fire- 
place. The edges were badly charred but the 
main part was legible. Anyway, this is the part 
that interests us.) 

. . . after all these months you should be set. 
Of course, your school is not as splendid as my 
alma murder, Bryn Mawr. Anyway, being at 
Bryn Mawr gives us the first crack at those pos- 
itively ducky boys from Haverford, and you know 
how thot . . . (here a part was burned) ... to 
us, Marge. Speaking of the Quake College, 
reminds me of the cutest boy I met there last week. 

George J., you know that . . . (here another 
part was destroyed by flame but it must have 
been awful for look what follows!) . . . God 
forgive me, took me to A Dance there and one 
of the dances traded was with a darling little 
boy named Tripp . . . Edwin Prescolt Tripp. 
Marge, he is divine. Such a little dear, scarcely 
five — five with the cunningest, wavy hair. I 
understand he is from Falmouth (George, the cat, 
told me Falmouth is nothing more than a water- 
tank town in Mass.) and that he is a darn good 
pitcher for the college nine. He is a little bit shy 
and has the darlingest twang, saying "whaaaatter" 
for water, "tyeeer" for tire and such things. 
Marge, and can TFHAT boy dance!! 

I like him loads and he is so funny! FHe enter- 
tained a crowd of us by imitating a college Prof, 
named Bones or Jones, I think the name is. Every- 
body who knows the Prof, said it was perfect. 
F-|is friends tell me he is interested in Art, spending 
much of his time at a place called THE BIJOU. 
I am a stranger around here so I do not know 
what kind of art they have there, but. Marge, it 
DOES show he has ambition, doesn't it. Just 
think, a young fellow devoting himself to Art. 

He has the ducklest little roadster and we . . . 
(this part was obliterated) ... so please do not 
tell any of the others but, you should see his 
HAIRY chest. O Marge, I . . . (the carbon- 
charred paper ended here at what might have 
interested us even more!!) 




EDWIN PRESCOTT TRIPP, JR. 

AMIN STREET FALMOUTH, MASS. 



Born 1912. Entered from Lawrence High School in 1930. 

Closs Secrefory (3); Blazer Committee (3), Ivy Committee 
(3)j Baseball, H (1, 2, 3, 4). 
Pre-Medical Major. 




page ninety-on 




WILLIAM JOSEPH WAGNER 

277 WEST END AVENUE NEW YORK CITY 



Born 1913. Entered from Townsend Harris Hall High School 
in 1930. 

Freshman Track Teom Squad (1, 2); Cricket Squad (3, 4); 
Cheer Leader (3, 4)/ News Board (1, 2, 3, 4); Advertising 
Manager (2, 3); Business Manager (4), Record Boord; Glee 
Club (2); Centenary Committee (4). 

Pre-Medical Major. 




SURE-FIRE AUTOMOBILE LOAN CO. 

777555 We'M-Gel-You-Yet Lane 
GIRL-AND-DANCEVILLE, PENNA. 

Mr. William Wagner 
Haverlord News 
Haverford College 
Haverford, Penna. 

Dear Sirs: 

We address you in the plural, "sirs," because 
surely no one man could give so many different 
promises. To be frank, we need that little sum 
advanced to you to buy a car. You said "when 
the time comes, Wagner will take care of it." 
Well, well, well, the time has come, and come 
again, and also fugited, and still what do we get 
— nothing but smiles, and pleasant (?) slaps on 
the back. 

And about our secretary (nice blonde, swell 
dancer, and all that, we admit) we really pay 
her to work here and for us. We have added 
$49.52 for the time she gave to you instead of her 
work/ after all, Mr. Wagner, someone has to 
get money for it, and since you did not give her 
any, you might as well pay her employers. We try 
to be fair and square, but we are not running a 
taxi dance hall. 

Your last letter (which came to us something 
like three months agO/ore you actually still living?) 
mentioned the possibility of accepting something 
instead of money for the debt. Nothing doing! 
We don't want the car you bought (even if it 
were still intact) nor do we want our suits cleaned 
and pressed/ nor do our wives wont dates with 
a former Brown gridiron star/ nor do we want 
to buy your loose-haired wolf-hound (he's been 
here for three weeks board free now, end we are 
getting a little tired of it — but we'll write another 
letter about that or else sic Macintosh on you.) 

We have written to your father, but he says 
he can't bother with your troubles what with 
Tammany getting overthrown, and everybody 
turning vegetarians and all. 

Please may we hove a check to show us 
you're alive? 

Sincerely, 

Sure-Fire Automobile Loan Co. 

per Dolores Delight, 
Contact Manager 



page ninely-lwo 



I had a strange dream, or as Chaucer would 
put it, a "streange drame. " Edwin While ap- 
peared, walking into a fortune teller's tent. 
She spoke to him, promising to tell him of his past 
so that he might believe her forecast of the 
future. 

"Look at me and I shall read in your eyes what 
your profession is." At this point a slide rule 
tumbled self-consciously from his pocket. "Ah, 
my spirit tells me you are an engineer and if 
you are an engineer, you are an interested 
and hard working member of the Engineering 
Club." Unable to control itself any longer, a 
large smooth egg with eyes and nose and a 
heavy beard waved an emphatic affirmation of 
this tact from the back of a long store counter 
on which electric Imotors were humm ng, "The 
Old Spinning Wheel. ' 

"Look at me again and I shall tell you what 
musical instrument you play." Strange to say 
Edwin snatched a violin bow from beneath his 
coat and began to pick his teeth with it. "Ah, 
you ore a violinist, but not a good one. Look at 
me again and I will tell you what you long to do." 
But seeing the mast of a sailboat slicking from his 
pocket, she went right on talking. "Ah, you long 
to go to sea and sail a boat. You are a sailor and 
a dreamer at heart. Beware the Jabberwockey 
of Math and Science. 

"Look at me and I will tell you what you did 
last summer." At this point a T-square and a large 
pair of dividers began to caper wildly around the 
floor and finally quieted down beside the slide 
rule which edged nervously away from them, 
managing at lost to hide under a book of multipli- 
cation tables. "Ah, I see you were a draughts- 
man. Look at me and I will tell you what girls 
you took to what dances." Strangest of all there 
was no movement of anything. Even the slide rule 
stopped squeaking. "Ah, I see you ore afraid of 
the ladies. Do not be so. Never write anything 
to them and you will be absolutely safe." 




EDWIN CHANDLEE WHITE 

185 WARRENTON AVENUE 
HARTFORD, CONN. 

Born 1913. Entered from Wesllown School in 1930. 

Engineering Club (1, 2, 3, 4). 
Engineering Maior. 



page ninety-three 





JOHN CYRUS WILSON 

323 RUGBY ROAD BROOKLYN, N. Y. 

Born 1912. Entered from George School in 1930. 

Senior Prom Committee/ Baseball, H (1, 2, 3, 4), Football 
Squad, H (2, 3)i News Board (3, 4), Sports Editor (4), Store 
Committee (4). 

Economics Major. 




James B. Eastman 
Coordinator oF Railroads 
18th and Pennsylvania Avenues 
Washington, D. C. 

Dear Sir: 

In response to your request for my opinions on 
railroad coordination and possible further improve- 
ments in train service I enclose some suggestions 
which I consider very worth while. It is with great 
pleasure that I realize favorable reports have 
reached you concerning my speech on railroad 
stabilization in the Doll's Ec 9 course. 

Here are my suggestions: 

(1) Practically free train fare from Brooklyn, 
N. Y. to Troy, N. Y., and faster service between 
those two cities, because when I want to get 
to Troy I generally want to get there in a hurry. 

(2) Same as No. 1, only with Sandy Springs, 
Md., substituted for Troy. 

(3) Drop the Prince Plan. My sentiments on the 
Boston financiers' proposal are summed up by 
saying that you can spell his name two ways. 

(4) Continuous movie shows on oil through 
trains, the more the better. I see as many as five 
a week, but please, no ballet dances! 

(5) Some sort of athletic event on each short 
run/ I have swell plans for railroad cor palestras, 
stadiums and swimming pools. 

(6) Burlesque shows — not too arty — on some 
through trains. This is, of course, a very radical 
suggestion. 

(7) A Magazine Library on ever/ train, includ- 
ing all the smutty pulps, and the wild west pulps, 
also Red Book and Colliers. There should also 
be easy chairs, the kind where your rump almost 
touches the floor and your knees hit your chin. 

(8) Of course there should be radios and cross 
word puzile books at every seat, numerous 
bars, plenty of free Chesterfields, a golf course, 
plenty of French novels, and innumerable Sunday 
magazine novels. 

These suggestions are purely personal and are 
the outgrowth of much intensive perusal of dry 
time-tables and out-of-the-way statistics of any 
kind — and some experience in the first two sug- 
gestions at least. 

Sincerely thine (I am a Quake) 

John C. Wilson 



page ninety-four 



Here we Find an imaginary letter by Bernard 
Shaw to his beloved Ellen Terry 

Dearest, darling Ellen: 

What a week! nay, a fortnight! 

Just after my last letter was posted, when I 
was on the point of foiling asleep, I suddenly 
recollected that your eyes were not strong and 
that I had been inflicting a ream of liny crabbed 
writing on you. Forgive me: man is by nature 
inconsiderate. 

I hove read carefully through that copy, but, 
worse luck, I must either write hurriedly or miss 
the post, as some people have arrived here and 
I have to spend a lot of time in mending punctures 
in female bicycle tyres. Therefore, brief and 
blunt 1 must be. 

After all your mentioning and praising I was 
naturally on the lookout for that fellow Winne 
the other night when I was at the party after 
Doll's House. He has probably changed a lot 
since you last saw him. I introduced myself and 
we were on very friendly terms before the evening 
was on the start. I chided him as best I could about 
keeping all his expenses in a budget as, darling 
Ellen, you wrote. However, he has changed in 
that respect for he swore up and down that he 
gave up the "silly" habit after he had been in 
college some time. No: I've no courage; I always 
am and always have been as timid as a church- 
mouse and accordingly, 1 did not seek to find the 
answer to your question as to why he spends so 
much time in the Physics courses, when he is so 
much better in other things. 1 gathered from his 
freely-flowing discourse that he plans to enter 
Medical School someday. Is that right? 

He was right smartly interested in your acting 
and so forth and, of course, 1 painted you in the 
purple. I notice he wears a slave bracelet. A 
friend tells me it is a token from one of the fair 
sex (poor boy!) and from which he never parts 
himself. Ellen, you never told me he is such a 
romanticist. 

Plainly and bluntly, darling, college has changed 
him from the sweet boy he was when he first 
entered (as you tell me) to a sophisticate. And, 
darling, did you ever hear him swear? From your 
letters I understood he never did such! Anyway, 
we took the tram home together and I was pleased 
to meet one of your friends. 

Night, you gorgeous thing, 

Bernie 




CHARLES KNICKERBACKER MERRILL WINNE 



151 CHESTNUT STREET 



ALBANY, N. Y. 



Born 1913. Entered from The Albany Academy in 1930. 

Senior Prom Committee, Band (1, 2), Instrumental Club 
(1, 2); Cop and Bells (2, 3, 4), Stage Manager Cap and Bells 
Play (3, 4), Play Committee (4), Kecord Board. 

Pt>y5tcs Moior. 




page ninety-f 




FREDERICK HAMILTON WRIGHT 

2134 WYOMING AVENUE WASHINGTON, D. C. 

Bom 1912. Entered from Western High School in 1930 

Commencement Day Committee; Radio Club (1, 2); Math- 
ematics Club (4); Liberal Club (4); Corporotion Scholar (2). 
Philosophy Maior. 



Dear P. B. Shelley: 

It is with the deepest sense of tragedy that I 
realize that I have been born one hundred and 
ten years too late. In this world of cold, hard, 
facts, great idealists of our calibre cannot find 
suitable environments in which to express our 
innate potentialities to the highest. Even at 
Haverford, where esthetes are looked upon 
with tolerance and compassion, I have never 
been fully appreciated. I have cultivated a vague 
and ethereal attitude of mind, rather maddening, 
I understand, to more practical souls, such as 
professors who like papers to be handed In on 
time, or approximately so. This chronic lateness 
is due in part to the largeness of my ideals. 

A man's reach should exceed his grasp 
Or what's a heaven for? 

So I have gone through college, taking six, seven, 
eight courses, honors work, and never doing 
justice to more than three of them. In fact, one 
course proved so interesting that I didn't bother 
to take the mid-year exam, so that I could study 
over the summer and take the course again. Yes, 
I agree with you, that's idealism. 

Instead of a Venetian gondola, I find a Packard 
touring car quite as efficacious in achieving 
romantic effects, affections, and affectations. 
Another one of my poses is that of a cricketer. 
("Cricketeers have hairy ears" — some rhyme, 
eh boss?) as a matter of fact — most abhorrent 
as facts are — I really took to cricket like a duck 
to water. Now my only concern is not to get 
ducks or dunk in my tea. 

Having a brilliant mind, I have yet to reach 
the depths of writing such poetry as Roos's and 
Hoover's. However, I am beginning to realize 
that only through the medium of verse is it possible 
to give real expression to all within me. 

Had we been born at the same time, we might 
have changed the world — separated by a century, 
the forces of idealism are dissipated and nullified. 

The lime is out of joint, O cursed spite 
That ever I was born to set it right 
Nay, come, let's go together. 



Just 



Ham 




.. ' 'V? ' '!;^ ! t- j -y . ' . ' ."t";!,'!;,. ' . 




page ninety-six 



Mr. Elmer J. Babbitt 
Pres. Rotary International 
New York City, N. Y. 

Dear Mr. Babbitt: 

If the Rotarians have been hard hit by the 
depression, and have lost many boosters because 
of serious disillusionments, we offer you a man 
that will take the place of thousands of them. 
In fact, you wouldn't need a single other booster, 
if you hired this one — Willard M. Wright, Jr., strict 
believer in Sportsmanship, Cleanliness, Order- 
liness, Capitalism, and The Purity-Of-Most- 
Modern-Girls. 

Jusf those few qualifications are enough to 
make him a thirty-third degree Rotarian upon 
application, are they not? AH, but besides those 
the boy is really clever. Willard knows innumerable 
cord tricks which will come in handy when your 
meetings get dull. And he can always laugh, 
^ith an extraordinarily enthusiastic guffaw at 
any of the attempted witticisms you speakers pull 
off. One trouble that we find with him is that 
he may laugh when there is absolutely nothing 
at all to laugh at, like sometime when someone 
is speaking on the holiness of the after-life, or 
something else really serious like. We are gen- 
erally pretty fortunate in staving off such momentary 
outbursts by telling him that he is not setting a 
good example and he is such a motherly soul and 
hales so to lead others into sin and wickedness 
that he often stops laughing immediately. 

One of his greatest attributes is his geniality 
and ability to bulldoze people into believing 
he really is somebody, and not just good ole' Bill. 
The two things which make this possible are his 
genial smile (it literally goes from one ear to the 
other) and his graceful dancing, hlis favorite 
foreign country is Russia, about which he knows 
three words in Russian and a lot of things young 
lovers did under the Czars. Please give him a 
job, or else he will be driving trucks filled with 
dry ice or selling neckties/ 1 am afraid of such a 
thing because it would hurt the fair name of our 
college. 

Sincerely, 

H. Batball Town 




WILLARD MOORE WRIGHT 

1828 NORTH 13TH STREET PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Bom 1912. Entered from Episcopal Academy in 1930. 

Class Doy Committee, Blozer Committee (3); Footboll Dance 
Committee (4), Student Extension Committee (1, 2, 3, 4); 
Traclc, Freshman Teom; Football Sauod (1), H (2, 3), Numerols 
(4); Monoger ot Cop and Bells (4). 

History Major. 



page ninety-seven 





CHARLES HALSTEAD CLOUKEY 

BORN . . . APRIL 15, 1912 
DIED . . SEPTEMBER 28, 1931 



GEORGE BREIDENHART ALLEN 

BORN . . . MAY 29, 1913 
DIED . . . AUGUST 8, 1932 





FRANCIS WHARTON STORK 
Meadowbfook Lane, Chestnut Hill, Pa. 



JOHN MONSARRAT 



EDWIN CHOUTEAU PERKINS 



CUTHBERT ALTAMONT PIHER 



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CHARLES SCUDDER BARRETT 
Lowrencevjile, N. J. 



HARRY EDMUND RICE 



DOUGLAS SELBY VANCE 



MASON WILLIAMS 



JOHN SHARPLESS EDWARDS 
Walnut Lane, HoverFord, Pa. 



JAMES A. MAC COLL 
Quaker Ridge, New Rochelle, N. Y. 



JOHN P. DES JARDINS 
7 Becket Avenue, Rochelle Park, N. J. 





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OnHO GERARD HELDRING-BYE 
901 Harvard Avenue, Swarthmore, Pa. 



ROBERT WILMOT COLOMY 

JAMES HUSTON COWAN 

WILLIAM WORCESTER DORMON 



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JOSEPH GORDON EARP WILLIAM BENSON NICHOLAS PAUL HARMON WORCESTER 

ISO Greeves Slieel, Kane, Pa. 67J Putman Avenue, Btooklyn, N. Y. 



JOHN LEWIS GROSS, JR. 
Sellersvllle, Pa. 



DAVID JUSTIN HOLDEN 

GERARD HOLZRICHTER 

JAMES BARCLAY LEEDS 

JOHN BENJAMIN MC CLINTOCK 



RICHARD MUNN SUFFERN 



CHARLES WILLIAM HART 
6S5 Lexington Place. Washington. D. C. 




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GRADUATE STUDENTS . . . SEATED— Sorgant, HIatt, Shafef, Hole . . . STANDING— Biidger. Mekeel, Parsons 



James Matthew Bridger 
Wilmer Baily Clement 
Franklin Kirkbride Fite 



GRADUATE STUDENTS 



Edwin Peelle Hiatt 
Francis Doon Hole 
Arthur Jacob Mekeel 



David Henry Parsons, Jr. 
John Romoine Sargent 
Mervin Cecil Shafer 



Hugh Hayes Aikens, Jr. 
William Lesher Azpell, Jr. 
David Hinrichs Bates 
Howard Sloan Bevan, Jr. 
Rene Blonc-Roos 
Clifton McCousland Bockstoce 
Arthur Brenlon Boggs 
William Robert Bowden, Jr. 
Frank Boyle 
Chapman Brown 
Paul Willits Brown, Jr. 
Benjamin Bartram Cadbury 
John Barrett Christopher 
John Adams Church, III 
Meredith Bright Colkel, Jr. 
Charles Blankley Conn, Jr. 
John Campbell DuFfield 



JUNIOR CLASS 

David Dennis Dunn 
George Elliott Dutton, Jr. 
John Habersham Elliott 
Woodruff Jones Emien 
Ernest Mervyn Evans 
Frederick Erwin Foerster 
Richard Edward Griffith 
William Henry Harmon, Jr. 
Joseph Haywood 
Richard Wesley Hires 
Sidney Hollander, Jr. 
William Nathan Huff 
Robert Franklin Hunsicker 
James Boird Case 
William George Kirkland 
Edward Charles Kunkle, Jr. 
Jerome Henry Lentz 



Edward Joseph Manning, Jr. 
Edward Wayne Marshall, Jr. 
Edward Jones Matlock 
Jackson Kenneth Matthews 
Edward Hommel McGinley 
William Thomas Mcintyre, Jr. 
William Harrison Mechling, II 
Allen Roy Memhard, Jr. 
Harry Chamberlain Meserve 
Edward Ross Miller 
Vincent Putnam Morgan 
Charles Thomas Nicholson, Jr. 
William Benson Nicolas 
Fred Fletcher Patten 
Kenneth Eccles Paul 
Samuel Potter, Jr. 
Alan Robert Pretzfeld 




JUNIOR CLASS 



John Biddle Rhoads 
Russel Warner Richie 
Kimberley Sidney Roberts 
Graham Rohrer 
Frederic Noble Rolf 
Rowland Greenough Skinner 
Charles Graff Smith 



JUNIOR CLASS, Continued 

John Winslow Smith 
Richard Reed Smith 
Martin Pullinger Snyder 
Glenn Cameron Stayer 
Alfred Gilbert Steer, Jr. 
Philip Pendleton Steptoe, Jr. 
William Sabin Stoddard 
Francis Joseph Stokes, Jr. 



William Hammond Totem 
Robert Stockton Trenbath 
James Ernest Truex 
Clarence Bradley Watkins 
Henry Dean Wellington 
Alexander Cooper Wood, 
Paul Harmon Worcester 



Elijah Dale Adkins, Jr. 
Robert Crozer Alexander 
Robert Wilson Baird, Jr. 
Joseph Barton, Jr. 
Henry Corneau Beck 
Thomas Ralston Bevan 
George Baruch Bookman 
Samuel Lippincott Borton, II 
Robert Braucher 
John Briggs, III 
Donald Wesley Brous 
Jonathan Allison Brown 
Thomas Downing Brown 



SOPHOMORE CLASS 

William Richard Brown, III 
Daniel Francis Coogan, Jr. 
Ben Thomson Cowles 
William Avery Crawford 
Ellis Irving Curley 
Marion Bostwick Davis, Jr. 
John Robert Diehl 
Arthur Sim Dulaney, Jr. 
David Cope Elkinlon 
Edward Sifton Evans 
Francis Cope Evans 
Grant Clippinger Eraser 
William Reed Fry, Jr. 



Lafayette Ross Garner 
Robert Smith Gawthrop, Jr. 
Milton Eager Glessner, Jr. 
John Nichols Goodridge 
Howard William Green 
Allan Clyde Hale, Jr. 
Henry Strong Huntington, III 
Robert Midgley Hutchinson 
Arthur Raymond Kane, Jr. 
Samuel Kind 
Dean Carey Klevan 
Robert Ellis Lewis 
Howard Thomas Lodge, Jr. 




SOPHOMORE CLASS 



SOPHOMORE CLASS, Continued 



William Herman Loesche, Jr. 
William Alexander Macan, II 
Lewis Bach Maier 
David Kempton Maxheld 
David Pollock McCune, ill 
Samuel Stuart McNeary 
J. Don Miller, Jr. 
Park Hays Miller, Jr. 
Warren Brooke Morgan, Jr. 
Charles Christopher Morris, II 
Lloyd Emery Morris, Jr. 
Ralph Christian Most 
Peter Kimball Page 
John Lindley Parker 
Edward Owen Parry 



Henry Frazer Parry 
Harry Theodore Paxton 
James Watson Pearce, Jr. 
Frank Gardiner Pearson 
James Gird wood Peirce 
Charles Perry 
John Sebastian Pugliese 
Joseph Dixon Purvis, Jr. 
William Rothermel Reynolds 
Albert Lyon Scott, Jr. 
Wayne Sensenig, Jr. 
Thomos Kite Shorpless 
William Edward Sheppard, II 
James Olson Sloss 



Caleb Allen Smith 
Walter Tausig Spaeth 
Allen Woodruff Stokes 
Edmund Moore Taylor 
Joseph Hooton Taylor 
George Brinton Thomas, Jr. 
William Francis Tiernan, Jr. 
Henry Llewellyn Tomklnson 
John Van Brunt, Jr. 
Hubert Mayo Vining 
Joseph Kenneth Weitzenkorn, 
Alexander Coxe Williams, Jr. 
Robert Benjamin Wolf 
Charles Wislar Yeorsley 
Ellis Bordiner Youtz 



Charles Jackson Allen, Jr. 
William Williams Allen, III 
Bruce Ambler 
Howard Aston Andrews 
Thomas Seth Barker, Jr. 
Kenneth Antrim Beck 
Sidney Willis Blackman 



FRESHMAN CLASS 

William Henry Bond 
Robert Clarke Bone, Jr. 
Walter John Bragdon, Jr. 
Robert Franklin Brattan, III 
Oliver George Brown 
John Abbot Cantrell 
James Gray Carr, Jr. 



Joseph Reed Carson 
Stephen Grellet Cory 
William Wilkie Chambers, Jr. 
Richard Melvin Clayton 
William Ward Condit 
Thomas Armour Conway, III 
Thomas Norton Cook 





FRESHMAN CLASS 




Richard Cooper 
James Albert Dailey, Jr. 
William Herbert Doudt 
Henry Sandwith Drinker, III 
William Morris Dugdale 
Thomas Evans Edwards 
Hans Bernhard Engelmonn 
Bruce Hartung French 
Henry Herman Freund, III 
Daniel Chappell Frysinger 
Carleton Gaines 
Allan Walton Gilmour, Jr. 
Roger Louis GreiF 
Roger Wisner Griswold, Jr. 
Henry Clark Gulbrandson 
Marshall Crapon Guthrie, Jr. 
Roy Conrad Haverkern, Jr. 
James Robert Harrison, Jr. 
Edward Lupton Hawkins, Jr. 
Bernard Hollander 
Charles Elmer Holzer, Jr. 
James Dawson Hoover 
Horn/ Samuel Hopper, II 
Andrew Dickson Hunt, Jr. 
Bryden Bordley Hyde 



FRESHMAN CLASS, Continued 

Harrison Kimball 
William Lawrence Kimber 
Robert Henry Krieble 
Horry Howard Kruener 
Paul Grimley Kuntz 
John Jacob Lawser 
Robert Waltner Leibold 
Boyd Conlin Lentz 
John Ashby Lester, Jr. 
Morris Albert Linton, Jr. 
James Harrison Lockwood 
John Brockie Lukens 
Richard Barron McLaughlin 
Ralph Henr/ McMohon 
Frederick Johnson Morgan 
William Newton Nelson, II 
William Bullivant Nichols 
Gregory Nicholas Nicholsky 
George Norris, Jr. 
Francis Edwin Nulsen 
John Edward Osmanski 
William Allen Polster 
Samuel Sturgis Poorman 
Edward Pugh 
Edgar Moskedal Rector 



Henry Dawson Riley 
Joseph Tracy Rivers, Jr. 
Peter Picord Rodman 
Edward Hoffman Rosenberry 
William Taussig Scott 
Edward Bettle Scull 
Leslie Birchard Seely, Jr. 
Henri Cleret Seibert 
Thomas Louis Shannon, Jr. 
Richard Bailey Shoemaker 
Archibald Stark 
William Mason Stevens 
Herbert William Taylor, Jr. 
Michael Leonard French Taylor 
Irving Telling, Jr. 
Daniel Field Tillotson 
James Wallace Van Cleave 
Melvin Atwood Weightmon 
Frederick Hawley Wheeler 
Philip Martin Whitman 
Carl Edward Wilbut 
Stephen Vincent Wilking 
Edmund Culberlson Wingerd 
Joy Wesley Worral, Jr. 
Frederick Dunstan Wright 



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FRONT ROW Brown 



THE RECORD BOARD 
Richardson Loewenslein Haines Egleslon SECOND ROW Grerf Hoti 

BACK ROW— Harjes Beaven Bowen Jones Wagner Stanley 



Trimble 



Bon 



McKee 



RECORD BOARD 

Synthesized from the stuff men are 
made of, this bewildered-appearing 
collection of editors, assistant-editors, 
photographers and Tll-have-done-by- 
tomorrow" boys is responsible for 
your Record Book. Procrastination, a 
disease valiantly fought by Editor-in- 
Chief Loewenstein, threatened to throve' 
things for a while, but by prodding 
on his temperamental stooges like a top 
sergeant, he eventually Vi'on, for here 
we are, aren't we? 



Editor-in-Chief 
BENJAMIN S. LOEWENSTEIN 

Associate Editors 
THOMAS S. BROWN OLIVER F. EGLESTON 

Editorial Staff 

CHARLES M. BANCROFT ROBERT H, BEAVEN 

LEWIS H, BOWEN ROBERT B. JONES 

C. K. MERRILL WINNE 

PItotograpftic Editors 
LEONARD L. GREIF, JR. ROBERT W. MCKEE 

Art Editor 
HENRY HOTZ, JR. 

Business Manager 
PHILIP B. RICHARDSON 

Advertising Manager 
WILLIAM H. HAINES, 3.d 

Business Staff 

ASA W. pons HARCOURT N. TRIMBLE, JR. 

WILLIAM J. WAGNER 




STUDENT 

COUNCIL 

FRONT ROW 

Harjei Atmore 

Richardson 

Gibbs (President) 

Richie Pleasants 

Bowen 

BACK ROW 

Kane Fraser 

McGinley Nicholson 

Harmon Hyde 



STUDENT COUNCIL 

The old moral backbone of Haverford broke into print this year 
for the first time in a long while by threatening to resign when its 
authority was questioned. To be sure the occasion was only a 
matter of snowballing and the culprit was just another one of the 
boys who traipse around Lloyd. But then look at John Wilkes 
and think how much trouble he started. Maybe we ought to be 
thankful. Anyway our friends of the moral backbone may cut a 
notch in their gun handle,- they won. They're in dead earnest 
from now on, so be careful. 



NEWS 



The college newspaper, containing all the old 

news, some of the new news, sportslight, and 
sidelights on campus activities, continues to be 
the big activity machine of Haverford. it had 
its twenty-fifth birthday this yeor, but the age 
of twenty-five is purely chronological; the age 
of Its members is considerably less. They work 
pretty hard, and as you see, fill up a good- 
sized picture. 



HAVERFORD 
NEWS 

FRONT ROW 

Wilson Harjes 

Bowen (Editor) 
Wagner Kunkle 

SECOND ROW 

Bowden Matlock 

Wood Skinner 

Loewenstein 

Wellington 

Jones McKee 

THIRD ROW 

Parker Morgan 

Atmore 

Grei* Woir 

Boird 

Kose Cowles 

Brown 

BACK ROW 

Borton Sheppard 

Russell 

Roberts Lewis 

Steer Kind 





HAVERFORDIAN 

SEATED 

Bancroft Stanley Egleston 

Blanc-Roos GriFFrth 

STANDING 
McNeary Dunn 



HAVERFORDIAN 

Our magazine, the Haverfordian, at whose name every head is 
bared and every heart does leap — our magazine, God bless it, with 
Oliver Egleston at the helm, has sailed the dubious seas of college 
literary taste for another year. The sails flapped a little when at 
mid-ocean a change of pilots took place, and there were not 
enough old salts to put over another chapbook. But issues 
have appeared regularly, and in spite of the usual mud-slinging 
from the News, the boys have served their Muse as honestly as 
they could. 



PRESS BUREAU 

All the news from our campus that might provoke 
interest elsewhere reached the outside world 
through the h-iaverford Press Bureau. From the 
exchange material printed in the "College World" 
we suspect that most of this college news consists 
of quips and cracks and wanton wiles. However, 
this organization, revamped and renamed this 
year, is one of the few campus activities with 
monetary recompense. 



PRESS BUREAU 

FRONT ROW 

Stanley Loewenstein 

Bowen 

BACK ROW 

Wolf Morgan 

Lewis 




GLEE CLUB 

BACK ROW 

Vining Bales 

Taylor 

SECOND ROW 

Boctstoca Rivers 

Kinib«r Huntingdon 

Coogan Rodman Hole 

Grerf Dulaney 

R. Smith 
Haines Steere 

C. Smith 
Perry Bowden 

Fultz Guthrie 

FRONT ROW 

MaxReld 

Skinner Lockard 

Hogenauer (Leader) 

Jones Beaven Almore 

Hot! Rohrer 




MUSICAL CLUBS 



The Instrumental Club, which was getting to be a myth, suddenly popped into 
existence again this year. Hunt Jones, the wand wielder, sweated and 
agonized to get his young band cf musicians to keep practicing and managed 
to get them to do their stuff at four of the concerts, including the brilliant hHorne 
Concert. Brilliant it was, and made the Glee Club have reason to feel proud, 
especially after the difficulties they encountered this year. One of these diffi- 
culties was the dearth of tenors (so masculine this college seems to be) and 
another was the cruel accident suffered by Gene Hogenauer, which necessitated 
Bob Almore's stepping into the breach as leader for a few weeks. Atmore's 
solo hits and other special features mode it an excellent season, and a hard one 
for next year's boys to beat. 



CAP AND 
BELLS PLAY 

This Club which has been mysteri- 
ously silent for about five months 
suddenly crashed through with 
announcements about try-outs for 
Three-Cornered Moon. The cast- 
ing accomplished, there has been 
little more for us to report, 
although as we break into print, 
v^e ore willing to moke a hypo- 
thetical reminiscence and soy it 
was a howfer of a success. 





.)/. 



CAP AND BELLS 
CLUB 

BACK ROW 

Bowden Truex 

SECOND ROW 

Full! Hoinei Hoganouat 

Loclcard 

FRONT ROW 
Jones Beoven Wrigtit 

Atmore (Vica-Preiidenr) 
MoiReld Rohrei Gibbs 

Three-Corneted Moon 



I.. 




FOUNDERS CLUB 

FRONT ROW 

Richie Trenbalh 

Gibbi 

Stanley Loewenslein 

BACK ROW 

Jones Atmore 

Flaccus 



FOUNDERS CLUB 



LIBERAL CLUB 



This select group is still an unknown quantity to most of the 
College — despite efforts at reform. There are banquets 
and fight talks for the Rhinies, and a neat schedule telling 
how to work your way In. Once in, the idea seems to be 
Good Fellowship and a Further Tie with Haverford. But 
most of us must say, with tears in our eyes, "Farewell, thou 
art too dear for my possessing!" 



Liberty and justice for all! Here is an array of students 
seriously attached to the idealistic principles of better 
human understanding. Under the chief instigator, Roger 
Scattergood, the ensemble has been nourished on choco- 
late-coated capsules of lectures, addresses, arguments 
pro-and-con with frequent flights of white doves bearing 
olive branches. 



LIBERAL CLUB 

BACK ROW 

Wood Kind 

Scott 

F. Evans C. Smith 

Taylor 

Etiilnlon C. Smith 

Perry 

FRONT ROW 

Holi 

Greif Hollander 

Scattergood (President) 

Russell Beaven 

Miller 




ENGINEERING 
CLUB 

FRONT ROW 

Ailtens Knight 

Singer Richie 

Maxfield 

Roll Fulti 

BACK ROW 

Hunsicker 

Miller Snyder 

Bevan 

Hancock While 

Hendrickson 



1 1 tS ^1 



uiliMIII 






m ■« 
■■I 




ENGINEERING CLUB 

The Engineering Club gives our future bridge builders, 
aviation experts and what-nots a chance to try their hand 
at practical problems. These addicts of the slide-rule and 
try-square make many trips to interesting manufacturing 
plants and museums. They are frequently found around old 
engines, drills, buzz-saws, etc. 



CHEMISTRY CLUB 

Guided by capable professors, and activated by 
promising student-chemists, this group has advanced 
by leaps and bounds until it is one of the most vital 
and most effective clubs on the campus. Oxygen, 
nitrogen, hydrogen, test tubes, beakers and flasks 
are the pre-requisites. 










CHEMISTRY 
CLUB 

FRONT ROW 

Fife 

Dunn Ellioll 

FHommaker 

Morgan Dulaney 

Lenti 

SECOND ROW 

Rivers 
Hunt Linton 

Bockstoce 
Stokes Smith 

THIRD ROW 

Guthrie Stebert 

Vining 




COMMUNITY 
CENTER 

FRONT ROW 

Vining Giaif 

Flaccus 

BACK ROW 
McNeary Kind 

Slokes 
Spaeth Bookman 



HAVERFORD 
COMMUNITY CENTER 

In the little bungalow at the corner of Railroad Avenue and Buck 
Lone, some Haverford students, led by Joe Stokes, hove been 
helping in the education and edification oF the younger inhabitants 
of thaJ territory. Games have been refereed, various stunts have 
been put on, and, as this book goes to press, we blush to say that 
the Haverford Fencing Team gave an exhibition of its prowess. 



FIELD CLUB 

The Field Club mokes interesting studies in bird- 
lore and general out-door life. Several trips over 
country trails and roads ore made during pleasant 
weather. The Club makes special effort to arrange 
for the actual feeding of migrating birds in the 
appropriate seasons. Vive Audubon! 



FIELD CLUB 

FRONT ROW 
Dulaney Dunn 

Cadbury 
Evans Marsliall 

BACK ROW 

Robert! Slebert 

Kunkle 




^■"JllJl III r:^". 



ENGLISH CLUB 

Less allenlion to dramatics than in the past, and 
concentration on literary efforts by Club members, 
made the English Club more worthy its name this 
year. Perhaps after a while, like some of the more 
practical clubs, this Club will arrange for regular 
outside speakers. Outsiders they will have to be, 
for the present members don't relish preparing 
informal lectures any more than they like to write 
theses for English courses. 




li'llli ■ 
^uji iir 




FRONT ROW— Efllerton, Spatlh, Tru«x, Hollander, Dunn 
SECOND ROW—Sloddord, Brown, Blanc-Roos, Jonsi 
THIRD ROW— Bowd*n, Robwti, Criffilh 



EVANGELICAL 
LEAGUE 

Art Singer and Win Smith cheerfully direct a 
gathering of students interested in religious ethics. 
Christian men from prominent sects are frequent 
visitors to meetings where they arbitrate many 
discussions and aid in Bible study. The only hitch 
IS that the two "Knights of Firecracker Abbey" 
(apologies to Dove Wilson, '33) are torn between 
the desire for destruction and their religious com- 
pulsions. But God willing, religion will win. 



FRONT ROW— Kiticnw, McN«ary, Smith, Slngtr, Curley 
BACK ROW—Kunli, Stoddard, Fraiw, Dallcy 



Though little known and less understood, this little 
group of prospective Einsteins meet regularly, and 
those that know say the discussions are interesting. 
Here's hoping President Schmid remembers to use 
English and not equations when addressing his less 
mathematical friends. 



FRONT ROW— Elliot, Smith, Schmid (PrMidwil), Huff, Haywood 
BACK ROW— Walkini, Boggi, Scott, Aipoll 






MATH CLUB ^ 





page one h u n d r e d s t x t e e n 



I 




THOSE RESPONSIBLE FOR IT ALL 
FRONT ROW H. G. Russell, H. N. Trimble, Jr. (Choitman), M. W. Stanley 
BACK ROW R. H. Beoven, R. O. B. Gibbs, W. H. Haines, III 



Where, oh wheie can my little gitl be^ 




Madame Chairman 
and how 



The traditional ivy is also present 



The social high light in the undergraduate career of the class of '34 was reached 
on May 5,1933, and was carried out with all the proper enthusiasm and sunny 
weather. Shown herewith are the more notable, picturesque, and striking scenes 




"Shick" Which One? 



Our Gong 



--\ \ 



k 



w 



I 



( 







^ 







Paul Sabin contributed rhe Msential for the Prom 



"Doc" Hyder and his Southernaires livened the Tea Dance 




\Hi 



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TrnBil^ .^^^^^^^B^M^^^^^^^^^^^I 


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page one hundred twenty-two 





■4S'. 



'>.V,»/* '' •' ' 




FOOTBALL TEAM 

FRONT ROW 



Fraser 


Boyle 


Taylor 


Conn 


Pleasants (Captain) 


Tiernan 




Kane 


C. Smith 




Bevon 


SECOND ROW 


B. Smith 


Wright 


Wotkins 


Lent! 




Rohrer 


Hale 


WoK 


Gawthrop 



THIRD ROW 
Loe$che Gibbs Gaines 

Osmanski 
Ambler Hogenauer McNeary 

FOURTH ROW 

Weightman Scull 

Wilking Holier Evans 

BACK ROW 

Stanley (Manoger) 

Rondall (Coach) 

LeTolle (Assistant Coach) 

Maserve (Assistant Manager) 



FOOTBALL 

Inaugurating the new coaching regime 
headed by Roy Randall, hHaverford's 1933 
eleven gained only a single victory in six 
games, a 7-6 conquest of Wesleyan. 
However, the true success of the season 
con best be estimated in terms of the 
foundations laid for larger returns in the 
wins column next year. 

Aside from Captain Dick Pleasants, bock- 
field star, only three members of lost 
season's squad will be absent, when the 
first practice session is called this Fall. 
These are Dick Gibbs and Bruce Smith, 
both of whom were letter winners, and 
Bill Wright, who received a numeral 
award. 



THE SEASON'S 

RECORD 



Haverford . 
Haverford . 
Haverford 7 . 
Haverford 7 . 
Haverford . 
Haverford . 



. Earlham 6 

. Susquehanna 6 

. Wesleyan 6 

, Hainilton 1 4 

. Johns Hopkins 14 

. Washington College 8 




Captain PIsoiants 



Reverse play 




Ei 



Action 







Interference 



^^ 



This liHle piggi* staved at home 






SOCCER TEAM 

FRONT ROW 

A. Slolcet Rush Richardion 

T. Richie (Captain) 

T. Blown Hoti R. Richie 

SECOND ROW 

C. Brown Evans 

Horman Tomkinson Shorpless 

J. Stokes P. Brown 

STANDING 

Trimble (Manager) 

McPete (Coach) 



SOCCER 

A record of five victories in eigfit starts 
tells tfie story of Haverford's 1933 soccer 
season. Headed by Captain Tom Ricfiie, 
All-American forward, and including Ricfi- 
ardson, Rusfi, Brown, Hotz, and Jones 
among its Senior members, the local eleven 
finisfied second in tfie Intercollegiate 
league, losing only to tfie University of 
Pennsylvania, cfiampions. A fiair-raising 
2-1 conquest of Swartfimore concluded 
onottier banner season. 



THE SEASON'S 




RECORD 


Haverford 5 . 


. Lafayette 1 


Haverford 3 . 


. Crescent 5 


Haverford 4 . 


. Princeton 


Haverford 1 . 


. Cornell 


Haverford 4 . 


. Lehigh 


Haverford . 


. Navy 2 


Haverford 2 . 


. U. o( P. 3 


Haverford S . 


. Swarthmore 1 



.nf>r 



r/4^v 



7V 



Poor old Swarthmorel 



4 1 





Foul throw! 



A familial K«n( 






'«—-4''.'i-i'.;-»»'' ■••":<>: 



Taking a hlgh'boll at Navy 



Chief kkkin'-Thebo 




T/l 



I>t9l 



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i-:94lPl 



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\ 



^ ;^ 



'^*21** 



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Lv^/fs* 



;1 1 Y\\-\ 




^'■^ 



•SfejPE, 



BASKETBALL TEAM BASKETBALL 



FRONT ROW 
Kane Harmon 

Flaccus (Captain) 
Poormon TIeman 

BACK ROW 

Randoll (Coach) 

Taylor DuHon 

Loewanstein (Monagar) 



Reaching the crucial Swarthmore game with a record 
of only three wins in a dozen contests, the pros- 
pects of a basketball victory over our ancient rival 
seemed extremely remote and almost out of the 
question. However, with the newly-installed system 
finally showing results, and Captain Lou Flaccus, 
the team's only Senior, leading the scoring parade, 
Haverford stamped the season a distinct success 
by drubbing the visiting courtmen 31-25. 



The frog 



Ouolco Flaccus, the high-scoring flash 



Aval 





THE 


SEASON'S RECORD 


Hoverlord 23 . 


. Philadelphia Textile 9 


Hoverlord 1 7 . 


. Weslevan 22 


IHoverFord 27 . 


. Trinity 30 


Hoverford 8! . 


. Upsula 26 


hHoveriord 1 3 . 


. Lehigh 28 


Haverford 21 . 


. P. M. C. 32 


Haverford 1 9 . 


. Delaware 28 


Haverford 38 . 


. Moravian 1 4 


Haverford 1 7 , 


. Hamilton 25 


Hoverford 20 . 


. Lafayette 23 


Haverford 21 . 


. Stevens 22 


Haverford 31 . 


. Princeton Seminory 29 


Haverford 31 . 


. Sworthmore 25 




Rhinle center 





WRESTLING 

In Its first season as a recognized major sport, the Haver- 
ford mat squad failed to win a single meet, oltfiougfi 
gaining an 18-18 deadlock with Gettysburg in the opener. 
With a squad composed entirely of underclassmen, next 
year's team, which will again be led by Captain Blanc-Roos, 
should succeed in compiling a more successful record. 



FENCING 

Also assuming the role of a newcomer to 
Haverford athletics, the fencing squad, 
under the tutelage of hienri Gordon, gained 
Four victories in nine starts. Oliver Egleslon 
was the only Senior member of the squad 
to be lost by graduation. 



WRESTLING 
TEAM 

SEATED 

Trenbath Frysingar 

BlonC'Roos (Captain) 

Skinner Stepto* 

STANDING 

Tni«K Taylor 

Totvm Brous Aikvns 

Holztf McGinley 




FENCING 
TEAM 

BACK ROW 

Llflccns 

F. Wright 

EglMion 

FRONT ROW 

Gordon (Cooch) 

Conway 

Matliews 

Dunn 

Staytr 



w ^-d 



Jf« 



t,f 



^'^- 



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CROSS-COUNTRY TEAM 



FRONT ROW— Shoemaker 
BACK ROW— Vining 



Runell 
HIppI* (Managai) 



Bodin* (Captain) 
Scon 



Scotttfgood 



Riven 



CROSS- 
COUNTRY 

Likewise competing for the 
first lime as a recognized 
varsity sport, the Cross-Coun- 
try team was equally unsuc- 
cessful, failing to gain a single 
victory in five starts. Captain 
Bodine and Scattergood, the 
team's only Seniors, were its 
outstanding performers, the 
former gaining one first place, 
two seconds, and a third in 
the five meets. 



SOUASH 

A new addition to Haverford 
athletics, the squash team, in 
its first season tared poorly. 
Meeting a group of nearby 
Prep schools, the local racquel- 
eers gained only a, single vic- 
tory in eight starts. However, 
with the exception of Floccus, 
Hogenauer and McKee, who 
played in a few matches, the 
entire squad will return next 
year and should compile a 
more enviable record for 1935. 



SQUASH TEAM 



SEATED Hogenouer 
STANDING — Floccm 



Memliaid (Captain) 



McKee 



Paul 





L-s^?>J 








TRACK TEAM 

BACK ROW 

HulcSinion Seely McNeary 

Vining SI055 

Haddleton (Coach) 

Hippie (Manaeer) 

F. Morgan MoH 

Leitei Holier Ambler 

SECOND ROW 
Neliort Scott 

Rodman Beck Potter 

Skinner Huff 

Hunt Wall Marshall 

Bocstoce Mechllng 

FRONT ROW 
Ouffield Lingerman Bodine 

ScoHergood Ro»h 

Bancroft (Captain) 
Hoti Smith 

Richardion Pott! Siebert 



The home stretch 



TRACK 

Preparing for their opening meet with Dickinson, 
the local trackmen found themselves extremely 
poor in the hurdles and the field events, v^^ith 
the prospects for a successful season greatly 
dimmed by these weaknesses, hlotz. Rush and 
Richardson in the field events, Bodine and 
Scattergood in the distances, and Captain 
Bancroft in the dashes, appeared as the most 
likely point winners among the Senior members 
of the squad. 



In the lead 



Goose-tlep 



.<4Jlll<! * .T^SR- 



TRACK SCHEDULE 


April 14 . 


. Dickinson, home 


April !1 . 


. Amherst, away 


April 88 . 


. Johns Hopkins, owoy 


Moy 5 . 


. Open 


May IJ . 


. M AS.C.A.A ,oway 


May 19 . 


. Swarthmore, away 




Taking the low hurdles 





i - ^ 




They're off 




Umph! Yyh got mel 




The weary trek 





^L 




^•'^ 



BASEBALL TEAM 

BACK ROW 

Hawkins Smirh (Manager) 

Randall (Coach) 

Wtlllnglon Malx Allceni 

SECOND ROW 

Puglle'e L«ntz 

Baird Gawlhrap Frawr 

Pufvii Tleman 

Corion Gritwold Gainftt 

FRONT ROW 

Herman 

Nicholson Singer Richie 

Haries (Captain) Wilson 
Tripp Foerster Taylor 



BASEBALL 

For the First time in many years Haverford's 
baseball prospect this season was unu- 
sually hopeful. With only two members of 
last year's team having graduated, and 
with the entire infield returning, the local 
tossers had, in the early spring, high hopes 
of turning in an enviable record during the 
campaign. Captain Harjes, Richie, Wilson, 
and Tripp, all of whom have had three 
years of varsity experience, ore the Seniors 
who will contribute to the team's success, 
and are looking forward to their first victory 
over an ancient rival, Swarthmore. 



BASEBALL 




SCHEDULE 


April 14 . 


. Delaware, owov 


April 18 . 


. Moravian, home 


April SI . 


. Osteopathy, home 


April 25 . 


. Stevens, home 


April S7 . 


. Wiltiami, home 


May 1 . 


. Lehigh, away 


May 2 . 


. Lehigh, home 


May 7 . 


. Homplon-Sydney, home 


May 9. 


. P. M. C. home 


May 11 . 


. Swarthmore, home 


May 16 . 


. Lafayette home 


May 19 . 


. Moravian, awoy 






At bat 



W*ll, why don't you run? 



One of our boys 



Junior day game with Swarthmort 





P' II 



jM.1 I I 





TENNIS 
TEAM 

Hunilck*r 

Walghtman 

Parry 

Ruiiell 

Msmhard 

Flaccus (Captain) 

Jon** 



TENNIS 

Although decisively beaten by Virginia, 
Navy and Pennsylvania in their opening 
matches, the local netmen, v^ith a well- 
balanced squad, gave earnest of more 
substantial results during the remainder o\ 
their season v^'hen meeting teams of their 
own calibre. Captain Flaccus and Man- 
ager Jones, playing first and third singles 
respectively, are the two Senior members 
of the team. 



TENNIS SCHEDULE 



At managsr and play* 
•quolly good 



Tha climax of the l«nnli i»aion 



Match 30 . 


. Virginia, away 


May 


8 . 


. LalayeHe, awoy 


April 


7 . 


. Novy, away 


May 


4 . 


. Lehigh, home 


April 


14 . 


. Pennsylvonic, owoy 


May 


5 . 


. Bucknell, away 


April 


18 . 


. Weit Chester Teocherj 


May 


9 . 


. Dickinson, away 






home 


May 


11 . 


. lohns Hopkins, home 


April 


iO. 


. Union, home 


May 


1! . 


. Brooklyn, home 


April 


81 . 


. Hamilton, home 


May 


15 . 


. Swarthmore, away 


April 


S5 . 


. Stevens, home 


May 


16. 


. Temple, home 


April 


87 . 


Williams, away 


May 


18 . 


. Bucknell, home 


April 


88 . 


. Wesleyan, away 












The winn 


ng strolce 




Balance 





CRICKET TEAM 

BACK ROW 
Schmid Smith Haywood 

SECOND ROW 

Knight Rector Matthews 

Bowden 

FRONT ROW 

Bridger Wright Crawford 

Brown (Captain) 

Reynolds Wagner 

Mallinson (Coach) 



CRICKET 

A group of veterans led by Captain Tom Brown, 
strengthened by the addition of a few promising 
Freshmen, carried on Haverford's distinction as the 
only cricket-playing college in America this spring. 



CRICKET SCHEDULE 




April 1 4 
April 81 
April 28 
May 5 
May 18 
May 18 
May 26 
June 2 

June 9 



The chirping cricket 



Lemon or cream? — Lemons! 
Punltl How<we-dorn7 



. . Ardmore C. C, home 
, . Baltimore C. C, home 
. . General Electric C. C. home 
, . Crescent A. C, home 
, . Viscose C. C, home 
, . Alumni, home 

. Open 

. Princeton Graduate School, 
home 

. Alumni, home 



Bowling 






*»^ 



\ 



v^ 




«5 



L 





GOLF TEAM 

FRONT ROW 

Linton 

Stanley (Manager) 

McKee (Captain) 

Williams 

Dutton 

BACK ROW 

Allen 
Stoddard 



Voted the most popular course 



GOLF 



GOLF SCHEDULE 



April 13 . 
April 16 . 
April 19 . 
April SO . 
April S3 . 
April !5 . 



April !7 , 



Under the leadership of Captain McKee, 
the local linksmen started their campaign 
by garnering a pair of easy conquests 
over West Chester and Swarthmore. 
The team is a group of veterans aug- 
mented by the addition of two Fresh- 
men, Linton and Allen. 

"I wandered, lonely oi o cloud 



Villonova, home 
Pennsylvania, home 
Osteopathy, home 
Cornell, home 
Delaware, away 
Franklin and Marshall, 

home 
Temple, away 



May 
May 
May 
May 



May 1 5 
May 18 . 
May 21 . 
May S3 . 



, Swarthmore, away 
, Hill School, away 

Johns Hopkins, home 

Rutgers, awoy 
. St. Josephs, awoy 
. Cornell, away 

Faculty, home 
. Alumni, home 





Trap-f hooting 




' ¥'^\ 


^» J 


JpMK 




page one hundred thirty-eight 




•*.. 



■. wTfS*" 



•^^ 




The necessary steps 



AFter the war 





Little comfort in the prospects 

Snaps of College Life, 

usual and unusual, 

we think to be more 

interesting 

than a prosy and 

probably-not-to-be-read 

class h^istory 





The pause that lost us the Penn soccer gome 



\ ■-:} 




The nudist of the new 



The early birds get the worms. And how I 



Loyalty or college spirits 





The anafomy of flits 




A mess hall (In truth) 




An atmosphere of slumber pervades the library 



The eve of the Delaware game 





They're off — 
all, lusl a little 




Recess 




-, .^ 



a^ 




The sublime and the ridiculous 



V^ 



■^^ 



Ovottine 




Srudy hall 





The radio doesn't work, either 




For miles around nothing may be seen but quaint old carts and children at their play 



■'?^-^M'--^ .^ 





"All hope abandon, 
ye who enter here" 




Mac — the flying 
Scotchman 





Some jockeys, eh, boss ? 




'Stoiue, Mae? 



m 




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property. 

J. B. LONGACRE 

Successor ro Longacre & Ewlng 

BULLin BUILDING -141 S. FOURTH ST. 

PHILADELPHIA, PENNA. 



HOLLAND'S 

CATERERS ■ CONFECTIONERS 

For the Discriminating Hostess 
Caterers for the Haverford Centenary 



RESTAURANT, 114 and 115 N. 19th St. 

WILLIAM NEWMAN, Manager 



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no Ljeat^ 

. . . the name of this firm 
has been nationally rec- 
ognized as headquarters 
for Young Men's Apparel 
that is exceptionally fine 
in Quality, and authentic 
to the lost detail of Style! 

JACOB REED'S SONS 

1424-1426 
CHESTNUT ST., PHILADELPHIA 



BEYER & CO. 

233-235 CALLOWHILL ST., PHILA. 




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POULTRY • EGGS • BUTTER 
CHEESE 

FAMOUS BEACHDALE DUCKLING DIFFERENT 
FROM OTHERS 



OTTO FUCHS 

LIBRARY AND LAW BOOKS 
A SPECIALTY 

2416 NORTH FIFTEENTH STREET 

BALDWIN 4120 



BREYER ICE CREAM CO. 

Patronize the Breyer Dealer 




WASHINGTON NEW YORK PHILADELPHIA 
NEWARK HARRISBURG 



Cricket Hand Laundry 

(The Homelike Laundry Service) 

41 CRICKET AVENUE • ARDMORE, PA. 

Strictly Hand Work ... All Types 
of Service . . . We Darn, Mend, 
and Sew Buttons on . . . FREE 
WE CALL AND DELIVER 



PHONE 



ARDMORE 2809 



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Hires 



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Root Beer 



FOR 
THIRST 
AND 
CHEER 



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Yo ur Guarantee of 

Real ROOT JUICES 




J^ku ^;:/-raveti:ctJL L^clleae cir^itnuaL was printed by the 

AQUATONE PROCESS • EDWARD STERN & COMPANY, INC. 

140 NORTH SIXTH STREET, PHILADELPHIA 




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