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Full text of "A record of the descendants of Allen Bread, who came to America from England in 1830"

Gc M. L. 

929.2 
B745b 
1692135 



REYNOLDS HISTORICAL 
GENEALOGY COLLECTION 



G^ 



.EN COUNTY PUBLIC I IBRARY 



3 1833 01200 9806 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2009 with funding from 

Allen County Public Library Genealogy Center 



http://www.archive.org/details/recordofdescendaOObrea 



A RECORD 



OF THE 



DESCENDANTS 



OF 



ALLEN BREAD, 



WHO CAME TO 



AA/'.ERiCA FROM England 



1 6 3 O 



Hathawav & Brothkks, 

THE EVAN'S I'RINTINCt HOUSE, 

FOl. RTH AND LIIiRAKY STS., 

PHILADELPHIA. 

092. 



it 






To .N\v BELOVED Wife, 



Who is still doing her full share in shaping my life 
and increasing my usefulness. 



PREFACE. 



On the loth day of September, iS6S, a convention of mem- 
bers of one of the many branches of the Breed family assembled 
at the house of the late Deacon J. C Breed, in Jamestown, N. Y. 
Deacon Breed read a paper giving the result of his work in trac- 
ing "the history of that branch of the family back to Allen Bread, 
who came from England to Massachusetts in 1630. A report of 
the proceedings was printed, and in 1S74 a copy of it was ex- 
amined by the author of this book. The statement that Allen 
Bread, born in England in 1601, was the father of all the Breed 
families in the United States, coupled with the fact that he came 
to America at such an early date, suggested at once the idea 
that some person should write a history- of the Breed family, and 
thus exhibit between the covers of a book the size of the family, 
and the intluence exerted by its meml^ers in Eynn and other 
cities and towns to which they migrated ; also their share in 
the events which made up the nation's history. 

I decided to undertake the task of compiling this work, se- 
curing and classifying the data obtained as opportunity offered, 
and the result is herein given. 

This book is primarily intended as a record of the Breed 
family. 

It is designed to enable the members of the family to trace 
easily the genealogical record of any individual, or of any branch 
of the famil}^ ; likewise to trace the records of more than one 
person, and find when and where they unite. 

I start with the name Allen Bread, b. 1601, and place in 
the record no name that cannot be traced to this one man by 
the plan here adopted. 

The notes concerning individuals have been sent to mc by 
the relatives of those to whom they refer, and are therefore be- 
lieved to be correct. 



The historic narration of events in a ffw cities and to.vns 
are given at some length, becau^e linked with the historv of our 
family. 

The genealogy of the fomiiy previous to the year 1630, can 
not be secured without innch expense, and therefore it is not 
treated in this book. 

Many blanks occur among the dates of births, marriages 
and deaths, and these can be filled by the families concerned. 

Some of the readers will doubtless be greath- surprised to 
discover how nuich more material tliey might have sent me. It 
gives me pleasure to acknowledge the valuable assistance which 
has been rendered by a few friends. When I had done about 
all I could to establish my own line of descent, information 
given from the War Records by the Hon. Charles O'Xeill, the 
Representative in Congress from the Second District of Penn- 
sylvania, and by Mr. Chas. 1). Whiting, of Hartford Conn' en- 
abled me to complete the record. When an appeal was made 
for subscriptions in advance, those who responded prompcly 
with checks for S20.00 each were Rev. Dr. David R. Breed Vjr 
Chicago; Mr. Wm, J. l^reed, and Mr. Tud>on W. Breed ' of 
Cincinnati ; and Mr. Allen G. Breed of Perry, Iowa. After'the 
manuscript had been about completed, tlie index ana chart 
made, and a long delay had occurred, Dr. David R. Breed sent 
ine his check of 5100.00 "to be returned in cash or in books.'' 
With this encouragement I have been able to revise all the manu- 
script and place the matter in the hands of the printer. One 
hundred books will be printed, and nearly all of this numl>er 
have now been ordered. 



^. 



/^^^^^2:^Cfe^ 



March ist, 1892. 



EXPLANATORY. 



This Record is divided into sections, each bearing a num- 
ber. ICach section contains the record of a family when the 
data is sufficient to warrant the use of a separate section. 

In .^onie cases the brevity of the notes or tlicir reception 
after the system of numbering had been arranged, made it 
necessary to place the record of several families in one section. 

Generally the arrangement of each section will be found to 
be as f 'Hows : 

(>i) the name of a parent, (b) the date of marriage, {c) tlie 
other parent's name, id ^. the list of the children, ' e) historical 
notes relating to the parents and those children whose names in 
the list have no numbers following them. 

The number which follows any name refers to another 
section in which that name appears. 

The number which follows a parent's name refers to a 
section in which the name has previously appeared as a child. 

The number attached to the name of a child, refers to a 
>ection in v.-hicli the name \vill be found as a parent. 

It will be noticed that blanks have been left in each family 
I'-t fir the birth date, and a space for tlie death date, v>-here 
-sucli d.iics have not been sent to us, in order that e<"u:h -nvxy be 
stipplied with the pen. and the record made complete. 



INDEX. 

In using the index lo fnul a jKrson wlinse christian name 
is a comniou one, it may be found the more easily by looking 
for the maiden name of the wife, or for that of a brother which 
is less common. 



CHART. 



The chart may be easily used to trace relationships thus : 
Find by the index the number of rlic section in which each of 
the names occur who^e relationship you wish to establish — 
make a note of each section number as you trace tliem back to 
the beginning. The point at which the section numbers are 
common, will give you the union of the two families. 

Example — The author's section is No. 36. The section of 
Mr. Kdward Breed of Syracuse, is No. 77. In tracing back 1>y 
section numbers we have 36-35-34-2S-2 7-2 1-20-2 for the one and 
for the other. 77-76-5S-56-55-51-2. We find then in No. 2, that 
Allen, b. 1626, is our common Grand 'Father. 



ABBREVIATIONS. 



b 


born. 


Bap 


baptized. 


Ch 


' . . . child. 


Chn 


children. 


d 


died. 


Dau 


daiiffhfer 


M. 


married. 



THH SETTLEMENT OF NEW ENGLAND. 



"The scttkiucnt of New Kngland was a result of the Ref- 
ormation and (jf implacable differences between the Protestant 
Dissenters and the Kstablished Anglican Church." 

" Puritanism, zealous for independence, admitted no voucher 
but the Bible ; a. fixed rule, which it would allow neither Par- 
liament, nor Hierarchy, nor Kin^; to interpret." 

" The surplice and square caj) were rejected as the livery of 
superstition ; the outward sign that prescription was to prevail 
above reason and authority to control inquiry." So says the 
historian Bancroft. 

While the Dissenters were protesting, King James saw that 
there was dan.ger that their desire for freedom might yet lead to 
an attempt at representative government ; for did he not say to 
some of them, " You are aiming at a vScot's Pre5b>-tery, wdiich 
agreeth v/ith Monarchy as well as G0]-> and the Devil," yet 
this very King made our grand represeiit;itive Government pos- 
sible by granting his sulijects a large tract of land in Anierica, 
thus inducing them to en.;igrate and establish a government for 
themselves. His first grant gave them Soo,ooo square miles of 
territory ; six times the area of Great Britain. 

I£ven after the Colonies had been established, the fears of 
the Parliament were aroused, and much was apprehended from 
its interference. Such interference was however prevented by 
important events happening in Great Britain, for just at this 
time the Jenny Geddes exploit occurred. 

That zealous woman could not brook the reading from the 
Liturgy, prayers translated from the Roman Missal, and ex- 
pressed her disgust b>- the throwing of her three legged stool at 
the officiating Dean, and by the cry, " What, ye villain, will 
ye say mass in my lug?" This crucial act on the part of 
the brave Jenny, was the beginning of the great religious 
revolution, which drew attention from the Americaii Colo- 
nics, and permitted them to grow untrammcled for twenty 
years. 

The name " New Rnt.l.and " was given by Captain John 
Smith, who examined the shores from the Penobscot to Cape 
Cod and prepared a map of the coast. 



The first Patt-iil was issued by Kuvj; James to forty of liis 
subjects, under tlie title of " The Council c.sta1>lished at Ply- 
mouth, in county of Devon, for tlic planting, rulin-, orderiii- 
and »;ovcrning New Kngland in America." 

The territory conferred extended from the 40'' to tlie .[S^ 
North latitude and from tlie Atlantic to the Pacific Ocean, with 
the lands and islands, rivers and harbors, n^.ore than Soo,ooo 
square miles. With this territory there was granted to the 
colonies the rights to the apijointi ng of all officers, and of the 
determining of all forms of government. 

On the T9th of March, 162S, John Humphry, a brother-in- 
law of the Karl of Lincoln, John Kndicott, and four others, 
gentlemen from Dorchester, obtained from the Council of New 
England, a grant of the coast 1)et\vecn Laconia and Plymouth 
Patent, including the whole of Massachusetts Bay and all the 
land Westward to the Pacific Ocean, between two parallel lines, 
" the one north of any and every part of the T^ferrimac River, 
and the other south of any and every part of the Charles 
River." 

These pioneers formed a company known as " TiiK 
Massachusetts C^od'Axv," and on the 4th of ^Tarch, 16 -g, 
John Winthrop, Sir Richard Saltenstall and others secured ^a 
charter to confirm the grant and then formed a corporation 
known as "The Governor and Company of Massachusetts 
Pa} in New PlnglanJ." PrLparalions were made to extend the 
settlement, which they named " The Pondons Plantation in 
Massachusetts Bay." 

Every 50 pounds (5240) contributed to the company's stock 
by any member entitled him to 200 acres of land. 

Every stockholder who emigrated at his own expense was 
to receive 50 acres for each mend.er of his family. The stock 
afterward diminished in value, and as a cojupensation, each 
stockholder was to receive 2c^j acres additional for each 50 pounds 
originally subscribed ; of this company, John Winthrop was 
elected Governor. 

Governor Winthrop was born in Gn^ton, County of Suffolk. 
England, January 11, issS. He dietl in P.oston, Mass.. March 
2f>, 1649. He was bred t.. the law. He sail-'d witli liis company 
from Varmoutli. Phigl.md, April 7, 1630. 



EARLIER EMIGRATIONS. 

Tiie Puritans fixun LeN'den sailed irom Suuthaniptou in Lbe 
Ma\-fl<)\ver and Speedwell, on August 5, 1620, but were forced 
by storms to returti to Plymouth. The Mayflower again sailed 
for America on September 6, 1620, and entered Cape Cod har- 
bor on November 11. This co'ony consisted of loi persons. 

The passengers of the Speedwell came with others in the 
Fortune, which arrived November 10, 1621. 

The third colony arrived in the "Annie and IJttle James," 
in August, 1623. 

The fourth colony arrived in June, 1629, in six ships, and 
with them came thirty-five members of the Leyden Congrega-' 
tion. They landed at Naumkeag (Salem). 

The fifth party arri\-ed about June i, 1630, from tlie West 
of England, under Ludlov/, brother-in-law of Endicoit. They 
landed at Nantasket, and settled Matapan, which they called 
Dorchester, after their native city. 

On June 12, the Arbella, and lifteen other vessels, arrived 
at Salem, with eiglit or nine luindred souls ; being the Massa- 
chusetts Company, under John Winthrop. 

Winthrop went to Boston, Saltenstall to Watertown, 
Pynchon to Roxbury, Craddock's servants to Mystic (called 
Medford), and Allen Bread, and others, stopped at Saugus, and 
founded T,ynn. 

]Mr. Bancroft tells us, "About Soo— all of them Puritans, 
inclined to the part}- of Independents ; many of them men of 
high endowments, large fortunes atid best education, scliolars, 
well versed in all the learning of the times ; clergymen, who 
ranked amouL' the most eloquent and pious in the realm — em- 
barked with Winthrop." 



LYNN. 

Lynn is pleasantly situated on the northern shore of Massa- 
chusetts Bay, between the cities of Salem and Boston. It has 

the river Saugus on th.e west, the har!)or on tl:e •■outh, the 
ocean on the south-east, and the Lakes of Pvnn on the uortii ; 



Salem is five miles north-east, aii'l I5ostoii is nine miles south- 
west. From the centre of the sonlhein side of Lynn a beacli of 
sand extends tw.^ miles into the oee;in, at tlie end of which are 
two peninsular islands, called the Xahants. 

The name Nahant is supposed to have been derived from 
the Indian word " Nahantceii " — twins. Great Nahant is two 
miles in length, and half a mile wide. It is surrounded by 
steep, craggy cliffs, rising from twenty to sixty feet above the 
tide, with a considerable depth of water below. Above the 
cliffs the promontory swells into mounds from sixty to ninety 
feet high. 

It w-as these Xahants which Thornwald saw as he sailed 
eastward from his \'ineland, as he called Rhode Island. Liet", 
a brother of ThornwaM had discovered Rhode Island in the 
year ickX), being led to it by reports from tlie voyager Biarne, 
who had seen new lands in that direction when driven out of 
his course by storms. 

Lief and Thornwahl were sons of Hric the Red, an Iceland 
Prince who emigrated to Greenland in the year 9SG. 

Thornwald, it is said, noticed Cape Cod and passed on to 
Xahant, where he landed and was killed by the Indians, and 
was buried by his friends. 

In 1603, Martin Pring, an explorer, sailed into Cape Cod 
P>ay in search of medicinal plants. In 1614 Captain John Smith 
sailed into Massachusetts r,a_\' and expressed his admiratioi; of 
the X.ahants thus : — " The many isles of Matlahunts are on the • 
west side of this bay, where are many isles and some rocks, 
that appear at great height al)ove the water like the Pieramidies 
of P'gypt." 

At the north-west extremity of Xahant is "John's Peril " 
a vast fissure in the cliff, forty feet perpendicular, wdiich re- 
ceived its name fiom the fMlowing anecdote : — 

"John Breed, OTie of the earl>- inhabitants of X'ahant, one 
day attempted to drive his team between a rock on the hill and 
this cliff. The passage being narrow, he found his team in 
great peril and ha-tilv unfastened liis oxen. The cart fell down 
the ])recij>ice and was dashed in pieces." 

In hom the inhabit:ints of Lynn consisted of the families of 
the fallowing five men : Iv.lmund and hVanci:; Ingrdls, Jolm 
and William Wood and William l>i.vev. 



Allen Bread, with some fifty others who landed with Gov. 
Winthiop settled at Lynn. 

After these settlers others came rapidls^ ; 'S\r. Bancroft says: 
" I'efore the Long Parliament assembled in i64r, 21, ckhd per- 
sons had arrived in New I'^ngiand, in 19S ships, and the cost of 
the Colonies had been nearly one million dollars." 

Boston was not a large town at this time, for John Fuller 
who came there in 1630 found that "only seven huts were 
erected." 

lyynn was known as " Saugust " when it -was incorporated 
in 1630 by being represented in the General Court. 

In the early part of 1631 provisions were scarce and many 
persons depended for subsistence on clams, ground nuts and 
acorns. Wheat sold for S3-ii per bushel, and Indian corn from 
Virginia at $2.44 per bushel. A good cow brought over Si 00 
and a \-oke of oxen over 5175. 

Previous to 1632 the people of Lynn had no minister of 
their o\vn. Some attended church at Salem, and others had 
meetings iu their houses. The Rev. Stephen Bachiler arrived 
in Boston, June 5th of that year and went at once to Lynn, tlie 
first service being conducted by him on the 8th of June. 

In 1635 Mr. Bachiler was dismissed and the celebrated 
Hugh Peters was employed to preach, but he would not become 
their pastor. He went back to England in 164 [ aiid was ex- 
ecuted on the charge of treason, Oct. i6th, 1660. 

In 1635 Rev. Samuel Wliiting (sec. 47; came to Lynn from 
his houie in Lynn, Kngland,and in compliment to him the name 
Saugust was dropped and the name Lynn adopted. 

Lynn in England was called "Lynn Regis," because it 
was patronized b\- King John, who in 12 15 received great ser- 
vice from the town in his war with France " He granted them 
a Mayor atid gave them his own sword to be carried before him, 
with a silver gilt cup which they have to this day." 

On Novemlxr Sth of tiiis year, Mr. Whiting was installed 
pastor of the church at Lynn, which consisted of six members 
besides the pastor. They signed a covenant aiid adopted the 
name, "The First Church of Christ in Lynn." 

S.'unuel Wliitnig was 1>. at Boston, Lincolnshire, England, 
>«o\-. 2otli, 1597. His fither John wa'^ Ma^-or of the cit}- in 
1600, and his brother John secured the same oftice in 162s. 



Mr. \\'hiti!ip; sailed from F.ii^laTK.l in April, iT^;/,, atul arrived at 
Boston, Mass. t)ii May 2^>. JIu d. Dec. nth, U')-j<.j, having 
preached at Lynn 4;^ years. His second wife was Klizaljcth vSt. 
John, of Bedford.shire, England, sister of C)liver St. John, Chief 
Justice of ICngland in the time of 01i\'er Cromwell. vSlie was 
sixth Cousin to King Idcury \'II. Through the Beauchamps she 
was descended from the Earls of Warren and vSurrey, from the 
Ivarl of "Warwick, from Willij.m the Con(jueror and from King 
Henry I, of France. She was descended from William the 
Norman in two distinct lines and in her were united the lineage 
of ten of the sovereigns of Europe. 

It seems most probable that Allen Thread was a Puritan 
when he landed. He came to this country to assist in estab- 
lishing a government wh.ich should be based upon principles 
wdiich were supported by the Puritans. He was identified with 
the Fir.-t Congregational Church in L\-nn, and as late as i6q2 
we find that bis son Allen 2 was assigned to a seat in tlie pulpit 
by vote of the Town [Meeting. He had gone to Long Island 
and assisted in the organization of a Congregational Church 
th.ere, which afterward became a Presbyterian Church. We 
find his graTidson sigrdng the list of " thoi^c called Quakers " 
in 1692. The greater part of that branch of the family 
which remained in Lynn, are members of the Society of 
F'riends. 

Allen's grandson, John 4S, went to Stonington, and the 
greater part of his descendants !ia\-e l>een Baptists. vSome of 
the Stonington Branch near Norwich, Conn, are Congre- 
gationalists, and those who descended from his great-grand-son, 
George 162, are Presbyterians. Other members of the family 
are found in New York, Peinis\ Ivania, Ohio, Illinois, Michiga'.i, 
Kansas, California and Texas. The descendants of Josiah 24, 
a great-grandson of Allen i6or, are Pre:-l)yterians. 

We know of several ministers of this name — three Presby- 
terians, 35, 37 and 193, two Congregationalists, 90 and 190, one 
Episcopalian, 109, and one Baptist, 136. 

We shall not make the absurd claim that no man by the 
name of Breed has ever disgraced tliat name l)y evil deeds. It 
is a nat.ie of a humc\n kimily, and the family can onlv impro\-e 
and secure honor to their name by oliedience to the laws (.f 
God as found in the Bible. Thi> thj\- h.ave nut all done. 



THE [^.RHED FAMILY. 

It is well kiunvii that the peculiarities of a faitiil}' (jf nni- 
inals are found in all its mcnibers. It is known also that this 
law applies to man. 

Kac]i fjiniily has its distinctive traits. It is therefore very 
intercepting to notice how these traits clin;^ to all the family, 
even through the varied circumstances of locality, religion, and 
employment. 

As a rule, the Breeds have been a positive, determined race, 
industrious and persevering in business, and careiul of ilieir in- 
come. 

In T.eiden, Holland, Dr. Breed 35 saw, a few years a;-.;o, 
that the name of th.c cliief street was " Brede," and that 
" Brede's Lager Beer Distillery '' seemed to be flourishing. 

In the year i i<X) main- Hollanders emigrated to Hngland 
and it was about that time that the town of lirede in Sussex 
county v.'as settled. The town now ccnitains a population of 
one thousand souls, and covers some live thousand acres. It 
was here that King Kdward I in the year ug-j received 
the oath of fealty from the Scottish chdeftains, Comyer and 
Monteith. The Register of the town dates back to 1359. In 
its church there are brasses with Latin inscriptions to Roliert 
Oxenbridge, dated 14^7 and 1402. The Afford Himily mansioti 
which is now called Brede Place, was erected in the reign of 
Kdward III. 

Tlie Manor of Brede, was distincc from the Hundred 
of Hastings up to the thirty-third year of Henry \'IIL 

The family spread over Kngland and we know very lit- 
tle of their history until the time of Allen Bread, who sailed 
for America with Governor Wdnthrop. 

In Hngland the name is now spelled "Brede," "Bread," 
" Breed" and "Breeds." London has a lU'cad street. 

Allen (Got spelled his name Bread, but soon after the 
family Settled in thi^ country the name was spelled "Breed." 
and thi.s furm is now uni\-ersall>- used here by his descendants. 
The Breed family in the Hnited States is one family, all 
being the descendants of Allen Brea<l an<l his first wife, who 
came to this country in 1630, bringing with them two boys 



and having two boys Itorn to tlicin after their .settlement in 
l^_\nn. 

It is our i!;tentiun in thi> l)ook to show /m^r a\\ persons 
named in th.c Record are rekiled lo Allen P.read and conse- 
quently to each other, and to show as far as possible, what sort 
of persons they are and have been, and under what circum- 
stances tlieir lives have been spent. 



RECORD 



BREED FAMILY 



No. I. 



Allen Brt-ad, 




b. 








160I, 


d. March 


Married 
















Allen 2, 




b. 








1626, 


d. 


Timothy 289, 




b. 








1628, 


d. 


Joseph 29.1, 




b. 








1632, 


d. 


John 291, 




b. 








■634, 


d. June 


Married 2 wife, 




March 


2S, 


1656. 




Elizabetii Kni 


^ht, 


, b. 










d. 



28, 167S. 



Allen Bread, the ancestor of all of tliis name in the United 
States of America, was born in England. We do not know in 
what part of the country. x\n aged member of the family in 
Lynn, Mass., is qnite sure he was a wholesale grocer in Liver- 
pool At present we must simply say, "We do not know." 



As to liis wealth or social st'iiuliiirr .,M,i r • i ,- - ' 

Ji\ta. ks .still kuowii as " >]reed's Fiid '" 
appo "t« 1;"';r' !'" '"""" '""'? ""'-■ *"*•" b>- Co„,™ittee, 

nine of .00 acres each ' M, ' ' T "^ ''''' ""'^ "^ ^^'^° ^'^^ 
^., , ^^^; ^^^"- --^li^-'i received 200 acres. 

1 he lists of those who recei^-ed latid are nr,t complete Tt 

ber of his fanndy. ' '^ acres fur each mem- 

His autograph is here gW,n as copied by ]. R Nevhali of 
T.vnn, trom an original docun:ent, for his history of Lynn 



tatio 



^^ //ty-^-.-^cJ" 



i„„ T •' '"'v-' ■'"' "2''"<^'"«" '» ^tnbli.l, a ch„rch before leiv 
ng Ly„„. J „ey „,,<ie a„ arra„ge„,e„t wiU, one Ca rHcw 

Daniel Pro.c ^ <:.^'tJ:::\^TT"' ';"'"""^ ^'^•"^' 

Kenyan,,, T,,,,;nas pi;a,u„.::;; •,^::::;;^;:::;r "»'-- pi^i-'p 



_ IntlieirCnurch Agreement, tlieyoffrtor s^,-^ .' • 

...t..ep.en„se.as.o„na.u,e,.,.nj,,:;r;,:;:-:;tr;::;^;: 



tlicni, ;uiil a chnrcli cstal)]i.slK:ci , pro\-i'.le(l that those who fidlow 
thL'iu shall be govt-nieJ b\- their .Vitick-s of xVgrecineiit. 

The>- sailed in the ves-^el of Capt. Daniel Howe to Sctjut's 
]')a>-. in the western part of I.'''ng Island, where they purchased 
land of Mr. James Forrett. agent of Lord Sterling, and agreed 
with the Indians for tlieir right. 

On hearing of this, the Dutch laid claim to that part of the 
Island, on account of previous purchase from tlie Indians, and sent 
men to take possession, who set up the arms of the Prince of 
Orange on a tree. The Lynn people, disregarding the claims 
of the Dutch, cut down the trees and began to build. Captain 
Howe took down the Prince's arms, and instead thereof, " an 
Indian drew a very unhandsome face." The Dutch Governor 
became angry and arrested si>: of the men. and imprisoned them 
initil he C'.>mmunicated v/ith Winthrop, when lie was compelled 
to let them go. They then removed more than eighty miles and 
settled in tlie eastern part of the Island, where they established 
a town v/liich they named for the place from which iliey had 
sailed, Southampton. 

The vessel, which was ov.-ned by those who left Lynn to 
settle on I,o:ig Island, in 1640, was first bought by eiglit men, 
P\arrington, vStanborough, Welbe, Job and Thomas Sayre, Xeed- 
bam and Walton. Afterward, by consent of the company, 
Allen ]>read, Halsey and Harker were admitted into the com- 
pany. 

The vessel became the property of Daniel Hov/e, in consid- 
eration of his holding it subject to the requirements of the 
coaipany. 

We find that when Allen Bread relin.quished his share in 
the vessel he received a " house lott, planting lott, and fiarme." 

In 1642 these settlers built a church, and Mr. Pierson re- 
mained as their pastor until 1647, ^vhen he left them, becau.se 
he believed that none but members of the church should receive 
the rights of freemen, holding thai: no man was fit to legislate 
for others, unless he was him.self obedient to tlie laws of God, 
Mr. Pierson went to IJranford, Conn., and later he became the 
first pastor of the First Presbyterian Church of Xewark, New 
Jersey. His son wa.^ the first President of Yale College. Mr. 
Pierson' s withdrawal !rom Southampton was probably the 
reasoti that Allen P.rea'l returne<l to Lvnn. We know that he 



resided there in ir,5&, as his marriage took pLace at that ti-r.e to 
Klizabotl; Knight, a dau. of William Knight, who settled in 
Iv5'nn in 1630, and wlio received, in iG;,*^-, sixty acres of land. 
Her sister, Ann Knight, \va> called, in Xov. i'''^6, to witness in 
Court, in a suit of Taylor vs. King, for recover}- for a mare, in- 
jured by a bull on the liighway. Ann Kniglit became the w. 
of Edward Richards, {h. 1C16.) 

At a general town meeting, Dec. 30th, r66r, it was ordered 
by a vote that Knsign John Fuller, Allen Bread, Senior, and 
Richard Jolmson should examine certain land claimed by D. 
Salmon, as a soldier in the Pequod Wars. 

The descendants of John (No. 253 to 262) form the " Breed's 
Hill branch," and the descendants of Allen 2 are divided in the 
next generation into two branches. Those from his sou John 
are the " Stonington branch," and those from his other chn. 
constitute the '" Lynn branch '" of the famil_\-. 

We now take up the oldest son of this family ; — 



No. 2. 



Allen Bread i, 


b. 




1626. 




Married 










Mary 


b. 




d. Nov. 


30, 16; 


Joseph 3, 


b. Feb. 


12, 


165S, d. Xov. 


25, 17: 


Allen 20, 


b. Aug. 


30, 


1660, 




John 51, 


b. Jan. 


iS, 


1663, d. 


17; 


Mary, 


b. Auj,^ 


24, 


1665, 




Elizabeth, 


b. Xov. 


I, 


1667, 




Samuel 195, 


b. Sept. 


25, 


1669, 





In 1692 (the year when there was so great excitement in 
New England about witches), the Town appointed a Committee 
to seat the people in the church, except in the pulpit and at the 
table, and in the deacon's seat. These seats were to be assigned 
only by Town Meeting. xAllen Breed, ' ' .senior, ' ' was one of the 
eight assigned by vote to a seat in the pulpit. 

If this was Allen r, he was 91 years old, and Allen 20 was 
only 32 years old, and we, therefore, believe that this man, so 
honored, was the respected father of thi.-, faiail\ , at the age of 
sixty- six. 



Josepli Pureed 2 


b. Feb. 


12, 


165.S, 


d. N 


Married 


Sep. 


2-, 


i^.S3, 




Sarah Farriiigton, 


b. Tune 




166.1, 


d. A 


.Mary, 


b. lulv 


4, 


16S4, 




Jane, 


b. Oct. 


i'^, 


16S6, 




Sarah, 


b. July 


16, 


16S9, 




Joseph 4, 


b. June 




1691, 




Ruth, 


b. Sep. 


13, 


169,^.. 




Elizabeth, 


b. Oct. 


6, 


169s, 




Mattliew, 


b. Nov. 


27, 


1697, 


d. Ja 


Matthew, 


b. Jan. 


3', 


1699, 




Morce, 


b. July 


20, 


1701, 




Mehetabe!, 


b. De.-. 


25. 


1704. 




Allen 5, 


b. .Marcl 


1 i^, 


1706, 





'713- 



25. 169S. 



Joseph Breed was known as " Kn.sign," and Prof. Kduard 
John:.oii, of Lynn, thinks he was Husi^n in ILin^; Phillip's War. 
We know nothing of his children, except Joseph and Allen. 
Matthew wa^ a ' ' Coaster. ' ' About 1693 he built a house which 
was still .standing in Dec. iSii, on South street. 



No. 4. 



Joseph Breed 3, b. June 1691, d. April 4 iSi 

Married 
Susannah Xewhall, 

Theopholis, b. 1719, 

Ruth, b. 1721^ 

Sarah, b. 1726, d. i~2t 



Lydia, h. 



29. 



Mary 27, b. Jan. 6, 1733, d. .May 7, [767. 

Ephraim, b. Aug. 26, 1736, d. April 4, 1S12. 

Joseph fought in the Battle of Lexington, and was Town 
Clerk twenty years. 

The wife of Joseph— Susannah Xewhall— was a daughter of 
Joseph, son of Thomas, sun of Thomas Xewhall, who came to 
this country in the same year as Allen Bread, 1630. 

Their daughter, .Mary Breed, married Josiah I^reed, 27, 
thus, her grandfather, Joseph 2, was a brother of Josiali's crra-ui- 
f:ither. Allen 2. ^ " ' 

Kpliraim m. Xov, 22, 1762, Susainiah, daughter uf Roh'crt 
and Mary ^RcUid) Mansfield, b. Oct 15. 1735. d. Sept. 22:1, 
1S06. He married Men. 15, i^o8, 2d u^" M:lnha (ALinsCulal 



Newhall, wid. Win. Xcwliall. of r.vniir.cld, a sisicr of his ist 
wiff. Shed. June lo, i8.->2 

Tht; children of I^ihraiiu and Martha were : Abigail, I). 
1765, m. Thomas Cheever; Su.-.aininli. I). 176s, 111. Theopholis 
Ilollowell ; Mary, b. 1770, ni. Daniel R. Will ; Joseph, b. (771 ; 
Sarah, 1773, ni. ]5enj. Ma.^sey, and 2d iiu.sband, Daniel I'arr- 
ington. 

Joseph b. 1771, in. March 17, 1704, .Mary Swecstcr, of Xo. 
Saiigus. Their children were ; — 

Joseph, b. March -s, 1795, Mary, b. Au.l^ 20, 1797, Susan, 
Oct. 21, 1799, ui. 1S30, Prof. Kdward Johnson ; Lydia, Sept. if,, 
1S02, Abigail, Nov. 2^,, 1S04, Jvphraini, b. iS-.S, Sally, iSii. 

Joseph, b. 1795, ni. iSiS, Kliza Walden. Their children 
were:— Atdos W., b. 1^20, l{li.7a Ann (-ee 2.jS'), b. 1821, Kph- 
raim, b. 1S22, Charles H . b. 1S24, Caroline, b. 1S26, Jo.seph W., 
b. 1S27, Abraham M., b. 1.S30, Malia, b. 1S31 , llariiett, b. iS^,^,, 
Nathaniel, b. 1836, Mary H., h. 1S39, Almina, b. 1S39, Ade- 
laide, b. 1S43. 



No. 5. 

Allen breed;, h. >hirch 16, 1707, 

Marric;d hme 2. 172.S, 
Ilulda Newhall, 

Col. Frederick 6, h. Au-. 2e, 1755, d. Apr. iSiS. 

Joseph b. June 3, 1729, 

Love h. Au--. i^\ 1 73 1, 

ferusha b. Sep. 3, (733, 

Hulda b. .Sep. 10, 173*',, 

Abigail i). \o\-. 7, 1741, 

Allen 12, [,. April ly, 1744, 

Hepsibali b. L")t.c. 13, 1746, 

Elephabet 1). June 4, 173.), 

Allen Sr. was a carpenter by trade. In his will dated 
March i, 1734, he left his brother .Matthew " one-(piarter part 
of the honiL-tead of their father Joseph, dec'd ; very near the 
Meeting House." 

Jo.seph ni. Nov. 1, 1750, Rebecca Mirriain. 

Love rn. Mcli. 29, 1750, .Alien Newhall. 

Jerusha ni. .Ap-r. .p 175S, flenry r.at(dielor. 

Abigail m. iVc. 2. 17'. I, Richard liichanis. 
_ Hepi^ibah in. Feb. ^, 1705, Hanso;; Newhall. 



No. 6. 










Fredetick llrecd, 


5, b. Aui;. 


20, 


175s, ( 


1. April 


Mariied 


April 


1,1, 


1780, 




Sarali Farrin-t<jn 


, b. 








Fredt-rick 7, 


b. Julv 


1, 


17S2, 




William S, 


b. 









I8IS. 



In Aiigiiht, 1776, an alarm was made at midnight through 
the streets of Lynn, Ma>s. , ''The Red-coats are landing at 
King's Beach I " 

On hearing this, it litrcauie the duty of a certain ofticer to 
recruit his men at the "Alarm vStation," which at that time was 
a tavern, kept by Increase Xewhall. in the old house now 
standing at the corner of Federal and r\[arion Streets, but said 
officer did not make his appearance until the return of the men, 
when he emerged from an oven, in which he had I)Len hiding. 
Mr. Frederick Lreed rallied the soldiers and marched them to 
Woodend, where they found that they had answered a false 
alarm. Mr. Breed was rewarded by a conunission in the Army, 
and he rose to the rank of Colonel. 

In the records of the War Department at Wash.ington, D. 
C, we find the following, concerning Frederick 6: — "Frederick 
Breed. In April, ibiS, of Lynn, Ma.-^sachu-^etts, aged 62 years. 
In May, 1775, he had a Conunission as Ensign in Captain Ad- 
dison Richards' Company, in Colonel John ^lansheld's Mass- 
achusetts Regiment, and Jann.arv ist, 1776, he received a Com- 
mission as 2nd IJeutenant in Captain Ezra Marshall's Company, 
in Col. Israel Ilutcuinson's 27th Regiment, which was signed 
by John Hancock, President of Congress, and he was dis- 
charged January ist, 1777, at Philadelphia." 

No. 7. 



Frederick lireed, 

Married 
Elizabeth 


6, 


b. July 
b. 


I, 17S2, 






No. 8. 












William Breed 6, 
.Married 
Mary \\'oodt;n Donis 
Abel n 9, 
Willi,, m J n, 


on 


b. 

April 
b. Aujr. 
b. June 
b. Jan. 


19, iSu6, 
2S, 17S6, 

1-, 1S..9, 


d. Jan. 
d. Dec. 
d. April 


24, 1S72. 
24, iS.SS. 
12, i.Soy. 


. William Breed's 


> \\ 


,'. wa^ b. 


in New 


Haven, 


Conn. 



25, 


tSii, d. 


Dec. 


24. 


iSS.S. 


2'>, 


^^3'^, 








6, 


d. 
1S35. 


Jan. 


i3. 


iS73. 


23, 


i'^42, d. 


Ni.v. 


9. 


1S51. 



No. 9. 

Abel D. Breed S, b. June 
Married Sep. 

Bethiah Gibbs Fearin- b. 

William J 10, b. Jan. 

Eninia Thatcher b. .May 
Married 2nd wife April 30, 1S77 

Mrs. Marian P. Burrctt b. 



Abel D. was b. iu Lynn; ni. in Warehani, Mass., a dau. of 
John Fearincr. He died of apoplexy, in New York Citv. His 
body was laid by the wife and dan., in W'archam. She'died in 
Warcham. His 2d w. was the widow of Geo. H. Burrett. 

Kmma was b. in Warcham. 



No. 10. 



W ilham J. Breed 9, 


b. Ian. 


6, 


1S35, 




Married 


Feb. 


s, 


1S66, 




Laura A. Adams, 


b. 








Emma T., 


b. April 


5, 


1S67, 




William D., " 


b. Oct. 


28, 


t86S, 




Laura F., 


b. Mch. 


20, 


1S70. 




Sarah J., 


b. Feb. 


16, 


iS7r, d. June 


9, 1S71, 


James Abel, 


b. April 


22, 


1S-4, d. .Mav 


12, 1S74. 
12, 1,876. 


Abel D., 


b. Nov. 


20, 


1S7.5, d. Julv 


Austin A. 


b. Feb. 


2S, 


1S7S. 




Howard 


b. July 


1 7) 


1S79. 





_ William J., b. in Fcarliam, Ma.ss., and lives in Cincinnati, 
Ohio. He has been a very snccessfnl bnsiness man. 



No. II. 

William J. Breed s, b. Jan. 10, 1S09, d. April 12, 1S69. 

Married, 133-^ 

Marj- Sn;ith, 

Henry L., b. 



William J. P.ree<l, b. in Lynn, Mass. ; was a cler-vman, and 
lived in Taunton, Mass. 



No. 12. 



Allen Breed 5, 


b. Aijri! 


19. 


1744. 










Married 


March 


4, 


1766, 










Abigail Lindsay 


b. 














Xehemiah 13, 


b. March 


24. 


1767, 


d. 


Feb. 


24, 


iS53- 


Thos. Andrew.-; ; 


r6,b. Dec. 


22, 


T76S, 


d. 


Feb. 


16, 


1S41. 


Halton John-^on 


b. >Larch 


s, 


1772. 


d. 


April 


16, 


1868. 


Allen 


b. Feb. 


7i 


1773, 


d. 






iSrjo. 


Love 


b. Jan. 


II, 




d. 


July 


10, 


I.S33. 


Abigail 


b. 






d. 


Sep. 


II, 


1S21. 


Ruth Lindsay 


b. 




1779, 


d. 


Sep. 


24. 


1S56. 


Arenath 


b. March 


20, 


1S16, 










Hannah 


b.- 














Ori-jhah 


b. 















Love Breed lu. Mr. Miles Shorey, a iialire of Xew 
Hampshire, who was one year older than his w. They were 
both killed by lightning, on the loth of July, 1S03, and an 
infant dan. which Mrs. Shore}' was carrying in. her arms at 
the time, was not killed, but had its hair scorched and its finger 
nails slightly burned. She lived to become the w. of Samuel 
Farririgton. The History of Lynn tells us, that, ''On Sunday, 
July loth, about 3 P. M.. a house on Boston Street near Cottage, 
was struck by lightning and ^.Ir. Shorey and his w. were in- 
stantly killed. The bolt appeared like a ball of fire. It struck 
the western chimney and tb.en after descending several feet. 
Separated. One branch nielted a watch which hung over the 
chamber mantle, passed over the cradle of a sleeping infant, 
covering it with cinders, and went out at the chimney, and 
when it reached the chamber floor, separated into two branches 
above the wife and husband, v.dio were passing at that instant 
from the parlor to the kitchen. One part struck Mrs. Shorey 
on the side of her head, left her stocking on fire and went into 
the ground. The other part entered Mr. Shorey's bosom, 
passed down his side, melted the buckle of his shoe, and went 
out at one of the front v,•indo\^■s. On the following day the}' 
were buried. The coffins were carried side by side, and a 
double procession of mourners of a great length, followed the 
bodies to their burial in one grave." 

Abigail m. John Cullins ; Arenath in. John Lcitock ; 
Hannah m. John Larock, Jr.: Orphah m. Winthrop Robert. 



No. 13. 



Ncheiniah Breed 12 


, 1'- 


Marcl 


1 -U 


17^57, 


<]. 


Feb, 


24, 


1^53. 


Married 




jun- 


I >, 


1793, 










Abigail Blanv 


b. 
















Abigail S. 


b. 


Aug. 


4. 


1794, 


d. 


Mav 


s, 


1S51. 


Lydia Blany 


b. 


Julv 


■4, 


^797. 


d. 


Jar. 


2, 


1S24. 


Andrews Blany r.: 


t,b. 


Julv 


2?' 


1799. 


d. 


May. 


7, 


1S83. 


Eliza Barluw 


b. 


Sep. 


26, 


lSu2, 


d. 


Jan. 


4, 


1S66. 


Nehemiah Allen 


b. 


Dec. 


16, 


I So.;, 


d. 


Aug. 


17, 


1SS2. 


Orpha Haskins 


b. 


May 


26, 


I So:, 


d. 


June 


9. 


1S76. 


Celina Shepard 


b. 


Aug. 


2, 


1S09, 










George Holt<^ii 


b. 


Mav 


6, 


1.S13. 











All the elm. hut the la.^t tv.-o d. in Lvnn. Mass. 



>,o. 14. 
















Andrews Blany Breed 13, 


b. Julv 


27, 


1799. 


d. 


.May 


7, 


1SS3. 


r^Iarried 


Oct. 


3. 


1S21, 










Abigail Allen. 


b. 














Allen Blany 15, 


b. June 


s, 


1S22. 


d. 


Jan. 


22, 


1SS6. 


Lydia Maria 


b. July 


3'-\ 


1S24, 










Sylvester B. 


b. June 


I, 


1S26, 


d. 


Nov. 


2, 


1S26. 


Catherine Allen 


b. April 


20, 


1S2S, 


d. 


. Aug. 


^9, 


1S52. 


Svlvester Barlow 


b. .Mard 


1 27, 


1^30, 










Diaries Otis 


b. May 


22, 


1S32, 











Andrews Blany fouu<l his \v. in Marblehead, Mass. 

Xo. 15. 

Allen Blany Breed 14, b. June S, 1.S22, d. Jan. 22, 1SS6. 

Married July S, 1849, 

Mary E. Osborne b. 

Elizabeth Francis b. March 2;^, 1S50. 
Mar}- Abigail b. Oct. 12, 1.S53, d. Aug. 26th, 1859. 

Lydia Maria b. Aug. 9, 1857, d. Dec. 16, 1861. 

Evelyn Augusta b. March 26, 1S69, 

At the death of Allen B. Breed, the following appeared in 
a local paper of Lynn, Mass. : — " He was born in this city. He 
was possessed of an active, energetic temperament, his inclina- 
tion tending towards pursuits that called for stirring rather than 
sedentary employment ; at the age of 17, he entered the service 
of William Hadley, who had recently established a bakery in 
Lynn, in the capacity of a driver, and subsequently, by pur- 
chase, assumed control and proprietorship, continuing in the 



business, we think, twenty-five years, a portion of wliieh time 
he was also associated v.ith William L. vScltuan, in the lixery 
stable business. Abont the year iSjo, he l:)uilt the large stable 
on Warren street, and de\'oted nearly his whr)le attention to that 
vocation from that time until his death. As a business man, 
he was active, thorough, upright and reliable, deiiving real 
satisfaction from close attention to the duties devolving upon 
him, and from the approbation and esteem of his patrons. He 
loved the truth and his wurd was implicitl>- relied uptMi by all 
who knew him. He was outspoken in condenuiation of all 
fraud and deceit, and would never tolerate injustice or wrong 
doing in anyone. He delighted in bestowing aid upon the de- 
serving, and was never known to refuse any call for charitable 
work. 

He was married to Miss Mary K. Osborne, of South Dan- 
vers, who \\ith two dau., ^Irs. I'jnory Robinson, and a }-onnger 
sister survive him. Two brothers, Sylvester B. and Charles O., 
and a sister, Mrs. J. W. Tewk^bury, also mourn his de- 
cease. 

His home relations were of the most pleasant nature, as he 
was an affectionate, confiding husl'and atid tender parent. A 
friend, in writing a consolatary note to the bereaved family, 
well says, ' He was a true and good man, prompt and warm in 
his friendship, without ostentation and deceit.' Genial, hearty 
and helpful, he had a genuine love for the good and true He 
answered th.e last sunnnons without fear, and though he ex- 
pressed a desire to linger longer with his loved ones, he sub- 
mitted without a murmur to the decree bidding good-bye as 
peacefully as though going on a pleasant journey. His loss 
will be severely felt, but leaving a memory fragrant with kind- 
ness and love, and he will ever live in the hearts of those for 
whom he cared with so much solicitude. 

His funeral took place on Monday last, and was very largely 
attended. The services were conducted by Rev. N. Wright, 
who paid a touching and truthful tribute to the departed. The 
floral testimonials were elegant and appropriate, consisting ot 
a pillow with the words ' Husband and Father,' and a star bear- 
ing the word ' Pa.' a crown, cross, a broken wreath with sickle 
and a ba'^ket of llowers. The rcTuains were follov/ed to Pine 
Grove Ceraeterv bv a long line of carriages." 



No. i6. 














Thomas Andrews HrecL 


li2,b. Dec. 


12, 


1768, 


d. 


Feb. 


16, 1841- 


Married 


>hu- 


9, 


1793- 








Hannah Newhall 


b. July 


K'. 


1767, 


d. 


Oct. 


2, 1825. 


Andrews 17, 


b. Sep. 


20, 


1794, 


d. 


April 


20, iSSi. 


Hannah 


b. Feb. 


26, 


1796. 








Henry A. 


b. April 


-'. 


179S, 


d. 


April 


i.S,S7. 


Daniel N. 


b. Jan. 


3. 


1800, 








Joseph Elaner 


b. May 


I f, 


1S03, 


d. 


Nov. 


12, 1SS6. 


Jacob 


b. March 


I, 


iS«:.7, 









Thomas A. Breed lived first at Solcm, Mass., and then Mt. 
Vernon, X. H. His w. was a dau. of Daniel Newhall and Sarah 
Batehelor, and Sarah was a dau. of Henry Batchelor, whose 
first w. was Jerusha lireed 5. Hannah in. Sept. 21, 1S17, 
William Rhodes. Hetiry A. m. Sept. i, 1S22, Mary W. Adams. 
He was m. three times. 

At the time of his death one of the local papers said, ^' He 
was the oldest member of the Masonic fraternity in the city, 
having been made a Mason in 1822. His death resulted from 
old age, no disease being apparent, and during his short con- 
finenient to the house, he has been visited and cared for by his 
Masonic brethren. 

?Ie was very prominent as a business man as early as 1S36, 
when he purchased the old mill property on Water Hill and 
dug out more than an acre of land for a new reservoir, built a 
large brick factory, etc. Some time after, this property was 
sold by Mr. Breed to Nehemiah Berry, who for many years did 
a successful business in .apices, etc. During this year (1836) 
Mr. Breed laid out several new streets and erected nearly 400 
dwellings and other buildings and a wharf, but with tlie fail- 
ure of the Nahant Bank, financial disaster came to him, check- 
ing his business operations for a while. At this time there were 
only seventeen brick buildings in the town and only six of any 
material, above two stories. The valuation of the dwellings 
averaged S500. 

He was the owner of a large portion of " Rocks Pastiire,' 
now known as the Plighlands, and did a vast amount of work 
on that territory, in laying out and grading streets, the expense 
of which absorbed nearly the whole amount of his receipts from 
the sale of lots ; adding to the attractions of the place but not to 
his possessions. 



He was also largely engaged in the ' Kasteni land specu- 
lations,' which ^iroved so disastrous to many pcjople in Maine 
and elsewhere. In this he claimed to have lost S20o,ooo. 

Mr. Breed v\-as one of the 200 Lynn citizens who went to 
California in 1S49. On arriving in San Francisco, he engaged 
in the lumber business quite extensively, continuing in the 
trade for about a year. He then engaged in general land busi- 
ness, and in 1S50 and 1851, he built two of the largest whar\-es 
in the city — the Market street and the California \\-har\'es. In 
company with Thomas O. ]>arkin, he originated the town of 
Sutterville. While in California he was estimated to be worth 
$500,000, but met with reverses which made him comparatively 
poor again. In 1857 he returned to Lynn. 

]SIr. Breed built the fine house known at present as the 
Tirrel Mansion, which at the time of its erection, was called the 
finest dwelling in Essex Count}-. He also erected the elegant 
block on the corner of Federal Street and Western Avenue, de- 
stroyed by fire a few >-ears since and rebuilt by L- Beebe & 
Sons. He founded the 'Lynn Mechanics' Institute,' which 
built Exchange Hall ; wns one of the founders of the Mass- 
achusetts Horticultural vSociety ; for a long term of years an 
active member of the Essex Agricultural Society, and presided 
at the last meeting of the Lynn members : one of the principal 
movers in founding the Unitarian Society- in Lynn, and the last 
survivor of the original corporators of the "Lynn Institution 
for Savings," instituted in 1S26. 

Mr. Breed retained his faculties, to a remarkable degree. 
Only three hours before his death he was sitting in his chair 
conversing with his old friend Benjamin Sprague, and spoke of 
his approaching Sgth birthday, inviting Mr. Sprague to be 
present with other friends at a reception on that day. He left 
no family except a son, who has been an inmate of an insane 
as5dum for 37 years. His wife died maiay years since." 

Another paper said "Mr. Breed, while a bo}-, happened to 
attract the attention of a gentleman who was temporarily here, 
and by his means was entered for an apprenticeship at the then 
large and leading grocery and mercantile house of Skinner >S: 
Flurd, in Charlestown After serving his full time there, he re- 
turned to Lynn, strongl}' impressed, as he often afterv.'ard asserted , 
with the single idea of doing .some good work for his native 



town. This was ill 1819. Obtaining- encouragement from his 
late emp]o\-ers aiul others, lie established a kirge grocer\- busi- 
ness in Market vSquare, \\'e>t j.yiiii. . The phirv was then, as to 
business, in a condition so crude and rudinientar}-, as t(j-day 
would baldly be tolerated in the most obscure town in Xew 
England. Mr. Breed set liimself to its development and prog- 
ress. Soon he had an insurance office in operation, the activit\- 
of 'Lynn Mechanics' Bank,' much increased, and a local trade 
in lumber established and put on a very broad foundation. A 
lyceum, a temperance society, and other like things followed. 
Among them may be simply mentioned the then startling inno- 
vation of a stove in the old meeting-house, obtained by his 
personal efforts against a very stout resistance. 

No room can be taken here for minute mention of his sub- 
sequent operations. Prominent among them and always to be 
remeral)ered witli gratitude In" the poor, was the intioduction 
of a plan of real estate sale, liy which the mechanic could buy 
a house-lot, build his cellar and give a partial mortgage back to 
the grantor, when he would put up a house for him and give 
him time for payment. If tradition errs not, this mode had been 
almost unknown here before : tor tlie wealth}- chose to keep 
their fields, and the poor had no lot.-^ within their reach. But 
he bought up land in quantities, laid out IhirtN'-fu'e new streets 
and lots uncounted, and made the workmen of Lynn bus}- with 
earning and paying for each a home and a fireside of his own. 

Mr. Breed's operations in Jvistern lands, his coloin- in 
Darien, Georgia, his silk-jri-intiug establishment at Water Hill, 
his foundation of the sh(jrt-lived Xahant Bank, his later and 
greater movements in California, his ' Lynn Mechanics' Insti- 
tute,' wdiich was to occuj^y the i)resent Exchange Hall and be 
a public educator, his manufiictory of bone fertilizer and his last 
speculation in the Highlands, these only can be named here. 
Besides these, it must not be forgotton that he set up the banner 
of the Second Congregational or rnitarian Societ}'.and sustained 
it, financially in his share, fur a long time, and morally to his 
latest days. Of the several corporators he remained the sole 
survivor. In 1S73, at the semi-centennial, only four remained, 
viz: Henry Xewhall, Ivsq , Col. Timothy Muiiroe and William 
Chase, Esq. Col. Munroe died within a month after. 

The Masonic Order wa.s a favorite object with him, and he 



was also an Odd F'V'lIow of higli des^ree, hjlin.o- in Ins time, everv 
chair in tliat inslitulion. Few men can point to a broader field 
of friendships in a lonu' life, nor have better title to happiness 
in such a view ; yet as he often said, better than all of them wa- 
the look on the face of a man who grasped his hand one dav in 
Boston saying, ' Mr. Breed, you arc the man who gave me work 
when r was hungry, and clothes when I had none to wear." 

"The only sister of Mr. Breed died earl\-, leaving two 
daughters, one of whom afterwards became Mrs. John B. Alley, 
having been brought up in Mr. Breed's own family. The other, 
was reared in the family of Andrews Breed, his sister is the sur- 
viving widow of Thomas F. Bancroft, 7£sq. To these ladies it is 
due, that the last days of this venerable old merchant were 
made not only comfortable but full of peaceful enioyment. Yet 
others, not to be numbered, seemed to press forward in their 
efforts to add something of delight to his latter days, and never 
a one but he piously marked and remembered." 

" He bore up the standard of a hale old age till the end of 
winter : and then, smitten by the chill of the spring, he slowly 
weakened till, even while speaking with his attendant, his 
breath went out and returned no more. But his record is writ- 
ten. He was many times rich, many times in adversity. But 
he was never unkind, ne\'er morose, nor wanting in a generous 
hope. ' In a better state than this may we all be granted leave 
to meet his new and blessed being. ' " 

Col. Daniel N. m. Sep. 14, 1S25, Catherine Childs, and d. 
in California, leaving a widow and chn. 

Joseph ]j. was a clergyman in Brooklyn, and his w. was a 
Miss Dalton. 

No. 17. 

Andrews Breed 16, b. Sep. 20, 1794, d. April 20, iSSi. 

Married Aug. 29, 1S22, 

Susan Davis b. April 1795, d. June 2, 1S6S. 

Edward Andrews b. Sep. 20, 1S24, 

Susan Davis b. Feb. 2;,, 1X31, 

Francis PfabodyiSb. Dtji:. 7, i8;i4, 

Anna Louisa 19, b. Nov. 6, i.S;,;, 

Hon. .Vndrews Breed was an active and useful citizcTi of 
Lynn, Mass. He held man}- public oftices including that of 



Mayor: v.-a> Adjutant of the Lynn Rec;iinent dnrin^T the War 
of iSij ; died at Lancaster and was buried in his l.)""t at Lynn 
At fmiily prayers, in April, i8Si, the passa-e [vvm the Lible 
which m turn came to him and uhieli h.e read in apparent 
health, was : "The night is far ..pent, the dav is at hand " In 
half an hour afterwards he fell down with appoplexv uncon- 
scious, and never spoke again. Plis w. was a dau. of Jonathan 
and Mary Chapman Davis. 



No. iS. 

Francis Peabody Breed 17, b. Dec. 
Married Sep. 

Mary F. Woodbun.' b. 

Edw. Woodbun- b. Jan. 

Gertrude b. Aug. 

Xo. 19. 

Anna Louisa Breed 17. b. Xov. 6, iS;7, 

^tarried Aug. 19,' 1S57.' 

Fnoch S. Juhnson, b. April 12, 1S2S, 

Snsan I. . Johnson b. Xov. 20, 1S58, 

Otis S. Johnson b. J,ui. lo, iS6r. 

Arthur S.Johnson b. March 24, :S69, (i. Auic. 17 iS6- 

Knoch S. Johnson was b, in Savannah, Georgia. Hisfathc. 
Otis Johnson was b. in Lviui, Ma<s.. Jan. 26, rs'^-o • h-~- d "pelV 
17, 1S70. His mother \-ir^infa Taylor was b^in Lffingham Q)'' 
Ua., Dec. rSo2, and d. in Lynn, Feb. 5, iSSr. 



7, 


1S34. 


10, 


1S57, 


b5, 


iSf.T, 


iS, 


1S64, 



er 



No. 20. 



Allen Bread 2, 


b. Aug. 


30, 


1660, 


Married 


May 


22, 


r6S4, 


Elizabeth Ballard, 


b. 






Nathaniel 


b. Aug. 


24, 


16S5, 


Elizabeth, 


b. J:,n.' 


-4, 


16S7, 


lohn 21, 


b. Oet. 


!0, 


'6S9, d. A) 


Mary. 


b. ,^[arcl 


1 21, 


1692, 


Rebecca, 


b. fan. 


26. 


1(^94, 


llfOzib.ih 


b. baie 


'9. 


"■^97. 


Josiah 


1'. 'lan. 


-9, 


1 70 1, 



Elizabeth Ballard and J..hn Breed b. i,, Lynn, ^Liss. 



No. 21. 



John Breed 20, 


b. Oct. 


10, 


1 6.S9, 


d. April 17 


, 1774. 


Married 


Jan. 


2, 


i7'7, 






Lydia Gott 


b. April 




1 699, 


d. Any. 


17S9. 


Allen 


b. Oct. 


26, 


171S, 






John 22, 


b. Sep. 


■3. 


1720, 


d. 


17S0. 


Nathaniel 25, 


b. July 


22, 


172S, 






Josiah 27, 


b. Dec. 


16, 


173T, 


d. Dec. 12, 


1790. 


Deliverance 


b. Oct. 


fj. 


i7;6. 







John Breed b. in L}'nn, ^Mass. His w. was from Wenham, 
Mass. 



No. 22. 



17SC. 



1S06. 
"I, 1S15. 

John Breed moved from Lynnfield, Ma.ss , to New Ipswich, 
N. H., about 1764. Plis w. was a dau. of "Elisha Newhall and 
Jane Breed. 



John Breed 21, 


b. Sep. 


13, 


1720, d. 




.Married 


June 


i^, 


!743. 




Jane Ncuhall 


b. Aucj. 








Allen 23, 


b. 




1744. cl. 




Lydia 24, 


b. 




1745. d. 


Dec. 



No. 2- 



Allen Breed 


22. 


b. 




1744. 


^Married 




Jan. 


IS, 


i7'j7. 


Lvdia Man^f 


ield, 


b. 






Lydia, 




b. 




176S, 


John, 




b. 




1769, 


Elisha. 




b. 




1 77 1, 


Allen, 




b. Feb. 


29> 


1772, 


Jane, 




b. 




1775, 


Enoch, 




b. 




177S, 



d. rSo6. 

d. 1807. 

d. March S, 1S49. 



A history of New Ipswich, N. H., says: "Allen Breed 
was a son of John Breed (22), who came from Lyimfield and 
settled in the southern part of the town about 1764, on what is 
still known as the Breed Farm. He reared a numerous family, 
two of wliom were deaf and dumlj, and after his death Allen 
(23), remained on the paternal farm and became quire a wealthy 
farmer. He was a soldier in the Re\-ulution for a short time. 
They were a consumptive family and a long row of stones in the 
south burving ground tells the sad storv." 



On Jnn. .7, 1767, lie signed, with others, a petition to 
His Kxt.lleiicy, Jolm Wci.tworth, Ivsq., Capt.-Gen'l Co-er- 
nor and Conunander-in-Clii.f. in and over His Majesty's Prov- 
ence of New Hampshire ; J - ^ ^ ^ 
The Honorable, His Majesty's Council and flouse of Ren- 
resentat,vesof said Province in General Assembly convened " 
asking for the appointment of a Committee to decide upon' a 
location for a Meeting Hon.e. A Committee of the town op- 
posed the petition. A Committee of the House of Representa- 
tives visited the town and decided that the site for the new Aleet- 
mg House should be the same as alreadv selected 

The size finally agreed upon was 60x45 feet, and 26 feet 
posts. It was " Voted that the Inhabitance find Provision for 
the Labrows a raising the M. H. at the Meetinghouse spot • 
also that the Carpinders shall chuse the Hands for raisiiU ' 
^^Aotcd the Committee provide Liquor for said Raisin-'" 
Allen Breed (23) had occupied a pew in the old Meeting 
House, on the left hand side of the middle aisle " 
_ After the completion of the system of numbering, adopted 
m this book, the following notes were received fron. Dr. I.ewis 

; ^f ^,''^°^^" '"'^'^ '^'^ ''''' ''' '^'^ photograph of the 

diest^ Allen, b. Feb. 20, 1773, had a son Leonard whose record 
IS as 101 OW.; • 



Leonard Breed, 


b. March 


-,/- 


rSoS, d. 


MarriLci 


Dec. 


2S, 


1S33, 


Marian Clark, 


b. April 


4, 


iSio, 


Lucy, 


b. Oct. 


22, 


1S34, 


Augustus L., 


h. Julv 


8, 


1S36, 


Mary, 


b. March 


12, 


1S39, 


William H., 


b. .\[ay 


20, 


1841, 


Esther A., 


b. Dec. 




1S44, d. July 


Clark \V., 


b. Feb. 


5, 


Jane L., 


b. Sept. 


5. 


1849, 


Miion C, 
Julia A., 


1). 

b June 


2f, 


1851, d. July 



IS54. 
IS54. 



All of these children were b. in Pittsfield, \'t 






r' 



\ — - 



Lucy, 




b. Oct. 


22, 1S34, 


Married 




Jan. 


I, 1S50, 


John xMilk, 




b. April 


19, 181S, 


Charles, 








Clarence, 








William, 








Herbert, 








Minnie, 








Lucy Breed in, 


, at 


Apcr Jtinctioii, Mass. 


Au^^ustus L., 




b. July 


S, 1836, 


Married 




Nov. 


7, 1S5S, 


Harriet M. Dur 


kee, 


b. 


183S, 


Nellie E., 




b. Sept. 


I, 1S59, d. April 


Ernest L., 




b. Feb. 


13, 1862. 


Allen F., 




b. lune 


29, 1S69, 


Ervie X., 




b. Dec. 


27, 1S71, 



23, ISS7. 



Atigusttis I/, enlisted as a private in Co. B. glh Regt. Vt. 
Vols., Dec. iS, 1S63, and served nntil the close of the war. He 
was in the following battles : 

Newport Barracks, Feb. 2, 1S64 ; Chapin's Farm, Sept. 29, 
1864; Fair Oak.-^ Oct. 27, 1S64 ; Fall of Richmond, April 3, 
1S65. 

The mother wash, at Crown Point, X. Y., and all the child- 
ren were b. in Chittendon, Vt. 

Nellie E. m. May 3, 1SS2, Jno. E. Fisk, b. May 10, 1S53, 
at Rutland, \'i., They had one son James. 

Earnest L. m. July 3, 1SS5, Minnie H. Morse, b. Aug. 14, 
1S61, in Illinois. They had one son, Bert L., b. Aug. 22, iSSS, 
at ^lillville, California. 

Mary, b. March 12, 1.539, n^' March 7, 1S64, Nelson Coburn, 
b. Aug. 31, 1S37, at Brooktield, \'t. They had two children, 
Elmer and Zilpha. 

William H., b. May 20, 1S41, m. Dec. 7, 1S65, Matilda A. 
Davis, b. April 4, 1S43, at Pittsfield, Vt. 

He enlisted Aug. 21, rS6i, as private in Co. G.. 5th Regt. 
Vt. Vols., 2nd Brigade, 2nd Division of 6th Army Corps, and 
re-enlisted Dec. 15, 1S63, discharged June 29, 1^65. His Regt , 
the 5th, arrived at Washington Sept. 25, 1S61, and cro.sscd over 
into \'irginia Se[)t. 27th, at Chain Bridge, eight miles above 
Washington. 



He was in the following battles : 

U-es Mills, Va., Ajml i6, 1862; Williaiusbur-, May 5, 
1S62 ; Geldings Farm. Jur.e 26, 1S62 ; Savage Station, June 29! 
1S62 ; White Oak Swamp, June 30. 1862 : Maryis Heights, May 
3, 1863 ; Salem Heights, May 4, 1S63 : Fredericksburg. June 5, 
1863 ; Gettysburg, Pa., July 3, KS63 ; Funkstown, Md.", July 10! 
1865: Rappahannock Station, Nov. 7, 1S63 ; Wilderness, May 
5 to 10, 1S64 ; Spottsylvania. May 10 to tS, 1S64 ; Cold Harbor, 
June 1 to 12, 1S64 ; Petersburg, June 18, 1S64 ; Charleston, Aug. 
21, 1S64; Obcquon, Sept. 13, 1864 ; Winchester, Sept. 19, 1864; 
Fishers Hill, Sept. 21 and 22, iS6j ; Cedar Creek, Oct. 19, 1864 ' 
Petersburg, March 25 and 27, 1S65 ; Petersburg. April 2, iS6s' 
Besides these regular battles he had many little brushes on 
the picket and skirmish lines. 

He was detailed at Gen. Gettey's head quarters as a sharp 
shooter, through the A\allcy Campaign, under Sheridan, in 1S64 
He was wounded May 12, 1S64 and June 3, 1S64. 
He held the rank of Corporal, Sergeant. Orderly Sergeant 
and Lieutenant. Xever saw a Rebel prison, but saw some hard- 
ship and genuine fun, and most always had plenty to eat, drink 
and to wear and came out a comparatively well man. 
He now resides at Pittsf^eld, Rutland' county, Vt. 
Their children were Lewis S. and S. Lewella. 
Lewis S . b. Xov. 4, 1S66, at Pittsfield, \'t.. m. Jan. 22. 1S91, 
atStockbridge, Vt.. Helen M. Carmll, b. May 5, 1,870, at Stock- 
bridge. AVhen f-urteen N'cars old he became^i competitor for 
a ^ prize offered by the University of \'ermont. A local paper 
gives^the following account of the award : 

"An unusual though not unifjue competition has just been 
completed by the award of prizes offered a vear ago for the best 
yield of corn and r)otatoe,-. rai,-,ed b\- A'ermont bovs under seven- 
teen years of age. Frank J. Hubbard, of Whiting, received a 
first pnze of S25, and a scholarship in the University for the 
production of 122 bushels of dry shelled corn to the acre, and 
Lewis S. Breed, of Goshen, a first prize of the .same value for 
the production of 492 busl-.d. of potatoes to the acre. There 
were 305 competitors from 146 towns, and as many of the boys 
raised both corn and potat-x-., the number of plots under cultiva- 
tion was about 400. The avera.^^e production of \'ermont farms 
lor the year 1878 was thirty-nine bushels of corn to the acre and 



140 bushels of potatoes, so that in spite of an unfavorable year, 
the boys have more than trebled the avera.qe prnduction. The 
competition was suggested and carried out by tlie State lTniv<T- 
sity and Agricultural College, \vlio.-:e efforts to raise the standard 
of agriculture are cordially appreciated throughout the common- 
wealth, A similar competition has been maintained in Maine 
for the first two months with results in the last instance and 
somewhat better than those obtained in \'crmont. The value 
of agricultural colleges has been sometime.-, questioned on the 
ground that they taught a great deal of theory and very little 
practice ; but it is an excellent coiribination of theory and prac- 
tice which can rai-e 492 bushels of potatoes on an acre of Vermont 
land." 

He was graduated from the Boston Dental College in the 
Class of 1SS9. Was appointed a member of the IJoard of Clinical 
Instructors of the same college June iS, 1S90. 

Clark V/,, b. Feb. 5. 1S51, at Pittsfield, m. Oct. 23, 18S5, 
Helen May Martin, b. May 26, 1S64, at South Shaftsburg, Vt. 

Jane L, b. Sept. 5, 1S49, m. Jan. 7, 1S74, at Pittsfield, Vt, 
Fred. Miner, b. April, 1S50, at Legden, Mass. 

Julia A , b. June 21, 1S56, m. Oct. 22, 1S7S, John Hunt, b. 
vSept. 12, 1S54, ^^ Stockbridge. Their children were Ethel, 
Arthur, Ruby and Tavern. 

No. 24. 

Lydia Breed 22, b. 1745, d. Dec. 21, 1815. 

Married 
Daniel Mansfield, b. Dec. 27, 1741, d. .^hlrch 29, 1S16. 

Jacob Mansfield b. Oct. 2^, 176'^, 

Daniel Mansfield, b. .March 3, 176S, 

Lydia Mansfield, b. June 9,1769, 

Joel Mansfield, b. July 2,1771, 

Mar>' .Mansfield, b. .March 7, 1773, 

Thomas .Mansfield b. Sept. 8, 1775, 

David Mansfield, b. Sept. 7,1777. 

Betsey Mansfield, b. May 26, 1779, 

Israel Mansfield, b. .March 11, 1781, 

Newell Mansfield, b. fan. 11,1784, 

William Mansfield b. Feb. 23. 17S6. 

Sally Mansfield, b. Aiit;-. 11,1788, 

Daniel Mansfield was son of Deacon Daniel and Lydia 
(Newhall) Mansfield. He was b. in T,vnnfield, Mass. Thev 



were residing in 1765, on their New Ipswicli larni, on the town 
line near Mason Villagu, (now Greenville), X. II. Their chn 
were all b. in New Jpswieh, N. H. 



Nathaniel Breed 21, b. July 22, 172S, 
Married 

John, h. Oct. 15, 1757, 

Thomas K. 26, b. April 10, 1761, d. Ftb. 2, 1849. 

Abigail, b. 

Nathaniel Breed was living- in Easton, Barnstable county, 
Mass., in 1757, and in 1760 he moved to Stidbury, Mass., and 
in 176S to Parkersfield, (now Nt^lson), N. U. In April, 1775, 
he was Surgeon of the Company of men who left Nelson tuider 
Lieut. Brown, and when they joined Col Reed's Regiment, he 
became Surgeon's mate of that regiment. 

"John Breed was b. in Easton. He volunteered on the 19th 
or 20th of April, 1775, in the afternoon, in the New Hampshire 
Militia, under Lieut. Abijah Brown, and marched from Nelson 
to Lexington, and thence to Boston, where he was enrolled in 
the Company of Capt. Ezra Towne, of New Ipswich. On Tues- 
day before the Battle of Breed's Hill, Col. Reed's Regiment was 
marched from Medford to Charlestown Neck and stationed there 
until the morning of the 17th of June, when the roar of British 
cannon was heard from Boston and the regiment was moved 
forward (see 2S). John Breed had his hat knocked off by a 
musket ball an^l another struck his cartouch box, passing 
through between the covering and the wood. In the retreat he 
left the Company with the wounded and went to Medford under 
Lieut. Josiah Brown. He remained with the regiment until 
Jan. I, 1776. In June, 1776, he went to Cambridge and enlisted 
for five months, under Capt. W'arren, of Cambridge, Mass., in 
Col. Wheelock's Mass. Regiment, and marched to Ticouderoga, 
N. Y., remaining until his term expired, lieing engaged in 
scouting, fortiiying and skirmishing. In June, 1780, he enlisted 
for six months under Capt. vSi-alding, and marched to the North 
River, and was hiatitjued at h'ishkill and at West Point ; when 
Gen. l>enedict .Arnold wa.s in command, was detailed one of six- 
teen as a guard to six hundred head of cattle at Robinson's farm 



and at Camp pond, during which lime 150 British horsemen ad- 
vanced to capture the guard and cattle, but the Yankees were 
too quick for them and saved themselves and all the catllo. In 
Sept., 1777, he volunteered and marched to Saratoga and Fort 
Edward ; was engaged mostly in scouting parties, and was on 
the opposite side of the river \\ hen Uurgovne surrendered. After 
the war he settled in Xelson, and in 1S2S, he removed to Sandy 
Creek." ^ i'fi'^-^ '>f~ 

BATTLK OF "BUNKER HILL." 

The battle between the American forces, which were not 
yet an organized army, and the Eritish troops under command 
of Major- General Howe, on June 17, 1775. took place on an ele- 
vation of land between the Charles and Mystic rivers. North of 
tlie city of Boston. 

This piece of land is a peiiinsula a mile long and less than 
one-half a mile wide, runnitig from the mainland Southeastward, 
and was, in 177^^. connected with the mainland by a causeway, 
which was often overflowed b}' the waters of the Charles river 
on its West side and the Mystic river on its East side. Com- 
munication v,-as bad v/ith Bo-ton b\' ferries. 

From the Northwest end the land rises in a large hill, no 
feet high, which is known as Bunker's Hill. South of this is 
another hill, sevent^'-five feet high, called Breed's Hill, and 
Southeast of this another hill, called Moulton's Point, thirt\'-five 
feet high. 

The proper name by which this battle should be known, 
and the name of the one ofhcer who was the superior in com- 
mand, have been subjects for discussion since that time. The 
name of the man we need not discuss at present, but the other is 
one which we now wish to examine. It has thus far borne two 
names, " Bunker's Hill " and " Breed's Hill." 

The results of this fight was so important that our country- 
men ha\-e been glad to do honor to those who participated in it. 
The first commemorative parade took place in Charlestown. in 
17S6. The first anniversary celebration was made by the Charles- 
town Artiller}', in 1794. In the same year a monument was 
erected by King Solomon's Lodge, and dedicated December 2d, 
to the memory of Joseph Warren, and it was r.laced on the spot 
\Vhere that noble officer fell, on Breed's Hill. On June 7, 1:^23, 



the Governor of Arassacbusetls npprovcl an Act of the Legishi- 
ture, estabhshing " Tlic Bunker Hill Moimnit-nt Association." 

Why '■ Bunker Hill :^ " 

In 1775, the C'''!iiniiuee of Safety of Charlcstown requested 
the Council of War to defend "Bunker Hill in the city of 
Charlcstown," and left it to their discretion as to how the work 
should be done. 

The Council of War complied wdth tliis request, and on June 
16, 1775, sent three regiments and a company of artillery to for- 
tify Piunker's Hill The orders were given to Col. William 
Prescott to be communicated after passing Charlcstown Neck 
(which is the isthmus between the mainland and Bunker Hill). 
Those orders commanded Prescott to build fortifications to be 
planned by the Chief Engineer, Col. Richard Gridley, and de- 
fend them until he should be relieved. After the battle, Col. 
Prescott wrote to John Adams, then a delegate to Congress, 
(Frothingham''s '"Siege of Boston," page 395). 

" On the 16 June, in the evening, I received orders to 
march to Breed's Hill, in Cliarlcstown. We arrived at the spot ; 
the lines were drawn by the engineer, and we began the intrench- 
raent about twelve o'clock." 

The mere fact that the orders contemplated the defence of 
Bunker Hill, before the exact spot was selected, and the other 
fact that the British engineer, Lieut. Page, so named the battle 
in his plans, is not sufticient reason for continuing the error. 
Ivieut. Page wished to give it its proper name. He found that 
there was a Breed's Plill and a Bunker Hill. He saw the orders 
contemplating the defence of " Bunker's Hill in the city of 
Charlcstown," so he drew his map, and named the battle ac- 
cording to the orders, then he named the hill where the battle 
occurred according to the orders and so we have his plans, show- 
ing the North (Bunker's) Hill, with the name " Breed" on it, 
and the vSouth (Ikeetl's) Hill with the r.ame " Bunker " on it, 
and the American historians ha\-e fjllowed like sheep, calling it 
"The Battle of liunker Hill," and '.pologizing for so doing. 
Mr. Frothingham says Bunker's Hill was " a well-known public 
place," but Breed's Hill was not " j-revious to 1775" — who 
cares ? He also says : " This hill was called Green's Hill in a 
British descrij^lion of the ti,>wn in 177 s." liritish descriptions of 
our towns, or uur larger cities, are \ery ajjt to be wrong even now. 



But the sanie author gives auother reason for naming the 
battle "Bunker Hill,'' and it is "a rouser ; " he says : "Be- 
sides, the name ' Breed's Hill ' will not do near so well for 
patriotic purposes. 

Thus, in the ' Declaration of Independence' — a poem — the 
author writes : — 

" Dun clouds of stnoke ! avaunt ! Mount Breed, all hail ! 
There Glory circled patriot Warren's head." 

We respectfully submit: The name, "Battle of Breed's 
Hill " should be adopted, 

Because the battle was began there, the redoubt stood there, 
Warren fell there, the battle was decided there, and both monu- 
ments have been there erected. 

Besides these, of course, we have another reason, viz. : That 
the hill was named for the Breed pastures South of the redoubt, 
which were owned by Ebenezer Breed, the great-grandson of 
John Breed, who was the second child of that famil>- name born 
on American soil, and the fourth son of the father of all the 
Breeds in America. 

No. 26. 

Thomas K. Breed 25, b April 10, 1761, d. I'eb. 2. 1S49. 
Married Dec. 15, 1791, 

Polly Keys b. 1771. 

Thomas K. Breed was b. in Sudbury, Mass. (see 25). About 
the last of November, 1775, while living in Parkersfield, X. H., 
he went to Winter Hill and enlisted in Capt. Towne's company 
for one year. He was but fourteen years old, but his tather was 
with that Regiment and his brother in that Company. After 
the evacuation of Boston (March 17, 1776), and the departure 
of many of the troops he was left with his father to assist in 
caring for the sick, and he left the service April 10, 1776, having 
secured a substitute. In July, 1777, he volunteered for two 
months and joined the Company of Capt. Stone, at New Marl- 
boro, and on arriving at Manchester, \'t., was. attached to the 
brigade of Gen. John Stark, and was in the battle of Benning- 
ton, Vt , Aug. 16, 1777. In July, 17S0, he enlisted for three 
months under Capt. Spaulding, and going to We.-^l roint, joined 
the reginic-nt of Col. Joseph Nichols, fie was m. Dec. 15, i;9i, 



in iVelson, N. II. He liad tluee or four elm. wliile lie lived in 
Nelson, and then moved to Antrim, where he had more chn. 
He also resided a while in New Ipswieh, X. II. and in Lowell, 
J^Iass. In Oel()l)er, iS6S, his widow was livin- in Antrim. 



No. 27. 



Josiah Breed 2[, b. Dec. 


16, 


1731, 


d. Dec. 


12, 1790. 


Married Dec. 


iS, 


1755, 






Mary Breed a, b. Jan. 


6, 


1733. 


d. May 


7, 1767. 


Mehetabel b. Jan. 


s, 


1757, 






Allen _2S, b. July 


14, 


1-59. 


d. April 


2, 1S42. 


Nathaniel b. Aug. 


30. 


1761, 






Charles b. Aug. 


3") 


1761, 






Joseph b. Mch. 


29, 


1764, 






Married 2d wife June 


30- 


176S, 






Hannah Bachelor b. 




1729, 


d. Aug. 


16, 1S05. 


Mary b. April 


29. 


1772, 


d. Nov. 


17. 1S13. 



Josiah Breed was b. in l.ynn, Mass His 2d w. was a dau. 
of Henry Bachelor. He was captured by Ihitish soldiers during 
the battle of Concord, and on May 28, 1775, he was exchanged 
for Lieutenant Gould, who had been wounded and captured at 
the bridge, and v.'hose income was ,/," 1,900 per annum, and who 
was said to have offered .{,'2,000 for his ran.som. Josiah made 
his brother Allen his Administrator. 

Daniel Breed was guardian for his 2d w. Hannah and dau- 
Mar\'. The partition of property was made March 5, 1792, by 
John Mansfield, John Flagg and H/.ra Breed 238. One third 
was set off to the widow Hannah, some land was set off to Me- 
hetabel his dau., and she was to receive beside, the following 
amounts from the sons :— Joseph, /27, iis. 5j2d. ; Charles' 
/15. los. 2,Vul.; Allen, /,32. 15s. 10- :d.; Nathaniel, ^4, 9s. lo^? jd'. 
Receipts were given by I):miel Newhall. His estate amounted 
to /7^\5. 13^- 5f^- No rei-ord is made that Allen received his 
share or j)aid as ordered. 

Mehetabel m. Theophilus Bachelor. 



No. 28. 



Allen Breed 


27, 


h. July 


14. 


1759. 


d. 


April 


2, 


1S42. 


Married 




July 




I7S1, 










Lucy Taylor 




b. 




1762, 


d. 


Marcl) 


23) 


1S25. 


Josiah 29, 




b. April 


25, 


I7S2, 


d. 


March 




1855- 


Melietabel 


32, 


b. Dec. 


s, 


I7S3, 


d. 


Feb. 




1S56. 


Lucy 




b. Dec. 


17, 


178=;, 


d. 


fulv 


2, 


1819. 


Mary 33. 




b. Mav 


20, 


I7S9, 


d. 


May 


26, 


1S69. 


Milly 




b. Feb. 


28, 


1790, 










Allen 34, 




b. Jan. 


20, 


1792, 


d. 


March 


13, 


1S27. 


Rachel 42, 




b. Feb. 


s, 


1794, 










Hannah 




b. Dec. 


14, 


1795, 


d. 






1S56. 


Ira 




b. Dec. 


23. 


1797, 


d. 


Jan. 


9, 


1S23. 


Geo. Washington 


b. Jan. 


14, 


iSuo, 










Harriet 47, 




b. Feb. 


2S, 


IS02, 










Lucretia 




b. July 


^5. 


TS04, 


d. 


Aug. 


15, 


1S04. 


Reuben T< 


lylor 


b. July 


2S, 


1806, 











Allen Breed was b. in Marblenead, Mass., and at the age 
of sixteen be enlisted iti the ariny and advanced to the rank of 
Lieutenant. During his boyhood in }klarblehead, the town was 
on fire with patriotic enthusiasm. When the exciting times of 
1775 came, his father enlisted at L}-nn, his uncle Nathaniel and 
his cousin John at Nelson N. H. He went to New Ipswich 
and wheti his cousin Allen 2;;^ enlisted, he also joined the same 
Company, and continued to serve in the army during the next 
five years. 

Marblehead, where his parents lived, was originally a part 
of Salem, from which it was detached and incorporated as a dis- 
trict town in 1649. At that time it contained forty-four families. 
It is a rough and rocky peninsula, extending three or four miles 
into the sea, and has a ven.' good harbor. 

The town is irregularly built and very compact. During 
the Revolutionary War, this town suffered severely, and tlie 
business of the place was all destroyed. From the inhabitants of 
this town, the Government received one entire Regiment, com- 
pletely officered and manned. 

Captain James Mugford, of this place, commanded a little 
privateer. He captured a British ship, which had just arrived 
near Boston, laden with arms, ammunition and other stt)res. 
He was killed on the same day he made the capture, January 
12, 1776, in attempting to return from Boston to Marblehead, 



while defending his vessel fioin the U):\[<, of a P.iitish man-of- 
war, riding at Nan.asket road. Tlieii plan was to take him at 
the moment his vessel ran ashore on a jioint of land, which 
makes the entrance of Pudding Point Gut. Capt. Mugford 
fought for a considerable time. At length one of the boats at- 
tempting to board him, he sprang to the railing of his vessel to 
repel the enemy, and he was mortally wounded with a ]iistol 
shot. Falling back, one of his crew anxiously inquired if he 
was wounded. He said, " Yes, but don't let the enemy know 
my situation, and if I die, act as if I were alive and were still 
commanding," after which he immediately expired. His brave 
seamen made dreadful havoc of the limbs and lives of the enemy, 
beat theraoflF and got into Marblehead, where great respect was 
shown to the remains of Capt. Mugford. 

The Rev. Samuel Checver, the first minister of Marblehead, 
was ordained in 16S4 and was succeeded by John Barnard, in 
1724; William Whitwell, 1770; Ebenezer Hubbard, 17S3 ; 
Samuel Dana, iSoi. 

The Second Chin-ch in Marblehead was formed before 1737, 
with Edward Holyoke as pastor. He was chosen President of 
Harvard College in 1737^ and was succeeded in the pastorate by 
Simon Bradstreet, 173-^, and Isaac Story, in 1772. 

Brigadier-General John Glover was b. in this town. He 
had the command of a regiment from the beginning of the Rev- 
olutionary War. He had the honor, with his brave officers and 
soldiers, of forming the advance part of the army which crossed 
the Delaware river before the Battle of Trenton. He also con- 
ducted Burgoyne's army after its surrender, through the New 
England States. Gen. Washington wrote to him from Morris, 
under date of April 26, 1777 : — 

" Difiidence in an officer is a good mark, because he will 
always endeavor to bring himself up to what he conceives to be 
the full line of his duty ; but I think I may tell you without 
flattery that I know of no man better qualified than you 
to conduct a brigade. You have activity and industry, and as 
you very well know the duty of a Colonel you know how to ex- 
act that duty from others." 

Hon. Elbridge Gerry, one of the signers of the Declaration 
^<f Independence, wa^ b in Marblehead, July 17, 1744. He con- 
tinued in public life, from his first election as a Representative 



of his native town, until his death. ?Ie was a member of Con- 
gress, Embassador to France, Governor of Massachusetts, and 
Vice-President of the United States. On tlie nigiit of the Battle 
of Lexington he was nearly captured by the British, as one of 
the " Rebel" Committee of the Provincial Congress. Pie died 
while on his way to the Senate Chamber in Washington, in 1S13. 

New Ipswich, Hillsborough county, N. H., at which place 
Allen Breed enlisted, has an area of 20,S6o acres. It is about 
fifty miles South-west of Concord. The Sonhegan river is the 
principal stream, although its clave}- loam soil is well watered 
by numerous rivulets. It has an academy, four meeting-houses, 
hotels, saw-mills, cotton-mills, grist-mill and match-factor>'. It 
was in 1S77 a large and prosperous town. It was settled before 
1749 ; was incorporated September 9, 1762. It sent sixty-five 
men to Breed's Hill. 

About June i, 1775, Col. James Reed arrived at Cambridge, 
Mass., with a Commission from the Provincial Congress of New 
Hampshire, to command a regiment of troops from that State. 
"The next morning," he says, "he was waited upon by Capt. 
Towme who introduced him to some other officers commanding 
companies from the State." A regiment was soon formed, con- 
sisting of eight companies, of which Capt. Towne's was called 
the first, and was assigned the post of honor, being stationed on 
the right.''^ As Cambridge was crowded with soldiers, Col. Reed 
marched his men to Medford, and on the 12th was ordered by 
Gen. Ward, to march to Charlestown Neck, to station guards at 
the ferry and extend them on to Bunker Hill ; and on the 14th, 
Col. Reed issued his regimental orders from that place. Pearly 
on the morning of June i7tli, the British commenced firing 
from the ships on the party who had, the night previous, formed 
entrenchments on Breed's Hill. Kbcnezer Breed owned a large 
farm on that hill. His grand-father was one of the first settlers 
of Lynn, Mass., and before the little unpleasantness caused by 
the attempt to retain possession of that hill had cleared away, 
several members of the Breed famil}- had taken an active part 
in the war. 

Every movement of the British army indicated an approach- 
ing engagement, and Gen. Ward, being called on for reinforce- 



History of New Ipswich. Kidder, 



nieiits, sent forward the two Xuw llaTiipsliire regiments — Stark's 
aiul Reed's. 'iMie}- were nearlx- destitute of powder and ball, 
and were each given a gill-cup full of powder, fifteen balls and 
one flint. They were then marched to their respective positions, 
and began the work of making up their cartridges. As tliere 
were hardly two muskets of the same calibre, many of the balls 
had to be reduced in size. Not a bayonet could be found in 
Capt. Towne's company, and not a dozen in the regiment of 
Col. Reed. The officers, like the men, carried guns. 

About one o'clock, Col. Stark's regiment had joined Col. 
Reed's marching over Charlestown Xeck, exposed to the fire of 
the British ships and floating batteries. They left their coats 
and blankets at the foot of Bunker Hill. They formed on the 
hill and marched across to the breastwork, which was made by 
planting two parallel lines of post and rail fence from a point 
near the redoubt dov.-n toward the river and filling tlie space 
between with new mown hay. About four o'clock they took 
their position behind this fence, Capt. Towne's company being 
next to the redoubt, and Col. Stark's regiment being farther 
down toward the river to the left of Col. Reed's regiment. 

For the general account of the battle, the reader is referred 
to the histories, but the presence of members of our family in 
Capt Towne's company, makes it worth while to give that com- 
pany's experience. 

When the British army advanced, the men in front of Capt, 
Towne's company were the Welsh Fusilecrs, the pride of the 
Britisli troops. They were twice repulsed by the Yankees, but 
when fresh troops came to the front and Capt. Tow ne's company 
had but one charge apiece left, they were compelled to retreat 
to Prospect Hill which they did in good order. They lost only 
one man. Several were woundtd but soon recovered. This 
company continued to form a part of the army employed in the 
siege of Boston. 

After this battle sickne-s dimini>hed the army, and many 
became dissatisfied and returned home. 

General Washington called for more men. The officers of 
the army conferred and decided to call out the minute men at 
once. When the messenger sent to New Ipswich, arrived there, 
the call was r<-.p'jnded to at once Ity Capt. Kleazer Cummings, 
with twenty-six men. General Washington was greatly pleased 



with the promptness of the response by the New Hampshire 
men, and General Gre-;'ne wrote to Congress, "■ New Hampshire 
behaves nobly." 

Allen Breed entered the service for six weeks between the 
ist and 15th of Xo\-eniber. 1775, at Xew Ipswich. X. H., in the 
company under the conmiand of Capt }£leazer Cnmmings, Lieut. 
Ferguson and Ensign Goodale, and marched directh' to Cam- 
bridge, Mass., where they were stationed in Fort X'o. 2. After 
remaining one week, they were taken by order of Gen. Putnam 
to Lechraore Point to commence the erection of another fort. 
At the close of the first day's " tatoo " the British who were 
occupying Fox Hill Fort in Boston, cannonaded them with shot 
and shell, but it did not prevent the completion of the Fort. 
At the same time the enemy's ship Somerset was lying in 
the bay between the forts, from which place she disappeared 
before the next niorning. 

About the first of February, 1776, he re-inlisted for two 
months at the camp in Cambridge, under Capt. Goodale, 
marching for Prospect Hill and was present at Coble Hill, one 
mile below when the Americans bursted a brass mortar, captured 
by the ship Manley Piere. The morning following the evac- 
uation of Boston b}' the British (about March 17th, 1776' he 
obtained permission to visit some friends in that place, and 
while there he had an opportunity to see the lari;e mortar 
(marked as weighing 3.(^40 pounds) which had been abandoned 
by the enemy. 

In July, 1776, he volunteered at Xew Ipswich under Capt. 
Joseph Parker for five months ; was mustered in at Jeffrey, and 
rendezvoused at Charlestown Xo 4. At the latter place, the com- 
pany crossed the Connecticut rivt-r on their way to Skeenboro, 
N. Y., and Fort Independence at Ticonderoga, N. Y.. where 
they were employed in getting out timber in the mountain to 
build row galleys, for service on Lake Champlain. 

For the campaign of 1777, three regiments were raised in 
X^'ew Hampshire under Colonels Joseph Cilly, X'athan Hale and 
Alexander Scammell. The officers were appointed by Congress 
for the war, and the men were enlisted either for that time or for 
three \-ears. They rendez.voused at Ticonderoga, under the 
immediate commn:id of Brigadier General Poor. 

From April to July, 1777, the town of X^'ew Ipswich was in 



a constant state of alarm. The rapid advaiicc of Gtii. Burgoyiie 
aroused the fears of the Colonists, and calls for more troops 
were freqnently made. Karly in July, Capt. vStcphen I'arker, 
then residing in the westerly ])art of the town, enlisted a large 
Company. The first two names on his pay-roll, as it stands in 
the State House at Concord, are xVllen llreed 23 and Allen 
Breed, Jr., 25, who were cousins. Kidder's Ilistorv^ of New 
Ipswich gi\'es an account of their dress, as seen b}- a friend of 
Mr. Kidder. 

"To a man they wore suiall clothes, coming down and fas- 
tening just below the knee, and long stockings with cow-hide 
shoes ornamented l:)y large buckles, while not a pair of hoots 
graced the company. The coats and waist coats were loose and 
of huge dimensions, with colors as various as the barks of oak, 
sumach and other trees of our hills and swamps could make 
them, and their shirts were all niade of flax, and like every 
other part of the dress, were homespun. On tlieir heads was 
worn a large round top and a broad -brimmed hat. Their arms 
were as various as their costume ; here an old soldier carried a 
heavy Queen's Arm, with which he had done sendee at the 
conquest of Canada, twenty years previous, while by his side 
walked a stripling boy, with a Spanish fusee, not half its weight 
or calibre, which his grand-father may have taken at the 
Havana, while not a few had old French pieces, that dated back 
to the reduction of Louisburg. Instead of the cartridge-box, a 
large powder-horn was strung under the arm. and occasionally 
a bayonet might be seen bristling in the ranks. 

' 'Some of the swords of the officers had been made by our 
Province blacksmiths, perhaps from some farming utensil ; they 
looked serviceable but heavy and uncouth." 

After a little exercising on the old Connnon, they briskly 
filed up the road, by the foot of the Kidder Mountain, and 
through the Spafford Gap, Peterboro', to the tune of " Over 
the Hills and far away." This Company was in Gen. Stark's 
brigade, which joined the \'ermont troops under Colonel Warner, 
twenty miles north of Bennington. Allen Breed 25, was, with 
others, detailed to assist in driving cattle to Stillwater, N. Y., 
for the subsistence of the Army assembling to oppose Burgoyne. 
They returned iust in time to be with their Company in the 
battle of Bennington. During the night of the battle, they 



assisted in y,nanliii-- llie Hessian prisoners, who were confinefl 
in the J'>eniiin.e,lon Mceting-house. 

When the news of thi^ victory reached Cori^ix-ss, they 
pa.^sed a vote of thanks to John Stark, and made him a Brig- 
adier Generak 

Soon after this, the Company marclied, to Saratoga, v.diere 
Breed remained after the expiration of his enlistment, in ex- 
pectation of the approacli of GL-n. Bnrg(n-ne, but returned home 
before his arrival and surrender Oct. 17, 1777- 

" In June, 1780, he was one of six taken by a Corporal from 
New Ipswich to Winchester, where he was mustered in, he 
then marched to Litchfield, Conn., next to West Point, X. Y., 
to be attached to the Company of Capt. Chern-, in the regiment 
of Col. Courtlar.d, and th.e divisirci undL-r tlie command of Gen. 
LaFayette. His regiment with two others, v/as sent to a place 
called Ilerrington, X. J., where an expedition was organized 
under Gen. LaFayette to capture Staten Iskmd; near lilizabeth- 
town, X'. J., the boats were so much injured, as to cau>e their 
return to the tents at Ilerrington ; Breed was soon after 
stationed at Fort Lee on the Fludson River, from wdiich place 
he was detailed with others to Bergen, X. J., to drive off the 
cattle, horses, etc., so as to prevent them from falling into the 
hands of the British who occupied Xew York on the opposite 
shore." 

In September, i>-33, he v/as residing in Hope, ^lontgomery 
county, X. Y. 

About 1S06, he went to F\iltonville, Montgomery county, 
X. Y., to li\-e with his dau. Mehetabel, where his w. d. He 
removed v.-ith the f unily to Stafford, Onondago Co. He d. at 
his dau's horiie in vStafford, of the infirmities of age, and wriS 
buried there. He was very tliin and spare, and was a carpenter 
by trade. His w. was a dau. of Reuben Taylor, wdio d. in 
1S13. She v.-as buried in a private cemetery at Alayfield, 
Montgomery Co., X, Y., which belonged to one Deacon 
Wilkinson. 

Mehetabel b. in Xelson, X. Y. Milly d. in Cambridge, 
Mass. Hannah d in Coxarkiu, X. Y. Ira d. in Greenbusli, 
X. Y. George went South and was ne\-er heard from. Lueit- 
tia d. in We.-.tun, Vt. 



No. 29. 

Josiali Breed 28, b. April 25, 17S3, d. March 5, 1S55. 

Married 

Sarah Ami P.aker b. 

. Lucius Hubbard 30b. Feb. 2S, 1&9, d. May 12, 1S45. 

Saraii Ana b. 

Josiah b. 

Thomas Raker b. 

Ann Lucy b. 

Sarah Ann ni. Francis Tufts, lived in K. Canibrid,2;c, Mass., 
and then in Xew Ipswich, N. IL, and returned to K. Cam- 
bridge, where Francis d. about Januruy, 1SS7. 

No. 30. 
Lucius Hubbard Breed 29, b. Feb. 2S, iSog, d. May 12, 1S45. 

Married 
Rebecca Starey b. 

Rebecca Slacey b. Jan. 15, 1841, d. June iS, 18S0. 
Hubbard 31, b. Jan. 27, 1S44, 

Fucius Hubbard Breed was a higlily respected sliip master 
who possessed tlie esteem and confidence of liis employers. 
His w. was a direct descendant of John Vinton, a French 
Huguenot, who settled at Braintree, Mass. 

The dau. ni. Feb. 7, 1867, Fclward Gahn. sou of ICdw.ard 
and Clarinda (Bailey) Mansfield, b. in South Reading, (now 
Wakefield) ^Lass., July 20, 1S42. Fie d. in Wakefield July 26, 

I.S75- 

Their chn. were: Clara Bailey ^Luisfield, 1). Sept. 14, 1S6S ; 
Edward Stacey Mansfield, b. Nov. 11, 1S70 ; Hubbard Breed 
Mansfield, b. July 17, 1S74. 

No. 31. 
Hubbard Breed 30, b. Jan. 27, 1844, 

Married 
Ada Elizabeth Clou-h b. 

Alice Hubbard b. March 23, 1S72, 

Mary Taylor b. Dec. 5, 1S74, d. June 5, 1S75. 

Anna X'inton b. March 29, rS76, d. Au,-,^. 10, 1S76. 

Nathaniel Perkins 1). March 3, 1S77, 

Ferd, .Matthews b. July 12, 1S79, d. April iS, iS8o. 

Vinton Sta'-ey b. Nuv. 7, 1S90, 

Hubbard Breed lives in Salem, ^^ass. He is the treasurer 
and one of the «.Iiri;ct(jr.-. of the- ICdisuu Fricctiic Illuminating 
Co., of Boston, Mas^. 



No. 32. 
Mehetalxl reived 28, b. Dec. S, 17S3, d- Feb. 1S66. 

Married Nov. 2.S, 1803, 

Kufus Hrced b. April 24, 17S4, 

Asa b. Sep. II, 1S06, 

Elizabeth b. Nov. 11, 1808, 

Rufus b. June 3, iSii, 

Nathaniel b. July 2, 1813, 

Geo. Washinijton b. April 12, 1S18, 
Allen b. An-. 25, 1S20, 

Reuben b. July 24, 1825, 

Mehetabel Breed b. in Nelson, N. Y. and d. in Spafford, 
N. V. Asa. m. Oct. 30, 1S2S. Klizabeth ni. May 20, 1S2S. 
Rufus ni. April 2, 1834. George Washington ni. March 29, 
1S40. 

No. 33. 

Mary IJreed 28, b. May 20, 17S9, d. May 26, 1S69. 

Married Nov. 17, 1808, 

Bryant b. 

George Bryant b. Nov. 27, 1S09, 

Mary Ann Bryant b. Aug. 28, 1811, 

Lucy Bryant b. March 24, 1814, 

Harriet Bryant b. Oct. 16, 181 5, 

Louisa Bryant b. Jan. 6, 1819, d. July 8,1839. 

Joseph Bryant b. Feb. 6, 1821, 

John Bryant b. Aug. 27, 1823, d. July 3. 1S24. 

William Bryant b. May 16, 1S25, d. Oct. iS, 1S63. 

Reuben Bryant b. Uci 27, 1827, d. .Sep. i6, 1&69. 

Allen Bryant b. Feb. 16, 1830, d. May 31, 1S61. 

Mary Bryant, the mother, d. iu New York City. 

No. 34- 
Allen Breed 28, b. Jan. 20, 1792, d. March 13, 1827. 

Married Oct. 22, 1S15, 

Johanna Pratt b. April 21, 1793, d. April 23,1878. 

William Pratt 35, b. Aug. 23, i8r6, d. April 14, 18S9. 
Phineas Allen b. March 29, 1818, d. July 15, 1829. 
Harriet Newell 38 b. Nov. 13, iS[9, 
John Barnard 39, b. Dec. 28, 1821, 
Catherine 40, b. Jan. 12,1824, 

Lucinda Pratt b. Aug. 30, 1826, d. Feb. 17, 1827. 
Allen Breed d. in New Hope, P-ncks comity, Pa., of con- 
sumpti:>n. lie had a bakery in Now Hope, having moved from 
Greentjush, X. Y., where he was in the same business. His 



grave is by the Preshyterian Cluircli of LaiuLertville, X. J., 
where alsi) his wile ami two ehu., P. Allen and I.ueiiula, are 
buried. His \v. was b. in Xew I]\s\vich, X. H , and d. in P,rook- 
lyn. X. Y. Phineas was b in Greenbnsh, X. V., Harriet in 
Stamford, Conn., Catherine and Lueinda in Xew Hope. 

No. 35. 

William Pratt Breed 34, h. Au- 2,3, 1S16, d. April 14, iS^g. 

Married Sep. 14, 1.S47, 

Rebecca Sharp Murray b. Nov. 17, 1.S20, 

John Howard 36, b. May 27, rS-jg, 

R. Anna b. Oct. 19, 1S53, 

William bratt 37. b. Peb. 7, 1S5S, 

William Pratt Breed was born in Greenbush, X. Y., and 
died in Philadelphia, Pa. In 1S19, his ])arents remo\-cd to 
Stamford, Conn., and in 1S22, he wa.s taken to X'ew Hope, 
Bueks count}', Pennsylvania, wliere he began liis schooling. 
After the death of his father, the iamily removed to Xew York 
city in 1S29. where he becanie an apjirentice to a bookliinder. 
Pie kept his book before him while at work, and studying thus, 
prepared hiniself tor college. 

At the age of sixteen he was received into full commutnon 
in th.e Rutgers Street Presbyterian Church, Xew York, of 
which Rev. John M. Krebs, H. D. was the pastor. He was 
prepared for college under the tuition of the Re\-. John J. Owen, 
D. 1)., entered the Hniversity of the city of X'ew York in iS-~,q, 
from which he was graditatcd in 1X43. He then spent one year 
in the I'nion Theological Seminar}-, Xew York, and entered 
the Tuiddle class in Princeton Theological vSeminar}', from which 
he was graduated in 1S47. During the vacation he taught 
school and preached to raise the funds necessar\- for the studies 
during the winter. He was licensed to preach the Gospel by 
the Presbyter}- of Xew York, April 21, 1S47. A letter from 
the Rev. Dr. Charles C. P.eatty, D. D. of Steubenville, Ohio, 
to Re\'. Dr. Archibald Alexander, a--king that one of the 
students be invited to visit vSteul)en\-i!le with a \-iew to settle- 
ment o\-er the Second Presbyterian Church of that place was 
placed in his hands. Though he had intended to "-o to the 
Foreign Mi-^sion Field, he visitcl Steubenville, an 1 accepted a 
call. He returned to Xew Hope, Pa. and ^\■,as married in Sep- 
tember, 1S47. He was ordained and installed bv the Presbvter\- 



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of Stenbeuville December i5tli, 1S47. During his pastorate 
there, 3S2 persons were rccei\-c<,l to the coiuniunion of the church. 
He was releised by the Pre.~^b}-tery of Stenbeuville May jth, 
1S56, that he might move to Philadelphia and become the 
pastor of the West Spruce Street Presb}-terian Church. He 
with his family cros-cd the :nountains in canal boats and found 
the cars even less comfortable. At that time the depot in 
Philadel[)hia was at the south-east corner of nth and Market 
Sts., aud the cars were drawn from \Ve>t Philadelphia by mules. 
He was installed par^tor of this church June 4, 1S56, the services 
being conducted in the Tenth Church. The new church was 
dedicated on the first Sabbath in January, 1S57. Mr. Pjreed 
alternated for a time with Rev. Henry A. Boardman, D. D., 
Pastor of the Tenth Church, from which the West Spruce St. 
congregation had gone to establish their new enterprise. Pie 
received the degree of D. D , in 1S64, tVom his Alma Mater, the 
University of the City of New York. 

The Quarter Centur}' of tlie Pastorate was celebrated on 
April 3 and 4, iSSi. He continued in the Pastorata until 1SS7, 
when he resigned, and was elected Pastor Emeritus, with a sal- 
ary for life. He filled the pulpit until May, 1SS8. He was 
often a representative of Presbytery in the General Assembly ; 
aud the Presbyterian Church honored him by twice electing 
him Moderator of the Synod of Philadel()hia, and, after the 
consolidation of Synods, by electing him Moderator of the Synod 
of Penns_\-l\-ania. 

He was Chairman, for several years, of the L'xecutive Com- 
mittee of the Presbyterian Historical Society of this city. He 
was elected member of tlie Presbyterian Board of Publication in 
1S55, Vice-President in 1S74, and he was President from 1S75 
until his death, in 1SS9. 

The following is a list of P)r. Breed's published works, by 
the Presbyterian iJoard of Publication : 

A Dream, Anthropos, Bible Lessons on Palestine, Book of 
Books, Christ Liveth in Me, breeding on Christ, Grapes from 
the Great \'ine. Hand P>ook for Punerals, Plome Songs, Jenny 
Gcddes, John Potter and Uncle Ben, Lessons in Flying, Little 
Priest, Manna Crumbs (Rutherford), Man Responsible for His 
Belief, Modern Christian Worker, Presbeterianism Tiiree 
Piuudrcd Years Ago, Presbyterians and the Revoltition, The 



Prisoners, Tlic Sunny Mount, The Th-atre, Under the Oak, 
Witherspoon, Tlie Dridge, Ih'id-et Sullivan, Church Ilistory 
in Brief, I'.rief Memoirs of the Pious. Brigliter Davs, Pritish 
Reformers, Lives of Britisli Reformers, Spectre of the Pnjcken, 
The Broken Pasket, Broken Pitchers, Broken Window, Aboard 
and Abroad. 

He delivered the address of welcome to the Pan-Presbyter- 
ian Council, when it met in Philadelphia, in 1SS4, and also the 
closing- address in Plorticultural PLall at the Centeiniial Celebra- 
tion of the Organization of the General Assembly, in Philadel- 
phia, in May, iSSS. 

Through his labors chiefly the Witherspoon :\ronument was 
erected in 1S76, in P\airmount Park, as a Presbyterian contribu- 
tion to the Centennial Exhibition, in conmiemoration of the 
part which that church took in the foundation of this Republic. 
He secured the $20,000 neces.^ary by speaking in seventy pul- 
pits and ten Synods and Presbyteries, stretching from the At- 
lantic Coa.-t to Ohio, 

R. Anna is a medical student. 

At the " New England " dinner, held in Philadel})hia, a 
few months before his death, he delivered the following address 
to about 250 members of the New P:ngland Society, of which he 
was the Chaplain : 

Mr. President :— A good lady once said, "When I hear a 
Presbyterian minister begin an address l,)}- saying that he does 
not intend to make a long speech, I feel my flesh creep all over 
me ; for then I know that we are in fgr it as long as the sands 
hold out in the hour-glass, if not a good deal longer." There- 
fore, it is my intention, at tliis time, to make a short speech, with- 
out announcing that intention beforehand 

The question has arisen in my mind whether it is altogether 
fair to impose upon the chaplain in addition to his onerous ofncial 
daties, that also of making a speech at these festivities. As he 
understands his duties, they include a careful oversight of the 
morals of all the members of the society ; and those who are 
acquainted with these members need not be told that in tliis 
alone he has a pretty heavy contract on liis hands. For ex- 
ample, he is a t,,t:d abstainer, and., of course, it is his duty to 
bring the whole member.-,hip of the society up to the same h!L;h 



cold -water ninrk. Va\\. a look o\-cr these tallies will show that 
he stands in a posititju \ery nuich ivseinl)liii^; that of Josluia 
just after he liad crossed the J()rdan — with a ,e;(«)d dical of land 
yet to 1)L- ]>o.ssos,^L-d. However, he is n(.)t at all discourai^ed. 
Indeed, for that matter, avIk) ever saw a true son of New iMig- 
land discouraged? Give him a peck of seed ami an acre of 
rock, and he will hring }()U a crop. That is what ni}- old 
grandfather used to do in New Ilamix-diire, where the soil is 
conipo.>-<ed chietl}- of stones — stones so man>- that one farmer 
sighed, " I believe when 1 shall ha\'e g<jt all the stones off m\- 
farm, there wdll be no farm let't." He utilized the ample 
annual crop of stones in Iniilding fences around his fields, and 
when one asked him why he made those walls three feet high 
and four feet thick, he answered, '" The winds are pesky high 
up here, and I luiild my walls so that when the}- blow down, 
they will be h.igher than they were before." It is said that if 
you shut up two Yankee boys in a room with nothing in it but 
themselves and the clothes the}" have on, they will make ten 
dollars a day a]>iece s\vapping jackets. (Applause.) 

Xo, the Chaplain is not discouraged. Why should he be? 
His success with the President of the vSociet}- has banished all 
thought of discouragement. Of course, it was his dut\' to 
begin with the President, and now he is aide to assure the 
members of the Socict}' that, since we met in this place on a 
like occasion a year ago, not in one single instance has our 
President been seen under the influence of intoxicating driid-:. 
I hope by the next meeting to be able to make a similar report 
respecting the \'ice-Presidents and Secretary. So, whatever, 
the onlook may be, the outlook is all that can be desired. 

Just here I would like to say in confidence (of cour.^e it 
will go no further; that our family wish, if possible, to secure 
the sendees of our distinguished guest, Senator Ivvarts, of 
New York, in the great case, not exacth' pending, but im- 
pending — I mean the case known as Breed versus Bunker. It 
is known to all sojourners in our national Jerusalem, from 
Cyrene to Mesopotanua, that the so-called battle of Bunker 
Hill was fought on Breed's Hill and that the monument stands 
to-day on Breed's, and not Bunker Hill. Yet, notwithstanding 
this obvious and unfjue^tionable hist(:>rical fact, for more than 
one hundred \-ears the Bunker familv have deliberateh'. 



])ersistetitly, agi;ressively, fmuduk-iitly, and wilh innlice \ne- 
IK'iisu, ])lacardL-(l lluit liill with llieir iair,il\ iiaiiie : and not 
content with that, thc\- liaxx- d\>:j cuiTU])tcd tlu.- yunlh of the 
hind, not, as Governur Berkelt>- euniphiiiied in X'iroinia, In- 
erecting a grammar-school, hnt h>- foisting thi> iVaud into tlic 
school-books, so that the children ma>- talk of "The P.attle of 
Btmker Hill." An.d, \vith the P.unkers. we intend also to 
indict the elegant historian, ^[r. Richard hVothiiigham, who, in 
his "History of the Siege of }]oston," while acknowdedging 
the fact, yet in>ists with i)o^iti\-e fatuity that the name 
" Breed " is not so fit for patriotic purposes as that of '" Bunker." 
Now, in the name of common sense, why not ? What does 
Shakespeare say on this point? 

Breed, Bunker ; What should be in that name Bunker? 
Why should that name be soandcd more than this ? 
Write them together. Breed is as fair a name ; 
Sound them, it doth become the mouth as well ; 
Weigh them, it is as heavy ; conjure with them — 
Breed will start a spirit as soon as Bunker any day. 

Forasmucli then as that sacred hill, crinr-oned once with 
the blood ot heroes, crowned now with tlie monument of their 
fame, was owned, po.--se>sed, cultiwited, and enjoyed by a side 
issue of otir himil}- line, therefore we propo.^e to solicit the aid 
of the distinguished Senator I'.varts, just as soon as he shall 
have .ser\-ed out liis tertn in the Pre:-idential chair to wliich it is 
our purpose one uf the>e days to elect him. ( Applause). 

And now as to this Pilgrim h'ather business. As I under- 
stand it, the chief end of a Xew Ivngland Society is to eulogize, 
first, the Pilgrim Fatliers, and next ourselves, their sons. 
This twin object, however, is olndously one and indi^•isi!)le ; for 
in eulogizing them, we //ytj/^/r/c eulogize otir^elves. My old 
Puritan mother used to say that every generation grows weaker 
and wiser. Well, if we mu-^t confess to a strong accession of 
weakness, we cling to the claim of wisdom to a degree that 
more than makes up the accomit. And since we are wiser than 
they, we are, of course better, for wisdom is goodness. 

It is tu>t only a chronological se<iuence, it is a logical 
consequence, that 270 years, more or k-s, of experience and 
tuitioii. mu-t ha\-e set u. f,rw„rd -ome leagues in ailvance of 
our distinguished predecessor^. Wliat, indeed, could be 



exjK'Ctcd of tl^.ose who li\-cd atid died without e\er having so 
much as .->eeu a copy of a dail>- nc\v>[)apL-r ? They had no 
cigars, and ver_\- little tea and coffee. They never got a gliin|>s(; 
of the glories of the dime novel : and as for ice-cream and 
terrapin, I doubt if such felicities ever rose upon the horizon of 
their thoughts. And it is ver}- questionable, v.diether from the 
landing of the Ma\-{lower to the Declaration of Independence, 
tlie whole aggregate of Puritan tribes ever jiroduced a Buffalo 
liill, much less a great l-hnerson-eclipsing son of Boston, the 
bosoni triend of the Prince of Wales, Bully Sullivan. And it 
is pretty certain that in the whole course of their history, they 
never flowered into Boodle Aldermen enough to people a single 
prison-cell. (Applause). 

At any rate, in one resplendent virtue, we stand head and 
shoulders taller than our forefathers, and that virtue is toler- 
ation. Oh, tiiey were a grim community, those old Puritans. 
W'h}-, Mr. President, they would not tolerate so much as a 
single sin : and I appeal to 3-0U if we, good-natured descendants 
of theirs, do not tolerate a good many. The}- surrounded 
tho-e commonwealths of theirs with wall and moat, and hedged 
themseh-es in v/ith portcullis and draw-bridge, and the 
applicant for admis.sion was put through a searching catechism. 
Just fancy that eminent philoso])her, orator, statesman, hero 
and reformer, John Most, after having sampled most of the 
prisons of Europe, and with the smell of many a cell on his 
comely person, to apply for admission at the door of a Puritan 
Commonwealth. 

Do you suppose they would have met him at Castle Garden, 
have given him the freedom of the city, endowed him with all 
the rights of citizenship, and a good man}' more, set him on a 
platform to harangue the crowds as if inspired with more devils 
than were expelled from Mary of Magdala ; and then when he 
was arrested, moved all perdition to prevent his conviction, and 
when he was convicted, to prevent the execution of the sentence, 
and let him out on bail to make a bee-line for the office of "The 
I''reiheit,'' there to indict more editorials aflame with the spirit 
of infernalism ? Why, Mr President, those stern, intolerent 
old fellows would have clutched John in their sinewy grasp, and 
without vetnorse or hesitation, have shot him into the air with 
a projectile Ibrce that would have carried him across the At- 
lantic, or into it. (Loud applause.) 



Ami as to vS])ics, Liii;< >S: Co., li.'i'l thc\' with their niiirdcr- 
oiis lx)ml->s covered tlie ]xi\-eiiieiit.^ of I^o.stou or Salem witli the 
smoking gore of human li\-es, scattering amis here, legs tliere, 
heads yonder, and hits of mangled tlesh here and there, and 
plunged all those women into wailing widowhood, and precip- 
itated all those children into or])hanage and penury- — would 
those stern Puritans ha\-e spent a whole _\-car in hampering, 
hindering and crippling panting Justice on her wa_\- to the exe- 
cution ? No, sir ! 'Idle arrest \v(udd have been instantaneotis, 
the trial quick. The jury would ha\'e been impaneled and then 
would have gone down on their knees to the God of Justice for 
light and guidance ; the testimony woidd ha\-e been weighed and 
the sentence executed, and those human tigers sent to wdiere they 
would explode no more dynnmite br)]ubs — at least on this planet. 
And what if Brigham Young, with twenty wives and a 
hundred children, were to ask admission there? Would they 
have l)een kindly funiished with a piece of territory whereon to 
niirture and spread their lepros\-, and, like a great devil-fish, 
sling their slim>' arms over States and Territories, and at last 
thrust one of them into the doors of Congress, to find in the 
United States vSenate a call to en.ter the great sisterhood of 
Commonwealths? Oh, as compared with \is, they were a ter- 
rible set, those old Puritans, with their sh(;rt hair and conical 
hats. 

And wdiat a purgatory their society nnist have been for 
cliildrcu ! Woe to the urch.in that shr)wed disrespect for old 
age ! One of the first texts that the child had to commit to 
memory was, " Thou shalt ri.se up h)et'i)re the hoary head and 
honor the face of the old nuin, and fear tli\- God." What 
a grand ad\'ance, Mr. President, we ha\-e made out of that 
straight-jacket. Now he calls his lather " the governor," and 
his mother his "maternal ancestor;" and wdien he meets an 
old man in the streets, he looks up and greets him with the 
salutation, " How are \-ou, old boss ? " Down e\-en to our day 
as I have seen a compa!i\- of New hhigland children on their way 
to or fi-om school, if the\ met a str^uiger, the boys bowed and 
the girls dropped a res-i)ectt'ui cmn-tesy. I do not remember just 
how long we have had the street cars running in Philadelphia, 
but since that t'n;e 1 have counted the number of tiujes that I 
have seen children rise to give tlieir seats to elderly people; and. 



the Dumber lias now reached the respectable aggregate of three. 
You see our children know their tights, an<l knowing them, 
dare maintain. 

And, dear me, that old Puritan Sunda}- — it alnio-t makes 
the cream on the table turn sour to think of it. Alas, for the 
boy that broke the Sabbath day. He was at once jerked into 
the bed-room, tied to the bed-post, and compelled to commit to 
memor}- the hymn : 

" Welcome, swcet day of rest." 

But our children — some of them at least — huddle together 
into some cozy nook on the Sabbath day, and read together a 
book of instructions on the most facile method of house-break- 
ing, and then, as was the case the other evening in our part of 
the city, a company of seven of them (their ages ranging from 
ten to thirteen) enter a house in the absence of the family, and 
ra\'age it from top to bottom, and then letire to tht-ir rendez- 
vous to divide the spoil. How in the world children got through 
life in those old Puritan times is more than we can imagine. 

And then, they say, a man with a young and beautiful 
wife was not allowed to kiss her on Sunday— a sore deprivation 
to both of them ; though I seem to hear one of them whisper- 
ing iu m}- ear, " If we did not kiss our own wives on Sunday, 
neither did v.-e kiss the wives of otlier men on week days."' 
" They screwed the weather-vane fast on Saturday so that it 
should not turn on Sunday." But it must be said for th.em that 
their own principles they had no occasion to screw fast even 
when " the blast of the terrible ones ^vas as a storm against a 
wall," though persecution 

" United the winds and let them fight 
Against the churches ; thongli tlie yeasty waves 
Confounded and swallowed navigation up ; 
Though bladed corn were lodged and trees blow n down ; 
Though castles ti:'pj)led on their warders' heads : 
Though palaces and pyramids did slope 
Their heads to their foundations." 

"They emptied out the yeast on Saturday night that it 
might not break the Sabbath by rising on Sunday." But they 
never tailed to rise to the altitude of a great occasion, whether 
Sunday or week-day, even wlien that occasion demanded th.e 
up-plucking of habit and at^ection rooted in the soil of ages and 



hallowed bj- the graves of main- generations, and, in response 
to the call of mysterious voices coining:: up out of the far-off fu- 
ture, voices felt rather than heard, calling them fn^ni land to 
land, from shore to shore, and at last over wild wintry seas, to 
take possession, in the interest of mankind, of this land : 



"A glorious land 
With broad arms stretched from shore to shore. 

The proud Pacific cliafes her strand, 
She hears the loud Atlantic roar ; 

And nurtured in hvx ample breast, 
How many a goodly prospect lies 

In nature's wildest grandeur drest, 
Enameled with her ]ovelie<t dyes." 



It is pleasant, on occasions like this, to call to mind the 
law of division of labor that runs through all the course of 
history. To one generation it is given to cultivate and exercise 
the virtues, and to another to eulogize them. To the days of 
Marathon and Salamis it was given to put the shoulder to the 
wheel, to roll back the avalanche of Oriental tyranny and 
corruption, and save the germs of western civilization from 
being crushed out of existence ; and to the days of Pericles to 
build monuments and sing peans over the heri^isni and sacrifice 
of their fathers It was given to the fathers of the Revolution 
to fight King George's red-coats on many an ensanguined 
plain, and to us to make Fourth of July orations o\er them. 
It was given to the Pilgrim Fathers to plough and sow on the 
hard rock, in the biting December blast, till the surface of 
Burial Hill undulated with grave-mounds, covering the forius 
of father, mother and child ; and to us to eat sumpttious 
dinners in their behalf. 

We assuredly ought to be satisfied with the lot that has 
fallen to us. They lived by faith, we l)y sight ; they fed on 
hopie, we on fruition : they fed on the east wind, we on the fat 
of the land ; they had tears to drink in great measure, we drink 
from a thousand singir.g fount. lins ; tliey had the real pain, we 
the champagne. Among the nnmy sins hijd to our charge, I 



am Mirc that the sin of env>iiv< Ihc lot of ov.r lMhj;rini I-'athcrs 
fnuls no phace. 

Ah, yes, as compared with us. they were a c[ueer, f[tiaiiit. 
hard featured, hard-headed, unreasonable, unattractive lot — 
those old Pilgrim Fath.ers. What an uncouth way tliey had of 
"popping the question " Jeremiah mounted his horst^, rode a 
few miles, knocked at the cottage door ; and when the girl 
answered the knock, he said, "Susannah, the Lord liath sent 
me to marry thee," "The Lord's will be done," said the 
damsel, and there was the end of it. How va-^tly more delicate 
the Philadelphia Quaker style : Jonathan said, '"' Sister Ruth, 
dost thou love me?" "Why, of course; are we not com- 
manded to love everybody ? " " No, but dost thou regard me 
with that peculiar ailection the world calls lovc ? " '" Well, my 
heart is an erring one ; I have tried to do my duty by ever}'- 
body, but I have long thought tliee was getting more than thy 
share." 

A Xew England man told me of his grandfather, who used 
to bring lumber down the river from the Upper Keiniebec. 
Having made his raft of logs, he would float down the stream 
till, \vhen th.e Saturday evening sun was nearing the horizon, 
the raft v.-as steered to the shore and lashed fast to a tree. 
Then the evening was spent in meditati^ju, arid the next 
morning the stout Puritan would come out on the deck of his 
raft with the old Book under his arm, and God's sun shining 
his benediction on the brightening earth and the old primewal 
forests waiting in silence for the coming man : and there he 
v/ould read : " Thy words were found, and I did eat them, and 
thy word was unto me the joy and rejoicing of my heart 
Thou didst find us in a desert land, in the waste, howling 
wilderness. Thou didst lead us aiiout ; thou did^t instruct us : 
thou didst keep us as the apple of the e\'e. As an eagle 
stirreth up her nest, fiuttereth over her young, spreadeth 
abroad her wings, taketh them, beareth them on her wings ; so 
the Lord alone did lead me, and there was no strange God 
with me.'' 

Only think of losing a whole day in this way. Time is 
money, and by spending that time in this unremunerative way 
that foulisli man l^^t money. 

Ah, well I It was not often in those days that the pra\-er 



was needed — a prayer. Mr. Pre.sideiit, that yon and I have 
litard r.ian_\- a lime, in onr day, ri.sinjj, from many a \-illage, 
town, city, connnonwealth, from every corner of the Repnblic : 

" God give us men ! 
Men whom the hist of ofticr cumot kill ! 

Men whom the spoils of oliice will not buy ! 
Men who have opinions and a will I 

Men who have honor — men who will not lie ! " 

(Applause.) 

No. 36. 
John Howard Breed 35, b. May 27, 1849, 
Married Oct. 19, 1875, 

Lizzie Clark Stanton b. 

J. Howard Breed was b. in vSteubenville, O., was !u. in 

Philadelphia. His w. was b. in Xew York City. 

No. 37. 

Wm. Pratt P.recd, Jr. 35, b. Feb. 7, 1S5S, 

Married June 11, 1.SS4, 

Georgie Cooper Clark b. Feb. 30, 1S60, 

Herbert Allen b. Nuv. 2u, 1SS5, d. Nov. 20, 1SS5. 

Ethel b. July 27, 1SS7, 

Helen Murray b. .March 5, 1S92, 

Rev. Wm. Pratt Rreed, Jr., was b. in Philadelphia, Pa.; 
graduated from University of Peims}-lvania in 1S7", and Prince- 
ton Theological Seminar\- in iSSj. The next year he was called 
to the pastorate of the Fairview Presbyterian Church, of Glen- 
more, Chester county, Pa., from which he was called to Milton, 
Pa., in iSSS. His w. was a dau. of Sereno B. and Annie M. 
Clark, of White Plains, Westchester county, N. Y. 

No. 38. 
Harriet Newell 15reed 34, b. Nov. 13, 1S19, 
Married Dec. 24, nSso, 

William Forrest b. 

Wm.AlIenForrestb. Jan. 11, 1S55, d. March 23, 185S. 
Married 2d husband 
Isaac N. Judson b. 

Carolyn J udson b. 

PTarriet Breed was 1). in Sl.unford, Conn., tn. first time in 
New York Cit\-, and second time in Brooklvn. N. Y. 



William Allen I'"orro,sl was 1). and also d. in Xcw York 
City. Carol} 11 Judsou was 1>. ill Brooklyn. 

No. 39. 
Jolm Barnard Breed 34, b. Dec. 2S, 1S21, 
Married June 10, 1S45, 

Rebecca McC. Morton b. d. Aug. 9, 1S77. 

William Allen b. July 2S, 1S46, 
Anna Hunt b. I^ec. 11, 1.^48, 

Amelia Morton b. July lo, 1S54, 
Married 2d wife 
Etiiily Judson 

J. B. Breed was 1). in vStaniford, Conn. : m. ist w. in New 
York. She d. in Hatfield, ]\Iass. ; m. 2d w. in Brooklyn. 
She was a dau. of Isaac N. Jiidson, 3S, the husband of Mr. 
Breed's sister. ]\[r. Breed has been prominent as a wall paper 
manufacturer, window sliade luanuficturer and retail wall 
paper dealer for years iu New York City and in Philadelphia. 
He retired from business in 1885. The chn. were b. in Eliza- 
beth, N. J. 

Anna Hunt was m. in Brooklyn, N. Y., to Alfred H. 
Graves of Hatfield, Mass. Their chn. were : — Howard 
Morton b. Jan. 13, 1872 ; Murray Breed b. Sep. 19, 1S74 : Minny 
Reba b. T3ec. 10, 1S79. 



No. 40. 














Catherine Freed 34, b. Jan. 


12, 


1S24, 










Married Dec. 


3b 


kS^5, 










Nathaniel Miller Terry b. Nov. 




1S20, 










AllynB. Terry 41, b. March 


20, 


1S4S, 


d. 


March 


5, 


iSSS. 


Harriet L. Terry b. July 


24, 


1S50, 


d. 


Jan. 


14, 


IS52. 


Emma Aug. Terry b. Nov. 


15, 


1^5^, 


d. 


Sep. 


27, 


1853. 


Henry B. Terry b. Nov. 


-5. 


1^54, 


d. 


Jan. 


[5, 


IS57. 


Gilbert W. Terry b. June 


12, 


1S5S, 










Emily MillerTerryb. June 


12, 


1S61, 


d. 


Feb. 


22, 


IS69. 


Nath'IM.Terr>-Jr.b. Nov. 


19- 


1S63, 


d. 


Aug. 


18, 


1 866. 



Catherine Breed was b. in New Hope, Bucks Co., Pa. ; was 
m. in New York City where their chn. were b., except the last, 
which was b. in Brooklyn. The deaths of the chn. occurred in 
New York except Allyn, Emily and Nathaniel, who d. at 
Roslynn, L. I. Mr. Terry was for many years a Ship Chandler 
in New York Cit}'. Gil!)ert m. Oct. 29, iSSa, vSarah A. Judson 
dau. of George T. Judson and Mary Fairchild. 



No. .| t. 

Allyii I'.rcfd Terry 40, b. Marcli 20, 1S4S, cl. March 5, iSS.S. 

.Married June 5, 1S77, 

l^^ary L. Ik-KIm I.. Jan. 2r, 1850, d. Jan. 1,1881. 

Herhtrt AUyn h. May 13, 1S7S, d. June 27, 1879. 

Married 2 J \v. 1S83. 

Nellie R.Andrews b. Sep. 19, 185S, d. March iS, 1S87. 

Allyii ]] Terr}- was b. in New York City ; va. ist \v. in 
Erouklyn ; .she wa.s b. in Windsor, Coini., and d. in Xcw \''jrk. 
Herbert A. Terry was 1). in Drookh'n and d. in vSinnniit, X. J. ; 
Allyn in. 2d w. at Stratford, Conn. She was b. in Stratford, and 
d. in Phikidcl[)]iia. 



No. 42. 
















Rachel P.reed : 


28, b. Feb. 


s, 


1794, 










Married 






1S17, 










P.enjaniin ( dbbs Wo^ 


i)d b. 














Glen Wood 43, 


b. Apr. 


5, 


1S18, 










Lucy Wood 4}, 


b. Feb. 


iS, 


1820, 










Sara'li Wood 


\). Nov. 


5, 


JS22, 


d. 


Nov. 


6, 


1S22. 


Reuben Wood 


h. Dec. 


10, 


^^^:->, 










Harriet Wood 


b. 




1S25, 


d. 


Oct. 


8, 


1 83 1. 


Laura WockI 


b. 




182S, 


d. 


Feb. 


12 


1832 


Oliver Wood 


b. Ai)r. 


17. 


'•■^.^^t, 










Ira Wotnl 


b. May 


J 8, 


1S34, 










C.eor;..;e Wood 


b. May 




I S3 7, 


d. 


March 




1838. 



at 

Greenlnish, e.xcept Sarah. Reuben Wood d. in Pittsfield, 
Mass. Ira Wood was ni. in Albany, N. Y. 

No. 43. 

Glen Wood 42, b. Apr. 5, 1S18, 

Married Sej). 28, [847, 

Maria Lounsbury b. d. Nov. S, 1849. 

Glen Wood b. July 31, 1.S4S, d. Au-. 26, 184S. 

FrancesM. W()o<!l). Ort. 23, 1S49, d. July 20, 1850. 

Married 2d wife Nov. 25, 1851, 

Phildinela Cliaj>iii Ba-;coinb. d. May 6, 1S66. 

Married 3d. wife March 15, 1S70, 
Mrs. Jeuiie L. Wells b. 

Ernest G. W(H.d b. June. 16,1871, 

Jennie \V..ud b. Feb. 8, 1S73, 

Frances L. Wood h). S--[). 25, 1X76, 



Glen Wood was b. in Greenbush, N Y. ; m. in Fallsburg, 
N. v., to rst \v. who d. in Keokuk, Iowa ; ni. :;nd w. in Spring- 
field, Illinois. She was from New Port, X. H., and d. in 
Chicago. Illinois. He m. 3d w. in Boston, Mass. ; she was 
from Buxton, Maine. 

Glen and Frances Wood were b. and also d. in Keokuk, 
Iowa. Ernest, Frances 2d and Jennie Wood were b. in 
Chicago. Illinois. 



No. 44. 

Lucy Wood 42, b. Feb. 18, 1820, 

Married May 18, 1841, 

Allen Butler b. 

W A. Butler 45, b. Aug. 25,1851, 

Edith L.Bntler 46, b. Dec. 21, 1856, 

Lucv Wood was b. and m. in Greenbush, N. Y. 



No. 45. 

William Allen Butler 44, b. Aug. 23,1851, 

Married Dec. 30, 1S74, 
Emma C. Pierce b. 

Allen P. Buder b. June 20, 1S76, 

William M. Butler b. Sep. 23, 1877, 

Lucy E. Butler b. June 6, 18S1, 

William Allen Butler was b. and m. in Syracuse, N. Y 
The chn. were all b. in Syracuse. 



No. 46. 

Edith Lizzette Butler 44, b. Dec. 21, 1856, 

Married Jan. 19, iSSi, 
Samuel Tallman Betts b. 

Sam'lT. Betts, Jr. b. June 4, 1882, 

Lucy Butler Betts b. Nov. i, 1S83, 

Edith L. Butler was b. and m. in vSyracuse, N. Y. The 
chn. were b. in Syracuse. 



No. 47. 

Harriet Breed 2S, 

Married 
Jonas Wliiting- 

James Edwin Whiting 

Charles Byron Whiting 4^ 

Albert Alden Whiting 

John Chester Whiting 

Mary Ann Wliiting 49, 

George Wiiish>\v Whiting 

Harriet Jane Whiting 

Martha Louisa Whiting 50, b. July 

Helen Kmnia Wliiting 

Charlotte Eliz. Whitin; 

Jonas Whiting was a diix-ct descendant of Sanuiel Whiting, 
(see notes on Lynnj, the first minister of Lytm. and who gave 
the town its nnnie in conmienioration of I<ynn Regis liis old 
home in Knghand. The children were b. in Greenbush, except 
Harriet and Martha who were b. in Pittsfield, Mass. 

No. 48. 



b. Feb. 


-S, 


I,So2, 










Feb. 


M. 


1826, 










b. Oct. 


s, 


1 So I , 










b. Dec. 


13, 


1826, 


d. 


Sep. 


s, 


1S27. 


b. Sept. 


3i 


1S2S, 










b. Aug. 


3. 


1^30, 




Aug. 


10, 


1S30. 


b. Oct. 


23, 


iS:,i, 




f"eb. 


I, 


1-S34. 


b. May 


•^7, 


iS34> 




Mav 


2S, 


1S76. 


b. ^Larch 


I, 


IS36, 




March 


I f, 


■854. 


i>. March 


4, 


IS3S. 




April 


15. 


1S3S. 


b. July 


4. 


■S39, 










b. lune 


30, 


1S42, 


d. 


Oct. 


3> 


1S4S. 


b. Feb. 


6, 


IS45, 


d. 


March 


6, 


1SS2. 



Charles Byron Whiting 47, 


, 1). Sep. 


3. 


182S, 


Married 


Dec. 


20, 


1J554. 


Sarah E. Fairchild 


b. 






Allie Whiting 


b. April 


7^ 


1S67, 


Lillie Whiting 


b. April 


7, 


iS'57, 



IS67. 
IS67. 

C. B. Whiting was b. in Greenbnsh, N. Y. His w. was a 
dan. of Frederick S. Fairchild of Greenbnsh. He is President 
of the Orient Insurance Company of Hartford, Conn. 

The evidence of the correctness of the ancestral record of 
the Atithor's branch of the fainil_\-, was recei\'ed from him in a 
letter dated Oct. 10, 18S3. 



No. 49- 



Mary Ann W^hiting 47, 


b. 


May 


27, 1S34, d. 


. May 


Married 




Aug. 


7, 1861, 




Frederick Carr 


b. 








George Whiting Carr 


b. 


Nov. 


16, 1S64, 




Harriet E. [5. Carr 


b. 


Jan. 


12, 1867, 





28, 1S76. 



Mai'N- Ann Whiting was b. and d. in Greenbtish, N. V. 



No. 50. 

Manila Louir,.i \Vliitin.o;47, b. July 4. 1S39, 

Married July 13, 1864, 

Sterling P>urton b. 

Henry Collin Burton b. Aug. 22,1865, 

Charles W. Burton b. Jan. 28, 1869, d. Jan. 31, 1S69. 

Jonas W. Burton b. March ii, 1S74, 

Lottie \V. Burton b. July 16, 1883, 

Martha Louisa Wliiting was b. in Pittsfield, Mass. 



No. 51. 

1751- 

28, 16SS. 
1752. 



John Breed 2, 


b. Jan. 


i'^, 


1^63, 


d. 


Married 


April 


28, 


1686, 




Marv KirtliHid 


b. 








Sarah 


b. July 


15. 


1687, 


d.Jan. 


Married 2d u'. 


June 


s, 


1690, 




Mercy Palmer 


b. 






d. 


Anna 52, 


1). Nov. 


8, 


I ^'93, 




Mary 


b. Jan. 


8, 


1697, 




Jolm 55 


b. Jan. 


26, 


1700, 




Elizabeth 


b. Jan. 


28, 


1702, 




Sarah 


b. Feb. 


I, 


1704, 




Zeruiah 


b. Aug. 


27. 


1706, 




Joseph 131, 


b. Oct. 


4, 


1708, 




Bethia 


b. Dee. 


3*^'. 


1710, 




Allen 140, 


b. Aug. 


29. 


1714- 




Gershoni 185, 


b. Nov. 


15, 


1715, 


d. Jan. 



5, 1777- 

John Breed resided in I^ynn until after the death of his first 
\v. and dan. and then reino\-ed to Stonin;gton, Conn., wliere he 
purchased land from Gershoin Palmer, the father of his 2d \v. 
Deacon J. C. Breed 115 says in his Historical Address. " Ger- 
shora Palmer was the son of Walter Paltner, who emigrated 
from England landing in Boston, Mass., in 1650. There 
meeting with Mr. Cheesborungh (who had previousl>- settled in 
Stonington, with 10 other immigrants) he became the 12th 
citizen of Stonington " The mother of his w. was eddied La'ly 
Anna, on account of the sweetness of her disposition and the 
dignity of h.-r p;o.-ence. Pier maiden name wa^ Ann Pcnai-on. 
She was a dau. of George Dennis'iu and Aim P.itrrowdell. 



John and liis \v. are buried in \Vc<iuiloqu()ck burial place, 
2_'2 miles from Stouington, on a sloping hill. Pie was dismissed 
from the church in Lj'un, and became a member in Stouington ; 
he was probably a Congregationalist. 

Mary m. June 21, 1721, Daniel Brown. Ivlizabeth m. 
March 3, 1725, John Hinkle}-. Sarah m. August 19, 1724, 
James Miner. Zeruiah m. Jan. 22, 1730, Sanuiel Hinkle}-. 



STONINGTOX, CONN. 



The first person to settle at vStonington, was William 
Cheeseborough, in 1649. In 165S, ten or twehe families settled 
there. 

The first settlement was made at Wegnetequods Cove, two 
miles North-east of Stouington Borough, Mass. They claimed 
this tract of country-, and continued to go\-ern it until Coimec- 
ticut secured a Roxal Charter. The borough is about seven 
miles square, and was incorporated in iSoi. 

It is situated on a rocky poiut of land, at tlie eastern ex- 
tremity of Long Lslaud Sound. It has a safe hnrbor and the 
principal business has been sealing and whaling. In Augu^t, 
[tSi__i, the town resisted an attack by the British I'lagship 
Ramilies of se\-enty-four guns, the Pactolus of thirt\--eight 
guns and the Despatch Brig of twenty-two guns. 



No. 52. 



Anna Breed 51, 


b. 


Nov. 


8. 


1693. 


Married 




March 


s, 


I7U, 


Israel Hewitt 


b. 








Annie Hewitt 


b. 


AU£^. 


10, 


i7>6. 


Israel Heuitt, Jr. 


. b. 


Julv 


'2, 


1723, 


Rufns Hewitt 


b. 


July 


9> 


1726, 


Charles Hewitt 5; 


Cd. 


Au.cj. 


16, 


173^. 


Anna Tleuilt 


b. 


Nov. 


8, 


'734. 



Israel Hewitt was known as " Major Hewitt. 



No. 



Charles Hewitt 52, 


b. 


Aug. 


16, 


I73S, 


-Married 




Oct. 


2S, 


'756, 


Hannah Stanton 


b. 








Charles Hewitt J r 


. b. 


All- 


16, 


'757. 


Hannah Hewitt 


b. 


Dec. 


22, 


175S, 


Stanton Hewitt 


b. 


Oct. 


s, 


1760, 


Eli Hewitt 


b. 


July 


31, 


I7f''4- 


Ferez Hewitt 


b. 


April 


-^9. 


177c-'- 


Isam Hewitt 


b. 


Jan. 


28, 


1772, 


Palmer Hewitt 


b. 


Jan. 


14. 


1774- 


Anna Hewitt 


b. 


Aug-. 


27, 


I777> 


Mary Hewitt 54, 


b 


Dec. 


I, 


17S1, 



No. 



54- 



-Mary Plewitt 53, 


b. 


Dec. 


I, 


"7Sr, 


Married 




May 


23, 


I S I [ , 


Richard Wlieeier 


b. 








H. S. Wheeler 


b. 


July 


26, 


I8[2, 


Marv Wheeler 


b. 


.March 


27, 


iSij, 


R. A. Wheeler 


b. 


Jan. 


29, 


1817, 



Richard A Wheeler is a Judge of the vSuperior Court iu 
Stoningtou, Conn. He has taken much interest in this work, 
and has kindly furnished .some valuable itubrmation ; hi.'? aunt 
Esther m. a Breed. 



No. 



John Breed 51, 


b. Jan. 


26, 


I T'-'O, 


Married 


Oct. 


II, 


172S, 


Mary Prentice 


b. 






Mercy 


b. Aug. 


0. 


1727, 


John 56, 


b. S.-p. 


5. 


1729. 


Nathan 104, 


b. Dec. 


^0! 


I73i> 


Mary 


b. Dec. 


25, 


1733, 


Sarah 


b. Dec. 


2S, 


1735, 


Esther 


b. Feb. 


23. 


>73S, 


Grace 


b. June 


2, 


1740, 


Ennna 


b. lune 


2, 


1742, 


Amos iiS, 


b. Dec. 


23. 


1744, 


Luc>- 


b. Dec. 


IS, 


1746. 



Xo. =;6. 



John Breed 55, 


b. Sept. 


5. 


1729. 










^ Tarried 


May 


•19, 


1750, 










Silence Grant 


b. 














Mar>' 


b. Feb. 


9. 


1751, 










Joim 


b. No\-. 


15, 


1752, 










Sarah 


b. Dec. 


16, 


1754. 










Oliver 57, 


b. Feb. 


5_ 


1757. 


d. 


July 


13, 


1S34. 


Reuben 


b. Sep. 


23! 


175s' 


d. 


Jan. 


29. 


1759- 


Prentice S3, 


b. Jan. 


I, 


1761, 










Eunice 


b. Feb. 


25, 


1763, 










Samuel 


b. March 


23, 


1765, 










Marcy 


b. Feb. 


6, 


1769, 










Xo. 57- 
















Oliver Breed, 56, 


b. Feb. 


6, 


1757, 


d. 


July 


^3. 


i'^34. 


Married 
















Grace Green 


b. 




1761, 


d. 


Aug. 


6, 


1S30. 


Henry Green 5S, 


b. March 


10, 


17S1, 


d. 


lulv 


2. 


1S2S. 


John 84, 


b. March 


15. 


1782, 


d. 


March 


20, 


1S53. 


Reuben S5, 


b July 


4, 


17S3. 


d. 


Sep. 


21, 


iS55- 


Nancy 


b. 














Lucy 


b. 














Adin 94, 


b. Feb. 


2, 


17S7, 


d. 


M<irch 


16. 


1S50. 


Oliver 103, 


b. 




17S9, 


d. 


April 


22, 


1.S62. 


Cyrus 


b. 




1792, 


d. 


Dec. 


s, 


1S61. 


Eunice 


b. 














Martha 


b. 














Grace 


b. 















Oliver Breed kept a complete record of hi.s family in an old 
Bible. After the death of his w. hi.s effects were moved to the 
house of one of his sons, where he lixed about four \-ears. 
Soon after his death his >on'.^ w. d. and the then " old thinc;;s " 
were stored in the barn, where the rats destroyed the old Bible. 
One of his dan. had copied the record, Init her house was 
burned and so the record.-, were destroyed. The followiu'^ is an 
extract from tlie records of the War Department relating to 
Oliver Breed. 

" In .'^ept. iS;,-. of \'olne\-. 0>\vego Coant>-, X. Y. He 
was born in Ston.inL^^ton, Conn., Feb. 6th. 1757. In 1793 he 
moved from Stonin;..' t^.ti. C'mn., to Leyden, Mas.-.., tlieu in '1799 
to Halifax, \'t., from thence to Heath, Mass., in [So6 then in 



iSoS goins^ to Litchfield. Herkimer Co., X. Y., then in i,si2 to 
Brookfiekl (probably }iIaili>oii Co., X. Y.i then iii 1S14 to 
Litchfiekk Herkimer Co., X'. Y., and about i>;2,t to \'ohiey, 
^vbere living the last S year.^. On an alarm in the .summer of 
1775, he volunteered under Capt. John Ih'eed in Col. Aver>-'s 
Regiment, absent about a week and again in the fall of 1775 for 
a week's ser\ice at Stonington Point, under Cai)t. Oliver 
Smith. In May, 1776, he enlisted under Capt. Abel Spicer for 
seven months in Col. Sheldon's Regiment, going to X. Y. City 
where and in the vicinit}- he was employed, and discharged 30 
miles East of the City, (which could not be on Long Island as 
that was in possession of the Rritish. The main army was at 
or near Fishkill, 30 miles Xorth of Xew York City and a con- 
siderable force of Americans occupied Southwestern part of 
Connecticut;'. 

In Ian. 1777, he enlisted 3 months in Col. Ripley's Regiment 
and v.'as stationed at Pro\'idence, W^arren and Bristol, in R, I. 
and in Oct. 1777, he formed a part of the garrison of Fort Gris- 
wold in Groton. Conn. In April. 177^, he entered f-.r about a 
four months cruise on board the armed Sloop Beaver, Capt. 
Joseph Dodge at Stonington, and had an engagement Vv'ith three 
boats sent from a British man-of-war having one killed and four 
wounded, but escaped fronr the boats. 

In Aug. 177S, he volunteered fur 3 months under Capt. 
Joseph Wheeler, in Col. Cliapman's Regiment, joining Sulli- 
van's army in Rhode Island to repulse the British occupation. 
On his return home he volunteered to be one of the garrison in 
Fort Griswold. In Oct. 1779. he volunteered in an expedition 
which passed over to Long Island against the British, which 
lasted two weeks. In Oct. 17S2, he was ist Sergeant in Capt. 
Amos Gallup' s Company that was stationed for two months in 
Fort Griswold. 

Stephen Breed (96; of Brookfield, Madison Co.. X. Y., is a 
witness to a part of his military services.'' 

Xancy m. John York and has 3 chn. Lucy m. Mr. 

\Villiar:is. C\tus m. vSu.-an Ward and also a 2d w. luniice 

rxrace m. a Mr. York. 



No. 5S. 










Henry (irrcn [ireed 57, 


b. Man;! 


1 U), 1781, 


d. July 


2, 1S28. 


Married 


June 


10. iSoi, 






Eleanor Fish 


b. Jan. 


15, [7S3, 


d. Ian. 


4, iS45- 


Pienr)- 59, 


b. Mav 


6, i.Soj, 


d. Dec. 


17, ^>i73- 


Phebe 61, 


b. Dec. 


14, iSu3, 


d. Mcli. 


9, 1S4S. 


Laura 62, 


b. hm. 


15. 1S06, 


d. Sep. 


17, JS76. 


Eliza 69, 


b. Apr. 


10, 1S07, 


d. Au-. 


16, 1857. 


Oliver 70, 


b. Nun-. 


23. iSu9. 






Joseph Fish 73, 


b. Sep. 


i5, ibir. 


d. June 


17, 1S71. 


Dudley Fish 76, 


b. Oct. 


5, I'^^ij. 






Ad in 


b. May 


28, 1816, 


d. Dec. 


4, 1S16. 


Ann is 80, 


b. May 


28, 18 16, 






C. Richardson Si 


, b. Au-. 


3. iSiS, 






Eleanor 


b. June 


28, 1S21, 


d. Mch. 


S, 1S43. 


George Packer S: 


:,b. Dec. 


17. 1S25, 






Hcnn- Green Breed was b. 


in Stonington, 


Conn., a: 


m. in Halifax, A't., d. 


in \'olney, Oswe 


go, Co.. 


X. Y. : 


d. in \'olnev. 











and \va.- 
His w. 



No. 5^ 



Plenty Breed 58, 


b. May 


6, 


1S02, 


d. 


Dec. 


17, 


^^72- 


Married 


Dec. 


5. 


1S43, 










Helen Curtis 


b. p-eb. 




1 816, 










Helen Maria 


b. Oct. 


6, 


1S44, 


d. 


Nov. 


4, 


1S46. 


Alice Augusta 


b. June 


23. 


1S46, 


d. 


Apr. 


25, 


1848. 


Henry Curtis 60. 


b. May 


!6, 


iS tc 










Louis Lawrence 


b. June 


-3' 


' ^5 ^ 


d. 


Aug. 


^i, 


iS53. 



Oswego Co., X. V. His w. was b. in Onondaga \'alley, Onon- 
daga Co., X. V. 

Xo. 60. 

Henry Curtis Breed 59, b. May 16, 1S49, 

Married May 21, 1879, 

Carrie E. Murgittroid b. Jan. 25, 1S60, 

Jessie b. Aug. 9, 1SS2, 

No. 61. 

Phebe Breed 5S, Dec. b. 14, 1S03, d. >rch. 9, 184S. 

Married Oct. i, 1S43, 

William Ricliardson b. 



No. 62. 

Laura Breed 58, b. Jan. i.s, 1S06, d. Sep. 17, 1.^76. 

Married Dec. 31, 1S29, 

James Longstreet b. May 24, 1.S06, d. May 22, 1S73. 

Cornelius H. Longstreet 63 b. Oct. 11, 1S31, 

James Oliver Longstreet 64 b. Nov. 16. 1S33, d. July 3, iS6r. 

Joseph Breed Longstreet 65 b. Aug. 29, 1S35, d. >Lay 24, 1879. 

Elien Elizabeth Longstreet 66 b. Sep. 10, 1S38, 

Louisa Annis Longstreet 67 b. Sep. 5, 1S40, 

Laura Breed Longstreet 6S b. Jan. 19, 1S45, 



No. 6;,. 



Cornelius 11. Longstreet 5S, 


b. Oct. 


". 


1S31, 


Married 


May 


3^1 


1S54, 


E. Jane Saterlee 


b. 







Cora Eli./abeth Longstreet b. Eeb. 27. 1S56, 
Carrie L. Longstreet b. Dec. n, 1S57, 

Herbert C. Longstreet b. Jan. iS, 1SS6,, 

Cora E. Long.<treet in. Apr. i6th, 1S7S, Frank S. Btirt. 
They had one child, Cora May Enrt b. Jttne 25th, 1S81. 

Can-ie L. Longi^treet in. Sep. 14. ibSo, Edgar H. Andrews. 
Thev had one child, Abbey D. Andrews b. July 15, 18:53. 



No. 64. 



James O. Longstreet 62, 


b. Nov. 


16, 1S33, d. July 


Married 


July 


7, 1S59, 


Josephine Christopher 


b. 




Josephine Longstreet 


b. Sep. 


22, 1S61, 



3, IS6I. 



No. 65. 

Joseph B. Longstreet 62, b. Aug. 29, 1S35, d. .May 24. iS79- 

Married May 23, 1S61, 

Rosaline S. Norlhway b. d. Oct. 15,1864. 

James Oliver Longstreet 2d b. Nov. S, 1S62, 

Sullivan Longstreet b. 

Chalmers Longstreet b. 

>hirricd 2d w. Nov. 30, 1S69, 

Margaret J aycox b. 



XO. 6C^. 

Ellen p:ii/.. I.on-street 62, b. Sep. i<>, 1S3S, 

Married April 21, 1S38, 

D. Morgan Fuhner h. IVh. 4, 1831, 

Ch:is. E. Inilnier h. April 5, 1S61, 

-H. Elton Fulnier b. Feb. 6, 1S64, 

Clark A. FuInier b. April 22, 1S67, 

Minnie L. Fulrner b. Ainil 11, 1S69, 

Nellie E. Fnlnier b. May 22, 1S71, 



No. 67. 

Louisa A. Longstrcet 62, b. Sept. 5, 1S40, 

Married June i, i8-,y. 

William Henry Barker b. July it, i83r, 

Irving Longstreet Barker b. Sept. 22, i860, 

Eva Louisa Barker b. March 7, 1864, 



Laura Mary Barker b. Oct. 6, 1871, d. Sept. 29, 1875. 

William H. Barker b. June d. Nov. 14, 1S73. 



No. 68. 

Laura B. Longstreet 62 b. Ian. 19, 1845, 

Married . June 17, 1867, 

Thomas J. Mahoney b. June lu, [S37, 

J. Carroll >Lahoney b. June 29, 1869. 

Clarence L. Mahoney b. Oct. S, 1S72, d. Jan. 9, 1SS3. 

Roy S. Mahoney b. Jan. 27, 1876, d. Aug. 22, 1S76. 

Dorr ^Llhoney b. May i, iSSi, 



Xo. 69. 

Eliza Breed 58 b. April 10, 1807, d. Aug. 16, 1857. 

Married Oct. 8, 1S2S, 

James A. Keeler b. 

Henry Breed Keeler b. Aug. 13, 1829, d. July 27, 1S53. 

Norman E. Keeler b. July 25, 1S33, d. .March 29, 1837. 

-,'-- Mary E. Keeler b. Feb. 16. 1836, d. Oct. 25, 1S36. 

>hirried 2d husband 1848, 

Jacob Piper b. 

Giles Smiih Filler b. Sept 20,1849, 

Henry P.recd Keeler was a physiciati Giles Smith Piper 
n^.. Ju.ie iS, 1879, Helen A. AllVed. They had two chn., Kniory 
Fayette Piper, b. April 30, rSSr. and a dau. b. OeL 30, 1SS2. 



No. 



Oliver Breed 58 b. Nov. 23, 1809, 

Married Feb. 12, 1SS4, 

Juliette Alvord b. April 17, iSrj. d. April 6, 1S64. 

Clark Oliver 71 b. July iS, 1S49, 

Frank Merrill 72 b. Nov. 30, 1850, 

Frederick b. Aug. i, 1S52, d. May 20, 186S. 

Charles Alvord b. March ii, 1S54, 

Married 2d wife Nov. 26, 1S57, 

Cora L. Bradley b. 

William Bradley b. Sept. 14, 1858, 

Joseph Jarvis b. May 13, 1861, d. Sept. 6, 1864. 



No. 



Clark Oliver Breed 7^ 


. b. luly 


iS. 


1849, 


Married 


Dec. 


iS, 


1S77. 


Ida Robinson 


b. July 


II. 


1859, 



No. 72. 



"rank Merrill Breed 70 


, b. 


Nov. 


30, 


1S50. 


Married 




Nov. 


g, 


1S73. 


-etitia A. Wood 


b. 


Dec. 


26, 


1 85 1, 


Garnie 


b. 


April 


30, 


1875, 


Bertha W. 


b. 


April 


15, 


1878, 


Ethel C. 


b. 


Dec. 


19. 


iSSi, 



No. 



Joseph Fish Breed 


58, 


b. Sep. 


16, 


iSii, 


d. 


June 


17. 


1S71. 


Married 




Oct. 


2, 


1 838, 










Letitia Lawrence 




b. 






d. 


April 


28, 


1S71. 


Charles L. 




b. Sep. 


17, 


1841, 


d. 


June 


13, 


1S47. 


Edwin Dean 




b. Sep. 


19. 


1843, 


d. 


March 


20, 


1S64. 


Eleanor M. 




b. Aug. 


31, 


JS45, 










Letitia M. 74, 




b. Sep. 


15, 


1849, 










Charles L. 




b. Feb. 


25, 


1855. 










Catherine Hammond 


75, b. Jan. 


8. 


1S57, 










Franc Rockwell 




b. Jan. 


8, 


1857, 


d. 


April 


4- 


1871. 



Charles L. Breed m. Nov. 13, iSSo, Hattie 1\. Sroger. 
Kleanor M. m. July 29, 1871, William L. Telfurd. 



No. 74. 

Letitia M. Breed 73, b. 

Married June 4, 1S71, 

Dudley H. Turner b. 

Frances lone Turner b. April 12, 1S72, 

Hulet McAllister Turner b. Oct. 28, 1S78, 

Dudley Breed Turner b. March 7,1883, 

No. 75. 
Catherine Hammond Breed 73, b. Jan. 8, 1857, 

Married Dec. 15, 18S0, 

William H. llawes b. 

William H. Hawes, Jr. b. Aug. 28,1881, 

No. 76. 

Dudley Fish Breed 58, b. Oct. 5, 1813, 

Married Dec. 25, 1839, 
Samantha Wood b. 

Jas.Fongstreet 77, b. Nov. 4, 1840, 

•Monroe 78, b. isep. 28, 1845, d. Sep. 15, 1875. 

Harvey 79, b. July i, 1S49, 

Ella L. b. Oct. 16, 1851, 

Dudley Breed was b. in \'ernioiit. Kis fatlie-r was a farmer 
and for many years a school-teacher. While Dudley was yel a 
boy, his father moved to Onondaga Co., N. Y., and afterwards 
near Fulton, Oswego Co.. N. Y.. where lie d. 

At the age of 21 years, he bought a timbered farm in the 
northern part of Volncy, N. Y. lie cleared it and then sold it, 
and bottght another farm not two mile^ away, known as the 
Northop farm. He lived there 4 years, and then bottght a large 
farm two miles North of Phoenix, Oswego Co., N. Y. Pie 
worked this two years and then mu\ed to Clay, Onondaga Co.. 
N. Y., and bought a farm known as the " Brick Yard Farm." 



No. 77. 






Jas. Longstreet Breed 


76, b. Nov. 


4, 1S40, 


Married 


Oct. 


2, 1862, 


Fannie Northrop 


b. Dec. 


2, 1842, 


Edward D. 


b. Sep. 


15, 1^63, 


Luella Cora 


b. Aug. 


31, 1865, d. July 16, 1879. 


Edith S. 


b. Jan. 


28, 186S, d. July :,[, 1883. 


Marion 


b. Jan. 


26. 1S72, 


I'dward Breed i 


is a Bridge 


Architect and Civil hhig 



gnicer at 
large. 



Xo. yS. 

Monroe Breed 76, b. Sep. 2S, is;45, cl. Sep. 15. 1S75. 

Married 

RhodH Couusell h. 1S45, d. Aug. 1.SS4. 

Grace b. 1S73, 

Xo. 79. 

Harvey Breed 76, b. Jul}- 1,1849, 

Married April 27, iSSi, 

Grace Hall b. March 7, 1S51. 

Lulu b. Sep. 9, 1&S2, 

No. 80. 

Annis Breed 5S, b. May 2S, 1S16, 

Married March 22, i8.p, 

Giles Sanford Smith b. Feb. 17. iSio, 

Marion PYancis Smith b. Feb. 16, 1841, 

Morean Delanean Smith b. Feb. iS, 1S43, 

F.dgarton John. Smith b. June 30, 1S45, 

Charles Richardson Smith b. July 11, 1S49, 

Eleanor Lamoine Smith b. Dec. 31, 1857, 

Frederick Eugene Smith b. Oct. 22, 1857, d. May S, 1876. 

Auni.> Breed was b. in Wiu.-or, Vt., nnd her hti-^band wa- 
b. in Warren, X. Y. The>- li\-e in Scranton, Pcnna. 

^Marion was b. in Xew York City. Morean was b. in \'ob 
ney, X. Y. T-'dgart^'ni wa< b. in FtiUnn, X'. Y. Charles was 
b. in Yohiey, X. Y.. and ni. Apr. S, 1S.S4. Jean Fa\-ctte Smith, 
of Scranton, Penna. Flleanor was b. in vStitville. X. Y.; m. L. 
S. Oakford, of Scranton, Pcnna. Frederick was b. in Ftdton, 
N. Y. 

Xo. Si. 

Charles Richardson Breed 58, b. Aug. 3, 1S18, 

Married Oct. 30, 1843, 

Or\illa Hull b. Sep. 22, 1S22, 

No. 82. 

George Pnck-r Breed 58, b. Dec. 17, 1S25, 

Married Sep. 6, 1849, 

Charlotte t'otler b. Sep. 23, 1S33, 

Everett Eugene b. June. 16, 1S53, d. Oct. 28, 18.83. 



No. 83. 



Prentice Breed ^6, 


b. 


Jan. I, 


1761, 


Married 




Dec. I, 


17S0, 


Mary Stanton 


b. 






Polly 


b. 


Aug. 20, 


17S1, 


Sophia 


b. 


Oct. S, 


17S4, 


Fanny 


b. 


March 27, 


17S7. 


Betsey 


h. 


Feb. 21, 


17S9, 


John Prentice. 


b. 


May 21, 


179'^, 



No. S4. 



John Breed 57, 


b. March 


15. 


1782, 


d. 


March 


20, 


1853. 


Married 


Apr. 


", 


1S05, 










Catherine Fisli 


b. May 


5, 


17S6, 


d. 


Aug. 




1879- 


Maria 


b. Jan. 


12, 


1S06, 










Susanna 


b. Sep. 


^^, 


iSoS.. 


d. 


Apr. 


13, 


1845. 


John F. 


b. Feb. 


5, 


i8ir, 










Catherine 


b. March 


s, 


1S16, 


d. 


Oct. 


^3, 


1S16. 


Amanda 


b. Oct. 


13, 


1S13, 


d. 


May 


3, 


1S3S. 


Samuel Oliver 


b. Sep. 


3'^. 


1S17, 










Survier E. 


b. March 


23. 


]S20, 










Charles \V. 


b. Sep. 


2r, 


1822, 










Catherine 


b. June 


I, 


1S25, 










Henry G. 


b. Jan. 


' r, 


IS2S, 










Martlia A. 


b. May 


iS, 


1^31, 











J(^hit Breed is ;i .Methodist inini^^ter; lie was m. in Halifax, 
Vt. Maria in. Jtiiic 24, 1S3S, 11. F. vSteadnian. Susanna ni. 
Ang". .S, 1S30. J(jhn ni. Jernsha Hnlhcrt, and li\-es at ^^ead\■ille, 
Penna. Amanda ni antl wlien she d. l^ft three clui. Sanitiel 
Oliver had 7 chn. Snrvier E. m. Sep. 12, 1S45, Plugh Brawley. 
and had two sons and 5 dan- Charles \V. m. Mary Sheplierd 
and had 6 chn. Catherine ni. Jnne i, 1S53, William Xason, 
M.D. Henry G. is a Methodist clergynian, and Presiding Klder: 
he was m. in 1S50, to Hainiah C/ray. They had i child, Han- 
nah, b. Jnne I, 1^53. His w. d. Jnne 9, 1S53; ni. 2d w. Oct. 
25, 1S54, Phebe Z. Hanvcrman. Their chn. were. Zeslie A. b. 
Dec. II, iS55; Addie b. May 17. 1862. Zeslie m. Dec. 4. 1879, 
Elizabeth Morgan. They had i child, Alta. Addie m. May 
17, 18S0, and had i chikl, Irma. 

Hannah m. X. M. Keed, and l:ad i cliild, Jessie. Martha 
A. ni. May 18, 1854. 



Xo. S5. 

Reuben Breed 57, b. July 4. ^7^3< ^^- ^^P- 21, 1S55, 

Married 

Martha Everett b. Jan. 7, 17S6, d. Sep. 3, 1S46. 

Louisa £6, b. June 15, i&^s, d. 1S7S. 

Calista b. June 14, 1S07, d. July 22, iS^.v 

SamanthaS7, b. June iS, i&g, d. Feb. 22, 1S74. 

Elizabeth b. Apr. 20, iSii, 

Lucy Ann b. Jan. 14. 18:4, d. Nov. 17, 1SS3. 

Andelucia bS, b. June 20, 1S17, 

Samuel Dwio;htS9,b. Nov. 3, 1821, 

John Everett 91, b. March 28, 1S23, 

Martha E. b. Nov. 7, 1S26, d. June 26,1842. 

Reuben Breed v.-ar> b. in Stoiiingtoii, and d. in Micliigan. 
lie \va^ a tanner by trade. His \v. was b. in Ilabifax. Vt.. and 
d. in Sniithville. X. Y. 

Calista nt. Julius Spencer. Her 2d hu4jand was T.everet 
Bryant. They had one son who was living in Caliibniia in 
i8S6. 

Elizabeth Breed m. Apr. 7, 1S47. ^L D. Hubbard at Bell- 
ville, Jefferson Co., X. V. Their chn. were Dwight P. Hubbard 
and another son. 

Martha E. d. in Sniithville, X. Y. 



Xo. 86. 



Louisa Breed S5, 






b, June 


'5, 


1S05, d. 


Married 






Dec. 


27, 


1826, 


Lewis Kellogg 






b. 




d. 


G'eo. C. Kello;- 


''i 




b. Dec. 


27, 


1S27, 


Julius Spencer 


Kel 


logs 


b. Jan. 


24, 


1829, 


Arthr.rT. Kelk 


3.^'g: 




b. luly 


13, 


1833. 



IS78, 
IS7S. 



Louisa Breed was ni. at Adams, Jefferson Co., X. Y. Lewis 
Kellogg d. at Washington, Wisconsin. Their chn. were b. in 
Adams'. X. Y. 

George m. Delia Boynton and had one son. Julius ni. 
Mary Cornell, and had one dan. Arthur ni. Julia Cornell, and 
had one dau.. Lulu b. in 1871. 



No. 87. 

Samantha P.reed 85, h. June iS, 1S09. d. Feb. 27, 1S74. 

Married 

Edmund L. Freeman b. 

Frances A. Freeman b. 

Lucy Ann l-^reeman b. 

Calista I'>eeman b. Jan. 12, 1S37, 

Lucia A. Freeman b. 

Mary I^lla l''recnian b. 

John S. P'reeman b. 

Aldebret Freeman b. 

Frances A. Freeman 111. Mr. vSon;er.s, and her 2(1 husband 
was Chauncey Freeman. They had one dau., Caiista hVeeman, 
who m. Clark S. Freeman. 



No. 88. 

Andalucia Breed 85, b. June 10, 1S17, 

Married 

E. S. I5r>-ant b. 

^Laria Bryant b. 

Charles S. Bryant b. 

Mott D. Rrvant b. 



No. 89. 
Samuel Dwight Breed 85. b. Nov. 
Married Sei"). 

Orpha Ann Fenn b. d. Feb. 1S46. 

Reuben Olando b. Oct. 
Married 2d wife Sep. 

Amelia F. Bosvvortli b. 

Dwiglit Paysongo, b. fune 
Amelia Mira b. Nov. 

Merle Amos b. Oct. 

Gertrude Taniora b, Nov. 

Rev. Samuel Hwii^ht Breed was b. in \'olney, Oswego Co., 
N. Y. lie moved to Ypsilantic, Michigan. Reuben Olando 
enlisted in the 4Lh Michigan Cavalr>- and d. in a Nashville 
llo.spital. 

Amelia Mira was a Grad. of Oberlin Congress of Music. 
Merle Amos was a (^rad. of Michigan rni\xr>ity in 18S4. Ger- 
trude Tamora is now in the Universit^• of Miehigan. f 1887). 



3. 


1S21, 




1S4T. 




d. Feb. 


5, 


1S43. 


14, 


1S4S, 


10, 


1851, 


27, 


■S52, 


2, 


1^59, 


9, 


1S64. 



No. 90. 

Dwight Payson I'-ited S9, b. June 

Married Apr. 

Una Briggs b. Apr. 

Reuben Leonard b. Jan. 

Clara Bosworth b. June 19, 1S7S, d. Nov. 9, 18S2. 

Dwight Egburt b. Sep. 

Rev. Dwight Pa^'soii Breed was Pa-tor at Katoii Rapids, 
Mich., and afterwards at Portland, Mich., and is now located 
in Reed City, Mich. 



No. 



10, 


1851, 




9> 


1S73. 




29, 


I •'^5 1, 




II, 


1S74. 




19, 


1S7S, c 


I. Nov. 


29, 


1SS4. 





John Everett Breed S5, 


b. March 


2S, 


1S23, 








Married 


Oct. 


2S, 


iS45, 








Catherine Morrow 


b. 












Edward Everett 


b. Sep. 


19. 


1S46, 








Montgomery C. 92, b. Feb. 


3, 


1S49, 








George M. 93, 


b. Nov. 


9- 


1350, 








Fred. S. 


b. Oct. 


21. 


1S52, 








Dwight H. H. 


b. Oct. 


29- 


1S54. 


d. Aug. 


2, 


1S56. 


Mary K. 


b. Jan. 


i7> 


1S5-, 


d. May 


14, 


1^73- 


Arthur W. 


b. Apr. 


6, 


1S59. 









John Everett Breed writes that he is a Doctor. Farmer and 
Apiarist. 

Edward Everett is a law}-er and a Real Estate Agent at 
Shawano, Shawano Co., Wisconsin. He m. Nov. 24, iSSo, 
Leona Grimmer. 

Fred. S. m. Mch. 28, 1SS5, Carrie Clark. 

No. 92. 



Montgomery C. Breed 91 


, b. Feb. 


3, 


1849- 


Married 


Aug. 


29, 


1S73. 


Sarah E. McFadden 


b. 






Mary K. 


b. Aug. 


29, 


1S74, 


Florence C. 


b. May 


4, 


1S76, 


Everett M. 


b. April 


4, 


1878, 


Jane \V. 


b. Aug. 


I, 


1SS3, 



Montgomer}' C. Breed is a farmer. 
(10) 



No. 93. 



George M. Dreed 91, b. Nov. 


9, 


1S50, 


Married Nov. 


2'i, 


iSSo, 


Effie C b. June 


27, 


18S1, 


Annia L. b. Sep. 


6, 


1S.S3, 



No. 94. 



Adin Breed 57, 


b. 


March 


I, 


1787, 


d. 


Marcli 


16, 


1S50. 


Married 


















Nancv 


b. 






1795, 


d. 


June 


10, 


1830. 


Julia 


b. 
















Malinda 95, 


b. 


Oct. 


3. 


1S.3, 


d. 


May 


29. 


1877. 


Caroline 96, 


b. 


July 


10, 


1S18, 










Sarah 97, 


b. 


Jan. 


21, 


1821, 










Charles 98, 


b. 


Jan. 


17. 


1S24, 


d. 


April 


15, 


1SS5. 


George G. 10 1, 


■ b. 


March 


II, 


1S25, 


d. 


Dec. 


7. 


1879. 


Charlotte 102, 


b. 


.May 


29, 


1S29, 


d. 


Sep. 


20, 


1862. 



No. 9^: 



Malinda Breed 94, 


b. 


Oct. 


3. 


1S13, 


d. 


May 


29, 


1S77. 


Married 




Dec. 


25. 


I S3 1, 










Anson Spencer 


b. 


April 


7, 


1S.03, 


d. 


Feb. 


9. 


1S70. 


Mary Spencer 


b. 


Dec. 


14, 


1S33, 


d. 


Dec. 


2S, 


1SS4. 


Nancy Spencer 


b. 
















Robert S. Spencer 


b. 
















Nellie Spencer 


b. 

















Mary Spettcer ni. Mch. 7, 1S55, Kdwin J. Vickey, who was 
b. May 23, 1834. They had one child, Clinton D. \'ickey b. 
Ang. I, 1S5S. 



No. 96. 

Caroline Breed 94, b. July 10, iSiS, 
Married Dec. 23, 1S44, 

Edward Richardson b. Feb. 9, 1816, d. .March 11, 18S4. 
Chauncey Ricliardson b. Marcli 14, 1S46, d. June 4, 1S51. 

Ella Richard.son b. Sep. 15. 1848, 

Libbie Ricliardson b. F^eb. 18, 1S51, 

Emma Richardson b. March 22, 1S53, d. June 9, 1854. 



Caroline Breed ni. at Pht.enix, N. Y. 

Ivlla was a tc-ar-licr of drawing and painliiio. lahliie ni. 
Dec. 13, 1871, Angus Briggs, who was li. Feb. iS, 1850. Their 
chn. were: l^dith b. v^ep. 6, 1.S75: Ivdward R. b. Oct. 2, 1S79, 
and Lena b. July 6, 1S82. 



No. 97. 

Sarah Breed 94 b. Jan. 21, 1S21, d. 1S49. 

Married Oct. 10, 1S43, 

Seth W. Alvord b. bily 31, iSry, 

Frederick W'ilHston Alvord h. July 2, 1846, 

Theodore W. Alvord b. Nov. 22, 184S, d. Aug. 9, 1S52. 



vSarah Breed m. at Phoenix, N. V. 

Frederick \V. Alvord m. Jan. 3, 1S71, at Phoenix, X. Y 
Jenny Lind Hutchinson, who was b. Mch. 11, 1S50. 



No. 98. 



Charles Breed 94 b. Jan. 


17, 


1S24, d. 


April 


Married June 




1S47. 




Phebe Sweet b. Oct. 


25, 


1S26, d. 


April 


Ida 99 b. July 


20, 


1S4S, 




Nellie joo b. Nov. 


14, 


1S52, 




Married 2d wife 








Adaline Devendorv b. Oct. 


25- 


1^33, 




Mary ' b. July 


20, 


iS6r, 




Carrie b. July 


17, 


1S64, 




-Mary b. June 


3. 


1S70, 





5, 1SS5. 



No. 99. 

Ida Breed 9S b. July 20, 1848, 

Married 

Lorenzo Camphell b. 

Cora Campbell b. 

Minnie Campbell b. 



The}- li\-e in Central Square, Oswego Comity, N. Y. 



No. loo. 



Nellie Breed 9S 




b. Nov. 


14, 


1S52, 


Married 




Dec. 


I, 


1872, 


James M. Marshall 




b. Oct. 


I, 


'S51, 


Blanche Neuhall Ma 


rt,hall 


b. Sept. 


21, 


1S73, 



No. loi. 

George G. Breed 94 b. March 11, 1S25, d. Dec. 11, 1S79. 

Married Feb. 3, 1S46, 

Mary Sweet b. Feb. 5, 1S25, 

Libbie b. Dec. i, 1847, 

Libbie ?jrecd m. May 10, 1S70, Prosper Tracy, who was b. 
June 19, 1^45. They had one child, Mamie b. June 17, 1S76. 



No. 102. 














Charlotte Breed 94, 


b. 


May 


29. 


1S29, d. Sept. 


20, 


1S62. 


Married 














Warren Hatch 


b. 












Frank Hatch 


b. 


Sept. 


8. 


1S49, d. Dec. 


2, 


1868. 


Clinton Hatch 


b. 


May 


10, 


1S53, d. Jan. 


7, 


1S58. 



No. 105. 
















Oliver Breed 57, 


b. 




1789. 


d. 


April 


20, 


1862. 


Married 


I'-el 


1- 9. 


1S17, 










Candice Merry 


b. 




1795, 










Clarrissa 


b. 




1820, 










Lawrence 


b. 




1S24, 


d. 






1S26. 


Maria C. 


b. 




182S, 


d. 






1SS2. 



Clarrissa Breed m. 1844, Orviii vSniith, who d. in iSSo. 

Maria C. ra. 1850, Pliny F. Conger. Their chn. were : — 
PVank E. b. Nov. 19, 1S54, andd. Dec. 18, 1S54 ; Inez M. b. Nov. 
16, 1S55 ; Clarice C. b. Mch. 25, 1.S58, and Oliver P. b. Sep. 20, 



S.O. I04- 








Nathan Breed 55, 


b. Dec. 


13, 


i7.y, 


Married 






1751, 


Lucy Babcock 


b. 






Nathan 


b. March 


30. 


1752, 


Lucy 


b. May 


i'^. 


1754, 


Joseph 105, 


b. July 


9. 


175S, 


Stephen 106, 


b. March 


15, 


1760. 


Esther in, 


b. July 


4. 


1762, 


Anna 


b. 






Grace 112, 


b. 






Thomas 113, 


b. Jan. 


3, 


1764, 


Joshua 


b. 




1770, 



1835. 



Nalhati Breed vSr. was 1). in Stoniiigton, Conn. 
Lucy in. William Slacl<:. Their dau. ra. X. M. Xoyes of 
Stonincrton. Anna m. Gilbert Grant. 



No. 105. 



Joseph Breed 104, 


b. 


Married 




Mercy Ilolmt-s 


b. 


Joseph 
Charles 


b. 
b. 


Nathan 


b. 


John 

Mercy 

Lucy 

Nancy 

Prudence 


b. 
b. 
b. 
b. 
b. 


Sarah 


b. 


Abigail 


b. 



July 



In iSiS Joseph Breed moved with part of his family to 
Cherrytree Township, Venango Co., Penna., (near Titusvillej. 
This settlement is now known as Breedtown. 

Charles m.and had three sons and two dan. Nathan had 
five sons and two dau. John had two sons and three dau. 
Merc}' m. Amos Hancock and had four sons and two dau. 
Lucy m. Mr. Collins and had four chn. Nancy m. Mr. 
Beeley and had seven chn. Prudence m. Mr. Lines and had 
three chn. Sarah m. Mr. Pendleton and had three chn. 
Abigail m. Mr. Gleason and had one child. 



No. io6. 

Stepluii Ikecd 104, b. Marcli 12, 1760, d. March 6, 1S35. 

Married 

Eslher Wheeler b. d. Aug. 7,1838. 

Esther b. 

Stephen 107 b. July i, 17S5, d. March 9, 1S52. 

Silence b. 

Hannah b. 

Alice b. 

Frederick William b. 



The War Department records contain the following^ 
relating to Stephen Breed. "In Oct. 1S32, of Brookfield, 
Madison Co., N. Y., born in StoniTigton, Conn., ^^arch 12, 
1760. He ni. April, 1779, Esther, daughter of Richard 
Wheeler. She was born in Stouington. He died March 6^ 
1S35. He moved from Stonington in 1S05 to Saybrook, Conn., 
then to North Milford, New Haven Co., Conn., in 1S09 ; then 
in 1S15 to North Stonington, Conn., and in 1S27 to Krookfield, 
N. Y. wliere living the last five years. His widow Esther was 
living March, 1S37, in Brookfield aged 76 years. She died 
Aug. 7, 1S3S, leaving five children surviving her. A witness 
in 1S36 was Joshua Breed of Brookfield, aged 66) years and a 
brother of Stephen. 

He was drat'ted at Stonitigton, Conn., the last of April, 
1776, for one month under Capt. Wm. Stanton, to be stationed 
at Eort Griswold in Grot(.Mi, Conn., and in tlie fall of 1777 he 
was again stationed in the h'ort. In Aug. 177S, he volunteered 
for three months under Capt. Daniel Carew in Col. Worthing- 
ton's Regiment, going to Howland's Ferry during Gen. Sul- 
livan's campaign in R. L, and was in the engagement on the 
island of R. L, after which retreated to Bristol. About April 
I, 1779, he enlisted at Colchester f tr six months under Capt. 
John Northrop and was stationed at White Plains, Peekskill 
and Fishkill, N. Y. In Nov. 1779, he volunteered at Stoning- 
ton for two months as one oi the garrison under Capt. Abner 
Comstock in F(jrt Tiumlnill, New London, and in April, 1780, 
he was drafted under Capt. John Swan and stationed one month 
at Stonington Point. In July, 17S0, he was drafted to serve 
two and one-half months at White Plains, N. V., and was out 



in Sept. 17S1, oil tlic alarm cau-^ed b\' tlie massacre of Col. 
Ledyard and -arrisoii at Fort Ciri>\vold, in Crroton, Sej)t. 6, 
17S1V' 

Stephen Breed, Sr., was b. in Stonington. His \v. was the 
oldest sister of Richard Wheeler (54) 

Silence m. and had two sons and two dau. Hannah ni. 
and had live sons and .-ix dau. hVederick William m. Miss 
Holbrook of Forestville, N. Y. Their chn. were : Frederick 
William and Elizabeth Alice. 



No. 107. 

Steplien Breed 106, b. July i, 17S5, d. March 9, 1S52. 

Married 

Sophia Geer b. June 12, 17S6, d. March 30, 1SS2. 

Stephen W . loS b. Sept. r2, iSi2, d. Dec. 28, 1S79. 

Robert lotch no b. March 6, 1S15, d. Feb. 27, 1SS2. 

Stephen Breed, Sr., was b. in Stonington, Conn., and in 
1S12 he moved to Susqitehanua Co., Peiiua. 

Robert Fitch Breed m. Apr. 21, 1S74, Emma Beers, who 
was b. Nov. 26, 1S44. il^s widow now lives in Brookh'n, 
Penna. Their chn. were : Stephen P'itch b. Jan. 21, 1875 ; 
Fdeanor Wheeler b. Feb. 17, 1S76, and Robert Stanley b. Oct. 
18, 1S77. 

No. loS. 

28, 1S79. 



Steplien W. Breed 


107, 


b. Sept. 12, 1S12, d. Dec. 


Married 






Susannah Guile 




b. July 15, 1S23, 


George P., 


109, 


b. Dec. 17, 1 848, 



No. 109. 

George F. Breed loS, b. Dec. 17, 1848, 
Married Feb. 9, 1882, 

Caroline Roberts b. 

Rev. George ¥. Breed is an Epi.scopal minister. He was 
a very popular pastor at Danville, Pe-nna., for some years and 
from there went tu Asltury Park, a large Summer re^^ort in 
Isew Jersey, and thence to Broviklyu, X. V. 



Xo. no. 








Robert. F. Urecd luj, 


b. March 


6, 


18 1 5, 


Married 


April 


21, 


1874, 


Emma Bcer^ 


b. Nov. 


26, 


1S44. 


Slepben Fitch 


b. Jan. 


21, 


1875, 


Elenor Wheeler 


1). Feb. 


17, 


1S76, 


Robert Stanley 


b. Oct. 


1 8, 


1S77, 


No. III. 








Esther Breed io_!, 


b. July 


4, 


1762, 


Married 








William Wilter 


b. 






No. 112. 








Grace Breed 104, 


b. 






Married 








Jesse Billings 


b. 






Elisha Billings 


b. 







d. April 27, 1SS2, 



Jesse Billings was from Saratoga, ^ 
Elisha Billing, m. the Rev. David Bernard. 



A dan. of 



Xo. 113- 

Thomas Breed 104, b. Jan 

Married 
Elizabeth Clements b 



1764, d, 1S26. 



Lucy b. Dec. i. 1793. 

William b. Dec. 24,1:95, 



S16. 



Elizabeth b. April 7, i79^. ^■ 

Thomas 114, b. Jan. ^o. ^Sc«, 

p^ra b. April 8, 1S06, 

Aurelia b. June 9, iSuS, 

Matilda b.jan. ^5, iSii, 

pi^iHp b. April 30, 1S13, d. 1834. 

Louisa b. Dec. 3. iS'T, 

Joshua b. March 1,1819, 
Thomas Breed was b. and raised in Stonington. He after- 
i nomas I. ^vhere he was m. and 

then nu.vea to Unoucuga Lu.,^ ^. \ • iUs 
Chatau^ua Co., X. ^^■, ^'■^'^'^ ''9- 



T.iiC}- in. ITennon Dai^^ett and had two sons and three dan. 
William m. Claris>a Jones, a sister ot' r)!i\-e (115), his brother 
John's wife. lie liad two sons and two dan. I'>.ra ni. Sarah 
Goff and had one son. Anrelia m. Lnthcr Botsford and had 
fonr sons and three dan. : they live in Kainlown, X. Y. 
Joshna ni. Betsey Heath and had three sous and one dau. 

No. 114. 



Tlioraas IVeed 113, 


b. Jan. 


10, iSoo, 


Married 






Maribah }>abcock 


b. 




Simeon 


b. 




Married 2d wife 






Elizabeth Rogers 


b. 




Married 3d wife 






Nancy McCL-iluni 







Tlionias Breed had three chn. by his 2d w. His 3d w. was 
a Jamestown lady. 

Xo. 115. 

John C. Breed 113, b. April 6, 1S04, d. Dec. 6, 1SS6. 

Married 

Olive Jones b. 

Antoinette b.Aug. 7. 1S2S, d. Sept. 6, 1S42. 

Ella A. b. March 13, 1S39, d. 1S69. 

Judson \V. 116. b. July 23, 1S32, 

Charles A. 117, b. Dec. 7, 1S45, 

. Deacon J. C. Breed lived in Jamestown, X". Y. In the 
Spring of iS6s, he wrote letters to many persons of the Breed 
name, asking for information about tlie family in general. He 
later joined with others in a request to many families to as- 
semble in Jamestown in con\-ention. 

On Sep. 10, 1S68, they came together and the proceedings 
were reported in pamphlet form. At that meeting Mr. Breed 
spoke a.-, follows : "As I review the records of past genera- 
tions, gone to their long home, and look upon this circle of 
friends gathered to hear of their ancestors, and for social 
reunion, what interesting thoughts crowd my mind and .seek 
utterance. Our ancestors landed in this country 240 years ago. 
Eight generations of them have been born, most C)f whom ha\-e 
pas.sed to their long rc^t. 

(II) 



They conlributed to the general .good : they helped the 
Nation to establish itself, as we are ikuv helping toniainlain it. 
They did their part well. Are we doing ours as well ? These 
are momentous questions. Tlie gray hairs gathering on my 
brow, and the whitened heads of others I see here to-day, 
together wit1i our fading vision and failing strength, imprcss- 
ingly remind us that we shall soon join tlic circle that has 
passed on bef>)re. It is not probable that all who are assembled 
here to-day, will again meet in a gathering like this. As we 
have such good evidence of the Christian character and 
integrity of so many of our ancestors who now sleep in the 
grave, my prayer to God is that ourselves, our children, and our 
children's children may all meet with the redeemed in Heaven, 
where its collected members shall be scattered no more 
forever.'' 

In a letter to the author, dated Nov. 23, 1S74, Mr. ]>reed 
speaks of that Convention as the '"First and only Convention " 
which has been held by the Breed family. In the same letter 
he says :— of a visit he made to Lynn — " I was shown a house 
in Lynn, the veritable timbers of which were taken from the 
house in which Allen Bread, the first, lived." In a letter 
dated Jan. 12, 1S74, he writes as follows: "I visited Lynn in 
September, 1S71, a city 9 mile^^ down the Atlantic from BostO!i, 
of 30,000 inhabitants. On their city register I found the names 
of 104 families of Breeds, engaged in the various enterprises of 
citv life, but mostly in the manuiacture and sale ol ladies' 
shoes. 

I traveled all o\-er Breeds' End, mentioned in my records, 
which is a part of the city proper, which was originalh- the 
farm of Allen P. reed, the emigrant. In the old cemetery I 
found the Breed Imrial hA, on which were two short slate stones 
representing the graves of Allen and John Breed, sons of Allen, 
the first." 

In the same letter he refers to his address at the Con- 
vention, thus ; " It may be proper to say that I lay no claim as 
an historic editor of the Breed famil_\- in this country, but some 
historic facts incidentally came into my hands, which, so in- 
terest me, I wa> induced to open a general corresp<jndence with 
the Breed f:imily of this ci-untry, which culminated in the ad- 
dress as read by me at tlie Convention." 



During the wliulc period of his long Hie he has been a useful 
member of society. His ]Mety liecame more and more matured, 
the symmetry of his Christian character daily incrca>^ed, the stui 
of his hopes slunie more and more brilHantly and shed its bright 
beams over his triinnphant dcjiarture. Altlirjugh he ha.-, gone, 
his example will long continue tc) shine brightly, and illumine 
the daik patluva>- of human life. " Being dead, he yet spcak- 
eth." 

In Xovemljer, 1S27, he married 01i\'e, the fifth daughter of 
Solomon Jones. For over fifty \'ears he resided in the house in 
■which he died. Olive, his wife, the companion of nearly sixty 
years of earthly life, tarries. 

There was placed in my hands last evening a pamphlet en- 
titled " Proceedings of the First Convention of the Breed Fam- 
ih' of the United States of America, held at Janicsiown, X. Y., 
September 10, iSGS, together with an Historical Address deliv- 
ered by Deacon J. C. B-reed on that occasion." This pamphlet 
which never had been brought to nu' notice pre\-iously contains 
facts important in the History of the Town of Ellicott, and it is 
appropriate that they be publislied now when we are mourning 
the departtire of good Deacon Breed from our midst. It appears 
that a desire to know more about, and to become better ac- 
quainted with all bearing the name of Breed, prompted the nu- 
merous families (.'f tluit name re'^iding in Jamestown to issue a 
circular letter, dated August i, iS'iS, inviting all of that name 
to a social gathering at Jamotown, on the toth of the following 
September. In response to this circidar seventy-fi\-e persons of 
that name assembled in Jamestown from various sections of the 
country. At one o'clock of that day, this as.'^emblage had a 
sumptu(jus repast, served to them at the residence of D. C. 
Breed. It is stated that the dinner was discussed in a man- 
ner to clearly demonstrate the fact that, although they might 
be unacquainted with each other they certainly were not 
strangers to good living. After dinner there was a formal or- 
ganization of the famil_\-, of which Richard E. Breed, of Pitts- 
burg, was elected President, and J. W. Breed, of Cincinnati, 
Secretar}-. Tlie bu-^iness meeting was closed In' the reading of 
an Ilir^torical A'ldre^.- by Deacon John C. Breed, of Jamestown. 
Mr. P.reed coinme!iCed by saying : — " We are descendants of an 
ancient famil\-, extending back to the first settlement of the 



country." The first and only man of the nanic was born in 
Kiitrland, in i6i")i, and emigrated to this country with John 
Winthrop, afterwards the celebrated Governor of >.Iassachusetts, 
and landed at Salem, Mass., in 1630. 

His grandfather John I'.reed and his wife, Mercy, are buried 
near Slonington, Ct., and one who visited the graves a short 
time pre\-ious to this con\'entiou says that the inscription on a 
stone of blue slate is well preserved. It reads as follows ; 

"In memory of a pious pair this carved stone is erected 
here, viz., of Mr. John Breed and his wite Mercy, wdio lived to- 
gether in ye marriage state, in a most religious manner about 
sixty-four years and then deceased, leaving a nuruerous off- 
spring, he in 1 75 1 about ninety }-ears of age, and she in 1752 
about eiglity-three years." 

His father Thomas married Elizabeth Clements and settled 
in Saratoga county, on a farm that was noted for the surrender 
of Gen. Burgoyne and his army in the war of the Revolution. 
This farm was situated about one mile from Schuylerville, 
where he was born. His father's family numbered twelve 
children. The most of them afterwards settled in Chatauqua 
courity. Aurelia Breed who married Luther Bottsfoed is the 
only one of the family now living, and she came yesterday to 
attend her brother's funeral. She lives now in Salamanca. 
She is tlie mother of Mrs. Ben. Garfield and grandmother to 
Fred. H. Garfield, of our city. She has two sons who are resi- 
dents of Jamestown. 

Mr. Breetl also said: — " You have no reason to be ashamed 
of \-our ancestors : \-ou are from a good stock ; your ancestors 
were among the most respectable leading business men of their 
time, and are generally found among the Christian men and 
women in the churches of Christ. The last record to me is far 
preferable to any political record however successful." 

p:ila m. Marcli 7, 1S61, Ransume A. Bowis. She " was a 
noble specimen of womanh' qualitie.-^." The\- had uo chn. 



Xo. 1 1 6. 










Judson W. r.rcLt 


1 115 


, b. Inly 


-3) 


lS^,2, 


Married 




Nov. 




1S5S, 


Sarah K. Was lib 


urn 


b. April 


14, 


1^39, 


Buruitl B. 




b. 0( t. 


9, 


i'^=^9, 


Alton 




b. luly 


9- 


i86r, d. Si 


Eddie H. 




b. Sep. 


19- 


1S63, 


Sam u el 




b. June 


6, 


1S67, 


Porter D. 




b. Mav 


9. 


1S71, 


Married 2d 


u\ 


Dec. 




1SS3, 


Augusta H. Grul 


jbs 


b. 







6, iSSs. 



Judson W. Breed's 2d \v. was from Taylorsport, Ky 

Xo. 1 17. 

Charles A. Breed 115, b. Dec. 7, 1849, 
Married 



Celestia Cook 


b. 






Ella 


b. 






Gyrtie 


b. 






Bessie 


b. 






Lona 


b. 






Emily 


b. 






Celestia Cook 


was a dau. c 


)f the Hon. 


Judge Cook. 


Xo. iiS. 








Amos Breed 5 


5. b. Dec. 


23, 1744, 




Married 


Jan . 


25, 176S, 




Lucy Randall 


b. 


1750, d. 


Sep. 1S30. 


Amos J 19, 


b. May 


5> i7^^9, 




Jesse 120, 


b. June 


12, 1771, d. 


1S31. 


Jedediah 121 


b. Au- . 


15, 1773, d. 


Oct. 31, 1S51. 


Lucy 124, 


b. F-eb. 


10, 1776, 




Jonas 125, 


b. April 


13, 1779, d. 


Sep. 6, 1S42. 


Elias 


b. March 


12, 1782, 




Elias Breed 


settled near 


Xorwich, 


X. Y., and became 


wealthy. 








Xo. 119. 








Ami.s Breed i 


IS, b. ^Lay 


5, 17^9, 




Married 









Amos b. 

Philura b. 

John b. 

Amos Breed removed from Stonington, Coim., to Pitcher. 
Clienango Co.. X. V. He was m. three times. His son Amos 
lives near Canton, 111. John d. at Pitcher. 



Xo. 1 20. 

June 12, 1771, d. iSjr. 

d. iS-,o. 



Jesse Hretd 118, 


b. 


Married 




Fianiiah Randall 


b. 


Hannah 


b. 


Jesse n. 


b. 


Franklin 


b. 


Joshua 


b. 


Amos 


b. 


Calvin G. 


b. 



Jesse Breed lived on a farm adjoinin;^ his brother Jonas, in 
vStouington, Conn. He afterward removed to Lilehfield, Conn., 
and then to Homer, N. Y.^ and after his family were grown, to 
Courtland, N. Y., where he d. 

Hannah m. a Mr. Friuk, and d. in 1830, leaving 2 chn. 
Jesse B., Jr., reiiiained in Stonington, and m. Alvina Peabody. 



No. 121, 



Jedediah Breed iiS, 


b. 


An- 


15, 


1773, 


d. 


Oct. 


3', 


1851. 


Married 








1S06, 










Nancy 


b. 








d. 


March 


4, 


1S72. 


Samuel B. 122, 


b. 


Ian. 


I, 


iSoS, 


d. 


Sept. 


31. 


1S46. 


Phebe N. 123, 


b. 


.May 


30. 


1S09, 










Harry F. 


b. 


March 


19. 


I S ir , 


d. 


Oct. 


^4, 


1861. 


Mary Ann 


b. 


Nov. 


-!. 


1S12, 


d. 


April 


3'''. 


1 S40. 


William N. 


b. 


Feb. 


8, 


iSiS, 


d. 


Nov. 


25. 


iS6r. 



Jedediah I'^reed w^as m. at Poughkeepsie, N. Y., and in 
iSii moved to Washingtonville, Orange Co., X. Y., where his 
dan. Phebe and her family were residing in March 1SS4. He 
was Post Master in Blooming Grove for a number of years, and 
at his death was succeeded by his son Henry. 



No. 122. 



Samuel B. Breed 12 1 


, b. Jan. 


T, iSoS, d. Sept. 


Married 






Ann Elizabeth 


b. 




Henry 


b. 





31, IS46. 



No. 123. 

Phebe X. Breed 121, h. May 30,1809. 

Married 

A. G. 0\\en b. 

Lucy OuLU b. 

G. A. Owen h. 

Lucy Owen m. J. T). Rockafellow, and lives in Middleton, 
N. Y. She has 5 chn. G. A. Owen and w. and 3 chn. livt. 
with his parents. 



No. 124. 

Lucy Breed iiS, b. Feb. 10, 1776, 

Married 
Samuel Peabody b. 

Allen B. Peabody b. 

Alvira Peabody b. 

Philura Peabody b. 

Elias Peabody b. » 

William Peabody b. 

Amos Peabody b. 

Nancy Peabody b. 

Martha Peabody b. 



No. 12 = 



Jona? Breed 11 8, 


b. Apr. 


13, 


1779, 


d. 


Sep. 


6, 


1S42, 


Married 






1S03, 










Betsey Niles 


b. 






d. 


Sep. 


13, 


1S63. 


Betsey 


b. Jan. 


6. 


1S05, 


d. 


Sep. 




iS7r. 


Bath.s'heba Niles 126, b. Aug. 


9, 


1S06, 


d. 


Nov. 




18S3. 


Grace Palmer 


b. Apr. 




1 80S, 


d. 


Feb. 


6, 


1S31. 


Sands Niles 127, 


b. Aug. 


20, 


1 8 10, 










Jonas P. 12S, 


b. July 


4, 


1H13, 


d. 






1S51. 


Mar>- C. 


b. March 


26, 


1S16, 










Esther \V. 


b. Nuv. 


3- 


18 1 8, 










Nancy M. 129, 


b. July 


i3> 


1S21, 










Edmund A. 130, 


b. Dec. 


'I. 


1S23, 










Amos 


b. July 


4, 


1S27, 










Lucy Randall 


b. March 


i^S 


■S30, 


d. 






1S69 



Mar>' C. Breed ni. Geor;..';e Sanntkrs ; had one ch. and lives 
at Austin. Texas. 



Esther \V. was 1). in Stonitigton ; in. in 1X41, Joseph Iiolhtf 
\'urk, rcuiia., wlio (I. in 1X49. H;ul one ch. Ivrastus vS. Doll, 
b. in 1S4S. She ni. cd hnsband, Jlugh Jones of Ohio, wlio d. 
March 2?, 1S7S. Their chn. were : Charity Jones b. Sep. r^, 
1853; Charlotte A. Jones b. March 10, 1S55 ; Amos Breed 
Jones b. I'eb. 16, iS57;John Jones b. Feb. 20, i36i. In the 
fall of 1S78. the family moved to Ashton, Kingman Co., III. 
Charity m. Mr. Roy ; had two chn., and lives in Harper City. 
Charlotte m. John Powell : had three girls, and in the spring 
of 1SS4, moved from Peoria, 111., to Chamancha Co., Kansas. 
Erastus S. Doll lives four miles West of Ashton. He settled 
there in Feb., 1SS3. He has a w., and a son and dau. 

Lucy Randall Breed m. W. J. Maple. She left 5 chu. 



No. 126. 

BathshebaNiles Breed 125, b, Aug. 9, 1S06, d. Nov. 1SS3. 

Married 1S34, 

Mr. Geyer b. 

Dudley R. Geyer b. d. 1S76. 

Grace J. Ge^er b. 

Mary Geyer b. 

Dudley R. Geyer left four chn.: Edmond, Sidney, Everett 
and Grace. 

Grace J. Geyer m. H. C. Bolton, and d. Feb. iS, 18S7. 
Their chn. were : John, William, Dudley and Mary. 

Mary Gex'er m. Alexander Sterns and lived near To- 
wanda, Kan. Shed. P'eb. 16, 1SS7. They bad 2 chn. : Joseph 



and Grace. 



iNO. 127. 














Sands Xiles Breed 12 


5, b. Aug. 


20, 


iSio, 








Married 


March 


22, 


1S3S, 








Julia Anna Porter 


b. 












John Henry 


b. May 


12, 


1S41, 


d. 


Feb. 


22, 1S54. 


Julia Maria 


b. Oct. 


29. 


1S44, 








Samuel Porter 


b. May 


12, 


1S49, 


d. 


April 


21, 1870. 


May Gracc 


b. Nov. 


21, 


1S52, 








flatti.' AuT.-Iia 


b. Oct. 


19, 


1^54, 








Lucy Emma 


b. Oct. 


20, 


ib&J, 


d. 


Xov. 


25, 1SS6. 



(12) 



Sands Nilcs Breed was 1). on the old flu in of JdIhi T^recd 51, 
in Stonington, Conn., and taken b\" his parents in iS^-; to Can- 
ton, 111. In 1S74 he was the agent for Canton of the New 
England Mutual Life Insurance Company, of Jloston. Mass. 
On September 30, 1SS2, he removed with two unmarried daus. 
to Austin, Texas, and after his dau. F.mma's death, he moved 
to San Antonio. 

Mr. Breed's mother was the only eh. of Sands Xiles and 
Bathsheba Palmer. Mr. Xiles was descended from a Xiles who 
came from England, in 1630, and settled in P>rantree, }vlass. 

Julia Maria Breed m. at Canton, 111., October 12, 1S71, 
Samuel Price Cochran, b. Xovemlier 24, 1S44, in McDonough 
county, 111. Their first ch. d. October 6, 1S75 ; second ch. was 
Sands Xiles Cochran, b. October 29, 1S76, and the third ch. 
was Louis Lafayette Cochran, b. March 2, 1SS2. They lived 
in Ouiricy, 111., and afterward moxed to Texas. 

May Grace m. Fred. J. Loring, b. October iC\ 1S49, in 
Athens, Maine. He was (in 1SS4) ''One of the most poynilar 
railroad conductors in the South, running between San Antonio 
and Laredo." Their chn. were : Fred. Porter Loring, b. Aug- 
ust 15, 1S76, and Charles Draper Loring, b. January 20, 18S4. 

Hattie xA.melia was a teacher in the High School in Can- 
ton, 111. 



No. 12S. 

Jonas P. Breed 125, b. July 4, 1813, d. 1S51. 

Married 



Mar>' E. b. 

Ann Elisa b. 

Julia Ann b. 



Jonas P. Breed went to California in 1S50. 

Mar}- E. is m. and lives at Warsaw, 111. Ann Elisa and 
her three chn. live near Canton, 111. We do not know her 
name nor that of Julia Ann, who lives with her two chn. in 
Indiana. 



Xo. 129. 



Nancy M. Ihccd 125, 


b. 


July 


^3, 


iR-'i, 


Married 




Dec. 


18, 


KS42, 


George H. Saunders 


b. 








Geo. Henry Saunders 


b. 


Sept. 


29, 


1S43, 


Sands Oscar Saunders 


b. 


Oct. 


10, 


1S46, 


Annie Maria Saunders 


b. 


Sept. 


^9, 


1S48, 


John Reiner Saunders 


b. 


Dec. 


I7> 


1S50, 


Ab'm Osee Saunders 


b. 


.May 


23, 


1S53. 


Prentice Banks Saunders b. 


May 


13, 


1855, 


Lucy Esther Saunders 


b. 


Oct. 


7, 


1857, 


Mary Lucinda Saunders b. 


Oct. 


13, 


1859, 


Grace Breed Saunders 


b. 


Jan. 


14, 


1S62, d.July 



6, 1S63. 

George H. Saunders i.s a neplicw of the lutsband of Mar}- 
C. Breed 125. His faniih' live in Peabody, Kansa.s. 

Nancy Saunders writes of her husband : "He is a native 
of New York State. His grandfather, Abraham Saunders, was 
an Orderly Sergeant at the Battle of Breed's Hill. He was the 
oldest son of a merchant in the city of London, England, and 
he would not claim his inheritance because he fought against 
his country." 

George was born in Fulton comity, lib, but all the others 
were born near La Harpe, Hancock county. 111. George lixes 
at Van Buren, Ark. 

Sands Oscar Wyqs near Harcrosse, Hancock cotuit}-. 111. 
Annie lives near Xcwton, Harvey Co., Kas.; was m. to Daniel 
Webster Wilcox of Middleton, Coini. They have i dau. Abbie 
b. May 7, 1S76. John R. married Hinma Dorce Jones of New- 
ton, Kas., Jan. 31, 1SS3. Had a dau. b. Feb. 14, 1SS4. 
Abraham O. and Prentice B. live near Sun City, IJarbour Co., 
Kas. John, Mary and Lucy live near Redden, Btitler Co., Kas. 



Edmund A. Breed 125, 


, b. 


Dec. 


2r, 


TS23, 


Married 




Ai)ril 




1S60, 


Angelina .Sterns 


b. 


April 


7, 


1S35, 


Horace Howard 


b. 


An-. 


25, 


1S62, 


MaUie Amelia 


b. 


.March 


4, 


1864, 


Charles Niles 


b. 


Nov. 


3> 


1S65, 


Henry Jerin 


b. 


Dec. 


^5, 


1871, 



Kdinund A. Breed was b. in Stoningtoii, Conn., and in the 
Springs of 1S33 liis father look him to Fnlton Co., Ill He ha 
been a farmer. His w. was b. in Roche.-ter, X. Y,, "andattlr 
age of 4 years was taken to Illinois. IKr father's motlier was 
a Cooper (b. in Vermont) and related to Peter Cooper of Xew 
York." In iSS4his elm. were all living at home. He was m. 
in Rochester, and lives near Canton, 111. 

No. 131. 

Joseph Breed 51, b. Oct. 4, 170S, 

Married June 2, 1737, 

Precilla Avery b. 

Joseph 132, b. April Si, 173S, d. 180S. 

Aver>' b. Nov. 21, 1739, 

Joseph Breed was buried in Washington Co., Georgia. 



1808. 



No. 132. 










Josepli Breed i^ 


tI, 


b. 


April I 


173.^ d 


Married 










Avery 




b. 






William 133, 




b. 




1769, d 


John 




b. 




1771, 


Aven,- 




b. 




^773. 


No. 133. 










WilHam Breed 13 


2, 


b. 




1769, d 


Married 








iSoo, 


Frances Brantley 




b. 






Nathan 




b. 




iSoi, d 


John 134, 




b. 




1803, d. 


Philip Brantley 


135 


b. 




1804, d. 


Joseph 137, 




b. 




1S06, 


Samantha 




b. 




iSoS, 


William Jasper 


jS 


b. 


June iQ, 


1S13, 


William Averv- 




b. 




iSiS, d. 


CordeUa 




b. 




1820, 


Richard N. 




b. 




IS22, 


Larkin 139, 




b. 


March 25, 


IS24, 


Washington Ta\ 


lor 


b. 






Nancy 




b. 







'837. 



1837- 



1873. 
IS68. 
1876. 



1882. 



William Breed, Sr., was buried in Randolph Co., Alabama. 
Natlian had n^ clin. Samaiuha m. Jcffer.->..n Faulkner and 
had 7 chn. William Avery had 7 chn. 



No. 134. 

John Breed 133. b. 1S03, d. 186S. 

Married 

Walker b. 1S30, 

Thomas b. 1S33, 

Jeptha b. 1S40, 

No. 135. 

1876. 



Philip Brantley Breed 13^ 


J, b. 




1804, d. 


Married 






1837, 


Elizabeth Middleton 


b. 






Richard J. 136. 


b. 


April 


6, 1S39, 


Alcy L. 


b. 




1S41, 


Nancy J. 


b. 




1S42, 


John M. 


b. 




1846, 


Francis C. 


b. 




1S48, 


Elias G. 


b. 




'S50, 


Samantha B. 


b. 




1S53, 


Mary J. 


b. 




1S56, 


Sallie A. 


b, 




rS57, 


William B. 


b. 




1S62, 



Philip Brantley Breed d. in Alabama. His w. wa.s a dau. 
of John Middleton of Virginia. 



No. 136. 
Richard J. Breed 135, b. April 6, 1839, 



Married 






1 868, 


P. Easom 


b. 






Thomas L. 


b. 


May 21, 


1S69, 


Louis B. 


b. 


May 13, 


1871, 


Annie E. 


b. 


April 17, 


1S73- 


Sarah C. 


b. 


March 17, 


1S75, 


Fannie C. 


b. 


Aug. 21, 


1S76, 


Cephetta M. 


•b. 


March 16, 


1878, 


Richard J., Jr. 


b. 


Dec. 2, 


1S79- 


John Elias 


b. 


Jan. 24, 


1884, 



Rev. Richard J. Breed is a Baptist clergyman in Rod 
Mills, Alabama. 



No. 137. 
Joseph Bleed 13;, 

Married 
Pasley Faulkner 
Harriet E. 
Jefferson F. 
William 
Malissia 
Francis 
No. 13S. 
William Jasper Breed 133, 
Married 



b. June 
Nov 
b. 

b. Jan. 
b. Feb 
b. Dec. 
b. luly 
b. Jan. 
b. }ilarch 21, 
b. May 23, 
b. Auff. 24, 



1S06, 



1S37, 
1840, 
1S42, 
1S47, 

19, 1813, 
5, 1S37, 

iSio, 

13, 1S39, 

23, 1S43, 

25, 1S44, 

I, 1S47. 

1S41, 

1S49. 

1S51, 



d. June 



d. Nov. 



29, 1S65. 
20, 1S61. 



2&, 



June 
Jan. 



1S65. 
iSti. 



Eli/:a A. 

B. Jeptha 

William B. 

James M. 

Josepli W. 

Francis E. 

Saman'.ha B. J. 

Eliza A. 

Sarah C. 

B. Jeptha Breed m. 1S6S, Panuelia Chatham. James M. 
m. in iSSr, Laura M. Milian, and had one son. Joseph W. m. 
in 1S77, Rosa M. Milian. They had two sons and three daus. 
Samantha B. J. m- in 1S79. Benjamin Camion. They had three 
sons and three daus. Sarah C. m Nov., 1S6S, T. F. Fisher, 
and had two sons and three daus. 



No. 139. 














Larkin Breed 133, 


b. March 


25' 


1S24, 








Married 


Dec. 


2S, 


1843. 








Catherine Tmdell 


b. 




1S26, 


d. 


Aug. 


4, 1S64. 


William Nathan 


b. Oct. 


13. 


1^45. 








Thomas L. 


b. Nov. 


21, 


1847, 


d. 


July 


14, 1SS2. 


Amarintha S. 


b. Oct 


1-, 


1S49, 








Sarah F. 


b. April 


2, 


TS51, 








Te.xanna 


b. July 


3, 


1S53, 








Mary- 


b. June 


19, 


1S55. 


d. 


Aug. 


1S70. 


Catherine 


b. March 


19, 


iSsS, 








Jabez L. C. 


b. Oct. 


21, 


1S59, 








Emily 


b. Feb. 


7, 


1S62, 


d. 


July 


11, 1S66. 


Married 2d wife 


Feb. 


20, 


iSSi, 








Mrs. M. M. Garrett 


b. 












Percy Brantley 


b. Dec. 


27, 


I8S2, 








Avery Caldwell 


b. June 


29, 


ISS4, 








Lucien Rich 


b. .Nhirch 


17, 


I8S6, 









William Nalh.m V.wxd m. Gei..ro;ia Tope. 

Tluiinas L. HI. Sallie SamiK-ls. Amarintha S. in. J. L. 
Billinghlv. Sarah l'\ in. F. K. vSaniucLs. Catherine in. William 
I,iiids\-. 

Larkiii Breed's :?d w., Mrs. Garrett, had been a Miss 
Mendeuhall. 



No. 140. 


















Allen Rrted 51, 




h. An-. 


29. 


1714, 










Ma I lied 




Feb. 


2, 


1737., 










Ann Cole 




b. 














Ann 




b. July 


II, 


1739, 










Abi-ail 




b. Jan. 


30. 


I74<^, 










Zeruiah 




b. Oct. 


23. 


1741, 










Mary 




b. Ian. 


3> 


1744, 










William 




b. Sep. 


20, 


1745, 










Allen 




b. Nov. 


14, 


1747, 










Susannah 




b. June 


3. 


1750. 










Married 2d 


\v. 


July 


5. 


1752. 










Hannah Dewey 




b. 














Gershoni 141, 




b. April 


29. 


1756, 


d. 


Aug. 




1S15. 


Jabish 158, 




b. Feb. 


24, 


175S, 










Esther 




b. Au■^^ 


5, 


1759, 










Christopher 




b. Jnly 


25> 


1761, 










Joseph 164, 




b. Feb. 


21, 


1763, 


d. 


Sep. 




1S2S. 


Hannah 




b. July 


29, 


1765, 










No. 141. 


















Gershotn Breed 


140 


. b. April 


29, 


1756, 


d. 


Aug. 




1S15. 


Married 


















Hannah Palmer 




b. 














William 




b. 














Allen 142, 




b. Aug. 


3, 


17S1, 


d. 


Feb. 


iS, 


1S66. 


Palmer 146, 




b. 




17S2, 


d. 


IX-c. 


10, 


i8[6. 


Van Renssel; 


aer 


b. 




1791. 


d. 


Oct. 


I5> 


1S15. 


James 151, 




b. June 


13. 


1794, 


d. 


Jan. 


27, 


1S84. 


Christopher 




b. 














Thomas 




b. 














Noyes 




b. 














I.ydia \'. 155 


, 


b. 














Hannah V. i 


5^^ 


b. 














Marv 157, 




b. 














Dtrlia 




b. 















Gcr>h(im Ikcetl eaiiiL- lu Manlius, Onolldac,^'l Co., X. V., in 
1793, aV>()Ui two years after a Church was formed, and he, tak- 
ing- the pastorate, retained it until his death, at whieli time his 
son A]len became the pastor. His w. was from Stonin:<ton. 

Christopher was killed by the fall of a tree while young. 
Rensselaer served in the army during the War of iSi 2. His w. 
was Lydia Palmer. Williatn d. young. Xoyes m. Lydia 
Mecham ; went West.iii 1S17, and d. in Illinois at the age of 
25 years. 

Xo. 142. 

Allen Breed 141, b. Aug. 3, 1781, d. l'"eb. 18, 1S66. 

Married 

Amelia Teall b. d. April 5, 1S39. 

Amelia b. July 2, iSoi, 

Hannah b. Dec. 3, 1S02, 

Allen Oliver Teall 143 b. Feb. 21,1804, d. 1S76. 

Phebe b. April 3, 1S06, 

Gershoni P. 145, b. Jan. 17, iSio, 

John b. June 15, 1812, 

Lydia B. b. Aug. 14, 1816, 

Mary b. Nov. i, 1S19, d. Dec. 15, 1837. 

George A. b. Aug. 13, 1021, 

Charles G. b. Aug. 11, 1S24, 

Allen Breed succeeded his father as pastor of the Baptist 
Church in Manlius, X^. V. 

Amelia :n. Pardon Thompsrjn, June 24, 1841. Hannah m. 
March 16, 1S23, Phiio Hoskins, and had two daus. One of 
them is Mrs. M. W. liowen, of Cayuga Lake, X. Y., with wdioni 
she now lives. Phebe m. Albert \'icnne, in 1S32, and has two 
chn. living in Clay, X. V. Lydia V,. m. John Sweeting. June 
6. 1S55. John was b. in Manlius, Onondaga county, X'. Y., 
and went to Cuthbert, Ala., in 1S37. He was m. June 11, 1S4S. 
Is a tanner by trade. Served in the army against the Indians 
in Florida. George A. m. Ann Hli/.a Westover, of Manlius, 
N. Y. 

Xo. 143. 

Allen Oliver Ttall Breed 142, b. Feb. 21, i&04, d. 1S76. 

Married 

Margaret Shields b. 

Charles A. 144, b. 1848, 



Allen O. T. llreed \va^ educated at IlruniltDii College. 
He was a clerk fc- a wliiU and then went to Monroe, Mich., 
and entered mercantile Inisuiess. He afterward went to 
Chica<:;o, and next to Milwaukee, Wis. 'June 18^5^ where he 
erected a trading post, transacting the usual trader's business 
with the Indian.^ and settlers. 

Lucy Ann m. Feb. lo, 1S59, George U. Fowler, b. Aug. 
17, 18^4, in Lewis county, X. V. She was b. in Milwaukee 
county. Wis. Their chn. were: hdliott S., b. Jan. 4, 1S60 ; 
Lillie ^L, b. May 13, 1S64 ; Roy F^., b. Feb. 6, 1S74, and Myron 
M., b. July 3, 1S76. 

No. 144. 

Charles A. Breed 143, b. 1848, 

>hirr!ed 

Alien A. b. 1S75, 

George Lewis b. iSSo, 

Charles A. Breed m. an adopted dan. of Geo. A. Breed 130. 



No. 145. 

Gershom P. Breed 142, 1). Jan. 17, 1810, 

Married 

Katharine Leech b. 

Henry Allen b. 1844, 

Mary b. 

Gershom P. P)reed is a Deacon of the Fifth Baptist Church 
of Milwaukee, Wis. 



No. 146. 

Palmer Breed 141 b. 17S2, d. Dec. 10, 1S16. 

Married 

Abigail Money b. 

Barnet Nb 147, b. .May iS, 1S08. 

Charlotte b. 

Abigail b. 



No. T47. 

Bainet M. Breed 146, b. May iS, iHoS, 
Married 



Palmer 14S. 


h. Sept. 


-'4, 


1S32, 










Benjamin Frank! 


\uh. Aug. 


3, 


1S3-I, 










Eugene 149, 


b. Dec. 


iS, 


I.S4I, 










Luther L. 


b. July 


26, 


1S46, 










Harvey 150, 


b. Oct. 


29, 


t^^4y. 










No. 1 48. 
















Palmer Breed 147 


b. Sept. 


24, 


IS32, 










Married 
















Franklin J. 


b. Oct. 


10, 


IS69, 










Andrew H. 


b. Oct. 


2S, 


IS73, 










No. 149. 
















Eugene Breed 147, 


b. Dec. 


iS, 


1841, 










Married 
















Eugene 


b. Dec. 


3, 


IS70, 










No. 150. 
















Harvey Breed 147, 


b. Oct. 


29. 


1^49. 










Married 
















Frederick Y. 


b. June 


10, 


1S77, 










Charles F. 


b. March 


14, 


1S7S, 










No. 151. 
















Jame.s Pureed 141, 


b. June 


13, 


1794, 


d. 


Jan. 


27, 


1SS4. 


Married 


Feb. 


2, 


'■'^17, 










Elizabeth Kinne 


b. fan. 


iS, 


1799. 


d. 


May 


22, 


1S46. 


Sophronia 


b. Nov. 


ir, 


1S17, 


d. 


Aug. 


15, 


1S27. 


Simon P. 152, 


b. Feb. 


I, 


1S19, 










Franklin 


b. June 


28, 


IS20, 










Condace 154, 


b. Nov. 


10, 


1821, 










Hannah 


b. Feb. 


17, 


I '"^23, 










Ezra 


b. Dec. 


23. 


IS24, 


d. 


Aug. 


15, 


1S25. 


George W. 


b. July 


13, 


IS26, 










Marvin A. 


b. July 


I9> 


IS28, 










Justus H. 


b. Marcl 


1 16, 


IS30, 










Levi N. 


b. Dec. 


6, 


1831, 


d. 


Aug. 


19, 


1S67. 


John 


b. Sep. 


10, 


KS33, 


d. 


.May 


10, 


1S35. 


M. Adelia 


b. Dec. 


6, 


IS35. 


d. 


-M.uch 


t, 


^^55- 


Sarah E. 


b. .Manh 


31, 


I83S, 


d. 


Sep. 


19. 


1847. 


Xenophon 


b. Dec. 


M, 


IS4I, 











The Bureau Co. Triliuue of Dec. 22, iSSi, i^avc a full 
account of a ivuniou of the cliiUlreu of Janics Iirccd, from 
which we take the followin,^ : 

"On tile loth of Xo\'eniV)er, an interesting reiuiiou of the 
Breed family took place at the residence of r^Ir. Austin Gillett, 
in Ca--!.s County, Michigan. 

It had been over forty years since they had all l.»een 
together. The_\- had all left their Xew York home many years 
ago, and on reas.sembling it was inlere^ting to niafk the great 
changes that had occurred. The>- came from eight different 
States and Territories. They went away mere .^-triplings — 
boys and girls. Tliey came back old men and women, the 
youngest being forty-six A'ears old, all wearing spectacles and 
the men Ixild and gra}-. The}- h.ad not grown much in height, 
but it was remarkable how they had dilated laterally. There 
were before the process of disintegration commenced, se\-en 
brothers and four sisters. Since then two had died — the 
youngest son and the youngest daughter. The mother had 
also gone to her 'long sleep that knows no waking.' Tliere 
were present at the reunion all the li\'ing children — six men 
and three women. The aged father, who reside.-^ with one of 
the sons in Xew York, was too feelde to stand the trip. Dr. S. 
P. Breed. Franklin Breed, Caudace Gillett and children, Han- 
nah Martin and daughter, Geo. W. Breed. M. A. Breed, Justus 
H. Breed, Levi X'. Breed, Mary A. Loosley and husband, Jas- 
A. Bond and daughter. ^Irs. Roxanna Benedict and son, and 
Mr. and Mrs. Thompson. 

The occasion of the reunion was the ootli anniversars' of 
the birth of Mrs. Candace Gillett. 

The part>' came together on the 9th and all stayed until 
the 12th, when part of the company felt compelled to leave for 
their homes. The remainder stayed a day or two longer. 

The loth was passed in a highly satisfactory manner by the 
guests in regaling themseh'es on the man}- rare and good things 
prepared for them b}- the hospitable host and li(">stess, which 
seemed to .stimulate all to ' a feast of reason and a flow of 
soul.' After the dinner hour the party were invited into the 
parlor, ta.stefully arranged and decorated by the hostess, wl leu Mr. 
Thompso:i opened the exercL-^es with a .short prayer. Mrs. Gillett 
followed in a neat, touching and wouumh- addre.ss of welcome. 



' Dr. vS. }'. Bleed was then called on for remarks, who said 
that 'it ga\-e him the keenest plea-^ure to be aide, iindei- the 
inspiration of circumstance^ >o pecnliarl}' lelicitons, to \'oicc 
the minds and teolini^s oi the Breed lamii\- in thaid-cing hi-> 
sister [ov her etTorts, so well-timed and successful, in brinc^ing 
the famih" together after so long a separation, from different 
directions and from such remote distances. 

\Vhene\'er he had thought of the pleasure in store for us 
at the prospecti\-e reunion, he lui'J fell his pul>e beating quicker, 
his heart palpitating with excitement, and was in a perpetual 
flutter of anticipation and expectation. 

As we take a look o\'er this little company, coming 
together from the Kast and trom the West, from the North and 
from the South, and remember whose <oi]S and daughters we 
are, it is by no means strange that our minds are at once 
crowded with delicious thoughts, precious memories, and 
filled witii conflicting emotions. 

But amid all these multitudinous oljjects now crowding on 
our imagination, tliere stand out most clear and distinct in the 
foreground of the picture, two central figures, alwa\-s present. 
never ol)scured by dark lines or shade.--, however .shifting the 
other objects in the picture may be. Idiese two are father and 
mother. The fornrer now \'enerated and consecrated ])y age, 
and too feeble to make one of this party, and the latter long 
since gone to her rest, whose name is canonized in our affec- 
tions, sacred " as the gods on sainted hills," who died tliat we 
might live, and wdiose .--hort, sharp and eventful lite ga\-e to the 
world this goodl\- famih'.' 

The Doctor than gave a detailed account of the several 
families. 

Franklin Breed stayed on the old homestead, but finall_\- 
came West in 1.S56, settled near the Doctor's and followed his 
trade, that of carriage maker for se\'eral years, but devoted his 
leisure hours in completing an invention of hi~> own, for bending 
and turning plow-handles, which was (piite an ingenious 
machine in its way, and proved for a time quite a lucrati\-e 
business. 

Ihit he seemed to be possessed with a roving disposition, 
and was not inclined to l)e kept steady to one calling or place. 
lie is an excellent workman, \-er\- ingenious, and has in\-ented 



and olitaiued letters patent on several mechanical de\-ices, 
\vlnLli be hopes will brin'^- liiin riches some da_\', but as }-et that 
da\" has not come. He now lives in I'aribault. Rice County, 
Minn. 

Mrs. Hannah (Breed) Martin came out west to Muskegon, 
Mich., in 1834. Mr. Martin went into the army in 1^62, and 
came home disabled for life. He still lives but is a pensioner. 
Mrs. Martin has two children li\'ing, a sou and a daughter, the 
latter of whom was with the mother at the party, a spiightly 
lass of fifteen summers. 

Geo. W. Breed came to Illinois in 1S49. stayed one season, 
but not being quite satisfied, returned to Xew York, and was 
employed on the Lake Shore R. R. in the construction depart- 
ment, atid is now superintendent of construction on the eastern 
divisioTi of said road. His home is Silver Creek, Xew 
York. 

M. A. Breed learned the drug business with Dr. vShaw in 
Fulton, Xew York, came west in 1S4S, clerked for J. G. 
McCreer}-, Rush\-ille, Illinois, and subsequently for Dr. Hoffman, 
Quincy, Illinois ; went to California in 1852, returned in 1S57, 
settled in Peoria in the same year, sold out in 1S67, went to 
Europe in i86s, opened in Chicago a fine store of fanc}- goods 
brought from Germany and Italy in 1869, sold out and returned 
to Peoria in 1S71, where he now resides, and has the credit of 
having the finest store of fine arts and fancy goods west of the 
Alleghany Mountains. 

Justus H. Breed is a genius in his way, a shrewd business 
man of an off-hand, rough-and-ready style. He came to 
Illinois in 1849, went to California in 1856, went to Honey 
Lake in 1857. ^o Arizona in 1S75, and opened a trading house 
at River Station on the Little Colorado River in 187^^, where he 
still resides. 

Levi X. Breed came to Illinois in 1S49, went to California 
in 1S53, to Honey Lake A'alley in 1S61 where he now resides. 
He has the name of being a well-to-do merchant and an exten- 
sive rancher. 

Tho.se who attended the reunion expressed themselves as 
highly gratified with their visit, and all felt amply paid for 
coming, rdthough some had travelled nearly ,s,ck:)o miles to be 
there. It was certainh- a notable thing for a famih' of ele\-eu 



line 
nil lies 



cliildren cit llic partin<;, after an absence of forty \ears, fo 
of tlieiii to meet a-, tluy cHd, rcpre>entin- with tlieii' fa 
over sixty persons. 

In February, 1S.S5, bVeU. A. Breed, son of L. X. J^.reed, in 
company with another inercliant of Los Angeles, Cab, was' on 
his way to Albuquerque fur su].plics : and, on arriving at Blue 
Water Station, they went out on the platform to%iew the 
country. Shortly after another train came along, and a col- 
lisi(.)n was tlie result--iiistantly killing Fred, and fatallv 
injuring his friend. The remains were taken to Los Angeles 
for interment where the father lives and the deceased was^vell 
known. He was 22 years of age, and a grad. of Ileald's 
business college of San I' rancisco. Afterwards he was engaged 
in abstracting for the law office of Gillette, Gibson & Wood •; 
but for the last two years he :vas a partner with his uncle in 
merchandizing at Holbrook, Arizona. Fie was m. about eight 
months before his death to a Miss Bryant of Chico, Cal. 

The death ot this promising young man was a stunning 
blow to his wife and parents, and his many relatives and friends 
deepl\- sympathized with them in their sad affliction. 

The members of this family having been invited to attend 
a second reunion, to be held at the home of Dr. S. P. Breed, at 
Centre Grove Farm, near Princeton, Bureau count}-, Illinois, as- 
sembled there on September 22, and 2:^ 18S6, the first day 
being-^ devoted mainly to the inspection of the Doctor's 
beautiful home, and becoming better acquainted with his 
family. 

The meeting was organized on Thursday. September 24LI1, 
by the selection of L. X. Breed, of Los Angeles, Cal., as Chair- 
man, and C. X. Ikmd, of Chicago, 111., Secretary. Dr. S. P. 
Breed made an address of welcome. 

Mrs. Hannah Martin, Mrs. Adelia Loosley, Dr. Franklin 
Breed and Mrs. Candace Gillett each made a short speech, 
thanking the Doctor for the cordial greeting he had extended 
to all. 

Chairman L. X. Breed, of Los Angeles, Cal., in speaking 
on the subject of reunions, made the following remarks : 

"Dear Friends .-—The idea of holding a reunion of the 
Breed family, originated first, I believe, with our .sister Can- 
dace, and to her belongs the credit of having successfully carried 



out that project, and prathcred together the nio.-,t scattered of 
our family, after >o uiau_\- lon;j^ _\-ears of scrparatiou. 

In acc(M-dance with her desire, we met at her home in Micli- 
igan, five years ago, and then held our first reunion—the re- 
membrance of which is very pleasing to me, and no doubt as 
much so to e^■ery one of you who were then present. 

Our oldest brother, who we must now look upon as the head 
of the family, becoming somewhat enthused over the success of 
that reunion, determined that it should be repeated sometime in 
the future, not exceeding five years. Accordingly, last month 
he issued his proclamation, and sent out summonses to the diff- 
erent States and Territories, requesting the memliers of the 
Breed family to congregate at Centre Grove Farm, near Prince- 
ton, 111., on the 23d of this month, for the purpose of holding 
our second reunion. 

Such a meeting as thi> twenty years ago, would have con- 
sumed so much time, and been attended with so much expense 
to some of us, tliat I doubt ver}- much whether the project 
could have been carried out. But now that the l^ast and the 
West have been united with bands of steel, and the Atlantic 
and Pacific Oceans have been welded, we look upon this trip 
across the continent as of but very little more importance than 
an ordinary morning call. 

I find a vast difference in journeying across the continent 
in 1S53 and in iS,S6. Then I was four months in driving cattle 
acro.ss the arid plains and rugged mountains, swimming rivers 
and fighting Indians, and subsi.-ting on bacon and beans. Now 
the trip is made in four days, and those four days are spent in 
a palace car, wdiere you have a darke}- to black }-our boots and 
suppl\- you with ice-water, and where you can enjoy all the 
comforts and luxuries of life which may be obtained at 3^our 
own drawing-room home. 

As to the representative men of the Hast and West who 
first conceived, and afterwards successfully carried out the 
great enterprise which brought about this state of affairs, were 
actuated solely by what would seem to be the future wants and 
necessities of the Breed family. I am unable to sa\- ; but I am 
willing to give them the benefit of the doul)t, and concede that 
such was the fact. .\t all e\-ents, we are now enj.>>ing the 
triumphs of skill, the labor and genius of th(\se public benefac- 



tors, aiul I FLjoice to know that by reason of their efforts we 
are enabled to meet in the centre of this va^t continent t'^-day, 
on snch shr)rt notice, and with so Httle expense. 

I look npon these reunions as great events in our lives — 
events wortliy to b2 marked with white stones, and I hope to 
see them continued as often as possible in the future. It has 
been suggested by some one of the family that the reunions 
should be held once in every three years, instead of once in 
five ; and when we take into consideration that life is short, 
and that many of us cannot reasonably hope to enjoy more than 
fifteen or twenty more of these meetings, I am r.ot sure but that 
the suggestion is a very good one. 

I should like very much to have the next reunion held at 
my home, in California. There, in the City of Angels, in the 
land of sun.shine, under the vine and fig-tree, surrounded by 
blooming ro.-es and fragrant orange blossoms, we could hold a 
reunion, without fear of cyclones or earthquakes. But, should 
this be deemed inexpedient by reason of the distance and 
expense, I shall be content to meet at any place you may 
suggest." 

At the afternoon session Dr. S. P. Breed read a paper, on 
" Reunions and Genealogy of the Breed Family." 

It is well known to some of you that, in iS6b, Deacon J. C. 
Breed, of Jamestown, New York, called together quite a num- 
ber of the Breeds living near him, as well as several more 
remote, and laid before them a report of his work in collecting 
the names and history of the Breed Fan^ily in America, in 
which he showed that all the Breeds in this country descended 
from Allyn Bread, born in England in 1601, came to America 
in 1630, and settled in Lynn, Mass. 

Our cousin, Geo. A. Breed, Milwaukee, attended that 
meeting and it is through his courtesy that I am able to lay 
before you a paper published .soon after, containing an account 
of the proceedings and work of the meeting. I had hoped that 
both of these gentlemen would be present to-day. However I 
have letters from them, expressing regrets at not being able to, 
attend, and, moreover, signifying a hope that the meeting may 
fully meet our expectations. 

Deacon J. C. Breed is the father of these reunions. In two 
letters recentlv received from him, he connnunicates some 



interesting- information in regard to liis work in Jamestown, N. 
Y., where he settled in 1822, and speaks of tlie several families 
of Breeds there, and hi:^ cliildren in bnsiness elsewhere. 

These letters are open for your inspection. Copies of the 
report he made were sent to distant members of the Breed 
name, and one chanced to fall into the hands of J. Howard 
Breed, of Philadelphia, who determined thereupon to write an 
extended history of the Breeds as far back as their genealogy 
could be traced. I have had some correspondence with him on 
this subject, and it is through him chiefly, that I am able to lay 
before you some interesting information about our early ancestors. 

Some two years since, tlirough his earnest solicitation, I 
consented to prepare and forward to him brief sketches of the 
lives of our fatlier, the late James Breed, and our mother, 
Elizabeth Breed, together vith those of her children, for pub- 
lication in that history. I did have some hope that J. H. 
Breed, the historian, would be here at this meeting, but for 
several good reasons he is not ; nevertheless, I refer you to 
several of his letters here beibre us, which yon can examine for 
yourselves, urging us to complete our part of this work. I 
hope you will, while here, supply me with the data I have been 
hitherto unable to obtain. In order to engage your more 
earnest attention to this matter, and moreover, to gratify a 
natural and laudable curiosity, I take it inherent in the breasts 
of all men to kno\v sonietliing about tlicir ancestors, I will call 
}-our attention tor a few moments to this genealogical chart. 
(The Doctor had carefully prepared a genealogical chart upon 
a black-board, which with his explanations, made it very clear 
to all present). 

Here you will see the name of Allen Bread, b. in England, 
in 1601, and as I have said, came to America in 1630, and set- 
tled in Lynn, where some of his descendants still reside. Below 
are the names of his tour sons, Allen, Timothy, Joseph and 
John. Allen and Timothy were b. in England, in the years 
respectively, i6j6 and 162S. Joseph and John were b. in Eynn, 
in 1632 and 1634. Allen of 1626, was the father of a long line 
of descendants. Some one hundred and four families of his 
progeny are still living in Lynn, (as you will see by reference 
to the recent letter of Deacon J. C. Breed) be.-^ides others, scat- 
tered far and near through the United States. 

(14) 



John Breed b. in rr.G;,, c^randson of Allen Bread of 1601 — 
the iM-iiueval rather of the Breed:, in Anicriea— moved from 
L3-nn to Stonington, Ct. He had three hons, John of ijcjo, 
Allen of 17 14, and Ger>hom of 17 15. This second son was onr 
great-grandfather. I k-arn from rcminiseences left by our grand- 
father, Geishom Breed, ofManlius, that our great-grandfather's 
name was Allen, and that he lived in vStonington, Ct., and was 
deacon of the Baj-.tiht Church there in 1765, (KIder Simeon 
Brown, pastor; and our grandfather, Kider Gershom Breed of 
1755. moved from Stonington to Little Tlousic, Rensselaer 
Patent, X. Y., in 1789, residing there for four years, and in 
1793 came to Manlius, Onondaga Co., N. Y., where our father 
was b. in 1794, being the youngest of his eleven children. So 
you see we have the connection complete — not a link n.iissing 
in the chain of succession from the patriarch, Allyn Bread, of 
1 60 1, to our father. 

Brother :Mar\-in proposes that we have the next reunion on 
Breed's Hill, at the base of the Bunker Hill M(jnuraent, and 
invite all the I'reeds in the United States to meet us there, and 
perhaps we may conclude to accept that proposal. I think if 
the five thousand Breeds in America would answer the roll 
call on that famous Hill, it would be more acceptable to the 
American peo]>le than to see the fulfdlment of the prophecy of 
Robert Toombs, " That the day would come, when the slave- 
holder would call the roll of his slaves at the foot of Bunker 
Hill Monument." I hope, therefore, that none of the Breeds 
will feel aggrieved or less patriotic in consequence of this 
inaccuracy of history, unintentional as it undoubtedly was, 
but remendjer that this is not the only error of history. 
Columbus, you know, fluled to get the honor of giving his 
name to the new world. The Breed family have survived and 
multiplied, and some of them are doing and feeling pretty well 
to-day, I thank you. 

Here it is pertineiit to remark, that Klder Gershom Breed 
was the first Baptist minister in Onondaga County, N. Y., and 
organised and established the first Baptist Church in the 
country, and that his name is frequently mentioned in connec- 
tion with the early history of the country. His oldest son, 
Elder Allen ]]recd, of 17S0, followed the profession of his 
father, continued on the old homestead, and labored far and 



near, preaching to, and bnildin- up clnnches in thf conntiT 
and d. at a ripe old age of sonic eigluy-k,ur vears, respected 
and honored by all who knew him. 

Elder Gershoni Breed, the pioneer of .Maiilius, ni. Hannah 
Palmer. Five of the sons, intervenin.c; between Allen and 
James, I never knew, they having all d. before I was old 
enough to remember them. Our uncle Allen, I kne^^• verv 
well. lie was a vers- good man. The ^•^,ungest, Jame^ I had 
some knowledge of-I lived with him until f was 19 vears old 
I must acknowledge that he was not a very great or wise man 
as the world goes, but he had no glaring t^nilts ; lie had manv 
homely, and simple virtues ; unadorned with da.h or .t^-le bu't 
eminently practical, and more useful than ornamental ' But I 
must return to the brothers and sisters between Allen and 
James, our father. 

-My knowledge of them is very meagre. I remember 
hearing father speak of them incidentally from time to time 
but I can only recall a few points." 

^^ Dr. Breed then gave some statistics, and then continued 
Aunt Lydia Breed in. one Ralph liaton. Thev had one <on 
whom they gave the euphoneous Scriptural name of Simon 
l^eter ; but the name, or something else, was too much for him 
and he d. a short time before I was b., and Aunt I.ydia request- 
ing the privilege of giving poor miserable me this name of her 
dead boy, it was su determined. Well, that name or some- 
thing e.>e was pretty hard on me for a while, for I remember 
hearing nu3ther sax- that I came x-ery near going under several 
times while young; but finally, as by the skin of my teeth I 
survived and am able to materialize slightly here on this 
occosion^^ Aunt Bxxlia Katon mo^-ed into the western portion 
or iNew \ ork soon after the circumstance above related Thev 
had another son, whom they named after his father Ralph' 
He came back to Onondaga Co., on a visit with hi.s motlier 
some time m 1S40 or 1S41. He was a quiet, steadv bov, given 
much to reading, and promised to be a student, 'but how he 
has turned out I do not know. 

I may be allowed to remark in this connection, that when 
my son wash, in rS6i, Richard Vates, just elected Governor 
of this Sute, wa. a very popular man, not only n^r his eloquent 
defence of the administration, but had made himself coiispicu- 



ous in the previous years as a true Republican, when it cost 
.something to l.e one; but then, wa.^ eloud reeling upon Ins 
character in consequence ot^ lu'.^ habit of drinkin^r. "i thou^-ht 
to name my boy after him, but I iiad some apprel:ensi.m tl'iat 
he might not stand firmly to his pledge to quit drinking. So, 
I wrote the name m the record, ' R. Yates Ih-eed,' udth the 
mental reservation that the ' R ' might stand for Richard or 
Ralph, as time should determine. WY- llnally chose Ralph, a 
. family name, and one my father often spoke of in con.necti'on 
with Aunt Lydia's husband— Ralph Eaton. 

Our sister Hannah, here, was named after her Aunt 
Hannah, and si.^ter Adelia, also here, was named after Aunts 
Mary and Delia, with the prefix of the letter A to the name 
I remember the talk between father and mother over this 
naming very well. Mother did not quite like the name Delia ; 
It seemed unfinished, and she proposed the prefix and it was 
adopted. 

One of tlie uncles— I think it was Rensselaer— served in 
the War of 1S12 and our father served for a time as his substi- 
tute, while he was at home sick. Father, long afterwards, 
drew a land warrant. Rensselaer, however, obtained soon after 
the War a warrant, or title for a tract of land somewhere in 
Illinois, and started from home to see it and if it suited him. to 
settle on it ; but what accident befell him we know not, for' he 
was never heard from afterwards. I remem])er hearing tather 
speak of his departure, and deplore the nncertaint}^ of his 
flite. And it is to this melancholy circumstance that I attribute 
largely the fact, that years after, when I was about to leave 
home for Illinois, he was very reluctant to give his con.sent 
referring pathetically to the fact that his brother had years 
before started for that wild, far-off country, and that no tidin-s 
ever came back from him. And I remember, moreover, that 
he appeared to be more deeply affected than I ever saw him 
before. His was not an emotional nature : he was not easily or 
strongly impressed, ordinarily, with either joy or sorrow. The 
repose of his character was remarkable. 

In running over the long li.st of Christian names of the 
Breeds, you will notice that Allen and Gershom and John recur 
several times. .These appear to have l)een tlirou-h the several 
generations favorite names. The oldest sons of .several fomilies 



were named Allen, and the second Gcrshoni. Our brother 
?\rirviu A. Breed's middle name is Alle-n. 

Our grandfather's name was Gershom, and his father's 
name was Allen of 17 14. He was the seeond son of John 1663, 
who moved from Lynn to Stonington, and is therefore called 
the lather of the Stouington branch of the Jh'eed family in 
America. It is because these family names occur so fre(iuently 
that the Instorian is obliged to afHx the date of birth to the 
names, to properly distinguish. 

I have here simply traced our line of descent fi'om the first 
Breed who settled in America, in 1630 ; but this gives a very 
inadequate conception of the many collateral branches now 
living in the United States, all descended from the same prim- 
itive stock. It is said the Breeds now nurnlier some five 
thousand in this country. You will see at once, that to write a 
complete histor}- of all these families is a stupendous w^rk, but 
I think J. Howard Breed is the man to do it, and I hope our 
own family will find an appropriate place in that work." 



CHARACTKRISTICS OF THE TRHED FAMILY. 

Taking the aljove title for his subject, Mr. Franklin Breed 
delivered the following address, which was listened to with deep 
interest by all present : 

" About forty years ago, in the State of New York, there 
gathered a little group of children at the fireside of parental 
guardianship, to participate and sympathize with each other, 
as the oldest son left home, to take his chances among strangers, 
or alone in the pathless wilds, far away towards tlie setting sun. 
All eyes were watching, while step after step carried him far- 
ther and farther away. Their eyes becoming dim with tears, 
they could only see something in the distance like a small shadow 
till at length all disappeared, when the father, mother, brothers 
and sisters, one and all, sought some lone, secluded spot, asking 
themselves the question, ' Will my son, my brother, ever 
return ? ' 

Soon after the second son followed the example. The 
sisters in the meanwhile struck for deej) v.-ater \n life's great 
ocean. But before many night falls had closed in upon this 



jubilant family, a strange sensation came over all. The old- 
time clock had ceased to tick, as thougli afraid to break the 
silence that reigned in the home mansion ; the grinding at the 
mill was low ; mourners went about the streets ; tlie motlier of 
their infant days, like a wearied dove, had drooped her wings- 
no mure to plume on the terraqueous globe. ]]ut before the 
demise had taken one oldivious step, that angel sister Eliza, 
(who, just belbre her departure, sat upon her brother's knee, 
and with her sweet lips imprinted upon his brow a parting 
kiss), following in the wake of inspired light, went to her 
mother and to her mother's God. Ah, who can stay the 
uprising of a saddened heart, b\- the invasions of death, but a 
God? The inspired soul speaks out, 'Give me Jesus, wdio 
alone can quiet the fears and calm the troubled soul amid the 
rising waters of death." 

Verily each one of this family knows right well v/hat it is 
to stand by and sue tlieir luved ones step into its chilling flood. 

But time sped, until at length the younger boys as with 
one bound, leaped from the old domicile, and in a moment were 
gone from sight. Through vales, o'er plaitis and mountain 
peaks — on and on, until their feet dipped in the blue waters of 
the Pacific. 

It is befitting to note some characteristics of this family, 
which are pieculiar to each and all. Ancestry has transmitted 
to them a bold, determined, dominant disposition of honesty, 
industry, perseverance and self-reliance. 

They have never been known to back down, or give up the 
cha.se in v/hatever they have undertaken. The effect of their 
pursuit has not lieen fan:e or applause, but financially to build 
up and establish a Inisiness of their own; and, in pursuit of 
this, their foot-prints may be seen in numerous States, up and 
down rivers and lakes, often fording the same, high or low, ap- 
parently bidding defiance to storm and tempest ; ministering to 
the sick and d\-ing; establishing trading-posts, founding towns 
and villages, wdiere the white man had not dared to venture. 
Forward they go, stretching their limbs from shore to shore, 
crossing the continent, and dropping a hook upon the stamping 
grounds of kings and nobles, beyond the waters of the Atlantic. 
vStopping not here- cMiward, (Miwanl, has been their watchword, 
until they have dipped their cup in the morning light, beneath 



the rising stars of creation — found the solution to some of her 
unmeasured proMcms, and drawn a line of distinction Ijctween 
matter and inamaterial substance. 

If none of this family have risen above an ' M. D.' or 
' Honoralde ' in position, the reason, perhaps, may be found in 
the fact that they ha\-e ne\'er applied themselves to such an 
undertaking' ; but they ha^'e been content to engage the quiet 
and eas}' flow of their riio>t natural al.iilities in putting together 
the woof arid warp of tlie real home-spun riiaterial. Yet, it 
seems apparent that their cla>s-mates and teachers have been 
so wild as to award them the palm of honor in original pro- 
ductions and well-timed >'peeches. Their impre.-.s appears here 
and there, along the great thoroughfares of internal improve- 
ments ; while the Ship of State has been held to sea by force of 
their council. And wc Ix'g leave to suggest here (if we may be 
allowed the a.-.-erLic>;"i;, they liave set forth aphorisms, and made 
a few marks upon the great canvass of human liistory that will, 
doubtle.-5S, be visil,>le when time puts on her evening gown, 
crouching beneath the weight of years. 

It is highly pi'oper to remark that the female members of 
this family ha\'e not been at all beliind in showing forth the 
same characteristics. The}- have not only acted well their part 
in the legitimate relations of their sex, but in times of pecuniary 
need, they have been kn(;wn to step to the front, and with their 
own hands, successfulh' ph' the propelling oars. Not that 
other families ha\'e not done as well ; but tell me if you know 
of any who have held a bare-hand grip to the raw edges of life, 
when the cut has gone deeper, or the smart been more severe ? 
In perils by sea and by land, by night and by day, their foot- 
steps might have l:ieen heard, pressing their way forward, until 
they have really gained the object of their pursuit. And now 
have returned — reassembled at the eldest brother's Illinois 
home ; here and there upon the green lawn, in the parlor, on 
the veranda, in the hall proper, up stairs, in the basement din- 
ing-hall, in the cook-room — two and two ^peaking to each other 
once more — here are forty }ears condensed into one da\'. " 

The bubject of " Our Mother" fell to the lot of Dr. S. P. 
Breed, who paid the following tribute to her memory. lie said : 

"Our mtjther's maiden name was Ivli/al'eth Kinne. Slie 
was the third child and second dau. of Ezra and Mary Kinne, 



of Maiilius, Ouoiul.'ii;'.'! county, N. Y., where she was b. January 
iS, 1799. v^hi; (1. of nuili-nant erysipelas, a sliort time after lier 
last aecouchiuent. 

During a period oi' t\vent_\--ninc }-ears, three months and 
twenty da>-s of married hfe, she f^ore to her husl)and fourteen 
living children, ten of them li\-ing to maturity-, nine of them 
are still living and eiglit have answered to the roll-call here 
to-day. 

Sophronia, the eldest child, d. at the age of nine years, nine 
months and four days, of malarial fever. I'>,ra, the sixth child, 
d. at the age of eleven months and twenty days, of cholera in- 
fantum. John, tlie elex'cnth child, d. at the age of one year and 
seven months, of strangulation with a few grains of corn which 
he had in his mouth, and while at play with s.ome of tlie older 
children, he sucked theni down into the wind-j^pe, during a 
paroxysm of laughter. 

I was present and remember the painful circumstance as 
well as if it liad been but yesterday, although it was over fifty 
years ago. It was on a Sunday evening, near sun down. 
Uncle Japheth Kinne and his w., near neighbors and relatives, 
were there, making an evening call, as they often did. Father 
and mother and the two friends were sitting together on the 
porch, engaged in conversation, while the children were playing 
around them. John was just learning to join in the sports, and 
he was the central figure, as he was so you!ig and sprightly. 
He had a small ear of red corn in his hand, and had bitten off 
a few kernels and had them in his mouth. He started to go to 
his mother, by whose chair I was standing. As he toddled off 
on his perilous journey, some one of the children behind him 
cried out ' I'll catch you,' and at the same tinie imitating foot- 
steps behind him. He quickened his pace, and looked around 
to see how near the pursuer was, and, elated with his success, 
he burst into a fit of laughter ; l)ut when he fetched a deep 
inspiration, he sucked the corn int*^ his wind-pipe, and fell to 
the floor in a fit of strangulation. Deacon Kinne, who sat 
nearest, picked him up and gave him to the arms (jf our 
mother, who had arisen from her chair and come forward to 
receive him. The child had already turned black or purple in 
the face, and was sLruggling violently for the breath it could 
not obtain. Mother made some ineffectual effort.-, to relieve the 



choking- and suffocating chiM, but soon discovering her faihire to 
do so, sank into a chair with tlie child in her arms, in utter 
despair. Father started for a doctor, Init long before he could 
get to thcni, poor little Johnny was cold in death. Who can 
imagine the terror and anguish of those few moments, which 
seemed so long and stirred up our emotions so deeply I Then 
came the shroud, the coffm, the funeral, and the slow, silent 
and solemn march to the gra\-e. How plainb,- are these sad 
events engraven on the tablets of our memory ! How many of 
you remember them as I do ? 

This was the th.ird death that had occurred in the family 
within ten \-ears. Tl;eie bereavements, and much sickness 
among the other children during this decade, in connection with 
over-work, and it may be added, the many anxieties and cares 
incident to the necessary pro\-ision for so large a familv, tended 
to depress the spirits of the young mother, naturally vivacious, 
and cast a sober and serious mien upon her, which settled into 
a persi>tent type in her character. Thtse early trials, moreover, 
no doubt served to render her more lenient and kind — more 
forbearing and affectionate toward the living, in consideration 
of the memory of the dead. Albeit, I doubt not that this 
equanimity of temper and unvarying amiability served to elicit 
from the children greater affection and a more considerate and 
respectful behavior. This leads me to say that our mother, in 
many respects, Vv'as n:ore ti;an an or<linar\- \\'onian. It seems 
to me she came very near tilling the ideal measure of exempli- 
fying all the cardinal virtues. She illustrated practically the 
faithful, noble and generous qualities of the ideal mother. 
She was ver\' industrious and skillful in her work, quick and 
methodical in her arrangement, patient in at^iction, charitable 
and forbearing towards the unwary, sympathetic and helplul 
among the sick, and generous to the needy and the poor, and 
remarkably free from any vindicti\-e spirit towards even the 
unthankful and the evil. When she felt it her duty to punish 
her children, which she sometimes did, there ne\-er appeared any 
passion in the stroke. She reasoned with them, and impressed 
upon them the fact that it wa> for their good, and that it was a 
painfud duty to be obliged to inflict upon them an\- l>odily pain. 
She was a good disciplinarian in her famil_\-, and governed it 
with a tirm but lenient hand. Obedience and order, were 

(15) 



prime factors in lier liousehokl. Nor was she wanting in [aiblic 
spirit ; she engaged cheerfull}^ in helping forward every enter- 
prise which she believed calculated to elevate, civilize and 
Christianize mankind. 

Jn her family she was an incessant worker ; and it does 
seem marvelous to us now what that woman did accomplish, 
when it is remembered that she lived under the old regime, 
when she was obliged to take her materials in their primary 
stage, and work them with her own hands up through the 
various processes necessary to make them subsen'e their 
purpose. It was in this way that she made nearly all the bed- 
clothing and wearing-apparel for her large family — carding, 
spinning, weaving, cutting, making, washing, ironing and 
mending all their clothing ; at the same time doing the house- 
work for them until she had children large enough to help her ; 
and, moreover, duritig all these long years of over a quarter of 
a century, the cradle in the corner had its occupant and needed 
attention. Amid all these multitudinous labors and cares, she 
found time to read her Bible and attend the regular meetings 
of the Baptist Church, of which she was a member. 

This remarkable woman wab of a delicate mold, fair com- 
plexion, l)lack hair, blue eyes, of medium height, with a 
pleasing address and agreeable presence. She was modest and 
retiring in her deportment, unostentatious in manners, though 
dignified and -^elf-possessed to a remarkable degree. When she 
arose to speak in meetings, as she often did, she was alwavs 
listened to with interest. Her style was conversational, and 
her speech easy flowing and graceful. She was never unduly 
excited or elated ; neither was she often disconcerted. She 
seemed to ha\-e her object well in hand. vShe spoke brieflv, 
and proceeded on to the conclusion without hesitation or 
repetition. 

During all her trials, disappointments, losses and bereave- 
ments—amid the cares and perplexities incident to her lot and 
station, slie never complained, and was always animated with a 
comfortable hope of a better future and a happier hereafter in 
the great Beyond. 

Such, in brief, is ati imperfect sketch of our mother, as she 
appears to us now, after the lapse of over fort\- years since she 
was laid away in the cold and silent grave. Although she lies 



full low ill that deep and narrow house, yet she lies in peace. 
No trouble, no pain oi sonow can ever leach her now. Her life was 
short, and its e\-ents were sharp ; but as soon as her task was 
done, she gathered uj) the folds of her mantle, wrapped them 
around her comely form, and laid herself down to a long, 
silent and dreamless sleep. But she is not forgotten. Her 
memory, like the faded rose, still leaves a sweet perfume behind. 
This delicate fragrance will continue to regale our moral senses 
while memor}'- reigns and life endures." 

At the conclusion of the Doctor's remarks, }vlrs. Candace 
Gillett, of Union, Mich., arose and entertained the audience 
with some of her recollections of her parents. She took for 
her subject " Our Father," and spoke as follows : 



OUR FATHER. 

"We have met here to-day at Brother vSin.iou's Illinois 
home, after five years of separation — the same number and the 
same faces except a few. There have been some sad changes 
since \\e last met. Our lather has been called to his long home, 
and three of our number have each buried a darling scjti ; vet 
our family circle of brothers and sisters, nine in number, is 
still unbroken, and all are here to-day, excepting George, who 
is detained on account of sickness. 

Brother Simon, being the oldest, and his w. a most esti- 
mable lady, we have thought best to leave the programme for 
the occasion, entirely to them. We find a topic lias been 
selected for each one, to bring out the characteristics of the 
Breed family. Brother Simon has chosen the subject of * Our 
Mother,' and desires me to speak of ' Our Father.' 

Although I am the oldest daughter now living, and re- 
member some incidents of our early life, which you perhaps 
have forgotten, yet I feel incompetent to do justice to a subject 
which lies so near my heart. 

Our father was twenty-two years of age when he married 
our mother who was only eighteen. Their first house-keeping 
was in rooms with grandfather Breed — a large two-stor\' stone 
house, buili on an elevated portion of his farm, (Ax-rlnoking 
several villages, near Fayetteville, Onondaga county, X. Y., 



where grandfatlKr Breed preached 'until he died. - I th.iiik 
father only moved twice in his lik-tinie, after settling on a farm 
— the last one being to Planniljal, X. Y., where both of our 
parents lie buried. I can .scarcely speak of our fatlier. aside 
from our mother, for they both possessed sterling qualities, 
which to me seem rare in these da\-s. I know we all loved 
mother dearly and truly, and I feel that her very life was .sacri- 
ficed on the altar of affection ; but when 1 call to mind the 
many good qualities of our father, I feel that he, too, has helped 
weaTe the great thread of our li\-es, b\- the example of his noble 
traits of character. His life was noted for his industrious 
habits, honesty in his dealings, prudence in his behavior, dis- 
creet and modest in all his actions, frugal in his expenditures, 
and temperate in all tilings. He was kind and neighborly, af- 
fectionate and sympatlietic. I have known him to weep in very 
sympathy with others at what some would call a trivial sorrow. 
Although he was a man of few words, he always spoke his 
mind, and to the point, and would quite often repeat some pas- 
sage of the Scripture, to give it weight. 

I have never heard either of our parents use a vulgar or 
slang word — something I fear every child cannot say of their 
parents now. 

As we seldom kept any hired help, we were early taught 
habits of industry and economy, which I assure you has been 
no detriment to us through life. I well remember when si-ter 
Hannah and myself v/ere quite young, father took it upon him- 
self, during the winter evenings, to give us our tirst les.sons in 
knitting, and thus to weave 'the stocking, the suspender and 
the garter. And. when only ten and twelve years old, we were 
taught to spin tow and wool, on a big wheel, and father made 
a long, low bench for us to walk on, in order to reach and turn 
the wheel-rim. 

What father lacked in literary education, was made up in 
good morals, sound principles, with a thorough religious life. 
And here let me sa}'. that brother Simon has spoken of our 
mother, and her beautiful traits of character— of all which she 
was well worthy — yet he has failed to speak sufficienth- of her 
religious life. I feel that it is but just to her memory, and due 
to her as a Christian, that I should speak of her here, in con- 
nection with father. Thev Avere firm believers in the Christian 



rcli.i^ion, and were acti\-e nieinbers in the Baptist Church, to 
whicli they belonged, and scarcely a vSabbath found their pew- 
vacant. 

We were taught to respect the Sabbath and reverence the 
Supreme Being ; to believe that the Bible is the word of God, 
and that through the sufferings, death and resurrection of Christ 
our Savior, is the only way of salvation and redemption to 
fallen man, and that all who accept Blim as their v'-^avior will 
have their part in the first resurrection, and dwell with Him 
eternally. 

I often call to mind the anxiety of our parents for us 
children, and ho\s- often they used to pray for us — that we too, 
should become Christians : and when I remember their prayers, 
their tears, and their deep solicitude for our welfare, here and 
hereafter, 1 think their prayers must have been like " bread cast 
upon the water, which shall be gathered after many davs.' 

After our mother died my brothers erected a family mon- 
ument on our lot in the Hannibal cemetery, so situated that at 
father's death, it would stand at the head of the two graves, 
and large enough to hold the inscription of each member of the 
family if need be. 

It is a beautiful stone, in several sections, surmounted 
with an ornamental cap. A few years later brother Xenophon, 
atler visiting the place, had an ornamental fence, composed of 
iron posts, set in marble base, connected by a chain of un- 
broken links passing from post to post, and in the centre of 
each loop thus formed, is suspended a small iron tassel. The 
fence is painted black, except the base, the tips of the posts, 
which are pyramidal form, and the points of the tassels, which 
are white. When I visited the place last it was beautiful, and 
well pre.served. Our father often used to go there, to visit 
mother's grave, and would sometimes speak of the beaut}- of 
the place, and of his wish to be laid at rest by the side of our 
mother, where that beautiful stone would bear the nairie of 
both as they lay side by side, and mark the spot in years to 
come of their last resting place. 

It is due to our brother George to state here, that after 
father's death, he took his remains back to Hannibal, and had 
them interred by the side of those of our mt)ther. I often think 
of his lonely trip, many miles from home, relatives or friends, 



as he weti'led liis \va>' hack, with no one to share his sorrow, 
or give him a word of condolence as the silent tear would steal 
its way down his nuuily cheek : and when he ncared our native 
village, and heard the long, sad notes of the tolling church- 
bell, to know that he was the only mourner there, as they laid 
away the last one of our parents. How sad his heart must 
have been. Yet he had one thought to comfort him— he was 
doing his duty, by fulfdling the last wish of our father. And 
there our parents rest in peace, side by side. 

When my mind turns back to the scenes of our childhood, 
and the happy days we spent together under our father's roof; 
of the lo!ig winter eveniiigs, as we sat before the great fire- 
place, with its huge back-log, and burning, blazing wood in 
front, held in place by the two large andirons, which seemed 
like sentinels on guard ; of the story-telling and mirth ; of the 
love and afTection that bound us together, and still binds us as 
firm as rocks— when I think of all this, and look around upon 
the same familiar faces to-day, I feel that I am young again, 
and sitting once more in my father's house, listening to his 
cheerful voice, calling me his 'old brown sugar,' as he often 
did when I was a little girl of six or eight years. And 
later in life, I well remember when our brothers, one by one, 
stepped out into the world to choose occupations and homes of 
their own, the heartaches and prayers of that dear mother, 
whose tender, afiectionate heart seemed almost full enough to 
burst with sorrow at the parting. And, oh, those prayers of 
our parents for the absent ones. Will they be answered? 
Shall we all meet in that beautiful land of peace ? Oh, let us 
all, who are here to-day, choose our parents' God for our God. 
Let us accept Christ as our Savior. Let us give back to Him 
that which He has purcha>ed with His own blood. Oh, let us 
not withhold from Him His just due, the homage of our 
hearts. Then, wdien the great trumpet shall sound at the last 
great day, we may all meet on that e\-ergreen shore, and clasp 
glad hands, ne\-er to part again. Yes, and those three prom- 
ising sons of ours, and other dear friends, who have passed 
over the river of death, I hope to meet there in that beautiful 
city of God, where no farewells are heard, or solemn good-bve. ' ' 

In connection with the subject of "Our Father," we 
reproduce the following, from the pen of Dr. S. P. Breed, 



written in i.*^S4, soon after tlie death of Mr. James Breed, and 
published in the Princeton pa]K-rs at that time. 



IN" MKMORIAM. 

" Died, on Sunday, Jan. 27, 18S4, at the residence of Capt. 
George W. Breed, near hVodionia, X. Y. , in the ninetieth year 
of his age, Mr. James Breed, father of Dr. v^. P. Breed, of this 
county. 

James Breed was b. in the town of Manlius, near S_vracuse, 
X. Y., June 13, 1794. Jle was the youngest son of Inkier 
Gershom Breed, who came from Connecticut and settled in the 
town of r^Ianlius, Onondaga Countx', X. Y., in 1792. He was 
the first Baptist minister in that county. James Breed was m. 
to I\lizabeth Kinne, whose father resided in the same town.-hip, 
on the 2d day of Februar_v, 1S17. They removed, in 1S20, to 
that part of the town of Cicero which was, in 1S25, set off 
and called Clay, but was still in Onondaga Co. Here they li\-ed 
until 1S35, and it was here that nearly all of their children now 
living were b. He removed from this place with his famil_\- to 
Oswego Co.. X. Y , in 1S35, wliere he continued to live until 
1S75, at which time he broke up housekeeping and went to live 
with \n> third son, Creorge, where he was -when he died. His 
wife died Ma\- 22, 1S46. He lived a v/idower several years, 
but, on the separation of the children, he m. again, but had no 
children. 

James Breed was a steady, industrious, honest man, 
singularh- careful, truthful and temperate in all his habits, 
and prudently mode>t ar.d unostentatious in his demeanor, and 
illustrated a maxim that he often repeated, ' It is better to 
suffer wrong than to do wrong.' Plis temperament was, per- 
haps, a tritle too cool to please, but he was always (piite the 
same, agreeable, kind-hearted, and well disposed toward all. 
He was a man of fcAV words, but they were always well con- 
sidered, chaste and appn^priate. I doubt if any one heard him 
use a harsh, vulgar or profan.e word. I don't think he ever had 
an enemy. He ne\-er drank c<:)ffee. seldom took tea, used no 
tobacco, and ver\' .-eldom drank anv kind of .spirits, though I 
don't think he e\-er signed au}' pledge. Phybicallv', he was 



never stroii.c;, yet, b\' luiconuiion care and prudence, liis life was 
prolonged until it nearl}- spanned a century. He was a farmer, 
in a small way, never ownini; more than one hundred acres at 
one time, and i::;enerally less ; but he understood his business 
well, and attended to it himself. He was very handy with 
tools, and made most of his own farm implements. When he 
settled on this little piece of ground in Cicero, it was in a state 
of nature, covered with heavy timber, and the country all 
around was quite new. No schools or churches nearer than 
eight miles, and it was fifteen miles to the nearest grist-mill ; 
3-et he cleared up his land, kept well out of debt, and raised a 
large family, with no assistance except what he had from his 
wife and children. He lived to see nine of them well settled, 
and most of them with families of tlieir own. But his work is 
now done, and he ' sleeps that sleep that knows no waking.' " 

THE OUTLOOK 01- THE BREED FAMIEY. 

This was the subject selected for the edification of the as- 
semblage by Mrs. Adelia Loosley of Iowa Cit>-, la., and that it 
was well received was evidenced by the marked attention given 
b}' all present during its rendition. The address was as follows ; 

'T know I am expected to respond, but I am not a prophet, 
nor the daughter of a prophet, nor yet the sister of one, that I 
should be able to tell you what the future shall be. But we 
may form 'some opinion, based upon what the past has been. 
We have heard to-day about our parents. Whatever desirable 
qualities of character they possessed, it cannot be denied that 
they were poor and obscure. By working hard and keeping at 
it, they secured a living for their large famil}' from a few stony 
acres, in a land where character was cultivated more than corn. 
One advantage they gave their children — the right to a prece- 
dent, old as Solomon, who said, ' I have been young, and now 
I am old, yet never have I seen the righteous forsaken, nor his 
seed begging bread." 

You, my brothers, have won whate\'er you possess of edu- 
cation, of cultivation, position and wealth, by your own un- 
aided efiforts ; and you place your children to-day on a far 
higher plane than the one upon which you stood when you be- 
gan tliis battle of life. Now, these children nuist decide as to 
what the future shall be. 



' Our little day draws near its close, 
Around uz falls the shad'.- of night- 
Death's deep repose.' 

But our children come to the front, and must either advance 
or retreat. If they will do for their children what we have done 
for them, and ]>lace them in a correspondingly advanced posi- 
tion, I think we may safely say that the outlook for this 
name and family is something beyond the common. But here 
the question comes, What is advancement '^ and lunv shall you 
reach a higher plane '^ If you ask us, one would say. ' Get 
rich ; whatever nou d>_^ or leave undone, by all means get 
riches.' Another wuuld tell y>iu tr. 'Get education at any 
cost.' Another, '.Cultivate contentment.' If you ask me. I 
would say, if you desire the highest excellence of character ; if 
you would have your name go down to your children, honored 
and blessed, and the world be a somev/hat better place for our 
having lived in it, I have one guide that I consider infallible, 
that I desire to commend to you. Not that my life has been a 
bright example, by any means, but if there has been an\-thing 
in my life that has saved it from utter worthlessness ; if my 
children owe me anything that has help^ed to make their mirids 
richer, their hearts purer, or their li\-cs more true and honest, 
it has been because I have tried to govern my lite and their' s by 
the precepts laid down in the Bi1)le. 

I hope I may be pardoned, for I cantiot let this opportunity 
pass without leaving my testimony with you— the children into 
whose hands we must resign the future — feeling, as I do, that 
when we, as a fatnily, meet again, it can hardly be that there 
w411 not be one vacant chair, and it may be mine. If it should 
be so, I wish yint to rememl.K-r that I told you that I belk-ve tlie 
Bible to be the only safe guide for human conduct. I believe, 
if you will stud}- it as an en([uirer and not a caviler ; if }-ou will 
mould your live^ upon its precepts, ju^t in proportion as you d(.) 
this better than we have done, \our lives will reach a higher 
plane than ours, and "God will hold up your goings in His 
paths that your footsteps slip not.' " 

Then followed a panegyric on " A Mother's love." by Dr. 
S. P. Breed, and liesides the speeches herewith printed, good 
addre.s.-^es were delivered by Mrs. Hannah Mariiu, "f Muske- 
gon, .Mich.; Hon. J. H. Breed, of Winslow, Arizona; Mr. 

(i6j 



Marvin A. Breed, of Iowa City, Iowa ; Mrs. Al/.ina lirccd, of 
Ccntix- Grove Farm ; .Mrs. L. X. P-recd, of Los Aii-dcs. Cal.; 
Mr. Ralph Breed, of Wyanet, 111.; Mr. lalward Sislcr, of Ne- 
braska, and Mr. Radcliffe. of Priiicctoti, 111. 

A banquet was gi\x-n on I'Vida\-, the 24tli. 

On Saturda}- uiornini^ a business meeting was held, at 
which the subject of the next reunion was talked over, and, 
after a thorough discussion, it was decided that Chicago would 
be the most suitable place for holding the same. 

Dr. Franklin Breed and Mr. Marvin A. Breed were ap- 
pointed a committteeto manufacture a box in which to keep the 
records of the Breed Reunions. 

The Secretaiy was instructed to purchase a book for the 
purpose of entering such records. 

A resolution was unanimousl>- adojHcd, expressing sorrow 
at the abserice of George \\'. Breed from this reunion. 

The meeting then adjourned, subject to the call of the 
Chairman. 



No. 152. 












Simon P. Breed 151, 


b. Feb. 


I, 


1S19. 






Married 


Dec. 


25, 


1S4S, 






Abzena S. Powers 


b. lune 


3, 


1S27, 






Ella 


b. July 


21, 


1850, 


d. July 


3, iSsr. 


Edoline 


b. July 


28, 


1S52, 


d. Sept. 


10, 1S53. 


Lena M. 


b. Feb. 


15, 


1S54, 






Kate 


b. Dec. 


iS, 


1S55, 


d. Nov. 


5, lS;J. 


Lizzie R. 153, 


b. Jan. 


5 


1S5S, 






Luella 


b. March 8, 


1S59- 






Ralph Y. 


b. Nov. 


6, 


186 1, 






No. 153. 












Lizzie R. Breed 152, 


b. Jan. 


5, 


185S, 






Married 


Nov. 


17. 


i8Sr, 






Charles E. Sisler 


b. Aug. 


2, 


1S56, 






Geo. Leon Sisler 


b. Oct. 


~3< 


1882, 






No. 154. 












Condace Breed 151, 


b. 


Nov. 


10, 


iS2r, 




Married 




Feb. 


17, 


184 r, 




Joseph Crofoot 


b. 










Simeon C. Crofoot 


b. 


Jan. 


24, 


1S42. 




Sophronia C. .M. Crofoot b. 


July 


23, 


1S44, 




Married 2d husbai 


k1 






1^57. 


-. 


Austin GilleU 


b. 











Condacf Breed in. her first husband in Hannibal, Oswego 
Co., X. V. 



No. 155. 




Lydia \'. Breed 141, 


b. 


Married 




Ralph Eaton 


b 


Sandford Eaton 


b. 


Lucinda Eaton 


b. 


Selah Eaton 


b. 


Gilbert Eaton 


b. 



Xo. 156. 

Plannah V. Breed 141, b. 

Married 
John W'ybr rn b. 

Mason Wyborn b. 

Lucy Wyborn b. 

John Wyborn b. 

Lydia Wyborn b. 

Gershom Wyborn b. 

Hannali Wyborn b. 



.NO. 157. 










Mary V. Breed 141, 


b. 








Married 










Selah Strong- 


b. 








William Strong 


b. 








Lucinda Strong 


b. 








Alfred Strong 


b. 








Orson Strong 


b. 








Erank Strong 


b. 




.. _ 




X'o. 15S. 










Jabish Breed 140, 


b. 


Feb. 


24, 


175S, 


Married 










Andrew 159, 


b. 


Jan. 


25. 


1790, 


Allen 160, 


b. 


May 


iS, 


1793, 


Gershom 161, 


b. 


Eeb. 


10, 


1795, 


William 162, 


b. 


Jan. 


20, 


1799, d. 


Jabish 


b. 


Sept. 


6, 


17S6, 


Abel 


b. 


Oct. 


13. 


i?05, 



Feb. 2, 1S7S. 



No. 159. 

Andrew I'.rced 15S, h. Jan. 25, 1791), 
Married 



Abel b. 

Charles b. 

Andrew b. 

Abel li\-ed in Aurora, 111. 

Xo. 160. 

b. .May iS, 1793, 



Allen Breed 15S, 


b. 


Married 




David 


b. 


Albert 


b. 


Franklin 


b. 


Betsey 


b. 


I.aura 


b. 


Marietta 


b. 



The chn. of Allen Breed live in Orlean.s Co., N. Y. 

No. 161. 

Gershom P.reed 15S, b. Feb. 10, 1795, 
Married 

jabez b. 

Dudley b. 

James M. b. 

Dudley Breed lives in Green, Chenango Co., N. Y. 
Tantes M. lives in Aurora, 111. 



[S78. 



No. 162. 












William Breed 15S, 


b. Jan. 


20, 


1799- 


d. 


Feb. 


Married 












Mary 


■ b. July 


3, 


1S22, 






William Horace 


163,!;. Apr. 


3' 


1S24, 






Hannah York 


b. An^. 


20, 


1S26, 


d. 


Sep. 


Fally .M. 


b. July 


15, 


iS29, 






Henr>- N. 


b. .May 


10, 


'S32, 






Allen G. 


b. Mav 


15, 


I-'^34, 






Ruby Aliueda 


b. Jan' 


7. 


1S37, 


d. 


Feb, 


Pulaski 


b. Sep. 


26, 


1841, 







1849. 



[SS3. 



William IJrced, Sr. , was b. in Stoniuc!;toii. 

Mary lives near Ijiiighaiuloii. William, Jr. was b. in 
Sloiiington and moved to Chenango Ct)., X. V., in 1.S24, {<> 
l?room Co., N. Y., in 1N40, and to Washington Co., Itiwa, in 
1865, where he d. His brothers and sisters were all b. in 
StoningLun. Allen G. is A'ice- President of the ist Xational 
P.ank of Perry, la. This bank is one of the strongest in Iowa, 
and is oflieered by men of known fmaneial abilit\- and integrit\'. 
Allen G. moved from Ainsworth to Pen-y, b.wa, in the fall of 
1SS4. Pulaski lives in Windham, Pi'adford Co., Iowa. 

No. 163. 

William Horace Breed 162 b. Aiir. 3, 1S24, 
Married 



Charles A. 


b. 








George A. 


b. 








Xo. 164. 










Joseph breed 140, 


b. Feb. 


1762, 


d. Sep. 


1S2S. 


Married 










Rhoda Greene 


b. 


1767, 


d. 


1S27. 


Caleb Greene t6 = 


;, b. 


17S5, 


d. 


1S35. 


Lucy 170, 


b. 


17S7, 






Rhoda 171, 


b. 


17S9, 


d. 


1S7S. 


Joseph 172, 


b. 


1790, 


d. 


1844. 


Hannah 175, 


b. 


I793> 


d. 


1S64. 


Jabish 176, 


b. 


1796, 


d. 


1S58. 


Polly 179, 


b. 


iSoo, 


d. 


1864. 


Russell rSo, 


b. 


1S03, 


d. 


1867. 


Philura 1S4, 


b. 


1S05, 


d.. 


1S64. 


Calancia 


b. 


1S07, 


d. 


1825. 


No. 165. 










Caleb Greene Breed 164, 


b. 


17S5, 


d. 


1S35. 


Married 










Polly Dye 


b. 








C Greene 166, 


b. 








Henry 167, 


b. 








Mary A. 


b. 








Esther 


b. 








Allen Palmer 16S 


, b. 








MatUiew 169, 


b. 








I^bartha 


b. 








Mirand.a 


b. 








Rhoda 


b. 









Mary A. P>rfe(l in. John McKil)bin. The\- had 2 chn.: 
Amelia and John W'eslew I^sthcr ni. Samuel Looniis and had 
one ch. Her 2d husband was I'>.ra lUirdick. Martha ni. 
Nelson Harve\- and liad one ch. Miranda m. Wesson Xewlon. 
This fainih- were all b. in Pharsalia, Chenango Co., N. V. 

Xo. 166. 

Caleb Greene Rreed, Jr., 165, b. 

Married 

Philura XefT b. 

Polly Esther b. 

Henry b. 

Ilendrick b. 

Elsina b. 

No. 167. 



Henrj- Breed 165, 


b. 


Married 




Jane McKibben 


b. 


Francis M. 


b. 


Elizabetii 


b. 


Ledwin 


b. 


Phebe Marietta 


b. 



No. 16S. 



Allen Palmer Breed 165, 


b. 


Married 




Adeline Harvey 


b. 


Han.ey D. 


b. 


Helen 


b. 


Bertha 


b. 


Allen Pahner, Jr. 


, b. 



No. 169. 

Matthew Breed 165, b. 

Married 
Polly Maria Looniis b. 

Eliza M. b. 

George b. 

Thomas b. 

Elsie b. 

Nettie 1. b. 



No. 170. 

Lucy r.rvccl 164, b. 

Married 

Lewis l>ro\vn b. 

Folly Maria I'rownb. 

Lewis Broun b. 

Esther Broun b. 

Emily Brown b. 

Polly Maria Brown m. David Lord. The chn. were : 
Edwin K., vSterlinj^:, Lewis, Polly Maria and others. Lewis 
Brown m. Kunice Far;_!,o and had one ch. : Purly. Ksther l^rown 
m. Sterline: Atwell and had one ch. : Kmily. 



No. 171. 



Rhoda Breed 164, 


b. 


>Lirried 




William Lewis 


b. 


Elias Lewis 


b. 


William Lewis 


b. 


Rhoda Lewis 


b. 


Joseph Lewis 


b. 


Hannah Lewis 


b. 


Isaiah Lewis 


b. 



17S9, d. 1S7S. 



Sally Marilla Lewis b. 

Klias Lewis m. Laura White. Their chn. were : Mary, 
Lydia, Fannie, Mertilo, Joseph, ]-:iias and Susan. Mary Lewis 
m. Charles Hyde. Their chn. were : Lorenzo, Lydia, Mellis- 
sio and Frank. Fannie Lewis ni. Henry Metzgar. Their chn. 
were : Cora, Willie, Ida and Laura. Mertilo m. Bridget 
Carl, and had one ch. : Dora Aim F:;iiza. 

William m. Caroline White. Their chn. were : F:nieline, 
Noyes, Jerome and Rhoda Lewis. Rhoda m. Christopher 
Greene, and had two chn. : William C. and ^Larilla Fell. 
Joseph m. Melissa Ferrer, and had two chn. : George Adella 
and William Arthur. Hannah m. Samuel Nelson Tower. 
Their chn. were : Haimah, Adelaide and Lewis Nelson. 
Isaiah m. Ann ICll/.a Doran. Their chn. were: Giles L, Joli'.i 
Oscar, Annie F. and Chark-s William. Sally m. Charles Camp. 



[64, 



No. 172. 

Jdsepli ]'.rccd 

Married 
Hannah Sisson 

Hannah 

Lucy Marcillia 

Joseph 173, 

William Sisscn 1; 

Calancia 

Lewis 



79c, 



1844. 



Hannah in. William Ilillard. Calancia m. George White, 
and had two chn. : Curtis and Hiram. Lewis went to Califor- 
nia. 



No. 173. 



Joseph Breed 172, 


b. 




Married 






Marinda Moore 


b. 




John Gilbert 


b. 




Marittie 


b. 




Celia 


b. 




No. 174. 






William Sisson Brued 17 


2, b. 




Married 






Hulda Spencer 


b. 




Emily 


b. 




Edward 


b. 




Lucy 


b. 




Ralph 


b. 




Han-iah 


b. 




Levicia 


b. 




No. 175. 






IL'uinah Breed 164, 




b. 


Married 






Elam Eldrid-e 




b 


Hannah Mary Eldrit 


Ige 


b 


Edison Eidrid;^e 




b. 


Khoda Amanda Eldr 


ids<. 


b 



Calancia B. Eldridge b. 

Mary Almira Eldrid-e b. 

P'.liza Emily EldridL^e b. 

John Milo Eldridge b. 



1793. 



1864. 



Hamiali P.iLx-d d. in Xortli I'itcher, Cheiiango Co.. N. Y. 

Ilaiiiiali Mary l{klii(,lL;e d. _\-ouiil;'. I{di.-^on in. Saiiiantha 
Weeks. Their elm. were: Orson, I'ertlia, Mary J. and Minnie 
A. Rlioda Amanda ni. Charle> A. McIvlroN-, and liad one eli. 
Calaneia d. aged t\\\-nt_\' \ears. Mar_\- Alniira n:. Lncien }!. 
Blackman. Eli/.a Kmily ni. Otis R. Arnold. 

No. 17^. 

Jabish Brt-ed 164, b. 1796, d. iSs*^. 

Marrie<j ^ 

Louisa F.ldridge b. 

Jabish I ifwry 177, h. 

Jackson b. 

Orson 17S, b. 

Climena b. 

Married 2d wife 

Cloe Eldridge b. 

» Cordelia b. 

Climena Breed m. Truman Parker. Cordelia m. J. J. 
Speakman. Their chn. were : Clesta, I'rank, Cloe, Eva and 
Benjamin. 

No. 177. 
labish ilenrv Breed 176, b. 

Married' 

Olive S. Lawtori b. 

Lois b. 

Sibel b. 

Mary b. 

Eunice b. 

Helen b. 

Henry b. 

Sarah b. 

Lois, Sibel and Mary d. \-oung. 
No. 1 7,8. 

Orson Breed 176, b. - 

Married 

Bertha Rienhart b. 

Mata b. 

linogene b. 

Laura b. 

Nellie b. 

Lrnina \>. 

Nellie and Em am d. yuung. 
(17) 



No. 179. 

Folly Breed 164, b. 1800, d. 1864. 

Married 

Seth Sahin b. 

Seth Otis Sabin b. 

Mary Lovinda Sabin b. 

Charlotte Sabin b. 

Estlier Maria Sabin b. 

Philo Russell Sabin b. 

Polly Sabin d. in Spencer, X. Y. 



No. I So. 

Russell P.recd 161, b. 1.S03, d. 1S67. 

Married 

Rebecca C. Congdon b. 

Norman l-"ord 18 r, b. 
Alexander Kinyan 182 b. 

Mary Rebecca b. 

Julia Esther b. 

George DeWitt 1S3, b. 

Russell Breed and his \v. d. in Chilton, Calumet Co., Wis- 
consin. 

Mary R. m. Stephen Healy, and had two chn. : Alliert S. 
and Mattie R. Julia E. m. John II. Clapper, and had two 
chn. : Julette Re!>ecca and John Henry. 

No. iSi. 

Norman Ford Breed 180, b. 

Married 

Margaret Maria Burns b. 

James Russel b. 

George Norman b. 

Margaret Jane b. 

No. 1S2. 



Alexander Kinyan Breed 180, 


b. 


Married 




Fannie C. Bianchard 


b. 


Frank 


b. 


Estell 


b. 


Adell 


b. 



No. iS:v 

CcorKe DcWitt Rtecd rSo b. 

Married 
Kli/a A. l''adiier b. 

I-"raiik b. 

Alexander K. b. 



No. 184. 

Philura Breed 164 b. 1S05, d. 1S64. 

Married 

Elisha Gardner b. 

Marzotte Cardner b. 

Calancia Gardner b. 

Henry Gardner b. 

Charles Gardner b. 

Georg-e Gardner b. 

CharloUe E. Ganlner b. 

Harriet Gardner b. 

Mar/.etta Gardner 111. Ilazzard lirowniiK/, and had two chn., 
Frank and Fred. Charlotte li.in. Ge<.a-i;e Pelliam, and had two 
chn., Karl and Fora. Flarriet m. Futher West, and had one 
ch., Foltie. 

No. 1S5. 

Gersliom Breed 5r, b. Nov. 15, 1715, d. Jan. 5, 1777. 

Married .May 10, 1747, 

Dorothy McLaren b. Sept. 25, 1728, d. Sep. 3, 1776. 

John xMcLaren iS6,b. April 28, 1748, d. May 31, 179S. 

Susanna b. Nov. 19, 1749, d. April 13, 1S32. 

Gershom b. Oct. 2, 1751, d. July i, 1753. 

Gershom b. Sep. 5, 1753, d. Au;^. 2, 1755. 

David 1S8, b. June 6, 1755, d. Dec. 7, 17S3. 

Alien b. Sep. 6, 1757, d.June 27, 185S. 

Shubal 19 r, b. April 20, 1759, d. Feb. 24, 1S40. 

Jesse 1). May 21, 1761, d. Nov. 19, 1S31. 

Simeon b. F'ly 17, 1763, d. Aug. 22, 1S22. 

Anna b. May 14, 1767, d. Jan. lo, 1S47. 

Gershom Breed was a saddk-r by trade. He moved to 
Norwich, Ct., about 1750, and tniilt his house in 1758 and his 
store in 1764. lie became an importer. His w. was the only 
dan. of Patrick McFareii (who d. L)ec. Q, 1731. and who was a 
sou of Rev. Joim McFareii, of i:Alinbiugh, Scothiiid—i 71 1 to 



1734 — ^'hI aftc^^\•^lrds a incrcliaiit of Middletoii, Ct.) and Doro- 
thy Otis fa dau. of Judge Jose])!! Otis, of Moutvillc, Ct., and 
Dorothy Thomas). (Jud;,;e Otis was a graiidsoii of Johti Otis 
of liuighani, the settler there in ii'^j^v ^^'^ '^^'- '^^■^^'' =^ ^^''^^'^- o[ 
Judge Nathaniel Thomas, of Marshfield, Mass., and Debora 
Jacob. Judge Thomas' estate was afterwards that of Daniel 
Webster). Patrick and Doroth>' McLaren were m. Nov. 8, 
1727. Mrs. Gershom I->reed d. at Branfi.)rd, Ct.,.on a retiu'ii 
from visiting a sick son at Xew Ha\en. 

The first two chn. were b. in Stonington. and the rest in 
Norwich, Ct. vSusanna m. Rev. David ]>rewer, of Guilford, 
Ct., and afterwards of Taunton, Mass. The\- had 6 chn. 

Jesse is mentioned in the records of the War iJepartment,- 
as follows : 

"In Now 1S19, of Norwich, Ct. He was born May 21st, 
i76i,and died in Nonvich, Nov. 19th, 1S31. He married in 
Norwich, Ct.. Oct. 6th, 1799, to Cynthia Ihilkle}-, whose 
maiden name was Rogers, and having no children they adorned 
their nephew, Jesse Breed Rogers, whose baptismal n.anie is 
stated to have been Jesse Breed and who was in business in 
New York Cit\- in 1856. At her death. July 31st. 1855, their 
property was betjueathed tu the adapted ncpliew, who was 
executor and residuary legatee of her will, which mentions 
John I'reed 2d and Joseph Breed, twin sons of James Breed 
n64) of Norwich, with a legac\- of Sioo to each. Jesse Breed, 
the soldier, was one of the old and respectal>le firm of Jesse and 
Simeon Breed, merchants in Norwich, and Jesse l:ad a brother 
John. L\"dia Breed aged 88 years in i85(), states that her hus- 
band Shubael ISreed (161), was a brother of Jesse Breed and 
Cynthia (Rogers) bJulkley Breed was the daughter of Major 
Uriah Rogers. 

About March ist, 17S0, Jesse Bjreed entered on board the 
frigate Trumbull, at New London, Ct>nn., Ca{)t. James Nichol- 
son, as a mid^hipman and then in Nov. i"So, he left to go on 
board the ship Confederacy, Ca{it. Setli Harding, as a mid- 
shipman, which latter ship was captured in April, 1781, and he 
was confined as a prisoner on board the prison ship Jersey in N. 
Y. harbor, then remo\-ed to the man-of-war Rainbow, and from 
thence carried to Deal, in iCugland, from which y)lace he 
escaped Jan. 3d, 17S2, to France. At L'Orieut about Feb. 1st, 



ly.'^:'. he went on board the U. v*^. ship Alliance, Capt. ]'.arry, 
for the ])urpose of returning; home, and arrix'ed at New- 
London, Ct., in >ray, 17S2. All his ])apers, books and 
clothing were stolen from him in Iuii;'land while sick in the 
hospital. WHiile serving in the ship Trumlndl they had an 
engagement with the British ship Watt, 36 guns, at which time 
he was wounded in three places, from which he has suffered 
se\'erel\-, his k-ft arm broken and crooked and lame, anil his 
left leg and thigh partiall_v withered." 

Simeon was a grad. of Yale in rySi, and was a partner of 
Jesse. He d. single. Ainia m. Re\'. Salmon Cone. 



No. rS6. 


















John McLriren P.reed rS5, 


, b. 


April 


28, 


1748, 


d. 


May 


31, 


.79S. 


Married 




Nov. 


14, 


iJJf. 










Mar}' Devotion 


b. 








d. 


Dec. 


3. 


1779. 


Married rind w. 




I'eb. 


13- 


1781, 










Rebecca Walker 


b. 






1753, 


d. 


June 


27, 


1824. 


Rthtjcca 


b. 


Sep. 


10, 


i7S[, 


d. 


July 


24, 


17S2. 


Rebecca 


b. 


Sep. 


12, 


17S3, 


d. 


Au^. 


^3, 


1S4S. 


Susan 1S7, 


b. 


Dec. 


17, 


1783, 


d. 


Au-. 


29, 


1 85 1 . 


.Sarah Johnson 


b. 


Ian. 


", 


17S9. 


d. 


Feb. 


25i 


1S48. 


Jolm 


b. 


March 


12, 


1791- 


d. 


Dec. 


3. 


1865. 


Joseph 


b. 


Auk. 


16, 


1793. 


d. 


Oct. 


8, 


1847. 



Hon. John McLaren Ikeed was b. in Stonington, Ct. Was 
a Yale grad. in 176s. Was a merchant at Norwich, Ct., and 
once a Mayor of the city. He wa^ a man of inte;j,rity, honor 
and dignified bearing and of a kindly disposition. He was enter- 
prising, l)ene\-olent and [)ul)lic spirited. His ist w. was a dau. 
of Rev. I{l.)enczer Devotion, of Windham, Ct. His 2d w. was 
a dau. of Hon. Robert Walker iwho was a grad. of Yale in 
1730. and Judge of the Suy)erior Court of Connecticut, and re- 
sided at Stratford, Ct.)and Rebecca Lewis. 

Rebecca 2d was b. in Norwich and d. unmarried. vSarah 
Johnson was the 2d w. of Rev. William Allen, D. D., President 
of P.oudoin College (who was a son of Rev. Thomas Allen and 
L\dia Lee), 1). Jan. 2, 1784. He m. his ist w. Jan. 2S, 1813; 
she was Maria Mallerillc, onl>' ch. of Rev. John Whechx-k, 
LL. D. and President oi' Dartmouth College and Maria Suhm, 
(who was a dau. of C,i)\-. Christian Suhm, of the Island of vSt. 
Thomas, West Indies. She d. at Brunswick, ^Lune. Rev. 



I>i-. Allt-n in. Miss V>rvod Dec. 2, i.S^a Ho u-n ■ . 1 r 

Harvard CoII.^e in is,.^ and sc ,1 i ""'''• ''^ 

succeeding hisltl.r L ^^r^ jt"!:] 1^:1^'.^} ^''^l^^'^^- 



«-■ wris iii.iilrPrL'si<ltntori)a?l- 



'""""; Coll.,. i„ ,S,6, .,,.1 of I:„,„,o;„ Con«.-e K, ,S,, „. 

;■•"'■'■ ''--^-i ■". Xuv. .3, ,s.„„ A„„i. Fuel, I.an-ai« 
d..u. , f U.bl,,„s Lan-aLee a.„I I.„cv ImIcI,, „f Windham C,' 

one t,„,. Ma.vo,- „r u. City. „e d. „-iu,o„t . ; lii ' j' 
-eh ,0, ,.„,. j,.ac„„ B,.e,l says of hi„, -..i" , ■'; 

streets. Awnnig posts and manv oilier un.i.lith- ohu^rt^ 
permitted to remain in tlie street; In- tli ^ A ^ "'" 

, acecT^tert the nonnnation and was in rl„- 

B.,'u,e...^:;':;;^^;:!:;:r;r :.■::":•": -,:-■ 

•^ \ i-,urous and errecti\-e manner Tiiic ^^^- 

a box and explained to the crcvd ,1 a, "\ '"-">■ '™""'«> 
encun.bering the .streets i„ de^re „.:„';: "'"■'"" ""^ 
ance to most ,,f ti, . •.• , ^^^^^ ^^"a ucie an annov- 

appea:;n::::;^U c^ . ':T:^:J;^- -dl, dis.,urin, the 

removed. At tlie close of 1, ' "'''^ •''"^'^^' "^'^^- '^^• 

clo.se of this exnlanatKMi he ordered them to 



quit. d!S]iersL' and leave him U> finish the work iio had under- 
taken. The crowd jeered at the Mayor's speech. Just then 
abt.uit 3' o soldiers appearcfl on the scene, and were tluis 
addressed by the Ma\-or : ' Soldiers, are x'our niuskets loadeil i" ' 
They replied in the affirinati\"e, and stated that their loading- 
included a ball as well as a cartridge. Ma\'or Breed again 
addressed the crowd and stated that all who remained upiMi the 
street at'ter ll\-e minutes, shotdd receive the contents of those 
guns. His determination of purpose was sufficienth' well 
known by the crowd to convince them, that he was no joker, 
and in four minutes the streets were deserted, and the Mayor 
pj'oceeded luimolested with the removal." 
Joseph d. unmarried. 

No. 1S7. 
Susan Breed 1S6, b. Dec. 17, 1785, d. Auvj. 29, 1851. 

Married 
James Dwight b. 

James Mcl.aren Breed Dwight h. 

Timothj- Du-ight b. 



Xo. iSS. 








David Breed 1S5. b. June 


6, 


1755, d. Dec. 


7, 17S3. 


Married 








Elizabeth Clement b. June 


9, 


1755, d. Dec. 


23, 1S26. 


David 1S9. b. "Xuv. 


29, 


17S,:;, d. Apr. 


r4, iS59- 


Betsey b. Apr. 


16, 


177S, d. Jan. 


i6, 1S29. 


Dorothy b. July 




1780, d. July 


1781. 



Ivlizaljeth Clement was a dan. of Jeremiah Clement, of 
Windham, Ct. In 178S she m. Rev. Aaron Cleveland, the 
grandfather of C, rover Cleveland, President ot^ the United 
States,. 1SS5 to 1S.S9. She d. in New York, Dec. 23, 1S26. 

Abijah, dan. of Rev. Aaron Cleveland, m. Rev. S. Hanson 
Cox, of Ihooklyn and afterwards of New York. 

Xo. 1 89. 

David Breed [88, b. Nov. 29, 1783, d. April i }, 1859. 

Married 

Julia Steadman It. Feb. 23, 1792, d. Feb. iS, 1S65. 

Abijah Cleveland b. April 11, 1813, d. July 28, 1S7S. 

Charles b. 1815, d. iSSi. 

David [90, b. July 15, 1822, 



Davi.l Breed 189, 


b. 


July 15. 


1S22, 




Married 




Nov. 25, 


1^47, 




Sarali Ann GilletLe 


b. 


, ALarch 


iS-i, 


d. Ai 


Married 2d wife 




Nov. 25, 


1S52, 




Caroline Louisa Lyman 


b. 


July 


1820, 




Mary Lonisa Steadinan 


b. 


Sept. iS, 


i'\5.>. 




Caroline Cleveland 


b. 


Oct. 14, 


i.^59, 





Abijnli CleveLaiid Pureed was b. in Waterlown, N. Y. , and 
wa.s buried Au<^. i, 1S7.S in Xew Haven. 

No. I go. 



1S49. 



Rev. David Ilreed was a niissionar_\- of American Board of 
C. F. ^L, anion;j, the Choctaw Indians — 1S47 ^^ 1S49. In iSgi 
he had a cancer removed b>y treatment which had worried him 
for ten _\ ear^, and yet his heroic courage enabled him to keep 
the kno^vIedc;c of its existence even trotn his wife. 

^Lary I^ouisa v^teadman m. Mch. 29, iSSi, Henry A. 
Spaford, Jr., of Lebanon, Ct. 

No. 191. 

Shuhal I]reed 1S5, b. April 20, 1759, d. Feb. 24, 1S40. 

Married June 25, 17S6, 

Lydia Perkins b. Oct. 11, 1767, d. Af)ril 15, 1S61. 

Charles iV b. Feb. i, 17S7, d. Feb. i, 1S15. 

Nancy b. .Sept. 6, 17SS, d. March 18, iSSo. 

Lydia b. Oct. 9, 179.J, d. h'ne 4, 1796. 

Mary b. May 20, 1795, d. March 18. 1856. 

Fli/.a b. Ai)ril 5, 1797, d. Feb. 2S, iSri6. 

George 192, b. March 27, 1799, d. A[)ril 30, 1S63. 

James 194, b. March 13, 1801, d. Dec. 8, 1852. 

Lydia Perkins b. (Jet. 12, 18^5, d. An-. 13, 1S12. 
Shubal I'reed was b. in Norwich, Ct., and a grad. of Vale 
in 177S. His w. was a dan. of Jabe/. Perkins of Norwich, and 
Ann Lathrop. vShe d. in Xorwich. 

Charles B. Ikeed was wounded at Bnena \'ista, and was 
killed there b\- his nurse. 

Nancy m Dec. ;,o, iSi,:;, W'm. Coit Williams, of Norwich, 
Ct., who d. leaving two elm. : vSimeon B. Williams, b. Feb. 3, 
1815, and Mary B. who d. in iSSx Her 2d husband was 
Nathan Whiting. Mary m. LVb. 11, 1819, Heiny H. Coit, of 
Cleveland, Ob.io. Their chn. v.xtc : Charles, ]k b. Oct. m, 
iS2<s Wm. Henry, b. March ;,<>, FS23 : h'^i/abcth, 1). March 28, 
1827 ; Maria, b. July 28, 1.S30 ; Mary, !>. July 15, 1839. 



vSimeon B. Williams, ni. Cornelia Johnson of Cincinnati. 
Children ; Clarine 'who m. M. L. Scudder), Alnii, Cornelia and 
Samuel Lawrence (who m. Adele WMieelcr). 



No. 192. 
















George Creed 19 r, 


b. 


March 


27, 


1799, 


d. April 


30, 


1863. 


M\irri.-d 




Sep. 


15, 


1S25, 








Anna Williams 


b. 








d. Aug. 


6, 


1S29. 


Charles 


b. 


Oct. 


31, 


1S26, 


d. [uly 


21, 


1S2S. 


George Willi.uiis 


b. 


.May 


7^ 


1829, 


d. Nov. 


-^ 


1S30. 


Married 2(.l w 




Oct. 


s, 


1S33, 








Rhoda Ogdcn Edwards 


b. 


Eeb. 


25, 


iSos 


d. April 


II. 


1S67. 


Anna Williams 


b. 


Sep. 


J 3. 


I '^34. 


d. April 


6, 


1S36. 


Mar>- 


b. 


Dec. 


27, 


1S35, 


d. April 


15, 


1S36. 


Richard Edwards 


. b. 


May 


6, 


I '^37, 








Sarah .Maria 


b. 


Oct. 


12, 


iS3'^, 








John Aikn 


b. 


May 


13. 


1841, 


d. May 


4, 


1S42. 


■ Henry At wood 


b. 


Aug. 


I, 


1842. 








Emma Bell 


b. 


Dec. 


9. 


1844, 








David Riddle 193 


, b. 


June 


10. 


184^, 








Georg-e Breed, Sr, 


,, was 1). 


in 


Norwich, Ct. 


; in 


. his I St 



in Tannton, Ma.ss. Pie m. his 2d w. in Pittshnrgh, Pa., where 
she d. She was the great-grand-danghter of the Rev. Jonathan 
Edwards, President of Princeton College. 



Richard Edwards Breed 


b. Mav 


6, 


1^37, 


Married 


Nov. 


^9. 


1S61, 


Martha O. Lyon 


b. 






Mary Edwards 


b. Oct. 


20, 


i86l', 


George 


b. July 


19, 


1854, 


Richard Edward. 


; b. .March 




1.866, 


Emma Bell 


b. Jan. 


II. 


1S6S, 


Kate Gordon 


b. Oct. 


10, 


1S71, 


Henderson 


b. April 


1 8, 


1874, 



d. May 19, 1S75. 

Richard Breed, Sr., was b. at Pittsbnrgh, Pa. Removed 
Aug. 6, 1856, to Cincinnati, O. ; returned to Pittsburgh, March 
31, 1863, where he succeeded his fither in the earthen-ware 
trade. He was largely engaged in real estate on his own ac- 
count, but the panic of 1S73 removed him from business entirely. 
From March. 18S0, until October 15, 1SS5, he was engaged in 
railroading in connection with a firm of contractors in Washing- 
ton City, duriiiLMvliich time his fanuly resided in Covington. Kv. 

Oeorge was app.jinted "Naval Cadet" from Kentucky and 
entered the Naval Academy in June.. 1S82. Pie was graduated 

(18) 



in June, iSS6, second in his class ; was attached to the U. S. 
Steamer "Atlanta" until May, iSSS, when hu was detacherl and 
ordered to Annapolis for his final examination, and was com- 
missioned " Knsign." He is now (1SS9) Inspector of Ordnance 
at Cold Spring, N'. Y. 

Richard, Jr., residing at Coviiigton, Ky. from September, 
1S80, until April. 1SS7, then in Chicago until Afarch, 1S8S, when 
he removed to Marion, Ind., where he is cngay^-d in the' man- 
ufacture of glassware. 

Kmma Bell m. July 11, 1SS9, Rev. Geo. David I.indsey of 
Ionia, Mich. 

Sarah M:iria Breed b. Oct. 12, iS^S, 
-^larded Oct. 12, 1S6}, 

Charles H. Ziig 

Eliza B. Zu-. b. Nov. 1S65, 

George B. Zug b. 

Charles Gordon Zug b. 

Rhoda Edu-artls Zug b. 

Emma Phillips Zug b. 

Henry Atuood Breed b. Aug. i, 1S42, 

Married 
Comelia Bed well 

Mar}- Bedv.ell b. iSjo, 

Henry b. 

Charles Henry b. 

Emma Bell Breed b. Dec. 9, 1S44, 

.Married 

Theodore E. Phillips b. 

Margaret Bush Phillips b. 

Sarah Breed Phillips b. 

Theodora Phillips b. 

Anna P-'hillips b. 

Harold Phillips b. 

No. 193. 

David Riddle Breed 192, b. June 10, 1S4S, 

Married June 16, 1870^ 
Mary Eli/.aheth Kendall b. 

Esther Kendall b. March 21, 1871, 

Mary Elizabeih b. Nov. 3, 1S72,' 

Maurice Edwards b. Nov. 15, 1S75J 

I^'^vid R. b. April 2, 1881,' 

Allen b. April lu, 1SS6, 



Kcv. David R. Breed, D.D., was prepared for Colle;<e at the 
Western Uiiiversit_\- of Pennsylvania, at Piltsbiirc;-!!. After two 
j-ears spent in business, heentered Hamilton College in the Fall 
of iSf).], as a Sophomore, g'raduating in the Class of 1867. He 
was graduated from Auburn Theological Seminary in 1S70. He 
was called Dec. 28, 1869, to the House of Hope Presl/n Church, 
of St. Paul, Minn. Pie began his labors there after leaving the 
Seminary, in 'Slay, 1870; was ordained and installed in October, 
1S70. His service in this church was ended by an accident, 
which was reported in one of our religious papers, as follows : 

"On the 5th of April, 1S82, he ascended a ladder to the 
ceiling of the church edifice to adjust the electric wire used in 
lighting the gas. The foot of the ladder slipped and he was 
precipitated with great violence to the floor, striking- on his 
hi}) and shoulder. Pie was rendered insensible b\- the fall, and 
remained on the floor until discovered by the janitor, who 
happened to pass through the building. Assistance was called 
and he was removed to his residence, where he was confiijcd to 
his bed for weeks, and during much of the time his friendh had 
little hope of his recover}-. 

When sufficiently able to tra\'el he visited the Ivast, and 
seemed to improve very rapidly. Returning, he entered upon 
his duties again only to learn that he was not jihysicalp- al)le 
to endure their hardships. Again he was granted leave of 
absence, and in company with PUder H. M. Knox, visited 
Europe. After an absence of six months he again returned to 
his charge, and his people were rejoiced to see him looking so 
well, believing that he had entirely recovered. At once he 
entered upon his duties with that vigor characteristic of him, 
but again he has broken down, and has tendered his resignation 
in order to seek rest or light duties. Of course, we must yield 
our own wishes in the nuatter and he must leave us. 

Dr. Breed come to our church from tlie Seminary, and l)y 
his ability, industr_\- and godl\- walk has built up a church 
organization in this city which will >tand as a monument to his 
memory long after the present members sleep the sleep of 
death. Not only will our church miss Dr. Breed, but his 
departure will be felt throughout the Northwest. This leaves 
us withoiit a pastor, and to ^upph- hi-; place in our pulpit and 
in our affecti<.)ns will be a difllcult task to perform." 



Ill Novemlver. 1SS4, he was invitt-d to oiqani/e a new 
Presbyterian Clmrcli in Cl,icaL.T., 111., which was caller! the 
Church of the Covenant. He began work in Chica-o, Jan. 11, 
1SS5, and tile Church was orcranized on the 7th of Mav follow- 
ing, and sooti called him to the pastorate. Ilis w. was from 
Grand Rapids, Mich. 



No. 194. 

James Breed igr, b. .March 13, iSoi, d. Dec 8 iS^2 

Married ' '^ ' 

Charles A. b. May 3, 1S39, 

LyJia P. b. April iS, 1.S41, 

John b. July 3, 1S43, 

Joseph b. July 3, 1843! 

George b. .-\ug. ^, 1S46 

James O. b. Nov. 25, iS_|7. 

Joseph Breed was for a time A>sistant Cashier of the Hart- 
ford National Bank. 

Lydia P. Breed m. a Mr. Myers. 

Xo. 195. 

Samuel Breed 2, b. Sept. 25, 1669, 

-^I'^-rricd Feb. 5, 1691' 

Anna Hood b. 

Samuel 196, b. Nov. ir, 1692, 

^'"os b. July 20, 1694, 

Jabez 201, b. Jan. 26, 1696, 

Abigail b. Sept. 7, 169s' 

Nathan 237, b. Jan. 3, 1703' 

Kei:iah b. Oct. 16, 1704, 

'■^""-'^ b. July 2S, 1706, 

Ebenezer 247, b. .May r, 1710, 

R"th b. .ALi'rch 10! 1712,' 

Benjamm 272, b. July 4, 1715,' d. June 7. 179S. 

As this Sanuiel Breed m. Anna Hood, and his .son Samuel 
m. a Mk^s Bassctt, and we know of no other Samuel Breed in 
L3-nn about th,.-, time, we think he niit.^t have been the Samuel 
referred to m the Hi.^tory of Lynn, as one of the 17 si<niers of 
the f^Mlowing letter to Governor Dudlev by the Quakers^ of 
Lynn: — ^ 



" Lvxx, 22th, 41110. 1703. 

" Whereas, we, the peoi>le called Quakers, of the town of 
L\nii, ha\-iiig been requested by the governor to ;4ive iu a li.'^t 
c>f L'ur names — in answer thereunto eacli person hath respec- 
tively signed b}' hiuiselfe." 

It is believed that he and his Brother Joseph located in the 
eastern part of the town, where Joseph built a house. 



Xo. 196. 








Samuel llreed 195, 


b. Xov. 


II, 


1692, 


^[a^ried 


June 


25. 


1720, 


Deliverance Bas.sett 


b. 




1695, 


Anna 


b. 






Sarali 


b. 






Huldah 


b. 






Neheiiiiali vq-j. 


b. 






William 


b. 







In 1717 Xahant was without an inhabitant, James Mills 
having died and his family removed. His hou.-e and land be- 
came the property of Dr. Burchsted, who, on December iS, 
17 17, sold it to v'^amuel Breed. Ke built a house where Whit- 
ney's Hotel nov.' stands. 

He was very small in stature and was generally called 
"Governor Breed." His hou.-^e became the propert}' of his 
son Nehemiah, and his grandson William, by whom it was re- 
built in 1S19. Frtr twenty-four \-ears this house v/as kept as a 
hotel by Jesse Rice, and was purchased in 1841 by Albert 
Whitney. 

Jabez Breed, a brother of Samuel, soon removed to Na- 
hant and built a house directly opposite, and then traded it to 
Richard Hood for his house on Xahant street, Lynn. 

Prior to 1800, the only houses in Xahant were those of 
Breed, Hood and Johnson. 

This is the first union between the families of Breed and 
Eassett. In 164'), many new families arrived, and the Bassetts 
among them. William Bassett was a farmer. He d. March 
31, 1703. He lived on Xahant street. He was an ensign in 
the Indian War, and was in the " swamp fight," and he re- 
ceived a grant of liud from the Court as a reward for li'S \-;r:ual)le 
services. His son William m. Sarah Hood, October 2s, 167s. 



vn -,; r'"'," f',"'" ^''" "" ^'"-"1'--' "f the .same- 
Ha., .he fi,-,l ch. b. lo theni nfler her ,c!ense was „a„,e<l 
Dehvera„ce, an,:l ,„ ,-20 she heca.ne the w. of Sa.nuel lireed 
WeshalUeethat the lia.sett girls eaptivated the lireed hovs 

lor seveial generations. ' " 

_ William Bassetfs grandson, William, had a son, Joseph 
b. HI 1715, whce dan., Rebecca, m. James lireed 2,,. Joseph's 
dau Sarah, m Abrahan. Breed .Sr, and his dan.! Hannah', m'. 

No. 197. 

Neheniiah Breed 190, b. 
Married 

W.lliamKA h. .Sept. ^m;,^. d. May ;, ,8,9. 

No. igS. 



William P.reed 197, b. Sept. i, 1759, d. Mas- 



Married 



Sep. 22, 1784, 



/, 1819. 



Hanriah Bassett b. June 12,' .76.,' d. Mav 261S60 

Nehennah 199, b. Oct. 14, ,785. d. Jun^ 26, 182,' 

Daniel 200, b. Jan. i} i-ss 

^ Nabby b.Sep. m;92; d. Aug. 26,1809. 

No. 199. 

Nehemiah lireed 198, b. Oct. 14, 17S5, d. June 26 182, 

Married ' ^' 

Miriam Alley b. 

^^"Jisail b. March 27, 1S13, 



2, 1814, d. Dec. i6, 181S. 



iSs8. 



1 8^8. 



Lydia b. Oct. 
No. 200. 

Daniel Breed 19S, b. Jan. 14, r7S8, d. Sep 

Married 

Abigail Newhall b. Ann, 2c,, 1802, d. Au^r 

William b. Nov. 5! :S2i', d. Ma?;;h 20, 1S23: 

'""7;/ ■ '•^■•'"- ^S, :825, d.June 9, .873. 

Hannah Mar,a b. Manh 23. 1827, d. Feb. 2r, .8;8. 

ante enry b. April .0. KS30, d. June r, ,80. 

Darnel H. b. Au. r, .83,, d. Nov. 5. .832. 

n"'f„ '•^'"- 5, KS33. d.Jan. ,3. KSo. 

Darnel Henry b.Sep. .6, 1835. d. Dec. ,3. ,8 5 

John H. b. March 2s. 18^9 

Geor-e r-ranus b. July 5, i84ri d. Dec. 2 .8.8 



William X. n\. Nov. 30, 1S57, Caroline A. Horton, h. Oct. 
18, iS;yS. I'he children were : Geo. II., b. \\n\\ 2, 1S59 ; Clara 
M., h. May 4, 1S61 ; Helen L., b. Ai)ril 25, 1SG3 ; C. Lena, b. 
March 27, 1S6S. 

■ No. 201. 

Jabez Breed 195, b. Jan. 

Married 

Desire b. 

Isaiali 202, b. Oct. 

Nathan 206, b. Oct. 

Amos 215, b. Aug. 

Mary b. Jan. 

Abigail b. Aug. 

Theodate b. Dec. 

Deborah b. June 3, 1738, 

Jabez Breed was b. in L}-nii. He moved to Xahaiit, where 
he built a house. A few years later he made a trade with 
Richard Hoos for his hou.se in Nahant Street, lyynn, and then 
moved there. (See 196). 



26, 1696, 




1723, 




25, 1724, d. April 


13, 1S09. 


7, 1726, d. Sep. 


22, 1803. 


14, 172S, d. May 


5, 1776. 


II) 1730. 




2, 1732, 




6, 1734, 





No. 202. 
















Isaiah Breed 201, 


b. Oct 


25, 


1724, 


d. 


April 


13. 


1S09. 


Married 
















Hannah 


b. 














Desire 


b. Feb. 


16, 


1748, 










Loi.s 


b. Julv 


10, 


1750, 










Hannah 


b. Jan. 


24, 


1752, 


d. 


Jan. 


14, 


JS35. 


Eunice 


b. Nov. 


14, 


1753, 










Jabez 203, 


b. Jan. 


24, 


1755, 


d. 


July 


2, 


1780. 


Marv 


b. July 


1 8, 


1757. 










Moses 


b. Nov. 


23, 


175S, 


d. 


Nov. 


13, 


1769. 


Ebenezer 


D. May 


12, 


1763, 


d. 


Sep. 


13. 


1763. 


Ebenezer 


b. 




1765, 


d. 


Dec. 


23, 


1839- 



The History of Lynn, Mass., by Lewis & Newhall, gives 
the following account of Ebenezer 2d ; 

" Mr. Breed closed his strangeh' eventful life, in Lynn 
Almshouse, on the 23d of December, 1S39, at the age of seventy- 
four years. He had been a pauper there for many years, and 
his life, which opened with utuisual promise, closed in misery 
and degredation. L}"nn is greath' indebted to liiiu as one of 
the most efficient laboiers in the establishment of that bu 



ei>o 



which has so enriched her, and on which her prosperit\- contin- 
ues to re>t. He was a native of tlie town, but while quite a 
young man removed to Philadelphia, where, in a very short 
period, by l;is talents, diligence and correct deportment, he 
won the favoralde notice of some of the most eminent business 
men. One or two natives of Lynn were then in Philadclpliia 
largely engaged in business, and occupying high social posi- 
tions. Among them was Stephen Collins, a Quaker, who read- 
ily extended a helping liand to .Mr. Breed, who v/as also a 
Quaker. And Philadelphia was at that time, as is well known, 
a sort of Quaker Paradise. Kvery thing seemed to operate 
favorably, and in a short time he found himself in a position 
prosperous and influential. 

In 1792, he vi-ited Kuiope, for business purpo.-es and while 
there did not fail to attempt something for the benefit of his 
native country, which, having just achieved her political inde- 
pendence, was struggling to place herself in a position to sup- 
ply her own needs in tho^e departments of tlie great economy 
of life, necessary for an independent nation. Among other 
things he set about introducing the morocco manufacture into 
America. And, for his success, the National Committee of 
Commerce and Manufactures, after his return, awarded him a 
vote of thanks. He appointed an agent at Lynn to sell to the 
shoe manufacturers the fashionable cloth stuffs, such as were 
used in the best manufacturer of France and England. Amos 
Rhodes, who built the house on tlie east side of Federal street 
next south of the mill brook, was his agent, and is said to have 
become rich on the commissiuns. He also sent over some ac- 
complished workmen to instruct the operatives here in the ele- 
gancies of the art. His first object seemed to be to determine 
that as elegant and substantial shoes could be made here as iu 
Europe ; after which another step was to be taken. 

Soon after the Revolution, shoes imported from France and 
EngLand were sold at such a cheap rate that there was but poor 
encouragement for the maiuifacturer at home. The trade at 
Lynn was languishing, and the most energetic were disheart- 
ened. At this juncture, Mr. Collins, Mr. Breed and a few 
others, joined forces in the endeavor to induce Congress to im- 
pose such a duty on imported shoes as would protect the home 
mauufacturers. Congress was at that lime holding its sessions 



ill Pliiladelpliia, and a good opporliinity was afforded for " log- 
rolliiiL; "--to use an expressive modern term wliich even Qua- 
kers may uot always disdain. Among the means resorted to 
for the furtherance of th.eir end was a dinner party, for they 
were slirewd enough to know that an appeal to the stomach is 
often effectual when one to the he:id is powerless. The party 
was held at the house of friend Collins. Sundry members of 
Congress were present and sundry fascinating ladies ; for female 
charms are another thing that even Quakers do not despise, par- 
ticularly iu a case like that before us, where a valuable end is 
to be answered. The celebrated Dolly Payne, who afterward 
became the wife of Madisou, was of the party, as well as Madi- 
son himself, who was at tb.at time an influential member of 
Congress. SufUce it to say. a very satisfactory tariff act was 
passed, and Lynn inuuediately commenced her upward career, 
much to the gratification of Mr. Breed and her dutiful sons 
abroad. 

In various other ways did Mr. Breed, while in prosperity, 
exert himself for the benefit of his native place. The post- 
ofTice was established here, in 1793, through his exertions : and 
being on a social footing v/ith many prominent individuals in 
various parts of the country, he was able, in a quiet way. to do 
many things to proniote her interests, of which few were ever 
directly informed, for he does not appear to have been one of 
tho^e gi\-en to boasting of his meritorious acts. 

But the sn:iles of fortune were withdrawn, while he was 
yet in the vigor of manhood. There is some doubt as to the 
precise cause of his downward course. In his reduced condition 
he was often in a muod to converse with those in whom he con- 
fided, on the occasion of his calamities and sorrows. And with 
tear.-^ in his e\-es he has reiterated to me that a severe dis- 
appointment in a fondly expected matrimonial connection, in- 
duced him to resort to the wine cup for relief — that he became 
wedded to the destroyer instead of the fair object of his nobler 
and purer affections, and was thus ruined. But some of his 
friends had another version, which was, that while in luirope 
he was brouglit into association with the fashionable and gay ; 
a class, at that period, almost universally derelict in morals and 
proud of lavisli expe:i(!iturc ; and that in th.eir society he con- 
tracted such h.abits as unfitted him for the rectified society of 

(19) 



bis native laud. In short it was asserted that he returned an 
intemperate, iui moral man ; and tliat the refined and wtalthy 
lady to whom he was affianced, in sorrr)W rejected him, and 
afterward accepted the hand of one more worthy her conhdence 
and affection. In his utter degredation he clung 1o the fond 
belief that he still remained fresh in her memory. I remember 
with what anjused sensibilities he one day, a short time before 
his death, informed me that as she passed through T.ynn, 
during the preceding suunner, she made inquiries respecting 
him, and being informed of his forlorn condition sent a kind 
raesr,agc and comforting donation to him, at the almshouse. 

In prosperity he became ac(piainted witli many leading 
men of the nation, and received letters which he treasured up 
with miserl}- care. And with some asperity he charged tlie 
over.'^eers of the poor with wantonly destroying them. It is not 
to be presutned that those dignitaries had any unworthy motive 
in view when they assembled around the work-house fire, 
examined the epistles, and dropped them one by one into the 
blaze ; yet, if re])resentations regarding them be true, some 
autographs were consumed that would at this tin.ie be estimated 
at a high pecuniary \-alue. They probably apprehended that 
the\- were removing tiic cause of the unhai)py hours, as they 
supposed them to be, that the poor old man experienced in 
poring over them — not realizing that he might be far I'rom un- 
happy at such hours, though tears would drop from his pur- 
blind e\es. And to tlie honor of the friends of his better days 
it should be .said that they did not all forget or r.eglect him in 
his bitter adversit}-. I had occasion to know that he received 
from them man}- kind remembrances and pecuniary gratuities. 

Mr. Breed is represented to ha\-e been in his early man- 
hood, more than ordinarily correct in his habits, especially as 
regarded th.e use of intoxicating liquors. It is said that on his 
occasional visits here he was accustomed to labor hard for the 
reformation of a connection who had fallen into intemperate 
habits ; on one occasion proceeding as far as the demonstrative 
argument of kn(;cl<ing in the head of a cask containing the 
creature of offence. 

His education was quite as good as the common schools of 
his day afforded. I have in my possession a considerable num- 
ber of letters wdiich he Avrote iK-tween 17S9 and 1810, and th.ey 



would compare favorably with the letters of almost any business 
man now among us. His expressions are clear and direct, and 
his penmanship unusually fair. And three or four of these 
letters I propose to introduce, believin-- that they will add to 
the interest of this sketch. 

All that will be given, with the exception of the last, were 
addressed to Amo^ Rhodes, the gentlemen before named as his 
agent at Lynn. 

Lc)Ni:»ox, 7 mo., 17, 1792. 

My Dear Friend : — I intended writing thee immediately on 
my arrival, but nothing in particular (jccurring to communicate, 
have delayed till now. We had a prosperous voyage of twenty- 
eight days. Since my arrival I have been into the Xorth of 
England, to Leeds, Manchester, Birmingham, vSheffleld, Liver- 
pool, &c. I find I shall be able to establish a good connection 
in business, and though I may not get the goods to answer to 
my particular plan, yet, I am sensible I shall reap advantages 
by coming here. I find some goods had been shipped out to 
me in the .spring, and by letters from Philadelphia learn they 
arrived safe and were forvrarded to tliee. Thou wilt do the best 
with them, and when the sak-s are nuide we will di\-ide the 
profits. I had goods to some amount shipped for the fall, from 
Leeds, previous to my reaching that place, so that I don't know 
what they are. Geo. Pennock is to receive them, and I expect 
to be in Philadelphia in the 9th or first of loth mo., in time to 
be in Lynn before tlie winter. I have ordered a considerable 
quantity of bindings ; was at the factory and saw them making 
them. I shall not brin.g out many other goods than shoe stuffs 
at present. I have met a o^rdial reception from tlKjse to whom 
I was recommended and have met with as much hospitality 
from others as ever I experienced — have been introduced to 
many ver>^ respectable merchants and others. . . 

I am, with nuich love and esteem, thy affectionate and 
sincere friend, 

PvBENEZER Breed. 

Mr. Breed remained in Pmgland but a few weeks after the 
date of the above. He then went over to PVance, to perfect 
some business arrangements there. And his flattering buccess 
is indicated in the fullowiu'^ letter ; 



Dunkirk (■France), 8 mo., 12, 1792. 
My Dear P'rieucl : — I have jii.st heard of a vessel bound to 
Newburyport, and have only time to inform tliee of my inten- 
tion to leave this place, this day, for London, from whence I 
shall shortly depart for America. I received thy acceptable 
favor, and am pleased to hear that we will be able to vend so 
man}- goods. I wrote thee last by the ship William Penn, and 
if nothing happens to prevent, shall embark liefore I write thee 
again. I have been making an excursion to Paris and through 
some parts of France. Please give my love to my parents and 
inform them I am well. I have sent out some stuffs, but have 
not many articles — thought best not to till I returned ; but I 
can have any quantity of goods from the people to whom I was 
recommended. I can not enlarge nov>-, and not knov.ing 
whether this will reach thee bef'Te I do, shall conclude with 
best respects to thy Elizabeth, and am, dear friend, 
Thine sincerely, 

Eben'r Breed. 

F"or several years Ebenezer Breed was an opium eater ; 
and his cravings for the pernicious drug were pitiable in the 
extreme. He used, occasionally, in good weather, to gain 
leave of absence from his pauper home, for a day or tv.'O at a 
time, and would then sometimes travel as far as Xaliant. though 
his blindness and other infirmities, during his latter years, com- 
pelled him to move very slowly. And on these occasions, if he 
could procure the means, he was pretty sure to become in- 
toxicated. His person was gross and uncleanly ; and those 
who met hira on these excursions were compelled to pronounce 
him as miserable and forlorn a looking object as could well be 
presented to the eye of pity. When in the street he was in con- 
stant fear of passing carriages, which in consequence of his 
blindness, he could not see, and as before said, his gait was 
extremely slow. I think he told me, as I met him in Federal 
street one summer evening, 1S37, on his w-ay home to the alms- 
house, that he had been the whole day in walking thus far frora 
Nahant. 

While on these excursions he would usually take the op- 
portunity to call at the office of Mr. Lumnuis, tlie printer, a 
biographical sketch of whom has already been given ; and from 



tliat balling" place he v/as never spurned, as lie was from other 
places where he desired to rest. He was generally so hungry 
by the time he arrived as to beg for something to eat. " Well, 
Uncle Fdx-n.," replied Mr. Lur.imus, on one occasion, " I can't 
take you to my boardingdiouse table, you are so dirty ; but Til 
get you something." Presently the old man was provided 
with a liberal ration, done up in a piece of newspaper, and the 
colloquy resumed something after this sort; "There, Uncle 
Kben., see how a little nice cold turkey will Mjt on yoiu' stom- 
ach" " Why, Charles, 1 thank thee kindly. It 

is a long time since I have tasted so dainty a thing as turkey. 

But " (after munching a little wdiile) — '' this don't taste exactly 

as turkey used to ; and the bones don't feel like turkey bones. 

. . P)Ut my e\-es are so dim that I can't tell what it looks 

like" "Well, Uncle l-^ben., if you haven't 

sight you must eat by f lith ; and mutton bones are just as good 
as turkey, if you have faith to believe they are. So eat away, 
and be thankful." 

But with all his faults, Mr. Breed retained many fine qual- 
ities and rays of smothered nobleness and rectitude would not 
unfrequently gleam forth. And it is painful that one whom 
nature see:ns to have dc-igned for some high duty should have so 
fallen— tliat one who really did so much for his native town, for 
his country, indeed .should at last have gone dov.m to a pauper's 
grave. 

From a histor\- like his, eminentl}- useful lessons may be 
drawn. Our sympathies are naturall\- touched while contem- 
plating the condition of one in degredation and di.^tress, who 
has seen better da\s, who has stood in a position to conunand 
our respect. But to render such les.-^ons most useful it is well 
to consider whether the degredation and distress were produced 
by causes over which the sufferer had no control or are to be 
attributed to his own perverse inclination. While, however, 
the lesson is being deduced, it should never be forgotten that it is 
an essential part of christian dut\- to endeavor to comfort and 
relieve the miserable, before we ask v, hat made them .so. I 
knew " Uncle I'd len." well, and had repeated conversations 
with him, though not before he had reached his low estate. 
Ilis sad memories and utter helplessness pressed with alnu-st 
insufferable weiglit, and conspired with his ph\-sical infirmities 



to render him a most forlorn and pitiable object. And I have 
heard his bitter complaints at the taunts of those in brief au- 
thority over him. They seemed to have no just conception of 
his still lingering virtues. By the just, even the offender 
against justice is sure to have his merits acknowledged. And 
into the most wretched soul a ray of sunshine darts when it feels 
that its little remnant of virtue is recognized and appreciated. 



No. 203. 












•~ 




Jabez Breed 202, 


b. Jan. 


24, 


1755, 


d. 


July 


2, 


17S.J. 


Married 
















Lydia 


b. 














xMoses 204, 


b. Oct. 


19, 


I77S, 


d. 


June 


30, 


iS55. 


Jabez 205, 


b. Aug. 


15, 


I7S0, 


d. 


Feb. 


2, 


1850. 


No. 204. 
















Moses Breed 203, 


b. 


19. 


I77S, 


d. 


June 


30, 


1855. 


Married 
















Patience Gove 


b. 














Judith 


b. Sep. 


22, 


1S05, 


d. 


April 


7, 


1SS3. 


Albert 


b. July 


12, 


tSo7, 










Maried 2d wife 
















Hannah Bassett 


b. 














Patience G. 


b. Aug. 


29, 


1S12, 


d. 


Oct. 


27. 


■873. 


Hannah B. 


b. June 


17, 


IS. 5, 


d. 


Dec. 


7^ 


iS39- 


Married 3d wife 
















Amey Bassett 


b. 














I.ydia Amey 


b. Feb. 


2-1, 


1^27, 











Judith Breed m. Silas Coolidge. Patience G. m. Green Paige. 
Hannah B. m. Franklin Dow. I^ydia x\mey m. Alvin Hoag. 



d. Feb. 2, 1850. 



STo. 205. 








Jabez Breed 203, 


b. Aug, 


15. 


1 7 So, 


Married 


Jan. 


I, 


1S07, 


Theodate Hood 


b. 






Ayoline A. 


b. Nov. 


22, 


1S07, 


Abigail 


b. Oct. 


6, 


1809, 


Lucinda B. 


b. Feb. 


26, 


1S15, 


Content 


b. Feb. 


8, 


1818, 


Cynthia P. 


b. Feb. 


26. 


1821, 


Sarah H. 


b. Jan. 


12, 


1824, 



d. June 3, 1879. 

Abigail Breed m. Hiram Clifford. Litcinda m. Nehemiah 
Hudson. Content m. Jonathan Haskell. C}'nthia in. Asa 
Warren. Sarah H. m. Elbridge G. Briggs. 



No. 206. 














Natliaii BrcLd 2ui, 


b. Oct. 


7, 


1726, 


d. Sep. 


22, 


.S03. 


Married 


Oct. 


3. 


1754, 








Keziaii nuxton 


b. 












James 


b. An-. 


^^, 


'755, 


d. 




175^5. 


Al.igail 


b. June 


10, 


1757, 


d. Man-li 


4. 


1 S3S. 


James 207, 


b. Feb. 


I, 


1759, 


d. Sep. 


f^, 


1.S4S. 


Keziah 


b. Aug. 


10, 


1761, 








Buxton 


b. May 


7, 


' 763, 


d. Feb. 


2S, 


1770. 


Nathan 


b. 




1757. 


d. Jan. 


21, 


■794. 


Elizabeth 


b. May 


s, 


1770, 








Married 2d wife 














Sarah Alley 


b. 












Keziah Breed in. 


Dec. 2 


6, I 


7S7. 


Riiftis >; 


'e\v 


hall. 


had one ch.. John New 


-hall 2 1 2 


. El 


izabe 


til m. Nehemiah ? 


No. 207. 














James Breed 206, 


b. Feb. 


I. 


1759- 


d. Sept. 


iS. 


1S4S. 


Married 


Sept. 


• 22, 


i7<'^4, 








Hannah Alley 


b. 












Sarah 


b. July 


6, 


17S5. 


d. May 


29. 


1S70. 


Isaiah 210, 


b. Oct. 


21, 


17S6, 


d. May 


24, 


1859- 


Keziah 


b. April 


2[, 


17SS, 


d. May 


12, 


1S56. 


Lydia 


b. May 


19. 


17S9, 


d. N^n•. 


25. 


1S46. 


Content 


b. Feb. 


13. 


1792. 


d. F.b; 


5, 


iS^r. 


Nathan 20S, 


b. Ian. 


2S, 


'79-1. 


d. July 


15. 


1S72. 


Hannah 


b. Nov. 


s, 


1795- 


d. June 


6, 


1796. 


Hannah 


b. April 


u. 


1797. 


d. March 


17 


iSSo. 


lames 209, 


b. May 


!?> 


1799. 


d. Sept. 


S, 


1S25. 


M..ry 


b. Dec. 


18, 


i.Soo, 


d. Sept. 


10, 


tSji. 


Huldah 


b. Dec. 


iS, 


iSoo, 


d. Sept. 


7, 


iSoi. 


Married 2d wife 


Dec. 


iS, 


1S22, 








Sarah Swett 


b. 












James Breed. Sr. , 


was b. 


iiiL 


villi. 


Pie \va: 


^ a 


man ( 



good 

abilities and was very conscientious. He was a soap and candle 
maker. One day his hired man said he had made a grand good 
trade by buying some soap barrels for fifty cents that were worth 
seventy-five cents. His reply was "John, I don't want thee to 
make any such bargains for me. If thee don't pay tlie man 
what the barrels are worth, thee sha'n't bring them home." 
He had often expressed a wish that he might see all his de- 
scendents together, and on his eightieth birth-da}-, his wish was 
gratified by seeing over ninety on that afternoon, a few more 
being out of town, wcrc unable tu attend. This parly was 
given at the house of his son, Nathan, and it was said that 



there was not an inleiiiperatc one anionc; thcni. He used to 
say thai he could .send {"or anyof hi.-, lainily in ten niiiuites, and 
this sayiu'j;; was verified in arranging; (oy the above part.\-, as all 
was done on that da\-.. 

One day he wanted to buy something of a peddler who came 
along, l)ut declined b) bu>- when the peddler told him his price, 
at tlie same time ^a>•ing he might ha\-e it for less, when Mr. 
Breed said, " What do thee have two prices for? Why don't 
thee ask what it's worth and sell for that ^ and not have two 
prices 1 No ! I sha'n't trade with thee. His eyes were so good 
that he never used glasses either reading or working. His w. 
was a dau. of John and Sarah Alley. John Alley belonged to 
one of the prominent families of the time, and was the grand- 
father of Hon. John Kas>ett Allev, M. C. 

Sarah Breed was b. in I.ynn ; m. John Mewer, who d. at 
Lyun. Their son.s became prominent l»u.--ines.-. men. and their 
dau. were spoken of in the highest terms. Ke/.iah was b. in 
Lynn; m. Jan. 5, iS.;)6, Daniel Carter. vShe d. in T.ytni. Lydia 
m. Dec. iS, iSii, I3aniel Smith. Hannah was b. in L}'nn ; m. 
May 15, 1S16, Jonath.an Buffum. 



No. 20S. 
















Natl^an Ereed 20; 


■ h. 


Jan. 


oc; 


!:94. 


d. 


• Ju'y 


15, 1S72. 


Married 




(Jet. 


-7, 


I Si 9, 








Mary E. Swelt 


b. 














Mose.s Suett 


b. 


Oct. 


21, 


1S20, 


d. 


Eeb. 


I, 1S62. 


Sarah Swell 


h. 


Dec. 


20, 


1S21, 








Lucy Jones 


h. 


.March 


10, 


1S24, 


d. 


Jan. 


I, 1S46. 


.Mary Suttt 


h. 


.April 


12, 


1S26, 








James Edward 


h. 


Sep. 


14. 


1S27. 


d. 


May 


7, 1S2S. 


Hannah Emily 


h. 


Sep. 


14, 


1S27, 


d. 


Nov. 


10, 1S33. 


Catherine Johns 


on b. 


Nov. 


7, 


KS30, 









Moses Swett Breed m. Dec. 7, 1S41, Deborah Phillips. 
Sarah Swett Ih-eed m. Nov. 15, 1S43, Alfred Macker. Lucy 
Jones Breed m. Xov. 15, 1S43, Henry M. Hacker. Mary Swett 
Breed, m., Dec. 15, 1S47, W'illiant Pjradford, Catherine J., m. 
Nov. 17, 1S47, Henry ]\L Hacker. 

No. 209. 



James Breed 207, 


b. May 


17. 


1799, d. Sep. 


iS, 1S25, 


Married 


April 


22, 


1S22, 




Nancy P.enrct 


b. 








Geort^e 


b. 




d. Eeb. 


3, 1S23. 


James .M. 


b. Sep. 


20, 


iS?4, ('. Jiibv 


3', I -^3 2- 



No. 2IO. 
















Is.iiah 15reed ^07, 


b. Oct. 


21, 


17S6, 


d. 


May 


24, 


i«59. 


Married 


Nov. 


22, 


1S09, 










Mary Blake 


b. 














BarllcU Blake 2! I, 


b. Jan. 


17. 


iSir, 


d. 


Sep. 


10, 


1883. 


Abbie Maria 


b. Feb. 


6, 


1S13, 










Mary Ann 263, 


b. Oct. 


20, 


1S16, 


d. 


Marc 


h 28, 


1SS9. 


Isaiah Clarkson ?\ 2, 


, b. Nov. 


26, 


1S19, 










George Rodman 21 


[^„ b. julv 


^4, 


1S25, 


d. 


Oct. 


4. 


1S56. 


Married 2d wife 


May 


iS, 


1S2S, 










Sally Preston Moore 


b. 














Lncilla Preston 


b. March 


10, 


1829. 










Tlervey Chai)liu 


b. Sep. 


7. 


1S30, 


d. 


Dec. 


25. 


1S32. 


Bowman Bii::elow 2 


r4, b. Feb. 


28, 


1S32, 










Francis Chaplin 


b. Dec. 


14, 


1S34, 










James llervey 


b. April 


3'J, 


iS3^^ 


d. 


April 


28, 


1 838. 


Hon. Isaii'li r>i 


\cd began 


[ hi 


!s laboi 


■ on ■ 


the ; 


shoei 



bench. He became a wealthy shoe niantifaclurer and was in 
active bnsiness for 50 years. He was a bank president for .^o 
years. He made liberal use of his means in [)ublic and private. 
He was a Christian of Calvanistic faitli, and was efficient in es- 
tablishing the Central Cong. Society of Lynn. He was elected 
senator in 1S39. 

Abbie Maria Breed, m. Oct. 9, 1S31, Charles }]. Clongh. 
Mary Ann lireed, m. Dec. S, 1S33, George \V. Keene, b. Feb. 
II, 1S15, d. Jan. 26. 1S74. 



No. 211. 
















Barllett Blake Breed 210, 


b. Jan. 


17, 


iSii, 


d. Sep. 




10, 


1S83. 


Married 


Sept. 


if>, 


nS32, 










Martha B. Bancroft 


b. 














Martha Maria 


b. Nov. 


2, 


1S33, 


d. Oct. 




27, 


1834. 


James Bartlett 


b. June 


[4.- 


183^, 


d. June 




II, 


1838. 


Frances M.iria 


b. June 


14, 


■S37, 










Married 


Oct. 




1S40, 










Susan T. Bancroft 


b. 














Martha Elkn 


b. Dec. 


28, 


1841, 


d. Feb. 




1 1, 


1852. 


Charles Barker 


b. fan. 


24. 


1844, 


d. Oct. 






iS45- 


Charles .Au-u.-^tus b. Nov. 


18, 


1846, 


d. Feb. 




10, 


iS52. 


Mary Blake 


h. Au-. 


12, 


1849, 










Susan Fthline 


b. Marcl 


li 8, 


1S51, 










Harriet Amelia 


b. Ian. 


31, 


i^S53, 


d. Marc 


■h 


18, 


1S55. 


Annie r.an':roft 


1). Nov. 


19. 


1S57, 










Lucy Bartlett 


b. Sep. 


2, 


1^59. 










Frances Maria Breed, m. 


Sep, 


• -2, 


i^57. 


Klias 


C. ( 



(20) 



No. 212. 








Isaiah Clarksun [jretd 2ti_ 


), b. Nov. 


26, 


1S19, 


Married 


Dec. 


6, 


1842, 


Josaphine I'arkcr 


b. 






James E. F. 


b. Oct. 


3, 


.843. 


Wilfred 


b. Jan. 


13. 


1S45, 


Walter M. 


b. Marcl 


1 3r, 


1S50, 


No. 213. 








George Rodman B: eed 2 ; 


o,b. July 


14, 


1S25, 


Married 


Jan. 


24, 


i''>56, 


Sarali Ba.ncruft 


b. 






George F. 


b July 


3'. 


1S56. 


Lizzie M. 


b. Nov. 


15. 


i«59. 


Sarah B. 


b. June 


I, 


1862. 



d. Oct. 



George F. lieeed, in. June 19, 1884, Ida Phillirick. Lizzie 
M., 111. July 31, 1883, Williaiu J. Pliilbrick. Sarah B., ni. June 
29, 18S2, Fred. I,aw. 



No. 214. 
















Bowman Bigclmv Breed 21c 


. b. 


Feb. 


-■9, 


I S3 2, 


d. 


Dec 


16, 1S73. 


Ma.ricd 




Oct. 


20, 


KS59. 








Hannah Putnam I'oi-ie 


b. 


June 


2, 


1S2S, 








Is a, ah 


b. 


nee. 


'5,' 


1S60, 


d 


Oct. 


10. 1S63. 


Bowman Sinclair 


b. 


lUIl:.' 


14. 


1S62, 


d. 


May 


7, 1S63. 


Alice Po[)e 


b. 


Feb. 


3. 


1 864, 


d. 


Oct. 


I, lSr4. 


Marian Keene 


b. 


Dec. 


2(1, 


1 866, 








Preston Hamilton 


b. 


June 


lb. 


1871, 








Nathaniel Po|)e 


b. 


P"eb. 


iS, 


1S74, 









On I'Viday, April 12, 1861, the South Carolina .soldiers fired 
on Fort Sunij>ter. 

President Lincoln at cnce called for troops from the several 
States. In five hours after the requisition arrived at Lynn, two 
full companies were armed and read>- for duty, and thev de- 
parted for the South on the 1 1 a. m. train the next day. 

These two companies— the Lynn Light Infantr>-, and the 
Lynn City Guards— formed a part of the Kighth Massachusetts 
Regiment, and 15owinan IL lireed was the Surgeon of the Reg- 
iment. 

The Lynn " Reporter," ui' Saturday, Iieceml^er 10, 1S73, 
thus speaks of the death of Dr. Breed : — 

"The funeral ser\icesover the remains of our lamented asso- 
ciate and friend, Dr. Bowman B. Breed, took pLace on Thursday 



afternoon. Previous to the removal of the corpse to the Central 
Chureb, where the public ol)Sfc[uics took place, hrief services were 
held at the late re.->iUeuce of the deceased, on High street, consist- 
ing of remarks !)>- Rev. J. W. Hamiltnn. of Xorwalk, Conn., 
the intimate friend and class-mate oi Dr. lireed at college, and 
prayer by Rev. A. 11. Currier, pastor of the Central Church. 
The scene at the church was one that will long be remem- 
bered by those who witnessed it. The large hou.>e was filled to its 
utmost capacity with .sorrowing relative.-^ aiul friends, including 
members of the cit\- government and various local associations 
to wdnch Dr. Breed belonged, while a large concourse of citi- 
zens, unable to gain admittance, gathered about the entrances, 
testifying bv their sad countenances to the love and esteem 
which they felt for <«ne whom they slujuld no more meet in the 
busy walks of life. Among the members of the State govern- 
ment and ocher officials wlio were ])re.-ent on the sad occasion, 
were : Hon. Oliver Warner, Secretary of the Commonwealth ; 
State Treasurer Adams, State Auditor Kndicott, Surgeon-(ien- 
eral Dale, Col. R. G. Usher, United States Marshal ; Col. Shep- 
herd, of the State Reform School at Westboro ; Prof. Crowell, 
of Amherst College; Willard P. Phillips, Ksq., of Salem; 
Hon. J. X. Marshall, of Lowell, and many other personal and 
political friends from distant places. The mendjers of the Ma- 
sonic and medical societies with which the deceased was con- 
nected occupied pronnnent places in the bod_\ of the house, 
those of Gen. Lander Post, G. A. R., who were present in 
large nundjers, alone wearing the full uniform of that order. 

The hearts of all present were heavy with grief as the re- 
mains of our beloved friend and lellow citizen were borne slowdy 
up the central aisle and placed in front of the de.sk, the follow- 
ing named gentlemen acting as pall-bearers :- -Kben Beckford 
nnd Nathan B. idetcher, of Olivet Commandery, Knights 
Templar, (in regalia) ; Dr. J. O. Webster and George T. Clark, 
from the Central Church and Society ; Drs. Dainel Perley and 
J. G. Pinkham, from the Lynn Medical Society ; Alderman 
Daniel A. Caldwell and Councilman Penjamin Scribner, Jr., 
from the city government ; Comrades Arthur PL Fuller and 
Luther Brown, from Gen. Lander Po^t. The casket contain- 
ing the remains was covered with beautiful wreaths of roses in- 
termixed with evergreen, and an elegant crown of fiowcr> which 



was the last love offering- of the members of Dr. lirced's Sab 
])ath School cla^s. to whom he was emleared by all those char- 
acteristics which bound him so closelv to ever\- one wh'i knew 
him. In this connection it is proper to remark that his liveliest 
interests were with the Sabl)ath School, and e\-en when feeling 
unable to attend the usual services on the Sabbath, he still 
made it a point to be with his cla.ss. Upjn the front of the 
pulpit was placed a cross composed of white flowers and ever- 
green, from ^vhich de[)ended festoons of smilax, reachin.g to 
vases of l)eautiful flowers placed upon the platf(jrrn on either 
side. The beautiful silk flag of Gen. Lander Post was also 
draped about the casket. I{very possible arrangement for the 
convenience of the large audience was made by the gentlemen 
who had the matter in charge — Messrs. Amris F. Pireed, }uiwin 
Patch and \Vm. Porter — but it was found impo.-;sible to seat all 
wlio desired ad;nittance. 

The impressive exercises were commenced by Rew J. W. 
Hamilton, who read appropriate selections of Scripture ; after 
which the choir connected with the Society — Miss Seville 
Davie, Miss Nellie Sargent, and Messrs. P'dward Butler and 
Charles Ji. Fairbanks, rendered that beautiful chant, " The 
Lord is my Shepherd," in an exquisite manner, K. K. Weston 
presiding at the organ. Rev. A. H. Currier f(dlowed in some 
feeling remarks, which were listened to with breathless interest, 
and which were as follows : 

"Our deceased friend passed awa}- from earth as the light 
of morning began to flush the east and the day to break like a 
lilly from the envelope of night. It was, I believe, a true 
emblem of the change which then occurred in his state. It 
was also something he had longed for as the\- that watch 
for the morning. He had no fears concerning it, but a 
Christian confidence. In the multitude of the troublous 
thoughts within him. the divine comforts sustained his soul. 
' The Lord is my Shepherd,' he said, ' I shall not want,' ' He 
leadeth me,' ' He restoreth my soul,' 'His rod and his staff, 
they comfort me.' Thus almost his last words uttered with 
failing difllcult breath, were given to the recitation of the 
twenty-third P.salm. With this and other like testimonies he 
assured his friends who stood about his hiedside, that it was all 
well with him. In addition to these dving words, we have, in 



jToof of it, wlint i< better than dying testimony — the assurance 
of his noble, eK^ninlar}- life. It was a lite wliich appears nn- 
spotte'l by a single dark stain. I do not believe that any man 
is able to trul\- allege against him one solitary act ui;\vnrih\- of 
a Christian man and an honorable gentleman. Wliat >L-rvices to 
his countr\-, state and cit\ , and to his fellow-men at large, tcj 
the poor, the bereaved and the orphaned, are revealed by the 
survey of his life. His memory is fragrant with good deeds. 
In tile light of his example, now that he is dead, we obtain a 
brtter realiziti'V.i of an. old poet's words—" that the actions of 
the iust smell sweet, and blossom in the dust.' It would be 
hard to find a life so short as his, more full of usefulness or 
more constantly devoted to the unselfish service of men. The 
value of his service to the country during the late war and just 
after it, in the organization and superintendence Ol hospitals 
cannot l^e too highly rated. I doubt if they have ever yet 
been recognized as they deserved. So of his work in the Legis- 
lature of the State, and in the public affairs of the city. He 
has lent a diligent and most efhcient hand in all public matters 
that have come up among us during the last few years. In the 
council chaml'er-. in the scln^ol boarrl, as a public servant, as a 
private citizen. a> a friend of the poor, as a comrade to his 
fellow-soldiers of tlie G. A. R.. as a member of the church, in 
every place h.e displayed a shining merit. He took an in- 
telligent and lieartv interest, also, in all questions of reform. 
His mind was hospitable to new ideas and fresh truths. 

A friend and associate in the ministry in this city, in a note 
of the kindest sympathy which I have received from him since 
the death of Dr. Breed, renders the following just tribute to his 
character : " I have, from the first, been impressed by his noble 
qualities, his large humanity, that included everything good, 
his dignity and manliness, and a lofty indignation at anything 
mean and selfish, his kindly and tolerant spirit — so many 
worthy traits indeed I Certainly, we have a dearth of men so 
spontaneously active, so heartily co-operative and so quick to 
give themselves to the service of what at once seems right and 
good to be done, as was he. ' Life is earnest,' if ever, as such 
men live it." I venture to assert that this warm and appre- 
ciative eulogi<ni of my i^iend will receive a hearty as>ent from 
all minds and classes. 



Anollier has wrillen to me of the efforts made b}- the de- 
ceased in favor of a.duiittiiig woman to a phice in the direetion 
of the public schools, such as she is entitled to receive as the 
natural educator of the young-, also to the advocacy he gave to 
her enjoyment of those civil rights of suffrage and equality 
which many of the best thinkers of the world believe she ought 
to possess. Thus from every side, by voice and written word, 
testimonies have come to me of his large-hearted goodness and 
magnanimity of mind. That which the Christian apostle sets 
before us, as a high and worthy aim, seems to have been 
turned into a beautiful inspiring fact by the deceased. 
"Whatsoever things are true, whatsoever things are seemly, 
whatsoever things are just, whatsoever things are pure, 
whatsoever things are lovely, whatsoever things are of 
good report "-- if there be an>- virtue an.d if there be any praise, 
he thought upon them and achieved them, and, tlierefore, as I 
believe, the promised recompense is his— the God of peace shall 
be \\ith him. He was a true lover of men. In the zeal of his 
unselhsh service to others, he disregarded and forgot his own 
interests. To the manifest injury and loss of his own personal 
advantage, as his friends often thought, he gave himself to 
public and benevolent ^vorks. But the generous impulses of 
his heart were not to be restrained b_\- considerations of self ad- 
vantage. With truer wisdom, no doubt, he listened to the 
appeal of public need, and refused t(j listen to the remonstrances 
of friends, urging him to confine his attention to the require- 
ments of private interest. He believed and acted upon that 
divine law annoimced by our Saviour that — Whosoever will 
save liis life, (in the sense of selfishly devoting it to personal 
advantage and enjoyment), shall lose it — but whosoever will 
lose it (in the sense of lavishing it upon others to the denial of 
self;, for Christ's sake and the Gospel, he shall find it. 

But it is not after all, in public or social life, that the best, 
most attractive side of a man's character is revealed. An em- 
inent person once being asked concerning another, " Is he a 
good man ? " replied that he "did not know," never having 
lived with him. This answer, intimating that the best and 
only reliable test of a man's character is to be found in the way 
he bears himself in the family circle and the ]irivacy of home 
life, had much of truth in it. But as regards our friend it is no 



doniaj.Mng- test. It may be said, indeed, that in no j^lace did he 
appear so well as in his own home and to th(jse who lived 
closest to him there. 

He was an affectionate father and devoted husband in the 
truest and most delightful sense. Hi- last conscious thoughts 
flowed out in love to those who were so dear, and with his fail- 
ing speech he murmured in their ears precious utterances of 
undying attachment. 1'hus, when life \vas fast ebbing away, 
he shov.-ed that there was no ebb in that tide of affection that 
flowed toward them. So to his mother and sisters and brethren 
his heart was a full fountain of love and courtesy. The mem- 
ory of his daily love and unaffected goodness can never grow 
dim. No feeble, flickering candle light was it, which in a 
short space diminislies to a point and then is lost sight of and 
forgotten, but, like a tlxed star, it will be visil:)le for the longest 
distance, and shine forever, a beacon to guide and a source of 
itifluence to bless. And now, friends, what shall we say and 
do in view of all this? Shall we give way to passionate, 
inconsolable com}jlaints and grief because so much worth and 
nobility of manhood are caught in death ? Or shall we not seek 
to be resigned to the Heavenly I'ather's will, who has called 
his faithful servant home? No doubt Christian faith and reason 
alike bid us meekly bow our heads in submission to Crod's will. 
Divine goodness, however dark and mysterious its appoint- 
ments, makes no mi^takes. 

' Tis well that the weary pilgrim should reach the heavenly 
home. The family circle is growing there, if diminislung here. 
With this new arrival there is joy on the other side, though our 
hearts are so heavy. Let us aim to ex^ercisc Christian patience 
in view of Christian hopes. Instead of dwelling on the sadness 
of our loss, let us own the happiness of his emancipation and 
think how he has at length obtained rest. His life was spent 
in sowing good. 1 think of him as like a husbandman who 
toils all day to plant his field, atid then at night lies down to 
sleep. Though the sleep has no earthly waking, the sei-d does 
not die. It springs up and comes to harvest, and those who 
survive rejoice in its bounteous blessings. The !)est memorial 
of the sleeper is !iot the seed that 'decayed nor the hours that he 
wrought in the field, however pleasant, but the harvest." 

Prof. J. B. Sevvall, of Bodoin College, formerly pastor of 



the Central Church, and an intimate friend of the deceased, 
paid the followiiiL;- merited tribute to liis memory : 

" I would gladhv- have l)een excused from taking part in these 
services, where my place is so truly that of a mourner, but it is 
ordered otherwise. 

My acquaintance witli Dr. Breed, which ripened each ^■ear 
into deeper esteem and friendship, dates back to the winter of 
1SG4-65. lie was then engaged in the studies of his medical 
course, though just at that time reco\-ering from a painful ill- 
ness, wdnch some of you will remember. His departure for 
Europe, where he contiiuied his studies for two years, occurred 
in 1857, returning only in time to greet, and then lay in the 
tomb, a noble father. It was easy to see that character and 
ability were ripening, and that his young shoulders were 
growing strong for the responsibilities which gathered and 
rested u])on them. His struggles as a young plivsician, his 
career in war, first as Surgeon of the Eighth Massachusetts 
Regiment and then as Medical Inspector and Surgeon in charge 
of Hospitals in different States, with the rank of Lieutenant- 
Colonel, his position in charge of the Militar\- Asylum in 
Maine — and finally his subserjuent life in this cit_\- as a 
physician, as ediior, and in different places of responsibility 
and trust, sustaining himself alwa\-s honorably, and deserving 
the confidence of all— need not be counted. Only let me call to 
mind how gratifying it wa> to .see him bearing himself with 
such manliness in the many and great difficulties which he had 
at times to encounter, and rising from them with undiminished 
courage and refined purpose and Christian feeling. 

If I may be allowed to trace the chief points of his mental 
and moral character, as seen from the stand-point of one who 
was indeed his pastor for rather more than half the period here 
spoken of, but more a personal friend but few years his seni(jr, 
I will mention, first, his religion. A person of \er\- ardent, 
impulsive and sanguine feelings was his contrast, and in the 
eyes of such a one sometimes, {)erhaps, his religiitu-; feelings 
might have seemed cold, sluggish and not profound, which was 
far from the truth. His religious convictioirs were earh' and 
strong, leading him to connect himself with the church during 
his college course. Hrs field of \-iew was com[)rehensi\'e. his 
understanding of truth clear, and while his ardor was not of a 



kind now to glow iutenscl\- and now to pale and grow cold, it 
was constant, strong and true, never allowing him to swer\-e 
from a course dictated by right principle and the truth, and 
holding him with, an increasing reverence and de\otion to all 
which sincere serAdce of God and his ffllr,w-man demands. No 
thoughtful mind probably ever passes through life without a 
period, perhaps, more than one, of severe religious questioning 
and happy is he who comxcs Safel\- over these stormy seas into 
a firm and serene faith. 

Not that all questions are settled, not that they are abso- 
lutely put to rest, but, so far as they are a really disturbing 
force, they are conquered by a growing knowledge and faith in 
in the character and Word of God. So was it, I think, with 
our friend. 

His mental qualities were characterized by strength and 
solidity, so that his views and opinions were clear and decided, 
and in matters of difference, most likely to be those to prevail, 
for their justice, rea>onableness and propriety,-. It was for this 

reason, coupled with an early for his well balanced 

character, he was so »oon called, as he was, to duties in connec- 
tion with the public schools of the cit}-, and labors as an officer 
of the city government, in the State LegL-^lature- His mind 
was clear in its discernments, ipiick to distinguish, and always 
guided by honest and unselfish purpose. I cannot, perhaps, 
speak of hir.i in the editorial cliair, where he was known by you 
all ; my impression, however, is that in occupying it he was in 
the right place, exerting a healthful and strong inlluence for 
and over this community, through his paper, r^fentally, and as 
filling posts of public influence, he wa.^ in a period of best prom- 
ise. His removal from us is the extinction of a life full of ca- 
pacity and hopefuUness for good for this city, for this good old 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts and perhaps a wider sphere. 

Of his social qualities, and of those qualities wdiich open a 
man increasingly to the wide circle without, of all classes, 
through sympathy, thoughtfulness and helpful, self-denying 
efforts, what shall 1 say ? It is no small praise to relate of him 
that an early manner, a little brusque and rough, through the 
vigor and strength of young manhood, gave place in time, and 
after a stern experience of those years of the war and a short 
subsequent period, to a tender refinement and delicacy of action, 

(21) 



so that in the converse of friends, as well as in professional ser- 
vice with the sick, there was a sympatlietic and winning gentle- 
ness. The great and good heart within did not fail to assert its 
supremacy without. I well remember, in the only case when 
the great sorrow entered the door of ui}- own dwelling, how 
strong and tender an arm has proved to lean upon — how satis- 
fying, though luiavailing, in s_\-nipathetic efforts were his visits 
to the sick-room — and after all was over, how thoughtful and 
self-sacrificing were the services rendered. To such disregard 
of self did he arrive, that I do not think the first thought of 
hesitation arose to prevent him from sallying forth, at any time 
of day or night, however inclement the wuather might l)e, when 
it was his to render the helping hand. His had the .^ound, 
strong heart, which nerved a ready hand— the manly soul which 
quickened tlie body not soon wearied in right d<;>iiig. Ib^w real 
and great will the void be made by his removal in the circle of 
the dearly beloved friends, in the mcmliership of this church 
and society, in the field of efiicient action, in this city, and com- 
munity at large; }0U will know friends, day ]_)y da_\-, as }-ou exper- 
ience it. Common-place thoughts sometimes acc|uire a startling 
freshness and force from occasion. We often say to ourselves, 
'■ How strange that Providence takes away one in the midst of 
usefulness, or from a post where just that life seemed a necessitv, 
while there are so many other lives miserable, without hope of 
good, aye, evil only and causing evil ^ '" Ihit we feel it when it 
comes to an actual case like this. \\'h\', my friends, this son taken 
from a mother, is such a stay in her declining years; this husband 
from this wife, in the midst of the way, the very pillar and foun- 
dation of the home of love ; this father from the>e little children 
in their tender years, the strength of the mother's hand hence- 
forth only to guide them, and a mother's without a father's love to 
cherish them ; this brother and a friend from so large and fondly 
attached circle ; this man and citizen from so useful and pn^mis- 
ing a career at very middife, when city and State are crying for 
able, honest, clear-sighted, right-hearted, unflinching men ? 

Why not instead a score of the evil and unworthy- ? It is, 
however, as idle and uiuvise to ask, as it woidd be wrong and 
disloyal to Hir.i who is ever and best of all to think that it is 
not right and well. 

A noble son has gone to a noble father. We pray the 



comfort wberewith Ciod comtbrtcth to be the widow's — the 
fatherlioodof God to be the fatherless cliikheirs — the strengtli of 
God to be the stay of that mother from whom such a stay is 
stricken — aiul the beiiechction of God rest upon the brothers 
and sisters and all the circle of the beloved friends, and that 
Commonwealth from which such an one is taken.'' 

He was liuricd in Pine Grove Cemetery. 

Resolutions of respect to the memory of Dr. Breed were 
adopted by the I'^ditors and Printers Association, the Ivynn 
Medical Society and by the Common Council of which he was 
President. 



No. 215. 
















Arjios Breed 201, 


b. An-. 


14, 


172S, 


d. 


May 


5, 


1776. 


Married 


Oct. 


I, 


1754, 










Ruth Newhall 


b. 














Amos 


b. An-. 


3b 


1755, 


d. 






1775- 


Elizabeth 


b. June 


7. 


175S, 


d. 


July 


I, 


1827. 


Aaron 216, 


b. March 


7. 


1761, 


d. 


Dec. 


24, 


1S17, 


Benjamin 22S, 


b. Aug. 


II, 


1763, 


d. 


Feb. 


16, 


1847. 


Theophihis 230, 


b. Aug:. 


11, 


1765, 


d. 


March 


21, 


1854. 


James 231, 


b. July 


15, 


176S, 


d. 


June 


■9, 


1S53 


Mary 


b. Jan. 


16, 


I77i> 


d. 


March 


22, 


1S04. 


No. 216. 
















Aaron P-rced 215, 


b. ^larcli 


7, 


1761, 


d. 


Dec. 


24, 


1817. 


Married 
















Sarah Atwell 


b. June 


24. 


1764, 


d. 


Dec. 


26, 


1S04. 


Anna 


b. July 


^S, 


17S4, 










Ruth 


b. Aug. 


10, 


17S6, 










Sarah 


b. Oct. 


18, 


17S8, 










Aaron 223, 


b. Jan. 


9> 


1791, 










Warner 


b. July 


27, 


1794, 










Nnbby Hurrile 


b. Eeb. 


28, 


T79S. 










P'ullerton 


b. Aug. 


16, 


1799. 










Isaac 


b. 














Harriet 


b. 














Lydia 


b. 














Annie 


b. 














Isaac 


b. 














Married 2d \v. 
















Mary Kemp 


b. .March 


' 17, 


1776, 


d. 


. May 




1S41. 


Horace Anson 21 


7 b. Nuv. 


10, 


i,So6, 


d. 


Oct. 


28. 


1S78. 


James Edwin 219 


, b. Oct. 


16, 


1 808, 


d, 


, Feb. 


2, 


iS57- 


Harriet Almira 


b. Scf). 


22, 


1 8 10, 


d. 


, Aug. 


26, 


1S34. 


Heimione 


b. March 18, 


i8r2. 










Lydia Maria 


b. Etb. 


22, 


i8i6, 











Aaron llrcfd d. on T,_\nn Common, of ajioplcxw I lis 2nd 
\v. wah b. in \'ermon1.. 

Anna m. Aug. 24, 1S03, Capt. Samuel Mudge, b. in Lynn, 
Feb. 24. 17S2, and d. vSl4). 24, iSiy. Their son Alfred was Ij. in 
Portsmouth, X. H., April 25, iSog ; he m. Dec. 22, iS^r, Lucy 
Angelina Kinsman, who was b. in South Reriding, ^Lass., Sep. 8, 
181 1, and who was a dau. of Timoth_\- and Lucy Kinsman. 

Ruth m. Mr. Xewhall ; Sarah m. Mr. lllsley ; Nabby 
Rurrile ni. Mr. Melcher. 



Horace Anson Breed 216, 


b. Nov. 


19, 


1S06, 


d. Oct 


Married 










Sarah Loring 


b. 








Sarah 


b. 








Edwin Horace 


b. 








George Mortimer 


b. 








Married 2d wife 










Elizabeth Brown 


b. 








Married 3d wife 










Sarah Smith 


b. 








Harriet Ann 


b. 








Orianna Antoinette 


b. June 


25, 


1S45, 




Alice Hcrmione 


b. A bay 


12, 


1848, 




WilHam Henry 21S, 


b. ALay 


19. 


1S51, 





2S, 1S78. 



Horace A. Breed was b. in Lynn. His chn. were all b. in 
Boston, wdiere he had gone from Lytni in iSiS. His first w. 
was from Princeton. 



No. 21S. 

WilHam Henry Breed 217, b. May 19, 1851, 

>btrned Oct. 7, 1874, 

Marv Linzley Curtis b. Oct. 7, 1S51, d. Aug. 24, 1SS5. 

Florence Curtis b. May 3:, 1S77, 

Ethel Abbott b. Sept. 7, 1S79, 

Married 26 wife 

Lottie Boyce Ablchell b. Oct. 28, 1863, 



b. Oct. 


i'^, 


iSuS, 


d. Feb. 


All-. 


25, 


1841, 




b. 








I). July 


15, 


1^12, 


(1. Dec. 


b. Nov. 


26, 


1S44, 




b. April 


i5. 


1S47, 




b. Nuv. 


17, 


1S49. 


cL May 


b. June 


s, 


1S.53, 




b. Marcl 


1 S, 


IS55, 





No. 219. 
James Edwin Ilreed 216, b. Oct. 16, iSoS, d. Feb. 2, 1S57. 

Married 
Persis New hall 

Mary Kemp 220, h. July 15, 1^42, d. Dec. 2r, 1S76. 

George Ileyvvood 

James I^duin 222, 

Arthur Winthrop b. Nov. 17, 1S49, d. May 22, 1S52 

Laura Persis 

Josiah Parker Flint 

Jcunes Ivdwin I'reed, Sr., wash, in I.\-iiu and d. in Lunis- 
ville, Ky. All hi.- elm. and grand-chn. were b. in Lonisville, 
and all who arc now lix'ing reside there. lie was m. in Lyim, 
and went to Kentuck_\- in the fall of 1S3S. His w. \vas a dan. 
of Franeis S. and Lydia Xewhall. 

Josiah Barker hdint Breed m. November 12, iS^^, Grace 
Newhall. 

No. 220. 
Mary Kemp Breed 219. b. July 15, 1S42, d. Dec. 21, 1S76. 

Married 
Alexander Gait Booth 
Percy Newhall Booth 
Alexina Gait Booth b. d. Dec. 10, 1S76. 



No. 221. 

Geo. Heywood iJreed2i9, b. Nov. 26, 1844, 
Married July 9, 1S74, 

Eliza Thurston Johnscjn b. June 29, 1S55, d. June i, 1S.S5. 

Lilla Newhall b. April 24, 1S75, 

George Horace b. June 4,1876, 

Edwin Thurston b. Feb. 9, 18S0, 

The Johnson family li^-ed in Louisville, Ky. 



No. 222. 

James Edwin Breed 219, b. Apnl 15, 1S47, 

Married May 24, 1S70, 

Lizzie Walker b. 

Persis Mary b. >LT.rch 11, 1S75, 

William Heywood b. Sep. 15, 1S79, d. Jan. 22, 1SS2. 

Mary Kaye b. March 24, 1S83, 

The Walker famih- lived in Louisville, Kv. 



b. July 


15, 


1S42, d. Dec. 


21: 


April 


1 8, 


1 866, 




b. 








b. lulv 


16. 


1S74, 




b. 




d. Dec. 


10 



b. Jan. 


9, 


179^ 


d. 






b. Nov. 


7. 


179-', 


d. 






b.july 


14. 


I Si,?, 


d. 


luue 


29, 1.S.S3. 


b. Feb. 


28, 


1S15, 


d. 


Jau. 


15, 1SS7, 


b. Sep. 


«, 


iSiS, 








b. March 


14, 


'793. 


d. 






b. June 


6, 


1S24, 


d. 






b. July 


27. 


I '^25, 


d. 






b. April 


23, 


1S27, 








b. Sep. 


2, 


1S29, 


d. 






b, Dec. 


14. 


I ^30. 


d. 






b.july 


21, 


tf^32, 


d. 






b. Marcli 


1 14, 


■S34. 








b. May 


17, 


1S36, 








b. Nov. 


29. 


TS09, 


d. 






b. Sep. 


2^, 


1S3S, 


d. 


Au-. 


1SS7. 


b. March 


6, 


1 s ^o, 








b. Sep. 


I, 


1S43. 









No. 223. 
Aarou Hreed 216, 

Married 
Hermione Church W'tid 

\\'illi.ini Burrou-hs 224, 

Sarah Hermione 

Aaron Edward 
Married 2d wife 
Mrs. Sarah Ann \\^•att Weld 

Horace Franklin 

Mary Harriet 225, 

Helen Maria 

Frederick Otis 

Frances Abbey 

Hannali Elizabeth 226, 

Alniira Georgiana 227, 

Stanley ^[ansfleld 
Married t,^\ w\(>' 

Hannah Matilda Plunimer 

Hubbard W'inslow 

Albert Jeffreys 

Caroline Matilda 

Geor^^e Washington Bourne b. June 5, 1S52, 

Aaron Breed was b. in l.ynn, Mass. His clin. were b. in 
Boston, Mass. 

Sarah Hermione m. John Lewis. Aaron Juhvard, ni. IsUa 
Bird and had one ch. lUla. He m. 2d wife, Alaria Phiniiner, 
(a sister of his father's 3d wifej, and they had i ch.. Amy. 
Horace Franklin ni. Susan Marhjwe and the\- had 3 sons and 
2 dau. Helen Maria m. WilHani B. Callender and had 4 cliild- 
ren. Frances Abbey m. John Bird, and had i son. Hubbard 
Winslow m. Miss Bartlett, was drowned in the harbor of Port- 
land, Me. Alliert Jeffreys was twice m. Caroline Matikha m. 
Mr. Torrey and had 2 children, Fvel>n and WiHiain. 

No. 224. 
William Burroughs Breed 223, b. July 14 1S12, d. June 29, 1SS3. 

Married Nov. 19, 1S44, 

Hannah Jane Curtis b. Nov. iS, 1S18, d. Nov. 16, 1S71. 

Lewis Clailin b. Oct. 25, 1845, 

William Curtis b. Aug. 11, 1S47, d. June 6, 1S63. 

Lewis Claflin m. Nov. 30, rSGc}, Alabama Butler, b. Jan. 
24, 1843, ^'"-^ their elm. are : Jennie Andrews, b. Oct. 3^, 1S70; 
Hattie Louise, b.july 12, iS/iS; Butler Curtis, b. Sept. 17, 1SS3. 



b. 












Sept. 
b. 
b. }-Vl). 


22, 


IS4S, 


(b 
lb 






h. Ian. 


3, 


IS5I, 








b. Au:4. 


12, 


IS52, 








b. I-Vb. 


22, 


1-^55, 


d. Sep 


t- 4. 


■ .S79. 



No. -5. 
^biry Ha:riet breed 223, 

iNbu I ied 
John S Crawford 

William S. Crawf.-rd 
^b\ry A. Cr.uvfortl, 
Anna pLlizabetli Crawford b 
Jennie Sarab Crawlord 
Harriet Xewliall Crawford b. Jiiuj 7, i'^57, 
John Crawford b. Jan. 26, 1S59, d July 22, 1S59. 

John Crawford 2(b b. AimII 22, iS6<-., 

Sanuie! Cr.iwford b. >birch 20, 1S63, 

Gjor-iana Criwfo.d b. Feb. 10, 1805, 

Mary Harriet Breed was m. in Galena, 111., by Rev. A. 
Kent. 

William vS. Crawford in. Oct. 25, 1SS3, lunnia M. Meredith, 
at iJubuqiie, Iowa, by Rev. Mr. Ijeniiett. The\- had i^ne cb., 
Emma May, 1), Oct. 3e:>, 1884, and d. Nov. 11. 18X4. Mary A. 
m. Samuel Ross Moore. Anna ]'di/.al)eth m. Juiie 10, 1S76, at 
Galena, 111., by Rev. A. C. Smith. She lives in Chicago. 
Harriet Xewhall in. at Galena, III. by Rev. A, C. Smith, Dec. 
29, iSSt, to William Refiley Randolph, who was b. in 1S52 and 
was killed April 27, 1S82. 

No. 226. 

Hannah FJi/ab--th Rreed 223, b. July 21, 1S32, d. 

>b-irii.-d Se[)t. 27, 1S52, 

William Shipard Woods b. 

Alice b. 

Charlotte CharlessW.jodsb. 

Saraii Leu is Woods b. 

William Pot IS Woods b. 

David Keith Woods b. 

G^orjje Shipard Woods b. 

Gardner Woods b. 

Louis Francis Woods b. 

.Mary Flizabeth Wo(xIs b. 

Charlotte C. Wo<xlsm. July 2, 1S90, Krnest M. Hubbard. 

Hannah Iv Breed wasm. in Galena, 111. Her husband was 
from Camden, South Carolina. Their chn. were all b in St. Lotus, 
except tlie two youngest, who were b, in Kirkwood, Missouri. 

Saraii L. Woods m. Oct. 2, 1884, by Rev. Dr. Campbell, ot 
Boston, Mass., to William Watkins Kaime. 



Xo. 227. 

GeorLrian.i AIniira HtlllI 223, t). March 14, 1S35, 

Married April 26, 1S59, 

William Grin Gear b. >[;!>• 23, 1831:1, d. 

Clare Heiiiiioiu- Gear b. April 6, 1S60, d. fune y), 1S60. 

Emma Sucille Gear b. Oct. 17, iS6r, 

Gecirgia Clark Gear b. Nov. 27, 1.S65, d. Dec. 11, 1565. 

Horace Herbert Gear b. Jan. i, 186S, 

Ella Joseijhine Gear b. I''eb. 13,1871, 

Georgiana A. I-Jreecl was b. in Bo--toii and \va=. m. in Joliet, 
111. 

Horace Herbert Gear wa.s ]). in St. Loui.s, Mo., and the 
other children were b. in Chicago, 111. 

« 

Xo. 22S. 

Benjamin I'reed 215, b. Aug. ir, 1763, d. Feb. 16, 1S47. 
Married 

Amos 229, b. 

No. 229. 
Amos Breed 228, b. 

Married 
S. Oliver b. 

Capt. Amos Breed .---a^-s that as Captain of a ves.-el 30 or 40 
years ago, he traded in Liverpool with Richard Breed 261. 

Xo. 230. 
Theophilus Breed 215 b. Aug. 11, 1765, d. March 21, 1S54. 

Married 
Theodate Purinton b. May 31, 1766, d. March 17. 1S53. 
Theophilus X, b. May \, iSu5. d. March 21, 1S-4. 

"On the night of Monday, Oct. 31, 1803, Theophilus 
Breed, Sr.'s barn, on the South side of the Lynn Common, was 
set on fire and burned by a mi.schievoiis bo\-." 

One of the local papers of L}-nn, speaks of the death of 
Theophilus X. Breed, as follows : 

■'The somewhat sudden decease of Theophilus X. Breed, 
gives occasion for many recollections, both of him and his day, 
that are at once ]")lea>ant and instructi\-e. Mr. Breed was the 
oidy son of Phcophilu> and Theodate ( Purinton > Breed. He 
was born in the now rather ancient homestead on the corner of 



South Common and Pleasant streets. Tliere were also two 
sisters, both okk-r than he, who married and settled in other 
States, but both also deceased before him. Mr. Breed's lather 
was well-known, and well connected ; he was hiins-lf the son 
of Amos l^reed, a patriarchal old man, who lived where Whit- 
ing street now opens from North Common, and whose ancient 
house yet stands a little. way to the north, on the west side of 
the former. The wife of Amos Breed lost her life l)y a fall 
down stairs during the war of 1776, ha\-ing l)een roused in the 
night by a sudden alarm, that the British were landing near 
L}-nn. In this older family were other children, of wdiom can 
only be mentioned here, Aaron Breed, of South Common street, 
whose daughter Hermione, became Mrs. George Ilood, and wdiose 
son, the late James BMwin Breed, Ksq., of I.ouisville, Ky.. is well 
rememb(?red : Benjamin N. Breed of Franklin street, wdio left 
numerous descendants; and James Breed, Jr. , of Broad .-street, now 
represented by the families of Stephen N. Breed and James 
Albert Breed, both well and favorably known through tlie city. 

Theophilus N. Breed seems quite early to have shown 
marked individuality of cliaracter, though more in respect of 
business than otherwi>e. He, in fact, stood all through life as 
especially independent in his tastes and feelings, though it 
never amounted to eccentricity, nor indeed to any maiiifest 
peculiarit}'. But the prescribed routine of the shoe-bench 
could not long restrain ^'.ich a man. and thus his early man- 
hood found him keeping a small store upon the homestead 
property, wdien the then solitary watch-maker of Lynn, John 
Osborne, shared work-room and customers with the young as- 
pirant for mechanical honors. 

Mr. Breed's special tastes rapidly developed in the direction 
of shoe-tool making, particularly in the art of cutting "shoulder- 
sticks," that then ser^-ed the place of the finer "irons" used 
by the edge-setter. In the making of these shoulders he ac- 
quired much skill; and then gradually added the making of 
other pieces of "kit," till "steels," "stamps," "buffers" 
and " tacks," could always be had of him of his own manufac- 
ture. The encouraging times of 1835 drew him into larger 
efforts; and his ^vatch-making friend having deceased, he con- 
tinued the whole .-tore and added a .separate manufactor\-, with 
almost the first steam engine ever set running in tlie town. 

(22) 



He now made knives, knife-straps and awls, in great qnan- 
tity.aswell as almost everything- else used by the shoemaker, 
trading also extensively in I5o>ton, and enjo} ing a praetical 
monoply of the tool business for the whole town, whieh then 
knevr scarccl\- any other vocation than the making of shoes. 
But the pressure of 1S37 deranged the affaii-s of everyone in 
some degree; and .Mr. Breed broke up his manufactory, replaced 
his engnie by a "horse-power," and by 1840 was again push- 
ing for fortune in the reviving currents of resuscitated trade. 
At this time he secured the services of more experienced work- 
men than he had before employed, and profiting bv every new 
opportunity, set himself to develop the tool business still fur- 
ther than ever. In some things he obtained an easy precedence; 
his knife-stT-aps and spring punches long led the market; but 
knives and awls were laid aside, the competition being too 
great fur prufii. In 1841 he became dissatisfied with his narrow 
mode of working, and looked about for a better location. A 
rudimentary water-privilege on the farm of Oren Dalrvmple 
attracted his notice and this he purchased, and immediately 
put to service by the building of a mill up^ni Oak street, early, 
say in 1S42. This mill proved the nucleus of a rather large 
establishment, when the fortunes of manufacturing- v/ere pin- 
sued with every variation of success, till a])out 1S50, when he 
found himself unable longer to carry on the works and they 
were closed. He afterward secured smaller places el.^ewhcrc, 
and manufactured ^,imilar articles to a limited extent: and still 
later, returned to liis early lines of effort and kept a tool-store, 
sometimes with a repair-shop connected. At length age and 
other causes led him to give up this also, and his latteT da>-> 
were passed as salesman for another party, still, however, in 
the same line of business that had been the choice of his life. 
His cherished situation- at the mills had meantime pa.ssed 
into the hands of the City, and been made the beginning of a 
great public water-supply. 

Of Mn Breed's enterprise at Oak street a word deserves to 
be said. Out of many branches of industry there attempted, 
two were especially notable. The second iro'n-foundr^■ in Lvun 
—the fir>t since the great works of 1640— was .set up bv him 
at the nulls, under the charge of the brother. John and Geor.^e 
Knowles, two skilled Kngk.hmeu who here engaged in the 



inakinp: of butl-hiiigcs, and also did f^ciieral casting-. Tliis 
fouiidr}- was not large, hut ruiilinuctl lV)r (Hiile a lime. 'Idie 
other point was the coniniencenient here as far as is known, of 
the niannfaeture of the turned, or hnished, grin'lst(.)ncs, par- 
ticnharly in small sizes now so common] >• f )und in e\-ery shop. 
This branch, begun, sa}- in 1S45, came very near being a profit- 
able monopoly in his hands; and many regrets ha\-e l)een 
expressed that he cciuld not ha\-e succeeded in ludding this to 
himself as it was plainly the great business oppijrtiniity of his 
life. X(.)thing like it had ])een seen before, },-et now the turned 
grindstone is simply a necessity for everyone that has anything 
to sharpen . 

Mr. lireed, however, did not engage in tool-making for 
mere gain. He was not a machinist, stricth' such, nor greatly 
an inventor; but by culti\'ating the talent derived, doubtless 
from hi.-i maternal ancestors, he became a very skillful v/hite- 
smith and finisher, some of his steel-Avork being lit to compare 
with the fuiest. He had also excellent skill as a wood-turner, 
and his knowledge of ornamental woods was, for his time, more 
extensive than any one else in the vicitnty. Indeed, it was 
often remarked that he and Richard Richards, of W'oodend, 
were the oidy skilled mechanics then li\ing in L\-nn. 

Mr. Breed married early in life, S>-l\'ania, daughter of 
George Xeal, of Maine, who still survives him. I'our children 
were born to them : George Freeman, some time an alderman 
of this city and well-known in merchant circles, and who died 
Aug. 2S, 1S90; Theophilus Harlan, prominent in the banking 
business of ]>oston, and Mrs. Charles M. A!le\', now of Clinton, 
Mass. An older daughter Sylvinia Helen, died in early life. 

The parents of Mr. Breed were both faithful mendjers of 
the Friends' Society, to which he, of course, also came by 
birthright.' But he relinquished this about 1S40, and not long- 
afterward connected himself with the Methoilist church, in 
which, we believe, he remained until his death. He was often 
very fortunate, though never acquiring wealth ; yet neither 
good nor evil fortune ever betrayed him into any irregidarity 
of life. He lived and died a pattern of good urorulit}-, genial 
and affable among his family and friends, well iidormed on 
general subjects and, full of humor that made his conqianionship 
almost always delightful. 



' Some have greatness thrust upon them.' Mr. P.reed could 
not he called a seeker of fame ; yet to-day, and for many a da\- 
to come his name will he more upon the lips of our peojde th;in 
any of the thousands around his hirth-plaee and hnrial. His 
efforts to raise and maintain- a lar.!j:e pond at his mills were 
ridiculed ; yet he persevered and succeeded, nut dreaming, 
meanwhile, that he was working out the great prol)lem for 
Lynn, and furnishing the means for pure and whok-some re- 
freshment to all the thirsty multitudes of the great city that 
was to he his successor in the premises. He would not make 
any claim, perhaps, as a benefactor ; yet in view of the whole 
history, we hardly could call it aught but ju-tice, that a thought 
of public gratitude should always mingle in the sweetness of 
the draught, and give better meaning to the frequent mention 
of tlie water of Breed's Pond." 



No. 231. 














James Breed 215, 


b. July 


^5. 


176S, 


d. Juno 


19, 


iS53- 


Married 


Sep. 


19. 


T79S, 








Phebe Nidiols 


b. 












Stephen 


b. Aug. 


24. 


1799, 


d. April 


II. 


1800. 


rhebe N. 


b. Sep. 




1802, 


d. Dec. 


6, 


1S25. 


Mary A. 


b. Sep. 


13. 


1804, 


d. Jan. 


3'-* I 


iS47- 


Stephen X. 232, 


b. Oct. 


10, 


1S06, 








Hannah C. 


b. Dec. 


I, 


1 80S, 


d. Aug. . 


, JO, 


1S27. 


James A. 236, 


b. April 


22, 


[Six, 








No. 232. 














Sttphen N. Breed 23 


1 b. Oct. 


10, 


1S06, 








Married 


Dec. 


ir, 


1S28, 








Elizabeth Breed 


b. 












Mary E. 


b. Jiih- 


15, 


1S30, 


d. June 


21, 


1S82. 


Albert H. 233, 


b. .Marcl 


1 >i, 


I S3 2, 








James F. 234, 


b. Jan. 


19, 


1S39, 








Harriet M. 


b. Nov. 


20, 


1S40, 








Stephen F. 235, 


b. Dec. 


9. 


1S42, 








Ella F. 


b. Sep. 




IS45- 


d. Aug. 


30, 


iSSi. 



We find in the War Department Records the following 
facts about vStephen N. Ikeed : 

" In Oct. 1S32, of Brookfield, ^Ladison Co., N. Y. Born in 
Stonington, Conn.. March 12, 1760. He married April, 1779, 
Esther, daughter of Richard Wheeler. She was born 'in 
Stonington. He died March 6, 1835. He moved, from Stoning- 
ton in 1805, to Saybrook, Coini., then ti) North Milford New 



}Ta\-cii Co., Conn., in 1S09; then, 1.^:5, to North Stonini^ton, 
Conn., ;uul in 18:7, to Drookfiekl, N. Y., where li\-ini> the h'l-t 
five years. His widow Esther w;is livint,^ ^Farch, iS — , in 
}^rookfield. acred 76 years. She died Awj. 7, iS-S, Iea\-in,r,^ 5 
children sur\-iving her. A witness in 1S36 was Joshna lirccd, 
of Brookfield, aged 66 years, and a brother ol" Ste[)hL-!i. 

He was drafted at Stonington, Conn., the la.-^t of April, 
1776, for one month nndcr Capt. Wni. Stanton, to be stationed 
at Fort Griswold, in C^roton, Conn., and in the Fall oi 1777 he 
was again stationed in the fort. In Ang., 1778, he \-oluiit(jcrcd 
for 3 months under Capt. Daniel Carew in Col. Worthington's 
Regiment, going to Howland's Ferry, during Gen. Sullivan's 
campaign in R. L, and was in the engagement on the Island 
of R. I., after which retreated to Bristol. About Aj)ril i, 1779, 
he enlisted at Colchester for six months under Capt. John 
Northrop, and was stationed at White I'lains, Pe'jk.skill and 
Fishkill, N. Y. 

In Nov., 1779, he volunteered at Stonington for two months 
as one of the garrison under Capt. Abner Comstock, in Fort 
Trumbull, New London, and in April, 1780, he was drafted 
under Capt. John Swan and stationed one month at StMuiugton 
Point In July, i7,Su, he was diaftcd to serve two-and-a-half 
months at White Flains, N. Y., and wa.s out in Sept., 1781, 
on the alarm caused by the massacre of Col. Fedyard and garri- 
son at Furt Grisw(.)ld, in Groton, Sept. 6, 1781." 

At the time of the death of Stephen N. Breed, one of the 
local papers of Lynn speaks as follows : — 

" Stephen N. Breed passed away early yesterday morning, 
but his illness could not be called acute until within a few weeks, 
— he being confined to his bed only for the past fortnight. Mr. 
Breed was a natixe of Lynn, and was born in the house in which 
he died, and where he had lived nearly all his life. In 1806, 
the year Mr. Breed was born, his father, James Ih'eed, estab- 
lished the wharf, since occupied by his tlesceudants, for a lum- 
ber wharf and for the maiuitacture of salt. Twenty years later 
Stephen became clerk and assistant to his father, and in 1S42 
formed a partnership with the late Joshua Patch— S. N. Breed 
& Co.— continuing till the death of Mr. Patch in 1866. Charles 
v. Patch, son of the latter, had an intere-^t in the business till 
1870, since which time Mr. Breed has been sole owner, and the 



concern has done j)rr>l)ahly the hardest retail Inniber business in 
the State. His three sons will continue the same. ]\Ir. P^rccd's 
wife survi\-es and he lea\-es one married daughter residing in 
Orange, New Jerse_\-. Mr. Breed was an ititelligent and ea[)al)le 
man of high cliaracter, and was universalh- respected. .Since 
liis maturity he has been a well-known I'nitarian, and l<e\'. S. 
B. vStewart will attend his funeral at his home to-inorrow after- 
noon. 

Mr. Breed tuok kindly to the reforms of the day, carefully 
discriminating between the narrow and \-isionar\- schemes of so- 
called reformers, and those measures of social improvement that 
base their demands upon the principles of ju.--.tice that appeal to 
man's uncorrupted moral sense. His wide reading had taught 
him that majorities were often wrong, and that of necessit\- re- 
form must begin with the minority. Whatever such a view cost 
him, he \vas willing to bear. 

Accordingly, lie was found in the ranks of the Aljolition- 
ists, wlien to be such made men sneer and raise the er\' of 
fanatic. While he well knew that the world would not hear 
too much reform at once, he realized that such an essential \-il- 
lar.y as humati sla\-er}- struck at the fundamental rights of man. 
Therefore he was a Garrisonian Abolitionist, theaigh never 
standing on the extieme non-voting ground ; being a decidccd 
Whig in earl}- \-ears, and later an earnest sui)porter of the Re- 
publican Party. Xo compromise must l^e riiade with sla\'erv, 
no toleration must be given to it, notliing but its destruction 
would meet the demands of justice. 

Mr. Breed was a member of the Old Silsbee .Street Debating 
Society, so famous in our local annals, and occasionall>- t<;)ok 
part in the debates ; but he usually preferred to listen. He 
had a fine sense of humor, and though undemonstratix'e in its 
manifestation, the few who knew him well saw how clearly he 
perceived the incongruities which lie at the root of man's hu- 
morous instincts, and how keenly he appreciated an>' demon- 
strations that presented the witty side of human nature. Pie 
was a genial, instructive companion. Plis tenacious memory 
furnished liim with a store-house of facts and remini.-ceiices 
running ba'/k to tlie early years of the century. The writer of 
the-e lines ha- had fre([uent 0'?c-asiou to a-\-ail Ivbnself o^" ATr. 
Breed's knowledge of these long-gone days, that furnished 



many instructive cliapters of pcrsonnl history, and prcscrwd for 
fulurc u>e many \-aluable traditi.uis. 

Mr. r<iccd was born and bred in the Quaker cwuununion, 
f)ut in earl\- life became a re.y:ular attendant ai the Unitarian 
Church, just then orij^anized. until the establishment of the Free 
Chr.rch, when he attended the ministry of Samuel Johnson. In 
the later years of his life he again attended the Unitarian Church. 
He never 'logmatized in mntters of religion, feeling assured that 
tliere were many things concerning it which he did not know, 
and man_\- more abmit which there was more or less uncert.tinty. 

His prudent habits and sound judgment gave him marked 
success in business. He took charge of the lumber trade estab- 
lished by his father — an industry then in its infancy — and laid 
the foundations of what became in after years, with the aid of 
his sons, one of the most extensive retail knnber establishments 
in Xew England, yielduig its owner an ample fortune. He 
was a man of .-trict business integrity, and he will be long 
reinemlicred by the multitude of his patrons, for tlie unpretend- 
ing kindness of h.is manners, and for his leniency when mis- 
fortune n;ade them his debtors. He wa? born in 1^06 and had 
he lived until the loth of October, would have completed his 
eiglitieth year." 

Mary H. Lreed ni. June 24, 1S69. George O. Welsh. Har- 
riet ni. Nov. 20, [^61, P. Augustus Walcott. They reside in 

Henrv A., and 



[S70. 



In a letter dated ?\Ich. 3, 1SS5, trom a correspondent of a 
Lynn paper, in Hawkes Park, \'olusia Co., Florida, we find 
the following: — 

"Our largest Lynn proprietor is Albert H. Breed, of the 

Well-known f.rm of S. X. Preed «X: Co., lumljcr mercliants, on 
Broad, corner of I'each street. A little west of tlie river he lias 



Orange. X. J. Their 


ch 


;n. we 


re: 


Caroline A., 


Elizabeth B. 










Xo. 233. 










Albert }{. Breed 232, 


b. 


March 


s, 


1S32, 


Married 




Oct. 


5, 


]S6S, 


Nellie Larrabee 


b. 






d. >bardi 


Stephen L. 


b. 


An-. 


7, 


1S69, 


Married 2d wife 




Sept. 


2, 


1^79, 


Su.saii Hunt 


b. 








Albert Kinsman 


b. 


Feb. 


9j 


iSSr, 


Annie Hunt 


b. 


(let 


6, 


18S2, 



a fifty-arre lot ]nircha,scd 6f the vState. And about two niilcs 
from the river, in the celel)rated TurnhuU llainiuock. he nwus 
an undivided half uTa fue-hundred-acre tract. This qualit}' of 
land is known locall>- a> " heav\- hainniock " : it is co\-ered 
with a heav_\- grov.'th of hard wood, such as oaks, of a A'aricty, 
sweet gum, ba}-, magnolia, also red cedar, bass or wahoo, and 
other kinds. There are live oaks occasionally found five feet 
through; wliite walnut or hickory, three feet through, bu.t the 
most lunnerous of the forest trees is the pnlm. The soil is a 
rich black loam, underlaid with small marl. 

The wdiolc tract was drained a hundifd years ago or more 
by large canals running through it, and cross ditclies leading 
into the canals. A further improvement found ready-made on 
that tract, is an old turnpike se\-eral miles long, running 
through, tlie wh.ole length of the Spanish Grant. To make 
improvements, at present rate of wage,-, twenty dollars pt-r 
month and board, would cost, say on Mr. B's land, prolxibh- 
ten thousand dollars. Mr. Breed has made substantial inipro\-e- 
ments. He has cleared and set out in orange trees about 
twenty acres. The ten acre grove is now two years old and 
has several trees in bloom. The two five acre groves were set 
out this winter frtjm nur^ery ^tock, Imdded one and two 3'ears: 
one of tliese is in full bloom. 

These groves adjoin each other, ha\-ing a westerlv front on 
this old turnpike, and extending easterly forty rods to one of 
the great canals. The gro\'es are now fenced in the usual 
maimer of such helds, xiz., of palms, laid u|) four logs high." 

No. 234. 

James F. Breed 232, b. Jan. 19, 1839, 
Married Sep. S, 1881, 

Ella Fitzpairick b. 

Chas. P"it/(:>alrick b. Aug. 17, 1SS2. 



\^o. 233. 










Stephen F. Breed 23 


2 b. 


Dec. 


9. 


1842, 


Married 




Dec. 


26, 


1S67, 


Margaret J. Boyd 


b. 








Mary J. 


b. 


May 


3'^ 


1S60, 


Stephen Alec. 


b. 


April 


12, 


1S72, 


Lewis B. 


b. 


Aug. 


25, 


1S75, 


Margaret K. 


b. 


Aug. 


I'-*. 


iSSo, 



No. 236. 

Janu-s A. Ilrecd 231, b. April 22, iSn, 

Marrit'd Seii. 23, 1835, 

LydiaS. WVbb h. Jan. S, j.s'12, 

Phel)e Anil h. Sep. 3, 1,^36, d. Jan. 23, 1-S90. 

Charles Edward b. Nov. 17, 1838, d. April 10, 1851.. 
George Albert b. June 6, 1841, 
Thomas Webb b. April 23, 1843, cl- Sep. 28, 1S4S. 
Lydia Adelaide b. June 2, 1845, 
Warren Mudgc b. April 17,1847, 
William Kliner b. June 5, 1849, d. March 12, 1850. 
Annie Florence b. Aug. 5, 1852, d. Jan. 26, 1S85. 
George Albert J^reed 111. Sep. i, 1871, I'annie Tucker, b. 
vSep. 17, 1,849. Warren Miidge Breed m. June 12, 1S8S, Florence 
Loui.^e Shedd, b. Sep. 23, 1857. Tlieir ch. Allen Webb was b. 
March 13, 1S89. 

No. 237. 

Nathan Breed 195, b.Jan. 3, 1703, d. 1753. 

Married Aug. 28, 1728, 

Mary Bassett b. Aug. 13, 1709,' d. 1793. 

Hannah b. July 2, 1729, d. 1730. 

Hannah b. May 3, 173:, 

Ezra 23S, b. M.ueh 16, 173^, d. 1821. 

Abigail b. March 13, 1735, 

Zepheniah 244, b. March 10, 1737, 

J^J'" b. May 8, 1739, d- 1740. 

Daniel b. Oct. 9, J 74 J, 

Alice b. Oct. 22, 1744, 

Anna b. Sep. 17, 1746, 

^^^^y t>. Aug. 4, 1748, d. Aug. 15, 1806. 

Enoch b. April 13, 1750, d. 1750. 

Mary tlas.^ett wa.s a dau. of John Ba.ssett of Lynn. 
Hannah 2d. ni. John Mower. Abig-ail ni. Nathan Breed. 
Daniel m. Elizabeth I^hillip.-.. Alice m. Mr. Newhall. Anna 
ni. Ezra Ba.-.^ett. Mary ni. Philip Saw\-er, of Newbury. Tiiev 
moved to Weare, in 178S, and .settled on a lot, a short mile 
south of the Friends' South Meeting House. 
No. 23S. 

Ezra Breed 237, b. March 16, 1733, d. 1821. 

Married 

Huldah breed b. 

William 239, b. 

Nathan b. 

(23) 



Iluldali Breed ^va> a dan. of Nathan Breed and Iliildah 
Purinlon. XaUian d. xunni^. 



d. Oct. 9, 1799. 



William Breed lived in Breed's End, T^ynn, Mass. His ist 
w., I^}-dia, '.vas I), in Weave, X. H., and d. in L>-nn. His 2d 
w., Elizabeth Pnrinton, was b. in Kensingte^n, X. H.. 

Marv was b. in Lvnn, and m. in 1S27, Charles Merritt. 



No. 239. 








William iJreed 23S, 


b. 






Married 




Oct. ro, 


1796, 


Lydia Breed 


b. 


April 22, 


1776, 


Marncd 2(] wife 








Elisahetli Purinton 


b. 






.Mary 


b. 




1S06, 


William K. 240, 


b. 


March 20, 


1 814, 



Xo. 240. 








William E. Breed 2; 


^q. b. March 


20, 


1S14, 


Married 


Nov. 


7. 


1S37, 


Abigail Ea.-,tman 


b. 






John W. 241, 


b. May 


s, 


1S39, 


Mary A. 


b. Oct. 


20, 


1S41, 


James P. 242, 


b. May 


6, 


1S44, 


William U. 243 


, b. Jutie 


I', 


1.S4S, 


Elizabeth A. 


b. Nov. 


2, 


1S53, 



William E. Breed was b. in Lynn, Mass. His \v. lived in 
Hanover, X. H. 

Mary A. was b. in T.ynn, and m. Ang. 5, 1S67. Mary A. 
SpafFord. They had five chn., and now reside at Rock Falls, 111. 

Elizabeth A. was b. in Lynn, and m. Sep. 1SS4, H. T. 
Xorris, and had five chn. 

Xo. 241. 

John W. Breed 240, b. May 8, 1S39, 

- Married Sept. 17, 1S67, 

. Andse Loveland b. 

Fred. A. b. June 11, 1S70, 

Alice M. b. Oct. 25, 1S71, 

Myra A. b. March 25, 1.S72, 

Josie M. b. Jan. 16, 1S7S, 

Annie M. b. .May 13, 1SS3, 

This family n.--;de at ^Lirion, Kansas. Fred, rMice and 
Myra were b. at Dixon, 111. Josie was b. at Leon, Iowa, and 
Annie 'M. was b. at Axtcll, Kansas. 



No. 242. 



James r. I'.ieed 


2.]0, 


b 


May 


6, 


1S44, 


Married 






June 


10, 


I S69, 


Olive F. Ay res 




b. 








Frank A. 




b. 


Au- 


20, 


1S72, 


Jaines E. 




b. 


Feb. 


s, 


'^"^77, 


Charles \V. 




b. 


Dec. 


17, 


1S78, 


Lloyd L. 




b. 


Oct. 


30, 


iSSi, 



James P. Ijrted was b. in L\ini, Mass. 

Frank A. was b. in Sterling-, 111.; James }\. an<l I.loyd L., 
in Chicago, 111., and Charles W. in Quincy, 111. The family 
now resides in Western Springs, 111. 

Xo. 243. 
William H. Breed 2\o, h. June 12, 1848, 



Married 


luly 


22, 


1870, 






Louise Ebtrly 


b. 










William C. 


b. Nov. 


24, 


1S72, 






Married 2nd vv, 


Sep. 


22, 


1S83, 






Addie McLaughlin 


b. 










Ollie A. 


b. Dec. 


3'--', 


J 884, 






Mabel 


b. April 


24 


1SS6, 






Frank .NL 


b. Jan. 


19. 


iSSi., 






Villiam C. Breed 


was b. in 


Di 


<on, 111. 


Ollie 


and Mabel 



were 1). in Axtell, Kan., and Frank in Mat ion, Kan. The 
family resides in Marion, Kan. 

No. 244. 
Zephaniah Breed 237, b. .March 10, 1737, d. Nov. 8, 1792. 
Married 



Ruth Phillips 


b. 




d. May 


4, 


1790. 


Mary 


b. Jan. 


5. 1761, 


d. Dec. 


10, 


1797- 


Daniel 245, 


b. April 


9, 1767, 


d. April 


5. 


1852. 


Abigail P. 


b June 


21, 1763 


d. Apri 


3t^ 


1803. 


Zephaniah 


b. 




d.Jan. 


II, 


1S39. 


Cornelia 


b. Feb. 


18, 1774, 


d. Aug. 


31, 


1S56. 


Jonathan 


b. Nov. 


28, 1776, 


d. Dec. 


2^, 


1859. 


Elizabeth 


b. 


1778, 


d. April 


5, 


1856. 


Married 2d vv. 




1791- 








Abigail 


b. 











Zephaniah Breed Sr., settled in Weare. N. H.^ about 1774, 
at the Center A'illage. known now as the Clement Place. His 
w. was a dan. of Walter Phillips. 



M:iry ni. Oct. 14, 17^9. lulnuiiul Gove, who d. July :'2. 
1S60. He in. his 2d w. Marcli 29, iS^jo, I.ydia C</rt.kuid, of 
Lee, b. Xov. 30, 177 1, ar.d d. April 12, i^j[(). Abigail P. 111. 
Kdinund Jolmson, Aup;. 24, 1791. Ilis 2iid \v. was ITuldah 
Green, a dau. of Levi and Jndith Grcju. Zc])Iianiah, Jr., ni. 
riannah Wing. Cornelia ni. vSep. U), 1794, I\n()ch l^age, wIk; 
was b. Jnne 6, 1764, and d. in 1S23. The>' had one ch., J<jhn 
C, who was b. Jan. 29, 1S04; was m. Sep. if), ii^y:>, atid d. 
April 5, 1S73. Jonathan in. Oct. 3, 1S05, Lydia Johnson, who 
was I). Ang. iS, 1774, and d. March 20, 1S34. She was a dan. 

in the 



of Knoch and Lydir 


I Johnson 




Klizabe 


til d. 


at Unity 


home of ]*,(hnnnd Jol 


nison. 










No. 245. 












Daniel Breed 244, 


h. April 


9. 


1769, d. 


, April 


4. 1S52. 


Married 


Aug. 


2S, 


1794, 






Molly Chase 


b. Jan. 


25, 


177^, <1 


. .May 


29, 1796. 


Married 2d wife 


Nov. 


14, 


1799. 






Abigail Hodgdon 


b. Aug. 


7. 


I77«, <1. 


, April 


II, 1.802. 


Married 3d wife 






1S06, 






Mary Au.stin 


b. Jan. 


3, 


1772, d, 


. Feb. 


29, l82(J. 


Abigail Hodgd. 


mb. iJec. 


18, 


1 8'. 7, 






Moses Ausdn 


b. 




1 8, .9, d 


July 


7, 1S35, 


Mary 


b. Oct. 


I, 


iSir, 






Daniel 246, 


b. March 


20, 


i'^i3- 






Married 4U1 wife 


July 


I'S, 


1S24, 






Betsey Peaslee 


b. April 


7, 


17S9, 






Israel F-'easU-e 


h. lune 


20, 


]^2S. d. 


July 


21, 1826. 


Enoch Paige 


b. Jan. 


I, 


1S27, d. 


Oct. 


S, 1877, 


Israel Peaslee 


b. Dec. 


14. 


1S2S, 






Anna Peaslee 


b. Dec. 


20, 


1S30, 







Daniel Breed, Sr., was b. in Lynn, and d. at Unity, X. IL 
His ist w. was a dan. of Nathan G. and Phebe Hoag Chase, of 
Weare; his 2d w. was a dan. of John and Snsanna Hnsse>- 
Hodgdon, of Weare; his 3d w. was a dan. of M(xses and Phelje 
H. Austin, of Rochester, N. Y.; his 4th w. was a dan. of Lben- 
ezer Peaslee and Abigail H. Peaslee, of Weare. 

Mar\- ni. Josiah D. Chase. She was one of those wdio, in 
an especial manner mauiiest, during their life-time, the divine 
side of hnman natni-e. Her hning and beneficent spirit songht 
not only her own im])ro\-einent and elevation of character, but 
tlie imjirovenient and retinement of all wlio came within llie 
sphere of her infinence. Cultured and intelligent and married 



in early life, her capacity for teacliing and imparting- a spirit 
for inipiovenient in others drew her to engage in teacliing in 
several important institutions of learning in New England and 
in Xew York; and during thirty years of her life she was thus 
engaged with her husband. There are some in almost all 
honorable positions, not (jnly of her native lanrl, but now of 
other lands, who know and appreciate the great excellence and 
beauty of her life and character, and who will learn with sad- 
ness of her death. 

vShe was an Elder of Weare Monthly Meeting, and died as 
.she had li\-ed in firm, unquestioning faith in the personal 
presence of the blessed Saviour, and could sa}- at all times: " I 
know that my redeemer liveth, and because He li\'eth I shall 
live also." 

Israel Peaslee d. at Unity. 
California. Israel 2d, and ^\nna c 

No. 246. 

Daniel Breed 245, b. March 20, 

Married Aug. 7, 

Gulielma Jioune b. Dec. 10, 

Ella Amelia b. July. 11, 

Gulielma Eudora b. Sept. r, 
Daniel Breed was prominent during the War of the Rebel- 
lion, because of his work on the "'Underground Railway," — 
lif)erating slaves. His W. was a dau. of Robert L. and Xaomi 
Eowne of Xew York. 

Ella was b. in Cambridge, Mass. aiKl d. at Washington. 
D. C. Gulielma was b. in Zurich, Switzerland. 



Enoch 


P. 


d. 


at 


Anal: 


1. in Unity, 


X. 


H. 




1S13. 










i'S45, 










iSiS, d. 


Oct. 




19. 1 


fS53, 


1S49, d. 


Jan. 




3'. 1 


S53. 


1S51, 











D. 247. 








benezer Breed 


195 Ij- 


May 


I, 1710, 


Married 








ebecca 


b. 






Samuel 24S, 


b. 




1747, 


Rebecca 252, 


b. 






James 253, 


b. 






Ruth 


b. 






William 


b. 




d. 


Amos 254, 


b. 






Ebenezer 255, 


b. 


May 


5, 1741, d. Nov. 


Simeon 


b. 






Richard 270, 


b. 






Elizabeth 271, 


b. 







1797- 



Ruth Breed ni. Micajali Alley. William started for Ohio 
with liis nephew Richard 232, but d. in Worcester, Mas... 
vSiineon ni. Widow I'arrington (nee Lois C;ouldi who had two 
chn. 



So. 24S. 






Samuel Breed 247, 


b. 




Married 






Theodate Puriiiton 


b. 




Charlotte 


b. 


Marcl: 


Charlotte (^d) 


1). 


A[)nl 


Anna 251, 


b. 


July 


Samuel 


b. 


Nov. 


Ebenezer 249, 


b. 


Marcl: 


Adelia 250, 


b. 


April 



7-17, 



8, 1772, d. March r5, 1772. 
.4, 1773. 

16, 1773, d. Nov. 15, 1S51. 
iS, 177S, d. Oct. 22, 1S26. 
iS, 17SS, d, March 2, iS^i. 
20, 17S9, d. Dec. 3, 1S63. 
Theodate I'urintou was a dau. of James Purinton. 
Charlotte 2d m. Gamaliel Oliver. They had two sons and 
one dau. 

Samuel m. Annie Allen, and their children were Richard, 
b. iSiS, Allen, Aza A., Nathan, r^Iary. 

Richard b. iSiS, m. HIiza Ann Breed, Jan. 26, 1S43, ^^le 
died Sep. 12, 1S90. He was at the close of 1S91 still owi^ier (jf 
a portion of the original Allen Breed grant of land. Their 
chn. wtre Laura Kllen b. 1S45, tl- i'S4S, Ann Eliza b. 1S47, m. 
J. Allen Flint, Matilda b. 1S49, Charles Orrin b. 1851, ni.' Oct. 
30, 1S89, T^illa M. Jacobus of B(iston. 

We take pleasure in inserting the following account which 
Mr. Breed sends us of his wonderful work as an athlete. 

"The Xew York Clipper of Feb. 2, 1SS4, contains a good 
likeness of Charles O. Breed, and adds the following record: 
Charles Orrin Breed, of Lynn, Mass., i> an amateur athlete 
whose achievemc-nts in the way of putting up dumljdjells and 
lifting heavy weights have within the past two years made 
him quite famous and .-^tanip him as one of the strongest men 
of the day. He is strictly an amateur and is engaged in the 
flour, grain, and feed business on Western aveuue, Lynn, whc-re 
he was born .\rarch 17, 1S51. His height in stockings is 5 ft. 
io>^ in., his weight 190 lbs., and his physical measurements 
are: Chest (natural) 42 9- ro in.; waist, 35 14-16 in.; upper arm, 
15 in.; lower arm, 12 7-16 hi.; tliigh. 24 1-16 in., calf, ij 9-16 
in. The foregoitig mea.surcmcnts were taken v.lic-n str!pr>ed, l-y 
Dr. D. A. Sargent, of ILarward Colk-ge Gynniasimu, Nov. r 18S-' 



A li>L of \n> ix-ironiiaiicc> (all of which haAX-, we are as;;ured, 
Ykx-u fairly aecuiiiplishcd in ihe picseiice of wilnc.->e<, j are 
given below: July 17, i,S.S2. Put on bhoukk-r fruni the floor 
a harrel of Hour weighing 220 lbs. and then tlirew it 11 ft. S 
in. Dec. 2. 1SS2. With right hand alone lifted a ^o'j lb. 
dumb-bell fairly from the tloor j.huo times in i h. 30 m. Par- 
ticulars of this feat are in Clipper almanac as follows; 50;.^ lb. 
dumb-bell lifted fairly trom the Tioor, right hand only i,r«» 
time- in 9 m. 40 s., 2,rKX) times in 19 in. 23 s., 3,i:x>j times in 
29 m. 2;}, s., 4,t)00 times in 39 m. 50., 5/30^ times in 52 m. 20 s., 
6,cx>.T times in i h. 7 m., 7,000 times in i h. 20 m. 20 s., and 
7,6'XJ times in i h. 30 m. Total weight lifted, 191 tou.>, iSck) 
ll.)s. Dec. 25, 1S82. Lifted on neck, while bending over, with 
hands on knees, 4301b.-. Jan. 29, 1SS3. Lifted from the floor 
with one hand a i ---pound dumb-bell \.n(y■^ times, in 29 m. 30s. 
May 23, itiS3. With Prof. George A. Walker, Superintendent of 
Y. }vL C. A. gymna-ium at Lynn, lifted clear of tlie floor an iron 
safe Weighing i53.jlbs., according to the city weigher. Xov. 10 
1SS3. Put up a 50 lb. dumb-bell from shoulder to arm's length 
abo\e head 60 times in succession, beating the best previous 
record of fifty-eight times, by G. -M. Robinson, the noted Cali- 
fornian athlete. We are in posses.-ion of the necessary e\"idence 
to establish the genuineness of thi^ performance. I^ec. 19, 1SS3. 
On a wager with a friend, who kept the score and expressed 
l;im>elf .-ali.-^Lled that all was correct, he put up a 3 lb. dumb- 
bell from .shoulder to arm's length 6,000 times, without rest, 
in exactl)- an hour, being an average of 100 times per minute. 
This was done in the presence of witnesses. Put up with each 
hand separately, a dumb-l)ell weighing 145 lbs., put up a 175 
lb. bell with the right hand, receiving assistance at the start 
from the left hand ; put up a 100 lb. bell twelve times in suc- 
cession, and a 75 lb. bell 35 times without stopping. He is a 
member of the Young Men'?, Christian Association g}-mna.-ium, 
and, as may well be believed from his record, is an honor to the 
institution. 

Since the above was written, Mr. Breed at the annual 
games of the "Union Amateur Athletic Club of Eo.ston " 
Januar_\- 30, 1SS4, put up a 120 lb, bell from shoulder 6 times in 
successi(;n, breaking the prexdous record of 5 times. For thi.- 
performance he was presented with a guld medal by Gov. 



Robinsrui. Ht- Uieii issued a cliallcii,c;;e to any man in America 
to compete witli 120 lb. ]k-U, l)ut it was ne\-er accepted. Lifted 
witli one liand, from the floor, a barrel of Hour \veii;]iin.c:, witli 
fixturLS, 219' J lbs. 241L1 times in one minute. Lnuu, Mitss., 
Dec. 13. 1.SS4. Total \vei;<ht lifted 2''> tons, 6S0 lbs. 

Mr. Ilreed is an exjiert with the gloves, ([uite a wrestler, 
and can do ich> yd. dash i!i fast time. Was consi(ka-ed in his 
da\- the best club .-.winder in Mass." 



1S31 



.NO. 249. 












Ebenezcr Breed .■'4S, 


b. 


March 


iS, 


17SS, 


d. March 


Married 












Susanna Morville 


b. 










Sarali Morville 


b. 


Oct. 


s, 


1S13. 




Jane 


b. 


Nov. 


I?! 


1816, 




Elizal^elh 


b. 


Feb. 


13. 


1^20, 




Samuel T. 


b. 


Jan. 


^5, 


1822, 




No. 250. 












Adelia Breed 24S, 


b. 


Apr. 


20, 


17S9, 


d. Dec. 


Married 












John Newhall 


b. 











3. 1S63. 



William O. NVuh.ill b. 

William O. Xt-whall is a Quaker Preacher, and a worthy 
man. He is a Clerk of Monthly and Quarterly Meetings. He 
has se\-eral children. 

No. 251. 

Anna Breed 248, b. July 16, 1775, d, Nov. 15, 1851. 

.\birried 

Jonathan Boyce b. 

Jonathan Boyce b. 

Charlotte Boyce b. 

Samuel Boyce b. 

Marcia Boyce b. 

James P. Boyce b. ^L^y 10, 1804, 

Patience Boyce b. 

Gilbert Boyce b. 

Eliza Boyce b. 

Charlotte Boyce m. Bennjah Purinton. Sanuicl m. VAw.:\ 
Bas.sctt 261. Patience m. Homer I-ry i See notes of No. 256). 
Gilbert m. Mary Ann Kstes. Ivliza m. Dr. Kitteridge. 



No. 252. 
Rihecca Breed 247, b. 

Married 
Kiioch Collins b. 

Mic.ijah Collins b. 
Eli,:abfth Collins b. 

No. 253. 

James Breed 247, b. 

Married 

Rebecca Bassett b. i754, 

William B. b. 

Eunice b. 

Rebecca b. 

Rebecca Bassett was a clau. of Joseph Bassett. 
Eunice Breed m. Joseph Fuller. 

No. 251. 
Amos Breed 247, b. 

Married Apr. 30, 1766. 



Amos 


b. 


Hannah 


b. 


Rebecca 


b. 


mos Breed, 


the sou 



m. Miss Reed of Salem. Hannah 
Kbenczer Burrill of Upperswatnpscott. 
No. 



■d:)- 



Ebenezer Breed 


'247 


,b. 


May 


5, 


1741, 


d. 


Nov. 


I, 


1797- 


Married 










1763, 










Lydia Bassett 




h. 
















Ebenezer 




b. 


April 


17, 


1764, 


d. 


April 


■4, 


1S4S. 


Enoch 256, 




b. 


Jan. 


~3> 


1766, 


d. 


Nov. 


12, 


1S47. 


Stephen 259, 




b. 


Mav 


8, 


176S, 


d. 


Oct 


3, 


1S27. 


Content 




b. 


Nov. 


27, 


1769, 


d. 


Oct. 


2, 


1841. 


Married 2d wife 


















Mary Green 




b. 


Auj;. 


II, 


■753. 


d. 


Oct. 


9- 


1797- 


Lydia 




b. 


.'Xpril 


22, 


1776, 


d. 


Jan. 


■ 2, 


1799- 


Rebecca 260, 




1). 


Nov. 


26, 


1777, 


d. 


Au-. 


■9, 


1S66. 


Isaiah 




b. 


Oct. 


24. 


■779, 


d. 


March 


■7- 


1S49. 


Ruth 261, 




b. 


March 


, 26, 


17S2, 


d. 


July 


5, 


iSfc. 


William 




b. 


June 


8, 


17S4, 










Mary 




b. 


July 


30, 


17S6, 










Micajah 264, 




b. 


Oct. 


20, 


17S8, 


d. 


Mav 


16, 


iS.5r. 


Anna 266/ 




b. 


Feb. 


I, 


I79[. 


d. 


Dec. 


23, 


1S62. 


Phebe 267, 




b. 


April 


6, 


'793, 


d. 


April 




■856. 


Samuel Darby 26S 


lb. 


June 


12, 


1795, 


d. 


Nov. 


4, 


1S57. 


(24) 





















Kbeiie/er I>rcccl, Sr.. settled in Weare, X. 11., in ijj^ at the 
foot of Big Hill, east of where D. 1^. Gove has re-constructeil 
the old farm hou.^c which Daniel Guve built in 1777-7-S, and 
one mile West of Center A'ilkv^^c. Mr. breed's elm. by his ist 
w. were all 1). in T.ynn ; those by his ?d w. were all b. in 
Weare. Mr. Ikecd's first four chn. settled in Weare, His 2d 
w., Mary Green, was a dau. of Isaiah an.d Mary Green of Weare. 

EbenezL-r, Jr., ni. }\Iartha Peaslee, of Xewton, X. H., who 
wash. April 27, 1763 and d. Sep. 13. iS2l). Content m. Xov. 
5, 17SS, Da\-id Gove, who was b. Jan. 14, i7()3 and d. May 
25, 1S24. They had a dau. Abigail Gove. Isaiah m. in iSio, 
Sally Gove, wdnj was b. Jul}- 11, 17SS and d. July 9, 1S60, 
was a dau. of Obadiah and Sarah Gove. Their chn. were : 
Isaac Bassett Crove, b. Aug. 12, ; Humphry G. Gove, b. 

March 9, 1S20, and d. Oct. i, 1S46, Isaac Bassett Gove m. and 
had two chn.: Adaline and Frank. William Breed was b. in 
Weare, X. H., June S, 17S4 and d. in Lynn. He m. Sally 
Dixy of Salem and settled there. He afterward n.io\-ed to L\'nn. 
He was a shoemaker. Mary m. K/.ikial Ivstes, a farmer and 
shoemaker, and both lived arid d. in Iv\"nn. Their chn. were : 
Ezekial Franklin, Ruth. Rebecca, I{li/.abeth, Lydia and Luc\-. 
Ruth m. I{. T. B. Gove, of I,}-nn. Rebecca m. lienjamin AW 
Currier of L>-nn. Idi/.abeth m. Joseph Swain of L}-nn. L}'dia 
m. Kdward Gold>inith of Lynn. 

Xo. 256. 

Enoch Dreed 255, b. Jan. 23, 1766, d. Xov. 12, 1S47. 

Married Oct. I795. 

Martha Mower b. Marcli 26, 1773, d. May 15, iSoS. 

Stephen b. Ian. 20, 1796, 

Nathaniel 257, b. d. Oct. 27, 1871. 

Abigail b. Xov. 12, 179S, 

Thnmas b. 

David b. 

Lydia M. b. June 28, 1S03, d. Oct. 5, 1874. 

>[oses b. .\[arch 26, 1S07, 

Married 2d wife (Jet. iSi.|, 

Lydia IVy b. .March 26, 1775, d. .\[)ril 23, 1847. 

Knoch r,ree(l v.'as b. in I<>-nn. He was a small man, with 
a \-ery kuge no-e. He al\va\-,-> wore a hut- pulring it on wliilc 
he dressed, wearing it at the table, and haiiging it on the po.-t 



Nathan Rreed 256, 


h. 


Married 




Miriam l-Yy 


b. 


H<jtner F. 25S, 


h. Oct. 


Sarah F. 


h. Nov 


D..rcas 


b l\-f). 



of liis bc'l at tuglit. lie was in. in Jv\'nn. ITis i,-.t w. was b. in 
L}-n!i, and was a dan. oT Joliu and llannab ^b)W(,.■r, of I,\-nn, 
His 2d w. was a wid. of John I'Vy, ol' Jioston, wiili four 
chn. : — Miriam, Sarali, Dorcas and Homer. Miriam Fry 
became the w. of Nathan }>reed 257. 1 b mier hV\- became the 
hnsl)and of Patience lJo}ce 251 

Abigail Breed was m. to Israel Iloig. LycHa M. Jheed d. 
sint^lc, in rro\idence, R. I. 

Xo. 257. 

d. Oct. 27, 1S71. 

d. .\hiy 7, 1S61. 
7, 1S23, d. March 22, 1SS8. 
3, 1S26, d. Jan. 13, 1S65. 
'^\ 1S34. 

Nathan Breed lived and d. in Weare, N. H. As will be 
seen by the record, he m. a dau. of his father's 2d w. 

vSarah F. 111. Milton Gove, and \vlien she d., m. her sister, 
Dorcas. 

Xo. 25S. 

Homer F. Breed 257, b. Oct. 7, 1S23, d. ^hlrch 22, iSSS. 

Married 

Rhoda I'.. Chase b. Sept. 2r, 1S23, 

Charles F. b. Jan. iR, 1S55, 

George b. Sept. 11, 1S61, d. Oct. iS, 1S61. 

Homer V'. Breed d. of drops}' of the heart, after an illness 
of some months. He was a genial, upright man, and a nseftil 
and respected citizen. He was a member of the Society of 
Friends. He left a widow and two adopted chn. He was bur- 
ied on Sunday, March 25, iSSS. 

No. 259. 

Stephen Breed 255, b. y\ay S, 176S, d. Get. 3, 1S27. 

Married May 3, 

Rhoda Chase b. Jan. 14, 1777, d. Oct. 23, 1S30. 

Richard b. Dec. 2, 1790, 

John b. Jnne 14, 1793, 

Fnoch b. An-. S, 1795, 

Thomas F. Ii. April 2, 1799, 



Stephen Breed was b. in I,>nn. His w. was a dau. of John 
and Sarah Cliase. 

Thomas F. lives in Weare, X. H. lie m. and had two 
chn., Martha and Mary Ellen. 

No. 260. 

Rebecca Breed 255, b. Ndv. 26, 1777, d. Au,^^ 19, 1S66. 

Married Ja'i. 12, 1799, 

Josiah Gove b. July 27, 177^^, d. May 18, 1S50. 

William Gove b. 

Ira Gove b. 

Albert Gove b. 

Rebecca P>rced was b. in Weare, her lur^band was a son of 
David and Martha Hoag Gove, brother of the hnsband of her 
step-sister, Content 255. 

William lived in Washington, D. C. Ira lived in Pittsfield, 
X. }I., and to him we are indebted for very much of these val- 
uable statistics. 

X"o. 261. 

Ruih Breed 255, b. March 26, 17S2, d July 5, iSho. 

Married 

Isaac Basselt b. 

William Bass^tt b. .March 4, i8>j;;, 

Eliza Bassett b. Aug. 23, iS-oj. 

Eunice Bassett 262 b. Nov. 2>'^, iSri, 

Lydia Bassett b. March 3, 1S13, 

Hannah Bassett b. OlI. 3. 1S15, 

Anna Greene Bassett b. April 10, 1S24, 

William m. Mary P>oyce (b. Dec. 21, 1S05 and d. May 19^ 
1S84) of Lynn ; Eliza m. vSamuel Boycc 251 ( b. Dec. 22, 1801, d. 
Aug. 20, 1S75) of Lynn ; Eydia nr. May 12, 1S37, James Kite, of 
Philadelphia, Pcnna ; Anna m. July i, 1S46, Joseph Philbrick 
Newhall (b. Jidy 16, 1S23, d. Sep. 2, 1S69) of Lynn. 

No. 262. 

Eunice Bissett 26 1, b. Nov. 30, iSti, 

Married April 15, 1831, 

William Solomon Boyce, b. Dec. 25, 1S09, d. Aug, 23, 1S73, 

Mary Bassett Boyce 269, b. Oct. 16, 1S33, 
I.saac Bassett Boyce 263, b. Sep. 3, 1S35, 

Charles Boyce b. April 17, 1841, 

Charles Boyce m. Sep. 22d, 1S64, Maria Louise Brown. 
The^- are residents of Boston. 



d. 


June 


21, 


1871. 


d. 


May 


II, 


1SS2. 


d. 


Dec. 


I, 


1S64. 


d. 


Nov. 


s, 


1S72. 


d. 


March 


5. 


1S55. 


d. 


April 


5. 


1S63. 



No. 263. 








Isaac r.asscll l!o3ce 262, b. Sep. 


3, 1S35, 






Married Oct. 


^, ''"iS^, 






Mary IJretd Kcene h. Imie 


26, 1S35, d. 


^ray 


I, iSSS. 


William Solomon Boycc b. July 


30, 1857, 






Marian Keene }5oyce b. .\[arch 


T5, i^'^-, 






George Keene Royce b. Oct. 


16, 1S63, 






Eunice Bassett Royce b. May 


II, 1868, d. 


May 


8, 1S69. 


Helen Maria Boyce b. Nov. 


5, 1870, 






Henry Swift Royce b. June 


10, 1872, 






Mary Brtcd Keene was the dati 


. of Geor 


ge W 


. Keene (b. 



I-eb. II, 1S15, and d. Jan. 26, 1S74J and Mary Ann P.reed 210, 



wb.o were ni. Dec. 8, 1833. 



William wSolonton Boyce ni. Nov. 14, 18S3, Helen Lee 
Attwill. Marian Keene in. June 5, 1S84, Joseph A. Stein 
George Keene ni. Sep. 12, 1SS8, Inez Apphia Nichols. 

No. 264. 



Micaiah Breed 255, 


b. Oct. 20, 


17SS, d. May 16, 1S51. 




Married 








Ruth Gove 


b. 






Edmund 


b. Aug. 12, 


1813, d. Sep. 21, 1S34. 




William 


b. Oct. 20, 


1 8 16, d. May 4, 1S48. 




Zephaniah 265, 


b. March 10, 


1819, 




Micajah Breed wa- 


ia shoeinakerand fanner. Ilis w. wa: 


sadau, 


of Hdnuind Gove and Mary Breed. 


They settled at Weare, 


, N. H, 


No. 265. 








Zephaniah Breed 264, 


b. July 8, 


1819, 




Married 


■A'-',^'- 7, 


1845, 




Mary P.. Thompson 


b. 






William O. 


b. June 26, 


1846, 




Charles H. 


b. Dec. I, 


1849, 




Maria L. 


b. March 31, 


1852, d. Au.ic- 20, i860. 




Francis H. 


b. Jan. 14, 


1856, d. Sep. 2, 1S60. 




Jennie T. 


b. March 10, 


1863, 




No. 266. 








Anna Breed 255, 


b. Feb. I, 


1791, d. Dec. 23, 1S62 




Married 








Elisha Parker 


b. 






David Parker 


b. 






William Parker 


b. 






Lydia Ann Parker b. 






Anna Breed was 


b. in Weare, N. IT., and d. at 


Lynn, 


Mass. Her husband was a carpenter of Lynn. 





li. Apr. 
All-. 
1.. July, 
b. 


6, 1793, (1. Apr. 
3. 1S15, 
I-!, I7V2, d. Apr. 


b. 
b. 





'2, 


1795, cl. Xo\". 


4, 1S57. 


4, 


1824, 




^> 


1796, d. Sep. 


5, 1S61. 


'S, 


1SJ5, d. Oct. 


21, JSS4. 


4, 


182S, d. l'\-b. 


12, 1865. 


25, 


iS3,5, 





No. 267. 
I'lube nrtx'd 255, b. Apr. 6, 1793, d. Apr. 3, iS.s6. 

Married 
Abin-r Jones 

William Junes 

James Jones 

Georg-e Hen ry J one^ 

Rebecca Jones b. 

Phel)e Breed w.is 1). at We-aie, and d. at I.yiin. Her luis- 
baiid was a .son of J"se|:ih and Ruth G<)\-e Jones. He was a 
machinist for many years, and later became a manufacturer of 
shoes in L>nn. 

Rebecca m. Joseph Rowell of Amesbury. 

No. 26S. 
Samuel Derby llreed 255, b. June 
Married Nov. 

Elizabeth Harr Madduck b. Feb. 

Sarah Maddock b. Dec. 

William Maddock 269 b. Jan. 

Mary Jane b. Apr. 

Samuel I>reed was b. in Weare, and moA'ed to IMiikidclphia, 
Pernia., where he d. His dans, engaged in busine-^s, and for 
many years were successtul in their dry g(jO{ls and trimming 
store, on \'ine street below Twelfth street. On the death of 
the elder sister, the store was sold and Mary and her sister-in- 
law now live in I'liiladelpihia during tlie cold weather and 
spend their summer da>-s in L_\nn, doing much good work in 
both cities. 

No. 269. 

William M. Breed 268, b. Jan. a, TS28, d. Feb. 12, 1865. 

Married Sep. 22, 185S, 

Mary Bassett Boyce 262, b. Oct. 16, 1S33, 

Eunice B. b. Sep. iS, [859, d. Nov. iS, 1S59. 

William M. Breed was b. in Philadelphia. He graduated 
from the Jeffer.^ou Medical ColleL;e in that city, in the spring of 
1S55, and became a very successful practitioner. He made 
surgery a specialty, and was for a long time Assistant Demon- 
strator of Anati'iny and Chief of tlie Clinic in that college. 
Early in the War of the Rebellion he entered into the Govern- 



niL-nt; svrx-if^?, and was f(ir soinctinie Assistant Snr>.:;L'0!i in the 
Army ITospital, at I'ilth and Ikittonwood streets, Philadeliihia. 
in the summer of 1S62, he and other well-known patriotic 
citi/ens, impressed with the superior advantages oftered tor hos- 
pital purposes, l)y the capacious building at the corner of Six- 
teenth and Filbert streets, and occupied as a State Arsenal, used 
their efforts with the proper authorities— military and civil — to 
secure its possession. After a I'rief delay, they were successful, 
and it was soon ]irepared for the reception of sick and wounded 
soldiers, and he was app(Mnted Surgcon-in-charge. 

• After leaving this institution, he resigned his position in 
the service, to devote him>elf to private practice, which he did 
not live very long to follow. " He was an excellent physician, 
and an honorable, courteous gentleman, and enjoyed the respect 
and esteem of all who knew him." 
No. 270. 
Richard Breed 247, b. 
Whirried 

Richard b. 

Elsie b. 

Sallie b. 

Richard Breed, Jr., went to Akron, Ohio, to settle. Klsie 

ni. Jonathan Conner. Sallie m. Samuel Silslen. 
No. 271. 

Elizalpet'n T-reed 247, b. 

Married 

Jedediah Peiiington b. 

David Peiiiiv^ton b. 

Betsey reiiington b. 
No. 272. 

Benjamin Breed 195, b. July 4, i7[5, d June 7, 1798. 

Married Sep. 27, 1747, 

Kiith Allen b. d. Apr. 17,1811. 

Jabez 273, b. Nov. 14, 17.1S, d. Oct. 13, 1S14. 

Kezia 1). Au;.^. 25, 1750, 

Abraham 2S1, b. Apr. 19, 1752, d. Nov. 26, 1831. 

Ruth b. I'\-l). iS, 1754, d. .Aug. 10, 1776, 

Nathan b. l"eh. 19, 1756, 

Benjamin b. Feb. 23, 175S, 

Anna b, Nov. 26, 1761, d. Nuv. i j, 1763. 

i-:ben^rzer h. May 12, 1766, 
Ruth Allen was fnjui Meuden, Worcester Co., Mass. 



N"o. 273. 






Jabez Breed 272, 


h. Nov. 


14, 


Married 


Apr. 


19, 


Mary Rassett 


b. 




Bassett 


b. Oct. 


24. 


Ruth 


b. Jan. 


24, 


Asa 274, 


b. Feb. 


23. 


Content 


b. Apr. 


'3- 


Francis 


b. Jan. 


7, 



174S, d. Oct. 13, 1S14. 



775, d. Dec. 22, 1S62. 
7S0, 
23, 17S3, d. Oct. 2S, 1S41. 

I7S5, 
I7S9, 

The History of Lynn tells ns that on ^^ay i, iSoo, tlie ship 
"William Henry," of Salem, owned by Hon. William Grav, 
was wrecked on an island of ice. Three of the crew were John 
Xewhalh James Parrott and Eassett Breed of Lynn. They 
launched the long boat and the whole crew (15 persons) leaped 
into it. They saved only the compass, captain's tnnik, an 
axe and a fishing--line. 

For six days the only water they had was taken from a 
hollow in the ice where rain had collected. On the fourth dav, 
the\- caught a fish, which some of them devoured raw, but the 
others were too faint with their long fast to swallow any. When 
the storm and fug cleared away they went ashore at Xewfound- 
land, and the next morning found their boat .stove and full of water. 

They subsisted for three da}s on sea peas, thistles and 
cranberries. Se\-eral of the crew were ui;able t<) walk, but ha\-ing 
repaired their boat, they put to sea and were discovered by a 
vessel, which at tn-.-,t would afford them no relief, Ijut after much 
entreaty threw them a rope, and they arrived at St. John's, where 
the American Consul furni>lied them with a pa.ssage hrjme. 

Bassett Breed lived to acquire considerable propertv, and 
was a worth V citizen. 



2S, 1S47. 

;S, 1S41. 



No. 274. 










Asa Breed 273, 


b. Feb. 


23i 


17S3, 


d. Oct 


Married 


May 




1S09. 




Betsey Nicliols 


b. 






d. Oct. 


Hiram N. 275, 


b. Sep. 


2, 


1S09. 




Asa 


b. Nov. 


21, 


1S13, 




Antoinette 


b. Jan. 


3f, 


I.S16, 




Jo.^epli N. 


b. July 




iSiS, 




Ro-ers J. 


b. Mav 


4, 


1S23, 




Sidney I. 


b. Dec. 


I, 


1S25, 




H or. ice S. 


b. Marcl 


1 2S, 


1.S2S, 





Asa Breed was m. in Andover, Ma 



No. 275 



Hiram N. Hrt-ed 274 


,b. Sc-p. 


2, 


1809, 










Married 


July 


4, 


1^30, 










Nancy Stone 


h. 














Hiram X. 276, 


b. An-. 


i6, 


1S30, 


d. 


Feb. 


25, 


1S77. 


Asa X. 277, 


b. Feb. 


22, 


1S32, 


d. 


S.p. 


II. 


1.SS4. 


Edwin E. 


b. March 


-5, 


1S33, 










Betsev A 27S, 


b. Xov. 


30, 


1S34, 










MaitliaE. 


b. March 


3^^. 


1S36, 


d. 


Dec. 


s, 


1S73. 


Laura L. 


b. Feb. 


9. 


183S. 


d. 


June 


7, 


1S70. 


Abbey M. 


b. Dec. 


I, 


1S40, 










Julia F. 279, 


b. Jan. 


9, 


1S43. 










Nathan D. C. 2Su 


, b. June 


II, 


I '^44, 


d. 


March 


I, 


18S5. 


Clara L. 


b. Oct. 


15, 


1S46, 











Hiram X. Breed. Sr., is a man of extraordinary memory 
He wa.s once Mavor of Lvnn. 



No. 276. 

Hiram X. Breed 275 b. Aug. 16, 1S30, d. Feb. 25, 1S77 
Married i8s2, 



Nancy M. Roberts b. 

Hiram X. b. June 17, iS = 

Caroline S. b. Aujr. ',0, 18= 



No. 



Asa X. Breed 275, 


b. 


Feb. 


22, 


I S3 2, 


d. Sep. 


Married 




Xov. 


25. 


1S5S, 




Eliza \V. F'erry 


b. 










Anna Laura 


b. 


Mav 


17. 


1S60, 





I8S4. 



No. 



Betsey A. Breed 275, 


b. 


X(_.v. 


3c, 


■834. 


.Married 




March 


i'^, 


1S59, 


Gilbert Wallace 


b. 








Xettie F. Wallace 


b. 


June 


6, 


1.S62, 


Chester F. Wallace 


b. 


Jan. 


12, 


1S65, 


Charles T. Wallace 


b. 


April 


2, 


1S69, 


Leon E. Wallace 


1). 


.Mav 


3. 


1872, 


Henry A. Wallace 


b. 


April 


3-. 


1S7S, 



Gilbert Wallace was from North wood, N. H. 
(25) 



No. 279. 
Julia F. I'rced 275, b. Jan. 9, 1S43, 
Married June :;o, iSfi;, 

Charles W. I'aul b. 

Charles Nathan I'aulb. June ?, i86r, 
Willie Irvin- Paul b. March 23, 1869, 

No. 2S0. 

Nathan I). C.IVeed 275 b. June rr, iS.t 1, d. .March i, 1SS5. 

Married Feb. i, 1883, 

Jennie .A. Lind.-ay b. 

The Lynn Transcript of March 6th, 1SS5, speaks of the 
death of Nathan D. C. l^reed, as follows : 

" Mr. Breed was apparently in his usual health last Fridav 
and took a drive with a horse and carriage he liad latelv pur- 
chased. He contracted what i)rL.ved a iatal cold, leading to 
inilaiiiniation of the bowels. He received pnanpt and skillful 
medical treatment, but without avail, and he pa.-^.-^ed away at 
ten o'clock on Sunday night. He was a native of Lynn. He 
had held various city otTices, with satisfaction to the people 
and credit to himself. At the time of Ids death he was one of 
the Commissioners of Pine Grove Cemetery, and last January 
was elected a men.iber of the Water Board. Mr. Breed was 
married something more than a \-ear ago. 

The funeral services were held at the First Universalist 
Church, yesterday afternoon, ar.d were largely attCTidcd. Tlie 
various orders of which Mr. Breed was a mend )er were fully 
represented. An impre.-,sive Odd Fellows' service was a prom- 
inent feature in the obsequies. Kndjlematical tloral tributes 
testified to the esteem and honor in which he was held by his 
fellow-citizens. An addre.ss was made by Rev. C. W. P.iddle, 
and he was followed in a brief address by Wdliam O. Newhall, 
of the Society of F'riends." 

No. 28 1. 
Abraham Breed 272. b. April 

Married 
Sarah Bassett b. 

Joseph Rassett2S2,b. Sep. 
Funice \'. b. May 

-Anna b. Feb. 

Sarah b. Sep. 



19, 


1752, 


d. 


Xuv. 


26, 


iSjr. 




1757, 


d. 


Dec. 


30, 


1S31. 


30, 


I7S3, 


d. 


Oct. 


iT), 


1S44. 


2, 


I7SS, 


d. 


Dec. 


29, 


.8^9- 


26, 


^794, 


d. 


Nov. 




1871. 


20, 


179^, 


d. 


Feb. 


-I, 


1872. 



iuinice V. Breed m. William J). Tliouip^on. Anna m. a 
Mr. Francis Jolmson. Sarah ni. Jolui ]i. Chase. 



No. 2S2. 

Joscf.li liassclt Dreed 2S1, h. Sep. 30, 17S3, tl. Oct. 16, 1S4.}. 

'"^I<<"i^-d Sep. 23, 1809, 

Maryjohn.son b. April 9, 1785, d. hine 30,1857. 

Catherine b. Oct. 3, iSio, d. S^p. 24^ 1827 

Joseph R. b. Aug. 4, 1S15, d. July 15' jij6. 

Joseph 2S3, b. Oct. 2, 1817, d. April 2S, 1SS7. 

^->^''''^ b. Oct. II, 1821, d. Oct. 23,1821 

Richard J. 2S6. b. Dec. 25, 1S22, d. Nov. 2, 1SS3. 

Henry 2S7, b. March 9, 1S29, 



No. 283. 



Joseph Breed 2S2, 1). 


Oct. 


2, 


1817, 










Married 


April 


^7i 


^839, 










Phebe C. P.oyce b. 








d. 


Aug. 


16, 


1 866. 


William Herschellb. 


Dec. 


26, 


1 839. 


d. 


M:.y 


24, 


1 843 


Joseph B. 284, h. 


Aug. 


31, 


1S44, 










William U. b. 


Dec. 


14, 


1846, 


d. 


June 


ir. 


1849. 


Henry \\"ilber 2S5 b. 


Aug. 


M, 


1^52, 











In speaking of the death of Joseph Breed, Sr., a local paper 
of L^nn says : — 

"Joseph. Breed, who<e demise we are called upon to record, 
was born in this city, and has ever since been a resident here. 
The Friends' School, at Providence, R. I., received him as a 
pupil in 1834. From there he returned to Lynn, and like all 
young men of that period, considered it necessary to learn the 
shoemaker's trade. At the age of 22, he went into the employ 
of James N. Buffum, as clerk, holding the position until Au- 
gust, 1S43, when he farmed a partnership with vSamuel Tufts, 
under the name of Samuel Tufts & Co. On the death of Mr! 
Tults, in 1852, Joseph Breed bought his partner's interest, and 
continued the Inisiness luider his own name up to 1873, when 
he enlisted the services of his two sons, Joseph B. and Plenry 
W. B>reed, as i)artners. Fight years ago a stroke of paralysis 
caused a good deal of an.xiety to his family, so much :jo that 
they have ever since taken particular care to make life's burden 
as easy for him as possil,)le. 



Last Saturday, Sunday and Monday he was out and about 
attendin.c; on Sunday tlie First Universalist Church, of which' 
society he has been a trustee for many years. Tue-~day, fcdin- 
somewhat more indi.sposed than usual' he took to his'b'ed and 
from the effects of another stroke of paralysis passed away 
Thursday, at live o'clock, in the presence of his sons. 

The only public position he occu].ied was that of First 
Clerk of the Common Council, from 1S50 to 1S53. 

_As Trustee and Vice-President of the I.vnn Institution for 
Savings, his influence as a man of keen insight and prudeure 
has been of great benefit. He leaves two sons, as named above' 
his wife having died in 1S66. He had two other children who 
died in infancy. 

hi the death of Joseph Breed the communitv lo>es a man of 
general activity, a critical literator, an enthusiasiir lover of 
music, a deep thinker, a man of admiral)le foresight and good 
tastes, with a generous appreciation of the labors of others ''and 
one also, whose many acts of uuparaded charity will endear^is 
memory to many hearts." 

The funeral service took place at his late residence, Xo 2S 
Nahant street, on Sunday afternoon, May ist, at 3 o'clock." ' 

No. 2S4. 

Joseph B. Breed, 2S3, 

Married 
Mary Lavinia Norcross 
Joseph N. 
Mabel L. 
Charles N. 

Married 2d wife 
Mary Ida Demarest 



Xo. 2S5. 

Henr}- Wilbur Breed, 2S3, b. Au^; 

Married 
Hannah Louise .Martin b. j. j,„. 6,1877 

Married 2d wife 
Lillian Gertrude .Martin 
Fannie Louise 
Edward F. 



b. Au-. 
Sept. 


31, 
20, 


1S44, 
1S65, 




b. 

b. Sept. 
b. July 
b. April 


22, 
13, 

21, 


d. .May 
1S6S, d. April 
1S72, 
1S77, 


24, iSSf. 
15, 1^76. 


June 
b. 


20, 


iSSS, 





b. Aug. 
Sept 
b. 


M, 1852, 
20, 1S76, 


^Lly 
b. 


25, iSSo, 


b. July 
b. Feb. 


17, iSSi, 
22, 1S83, 



No. 2S6. 
















RiclK.rd j. Breed 2S2, 


b. Dec. 


^5» 


t82.->, 


d 


Nov. 


2, 


1S83. 


Married 


Dec. 


JO, 


1S5S, 










Caroline Dennis 


b. 














Marv i:. 


b. June 


27, 


1 .860, 










Edward E. 


b. Jan. 


12, 


1S65, 










No. 2S7. 
















] lenry Breed 2S2, 


b. March 


9. 


IS29, 










Married 


Nov. 


13, 


IS50, 










Sarah Ellen Williams 


. b. 






d. 


Aug. 


29. 


TS57. 


George H. 


b. Oct. 


16, 


1,851, 










Erank M. 2SS, 


b. March 


12, 


1S53. 










Charles H. 


b. March 


s, 


i«\55, 


d. 


Aug. 


5. 


iS55- 


Fred. 


b. Feb. 


I, 


1S57, 


d. 


Apr. 


22, 


1857- 


Married 2d wife 


Oct. 


15, 


1S62, 










Sarah Adams 


b. 














Flora H. 


b. Julv 


12, 


iS6,l, 










Henry Lincoln 


b. May 


21, 


1S65, 


d. 


July 


14, 


1S65. 


Isahelle M. 


b. Aug. 


s', 


1S67, 










Sarah Ellen 


b. March 


7, 


1S70, 










Emma II. 


b. Nov. 


14, 


)872, 











In a " Genealogy of the Breed Family," ]niblislied by ^vlr. 
Henry }>reed, he says : 

" In tracing the history of this family in this city, from 
father to son, and from family to family, and from generation 
to generation, now down to the tenth, I have formed a rough 
estimate of those now living here that have their origin in a 
more or less degree from Allen Breed, the emigrant of 1630, 
and judge it to be one thousand, more rather than less. 

Aniong these and from those who have preceded us are and 
have been the ones who were foremost in every good work that 
has proved to lie of much benefit to their native city, such as 
the incorporating and building the Boston turnpike (a great 
work for those days — 1S03), the two steam railroads, the horse 
railroad, in constructing the gas v¥©rks,> water works, and in 
establishing charitable and Ijenevolent institutions. At the 
State House, in Bo.ston, they have repeatedly represented the 
town and city in Council and Senate Chamber and in the Halls 
of the Legislature. In our municipal affairs they have served 
in every branch of its departments. While at the prison 
houses of the ^vhole State not one (\.o the writer's knowletlge) 
who bears the name has ever been a convicted inmate. 



The characteristics of ihu family as a whole are larger or 
al)o\e the average >i/x\ especiall>- is this true of the })ast gen- 
eration, they are broad across the sh'UiMcrs willi well developed 
lungs. the>- are free from pulmonary di-east'S, but many in ad- 
vanced ages ha\-e become corpulent and suLbject to apoplexy. 
Another peculiarity is loss ^f hair or baddness of the head. 

Thus briefly is given the history of a small part of this 
large family, which it is hoped will stimulate .-^ome members of 
other portions to do likewise, so that finally we ma>- gather to- 
gether a complete record of the whole. ' ' 

George H. Breed m. Aug. 27, 1S77, and had one ch., 
Archie b. May 25, 1S7S. 



No. 28S. 












?>a!ik M. Breed 2S; 


-, b. .March 


12, 


1S53, 






Marri^-d 


Nov. 


26, 


1S73, 






Clara E. Delano 


b. 










George H. 


b. April 


30. 


1^75, 






Melville 


b. Dec. 


2, 


1S76, 






Xo. 2S9. 












Timothy Bread r, 


b. 




162S, d. 






Married 


March 


3. 


1 6So, 






Sarah Xevhall 


b. M.u-ch 


3, 


1630, d. 


Nov. 


27, 16SS. 


J.,seph 


h. April 


iS, 


i6S[, 






TirnoLhy 


b. July 


I, 


i^S3, 






Samuel 


b. July 


I, 


16S6, 






Married ^d w. 












Sarah 


b. 










Thomas 


b. Jan. 


14. 


1^94. 






Mary 


b. Aug. 


14, 


1696, d. 


Aug. 


28, 1696. 


Sarah 


b. Aug. 


14, 


1696, d. 


Aug. 


2S, 1696. 


Thomas 


b. Sep. 


21, 


169S, 






Jonathan 


b. Jan. 


29. 


1699, 






Timothy Breed was b. in Hng 


land. 


His w 


■., Sarah, was a 



dau. of John Xewhall and Hlizabeth Pa}-t(jn. Timothy was not 
a lazy man. W'e learn from the Petition, a copy of which is 
given, that he took a little active exercise in the " Xipmugg 
country," and had quite a tancy for it. 

The name of Timothy and hi.- brother Joseph 252, will be 
found in the following Petition of .-^ome of the inhabitants of 
Lynn, f<->r a remuneration, f-r their -crviccs in the Wampanoag 
War, which was oresented in i6s^ : 



" Tu the honDrciI Governor and Compau}-, the Genc-ral 
Court of tlic Massachusetts liay, that is to be a>senil)lcd the 27 
May 16S5, the huuible petition of several inhabitants of Lyini, 
who were sold, impressed and >ent furth for the service of the 
country, that v>-a.-> with th.e Indians in the long march in the 
Xipniugg cr)untry, and the nght at the fort in Narragan^ett, 
luimbl}- showeth, That _\-our petitioners did, in obedience unto 
the authority whicli God hath >et o\-er them, and love to their 
country, leave tlieir deare relations, some of us our dear wives 
and children, which we would have gladly remained at home, 
and the bond of love and duty vrould have bcmnd us to choose 
rather soe to h.ave done considering the season and time of year, 
when that hard service was to be performed. But your 
petitioiiers left what was dear to them, and preferred the 
publique v/eal above the private enjoyments, and did cleave 
thereunto, ai:d exposed ourselves I0 the dilTiculties and hard- 
ships of the winter, as well as the dangers of that cruel warr, 
with consideration to the enemy. What our hardships and dif- 
ficulties were is well known to some of \'our v/orships, being our 
honourei-1 magistrates, as also what nierc\- it was from the Lord, 
who alone preserved us, and gave our lives for a pre_\-, by lead- 
ing us through such imminent dangers, \vhereb>- the Lord gave 
us to see many of our dear friends lose their blood and lite, 
which might have been our case, but that God soe dispo.-^ed 
tov.-ard us deliverar.ce and ^trengtli to returne to our iKanes, 
whicli we desire to lemendjer and acknowledge to his most 
glorious praise. P.ut >et, v/e take the boldness tosignihe to this 
honored Court, how that ser\ice was noe whitt to our jtarticular 
outward advantaire, but t<.) thecontrary,much to ourdisadvantage. 
Had we had the liberty of sta\dng home, as our neighbors had, 
we had paid double rates, it would have been to our advantage, 
as indeed we did pay our properties l)y our estates in the publick 
rates to the utmost bounds. Nothwithstanding all, \-et we 
humbly conceive, that b>- suppres^ion of the enem>- which God 
of his great mercy \-ouchsafed, wee poor soldiers aiul servants 
to the country were instruments to procure much land, which 
we doubt not shall and will be impro\-ed, by the prudence of 
this honored Court, unto people that need most especially. 
And we, >'our p^jor petitioners, are diver.^ of us in need (if lan.d, 
for want whereof some of us are forced upon considerations of 



dci^artinc; tlii< Colony and GoverninLnt, to seek accommoda- 
tions whercl)\' the iK-tter to maintain the cliar;4e in our famiHes, 
witli our wives and cliildren, and to leave unto them, when the 
Lord .^hall take u.> away by death, which we mu.-t ex|"^cct. 
And di\-ers of us ha\-e reason to fear our days may be nmch 
shortened by our hard service in the war, from pains and aches 
of our liodies. that we feel in our bones and sinews, and lame- 
ness thereljy taking hold of us much, especially at the spring 
and fall, whereby we are hindered and disabled of that ability 
for our labour wdiicli we constantly had. through the mercv of 
God, before, that ser\-ed in the wars. Xow, your poor petition- 
ers, are liopeful this honored Court will be moved with consid- 
eration and some respect to the poor soldiery, and particularly 
to us, tliat make bold to prefer our petition, humbly to crave, 
that we. whose names are liereunto subscribed may be so gra- 
ciously considered b}- this honored Court as to grant us some 
good tracks of land in Nipmugg country, and our posteritv 
may live in the same colon_\' v.diere our fathers did, and left us, 
and probably many of those who went fellow soldiers in the 
war may be provided for, and their children also, in the portion 
of conquered lands their fathers fought for. Your petitioners 
think it is but a very reasonalde reque.-t, which will be no way 
offensive to this honored Court, which, if they shall please to 
grant unto your petitioners, it will not only be satisfaction to 
their spirit.-, fur their services already- dorie, but be a future 
obligation to them and theirs after them for future si-rvice, and 
ever to pray. ' ' 

This petition was signed by twenty-five inhabitants of 
Lynn, whose names were, William Bassett. John Farrington, 
Nathaniel Ballard, Timothy Breed, Jonathan Locke, Daniel 
Johnson, Widow Hathorne, Samuel Tarbox, Samuel Graves, 
John Ldraunds, Samuel Johnson, Daniel Golt, Jo>eph Hawkes, 
xVndrew Townsend, John Davis, Joseph Collins, Samuel 
Mower, Robert P(jtter, senior, Joseph INIansfield, Robert Driver, 
John Richards, John Liudsey, Philip Kertland, Jose|)h Breed, 
Ilenr}- Rhodes. It was also signed b}- sixteen persons of other 
towns. On the 3d of June, the Court granted them a tract of 
land in Worcester count}-, eight miles square, on condition 
that thirty tamilies, with an orthodox minister should >ett!e 
there within four years. 



KINf". PIIIIJP'S WAK. 

Ill the vear 1675, an old Indian vSaclieni, Passaconaway, 
lived nt IVnacook. Tie had great fame anion;:;; the trihes and 
any words of his had a strong intluence with all the chiefs. 

In 1660, at a great dance and feast, held ])y many of the 
•tribes of that territur}-, now called New hhigland, Passaconaway 
rose and spoke as a dying man to his friends: "Hearken to 
the last words of your father and iViend. The white men are 
the sons of the morning. The Great Spirit is their Father. 
His sun shine.-. 1)right about them. Never make war with them. 
Sure as you light the fircs, the breath of heaven will turn the 
flames upon you and destroy you. Listen to my advice. It is 
the last I shall be alh^wed to give >-ou. Remember it and live." 
These words were long remembered by his sou Waiudonset. 
Upon .some of the others it had the .>ame effect, but upon most 
of the chiefs, the strongest iinpres-^ion was produced by the sad 
wraning (hat the White Man was advancing, and caused a de- 
sire to oppo.se them by war. One noted chief, among them, 
Philip, Sachem of the Wampanoags, determined to take 
advantage of this growing discontent to encourage a 
wardike spirit. His old men approved and he .secured the 
alliance of the Tarratcens. the Ossipees, the Indians at 
the mouth of the Pascataqua at Swam.scot Falls and at 
Newich wan nock. 

The helj) of the Tarrateens was .secured by a singular inci- 
dent. The wife of Iquando, sachem of the Pequankets, was 
passing on Saco river with her infant child, in her frail birch bark 
canoe, when she was met by some thoughtless sailors. They 
had heard that Indian children could swim as naturally as the 
young of brutes, and they up.set the canoe. The child sank. 
The mother instantly dived and recovered it, but the child died 
soon after and the Indians ascribed its death to this brutal treat- 
ment. Iquando was a noted sachem, a leader in the supersti- 
tious devotions of the Indians, and pretended to hold intercourse 
with the invisible world. This imlignity gained his inHuence, 
and thus the tribes of Maine and Massachusetts became Philip's 
allies. 

In June, 1675, he began his war again>t the whites by an 
attack on Swan.^ey, Mas.-.., and then on to New Hampshire, to 

(26) 



Soineihworth atiJ Duihain, then on to Maine, to D'axt, Lam- 
prey river and ICxter. Pliilip led tlie southern tribes against 
the Massachusetts towns of Brookheld, Deerfield, Ilalfield, 
Mendon, Ciorton, Relioboth, Providence and Warwick au'l 
many other pkrces. These fights contiiuied. until winter came, 
and then Philip retired, glutted with blood, to a great swamp 
in Rhode Island, sixteen miles from Pcttyquamscot, where he 
built on a piece of dry land in tlie heart of the swamp, more 
than six hundred wigwams and stored large quantities of pro- 
visions, and enclosed the camp with a fence of branches and 
piled baskets of corn inside the huts, to make them bullet-proof. 
He had witl; liim old men, women and children, in all over one 
thousatid people. 

Tlie colonists organized a winter expedition against him. 
MassachusL-tls furnished 527 men. Pl\-mouth 159 and Con- 
necticut 300, and to these were added 150 Mohegan Indians, 
making 1136 men, under John Winslow, Governor of Plynunith 
Colony. 

The colonists started on December 19, 1575, from Pctty- 
quamscot, and by afternoon reached and attacked the Indian 
fort, marching through deep snow. After a desperate fight, the 
whites set fire to the wdgwaras and slew the Indians who tried 
to escape. It is believed that one thousand Indians were killed 
and mortally wounded in this tight. 

This v^-as a death-blow- to the power of the southern tribes. 
Philip was de-erted by his allies, and was surpri-^ed and killed 
by an Indian in the .service of Capt. Cluirch. Troubles with 
the Indians did not stop here, but this was the end of " King 
Philip's War." 

Xo. 290. 

Joseph Bread i, b. 1632, 

Married 

Mary b. July 4, 16S4, 

Joseph. Pfrcad was the first child of our fimily b. on Amer- 
ican soil. He took an active part in King Philip's War, en- 
listing with ins brother Timotlu", in the expedition to Rhode 
Island. I See 2^9. ; 



Xo. 29 r. 


















John Bread i, 




b. 




163-), 


d. 


June 


28, 


167S. 


Married 




Dec. 


2F, 


i(M, 










Sarah Tl.ithorn 




h. June 


2, 


t6pi, 


d. 


Fet). 


22, 


1676. 


John 




b. June 


7. 


1664, 










Sarah 




b. Dec. 


2S, 


1667, 










Wilham 




b. May 


iS. 


1671, 










Ephraim 292, 




b. Dec. 


16, 


1672, 


d. 


Dec. 


29. 


1721. 


Ebeiiezer .-gj. 




b. April 


'3i 


1676, 










• Married 21] w. 




March 


4, 


167S, 










Sarah Hart 




b. 














John Bread was 


b 


. in Lynn 




His 


\v. 


Sarah 


, \\'as a 


Jolm Ilathorn of L>nr 


1. 














No. 292. 


















Ephraim Breed 2' 


,(r, 


, h. Dec. 


16, 


1672, 


d. 


Dec. 


29, 


1721. 


Married 


















Martha Gloss 




b. 






d. 


.May 


15, 


1765. 


Eh'zabeth 




b. Jan. 


5. 


1702, 










Martha 




b. Feb. 


17, 


1704, 


d. 


Jan. 


2, 


I72I. 


Ephraim 293, 




b. April 


2, 


1707, 


d. 


Nov. 


21, 


1739- 


Rebecca 




b. June 


22, 


1709, 










Rebecca 




b. Nov. 


10, 


171I: 


, d 


. o<-t. 


7- 


1730. 


Sarah 




b. April 


8, 


1714, 










Mary 




b. March 


5- 


17 15. 


d. 


Jan. 


2^, 


I72t. 


Charles 296, 




bap..Mch. 


29, 


1719. 











Martlia Gloss was a niccc of Charles Chambers. 
Elizabeth m. Joint Dysert. Martha and Mary d. of small- 
pox. Rebecca 2(1 d. of fever. 

No. 293. 

Ephraim Breed 292, b. April 2, 1707, d. Nov. 21, 1739. 

Married Dec. 30, 1730, 

Hannah Huet b. 1710, d. Dec. 4, 1737. 

Epiiraim 294, b. Sep. 14, 1731, 

Ephraim Breed, Sr., was a mariner. 



No. 294. 














Ephraim Breed, 293, 


b. Sept. 


14, 


1731. 








Married 


May 


12, 


1757, 








Hannah Newell 


b. March 


22, 


1732, 


d. Jan. 


2, 


176 r. 


Ephraim, 295, 


b. Dec. 


17', 


1760, 


d. Nov. 


15. 


1830. 


Married 2d wife 


Dec. 


3> 


1761, 








Ann Larkin 


b. 




1737, 


d. 




1793- 


Married 3d wife 














Marg:aret Harrington 


b. 






d. Feb. 


ir, 


iSri. 



Hannah Xewdl was a dan. of I'liplia Newell, a potter. 
Ann T.arkin P.ieed d. at Marlboro. 

No. 295. 

Ephraim Breed, 294, b. Dec. 17, 1760, d. Nov. 15, 1S30. 

Married 
Dorcas Sylvester b. d. Nov. 12,1846. 

Anna Phillips b. May 12, iS<i2, 

Hannah Newell b. May 2}, !So6, d. Sep. 4, 1828. 

Anderson Philliijsb. Dec. 28, ]8i!, 

Epliraim Breed d. in Charlestown. ?Ie was a cordwainer 
of Boston. 

Anna Phillips m. Antonio Cri.-^p. 

No. 296. 
Charles Breed, 292, bap. .Mcli,29, 1719, 
-'^I'^rried Jan. 31, 174S, 

Hannah Newell b. Jan. 30,1722, d. Dec. 24,1763. 

Cileries b. Jan. 2, 1754, d. Sept. 19, 1757. 

Charles Breed was baj). March 29, 17 19. He was a mari- 
ner. His w. was bnried Dec. 24, 1763. 

No. 297. 

Ebenzer Breed, 291, b. Apr. 15, 1676, 
Married Dec. 4, 17 12, 

Mrs. Hannah Carey b. 

Ebenc/er b. Ai^r. 22, 1715, d. July 17, 17:5. 

Ebenezer b. Dec. 28, 1716, d. March 11, 1717. 

John, 298, bap. May 4, 171S, 

Ebenezer b. Apr. 3, 1720, d. Aug. 22, 1720. 
Mrs. Hannah Care\- was a Miss Marshall. 

No. 298. 

John Breed, 297, bap. May 4, 17:8, 

Married June iS, 1741, 

l\Iary loiter b. 

Ebenezer, 297, bap. July 11, 1742, d. July 13, 1S17. 

Mary b. March 25, 1744, 

John b. April 20, 1746, 

Hannah, 300, b. Dec. 28, 1747, 

Sarah bap. May 6, 1750, 

John Breed, Sr., was a distiller. 

Sarah was bap. early on the day of May 6, 1750. 



No. 299. 












zibciie/er Rixed, 29S, 


b.july ri, 


174-', d. 


July 


13- 


1S.7. 


Married 


Oct. 31, 


1767, 








r'hebe Trumbull 


b. I-eb. 


174-% c3. 


Mav 


3. 


1 76S. 


James Trumbull 


bap. May 15, 


176S, d. 


May 


10, 


'797- 


Married 2d wife 












Mary Trumbull 


b. 


1751. tl. 


Sept. 


19- 


i8u). 


John 


bap. Sep. 23, 


•77'', 








Ebenezer 


bap. Oct. 27, 


1771, 








John 


bap. Dec. 27, 


1772, 








Richard Foster 


b. 










Mary 


b. 










Hannah 


b. 











Ebenezer Breed, Sr., was bap. July n, 1742. He was a 
tin-plate worker by trade. In 17S7 he was Ttjwn Treasnrer. 

James Trumbull was a merchant. His w.'s name was h'liz- 
al^eth. Jr.lm m. Ruth Tnfts \'osc. John 2(1, lived at Ik-lle Isle 
— since called Breed's Island — Boston. Richard P'oster Ijecauie 
a nieichant in Liverpool, England. Mary ni. John Shaw, of 
the U. S. Xavy. 

No. 300. 
Hannah Breed, 29S b. Dec. 2S, 1747, 

Married 
David Osgr.od b. 

Mary Os.i^ood b. 

David O.-good was a clergyman. 



INDEX OF CHRISTIAN NAMES, 



Aaron 216,223 ' Amos, S9, iiS, 119, 120, 125, 195 



Abl>a 210 



329, 247. 254 



Abbey 223 ; Amy 223 

Abhie 275 . Anderson 295 

Abel 9, 10, 15S, 159 I Andrew 14,3, i^q 

Abi^-ail, 4. 5, '^, 13, M, '5. ^5: i'-',5, , Andrcvs 14, 16, 17, 2J4 

140, 146, 195. 199, 201,205,206, i Ann. 4, 29, S5, 121, 122, 12S, 140, 

^37. 241-, 245, 256 : 217, 236, 24S, 263 

Abijah 189 ' Anna, 17, 19, 31, 35, 39, 52, 104, 1S6, 

Abbott 21S : 192, 195, 196, 216, 237. 245, 251 

Abraham 4- 2S1 266, 272, 277, 2S1. 295 

Addie 84 , Arinic,93, 136, 211, 216, 233, 236, 241 

Adelaid 4, 236 Annis So 

Adelia 151, 250 Anson 217 

Adell 1S2 Antoineite 115, 217, 274 

Adin 5S, 94 Andalucia 88 

Alb-rt 160,204,223,233,236 Arcnatli 12 

Alcy 135 Aroline 205 

Alec 235 Arthur 19, 91, 219 

Alexander 1S2, 183 Asa 32, 274, 277 

Alice, 31, 39, 106, 214, 217, 237, 241. ^ Atwood 152 

Allen, I, 2, 3, 4, 5, 12, 13, 14, 15, 20, I Augusta 15, 59 

21, 22, 23, 27, 28, j2. 34. 37, 2,S, I Augustus 23, 211 

39, 140, 142, 144, 145, 160, 162, : Aurelia 113 

16S, 1S5, 192, 193, 236, 248 Austin 10, 245 

A'"^^"^^ 162 Avery 131, 132, 133, 139 



29, 219 



Almina 4 

Almira 216, 223, 227, 246 Baker. 

Alton 116 Bancroft ..2] 

Alvord 70 Barker 29, 211 

Amanda 84 Barlow 13, 14 

Amarintha 139 Barnard 39 

Amelia 39, 89, 127, 130, 2:1 Banici 147 

Amey 204 Bartlett 211 



I^,is>^ett ?S2 ' Chirk 23, 71 

]?athslich;i 126 Chirksoii 212 

Bell 192 Cluris'.a 103 

Bciijaniin i 1-7, 22S, 272 Clovuland 1S9, rr/j 

Berlha 72, 168 Climena 176 

Bessie 117 Cuiidacc 154 

Bcthia 51 Content 205,207, 255, 260 

Betsey 83, 125, 160, iSS, 27S Cora 77 

Ei:j;lo\v 214 Cordelia 133, 176 

F)lake 211 Cornelia 244 

Blaner 16 Curtis 60, 21S, 224 

Blany 13, 14, 15, 16 Cynthia 205 

Bosworth 90 Cyrus 57 

Bourne 223 

Bowman 214 Daniel. . 16, 200, 237, 24,1, 245, 246 

Bradley 70 David.. .160, iSS, 1S9, 190, 193, 256 

Brantley. 135, 139 Davis 17 

Burrile. 216 Dcui 73 

Burroui^hs 224 Debora 201, 20S 

Burvvitt 116 Deliverencc 21 

Butler 224 Delia 141 

Buxt(jn 206 Derby 26S 

Desire 201,202 

Calancia 164, 172 De Witt 1S3 

Caldwell 139 Dorcas 257 

Caleb 165, 166 Dorothy iSS 

Calista 85 Dudley 76, 161" 

Calvin 120 . Dwight 89, 90, 91 

Caroline 4, 96, 190, 223, 276 

Carrie 98 ■ Earnest 23 

Catherine, 14, 40, 75, 84, 139, 20S Easter 55 

'282 Ebenezer, 195, 2u2, 247, 248, 249 

Celia 173 : 255, 272, 291, 297, 299 

Colina 13 Eddie 116 

Cephetta 1 36 Edith 77 

Charles, 4, 14, 23, 27, 70, 73, Si, 84 Edmund 130, 264 

98, 105, 117, 130, 142, 144, 150 ; Edward, 17, iS, 77, 91, 174, 208,223 

159,163,189,197,192,194,211 i 236,285,286 

234, 236, 242, 248, 258, 2G5, 2S4 ; lulwards 196 

287, 296 I luiwin. . . 73, 2r7, 219, 221, 222, 275 

Chaplin 210 Eeloline 152 

Charlotte 102, 146, 248 Etlie 93 

Christoi)her 140, 141 ' Egburt 90 

Claflin 224 I I-;iiiaiior 58, 73, 107, no 

Clara 90, 200, 275 ' Elias 118, 135, 136 

Clarence 23 ' Eliphabet 5 



KHsha 23 

I'-liza [, 13, 69, 13.S, 169, 191, 24S 

Eli/al.ali, 2, 3, 7, 15, 2..., 32, 51, S5 
b.'^, 113, 122, 1^,7, [93, 2^6, 215 
223, 226, 232, 240, 244, 247, 249 

271, 292 

Ella, 76, 115, 117, 152, 223, 232, 246 

Kllen 2 11, 248, 259, 2S7 

VAnv.jr 236 

Elsie 169, 270 

EWnra 1G6 

Emily 117, 139, 174, 20S 

Enirna .9, jo, 55, 127, 17S, 192, 2S7 

FmocU 23, 237, 245, 256, 259 

Kpliraiui 4, 292, 293, 294, 295 

Ervin 2", 

Estelle 1S2 

Esther, 3;,, 55, ujG, hi, [25, 14^, 

165, 166, iSo, 193 

Ethe! 37, 72, 21S 

Ethliiitj 211 

Eudoi a 246 

Eugene 82, 149 

Eunice.... 56, 57, 177, 202, 253, 281 

E\elyn 15 

Everett 82, gr, 92 

I^^'''^ "3. 151, 23S I 

I'ally 162 [ 

Fannie 2S5 i 

Fanny S3, 136 \ 

Ferdinand -,1 

Fi^h -3, 76 \ 

Fitch 107, no j 

Fit/patrick 234 1 

Flint 219, 24S I 

Flora 2S7.. i 

Florence 92, 218, 236 

Ford IS I I 

Foster 299 : 

Franc 73 

Frances 223 : 

Franci.s, 15, 17, iS, 135, 137, 13S \ 

167, 200, 210, 211, 265 

Franlc....7j, 1.^2, 183, 242, 243, 288 
I'rankhn, 120, 147, 14S, 151, iG-^, 223 



Frederick, 5, 6, 7, 70. 91, 106, 150, 

223, 241, 287 

I-'ullcrton 2r6 

Garnie -2 

George, 13, 2S, ;i2, 82, 93, joi, 109, 
142, 144, 151, 163, 169, iSi, 183, 
192, 19 }, 200, 209, 213, 217, 22 r, 

223,236,258,287,288 

Cieorgiana 22 v 227 

Gershorn 141, 145, j6i, 1,^5 

Gertrude 18, 89 

Grace 55, 57, 78, 1 12, 125. 127 

Green ^g 

<^'i'eene 164, 165, 166 

Gulielnia 246 

Gyrtie ny 

lialton 12 

Hamilton 214 

Hammond 73^ -^ 

Hannah, 12, 16, 28, 106. 120, 140, 
142, 151, 156, J62, 172, 174, 175, 
200, 202, 207, 208, 223, 226, 231, 

237, 254, 295, 299, 300 

Harriet, 4, 28, 38, 47, 137, 211, 216, 

217, 223, 225, 232 

Harry 121 

Harvt-y 79, 150, 168 

Haskins [- 

Hattie 127, 224 

Helen 59, 168. 177, 223 

Hendrick 166 

Henry, 11. 16, 58, 59, 60, 84, 122 
127, 13CJ, 145, 162, i66, 167, 177 
192, 2o<j, 217, 218, 263, 285, 287 

Frep/.ihah ' 5, 20 

Herbert 23, :;7 

Herminone 216, 217. 22^ 

Herscheir ' 283 

Hervey 210 

Hey wood 22 r 

Hiram 275, 276 

Homer 2=18 

Horace.. 130, 163, 217,221, 223,274 
Hotton 17 



^^"^•■•"■J ic>, 36, 130 I Juslui.-i I04, 113, 120, 209 



it.Kird. 
Hukl. 
Ihmt 



Ida 

Itno,L;ene 



Jiidilli 204 

Judsoii u6 

Julia 23, 94, 127, 12.S, 180, 279 

-U"^'"^ i^i 



99 

178 

Ira 2S 

I^aac 216 

I-^abelle ,S7 ' '""'"^ ''^ 

Isaiah 202. 2:0. 212. 2T, ,.. ; Ke.np 220 



•■^^^le T52 

Kavc 22-> 



212, 21^4 



T_^„ I ' rvt.iui.ii IQ 



Kendall 



■245 



labez. ..139, i6r, 201, 



20 



o> -', 



Keziali . . . ; 105, 206, 207 

Kinsman 233 

Kiiiyan 182 



139 



Jabisli 15S, 164, 176, 177 

Jacob 16 ; 

Jft>"-sun ,;6 ; Lail 

James, 10, 77. 138, 151, 161, i8r, ; Laura, 10, 62, 160, 17S, 219, 24S 

194, 206, 207, 209, 2ir., 21 1, 2r2, I 2-s "^"7 

219, 222, 231, 234, 236, 242, 247, ■ Lawrence 59, 103 

253, 259 ; Ledwin 167 

J-'^'^e 3, 22, 23. 92, iSi, 249 , Lena 152 

J'^''^''^ 70 I Leonard 23, 90 

J'lsper 138 j Letitia 74 

J"^^^^'-li 121 ' Levi 151 

1^^^'^y^ 223 j Levicia 174 

J^f'^''^'^"'' 137 ' Leu-ella 23 

-'<^n"'e 224, 265 i Lewis 23, 144, 172, 224, 235 

J^'i'^'^''^ 134, 13^^ ' Libbie loi 

i^'i" 130 i Lilla 221 

Jerusha 5, x6 : Li„c,,!n 2S7 

J^^^e 60, 120, 1S5 i Lindsav 12 

John, r, 20, 21, 22,23,25,36,39,51, I Lizzie 153, 213 

55. 56, S3, S4, 91. 1,55, ir5. iiS, ; Lois 59, 177, 202 

119,127,132,134,135,136,142, I Lona 117 

151. -173. iSb, 192, 194, 200, 201, I Louis 59, 136 

-37. 241, 291 29S, 299 I Loui-a 17, 19, 86, 113, 190 

Johnson i, 129, 186, 20S ; Louise 224, 285 



J'-'"^'^^ 125, 1 28 : Lonj;street 

5 



J"»^itlian 244,289 ; Love 5 12 



Ju"es 20S ' Loyd 242 

Joseph, !, 2, 3, 4, 5, 16, 27, 70. :3_ Lucilla 210 

105. 131, J32, 137. 138, 164, 172,' ; Lucinda 34,'205 

173. 194. 274, 282, 283, 2S4, 290 I Lucius '. . ^,0 

]o-.\:ih I, JO, 21, 27. 2S, 29 I Lucretia 28 

J^^'^ 241 ! Lucieu I3y 

(27) 



Lucy, 2,-;, 2S, 29, 55, 57, S5, 10 j, 105, Merle S9 

113, 124, 125, 127, 170, 172, 174, ' Merrill 72 

208 Micajah 264 

Lii-'Ua 77,152 . Milly 2S 

Lulu 79 Milun -3 

Luther .147 Minnie 23 

Lydia, 4, 13, 14, 15, 22, 2t„ 24, 142, Mira S9, 241 

155. '71, iQi. 194- 199, -o;,, 2(4, Miranrla 165 

207, 216, 236, 239, 255, 256. 2S2 Monroe 78 

' Mont.;^^onicry 92 

Mabel 243, 2S4 i Murce 3 

Madd'jck ^ 26S Mortimer 217 

Malia 4 Morton 39 

Malissa 137 i Morvi'le 249 

Mansfield 223 ' Moses 202, 204, 2uS, 245, 25^ 

Marcey 56 Mudge 236 

Marcil'la 172 McLaren 185 

Margara i8r, 235 

Maria, 14, 15, 59, 84, 103, 127, 192, Xabby 19S, 216 

200,210,211, 216,223,265 Xancy, 57, 94, 105, 121, 129, 133 

Marian 77, 214 135, 191 

Marietta 160, 167 Nathan, 104, 105, 113, 133, 139,206 

^Laril.■n 77 , 20S, 237, 238, 248, 25,6. 257, 272 

Marittie 173 I 2N) 

Manila, 57, 84, S5, 165. 211, 259, Nathaniel, 4, ;o, 21, 25, 27, 31, 32 

275.-92 214 

Marvin 151 Nehiiniah. . 12, 13.25,196,197,199 

Mary, 2, 3, 4, 10, 15, 20. 23. 27. 28, Nellie 23, iiX), 17.^ 

31, 33, 51, 55, 56, 91. 92. 98. 121, Nettie 169 

125, 128, 135. 139, 140, 142, 145, Ne\>ell -38, 295 

157, 162, 165, 177, 18-3, I9<^:i. 191, Neuhall 221 

192. 193, 201, 202, 207, 20S. 21 1. Niles 126, 127, 130 

215, 220, 222, 223, 225, 231, 232, Norman i.*^' 

233, 237, 239, 240. 244, 245, 248, . Noyes 14> 

~55y 259, 263, 264, 26S, 2S6, 289, 

290, 292, 29S, 299 Olando 89 

Mata' 17S Ollie 243 

Matilda 113, 223, 24S Oliver 57, 70, 71, 84, 103, U3 

Mattie 130 (Jrphah 12, 13 

^Latlhe\v 3,5,169 Orianna 217 

Matthews 31 Orrin 24S 

.^LauriLe 1 93 ( >rson '7'^ 

May 127 Ods 14. 19. 223 

Mehetabel 3, 27, 28, 32 

Melville 2.SS Packer "^2 

^Icicy 55, 105 , I'aige 2;: 



' •••Inier t:5, i.i6, 14S, 16S I Sands 12- 

;;^>'f ^" 90 : Saiah, 3, 4, 29, 51. 55, '56,'97 ' 105! 

^ ''■^'^'^'<^y 17, IS , 136, I3S, I3y, 151, 177,1,%, 1^2, 

J^^''*'"'^'-' ^'45 , '9^ ^-'-'S, -^07, 20S, 213, 216, 217, 

\y^'^^^ 139 1 223, 249, 257, 26S, 281, 2^7, 2S9, 



iVrkin 

I'ersis 219. 222 ' Shc-pard 

Pliebe, 61, 123, 142, 167, 231^ 236, Shubal 



91 __ 291, 292, 298 

13 

191 



Phi! 



267 Si!. el.. 
135 Sidney 



274 



Pli'll'PS 295 Sinieun 1,4, 

Philura irg, i'^4 Simon ' "' j^^ 

^'^""^■^s 34 Silence ' ' 106 

r'"»y S3, 1G6, 179 Sinclair 214 

4 



f'ope 214 Si^son I 

Torter 116, 127 Supl.ia y 



34. 35. 37 ' Sophronia 



Pratt 

l'^''t"^'ce 56, S3 Stacey 30 ^i 

Preston 210,214 Statford "^ ' ^ 

P^^e^ce 105 Stanlev 10-' '„o ' ^^^ 



P^ila-^ki 162 Stradnui 

Rachel .9 



190 

42 Stephen, 106, 107, loS, no, 2^,1, 2^ 

Ralph i=;o r-i ^ ' . -^ 

' '0->'/4 2-^:;, 2^S, 2Sb 2^Q 

R^-^ndall : 125 Survier .7 s. 

Rel..-cca, 20, 30, ..^o, ]S6, 247, 252, Susan 4, 17, ,9, ,57, 211 

'^'\ -53- 254. 260, 292 Susanna S4, 140, 1S5 

Reuben ....... 2S. :,2, 56, 85,89, 90 Suett 20S 



f'^lio^'i 165. 171 Svlvester 

Rich ,3c, 



14 



Richard, 133, 136, 192, 24S, 259, 270, '^^■^""-"'- S9 



2S6, 299 



Tavlor 2S 



Richardson 81 Teall j^. 

Riddle 153 Texanna 13^ 

Robert 107, no Timothy i, 2S9 

Rochu-ell v. . 73 Thatcher ^ 

Rodman 213 Thcodate 2or 

Rogers 274 Theopholis 4, 215, 230 

Ruby J62 Thomas, 12, 16, 25, 26, 29, 113,^14, 

Rufus 32 '34, 13^, 139. '41, 169, 236, 256, 

Russel iS.1, iSr 259, 289 

Ruth, 3,4, T2, 195, 216,247, 26t, 272 Thurston 221 



Sal lie 



\'inton. 



Samantha ... .87, , r3, 133,' 135.' 138 '^''" ''^'^"^s^'^er. 
Samuel, 5^,84, S9, 116, 122, 127, 195, W.dker 



196, 247, 24S, 249, 268, 2S9 Waltt 



^^'•'^''ncr 2(6 , WilHanis 15., 22), ?^,r, 

^Vanvn 2:,6 , Wik.T "... ' , ,\ 

Washington 28,32,133,22;, \ Winslovv 2-, 

^^'ebb 236 , Winthrop 219 

Wheeler 107, n>. Woodburv ,S 

Wilfred 212 ' ' 

William, 6, S, 10, 11, 23, 35, 37, 39, Xenophon 151 

. 7u, 106, I II. 113, 121, 133. 135. 

137. ifvS, 139, 140, 141, 162, 163, 

174, 196, 19.S, 2w, 218, 224,239, Z-phLiiiah 



York 



162 



244, 2r 



240, 243, 247, 253, 255, 264, 265, , Ztruiah 51, 1^0 

26S, 269, 2S3, 291 , Zeslie S4 



Index of Names other than Breed. 

Ad.irns, L:u;ra A 10 ', Dabcock, Maribah ii4 

" ^^^'y ^^' 16 , liailey, Clarinda 3,, 

" Sarah 2S7 I iJaker, Sarah Ann ^g 

AlfVed, Helen A 69! Ballard, Elizabeth ,0 

^""'^-^^'-•''' 14 ; Bancroft, Martha R ojj 

" Ruth 272 I u c- . 

yu X, , i baran 211 

Allev, li.innah 207 'n c 1^ 

, ' ,, , ^ ' , Susan 1 Tir 



Mrs. I. B 16 



r 
Mrs. Tlius. F 16 



Micaiah , 217 ' n 1 t- t - 

•+' i B.irker, Lva Louisa 6 



Mirriain 199 



Sarah Ann. 



Sarah 206 : m t___!__ t . 

Alvord, Frederick W 97 : 



Irving L 67 

La.ura Mary 6" 



Juliette 70 

" SethW 97 W^lham U 67 

" TheodoreW 97 ^ " ^V illiam Henry 67 

Andrt^us, Abbie D 63 ^^'^'tl^^t. Miss 223 

Kdi^ar H 6^ Basconi, P. C 43 

Nellie B 41 Bassett, Aima 261 

Arnold, Otis R 175 ' " Deliverence 196 

Atwcll, Fniily i;o ' " ^^''^'' 261 

" Sarah 216 ' " Eunice 262 



Sterlinj^ i- 



E> 



Atuill, Helen 1 263 ' " Hannah 198,204,26: 

Austin, Mary 245 " ^■^'^'^'-" 261 

Moses 245 " Joseph 253 

" Phfbe 245 " ^'>'^''^ 255,261 

Avery, I'riciUa 131 ■ " ^^^'^V 237,261 

Ayrt'S, Olive F 242 " Rt-becca 253 

Sarah 281 

Babcock, Lucy 104 1 '• William 261 



Ratdu-lor, Mannali 07 

Henry 5.1^:^7 

" Sarah 16 

Bct'ley, Mr 105 

I'eers, Eninia 11.7, iio 

Heldin, Mary L 11 

llenneit, Nancy 209 

Bernard, Rev. David 112 

Berry. Eli/a \V 277 

Belts, Lucy B 46 

" Samuel T 46 

*' Samuel T. Jr 46 

Billings, Eli-ha 112 

" Jesse 112 

Biliin-sly, J. L 139 

Bird, Klla 223 

" John 223 

BlackniM:, L. B 175 

Blake, Mary 210 

Blanchard, Fannie C 1S2 

Blany, Abigail 13 

Bolt'.n, Dudley 126 

" H.C 126 

" John 126 

M;irv 126 

William 126 

Booth, Alexander G 22<j 

Percy N 220 

Bosu.,rth, Amdia E S9 

Bolsford, Luiliei- 113 

Bou-en, Mrs. M. \V 142 

Bowis, R. A 115 

Bowne, Gulielma 246 

" Xaome 246 

" Robert L ....246 

Boyce, Cliark-s 262 

" Charlotte 251 

Eliza 251 

" Eunice B ... .263 

' ' George K 263 

Gilbert 251 

Helen .M 263 

Hep.ry S 263 

Isaac B 263 

James 251 

" Jonaliian 251 



Boyce, .Marcia 251 

M.irian K 263 

Mary 261 

" Mary B 269 

Patience 251, 256 

" PhebeC 2S3 

" Samuel 251, ?6i 

" William S 262, 263 

Boyd, .M. j 235 

P.oynton, Delia .S6 

liradford, William 20S 

Bradley, Cora L 70 

Brantley. Francis 133 

Brawley Hugh 84 

Briggs, Angus 96 

''" E. G 205 

" Edward R 96 

" lAnci 90, 96 

Brown, Daniel 51 

' ' Elizabeth 217 

" Emily 170 

" Esther 170 

" Lewis 170 

" Maria L 262 

'• Polly M 170 

Browning, P'r.mk 1S4 

" Fred JS4 

Hazzard 1S4 

Bryant, Mr 33 

" Allen 33 

Charles S SS 

E. S 88 

George ^2, 

" Harriet 33 

John 33 

" Joseph 33 

Leveret 85 

Louisa 33 

" i^i'f^y 33 

" Maria SS 

" Mary Ann 2^3 

" Mott D SS 

Reulien 33 

" William 33 

BuTinn. Jc-inathan 2(-i7 

Burdick, Ezra 165 



Burns, Mar-arel M iSr ; Christoi-li. r. Joscpliiiic r, j 

P.uirctt, C".eo;-e H 9 ' CIa[.p..;r, joim li ,'-,, 

•"^f-T-iani P g ' - Juliette R rs, 

nurrill, Ebcne/ri- 254 ,' Clark, Gc.rgi.:; C -,; 

Burt, Cora May 63 \ " Marian 2^ 

" Franks 63 " Screno B -/, 

Burton, Charl-s W 50 ; Clement, Kli/aoeth iSS 

Henry C 50 ' " Jereniiali iSS 

Jonas W 50 Clements, l-^lizalicth 113 

Lottie \V 50 - Clitt;,rd, Hiram 2.;:; 

M--irtha L 50 : Cl'_ai-li, I-:ii/ahe;h 3t 

Sterling 501 " Charles 15 21-, 

Butler, Alahama 224 Coburn, Elmer 23 

Allen 44 j " Nelson 23 

" Allen? 45! " Zilpha 2^ 

" Eflith 1 44, 46 ■ Coc'nran, L. L 127 

" Eucy E 45! " L. P 127 

Butler, William Allrn 44, 45 ' Cole, ^lm 140 

" William M 45 : Collins, Mr 105 

Buxton, Ke/iah 206 j " Elizabeth 252 

; " Enrich 252 

Callender, William B 223 ] '' John 12 

Camp, Charles 171 ' " Micajah 252 

Campljcll, Cora 99 CongJon, Rebecca C iS'j 

E. B 99 Conger, Clarire C 103 

Minnie 99 •' E"rank E 103 

Cannon, Ijonjamin 13S " Inez 103 

Carr, Frederick 49 " Oliver 103 

" George W 49, •■ p. E 103 

" Harriet E. B 49 Conner, Jun ithan 270 

Carrol, Helen M 23 Counsell. Rhoda 78 

Cary, Hannah 297 Cook, Celestia 117 

Carter, Daniel 207 Coolidge, Silas 204 

Chambers, Charles 292 Cornell, Julia So 

Chapin, Elias C 211 " Mary ,S6 

Chase, John 259 Cortland, Lydia 244 

" John B 2Sr Crawford, Ann E 225 

Josiah D 245 •' Emma 225 

^^olly 245 " Georgiana A 225 

Nathan G 245 " Harriet N 225 

Phebe H 245 " Jennie S 225 

Rhoda 259 " John 225 

Rhoda B 25S " John S 225 

" Sarah 259 " Mary A 225 

Chatham, Parmelia 13S " Samuel 225 

Child-^, Catherine 16 " William S 225 



Crisp, Ant(Mii() 295 

Croit, Ikiny H iqi 

Crofoot, I'-)sepli 154 

" Siniion C 154 

" Soplironia C. M 154 

CurriL-r, Benjaiiiiii W 2.S5 

Curtis, Hannah 224 

" Helen 59 

Ciirtiss, Mary 1 21S 

Diigg-eit, Harmon 113 

Dalton, Miss 16 

Davis, Jmiatlian 17 

" MaryC 17 

" Matilda 23 

" Susan T7 

Delano, Clarcno E 2SS 

Demarest, Mary 1 2.S4 

Dennis, Caroline 2S6 

Dcnison, Mary W^ooden 8 

Devendury, Adaliiie 9S 

Devotion. Mary 1S6 

Dewey, I lannah 140 

Dixy.'Sally 255 

Doll, Erastus S 125 

" Joseph 125 

Doran, Ann Eliza 171 

Dow, Franklin 204 

Durkee, Harriet M 23 

Dvviu;]it, James 1S7 

" James McL. 1! 1.S7 

" Timothy 1S7 

Dye, Polly 165 

Dysert, John 292 

Easom , F. P 136 

Eastman, Abi'^ail 240 

Eaton, Gilbert 155 

" Lucina 155 

" Ralph 155 

Scmford 155 

" Selah 155 

Eberly, Louise 243 

Eldridi^e, i>ertha 175 

" Calancia 175 

" Cloe 176 



Eldrid-e, Elam ,75 

Edison 175 

" I^li/aE 175 

Hann;.h M 175 

" JohnM 175 

Louisa 176 

^-iryA 175 

^lary J 175 

'' Minnie A 175 

" Orson 175 

Edwards, Rhuda O 192 

Estes, Elizabeth 255 

" J^^ekial 255 

" I-"rank!in 255 

" 1 »ty 255 

" i-y^^i^i 255 

" ^I^^ryA 251 

" Kebecca 255 

Ruth 255 

Everett. Martha 85 

P'adner, Eli/a A 1S3 

Faitchild, Sarali K 48 

I'"arrinj-lon, Mrs 247 

" Daniel \ 

" Sanniel 12 

Sarah 3, 6 

h'aulkner, Jeffersun 133 

Pa-^k'v T37 

Ee.iritiL;-, Herthki Cdbbs 9 

Jolni 9 

Fenn, Orpha Ann 89 

Ferrar, George A 171 

" Melissa 171 

" William A 171 

I-'ish, Catherine 84 

" Eleanor 58 

Msk, James 23 

" Jiio. E 23 

Fisher, F. F 138 

Fit/palrick, hdla 23 ^ 

k'orrest, William 38 

William Allen 38 

Foster. Mary 298 

F.wler. I'lliott S 143 

Geor-cH 143 



Fouler, IJlliu M 1.13 Oeyer, F..linuiMi 126 

" Marria'u .M 143 j " ICverctt 126 

Roy F. U3 ' " < ""-a. L- J 12^, 

Frcc-man, AKicbtft 87! " .Mary 126 

Ca]isUi 87 I " Sidney 126 

Chaunr.-y 87 j Gillctt. Austin 154 

" Clark S S7 : " Sar.ili Ann 190 

E'JnuuKl L 87 I Gleasoii, Mr 105 

Frances A 87 i Gloss, ^[artlla 292 

John S 87 ' Golf, Sarah 113 

Lucia A 87 , Cioldsniilh, }::du-ar(l 255 

Lucy A 87 ' Gutl, Lydia 21 

Mary !■: 87 ! Gould. Lieutenant 28 

I-'rink, Mr 57, '^o | " Miss 248 

P'ry, Dorcas 256 j Gove, Abigail 255 

" Homer 151,256' " Albert 260 

" John 2561 " David 255,260 

'• Lydia •••256 j " Dorcas 257 

" Miriam 256,257! " Fdniund 244,264 

" Sarah 256 I " Ira 260 

Fuller, Joseph 253 j " Josiah 260 

Fuhncr, Charles E 66 j " M.irtha II 260 

Clark A 66 I " Milton 257 

" I). Morgan 66 ; " Patience 204 

H.Elton 66 i " Ruth 264 

Minnie L 66 " William 260 

" Nellie E 66 i Green, Ad.iline 255 

" Christopher 171 

Gardner, Ca'encia 184 I " E. T. 11 255 

Charh.s 184 J " Frank 255 

Charlotte 1S4} " Grace 57 

Elisha 1S4 i " Huldah 244 

George 1S4 I " Humphry G 255 

Harriet 1S4 ! '' Is.iac B 255 

" flenry 1S4I " Isaiah 255 

Marzetta 184 | " Judith 244 

Garrett, Mrs. M. M 139 } " Levi 244 

Gear, Clara II 227 { " Marilla F 17 ^ 

" EllaJ. 227 I " Mary 255 

" Emma S 227 | " Obadiah 255 

" Georgia C 2271 " Sallie 255 

" Horace H 227 j " . Sarah 255 

" William 227 I " Rhoda 164 

Geer, Sophia 107 j " Willi. tm C 171 

Geyer, Mr 126 Grant, Gilbert 104 

" Dudlev R 126 " Silence 5*^ 



Graves, Alfr^Ml II. 39 

" lluuarc! M 39 

Minnie D 39 

Murrny 15 39 

Gray, Hannah S4 

Grinnicr, Lociia 91 

Grubbs, Augusta II 116 

Guile, Susanna loS 

Hacker, Alfrtd 208 

Henry M 208 

Hall, Grace ••••79 

Hallowell.T 4 

Harrington, Margaret 294 

Hart, Sarah 291 

Harvey, Adaline 168 

Miranda 165 

Nelson 165 

Hancock, Amos 105 

Haskell, fonathan 205 

Hatch, Clinton 102 

Frank 102 

"■ Warren 10? 

Hathorn, John ... 291 

Sarah 291 

Hauverman, J. L 97 

Hawes, William H 75 

Healy, Albert S iSo 

Mattie R iSo 

" Stephen iSf-i 

Heath, Betsey 113 

Hewitt, Anna 52, 53 

" Annie 52 

Charles 53 

Charles, fr 53 

" Kli 53 

" Hannah 53 

kani 53 

Israel 52 

" Israel Jr 52 

Mary 54 

" Palmer 53 

Perez 53 

Rufus 52 

Sta-itoii.... 53 

Hillard, William 172 



Hinkley, John 51 

" Sanuiel 51 

Hoag, Alvin 21.4 

Hogdon, Abigail 245 

John 245 

" Susanna H 245 

Holbrouk, Mi-^s 106 

i I lolmes, Mercy "^5 

I Hood, Anna i95 

; " Tiipodate 205 

I Horton, Carolina 20^ 

I Hoskins, Philo 142 

; Hubbard, Dwight P '^^5 

E. m' 226 

{ " M. D ^5 

Hudson, Xehcmiah 205 

Huet, Hannah 293 

Hulbert, Jerusha S4 

Hull, Orvilla ^i 

Hunt, Anluir - 23 

" Ethel 23 

I " Juhn 23 

j " Lavern 23 

i " Ruby 23 

j " Su.-,an 233 

j Hutchin-on, Jennie I. 97 

I Hvde, Charles 171 

1 '" Frank 171 

i " Lorenzo ^7^ 

I - Lydia ^71 

I •• Mtlissio 171 

I 
Illslev, Mr 216 



.24S 
..63 



i Jacoblius, Lilla M 

Jaycox, Margaret 

i Johnson, Mr 201 

I " Arthurs 19 

j " Cornelia 191 

I " Edmund 244 

" Pxlward 4 

' " Eliza T 221 

! " Enoch 244 

! " Enochs 19 

I " Lydia 244 

I " .Mary 282 



(28) 



Juluisoii, Otis 19 j Larr;il)ec, NcIIit- 233 

Otis S 19 ■ I.aiTiK k, juhn Jr 12 

" Susan L 19 ; Lathrcjp, Ann iqi 

Jones, Abner 267 > Law, I'lcd 213 

" Anios 15 125 I Law rcnc-c, Lititia 73 

" Charity 125 ; Lauton, Olive 213 

" CharlotK-; A 125 j Lt-ccli, Katlieiinc 1.15 

" Clarissa 113 1 Leitock, Jcjlm 12 

" Enuna I) 129 Lewis, Annie E 171 

" George 267 1 " Charles W 171 

" Hugh 125; '• Dora A 171 

" James 267 ' " Elias 171 

" John 125 j " P^nieline 171 

Joseph 267 j ■' Eaimy 171 

" Olive 115' " CilesJ 171 

" Rebecca 267 ' " Hannah... 171 

Ruth G 267 I " Isaiah 171 

" William 267; " John ?-'j 

Judson, Carolyn 38 ! " John Oscar 171 

" Emily 39 " Joseph 17' 

" Isaac N 3S " Lydia 17' 

I " Mary I'/i 

Kaimr, William \V 226 i " Merlilo 171 

Keeler, Henry P. 69 ! " N'oyes 'T' 

Janus A 69 ' " Rhoda '7' 

Mary E 69' " Sally M '7' 

" Norman P^ 69 \ " Susan ' /' 

Keene, George W 210,263 | " William. '-' 

Mar>-B 263 i Lindsay, Abigail '• 

Kellogg, Arthur T S6| " Rev. Geo. D ■ ^'>- 

George C 86: " Jennie A -"-' 

Julius 86 : Lindsy, Willicun K'-'- 

Lewis 86 i Lines, Mr '"^ 

Kem[), Mary 216 | Longstreet, Carry I '■:•. 

Kendall, Marv Elizabeth 193' " Chalm.-rs ", 

Keys, Polly..' 26 i " Cra l' '' ^ 

KiiHie, Elizabeth 151 j " Cornelius 1 1 '<.% 

Kinsman, Lucy 216 '[ " Klk-n '''" 

Lucy A 216; " Herbert C ^.^ 

Timothy 216: " James '- 

Kirtland, .Mary 51 ; " James O 64.65 

Kite, James 261 j " Josephine ''i 

Kilteridge, Dr 251 j " Joseph P. '''- 

Knight, Elizabeth i | " Laura '>'■ 



! " LMuisa. 

L irkin, Aiuia 294' " Sullivan 



I.ootnis, Pollv M if^9 

" Samuel 165 

lA.rd, David 170 

" Edwin D ^:o 

•' Polly M 17^ 

" Steilin- 170 

Lorin-, Charles D i?7 

"' Fred. J 127 

Fred. P 127 

Sarah 217 

L';-uiisbur\-, Maria 43 

Lovcland, Antlse 241 

Lyman, Caroline 1 19^ 

Maddock, Elizabeih H 26S 

Clarence L 6>i 

Mahonev, Dorr ^S 

■' ' J. Carrr.ll 6^ 

Roy S 6S 

Thomas J 6S 

Mansfield, Ik-tsey 24 

Clara B 30 

Clarinda 3'^ 

Danit-1 24 

David 24 

Edward Calin 30 

Edward S 3'> 

Hubbard P. 30 

Israel 24 

Jacob 24 

Joel 24 

Lydia 23, 24 

Mary 4. 24 

" Newell 24 

Sally 24 

" Susannah 4 

Thomas 24 

William 24 

>hn)le, W.J 125 

Marlow, Susan 223 

Marshall, Mi.ss 297 

P.lanclie X luo 

JatTies M io«3 

Martin, Hannah 1 2.S5 

K-l-n May 23 

Lilian C 2S5 



Martin, Massey B 4 

Mecham, Lydia 14' 

Mclch.-r, Mr 21^ 

Mendenhall, Miss 139 

:\Icrcdilh. Emma M 225 

Merrilt, Charles 239 

Merry, Candice 103 

Metzgar, Cora 171 

Henry 17' 

Ida. 171 

Laura 171 

Willie 171 

Mewer, John 207 

Middleton, Elizabeih 135 

John 135 

Milk, Jn..... 23 

Mil'.an, Laura M 13S 

•' Rosa M 13S 

Miner, Fred.... 23 

" James 151 

Miriam, Rebecca 5 

Mitchell, Lottie Poyce 21S 

Money, Abi-ail i.;6 

Miiorc, Miranda 172 

" Sally P 210 

" Samuel R 225 

Morse, Pert 1 22, 

■' Minnie H 23 

Morgan, Elizabeth S; 

.Morrow, Catherine 91 

Morton, Rebecca .\IcC 39 

Morville, Susanna 249 

Mower, Hannah 256 

: " John 237,256 

: " Martha 256 

' .Mudcce, Alfred 216 

Capt. Samuel 216 

Murgittroid, Carrie E 60 

Murray, Rebecca S 35 

McCollum, Xancy m 1 

Mcl-dn.y, Calancia t7.S 

Charles A I75 

McFadden, Sarah E 92 

.McLau-hlin, Atldie 243 

MeLaren, Dorothy 1S5 

i .McKibben, Amelia 1^5 



McKiliben, Jane. 



.167 
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JohnW 165 I 

I 

Narcross, Mary 1 2S4 | 

Nason, William 84 

Neft; Philure 166 ! 

Newfll, ElizabLth 294 , 

" Hannah 294,296 | 

Lydia 24 

NVwhal!, Mr 216, 237 j 

Abigail 200 , 

Allen 5 | 

Daniel if>, 27 j 

Elisha 22 I 

Francis J 219 | 

" Giace 219 I 

Hannah 16 ! 

" Hanson 5 

Huldah 5 

" Jane 22 

" John 206, 250, 2S9 

Joseph 4. 261 

" Lydia 219 

May 4 

" I'ersis 219 

" Rufns 206 

" Ruth 215 

Susannah 4 

Thomas 4 

William 4 

William 250 

Newton, Wesson 165 

Nichols, Betsey 274 

LA 263 

" Phebe 231 

Niles, Betsey 125 

Norris, H. T 240 

Northrope, Faimie 77 

Northway, Rosaline S 65 

Noyes, N. M 104 

Oakford, L. S So 

Oliver, Gamaliel 24S 

Osborne, Marv V. 15 

Osgood, David 300 



Osgood, Mary 3<kj 

Ouen, A. G 173 

" G. A 1^3 

" Lucy i.\^, 

Farkt-r, David. 2O', 

Elisha 366 

" Josephine 212 

Lydia 266 

" Triunan 176 

Wiliiant 2(/} 

Page, Em ch 2.14 

" John C 2 M 

Paige, Green 204 

Palmer, Hannah 141 

Lydia 141 

Mercy 51 

Paul, Charles N 279 

" Charles W 279 

" Willie 1 279 

Payton, Elizabeth 2S(j 

Peabixly, Allen 1 2 ( 

Alvira 12.. 

" Amos 12; 

Elias 12.) 

Martha i-'i 

Nancy 12: 

Philura i-l 

" Samuel ' -' ' 

William ■ i-'4 

Peaslee, Abigail II 2 1 -", 

Betsey ^iS 

" Ebeue/er 243 

Martha 2^5 

Pelham, Earl i"-i 

George I'^'l 

Lora -•^4 

Pendleton, Mr '".S 

Pennington, Betsey 271 

David 27! 

Jedediah 271 

Perkins, Jabfcz 'V 

Lydia ">' 

Philbrick. Ida : -'.'^ 

WilhamJ -^1' 

Phillips, Elizabeth ^^: 



Phillips, Ivuth 244 

Walter ..244 

P'icrct-', Kiiinia C }5 

Piper, Emory I' 69 

" Giles Smith 69 

" Jacub 69 

Pliitnmer, Hannah M 223 

" Maria 223 

Pope, GeoriMa 139 

" Mannah P 214 

Porter, Julia Ann 127 

Potter, Charlotte 82 

Powell, John 125 

" Joseph 267 

Powers, Al)/enn S 152 

Pratt, Johanna 34 ' 

Prentice, Mary 55 

Purinton, P.rnjah 251 

" Elizabeth 239 

Huldah 23S 

" Thcodate 23^,248 

Robert, Winthrop 12 

Randall, Hannah 120 

l.ncy iiS 

Randolph, William L 225 

Reed, Miss 254 : 

" N. M 84 

Richards, Richard 5 

Richardson, Chauncey 96 

" Edward 96 

Ella 96 

" Emma 96 ! 

" Libble 96 

" William 6[ 

Reinhart, Bertha 178 ■ 

Roberts, Caroline 109 i 

" Nancy M 276 , 

Robinson, C. Emory 15 

Ida 71 ' 

Rockafellow, J. D 123 ! 

Rogers, Elizabeth 114 

^oy, Mr 125 

Sabin, Charlotte 179 ; 

" Esther M 179 i 



Sabin, Mary 1 179 

" I'hilo lyt, 

" Setli ,79 

" Se;h O i-c^ 

Samuels, I-". K i ^y 

" Sallie 139 

Satterlee, E. Jane 63 

Saunders, A. 129 

Abraham 129 

Annie M 129 

George 125 

George H 129 

' ' G race B 129 

John R 129 

I'l'cy E 129 

Mary L 129 

P. B 125 

S. O 129 

Sawyer, Philip 237 

Shedd, Florence 236 

Shepherd, Mary 84 

Shields, Margaret 143 

Shorey, Miles ^2 

Silsher, Nehimiah 206 

Silslen, Samuel 270 

Sisler, Charles E 153 

' ' George L j =; - 

Sisson, Hannah 172 

Slack, Willi.im 104 

Smith, Charles R S<j 

" Daniel 207 

" Edgarton J Sfj 

" Eleanor I So 

" Frederick E So 

" Giles S So 

" Jean Fayette 80 

" Marion F 80 

" Mary n 

" Morean D 80 

Orvin 103 

" Sarah 217 

Somers, Mr 87 

Spaford, I lenry A., Jr 190 

Mark A 240 

Spe.ikman, Benjamin 176 

Clesta 176 



Spfc.ikniaii, Cloe 176 ! 

E^a 176 I 

Frank 176 1 

J- J 176 ' 

Spencer, Anson 95 j 

Huldah 174 I 

Julius 85 I 

^Iar>' 95 | 

" Nancy 95 1 

Nellie 95 J 

Robert S 95 j 

Sro^rer, Hattie E 73 i 

Slncey, Rebecca 30 

" Hannah 53 . 

Stanton, Lizzie Clark 36 ! 

Mary S2 ' 

Steadnian, E. F 84 I 

Julia 1S9 ; 

Sterns, Alexander 126 I 

" An;j;eline 130 I 

" Grace 126 ; 

" Joseph 126 ' 

Stone, Nanc\- 275 [ 

Strong, Alfred 157 ■ 

" Frank 157 \ 

" Lucinda 157 ! 

" Orson ic;7 ! 

" Selah 157 , 

" William 157 ' 

Swain, Joseph 255 

Sweester, May 4 ' 

Sueet, Mary 10 1 ! 

" Phelie 98 I 

Sweetin;^, John 142 I 

Swett, Mary E 208 

" Sarah 207 

Sylvester, Dorcas 295 

Taylor, Lucy 28 . 

" Vir.i^inia 19 | 

Teall, Amelia 142 ' 

Tedford, William 1 73 ' 

Terry, Allyn B 41 

Emilv M 40 

" Emma A jo 

" Gilbert W 40 



Terry, Harri.jt 1 4,-, 

" Henry 15 jo 

" Herbert Allyn 41 

" Nathaniel M ^n 

Thatcher, Emma ,j 

Teu-ksbury, J. W i^ 

Thompson, Mary B. . . 265 

" Pardon .142 

William 2Sr 

Tindell, Catherine 1-9 

Torrey, Mr 22^, 

" ICvelvn 22:; 

" William 223 

Tower, Adelaid, 17 1 

" Hannah iji 

" Lewis X I- 1 

" Samuel N' ij[ 

Tracey, .Alamie u,i 

Prosper loi 

Trumbull, Mary 299 

Phebe 299 

Tu<'ker, Faniiia 236 

Tufts, Francis 29 

Turner, Dudley B 7; 

Dudlev 11 7 1 

l-'rap.cis I ;.! 

Hulet, McA 7; 

Vickey, Clinton D j^ 

Edwin J ..:; 

Vienne, Albert 14.' 

\'inton, Jehu y> 

Walden, Eli/a i 

" .\mos ! 

Walker, Lizzie 2S2 

Rebecca 186 

Wallace, Charles T 27.S 

Chester B 2:S 

Gilbert 2-s 

" Henry A 27'-' 

Leon H 27S 

Nettie F 278 

Ward, Susan 57 

Warren, Asa - '5 

Washburn. Sarah E i I'i 



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