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Full text of "Record of the Hampden-Sydney Alumni Association"

MARCH 20 1 1 



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HAMPDEN- 
SYDNEY 




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Hampden-Sydney College 



^ REGIONAL FOUNDATION 



.^W/'' ->%:V GLOBAL OUTLOOK 



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The Inauguration of ^*- - — 

Dr. Christopher B. Howarc 

as 24th President of the College , ,v, 



UPCOMING EVENTS 

TO CONTINUE THE CELEBRATION 



OF THE INAUGURATION OF 
PRESIDENT HOWARD 



^^■•'••' 



MAY 85 20II 

R. NICHOLAS BURNS 

Former Ambassador to NATO and Greece; 
former Undersecretary of State for Political Affairs 

Commencement Speaker \ 
10 am, Venable Hall Lawn 



www.hsc.edu/President/Inauguration.html 




John Lee Dudley '95, Editor 
434) 223-6397, therecord@bsc.edu, 
)x 626, Hampden-Sydney, VA 23943 
Richard McClintock, Art Director 
134) 223-6395,mccrmlock@hsc.edu, 
)x 626, Hampden-Sydney, VA 23943 

)pyright © 2011 by Hampden-Sydney 
College. Non-profit standard postage 
id at Farmville, Virginia Z3901, and at 
additional mailing offices. 

'ublished by Hampden-Sydney Col- 
;e, Hampden-Sydney, Virginia 23943, 
i a service to its Alumni and friends. 
)duced by the Hampden-Sydney Col- 
ic Publications OflSce, (434) 223-6394. 
intent of Tf)e Record is determined by 
Editor. Although the Editor welcomes 
NS about Alumni, Jlie Record does not 
int unsolicited articles or articles that 
are solicited without prior consent 
of the Editor. 



WW.HSC.EDU- 

w.jiicebook.comlHnmpdeiiSydneyCollege 



ON-DISCRIMINATION POLICY: 
Hampden-Sydney College, while 
mpted from Subpart C of the Title IX : 
julation with respect to its admissions 
and recruitment activities, does not 
riminate on the basis of race, color, sex, 
ligion, age, national origin, handicap, 
!xual orientation, or veteran status in 
e operation of its education programs 
nd with respect to employment. For 
formation on this non-discrimination 
jolicy, contact the Office of Human 
^sources. Box 127, Hampden-Sydney 
ollege, Hampden-Sydney, VA 23943, 
(434) 223-6220. 



r'HAMPDEN- 
SYDNEY 




aclmry Pierce 11 (f 
C) phones home as Alexey Potapov 
(from Russia) andjanko Kaitej '11 
otn Serbia) pass by Graham Hall. 

PHOTO BY STEPHEN O. MUSKIE 




2 

Viewing the Globe 

from atop Tlie Hill 

The worldwide impact of 
Hampden-Sydney alumni 





■^ BARRON FRA2IER '12 AND HIS HAMPDEN-SYDNEY RELATIVES 

Dreams and Discipline 

Destined from birth to be 
a Hampden-Sydney man 



11 

A new language 

for an old conversation 

A tiistorian seeks out ttie 
real causes of the Civil War 



HISTORIAN ED AYERS 




15 On the Hill 
26 Athletics 



29 Alumni Activities 
32 Class Notes 

ALUMNI PROFILES: Tyler Whitley '59, political reporter 
David Lawrence '98, ski instructor 



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Viewing the Globe 
from atop The Hill 



JOHN DUDLEY '95 



TTiere was a time when the closest most Americans got to an 
international career was serving overseas in the armed forces. 
Times have changed. 

American corporations have call centers in India Citizens for a Culturally Diverse World." Though 
and manufacturing plants in China. Foreign the College has for many years offered a variety 

automobile companies have factories in Alabama, of overseas educational opportunities, brought 



South Carolina, and Georgia. 

Though Hampden-Sydney College's serene 
setting may seem isolated at times, we have 
always understood that we must prepare young 



international students and speakers to campus, 
and imparted to students the value of understand- 
ing the variety of culture, both internationally 
and domestically, this plan formalized a process to 



men for whatever they choose to do and wherever increase opportunities for multicultural education 
they choose to go. For decades, this meant at Hampden-Sydney. The faculty and administra- 

European foreign-language training and courses tion of the College used the occasion of the reac- 



in world religions and world 
history. 

Not only do we continue 
to offer these courses, but 
we also have several study- 
abroad programs, inter- 
national faculty, cultural 
programming, and a grow- 
ing enrollment of interna- 
tional students. Today our 
programs are as diverse as 
the v/orld about which they 
teach us. 

Our world is getting 
smaller (or "flatter" if you 
are a student of Thomas Friedman) and our 
mission to create "good citizens" now means 
more than good citizens of our local communi- 
ties and the United States. Our role as global 
citizens grows each year, and Hampden-Sydney 
College has evolved to address these changes. 



The Inauguration of 
T)r. Christopher 'S. Howard 
as the 24th president of 
hfampden-Sydney College 
includes many programs throughout 
the academic year that recognize the 
College as a 
with a 
and a 

This third part in a series 
examines tfampden-Sydney's 

global outlook — how it 

prepares young men to become 

global citizens in the 21st century. 



JONALEOUNDATION 



creditation by the Southern 
Association of Colleges and 
Schools and its requirement 
of a Quality Enhancement 
Plan (QEP) to develop this 
plan. 

The QEP has four 
initiatives: establish 
residential language houses 
and an International House 
on campus; bring to campus 
Amity Scholars from other 
countries; bring to campus 
each year a scholar-, writer-, 
or artist-in-residence who in 
some way represents a multicultural perspective; 
and establish a fund for student groups to 
plan and carry out programs for the campus 
community that relate to the theme of "the 
culturally diverse world." 

The students have a Spanish house and a 



In 2006, Hampden-Sydney College developed German house where they practice language 
a plan called "Preparing Good Men and Good immersion. The International House is now 



THE RECORD OF HAMPDEN-SYDNEY COLLEGE ■ MARCH 2011 



several years old and 
regularly the site of 
intercultural events such 
as the Chinese New Year 
celebration, the Indian chai 
reception, and the Film 
and Food Festival. These 
programs, and similar 
programs at the language 
houses, are paid for in part 
by the fund developed in 
the QEP. 

Recent years have seen an increasing number 
of international teachers on campus. Amity 
Scholars, sponsored by the Amity Institute, have 
come from France, Spain, Colombia, and Costa 
Rica; one from Germany is coming next year. 
These scholars live with students in language 
houses, helping them with their mastery of the 
language and participating in cultural exchange. 
In a related move, for the past four years 
Hampden-Sydney College has welcomed, with 
assistance from the Fulbright Program, Chinese 
Foreign Language Teaching Assistants who live 
on campus, teach courses in Chinese, attend 
classes with students, and lead programs on 
Chinese culture. 

Nearly ten years ago, the Dean of Students 
Office developed "Beyond the Hill," a program 




Fulbright Scholar Chao Wei and Tian Shihao '12 

of China and Mohit Shrestha '11 of Nepal at the 

International House Chinese New Year celebration 



that offers public service 
trips to students. One of 
the most popular facets of 
Beyond the Hill is travel- 
ing to Central American 
and Caribbean countries to 
work with the non-profit 
organization Rivers of 
the Wodd. Since 2002, 
more than 200 partici- 
pants (students, alumni, 
and staff) have put in 29,260 hours of volunteer 
work in Belize, Honduras, Costa Rica, and the 
Dominican Republic. 

This past January, Beyond the Hill returned 
to Punta Gorda, Belize, for the sixth time to 
continue construction of a hospital deep in the 
jungle. Marshall McClung '11 went on the trip in 
January, his second. 

He says, "For the past three trips, we've been 
building the maternity ward at the hospital. It is 
vitally important for that area. It's surrounded by 
jungles. Women going into labor can get there 
quickly instead of having to travel to another 
hospital along dirt roads for two hours. We have 
had some small group discussions about what we 
got from the trip. The thing that kept coming up 
for me was being grateful for what we have here 
and spreading that message ol gratitude to others." 



Students on the Beyond the Hill service trip to Belize stand infviit of the maternity hospital they have been building. 




4 THE RECORD OF HAMPDEN-SYDNEY COLLEGE • MARCH 2011 



Closer to home, the Pohtical Science depart- 
ment recently changed its name to Government 
and Foreign Affairs. Dr. John Eastby says, "In 
some ways the change from 'political science' 
to 'government and foreign affairs' reflects our 
recognition that we needed a foreign affairs major. 
With the rise of America's position in the world, 
we've been called on to deal with parts of the 
world in a geopolitical and economic way that just 
was not the case a hundred years ago. This really 
began in World War I, but since 1940s and '50s 
political science departments have been develop- 
ing foreign affairs majors. With Roger Barrus 
teaching his world politics class, we began to see 
more of a need for it. Jim 
Pontuso has been traveling 
overseas more and more, 
which also showed us a need 
for it. And David Marion, 
with his work at the Wilson 
Center, has seen a growing 
student interest in under- 
standing the world and our 
place in it." 

The former politi- 
cal science department 
has always kept an eye 
on international happen- 
ings and encouraged our 
students to do the same. Will 
Homiller '99 is one of many 
Hampden-Sydney students who have earned an 
internship with the Fulbright Commission in 
Prague thanks to the help of Dr. Pontuso. Not 
only is that particular internship an opportunity 
to travel abroad and work within an esteemed 
organization, it also requires researching and writ- 
ing a paper. 

Homiller says, "That internship had a 
profound effect on every aspect of my life. 
Academically, I got a better sense of what students 
around the world were doing for their education. 
Personally, I developed a broader view of the world 
and a knowledge and appreciation for the diversity 
of cultures. Socially, I was challenged to reach out 
to people and to strike out on my own. There's 
not a day that goes by that I don't think about my 
time in Prague; it helped shape who I am. " 



Our world is 
getting smaller and 

our mission to 

create ''good citizens" 

now means more than 

good citizens of our 

local communities 

and the 

United States. 



Students going abroad for a semester often 
chose schools in Western Europe, but that too 
is changing. Yes, Hampden-Sydney still has 
students going to France, Germany, and the 
United Kingdom. However, this spring young 
men from The Hill are also in China, Morocco, 
Costa Rica, Egypt, and South Korea. 

We strive to create the most enriching colle- 
giate experience for our students. Time and again 
students who have studied abroad tell us what a 
pivotal experience it was in their lives. Living on 
their own and becoming immersed in a totally 
new environment accelerates maturation and 
cultivates learning. 

"Globalization is an 
unavoidable reality and 
the world is indeed 'flat,' as 
Thomas Friedman suggested 
in his revolutionary book 
from 2005," says Matthew 
Scholl '01, a fund manager 
for Pramerica Financial 
in Munich, Germany. He 
says he saw evidence of this 
interconnectedness when 
German pensioners lost their 
retirement savings because 
American homeowners 
defaulted on their mortgages 
causing a financial crisis. 
Scholl recommends 
students study abroad in an emerging economy 
and make a conscious effort to understand the 
dynamics at work in those countries. He adds, 
"Build and maintain a strong and diverse interna- 
tional network of friends and contacts." 

Study abroad is an effective way to develop 
foreign language skills. Scholl recommends it, 
as does Scott Schwind '93, a lawyer in Houston 
who focuses on international energy matters. 
Schwind speaks French, Portuguese, and Span- 
ish fluently and previously practiced law in Sao 
Paolo, Brazil. He says successful business leaders 
cannot sit back and wait for the rest ol the world 
to learn English, but he says this with a caveat. 
"We are blessed to be native English speak- 
ers. It is the language of international business. 
A Chinese businessman will negotiate a deal 



THE RECORD OF HAMPDEN-SYDNEY COLLEGE • MARCH 2011 



with a Polish businessman 
in English. For anyone 
who wants to do interna- 
tional business, be the best 
English speaker you can be. 
Remember, though, that 
foreign language can be a 
bridge to another person 
or another culture. When 
I am negotiating with 
people in their language — 
even though they may 
speak English — the fact 
that I speak their language 
makes them comfortable. 
That I am getting out of my 
comfort zone is a form of 
good will." 

Gerhard Gross '84 
agrees that speaking a 

foreign language is only part of the equation. 
Now the president and CEO-Mexico for Daimler 
Trucks North America, Gross could speak four 
languages when he enrolled as a freshman. He 
says understanding cultural nuances is also 
important. "In some parts of the world — Latin 
America, Spain, Italy for example — people are 
more emotional. In other areas, like the United 
States and Germany, people are very literal. 
Understanding these kinds of differences makes 
it much easier to work together. What Hampden- 
Sydney students really need to value, though, 
are the College's academic rigor and liberal arts 
curriculum; those are priceless." 

It was not until a study abroad program at La 
Universidad de las Americas in Puebla, Mexico, 
that Scott Williams '98 considered adding a 
Spanish major to his political science major. Alter 
graduation, he took his Spanish language skills 
and volunteered at the Coast Rica Rainforest 
Outward Bound School, where he later landed 
a paying job. He says, "This allowed me the 
immersion I was looking for to push my language 
skills and afforded me additional global perspec- 
tive in living in a foreign country, while working 
with other young, dynamic people from Austra- 
lia, South Africa, U.K., Zimbabwe, Chile, and 
more. My world got a lot bigger that first year 




Gerhard Gross '84 spoke four languages when 
he came to Hampden-Sydney. He says knowing 
both other languages and cultural nuances makes 
his life much easier as president and CEO- 
Mexico for Daimler Trucks North America. 



out of my historic comfort 
zone. I understood what it 
was to connect with people 
who didn't share my back- 
ground, to understand and 
synthesize other perspec- 
tives, challenge my own 
understandings, and grow 
immensely on a personal 
and professional level due to 
this experience." 

Williams continues to 
live in Costa Rica (with 
his Argentine wife) and is 
a partner in a successful 
real estate company with 
Martin Gill '00. 

Charles Blocker, Jr. '84, 
the CEO of Z-I Capital 
Partners in Bangkok, 
Thailand, says having a global outlook for the new 
century is more important than we may realize. 
"The 21st Century is Asia's century. Investing, 
living, working, studying, and existing in the U.S. 
will be heavily influenced by what is going on in 
Asia. This is not to say the Middle East, European 
Union, and South America are not players — they 
are — but the fundamental point is that the U.S. 
will increasingly play a different leadership role 
and have less prominence than in the last 50-60 
years. Economic, political, and demographic 
profiles make this almost certain." 

International business is a family affair for 
the Blockers. Charles Blocker's brother, Walter 
A. Blocker II '90, is the chairman and CEO of 
Vietnam Trade Alliance in Ho Chi Minh City 
and a member of the Board of Governors of the 
American Chamber ol Commerce in Vietnam. 

Not every student has the opportunity or the 
inclination to spend a semester or year overseas, 
but the College has ways of bringing the outside 
world to campus. There are the multicultural 
programs and international scholars created 
as part of the QEP, but having international 
students within the student body gives native 
born Americans the chance to develop lifelong 
friendships with young men from around the 
globe. Hampden-Sydney has a healthy population 



6 THE RECORD OF HAMPDEN-SYDNEY COLLEGE • MARCH 2011 




Charles Blocker, Jr. '84 



Scott Schwind '93 



Andrew St. A. Mcleod '08 



of international students, not students who come 
here for one or two semesters, but young men 
from foreign countries who choose Hampden- 
Sydney College for their complete undergraduate 
education. 

Andrew McLeod '08 could have attended 
the University of the West Indies in his native 
Jamaica, but he came to Hampden-Sydney 
instead. He says, "At this particular stage in your 
life, apart from getting a good education, you 
need to make certain international occupational 
connections." 

The number of international students on 
campus has risen and fallen through our history. 
In the early 20th century, many Presbyterian 
missionaries sent their sons to Hampden-Sydney 
College. Such was the case of the brothers 
Addison Alexander Talbot, Jr. '31, George Bird 
Talbot '31, and Charles Finley Talbot '32, who 

Scott Williams '98 (below ri^ht, with his Argentine wi. 



came from Shanghai, China, and had never 
before been to the United States 

Following World War II, the number of 
international students dropped significantly until 
the 1970s. When President Walter Bortz arrived 
in 2000, he recognized the value international 
students have in their intellectual and cultural 
contributions to the school. He increased the 
financial aid and work-study opportunities avail- 
able to international students and their numbers 
grew. In recent years, we have had more than 20 
international students at one time. 

Mohit Shrestha '11 is the president of the 
International Club and lives in the Interna- 
tional House, where the club hosts many events 
throughout the year. "We love to have people over 
to the house so we prepare and serve authentic 
international cuisine. One of our most popular 
events recently has been the Chinese New Year. 
ife Mariana) volunteered at the Coast Rica Rainforest 



Outward Bound School, landed a paying job there, and stayed on as a partner in a successful real estate company. 




THE RECORD OF HAMPDEN-SYDNEY COLLEGE • MARCH 2011 



Because we have more students taking Chinese 
now, a Chinese scholar on campus, and a grow- 
ing number of Chinese in the community, there 
is a lot of interest in celebrating the holiday." 

The International Club, which grew out of 
the Minority Student Union in 2004, hosts a 
variety of lectures and presentations throughout 
the year plus a large event each semester. One 
is a "mini-exhibition" with a multitude of food 
from around the world with performances of 
international dances and songs. However, the 
most popular event is the International Food and 
Film Festival. "We don't pick just any film to 
share with the community," says Shrestha. "We 
look for films that have been recognized interna- 
tionally and that have a message. Last semester 
we showed Amreeka, a Palestinian film about 
a family moving to the United States and the 
challenges they face. Many of those challenges 
are the same ones we international students faced 
when we moved here, so we really enjoyed shar- 
ing the film with the community." 

After graduating in 2008, Wesley Julian, Eric 
Lewis, and John Rothgeb enrolled in the Japan 
Exchange and Teaching Programme (JET), 
through which they taught English in Japan. 
The program not only gave them the opportu- 
nity to develop valuable teaching skills, but also 
provided an exciting way to immerse themselves 
in a foreign culture. 

After two-and-a-half years, John Rothgeb 
is still living and teaching in Japan. While he 
appreciates the intercultural development he 
has experienced, he is also getting comfortable 



with living abroad. "To be honest, I didn't expect 
when I left that I would be here for such a long 
time, but life is just too good over here. JET for 
me has been an opportunity to jumpstart my life 
after college by quickly getting set up into a 'job 
and apartment' scenario. It's definitely not the real 
world, but it's what I had envisioned would be the 
next step after finishing school." 

Wesley Julian and Eric Lewis have both gone 
their own way. Julian has returned to the United 
States and is a graduate student at the University 
of Richmond. Lewis moved to Cambodia where 
he was the chief tour master for PEPY Tours in 
Cambodia. He has recently returned to the U.S. 

Hampden-Sydney College students are 
keenly aware of the vastness of the modern 
world. During the last century — even the last 
50 years — advances in travel and communica- 
tion have shrunk the world to a more manage- 
able size. However, being able to travel the world 
with more ease now means our young men need 
to be prepared to engage diverse people and to 
appreciate their diverse cultures. The College and 
its students are preparing themselves for the next 
century, for lives filled with new experiences, 
for continued education, for the joy of cultural 
exchange, and lor the benefits of extending their 
outlook beyond local to global. 

Whether a Hampden-Sydney Man is around 
the world or across town, he must understand the 
value of every other person he meets. We do this 
by having a global outlook, by looking beyond 
our literal and figurative horizons to discover 
more about our world and ourselves. 



I 




Eric Lewis '08 as an English teacher in Japan (left) 
and as a tour company manager in Cambodia. 



8 THE RECORD OF HAMPDEN-SYDNEY COLLEGE • MARCH 2011 



Dreams and Discipline 



BARRON FRAZIER '12 



My grandfather, who graduated from The Hill in 1946, most 
likely had planned for my attendance at Hampden- Sydney 
before I was born. For most of my childhood, I looked at H-SC 
and promised myself that I would not attend an all-male college, 
especially a college that my family encouraged me to attend. 



But as I matured and as my wardrobe evolved 
into a garnet-and-grey collection, I began to 
consider what I wanted out of my education. 
After recognizing that I wanted more than an 
education — a place I could call home, a place 
where professors knew me by my first name, and 
a place founded on tradition — I realized that 
Hampden-Sydney College fit my needs, not only 
for an experience, but also for an education that 
would undoubtedly open great opportunities in 
my future. 

As I matriculated at 
Hampden-Sydney in 2008, 
I entered knowing that 
I wanted to become a doctor 
and began the pre-medicine 
coursework in order to 
prepare myself for applying to 
medical schools. Hampden- 
Sydney College remains 
unique in that it ofi^ers three 
early- acceptance programs 
into medical school; however, 
it also demands that all 
students digest a thorough 
education in the liberal arts. 
For the past two-and-a-half 
years, I have been challenged 
academically and inspired to do my best at all 
times. My professors readily volunteer to help 



Hampden-Sydney College 

remains unique 

in that it offers three 

early-acceptance programs 

into medical school; 

however, it also demands 

that all students digest 

a thorough education 

in the liberal arts. 

BARRON FRAZIER '11 
Pre-medical student 



after hours and have always taught my peers 
and me to focus on the retention ol the mate- 
rial, not just on the numerical grades. When my 
first-semester grades came in, I was teasingly 
told by my grandfather that I must have paid 
extra money for those grades, because I never did 
that well in high school. A year-and-a-half later, 
I received the Samuel S. Jones Phi Beta Kappa 
Award, an honor that I never imagined would 
belong to me, as well as early acceptance into 
Eastern Virginia Medical School, a dream come 
true. 

With a little more 
confidence in my aca- 
demic ability, I began to 
apply for different research 
programs for the summer 
after my sophomore year. 
Twelve applications (and 
twelve letters of rejection) 
later, I reached a defining 
moment. I felt discouraged, 
but as my favorite basket- 
ball player Michael Jordan 
said, "Obstacles don't have 
to stop you. If you run into 
a wall, don't turn around 
and give up. Figure out 
how to climb it, go through it, or work around 
it." Motivated to find an opportunity, I looked 



THE RECORD OF HAMPDEN-SYDNEY COLLEGE • MARCH 2011 



for an answer and later 
that week received 
information about the 
Fulbright Commission 
Summer Institute at 
England's Roehamp- 
ton University. Inter- 
ested by the program's 
offerings, I decided 
one more application 
could not hurt. I spent 
about four weeks of 
editing and rewrit- 
ing my application; a 
week after my phone 

interview, I received a letter informing me of 
my admittance into the Fulbright program. 
Ecstatic and absolutely dumbfounded, I left 
for London on June 26, 2010, to begin my 
studies on human rights and citizenship. 

For five weeks, seven other students from 
various parts of the United States and I ana- 
lyzed the fundamentals of human rights and 
the differences between the U.S. and U.K. 
governments, while also discussing controver- 
sial subjects such as gay 
marriage and healthcare. 
Although I was biology 
major, H-SC's intensive 
liberal arts require- 
ments prepared me for 
conversations that dealt 
with analyzing history 
and governments. In 
the classroom setting, 
I discovered that some of 
my views were inherited 
rather than decided for 
myself As I explored the 
multicultural areas of 
London and traveled to 
Edinburgh and Brussels, 
it became very appar- 
ent that citizenship has 
evolved over the past 
few decades because ol 
globalization. 




Barron Frazier '12 (top left) with C.R. Hudgins '46 

(his grandfather, a former Trustee). 

Bottom: Bill Hudgins '84 (uncle) and W. Levi Old '46. 



Barron Frazier '12 ivith friends during his stay at the 
Fidbright Commission Summer Institute in England. 




Fifty years ago, 
many cultures outside 
our national borders 
seemed very foreign; yet 
today, mass media such 
as television and the 
Internet have familiar- 
ized our perception of 
different cultures and 
places. Country lines 
are becoming blurred 
as this new concept of a 
global citizen con- 
tinues to develop. By 
the time I returned to 
Virginia, some of my viewpoints had changed and 
some were more defined, but most significantly, 
I returned with a greater sense of my surround- 
ings on a global scale. 

In reality, I did not stand out in high school 
on the athletic field or in the classroom, yet 
Hampden-Sydney College has provided me with 
a place to gain not just a degree but an education. 
Any student who enters these grounds with the 
will to work will be able to use his degree and 

his experience to pursue 
great opportunities and 
to achieve his potential, 
his goals, and his dreams. 
Even today, it still feels as 
though I am in a dream, 
as if the events in my life 
over the past three years 
are too good to be true. 

As human beings, 
we all have the ability to 
dream, but Hampden- 
Sydney College gave me 
the discipline I needed 
to reach my dreams. 
Yes, dreams allow us 
to see the depth of our 
potential, but only with 
discipline can dreams 
develop into the great 
storyline of a person's 
pursuit of excellence. 



10 THE RECORD OF HAMPDEN-SYDNEY COLLEGE • MARCH :U11 



A new lanmag'e 






for an old conversation 



JOHN DUDLEY '95 



One hundred and fifty years ago young men in Virginia were 
facing an uncertain future. These young men, many of them the 
same age or younger than our Hampden-Sydney students, were 
facing a future that could include the creation of a new country, 
a prolonged war, and a dramatic change to their way of life. 



Their country was at a crossroads and the future 
they faced was more complex than deciding 
between entering the workforce or going to 
graduate school. In March o[ 1860, Virginians 
were deciding whether they would remain a part 
of the United States of America or join the rap- 
idly growing number of states breaking away. 

In recognition and remembrance of this criti- 
cal time in our national history and as a part of 
the celebration of the inauguration of Dr. Chris- 
topher B. Howard, Hampden-Sydney College's 
24th president, on February 3 the noted historian 
and President of the University of Richmond, Dr. 
Edward L. Ayers, asked, "Why should we care 
about the Civil War?" 

Before joining Richmond in 2007, Dr. Ayers 
was the Dean of Arts and Sciences at the Univer- 
sity of Virginia, where he was named National 
Professor of the Year in 2003 by the Carnegie 
Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. 
Among his many distinctions as a historian of the 
American South, Ayers has written and edited ten 
books, including The Promise of the New South: 
Life After Reconstruction, which was a finalist for 
both the National Book Award and the Pulitzer 
Prize. 

So, why should we care about the Civil 
War? Ayers says we often forget that this was 
an event of global importance, an event that 



greatly influenced the next hundred years. "We've 
gotten so used to it, we've seen so many highway 
markers, that we've domesticated the Civil War 
and we've forgotten what could have happened. 
We've forgotten that the United States could have 
been divided. What would the 20th century have 
looked like without this country unified to go to 
the aid of democracy? The other thing is that if 
we had established a separate nation, you would 
have found the fourth-richest economy in the 
world based on slavery, showing that you could 
have an advanced economy with forced labor. So, 
why should wt care about the Civil War? Because 
matters of ground-shaking importance happened 
all around us." 

To appreciate the effect the Civil War had on 
the United States and the world, Ayers examined 
what caused the war, particularly our long-held 
beliefs that the war was a matter of slavery, states' 
rights, or economics. 

"This is a remarkably impoverished conversa- 
tion, considering we've had 150 years to think 
about this. I really can't think of any other subject 
in world history for which we have exactly the 
same range of explanations that we did at the 
time. The French Revolution — how many times 
have we rethought that? The Russian Revolution, 
even the Cold War? But for the American Civil 
War we use the same language they used at the 



THE RECORD OF HAMPDEN-SYDNEY COLLEGE • MARCH 2011 1! 



time and just argue back and forth." 

This is not to say that the conversation 
has not had some changes. Among the usual 
explanations, the prevailing theory has changed, 
James McPherson's 1988 book, Battlecry of 
Freedom, tells us that the war was about the 
struggle between a modern North and an agrar- 
ian South — the economic explanation, which 
is similar to historian James Beard's explana- 
tion of the 1920s. In the run-up to World War 
II, people thought the Civil War was a terrible 
mistake that never should have happened. Ayers 
noted that the war in Europe and the Pacific 
changed that perception: "[Pulitzer Prize win- 
ning historian] Arthur Schlesinger, Jr., comes 
out of the war and says, 'We were wrong about 
the Civil War. Sometimes there are things that 
need to be destroyed. The 
American Civil War was an 
example of that, just like 
World War ir." 

So, what is wrong with 
the possible explanations of 
economics, states' rights, and 



"The truth of the history 
we write matters. 



slavery? 

First, the South was 
not, as the argument stated, 
financially dependent on 
the North. The two regions 
had a symbiotic arrange- 
ment. Ayers points out that 
in 1860 the South, with its 
slave-based workforce, was 
the fourth-largest economy 
in the world, white Southern- 
ers were remarkably literate 
for the time, the South had 
an extensive railroad system. 



Ihe truth that we pass on 
to our children matters. 
It cant be just what we wish 
it were. It cant he just what 
we use to flagellate ourselves. 

It cant he cheap. It has 
to he true to the evidence. " 

EDWARD AYERS 

American historian, 

President of the University of Richmond 



voter turnout among white men was above 80 
percent, and the South controlled the cotton 
that fuelled the economic growth of the North, 
England, and France. 

Ayers also contended that the states' rights 
argument, which Confederate President Jeffer- 
son Davis developed after the war ended, is 
"nonsensical." He said, "Why would the South 
claim 'states' rights?' Before the Civil War, the 
South largely controlled the federal government 
and was the main beneficiary of it. A majority of 
presidents had been Southerners and slavehold- 
ers. The Supreme Court was dominated by 
Southerners. Federal law said if slaves ran away 
you must return them; the federal government 
was on the side of the slaveholders. The war with 
Mexico was fought largely at the instigation ol 
southern states. The Dred 
Scott Act used the power of 
the federal government to 
extend slavery into the ter- 
ritories. So, the South was 
not touting 'states rights' 
when [the federal govern- 
ment] was advantageous 
to it. Similarly, the North 
was all about states rights 
when they were asked to do 
something they didn't want 
to do: the War of 1812 or 
the Fugitive Slave Law." 

Fie added, "We've got to 
forget this idea that it was 
somehow in the soil that 



the South was all about states rights and 
the North is all about 'big government.' 
There's no 'big government' in 1860. 
They barely have an army. The fact that 



I 






the Confederacy fought against them for 
so long shows how httle of an army they 
had." 

The third possibility popular among 
those who have studied the Civil War is 
that an overwhelming tide of the aboli- 
tionist movement crashed head-on against 
the South 's devotion to the slave system. 
However, Ayers pointed out that only 
two or three percent ol Northerners were 
abolitionists. Rather than being staunchly 
anti-slavery, most Northerners actually 
were complicit with slavery in the South. 

"All the Republicans said was that you cannot 
use the power of the federal government to extend 
slavery into the territories," explained Ayers. 
"They did not support John Brown; in their 
platform, they denounce John Brown. Frederick 
Douglas says the Republican Party is the worst 
thing that has ever happened to African Ameri- 
cans in 1860. They're not going, 'Yes, [Abraham 
Lincoln is] really an abolitionist.' Because he 
wasn't. He hated slavery but he says, Tolks, 
there's nothing I can do about slavery where it 
is. The Constitution does give them the right to 
have it. There's nothing I can do about it.' Even 
when the war starts he says, 'Slavery is going to 
continue in Kentucky and in Maryland because 
the Constitution does not give me any authority 
to get rid of it.' So, we need to be suspicious of 
this idea that the North was really against slavery 
but didn't know it." 

If these popular and long-held positions are 
not supported by evidence from the time, what 
does the evidence tell us? To find out, Ayers and 
the University ol Richmond are using modern 
technology to tell us more about the issues of the 
day that drove people to war. 

The University of Richmond has developed 
the Digital Scholarship Lab to collect and analyze 
tremendous amounts of data. Ayers used the tech- 
nology to show how a closer look at the election 
of 1860 breaks down our common perception 
of North versus South, of a properly delineated 
Mason-Dixon Line. By showing the election 
results by county rather than by state, Ayers illus- 
trated that unionist feelings reached throughout 



"^^m^' 



Hampden-Sydney College 



REGIONAL FOUNDATION 



GLOBAL OUTLOOK 



Celebrating the Inauguration of 
Dr. Christopher B. Howard 

as 24th President of the College 

DR. AYERS'S LECTURE WAS 
ANOTHER IN THE YEAR-LONG 
SERIES OF INAUGURAL EVENTS 



the South and the margin of victory in many 
counties was very slim. "What we saw with the 
2008 election is that if you win the election with 
52% of the vote, you don't control everything, 
and if you lose the election with 48% of the vote, 
you don't just give up. The same thing was true 
then. What did all of those in the South who 
voted for the Union in the fall of 1860 think 
for the next five years? What did all those folks 
who voted for the Democrats in the North think 
about all the way through the Civil War?" 

Historians are also using the Digital Schol- 
arship Lab to scour volumes of The Richmond 
Times-Dispatch to discover what was on the 
minds of people before the war. Was it slavery, 
states' rights, or the economy, or something else? 
By focusing his digital search on the months 
of Virginia's secession convention, Ayers lound 
that slavery was a popular topic but states' rights 
was mentioned more often as the convention 
progressed. Likewise, during the course of the 
war various topics became more popular, some 
became less popular, and some, like the sale of 
war bonds and notices ol escaped slaves, saw dra- 
matic changes as the end of the war approached. 

"Combined, these perspectives show us that 
we might as well get over the notion that this 
moment in the American past was simple, that 
you can fit your explanation for it on a bumper 
sticker, that something this complex is going to 
have a one-word answer." 

So, why should we care about the Civil War? 
"The truth of the history we write matters," said 
Ayers. "The truth that we pass on to our children 



THE RECORD OF HAMPDEN-SYDNEY COLLEGE • MARCH 2011 13 



matters. It can't be just what we wish it were. It 
can't be just what we use to flagellate ourselves. It 
can't be cheap. It has to be true to the evidence. 
So . . . what's the best history? It's the history that 
can account for the most evidence. You say in 
court, 'What's the best explanation?' What's the 
best investment decision? Why would history be 
any different?" 

The new processes at the University of Rich- 
mond's Digital Scholarship Lab are providing 
new evidence, which can lead to modified — or 
even new — ideas about the Civil War. This is 
just fine with Ayers. 

"This means that history is intrinsically 
revisionist. Somehow that has become known 
as some horrible word, but I want revisionist 
history just like I want revisionist medicine. If 
we relied on the explanations that people at the 
time had for illness in 1860, there would be a lot 
fewer people here right now. If we believed that 
there was no real cure for diarrhea and dysen- 
tery — that killed far more men than bullets — we 
would consider ourselves foolish. Why would 
we believe that we have not moved beyond the 
explanations [for the war] that people of the time 
gave? I don't know about you, but I don't know 
anything about the world in which I live right 
now. I read three newspapers every day to try to 
keep up, but I can't. " 

"We see that the war grew out of the presence 
and problem of slavery in the body politic of the 
nation, and that presence overrode the economic 
reasons for the union to cohere." 

Ayers said that we have had the story 
backwards, that for Southerners the issues were 



security and the sanction of slavery. Along with 
demands for the non-slave North to respect 
Southerner whites' economic rights, racial rights, 
and electoral rights, Ayers said Southerners also 
"demanded that the North respect the ethical 
basis of slavery." This ethical battle over slavery 
pitted the South against the North. 

Meanwhile, Ayers said Northerners were 
upset with slave-owning Southerners' desire 
to expand slavery westward, for their previous 
dominance in the federal government, and their 
"contempt for working, white men." 

He said, "This conflict was not about slavery 
itself, not about injustice to enslaved people, 
but about the implications of slavery for white 
people. That's what the Civil War was about: the 
implications of slavery for white people." 

Once we understand why this country was 
torn apart by civil war, we can begin learning the 
lessons of this period in our history. With a truer 
understanding of the people and issues of the 
day, and with the technology to discover more 
evidence about the time, we can carry on a new 
conversation about the American Civil War. 

Ayers ended his provocative and insightful 
presentation with this thought: "We are going to 
find a new language, a more supple language, a 
more honest language, which is not about beat- 
ing up anybody's ancestors, not about casting 
doubt on anybody's honor. It's about accounting 
for evidence. One hundred and fifty years is a 
long time to have the same argument. I think 
that finally in our time we have a chance to hand 
our kids a richer language in which they can 
have a more productive conversation about the 
things we've been talking about for so long. " 



* Ik 



REBIRTH OF A NATIO 

A new look at tlie (Ivil War 
on its 150tl¥ Aiiliiver!!^!*} 

THE ilAMPDEN HyDXEY SI MMEKfOLLECiE 

.11X413-5, m\\ 

, Visit wwwJisc.edu/Constituents/AlumniJitml to j'egisfer. 



HAMPDEN-SYDNEY SUMMER COLLEGE: BECAUSE LEARNING NEVER STOPS 



wmm^/nr/mMA 



CAMPUS NOTES 



^^^^^^^■?J^S 



Members of the Board of Trustees and the Steer- 
ing Committee are reviewing the information 
gathered from numerous surveys and meetings 
with Hampden-Sydney College alumni, parents, 
faculty, staff, students, Trustees, and community 
regarding the development of a new Strategic Plan. 

Constituent groups have been approached by 
e-mail, conference call, and roundtable discussion 
to identify a few "big ideas" to help the Col- 
lege better succeed at forming "good men and 
good citizens." The Strategic Planning Steering 
Committee and Bryan & Jordan Consulting are 
working together to determine how to position 
the College for success in the coming decade, as 
well as where the Hampden-Sydney should be as it 
approaches its 250th anniversary. 

After a list of plan objectives is formulated, 
they will be prioritized by the Steering Commit- 
tee. For more information on the progress of the 
Strategic Plan, please visit www.hsc.edu/strategic- 
planning- committee, html 




This photograph of the Hampden-Sydney Campus 
Christmas tree, taken by Zachary Roberts '10, won first 
place in theWit^miz Living Favorite Christmas Tree 
photo contest in December 2010. 



Nathaniel Perry, editor of The Hampden-Sydney 
Poetry Review and an assistant professor of Eng- 
lish, is the winner of the 2011 American Poetry 
Review/Honickman First Book Prize. Perry's 
manuscript, Nine Acres, was chosen from more 
than 1,000 entries. He earned master's degrees 
from Boston University and Indiana University. 

"Ever since the founding of TJie Hamp- 
den-Sydney Poetry Review over 25 years ago, 
Hampden-Sydney has been an important force in 
the world of poetry," says Dr. Robert Herdegen, 
Dean of the Faculty. "Neil Perry is continuing 
that tradition, both as the editor of the Review 
and now as the winner of this major award. The 
American Poetry Revieiv's Honickman Prize, 
which is awarded for the best first book of poetry, 
is a significant award in itself and also a launching 
pad for an outstanding young poet. Almost all the 
poems in Ni?ie Acres were written since Profes- 
sor Perry arrived at Hampden-Sydney, and we're 
proud that he is part of our community." 

Perry says, "Teaching at Hampden-Sydney has 
provided me with a rare opportunity — the chance 
to learn and think at the highest levels, in the 
heart of rural America. This unusual combination 
plays a major role in the book: the poems attempt 
to understand self-sustainability on all levels, on 
the land, with each other, in the mind and heart, 
and, perhaps, in the spirit as well. Nine Acres takes 
as its starting place the classic farm manual. Five 
Acres and Independence by M.G. Kains, so perhaps 
it is a metaphorical 'independence' that I am after 
and that I hope too to impart to my students. In 
the land and in learning is a freedom from our 
worst selves, and all of us — students and teachers 
alike — have to scramble like crazy to find our 
ways toward it." 

Nine Acres will be published by the American 
Poetry Review and Copper Canyon Press in 
September. To subscribe to The Hampden-Sydney 
Poetry Review, send $7 to P.O. Box GG, Hampden- 
Sydney, Virginia 23943. 



THE RECORD OF HAMPDEN-SYDNEY COLLEGE • MARCH 2011 15 



mnims-/fmm^A 



CAMPUS NOTES 



The Virginia Museum of Fine Arts has awarded 
Associate Professor of Fine Arts Pam Fox one of 
18 professional fellowships in connection with her 
photographic series "Lure." Her work was made 
possible in part by support from the summer 
research grant money available to faculty at 
Hampden-Sydney. 

Fox says of her Lure series, "A camera is an 
instrument of pursuit and capture. Unlike the 
hunter who is in pursuit of real prey, the photog- 
rapher is in the business of transforming the real 
and leaving it behind. As part of the image-mak- 
ing process, the lens inherently turns what is shot 
into artifice or symbol. There is visual ambiguity 
in the process: the lure calls us toward something 
seemingly real, something that instinctually 
draws us closer." 

Fox has won several accolades during her 
career. She was the 2008 recipient of the Teresa 
Pollack Award for Excellence in the Visual Arts 
and a recipient of grants from the National 



Endowment for the Humanities, the Virginia 
Museum Fellowship, and Virginia Commission 
for the Arts Fellowship. Recently, her work has 
appeared in exhibitions across Virginia, as well as 
in College Park, Maryland; Fort Collins, Colo- 
rado; and Tashkent, Uzbekistan. She has taught 
photography at Hampden-Sydney since 1993. 

"Water Deer, "from the "Lure" series by Pam Fox. 





President Howard (center) was recently a guest of the Lynchburg Kiwanis Club. There he saw many Hampden-Sydney 
men, including (from left) Hugh Haskins '02, Max Meador '58, Smokie Watts '57, David Heppner '82, Chris Bryant 
'00, Tulane Patterson '78, Sutton Tinsley '07, and John Tinsley "77 









1 1 


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^Mjii^^lggl^jlglffe:-. 



16 THE RECORD OF HAMPDEN-SYDNEV COLLEGE • MARCH 2011 



tude 

themse 



"Know that you have made a difference" was the 
message author Wes Moore gave to an assembly 
of students on January 20. "I know that a lot of 
people are asking you 'What do you want to do 
with your life?' and 'What kind of job do you 
want to get?' I'm going to tell you something 
you probably don't want to hear: your greatest 
legacy won't be your job." 

Moore's background includes a graduating 
from Johns Hopkins University as a member of 
Phi Beta Kappa, earning a master's degree from 
Oxford University as a Rhodes Scholar, serving 
as a U.S. Army paratrooper with the 82nd Air- 
borne Division in Afghanistan, and writing the 
book The Other Wes Moore. The book examines 
the lives of the author and another man with the 
same name, of the same age, and from the same 
neighborhood but with dramatically different 
lives. The "other West Moore" is serving life in 
prison after taking part in an armed robbery 
that resulted in the death of a police officer. 

Moore's own life was not without struggle. 
His father died when he was only three years 
old. Because of this catastrophic event, he was 
an angry boy who often got in trouble and did 
poorly in school. After years of threats, Moore's 
mother finally came through by sending him off 
to military school. 

To the delight of the students in attendance, 
Moore talked about fighting back against the 
military school system, trying to run away from 
the school, and finally breaking down in the 
middle of woods as the city-boy-turned-escapee 
realized his upperclassmen had intentionally 
given him bad directions to the nearest train 
station. When the pranksters led him back to 
the school, Moore called his mother and begged 
to come home. She told him, "Too many people 
have sacrificed for you to be there. Too many 




Author Wes Moore urged students to judge their 
every actiofj on its usefidness to others. 

people back home are rooting for you. You need 
to realize that it's not all about you." He was 
not happy with her, but years later he reflected 
on that moment and began to realize exactly 
what she meant. 

"I want to be useful," Moore said to the 
students. "I want to know that my life means 
something to someone other than me. I know 
that what I do for others is important because 
of all of the things that so many people did for 
me." 

"Wes identifies with our core mission of 
forming good men and good citizens'," says 
Thomas Ransom '00, who became close 
friends with Moore while doing a fellowship 
at Princeton University's Woodrow Wilson 
School of Public Policy and International 
Affairs. "His message is one that promotes a 
society where we strive to reach everyone and 
help them be the best they can be. This is a 
message that everyone needs to hear." 

Moore reiterated that message when he told 
the students to ask themselves simple questions 
"Am I being useful? Am I being helpful?" The 
answer will tell them if they are making the 
right decisions. 



THE RECORD OF HAMPDEN-SYDNEY COLLEGE • MARCH 2011 17 



wimmsimmm^^ 



CAMPUS NOTES 



"Virginia's Wine Artist, " Christopher Mize '89, 
presented one of his works, "Hampden-Sydney 
Red and White #1," to the College on February 
15. Mize is a self-taught artist who left his career 
in management to focus full-time on painting. 
Working in his Goochland County studio, he 
creates a variety of still life settings using wine 
bottles, glasses, and, often, musical instruments. 

"My wife's family owns restaurants in 
Richmond and she taught me a lot about wine, 
so I started painting wine bottles and glasses," 
explains Mize when asked why he paints wine. 
"The restaurant's wine distributor heard about my 
work and connected me with the Virginia Wine 
Marketing Office, and it grew from there. Also, 
painting wine allows me to paint still lifes, which 
I'm known for, as well as vineyard scenes, cafe 
scenes, a wide variety of subjects." 

Though Mize had enjoyed arts as a child, it 
was not until he studied abroad in college that 
he developed a strong appreciation for painting. 
Using photographs of the works of Monet, Sisley, 
and Manet as his guide, Mize learned to paint 




with the technique called impasto — adding thick 
layers of paint to create a texture like cake icing. 

"I have wanted to give back something to the 
school, so contributing one of my paintings is very 
exciting," says Mize, who is the twin brother of 
David Mize '89. "I developed my love of paint- 
ing at Hampden-Sydney, and I learned a lot from 
Professor David Lewis. Knowing that my artwork 
is here means I don't have to leave behind all of the 
fun I had in college." 

He told students in Professor Lewis' class that 
painting gives him the satisfaction his life was 
missing: "I have an MBA. I worked for a pharma- 
ceutical company for eight years. I climbed the 
corporate ladder and was making the six-figure 
income, but I wasn't happy. I had to get back to 
painting to find that happiness. I don't know any 
other job I could have where I could work 16 
hours straight and love every minute of it." 

A portion of the proceeds from the sale of 
reproductions of "Hampden-Sydney Red and 
White #1" will be donated to the College. 
They are available at www.christophermize.com. 



"I developed my love 

of painting at 
Hampden-Sydney. " 

CHRIS MIZE '89 
Virginia's Wine Artist 



Chris Mize '89 told a 
beginning drawing class 
about his career arc from \ 
accounting to art as 
he presented his 
painting to the 
College. 




Christopher Hughes '88 talks with Stephen Turchan '11 
about communications for life. 



"I don't think you've even arrived until you've 
been horribly misquoted by the press," said U.S. 
Marine Corps Lt. Colonel Christopher Hughes 
'88 to members of Hampden-Sydney's National 
Security Studies Program. 

Col. Hughes, a Public Affairs Officer, returned 
to campus January 28th to discuss "Leaders as 
Communicators: National Security Challenges 
in the 21st Century." His recent assignments have 
taken him to Afghanistan's Helmand province, 
where he served as NATO Regional Command 
Southwest's Director of Public Affairs. Before 
that he was in Iraq as Public Affairs Director for 
Multi-National Forces West in al-Anbar province. 
He has also served in Hawaii, Australia, Bahrain, 
Kuwait, and East Timor. 

Tnough he was on campus for the benefit of 
the students, he says, "I am the real benefactor of 
this experience. I feel so good about the energy 
here on campus, and the state of Hampden-Syd- 
ney is so good. It is an honor to re-engage with 
the school and to get to know the students. Since 
I've been in the Marine Corps, I've been overseas 
a lot or in California. I didn't have the opportu- 
nity to come back to campus. I was really envious 
of the alumni I saw in The Record who were 
coming back and getting involved. Now that I am 
closer, I try to get down here every chance I can." 



Col. Hughes gave students current examples 
of poorly handled communications operations, 
such as BP's response to the oil spill in the 
Gulf of Mexico, Brett Favre's multiple retire- 
ments from professional football, and Rolling 
Stone magazine's article about General Stanley 
McChrystal. 

What advice did Hughes give the students? 
"It's always better for someone else to sing your 
praises than for you to sing them yourself Effec- 
tive communicators determine whether or not 
their message is being received and understood. 
Lie just a little bit and you lose all the support of 
your closest allies." 

Along with his advice. Col. Hughes told the 
students, "If you take away one thing from this 
talk tonight, it should be this: I played football 
for Stokeley Fulton." 



J.B. POTTER '11 

As a part of its ongoing mission, the Wilson 
Center for Leadership in the Public Interest 
brings speakers to campus to discuss significant 
issues bearing on leadership and public affairs. 
On January 20 (just days before he announced 
he would be running for the U.S. Senate again), 
the Center welcomed longtime Virginia politi- 
cian George Allen. The Republican represented 
Virginia in the U.S. Senate form 2000 to 2006. 
Prior to that, he served in the Virginia 
state legislature, in the U.S. House 
of Representatives, and as the 67th 
governor of Virginia. Also, he was 
the College's commencement 
speaker in 1995. 

Drawing on his wealth of 
experience in public office. 
Governor Allen gave a talk 
entitled "Governmental 
Leadership: The 
Challenges of 
State and Federal 
Governance." 




minms/fw/m^A 



CAMPUS NOTES 



Having served in both state and federal office, 
Governor Allen was able to use his firsthand 
experience to compare and contrast the two 
levels of government. Each level of government 
has unique responsibilities. Because a state 
government is "closer to the people." its two 
chief responsibilities are law enforcement and 
education. The federal government, on the other 
hand, says Allen, deals with national security and 
foreign affairs. Different responsibilities necessi- 
tate different styles of leadership. "Being governor 
is like being a CEO," says Allen. "Being a senator 
is like being on the Board of Directors." In both 
cases, though, it is essential to develop a concrete 
conception of the proper role of government. 

According to Governor Allen, an elected 
official's political principles should guide and 
define him. His personal political philosophy is 
encapsulated in what President Thomas Jefferson 
called "the sum of good government." Quoting 
Jefferson, Governor Allen says he believes in "a 
wise and frugal government, which shall restrain 
men from injuring one another, which shall leave 
them otherwise free to regulate their own pursuits 
of industry and improvement, and shall not take 
from the mouth of labor the bread it has earned." 

Embracing such an approach to government 
in theory is easier than putting that approach into 
practice. Allen emphasized that it is difficult to 
change the status quo in public service. "If you, as 
a politician, run your campaign on an agenda, it 
is incumbent upon you to keep your promises." 

Governor Allen added that to make good on 
political promises, it is important for a govern- 
ment official to have a dedicated and talented 
team, who can identify and implement innova- 
tive solutions. He recalled the dynamic team he 
had during his tenure as Governor. From 1994 
to 1998, he worked with officials from across 
the Commonwealth to decrease crime rates by 
cracking down on parole for repeat offenders. His 
team also focused on economic development and 
educational reform, because an efficient market 
and educated citizenry are, as Governor Allen 
puts it, "essential parts of a vibrant state." 

Mr. Allen is the father of Forrest Allen '13. 



.udent tea. 
thics Bo>vl VII 



J.B. POTTER '11 

The twelfth annual Ethics Bowl took place at 
Virginia Wesleyan College on 13 and 14 Febru- 
ary 2011. This two-day debate tournament is 
held once a year to encourage thoughtful reflec- 
tion about moral and ethical issues. Organized 
by the Virginia Foundation for Independent Col- 
leges (VFIC), the Ethics Bowl involves student 
teams from all VFIC member schools. 

The Hampden-Sydney team — Chris Deen 
'13, J.B. Potter '11, Baker Allen '14, and Osric 
Forrest '12 — practiced rigorously for sev- 
eral weeks before the tournament. Dr. James 
Janowski, Associate Professor of Philosophy, and 
Dr. Marc Hight, Elliott Associate Professor of 
Philosophy, serve as the team's faculty advisors 
and co-coordinators. Their efforts and expertise 
ensured that the team was polished and well 
prepared by the time of the tournament. 

This year's tournament, sponsored by the 
Wachovia Wells Fargo Foundation and other 
Virginia businesses, had the theme "Ethics & 
Privacy." Presented with case studies that related 
to this topic, opposing teams debated some of the 
relevant ethical dilemmas. Each team presented 
its positions and analysis to panels of judges — 
business, professional, and educational leaders 
from across the Commonwealth. 

Garnering praise from judges and spectators 
alike, the Hampden-Sydney team represented 
the College well. After a tough first-round bout 
against Bridgewater College, the Hampden-Syd- 
ney team regrouped to overcome the initial set- 
back. In a sweep of the remaining competitors in 
its division, the team won its next three rounds, 
defeating Mary Baldwin College, Hollins 
University, and Randolph College. With a 3-1 
record, the team earned far more speaker points 
(presentation points awarded by the judges) than : 
any other team. These points propelled the H-SC 
team to the championship round and proved to 
be the deciding factor, as there was a three-way 



20 THE RECORD OF HAMPDEN-SYDNEY COLLEGE • MARCH 2011 



^ Wachovia Ethics B. 

\ proiiruni oj llu- \ ii^^initi loundalion fr 'ulcfu-iidtnt ( 




After the Wachovia Ethics Bowl competitioti, from left: coach Mark Hight, judge Roger Mudd, Chris Deen '13, 
J.B. Potter '11, Baker Allen '14, Osric Forrest '12, coach fames Janowski, and judge Martha- Ann Ali to. 



tie for first place (three teams with a record of 
3-1) in Hampden- Sydney's division. 

Hampden-Sydney advanced to the final 
round, squaring off against our "sister" school, 
Sweet Briar College. According to the panel 
of judges, which included retired journalist 
Roger Mudd and Martha-Ann Alito, wife to 
Supreme Court Justice Samuel Alito (who was 
also in attendance), the championship round was 
extremely close. The H-SC team was edged out 
to finish second out of the sixteen teams in the 
tournament. This achievement equals Hampden- 



Sydney 's best previous performances, runner-up 
in the 2004 and 2010 Ethics Bowls. 

In the past four years, the H-SC Ethics Bowl 
team has compiled an enviable record. In both 
2008 and 2009, the team went 3-1 and missed 
the championship round in a tie-breaker. In 
2010 the team went 4-0 but lost in the final 
round. This year's performance brings the team's 
four-year record to 13-3 (excluding the final 
rounds), making Hampden-Sydney one of the 
most successful schools in the recent history of 
the Ethics Bowl. 




Eagle Scouts in the Class of 2014, with President Howard: From left, front row: Baker Allen, Birmingham, AL; Colman 
Packard, Charlottesville, VA; Travis Luck, Richmond, VA; Dr. Howard; William Burton, Lynchburg, VA; fames Lilly, 
Bluefield, WV; andfackson Riley, Morehead City, NC Back row: John CorreU, Durham, NC; Richard Nagel, Fairfax 
Station, VA; fohn Dekarske, Franklin, VA; Kevin Wade, McLean, VA; Khobi Williamson, Norfolk, VA; Hunter Brown, 
Richmond, VA; Chase Baldwin, Palmyra, VA; and Keil Powell, Norfolk, VA. 



THE RECORD OF HAMPDEN-SYDNEY COLLEGE ■ MARCH 2011 21 



mr/ms/gmm^A 



CAMPUS NOTES 



NATHAN R. RYALLS '11 

A recent discussion on the concept of "brother- 
hood" at Hampden-Sydney College included 
the perspectives of two alumni, a faculty 
member, a student, and a professor from 
the U.S. Marine Corps War College. In the 
afternoon of February 22, members of the 
community gathered to discuss the perspectives 
of Nathan Ryalls '11, Billy Sublett 74, Jeffrey 
Harris '90, and Dr. Anne Lund. That evening, 
Dr. Tammy Shultz, Director of National Secu- 
rity and Joint Warfare and Professor of Strategic 
Studies at the United States Marine Corps War 
College, gave the talk "Traditions: A Double- 
Edged Sword?" 

Mr. Ryalls started the symposium 
by presenting a definition of brother- 
hood developed by the Committee 
on Sustaining Traditions (initiated 
by Student Body President Ken 
Simon '11), explaining that 
it is time to enter a discus- 
sion on "why we have 
not lived up to these 



DR. TAMMY SCHULTZ 



ideals and when we 
have surpassed them." 

"Who is the Hampden-Sydney Man?" was 
the question Billy Sublett sought to answer. He 
shared his own experience coming to Hampden- 
Sydney as a freshman in 1969 and said, "I was 
very small, not only in terms of my stature for 
the football team, but also in m.y thinking." He 
explained to the audience how he had changed 
his values while at Hampden-Sydney. He ended 
with this challenge to the audience: "when we 
go forth into this world, what we have to do is 
be worthy of the code and oath we have taken." 

Mr. Harris shared his experience of being a 
gay, black man on Hampden-Sydney 's campus 
and noted that while "it was difficult enough 
being a black person, I couldn't have imagined 
being out on this campus." Mr. Harris was 
honest and open about his experiences, giving 





the audience a clear sense of 
the extent to which his time 
at Hampden-Sydney was dif- 
ficult. He said, "Brotherhood is 
what you make it," and added 
that his best advice for his 
Hampden-Sydney brothers 
(students and alumni) was 
simply to "be yourself" 
Mr. Harris noted how happy he had been when, 
after announcing his homosexuality to his 
Hampden-Sydney friends, "not a man turned 
me away." He ended his presentation with the 
statement: "I think of each of you as one [of my 
brothers] whether you think of me as one or 
not." 

Dr. Lund has the distinction of being the 
first female professor at Hampden-Sydney 
College. She spoke about the early years of her 
tenure as the only female faculty member and 
how many friends felt she had lost her mind 
when she accepted the position. However, she 
said, "I believe I am a part of this community." 
She noted her objection to the "Where men are 
men and women are guests" bumper sticker 
and stated that she never felt like a guest inside 
or out of the classroom. Dr. Lund believes that 
"the diversity [of this community] enriches the 
brotherhood beyond measure.' 

Before her presentation that evening. Dr. 
Tammy Shultz warned the audience, 
"If I don't offend you, then I'm not doing my 
job." 

She spoke about the decision 
to repeal "Don't Ask Don't 
Tell," and explained why she 
thinks the Marines are the 
most resistant of the mili- 
tary branches to 
opening their 
ranks to gays 
and lesbians. 



JEFFREY HARRIS '90 



r 




22 THE RECORD OF HAMPDEN-SYDNEY COLLEGE . MARCH 2011 



She noted similarities between the Marines and 
Hampden- Sydney College, beyond their shared 
birthday, noting that both institutions are slow 
to change because of their traditions. Dr. Shultz 
argued that traditions create the positive sense of 
"we-ness," but at the same time negatively define 
who we are by forcing us to define who we are 
not. 

The "Honoring the Brotherhood" Sympo- 
sium was the start of a discussion of Hampden- 
Sydney College's strengths and weaknesses. This 
discussion should continue as we try to under- 
stand what a Hampden- Sydney Man is and how 
members of this community can live up to our 
ideals of brotherhood. 




le Jones will assume the 
position of vice president for strategy, admin- 
istration, and Board affairs. This follows the 
retirement of Dr. Paul Baker, vice president 
for administration and college relations. Dale 
Jones holds a B.S. in aeronautical engineering 
from the U.S. Air Force Academy, an M.B.A. 
from Wright State University, an M.A. in public 
policy from The George Washington Univer- 
sity, and a Ph.D. in public administration from 
Syracuse University. 

Presently, Dr. Jones is an associate professor 
of public administration and the chair of the 
Master of Public Administration program at 
the L. Douglas Wilder School of Government 
and Public Affairs at Virginia Commonwealth 
University, as well as the director of the Univer- 
sity's National Homeland Security Project. He 
is the author of the book Downsizing the Federal 
Government: The Management of Public Sector 
Workforce Reductions and is a contributing author 
of another recently-published book entitled The 
Future of Public Administration, Public Manage- 




Dr. V. Dale Jones, the new Dr. Paul S. Baker, the 

vice president for strategy, retiring vice president for 

administration, and board administration 
affairs 



ment, and Public Service around the World, in 
addition to numerous book chapters and profes- 
sional journal articles. He is also a member of the 
national Board of Directors for the Homeland 
Security and Defense Education Consortium 
Association. 

As vice president for strategy, administra- 
tion, and board affairs. Dr. Jones will coordinate 
ongoing strategic planning for the College, 
supervise the offices of college events, public rela- 
tions, and the Atkinson Museum, and serve as 
the chief administrative liaison for operations of 
the Board of Trustees. In addition. Dr. Jones will 
serve as the interim director of external affairs for 
the Wilson Center for Leadership in the Public 
Interest. 

Dr. Jones is assuming responsibility of many 
areas that have been under Dr. Paul Baker's 
direction. Dr. Baker has been studying theology 
at Union Theological Seminary in Richmond 
and plans to enter the Methodist ministry. He 
has been at Hampden-Sydney since 1983 and 
worked as director of student aid and records, 
associate dean for academic administration, 
executive assistant to the president, and vice 
president for administration and college rela- 
tions. He was also acting dean of students during 
the 2003-04 academic year. For his outstanding 
service to the College, he was awarded the Keat- 
ing Medallion in 2002. 



THE RECORD OF HAMPDEN-SYDNEY COLLEGE • MARCH 2011 23 



winmm/rmm^A 



CAMPUS NOTES 



earthaua 



WESLEY JULIAN '08 REPORTS ON HIS EVE^NTFUL RETURN TO JAPAN 



When he noticed that the graduation at Osato 
Junior High School corresponded to his Spring 
Break at the University of Richmond, Wesley 
Julian '08 thought that would be a great time to 
return to the small Japanese town where he taught 
English for two years. It was going to be a great 
day of celebration for many of the children he 
taught. Julian could reconnect with friends, col- 
leagues, and students. 

There was no way to know that on that same 
day, the strongest earthquake ever would violently 
shake Japan, sparking devastating tsunamis and a 
nuclear emergency. 

Osato is a small town with only about 9,000 
residents, and it sits about 16 km north of Sendai. 
Julian spent two years there teaching English 
with the Japan Exchange and Teaching (JET) 
Program. Though he had left only about eight 
months earlier, he was excited to be back. 

"The graduation ceremony on Friday [March 
11] was beautiful," says Julian. "It started at ten 
in the morning. We had lunch at noon. Around 
2:30, 1 was winding down with seven teachers in 
the staff room; the female teachers had changed 
out o^ kimono, their traditional dress, and 
everyone was about to go home. That's when the 
earthquake hit. For the first 30 seconds, I thought 
it was just another earthquake. Then the first big 
tremor hit and it got more intense. I could tell by 
the way my Japanese teachers were reacting that 
this was a really big earthquake." 

Earthquakes are a regular occurrence in 
Japan, something that might seem strange to 
most Americans. They occur so often that Julian 
says he became used to them. He says, "I know it 
sounds strange, but low-level quakes are kind of 
soothing — like a little massage. At least that's how 
I used to feel." 

There was no electricity and no phone service, 
only radio reports of the destruction. He was stay- 
ing with another teacher, Sakai Sensei, and her 
husband in their apartment in the city of Rifu. 
Normally the drive would take about 20 minutes; 



it took them three hours. 

Aftershocks were coming regularly and his 
friends' apartment was on the fourth floor of their 
building. He says, "I was worried, but they were 
okay with it. I tried to model my outlook on their 
outlook." Nonetheless, he slept fully dressed with 
his passport in his pocket. 

The next morning they got up early, before 
many cars were on the road, and returned to the 
school. They spent the day cleaning, establish- 
ing the evacuation zone in the school gym, and 
checking the building for damage. He still had not 
been able to reach his family in the United States 
and was not aware of the extent of the tremendous 
damage caused by the tsunami the day before. 

They returned to the apartment in Rifu and 
planned to drive the next morning before dawn 
to Yamagata where Julian could catch a flight to 
Tokyo. 

"We decided that the car had enough gas to get 
us there — none of the gas stations were open — and 
we needed to leave early to avoid traffic. I had been 
trying to call home about every 20 minutes and it 
wouldn't go through. About halfway to Yamagata 
I tried and all of the sudden it started ringing. 
I started yelling, 'Pull over. Pull over.' My parents 
answered the phone and I was so relieved to hear 
their voices." 

In Yamagata, Julian got a stand-by ticket to 
Tokyo. Thirteen hours later he boarded the plane 
for Tokyo's domestic airport. Once there, he took 
the train to Narida, the international airport, arriv- 
ing at ten o'clock that night. 

"All of the ticket counters were closed at Narida 
Airport. Hardly anyone was there. Security guards 
were walking around handing out blankets and 
pillows for everyone. They also had bottled water 
and crackers." 

In that airport, Julian also started contacting his 
friends in Japan. "I met some American university 
students who let me use a computer. The airport 
had electricity and Internet, so I could finally relay 
some information and get information. I have to 



24 THE RECORD OF HAMPDEN-SYDNEY COLLEGE • MARCH 2011 




say that I've really learned how crazy technology 
is in this day. The only reason I could talk to my 
parents was by cell phone. I used wi-fi and my 
iPhone to get on the Internet. Using technology 
I got the Today Show's Ann Curry to find a miss- 
ing friend. Within 72 hours, NBC found my 
friend in a small Japanese fishing village. I can't 
believe how quickly information travels." 

A few more standby tickets and many more 
hours of waiting and travel later, Julian was back 



Wesley Julian '08 in the snow outside the evacuated Osato Junior 
High School shortly after the Japanese earthquake on March 11. At 
left are the devastated school library and the evacuation zone set up 
in the gymnasium. 



home in Richmond. In Japan, though, many 
families are still struggling to find loved ones, to 
find food and clean water, and to make sense of 
their uncertain future. 

"I hope more is said about how prepared the 
Japanese are for earthquakes — their evacuation 
plans, their response, their infrastructure. Also, 
everyone was so polite and considerate despite 
being hungry and faced with so much destruction. 
I remember even right after the earthquake one 
of the teachers was trying to get by me. He would 
have been justified saying 'Get out of my way,' 
but instead he said, 'Please excuse me.' And I can't 
believe how well the buildings and bridges held up 
to a level-nine earthquake. It's just amazing." 

His Spring Break trip to Japan was more mem- 
orable than he had imagined, and he certainly 
learned more than most students on vacation. 

"I have a much better appreciation for friends 
and family, how many people care about us, and 
how important we all are to each other." 



THE RECORD OF HAMPDEN-SYDNEY COLLEGE • MARCH 2011 25 



Sports News 



DAVIS YAKE '08, SPORTS INFORMATION DIRECTOR 

FOR TIGER SCHEDULES AND THE LATEST PROGRESS ON THE SEASON, VISIT WWW.HSC.EDU/ATHLETICS.HTML 



The 2010-11 Hampden-Sydney Tiger basketball 
season was one of ups and downs. The Tigers 
started the season with a 4-1 record. The Tigers 
then won their Roundball Club Tip-OfFTour- 
nament and took the crown in the South Region 
Hoops Challenge, defeating eventual USA South 
Conference Champion and NCAA Tournament 
participant North Carolina Wesleyan. 

The Tigers then went on the road to open up 
Old Dominion Athletic Conference (ODAC) 
play at nationally-ranked Eastern Mennonite, 
losing 79-63. After an easy win over Johnson & 
Wales, H-SC took another game on the chin, 
this time on the road at Randolph College. 

The Tigers returned from winter break to 
host The Car Coop-Weenie Miller Holiday 
Hoops Tournament, winning their third tourna- 
ment of the season. The Tigers hit the road again 
for an ODAC contest at Top-10 ranked Virginia 
Wesleyan. The Tigers nearly pulled off the upset, 
but late free throws by the Marlins secured the 
69-61 H-SC loss. 

The Tigers came back home to a 15 -point 
victory over Roanoke College. Their three-game 
road stand ended with losses to Lynchburg and 
Bridgewater but a win over Washington & Lee. 



The rough first-half stretch of ODAC games 
continued to plague the Tigers on their return 
home. Hosting arch-rival and top-10-ranked 
Randolph-Macon, the Tigers were down by 21 
points with just 12:55 left in the game, when a 
remarkable comeback put the Tigers in posi- 
tion to win. Down just two with 57 seconds 
remaining, the Tigers got the ball back with 28 
seconds left, but a Randall Ward three-point 
jumper from the corner came up short, as did 
a desperation three-point heave from halfcourt 
at the buzzer. Five days later, the Tigers hosted 
Lynchburg College, and a three-point shot from 
just above the arc by Fletcher Lumpkin rolled in 
and out, giving the Tigers a two-point loss. 

With just a 2-7 ODAC record after nine 
games, the Tigers looked like they would have to 
battle to finish above the bottom three spots in 
the ODAC. However, the Tigers turned around 
their season with a string of victories. 

First there was a 10-point victory over 
Randolph, in which Tiger fans saw a career-high 
performance from senior captain Colin O'Neill, 
who poured in 21 points. Then Tigers then 
rolled to a 21-point win against Bridgewater Col- 
lege. During a two-game road trip, the Tigers 



Sophorrwre forward Harrison George Junior wing Ru White 



Senior forward Colin 'Neill 




26 THE RECORD OF HAMPDEN-SYDNEY COLLEGE • MARCH 2011 




At the aluDuii basketball giDiie, {jruiit ruw) Chris Fux 'OU, Drew Prehiiius 'U8, Alike Edwards '07, Byron Laiuton '09, 
Alex Robbins '99, Kristian Hargadon '01, Marcus Gregory '03, Bat Barber '92, Tee Jennings '95, Brad Pomeroy '92, 
T.J. Grimes '01, Bryan Sheridan '97, Jim Countiss '71, (back row) Dee Vick '94, Aaron Lewek '06, Hakeem Groom '10, 
Karlis Trops '10, Mike TJwmpson '04, Turner King '10, Troy Kaase '08, Gale Phillips '09, Billy Reid '94, Herb Sebren 
'66, Nate Schwab '96, and Lane Brooks '03. Not pictured: Rick Galdwell '87, Lane Medlin '10, and John Barker '71. 



topped Emory & Henry by 10 and #19 Ferrum 
College 87-83. The Tigers' winning way contin- 
ued at home in Fleet Gymnasium with wins over 
top-10 ranked Virginia Wesleyan, Washington 
& Lee, and Guilford. 

Heading into the season finale against 
Randolph-Macon, the Tigers were tied for fifth 
in the conference with Randolph College. A win 
over the vaunted Yellow Jackets would secure the 
Tigers the fifth seed in the ODAC Tournament 
and a first-round bye. 

The H-SC vs. R-MC rematch look like it was 
going to be a blowout win by the Yellow Jackets 
as they led by as many as 19 in the first half 
However, the Tigers fought back into the game 
and even led in the second half Down one with 
45 seconds left, a Yellow Jacket player missed a 
layup and two free throws with just 10 seconds 
remaining. The Tigers got the rebound with the 
chance to win the game, but Ben Jessee missed a 
three-pointer at the buzzer to fall by one, 61-60. 

The Tigers hosted a first-round ODAC Tour- 
nament game against the 11th seeded Emory & 
Henry and sent the Wasps packing with a 71-61 
win, earning the Tigers a trip to Salem. 

The night before the games in Salem, the 
ODAC Men's Basketball Banquet took place. 
Harrison George earned First-Team AU-ODAC 
after leading the league in scoring and second in 
rebounding. O'Neill also earned a spot on the 
ODAC Sportmanship Team. 



"THE GAME" 
FEATURED ON MSNBC 




In an online article at 

nbcsports. msnbc. com/id/ 

40095988/ns/sportS'College_ 

football/, sportswriter Jelisa 

Castrodale surveys the 116-year 

history of the Tiger-Yellow Jacket 

rivalry and interviews players 

and coaches. 

AN excerpt: 

"I've been here 11 years 

and it didn't take me long 

to realize that you can go 9-1 

and lose to Macon and it's a bad 

year, and you can go 1-9 and 

beat them and it's a good year, " 

said Hampden-Sydney coach 

Marty Favret. 



THE RECORD OF HAMPDEN-SYDNEY COLLEGE • MARCH 2011 27 



The Tigers vs. Royals quarterfinal game 
proved to be a classic thriller that came down 
to the buzzer. Ru White received the in-bounds 
pass but his half court shot at the buzzer was just 
a little too wide, as it bounced off the rim to give 
the Royals the win. 

H-SC finished the season with a 17-10 record, 
the best record since 2006-07 and the first win- 
ning season since 2007-08. With only one senior 
lost to graduation, the Tigers will look to earn 
their 11th ODAC Championship in 2012. 




Basketball veteran David Corrigan '79 and his son 
Patrick 13, a point guard on the current basketball team. 



Ty Cobb Ball Park to open by Macon Game 



Ty Cobb Ball Park, designed to complement 
Everett Stadium, is scheduled to be finished in 
time for the double-header against the Ran- 
dolph-Macon Yellow Jackets on April 16. 

The primary benefactors for the ball park 
are Bruce and Gladys Spencer; Byron and Pam 
Wurdeman, the parents of Chapman Wurde- 
man '13; and John '52 and Peggy Schug, whose 
generosity toward academic scholarships and the 
Beyond the Hill program have already enriched 
the lives of many students. Mrs. Schug's family 
has a strong connection with baseball; her grand- 
father was the legendary Ty Cobb. 

"This is an exciting time for Hampden- 
Sydney baseball," says head coach JefFKinne. 
"With our new ball park we will have one of the 
top venues in all of Division III. This is some- 



thing our players, friends, and fans will be able 
to enjoy for years to come. On behalf of the 
Tiger baseball community, I'd like to thank all 
involved for making this possible." 

The new facility will have seating for nearly 
300 spectators, a concourse with a lounge and 
press box above, and men's and women's rest- 
rooms that will be available during both basebal 
and football games. 

The newfacility should be completed before 
the end of the season. "I am excited that our 
seniors will be able to play here," adds Coach 
Kinne. "They are the ones who approached 
President Howard about building this ball park. 
They deserve a lor of the credit for making this 
happen." 




Alumni Activities 

MARK MEITZ '95, DIRECTOR OF ALUMNI RELATIONS 



Recent gatherings 

Graduates from the last ten 
years met for the Young 
Alumni Taskforce at The 
Commonwealth Club in 
Richmond and spent a 
Saturday sharing ideas and 
talking about ways to involve 
more young alumni in College 
events. 

Later in the same day, 
members of the Gammon 
Society of donors, commonly 
called the Young Founders, 
attended an evening of fun 
and fellowship at Lewis Ginter 
Botanical Gardens. The event 
was sponsored by Malcolm 
Sydnor '94 and Joe Dunn '93. 

Dean of Admissions 
Anita Garland has been 
busy recruiting new students 
and speaking at alumni club 
meetings, including the South 
Hampton Roads Club, the 
Martinsville Club (hosted 
byWillPanniir??), the 
Midlands Club of South 
Carolina in Columbia, and the 
Palmetto Club of Charleston 
(SC). Hugh Haskins '01, 
director of planned giving 
(and a former associate dean of 
admissions), was excited to join 
Ms. Garland for many of the 
events. 

The Atlanta Club filled the 
basement of Ormsby's to meet 
with President Christopher 
Howard and new students. 

Ue Nashville Club held 




HAMPDEN-SYDNEY COLLEGE 

My fellow Alumni, 

2011 is moving along quickly for the alumni 
office. We have had the good fortune to 
synchronize alumni club events, admissions, 
athletics, development and Dr Howard's 
speaking engagements. In the run up to 
Alumni Council weekend (March 17-19), we 
enjoyed some great events (highlighted below) 
and are actively working with new or dormant 
clubs to schedule events for the spring and 
summer. Please log on to www.hsc.edu for 
upcoming events and feel free to contact me 
with comments, suggestions, and ideas. 




Maxk/Meitz, Director of Alumni Relations 
MMeitz@hsc.edu 
(434) 223-6242 

P.S. If you haven't already done so, please 
log onto to '*The Network' (http://thenetwork. 
hsc.edu) and update your contact information 
so we can keep you informed about Hampden- 
Sydney College events happening near you. 



THE RECORD OF HAMPDEN-SYDNEY COLLEGE • MARCH 2011 29 




1 

1 


9 \ " ^ 



President Howard spoke to aluimii, parents, and prospective students at a Pig Pickin ' Party on March 3, 2011, at the 
Milburnie Fishing Chib in Raleigh. Dean of Admissions Anita Garland (in hat at second table on right) also spoke. 

a cocktail and hors d'oeuvre 
reception at the Belle Meade 
Country Club on February 23, 
2011, welcoming Dr. Howard 
to town. Michael Finucane 
'94 sponsored and hosted 
this wonderful event. During 
his comments to the club, 
Dr. Howard mentioned that 
Myron Rolle, a member of the 
Tennessee Titans football team, 
will join the Hampden-Sydney 
College Board of Trustees. 

After snow pushed it back 
a day, the Southside Alumni 
Club reception in Kirby 
Field house gave guests an 
opportunity for fellowship, 
good food, and to hear 
comments from Dean Garland, 
club president Chris Dowdy 
'99, and President Howard 
before watching the 201 1 
edition of Tiger basketball. 

Watch your mail for 
future alumni club activities 
happening in your area. 



At the Hampden-Sydney Club of Southside Virginia pre-game reception: 
Janet and Ed Early '57 and Sumner Pugh '57 and Patty Piigh. 

Below, President Howard congratidates Chris Doivdy '99 (left) 
on his successful term as Southside Alumni Club President. 




THE RECORD OF HAMPDEN-SYDNEY COLLEGE . MARCH 2011 



Young Founders 
Celebration 

On Saturday, February 19, 
Young Founders from across 
the region gathered at the Lewis 
Ginter Botanical Garden in 
Richmond for the Fifth Annual 
Young Founders Dinner Cele- 
bration. 

During the program. Young 
Founders Chairman John 
Cronly '06 presented Gammon 
Medallions to Chris Dowdy 
'99, Andrew Sinclair '03, 
Rusty Foster '04, and Judson 
McAdams '04. 

This was the first time that 
the Young Founders celebration 
was held at Lewis Ginter. "It 
was a great night for the Col- 
lege," says Cronly. "Our ability 
to build strong relationships 
with young alumni is critical to 
the College's future." 

The Gammon Medallion 
was established in 2006 to 



recognize Young Alumni 
(defined as graduates and 
non-graduates of 
Hampden-Sydney 
College who have 
not yet celebrated 
their 10-year 
Reunion) who have 
given of themselves 
in both service and 
philanthropy to Hampden 
Sydney College. 




Named in honor of 
Hampden-Sydney College's 

President Edgar Graham 
Gammon, Class of 
1905, the medallion 
recognizes those 
Young Alumni 
whose contributions 
have significantly 
aided the College in 
fulfilling its mission to form 
"good men and good citizens." 



At the 2011 Young Founders celebration: Stephanie Harvie, Charlie Parrish 
12, Willis Davis '10, and Taylor Hujfinan. 




Recipients of the 2011 Young Founders Gammon Medallions: Chris Dowdy '99, Judson McAdar, 
Rusty Foster '04, and Andrew Sinclair '03. 




THE RECORD OF HAMPDEN-SYDNEY COLLEGE • MARCH 2011 31 



Class Notes 



INFORMATION RECEIVED BEFORE FEBRUARY 1, 201 



Send items for Class Notes to classnotes@hsc.edu. 

For searchable Alumni news, posted as it arrives, visit 

www.hsc.edulConstituentslAlumni.html 



1945 



The Rev. Dr. ROBERT BLUFORD, 

JR. joined the Wings ot Freedom Tour 
from Staunton to Chesterfield aboard 
a restored B-24. Bluford volunteered 
tor the U.S. Army Air Force in 1942 
and served as a B-24 bomber pilot and 
squadron leader, flying 18 missions 
over the European Theater. During 
the November flight, Bluford was 
offered the co-pilot's seat and flew part 
of the way. He was happy to report 
that, despite not flying a bomber for 
65 years, he kept it level. 



1954 



WILLIAM C. BOINEST received 
the Lifetime 
Achievement in 
Philanthropy 
award during the 
National 
Philanthropy 
Day luncheon 
and awards 
ceremony in Richmond on November 
17, 2010. He was nominated for the 
award by the Greater Richmond 
Chapter of American Red Cross, Bon 
Secours Richmond Health Care 
Foundation, and Hampden-Sydney 
College. 




1960 



The Rev. JAMES H. GRANT, JR., 

serves on the Family Assessment and 
Planning Team for the Department ot 
Social Services in Tazewell County, as 
vice chairman of the Senior Volunteer 
Services Advisory Council for Clinch 
Valley Community Action, and on the 
Committee on Ministry for Abingdon 
Presbytery. He is a retired (though still 
very active) Presbyterian minister. 



1963 



JOSEPH E. "JOEY" VIAR was 

named a "Living Legend of Alex- 
andria," primarily for his work as 
Chairman of the Alexandria Hospital 
Foundation. Under his leadership the 
foundation raised $40 million, which 
has taken a "fine community hospital" 
to a state-of-the-art medical center. 
In 2008 the Alexandria Times named 
him Citizen of the Year. 




Tl)c Rev. Dr. Robert Bluford, Jr. '45 with the restored B-24 he flew successfully 
in November, in his first time as a bomber pilot in 65 years. \ 



1964 



K. NEAL HUNT, SR., has been 
re-elected to the North Carolina 
State Senate representing Senate 
District 15, which includes Raleigh. 



1965 



The Rev. G. GEOFFREY 
HUBBARD is chairman of the 
Board of Directors of the Bedford 
Parish Nurse Ministry and pastor at 
Cool Spring Presbyterian Church. 
JULIOUS R "JOEY" SMITH, 
JR., chairman 
and CEO of 
Williams 
Mullen, has 
been listed in 
Virginia's 
Leaders in the 
Law 2010, a 



1l 



publication ot Virginia Lawyers 
Weekly. 

ROBERT C. WIMER has 
co-authored, with Leah Settle Gibbs, 
the book Amherst: From Taverns to 
a Town. Mr. Wimer is the retired 
editorial page editor of Tlie News & 
Advance in Lynchburg. 



1967 



Dr. C. BRUCE ALEXANDER, 

professor and vice chair of the 
Department of Pathology at the 



UAB Health System, is president- 
elect of the American Society of 
Clinical Pathologists. He has been 
an active member of the organiza- 
tion since becoming a fellow in 1982. 
He lives in Birmingham, Alabama. 
HENRY RCUSTIS, JR., has 
been elected chairman of Hampton 
Roads Bankshares, a $3-billion bank 
holding company headquartered in 
Norfolk. He is a partner and attorney 
at the law firm Custis, Lewis & Dix 
in Accomac. 



1968 



JAMES L. BECKNER is the 

co-founder of Beckner Clevy Part- 
ners, a private equity hedge fund. He 
lives in Nashville, Tennessee. 

RONALD R. TWEEL has been 
named to 
Virginia 
Business 
magazine's 
2010 list of 
Legal Elite and 
in Virginia's 
Leaders in the 
Law 2010, a publication of Virginia 
Lawyers Weekly. He was recognized 
for his work in domestic relations 
and for his pro bono work. He is an 
attorney and partner at Michie 
Hamlett Lowry Rasmussen & Tweel 
PLLC in Charlottesville. 




32 THE RECORD OF HAMPDEN-SYDNEY COLLEGE - MARCH 2011 




CHARLES F. "RICK" WITT- 
HOEFFT, an 

attorney and 
executive 
vice president at 
Hirschler 
Fleischer PC, 
has been Hsted 
in Virginia's 
Leaders in the Law 2010, a pubhcation 
of Virginia Lawyers Weekly. He was 
recognized for his work in business 
and commercial law. 



1970 



WILLIAM D. SELDEN V, 

president ol" C.P. Dean Company 
in Richmond, was named the 2009 
Distinguished Retailer of the Year by 
the Retail Merchants Association. 



1971 



DALE W. PITTMAN, an attorney 
in Petersburg, has been listed in 
Virginia 's Leaders in the Law 2010, 
a publication oi Virginia Lawyers 
Weekly. He was recognized for his 
work in consumer law. 



1974 



B. BOYD JOHNSON has been 
appointed to the board of directors 
of the Roanoke Economic Devel- 
opment Authority. Mr. Johnson 
is director of Hall Associates asset 
management group. 



1976 



Dr. JOHN R. HUBBARD has been 
selected by the Consumer's Research 
Council of America as one of "Amer- 
ica's Top Psychiatrists. " Dr. Hubbard 
has also recently published a new 
book, Great Life Choices for Teens. He 
lives in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. 



1978 



PATRICK C. DEVINE, JR., has 

been named "Norfolk Health Care 
Lawyer of the Year" in Best Lawyers 
2011. He is a lawyer with Williams 
Mullen. 



1979 



JOSEPH D. THORNTON of 

Mitchell, Wiggins. & Co. LLP was 
named to Virginia Business maga- 
zine's list of Super CPA's in Virginia. 



1980 



DOUGLAS C. McELWEE has been 
elected to serve a three-year term as 
an assistant managing member of the 




Hunter Bendall 76 (4th from left ) at rehearsal dinner for Llunter Bendall, Jr. 
(far right) onfune 25, 2010, in Peaks Island, Maine. Tl)irdfrom left is Hank 
Miller V, son of Hank Miller IV 75; fifth from left at front is Stephen Rilee, 
son of Tom Rilee '75; 4th from right is Landon Hill, son of Bill Hill '76. 



Charleston law firm Robinson 

& McElwee, 
PLLC. He 
earned his law 
degree from 
West Virginia 
University and 
focuses on 
mineral 

operational issues, mineral and 
commercial real estate, and 
bankruptcy related issues. 

DAVID R WATSON has been 
appointed deputy business area 
executive for National Security 
Space at the Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity Applied Physics Laboratory. 




CHARLES V McPHILLIPS, 

executive vice president of practice 
management at Kaufman & 
Canoles, P.C., in Norfolk, has been 
inducted as a Fellow of the Virginia 
Law Foundation, a distinction for 
attorneys of character who are 
outstanding in their profession and 

From left. Jay Mitchell '85, Will Bettendorf '86, Ed McMidlen '86, and 
their wives in Pompeii, during the summer of 2010. 



in their communities. Mr. McPhil- 
lips has also been named to Best 
Lawyers in America for corporate law 
(1998-2011). In addition to buyers and 
sellers in the mergers and acquisi- 
tion market, he advises government 
contractors, international business, 
and closely-held companies. He is 
also a Trustee of Hampden-Sydney 
College. 

Dr. DAVID E. ROSS was 

certified in the 
subspecialty of 
behavioral 
neurology & 
neuropsychiatry 
by the United 
Council for 
Neurologic 
Subspecialties. Neuropsychiatry is a 
relatively new subspeciality, and Dr. 
Ross is one of two physicians in 
Virginia currently certified in this 
area. He completed medical school 
and residency in psychiatry at the 
Medical College of Virginia. In 1997 

CONTINUED ON PAGE 36 





THE RECORD OF HAMPDEN-SYDNEY COLLEGE • MARCH 2011 33 



R. Tyler Whitley '59, 
political reporter 

"If I had a good hobby, 
I might have retired some 
time ago," says Tyler 
Whitley '59. Certainly 
some Virginia politicians 
wish he played golf. 

Instead, the lifelong 
Richmonder has clocked 
more than 50 years as a 
reporter, more than 30 
of them covering politics 
for Jlje Richmond Times- 
Dispatch. 

He was the editor of 77?^ 
Tiger at Hampden-Sydney 
during his senior year but 
quickly admits that did 
only a little to prepare him 
for a career in journalism. 

"There wasn't a lot of 
mentoring, but we found 
news. We worked for a 
couple of nights maybe 



Political reporter Tyler Whitley 
'59 (center) at his 50-year- 
anniversary party, with former 
Virginia governors Jim Gilmore, 
L. Douglas Wilder, Gerald 
Baliles, and Linwood Holton. 



f 



every week. We had to go into 
Farmville to The Farmville 
Herald; they printed the 
paper for us. We got to know 
Barrye Wall [Class of 1919 and 
founder of The Tiger] there. 
That kind of got me interested, 
but really we were just playing 
around." 

Members of V)e Tiger staff 
under Whitley included guys 
like current Chairman of the 
Board of Trustees Tom Allen 
'60, longtime Hampden- 
Sydney Dean of Students 
Lewis Drew '60, and legendary 
professor John Brinkley '59. 
Whitley says he remembers 
Brinkley being "smart, very 



C^ll politicians are 

pretty much the same. 

CMost of them are 

pretty smart people; 

they're not the dummies 

that they are sometimes 

portrayed as. 

They wouldn't be in politics 

if they weren't easy 

to get along with. " 



smart," but Whitley was no 
slouch. He was a member of 
the honor fraternities Phi Beta 
Kappa and Eta Sigma Phi, just 
like Brinkley. 

Also on the staff was Don 
Whitley '59, Tyler's twin 
brother. They have always been 
great friends, living together 
as college roommates for three 
years and both joining PI Kappa 
Alpha. "I'm not surprised that 
he has been so successful," says 
Don Whitley of his brother. 
"He loves his work. He knew 
what he wanted to do and he 
just loves it." 

After college, Whitley joined 
the Army for his requisite six- 
month stint, then returned 
to Richmond. That's when 
he learned about an opening 
at the News Leader. 

"I had just gotten out of 
the Army. I was drinking 
beer at Philips Continental 
Lounge one night and this 
former Hampden-Sydney 
guy who worked for the 
News Leader told me there 
was an opening for an obit 



TYLER WHITLEY '59 
Political reporter 



% 






writer. He said, 'They're going 
to want to pay you $75 dollars 
a week. Ask for $85.' So I asked 
for $85 and got $80. I came 
down and passed the spelling 
test and that was it. I didn't 
know anything about writing 
obits or anything; they just had 
to kind of help me along. I got 
out of the Army on December 
6th and was down here on 
December 20th. I've been here 
ever since." 

After writing obituaries, 
Whitley was moved to the 
business section. "I guess they 
had a void and they asked 
me to fill it. I became the 
business editor and trained 
some really good people 
there — ^Jeanne Cummings, 
who is with Politico now and 
used to work for The Wall Street 
Journal, and Roger Kintzel, 
who became publisher of The 
Atlanta Constitution. We had a 
pretty good shop, though I had 
nothing to do with it." 

The folks running the paper 
must have seen through his 
modesty. He was moved over 
to special assignment before 
becoming political editor in 
1980. 

During his career, 
Whitley has covered 14 
national conventions and nine 
governors, saying, "All of them 
are a little different and still a 
little the same, too." He says 
the highlight of it all was the 
1989 gubernatorial race in 
which Doug Wilder was the 
first African American elected 
a state governor in the history 
of the nation. 



According to Whitley, 
journalism itself has not 
changed during his career, 
but the newspaper industry is 
"threatened." 

"People are deserting 
newspaper reading in 
droves. Our circulation has 
plummeted, but the principles 
of journalism — finding the 
news, getting to the bottom 
of it, and writing it — are still 
the same. The equipment is 
much better now. Computers 
are much better than the old 
typewriters, I guarantee ya." 

During his 30 years of 
covering politics, the players 
have not changed much either. 
"I think all politicians are 
pretty much the same. Most of 
them are pretty smart people; 
they're not the dummies that 
they are sometimes portrayed 
as. They wouldn't be in politics 
if they weren't easy to get along 
with." 

Whitley must be pretty 
easy to get along with, too. 
He makes a point to keep 
everything professional. He 
never has social relationships 
with politicians and he 
keeps his personal thoughts 
to himself "I don't think 
I am pro-Democrat or pro- 
Republican. I try to keep an 
even balance." 

He says he very seldom 
gets a call from someone upset 
about an article, though he 
did get one during his days as 
editor of The Tiger. He wrote 
an editorial calling for the end 
of spring football practice, 
because it was taking good 
athletes away from baseball. 



Bob Thalman, the head 
football coach, called up and 
chewed him out a little. 

His memories of Hampden- 
Sydney are fond; even recalling 
his phone call from Coach 
Thalman elicits a chuckle. 
Like so many of his classmates, 
though, Whitley says it 
was Dr. Graves Thompson 
1927 who had the greatest 
influence on his life on The 
Hill. "Dr. Thompson was a 
wonderful teacher. I remember 
particularly well his English 
Etymology class and his 
sense of humor. I remember a 
fellow in class asking him if he 
believed in reincarnation. Dr. 
Thompson said, 'Yes. Better 
luck next time'." 

Though Whitley sees 
the end of his own career 
approaching, he thinks the 
newspaper industry will 
remain. "It will survive, but 
in a lesser state. I'm probably 
getting out at a good time. 
I will probably work for 
another year of so before I'm 
done." 

The Richmond Times- 
Dispatch recently celebrated 
Whitley's 50 years with the 
company. Now that the 
tables have turned, and he is 
the subject of the news, he is 
ready for his final by-line and 
considering his options for a 
really good hobby. 



THE RECORD OF HAMPDEN-SYDNEY COLLEGE • MARCH 201! 



he joined the faculty at the Medical 
College of Virginia as a clinical 
assistant professor. In 2001, he 
founded the Virginia Institute of 
Neuropsychiatry, of which he is the 
director. He is a nationally 
recognized clinician, educator, and 
author. 



1983 



ROBERT H. CAMP has been 
appointed the director of the 
Writing Center at Virginia Union 
University in Richmond. 




1984 



DAVID A. ARIAS has been elected 
to the Heritage 
Bankshares 
board of 
directors. He is 
the president of 
Swimways 
Corp., a 
Virginia 
Beach-based midsized designer, 
manufacturer and distributor of 
swimming pool toys, games and 
recreational products. He holds an 
MBA from the Fuqua School of 
Business at Duke University. He is a 
trustee of the Virginia Aquarium 
and Virginia Beach Vision and 
chairman of the United Way South 
Hampton Roads Tocqueville 
Society. 

ERICW. UHTENWOLDT 
of Trophy Club, Texas, is the vice 
president of manufacturing for 
OUT! Pet Care. 



1986 



MAURICE A. JONES has been 
elected chair-elect to the Hampton 
Roads Chamber of Commerce. He 
is the president of Pilot Media. 

J. LAWRENCE MANSFIELD, 
JR., has been promoted to president 
of Central Virginia Market for Gate- 
way Bank. He lives in Richmond. 



1988 



THOMAS B. GATES, vice presi- 
dent and Virginia state manager for 
First American Title, was featured in 
the company's magazine. Vie Wire. 



1989 



JOHN M. HOPPER has joined the 
First Tennessee Richmond private 
client services group as senior vice 
president. He lives in Richmond. 
WILLIAM M. "BILL" 




Taylor Smack '97, right, owner of Blue Mountain Brewery, with brewers 
Chad Dean and Matt Nucci, stand over barrels of their Dark Hollow stout. 



STANLEY, JR., has been elected to 
the Virginia Senate District 19 seat 
in a 2011 special election. This seat 
was previously held by Robert Hurt 
'91, who was elected to the U.S. 
House ot Representatives in 2010. 
Mr. Stanley is an attorney with the 
law firm Bird & Stanley, LLC, in 
Moneta. 



1990 



MARK K. DuBOSE has joined 
Bank of America in Charlotte, 
providing advice and counsel to 
corporate and investment banking 
groups. He and his wife Brittan live 
in Charlotte with their two children, 
Henry (5) and Isabel (2). 



1991 



CHRISTOPHER H. "TOPPER" 

RAY has been named president of 
Bravo Group Communications. 
Previously, he was principal and 
chiel communications officer at 
Blank Rome, LLP. 



1992 



SCOTT COOPER will write and 
direct an adaptation for Fox 2000 
Pictures of the 2006 historical novel 
about Edgar Allan Poe as a West 
Point cadet. He is an actor and direc- 
tor living in Los Angeles. 

MATTHEW B. WHITAKER 
has joined Anderson Strudwick, 
Inc., as vice president of investments. 
He has an MBA from Virginia 
Commonwealth University. 




1994 



J. CHRISTOPHER LEMONS is a 

senior assistant 
attorney 
general for the 
Common- 
wealth of 
Virginia. 
He advises on 
public-private 
partnerships tor the financing, 
development operations, and 
maintenance of transportation 
infrastructure assets. 

N.DOUGLAS PAYNE, JR., 
has been elected to the Board of 
Trustees of the Fishburne-Hudgins 
Educational Foundation, Inc. Previ- 
ously, he served on the Fishburne 
Military School's Board of Visitors. 
Mr. Payne is the president and 
CEO of Payne Communications in 
Richmond. 

WILLIAM H. WRIGHT IV 
has joined the staff of Senator Brown 
(R) of Massachusetts, assigned to the 
Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs. 
Before this move, Mr. Wright was 
with the national Counter-Terrorism 
Center and the State Department. 



1995 



G. BERKELEY EDMUNDS has 

been promoted to managing director 
in institutional equity trading with 
Wells Fargo Securities in Baltimore, 
Maryland. He and his wife Cheney 
live in Annapolis with their two 
sons Berkeley, Jr. (4), Bower (3), and 



36 THE RECORD OF HAMPDEN-SYDNEY COLLEGE . MARCH 2011 



daughter Serpell (2). 



1996 



TODD T. REID has been named 
state director for U.S. Senator Marco 
Rubio of Florida. Mr. Reid worked 
for Rubio during his tenure in the 
Florida House of Representatives. 
Most recently, he was deputy chief of 
staff for Dean Cannon, speaker of the 
Florida House of Representatives. 



1997 



TAYLOR SMACK, owner of Blue 
Mountain Brewery near Charlottes- 
ville, has introduced a new product, 
Dark Hollow Stout, which is aged in 
charred oak bourbon barrels. 

DAVID TING-DAI WANG is a 
web designer for Houlihan Lokey, an 
investment bank in Los Angeles, Cali- 
fornia. He and his wife Trendy enjoy 
bicycling in Southern California. This 
year David completed his first century 
(100-mile ride), and his wife completed 
her first half-century. 



1998 



JONATHAN S. JACKSON works in 

sales for SpeakWrite in Austin, Texas. 

BRANDON OGBURN is an 

attorney in the Public Integrity Divi- 
sion of the office of the Mississippi 
Attorney General. 

ROBERTA. "ROBBY" PEAY 
has been promoted to President & 
CEO of Bizport, Ltd., a document 
services and logistics company with 
operations in Richmond, Hampton 
Roads, and Roanoke. Mr. Peay was 
previously their chief operating officer. 



SHERWOOD H. BOWDITCH 

has been appointed to the Virginia 
Chamber of Commerce Economic 
Development Committee. He works 
for Morgan-Marrow Company in 
Hampton. 



2001 



NATHANIEL J. GOODWYN 

is a bassist with 
Richmond-based 
instrumental trio 
Near Earth 
Objects, which 
also features Joey 
Ciucci (younger 
brother of Billy Ciucci '02) on 
keyboards. The band's first full-length 
album. Manual for Self-Hypnosis, is 
available on iTunes. 




H-SC Alumni of the Class of 1994 maintaining a pi e-Tfmnksgiving tradition 
started at H-SC18 years ago: the Annual Hampden-Sydney Stretch Your 
Stomach Feast has been held every year since graduation either in Atlanta 
or in Cashiers, NC, at the Wade Hampton Golf Club. Although others from 
Virginia and Vanderbilt have been invited over the years, the core group (all 
pictured here) of Atkins Roberts '94, Bartow Morgan '94, Holmes Bell '94, 
Chris Faussemange '94, Colin Mellon '93, Robert Suggs '96 and Doug Payne 
'94 have made the annual trek with wives and significant others each year. 
Tlie photo was taken at Holmes Bell's house in Cashiers. 



PETER M.McCOY JR., was 

elected to the South Carolina House 
of Representatives, representing the 
115th district. He is a criminal pros- 
ecutor in the Ninth Circuit Solicitor's 
Office. 



^EE 



RICHARD C. L. MONCURE, 
JR., works for 
Friends of the 
Rappahannock 
as the steward of 
the tidal river 
below Fredericks- 
burg. He monitors the lower 






Rappahannock and works with 
local citizens to protect the river. 
He has also worked as a commer- 
cial fisherman and at his father's 
seafood market and restaurant. 
Before that he was a Peace Corps 
volunteer in Zambia. 

RYAN D. SILVERFIELD is 
the assistant offensive tackle coach 
for the Minnesota Vikings. 

KEVIN L. TURNER is 
special deputy attorney general for 
the State of Alabama. He will be 
the AG's liaison to the Governor 
and will oversee legislative affairs 
for the entire AG's office. 



CONTINUED ON PAGE 40 



Patrick Elb '95 and his wife Keri show their spirit at Neko Harbor during 
their fanuary trip to Antarctica. Thanks to them, we now have pictures of 
alumni holding a Hampden-Sydney banner on all seven continents: visit 
www.facebook.com/HampdenSydneyCollege, click on Photos, choose the 
album "You can go anywhere ivith a degree from Hampden-Sydney. " 





THE RECORD OF HAMPDEN-SYDNEY COLLEGE . MARCH 2011 37 



David Lawrencey 
Jr. '98, ski 
instructor and 
business owner 

Just days after he graduated 
from Hampden-Sydney Col- 
lege, David Lawrence '98 
packed up his car and started 
driving west. He had the 
promise of a job in Washing- 
ton state and very little idea 
of what lay between him and 
there. "I was in way over my 
head," he says. "I still am. 
It's great." 

The English major from 
Chesapeake, Virginia, had 
planned for years to move 
out West but had done 
remarkably little research. 
As a college student, he 
spent much of his free time 
working at Wintergreen 
Resort and enjoyed 
downhill skiing. 

Fast-forward 13 
years and Lawrence is a 

David Lawrence '98 
cross-country skiing. 



nationally recognized cross- 
country ski instructor and 
co-owner (with his wife Brooke) 
of a river rafting company. 

From September to April, 
Lawrence is a ski instructor, 
head coach of the Methow 
Valley Nordic Team, and 
member of the Professional 
Ski Instructor Association 
(PSIA) Nordic Team. 

The rest of the year, he and 
Brooke are running Pangaea 
River Rafting near Missoula, 
Montana. 



"7^ ^stan taught me 

how to be a coach. He does 

a great job reaching athletes 

individually. I didn't get it 

then, but I get it now and it 

helps me be a better teacher. 

UOhen I teach skiing, 

I have to get rid of my 

preferences and figure out 

what is best for my student. " 

DAVID LAWRENCE '98 
' "' ■ ■ ■ ■ ' ' itewater guide 



Through his position on 
the 30-member PSIA team, of 
whom only five are Nordic skiers 
like Lawrence, he travels across 
the country to work with other 
instructors and to ski in some of 
the most beautiful mountains in 
the world. He says, "You work 
your normal job, but you also go 
to team training events around 
the country to share teaching 
techniques, train instructors, 
give exams. I've also developed 
educational materials and written 
articles. You are really the face of 
■ the Association." 

Lawrence did not even 
learn how to cross country 
ski until he moved to 
Washington. He says having 
the right attitude has helped 
launch him to the top of the 
sport. "Being athletic and 
coordinated helps a lot, but 
having the attitude of a learner 
is probably most important. 
I am still just a student and 
I'm hungry to learn. I didn't 
get bothered by setbacks. 
If I wanted to be a world-class 
skier, I needed to be a world- 
class student. I needed to be a 




*> _-_ jom^rA^i' ■ 




ence '98 (in black at stern) guiding a party through the whitewater of a Montana River. 



world-class beginner." 

He is also very passionate 
about the outdoors, his life, 
and his work. That passion 
reached a tipping point when 
Lawrence and Brooke hiked 
the Pacific Crest Trail together. 
"She and I always said and 
believed that we could do 
anything. That was just lip 
service until we hiked the 
Pacific Crest Trail. That was 
when we realized that we really 
could do anything if we put 
our heart and minds into it. 
That hike was the seed for us 
to bike across the country. We 
didn't own bikes. We didn't 
really bike very much, but we 
believed we could do it." So, in 
2005 they did. 

Literally along the way they 
negotiated to buy their river 
rafting company. They had no 
experience running a business, 
so the English major did what 



he knew how to do. "I picked 
up a book and started reading. 
Dr. Sarah Hardy was my 
advisor and I give her credit for 
cultivating my love of reading. 
I still do it all the time. I love 
learning and reading is such a 
wonderful way to do that." 

Lawrence continues, "Many 
people at Hampden-Sydney 
taught me skills that I still 
use — Dr. Hardy, Ray Rostan, 
General Wilson. [Lacrosse 
coach] Ray Rostan taught me 
how to be a coach and I think 
about that a lot. He does a 
great job reaching athletes 
individually. I didn't get it 
then, but I get it now and it 
helps me be a better teacher. 
When I teach skiing, I have 
to get rid of my preferences 
and figure out what is best for 
my student. General Wilson 
taught me how to read the 
Bible in his Sunday school 



class. He taught me a lot about 
character and about giving 
back." 

What drives David 
Lawrence now is the passion he 
has for his life and his family. 
When the temperatures rise 
and the snow melts, they will 
return to their river rafting 
business, enjoying the outdoors 
and continuing to "live in the 
moment," as he calls it. 

"People should be 
passionate about their lives. 
Nobody wants to have a life 
that's not fun. I am passionate 
about skiing and about 
teaching others. Follow your 
heart. Be a learner." 

Always on the water, 
whether frozen or liquid, 
David Lawrence is happy to 
split his time between skiing in 
the beautiful mountains and 
rafting down the raging rivers 
of the Pacific Northwest. 



THE RECORD OF HAMPDEN-SYDNEY COLLEGE • MARCH 2011 39 



2004 



WILLIAM H. PUTEGNAT V 

acquired his family's industrial 
laundry business, Model Laundry, 
in January 2010. Model Laundry, 
founded in 1906 by William s 
great-grandfather, William Henry 
Putegnat, services the South Texas 
area. Mr. Putegnat lives in Browns- 
ville, Texas. 



2005 



JOHN Z. AXSOM has founded 
Musukan, Inc., and is currently in the 
building stage of his dojo, Oushi- 
Musu No Yakata (that is. House of 
the Bull Moose). The dojo will teach 
traditional Okinawan Shorin-ryu 
Karate-do. Also, he teaches govern- 
ment, U.S. history, and constitutional 
law at Menchville High School in 
Newport News. 

MICHAEL R. SCHULZ has 
been promoted to captain in the U.S. 
Marine Corps. 



2006 



MARK J. PINTO, JR., is a govern- 
mental consultant for The Fiorentino 
Group, a government relations and 
business development firm in Tampa, 
Florida. 



2007 



Lt RYAN P. ALEXANDER and his 

unit redeployed early in December to 
Ft. Stewart, Georgia. In recogni- 
tion of his outstanding leadership 
and performance, Ryan received 
the Bronze Star and the Combat 
Infantryman Badge. Ryan was Cadet 
Battalion Commander in the ROTC 
Program at Hampden-Sydney. 





Andreiu Murphy '10 in Springer Mountain, Georgia, at the end of the Appa- 
lachian Trail, whose 2,179 miles he hiked for six months after graduation. 



MICHAEL A. FRANKS is a 

business banking officer with Towne- 
Bank in Williamsburg. 

EVERETT M. GARDNER has 
joined the Shaheen & Shaheen, PC, 
as an attorney. He earned his J.D. 
from the University of Richmond 
School of Law and specializes in real 
estate law, traffic defense, estate plan- 
ning, and general civil litigation. 

C. SCOTT McADAMS is 
a sales and leasing associate with 
Commonwealth Commercial Part- 
ners in Richmond. 



WILLIAM B. BROCKMAN works 
in the health-physics department at 
Dominion Virginia Power's North 
Anna Nuclear Power Plant. He lives 
in Orange. 



2009 



DAVID B.SHERMAN, JR., 

is attending the Charlotte School of 
Law in Charlotte, North Carolina. 



2010 



MATTHEW L. BROWN has been 
named an assistant coach with the 
Hampden-Sydney baseball team. 
During his two-year stint as a player, 
he earned several accolades, includ- 
ing being named a Rawlings South 
Region Gold Glover. 



SPENCER B. CONOVER 

is the assistant director ol Annual 
Giving at Hampden-Sydney College. 

JOSH MILLER is an assistant 
football coach at Hampden-Sydney, 
working with the defensive line. 

ANDREW MURPHY has 
completed hiking the 2,179-mile 
Appalachian Trail. He hiked south- 
bound from Mt. Katahdin in Maine 
to Springer Mountain in Georgia. 
The whole trip took six months and 
ten days. 

WILLIAM A. PACE II has 
joined the staff of Virginia U.S. 
Congressman Robert Hurt '91. 

RICHARD J. "JACK" RUDDY 
is the assistant director of events for 
the Heritage Foundation. 

BRYAN VANETTEN is a 
knowledge resources coordinator 
with Whitney, Bradley & Brown, in 
Reston. 



2011 



JOSEPH K. LANNETTI, a gradu- 
ate of the Public Service Program, is 
the assistant to the director of devel- 
opmental services for the Greater 
Richmond ARC, unvw.richmondarc. 
org. 



2012 



SCOTT HENSHAWhas been 
promoted to corporal in the USMC 
Reserve. 



DO YOU KNOW SOME LIKELY YOUNG MEN 

WHO WOULD PROFIT BY THE 

HAMPDEN-SYDNEY EXPERIENCE? 

Send their names to Anita Garland, Dean of Admissions at the College, agarland@hsc.edu. 



40 THE RECORD OF HAMPDEN-SYDNEY COLLEGE ■ MARCH 2011 



Advanced 
Studies 



Weddings 



1995 



CHRIS BEDFORD successfully 
defended his dissertation in psychol- 
ogy at the U. of Minnesota. 



2001 



BENJAMIN H. GATES earned a 
doctorate of optometry from Nova 
Southeastern University in Fort 
Lauderdale, Florida. Licensed in 
Virginia, he is an optometrist in 
Richmond. 



ANDREWS. McGOWAN of 

Henrico has earned his masters degree 
from Drexel University's Physician 
Assistant Program. He works in spine 
surgery at Advanced Orthopedic 
Centers in Richmond. 



2008 



BRENNAN BREELAND, third-year 
law student at Old Miss, has been 
accepted into the Army JAG program. 

PETER D. CROWE has begun 
the process to enter the Roman 
Catholic priesthood in the Diocese of 
Memphis. He studied Spanish at the 
Panamerican University in Mexico 
City. In September, he began six years 
ol philosophy and theology studies at 
St. Meinrad's Benedictine Abbey in 
Indiana. Mr. Crowe had worked in 
logistics for the U.S. Army. 

JAMES L. GRESHAM II placed 
first in the domestic graduate category 
at the Phi Beta Delta International 
Honor Society's second annual 
International Experiences speech 
competition. He is a graduate student 
in higher education at Virginia Tech. 
In his speech he discussed going to the 
Dominican Republic to build floors 
and latrines at Haitian refugee camps. 

JOSEPH "TREY" T. KEELER 
'08 completed his master's degree in 
international relations at the Univer- 
sity of Melbourne (Australia). 



2009 



GEORGE B. ELLIOTT III is a 

second-year law student at the Univer- 
sity of Alabama School of Law and 
recently admitted to the Manderson 
Graduate School of Business at the 
University oi Alabama to pursue an 
MBA along with his JD. 



1977 



JAMES C. S. HOLLADAYand 
ANN WOOD were married on 
October 16, 2010, in Linville, North 
Carolina. They live in Greenwood. 



1984 



THOMAS UNDERWOOD 
WARREN and CHRISTINE 
BRUNER JOHNSTON were 
married on December 10, 2010, in 
Mobile, Alabama. The bride is a 
graduate of The University of North 
Carolina at Chapel Hill. They couple 
splits time between Mobile and 
Austin, Texas. 



1989 



TUCKER DAVID DAVIS and 
PAOLA TATIANA ZULUAGA 

were married on October 9, 2010, 
in Washington, DC. In attendance 
were Brian Keyser '87 and Andrew 
Ames '89. The bride and groom both 
work lor the lederal government. 
They will split their time between 
Washington, DC, and Ashburn, Va. 



1997 



DAVID TING-DAI WANG and 
CHUNG-WEN (TRENDY) LIU 

were married in 2008; they live in 
Southern California, where David is 
a web designer. 



1999 



JUSTIN PATRICK HOLOF- 
CHAK and WHITNEY LEIGH 
MARCUM were married on August 



Tucker Davis '89 and Paola Ziiliiaga 




Vjomas Underwood Warren '84 and 
Christine Brimer Johnston, married 
on December 10, 2010. 




David 'Wang '97 and Chung-Wen 
Liu, married in 2008. 




THE RECORD OF HAMPDEN-SYDNEY COLLEGE • MARCH 2011 




Tlwnias L. Krebs,Jr. '02dndAiieJapphie}i, married on September 18, 2010. 




At the wedding oj Benjamin Nicholas Perrone 03 and Meredith Brooke 
English, married on January 17, 2010. 




7, 2010, in Asheville, North Caro- 
lina. The bride is from Louisville, 
Kentucky, and a graduate of Furman 
University. The groom is a member 
of Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity 
and works in commercial real estate 
in Charlotte, North Carolina. 



SLI 



Dr. DANIEL B. LARISON and 
KRISTINE MARIE HESS were 
married on July 31, 2010. Karl 
Vanmoerkerque 00 served as a 
groomsman. The bride is a doc- 
toral candidate in art history at the 
University ot Chicago. The groom 
earned a Ph.D. in history from the 
University of Chicago. They live in 
Chicago. 



2002 



THOMAS L. KREBS, JR., and 
AVE JAPPINEN were married at 
the Williamsburg Winery on Sep- 
tember 18, 2010. The groom works 
for the Commonwealth of Virginia. 
The bride works for Dexis, LLC. 
They live in Newport News. 



2003 



BENJAMIN NICHOLAS 
PERRONE and MEREDITH 
BROOKE ENGLISH were married 
on January 17, 2010, in Charleston, 
South Carolina. In attendance were 
Kerr Ramsay 03, Tom Hogge 
'03, Justin Ellett '02, Tim Daniels 
'03, Ben Watts '03, John Harman 
'03, Russell Cummings '03, Matt 
Myers 03, Andrew Turner 02, 
Clinton Lukhard 02, Cory Hopper 
'05, Billy Ciucci '02, Justin Scott 
'03, and Court Vanzant '02. The 
bride is a graduate of the University 
of Georgia and is the director of 
advertising and brand management 
at the College of Charleston. The 
groom is a marketing associate for 
Sysco Foodservices. They live in 
Charleston, South Carolina. 



At the wedding of Stephen Brown "Trey " Surber III '05 and Katherine Lacy 
Nolan, married on October 9, 2010. i 



2005 



STEPHEN BROWN "TREY" 
SURBER III and KATHERINE 
LACY NOLAN were married on 
October 9, 2010, in Charlottesville 
at St. Paul's Memorial Church. In 
attendance were Gardner Meek '07, 
Louis Walker 05, Cory Rayfield 
'05, Scott Russo '05, Wythe Hogge 
05, Matt Ferguson 05, Kenny 
Strickler '05, W. Brad Jones '06, 



i2 THE RECORD OF HAMPDEN-SYDNEY COLLEGE - MARCH 2011 



Chase Kurtz '04, Alex Crouch '07, 
Peter Boyd '05, Eric Bryant '06, and 
Patrick Dollar '04. The bride, a grad- 
uate of the University of Alabama, is 
a communications analyst with Ac- 
centure. The groom is a senior inside 
sales associate at ScienceLogic. They 
live in Arlineton. 



2006 



ERIC B. BRYANT and AMANDA 

PRINE were married on September 
18, 2010 at Mankin Mansion in 
Richmond. The bride is a graduate of 
Sweet Briar College. 

CORYDON PATRICK 
CUTLER and LINDSAY DOANE 
WOHLFORD were married on 
September 11, 2010, at The Tides Inn 
in Irvington. The bride is a graduate 
of Longwood University and works 
lor Bon Secours Health System. The 
groom is the owner and operator of 
Cutler Orthopedics, LLC, a medical 
product distribution company. They 
live in Richmond. 

Dr. RICHARD TORRENCE 
JONES and ELIZABETH MARIE 
MATTESON were married on 
October 10, 2010, at Holy Rosary 
Church in Washington, D.C. The 
bride is a graduate of The College of 
William & Mary and is attend- 
ing VCU School of Dentistry. The 
groom earned a DDS from VCU 
School of Dentistry and is complet- 
ing a residency at VCU. They live in 
Richmond. 

SAMUELJ.LONG,JR.,and 
JENNICA MAPP AMES were 
married on October 23, 2010, at 
Edgewater Farm in Cape Charles. 
In attendance were Daniel S. Long 
'75, Rucker Snead '81, Michael R. 
Schulz 05, Gregory Justice 03, 
Jason D. Stacy 05, Joel R. Myers 
'07, and Ryan Godfrey '05. The 
bride is a graduate of Longwood 
University and works as an occupa- 
tional therapist's assistant. They live 
in Cheriton. 

RUSSELL W.WOOD and 
ANDREA KELLEY were married 
on December 5, 2009. 



2007 



ALEXANDER HARKNESS 
BELL and KATHERINE KELLY 
ROGERS were married on June 
20, 2009, at the Alpharetta United 
Methodist Church. In attendance 
were Tyler Keefer '08, Andrew 




At the wedding of Eric B. Bryant '06 mid Amanda Prine, 
married on September 18, 2010. 




At the wedding of Samuel J. Long, Jr. '06 and Jennica Mapp Ames, 
married on October 23, 2010 




At the wedding of Russell Wood '06 and ANDREA KELLEY, 
married on December 5, 2009. 



THE RECORD OF HAMPDEN-SYDNEY COLLEGE • MARCH 2011 43 



Patterson '08, Stafford Cassell '07 
(groomsman), C. Rodes Boyd 08, 
Chris Anderson 06, Will Guza 
'06, Gray Pendleton 07, Casey 
Ariail 08, Charles D. Robison 
IV '01, Jimmy Philbin '08, Alex 
Bell '78 (the father of the groom). 
Will Fedora 07, Tyler Anderson 
'08, Price Gutshall '08, R. Mark 
Johnson '78, J. Hammil Hume 
'77, Dr. Mike Morgan '77, Charles 
D. (Chick) Robison III '70, Nick 
Junes '08, R. Matthew Dumas '06, 
and John Baker '06. The groom 
is pursuing a law degree at John 
Marshall Law School in Atlanta and 
the bride is finishing up her master's 
degree in teaching while teaching 
first grade. They live in Atlanta. 

WESLEY ROLLINGS DUKE 
and MARCI ELIZABETH 
HARRISON were married on 
October 24, 2009, at the Chester 
Presbyterian Church. In attendance 
were Carter Smith '07, Alex Crouch 
'07, Gardner Meeks '07, McClain 
Bean '07, Mark McDonald '07, 
Reed Westra '09, Ben Harris '09, 
Kevin Harris '77, and Christopher 
Pollard '10. They live in Richmond. 

BENJAMIN TAYLOR BARN- 
HILL and SARA ELIZABETH 
GRAY were married on October 
9, 2010, at Tuckahoe Plantation in 
Richmond. In attendance were John 
M. Boswell, Jr. '08, R. Wesley Ju- 
lian '08, Andrew S. McGowan '07, 
James L. Gresham II 08, Benjamin 
A. Pope IV '07, Shawn L. McMa- 
hon '97, John M. Boswell, Sr. '65, 
John Z. Axsom 05, Patrick A. 
Rowe '09, M. Watson Mulkey '08, 
Justin M. Azar '07, and Edward M. 
Savage '08. The bride is a graduate ol 
the University of Virginia. She works 
as a speech-language pathologist at 
Children's Hospital of Richmond. 
The groom is a scientist at Pharma- 
ceutical Product Development, Inc. 
They live in Richmond. 




At the wedding oj Wesley Rollings Duke '07 and Marci Elizabeth Harrison, 
married on October 24, 2009. 



1 1. \ 



At the wedding of Alexander Harkness Bell '07 and Katherine Kelly . 
married on June 20, 2009. 




At the wedding oj Benjamin Taylor Barnhill 08 and Sara Elizabeth Gray, 
married on October 9, 2010. 



THE RECORD OF HAMPDEN-SYDNEY COLLEGE • MARCH 2011 



Births 



1983 



To DURAN and TIFFANY 
HOLTON, a daughter, Alexis Paige 
Holton, on September 3, 2010. They 
live in San Diego. 



1988 



To ANDREW and ROBYN 

FOSTER, a son, Sheperd Andrew 
"Shep" Foster, on May 10, 2010. 
He joins his brother Wil and sister 
Regan. They live in Macon, Georgia. 



1991 



To BARRY B. CONRAD II and 
EMILY CONRAD, a daughter, 
Lucy Staton Conrad, on November 
2, 2010. They live in Dallas, Texas. 



1993 



To ROB and SYDNEY JAMISON, 

a son, Robert 
Andrew 
"Drew" 

Jamison, Jr., on 
September 25, 
2010. He joins 
his four-legged 
brother 

"Coach" at their home in Raleigh, 

North Carolina. 




[EH? 




To NATHAN and SHANNON 
GINGRAS, a 

daughter, 
t|<ife Jl Elizabeth 
Gertrude 
Temple 
Gingras, on 
September 24, 
2010. She joins 

her brother Temple at their home in 

Richmond. 



1998 



To RICHARD and DIANA 

BAKEWELL, 

a daughter, 
Adeline Olive 
Bakewell, on 
August 13, 
2010. She joins 
her brother 
Aidan Blair. 
They live in Alexandria. 




To CHRIS and ASHLEY 
PEACE, a son, Henry Covington 
Peace, on October 18, 2010. TTiey live 
in Mechanicsville. 

To TERRELL and ANNE 
WILSON, a daughter, Mary Hannah 
Wilson, on April 2, 2010. She joins 
her sister Chase at their home in St. 
Louis, Missouri. 



1999 



To ANDREW and VANESSA 

HAMP- 
TON, a 

daughter. 
Tabor 
Elizabeth 
Hampton, 
on July 8, 
2010. They 
live in Richmond. Tabor is shown 
with her father and her grandfather, 
Timothy B. Hampton '75. 

To JD and ANN JORDAN, a 
son, Malcolm Alexander Jordan, on 
July 6, 2010. They live in Roswell, 
Georgia. 

To ANDREW R. McELROY 
III and JEN McELROY a daughter, 
Elinore Grace McElroy on June 2, 
2010. Uiey live in West Hartford, 
Connecticut. 




TTT- 



Hi 

To COREY and JANETTE 
HARDISON, a daughter, Ella Grace 
Hardison, on August 25, 2010. They 
live Midlothian, Virginia. 



2002 



To JOE and KATE McKNEW, a 

son, Joseph 
Andrews 
McKnew, on 
August 22, 
2010. They live 
in Virginia 
Beach. 




2003 



To GREG and ANNA 
McCHESNEY, a son, Camden 
Thomas McChesney, on August 6, 
2010. They live in Richmond. 




2004 



To JOHN G. "JAY" DANIEL, JR., 
and MORGAN 
DANIEL, a son, 
John Kyle 
Daniel, on 
October 26, 
2010. He joins 

t ^I^S^J^diik.^^^ 1^'^ sister Molly 
Blaire (3). 

HJIiE 

To ANDREW and KELLY PEM- 
BERTON, a daughter, Elle Dowd 
Pemberton, on November 3, 2009. 
They live in Richmond. 

To JOHN and ANNIE 
RAMSAY, a son. Walker Patterson 
Clark Ramsay, on October 20, 
2010. The father is assistant dean of 
students for activities at Hampden- 
Sydney. Walker is the grandson of 
Dean of Students David A. Klein 78. 



2006 



To PATRICK and MOLLY GEE, 

a daughter, 
Olivia McCaslin 
Gee, on 
September 22, 
2010. They live 
in Richmond. 



Colleae Famir 



To JOSH and TRICIA LAUX, a 
daughter, Keira Corson Laux, on 
December 3, 2010. Mr. Laux is the 
head soccer coach at the College. 




THE RECORD OF HAMPDEN-SYDNEY COLLEGE ■ MARCH 2011 45 



Deaths 



1933 



JOHN ALBERT HOPKINS III of 

Charleston, West Virginia, died on 
November 10, 2010. He was an Army 
veteran of World War II, receiving 
a purple heart. Following the war, 
he worked at Charleston National 
Bank until retiring as vice president 
in 1978. He was active in both the 
First Presbyterian Church and the 
Boy Scouts of America and enjoyed 
playing tennis. 




1942 



FRANK S. HEIDELBACH of 

Westwood, 
\^ Massachusetts, 
died on 
December 1, 
2010. He 
earned a 
master's degree 
from the 
University of Virginia and was an 
Army veteran of World War II. He 
earned an MBA from Columbia 
University and worked for 31 years 
with Mobil Oil, managing 
operations around the wodd. 

Dr. EDWIN B. VADEN of 
Charlottesville died on December 
7, 2010. He was a graduate of the 
University of Virginia Medical 
School and a veteran of World War 
II and the Korean War. Dr. Vaden 
was a retired pediatrician who 
practiced 33 years in Lynchburg and 
20 years on Pawleys Island, South 
Carolina. 

GORDON CHURCHILL 
WILLIS of 
Roanoke died 
on December 
17, 2010. After 
leaving 
Hampden- 
Sydney to serve 
as a fighter 
pilot in the Navy, he graduated from 
the U.S. Naval Academy. He was 
chairman and treasurer of Rockydale 
Quarries Corp and active in many 
levels of education, as one of the 
early organizers of both North Cross 
School and what became the 
Virginia Community College 
System. He served also as chairman 
of the State Council of Higher 
Education for Virginia. During the 
1960s, Willis served on a biracial 





committee that helped the Roanoke 
Valley adapt more peacefully to 
integration than many other 
Southern cities. In 1992, he was 
named Cultural Laureate of 
Virginia. In 2000, he received the 
Noel C. Taylor Humanitarian 
Award. 



1944 



Dr. E. RANDOLPH TRICE of 

Richmond died 
on January 16, 
2011. He 
earned his 
medical degree 
from the 
Medical 
College of 
Virginia. After serving as a medical 
officer in U.S. Army hospitals in 
Germany and Japan, Dr. Trice 
established his practice in 
dermatology in Richmond. He was a 
clinical professor of dermatology at 
MCV, a former Vice-President of the 
Richmond Academy of Medicine, 
and former President of the 
Richmond Dermatological Society 
of Virginia. He was a prolific writer 
of medical literature, particulaHy on 
the subject of the history of 
medicine. He also published several 
papers and books of general 
historical interest, among them the 
history of the Kappa Sigma 
fraternity at Hampden-Sydney 
College. Dr. Trice was among the 
founders of the Richmond 
Symphony, and he served that 
organization as a board member and 
as president. He also presided over 
the Federated Arts Council ol 
Richmond. He was a member, 
former vestryman, and historian of 
St. James's Episcopal Church. 



1945 



Dr. LONNIE B. DICKENS, JR., 

of Chariottesville died on November 
21, 2010. He earned his doctor of 
dental surgery from the Medi- 
cal College of Virginia. He was a 
life member of the Chariottesville 
Albemarle Rescue Squad, serving as 
president in 1973-74. He was a Navy 
dentist during the Korean War and 
then practiced dentistry in Charlot- 
tesville for 43 years. 

GEORGE ROGERS CLARK 
STUART of Abingdon died on 
August 23, 2008. He was a veteran 
of World War II and earned a 
law degree from the University of 



Virginia. He practiced law for 40 
years. He served two terms in the 
Virginia House of Delegates and was 
elected president of the Virginia Bar 
Association in 1969. 

MELVIN HOWELL TENNIS, 
JR., of Fort Walton Beach, Florida, 
died on January 26, 2010. 



1949 



The Rev. ARTHUR HUBBARD 
STEVENS, JR., of Richmond died 
on January 9, 2011. He was a Word 
War II veteran and an ordained 
Presbyterian minister for 59 years, 
serving many churches across Vir- 
ginia. When he was pastor of College 
Church, he took a significant stand 
against the closing of the Prince 
Edward County Schools. 



1950 



CHARLES BOLIVAR LEECH 

III of Lexington died on Decem- 
ber 5, 2010. He was a member of 
Kappa Alpha Order. He owned and 
operated a beef farm and formed 
Ingleside Dairy Farm. He served as 
a director of the Rockbridge Farmers 
Co-Op for 32 years, was a member 
of the Rockbridge County Board of 
Supervisors. 

Dr. RUSSELL C. MACDON- 
ALD of Roanoke died on October 
12, 2009. He earned a Ph.D. from the 
University of Pennsylvania and was 
a professor emeritus at West Virginia 
University. 

The Rev. ROBERT DANIEL 
SIMMONS of Williamstown, West 
Virginia, died on December 23, 2010. 
He was a Navy veteran of World War 
II and earned a master of divinity 
from Union Theological Seminary 
and a master of theology from Princ- 
eton University. During his career, 
he served churches in Virginia, New 
Jersey, Maryland, and West Virginia. 



1954 



JAMES V. REVERCOMB of 

Roanoke died 
on December 
12, 2010. He 
graduated from 
the University 
of Virginia. He 
worked for 
Kaiser 

Aluminum and RB&W Nut and 
Bolt Company before starting his 
own business, RevCar Fasteners, in 
1969. He became an industry leader, 
being elected President of the 




46 THE RECORD OF HAMPDEN-SYDNEY COLLEGE • MARCH 2011 



National Fasteners Distributorship 
Association and one of the first 
members to be voted into the 
association's Hall of Fame. He is the 
father of Stuart H. Revercomb '84 
and Randolph C. Revercomb '81. 



1955 



-The Rev. Dr. ROBERT EUGENE 
RANDOLPH of Cartersville, Geor- 
gia, died on December 6, 2010. He 
earned his master of divinity from 
Columbia Theological Seminary and 
his Ph.D. from Emory University. 
He was a Marine Corps veteran and 
an ordained Presbyterian minister, 
serving many churches in Georgia 
and Tennessee. 



EE^ 



EDWARD HUNTER BRYANT, 
JR., of Richmond died on Novem- 
ber 15, 2010. He graduated from 
Greensboro College, where he was 
student government president. He 
was a graduate of T.C. Williams 
School of Law and a member of the 
Virginia State Bar Association. He 
founded Real Estate Resources, Inc., 
in 1986. 



1964 



The Hon. THOMAS HUTTON 
WOOD, SR., of Verona died on 
January 14, 2011. He earned his 
law degree from the University of 
Virginia School of Law. He practiced 
law for many years and served part- 
time as an assistant public defender 



and Commonwealth's Attorney for 
the city of Staunton before being 
appointed judge of the Staunton and 
Augusta County General District 
Court in 1980. In 2003, he became 
the chief judge of the 25th Judicial 
Circuit, serving until his retirement 
in 2007. 



1977 



DAVID ALLEN SNYDER of 

Elizabethton, Tennessee, died on 
November 6, 2010. He was a contrac- 
tor and a member of Clark Street 
Baptist Church. 



1987 



WILLIAM EWELL BARR of 

Greenville, South Carolina, died 
on November 24, 2010. He was a 
member of Phi Beta Kappa and he 
worked as director of finance and 
administration for Liberty Life 
Insurance Co. 



2014 



JACOB HOUSTON KISER of 

Verona died on 
December 31, 
2010. He was a 
graduate of 
Fort Defiance 
High School 
A >»rfP^^^H 3nd a freshman 
^<^H ^^^H at Hampden- 
Sydney College, who planned to 
major in physics. He was stage 
manager for the fall theatre 
production at the College and 




manager of the baseball team. He 
spent the last couple of summers 
working at Shenandoah Valley 
Airport at Classic Aviation. He was a 
junior member of the Glenmore Hunt 
Club and attended Lebanon Church 
of the Brethren. 



Colleae Famil^ 



EDWARD J. CAMPBELL of 

Racine, Wisconsin, 
died on October 8, 
2010. He was a 
former trustee of 
Hampden-Sydney 
College. Mr. 
Campbell was a 
veteran of World 
War II and a graduate of Northwest- 
ern University. During his career he 
served as president and CEO of 
Newport News Shipbuilding and 
of J.I. Case Company. 




CMark your calendar 
for these upcoming events: 

Commencement, May 8 

Summer College, June 3-5 

Family Weekend, September 16-17 

Homecoming, October 7-8 

The Game (at Randolph-Macon), November 12 



THE RECORD OF HAMPDEN-SYDNEY COLLEGE • MARCH 2011 47 



11th Annual H-SC Sigma Nu Golf Outing 



TOM MISHOE '74 



FOR ELEVEN YEARS, a group of 
Hampden-Sydney Alumni and Sigma 
Nu fraternity brothers have been 
gathering each year for a golf outing. 
In April 2010, they came together 
again in Pinehurst, North Carolina, 
and a great time was had by all. 

These golf outings have been held 
in Pinehurst and in Myrtle Beach, 
South Carolina. The number of 
attending Sigma Nu Brothers at these 
outings ranges from 12 to 25. 

While a lot of golf has been 
played and a lot of $1 "clam" bets 
have been won and lost on these trips, 
the real reason for the trips has been 
to ensure that the brothers of Sigma 
Nu maintain close relationships. This 
objective surely has been accom- 
plished. While the golf has been 
enjoyable (most of the time), these 
trips have been more about sharing 
meals, sharing a drink, remember- 
ing old times on The Hill and at the 
Sigma Nu house, catching up with 
one another, hearing about life's 
milestones, and finding ways to help 



one other. The guys eagerly anticipate 
this trip, and the 2011 outing already 
has been planned. 

In 1999, the first outing was 
organized by Frank Pegram '79 for 
a couple of close friends. Since then 
it has expanded to include a wider 
range of graduation years. Other 
Sigma Nu brothers instrumental in 
planning these events have included 
Tom Mishoe '74, Gregg Henderson 
'76, W.C. Sprouse '76, and Gray 
Tuttle '76. Rumor has it that Sprouse 
and Walker have attended every golf 
trip since the first. It is also rumored 
that a Randolph-Macon graduate 
(a "friend ' of an unnamed Tiger) 
attended one year to fill in lor a 
last-minute drop out. It really did not 
work out very well (for the R-MC 
graduate, of course). 

These golf outings have renewed 
old friendships and created new 
and lasting friendships. While most 
attendees have graduated between 
1970 and 1979, the organizers want 
to expand the graduation range to 



include a greater number of Sigma 
Nu Brothers. Any Sigma Nu wanting 
more information about this event 
may contact Tom Mishoe at (804) 
690-9567 

It should be noted that Tuttle, 
Pegram, and Howard were on H-SC's 
golf teams from 1972 to 1979. These 
were some of H-SC's best golf teams, 
twice winning conference champion- 
ships, twice being VCAA champs, 
winning one State Championship, 
and qualifying to play in the NCAA 
championship for five of these seven 
years, with the 1975 team finish- 
ing as runner-up in the Division III 
championship. Tuttle was on the All 
American Team in 1975 and 1976. He 
has continued to add to his golf aura 
by participating in recent U.S. Senior 
Amateur Championships (along 
with the Amateur and Mid-Amateur 
versions of this prestigious tourna- 
ment). As a bonus on the golf trips, 
Tuttle provides "free" golf lessons to 
all Sigma Nus who need some help on 
the course. 



Sigma Nu brothers at the 2010 golf trip inchided (from lefi) David Beasley '78, Pete Faust '76, Frank Pegram '79, 
Bill Howard '77, Gray Tuttle '76, Tim Hampton '75, Gregg Henderson '76, WC Sprouse '76, Rick Walker '76, Tom 
Mishoe '74, and John Coupland '74. In honor of Gus Franke, coach and mentor to the golf team, this group of alumni 
made a contrihution of $550 to the Gus Fnuikc Scholarship Fund to help the gnlf team. 




48 THE RECORD OF HAMPDEN-SYDNEY COLLEGE . MARCH 201 1 



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Good men. 
Good citizens. 
Great deal. 

Take advantage of one of the College's best kept 
secrets, the monthly debit plan. 

Maximize your gift by breaking it up monthly. 



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Don^t write one check — break it up and cash in on your 
rewards program. The plan accepts Visa^ MasterCard, and 
American Express. 

Here's how it works. Following the 15th of each month, 
your card w^ill be charged w^hatever amount you would like 
to give. Depending on w^hat time of the year you sign up, the 
number of months remaining in the College's fiscal year will 
determine the length of the plan. 

A Founder's gift of $1,800 becomes $150 per month 
when you sign up in July. You can automatically renew^ your 
plan and, if so inclined, increase the monthly amount each 
year — even as little as $10 per month w^ill make a significant 
difference. You may also choose quarterly and semi-annual 
payments. 

The secret is out. Don't delay. 

TOLL FREE (800) 865-1776 • WWW.HSC.EDU 



Don't wait! The Hamf den-Sydney Fund campaign ends on June 30. 



HAMPDEN-SYDNEY COLLEGE 

Hampden-Sydney, VA 23943 

Address Service Requested 



HAMPDEN-SYDNEY SUMMER COLLEGE: BECAUSE LEARNING NEVER STOPS 



REBIRTH 

OF A 

NATION 

A new look 

at the Civil W^ir 

on its 15(Hh Annivei*sar\ 




/ 



Join legendary history pi*ofessors 

Ronald L. Heinemann and 

James Y. Simms with 

noted author Elizabeth Varon 

for the 20.11 Summer College, m 

JUNE 3-5. 

To make your reservations, call the 

Hampden-Sydney Alumni Office at (434) 223-6148 

or visit www.hscedii/Constituents/AlumntJitmL 



CtmtR IMAGi, JOHN ItOW GEROME FERRIS. 'lEI US HAVE PEACE, 1865 ' REPROOUCEtl 8Y (IND PERMISSION Of IHE VIRGINIA HISIORICAl SOCIETY (1996 172 1). eACKCRQUNO; SURREIIDEF OOCU.MfNI 



FROIH APfOMAIIOxJI