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Full text of "Record of the Harris family descended from John Harris, born in 1680 in Wiltshire, England"

Gc M. L. 

929.2 

H2422h GENEALOGY COLUECTION I 

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GENEALOGY 
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RECORD 



THE HARRIS FAMILY 



DESCENDED FROM 



JOHN HARRIS 



BORN 1680 



WILTSHIRE, ENGLAND 



PHILADELPHIA 
1903 



PRESS OF 

GEORGE F. LASHER 

PHILADELPHIA 



\ 



PREFACE. 

In 1898, when I did not know that I should ever have the leisure requisite 
to put into shape the genealogical material that has been accumulating in my 
hands during the last thirty years, I printed some notes on the ancestry of my 
children, thinking that they would at least furnish a clue to anyone who might 
hereafter become interested in the subject of the history of any of the families 
Avhose career is tlierein sketched, and might desire to make it the subject of a 
further study. 

The leisure which I then lacked has since come to me, and has enabled me 

to prepare a more complete account than is contained in the earlier book, of that 

branch of the Harris family which is descended from John Harris, born about 

1680, in Wiltshire, England, through his two sons, John and Thomas, born, 

respectively, in 1717 and 1722. 

v) No record such as this can justly claim completeness or perfect accuracy. 

In the coiu'se of two hundred years some branches of a family stray away beyond 

recognition, and there are other branches, the members of which, who, though 

^ known, do not sympathize with the undertaking of making a family record, and 

^ will not, therefore, contribute their quota of information. And in many cases 

iJ^ no accurate records have been kept, and the several accounts obtainable do not 

entirely harmonize. 

I have been most fortunate in finding many members of the family who 

__2 have each been willing to take great pains to furnish full information as to that 

— ~j portion of the record which specially concerns each of them, and to the labors of 

■ - these persons it is largely due that it has been possible to make so much of a 

■^ history of the family as is contained in the folloAving pages. 

The record is fairly complete down to the generation of the great-great- 
grandchildren of the John Harris above named, which generation is called in 
the following pages the nineteenth; and as many persons of this generation are 
still living there should be no difficulty in each branch of the family carrying 
on for itself the record if it shall so desire. 

I found it increasingly difficult to get the desired information in regard to 
the generations subsequent to the nineteenth, as they are composed mostly of 
persons whose careers have not yet closed. What I have printed is all that I 
have been able to obtain after painstaking effort. 

The net result of this labor is that there are in the following record the 
names of 995 persons, including John Harris, of Generation XIV, and his 

(3) 

1151103 



~o 



descendants; or, 992 persons, if only the descendants of John Harris, of Genera- 
tion XV (born about 1680), are counted. 

There are 432 persons in the family of his older son, John, and 560 per- 
sons in the family of his younger son, Thoma-s. 

Had it been possible to secure the names of every member of these families 
it is estimated that there would have been 522 persons in the family of John 
Harris and 606 in the family of Thomas, or a total of 1128 descendants of 
John Han-is, of Generation XV. 

Reckoning by generations we should have as follows: — 





JOHN Harris (XVI l) 


Thomas Harris (m 2) 


JOHN Harris (XV). 




and his descendants. 


and his descendants. 


Total Descendants. 


GENEKiTION. 






' 


ESTIMATED 




ESTIMATED 




RECORDED. 


TOTAL. 


RECORDED, 


TOTAL. 




TOTAL. 


XVI. 


1 


1 


1 


1 


2 


2 


XVII. 


7 


7 


9 


9 


16 


16 


XVIII. 


IS 


18 


28 


28 


46 


46 


XIX. 


51 


51 


93 


93 


144 


144 


XX. 


158 


170 


178 


181 


336 


354 


XXI. 


172 


220 


207 


231 


379 


451 


XXII. 


25 


55 


44 


60 


69 


115 




432 


522 


560 


606 


992 


1128 



It will be seen that down to Generation XIX the record is believed to be 
complete. After that generation there is an increasing number of unrecorded 
persons in each of the next two generations. The last generation is only in 
the process of formation, and will not be completed for many years. 

The record is less full for the family of John Harris, of Generation XVI, 
than for that of Thomas, his brother, the descendants of the older brother being 
much the more widely dispersed, and, therefore, more difficult to reach. 

Great care has been taken to insure correctness as to names, dates and facts, 
and it is hoped that a fair degree of accuracy has been attained. 

Some differences will be found between the statements in this record and 
those in the "jSTotes" before referred to. Some new light has been shed on the 
subject by the studies of the last five years, and wherein the accounts differ, the 
following statements may be considered the more accurate. 

JOSEPH S. HAERIS. 

Philadelphia, Makch, 1903. 



THE HARRIS FAMILY. 



There is no reliable tradition in regard to the early history of that branch 
of the Harris family with which the following narrative will concern itself. 
The date of the birth of the emigrant brothers, John and Thomas Harris, is 
known; it is known that they came to America from Antrim or Donegal in 
Ireland, and it is said that they were of Scotch-Irish origin, but these are the 
first facts relating to the family that are now in our possession. It might be 
supposed from the statement about its origin that its earliest home had been 
in Scotland, but all that the members of the Scotch-Irish settlement in the north- 
west of Ireland in the early eighteenth century had in common was that they 
were all emigrants from some part of Great Britain. It is true that many of 
them were of Scottish ancestry, but many of them were of English descent, 
and some of them were originally from Wales. All of the early Harrises were 
Presbyterians, and this would argue for a Scottish origin of the family, as among 
the emigrants from southwestern England the prevalent form of religioiis belief 
was that of the Quakers, while the Welsh were largely Baptists; and it must be 
admitted, further, that so far as this branch of the Harris family has developed 
a distinctive type of personal appearance, it is Scotch rather than English. 

It seems strange that a family of intelligent people should have lost so 
completely all knowledge of its early seat; but the emigrants who came from 
Great Britain through Ireland to America, reaching their transatlantic home 
before the middle of the eighteenth century, had been taught by the religious 
persecutions, and the annoyances which they had suffered from the government 
through oppressive legislation in relation to their lands and their manufacturing 
industries, to consider England but an unkind stepmother. Ireland was, to most 
of them, only a spot on which they had paused a little to take breath for the 
longer flight across the Atlantic. They remained there too short a time to 
become attached to the soil; and their first half-century in America was a time 
of growing estrangement from their mother country, culminating in a long and 
bitter war, waged against a people Avhose government they had found harsh 
and oppressive in peace, and who in war had let loose upon her children hordes 
of brutal hireling European soldiers, and swarms of the dusky savages who were 
the terror of their new home. 

(5) 



6 THE IL^RRIS BECORD. 

So it came to pass that for a century the emigrants and their fathers had 
no kindly thought of the land which they had gladly abandoned. In the case 
of the Harris family, they seem to have left no near relatives behind with whom 
intercourse might have been maintained. They had lived such a little time iu 
Ireland that no trace can now be discovered of them there; and while there arc 
many people of the same name remaining both in Scotland and England, no 
positive and sure connection with any of them can now be established. 

Such study of the question as is still possible leads on the whole to the 
impression that o\u- Harris ancestors came originally from southwestern Eng- 
land. The grounds for this impression are stated in an account of the "Ancestry 
of the Children of Joseph Smith Harris," printed in 1898, and an extract from 
that accoxmt is here presented, with such slight changes as further study haa 
suggested to be desirable: — 

"In the commencement of the reign of James I. of England, the King had 
recourse to an issue of 'the lung's Majesties privy scales' as a means of raising 
money for the expenses of his government. This was a common device in those 
days, when Parliament had not acquired the undisputed right to grant all sup- 
plies of money, when the royal prerogative was used much more freely than in 
later years, and when there was no regular provision for the expenses of the 
state. It was simply a forced loan from the richer of the King's subjects, whose 
only comfort was that but a moderate sum was exacted from each, and that the 
tax was laid with reasonable impartiality. 

"Among those to whom the privy seals were sent in IGO-i in Buckingham- 
shire was one 'Thomas Harris, Gent.,' who is the earliest person that I have 
found bearing the family name whom there is any reason to consider one of our 
progenitors. 

"A contribution of £20 was demanded from him, but it is doubtful whether 
it was paid, as Thomas Harris appears a little later among those who were dis- 
charged by the Lords of the Council, being apparently exonerated from the 
required payment. Richard Harris, rector of Hardwick, was taxed £30 at the 
same time, and paid the amount; but, when in 1626, in the reign of Charles I., 
another forced loan was demanded, there were no persons named Harris an the 
Buckinghamshire list, Thomas Harris appearing by that time to have removed 
to London. A little later, when the contest between the crown and the Estab- 
lished Church on the one hand and the Puritans on the other commenced to 
grow serious, a society was formed in England to buy 'Impropriations,' which 
were benefices in the hands of laymen or lay corporations that could be relied 
on to produce an annual revenue, and were, therefore, available for purposes of 



EARLY HISTORT. 7 

endowment. These, after purchase, were used for the support of lecturers in the 
churches, who, being subject to no episcopal authority, were generally zealous 
teachers of Puritanism. Archbishop Laud, full of zeal for the suppression of 
the sects, procured a decree of the Court of Exchequer to abolish this society 
and to forfeit its property to the King. 

"This action, of course, caused vigorous remonstrance, and in 163G, the 
Mayor, bailiffs, and townsmen of High Wycombe, Buckinghamshire, petitioned 
the archbishop to grant to the church there the revenue of £40 per year in lieu 
of the impropriations to the amoimt of £260 which they had purchased for that 
purpose and which had been forfeited by Laud. Among the twenty signers to 
this petition appear the names of Samuel Harris, one of two bailiffs of the town, 
and the poet, Edmund Waller. So early had the Harris family taken the side 
of dissent from the Church of England, whicli it has ever since maintained. 

"When, later in the same unfortunate reign, the controversy between 
Charles I. and his subjects grew more grave, Ireland, which had national 
and religious grievances to avenge, thought that the time had arrived when 
it might throw off the English yoke, and in the winter of 1G41-2 the Irish rose 
in rebellion throughout the island and massacred the English who were living 
among them. As Parliament would not trust the King with an army to subdue 
Ireland, fearing that he might use it to overawe his English subjects, and as 
the Irish disorders were intolerable, it resorted to the expedient of raising a 
volunteer army, and in 1642 offered two million five hundred thousand acres 
of Irish lands, which were to be forfeited on account of the rebellion, as 
security to those who should advance moneys toward raising and paying a 
private army for subduing the rebels. The subscribers, or 'Adventurers,' as 
they were called, were to have estates or manors of one thousand acres each 
given them, at the rate of four shillings per acre for lands in Ulster, six 
shillings in Connaught, eight shillings in Munster, and twelve shillings in 
Leinster. This subscription was commenced in 1642 and closed in 1646. The 
land Adventurers numbered eleven hundred and eighty-eight, and subscribed 
£249,305 19s. 8d., and the sea service had one hundred and seventy-two sub- 
scribers for £43,406 5s. 

"No great change was wrought in Ireland as the result of this undertaking, 
the army of five thousand foot and five hundred horse under Lord Wharton, 
which was raised for this duty, being detained in 1642 to do battle with the 
King on English soil, and Ireland remained a prey to violence till 1649, 
when Cromwell took the anarchy in hand and avenged the massacre of 1641 
by measures scarcely less cruel. 



8 THE HARRIS RECORD. 

"After tlie restoration of peace the Irish lands were partitioned, and the 
Adventurers of 1G42 shared with the soldiers who subdued the land in the 
division of the forfeited estates. 

"The names of John Hampden and Oliver Cromwell, with a great many 
members of Parliament, knights, and gentlemen, appear on the list of 
Adventurers, of which No. 533 was Thomas Harris, of London, merchant; 
No. 545 was Thomas Harris, of London, grocer; and No. 82 was John 
Harris, of London, girdler; each of whom subscribed £100, the latter name 
also appearing — No. 1304 — as a subscriber for £150 for the sea service. 
Thomas Bailey, of Marlborough, No. 875, was a subscriber for £150. 

"This is the first record which I have found connecting the Han-is family 
-with Ireland, and the first which associates the names of Harris and Bailey, and 
it shows both families as being at that early date on the side of Parliament 
and opposed to the Established Church. 

"There is no reason to siippose that many of those to whom lands were 
allotted in Ireland chose at once to reside there. The country was too much 
disturbed and had been too recently desolated to be a pleasant residence, and 
it is probable that half a century elapsed before any of the Harris faniilj" 
thought it well to settle on their Irish possessions. 

"Some change of fortune, associated, perhaps, with the reverses that befell 
the parliamentary party and led to the restoration of Charles II., seems to 
have caused our progenitors to leave London, and in 1701 we find John Harris, 
of Goatacre, Wiltshire, clothier (maker of cloth), 'son of John Harris, late 
deceased,' and Edward Harris, of Goocham, in the same county, yoeman, 
selling to Philip Roman for £100, Pennsylvania money, one thousand acres 
of land out of fifteen hundred acres which the elder John Harris had acquired 
by virtue of a contract made July 11, 1681, 'between "William Penn, Esq., 
of the one part, and the said John Harris, deceased, and others, purchasers of 
lands within the said tract or province, of the other part.' The deed for this 
land, which is in my possession, is curious as being a transfer from one whom 
I suppose to be my father's ancestor, to one whom I know to have been a 
progenitor of my mother, and as showing again in my father's ancestry a 
disposition to embark in 'adventures' for lands over seas; this transaction 
referring apparently to one of a series of sales by William Penn, to what 
would now be called a 'syndicate,' of privileges entitling the purchasers to 
take up lands in his newly-granted transatlantic domain. 

"We next find the Harris family in Ireland early in the eighteenth 
century, and we are now at least on the solid ground of fact, for we have 



EARLY HISTORY. 



the direct evidence of family records and traditions that John Harris, born 
in 1717, and Thomas Harris, born in 1722, in Ireland, were brothers, and 
were the progenitors of all the persons with whom this record is concerned. 

"I conjecture that they were sons of the John Harris who was of Goat- 
acre, Wiltshire, in 1701, and that he, some time previous to the birth of 
his sons, had decided to move to the Irish lands which his family had held 
unused for half a century. I believe that the family were resident in Ireland 
but a few years, and that John and Thomas were the only sons, because a 
diligent and intelligent search, made some years since, fails to show any trace 
or any recollection of the Harris family in the county of Antrim, where they 
resided, or in the adjoining counties. A member of the family of Bailey, 
into which family Thomas Harris married in 1747, was found, whose recol- 
lection could run back to 1780, but she had no knowledge that any persons 
named Harris had ever resided in that district. 

"I suppose that the Baileys emigrated to Ireland at the same time the 
Harris family went there. They seem to have been ancient allies, joint 
contributors to the Adventurers' fund in 1642, neighbors in Wiltshire, where 
Thomas Bayley and Edward Bayley were living in 1685, and neighbors in 
Ireland, where Elizabeth Bailey (the name has several spellings), who was an 
orphan brought up by her uncle, Edward Bayley, D.D., rector of Killmegan 
and Killcow, County Down, and afterward Bishop of Kaphoe, lived before 
she emigrated to America about 1742. 

"It may be well, before leaving the earlier history of the Harris family, 
to restate briefly what are my reasons for conjecturing that the persons of 
whom I have hitherto spoken were progenitors of John and Thomas Harris, 
who emigrated from Ireland to Pennsylvania in the middle of the eighteenth 
century : — 

"1. The persistence of the names Thomas and John. 

"We shall find later that these two names were repeated in the family in 
the succeeding generations with a frequency which leads to the belief that 
they had the value which is often attached to names that have been repeatedly 
used in family history, and which were, perhaps, first borne by those who were 
regarded as the founders or as the most distinguished members of the family. 

"2. All these names occur in the same section of England — Buckingham- 
shire, London and AViltshire being almost contiguous; while Wiltshire, the 
last English home of the family, was the locality from which came a large 
part of the emigration to or toward Pennsylvania in the beginning of the 
eighteenth century. 



10 THE HAKEIS RECOED. 

"If the Wiltshire Harrises and Baileys were the emigrants to Ireland about 
1710, they would be the more likely, having once been companions in breaking 
up their old home, to join in emigrating, as they did about 1745, to the land 
of peace and plenty, to which so many of their old neighbors had recently gone, 
in Pennsylvania. 

"3. In England, as in Ireland and in Pennsylvania, the Baileys were 
associated with the Harrises, and it is likely that those who thus together 
braved the perils of the seas and the hardships of distant lands were 
hereditary friends and neighbors. 

"4. Dissent fi-om the Established Church seems likewise to have been a 
characteristic of these people for several generations, and it is noteworthy 
that Puritanism or Presbyterianism was the form of dissent found in the 
Harris and Bailey families, rather than Quakerism, which was the more 
common type of nonconformity at that time in southwestern England. 

"5. And in all respects these quiet persistent people, who lived together 
in various parts of southwestern England during the seventeenth century, 
firm in holding to their views of what was right, and enterprising in 
seeking new and distant homes to better their condition, seem likely to 
have been of the same families as those whom we know to have crossed 
the Atlantic in the middle of the eighteenth century and to have founded 
our branch of the Harris family in America. 

"6. I have carefully inquired into the ancestry of several of the American 
members of the Harris family who I know were not descendants of the 
emigrants, John or Thomas Harris, but who all so much resembled in 
personal appearance members of our family that they were supposed to be 
relations, and doubtless were of the same stock; and I found that aU of 
these families came from the southwest of England directly to America, so 
that there is an additional reason for believing that that section of the 
country was once the home of our ancestors. 

"While, therefore, I do not wish to claim that these men bearing our 
name were our undoubted progenitors, I feel that I have established a 
probability that they were, but as the relationship is not capable of proof, 
I shall omit them from our table of descent. 

"We may suppose the first Thomas Harris, who, to his discomfort, re- 
ceived the King's privy seals in 1604, to have been born about 1570; the 
second Thomas, the London merchant, an 'Adventurer' for lands in Ireland 
in 1642, to have been his son, born about 1605; John, who, in 1681, made 
the agreement with William Penn for the purchase of lands in Pennsylvania, 



EARLY HISTORY. 11 

to have been the grandson of the first Tliomas, and to have seen the light 
about 1640; and the second John, who sold the right to locate land in 
Pennsylvania in 1701 to Philip Koman, to have been born about 1680, 
and to have been the emigrant to Ireland and the father of John and 
Thomas Harris, born, respectively, in 1717 and 1722, and emigrants, when 
they arrived at man's estate, from Ireland to America. 

"These conjectured dates would show that the Harris family in early, as 
in later, days, married at mature years, so that the generations succeeded each 
other slowly, the average distance of time between father and son being about 
forty years. 

"The index numbers in this record are arbitrary. The Roman numerals 
indicate the several generations. The generation to which John and Thomas 
Harris, who emigrated to America about 1750, belonged, is called XVI 
because in compiling the record of some of the other families of my children's 
ancestry I found that the earliest generation numerals would be negative, were 
a lower number than XVI taken for the generation which corresponded to 
that of the Harris emigrants. It is desirable that the same generation numeral 
shall characterize every line of ancestry at any given number of removes from 
my children, who are taken as the meeting point of all of the families from 
which they are descended. 

"The Arabic numerals indicate the position of each member of the family 
within his own generation, according to seniority, the senior member being 
always No. 1." 



ORIGIN IN FRANCE. 



The writer of "The Norman People and Their Existing Descendants," 
Henry S. King & Co., London, 1874, gives this account of the origin of 
the family of Harris: — 

Landric de Beaugency, of Beaugency in the Orleanois (France), had 
issue, John and Hericeus or Herice, who were prohibited by King Robert 
of France (Robert II. "the Pious," who reigned from 996 to 1031), from 
making inroads on the estate of a neighboring abbey. 

Landric appears in 1028 as a witness to a charter of King Robert. He 
was ancestor of the powerful Barons of Beaugency. 

Hericeus was father of Ancelin de Beaumont (styled "Ancelin" in Domes- 
day Book), who, in 1086, held a great Barony in iSTottingham, England. 

His son, Ivo Fitz Herice or de Heris, was Viscount of Nottingham 
before 1130. He had issue: — 

1. Ralph Hauseline, who held the Barony in 1165. 

2. Robert Fitz Herice, mentioned in a charter of Barberic Abbey. He 
was executed by Henry II. of England (who reigned from 1154 to 1189). 

3. Josseline, mentioned as being of Hunts in 1156. 

4. William, who held, in 1165, three fiefs in Nottingham, and four in 
Lincoln. 

5. Humphrey — Humphrey Harris was of Berks, 1158. 

In the next century William Harris possessed estates in Wilts. From 
him descended William Harris, one of the principal inhabitants of Salisbury, 
Wilts, in 1469, who was an ancestor of the present Earls of Malmesbury. 

Another line, perhaps, was that of Ralph Heris, of Normandy, France, 
mentioned in 1180 and 1195; Ivo de Heris, England, 1130; Ivo de Heris, 
1199; Hugh de Heris and Roger Heris, about 1272. 

All of these families of Harris, Heris and Herice are united, not merely 
by the similarity of their surnames, but, which is more important, by the 
identity of their armorial bearings, three hedge hogs or "herissons," which, 
appearing in the earliest times, are still borne by the Earls of Malmesbury. 

(12) 



ORIGIN IN FEANCE. 13 

It is interesting to note that the \vi-iter of "The Norman People" traces 
the family from its French liome to the locality to which my investigations 
have assigned it, about Salisbury in Wiltshire, and further, that this account 
of the origin of the family agrees with the tradition held by the descendants 
of William Harris, emigrant to America in 1742, as stated on page 15. I 
have not had an opportunity to examine the book from which I have quoted, 
but give the extract substantially as it was given to me. 

A professional genealogist advises me that he has traced our branch of 
the family back in an unbroken line from the emigrants of the eighteenth 
century to the year 1450, but I have not the means of verifying the statement. 



14 



THE HARRIS RECORD. 



GENERATION XIV. 



INDEX 
NO. 


MEMBER OF FAMILY. 


CONSOKT. BIRTH. 


MARRIAGE. 


DEATH. 


RESIDENCE. 


XIV 


John Harris. 




About 1640. 




About 1700. 


Wiltshire, Eng. 


GENERATION XV. 


The Children of John Harhis (XIV). 



XV I 

1 i.Iohn Harris. 

2 Edward Harris. 



About 1680. 
About lt>82. 



Goatacre, Wiltshire. 
Goocham, Wiltshire. 



John Harris (XI Y). We know of him only that he lived in Wiltshire, 
England; that he was one of the persons who, in 1681, bought of William 
Penn rights to locate lands in Penn's proposed colony of Pennsylvania; that 
he bought in this way 1500 acres, and that he thereafter sold 500 acres, 
leaving the remaining 1000 acres to his sons, John and Edward, and that 
in 1701 he had recently died. 

John Harris (XV 1). Of hini we know that he was a resident in 1701 
of Goatacre, a small village in Wiltshire, England, and that he was a clothier 
— I. e. a manufacturer of cloth, which seems to have been a leading industry- 
in that section of the country; that he was "son and heir apparent" to John 
Harris (XIY), and that he joined with Edward, his brother, in 1701, in 
selling the remaining 1000 acres of land in Pennsylvania to Philip Roman, 
who had been then for some years resident in that colony. John and 
Edward Harris seem to have originally taken these lands for themselves, 
their names appearing as proprietors in Birmingham township, Chester 
county, on a map made by Thomas Holme in 1689 for William Penn; 
which map shows all the lands that had been taken up in Pennsylvania to 
that date. 



GENERATION XVI. 



15 



They changed their minds about emigrating, however, and John prol)al)ly 
removed to Ireland and died there about 1744. 

Edward Harris (XV 2) was a younger son of John Harris (XIV), a 
jeoman, and a resident of Goocham, in Wiltshire, in 1701. There is no 
reason to suppose that he removed to Ireland. 

GENERATION XVI. 



INDEX 
NO. 


MEMBEK OF FAMILY. 


CONSORT. 


BIRTH. 


MARRIAGE. 


DEATH. 


RESIDENCE. 


Ttik Otttt.drf.n of .ToiTisr Harrts (XV I'l anti Mary 


XVI 

1 

2 


.John Harris. 
Thomas Harris. 


Hannah Stewart. 
Elizabeth Bailey. 


1717. 
1722. 


About 1760. 
1748. 


Aug. 13, 1773. 
Dec. 11, 1799. 


Newtown, Pa. 
East Whiteland, Pa. 



It is not known with exactness when our branch of the Harris family 
came to America. There was a John Harris among the twelve resident 
taxpayers of Easttown township, Chester county, in 1715. As this is the 
locality in which Thomas Harris (XVI 1) first appeai-s, it may be that this 
man was John Harris (XV 1), who, with his brother Edward, in 1701 sold 
1000 acres of land to Philip Roman. If so, he must have returned to the 
family property in Antrim, Ireland, for the record says that his sons, John 
and Thomas, were born there in 1717 and 1722, respectively. When his 
sons came to man's estate, he may have sent them out to settle in Penn- 
sylvania, being then too old to change his home; or, it may be that they 
emigrated after their father's death. 

The name of Thomas Harris (XVI 2) first appears on the public records 
in Pennsylvania in a list of taxables of Easttown township, Chester county, 
in 1747, and the first note regarding John Harris (XVI 1) is in a similar 
list of taxables for Newto\vn township, Bucks county, in 1754. 

There was a William Harris whose descendants suppose that they and 
we are of the same family, who married Elizabeth Blair, and afterward 
emigrant from Ireland in 1742, and passed the rest of his life in Phila- 
delphia. The tradition in his branch of the family is that the name was 
originally "Herries," and is of French origin, but I do not know what basis 
there is for that belief. They also claim a bishop of the Episcopal church 
in Ireland as one of their ancestors. 

AU of these persons — Thomas, John and William — were of the Presby- 
terian form of faith. 



16 THE HARRIS RECORn. 

Dr. Robert llarrii^, who ■was a surgeon duriug the Kevolutionary war, 
and whof-e name frequently ai>pears in the records of that time as a man- 
ufacturer of gunpowder for the government, was a nephew of this William 
Harris, and married his daughter Isabella. He built the first powder mill in 
the province, on Crum creek, three miles above Chester. This was about 
seven miles below Gnibb's mill, on the same stream, where Thomas Harris 
lived from 1760 to 1768. His powder mill went into operation May 23, 
1775, and he reported soon after to the Committee of Safety that he expected 
to be able to deliver one ton of powder weekly after June 1 for the public use. 

As John and Thomas Harris, with whom we are more immediately 
concerned, were young men when they came to this country, we need not 
be surprised that they did not at once settle down, and did not, therefore, 
appear anywhere on the list of taxables for several years after their arrival. 
We shall probably not be far astray if we put the date of the emigration of 
Thomas at 17-15. John may have come later upon advices from Thomas of 
his successful start in the new country. 

John Harris (XVI 1) was born in Ireland, and came thence to New- 
town about 1750. The earliest notices of his residence in America are the 
appearance of his name on the list of taxables in Newtown in 1754, and his 
appointment in 1756 as one of the appraisers of the estate of Daniel Lowell. 
He probably married early in 1760, as his wife, Hannah Stewart, was prob- 
ably born in 174:1, and their first child was born in November, 1760. 

He prospered in his new home, and gradually acquired a considerable 
property. Before 1757 he owned a store and a tannery in the village of 
Newtown. His subseqiient acquisitions are recorded as follows: — 

May 7, 1757, John Harris, storekeeper, bought from Ben- 
jamin Twining 60 acres of land in Newtown, adjoining 
the Presbyterian church lot, a part of the original 
Thomas Eowland tract, conveyed to him by William 
Penn in 1684, which lay between the original town 
plot of Newtown and Neshaminy creek, being in the 
forks of the creek with Newtown creek, for £320. 

March 7, 1758, John Harris, merchant, bought from the 
executors of Christian Vanhorne's estate 30 acres 
in Newtown township, adjoining land laid out for a 
parsonage. 



GENERATION XVI. 17 

April 3, 1761, John Harris, of Newtown, merchant, 
bought from Hezekiah Rye 134 acres in the Manor 
of Highlands, Upper Makefield township. 

April 20, 1763, John Harris, of Newtown, merchant, 
bought of the trustee of Loudon Company 119 
acres 115 perches in Upper Makefield township. 

April 1, 1765, John Harris, of Newtown, bought of 
Rob. Cummings 106 acres in Newtown township, on 
Newtown creek. 

September 22, 1767, John Harris bought of Nelson 
Jolly, of Frederick county, Va., 61 acres in New- 
town, being his upper farm on tlie west side of 
Newtown common. 

April 24, 1770, John Harris, Esq., bought of George 
Dillion one acre in Upper Makefield township. 

General W. H. H. Davis, the historian of Bucks county, says that "he 
acquired in all over 500 acres of land, of which 257 acres lay in Newtown, 
and as much more in Upper Makefield township," which adjoins Newtown 
on the eastward. He also owned 156 acres of land in Northampton town- 
ship, and lands in Kentucky at the time of his death. 

General Davis further remarks: "John Harris is styled 'Esq.' on his 
tombstone, which at that time shows that he was a man of some local note."' 

John Harris was a man of influence and of public activity. He took 
an active part in the organization of the Newtown Library in August, 1760, 
and was appointed its first treasurer, holding that office till 1764. He was 
a prominent member of the Newtown Presbyterian church. This church was 
founded in 1734. The original house of worship stood on the Old Swamp 
road on the Alexander German farm, and aboiit a mile west of the village. 
It was abandoned in 1769, and a new church was built near the borough 
limits, on the south side of the common, on a lot containing one-half acre, 
conveyed to the church by John Harris May 30, 1769, the lot adjoining one 
secured from Thomas Buckman. In 1772 John Harris was appointed by the 
legislature to settle certain disputed accounts of this church. 

He was a Justice of the Peace, then an office of higher dignity than 
now, from 1764 till his death in 1773. 

His house, the old yellow stone house, long kno'mi as the '"Washington 



18 THE HARRIS RECORD. 

Headquarters," stood until 1862, when it was rebuilt on the original foun- 
dations, so that its identity has been to some extent preserved. It was one 
of the most substantial houses in Newto^Ti, which was from 1725 to 1813 
the county seat of Bucks county. It was selected by General Washington 
as his headquarters, when, after the battle of Trenton, December 26, 1777, 
he recrossed the Delaware river into Pennsylvania. He fell back on New- 
town, where he had fixed his depot of supplies, because it was a central 
location, somewhat removed from the river, in a defensible country, and 
easy of access from all points of the country held by the American troops. 
He reached ]Sre\vtown on the evening of December 26, or on the morning 
of the next day, took up his quarters in John Harris' house, where he 
remained till the 29th of December, when he recrossed into New Jersey, 
leaving the troops holding Newtown in command of Lord Sterling, who at 
that time was incapacitated by rheumatism for more active service. On his 
departure he presented Mrs. Harris with a piece of silver, a tea pot, according 
to one version of the family tradition, though another says it was a coffee urn. 
This relic was treasured in the family for many years. It was melted into 
teaspoons by direction of John Harris' grandson, John Hanna. They were 
in 1898 in the possession of Mr. Hunt Reynolds, of Frankfort, Kentucky. 

There is no record of his having rendered military service at any time. 
He died before the Revolution, and the Indian warfare, which occurred 
between 1755 and 1758, did not come within many miles of Newtown. 

He died intestate, leaving a considerable estate, of which his widow, 
Hannah Harris — born Hannah Stewart — was appointed administratrix. 

She reported the value of the personal 

property as £1866 Ss. lOd. 

Settlement filed September term, 1783, 

credits her for debts paid 1244 17 11 

And she acknowledges as being in her 

hands at that time £ 621 10s. lid. 

She also reports at a later date — 

His remaining real estate valued at. £1168 

Sold in 1790 1632 10s. 

(Item not named) 60 

Total £2860 lOs. 



GKXERATIOX \'VT. 19 

In 1782 Hannah Harris is registered as the owner of 11 slaves, out of 
a total of 23 owned in the town. 

The wife of John Harris, Hannah Stewart, was a daughter of Charles 
Stewart and Sarah, his wife. Charles Stewart was born in 1719, in Scotland, 
and probably married there. Upon his emigration to America he settled in 
Upper Makefield township, Bucks county, Pennsylvania, a few miles east of 
Newtown, which was then the county seat. He was a man of good position 
and of comfortable estate. He served for some years as captain of a com- 
pany of "Associators," as the volunteer military force of Pennsylvania 
between 1748 and 1755 was called; and he died September 16, 1794. 

His wife, Sarah, whose family name is unknown, was born in 1721; 
married in 1740, and died at the home of her daughter Hannah, in Wood- 
ford, Kentucky, May 20, 1805. 

Hannah Stewart was a woman of more than ordinary executive ability. 
She was left a widow with seven children when she v.'as 32 years of age, 
with a comfortable property from the estate of her husband, John Harris, 
yet, although her brother, Kobert Stewart, was living, her father named her 
first of his executors, and the records of her busy life show that until she 
was nearly sixty years old she traveled backward and forward between her 
Kentucky and Pennsylvania homes as freely as though the journey were, as 
it is now, a matter of thirty-six hours of comfortable riding, instead of being 
a toilsome expedition of a month's duration, full of hardships and of dangers 
from savage foes. 

Her brother, William Stewart, had, about the year 1773, accompanied 
Daniel Boone to Kentucky. He acquired valuable lands there, but, being 
killed by the Indians at the battle of Blue Licks, August 19, 1782, his estate 
fell to his sisters. Though Hannah's father was still living, he was probabl\ 
out of health, and her brother Robert, who went to Kentucky, did not make 
satisfactory pi'Ogress in settling William's estate, so that the burden of the 
work devolved upon Hannah. She decided to remove to Kentucky, and in 
1785 she went there, as the family tradition says — "in a lumbering, old- 
fashioned wagon," the door handle of which is still treasured as an heir- 
loom. She took with her her mother Sarah Stewart and her own children, 
with the exception of John Harris, who did not join the family for several 
years. She made a journey to Pennsylvania in 1787, went back to Ken- 
tucky, and again returned to Pennsylvania in 1797, probably on business 
connected with the estates of her husband, her brother and her father who 
had died in 1794. 



20 THE HAEEIS EECOED. 

In connection ■sv'ith the settling of the affairs of her brother William 
Stewart, she rendered an account which is worth quoting. 

"Hannah Harris, June 3, 1797, makes memoranda of disbursements in- 
curred by her in her first trip to Kentucky, to superintend and endeavor to 
secure the estate devised by the will of William Stewart, deceased. 

"Expenses of trip from Newtown, Bucks 
county, Pennsylvania, to Danville, 
Kentucky £ 70 

"Boat to ascend Ohio river 18 

"Supplies for myself and my family for 
two years, and expenses of return 
to Newtown, Bucks county, Penn- 
sylvania 350 

"Expenses of negro man in Kentucky, and 

going and coming 36 Ss. lOd. 

"Thomas Lowrie, services in Kentucky and 

on my return 45 14 3 

"Loss sustained in horses in my journey, to 

stay at and return from Kentucky. . 80 

"Total £610 Os. Id." 

She returned to her Kentucky home in the summer of 1797, and died 
there about 1803. 

The Harris mansion house in Newtown, Bucks county, Pennsylvania, 
seems to have been sold in 1803, closing out the family interests in Penn- 
sylvania; and intercourse between the families of the brothers, John and 
Thomas Harris, came to an end so completely that no communication passed 
between them until 1897, in which year they, almost by accident, again 
discovered each other. 

Thomas Harris (XVI 2), who was born in Antrim, Ireland, in 1722, 
emigrated probably about 1745. His name first appears as a land-owner of 
Easttown township, Chester county, in 1747, and in the latter part of that 
year he married Elizabeth Bailey. She was then living with her uncle 
Alexander Bailey in Willistown township, Chester county, which township 
adjoins Easttovm, being west thereof. Alexander was childless, and he made, 



GENEKATION XVI. 21 

July 12, 1748, a deed of trust to Isaac Wayne and John Marran, under the 
provisions of which his property was ultimately to pass to the heirs of his 
niece, Elizabeth Harris. 

Thomas Harris soon afterward took a lease of this property, and he lived 
there till about 1760, when he removed to Grubb's mill, which was probably on 
Crum creek near his old home, but which I have not been able to locate exactly. 
He calls himself a miller in 17C1. 

He removed thence to East Whiteland township about 1768, and spent in 
that locality the remainder of his days. 

The Willistown farm is situated between the north and the west branches 
of Crum creek, somewhat nearer the former, about two miles southwest from 
Paoli station on the Pennsylvania railroad, the house being about one-eighth of a 
mile south of the road running from Sugartown to Berwyn. It adjoins the farms 
which were, twenty years ago, owned by Joshua Evans, Jeffrey Smedley and 
Enos Hibberd, and it was then a part of the latter's farm. When I visited it in 
1890 I found that the house wliich was built of a brown neighborhood stone, and 
which had once been a comfortable home, had fallen into somewhat ruinous 
condition, having been occupied mostly by tenant farmers since the death of 
John Harris (XVII 10) in 1838. The out-b\iildings had largely disappeared 
through decay, and the woman who lived in the house could conjecture no 
reason for our visit but that we wanted to see the haimted chamber, there being 
some modern ghost story connected with the house, in which we were not 
interested. The first home of my father's ancestors in this country had little to 
which sentiment could be attached, and I have never seen it since. 

I do not know what circumstances led Thomas Harris to remove to East 
Whiteland township, but he bought a farm there December 30, 1770, from 
John Minshall and others for £1200. He is spoken of in this deed as Thomas 
Harris, yeoman of East Whiteland, so that he had become a resident of that 
township, perhaps a renter of this farm, before purchasing. It contained 200 
acres, with allowances amoimting in all to about 220 acres. From the price paid, 
and because the "Old Provincial" road, then the gi-eat highway through the 
Great Valley of Chester county, ran through it, and because it was to a consider- 
able extent cultivated land, it was apparently one of the more valuable farms 
of that district. It was a part of a tract of 3000 acres allotted by William Penn 
to Lewis David, the deed to whom was dated December 2 and 3, 1681; and it 
was included in, and was near to the western boundary of the "Welsh tract," a 
baronry of 40,000 acres which Penn agreed to set apart for Welsh purchasers, 
and which was to have a certain degree of autonomy. The plan was never 



22 THE a.4.KEIS KECORD. 

carried out, and the unfulfilled undertaking was the source of much dispute 
between the proprietor and his captious grantees. 

The house was situated on the south side of the Old Provincial road, one 
of the oldest highways in the country, which ran from Philadelphia to Lancaster. 
It was and is still ordinarily called the "Swedes Ford" road, but the road to 
which that name should be confined was built in 1724 westward from a ford on 
the Schuylkill river near Bridgeport, at which point a Swede named Mats 
Holstein had settled in 1712, to an intersection with the Old Provincial road, 
about a mile east of the Harris farm, where it ended. 

Out of the northwest corner of the farm there was reserved, at the time 
of the purchase, a lot containing five acres, the title to which had passed from 
the vendors, and Thomas Harris had to wait to get possession of this lot till 
January 25, 1790, when he bought it of George Smedley's heirs for £35. 

At some period in his later life he availed himself of the facilities which 
were afforded by a fine stream of water crossing the road in front of his house, 
which stream being dammed so as to form a pool in the road, made a convenient 
place for watering stock, to open a tavern for the accommodation of travel, and 
in a document dated in 1790 he is described as "inn-keeper." I conjecture that 
the inn was the building which to this day stands directly on the road, and was 
not the dwelling, which is some thirty yards back from the highway, and I think 
that the rear part of this inn, which contained a capacious cellar, was the 
distillery where were manufactured some of the liquors required for the use of 
the guests of the inn. 

This hostelry bore on the sign the figure of General Washington, and the 
name clung to it at least till 1794, at which date William Harris iises it as the 
address of a letter to his wife. I think, however, that it was not then used as 
an inn. 

Country inns in the eighteenth century, when all travel and freight went 
by stage and wagon, were both more useful and more rep\itable than they are 
now, and many of the well-to-do farmers living along the main highways made 
arrangement to entertain travelers. 

There is no record of any part taken by Thomas Harris in the war of the 
Revolution. He was an old man, as age was counted in those days, when the war 
broke out; ho contribiTted to the defense of the infant state his only two sons, 
and as his property needed some one to care for it he doubtless felt absolved 
from personal service. 

He did not, however, escape entirely the losses consequent upon the war. 
After the battle of the Brandywine, General Washington retreated to the 



QENEEATION XVI. 23 

northward and eastward toward the Schuylkill river, passing down the Great 
Valley. The British army in pursuit encamped; September 16, 1777, partly on 
the South valley hill, south of the "Three Tuns" tavern, about two miles south- 
west of the Harris homestead. They were detained there for some time by a rain 
storm of considerable severity, which proved the salvation of the American 
army, as the Schuylkill river rose so much as to be unfordable after Washington 
had crossed it. 

While the British remained in camp they helped themselves freely to the 
farmers' fences, and when they moved, another part of the army that had 
encamped aboiit the White Horse tavern, three-quarters of a mile west of the 
house of Thomas Harris, marched, on the ISth of September, eastward along the 
Old Provincial road. Hearing of the coming of the enemy the family fled to the 
x^orth valley hill, from whence returning after the troops had passed, they found 
that the bread which had been left baking in the oven, and the chickens with 
which the farm was stocked, had disappeared, being taken by the British as 
spoils of war. 

It is significant as to the class of facts on which family tradition fastens, 
that this trifling loss should be the incident that was chiefly remembered, while 
the greater loss of fences and other farm property destroyed is not mentioned in 
the tradition, and only appears afterward in a claim on account of British 
spoliation. The story evidently originated with the wife, and noted the facts 
which impressed her most strongly as bearing directly on the food supply. 

After the war an act of the Pennsylvania assembly was passed, September 
21, 1782, to reimburse the sufferers for "damages and loss sustained from the 
troops and adherents of the King of Great Britain during the war," and 
claimants under the provisions of this act were called upon for statements. 
In response to this call Thomas Harris averred that his losses, among which were 
2300 fence rails, amounted to £143 9s. 9d., and his son William reported a loss 
of £41 6s. Od. 

After the Paoli massacre, in September, 1777, General Wayne, a part of 
whose command had suffered heavily, retreated northwestward as far as the 
White Horse tavern, and must have passed, on September 30, through Thomas 
Harris' farm, but I have no note of any further movements of considerable 
bodies of troops through that part of Chester valley. 

Por some years after his marriage Thomas Harris was an attendant upon 
the services at St. Peter's Episcopal church in the Chester valley, some four 
miles east of his East Whiteland home, his wife's family having belonged to 
that church in Ireland. St. Peter's church was built in 1744, and there was 



24 



THE HARKIS RECORD. 



then no Presbyterian church in the neighborhood, except a log building which 
was the precursor of the present Great Valley Presbyterian church. As that 
congregation was composed of Welsh settlers, and the services were conducted 
in their language, it was not available for English-speaking people. But the 
Scotch-Irish element of the Presbyterians was not satisfied with this exclusion, 
and after a long controversy the Presbytery of Philadelphia brought about a 
compromise, and on the 16th of April, 1761, Mr. John Simontoh was ordained 
and installed as the pastor of the church, and thereafter, for a time, service was 
held both in the English and Welsh languages. 

At that time Thomas Harris is mentioned as one of the "chief persons of 
the congregation," and he was one of the coi-porators named in the charter which 
was granted by the state, November 22, 1788. 

The family tradition says that he had gone willingly, at iirst, to his wife's 
church, but as the differences between the Mother country and the colonies 
began to grow acute, the Episcopalians largely taking the side of the home 
government, and the Presbyterians maintaining the cause of the colonies, he 
gradually found the prayers for the king distasteful, and thereafter preferred 
the Presbyterian form of Avorsbip. 

Little is now known of the man himself beyond the fact that he was 
taciturn, and that he had the large ideas of the rights of a father that were 
more commonly held then than now. To the end of his life he expected that 
in harvest-time his sons should let their farm work stand and assist him in 
gathering his crops, caring for their OAvn afterward. As, liowever, in those days, 
a man's neighbors, and not his hired hands, assisted when work was pressing, this 
was, perhaps, only a little straining of the ordinary neighborhood courtesy. 

Thomas Harris and his wife died within a few days of each other, in August, 
1799, and were buried near the Great Valley Presbyterian church. Their tomb- 
stones stand on the rise of ground north of the rivulet that flows through the 
grave-yard. They are marble slabs, standing side by side, about five feet high, 
inscribed as follows : 



In 

Memory of 

Thomas Harris, 

v.iio departed this 

Life August the 11, 1799, 

Aged 77 years. 



In 

Memory of 

Elizabeth Harris, 

wife of Thos. Harris, \ 

Departed this life 

August 22ud, 

1799, Aged 73 years. 



GENERATION XVI. 25 

Thomas Harris died intestate, and there was a good deal of feeling in the 
family because the larger share of the property, for some reason, fell to his oldest 
s-on. The English idea of primogeniture had not been eradicated from people's 
minds at that early date. The heirs, however, agreed on a settlement December 
7, 1799, by the terms of which, after the debts and funeral expenses should be 
paid, and the four sisters had each taken such of the movables as they claimed 
(excluding those embraced in the inventory of personal property, made by David 
Cloyd and Francis Lee), the personal estate not embraced in either of these 
categories should belong to John and William on their payment of £200, to be 
equally divided among the sisters. The land was to be sold and the pi'oceeds 
equally divided among the six heirs— "The sisters to release John and William 
in respect or concerning any estate our father left or gave to them in his 
life time." 

The Willistown property had apparently been given to John before this 
time, and a part of the East Whiteland farm, about 60 acres in extent, had been 
given to William. The balance, said to contain 140 acres, but which really 
measured 164 acres 48 perches, was sold in pursuance of the agreement just 
recited to Rev. John Gemmil, September 24, 1801. In this sale some rights in 
connection with certain springs were alienated, and out of this alienation grew a 
litigation which disturbed the relations of the Harris and Gemmil families for 
quarter of a century. The property sold netted £2464 10s. 

In the statement of the holders of silverplate in Chester county, made by 
the assessors in 1777 for purposes of taxation, Thomas Harris is expedited with 
six teaspoons, which were probably a part of the portion of his wife, Elizabeth 
Bailey. 

He seems to have settled his sons on farms early in their lives. John was 
left at the Willistown farm at the age of 17, when his father bought the East 
Whiteland property, and William was probably in charge of the portion of the 
East Whiteland farm south of the Old Provincial road in 1777, when he was 
20 years old, as he claims that damage was done him by the British army in 
that year. 

Thomas Harris lived in his latter years on that part of his farm which was 
sold to Rev. John Gemmil in 1801, having built a house on the north side of the 
road, leaving the old homestead on the south side of the road to his son William. 

Thomas Harris' wife, Elizabeth Bailey, was born in County Derry, Ireland. 
Her father, William Bailey, was blind, and Elizabeth lived for a number of 
jears with her uncle, the bishop of Raphoe in Ireland. William's brother, 
Alexander, had gone to America about 1716, and had settled in Willistown, 



26 THE HARRIS RECORD. 

Chester county, Pennsylvania. He had prospered there, and as he was childless 
he invited "William and his two daughters to join him, which they did about 
1742. William's wife had died before the family left Ireland. 

Of the emigration of the Baileys it is only remembered that the ship on 
which they sailed, when near her destination, M-as overhauled by pirates, who 
then infested every sea on which commerce was carried to such an extent that in 
the columns of the "American Mercury," published weekly in Philadelphia in 
the middle of the eighteenth century, acts of piracy are constantly clironicled, 
and excite no more comment as incidents of travel than do heavy gales of ^dnd, 
or any other disagreeable phenomenon. The pirates of those days were highway 
robbers, and not ordinarily murderers. That trait developed later, when the 
severities used in punishing them caused reprisals; and when the Baileys' ship 
was taken, while they doubtless plundered the vessel of most of its valuables, the 
act which created the deepest impression was their taking the vessel's supply of 
drinking water. For lack of this necessary of life the ship's company suffered 
greatly, some of the children dying for want of it, and their cries and her own 
sufferings made such an impression on Elizabeth Bailey that in her later life she 
said that she never took a drink of water without first thanking God for it. 

The family tradition has preserved no note in regard to Elizabeth Bailey 
Harris except that she was slight in person and little of stature. 

The Baileys were Episcopalians, and their place of worship was at St. 
Peter's church, about two miles north of their home. 



GENEKATION XVII. 



27 



GENERATION XVII. 



INDEX 

NO. 


MEMBER OF FAMILY. 


CONSOKT. 


BIRTH. 


MARRIAGE. 


DEATH. 


RESIDENCE. 


Til 


E Children of John Harris (XVI 1) and Hannah Stewart. 




XVII 
1 

2 

I 
5 
6 

7 


Ann Harris. 

Sarah Harris. 

Mar.y Harris. 
Elizabeth Harris. 
John Harris. 
Kachel Harris. 
Hannah Harris. 


I. Hugh Shiell. 
II. Harry Innes. 

I. Charles Smith. 
II. Thomas Carneal. 
James Hanna. 
Thomas Todd. 
Jane Hunt, 
never married, 
never married. 


Nov. 9,1760. 

1702. 

About 1764. 
Feb. 20, 1765. 
About 1767. 
About 1769. 
About 1771. 


I. May 31, 1782. 
n.Feb. 1792. 
1. Before 1790. 
II. After 1803. 
About 1784. 
June 22, 1788. 
About 1794. 


May 12, 1851. 
1844. 

Feb. 1, 1811. 
1847. 
1838. 
1807. 


Near Frankfort, Ky. 

Near Frankfort, Ky. 

Frankfort, Ky. 
Near Frankfort, Ky. 

Near Frankfort, Ky. 


The 


Children of Tiiom 


as Harris (X; 


'I 2) AND Elizabeth Bailey. 




9 

10 
11 
12 \ 
13 
14 

15 

16 


Mary Harris. 
Bailey Harris. 
.lohn Harris. 
Jane Harris. 
William Harris. 
Margaret Harris. 
Elizabeth Harris. 

Agnes Harris. 
Hannah Harris. 


Mary Bowen. 
never married. 
Mary Campbell. 
David Christie. 
Joseph Mackelduff. 

Israel Davis. 
George Calbraith. 


Mch. 11, 1749. 
Mch. 16, 1751. 
Apr. 1, 1753. 
May 27, 1755. 
Oct. 7, 1757. 
.Tan. 10, 1760. 
Feb. 9,1762. 

Nov. 15, 1765. 
Jan. 16, 1769. 


1776. 

Apr. 24, 1780. 

May 9, 1786. 

About 1801. 
About 1797. 


in infancy. 
Apr. 4, 1757. 
Dec. 25, 1838. 
Mar. 9,1778. 
Sep. 4, 1812. 
Dec. 24, 1843. 
June 2, 1840. 

Aug. 15, 1830. 
Feb. 14, 1843. 


Willistown. Pa. 

East Whitelaud, Ta. 
East Whiteland, Pa. 
Braudywine 

Manor, Pa. 
Tredyffrin, Pa. 
McVeytown, Pa. 



Ann Harris (XVII 1) had the honor of dancing in her youth with General 
Washington, at a ball given by Robert Morris, the financier of the Kevolution, 
at whose house Ann Harris was then visiting. The dress she wore at that time 
has been used a number of times since by her descendants on occasions of state, 
and is still in the possession of her family. 

Her first husband. Dr. Hugh Shiell, was a native of Ireland, who, when he 
emigrated, was apparently a person of considerable fortune. He received his 
degree of M.D. from the University of Edinburgh, then, as now, one of the 
foremost seats of medical teaching. Upon his emigration, about the commence- 
ment of the Revolutionary war, he settled in Philadelphia, and engaged there in 
the practice of his profession. He was an intimate friend of Robert Morris, and 
when in 1780, Morris organized the Bank of North America, through whose 
agency he proposed to furnish the money required to supply the American 
army with provisions, Hugh Shiell subscribed £5000 to the capital stock. 



28 THE HAEEIS EECOED. 

Among the guests at the Morris mansion Dr. Shiell met Ann Harris. The 
two soon became attached, but her mother refused her consent to their marriage, 
apparently not trusting the stranger, but giving the not wholly ingenuous 
reason that she proposed that all of her daughters should remain single. The 
young pair took what seemed to them the only way left to carry out their own 
wishes, walked to the First Presbyterian church, then on Market street above 
Second street, and were married by the pastor, Dr. John Ewing, afterward 
Provost of the University of Pennsylvania. After the ceremony they went to 
the house Dr. Shiell had prepared for their home, and the mother, like a prudent 
woman, accepted the accomplished fact. 

In 1783 or 1784 the Shiells removed to Lincoln county, Kentucky, near 
the town of Danville, where Dr. Shiell died in November, 1785, having caught 
cold from getting thoroughly wet in crossing a stream, which wetting brought 
on pneumonia. 

Ann Harris married a second time, Harry Innes, an intimate friend and 
the legal adviser of Dr. Shiell, who was then Judge of the United States District 
Court for Kentucky. He was born November 15, 1752, in Caroline county, 
Virginia, and had held several positions of trust under the state government 
before he was appointed a Judge of the Supreme Court for the District of 
Kentucky in 1783. He had been married some years before, but was a widower 
with several children when he removed to Kentucky. 

In 1785 and 1787 he was Attorney-General of Kentucky, and in 1787 he 
was appointed by the United States government. Judge of the United States 
District Court, which position he held till his death, September 20, 1816. 

In the serious debates which preceded tlie severance of Kentucky from 
Virginia, and its erection into a state in 1792, he had been one of the party 
which strongly insisted upon the severance and was disposed to establish the 
independence of Kentucky, but when the question was decided by the entrance 
of Kentucky into the Union he became an important factor in guiding the 
destinies of the infant state. 

After her second marriage Ann Harris removed from Lincoln county to 
Judge Innes' home at "Cedar Hill," near Frankfort, Kentucky, and the Shiell 
home was sold. 

Judge Innes was a man of high character and of good business ability; a 
kind father, although of somewhat irascible temper, and a strict disciplinarian 
in his family. He was an Episcopalian. His wife became a church member in 
1840, the result of conversations ■with Rev. E. D. Morris, pastor of the 
Presbyterian church in Newto^\^l, Bucks county, Pennsylvania, which had 



GENERATION XVII. 29 

been lier early home. Slie is said to liave inliLriied mucli of the physieal vigoi' 
and the mental ability of her mother. 

Judge Innes and his wife were buried at the Innes homestead, but were 
afterward reinteri'ed in the cemetery at Frankfort. 

Sarah Han-is (XVII 2). Her first husband, Charles Smith, was a captain 
in the army with which General Anthony Wayne defeated the Indians at the 
falls of the Miami river in Ohio, in the autumn of 1794. No children were 
born to her by either of her marriages. 

After the death of her sister, Elizabeth Harris (XVII 4), Sarah took charge 
of her household, and continued this care till her death. She was an excellent 
manager, and was much beloved by her foster children. She is buried in 
Henderson, Kentucky. She and her sister Eachel were tall and slight, and were 
blondes in complexion. 

Mary Harris (XVII 3). Her husband, James Hanna, was a prominent 
lawyer of Xewtown, Bucks coimty, Pennsylvania. He was admitted to practice 
as attorney in 1781, was Recorder of Deeds and Register of Wills for Bucks 
county, appointed May 7, 1788, and holding that office till 1802; Judge of 
the Court of Common Pleas, appointed in 1790; Lieutenant-Colonel of a 
regiment of Pennsylvania troops which was raised to quell the Whiskey 
Insurrection in 1794; a prominent member of the Presbyterian church of 
Newto^vn; Senior Warden of the Newtown Masonic Lodge in 1793, and a man 
of considerable means. 

Elizabeth Harris (XVII 4). Her husband, Thomas Todd, was a son of 
Richard Todd and Elizabeth Richards, whose home was on York river, King 
and Queen county, Virginia. Elizabeth Richards was a cousin of the mother 
of Judge Harry Innes, who had the same name. He was born January 23, 
1765. He was in the military service for six months in the winter of 1780, in 
the Revolutionary war, as a private in the Manchester cavalry of Richmond, 
who were called out to repel the invasion of Virginia by Generals Arnold and 
Philips. He was educated between 1781 and 1783 at Liberty Hall, Lexington, 
Virginia, now Washington and Lee college. 

In June, 1783, he removed to Bedford county, Virginia, near New Loudon, 
on Big Otter river, where he lived in the family of his cousin. Judge Harry 
Innes, teaching his daughters Latin and Greek, and at the same time studying 
surveying and performing certain duties in the office of the County Clerk. 

Judge Innes, having been appointed Judge in the District of Kentucky, 
removed his family to Danville, Kentucky, in the spring of 1784, Thomas Todd 



30 THE HARRIS RECORD. 

superintending the removal, and himself soon opening a law office there. He 
v,-as the secretary, and Judge Samuel McDowell was the president of the seven 
conventions which were held at Danville between 1784 and 1792, laboring in 
the formation of the state of Kentucky, and for its admission as a member of the 
Union. He was the first clerk of the Court of Appeals after the admission of 
Kentucky as a state in 1792. In 1802 he was appointed a judge of that court, 
and he was its chief justice when, in February, 1807, he was appointed by 
President Jefferson a justice of the Supreme Court of the United States, 
Jefferson had asked each member of Congress from the three States of Kentucky, 
Tennessee and Ohio, M'hieh were included in the new "Seventh Circuit," to 
indicate to him his first and second choice for the position of Associate Justice 
to hold court in that circuit. When the lists were opened, Todd had been 
named by e^'ery member. He held two sessions of court each year in each of 
the towns of Nashville, Tennessee; Frankfort, Kentucky, and Chilicothe, Ohio, 
and during the winter sat for two months with the Siipreme Court in AVash- 
ington, D. C. He continued in this service till his death, February 7, 1826. 
He had an exceptional understanding of the land laws of Kentucky, and his 
decisions are still quoted as authoritative. In his character the eminent jurist, 
the Christian gentleman and the courtly Virginian were so blended as to give 
him great influence and an exceptionally high position. 

After the death of his first wiie he married, April 6, 1812, Lucy AVash- 
ington, born Lucy Payne, the widow of Major George Steptoe AVashington, of 
''Harewood," Jefferson county, A^irginia, and a sister of Mrs. President James 
Madison. 

Judge Todd died at his home in Frankfort, Kentucky, and was buried on 
the farm of Judge Harry Innes in Franklin county, near the to^vn of Frankfort. 
His body Avas afterward removed to Frankfort cemetery, where Elizabeth Harris 
was also buried. 

John Harris (XVII 5) removed to Kentucky some years after the other 
members of the family went there. His wife, Jane Hunt, was of New Jersey. 
Jane's mother, who went to Kentucky with her daughter, died at Trough 
Spring, Kentucky. 

Rachel Harris (XA'^II G) lived in her later life with her sister Sarah in the 
house of her niece, Ann Todd (XA^III 11). 

Hannah Harris (XA'II 7) was never married. She died first of the family, 
and seems to have made no special mark in the family history. 



GENERATION XVII. 31 

John Harris (XVII 10) was apparently left in charge of the Willistown 
property when his fatlicr purchased the East Whitcland farm in 1770, at which 
time he was in his eighteenth year. He remained there all his life, and was 
always a farmer. 

During a part of the Revolutionary war he was one of the collectors of 
fines imposed for neglect of military duty, and there is a tradition in his family 
that he was at one time one of the army paymasters, and that while the 
American army lay at Valley Forge an unsuccessful attempt was once made to 
rob him at a time when he had a considerable sum of money in his possession. 
His grandson. Rev. Isaac O. Sloan (XIX 69), says that the records of Penn- 
sylvania in the Revolution show that John Harris was a lieutenant in 1777, and 
a captain in 1780, served through the Revolution, was with Washington's army 
at the battle of Germantown, and spent the Avinter at A'alley Forge, where he 
supplied the army with much provision from his farm. 

In 1794 he was lieutenant-colonel, commanding the regiment of Chester 
county militia, which was called into service by President Washington to quell 
the "Whiskey Insurrection" in western Pennsylvania. It ^vent into service 
September 19, 1794, and proceeded at once to the disturbed district. The 
presence of a large force and the authority of General Washington, who was in 
command, overawed the malcontents. No blood was shed, and the work of the 
expedition was done before winter. 

December 23, 1794, Brigadier-General Thomas Proctor writes to "Col. 
John Harris, Commanding Militia," directing him to compliment the troops 
under his command for their good conduct. The pay of a lieutenant-colonel 
in that expedition was $75 a month. 

He was a member of the Great Valley Presbyterian church, and in his 
later life an elder, as were, at various times, his brother William and his nephews 
William and Stephen. 

He was tall and slight, as is the manner of the Harris race. He was very 
fond of walking, and almost always to the end of his life walked to church^a 
distance of about three miles. He generally came in company with another 
elder, Thomas Hutchinson, who was of the same build, and their arrival was 
usually hailed by the youngsters with the remark, sotto voce, "Here come the 
two Apostles." 

Late in his life it is said that John Harris was offered a pension for his 
Revolutionary services, but it was not in those days the fashion for persons who 
could help themselves to accept help fi'om their country, and he declined it, 
saying that he did not need it. 



32 THE HARRIS RECORD. 

He died at his farm liouse in Willistown. His grave is at the Great 
Valley Presbyterian church, and he is buried in the older part of the grave- 
yard by the side of his wife, the inscription on his tombstone being as follows: 

In 

Memory of 

Col. John Harris, 

of Willistown, Chester County, 

who departed this life 

December 25th, 1838, 

Aged 85 years. 

Through all his life truth was his aim, 
However try'd, still found the same; 
Fraud or guile he despised in his heart. 
Even in religion, and it was his chart. 

He was charitable, kind and free from pride. 
With his opponents at peace, whom he liv'd beside: 
He was orthodox and sound, but not to be led, 
On Christ and His word he humbly died. 

His wife, Mary Bowen, was a daughter of Thomas Bowen and Esther Jones. 
She was born November 23, 1756, and died September 18, 1822. She was a 
great-granddaughter of Eev. Malachi Jones, born in 1651 in Wales, and 
educated and ordained there. He became, in September, 1714, the first pastor 
of the Presbyterian church of Abington, Montgomery county, Pennsylvania, 
and ministered to that church till his death, March 26, 1729. 

Her tombstone bears this inscription: 

Sacred 

to the memory of 

Mary Harris, 

Consort of John Harris, 

who departed this life 

Sept. the 18th, 1822, 

Aged 65 years, 9 months and 25 days. 

Through life's tempestuous walk 
Her days were spent in peace. 
Domestic were her joys, 
The Bible her solace. 

Her family was her care. 
Her first and last request 
To Him who gorerns all: 
That He would make them blest. 

This ej)itaph, and that on her husband's tombstone were written by their 
son-in-law, John Sloan. All educated persons in those days were supposed to be 
competent to write verse, and but little of it can claim to be poetry. 



GENERATION XVII. 33 

William Plarris (XVII 12) lived all lils days in the home in East White- 
land which his father purchased in 1770. He entered the military service of 
the country at the early age of 18, the first mention of him being in a mem- 
orandum book of Captain Persifor Frazer in the summer of 1776, when he is 
spoken of as Sergeant Harris. He was appointed in April, 1777, second lieu- 
tenant of Captain John Marshall's company of the State Kegiment of Foot, 
Col. John Bull commanding, and rose to the position of captain. The regiment 
to which he was attached, to whose command Walter Stewart succeeded in June, 
1777, was taken into the Pennsylvania line in the Continental service, and 
became the Thirteenth regiment. This regiment was in action in the battles 
of Brandywine and Germantown, and the family tradition says that William 
Harris fought in these battles and in several minor engagements. 

There are in the public records of the day notes connecting him with the 
movement of troops at various times throughout the Revolution, but the 
battalion to which he belonged does not seem to have been in action in the latter 
years of the war. 

He was again in service in 1794, when an army was called out to quell the 
Whiskey Insurrection in western Pennsylvania. He was the captain of the 
eighth company of the Chester county regiment, and was the regimental 
paymaster. 

He continued throughout his life attached to the state military organiza- 
tion, rising steadily imtil, in 1811, he was commissioned Brigadier-General of 
the Second Brigade, Third Division of Pennsylvania troops. 

When in 1812 the war with Great Britain broke out. Governor Snyder of 
Pennsylvania ordered out 14,000 troops. William Harris was then called into 
the service with the conmiand due his rank, but he died before the troops took 
the field. 

He was a member of the state legislature, elected in 1779, in 1780 and 
again in 1810 and 1811, and was on duty in the last session of that body prior 
to his death. 

He was, in many ways, an important factor in the life of the community 
in which he lived, where to this day his zeal in the cause of public education is 
not wholly forgotten. He gave to those of his sons who desired it the best 
education the region afforded, and was mainly instrumental in the creation of 
the Chester county academy, which held for some years an honorable place 
among the preparatory schools of his section of Pennsylvania. By his efforts 
while in the legislature he obtained an appropriation to erect the buildings 
required, and to maintain the school, and he gave the ground needed for the 



34 THE HAREIS EECOED. 

purpose out of his o\vii farm. He also gave freely his personal attention to 
forwarding and hastening the completion of the project, though he did not live 
to see the inauguration of the school. 

He was an elder in the Great Valley Presbyterian church, and in various 
ways was active in church work. His pastor, Rev. William Latta, summed up 
his career in the inscription which his tomb still bears: 

Sacred 

to the memory of 

Gen. William Harris, 

who departed this life 

Sept. 4th, 1812, 

in the 54th year of his age. 

Gen. Harris was a man of great worth, and to those 
who knew him his memory will long be dear. 
Uprightness, sincerity, candor and integrity were marked 
features of his character. Possessing naturally an excellent 
understanding, and a turn for public business, he was 
eminently useful. The public generally, and especially 
the church of which he was a member, has sustained 
a loss by his death, which is sensibly felt. The lingering 
illness which dissolved his earthly tabernacle he bore 
with remarkable patience, and trusting in the merits of his 
Kedeemer for acceptance with God, and evidently ripening for 
Heaven, he closed his eyes upon this transient scene with the 
comfortable hope of awakening in the light of Eternal day. 

William Harris was, as men of the family are apt to be, tall and rather 
slight in person. He was a man of great industry and energy, the principal note 
of his character that I could get when I made inquiry twenty years ago of those 
who still remembered him being that he was very vigorous in his administration 
of public duties, and impatient of sluggards. His health was not vigorous after 
his early army experience, which brought him some permanent injury, and 
doul)tless somewhat shortened his life. 

He left a fair estate, which was divided among his sons, with the reservation 
of a comfortable maintenance for their mother. 

His wife, Mary Campbell, born February 27, 1752, died J^ovember 26, 
1837, was a daughter of Eev. John Campbell, a minister of the Presbyterian 
church, and Mary Hubbard. She was a woman of great physical and mental 
vigor, ruled well her household, and retained throughout her life the respect and 
affection of her sons, whose letters to her, which are still preserved, furnish many 
proofs of their attachment to her, and supply much material for the history of 
the family in the first third of the nineteenth century. 



GEXERATIOX XVII. 35 

Margaret Harris (XVII 13) was a Avoman of exemplary piety, of great 
industry and cheerfulness, much respected in her old age, and a member of St. 
Peter's Episcopal church, where she is buried. She lived in her later years on 
the Old Provincial road, aljout half a mile west of the Harris homestead. 

David Christie lived in his youth in Tredyffrin township, Chester county. 
His brothers, James and John Christie, were oiEcers during the Revolutionary 
war. John Christie entered the navy, and, October 4, 177C, was in command 
of the Fire Brig Vesuvius. He was a prominent person in the Great Valley 
Presliyterian church. He and James are frequently mentioned in the public 
records during the licvolutiouary war and afterward. 

Elizabeth Harris (XVII 14) lived after her marriage at Brandy wine 
Manor, West Brandywine township, Chester county. She and her sister Hannah 
were very handsome women, of medium height. Their sister Agnes was tall, 
comely and had a good figure. All the sisters were noted for their housewifely 
virtues, excelling especially in the then universal and necessary accomplish- 
ments of spinning and weaving. Their stores of linen and cloth were the won- 
der and admiration of the neighborhood. 

It was at the hospitable mansion of "Aunt Betsey Mackelduff" that her 
nephews, Thomas and "W'illiam Harris, lived while pursuing their studies at 
Brandywine academy, and all of her relatives were sure of a hearty welcome 
and good cheer there. 

Her husband, Joseph Mackelduff, was a son of Samuel Mackelduff, who 
emigrated from the north of Ireland, and took up a part of the lands of Springton 
Manor. This property is still held by the Mackelduff family. He built a mill 
on the west branch of the Brandywine creek, near what is now Ferndale station, 
on the Wilmington and Northern railroad. Joseph Mackelduff, the oldest son 
of Samuel, was a man of good position and of large means. 

Agnes Harris (XVII 15) lived one mile east of the Great Valley Presby- 
terian church, north of the Swede's Ford road, and on the north side of the 
Valley creek. The property was bought by Israel Davis, her husband, from 
John Christie, and is the farm which was, in 1876, owned by Henry Eeynard. 
/ Israel Davis was a member of a numerous and influential family of Welsh 

I descent, and a man of considerable means. Their only child, Mary (XVIII 39) 
j dying in infancy, her mother took her gig and traveled alone, a distance of 
nearly two hundred miles, to Juniata county, where her sister, Hannah Calbraith, 
lived. She returned home with her niece, Jean Calbraith, who was two years 
younger than her own lost child, and intended to make her her heir. But Agnes 



1151103 



36 THE HAEEIS RECORD. 

died before her husband, and on his death he left all his estate to his relatives 
of his own name. 

Hannah Harris (XVII 16) lived at MeVeytown, in Juniata county, Penn- 
sylvania. Her husband's name was usually spelled "Calbraith," and was so 
pronounced, though in one of the documents in my possession, dated December 
7, 1799, he writes it George "Galbraith." He was an cmigi-ant from the north 
of Ireland, but there is little doubt that he was of the family of Galbraith, who 
are people of influence in Scotland, as that family had representatives among the 
Scotch-Irish emigrants who settled in Donegal, Lancaster county, about 1722, 
and became very influential there in Revolutionary times. 
, George Calbraith, upon his emigration in 1773, brought with him a 

certificate dated April 11, 1773, signed by Alexander Marshall, of the 
"Protestant Dissenting Congregation of Ballymoney, County Antrim, Ireland," 
which states that "he was born in that parish, and that ha-^ang an irreproachable 
character he is recommended to the notice of any Christian society where he may 
happen to settle." 

He was a widower with six children at the time of his marriage to Agnes 
Harris. He was wealthy, and is remembered as a very kind-hearted man. He 
was a merchant and an innkeeper. 

The name "Calbraith" is now extinct as a surname in this branch of the 
family. 



GENEEATION XVIII. 



37 



GENERATION XVIII. 



MEMBER OF FAMILY. 



MARKIAGE. 



The Children of Ann Harris (XVII 1) and Hugh Shiell. 



RESIDENCE. 



XVIII 

1 



Catharine Harris 

Shiell. 



Thomas Bodley 



Aug. 19, 1785. 



Jan. 1, 1804. 



June 24, 1841. 



The Children of Ann Harris (XVII 1) and Harry Innes. 



Maria Knox Innes. 



I. John Harris Todd 
XVIII 10. 
H. John Jordon 

Crittenden. 



Oct. 19, 1796. 



I. Oct. 30, 1817. 
II. Not. 15, 182G. 



Sep. 8, 1851. 



Lexington, Ky. 



Frankfort, Ky. 



The Children of Mary Harris (XVII 3) and Jaaies Hanna. 



Mary Hanna. 

John Harris Hanna. 



Sophia Hanna. 
Charles Stewart 

Hanna. 



Snmuel Spotts. 
I. Elizabeth 

Richards Todd 
XVIII 9. 
II. Mary Sophia Hunt. 
Wilson Merrill. 

never maiTied. 



About 178G. 

About 1788. 
About 1789. 



Dec. 29, 1S25. 



1873. 



Frankfort, Ky. 
St. Joseph, Mo. 



The Children op Elizabeth Harris (XVII 4) and Thomas Todd. 



Harry Innes Todd. 
Charles StewartTodd. 
Elizabeth Richards 

Todd. 

John Harris Todd. 

Anna Maria Todd. 

Millicent Todd. 



novor married. 
Letitia Shelby. 

■Tolin Harris Hanna 

XVIII 4. 
Maria Knox lunos 

XVIII 2. 
Edmund Lyne 

Starling, 
never married. 



May 26, 1789. 
Jan. 22, 1791. 



Nov. 18 1792. 
June 12, 1795. 
May 29, 1801. 



June 16, 1816. 



Oct. 30, 1817. 



Nov. 29, 1812. 
May 16, 1871. 



Aug. 31, 1824. 
At 18 years. 



Frankfort, Ky. 
Shelby county. Ky. 

Frankfort, Ky. 
Frankfort, Ky. 
Henderson, Ky. 







The Children of 


John Harris (XVII 5) and Jane 


Hunt. 




13 


Innes Todd Harris. 


never married. 












14 


Daniel Harris. 


Eleanor Hunt. 












15 


Hannah Harris. 


never married. 












16 


William Stewart 
















Harris. 


Charlotte Martin. 




Sep. 22.1800. 




May 15, 1848. 




17 


John Harris. 


Lucy Buck. 












18 


Charles Henry 

Innes Harris. 












Illinois. 



38 



THE HAKEIS EECOED. 
GENERATION XVIII. 



INDEX 
NO. 



MEMBER OF FAMILY. 



MAKBIAGE. 



BESIDENCE. 



The Children of John Harris (XVII 10) and Mart Bowen. 



XVIII 












19 Thomas Harris. 


Catharine Smith. 


Nov. 28, 17T7. 




June 2,1842. 


Pikeland, Pa. 


20 Malachi Harris 


Ana Neiler. 


July 31, 1779. 


Feb. 2C, ISIG. 


July 1822. 


Charlestown, Pa. 


21 ;.\gTies Harris. 




Dec. 16, 1780. 




in childhood. 




22 1 Esther Harris. 


never married. 


Nov. 25, 1783. 




Sep. 30,1861. 


Willistowu, Pa. 


23 :Elizabeth Harris. 




July 6. 1785. 




in infancv. 




24 i.Tohn Harris. 


Hannah Hoskins. 


Apr. 30, 1787. 


Apr. 30, 1819. 


Nov. 11. 1837. 


Pikeland, Pa. 


25 Marv Harris. 


Jolin Sloan. 


Aug. 18, 1789. 


Feb., 1808. 


Mch. 16, 1886. 


Philadelphia, I'a. 


26 Elizabeth Harris. 




Nov. 25, 1792. 




in childhood. 




27 Martha Jones Harris. 


never married. 


Mch. 11, 1794. 




Nov. 19, 1829. 


Willistown, Pa. 



The Children of William Harris (XVII 12) and Mart Campbell. 



28 


Campbell Harris. 


1 
Jane Loe. j^.iy 2,1781. 


1 SOS. May 17,1853. 


Geneseo, N. Y. 


29 


Thomas Harris. 


I. Jane Phillip.s 










Hodgdon. Jan. 3. 1784. 


I.Jan., 1820.; Mch. 4,1861. 


I'hiladelphia, Pa. 






II. Esther White 












Macphersou. 


II. Apr. 30, 1839. 






30 Marv Harris. 


Oct. 1.5,1786. 




May 20. 1791. 




31 John Harris. 


I. Mary Forster. [May 20, 1789. 


I. Oct. 28, 1819. 


May 12, 18t!4. 


Washington, D. C. 






H. Mary Gilliat Gray.) 


II. Oct., 1845. 






32 


William Harris. 


Elizabeth Matilda 














Patterson. 


Aug. 18. 1792. 


Apr. 20, 1S20. 


Mch. 3. 1861. 


Philadelphia, Pa. 


33 


James Bailey Harris. 


Maria Driesbach. 


Oct. 14.1795. 


Apr. 10, 1838.1 June 23, 1881. 


Geneseo, N. Y. 


34 


Stephen Harris. 


Marianne Smith. 


Sep. 4, 1798. 


Apr. 4, 1833. 


Nov. 18, 1851. 


Philadelphia, Pa. 



The Children of Margaret Harris (XVH 13) and David Christie. 



35 Jean Christie. 



Joseph Pearce. 



Mch. 9, 1782. 



Mar. 2, 1805. 



Nov. 24, 18.51. ;W. Whiteland, Pa. 



The Children of Elizabeth Harris (XVII 14) and Joiseph Mackelduff. 



36 


Mary Mackelduff. 


William Long. 


Apr. 30, 1787. 




Aug. 19, 1820. 


Brandywine 

Manor, Pa. 


37 


Joseph Mackelduff. 


I. Rachel McClure. 


Nov. 14, 1788. 


I. 1817. 


July 15, 1872. 


Brandywine 

Manor, Pa. 


38 


Elizabeth Mackelduff. 


11. JeanCalbraith 
XVIII 43. 

John McClurc. 


Nov. 17, 1789. 


II. Mar. 29, 1829. 
Feb. 6,1816. 


Aug. 2,1822. 


Brandywine 

Manor, Pa. 



The Children of Aqnes Harris (XVII 15) and Israel Davis. 



39 Mary Davis. 



Aug. 1, 1802. 



IJune 24. 1805. 



QENEEATION XVin. 
GENERATION XVIII. 



39 



MEMBER OF FAMILY. 



MARRIAGE. 



RESIDENCE. 



The Ohildben of Hannah Harris (XVII 16) and George Calbraith. 



XVIII 














40 


Elizabeth Calbraith. 


Jonu Haman. 


.Tune 2, 1798. 


Mar. 23, 1819. 


June 2, 1849. 


McVeytown, Pa. 


41 


Nancy Calbraith. 


Augustine Wakefield. 


Jan. 24. 1801. 


May, 1833. 


Apr. 10, 1863. 


McVeytown, Pa. 


42 


Julianna Calbraith. 


William Swanze.v. 


Jan. 2, 1803. 


Nov. 25, 1830. 


Dec. 30, 1842. 


Minneapolis, Kas. 


43 


Jean Calbraith. 


.Toseph Mackelduft' 








Brandyvpine 






XVIII 37. 


Aug. 8, 1804. 


Mar. 29, 1829. 


Sep. 5, 1891. 


Manor, Pa. 


44 


George Harris 














Calbraith. 


ilaria Reynoki.'i. 


Dec. 27, 1806. 


May 9, 1844. 


Dec. 17, 1866. 


McVeytown, Pa. 


45 


Hannah Calbraith. 


Michael Cresswell. 


Sep. 24, 1809. 


Sep. 1, 1834. 


Nov. 7, 1838. 


McVeytown, Pa. 


46 


Harriet Calbraith. 


never married. 


May 24, 1816. 




Apr. 7, 1833. 





Catharine Harris Shiell (XVIII 1) passed her early life in the house of 
her stepfather, Judge Harry Innes, in Frankfort. She and her half-sister, 
Maria Knox Innes (XVIII 2), were constant companions, and she did not know 
that their fortunes were different, or that she was an heiress, until after her 
marriage, when Judge Innes transferred to her the large property she had in- 
herited from her father. 

The Bodleys were of Lexington, Kentucky, and Thomas Bodley and his 
wife exercised a lavish hospitality there. Transylvania University, which was 
located in Lexington, Kentucky, was then the chief seat of learning in the 
southwest, and the gracious liospitality of the Bodley home made the mistress 
a queen in the little community, as is evidenced by many still existing letters 
from those who had been students in Lexington, and had been recipients of her 
many benefactions. 

The family came to number twelve children, and there were in her house- 
hold a French governess, an English head-nurse, and a host of negro servants, 
but she found time and heart to care for a host of college boys, to influence them 
for good, and to give them some of the comfort and protection of motherly care. 

The husband died suddenly from cholera in 1834, when it made its first 
and most fatal visit to America, and after his death she found that their gen- 
erous living had greatly diminished their means, and that, because her husband 
and her stepfather had always relieved her of the care of her estate, she was so 
ignorant of the nature of her investments that she could not trace them. 
Nearly forty years after her death one of her grandsons found, among a bundle 
of old papers, a lease for the term of ninety-nine years that had been made by 



40 THE HARRIS RECORD. 

her father to persons in Philadelphia, Pennsj^lvania. The property had become 
very vahiable, but the rights of the owners had been so long neglected that the 
title had passed from them irrevocably. 

Mrs. Bodley died in Lexington, Kentucky, where she had spent all of her 
married life. 

Maria Knox Innes (XVIII 2) was distinguished for her great beanty, and 
for her social charm. Her first husband, John Harris Todd (XVIII 10), was 
her consin. Her second husband, John Jordon Crittenden, was born in Wood- 
ford county, Kentucky, September 10, 1787, and was a widoM'er at the time 
of their marriage. He was a lawyer, and was, through a large part of his life, 
very prominent in state and national politics. Pie was elected to the United 
States Senate in 1817, and again in 1835, in 1843 and in 1855. He was ap- 
pointed United States attorney -general bj- President W. H. Harrison in 1841, 
and again by President Fillmore in 1853, and was chosen governor of Kentucky 
in 1848. He made, in the last year of his congressional career, earnest efforts 
to avert the Ci\'il war, bringing forward for that purpose a series of resolu- 
tions, which were known as the Crittenden Compromise. He was, perhaps, 
after Henry Clay, the most influential man that Kentucky has produced. He 
died in 1863. 

Mary Hanna (XVIII 3). Her husband, Samuel Spotts, served in the 
United States army throughout the War of 1812-15. He was a first-lieutenant 
in command of a battery of artillery, and was brevetted captain January 8th, 
1815, "for distinguished and meritorious service in the battle of New Orleans, 
and for his uniform gallant conduct in the army." He remained attached to 
the artillery arm of the service till 1829, when he resigned. General Jackson 
presented him a sword in recognition of his services at New Orleans. He died 
July 11, 1853. 

John Harris Hanna (XVIII 4) was born in Bucks county, Pennsylvania, 
but removed to Kentucky while still a boy. For the last fifty years of his life 
he was a resident of Frankfort, Kentucky, and he died there. The Hanna 
hoiise is still one of the landmarks of that town. It is a large house, built in 
the colonial style, and stands facing the entrance of the bridge across the Ken- 
tucky river, between North and South Frankfort. 

Mr. Hanna was a lawyer. He was for thirty years clerk of the United 
States Circuit and District courts, was president of the Farmers' Bank of 
Frankfort for a long period, possessed a considerable fortune, was an owner in 
woolen, cotton and flour mills, and was for fifteen years one of the proprietors 



GENERATION XVIII. 41 

of the line of stages that ran between Louisville and Lexington. He built at 
his own cost the Episcopal church in Frankfort. He was generous and philan- 
thropic, and was a man of broad and liberal views. After the death of his first 
wife, Elizabeth Eichards Todd (XVIII 9), who was his cousin, he married Mary 
Sophia Hunt, daughter of John W. Hunt, of Lexington, Kentucky, but he had 
no children by either marriage, and his heir was Hunt Keynolds, a nephew of 
his second wife. 

Sophia Hanna (XVIII 5). Her husband, Wilson Merrill, was of St. 
Joseph, Missouri. 

Charles Stewart Hanna (XVIII 6) was a paymaster of the United States 
navy. He died in Frankfort, Kentucky. 

Harry Innes Todd (XVIII 7) was graduated in the summer of 1822 at the 
Medical school of the LTniversity of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. He started 
to return to his home in Frankfort, Kentucky, but was taken ill at Bedford, 
Pennsylvania, where he remained till his death. He was buried at Bedford. 
He is remembered as a young man of great promise. 

Charles Stewart Todd (XVIII 8) was born in Lincoln county, Kentucky, 
and was educated at William and Mary college, Williamsburg, Virginia, in 
1807, 1808 and 1809. He was graduated in law at Litchfield, Connecticut, 
where was the foremost law school of that time, in the early spring of 1812, and 
began at once the practice of his profession in Lexington, Kentucky. He en- 
listed in the summer of 1812 as an ensign in the local military company which 
was called into service on the outbreak of the war of 1812. During the next 
winter he was promoted to a captaincy of the Twenty-eighth Infantry, May, 
1813, and was appointed aide-de-camp and assistant inspector-general May 
20, 1813, on General William Henry Harrison's staff, in which capacity he 
served at the Battle of the Thames, October, 1813. He was appointed Xovember 
1, 1813, assistant inspector-general with the rank of major, and was assigned 
to duty in the eighth district, comprising the states of Kentucky and Ohio, and 
the territories of Indiana, Michigan, Illinois and Missouri. He resigned his 
commission in 1815, and resumed the practice of law in Frankfort, Kentucky. 

In 1817 he was, for a few months, Secretary of State in the Administra- 
tion of Governor Madison, who died soon after his inauguration. 

In 1818 he abandoned the practice of law, and settled on a fine farm called 
"Stockdale" in Shelby county, Kentucky, which land had been surveyed for, 
and patented to his wife's father, Governor Isaac Shelby, in April, 1776. 



42 THE HARRIS RECORD. 

In 1820 Colonel Todd was appointed by President Monroe Charge d' Af- 
faires, and in 1822 Minister to the State of Colombia, South America. It was 
during his administration of the latter office that President Monroe made 
the declaration in regard to the necessity of non-interference in American 
affairs by European powei's, which has since been known as the Monroe 
doctrine. He returned from Bogota in 1825. On his way home in a United 
States frigate he was attacked by yellow fever when off Santiago, Cuba. His 
life was despaired of, and he was landed at Charlestown, South Carolina, to 
die. He did recover, but it was a singular consequence of his sickness that, 
whereas he had from his infancy hair of positive redness, it changed at the age 
of 34, before his arrival at home in Kentiicky, to a dark bro\^Ti, and so remained 
throughout liis life, being but slightly tinged with gray when he died, at the age 
of 76 years. It is further worthy of note that all of his children had dark hair, 
and that among his descendants, which have now reached to the fifth generation, 
red heads occasionally appear, which can only be traced to Colonel Todd. 

A stay of six weeks in Charlestown so far recruited his health that he was 
able to undertake the journey of six hundred miles on horseback to his Ken- 
tucky home, where his fine blue-grass farm became noted as a model of agricul- 
tural management, as well as the seat of a gracious hospitality. 

During the Presidential campaign of 1840 Colonel Todd spent many 
months in Cincinnati, Ohio, where he edited the "Republican," and took an im- 
portant part in promoting the candidacy of his old commander. General William 
Henry Harrison. President Harrison lived but one month after his inaugura- 
tion, but John Tyler, his successor, carried out Harrison's wishes in appointing 
Colonel Todd Minister to Russia, which position he held from 1841 to 1845. 

During the next Administration, which was democratic in politics, he held 
no office, but in 1850 President Fillmore appointed him one of the commis- 
sioners to treat with the Indians of western Texas and New Mexico, a region 
which had but lately come under our control, and which was inhabited by the 
fiercest and most untamable savages which have ever been wards of the gov- 
ernment of the United States. The familiarity with the topography and with 
the possibilities of this region, which he acquired \\'hile engaged in this duty, led 
him to become one of the projectors of the Southern Pacific railroad, and when 
a company was formed to build it, he was elected to its \'ice-presidency. While 
he held that position he made his home at Marshall, Texas, where he lived till 
1861, when he returned to Kentucky, settled at Owensboro, and was appointed 
by President Lincoln Assessor of Interaal Revenue for the district of western 
Kentucky. 



GENERATION XTIII. 43 

Colonel Todd was a successful man throughout his life, making a shining 
mark as a scholarly -wTiter, a brilliant diplomatist and a distinguished soldier, 
and he is remembered as one of the ablest public servants whom his native state 
has produced. 

His wife was the youngest daughter of Isaac Shelby, the first governor of 
Kentucky, and a granddaughter of General Evan Shelby, who was in command 
of all the troops which were actively engaged in the hard-fought battle, and the 
important victory over the Indians, known as the "Battle of Point Pleasant," 
or the "Battle of the Great Kanawha," which was fought at the confluence of 
the Ohio and Kanawha rivers, October 10, 1774. Theodore Koosevelt, in 
his history of the "Winning of the West," says that Evan Shelby was a stout old 
Marylander of Welsh blood, and that his son, Isaac Shelby, a stalwart, stern- 
visaged young man, was a subaltern in his father's company, but was put at its 
head when, upon the wounding of Colonel John Field, the command of all the 
forces engaged devolved upon Evan Shelby. General Andrew Lewis was the 
commander of the expedition, but he was not in the field during the fighting. 

The Shelbys were at this time citizens of the debatable land claimed by 
Vii'ginia and North Carolina, which afterward became the eastern part of the 
state of Tennessee, and Isaac Shelby was, in 1779, made county lieutenant of 
Sullivan county, a part of that territory. October 7, 1780, he was in com- 
mand of the left wing of the American army at the battle of King's Mountain, 
which was, perhaps, the most completely successful action fought h\ the Ameri- 
cans during the war of the Revolution. 

He removed to Kentucky, of which he became the first governor l792-(3, 
and was again governor 1812-16. He was born in Maryland, December 11, 
1750, and died in Kentucky, July 18, 1826. 

Evan Shelby's wife was Letitia Cox, and the wife of Isaac Shelby was 
Susanna Hood, a daughter of Xathaniel Hood and Sarah Simpson. Colonel 
Hood was killed and scalped In- the Indians at Boonesborough, Kentucky, in 
August, 1782. 

A romantic story is told of the meeting of Letitia Shelby, the youngest 
daughter of Isaac Shelby, with Charles Stewart Todd, who afterward became 
her husband. After the disastrous battle of the River Raisin, Upper Canada, 
January 22, 1813, General Winchester, who was in command, sent Captain 
Todd with dispatches to Governor Shelby, apprising him of the disaster to the 
Kentucky troops. After a journey of great hardship and privation through 
pathless forests in the dead of winter, Todd arrived at the executive mansion 
at Frankfort to find the governor at the theater. AVith torn and mud-stained 



44 THE HABEIS RECORD. 

uniform, showing signs of his wrestle with the difficulties of his journey, and of 
his haste to deliver his dispatches, he entered the theater and presented them to 
"His Excellency's" box. They told of the defeat and capture of five Kentucky 
regiments, and almost every person in the audience had a relative or a friend 
whose life was in jeopardy. The whole theater sat in suspense while the gov- 
ernor perused them, and the suspense but grew greater when, burying his face in 
his hands, he gave them to his secretary that he might read them aloud. 

But the sad tale was no new one to the messenger. During his long jour- 
ney he had become habituated to the moving details, and his wandering gaze 
being soon arrested by the sight of Letitia Shelby, seated in her father's box, he 
fell at once a victim to her charms. Her portrait remains to testify to her great 
beauty, and she, on her part, found the herald a young hero, who captivated her 
fancy, so that a mutual attachment was then formed which led to their marriage 
at the executive mansion three years later. She was fourteen years old when 
they met, having been bom June 11, 1799, and she died July 22, 1868. 
Colonel Todd outlived her nearly three years, dying while making a visit at 
Baton Rouge, Louisiana. He and his wife lie buried at Elmwood cemetery, 
Owensboro, Kentucky. 

Elizabeth Kichards Todd (XVIII 9) had two children, both of whom died 
in infancy. The mother and the children were buried on the Todd farm in 
Woodford county, Kentucky, near Versailles. 

John Han-is Todd (XVIII 10) early embraced a political career, and, dur- 
ing the last six years of his life, became one of the most influential men in his 
native state. Kentucky was then suifering greatly from the general financial 
wreck which, throughoTit the coimtry, followed the short period of inflation after 
the close of the war with Great Britain in 1815. The banks were ruined every- 
where, and financial distress was widespread. 

Mr. Todd, who was elected in 1818 and in 1821 to the state legislature to 
represent the counties of Franklin and Owen, rendered great service in bringing 
order out of the commercial chaos. During his second term in the legislature 
he succeeded in procuring the repeal of the oppressive and barbarous law which 
pei-mitted the imprisonment of debtors. His third campaign in 1824 was hotly 
contested. He threw himself into the conflict with great ardor, and won his 
election, but he had overtaxed his streng-th, and died suddenly from exhaiistion 
soon after the close of the campaign. 

He had the qualities requisite for political success, and had he lived, would 
doubtless have reached a very high position in the service of the state. 



GENERATION XVIII. 45 

Anne Maria Todd (XVIII 11). Her husband, Edmund Lyne Starling, 
born, Mecklenburg county, Virginia, May 9, 1795, was a son of William Starling 
and Susanna Lyne, who were married in 1774. William Starling was born in 
King William county, Virginia, September 4, 1756, and Susanna Lyne, who 
was a daughter of Colonel William Lyne, was a native of the same county. 
William Starling and his wife removed in 1794 to Kentucky, and settled in 
Mercer county, near Harrodsburg. He was a large property owner, and was 
engaged in mercantile pursuits on an extended scale. He represented Mercer 
county in the state legislature, and, December 18, 1806, was appointed assistant 
judge for his district. 

He died December 25, 1826. 

Edmund Lyne Starling was married in Frankfort, Kentucky, and lived 
there for some years, when he removed to a farm in Logan county. 

In 1830 he changed his residence to Henderson county, where he bought 
a country place on the Knob Lick road. He was appointed a magistrate, and 
served in that capacity from 1835 to 1850. 

In 1851 he removed to the town of Henderson, where he spent the rest of 
his days, and where he died August 30, 1869. He administered many trusts 
during his life, but his career was largely that of a gentleman of means, given 
to hospitality and to the service of others. 

Another son of William Starling, Lyne Starling, whose business career was 
passed in Columbus, Ohio, amassed a fortune which was estimated at three mil- 
lion dollars. As he had no direct heirs, his estate descended to his brother 
Edmund and other members of the family. 

Daniel Harris (XVIII 14). His wife, Eleanor Hunt, was from Ohio. 
They had no children. 

William Stewart Harris (XVIII 16) entered the United States navy 
November 30, 1814, and reached the rank of commander September 8, 1841. 
While in command of the Iris, during the war with Mexico, he lost his life in 
Tuxpan bay, Mexico, May 15, 1848, in an effort to save the lives of Com- 
mander H. Pinckney and others. 

Thomas Harris (XVIII 19) was second sergeant of Captain George Hart- 
man's company of the Sixty-fifth Regiment of drafted militia of Pennsylvania, 
Lieutenant-Colonel John Pearson commanding, in the War of 1812-14. It was 
called the "crack" company among those which were assembled at the army 
rendezvous at Marcus Hook, Pennsylvania, in October, 1814. 



46 THE HARRIS RECORD. 

He owned a grist mill on Pickering creek, AVest Pikeland, Chester county, 
north of Chester valley, about four miles from his father's home. His wife, 
Catharine Smith, was of Pikeland. She was born May 5, 1783, and died August 
2, 1856. 

Malachi Harris ("XVIII 20). His wife, Ann JSTeiler, born August 15, 1794, 
was a daughter of John Xeiler, of Chester county. After his death she married, 
October 26, 1828, Jacob Clemens. She died September 13, 1849. 

Esther Harris (XYIII 22) was her father's housekeeper after the death of 
her sister Martha. In her later life she lived at Malvern, Chester county, with 
her nephew, Malachi Harris (XIX 62), in a hoiise which belonged to her. She 
died there. 

John Harris (XVIII 24) lived on a farm in Pikeland which he inherited 
from his father. He had also a mill on Pickering creek. He was a private in 
his father's company in October, 1814. His wife, Hannah Hoskins, bom 
March 9, 1797, was a daughter of John Hoskins, of Chester county. John 
Harris died at the "Leopard Inn" in Easttown, near his father's home. 

Mary Harris (XYIII 25) removed soon after her marriage to Philadelphia, 
where she spent the rest of her life. She lived to a great age, dying in her 
ninety-seventh year. She retained to a very late period her activity and her 
faculties but little impaired, and it is remembered that within two years of her 
death she walked on one occasion five miles without feeling greatly fatigued. 

Her husband, John Sloan, was of Scotch ancestry. He was born March 
17, 1780, at Carrickmacross, County Monaghan, Ireland, and with his brother 
James emigrated to America in 1801, landing at Xew Castle, Delaware, in May 
of that year. On their arrival, James, who was a linen weaver, took up that 
occupation, and prospering became the proprietor of a number of looms. 

John went to Fallowfield to^^Tiship, Chester county, and was soon given 
charge of a school there by General Samuel Cochran and other prominent citi- 
zens of that neighborhood. 

Gilbert Cope, the historian of Chester county, speaks of him as a teacher 
of distinction. He left there in 1S08, and opened a store at the southwest cor- 
ner of Thirteenth and Market streets, Philadelphia. After several years he and 
his brother James bought ground at the corner of Eighteenth and Market streets, 
where they erected a building in which a grocery and provision business was 
conducted by them for some years. At a later date the partnership was dis- 
solved, and James bought property on Market street, near Twenty-second street, 
where his business was thereafter conducted. John retired from business at the 



GENERATION XVIII. 47 

age of 60, interesting himself tliercaftcr chielly in the religion? movements of 
the day and in reading. 

John Sloan was a man of sterling integrity, and was prudent and successful 
in business. He was an earnest and consistent Christian, he and his wife being 
communicants of the First Presbyterian church of Philadelphia. He died 
August 27, 1862, and is buried in North Laurel Hill cemetery. 

His parents were John Sloan and Ellen Oliver. His mother's mother was 
named Phillips, and his father's mother's name was Ross. They were Presby- 
terians. 

The elder John Sloan, with his wife and their children, Thomas and Mary, 
came to America some years after the emigration of their sons John and James. 
John Sloan, Sr., died on the ocean passage, and was buried at sea. His wife 
died in Philadelphia in 1823 or 1824. 

Martha Jones Harris (XVIII 27) was her father's housekeeper until her 
death. She and her cousin, Stephen Harris (XVIII 34), were attached play- 
mates in their childhood, and were fast friends as long as they lived. She was 
a woman of sterling virtues, attractive manners and considerable personal beauty. 

Campbell Harris (XVIII 28) was a farmer. In his early married life he 
had a farm of forty acres in East Whiteland, Chester county, and was proprietor 
of the General Wayne inn, on the Philadelphia and Lancaster turnpike. In 
1818 he removed with his family to the Genesee valley, Livingston county, 
New York, where he took charge of a large tract of land belonging to John H. 
Brinton, of Philadelphia, and where he acquired a tine farm for himself, which 
remained his home throughout his life. 

His wife, Jane Lee, was a daiighter of Francis Lee, born in Antrim, Ireland, 
who came to America about 1775, and Jane Alexander. The Lees were at the 
time of Jane's marriage residents of East Whiteland. She died February 25, 
1846. 

Thomas Harris (XVIII 29) completed his preliminary education at 
Brandymne academy in Chester county. He received the degree of "M.D." 
from the University of Pennsylvania in 1809. He entered the naval service in 
the war with Great Britain, July 6th, 1812, and remained in it during the rest 
of his life. He was surgeon of the sloop of war Wasp, which in the fall of 1812 
captured the British sloop of war Frolic, after a severe engagement, but was 
herself disabled and obliged soon afterward to surrender to the British 74-gun 
ship Poictiers, which came up after the engagement was over. He was in active 
service on the Atlantic and on Lake Ontario during most of the war, but was 



48 THE HAKKIS RECOEO. 

not in any other considerable engagement. He sailed in March, 1815, with 
Commodore Decatur on his expedition to punish the Barbary piratical powers. 
He was pnt in charge of the wounded of the Algerine flagship Mashouda after 
her capture by Decatur. 

As the United States was at peace for many years after 1815, the navy was 
but little engaged, except in cruising, and Thomas Harris was, for a number of 
years, allowed to pursue the practice of his profession on shore, being on leave of 
absence. He developed a very valuable practice in Philadelphia, and won a 
high reputation as a physician, but more especially as a surgeon. In 1831 he 
was called upon to extract a ball which President Jackson had received in a duel 
with Charles Dickinson in ISOG. He was on several occasions assigned to spe- 
cial duty by the IS^aval department, but his home remained in Philadelphia 
until in 1844 he was ordered to Washington as Chief of the Bureau of Medicine 
and Surgery, which position he held imtil he was retired from the service in 
1857 on accoimt of age and physical disability. He then returned to Philadel- 
phia, where he ended his days. 

His first wiie, Jane Hodgdon, was a daughter of Major Samuel Hodgdon, 
of Philadelphia, who had been an officer of the United States army from 1776 
to 1800. He was the Quartermaster-General and Paymaster of General St. 
Clair's army in the campaign against the Miami Indians in Ohio in 1791. In 
the year 1813 he was President of the Pennsylvania Company for Insurance on 
Lives and Granting Annuities, Philadelphia. 

Major Hodgdon's wife was Mary Hodge, of Philadelphia. 

Jane Hodgdon, who was the mother of all the children of Thomas Harris, 
died July 21, 1834. 

His second wife, Esther White Macplierson, born 1803, was a daughter of 
Major Samuel Macplierson, of the Revolutionary army, and Elizabeth White, 
daughter of William White, the first Protestant Episcopal Bishop of Penn- 
sylvania. She died May 18, 1855. 

John Harris (XYIII 31) entered the United States Marine Service during 
the war with Great Britain, his commission as lieutenant bearing date April 23, 
1814. He served during the summer of that year in the force whicli opposed 
the British advance on Washington. 

In ]May, 1815, he sailed under Commodore Decatur in the expedition which 
punished the Barbary piratical powers, and was present in the action which re- 
sulted in the capture by the United States frigate Guerriere of the Algerine 
flagship Mashouda. 



GENERATIOK XVIII. 49 

He was in active sea service for a large part of the next twenty years, 
visiting in that time most parts of the workl in which the United States then 
maintained a fleet. 

In 1836 he was engaged in the Creek war in Alabama, and in the Seminole 
war in Florida, and received a brevet as major ''for gallantry and good conduct 
in that war, particularly in the affair of 'Hatchee Lustee.' " 

In 1848 he was in command of a battalion of marines that was stationed 
at Alvarado, near Vera Cruz, Mexico, diiring the latter part of the Mexican 
war, and January 7, 1859, he was appointed colonel commandant of the United 
States Marine Corps, Avhich position he held till his death. 

He married at Erie, Pennsylvania, while stationed at that post, Maiy 
Forster, daughter of Colonel Thomas Forster and Sarah Montgomery. She was 
born August 10, 1795, and died September 22, 1820. 

His second wife, Mary Gilliat Gray, was the daughter of William Gray, 
who, for many years, held the position of British consul at ISTorfolk, Virginia. 
She was born in 1811, and died February 16th, 1883. 

John Harris had no children by either marriage. 

William Harris (XVIII 32), like his brother Thomas, was edi;cated at 
Brandwine academy, and received in 1812 the degree of "M.D." from the 
University of Pennsylvania. He commenced the practice of medicine in Ches- 
ter county, and remained there till 1834, when he removed to Philadelphia, 
where he spent the rest of his life. He was a sviccessful physician, a writer for 
the press on medical subjects, and a lecturer in a siimmer school of medicine. 
He was an elder in the Tenth Presbyterian church of Philadelphia. 

His wife, Elizabeth Matilda Patterson, born February 13, 1794, died July 
18, 1880, was the youngest daughter of Dr. Robert Patterson, of Philadelphia, 
and Amy Hunter Ewing. Dr. Patterson was born in Ireland May 30, 1743; 
emigrated to America in 1768; was a surgeon in the Revolutionary army from 
1776 to 1778; professor of mathematics in the University of Pennsylvania from 
1779 to 1814, and director of the United States Mint at Philadelphia from 1805 
to 1824, in which year he died. 

James Bailey Harris (XVIII 33) was a farmer throughout his life. He 
was offered an appointment at West Point academy in 1818, but did not 
accept it. He removed to the Genesee valley with his brother Campbell in 
1818, and ahvays continued to live there. His wife, Maria Driosbach, was the 
daughter of a Dutch military officer, who was at one time commandant of the 
important fortress of Bei'gen-op-Zoom. She died in August, 1864. 



50 THE HAEEIS EECOED. 

Stephen Harris (XVIII 34) was educated at the Chester county academy, 
and was graduated in 1819 as "M.D." of the University of Pennsylvania. He 
lived nearly all his life in the house in which his father and grandfather had 
lived, lea-\ang it a year before his death to remove to Philadelphia. He was an 
able physician, and a man greatly revered and beloved in the community in 
which he spent his life. He was an elder in the East Wliiteland Presbyterian 
church, which was built almost entirely by his exertions, and largely by his con- 
tributions of money. 

His wife, Marianne Smith, born April 2, 1805, died March 12, 1890, was 
a daughter of Joseph Smith, an iron and shipping merchant of Philadelphia, 
and Mary Frazer. Joseph Smith's father was Colonel Robert Smith, of the 
Revolution, and Mary Frazer's father was Colonel Persifor Frazer, who, also, 
was a Revolutionary officer. 

Jean Christie (XYIII 35). Her husband, Joseph Pearce, born June 9, 
1780, was a son of Cromwell Pearce and Margaret Boggs. Cromwell Pearce 
was born in Kila^vdllan, Ireland, December 2, 1733. He served as lieutenant 
in General Forbes' expedition to Pittsburg, his commission being dated May 
8, 1758. He was in the army during the Revolutionary war, being com- 
missioned major May 6, 1777, and colonel Fifth Battalion, Chester county 
militia May 20, 1779. He died in "Willistown August 4, 1794. His wife, 
Margaret Boggs, born 1730, died December 28, 1818. 

Joseph Pearce's brother, Cromwell, was also an officer of the United States 
army, rising in the war of 1812-15 to the rank of colonel of the Sixteenth 
regiment, United States infantry. He was born August 13, 1772, and died 
in Chester coimty April 2, 1852. 

Joseph Pearce lived in West AVhiteland to\\aiship, Chester county, till 
his appointment by Governor Shultze as Register of Wills for Chester county, 
January, 1824, when he removed to West Chester, the county seat, where he 
died April 11, 1828. After his death his wife returned to her mother's home 
in East Whiteland. 

Joseph Mackelduff (XVIII 37) was a man of large property and of con- 
siderable prominence in his section of Chester county, being sometimes called 
"King of Brandywine ]\Ianor." His first wife, Rachel McClure, was born April 
20, 1795, and died December 17, 1826. She and the husband of his sister, 
Eliza, were sister and brother. His second wife was the daughter of his aunt, 



GENERATION XVIII. 51 

Hannah Harris. The Mackeldnffs were and are Presbyterians, and are among 
the principal supporters of the BrandyM'ine Manor Presbyterian church. 

EKzabeth Mackelduff (XVIII 38). Her husband, John McClure, son of 
Joseph McClure and Martha Thompson, of Uwchlan, Chester county, Pennsyl- 
vania, was born July 26, 1791, died February 9, 1873. After his first wife's 
death he married her first cousin, Elizabeth Mackelduff, daughter of Samuel 
Mackelduff. She was born January 23, 1794, and died December 15, 1867. 
By the second mamage there were three children — Elizabeth M., John, Jr., 
and Samuel M. McClure. 

John McClure was a farmer and a woolen manufacturer. He retired from 
business after having acquired a competence. He was an elder in the Brandy- 
wine Manor Presbyterian church, which contains a Avindow dedicated to his 
memory. 

E ]jzabe th_Calbraith (XVIII 40). Her husband, John Haman, was born 
March 27, 1786, in Kent county, Maryland. His father was Samuel Ham- 
mond, who emigrated from Bellesharry, Ireland, about 1776, and settled in 
Kent county, Maryland, where he married Maria Bryan, a native of that county. 
Besides their son John, they had a daughter Jane. 

It is not known whj' John changed his surname to Haman, but his descend- 
ants have retained the changed spelling, with the exception of his son, John 
Harris Hammond (XIX 131), who resumed the earlier spelling, which form 
continues to be used by his children. 

John Haman, Sr., removed to McVeytown, Pennsylvania, about 1811, be- 
came a merchant and married, and January 29, 1866, died there. 

Xancy Calbraith (XVIII 41). Her husband, Augustine Wakefield, born 
January 10, 1792, was from Chester county. He died March 10, 1869. They 
were married by Rev. James Woods, of McVeytown. 

Julianna Calbraith (XVIII 42). Her husband, William Swanzey, was 
from Centre county, Pennsylvania. 

Jean_Calbraith (XVIII 43) was taken at an early age by her "Aunt Xancy" 
— Agnes Harris (XVII 15) to be a daughter in place of her only child who ^vas 
two years younger, and who had died. When she gTew to womanhood Thomas 
Hutchinson Avas an aspirant for her hand, but her adoptive mother did not smile 
on him, and summoned to her aid her nephcAv, Joseph Mackelduff (XVIII 37), 
then a widower. Joseph solved the difficulty by winning his cousin for him- 
self. They were married at McVeytown by Rev. James Woods. 



52 THE HAKEIS KECOED. 

George Harris Calbraith (XVIII 44) was a contractor in comfortable cir- 
cumstances, having inherited a considerable body of lands from his father. He 
lived, first, on the Mattawanna farms, near McVeytown, Pennsylvania, and 
afterward in Cecil coimty, Maryland. His wife was a daughter of Reuben 
Reynolds and Henrietta Cromwell, of Rising Sun, Cecil county, Maryland, who 
was a lineal descendant of the Protector Oliver Cromwell, being seven genera- 
tions distant from him. Slie died August 12, 1863. 

Hannah Calbraith (XYIII 45). Her husband, Michael Creswell, was an 
ironmaster. He had a furnace a short distance north of McYeytown. They 
were married by Rev. James Woods, of McYeytown. 

After his wife's death, Michael Creswell married Miss Jackson, of Hunt- 
ingdon, Pennsylvania. 



QENEEATION XIX. 



53 



GENERATION XIX. 



INPEX 














NO. 


MEMBER OF FAMILY. 


CONSORT. 


BIRTH. 


MARRIAGE. 


DEATH. 


RESIDENCE. 


The Children of Cathaeine Harris Shiell (XVIII 1) and 


Thomas Bodley. 


XIX 














1 


Harry Innes Bodley. 


Sarah Gist Bledsoe. 


Sep. 28, 1804. 


Nov. 22, 1826. 


Jan. 7, 1883. 


Kirkwood, Mo. 


2 


William Stewart 














Bodley. 


Ellen Pearce. 


June 7,1806. 


Mar. 12, 1835 


Apr. 8, 1877. 




3 


Anne Isabella Bodley. 


William Henry Hurst. 


Aug. 20, 1807. 


Mar. 24, 1830. 


Apr. 3, 1853. 


Vicksburg, Miss. 


4 


Hugh Shiell Bodley. 


never married. 


Nov. 13, 1809. 




July 6, 1835 


Vicksburg, Miss. 


5 


Maria Innes Bodley. 


Edward Bentley 














Church. 


Oct. 19, 1811. 


Mar. 8,1833. 


Mch. 5,1883. 


Louisville, Ky. 


6 


John Fowler Bodley. 


Sarah Hannah 














Reading. 


Oct. 25,1814. 


June 11, 1836. 


Sep. 22,1853. 




7 


James Breckenridge 

Bodley. 




Sep. 12,1816. 




June 15, 1&33. 




8 


Catharine Elizabeth 


Erasmus Boyle 












Bodley. 


Owsley. 


Mch. 27, 1818. 


May 22, 1842. 


Oct. 8, 1886. 




9 


Thomas Bodley. 


Julia Ann McCabe. 


Mch. 19, 1821. 


Nov. 6,18.56. 


Sep. 17, 1878. 




10 


Charles Scott Todd 














Bodley. 


Prances Price Curd. 


Jan. 5, 1823. 


Nov. 7, 1844. 


Oct. 11, 1809. 




11 


Ellen Piudell Bodley. 


George Henry Gill. 


Dec. 24, 1824. 


Apr. 13, 1859. 




Kirkwood, Mo. 


12 


George Wallace 














Jones Bodley. 


never married. 


Mch. 27, 1827. 




Sep. 1855. 




The Children of Maria Knox Innes (XVIII 2) 


and John Harris Todd (XVIII 10). 


13 


Harry Innes Todd. 


Jane Ballinger 














Davidson. 


Sep. 6, 1818. 


Aug. 20, 1839. 


May 12, 1891. 


Frankfort, Ky. 


14 


Elizabeth Anne Todd. 


William Henry 














Watson. 


May 8,1820. 


Mar. 29, 1842. 


May 15, 1898. 


Frankfort, Ky. 


15 


Thomas Todd. 




Jan. 15, 1822. 




Oct. 10,1823. 




16 


Catharine Lucy Todd. 


Thomas L. Crittenden. 


June 20, 1824. 


Oct. 19,1842. 


Mch. 13, 1895. 




The Children of Maria Knox Innes (XVIII 


2) and John Jo 


SDON CRITTEND 


EN. 


17 


John Jordon 














Crittenden. 


never married. 


Aug. 16, 1830. 




Oct. 6, 1854. 




18 


Eugene Wilkinson 














Crittenden. 


Laura Bacon. 


July 1, 1832. 


Sep. 13,1855. 


Aug. 1,1874. 




The Children of Mary Hanna (XV 


II 3) AND Samu 


EL Spotts. 




19 1 Harry Innes Spotts. 


Jane Pearce Tunstali. 


Nov. 9,1819. 




Mar. 5,1864. 




20 


James Hanna Spotts. 


Elizabeth Harper 

Tunstali. 


Mar. 11, 1822. 




Mar. 9,1882. 




21 


Mary B. Spotts. 


George Triplett. 


1824. 






St. Joseph, Mo. 



54 



THE HAEEI8 RECORD. 



GENERATION XIX. 



MEMBER OF FAMILY. 



MARRIAGE. 



RESIDENCE. 



The Children of Sophia Hanna (XVIII 5) and Wilson Merrill. 



XIX 
22 
23 



Mary Merrill. 
Madge Merrill. 



St. Joseph, Mo. 



The Children of Charles Stewart Todd (XVIII 8) and Letitia Shelby. 



24 


Elizabeth Richards 














Todd. 


Robert H. Rnssel. 


Apr. 17, 1817. 


Jan. 11, 1837. 


Nov. 4,1884. 


Marble Falls, Tex. 


25 


Isaac Shelby Todd. 


Sarah Wilson. 


Dec. 25, 1818. 


Jan. 26, 1847. 


Dec. 23, 1888. 


Louisville, Ky. 


20 


Thomas Todd. 


I. Jaue Smith. 
II. Susan Hampton 
Jacobs. 
III. Bettie D. Bonney. 


Dec. 1, 1820. 


I.Jan. 14,1841. 

II. Oct. 21,1851. 
III. May 10, 1860. 






27 


Susanna Hard Todd. 




July 16, 1822. 




Jan. 13, 1825. 




28 


Sarah Shelby Todd. 


I. Finlev W. Wall. 
II. E. A. Hathaway. 


Jan. 13,1825. 


I. Aug. 22, 1848. 
II. June 6,1854. 


Sep. 1, 1901. 


Owensboro, Ky. 


29 


John Harris Todd. 




Sep. 28,1826. 




Aug. 29, 1852. 




30 


Charles Stewart Todd. 




Oct. 7, 1828. 




May 31, 18.32. 




31 


Henry Clay Todd. 




Sep. 5, 1830. 




May 30, 1832. 




32 


Letitia Shelby Todd. 


John H Carter. 


Dec. 10, 1882. 


Oct. 20, 1855. 


June 22, 1892. 


New Orleans,La. 


33 


Anne Maria Todd. 




Noy. 13, 1834. 




Sep. 13,1835. 




34 


Virginia Shelby Todd. 


Daniel M. Griflflth. 


Nov. 16, 1836. 


Oct. 14, 1857. 


Aug. 9, 1883. 


Owensboro, Ky. 


35 


Charles Henry Todd. 


Rosa Burwell. 


Nov. 6,1838. 


Feb. 15, 1865. 




Owensboro, Ky. 



The Children of Anna Maria Todd (XVIII 111 and Edward Lyne Starling. 



36 


Lyne Starling. 


I. Miriam Dillon. 
II. Anna B. Wallner. 
III. Mary H. Allisoo. 


Aug. 23, 1818. 


I. July 8,1839. 

II. June 13, 1843. 

HI. Apr. 29,1846. 


Nov. 2.5, 1851. 


Henderson, Ky. 


37 


Thonaas Todd StarUng. 




May 20, 1820. 




July 22, 1821. 




38 


Sarah Carneal 














Starling. 


Henry Lyne. 


Feb. 11, 1823. 


June 2, 1849. 


Apr. 23. 1859. 




39 


Jane Davidson 

Starling. 




Oct. 31, 1824. 




Feb. 27, 1840. 




40 


Elizabeth Todd 

Starling. 




June 11, 1826. 




Sep. 19,1841. 




41 


William Starling. 




Nov. 30, 1827. 




Oct. 29,1850. 




42 


Charles Todd Starling. 


Maria J. Tunstall. 


Sep. 22, 1829. 


Feb. 27, 1851. 




Henderson, Ky. 


43 


Susanna Lyne 

Starling. 




Sep. 6, 1834. 




Sep. 13,1852. 




44 


Ann Maria Starling. 




Aug. 6,1837. 




Apr. 20, 1838. 




45 


Lucy Bell Starling. 




July 28, 1839. 




Jan. 12,1840. 




46 


Edward Lyne Starling. 




June 10, 1841. 




July 12, 1841. 





OENEBAXION XIZ. 



55 



GENERATION XIX. 



MEMBER OF FAMILY. 



MARRIAGE. 



RESIDENCE. 



The Children of William Stewart Harris (XVIII 16) and Charlotte Martin. 



XIX 

47 
48 
49 



William Harris. 
Sarah Harris. 
John Harris. 



Oct. 30, 1838. 



The Children of John Harris (X'VTII 17) and Lucy Buck. 



Innes Todd Harris. 
Pendleton Harris. 



The Children of Thomas Harris (XVIII 19) and Catharine Smith. 



52 


Thomas Harris. 




Mar. 20, 1814. 




Sep. 22, 1825. 




53 


Jackson Harris. 




Oct. 8, 1819. 




July 3, 1822. 




54 


Mary Harris. 


John G. Culton. 


Nov. 29, 1823. 


Apr. 5, 1849. 


June 14, 1852. 


West Pikeland, Pa. 


55 


Martha Harris. 


Antrim P. Morgan. 


Oct. 24,1825. 


Dec. 31, 1846. 


Mar. 10, 1898. 


Near Quaker- 
town, Pa. 



The Children of Malachi Harris (XVIII 20) and Ann Neiler. 



Martha Harris. 

Mary Ann Harris. Cyrus R. Llewellyn. 

Esther Bowen Harris, never married. 



Mar. 23, 1817. 
Feb. 27, 1819. 
Apr. 23, 1821. 



Jan. 4, 1844. 



Dec. 3, 1820. 
Dec. 4, 1896. 



W. Pikeland, Pa. 
W. Pikeland, Pa. 



The Children of John Harris (XVIII 24) and Hannah Hoskins. 



59 


Thirza Bowen Harris. 


John Harvey. 


Dec. 18, 1820. 






Utah. 


60 


John Harris. 


Rebecca Stott. 


Sep. 30, 1823. 


June 12, 1845. 


Oct. 3. 1S9C. 


Eastern Shore, Md. 


61 


Martha. E. Harris. 


Levi B. Shellady. 


Mar. 24, 1826. 




Dec. 14, 1860. 


Philadelphia, Pa. 


62 


Malachi Harris. 


Elizabeth McClure. 


Jan. 28, 1830. 






Malvern, Pa. 


63 


Thomas Bowen 














Cadwallader Har.-is. 


Sarah A. Mclntyre. 


Jan. 21, 1836. 


Apr. 25, 1867. 


Dec. 22, 1872. 


Malvern, Pa. 



56 



THE HARRIS RECORD. 
GENERATION XIX. 



MEUBER OF FAUtLY. 



MABRIAGE. 



BGSIDENCE. 



The Children of Mary Harris (XVIII 25) and John Sloan. 



XIX 














64 


John Harris Sloan. 


never married. 


Nov. 10, 1808. 




1842. 




65 


James Sloan. 


Mary Anne Reese. 


Oct. 6, 1810. 


Dec. 29, 1842. 


Apr. 9, 1893. 


Port Kennedy, Pa. 


66 


Thomas Sloan. 


Harriet Seely. 


Feb. 17, 1814. 


Feb. 20, 1845. 


Jan. 20, 1874. 


Louisville, Ky. 


67 


Annie Sloan. 


Thomas Marshall Zell. 


Sep. 18,1816. 


1850. 


June 19, 1894. 




68 


MalEiChi Wilson Sloan. 


I. Elizabeth L. 














Shaw. 


Aug. 18, 1818. 


I. Mar. 27, 1837. 


Aug. 16, 1881. 


Delaware Co., Pa. 






II. Annie Morley. 




II. About 1862. 










III. ElizabethMoore 














Lukens. 




III. 1865. 






69 


Isaac Olirer Sloan. 


never married. 


Oct. 10, 1820. 




Oct. 27, 1899. 


Philadelphia, Pa. 


70 


Lemuel Sloan. 




Mar. 24, 1823. 




Oct. 21, 1823. 




71 


Mary Sloan. 




July 31, 1824. 




Sep. 24,1824. 




72 


Mary Sloan. 


never married. 


Sep. 8. 1826. 






Philadelphia, Pa. 


73 


Andrew Jackson 














Sloan. 


I. Mary W. Potter. 
II. Frances Cooper 

Burrows. 


Mar. 24,1829. 


I. 1855. 
II. Apr. 9,1874. 




Philadelphia, Pa. 


74 


George Washington 














Sloan. 


Anne Henry Ludlow. 


Mar. 25, 1832. 


Dec. 10, 1858. 




Philadelphia, Pa. 


75 


Samuel Grant Sloan. 


Eleanor Chandler 














Johnson. 


June 30, 1834. 


Aug. 29, 1861. 




St. Paul, Minn. 



The Children of Campbell Harris (XVIII 28) and Jane Lee. 



76 


Francis Lee Harris. 


I. Mary Mather. 
II. Mary Fisher 

Harris 
XIX 91. 
HI. Sarah Leiper 

Kaue. 


1809. 


I. 1835. 
II. May 13,1851. 

HI. 1855. 


Feb. 23, 1876. 


New York City. 


77 


Mary Harris. 


Sanford A. Hooper. 


Aug. 17, 1811. 


June 30, 1840. 


Jan. 15,1875. 


Belle Plain, Minn. 


78 


Ellen Brick Harris. 


John Young. 


Sep. 7, 1813. 


Oct. 21, 1833. 


Apr. 26, 1872. 


Geneseo, N. Y. 


79 


Jane Lee Harris. 




1815. 




Jan. 11, 1823. 




80 


Sarah Harris. 




Not. 1817. 




1818. 




81 


William Harris. 




Oct. 8, 1820. 




Dec. 1823. 




82 


Ann D. Harris. 


James Wood. 


May 8,1822. 


June 30, 1817. 


Nov. 14, 1871. 


Geneseo, N. Y. 



The Children of Thomas Harris (XVIII 29) and Jane Phillips Hodgdon. 



Mary Campbell 

Harris 
William Augustus 

Harris 
Elizabeth Hodgdon 

Harris 
Thomas Cadwallader Mary Louisa 

Harris, 
Charles Morris 

Bainbridge Harris 



John Thomas Beale 

Dorsey. 



Lizzie Taylor. 

Peter Vivian Daniel. 
iry Louisa 
Bainbridge Jaudon. 

Amelia Gantt Bowie. 



Oct. 10. 1820. 
May 4, 1822. 
Feb. 10, 1824. 
Nov. 14, 1825. 
Oct. 3, 1827. 



Jan. 


11,1849. 




1854. 




1853. 


Mar 


1,1859. 


Jan. 


24, 1867. 



Feb. 15, 1852. 
Oct. 25, 1881. 
1857. 
Jan. 24,1875. 
Jan. 8, 1901. 



Ellicott Mills, Md. 
Baltimore, Md. 
Richmond, Va. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
Washington, D. C 



GENERATION XIX. 
GENERATION XIX. 



57 



MEMEEK OF FAMILY. 



MAItRIAGE. 



KESIDENCH. 





The Children of Wii-liam Hakkis IXVIII 32) and Elizabeth 


Matilda Patterson. 


XIX 

88 


Emma Ewing Harris. 


Nathan D. Benedict. 


.Jan. 27. 1821. 


Apr. 25, 1844. 


.Ian. 30. 1903. 


Philadelphia, Pa. 


89 


liobert Patterson 














Harris. 


never married. 


Nov. 1.5, 1822. 




Feb. 20. 1899. 


Philadelphia, Pa. 


90 


John Campbell Harris. 




May 3,1824. 




.lune 30, 1841. 


Philadelphia, Pa. 


91 


Mary Fislier Harris. 


Francis Lee Harris. 














XIX 76. 


Nov. 27, 1826. 


May 13, 1851. 


Sep. 21,1853. 


New York City. 


92 


Matilda Moor<^ Harris. 


Isaac Oliver Blight. 


Apr. 24, 1829. 


Apr. 18,1854. 




Towanda, Pa. 


93 


William Harris. 


Christina Van Alen 














Butler. 


Dec. 20, 1831. 


May 24,1864. 


Mar. 23, 1885. 


Princeton, N. J. 



The Children of James B.\iley Harris (XVIII 33) and Maria Dbiesbach. 



94 James B. Harri 



never married. 



Dec. 1839. 



July 1899. iGeneseo, N. Y. 

I 



The Children of Stephen Harris (XVIII 34) and Marianne Smith. 



98 


Stephen Harris. 


Catharine McArthur. 


May 23, 1834. 


Mar. 10,1863. 


Mar. 10, 1874. 


Pottsville, Pa. 


99 


Joseph Smith Harris. 


I. Delia Silliman 










100 




Brodhoad. 


Apr. 29, 1836. 


I. June 20, 186.5. 




Philadelphia, Pa. 


101 




II. Emily Eliza Potts. 




II. Apr. 27,1882. 






102 




III. Anna Zelia Potts. 




III. Oct. 19,1806. 






103 


Martha Frazer 














Harris. 


Ilenry Chester Parry. 


May 24 1838. 


May 17,1870. 




Augusta, Ga. 




John Campbell Harris. 


ilary Powers. 


Apr. 10. 1840. 


Oct. 21,1869. 




Philadelphia, Pa. 




Frazer Harris. 




Nov. 12, 1841. 




Apr. 19, 1859. 




95 


Mary Campbell 












96 


Harris. 
William Harris. 
Emma Vaughan 

Harris. 




July 16, 1843. 
Feb. 15. 1845. 

Auff. 17, 1846. 




June 18, 1866. 
Mar. 8,1845. 

Dec. 19, 1849. 




97 


Thomas Harris. 




Dec. 23, 1848. 




July 15, 1851. 







The 


Children of Jean 


Christie (XVIII 


35) AND Jose 


pii Pearce. 




104 Thomas Harris 


I. Elizabeth C. 




i 




Pcarce. 


.Tones. 


Dec. 29, 1805. ] 


.Oct. 1G,182S. Nov. 21, 1802. 


Yorlc, Pa. 




II. Ann E. Beatty. 


I 


.Mar. 10, 1840.1 




105 Cromwell Pearce. 


Margaretta Jones. 


Dec. 29, 1805. 


Feb. 26, 1828. i Mar. 5, 1830. 


Bast Whiteland. Pa. 


106 Margaret Poarce. 


never married. 


June 26, 1809. 




Mar. 21, 1864. 


West Chester, Pa. 


107 .\nthoDy Wayne 














Pearce. 




Oct. 24, 1811. 




Jan. 16,1815. 




108 


George Washington 














Pearce. 


Ann Elizabeth Kerns. 


Jan. 15, 1814. 


Jan. 2, 1850. 


Apr. 13, 1864. 


West Chester, Pa. 


109 


Ann Eliza Pearce. 


never married. 


May 29, 1816. 




Jan. 8, 1892. 


West Chester, Pa. 


110 


Harriet Porter Pearce. 


never married. 


Apr. 21, 1820. 




Nov. 1901. 


West Chester, Pa. 



58 



THE HAERIS RECOED. 



GENERATION XIX. 



INDEX 
NO. 



MEMBER OF FAMILY. 



BESIDENCE. 



The Children of Mary Mackeldvff (XVIII 36) and William Long. 



XIX 

111 



112 
113 



114 



William Loiig. 



Joseph M. Long. 
John Harris Long 



Elizabeth Ann Long. 



1806. 



Penina Hutchinson. lApr. 7.1808. I June 1,1829. 
Isabella Ralston Grier. Mar. 14, 1810. Feb. 11, 1834. 



William M.Buchaaan. 



July 18, 1812. 



Dec. 8, 1836. 



May 1823. 



Aug. 30. 1885. 
Feb. 29. 1852. 



Feb. 21, 1841. 



Brandywine Manor, 
Pa. 

West Chester, Pa. 

Brandywine Manor, 
Pa. 

Brandywine Manor, 
Pa. 



The Children of Joseph Mackelduff (XVIII 37) and Rachel McClube. 



115 James Harris 

Mackelduff. 

116 Elizabeth Mackelduff. 



July 21, 1818. 
Dec. 31. 1819. 



June 5,1820. 
Mar. 9 1821. 



The Children of Joseph Mackelduff (XA'III 37) and Jean Calbraith (XVIII 43). 



117 


Joseph Davis 














Mackelduff. 


Mary Munholland. 


Apr. 9.1830. 


Mar. 17, 1863. 


Feb. 27, 1880. 


Brandywine Manor, 


118 


George Calbraith 

Mackelduff. 




Aug. 16 1832. 




Sep. 2, 1832. 


Pa 


119 


Hannah Emily 

Mackelduff. 




July 28, 1833. 




Oct. 3, 1839. 




120 


Eliza Jane Mackelduff. 


James Grier McClure. 


Nov. 2,1835. 


Jan. 30, 1868. 






121 


Harriet Calbraith 

Mackelduff. 




Jan. 28, 1838. 




Feb. 18. 1845. 




122 


Samuel Calbraith 

Mackelduff. 




Mar. 4,1841. 








123 


William Harris 














Mackelduff. 


Deborah Thomas. 


June 20. 1843. 


June 25, 1868. 


May 28, 1894. 


Philadelphia, Pa. 


124 


Emma Mary 

Mackelduff. 




Mar. 7, 1846. 




Dec. 31, 1855. 





The Children of Elizabeth Mackelduff (XVIII 38) and John McClube. 



125 

126 



Joseph Mackelduff 

McClure. 
James McClure. 



Henrietta McConnell. 
Francina 

Carmichael Buun 



Apr. 22, 1819. 
Aug. 31, 1821. 



July 3, 1856. 
May 15, 1842. 



Nov. 19, 1878. 
Aug. 8, 1861. 



Milford Mills, Pa. 
Wayneburg, Pa. 



GENEEATION XIX. 
GENERATION XIX. 



59 



MEMBER OF FAMILY. 



MARRIAGE. 



RESIDENCE. 





The Cuildren of Elizabeth Calbraith 


(XVIII 40) AND 


John Haman. 




XIX 1 












127 Hannah Maria 














Haman. 


William Macklin. 


Sep. 28,1820. 


Feb. 10, 1848. 


Feb. 11,1892. 


McVeytown, Pa. 


12S 


Samuel Haman. 


Henrietta M. Smith. 


Nov. 16, 1822. 


Feb. 3, 18.53. 


18S0. 


Cedar Rapids, la. 


129 


Jane Calbraitti 














Haman. 


George W. McBridc. 


Apr. 8, 1825. 


Dec. 25, 1851. 


Apr. 4, 1000. 


McVeytown, Pa 


130 : Nancy Calbraith 












1 Haman. 
131 [John Harris 

Hammond. 


Richard H. Morrow. 


Feb. 18, 1828. 


Sep. 2, 185(5. 




Altoona, Pa. 


Lizzie Snyder. 


May 21, 1834. 


Oct. 20, 18(i7. 


Nov., 1890. 


Budora, Kas. 


132 George Calbraitli 












Haman. 


Louisa Wolt. 


Jan. 22, 1838. 


June 11, 1861. 




Cedar Rapids, la. 



The Children of Nancv Calbraith (XVIII 41) and Augustine Wakefield. 



! 1 
133 Rebecca Jane Reuben T. 








1 


1 Wakefield, i Applebaugh. 


Mar. 18, 1834. 


Dec. 26, 1855. 


Oct. 


2, 1902. ;Culver, Kas. 


134 George Calbraith 












■ Wakefield, never married. 


Dec. 6, 1835. 




Apr., 


1887. 




135 Hannah Elizabeth i 












1 Wakefield. John Stine. 


Nov. 29, 1839. 


May 20, 1875. 








136 Nancy Wakefield. Amor William 












j Wakeiield. 


Jan. 4,1844. 


May 13, 1868. 


Nov., 


1899. 


Culver, Kas. 



The Children of Julianna Calbraith (XVIII 42) and William Swanzey. 



137 lAnu EHzabeth 

Swanzey. 

138 George Calbraith 

I Swauzey. 

139 jWilliamH. Swanzey. 



Sep. 19,1831. 

Nov. 4, 1832. 
I.^abella May 

Wakefield.! Apr. 12,1834. Jan. 16.1856. 



July 7. 1847. 
Nov. 23, 1833. 
Aug. 22, 1902. 



Minneapolis, Kas. 



The Children of George Harris Calbraith (XVIII 44) and Maria Reynolds. 



—140 

141 

142 
143 


Henrietta Cromwell 

Calbraith. 
George Harris 

Calbraith. 
Francis Calbraith. 
Henry Clay Calbraith. 


Robert A. Clarke. 


July 5, 1845. 

Sep. 14, 1817. 
May 15,1849. 
Jan. 15,1852. 


May 


9, 1867. 


Sep. 25, 1847. 
Jan. 21, 1850. 
Mar. 23, 1852. 


McVeytown 


Pa. 



The Children of Hannah Calbraith (XVIII 45) and Michael Creswell. 



144 J. Creswell. 



About 1836. 



60 THE HARRIS RECORD. 

Hugh Shiell Bodley (XIX 4) was a physician of Vicksburg, Mississippi. 
Seventy j^ears ago, Vicksburg, one of the principal towns on the lower Mis- 
sissippi river, and a place of call for all boats doing business on that great chan- 
nel of commerce, had become a favorite haunt of gamblers. It was so well 
knovm to be terrorized by them and their ^acious allies that business men from 
other parts of the country shunned the place. 

Feeling that the city's good name and its business prosperity were alike 
being destroyed, the citizens determined to drive out the objectionable element 
of their population, and appointed a committee to compel the whole fraternity 
of gamblers to leave the place. Dr. Bodley, who was captain of the local mili- 
tary company, was the leading spirit of the committee. The first house raided 
had been a private dwelling, and it had but one narrow entrance door, so that 
the attacking party were obliged to enter it in single file. Dr. Bodley, saying 
that he would not send his men where he feared to lead them, was the first man 
to enter the house, and was shot dead as he crossed the threshold. The citizens 
of Vicksburg erected a monument to his memory, which bears this inscription : 

Erected by 
a grateful community 

to the memory of 

Dr. Hugh S. Bodley, 

Murdered by the gamblers 

July 5, 1835, 

while defending the morals 

of Vicksburg. 

Maria Innes Bodley (XIX 5). Her husband, Edward B. Church, was a 
physician of Louisville, Kentucky. 

Harry Innes Todd (XIX 13) inherited the energy of his grandfather. 
Judge Harry Innes, for whom he was named. 

His business career began as a clerk on one of the steamboats plying be- 
tween Louisville and New Orleans, and later in life he owned and commanded 
a mtmber of steamboats which ran on the Ohio and Kentucky rivers, and which 
were very successful. 

He was a staunch LTnion man, and did much at the outbreak of the Civil 
war in 1861 to influence members of tlie Kentucky legislature to keep the 
state loyal to the government. 

He was elected to the legislature from Franklin county in 1876, and was 
largely instrumental in the passage of what was known as the Kuklux law. 



GENERATION XIX. 61 

The law promptly put an end to the illegal and outrageous practices which at 
one time terrorized many districts of the Southern states. 

His wife, Jane Ballinger Davidson, was a daughter of Colonel James 
Davidson. She was born September 9th, 1820. 

Catharine Lucy Todd (XIX 16). Her husband, Thomas L. Crittenden, 
was a son of United States Senator John Jordon Crittenden by his first wife, 
and was born at Kussellville, Kentucky, about 1819. He first served as a pri- 
vate in the Kentucky volunteers in 1836. In the Mexican war he reached 
the rank of a brigadier-general of volunteers, and he was a major-general of 
volunteers in the Civil war. He was appointed lieutenant-colonel. Thirty- 
second United States infantry, July 28, 1866, and was brevetted brigadiei-- 
general for services at the battle of Stone river, Tennessee. He retired from 
the service May 19, 1881, and died October 23, 1893. 

John Jordon Crittenden (XIX 17) died soon after his graduation at the 
Medical school in Philadelpliia. 

Eugene Wilkinson Crittenden (XIX 18) entered the United States army 
as second lieutenant, First Cavalry, March 3, 1855. He rose to the rank of 
major. Fifth Cavalry, July 28, 1866. 

James Hanna Spotts (XIX 20) entered the United States navy August 2, 
1837, held during the Civil war the rank of commander, and was appointed 
rear-admiral May 28, 1881. 

Mary E. Spotts (XIX 21). Her husband, George Triplett, was of Frank- 
fort, Kentucky. 

Elizabeth Kichards Todd (XIX 24). Her husband, Eobert H. Eussell, 
was an officer of the Confederate states in the Civil war. He died in 1863, 
and was buried at Vicksburg, Mississippi. His wife died suddenly in the rail- 
way cars at San Antonio, Texas, as she was starting for her home at Marble 
Falls, Texas. She was buried in San Antonio. 

Isaac Shelby Todd (XIX 25) lived on the old Todd place, "Stockdale," as 
a farmer till I860, when he removed to Louisville, Kentucky, where he en- 
gaged in mercantile pursuits. In 1882 he removed to Anchorage, Kentucky, 
where he died. His wife, Sarah Wilson, died in 1874, He was buried in 
Cave Hill cemetery, Louisville. He was a prominent man in the community 
in which he lived. 



62 THE HARRIS KECOBD. 

Thomas Todd (XIX 26) was born, and has always lived at *'Stockdale," the 
Todd farm, which was jiatented by his grandfather. General Isaac Shelby, in 
April, 1776. He commanded, during the Mexican war, a company from 
Shelby county, Company I in the Third Kentucky A-olunteers, of which John 
C. Breckenridge, afterward Vice-President of the United States, 1857-1861, 
was major. 

Captain Todd has represented his county in the state legislature, and has 
always taken an active part in public affairs. For thirty years he has been the 
chairman of the county republican committee. 

In 1854 he was elected Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Masons of 
Kentucky, and he is the oldest li\'ing Past Grand Master in the state. 

He is still a vigorous man, tall and erect, still farms his ancestral acres, and 
is a man of influence and greatly esteemed in the community in which he is so 
widely known. His first wife, Jane Smith, died October 16, 18-45. His second 
wife, Susan Jacobs, died September 3, 1853, leaving no children. 

Susanna Hard Todd (XIX 27) died in early childhood of scarlet fever. 

Sarah Shelby Todd (XIX 28). Her first husband, Finley W. Wall, was 
a lawyer. He died February 7, 1852. Her second husband, E. A. Hathaway, 
was a merchant of Owensboro, Kentucky. He died February 23, 1897. She 
spent all her married life in Owensboro, Kentucky. She died at the house 
of her youngest daughter, Mrs. James M. Green (XX 131), in Hopkins%'ille, 
Kentucky. She and her two husbands were buried in Elmwood cemetery, 
Owensboro. 

John Harris Todd (XIX 29) received the degree of "A.M." from Centre 
college, Danville, Kentucky, in 1850. He was graduated also in law, and 
settled at Owensboro, Kentucky. He was attorney of Daviess coimty, Ken- 
tucky, at the time of his death. He died of typhoid fever, and was buried in 
the Todd lot in Elmwood cemetery, Owensboro. 

Charles Stewart Todd, Henry Clay Todd and Anne Maria Todd (XIX 30, 
31 and 33) all died of scarlet fever. 

Letitia Shelby Todd (XIX 32). Her husltaud, John H. Carter, was born 
in Amherst county, Virginia, and died May, 1893, in New Orleans, Louisiana, 
where he was a prominent physician. He had been a practitioner of medicine 
for more than fifty years. He and his wife were buried in Xe\\' Orleans. 

Virginia Shelby Todd (XIX 34). Her husband, Diuiiel M. Griffith, was 
a resident of Owensboro, Kentucky, where he was born February 28, 1826, 



GENERATION XIX. 63 

and died November 3, 1893. lie was one of the most prominent citizens of 
the town. He and his wife are buried in Elmwood cemetery, Owensboro. 

Charles Henry Todd (XIX 35) was born at "Stockdale," Shelby county, 
Kentucky. He received his early education at Frankfort, Kentucky, and re- 
ceived the degree of "M.D." from Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana, 
in January, 1861. In the same year he entered the sei'vice of the Confederate 
states, and served as a surgeon in the army of Northern Virginia during the 
war, being at its close (at Appomattox, April 9, 1865), surgeon of the Thirteenth 
Kegiment of Virginia infantry, attached to "Stonewall Jackson's" corps. 

In May, 1865, he returned from Virginia to Kentucky, riding on horse- 
back the whole distance from Lynchburg to Owensboro, Kentucky, where he 
settled, and where he has since practiced medicine. He was president of the 
Kentucky State Medical society in 1879, on the occasion of the unveiling at 
Danville, Kentucky, of a monument erected by the physicians of Kentucky to 
the memory of Ephraim McDowell, the renowned ovariotomist, whose wife was 
an aunt of Dr. Todd, being a daughter of Governor Isaac Shelby. Dr. Todd 
has been for twenty years the president of the Owensboro Medical society. 
He married shortly before the termination of the Civil war, Kosa, youngest 
child of William A. Burwell, of Bedford county, Virginia, and Frances Steptoe. 
She was born December 19, 1845. 

Lyne Starling (XIX 36) was engaged in mercantile pursuits during his 
short life, which ended when he was 33 years of age. 

His first wife, Miriam Dillon, died January 20, 1841. 

Charles Todd Starling (XIX 42) was educated at Gambler college, Ohio. 
He was an officer for some years of the Circuit and County courts, and later, 
for a number of years, has been, and still is, cashier of the Farmers' bank and 
trust company of Kentucky. He is an elder in the Presbyterian church of 
Henderson, Kentucky. 

He has no children. 

Jackson Harris (XIX 53) was accidentally killed by a stone thrown by a 
boy with whom he was playing. 

Mary Harris (XIX 54). Her husband, John G. Culton, born December 
14, 1809, died August, 1892, was of Montgomery county, Pennsylvania. 

Martha Harris (XIX 55). Her husband, Antrim F. Morgan, was of 
Montgomery county. He died December 24, 1897. Their home was near 
Quakertown, Pennsylvania. 



64 THE HARRIS RECORD. 

Mary Ann Harris (XIX 57), and Esther Bowen Harris (XIX 58), lived on 
the Xcilcr place in Pikeland to^^mship, Chester county, Pennsylvania. The 
husband of Mary Ann Harris, Cyrus R. Lle\vell3-n, was born February 1, 1817, 
and died June 2, 1860. 

Thirza Bowen Harris (XIX 59) was married in Chester county, Pennsyl- 
vania. She and her husband, John Harvey, were carried away by ]\Ionnon 
preaching, and with their large family of children migrated to Xauvoo, Illinois. 
They did not, however, become polygamists. 

There was a John Harvey who the Mormon chiu'ch records say went to 
Utah in 1848. It is possible that this was the husband of Thirza Bowen Harris, 
but nothing is positively known, as the family in the east have entirely lost 
touch with this branch. 

John Harris (XIX GO) was a wood and lumber merchant. He removed 
about 1850 from Chester county to the eastern shore of Chesapeake bay, Mary- 
land. His wife, Rebecca Stott, of West Chester, Pennsylvania, was born De- 
cember 31, 1817, and died Febntary 23, 1849. She was a ^^adow at the time 
of her marriage to John Harris. Her maiden name was Lloyd. 

Martha E. Harris (XIX 01) had no children. Her husband, Levi B. 
Shellady, had a shoe store on Fourth street, above Walnut street, Philadelphia, 
from 1847 to 1853. 

Malachi Harris (XIX 62) inherited the property of his aunt, Esther Harris 
(XVIIT 22), at Malvern, Pennsylvania, and lived there. He had no children. 

Thomas Bowen Cadwallader Harris (XIX 63) was a farmer, who lived 
near Malvern, Pennsylvania. He was born in the house in which his father 
and grandfather were born, and which had been the home of his great-grand- 
father, Thomas Harris (XVI 2), and was the original Harris home in America. 
His wife, Sarah A. Mclntyre, was born July 5, 1840. They were married 
by Rev. Robert M. Patterson, ])astor ni the Gn^at Valley Presbyterian church, 
Chester county, Pennsylvania. 

John Harris Sloan (XIX 64) met his death liy being thrown from a wagon 
in which he was driving on the AVest Chester road, fifteen miles from Philadel- 
phia. 

James Sloan (XIX 65) was a farmer. He lived on the property inherited 
by his wife, Mary Anne Reese, a daughter of Abel and Mary Reese, of Howell- 
ville, Chester county, Peimsylvania. Slic was born September 5, 1819, and 
died October 19, 1877. 



GENERATION XIX. 65 

Thomas Sloan (XIX 66). His wife, Harriet Seely, born August 16, 1820, 
was from Xew York city. They lived there for some years after their marriage, 
but removed about 1849 to Louisville, Kentucky. 

Annie Sloan (XIX 67). Her husband, Thomas Marshall Zell, was of 
Merion, Delaware county, Pennsylvania. He was an assistant to his father-in- 
law, John Sloan, and carried on his business after John Sloan's death. Thomas 
Zell died November 12, 1865. They had no children. 

Malachi Wilson Sloan (XIX 68). His middle name was given in compli- 
ment to his father's pastor, Dr. James Wilson. He was a farmer, who lived in 
Delaware county. He was proprietor of the Lamb tavern in Springfield town- 
ship, Delaware county, Pennsylvania, in 1868, and owned it till his death. His 
first wife, Elizabeth Shaw, born 1818, died March 24, 1853, was a member of 
the Methodist church. His second wife, Annie Morley, bom 1820, died Sep- 
tember 27, 1863, was an English woman, Avho lived but a short time after her 
marriage, and left no children. His third wife, Elizabeth Moore Lukens, born 
March 13, 1837, outlived him, dying April 14, 1894. 

Isaac Oliver Sloan (XIX 69) was graduated at Wasliington and Jefferson 
college, Canonsburg, Pennsylvania; studied theology at Union Theological 
seminary, New York; received license to preach from the Fourth Presbytery 
of Philadelphia, and was ordained in 1856 by the Presbytery of Hanover, Vir- 
ginia. He Avas a missionary in Kent county, Virginia, for four years. His 
first pastoral charge was at Talleysville, Accoinac county, Virginia, where he 
remained till the outbreak of the Civil war. He w'as twice commissioned by 
President Lincoln as chajilain of the field hospitals within the lines of the army 
of the Potomac, and afterward by President Johnson chaplain of the officers' 
hospital in the Naval Buildings, Annapolis, Maryland. After the close of the 
war he went west, and spent the rest of his active life in Minnesota, where he 
reared two churches, and in North Dakota, where he founded three churches. 

Worn out by the hardships of frontier life, he retired from the ministry, 
and returned to Philadelphia, living the remainder of his life with his sister, 
Mary Sloan. 

Mary Sloan (XIX 72) lived mostly with her mother until the death of the 
latter in 1886. She had the charge of the household of her brother, Andi'ew 
Jackson Sloan, for some years after the death of his first wife. Her home is 
now in West Philadelphia. 



66 THE HARRIS RECORD. 

Andrew Jackson Sloan (XIX 73) was a member of the firm of McCallum, 
Crease & Sloan, manufacturers and dealers in carpets, until the dissolution of 
the firm in 1892. He lives in Philadelphia. His first wife, Mary "W. Potter, 
born 1831, died May 28, 1863, was a Philadelphian. His second wife, Frances 
Cooper Burrows, was a daughter of Edward Burrows, of Philadelphia. 

George Washington Sloan (XIX 74) has no children. 

Samuel Grant Sloan (XIX 75) is a real estate agent and conveyancer. He 
lives in St. Paul, Minnesota. His wife, Eleanor Chandler Johnson, bom in 
Ang-usta, Maine, November 23, 1839, was a sister of the artist Eastman John- 
son, of New York, and also a sister of the wife of Rev. Joseph May, D.D., pas- 
tor of the First Unitarian church of Philadelphia. Her parents were Philip C. 
Johnson, born March 11, 1794, and Eleanor Chandler, born October 18, 1795, 
both of Fryeburg, Maine. 

Francis Lee Harris (XIX 76) was born in Chester county, Pennsylvania. 
He received his early education at his father's home in Geneseo, New York, 
and completed it at the Chester county academy, while li^ang with his grand- 
mother, Mary Campbell Harris, at the old Harris homestead in Pennsylvania. 
He studied medicine with his uncle, Stephen Harris (XVHI 34), and received 
the degree of M.D. from the University of Pennsylvania in March, 1832. 

In the summer of that year he traveled extensively through the eastern 
states in company with Mr. Wadsworth, of Geneseo. He commenced the prac- 
tice of medicine in Geneseo, but removed, early in 1834, to Buffalo, New York. 
He was appointed physician to the hospital which was opened that year for the 
reception of cholera patients, when that disease was making its first and most 
fatal visit to America. For services rendered in that capacity he and his 
colleagues were officially thanked by the mayor of Buffalo. 

In the fall of 1840 he was elected coroner of Buffalo. 

His first wife, Mary Mather, whom he married in Buffalo, soon lost her 
health, and in March, 1840, he thought her dying of consumption, which dis- 
ease had proved fatal to her mother and four of her sisters. She, however, 
lived several years longer, dying about October 20, 1847. He was, May 1, 
1848, appointed deputy Health Officer of the Quarantine station, Stat en Island, 
New York, and upon the expiration of that commission he established himself 
in Thirtieth street. New York, where he spent the rest of his life in the practice 
of his profession, in which he made a decided success. 

He was a large man, tall and of a full figure, thoiigh not too stout, a 
courteous and hospitable gentleman, with a copious fund of humor. 



GENEEATION XIX. 67 

His second wife was his cousin, Mary Fisher Harris (XIX 91), and his 
third wife, Sarah Leiper Kane, was a daughter of General Thomas Kane, of 
Philadelphia. She outlived him several years. There were no children by 
either of the later marriages. 

Mary Harris (XIX 77) was born in Chester county, Pennsylvania. She 
was for some years at the head of her father's household, after her mother's 
death. Although a large woman, weighing in her later years 220 pounds, she 
was very active and efficient. 

Her husband, Sanford A. Hooper, was, in 1839, a partner with her father, 
Campbell Harris, in the construction of the Genesee Valley canal. In 1841 
he became the lessee of the farm of his father-in-law in Geneseo, and was Super- 
intendent of the Genesee Valley canal from 1843 to 1845. The family soon 
afterward removed to the west, and were among the pioneers of the state of 
Minnesota. She was a devoted member of the Episcopal church, and herself 
raised nearly all the funds required for the erection of a church edifice in Belle 
Plaine, Minnesota. She gave entertainments, for which her husband said he 
provided the materials; she prepared them, and he and his three sons bought 
the greater part at the sale on the lavra, and presented them to the people of 
the village. She was a much-valued helper to Bishop Whipple in his attempts 
to get a foothold for practical Christian living in that rougli and wild frontier 
community, and Bishop Wells said of the church built throiigh her labors at 
Belle Plaine: "I consider this a model church edifice, and only wish I had three 
such in my diocese." 

Ellen Brick Harris (XIX 78) was born in Chester county, Pennsylvania. 
She was a tall woman, but never inclined to grow stout, as did her sisters. 

Her husband, John Young, was descended from John Young, who 
emigrated from England in 1648 to the Cape Cod settlement in Massachusetts. 
His descendant of the same name was born in 1804 in Chelsea, Vermont, and 
removed with his parents to what was then thought to be the "far West," set- 
tling in Conesus, Ontario county. New York. Here he acquired his education, 
and became, at 15 years of age, a teacher in the village school at Lima, and 
soon after a law student in the office of A. A. Bennett. He was admitted to 
the bar in 1829, and settled in Geneseo, the county seat of Livingston county. 
He soon achieved success in his profession, and was one of the leading lawyers 
in his section of the state. 

He was elected to the state legislature in 1832, and again in 1844 and in 
1845, and became a political leader of the whig party, which, taking advantage 



68 THE HARRIS RECORD. 

of intestine feuds in the democratic party, succeeded in gaining control of the 
state government. He was a member of Congress from 1841 to 1843, gov- 
ernor of the state of Xew York from 1847 to 1849, and United States assistant 
treasurer in New York city from 1849 till his death, which occurred in New 
York city, April 23, 1852. 

He remained throughout his life a student of law and of literature; was 
courteous in his bearing, and a forcible public speaker. 

After his death his wife returned to her home in Geneseo, where she died. 

Jane Lee Harris (XIX 79) was fatally burned in her childhood. 

Ann D. Harris (XIX 82) was a tall, handsome woman, with a moderately 
full figure. Her husband, James Wood, was born at Alstead, New Hampshire. 
He emigrated in his childhood with his father to Richmond, Ontario county, 
New York. He acquired his early education at the Wesleyan seminary in 
Lima, New York, and was graduated at Union college, Schenectady. He 
studied law in the office of John Young in Geneseo, and upon his admission to 
the bar in 1843 he became his partner, and the two men retained throughout 
life the closest personal relations. He was a successful lawyer, and was at one 
time district attoniey of Livingston county. 

In 1862 he raised the One Hundred and Thirty-sixth Regiment, New York 
state volunteers, and took the field as its colonel. He served in the army of 
Virginia, and after the battle of Gcttysbiirg was transferred to the army of the 
Cumberland. He was appointed brigadier-general, and took an active part in 
Shennan's campaigns till their termination at Bentonville, North Carolina, in 
March, 1865. 

After the close of the war he resumed the practice of law in Geneseo in 
partnership with his nephew, Campbell H. Young (XX 217), and made Geneseo 
his home for the rest of his life, which ended in 1892. 

He was a high-minded, benevolent and public-spirited citizen, and was held 
in high esteem in the region in which he lived, and in which he filled a 
number of positions in the service of the community and of the church. 
Colonel "Wood left no children. 

Mary Campbell Harris (XIX 83). Her husband, Thomas Beale Dorsey, 
was of Andersons, Howard county, Maryland. 

William Augustus Harris (XIX 84) received the degree of M.D. from the 
University of Pennsylvania in 1843, entered November 27, 1844, the Med- 
ical corps of the United States navy, in which he served for some years. He 



GENERATION XIX. 69 

was retired May 8, 1861, on account of ill health, with the rank of passed assist- 
ant surgeon, and lived thereafter in Baltimore, Maryland. His wife, Elizabeth 
Saunders Taylor, born in 1828, died in 1856, was of Norfolk, Virginia. 

Elizabeth Hodgdon Hai-ris (XIX 85) lost her life in consequence of her 
dress taking fire from the candles on her dressing table. Her husband, Peter 
Vivian Daniel, was born at Crow's Nest, Stafford county, Virginia, April 24, 
1784. He was educated at home by a private tutor, and was gi'aduated at 
Princeton college in 1805. He read law under Edmund Kandolph, the first 
attorney-general of the United States, whose youngest daughter was his first 
mfe. He was admitted to the bar in 1808, was elected to the Virginia legis- 
lature in 1809, and was a member of the Privy Council till the new Constitu- 
tion of that state was adopted in 1830. Upon the transfer of Eoger B. Taney 
to the United States treasury department, he was offered the position of attorney- 
general which Taney had vacated. This position was declined by Mr. Daniel. 
In 1836 he was appointed United States district judge for the Eastern District 
of Virginia, and in 1841 he was appointed associate justice of the United States 
Supreme Court, which position he held till his death, which occurred in Rich- 
mond, Virginia, May 31, 1860. He was regarded as a learned judge, but was 
an extreme conservative. He showed in his opinions resolute opposition to all 
extensions of the national power and jurisdiction, and vigorously upheld the 
doctrine of state sovereignty. 

Thomas Cadwallader Harris (XIX 86) was appointed midshipman. United 
States navy, September 4, 1841, and remained in that service during the rest 
of his life, rising to the rank of captain December 12, 1872. 

In the early part of the Civil war he was attached to the United States 
steamer Powhatan, Captain David D. Porter commanding, and sailed in her 
about ten thousand miles in unsuccessful attempts to capture the Confederate 
States steamer Sumter. In 1863 and the early months of 1864 he was executive 
ofiicer of the United States steamer Kearsarge, Captain John A. Winslow com- 
manding, which was detailed to capture, and did finally sink in action, the Con- 
federate States steamer Alabama. 

His later service during the war was on the Atlantic coast and in the Gulf 
of Mexico. His sea duty was continuous for six years during and immediately 
subsequent to the Civil war, when he only came home long enough to be trans- 
ferred from one vessel to another. 

At the time of his death he was on duty at the Philadelphia United States 
naval asvlum. 



70 THE HARRIS RECORD. 

His wife, Mary Louisa Baiiil)ridge Jaudoii, born April 22, 1835, is a 
daughter of Ashbel Green Jaudon and Lucy Ann Bainbridge, of Xew York. 
Her mother was a daughter of Commodore "William Bainbridge, United States 
navy. 

Charles Morris Bainbridge Harris (XIX 87) was born in Philadelphia. 
He was educated at the University of Pennsylvania, from which he received 
the degrees of A.B. 1845, A.M. 1848 and M.D. 1851. After his father's re- 
moval to Washington he entered the service of the United States government. 
He was a clerk in the office of the Secretary of the Treasury from 1861 to 186.3; 
captain's clerk of the United States steamer Yantic from 1864 to 1865; was in 
action at Fort Fisher, North Carolina, in December, 1864, and again in Janu- 
ary, 1865; was assistant assessor of Internal Revenue of the Fourth District, 
New York city, from 1865 to 1871, and was a clerk in the Sixth Auditor's 
office. United States Post Office Department, from 1872 to 1893. 

After leaving the Government ser^ace he opened a real estate office in 
Washington, D. C. 

His wife, Amelia Gantt Bowie, is a daughter of John Bowie, of Maryland. 

Emma Ewing Harris (XIX 88). Her husband, Xathan D. Benedict, was 
born in De Euyter, New York, April 7, 1815. He was educated, first, in 
Dr. Phinney's school in Xewburgh, New York; was graduated at Rutgers col- 
lege, New Brunswick, New Jersey, in 1837, and received the degree of M.D. 
from the University of Pennsylvania in 1840. He settled in Philadelphia, 
where he practiced medicine till he was appointed Chief Resident Physician in 
charge of the Philadelphia Blockley Hospital in 1846. Thence he was trans- 
ferred to the superintendency of the New York State limatic asylum at LTtica. 
After several years spent there, his failing health admonished him to remove to 
the south, and he opened a sanitarium at Magnolia, on St. John's river, Florida. 
This proved a successful enterprise until the outbreak of the Civil war, when, 
as Dr. Benedict was a strong Union man, he was obliged to leave Magnolia, and 
find safety in the region under the control of the United States government. 

He then took charge of the LTnited States general hospital at St Augus- 
tine, Florida. After the war he resumed his practice, and when the state gov- 
ernment was reestablished was appointed a judge. 

The disease, which had attacked him in the north, aggravated by the hard- 
ships of the first years of the Civil war, proved too much for him to withstand, 
and he died April 30, 1871, of consumption. His wife returned to the north 
after his death. 



GENERATION XIX. 71 

He and his wife were throughout their lives earnest and active Christians 
of the Presbyterian Church. 

Robert Pattereon Harris (XIX 89) received from the University of Penn- 
sylvania the degrees of A.B. in 1841 and M.D. in 1844. After several years 
of practice in Wills' eye hospital and the Pennsylvania hospital in Philadel- 
phia, he commenced, in 1847, the private practice of medicine, to which and to 
literary pursuits the rest of his life was devoted. His tastes in early life had 
inclined him to a mechanical career, and he was a very skillful handicraftsman. 
Whatever he did he threw into the pursuit great energy, and when he was still 
young, his father, himself a physician, said that he was the best read physician 
in Philadelphia. He remained a student throughout his life, and was a fre- 
quent contributor to medical periodicals, and a recognized authority on many 
points of medical and surgical history. 

He was also a well read botanist, and took great interest in the introduction 
into the country of new ornamental plants and useful vegetables and fruits. 

He carried on an extensive correspondence in Europe, Asia and Spanish 
America in connection with these two subjects of medical and surgical history 
and economic botany, being a fluent writer in several of the principal European 
languages. 

He was for many years an active member of the College of Physicians and 
Surgeons of Philadelphia. 

He was an elder in the Presbyterian church, and was a most manly and 
cheerful Christian man. 

John Campbell Harris (XIX 90) died while a student in the University 
of Pennsylvania from the effects of a bath in the Schuylkill river, taken too 
soon after his recovery from an attack of the measles. 

Mary Fisher Harris (XIX 91) was badly burned by falling into an open 
fire when she was seven years old. She was thought, at the time, to have been 
fatally injured, and though she recovered, the accident may have shortened her 
life. She married her cousin, Francis Lee Harris (XIX 76), but lived only 
two years after her marriage. She left no children. 

Matilda Moore Harris (XIX 92). Her husband, Isaac Oliver Blight, born 
December 29, 1830, died August 6, 1899, was for many years superintendent 
of the Barclay Railroad and Coal company in Bradford county, Pennsylvania. 



72 THE HARRIS RECORD. 

William Harris (XIX 93) received the degi-ee of A.B. from the University 
of Pennsylvania in 1850. His fii'st service after graduation was with a mer- 
cantile house in Philadelphia, and afterward, from 1852 to 1858, with Maitland, 
Phelps & Company, of New York. He showed great aptitude for mercantile 
pursuits, and would probably have been a successful merchant had he not 
thought it his duty to enter the ministry. He was graduated at the Theological 
seminary, Princeton, ISTew Jersey, in 1861; was chaplain of the One Hundred 
and Sixth regiment, Pennsylvania volunteers, in the Civil war in 1861 and 
1862, serving throughout the Peninsular campaigns with General McClellan's 
army. He was agent of the United States Sanitary Commission in 1862 and 
1863; pastor of the Presbyterian church at Towanda, Pennsylvana, from 1864 
to 1870, and treasurer of the College of Xew Jersey at rrincoton from 1S70 to 
1885, in which year he died. 

His wife, Christina Van Alen Butler, is a daughter of Walter Butler and 
Maria Yan Alen. All of their children were born in Princeton, except the 
second, who was born in Towanda. 

Stejilien Harris (XIX 95) was educated, first, in Chester Valley, and after 
the removal of his father to Philadelphia in April, 1850, he entered the Central 
High school in September, 1850, passing an examination which placed him at 
the head of a class of over 140 boys. His progress was so satisfactory that he 
was twice promoted into the next class above his ovra, and was graduated in 
June, 1853, with the degree of A.B., being one of a very few who ever finished 
the four-years' course at the Central High school in three years. He was gen- 
erally at or very near the head of his class during his whole course, though he 
was graduated without rank, as he was ill of typhoid fever at the time the class 
finished its work. 

He entered at once the service of the United States Coast Survey, in which 
he remained seven years, rising to the rank of sub-assistant. His work was 
mostly on the coast of Maine in summer, and on the coast of Florida, Mississippi 
or Louisiana in the winter. He rendered valuable service, and was highly 
thought of in the seiwice, but he desired a more settled life, and in 1860 he 
established himself as a civil and mining engineer in Pottsville, Pennsylvania, 
where he spent the rest of his life. He and his brother Joseph foi-med, in 1860, 
a partnership which lasted till Stephen's death, though Joseph did not perma- 
nently join him in Pottsville till 1864. The engineering practice became at 
once a remunerative one, and his services were held in high estimation by a 
wide range of clients. 



GENERATION XIX. 



73 



In 1864 he was appointed the agent and engineer of the City of Philadel- 
phia, in which capacity he had charge of the very valuable coal estate left to 
the city by Stephen Girard in 1S31. This property he developed and made it 
very remunerative. 

A long career of usefulness seemed to have opened before him, but it was 
destined to come to a tragic close. On the morning of the 10th of March, 1874, 
he went to inspect some mining work that was being done on the Broad Moun- 
tain lands, about nine miles from his home. The day was cold and there was 
a furious snowstorm raging on the mountain. In some unknown way he was 
struck by a coal train which was backing up the Broad Movmtain and Mahanoy 
railroad, and was instantly killed. 

He was a man of unusual gifts, an able mathematician, an untiring student, 
and a man of great reasoning power and of wide influence. He was an earnest, 
devoted and useful Christian man, and combined in a degree rarely seen the 
abilities of a successful man of business and the deep and true family affections 
with devoted and self-sacrificing piety. 

His wiie, Catharine McArthur, born January 7, 1837, was the daughter 
of John McArthur and Elizabeth Wilson, of Philadelphia. Mr. McArthur was 
an architect and builder of Scottish birth, and an elder in the Tenth Presby- 
terian church of Philadelphia. 

Joseph Smith Harris (XIX 96) had a career, which, during his school life, 
ran closely parallel to that of his brother Stephen, entering the Central High 
school with him, and being graduated with him, and holding, like him, the 
highest places in his class. 

Upon leaving school in 1853 he entered the service of the North Pennsyl- 
vania Railroad company, in which he rose to the rank of topographer. On 
leaving this work upon the completion of the surveys in which he was engaged 
he entered, in the fall of 1854, the service of the United States government, in 
which he remained nearly ten years. He served for about two years in the 
Coast Survey in Mississippi Sound, spent the season of 1856 in Kentucky, run- 
ning a base line for the Kentucky Geological Sun'ey, and in 1857 was appointed 
one of the astronomers of the Northwest Boundary Survey. He remained 
nearly five years on the extreme northwestern frontier of the United States, in 
what are now the States of Washington, Idaho and British Columbia. In the 
season of 1862 he was, at first, the first ofliccr, and later in command of the 
United States steamer "Sachem," on duty with Farragut's fleet in the Mis- 
sissippi. 



T* THE HARRIS RECORD. 

Leaving the service of the United States government in 186i he removed 
to Pottsville, Pennsylvania, joining there his brother Stephen in business. He 
was engaged in civil and mining engineering for a number of years, until he 
was called to N^ew York in 1880 as general manager of the Central Railroad of 
Xew Jersey. In 1882 he was elected president of the Lehigh Coal and Naviga- 
tion company and removed to Philadelphia. In 1893 he was appointed the 
managing receiver, and elected the president of the Philadelphia and Eeading 
railroad company and the Philadelphia and Heading Coal and Iron company. 
He held these presidencies till his retirement in 1901. 

His first wife, and the mother of all his children, Delia Silliman Brodhead, 
born January 20, 1842, died August 19, 1880, was the second daughter of 
George Hamilton Brodhead, of New York, for many years secretary of the 
New York Stock Exchange, and later its \-ice-president and president, and 
JuUa Ann Phelps. 

His second and third wives, Emily Eliza and Anna Zelia Potts, were sis- 
ters, and were daughters of George Henry Potts, president of the National Park 
bank. New York, and Emily Dilworth Gumming. His second wife, Emily 
Eliza Potts, was born July 14, 1843, and died December 29, 1890. His third 
wife, Anna Zelia Potts, was born June 11, 1850. 

Martha Frazer Harris (XIX 97). Her husband, Henry Chester Parry, 
born June IT, 1839, died November 7, 1893, was a physician, a graduate of 
the Medical school of the University of Pennsylvania. He was, during the 
Civil war and for some years later, a svirgeon in the United States army. 
After his marriage he commenced the private practice of medicine in Brooklyn, 
New York, and in 1874 removed to Pottsville, Pennsylvania. 

After his death, which occurred November 7, 1893, his widow removed, 
in 1897, to Augusta, Georgia, where she now lives. 

John Campbell Harris (XIX 98) was educated at the Central High school 
of Philadelphia, and studied law aftei"ward mth his mother's brother, P. Frazer 
Smith, in West Chester, and ^vith John G. Carlisle, in Washington, D. C, 
where he was admitted to practice. 

In 1860 he was appointed clerk to the commandant of the United States 
Marine Corps by his uncle. Colonel John Harris, and November 25, 1861, he 
was commissioned a second lieiitenant in that corps. He served throughout 
the Civil Avar; was brevetted first lieutenant for ''gallant and meritorious services 
at the attack on Forts Jackson and St. Philip April 24, 1862;" was com- 
missioned first lieutenant February 16, 1864, and remained in the service until 



GENEKATION XIX. 



75 



July 31, 1869, when he resigned and engaged in the manufacturing business 
in Philadelphia. 

He retired from active business pursuits in 1879. 

His wife, Mary Powers, born October 30, ISio, is the only daughter of 
Thomas H. Powers, senior partner of the firm of Powers & Weightman, manu- 
facturing chemists of Philadelphia, and Anna Cash. 

Frazer Harris (XIX 99) was a lad of great promise and decided artistic 
ability. He died suddenly, before his education was completed, from a malig- 
nant pustule in his face, which ended his life a few days after its appearance. 

Mary Campbell Harris (XIX 100) died of consumption in her early 
womanhood. 

Thomas Harris Pearce (XIX 104) was graduated at the West Point 
academy, and appointed second lieutenant, Sixth infantry, July 1, 1826. He 
resigned his commission March 31, 1820. His first wife, Elizabeth Jones, 
was a daughter of Kichard Jones. His second wife was from Columbia, Penn- 
sylvania. 

Cromwell Pearce (XIX 105) was the proprietor of the "White Horse" 
store, on the Old Provincial road, one mile west of the Harris homestead. 

His wife, Margaretta Jones, born September, 1809, was a daughter of John 
Jones, of Conestoga, Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, who died in 1815. After 
the death of Cromwell Pearce she married Edward Yarian, who died in 1895. 
She died October 1, 1900. 

Margaret, Ann Eliza and Harriet Pearce (XIX 106, 109 and 110) lived 
for many years on Minor street, West Chester, Pennsylvania. They were all 
highly useful and estimable women of exemplary lives, and devoted to the serv- 
ice of the Episcopal church. 

George Washington Pearce (XIX 108) lived in West Chester, Pennsyl- 
vania, after 1824. He was admitted to the bar in 1842. In 1849 he was 
elected treasurer of Chester county, which position he held for two years. In 
1853 he became the editor and proprietor of the "American Republican and 
Chester County Democrat" of West Chester, a paper which curiously combined 
in its title, which was the result of a combination of two newspapers, the names 
of the three national political parties which were most prominent in the next 
decade. He made it an influential sheet, for in those days newspapers in the 
smaller towns still had influence. It was democratic in politics until the Civil 
war, when Mr. Pearce and his paper took the side of the administratiouj and 



76 



THE HAEEIS RECORD. 



continued throughout his life to support the republican party. At the time of 
his death ho was superintendent of the Stationery Department of the United 
States House of Representatives at Washington, D. C. 

He was a man of ability and of high character, one of the founders of the 
Episcopal church in AVest Chester, and one of its staunch supporters. 

He was lame from a white swelling, from which he suffered in his youth. 
His wife, Ann Elizabeth Kerns, died in 1857. 

Joseph M. Long (XIX 112). His wife, Penina Hutchinson, born August 
26, 1808, died July 10, 1891. 

John Hams Long (XIX 113). His wife, Isabella Ralston Grier, was born 
in 1808, and died February 23, 1890. 

Elizabeth Ann Long (XIX 114). Her early manied life was spent at 
Brandywine Manor. In 1838 she removed to Gallagherville, Chester county. 
After her death her husband, William M. Buchanan, married again, and had a 
family of six children. He died in 1892. 

Joseph Davis Mackelduff (XIX 117) owned a large farm and a mill at 
Ferndale station, on the Wilmington and X^orthern railroad, Chester county, 
Pennsylvania. His wife was a daughter of Dr. Henry MunhoUand, of Waynes- 
burg, Pennsylvania. 

Eliza Jane ilackelduff (XIX 120). Her husband, James Grier McClure, 
kept the store at Brandj'^vine Manor post office. He died December 18, 1901. 

William Harris MackeldufF (XIX 123) was a merchant of Philadelphia. 
His wife, Deborah Thomas, was of Drifton, Luzerne county, Pennsylvania. 

Joseph MackeldufF ]\IcCliire (XIX 125) was a physician. His -n-ife, Hen- 
rietta McConnell, was born October 18, 1831. 

James McClure (XIX 126). His wife, Francina Carmichael Bunn, born 
May 29, 1842, died December 16, 1870. 

Hannah Maria Haman (XIX 127) spent her whole life in her father's 
house in ilcVeyto^vn, being bom there and dying there. Her husband, Wil- 
liam Macklin, was a merchant of McVeytown, ilifflin county, Pennsylvania. 
From 1846 till his death, Febrnary 21, 1884, he was an elder in the Presby- 
terian church of that tovm. 

Samuel Haman (XIX 128) died in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. His wife, Hen- 
rietta M. Smith, originally from Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, died in Dan- 
ville, Pennsylvania, February 3, 1860. 



GENERATION XIX. Y7 

Jane Calbraith Ilaman (XIX 129) lived for many years in McVeytown, 
Pennsylvania, but died in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. Her husband, George 
W. McBride, died August 13th, 1S49. 

ISTancy Calln-aith Haman (XIX 130). Her husband, Rev. Eichard H. 
Morrow, was at the time of their marriage pastor of the Second Presbyterian 
church of Cedar Eapids, Iowa. He died June 10, 1859. 

John Harris Haman (XIX 131) resumed the original spelling of the fam- 
ily name on arriving at maturity, and was thereafter known as Hammond. He 
was associated with his brother, George Calbraith Haman, in the drug business 
at Cedar Eapids, Iowa, but afterward removed to Eudora, Kansas, where he en- 
gaged in the same pursuit. 

George Calbraith Haman (XIX 132) went to Cedar Rapids, Iowa, in April, 
1857, where he established himself in business as a druggist. 

Rebecca Jane Wakefield (XIX 133). Her husband, Reuben T. Apple- 
baugh, born May, 1828, in Huntingdon county, was a merchant of Hollidays- 
burg, Pennsylvania. They now live in Kansas. 

Hannah Elizabeth Wakefield (XIX 135). Her husband, John Stine, was 
a farmer. He died May 10, 1886. 

Xancy Wakefield (XIX 136). Her husband. Colonel Amor William 
Wakefield, was her second cousin. He was born October 30, 1829, near Mc- 
Veytown, and died December 17, 1891, at Culver, Kansas. 

William H. Swanzey (XIX 139) was smitten with apoplexy while at 
prayer meeting on the evening of August 21, 1902. He was carried home, 
where he died the next morning, without regaining consciousness. His wife, 
Isabella May Wakefield, born March 25, 1834, died June 17, 1892, was a 
daughter of William Wakefield, who was a brother of Augustine Wakefield, 
who married Xancy Calbraith (XVIII 41). Isabella was a sister of Colonel 
Amor William Wakefield. 

Henrietta Cromwell Calbraith (XIX 140). Her husband, Robert A. 
Clarke, who died August 24, 1879, was a prominent lawyer of Altoona, Penn- 
sylvania. He was a son of Dr. David Duncan Clarke, pastor of the Presby- 
terian church of McVeytown, Pennsylvania, and Mary Cochran. 



GENERATION XX. 



79 



GENERATION XX. 



MEMBER OF FAMILY. 



MAItRIAGE. 



RESIDENCE. 



The Children of Harry Innes Bodley (XIX 1) and Sarah Gist Bledsoe. 



XX 

1 

2 
3 
4 
5 

6 

7 



Judith Ann Bodley. Abram S. Mitchell. 
Euphemia Brown I 

Bodley. j Benjamin Heusley. 
Catharine Isabella 

Bodley.'William T. Esses. 
Thomas Brecken- 

ridge Bodley. 
Josephine Mary 

Bodley. 
Charlton Hunt Bod'ey. 
Miriam Gratz Bodley. 
Sara Howard Bodley.' 
Ella Cecil Bodley. Henry W. Hough. 

Laura Cary Bodley. Anderson Gratz. 
Mary Hanna Bodley. 



Jan. 10, 

Aug. 13, 

Sep., 

June 30, 

July 5, 

Dec. 27, 

Jan. 5, 

Oct. 2.5, 

Oct. 14, 

May 1, 1849. 



IS'28. 

1829. 

1831. 

1833. 

1836. 
1837. 
1840. 
1841. 
1843. 



Nov., 1845. 
Oct. 16, 1851. 
Nov., 1863. 



Jan. 25, 1872. 
Feb. 9, 1876. 



June 18, 1849. 

Feb. 8, 1865. 

Jan. 31, 1837. 

Sep. 22,1837. 
Feb. 9, 1842. 
Jan. 10, 1885. 
June 18, 1849. 



The Children of William Stewart Bodley (XIX 2) and Ellen Pearce. 



12 


Hugh Shiell Bodley. 


never married. 


Sep. 24,1836. 








13 


.\nn James Bodley. 


never married. 


May 6, 18.39. 








14 


Elizabeth Bodley. 




Jan. 20,1841. 




June 15, 1841. 




15 


Jlartha Stanard 

Bodley. 


never married. 


July 12,1842. 








16 


Pearce Bodley. 


Mary F. A. McHenry. 


Dec. 3, 1844. 


June 15, 1875. 


Sep. 8, 1902. 




17 


Harry Innes Bodley. 




Mar. 3,1847. 




Mar. 25, 1848. 




18 


William Stewart 

Bodley. 


never married. 


Feb. 20, 18?.0. 








19 


Temple Bodley. 


Jane Edith Fosdick. 


Sep. 5, 1852. 


Nov. 22, 1892. 






20 


Stanard Bodley. 




Nov. 15, 1855. 




Sep. 10, 1861. 




21 


Ellen Pearce Bodley. 


never married. 


Nov. 8, 1858. 




Sep. 17,1887. 





The Children of Anne Isabella Bodley (XIX 3) and William Henry Hurst. 



22 
23 

24 
25 


Hugh Shiell Hurst. 
Nancy Stanhope 

Hurst. 
Henry Hurst. 
Mary Hurst. 


Wyndham 

Robertson Trigg. 

John Victor Doniphan. 


July 31,1835. 

May 23, 1837, 

Nov. 8, 18-10. 

1848. 


May 31, 1861. 
1872. 


in infancy, 
in infancy. 





80 



THE HARRIS RECORD. 



GENERATION XX. 



MBMBEB OF FAMILY. 



ilABBIAGE. 



RESIDENCE. 





The Children of Maria Innes Bodley (XIX 5) and Edward B. Church 




XX 














26 


Edward Church. 




Feb. 7, 1834. 




Aug. 23, 1840. 




27 


Catharine Shiell 


Rev. John H. 












Church. 


Waterman. 


1835. 


Mar. 20, 1859. 






28 


Elizabeth Church. 




Oct., 1888. 




Aug. 5,1839. 




29 


William Bodlev 














Church. Elizabeth Lunn. 


Dec. 19, 1839. 


Dec. 25, 1873. 


Mar., 1901. 


Raj-town, Mo. 


30 


Elizabeth Church. 


1841. 




184 . 




31 


Rev. Edward 












Bentley Church. Frances Kellogg. 


Sep. 7, 1843. 






San Francisco, Cal. 



The Children of John Fowler Bodley (XIX 6) and Sarah Hattnah Reading. 



32 


Thomas GouTerneur 
















Bodley. 




Apr. 


3, 1837. 




July 10,1840. 




33 


Sophie Atwood 
















Bodley. 




Oct. 


27, 1838. 




Sep. 14,1853. 




34 


Catharine Harris 
















Bodley. 




Jan. 


27, 1840. 




Apr. 1, 1843. 




35 


Ellen Reading Bodley. 


William M. Thornton. 


Feb. 


20, 1842. 


May 6. 185S. 






36 


Isabella Hurst Bodlev. 


Oscar E. Finlay. 


Dec. 


16, 1843. 


Not. 20, 1S67. 


Dec. 14,1868. 




37 


Elizabeth Innes 
















Bodley. 




Sep. 


16. 1845. 




Nov. 3, 1867. 




38 


Maria Church Bodley. 


Samuel B. Fairchild. 


Dec. 


24, 1848. 


May 9, 18G7. 




Forest, Miss. 


39 


Charlotte Tillery 
















Bodley. 




Dec. 


24, 1848. 




June 23, 1849. 




40 


William Stewart 
















Bodley. 


Laura Rozier. 


Sep. 


25, 1850. 




Dec, 1892. 




41 


Mary Louisa Bodley. 


Blair Randolph 
















Burwell. 


Apr. 


21, 1852. 


Oct. 31, 1SS2. 






42 


Sallie Fowler Bodley. 




Sep. 


24, 1853. 




Feb. 4, 1878. 





The Children of Catharine Elizabeth Bodley (XIX 8) and Erasmus Boyle Owsley. 



43 



46 



Catharine Innes 

Ow&ley.lj. William Akin, M.D. Apr. 9,1813 

Elizabeth Owsley. ] I 

Ellen Stewart Owsley. Thomas Saunders. 

M.D 

.\melia Bryan Owsley., I. Lawrence Carr 

I Robinson 

II. George Garvin 
, Brown 

Ann Isaliella Owsley. ! William F. Booker. 

William Owsley. Florence Ronald. 

49 Maria Bodley Owsley. 

50 Cornelia Young 
Owsley. 



Jan. 2, 1846. 
Feb. 16, 1818. 



Jan. 3, 18ii0. 
Apr. 28. 1852. 
Dec. 18, 1855. 



Feb. 20, 18G3. 



July 27, 18G9.| 

Jan. 10, 1867.1 

I. Oct. 13, 1868. 

II. Feb. 1, 1876. 

Nov. 28,1872. 

1878.1 



in infancy. 
Dec. 15, 1867. 



Dec. 17, 1859. 
Dec. 3, 1869. 



GENERATION XX. 



81 



GENERATION XX. 



MEMBER OP FAMILY. 



MAnni.\GE. DEATH 



RESIDENCE. 



The Children of T'^omas Bodley (XIX 9) and Julia Ann McCabe. 



XX 














51 


Kate Shiell Bodley. 




Sep. 22,1857. 




Sep. 22,1858. 




52 


Philip Thurman 

Bodley. 




Mar. 13, 1859. 




July 18, 1864. 




53 


Thomas Bodley. 


Grace Downey. 


Dec. 15,1860. 


Jan. 10, 1884. 






54 


Harry Innes Bodley. 




Feb. 19,1863. 




Mar. 22, 1887. 




55 


Julia Bodley. 




Feb. 28,1866. 








56 


Effle May Bodley. 




July 12,1869. 








57 


William Stewart 

Bodley. 




July 6, 1871. 




Aug. 11, 1890. 





The Children of Charles Scott Todd Bodley (XIX 10) and Frances Price Curd. 



58 


Eleanor Hunt Bodley. 




Oct. 26, 1845. 




Sep. 5, 1860. 




59 


Catharine Shiell 

Bodley. 




Aug. 10, 18 i 7. 




Sep. 5, 1860. 




60 


Anne Reynol4s 

Bodley. 




Feb. 14,1849. 




Sep. 8, 1860. 




61 


Mary Hanna Bodley. 




Oct. 19,1850. 








62 


Harrv Innes Bodley. 


Marv Anna Gillespie. 


Apr. 10,18.52. 


Sep. 13,1877. 






63 


John Curd Bodley. 


LelaU Barnes. 


Apr. 10, 1851. 


Apr. 13, 1884. 






64 


Theodosia Charlton 

Bodley. 




Apr. 12, 1857. 




Aug. 13, 1800. 




65 


Florence Dudley 














Bodley. 


Rufus Davenport. 


June 19, ISCl. 


Oct. 20, 1887. 




St. Paul, Minn. 


66 


Charles Shiell Bodley. 




Aug. 16, 1862. 




June 2,1863. 





The Children of Ellen Pindell Bodley (XIX 11) and George Henry Gill. 



67 


Charles Jones Gill. 




June 29, 18.08. 




July 


9, 1859. 




68 


Henry Bodley Gill. 


I. Lucy Underwood 
Morris. 
II. Adeline Florence 

Brandreth. 


Feb. 11, 1860. 


I. Feb. 2, 1889. 
II. July 31,1902. 








09 


Mary Weston Gill. 


Frederick S. Jones. 


Sep. 26, 1SG2. 


June 4, 1890. 








70 


Annabel Hurst Gill. 


Charles C. Guilford. 


Nov. 3, 1804. 


Dec. 16, 1900. 









82 



THE HARRIS RECORD. 
GENERATION XX. 



MEMBEK OF FAMILY. 



KESIDENCB. 



The Children of Habry Inxes Todd (XIX 13) and Jane Baxlinger Davidson. 



XX 


















71 


Harriet Davidson 


















Todd. 


John W. Pugh. 


Jan. 


29, 1841. 


Dec. 


27, 1883. 




Indiana. 


72 


Ann Innes Todd. 


never married. 


Nov. 


3, 1842. 






Dec. 15, 1875. 




73 


James Davidson Todd. 


never married. ■ 


July 


4, 18M. 










74 


John Harris Todd. 


I. Bonnie Brodhead. 
II. Annie Boifuiellet. 


Oct. 


11, 1845. 


I. July 
II. Mar. 


27, 186C. 
10, 1879. 


Nov. 18, 1883. 




75 


Chapman Coleman 

Todd. 


I. Ann Mary 


















Thornton. 


Apr. 


5, 1848. 


I. Oct. 


7, 1869. 










II. Eliza James. 






II. Oct. 


24, 1872. 






70 


HaiTj- Innes Todd. 


never married. 


Dec. 


28, 18.50. 






Aug. 23, 1895. 




77 


Maria Church Todd. 




Feb. 


3, 18.52. 






Aug. 13, 1853. 




78 


Julia Robertson Todd. 


never married. 


Feb. 


3, 1852. 








Louisville, Ky. 


79 


Maria Crittenden 

Todd. 


never married. 


Jan. 


9, 1854. 










80 


George Davidson 


















Todd. 


Laura Chapin Durkee. 


.Apr, 


19, 185(5. 


Apr. 


28, 1897. 




Louisville, Ky. 


81 


.Jennie Logan Todd. 


Isaac N. Cardwell. 


June 


2, 18.58. 


Nov. 


10, 1882. 






82 


Mary Hanna Todd. 


James L. Watson. 


Apr, 


20, 1800. 


June 16, 1881. 




Lexington, Ky. 


83 


Elizabeth Watson 

Todd. 




Jan. 


17, 1802. 






Dec. 18, 1865. 




84 


Kitty Thomas Todd. 


S. B. Holmes. 


Mar 


30, 1803. 


Oct. 


15, 1885. 




Frankfort, Ky. 


85 


Robert Crittenden 


William Virginia 
















Todd. 


Cotton. 


Jan. 


24, 1SG5. 


Feb. 


6, 1S90. 




Louisville, Ky. 



The Children of Elizabeth Anne Todd (XIX 14) and William Henry Watson. 



86 


Edward Howe 

Watson. 




Apr. 2, 1843. 




Mar. 13, 1848. 




87 


Ann Innes Watson. 




July 29,1845. 




Oct. 6, 1848. 




88 


Katharine 














Crittenden Watson. 


Lyne Starling. 


Aug. 7, 1849. 


Oct. 1, 1872. 




Greenville, Miss. 


89 


Maria Crittenden 


Joseph Weisiger 












Watson. 


Lindsey. 


Jan. 29, 1852. 


Jan. 7, 1873. 




Louisville, Ky. 


90 


EJmmeline Swigert 














Watson. 


Robert A. Waller. 


Mar. 8, 1855. 


June 7, 1876. 




Chicago, 111. 



The Children of Catharine Lucy Todd (XIX 16) and Thomas L. Chittenden. 



91 
92 


Annie Crittenden. 
John Jordon 




Jan. 10,1814. 




Dec, 1844. 




93 


Crittenden. 
Maria Innes 

Crittenden. 


never married. 


June 7, 1854. 
Mar. 23, 1856. 




June 25, 1876. 
Nov. 17, 18.59. 





GENERATION XX. 



88 



GENERATION XX. 



MEMBER OF FAMILY. 



MARRIAGE. 



RESIDBNCH. 



The Children of Eugene Wilkinson Chittenden (XIX 18) and Laura Bacon. 



XX 














94 


John Jordon 

Crittenden, 


Rose . 


June 18, 1850. 








95 


Sadie Bacon 














Crittenden. 


.1. Swigert Taylor. 


Aug. 27, 1858. 


Nov. 24, 1880. 




Frankfort, Kv. 


96 


Franii Rector 














Crittenden. 


never married. 


Feb. 3, 1801. 




Mar. 17, 1894. 





The Children of Harrt Inne.s Spotts (XIX 19) and Jane Pearce Tunstall. 



97 



Martha Spotts. 
Leontine Spotts. 
Albert Tunstall Spotts. 



Theodore Zacherie 

Blakeinan. 
Charles Mcintosh 

Keeney. 
I. Virginia Brown 
II. Susie .Tohnstone. 



San Francisco, Cal. 



San Francisco, Cal. 
San Francisco, Cal. 



The Children of James Hanna Spotts (XIX 20) and Elizabeth Harper Tunstall. 



100 Temple Tunstall 

Spotts.! never married. 

101 Elizabeth Spotts. 'never married. 

102 Harry lanes Spotts. 



Nov. 12, 1901. 
Nov. 21, 1882. 



The Children of Mary E. Spotts (XIX 21) and George Tbiplett. 



103 Annie Triplett. 

104 John Triplett. 

105 Edward Triplett. 
100 Samuel Triplett. 

107 Louis Triplett. 

108 ! George Triplett. 



John Hinman. 



Chicago, 111. 



The Children of Elizabeth Richards Todd (XIX 24) and Robert H. Russel. 



109 Letitia Shelby Russel. 


Judge R. T. Posey. 


Feb. 24, 1838. 






Silver City, N. M. 


110 William H. Russel. 




Mar. 23, 1839. 






Santa Fe, N. M. 


Ill jOlga Russel. 


Thomas Hall. 


Dee. 3, 1842. 






Memphis, Tenn. 


112 ICharles Stewart 












t Russel. 




Mar. 25. 1847. 






Soroeco, N. M. 


113 1 Robert Edward 












j Russel. 


Maude Murphy. 


Jan. 2, 1859. 


Apr. 28, 1887. 




Alameda, Cal. 



84 



THE HARRIS RECORD. 
GENERATION XX. 



INDEX 
NO. 



MEMBER OF FAMILY. 



BIRTH. 



MABRIAGE. 



BESEDENCB. 



The Children of Isaac Shelby Todd (XIX 25) and Sabah Wilson. 



114 Laura Griffln Todd. [ William W. Black. 

115 'Thomas Wilson Todd, never married. 

116 jSusan Hampton Todd. Vernon Wolfe. 



May 29, 1S49. ! Apr. 10, 1874. 

June 6, 1852. I 

May 11, 1854. j Aug. 14, 1873. 



Mar. 19, 1892. 



Cincinnati, O. 
Louisrille, Ky. 



The Children of Thomas Todd (XIX 26) and Jane Smith. 


117 Charles Stewart Todd. 

118 Henry Smith Todd. 




Oct. 28, 18n. 
Aug. 10, 1843. 




Dec. 31, 1862. 




The Children of Thomas Todd (XIX 2(5) and Bettie D. Bonnet. 



119 



120 
121 



Katharine Shelby 

Todd. 

Charles Stewart Todd. 
Rawler Bonney Todd. 

122 'Letitia Shelby Todd 

123 ; Elizabeth A'irginia 

Todd. 



Sep. 24,1861. 
Apr. 11, 1863. 
Jan. 5, 1865. 
Dec. 13, 1866. 

Apr. 7, 1809. 



The Children of Sarah Shelby Todd (XIX 28) and Finley W. Wall. 



124 
125 



Sarah Shelby Wall. W. H. Lindsay. 
Letitia Shelby WaU. 



May 28,1849. 
1850. 



1872. 1874. 

Feb. 12, 1854. 



The Children of Sarah Shelby Todd (XIX 28) and E. A. Hathaway. 



126 Charles Todd 














Hathaway. 




Apr. 


12, 1855. 






Owensboro, Ky. 


127 ! Alice Hathaway. 


Dr. P. T. Johnson. 




1857. 


1876. 




Owensboro, Ky. 


128 1 Thomas Shelby 














Hathaway. 






1858. 




1882. 




129 John Hathaway. 


Kate Major. 




1859. 


1890. 


1890. 


Henderson, Ky. 


130 Clinton G. Hathaway. 


James M. Green. 




1801. 


1889. 




HopkinsvlUe, Ky. 



The Children of Letitia Shelby Todd (XIX 32) and John Carter. 



131 


Florence Carter. 


Peyton C. Richards. 


1856. 






New York, N. Y. 


132 


John Todd Carter. 












133 


Virginia Griffith 

Carter. 










New York, N. Y. 


134 


Charles Todd Carter. 










New Orleans, La. 


135 


Edward Lee Carter. 












136 


Thomas Todd Carter. 










New Orleans, La. 



GENERATION XX. 
GENERATION XX. 



85 



INDEX 














NO. 


MEMBER OF FAMILY. 


CONSORT. 




marriage. 


DEATH. 


residence. 




The Children of Virginia Shelby Todd (XIX 34) and Daniel 


MosELY Griffith. 


XX 

137 


Letitia Shelby Griffith. 


Henry Colston 

Watkins. 


Aug. 11, 185S. 


1880. 






138 


Virginia Todd Griffith. 




Oct. 2, 1850. 




Apr. 28, 1875. 




139 


Joshua Todd Griffith. 


Jettie Rothschild. 


Apr. 1, 1861. 


1891. 




Owensboro, Kv. 


140 


Florence Griffith. 


Harmon A. Miller. 


Feb. 1, 1803. 


1885. 




Asheville, N. C. 


141 


Rosa Burwell Griffith. 


Samuel Shelton 














Watkins. 


June 13, 1865. 


1887. 




Owensboro, Ky. 


142 


Daniel Moseley 














Griffith. 


Sue Mildred Herr. 


Sep. 19,1867. 


1894. 




Owensboro, Ky. 


143 


Charles Todd Griffith. 




Sep. 19, 1871. 




Apr. 30, 1880. 




144 


Ruth Griffith. 




Jan. 15, 1870. 




Doc. 10, 1884. 




145 


Clinton R. Griffith. 




Aug. 30, 1873. 






Frankfort, Ky. 


146 


Mary Ridgley Griffith. 


Lee Davis Ray. 


Mar. 27, 1876. 




Dec. 10, 1901. 


Owensboro, Ky. 



The Children of Charles Henry' Todd (XIX 35) and Rosa Bubwell. 



William Burwell Todd. 
Rosa Shelby Todd. 
Isaac Shelby Todd. 
Francis Steptoe Todd. 
Charles Stewart Todd. 
Letitia Burwell Todd. 



Mar. 9,1870. 
July 11,1873. 
Oct. 15, 1875. 
Apr. 11,1879. 
Dec. 16, 1883. 
June 18, 18S7. 



Sep. 24,1870. 
Feb. 5, 1876. 



June 21, 1887. 



George Lyne. 



William StarlingLyne. 



Susanna Lyne. 
James Lyne. 



I. Junia B. Averitt. 
II. Martha E. Foster. 
III. Lillie M. Risinger. 
Mary McDowell 

Meyer, 
.lacob Swigert. 



Sep. 20, 1840. 



Jan. 7, 18.53. 
Feb. 25, 1855. 
Aug. 16, 1858. 



I.Feb. 15,1879. 
II. June 11, 1885. 
III. Mar.31, 1902. 

Dec. 16,1875. 
Nov. 19,1879. 



Jan. 25, 1893. 
Jan. 17, 1859. 



The Children of Lyne Starling (XIX 36) and Miriam P. Dillon. 


153 


Edmund Lyne 

Starling. 


Mary B. Stewart. 


May 9, 1840. 


Oct. 6, 1863. 






The Children of Lyne Starling (XIX 36) and Mary H. Allison. 


154 


Ann Maria Starling. 




Jan. 26, 1849. 




Nov. 22, 1865. 




The Children of Sarah Carneal Starling (XIX 38) and Henry Lyne. 



86 



THE HAKKIS EECOED. 
GENERATION XX. 



INDEX 
NO. 



MEMBEE OF PAMILT. 



BIRTH. 



MABRIAGE. 



BESIDBNCE. 



The Children of Mary Harris (XIX 54) and John G. Culton. 



XX 

159 
160 



Rebecca Jane Culton, 
Thomas Harris Cul ton. 



William W. Moses. 



Mar. 10, 1850 
May 31, 1852. 



June 3, 1873. 



Sep. 



LiouTiUe, Pa. 



The Children of Martha Harris (XIX 55) and Antrim F. Morgan. 



161 


Thomas Harris 
















Morgan. 


Ida Wolf. 


Jan. 2, 1848. 


Oct. 4, 1877. 








162 


Hannah Morgan. 


Stephen F. Penrose. 


Feb. 2, 1849. 


Apr. 20, 1871. 








1G3 


Catharine Morgan. 


Charles E. Smulling. 


Sep. 20,1852. 


Mar. 6, 1879. 


Apr. 


12, 1885. 




104 


George C. Morgan. 


Inez M. Brook. 


June 9, 1856. 


Mar. 25, 1880. 








105 


Joseph A. Morgan. 


Annie Long. 


Apr. 30, 1869. 













The Children of Mary Ann Harris (XIX 


57) AND Cyrus 


R. Llewellyn 




166 


Malachi H. Llewellyn. 


Emma M. Myers. 


Sep. 30,1844. 


Mar. 4, 1871. 




West 


107 


Thomas C. Llewellyn. 


Clara V. McWilliams. 


Feb. 26, 1847. 


Nov. 14, 1880. 




West 


168 


Clara Llewellyn. 




Mar. 20, 1849. 




May 30, 1862. 




169 


Annie C. Llewellyn. 


unmarried. 


Jan. 2, 1852. 






West 


170 


Martha S. Llewellyn. 


Lewis E, Penuypacker. 


July 26,1857. 


Jan. 4, 1890. 




West 


171 


Stephen N. Llewellyn. 


unmarried. 


Feb. 9, 1860, 






West 



Phila., Pa. 
Pikeland, Pa. 

Pikeland, Pa, 
Pikeland, Pa. 
Pikeland, Pa. 



The Children of John Harris (XIX GO) and Rebecca Stott. 



172 
173 
174 



William Harris, 
John Harris. 
Alfonso Harris. 



Clara Murby. 
Emma Thomas. 
Martha A. Everett. 



Oct. 11,1845, 
June 17, 1847, 
May 1, 1852, 



1872. 
Dec. 30, 1874. 



Laramie, Wyoming. 
Valley Lee, Md. 
Valley Lee, Md. 



The Children of Thomas Bowen Cadwallader Harris (XIX 03) and Sarah A. McIntyre. 



175 IColeman Bowen 

Harris 



Mar. 29, 1868. 





The Children of Jajies Sloan (XIX 65) and Mary Ann Reese. 




176 


Mary Svlvania Sloan. 


Abram H. Brower, 


Oct. 1.3,1843. 


Dee. 21, 1871. 






177 


Albert Barnes Sloan. 


Lizzie K. Reese. 


Jan. 1, 1846. 


Jan. 27, 1876. 


Feb. 28, 1877. 




178 


Violetta Kennedy 

Sloan. 


George Verrecse. 


Nov. 23.1847, 








179 


xVbel Reese Sloan. 


Mary Dickinson. 


Mar. 5. ls,-,n. 


Apr. 14, 1870. 






180 


James Oliver Sloan. 




Juiiu ;!it. 1S.-.2. 




in infancy. 




181 


Thomas Harris Sloan. 




Feb. 2(1, lS.'i4. 








182 


Annie Zell Sloan. 


Thomas C. Conklm. 


Oct. 10, 1850. 


Oct. 5, 1899. 


Nov. 17, 1886. 


Cahfornia. 


183 


Edith Bennett Sloan. 


William Greenley. 


Oct. 10,1858. 


Jan. 24,1893. 







GENERATION XX. 
GENERATION XX. 



87 

















NO. 


MEMBER OP FAMILY. 


CONSORT. 


BIRTH. 


MAREIAOr;. 




RESIDENCE. 


The Children of Thomas Sloan (XIX G6) and Harriet Seely. 


XX 

1&4 


Mary Eleanor Sloan. 


Peter Henry 














Thomson. 


Jan. 14, 1846. 


Dec. 17, 1873. 




Brooklyn, N. Y. 


185 


Harriet Emma Sloan. 




Sep. 23,1847. 




June 20, 1849. 




18G 


Annie Zell Sloan. 


Henry Harrison Old. 


June 12, 1850. 


Nov. 18, 1869. 




Jersey City, N. J. 


187 


Francis Henry Sloan. 


Jessie Vandcroef. 


Nov. 7,1851. 


Sep. 19, 1876. 




Brooklyn, N. Y. 


188 


Eliza Evans Sloan. 


Corydon Bemont 

Phelps, Jr. 


June 5,1855. 


June 25, 1879. 






189 


John Harris Sloan. 


Lilia Garretson. 


June 22, 1858. 


Jan. 12,1889. 






190 


Alice Hewett Sloan. 


unmarried. 


Feb. 2, 1860. 








The Children of Malachi Sloan (XIX 68) and Elizabeth L. Shaw. 


191 


Mary Anna Harris 


Samuel Evans 












Sloan. 


Haines. 


Apr. 21, 1839. 


Aug. 3,1859. 






192 


Oliver Wilson Sloan. 




Nov. 27, 1841. 




Mav 26, 1843. 




19.3 


Emma Gibson Sloan. 




Nov. 3,1843. 




Dec. 8, 1844. 




194 


Albert Wilson Sloan. 


I. Mary McLeister 

Webster. 
II. Anna Margaret 

Bailey. 


Apr. 13, 1.845. 


I. Nov. 21, 1863. 
II. Oct. 19,1892. 






195 


Ellen Bailey Sloan. 


Samuel F. Pancoast. 


Mar. 6, 1847. 


Mar. 7,1871. 




Springfield, Del. Co., 
P.i. 


196 


William Jones Sloan. 


Mary Ann Davidson. 


Oct. 16,1848. 


Oct. 18, 1870. 




197 


Martha Harris Sloan. 


William Walker 














Kendall. 


Feb. 7, 1850. 


June 15, 1871. 


Apr. 25, 1874. 




198 


Edward Twaddell 

Sloan. 




Jan. 21,1852. 




Apr. 17, 1852. 




The Children of Malachi Wilson Sloan (XIX 68) and Elizabeth Mooke Lukens. 


199 


John Harris Sloan. 


Lvdia Brooks 














Bowdeu. 


May 28, 1866. 


July 2, 1894. 




Media, Pa. 


200 


Lewis Sloan. 




Mar. 24, 1S6S. 




Mar. 0, 1869. 




201 


Bessie Moore Sloan. 


Isaac Burton Roberts. 


Mar. 26, 1874. 


June 4, 1895. 






The Children of Andrew Jackson Sloan (XIX 73) and Mary Potter. 


202 


Annie Zell Sloan. 


Charles W. Bailey. 


Jan. 16, 1856. 


Apr. 9, 1884. 


June 18, 1899. 


Philadelphia, Pa. 


203 


John Sloan. 


Elizabeth Chenowith. 


July 14, 1858. 


Nov. 14, 1881. 






204 


William McCallum 

Sloan. 


unmarried. 


May 2,1860. 








The Children of Andrew Jackson Sloan (XIX 73) and Frances Cooper Burrows. 


205 Frances Burrows 










Sloan. 


unmarried. 


May 1, 1875. 






206 Burrows Sloan. 


Alice Painter. 


Nov. 25, 1877. 


Nov. 4,1902. 





88 



THE HAEEIS EECOED. 
GENERATION XX. 



INDEX 
NO. 



MEMBER OF FAIIILT. 



BIKTH. 



MABBIAGE. 



RESIDENCE. 



The Children of Samuel Gkant Sloan (XIX 75) and Eleanor Chandler Johnson. 



XX 1 














207 1 Mary Sloan. 


unmarried. 


Sep. 8, 18G3. 








St. Paul, Minn. 


208 ; Reuben Johnson 














1 Sloan. 


unnKirried. 


Mar. 26, 1866. 








Harlem, N. Y. 


209 i Eleanor Faith 














Chandler Sloan. 


never married. 


June 11, 1878. 


Feb. 


3, 1903. 


St. Paul, Minn. 



The Children of Francis I.ee Harris (XIX 7G) and Mary M.\ther. 



210 


Elizabeth W. Harris. I. William Porter 

Steele. 
11. Thomas Vincent 
de Wierzbicki. 


May 


1, 1838. 


I. 1856. 
II. Jan. 16,1866. 




Mentone, France. 


211 


Francis Mather 

Harris. Sarah E. 


Feb. 


2, 1840. About 1863. 


Aug. 29, 1880. 


Greenville, N. J. 



The Children of Mary Harris (XIX 77) and Sanford A. Hooper. 



212 


John Young Hooper. 


Helen J. Baldwin. 


July 30, 1841. 


Apr. 16, 1865. 


Apr. 8, 1889. 


Belle Plain, Minn. 


213 


Jane Lee Hooper. 




May 3, 1844. 




Jan. 28, 1848. 




214 


Charles Mather 


Susan Elizabeth 












Hooper. 


Stoever. 


Dec. 13, 1845. 


Apr. 17, 187 . 


Jan. 30,1894. 


Amboy, Minn. 


215 


Annie Wood Hooper. 


John S. De Wolf. 


Jan. 25,1848. 


Jan. 30,1868. 


July 27, 1899. 


Minneapolis, Minu. 


216 


Campbell Harris 














Hooper. 


Effie A. Manley. 


July 3, 1852. 


July 24, 1873. 




Montrose, Dak. 



The Children of Ellen Brick Harris (XIX 78) and John Young. 



217 


Mary J. Young. 


Albert M. North. 


Nov. 29, 1834. 


May 22, 1856. 




Geneseo, N. Y. 


218 


Campbell Harris 














Young. 


never married. 


Oct. 6, 1838. 




Feb. 11, 1898. 


Geneseo, N. Y. 


219 


Kate Lee Young. 


Thomas 0. T. 














Buckley. 


Sep. 25,1840. 


Sep. 3, 1873. 




Geneseo, N. Y. 


220 


John Young. 


Martha Eliza Carr. 


Apr. 23, 1844. 


Jan. 12, 1898. 




Geneseo, N. Y. 


221 


Jane Lee Young. 


Louis H. Powell. 


Nov. 29, 1850. 


June 2, 1880. 




Leesburg, Va. 



The Children of Mary Campbell Harris (XIX 83) and John Thomas Beale Dorsey. 



Thomas Beale Dorsey, 



never married. 



Oct. 23, 1849. 



About 1885. 



Anderson's P. C, 



GENEKATION XX. 



89 



GENERATION XX. 



MEMBER OF FAMILY. 



MABEIAGE. 



RESIDENCE. 



The Children of William Augustus Harris (XIX 84) and Elizabeth Saunders Taylor. 



Elizabeth Taylor 

Harris. 



Grenvilie Gaiues. 



July 2T, 1S5U. 



Nov. 15, 1882. 



Warreutou, Va. 



The Children of Elizabeth Hodgdon Harris (XIX 85) and Peter Vivian Daniel. 



Mary Campbell 

Daniel. 
Travers Daniel. Flora L. Bradford. 



Aug. 22, 1854. 

Aug. 26, 1850. Jan. 2, 1878. 



Mar. 14, 1802. 



Culpepiier C. H., Va. 



The Children of Thomas Cadwallader Harris (XIX 86) and Mary Louisa Bainbridge Jaudon. 



226 


Thomas Cadwallader 














Harris. 


unmarried. 


Jan. 10,1860. 






Philadelphia, Pa. 


227 


Mary Campbell 














Harris. 


John Ijewis Wilson. 


Dec. 27, 1861. 


Mar. 12, 189.3. 




Philadelphia, Pa. 


228 


Lucy Jaudon Han-is. 


Theodore 














Frothingham. 


Dec. 23, 1866. 


May 22, 1888. 




Philadelphia, Pa. 



The Children of Charles Morris Bainbridge Harris (XIX 87) and Amelia Gantt Bowie. 



229 
230 
231 



Anna Bowie Harris. 

Charles Gantt Harris. 

Thomas Cadwallader 

Harris. 



unmarried, 
unmarried. 



June 4, 1871. 
Sep. 16,1872. 



Mar. 6, 1876. 



The Children of Emma Ewing Harris (XIX 88) and Nathan D. Benedict. 



232 


William Harris 














Benedict. 


Clara Thier. 


July 29, 1845. 


Dec. 25, 1877. 




New Brunswick. 

N. J. 


233 


Clara Howard 














Benedict. 


Caleb Rodney Layton. 


Jan. 4, 1847. 


Mar. 12, 1873. 


Feb. 28, 1887. 




231 


Harriet Neilson 














Benedict. 


never married. 


Sep. 30, 1848. 




Dec. 26, 1888. 




235 


Emma Ewing 

Benedict. 




Sep. 30,1848. 




May 8,1849. 




236 


Mary Gray Benedict. 


Eleazar Kingsbury 














Foster. 


July 22, 1850. 


Nov. 19, 1874. 




Sanford, Fla. 


237 


Robert Patterson 














Benedict. 


.lulia Sherman Ells. 


Sep. IS, 1859. 


Oct. 17,1882. 




St. Louis, Mo. 



90 



THE HARRIS BECOED. 



GENERATION XX. 



MEMBEK OF FAMILY. 



BESIDENCB. 



TiiE Children of Matilda Moore Harris (XIX 92) and Isaac Oliver Blight. 



sx 










238 


William Harris Blight. 


Hattie Palmer. 


Mar. 11, 1855. 


Feb. 18,1880. 


23y 


Matilda Patterson 










Blight. 


unmarried. 


Nov. 30, 1858. 




240 


Mary Valeria 










Sergeant Blight. 


unmarried. 


Apr. 23, 1861. 




241 


Cornelia Ta.rlor 


William Sergeant 








Blight. 


Blight. 


June 11, 1864. 


Dec. 6, 1890. 



Elmira, N. Y. 
ToTvanda, Pa. 
Towanda, Pa. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



The Children of William Harris (XIX 93) and Christine Van Alen Butler. 



242 


Walter Butler Harris. 


Ann Letitia Yeomans 


July 13, 1865. 


Nov. 22, 1892. 




Princeton, N. J. 


243 


Elizabeth Patterson 














Harris. 


unmarried. 


Oct. 6, 1867. 






Princeton, N. J. 


244 


William Harris. 


Cornelia McGilvary. 


June 21, 1870. 


Nov. 2,1897. 




Siam. 


245 


Van Alen Harris. 


unmarried. 


Jan. 26, 1872. 








246 


Robert Patterson 

Harris. 


unmarried. 


Dec. 11, 1873. 








247 


Henry Alexander 

Harris. 


unmarried. 


Feb. 26, 1876. 









The Children of Stephen Harris (XIX 95) and Catharine McArthur. 



248 


Stephen Harris. 


Agnes Cointat. 


Oct. 15,1804. 


June 12, 1899. 


Germantown, Pa. 


249 


John McArthur 












Harris. 


Sophia AVeygandt. 


Mar. 5,1867. 


June 14, 1894. 


Germantown, Pa. 


250 


Elizabeth Harris. 


Edward H. Keiser. 


Feb. 26, 1870. 


June 18, 1896. 


St. Louis, Mo. 


251 


Mary Campbell 












Harris. 


unmarried. 


Sep. 16,1872. 




Philadelphia, Pa. 



The Children of Joseph Smith Habkis (XIX 96) and Delia Silliman Brodhead. 



252 


Marian Frazer Harris. 


unmarried. 


Dec. 3, 1866. 






Germantown, Pa. 


253 


George Brodhead 














Harris. 


Elizabeth Holbert. 


Sep. 3, 1868. 


June 2, 1896. 




Reading, Pa. 


254 


Frances Brodhead 


Reynolds Driver 












Harris. 


Brown. 


Mar. 15, 1870. 


June 4, 1895. 




Germantown, Pa. 


255 


Clinton Gardner 














Harris. 


unmarried. 


Mar. 18, 1872. 






New York, N. Y. 


256 


Madeline Vaughan 


Henry Ingersoll 












Harris. 


Brown. 


Nov. 5,1873. 


Nov. 14, 1900. 




Philadelphia, Pa. 



GENERATION XX. 
GENERATION XX. 



91 



MEMBER OP FAMILY. 



MARKIAGE. 



RESIDENCE. 



The Childeen of Maetua Feazer Harris (XIX 97) and Henry Chester Parry. 



XX 

257 
258 



Mary Campbell Parry. 
George Gowen Parry. 



William E. Mikell. 
unmarried. 



Mar. 20, 1871. 
Dec. 4, 1872. 



Apr. 12, 1899. 



Augusta, Ga. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



The Children of John Campbell Harris (XIX 98) and Mary Powers. 



2.59 Thomas Powers ' 

Harris, unmarried. 

260 j xVlan Campbell Harris.! unmarried. 

261 Henry Frazer Harris, unmarried. 



Oct. 10,1870. 
Mar. 18, 1873. 
May 31, 1880. 



Cedar Edge, Col. 



The Children of Thomas Harris Pearce (XIX 104) and Elizaeeth O. Jones. 



262 Joseph Pv. Pearce. 



never married. 



Sep. 23,1829. 



Sep. 13,1862. 



The Children of Thomas Harris Pearce (XIX 104) and Ann E. Beatty. 



Charles Clinton 

Beatty Pearce. 



Mar. 23, 1848. 



Jan. 21, 1862. 



The Children of Cromwell Pearce (XIX 105) and Margaretta Jones. 



Eliza Jane Pearce. 



Richard Alexander ' I 

Douglas.. Oct. 10, 1S30. I Dec. 31, 1851. 



Germantown, Pa. 



The Children of George Washington Pearce (XIX 108) and Ann Elizabeth Kerns. 



Henrietta Day Pearce. 
George Herbert 

Pearce. 



Benjamin Ashburner. Nov. 16, 1850. 
Dec. 2,1856. 



Nov. 25, 1873. 



Sep. 10, 1880. Philadelphia, Pa. 
Mar. 10, 1863. I 



The Children of Joseph M. Long (XIX 112) and Penina Hutchinson. 



267 Hannah Mary Long. 

268 I Elizabeth Ann Long. 



Eber Woodward. 
William Coleman 

Hemphill. 



Oct. 10, 1830. Dec. 27, 1855. 
Dec. 1, 1832. I Feb. 28, 1856. 



Aug. 11, 1896. I West Chester, Pa. 
West Chester, Pa. 



THE HARRIS RECORD. 
GENERATION XX. 



INDEX 
NO. 


MEMBER OF FAMILY. 


CONSORT. 


birth. 


MABBIAGE. 


DEATH. 


RESIDENCE. 


TuE Children of John Habris Long (XIX 113) and Isabella Ralston Grier. 


XX 

269 


Mary Jane Grier Long. 


Neal Graham Kurtz. 


Dec. 7, 1834. 


Jan. 17,1861. 


IHoneybrook, Pa. 


The Children of Elizabeth Ann Long (XIX 114) and William SI. Buchanan. 



Emma M. Buchanan, unmarried. 



Sep. 18,1837. 



West Chester, Pa. 





The Children of Joseph Davis Mackelduff (XIX 117) and Mart Munholland. 


271 


Joseph Howard 














Mackelduff. 


Laura Grace Powney. 


Mar. 29, 1865. 


Apr. 28, 1897. 






2.2 


Emma Jane 

Mackelduff. 




July 7, 1866. 




Oct. 16,1866. 




273 


Anna Mae Mackelduff. 


unmarried. 


June 25, 1867. 








274 


Henry Munholland 

Mackelduff. 




Oct. 4, 1869. 




Apr. 22, 1891. 




275 


Mary Gertrude 

Mackelduff. 




Apr. 7, 1873. 




Sep. 1, 1873. 




276 


Blanche Latta 

Mackelduff. 


unmarried. 


Oct. 31,1875. 









The Children of Eliza .Jane Mackelduff (XIX 120) and James Grier McClure. 



277 


Bessie .Tane McClure. 


ncTer married. 


Jan. 10,1869. 




Apr. 14, 1902. 




278 


Emma Mary McClure. 


unmarried. 


Sep. 13,1870. 








279 


Helen Grier McClure. 


unmarried. 


Aug. 29, 1872. 








280 


Anna Calbraith 

McClure. 


unmarried. 


Feb. 21, 1875. 








281 


Hattie Myers 

McClure. 


unmarried. 


Jan. 2, 1877. 









The Children of William Harris Mackelduff (XIX 123) and Deborah N. Thomas. 



282 
283 



Joseph F. Mackelduff. 
Mary N. Mackelduff. 



Charlotte Miller. 



Apr. 20, 1869. Dec. 9, 1899. 
Oct. 13. 1874. 



Feb. 6, 1875. 



Philadelphia, Pa. 



The Children of Joseph Mackelduff McCurRE (XIX 125) and Henrietta McConnell. 



284 
285 



Clara Augusta 

McClure. 
Margaret Valeria 

McClure. 



William Pcnnock. 



Apr. 19, 1857. 



Lyndell, Pa. 
Lyndell, Pa. 



GENERATION XX. 
GENERATION XX. 



93 



MEUBEK OF FAMILY. 



MAEKIAGK. 



RESIDENCE. 



The Children of James McCluee (XIX 126) and Fkancina Carmichael Bunn. 



XX. 

280 

287 


Sarah Jane McClure. 

Elizabeth Mackelduff 
McClure. 


I. JohnWesley Good. 
II. George Abner 

Brainard. 
George Emerson 

Prutsmau. 


Mar. 27, 1844. 
Mar. 23, 1846. 


I. Nov. 

II. Sep. 

Jan. 


19, 1868. 
1, 1881. 
6, 1870. 






SheHieUl, 111. 
Galesburg, 111. 


288 
289 


Hannah Emily 

McClure. 
John Franklin 

McClure. 


Jane M. Mills. 


Dec. 11, 1847. 
May 19, 1850. 


Aug. 


6, 1875. 


Jan. 

Feb. 


4, 1863. 
27, 1892. 


Watsontown, Pa. 



The Children of Hannah Maria Haman (XIX 127) and William Macklin. 



290 


John Haman Macklin. 




July 19, 1849. 




Nov. 


22, 1849. 




291 


George Howard 
















Macklin. 


I. Rebecca E. Ross. 

II. Rosanna M.Kyle. 

III. Laura J. Leffard. 


Oct. 2G, 1850. 


I.Oct. 11,1874. 
II. Feb. 16,1888. 
III. Jan. 3,1893. 






MeVeytown, Pa. 


292 


James Macklin. 


Ellen Jane Leattor. 


Dec. 2, 18.52. 


Nov. 7, 1878. 






McVeytown, Pa. 


293 


Elizabeth Macklin. 




May 30, 1854. 




Jan. 


15, 1855. 




294 


Harris C. Macklin. 


Ida MacSmith. 


Mar. 10, 1856. 


Feb. 22, 1882 






Roanoke, Va. 


295 


William Macklin. 




Apr. 27, 1857. 




Aug 


, 1857. 




296 


Ella Macklin. 


Samuel H. Haffley. 


Sep. 15,1860. 


Oct. 16, 1800. 






Flagstaff, Ariz. 


297 


Effle Macklin. 


unmarried. 


Jan. 9, 1863. 








MeVeytown, Pa. 



The Children of Samuel Haman (XIX 128) and Henrietta M. Smith. 



298 


Sally Henrietta 










Haman. 


John S. McCrum. 


Aug. 1, 1854. 


Feb. 11. 1875. 


299 


Lizzie Calbraith 










Haman. 


unmarried. 


Mar. 11, 1858. 





Kansas City, Mo. 
Kansas City, Mo. 



The Children of Jane Calbraith Haman (XIX 129) and George W. McBride. 



300 
301 
302 



Charles R. McBride. 
Harry McBride. 
Nannie McBride. 



Addie L. Winner. 
Allen A. Leonard. 



June 8, 1853. 
June 23, 1857. 
Oct. 22, 1860. 



Feb. 29, 1892. 
June 23, 1887. 



Altooua, Pa. 
Oct. 19, 1897. Altoonn, Pa. 

Harrisburg, Pa. 



The Children of Nancy Calbraith Haman (XIX 130) and Richard H. Morrow. 



303 Lizzie Morrow. John A. Canan. July 23, 18,59. May 29, 1880 



Altoona, Pa. 



94 



THE HARRIS RECORD. 
GENERATION XX. 



MEMBER OF FAJilLY. 



MARRIAGE. 



RESIDENCE. 



The Children of John Habbis Hammond (XIX 131) and Lizzie Snydeb. 



XX 

304 



305 



Henry Snyder 

Hammond. 
Frank Calbraith 

Hammond. 



June 17, 1868. 
Mar. 27, 1S76. 



Eldora, Iowa. 
Eldora, Iowa. 



The Children of George Calbraith Haman (XIX 132) and Louisa Wolf. 



306 Nannie Louise ' 

Haman. J. C. Haskell. 

307 I Margaret Blanche j 

I Haman. John Hamilton. 

308 Edward Haman. Phoebe Sherman. 



June 4, 1862. 



Oct. 5, 1870. 
Feb. 1, 1880. 



Sep. 21, 1S87. 



Sep. 7, 1898. 
Oct. 16, 1901. 



Spokane, Wash. 



Cedar Rapids, Iowa. 
IC^dar Rapids, Iowa. 



The Children of Rebecca Jane Wakefield (XIX 133) and Reuben T. Applebaugh. 



310 
311 



313 

314 



315 
316 



Augustine Wakefield | 

Applebaugh. i Jessie Hollingsworth, 



John R. Applebaugh 
Edmund C. 

Applebaugh. 
Henry Percy 

Applebaugh. 
Anna G. Applebaugh. 
II. Bessie 

Applebaugh. 
William M. 

Applebaugh. 
Reuben Applebaugh. 



Eva L. Pittiuger. 



Sarah Gibson. 

J. Herbert Caldwell. 



Thomas P. Jackson. 
Myrtle M. Spratt. 



July 27, 1857. 
June 20, 1859. 



June 2, 1861. 



Apr. 4, 1863. 
June 25, 1865. 



Apr. 6, 1868. 



Apr. 7, 1871. 
May 14, 1874. 



Dec. 30, 1886. 
Oct. 14, 1886. 



Feb. 17, 1892. 
Feb. 5, 1889. 



Aug. 2, 1894. 
June 1, 1898. 



The Children of Hannah Elizabeth Wakefield (XIX 135) and John Stine. 



317 


Horace Wakefield 

Stine. 




Aug. 28, 1876. 






1 
Jan. 11,1900. 




318 


Howard A. Stine. 


unmarried. 


Feb. 23, 1878. 










319 


Bella Stine. 


Edward Gro. 


Mar. 15, 1880. 


Not. 


20, 1901. 






320 


Janet Stine. 




Jan. 13,1882. 






June 28, 1890. 

1 





The Children of Nanct Wakefield (XIX 136) and Amok William Wakefield. 



321 


Amor Swanzey 














Wakefield. 


Hattic Edith Black. 


Apr. 21, 1870. 


Nov. 


28, 1895. 


Kan. 


322 


Jane Elizabeth 














Wakefield. 


unmarried. 


Dec. 11, 1871. 






Kan. 


323 


David Russel 














Wakefield. 


unmarried. 


Feb. 12, 1875. 






Kan. 







GENERATION XX. 
GENERATION XX. 




95 


INDEX 
NO. 


MTP.MRUn OF FAMTT.Y 


CONSOBT. 


BIBTH. 


MAKKIAUE. 


DEATH. 


RESIDENCE. 


The Children of William H. Swanzey (XIX 139) and Isabella M. Wakefield. 


XX 

324 
325 

32G 

327 

328 
329 
330 
331 


Annie Swanzey. 
William Wakefield 

Swanzey. 
Emmor Calbraith 

Swanzey. 
Emlen Everett 

Swanzey. 
Mabel Swanzey. 
Julia Swanzey. 
Liuah Swanzey. 
Edith Swanzey. 


unmarried. 

Mary A. Davidson, 
unmarried. 
James E. Maltby. 
unmarried. 
George C. Miller. 


Feb. 20, 1857. 

Dec. 26, 1858. 

Dec. 9, 1860. 

Feb. 7, 18&3. 
Sep. 13, 1865. 
Mar. 18, 1868. 
Nov. 19, 1870 
Mar. 24, 1871. 


Apr. 2, 1902. 
Nov. 15, 1887. 
Nov. 20, 1890. 


Apr. 26, 1864. 
May 10, 1864. 

Jan. 25, 1889. 


Minneapolis, Kan. 


The Children of Henrietta Cromwell Calbraith (XIX 140) and Robert A. Clarke. 


332 
333 
334 

335 

336 


Mary Cochran Clarke. 
Robert Clarke. 
Retta Calbraith 

Clarke. 
George Calbraith 

Clarke. 
Delia Cromwell 

Clarke. 


unmarried. 
Elizabeth S. Lloyd. 


May 23, 1868. 
July 30, 1872. 

Nov. 9,1873. 

Jan. 16, 1870. 

Aug. 27, 1877. 


Sep. 6, 1898. 


June 10, 1875. 
Aug. 17, 1875. 

Feb. 21, 1889. 





Edward Bentley Church (XX 31). There are no children in this family. 

John Harris Todd (XX 74) entered the United States army as second 
lieutenant, Eighteenth infantry, August 22, 1867, and rose to rank of first 
lieutenant, March 20, 1879. He died from exposure to a blizzard near Fort 
Assiniboine. 

Chapman Coleman Todd (XX 75) entered the United States navy October 
9, 1861, reaching the grade of commander May 21, 1895. He was in com- 
mand of the United States gimboat "Wilmington during the Spanish war, which 
did valuable service in the waters around the island of Cuba, for which he was 
advanced five numbers, which made him a captain. He retired from the United 
States navy in 1902 with the rank of rear-admiral, and now lives with his son, 
Harry Innes Todd (XX 1) in Albemarle county, Virginia. 

George Davidson Todd (XX 80) was educated at the public schools of 
Frankfort, Kentucky, and began his business career in the bank of Kentucky. 
At a later date he was with the firm of "W. B. Belknap & Company, of Louis- 



96 THE HARKIS RECORn. 

ville, iiiid was one of the incorporators of tlie Todd-Donigan Iron company. 
He was elected Mayor of Louisville in 1895 and 1890. After tbe expiration of 
his service as mayor he established the Todd Manufacturing company, located 
at New Albany, Indiana, of which he is the president. He is a member of the 
Society of Colonial Wars and of the Sons of the American Revolution, and is 
a Mason of the Scottish Rite, of tlic thirty-second degree. 

Emeline Swigert "Watson (XX 90). Her husband, Robert A. AValler, was 
the city treasiirer of Chicago in flavor Carter Harrison's administration. His 
family was originally from Lexington, Kentucky. He died about the year 1900. 

John Jordou Crittenden (XX 9::^) entered the L'nited States army in 1875 
as second lieutenant, Twentieth infantry. He was in General George A. 
Custer's command in Montana Territory, and was killed in Custer's last dis- 
astrous action witli the Indians. 

John Jordon Crittenden (XX 91) entered the LTnited States army in 1876 
as second lievitenant, Twenty-second infantry. 

Albert Tunstall Spotts (XX 99) is coiner in the United States Mint at 
San Francisco. 

Charles Stewart Todd (XX 117) was, during the Civil war, a captain in 
the Sixth Kentucky regiment in the United States service. He was killed at 
the battle of Murfreesboro, Tennessee. 

Edmund Lyne Starling (XX 153), after finishing his education at the age 
of 10, was, for sevei-al years, a clerk in the offices of the Circuit and County 
courts. On the outbreak of the Ci^'il war he raised a company of troops, and 
took service under the LTnited States government. In October, 1861, he was 
appointed adjutant of the Seventeenth Kentucky regiment, and served with 
his regiment in the battles of Fort Donelson, Sliiloh and C^orinth. Ill health 
compelled him to resign his commission, and he retired fiom the military serv- 
ice, carrying with him complimentary letters from General Grant and other 
officers. 

In 1867 he served as councilman of the city of Henderson, Kentucky, 
and in 1868 he was elected mayor, which position he held for six years, admin- 
istering the government M-ith energy and success. 

He is the author of a valuable history of Henderson county, and has been, 
since 1878, the editor of the leading daily paper in the city of Henderson. 

His wife, Mary B. Stewart, was of New Orleans, Louisiana. 



GENERATION NX. 97 

George Lyne (XX 155). His first wife, Junia B. Averitt, died April 23, 
1883. His second wife, Martha E. Foster, died September 29, 1897. 

Thomas Harris Morgan (XX 161). His wife, Ida AVolf, was of Quaker- 
town, Pennsylvania. 

Hannah Morgan (XX 162). Her hnsljand, Stephen F. Penrose, was a 
drnggist of Quakertown, Pennsyh'ania. He died May 6, 1886. 

Catharine Morgan (XX 163). Her Imshand, Charles E. Smnlling, was of 
Richland, Bncks county, Pennsylvania. 

George C. Morgan (XX 164). His wife, Inez M. Brooke, was of 
Plymouth, Montgomery county, Pennsylvania. 

Joseph A. Morgan (XX 165). His wife, Annie Long, was of Plymouth, 
Montgomery county, Pennsylvania. 

Malachi H. LleAvellyn (XX 166). His wife, Emma M. Myers, of Phila- 
delphia, was born February 5, 1852. 

Thomas C. Llewellyn (XX 167). His wife, Clara V. McWilliams, of 
West Pikeland, Chester county, was born October 4, 1856. 

Martha S. Llewellyn (XX 170). Her husband, Lewis E. Pennypacker, 
was born September 23, 1853. 

William Harris (XX 172) received his degree of M.U. in 1870 from the 
LTniversity of Pennsylvania. After two years spent in Philadelphia in hospital 
practice, he went, in 1872, to Laramie, Wyoming, whicli is still his home. He 
was for fifteen years surgeon of the Union Pacific Bailway company. He 
owms a ranch near Buffalo, Wyoming. 

Albert Barnes Sloan (XX 177). His wife, Lizzie K. Reese, was born 
February 4, 1855. 

Thomas Harris Sloan (XX 181) went to the west in very early life, since 
when he has never been heard of. 

Annie Zell Sloan (XX 182). Her husband, Thomas C. Conkliu, born 
March, 1848, died October 6, 1900. They have no children. 

Edith Bennett Sloan (XX 183) has no children. 



98 THE HARRIS RECORD. 

Mary Eleanor Sloan (XX 184). Her husband, Peter Henry Thompson, 
born Whippany, New Jersey, December 24, 1849, is a son of John Thomp- 
son and Ann Adams. He was, until his retirement from business in 1889, \-ice- 
president of Peter Adams & Company, j^aper manufacturers, Buckland, Con- 
necticut. He was married in Jersey City by Rev. Wheelock H. Parmly. 

Annie Zell Sloan (XX 186). Her husband, Henry Harrison Old, was 
born in Jersey City, Xew Jersey, July 29, 1847, and died July 7, 1898. He 
was of the firm of VanUohlen & Old, hat manufacturers, Xew York city. 
They had no children. 

Francis Henry Sloan (XX 187) is a member of the firm of Dodge & Olcott, 
wholesale drug merchants, Xew York city. His wife, Jessie Yanderoef, born 
December 19, 1857, at Mount Yernon, Xew York, is a daiighter of John Jay 
Yanderoef and Mary Emeline Colles. 

Eliza Evans Sloan (XX 188). Her husband, Coydon Bemont Phelps, Jr., 
born March 15, 1848, in Boston, Massachusetts, is a salesman for D. S. Wal- 
ton & Company, paper dealers, Xew York city. They have no children. 

John Harris Sloan (XX 189) is secretary and treasurer of the firm of 
Miller, Sloan & Wright, paper merchants, Duane street, Xew York city. His 
wife, Lilia Garretson, born ]\Iay 25, 1859, is of Jersey City, Xew Jersey. 

Albert Wilson Sloan (XX 194). His first wife, Mary McLeister Webster, 
born February 22, 1840, died October 8, 1891. His second wife, Anna 
[Margaret Bailey, was a widow. There were no children by the second mar- 
riage. 

Ellen Bailey Sloan (XX 195). Her husband, Samuel F. Pancoast, of 
Springfield, Delaware county, Pennsylvania, was born August 22, 1828, and 
died January 18, 1891. 

William Jones Sloan (XX 196). His wife, Mary Ann Davidson, born 
July 23, 1848, was of Philadelphia. 

Martha Harris Sloan (XX 197). Her husband, William Walker Kendall, 
died April 25, 1874. 

John Harris Sloan (XX 199). His wiie, Lydia Brooks Bowden, bom 
March 13, 1866, was of Philadelphia. 



GENERATION XX. 99 

Bessie Moore Sloan (XX 201). Her husband, Isaac Bnrton Roberts, born 
September 4, 1874, in Philadelphia, is a physician, a graduate of the Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania. 

Annie Zell Sloan (XX 202). Her husband, Charles W. Bailey, son of 
Joseph T. Bailey, is vice-president and treasurer of the Bailey, Banks & Biddle 
Company, Philadelphia. 

John Sloan (XX 203). His wife, Elizabeth Chenowith, was of Washing- 
ton, D. C. 

Burrows Sloan (XX 200) is a member of the First City Troop of Philadel- 
phia. His wife, Alice Painter, is of Allegheny City, Pennsylvania. 

Elizabeth ^Y. Harris (XX 210). Her first husband, William Porter Steele, 
was of Lancaster county, Pennsylvania. Her second husband, Thomas Vincent 
de Wierzbicki, born Poland, April 5, 1827; died, Paris, June 2, 1896, was 
a Polish Count who had estates in Poland, but lived principally in the cities of 
western Europe. 

Francis Mather Harris (XX 211) was an oiRcer of the merchant marine 
during most of his adult life. During the Civil war he conmianded vessels 
engaged in running the blockade of the southern ports. At the time of his death 
he was first officer of the steamship Vera Cruz, which was lost at sea in a gale, 
the vessel breaking upon the Florida coast. His widow, Sarah E., was of Welsh 
parentage. She died about 188.3. 

John Young Hooper (XX 212). His wife, Helen Baldwin, was of Belle 
Plaine, Minnesota. 

Mary J. Young (XX 217). Her husband, Albert M. Xorth, belongs to a 
family which was originally settled in Middletown, Connecticut, 

Campbell Harris Young (XX 218) was admitted to practice at the bar in 
1859. On the outbreak of the Civil war he enlisted in the One Hundred 
and Thirty-sixth regiment, Xew York state volunteers, and when this regiment 
came under the command of his uncle, James Wood, he was appointed its 
adjutant. He served throughout the war, rising to the rank of major. He was 
appointed judge advocate-general of the state by Governor Beuben Fenton 
January 1, 1867, and later was, for several years, deputy clerk of the state 
Court of Appeals. 



100 THE HARRIS RECORD. 

In 1875 he retnniod from New York city, where he had lived for some 
years, to Geneseo, and became there a partner in the law practice of his uncle. 
General Wood. 

Kate Lee Young (XX 219) has no children. 

John Young (XX 220) is a civil engineer and surveyor. His wife, Martha 
Eliza Carr, is a member of the Carr family of St. Louis, Missouri, a grand- 
daughter of William Chiles Carr, the first jvidge of the Circuit Court of Mis- 
souri. She is descended fi'om Thomas Carr, of England, who, in 1705, mar- 
ried Mary Dabney, of Virginia, in which colony he made his American home. 

Jane Lee Young (XX 221). Her husband, Louis Hamilton Powell, son 
of Dr. Francis Whiting Powell, of Loiidon county, Virginia, born December 2, 
1848, died March 8, 1889, was a lawyer of Leesburg, Virginia. He was one 
of the Hill-Powell family of Lovidon coimty, Virginia — his great-grandfather, 
Leven Powell, one of the early settlers of that county, coming there from Somer- 
set county, Virginia, in the middle of the eighteenth century. He was a 
colonel in the Continental service during the war of the Revolution, was with 
the American army at Valley Forge, and was later a member of the first United 
States Congress. Louis Hamilton Powell was educated at the University of 
Virginia at Charlottesville. 

Elizabeth Taylor Harris (XX 223). Her husband, Orenville Gaines, born 
September 26, 1854, was a graduate in law of the University of Virginia, and 
is a practicing lawyer of Warrenton, Virginia. He has been active in the 
political life of his state, and was at one time chairman of the state committee 
of the democratic party. 

Travers Daniel (XX 225). His wife. Flora L. Bradford, died October 3, 
1883. 

Thomas Cadwallader Harris (XX 226) is engaged in insurance business in 
Philadelphia. 

Mary Campbell Harris (XX 227). Her husband, John Lems Wilson, is 
secretary and treasurer of the Longdale Iron company. They have no children. 

Lucy Jaudon Harris (XX 228). Her husband, Theodore Frothingham, 
born March 22, 1848, is vice-president and treasurer of the Philadelphia Securi- 
ties company. 



GENEEATIOX XX. 101 

Charles Gantt Harris (XX 230) was graduated from the Polytechnical 
institute, Worcester, Massachusetts, in 1894, as electrical engineer, and from the 
Columbian Law school, Washington, D. C, in 1897, and in patent law in 1898. 
He is an officer of the Electrical department of the District of Columbia. 

Thomas Cadwallader Harris (XX 231) is receiving teller of the banking 
house of Lewis Johnson & Company, Washington, D. C. 

William Harris Benedict (XX 232) was conscripted into the Confederate 
States army in Florida in July, 18C3. His health being such tliat he was not 
fit for service, and his father being a strong Union man, he escaped from the 
service and walked seventeen miles through the woods to St. Augustine, then 
held by L^nited States troops. He was sent north on a government transport. 
He was, from 1865 to 1869, in the service of the Pennsylvania raili'oad at 
Philadelphia. In 1885 he went to Florida, and settling at Palm Beach, com- 
menced to grow tropical fruits. This venture was successful, but his wife's 
health, was so bad that he was obliged to return north. Since 1893 he has had 
charge of the estate of a gentleman in New York. 

His wife, Clara Thier, born December 29, 1855, is a daughter of AVilliam 
Thier and Hannah Cutts, of Nottingham, England. She came with her parents 
to America in July, 1864. 

Clara Howard Benedict (XX 233). Her husband, Caleb Rodney Layton, 
was born in GeorgetoAvn, Delaware, March 10, 1826. He was admitted to 
the West Point academy in Jime, 1843, but remained there only two years. 
He practiced law in Georgeto^vn from 1848 to 1861 in partnership with his 
father. Judge C. K. Layton. 

Upon the outbreak of the Civil war he entered the service as a captain of 
the First Delaware volunteer regiment. August 5, 1861, he was commissioned 
captain United States army, in which he reached the rank of lieutenant-colonel. 
Twentieth infantry, April, 1883. He was retired for disability October 8, 1885, 
and died August 20, 1887. 

Mary Gray Benedict (XX 236). Her husband, Eleazar Kingsbury Foster, 
a son of Judge E. K. Foster, of Xew Haven, was born in New Haven, Con- 
necticut, October 31, 1841; was graduated at Yale college in 1863, went to 
Florida in 1865, and engaged in the practice of the law. He held, at various 
times, many positions in the service of the public. He was one of the judges 
of the Circuit court of Florida, state superintendent of public instruction, 
president of the board of tmstees of the Florida Agricultural college at Lake 



102 THE HARRIS RECORD. 

City, a trustee of the "Univorsity of the South," at Siiwanee, Tennessee, and 
couusel of the "Plant Railroad System." He received in his youth an injury 
to the bone of his leg which caused him great suffering for over thirty years, 
and finally cost him iiis life, as he died from the amputation of his leg December 
8, 1899. 

Robert Patterson Benedict (XX 237) is the representative in Chicago of 
the Pennsylvania Salt ]\Ianufacturing company of Philadelphia. His wife, 
Julia Sherman Ells, born October 17, 18G0, is a daughter of Edgar Stimpson 
Ells and Eliza Hoyt Sherman. 

William Harris Blight (XX 238) is a commission merchant of Elmira, 
New York. His wife, Hattie Palmer, was born in 1855. They have no chil- 
dren. 

Cornelia Taylor Blight (XX 241). Her husband, William Sergeant 
Blight, born March 7, 1858, is a son of William Blight and Sarah Penrose, 
of Philadelphia. He is head master of the Blight school in Philadelphia. 
They have no children. 

Walter Butler Harris (XX 242) was graduated at the College of Xew Jer- 
sey, Princeton, Xew Jersey, in 1886. He is now professor of Geodesy in 
Princeton University, and borough engineer and president of the board of 
health of the town of Princeton. He is an elder in the Presbyterian church. 

His wife, Ann Letitia Yeomans, is a daughter of Edward D. Yeomans, 
D.D., and Gorilla Green. 

William Harris (XX -244) received from Princeton college the degree of 
A.B. in 1892, was graduated from Princeton Theological seminary in 1895, is 
a missionary of the Presbyterian cliurch, stationed in the hill country of Siani. 
He has no children. 

Van Alen Harris (XX 245) was graduated from Princeton college in 
1893; an engineer in Porto Rico since April, 1900. 

Robert Patterson Harris (XX 246) was graduated from Princeton college 
in 1895; has been mining in North Carolina since 1898. 

Heni-y Alexander Harris (XX 247) was graduated from Princeton college 
in 1897. 

Stephen Harris (XX 248) was graduated at the University cf Pennsylvania, 
B.S. 1886 and C.E. 1887. Was an assistant engineer on the surveys for the 



GENERATION XX. 103 

Nicaragua canal from 1897 to 1900. In 1901 and 1902 was in the service of 
the city of Philadelphia, and is now an engineer of the Philadelphia and Read- 
ing Railway company. 

His wife, Agnes Cointat, born August 29, 1868, is a daughter of Achilla 
Cointat, of Turny, Department of the Yonne, France, and Clarisse Eleonore 
Dubois. 

John McArthur Harris (XX 249) was graduated at the University of Penn- 
sylvania, A.B. 1887, A.M. 1890, and is an architect of tlie firm of AVilson, 
Harris & Richards, Philadelphia. 

His wife, Sophia AVeygandt, is a daughter of Cornelius AYeygandt, presi- 
dent of the AVestern National bank of Philadelphia, and Lucy Thomas. She 
is a graduate of Bryn Mawr college, A.B. 1889. He is an elder in the Second 
Presbyterian church of Germantown. 

Elizabeth Harris (XX 250) was graduated at Bryn Mawr college, A.B. 
1890, A.M. 1891. Her husband, Edward H. Keiser, born November 20, 
1861, a son of Bernhard Keiser and Katharina Pfeifer, of Allentown, Pennsyl- 
vania, received from Swarthmore college the degrees of B.S. 1880 and M.S. 
1881, and Ph.D. from Johns Hopkins University in 1884. He was professor 
of Chemistry at Bryn Mawr college till 1900, when he was appointed to the 
same position at AVashington university, St. Louis, Missouri. 

Mary Campbell Harris (XX 251) was graduated at Bryn Mawr college, 
A.B. 1895. She is now a teacher at Miss Irvine's school in Philadelphia. 

George Brodhead Harris (XX 253) was graduated at the University of 
Pennsylvania, B.S. 1888 and C.E. 1889. He is treasurer of the Reading Iron 
company, Reading, Pennsylvania. 

His wife, Elizabeth Holbert, born June 21, 1867, is a daughter of Albert 
Ruggles Holbert and Mary Henrietta AV^isner, of AYarwick, Orange county, 
New York. 

Frances Brodhead Harris (XX 254) was graduated at Bryn Mawr college 
in 1892. Her husband, Reynolds Driver Brown, born May 6, 1869, is a 
son of Henry AV. Brown and Alice P. Driver, of Philadelphia; was graduated 
at Harvard university, A.B. 1890, and at the Law school of the University of 
Pennsylvania, 1894. He is a member of the law firm of Burr, Brown & Lloyd, 
Philadelphia, and a professor of Law at the University of Pennsylvania. 



104 THE HARRIS RECORD. 

Clinton Gardner Harris (XX 255) was graduated at the University of 
Pennsylvania, B.S. 1892, B.Arch. 1S93; was in the ofKce of Cope & Stewardson, 
Philadelphia, for several years; studied in Paris 1899 to 1902, and is now in the 
office of Warren & Wetmore, architects, Xew York city. 

Madeline Yaiighan Harris (XX 256) was graduated at Hrya Mawr col- 
lege 1895. Her husband, Henry Ingersoll Brown, born May 7, 1870, is a 
son of Henry W. Brown and Alice P. Driver, of Philadelphia. He was a mem- 
ber of the class of 1891 at the University of Pennsylvania, but left college dur- 
ing his junior year. He is a member of the insurance firm of Henry "\V. Brown 
& Company, of Philadelphia. 

Mary Campbell Parry (XX 257). Her husbajid, William E. Mikell, is a 
cotton broker of Augusta, Georgia. 

George Gowen Parry (XX 258) is engaged in the Law department of the 
Philadelphia and Beading Railway company in Philadelphia. He is a lieuten- 
ant and adjutant of the Second regiment, Pennsylvania volunteers. 

Thomas Powers Harris (XX 259) was a member of the Class of 1891 of 
the University of Pennsylvania, but his health did not permit him to pursue his 
studies beyond his junior year. He is the owner of the Sapony cattle ranch. 
Cedar Edge, Colorado. He has taken the name of his mother's father, and is 
now Thomas Harris Powers. 

Alan Campbell Harris (XX 260) is engaged in the study of art in Europe. 

Henry Frazer Harris (XX 261) is a student at Princeton university. 

Joseph R. Pearee (XX 262) served in the United States army during tlie 
early part of the Civil war. He was very badly wounded at the second battle 
of Bull Run, Virginia, in August, 1862. Pie lay on the field for more than 
twenty-four hours, and when he was removed to Bethel hospital, Washington, 
D. C, he was too much exhausted to recover, and died after an amputation of 
his leg. 

Eliza Jane Pearee (XX 264). Her husband, Richard Alexander Douglas, 
born December 31, 1824, died September 2, 1871. 

Henrietta Day Pearee (XX 265). Her husband, Benjamin Ashburner, 
born December 1, 1847, died May 8, 1887. He was in the service of the 
Empire Transportation line, a department of the Pennsylvania Railroad. 



GEXERATION XX. 105 

Their son, Algernon Eyre Ashburner, has in his possession a pair of old 
plated teapots which are marked with the name Harris, 1758, which doubtless 
belonged to Thomas Harris (XVI 2), and half a dozen teaspoons of the same 
date, which are marked with what he thinks is the family' crest. 

Hannah Mary Long (XX 267). Her hnsband, Eben Woodward, bom 
Xovember 5, 1826, died September 7, 1888. 

Elizabeth Ann Long (XX 268). Her husband, William Coleman Hemp- 
hill, born June 10, 1838, died July 17, 1887. 

Mary Jane Grier Long (XX 269) lived with her mother at Brandywine 
Manor till 1867, when she removed to her present home at Honey Brook. Her 
husband, Xeal Graham Kurtz, was born October 13, 1832, and is still living. 
They have no children. 

Emma M. Buchanan (XX 270) is a nurse. 

Joseph F. Mackelduff (XX 282) has no children. 

Clara Augusta MeClure (XX 284) has no children. 

Sarah Jane McClure (XX 286). Her first husband. John Wesley Good, 
was of Waynesburg, Pennsylvania, born January 29, 1843, died July 9, 
1873, at Downingtown, Pennsylvania. Her second husband, George Abner 
Brainard, was of Buda, Illinois. 

Elizabeth Mackelduff ]\IcClure (XX 287) finished her education in the 
Mansfield Xormal school, Mansfield, Pennsylvania. Her husband, George 
Emerson Prutsman, was of Tioga, Tioga comity, Pennsylvania, born May 9, 
1836. They removed in 1879 to Buda, Bureau county, Illinois, and in 1895 
to Galesburg, Knox county, Illinois, where they now live. The family are all 
members of the Congregational church. 

John Franklin McClure (XX 289) was educated at Kingston seminary, 
Kingston, Pennsylvania; was gradiiated M.D. 1875, Bellevue Medical college, 
and settled the same year in Watsontown, Pennsylvania. He was a successful 
physician, and a public-spirited citizen. He was chief burgess of Watsontown 
at the time of his death, a director of the Farmers' National bank, and a mem- 
ber of the Board of Trade. His wife, Jane M. Mills, was of La^^Tcnceville, 
Tioga county, Pennsylvania. They had no children. 

George Howard Macklin (XX 291) and 



106 THE HAEKIS EECORD. 

James Macklin (XX 292) are associated as merchants in McVeytown, 
Pennsylvania, imder the firm name of William Macklin's Sons, they having 
succeeded to their father's business. George Howard Macklin's first wife, 
Rebecca E. Ross, died October 29, 1880; his second wife, Rosanna M. Kyle, 
died November 17, 1888. 

James Macklin is an elder in the Presbyterian church at McVeytown. 

Harris C. Macklin (XX 294) holds the position of general storekeeper of 
the ISTorfolk and Western Railway company, at Roanoke, Virginia. 

Sally Henrietta Haman (XX 298). Her husband, John S. McCnim, died 
March 20, 1899. 

Lizzie Calbraith Haman (XX 299). She has resumed the original spelling 
of the family name and writes it "Hammond." 

Charles R. McBride (XX 300), Harry McBride (XX 301) and the hus- 
band of Nannie McBride (XX 302), Allen A. Leonard, are all in the service of 
the Pennsylvania Railroad company. 

Lizzie Morrow (XX 303). Her husband, John A. Canan, is a prominent 
business man of Altoona, Pennsylvania, and an elder in the Broad Avenue Pres- 
byterian church of that town. 

Nannie Louise Haman (XX 306) has no children. 

Margaret Blanche Haman (XX 307). Her husband, John Hamilton, is 
a graduate of the Medical school of the University of Pennsylvania, and is a 
successful practitioner of medicine in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. They have no chil- 
dren. 

Edward Haman (XX 308) is associated with his father as a druggist in 
Cedar Rapids, Iowa. He has no children. 

George Calbraith Clarke (XX 335) is a civil engineer in the service of the 
Pennsylvania Railroad company, in charge of the LTnion station, Pittsburg, and 
of new construction at Latrobe and elsewhere on the Western Division. 

His wife, Elizabeth S. Lloyd, is a daughter of Wilson Lloyd and Sarah 
McAllister, now of "High's Fancy," Juniata coimty, Pennsylvania. 



GENERATION XXI. 



107 



GENERATION XXI. 



INDEX 
NO. 


MEMBEH OF FAMILY. 


COXSOET. 


BIItTH. 


MARRIAGE. 


DEATH. 


RESIDENCE. 


The Cuildken of Judith Ann Bodley (XX 1) and Abeam S. Mitchell. 


XXI 

1 


Harry Bodley 

Mitchell. 












The Children of Euphemia Beown Bodley (XX 2) and Dr. Benjamin Hensley. 



Katharine Howard 

Hensley. 

Harry Bodley 

Hensley. 



Samuel Bowcn. 



Oct. 18, 1852. 



The Children of Ella Cecil Bodley (XX 9) and Henry W. Hough. 



Emeline Robert 

Hough. 
Jessie Bledsoe 

Hough. 
Bodley Hough. 
Miriam Gratz Hough. 
Cecil Bodley Hough. 
Raymond Henry 

Hough. 
Effle Innes Hough. 



Apr. 23, 1873. 

May 28, 1874. 
Feb. 26, 1876. 
Oct. 1, 1877. 
July 30, 1879. 

Mar. 2, 1881. 
Aug. 18, 1883. 



The Children of Pearce Bodley (XX 16) and Mary F. A. McHenry. 



11 Beverly Meriwether 

I Bodley. 

12 j Innes Harwood 

Bodley. 



Sep. 18,1887. 
Aug. 30, 1889. 



The Children of Temple Bodley (XX 10) and Jane Edith Fosdick. 



13 



William Fosdick 

Bodley. 
Ellen Pearce Bodley. 
Edith Fosdick Bodley. 



Nov. 6, 1893. 
May 10, 1897, 
Nov. 30, 1900. 



Nov. 18, 1894. 



108 



THE HARRIS RECORD. 
GENERATION XXI. 



INDEX 

MEMHEK OF FAMILY. 



BESIDENCE. 



The Children of Nancy Stanhope Hurst (XX 23) and Wynpham Robertson Trigg. 



XXI 

16 
17 
18 
19 
20 



James Trigg. 
Sallie Mitchell Trigg. 
Ellen Gill Trigg. 
Sue Pelhani' Trigg. 
Wyudham Stanhope 
Trigg. 

21 Byrd Campbell Trigg. 

22 I Mary Hurst Trigg. 

23 j Davis Buckner Trigg. 

24 Thomas King Trigg. 



Frank WillarJ Rigg. 



A. Wyatt. 



Apr. 6, 1862. 
Nov. 24, 1803. 
Feb. 21, 1867. 
Apr. 6, 1868. 

Oct. 24, 1869. 
Dec. 7, 1871. 
Sep. 12, 1874. 
Apr. 11, 1876. 
Jan. 6, 1878. 



Oct. 2, 1895. 



Feb. 28, 1891. 



in infancy. 
Nov. 9, 1868. 



in infancy. 



in infancy. 



The Children of Mary Hurst (XX 25) and John Victor Doniphan. 



John Victor 

Doniphan. 
Edward Stites 

Doniphan. 



1877. 
1881. 



The Children of Catharine Shiell Church (XX 27) and Rev. John H. Waterman. 



Maria Church 

Waterman, 
.Jame.s Waterman. 
William Bodley 

Waterman, 
George Starling 

Waterman, 
Edward Bentley 

Waterman. 
Katharine Hays 

Waterman. 
Mary Hanna 

Waterman. 
John Gill Waterman. 
Harry Bodley 

Waterman. 
Thomas Talbot 

Waterman. 



James K. Johnston. 
Bina Murphy. 


Apr. 2,1860. 
Aug. 12, 1862. 


Sep. 11,1888. 
May 8, 1890. 






Oct. 21,1864. 




Aug. 2,1869. 


Helen L. Gillogly 


Feb. 15, 1867. 


Dec. 15, 1892. 




Ida Belle Francisco. 


Apr. 13, 1869. 


Dec. 25, 1895. 




John C. Hagler. 


Sep. 1, 1872. 


Mar., 1897. 




Louis H. Gould. 


July 19, 1875. 
Feb. 20, 1878. 

Feb. 20, 1878. 

Apr., 1885. 


Sep. 22,1901. 







The Children of William Bodley Church 


(XX 29) and Elizabeth Lunn 




37 1 Catharine Church. 












38 Marion Church. 












39 !.Iames Lunn Church. 












40 


Elizabeth Church. 












41 


William Bodley 

Church. 












42 


Hugh Shiell Church. 












43 


Francis Church. 












44 


Maria Church. 












45 


Mary Church 












46 


Edward Church. 













GENEEATION XXI. 
GENERATION XXI. 



109 



MEMBER OF FAMILY. 



MARRIAGE. 



BBSIDENCE. 



The Children of Catharine Innes Owsley (XX 43) and J. William Akin, M.D. 



XXI 

47 

48 
49 
50 



Elizabeth Bodley 

Akin. 
Jane Akin. 

William Owsley Akin. 
Thomas Bodley Akin. 



June 1, 1870. 
Aug. 14, 1872. 
Dec. 11, 1874. 
Apr. 26, 1878. 



Feb. 26, 1881. 



The Children of Amelia Bryan Ow.sley (XX 46) and Lawrence Carr Robinson. 



51 Lalla Robinson. 



Embrey Lee 

Swcaringen. Juno 9, 1870. 



Jan. 4, 1887. 



July 11, 1897. 





The Children of Amelia Bryan Owsley (XX 46) and George Garvin Brown. 


52 


Mary Garvin Brown. 




Jan. 29,1877. 








53 


Owsley Brown. 




Feb. 25, 1879. 








54 


Elizabeth Bodley 

Brown. 




June 6, 1881. 








55 


George Garvin 

Brown, Jr. 




Nov. 12, 1882. 




in infancy. 




56 


James Holloway 

Brown. 




June 19, 1884. 




in infancy. 




57 


Robinson 

Swearingen Brown. 




Mar. 30, 1887. 








58 


Innes Akin Brown. 




Mar. 19, 1888. 








59 


Amelia Belle Brown. 




Mar. 6, 1889. 









The Children of Ann Isabella Owsley (XX 47) and William F. Booker. 



60 


Boyle Owsley Booker. 




Oct. 20, 1873. 




Sep. 


18, 1874. 




61 


William Frederick 
















Booker. 


Mattie Lee Williams. 


Aug. 27, 1876. 


Oct. 9, 1901. 








62 


Maria Lewis Booker. 




Aug. 14, 1878. 










63 


Edmund Booker. 




Dec. 29, 1879. 










64 


Bodley Booker. 




May 2, 1887. 










65 


Peaslee G. Booker. 




June 27, 1889. 










66 


Elizabeth Booker. 




Oct. 9, 1894. 











The Children of William Owsley (XX 48) and Florence Ronald. 



67 Erasmus Boyle 

Owsley. 

68 Ronald Owsley. 

69 William Booker 

Owsley. 



1881. 
1891. 



in infancy. 



110 



THE IIAHRIS RECORD. 
GENERATION XXI. 



MEMBER OF FAMILY. 



BIHTH. 



MARRIAGE. 



RESIDENCE. 



The Children of Thomas Bodley (XX 53) and Gkace Downey. 



XXI 

70 Grace Mabel Bodley. 

71 daughter. 



Oct. 25,1884. 
Nov. 9, 1894. 



The Children of Harry Innes Bodley iXX 54) and Mary Anna Gillespie. 



72 


George Hendrick 

Houghton Bodley. 




Oct. 5, 1879. 








73 


Harry Innes 

Bodley, Jr. 




Apr. 8, ISSti. 




July 25, 1896. 




74 


Charles Gillespie 

Bodley. 




Mar. 5,1886. 








73 


Eleanor Stewart 

Bodley. 




June 29. 1887. 








76 


Anna Davenport 

Bodley. 




Oct. 20, 1889. 









The Children of John Curd Bodley (XX 63) and Lelah Barnes. 



77 Francis Charlton 

Bodley. 

78 Mary Ethel Bodley. 



Dec. 29, 1806. 
June 1, 1891. 



The Children of Florence Dudley Bodley (XX 65) and Rufus Davenport. 



Florence Davenport. 
Rufus Bodley 

Davenport. 



Oct. 15, 1888. 
May 13, 1891. 



Mar. 22, 1896. 



The Children of Mary Weston Gill iXX 69) and Frederick S. Jones. 


81 
82 


George Gill Jones. 
Ellen Bodley Jones. 


Sep. 1.5,1891. 
May 16, 1893. 








The Children of Annabel. Hurst Gill (XX 70) and Cilarles C. Guilford. 


83 


Ellen Pindell 

Guilford. 




Nov. 6,1902. 









GENEEATION XXI. 
GENERATION XXI. 



Ill 



INDEX 
NO. 


MEMBEK or FAMILY. CONSORT. 


BIETH. 


MARRIAGE. 


DEATH. 


r.ESIDENCE. 


The Children of John Harris Todd (XX 74) and Bonnie Brodhead, 


XXI 

84 


Bonnie Brodhead 

Todd. 




July 16,1867. 








The Children of John Harris Todd (XX 74) and Annie Boifieullet. 


85 
86 


Annie Innes Todd. 
Margaret Bates Todd. 




Dec. 29. 1879. 
May 22, 1884. 




Jan. 7, 1882. 




The Children of Chapman Coleman Todd {XX 75) and Ann Mary Thornton. 


87 


James Thornton Todd. 




July 18, 1870. 




Aug. 11, 1870. 




The Children of Chapsian Coleman Todd (XX 75) and Eliza James. 



Andrew James Todd. 
Harry Innes Todd. 
Chapman Coleman 

Todd. 



Nov. 3,1876. 
July 28, 1880. 



Jan. 22,1893. 



July 13,1877. 



The Children of George Davidson Todd (XX 80) and Laura Ciiapin Durkee. 



91 Laura Durkee Todd. 

92 George Davidson 

Todd, Jr. 



Mar. 8, 1S99. 
Dec. 15, 1900. 



The Children of Mary Hanna Todd (XX 82) and James L. Watson. 



93 Jane Todd Watson. 

94 [James Sa£fell Watson. 

95 Harry Innes Todd 

Watson 



Oct. 27,1882. 
Apr. 21, 1887. 



Dec. 16, 188&. 



The Children of Kitty Thomas Todd (XX 84) and S. B. Holmes. 



Jane Todd Holmes. 
John Tddd Holmes. 



Aug. 1,1886. 
Apr. 20, 1888. 



112 



THE HARRIS RECORD. 
GENERATION XXI. 



MEMBER OF FAMILY. 



MAKBLIGE. 



BESIDEXCE. 



The Children of Robert Crittenden Todd (XX 85) and William Virginia Cotton. 



XXI < 

9S ' Virginia Cotton Todd. 
99 ILinv Inn.'s T...l,l. 

100 Faniii.' C'l.tlun Todd. 

101 Janifs Davidsi.nTodd.l 

102 Logan Card well Todd.; 



July 28, 1892. 
Jan. 30, 1894. 
May 23, 189.5. 
Dec. 22. 1896. 
Dee. 23, 1899. 



The Children of Katharine Crittenden Watson (XX 88) and Ltne Starling. 



103 i Henry Watson 

Starling. 

104 Lync Starling, Jr. 

105 Kitty Junes Starling. 

106 I JIaria Heusley 

j Starling. 



Sep. 19, 1873. 
Nov. 2, 1875. 
Sep. 13, 1877. j 

Apr. 18, 1884. , 



The Children of Maria Crittenden Watson (XX 89) and Joseph Weisiger Lindsey. 



107 
108 
109 
110 
111 



Henry Watson 

Lindsey. 
Thomas Noble 

Lindsey. 
Elizabeth Watson 

Lindsey. 
Marie Crittenden 

Lindsey. 
Joseph Weisiger 

Lindsey, Jr. 



Oct. 23, 1873. 
Nov. 30, 1874. 
Feb. 9, 1876. 
Sep. 27,1878. 
Jan. 10, 1882. 



The Children of Emmeline Swigert Watson (XX 90) and Robert A. Waller. 



112 Robert A. Waller, Jr. 



Sep. 4, 1878. 



The Children of Sadie Bacon Crittenden (XX 95) and J. Swigert Taylor. 



113 


Eugene Crittenden 

Taylor. 




Jan. 5, 1882. 




June 14, 1883. 




114 


Mary Belle Taylor. 




Sep. 20, 1883. 








115 


Edmund Haynes 

Taylor. Jr. 




Nov. 30, 1886. 









The Children of Martha Spotts (XX 97) and Theodore Zacherie Blakeman. 



Leontine Spotts 

Blakeman. 



GENERATION XXI. 



113 



GENERATION XXI. 



MEMBER OF FAMILY. 



MARMACIE. 



RESIDENCE. 



The Ohildhen of Leontine Spotts (XX 98) and Charles McIntosh Keeney. 



XXI 

117 



118 



Ethel Spotts Keeney. 
Innes Spotts Keeney. 



Theodore Edwin 

Tomlinson. 



Dec. 17, 1902. 



New York, N. Y. 



The Children of Olqa Russel (XX 111) and Thomas Hall. 


119 


Russel Hall. 












The Children of Robert Edward Russel (XX 113) and Maude Murphy. 



120 Eleanor Russel. 

121 Olga Russel. 

122 Jane Russel. 

123 Roberta. Russel. 



Aug. 3, 1889. 
Apr. 20, 1891. 
Mar. 8, 1893. 
May 18, 1898. 



The Children of Laura Griffin Todd (XX 114) and William W. Black. 



12.5 
126 



Cornelia Culmies 

Black. 
William C. Black. 
Isaac Shelby Black. 



Apr. 11, 1875. 
Aug. 1, 1876. 
Jan. 5, 1878. 



The Children of Susan Hampton Todd (XX 110) and Vernon Wolfe. 



128 
129 



130 
131 



Sarah Shelby Wolfe. 

Charles Todd Wolfe. 
Chancie Johnson 

Wolfe. 
Susie Vernon Wolfe. 
Mary Charuley Wolfe. 



Harrison Mason 

Shallcros 



Apr. 20, 1874. i Apr. 20, 1895. 
Aug. 31, 1878. ' 



Not. 25, 1882. 
Nov. 11, 1887. 
Nov. 30, 1895. 



The Children of Sarah Silelby Wall (XX 124) and W. H. Lindsay'. 



132 Sarah Wall Lindsay. S. M. Talliaferro 



Salt Lake City. 



lU 



THE HARRIS RECORD. 
GENERATION XXI. 



MEMBER OF FAMILY. 



MARRIAGE. 



RESIDENCE. 



The Children of Alice Hathaway (XX 127) and P. T. Johnson. 



XXI 

133 : Jam^sLeefer Johnsou 

134 ! Henrietta Johnson. 

135 Alleine Johnson. 

136 Richard Johnson. 

137 i Tyler Johnson. 

138 Alfred Johnson. 



The Children of Letitia Shelby Griffith (XX 137) and Henry Colston Watkins. 


139 Virginia Griffith 

Watkins. 




Sep. 24,1883. 






The Children of Joshua Todd Griffith (XX 139) and Jettie Rothschild. 


140 Virginia Todd Griffith. 

141 Joshua Todd Griffith. 












The Children of Florence Griffith (XX 140) and Harmon A. Miller. 



142 Amelia F. Miller. 

143 Virginia Griffith 

Miller. 

144 Daniel Griffith Miller. 

145 Florence Miller. 

146 Horace W. Miller. 



The Children of Rosa Burwell Griffith (XX 141) and Dr. Samuel Shelton Watkins. 



147 
148 
149 



Rose Yandell Watkins. 
Sue Roberts Watkins. 
Daniel Griffith 

Watkins. 



The Children of Dr. Daniel Moseley Griffith (XX 142) and Sue Mildred Heer. 



Mildred Taylor 

Griffith. 



GEXERATIOX XXI. 

GENERATION XXI. 



115 



MEMBER OF FAMILT. 



MABniAGE. 



RESIDENCE. 



The Children of Edmund Lyne Starling (XX 1.53) and Mary B. Stewart. 



XXI 
















151 


Edmund Lyne 

Starling. 




July 31, 18(54. 










152 


Stewart Starling. 


Nellie Ford. 


Mar. 9, 1866. 


Nov. 2 


5, 1S9C. 






153 


Ann Maria Starling. 




Aug. 11, 1867. 










154 


Lyne Starling. 




.Tan. 23, 1869. 






July 11, 1869. 




155 


Mary Stewart 
















Jstarling. 


Sterling W. Price. 


Dec. 3,1870. 


May 


3. 1894. 




Henderson, Ky. 


156 


Thoma.s Stewart 

Starling. 




Feb. 4, 1872. 










157 


Miriam Starling. 




Oct. 25,1873. 










158 


Susanna Lyne 
















Starling. 




.Tuly 9, 1879. 











The Children of George Lyne (XX 155) and .Tunia B. Averitt. 



159 
160 



Susan Starling Lyne. 
Lafayette Averitt 

Lyne. 



Feb. 
Sep. 



16, 1880. 
3, 1882. 



Aug. 25, 1889. 
July 5, 1883. 



The Children of George Lyne (XX 155) and Martha E. Foster. 



161 
162 



Henry Lyne. 
Edmund Starling 

Lyne. 
Enoch William Lyne. 



July 31, 1887. 



July 5, 1889. 
May 15, 1894. 



The Children of William Starling Ly'ne (XX 156) and Mary McDowell Meyer. 



164 


Charles Starling Lyne. 




Oct. 16,1876. 








165 


John Meyer Lyne. 




Jan. 18, 1878. 








166 


Oscar Lyne. 




Oct. 2, 1879. 








167 


Mary Lyne. 




Oct. 9, 1883. 








168 


William Starling 

Lyne. 




Nov. 22, 1885. 








169 


Florence Lyne. 




Aug. 15, 1888. 








170 


Susie Swigert Lyne. 




Jan. 8, 1894. 









The Children of Susanna Lyne (XX 157) and Jacob Swigert. 



171 Mary Heudrick 

Swigert. 

172 Starling Swigert. 



Aug. 24, 1880. ! 
Oct. 7, 1882. 



116 



THE HARRIS RECORD. 
GENERATION XXI. 



MEMBER OF FAMILY. 



BIRTH. 



MARRIAGE. 



BESIDEN'CE. 



The CnrLDBEN of IJebecca Jane Culton (XX 159) and V^'illiam W. Moses. 



XXI [ 

172 l.Tohn Culton Moses. 

173 j Harris Culton Moses. 
17-1 G. Herman Moses. 
175 Anna Marguerite 

Moses. 



May 18, 1876. 
Mar. 11, 1879. 
Mar. 25, 1881. 

Mar. 11, 1889. 



Dee. 26, 1878. 
Jan. 22, 1884. 
Mar. 31, 1892. 

Apr. 11, 1892. 



The Childken of Thomas Haeris Morgan (XX 161) and Ida Wolf. 



176 I Lizzie Morgan. 

177 jTliomas Harris 

Morgan 



Apr. 15, 1881. 
Jan. 4, 1884. 



The Children of Hannah Morgan (XX 162) and Stephen F. Penrose. 



178 
179 



Alice Malvina 



Martlia Annie 



Henry S. Jotinson. 
Milton Johnson. 



Mar. 13, 1872. 
July 26, 1878. 



Feb. 10, 1898. 
Not. 20, 1901. 



Richland, 

Bucks Co., Pa. 



The Children of Catharine Morgan (XX 163) and Charles E. Smulling. 



180 
181 
182 



Antrim Morgan 

Smulling. 
Robert Edmund 

Smulling. 
Hannah Penrose 

Smulling. 



June 6, 1880. 
Sep. 5, 1882. 
Sep. 20,1884. 





The Children of George 


C. Morgan (XX 164) and Inez M. Brook. 




183 


Warren B. Morgan. 




Feb. 25, 1881. 








184 


Lottie Morgan. 




Aug. 22, 1882. 








185 


Elsie Morgan. 




Feb. 6, 1884. 




Apr., 1885. 




186 


George R. Morgan. 




July 22, 1886. 








187 


John B. Morgan. 




Aug. 23, 1888. 








188 


Inez Morgan. 




Feb. 8, 1891. 








189 


Blanche Morgan. 




Sep. 10, 1892. 






, 


190 


.Tanet Morgan. 




Jan. 11, 1894. 




Dec, 1894. 


I 


191 


Catharine Morgan. 




Sep. 1, 1898. 









The Children of Joseph A. Morgan (XX 165) and Annie Long. 



192 



Martha Harris 

Morgan. 



Apr. 30, 1893. 



GENERATION XXI. 
GENERATION XXI. 



117 



MEMBEIt OF FAMILY. 



BIIITH. 



RESIDENCE. 



The Children of Malachi H. Llewellyn (XX 166) and Emma M. Myers. 



XXI 
















193 


Margaret Llewellyn. 


never married. 


Sep. 5, 1873. 




July 27 


1894. 


West Philadelphia. 


194 


M. Melchior 
















Llewellyn. 


unmarried. 


Apr. 3, 1879. 








West Philadelphia. 


195 


Stephen Llewellyn. 


unmarried. 


Sep. 25,1884. 








West Philadelphia. 


196 


Mary Esther 
















Llewellyn. 




Jan. 25, 1889. 








West Philadelphia. 



The Children of Thomas C. Llewellyn (XX 167) and Clara V. McWilliams. 



197 
198 
199 



Esther Llewellyn. 
John Llewellyn. 
Henry Llewellyn. 



Dec. 9, 1882. 
Jan. 18, 1885. 
Apr. 14, 18S7. 



Dec. 22, 1884. West Pikeland, Pa. 
West Pikeland. Pa. 
West Pikeland, Pa. 



The Children of Martha S. Llewellyn (XX 170) and Lewis E. Pennypacker. 



200 
201 



Ear! S. Pennypacker. 
George L. 

Pennypacker. 



May 17, 1892. 
Oct. 4, 1897. 



West Pikeland, Pa. 
West Pikeland, Pa. 



The Children of William Habris (XX 172) and Clara MimsY. 



Frank W. Mondell. 



Dec. 14, 1877. 



May 14, 1899. 



Laramie City, Wy. 



The Children of Alfonso Harris (XX 174) and Mabtha A. Everett. 



203 
204 
205 



Franklin Harris. 
Mary Harris. 
Pearl Harris. 



Sep. 6, 1878. 
Oct. 11, 1883. 
July 10, 1886. 



Oct. 4. 1885. 
June 30, 1884. 



The Children of Mary Sylvania Sloan (XX 176) and Abram H. Broweb. 



206 Abram John Brower. 

207 Minnehaha Brower. 

208 Vinnie Bird Brower. 



Sep. 18, 1872. 
July 19, 1876. 
Sep. 15, 1881. 



June 10, 1878. 
Aug. 8, 1882. 



The Childben of Albert Barnes Sloan (XX 177) and Lizzie K. Reese. 



209 Alberta Oliver Sloan. 



June 10, 1887. 



Sep. 15, 1885. 



118 



THE HARRIS RECORD. 
GENERATION XXI. 



INDEX 
NO. 


MEMBER OF FAMILY. 


CONSORT. BIRTH. 


MARRIAGE. 


DEATH, 


EE8IDENCE. 


The Children of Abel Reese Sloan (XX 179) and Mart Dickinson. 


XXI 

210 
211 


Laura May Sloan. 
Annie Zell Sloan. 




Aug. 31, 1877. 


Nov. 17, 1886. 




The CniLDREN of Mary Eleanor Sloan (XX 184) and Peter Hlnry Thomson. 


212 Robert Craig 

Thomson. 




Apr. 19, 1SS3. 








The Children of Annie Zell Sloan (XX 180) and Henry Harrison Old. 



213 Carolyn Louise Old. 

214 Harriet Sloan Old. 

215 Benjamin Harrison 

Old. 



Mar. 7, 1874. 
June 22, 1875. 



Nov. 26, 1877. 



The Children of Francis Henry Sloan (XX 187) and .Jessie Vandeeoef. 



216 
217 



218 
219 



Aline Sloan. 
Russel Robinson 

Sloan. 
Jessie Vanderoef 

Sloan. 
Harold Olcott Sloan. 



Mar. 13, 1879. 
May 29, 1881. 



May 2, 1884. 
June 22, 1894. 



The Children of John Harris Sloan (XX 189) and Lilia Gabretson. 



220 



221 

222 



Douglas Garretson 

Sloan. 

John Harris Sloan, Jr. 

Kenneth Henderson 

Sloan. 



Apr. 8, 1890. 
Mar. 30, 1892. 



May 31, 1894. 



The Children of Mary Anna Harris Sloan (XX 191) and Samuel Evans Haines. 



223 
224 
225 



Oliver Sloan Haines. 
Malachi Sloan Haines. 
Edward Steel Haines. 



Marie Eldridge. 



Adella Engle 

Davidson. 



Aug. 12. 1860. July 24, 1890. 

May 15, 1803. Mar. 1, 1864. 

Aug. 9, 1871. June 10, 1895. 



GENEEATION XXI. 
GENERATION XXI. 



119 



MEMBER OF FAMILY. 



BIKTH. 



MARRIAGE. 



RESIDENCE. 





The Children of Albert Wilson 


Sloan (XX 194) and Mart MacLeister Webster. 


XXI 














226 


Elizabeth Shaw Sloan. 


Nathan Hays Bonsall. 


Sep. 4, 1864. 


Ma,r. 25, 1886. 






227 


Malachi Wilson Sloan. 




June 2, 1865. 




in infancy. 




228 


.Joseph Webster Sloan. 


Louisa Sellers Bonsall. 


Feb. 17, 1866. 


June 3, 1891. 






229 


George Washington 

Sloan. 




May 14, 1867. 




Oct. 22,1896. 




230 


Benjamin Hannum 

Sloan. 




Dee. 8,1869. 




Aug. 8,1894. 




231 


Elsie Sloan. 


James LaEferty 














Hoffner. 


Jan. 4, 1871. 


Sep. 16,1891. 


in infancy. 


San Francisco, Cal. 


232 


Annie Zell Sloan. 




May 1, 1872. 









The Children of Ellen Bailey Sloan (XX 195) and Samuel F. Pancoast. 



233 


Elizabeth Shaw 

Pancoast. 


unmarried. 


Aug. 19, 1872. 








234 


Malachi Sloan 

Pancoast. 


unmarried. 


July 13, 1874. 








235 


Martha Harris 

Pancoast. 




Aug. 28, 1876. 




Feb. 25, 1892. 




236 


Laura Ross Pancoast. 




Aug. 25, 1881. 




Aug. 13, 1882. 





The Children of William Jones Sloan (XX 196) and Mart Ann Davidson. 



237 
238 
239 



Robert Lukens Sloan. 
Malachi Wilson Sloan. 
William Jones Sloan. 



Grace Thatcher. 
Mabel Edna Adams. 



Sep. 12, 1871. 

Dec. 26, 1874. Nov. 26, 1902. 

May 23, 1877. Sep. 12, 1898. 



Jan., 1874. 



The Children of Martha Harris Sloan (XX 197) and William Walker Kendall. 



240 


Elizabeth Sloan 


Charles Hatfield 










Kendall. 


Miller. 


June 9,1872. 


Oct. 


4, 1893. 


241 


William Jones 

Kendall. 




Apr. 13, 1874. 







Aug., 1893. 



The Children of John Harris Sloan (XX 199) and Lydia Brooks Bowden. 



242 Mary Bowden Sloan. 



Nov. 17, 1896. 



The Children of Bessie Moore Sloan (XX 201) and Isaac Burton Roberts. 



243 
244 



Elizabeth Daniel 

Roberts. 
Alan Burton Roberts. 



Sep. 24,1899. 
Mar. 23, 1902. 



120 



THE HARRIS RECORD. 
GENERATION XXI. 



INDBX 
NO. 


MEMBER OF FAMILY. 


CONSORT. 


BIRTH. 


marriage. 


DEATH. 


residence. 


The Children of Annie Zell Sloan (XX 202) and Chahles W. Bailey. 


XXI 

245 
246 


Emilie Aymar Bailey. 
Beatrice Bailey. 




Mar. 25, 1887. 
Mar. 1, 1892. 









The Children of John Sloan (XX 203) and Elizabeth Chenowith. 



247 



248 
249 



Elizabeth Chenowith 

Sloan. 
Ruth Sloan. 
Annie Bailey Sloan. 



Oct. 8, 1883. 

1887. 



in infancy. 



The Children of Elizabeth W. Harris (XX 210) and William Porter Steele. 



250 



Jeannie Porter Steele. 



Charles S. Robinson 

Smith. Mar. 20, 1858. Apr. 29, 1879. 



The Children of Elizabeth W. Harris (XX 210) and Thomas Vincent de Wierzbicki. 



251 
252 



Henri Vincent de 

Wierzbicki. 
Vincent de Wierzbielii. 



Sep. 3, 18G7. 
Oct. 9, 1868. 



Sep. 13, 1868. 



The Children of Francis Mather Harris (XX 211) and Sarah E. 



253 Marie J. R. C. Harris. Robert Gilchrist. About 1864 



1894. Mar. 1, 1806. Greenville. N. J 



The Children of John Young Hooper (XX 212) and Helen J. Baldwin. 



254 


William Allen Hooper. 


Caroline Emily . 


June 


1, 1866. 


Dec. 18, 1885. 






255 


Charles Campbell 

Hooper. 




Sep. 


1, 1868. 








256 


Ralph Bertram 

Hooper. 


Emma Josephine 
















Montague. 


July 


31, 1870. 


Nov. 1, 1891. 






257 


Sandford A. Hooi)er. 




July 


7, 1872. 








258 


Guy Earlscourt 
















Hooper. 


Cloris Baldwin. 


Dec. 


23, 1874. 


May 26, 1895. 






259 


Beryl Bernice hooper. 




Jan. 


21, 1877. 




Apr. 30,1878. 




260 


John Young 
















Hooper, Jr. 


Edna Eddy. 


Mar. 


23, 1879. 


Mar. 27, 1902. 






261 


Elizabeth Mary 

HiTOper. 




Feb. 


7, 1882. 








262 


Gertrude Mehetable 
Hooi>er. 




Apr. 


7, 1884. 








263 


Prank Lee Harris 

Hooper. 




Mar. 


16, 1886. 








264 


Annie Wood Hooper. 




Mar. 


28, 1888. 









GENERATION XXI. 

GENERATION XXI. 



121 



MEMBER OF FAMILY. 



MARRIAGE. 



RESIDENCE. 



The Childhen of Charles Mather Hooper (XX 21-1) and Susan Elizabeth Stoever. 



XXI 

265 
266 
267 



John Stoever Hooper. 
Mary I#ouisa Hooper. 
Campbell Harris 

Hooper. 



Theresa Mary Prank. 
Noble Charles Darrow. 



Aug. 25, 1874. 
Feb. 11,1877. 



Oct. 9, 1881. 



May 13, 1001. 
Sep. 17, 1900. 



The Children of Annie Wood Hooper (XX 215) and John S. De Wolf. 



268 
269 



270 
271 



Minnie Elizabeth 

De Wolf. 

Bessie Maude 

De Wolf, 
a son. 

Edith M. De Wolf. 



Charles E. Burdick. 
unmarried. 
Leslie A. Jenkins. 



Apr. 22, 1873. 
June 10, 1877. 



Apr. 18, 1895. 



Jan. 30, 1897. 



in infancy. 



The Children of Campbell Harris Hooper (XX 216) and Effie A. Manley. 



272 
273 
274 



Louise Hooper. 
Grace Hooper. 
Mary Hooper. 



Alviu Minkler. 
Alfred Smith. 



July 20, 1876. 

June 10, 1878. 

1886. 



The Children of Mary J. Young (XX 217) and Albert M. North. 



275 Ellen Harris North, unmarried. 



Nov. 27, 1858. 



Geneseo, N. Y. 



The Children of John Young (XX 218) and Martha Eliza Carr. 



276 
277 



Mary Paschall Young. 
Katharine Campbell 

Young. 



Jan. 5, 1899. 
July 23, 1900. 



The Children of Jane Lee Young (XX 221) and Louis H. Powell. 



278 
279 
280 



Katharine Buckley 

Powell. 

Francis Whiting 

Powell. 

Mary Campbell 

Powell. 



Feb. 8, 1882. 
Mar. 13, 1884. 
Oct. 21,1885. 



July 15, 1886. 



122 



THE HAEEIS KECOED. 
GENERATION XXI. 



MEMBEK OF FAMILY. 



BIBin. 



MABRIAUE. 



RESIDENCE. 



XXI 

281 
282 



The Children of Elizabeth Taylor Harris (XX 22.3) and Grenville Gaines. 



Mary Foster Gaines. 
William Harris 

Gaines. 
Elizabeth Taylor 

Gaines. 



Sep. 20, 1883. 
Mar. 11, 1887. 
June 11, 1889. 



The Children of Travers Daniel (XX 225) and Flora L. Bradford. 



284 

285 



286 



Alice Vivian Daniel. 
Mary Campbell 

Daniel. 
Travers Daniel. 



Feb. 10, 1879. 



Aug. 8, 1880. 
Oct. 3, 1883. 



The Children of Lucy Jaudon Harris (XX 228) and Theodobe FBOXHiNaHAM. 



287 
288 
289 
290 



Theodore 

Frothingham. 
Thomas Harris 

Frothingham. 
Huntington Wolcott 

Frothingham. 
William Bainbridge 

Frothingham. 



Apr. 19, 1889. 
Apr. 5, 1891. 
Sep. 19,1893. 
Oct. 30, 1898. 



The Children of William Harris Benedict (XX 232) and Clara Thier. 



291 


Nathan Thier 

Benedict. 




Nov. 23, 1881. 








292 


James Clarence 

Benedict. 




Oct. 29,1883. 








293 


William Harris 

Benedict, Jr. 




Sep. 24,1885. 








294 


Clara Louise Benedict. 




Feb. 12, 1892. 









The Children of Clara Howard Benedict (XX 233) and Caleb Rodney Layton. 



295 


Clara Benedict 


Charles Frederic 














Layton. 


Ward. 


Oct. 27,1874. 


Apr. 


7, 1897. 




MontixL'lier, \ t. 


296 


Caleb Rodney Layton. 




Jan. 11, 1877. 








Gainesville, Fin. 


297 


Hattie Benedict 

Layton. 




Feb. 20, 1879. 








Montpelier, Vt. 


298 


Louis Bush Layton. 




Sep. 12,1880. 








Gainesville, Fla. 



GEXEKATION XXI. 
GENERATION XXI. 



123 



MEMBER OF FAMILY. 



MAnBIAGE. 



RESIDENCE. 



The Children of Mary Gray Benedict (XX 236) 4ND Bleazar Kingsbury Foster. 



XXI 

299 



300 
301 



Eleazar Kingsbury 

Foster. 
Mary Benedict Foster. 
Emma Harris Foster. 



Sep. 24,1875. 
May 31, 1880. 
July 28, 1882. 



The Children of Robert Patterson Benedict (XX 237) and Julia Sherman Ells. 



302 
303 



Edgar Ells Benedict. 
Robert Patterson 

Benedict. 
Florence Eliza 

Benedict. 



Oct. 29, 1884. 
Aug. 25, 1886. 
July 13,1891. 



The Children of Walter Butler Habris (XX 242) and Ann Letitia Yeomans. 



306 
307 



Dorothy Gorilla 

Harris. 
Walter Butler Harris. 
George Yeomans 

Harris. 
Helen Boyd Harris. 



Oct. 16,1893. 
Oct. 19, 1895. 



Apr. 11, 1901. 
Apr. 5, 1902. 



Apr. 14,1901. 



The Children of Stephen Harris (XX 248) and Agnes Cointat. 



309 Eleonore Dubois 

Harris. 



Apr. 1, 1900. 



The Children of John McArthuk Harris (XX 249) and Sophia Weygandt. 



310 
311 



Lucy Weygandt 

Harris, 
.lolin McArthur 

Harris, Jr. 



June 3, 1895. 
June 16, 1901. 



The Children of Elizabeth Harris (XX 250) and Edward H. Keiser. 



312 



313 
314 



Catharine Harris 

Keiser. 

Bernhard Keiser. 

Stephen Harris 

Keiser. 



Apr. 16, 1897. 
Mar. 17, 1899. 



Apr. 29, 1901. 



124 



THE HARRIS RECORD. 
GENERATION XXI. 



INDEX 
KO. 



MEMBER OF FAMILY. 



MARRIAGE. 



RESIDENCE. 



The Childeen of George Brodhead Harris (XX 253) and Elizabeth Holbert. 



XXI 

315 



316 
317 



George Brodhead 

Harris.! 
Marian Frazer Harris.' 
Joseph Macdonald 

Harris. 



May 5, 1899. 
Dec. 15, 1900. 



Sep. 6, 1902. 



Feb. 11, 1901. 



The Children of Frances Brodhead Harris (XX 254) and Reynolds Driver Brown. 



318 Joseph Harris Brown. 



Feb. 23, 1897. 



Mar. 22, 1899. 



The Children of Mary Campbell Parry (XX 257) and William E. Mikell. 



Waring Mikell. 



Feb. 26, 1900. 



The Children of Eliza Jane Pearce (XX 264) and Richard Alex.\nder Douglas. 



320 


Marj- E. Douglas. 


Robert J. Anderson. 


Oct. 10,1852. 


Feb. 17, 1887. 




321 


Edward Varian 












Douglas. 


Cora Tilge. 


Nov. 27, 1854. 


Nov. 15, 1883. 




322 


Walter Pearce 












Douglas. 


Laura Sparks. 


July 6, 1856. 


Dec. 28, 1888. 




323 


Lily Douglas. 




June 28, 1862. 




Mar. 2, 1864. 



Minneapolis, Minn. 
Chestnut Hill, Pa. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



The Children of Henrietta Day Pearce (XX 265) and Benjamin Ashburner. 



324 



Algernon Byre 

Ashburner. 



Mary Edna Roberts. Apr. 3, 1870. Nov. 2, 1897. 



Germantown, Pa. 





The Children of Hannah 


Mary Long (XX 266) and Eber Woodward. 




325 


Wilmer Worthington 
W^oodward. 




Dec. 3, 1858. 








326 


Anna Augusta 

Woodward. 




Dec. 3, 1858. 




Mar. 24, 1870. 




327 


Mary Penina 

Woodward. 




Sep. 5, 1860. 








328 


John Pierce 














Woodward. 


Anna Palmer Lear. 


Dec. 7, 1862. 


June 11, 1902. 






329 


Elizabeth Hutchin- 
son Woodward. 




Feb. 26, 1865. 




May 24, 1880. 




330 


Frederick Augusta 

Woodward. 




June 18, 1871. 








331 


Roskell Everhart 

Woodward. 




June 25, 1873. 









GENERATION XXI. 
GENERATION XXL 



125 



MEMBER OF FAMILY. 



MARRIAGE. 



RESIDE.NCE. 



The Children of Elizabeth Ann Long (XX 268) and William Coleman Hemphill. 



XXI 

332 

333 


Margaret Coleman 

Hemphill, unmarried. 
Martha Bryan 

Hemphill. [Lewis Hoopes Miller. 


May 1, 1859. 
Mar. 13, 1870. 


May 6, 1891. 




West Chester, Pa. 
West Chester, Pa. 



The Children of Joseph Howard Mackelduff (XX 271) and Laura Grace Powney. 



Samuel Forney 

Mackeldufe. 



The Children of Sarah Jane McCluke (XX 286) and John Wesley Good. 



335 
336 



Walter McClureGood. 
Charles Wesley Good. 



Nina Sprague. 



Dec. 16, 1872. 



Jan. 15, 1900. 



July 26,1873. 





The Children of 


Elizabeth Mackelduff McClure (XX 287) and 


George Emerson 


Prutsman. 


337 


Mabelle Francina 

Prutsman. 












Manhattan, 111. 


338 


George McClure 

Prutsman. 












Greenville, Tex. 


339 


Sibyl Marie Prutsman. 














340 


Paul Emerson 

Prutsman. 














341 


James Claude 

Prutsman. 




Jan. 3, 1879. 






June 12, 1880. 




342 


Bruce McClure 

Prutsman. 




Feb. 7, 1881. 






Sep. 11,1900. 







The Children of 


George Howaed Macklin 


(XX 291) AND Rebecca E. Ross. 


343 

344 

345 


Frank Ross Macklin. 
William Warren 

Macklin. 
Sarah Haman 

Macklin. 




June 27, 1875. 
Aug. 22, 1876. 
Apr. 30, 1878. 




Feb. 15, 1877. 
July 1, 1883. 


Philadelphia, Pa. 



The Children of George Howard Macklin (XX 291) and Rosanna M. Kyle. 



346 James Kyle Macklin. 



Nov. 12, 1888. 



Dec. 1, 1888. 



126 



THE IIAEKTS RECORH. 

GENERATION XXI. 



INDEX 
NO. 


MEMBER OF FAMILY. CONSORT. MAItRIAGE. 


BIBTH. j DEATH. 


RESIDENCE. 


The Children of George Howard Macklix (XX 291) and Laura J. Leffard. 


XXI 
347 


Henry Stryker 

Macklin. 


Sep. 22, 1896. 








The Children of James Macklin (XX 292) and Ellen Jane Leattor. 



3-18 Jessamine Macklin. {John Thrush Rodgers. 

349 Annie Leattor 

i Macklin 

350 I Hannah Haman 
i Macklin 

351 iGeneTieve Warren 
I Macklin 



Oct. 8, 1879. 

Apr. 19, 1881. 

Apr. 9, 1888. 

Apr. 9, 1894. 



7, 1902. 



McVeytown. Pa. 



The Children of Harris C. Macklin iXX 294) and Ida MacSmith. 



352 Harold Macklin. 



Feb. 10, 1895. 



The Children of Ella Macklin (XX 29U) and Sajiuel H. Haffly. 



353 


Donald Macklin 

Haffly. 




Nov. 4, 1891. 








354 


Marie Haffly. 




June 27, 1893. 




June 21, 1900. 




355 


Margaret Haffly. 




Sep. 23, 1894. 








356 


Kenneth Haffly. 




June 19, 1897. 




Aug. 22, 1900. 





The Children of Sally Henrietta Haman iXX 298) and John S. McCrum. 



357 


Ralph Hammond 














McCrum. 


Mary Ingram. 


Dec. 23, 1875. 


Oct 24,1900. 






358 


William Hammond 

McCrum. 




Sep. 9, 1877. 








359 


Mildred McCrum. 




Oct. 23,1879. 








360 


John S. McCrum. 




Sep. 12,1881. 




Dec. 1. 18S2. 




361 


Janet Agnes McCrum. 




Sep. 25,1884. 








362 


Margaret McCrum. 




July 24, 1887. 









The Children of Harry McBride (XX 301) and Addie L. Winner. 



Edgar Haman 

McBride. 



Sep., 



GENEEATIOX XXI. 
GENEKATION XXI. 



127 



INDEX 
NO. 


MEMBER OF FAMILY. 


CONSORT. 


BIRTH. 


MARRIAGE. 


DEATH. 


RESIDENCE. 


The Children of Nannie McBride (XX 302) and Allen A. Leonard. 


XXI 

364 


Irene Haman 

Leonard. 




May 25, 1890. 










The Children of Lizzie Morrow (XX 303) and John A. Canan. 





365 
366 
367 



Margaret M. Canan. 
Mary H. Canan. 
John J. Canan. 



June 17, 1889. 
Oct. 5, 1890. 
Apr. 7, 1896. 



Jan. 13, 1901. 



The Children of Augustine Wakefield Applebaugh (XX 309) aj^d Jessie Hollingsworth. 



368 



369 
370 



Harvey Vance 

Applebaugh. 
Ross H. Applebaugh. 
Gussie Applebaugh. 



Dec. 20, 1888. 
Oct. 20, 1890. 
Aug. 8, 1894. 



The Children of John R. Applebaugh (XX 310) and Eva L. Pittingeb. 



371 I Ethel R. Applebaugh. 

372 I Frank P. Applebaugh. 



Apr. 8, 1891. I 
Apr. 13, 1893. j 



The Children of H. Bessie Applebaugh (XX 314) and Thomas P. Jackson. 



373 
374 



Reuben Applebaugh 

Jackson. 
Harry P. Jackson. 



Aug. 15, 1895. 
Apr. 17,1902. 



The Children of William M. Applebaugh (XX 315) and Myrtle M. Spratt. 



Ruth Marie 

Applebaugh. 



Jan. 17, 1902. 



The Children of Amor Swanzey Wakefield (XX 321) and Hattie Edith Black. 



Aug. 25, 1897. 



12S 



THE HARRIS RECORD. 
GENERATION XXI. 



INDEX 
NO. 


MEMBER OF FAMILY. 


COXSOBT. 


BIRTH. 


MAKRIAGE. 


DEATH. 


RESIDENCE. 


The Children of Edith Swanzey (XX 331) and George C. Miller. 


XXI 

377 


Paul S-n-anzey Miller. 




Nov. 7,1902. 








, ,TnE Childben of George Calbraith Clarke (XX 335) and Elizabeth S. Lloyd. 



378 Elizabeth Lloyd 
Clarke. 

379 George Calbraith 
Clarke. 



Apr. 25, 1900. 
Feb. 2, 1902. 



Ida Harris (XXI 201). Her husband, Frank W. Mondell, has been a 
member of Congress from Wyoming, from 189 7 to the present time. 

Benjamin Harrison Old (XXI 223) is a salesman, with J, Kissock & Com- 
pany, spice brokers, Xew York city. 

Oliver Sloan Haines (XXI 231) is a physician; a graduate of Hahnemann 
Medical school, Philadelphia. 

Edward Steel Haines (XXI 233) is a physician; a graduate of Hahnemann 
Medical school. His wife, Adella Engle Davidson, was born July 11, 1875. 

Elizabeth Shaw Sloan (XXI 234). Her husband, Nathan Hays Bonsall, 
was born December 27, 1861. 

Joseph Webster Sloan (XXI 236). His wife, Louisa Sellers Bonsall, was 
born December 24, 1868. 

Elsie Sloan (XXI 239). Her husband, James Lafferty HofFner, was born 
May 2, 1867. 

Malachi Wilson Sloan (XXI 246) is a physician. He was graduated in 
1899 by the Hahnemann Homeopathic Medical school of Philadelphia. His 
wife, Grace Thatcher, born August 4, 1873, was of West Philadelphia. 

William Jones Sloan (XXI 247). His wife, Mabel Edna Adams, was bom 
February 21, 1882. 



GEXEKATIOX XXII. !:."■• 

Jeannle Porter Steele (XXI 258). Her husband, Charles Kobinson Smith, 
is of the firm of Smith & Martin, lawyers. Broad street. New York city. 

Ellen Harris North (XXI 202) is engaged in preserving fruits, etc., in 
Geneseo, New York. 

Francis Whiting Powell (XXI 279) is a student at the University of Vir- 
ginia. 

Edward Varian Douglas (XXI 321) was, until recently, president of the 
Consolidated Lake Superior company of Philadclplua. 

"Walter Pearce Douglas (XXI 322) is secretary of the Consolidated Lake 
Superior company of Philadelphia. 

Walter McClure Good (XXI 335) was born Waynesburg, Pennsylvania; 
stvidied dentistry at the Iowa State viniversity, and the Louisville Dental col- 
lege, Louisville, Kentucky, from which latter college he v;as graduated. He is 
now practicing dentistry in Sheffield, Illinois. His wife, Nina Sprague, is of 
Russell, Iowa. 

Mabelle Francina Prutsman (XXI 337) was graduated from Buda High 
school, Knox college, and the Columbian school of Oratory in Chicago. She is 
now principal of the Manhattan High school of Manhattan, Illinois. 

George McClure Prutsman (XXI 338) was educated at the Buda High 
school, and is now in business in Greenville, Texas. 

Sibyl Marie Prutsman (XXI 389) was valedictorian of the graduating class 
in Knox college, Galesburg, Illinois, in 1899, taking the highest honors in the 
scientific course. She is now a private iustrvictor in Knox college. 

Paul Emerson Prutsman (XXI 340) was graduated from Knox college in 
1899. He was principal of the High school at Lockport, Illinois, for two years, 
and is now professor of Mathematics in the High school of Joliet township, 
Joliet, Illinois. 

Bruce McClure Prutsman (XXI 342) at the time of his death was a 
sophomore in Knox college, Galesburg, Illinois. 



GENERATIOX XXII. 



131 



GENERATION XXII. 



INDEX 
NO. 


MEMBER OF FAMILY. 


CONSOKT. 


BIRTn. 


JIARRIAGE. 


DEATH. 


RESIDENCE. 


The Childeen of Katharine Howard Hensley (XXI 2) and Samuel Bowen. 


XXII 
1 


Katharine Euphemia 
Bowen. 












The Children of Ellen Gii.l Trigg (XXI 18) and Frank Wii.lard Rigg. 


2 
3 


Katharine Innes Rigg. 
Frank Willard Rigg. 


Apr. 12.1899. 
Sep. 4, 19(K). 






The Children of Byrd Campbell Trigg iXXI 21) and A. Wyatt. 


4 Wyndham Robertson 
Trigg, Jr. 




Dec. 29, 1901. 








The Children of Maria Chuech Waterman (XXI 27) and James K. Johnston. 



James Kemp 

Johnston. 
Thomas Hays 

Johnston. 
Edward Deane 

Johnston. 
Margaret Johnston. 



June, 1889. 
1895. 

Feb., 1902. 



The Children of James Waterman (XXI 28) and Bina Muephy. 



May, 1894. 



The Children of George Starling Waterman (XXI 30) and Helen L. Gillogly. 



Edward Syms 

Waterman, 
.lames Webster 

Waterman. 
Catharine Church 

Waterman. 



Not. 22, 1901. 



132 



THE HARRIS RECORD. 
GENERATION XXII. 



INDEX 
NO. 



MEMBER OF FAMILT. 



BIRTH. 



MABRIAGE. 



EESIDENCE. 



The Children of Edward Bentley Waterman (XXI 31) and Ida Bell Francisco. 



XXII 
13 



Francis Bentley 

Wnlerman. 
Lawrence Wiggin 

Waterman. 
Edward Church 

Waterman. 



Feb. 21, 1897. 
Jan. 11,1899. 
Mar. 22, 1901. 



Dec. 11, 1900. 



The Children of Katharine Hays Waterman (XXI 32) and John C. Hagler. 



16 jjohn Carroll Hagler. 

17 ] Katharine Church 

I Hagler. 



Mar. 1, 1S99. 
Mar. 31, 1901. 



The Children of Lalla Robinson (XXI 51) and Embrey Lee Sweakingen. 



18 



Amelia Lawrence 

Swearingen. 

Lalla Swearingen. 

George W. 

Swearingen. 



Jan. C, 1888. 
Apr. 15, 1891. 



June 28, 1897. 



May, 1891. 



The Children of Sarah Shelby Wolfe (XXI 127) and Harrison Mason Shallcross. 



21 Vernon Lewis 

Shallcross, 



Jan. 13, 1900. 



The Children of Stewart Starling (XXI 152) and Nellie Ford. 



Edmund Lyne 

Starling. 
Salem Ford Starling. 



Oct. 7, 1897. 
Jan. 25, 1899. 



The Children of Mary Stewart Starling (XXI 155) and Sterling W. Price. 



24 Starling Worth Price. 



July, 1895. 



The Children of Alice Malvina Penrose (XXI 178) and Henry S. Johnson. 



Clara Penrose 

Johnson. 
Alfred Strawn 

Johnson. 



Jan. 2C, 1899. 
Oct. 13, 1900. 



GENERATION XXII. 
GENERATION XXII. 



133 



MEMBER OF FAMILY, 



BIRTH. 



MARRIAGE. 



RESIDENCE. 



The Children of Mabtha Annie Penrose (XXI 179) and Milton Johnson. 



XXII 

27 



Stephen Penrose 

Johnson. 



Oct. 15, 1902. 



Oct. 16,1902. 



The Children of Ida Harris (XXI 202) and Frank W. Mondell. 



28 Doroth.v Mondell. 



Mar. 27, 1900. 



The Children of Edward Steel Haines (XXI 225) and Adella Engle Davidson. 



29 


Dorothy Haines. 




Aug. 6,1896. 








30 


Madelaine Adella 

Haines. 




June 25, 1899. 




Dec. 9, 1900. 




31 


Margaret Blake 














Haines. 




Oct. 18,1901. 




Aug. 28, 1902. 





The Children of Elizabeth Shaw Sloan (XXI 226) and Nathan Hats Bonsall. 



32 


Albert Sloao Bonsall. 




Mar. 16, 1887. 








33 


Mary Landis Bonsall. 




Dee. 29, 1888. 








34 


Edith Kimes Bonsall. 




June 30, 1891. 








35 


Nathan Webster 

Bonsall. 




Mar. 12, 1893. 








36 


Le Roy Haines 

Bonsall. 




Dec. 7, 1895. 








37 


Viola Gilpin Bonsall. 




Apr. 2, 1897. 




July 13,1897. 




38 


Elwyn Paucoast 

Bonsall. 




Apr. 22, 1898. 




July 5, 1898. 




39 


Lawrence Yarnall 

Bonsall. 




Mar. 211900. 




May 26, 1900. 





The Children of Elsie Sloan (XXI 231) and Jaues Lafferty Hoffner. 



James Raymond 

Hoffner. 
Wilhelmina Sloan 

Hoffner. 



June 10, 1892. 
Nov. 24, 1896. 



The Children of William Jones Sloan (XXI 239) and Mabel Edna Adams. 



Gertrude C. Sloan. 
Thelma Frances Sloan. 



Sep. 22,1899. 
Sep. 20, 1900. 



134 



THE HARRIS RECORD. 
GENERATION XXII. 



MEMBER OP FAMILT. 



BIBTH. 



MARRIAGE. 



RESIDENCE. 



The Children of Elizabeth Sloan Kendall (XXI 240) and Charles Hatfield Miller. 



XXII 
44 



William Kendall 

Miller. 
Charles Horace Miller. 



Feb. 21, 1895. 
Apr. 9, 1896. 



The Children of Jeannie Porter Steel (XXI 250) and Charles S. Robinson Smith. 



46 Elsa Robinson Smith. 

47 Gertrude K. 

Robinson Smith. 

48 Hilda Robinson Smith. 



May 18, 1880. 



July 13,1881. 
Oct. 11, 1883. 



The Children of William Allen Hooper (XXI 254) and Caroline Emily 



49 I William Riley Hooper. 

50 Wallace Clifford 

Hooper. 



Jan. 19, 1889. 
Mar. 8,1893. 



The Children of Guy Earlscourt Hooper (XXI 258) and Cloris Baldwin. 



Myrl Undine Hooper. 
Gerald Earlscourt 

Hooper. 



May 12, 1896. 
June 23, 1898. 



Sep. 21, 1898. 



The Children of John Stoever Hooper (XXI 265) and Theresa Mart Frank. 


53 


John Stoever | 

Hooper, .Ir. 


i 

Jan. 20, 1902. 

I 


The Children of Mary Louisa Hooper (XXI 266) and Noble Charles Darrow. 


54 


Dorothy Delow 

Darrow. 




July 3, 1901. 








The Children of Edith M. De Wolf (XXI 271) and Leslie A. Jenkins. 


55 


John L. Jenkins. 




Dec. 11, 1902. 







GENERATION XXII. 
GENERATION XXII. 



135 



INDEX 
NO. 



MEMBER OF FAMILY. 



BIBTH. 



MARRIAGE. 



RESIDENCE. 



The Children of Louise Hooper (XXI 272) and Alvin Minkler. 



XXII 

50 

57 

58 



Donald Minkler. 
Robert Minkler. 
Campbell Minkler. 



The Children of Grace Hooper (XXI 273) and Alfred Smith. 


59 


Ronald Smith. 












The Children of Clara Benedict Layton (XXI 295) and Charles Frederic Ward. 


60 
61 


Frederic Ward. 
Carroll Ward. 




1898. 
1900. 








The Children of Edward Varian Douglas (XXI 321) and Cora Tilge. 



Elsie Douglas. 
Malcolm Graham 

Douglas. 
Richard Alexander 

Douglas. 



Oct. 18,1884. 
Aug. 12, 1886. 
May 10, 1893. 



The Children of Walter Peaece Douglas (XXI 322) and Laura Spaee:s. 



Amelia Douglas. 



Dec. 7, 1891. 



The Children of Algernon Eyre Ashburner (XXI 32'4) and Mary Edna Roberts. 



Helen Roberts 

Ashburner. 



Jan. 23, 1901. 



The Children of Martha Bryan Hemphill (XXI 333) and Lewis Hoopes Miller. 



Elizabeth Blanche 

Miller. 
Jesse McCauley Miller. 



Apr. 14, 1892. 
Apr. 21, 1898. 



The Children of Walter McClure Good (XXI 335) and Nina Sprague. 



Louise Elizabeth 



Mar. 23, 1901.