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Full text of "The records of living officers of the U.S. navy & Marine corps : compiled from official sources"

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THE EECOEDS 



LIYING OTFICEES 



U. S. NAVY AND MARINE CORPS. 



COMPILED FROM OFFICIAL SOURCES 
BY 

LEWIS R. HAMERSLY, 

(late lieutenant united states marine corps.) 



THIED EDITION. 
REVISED, WITH NUMEROUS ADDITIONS. 



PHILADELPHIA: 

J. B. LIPPINCOTT & CO. 

1878. 



Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1878, by 

LEWIS R. HAMERSLY, 
In the Office of the Librarian of Congress at Washington. 



TO 

THE OFFICERS 

OF THE 

UNITED STATES NAYY AND MAEINE COEPS 
IS RESPECTFULLY DEDICATED 

THIS RECORD OF THEIR SERVICES, 

AKD 

HISTOEY OF THE WAEFAEE, 

WHICH THEIR VALOR AND PATRIOTISM SO MUCH AIDED, 

WITH DIVINE HELP, 

TO MAKE GLORIOUSLY SUCCESSFUL. 



OPINIONS OF THE FIRST EDITION. 



Navy Department, 

llth January, 1870. 
Dear Sir: 

I have examined the proof-sheets of your work on the Records of the Living 
Officers of the Navy, and am of opinion that it will supply a want, and be a useful 
hook to the service and to the country. 

Very respectfully. 

Your obedient servant, 

GEORGE M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of Navy. 
Lewis R. Hamerslt, Esq., 

Editor of the Records of Living Officers. 



Navy Department, 

Washington, January 11, 1870. 
This seems to be a concise statement of the services of the Living Officers of the 
Navy, as shown by the records of this Department. 

D. D. PORTER, 

Vice- Admiral. 



PEEFAOE TO EEYISED EDITION. 



The services of army officers have been recorded by several authors, but those 
of the Navy and the Marine Corps have been wholly neglected, — the Official 
Registers merely giving the name, place of birth, date of last commission, and 
present station. Much more is required, not alone in justice to these gallant 
patriots, but as part of our national history ; as an incitement to others to pursue 
the career in which, while performing duty, they won renown. The present 
volume endeavors to supply this want. For the conductors of the public press, 
who may have occasion to write about these brave men, living or dead (for, though 
glory is immortal, those who obtain it must submit to the common destiny of their 
race), this work will be a treasury of facts, accurate in its full details. Hence- 
forth, when an Officer of the Navy or Marine Corps passes to the better land, the 
recording journalist can draw upon these pages for the substantial facts of his 
public service, and not, as hitherto, 'make mere mention of his name. 

Here are the records of Living Officers of the United States Navy and Marine 
Corps (from the grade of Admiral down to that of Lieutenant-Commander, 
inclusive, not omitting full Surgeons, Paymasters, Engineers, and Marine Officers), 
as they appear in the Navy Register for 1870. These records have been generally 
verified by information obtained from the officers themselves. 

In the cases of such retired Officers as had entered the Navy early in the 
present century, it has often been difficult, sometimes impossible, to obtain a 
correct record of their first services. The first Navy Register was published in 
1816, and, for some years later, all Paymasters' Accounts, with the Muster and 
Pay-rolls, were filed in the office of the Comptroller of the Treasury, and perished 
when that edifice was destroyed by fire in 1833. To explain why, in the cases 
of some of the Retired Naval Officers, the commission of Captain follows that of 
Lieutenant, the intermediate grades of Lieutenant-Commander and Commander 
being omitted, it should be known that the law of 1867 provided that Officers on 
the Retired List should be promoted with Officers of the same date on the Active 
List. Thus, Officers who had for many years been Lieutenants on the Retired 
List were promoted at once, in pursuance of this law, to the rank of Captain, and 
even Commodore. 

Philadelphia, August, 1870. 



PEEFAOE TO THIED EDITION. 



The reader will look in vain in tte present edition of this work for the records 
of some of the illustrious men that graced the pages of the earlier issues. Since 
then death has removed from our midst Farragut and Gushing, and others famous 
in song and story, whose prowess and exploits, while adding new lustre to the 
American name and Navy, have made their fame immortal. New names and new 
actors, and a new generation, in many cases, appear upon the scene, the records 
of whose faithful service, with those of the older officers still living, it is the object 
of the present work to perpetuate and honor. 

Philadelphia, March 15, 1878. 



RECORDS 



LIVING OFFICERS OF THE U. S. NAVY, 



ADMIRAL DAVID D. PORTER. 

David D. Porter is a native of the State of Pennsylvania. Appointed 31{d- 
shipman from that State, February 2, 1829 ; attached to frigate Constellation, 
Mediterranean Squadron, 1830; frigate United States, same squadron, 1833-4; 
attached to ship-of-the-line Delaware, Mediterranean Squadron, 1835. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 4, 1836 ; on Coast Survey duty, 1837- 
40. Commissioned as Lieutenant, February 27, 1841 ; frigate Congress, Mediter- 
ranean Squadron, 1843-5 ; Naval Observatory, Washington, D. C, 1846. Lieu- 
tenant Porter was attached to Home Squadron, 1847, and actively engaged in the 
war with Mexico ; was present at the two attacks on Vera Cruz and one on Tuspan, 
and one at Tobasco ; participated also in a land fight at Tamultee, and a similar 
engagement at Chiflon ; on Coast Survey duty, 1848-9 ; on leave of absence, 
1850 ; commanding Pacific Mail steamer Georgia, 1851-3 ; on leave of absence,. 
1854; commanding store-ship Supply, 1855-7; attached to Portsmouth Navy 
Yard, N. H., 1858-60. 

Promoted to Commander, April 22, 1861. Commissioned as Rear- Admiral, 
July 4, 1863; as Vice-Admiral, July 25, 1866. 

Vice- Admiral Porter was actively employed from the beginning to the close of 
the Rebellion. As early as April, 1861, he sailed from New York in the Powhatan 
for Fort Pickens, and remained on the coast of Florida until ordered North tO' 
assume command of the mortar fleet fitting out to co-operate with Admiral Far- 
ragut in his attack on the defences of New Orleans. He displayed great energy 
in hastening the sailing of these vessels, and when Farragut arrived at the 
Southwest Pass, Porter's vessels were at their stations and ready to commence the 
attack. 

On the 11th of April, 1862, he began the bombardment of Forts Jackson and 
St. Philip. The mortar flotilla kept up a steady fire, with but slight cessation, 
for six days and nights, at the end of which time both of the forts, powerful as 
they were, and desperate as was their resistance, had become so weakened and the 
ganison so demoralized, as, in the judgment of the flag-officer, to render the 
passage of the fleet possible. 

On April 28, Brigadier- General Duncan, commanding the coast defences, and, 
Lieutenant-Colonel Higgins, commanding Forts Jackson and St. Philip, surrendered 
to Commander Porter. From this time until July, 1862, he remained in com- 
mand of the mortar flotilla, actively, zealously, and efficiently co-operating with 
Admiral Farragut in his operations on the Mississippi, from New Orleans to. 

% 



8 ADMIRAL. 

Vicksburg. Commander Porter was soon after appointed Acting Bear- Admiral, 
and ordered to the command of the Mississippi Squadron. The true character of 
his natural endowments and professional attainments may be seen in his creating 
a fleet of one hundred and twenty-five vessels — a number far exceeding that com- 
manded by any other officer in the history of naval warfare — out of the material 
aflforded by ordinary river steamboats, which he plated, armed and equipped, 
making them formidable and efficient war vessels. In the squadron there were 
more than thirteen hundred officers ; of these not more than twenty-five were of 
the regular navy, the rest consisting mainly of Western steamboat-men, utterly 
without naval training, but who, under the rigid discipline and inspiring example 
of their commander, soon became valuable and trustworthy officers. In January, 
1863, Admiral Porter's fleet captured Arkansas Post, on the Arkansas River, and 
in the month of May following he destroyed the formidable rebel batteries at 
Grand Gulf. Invaluable aid was rendered to the army under General Grant by 
Admiral Porter in the reduction of Vicksburg, which surrendered July 4, 1863. 

During the siege of Vicksburg his mortar fleet were forty days, without inter- 
mission, throwing shells into the city and even into the works beyond it. Thir- 
teen heavy guns were landed from the vessels, and men and officers sent to man 
them. Before the city capitulated, sixteen thousand shells were thrown from the 
mortars, gunboats, and naval batteries. 

In addition to these successes. Admiral Porter obtained control of the Yazoo 
Biver, sweeping from its channel the net-work of torpedoes and contrivances for 
submarine warfare near its confluence with the Mississippi. These efforts were 
followed by the novel and singular Yazoo Pass expedition, and the expeditions of 
Steele's Bayou and Deer Creek. The Cumberland and Tennessee Bivers were 
actively patrolled by his vigilant officers, and the exciting chase of Morgan by the 
steamers on tl^ Ohio Biver, over a distance of five hundred miles, intercepting 
him and his band when attempting to escape, naturally attracted the attention of 
the country. 

In March, 1864, a portion of the Mississippi Squadron, under Admiral Porter, 
ascended the Bed Biver to form a junction with the army under General Banks 
at Alexandria, La. From this point, with some of his most formidable iron-clads, 
Admiral Porter penetrated some fifty miles farther up the river, to Springfield 
Landing. While at Springfield Landing he learned that the army under General 
Banks had met with a reverse, and was falling back to Pleasant Hill, some distance 
below. Bear-Admiral Porter was therefore compelled to turn back, his retracing 
steps harassed at every available point by the enemy, flushed with their recent 
success against the army. 

On April 14, Admiral Porter reached Grand-Ecore, where he found the vessels 
he had left at that point still detained above the bar. The river instead of rising 
as customary at this season, had fallen during his absence, and the destruction of 
the best portion of the squadron seemed inevitable. But, in the words of the 
Admiral, " Providence provided a man for the occasion." Lieutenant-Colonel 
Bailey, Acting Engineer of the 19th army corps, constructed a series of dams 
across the river at the falls, and the water rising to a sufficient height, the im- 
perilled boats passed safely over the bar. 

Bear- Admiral Porter, who had displayed ability of the highest order, and as 
commander of the Mississippi Squadron had met with marked success in his 
operations against the enemy, and who, moreover, enjoyed the entire confidence of 
the Department and the nation, was detached from the Mississippi and ordered 
to the command of the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, which embraced 
within its limits Cape Fear Biver and the port of Wilmington. 

A fleet comprising all the available vessels at the disposal of the Department, 



VICE-ADMIRAL. 9 

and commanded by officers who had distinguished themselves in the earlier 
operations of the war, was assembled at Hampton Roads. In the early part of 
December the fleet sailed for Beaufort, N. C, where they were to rendezvous. 
Final preparations for the attack were then made. On December 24, 1864, Rear- 
Admiral Porter, with a force of thirty-five vessels, five of which were iron-clads, 
and a reserve force of nineteen vessels, commenced the bombardment of the forta 
at the mouth of Cape Fear River, and silenced them in an hour and a quarter. 
On the following day the fleet renewed the attack, and seriously damaged the 
enemy's works. 

General Butler, who commanded the military forces, after a reconnoissance, 
decided that the place could not be carried by assault. He therefore, after in- 
forming Rear-Admiral Porter of his intention, returned with his command to 
Hampton Roads. Admiral Porter, aware of the necessity of reducing the works 
and the great importance of closing the port of Wilmington, and confident that 
with adequate military support the fort could be carried, earnestly requested that 
the enterprise should not be abandoned. On the suggestion of the President, 
Lieutenant-General Grant was advised of the confidence felt by Rear-Admiral 
Porter that he could obtain complete success provided he should be sufficiently 
sustained. Such military aid was therefore invited as would secure the fall of 
Fort Fisher. A second military force was promptly detailed, composed of about 
8500 men, under command of Major-General A. H. Terry, and sent forward. 
This force arrived ofi" Fort Fisher on the 13th of January. Offensive operations 
were at once resumed by the naval force, and the troops were landed and en- 
trenched themselves, while a portion of the fleet bombarded the works. These 
operations were continued throughout the 14th with an increased number of 
vessels. The 15th was the day decided upon for the assault. 

During the morning of that day forty-four vessels poured an incessant fire into 
the fort. There was besides a force of fourteen vessels in reserve. At 3 p.m. 
the signal for the assault was made. Desperate fighting ensued ; traverse after 
traverse was taken, and by 10 P.M. the works were all carried. 

Fourteen hundred sailors and marines were landed, and participated in the direct 
assault. Seventy-five guns, many of them superb rifle pieces, and nineteen hun- 
dred prisoners were the immediate fruits of the victory. 

In 1866, Vice-Admiral Porter was appointed Superintendent of the Naval 
Academy at Annapolis, which institution, under his excellent management, acquired 
the highest standing. 

Special duty, Navy Department, 1869-70. 

Commissioned as Admiral, August 15, 1870; special duty, Washington, 
1870-8. 



VICE-ADMIRAL STEPHEN C. ROWAN, 

Born in Ireland, December 28, 1805 ; appointed Midshipman from Ohio, Feb- 
ruary 15, 1826, and ordered to the sloop-of-war Vincennes, Pacific Squadron ; 
serving in schooner Experiment, Chesapeake Bay, 1831. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, April 28, 1832, and attached to sloop-of-war 
Vandalia, West India Squadron, 1834-6, and to store-ship Relief, 1837. 

Commissioned dtB Lieutenant in 1837; on Coast Survey duty, 1840; attached to 
frigate Delaware, Brazil Squadron, 1843 ; serving in Pacific Squadron, 1846-8, 
and took an active part in the war with Mexico. 

Commanded naval battalion under Commodore Stockton at the battle of the 
Mesa, Upper California ; commanded a landing party that made a successful night 



10 REAR-ADMIRALS. 

attack on a Mexican outpost, near Mazatlan ; Executive-Officer of the Cyane when 
she bombarded Guaymans ; ordnance duty, 1850-3. 

Promoted to Commander^ September 14, 1855, and ordered to command of 
store-ship Relief; on ordnance duty, 1858-61; commanded sloop-of-war Pawnee, 
1861-2. 

In May, 1861, when in command of the Pawnee, engaged the rebel battery at 
Acquia Creek. This was the first action of the war. While in command of the 
Pawnee, he participated in the attack and capture of the forts and garrison at 
Hatteras Inlet. 

February 7, 1862, commanded a naval flotilla in the sounds of North Carolina, 
and took part in the successful combined attack of the navy and army upon 
Roanoke Island, on February 8. On the morning after the capture of Roanoke 
Island, Commander Rowan, with a portion of his flotilla, pursued the enemy into 
Albemarle Sound, and at 8 A.M., February 10, the rebel steamers, under the 
command of W. F. Lynch, formerly of the U. S. Navy, were discovered drawn up 
behind a battery of four guns, supported by a schooner on the opposite side of the 
river, armed with two heavy thirty-two pounders. Fire was opened by the in- 
surgents from the fort and steamers at long range. Commander Rowan pushed on 
steadily until within three-fourths of a mile, when he opened fire and dashed ahead 
at full speed. This bold and wholly unanticipated onset dismayed the rebels, who 
hastily abandoned their works, which, with their entire fleet, were captured or 
destroyed. 

Passing up the river, the flotilla took possession of Elizabeth City, Lieutenant 
Murray was despatched with a small force to Edenton, of which he quietly took 
possession, and on returning from this duty he was sent to obstruct the Chesapeake 
and Albemarle Canal. In this expedition there were five armed steamers and one 
schooner destroyed, and one steamer, the Ellis, captured. 

Commissionbd as Captain, July 16, 1862, and as a reward for distinguished 
gallantry, promoted to Commodore, to take rank from the same date. 

Commodore Rowan commanded the naval forces at the fall of Newbern, N. C. ; 
commanded the New Ironsides off Charleston, and participated in the different 
engagements with Forts Wagner, Gregg, and Moultrie. 

Commissioned as Rear- Admiral, July 25, 1866; Commandant Norfolk Navy 
Yard, 1866-7 ; commanding Asiatic Squadron, 1868-70. 

Commissioned as Vice-Admiral, August 15, 1870 ; special duty, Washington, 
1871 ; Commandant Navy Yard and Station, New York, 1872-6 ; Port-Admiral, 
New York, 1877-8. 

REAR-ADMIRAL JOHN RODGERS, 

Born in Maryland, and appointed Midshipman from District of Columbia, April 
18, 1828. Attached to frigate Constellation, Mediterranean Squadron, 1829-32 : 
Naval School, Norfolk, 1833-4. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 14, 1834 ; on leave, 1835 ; brig Dol- 
phin, Brazil Squadron, 1836-8 ; special service, 1839. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, January 22, 1840 ; brig Boxer, Home Squadron, 
1841-3 ; special service, 1844-5 ; sloop Marion, Mediterranean Squadron, 1846- 
7 ; Coast Survey, 1848-52 ; commanding steamer John Hancock, and Surveying 
and Exploring Expeditions to North Pacific and China Seas, 1853-6. 

Commissioned as Commander, September 14, 1855 ; special duty, Washington, 
D. C, 1857-9 ; waiting orders, 1860. 

In 1861, Commander Rodgers was ordered to special duty in the West, super- 
intending the construction of the Benton class of iron-clads. In 1862 he was 



REAR-ADMIRALS. 11 

assigned to the command of the iron-clad steamer Galena, and ordered to the 
North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. On May 10, 1862, Commander Rodgers 
left Hampton Roads in command of an expedition of gunboats, with orders to 
enter the James River, and, if possible, to ascend the river to Richmond. After 
two engagements with rebel batteries, which were in each instance silenced, the 
fleet reached Fort Darling, a casemated battery, erected on the crest of a hill, 
which, together with sunken vessels, eflPectually obstructed the channel. 

On the morning of May 15, Commander Rodgers anchored the Galena in front 
of and at a distance of five hundred yards from the rebel fort. The Aroostook 
and Port Royal, wooden gunboats, were stationed eight hundred yards below the 
flag-ship. At 8 A.M. the vessels opened fire on Fort Darling, and from that time 
until 12 M. kept up a vigorous bombardment. At 12.10 p.m., Commander Rodgers 
having expended every shot and shell in the magazine and shell-room of the Galena, 
made signal to withdraw from action, the vessels retiring in good order, and giving 
the rebels a parting shot as they steamed down the river. The monitor being unable 
to give sufficient elevation to her guns, and the Naugatuck, better known as the 
Stevens battery, having burst her rifle-gun at the first fire, were rendered useless, 
so far as the fort was concerned ; although both vessels did good service during 
the action by stationing their crews as sharpshooters and picking ofi" the rebel rifle- 
men, who greatly annoyed the crews of the wooden vessels. 

The armor of the Galena did not prove of any service to her. She was hit one 
hundred and twenty-nine times, losing in killed and wounded two-thirds of her 
crew. The Aroostook and Port Royal sufiiei'ed to a less extent. 

Commissioned as Captain, July 16, 1862. 

In 1863, Captain Rodgers was ordered to the command of the monitor Wee- 
hawken, and sailed from New York in that vessel for the South Atlantic Block- 
ading Squadron. On his way South, and while ofi" the Delaware Breakwater, 
he encountered a heavy gale. He was urged to run in and remain until the 
storm abated. This he declined to do, saying he wished to test the sea-going 
qualities of the monitors. The Weehawken rode out the gale, and reached Port 
Royal in safety. 

On June 17, 1863, in "Warsaw Sound, Georgia, Captain Rodgers, in the Wee- 
hawken, encountered the powerful rebel iron-clad Atlanta, a vessel of much greater 
tonnage than the Weehawken. So confident were the rebels of a speedy victory, 
that the Atlanta was accompanied from Savannah to the scene of action by boats 
freighted with gay parties eager to witness the triumph of their vessel. Five shots 
were fired by the Weehawken. The fight lasted but fifteen minutes, at the end of 
which time the Atlanta surrendered. An important feature of this conflict was 
the final settlement of the dispute as to the value of the new fifteen-inch gun, which 
fully proved its merit. 

Commissioned as Commodore, June 17, 1863 ; commanding iron-clad Dictator, 
special service, 1864-5 ; commanded monitor Monadnock, 1866-7 ; and in that 
vessel made the passage around the Horn to San Francisco. Commodore Rodgers 
touched at Valparaiso, and witnessed the bombardment of that place by the Spanish 
Fleet. 

Commanding Navy Yard, Boston, 1867-9. 

Commissioned as Rear-Admiral, December 31, 1869; commanding Asiatic 
Fleet, 1870-2; Commandant Mare Island Navy Yard, 1873-7; Superintendent 
Naval Observatory, 1877-8. 



12 REAR-ADMIRALS. 

EEAR-ADMIRAL JOHN L. WORDEN, 

Born in New York, March 12, 1818. Appointed from New York, January 12, 
1835 ; sloop Erie, Brazil Squadron, 1836-7 ; Naval School, Philadelphia, 1840. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, Julj 16, 1840; store-ship Belief, Pacific 
Squadron, 1843; special duty, 1845 ; Naval Observatory, 1846 ; store-ship South- 
ampton, Pacific Squadron, 1846-7. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, November 30, 1846 ; frigate Ohio, Pacific Squad- 
ron, 1848-50 ; Naval Observatory, Washington, 1851-2 ; frigate Cumberland, 
Mediterranean Squadron, 1853-5 ; Naval Observatory, Washington, 1856 ; Navy 
Yard, New York, 1857-8 ; sloop Savannah, Home Squadron, 1859 ; Home 
Squadron, 1860 ; commanded iron-clad Monitor in her engagement with rebel 
iron-clad Merrimac, in Hampton Roads, March 9, 1862. On March 8, 1862, 
the Merrimac came down from Norfolk, and engaged the Congress and Cumber- 
land, then lying off Newport News, and, after a brief action, destroyed those ves- 
sels. The Merrimac then steamed up the Elizabeth River, and it was feared that 
on the following day the steam-frigates Minnesota and Roanoke, then lying in 
Hampton Roads, would share the fate of the Cumberland. At this juncture of 
affairs the Monitor arrived, and when the Merrimac steamed into the Roads on the 
9th, it was to find an adversary of different metal from that of the ships so easily 
destroyed the day before. At 8.45 a.m. the Monitor opened fire on the Merri- 
mac, and continued the action until 12.15 P.M., when the Merrimac retreated to 
Sewall's Point. During the action Captain Worden was injured in the eyes by 
the explosion of a shell from the Merrimac upon the outside of the eye-hole of 
the pilot-house exactly opposite his eye. 

Commissioned as Commander, July 12,1862; commanding iron-clad steamer 
Montauk, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron ; commanded the iron-clad Mon- 
tauk in the blockading fleet in Ossabaw Sound, and engaged Fort McAllister, on 
the Ogeechee River, January 27, 1863, and again, February 1, 1863; attacked 
and destroyed the rebel privateer Nashville under the guns of Fort McAllister, on 
February 28, 1863 ; commanded the Montauk in the attack made by Admiral 
Du Pont, with the iron-clad fleet, on the defences of Charleston, on April 7, 
1863. 

Commissioned as Captain, February 3, 1863. 

Captain Worden was promoted out of the line as a reward for distinguished 
gallantry in the engagement with the Merrimac, and in other battles in which he 
had taken part. Special duty. New York, 1864—6 ; commanded the steam-sloop 
Pensacola, North Pacific Squadron, 1867 ; special duty, 1868. 

Commissioned as Commodore, May 27, 1868 ; Superintendent Naval Academy, 
1870-4. 

Commissioned as Rear-Admiral, November 20, 1872 ; commanding European , 
Station, 1875-7. 



REAR-ADMIRAL WILLIAM E. LE ROY, 

Born in New York, March 24, 1818. Appointed from New York, January 11, 
1832 ; attached to frigate Delaware, Mediterranean Squadron, 1833-6 ; brig Dol- 
phin, Brazil Squadron, 1837-8. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 23, 1838 ; frigate Constitution, Pacific 
Squadron, 1839-40 ; store-ship Erie, 1842-3. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, July 13, 1843 ; steamer Mississippi, Home 
Squadron, 1846 ; steamer Princeton, Home Squadron, 1847 ; engagement with 



REAR-ADMIRALS. 13 

Mexican soldiers at Rio Aribiqua, while assisting to water the Princeton ; sloop 
Savannah, Pacific Squadron, 1849-51 ; waiting orders, 1852 ; frigate Savannah, 
Brazil Squadron, 1853-5 ; Naval Station, Sackett's Harbor, New York, 1857-8 ; 
frigate Sabine, Brazil Squadron, 1859 ; commanding steamer Mystic, coast of 
Africa, 1861. 

Commissioned as Commander, July 1, 1861 ; commanding steamer Keystone 
State, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862-3 ; capture of Femaudina, 
1862 ; engagement with iron-clads, off Charleston, South Carolina, January, 
1863; commanding steam-sloop Oneida, "Western Gulf Squadron, 1864; com- 
manding steam-sloop Ossipee, Western Gulf Squadron, 1864-5. 

Commanded the Ossipee at the battle of Mobile Bay, August 5, 1864 ; his 
vessel was struck many times, but, fortunately, not disabled. When about run- 
ning down the Tennessee, that vessel displayed a white flag, and Captain Le Roy 
received her surrender from Captain Johnston, her commander, the rebel Admiral, 
Buchanan, being wounded ; naval rendezvous. New York, 1866-7. 

Commissioned as Captain, July 25, 1866 ; Fleet- Captain, European Squadron, 
under Admiral Farragut, 1867-8. 

Commissioned as Commodore, July, 1870 ; special duty New London, 1871 ; 
senior-officer Board of Examiners, 1872-3. 

Commissioned as Rear-Admiral, April 5, 1874 ; commanding S. A. Station, 
1874-6; commanding European Station, 1878. 



REAR-ADMIRAL J. R. MADISON MULLANY, 

Born in New York, October 26, 1818. Appointed from New Jersey, January 
7, 1832 ; attached to frigate Constellation, Mediterranean Squadron, from February, 
1832, to December, 1834 ; receiving-ship, and Naval School, Navy Yard, New 
York, from June, 1835, to April, 1836 ; frigate United States, Mediterranean 
Squadron, from May, 1836, to December, 1837 ; schooner Shark, Mediterranean 
Squadron, from December, 1837, to March, 1838 ; Naval School, Navy Yard, 
Norfolk, from March, 1838, to June, 1838. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, June, 1838 ; naval rendezvous. New York, 
from November, 1838, to August, 1839 ; brigantine Dolphin, coast of Africa, 
from August, 1839, to September, 1840 ; receiving-ship and rendezvous, New 
York, from October, 1840, to December, 1841 ; steam-frigate Missouri, Home 
Squadron, from December, 1841, to July, 1842 ; receiving-ship at New York, from 
July, 1842, to April, 1843. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, February 29, 1844; brig Somers, West Indies, 
from April, 1843, to April, 1844 ; brig Washington, Coast Survey, deep-sea 
soundings, and observations for temperature in Gulf Stream, from July, 1844, to 
May, 1847 ; brig Washington, Home Squadron, from May, 1847, to August, 
1847; active service on the Mexican coast during the Mexican War; took 
part in the attack on, and capture of the city of Tobasco, June, 1847 ; brig 
Washington, Coast Survey, from September, 1847, to May, 1848, engaged in 
deep-sea soundings, and observations for temperature in Gulf Stream ; sloop-of- 
war St. Louis, Brazil Squadron, from June, 1848, to April, 1849 ; frigate Brandy- 
wine, Brazil Squadron, from May, 1849, to December, 1850 ; receiving-ship at 
New York, from April, 1851, to September, 1851 ; gunboat John Hancock, 
special service on coast of United States, and in West Indies to search for fili- 
bustering vessels, from September to October, 1851 ; receiving-ship at New York, 
from October, 1851, to September, 1852 ; frigate Columbia, West India Squadron, 
from September, 1852, to April, 1855 ; Inspector of Ordnance, Navy Yard, New 



14 REAR-ADMIRALS. 

York, from May, 1855, to May, 1858 ; brig Arctic, special service, "West Indies, 
from May to August, 1858 ; frigate Niagara, as Executive-Officer, special service, 
coast of Africa, from September to December, 1858 ; frigate Constellation, as 
Executive-Officer, fitting ber for sea, April and May, 1859 ; frigate Sabine, as 
Executive-Officer, West India Squadron, May, 1859, to December, 1860 ; frigate 
Sabine, off Pensacola, commencement of war, from January to Marcb, 1861, 
assisting in the protection of Fort Pickens; commanded gunboat Wyandotte, 
April and May, 1861, occupying a position inside of the harbor of Pensacola, in 
rear of Fort Pickens, to aid in protecting it from a threatened attack from the 
enemy ; assisted in towing in the boats and landing forces, composed of sailors 
and marines, April 12, 1861, reinforcing Fort Pickens ; commanded store-ship 
Supply, Home Squadron, May and June, 1861, off Pensacola, and during passage 
to New York ; Inspector of Ordnance, Fort Pitt foundry, Pittsburg, and other 
places, from July, 1861, to March, 1862. 

Commissioned as Commander^ October 18, 1861 ; commanded steamer Bienville, 
N. A. and W. G. Squadrons, from April, 1862, to May, 1865, — except as hereafter 
noted, — frequently engaged with, and coming under the fire of the forts off Charles- 
ton and other points on the Southern coast. 

Arriving in command of the Bienville off Mobile shortly before the battle of 
August 5, 1864, volunteered his services for the engagement then being planned. 
The Bienville not being considered by Admiral Farragut a fit vessel to engage the 
forts, he was assigned by Admiral Farragut to the command of the Oneida, which, 
on the passing of Fort Morgan, occupied the side exposed to the fire of the fort, 
the Galena being lashed to the opposite or port side, and being under his control 
by virtue of his seniority. The Oneida occupied the rear of the line of battle, and 
was exposed to a very destructive fire from Fort Morgan. The first shell by which 
she was struck entered the ship just under the mizzen rigging, killing the cabin 
steward, cutting the wheel-ropes, and setting the cabin on fire. The steering-gear 
being promptly repaired, the vessel was again struck, the shot exploding the star- 
board boUer and scalding sixteen men. The Oneida was partly disabled by this 
shot, but steam on the port boiler was still available, and sufficed to move the ship. 

As rearmost vessel, the ship was exposed to a very heavy fire for some time after 
she was able to return it, owing to the fact that she had passed too far beyond the 
fort to be enabled to train her guns sufficiently aft to bring them to bear on it. 

When nearly free from the fire of Fort Morgan, the Oneida was assailed by the 
ram Tennessee, with whom she exchanged shots in passing. The latter, coming 
up under her stern, was enabled to rake her, one shot visiting serious loss upon the 
ship, and inflicting several severe wounds upon Commander MuUany, one of which 
necessitated the amputation of his left arm. 

Up to this time he had exercised active command of the two vessels, standing 
upon the poop and " conning" the ship, and encouraging the crew by voice and 
example. After this injury the vessel was not again struck, and the engagement, 
as far as the Oneida and Galena were concerned, terminated. 

A certain ambiguity in a letter of Admiral Farragut to Captain Wells, dated 
April 21, 1870, conveys the erroneous impression that the Oneida was disabled 
entirely by the explosion of her boiler, and that her commander being wounded 
early in the action, the command of both vessels devolved upon the commanding 
officer of the Galena. This is incorrect in regard both to the Oneida and to Com- 
mander MuUany, the fact being well established that Commander Mullany com- 
manded both vessels until fire had nearly if not quite ceased, and that the action 
was virtually over the following extract from a letter, written by the executive- 
officer of the Oneida, will show : 



RE A R-ADMIRA LS. 15 

"Newport, R. I., June 10, 1872. 

" Commodore J. R. M. Mullany, U. S. Navy. 

" You were on deck, in active command, through all the perilous part of the 
Mobile fight, and the very last serious accident of the many incurred by the Oneida 
was your wound. 

" When compelled to go below, you sent for me, and turned over the command 
to me on deck, and I am quite sure that your ship never fired a gun after you were 
wounded, 

" I am confirmed in this belief by the recollection that Lieutenant E. N. Kel- 
logg, who commanded the after division, reported to me some minutes before you 
were hurt that his guns would no longer bear on the fort. 

" Subsequently to this the ram passed close alongside, giving Kellogg an oppor- 
tunity to get one shot into her. She then passed astern, also out of our range, and 
delivered a raking fire, during which you were wounded. 

" Having nothing to fire at, the Oneida's guns were silent jfrom this time. 
" Very respectfully your obt. serv't, 

" CHARLES S. HUNTINGTON, 

" Lieutenant- Commander, U. S. N'. 
" Uxecutive- Officer of Oneida during action of Aiigust 5, 1864." 

While commanding the Bienville, ofi" Charleston, 1862, captured steamers Stettin 
and Patras, under English flag, loaded with munitions of war, vessels and cargoes 
valued in the aggregate at half a million dollars. Also captured nine schooners 
from Nassau, all under English colors. 

Commanded division of W. Gr. Squadron, extending from Sabine Pass to Rio 
Grande, from April to September, 1863. 

While in the Bienville, off Galveston, Texas, sent in boat expedition, and captured 
and brought off two schooners with five hundred and seventy-six bales of cotton. 

Inspector in charge of ordnance at Navy Yard, New York, from May, 1865, to 
May, 1868. 

Commissioned as Captain, July 25, 1866 ; special duty as one of Board of Visitors 
to Naval Academy, May and June, 1868 ; special duty on Board to select sites for 
powder-magazines, Portsmouth, N. H., Boston, and New York, June and July, 
1868 ; court-martial duty at New York, August, 1868 ; commanded sloop Rich- 
mond, European Squadron, December, 1868, to November, 1871. 

Commissioned as Commodore, August 15, 1870 ; commanded Mediterranean 
Squadron, European Fleet, from October, 1870, to November, 1871 ; occasional 
Court duty from November, 1871, till September, 1872 ; commanded Navy Yard, 
Philadelphia, from October, 1872, to June, 1874 ; in addition to which, com- 
manded Naval Station, League Island, from April, 1873, to June, 1874. 

Commissioned as Rear-Admiral, June 5, 1874 ; commanded North Atlantic 
Station from June, 1874, to February, 1876 ; during this period was engaged with 
portion of squadron at New Orleans from September, 1874, to March, 1875, acting 
in co-operation with General Emory, and afterwards with General Sheridan ; in 
September and October, 1875, was at Aspinwall with his flag-ship and one other 
vessel of squadron, to protect American interests on the Isthmus, then menaced 
by the rebellion in the State of Panama. Was authorized by Navy Department 
at this time to command for the purpose the vessels of the South Pacific Squad- 
ron, then in the harbor of Panama, consisting of the flag-ship Richmond and the 
Omaha ; took command of the Naval Asylum and Station as Governor on March 
1, 1876, where he is now on duty. 



16 REAR-ADMIRALS. 

REAR-ADMIRAL C. R. P. RODQERS, 

Born November 14, 1819, in Brooklyn, N. Y. Appointed Midshipman from 
Connecticut, October 5, 1833; attached to frigate Brandywine and sloop Vin- 
cennes, Pacific Station, 1834-36 ; Navy Yard, New York, 1837 ; sloop Fairfield 
and brig Dolphin, Brazil Squadron, 1837-39. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, July 8, 1839 ; schooner Flirt, coast of 
Florida, 1830-40 ; and in command of schooner Phoenix, 1841-42, being actively 
employed in the Seminole War during those three years. Sloop Saratoga, coast 
of the United States, 1842-43. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, September 4, 1844; served in Mediterranean 
Squadron in frigate Cumberland, 1843-45, and in store-ship Lexington, 1845 ; 
Coast Survey, 1846; frigate Potomac and sloop Albany, blockading Mexican 
coast, 1847 ; present and in the trenches at the reduction of Vera Cruz, and at 
the capture of Tobasco and Tuspan ; Coast Survey, 1848-49 ; frigate Congress, 
Brazil Squadron, 1850-51 ; frigate Constitution, coast of Africa, 1852-55 ; Coast 
Survey, commanding steamer Bibb and schooner Gallatin, 1856-57 ; steam- 
frigate Wabash, Mediterranean Squadron, 1858-59 ; Commandant of midshipmen 
at Naval Academy, 1860-61. 

Commissioned as Commander, October 15, 1861 ; served in steam-frigate Wabash 
as Captain and Fleet-Captain, 1861-63, commanding that ship at the battle of 
Port Royal, November, 1861, and the naval force in the trenches at the reduction 
of Fort Pulaski, January 27, 1862. While in the Wabash, much employed on 
detached service, in command of a division of gunboats, in retaking the coast and 
inlets of Georgia and Florida, and South Carolina south of Port Royal ; Fleet- 
Captain in the New Ironsides, in the attack on Charleston, April 7, 1863. Rear- 
Admiral Du Pont in his official report of that engagement says, " On this as on 
all other occasions, I had invaluable assistance from the Fleet-Captain, C. R. P. 
Rodgers, who was with me in the pilot-house directing the movements of the 
squadron. For now over eighteen months in this war this officer has been afloat 
with me, and in my opinion no language could overstate his services to his 
country, to this fleet, and to myself as its commander-in-chief." Commanded 
steam-sloop Iroquois, 1863-65, on special service. 

Commissioned as Captain, July 25, 1866; Navy Yard, Norfolk, 1865-67; com- 
manded steam-frigate Franklin, Mediterranean Squadron, 1868-70. 

Commissioned as Commodore, August 28, 1870 ; special service in Europe, 1871 ; 
Chief of Bureau of Yards and Docks, October, 1871-74. 

Commissioned as Rear-Admiral, June 14, 1874 ; Superintendent Naval 
Academy, 1874-78. 

REAR-ADMIRAL STEPHEN D. TRENCHARD, 

Born in New York, July 10, 1818. Appointed from New York, October 23, 
1834 ; receiving-ship. New York, 1835-7 ; Naval School, Philadelphia, 1839-40. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, July 16, 1840 ; sloop Preble, West India 
Squadron, 1841-4; sloop Fairfield, Home Squadron, 1844-5; Coast Survey, 
1845-9. 

Commissioned as Ldeutenant, February 27, 1847 ; sloop Albany, Home Squad- 
ron, 1850-2 ; receiving-ship, Philadelphia, 1853 ; Coast Survey, 1854-7 ; steam- 
frigate Powhatan, East India Squadron, 1857-9 ; commanding steamer Rhode 
Island, supply -vessel to Blockading Squadron, 1861-5. 

Commissioned as Commander, July 16, 1862 ; two attacks on Fort Fisher, 
December, 1864, and January, 1865 ; Navy Yard, New York, 1866-9. 



REAR-ADMIRALS. 17 

Commissioned as Cnptain, July 25, 1866 ; commanding steam-sloop Lancaster, 
flag-ship South Atlantic Squadron, 1869-71. 

Commissioned as Commodore, May 7, 1871 ; member Board of Examiners, 
1872 ; Light-House Inspector, 1873-5. 

Commissioned as Rear-Admiral, August 10, 1875 ; commanding N. A. Station, 
1876-8. 



REAR-ADMIRAL ALEXANDER MURRAY, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania, August 22, 1835 ; at- 
tached to West India Squadron, 1836-8 ; while in the West Indies, sailed in 
Warren, Grampus, Constellation, St. Louis, and Vandalia ; coast of Florida, Sem- 
inole War, 1 839-41 ; sailed in steamer Poinsett, cutter Van Buren, and served 
on the land in command of open boats. 

Promoted to Passed Jlidshi'pmaii in 1841 ; coast of Florida, Seminole War, 
1841-2 ; Pacific Squadron, 1843-5, in schooner Shark, frigate United States, 
and sloop-of-war Levant; Gulf of Mexico, 1846, steamer Vixen, capture of 
Alvarado, Tobasco, Tuspan, Vera Cruz, and Tampico, — slightly wounded at 
Alvarado. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, August 12, 1847; razee Independence, Mediter- 
ranean Squadron, 1849-51 ; commanding United States steamer Fulton, West 
Indies; Vice-President King on board, 1852; receiving-ship, Norfolk, 1853; 
commanding steamer Bibb, Coast Survey, 1857-9 ; United States sloop Cumber- 
land, Home Squadron, 1859; commanding United States S. Pocahontas, 1860-1 ; 
detached at Norfolk, Va., and at the firing on Fort Sumter rejoined the United 
States sloop Cumberland, without orders ; burning of Navy Yard ; commanding 
steamer Louisiana, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1861-2 ; repulsfeof rebel 
steamer Yorktown, ofi" Newport News, September, 1861 ; battle of Roanoke Island, 
February 8, 1862 ; battle of Elizabeth River, with the fort and Lynch's fleet, 
February 10, 1862; battle of Newbern, North Carolina, February 14, 1862; 
engagement with Wise's division; battle of Winton, North Carolina, 1862; 
commanded naval forces at battle of Kingston, North Carolina, 1862 ; commanded 
naval forces at the repulse of rebels, under Hill, from Newbern, North Carolina, 
February 14, 1862 ; commanded a naval and military expedition up the York and 
Pamunky Rivers, which was entirely successful, destroying twenty-seven vessels, 
two large steamers among the number, approaching to within eleven miles of Rich- 
mond, in the month of May, 1862. This expedition was afloat and the enemy 
in sight nearly all the time. 

Commissioned as Commander, July 16, 1862; special duty, sounds of North 
Carolina, 1863 ; Navy Yard, Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 1864-5 ; commanding 
special squadron to Russia, 1866-7. 

Commissioned as Captain, July 25, 1866 ; Navy Yard, Philadelphia, 1869-72. 

Commissioned as Commodore, June 19,' 1871; member Light-House Board, 
1873-6. 

CommisS'ioiied as Rear-Admiral, April 26, 1876 ; commanding Pacific Stations, 
1876-8. 

REAR-ADMIRAL THOMAS H. PATTERSON, 

Born in Louisiana, May, 1820. Appointed from Louisiana, April 5, 1836, as 
Acting Midshipman ; attached to brig Porpoise, survey of Southern harbors, July 
20, 1836, to February 14, 1837. 

Promoted to Midshipman, March 3, 1847 ; Navy Yard, Washington, March 9 

2 



18 , REAR-ADMIRALS. 

to April 20, 1837 ; ordered to frigate Macedonian, Exploring Expedition, April 
20, 1837 ; ordered to sloop Falmouth, Pacific Squadron, June 27, 1837, — served 
until June 16, 1840 ; leave of absence until October 3, 1840 ; ordered to brig Con- 
sort, survey of Apalachicola Bay, October 3 to 8, 1840 ; ordered to Navy Yard, 
Washington, to August 31, 1841 ; Naval School, Philadelphia, to August 9, 
1842. 

ProDQOted to Passed Midshipman, July 1, 1842 ; Naval Observatory, August 
9, 1842, to August 31, 1843 ; attached to brig Lawrence, as Acting Master, West 
India Squadron, from August 31 to November 1, 1843, and as Acting Lieutenant, 
to April 17, 1844; attached to brig Washington, as Passed Midshipman, Coast 
Survey, from April 17, 1844, to June 5, 1846, and as Acting Master, to October 
31, 1848. 

Promoted to Master, October 31, 1848. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, June 23, 1849; attached to sloop Vandalia, 
Pacific Squadron, from July 11, 1849, to October 12, 1852; leave of absence, 
October 12 to October 30, 1852 ; special duty, Washington, D. C, to December 
23, 1854 ; sloop Jamestown, flag-ship, coast of Africa, to June 8, 1857 ; leave of 
absence, to July 13, 1857 ; Navy Yard, Washington, D. C, to October 13, 1859 ; 
steam-sloop Mohican, coast of Africa, to October 15, 1861 ; commanding steam- 
gunboat Chocura, Hampton Roads, York River ; present at the siege of York- 
town, May 4, 1862 ; took part in expedition and was the leading gunboat up 
the Pamunky River to the White House, — to open the way, and in support of 
General McClellan's army ; co-operated with the advance of General Stoncman's 
command at the White House, in checking the approach of the enemy at that 
point; from early in June until October, 1862, senior-officer of the naval forces in 
the York and Pamunky Rivers, and in constant co-operation with the Army of the 
Potomac' 

Commissioned as Commander, July 16, 1862; commanded the steamer James 
Adger, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, from November 18, 1862, to June 
27, 1865; towed the iron-clad Montauk to Beaufort, North Carolina; thence to 
Port Royal, January 2, 1863 ; convoyed to Hampton Roads and Philadelphia the 
officers and crew of the Confederate iron-clad Atlanta, June 19, 1862; ofi" Nan- 
tucket, in search of the Confederate cruiser Tacony, June 25, 1863; blockade 
duty off Wilmington, North Carolina, July 7, 1863, in company with the Iroquois 
and Mount Vernon ; cut out the steamer Kate from under the batteries at New 
Inlet, North Carolina, July 31, 1863 ; participated in the attack and capture of a 
flying battery, a few miles above Fort Fisher, North Carolina, August 23, 1863; 
chased ashore and captured the blockade runner Cornubia between New Inlet and 
Masonboro' Inlet, North Carolina, November 8, 1863 ; chased and captured the 
blockade-runner Robert E. Lee, off Cape Lookout, November 9, 1863, — both ves- 
sels loaded with arms and supplies for the Confederate army ; captured schooner 
Ella, off Masonboro' Inlet, North Carolina, November 26, 1863 ; blockade duty, 
South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, June 14, 1864 ; senior-officer of the outside 
blockade, off Charleston, South Carolina, September 15, 1864 ; convoy duty, Mara- 
quana passage, April 25, 1865; detached, waiting orders, June 27, 1865; com- 
manding the steam-sloop Brooklyn, flag-ship, Brazil Squadron, September 19, 1865, 
to September 16, 1867. 

Commissioned as Captain, July 25, 1866 ; Navy Yard, Washington, D. C, from 
December 26, 1867, to June, 1871. 

Commissioned as Commodore, November 2, 1871 ; special duty, Washington, 
1871-2; Commandant Navy Yard, Washington, 1873-6; President Board of 
Examiners, 1876-7. 

Commissioned as Rear-Admiral, 1877 ; commanding Asiatic Station, 1878. 



Rear-admirals. 19 

REAR-ADxMIRAL JOHN C. HOWELL, 

Born in Pennsylvania, November 24, 1819. Appointed from Pennsylvania, 
June 9. 1836 ; sloop Levant, West India Squadron, 1837-41. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, July 1, 1842 ; frigate Congress, Mediterra- 
nean Squadron, 1842-4 ; brig Perry, East India Squadron, 1844-5 ; Naval 
Storekeeper, Macao, 1846-8. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, August 2, 1849 ; frigate Raritan, Home Squadron, 
1849-50 ; sloop Saratoga, East India Squadron, 1851-3 ; receiving-ship, Phila- 
delphia, 1854-6 ; steam-frigate Susquehanna, Mediterranean Squadron, 1856-8 ; 
receiving-ship, Philadelphia, 1859-60 ; steam-frigate Minnesota, North Atlantic 
Blockading Squadron, 1861 ; battle of Hatteras Inlet. 

Commissioned as Commander, July 16, 1862; commanding steamer Tahamo, 
p]astern Grulf Blockading Squadron, 1862-3 ; commanding steamer Nereus, North 
Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; two actions at Fort Fisher, December, 
1864, and January, 1865. 

Commissioned as Captain, July 25, 1866 ; commanding rendezvous, Philadel- 
phia, 1866-8 ; Fleet-Captain, European Squadron, 1869-70 ; Chief of Staif, 
European Fleet, 1871 ; commanding League Island Station, 1871-2. 

Commissioned as Commodore, January 29, 1872 ; commanding Navy Yard, 
Portsmouth, N. H., 1872-5 ; Chief of Bureau of Yards and Docks, 1875-8. 

Commissioned as Hear- Admiral, 1877. 



REAR-ADMIEAL DANIEL AMMEN, 

Born in Ohio, May 15, 1820. Appointed Midshipman, July 7, 1836; attached 
to the Exploring Expedition, 1837-8 ; sloop Levant and Vandalia, in the West 
Indies, 1838-9 ; sloop Preble, on the coast of Labrador and in the Mediterranean, 
1840-1 ; returned to the United States on board ship-of-the-line Ohio, 1841, and 
to Naval School ; passed examination, June, 1842, and received warrant of Passed 
Midshipman ; store-ship Lexington, as Navigator, 1843-4, to the Mediterranean ;. 
sloop Vincennes, as Navigator, East India Squadron, 1845-7 ; Coast Survey, 
1848-9. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, November 4, 1849 ; frigate St. Lawrence, Mediter- 
ranean Squadron, 1850 ; Coast Survey, 1851 ; attached to a Commission for selecting: 
a Naval Station in the Bay of San Francisco, California, 1852; scientific expedi- 
tion of steamer Water Witch, Paraguay River, 1853-4 ; brig Bainbridge, Brazil 
Squadron, 1854-5 ; Naval Observatory, Washington, 1856-7 ; steam-sloop Sara- 
nac, Pacific Squadron, 1858 ; steam-frigate Merrimac, Pacific Squadron, 1859-60;, 
steam-frigate Roanoke, as Executive- Officer, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron,. 
1861 ; commanding Seneca, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1861-2, at battle- 
of Port Royal, November 7, 1861 ; the day following hoisted our flag over Fort 
Beauregard, and made formal delivery to the army, by order of Rear- Admiral Du 
Pont; Tybee Island, December, 1861 ; commanded forces entering by way of Whale- 
Branch in attack on Port Royal Ferry, January 1, 1862 ; engaged in the operations 
against Fernandina through St. Andrew's Sound and in St. John's River. 

Promoted to Commander, February 21, 1863; commanding monitor Patapsco,. 
South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, against Fort McAllister, March, 1863, and 
in the attack on Fort Sumter, April 7, 1863 ; had charge of a draft of two 
hundred and twenty seamen on board of the California passenger steamer Ocean 
Queen, May, 1864, bound to Aspinwall ; two days after leaving New York sup- 
pressed an open and organized mutiny, with the assistance of Boatswain Thomas 



20 REAR-ADMIRALS. 

G. Bell, who was the only aid assigned, receiving in doing so the excellent co- 
operation of Captain Tinklepangh, — who commanded the Ocean Queen, — his 
officers, and several of the passengers ; commanding steam-sloop Mohican, North 
Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; in the bombardment of Fort Fisher, 
December, 1864, and again when it was carried by assault by the army, January, 
1865 ; commanding iron-clad Miantonomah, special service, 1866. 

Commissioned as Captain, July 25, 1866 ; special duty, Hartford, Connecticut, 
1866-7 ; commanding flag-ship Piscataqua, Asiatic Squadron, 1867-8 ; Chief of 
Bureau of Yards and Docks, 1869-71. 

After the fall of Fort Fisher, the Mohican, under the command of Commander 
Ammen, was ordered to Warsaw Sound, Georgia. The difficulty of landing troops 
without surf-boats being brought forcibly to view, he selected suitable trees on the 
adjacent islands, had them sawed into planks, and constructed on his design a cask 
"Balsa," or life-boat, which is now at the Navy Yard, Portsmouth, N. H., at 
which place are built Ufe-boats on this design for all of our vessels of war. Chief 
of Bureau of Navigation, 1871-8. 

Commissioned as Commodore, April 1, 1872. 

Commissioned as Rear-Admiral, 1878. 



KEAR-ADMIRAL EDWARD T. NICHOLS. 

Born in Georgia, March 1, 1823. Appointed from Georgia, December 14, 
1836; attached to sloop Levant, West India Squadron, 1837-40; Naval School, 
Philadelphia, 1841-2. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, July 1, 1842 ; frigate Columbus, Mediter- 
ranean Squadron, 1842-4 ; steamer Colonel Harney, Atlantic coast, 1845 ; frigate 
Columbia, Brazil Squadron, 1845-7 ; bomb-vessel Stromboli, Home Squadron, 
1847-8; frigate Savannah, Pacific Squadron, 1849-51. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, March 13, 1850 ; Navy Yard, Pensacola, 
1852-3; steam-frigate Saranac, Mediterranean Squadron, 1853-6; Navy Yard, 
Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 1857-8 ; sloop Jamestown, Home Squadron, 
1858-60 ; commanding steamer Winona, West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 
1861-2; bombardment of Forts Jackson and St. Philip; present at and received 
■the surrender of Fort St. Philip, April 28, 1862;. attack upon and passage of 
yicksburg batteries, June 28, 1862 ; engagement with rebel ram Arkansas; bom- 
bardment and passage of Vicksburg batteries, July 15, 1862. 

Commissioned as Commander, July 16, 1862; commanding steamer Alabama, 
West India Squadron, 1863 ; commanding steamer Mendota, North Atlantic 
Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; engaged with rebel battery at Four Mile Creek, 
James River, June 16, 1864; special duty. New York, 1866-8. 

Commissioned as Captain, July 25, 1866 ; Chief-of-Stafi", Asiatic Squadron, 
1870-2. 

Commissioned as Commodore, May 24, 1872 ; Commandant Navy Yard, Boston, 
1872-6 ; member of Board of Examiners, 1877. 

Commissioned as Rear-Admiral, February 25, 1878; commanding South 
Atlantic Station. 



REAR-ADMIRALS. 21 

REAR-ADMIRALS ON THE RETIRED LIST. 

Retired after Forty-five Years' Service. 



REAR-ADMIRAL HIRAM PAULDING, 

Born in New York, 1797. Appointed Midshipman same State, September 1, 
1811 ; served on Lake Ontario with Commodore Chauncey at the commencement 
of the war with England ; transferred to Lake Champlain, and served on board 
President and Ticonderoga, and commanded second division of guns in the action 
with the British Fleet near Plattsburg; in 1815, served in frigate Constellation, 
squadron of Commodore Decatur, in the war with Algiers, and participated in the 
capture of Algerine cruisers. 

Promoted to Lieutenant^ April 27, 1816; served on board Independence, 74; 
served on board brig Prometheus, 1817 ; in 1818, ordered to frigate Macedonian, 
and made a cruise of three years in Pacific Ocean, returning in 1821. (On leave 
in 1822, which year was passed at the military academy of Captain Partridge, at 
Norwich, Vt.) In 1823, ordered to steamer Sea Gull (the first steamer employed 
as a man-of-war) in the squadron of Commodore Porter for the suppression of 
piracy in the West Indies; in 1824, ordered to frigate United States, and made a 
cruise of nearly four years in the Pacific Ocean, and while there, in 1826, volun- 
teered for duty on schooner Dolphin, ordered in pursuit of mutineers of whale-ship 
Globe, — absent one year on this service, — rejoined the United States and returned 
in her to New York ; in 1830, joined frigate Constellation as First Lieutenant, 
and served in her two years in the Mediterranean ; in 1834, was appointed to 
command schooner Shark, and made a cruise in the Mediterranean of about two 
and one-half years. 

Promoted to Commander, February 9, 1837 ; in 1838, appointed to command 
sloop-of-war Levant, and made a cruise in the West Indies; in 1841, Executive- 
Ofl&cer, Navy Yard, New York. 

In 1843, promoted to Post- Captain ; in 1844, appointed to command sloop-of- 
war Vincennes, and made a cruise in the East Indies of three years, — was left in 
command of station by the return of Commodore Biddle to United States ; in 1848, 
appointed to command frigate St. Lawrence, and cruised in the Baltic, North Sea, 
west coast of Europe, and Mediterranean ; in 1852, ordered to command Vermont, 
74, to join the East India Squadron, but her sailing was countermanded, and same 
year ordered to command Navy Yard, Washington ; in 1855, appointed to com- 
mand Home Squadron ; in 1858, relieved from Home Squadron soon after having 
sent the filibuster Walker and his men home from Nicaragua ; in 1861, appointed 
by President Lincoln to assist in the Navy Department in putting the Navy afloat 
and rendering other services consequent upon the breaking out of the Rebellion. 
In the performance of these duties was the destruction of the Navy Yard at Nor- 
folk, in obedience to orders ; same year appointed to command Navy Yard, New 
York. 

Commissioned as Rear-Admiral, July 16, 1862. During the Draft Riots in 
New York City, in 1863, the marines and seamen on the station protected public 
and private property on the North and East Rivers, the Arsenal, Custom-House, 
Sub-Treasury, and many other buildings in New York. Admiral Paulding at 
this time was in command of the Navy Yard at New York, and always, in his 
many stations of honor and trust, acted with discretion and a zealous devotion to 



22 REAR-ADMIRALS. 

the public good. Governor of Naval Asylum at Philadelphia, 18G6-8. Post- 
Admiral at Boston, 1869-71. 

Born in 1797 ; will be eighty-one on December 11, 1878. 



REAR-ADMIRAL CORNELIUS K. STRIBLING, 

Born in South Carolina. Appointed Midshipman from same State, June 18, 
1812; served on board the Macedonian from January 1, 1813, to April, 1814, 
and Mohawk, on Lake Ontario, until April, 1815, and in Macedonian in the 
squadron under the command of Commodore Decatur, when the Algerine frigate 
and brig were captured, in 1815 ; from 3Iacedonian to Constellation in October, 
1815, and returned to the United States in Constellation, end of 1817. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, April 1, 1818; on board the Constellation, on 
coast of South America, 1819-20 ; in the West Indies, on board the IJornet, 
Peacock, John Adams, and Constellation, 1822-5 ; in April, 1823, commanded 
two barges on the coast of Cuba, and after a running fight, captured the piratical 
schooner Pilot ; on board the Brandywine, Pacific Squadron, 1826-7, and sloop 
Vincennes, 1827-31 ; receiving-ship Norfolk, 1831-8 ; Assistant Inspector of 
Ordnance, 1833-5 ; sloop-of-war Peacock, East India and Pacific Squadrons, 
1835-7 ; rendezvous, Norfolk, 1840. 

Commissioned as Commander m 1840 ; commanding rendezvous, Norfolk, 1840 ; 
Navy Yard, Washington, 1840-1; commanding sloop-of-war Cyane, 1841-4; 
Pacific Squadron, frigate United States, 1844; receiving-ship Norfolk, 1845-7; 
Fleet- Captain, Pacific Squadron, 1847-8; commanding ship-of-the-line Ohio, 
1848-50 ; Superintendent of the Naval Academy, 1850-3. 

Commissioned as Captain, August 1, 1853; commanding sloop-of-war San 
Jacinto, special service, 1854-5; Commandant Pensacola Navy Yard, 1857-9; 
commanding East India Squadron, 1859-61 ; Commandant Navy Yard, Philadel- 
phia, 1862^; commanding East Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1864-5; member 
of Retiring Board of 1855 ; in 1861, member of a Board of Commissions (three 
Senators, three members of the House of Representatives, one army and one navy 
officer), provided for by Act of Congress of July 31, 1861, to examine and report 
as to compensation of all officers of the government, and for other purposes ; 
member of Light-House Board, 1862. 

Commissioned as Commodore, July 16, 1862. 

Commissioned as Rear- Admiral, July 25, 1866 ; member of the Light-House 
Board, 1867-70. Total sea service, twenty-six years two months; shore and 
other duty, nineteen years one month. 



REAR-ADMIRAL JOSHUA R. SANDS, 

Entered the Navy as Acting Midshipman, September, 1812, and was at once 
employed under Commodore Chauncey on Lake Ontario. On the 5th of Novem- 
ber was put under fire of the enemy in an attack of the Royal George, which 
ship was compelled to retire from the fire of the American Squadron to Kingston, 
where, protected from the batteries on shore, no further efi"orts were made to cap- 
ture her. April, 1813, he joined sloop-of-war Madison, and was present at the 
capture of Little York (now Toronto) ; carried orders during the greater part of 
the attack, from the Commodore to the difierent vessels of the squadron, while 
engaged with the forts and batteries, until the enemy surrendered. May, same 
year, was engaged with the enemy at the capture of Fort George, Upper Canada ; 



REAR-ADMIRALS. 23 

then served on board the sloop-of-war Pike ; engaged several times the British 
Squadron under Sir James Yeo ; twenty-six men killed on board the Pike in one 
of them ; served on shore in a battery on opening campaign, 1814; was ordered 
to join frigate Superior, and served on board until peace was proclaimed in 1815 ; 
then ordered to United States ship Washington, 74 guns, bound to Mediterranean; 
served in her until 1818, when promoted to a Lieutenant; in 1819 was ordered 
to sloop-of-war Hornet, coast of Africa and West Indies; in 1821, ordered to 
the Franklin, 74 guns. Commodore Stewart, employed on the Pacific until 1824; 
1828, ordered to sloop-of-war Vandalia, serving on the coast of Brazil; 1830, 
returned to the United States, and was variously employed on shore duty, re- 
cruiting, etc. 

1840, promoted to the rank of Commander ; 1841, attached to the New York 
Navy Yard until 1843, then ordered to command the United States ship Falmouth, 
and served in her in the years 1843-5, in the Gt-ulf of Mexico and West Indies ; 
1846, was ordered to command the steamer Vixen ; served in her in the capture 
of Alverado, Tobasco, and Lagona, of which was made Governor, and remained 
until withdrawn to take part in the attack of Vera Croix ; engaged with the 
castles from Point Horwas until ammunition was expended ; having been supplied 
by the Commodore, put out in front of enemy's batteries and castles in company 
with United States steamer Spitfire, and four gunboats, and remained under fire 
of the castle until ordered to retire by Commodore Perry ; commanded the 
steamer Vixen at the capture of Tampico and Tuspan ; 1847, was intrusted with 
the flags, trophies, and brass cannon taken from the castles, and sent home 
with despatches .with complimentary letter to the Department ; returned to the 
United States in the sloop-of-war St. Mary's in 1848; 1848, was ordered to 
command the United States ship North Carolina, and remained in her two years ; 
1851, ordered to command the United States frigate St. Lawrence, sailed in her 
to World's Fair in England, subsequently visited Portugal, and returned to the 
United States same year; in 1853 was ordered to command the United States 
S. Allegheny, for Japan, — she proved to be a failure, and was never after em- 
ployed ; 1856, ordered to comiuand United States frigate Susquehanna, visited 
Central America, Mediterranean, and England ; was engaged in her laying the 
cable in 1857 ; rejoined the Mediterranean Squadron, and was again ordered to 
Central America, where having laid for some mouths in the Nicaraguan River, 
captured part of the filibusters and their steamer, which was left by Commodore 
Paulding, to whom they were sent, and then forwarded to New Orleans ; while 
in the river, was visited with the yellow fever and was compelled, for the want of 
medicines, to sail for Port Royal, Jamaica, where, after our arrival, landed eighty- 
three patients, and after taking in coal, some thirty more were landed and left in 
the hospital ; the ship now being entirely demoralized as a man-of-war, it was de- 
termined to return to the United States, and landed at New York in 1858 ; 1859, 
ordered to command the United States Squadron (flag-ship Congress) on the coast 
of Brazil, and remained until the breaking out of the Rebellion in the United 
States in 1861. 

1862, was commissioned a Commodore^ and was engaged until 1866 on light- 
house duty on the Lakes Erie and Ontario, and St. Lawrence River, in which 
year was commissioned a Rear- Admiral ; 1869, was appointed Port- Admiral, at 
Norfolk, Va., where he was stationed until 1872. 



24 REAR-ADMIRALS. 

KEAR-ADMIRAL LEVIN M. POWELL, 

Born in Virginia. Appointed Midshipman^ March 1, 1817 ; served as Midship- 
man in the Mediterranean, China Seas, and in the Grulf of Mexico and West 
Indies for the suppression of piracy. 

Commissioned as Lievtenanf, April 28, 1826 ; served in the Mediterranean, 
West Indies, and Gulf of Mexico ; before Charleston in the sloop Natchez during 
the nullification troubles ; on coast of France pending the demand for payment of 
the French indemnity, 1834-5 ; in the West Indies and on coast of Florida on 
the outbreak of the Seminole War, — commanding several expeditions against the 
hostile Indians, — in the last of these was wounded in a fight with them on the 
head-waters of Jupiter River, in January, 1837; received the thanks of the Navy 
Department for these services in Florida ; commanded two surveying expeditions 
for the rectification of positions and soundings of the eastern coast and harbors of 
the Gulf of New Mexico ; and was commissioned Commander, while on this duty, 
June 24, 1843; appointed Assistant Inspector of Ordnance, October, 1843, and 
continued on ordnance duty until appointed to command of sloop John Adams, 
which sailed for Brazil, July, 1849 ; served in her on the coast of South America 
and on the coast of Africa until return, in December, 1850 ; from 1851 to 1854, 
Executive-Officer of the Navy Yard, Washington ; was in command of the flag- 
ship Potomac cruising in North Atlantic and West Indies, to August, 1856. 

Promoted to Captain, September 14, 1855 ; Inspector of contract steamers in 
1858, and appointed Captain of the frigate Potomac early in 1861, and sailed for 
Gulf Squadron September of the same year ; was retired by the Act of December, 
1861, and from command of the Potomac, June 30, 1862; Inspector of Third 
Light-House District from November 7, 1862, to October, 1866. 

Commissioned as Commodore, July 16, 1862. 

Commissioned as Rear-Admiral, as per Register, and on special service from 
1867 to 1872. 

REAR-ADMIRAL THOMAS 0. SELFRIDGE, 

Born in Massachusetts. Appointed from Massachusetts, January 1, 1818. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, Mdsch. 3, 1827; Exploring Expedition, 1829; 
sloop Natchez, West India Squadron, 1830 ; frigate Delaware, Mediterranean 
Squadron, 1834; frigate North Carolina, 1837; rendezvous, Boston, 1840. 

Commissioned as Commander, April 11, 1844; Navy Yard, Portsmouth, New 
Hampshire, 1845; frigate Columbus, East India Squadron, 1846; commanding 
sloop Dale, Pacific Squadron, 1848 ; commanding rendezvous, Boston, 1851-2 ; 
Boston Navy Yard, 1853-5. 

Commissioned as Captain, September 14, 1855; commanding steamer Missis- 
sippi, 1861 ; Commandant Mare Island Navy Yard, California, 1862-4. 

Commissioned as Commodore, July 16, 1862; Commandant Navy Yard, 
Philadelphia, 1867-8; President Examining Board, 1869. 

Commissioned as Rear-Admiral, July, 1870. 



REAR-ADMIRAL ANDREW ALLEN HARWOOD, 

Born in Pennsylvania, and appointed Midshipman from same State, January 1, 
1818 ; served in the gun-brig Saranac, on the Amelia Island Station, 1818 ; sloop- 
of-war Hornet, 1819-21, during which time said ship was chiefly engaged in 
cruising for the suppression of the African slave-trade, and of piracy in the West 



REAR-ADMIRALS. 25 

Indies ; Navy Yard, Philadelphia, and United States S. North Carolina, in 
1822 ; steamer Sea Gull and barges belonging to the expedition under Com- 
modore Porter, against the West India pirates, 1823 ; on July 3, of that year, 
assisted in the capture of the piratical schooner Catalina, of three guns, and her 
barge, by the barges Gallinipper and Musquito in Signapa Bay ; frigate Constitu- 
tion in the Mediterranean, 1824-7, — in the latter part of this service as Acting 
Master. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, March 3, 1827 ; receiving-ship, Philadelphia, 
1828-30; Navy Yard, New York, 1831-2- frigate United States, Mediterranean 
Squadron, 1832-3 ; detached as special messenger to bring home the ratified 
treaty with Naples ; frigate Potomac, schooner Shark, and frigate Constitution, 
Mediterranean Squadron, 1835-7 ; New York Station on special service, 1840-3; 
Assistant Inspector of Ordnance, 1843-52 ; in 1844, member of a commission to 
visit dock-yards and foundries in England and France, and report on ordnance 
improvements. 

Commissioned as Commander, October 2, 1848 ; in 1851-2, member of a 
Board appointed to prepare the Ordnance Instructions for the Navy and to make 
the necessary investigations and experiments ; commanded frigate Cumberland, 
Mediterranean Squadron, 1853-5. 

Commissioned as Captain, September 14, 1855 ; Inspector of Ordnance, 
1858-61 ; member of a Board to revise the Ordnance Instructions, and prepare a 
new edition. 

Commissioned as Chief of the Bureau of Ordnance and Hydrography, August 
6, 1861. 

Commissioned as Commodore, July 16, 1862 ; Commandant Navy Yard, 
Washington, and of the Potomac Flotilla, 1862-3; Secretary Light-House Board, 
and member of Examining Board, 1864-9. 

Commissioned as Rear-Admiral, February 16, 1869 ; member of Retiring 
Board and on special duty at Washington, 1869-72. 



REAR-ADMIRAL JAMES L. LARDNER, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed Midshipman from that State, May 10, 1820 ; 
served in the schooner Dolphin and ship Franklin, 80 guns, flag-ship Commodore 
Stewart, Pacific Ocean, in 1821-4. August, 1825, joined frigate Brandywine and 
sailed to France, carrying to his home General Lafayette, "the Nation's Guest." 
Sailed afterward to the Mediterranean, and returned to New York in 1826. Oc- 
tober, 1826, sailed in frigate Brandywine, flag-ship of Commodore Jacob Jones, 
to the Pacific Ocean, and served in that ship, schooner Dolphin, and ship Vin- 
cennes until June, 1830, — nearly three years of which as navigating officer of the 
latter ship, in which he circumnavigated the globe in 1829-30. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, May 17, 1828. Summer of 1832, served as senior 
Lieutenant in schooner Experiment; 1833-4, served in the Delaware, 86 guns, 
flag-ship of Mediterranean Squadron, Commodore Patterson. April, 1837, ordered 
to Independence, 60 guns, flag-ship of Brazil Squadron, Commodore Nicholson, 
and served in Russia, England, and in Brazil, 1837-8. In the years 1841-4 served 
as senior Lieutenant in sloop Cyane and frigate United States, flag-ship of the 
Pacific Squadron, nearly three years in the latter ship. Commanded receiving- 
ship, at Philadelphia, in the years 1845-8. May, 1850, sailed in command of 
brig Porpoise to the coast of Africa, and made a cruise of three years in com- 
mand of that vessel and the sloop-of-war Dale, retvirning to Boston in April, 
1853. 



26 REAR-ADMIRALS 

Commissioned as Commander, May 17, 1851. Served as Fleet-Captaia of the 
West India Squadron, in the summer of 1855. 1860, ordered to the Philadelphia 
Navy Yard. 

Commission as Captain dated May 19, 1861. September, 1861, ordered to 
command the steam-frigate Susquehanna, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron ; 
was with Du Pont at the capture of Port Royal and blockading South Carolina 
and Georgia, for which service his name was sent to Congress, by President 
Lincoln, for a vote of thanks, which passed the House, but was thrown out in the 
Senate. After the battle of Port Royal, Captain Lardner received a compliment- 
ary letter from Flag-Officer Du Pont, of which the following is a copy : 

"Wabash, off Hilton Hkad, Port Royal, S. C, Nov. 9, 1861. 

" I enclose a general order, to be read to the oflSicers and crew of the Susque- 
hanna, and I take the occasion to say that your noble ship, throughout the whole 
of the battle, was precisely where I wanted her to be, and doing precisely what I 
wanted her to do, and that your close support of this ship was a very gallant thing. 
" Truly your friend, 
(Signed) "S. F. DUPONT. 

" Capt. J. L. Lardner, Command'g Susquehanna." 

May, 1862, assumed command of the East Grulf Blockading Squadron, with 
the flag of Rear- Admiral. Returned home in December, invalided by a severe 
attack of yellow fever at Key West. Admiral Lardner lost, by yellow fever, 40 
gallant officers and men, from his flag-ship, in the summer of 1862. May, 1863, 
took command of the West India Squadron, with flag of Rear-Admiral ; squadron 
withdrawn, October, 1864. 

Commissioned as Commodore, July 16, 1862. 

Commissioned as Rear-Admiral, July 25, 1866. On special duty from 1864 
to 1869. Governor of Naval Asylum, Philadelphia, 1869-71. 



REAR-ADMIRAL HENRY K. THATCHER, 

Born in Maine, at the seat of his grandfather, Major-General Henry Knox, of 
Revolutionary memory. Appointed Midshipman from there March 4, 1823; 
Washington Navy Yard during that year (which was very active in equipping 
the so-called mosquito fleet of Commodore David Porter, to attack the pirates of 
the West Indies), from thence to frigate United States, under Commander Isaac 
Hull, until May, 1827. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, March 23, 1829, while serving on board 
Independence, 74, at Boston Station ; Acting Master of schooner Porpoise and 
sloop-of-war Erie, Commander J. D. Elliot's Squadron, West India Station, 
1829-31. 

Promoted to Lieutenant, February 28, 1833 ; Boston Navy Yard and sloop-of- 
war Falmouth (West Indies), 1833-4; sloop-of-war Erie, 1835; receiving-ship 
Boston, 1836-7 ; frigate Brandy wine, Mediterranean Station, 1840-1 ; receiving- 
ship Ohio, Boston harbor, 1842-3; sloop-of-war Jamestown, Commander Bolton, 
African Squadron and Mediterranean, 1847-50, and Navy Yard, Boston ; com- 
manding store-ship Relief, Brazil Squadron, 1852-3; Naval Asylum, 1854-5. 

Promoted to Commander while there in February, 1855 ; commanding sloop- 
of-war Decatur, Pacific Squadron, from 1855-7; Executive-Officer, Boston Navy 



REAR-ADMIRALS. 27 

Yard, 1860-1 ; commanding sloop-of-war Constellation, coast of Europe and 
Mediterranean, 1862-3, as a commander. 

Promoted to Commodore during this command. Relieved July, 1863, and 
ordered home to command steam-frigate Colorado and division of Southern block- 
ade ; commanded first division of Porter's Squadron in the attacks and capture of 
Fort Fisher and dependencies, in December, 1864, and January, 1865; after 
which, he was ordered to command of the West Gulf Squadron as Acting Rear- 
Admiral, and at once commenced active operations for the capture of Mobile and 
coast of Texas, in co-operation with the land-forces under General Canby. After a 
vigorous bombardment. Forts Alexis and Spanish Fort were carried by assault by 
the army on the night of April 9, 1865, leaving the minor works a comparatively 
easy prey, — the Forts Ti-acy and Huger, near Tracy and Huger, made a spirited 
resistance until the night of the 11th, when their garrisons made their escape 
through the marshes and in boats. On the following day, a large army force 
embarked in transports, under convoy of the squadron, crossed the bay, eight 
miles, in a dense fog, for the purpose of making a combined attack by land and 
water upon the city and its immediate defences, but on reaching the eastern shore 
the fog suddenly lifted, when flags of truce were discovered at the landing, and 
the announcement made that the rebel General Maury had evacuated the city with 
all his army ; a formal demand was at once made by General Granger and Acting 
Rear- Admiral Thatcher for the surrender of the city, which was unconditionally 
complied with, and the fortifications and city taken possession of without delay, 
the stars and stripes taking the place of the rebel flag in every direction. The 
rebel naval forces, under Flag-Ofl&cer Ebenezer Farrand, consisting of the iron-clad 
frigate Nashville, sloop-of-war Morgan (partially iron-clad), the iron-clad ram Baltic, 
the steamer Black Warrior, and the rams Tuscaloosa and Huntsville, fled to the 
river Tombigbee, and sinking the two last named in the channel. Our forces 
afloat being about to pursue them, Farrand proposed terms of surrender, which 
having been accepted by Acting Rear-Admiral Thatcher, a suitable force under 
Commander Edward Simpson (fleet-captain), was despatched by him to take pos- 
session and bring them with their officers and men to the city. Preparations were 
then at once made for the attack on Texas, but before the forces could move, pro- 
positions were made for the surrender of all their posts through Captain Sands, 
commanding the Texas division of the blockade, and commissioners sent by the 
rebels to New Orleans to complete the arrangements. Acting Rear-Admiral 
Thatcher at once proceeded to Galveston in his flag-ship and was well received 
by the authorities of that city. The forts were garrisoned by blue-jackets until 
the boys in blue could be sent from New Orleans to relieve them. In May, 1866, 
Commodore Thatcher was relieved from the Gulf and ordered to the command of 
the North Pacific Squadron, in which command he remained until relieved in 
August, 1868. 

Commissioned as Rear-Admiral, July 25, 1866 ; Port- Admiral, at Portsmouth, 
New Hampshire, 1869-71. 

REAR-ADMIRAL SYLVANUS W. GODON. 

Sylvanus W. Godon was born in Pennsylvania. He was appointed Mid- 
shipman from the same State, March 1, 1819. 

Promoted to Passed 3Iidshipman, and ordered to frigate Macedonia, Brazil 
Squadron, 1827 ; on duty at Naval School, Norfolk, Va., 1829 ; serving in sloop- 
of-war Natchez, Mediterranean Squadron, 1830 ; attached to frigate Potomac, 
Pacific Squadron, 1833-4 ; serving in schooner Shark, Mediterranean Squadron, 
1835. 



28 REAR-ADMIRALS. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant^ December 17, 1836 ; attached to sloop-of-war 
Peacock, East India Squadron, 1836-7 ; and to sloop-of-war Cyane, Mediter- 
ranean Squadron, 1840 ; attached to bomb brig Vesuvius, 1847, at the siege of 
Vera Cruz ; on special duty, 1850 ; Executive-Officer of steamer Susquehanna, 
East India Squadron, 1851-3. 

Promoted to Commander, September 14, 1855 ; commanding sloop-of-war 
Mohican, Pacific Squadron, 1860. 

Commissioned as Captain in 1861, and ordered to command of sloop-of-war 
Powhatan, one of the vessels of Du Pont's Expedition to Port Royal. 

Promoted to Commodore, January 2, 1863; on special duty, 1864; command- 
ing steamer Susquehanna, and Fourth Division of Porter's Squadron, at the two 
battles of Fort Fisher, in December, 1864, and January, 1865. 

Commissioned as Rear- Admiral, July 25, 1866 ; commanding South Atlantic 
Squadron, coast of Brazil, 1866-7 ; Commandant Navy Yard, New York, 
1868-70. 

REAR-ADMIRAL WILLIAM RADFORD. 

William Radford was born in Virginia. He was appointed from the State 
of Missouri, March 1, 1825 ; attached to Mediterranean Squadron, 1827-8; and 
to sloop-of-war Erie, West India Squadron, 1830-1. 

Promoted to Passed MidsMpman, June 4, 1831 ; attached to sloop-of-war John 
Adams, Mediterranean Squadron, 1835. 

Promoted to Lieutenant, February 9, 1837 ; attached to sloop-of-war Warren, 
Pacific Squadron, 1845-7. 

Lieutenant Radford commanded the party that cut out the Malokadel, a Mex- 
ican vessel of war, at Mazatlan, west coast of Mexico ; attached to store-ship 
Lexington, 1852-3. 

Promoted to Commander, September 14, 1855; commanding sloop-of-war 
Dacotah, East India Squadron, 1860-1. 

Commissioned as Captain in 1862 ; commanding sloop-of-war Cumberland in 
1861, and was on court-martial duty at Old Point, when that ship was attacked 
by the ram Merrimac, which had steamed down from Norfolk. Commander 
Radford made strenuous exertions to reach his ship before the fight was over, but 
arrived at Newport News just as the Cumberland was sinking. 

Promoted to Commodore, April 24, 1863 ; commanded frigate New Ironsides, 
and iron-clad division of Porter's Squadron, at the two attacks upon Fort Fisher, 
in December, 1864, and January, 1865 ; Commandant at Washington Navy Yard, 
1866-8. 

Commissioned as Rear-Admiral, 1868 ; commanding European Squadron in 
1869-70 ; special duty, Washington, 1871-2. 



REAR-ADMIRAL THOMAS T. CRAVEN. 

Thomas T. Craven was born in the District of Columbia. Appointed Mid- 
shipman from the State of New Hampshire, May 1, 1822 ; serving in the sloop- 
of-war Peacock, Pacific Squadron, 1827. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, May 24, 1828 ; serving in sloop-of-war Erie, 
West India Squadron, 1829. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, May 27, 1830 ; serving in brig Boxer, Brazil 
Squadron, 1833, and attached to receiving-ship at New York, 1836; exploring 
expedition, 1840 ; attached to razee Independence, Mediterranean Squadron, 
1850; on duty at Naval Academy, 1851-5. 



REAR-ADMIRALS. 29 

Commissioned as Commander, December 16, 1852 ; commanding frigate Con- 
gress, Mediterranean Squadron, 1856-8; Naval Academy, 1859; commanding 
sloop Mohawk, Home Squadron, 1860. 

Commissioned as Captain, June 7, 1861 ; commanding sloop-of-war Brooklyn, 
Home Squadron, 1861-2; while in command of the Brooklyn, participated in 
the attack upon and passage of Forts Jackson and St. Philip. In this action. 
Captain Craven's vessel became entangled in the hulks and rafts which sustained 
the chain barricade of the river, and, while in this situation, received a severe fire 
from Fort St. Philip, and was attacked by one of the enemy's rams and a large 
rebel steamer; the latter received a broadside from the Brooklyn, at sixty yards, 
so well delivered as to end the conflict, so far as the steamer was concerned. 

The ram struck the Brooklyn at the starboard gangway, but the chain-armor 
proved a perfect protection. By this time the Brooklyn had swung clear of the 
obstructions, and passed on up the river. Captain Craven continued in command 
of the Brooklyn, taking part in all the engagements along the Mississippi River, 
up to and including that of Vicksburg, until late in the summer of 1862, when 
Jie was detached and ordered North. 

Commissioned as Commodore, July 10, 1862 ; commanding steam-frigate 
Niagara, special service, European waters, 1864-5. 

Commissioned as Rear- Admiral, October 10, 1866 ; Commandant of Navy 
Yard, Mare Island, California, 1867-8 ; commanding North Pacific Squadron, 
1869 ; Port-ldmiral, San Francisco, California, 1870-1. 



REAR-ADMIRAL HENRY K. HOFF, 

Appointed as Midshipman from South Carolina, October 28, 1823 ; ordered 
to schooner Porpoise, October, 1823; cruising in West Indies; ordered to brig 
Brandywine, 1825, conveying Lafayette to France; to frigate Constitution, 1826, 
Mediterranean. 

In 1828 passed examination, and ordered to New York Yard; Acting Sailing- 
Mas ter. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, March 3, 1831 ; to frigate Potomac, June, 1831 ; 
landed at Qualla Battoo, East Indies, February, 1832, with a division of seamen ; 
attacked one of the forts ; captured it by storming, after a fight of nearly two 
hours, killing the Rajah, with 11 Malays; 6 seamen badly wounded ; assisted, 
also, in taking another fort ; division under Lieutenant Shubrick (Executive-Offi- 
cer Potomac) ; ordered to frigate Independence, 1837 ; Savannah frigate (Execu- 
tive), 1843, Pacific ; store-ship Relief, as Lieutenant-Commander, 1843, at Callao ; 
to frigate St. Lawrence (Executive), Baltic and Atlantic, 1848. 

Commissioned as Commander, February 6, 1854 ; ordered to command frigate 
Independence, September, 1856, Pacific ; transferred from Independence (laid up. 
Mare Island) to sloop John Adams, 1857, as senior-officer of Pacific Squadron ; 
returned to United States via Cape Horn, 1858 ; ordered to steamer Princeton, 
Navy Yard, Philadelphia, 1859. 

Commissioned as Captain, June 30, 1861 ; ordered to command sloop Lancaster, 
1861, Pacific. 

Commissioned as Commodore, July 16, 1862; returned to United States, 1862 ; 
ordered to Philadelphia to ordnance duty during the Rebellion. 

Commissioned as Rear-Admiral, April 13, 1867, and ordered to command the 
North Atlantic Squadron in October, 1867, retaining command until October, 
1869. Rear- Admiral Hoff's duties while in command of the North Atlantic 
Station were of the most arduous and delicate nature, owing to the Cuban troubles 



30 REAR-ADMIRALS. 

and other causes. Ordered as a member of the Retiring Board, October, 1869 ; 
and, while on that duty, ordered as President of Board of Examiners at Annapolis 
for the class of 1870. 



REAR-ADMIRAL JOHN W. LIVINGSTON, 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, March 4, 1823. 

Served as a Midshipman in sloop-of-war Ontario and frigate Delaware in the 
Mediterranean, and in frigate Constitution, at close of " piratical war," in the 
West Indies. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, June 21, 1832, and served as a watch-officer in 
brig Dolphin and sloop Fairchild in the Pacific, and in frigate Columbia on a 
voyage around the world, visiting Sumatra, and destroying the piratical establish- 
ments on that island, and as Executive-Officer (a portion of the time in command) 
in the frigate Congress on the coast of California and Mexico during the entire 
Mexican War ; was present at the capture of Guaymas and San Bias, and in the 
various operations in California. 

Commissioned as Commander, May 24, 1855 ; commanding sloop-of-war St. Louis 
on coast of Africa, 1856-8 ; commanding steamer Penguin, Blockading Squadron, 
1861-4; while off Wilmington, N. C, chased and destroyed a blockade-runner; 
commanding steamer Bienville, Blockading Squadron, 1861 ; commanding frigate 
Cumberland, James River blockade, in early part of 1862. 

Commissioned as Commodore, July 16, 1862. After the evacuation of Norfflk 
by the rebels, Commodore Livingston was ordered there in command of Navy Yard, 
with directions to restore the dry dock, so it might be available for the repair 
of our Southern cruisers. In 1864, Commodore Livingston was detached from 
the Norfolk Yard, and in 1865 ordered to the command of the Naval Station at 
Mound City, 111., and the remaining vessels of the Mississippi Squadron. In 1866 
he was detached from this duty and ordered to special service. 

Commissioned as Rear- Admiral, May 26, 1868. 



REAR-ADMIRAL THOMAS TURNER. 

Thomas Turner is a native of Virginia. Appointed Midshipman from Vir- 
ginia, April 21, 1825 ; attached to frigate Constellation, Mediterranean Squadron, 
1827 ; sloop-of-war Warren, Mediterranean Squadron, 1830. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 4, 1831 ; frigate Constellation, Medi- 
terranean Squadron, 1834, and frigate Delaware, same squadron, 1835. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, December 22, 1835 ; frigate Columbus, East India 
Squadron, 1840; receiving-ship at Philadelphia, 1843; sloop Albany, Home 
Squadron, 1847. 

Lieutenant Turner was actively engaged in the war with Mexico, and was present 
at Tuspan, April 7, 1847 ; receiving-ship at Philadelphia, 1850 ; frigate Congress, 
Brazil Squadron, 1851-3 ; on ordnance duty, 1854-7. 

Commissioned as Commander, September 14, 1855 ; commanding sloop-of-war 
Saratoga, Home Squadron, 1859-60. Commander Turner was in command of 
Saratoga in the engagement between that vessel and two Spanish steamers, the 
Marquis of Havannah and General Miramon, in the harbor of Anton Leyardo, 
Mexico, when they were captured, March 6, 1860, at midnight. 

Commissioned as Captain, July 16, 1862. 

Commissioned as Commodore, December 13, 1863 ; commanded frigate New 
Ironsides, special service, 1863 ; commanded frigate New Ironsides in the attack 



rear-admirals. 31 

upon Forts Sumter, Moultrie, and Beauregard, in Charleston harbor, Aj^ril 7, 
1863. Admiral Du Pont was on board the New Ironsides, and commended Com- 
modore Turner for the judgment and ability with which he handled his vessel. 
Special duty. New York, 1864-5 ; special duty, Philadelphia, 1866-7 ; on ordnance 
duty, Philadelphia, 1868. 

Commissioned as Rear-Admiral, May 27, 1868 ; commanding Pacific Fleet, 
1869-70. 



KEAR-ADMIEAL CHARLES H. POOR. 

Charles H. Poor was born at Cambridge, Massachusetts, in June, 1809. 
Appointed Midshipman from Massachusetts, March 1, 1823; attached to sloop- 
of-war John Adams, West India Squadron, 1827 ; frigate Java, Mediterranean 
Squadron, 1829. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, March 29, 1829, and ordered to frigate 
Delaware, Mediterranean Squadron, 1830; sloop-of-war Lexington, Brazil Squad- 
ron, 1833, and brig Boxer, same squadron, 183-4. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, December 31, 1833; rendezvous, Norfolk, Vir- 
ginia, 1836; razee Independence, Brazil Squadron, 1840; Navy Yard, Washing- 
ton, 1846-8; Inspector, etc., 1850-1; frigate St. Lawrence, Pacific Squadron, 
1852-5. 

Commissioned as Commander, September 14, 1855 ; Navy Yard, Norfolk, Vir- 
ginia, 1856-8; commanding sloop-of-war St. Louis, Home Squadron, 1860-1; 
commanded expedition of sailors and marines to reinforce Fort Pickens, 1861 ; 
frigate Roanoke, N. A. B. Squadron, 1861-2. Commander Poor took command 
of steamer Illinois, to act as a ram against the Merrimac, but did not have an op- 
portunity to test the power of his vessel. Passed rebel batteries, under fire, at 
SewalFs Point, while proceeding from Hampton Roads toward Newport News in 
frigate Roanoke, to assist the Congress and Cumberland. 

Comniissioned as Commodore, January 2, 1863; commanding sloop-of-war 
Saranac, Pacific Squadron, 1863-5 ; compelled the authorities at Aspinwall to 
release United States Mail steamer detained to collect illegal dues (appi'oved by 
Secretary of the Navy) ; compelled authorities at Rio La Hache to hoist and 
salute the American flag, which had been insulted (approved by Secretary of the 
Navy) ; commanding Naval Station at Mound City, Illinois, 1866-8. 

Commissioned as Rear- Admiral, September 20, 1868 ; Commandant Navy Yard, 
Washington, 1869; commanding North Atlantic Squadron, 1869-70; member 
Retiring; Board, 1871-2. 



REAR-ADMIRAL JAMES F. SCHENCK, 

Born in Ohio, June 11, 1807. Appointed from Ohio, March 1, 1825; sloop 
Hornet, West India Squadron, 1829; frigate Brandywine, 1830. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 4, 1831 ; sloop John Adams, Medi- 
terranean Squadron, 1833-4. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, December 22, 1835 ; sloop St. Louis, West India 
Squadron, 1837; brig Dolphm, Brazil Squadron, 1840; razee Independence, 
Home Squadron, 1843; frigate Congress, Pacific Squadron, 1846-7. During 
the war with Mexico, Lieutenant Schenck, as chief Military Aid to Commodore 
Stockton, landed and took possession of Santa Barbara and San Pedro, in Cali- 
fornia ; serving in same capacity, marched on and was at the first capture of Los 
Angeles. As Second Lieutenant of the frigate Congress, was at the bombardment 



32 REAR-ADMIRALS. 

and capture of Gruaymas, and the taking of Mazatlan. Frigate Congress, East 
India Squadron, 184:8 ; commanding mail steamship Ohio, 1848-52. 

Commissioned as Commander, September 14, 1855 ; commanding receiving- 
ship, New York, 1848 ; commanding steamer Saginaw, East India Squadron, 
1860-1. On June 30, 1861, the Saginaw was fired upon by a fort at " Quia 
Hone," Cochin China ; the fire was returned and the fort silenced. 

Commissioned as Captain, 1861 ; commanding frigate St. Lawrence, Blockading 
Squadron, 1862. 

Commissioned as Commodore, July 2, 1863 ; commanding steam-sloop Pow- 
hatan, N. A. Squadron, 1864-5 ; commanded Powhatan and Third Division of 
Porter's Squadron in the two attacks on Fort Fisher ; commanded Naval Station, 
Mound City, Illinois, 1866. 

Commissioned as Rear- Admiral, July, 1870. 



REAR-ADMIRAL SAMUEL PHILLIPS LEE, 

Born in Virginia, February 13, 1812. Appointed Midshipman from his native 
State, November 22, 1825 ; attached to frigate Java, Mediterranean Squadron, 
1828-32. 

Promoted to Passed MidsMpvian, June 10, 1833 ; frigate Brandywine, Pacific 
Squadron, 1834-5, and to sloop Vincennes, same squadron, 1836-7. * 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, February 9, 1837 ; attached to West India 
Squadron, 1839-42; Coast Survey, 1841-4; Pensacola Navy Yard, 1845-6; 
Coast Survey, 1847-51; commanding brig Dolphin, special service, 1852; 
Hydrographical duty, 1852-4 ; Naval Observatory, Washington, 1855. 

Commissioned as Commander, September 14, 1855 ; special service, 1856-60. 

In 1861, Commander Lee was ordered to command the sloop-of-war Oneida, 
and in that vessel took part in the attack and passage of Forts Jackson and St. 
Philip, and the various battles on the Mississippi from New Orleans to Vicksburg, 
winning a high reputation for gallantry and devotion to duty. 

Commissioned as Captain, July 16, 1862, and ordered to the command of the 
N. A. B. Squadron, with the rank of Acting Rear- Admiral. While in command 
of the N. A. B. Squadron, he greatly harassed the enemy by numerous expeditions 
up the navigable streams within the limits of his squadron. He was at all times 
ready to co-operate with the army, and on more than one occasion the presence of 
his vessels saved the military forces from serious disaster. Wilmington, N. C, 
was the most difiicult port on the coast to blockade, but Acting Rear- Admiral 
Lee, by a wise distribution of the vessels of his squadron, made the blockade as 
effective as it was possible to make it. In the summer of 1864, Acting Rear- 
Admiral Lee was transferred to the command of the Mississippi Squadron. In 
December of the same year he rendered good service to the country, by keeping 
open the Cumberland River at the time Hood's army was advancing on Nashville, 
and when the safety of the army under General Thomas depended in a great 
measure upon reinforcements and supplies reaching them promptly ; the railroad 
communication between Louisville and Nashville having been interrupted, the 
Cumberland River was the only channel of communication. 

During this campaign, Admiral Lee was several times under fire, and for his 
services received a vote of thanks from Congress. 

In 1865, the Mississippi Squadron was disbanded and most of the vessels sold, 
Captain Lee being ordered East. 

Commissioned as Commodore, July 25, 1866; in 1866-7, Commodore Lee 



REAR-ADMIRALS. 33 

was President of the Board to examine volunteer officers for admission into the 
regular navy; on special duty at Washington, D. C, 1868-70. 

Commissioned as Rear- Admiral, June, 1870, and to the command of the 
North Atlantic Fleet. Retired 1873. 



REAR-ADMIRAL 0. S. GLISSON, 

Born in Ohio. Appointed Midshipmayi from Indiana, November 1, 1826; first 
cruise in the sloop John Adams, West Indies, 1827-8 ; sloop Falmouth, same 
squadron, 1829-30 ; schooner Grampus, same squadron, 1831-2. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 4, 1832 ; in the Delaware, 74, Medi- 
terranean, 1832-5 ; Navy Yard, Norfolk, Va., 1836. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, February 9, 1837 ; in sloop Fairfield, Brazil 
Squadron, 1837-40 ; sloop Marion, West India Squadron, 1841-2 ; sloop Sara- 
toga, Brazil Squadron, 1843-4; commanding schooner Reefer, during the Mex- 
ican War, 1847 ; Navy Yard, Norfolk, 1848-50 ; special duty, 1851-2; attached 
to steam-frigate Powhatan, East India Squadron, and on the Japan expedition, 
1852-5, — was in Japan when the first treaty was made by Commodore M. C. 
Perry. 

Commissioned as Commander, September 14, 1855 ; commanding store-ship 
John P. Kennedy, East India Squadron, 1856 ; Naval Asylum. Philadelphia, 
1857-60; commanding steamer Mount Vernon, N. A. B. Squadron, 1861. 

Commissioned as Captain, July 16, 1862 ; while in the Mount Vernon, saved 
the transport Mississippi, bound to New Orleans, with General Butler and fifteen 
hundred men on board. It was supposed that she was designedly run on Frying- 
pan Shoal, North Carolina ; and had it not been for the timely assistance of the 
Mount Vernon, it is very probable that many lives would have been lost. By this 
valuable service being rendered, General Butler was enabled to reach New Orleans 
in time to participate in that great battle. While on the blockade of Wilmington, 
he burned a light-boat under the guns of Fort Caswell, so close that they could 
hear the sentinels calling " all's well." This light-boat was all ready to receive 
her battery of eight guns, and would have been put in commission in a few days, 
to cruise against our commerce. 

Commanding steam-sloop Mohican, 1862-3, in chase of the Alabama; com- 
manding steamer Santiago de Cuba, 1864-5 ; present at the two attacks on Fort 
Fisher, December, 1864, and January, 1865 ; commanded the Third Division in 
both engagements ; was recommended by Admiral Porter for promotion for cover- 
ing the landing of the troops and carrying his division into action. 

Commissioned as Commodore, July 25, 1866. 

Commanding Naval Station, League Island, Pa., 1867, to May 1, 1870. 

Commissioned as Rear-Admiral, June, 1870, and ordered to the command of 
the European Fleet, where he remained until retired in 1871. 



REAR-ADMIRAL MELANCTHON SMITH, 

Born in New York, May 24, 1810. Appointed from New York, March 1, 
1826 ; from July 22, 1826, to June 15, 1830, attached to frigate Brandy wine 
and sloop Vincennes, Pacific Squadron ; Naval School, 1831 ; frigate Potomac, 
May 3 to June 28, 1831; Navy Yard, New York, from June 28, 1831, to 
January 19, 1832. 

3 



34 REAR-ADMIRALS. 

Promoted to Passed 3fidsJiipman, June 1, 1832 ; sloop St. Louis, West India 
Squadron, August 8, 1832, to December 14, 1832 ; Navy Yard, Pensacola, De- 
cember 14, 1832, to July 21, 1833 ; brig Porpoise and sloop Vandalia, West India 
Squadron, from July 21, 1833, to August 15, 1834; Navy Yard, New York, 
July 20, 1835, to November 4, 1835. 

Promoted to Master, 1836 ; sloops Natchez and Vandalia, West India Squadron, 
from 1836 to 1838. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, March 8, 1837 ; steamer Poinsett, operating against 
the Indians in Florida, from June, 1839, to March, 1840 ; commanded a fort and 
a twenty-oared barge for one month, in 1839, during the Florida War ; Navy Yard, 
New York, 1841 ; sloops Fairfield and Preble, Mediterranean Squadron, from 
April 23, 1841, to September 5, 1843 ; receiving-ship at New York, from No- 
vember, 1843, to October, 1844 ; store-ship Erie, from October, 1844, to December, 
1844; sloop Vandalia and steamer Colonel Harney, Home Squadron, from Decem- 
ber, 1844, to January, 1846 ; Executive-Ofl&cer of Pensacola Navy Yard, January, 
1846, to April, 1848; frigate Constitution, Mediterranean Squadron, from Sep- 
tember, 1848, to January, 1851 ; waiting orders, 1851. 

Commissioned as Commander, September 14, 1855; Executive-Officer of frigate 
Potomac, while she was flag-ship to Flag-Officer Paulding, June, 1855, to October, 
1855 ; Light-House Inspector, October, 1857 ; commanding at different times the 
steamers Mississippi, Massachusetts, and Monongahela, Gulf Blockading Squadron, 
from May 1, 1861, to June 22, 1863. While commanding the Massachusetts, 
engaged a fort at Ship Island, July 9, 1861, and three Confederate steamers and a 
revenue-cutter off Ship Island in 1861 ; engagement with rebel steamer Florida, 
Mississippi Sounds, October 26, 1861 ; cut the telegraph wire between Shields- 
boro and Pass Christian, September 20, 1861 ; capture of a battery of two guns at 
Beloxi. December 31, 1861, while commanding the steamer Mississippi, was in 
the attack and passage of Forts Jackson and Philip, and the capture and destruc- 
tion of the rebel ram Manassas, April 24, 1862. Flag-Officer Farragut, in his 
official report, says, " Just as the scene appeared to be closing, the ram Manassas 
was seen coming up under a full head of steam to attack us. I directed Captain 
Smith, in the Mississippi, to turn and run her down. This order was instantly 
obeyed by the Mississippi, turning and going at her at full speed. Just as we 
expected to see the ram annihilated, when within fifty yards of each other, she 
put her helm hard-a-port, dodged the Mississippi, and ran ashore. The Missis- 
sippi poured two broadsides into her and sent her drifting down the river a total 
wreck. Thus closed our morning's fight." Chalmette batteries, below New Orleans, 
April 25, 1862. 

Commissioned as Captain, July 16, 1862. 

Captain Smith remained in the Mississippi, taking part in all the engagements 
of the squadron until March 14, 1863, when, in attempting the passage of the 
batteries at Port Hudson, the Mississippi grounded in twenty-three feet of water, 
and keeled over to port. Every effort was made to get the vessel o^, but without 
avail, and the enemy having obtained the exact range of the ship, were hulling 
her at almost every shot, when Captain Smith gave orders to fire her, which was 
done in four different places between decks. When the flames had gained sufficient 
headway to render the destruction of the vessel certain. Captain Smith gave orders 
to abandon her, which was done quietly and without confusion, he being the last 
man to leave. By his cool and courageous bearing in the trying situation in 
which he was placed. Captain Smith won the admiration of all, and his course was 
approved by both Eear- Admiral Farragut and the Department. While command- 
ing the Monongahela, participated in the attacks on Port Hudson, from June 1 to 
20, 1863 ; from June 22, 1863, to July, 1863, under orders North to report for 



REAR-ADMIRALS. 35 

a command, — reporting July 7, 1863 ; from July, 1863, to February 15, 1865, at 
sea, commanding iron-clad Onondaga; temporarily transferred, April 23, 1864, by 
telegraph, to command of squadron in North Carolina Sounds, to capture rebel 
ram Albemarle ; engaged that vessel and her consort, the steamer Bombshell, in 
Albemarle Sound, capturing the latter vessel May, 1864 ; returned to Onondaga 
as Divisional Officer on James River, and was permanently transferred to frigate 
Wabash, for operations against Fort Fisher ; participated in both attacks on Fort 
Fisher ; 1865, Navy Yard, Washington, D. C. 

Commissioned as Commodore., July 25, 1866 ; Chief of Bureau of Equipment 
and Becruiting, Navy Department, 1866-70. 

Commissioned as Rear- Admiral^ July, 1870 ; Commandant Navy Yard, New 
York, 1870-2. 

BEAB-ADMIBAL CHABLES STEWABT BOGGS, 

Born in New Brunswick, New Jersey, January 28, 1811. Appointed Midship- 
man from same State, November 1, 1826. Attached to Mediterranean Squadron, 
— sloop-of-war Warren and ship of-the-line Delaware, — 1827-30 ; West India 
Squadron, schooner Porpoise, from 1830-2. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, April 28, 1832 ; receiving-ship. New York, 
1832 ; West Indies, sloop Falmouth, 1833-4; rendezvous, New York, 1835-6. 

Promoted to Lieutenant, September 6, 1837 ; Pacific Squadron, ship-of-the-line 
North Carolina and schooner Enterprise, 1837-8 ; receiving-ship New York, in 
charge of apprentices, 1840-1 ; coast of Africa, sloop Saratoga, 1842-3 ; partici- 
pated in the destruction of the Bereby Village on that coast ; Home Squadron, 
1846-7, steamer Princeton; present at siege of Vera Cruz; commanded boat 
expedition from the Princeton, which destroyed the United States brig Truxton 
after her surrender to the Mexicans ; receiving-ship, New York, 1848 ; Execu- 
tive-Ofiicer of the frigate St. Lawrence to the World's Fair, London, 1848 ; First 
Lieutenant Navy Yard, New York, and inspecting for Bureau of Provisions and 
Clothing, 1851-4. 

Commissioned as Commander, September 15, 1855 ; commanding United 
States mail-steamer Illinois, 1856-8 ; Light-House Inspector, California, 1860-1 ; 
commanding United States steamer Varuna at the passage of Forts Jackson and 
St. Philip, April 24, 1862. The Varuna was the only vessel of Farragut's 
Squadron lost at the passage of the forts. From her great speed she was able to 
get ahead of all the fleet, and engage the rebel squadron above the forts. She- 
was attacked by two rams, and sunk after being run into the bank of the river;, 
causing, however, the destruction of the attacking vessels. 

Commissioned as Captain, July 16, 1862 ; commanded steam-sloop Sacramento, 
on the blockade of Cape Fear Biver ; left his command on account of serious 
sickness ; special duty under Admiral Gregory, at New York, 1864-5 ; super- 
intended the construction of small steam picket-boats, and specially designed and 
fitted out the torpedo-boat, which, under the dashing Cushing, destroyed the rebel 
iron-clad Albemarle; 1866, commanded the United States steamer Connecticut ;_ 
special cruise in the West Indies ; fell in with the rebel iron-clad Stonewall in the 
harbor of Havana, and previous to her being given up to the Spanish govern^ 
ment, demanded her surrender to the United States. 

Promoted to Commodore, July 25, 1866 ; commanded steamer De Soto, North 
Atlantic Squadron, 1866-8. The De Soto suffered serious damage in the earth- 
quake at St. Thomas, but was safely brought to the United States for repairs, 
bringing the crew of the United States steamer Monongahela, which had beea 
thrown ashore by the earthquake at St. Croix. Special duty, to report on the. 



36 REAR-ADMIRALS. 

condition of steam-engines afloat, 1869-70 ; commanding Light-House Depot, 
Tompkinsville, Staten Island, and Light-House Inspector, Third District. 

Commissioned as Rear-Admiral, July, 1870 ; commanding European Fleet, 
1871-2. 



REAR-ADMIKAL A. H. KILTY, 

Born in Maryland. Appointed from Maryland, July 4, 1821 ; first cruise, 
Franklin, 74, Commodore Stewart, Pacific, 1821-4; store-ship Decoy, West 
Indies, sloop John Adams, Pensacola Station, frigate Constellation, 1825-7 ; 
Brazil Station, frigate Hudson^ sloop Boston, 1828-9 ; surveying coast of Lou- 
isiana, 1830-1. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, April 28, 1832 ; schooner Grampus, West 
Indies, 1832-4 ; receiving-ship, Sea Grull, Philadelphia, 1835-6. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, September 6, 1837 ; sloop John Adams, East 
India Squadron, 1838-40 ; present at the attack on Qualla Battoo and Muckie, 
by Commodore Reid ; Columbus, 74, Mediterranean and Brazil, 1843-4 ; frigate 
United States, coast of Africa and Mediterranean, 1846-9 ; rendezvous, Baltimore, 
1851-2; receiving-ship. North Carolina, New York, 1854-5. 

Commissioned as Commander, September 14, 1855; commanding rendezvous, 
Baltimore, 1860; ordered to St. Louis, 1861, to aid in organizing Naval flotilla 
under Foote, — took command of gunboat Mound City, and was engaged at Island 
No. 10 and Fort Pillow. The Mound City being sunk in the latter engagement, 
she was raised, repaired at Mound City, and rejoined the flotilla. 

In June, 1862, was placed in command of an expedition to White River, 
Arkansas ; on the 17th, attacked Fort St. Charles, about one hundred miles from 
the mouth of the river, and, with the aid of military force under Colonel Fitch, 
took it ; but near the close of action a shot entered the steam-drum of the Mound 
City, and the escape of steam caused the death of more than a hundred officers 
and men, — the commanding-officer receiving a severe scald, which caused the loss 
of his left arm. 

Commissioned as Captain, July 16, 1862 ; ordnance duty, Baltimore, 1863 ; 
command of iron-clad, frigate Roanoke, North Atlantic Squadron, and receiving- 
ship, Vermont, 1864-5. 

Commissioned as Commodore, July 25, 1866 ; command of Norfolk Navy 
Yard, 1867-70. 

Commissioned as Rear-Admiral, July 13, 1870. 



REAR-ADMIRAL JOSEPH F. GREEN, 

Born in Maine, November 24, 1811. Appointed Midshipman, from same State, 
November 1, 1827; attached to sloop-of-war Vandalia, Brazil Squadron, 1830; 
Naval School, Norfolk, 1833. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 10, 1833 ; frigate Potomac, Mediter- 
ranean Squadron, 1835-7. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, February 28, 1838 ; sloop Erie, West India Squad- 
ron, 1840; frigate Columbus, Brazil Squadron, 1843-5; rendezvous, Boston, 
1846 ; ship-of-the-line Ohio, Pacific Squadron, during all of the Mexican War. 
Lieutenant Green took part in all of the important actions on the Pacific coast. 
He remained in the Ohio until 1850 ; Navy Yard, Boston, 1851-2 ; ordnance 
duty, 1853-4^ Naval Academy, 1855-8. 



REAM- ADMIRALS. 37 

Commissioned as Cominander, September 14, 1855 ; waiting orders, 1859-60 ; 
ordnance duty, 1861. 

Commissioned as Captain, July 16, 1862; commanding steam-sloop Canandai- 
gua, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862—4 ; participated in the bombard- 
ment of Fort Wagner; ordnance duty, Boston Navy Yard, 1866-8. 

Commissioned as Commodore, July 24, 1867 ; special duty, 1869 ; command- 
ing Southern Squadron with Atlantic Fleet, 1870-1. 

Commissioned as Rear-Admiral, July 13, 1870. 



REAK-ADMIRAL THORNTON A. JENKINS, 

Born in Virginia, and appointed Midshipman from that State, November 1, 1828 ; 
attached to sloop-of-war Natchez, West Indies, 1828-31 ; in Boat Squadron, in 
1829, cruising for pirates on coast of Cuba ; in sloop-of-war Vandalia, West Indies, 
in 1831-33. 

Passed examination for promotion to Lieutenant, June 2, 1834, and awarded by 
the Examining Board No. 1 of the class of 82 graduates. On the Coast Survey, 
1834 to 1842. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, December 9, 1839 ; served in the frigate Congress, 
Brazil and IMediterranean Squadron, 1842-5, being present at the capture of the 
Buenos Ayrean Squadron, off" Montevideo, September 29, 1844 ; on special service 
in Europe in 1845-6; was Executive-Officer of sloop-of-war Grermantown, in Gulf 
of Mexico, during the Mexican War ; and latter part, commanding store-ship Re- 
lief, same squadron, 1847-8 ; commanded part of the forces employed in the capture 
of Tuspan and Tobasco ; on the Coast Survey, 1848-52 ; acted as Secretary of 
Light-House Board from 1853-8. 

Commissioned as Commander, September 14, 1855 ; commanding sloop-of-war 
Preble on Paraguay Expedition, on Brazil Station, coast of Central America, and 
in Gulf of Mexico, 1858-60. Present at the capture of the armed vessels Mira- 
mon and Marquis of Havana, off Vera Cruz, and under the walls of that city and 
the Fort of St. Juan d'UUoa, during the siege and bombardment by the in- 
surgent forces of General Miramon. Charged with conveying the prizes Mirambn 
and Marquis of Havana and transporting their crew and passengers as prisoners to 
New Orleans. Secretary of Light-House Board, 1861. 

Commissioned as Captain, July 16, 1862 ; commanding steam-sloop Wachusett, 
on James and Potomac Rivers, 1862 ; being senior-officer, present at repulse of the 
enemy at Coggin's Point, James River, and at the attack on our flotilla, off" City 
Point, James River, August, 1862 ; commanded steam-sloop Oneida, West Gulf 
Blockading Squadron, off" Mobile, in the fall of 1862 ; was appointed Fleet-Captain 
and Chief-of-Staff of Farragut's Squadron, and was present at the passage of Port 
Hudson, March 14, 1863 (see Farragut's Report) ; fought Grand Gulf Batteries, 
March 19, 1863 ; Warrenton, March 21, 23, 25, and 28, 1863 ; Grand Gulf, March 
30, 1863 ; on the blockade of, during the siege prior to the surrender and attack 
on Port Hudson, May 24, 27, and 28,1863. Wounded on board the United States 
steamer Monongahela in fight with enemy's batteries stationed on Madame Win- 
chester's farm, College Point, Mississippi River, being in command of three armed 
vessels conveying provisions, arms, and ammunition to the army and navy operating 
below Port Hudson ; commanding steam-sloop Richmond, and senior naval-officer 
in command of naval forces below, at the time of the surrender of Port Hudson, 
July 9, 1863 ; commanding division, blockading Mobile entrance, etc., from De- 
cember, 1863, to battle of Mobile Bay, August 5, 1864, in which he took part, 
as well as the surrender of Forts Morgan, Gaines, and Powell, August 29 ; left in 



38 REAR-ADMIRALS. 

command of the Mobile Bay Division, until February, 1865 ; March 14, 1865, 
ordered to James River, remained there until after Lee surrendered to General 
Grant. 

Admiral Farragut, in his detailed report of the Mobile affair, says, " Before 
closing this report, there is one other officer of my squadron of whom I feel bound 
to speak. Captain T. A. Jenkins, of the Richmond, who was formerly my chief-of- 
staflf, not because of his having held that position, but because he never forgets to 
do his duty to the government, and takes now the same interest in the fleet as 
when he stood in that relation to me. He is also commanding officer of the second 
division of my squadron, and as such, has shown ability and the most untiring 
zeal. He carries out the spirit of one of Lord Collingwood's best sayings, — ' not 
to be afraid of doing too much ; those who are, seldom do as much as they ought.' 
When in Pensacola, he spent days on the bar, placing buoys in the best position, 
was always looking after the interests of the service, and keeping the vessels 
from being detained in port one moment more than necessary. The gallant Craven 
told me only the night before the action in which he lost his life, ' I regret. Ad- 
miral, that I have detained you ; but had it not been for Captain Jenkins, God 
knows when I should have been here. When your order came I had not received 
an ounce of coal.' I feel that I should not be doing my duty if I did not call the 
attention of the Department to an officer who has performed all his various duties 
with so much zeal and fidelity." 

Commissioned as Commodore, July 25, 1866 ; in August, 1865, appointed 
Chief of Bureau of Navigation and Detail, and held that position until April, 
1869, when he resigned, and was ordered to duty as Secretary of the Light-House 
Board. 

Promoted to Rear-Admiral, August 15, 1870 ; ordered to command the 
United States naval forces on Asiatic Station, in December, 1871 ; relieved in 
China, December, 1873 ; retired, December 11, 1873 ; appointed by the President, 
March 25, 1874, Commissioner to represent the Navy Department at the United 
States International Centennial Exhibition of 1876, at Fairmount Park, Phila- 
delphia. Official residence, Washington, D. C. 



REAR-ADMIRAL WILLIAM ROGERS TAYLOR, 

Born in Rhode Island, November 7, 1811. Appointed Midshipman from same 
State, April 1, 1828; attached to sloop St. Louis, Pacific Squadron, 1829-32; 
Naval School, New York, 1833-4. 

Promoted to Passed Midshijyman, 1834 ; receiving-ship. New York, 1835 ; 
sloop Peacock, East India Squadron, 1836-8. 

When the sloop Peacock ran ashore on the island of Madeira, in 1836, Passed 
Midshipman Taylor was sent to Muscat, in command of a cutter, to convey the 
diplomatic agent, Edmund Roberts, Esq., to that place, with some ratified treaties 
which he was charged to exchange. It was a sea-voyage of five days' duration, 
attended with considerable peril from bad weather and the Arab pirates, some of 
whom chased them for several hours. The Arabian sloop-of-war Sultana was sent 
to render assistance to the Peacock. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, February 10, 1840 ; brig Oregon, survey of 
Tampa Bay, 1842-3; sloop St. Mary's, Home Squadron, during Mexican War; 
engaged at Tampico Bar, June 8 and June 15, 1846 ; present at siege of Vera 
Cruz, and commanded an eight-inch gun in the Naval Battery ; Naval Asylum, 
Philadelphia, 1848-50 ; sloop Albany, Home Squadron, 1851-2 ; ordnance duty, 
1853-5. 



REAR-ADMIRALS. 39 

Commissioned as Commander, September 14, 1855 ; ordnance duty, 1857-9 ; 
ordnance duty, Washington, D. C, 1861. 

Commissioned as Captain. July 16, 1862 ; commanding steam sloop-of-war 
Housatouic, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, ] 862-3. 

Senior-officer oflF Charleston, at time of unsuccessful attack upon the blockad- 
ing vessels by rebel rams Chocura and Palmetto ; present as Fleet-Captain with 
Admiral Dahlgren, during all the operations against Morris Island, from July 10 
to 19, 1863, and was in battle with Forts Wagner and Sumter; on board the 
monitor Catskill on the 10th, and again on board the monitor Montauk, on 
July 18, 1863 ; commanded steam-sloop Juniata, North Atlantic Blockading 
Squadron, 1864-5, and was present upon both attacks upon Fort Fisher. 

Commissioned as Commodore, July 25, 1866; ordnance duty 1866-7; com- 
manding Northern Squadron, Pacific Fleet, 1869-71. 

Commissioned as Rear- Admiral January 19, 1871 ; President Board of Ex- 
aminers, 1872-3. 

REAR-ADMIRAL BENJAMIN F. SANDS, 

Born in Maryland. Appointed jMidshipman from Kentucky, April 1 , 1 828 ; 
attached to sloop Vandalia, Brazil Squadron, 1830-32 ; in sloop St. Louis, 
West India Squadron, 1833-4. 

Warranted as Passed Midshipman, June 14, 1834 ; on the Coast Survey, 
1836-41. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, March 16, 1840 ; in the frigate Columbus, 
Mediterranean Squadron, 1842-4; on special duty in 1845; at Naval Obser- 
vatory, 1846; Home Squadron, 1847 ; passage up Tobasco River, and at Tobasco, 
June 15, 1847 ; in sloop Yorktown, and commanding brig Porpoise, coast of 
Africa, 1848-50 ; on Coast Survey, 1851-55. 

Commissioned as Commander, September 14, 1855 ; continued on Coast 
Survey, 1855-58 ; in Bureau of Construction, 1859-60 ; commanding Coast 
Survey steamer Active, 1861-2. 

Commissioned as Captain, July 16, 1862 ; commanding steam-sloop Dacotah, 
North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, in 1863; in engagement at Fort Caswell, 
February 23, 1863 ; commanding steamer Fort Jackson, North Atlantic Block- 
ading Squadron, 1864-5, — present at both attacks upon Fort Fisher; on block- 
ade of Wilmington, most of the time, senior-officer commanding that division, 
from November, 1862, to February, 1865 ; commanding division on blockade 
of coast of Texas, from February to June, 1865. The surrender of the rebel 
trans-Mississippi forces to General Canby, U. S. A., was signed by Greueral E. 
Kirby Smith and Major-General J. Bankhead Magruder, June 2, 1865, and 
formal possession taken of Galveston by Captain Sands, commanding division off 
coast of Texas, by hoisting our flag over the last foothold of rebellion. 

Commissioned as Commodore, July 25, 1866 ; at Navy Yard, Boston, 1865-6 ; 
Superintendent Naval Observatory, Washington, 1867-73. 

Commissioned as Rear- Admiral, April 27, 1871. 



REAR-ADMIRAL CHARLES STEEDMAN, 

Native of Charleston, S. C. Appointed Midshipman in the Navy, April 1, 1828 ; 
first duty at the New York Navy Yard ; served in the West Indies as Midship- 
man in the sloops-of-war Natchez and Fairfield, and schooner Grampus'. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, January 14, 1834. In the Mediterranean on 



40 REAR-ADMIRALS. 

board of the frigates Constitution and United States and schooner Shark, in the 
years 1836-8, and in the West Indies on board the Macedonian up to 1840, — the 
last six months as Acting Lieutenant. 

Promoted as Lieutenant, February 25, 1841 ; served in the brig Dolphin on the 
Home Station and West Indies ; invalided and sent home 1842 ; Coast Survey, 
1843-4 ; served in the West Indies and Gulf of Mexico on board of the St. 
Mary's, 1845-7 ; commanded the eight-inch gun on naval battery at the bom- 
bardment of Vera Cruz, and commanded the St. Mary's launch in an attempt to 
surprise and capture Mexican gunboats inside of Tampico bar ; attached to Naval 
Observatory from latter part of 1847 to first of 1849 ; served on board frigate 
Cumberland in the Mediterranean, 1850-1 ; attached to Naval Observatory 
1853-5. 

Commissioned as Commander, September 14, 1855 ; special duty in Washing- 
ton, 1857-8 ; revising signal code and framing station bills for ships of the navy; 
commanded brig Dolphin, Paraguay Expedition, 1859-60, and was left in com- 
mand of Brazil Squadron when Flag-Officers Shubrick and Forrest returned home ; 
remained in command for nine months, until the arrival of Flag-Officer Sands ; re- 
turned home December, 1860 ; when rebellion broke out was on leave ; volunteered to 
Admiral Du Pont for any service ; was, by him, sent to take command of the Bal- 
timore Kailroad Company's steamboat Maryland ; kept communication open be- 
tween Havre-de-Grace and Annapolis until the railroad bridges were repaired and 
communication opened between Baltimore and Philadelphia ; was first to telegraph 
from Havre-de-Grace to General Patterson that General Butler had lauded at 
Annapolis with Massachusetts regiment and Seventh New York regiment, and had 
opened communication with Washington; in 1861, ordered to join Commodore 
Foote on the Mississippi ; soon detached and ordered to take command of Bien- 
ville ; attached to Port Royal Expedition, under Flag-Officer Du Pont ; led the 
second column in the attack and capture of Port Boyal ; in the Bienville brought 
north Flag-Officer Du Pont's despatches reporting the capture ; after this block- 
aded the coast of Georgia in the Bienville, and participated in the capture of all 
the ports on that coast south of Savannah ; after this returned North ; was de- 
tached from Bienville and ordered to Paul Jones ; joined Admiral Du Pont's 
Squadron with Paul Jones and other gunboats ; engaged Fort McAllister on the 
Ogeechee River, in August, 1862 ; on the 17th September following engaged and 
silenced the batteries at St. John's Bluff, on the St. John's River, Florida ; consid- 
ered it necessai-y to have troops to co-operate in capturing the forts and getting 
possession of the river ; applied to Admiral Du Pont for the same on the 30th of 
same month ; with the co-operation of General Brannon captured the forts on St. 
John's Bluff, and with the gunboats opened and held the St. John's River to Lake 
Beaufort. 

Commissioned as Captain, September 13, 1862. Transferred to the steam- 
frigate Powhatan, and employed in her blockading off Charleston for several months ; 
with the Powhatan towed the captured ram Atlanta to Philadelphia ; soon after 
was detached and took command of Ticonderoga ; in her was employed on various 
detached service ; returned in her in November, 1864, with engines disabled from 
an unsuccessful search of the rebel vessel Florida, on the coast of Brazil ; volun- 
teered to join Admiral Porter's command; vessel temporarily repaired ; joined the 
Admiral and participated in the two attacks and capture of the forts at the mouth 
of the Wilmington River, December, 1864, and January, 1865 ; after the fall of 
those forts joined Admiral Dahlgren's Squadron off Charleston ; the Ticonderoga 
being unfit for service was ordered to Philadelphia for repairs ; so soon as she was 
repaired, proceeded, November, 1865, to the Mediterranean and joined Admiral 
Goldsborough's European Squadron. 



REAR-ADMIRALS. 41 

Promoted to Commodore, July 25, 1866. Soon after exchanged commands with 
Captain Wyman, of the Colorado ; returned home in the Colorado, September, 
1867 ; on special duty, 1868-9, and commanding Boston Navy Yard, 1869-72. 

Commissioned as Rear-Admiral, May 25, 1871. 



REAR-ADMIRAL THEODORE P. GREENE, 

Born in Montreal, Canada. Appointed Midshipman from Vermont, November 
1, 1826; in sloops Warren, Ontario, and frigate Constellation, Mediterranean 
Squadron, 1827-32. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, 1832 ; sloop Vincennes, Pacific Squadron, 
and cruise around the world, 1834-6. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, December 20, 1837 ; razee Independence, Brazil 
Squadron, Master and Lieutenant, 1837-9 ; receiving-ship at Boston, 1841-2 ; 
schooner Porpoise, 1843; store-ship Lexington, 1844; frigate Congress, Pacific 
Squadron, during Mexican War, 1846-8 (six months in command of land 
forces at Mazatlan) ; sloop Cyane, Home Squadron, 1852-3; Navy Yard, Boston, 
1854-6. 

Commissioned as Commander, September 14, 1855 ; Light-House Inspector, 
1858-60 ; Navy Yard, Mare Island, California, 1861-2. 

Commissioned as Captain, July 16, 1862; commanding St. lago de Cuba, 
and San Jacinto, 1863-4 ; while commanding latter vessel, left in command of 
East Gulf Squadron, on return of Rear- Admiral T. Bailey to United States ; 
commanding Richmond, West Gulf Squadron, 1865 (protected troops landing 
for attack upon Mobile) ; ordnance duty, Portsmouth, N. H., 1866 ; commanding 
Powhatan, Pacific Squadron, 1867. 

Commissioned as Commodore, July 24, 1867 ; commanding Pensacola Navy 
Yard, 1868-70. 

Commissioned as Rear-Admiral, May 24, 1872. 



REAR-ADMIRAL AUGUSTUS LUDLOW CASE, 

Born in Newburgh, New York, February 3, 1813. Appointed Midshiptman 
April 1, 1828; first order, July, 1828, to receiving-ship Robert Fulton, New 
York ; first cruise in frigate Hudson, Brazil Squadron, 1828-31 ; Navy Yard, 
New York, in 1832 ; cruise in sloop-of-war St. Louis, West Indies, 1832-3 ; New 
York Navy Yard and School, 1833-4. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 14, 1834 ; Navy Yard, New York, 
1835; schooner Experiment, Coast Survey, 1836; bark Pioneer, U. S. South 
Sea Surveying and Exploring Expedition, 1837. 

Commissioned as '"Lieutenant, while on duty in the Exploring Expedition," 
June, 1838 ; store-ship Relief, Exploring Expedition, 1838 ; sloop-of-war Vin- 
cennes, Exploring Expedition, 1839-42. 

Commissioned as lAeutenant, February 25, 1841 ; cruise in frigate Brandy- 
wine, East Indies, 1843-5. During Mexican War : In schooner Mahonese, brig 
Porpoise, frigate Raritan, sloops-of-war John Adams and Germantown, Gulf of 
Mexico, 1846-8. He was present at, and participated in the capture of Vera 
Cruz, Alvorado, and Tobasco. After the landing of the troops on the first day, 
was in charge of the beach and superintended the landing of troops, ordnance, 
and stores for the investment of Vera Cruz. After possession of Laguna was 



42 REAR-ADMIRALS. 

taken by the Porpoise, he was despatched, in a "bungo" having one of the Por- 
poise's 42-pounder carronades mounted on the bow, with Passed Midshipman F. 
K. Murray and 25 men, up the Palisada River to the town of the same name, 
which was captured and held for a fortnight against a large body of cavalry which 
almost daily threatened an attack. The object of holding the town was to inter- 
cept and capture General Santa Anna, who, it was supposed, would endeavor to 
escape to Honduras, via the Palisada passes. Cruise in sloop-of-war Vincennes, 
Pacific Ocean, 1849-51 ; commanding sloop-of-war Warren, Pacific Squadron, 
1852-3 ; Light-House Inspector, Third District, New York, 1853-7. 

Commissioned as Commander, September 14, 1855 ; waiting orders in 1858 ; 
commanding steamer Caledonia, Brazil Squadron and Paraguay Expedition, in 
1859 ; waiting orders in 1860. During the Rebellion : In March, 1861, just at 
the commencement of the Rebellion, Commander Case was ordered to Washington 
as assistant to (then) Commodore Stringham, in the Office of Detail ; but on 
the assignment of the latter to the command of the North Atlantic Blockading 
Squadron, he was appointed Fleet-Captain of it, and with him joined the steam- 
frigate Minnesota, at Boston, April 13. Subsequently, served in the same posi- 
tion with Flag-Officer L. M. Goldsborough and Acting Rear- Admiral S. P. Lee, 
who were successively appointed to command the Fleet, 1861-2. He took part 
in the capture of Forts Clarke and Hatteras, August 28 and 29, 1861 ; Roanoke 
Island, February 7 and 8, 1862 ; Sewell's Point (where, in passing the heavy 
fortifications on Craney Island, he landed from his " tug" and hauled down the 
large rebel flag there flying) and Norfolk, May 10, 1862 ; and all of the general 
active operations of the North Atlantic Fleet, until January, 1863, when, it being 
understood that active operations were over, and that the duty of the fleet would 
be mostly confined to blockading, he was assigned to the command of the steam- 
sloop Iroquois, which was fitted to look after the Alabama, but was afterward 
attached to the North Atlantic Squadron. In charge of the blockade of New 
Inlet, N. C, 1863 ; cut out the steamer Kate from under Fort Fisher and the 
other batteries at New Inlet, aided by the steamers James Adger and Mount Vernon, 
in August, 1863. 

Commissioned as Captain, January 2, 1863 ; special duty, Washington, in 
1864; Navy Yard, New York, 1864-5 ; Fleet- Captain, European Squadron, 
1865-6. 

Commissioned as Commodore, December 8, 1867 ; Light-House Inspector, 
Third District, New York, 1867-9. 

Chief of Bureau of Ordnance, 1869-73. 

Commissioned as Rear- Admiral, May 24, 1872 ; commanding European 
Squadron, 1873-5, and combined European North and South Atlantic Fleets, 
assembled at Key West, Florida, 1874, for special service in connection with 
the steamer Virginius difficulties, and for ordnance, torpedo, and fleet practice and 
tactics, etc. Total sea service, twenty-four years ten months ; shore or other duty, 
twelve years. 

REAR-ADMIRAL ALFRED TAYLOR, 

Appointed Midshipman, 1825 ; Mediterranean Squadron, 1826-9 ; Pacific 
Squadron, 1830-2. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 4, 1831 ; Navy Yard, Portsmouth, 
1833 ; Navy Yard, Boston, 1834 ; Brazil Squadron, 1835-6. 

Commissioned d& Lieutenant, February 9, 1837; sloop Cyane, Mediterranean 
Squadron, 1840-2 ; Navy Yard, Washington, 1843 ; sloop Boston, Brazil Squad- 
ron, 1845-6 ; attached to frigate Cumberland, Home Squadron, during Mexican 



REAR-ADMIRALS. 43 

War; Navy Yard, Wasliington, 1848-51; steam-sloop Mississippi, East India 
Squadron, 1853-5. 

Commissioned as Commander^ September 14, 1855 ; commanding rendezvous. 
New York, 1856-8; commanding sloop Saratoga, 1861. 

Commissioned as Captain, 1862; Navy Yard, Boston, 1862-5; commanding 
flag-ship Susquehanna, Brazil Squadron, 1866. 

Commissioned as Commodore, September 27, 1866 ; Light-House Inspector, 
1868-72. 

Commissioned as Rear-Admiral, January 29, 1872. 



REAR-ADMIRAL GEORGE F. EMMONS, 

Native of Vermont, from which State he was appointed Midshipman, April 1, 
1828; at Naval School, Brooklyn, New York,- 1828; thence to steam-frigate 
Fulton, in which he remained until she blew up, June 4, 1829 ; then in frigate 
Brandy wine, on special service to West Indies, 1830 ; and in Mediterranean, 
1830-3. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, July 14, 1834; brig Consort, on our coast, 
1836 ; bark Pioneer, West Indies, 1837, carrying out General Santa Anna, 
after his defeat in Texas ; in frigate Macedonian (as Master) on our coast, 
1837 ; joined the sloop-of-war Peacock, and was commissioned as " Lieutenant 
during the exploring expedition" of Captain Wilkes, serving in her from 1838 
to July, 1841, when she was lost on the bar at the mouth of Columbia River, 
Oregon. 

Regularly commissioned as Lieutenant, February 25, 1841 ; was occasionally 
in command of schooner Flying Fish, and while engaged in surveying and boat 
expeditions among the Pacific Islands, was frequently engaged with the natives. 
(See narrative of Ex. Ex.) 

After the loss of the Peacock, had charge of a party consisting of the Scien- 
tific corps, officers, sailors, marines, and some hunters and trappers, to explore the 
country south of the Columbia to the head-waters of the Sacramento, and thence 
through California to San Francisco, where the party arrived, after several skir- 
mishes with hostile natives, but without loss; in November, 1841, joined the 
Vincennes, flag-ship of the Ex. Ex., and came home in her via the East Indies, 
in 1842 ; receiving-ship and recruiting duty in Baltimore in 1843 ; in sloop-of- 
war Boston and frigate Raritan, Brazil Squadron, in 1843-6 ; during the Mexi- 
can War, in the Ohio ; 1847-8, in Gulf of Mexico, Brazil, and JPacific ; was 
frequently employed on shore in Upper and Lower California, and once sent to 
the Sierra Nevada as bearer of despatches to General Mason ; in sloop Warren 
and Southampton, Pacific, in 1849 ; on Bureau duty. Navy Department, Wash- 
ington, 1851-2; in frigate Savannah, Brazil Squadron, 1854-6; during the last 
year was in command of her as the flag-ship of Commodore Mercer. 

Commissioned as Commander, January 28, 1856; Bureau duty and member 
of Light-House Board in 1861 ; during the rebellion, was generally employed on 
blockade duty in the Gulf of Mexico and on the Mississippi River in command 
of the United States steamers Hatteras, R. R. Cuyler, Monongahela, and Brooklyn ; 
while in command of the first named captured Cedar Keys and Pass Christian, 
and some twenty prizes, nearly all of which were under English colors. 

Commissioned as Captain, February 7, 1863 ; was Fleet-Captain under Ad- 
miral Dahlgren, ofi" Charleston, in 1863, while Fort Sumter was being reduced ; 
afterward commanded the United States steam-sloop Lackawanna and a division 
of blockading vessels (from five to fifteen) in the Gulf of Mexico, to the close 



44 REAR-ADMIRALS. 

of the war ; while commanding afloat at New Orleans, assisted in destroying the 
rebel ram Webb and capturing her officers and crew ; upon two occasions success- 
fully repelled and thwarted the attempts of the enemy to burn the shipping and 
city by fire rafts and boats laden with hay and combustibles, whereby millions of 
property were saved ; commanded the United States steam-sloop Ossipee to the 
Pacific and Alaska, in 1866-8, carrying thither our Commissioners and hoisting 
the American flag over our new possessions. During the return trip to San 
Francisco, the ship came near being lost in a hurricane which she encountered off 
Sitka. 

Commissioned as Commodore, September 20, 1868 ; appointed senior member 
of Ordnance Board in Washington, 1869, and subsequently given charge of the 
Hydrographic Office ; commanding Naval Station, Philadelphia, 1870-2. 

Commissioned as Rear-Admiral, November 5, 1872. Total sea service, twenty- 
three years ; shore or other duty, eleven years. 



KEAK-ADMIRAL GUSTAVUS H. SCOTT, 

Born in Virginia, June 13, 1812. Appointed from Virginia, August 1, 1828; 
frigate Guerriere, Pacific Squadron, 1829-31 ; schooner Experiment, Chesapeake 
Bay, 1833. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 14, 1834 ; sloop Vandalia, West India 
Squadron, 1835-6 ; waiting orders, 1837 ; West India Squadron, 1839-40. 

Commissioned as izeit^enaji^, February 25, 1841 ; frigate Columbus, Mediterra- 
nean Squadron, 1843-4; special duty, 1845; frigate United States, Mediterranean 
Squadron, 1846-7; ordnance duty, 1848-9; waiting orders, 1850; ordnance duty, 
1851 ; frisjate St. Lawrence, Pacific Squadron, 1852-3 ; steamer Michigan on the 
Lakes, 1855-7. 

Commissioned as Commander, December 27, 1856 ; Light-House Inspector, 
1858-60 ; commanding steamer Keystone State, special service, 1861 ; command- 
ing steam-gunboat Maratanza, N. A. B. Squadron, 1862-3. 

Commissioned as Captain, November 4, 1863 ; commanding steamer De Soto, 
Blockading Squadron, 1864 ; commanding steam-sloop Canandaigua, Blockading 
Squadron, 1865; commanding steam-sloop Saranac, Pacific Squadron, 1866-7; 
member ofExamining Board, Philadelphia, 1868; Light-House Inspector, 1869-71. 

Commissioned as Commodore, 1869. 

Commissioned as Rear-Admiral, February, 1873 ; commanding North Atlantic 
Station, 1873. 



REAR-ADMIRAL JOHN J. ALMY, 

Born in Rhode Island in the year 1815. Appointed from that State as 3Iid- 
shipman, February 2, 1829 ; attached to the tJ. S. S. Concord, Mediterranean, 
1830-2 ; U. S. S. Ontario, coast of Brazil, 1833^ ; examined and promoted to 
Passed Midshipman, July 3, 1835 ; receiving-ship at New York, 1836-7 ; U. S. 
S. Cyane, Mediterranean, 1838-41, as Acting Master and Navigator. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, March 8, 1841 ; U. S. brig Bainbridge, West In- 
dies, 1842; frigate Macedonian, coast of Africa, 1843-5; hne-of-battle ship Ohio, 
Gulf of Mexico and Pacific Ocean during the Mexican War and after the war, 
1846-50 ; participated in the siege and capture of Vera Cruz and the capture of 
Tuspan ; latter part of the war — 1848 — on the Pacific coast, and commanded one 



REAR-ADMIRALS. 45 

of the forts at Mazatlan during the naval occupation of that place ; Coast Survey 
in 1851-6, on the survey of Chesapeake Bay and the sea-coast of Virginia and 
North Carolina ; commanding U. S. S. Fulton, on the coast of Central America, 
in 1857, when General Walker and his filibustering party surrendered to Rear- 
Admiral Paulding, on board of that vessel, at Nicaragua. In the operations of the 
U. S. Squadron against the filibusters, the Commander-in-Chief, Rear-Admiral 
Paulding, in his report to the Department, said: "Lieutenant-Commander Almy 
performed his part of the work exceedingly well, and is an ofiicer who can be 
relied upon at all times." Commanded the Fulton in the Expedition to Paraguay 
in 1858-9 ; at Navy Yard. New York, 1860-1. 

Commissioned as Commander, April 24, 1861 ; commanded U. S. S. South 
Carolina, South Atlantic Squadron, under Admiral Du Pont, 1862-3 ; U. S. S. 
Connecticut, North Atlantic Squadron, under Admiral Lee, 1864; U. S. S. 
Juniata, South Atlantic Squadron, under Admiral Dahlgren, 1865. 

While in command of the Connecticut, captured and sent in four noted 
blockade-running steamers with valuable cargoes ; ran ashore and destroyed four 
others. 

Commissioned as Captain., March 3, 1865 ; commanded U. S. S. Juniata in a 
cruise to the South Atlantic (coast of Brazil and south coast of Africa), 1865-7. 
While on the coast of Brazil, rescued the Brazilian brig Americo and crew from 
shipwreck, attended with great danger, for which service received the thanks of 
His Imperial Majesty the Emperor of Brazil. Ordnance duty at the Navy Yard, 
New York, 1868-9. 

Commissioned as Commodore, December 30, 1869 ; Chief Signal-Ofiicer of the 
Navy at Washington, 1870-2. 

Commissioned as Rear-Admiral, August 24, 1873, and on the following month 
ordered to, and took command of, the U. S. naval forces in the Pacific Ocean. 
While at Panama; in October, 1873, a serious and violent revolution broke out, 
characteristic of that country, which continued for three weeks. The city of 
Panama and the Panama Railroad were in imminent danger of being destroyed. 
A force of seamen and marines numbering two hundred, under competent officers, 
was landed from the ships and kept on shore until the revolution terminated, 
ajffording efficient protection to the railroad, to American and to European inter- 
ests. Two U. S. vessels, the flag-ship Pensacola and the Benicia, were the only 
men-of-war in port. Passengers, freight, and specie continually passed over the 
road in safety and without interruption. 

For these services Rear-Admiral Almy received the thanks of the Panama 
Railroad Company, the Pacific Mail Steamship Company, and of all the Consuls 
and the foreign merchants at Panama. 

In 1875, while in command of the U. S. Pacific Squadron, His. Majesty King 
Kalakaua, of the Hawaiian Islands, presented Rear-Admiral Almy with the in- 
signia of the Order of Kamehameha I., in appreciation of courtesies and attentions 
bestowed upon His Majesty connected with his visit to the United States, the 
King and his suite having been conveyed to and from the islands in United States 
ships under the orders of, and arrangements made by, the Rear-Admiral. 

Was in command of the U. S. naval forces in the Pacific for two years and 
ten months, returning to the United States in July, 1876. 

Has performed altogether twenty-seven years and ten months sea-service, the 
largest amount, up to this time, credited to any officer of the navy ; shore or 
other duty, fourteen years and eight months. 

In April, 1877, was retired, having reached the age prescribed by law for 
retirement. 



46 REAR-ADMIRALS. 

EEAR-ADMIRAL DAVID D. McDOUGAL, 

Born in Ohio. Appointed from Ohio, April 1, 1828; sloop Natchez, West 
India Squadron, 1829-31 ; frigate Brandywine, Mediterranean Squadron, 1832-5. 

Promoted to Passed Midshijnnan, June 14, 1834; Navy Yard, New York, 
1835-6; sloop Natchez, West India Squadron, 1837-9; brig Consort, Coast 
Survey, 1840-3. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant^ February 25, 1841 ; Navy Yard, New York, 
1843-4; steamer Michigan, on the lakes, 1845-6; sloop St. Mary's, 1846; at- 
tached to United States steamer Mississippi,' at the capture of Vera Cruz; brig 
Baiubridge, 1848-50, coast of Africa; steamer Michigan, on the lakes, 1852-4; 
commanding store-ship Warren, 1855-7. 

Commissioned as Commander, January 24, 1857 ; Navy Yard, Mare Island, 
California, 1859-60 ; commanding steam-sloop Wyoming, Asiatic Squadron, 
1861-4 ; while in command of the Wyoming, engaged six batteries and three 
vessels of war, at Simonsaki, Japan, July 16, 1863, sinking a brig and exploding 
the boilers of a steamer, with a loss of eleven killed and wounded on the Wyoming. 

Commissioned as Captain, March 2, 1864 ; commanding Navy Yard, Mare 
Island, California, 1865-6 ; commanding steam-sloop Powhatan, South Pacific 
Squackon, 1868-9. 

Commissioned as Commodore, 1869 ; commanding South Squadron, Pacific 
Fleet, 1870-2. 

Commissioned as Rear- Admiral, September 27, 1873. 



REAR-ADMIRAL JAMES H. STRONG. 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, February 2, 1829; attached 
to sloop Lexington, Brazil Squadron, 1832-3 ; schooner Enterprise, Brazil 
Squadron, 1834; Naval School, New York, 1835; frigate Constellation, West 
India Squadron, 1836. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 4, 1836 ; razee Independence, Brazil 
Squadron, 1839-42. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, September, 1841 ; frigate Columbus, East India 
Squadron, 1844-6; receiving-ship, New York, 1851-2; sloop Levant, Mediter- 
ranean Squadron, 1853-5 ; receiving-ship. New York, 1856 ; rendezvous. New 
York, 1857-8 ; commanding store-ship Relief, 1859. 

Commissioned as Commander, April 24, 1861 ; commanding steamer Mohawk, 
South Atlantic Squadron, 1861 ; commanding steamer Flag, South Atlantic 
Squadron, 1862 ; commanding steam-sloop Monongahela, Western G-ulf Block- 
ading Squadron, 1863-5, 

In November, 1863, Commander Strong convoyed a division of the army under 
Greneral Banks from New Orleans to Brazos Island, at Brazos de Santiago. On 
November 25, 1863, a body of troops under Major-Greneral Banks captured a 
battery of three heavy guns at Arkansas Pass. Commander Strong, after assisting 
in the landing of the troops, steamed ahead and opened an eifective fire on the 
battery, which shortly hoisted a white flag and was taken possession of by the 
troops, who had also engaged it. General Banks commended the effective gun- 
nery of the Monongahela. Commander Strong commanded the Monongahela at 
the battle of Mobile Bay, August 5, 1864. His vessel was the first to engage the 
rebel ram Tennessee. He sheered out of the line to run into her, and struck her 
fair, at the same time giving her a broadside of solid 11 -inch shot, which appar- 
ently had but little if any efl"ect upon her. Soon after, signal was made to his 



REAR-ADMIRALS. 47 

ship to again run into her ; he did so, and was about to try it a third time, when 
she surrendered to the fleet. 

Corumii^sioned as Captain, August 5, 1865 ; Inspector, Navy Yard, New York, 
1866-7 ; commanding steam-sloop Canandaigua, European Squadron, 1868-9 ; 
attached to Navy Yard, New York, 1870. 

Commissioned as Commodore, March 2, 1870; Light-House Inspector, 1871-2. 

Commissioned as Rear-Admiral, September, 1873 ; commanding South At- 
lantic Station, 1873-4. 

REAR-ADMIRAL ROGER N. STEMBEL, 

Born in Middletown, Md. Appointed from Ohio, March 27, 1832 ; attached to 
schooner Porpoise, West India Squadron, 1832-3 ; Naval School, New York, 
1834-8. 

Promoted to Passed MidsJiipman, June 23, 1838 ; attached to frigate Brandy- 
wine, Mediterranean Squadron, 1840-2. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, Oct. 26, 1843 ; Coast Survey, 1844-7 ; sloop 
Levant, Home Squadron, 1849-50 ; sloop Jamestown, Brazil Squadron, 1851-3 ; 
special duty, Washington, 1855-7 ; steam-frigate Mississippi, East India Squad- 
ron, 1857-9; special duty, Cincinnati, 1861. 

Commissioned as Commander, July 1, 1861 ; Mississippi Flotilla, 1862 ; engage- 
ment at Lucas Bend, September 9, 1861 ; Belmont, November 7, 1861 ; Fort 
Henry, February 6, 1862 ; bombardment and capture of Island No. 10, Missis- 
sippi River, from March 16 to April 7, 1862 ; near Fort Pillow, with rebel rams, 
May 10, 1862, besides several minor affairs, while attached to Mississippi Flotilla, 
from August, 1861, to May, 1862; wounded near Fort Pillow, May 10, 1862, 
in engagement with rebel rams ; waiting orders, 1863 ; rendezvous, Philadelphia, 
1864; special duty, Pittsburgh, 1865. 

Commissioned as Captain, July 25, 1866 ; commanding steam-sloop Canandaigua, 
European Squadron, 1866-7; commanding Naval rendezvous, Boston, 1869-70. 

Commissioned as Commodore, July 13, 1871 ; commanding North Pacific 
Fleet, 1872. 

Commissioned as Rear-Admiral, February 2, 1875. 



REAR-ADMIRAL EDWARD MIDDLETON, 

Born in South Carolina. Appointed from South Carolina, July 1, 1828 ; frigate 
Java, Mediterranean Squadron, October, 1828, to May, 1831 ; sloop Vandalia, 
West India Squadron, 1831-3 ; receiving-ship, Brooklyn, 1833-4. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 14, 1834 ; frigate Constitution, Med- 
iterranean Squadron, 1835-8 ; sloop Marion, Brazil Squadron, 1839-42. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, February 25, 1841 ; store-ship Lexington, 1843-4; 
sloop Plymouth, Mediterranean Squadron, 1844-5 ; frigate Cumberland, Home 
Squadron, 1846 ; steamer Princeton, 1847-9 ; store-ship Erie, 1849 ; Navy Yard, 
Philadelphia, 1849-51; razee Independence, Mediterranean Squadron, 1852; 
receiving-ship. New York, 1853; Executive-Officer of sloop Decatur, Pacific 
Squadron, 1854-6 ; operating against a combination of hostile Indians of the 
various tribes of Washington and Oregon Territories during the war of the winter 
of 1854-5 ; attacks upon Seattle, Washington Territory, January 26, 1856. 

Commissioned as Commander, January 26, 1856; commanding sloop Decatur, 
1856-7 ; commanding steam-sloops St. Mary's and Saranac at different times, 
Pacific Squadron, 1861-5. 



48 REAR-ADMIRALS. 

Commissioned as Captain, April 24, 1863 ; special duty, New York, 1866 ; 
Navy Yard, Mare Island, California, 1867-8 ; commanding steam-sloop Pensacola, 
Pacific Squadron, 1868-9. 

Commissioned as Commodore, November 26, 1868; commanding steam-sloop 
Lackawanna, Pacific Fleet, 1869 ; Commandant Navy Yard, Pensacola, Florida, 
1870. 

Commissioned as Rear-Admiral, August 15, 1876. 



REAR-ADMIRAL WILLIAM REYNOLDS, 

Appointed Acting Midshipman, from Lancaster, Pennsylvania, November 17, 
1831 ; first cruise, schooner Boxer, sloop-of-war Peacock, coast of Africa, Brazil, 
East Indies, 1831-34 ; frigate Potomac, Delaware, 74, Mediterranean, 1834-6 ; 
Naval School, Norfolk, 1836-7. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipvian, June, 1837 ; Pennsylvania, 120, Philadelphia 
to Norfolk, 1837-8 ; Depot of Charts, Washington, 1838 ; Exploring Expedition, 
1838-42. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, September, 1841 ; frigate Cumberland, Mediter- 
ranean, 1843-4 ; corvette Plymouth, Mediterranean, 1845 ; steamer Alleghany, 
Pittsburgh, Mississippi River, Gulf of Mexico, Brazil, IMediterranean, 1846-9 ; 
Bureau of Construction, 1850; invalided, 1850; command of store-ship Fredonia, 
Valparaiso, 1855; retired, 1855 ; Naval Storekeeper, Honolulu, 1857-61 ; under 
surgical treatment, 1861-2. 

Commissioned as Commander, reserved list, 1862; command of Vermont, 
Port Royal, November, 1862 ; of New Hampshire, and Naval Depot, Port Royal, 
1863-5 ; restored to active list, February, 1866 ; command of Lackawanna, North 
Pacific, 1866-9. 

Commissioned as Captain, July, 1866. 

Commissioned as Commodore, June, 1870 ; Chief of Bureau of Equipment, 
July, 1870-5. 

Commissioned as Rear-Admiral, December, 1873 ; command of Asiatic Station, 
flag-ship Tennessee, April, 1875-7 ; invalided, August, 1877 ; retired, December, 
1877. 



REAR-ADMIRAL GEORGE HENRY PREBLE, 

Born in Portland, Maine, and appointed a Midshipman from that State, October 
10, 1835 ; frigate United States, Mediterranean, May, 1836, to November, 1838 ; 
sloop Warren, frigate Macedonian, sloop Levant, and sloop Erie, West Indies, 
January, 1839, until September, 1840; Naval School, at Philadelphia, January 
to June, 1841, when he was warranted Passed Midshipman, No. 7, in a class of 
24 ; was Acting Lieutenant of schooner Madison and brigantine Jefferson, on the 
Florida Expedition, from August, 1841, to August, 1842; went on several canoe 
expeditions into the everglades, and returned with the expedition, sick ; in receiving- 
ship Ohio, at Boston, from October, 1842, to May, 1843; Acting Master and 
Acting Lieutenant in sloop St. Louis, East Indies, and circumnavigating the world, 
May, 1843, to September, 1845 ; had charge of first American armed force ever 
landed in China, for the protection of American Consulate and residents of Canton, 
June and July, 1844 ; Acting Master and Executive of schooner Petrel, in the 
Gulf of Mexico, May, 1846, to May, 1847 ; participated in surrender of Alvarado, 



REAR-ADMIRALS. 49 

Laguna, Tampico, and Panuco, and assisted at siege, etc., of Vera Cruz ; returned 
to United States in sliip-of-the-line Ohio, sick. May 31. 

Warranted as Master^ July 15, 1847. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant^ February 5, 18-18 ; returned to the Gulf in sloop 
Saratoga, February, 1848, and came home sick, March, 1849 ; Executivc-OflBcer 
of steamer Legree, Coast Survey, April, 1849, to January, 1851 ; from January 
to August, 1851, in frigate St. Lawrence, which conveyed American contributors 
to World's Fair, at London, and then conveyed our Minister to Lisbon ; command- 
ing schooner Gallatin, etc.. Coast Survey, August, 1851, to December, 1852; 
December, 1852, to March, 1853, attached to the Vermont, 74; on Japan expe- 
dition and in China waters, from April, 1853, to August, 1856, in Macedonian, 
and commanding chartered steamer Queen ; assisted in the surveys of Jeddo and 
Hakodadi Bays ; and also surveyed the harbor of Kealung, Island of Formosa, 
his chart of which is published in the official report of the expedition ; was on 
several successful expeditions against pirates in China, and received the thanks of 
Commodore Abbot and of the English Admiral, Sir James Stirling, for the part 
taken by him in the one to Kulan ; commanded an expedition to Foo-chow-foo, in 
the American steamer Confucius, destroying several pirate junks ; prepared sailing 
directions for Shanghai, which were published by the English and United States 
governments, and in several private editions ; was Light-House Inspector of First 
District (coast of Maine and New Hampshire), from September, 1856, to October, 
1857 ; at Navy Yard, Charlestown, Massachusetts, October, 1857, to September, 
1859 ; Executive-Officer of steam-sloop Narragansett, Pacific Squadron, Septem- 
ber, 1859, until November, 1861, and ordered home at his own request to serve 
on the Atlantic coast ; in January, 1862, took command of the steam-gunboat 
Katahdin, equipping at Boston, and, March 29, reported to Admiral Farragut, 
West Gulf Squadron ; passed the forts with the fleet, April 24, 1862, engaged 
the enemy's fleet, and was at the attack upon the lower defences and at the sur- 
render of New Orleans ; participated in all of Farragut's operations on the river 
that year, as far as Vicksburg, assisting in destroying Grand Gulf; August 4, 
1862, was transferred to the command of the steam-sloop Oneida; while steaming 
up the river above New Orleans, at night, August 8, the Oneida was j^urposely 
run into by the steamboat Lewis T. Whitman, and although every eff'ort was made 
to save her crew and passengers (seventy of whom were saved), many lives were- 
lost. Her rebel captain was sent to New Orleans in irons, and after his release,, 
served upon the steam-tug Boston, and conveyed her to the rebels at Mobile. 

Commissioned as Commander, July 16, 1862 ; on the blockade off Mobile- 
August 25 to October, 1862 ; on August 29 he was left senior-officer present, four 
vessels out of seven of our usual blockading force having left for coal and repairs ;. 
on September 4, about 6 P.M., a steamer flying English colors, and having every 
appearance of one of Her Britannic Majesty's gunboats, approached the bar, and, 
was met by our vessels underway ; the Oneida fired three shots across the stranger's 
bow, the last at her fore-foot, without bringing her to ; and then, within three- 
minutes of the first gun, fired a broadside into her, and continued the chase, with 
the other vessels, until she, from her superior speed, was enabled to run in over 
the southeast shoals under cover of Fort Morgan's guns. This steamer proved to 
be the rebel cruiser Oreto, afterward called the Florida. Her commander subse- 
quently wrote as follows : 

" I can vouch for his (Preble's) promptness and destructive energy on the occa- 
sion of my entering Mobile Bay. The superior speed of the Florida alone saved 
her from destruction, though not from a frightful mauling. We were torn to 
pieces, — one man's head taken ofi", and eleven wounded ; boats, standing- and 
running-rigging shot away, also foregaff. Four shells struck, our hull, and. had. 

4 



50 REAR-ADMIRALS. 

the one (11-inch) that grazed our boiler and entered the berth-deck (killing one 
and wounding two) exploded, every man belonging to the steamer would have 
been killed, as I had only the officers on deck, until about to cross the bar, when 
I made some sail, and one man was wounded in the rigging ; we had about 1400 
shrapnel shot (balls) in our hull, and our masts were pitted like a case of small- 
pox. The damage done her was so great that we did not get to sea again for over 
three months." 

For not preventing the Oreto's running the blockade. Commander Preble was 
summarily dismissed from the naval service, by order of September 20, 1862, but 
was nominated to the Senate by the President, and on recommendation of the 
Naval Committee was, on February 21, 1863, confirmed and restored to his proper 
rank and position as a Commander, the injustice of his summary dismissal being 
generally admitted. April 9, 1863, agreeably to orders from the Navy Depart- 
ment, proceeded via England to Lisbon, and June 3 took command of the sailing 
sloop St. Louis at the latter port, and ordered to cruise for rebel corsairs between 
Lisbon, the Azores, Canary Islands, and Gibraltar. Though requesting more 
active duty, and command of a steamer on the coast, he was in command of the 
St. Louis, cruising within those limits, until ordered to Port Royal, South Caro- 
lina, September 3, 1864, once falling in with his old foe, the Florida, at Madeira, 
and preventing her from getting a full supply of coal, but not able to prevent her 
from running out in a calm. He gave chase as soon as he got wind, but of course 
did not catch her. 

Reported to the Admiral November 2, 1864; took charge of the coal depot, 
and blockaded in the North Edisto until November 24, when he was ordered to 
command the Fleet Brigade then organized by Admiral Dahlgren at Port Royal, 
to co-operate with an army force designed to assist General Sherman's approach to 
the coast ; this brigade, consisting of naval artillery, sailor infantry, and a marine 
battalion, 493 all told, joined an army force under General J. P. Hatch at Boyd's 
Neck, and on November 30, 1864, engaged in the severe battle of Honey HUl ; 
it also took part in the actions of the 6th, 7th, and 9th of December on De Vaux's 
Neck, and was daily under fire until withdrawn on December 28 ; the general 
orders and written commendations of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren and Generals Foster, 
Hatch, and Potter, were gratifying to all connected with the brigade (see Secre- 
tary of Navy's Report, 1865) ; April 4, transferred to the command of the steamer 
State of Georgia, and proceeded to Aspinwall to look after American interests ; 
his vessel and the Huntsville rescued six or seven hundred passengers from the 
wrecked steamship Golden Rule, near Aspinwall ; in acknowledgment of this ser- 
vice he received the thanks of the rescued people, transmitted through the Navy 
Department ; the State of Georgia returned to New York, and went out of com- 
mission September 11, 1865; at Boston Navy Yard as General Inspector of Sup- 
plies, from October 14, 1865, to July 5, 1867, and continued as Equipment- Officer 
until July, 1868 ; Chief-of-Stafi", North Pacific Squadron, from August, 1868, 
until December 19 ; commanding the flag-ship Pensacola, 1868-70. 

Commissioned as Captain, March 16, 1867, to take rank from January 29, 
1867 ; commanding Naval rendezvous, Boston, 1871-2. 

Commissioned as Commodore, November 2, 1871 ; commanding Navy Yard, 
Philadelphia, 1873-5 ; special duty, 1876. 

Commissioned as Rear-Admnal, September 30, 1876 ; commanding South 
Pacific Station, 1877-8 ; retired, February 25, 1878. 



REAR-ADMIRALS. 51 

Retired on their own Apijllcation after Forty Years^ or more Consecutive Service, 
in Conformity with Section 21 of the Act of August 3, 1861. 



REAR-ADMIRAL HENRY WALKE, 

Born in Princess Anne County, Virginia, December 24, 1809. Entered the Navy 
as Midshipman, from Ohio, February 1, 1827 ; first orders were to the receiving- 
ship Alert, Lieutenant Commanding D. G. Farragut ; attached to sloop Natchez, 
1828-9 ; sloop Ontario and frigate Constellation, in the Mediterranean, 1830-1 ; 
at Norfolk Naval School, 1832-3. 

Promoted to Passed. Midshipman, June 10, 1833 ; Philadelphia rendezvous 
and receiving-ship, 1834-6 ; in ship-of-the-line North Carolina, Pacific Squadron, 
1836-9. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, December 9, 1839 ; receiving-ship North Caro- 
lina, at New York, 1840 ; sloop Boston, East Indies, 1841-3 ; brig Bainbridge, 
Brazil Squadron, 1844; receiving-ship North Carolina, New York, 1845-6; in 
bomb-brig Vesuvius, Mexican War, in 1847 ; present at the surrender of Vera 
Cruz, Tuspan, and Tobasco ; frigate Cumberland, Mediterranean, in 1848-9; 
receiving-ship North Carolina, New York, during 1851-3. 

Promoted to Commander, September 14, 1855 ; commanding store-ship Supply, 
1859-61, on the coast of Africa and in the West Indies; escaped from the 
capture of Pensacola Navy Yard by the rebels, and transported our garrison at 
Barrancas, under Lieutenant Slemmer, to Fort Pickens, supplying him with 
provisions and indispensable assistance, and intercepting supplies to secure that im- 
portant fortress from capture by the rebels, thus retaining one point in the South- 
ern territory over which the Union flag waved triumphantly through the Rebel- 
lion ; in co-operation with our garrison, dismantled and spiked the guns of Forts 
Barrancas and MacRea ; rescued all our captured officers, sailors, marines, and 
mechanics, including the sick, with their families, upon his own responsibilit}', for 
which he was tried by a court-martial, but justified in his conduct and compli- 
mented by the press. 

September 5, 1861, Commander Walke was ordered to the Mississippi Flotilla 
(Admiral Foote), and commanded gunboats Tyler and Lexington, at the battle 
of Belmont, November 7, 1861 ; commanded the Carondelet at the battle of Fort 
Henry, February 6, 1862, and battle of Fort Donelson, February 13 and 14, and 
at the surrender on the 16th, 1862; bombardment above Island No. 10, March 
17, 1862. He was the first officer to set the example of running the gauntlet of 
the enemy's batteries, April 4, 1862, at Island No. 10 ; captured one of the bat- 
teries opposite Point Pleasant, and spiked the guns (long 24-pounders), April 6, 
1862 ; with the Carondelet and Pittsburg, captured three batteries below New 
Madrid, Missouri, and covered Greneral Pope's army in landing to capture the 
rebel army, at Island No. 10, without loss, April 7, 1862, receiving therefor a 
letter of thanks from the Navy Department ; led in the battle of Fort Pillow, 
May 11, 1862 ; in the line of battle when our fleet destroyed that of the enemy 
at the battle of Memphis, June 6, 1862 ; engaged the ram Arkansas, in the 
Yazoo River, July 15, 1862. 

Commissioned as Cajjtain, July 16, 1862; commanding the lower division of 
Mississippi Flotilla, at Helena and Vicksburg, 1862 ; commanded the irou-clad 
ram Lafayette, in 1863, — the Lafayette passed the enemy's batteries with Admiral 
Porter, at Vicksburg, April 16, 1863; and also at the battle of Grand Gulf, of 
five hours and a half duration, and immediately after, silenced the principal bat- 
tery alone with the ram ; accompanied Porter's first expedition up the Red Rivdr 



52 REAR-ADMIRALS. 

to Alexandria, Louisiana, May, 1863 ; dispersed rebel forces under General Taylor, 
from Simmsport, Atchafalaya River, June 4, 1863. 

Commodore Walke received complimentary lettfers for his conduct in the fifteen 
engagements on the Mississippi, above mentioned, from the Hon. Gideon Welles, 
General Grant, Admiral Foote, General Pope, Admiral Davis, and Admiral Porter, 
and for which he was promoted. 

Commanded the Sacramento in pursuit of the Alabama, 1864 ; relieved the 
Kearsage on the coast of Europe, and blockaded the rebel steamer Rappahannock 
in the port of Calais, France, 1865. 

Commissioned as Commodore^ July 25, 1866 ; in command of Naval Station 
at Mound City, Illinois, 1868-70. 

Commissioned as Rear-Admiral, July 13, 1870 ; Light-House Board, 1871-3. 
Total sea service, eighteen years and nine months ; shore or other duty, nine 
years and one month. ' 



REAR-ADMIRAL ENOCH G. PARROTT, 

Born in New Hampshire. Appointed from New Hampshire, December 10, 
1831 ; attached to schooner Boxer, Brazil Squadron, 1832-4; attached to sloop 
Natchez, Brazil Squadron, 1835 ; Navy Yard, Boston, 1837. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 15, 1837 ; brig Consort, on surveying 
duty, 1840. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, September 8, 1841. Was engaged in the opera- 
tions under Commodore Perry against Beraty, and the neighboring towns on west 
coast of Africa, December, 1843, and was with all the landing parties. Sloop 
Saratoga, coast of Africa, 1843 ; frigate Congress, Pacific Squadron, 1846-8. 
During the war with Mexico, while serving in the Congress, was with Fre- 
mont's Expedition from Monterey to Los Angeles, at which place there was a 
slight engagement; was at the capture of Guaymas and Mazatlan, and in two 
skirmishes at the last-named place. The Congress received the thanks of the 
President and the Department. Receiving-ship, Boston, 1850 ; sloop St. Louis, 
Mediterranean Squadron, 1852-3 ; sloop St. Mary's, Pacific Squadron, 1854-5 ; 
Naval Observatory, Washington, 1857-8 ; special duty, 1859. 

Commissioned as Commander, April, 1861; was with the expedition which 
destroyed Norfolk Navy Yard, April, 1861 ; in the brig Perry at the time of the 
capture of the rebel privateer Savannah, which resisted ; received for this the 
commendation of the Department; commanding steamer Augusta, 1861-3; in 
the Augusta, participated in the battle of Port Royal, under Rear-Admiral Du 
Pont, and subsequently engaged the rebel rams at the time of their sortie from 
Charleston, January 13, 1863, and was on this occasion under the fire of the rebel 
batteries in Charleston harbor ; commanding iron-clad Canonicus, N. A. B. Squad- 
ron, 1864-5 ; in the Canonicus participated in the engagement with Howlett's 
Battery and the iron-clads on James River, June 21, 1864 ; and in the subsequent 
engagement with Howlett's Battery ; commanding iron-clad Monadnock, in the 
attacks under Rear-Admiral Porter on Fort Fisher, in December, 1864, and Jan- 
uary, 1865 ; and subsequently, under Rear-Admiral Dahlgren, was present at the 
surrender of Charleston ; commanding receiving-ship, Boston, 1865-8. 

Commissioned as Captain, July 25, 1866; Navy Yard, Portsmouth, New 
Hampshire, 1869. 

Commissioned as Commodore, 1870 ; Commandant Navy Yard, Mare Island, 
1871-2; Asiatic Station, 1872-3. 

Commissioned as Rear-Admiral, November 8, 1873. 



REAR-ADMIRALS. 53 

REAR-ADMIRAL FABIUS STANLY. 

Fabius Stanly, son of the Hon. John Stanly, was born in Newbern, North 
Carolina, December 15, 1815. Appointed Midshipman, December 21), 1831 ; 
served ia the frigate Constellation, Mediterranean, 1832-4 ; receiving-ship Hud- 
son, Nevs^ York, 1835 ; sloops Concord and Warren, West Indies, 1835-G ; bark 
Consort, surveying, 1837; sloop Falmouth, North Carolina, 74, Pacific Ocean, 
1837-9; Delaware, 74, Brazil, 1841-3. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, 1841 ; stm. Union, special service, 1843-4 ; stm. 
Princeton, special service, 1844; sloops Dale, St. Mary's, and Warren, and frigate 
Congress, Pacific Ocean, 184G-8 ; commanded mail-steamer, 1850; commanded 
sloop Warren, California, 1853-4 ; was Executive-Officer of Navy Yard, Mare 
Island, 1855 ; commanded transport Supply, Paraguay Expedition, 1858-9 ; com- 
manded stm. Wyandotte, south side of Cuba, 1859-60 ; commanded receiving- 
ship Independence, California, 1861 ; light-house duty, California, 1862 ; com- 
manded sloop Narragansett in Pacific, 1863-4 ; Ordnance-Officer, Mississippi 
Squadron, 1864 ; investigating bounty frauds, 1864 ; commanded State of Georgia, 
South Carolina, 1864-5 ; commanded sloop Tuscarora, Pacific Ocean, 1865-7 ; 
rendezvous in Baltimore, 1869. 

During the Mexican War was in the Pacific ; took part in the capture of Cali- 
fornia and defence of San Francisco ; had»a part in the capture of Guaymas ; led 
the advance in storming Fort Cachori ; commanded the expedition against Fort 
Bacoch Vampa, — took it by storm, leading the charge ; was in command of the 
night expedition to spike a battery of guns on its way to Guaymas; passed through 
the enemy's lines, of fifteen hundred men, with thirty men, spiked the guns, and 
fought his way back to the boats (twelve miles), bringing ofi" the wounded and 
prisoners ; was commended in the public despatches from each of his commanding 
officeirs (Captains Craven, Yard, and Commodore Rudd) for his conduct in each 
of these actions. There were several other less important afi'airs, not mentioned 
by name, for which he was also commended in the public despatches from Guay- 
mas, by the above-named officers. Was at the capture of Mazatlan, — Admiral 
Shubrick commanding, — and was assigned the command of the outpost nearest 
the enemy, who held the approaches to the city, whose nightly attacks were so 
troublesome that two men of straw had to be placed with each sentinel. Was in 
the battle of Trois, commanding the centre division, which became the rear on the 
retreat of the rear division. In this action had one man killed and twenty-three 
badly wounded out of twenty-five men ; was in the action the next day, commanding 
the artillery, at the capture of the village Trois ; received favorable mention in official 
reports ; had frequent skirmishes with the enemy about Mazatlan, in one of which 
a hand-to-hand contest ensued, in which he received a lance wound in the breast. 

In 1860, when in command of the Wyandotte at Key West, after consultiog 
with General Meigs, U. S. A., he placed his ship so as to protect Fort Taylor from 
the threatened attack of the rebels then mustering in force there; was deprived of 
his command on reporting his cause to the Department. General Meigs was also 
censured, being ordered from Key West. 

Was on the coast of Mexico (Pacific Ocean) during the early years of the Re- 
bellion, — received the thanks of the State Department for his diplomatic services 
there ; had received the thanks of the Navy Department twice during the Mexican 
War from two different Secretaries of the Navy. 

In 1865, was ordered to report to Admiral Dahlgren, off Charleston, by whom 
he was ordered to command Fort Johnson ; then to arrange and command an ex- 
pedition up the Santee with General Schimmelfeng ; then to command the ex- 
pedition of Bull's Bay with General Potter, against Charleston, the success of 



54 REAR-ADMIRALS. 

which caused the fall of Charleston. In this expedition commanded sixty-eight 
guns and thirteen field-pieces. 

Commissioned as Commodore^ June, 1870 ; Light-House Inspector, 1871-3. 

Commissioned as Rear- Admiral, February 12, 1874. 



REAR-ADMIRAL REED WERDEN, 

Born in Pennsylvania, 1818. Appointed from Ohio, January 9, 1834 ; attached 
to schooner Enterprise, Brazil Squadron, 1834-5 ; sloop-of-war Ontario, Brazil 
Squadron, 1836 ; sloop-of-war Erie, Brazil Squadron, 1837 ; sloop-of-war Cyane, 
Mediterranean Squadron, 1838-9 ; Naval School, Philadelphia, 1840. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, July 16, 1840 ; sailed for China in the sloop- 
of-war Boston, October, 1840 ; frigate Constellation, East India Squadron, 1841-2 ; 
sloop-of-war Boston, East India Squadron, as Master, 1842-3 ; receiving-ship, 
New York, 1844. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, February 27, 1847 ; sloop-of-war Germantown, 
Home Squadron, 1847 ; commanded a party of seamen at the capture of Tuspan, 
Mexico; receiving-ship Vermont, Boston, 1848; sloop-of-war Vandalia, Pacific 
Squadron, 1849-52 ; Naval rendezvous, Baltimore, 1853 ; sloop-of-war Albany, 
Home and West India Squadrons, 1853-4; special duty, West Indies, 1855; 
Naval Observatory, Washington, D. C, 1856 ; frigate Cumberland, on the coast 
of Africa, 1857-9 ; frigate Minnesota, Home Squadron, 1861 ; commanding 
steamer Yankee, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1861 ; commanding United 
States steamer Stars and Stripes, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862 ; at 
the capture of Roanoke Island and Newbern ; commanding steamer Connemaugh, 
South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862-3. 

Commissioned as Commander, July 16, 1862 ; Navy Yard, Philadelphia, 1854 ; 
Fleet-Captain East Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; commanding U. S. S. Pow- 
hatan, East Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1865 ; blockaded the rebel ram Stonewall, 
in the port of Havana, West Indies, until her surrender to the Spanish government ; 
special duty at Navy Yard, New York, 1865 ; commanding U. S. S. Bienville, West 
Indies, 1866. 

Commissioned as Captain, July 25, 1866 ; Navy Yard, Mare Island, California, 
1868-71. 

Commissioned as Commodore, April 27, 1871 ; commanding Naval Station, 
New London, 1872-4. 

Commissioned as Rear-Admiral, February, 1 875 ; commanding South Pacific 
Station, 1875-6. 

REAR-ADMIRAL EDWARD DONALDSON, 

Born in Maryland. Appointed Cadet Midshipman, October, 1834, and went to 
West Indies in St. Louis, and returned following year in the Falmouth ; went out 
in the fall of 1835, to the West Indies, in the Warren ; transferred to the Van- 
dalia, and continued until 1838 ; in frigate Columbia, East Indies, 1839-40 ; while 
attached to her, took part in the attacks on forts on the coast of Sumatra, 1839. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 22, 1841 ; in McLaughlin's Mosquito 
Fleet, in Florida, 1841-2 ; in brig Truxton, 1843-4 ; sloop Erie, coast of Africa, 
1845 ; on the Coast Survey in 1846 ; cruise in sloop Plymouth, East Indies, 
1847-8. 

Commissioned as Lieidenant, October 23, 1847 ; in brig Dolphin, East Indies, 
1849-50; at rendezvous, Baltimore, 1852; in steamer Water Witch, river La 
Plata, 1853-4 ; steam-frigate Merrimac, special service, 1856-7 ; receiving-ship 



COMMODORES. 55 

at Baltimore, 1858-9 ; in steamer San Jacinto, coast of Africa, 1860-1 ; rendez- 
vous, Philadelphia, 1861 ; commanding steam -gunboat Scioto, West Gulf Squad- 
ron, 1861-2 ; bombardment, etc., of Forts Jackson and St. Philip, and capture of 
New Orleans, April, 1862, and other operations in the river. 

Commissioned as Commander, July 16, 1862 ; commanding receiving-ship at 
Philadelphia, in 1862-3 ; was Executive-Officer of steamer Keystone State in 
trip to the West Indies in search of the Sumter ; commanding steamer Keystone 
State, North Atlantic Squadron, 1863-4; commanded the steam-sloop Seminole 
at the battle of Mobile Bay, August 5, 1864; ordnance duty, Baltimore, 1865. 

Commissioned as Captain, July 25, 1866 ; commanding receiving-ship at Balti- 
more, 1866-8 ; at New York Navy Yard, March, 1869, to February, 1870. 

Commissioned as Commodore, 1871. 

Commissioned as Rear- Admiral, 1876. 



COMMODORES. 



COMMODORE ROBERT H. WYMAN, 

Born in New Hampshire. Appointed llidshipman from l^ev^ Hampshire, March 
11, 1837 ; attached to razee Independence and sloop Fairfield, Brazils, 1837-8 ; 
sloop John Adams, Etist Indies, 1838-40 ; sloop Concord, line-of-battle-ship Del- 
aware, and frigate Potomac, Brazil Squadron, 1840-2 ; at Naval School, Philadel- 
phia, 1842-3. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 29, 1843 ; schooner Onkahage, and 
brig Perry and frigate Brandywine, East Indies, 1843-6 ; served in the Gulf on 
board the Princeton, Porpoise, and Albany, during the Mexican War ; present 
at the siege of Vera Cruz ; Observatory, Washington, 1848 ; receiving-ship at 
Boston, 1849-50. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, July 16, 1850 ; sloop St. Mary's, Pacific and East 
India Squadrons, 1850-2 ; Observatory, Washington, 1853-4 ; practice-ship Preble ; 
1855-6; razee Independence and sloop St. Mary's, Pacific, 1856-9; practice- 
ships Preble and Plymouth, 1859-60 ; sloop Richmond, 1860-1 ; commanding 
steamer Yankee and Pocahontas, 1861 ; Pawnee, South Atlantic Blockading 
Squadron, 1861-2 ; battle of Port Royal, November, 1861 ; commanding Poto- 
mac Flotilla, 1862. 

Commissioned as Commander, July 16, 1862; commanding steamer Sonoma 
in James River, and Wachusett and Santiago de Cuba, West India Squadron, 
1862-3 ; special duty, Washington, 1863 ; special duty. Navy Department, 1864 
-5 ; commanding steam-frigate Colorado, flag-ship European Squadron, 1865-7. 

Commissioned as Captain, July 25, 1866 ; commanding steam-sloop Ticon- 
deroga, European Squadron, 1867-9 ; Hydrographic Office, Washington, 1869-70 ; 
in charge of Hydrographic Office, 1871-8. 

Commissioned as Commodore, July 19, 1872. Total sea-service (1878), 
twenty years and five months ; shore or special duty, eighteen years. 



COMMODORE GEORGE B. BALCH, 
Born in Tennessee, January 3, 1821. Appointed from Alabama, December 30, 
1837 ; attached to sloop Cyane, Pacific Squadron, 1840 ; Naval School, Phila- 
delphia, 1843. 



56 COMMODORES. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 29, 1843 ; special duty, 1845 ; in war 
with Mexico, November 1, 1846, engaged in first attack on Alvarado, by squadron 
under Commodore Connor; engaged in active operations from May, 1846, to sur- 
render of Vera Cruz, March, 1847 ; in Mosquito Fleet, under Commodore Tat- 
nall, covered the landing of the army under General Scott, March 9, 1847 ; at the 
time Acting Master of the Falcon ; March, 1847, engaged in the joint bombard- 
ment of Vera Cruz with the army, and was present at the surrender of that city 
and the Castle of San Juan d'UUoa to the military and naval forces ; steamer 
Princeton, Mediterranean Squadron, 1847-8 ; Naval Observatory, Washington, 
1849-50. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, August 16, 1850 ; sloop Plymouth, Pacific Squad- 
ron, 1851-4; while on the Plymouth, Lieutenant Balch, in command of the ad- 
vance post at Shanghai, China, was wounded in the hip in a fight between the 
rebels and Imperialists ; Navy Yard, Washington, 1855-7 ; sloop Jamestown, 
Home Squadron, 1857-8; sloop St. Mary's, Pacific Squadron, 1858-9; frigate 
Sabine, 1860 ; while on the Sabine, fell in with the transport Governor and res- 
cued nearly four hundred marines, under Lieutenant-Colonel Reynolds, the trans- 
port sinking under the Sabine's stern, November 24, 1861 ; in command of steamer 
Pocahontas, South Atlantic Squadron, 1861-2 ; volunteered for command of boats 
in taking possession of Tybee Island, December 26, 1861. 

Commissioned as Commander, July 16, 1862 ; engaged rebel battery at Stono, 
South Carolina; in August, 1862, ascended Black River the distance of seventy- 
five miles, and drove rebel battery from earthworks, and engaged rebel infantry on 
the Bluffs ; commanding steamer Pawnee, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 
1863-5 ; July 16, 1863, was attacked by two batteries, the rebels making a simul- 
taneous attack on General Terry's forces. They were repulsed, and Commander 
Balch was informed by General Terry that he had saved his command. The Pawnee 
was struck forty-six times. On December 25, 1863, the Marblehead was opened 
on by rebel batteries ; the Pawnee took an enfilading position in the Keowah River, 
and demoralized the enemy and caused him to retreat ; afterward captured two 
rebel guns. While in command of the Pawnee, Commander Balch engaged in 
the combined operations of the naval forces under Rear-Admiral Dahlgren, and 
the army under General Foster, in Stono Pviver, South Carolina, from July 3 to 
11, 1864, and particularly in the bombardment of Battery Pringle, on James 
Island, South Carolina. On February 9, 1865, having with him the Sonoma and 
Dafi"odil, he ascended the Togoda Creek, North Edisto, South Carolina, and en- 
gaged three rebel batteries of eleven or twelve guns, driving the rebels from their 
earthworks. The Pawnee was hit ten times, the Sonoma twice, and the Dafibdil 
twice ; Navy Yard, Washington, 1866-8. 

Comrai.Sbioned as Captain, July 25, 1866 ; commanding flag-ship Albany, North 
Atlantic Squadron, 1868-9 ; navigation duty, Washington, 1870-1 ; Navy Yard, 
Washington, 1872. 

Commissioned as Commodore, August 13, 1872 ; Governor Naval Asylum, 
Philadelphia, 1873-6 ; member Light-House Board, 1877-8. 



COMMODORE THOMAS H. STEVENS, 

Born in Connecticut. Appointed from Connecticut, December 14, 1836 ; attached 
to razee Independence, Brazil Squadron, 1838-41. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, July 1, 1842 ; surveying duty. Gulf of Mexico, 
1842-3 ; steamer Michigan, on the lakes, 1843-4 ; Naval Storekeeper, Honolulu, 
1845-8; Naval Station, Sackett's Harbor, New York, 1849. 



COMMODORES. 57 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, May 10, 1849 ; attached to steamer Michigan, on 
the lakes, 1849-51 ; Coast Survey, 1852-5 ; steam-frigate Colorado, Home Squad- 
ron, 1858-60; commanding steam-gunboat Ottawa, 1861-2; participated in the 
engagement with the rebel fleet at Port Royal, November 4, 1861, and engage- 
ment with Forts Beauregard and Walker, November 5, 1861 ; battle of Port Eoyal 
and capture of Forts Beauregard and Walker, November 7, 1861 ; battle of Port 
Royal Ferry, January 1, 1862 ; engagement with Tatnall's rebel fleet, February, 
1862 ; capture of Fort Clinch and the towns of Fernandina and St. Mary's, and 
steamer Darlington, March 3, 1862; engagement with enemy's riflemen on the 
St. Mary's River, March 6, 1862; during the months of March and April, 1862, 
Lieutenant Stevens was in command of the first expedition up the St. John's 
River, which captured Forts Steele and Finnegan, with their guns, etc., and the 
towns of Mayport, Jacksonville, Magnolia, and Pulaski, and yacht America. 

Commissioned as Commander, July 16, 1862 ; commanding steamer Maratanza, 
North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862 ; present at the battle of West Point, 
and command of the first naval expedition to Cumberland and White House to 
open the river for and support the advance of General McClellan, May, 1862; 
present at demonstration against Petersburg and battle of Malvern Hill, June, 
1862 ; on July 4, 1862, the Maratanza, under the command of Commander Ste- 
vens, captured the rebel gunboat Teazer ; commanding iron-clad Monitor, North 
Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862 ; while in command of Monitor, covering 
the flank of McClelian's army on the James River and the rear in his withdrawal 
from the Peninsula ; commanding steamer Sonoma, West India Squadron, 1862-3 ; 
capture of schooner Clyde, steamer Victoria, brigantine Atlantic, bark Springbok, 
steamer Virginia, and chase of rebel privateer Florida for thirty-four hours ; com- 
manding iron-clad Patapsco, South Atlantic Squadron, 1863 ; while in command 
of Patapsco, participated in engagement with Fort Morgan, August 22, attack on 
Fort Sumter, August 23, and engagement with Fort Moultrie, battery Bee, and 
adjacent batteries, in command of four monitors, August 31 ; on September 1, 
demonstration against Fort Sumter and obstructions ; September 6, engagement 
with Forts Wagner and Grregg and capture of the same ; September 7, demonstra- 
tion against Fort Sumter and obstructions, and engagement with all of Sullivan's 
Island batteries ; September 8, engagement with Sullivan's Island batteries ; in 
command of boat assault on Fort Sumter on the night of September 8 ; bombard- 
ment of Fort Sumter, from October 25 to November 4, inclusive ; commanding 
steam-sloop Oneida, Western Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1863-5 ; operations be- 
fore Mobile, from July 1 to August 3, 1864 ; to enable Commander MuUany (now 
Rear- Admiral), who had volunteered for the occasion, to participate in the fight, 
Stevens consented to take the double-turreted monitor Winnebago, and Mullany 
was assigned to the Oneida (by this arrangement both these ofl&cers commanded 
fighting ships) ; commanded monitor Winnebago in engagement with Fort Powell, 
driving off reinforcements and supplies, August 4, and in battle of Mobile Bay, 
and capture of rebel ram Tennessee and fleet, and at capture of Forts Powell and 
Gaines ; bombardment and capture of Fort Morgan ; while in command of Oneida, 
May 13, 1865, off Bocha Chico, Texas, covering left flank of the army from ap- 
prehended attack ; present at the ratification of the agreement for the surrender 
of the trans-Mississippi army, by Generals Curtis, Smith, and Magruder ; in com- 
mand of Texas division of Gulf Squadron, July, 1865 ; in August, returned to 
New York in command of the Oneida. 

The zeal and conduct with which these arduous duties were performed during 
the war of the Rebellion are best shown in the numerous letters and testimonials in 
relation to Captain Stevens, from his commanding and brother officers, — men whose 
own experience and valor make them best qualified to judge of such services. 



58 COMMODORES. 

Upon the occasion of his leaving the squadron the following letter was addressed 
him by the late Admiral Du Pont: 

" I cannot permit you to leave without expressing my regret at your withdrawal 
from my squadron, having ever found you prompt, energetic, skilfiil, and brave in 
all the duties pertaining to your command. Your operations on the St. John's 
River, as senior-officer of the naval forces which took possession of those waters, 
were attended by circumstances requiring judgment and discretion, both of whjch 
you exhibited in a manner highly satisfactory to me. 

" I am, sir, respectfully, your obedient servant, 

"S. F. DU PONT, 
'■^ Flag- Officer Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron" 

Upon being relieved of the command of the U. S. S. Monitor, then in Hampton 
Roads, the present Rear- Admiral, John Rodgers, wrote as follows : 

" In all the time of our companionship on duty you have evinced courage and 
coolness. In our reconnoissance of the forts at Hilton Head previous to the grand 
attack, in the grand attack in which they were taken, in the Cooper River, in the 
Appomattox, with your vessel aground under very trying circumstances, you have 
exhibited the characteristics of a valuable officer. I have not cited occasions of 
which I have only heard, but of which I have been mindful, where your conduct 
has received the warmest prai»e. Everywhere you have shown yourself a dashing, 
zealous officer." 

Rear- Admiral Charles Wilkes, in a letter to the Secretary of the Navy, in ref- 
erence to Captain Stevens, writes : 

" I have had many and favorable opportunities, having been associated with him 
(Commander Stevens), and he served under my command in the James River, and 
in the West Indies, most of the time under my immediate observation. His patriot- 
ism is beyond doubt ; his ability as an officer is second to none in the navy ; he 
has at all times given me on duty entire satisfaction in the performance of his 
duties, and the zeal with which he executed them. I think him a high-toned 
officer and a gentleman, and know him to be an ornament to the service. His 
duties engrossed his whole attention ; ever ready and prompt in their execution, 
winning my entire satisfaction and confidence in his willingness, activity, and ability 
in the execution of orders. His command was always held ready for duty, and 
through his example, energy, and good management he fulfilled many orders, 
overcoming great difficulties he had to encounter. He is brave and chivalric ; no 
officer could have shown more attachment to the Union cause during the late war, 
and none exerted themselves more to maintain and restore the Union and uphold 
the honor of our flag." 

And again he says : 

" In arduous cruising in the West Indies, he upheld the honor of our flag, with 
spirit, upon several occasions, — his long and arduous chase of the Florida, on the 
Bahama Banks, should alone have advanced him to a higher grade." 

Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, in his farewell order upon relinquishing command of 
the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, says, in reference to the night attack on 
Sumter : 

" When I began to perceive that the enemy was not likely to be driven out of 
Sumter, except by assault, and saw that the force which I had could not of itself 
go further, unless he was driven out, I ordered the assault. It failed, but never 
was more gallantry displayed than in the attempt." 

Admiral Dahlgren also addressed the Department in relation to the meritorious 
services of Captain Stevens in presence of the enemy. Referring to the action of 
August 31, 1863, upon which occasion four monitors, under the command of Cap- 



COMMODORES. 59 

tain Stevens, engaged Fort Moultrie and the adjacent batteries, at short range, 
the Charleston papers the following morning remarked : 

" The engagement was a very spirited one, and it must be confessed, the Yankee 
captains fought their ships with great gallantry." 

Commander Edward Simpson, now Captain, who commanded the monitor Pas- 
saic' upon this occasion, refers to it in his oflScial report as the most severe action 
that had taken place between armored vessels and earthworks up to that time. 

Rear- Admiral Rowan, in his letter to the Department, writes : 

" I have great pleasure in stating that no officer (in my opinion) could have 
performed his duties better than did Commander Stevens during his arduous ser- 
vices off Charleston. I had many opportunities of judging of his conduct while 
under the fire of the enemy, and was most favorably impressed by his coolness, 
decision of character, professional knowledge, intelligence, and energy upon the 
occasion of every conflict with the enemy off Charleston." 

Admiral Rowan also says : 

" I witnessed, upon one occasion, the gallant and intelligent conduct of this 
officer while engaged with Fort Moultrie and its other defences. I also witnessed 
his gallant bearing on the occasion of the Ironsides' attack on Fort Moultrie, when 
he passed from his monitor to the Ironsides and back to his vessel in a boat, while 
the fire of Moultrie and its surrounding batteries was concentrated on that ship." 

Captain Stevens was also specially mentioned in Admiral Farragut's report of 
the battle of Mobile Bay, and Captain, now Rear- Admiral, Le Roy took occasion 
to say in reference to this action : 

" Commander Stevens commanded one of the river iron-clads, and I had an 
excellent opportunity toward the close of the action with the fleet of observing 
the cool and gallant conduct of Commander Stevens. In my opinion, no officer 
could have exhibited more coolness. Commander Stevens was outside the turrets, 
perfectly exposed, and as the vessel I commanded was close alongside his ves- 
sel, both running for the ram Tennessee, and as my vessel was the faster and more 
manageable, he cheered me with words of encouragement as I was passing." 

The gallant and accomplished Captains Percival Drayton and C. R. P. Rodgers, 
in theu- official reports of various operations against the enemy, make the most 
honorable mention of this officer. 

Captain C. R. P. Rodgers, now Rear-Admiral, says : 

" He (Commander Stevens) commanded the expedition which captured Jackson- 
ville, and took possession of the St. John's River, where he displayed signal energy 
and judgment. 

" In these operations against the enemy, I constantly had occasion to observe 
his imperturbable coolness, unflinching nerve, and thorough aptitude for command. 

*********** 

" I am much impressed with his devotion to his country, and the eminent 
service he has rendered during the Rebellion." 

The present Rear- Admiral, J. R. M. MuUany, says : 

" I can state that Commander Stevens is known to myself, and the service gen- 
erally, as a gentlemanly and intelligent officer, distinguished for his coolness and 
gallantry in battle, and for his loyahy to the country and its flag during the war, 
and for his active efforts for the suppression of the late Rebellion, being foremost 
upon all occasions in seeking active service. It is, perhaps, worthy of remark, 
that while Commander Stevens was in command of an iron-clad, and under a very 
heavy fire, from the forts at the entrance of Mobile' Bay, on August 5, 1864, I 
observed he kept his position outside the turret throughout the engagement." 

Captain Daniel Ammen, now Rear-Admiral, says : 



60 COMMODORES. 

" Commander Stevens and myself were together in the attack on Port Royal, 
afterwards in a demonstration on the city of Savannah, Georgia, in which I have 
always thought he would have taken the city had he been in command." 

Rear- Admiral J. L. Lardner says : 

" Commander Stevens commanded the Ottawa, one of Admiral Du Font's squad- 
ron, in part of the years 1861 and 1862. He performed his duty in a zealous, 
efficient, and gallant manner at the capture of Port Royal, on November 7, 1861, 
and at the capture of Fort Clinch and Fernandina, Florida. At the latter place, 
his vessel, the Ottawa, was the first and only vessel that got into the harbor on the 
day of the capture, and Fort Clinch was taken possession of and occupied by 
Commander Stevens." 

Commander James E. Jouett, now Captain, says : 

" As the executive-officer of the steamer Michigan, he performed his duties 
promptly, efficiently, and faithfully, setting a noble example of officer-like conduct 
and patriotism. Men were uncertain in those days. He stood boldly forth in depre- 
cating disloyalty. I served with him in the squadron off Mobile. He sustained 
the high reputation he had previously made off Charleston, South Carolina, for 
courage and dash. He was spoken of as the gallant Tom Stevens." 

Commissioned as Captain^ July 25, 1866 ; Light-House Inspector, 1867-70 ; 
commanding frigate Guerriere, European Squadron, 1870-1. 

Commissioned as Commodore, November 20, 1872 ; commanding Navy Yard, 
Norfolk, Virginia, 1873-6. While on this duty, assigned by the President, at 
the request of the Governor of Virginia, as member of U. S. Advisory Board 
to Harbor Commissioners of Norfolk and Portsmouth ; continued upon same duty 
after being relieved as Commandant of the Yard, upon expiration of term, and 
also employed at present as President of Board for examination of and report 
on Puritan. 

COMMODORE FOXHALL A. PARKER, 

Born in New York. Appointed from Virginia, March 11, 1839 ; attached to 
sloop Levant, West India Squadron, 1840 ; served in Florida against the Indians; 
Naval School, Philadelphia, 1843. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 29, 1843 ; steamer Michigan, on the 
lakes, 1844-5 ; Coast Survey, 1848 ; frigate St. Lawrence, Mediterranean Squadron, 
1849-50. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, September 28, 1850 ; steam-frigate Susquehanna, 
East India Squadron, 1851-3 ; Coast Survey, 1854-5 ; unemployed, 1S56-9 ; 
Pacific Squadron, 1859-61 ; Navy Yard, Washington, as Executive-Officer, 
1861-2 ; doing duty with the navy on the Potomac, and with the army at Alex- 
andria ; while attached to the Navy Yard at Washington, was ordered, two days 
after the battle of Bull Run, to Fort Ellsworth, with two hundred and fifty sea- 
men and marines, to protect it from the attack of General Beauregard, who was 
expected to storm it, and by his prompt and vigorous action, contributed greatly 
to the safety of Alexandria, and to rallying the men from their demoralization 
after the defeat at Bull Run. 

Commissioned as Commander, July 16, 1862; commanding steam-gunboat 
Mahaska, 1863 ; in command of the naval battery on Morris Island, at the bom- 
bardment of Fort Sumter, from the 17th to the 23d of August, 1863 ; engaged 
with skirmishes with batteries on Potomac and Raj^pahannock Rivers, and off 
Wilmington, North Carolina, with rebel troops on shore, while commanding the 
Mahaska, in 1863, and the Potomac Flotilla, in 1864-5 ; on one occasion, at the 
head of a small detachment of soldiers and marines, with two howitzers manned 



COMMODORES. 61 

by seamen, Commander Parker marched some distance into Virginia and drove 
a force of over one hundred cavahy out of Matthew's Court-House, which he 
took possession of; Bureau of Navigation, 1866. 

Commissioned as CajJtain, July 25, 1866 ; special duty, Hartford, Connecticut, 
1867-8 ; Navy Yard, Boston, 1869-70 ; commanding frigate Franklin, European 
Squadron, 1870-1 ; member Board of Examiners, 1872. 

Commissioned as Commodore, November 25, 1872 ; was Chief-of-Staff to the 
North Atlantic Fleet, 1872 ; ordered to special duty at Washington, August 7, 
1872, to draw up a code of signals for steam tactics, and Chief Signal-Officer of the 
Navy, 1873-6. In 1863 he prepared, by order of the Navy Department, systems 
of " Fleet Tactics under Steam," and " Squadron Tactics under Steam ;" in 1865, 
" The Naval Howitzer Afloat ;" and in 1866, " The Naval Howitzer Ashore ;" all 
of which works are text-books at the Naval Academy. Was one of the founders 
of the U. S. Naval Institute, organized October 9, 1873, at Annapolis, " for the 
advancement of professional and scientific knowledge in the Navy." In Decem- 
ber, 1874, Commodore Parker was appointed Chief-of-StafF of the united fleets 
under command of Admiral Case, which were assembled for instruction in tactics 
in the Florida waters; commanding Navy Yard, Boston, Massachusetts, 1877-8. 
Commodore Parker is the author of the " Fleets of the World," and " The Battle 
of Mobile Bay," two works of great and enduring interest to the naval profession. 



COMMODORE JOHN GUEST, 

Born in Missouri. Appointed from Arkansas, December 16, 1837; attached to 
Levant, Constellation, Boston, and sloop Warren, West India Squadron, 1838-42 ; 
Naval School, Philadelphia, 1843. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 29, 1843 ; steamer Poinsett, survey of 
Tampa Bay, 1844-5 ; frigate Congress, Pacific Squadron, 1845-8 ; war with 
Mexico, battle of San Gabriel, California, January 8, 1848, battle of Mesa, Cali- 
fornia, January 9, 1848. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, December 24, 1850 ; sloop Plymouth, and Sus- 
quehanna, in Japan Expedition, at the first landing of Americans in Japan, under 
Commodore Perry ; East India Squadron, 1851-5 ; boarded with the cutter of 
the Plymouth, at Shanghai, 1854, the Chinese man-of-war. Sir H. Compton, and 
liberated a pilot-boat's crew who were under the protection of the American flag ; 
in April, 1854, was second in command of the Plymouth, under Captain John 
Kelley, in a severe and victorious action with the Chinese, at Shanghai, to 
prevent aggression on foreign residents ; special duty, Washington, 1855-6 ; steam- 
frigate Niagara, laying the first telegraph cable across the Atlantic, 1857-8 ; rendez- 
vous, Philadelphia, 1859 ; frigate Niagara, returning Japanese Embassy to Japan, 
1860; commanding steam-frigate Niagara, W. G. B. Squadron, 1861; in com- 
mand of the boats of Niagara, cut out the schooner Aid, then under the protec- 
tion of Fort Morgan, Mobile Bay, August, 1861 ; commanding steamer Owasco, 
W. G. B. Squadron, 1862 ; at Forts Jackson and St. Philip, and capture of 
New Orleans, 1862 ; battles on the Mississippi up to and including Vicksburg, 
1862. 

Commissioned as Commander, July 16, 1862 ; commanded Owasco at the 
capture of forts at Galveston City ; commanding iron-clad Sangamon, the first 
U. S. vessel fitted with a spar torpedo, the invention of Captain Guest, S. A. B. 
Squadron, 1863; commanded the Galatea, on convoy duty in West Indies, in 
1863-4 ; commanding steamer Iosco, N. A. B. Squadron, 1864-5 ; present at the 
two attacks on Fort Fisher. 



62 COMMODORES. 

Commissioned as Captain^ July 25, 1866 ; Navy Yard, Portsmouth, New 
Hampshire, 1867-9 ; Naval rendezvous, Philadelphia, 1870 ; commanding Brook- 
lyn, European Squadron, 1870-1 ; Captain of Philadelphia Navy Yard, 1871-2. 

Commissioned as Commodore, December 12, 1872; senior-officer of Board of 
Inspection of Vessels, 1872-6 ; Commandant Navy Yard, Portsmouth, New 
Hampshire, 1877-8. 

COMMODORE JOHN M. B. CLITZ, 

Born in New York, March 10, 1823. Appointed from Michigan, Augnist 12, 
1837 ; attached to sloop Ontario, West India Squadron, 1838-42 ; Naval School, 
Philadelphia, 1843. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 29, 1843 ; sloop St. Mary's, Mediter- 
ranean Squadron, 1844-5 ; sloop Falmouth, Home Squadron, 1845-6 ; bomb- 
brig Heela, Home Squadron, 1847 ; capitulation of castle of San Juan d'Ulloa 
and capture of Tuspan ; steamer Petrita, Home Squadron, 1847-8 ; frigate Cum- 
berland, Mediterranean Squadron, 1849-51. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, April 6, 1851 ; Coast Survey, 1851-2 ; steam- 
frigate Mississippi, East India Squadron, 1852-5 ; special duty, Washington, 
1856; sloop Decatur, Pacific Sqiiadron, 1858-9 ; steam-sloop Iroquois, 1861. 

Commissioned as Commander, July 16, 1862 ; commanding steamer Penob- 
scot, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1863; commanding steam-sloop 
Juniata, East Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1863 ; commanding steamer Osceola, 
North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5; at both attacks on Fort Fisher; 
Navy Yard, Boston, 1866. 

Commissioned as Captain, July 25, 1866; commanding steam-sloop Pawnee, 
South Atlantic Squadron, 1868-9 ; ordnance duty. Navy Yard, New York, 1870 ; 
commanding California (second-rate). Pacific Fleet, 1870-2. 

Commissioned as Commodore, December 28, 1872 ; commanding Naval Station, 
Port Royal, South Carolina, 1876-7. 



COMMODORE ANDREW BRYSON, 

Born in New York, 1822. Appointed from New York, December 21, 1837; 
attached to sloop Ontario, West India Squadron, 1838-42 ; Naval School, Phila- 
delphia, 1842-3. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 29, 1843 ; sloop Decatur, coast of 
Africa, 1843-5 ; steamer Michigan, on the lakes, 1845-9 ; store-ship Erie, 
1850-1. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, August 30, 1851 ; brig Bainbridge, coast of 
Africa, 1851-3 ; receiving-ship, Boston, 1853-5 ; sloop Saratoga, Home Squad- 
ron, 1856-8 ; sloop Preble, Brazil Squadron, 1858-9 ; Navy Yard, New York, 
1861. 

Commissioned as Commander, July 16, 1862 ; commanding steamer Chippewa, 
special service, 1862-3 ; commanding iron-clad Lehigh, South Atlantic Blockading 
Squadron, 1863 ; at the reduction of Fort Macon, and in all the principal actions 
in which the iron-clads were engaged ofi" Charleston, from September 22, 1863, to 
April 5, 1864; wounded slightly by fragment of shell oflF Charleston; command- 
ing the iron-clad Essex, Mississippi Squadron, 1864-5. 

Commissioned as Captain, July 25, 1866 ; commanding steamer Michigan, on 
the lakes, 1866-9; commanding receiving-ship Boston, 1869-70; Navy Yard, 
Boston, 1871 ; commanding Brooklyn (second-rate), European Fleet, 1871-2. 



COMMODORES. 63 

Commissioned as Commodore, February 14, 1873 ; member Board of Exam- 
iners, 1873 ; Commandant Navy Yard, Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 1874-6. 



COMMODORE D. M. FAIRFAX, 

Born in Virginia. Appointed 3Iidshipman from North Carolina, August 12, 
1837 ; sloop John Adams, East Indies, 1837-40 ; at the destroying of towns on 
the west coast of Sumatra, in 1839 ; ten months in sloop Fairfield and frigate 
Brandywine, Mediterranean, in 1841-2 ; Naval School at Philadelphia, 1842-3. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 29, 1843 ; attached to steam-frigate 
Missouri until she was destroyed by fire at Gibraltar, in 1843 ; Coast Survey, in 
1844 ; brig Porpoise, 1845 ; transferred, after four months, to frigate Columbus, 
East India and Pacific Squadron, 1845-7 ; in store-ship Erie, Pacific Squadron, 
for four months, and transferred to sloop Cyane, 1847-9 ; at the attack and cap- 
ture of several towns on the west coast of Mexico, under Commander Du Pont ; 
frigate Congress, Brazil Squadron, 1850-3. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, February 26, 1851 ; frigate Potomac, Home 
Squadron, 1855-6 ; transferred to frigate Wabash, and continued in her during 
1856-8; at capture of Walker's expedition, at San Juan, Nicaragua; steamer 
Mystic, in 1859; Constellation, 1859-60; San Jacinto, 1860-1, coast of Africa; 
while in the last named, directed in person the taking from the Trent of Messrs. 
Mason and Slidell ; commanding steamer Cayuga, Mississippi Squadron, in 1862, 
under Admiral Farragut ; skirmishing along its banks and keeping river open as 
far as Red River. 

Commissioned as Commander, July 16, 1862 ; commanding monitor Nantucket, 
South Atlantic Blockading Squadron ; attack on Charleston forts, April 7, 1863 ; 
commanding Montauk, in night and day work at Charleston, until August 25, 
1863 ; Commandant of Midshipmen, at the Naval Academy, 1863-5 ; command- 
ing Practice Squadron, two seasons. 

Commissioned as Captain, July 26, 1866 ; commanding steamer Rhode Island, 
flag-ship North Atlantic Squadron, 1866 ; commanding flag-ship Susquehanna, 
same squadron, 1867-8 ; on ordnance duty at different periods, at Philadelphia, 
New York, and Boston ; Executive-Officer of Navy Yard, Portsmouth, New 
Hampshire, 1870-2. 

Commissioned as Commodore, August 24, 1873 ; commanding Naval Station, 
New London, Connecticut, 1873-6 ; special duty, 1876-7 ; Commandant Naval 
Station, New London, 1877-8. Total sea service, twenty years and four months ; 
shore duty, fifteen years. 



COMMODORE JAMES H. SPOTTS, 

Born in North Carolina. Appointed from Kentucky, August 2, 1837 ; attached 
to sloop John Adams, East India Squadron, 1838-42; Naval School, Philadelphia, 
1842-3. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 29, 1843 ; store-ship Lexington, Pacific 
Squadron, 1846-8. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, November 21, 1851 ; sloop Portsmouth, Pacific 
Squadron, 1851-5 ; rendezvous, Philadelphia, 1855-7 ; steamer Michigan, on the 
lakes, 1857-8 ; sloop Cyane, Pacific Squadron, 1858-9 ; frigate Santee, 1861. 

Commissioned as Commander, July 16, 1862 ; commanding steamer Magnolia, 
East Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1862 ; commanding steamer South Carolina, 



64 COMMODORES. 

South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1863-4; commanding steamer Powhatan, 
North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; in both engagements with Fort 
Fisher, November, 1864, and January, 1865 ; in the engagement with Fort An- 
derson, and engagements along the banks of the Cape Fear Biver, February, 
1865 ; also at the bombardment of the batteries above Dutch Gap, James Biver, 
April, 1865. 

Commissioned as Captain, July 25, 1866 ; Navy Yard, Mare Island, California, 
1866-7 ; commanding steam-sloop Guerriere, 1870 ; commanding Saranac, Pacific 
Squadron, 1871 ; commanding Pensacola, P. S., 1872. 

Commissioned as Commodore, September 25, 1873 ; Light-House Inspector, 
1874-5. 

COMMODOBE J. W. A. NICHOLSON, 

Born in Massachusetts. Appointed from New York, February 10, 1838 ; attached 
to sloops Natchez and Warren, "West India Squadron, 1838-41 ; to Brandy wine, 
frigate, Mediterranean Squadron, 1841-2 ; special service, 1842-3. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 20, 1844; steamship Princeton, 
1844-6; Pacific Squadron, 1846-7 ; store-ship Fredonia, 1848 ; frigate Baritan, 
1849-50 ; Southampton store-ship Pacific, 1851-2. 

Promoted to Lieutenant, April 24, 1852 ; sloop Vandalia, Japanese Expedition, 
under Commodore Perry, 1853-5 ; participated in all of the ofl&cial meetings with 
the Japanese on that expedition ; stationed on shore, with a guard from the Van- 
dalia, at Shanghai, China, for several months, to protect the foreign settlement, 
while the contending Chinese were encamped near by ; Navy Yard, New York, 
1856-7 ; sloop Vincennes, African coast, 1857-60 ; 1861, attached to steamer 
Pocahontas, which vessel started for the relief of Fort Sumter, but arrived too 
late, as the fort capitulated, a short time after the arrival of the Pocahontas, on 
April 13, 1861 ; stationed in Potomac Biver until October, 1861 ; engagement 
with rebel batteries at Acquia Creek ; in command of steamer Isaac Smith, 1861, 
and participated in actions with rebel fleet, November 5 and 6, and battle of Port 
Boyal, November 7, 1861 ; also participated in the capture of Jacksonville, Fer- 
nandina, and St. Augustine, Fla. ; held the towns of Jacksonville and St. Augus- 
tine for several months ; while in command of St. John's Biver, was attacked by 
rebel infantry, and defeated them with considerable loss ; engagement with rebel 
flotilla in Savannah Biver, February, 1862. 

Commissioned as Commander, July 16, 1862 ; ordnance duty, New York, 1863 ; 
South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864; command of monitor Manhattan, 
Western Gulf Squadron, 1864 ; battle of Mobile Bay Forts, and capture of rebel 
ram Tennessee, August 5, 1864 ; bombarding Fort Morgan from August 9 until 
the surrender on the 21st; commanding the steamer Mohongo, Pacific Squadron, 
1865-6 ; commanding steamship Wampanoag, 1867-8. 

Commissioned as Captain, July 25, 1866 ; Navy Yard, New York, 1868-70 ; 
commanding Lancaster (second-rate), South Atlantic Fleet, 1871-2. 

Commissioned as Commodore, November 8, 1873 ; member Board of Exam- 
iners, 1873-4 ; President Board of Examiners, 1875-6 ; Commandant Navy Yard, 
1876-8. Total sea-service (1878), twenty-one years and seven months ; shore or 
other duty, eleven years. 

COMMODOBE GEOBGE H. COOPEB, 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, August 14, 1837 ; attached to 
fleet operating on coast of Florida, 1837, and was constantly employed co-operating 



COMMODORES. 65 

with the army in boat expeditions against the Seminole Indians ; frigate Constitu- 
tion, Pacific Squadron, 1838-42 ; Naval School, Philadelphia, 1843. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 23, 1843 ; schooner Flirt, Home 
Squadron, 1846-7. 

The Flirt reported for duty to General Zachary Taylor in March, 1846. Passed 
Midshipman Cooper commanded a detachment of men at Point Isabel, Texas, under 
Major Monroe, of the U. S. Army, previous to and after the battles of May 8 and 
9. After the capture of Monterey, was transferred to Commodore Connor's squad- 
ron, and was in both attacks on Tobasco, and attacks on Alvarado and Tuspan. 
Served in the squadron until the reduction of the capital. Receiving-ship, Nor- 
folk, 1847-8 ; Naval Station, Norfolk, 1849-50 ; steam-frigate Susquehanna, East 
India Squadron, 1850-5. 

Commissioned as Lieufeiianf, May 8, 1851 ; rendezvous, Norfolk, 1856; ord- 
nance duty, Norfolk, 1857; steam-frigate Roanoke, Home Squadron, 1859-60; 
Navy Yard, Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 1861. 

Commissioned as Commander, July 16, 1862; commanding steamer Massachu- 
setts, supply- vessel, Atlantic Squadron, 1862 ; commanding steamer Mercedita, 
S. A. B. Squadron, 1863 ; was seven weeks in command of monitor Sangamon, 
inside of Charleston Roads, employed on picket duty, and acting in concert with 
the army, constantly shelling Fort Sumter and the batteries on Sullivan's Island ; 
stationed in Stono Inlet, South Carolina, as senior-officer, co-operating with the 
army in expeditions against the enemy, and frequently engaged at short range ; 
commanding steamer Sonoma, S. A. B. Squadron, 1863-4; commanding steamer 
Glaucus, E. G. B. Squadron, 1864-5 ; commanding steamer Winooskie, special 
service, 1866-7; Navy Yard, Norfolk, 1867-9. 

Commissioned as Captain, December 2, 1867 ; commanding steam-frigate Colo- 
rado, Asiatic Squadron, 1870-1 ; Navy Yard, Norfolk, 1872 ; commanding 
Roanoke, 1873-4. 

Commissioned as Commodore, June 5, 1874; Commandant Navy Yard, Pen- 
sacola, 1875-6; Light-House Inspector, 1876-7.; President Board of Inspection, 
1877-8. 

COMMODORE J. C. BEAUMONT, 

Appointed Acting Midshipman, March 1., 1838 ; sloops-of-war Ontario and Erie, 
1838-40; frigate Constellation during her cruise around the world, 1840-4. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipmari^ 1844; sloop-of-war Jamestown, coast of 
Africa, Acting Master, 1844-6; ship-of-the-line Ohio, West India Squadron, 
1846; at the fall of Vera Cruz; frigate Columbia, 1847, Acting Lieutenant; 
Naval Observatory, Washington, D. C, 1848 ; razee Independence, Mediterranean 
Squadron, Master and Acting Lieutenant, 1849-52. 

Promoted to Lieutenant in 1852; Naval Observatory, 1852-4; U. S. steamer 
San Jacinto, on the coast of Europe and the West Indies, 1854-5; frigate 
Potomac, Home Squadron, 1856; steam-frigate Wabash, Home Squadron, 1857 ; 
receiving-ship at New York, 1857-8 ; steam-sloop Hartford, East India Squadron, 
1859-60; sloop-of-war John Adams, Executive-Officer, 1860-1; Lieutenant- 
Commander, commanding U. S. steamer Aroostook, North Atlantic Squadron, 
1862 ; was an active participant in the engagements with the enemy's batteries in 
the James River and at Fort Darling, in May, 1862. 

Promoted to Commander, 1862 ; commanded the steam-gunboat Sebago, South 
Atlantic Squadron, 1862-3; commanded monitor Nantucket, 1863, in various 
engagements with the rebel fortifications in Charleston harbor, and took a leading 
part in the capture of Fort Wagner ; commanded U. S. steamer Mackinaw, 

5 



66 COMMODORES. 

1864-5, in the North and South Atlantic Squadrons ; participated in all of the 
attacks on Fort Fisher, where his vessel was badly cut" up by the enemy's shell ; 
participated in all of the subsequent engagements with the rebel batteries on the 
Cape Fear River ; commanded the iron-clad Miantonomah, special cruise on the 
coast of Europe, 1866-7 ; retired in 1868. 

Restored to the active list in 1873, as Captain; commanded the U S. steamer 
Powhatan, 1873-4, special service. 

Promoted to Commodore in 1874 ; present duty, Chief Signal-Officer of the 
Navy. 

COMMODORE JOHN C. FEBIGER, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Ohio, September 14, 1838 ; attached 
to frigate Macedonian, West India Squadron, 1838-40 ; sloop Concord, Brazil 
Squadron, 1841-3 ; wrecked in Concord on east coast of Africa, 1843 ; attached 
to brig Chippola, purchased by government at Rio de Janeiro, and used to recover 
and dispose of equipment of Concord, 1843-4. 

Promoted to Passed 31idsh'ipman, May 20, 1844; frigate Potomac, Home 
Squadron, 1844-5 ; sloop Dale, Pacific Squadron, 1846-7 ; frigate Columbus, 
Pacific Squadron, 1848; sloop Dale, African Squadron, 1850; Coast Survey, 
1852-7. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant^ April 30, 1853 ; sloop Germantown, East India 
Squadron, 1858-60; sloop Savannah, 1861. 

Commissioned as Commander, August 11, 1862 ; commanding the steamer 
Kanawha, West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1862-3 ; engagement ofi" Mobile 
Bay, April 3, 1862 ; commanding steamers Osage, Nersho, and Lafayette, Mis- 
sissippi Squadron, 1863 ; commanding steamer Mattabeset, North Atlantic Block- 
ading Squadron, 1864-5; engagement with rebel ram Albemarle, in Albemarle 
Sound, May, 1864; commanding steamer Ashuelot, Asiatic Squadron, 1866-8. 

Commissioned as Captain, May 6, 1868; commanding steam-sloop Shenan- 
doah, Asiatic Squadron, 1868-9. While commanding the Shenandoah, entered 
and surveyed Ping-Yang Inlet, west coast of Corea. Special duty as Inspector of 
Naval Reserved Lands, 1869-70 ; special duty, 1871-2 ; member Board of Ex- 
aminers, 1873-6. 

Commissioned as Commodore, August 9, 1874 ; Commandant at Navy Yard, 
Washington, 1876-8. 

COMMODORE PEIRCE CROSBY, 

Born in Delaware County, Pennsylvania. Appointed Midshipman from Penn- 
sylvania, June 5, 1838; attached to line-of-battle-ship Ohio, from 1838 until the 
summer of 1841, while flag-ship in the Mediterranean; attached to receiving- 
vessel Experiment, at Philadelphia ; afterward attached to steamer Mississippi, 
on her trial trip with the Missouri, from New York to Washington. In 1842, 
was attached to the frigate Congress, and sailed with her from Portsmouth, New 
Hampshire, to the Mediterranean ; served in her six months ; was then trans- 
ferred to the sloop Preble, and returned to the United States in the fall of 1843, 
and was then attached to the Naval School at Philadelphia. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, May, 1844; Coast Survey from summer of 
1844 to summer of 1846, when he was ordered to the sloop Decatur, and served 
in her six months in the Gulf of Mexico, during the IMexican War ; participated 
in the attack and capture of Tuspan and Tobasco. Was then transferred to the 
gunboat Petrel, and served in her one year, until peace was declared in the summer 



COMMODORES. 67 

of 1848; afterward was attached to the store-ship Relief, in 1849, carrying sup- 
plies to the Mediterranean and Coast of Africa Squadron, until the summer of 
1850 ; attached to Philadelphia Navy Yard from fall of 1850 to 1852, inclusive, 
and then transferred to receiving-ship stationed at Philadelphia, until spring of 
1853 ; became attached to the frigate Sacramento, then fitting for sea at Norfolk ; 
was soon detached from her and placed on waiting orders. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, September 3, 1853 ; in the winter of 1853, was 
ordered to sloop German town, and sailed in her in the spring of 1854, from 
Boston to the coast of Brazil, and returned to the United States in February, 
1857 ; attached to receiving-ship at Philadelphia, until the latter part of 1858 ; 
sailed in the sloop Saratoga, in the fall of 1858, for the Gulf of Mexico, and 
with the exception of forty days on board the Brooklyn, under Captain (now 
Admiral) Farragut, served two years, and returned to the United States in the 
Saratoga, in 1860 ; attached to the receiving-ship at Philadelphia, from 1860 to 
spring of 1861 ; in the spring and summer of 1861, served in Chesapeake Bay, 
keeping open communication between Annapolis and Havre de Grace, capturing 
and destroying rebel vessels in the bay, and cutting off rebel supplies and com- 
munications. In the summer of 1861, received orders, and was attached to the 
frigate Cumberland ; was detailed for duty on shore at Fortress Monroe ; trans- 
ported the troops across Hampton Creek, on the night prior to the battle of Big 
Bethel, also transported them on their return after their unsuccessful attempt to 
take that place. Volunteered and took the steamer Fannie (a canal-boat), secured 
her boilers temporarily down to the deck with chains, and proceeded with her, in 
company with the squadron, to the attack on Forts Hatteras and Clarke, in order 
to have a light-draft vessel to operate in landing troops at that place ; superin- 
tended the landing of troops, until the heavy surf swamped and broke up the 
boats and dashed them on the beach, when Lieutenant Crosby took a ship's heavy 
launch and landed two more boat-loads of troops, until the sea became so heavy 
that it threw the launch upon the beach, dashing all the crew out of her on tO' 
the shore. After thus having landed three hundred men and ofl&cers, the squad- 
ron and transports, on account of the bad weather, stood off seaward, leaving the^ 
troops landed on the shore until the following day, when the squadron returned, 
opened fire, and captured the forts, which were garrisoned by over seven hundred; 
men, who had been led to believe, by the display made by the troops landed, that 
their force was over two thousand strong. In this way the rebels were deceived,, 
and our troops were saved from attack and probable capture, as nearly all the- 
ammunition was wet, and the volunteer troops, being in a disorganized state, could 
not, in all probability, have successfully opposed double their number. Lieutenant 
Crosby succeeded in getting a strong picket thrown across the point in front of the- 
enemy's batteries, thus preventing their making a reconnoissance or ascertaining, 
the actual force of the Union troops, when the squadron returned on the following; 
day, and relieved them from their critical position. Was especially mentioned in. 
General Butler's official report of the expedition. Captured several schooners 
running the blockade, they not knowing the forts had surrendered. 

In the fall, and shortly after the capture of these forts, was ordered to the com- 
mand of the gunboat Pembino, fitting out at New York ; but was taken danger- 
ously ill with typhoid fever, brought on by constant exposure, privations, and 
fatigue in the performance of his duties. In the winter of 1861, took command 
of the gunboat Pinola, at Baltimore ; took her to Washington, received her battery,, 
and sailed for the Gulf Squadron, joining Admiral Farragut's command in the 
spring of 1862. While on his way to join the squadron, captured the schooner 
Cora, loaded with cotton, and sent her North as a prize. Commanded the Pinola 
on the memorable night when she co-operated with the Itasca in breaking through. 



68 COMMODORES. 

the chain barrier across the Mississippi, at Forts Jackson and St. Philip, The 
Itasca successfully slipped the end of the cable on the opposite shore to Fort 
Jackson, and in so doing ran hard and fast aground, but through the skilful exer- 
tions of Commander Crosby, was rescued from her critical position, at about two 
o'clock in the morning. The Pinola's duty on this occasion was to blow up with 
torpedoes the vessels holding the chain barrier, and anchored directly under Fort 
Jackson's guns, — which was twice tried. The vessels were boarded, which imme- 
diately drew the fire of Fort Jackson ; torpedoes were placed in the hold, also 
outside of the vessels, and everything carefully arranged ; but owing to the mass 
of floating timber around the vessels, the strong current and dark night, the wires 
attached to the galvanic battery and torpedoes were broken just as the attempt 
was made to explode them. When the third attempt was about being made, a 
boat arrived alongside, announcing the Itasca ashore, and in want of the Pinola's 
assistance to get her afloat ; the attempt to blow up the vessels was reluctantly 
given up for the time, to assist the Itasca, and in going to her assistance again 
drew the fire of Fort Jackson. In the first attempt to pull the Itasca afloat, two 
hawsers broke, but succeeded with an eleven-inch hawser the second time in pull- 
ing her ofi"; and in doing this, the Pinola passed well up through the barrier 
under Fort St. Philip, far enough to prove that the road was clear, but owing to 
the heavy bombardment of the mortar-fleet, was not heard or seen. 

Participated in the bombardment and passage of Forts Jackson and St. Philip, 
Chalmette batteries, and capture of New Orleans ; also in the bombardment, 
passage, and re-passage of batteries at Vicksburg, and engagement with the rebel 
iron-clad Arkansas. Blockaded ofi" Mobile in the fall of 1862 ; was ordered 
North to command the iron-clad Sangamon. 

Was promoted to Commander, September 3, 1862 ; detached from Sangamon, 
and appointed Fleet-Captain, North Atlantic Squadron, under Rear-Admiral S. 
P. Lee ; commanded an expedition up the York River, co-operating with General 
Dix, in command of the Army Corps at the White House. In the winter of 
1863, took command of the Florida, destroyed two blockade-runners at Mason- 
^oro' Inlet, while attempting to run the blockade, just at the break of day, and in 
so doing drew the sharp fire of flying batteries, on shore; was transferred to the 
command of the Keystone State in 1864 ; captured five blockade-runners while in 
command of her, and caused many others to throw overboard their cargoes in 
•order to escape. Detached from Keystone State, and ordered to the Muscoota ; 
detached from the Muscoota, and ordered to the Meticomel, 1864-5; blockaded 
■ofi" Galveston, Texas, and commanded her in the attack on Mobile. Planned and 
directed the construction of torpedo-nets, and spread them from shore to shore of 
the Blakely River, which caught all the floating torpedoes sent down to destroy 
the vessel ; also planned torpedo drag-nets, superintended the removal of one hun- 
dred and forty torpedoes, and successfully cleared the track so as to allow the 
squadron to pass up safely to the city of Mobile. Occupied Forts Huger and 
Tracy on the night of the evacuation by the rebel forces; was especially com- 
mended by Admiral Thatcher in his official report of the naval operations at that 
port ; was detached from the Metacomet, on her return to Philadelphia, in August, 
1865, at the close of the war. In September, 1865, received orders to command 
the Shamokin ; sailed in her for the coast of Brazil, where he remained until 1868. 

Promoted to Captai7i, May 27, 1868, and detached, returning to the United 
States by the mail-steamer. While in command of the Shamokin conveyed Min- 
ister Washburn to Paraguay. At Norfolk Navy Yard as Inspector of Ordnance, 
1869-70 ; Navy Yard, Philadelphia, 1871-2 • Navy Yard, Washington, 1872-4. 

Commissioned as Commodore, October 3, 1874 ; commanding Naval Station, 
League Island, 1878. 



COMMODORES. 69 

COMMODORE JOHNSTON B. CREIGHTON, 

Born in Rhode Island. Appointed from Rhode Island, February 10, 1838 ; 
attached to sloop-of-war Levant, frigate Constellation, sloop-of-war Natchez, and 
frigate Macedonian, in West Indies, 1840; frigate Columbia, Brazil Squadron, 
1843. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, May 20, 1844 ; brig Truxton, coast of 
Africa, 1844-6 ; sloop Dale, Pacific Squadron, 1846-7 ; store-ship Lexington, 
Pacific Squadron, 1848-50; steamer Michigan, on the lakes, 1850-2; frigate 
Cumberland, Mediterranean Squadron, 1852-5. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, October 9, 1853; Navy Yard, Boston, 1856-8; 
steam-frigate Roanoke, Home Squadron, 1859-60 ; commanding steamer Ottawa, 
S. A. B.' Squadron, 1862. 

Commissioned as Commander, September 20, 1862 ; special duty, 1863 ; com- 
manding steamer Mahaska, S. A. B. Squadron, 1863-4; from August 8 to 21, 
1863, bombarding Forts Wagner and Glregg, Morris Island, South Carolina, while 
in command of the Mahaska ; commanding the steamer Mingo, S. A. B. Squad- 
ron, 1864-5 ; took possession of Greorgetown, S. C, and endeavored to communicate 
with G-eueral Sherman, — held it until relieved by army ; ordnance duty, New 
York, 1866-7; commanding steam-sloop Oneida, Asiatic Squadron, 1867-9. 

Commissioned as Captain, November 26, 1868 ; special duty. New York, 
1870-1 ; commanding Guerriere, European Squadron, 1871-2 ; member Board 
of Examiners, 1873-4. 

Commissioned as Com?/iotZore, November 9, 1874; Commandant Navy Yard, 
Norfolk, Vir<nnia, 1876-8. 



COMMODORE AARON K. HUGHES, 

Born in New York State. Appointed Acting Midshijjman from New York, 
October 20, 1838 ; made first cruise in the Pacific Ocean, on board the frigate 
Constitution, flag-ship of Commodore Alexander Clayton, Captain Daniel Turner 
commanding, from January, 1839, until November, 1841 ; in February, 1842, was 
ordered to the brig Boxer, — served in her in the Gulf of Mexico, and in the West 
Indies, until the autumn of the same year ; served in the receiving-ship Pennsyl- 
vania, Norfolk, Virginia, from January, 1843, until June of the same year; was 
then ordered to the frigate Macedonian, African Squadron, and served in her until 
the winter of 1844. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, May 28, 1844 ; served in the frigate Colum- 
bia, coast of Brazil, from the fall of 1845 until the spring of 1846 ; served during 
the summer of 1846 in the office of the United States Coast Survey ; in the fall 
of same year, was ordered as Passed Midshipman to the steamer Michigan, on the 
Western lakes, and served in her until the summer of 1848 ; served in the receiv- 
ing-ship North Carolina, as Passed Midshipman, from fall of 1849 until summer 
of 1850 ; was then ordered as Acting Master to the sloop St. Mary's, which order 
was revoked before that vessel went to sea ; in about a month after, was ordered to 
the sloop Albany, and served in her as Acting Master in the West Indies and Gulf 
of Mexico, for two years and one month, and was granted leave from her in the 
latter part of the fall of 1852 ; in the winter of 1852, was ordered as Acting 
Master to the receiving-ship Ontario, where he received a warrant as Master, in 
the line of promotion, and served in her until the summer of 1853, when he was 
detached and granted leave of absence. 

Promoted to Lieutenant, August, 1853, and in December of same year, was 
ordered as Lieutenant in sloop-of-war Decatur, Pacific Squadron, until August of 



70 COMMODORES. 

1856 ; made the passage tlirougli the Straits of Magellan, from the Atlantic to the 
Pacific, occupying eighty-three days, or one hundred and eighteen days fi'om Rio 
Janeiro, Brazil, to Valparaiso, Chili ; while attached to this vessel in Puget Sound, 
Washington Territory, where he passed the winter of 1855-6, had an engagement 
on shore at the town of Seattle, with five hundred hostile Indians, who had at- 
tempted to murder the inhabitants, pillage and destroy the place ; but through the 
unremitting watchfulness of the late Commodore Guert Gansevoort, their objects 
were frustrated by the landing of the officers and crew of the Decatur ; engage- 
ment commenced at 8 a.m., and ended at 4 P.M., on the 26th day of January, 
1 856. It was estimated that the Indians lost thirty-five killed and thirty wounded. 
This ended hostilities in the Territory. In the winter of 1856-7, ordered as Lieu- 
tenant, and served on board the receiving-ship Alleghany, Baltimore, as Executive- 
Officer until the fall of 1857, when he was ordered as Lieutenant and Executive- 
Officer to the store-ship Supply, of the African and Brazil Squadrons, serving until 
the fall of 1858 ; after a month's leave, was again ordered to the receiving-ship Al- 
leghany, where he served as a Lieutenant until June, 1859; was then ordered as 
a Lieutenant to the San Jacinto, and served in her as Second Lieutenant, Execu- 
tive-Officer, and about six weeks in command of that vessel, until January, 1860 ; 
was then ordered by the flag-officer commanding the African Squadron to the sloop 
Portsmouth as Executive-Officer, and served in her until June of same year ; was 
then re-ordered to the San Jacinto, at the Island of Madeira, and on her way to 
St. Paul de Loanda, west coast of Africa, was sent as prize-master of the captured 
slaver Storm King, and after taking charge of that vessel two hundred miles to 
the westward of the Congo River, and conveying six hundred and nineteen recap- 
tured Africans to Monrovia, Liberia, a distance of fifteen hundred miles, delivered 
them to the charge of the Reverend John Seys, Government Agent there ; brought 
the prize to Norfolk, Virginia, in September, 1860 ; in December, 1860, ordered 
as Lieutenant to receiving-ship Princeton, at Philadelphia, — served in her until 
April 23, 1861, on which day he was ordered to the Philadelphia City ice-boat, 
which had been improvised into a man-of-war in less than twenty-four hours, as 
Executive, under Commander (now Rear- Admiral) Oliver S. Glisson ; sei-ved in 
her in the Chesapeake, convoying government transports with troops and muni- 
tions of war, until the middle of May of same year ; was then ordered to the 
frigate Mississippi, — served in her as Second Lieutenant and Executive in the 
Gulf Squadron, until October 31, 1861, when he was ordered in command of the 
steamer Water Witch ; serving in same squadron until April, 1862, when she was 
ordered North for repairs ; while in command of the Water Witch, in November, 
1861, was ordered by Captain (now Rear- Admiral) L. M. Powell, while lying off 
Fort Morgan near the entrance to Mobile Bay, to steam in toward the fort and 
endeavor to cut out a schooner, which, in attempting to run in, had grounded 
under the guns of the fort ; when within range he opened fire upon the schooner, 
which was vigorously returned by the guns of Fort Morgan, and from the guns 
of a masked battery to the eastward of the fort. This engagement lasted for more 
than an hour, when a signal to haul out of action was made by the officer above 
mentioned. In May, 1862, was ordered to command the gunboat Mohawk, — served 
in her under Flag-Officer and Admiral Du Pont, South Atlantic Squadron, until 
June, 1863 ; while at Fernandina, Florida, as senior Naval-Officer, was requested 
by the military authorities stationed there to accompany them on an expedition to 
St. Mary's, Georgia, for the purpose of supplying lumber for the troops. Accord- 
ingly, on November 9, 1862, the army transport having preceded him, steamed 
over to that place. On approaching the town, they met the army transport with 
two companies of volunteers returning, they having been fired into by rebel troops 
stationed in the town, — one of their men being dangerously, and two supposed 



COMMODORES. 71 

mortally wounded, were sent on board the Mohawk for medical treatment. He 
continued on his course to the town and made fast to the wharf, sending one officer 
on shore who communicated with two women, apparently the only inhabitants of 
the town ; they assured him that the man alluded to had been wounded by some fool- 
ish boys, — the account did not satisfy him. He then offered to give these women 
a safe conduct to Fernandina, which they declined. He then determined to fire 
into the town, but upon the earnest solicitation of Colonel Rich, commanding 9th 
Regiment, IMaine Volunteers, decided to leave without molesting the place, upon 
the express understanding, however, that if a single shot was fired at the vessel, 
he would return and bombai'd the town. He had no sooner left the wharf than 
volleys of musketry were opened upon him from different parts of the town. The 
channel of the river was so narrow that he was obliged to drop anchor in order to 
get the vessel's head up stream, and as soon as this could be done he opened fire 
upon the town and destroyed the greater portion of it, completely driving the 
rebels out of the place. He subsequently learned that one hundred and fifty men 
were concealed there. 

In June, I860, was ordered to command the gunboat Cimmaron, — served in her 
in South Atlantic Squadron, under Rear- Admiral Dahlgreu, until May, 1864 ; 
while in her participated in the attack on the enemy's works before Charleston, 
August 17, 1863, and served in other engagements at the same place. In Octo- 
ber, 1864, ordered to report to Acting Rear-Admiral Lee, as Ordnance-Officer, 
Mississippi Squadron ; in February, 1865, was transferred as Executive-Ofiicer to 
the Mound City Naval Station, in which capacity he served until February, 1866 ; in 
April, 1866, was ordered as a member of the Naval General Court-Martial assembled 
at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and served on it until it was dissolved in June, 1866 ; 
in August, 1866, was ordered as Light-House Inspector of the Sixth Light-House 
District, at Charleston, South Carolina, where he served until August 7, 1868. 

Promoted to Lieutenant- Commander, July 16, 1862. 

Promoted to Commander, November 16, 1862. 

Promoted to Captain, February 10, 1869; commanding R. S. Boston, 1870; 
commanding Pensacola (second-rate). Pacific Squadron, 1872-4. 

Commissioned as Commodore, February 4. 1875 ; commanding Naval Station, 
Port Royal, South Carolina, 1877-8. 



COMMODORE EDMUND R. COLHOUN, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed fi-om Missouri, April 1, 1829 ; attached to 
sloop Marion, Brazil Squadron, 1839-40 ; frigate Congress, Mediterranean Squad- 
ron, 1841-3 ; Naval School, Philadelphia, 1845. 

Promoted to Passed Midshijmian, July 2, 1845; frigate Cumberland, Home 
Squadron, 1846 ; Mexican War, in the first attack on Alvarado, under Commo- 
dore Connor, and under Commodore Perry at the first attack on Tobasco, and 
afterwards at its capture ; served as Passed Midshipman on board the armed prize- 
schooner Nonata; receiving-ship, Philadelphia, 1848-9; sloop Albany, Pacific 
Squadron, 1849-50 ; receiving-ship, Philadelphia, 1850-1 ; frigate St. Lawrence, 
Pacific Squadron, 1852-3 ; resigned, June 27, 1853 ; re-entered the service as 
Acting Lieutenant in 1861 ; commanded steamer Hunchback, North Atlantic 
Blockading Squadron, 1861-2 ; battle of Roanoke Island, February 7 and 8, 
1862 ; capture of Newbern, March 14, 1862 ; engagements on the Blackwater 
River, below Franklin, Virginia, October, 1862. 

Commissioned a| Commander, November 17, 1862 ; commanding steamer 
Ladona, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1863 ; commanding monitor Wee- 



72 COMMODORES. 

hawken, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1863; in the different actions 
with Forts Sumter, Wagner, Beauregard, etc., from July 10 to September 15, 
1863 ; commanding monitor Saugas, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864- 
5 ; engaged Howlett's Battery on James River, June 21, and again December 5, 
1864 ; took part in bombardment of Fort Fisher, December 25, 1864, and the 
different engagements until its capture, January 15, 1865 ; special duty, New 
York, 1866 ; Fleet-Captain, South Pacific Squadron, 1866-7. 

Commissioned as Captain, 1869 ; commanding iron-clad Dictator, North Atlan- 
tic Squadron, 1870-1 ; Inspector of Ordnance, Philadelphia, 1871-2 ; command- 
ing Hartford (second-rate), flag-ship Asiatic Squadron, 1872-3 ; commanding 
Richmond (second-rate), S. Pacific Squadron, 1874-5. 

Commissioned as Commodore, February 4, 1875 ; member Board of Examiners, 
1875-6 ; Commandant Navy Yard, Mare Island, California, 1877-8. 



COMMODORE CHARLES H. BALDWIN, 

Born in New York, September 3, 1822. Appointed from New York, April 24, 
1839 ; attached to frigate Brandy wine, Mediterranean Squadron, 1839-40 ; sloop 
Fairfield, Mediterranean Squadron, 1840-3 ; sloop Vandalia, 1843-4 ; Naval 
School, Philadelphia, 1844-5. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, July 2, 1845 ; frigate Congress, Pacific 
Squadron, 1845-9; War with Mexico: operations in the neighborhood of Maza- 
tlan during the time that place was in possession of the United States naval forces, 
from November, 1847, to June, 1848 ; two engagements with the enemy. 

Commissioned as LiexUenant, November, 1853 ; resigned, February 28, 1854 ; 
re-entered the service as Lieutenant, 1861 ; commanded steamer Clifton at the 
passage of Forts Jackson and St. Philip, and capture of New Orleans, also at 
first attack on Vicksburg, 1862. 

Commissioned as Commander, November 18, 1862 ; commanding steamer 
Yanderbilt; special service, 1863-4; ordnance duty. Mare Island Navy Yard, 
California, 1864-7 ; Fleet-Captain, North Pacific Squadron, 1868-9. 

Commissioned as Captain, 1869 ; Inspector of Ordnance, Mare Island, Cali- 
fornia, 1869-71 ; commanding Colorado, Asiatic Squadron, 1871-3 ; commanding 
Naval rendezvous, San Francisco, 1873. 

Commissioned as Commodore, August 8, 1876 ; member Board of Examiners, 
1876-8. 



COMMODORE ROBERT W. SHUFELDT, 

Born in New York. Appointed 3HdsMpman from New York, May 11, 1839; 
first cruise in the frigate United States, Pacific Squadron, 1839-41 ; in brig 
Bainbridge, Home Squadron, 1842-4; at Naval School, Philadelphia, 1844-5. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, July 2, 1845 ; on the Coast Survey in 1845 
-6 ; in frigate United States, Mediterranean Squadron, 1846-7, and sloop Marion, 
same squadron, 1847-8 ; in mail-steamer Atlantic, 1849-50. 

Promoted to Master, February 21, 1853. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, 1854; resigned, June 20, 1854. (While out of 
the Navy he was active in the organization of the steam commercial marine of 
New York. Served two years in the Collins line of Liverpool steamers, as Chief 
Officer ; superintended the building of and commanded the steamers Black War- 
rior and Cahawba, between New York and New Orleans ; was engaged for a year 
in the effort to open a transit across the Isthmus of Tehuantepec. At the com- 



COMMODORES. 73 

mencement of the war, was commanding the steamer Quaker City, between New 
York and Havana, when he was appointed Consul-General to Cuba by President 
Lincoln ; served in that office for two years, under difficult and trying circum- 
stances, with the entire approbation of the government. He resigned in April, 
1863, and accepted a commission of Commander in the Navy, previously tendered.) 

Reinstated and received commission as CowtmomcZer, dated November 19, 1862. 
In May, 1863, commanded steamer Conemaugh, South Atlantic Blockading 
Squadron ; was present and participated in the capture of Morris Island, and in 
several of the attacks upon Fort Wagner. Commanding steamer Boteus, East 
Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1863-5 ; commanding steam-sloop Hartford, flag-ship 
East India Squadron, 1865-6; commanding steam-sloop Wachusett, Asiatic 
Squadron, 1866-8 ; commanding Naval rendezvous. New York, 1868-9. 

Commissioned as Captain, December 31, 1869; commanding monitor Mian- 
tonomah, 1870; commanding T. and N. Surveying Expedition, 1870-1 ; com- 
manding Wabash, flag-ship European Squadron, 1871-2 ; Navy Yard, New York, 
1872—4; Chief of Bureau Equipment and Recruiting, from February 1, 1875, to 
present time. 

Commissioned as Commodore, September 21, 1876. 



COMMODORE ALEXANDER COLDEN RHIND, 

Born in New York. Appointed from Alabama, September 3, 1838 ; attached 
to line-of-battle ship Ohio and sloop Cyane, Mediterranean, 1839-41; sloop 
Warren, West Indies, 1842-3; frigate Macedonian, coast of Africa, 1843-4; 
Naval School, Philadelphia, 1844-5. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, July 2, 1845 ; brig Washington, Coast 
Survey, 1845-6 ; Home Squadron, coast of Mexico, until end of the war ; present 
at Alvarado and Tobasco ; steamer Water Witch, Home Squadron, 1848 ; Coast 
Survey, schooner Ewing, to California, 1849-50 ; sloop St. Mary's, East Indies, 
1850-1 ; Coast Survey, 1851-4. 

Promoted to Master, April 30, 1853. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, February 17, 1854; sloop John Adams, Pacific 
Squadron, 1855 ; sloop Constellation, coast of Africa, 1859-61 ; commanding 
steam-gunboat Crusader, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862 ; participated 
in various small afiairs at North Edisto ; shore fight at Seabrook's Plantation, 
South Carolina, the crew of the Crusader defeating a rebel mounted force ; capture 
and destruction of rebel works commanding South Edisto, Dawho, and Pon-Pon 
Rivers, for which he received the thanks of the Department. 

Commissioned as Lie^itenant- Commander, July 16, 1862 ; commanding steamer 
Seneca, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862 ; commanding iron-clad steamer 
Keokuk, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862-3; commanding her in the 
attack on defences of Charleston, April 17, 1863. In this engagement the 
Keokuk was struck ninety times in thirty minutes ; nineteen shots pierced her 
through, at and just below the water-line. Finding it impossible to keep his 
vessel afloat under such an extraordinary fire. Commander Rhind withdrew from 
action. Being in smooth water he managed to keep her afloat during the night, 
although the water was pouring into her in many places, but at 7.30 a.m. on the 
following morning, she went down ; the officers and crew were saved, but lost all 
their efi'ects. 

Commissioned as Commander, January 2, 1863; commanded steamer Paul 
Jones, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1863, and took part in various en- 
gagements with Fort Wagner and other defences of Charleston ; commanded 



74 COMMODORES. 

steam-frigate Wabash, flag-ship South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1863 ; com- 
manding steam-gunboat Agawam, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5, 
and on duty in James River from May to October, 1864. Engagement with 
rebel batteries at Deep Bottom, August 13, 1864. Rear-Admiral Lee, in his 
report of this affair, thus speaks of Commander Rhind : " I take great pleasure in 
calling the attention of the Department to the gallantry and endurance displayed by 
Commander Rhind of the Agawam, and the officers and men under his command, 
in the engagement with three rebel batteries, August 13, 1864, reported to the 
Department by Captain Smith, divisional commander on the James River." Com- 
mander Rhind received thanks of the Department in letter dated September 7, 
1864.' In December, 1864, Commander Rhind was detailed by Admiral Porter 
to command the powder-boat Louisiana, and on the night of the 23d that vessel 
was exploded within two hundred and fifty yards of Fort Fisher, the officers and 
men being taken off by the steamer Wilderness. Rear -Admiral Porter, in his 
official report to the Navy Department, says, " In conclusion, allow me to draw your 
attention to Commander Rhind and Lieutenant Preston. They engaged in the 
most perilous adventure that was, perhaps, ever undertaken. As an incentive to 
others I beg leave to recommend them for promotion. No one in the squadron 
considered that their lives would be saved, and Commander Rhind and Lieutenant 
Preston had made an arrangement to sacrifice themselves in case the vessel was 
boarded, a thing likely to happen." Commanding receiving-ship Vermont, New 
York, 1866-7 ; commanding Naval rendezvous, New York, 1868 ; Navy Yard, 
New York, 1869-70. 

Commissioned as Captain^ 1870 ; commanding "Congress (second-rate), Euro- 
pean Station, 1872-3 ; Light-House Inspector, 1876-8. 

Commissioned as Commodore^ September 30, 1876. 



COMMODORE GEORGE M. RANSOM, 

Born in Otsego County, New York, 1820. Appointed from Ohio, July 25, 1839 ; 
served in the Marion, coast of Brazil, 1839-42; in the Erie, Pacific Squadron, 
1843-4 ; Naval School, Philadelphia, 1845. 

• Promoted to Passed Midshipman, July 2, 1845 ; Naval Observatory, Wash- 
ington, 1845-6 ; served seven months on the coast of Mexico, in the war, 1847 ; 
Naval Observatory, 1847-8 ; in the Portsmouth, coast of Africa, 1848-50 ; in 
the Relief, coast of Brazil, 1851-2 ; in the Michigan, on the lakes, 1853-5. 

Warranted as Master, June 28, 1853. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, February 21, 1854 ; served in the brigs Perry 
and Dolphin, coast of Africa, 1855 ; in the Jamestown, coast of Africa, 1856-7 ; 
ordnance duty, Boston, 1857-9 ; in the Narragansett, 1860 ; and Executive of the 
Saranac, Pacific Squadron, 1861 ; commanded steam-gunboat Kinco, West Gulf 
Squadron, 1862-3. In the general engagement with the Forts Jackson and St. 
Philip, while passing them, April 24, 1862, the Kinco was set on fire by a red- 
hot shot from the former, lodging in a knee within ten feet of her open magazine 
hatch. To discover and dislodge it by use of axes, from the berth-deck, now 
filled with smoke, — to extinguish the fire and prevent a panic — that seemed im- 
minent in the trying circumstances, — was effected by the prompt presence there 
and personal intrepidity of the commander. He participated in that morning's 
destruction of the enemy's fleet above the forts, in the capture of New Orleans, 
and in all of Farragut's operations in that year, as far as Vicksburg. 

He was commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, July 16, 1862. He con- 
tributed largely to the defeat of Breckenridge's army at" Baton Rouge, August 5, 



COMMODORES. 75 

1862, by the effects of shells, which caused it ultimately to fall back suddenly in a 
demoralized condition. He was appointed by Flag-Officer Farragut, August 8, 
1862, to command a division of the West Gulf Squadron, to operate, with a flotilla 
of gunboats, between New Orleans and Baton Rouge, and to co-operate with the 
army. With a part of his flotilla, on October 1, 1862, he captured from the rebels 
fifteen hundred of beef cattle, ten miles above Donaldsonville, Louisiana. Three 
days later he had a sharp engagement with a rebel battery and guerillas, two 
miles below Donaldsonville, costing some valuable lives, while passing the cattle 
in transport steamers down to our army at New Orleans. 

Commissioned as Commander, January 2, 1863 ; commanded the Mercedita, 
West India Squadron, from April to August 24, 1863; commanded the Grand 
Gulf, North Atlantic Squadron, 1863-4; commanding the Muscoota, 1865, was 
appointed by Rear- Admiral Stribling to have general supervision of the vessels 
employed ou the blockade (twenty -three), and cruising near the blockaded ports 
in the East Gulf Squadron; commanded the Algonquin, from January 18 to 
March 21, 1866, in a trial with the Winooski, in Long Island Sound ; at League 
Island, Pennsylvania, as Executive, 1867-9. 

Commissioned as Captain, March 2, 1870 ; commanded the iron-clad Terror, 
North Atlantic Fleet, 1870 ;' at New York Navy Yard, as Executive, 1871-3 ; 
commanded the Colorado, North Atlantic Squadron, from December 1, 1873, to 
June 19, 1875 ; commanded the Franklin, from December 9, 1876, to March 2, 
1877, on special service. 

Commissioned as Commodore, March 28, 1877. Sea service, twenty-one years 
and eleven months ; shore and other duty, eleven years and three months. 



COMMODORE WILLIAM F. SPICER, 

Born in the city of New York. Appointed Midshipman, June 21, 1839 ; or- 
dered to Dolphin, August, 1839, for service west coast of Africa ; detached from 
Dolphin, July, 1840 ; ordered to receiving-ship North Carolina, December, 1840 ; 
detached from same, July, 1841 ; service in North and South Pacific in various 
vessels during the time from August, 1841, to 1844 ; Naval School, Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania, from September, 1844, to June, 1845. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, July 2, 1845 ; Dolphin, west coast of Africa, 
from 1845 to 1847 ; receiving-ship North Carolina, February, 1848, to Septem- 
ber, 1849 ; Nautilus, Coast Survey, from May to December, 1850 ; Saranac and 
Vixen, Gulf Squadron, from December, 1850, to June, 1852; Cumberland and 
Levant, Mediterranean Squadron, from September, 1852, to February, 1855. 

Promoted to Master, June 28, 1853. 

Promoted to Lieutenant, February 25, 1854 ; served again in same squadron, 
from October, 1856, to August, 1858 ; Boston Yard, from September, 1858, to 
May, 1860 ; Niagara, China and Japan and blockade, from May, 1860, to August, 
1862. 

Promoted to Lieutenant- Commander, July 16, 1862; Navy Yard, Boston, 
from October, 1862, to February, 1863. 

Promoted to Commander, January 2, 1863 ; Cambridge, Quaker City, North 
Atlantic Blockading Squadron, from April, 1863, to May, 1865 ; action at Fort 
Fisher, December 25-27 ; special duty Portsmouth Navy Yard, October, 1865 ; 
Chicopee, Gulf Squadron, from December 11, 1865, to December 18, 1866 ; Da- 
cotah, South Pacific, from June, 1867, to July, 1869 ; equipment duty, Boston 
Navy Yard, from September, 1869, to September, 1872. 

Promoted to Captain, April 22, 1870 ; monitor Terror, Gulf Squadron, from 



76 COMMODORES. 

January, 1873, to July, 1873 ; monitor Dictator, Gulf Squadron, from January, 
1874, to February, 1875 ; to command of rendezvous, Boston, from March, 1875, 
to July, 1876. 

Promoted to Commodore, April 23, 1877. 



Retired after Forty-five Years' Service, or on attaining the Age of Sixty-two 
Years, in Conformity with Act of Congress. 



COMMODORE JOSEPH B. HULL, 

Born in Westchester, New York. Appointed Midshipman from Connecticut, 
November 9, 1813, and ordered to Navy Yard, Portsmouth, New Hampshire ; 
joined the frigate Congress, and went to Holland and the Mediterranean, 1815, 
i-eturning in Commodore Bainbridge's Squadron ; in the Washington, 74, in the 
Mediterranean, 1816-7 ; transferred to the frigate United States in 1818, and re- 
turned in her to Norfolk in the summer of 1819 ; in 1820, attached to the Boston 
Navy Yard ; in the Franklin, 74, Pacific Squadron, 1823, as Passed Midshipman ; 
in 1824, ordered to schooner Dolphin as Acting Lieutenant ; rejoined the Franklin 
and returned home in her in 1825. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, January 13, 1825 ; in frigate Constellation, West 
Indies, in 1827 ; ordered to sloop John Adams, 1828, and returned home ; in 
frigate Gruerriere, Pacific Squadron, 1829-31 ; attached to Washington Navy Yard, 
1831-3; in frigate Potomac, Mediterranean Squadron, 1834-7; attached to 
receiving-ship at Boston, from fall of 1839 to September 8, 1841. 

Commissioned as Commander, September 8, 1841 ; in command of sloop War- 
ren, Pacific, 1843-6 to October, 1847, returning via Panama. While in com- 
mand of the Warren, off Mazatlan, sent in a boat expedition under Lieutenant 
Radford (now Rear- Admiral), to cut out the Mexican gun-brig Malekadhel, which 
was successfully done ; was in command of the Northern District of California for 
a short period before the close of the Mexican War ; commanding Naval rendez- 
vous, Philadelphia, from November, 1849, to December, 1851. 

Commissioned as Captain, September 14, 1855 ; in command of frigate St. 
Lawrence, Brazil Squadron and Paraguay Expedition, 1856-9, returning in May ; 
in command of the Savannah, coast blockade, from June to September, 1861. 

Commissioned as Commodore, July 16, 1862; superintending the building of 
gunboats at St. Louis, from June, 1862, until 1864, when he was transferred to 
Pittsburgh ; in command of Navy Yard, Philadelphia, from November 10, 1864, 
to January 1, 1866 ; President of Examining Board at Philadelphia, from December 
3, 1866, to July 8, 1867 ; Light-House Inspector for the First District, with head- 
quarters at Portland, 1869-73. Total sea-service (1878), twenty-two years three 
months ; shore and other duty, seventeen years six months. 



COMMODORE CHARLES LOWNDES, 

Born in Maryland. Appointed from Maryland, March 28, 1815. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, January 13, 1825; sloop Falmouth, West India 
Squadron, 1829-30 ; sloop Ontario, Brazil Squadron, 1834. 

Commissioned as Commander, September 8, 1841 ; commanding sloop German- 
town, Home Squadron, 1850 ; commanding rendezvous, Baltimore, 1852. 



COMMODORES. *11 

Commissioned as Captain, September 14, 1855 ; commanding steam-sloop 
Hartford, East India Squadron, 1860-1. 

Commissioned as Commodore, July 16, 1862 ; Prize Commissioner at Baltimore, 
1864-5. 

COMMODORE JOHN MARSTON, 

Born February 26, 1796. Entered the Navy as Midshipman, April 15, 1813 ; 
served on board the frigate President, Commodore John Rodgers ; Washington, 
74, Commodore Isaac Chauncey ; frigate Java, Commodore 0. H. Perry ; brig 
Prometheus, Captain Alexander S. Wadsworth ; brig Prometheus, Captain ^Villiam 
Bolton Finch ; frigate Constellation, Commodore Charles Morris ; frigate Constitu- 
tion, Commodore Jacob Jones ; frigate Congress, Commodore James Biddle ; 
frigate Brandywine, Commodore Charles Morris, when she took La Fayette to 
France, and afterwards in the Mediterranean ; frigate Brandywine, Commodore 
Jacob Jones, in the Pacific Ocean ; schooner Dolphin, Captain John H. Aulick ; 
sloop Vandalia, Commodore John D. Henley ; frigate United States, Commodore 
Lawrence Kearney ; frigate Potomac, Captain George W. Storer ; sloop Yorktown ; 
sloop Cumberland, at the bombardment of Hatteras ; steam-frigate Roanoke, — 
commanded at Hampton Roads in that ship when the Merrimac came down from 
Norfolk, Virginia ; in addition to this, a variety of service performed at the 
Portsmouth and Philadelphia Navy Yards. 

Promoted from a Midshipman, July 13, 1825, to a Lieutenant. 

Promoted from a Lieutenant to a Commander, September 8, 1841. 

Promoted from a Commander to a Captain, September 14, 1855. 

Promoted from a Captain to a Commodore, July 16, 1862. 



COMMODORE HENRY EAGLE, 

Born in New York. Appointed Midshipman from that State, January 1, 1818. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, March 3, 1827 ; in sloop Natchez, West Indies, 
1827; frigate Hudson, Brazil, 1829-31; receiving-ship, at New York, 1833-4; 
sloop Erie, Brazil, 1835-7 ; rendezvous, New York, 1840 ; sloop Yorktown, Pa- 
cific, 1841-2 ; commanding schooner Shark, Pacific, 1843-4. 

Commissioned as Commander, June 4, 1844 ; superintended the construction 
of Stevens' iron ship, Hoboken, New Jersey, for three years, to 1846 ; Inspector, 
etc., at New York, 1846 ; commanding bomb-vessel ^tna, and a division of the 
squadron of five vessels, during the Mexican War ; stationed at Tobasco, also Civil 
and Military Governor of the Province, and Collector of the Port, 1847-8 ; special 
service, 1851 ; commanding steamer Princeton, Home Squadron, 1854-5. 

Commissioned as Captain, September 14, 1855 ; volunteered for the command 
of gunboat Monticello in April, 1861, and was in command of her during the 
attack on Sewell's Point Battery, Virginia, May 19, 1861 ; commanding frigate 
Santee, Gulf Squadron, 1861-2. The boats of the Santee captured the privateer 
Royal Yacht, Galveston harbor. 

Commissioned as Commodore, July 16, 1862 ; Prize Commissioner, New York, 
1864—5 ; Light-House Inspector, 1865-6. Total sea service, eighteen years 
seven months ; shore or other duty, eleven years seven months. 



78 COMMODORES. 

COMMODORE HUGH Y. PURVIANCE, 

Born in Maryland. Appointed from Maryland, November 3, 1818; frigate 
Congress, 1819-21, and Franklin, 74, 1821-4, Pacific Squadron; North Carolina, 
74, Mediterranean Squadron, 1824-7. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant^ March 3, 1827 ; sloop Falmouth, West India 
Squadron, 1828-30 ; sloop Peacock, East India Squadron, 1833-4 ; rendezvous, 
Baltimore, 1836-7 ; Brazil Squadron, 1837-8, commanding brig Dolphin and 
sloop Fairfield ; relieved an American schooner from the French blockade at 
Salado, River Platte ; rendezvous, Baltimore, 1839-40 ; Brandy wine, Mediterra- 
nean Squadron, 1841-2 ; rendezvous, Baltimore, 1843 ; commanding brig Pioneer, 
coast of Africa, 1843 ; frigate Constitution, Mexican blockade, 1846. 

Commissioned as Commander, March 7, 1849 ; receiving-ship Consort, Balti- 
more, 1850-1 ; commanding sloop Marion, coast of Africa, 1852-5. 

Commissioned as Cajytain, January 28, 1856 ; commanded frigate St. Lawrence 
on the blockade ofi" Charleston and southern coast, 1861 ; sunk the Confederate 
privateer Petrel ofi" Charleston when just twelve hours out; captured several prizes ; 
participated in the fight of the Merrimac, gunboats, and batteries ofi" Sewell's Point, 
Hampton Roads. 

Commissioned as Commodore, July 16, 1862 ; Light-House Inspector, 1863-5. 
Received a vote of thanks of Maryland Legislature. 



COMMODORE ROBERT B. HITCHCOCK, 

Born in Connecticut. Appointed from Connecticut, January 1, 1825 ; schooner 
Shark, West India Squadron, 1827 ; frigate Delaware, Mediterranean Squadron, 
1829-31. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 4, 1831 ; special duty, 1833-4. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, March 3, 1835 ; special duty, 1837 ; frigate Ohio, 
Mediterranean Squadron, 1840 ; rendezvous, Boston, 1843 ; frigate Savannah, 
Pacific Squadron, 1845-6 ; ordnance duty, 1850-2 ; commanding store-ship 
Relief, 1853; Inspector, etc., Boston, 1854-5. 

Commissioned as Commander, September 14, 1855 ; ordnance duty, 1856-7 ; 
commanding steam-frigate Merrimac, Pacific Squadron, 1858-60 ; Inspector of 
Ordnance, 1861. 

Commissioned as Captain, 1861. 

Commissioned as Commodore, July 16, 1862 ; commanding steam-sloop Sus- 
quehanna, Western Gulf Squadron, 1862-3. During the greater portion of the 
time Commodore Hitchcock was attached to the Western Gulf Squadron he was 
the senior-ofiicer of the blockading fleet ofi" Mobile. Ordnance duty, 1864-5 ; 
Commandant Navy Yard, Norfolk, 1866 ; special duty, 1870-3. 



COMMODORE TIMOTHY A. HUNT, 

Born in Connecticut. Appointed from Connecticut, February 1, 1825 ; sloop 
Vincennes, Pacific Squadron, 1827 ; sloop Warren, Mediterranean Squadron, 
1829 ; sloop Vincennes, Pacific Squadron, 1830. 

Promoted to Passed 3fidship7nan, June 4, 1831 ; frigate Delaware, Mediter- 
ranean Squadron, 1833—4. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, December 17, 1836 ; receiving-ship, Boston, 
1840 ; receiving-ship, New York, 1843; frigate Brandywine, East India Squadron, 



COMMODORES. 79 

1845 ; commanding ordnance-transport Electra, 1847-8 ; Navy Yard, Boston, 
1850; frigate Columbia, Home Squadron, 1853-5. 

Commissioned as Commander, September 14, 1855 ; ordnance duty, 1856-9 ; 
commanding steam-sloop Narragansett, Pacific Squadron, 1860-1. 

Commissioned as Captain, July 16, 1862. 

Commissioned as Compiodore, January 2, 1863 ; ordnance duty, Boston, 1862 
-7; special duty, New London, Connecticut, 1869-71. 



COMMODORE JOHN M. BERRIEN, 

October 4, 1825, ordered to join the frigate Constellation, Captain M. T. Wool- 
sey, at Norfolk, Virginia, as Midshipman; joins the West India Station; ship 
cruises on the south side of Cuba; December 21, at night, "runs ashore" on the 
Isle of Pines, where she remains thumping for eleven hours ; gets oif finally by 
starting water, and throwing overboard a quantity of shot and provisions ; Janu- 
ary, 1826, ship visits Matanzas ; serves in boat expedition fitted out by tlie frigate 
to search among the "Keys" for pirates; June, 1827, is transferred from the 
Constellation to the sloop-of-war John Adams, Lieutenant Commanding E. R. 
Shubreck ; ship visits Key West and Matanzas ; the yellow fever makes its ap- 
pearance on board, and the John Adams returns to Norfolk, Virginia, October 16; 
May, 1828, is ordered to the Recruiting rendezvous at Carlisle, Pennsylvania, 
Captain J. D. Elliott in charge; October 19, is ordered to the frigate Gruerriere, 
Commodore C. B. Thompson, at Norfolk, Virginia; February 13, 1829, sails for 
Pacific Ocean ; June 10, in the harbor of Callao, Peru, is transferred from the 
Guerriere to the frigate Brandywine, Commodore Jacob Jones, for the purpose of 
returning to the United States to prepare for and to meet his examination ; Bran- 
dywine arrives at New York, October 8 ; March, 1831, is ordered to attend exam- 
ination at Norfolk, Virginia ; in May, passes examination, and in July receives a 
warrant as Passed Midshipman, dated June 4, 1831 ; November 25, is ordered as 
Acting Sailing-Master of the schooner Shark, of twelve guns. Lieutenant Com- 
manding Boerum, at Norfolk, Virginia ; sails for the West India Station, where 
he served until 1834; February 23, 1835, is ordered to the frigate Constitution, 
Commodore J. D. Elliott, as Acting Second Master ; ship sails for France, takes 
on board Minister Livingston and family at Havre, and sails for New York ; puts 
into Plymouth, England, on account of bad weather, where the ship attracts much 
attention as having borne a conspicuous part in the War of 1812 ; coming out 
of the English channel, vessel is near being lost on the rocks of Scilly, and only 
escapes by dint of carrying sail ; June 23, arrives at New York ; in August is 
detached from Constitution ; June, 1836, is ordered to the receiving-ship at Nor- 
folk, as Passed Midshipman. 

March, 1837, received commission as Lieutenant, to take rank as such from 
February 9, 1837 ; is detached from the receiving-ship at Norfolk in April, but 
rejoins that vessel in July ; August, 1838, receives orders to join the West India 
Squadron, and joins the sloop-of-war Natchez, Commander Benj. Page, at Pensa- 
cola ; October 18, ship sails for Havana and the Windward Islands ; visits St. 
Thomas and St. Barts ; July, 1837, arrives at New York in the Natchez; served 
most of 1840 in the Delaware, 74, which vessel had been fitted up at Norfolk as 
a school-ship for the instruction of boys, naval apprentices ; in November, is 
ordered to the sloop of-war Dale, Commander Charles Gaunt, at Norfolk ; sails for 
the Pacific in company with the sloop-of-war Yorktown, Commander Aulick ; 
ships part company in a gale in the Gulf Stream, and after twelve days' separation 
meet at a preconcerted point in mid-ocean, both vessels " heaving to" on the same 



80 COMMODORES. 

night within a mile and a half of each other; this little matter is only mentioned 
to show the accuracy of chronometers; March, 1841, the Dale doubles Cape 
Horn; is twenty -six days off the Cape; anchors in Valparaiso, April 4; ship 
visits Callao, Santa, Paita, Putia, Guayaquil, and Lambeyeque ; in 1842, Com- 
mander Dornin assumes command of the Dale ; ship visits Coquimbo, Arica, Islay, 
Panama, San Francisco, and Monterey, California ; in 1843, ship visits Mazatian 
and Guaymas, Mexico ; returns to Valparaiso in July, takes on board the remains 
of Commodore Claxton, sails for the United States, and reaches Philadelphia 
October 20 ; September, 1844, is ordered to the frigate Potomac, flag-ship of 
Commodore Connor, at Philadelphia ; sails for the West India Station, via Nor- 
folk ; ship visits Kingston, Jamaica; in 1845, ship visits Port au Prince and 
Havana ; passes much time off Vera Cruz ; springs a leak and returns to Norfolk 
in December ; October, 1846, is ordered to the receiving-ship at New York ; Feb- 
ruary 17, 1847, is ordered to the steamer Scorpion, Commander Bigelow, at New 
York ; joins the squadron under Commodore M. C. Perry, off Vera Cruz ; May 
19, is ordered to the schooner Bonito ; is present, in command of the Bonito, at 
the capture of the city of Tobasco, Mexico; June 16, vessel cruises on the coast 
of Mexico and captures trading vessels Gavilan and Montezuma ; January, 1848, 
is detached from schooner Bonito, and returns to United States ; November 9, 1849, 
is ordered to the receiving-ship at Boston ; in 1850, attached to receiving-ship at 
Boston ; is ordered, March 13, 1853, to the frigate Savannah, flag-ship of Com- 
modore Salter, at Norfolk ; sails for the coast of Brazil as Executive-Officer of the 
ship ; attached to the Savannah, 1854-5. 

March 13, 1856, receives a commission as Commander^ to take rank as such 
from September 14, 1855 ; returns to the United States in merchant vessel, April 
23 ; August 14, 1857, is ordered to Navy Yard at Portsmouth, New Hampshire ; 
attached to Navy Yard, Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 1858-9 ; is ordered to pro- 
ceed, February 11, 1860, to Hong-Kong, China, via San Francisco, and report 
for command of the sloop-of-war John Adams ; crosses the Pacific Ocean in a 
merchant vessel, and reaches Hong-Kong in seventy-three days from New York ; 
joins the John Adams at Foo Chow, June 14 ; June 26, collision at Foo Chow 
between the Cantonese and Chinchew-men ; lands the ship's howitzer, with a party 
of eighty seamen and marines, for the protection of the foreign residents ; receives 
a vote of thanks from the Board of Foreign Consuls; in 1861, ship visits Hong- 
Kong, Manila, Bangkok, Singapore, and Swatow ; at Bangkok receives on board 
royal letter and presents from His Majesty the King of Siam to His Excellency 
the President of the United States ; ship sails from Hong-Kong (against monsoon), 
July 7, bound to New York ; touches at Batavia for supplies, and passes the 
Straits of Sunda September 26 ; anchors at St. Helena November 20 ; January 
11, 1862, arrives at New York; February 28, is ordered to Pittsburgh, Pennsyl- 
vania, as Assistant Inspector of Ordnance at the Fort Pitt works. 

In August, receives an appointment as Captain^ to date as such from July 16 ; 
in September, 1864, detached from ordnance duty and ordered to the iron-clad 
Mouadnock, at Boston ; joined that vessel October 7 ; left for Hampton Roads, 
and joined the squadron under Admiral Porter, in those waters ; Monadnoek is 
ordered to New York on special service ; returns again to Hampton Beads ; 
November 16, detached from the Monadnoek and ordered to the Norfolk Navy 
Yard; October 31, 1865, detached from Norfolk Navy Yard and ordered to the 
Fifth Light-House District. 

September 26, 1866, commissioned as Commodore; December 28, placed on 
the retired list; in 1867, on light-house duty. Fifth District; October 7, 1868, 
detached from light-house duty. 



COMMODORES. 81 

COMMODORE SIMON B. BISSELL, 

Born in Vermont. Appointed 3IidsMpman from New Hampshire, November 
6, 182-i ; sloop-of-war Vincennes, Pacific Squadron, 1826-9 ; Pensacola Navy 
Yard, 1830. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 4, 1831 ; frigate United States, Medi- 
terranean Squadron, 1833-4 ; frigate Delaware, same squadron, 1835-6 ; receiving- 
ship at Boston, 1837. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, December 9, 1837 ; steamship Fulton, Atlantic 
coast, 1840 ; steamer Missouri, Home Squadron, 1843 ; sloop Albany, Home 
Squadron, during the war with Mexico ; present at the siege of Vera Cruz ; 
stationed at the Naval Battery ; unemployed from 1848-58. 

Commissioned as Commander, September 14, 1855 ; commanding receiving- 
ship. Mare Island, California, 1860 ; commanding sloop Cyane, Pacific Squadron, 
1861-2. 

Commissioned as Captain, July 16, 1862 ; Navy Yard, Mare Island, California, 
1863^. 

Commissioned as Commodore, October 10, 1866 ; commanding sloop-of-war 
Mouongahela, North Atlantic Squadron, 1866-7 ; special service, 1869-72. 



COMMODORE CICERO PRICE, 

Born in Kentucky. Appointed Midshipman from that State, February 1, 1826 ; 
frigate Macedonian, Brazil, 1826-8 ; sloops Erie and Shark, West Indies, parts of 
1829-31. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, April 28, 1832 ; brig Boxer, 1834-7, and 
North Carolina, 1837-8, Pacific Squadron. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, September 6, 1837 ; steamer Fulton, Atlantic 
coast, 1840 ; in Delaware, 74, Brazil and Mediterranean, 1841-3 and part of 
1844; receiving-ship at New York, 1845; sloop Marion, coast of Africa, 1846; 
sloop Marion, Mediterranean, 1848-9 ; Navy Yard, Memphis, 1850 ; Pacific 
Squadron, 1851 ; ordnance duty, 1853; receiving-ship at Norfolk, 1854. 

Commissioned as Commander, September 14, 1855 ; First Lieutenant of sloop 
Constellation, Mediterranean, parts of 1855-6 ; commanding steamer Huntsville, 
Grulf Blockading Squadron, 1861. 

Commissioned as Captain, July 16, 1862 ; commanding sloop Jamestown, East 
Indies, 1862-5. 

Commissioned as Commodore, September 28, 1866. Total sea service, twenty- 
one years and one month ; shore or other duty, six years and one month. Resi- 
dence, Troy, New York. 

COMMODORE LOUIS C. SARTORI, 

Born in New Jersey. Appointed from New Jersey, February 2, 1829 ; attached 
to ship Warren and schooner Enterprise, Brazil Station, 1831-3; frigate Constel- 
lation, Mediterranean Squadron, 1834; frigate Constellation, West Indies, 1835;. 
ship Natchez, West Indies, 1836-7. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 14, 1837 ; Navy Yard, Philadelphia,. 
1838 ; frigate Constitution, Pacific Squadron, 1839-41. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, September 8, 1841 ; receiving-ship North Caro- 
lina, New York, 1842; receiving-ship, Philadelphia, 1843; ship Plymouth, 
Mediterranean and Brazil Squadron, 1845-6 ; bomb-schooner Stromboli, Mexicaa 



82 COMMODORES. 

War, 1847-8; at the capture of Tobasco ; Mediterranean Squadron, 1849-52; 
on board steamer Alleghany, frigates Constitution and Independence ; receiving- 
ship Pennsylvania, Norfolk, 1853 ; Naval Asylum, Philadelphia, 1853-4 ; ship 
John Adams, Pacific Squadron, 1855-6 ; commanded expedition and engage- 
ment against the Fejees, 1855 ; Navy Yard, Philadelphia, 1857-8 ; commanding 
steamer Water Witch, West Indies, 1859-60. 

Commissioned as Commander, April 7, 1861 ; commanding steamer Flag, 
Blockading Squadron, 1861 ; commanding receiving-ship Ohio, Boston, 1862 ; 
commanding steamer Florida, North Atlantic Squadron, 1862 ; commanding ship 
Portsmouth, West Gulf Squadron, 1863-5 ; commanding steamer Agawan, North 
Atlantic Squadron, 1866. 

Commissioned as Captain, September 26, 1866 ; commanding steamer Ossipee, 
Pacific Squadron, 1868-9 ; commanding steamer Saranac and Lackawanna, 1870; 
commanding Naval rendezvous, San Francisco, 1871-2. 

Commissioned as Commodore, December 12, 1873 ; retired, June, 1874. 



COMMODORE WILLIAM RONCKENDORFF, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania, February 17, 1832 ; 
attached to the schooner Experiment, on the coast, and transferred to the schooner 
Porpoise, West India Squadron, 1832-3 ; frigate Constitution and sloop John 
Adams, Mediterranean Squadron, 1835-7. 

Promoted to Passed 3Iidshipman, June 23, 1838 ; brig Consort, Coast Survey, 
1839-41 ; sloop Preble, Mediterranean Squadron, 1842-3. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, June 18, 1843 ; frigate Congress, Brazil Squadron, 
1843-5 ; 1845, bearer of despatches, by the way of the Isthmus of Panama, to 
the Commander-in-Chief of the Pacific Squadron, and served in that squadron 
during the Mexican War, returning to New York from that station, in the frigate 
Savannah, September, 1847 ; sloop Portsmouth, coast of Africa, 1849-51 ; re- 
ceiving-ship, New York, 1852 ; frigate Cumberland, Mediterranean Squadron, 
1852-5 ; Navy Yard, Philadelphia, 1855-8 ; commanding steamer M. W. 
Chapin, Brazil Squadron and Paraguay Expedition, 1859 ; attached to Coast 
Survey, 1860. 

Commissioned as Commander, June 29, 1861; on February 28, 1861, Com- 
mander Ronckendorfif was ordered to take command of the steamer Water Witch, 
and proceed to the Grulf Squadron, on special service, until October 12, 1861, at 
which date he was detached and ordered to proceed North as bearer of important 
despatches to the Hon. Secretary of the Navy, from Flag-Officer McKean ; 
December 27, 1861, ordered to the steam-sloop San Jacinto, and on March 4, 
1862, ordered to proceed with that vessel in search of the ship-of-the-line Ver- 
mont, supposed to be on George's Shoals; March 8, returned to Boston Navy Yard, 
and on the following day ordered to proceed to Hampton Roads with the San Ja- 
cinto, with greatest despatch, and report to the senior-officer present, to watch and 
iittack, if necessary, the Confederate steamer Mei-rimac ; May 15, 1862, partici- 
pated in the attack on the fortifications on Sewell's Point; May 18, 1862, pro- 
ceeded to Norfolk with the San Jacinto ; May 23, 1862, sailed from Hampton 
Roads to Key West with Flag-Officer Lardner on board; August 1, 1862, re- 
turned North with the San Jacinto, by order of Flag-Officer, — having yellow fever 
on board ; September 29, 1862, ordered to join the North Atlantic Squadron 
with the San Jacinto, and to proceed off Wilmington, North Carolina, — block- 
ading, October 9, 1862; ordered to return from Wilmington with the San Jacinto 
to Hampton Roads ; October 26, 1862, ordered to proceed in the San Jacinto to 



COMMODORES. 83 

Bermuda and cruise among the West India Islands in search of the rebel steamer 
Alabama; May 26, 1863, detached from the San Jacinto, and reported for the 
command of the steam-sloop Ticonderoga, May 28, 1863 ; ordered to the West 
Indies, in the Ticonderoga, as flag-ship of that squadron, under Rear-Admiral 
Lardner, to look after the rebel cruisers ; September 28, 1863, ordered to Phila- 
delphia in the Ticonderoga, for repairs; October 16, 1863, detached from the 
Ticonderoga and ordered to the command of the frigate Powhatan, and to proceed 
to the West Indies as flag-ship of that squadron; October 14, 1864, detached 
from the command of the Powhatan, — she having returned home; October 18, 

1864, ordered to report to Rear-Admiral Gregory, at New York, for special duty ; 
was ordered West on a Court of Inquiry, held at Erie, Chicago, Cincinnati, Louis- 
ville, Kentucky, and then returned to Philadelphia; February 15, 1865, ordered 
to command the iron-clad Monadnock, up the James River, — was there until the 
evacuation of Richmond, — came down the river and anchored ofi" Fortress Monroe 
to look out for the Stonewall ; in May, sailed in the Monadnock, in a squadron 
commanded by Admiral Godon, to Havana, in search of the Stonewall ; July 9, 

1865, transferred from the iron-clad Monadnock to the iron-clad Tonawanda, and, 
after a short cruise in her, was detached, she being laid up, and ordered to com- 
mand the receiving-ship at Philadelphia, January 1, 1866; Commander Roncken- 
dorff" was actively employed during the whole period of the Rebellion ; in charge of 
iron-clads. New Orleans, 1871-2. 

Commissioned as Commodore, 1873; retired, 1874. 



COMMODORE ALBERT G. CLARY, 

Born in Massachusetts. Appointed from IMassachusetts, May 8, 1832 ; attached 
to sloop Vincennes, Pacific Squadron, 1834-6 ; Naval School, New York, 1837. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, July 8, 1839 ; sloop Marion, Brazil Squad- 
ron, 1839-42; receiving-ship, Boston, 1843-5. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, April 11, 1845; sloop Preble, Home Squadron, 
during the war with Mexico, at Tuspan and Tobasco ; sloop Preble, Pacific Squad- 
ron, 1847-50 ; receiving-ship, Boston, 1852 ; sloop Marion, coast of Africa, 1853 ; 
frigate Constitution, coast of Afiica, 1854-5 ; Navy Yard, Portsmouth, New 
Hampshire, 1856-7; steam-frigate Minnesota, East India Squadron, 1858-9; 
steam-frigate Colorado, 1861 ; commanding steamer Anacostia, Potomac Flotilla, 
1861 ; engagement at Acquia Creek, May 31 and June 1, 1861 ; battle of Port 
Royal, November 7, 1861. 

Commissioned as Commander, July 16, 1862 ; commanding steamer Mount 
Vernon, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862 ; commanding steamer Tioga, 
West India Squadron, 1863; commanding steam-sloop Dacotah, North Atlantic 
Blockading Squadron, 1864; commanding steam-sloop Seminole, West Gulf 
Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; commanding receiving-ship, Norfolk, 1866. 

Commissioned as Captain, November 21, 1866 ; commanding Dictator, 1870-2. 

Commissioned as Commodore, 1873 ; retired, 1874. 



Retired on his own Application after Forty Years Consecutive Service. 

COMMODORE CHARLES W. PICKERING, 

Born in New Hampshire, from which State he was appointed Midshipman, May 
22, 1822. In 1822-3 made his first cruise with his uncle, Captain R. T. Spen- 



g4 COMMODORES. 

cer, on board the sloop-of-war Cyane, a prize to the Constitution, under Commo- 
dore Stewart. During this cruise the Cyane was stationed on the coast of Africa, 
and lost by fever fifty of her officers and crew. On leave, 1824-6 ; Naval School, 
New York, 1827 ; in 1828, attached to sloop-of-war Erie, Captain Daniel Turner, 
West India Station ; on the return of the Erie to New York, was ordered to the 
Naval School, but by permission of the Department, was placed at a boarding- 
school in New York City, where he remained until the summer of 1831 ; from 
the summer of 1831 to February, 1834, was attached to the sloop-of-war Fal- 
mouth, Captain F. H. Gregory, Pacific Squadron. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman^ June, 1833 ; serving at Navy Yard, Boston, 
durins the years 1835-6 ; from 1837-9, attached to United States frigate Fulton, 
stationed on the United States coast. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, December 8, 1838; from 1840-2, attached to 
sloop Yorktown, Pacific Squadron ; from 1844-5, Executive-Officer of the sloop 
Preble, West India and African Squadrons ; attached to Navy Yard, Portsmouth, 
New Hampshire, 1846-7 ; in 1848-9, attached to sloop-of-war St. Mary's, Pacific 
Squadron ; commanding the sloop-of-war Warren, Pacific Squadron, during the 
years 1850-1 ; in 1854, served as Executive-Officer of the sloop Cyane, which ves- 
sel took out the Darien Expedition, under Lieutenant Strain, who lost seven of his 
men by starvation. Lieutenant Pickering in his search for that party, was within 
four hours' march of the head-waters of the Chaquenaque, the course of which 
it was his intention to follow, when he was apprised by Indian runners of the 
arrival of Lieutenant Strain and party at Chapagana, Pacific side. Lieutenant 
Pickering's observations during two successive expeditions from the ship, in search 
of Strain, convinced him of the utter folly of any attempt to cut a canal at Darien. 
After landing Lieutenant Strain with the remainder of his party at New York, the 
Cyane was ordered to Grey town, Nicaragua, which town, in pursuance of redress, 
was reduced to ashes, after a bombardment of four hours. Only one house was 
left standing. In 1855-7, attached to United States Navy Yard, Portsmouth, New 
Hampshire. 

Promoted to Commander, September 14, 1855 ; in 1859-61, Inspector of the 
Seventh Light-House District, headquarters at Key West. 

Commissioned as Captain, July 15, 1862 ; in 1862-3, commanding United 
States steam-sloop Kearsarge, Mediterranean and Western Islands ; in 1863-4, com- 
manding United States steam-sloop Housatonic, which was blown up, ofi" Charleston, 
on the night of February 17, 1865, by a submarine torpedo. As soon as recovered 
from wounds received on board the Housatonic, took command of the United States 
steamer Vanderbilt, which vessel participated in the capture of Fort Fisher. De- 
tached from Vanderbilt in August, 1865, and ordered to Portsmouth Navy Yard ; 
detached from Portsmouth Navy Yard, February, 1867, when Captain Pickering 
went upon the retired list at his own request. 

Commissioned as Commodore in 1871. 



Ret ired from Incapacity resulting from Long and Faithfd Service. 



COMMODORE CHARLES GREEN, 

Born in Connecticut. Appointed from Connecticut, May 1, 1826 ; receiving- 
ship Independence, Boston, 1826 ; sloop Erie, West India Squadron, 1827-8 ; 
sloop Peacock, West Indies, 1829-31. 

Promoted to Passed Midshijyman, April 28, 1832 ; New York Station, 1831^ ; 
frigate Brandy wine, Pacific Squadron, 1834-7. 



COMMODORES. 85 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, March 8, 1837 ; sloop Levant, West Indies, 
1838 ; receiving-ship at New York, 1839-40 ; sloop Falmouth, Home Squadron, 
1841-3 ; steamer Union, Norfolk, 1847 ; steamer Michigan, lakes, 1848-5U ; 
steamer Fulton, 1852 ; receiving-ship Ohio, Boston, 1853-5. 

Commissioned as Commander, September 14, 1855 ; New York Navy Yard, 
1857-8; Light-House Inspector, Buftklo, 1858-61. 

Commissioned as Captain, July 16, 1862 ; commanding Jamestown, 1861-2 ; 
on blockade off Savannah, Fernandina, Wilmington, North Carolina; captured 
and sent into port or destroyed six prizes ; sent the boats and destroyed the bark 
Alvarado, under guns of fort at Fernandina ; commanding receiving-ship Ohio, 
Boston, 1863-5; Light-House Inspector, Ninth District, New Orleans, 1865-7. 

Commissioned as Commodore, March 12, 1867. 



Retired from Disability proceeding from Causes not Incident to the Service. 



COMMODORE EDWARD R. THOMPSON, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed llidshipman from New Jersey, December 
1, 1826; sloop Natchez, West Indies, 1827-8; sloop Ontario, Mediterranean, 
1829-31. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, April 28, 1832. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, March 8, 1837 ; razee Independence, Brazil 
Squadron, 1837-8; sloop John Adams, East India Squadron, 1839-40; special 
service, 1843 ; steamer Princeton, 1844-5 ; brig Porpoise and frigate Potomac, 
Gulf of Mexico (during the war), 1846-7 ; Navy Yard, Philadelphia, 1848-9 ; 
sloop Germantown and brig Porpoise, coast of Africa, 1851-2 ; rendezvous, 
Philadelphia, 1854-5. 

Commissioned as Commander, September 14, 1855 ; brig Dolphin, coast of 
Africa, 1856-7 ; ordnance duty, Philadelphia, 1858-60 ; commanding steamer 
Seminole, 1860-1 ; rendezvous, New York, 1862-4 ; rendezvous, Philadelphia, 
1865. 

Commissioned as Commodore, 1866. 



COMMODORE ROBERT HANDY, 

Born in Rhode Island. Appointed from Rhode Island, February 1, 1826; 
sloop Adams, West India Squadron, 1827 ; frigate Hudson, Brazil Squadron, 
1829-30. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, April 28, 1832 ; sloop Vincennes, Pacific 
Squadron, 1832-5. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, March 8, 1837 ; frigate Brandywine, Pacific 
Squadron, 1837 ; Navy Yard, Boston, 1840 ; sloop Levant, Pacific Squadron, 
1845-6 ; receiving-ship, Boston, 1847-8 ; Navy Yard, Boston, 1850. 

Commissioned as Commander, September 14, 1855 ; Light-House Inspector, 
1858-9 ; commanding rendezvous, Boston, 1860 ; commanding sloop Dale, Pacific 
Squadron, 1862-5. 

Commissioned as Commodore, September 28, 1866. 



86 COMMODORES. 

Retired under the First Section of the Act of April 21, 1864, as not Recom- 
mended for Promotion. 



COMMODORE FRANCIS B. ELLISON, 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, May 28, 1819. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, May 17, 1828 ; schooner Porpoise, Mediterranean 
Squadron, 1827-9 ; receiving-ship, New York, 1833-4 ; Navy Yard, 1837 ; frigate 
Brandy wine, 1840; store-ship Lexington, Mediterranean Squadron, 1845; Navy 
Yard, New York, 1847-8. 

Commissioned as Commander, May 29, 1850 ; Inspector, etc., New York, 
1853-4 ; eommanding sloop Jamestown, coast of Africa, 1855. 

Commissioned as Captain, March 2, 1857. 

Commissioned as Commodore, July 16, 1862 ; Light-House Inspector, 1866-8. 



COMMODORE SAMUEL LOCKWOOD, 

Born in Connecticut. Appointed Midshipman from New York, July 12, 1820 ; 
served in the West Indies four years and nine months ; on board of the sloop 
Hornet, from March, 1821, two years and two months; frigate Congress, six 
months, 1823 ; in 1825, seven months in frigate Constellation, where he had the 
yellow fever ; sailed from Boston, 1826, in sloop Warren, for the Mediterranean, 
where she was actively engaged in ferreting out Greek pirates, for one year and 
three months ; ordered to the frigate Constitution, to return to the United States 
for examination, — three months attached to her. 

Promoted to Lieutenant in 1828 ; served on the Brazil Station, on board the 
frigate Hudson and sloop Vandalia, 1831-2, one year and six months ; sloop Fair- 
field, Pacific Station, two years and ten months, 1834-6 ; receiving-ship Hudson, 
New York, ten months, 1836-7 ; frigate Macedonian, ten months, 1837-8 ; Com- 
modore Jones' Exploring Expedition, sloop Cyane (First Lieutenant), Mediter- 
ranean, 1838-9, one year and six months ; Ohio, Commodore Hull, 1839-41, one 
year and eight months; rendezvous, Boston, 1843-4; Navy Yard, Portsmouth, 
New Hampshire, 1845-6 ; frigate Potomac (First Lieutenant), Home Squadron, 
1846-7 ; blockading Vera Cruz, in command of steamers Petrel and Scourge, 
1847-8 ; assisted in the capture of Vera Cruz, Tuspan, Tobasco, and blockaded 
Tobasco River for six months. 

Commissioned as Commander, 1850 ; rendezvous, Boston, 1853-5 ; command- 
ing sloop Cyane, Pacific Station, 1858-60, two years and three months ; command- 
ing steamer Daylight, one year and four months. North Atlantic Squadron, 
1861-2, during the Rebellion; blockaded durijog that time Wilmington and Beau- 
fort, North Carolina, York River and Newport News, and oflT Cape Henry, 
Virginia ; while at the latter station, had an engagement with a shore battery, at 
Lynnhaven Bay, — succeeded in silencing the rebel battery, and rescued a Balti- 
more ship ; while blockading Beaufort, North Carolina, Commander Lockwood, 
commanding the flotilla stationed there, assisted, with a portion of the army, in 
the capture of Fort Macon, and the terms of surrender were signed, on the part 
of the United States, by General Parks and Commander Lockwood ; and on the 
part of the rebels by Colonel White, their commander. 

Commissioned as Commodore in 1867, to rank with those of his original date ; 
on special duty, Philadelphia, 1864-5. 



COMMODORES. 87 

COMMODORE JOHN J. GLASSON, 

Born in New York City. Appointed Midshipman from New York, February 1, 
1823 ; served in the store-ship Decoy and schooner Fox, in the West India 
Squadron, fitted out by special Act of Congress for the suppression of piracy, 
which was successfully accomplished under the command of Commodore David 
Porter, 1823 ; schooner Grampus, coast of Africa and "West Indies, 1824 ; in the 
North Carolina, 74, and sloop Warren, Mediterranean, 1825-9 ; sloop Natchez, 
West Indies, 1830. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 4, 1831 ; revenue-cutter Rush, as First 
Lieutenant, U. S. R. S. New York, 1831-2 ; schooner Shark (as Master), Medi- 
terranean, 1833-4; rendezvous, New York, 1835-7. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant , February 9, 1837 ; sloops Lexington and Fal- 
mouth, in the Pacific, 1838-40 ; steamer Fulton, on special service, New York 
harbor, 1841-2; sloop Decatur, coast of Africa, 1843-4; store-ship Lexington, 
with troops to the coast of Texas, 1845 ; steamer Spitfire (Executive) and schooner 
Falcon, Home Squadron, 1846-8; commanded the latter vessel in the attack on 
Vera Cruz, and the Castle of San Juan d'Ulloa, which were captured by the 
joint action of the army and navy) ; -also in the rescue of one hundred and twenty- 
one inhabitants of the town of Valladolid, Yucatan (burned and sacked by the 
Indians in a state of insurrection), landing them safely at the city of Campeachy ; 
vide Report of the Secretary of the Navy (Ex. Doc. xxx.. Congress, second ses- 
sion), which says in connection with the state of affairs in Yucatan, that the 
squadron " extended protection, food, and shelter to fleeing white inhabitants in 
their destitution and despair, and those thus aided were a portion of the people of 
a country with whom we were at war ;" while without an officer, and the Falcon 
was employed as a revenue-cutter to secure the duties on foreign importations, 
which duties were to be collected at the port of Laguna, " as a war revenue," he 
relieved a French bark named L'Asie de Dunkirk from a perilous position oiF the 
harbor of Aquador, which she mistook for the port of Laguna, Yucatan ; received 
commendations from Commodores David Connor and M. C. Perry, for services 
while in the Gulf; Navy Yard, New York, 1850 ; commanding store-ship Lex- 
ington, with presents for the Japanese, Commodore Perry's Expedition, 1853-4; 
Commodore Perry duly acknowledged " the prompt and efficient aid rendered by 
Lieutenant Commanding Glasson," in a letter to the Secretary of the Navy, dated 
Yeddo Bay, April 1, 1854 ; a favorable report of inspection of the ship was made 
on returning to New York, and Secretary Dobbin, in a letter to Lieutenant Glas- 
son, dated Navy Department, February 19, 1855, says, " the good order of the 
ship, the promptness and efficiency of the crew in the performance of their vari- 
ous duties, and the satisfactory condition of her armament, magazines, etc., fur- 
nish undoubted evidence of the attention paid to discipline, and other requisites of 
a man-of-war, reflecting great credit upon her commander and the officers asso- 
ciated with him." 

Commissioned as Commander., September 14, 1855 ; commanding rendezvous, 
New Bedford, Massachusetts, 1861-3 ; Navy Yard, Norfolk, Virginia, in charge 
of stores for the supply of the Coast Squadron in the Atlantic, and the flotilla 
forces in the Chesapeake, 1864-6. 

Commissioned as Commodore, September 28, 1866. Sea service, seventeen 
years eleven months ; shore or other duty, eight years ten months. Residence, 
New York City. 



8 COMMODORES. 

Retired in Conformity with Act of February 28, 1855, and its Amendments. 



COMMODORE CHARLES BOARMAN, 

Born in Maryland. Appointed from District of Columbia, June 9, 1811 ; 
ordered to attend the Naval School at the Navy Yard, Washington ; then ordered 
to the sloop Erie, at Baltimore ; attached to brig JeflPerson, Lake Ontario, during 
the War of 1812 ; sloop Erie, Mediterranean Squadron, 1814-17. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, March 15, 1817 ; Navy Yard, Washington, Dis- 
trict of Columbia, 1817 ; sloop Peacock, West India Squadron ; commanding 
schooner Weasel, West India Squadron, 1827-8 ; frigate Java, flag-ship Mediter- 
ranean Squadron, 1828 ; frigate Delaware, flag-ship Mediterranean Squadron, 
1829 ; Executive- Officer of flag-ship Hudson, Brazil Squadron ; commanding 
Vandalia, Brazil Squadron ; schooner Grampus, West India Squadron. 

Commissioned as Cornmander, February 9, 1837 ; commanding sloop Fairfield, 
Brazil Squadron, 1840. 

Commissioned as Captain, March 29, 1844 ; commanding frigate Brandywine, 
flag-ship Brazil Squadron, 1844-50 ; commanding Navy Yard and Station, New 
York, from October 1, 1852, to October 1, 1855 ; special service, 1861-5. 

Commissioned as Commodore, March 12, 1867. 



COMMODORE JOHN H. GRAHAM, 

Born in Vermont. Appointed from New York, June 18, 1812. 
Commissioned as Lieutenant, March 5, 1817. 
Commissioned as Commander, February 28, 1828. 
Commissioned as Captain, March 7, 1849. 
Commissioned as Commodore, July 16, 1862. 



COMMODORE HENRY BRUCE, 

Born in Massachusetts. Appointed from Massachusetts, November 9, 1813. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, January 13, 1825 ; receiving-ship, Boston, 1827 ; 
frigate Brandywine, Mediterranean Squadron, 1837 ; Navy Yard, Boston, 1840. 

Commissioned as Commander, September 8, 1841 ; commanding brig Truxton, 
coast of Africa, 1845 ; commanding rendezvous, Boston, 1848-50. 

Commissioned as Commodore, July 16, 1862. 



COMMODORE CHARLES H. JACKSON, 

Born in Georgia. Appointed from Georgia, March 4, 1818. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, March 3, 1827 ; Coast Survey, 1827 ; receiving- 
ship, Philadelphia, 1830-2 ; schooner Shark, West India Squadron, 1833-4 ; 
brig Boxer, Pacific Squadron, 1837 ; rendezvous, Boston, 1845 ; special duty, 
Boston, 1847. 

Commissioned as Commander, September 14, 1848. 

Commissioned as Commodore, July 16, 1862. 

# 



CAPTAINS. 89 

COMMODORE JONATHAN W. SWIFT, 

Born in ]\Iassacliusetts. Appointed from North Carolina, August 25, 1 823 ; 
went to Mediterranean in 182-i, and returned in 1826 ; went to the Pacific in 
frigate Brandywine in 1826 ; returned in 1829 ; examined in 1830, and pro- 
moted in 1831. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, March 3, 1861 ; went to the Mediterranean in 
1831, and returned in 1832; steamship Fulton, Atlantic coast, 1840; special 
service, 1850-5. 

Commissioned as Commodore, July 16, 1862. Residence, Geneva, New York. 



COMMODORE WILLIAM B. WHITING, 

Born in New York, November 13, 1813. Appointed from New York, February 
2, 1829 ; attached to receiving-ship at New York, 1831 ; sloop Falmouth, Pacific 
Squadron, 1831-3 ; survey of San Lorenzo, including Bocadel Diablo, 1832 ; 
surveys of Bays of Ferrol and Samana, 1833; schooner Dolphin, Pacific Squadron, 
1833; frigate Potomac, Pacific Squadron, 1833-4; receiving-ship at New York, 
1835 ; frigate Constellation, West India Squadron, 1835-6. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 4, 1836 ; receiving-ship at New York, 
1836-7 ; Coast Survey, 1837-42 ; survey of Potomac, 1842-3 ; frigate Macedo- 
nian, coast of Africa, 1843-5 ; surveys of Las Palmas and Bay of Gando, 1844 ; 
Observatory, Washington, 1845-50 ; Coast Survey, 1851-2 ; sloop Vandalia, East 
India Squadron, 1852-6 ; surveys of Mew Bay and Cumsingmoon, 1852 ; surveys 
of west coast of Loo Choo and Deep Bay, 1853 ; surveys of Toobootch, Shah- 
Bay, Yeddo Bay, and Hakodadi, 1854 ; retired, 1855 ; Naval Observatory, Wash- 
ington, 1861-71. Unable to perform duty afloat during the war (as decided by a 
medical board), took charge of the Observatory in 1861, without any assistant, in 
hydrographical duty, thus leaving a more able-bodied oflicer available for active 
duty at sea. 

Commissioned as Commander, July 21, 1861. 

Commissioned as Captain, 1867. 

Commissioned as Commodore, 1871. 



CAPTAINS. 



CAPTAIN SOMERVILLE NICHOLSON, 

Born in New York, January 1, 1822. Appointed from New York, June 21, 
1839 ; attached to frigate Brandywine, Mediterranean Squadron, 1839-40 ; brig 
Truxton, 1841-3 ; Naval School, Philadelphia, 1845. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, July 2, 1845; Coast Survey, 1846-7; 
steamer Alleghany, Brazil Squadron, 1848-9 ; Coast Survey, 1849-52 ; steam- 
frigate Powhatan, East India Squadron, 1852-4. 

Promoted to Master, September 9, 1853. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, May 5, 1855 ; steam-frigate Mississippi, East 
India Squadron, 1855 ; ordnance duty, Washington, 1856-7 ; sloop Cumberland, 
coast of Africa, 1858-9 ; sloop Macedonian, Home Squadron, 1860-1 ; com- 
manding steam-gunboat Marblehead, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, July 16, 1862. 



90 CAPTAINS. 

Commissioned as Commander, January 2, 1863 ; commanding steamer State 
of Greorgia, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864 ; commanding steamer 
Galatea, West India Squadron, 1865 ; special duty, Navy Yard, Washington, 
1866-8 ; member of Ordnance Board, 1869 ; commanding steam-sloop Benicia, 
Asiatic Fleet, 1869-70. 

Commissioned as Captain, June, 1870; commanding Lancaster (second-rate), 
S. A. Squadron, 1872-3. 



CAPTAIN WILLIAM E. HOPKINS, 

Born in Virginia. Appointed from Virginia, November 13, 1839 ; attached to 
sloop Vandalia, Home Squadron, 1841-3 ; Naval School, Philadelphia, 1845. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, July 2, 1845 ; frigate Cumberland, 1847 ; 
schooner Falcon, Home Squadron, 1848-9 ; Coast Survey, 1850-1 ; sloop Marion, 
coast of Africa, 1851-5. 

Promoted to blaster, December 2, 1853. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, July 10, 1854 ; receiving-ship, Philadelphia, 
1856-8 ; sloop Macedonian, Mediterranean Squadron, 1859-60 ; sloop Preble, 
1861. 

Commissioned as i/^eM^eJ^a«^ Comma/icZer, July 16, 1862; rendezvous, Phila- 
delphia, 1862; commanding steamer Saginaw, Pacific Squadron, 1863-5. 

Commissioned as Commander, November 4, 1863 ; commanding steamer 
Shamrock, European Squadron, 1866-7 ; League Island, Pennsylvania, 1868. 

Commissioned as Captain, June, 1870 ; Navy Yard, Mare Island, California, 
1870-2 ; commaading Benicia (third-rate), North Pacific Station, 1872-5 ; com- 
manding receiving-ship Independence, Mare Island, 1877-8. 



CAPTAIN THOMAS PATTISON, 

Born in New York, February 8, 1822. Appointed from New York, March 2, 
1839 ; attached to steam-sloop St. Louis, Pacific Squadron, 1839-42 ; receiving- 
ship, Boston, 1843 ; Naval School, Philadelphia, 1845. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, July 2, 1845 ; steamer Princeton, 1846 ; 
during the Mexican War, served in the following ships as Passed Midshipman 
and Sailing-Master : Raritan, Cumberland, Electra, Scorpion, and gunboat Reefer; 
Coast Survey, 1850-1 ; sloop Portsmouth, Pacific Squadron, 1852-5. 

Promoted to Master, 1854. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, September 12, 1854 ; receiving-ship, Boston, 
1855-6 ; Navy Yard, Boston, 1857 ; steam-frigate Mississippi, East India Squad- 
ron, 1857-60 ; Naval Station, Sackett's Harbor, 1860-1 ; sloop Perry, Atlantic 
Squadron, 1861 ; Executive-Officer of the Perry at the time of the capture of 
privateer Savannah, off Charleston, June 4, 1861 ; commanding steamer Philadel- 
phia, Potomac Flotilla, 1861 ; engagement with Acquia Creek batteries, October 
1, 1861, and engagement with Potomac River batteries, the latter part of October, 
1861. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, July 16, 1861 ; commanding steamer 
Sumter, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862 ; commanding the Clara 
Dolson, Mississippi Squadron, 1863; Commandant Naval Station, Memphis, 
Tennessee, 1863-5. 

Commissioned as Commander, March 3, 1865 ; commanding steamer Muscoota, 
Atlantic Squadron, 1866-7 ; Navy Yard, Norfolk, 1867-9. 



CAPTAINS. 91 

Commissioned as Captain, June, 1870 ; commanding Richmond (second-rate), 
1872; commanding Saranac (second-rate), N. Pacific Station, 1872-3; command- 
ing R. S. Independence, Mare Island, 1874-7. 



CAPTAIN WILLIAM NICHOLSON JEFFERS, 

[Chief of Bureau of Ordnance, with relative rank of Commodore.'] 

Born in New Jersey. Appointed from New Jersey Acting 3Iidshipinan, Sep- 
tember 25, 1840 ; ordered to U. S. S. North Carolina, 74 ; served in brig Wash- 
ington, tender to that ship, for several winter months on coast relief of ships in 
distress ; September, 1841, to frigate United States, 44; served four years in that 
ship, and frigate Congress, 44, on Pacific and Brazil Stations; October 10, 1845, 
to Naval School at Annapolis ; graduated No. 4, and promoted to Passed Midsliip- 
7nan, July 11, 1846 ; ordered to steamer Vixen, 3, and served through the war 
with Mexico ; present at attack on forts of Alvarado, under Commodore Connor ; 
at two attacks on and capture of Tobasco, under Commodore Perry ; at capture of 
Tuspan ; of Coatzocoalcos and Laguna de Terminos ; covered the landing of the 
U. S. Army at siege of Vera Cruz, and took part with others of Mosquito Fleet in 
the bombardment of the city of Vera Cruz, and of the castle of San Juan 
d'Ulloa ; in 1848-9, on duty at Naval School as Acting Master and Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Mathematics ; December, 1849, to October, 1850, schooner Morris, Coast 
Survey, harbor of Galveston and Gulf of Mexico ; October, 1850, to March, 
1852, mail-steamer service, between New York and Aspinwall, Havana, Kingston, 
and New Orleans, a part of the time in command ; March, 1852, to screw-sloop 
Princeton, 10, as Acting Master; November, 1852, transferred to frigate Mace- 
donian, 22, as Acting Master; December, 1852, exploration of Isthmus of Hon- 
duras; September, 1853, to screw-sloop Alleghany, 10, as Acting Master ; Octo- 
ber, 1853, transferred to sloop Germantown, 20 ; 1853-4, sloop German town, 
Brazil Squadron. 

Promoted to Master, June, 1854. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, January, 1855 ; transferred to U. S. S. Water Witch, 
3, survey of La Plata and Parana, 1855-6 ; presented with a sword, with gold 
hilt and scabbard, by Her Majesty the Queen of Spain, for saving the schooner 
Cartagenera, of 10 guns, in October, 1855 (assent of Congress, April, 1858) ; 
had an engagement with the fort at Paso de la Patria, which caused the expedi- 
tion to Paraguay, under Commodore Shubrick, and extorted apology by Paraguay ; 
1857, preliminary survey of Isthmus of Honduras for Interoceanic Railway ; 
1858-9, gunnery-ship Plymouth, 9, West Indies ; January, 1859-60, screw-sloop 
Brooklyn, 22, and sloop Saratoga, 20, West Indies ; surveyed Chiriqui Isthmus 
while attached to Brooklyn ; when the Rebellion broke out he was on sick-leave at 
his home, but he at once applied for service. 

"Annapolis, Maryland, April 13, 1861. 
" Sir, — The news of actual hostilities having commenced at Charleston reached 
this place this morning, and, as an officer loyal to the government of the United 
States, I consider it my duty to place myself on record by offering to serve when- 
ever and wherever my services may be required. 

" Respectfully your obedient servant, 

"WILLIAM N. JEFFERS, 

" Zjieiitenant." 

He was immediately detailed to relieve Lieutenant G. T. Sinclair on ordnance 
duty at Norfolk ; but that yard having been destroyed before he could reach there, 



92 CAPTAINS. 

was detailed to keep the Potomac River open ; April and May, 1861, command 
of steamer Philadelphia, 2, on Potomac River; May to December, 1861, frigate 
Roanoka, -14, on blockade Atlantic coast and off Charleston ; engagement with 
batteries at Sewell's Bluff; December, 1861, command of steamer Underwriter, 3, 
Pamlico Sound ; battles of Roanoke Island, Elizabeth City, and numerous skir- 
mishes, under Commodore Goldsborough and Commander Rowan ; expedition 
to Currituck Sound ; March, 1862, command of Monitor, 2, after Worden was 
wounded ; various bombardments and battles of Drury's Bluff, under Commander 
John Rodgers. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander^ July 16, 1862 ; September, 1862, ord- 
nance duty at Philadelphia ; September, 1863, to duty as Inspector of Ordnance, 
and in charge of experiments at the Ordnance Yard, Washington. 

Commissioned as Commander, March, 1865 ; July, 1865, to command screw- 
sloop Swatara, 10, West Indies, Mediterranean, and Africa; 1865-8, under 
Admirals Goldsborough and Farragut ; December, 1868-9, Naval Observatory ; 
1869-70, Board of Examiners. 

Commissioned as Captain, July, 1870 ; September 30, 1870, to duty as As- 
sistant in Bureau of Ordnance; October, 1871, to command gunnery-ship Con- 
stellation, 10, West Indies and coast; April 10, 1873, Chief of Bureau of Ord- 
nance, with relative rank of Commodore; in 1875, introduced a system of B. L. 
boat howitzers of bronze and of steel ; and in 1876 doubled the power of the 
Dahlgren M. L. 11-inch smooth bore by converting it into an 8-inch rifle; also 
commenced the conversion of Parrott 100-pounder to B. L. on the slotted screw 
principle ; worked up the details of a system of breech-loading for every calibre 
up to 12-inch; April 10, 1877, renominated Chief of Bureau of Ordnance for 
four years ; author of " Short Methods in Navigation," 1849 ; " Theory and Prac- 
tice of Naval Gunnery," 1850 ; " Marine Surveying," 1871 ; and of numerous 
pamphlets on professional subjects; editor of " Inspection and Proof of Cannon," 
1864 ; " Ordnance Instructions for U. S. Navy," fourth edition, 



CAPTAIN EDWARD SIMPSON, 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, February 11, 1840 ; attached 
to sloop Decatur and frigate Potomac, Brazil Squadron, 1840-1 ; returned to the 
United States in frigate Constitution, 1841 ; attached to frigate Independence, 
Home Squadron, 1841-2; attached to frigate Congress, Mediterranean and Brazil 
Squadrons, 1842-5 ; attached to receiving-ship North Carolina, 1845 ; Naval 
Academy, Annapolis, Maryland, 1845-6. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, July 11, 1846 ; War with Jlexico : attached 
to steamer Vixen, 1846-7 ; present at attack on forts of Alvarado, under Commodore 
Connor ; at two attacks on Tobasco, under Commodore Perry ; at capture of Tam- 
pico, under Commodore Perry ; at capture of Tuspan ; at capture of Coatzacoaicos ; 
at capture of Laguna de Terminos. At siege of Vera Cruz, covered the landing 
of the United States Army, and took part with the rest of the Mosquito Fleet in the 
bombardment of the city of Vera Cruz and of the Castle of San Juan d'Ulloa ; 
attached to Coast Survey, 1848-50; attached to frigate Congress, Brazil Squadron, 
1850-3 ; attached to Naval Academy, as assistant Instructor in Naval Gunnery 
and Infantry Tactics, 1853-4. 

Promoted to Master, July 10, 1854; Coast Survey, 1855-6. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, April 18, 1855 ; attached to sloop Portsmouth, 
East India Squadron, 1856-8 ; engaged with Commander A. H. Foote in the 
bombardment and capture of the Barrier Forts in the Canton River ; attached to 



CAPTAINS. 93 

Naval Academy, in charge of Instruction in Theory and Practice of Naval Gun- 
nery, 1858-62 ; Commandant of Midshipmen, at Naval Academy, 1862-3. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, July 16, 1862 ; commanding iron-clad 
Passaic, South Atlantic Squadron, 1863-4; engaged with Fort Wagner, July 29, 
1863; Fort Sumter, August' 17, 1863; Fort Wagner, August 18, 1863; Fort 
Sumter, August 23, 1863 ; Fort Moultrie, August 31, 1863 ; Fort Sumter, Sep- 
tember!, 1863; Battery Bee, September 8, 1863; Fort Moultrie, November 16, 
1863 ; commanding steamer Isonomia, off Wilmington, in East Gulf Squadron, 
and on Bahama Banks, 1864; Fleet-Captain, Blockading Squadron, 1865-6; 
engaged in operations before Mobile, from March 27, 1865, to April 12, 1865, 
when the city capitulated. 

Commissioned as Commander, March 3, 1865 ; commanding steam-sloop 
Mohican and steamer Mohongo, North Pacific Squadron,- 1866-8; in charge 
Hydrographic Office, Washington, 1868-9 ; Assistant to Chief of Bureau of 
Ordnance, Navy Department, Washington, 1869-70. 

Commissioned as Captain, August 15, 1870 ; special service in Europe, 1870- 
2; commanding Torpedo Station, 1873; commanding steam-frigate Franklin, 
North Atlantic Station, 1873-4; commanding frigate Wabash, N. A. Station, 
1874; commanding Torpedo Station, 1874-5 ; commanding steam-sloop Omaha, 
South Pacific Station, 1875-7 ; Navy Yard, New York, 1877-8. 



CAPTAIN WILLIAM GRENVILLE TEMPLE, 

Born in Vermont, March 23, 1824. Appointed Acting Midshipman from Ver- 
mont, April 18, 1840 ; ordered to receiving-ship Columbus, Boston, September 
24, 1840 ; detached from Columbus and ordered to frigate Constellation, Boston, 
— sailed on a cruise around the world, and at Rio de Janeiro the Constellation 
became flag-ship of the East India Squadron ; May 8, 1844, detached from 
Constellation at Norfolk, and granted leave of absence ; August 21, 1844, ordered 
to frigate Potomac, flag-ship of the Home Squadron, Philadelphia ; March 14, 
1845, detached from Potomac at Pensacola, and ordered to brig Lawrence at same 
place ; October 21, 1845, detached from Lawrence at Pensacola, and ordered back 
to Potomac at same place ; December 5, 1845, detached from the Potomac at 
Norfolk, and ordered to Naval School, Annapolis. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, July 11, 1846; July 13, 1846, detached 
from Naval School and waiting orders ; October 5, 1846, ordered to sloop-of-war 
Boston, New York, and started for Gulf of Mexico; November 15, 1846, 
wrecked on west end of Eleuthera, one of the Bahamas, opposite Hole-in-the-Wall ; 
November 29, 1846, ordered to Norfolk in schooner Volant, in charge of sick 
men from wreck of the Boston; January 7, 1847, ordered to receiving-ship Penn- 
sylvania, Norfolk ; February 4, 1847, detached from Pennsylvania, and from duty 
connected with the Boston Court-Martial at Norfolk, and ordered to steamer 
Scourge, New York, — sailed for the Gulf of Mexico; March 29, 1847, present at 
the surrender of Vera Cruz ; March 31, 1847, present at the capture of Alvai-ado 
by the Scourge, and ordered to take command on shore; April 1, 1847, relieved 
on shore and ordered back to the Scourge ; April 18, 1847, present at the capture 
of Tuspan ; June 15 and 16, 1847, present at the capture of Tobasco ; November 
27, 1847, detached from the Scourge at Frontera, by medical survey, and took pas- 
sage in steamer Scorpion ; December 25, 1847, ordered as Acting Master to the 
steamer Mississippi, Vera Cruz; April 21, 1848, detached from the Mississippi, 
Boston, and granted leave of absence ; June 14, 1848, ordered to Naval Observa- 
tory, Washington ; May 2, 1849, detached from the Observatory, and ordered as 



94 CAPTAINS. 

Acting Master to fhe Coast Survey, schooner Petrel, New York. The party was 
transferred at New Orleans into the Coast Survey, steamer Hetzel, and was chiefly 
occupied in surveying the Florida Reef and Gulf Stream. August 2. 1850, 
detached from the Hetzel, Baltimore, and ordered to the Coast Survey Ofiice, 
Washington; October 11, 1850, detached from the Coast Survey, and ordered to 
the Observatory, Washington ; November 28, 1850, detached from the Observa- 
tory, and granted leave of absence for the purpose of taking charge of the hydro- 
graphic works on the survey of the Isthmus of Tehauntepec, for a railroad and 
canal ; April 5, 1852, ordered as Acting Master to the sloop-of-war Levant, Norfolk, 
and sailed for the Mediterranean. 

Promoted to Master, July 21, 1854, 

Promoted to Lieutenant, April 18, 1855 ; May 7, 1855, detached from the 
Levant, New York, and granted leave of absence; June 4, 1855, ordered to the 
steamer Corwin, Coast Survey, New York, surveying that bay and harbor ; Decem- 
ber 3, 1855, detached from the Corwin, New York, and ordered to the Coast Sur- 
vey Office, Washington ; May 19, 1856, detached from Coast Survey Office, and 
ordered to the steamer Corwin, Coast Survey, New York, — engaged during the 
winter on the Florida Reef and Gulf Stream, and during summer at New York, 
New Haven, Boston, Salem, and Casco Bay; June 1, 1857, succeeded to the 
command of the Corwin; October 11, 1858, detached from command of the Cor- 
win, and ordered to the Coast Survey Office, Washington ; April 7, 1859, detached 
from Coast Survey Office, and ordered to the steam-frigate Lancaster, flag-ship of 
the Pacific Squadron, Philadelphia, — performed the duties of Flag-Lieutenant, in 
addition to those of watch and division-officer, during the whole cruise ; October 
11, 1861, detached from the Lancaster at Panama, and ordered to return to New 
York ; October 24, 1861, granted leave of absence at New York ; November 11, 

1861, ordered to command the steamer Flambeau, New York, and sailed on au 
independent cruise to the Bahamas; January 22, 1862, detached from command 
of the Flambeau, Port Royal, South Carolina, by medical survey, and sent to New 
York in the frigate Savannah; February 11, 1862, placed on waiting orders at New 
York ; February 26, 1862, ordered to ordnance duty. New York ; April 19, 1862, 
succeeded to Inspectorship of Ordnance, New York. 

Promoted to Lieutenant- Commander, July 16, 1862; September 22, 1862, 
detached from ordnance duty, and ordered to command the steam-gunbofit Pem- 
bina, New York, and to join the West Gulf Blockading Squadron ; November 22, 

1862, detached from command of the Pembina, off Mobile, and ordered to Key 
West as Fleet-Captain of the East Gulf Blockading Squadron; April 10, 1864, 
ordered temporarily to command the flag-ship San Jacinto, Key West, for special 
service ; April 13, 1864, detached from command of the San Jacinto, and ordered 
to resume duty as Fleet-Captain ; July 12, 1864, present on duty in the trenches 
about Washington, on the occasion of General Early's attack ; September 19, 1864, 
detached from Fleet-Captaincy, and ordered to ordnance duty at Cold Spring 
Foundry ; November 8, 1864, detached from ordnance duty, and ordered to com- 
mand the steamer Pontoosuc, New York, and to join the North Atlantic Block- 
ading Squadron ; December 24 and 25, 1864, present at the bombardment of Fort 
Fisher ; January 13 to 15, 1865, present at the capture of Fort Fisher; February 
18 to 22, 1865, present at the passage up the Cape Fear River, and the capture 
of Wilmington, North Carolina. 

Promoted to Commander, March 3, 1865 ; April 1, 1865, present at the bom- 
bardment of rebel fortifications on the James River, above Dutch Gap ; April 3, 
1865, present at the capture of Richmond, Petersburg, etc. ; May 25, 1865, 
detached from command of the Pontoosuc, Hampton Roads, and granted leave of 
absence; August 17, 1865, ordered to command the steamer Tacony, Boston, and 



CAPTAINS. 95 

to join the Atlantic Squadron, where she became the flag-ship during the following 
year; October 31, 186G, detached from command of the Tacony, Norfolk, and 
ordered as Inspector of Ordnance to Portsmouth, New Hampshire ; October 18, 
1869, detached from ordnance duty at Portsmouth, and ordered as member of 
Permanent Ordnance Board, at the Navy Department, Washington, D. C. 

Promoted to Cnptain, August 28, 1870 ; October 18, 1870, detached from 
ordnance duty, and ordered as Assistant Judge-Advocate of the Navy, in the 
Navy Department; December 23, 1870, detached from the Navy Department, and 
ordered to command the frigate Tennessee, at New York, and to take the U. S. 
Commissioners and their suite out to the Island of San Domingo ; April 25, 1871, 
detached from the Tennessee at New York, and placed on waiting orders ; May 1, 
1871, ordered to duty under the Bureau of Ordnance ; October 5, 1871, detached 
from ordnance duty, and ordered to flag-ship Wabash, at Boston, as Chief-of-Stafi" 
of the European Squadron; July 6, 1872, ordered to command the Wabash, in 
addition to duties as Chief-of-Stafi"; May 31, 1873, detached from the Wabash, 
with leave of absence for eighteen months, and orders to return to the United 
States at its expiration ; December 11, 1874, ordered to take charge of the gov- 
ernment's reception of the King of the Hawaiian Islands at Washington, for 
which service, by permission of Congress, received from His Majesty Kalakaua a 
decoration as Knight Commander of the Royal Order of Kamehameha I. ; 
relieved from this duty on December 28, 1874; February 1, 1875, ordered, as 
Captain of the Yard, to New York Navy Yard ; October 31, 1877, detached from 
New York Navy Yard, and placed on waiting orders. 



CAPTAIN SAMUEL P. CARTER, 

Born in Carter County, Tennessee. Appointed from Tennessee, February 14, 
1840 ; attached to Delaware, 1840 ; to sloop Dale, Pacific Squadron, 1840-3 ; 
North Carolina, 1844 ; steamer Michigan, on the lakes, 1844-5 ; frigate Potomac, 
Home Squadron. 1845 ; Naval School, Annapolis, 1845-6. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipma7i, July 11, 1846 ; Ohio, 74, Home Squadron, 
1846-7 ; present at capture of Vera Cruz ; Naval Observatory, Washington, 1847-8 ; 
frigate St. Lawrence, Mediterranean Squadron, 1848-50 ; Naval Academy, 1850-3 ; 
store-ship Relief, 1853-5. 

Promoted to Master, September 12, 1854. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, April 18, 1855 ; steam-frigate San Jacinto, East 
India Squadron, 1855-7 ; at attack on Barrier Forts, Canton River, China, 1856 ; 
Naval Academy, 1857-60 ; steam-sloop Seminole, Brazil Squadron, 1860-1 ; re- 
turned to the United States, July 6, 1861 ; July 11, 1861, Lieutenant Carter was 
ordered to report to the Secretary of War for special duty ; was instructed to pro- 
ceed to East Tennessee and raise troops ; organized the Tennessee Brigade, and 
was assigned to command in September, 1861, with acting appointment of Briga- 
dier-General ; present at Wild Cat, Kentucky, at Zollicoff"er's repulse, October, 
1861 ; at battle of Mill Springs, January, 1862 ; commanded in Southeastern 
Kentucky from February, 1862, to April, 1862 ; and in operations against Cum- 
berland Gap, March and May, 1862; commissioned Brigadier- General May 1, 
1862; at capture of Cumberland Gap, June 17, 1862; in Kanawha Valley in 
October and November, 1862, at which time the rebel troops were driven out and 
the valley re-occupied by Union forces. Commanded cavalry expedition into East 
Tennessee, tore up track and destroyed bridges on East Tennessee and Virginia 
Railroad, and in several engagements, at Holston, Carter's Station, and Jonesville, 
defeated rebel troops in December, 1862, and January, 1863. This cavalry raid, 



96 CAPTAINS. 

which was the first of any importance made by Union troops into rebel territory, 
was attended with valuable results, not only from amount of damage done rebel 
cause from destruction of property, loss of troops, and the breaking of their prin- 
cipal line of railway, but from the relief it alForded Greneral Rosecrans when 
pressed at Murfreesboro', and the new life it infused throughout all our cavalry 
commands. For this successful raid received thanks of the General-in-Chief of the 
army, in general orders ; also of the Commander of the Department of the Ohio, 
in general orders, and the Commander of the District of Kentucky ; was recom- 
mended by latter two for promotion to Major-General ; was assigned to command 
of Division of Central Kentucky in March, 1863 ; at battle of Dutton's Hill, 
March 31, 1863; commanded in Southeastern Kentucky, headquarters at Somer- 
set, from May to July, 1863 ; defeated Pegram's forces at Monticello and Beaver 
Dam in May and June, 1863, and Morgan at West's ; was thanked, in general 
orders, by the Commander of the Department of the Ohio. In July, 1863, was 
assigned to command of cavalry division, 23d Army Corps, and had the advance 
when Burnside occupied East Tennessee, in August and September, 1863 ; defeated 
Morgan's forces near Emory, August 28, 1863, and Smith's, at Loudon, August 
29 ; present at siege and battle of Knoxville, November and December, 1863 ; 
Provost-Marshal-General of East Tennessee, September, 1863, to Januai-y, 1865, 
when he was relieved at his own request, ordered to North Carolina, and assigned 
to command of Division of the District of Newbern ; commanded the left wing 
at battle of Kinston (Wise's Fork), North Carolina, on March 10, 1865, where 
Bragg was defeated; occupied Goldsboro', North Carolina, March 20, 1865, driv- 
ing out the rebels with his command ; was in command of the place during its 
occupancy by the armies of General Sherman ; assigned to command of 3d Division, 
23d Army Corps, April 7, 1865 ; brevetted Major-General March 13, 1865 ; was 
in command of Western North Carolina from May, 1865, and of 23d Army Corps 
from July, until relieved from duty in that State in August, 1865 ; honorably 
mustered out of the army January, 1866. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander^ July 16, 1862. 

Commissioned as Commander, June 23, 1865 ; commanding steamer Monocacy, 
Asiatic Squadron, 1866-9; Naval Academy, as Commandaot of Midshipmen, 
1869-72. 

Commissioned as Captain, October 28, 1870 ; commanding steam-sloop Alaska, 
European Station, 1872-5 ; member Light-House Board, 1876-8. 



CAPTAIN THOMAS S. PHELPS, 

Born in Maine. Appointed from Maine, January 17, 1840 ; attached to sloop 
Preble, coast of Labrador and Bay of Fundy, March to December, 1840 ; Medi- 
terranean Squadron, January, 1841, to September, 1843 ; sloop Boston, Brazil 
Squadron, October, 1843, to February, 1846 ; Naval School, February to July, 
1846. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, July 11, 1846; sloop Boston, Gulf Squad- 
ron, October 5, 1846 ; wrecked on the Island of Eleuthera, West Indies, 
November 16, 1846 ; detached and ordered to steamer Polk, for war and special 
service; in Mexico, February 20, 1847; after-section filled with water oflF Cape 
Hatteras, April 1, 1847 ; returned detached, and ordered to Coast Survey, May 7, 
1847 ; attached to schooners Nautilus, J. T. Mason, and steamer Legare until June, 

1849 ; razee Independence, Mediterranean Squadron, June, 1849, to December, 

1850 ; frigate Constitution, same squadron, December, 1850, to February, 1851 ; 
schooner Graham, steamers Legare and Hetzel, Coast Survey, May 1, 1851, to 



CAPTAINS. 97 

November, 1852 ; receiving-ship Pennsylvania, November, 1852, to January 1, 
1853; steamer Fulton, one month, — rejoined Pennsylvania, and attached until 
December, 1853 ; surveyed Elizabeth lliver and Norfolk Navy Yard ; sloop 
Decatur, Pacific Squadron, December, 1853, to April 15, 1857 ; served throughout 
the Indian War in Washington Territory, 1855-6. 

Promoted to Master, March 1, 1855. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, September 14, 1855 ; battle of Seattle, W. T., 
January 26, 1856 ; ordnance duty, Norfolk, Virginia, May, 1857, to September, 
1858 ; Paraguay Expedition and Brazil Squadron, September, 1858, to June, 
1859; steamer Crusader, Home Squadron, June 16 to August 24, 1859; com- 
manded steamer Vixen, Coast Survey, and on special service, August, 1859, to 
September, 1861 ; attached to expedition for the relief of Fort Sumter, iMarch, 
1861. " In organizing the government for war, it was decided by the Chiefs of 
Departments that one naval-officer skilled in surveying should be detached for 
special service to o^i-operate with army and navy, and Lieutenant Phelps was se- 
lected by ballot for that duty." In consequence of the destruction of signs, 
boats, buoys, and ranges, and the erection of heavy batteries by the rebels, the 
Potomac lliver was rendered almost impassable, and at this critical moment when 
•he safety of Washington was hazarded, a survey and chart of the river became 
imperative. For this purpose, six steamers were placed at the disposal of Lieur 
tenant Phelps. Selecting two, he, in June, successfully executed the work, which 
fully answered the requirements of the country. Transferred to steamer Corwin 
for secret service, September 24, 1861 ; examined five of the inlets of North 
Carolina, and surveyed and buoyed Hatteras Inlet, for the introduction of expe- 
ditions into the interior waters of that State ; skirmished with rebel gunboats,. 
Pamlico Sound, November 9, 1861 ; engagement with rebel gunboat Curlew, 
Hatteras Inlet, November 14, 1861 ; received compliments of Secretary of 
Navy ; secret service in Virginia waters, December, 1861 ; attached to North 
Atlantic Blockading Squadron, March, 1862; assigned to command of division 
for operations in rear of Gloucester Point, Virginia, April 1, 1862 ; York River, 
April 21, three engagements with Yorktown and Gloucester Point batteries;, 
skirmish with rebels, Queen's Point, Virginia, captured five, and caused the de- 
struction of two of the enemy's vessels, — prevented destruction of White House- 
bridge, May 4, 1862 ; frequent skirmishes with main body of rebel army re- 
treating from Yorktown, May 5 and 6 ; battle of West Point, Virginia, ascended 
the Matipony River, and prevented the junction of a large force of rebels with, 
main army. May 7 ; made reconnoissanco charts of Matipony and Pamunky Rivers. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, July 16, 1862. In obedience to the- 
demands of Congress and an order of the Navy Department, executed a close and. 
complete survey of the Potomac River ; opposed in the work by enemy's infantry 
and artillery, July 29, 1862, to March 1, 1863 ; commanded steamer Corwin, on. 
special service, from March, 1863, to December, 1864, — principally employed in 
making surveys in anticipation of naval and military movements, and in examining 
dangers in the way of blockaders and transports ; iron-clad Saugus, December,. 
1864 ; steam-sloop Juniata, January 3, 1865 ; commanded the Juniata at the 
capture of Fort Fisher, January 15, 1865 ; South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 
January 21, 1865 ; commanded steamer Lenapee, Atlantic Coast Squadron,. 
March 2, 1865, to April 3, 1867. 

Commissioned as Commander, August 5, 1865 ; Mare Island Navy Yard, 
California, 1867-70 ; commanding R. S. Independence, 1870-1 ; commanding 
steam-sloop Saranac, N. P. Station, 1871-2. 

Commissioned as Captain, June 19, 1871 ; Navy Yard, Mare Island, California^ 
1873-7. 

7 



98 CAPTAINS. 

CAPTAIN EDWARD BARRETT, 

Born in Louisiana. Appointed from Louisiana, November 3, 1840 ; attached to 
the sloops Warren and Levant, and frigate Macedonian, 1841-2, West India 
Squadron ; to the line-of-battle ship Columbus and the sloop-of-war Preble, 1842—4, 
Mediterranean and Brazil Squadrons; sloop Falmouth, 1844-5, Mexican Gulf 
Squadron. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, 1846 ; in 1846-7, during the Mexican War, 
was attached to the frigates Mississippi, Cumberland, and Raritan, and sloop John 
Adams ; was present in all the engagements on the coast ; at Alvarado, Vera Cruz 
(during the siege of Vera Cruz served in General Worth's division, and at Naval 
Battery), Tuspan, Tobasco, and in expedition to Laguna; attached to the sloop 
Jamestown, 1848-50 ; African and Mediterranean Squadrons, 1852-7. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, September 14, 1855 ; attached to frigate Cum- 
berland, sloops St. Louis and Saranac, frigate Congress, sloop Constellation, Mediter- 
ranean Squadron ; 1858-9 (part of 1859 attached to receiving-ship North Caro- 
lina), was attached to sloop Portsmouth, African Squadron ; 1860-1, attached to 
the Dacotah, East India Squadron ; in 1861-3, in command of the school-ship 
Savannah, gunnery-ship for instruction of volunteer ofl&cers. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, 1862; in 1863-4, commanded gun- 
boat Massasoit and iron-clad monitor Catskill, blockading Charleston, South Caro- 
lina ; 1865, ordnance duty, Norfolk, Virginia. 

Commissioned as Commander, December 24, 1865 ; 1866, commanded steamer 
Agawan, North Atlantic Squadron ; 1867-70, commanding steamer Quinnebaug, 
South Atlantic Squadron ; captured the steamer Deer, the last prize captured 
during the war; ordnance duty. Navy Yard, New York, 1870-1. 

Commissioned as Captain, May 7, 1871 ; navigation duty. New York, 1872-3 ; 
commanding steam-sloop Canandaigua, North Atlantic Station, 1874-5 ; command- 
ing steam-sloop Plymouth, North Atlantic Station, 1875-8. 



CAPTAIN HOMER C. BLAKE, 

Born in New York, 1822. Appointed from Ohio, March 2, 1840 ; frigate Con- 
stellation, East India Squadron, 1841-3 ; sloop Preble, coast of Africa, 1843-5 ; 
Naval School, 1846 ; sloop Preble, Pacific Squadron, 1846-8. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, July 11, 1846; receiving-ship. New York, 
1849-50 ; frigate Raritan, Pacific Squadron, 1850-2 ; receiving-ship, Boston, 
1853-6. 

Commissioned as Lieidenant, September 14, 1855 ; frigate St. Lawrence, Brazil 
Squadron, 1857-9 ; frigate Sabine, Home Squadron, 1861-2. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, July 16, 1862 ; commanding steamer 
Hatteras, Western Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1862-3. On January 11, 1863, 
the Hatteras, while at anchor ofi" Galveston, Texas, was ordered by signal from 
the Brooklyn, flag-ship of the division blockading Galveston, to chase a sail to the 
southward and eastward. Commander Blake at once obeyed the signal, and steamed 
at all speed in the direction indicated, and rapidly gained upon the suspicious 
-vessel, which was discovered to be a steamer. When within about four miles of 
the vessel, it was observed that she had ceased to steam, and was lying " broadside 
on," awaiting the approach of the Hatteras. When at about the distance of 
seventy -five yards, Commander Blake hailed, and asked, " What steamer is that?" 
The reply was, " Her Britannic Majesty's ship Vixen." Captain Blake ordered 
.a boat to be sent aboard, but before the order could be obeyed, the commander of 



CAPTAINS. 99 

the strange craft hailed and said, " We are the Confederate steamer Alabama," 
which was accompanied by a broadside. The Hatteras returned the fire almost 
instantly, and steamed directly for the Alabama iu the hope to carry her by board- 
ing; but the attempt was defeated by the commander of the piratical craft. At 
length a shell entered the hold of the Hatteras, and at the same instant another 
shell passed through the " sick-bay," exploding in an adjoining compartment, and 
setting fire to the vessel. Still another shell entered the cylinder, filling the en- 
gine-room and deck with steam, and depriving Commander Blake of all power to 
manoeuvre his vessel or work the pumps, upon which the reduction of the fire de- 
pended. With the vessel on fire in two places, and her engine disabled. Com- 
mander Blake felt that it was useless to sacrifice the lives of his command, and so 
ordered a lee gun to be fired. The Alabama then asked if assistance was desired, 
to which an affirmative answer was given. After considerable delay, the Ala- 
bama sent assistance, and the crew and officers of the Hatteras were transferred 
to the Alabama, Ten minutes after the crew left her decks, the Hatteras went 
down bow first. The battery upon the Alabama brought into action against the 
Hatteras numbered seven guns, consisting of four long 32-pounders, one 100- 
pounder rifled gun, one 68-pounder, and one 24-pounder rifled gun. The guns 
used in the action by the Hatteras were two short 32-pounders, one 30-pounder 
rifled Parrot, and one 20-pounder rifled gun. The action was fought at a distance 
of about seventy-five yards. The crew of the Hatteras were landed at Port 
Koyal, Jamaica, and were with all despatch conveyed from Port Royal to Kingston, 
under the guidance of the American Vice-Consul, John N. Camp. Commanding 
steamer Utah, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1863-5 ; shelled with three 
divisions of rebel army at Malvern Hill, 18t)4 ; assisted to repulse an attack of 
the rebels on the right of the army of the James, October, 1864 ; engagement 
with rebel batteries at Trent Reach, James River, 1865 ; Navy Yard, Portsmouth, 
New Hampshire, 1866-8. 

Commissioned as Commander^ March 3, 1866 ; commanding steam-sloop Swa- 
tara, European Squadron, 1868-9 ; commanding steam-sloop Alaska, Asiatic Fleet, 
1870-2. 

Commissioned as Captain^ May 25, 1871 ; commanding Naval rendezvous, 
New York, 1873-7. 

CAPTAIN CLARK H. WELLS, 

Born in Reading, Pennsylvania, September 22, 1822. Appointed Midshipman 
from Pennsylvania, September 25, 1840 ; attached to the line-of-battle ship North 
Carolina, 1840 ; frigate Brandywine and sloop Fairfield, Mediterranean Station, 
1840-1 ; razee Independence, Home Squadron, 1842-3 ; sloop Levant, Pacific 
Station, 1844-5 ; Naval School, Annapolis, Maryland, 1846. 

Graduated and became -a Passed Midship num, July 11, 1846 ; during the Mex- 
ican War, attached to the brig Somers, blockading Vera Cruz, in 1846, and to 
gunboat Petrel, 1846-7, during which time the latter vessel was one of Tatnall's 
flotilla in the attack upon the Castle of San Juan d'UUoa and the city of Vera 
Cruz ; took part also in the capture of Tuspan and Tampico ; to the East Indies, 
and around the world, in sloop Plymouth and brig Dolphin, 1848-51 ; receiving- 
ship Princeton, in 1852, and Naval Observatory ; store-ship Fredonia, at Val- 
paraiso, Chili, in 1852-5. 

Promoted to blaster in 1855. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, September, 1855 ; Naval Observatory, Washington, 
District of Columbia, in 1856 ; served as Ex. -Officer of the barque Resolute, 
originally an English man-of-war, abandoned in the Arctic Seas, and subsequently 



100 CAPTAINS. 

recovered by the American whale ship George Henry, which vessel found her in 
a field of ice some nine hundred miles from where her crew left her. Congress, 
by a joint resolution dated August 28, 1856, purchased her from the salvors, and 
ordered her restoration to the British government, which order was complied with on 
her arrival in England, where she was honored by a visit from the Queen of Eng- 
land and Prince Albert, to whom the vessel was presented by Captain Hartstene ; in 
the U. S. S. Niagara, 1857 ; employed in the first Atlantic Cable Expedition, and 
then joined the U. S. S. Susquehanna, in 1858, one of the Mediterranean Squad- 
ron ; shortly afterwards the vessel was sent to the West Indies, and to Greytown, 
Central America, when the yellow fever broke out on board, carrying ofi' sixty of 
her crew and two officers, which necessitated her return North and being put out 
of commission ; in the same year was attached to the U. S. S. Water Witch, 
Home Squadron ; Ex.-Ofiicer of U. S. S. Metacomet, Paraguay Expedition, in 
1859 ; when the Rebellion broke out, was ordered as the Ex.-Ufiicer of the U. S. S. 
Susquehanna, then commanded by Captain James Lardner, now Rear-Admiral, 
and which vessel took a very prominent pari in the battle of Port Royal, South 
Carolina, sustaining considerable damage by the fire from the two forts, Hilton 
Head and Bay Point, having been struck some thirty-five times, and losing 
several of her crew, besides the wounded ; received a commendatory letter from 
Rear-Admiral Lardner for services rendered on that occasion ; the Susquehanna 
was specially mentioned in the otiicial Report of the late Rear-Admiral l)u Pont, 
who commanded the expedition ; was sent several times with a detachment of 
sailors and marines to reinforce the U. S. S. Unadilla, when much exposed to 
night attacks in Wright River, South Carolina ; was present at the occupation of 
Fernandina, Florida, the enemy having abandoned the place on the appearance of 
the expedition under the late Rear-Admiral Du Pont ; was then transferred to the 
U. S. sloop-of-war Vandalia, engaged in the i lockading of Warsaw Sound and 
Charleston, South Carolina, for a number of months ; transferred to the command 
of the U. S. sloop-of-war Dale, and brought her to Philadelphia. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, 3vi\j 16, 186:^; Ex.-Ofiicer of the 
Navy Yard, Philadelphia, in 1863 ; applied and received orders to command the 
U. to. S. Galena, when rebuilt as a wooden vessel ; joined the West Gulf Squadron, 
in 1861 ; was sent several times by the late Admiral Farragut, then in command 
of the fleet, to shell a blockade-runner, ashore under the guns of Fort Morgan ; 
was engaged in the battle of Mobile, and during the passage of the forts the 
Galena was secured to the Oneida, bringing up the rear, both vessels being exposed 
to the fire of the forts from the commeucemek.;t to the close of the action, also 
from the rebel ram Tennessee ; when near the forts, a shell from the latter ex- 
ploded one of the boilers of the Oneida, which necessitated her being turned in by 
her consort, the Galena, and after Captain Mullany, of the former vessel, had his arm 
shot ofi, which occurred opposite the forts. The services of the U. S. S. Galena 
were duly acknowledged in the oflicial Report v f the action by Admiral Farragut, 
and a commendatory letter was received from him, in which he says, " That 
in j^our case I depart from my usual custom, not to give letters for good conduct 
in time of war, where there is an immediate commander first to forward it, but, 
inasmuch as Captain Mullany was wounded, and the command of the two vessels 
(Oneida and Galena) devolved upon you, and were carried through the battle with 
great gallantry, I take pleasure in giving my ofiicial testimony to your very meri- 
torious conduct in that engagement, and trnst that in the future it may be of 
service to you." East Gulf Squadron, in 1864; refitted in Philadelphia, and 
joined the fleet of Admiral Porter, in the James River, and remained there until 
the close of the war; commanded the U- S. S. Kansas, South Atlantic Station, in 
1864-6; visited most of the ports ot hat station; received a letter of thanks 



CAPTAINS. • 301 

from the English government and the British Admiral for going to the assistance 
of H. B. M. gunboat Gleaner, reported to be dangerously ashore in Maldonado 
Bay ; the services of the Kansas were also acknowledged by the British Admiral 
for assisting in rescuing an English merchant vessel (Grleaner), aground on the 
English Bank, River La Plata. 

Commissioned as Commander^ July 25, 1866, and was one of the number 
selected for promotion by a Board of Officers for services in the war ; attached to 
the Navy Yard, Portsmouth, New Hampshire, in 1868-70 ; sent to Europe, in 
1870, in command of the U. S. S. Shenandoah. 

Promoted to Captain, June 19, 1871 ; visited most of the ports on the Medi- 
terranean, and during this cruise, which continued until 1874, received a letter of 
thanks from the Italian government, for assistance rendered to the Italian irou-» 
clad Compt de Verde, in the harbor of Spezia, which vessel broke from her moor- 
ings in a gale of wind, and came near drifting on the rocks ; received the decoration 
of the Legion of Honor from President Thiers, of France, and Congress, by a 
joint resolution, March 3, 1875, authorized its acceptance; detached from the 
Shenandoah at Key West, Florida, January 31, 1874 ; February 26, 1874, 
ordered as Ex.- Officer of the Navy Yard, Boston, Massachusetts; transferred as 
Captain of the Navy Yard, Philadelphia, and Equipment-Officer, October, 1874 ; 
thence to League Island Navy Yard, January 1, 1876, and ordered in command of 
that station, January 10, 1876 ; detached, November 1, 1877, on the completion 
of the full term of three years on duty at the Philadelphia Station. Sea service, 
twenty-two years and six months ; shore duty, nine years and two months ; unem- 
ployed, five years and six months ; in the service, thirty-seven years and three 
months. At present on waiting orders. 



CAPTAIN S. P. QUACKENBUSH, 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, February 15, 1840 ; attached 
to sloop Boston, East India Squadron, 1841-2 ; frigate Raritan, Brazil Squadron, 
1843-5 ; Naval School, 1846 ; sloop Albany, Home Squadron, 1846-7 ; was 
actively engaged in operating against Vera Cruz, and on blockading duty during 
the Mexican War. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, July 11, 1846 ; store-ship Supply, Mediter- 
ranean Squadron, 1847-8 ; Coast Survey, 1849-50 ; mail-steamer Pacific, 1850-1 ; 
mail-steamer Illinois, 1852 ; brig Perry, coast of Africa, 1853-4. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, September 4, 1855 ; Home Squadron, 1856 ; 
steam-frigate Wabash, Home Squadron, 1857-8 ; Navy Yard, Philadelphia, 1859; 
frigate Congress, Brazil Squadron, 1859-61. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, J\i\j IQ, 1862; commanding steamer 
Delaware, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862 ; covered the retreat of 
General Burnside's army at Roanoke Island, and scattered a large body of the 
enemy who were preparing to resist them ; commanding the Delaware, flying 
the divisional flag of Commander S. C. Rowan, at the battles of Roanoke Island, 
Elizabeth City, and Newbern, 1862 ; at Winton, North Carolina, in same vessel, 
engaged a rebel battery and a regiment of infantry at short range ; engagements 
with Sewell's Point battery and a flying battery at Wilcox Landing, and a battery 
on Malvern Hill, James River ; engagement with a battery at Point of Rocks, 
Appomattox River, 1862 ; covered the rear-guard of the army at the retreat to 
Harrison's Landing, 1862 ; commanded the steam-gunboat Unadilla, South Atlantic 
Blockading Squadron, 1863 ; commanding steam-gunboat Pequot, North Atlantic 
Blockading Squadron, 1863-4 ; commanded the iron-clad Patapsco, South Atlantic 



102 CAPTAINS. 

Blockading Squadron, 1864, and while engaged in ascertaining tlie nature and posi- 
tion of the obstructions in Charleston harbor and dragging for torpedoes, was struck 
by one, and sunk in twenty seconds, — this occurred within three hundred and fifty 
yards of Fort Sumter ; commanded the steamer Nungo, South Atlantic Block- 
ading Squadron, Georgetown, South Carolina, for the protection of that place, and 
with a force of light-draught vessels under his command, prevented the re-erection 
of the fort by the enemy, which had been previously destroyed by our fleet. 

Commissioned as Commander^ July 25, 1866; commanding steamer Cone- 
maugh, Atlantic Squadron, 1866-8 ; Navy Yard, Norfolk, 1868-70 ; commanding 
steam-sloop Tustarora, 1871. 

Commissioned as Captam, July, 1871 ; commanding Terror (third-rate), N. 
.A. Station, 1872 ; commanding R. S. New Hampshire, 1873-5. 



CAPTAIN EARL ENGLISH, 

Born in New Jersey. Appointed from New Jersey, February 25, 1840 ; attached 
to frigate Constellation, East India Squadron, 1840--4; steamship Princeton, special 
service, 1844-5; Naval School, 1846. 

Promoted to Passed Midshijmian, July 11, 1846; razee Independence, flag- 
ship, Pacific Squadron, 1846-8 ; present at capture of Mazatlan, 1847 ; steamer 
Yixen, Home Squadron, 1849-50 ; store-ship Southampton, Pacific Squadron, 
1851-3 ; receiving-ship, Philadelphia, 1853 ; Coast Survey, 1854-5. 

Promoted to blaster, 1855. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, September 14, 1855; sloop Levant, East India 
Squadron, 1855-8 ; took part in engagements with Barrier Forts, Canton River, 
China, November, 1856; Navy Yard, Philadelphia, 1859 ; steam-sloop Wyom- 
ing, Pacific Squadron, 1860-1 ; commanding steamer Somerset, Eastern Gulf 
Blockading Squadron, 1862; capture of fort at mouth of St. Mark's River, 
Florida, June 15, 1862. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, July 16, 1862 ; commanding steam- 
gunboat Sagamore, East Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1863; captured and de- 
stroyed town of New Smyrna, Florida, July 28, 1863; commanding steam-gun- 
boat Pontiac, 1864 ; commanding steamer Wyalusing, North Atlantic Blockading 
Squadron, 1864-5; capture of Plymouth, North Carolina, October, 1864; in 
action with rebel batteries and infantry, on Roanoke River, near Poplar Point, 
North Carolina, during the expedition up that river, the advance being prevented 
by torpedoes, December, 1864 ; ordnance duty. Navy Yard, New York, 1866. 

Commissioned as Commander, July 25, 1866 ; commanding steam-sloop Iro- 
quois, Asiatic Squadron, 1867-9 ; commanding flag-ship Delaware, Asiatic 
Fleet, 1870. 

Commissioned Captain, September 28, 1871 ; special duty, 1872; Navy Yard, 
Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 1873; commanding Congress (second-rate), Euro- 
pean Station, 1873-6 ; Navy Yard, Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 1876-8. 



CAPTAIN REIGART B. LOWRY, 

Born in South America, July 14, 1826. Appointed from Pennsylvania, January 
21, 1840; attached to sloop Boston, East India Squadron, 1840-3; steamer 
Princeton, special service, 1844-5 ; Naval School, 1846. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, July 11, 1846; Home Squadron, during 
Mexican War; present at Tampico, Tuspan, Vera Cruz, Tobasco, Seven Palms, 



CAPTAINS. 103 

and Alvarado ; wounded slightly at Tuspan ; razee Independence, Mediterranean 
Squadron, 1850-2; sloop Plymouth, East India Squadron, 1852-4. 

Promoted to Master, 1855. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, September 14, 1855 ; steam-frigate Powhatan, 
East India Squadron, 1855-6; receiving-ship, New York, 1857-8; sloop Preble, 
Brazil Squadron, 1858-9 ; special duty, 1860-1 ; steam-sloop Pawnee, Atlantic 
coast, 1861 ; was present in Pawnee in first firing on Sumter; engagement at 
Acquia Creek, Potomac River, 1861 ; commanded steamer Freeborn in engage- 
ment at Matthias Point and other affairs on Potomac Eiver ; suggested Hatteras 
Expedition, and gave information which led to it ; received thanks of the Sec- 
retary of the Navy for the same, August, 1861 ; commanded steamer Under- 
writer, in Albemarle Sound, 1861 ; was Executive-Officer of steam-sloop 
Brooklyn in the battles with the forts below New Orleans, and at the capture 
of the city ; first attack on Vicksburg, June 30, 1862 ; commanded steamer 
Scioto, Western Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1862-3 ; engagement at Donald- 
sonville, Louisiana, between Scioto and rebel force of nine hundred men and 
seven pieces of artillery, October 5, 1862 ; engagement with batteries at Gal- 
veston, January, 1863. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, July 16, 1862; special duty, 
Washington, 1863-4; commanding apprentice-ship Sabine, 1864-8. 

Commissioned as Commander, July 25, 1866 ; commanding flag-ship, North 
Atlantic Fleet, 1869-70. 

Commissioned as Captain., November 2, 1871 ; commanding steam-sloop 
Canandaigua, N. A. Station, 1872-4 ; Naval Station, New London., Connecticut, 
1875-6. 

CAPTAIN JOHN H. UPSHER, 

Born in Virginia, December 5, 1823. Appointed from Virginia, November 4, 
1841 ; attached to frigate Congress, Mediterranean Squadron, 1841-3 ; sloop St. 
Mary's, Mediten-anean Squadron, 1843-6 ; Home Squadron, during Mexican 
War ; in the Naval Battery, during the bombardment of Vera Cruz ; Naval 
School, 1847. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, August 10, 1847 ; frigate Cumberland, 
Mediterranean Squadron, 1849-50; ordnance duty, 1852; store-ship Supply, 
East India Squadron, 1853-6. 

Promoted to Master, 1855. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, September 14, 1855 ; ordnance duty, Washington 
Navy Yard, 1856-7 ; sloop Cumberland, coast of Africa, 1858-9 ; Instructor at 
Naval Academy, 1859-60 ; North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1861 ; at cap- 
ture of forts at Hatteras, North Carolina ; steam-frigate Wabash, South Atlantic 
Blockading Squadron, 1861 ; present at battle of Port Royal ; commanding 
steamer Flambeau, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862-3 ; several expe- 
ditions up the rivers of South Carolina. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, July 16, 1862; commanding steam- 
frigate Minnesota, flag-ship, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1863-4 ; com- 
manding steamer A. D. Vance, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5; 
at capture of Fort Fisher, January, 1865 ; commanding steamer Frolic, European 
Squadron, 1865-7. 

Commissioned as Commander, July 25, 1866 ; commanding apprentice-ship 
Saratoga, 1868-70 ; special duty. New London, Connecticut, 1871-3. 

Commissioned as Captain, January 31, 1872 ; commanding Brooklyn (second- 
rate), S. A. Station, 1875-6 ; member Board of Inspection, 1877-8. 



104 CAPTAINS. 



CAPTAIN FRANCIS A. ROE, 



Born in New York, October 4, 1823. Appointed from New York, October 19, 
1841; attached to sloop John Adams, Brazil Squadron, 1841-3; sloop York- 
town, coast of Africa, 1844-6; steamer Alleghany, Mediterranean Squadron, 
1846-7 ; Naval School, 1847-8. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, August 10, 1847 ; mail-steamer Georgia, 
1851-2; brig Porpoise, North Pacific Expedition, 1853-4; engagement with 
squadron of fourteen Chinese junks, in 1854 ; defeated the squadron and broke 
up their rendezvous near Macao, sinking a number of junks ; sloop Viucennes, 
North Pacific Expedition, 1855. 

Promoted to Master, 1855. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, September 14, 1855; Coast Survey, 1857-8; 
sloop Macedonian, Mediterranean Squadron, 1859-60 ; Executive-Officer steam- 
sloop Pensacola, Western Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1861-2 ; engagement with 
batteries on the passage down the Potomac ; attack on and passage of Forts Jack- 
son and St. Philip, and Chalmette batteries, nnd capture of New Orleans ; engage- 
ment at Baton Rouge, August 5, 1862. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, July 16, 1862; commanding steam- 
gunboat Katahdin, Western Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1862-3 ; second engage- 
ment at Baton Rouge and destruction of rebel iron-clad Arkansas, August 7, 
1862; two fights near Donaldsonville with masked batteries; engagement at 
Plaquemine, Louisiana ; skirmishing constantly for over four mouths in the 
Katahdin between Baton Rouge and College Point, Louisiana, 1862 ; command- 
ing steamer Sassacus, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1863-4 ; battle of 
rebel iron-clad Albemarle and gunboat Bombshell, May 5, 1864; commanding 
steamer Michigan, on the lakes, 1864-6 ; attached to steam-sloop Madawasca, 
New York, 1866-7. 

. Commissioned as Commander, July 25, 1866 ; commanding steamer Tacony, 
Atlantic Squadron, 1867; Fleet-Captain, Asiatic Squadron, 1868-71; Navy 
Yard, Boston, 1872-3. 

Commissioned as Captain, April 1, 1872; comma^.ding steam-sloop Lancaster, 
S. A. Station, 1873-4 ; Naval Station, New London, 1875-6. 



CAPTAIN SAMUEL R. FRANKLIN, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania, February 18, 1841 ; 
attached to frigate United States, Pacific Squadron, 1841-3 ; store-ship Relief, 
Pacific Squadron, 1845-7 ; present at the demonstration upon Monterey, the 
enemy offering no resistance, and the place being occupied without a battle; 
Naval School, 1847. 

Promoted to Passed Midship)man, August 10, 1847 ; razee Independence, 
Mediterranean Squadron, 1849-52 ; Coast Survey, 1853-5. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, September 14, 1855 ; Naval Academy, 1855-6 ; 
sloop Falmouth, Brazil Squadron, 1857-9 ; sloop Macedonian, Home Squadron, 
1859-60 ; steam-sloop Dacotah, Atlantic coast, 1861-2 ; was a volunteer on 
board of the Roanoke in the action with the Merrimac, March, 1862, in which 
the Congress and Cumberland were destroyed. The Roanoke was engaged with 
the forts at Sewell's Point, but grounded, and did not get fairly into the action. 
Executive-Officer of the Dacotah in the attack upon the batteries at Sewell's 
Point in the spring of 1862. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, July 16, 1862; commanding the 



CAPl ilNS. 105 

steam-gunboat Aroostook, James River Flotilla, 1862; commaiidinfj; Aroostook, 
Western Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1863; sp'^cial duty. New Orleans, 1864; 
on the staff of Acting Rear Admiral Thatcher during the operations in JMobile 
Bay, in the .spring of 1865, and was the naval representative in the demand for 
the surrender of tlie city of Mobile ; commanding steamer Saginaw, North 
Pacific Squadron, 1866-7. 

Commissioned as Commander, September 26, 1866; ordnance duty. Mare 
Island, California, 1868-9 ; commanding steam-sloop Moliican, North Pacific 
Squadron, 1869-70 ; equipment duty, Navy Yard, Mare Island, California, 
1870-2. 

Commissioned as Captain, August 13, 1872 ; commanding steam-frigate Frank- 
lin, European Station, 1873-6 ; Navy Y.rd, Norfolk, 1877. 



CAPTAIN WILLIAM D. WHITING, 

Born in Massachusetts, May 27, 1823. Appointed "at large," March 1, 1841 ; 
attached to sloop Cyane, Pacific Squadron, 1841—4; line-of-battle ship Columbia, 
East India Squadron, 1845-6; sloop Levant, 1846-7; Naval School, 1847-8. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, August 10, 1847 ; sloop Marion, East India 
Squadron, 1849-52 ; Naval Observatory, Washington, 1853 ; Coast Survey, 
1854-7. 

Promoted to llaster, 1855. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, September 14, 1855 ; fria-ate Niagara, laying of 
Atlantic Cable, 1857 ; sloop Marion, coast of Africa, 1858-60 ; Executive-Olficer, 
sloop Vandalia, at capture of Port Royal, 1861 ; commanding steamer Wyandotte, 
South Atlantic Squadron and Potomac Flotilla, 1862. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, July 16, 1862; commanding steam- 
gunboat Ottawa, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1863 ; attack and capture 
of lower end of Morris Island ; attacks on Fort Wagner and Battery Gregg, and 
bombardment up to the time of their evacuation ; commanding school-ship 
Savannah, 1864-5 ; commanding steamer Tioga, coast of Maine and Gulf 
Squadron, 1866. 

Commissioned as Commander, July 25, 1866 ; Navy Yard, New York, 1867-9 ; 
commanding sloop Saratoga, North Atlantic Squadron, 1869; commanding 
double-turret iron-clad Miantonomah, 1870 ; Navy Yard, New York, 1871-2. 

Commissioned as Captain, August 19, 1872 ; commanding flag-ship Worcester, 
N. A. Station, 1872-5 ; Naval Asylum, Philadelphia, 1876-8. 



CAPTAIN EDWARD Y. McCAULEY, 

Born in Pennsylvania, November 2, 1827. Appointed from Pennsylvania 
September 9, 1841; attached to Mediterranean Squadron, 1841-5; frigate 
United States, coast of Africa, 1846-8. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, August 10, 1847 ; frigate Constitution, 
Mediterranean Squadron, 1849-52 ; steam-frigate Powhatan, East India Squadron, 
1852-6 ; present at the attack on pirates, China Seas, 1855. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, September 14, 1855 ; receiving-ship, Philadelphia, 
1856-7 ; steamer Niagara, Cable Expedition, 1857-8 ; Naval Observatory, 
1858-9; resigned, August 19, 1859; re-entered the service as Acting Lieutenant, 
1861 ; steamer Flag, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1861-2. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, July 16, 1862 ; commanding steamer 



106 CAPTAINS. 

Fort Henry, East Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1862-3 ; boat attack on Bayport, 
Florida, and two skirmishes, commanding steam-gunboat Tioga, East Gulf 
Blockading Squadron, 1863-4; gunboat Benton, Mississippi Squadron, 186-4-5; 
special duty, Philadelphia, 1866-7. 

Commissioned as Commander., September 27, 1866 ; Fleet-Captain, North 
Atlantic Squadron, 1867-8; Navy Yard, Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 1868-70; 
Naval Academy, 1871-2. 

Commissioned as Captain September 3, 1872 ; commanding steam-sloop Lacka- 
wanna, Asiatic Station, 1872-5 ; Navy Yard, Boston, 1875-8. 



CAPTAIN J. C. P. DeKRAFFT, 

Born in District of Columbia, January 12, 1826. Appointed from Illinois, 
October 19, 1841 ; attached to frigate Congress, Mediterranean Squadron, 1841-3 ; 
frigate Raritan, Brazil Squadron, 1844-6 ; Home Squadron, 1846 ; first attack on 
Alvarado, 1846; frigate Ohio, Pacific Squadron, 1847 ; Naval School, 1847-8. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, August 10, 1847 ; frigate Raritan, Home 
Squadron, 1849-50 ; Coast Survey, 1851 ; steamer Vixen, Home Squadron, 
1851-2 ; Coast Survey, 1853 ; steamer Michigan, on the lakes, 1855. 

Pi'omoted to Master, 1855. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, September 14, 1855 ; sloop John Adams, Pacific 
Squadron, 1856-8 ; steamer Michigan, on the lakes, 1859 ; frigate Niagara, spe- 
cial service, 1861 ; attack on Fort McCrean, defences of Pensacola, 1861 ; Navy 
Yard, Washington, 1862-3; commanding steamer Conemaugh, Western Gulf 
Blockading Squadron, 1864-6 ; attack on Fort Powell and defences of Mobile 
Bay, August 5, 1864. 

Commissioned as Commander, July 25, 1866 ; special duty, Philadelphia, 1867 ; 
Fleet-Captain, North Atlantic Squadron, 1868-9 ; special duty, Philadelphia, 1870 ; 
Navy Yard, Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 1870-2. 

Commissioned as Captain, November 20, 1872 ; commanding flag-ship Rich- 
mond, N. P. Station, 1873 ; commanding Hartford, flag-ship, Asiatic Squadron, 
1874 ; Navy- Yard, Boston, 1877-8. 



CAPTAIN OSCAR C. BADGER, 

Born in Connecticut. Appointed from Pennsylvania, September 9, 1841 ; at- 
tached to razee Independence, Home Squadron, 1841-2 ; sloop Saratoga, coast of 
Africa, 1843-4 ; was in landing party from the Saratoga, and took part in the 
destruction of the Bereby villages, 1843 ; steamer Mississippi, Gulf Squadron, 
during jMexican War ; at attack on Alvarado, 1846 ; frigate Brandy wine and brig 
Perry, Brazil Squadron, 1847-9. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, August 10, 1847 ; store-ship Supply, Pacific 
Squadron, 1850 ; frigate Savannah, Pacific Squadron, 1850 ; sloop Vincennes, 
Pacific Squadron, as navigator, 1851-2 ; Naval Observatory, Washington, 1853^. 

Promoted to Master, 1855. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, September 15, 1855; sloop John Adams, Pacific 
Squadron, 1855-6, as navigator, — while attached to this vessel, commanded a party 
which attacked and destroyed the village of Vutia, Fejee Islands ; engaged in skir- 
mishes with the Fejeeans, on other occasions ; ordnance-ship Plymouth, 1858 ; 
sloop Macedonian, Mediterranean Squadron, 1858-60 ; steam-frigate Minnesota, 
and Navy Yard, Washington, 1861 ; commanding steamer Anacostia, Potomac 
Flotilla, 1861-2 ; attack on Cock-pit Point battery, January 2, 1862, — was favor- 



CAPTAINS. 107 

ably mentioned, in despatches from the commander of the flotilla, on this occasion ; 
attack on Acquia Creek batteries, March, 1862, and engaged in a number of other 
attacks on Potomac River batteries the same year ; while in command of the Ana- 
costia, was engaged in the siege of Yorktown, Virginia, and defences at Gloucester 
Point. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, July 16, 1862; ordnance-officer in 
charge of arming gunboats building on Western rivers, 1862-3 ; South Atlantic 
Blockading Squadron, 1863 ; engaged in the attack on Morris Island batteries, July 
11, 1863 ; commanded the iron-clad Patapsco, in the attack on Fort Wagner, July 
18, 1863, and on Forts Wagner, Gregg, and Sumter, August 17, 1863 ; commanded 
the iron-clad Montauk, in a night attack on Fort Sumter, August 22, 1863; ap- 
pointed Fleet-Captain, ad interim, of South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, and 
was in the flag-ship Weehawken (iron-clad), in an attack on Fort Sumter on the 
night of September 1, 1863, and was severely wounded, his right leg being shat- 
tered by a metallic splinter ; favorably mentioned in the despatches by the Rear- 
Admiral commanding the squadron for services during these operations ; ordnance 
duty, Navy Yard, Philadelphia, and Inspector of Cannon, Pittsburgh, 1864-6. 

Commissioned as Commander, July 25, 1866; commanding steamer Peoria, 
North Atlantic Squadron, 1866-7 ; received vote of thanks from the legislative 
assemblies of the islands of Antigua and Saint Kitts, for services rendered by his 
command to the authorities, and to the suff'erers by the great fire which destroyed 
the city of Basse Terre, July 4, 1867 ; equipment duty. Navy Yard, Portsmouth, 
New Hampshire, 1868-70 ; commanding steam-sloop Ticonderoga, South Atlantic 
Fleet, 1871-3. 

Commissioned as Captain, November 25, 1872 ; commanding R. S. Ohio, 
1873-4; Navy Yard, Washington, 1875-8; commanding frigate Constitution, 
special service, 1878. 

CAPTAIN STEPHEN BLEECKER LUCE, 

Born in New York, March 25, 1827. Appointed Mldsliipman from New York, 
October 19, 1841, and ordered to the North Carolina, 74, New York ; April, 1842, 
to March, 1845, attached to frigate Congress, Captain P. F. Voorhees, on the 
Mediterranean and Brazil Stations; May, 1845, to March, 1848, attached to the 
Columbus, 74, Commodore James Biddle, circumnavigating the globe, visiting 
Japan, and serving on the coast of California during the Mexican War; April 1, 
1848, ordered to Naval Academy for examination fol" promotion to Passed Mid- 
shipman; August 20, 1849, to October, 1852, attached to Vandalia, Captain 
Wm. H. Gardner, during her cruise in the Pacific; December, 1852, attached to 
astronomical party under Lieutenant J. M. Gilliss, Washington, D. C. ; May 9, 

1853, to February 8, 1854, attached to steamer Vixen, Home Squadron ; May 18, 

1854, to November 16, 1857, attached to U. S. Coast Survey. 
Promoted to blaster, September 15, 1855. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, September 16, 1855; November 16, 1857, to 
February 11, 1860, attached to sloop-of-war Jamestown, Captain C. H. A. H. 
Kennedy, during her cruise in West Indies and on the Isthmus ; March 2, 1860, 
to Naval Academy, as Assistant Instructor; May 2, 1861, ordered to frigate 
Wabash, Captain Wm. Mercer, attached to Blockading Squadron, coast of South 
Carolina ; participated in the battles of Hatteras Inlet and Port Royal ; com- 
manded a howitzer launch of Wabash during a reconnoissance in force and engage- 
ment with rebels at Port Royal Ferry, South Carolina, by combined military and 
naval forces ; January 10, 1862, ordered to Naval Academy, Newport, Rhode Island. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, July 16, 1862 ; June 1, 1863, ordered 



108 CAPTAINS. 

to command practice-ship Macedonian (European cruise) ; October 13,1863, ordered 
to command monitor Nantucket, attached to North Atlantic Blockading Squad- 
ron ; while in command of Nantucket engaged the rebel Forts Sumter and Moul- 
trie a number of times; August 19, 1864, ordered to command Sonoma, double- 
ender. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron ; August 27, 1864, to Canandaigua, 
N. A. B. S. ; September 1, 1864, to June 9, 1865, to Pontiac, N. A. B. S. ; while 
in commaiKl of Pontiac, engaged Battery Marshall ; January 5, 1865, reported to 
General W. T. Sherman, at Savannah, Georgia, for duty in connection with the 
army. With much difficulty got the Pontiac up the Savannah River to Sister's 
Ferry, about forty miles above the city, and guarded the pontoon bridge from 
molestation by the rebels while General Slocum's wing passed into South Caro- 
lina. September 26, 1865, to Naval Academy (Annapolis) ; October 6, 1865, 
relieved Commander Fairfax as ComTiandant of Midshipmen (Naval Academy) ; 
June 8, 1866, ordered to command Practice Squadron, consisting of Macedonian 
and Savannah, frigates ; Winnipec, double-ender ; Saco and Marblehead, steam 
third-rates ; and yacht America (cruise on the coast). 

Comoiissioned as Commander, July 25, 1866 ; June 12, 1867, in command of 
Practice Squadron, consisting of Macedonian, Savannah, and Dale (European 
cruise) ; May 31, 1868, in command of Practice Squadron, consisting of Savan- 
nah, Macedonian, and Dale (West Pomt and European cruise) ; September 30, 
1868, to May 26, 1869, in command of Mohongo, double-ender. Pacific Squad- 
ron ; February 19, 1869, to July 12, 1872, in command of Juniata, Mediterra- 
nean Squadron ; September 14, 1872, to Boston Navy Yard, as Equipment Officer. 

Commissioned as Captain, December 28, 1872 ; December 12, 1873, ordered 
to command frigate Minnesota during the Virginius excitement ; detached on the 
22d, and resumed duties at Boston ; October 15, 1875, detached from Boston Navy 
Yard (as Captain of the Yard) ; November 1, 1875, ordered to command the 
Hartford, at New York, relieving the Worcester as flag-ship of the North Atlantic 
Squadron; August 21, 1877, detached from the Hartford; August 25, 1877, 
ordered as Inspector of Training-Ships ; January 1, 1878, in command of the 
U. S. training-ship Minnesota, New York. 



CAPTAIN JOHN LEE DAVIS, 

Born in Indiana. Appointed Acting Midshipman, January 9, 1841, and ordered 
to receiving-ship North Carolina; Mediterranean Squadron, sloop Fairfield, 1841 
—4; January 25, 1842, warranted Midshipman; Home Squadron, 1845-6, in 
store-ship Lexington, frigate Potomac, brig Porpoise, and schooner Flirt ; engaged 
in the blockade of Vera Cruz and other Mexican ports ; Naval School, 1846-7. 

Warranted Passed Midship>man, August 10, 1847 ; Home Squadron, 1847-8, 
in frigate Cumberland and steamer Iris ; East India Squadron, 1848-51, in sloops 
Plymouth and Preble, and brig Dolphin ; January, 1849, appointed Acting Lieu- 
tenant ; November, 1849, captured a piratical junk near Macao, with Midshipman 
Benham, Captain's-clerk Hudson, and fifteen men ; the enemy lost three killed 
and had many wounded. Midshipman Benham and two men slightly wounded ; 
returned in the Plymouth as Flag-Lieutenant ; Coast Survey, 1851, in brig Wash- 
ington ; coast of Africa, 1852-4, in brig Perry ; during the cruise appointed Acting 
Master, and returned as Executive-Officer ; Coast Survey, 1855-7, Acting Master, 
steamer Corwin. 

Warranted Master, September 15, 1855. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, September 15, 1855 ; Pacific Squadron, 1857-9, in 
sloop Vandalia and steam-frigate Merrimac; leave of absence, 1860 ; Gulf Squadron, 



CAPTAINS. 109 

1861, steamer Water Witch, Executive-Officer ; October 12, 1861, engagenient at 
4 A.M., head of the Passes, Mississippi Kiver, with the rebel ram Manassas, and 
the same day with rebel fleet near Pilot Town ; command of Water Witch was 
tendered, but declined in favor of senior ; ordered as Executive-Officer of the 
frigate Potomac ; November, ordered as Executive-Officer of the steam-frigate 
Colorado ; April 9, 1862, on Captain T. Bailej^'s leaving the ship at Southwest 
Pass, took command and forwarded supplies to fleet up the river. 

Commissioned as Lientenant-Communder, July 16, 1862 ; South Atlantic Block- 
ading Squadron, 1862-4, in command of steamer Vixen, gunboat Wissahickon, 
and iron-clad Montauk; November 7, 1862 (^Wissahickon), burned a rebel schooner 
in the Little Ogeechee River, loaded with naval stores, assisted by the Dawn, Lieu- 
tenant Commanding J. S. Barnes; November 19, engagement with Port McAl- 
lister, Ogeechee Biver, was struck by an 8-inch solid shot about four feet below 
water, with great difficulty stopped the leak temporarily, after the action laid the 
vessel ashore, and at the falling of the tide put in a patch twelve by twenty-three 
inches; January 27, 1863, engaged Fort McAllister, February 1, ditto, and Feb- 
ruary 28, ditto, when the privateer Nashville was dqstroyed ; 3Iarch 19, sunk the 
blockade-runner steamer Georgiana, in attempting to get into Charleston ; June 5, 
pursued the steamer Isaac Smith, loaded with cotton, running out of Charleston 
harbor, and by shot disabled her, when she ffas beached under Fort JMouItric and 
lost, and her cargo damaged ; July 11, engaged Cummings' Point battery ; from 
July 12 to 18, inclusive. Fort Wagner ; August 17, Fort Sumter ; August 18, Fort 
Wagner ; in command of Montauk, September 1, engaged Fort Sumter, etc. ; 
September 6, Fort Gregg, etc. ; September 7, Fort Sumter, etc. ; September 8, 
battle with Fort Moultrie, Battery Bee, etc., in company with the other monitors 
and New Ironsides; November 5, 9, and 10, Fort Sumter; November 16, Fort 
Moultrie; North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5, in command of steamer 
Sassacus ; November 5 and 6, 1864, chased the privateer Tallahassee ; December, 
towed the Louisiana, powder-boat, from Norfolk to Fort Fisher via Beaufort ; 
December 24 and 25, engaged Fort Fisher; J inuary 13 and 14, 1865, Fort 
Fisher; January 15, battle with Fort Fisher, etc. ; February 18, Fort Anderson, 
in Cape Fear Biver ; February 20 and 21, Fort Strong, on the last day was struck 
several times, a 30-pounder Parrot shell was received about three feet below water, 
the leak was kept under until night, when it was effectually stopped ; Navy Yard, 
Philadelphia, 1865-6. 

Commissioned as Commander, July 25, 1866; special duty, 1866-8; Navy 
Yard, Washington, 1868-71 ; commanding Wyoming (third-rate), 1872. 

Commissioned as Captain, February 14, 1873 ; member Light-House Board, 
1873-6 ; commanding Trenton, flag-ship European Squadron, 1877-8. 



CAPTAIN ALEXANDER A. SEMMES, 

Born in District of Columbia. Appointed frou Maryland, October 22, 1841 ; 
attached to frigate Columbus, Mediterranean Squadron, 1841-3; skirmish with 
the natives at Grand Bereby, Africa; sloop Vucennes, East India Squadron, 
1845-6; Naval School, 1847. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, August 10, 1847; Naval Observatory, 
Washington, 1849-50 ; frigate Congress, Brazil Squadron, 1851-2 ; Coast Survey, 
1853 ; Naval Observatory, Washington, 1854. 

Promoted to blaster, 1855. 
• Commissioned as Lieutenant, September 15, 1855; steamer Massachusetts, 
Pacific Squadron, 1855-7 ; November, 1856, commanded a force of twenty-three 



no CAPTAINS. 

sailors and marines in a successful attack upon an encampment of one hundred 
Russian- American Indians in Puget Sound ; steam-sloop Powhatan, East India 
Squadron, 1859-60 ; steamer Rhode Island, Atlantic coast, 1861 ; commanding 
steamer Wamsutta, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862-3 ; engaged in 
skirmish with rebels at an island in Newport River, G-eorgia, April, 1 862 ; 
commanding steam-gunboat Tahoma, East Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1863-4:; 
attacked the batteries of Tampa, Florida, April, 1863, and in October, 1863, 
attacked same batteries as a ruse while despatching a party of sailors to capture 
some blockade-runners ; September, 1863, while in command of a light-draught 
steamer, with detachment from various vessels of the East G-ulf Squadron, made 
a demonstration on Bayport, Florida, which resulted in the destruction of an 
English blockade-running steamer and the warehouse containing her cargo ; com- 
manding iron-clad Lehigh, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; 
bombarding of Fort Pringle, July 7-10, 1864 ; picket duty in the harbor of 
Charleston during the fall and winter of 1864-5 ; February, 1865, commanding 
the Lehigh, and senior-officer of six vessels operating against the rebel defences 
on James Island ; fall of Charleston, 1865 ; commanded the Lehigh in a midnight 
bombardment of the Howlett House batteries on James River ; fall of Richmond ; 
ordnance duty, Philadelphia, 1866-8. 

Commissioned as Commander, July 25, 1866 ; commanding sloop Portsmouth, 
South Atlantic Squadron, 1869-71 ; Navy Yard, Pensacola, 1872^. 

Commissioned as Captain, August 24, 1873 ; commanding Alaska (second- 
rate), European Station, 1875-6. 



CAPTAIN WILLIAM T. TRUXTON, 

Born in Pennsylvania, March 11, 1824. Appointed from Pennsylvania, Feb- 
ruary 9, 1841 ; attached to frigate Cumberland, Home Squadron, 1842-4; brig 
Truxton, coast of Africa, 1844-5 ; Naval School, 1846. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, August 10, 1847 ; store-ship Supply, Pacific 
Squadron, 1850-2 ; brig Dolphin, special service, 1853 ; special duty, 1854. 

Promoted to Master, 1855. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, September 15, 1855 ; Coast Survey, 1855-7 ; 
brig Perry, Brazil Squadron, 1858-60 ; sloop Dale, 1861 ; commanding sloop 
Dale, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, July 16, 1862; commanding steam- 
gunboat Chocura, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1863 ; commanding steam- 
gunboat Tacony, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1863-5 ; capture of Ply- 
mouth, North Carolina, October, 1864 ; two "attacks on Fort Fisher, North Carolina, 
December, 1864, and January, 1865 ; various engagements with batteries along 
the coast of North Carolina ; special duty. Navy Yard, Philadelphia, 1866-7, 

Commissioned as Commander, July 25, 1866 ; commanding sloop Jamestown, 
North Pacific Squadron, 1868-70 ; ordnance duty. Navy Yard, Boston, 1871-3. 

Commissioned as Captain, September 25, 1873 ; commanding Brooklyn (second- 
rate), North Atlantic Station, 1873-4, and flag-ship, S. A. Station, 1874-5 ; mem- 
ber Board of Inspectors, 1876 ; Navy Yard, Norfolk, 1877-8. 



CAPTAIN JONATHAN YOUNG, 

Born in Ohio. Appointed from Illinois, October, 1841 ; attached to the steamer 
Mississippi and sloop-of-war Vincennes, Home Squadron, 1841-4 ; boat expedi- 



CAPTAINS. Ill 

tion after pirates about the Isle of Pines, on south side of the Island of Cuba, 
1842 ; captured a slave-vessel with five hundred slaves on board ; attached to the 
line-ot-battle ship Columbus, 74 guns, flag-ship of Commodore James Biddle, P]ast 
Indies, and around the world, 1845-8 ; made a forcible entry into the harbor of 
Yeddo, Japan, 1846, to deliver a letter from the President of the United States 
to the Emperor of Japan, and receive a reply ; participated in the Mexican War 
on the coast of California. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, August 10, 1847 ; attached to the frigate 
Raritan, flag-ship of Commodore Parker, Home Squadron, 1849-50 ; sloop-of war 
St. Mary's, Pacific Squadron, and around the world, 1850-2 ; Naval Observatory, 
1853 ; steamer Massachusetts, Pacific Squadron, 1854-7. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, September, 1855 ; engaged in a war with In- 
dians in Puget Sound, Washington Territory, in command of the landing forces ; 
Naval Observatory, 1858; steamer Westernport, Paraguay Expedition, 1858-9; 
Naval Observatory, 1859-60 ; steam-frigate Susquehanna, Gulf, Mediterranean, 
and Atlantic coast, 1860-1 ; participated in the capture of Hatteras Inlet and 
Port Royal ; Executive-Ofiicer of the sloop-of-war Jamestown, blockading off 
Wilmington, North CaroHna, November, 1861, to June, 1862; Executive-Ofiicer 
of the steam-frigate Powhatan, ofi" Charleston, South Carolina, June to November, 
1862. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, 3 vi[y 1^,1QQ2] commanded steam- 
gunboat Pembina, ofi" Mobile, 1863 ; engagement with shore batteries planted for 
the purpose of driving her farther off shore, silenced the battery, and forced it to 
retire ; under fire from troops on shore while destroying a rebel blockade- runner 
stranded on the beach; temporary ordnance duty, 1863, while recruiting from an 
attack of fever contracted while on duty in Pensacola harbor ; commanded the 
steamer Cimarron, blockading off the coast of South Carolina and Georgia, from 
March to July, 1864 ; commanded the iron-clad monitor Sangamon, off Charles- 
ton, from July, 1864, until the fall of Savannah and Charleston ; in all the 
engagements with the defences of Charleston harbor, from July, 1864, to Febru- 
ary, 1865 ; after the surrender of these cities, his vessel was ordered up the coast 
to reinforce Admiral Porter's fleet off Wilmington and up the James River; 
detached from command of the Sangamon, March 28, 1865 ; commanding the 
receiving-ship Vandalia, Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 1865-7 ; was recommended 
for promotion by the Board of Admirals, for gallant and meritorious service during 
the war. The gallant and zealous services of Commander Young during the Rebel- 
lion elicited letters of high commendation from Vice-Admiral Porter, Rear- 
Admirals Gardner, Bailey, Dahlgren, Godon, and many others, under whose 
command he had served. 

Promoted to Commander; commanding the steamer Mohaska, North Atlantic 
Squadron, 1867-8 ; Naval Observatory, 1869-70 ; Navy Yard, Portsmouth, New 
Hampshire, 1871-2 ; commanding R. S. Ohio, 1872-3. 

Commissioned as Captain, November 8, 1873 ; Navy Yard, Portsmouth, New 
Hampshire, 1873-6 ; commanding flag-ship Tennessee, Asiatic Squadron, 1876-8. 



CAPTAIN WILLIAM KENNON MAYO, 

Born at Drummondtown, Virginia. Appointed Midshipman from Virginia, Octo- 
ber 18, 1841 ; began naval service on the Pennsylvania, 120, at Norfolk. Virginia, 
in November, 1841 ; joined the flag-ship United States (frigate). Pacific Squadron, 
November 19, 1841, and transferred to the Cyane, February, 1843 ; at the capitu- 
lation of Monterey, in charge of the boats of the landing party ; November, 1844, 



112 CAPTAINS. 

ordered to the sloop St. Mary's, of the Texas Annexation Squadron ; served in her 
during the entire war with Mexico ; blockade of Tampico and Vera Cruz ; bom- 
bardment of forts at the mouth of Tampico Elver ; attempt to cut out three gun- 
boats in Tampico River ; planting of and service at the Naval Battery, Vera Cruz ; 
fall of Vei-a Cniz and Tampico; September, 1847, ordered to be a pupil of the 
Naval School ; passed examination July 14, 1848. 

Warranted Passed Midshipman., August 10, 1847 ; during July, 1848, ordered 
to the frigate St. Lawrence, European seas ; March, 1851, ordnance duty at Nor- 
folk, Virginia ; July, 1851, ordered to the brig Dolphin, on special service to make 
scientific observations in the North Atlantic, surveys, etc. ; commended as an accu- 
rate and critical navigator (Senate Doc, " Cruise of the Dolphin") ; July, 1852, 
ordered to the steam-frigate Saranac, on special service, to Brazil ; commended by 
the Department, May, 1853; during July, 1853. ordered to the Coast Survey, 
and in November of the same year, to the sloop Cyane, detailed from the Home 
Squadron for the use of Lieutenant J. Gr. Strain's party for the exploration of a 
canal route from the Atlantic to the Pacific Ocean, over the Isthmus of Darien; 
member of the United States party that made th.Q first topographic reconnoissance 
/ about, and the first complete hydrographic survey of the Bay of Sassardic or Cale- 
donia Bay, and member of the party that sought Strain in the wilderness; June, 
1854, ordered to the Coast Survey ; October, 1854, ordered to the Naval Academy, 
in Executive Department, and as Instructor in Seamanship, Naval Tactics, and 
Gunnery, with promotion to Acting Master , cruise of the Practice ship, 1855 ; 
special commendation (Report of Secretary of the Navy, 1855, page 76) ; author 
of the MS. " System of Naval Tactics and Fleet Sailing," taught at the Academy, 
the only one used. 

Promoted Master^ September 14, 1855. 

Commissioned Lieutenant, September 15, 1855 ; May, 1857, joined the steam- 
frigate Minnesota, which sailed on a special diplomatic mission to Asia ; September, 

1859, ordered to the Naval Academy, as Instructor in Ethics, etc.; February, 

1860, ordered to Norfolk, Pennsylvania, 120 ; December, 1860, to the sloop St. 
JMai-y's, of the Pacific Fleet; ordered East, January, 1862, and assigned the Ex- 
ecutive-Officer of the new steam-sloop Housatouic, blockade of Charleston, South 
Carolina. 

Commissioned Lieutenant- Commander, July 16, 1862; in command of the 
gunboat Kanawha, Western Gulf Squadron, November, 1862 ; engagement with 
riflemen and field batteries. Mobile Point; fight with Fort Morgan, on October 12, 
1863 ; commended for gallantry, etc. (Report of Secretary of the Navy, 1864. 
page 478); capture of six schooners ; directed capture of three steamers ; detached 
from the Kanawha, November, 1863; in February, 1864, special (iron-clad) duty 
in New York City ; May, 1864, took a draft of contrabands to the Pacific Fleet, at 
Panama, New Granada ; July, 1864, under direct orders from the Department, took 
command of the monitor Nahant, in front of Charleston, South Carolina ; July, 
1864, discovered that the port of Charleston WaS not closed to commerce ; this led 
to a more vigorous system of picket duty, by which nine trading steamers were run 
ashore in seven months ; aft'airs with Fort Moultrie as episodes of picket duty ; 
fall of Charleston, February, 1865 ; general commendation as an iron-clad Com- 
mander (see Secretary of Navy's Report, 1864, page 11) ; March, 1865, Ordnance- 
Officer of the South Atlantic Blockading Fleet, and command of Bay Point Depot 
until May, 1866. 

Commissioned Commander., July 25, 1866, under the operation of the proviso 
of the first section of the statute ; from November, 1866, to May, 1869, on navi- 
gation duty at Boston, Massachusetts; inventor of the Naval Standard Binnacles, 
type of Jauuary, 1869 ; commanding steam-slocp Tuscarora, North Atlantic Fleet, 



CAPTAINS. 113 

1870 ; commanding Congress (second-rate), N. A. Fleet, 1870-1 ; commanding 
Omaha (second-rate), North Pacific Station, 1872-4, 
Commissioned as Captain, December 12, 1873. 



CAPTAIN JAMES E. JOUETT, 

Born in Kentucky. Appointed from Kentucky, September 10, 1841 ; attached 
to razee Independence, 1841-3 ; sloop Decatur, coast of Africa, 1844-5 ; steamer 
Princeton, Gulf Squadron, 1846-7 ; during the Mexican War held Point Isabel 
with sailors from the squadron ; Naval School, 1847. 

Promoted to Passed 3Iidshipman, August 10, 1847 ; frigate St. Lawrence, 
Mediterranean Squadron, 1848-50 ; store-ship Lexington, Pacific Squadron, 1851 
-2; mail-steamer Illinois, 1853-4; sloop St. Mary's, Pacific Squadron, 1855-7. 

Promoted to 3Iaster, 1855. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, September 15, 1855 ; steamer Michigan, on the 
lakes, 1858; steamer N. W. Chapin, Brazil Squadron, and Paraguay Expedition, 
1858-9 ; steamer Crusader, Home Squadron, 1860 ; steamer Michigan, on the 
lakes, 1861 ; frigate Santee, Western Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1861-2. On 
November 7, 1861, Lieutenant Jouett commanded a detachment of sailors and 
marines from the Santee, who boarded and destroyed the rebel armed schooner 
Royal Yacht, in Galveston Bay ; Lieutenant Jouett had a desperate hand-to-hand 
conflict with the commander of the rebel vessel, and received two severe wounds 
in the right arm, and right side and lung, from a pike in the hands of one of the 
crew of the schooner who came to the assistance of his commander ; Lieutenant 
Jouett received the commendation of his commanding officer, and the thanks of 
the Department, for this achievement. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, July 16, 1862; steamer Michigan^ 
on the lakes, 1862 ; commanding steamer E. R. Cuyler, Western Gulf Blockading- 
Squadron, 1863; commanding steamer Metacomet, Western Gulf Blockading; 
Squadron, 1863-4; battle of Mobile Bay, August 5, 1864. Soon after the fleet 
had passed the forts at the entrance of Mobile Bay, Lieutenant-Commander Jouett 
was ordered to pursue the three rebel gunboats who were annoying the fleet by 
a raking fire. They steamed up the bay, closely pursued by the Metacomet, and 
engaged that vessel with their stern guns, of which they had three each. The 
Gaines retreated under cover of the fort in a crippled condition, the Morgan hauled 
ofi" to starboard, and the Selma struck her flag to the Metacomet, and was taken 
possession of by an officer detailed for that purpose by Lieutenant-Commander- 
Jouett. Rear-Admii-al Farragut, in his official report of the battle of Mobile Bay,. 
says, " Lieutenant-Commander Jouett's conduct during the whole afiair commands 
my warmest commendation." Naval rendezvous, Philadelphia, 1865-6. 

Commissioned as Commander, July 25, 1866 ; Navy Yard, New York, 1867-8 ;. 
commanding steamer Michigan, on the lakes, 1868-70; ordnance duty, Navy 
Yard, Norfolk, 1871-2 ; Member Board of Inspectors, 1873. 

Commissioned as Captain, June 6, 1874; commanding Powhatan (second- 
rate), special service, 1873-6 ; Member Board of Inspection, 1877-8. 



CAPTAIN T. SCOTT FILLEBROWN, 

Born in District of Columbia. Appointed from Maine, October 19, 1841 ; 
attached to frigate Congress, Mediterranean Squadron, 1842-5 ; steam-frigate: 

8 



114 CAPTAINS. 

Mississippi, Home Squadron, 1846-7 ; was present in all the operations on the 
Gulf coast during the Mexican War ; Naval School, 1847. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, August 10, 1847; frigate St. Lawrence, 
North Europe and Mediterranean Squadron, 1849-51 ; Naval Observatory, 
Washington, 1851 ; store-ship Lexington, Pacific Squadron, 1851-2 ; sloop 
Vincennes, North Pacific Expedition, 1852-6. 

Promoted to Master, 1855. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, September 15, 1855 ; Naval Observatory, Wash- 
ington, 1857-8; steamer Release, Brazil Squadron and Paraguay Expedition, 
1858-9 ; commanding steamer Anacostia, special service, 1859-60 ; steam-frigate 
Roanoke, Atlantic coast, 1861. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, 3v\j 16, 1862; Navy Yard, New 
York, 1862-3; commanding steam-gunboat Chenarugo, 1863; while going down 
New York harbor in the Chenango, lost four officers and thirty men by the ex- 
plosion of her boiler ; commanding iron-clad Passaic, operating against Fort Sum- 
ter, during May, 1864 ; commanding iron-clad Montauk, operating against Battery 
Pringle, in Stono River, South Carolina, during July, 1864 ; commanding steamer 
Sonoma, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5; engagement with rebel 
batteries in Tagoda River, February, 1865 ; Naval Observatory, Washington, 1866. 

Commissioned as Commander, July 25, 1866 ; Hydrographic Office, Washing- 
ton, 1867-8; commanding steam-sloop Narragansett, North Atlantic Squadron, 
1869 ; special duty, Washington, D. C, 1869-70 ; Bureau of Equipment, 1871-2 ; 
commanding Shenandoah (second-rate), European Station, 1873. 

Commissioned as Captain, January 6, 1874; Navy Yard, Norfolk, 1874-6; 
commanding. Powhatan (second-rate), N. A. Station, 1877-8. 



CAPTAIN JOHN H. RUSSELL, 

Born in Maryland. Appointed from same State, September 14, 1841 ; attached 
to sloop Cyane, Pacific Squadron, 1841-3 ; sloop St. Mary's, Mediterranean 
Squadron, 1844-6 ; steamer Alleghany, Mediterranean Squadron, 1847. 

Promoted to Passed Midsldpman, August 10, 1847; mail-steamer Georgia, 
1850-2 ; North Pacific Exploring Expedition, 1852-6. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, September 15, 1855 ; ordnance duty, Washing- 
iton, 1857-61. Lieutenant Russell was stationed at the Washington Navy Yard 
.at the beginning of the Rebellion, and was one of the large number of officers 
there at the time who remained loyal ; the Commandant, Captain Buchanan, and 
all the others, except Dahlgren and Russell, going over to the rebels. Lieutenant 
JRussell was detached as one of the officers to go to the Norfolk Navy Yard to 
bring the United States vessels away, and had charge of the last boat which left 
,the yard. Steam-frigate Colorado, 1861 ; led the boarding party in the attack on 
jebel privateer Judith, at Pensacola, Florida, 1861 ; wounded in the arm by buck- 
shot. For the destruction of the Judith he was complimented by the Navy De- 
partment, and received the thanks of the Maryland Legislature. Commanding 
steam-gunboat Kennebec, Western Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1862-3 ; bombard- 
ment of Forts Jackson and St. Philip. The Kennebec was the first vessel to 
.cross the bar, and the first gun fired from the forts was at that ship. In all the 
.actions up to and including Vicksburg. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, July 16, 1862 ; commanding steam- 
sloop Powhatan, South Atlantic Squadron, 1863 ; ordnance duty, Washington, 
1864 ; commanding sloop Cyane, Pacific Squadron, 1864-5 ; ordnance duty, Navy 
Yard, Norfolk, 1866 ; Navy Yard, Mare Island, California, 1866-9. 



CAPTAINS. 115 

Commissioned as Commander, January 28, 1867 ; commanding steam-sloop 
Ossipee, Pacific Fleet, 1869-71 ; Navy Yard, Mare Island, 1872-3. 

Couiniissioned as C^ip^am, February 12,1874; commanding steam-sloop Plym- 
outh, North Atlantic Station, 1875; special duty, 1876; commanding Powhatan 
(second-rate), 1876-7. 

CAPTAIN ANDREW W. JOHNSON, 

Born in District of Columbia. Appointed from District of Columbia, October 
19, 1841 ; attached to sloop Marion, West India Squadron, 1841-3; sloop War- 
ren, Pacific Squadron, 1844-7. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, August 10, 1847 ; store-ship Erie, Pacific 
Squadron, 1848; store-ship Relief, Mediterranean Squadron, 1850-1; Naval 
Observatory, Washington, 1850-2 ; sloop Levant, Mediterranean Squadron, 
1853-5. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, September 15, 1855 ; Naval Observatory, 1856-7 ; 
steam-frigate Saranac, Pacific Squadron, 1858-9 ; sloop Savannah, North Atlantic 
Blockading Squadron, 1861 ; engagement with rebel steamer Teazer, in James 
River, Virginia ; two engagements with rebel steamer Yorktown, in James River, 
Virginia, 1861 ; steam-sloop Saranac, Pacific Squadron, 1862-3. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, July 16, 1862; steam-sloop Lan- 
caster, Pacific Squadron, 1864 ; South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; 
engagements in iron-clads Lehigh and Montauk, with rebel batteries in Stono 
River, South Carolina, from July 3 to 9, 1864 ; Naval Observatory, Washington, 
1866-8. 

Commissioned as Commander, February 2, 1867; Chief-of-StaflF of South At- 
lantic Squadron, 1869-72 ; Naval Observatory, 1872-3. 

Commissioned as Captain, April 5, 1874 ; commanding training-ship Minne- 
sota, 1874r-7. 

CAPTAIN WALTER W. QUEEN, 

Born in District of Columbia, October 6, 1824. Appointed from New York, 
October 7, 1841 ; attached to sloop Marion, West India Squadron, 1841-3 ; 
brig Perry, East India Squadron, 1843-5; frigate Cumberland, Home Squad- 
ron, during Mexican War; stationed at Point Isabel during battles of Palo 
Alto and Resaca de la Palma, May 8 and 9, 1846 ; attacks on Alvarado, 
Tampico, Tuspan, and Vera Cruz; frigate Ohio, Pacific Squadron, 1847; Naval 
School, 1847. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, August 10, 1847 ; resigned, 1847, and re- 
entered the service in 1854. 

Promoted to Master, 1855. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, September 16, 1855 ; store-ship Relief, Brazil 
Squadron, 1855; steamer Michigan, on the lakes, 1856; East India Squadron, 
1857-8; receiving-ship, Baltimore, 1859-60; steam-sloop Powhatan, special ser- 
vice, 1861 ; attached to Powhatan during the reinforcement of Fort Pickens, 
Florida, 1861, and served nineteen days on shore at the fort, in charge of the 
boats of the fleet ; commanded Second Division (seven schooners) of the IMortar 
Flotilla, under Commander Porter, during the bombardment of Forts Jackson and 
St. Philip, and during the attack on Vicksburg, when Flag-Officer Farragut passed 
the batteries with his fleet. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, July 16, 1862; ordnance duty, 
Navy Yard, Washington, 1862-3 ; commanding steam-gunboat Wyalusing, North 



116 CAPTAINS. 

Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1863-4; commanded the Wyalusing in the en- 
gagement with rebel ram Albemarle and her consorts, the Bombshell and Cotton- 
Plant, May 5, 1864, when the ram, to prevent capture, sought refuge in the Roanoke 
Eiver ; ordnance duty, Reading, Pennsylvania, 1865-6. 

Commissioned as Commander, July 25, 1866 ; special duty, Hartford, Con- 
necticut, 1867 ; commanding steam-sloop Tuscarora, South Pacific Squadron, 
1867-70; commanding receiving-ship Potomac, 1871-2; Navy Yard, Washing- 
ton, 1873-4. 

Commissioned as Captain, June 4, 1874; commanding Saranac, North Pacific 
Station, 1874; North Pacific Station, 1875; commanding receiving-ship Wor- 
cester, 1876-7 ; commanding receiving-ship Franklin, 1877-8. 



CAPTAIN RALPH CHANDLER, 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, September 27, 1845 ; Naval 
School, 1846 ; razee Independence, flag-ship Pacific Squadron, 1846-8 ; blockade 
of Mazatlan, Mexico, for thirty-five days in 1847; capture of Mazatlan and 
two skirmishes during its occupancy of eight months by the naval forces ; Vin- 
cennes, Pacific Squadron, 1849-50. 

Promoted to Passed 3Iidshipman, October 6, 1851 ; Naval Academy, 1852; 
sloop St. Louis, Captain Ingraham, Mediterranean Squadron, 1853-5; Koszta 
affair in Smyrna, 1854. 

Promoted to Master, 1855, 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, September 16, 1855; Coast Survey, 1856-7; 
received complimentary letter of thanks from Professor A. D. Bache, Superintendent 
of Coast Survey, for carrying schooner Crawford safely through a series of hard 
gales and cyclones lasting twenty-four days ; the schooner hung off Hatteras at 
the time bad weather came on ; survey of Parana River and tributaries, 1858-9 ; 
sloop Vandalia, 1860-1; battle of Port Royal; steam-sloop San Jacinto, North 
Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862 ; engagement with Sewell's Point batteries 
and capture of Norfolk, 1862 ; steam-sloop San Jacinto, East Gulf Blockading 
Squadron, 1862-3 ; received the thanks of the Navy Department for the re- 
covery of the propeller that broke off from the shaft in the Bahama Channel. 
The drawings showing the manner in which it was accomplished are at the Naval 
Academy, and are referred to in lectures on seamanship. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, July 16, 1862 ; commanding steamer 
Huntsville, East Gulf Blockading Squadron, 186.3-4 ; commanding steam-gun- 
boat Maumee, North Atlantic Squadron, 1864-5 ; bombardment and capture of 
Fort Fisher, Forts Anderson and Lee, on Wilmington River, and capture of Wil- 
mington ; in command of double-ender Lenapee, 1865 ; in command of monitor 
Sangamon, 1865, on James River ; was detailed by Admiral Porter to remove 
the torpedoes and clear the channel to Richmond, which duty was successfully 
accomplished without accident ; steamer Don, special service, 1866-8 ; discovered 
and surveyed the Cultivator Shoal, about fifty miles east of Cape Cod. 

Commissioned as Commander, July 25, 1866 ; commanding steamer Talla- 
poosa, special service, 1869-70 ; Navy Yard, New York, 1870-4. 

Promoted to Captain, June 4, 1874 ; commanding Swatara, transit of 
Venus Expedition, 1874-5 ; landed five parties of observation in the Southern 
Hemisphere : one at the Desolation Islands, Indian Ocean ; two at Tasmania ; 
one at New Zealand ; and one at the Chatham Islands, five hundred miles east of 
New Zealand ; was informed that the German party for the observation of the 
transit, located at the Auckland Islands, about five hundred miles south of N. New 



CAPTAINS. 117 

Zealand, was in distress. Immediately went there from Tasmania, found the 
party all right ; compared their chronometers with the thirty on board the Swatara, 
which added greatly to the correctness of their observation of the transit. 

(Copy.) "Imperial German Legation, 

" Washington, May 23, 1876. 

" Sir, — The members of the German Expedition appointed two years ago to 
observe the transit of Venus have now made their report to the Imperial govern- 
ment. 

" It appears from this report in what humane and kind manner you have acted, 
when you sailed from Melbourne to the Auckland Islands to support there the 
members of the German Expedition. 

" These members have also pointed out in the report the readiness with which 
you put at their disposal the chronometers of the Swatara, — a kindness which 
has facilitated the German Expedition in their work to determine the longitude 
of the Auckland station. 

" In consequence thereof, the Chancellor of the German Empire, Prince Bis- 
marck, has instructed me to tender to you his warmest thanks for your noble and 
valuable support accorded to our countrymen. 

" It affords me a great honor and pleasure to execute such order of Prince 
Bismarck by this letter, and I beg you, sir, to accept on this occasion the assur- 
ance of my very high esteem. 

" (Signed) SCHLOZER, 

" German Minister. 

" To Captain Ralph Chandler, United States Navy.'' 

" II. S. Navy Yard, Boston, May 29, 1876. 
" Forwarded by 
(Signed) "ED. T. NICHOLAS, Commandant:' 

Commanding frigate Wabash, receiving-ship, Boston, 1875-8. 



CAPTAIN PHILIP C. JOHNSON, Jr., 

Born in Maine. Appointed from Maine, August 31, 1846 ; during the Mexican 
War, present at the bombardment of Vera Cruz and at Tuspan ; attached to 
frigate Ohio, Pacific Squadron, 1847-8; Naval School, 1850; frigate Congress, 
Brazil Squadron, 1850-1 ; Naval Academy, 1852. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 8, 1852; store-ship Fredonia, Pacific 
Squadron, 1853 ; Coast Survey, 1854-9. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, September 16, 1855 ; steam-sloop San Jacinto, 
coast of Africa, 1859-61 ; commanding steamer Tennessee, Western Gulf Squad- 
ron, 1861-3 ; present at the bombardment and passage of Forts Jackson and 
St. Philip. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, July 16, 1862; steamer Katahdin, 
Western Gulf Squadron, 1864; Naval Academy, 1865-6; steamer Sacramento, 
special service to North Pacific Squadron, 1866-8. 

Commissioned as Commander, February 2, 1867 ; Fleet-Captain, South Pacific 
Squadron, 1868-70 ; Coast Survey, 1871-4. 

Commissioned as Captain, June 14, 1874 ; commanding Omaha (second-rate), 
South Pacific Squadron, 1874 ; commanding Richmond (second-rate), South 
Pacific Squadron, 1875-6 ; Navy Yard, Mare Island, California, 1877-8. 



118 CAPTAINS. 

CAPTAIN KIDDER RANDOLPH BREESE, 

Born in Philadelphia, April 14, 1831. Appointed Midshipman, November 6, 
1846, from Rhode Island, and, on the 25th of November, passed the required 
mental and physical examination at Annapolis; February, 1847, was ordered to 
the Saratoga, Commander Farragut, and served in her on the Mexican coast during 
the war. In the spring of 1848, the Saratoga going out of commission, was 
ordered to the St. Mary's, and, on her arrival at Rio de Janeiro, was detached 
and ordered to the frigate Brandywine ; served in the Brandywine until the ex- 
piration of her cruise, December, 1850; February, 1851, joined the frigate St. 
Lawrence, then loading at New York with articles for the World's Fair, at Lon- 
don, and made that cruise in her, returning in September, 1851 ; from October, 
1851, to June, 1852, at the Naval Academy studying for examination. 

Passed and received warrant as Passed Midshipman, June, 1852, and was 
ordered to the Mississippi, flag-ship of Commodore M. C. Perry, commanding 
Japan Expedition during this cruise; was temporarily attached to the Macedonian, 
in search of coal on the north end of the Island of Formosa, and in inquiry of the 
captivity of Americans by the savages of that island ; on the return of the Missis- 
sippi to the United States, in June, 1855, was detached and granted leave; in 
July was ordered on Coast Survey duty, and was engaged on that work until 
August, 1858 ; was then ordered to the Preble, on the Paraguay Expedition, 
serving in that expedition and afterward on the Mosquito coast, off Greytown, 
until September, 1859, when invalided home with Isthmus fever; December, 
1860, was ordered to the Portsmouth, on the coast of Africa, and took passage in 
the Mohican to join that ship ; served on board the Portsmouth until August, 
1860, when joined the San Jacinto; remained on board the San Jacinto until 
the expiration of her cruise, December, 1861, during which upward of fifteen 
hundred slaves were captured on the coast of Africa, and Messrs. Slidell and 
Mason were taken from the Trent ; December, 1861, was ordered to the command 
of the Third Division of Porter's Mortar Flotilla, and participated in the attack on 
New Orleans and Vicksburg, in 1862 ; was recommended for promotion by Cap- 
tain Porter for services at this time. 

July, 1862, was made Lieutenant- Commander by the establishment of that 
grade; October, 1862, joined Admiral Porter in the Mississippi Squadron, and 
took command of his flag-ship, the Black Hawk ; served in that capacity during 
Admiral Porter's command, and was present, or connected with all the most im- 
portant operations on the Mississippi River and its tributaries during that officer's 
command ; at the close of the Red River Expedition was recommended, with 
certain other commanding officers, for promotion to Commander. 

On Admiral Porter being ordered, in September, 1864, to command the North 
Atlantic Blockading Squadron, was selected by him as his Fleet-Captain, and 
served in that capacity until May, 1865, when hostilities ceased ; as Fleet-Captain 
was in both engagements at Fort Fisher and in the subsequent operations in Cape 
Fear River ; commanded the sailors and marines in the naval assault on Fort 
Fisher, and was recommended by Admiral Porter for immediate promotion for 
services on that occasion. His services throughout the Civil War are thus honor- 
ably mentioned by Admiral Porter in his " commendatory despatch" of January 
28, 1865: "Lieutenant-Commander K. R. Breese, my Fleet-Captain, has been 
with me nearly all the time since the Rebellion broke out. In command of a 
division of the Mortar Flotilla, which opened the way to New Orleans, he made his 
first record there. In the Mississippi with me for two years, engaged in harass- 
ing and dangerous duties, he always acquitted himself to my satisfaction. In 
charge of the mortars at the siege of Vicksburg, he helped to hasten the surrender 



CAPTAINS. 119 

of that stronghold. At Fort Fisher he led the boarders in the assault, and, 
though we were not successful in getting into the fort in the face of equal num- 
bers, yet that assault gained the day, as is generally admitted on every side. 
Our troops obtained a footing without much resistance, then nobly maintained 
what they had won. Lieutenant-Commander Breese did all he could to rally his 
men, and made two or three unsuccessful attempts to regain the parapet ; but the 
marines having failed in their dut^ to support the gallant officers and sailors, who 
took the lead, he had to retire to a place of safety. He did not, however, lose the 
ground, but remained under the parapet in a rifle-pit, using a musket until night 
flivored his escape. He is a clever, gallant officer, and I strongly recommend his 
immediate promotion to a commaLder." August, 1865, was ordered to the Naval 
Academy, and served there until September, 1866, as assistant to the Superin- 
tendent, Admiral Porter; November, 1866, was ordered, as a member of a Board, 
to examine volunteer officers for entry into the navy; June, 1867, to the Wash- 
ington Navy Yard, as Inspector of Ordnance ; July, 1869, was detached from the 
Navy Yard and ordered as a member of a permanent Ordnance Board, holding its 
meetings in the Navy Department ; was member of a Board for the examination 
of breech-loading arms for the navy, and detailed to witness the experiments of 
the Army Board at St. Louis, engaged upon similar duty; June 29, 1870, ordered 
to the command of the Plymouth, European Squadron ; detached from Plymouth 
in October, 1S72 ; December, 1872, ordered to duty in the Bureau of Ordnance, 
Navy Department, and, in June, 1873, to the Naval Academy, as Commandant of 
Midshipmen. 

Commissioned as Captain, August 9, 1874, and in November, 1874, was, at 
his own request, detached from the Naval Academy ; in January, 1875, ordered 
to report to Superintendent Coast Survey for duty as Hydrographic Inspector, and 
in June, 1875, was detached and ordered to the command of Torpedo Station, 
Newport, Khode Island, which is his present duty. 



CAPTAIN LEWIS A. KIMBERLY, 

Born in New York. Appointed from Illinois, December 8, 1846 ; sloop James- 
town, coast of Africa, 1847-50 ; frigate Baritan, Pacific Squadron, 1851-2. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 8, 1852 ; sloop Dale, coast of Africa, 
1852-6. 

Promoted to Master, 1855. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, September 15, 1855 ; receiving-ship, Boston, 1857 ; 
sloop German town. East India Squadron, 1858-60 ; frigate Potomac, store-ship, 
Western Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1861-2. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, July 16, 1862 ; steam-sloop Hartford, 
flag-ship Farragut's Squadron, 1862-4; engagement and passage of Port Hudson 
batteries ; engagement with batteries at Grand Gulf and Warrington, Mississippi 
River ; battle of Mobile Bay ; steam-frigate Colorado, flag-ship European Squadron, 
1865-6. 

Commissioned as Commander, July 25, 1866 ; commanding receiving-ship. 
New York, 1867-70 ; commanding Benicia (second-rate), Asiatic Station, 1870-2 ; 
commanding Canonicus (iron-clad), North Atlantic Station, 1873. 

Commissioned as Captain, October 3, 1874 ; commanding Monongahela 
(second-rate). South Atlantic Station, 1874-6 ; commanding Omaha, flag-ship, 
South Pacific Station, 1877-8. 



120 CAPTAINS. 

CAPTAIN BANCKOFT GHERARDI, 

Born in Louisiana, November 10, 1832. Appointed from Massachusetts, June 
29, 1846 ; attached to frigate Ohio, Pacific Squadron, 1846-50 ; steam-sloop 
Saranac, Home Squadron, 1850-1 ; Naval Academy, 1852. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 8, 1852 ; sloop St. Louis, Mediter- 
ranean Squadron, 1853-5. 

Promoted to Master, 1855. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, September 16, 1855; sloop Saratoga, Home 
Squadron, 1856-8 ; rendezvous, Boston, 1859 ; steam-sloop Lancaster, Pacific 
Squadron, 1861-2. 

Commissioned as Liev tenant- Commander, July 16, 1862; South Atlantic 
Blockading Squadron, 1862 ; engagement with Fort Macon, 1862 ; steam-sloop 
Mohican, special service, 1863 ; commanding steam-gunboat Chocura, Western 
Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1863-4 ; commanding steamer Port Royal, Western 
Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1864; battle of Mobile Bay, August 5, 1864; com- 
manding steamer Pequot, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5. 

Commissioned &sComma7ider, July 25, 1866 ; rendezvous, Philadelphia, 1866-7 ; 
navigation duty, Navy Yard, Philadelphia, 1868-70 ; commanding Jamestown 
(third-rate). Pacific Fleet, 1871 ; commanding receiving-ship Independence, 
1872-3. 

Commissioned as Captain, November 9, 1874 ; commanding Pensacola, flag- 
ship, North Pacific Station, 1875-6. 



CAPTAIN DANIEL L. BRAINE, 

Born in New York. Appointed Midshipman from Texas, May 30, 1846; Home 
Squadron during Mexican War; at Alvarado, Tobasco, Tuspan, Laguna, Tampico, 
and Vera Cruz; sloop John Adams, Home Squadron, 1848; sloop St. Mary's, 
East India Squadron, 1849-50; steam-sloop Saranac, Home Squadron, 1850-1 ; 
Naval Academy, 1852. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 8, 1852 ; sloop St. Louis, Mediterranean 
Squadron, 1853-5. 

Promoted to Master, 1855. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, September 15, 1858 ; Coast Survey, 1856-7 ; 
sloop Vincennes, coast of Africa, 1858-60 ; commanding steamer Monticello, 
North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1861-2 ; engagement with rebel battery of 
five guns at Sewell's Point, Virginia, May 19, 1861, lasting one hour and fifteen 
minutes, being the first naval engagement of the war ; attack and capture of Forts 
Hatteras and Clarke, October 5, 1861 ; engaged the enemy at Kimmekerk Woods, 
above Cape Hatteras, exchanged shots with their gunboats, and dispersed with 
effect two regiments of infantry, sinking two barges, and rescuing the Twentieth 
Indiana Regiment, who were surrounded by rebels; in November, 1861, engaged 
and silenced a two-gun battery at Federal Point, North Carolina, and dismounted 
one of the guns. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, July 15, 1862 ; in 1862-4, numer- 
ous engagements with Forts Caswell and Fisher ; while on blockading duty in com- 
mand of Monticello, Vicksburg, and Pequot ; commanded the Pequot in the attacks 
upon Fort Fisher, and also in the attacks upon Fort Anderson, and three forts on 
Cape Fear River, as the fleet advanced up that river to Wilmington, North Caro- 
lina ; ordnance duty. Navy Yard, New York, 1866-7. 

Commissioned as Commander, July 25, 1866 ; commanding steam-sloop Hart- 



CAPTAINS. 121 

ford, flag-ship Asiatic Squadron, 1867 ; comraandins; steamer Sharaokin, Brazil 
Squadron, during 1868; equipment duty, Navy Yard, New York, 1869-72; 
commanding Juniata (third-rate), European Station, 1874-5. 

Commissioned as Captain, December 11, 1874; commanding R. S. Colorado, 
1875-8. 

CAPTAIN GEORGE E. BELKNAP, 

Born in New Hampshire, January 22, 1832. Appointed Midshipman from same 
State, October 7, 1847 ; attached to brig Porpoise, coast of Africa, 1847-50 ; 
frigate Baritan, Pacific Squadron, 1850-3 ; Naval Academy, 1853. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 10, 1853 ; Coast Survey, steamer Cor- 
win, 1854 ; Acting Master sloop Falmouth, 1854-5 ; sloop Saratoga, 1855. 

Promoted to Master, 1855. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, September 16, 1855 ; receiving-ship Ohio, Boston, 
1856 ; sloop Portsmouth, East India Squadron, 1856-8 ; commanded a launch 
with 12-pounder howitzer at the capture of the Barrier Forts, Canton River, 
China, November, 1856, and assisted in undermining and blowing up the same, 
the forts four in number, and mounting 176 guns ; sloop St. Louis, Home Squad- 
ron, 1859-61 ; commanded the boats of the St. Louis at the first and second re- 
inforcements of Fort Pickens, April, 1861 ; gunboat Huron, South Atlantic Block- 
ading Squadron, 1861-2 ; expedition against Fernandina, St. John's, St. Mary's, 
St. Aug-ustine, etc. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, July 15, 1862 ; iron-clad steamer 
New Ironsides, special service, 1862, and South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 
1863-4, many (27) engagements with defences of Charleston Harbor, comprising 
actions against Forts Wagner, Sumter, and Moultrie, Batteries Bee, Beauregard, 
etc.; commanded gunboat Seneca, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864; 
commanded iron-clad Canonicus in two actions with Howlett House battery, De- 
cember, 1864, and at Fort Fisher, December, 1864, and January, 1865, taking 
the advanced position ; after capture of Fort Fisher, proceeded to Charleston, and 
was present at the evacuation of the city ; fired last hostile shot at its defences ; 
commanded same vessel in Admiral Godon's Special Squadron to Havana, in 
quest of the rebel iron-clad Stonewall ; steam-sloop Shenandoah, Asiatic Squadron, 
1866-7. 

Commissioned as Commander, July 25, 1866; commanding flag-ship Hartford, 
Asiatic Squadron, 1867-8; commanded expedition against Indians on Island of 
Formosa, 1867 ; Naval rendezvous, New York, 1868 ; navigation duty, Navy Yard, 
Boston, 1869 ; ordered to command steam-sloop Tuscarora, May, 1872, and sailed 
for South Pacific Station ; January 1, 1873, ordered to take Commander Selfridge 
and party on board and co-operate in the survey for inter-oceanic canal across the 
Isthmus of Darien ; May, 1873, detached from South Pacific Squadron, and 
assigned to special duty with the Tuscarora, to make deep-sea soundings between 
the western coast of the United States and the shores of Japan, to determine the 
feasibility of laying a submarine cable on the bed of the Pacific. Fitted the ship 
for the work at Mare Island Yard, California, and began operations September, 
1873. Used Sir Wm. Thomson's machine for sounding with piano-forte wire, at 
that time comparatively untried ; improved the machine and developed its work- 
ing capacity, sounding with more ease and accuracy in 4000 fathoms than was 
formerly done in 500 fathoms, using rope. Ascertained " True Continental Out- 
line" from Cape Flattery to San Diego ; run line of soundings from San Diego to 
Yokohama, Japan, via Hawaiian and Bonin Islands. Returning, sounded from 
Yokohama to Cape Flattery, Washington Territory, via the Aleutian Islands. 



122 CAPTAINS. 

Found off the coast of Japan the most extraordinary depths ever known, the 
deepest water being 4655 fathoms, or more than 5i statute miles. Invented three 
different cylinders or cups for bringing up specimens of soil from ocean-bed, 
which are now in use both in the naval service and the Coast Survey. 

Extract from Address to the Mathematical and Physical Section of the British 
Association, Glasgow, September 7, 1876, by Sir William Thomson, LL.D., M.A., 
F.R.S., President of the Section : 

" I wish I could speak to you of the veteran Henry, generous rival of Faraday 
in electro-magnetic discovery ; of Peirce, the founder of high mathematics in 
America ; of Bache, and of the splendid heritage he has left to America and to 
the world in the United States Coast Survey ; of the great school of astronomers 
which followed Gould, Newton, Newcomb, Watson, Young, Alvan Clarke, Ruther- 
ford, Draper (fiither and son) ; of Commander Belknap and his great exploration 
of the Pacific depths by piano-forte wire, with imperfect apparatus supplied from 
Glasgow, out of which he forced a success in his own way." 

Senior-officer present at Honolulu when riot occurred on the election of David 
Kalakaua as King of Hawaiian Islands ; landed companies of blue-jackets and 
marines from Tuscarora and Portsmouth, restored order, and occupied the town 
six days, at request of the King, when, the new government being firmly established, 
withdrew the force to the ships. Received therefor, in conjunction with Com- 
mander Skerrett, commanding Portsmouth, the thanks of the King, the Legis- 
lative Assembly, the Chamber of Commerce, and the Consular Corps. Detached 
from Tuscarora, October, 1874 ; ordered as Hydrographic Inspector, U. S. Coast 
Survey, December, 1874 ; asked for other orders, and ordered to command U. S. 
receiving-ship Ohio, Boston, January, 1875. 

Commissioned as Captain, January 25, 1875 ; March, 1875, obliged to go South 
on account of ill health, due to a cold contracted while doing deep-sea work ; de- 
tached from Ohio, and ordered to Navy Yard, Pensacola, as Captain of the Yard ; 
June, 1875, appointed member of Board of Visitors to Naval Academy; October, 
1875, ordered as member of Board of Examiners of Midshipmen at Naval Acad- 
emy ; detached from Navy Yard, Pensacola, May 1, 1876, and put on special duty 
with reference to deep-sea sounding; December 1, 1876, ordered as Commandant 
Navy Yard, Pensacola. Sea service, nineteen years seven months ; shore duty, 
eight years. 

CAPTAIN DAVID B. HARMONY, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from same State, April 7, 1847 ; attached 
to frigate Brandy wine, Brazil Squadron, 1847 ; frigate Ohio, Pacific Squadron, 
1847-8; sloop Warren, Pacific Squadron, 1849-50; sloop Falmouth, Pacific 
Squadron, 1851-2 ; Naval Academy, 1853. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 10, 1853; store-ship Relief, 1854. 

Promoted to Master, 1855. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, September 16, 1855 ; receiving-ship, Baltimore, 
185G-7 ; sloop Decatur, Pacific Squadron, 1858-60 ; steam-sloop Iroquois, West- 
ern Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1861-2 ; bombardment and passage of Forts 
Jackson and St. Philip, Chalmette batteries, and capture of New Orleans ; capture 
of Grand Gulf; both engagements with batteries at Vicksburg; engagement with 
rebel ram Arkansas. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Convnander, July 16, 1862; iron-clad Nahant, 
South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862-3 ; attack on defences of Charleston, 
April 7, 1863 ; capture of rebel ram Atlanta, June 17, 1863 ; bombardment of 
Morris Island batteries, from July 10 to August 1, 1863; commanding steam- 



CAPTAINS. 123 

gunboat Tahoraa, East Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1864 ; commanding steam- 
gunboat Sebego, West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; capture of Mobile ; 
Navy Yard, New York, 1866-7. 

Commissioned as Commander, July 25, 1866 ; commanding steamer Frolic, 
European Squadron, 1867-9 ; Inspector of Supplies, Navy Yard, New York, 
1869-71; commanding Kearsarge (second-rate), xisiatic Station, 1873-4; com- 
manding flag-ship Hartford, Asiatic Station, 1874-5. 

Commissioned as Captain, February 4, 1875. 



CAPTAIN A. E. K. BENHAM, 

Born in New York, 1832. Appointed from New York, November 24, 1847 ; 
attached to sloop Plymouth, East India Squadron, 1847-8; brig Dolphin, East 
India Squadron, 1849-50 ; sloop Plymouth, 1850-1 ; steam-frigate Saranac, 
Home Squadron, 1851-2 ; Naval Academy, 1853. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 10, 1853 ; sloop St. Mary's, Pacific 
Squadron, 1853-7. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, September 16, 1855; Coast Survey, 1857-8; 
steamer Westernport, Brazil Squadron and Paraguay Expedition, 1858-9 ; 
steamer Crusader, Home Squadron, 1860-1 ; steamer Bienville, South Atlantic 
Blockading Squadron, 1861-2; battle of Port Koyal, 1861; steam-sloop Sacra- 
mento, 1863. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, July 16, 1862; commanding steam- 
gunboat Penobscot, Western Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1863-5 ; temporary 
duty. Navy Yard, New York, 1866 ; steamer Susquehanna, special service, 1867. 

Commissioned as Commander, June 9, 1867 ; Navy Yard, New York, 1868-9 ; 
Light-House Inspector, 1870-1 ; commanding Canonicus (iron-clad), N. A. Sta- 
tion, 1871-2; commanding Saugus (iron-clad), N, A. Station, 1872-3; Light- 
House Inspector, 1874-8. 

Commissioned as Captain, March 12, 1875. 



CAPTAIN JOHN IRWIN, 

Born in Pennsylvania, April 15, 1832. Appointed from Pennsylvania, Sep- 
tember 9, 1847 ; attached to frigate Cumbei-land, Home Squadron, 1847-8 ; 
frigate St. Lawrence, Mediterranean Squadron, 1849-50 ; sloop John Adams, 
coast of Africa, 1851-3. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 10, 1853 ; steamer Fulton, Home 
Squadron, 1854-6. 

Promoted to Master, 1855. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, September 16, 1855; Coast Survey, 1857-8 ; 
sloop Savannah, Home Squadron, 1859-60 ; steam-frigate Wabash, flag-ship 
South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1861-3 ; capture of forts at Hatteras Inlet ; 
capture of Forts Walker and Beauregard ; in charge of boat howitzers ashore 
at battle of Port Royal Ferry, January 1, 1862; bombardment and capture of 
Fort Pulaski. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, July 16, 1862; ordnance duty, 
Philadelphia, 1864; Western Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1864-5; special duty, 
Philadelphia, 1866-7. 

Commissioned as Commander, July 25, 1866 ; commanding steamer Newbern, 
North Atlantic Squadron, 1868 ; commanding steamer Gettysburg, North Atlantic 



124 CAPTAINS. 

Squadron, 1868-70 ; commanding Yantic (fourth-rate), N. A. Fleet, 1871 ; League 
Island Station, 1872; commanding R. S. Sabine, 1873-5. 

Commissioned as Captain, May 15, 1875; commanding Pensacola, flag-ship 
Pacific Station, 1875-8. 



CAPTAIN JAMES A. GREER, 

Born in Ohio. Appointed from Ohio, January 10, 1848; sloop Saratoga, 
Home Squadron, 1848-9; sloop St. Mary's, Pacific Squadron,, 1850-2 ; frigate 
Columbia, Home Squadron, 1852-3 ; Naval Academy, 1854. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 15, 1854; razee Independence, Pacific 
Squadron, 1855-7. 

Promoted to Master, 1855. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, September 16, 1855; Navy Yard, Norfolk, 1858 ; 
steamer Southern Star, Brazil Squadron and Paraguay Expedition, 1858-9 ; steamer 
Sumter, coast of Africa, 1860-1. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, July 16, 1862; sloop St. Louis, 
special service, 1862-3; Mississippi Squadron, 1863-4; commanded iron-clad 
Benton, and a division of Admiral Porter's Squadron ; passage of Vicksburg, 
April, 1863 ; engagement at Grand Gulf, April 29, 1863 ; bombardment of Vicks- 
burg batteries during the siege of forty-five days ; frequently engaged with guerillas ; 
accompanied the Red River Expedition ; Naval Academy, 1865-6. 

Commissioned as Commander, July 25, 1866 ; commanding steamer Mohongo, 
North Pacific Squadron, 1866-7 ; commanding steam-sloop Tuscarora, North 
Pacific Squadron, 1868; ordnance duty, Philadelphia, 1869; Naval Academy, 
1869-72 ; member Board of Inspectors, 1872-5. 

Commissioned as Captain, April 26, 1876 ; commanding Lackawanna (second- 
rate), N. P. Station, 1876-7 ; commanding Constellation (third-rate), special 
service, 1878. 



CAPTAIN AARON WARD WEAVER, 

Born in District of Columbia, July 1, 1832. Appointed from Ohio, May 10, 
1848 ; attached to sloop St. Louis, Brazil Squadron, 1849-51 ; frigate Congress, 
Brazil Squadron, 1851-3; Naval Academy, 1854. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 15, 1854 ; steamer Fulton, Home 
Squadron, 1854-5. 

Promoted to Master, 1855. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, September 16, 1855 ; Coast Survey, steamer 
Walker, 1856-7 ; steamer Arctic, latter part of 1857 ; surveying Trinity Bay, 
Newfoundland, for Atlantic telegraph cable, also deep-sea soundings down axis of 
Gulf Stream ; sloop Marion, coast of Africa, 1857-9 ; July, 1859, came to New 
York from Congo River, in command of prize-bark Ardennes, which vessel had 
been seized as a slaver ; steam-frigate Susquehanna, Blockading Squadron, 1801-2 ; 
bombardment and capture of Forts Hatteras and Clarke, North Carolina ; bom- 
bardment and capture of Forts Beauregard and Walker, Port Royal, South 
Carolina ; in charge of Susquehanna's armed launches, before the fall of Fort 
Pulaski, convoying guns up to the army battery at Vernes Point, and taking up 
torpedoes, surveying, etc. ; engagement at Sewell's Point, Virginia, May 18, 1862, 
and present at occupation of Norfolk, by United States forces. 

Commissioned 2tS Lieutenant- Commander, July 16, 1862; commanding steam- 
gunboat Winona, Western Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1862-3 ; severe engage- 



CAPTAINS. 125 

ment with rebel batteries near Port Hudson, Louisiana, December 14,1862; 
engagement with rebel forces at Placquemine, Louisiana ; engagement with the 
rebels under Generals Green and Mouton, some three thousand in force, when 
they attacked Fort Butler, Donaldsonville, Louisiana, and were repulsed with a 
loss of about one hundred killed and wounded, and one hundred and twenty pris- 
oners, favorably mentioned in Admiral Farragut's despatch, dated June 9, 1863; 
engagement with rebel batteries below Donaldsonville, after fall of Port Hudson ; 
commanding steam-gunboat Chippewa, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 
1864 ; in command of Chippewa at first attack on Fort Fisher ; was transferred 
to command iron-clad Mahopac, and was in command of that vessel at last attack 
and capture of Fort Fisher ; favorably mentioned in Admiral Porter's despatch, 
dated January 28, 1865, and recommended for promotion; also favorably men- 
tioned in report dated January 15, 1865, of Commodore William Radford, com- 
manding iron-clad division ; was ordered to Charleston, and on the advanced picket 
when that place and fortification were captured ; was then ordered to James River, 
and participated in the night bombardment of rebel works near Richmond, just 
previous to their evacuation ; Navy Yard, Boston, 1866. 

Commissioned as Commander, July 25, 1866 ; commanding U. S. Tallapoosa, 
1866-7 ; commanding rendezvous, Washington, 1868 ; Inspector of Supplies, 
Washington, 1869-70; commanding Terror (iron-clad), N. A. Fleet, 1870-1; 
charge of nitre depot. Maiden, Massachusetts, 1872-5; commanding Dictator 
(iron-clad), N. A. Station, 1875-7. 

Commissioned as Captain, August 8, 1876. 



CAPTAIN WILLIAM P. McCANN, 

Born in Kentucky, May 4, 1830. Appointed from Kentucky, November, 1848; 
attached to frigate Raritan, flag-ship of Home Squadron, November 8, 1848, to 
May 1, 1850 ; cruise in West Indies and Gulf of Mexico ; again attached to 
Raritan, flag-ship of Pacific Squadron, June 27, 1850, to February 2, 1853 ; cruise 
in South Pacific ; Columbia, flag-ship of Home Squadron, May 4 to October 24, 
1853 ; Naval Academy, October 24, 1853, to June 15, 1854. 

Promoted to Passed Midshijmian, June 15, 1854 ; frigate Independence, flag- 
ship Pacific Squadron, August, 1854, to November 15, 1857 ; cruise of thirty-nine 
months in North and South Pacific, Polynesia, and Sandwich Islands. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, from September 16, 1855 ; receiving-ship Alle- 
ghany, January 23 to August 3, 1858; Lieutenant and Navigator of the frigate 
Sabine, flag-ship of Brazil Squadron and Paraguay Expedition, August 14, 1858, 
to May 9, 1859; visiting Bermuda Islands and Montevideo; again ordered to 
Sabine, cruising in West Indies and Gulf of Mexico, August, 1859, to July 4, 
1861 ; at Vera Cruz on the breaking out of the Rebellion at Pensacola, reinforced 
Fort Pickens with sailors and marines, April 14 to 15, 1861 ; remained off the 
fort one hundred and twenty-seven days, and in June, assisted in landing addi- 
tional reinforcements under Colonel Harvey Brown ; again attached to Sabine, 
August 30, 1861, to January, 1862 ; blockading on the coast of South Carolina, 
rescued a battalion of marines of Port Royal Expedition, and crew of the trans- 
port-steamer Governor, which vessel foundered ; ordered to command temporarily 
gunboat Maratanza, at siege of Yorktown, April, 1862; had several engagements 
with the batteries there and at Gloucester Point ; May 4, enemy evacuating York- 
town, Maratanza moved up the York and Pamunky Rivers, co-operating with the 
Army of the Potomac; was relieved by Commander Stevens, remained as Execu- 
tive-Oflicer ; at West Point, Virginia, May 9, 1862, drove ofi" a rebel battery 



126 CAPTAINS. 

attacking Franklin's corps ; led reconnoitring expeditions on York River and 
Richmond Railroad, and on the right bank of the Pamunky ; with the army at 
Malvern Hill, on the James River, had frequent engagements during the guerilla 
warfare in the James and Appomattox Rivers, at Point of Rocks and City Point; 
July 4, captured rebel gunboat Teazer, with plans of batteries, torpedoes, and de- 
fences of Richmond ; recaptured thirty-six wounded officers and men of tlie army, 
captured several blockade-runners on the Potomac, and co-operating with the army 
at Acquia Creek. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, July 16, 1862; Maratanza block- 
ading. Cape Fear River, having driven off working parties from batteries near 
Fort Caswell, was attacked by a battery of Whitworth guns, having one officer 
and one petty officer killed, and seven men wounded ; ordered to command the 
Hunchback, in sounds of North Carolina, October 1, 1862 ; March 14, 1863, 
battle at Newbern with the forces of Hill and Pettigrew, which attacked Camp 
Anderson and the Hunchback ; they had eighteen pieces of artillery, and several 
thousand infantry. After an action of an hour and a half, she succeeded in 
silencing the guns and compelling the army to withdraw. Commander Murray in 
his official report said, " The firing of the Hunchback was excellent, and the 
manner in which Lieutenant-Commander McCann handled the battery which the 
enemy unmasked upon him in the morning was as gratifying to us, and as credits 
able to himself, as it must have been mortifying and vexatious to the enemy." 
April, 1863, during the siege of Washington, North Carolina, had command of 
five gunboats, with which he frequently engaged and silenced the batteries at Hill's 
and Swain's Point, on the Pamlico, and assisted in sending reinforcements and 
supplies to the garrison and gunboats at Washington ; September 6, left the 
sounds with the Hunchback, which was laid up at Norfolk for repairs ; November, 

1863, was ordered to command the Kennebec, West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 
then commanded by Admiral Thatcher, and soon after by Admiral Farragut ; had 
thirteen months' active service blockading Mobile, and participating in several 
engagements with the batteries and Fort Morgan, while attacking stranded blockade- 
runners. She was mentioned by Admiral Farragut in a congratulatory order to 
the fleet on the occasion of the destruction of the Ivauhoe, under the guns of 
Battery G and Fort Morgan. Captured at sea three blockade-runners loaded with 
cotton, — the Marshall I. Smith, steamer Grey Jacket, and the John Scott, for- 
merly the Victoria, with forty-five blockade-runners and rebel officers, — the vessels 
and cargoes sold for half a million of dollars ; battle of Mobile Bay, August 5, 

1864. The Kennebec was lashed to the Monongahela, fifth in line of battle, and 
in that position entered the bay, engaging the vessels and forts ; while ramming 
the iron-clad Tennessee at full speed with the Monongahela, she had several officers 
and men wounded, one of the latter mortally, by a shell from the Tennessee, when 
the vessels were touching. After the collision the Tennessee's boat's davits and 
falls were left on the port anchor, and the wreck of her boat across the Kennebec's 
stern ; after this, a 10-inch shell from Fort Morgan passed through Kennebec's 
quarter, the splinters knocking down a man at the engine bell. At night she 
pursued and attacked the Morgan, that had eluded the fleet below, and escaped by 
getting in shoal water at Dog River Bar. December, 1864, detached from Ken- 
nebec ; command of Tahoma, February to August, 1865; disabled in a gale in 
Gulf Stream, returned to Norfolk, and thence to Boston ; Naval Academy, 1866 ; 
command of Tallapoosa, West Gulf Squadron, March, 1866, to January 5, 1867 ; 
Naval rendezvous, Philadelphia, 1867-8. 

Commissioned as Commander, December 8, 1867 ; Navy Yard, Philadelphia, 
1869-70 ; Light-House Inspector, 1871 ; commanding Nipsic (fourth-rate), N. A. 
Fleet, 1872 ; Light-House Inspector, 1873-6. 



CAPTAINS. 127 

Commissioned as Captain, September 21, 1876 ; commanding Lackawanna 
(second-rate), N. P. Station, 1877-8. 



CAPTAIN JAMES H. GILLIS, 

Born in Pennsylvania, May 14, 1831. Appointed from same Stata, October 12, 
1848; attached to frigate Raritan, Home Squadron, 1849-50; sloop Dale, coast 
of Africa, 1851-3; Naval Academy, 1854. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 15, 1854 ; sloop John Adams, Pacific 
Squadron, 1854-5. 

Promoted to Master, 1855. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, September 17, 1855 ; Coast Survey, 1856-7 ; 
store-ship Supply, Pacific Squadron, 1857-9 ; sloop Germantown, coast of Africa, 
1859. While attached to the store-ship Supply, then lying in the harbor of jMon- 
tevideo, during the prevalence of a terrific pampero, rescued the captain and three 
of the crew of a vessel that had foundered outside of the harbor, for which he 
was made an honorary member of several societies in Montevideo, and received 
the thanks of the Argentine Minister. Steamer Water Witch, Home Squadron, 
1860 ; frigate St. Lawrence, Atlantic Squadron, 1861 ; sinking of rebel privateer 
Petrel, July, 1861 ; steam-frigate Susquehanna, Mediterranean Squadron, 1861 ; 
South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862 ; was ambushed at Slaum's Bluff by 
a battery and two regiments of infantry, after the capture of a rebel battery at the 
junction of the Dawho and South Edisto Rivers, but drove them off, for which he 
received a commendatory letter from the Secretary of the Navy. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, July 16, 1862; commanded steamer 
Com. Morris, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862-3 ; battle of Jamestown 
Island, South Carolina, June, 1862 ; North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1863-4; 
engagement with rebel battery at Taylor's Landing, Pamunky River, April 16, 
1863 ; commanded the Elk, West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1864 ; went to the 
assistance of Admiral Porter's fleet, when he was up Red River with the Banks 
Expedition; commanding iron-clad Milwaukee, West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 
1864-5 ; engagement with Spanish Fort, Mobile Bay, March 28, 1865, at which 
time the Milwaukee was sunk by a rebel torpedo ; commanded naval battery on 
shore at the siege of Spanish Fort, after the sinking of the Milwaukee, until 
the fall of that work ; commanded the Monongahela and Scioto, West Gulf 
Blockading Squadron. 

Commissioned as Commander, July 25, 1866 ; commanded steamer Wateree, 
South Pacific Squadron, 1867-8 ; the Wateree was carried half a mile inland by 
a tidal wave at Arica ; Commander Gillis received the thanks of the English gov- 
ernment for assistance rendered British subjects during the time of the earthquake 
at Arica in 1868 ; equipment duty, Washington, 1869-71 ; commanding Mahopac 
(iron-clad), N. A. Fleet, 1872 ; commanding Michigan (fourth-rate), 1873-6. 

Commissioned as Captain, September 30, 1876 ; equipment duty, New York, 
1876-8. 

CAPTAIN WILLIAM E. FITZHUGH, 

Born in Ohio. Appointed from Ohio, November 20, 1848 ; attached to frigate 
Cumberland, Mediterranean Squadron, 1849-51 ; sloop Cyane, Home Squadron, 
1852-3 ; Naval Academy, 1854. 

Promoted to Passed 3Iidshipman, June 15, 1854; sloop John Adams, Pacific 
Squadron, 1854-5. 



128 CAPTAINS. 

Promoted to Master, 1855. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, September 17, 1855 ; sloop St. IMary's, Pacific 
Squadron, 1856-7; sloop Vincennes, coast of Africa, 1858-60; steam-sloop 
Lancaster, Pacific Squadron, 1861-2. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, July 16, 1862 ; steam-sloop Iroquois, 
North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862-3 ; Western Gulf Blockading Squad- 
ron, 186-4 ; was present at engagement with Fort Morgan, August, 1864; com- 
manding steamer Ouachita, Mississippi Squadron, 1864-5 ; received the surrender 
of rebel naval forces on Red River; commanding steamer Paul Jones, Gulf 
Squadron, 1866-7 ; commanding receiving-ship, Norfolk, 1868-70 ; commanding 
flag-ship Severn, N. A. Fleet, 1870-1 ; equipment duty, Mare Island, 1873-4 ; 
ordnance duty. Mare Island, 1875-6. 

Commissioned as Captain, November 25, 1876. 



CAPTAIN GEORGE BROWN, 

BoR\ in Indiana, June 19, 1835. Appointed from Indiana, February 5, 1849 ; 
attached to frigate Cumberland, Mediterranean Squadron, 1849-51 ; frigate St. 
Lawrence, Pacific Squadron, 1851-4. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, 1856. 

Promoted to Master, 1856. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, June 2, 1856 ; sloop Falmouth, Brazil Squadron, 
1856-9 ; store-ship Supply and sloop Portsmouth, coast of Africa, 1859-60 ; sloop 
Pawnee, 1860 ; steam-sloop Powhatan, special service, 1860-1 ; gunboat Octarora, 
Mortar Flotilla, and Wilmington, North Carolina Blockade, 1861-2 ; engagement 
at Vicksburg, June 28, 1862. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, July 16, 1862; commanding iron- 
clad Indianola, Mississippi Squadron, 1862-3 ; passage of Vicksburg and War- 
rentou, February 14, 1863 ; action between Indianola and rebel rams Wm. H. 
Webb and Queen of the West, and cotton-clad steamers Dr. Batey and Grand 
Era, at Upper Palmyra Island, Mississippi River, February 24, 1863. The 
engagement lasted one hour and twenty-seven minutes, and resulted in the sur- 
render of the Indianola to a force of four vessels manned by over one thousand 
men. The loss of the Indianola was one killed and one wounded (Lieutenant- 
Commander Brown) severely, and seven missing, while the enemy lost two officers 
killed and many wounded. Lieutenant-Commander Brown and his officers and 
crew were taken prisoners, but were exchanged at Richmond a few months later 
in the war ; commanding steam-gunboat Itasca, Western Gulf Blockading Squad- 
ron, 1864 ; battle of Mobile Bay, August 5, 1864 ; gunboat Arizona, 1864-5, — 
lost by fire, February, 1865; ii'on-clad Cincinnati, 1865; gunboat Pocahontas, 
1865 ; gunboat Hornet, 1865 ; naval operations in Mobile Bay, against Spanish 
Fort and defences of city of Mobile, from March 23 to April 14, 1865. 

Commissioned as Commander, July 25, 1866 ; Navy Yard, Washington, 
1866-7 ; as agent of Japanese government in command of Japanese iron- 
clad Stonewall, 1867-9; commanding Michigan (fourth-rate), 1870-2; ordnance 
duty, Boston, 1873-6; Light-House Inspector, 1876-8. 

Commissioned as Captain, 1877. 



CAPTAINS. 129 

CAPTAIN JOHN G. WALKER, 

Born in New Hampshire. Appointed from Iowa, October 5, 1850 ; Naval 
Academy, 1851 ; attached to sloop Portsmouth, Pacific Squadron, 1851-5 ; Naval 
Academy, 1856. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 20, 1856 ; sloop Falmouth, Brazil 
Squadron, 1856-7 ; frigate St. Lawrence, Brazil Squadron, 1858-9. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, January 23, 1858-9 ; steamer Connecticut, At- 
lantic coast, 1861 ; steam-gunboat Winona, West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 
1862 ; passage of Forts Jackson and St. Philip, Chalmette batteries, and capture 
of New Orleans ; operations against Vicksburg, in summer of 1862, including 
the passage of the batteries both ways. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Comviander, July 16, 1862; commanding iron- 
clad steamer Baron de Kalb, Mississippi Squadron, 1862-3; operations against 
Vicksburg, winter of 1862-3; two attacks on Haines' Bluff; engagement at Arkan- 
sas Post ; Yazoo Pass Expedition ; with the attack on Fort Pemberton ; capture 
of Yazoo City, and expedition up Yazoo River to destroy steamers, having three 
sharp fights ; commanded naval battery in 15th army corps at siege of Vicksburg ; 
commanding steam-gunboat Saco, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; 
capture of Wilmington, North Carolina, and forts, with the exception of Fort 
Fisher; commanding steamer Shawmut, Brazil Squadron, 1865-6. 

Commissioned as Commander, July 25, 1866 ; Naval Academy, 1866-9 ; com- 
manding frigate Sabine, special service, 1869-70 ; Light-House Inspector, 1871-2 ;, 
Secretary Light-House Board, 1873-8. 

Commissioned as Captain, 1877. 



CAPTAIN FRANCIS M. RAMSAY, 

Born in the District of Columbia. Appointed 3Iidshipman from Pennsylvania^ 
October 5, 1850 ; Naval Academy, 1850-1 ; practice-ship Preble, 1851 ; frigate 
St. Lawrence, Pacific Squadron, 1851-5 ; Naval Academy, 1855-6. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, June, 1856 ; sloop Falmouth, Brazil 
Squadron, 1857. 

Appointed Acting Master, June 24, 1857 ; steam-frigate Merrimac, Pacifia 
Squadron, 1857-60. 

Promoted to Master, January 22, 1858. 

Promoted to Lieutenant, January 23, 1858 ; ordnance duty. Navy Yard, WasL- 
ington, J). C, 1860 ; sloop Saratoga, African Squadron, 1860-2. 

Promoted to Lieutenant- Commander, July 16, 1862; commanding iron-clad 
Choctaw, Mississippi Squadron, 1863-4 ; engagements at Haines' Bluff, YazoO' 
River, April 30 and May 1, 1863; expedition up Yazoo River to Yazoo City, 
destroying rebel Navy Yard and vessels. May, 1863 ; engagement at Liverpool 
Landing, Yazoo River, May, 1863; engagement at Milliken's Bend, Mississippi 
River, June 7, 1863 ; siege of Vicksburg, May, June, and July, 1863 ; com- 
manded a battery of three heavy guns mounted on scows, in front of Vicksburg,, 
from June 19 to July 4, 1863 ; commanding Third Division, Mississippi Squad- 
ron, July, 1863, to September, 1864 ; several engagements with field batteries- 
and guerillas, 1863-4; commanded expedition up Black and Ouachita Rivers,, 
March, 1864; engagement at Trinity, Louisiana, March, 1864; engagement at 
Harrisonburg, Louisiana, Ouachita River, March, 1864; Red River Expedition, 
March, April, May, 1864 ; expedition up Black and Ouachita Rivers, April^ 
1864 ; several engagements with guerillas at Fort De Russy, Louisiana, May^ 



130 CAPTAINS. 

1864 ; commanding Third and Fourth Districts, Mississippi Squadron, May to 
September, 1864; commanded expedition into Atchafalaya River, June, 1864; 
engagement at Simmsport, Louisiana, Atchafalaya River, June 8, 1864 ; com- 
manding gunboat Unadilla, North Atlantic Squadron, 1864-5; engagements 
with Fort Fisher, North Carolina, December 24 and 25, 1864 ; engagement with 
Fort Fisher, North Carolina, January, 1865 ; several engagements with Fort 
Anderson, and with other forts on the Cape Fear River, January, February, 
1864 ; capture of Richmond, Virginia ; Naval Academy, in charge of Department 
of Gunnery, 1865-6. 

Promoted to Commander, July 25, 1866 ; navigation duty, Navy Yard, Wash- 
ington, D. C, 1866-7 ; Fleet-Captain and Chief-of-StaflF, South Atlantic Squadron, 
flag-ship Guerriere, 1867-9; commanding steam-frigate Guerriere, June, July, 
1869 ; ordnance duty, Navy Yard, Washington, D. C, 1869-72 ; Bureau of 
Ordnance, 1873 ; commanding Ossipee (third-rate), N. A. Station, 1873-4 ; com- 
manding Lancaster (second-rate), 1874-5 ; Naval Asylum, Philadelphia, 1875-6; 
Inspector of Ordnance, New York, 1876-8. 

Commissioned as Captain, 1878. 



Retired on his own Application after Forty Years' Consecutive Service. 



CAPTAIN DOMINICK LYNCH, 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, February 2, 1829 ; attached 
to Mediterranean Squadron, on the ships Ontario, Concord, Java, Delaware, and 
United States, 1829-34. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, July 3, 1835 ; receiving-ship Hudson, 1835 ; 
frigates United States and Constitution, Mediterranean Squadron, 1836-8 ; sloops 
St. Louis and Dale, and schooner Shark, Pacific Squadron, 1839-43. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, September, 1841 ; sloop Plymouth, Brazil Squad- 
ron, and steam-frigate San Jacinto, Mediterranean Squadron, 1844-6 ; steamer 
Mississippi, Home Squadron, and receiving-ship Pennsylvania, 1846-8; sloops 
Vincennes and Vandalia, Pacific Squadron, 1849-51 ; Navy Yard, New York, 
1853-5 ; retired, 1855 ; chart duty, New York, 1859-60 ; steamer Daylight, 
North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1861-2 ; capture of Fort Macon and 
engagement with field batteries, Lynnhaven Bay. 

Commissioned as Commander, July 21, 1861 ; at Forts Hatteras and Clarke; 
commanding brig Bainbridge, Aspinwall, 1862-3 ; commanding ordnance-ship 
.St. Lawrence, and in charge of Naval Station, Beaufort, North Carolina, 1863-5 ; 
Naval Storekeeper, Philadelphia, 1866-7. 

Commissioned as Captain, March, 1867; Executive-Officer, Naval Asylum, 
Philadelphia, 1867-70 ; commanding receiving-ship, Boston, 1871-2. 



Retired from Incapacity resulting from Long and Faithful Service. 



CAPTAIN THOMAS M. BRASHER, 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, June 6, 1831 ; attached to 
sloop Falmouth, Pacific Squadron, 1831-4; frigate Potomac, Mediterranean 
-Squadron, 1834-6 ; Naval School, New York, 1837. 



CAPTAINS. 131 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 15, 1837 ; sloop St. Louis, Pacific 
Squadron, 1839-42. 

Commissioued as Lieutenant, September 8, 1841 ; sloop Dale, Pacific Squadron, 
1842-3; brig Lawrence, Home Squadron, 1844-5; frigate Cumberland, Home 
Squadron, during the Mexican War ; sloop Germantown, Brazil Squadron, 
1850-1 ; frigate St. Lawrence, Pacific Squadron, 1851-5 ; Navy Yard, New 
York, 1855-6 ; Naval Observatory, Washington, 1856-7 ; rendezvous, New 
York, 1859-60. 

Commissioned as Commander, April 24, 1861 ; commanding brig Bainbridge, 
North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1861 ; retired, 1862 ; Navy Yard, Pensa- 
cola, 1863-4; special duty, 1865 ; commanding store-ship, South Pacific Squadron, 
1865-8. 

Commissioned as Captain, 1867 ; Light-House Inspector, 1868-70. 



CAPTAIN FRANCIS S. HAGGERTY, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania, February 17, 1832; 
attached to schooner Experiment, Chesapeake Bay, 1832-33, and also in Charlet?- 
ton harbor during the time of nullification, 1833 ; sloop-of war Ontario, coast of 
Brazil, 1833-4; frigate Constitution, Mediterranean Squadron, 1835-7. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, July 23, 1838 ; frigate Constitution, Pacific 
Squadron, 1838-41 ; rendezvous. New Y'ork, 1841-2 ; Coast Survey, 1842-5. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, December 19, 1843; steamers Mississippi and 
Princeton, Home Squadron, 1844-6 ; brig Bainbridge, coast of Africa, 1849-51 ; 
receiving-ship. New York, 1851-2 ; steam-frigate Powhatan, Japan Expedition, 
Commodore Perry, 1852-5 ; Naval Observatory, Washington, 1855-7 ; steam- 
frigate Saranac, Pacific Squadron, 1857-9 ; brig Perry, East Gulf Squadron, 
1860 ; at the commencement of the Rebellion, was employed on the river Potomac, 
in command of the brig Perry ; was transferred to the sloop-of-war Vandalia, 
belonging to the squadron under command of Commodore Du Pout, Port Royal 
Expedition ; convoyed the powder and store-ships to the place of destination ; 
commanded the sloop-of-war Vandalia, in the attack on the rebel batteries at Port 
Royal, November 7, 1861 ; taking an active part in the reduction of the batteries, 
and subsequently in blockading duty in the mouth of Savannah River; was 
placed on the retired list in consequence of injuries received in line of duty ; 
received the thanks of Congress for meritorious service and conduct in conjunction 
with the other officers engaged in the above-mentioned conflict ; ordnance duty, 
Boston, 1861-6. 

Commissioned as Commander, October 11, 1861. 

Commissioned as Captain, 1867 ; in charge of iron-clads, New Orleans, 1867-9 ; 
Light-House Inspector, Seventh District, Key West, Florida, 1870-1. 



Retired from Incompetency or Disability proceeding from other Causes not 
Incident to the Service. 



CAPTAIN OVERTON CARR, 

Born in District of Columbia. Appointed fi-om Indiana, March 1, 1827 ; attached 
to frigate Java, Mediterranean Squadron, 1828-9 ; frigate Delaware, Mediterranean 
Squadron, 1829-30 ; Naval School, Norfolk, 1832-3. 



132 CAPTAINS. 

Promoted to Passed MidsMpman, June 10, 1833 ; sloop John Adams, Mediter- 
ranean Squadron, 1834-6 ; receiving-ship, Philadelphia, 1838-40, 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, December 8, 1837 ; special service, 1842-5 ; 
sloop Germantovrn, Home Squadron, 1846-8; steam-frigate Saranac, Home 
Squadron, 1849-52 ; ordnance duty, 1852-4 ; steam-frigate San Jacinto, survey 
of the River La Plata, 1854-5 ; Navy Yard, Philadelphia, 1858-60 ; commanding 
steamer Quaker City, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1861 ; retired, 1861 ; 
commanding receiving-ship, Baltimore, 1861-2 ; Navy Yard, Washington, 1864-5. 

Commissioned as Captain, 1867. 



CAPTAIN RICHARD T. RENSHAW, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania, February 26, 1838 ; 
attached to frigate Constitution, Pacific Squadron, 1838-40; steamer Missouri, 
Home Squadron, 1842-4. 

Promoted to Passed MidsMpman, May 20, 1844 ; steamer Colonel Harney, 
1845-6 ; schooner Onkahie, Brazil Squadron, 1847-8; receiving-ship, New York, 
1851 ; steamer Fulton, Home Squadron, 1852 ; resigned, June 29, 1852, and 
re-entered the service as Acting Lieutenant, in 1861 ; commanded steamer Louisi- 
ana, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1861-4 ; capture of Roanoke Island, 
February 8, 1862 ; Washington, North CaroUna, September 6, 1862 ; defence of 
Washington, North Carolina, April, 1863, and several actions of minor importance. 

Commissioned as Commander, September 22, 1862 ; commanding steamer Mas- 
sasoit. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; several engagements on 
James River in 1864-5 ; commanding steamer Agawan, Atlantic Squadron, 
1865-6 ; navigation duty, Norfolk Navy Yard, 1866-9. 

Commissioned as Captain, 1869 ; Light-House Inspector, 1870-1 ; commanding 
flag-ship Worcester, N. A. Fleet, 1871-2. 



Retired as not Recommended for Promotion. 



CAPTAIN ROGER PERRY, 

Born in Maryland. Appointed from Maryland, July 1, 1828 ; schooner Grampus, 
West India Squadron, 1834. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 14, 1834; frigate Constellation, West 
India Squadron, 1835-8 ; receiving-ship, Baltimore, 1839-41. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, February 25, 1841 ; steamer Union, special ser- 
vice, 1844-5 ; on coast of Africa, 1846-7 ; frigate United States, Mediterranean 
Squadron, 1848-9 ; receiving-ship, Baltimore, 1850-1 ; steam-frigate San Jacinto, 
Mediterranean Squadron, 1852-3 ; rendezvous, Baltimore, 1854-5. 

Commissioned as Commander, September 14, 1855; retired, 1861 ; commanding 
store-ship Fredonia, Pacific Squadron, 1863^. 

Commissioned as Captain, 1867. 



CAPTAIN WILLIAM ALBERT PARKER, 

Born at Portsmouth, New Hampshire, January 12, 1816. Entered the navy as 
a Midshipman, July 3, 1832 ; first service in the U. S. sloop-of-war Vincennes, 



CAPTAINS. 133 

under the command of Commodore Alexander S. Wadsworth and Captain John 
H. Aulick, on the Pacific Station ; second cruise was made in the U. S. razee la- 
depeudeuce, under the command of Commodore John B. Nicholson, on the coast 
of Brazil and the coast of England and Eussia, and bearing the Hon. G-eorge M. 
Dallas as Minister to the latter country. 

Promoted to the grade of Passed Midshipman on June 23, 1838 ; thence 
served in the U. S. line-of-battle ship Ohio, under command of Commodore Isaac 
Hull and Captains Joseph Smith and Lavallette, in the years 1838-41, in the 
Mediterranean Squadron ; the next service was at the rendezvous at Boston, Massa- 
chusetts ; in the year 1842 served on board the frigate United States, under 
commands of Commodore T. Ap Catesby Jones and Captain James Armstrong, 
on the Pacific Station. 

Promoted to Lieutenant, May 16, 1843, and transferred to the Cyane, 
Commander C. K. Stribling ; the squadron was actively employed, and visited 
the coast of California and the Sandwich Islands, Chili, Peru, etc. ; in 1846, 
ordered to the U. S. steamer Mississippi, Captain Andrew Fitzhugh, on the Mex- 
ican coast ; afterwards, under command of Commodere Matthew C. Perry ; 
served in this steamer, and the Raritan, Commodore David Connor, during the 
Mexican War, till near its termination ; in 1848, was attached to the National 
Observatory at Washington, then under the superintendence of Lieutenant Mat- 
thew F. Maury; the next service was in the Raritan, Commodore Foxhall A. 
Parker and Captain Benjamin Page ; was present at the siege and capture of 
Vera Cruz, Tobasco, and other places; in 1851, served onboard the receiving-ship 
Franklin ; in 1852, was ordered to the sloop Portsmouth, T. A. Dornin, Com- 
mander, on the Pacific Station, and returned home in 1855 ; in 1856, was stationed 
at the rendezvous, Boston, for about two years ; in 1859-60, commanded the store- 
ship Release, and was ordered to the Mediterranean Squadron at Spezia ; from 
thence to the squadron under Commodore Shubrick, to Paraguay, for the settle- 
ment of difficulties with that country, and thence to the African Squadron ; after 
that cruise, served as First Lieutenant at the Boston Navy Yard, under command of 
Captain Wm. L. Hudson and Commander Henry K. Thatcher ; on the breaking out 
of the Rebellion, was ordered to command the steamer Cambridge, and served on 
the North Atlantic Blockade, off the coasts of Virginia and North Carolina, 
under the command of Commodores L. M. Goldsborough, Samuel Phillips Lee, 
and David D. Porter, and under the latter commanded the Fifth Division of the 
North Blockade, which included more than twenty vessels of different kinds and 
several monitors ; detached from that duty in the early part of 1865, having 
served continuously from the beginning of the war. 

Promoted to Commander, June 28, 1861 ; placed on the retired list, Decem- 
ber 23, 1865 ; from 1866-9, commanded the receiving-ship Independence, on the 
California Station. 

Promoted to Captain, on the retired list, April 19, 1869 ; last duty was as 
Inspector of Light-Houses, Seventh District, which included the whole coast of 
the Gulf of Mexico, from Cedar Keys, Florida, to the southern border of the 
State of Texas. Total sea service, twouty-two years ; shore or other duty, twelve 
years and nine months. 



CAPTAIN THOMAS G. CORBIN, 

Born in Virginia, August 13, 1820. Appointed from Alabama, May 15, 1838; 
attached to frigate Brandy wine, Mediterranean Squadron, 1838-42. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, May 20, 1844 ; Coast Survey, 1844-5 ; 



134 CAPTAINS. 

frigate Columbia, Brazil Squadron, 1845-6 ; Coast Survey, 1847-50 ; sloop St. 
Mary's, Pacific Squadron, 1850-2. 

Commissioned as Lieutenatit, June 10, 1852 ; steamer Princeton, 1852-3 ; sur- 
vey of the River La Plata, 185.3-5 ; Navy Yard, Mare Island, California, 1855-6 ; 
receiving-ship, New York, 1857-8; steam-frigate Wabash, Mediterranean Squad- 
ron, 1858-9; on leave, 1860; steam-frigate Wabash, South Atlantic Blockading 
Squadron, 1861-3 ; capture of Forts Beauregard and Walker, and Port Royal, 
South Carolina, April, 1861. 

Commissioned as Commander, July 16, 1862 ; Commandant of Midshipmen, 
Naval Academy, 1863; commanding steamer Augusta, 1864-5; Fleet-Captain, 
West India Squadron, 1865-6. 

Commissioned as Captain, July 25, 1866 ; commanding steam-sloop Guerriere, 
flag-ship South Atlantic Squadron, 1868 ; member of Examining Board, 1869 ; 
special duty, 1869-70. 

CAPTAIN EGBERT THOMPSON, 

Born in New York, 1822. Appointed from New York, March 13, 1837 ; at- 
tached to razee Independence, special service, 1837-8 ; Exploring Expedition, 
1838-42 ; brig Somers, special service, 1842-3. 

Promoted to Pasaed Midshipman, June 29, 1843; frigate Cumberland, flag- 
ship Mediterranean Squadron, 1843-5 ; Executive-Officer steamer Bonita, Home 
Squadron, June, 1846, to June, 1847 ; during the Mexican War, participated in 
all the active operations of the fleet ; steamer Michigan, on the lakes, December, 
1847, to May, 1850 ; Navy Yard, Philadelphia, 1850. 

Commissioned as Lieidenant, September 27, 1850 ; sloop Decatur, Home 
Squadron, February, 1851, to June, 1852; R. S. North Carolina, 1852-5; sloop 
St. Louis, coast of Africa, 1855-8 ; ordnance duty, Washington, 1858-9 ; steamer 
Fulton, 1859, when wrecked in a hurricane and taken to Pensacola for repairs; 
steam-sloop Pensacola, 1859-60; steam-sloop Powhatan, Gulf Squadron, 1860-1; 
commanding Pittsburgh (iron-clad), Mississippi Flotilla, 1861-2 ; participated in 
the battle of Fort Donelson, when the Pittsburgh was run ashore to save her from 
sinking ; noted for running the batteries of Island No. 10, April 7, 1862, which 
elicited the thanks of the Department ; took part in the attacks on Fort Madrid, 
and in the engagement with the rebel rams above Fort Pillow. 

Commissioned as Commander, July 16, 1862, Naval rendezvous, Philadelphia, 
1863-4; commanding steamer McDonough, S. A. B. Squadron, 1864-5; com- 
manding steam-sloop Dacotah, S. P. Squadron, 1866-7. 

Commissioned as Captain, July 26, 1867 ; Naval Station, Mound City, Illinois, 
1869-71. 



Retired on Account of Physical Disability. 



CAPTAIN MATHIAS C. MARIN, 

Born in Florida. Appointed from Florida, January 3, 1832 ; attached to schooner 
Porpoise, West India Squadron, 1832-3 ; sloop John Adams, Mediterranean 
Squadron, 1834-7. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 23, 1838; rendezvous. New York, 
1839 ; schooner Flirt, Florida War, 1839-40 ; sloop Vandalia, Home Squadron, 
1841-3. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, March 29, 1844 ; sloop Yorktown, coast of Africa, 



CAPTAINS. 135 

1844-5 ; steamer Scourge, Gulf, in Mexican War, 1846-7 ; present at capture of 
Tuspan, Tobasco, Alvarado, and Tlacotalpau ; Coast Survey, 1847-9 ; sloop Le- 
vant, Mediterranean Squadron, 1852-3 ; Navy Yard, Pensacola, Florida, 1855 ; 
retired, 1855 ; restored to active list, 1857 ; sloop Macedonian, 1861. 

Commissioned as Commander, October 18, 1861 ; commanding sloop St. Louis, 
special service, 1862-3 ; ordnance duty. Navy Yard, Boston, 1864-5 ; ordnance 
duty, Norfolk Navy Yard, 1867-8. 

Commissioned as Captain, 1867 ; special duty, Maiden, Massachusetts, 1869-72. 



Retired in Conformity with Act of February 28, 1855. 



CAPTAIN SAMUEL R. KNOX, 

Born in Massachusetts. Appointed from Massachusetts, April 1, 1828; served 
on the Boston Station, from August to November, 1828 ; attached to the Pacific 
Squadron, viz. : frigate Guerriere, from November, 1828, to June, 1829 ; schooner 
Dolphin, to June, 1830 ; frigate Guerriere, until August, 1831 ; again to the 
Dolphin ; acted as Master of the Dolphin, from December, 1831, to March, 1833 ; 
Boston Station, from August to November, 1833 ; furlough from November, 
1833, to March, 1837, during which time was on the northwest coast of North 
America. 

Promoted to Parsed Midshipman, July 15, 1837 ; ordered to Boston Station, 
and appointed to the command of a chartered schooner employed on survey of 
George's Bank, under command of Lieutenant Wilkes ; in the Porpoise during the 
months of August and September, 1837 ; from November, 1837, to March, 1838, 
on board the brig Porpoise, survey of Savannah River, May River, and Calibogue 
Sound, South Carolina and Georgia; July, 1838, to the Exploring Expedition; 
served on board the Vincennes, and in command of schooner Flying Fish, — in 
the latter, two years and five months ; returned home in the Vincennes, in June, 
1842. 

Promoted to Lieutenant, September 1, 1841 ; Boston Station, from July, 1842, 
to October, 1843 ; ordered to sloop Yorktown in October, and transferred to sloop 
Plymouth, December, 1843 ; in the Mediterranean, in sloop Plymouth and frigate 
Cumberland, until November, 1845 ; receiving-ship, Boston, from March to Octo- 
ber, 1846; sloop Albany, November, 1846; Gulf Squadron, coast of Mexico; 
served in Naval Battery before Vera Cruz ; present at surrender of same place in 
March, 1847 ; at the capture of Tuspan, commanded a shore party of ninety men ; 
commanded schooners Flirt and Wasp, the latter taken into the service as a de- 
spatch-vessel, and returned in her to Philadelphia in August, 1848, at the termi- 
nation of the Mexican War ; commanded steamer Massachusetts, from January, 
1849, to March, 1852 ; employed on special service with a Board composed of 
Military and Naval Officers, making a reconnoissance of the coasts of California 
and Oregon, for Naval and Military purposes ; receiving-ship, Boston, and In- 
spector of Light-Houses, etc., 1853-4 ; sloop Falmouth, Home Squadron, 1854-5 ; 
retired, 1855 ; Boston Station, April, 1861 ; May, 1861, to steamer South Caro- 
lina ; employed in operating on the Southern coast of the United States, block- 
ading ofiF Galveston, Texas, at Barataria, and the mouths of the Mississippi, 
Louisiana, to January, 1862, during which service had a skirmish with the bat- 
teries at Galveston, and chased two armed steamers up the Mississippi River to 
the protection of the forts; commanded Naval rendezvous at Boston, 1862-5. 

Commissioned as Captain, 1867. 



136 CAPTAINS. 

CAPTAIN CHARLES THOMAS, 

Born in Maryland. Appointed from Maryland, February 2, 1829 ; attached to 
eloop Erie, West India Squadron, 1829-32 ; sloop Peacock, Brazil Squadron, 
1832-4 ; Naval School, Norfolk, 1834-5. 

Promoted to Passed Mkhhipnian, July 3, 1835 ; frigate United States, Med- 
iterranean Squadron, 1836-9; receiving-ship, New York, 1839-40. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, September 8, 1841 ; frigate Constitution, Home 
Squadron, 1841-4 ; receiving-ship, Baltimore, 1846-7 ; sloop Germantown, Home 
Squadron, during Mexican War ; receiving-ship, Baltimore, 1850-1 ; unemployed 
from 1851 to 1863 ; special duty, Philadelphia, 1863-4. 

Commissioned as Captain, 1867. 



CAPTAIN GEORGE M. WHITE, 

Born in Georgia. Appointed from Georgia, November 1, 1828; attached to 
gloop Natchez, West Indies, 1829-31 ; attached to schooner Experiment, 1832 ; 
at the Portsmouth Navy Yard, from April to July, 1833. 

Promoted to Passed 3Iidshipman, June 14, 1834 ; attached to sloop Concord, 
West Indies, 1836-8 ; attached to St. Louis, Pacific, from May, 1839, to No- 
vember, 1840 ; attached to schooner Shark, from November, 1840, to May, 1842 ; 
returned to the United States in the St. Louis, in September, 1842. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, February 25, 1841 ; at the Portsmouth Navy 
Yard, from December, 1842, to September, 1843 ; store-ship Lexington, from 
September, 1843, to May, 1844 ; brig Somers, from September, 1844^ to 1846 ; 
at the Portsmouth Navy Yard, from 1847-9 ; attached to the sloop Falmouth 
from March, 1849, to February, 1852 ; attached to the R. S. Ohio, from October, 
1852, to May, 1853 ; at the Portsmouth Navy Yard, from May, 1853, to September, 
1854, when detached and placed on the reserve list on account of sickness. 



CAPTAIN EDWARD C. BOWERS, 

Born in Connecticut. Appointed from Connecticut, February 2, 1829 ; attached 
to sloop-of-war St. Louis, Pacific Squadron, 1829-32; Navy Yard, Boston, 
1833-4. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, July 3, 1835 ; frigate Constellation, West 
Indies, 1836-8 ; flag-ship Ohio, Mediterranean Squadron, 1839 ; receiving-ship, 
Boston, 1840. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, April 26, 1841 ; receiving-ship, Boston, 1842-5 ; 
steamer Princeton, Mexico, 1846 ; ordnance transport Electra, 1847 ; sloop-of- 
war Decatur, coast of Africa, 1847-50 ; sloop Plymouth, East Indies, 1851-2 ; 
receiving-ship, New York, 1852-4 ; retired, 1855 ; rendezvous, Portsmouth, New 
Hampshire, 1861-3. 

Commissioned as Commander, July 21, 1861 ; commanding receiving-ship 
Vandalia, Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 1864-5. 

Commissioned as Captain, 1867. 



CAPTAIN FRANCIS LOWRY, 

Born in Vermont. Appointed from Vermont, August 3, 1831 ; attached to 
flag-ship Fairfield, West India Squadron, 1831-2, visiting St. Domingo, Wind- 



COMMANDERS. 137 

ward and Leeward Islands and Gulf of Mexico ; in July, 1832, took passaf2;e in 
schooner Shark, and in September joined schooner Grampus, at Pensacola, visited 
Key West and the Gulf of Mexico ; detached, February, 1834 ; receiving-ship, 
New York, 1834 ; frigate Brandywiue, Pacific Squadron, 1834-6 to April, 1837 ; 
part of years 1837-8 at Naval School, New York. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 23, 1838 ; Coast Survey, 1838-40 ; 
in 1841-2, steamer Fulton, part of the time as Acting Master ; receiving-ship, 
Boston, 1842-3. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, July 4, 1843 ; latter part of 1843, at Naval 
rendezvous. New York; sloop John Adams, Gulf of Mexico, 1845-7; retired 
in 1855 ; Naval rendezvous, Portland, Maine, 1861. 

Commissioned as Captain, 1867. 



COMMANDERS. 



COMMANDER RICHARD L. LAW, 

Born in Indiana. Appointed from Indiana, February 17, 1841 ; attached to 
frigate Delaware, Brazil Squadron, 1841-3 ; brig Lawrence, Home Squadron, 
1843-5. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, August 10, 1847 ; brig Perry, Brazil 
Squadron, 1847-8; frigate Brandywine, Brazil Squadron, 1849-50; Coast 
Survey, 1851-5. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, September 14, 1855 ; sloop Constellation, Medi- 
terranean Squadi'on, 1856-7 ; Naval Academy, 1858-9 ; steam-sloop Hartford, 
flag-ship East India Squadron, 1859-61. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, July 16, 1862 ; commanding steamer 
Clifton, Western Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1862-3 ; three engagements at Gal- 
veston, Texas, one at Lavacca, Texas ; commanding store-ship New Hampshire, 
South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1865-6. 

Commissioned as Commander, September 26, 1866 ; commanding receiving- 
ship New Hampshire, Norfolk, 1866-7 ; commanding steam-gunboat Tacony, 
North Atlantic Squadron, 1867 ; commanding steamer Suwanee, North Pacific 
Squadron, 1868; commanding steamer Ashuelot, Asiatic Squadron, 1868-9; 
commanding steam-sloop Iroquois, Asiatic Squadron, 1869-70 ; Navy Yard, Phil- 
adelphia, 1871-2 ; Naval Asylum, Philadelphia, 1873-4 ; commanding Dictator 
(iron-clad), N. A. Station, 1874-5 ; Bureau of Yards and Docks, 1877-8. 



COMMANDER MILTON HAXTON, 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, October 19, 1841 ; attached 
to brig Dolphin, Home Squadron, 1841-3 ; frigate Congress, Brazil Squadron, 
1843-5 ; brig Bainbridge, Brazil Squadron, 1846 ; Home Squadron, 1846-7 ; 
attack on Alvarado, 1846 ; Naval School, 1847-8. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, August 10, 1847 ; mail-steamer Ohio, 1850; 
mail-steamer Baltic, 1851 ; sloop Plymouth, East India Squadron, 1852—4. 

Attack on and capture and destruction of Imperial Chinese fortified camp (de- 
fended by several thousand troops), by a party of about three hundred American 
and British " blue-jackets" and marines, at Shanghai, April, 1854. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, September 15, 1855 ; sloop John Adams, Pacific 



138 COMMANDERS. 

Squadron, 1856-8; receiving-sliip, New York, 1858 ; steamer Mystic, coast of 
Africa, 1860-1 ; South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862 ; attack and capture 
of Fort Macon, April 26, 1862. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, July 16, 1862; commanding steam- 
gunboat Kineo, Western Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1863 ; commanding steamer 
Maratanza, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864; commanding steamer 
Mercedita, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; Naval rendezvous, 
New York, 1866; receiving-ship. New York, 1866-7. 

Commissioned as Commander, December 29, 1866 ; Navy Yard, New York, 
1868 ; commanding the store-ship Onward, Pacific Fleet, 1869-71 ; Navy Yard, 
New York, 1871-5 ; commanding Vandalia (third-rate), N. A. Station, 1876 ; 
commanding Despatch (fourth-rate), special service, Europe, 1877-8. 



COMMANDER R. F. R. LEWIS, 

Entered the naval service, October, 1841, as Midshipman ; immediately ordered 
to the sloop-of-war Warren, fitting out at Norfolk ; before sailing, detached and 
ordered to the receiving-ship Pennsylvania, at Norfolk, Virginia ; served on board 
a few mouths, detached, and ordered to sloop-of-war Vandalia in 1842 ; served 
on board three years on coast of Africa and West Indies ; ordered to join Cyane 
at Norfolk, Virginia, in 1845 ; served three years on Pacific Station, participating 
in Mexican War : bombardment of Gruyamas, cutting out brig Condor in that 
harbor, under the fire of the troops on shore and field artillery, blockading Maza- 
tlan, capture of Monterey, California, relief of San Jose, Lower California, be- 
sieged by Mexicans and Yakee Indians, and in 1848 vessel returned home, close 
of war ; then detached and ordered to the Naval Academy, Annapolis, Maryland, 
for examination, and was promoted to Passed 3Iidshipman in 1849, and ordered 
to the steamer Vixen ; served about one year cruising in the West Indies and on 
the Spanish Main ; detached in 1850, and ordered to Naval Observatory, Wash- 
ington ; served few months in constructing charts, etc. ; detached and accepted 
service on board the Collins line of steamers in 1851 ; made two or three voyages 
to Liverpool from New York ; detached and ordered, in 1852, to practice-ship 
Preble, Naval Academy ; served one and a half years, then detached and ordered 
to brig Dolphin, fitting out at Norfolk, Virginia ; detached before sailing, and 
ordered, in 1853, to the Supply, fitting out at New York, for bringing camels home 
from Mediterranean ; made the two voyages. 

Promoted to Master and Lieutenant in 1855 ; detached from the Supply after 
two years' service, then granted short leave, and, in 1856, ordered to the receiving- 
ship Alleghany at Baltimore ; in 1858 detached and ordered to the frigate Sabine 
at New York ; served in the Paraguay Expedition and in the West Indies ; last 
few months of the cruise (three years) blockading the harbor of Pensacola at the 
commencement of the late Rebellion, and ofi" that port commanded a division of 
boats in the reinforcement of Fort Pickens under the guns of the rebel Fort 
McRae; was promoted to the position of Executive-Officer, and, in 1861, returned 
to Portsmouth, New Hampshire; vessel paid off and put out of commission, short 
leave of absence granted, and, in 1861, was ordered as Executive-Officer of the 
steamer De Soto, Farragut's fleet, for duty on the blockade, West Gulf Blockading 
Squadron. 

Promoted to Lieutenant- Commander, and, after one year's service on board, 
detached and ordered to command the gunboat Itasca, Mississippi River, first 
command ; served one year, keeping the river clear of the enemy, convoying 
river-boats, carrying despatches, etc. ; engagement with the rebel forces at Man 



COMMANDERS. 139 

Shack Bend, on the river, and blockading coast of Texas; engagement with a bat- 
tery at Valasco, coast of Texas, and captured two prizes laden with cotton, military 
equipments, medicines, etc., ran two or three others ashore, causing their de- 
struction ; vessel was then ordered North for repairs ; was detached at Philadel- 
phia in 1863 ; granted short leave of absence, and soon after ordered to Baltimore 
to assist in superintending repairs and fitting out vessels ; remained there three 
months, then detached and ordered to South Atlantic Blockading Squadron in 
1864 ; commanded respectively the barque Ethan Allen, steamers Nipsic, Ma- 
haska, and iron-clad Nantucket on blockading duty ofi" Charleston, and on St. 
John's Eiver, picketing and patrolling the St. John's, keeping it clear of the 
enemy, taking up torpedoes, landing troops, etc. ; before Charleston participated, 
in the iron-clad Nantucket, in the close blockade of the harbor, and a lively en- 
gagement with the batteries on Sullivan's Island, in endeavoring to fire with shell 
a stranded blockade-runner; and the last service, on duty in the harbor of Port 
Royal for the purpose of protecting the receiving-ship New Hampshire from an 
expected attack of the rebel iron-clad Stonewall ; then returned home, in June, 
1865, in command of the Nantucket; laid up at Philadelphia; in 1865, was 
ordered to the Naval Academy, Annapolis, as Senior-Instructor in seamanship, 
and afterwards Superintendent of grounds and buildings. 

In January, 1867, was promoted to Gomviander ; in 1869, ordered to the 
command of the Resaca, Pacific Squadron ; served two years, then detached ; 
returned home, and ordered, in 1871, on duty as member of Board of In- 
spectors ; served three years, then detached and ordered to the Asiatic Station ; 
commanded the Yantic and Kearsarge, respectively ; served one and a half years ; 
last few months in command of the squadron; was detached November, 1875; 
returned home, and after four months on waiting orders, was ordered to present 
station as Inspector of Ordnance, Navy Yard, Norfolk. 



COMMANDER S. LIVINGSTON BREESE, 

Born in Illinois. Appointed from Illinois, May 14, 1846 ; attached to sloop Ger- 
mantown. Home Squadron, 1846-8 ; participated in the capture of Tuspan and 
Tobasco ; sloop St. Mary's, East India Squadron, 1849-50 ; brig Bainbridge, 
Brazil Squadron, 1851 ; Naval Academy, 1852. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 8, 1852 ; brig Dolphin, special service, 
1853 ; sloop Cyane, Home Squadron, 1853-4 ; while on the Cyane, assisted in 
the destruction of Greytown ; Coast Survey, 1855-7. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, September 16, 1855 ; steam-frigate Merrimac, 
Pacific Squadron, 1858-60; steam-sloop Richmond, Mediterranean Squadron, 
1860 ; steamer Crusader, 1861 ; commanded yacht Wanderer, as despatch-vessel, 
in the Gulf, 1861 ; steamer Quaker City, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 
1862-3 ; engaged with rebel iron-clads off Charleston, in January, 1863. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, July 16, 1862; commanding steam- 
gunboat Ottawa, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1863^; Inspector, etc., 
Navy Yard, Pensacola, Florida, 1867-8. 

Commissioned as Commander, April 14, 1867 ; commanded the steam-gunboat 
Galena, 1869; Naval Observatory, 1870-1 ; commanding R. S. Vandalia, 1871-2; 
commanding R. S. Potomac, 1872-3 ; equipment duty, Norfolk, 1874 ; command- 
ing Ossipee (third-rate), N. A. Station, 1875-8. 



140 COMMANDERS. 

COMMANDER HENRY WILSON, 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, October 22, 1847 ; attached to 
steamer Alleghany, Brazil Squadron, 1847-8 ; sloop Marion, East India Squadron, 
1849-50 ; sloop Plymouth, 1851 ; Home Squadron, 1852 ; Naval Academy, 
1853. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 10, 1853 ; steamer Fulton, Home 
Squadron, 1853-6. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, September 16, 1855 ; Coast Survey, 1857-8 ; 
steamer Caledonia, Brazil Squadron and Paraguay Expedition, 1858-9 ; store- 
ship Relief, Home Squadron, 1859-60 ; sloop Vandalia, 1861 ; steamer Hatteras, 
Western Gulf Squadron, 1862 ; commanding steam-gunboat Owasco, Western 
Gulf Squadron, 1862-3. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, July 16, 1862; commanding steam- 
gunboat Cayuga, Western Gulf Squadron, 1864-5 ; special duty. Navy Yard, New 
York, 1866-7 ; commanding steamer Saco, North Atlantic Squadron, 1867-9. _ 

Commissioned as Commander, April 30, 1867 ; commander steam-sloop Frolic, 
special service, 1870 ; commanding Frolic, flag-ship Port- Admiral, New York, 
1873 ; commanding Catskill (iron-clad), N. A. Station, 1875-6. 



COMMANDER" JOSEPH S. SKERRETT, 

Born in Ohio. Appointed from Ohio, October 12, 1848; attached to razee In- 
dependence, Mediterranean Squadron, 1848-52; sloop Marion, coast of Africa, 
1852-4 ; Naval Academy, 1855. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, September 16, 1855 ; frigate Potomac, Home 
Squadron, 1856 ; sloop Falmouth, Brazil Squadron, 1856-9 ; sloop Saratoga, coast 
of Africa, 1860-3. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, J n\j 16, 1862; commanding gun- 
boat Katahdin, Western Gulf Squadron ; engagement with rebel fortifications at 
the mouth of the Brazos River, Texas, June 27, 1864 ; commanding steamer 
Aroostook, Western Gulf Squadron, 1863-5 ; Naval rendezvous, Washington, 
1866-7 ; commanding apprentice-ship Portsmouth, 1867-8. 

Commissioned as Commander, June 9, 1867 ; Naval Academy, 1869-72 ; 
commanding Portsmouth (third-rate). Surveying service in Pacific, 1872-5 ; Navy 
Yard, Washington, 1875-8. 



COMMANDER FRANCIS H. BAKER, 

Born in South Carolina. Appointed from New Hampshire. October 12, 1848 ; 
attached to frigate Constitution, Mediterranean Squadron, 1848-50 ; sloop James- 
town and frigate Congress, Brazil Squadron, 1851-3 ; Naval Academy, 1853—4. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 13, 1854 ; sloop John Adams, Pacific 
Squadron, 1854-8. 

Promoted to Master, September 14, 1855. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, September 15, 1855 ; while attached to John 
Adams, in 1855, on a number of boat expeditions, when several Fejee towns were 
attacked, captured, and burned ; receiving-ship Pennsylvania, 1858 ; steamer 
Water Witch, Brazil Squadron and Paraguay Expedition, 1858-9 ; sloop Preble, 
Gulf Squadron, 1859; steam-sloops Narragansett and Saranac, Pacific Squadron, 
1860-3. 



COMMANDERS. 141 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, July 16, 1862; receiving-ship 
Princeton, 1863; steam-sloop Tuscarora, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 
1868 ; commanding steam-gunboat Huron, South and North Atlantic Block- 
ading Scpadrons, 1863-4; during the rebel raid of the summer of 1864, com- 
manded at Havre de Grace a force of marines and workmen, with howitzers sent 
from the Philadelphia Navy Yard ; commanding steamer Vicksburg, North At- 
lantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; while in command of the Vicksburg, 
stationed with other vessels to guard the Fort Caswell entrance to Cape Fear 
River, during the attack on Fort Fisher, in January, 1865 ; also assisted to 
embark General Butler's army, after the first attack on Fort Fisher, December, 
1864 ; temporary duty, Navy Yard, Norfolk, 1865-6 ; commanding steamer 
Unadilla, Asiatic Squadron, 1866-8. 

Commissioned as Commander, July 24, 1867 ; navigation duty, Norfolk, Vir- 
ginia, 1869-72 ; Light-House Inspector, 1873-4 ; Light-House Inspector, 1876-7 ; 
Navy Yard, Norfolk, 1877-8. 

COMMANDER JOSEPH P. FYFFE, 

Born in Ohio, July 26, 1832. Appointed from Ohio, September 9, 1847; 
attached to bomb-vessel Stromboli, Home Squadron, 1847-8 ; sloop Yorktown, 
coast of Africa, 1848-50 ; Home Squadron, 1852 ; Naval Academy, 1853-4. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 15, 1854 ; steam-frigate San Jacinto, 
special service, 1855. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, September 16, 1855 ; store-ship Relief, Brazil 
Squadron, 1856-7; sloop Germantown, East India Squadron, 1857-9; steam- 
sloop Lancaster, 1860-1 ; steam-frigate Minnesota, flag-ship North Atlantic 
Blockading Squadron, 1863-5 ; took part in the destruction of the blockade- 
runner Hebe, and two rebel guns on the beach near Fort Fisher, North Carolina, 
August, 1863 ; also in the destruction of the blockade-runner Ranger, and en- 
gagement with infantry below Fort Caswell, North Carolina, January, 1864; 
engaged a rebel force of artillery above Cox's wharf, James River, May, 1864; 
engaged rebel batteries near Deep Bottom, James River, and rebel batteries at 
Curtis' Neck, near Tilgman's wharf, James River, June, 1864; engaged rebel 
batteries and rams near Dutch Gap, January, 1865. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander^ July 16, 1862; Navy Yard, Boston, 
1867 ; steamer Oneida, Asiatic Squadron, 1868-9. 

Commissioned as Commander, December 2, 1867 ; commanding steamer Cen- 
taur, North Atlantic Fleet, 1869-70 ; in charge nitre depot. Maiden, Massachu- 
setts, 1871-2 ; commanding Monocacy (third-rate), Asiatic Station, 1875-8. 



COMMANDER OSCAR F. STANTON, 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, December 29, 1849 ; Naval 
School, 1850; steam-frigate Susquehanna, East India and China Seas, 1851-2; 
sloop Saratoga, China Seas and Japan Expedition, 1853-4 ; Naval Academy, 
September, 1854, to June, 1855. 

Promoted to Master, September, 1855 ; sloop Constellation, Mediterranean 
Squadron, August, 1855, to August, 1858. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, April 2, 1856 ; steamer Memphis, Paraguay 
Expedition, from October, 1858, to June, 1859 ; store-ship Supply, sloops Marion 
and Portsmouth, coast of Africa, September, 1859, to October, 1860 ; sloop St. 
Mary's, Pacific Squadron, December, 1860, to April, 1862. 



142 COMMANDERS. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander^ July 16, 1862 ; steam-gunboat Tioga, 
James River Flotilla and West India Flying Squadron, June, 1862, to November, 
1863 ; steam-gunboat Panola, West Gulf Blockading Squadron, December, 1863, 
to November, 1864 ; ordnance duty. New York, December, 1864, to March, 1865 ; 
steam-frigate Powhatan, Gulf Squadron, March to August, 1865 ; Naval Acad- 
emy, November, 1865, to May, 1867 ; steam-gunboat Tahuna, Gulf of Mexico, 
May to September, 1867. 

Commissioned as Commander, December, 1867 ; store-ship Purveyor, special 
service. Gulf of Mexico and west coast of Africa, July, 1868, to April, 1869 ; 
commanding receiving-ship Vandalia, Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 1870-1 ; 
commanding Yantic (third-rate), Asiatic Station, 1872-4 ; Navy Yard, Norfolk, 
1875-7. 

COMMANDEE B. B. TAYLOR, 

April 3, 1849, entered the service as Midshipman, and ordered to sloop John 
Adams, fitting at Boston for the Brazil and African Station ; October 12, 1850, 
transferred to the U. S. S. Portsmouth, flag-ship of the African Squadron, at 
Porto Praya; June 28, 1851, detached from Portsmouth at Boston ; October 3, 
1851, ordered to the U. S. S. St. Lawrence, fitting at New York for the Pacific 
Station ; August 14, 1854, detached at Payta, Peru, and ordered to United States 
for course at Academy. 

June 9, 1855, promoted to Passed Midshipman, and detached from Academy. 

Promoted to Master, September 16, 1855, and ordered to U. S. S. St. Louis, 
fitting at Philadelphia for African Station. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, July 31, 1856; February 12, 1858, detached 
from St. Louis at New York ; August 6, 1858, ordered to receiving-ship Alle- 
ghany at Baltimore ; October 21, 1858, detached from Alleghany, and ordered to 
the store-ship Release, fitting at New York for Expedition to Paraguay ; March 
16, 1859, transferred to the U. S. S. M. W. Chapin, at Montevideo ; May 21, 
1859, detached from the M. W. Chapin at Washington ; October 3, 1859, ordered 
to the U. S. S. Michigan, on the lakes ; November 14, 1859, detached from the 
Michigan, with orders to the U. S. S. Preble at Aspinwall ; September 24, 1860, 
detached from the Preble at Boston ; October 12, 1860, ordered to the Naval 
Academy ; May 7, 1861, detached from the Academy, with orders to the U. S. S. 
Colorado, fitting at Boston as flag-ship of the Gulf Squadron, Flag-Officer Mer- 
vine ; August 14, 1861, detached from the Colorado; October 28, 1861, ordered 
to U. S. S. Connecticut, — supply and despatch duty ; May 17, 1862, transferred 
to U. S. S. Cimmarron, for duty in James River and South Atlantic Squadron. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Conmiander, July 16, 1862; March 4, 1863, 
transferred to the U. S. S. Ticonderoga, fitting at New York, Admiral Lardner's 
flag-ship West India Squadron ; November 17, 1863, transferred to the command 
of the U. S. S. Kanawha, West Gulf Squadron ; July 3, 1865, detached from the 
Kanawha at New York ; September 28, 1865, ordered to the Navy Yard, Phila- 
delphia ; May 29, 1866, detached from the Philadelphia Navy Yard, with orders 
to the Naval Academy. 

Commissioned as Commander, March 14, 1868 ; March 15, 1869, detached from 
the Academy ; April 12, 1869, ordered to the U. S. S. Idaho, Asiatic Station ; Octo- 
ber 20, 1869, transferred to the U. S. S. Ashuelot at Yokohama; June 21, 1871, 
detached from the Ashuelot at Shanghai, and returned to the United States ; Janu- 
ary 24, 1872, ordered to the Navy Yard, Philadelphia ; October 19, 1872, detached 
from Navy Yard, Philadelphia, with orders to the Bureau of Yards and Docks; Jan- 
uary 15, 1874, detached from duty in the Bureau of Yards and Docks, with orders 



COMMANDERS. 143 

to the U. S. S. Wachusett, at Key West, North Atlantic Squadron ; December 
30, 1874, detached from Wachusett at Boston ; March 10, 1875, ordered aa 
member of Board of Inspection ; August 1, 1876, detached, — Board dissolved 
December 9, 1876, ordered to Boston Navy Yard. 



COMMANDER H. ERBEN, Jr., 

Born in New York City. Appointed from New York City, June 17, 1848; 
attached to frigate St. Lawrence, 1848-50 ; attached to frigate St. Lawrence, 
World's Fair, London, 1851 ; attached to frigate St. Lawrence, Pacific Squadron, 
1852-3 ; Coast Survey, 1854; Naval Academy, 1855. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, 1855 ; frigate Potomac, Home Squadron. 

Promoted to Master, September 15, 1855; store-ship Supply, Mediterranean, 
1856-7. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, December 27, 1856 ; steam-frigate Mississippi, 
East Indies, 1857-8 ; leave, 1859 ; store-ship Supply, Gulf Squadron, 1860-1 ; 
at Pensacola when Navy Yard surrendered, Supply bringing home, as prisoners, 
marines and workmen surrendered there ; steamer Huntsville, Blockading Squadron, 
1861 ; Mississippi Squadron, 1862 ; engagement with Fort Pillow, April, 1862 ; 
engagement with rebel fleet at Port Pillow, May 10, 1862 ; capture of Memphis, 
June 6, 1862 ; passage of Vicksburg batteries, July 15, 1862; engagement at 
Baton Rouge, Louisiana, and destruction of rebel ram Arkansas, August 6, 1862. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, July 16, 1862; iron-clad Patapsco, 
South Atlantic Squadron, 1863 ; engagement with Fort McAllister, Ogeeehee 
River, March, 1863 ; attack upon forts below Charleston, April 7, 1863 ; steam- 
frigate Niagara, special service, 1863-4 ; commanding steamer Panola, Western 
Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; Navy Yard, New York, 1866 ; commanding 
steamer Huron, South Atlantic Squadron, 1867-8; commanding steamer Kansas, 
South Atlantic Squadron, 1868-70. 

Commissioned as Commander, May 6, 1868 ; ordnance duty. New York, 1871 ; 
Naval rendezvous, New York, 1872-4 ; commanding Tuscarora (third-rate), North 
Pacific Station, 1874-5 ; Navy Yard, Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 1876-8. 



COMMANDER EDWARD P. MoCREA, 

Born in New York. Appointed from Wisconsin, October 16, 1849 ; attached to 
sloop Germantown, Home Squadron, 1850-3; brig Perry, coast of Africa, 1854; 
Naval Academy, 1855. 

Promoted to Master, September 15, 1855; frigate Congress, Mediterranean 
Squadron, 1855-6 ; sloop John Adams, Pacific Squadron, 1856-8. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, January 24, 1857 ; steamer Caledonia, Brazil 
Squadron and Paraguay Expedition, 1858-9 ; commanding steamer Jacob Bell, 
Potomac Flotilla, 1861, and James River Flotilla, 1862; several engagements 
with rebel batteries on the Potomac and James Rivers. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, July 16, 1862; steam-sloop Lan- 
caster, Pacific Squadron, 1862-5 ; steam-sloop Canandaigua, European Squadron, 
1866-8. 

Commissioned as Commander, May 27, 1868 ; commanding steamer Monocacy, 
Asiatic Squadron, 1869-72 ; commanding Montauk (iron-clad), N. A. Station, 
1875-6. 



144 COMMANDERS. 

COMMANDER RICHARD W. MEADE, Jr., 

Born in New York City, October 9, 1837. Appointed as Midshipman from 
California, October 2, 1850 ; Naval Academy, October 2, 1850, to November 20, 
1851 ; practice-ship Preble, July to October, 1851 ; steam-frigate San Jacinto, 
Mediterranean Squadron, November 20, 1851, to April 28, 1853 ; sloop St. Louis, 
Mediterranean, April 28, 1853, to March, 1854 ; present at the " Koszta aflPair," 
in Smyrna, July, 1853 ; frigate Columbia, West Indies, May 10, 1854, to April 
2, 1855 ; Naval Academy, October 1, 1855, to June 21, 1856, — passed No. 5 in 
class. 

Warranted as Passed Midshipman, June 20, 1856 ; steam-frigate Merrimac, 
North of Europe and West Indies, July 12, 1856, to April 4, 1857. 

Appointed as Acting Master, April 14, 1857, and ordered to corvette Cum- 
berland, west coast of Africa, April 14, 1857, to January 11, 1859. 

Warranted as Master, January 22, 1858. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, January 23, 1858 ; sloop Dale, African Squadron, 
January 11, 1859, to May 23, 1859; steam-frigate Saranac, Pacific Squadron, 
September 17, 1859, to March 20, 1860 ; sloop Cyane, Pacific Squadron, March 
20, 1860, to August 2, 1861 ; sick in Naval Hospital, New York, with Acapulco 
fever, from August to October, 1861 ; Instructor in Gunnery to volunteer ofiicers, 
receiving-ship Ohio, October 29, 1861, to January 3, 1862 ; steam-sloop Dacotah, 
North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, as Executive-Officer, January 31, 1862, to 
March 9, 1862 ; sick in Chelsea Hospital from effects of fever from March 9, to 
May, 1862 ; steamer Conemaugh, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, as Execu- 
tive-Officer, June 17, 1862, to September 8, 1862. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, July 16, 1862; iron-clad Louisville, 
Western Flotilla, in command from September 15, 1862, to December 1, 1862; 
employed in breaking up guerilla warfare on the Mississippi River, between Mem- 
phis and Helena; co-operating with troops from Major-General W. T. Sherman's 
division and Brigadier-General E. Carr's division ; commended by Rear- Admiral 
Porter in official despatches ; invalided from broken health in December ; ordnance 
duty. New York, January 26, 1863, to June 15, 1863 ; commanded steamer 
United States in search after privateer Tacony from June 15, 1863, to July 2, 1863 ; 
commanded the Naval Battalion during the July riots in New York ; stationed 
in the lower part of the city from Monday to Saturday, and maintained order in 
the limits of dist/rict, dispersing several disorderly gatherings ; steam-gunboat 
Marblehead, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron ; in command from September 
12, 1863, to May 3, 1864 ; stationed in Stono River on picket duty, and performed 
various services against the enemy in conjunction with General Gillmore's outpost; 
December 25, 1863, battle on the Stono ; the enemy attacked from John's Island 
earthworks Avith sixteen pieces of artillery and a strong supporting infantry force, 
the object being to sink, capture, or drive ofi" the Marblehead, erect heavier works, 
and thus drive Gillmore's transports out of Stono Inlet and turn his left flank. 
The Marblehead's crew consisted of seventy men ; after a sharp fight of over an 
hour the Pawnee and Williams coming to her aid, the enemy was routed and 
driven from his works with the loss of two 8-inch guns and many men ; the 
Marblehead was struck thirty times in the hull, and lost three killed and six 
wounded ; on 28th, a force of one hundred men under his command landed and 
brought away the two guns, destroying the batteries ; for this service, in ad- 
dition to Captain Balch's commendation, he was officially thanked in general 
orders by Rear-Admiral Dahlgren, the order to be read on every quarter-deck 
in the fleet ; subsequently recommended for promotion by Rear-Admiral Dahl- 
gren and the Board of Admirals, " for gallant conduct in face of the enemy ;" 



COMMANDERS. 145 

commanded steamer Cliocura, AVest Gulf Blockading Squadron, May 3, 18(34, 
to July 7, 1865 ; during this time actively engaged in blockading the Texas coast 
and harassing the enemy; from October to December, 1864, captured or destroyed 
seven blockade-runners, viz. : Louisa, Cora Smyser, Louisa, No. 2 (destroyed), 
Lowood, Julia, Lote Hurley, and Alabama ; January 22, 1865, cut out of the 
Calcasieu River, Louisiana, and destroyed, in face of a greatly superior force, the 
blockade-runner Delphina, for which service officially thanked by Commodore J. 
S. Palmer, commanding squadron in Admiral Farragut's absence ; April 24, 1865, 
present at the affair of the ram Webb, New Orleans; Naval Academy, July 7, 
1865, to September 1, 1868 ; commanded frigate Sautee, summer of 1865 ; com- 
manded steamer Marblehead, summer of 1866, coast of United States ; commanded 
sloop Dale, summer of 1867, coast of Europe ; steamer Saginaw, Pacific Squadron, 
in command October 24, 1868, to May 5, 1869, stationed in Alaska, and occupied 
in surveying and keeping refractory Indians quiet. 

Commissioned as Commander, September 20, 1868 ; special duty, May 5, 1869, 
to November, 1869 ; ordnance duty, November, 1869, to July, 1870 ; during 
which time made a thorough inspection of all the principal gun-foundries in the 
country, and embodied the result of his observations in a report to the Bureau of 
Ordnance, August 13, 1870 ; October 8 to December 21, 1870, on duty as member 
of a Board to examine Midshipmen of the class of 1869 ; February 15, 1871, to 
April 22, 1873, commanding tJnited States steamer Narragansett, Pacific Station ; 
specially commended by the Secretary of the Navy in his annual report to the 
President of the United States, for " great judgment and skill" in negotiating a 
commercial treaty in the Samoan or Navigator Islands (see Report of the Secretary 
of the Navy for 1872, pages 13 and 14). Between March 21, 1871, and April 1, 
1873, the Narragansett passed four hundred and thirty-one days under way 
and actively cruising, sailing almost entirely under canvas nearly sixty thousand 
miles. During this time she visited almost every quarter of the Pacific Ocean, 
extending her cruise to Australia and the Coral Sea ; surveyed a number of harbors 
and islands, made treaties, and collected, in the Polynesian Islands, indemnities 
for outrages inflicted on American citizens by the natives, without death or casualty 
of any kind. The cruise was so unusual a one as to attract public notice, and 
call forth comments of a very complimentary character from many quarters. In 
an official letter from the Secretary of the Navy to Commander Meade, dated 
May 2, 1873, the Admiral of the Navy is quoted as speaking of the Narragansett 
and her return of exercises as follows : " The best ever sent in," and reports 
her as performing " more professional work than any other ship afloat for the 
past two years," with other highly complimentary language ; May 10, 18'/3, 
special duty to prepare a report on American trade in the Pacific, and compli- 
mented in an official letter by the Chief of the Bureau of Navigation for the 
report transmitted ; June 30, 1873, to May 1, 1876, Inspector of Ordnance at the 
New York Navy Yard, and for the greater part of the time acting as Navigation- 
Officer, in addition to his other duties ; since May 1, 1876, waiting orders. 

Commander Meade has served in twenty-two vessels, commanding with invariable 
success ten ; author of a work on '' Boat Exercise," a compilation on " Naval Con- 
struction," and translator of several professional pamphlets from the French to the 
English language. 

10 



146 COMMANDERS. 

COMMANDER CHARLES C. CARPENTER, 

Born in Massachusetts. Appointed Midshipman from Massachusetts, October 1, 
1850 ; attached to sloop Portsmouth, Pacific Squadron, 1851-5 ; Naval Academy, 
1855-6. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 20, 1856; steam-frigates Merrimac, 
Roanoke, Colorado, and brig Dolphin, Home Squadron and special service, 1856-8 ; 
the last named capturing slave-brig Echo, with three hundred slaves on board ; 
in receiving-ship at Boston, 1868-9. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, January 23, 1858; steamer Mohawk, coast of 
Cuba, 1859-60 ; capturing slaver Wildfire, with five hundred slaves on board; 
steamer Mohawk, Texas and East Gulf Blockade, 1861 ; steamer Flag, South 
Atlantic Blockade, 1862 ; capturing steamers Anglia and Emily. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, July 16, 1862; iron-clad Catskill, 
South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1863 ; attacks on defences of Charleston, 
April 7, July 10, and August 17, 1863 ; Naval Academy, 1863-5 ; steam-sloop 
Hartford, flag-ship Asiatic Squadron, 1866-7 ; commanding steamer Wyoming, 
same squadron, 1868 ; Navy Yard, Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 1868-70. 

Commissioned as Commander, March, 1869 ; Navy Yard, Portsmouth, New 
Hampshire, 1871 ; commanding Nantasket (third-rate), N. A. Station, 1871-2 ; 
equipment duty, Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 1872-5 ; commanding Huron 
(third-rate), N. A. Station, 1875-6 ; Navy Yard, Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 
1878. 



COMMANDER WILLIAM A. KIRKLAND, 

Born in North Carolina. Appointed from North Carolina, July 2, 1850 ; at- 
tached to sloop Portsmouth, Pacific Squadron, 1851-5 ; Naval Academy, 1856. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 20, 1856 ; frigate St. Lawrence, 
Brazil Squadron, 1856-7 ; sloop Falmouth, Brazil Squadron, 1857-9. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, March 18, 1858; store-ship Release, Brazil 
Squadron, 1860 ; steamer Pulaski, coast of Brazil, 1861-3. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, July 16, 1862 ; steam-sloop Wyo- 
ming, East India Squadron, 1863-4 ; commanding iron-clad Winnebago, Western 
Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; served under Acting Rear-Admiral Thatcher 
in the combined movements of the military and naval forces against the defences 
of the city of Mobile, which resulted in the capture of that place and the sur- 
render of the rebel fleet ; commanding steamer Wasp, South Atlantic Squadron, 
1866-70. 

Commissioned as Commander, 1869 ; commanding store-ship Gerard, special 
service, 1873 ; ordnance duty, 1874 ; commanding Wasp, S. A. Station, 1875-6 ; 
commanding Frolic (fourth- rate), S. A. Station, 1876-7 ; commanding Supply, 
(fourth-rate), special sei-vice, 1878. 



COMMANDER EDWARD E. POTTER, 

Born in New York. Appointed from Illinois, February 5, 1850 ; attached to 
sloop Decatur, Home Squadron, 1852 ; frigate Constitution, coast of Africa, 
1853-5 ; Naval Academy, 1856. 

Promoted to Passed Midsliipman, June 20, 1856 ; frigate St. Lawrence, coast 
of Brazil, 1857-9. 



COMMANDERS. 147 

Commissioned as Lieutenant., July 9, 1858 ; steam-frigate Niagara, 1861 ; 
Western Gulf Squadron, 1862 ; bombardment and passage of Forts Jackson 
and St. Philip, and capture of New Orleans ; engagement with field battery at 
Grand Gulf, Mississippi, June 9, 1862; passed Vicksburg batteries twice; en- 
gagement with ram Arkansas, above Vicksburg, June, 1862. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander^ 3\x\'j l&^i IQQ'Z; steam-sloop Lack- 
awanna, Western Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1863 ; commanding iron-clad 
Mahopac, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; several engagements 
with Howlett House batteries, December, 1864 ; two engagements at Fort Fisher, 
December, 1864, and January, 1865 ; bombardment of Fort Anderson, February 
18, 1865 ; steamer Rhode Island, Atlantic Squadron, 1866-7 ; frigate Franklin, 
flag-ship European Squadron, 1867-8; Navy Yard, Boston, 1868-71. 

Commissioned as Commander^ 1869 ; commanding Shawmut (third-rate), 
N. A. Fleet, 1871-2; Light-House Inspector, 1873-7. 



COMMANDER LESTER A. BEARDSLEE, 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, March 5, 1850 ; attached to 
sloop Plymouth, East India Squadron, 1851-5 ; participated in one battle and 
several skirmishes with the Chinese army at Shanghai ; Naval Academy, 1856. 

Promoted io Passed Midshipman., June 20, 1856; steam-frigate Merrimac, 
special service, 1856-7 ; sloop Germantown, East India Squadron, 1857-60. 

Promoted to Master^ January 22, 1858. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, 1859 ; sloop Saratoga, coast of Africa, 1860-3. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, July 16, 1862; South Atlantic 
Blockading Squadron, 1863; attack on the defences of Charleston harbor, April 
7, 1863 ; steam-sloop Wachusett, special service, 1864-5 ; capture of rebel 
steamer Florida, by the Wachusett, in October, 1864; commanding steam-gun- 
boat Aroostook, Asiatic Squadron, 1866-8 ; steam-sloop Lackawanna, North 
Pacific Squadron, 1868-9. 

Commissioned as Commander, 1869 ; on duty at Hydrographic Office, Washing- 
ton, D. C, 1869-71, Navy Yard, Washington, 1872-4 ; special duty, 1875-8. 



COMMANDER THOMAS 0. SELFRIDGE, Jr., 

Entered the Navy as a Cadet Midshipman, October 3, 1851 ; graduated June^ 
1853, at the head of the first class organized on the present basis of the Naval 
Academy ; served as midshipman on the razee frigate Independence in the 
Pacific. 

Made a Passed Midshipman in November, 1856 ; served in the Coast Survey till 
October, 1857 ; as Master of the sloop-of-war Vincennes, on the coast of Africa^ 
till April, 1860. 

Commissioned 2ts Lieutenant in 1860; served in the Cumberland in I860;; 
was present at the destruction of the Norfolk Navy Yard ; at the bombardment 
and capture of the Hatteras forts ; was Second Lieutenant of the Cumberland 
when sunk in the action with the Confederate iron-clad Merrimac ; detailed to- 
command the Monitor after the wounding of Captain Worden ; subsequently 
Flag- Lieutenant of the North Atlantic Squadron ; detailed to command a sub- 
marine torpedo-boat, which, upon being found deficient in speed, was abandoned^ 
and he was detailed for duty in the Mississippi Fleet. 



148 COMMANDERS. 

Commissioned as Lie^itenant- Commander, July, 1862 ; commanded the iron-clad 
Cairo, blown up by a torpedo in Yazoo River, back of the defences of Vicksburg ; 
commanded gunboats Conestoga and Manitou ; commanded a siege battery in the 
capture of Vicksburg ; sunk in the Conestoga by collision with the ram General 
Price ; commanded the iron-clad Osage in the Red River Expedition ; while 
bringing up the rear fought the rebels at Blair's plantation, Red River, inflicting 
a loss of four hundred killed and wounded ; commanded the ram Vindicator and 
Fifth Division, Mississippi Fleet; ordered East, and commanded the Huron in the 
two bombardments of Fort Fisher ; commanded the Third Division of the land 
assaulting column of sailors upon that fort; ordered to Naval Academy in 1865 
as Instructor in Seamanship ; commanded Macedonian in the practice-cruises of 
1867-8 ; ordered, 1868, to command the Nipsic, attached to the West India 
Squadron. 

Commissioned as Commander, December, 1869 ; ordered, in 1869, to take charge 
of surveys of the Isthmus of Darien for an interoceanic ship-canal ; was engaged 
upon surveys of the Darien Isthmus till 1874 ; Navy Yard, Boston, 1874-5 ; 
Torpedo Station, Newport, Rhode Island, 1877-8. 



COMMANDER JOSEPH N. MILLER, 

Born in Ohio, November 22, 1836. Appointed from Ohio, April 8, 1850 ; 
Naval Academy, 1851-4; frigate Independence, Pacific Squadron, 1855-6. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, November 22, 1856 ; Naval Academy, 
1858. 

Promoted to Master, January 22, 1858 ; sloop Preble, Western Gulf Blockad- 
ing Squadron, 1858-9. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, 1861 ; brig Perry, 1861 ; Naval Academy, 1862. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, July 16, 1862; iron-clad Passaic, 
South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862-3 ; iron-clad steamer Sangamon, 
1863-4; Fort McAllister, March 3, 1863; Fort Sumter, April 7, 1863; iron- 
clad steamer Monadock, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; present 
at the two attacks on Fort Fisher, December, 1864, and January, 1865 ; Naval 
Academy, 1866-7 ; steamer Powhatan, flag-ship South Pacific Squadron, 1867-9 ; 
Navy Yard, New York, 1870. 

Commissioned as Commander, l^'l ; Chief-of-Staff', Southern Squadron, Pacific 
Fleet, 1871-2; commanding Ajax, iron-clad, N. A. Station, 1873; Hydrographic 
•Office, 1874-5; commanding Tuscarora (third-rate), N. P. Station, 1875-6; 
Bureau of Yards and Docks, 1876-7 ; Light-House Inspector, 1877-8. 



COMMANDER MONTGOMERY SICARD, 

Born in New York, September 30, 1836. Appointed from New York, October 
1, 1851 ; Naval Academy, 1851-5; attached to Irigate Potomac, Home Squadron, 
1855-6 ; steam-frigate Wabash, Home Squadron, 1856-9. 

Promoted to Master, November 4, 1858. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, 1861 ; steam-sloop Dacotah, 1861 ; steam-sloop 
•Oneida, Western Gulf Squadron, 1862-3 ; bombardment and passage of Forts 
Jackson and St. Philip, and Chalmette batteries, and destruction of rebel flotilla 
and transports, April 24, 1862 ; passage of Vicksburg batteries, June, 1862 ; 
engagement with rebel ram Arkansas, July, 1862. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, July 16, 1862; steam-sloop Ticon- 



COMMANDERS. 149 

deroga, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; two attacks on Fort 
Fisher, in December, 1864, and January, 1865; naval and land assault on Fort 
Fisher, January 15, 1865; bombardment of Fort Anderson, February, 1865; 
Naval Academy, 1866-8; steam-sloop Pensacola, North Atlantic Squadron, 
1868-9; commanding steamer Saginaw, Pacific Fleet, 1869-71. 

Commissioned as Commander, 1870 ; ordnance duty, New York, 1871-2 ; 
ordnance duty, Washington, 1872-6; Bureau of Ordnance, 1877. 



COMMANDER E. 0. MATTHEWS, 

Born in Maryland. Appointed from Missouri, October 2, 1851 ; Naval Acad- 
emy, 1851-5 ; frigate Potomac, Home Squadron, November, 1855, to May, 1856; 
sloop Saratoga, Home Squadron, May, 1856, to January, 1858 ; sloop Macedonian, 
Mediterranean Squadron, May, 1858, to July, 1860. 

Promoted to Master, November 4, 1858. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, July, 1860 ; Naval Academy, as Instructor in 
Mathematics, October, 1860, to April, 1861 ; steam-frigate Wabash, May, 1861, 
to November, 1861 (assisted in capture of forts at Hatteras Inlet) ; sick; Naval 
Academy, November, 1861, to October, 1862; Instructor in Seamanship. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, July 16, 1862; October, 1862, to 
June, 1864, Head of Department of Gunnery, etc. ; June, 1864, to July, 1865, 
South Atlantic Squadron, commanding Sonoma, then constructing naval battery 
on Morris Island ; commanded naval light artillery at Honey Hill, South Carolina, 
November 30, 1864; battles at Tullifinny Cross-Roads, December, 1864; staff 
of Admiral Dahlgren, January to July, 1865 ; apprentice-ship Savannah, August, 
1865 ; Naval Academy, November, 1865, to June 9, 1869, Department of Gun- 
nery ; Head of Torpedo Corps, June 9, 1869-72. 

Promoted to Commander, May 4, 1870 ; commanding Ashuelot, Asiatic 
Station, 1873-7. 

COMMANDER EDWARD P. LULL, 

Born in Vermont, February 23, 1836. Appointed from Wisconsin, October 7, 
1851; Naval Academy, 1851-5; attached to frigate Congress, Mediterranean 
Squadron, 1856-8. 

Promoted to Master, November 8, 1858 ; steam-frigate Roanoke, Home Squad- 
ron, 1858-61 ; engagement between Roanoke and forts at Hatteras Inlet, July, 
1861. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, 1860 ; Naval Academy, 1862-3. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, July 16, 1862; steam-sloop Brook- 
lyn, West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1864; passage of forts in Mobile Bay, and 
engagement of rebel gunboats, August 5, 1864; bombardment of Fort Morgan, 
August 14, 1864 ; commanding captured iron-clad Tennessee, Mississippi Squad- 
ron, 1864-5 ; commanded Tennessee at the bombardment of Fort Morgan, August 
22, 1864; steamer Swatara, West India Squadron, 1866; Naval Academy, 
1867-9. 

Commissioned as Commander, 1870 ; commanding store-ship Guard, 1871 ; 
Bureau of Yards and Docks, 1872; Torpedo Station, 1873—4; Hydrographic 
Inspector, Coast Survey, 1875-8. 



.150 COMMANDERS. 

COMMANDER CHARLES S. NORTON, 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, October 3, 1851 ; Naval 
Academy, 1851-5 ; attached to frigates Potomac and Wabash, Home Squadron, 
1855-8 ; frigate Wabash, Mediterranean Squadron, 1858-60. 

Promoted to Master, November 4, 1858 ; steam-sloop Seminole, Brazil Squad- 
ron, 1861-2 ; blockade off Charleston, Hampton Roads, Potomac Flotilla, 1861-2. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, 1861 ; several engagements with Potomac bat- 
teries and Sewell's Point ; battle of Port Royal. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, July, 1862; steam-gunboat Mara- 
tanza, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862-4; steamers Fort Jackson and 
Mercedita, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1863-4 ; steam-sloops Richmond 
and Albatross, West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 j steamer Shamrock, 
European Squadron, 1866-8 ; Portsmouth, New Hampshire, Navy Yard, and 
United States receiving-ship Vermont, New York, 1868-9 ; on " iron-clad duty," 
New Orleans, Louisiana, 1869-70. 

Commissioned as Commander, January, 1870 ; Light-House Inspector, 1872-5 ; 
commanding Passaic (iron-clad), 1875-8. 



COMMANDER JOSEPH M. BRADFORD, 

Born in Tennessee. Appointed from Alabama, January 10, 1840 ; attached to 
frigate Columbus, Mediterranean Squadron, 1840-3; sloop Vandalia, Home Squad- 
ron, 1843-5 ; Naval School, 1846. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, July 11, 1846 ; attached to steamer Spitfire, 
Home Squadron, 1846-7 ; was in the several attacks on Vera Cruz ; on board the 
Spitfire when that vessel, assisted by two other gunboats, captured a 10-gun fort 
a few miles below Tobasco ; in several skirmishes in and about Tobasco ; at cap- 
ture of Tuspan and Tampico ; frigate Brandy wine, Brazil Squadron, 1847-8; 
razee Independence, Mediterranean Squadron, 1849-52; Coast Survey, 1853; 
sloop Dale, coast of Africa, 1854-5. 

Promoted to blaster, 1855. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, September 16, 1855 ; sloop Jamestown, coast of 
Africa, 1856; receiving-ship, Boston, 1857-9; store-ship Release, Brazil Squad- 
ron, 1860-1 ; Navy Yard, Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 1862-3. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, July 15, 1862 ; commanding steamer 
Nipsic, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1863; November, 1863, was ap- 
pointed Fleet-Captain of the South Atlantic Squadron, and served in that capacity 
until June 25, 1865 ; was a number of times under fire at Charleston and Stone 
Inlet; Navy Yard, Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 1866. 

Commissioned as Commander, July 25, 1866 ; commanding steam-sloop Resaca, 
North Pacific Squadron, 1867-8; ordnance duty. Navy Yard, Boston, 1869-70; 
special duty, Bureau of Yards and Docks, 1871 ; Inspector of Ordnance, Navy Yard, 
Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 1874-5 ; commanding Marion (third-rate), Euro- 
pean Station, 1876-8. 

COMMANDER ROBERT L. PHYTHIAN, 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, January 28, 1852 ; Naval 
Academy, 1852-6 ; attached to frigate St. Lawrence, Brazil Squadron, 1857-9. 

Promoted to Master, 1859 ; sloop Jamestown, 1861. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, 1861 ; Naval Academy, 1862-3. 



COMMANDERS. 151 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander^ July 16, 1862; iron-clad Lehigh, 
South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1863-4; iron-clad New Ironsides, South 
Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; Naval Academy, 1866-9. 

Commissioned as Commander, July 13, 1870; Chief-of-Staff, Pacific Squad- 
ron, 1870-2; Navy Yard, Boston, 1873—4; commanding Nautical Schoul-ship 
St. Mary's, 1875-8. 

COMMANDER AUGUSTUS P. COOKE, 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, May 27, 1852 ; Naval Academy, 
1852-6 ; steam-frigate Wabash, Home Squadron, 1856-8. 

Promoted to Master, 1859. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, 1861 ; steam-sloop San Jacinto, 1861 ; steam- 
gunboat Pinola, Western Gulf Squadron, 1862-3. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, August 11, 1862; commanding 
steamer Estrella, Western Gulf Squadron, 1864 ; Naval Academy, 1865-7 ; steam- 
frigate Franklin, flag-ship European Squadron, 1867-8 ; steam-sloop Ticonderoga, 
European Squadron, 1868-9 ; Naval Academy, 1869-72. 

Commissioned as Commander, August 15, 1870; Torpedo Station, 1873; 
commanding Intrepid, 1874 ; commanding Swatara (third-rate), North Atlantic 
Station, 1875-8. 

COMMANDER RUSH R. WALLACE, 

Born in Tennessee, November 7, 1835. Appointed from Tennessee, May 25, 
1852 ; Naval Academy, 1852-6 ; attached to frigate St. Lawrence, Brazil Squad- 
ron, 1856-9. 

Promoted to Master, 1859. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, 1861 ; steamer Crusader, 1861 ; sloop Constella- 
tion, Mediterranean Squadron, 1861-3. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, October 1, 1862; steam-sloop Shen- 
andoah, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1863-5 ; present at the two attacks 
on Fort Fisher, December, 1864, and January, 1865 ; steamer Fort Jackson, 
Western Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1865 ; Naval Academy, 1866-7 ; frigate 
Guerriere, flag-ship South Atlantic Squadron, 1868 ; steam-sloop Richmond, 
European Fleet, 1868-9. 

Commissioned as Commander, October 25, 1870 ; commanding Idaho, store- 
ship Asiatic Fleet, 1870-1 ; commanding Ashuelot (third-rate), Asiatic Fleet, 
1872 ; Inspector of Ordnance, Norfolk, 1873-4; Light-House Inspector, 1875-8. 



COMMANDER CHESTER HATFIELD, 

Born in Massachusetts. Appointed from New York, May 21, 1852 ; Naval 
Academy, 1852-6 ; attached to steam-frigate Merrimac, special service, 1856-7 ; 
steam-frigate Merrimac, Pacific Squadron, 1857-8. 

Promoted to Master, 1859. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, 1860 ; steamer Mohawk, 1861 ; steam-gunboat 
Owasco, West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1862-3 ; bombardment and passage of 
Forts Jackson and St. Philip, and attack on Vicksburg ; capture of Galveston, 
Texas. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, October 2, 1862 ; commanding steam- 
gunboat Aroostook, West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1863-4 ; steamer Roanoke, 



152 COMMANDERS. 

North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864—5 ; Naval Academy, 1866 ; steamer 
Ashuelot, Asiatic Squadron, 1867 ; steam-sloop Shenandoah, Asiatic Squadron, 
1868-9 ; Navy Yard, New York, 1870-1 ; commanding Kansas (third-ratej, N. 
A. Fleet, 1872 ; Inspector of Ordnance, Norfolk, 1874-6. 
Commissioned as Commander, January 19, 1871. 



COMMANDER CHARLES J. McDOUGAL, 

Born in New York. Appointed from Pennsylvania, May 26, 1852; Naval 
Academy, 1852-6 ; attached to sloop Cyane, Home Squadron, 1856-8 ; sloop 
Marion, coast of Africa, 1858-60. 

Promoted to Master, 1859. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, January 23, 1861 ; steamer Saginaw, 1861 ; steam- 
gunboat Port Royal, East Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1862-3. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, November 16, 1862; commanding 
steamer Hendrick Hudson. East Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1863-5 ; command- 
ing steamer Camanche, San Francisco, California, 1865-6 ; commanding store- 
ship Jamestown, North Pacific Squadron, 1866-8 ; steam-sloop Guerriere, 
fliig-ship South Atlantic Squadron, 1868-9 ; rendezvous, San Francisco, 1870-2. 

Commissioned as Commander, January 19, 1871 ; commanding Saco (third- 
rate), Asiatic Station, 1873-6 ; ordnance duty, Mare Island, 1876-8. 



COMMANDER GEORGE H. PERKINS, 

Born in New Hampshire, October 21, 1831. Appointed from New Hampshire, 
October 1, 1851 ; Naval Academy, 1851-6 ; attached to sloop Cyane, Home 
Squadron, 1856-8 ; store-ship Release, Brazil Squadron, 1858-60. 

Promoted to Master, 1859 ; steamer Sumter, 1861. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, February 2, 1861 ; steam-gunboat Cayuga, Western 
Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1862-3. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, December 13, 1862 ; commanding 
steam-gunboat Scioto, Western Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1863-5 ; bombard- 
ment of the forts below New Orleans and Chalmette batteries ; passage of the 
forts in Mobile Bay and capture of the city ; skirmishes on the Mississippi in the 
New London, Cayuga, and Scioto, and on the blockade of the coast of Texas in 
the Scioto ; special duty. New Orleans, 1866 ; steam-sloop Lackawanna, North 
Pacific Squadron, 1867-8 ; ordnance duty, Boston, 1870-1. 

Commissioned as Commander, January 19, 1871 ; Light-House Inspector, 
1873-5 ; commanding Ashuelot (third-rate), Asiatic Fleet, 1877-8. 



COMMANDER ALFRED HOPKINS, 

Born in New York. Appointed October 1, 1851; Naval School, 1851-5; 
frigate Congress, Mediterranean Squadron, 1856-8. 

Promoted to Master, November 4, 1858; brig Bainbridge, Mediterranean 
Squadron, 1858-9. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, 1861 ; steamer Louisiana, North Atlantic Block- 
ading Squadron, 1861-2. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, July 16, 1862; iron-clad steamer 
Lehigh, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862-4 ; capture of Roanoke 
Island, and of rebel squadron ofi" Elizabeth City ; capture of Newbern ; bombard- 



COMMANDERS. 153 

ment of Fort Sumter during several days, in November, 1863 ; also several small 
affairs around Sewell's Point, and on the eastern shore of Virginia ; Naval Acad- 
emj^ 1865 ; steamer Florida, North Atlantic Squadron, 1866-7 ; steamer De Soto, 
North Atlantic Squadron, 1868 ; receiving-ship, Philadelphia, 1868-9 ; com- 
manding sloop Cyane, Pacific Fleet, 1869-71. 

Commissioned as Commander., March 2, 1871 ; furloughed 1872-3 ; command- 
ing Kansas (third-rate), N. A. Station, 1873-4; commanding Wyandotte (iron- 
clad), N. A. Station, 1875-6. 



COMMANDEK EGBERT BOYD, 

Born in Maine. Appointed from Maine, January 14, 1850 ; attached to sloop 
John Adams, coast of Africa, December, 1850, until February, 1852 ; brig Bain- 
bridge, coast of Africa, February, 1852, to September, 1853 ; sloop St. Mary's, 
Pacific Squadron, October, 1853, to July, 1855; Naval Academy, 1855-6. 

Promoted to Passed llidsJu'pman, June, 1856 ; store-ship Release, Home 
Squadron, 1856 ; Coast Survey, 1856-7 ; steam-frigate Powhatan, East India 
Squadron, December, 1857, to August, 1860. 

Promoted to blaster, January, 1858. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, January, 1858 ; attached to store-ship Release, 
until her arrival at Sardinia, Mediterranean ; transferred to flag-ship Richmond, 
Mediterranean Squadron, July, 1861 ; steam-frigate Powhatan, cruising in the 
West Indies, in search of rebel steamer Sumter ; attached to Gulf Blockading 
Squadron ; several skirmishes with rebel gunboats ; participated in the bombard- 
ment of Pensacola, Florida ; flag-ship Colorado, East Gulf Blockading Squadron, 
until June, 1862. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, July 16, 1862; sloop Ossipee, at 
Hampton Roads, October, 1862, to February, 1863; receiving-ship Ohio, May to 
September, 1863 ; steam-frigate Powhatan, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 
September, 1863; ordered to tow the captured iron-clad Atlanta to Philadelphia; 
after which proceeded to West Indies as flag-ship of that squadron, until October, 
1864 ; Mississippi Flotilla, as Commander of the Ninth District (Tennessee River), 
December, 1864 ; was employed keeping open communications on that river until 
the close of the war ; in several skirmishes with the enemy ; remained cruising in 
Western rivers until December, 1865 ; Naval Academy, to June, 1866 ; temporary 
duty at Navy Yard, Boston, until August, 1866 ; steamer Winooski, West India 
Squadron, August, 1866, to July, 1867 ; steamer Wampanoag, on trial duty from 
September, 1867, to June, 1868 ; receiving-ship Ohio, Boston, Massachusetts, 
until September, 1868 ; commanding steamer Yantic, West India Squadron, until 
January, 1869; waiting orders since April, 1869, to June, 1870 ; Light-House 
Inspector, 1871—4. 

Commissioned as Commander, March 20, 1871 ; commanding Alert (third-rate), 
Asiatic Station, 1876-8. 

COMMANDER GEORGE A. STEVENS, 

Born in Massachusetts. Appointed from Tennessee, May 13, 1840 ; attached to 
frigate Potomac, Home Squadron, 1840-3 ; steam-sloop Princeton, special service, 
1844-5 ; Naval School, 1846. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, July 11, 1846 ; razee Independence, flag-ship 
Pacific Squadron, 1846-8 ; Coast Survey, 1849-50 ; frigate Raritan, Pacific Squad- 
ron, 1850-2 ; store-ship Southampton, Pacific Squadron, 1852-5. 



154 COMMANDERS. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, September 14, 1855 ; brig Bainbridge, Brazil 
Squadron, 1858-60; ordnance duty, Boston, 1861. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, July 16, 1862 ; commanding steam- 
gunboat Huron, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862-4 ; retired October 
25, 1865 ; equipment duty, Pensacola, 1867-71. 

Commissioned as Commander, May, 1871 ; equipment duty, Norfolk, 1872-3 ; 
commanding Lebigh (iron-clad), N. A. Station, 1876. 



COMMANDER J. N. QUACKENBUSH, 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York,, September 24, 1847; frigate 
Cumberland, Home Squadron, during Mexican War; sloop Falmouth, Pacific 
Squadron, 1849-51 ; frigate Raritan, Pacific Squadron, 1851-53 ; dismissed the 
service, January 3, 1854; reinstated in the service, 1861, as an Acting Lieu- 
tenant. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, July, 1862; Lieutenant-Commander 
Quackenbush was actively employed against the enemy during the entire period of 
the Rebellion ; commanding steamer Mackinaw, Atlantic Squadron, 1866-8 ; re- 
tired, 1869 ; Naval Station, League Island, Pennsylvania, 1869-70. 

Commissioned as Commander, May, 1871 ; commanding Wasp, S. A. Station, 
1871-2. 

COMMANDER THOMAS H. EASTMAN, 

Born in New York. Appointed from New Hampshire, January 31, 1853; 
Naval Academy, 1853-6 ; attached to steam-frigate Wabash, Home Squadron, 
1856-8. 

Promoted to Master, 1859. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, 1860 ; commanding steamer Yankee, Potomac 
Flotilla, 1861 ; steamer Thomas Freeborn, Potomac Flotilla, 1861 ; numerous 
sharp engagements with rebel batteries and guerillas on the Potomac and Rappa- 
hannock Rivers, 1861 ; steamer Keystone State, Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 
1861-3 ; engagements with Forts Hatteras and Clarke ; engagement of Keystone 
State with rebel iron-clads Chicura and Palmetto, ofiF Charleston, in 1863. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, September 30, 1862 ; South Atlantic 
Blockading Squadron, 1863-5 ; on board the Weehawken at the reduction of 
Fort Sumter and Charleston, South Carolina; Naval Academy, 1866-7; com- 
manding steamer Penobscot, North Atlantic Squadron, 1867-9. 

Commissioned as Commander, June 19, 1871 ; equipment duty. Navy Yard, 
Washington, 1872 ; equipment duty, Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 1873-5 ; 
commanding Ajax (iron-clad), N. A. Station, 1876-8. 



COMMANDER EDWARD TERRY, 

Born in Connecticut. Appointed from Connecticut, September 21, 1853 ; Naval 
Academy, 1853-7 ; attached to sloop Germantown, East India Squadron, 1857-9 ; 
steam-sloop Richmond, Western Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1861-5 ; engagement 
with rebel ram Manassas and steamers in the Mississippi River, October 12, 
1861 ; Fort McRae and rebel batteries, November 22, 1861 ; bombardment and 
passage of Forts Jackson and St. Philip, capture of New Orleans, and passage of 



COMMANDERS. 155 

Vicksburg; bombardment of batteries at Port Hudson, Marcli 14, 1863; battle 
of Mobile Bay, August 5, 1864. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, January 4, I860 ; steam-frigate Pow- 
hatan, Pacific Squadron, 1866-7; Naval Academy, 1868-9; commanding Saco 
(third-rate), Asiatic Fleet, 1870-2. 

Commissioned as Commander, October 30, 1871 ; Naval Academy, 1873-4 ; 
Commandant Cadets, Naval Academy, 1875-8. 



COMMANDER FEANCIS M. BUNCE, 

Born in Connecticut. Appointed from the same State, May 28, 1852 ; Naval 
Academy, 1852-7 ; attached to sloop Grermantown, East India Squadron, 1857-9 ; 
sloop Macedonian, 1861. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, April 11, 1861 ; steam-gunboat Penobscot, North 
Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1861-2 ; skirmishes at YorktovFU and Gloucester, 
April, 1862 ; engagements at Fort Fisher and other rebel batteries at mouth of 
Cape Fear River, from May to August, 1862 ; steam-sloop Pawnee, South 
Atlantic Squadron, 1863; iron-clad Catskill, South Atlantic Squadron, 1863-4; 
July 10, 1863, commanded a boat expedition co-operating with General Gillmore 
in assault on and capture of a part of Morris Island ; participated in all actions 
at siege of Charleston, from July 16 to November 12, 1863 ; attack upon Fort 
Sumter, September 8, 1863; was wounded by the premature explosion of a 150- 
pound rifle gun in the turret of the iron-clad Patapsco. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, January 16, 1863; iron-clad Dictator, 
North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864; commanding iron-clad Monaduock, 
special cruise, 1865-6 ; Navy Yard, Boston, 1867-70. 

Commissioned as Commander, November 2, 1871 ; Navy Yard, Washington, 
1875-6 ; Torpedo Inspection, 1877. 



COMMANDER BYRON WILSON, 

Born in Ohio, December 17, 1837. Appointed from Ohio, January 31, 1853 ; 
Naval Academy, 1853-7 ; attached to steam-frigate Mississippi, East India Squad- 
ron, 1857-9 ; steam-sloop Richmond, Western Gulf Squadron, 1861. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant , April 16, 1861 ; commanding iron-clad Mound 
City and a division of the Mississippi Squadron, 1863-5 ; passage of Vicksburg 
batteries, April 16, 1863 ; attack on Grand Gulf, April, 1863 ; Deer Creek, 1863 ; 
Red River Expedition, 1864. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, November 5, 1863; steam-sloop 
Saranac, Pacific Squadron, 1866-8 ; steam-sloop Plymouth, European Fleet, 
1868-9 ; commanding Nipsic (fourth-rate), Darien Expedition, 1870-1. 

Commissioned as Commander, January 20, 1872 ; commanding R. S. St. 
Louis, 1875-8, 

COMMANDER FREDERICK V. McNAIR, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania, September 21, 1853; 
Naval Academy, 1853-7 ; steam-frigate Minnesota, East India Squadron, 1857-9 ; 
steam-sloop Iroquois, West Gulf Squadron, 1861-2 ; bombardment of Forts 
Jackson and St. Philip and Chalmette batteries ; engagement at Grand Gulf; pas- 
sage both ways of Vicksburg batteries, and destruction of rebel ram Arkansas. 



156 COMMANDERS. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, Aj^xW 18, 1861; steam-stoop Juniata, 1862-3 ; 
steam-sloop Seminole, Western Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1863-4 ; steam-sloop 
Juniata, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; at both attacks on Fort 
Fisher. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, April 20, '1864 ; steam-sloop Juniata, 
Brazil Squadron, 1865-6 ; steamer Brooklyn, flag-ship South Atlantic Squadron, 
1866-7; Naval Academy, 1868; frigate Franklin, flag-ship European Squadron, 
1868-9 ; equipment duty, Philadelphia, 1870-1 ; Naval Academy, 1871-4. 

Commissioned as Commander, January 29, 1872 ; commanding Kearsarge 
(third-rate), Asiatic Squadron, 1875-8. 



COMMANDER ARTHUR R. YATES, 

Born in New York, Entered Naval Academy, September 24, 1853 ; graduated, 
1857; from 1857 until 1860, in steamer Mississippi, Asiatic Squadron; July, 
1860, until December, 1860, in steam-sloop Brooklyn, Gulf Squadron ; from Decem- 
ber, 1860, until December, 1863, in the sloop Cyane, Pacific Squadron. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, April 18, 1861 ; from January, 1864, until August, 
1864, steamer Augusta; a volunteer on board the flag-ship Hartford at battle of 
Mobile Bay (see Admiral Farragut's Report) ; evening of day of the battle, placed 
in command of the captured gunboat Selma ; from that time until June, 1867, 
successively in command of Selma, J. P. Jackson, and Chocura, Gulf Squadron. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, November 16, 1864; September, 
1867, until June, 1868, Esecutive-Oflicer of flag-ship Piscataqua, Asiatic 
Squadron ; from June, 1868, until July, 1869, successively in command of steamers 
Ashuelot and Unadilla, same squadron ; Naval Academy, 1870-2. 

Commissioned as Commander, February 6, 1872 ; commanding Manhattan 
(iron-clad), N. A. Station, 1873 ; commanding R. S. Sabine, 1875-6. 



COMMANDER JOHN ADAMS HOWELL, 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, September 27, 1854; Naval 
Academy, 1854-8 ; attached to sloop Macedonian, Mediterranean Squadron, 
1858-9 ; store-ship Supply, 1861. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, April 18, 1861 ; attached to steam-sloop Ossipee, 
North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862-3; steam-sloop Ossipee, Western 
Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1863-5 ; participated in the battle of Mobile Bay, 
August 5, 1864. 

Commissioned as Lietitenant- Commander, March 3, 1865; steamer De Soto, 
special service, 1866 ; steamer De Soto, North Atlantic Squadron, 1866-7 ; Naval 
Academy, 1868-72. 

Commissioned as Commander, March 6, 1872 ; Coast Survey, 1872-4 ; Naval 
Academy, 1875-8. 

COMMANDER ALLEN V. REED, 

Entered the Naval Academy as Acting Midshipman, September 26, 1854; 
two practice-ship cruises in Preble, Commander Joseph H. Green, in 1855-7 ; 
graduated June 10, 1858 ; joined Macedonian, Key West, July 12, 1858 ; went 
to Mediterranean Squadron, waiting orders, July 28, 1860 ; final examination, 
January 5, 1861. 



COMMANDERS. 157 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, January 9, 1861 ; joined Pawnee, February 12. 

Promoted to Master, February 28, 1861 ; transferred to Water Witch, March 
8, Gulf Squadron, as Navigator and Watch-Officer. 

Promoted to Lieutenant, April 18, 1861 ; joined flag-ship Colorado, Sep- 
tembur 16, as Watch-Officer; joined Potomac in December, 1861, as Watch- 
Officer, and afterwards was Executive- Officer for one year; joined Lackawanna 
as Executive-Officer, August 17, 1863 ; detached November 12, and ordered 
North ; waiting orders till February 6, 1864:; then joined Tuscarora at Beaufort, 
North Carolina, as Executive-Officer, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron ; de- 
tached at Baltimore June 1, and took the crew on to New York; joined the 
Pawtuxet (double-ender), as Executive-Officer, June 6. 

Promoted to Lieutenant- Commander, March 3, 1865; in command of the Paw- 
tuxet for two months ; detached July 15, 1865 ; waiting orders till September 1-1 ; 
then joined Miantonomah as Executive-Officer ; detached April 29, 1866 ; waiting 
orders till July 11 ; then at Navy Yard, Norfolk, as assistant to the Executive- 
Officer till September 26 ; then joined Resaca as Executive-Officer, and went to 
Pacific Station ; transferred to Saranac, February 20, 1868 ; officers and crew 
transferred to Jamestown, January 25, 1869 ; detached July 1, and ordered home ; 
joined receiving-ship Vermont, September 11, as Executive-Officer; equipment 
duty at Navy Yard, New York, from May 15, 1870, to September 26 ; navigation 
duty (same yard) from September, 1870, to May, 1872. 

Promoted to Commander, April 1, 1872 ; waiting orders till July 23 ; joined 
Kansas at Key West, August 9 ; in command till June 20, 1874 ; connected with 
the Nicaragua Surveying Expedition and the North Atlantic Station ; waiting 
orders till November 19 ; then attached to Hydrographic Office, and as Assistant 
Hydrographer since September 20, 1875. 



COMMANDER GEORGE DEWEY, 

Born in Vermont. Appointed from Vermont, September 23, 1854; Naval 
Academy, 1854-8 ; attached to steam-frigate Wabash, Mediterranean Squadron, 
1858-9 ; steam-sloop Mississippi, West Gulf Squadron, 1861-3; capture of New 
Orleans, April, 1862 ; Port Hudson, March, 1863 ; engagements with rebels below 
Donaldsonville, Louisiana, July, 1863. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, April 19, 1861 ; steam-gunboat Agawan, North 
Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; two attacks on Fort Fisher, December, 
1864, and January, 1865. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, March 3, 1865; steamer Kearsarge, 
European Squadron, 1866 ; frigate Colorado, flag-ship European Squadron, 1867; 
Naval Academy, 1868-9 ; commanding Narragansett (fourth-rate), special service, 
1870-1 ; Torpedo Station, 1872. 

Commissioned as Commander, April 13, 1872 ; commanding Narragansett 
(fourth-rate), Pacific Survey, 1872-5 ; Light-House Inspector, 1876-8. 



COMMANDER GEORGE B. WHITE, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from same State, September 28, 1854 ; Naval 
Academy, 1854-8 ; attached to steam-sloop Saratoga, Home Squadron, 1858-60 ; 
was on the Saratoga in the action which resulted in the capture of the steamers 
Miramon and Marquis de la Habana, Vera Cruz, 1860 ; steamer Union, Home 
Squadron, 1861. 



158 COMMANDERS. 

Commissioned as Ideiitenant, April 19, 1861 ; steam-gunboat Ottawa, South 
Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1861-3 ; at battle of Port Royal, 1861 ; engage- 
ment at Port Royal Ferry, June 1, 1862 ; engagement with rebel flotilla, Wil- 
mington River, February, 1862 ; capture of Fernandina, and action in St. Mary's 
River, March, 1862, and operations in Stouo River ; steamer State of Georgia, 
North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1863-4; steamer Mendota, North Atlantic 
Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; capture of Fort Fisher. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander^ March 3, 1865; steam-sloop Daco- 
tah, Pacific Squadron, 1866-8 ; League Island, Pennsylvania, 1869 ; equipment 
duty, Philadelphia, 1869-71 ; commanding R. S. Onward, Callao, Peru, 1871-2. 

Commissioned as Commander ^ August 13, 1872 ; Light-House Inspector, 1877 ; 
commanding Frolic (fourth-rate), S. A. Station, 1877-8. 



COMMANDER HENRY L. HOWISON, 

Born in Indiana. Appointed from Indiana, September 26, 1854; Naval 
Academy, 1854-8 ; attached to steam-frigate Wabash, Mediterranean Squadron, 
1858-60 ; steamer Pocahontas, 1861. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant^ April 19, 1861 ; steamer Augusta, South At- 
lantic Blockading Squadron, 1861-3 ; at Port Royal ; engagement with rams off 
Charleston, 1863 ; South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864 ; engagement with 
the forts of Charleston, 1863-4 ; steamer Bienville, Western Gulf Squadron, 
1864-5 ; battle of Mobile Bay, August 5, 1864. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander^ March 3, 1865 ; temporary ord- 
nance duty, Washington, 1866 ; steam-sloop Pensacola, North Pacific Squadron, 
1866-8 ; ordnance duty, Washington, 1869 ; Naval Academy, 1870-2. 

Commissioned as Commander, August 19, 1872 ; commanding Shawmut, 
(third-rate), N. A. Station, 1872-4 ; Naval Academy, 1875-8. 



COMMANDER ALBERT KAUTZ, 

Born in Ohio. Appointed from Ohio, September 28, 1854; Naval Academy, 
1854-8 ; attached to steam-frigate Roanoke, Home Squadron, 1858-60 ; prisoner 
in North Carolina, 1861. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, April 21, 1861 ; steam-sloop Hartford, Western 
Gulf Squadron, 1861-2 ; steam-sloop Susquehanna, 1863 ; served in the Hart- 
ford at the capture of New Orleans, and the passage of Vicksburg, June 29 and 
July 16, 1862 ; Pacific Squadron, 1865. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, May 31, 1865 ; steamer Towanda, 
1866 ; steamer Pensacola, North Pacific Squadron, 1866-8 ; receiving-ship, 
Norfolk, 1869; Navy Yard, Boston, 1869-72. 

Commissioned as Commander, September 3, 1872; commanding Monocacy 
(third-rate), Asiatic Station, 1873-5 ; Light-House Inspector, 1876-8. 



COMMANDER ALFRED T. MAHAN, 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, September 30, 1854; Naval 
Academy, 1856-9 ; attached to frigate Congress, Home Squadron, 1861 ; steamer 
Pocahontas, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1861-2. 



COMMANDERS. 159 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, August 31, 1861 ; Naval Academy, 1863 ; 
steam-sloop Seminole, Western Gulf Squadron, 1863-4; steamer James Adger, 
South Atlantic Squadron, 1864-5. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, 3 wne. 7, 1865; steamer Muscoota, 
Gulf Squadron, 1865-6; steamer Iroquois, Asiatic Squadron, 1867-9; com- 
manding; steamer Aroostook, Asiatic Fleet, 1869-70 ; Navy Yard, New York, 
1871 ; R. S. New York, 1872. 

Commissioned as Commander, November 20, 1872; commanding Wasp, 
(fourth-rate), S. A. Station, 1873-4; Navy Yard, Boston, 1876-7; Naval 
Academy, 1877-8. 



COMMANDER GEORGE C. REMEY, 

Born in Iowa. Appointed from Iowa, September 20, 1855 ; Naval Academy, 
1855-9 ; attached to steam-sloop Hartford, East India Squadron, 1860-1. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, August 31, 1861 ; steam-gunboat Marblehead, 
South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1861-4; was present at the siege of York- 
town, and on several occasions engaged the batteries at long range ; in conse- 
quence of the Marblehead being grounded, was compelled to witness the battle of 
West Point, Virginia, without being able to participate ; engagement with rebels 
at White House, Pamunky River, June 29, 1862 ; engaged batteries on Sullivan's 
Island, South Carolina, on two different occasions ; engaged Battery Wagner, Mor- 
ris Island, South Carolina, at long range; took part in general engagement of Bat- 
tery Wagner, August 17, 1863 ; was in command of naval battery on Morris Island, 
from August 23 to September 8, 1863; and was engaged in bombardment of 
Fort Sumter, and at times Fort Gregg ; had command of the Second Division of 
boats in the night attack on Fort Sunater, September 8, 1863, and was taken pris- 
oner by the rebels ; steam-gunboat Marblehead, Naval Academy, Newport, 1865-6. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, June 25, 1865; steamer Mohongo, 
Pacific Squadron, 1866-7 ; Naval Academy, 1868-9 ; attached to frigate Sabine^ 
special service, 1869-70 ; T. and N. Surveying Expedition, 1871 ; Naval Observa- 
tory, 1872. 

Commissioned as Commander, November 25, 1872 ; Bureau of Yards and Docks, 
1873-6 ; commanding Enterprise (third-rate), N. A. Station, 1877-8. 



COMMANDER NORMAN H. FARQUHAR, 

Born in Pennsylvania, April 11, 1840. Appointed from Pennsylvania, Septem- 
ber 27, 1854; Naval Academy, 1854-9 ; squadron on coast of Africa, 1860-1. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, August 31, 1861 ; steam-gunboat Mahaska, North 
Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862-3; steamer Rhode Island, West India 
Squadron, 1863-4 ; steamer Santiago de Cuba, North Atlantic Blockading Squad- 
ron, 1864-5 ; present at both attacks on Fort Fisher. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, August 5,1865; Naval Academy, 
1866-8 ; steamer Swatara, European Squadron, 1868-9 ; Navy Yard, Boston, 
1870 ; commanding Kansas (fourth-rate), T. and N. Surveying Expedition, 1871 ; 
Navy Yard, Boston, 1872. 

Commissioned as Commanc^er, December 12, 1872; in charge practice-ships, 
Naval Academy, 1873-8. 



160 COMMA NDERS. 

COMMANDER S. DANA GREENE, 

Born February 11, 1840, in Cumberland, Maryland. Appointed an Acting Mid- 
shipvian at the Naval Academy, at Annapolis, Maryland, from Rhode Island, 
September 21, 1855 ; graduated June 9, 1859, number 7 in class of twenty; on 
same day received a warrant as a MidsMpman^ and was ordered to the Hartford, 
at Boston; attached to Hartford, 1859-61, China Station. 

Promoted to Lieute7iant, August 31, 1861 ; attached to the Monitor as Execu- 
tive-Officer, from January 24, 1862, until she foundered, off Cape Hatteras, De- 
cember 30, 1862 ; engagement with the rebel iron-clad Merrimac, March 9, 1862, 
at Hampton Roads ; was in command of the Monitor after Lieutenant-Commanding 
Worden was wounded, and at the time the Merrimac was driven from the battle- 
ground ; engagement with rebel batteries at Drury's Bluff, James River, May, 
1862 ; Admiral Wilkes, James River Flotilla, June to September, 1862 ; served 
on board steamer Florida, blockading coast of North Carolina, January to Septem- 
ber, 1863 ; special duty at New York, November, 1863, to February, 1864 ; at- 
tached to the Iroquois, 1864-5. 

Pi-omoted to Lieutenant- Commander, August 11, 1865 ; Naval Academy, Octo- 
ber, 1865, to October, 1868, as Assistant Professor of Mathematics ; served in 
practice-vessel Marblehead, 1866 ; Macedonian, 1867 ; and Savannah, 1868 ; at- 
tached to the Pacific Squadron, 1868-71, on board the Ossipee, Saranac, and 
Pensacola. 

Promoted to Commander, December 12, 1872; Naval Academy, as Head of 
the Department of Navigation and Astronomy, June, 1871, to June, 1873 ; and 
as Superintendent of grounds, to December, 1874 ; commanding Juniata, on Eu- 
ropean Station, 1875 ; and coast of the United States, 1876 ; commanding Monon- 
gahela, on home coast, 1877 ; Naval Academy, 1878. 



COMMANDER THEODORE F. KANE, 

Born in District of Columbia. Appointed from New York, September 27, 
1855; Naval Academy, 1855-9; attached to sloop Constellation, coast of Africa, 
1859-61. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, August 31, 1861; Naval Academy, 1862-3; 
steamer Neptune, West India Squadron, 1863-5. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, September 22, 1865 ; Naval Academy, 
1866-8 ; steamer Mohongo, North Pacific Squadron, 1868-9 ; steam-sloop Juniata, 
European Fleet, 1870-1 ; Navy Yard, Washington, 1872. 

Commissioned as Commander, December 28, 1872 ; special duty, Washington, 
1873-6 ; commanding Alliance (third-rate), North Atlantic Station, 1876-8. 



COMMANDER C. M. SCHOONMAKER, 

Born February 2, 1839. Appointed Acting 3Iidshipman at United States Naval 
Academy, Annapolis, Maryland, September 28, 1854; graduated and received 
certificate of graduation, June, 1859; 1859-60, squadron, west coast of Africa; 
May, 1861, to September, 1861, on board U. S. steam-frigate Minnesota, bearing 
flag of Flag-Officer S. H. Stringham ; participated in fight with Forts Hatteras 
and Clarke, and captured them ; August, 1861, took about seven hundred prison- 
ers ; was Sailing-Master of Minnesota at this time. 

Promoted to Lieutenant, August 31, 1861 ; detached from Minnesota, Septem- 



COMMA NDERS. 161 

ber, 1861; November, 1861, to July, 1863, Executive-Officer of U. S. gunboat 
Wyandotte, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron ; October, 1862, to March, 1864, 
Executive-Officer of U. S. steamer Octorara ; one year in Rear-Admiral Wilkes's 
Flying Squadron, and the rest of the time in West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 
blockading off Mobile Bar; May, 186-4, to September, 1864, Executive-Officer 
of U. S. monitor Manhattan, joining her in New York ; on board this ship par- 
ticipated in passing the forts in Mobile Bay ; August 14, 1864, fight with and the 
capture of the iron-clad steamer Tennessee, and other Confederate gunboats, and 
capture of Forts Morgan and Gaines; September, 1864, to December, 1864, Ex- 
ecutive-Officer of U. S. gunboat Augusta, convoying Aspinwall steamers; March, 
1865, ordered as Executive-Officer of monitor Catskill, Charleston harbor ; June, 
1865, ordered as Navigator of U. S. steamer Juniata, at Port Royal, South Caro- 
lina ; sailed for the Brazil Squadron ; served one year as Navigator, and the other 
and last of cruise as Executive-Officer. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, December 24, 1865; October, 1867, 
ordered as Navigator of U. S. steam-frigate Piscataqua, afterwards called the Dela- 
ware, bearing the flag of Rear- Admiral S. C. Rowan ; joined the Asiatic Squadron ; 
upon arrival at the station became the Executive-Officer, which position he held 
until end of cruise ; returned to New York, November, 1870 ; January, 1872, to 
May, 1572, torpedo instruction, Newport, Rhode Island ; May, 1872, to Septem- 
ber, 1873, commanded U. S. steamer Frolic, bearing the flag of Vice-Admiral 
Rowan, U. S. N. ; May, 1873, went to St. Johns, New Foundland, and received 
and brought to Washington the part of the crew of the Polaris taken from an ice- 
floe ; September, 1873, to October, 1874, Navigation-Officer, Navy Yard, New York. 

Commissioned as Commander, February 14, 1873 ; December, 1874, ordered 
to duty as Inspector of the Eighth Light-House District, with headquarters at 
New Orleans, Louisiana, which is his present duty. 



COMMANDER HENRY B. SEELY, 

Born in New York, July 7, 1838. Appointed from New York, May 26, 1852 ; 
Naval Academy, 1852-7 ; attached to steam-frigate Minnesota, East India 
Squadron, 1857-9 ; steamer Keystone State, 1861. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, April 17, 1861 ; steamer Sumter, South Atlantic 
Blockading Squadron, 1862-3 ; steam-sloop Narragansett, Pacific Squadron, 
1863-5. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, February 21, 1864; steamer Bien- 
ville, 1866 ; steamer Pawnee, South Atlantic Squadron, 1867-9 ; Light-House 
Inspector, 1872-6. 

Commissioned as Commander, August 24, 1873. 



COMMANDER R. S. McCOOK, 

Born in Ohio, March 10, 1839. Appointed from Ohio, September 21, 1854; 
Naval Academy, 1854-9. Midshipman on San Jacinto, 1859-61, west coast of 
Africa ; returned from that station in slaver Storm King, captured off the Congo 
River with seven hundred and nineteen slaves on board ; flag-ship Minnesota, 
N. A. Blockading Squadron, 1861 ; prize-master rebel privateer Savannah and 
ship Arago ; capture Forts Clarke and Hatteras ; on arrival of Minnesota at New 
York, was detached and ordered Executive-Officer Stars and Stripes. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, August 31, 1861 ; battle of Roanoke Island ; com- 

11 



162 COMMA NDERS. 

manded naval howitzer battery on shore at battle of Newborn, North Carolina ; 
commanded Stars and Stripes in North Carolina sounds, and on blockade off 
Wilraincrton, North Carolina ; 1863, Executive-Officer Bienville ; Executive-Officer 
iron-clad Canonicus, in operations up James River, attacks on Hewlett's battery, 
both attacks on Fort Fisher, and surrender of Charleston, South Carolina; 1865, 
Executive-Officer Tioga. 

Commissioned as Lie7itena7it- Commander, Mavah 3, 1865; Naval Academy, 
1866-7 ; Executive-Officer Kearsarge, Albany, Congress ; commanded Nan- 
tasket, Kansas, and Yantic, West India Station ; commanded Yantic, Asiatic 
Station ; 1877-8, Navigation-Officer, New York Navy Yard. 

Commissioned as Commander, 1873. 



. COMMANDER GILBERT C. WILTSE, 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, September 20, 1855 ; Naval 
Academy, 1855-9; attached to frigate Congress, Brazil Squadron, 1859-60; 
frigate Congress, Home Squadron, 1860-2; took part in the battle between the 
Congress and Cumberland and the rebel ram Merrimac, in Hampton Roads, 
March 9, 1862. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, April 19, 1861 ; steam-sloop Dacotah, West 
India Squadron, 1862-3 ; South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1863-5. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, March 3, 1865; steamer Agawam, 
Atlantic Squadron, 1866-7 ; apprentice-ship Sabine, 1868 ; Navy Yard, New 
York, 18G9; attached to steamer Centaur, North Atlantic Fleet, 1870; Navy 
Yard, Pensacola, 1871-2. 

Commissioned as Commander, November 8, 1873 ; commanding Shawmut 
(third-rate), N. A. Station, 1875-6. 



COMMANDER JAMES O'KANE, 

Born in Indiana. Appointed from Indiana, October 30, 1856 ; Naval Academy, 
1856-60. 

Promoted to Master, 1861 ; attached to steam-frigate Niagara, 1861 ; steam- 
sloop Brooklyn, West Gulf Squadron, 1861-3 ; passage of Forts Jackson and 
St. Philip, Chalmette batteries, and capture of New Orleans ; passage of Vicks- 
burg ; was wounded by a musket-ball in the left leg at passage of the forts below 
New Orleans. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, J u\j 16, 1862; steam gunboat Paul Jones, South 
Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1863-5 ; engagements at Honey Hill, Tullifirmy 
Cross-Iioads, and on the Charleston and Savannah railroad ; steamer Rhode 
Island, flag-ship West India Squadron, 1865-6. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Com7nander, ATpnl 12, 1866; steamer Swatara, 
European Squadron, 1866-7 ; Naval Academy, 1868-9 ; attached to steam-sloop 
Lancaster, 1870 ; commanding Wasp (fourth-rate), S. A. Station, 1870-1 ; ordnance 
duty, Pittsburgh, 1872 ; commanding Mahopac (iron-clad), N. A. Station, 1873. 

Commissioned as Commander, January 6, 1874 ; Naval Academy, 1875-8. 



COMMANDER SULLIVAN D. AMES, 

Born in Rhode Island, July 16, 1840. Appointed from Rhode Island, Septem- 
ber 22, 1856 ; Naval Academy, 1856-60. 



COMMANDERS. 163 

Promoted to Master, 1861 ; attached to steam-sloop Dacotah, 1861 ; Naval 
Academy, 1862. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, July 16, 1862 ; steam-sloop Dacotah, North At- 
lantic Squadron, 1862-4; engagement with Sewell's Point Battery, May 8, 1862 ; 
steam-frigate Colorado, flag-ship European Squadron, 1865-6 ; steamer Resaca, 
North Pacific Squadron, 1866-8. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, July 25, 1866 ; Naval Academy, 
1869-72 ; staff duty, Wabash, flag-ship European Squadron, 1873 ; and same 
duty, Franklin, 1874. 

Commissioned as Commander, January 6, 1874 ; Light-House Inspector, 1875 ; 
ordnance duty, Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 1876-7. 



COMMANDER J. CRITTENDEN ^WATSON, 

Born in Kentucky, August 24, 1842, Appointed from Kentucky, September 
29, 1856 ; Naval Academy, 1856-60. 

Promoted to Master, 1861 ; attached to frigate Sabine, 1861 ; steam-sloop Hart- 
ford, West Gulf Squadron, 1862-4. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, July 16, 1862; bombardment and passage of 
Forts Jackson and St. Philip, and Chalmette batteries, April, 1862 ; passage of 
Vicksburg batteries, June and July, 1862 ; passage of Port Hudson, March 14, 
1863; passage of Grand Gulf, March 19 and 30, 1863; battle of Mobile Bay, 
August 5, 1864 ; was wounded by a fragment of shell from rebel battery at War- 
rington ; steam-frigate Colorado, flag-ship European Squadron, 1865-7. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, July 25, 1866 ; steam-frigate Frank- 
lin, flag-ship European Squadron, 1867-8 ; steam-sloop Canandaigua, European 
Squadron, 1868-9 ; special duty, Philadelphia, 1870 ; Alaska (second-rate), Asi- 
atic Squadron, 1871 ; commanded store-ship Omaha, Yokohama, 1872-3 ; ord- 
nance duty, New York, 1874. 

Commissioned as Commander, January 23, 1874 ; Navy Yard, Mare Island,, 
1875-7. 

COMMANDER HENRY B. ROBESON, 

Born in Connecticut. Appointed from Connecticut, September 25, 1856 ; Naval 
Academy, 1856-60. 

Promoted to Master, 1860 ; attached to steam-frigate Niagara, Blockading: 
Squadron, 1860-1 ; engagement at Fort McRae, November 23, 1861 ; iron-clad, 
steamer New Ironsides, special service, 1863 ; and South Atlantic Blockading; 
Squadron, 1864; engagement with the defences of Charleston, South Carolina,. 
April 7, 1863 ; commanded a landing party from the New Ironsides in the assault 
and capture of rebel works on the lower part of Moms Island, July 10, 1863 ; 
various bombardments of Forts Wagner, Sumter, Moultrie, and all the actions in 
which the New Ironsides was engaged off Charleston ; steam-frigate Colorado,. 
North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; both assaults on Fort Fisher ; 
commanded a landing party from the Colorado in the assault upon Fort Fisher, 
January 15, 1865; steamer Colorado, flag-ship European Squadron, 1865-7. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, July 25, 1866; steam-sloop Pis- 
cataqua, Asiatic Squadron, 1867-70 ; special duty, 1871-2 ; iron-clad Dictator, 
1873 ; Navy Yard, New York, 1874-6. 

Commissioned as Commander, February 12, 1874 ; European Squadron, 187& 
-7 ; commanding Vandalia (third-rate), European Station, 1877-8. 



164 COMMANDERS. 

COMMANDER HENRY DE HAVEN MANLEY, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania, September 25, 1856; 
Naval Academy, 1856-60. 

Promoted to Master, 1861 ; attached to steam-sloop Brooklyn, Western Gulf 
Blockading Squadron, 1861 ; reinforcement of Fort Pickens ; on board the Con- 
gress in her fight with the rebel iron-clad Merrimac, March 8, 1862, and favorably 
mentioned in the official report of the action ; steam-sloop Canandaigua, South 
Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862-4 ; attack on Fort Sumter, April, 1863 ; 
attack and capture of lower end of Morris Island, July, 1863 ; numerous engage- 
ments during the siege of Charleston. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, July 16, 1862; steamer State of Georgia, South 
Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864—5 ; school-ship Sabine, 1866. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, i\x\j 25, 1866 ; steam-frigate Frank- 
lin, flag-ship European Squadron, 1867-8; Hydrographic Office, Washington, 
1869 ; steam-sloop Lancaster, flag-ship South Atlantic Squadron, 1869-72 ; ord- 
nance duty. Navy Yard, Washington, 1873-4. 

Commissioned as Commander, April 5, 1874 ; Torpedo Station, 1875 ; com- 
manding Ranger (third-rate), Asiatic Station, 1876-8. 



COMMANDER WILLIAM WHITEHEAD, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania, September 23, 1856 ; 
Naval Academy, 1856-60. 

Promoted to Master, 1861 ; attached to steam-sloop Dacotah, 1861 ; steam-gun- 
boat Sonoma, West India Squadron, 1861-2 ; North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 
in York River, from March to May, 1862 ; in James River, from May to July, 1862. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, July 16, 1862 ; iron-clad steamer Passaic, South 
Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1863-5 ; engaged ofi" Charleston, South Caro- 
lina, from July, 1863, to April, 1864 ; engagement in Stono River, South Caro- 
lina, with batteries on James Island, July 3 to 6, 1864 ; in Togoda Creek, Feb- 
ruary 9, 1865 ; attached to iron-clad Monadnock on her passage from New York 
to San Francisco, 1866. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, July 25, 1866; steamer Saco, At- 
lantic Squadron, 1866-7 ; steam-sloop Kearsarge, South Pacific Squadron, 1867- 
8 ; steam-sloop Dacotah, South Pacific Squadron, 1868-9 ; attached to steam- 
frigate Powhatan, Pacific Squadron, 1869-70 ; Navy Yard, Philadelphia, 1873. 

Commissioned as Commander, June 4, 1874 ; Navy Yard, New York, 1875- 
6 ; commanding Yantic (third-rate), Asiatic Station, 1876-7. 



COMMANDER WINFIELD S. SCHLEY, 

Born in Maryland, 1839. Appointed from Maryland, September 20, 1856 ; 
Naval Academy, 1856-60. 

Promoted to Master, 1861 ; attached to frigate Potomac, store-ship, at Ship 
Island, 1861-2 ; steam-gunboat Winona, West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1862-3; 
engaged with a field battery near Port Hudson, Louisiana, December 14, 1862 ; 
in all the engagements which led to the capture of Port Hudson, from March 16 
to July 9, 1863 ; in one or two small skirmishes in cutting out schooners. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, July 16, 1862; steam-gunboat Wateree, Pacific 
Squadron, 1864-6, 



COMMANDERS. 165 

Commissioned as Lieute7iant- Commander, July 25, 1866; Naval Academy, 
1867-9 ; Benicia (third-rate), Asiatic Fleet, 1871-2 ; Naval Academy, 1873-6. 

Commissioned as Coinmander, June 10, 1874; commanding Essex (third-rate), 
S. A. Station, 1877-8. 

COMMANDER SILAS CASEY, Jr., 

Born in Rhode Island, September 11, 1841. Appointed from New York, Sep- 
tember 25, 1856 ; Naval Academy, 1856-60. 

Promoted to Master, 1861 ; attached to steam-frigate Niagara, 1861 ; engage- 
ments with the batteries at Pensacola, Florida, October, 1861 ; steam-gunboat 
Wissahickon, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862-3 ; several engagements 
with Fort McAllister, October, 1862 ; first attack on Charleston, under Admiral 
Pont. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, July 16, 1862 ; steamer Quaker City, North 
Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1863-5 ; attack on Fort Fisher, December, 1864 ; 
steamer Winooski, Atlantic Squadron, 1865-7. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, July 25, 1866; Naval Academy, 
1868-9 ; flag-ship Colorado, Asiatic Squadron, 1870-2 ; ordnance duty, Phila- 
delphia, 1873-4. 

Commissioned as Commander, June 14, 1874 ; commanding Portsmouth (third- 
rate), 1875-6 ; Light-House Inspector, 1877-8. 



COMMANDER WILLIAM T. SAMPSON, 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, September 24, 1857 ; Naval 
Academy, 1857-60 ; frigate Potomac, 1861. 

Promoted to Master, 1861. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, July 16, 1862 ; practice-ship John Adams, 
1862-3 ; Naval Academy, 1864; iron-clad Patapsco, South Atlantic Blockading 
Squadron, 1864-5 ; was in Patapsco when she was destroyed in Charleston harbor, 
January 15, 1865 ; steam-frigate Colorado, flag-ship European Squadron, 1865-7. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, July 25, 1866; Naval Academy, 
1868-71 ; Congress (second-rate), special service, 1872, and same ship, European 
Station, 1873. 

Commissioned as Commander, August 9, 1874 ; commanding Alert (third- 
rate), 1874-5 ; Naval Academy, 1876-8. 



COMMANDER BARTLETT J. CROMWELL, 

Born in Georgia. Appointed from Nebraska, September 21, 1857 ; Naval 
Academy, 1857-60 ; attached to frigate St. Lawrence, 1861 ; steamer Quaker 
City, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862 ; steam-gunboat Conemaugh, 
South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862-3 ; attack on Morris Island and 
Battery Gregg. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, July 16, 1862 ; steamer Proteus, East Gulf 
Squadron, 1863-5 ; steamer Shawmut, Brazil Squadron, 1865-6. 

Commissioned as Lie^itenant- Commander, July 25, 1866; Naval Academy, 
1868-9; Plymouth (third-rate), European Fleet, 1871-2; Powhatan, special 
service, 1873-4. 

Commissioned as Commander, October 24, 1874 ; Inspector of Ordnance, Phila- 
delphia, 1875-8. 



166 COMMANDERS. 

' COMMANDER GEORGE W. HATWARD, 

Born in Ohio, October 31, 1838. Appointed from Wisconsin, September 26, 
1857 ; Naval Academy, 1857-60 ; attached to sloop Vandalia, 1861 ; battle of 
Port Royal, November 7, 1861 ; South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862-3. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, July 16, 1862 ; steam-gunboat Sonoma, South 
Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1863-5 ; blockading Charleston from December, 
1863, to October, 1864 ; practice-ship Sabine, 1865-6 ; steamer Mohican, North 
Pacific Squadron, 1866-8. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, July 25, 1866; steamer Mohongo, 
North Pacific Squadron, 1868-9 ; on duty at Naval Academy, 1869-70 ; Ten- 
nessee (second-rate), special service, 1871 ; Wabash, flag-ship European Squadron, 
1872-3 ; Franklin, same station, 1874. 

Commissioned as Commander, November 9, 1874 ; commanding Supply, special 
service, 1875-6 ; commanding R. S. Wyoming, 1877-8. 



COMMANDER JOHN W. PHILLIP, 

Born in New York, August 26, 1840. Appointed from New York, September 
22, 1856 ; Naval Academy, 1856-60 ; attached to sloop Marion, 1861. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, July 16, 1862 ; steam-gunboat Chippewa, special 
service, 1862-3 ; steam-gunboat Chippewa, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 
1863-5; siege of Charleston, July 10, 1863, to January 1, 1864; wounded in 
leg by a splinter in Stono River, July 16, 1863; steam-sloop Wachusett, East 
India Squadron, 1866-7 ; steam-sloop Hartford, flag-ship Asiatic Squadron, 
1867-8 ; attached to steam-sloop Richmond, European Fleet, 1869-72. 

Commissioned as Commander, December, 1874 ; commanding Adams (second- 
rate), N. A. Station, 1877. 

COMMANDER HENRY F. PICKING, 

Born in Pennsylvania, January, 1840. Appointed from same State, September 
28, 1857 ; Naval Academy, 1857-60 ; attached to frigate St. Lawrence, North 
Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1861-2 ; sinking of the privateer Petrel ; engage- 
ment with the rebel ram Merrimac and Sewell's Point batteries, 1862 ; frigate St. 
Lawrence, East Gulf Blocbading Squadron, 1862 ; West Gulf Blockading Squad- 
ron, 1863 ; Naval Academy, 1864 ; South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; 
several skirmishes with batteries on Sullivan's Island during 1864-5 ; steamer 
Swatara, West India Squadron, 1865-6. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, July 25, 1866; steamer Swatara, 
European Squadron, 1866-8; League Island, Pennsylvania, 1868-9 ; on duty at 
Naval Academy, 1869 ; flag-ship Colorado, Asiatic Fleet, 1870-2 ; Torpedo Station, 
1873; Roanoke (iron-clad), New York, 1874. 

Commissioned as Commander, Jan. 25, 1875 ; Light-House Inspector, 1875-8. 



COMMANDER FREDERICK RODGERS, 

Born in Maryland, October 3, 1842. Appointed from Maryland, September 
25, 1857 ; Naval Academy, 1857-60 ; attached to frigate Santee, 1861-2. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, July 16, 1862 ; West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 
1862-3 ; engagement at Donaldsonville, Louisiana, October 4, 1862 ; Port Hud- 



COMMANDERS. 167 

son, Louisiana, March 14, 1863 ; steamer Grand Gulf, North Atlantic Blockading 
Squadron, 1863—4; steamer Grand Gulf, West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 
1864-5. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander^ July 25,1866; steamer Swatara, 
European Squadron, 1866-7 ; steamer Michigan, on the lakes, 1868-9 ; Sarauac 
(second-rate), N. P. Squadron, 1870-2 ; commanding Despatch, special service, 
1873-6. 

Commissioned as Commander^ February 4, 1875 ; commanding Adams (third- 
rate), S. A. Station, 1877-8. 



COMMANDER JOHN F. McGLENSEY, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania, September 28, 1857 ; 
Naval Academy, 1857-60 ; Navy Yard, Washington, 1861 ; South Atkiutie 
Blockading Squadron, 1861-3; battle of Port Royal, November 7, 1861. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant^ July 16, 1862 ; East Gulf Blockading Squadron, 
1864 ; steamer Mingo, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; several 
engagements with the enemy ; steam-sloop Monongahela, Atlantic Squadron, 
1866-8. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, July 25, 1866 ; Naval Academy, 
1869 ; Guerriere (second-rate), European Fleet, 1870-2 ; Ticonderoga (second- 
rate), N. A. Squadron, 1874. 

Commissioned as Commander, February 8, 1875 ; Navy Yard, Pensacola, 
1876-7 ; commanding Canonicus (iron-clad), N. A. Station, 1877-8. 



COMMANDER EDGAR C. MERRIMAN, 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, September 21, 1857 ; Naval 
Academy, 1857-60 ; resigned, 1860 ; re-entered the service as Acting Master, 
1861 ; Mortar Flotilla, 1861-3 ; bombardment of Forts Jackson and St. Philip, 
April, 1862. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, July 16, 1862; steamer Florida, North Atlantic 
Blockading Squadron, 1864 ; Pacific Squadron, 1865-6. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, July 25, 1866; steamer Wateree, 
South Pacific Squadron, 1867 ; Navy Yard, Mare Island, California, 1868 ; 
steam-sloop Pensacola, flag-ship North Pacific Squadron, 1868-9 ; navigation 
duty. Mare Island, California, 1869-70 ; Canandaigua (second-rate), 1872 ; Col- 
orado, N. A. Station, 1873. 

Commissioned as Commander, March 12, 1875 ; Light-House Inspector, 1875 ; 
commanding Nantucket (iron-clad), N. A. Station, 1875-6; Light-House In- 
spector, 1876-8. 



COMMANDER FREDERICK R. SMITH, 

Born in Maine. Appointed from Maine, September 24, 1858 ; Naval Academy, 
1858-61 ; attached to steam-frigate Colorado, West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 
1861 ; steamer Flambeau, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862-3 ; en- 
gagement with Fort McAllister ; boat expedition. Bull's Island, South Carolina, 
1863. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, August 1, 1862 ; steam-sloop Ticonderoga, 1864; 



168 COMMANDERS. 

steamer Rhode Island, Nortt Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; both attacks 
on Fort Fisher ; land assault on Fort Fisher. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, July 25, 1866; steamer Ashuelot, 
Asiatic Squadron, 1868-9 ; Severn (second-rate), N. A. Squadron, 1871 ; Iro- 
quois (third-rate), N. A. Fleet, 1872 ; Inspector of Ordnance, Key West, 1873 ; 
Lancaster (second-rate), S. A. Squadron, 1874-5. 

Commissioned as Commander, April 6, 1875 ; commanding Saugus (iron-clad), 
N. A. Station, 1876. 



COMMANDER CHARLES L. HUNTINGTON, 

Born in Illinois. Appointed from Illinois, September 29, 1858; Naval Academy, 
1858-61 ; attached to steamer Cambridge, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 
1862. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, August 1, 1862; steam-sloop Monongahela, West 
Grulf Blockading Squadron, 1863 ; siege of Port Hudson, and frequently under 
the fire of the enemy's batteries ; several engagements with rebel batteries near 
Donaldsonville, Louisiana ; attached to steam-sloop Oneida, West Gulf Blockading 
Squadron, 1864-5 ; participated in the battle of Mobile Bay, August 5, 1864. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, July 25, 1866; steamer Kansas, 
Brazil Squadron, 1866-8; League Island, Pennsylvania, 1869-70; Jamestown 
(third-rate). Pacific Fleet, 1870-1 ; torpedo service, 1872 ; Navy Yard, Phila- 
delphia, 1874; Navy Yard, New York, 1875. 

Commissioned as Commander, Kt^xW. 14, 1875; commanding Intrepid, 1875-6; 
equipment duty, Navy Yard, New York, 1877. 



COMMANDER LOUIS KEMPFF, 

Born in Illinois. Appointed from Illinois, September 21, 1857 ; Naval Academy, 
1857-61 ; attached to steam-frigate Wabash, Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 
1861-2 ; battle of Port Royal, November 7, 1861 ; in charge of a howitzer from 
the Wabash, and with the body of troops under General Stevens in the expedition 
against Port Royal Ferry, January, 1862 ; expedition which resulted in the cap- 
ture of Fernandina and Jacksonville, Florida, and St. Mary's, Georgia. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, August 1, 1862; West Gulf Blockading Squad- 
ron, 1863 ; supply-steamer Connecticut, 1864 ; steamer Suwanee, South Pacific 
Squadron, 1865-7. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, July 25, 1866; apprentice-ship 
Portsmouth, 1868 ; receiving-ship Independence, Mare Island, California, 1869 ; 
Saranac (third-rate). Pacific Fleet, 1870-2; Naval rendezvous, 1873-4; Light- 
House Inspector, 1875-6. 

Commissioned as Commander, March 7, 1876 ; Navy Yard, Mare Island, 
1877-8. 

COMMANDER SMITH W. NICHOLS, 

Born in Massachusetts. Appointed from Massachusetts, September 25, 1858 ; 
Naval Academy, 1858-61 ; attached to steam-frigate Wabash, Atlantic Blockading 
Squadron, 1861. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, August 1, 1862; school-ship Macedonian, 1863; 
attached to steam-sloop Shenandoah, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 



COMMANDERS. 169 

1864-5 ; bombardment of Fort Fisher, North Carolina, December, 1864 ; capture 
of Fort Fisher, January, 1865. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, 3 \i\j 25, 1866; steam-sloop Shen- 
andoah, Asiatic Squadron, 1866-9 ; special duty, Boston, 1869 ; Navy Yard, 
Boston, 1871-2; Omaha (second-rate). South Pacific Station, 1872-4; ordnance 
duty, Boston, 1876. 

Commissioned as Commander, April 26, 1876; Light-House Inspector, 1876-8. 



COMMANDER FRANCIS J. HIGGINSON, 

Born in Massachusetts. Appointed from said State, September 21, 1857; Naval 
Academy, 1857-61 ; attached to steam-frigate Colorado, West Gulf Blockading 
Squadron, 1861-2 ; capture of rebel privateer Judith, at Pensacola, Florida, 
1861 ; bombardment of Forts Jackson and St. Philip, Chalmette batteries, and 
capture of New Orleans, April, 1862. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, August 1, 1862; steamer Vixen, South Atlantic 
Blockading Squadron, 1862 ; steam-sloop Powhatan, South Atlantic Blockading 
Squadron, 1863-4; bombardment of Fort Sumter; Naval Academy, 1864-5. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, July 25, 1866; steam-sloop Hartford, 
flag-ship Asiatic Squadron, 1866-8 ; steam-frigate Franklin, flag-ship European 
Squadron, 1868-9 ; Richmond, European Fleet, 1870-1 ; Shenandoah, same 
Station, 1872 ; and Franklin (first-rate), N. A. Station, 1873 ; commanding ren- 
dezvous, Boston, 1874-5; Torpedo Station, 1875 ; special ordnance duty, 1876-8. 

Commissioned as Commander, June 10, 1876. 



COMMANDER GEORGE W. SUMNER, 

Born in Michigan. Appointed from Kentucky, September 20, 1858 ; Naval 
Academy, 1858-61 ; attached to steam-frigate Colorado, West Gulf Blockading 
Squadron, 1861 ; Mortar Flotilla, 1862 ; bombardment of Forts Jackson and St. 
Philip, April, 1862 ; Vicksburg batteries, 1862. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, August 1, 1862 ; West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 
1863-4 ; steamer Massasoit, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; steamer 
De Soto, Atlantic Squadron, 1866-7. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, July 25, 1866 ; steam-frigate Franklin, 
flag-ship European Squadron, 1868-71 ; Hydrographic Office, 1872-6. 

Commissioned as Commander, June 13, 1876. 



COMMANDER BENJAMIN F. DAY, 

Born in Ohio, Appointed from Ohio, September 20, 1858 ; Naval Academy, 
1858-61; attached to steamer New London, W. G. B. Squadron, 1862-3; 
wounded in a night engagement at Madam Winchester's plantation, July 9, 
1863. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, August 1, 1862; steam-frigate Colorado, W. G. 
B. Squadron, 1863-4 ; steamer Saugus, N. A. B. Squadron, 1864-5 ; engagements 
with Howlett House batteries in James River ; attacks on Fort Fisher ; steam- 
sloop Tuscarora, Pacific Squadron, 1866-8. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, July 25, 1866 ; steam-sloop Contocook, 
flag-ship N. A. Squadron, 1868-9 ; Ticonderoga (second-rate), 1871 ; Congress 



170 COMMANDERS. 

(second-rate), special service, 1872, and same ship, European Station, 1872-3 ; 
R. S. New Hampshire, 1874-5 ; commanding Manhattan (iron-clad), N. A. Station, 
1876. 

Commissioned as Commander, August 8, 1876 ; commanding naval force, Rio 
Grande, 1877-8. 

COMMANDER JAMES D. GRAHAM, 

Born in District of Columbia. Appointed from Illinois, September 25, 1857 ; 
Naval Academy, 1857-61; West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1861-2; Forts 
Jackson and St. Philip; two attacks on Vicksburg; James River Flotilla, 1862. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, August 1, 1862 ; sloop Jamestown, East India 
Squadron, 1862-5. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, July 25, 1866; steamer Augusta, 
special service, 1866-7; steam-sloop Powhatan, flag-ship South Atlantic Squadron, 
1867-8 ; receiving-ship, Boston, 1868-9 ; steam-sloop Juniata, European Squadron, 
1869-71 ; Naval Observatory, 1872 ; "Benicia (third-rate), N. P. Station, 1872-5 ; 
commanding Mahopac (iron-clad), N. A. Station, 1875-6 ; commanding Passaic 
(iron-clad), 1876-7. 

Commissioned as Commander, September 9, 1876. 



COMMANDER WILLIAM R. BRIDGMAN, 

Born in Iowa. Appointed from Iowa, November 29, 1859 ; Naval Academy, 
1859-61 ; West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1861-3 ; passage of Forts Jackson 
and St. Philip, Chalmette batteries, and capture of New Orleans, April, 1862 ; 
Arkansas Post, 1862. 

Promoted to Ensign, September 10, 1862 ; most of the naval fights about 
Vicksburg, ending in the capture of the city, July, 1863 ; steam-frigate Niagara, 
special service, 1864. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, February 22, 1864 ; steam-sloop Lancaster, flag-ship 
Pacific Squadron, 1865-7. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, July 25, 1866 ; steam-frigate Min- 
nesota, special service, 1868 ; steam-sloop Contocook, flag-ship North Atlantic 
Squadron, 1868-9 ; frigate Sabine, special cruise, 1869 ; Naval Academy, 1870-1 ; 
Constellation (gunnery-ship), 1871-2 ; commanding Palos (fourth -rate), Asiatic 
Station, 1873-6. 

Commissioned as Commander, September 21, 1876 ; Light-House Inspector, 
1876-8. 



COMMANDER ALEXANDER H. McCORMICK, 

Born in District of Columbia. Appointed from Texas, September 21, 1859; 
Naval Academy, 1859-61 ; attached to steamer Norwich, South Atlantic Block- 
ading Squadron, 1862-3 ; bombardment of Fort Pulaski, 1862 ; fort in Wingaw 
Bay, South Carolina, 1862 ; second occupation of Jacksonville, Florida, 1863. 

Promoted to Ensign, December 22, 1862; steam-sloop Iroquois, special service, 
1864-5. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, February 22, 1864 ; Naval Academy, 1866-9. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, July 25, 1866 ; steam-sloop Lancas- 
ter, flag-ship South Atlantic Squadron, 1869 ; Lancaster, flag-ship S. A. Fleet, 



COMMANDERS. 171 

1870-72; Naval Academy, 1873-4 ; Pensacola, flag-ship North Pacific Station, 
1875-6. 

Commissioned as Commander^ September 3, 1876 ; Ordnance Bureau, 1877-8. 



COMMANDER HENRY L. JOHNSON, 

Born in Vermont. Appointed from same State, September 30, 1859; Naval 
Academy, 1859-61 ; attached to steam-sloop Mississippi, 1861 ; steam-sloop Tus- 
carora, special service, 1862-3. 

Promoted to Emipi, September 24, 1863 ; South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 
1864-5. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, February 22, 18'64 ; steamer Nipsic, Atlantic 
Squadron, 1865-6. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, July 25, 1866; Naval Academy, 
1866-9 ; steam-sloop Juniata, European Squadron, 1869 ; Juniata (third-rate), 
European Fleet, 1870-2; Canandaigua (second-rate), N. A. Station, 1873-4; 
R. S. Colorado, 1875 ; special duty, commanding naval forces on Rio Grande, 
1875-7. 

Commissioned as Commander, November 25, 1876. 



COMMANDER ALBERT S. BARKER, 

Born in Massachusetts. Appointed from that State, October 25, 1859 ; at Naval 
Academy, 1859-61 ; in steamer Mississippi, W. Gr. B. Squadron, 1861-3 ; bom- 
bardment and passage of Forts Jackson and St. Philip, Chalmette batteries, and 
capture of New Orleans, 1862 ; in attack on and attempted passage of Port 
Hudson, March 14, 1863, his ship was destroyed and he joined the steam-sloop 
Monongahela, in her taking part in the siege of Port Hudson, in the fight below 
Donaldsonville, and guerilla fighting generally until the river was clear. 

Promoted to Ensign, February 22, 1862 ; in steam-frigate Niagara, special 
service, 1864. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, February 22, 1864; Pacific Squadron, 1865-7. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, July 25, 1866 ; in flag-ship Guerriere, 
S. A. Station, 1867-9 ; steamer Terror, 1870 ; Wachusett (third-rate), European 
Fleet, 1871-2 ; Torpedo Station, 1873 ; Intrepid, Boston, 1874 ; Naval Academy, 
1874-6 ; commanding Palos (fourth-rate), Asiatic Station, 1876-7. 

Commissioned as Commander, March 28, 1877 ; commanding Alert (third- 
rate), Asiatic Station, from April 21, 1877, to July 31, 1877. 



COMMANDER MORTON W. SANDERS, 

Born in Massachusetts. Appointed from Massachusetts, September 25,1859; 
Naval Academy, 1859-61 ; attached to sloop Vincennes, West Gulf Blockading 
Squadron, 1861-3; engagement with rebel fleet at S. W. Pass, Mississippi River, 
October, 1861. 

Promoted to Ensign, November 22, 1862; Mississippi Squadron, 1864; Red 
River Expedition, 1864. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, February 22, 1864 ; North Atlantic Blockading 
Squadron, 1864-5 ; bombardment of Fort Fisher, December, 1864 ; capture of 
Fort Fisher, January, 1865 ; Pacific Squadron, 1865-9. 



172 COMMANDERS. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, July 25, 1866 ; steam-sloop Juniata, 
European Squadron, 1869-70 ; on leave in Europe, 1871-2 ; Naval rendezvous, 
San Francisco, 1873-4 ; North Pacific Station, 1875 ; Lackawanna (second-rate), 
North Pacific Station, 1875-77. 

Commissioned as Commander in 1877. 



COMMANDER CHARLES STANHOPE COTTON, 

Born February 15, 1843, at Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Appointed Acting Midshipman 
at Naval Academy, Annapolis, Maryland, from First District of Wisconsin, Sep- 
tember 23, 1858 ; May 10, 1861, detached from the Naval Academy and detailed 
for active duty ; June 7 to August 15, 1861, served on board frigate St. Lawrence ; 
on July 28 she captured the Confederate privateer Petrel ; August 15 to No- 
vember 19, duty in Philadelphia in connection with the trial of prisoners captured 
on board the Petrel; November 19, 1861, to February 24, 1863, served on board 
frigate Minnesota, flag-ship N. A. B. Squadron ; participated in action between 
Merrimac and Monitor and the fleet in Hampton Roads, on March 8 and 9, 1862. 

Promoted to Ensign, November 11, 1862; February 24 to July 13, 1863, 
attached to steam-sloop Iroquois, ofi" Wilmington, North Carolina; March 8, 1864, 
to August 10, 1865, attached to steam-sloop Oneida, W. G. B. Squadron, except 
a few weeks of service on board the Hartford and the Kineo. 

Promoted to Lieutenant, February 22, 1864 ; August 5 to 23, 1864, served on 
board Oneida during battle of Mobile Bay and subsequent operations to surrender 
of Fort Morgan ; November 13, 1865, to May 3, 1869, attached to steam-sloop 
Shenandoah, in the East Indies and China. 

Promoted to Lieutenant- Commander, July 25, 1866 ; from September 30, 1869, 
to July 29, 1870, duty at Naval Academy ; October 1 to December 23, 1870, duty 
at Navy Yard, Kittery; January 5 to April 24, 1871, attached to frigate Ten- 
nessee, San Domingo Expedition ; April 24, 1871, to February 16, 1874, attached 
to steam-sloop Ticonderoga as Executive, on the Brazil Station; May 1, 1874, 
to June 1, 1876, duty at Navy Yard, Kittery; June 1 to September 9, 1876, 
Torpedo Instruction at Newport ; September 15 to October 4, 1876, Executive of 
receiving-ship Worcester, Norfolk ; October 6, 1876, to present time, Navy Yard, 
New York. 

Promoted to Commander, April 25, 1877. 



COMMANDER JOHN R. BARTLETT, 

Born in New York. Appointed from Rhode Island, November 25, 1859 ; Naval 
Academy, 1859-61 ; attached to steam-sloop Mississippi, West Gulf Blockading 
Squadron, 1861-2; bombardment and passage of Forts Jackson and St. Philip, 
Chalmette batteries, and capture of New Orleans ; attack on Vicksburg, June, 
1862 ; steam-sloop Brooklyn, West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1862-3. 

Promoted to Ensign, September 8, 1863 ; South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 
1863-4. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, February 22, 1864 ; steam-sloop Susquehanna, 
North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; bombardment of Fort Fisher, 
December, 1864 ; on shore with assaulting party at capture of Fort Fisher, Jan- 
uary, 1865 ; steam-sloop Susquehanna, special service, 1866. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, July 25, 1866; steamer Nipsic, 
Atlantic Squadron, 1866-7 ; Naval Academy, 1867-9 ; frigate Sabine, special 



COMMANDERS. 173 

cruise, 1869 ; T. and N. Surveying Expedition, 1870-1 ; special duty, 1871-2 ; 
ordnance duty. Navy Yard, Boston, 1872-4 ; Hydrograpliic Office, 1877-8. 
Commissioned as Commander, 1877. 



COMMANDER OLIVER A. BATCHELLER, 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, November 25, 1859 ; Naval 
Academy, 1859-61 ; attached to sloop Vincennes, West Gulf Blockading Squad- 
ron, 1861-2. 

Promoted to Ensign, November 22, 1862 ; steam-sloop Mississippi, West Gulf 
Blockading Squadron, 1862-3 ; attack on Port Hudson, March 14 and 15, 1863 ; 
siege of Port Hudson ; West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; battle of Mobile 
Bay, August 5, 1864 ; siege of Fort Morgan. 

Commissioned as Ideutenant, February 22, 1864 ; steamer Frolic, European 
Squadron, 1866. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, July 25, 1866; steam-frigate Colo- 
rado, flag-ship European Squadron, 1867 ; steam-sloop Piscataqua, Asiatic Squad- 
ron, 1867-9 ; Naval Academy, 1870—4 ; Franklin, flag-ship European Station, 
1875-6 ; Navy Yard, Boston, 1877-8. 

Commissioned as Commander, 1877. 



COMMANDER SILAS W. TERRY, 

Born in Kentucky. Appointed from Kentucky, September 28, 1858 ; Naval 
Academy, 1858-61 ; attached to sloop Dale, Atlantic coast, 1861-2 ; steamers 
Wabash and Alabama, engagement with rebels on the South Edisto River in 1862. 

Promoted to Ensign, September 16, 1862 ; North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 
1863. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, February 22, 1864 ; Mississippi Squadron, 1864 ; 
Red River Expedition, 1864. While in temporary command of a naval transport, 
had an engagement with a rebel battery, supported by a large force of infantry. 
Lieutenant Terry was, upon recommendation of Rear- Admiral Porter, advanced 
several numbers in his grade for his gallantry upon this occasion. North Atlantic 
Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; battles with Forts Fisher and Anderson and other 
rebel batteries near Wilmington, North Carolina ; was on the James River, and 
present at the fall of Richmond. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, July 25, 1866; steam-sloop Ticon- 
deroga, European Squadron, 1865-8 ; receiving-ship. New York, 1868-9 ; on duty 
at Naval Academy, 1870-1 ; Worcester, flag-ship N. A. Fleet, 1871-3 ; Naval 
Observatory, 1873 ; Naval Academy, 1874-7. 



COMMANDER MERRILL MILLER, 

Born in Ohio. Appointed from Ohio, November 28, 1859 ; Naval Academy, 
1859-61 ; attached to frigate Potomac, Atlantic coast, 1861-2. 

Promoted to Ensign, October 13, 1862 ; Mississippi Squadron, 1862-3 ; battle 
of Arkansas Post, 1863 ; Haines' Bluff", 1863 ; in charge of mortar-boats, at siege 
of Vicksburg, for twenty-three days, in 1863. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, February 22, 1864 ; North Atlantic Blockading 
Squadron, 1864-5 ; expedition up James River, 1864 ; both attacks on Fort 



174 COMMANDERS. 

Fisher ; attached to iron-clad Monadnock on her passage from New York to San 
Francisco, 1866. 

Commissioned as, Lieutenant- Commander, July 25, 1866; Naval Academy, 
1867-9 ; steam-sloop Lancaster, flag-ship South Atlantic Squadron, 1869-72 ; 
Worcester, flag-ship N. A. Station, 1872-4; Naval Academy, 1875-8. 

Commissioned as Commander, 1878. 



RETIRED COMMANDERS. 



Retired in Conformity with the Twenty-third Section of the Act of August 3, 1861. 
COMMANDER WILLIAM M. GAMBLE, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from New York, May 1, 1841 ; attached to 
steamer Missouri, Home Squadron, 1841-4 ; frigate Savannah, Pacific Squadron, 
1844-6; Naval School, 1847-8. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, August 10, 1847 ; frigate St. Lawrence, 
Mediterranean Squadron, 1849-50 ; Observatory, Washington, 1851 ; frigate 
St. Lawrence, Pacific Squadron, 1851-3 ; sloop Portsmouth, Pacific Squadron, 
1853-5. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, September 15, 1855 ; Coast Survey, 1856-8 ; 
sloop Saratoga, Home Squadron, 1858-60; steam-sloop Powhatan, South Atlantic 
Squadron, 1861-2. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Coynmander, July 16, 1862 ; commanding steamer 
Pocahontas, Western Grulf Squadron, 1863 ; South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 
1864. 

Commissioned as Commander, March 3, 1865. 



COMMANDER CHARLES H. CUSHMAN, 

Born in Maine, December 6, 1831. Appointed from Maine, March 24, 1849; 
attached to sloop Vandalia, Pacific Squadron, 1849-52 ; frigate Constitution, 
coast of Africa, 1853-4. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, 1853. 

Promoted to Master, September 16, 1855; Coast Survey, 1856. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, February 8, 1856; Naval Academy, 1857-8; 
steamer Westernport, Brazil Squadron and Paraguay Expedition, 1858-9; 
steamer Water Witch, Home Squadron, 1860; steamer Massachusetts, Western 
Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1861 ; engagements with rebel steamers and forts at 
Ship Island, Louisiana, July and August, 1861 ; steam-gunboat Pembina, South 
Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1861-2 ; battle of Port Royal, November 7, 
1861 ; iron-clad Montauk, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862-3 ; attack 
on defences of Charleston, April 7, 1863 ; bombardment of forts and batteries in 
Charleston harbor, from July 10 to July 28, 1863 ; iron-clad Onondaga, North 
Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; on picket duty, James River, May 5 to 
October 28, 1864; attacks on Fort Fisher, December, 1864, and January, 1865; 
Lieutenant-Commander Cushman was in the land assault on Fort Fisher, and 
was wounded ; commanding steamer Mahaska, Gulf Squadron, 1866-7. 

Commissioned as Commander, July 25, 1866 ; Navy Yard, New York, 1868-9; 
Bureau of Equipment, Navy Department, 1869-71 ; commanding Wachusett 



COMMANDERS. 175 

(third-rate), European Fleet, 1871-3; commanding R. S. "Worcester, 1875-6; 
retired, 1877. 

COMMANDER THOMAS L. SWANN, 

Born in Maryland. Appointed from Maryland, December 8, 1856 ; graduated, 
June, 1860, and ordered to steam-frigate Niagara; engaged on special service, 
conveying home Japanese Embassy, 1860 ; returned home, April, 1861, and was 
ordered immediately to blockade Charleston, and from thence as flag-ship of Gulf 
Squadron ; active blockade duty on Gulf, 1861-62 ; present at the engagements 
between Forts McCrea, Barancas, Pensacola Navy Yard, and Fort Pickens, assisted 
by Niagara and Richmond, in 1861 ; was in boat expedition, June, 1861, which 
cut out steamer Ariel from under the guns of Fort Morgan. 

Promoted to Master^ August, 1861 ; returned home in Niagara, in June, 1862 ; 
attached to Naval Academy, Newport, from June 14, 1862, to November, 1863. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, July 16, 1862 ; attached to steam-sloop Brooklyn, 
Western Gulf Blockading Squadron, 186-1; was present at the battle of Mobile 
Bay, August 5, 1864, and bombardment of Fort Morgan, August 22, 1864; the 
Brooklyn was riddled in the action of the 8th of August, and returned North for 
repairs, September, 1864; joined the following month Admiral Porter's fleet in 
Hampton Roads ; Executive of Brooklyn during both attacks on Fort Fisher ; 
detached from Brooklyn, February, 1865, and ordered to Naval Academy, New- 
port, Rhode Island, and after making practice-cruise with Midshipmen, was ordered 
as Executive-Ofiicer of steamer Algonquin ; detached from Algonquin, March, 
1866, and ordered to Navy Yard, Boston. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, May 2, 1866, and in July, ordered 
as Executive-Officer of steam-sloop Mohican ; detached for duty on the North 
Pacific Squadron ; detached from Mohican, October, 1868, and ordered to duty at 
Naval Academy, as Head of Department of Ethics and English Studies, where 
he remained until 1871 ; Wabash, flag-ship European Fleet, 1871-3 ; special 
ordnance duty, 1873—4. 

Commissioned as Commander, January 6, 1874 ; sick leave, 1874-6 ; retired, 
1877. 

COMMANDER GEORGE M. BACHE, 

BoEN in District of Columbia, November 12, 1840. Appointed from Pennsyl- 
vania, November 19, 1857 ; Naval Academy, 1857-60 ; attached to sloop James- 
town, Atlantic Squadron, 1861 ; steam-sloop Powhatan, Blockading Squadron, 
1861-2. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, July 16, 1862; commanding iron-clad Cincin- 
nati, Mississippi Squadron, 1862-3 ; attack on Haines' Blufl", December 27, 1862 ; 
engagement with batteries and sharpshooters, March, 1863; engagement with 
Vicksburg batteries. May 27, 1863, at which time the Cincinnati was sunk. 
Lieutenant Bache received the commendation of his commanding-officer, Rear- 
Admiral Porter, for his meritorious conduct in this affair ; and General Sherman, 
who was an eye-witness of the engagement, testifies that " the style in which the 
Cincinnati engaged the battery elicited universal praise." Lieutenant Bache also 
received a letter of thanks from the Navy Department. Commanding steam-gun- 
boat Lexington, Mississippi Squadron, 186.3-4 ; engagement with batteries and 
sharpshooters at Blair's Landing, on Red River, April 12, 1864, and at Point of 
Rocks, Louisiana, April 26, 1864 ; steam-sloop Powhatan, North Atlantic Block- 
ading Squadron, 1864-5 ; both attacks on Fort Fisher, and in the naval assault 



176 COMMANDERS. 

on the works; wounded in the right shoulder in the assault on Fort Fisher; 
steam-sloop Sacramento, special cruise, 1865-7. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, July 25, 1866; Navy Yard, Phila- 
delphia, 1868 ; steam-sloop Juniata, European Squadron, 1869-72 ; ordnance 
duty, Navy Yard, Washington, 1873-5 ; retired, 1875. 



Retired in Conformity with the Twenty-third Section of the Act of August 3, 1861. 



COMMANDER BAYSE N. WESTCOTT, 

Born in New Jersey. Appointed from Florida, December 5, 1837 ; sloop-of-war 
Erie, Home Squadron, 1838 ; sloop Levant, West Indies, 1838-40 ; steamer 
Poinsett, Home Squadron, 1840 ; frigate Brandy wine, Mediterranean, 1840-1 ; 
McLaughlin's Florida Expedition against the Indians, 1841-2 ; Naval School, 
Philadelphia, 1842-3. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 29, 1843 ; frigate Independence, Home 
Squadron, 1843; frigate Potomac, Home Squadron, 1844; brig Somers, Home 
Squadron, 1844-5; rendezvous, Philadelphia, 1845-6; steamer Hunter, Gulf of 
Mexico, 1846-7 (wrecked on Green Island Reef, oflF Vera Cruz, while bringing 
in a French bark that had run the blockade, and was captured while attempting 
to get out) ; gunboat Petrel, Gulf of Mexico, operating against the Mexicans, 
1847 ; ship Supply, special service, coast of Syria, 1847-8 ; rendezvous, Phila- 
delphia, 1848-50. 

Promoted to Master, October 18, 1850 ; frigate St. Lawrence, special service, 
carrying contributions to the World's Fair, London, 1850-1. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, June 11, 1851 ; Coast Survey, 1852-4; frigate 
Congress, Mediterranean Squadron, 1855-7 ; Light-House Inspector, 1857-9 ; 
steamer Saginaw, East Indies, 1859-60 ; frigate San tee. Gulf Blockading Squad- 
ron, 1861 ; retired. May 14, 1863 ; special duty. New York, 1864-5 ; Navy Yard, 
Pensacola, Florida, 1867-9 ; Light-House Inspector, 1869-70. 



COMMANDER SAMUEL MAGAW, 
Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania, November 23, 1841 ; 
attached to frigate Columbia, Brazil Squadron, 1841-3; brig Porpoise, Home 
Squadron, 1845-6 ; was sent to Texas to await the ratification of our annexation 
resolution by the Texan Congress, afterward to St. Domingo on special service ; 
piloted Commodore Connor's Mosquito Fleet to Tampico, having previously (at 
night) surveyed the bar, which place surrendered on their approach ; served at the 
Naval Battery at the second day's fight at the bombardment of Vera Cruz at the 
frigate Raritan's guns ; Naval School, 1847-8. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, August 10, 1847 ; store-ship Supply, Pacific 
Squadron, 1849-51 ; Pacific Squadron, 1853 ; frigate St. Lawrence, Pacific 
Squadron, 1854-5. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, September 15, 1855 ; steamer Michigan, on the 
lakes, 1856-7 ; Flag-Lieutenant, under Flag-Officer Mcintosh ; frigates Colorado 
and Roanoke, Home Squadron, 1857-8 ; commanding steamer Thomas Freeborn, 
Potomac Flotilla, 1862-3. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, July 16, 1862 ; commanding steamer 
Commodore Read, Potomac Flotilla, 1863-i, while commanding the Thomas 



COMMA NDERS. 177 

Freeborn and Commodore Read had command of a division, and at one time, 
while Commodore Harwood commanded the Navy Yard at Washington, acted 
as senior-officer afloat ; Lieutenant-Commander Magaw received highly commend- 
atory letters from Generals Burnside and Hooker for assistance and services ren- 
dered them while attached to the Potomac Flotilla ; commanding steamer Lenapee, 
North Atlantic Squadron, 1865 ; commanding steamer Tallapoosa, Gulf Squadron, 
1866, 

Commissioned as Commander, Oct. 10, 1866. 



COMMANDER FRANCIS G. DALLAS, 

Born in Massachusetts. Appointed from Massachusetts, November 8, 1841 ; 
attached to frigate Columbia, Brazil Squadron, 1841-3 ; frigate Columbia, Med- 
iterranean Squadron, 1843-5 ; Navy Yard, Pensacola, 1846 ; sloop Saratoga, 
Home Squadron, 1846-7 ; Naval School, 1847-8. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, August 10, 1847 ; unemployed from 1849 
to 1855 ; sloop Decatur, Pacific Squadron, 1855-7. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, September 15, 1855 ; receiving-ship, Philadelphia, 
1858 ; sloop Dale, coast of Africa, 1859-60 ; retired, December 16, 1864. 

Commissioned as Commander, March 3, 1865 ; sick from 1861 to 1869. 



Retired under the First Section of the Act of April 21, 1864. 



COMMANDER H. N. T. ARNOLD, 

Born in New York. Appointed from New Jersey, March 13, 1839 ; attached 
to frigate Constitution, Pacific Squadron, 1839-41 ; brig Boxer, Home Squadron,, 
1842U ; Naval School, Philadelphia, 1844-5. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, July 2, 1845 ; steamer Colonel Harney, 1846 ; 
Home Squadron, 1846-7 ; mail-steamer Pacific, 1850-1 ; sloop Plymouth, East 
India Squadron, 1851-5. 

Promoted to blaster, 1854. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, September 12, 1854 ; Naval Station, Sackett's- 
Harbor, New York, 1856-7 ; steam-frigate Merrimac, Pacific Squadron, 1858 ;, 
steam-sloop Saranac, Pacific Squadron, 1859-60 ; steamer Mohawk, Blockading, 
Squadron, 1861, 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, July 16, 1862 ; commanding steamer- 
Mystic, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862-3 ; commanding steamer 
Mercedita, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1863-4 ; commanding steamer- 
Chickopee, Atlantic Squadron, 1865-6. 

Commissioned as Commander, March 3, 1865 ; retired, 1871. 



COMMANDER WILLIAM GIBSON, 

Born in Maryland. Appointed from Pennsylvania, February 11, 1841 ; attached 
to Hne-of-battle ship Delaware, Brazil Squadron, 1841 ; to sloop Concord, and 
wrecked in her in the Mozambique Channel, 1842 ; to Delaware again, Mediter- 
ranean, 1843 ; brig Lawrence, Home Squadron, 1844 ; frigate Potomac, Home 
Squadron, 1845 ; gunboat Reefer, Gulf of Mexico, 1846, from the beginning of 
the war ; closely engaged with the batteries and troops in the two attacks oa 
Alvarado ; present at Tobasco. 

12 



178 COMMANDERS. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, August 10, 1847 ; steamer Mississippi and 
other vessels of Gulf Squadron, 1848 ; Coast Survey, schooner Ewing, Pacific 
coast of the United States, 1849-51 ; assaulted by a mutinous and deserting 
boat's crew, in the bay of San Francisco, California, September, 1849, thrown 
overboard, rescued and resuscitated from drowning ; thanked by Superintendent 
of Coast Survey, for "characteristic gallantry;" Coast Survey, New England, 
1852 ; steamer John Hancock, North Pacific Expedition, 1853 ; assisted in sur- 
vey of Gaspar Straits ; commanding schooner Fenimore Cooper, North Pacific 
Expedition, 1854-5 ; surveys solely conducted by that vessel, the coast of Niphon 
in the Japan Sea, and the Aleutian chain of islands ; Commander (now Rear- 
Admiral) Rodgers complimented him for his " zeal, his energy, and the hardships 
of a dangerous cruise," and wrote that his " usefulness was in inverse proportion 
to the size of his vessel." 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, September 15, 1855 ; special duty, Washington, 
1857-8 ; frigate Sabine, Paraguay Expedition, 1858-9 ; special duty, Washington, 
1859 ; gunboat Pocahontas, Gulf Squadron, 1860 ; steam-frigate Minnesota, 1861 ; 
steamer Santiago de Cuba, 1861-2. 

Commissioned as Lieutenaiit- Commander, July 16, 1862 ; commanding steamer 
Yankee, Potomac Flotilla, 1862 ; present during all the operations on the James 
River, while McClellan occupied Harrison's Landing, and guarded with three 
gunboats his re-crossing the Chickahominy ; captured several vessels in a night 
expedition up Chip Oaks Creek, and thanked by Commodore Wilkes ; commanding 
steam-gunboat Seneca, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862-3 ; Senior- 
Officer in the Ogeechee, January, 1863, blockading rebel war steamer Nashville ; 
engaged in three attacks on Fort McAllister, and the destruction of the above- 
named vessel, after the arrival of Captain Worden in the Montauk ; praised by 
the late Rear- Admiral Du Pont, in a letter to the Department, for "great spirit 
and vigilance;" commanding iron-clad Catskill, steam-gunboat Nipsic, steamer 
Sonoma, and iron-clad Lehigh, successively, 1864; frequent engagements with the 
batteries near Charleston ; Rear- Admiral Dahlgren wrote that his " monitor service 
would always be a handsome testimonial in his favor ;" Rear- Admiral Rowan, that 
he " commanded one of the iron-clads during the active operations off Charleston, 
iiind did gallant and efficient service ;" commanding steamer Mahaska, and First 
Division of the East Gulf Squadron, 1865 ; thanked by Major-General Newton 
for " zealous and able co-operation with the land forces," in the joint expedition to 
,St. Marks ; commanding steamer Tehama, 1866-7 ; rode out hurricane near Ba- 
hamas, October, 1866 ; thanked by British government for aid rendered those 
islands ; retired, April 26, 1867. 

Promoted to Commander on the retired list, April 26, 1867 ; special duty, 
Washington, 1867 ; Navy Yard, Pensacola, 1868-70. 



COMMANDER GREENLEAF CILLEY, 

■Born in Maine. Appointed from Maine, February 26, 1841 ; attached to frigate 
'Cumberland, Mediterranean Squadron, 1843-5 ; sloop Plymouth, Brazil Squadron, 
1845-6 ; frigate Ohio, Pacific Squadron, 1846-7. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, August 10, 1847; Naval School, 1848; 
frigate Raritan, Home Squadron, 1849-50 ; Coast Survey, 1851-2 ; store-ship 
Fredonia, Pacific Squadron, 1852-3 ; Pacific Squadron, 1854 ; frigate St. Law- 
rence, Pacific Squadron, 1855. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, September 15, 1855 ; sloop Saratoga, Home 
Squadron, 1856-8 ; steamer Metacomet, Brazil Squadron and Paraguay Expedi- 



COMMANDERS. I79 

tion, 1859 ; brig Bainbridge, Brazil Squadron, 1860 ; steamer Pulaski, Brazil 
Squadron, 1861-3. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander^ July 16, 1862 ; retired March 18, 1865. 

Commissioned as Commander, March 3, 1865. 



COMMANDER EDWARD E. STONE, 

Born in Georgia, January 26, 1826. Appointed from Georgia, October 19, 
1841 ; attached to frigate Bainbridge, Home Squadron, 1842-4 ; brig Perry, East 
India Squadron, 1854-5 ; frigate Cumberland, Home Squadron, during Mexican 
War; attack on Vera Cruz; Naval School, 1847-8. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, August 10, 1847 ; brig Perry, coast of 
Africa, 1848-50 ; sloop Portsmouth, coast of Africa, 1851 ; Coast Survey, 1852 ; 
store-ship Fredonia, Pacific Squadron, 1853 ; Coast Survey, 1854-6. 

Promoted to Master, 1855. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, September 15, 1855 ; barque Resolute, special 
service, 1857 ; sloop Marion, coast of Africa, 1858 ; sloop John Adams, East 
India Squadron, 18G0-1 ; commanding school-ship Macedonian, 1862-3. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Conim,ander, July 16, 1862 ; commanding steamer 
Iron- Age, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; engagement with and 
capture of Fort Anderson ; slightly wounded at Fort Anderson. 

Commissioned as Commander, July 25, 1866 ; special duty, New Orleans, 
1866-7; commanding steamer Shawmut, Atlantic Squadron, 1867-8; Light- 
House Inspector, 1869. 



Retired under the Fourth Section of the Act of April 21, 1864. 



COMMANDER WILLIAM C. WEST, 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, January 30, 1841 ; attached 
to frigate United States, Pacific Squadron, 1841-4 ; sloop Vincennes, East India 
Squadron, 1845-6 ; Naval School, 1847-8. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, August 10, 1847 ; sloop St. Louis, Brazil 
Squadron, 1849-51 ; frigate St. Lawrence, Pacific Squadron, 1851-5. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, September 15, 1855 ; Naval Observatory, Wash- 
ington, 1856-7 ; sloop Vincennes, coast of Africa, 1858-60 ; frigate St. Lawrence, 
1861. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, July 16, 1862 ; ordnance duty. Navy 
Yard, Boston, 1863 ; South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864. 

Commissioned as Commander, March 3, 1865 ; commanding at Beaufort, 
1865 ; retired, April 26, 1866 ; special duty, Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 1868. 



Retired in Conformity with the Act of Fehruary 28, 1855. 



COMMANDER NATHANIEL T. WEST, 

Born in Massachusetts. Appointed from Massachusetts, February 18, 1841 ; 
attached to schooner Grampus, Home Squadron, 1841-4 ; sloop St. Louis, East 
India Squadron, 1845 ; Naval School, 1846. 



180 LIEUTENANT-COMMANDERS. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman., August 10, 1847; Home Squadron, 1847; 
steamer Vixen, Home Squadron, 1848 ; Germantown, Home Squadron, 1849-50 ; 
Coast Survey, 1851 ; sloop Cyane, Home Squadron, 1852 ; sloop Macedonian, 
East India Squadron, 1853 ; frigate Columbia, Home Squadron, 1854-7 ; retired, 
September 13, 1855 ; sick from 1855 to 1869. 

Commissioned as Commander. March 3, 1865. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDERS. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER FREDERICK PEARSON, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania, September 21, 1859; 
Naval Academy, 1859-61 ; attached to frigate St. Lawrence, Atlantic coast, 1861 ; 
sinking of privateer Petrel; steam-frigate Wabash, flag-ship South Atlantic Block- 
ading Squadron, 1862-3 ; attached to the naval howitzer battery which accom- 
panied the army in the operations against the enemy's batteries on Coosaw Creek, 
South Carolina ; attached to the rifle battery at the reduction of Fort Pulaski, at 
the occupation of Fernandina, Florida, and the engagement the day after between 
the Ottawa and the enemy up the St. Mary's River ; attached to the navy how- 
itzers at the battle of Pocotaligo. 

Promoted to Ensign, September 16, 1862 ; sloop Jamestown, East India Squad- 
ron, 1864-5 ; commanded a chartered steamer, and co-operated with vessels of the 
English, French, and Dutch fleet at Simonasaki, Straits of Japan, 1864. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, February 22, 1864; Pacific Squadron, 1865-7. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, 3vi\^ 25, 1866 ; steam-frigate Frank- 
lin, flag-ship European Squadron, 1867-8; practice-ship Macedonian, 1868-70; 
special duty, Ordnance Bureau, 1871-2 ; Brooklyn (second-rate), European Sta- 
tion, 1873-4; special duty, Hartford, Connecticut, 1874; special ordnance duty, 
1875-7. 

LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER JOHN J. READ, 

Born in New Jersey. Appointed from New Jersey, September 21, 1858; Naval 
Academy, 1858-61 ; Atlantic Squadron, 1861 ; steam-sloop Hartford, flag-ship 
West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1862 ; in all of Farragut's battles, from the South 
West Pass of the Mississippi River to Vicksburg, 1862-3. 

Promoted to Ensign, November 22, 1862 ; South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 
1863-4. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, February 22, 1864 ; steamer R. R. Cuyler, North 
Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; steamer De Soto, Atlantic Squadron, 
1865-6. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, July 25, 1866; steamer Rhode 
Island, Atlantic Squadron, 1867 ; steam-sloop Susquehanna, flag-ship North 
Atlantic Squadron, 1867-8; steamer Michigan, on the lakes, 1869 ; Guerriere 
(second-rate), European Station, 1870-2 ; Richmond (second-rate). North Pacific 
Station, 1873-6 ; commanding Richmond, flag-ship S. P. Station, 1876-7. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER EDWIN T. WOODWARD, 

Born in Vermont. Appointed November 21, 1859 ; Naval Academy, 1859-61 ; 
steam-sloop Mississippi, 1861 ; attached to garrison of Ship Island, November 4, 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDERS. 131 

1861, to January 24, 1862; gunboat Scioto, 1862; attack on and passage of 
Forts Jackson and St. Philip, Clialmette batteries, and capture of New Orleans ; 
passage of the Mississippi River to Vicksburg ; two attacks on Vicksburg, 1802, 
under Admiral Farragut, — passing the batteries both times ; engagement with 
rebel ram Arkansas, above Vicksburg, 1862 ; sloop Cyane, Pacific Squadron, 
1863-4. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, February 22, 1864 ; steam-frigate Minnesota, N. 
A. B. Squadron, 1864-5 ; two attacks on Fort Fisher (in landing party) ; steam- 
sloop Kearsarge, European Squadron, 1865-6. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, July 25, 1866; Naval Academy, 
1866-7 ; steam-frigate Guerriere, flag-ship S. A. Squadron, 1867-8 ; steamers 
Quinnebaug and Kansas, 1869; ordnance duty, Navy Yard, New York, 1869-71 ; 
Canonicus (iron-clad), N. A. Station, 1871-2 ; R. S. Vermont, 1873 ; Brooklyn 
(second-rate), flag-ship S. A. Squadron, 1874-5 ; Vandalia (third-rate), N. A. 
Station, 1875-6 ; torpedo duty, 1877. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER GEORGE W. WOOD, 

Born in Ireland. Appointed from Pennsylvania, September 22, 1859 ; Naval 
Academy, 1859-61 ; frigate St. Lawrence, Atlantic coast, 1861 ; destruction of 
privateer Petrel ; steam-sloop Oneida, W. G. B. Squadron, 1862 ; through all the 
operations with Admiral Farragut on the Mississippi, from the attack on the forts 
below New Orleans until the siege of Vicksburg was raised in 1862 ; commanded 
a howitzer and landing party that forced the surrender of Natchez, May 12, 
1862. 

Promoted to Ensign, February 24, 1863 ; steam-sloop Dacotah, North Atlantic 
Blockading Squadron, 1863-4. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, February 22, 1864 ; iron-clad Roanoke, North 
Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5. On February 5, 1865, commanded a 
boat expedition consisting of ten boats and one hundred and fifty men, proceeded 
up Pagan Creek, a tributary to the James, and captured a torpedo-boat and torpedo, 
filled, and ready for use. Steamer Vanderbilt, special service, 1866-7. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, July 25, 1866; steamer Suwanee, 
North Pacific Squadron, 1868 ; sloop Cyane, North Pacific Squadron, 1869-70 ; 
League Island Station, 1870-1 ; Mahopac (iron-clad), N. A. Station, 1871-2 ; 
Lancaster, flag-ship S. P. Squadron, 1873-4 ; Navy Yard, New York, 1875-7 : 
torpedo duty, 1877. 

LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER CHARLES W. TRACY, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from the same State, October 27, 1859 ; 
Naval Academy, 1859-61 ; attached to frigate St. Lawrence, Atlantic coast, 
1861 ; destruction of privateer Petrel ; steam-gunboat Octorara, Mississippi 
Squadron, 1862-3; Vicksburg, July, 1862. 

Promoted to Ensign, December 10, 1862 ; South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 
1863-5; at Charleston, April, 1863, and other actions during the siege. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, February 22, 1864 ; Pacific Squadron, 1866-8. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, July 25, 1866 ; steam-sloop Plymouth, 
European Squadron, 1869 ; Naval Academy, 1870-2 ; Alaska (second-rate), 
European Station, 1873-5 ; Juniata, European Station, 1876. 



182 LIEUTENANT-COMMANDERS. 

LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER MORTIMER L. JOHNSON, 

Born in Vermont. Appointed from same State, September 30, 1859 ; Naval 
Academy, 1859-61 ; attached to steam-sloop Mississippi, 1861 ; steam-sloop Tus- 
carora, special service, 1862-3. 

Promoted to Ensign, September 24, 1863 ; South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 
1864-5. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, February 22, 1864; steamer Nipsic, Atlantic 
Squadron, 1865-6. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, July 25, 1866; Naval Academy, 
1866-9; steam-sloop Juniata, European Squadron, 1869; Navy Yard, Ports- 
mouth, New Hampshire, 1870-1 ; R. S. Sabine, 1873-4 ; R. S. Ohio, 1875 ; 
R. S. Wabash, 1875-7. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER EDWIN M. SHEPARD, 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, November 24, 1859 ; Naval 
Academy, 1859-61 ; attached to sloop Vincennes, West Gulf Blockading Squad- 
ron, 1861-2 ; passes of the Mississippi River. 

Promoted to Ensign, November 22, 1862; steam-sloop Mississippi, West Gulf 
Blockading Squadron, 1862-3 ; remained on board the Mississippi until her de- 
struction ; ordered thence to gunboat Essex ; remained on board during the siege 
of Port Hudson, and served with naval battery of 19 guns on shore with the 
army for several weeks ; received a commendatory letter from General Arnold, 
General Banks' Chief of Artillery ; attached to monitor Mahopac during the 
siege of Charleston, South Carolina, and in James River ; steam-sloop Wachusett, 
special service, 1864-5 ; capture of rebel privateer Florida, October 7, 1864. 

Commissioned as. Lieutenant, February 22, 1864; steamer Vanderbilt, June, 
1865, during the trial-trip of the Dictator; steamer Tacony, Atlantic Squadron, 
1865-6. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, July 25, 1866; steamer Osceola, 
Atlantic Squadron, 1867 ; apprentice-ship Saratoga, 1868-9 ; California (second- 
rate), 1871 ; torpedo service, 1872 ; Hartford (second-rate), flag-ship Asiatic 
Squadron, 1872-5 ; ordnance duty, Washington, 1875-6 ; Navy Yard, Ports- 
mouth, New Hampshire, 1876-7. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER CHARLES McGREGOR, 

Born in Ohio. Appointed from Illinois, September 21, 1860; Naval Academy, 
1860-3; while on leave of absence in 1862, volunteered against Kirby Smith; 
was assigned to duty, first with the army, and afterward transferred to the gun- 
boat flotilla, under Commodore Duble, of the gunboat service, and received com- 
mendations from that ofiicer and General Wallace for services rendered ; was 
appointed Acting Assistant Professor at the Naval Academy in 1862. 

Promoted to Ensign, May 28, 1863 ; steam-gunboat Tuscarora, North Atlantic 
Blockading Squadron, 1863-4; steam-sloop Juniata, North and South Atlantic 
Blockading Squadrons, 1864-5 ; both attacks on Fort Fisher, and land assault 
on same ; received commendation of Captain W. R. Taylor ; was in the expedition 
to Bull's Bay, at the capture of Charleston, South Carolina ; steam-sloop Juniata, 
Brazil Squadron, 1865-7. 

Promoted to Master, November 10, 1865. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDERS. 183 

Commissioned as Lieutenant^ July 25, 1866 ; flag-ship Powhatan, South Pacific 
Squadron, 1867-9. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, March 12, 1868; flag-ship Pow- 
hatan, West India Squadron, 1869 ; Naval Observatory, 1870 ; Naval Academy, 
1870-1 ; Wabash, flag-ship European Fleet, 1871-2 ; Shenandoah (second-rate), 
European Fleet, 1872-3 ; equipment duty. Navy Yard, Boston, 1875-8. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER ROBLEY D. EVANS, 

Born in Virginia. Appointed fi'om Utah, September 20, 1860 ; Naval Academy, 
1860-3. 

Promoted to Ensign, October 1, 1863 ; attached to steam-sloop Powhatan, West 
India Squadron, 1864 ; North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; both attacks 
on Fort Fisher, January 15, 1865 ; in the land attack on Fort Fisher received two 
severe wounds from rifle-shots ; Navy Yard, Philadelphia, 1866. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, July 25, 1866 ; ordnance duty, Navy Yard, Wash- 
ington, 1867 ; steam-sloop Piscataqua, flag-ship Asiatic Squadron, 1867-9. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, March 12, 1868 ; Navy Yard, Wash- 
ington, 1870-1 ; Naval Academy, 1871-2 ; Shenandoah (second-rate), European 
Fleet, 1873; Congress (second-rate), European Fleet, 1873-6; commanding train- 
ing-ship Saratoga, 1877-8. 

LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER GEORGE W. COFFIN, 

Born in Massachusetts. Appointed from Massachusetts, September 20, 1860 ; 
Naval Academy, 1860-3. 

Promoted to Ensign, October 1, 1863 ; steam-sloop Ticonderoga, North Atlantic 
Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; both attacks on Fort Fisher ; wounded by a 
Minie-ball in right leg at land assault on Fort Fisher ; steamer Shawmut, Brazil 
Squadron, 1866. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, July 25, 1866 ; steam-frigate Franklin, European 
Squadron, 1867-8. 

Commissioned &% Lieutenant -Command er,M.&vch. 12, 1868; Naval Academy, 
1868-9 ; Chief-of-Staff, S. S. of N. A. Fleet, 1870-1 ; Constellation (gunnery- 
Bhip), 1871-2 ; Naval Academy, 1873-4; Plymouth, N. A. Station, 1875 ; Hart- 
ford, flag-ship, N. A. Station, 1875—6 ; Coast Survey (commanding Hassler), 
1876-8. 

LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER HENRY GLASS, 

Born in Kentucky. Appointed from Illinois, September 24, 1860 ; Naval 
Academy, 1860-3. 

Promoted to Ensign, September 8, 1863 ; attached to steam-sloop Canandaigua, 
South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1863-5 ; all the general engagements with 
forts and batteries in Charleston harbor, from July 8 to September 28, 1863 ; en- 
gagements with batteries in Stono River, South Carolina, December 28, 1863, and 
July 3 and 11, 1864 ; engagements with batteries in North Edisto River, February 
9, 1865 ; capture of Georgetown, South Carolina, February 5, 1865. 

Promoted to Master, November 10, 1865 ; steam-sloop Powhatan, Pacific 
Squadron, 1865-8. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, July 25, 1866. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander., March 12, 1868; steam-sloop Tus- 



184 LIEUTENANT-COMMANDERS. 

carora, North Atlantic Squadron, 1869 ; Mohican (third-rate), Pacific Fleet, 
1870-1 ; Pacific Fleet, 1872 ; Iroquois (third-rate), Asiatic Station, 1872-3 ; R. 
S. Independence, 1875; commanding Nautical S. S. Jamestown, 1876-8. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER PHILIP H. COOPER, 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, September 28, 1860 ; Naval 
Academy, 1860-3. 

Promoted to Ensign, May 28, 1863 ; attached to steam-sloop Richmond, West 
Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1863-5 ; battle of Mobile Bay, August 5, 1864. 

Promoted to Master, November, 1865 ; steam-sloop Powhatan, South Pacific 
Squadron, 1865-7. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, November 10, 1866 ; Naval Academy, 1867-9. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, March 12, 1868; frigate Sabine, 
special cruise, 1869 ; T. and N. Surveying Expedition, 1870-1 ; Naval Academy, 
1872-4; Torpedo Station, 1875; Experimental Battery, Annapolis, 1875-6. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER HENRY C. TAYLOR, 

Born in District of Columbia. Appointed from Ohio, September 28, 1860 ; 
Naval Academy, 1860-3. 

Promoted to Ensign, May 28, 1863 ; attached to steam-sloop Shenandoah, 
North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1863-4 ; steam-sloop Iroquois, special 
service, 1864-5. 

Promoted to Master, November 10, 1865 ; steamer Rhode Island, North Atlantic 
Squadron, 1866-7. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, November 10, 1866 ; steam-sloop Susquehanna, 
flag-ship North Atlantic Squadron, 1867-8. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, March 12, 1868; store-ship Guard, 
European Squadron, 1868-70; Naval Academy, 1870-1; commanding Coast 
Survey steamer Hassler, 1872-7 ; Hydrographic Office, 1877-8. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER ALLEN D. BROWN, 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, September 26, 1860; Naval 
Academy, 1860-3. 

Promoted to Ensign, May 28, 1863 ; attached to steam-sloop Iroquois, special 
service, 1863—4. 

Promoted to Master, November 10, 1865 ; steamer Rhode Island, North Atlantic 
Squadron, 1865-6. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, November 10, 1866 ; steamer Unadilla, Asiatic 
Squadron, 1867-9. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, March 12, 1868; Naval Academy, 
1869-72; Pensacola, flag-ship N. P. Squadron, 1872-5; Naval Academy, 1876-8. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER GEORGE H. WADLEIGH, 

Born in New Hampshire. Appointed from New Hampshire, September 26, 
1860 ; Naval Academy, 1860-3. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDERS. 185 

Promoted to Ensign, May 28, 1863 ; attached to steam-sloop Lackawanna, 
West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 186-4-5 ; battle of Mobile Bay, August 5, 
1864 ; promoted to Master, November 10, 1865 ; steam-sloop Ticouderoga, Euro- 
pean Squadron, 1865-9. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, November 10, 1866. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, March 12, 1868; Naval Academy, 
1869-70; torpedo duty, 1871 ; Shawmut (third-rate), N. A. Fleet, 1871-2; R. 
S. Ohio, 1873-4 ; Nautical School-ship St. Mary's, 1875-6 ; Peusacola, flag-ship 
Pacific Station, 1876-8. 

LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER A. S. CKOWNINSHIELD, 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, September 21, 1860 ; Naval 
Academy, 1860-3. 

Promoted to Ensign, May 28, 1863 ; attached to steam-sloop Ticonderoga, 
North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5; both attacks on Fort Fisher; 
steam-sloop Hartford, East India Squadron, 1865-8. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, November 10, 1866. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, March 10, 1868; steam-sloop Rich- 
mond, European Squadron, 1868-9 ; Richmond (second-rate), European Fleet, 
1870-1 ; Lackawanna (second-rate), Asiatic Station, 1872-4 ; leave in Europe, 
1875 ; ordnance duty. Navy Yard, Washington, 1875-8. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER CHARLES H. CRAVEN, 

Born in Maine. Appointed from Maine, September 20, 1860 ; Naval Academy, 
1860-3. 

Promoted to Ensign, May 28, 1863; serving in South Atlantic Blockading 
Squadron, 1863-5; occupation of Morris Island, July, 1863; in command of 
Fifth Division at assault on Fort Sumter, September 7, 1863; attacks on rebel 
batteries in Stono River, July 3 and 7, 1864 ; joint expedition of naval and mili- 
tary forces to cut Charleston and Savannah Railroad, August and September, 
1864 ; in charge of launch from Housatonic, stationed inside of Morris Island, to 
prevent rebel communication ; while on this duty, captured Major Walley, of the 
rebel army, who was in a boat, with a surgeon and the crew ; made attack with 
the army on Forts Gregg and Wagner, and at the evacuation of Morris Island 
captured three boats with eighty men and officers in them ; performed duty in 
naval battery on Morris Island ; was attached to Housatonic when she was 
blown up, February 17, 1864 ; steam-frisate Colorado, European Squadron, 
1865-7. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, November 10, 1866 ; steam-sloop Wampanoag, 
1868. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, March 12, 1868; steam-sloop Pow- 
hatan, Pacific Squadron, 1868-9 ; store-ship Onward, South Pacific Squadron, 
1869; Nyack (fourth-rate). Pacific Fleet, 1870-1; R.S.Independence, 1872; 
Kearsarge (third-rate), Asiatic Station, 1872-5 ; Navy Yard, Mare Island, 
1876-8. 

LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER FRANK WILDES, 

Born in Massachusetts. Entered Naval Academy, September 21, 1860 ; gradu- 
ated, May 28, 1863, and appointed Ensign same day ; ordered to steam-sloop Lacka- 



186 LIEUTENANT-COMMANDERS. 

wanna, West Gulf Squadron, about June 15, 1863 ; present at battle of Mobile, 
and served in Naval Battery until surrender of Fort Morgan ; present in monitor 
Chickasaw during operations in Mobile Bay, March and April, 1865, until occu- 
pation of Mobile by our troops; returned home in Lackawanna, June, 1865; 
ordered to iron-clad Monadnock, about October 1, 1865, and went to San Fran- 
cisco in her ; on her being put out of commission, ordered to Vanderbilt, about 
June, 1866. 

Promoted to Master^ 1866, and to Lieutenant, 1867; ordered to steamer 
Suwanee, spring of 1867, and cruised from Panama to British Columbia, until 
her wreck on north coast of Vancouver's Island, in July, 1868. 

Promoted to Lieutenant- Commander, March 12, 1868 ; ordered to steam-sloop 
Pensacola, August 1, 1868; and ordered home September 1, 1868; ordered to 
frigate Franklin, in January, 1869, and made European cruise in her until her 
return home in November, 1871 ; ordered to duty at Boston Navy Yard, about 
February 1, 1872 ; detached and ordered Executive of steam-sloop Wyoming, 
August 1, 1873; cruised in West Indies until April, 1874, when transferred to 
steam-sloop Wachusett, as Executive ; cruised in West Indies until she was ordered 
home in November, and arrived in Boston, December, 1874 ; ordered to Torpedo 
School at Newport, June 1, 1875, and detached October 9, 1875; ordered as 
Executive of iron-clad Dictator, at Port Royal, South Carolina, May 15, 1876 ; 
detached on her being put out of commission at Philadelphia, June 7, 1877 ; 
ordered to special ordnance duty at Cold Spring, New York, January 1, 1878, 
where he is at present. 

LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER AUGUSTUS G. KELLOGG, 

Born in Ohio. Appointed from Illinois, September 21, 1860 ; Naval Academy, 
1860. 

Promoted to Ensign, May 28, 1863 ; attached to steamer Rhode Island, North 
Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864 ; steam-sloop Powhatan, North Atlantic Block- 
ading Squadron, 1864-5 ; both attacks on Fort Fisher. 

Promoted to Master, November 10, 1865 ; steam-sloop Shenandoah, East India 
Squadron, 1865-8. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, November 10, 1866. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, March 12, 1868; steam-gunboat 
Aroostook, Asiatic Squadron, 1868-9 ; iron-clad duty. New Orleans, 1869 ; Naval 
Academy, 1870-1 ; Hydrographic Office, 1872; Michigan (fourth-rate), 1873-6; 
training-ship Monongahela, 1876-7 ; commanding Speedwell (fourth-rate), 1877-8. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER JAMES H. SANDS, 

Born in District of Columbia. Appointed from Maryland, November 22, 1859 ; 
Naval Academy, 1859-63. 

Promoted to Ensign, May 28, 1863 ; attached to steam-sloop Tuscarora, North 
Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1863-4 ; steam-sloop Shenandoah, North Atlantic 
Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; both attacks on Fort Fisher ; steam-sloop Hart- 
ford, flag-ship East India Squadron, 1865-8. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, November 10, 1866. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, March 12, 1868; steam-sloop Rich- 
mond, European Squadron, 1869-70; California, flag-ship Pacific Fleet, 1871-2; 
Hydrographic Office, 1873-4 ; Minnesota (first-rate), training-ship. New York, 
1875-6 ; Navy Yard, New York, 1876-7. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDERS. 187 

LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER YATES STIRLING, 

Born in Maryland. Appointed from Maryland, September 27, 1860 ; Naval 
Academy, 1860-3. 

Promoted to Ensign, May 28, 1863 ; attached to steam-sloop Shenandoah, 
North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1863-5; both attacks on Fort Fisher; 
steamer Mohongo, Pacific Squadron, 1865-7. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, November 10, 1866. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, March 12, 1868; steam-sloop Con- 
tocook, flag-ship North Atlantic Squadron, 1868-9 ; Pacific Fleet, 1870-1 ; R. 
S. Independence, 1871-2 ; sick-leave, 1873-5 ; R. S. Worcester, 1875-6 ; torpedo 
duty, 1877. 

LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER WILLIAM C. WISE, 

Born in Virginia. Appointed from Kentucky, September 29, 1860 ; Naval 
Academy, 1860-3. 

Promoted to Ensign, October 1, 1863 ; attached to frigate New Ironsides, South 
Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1863-4 ; besides being on constant picket duty and 
in several skirmishes, took part in the famous Jacksonville Expedition ; steam- 
frigate Minnesota, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; both attacks on 
Fort Fisher ; ordered to command of the flag-ship Malvern, Admiral D. D. Porter, 
and commanded her until the fall of Richmond, participating in the bombardment 
and capture of the various forts on Cape Fear River ; with the Malvern in James 
River, participated in the final movements against Richmond, the Malvern being 
the first vessel to anchor off the city ; steam-sloop Hartford, flag-ship Asiatic 
Squadron, 1865-6 ; steamer Wachusett, 1866-8 ; landed one hundred men, with 
Lieutenant-Commander J. W. Phillips, marched six miles into the interior, sur- 
prised and captured a band of robbers, bringing in twenty prisoners and a number 
of arms. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, February 21, 1867. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, March 12, 1868; practice-ship Dale, 
1869 ; steamer Miantonomah, New York, 1870 ; Brooklyn (second-rate), Euro- 
pean Station, 1871-2; Ajax (iron-clad), N. A. Station, 1873; R. S. Vermont, 
1874 ; Tennessee, Asiatic Station, 1875-8. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER LEWIS CLARKE, 

Born in Connecticut. Appointed from Connecticut, September 24, 1861 ; Naval 
Academy, 1861-3. 

Promoted to Ensign, October 1, 1863 ; steam-sloop Richmond, West Gulf 
Blockading Squadron, 1863-5 ; battle of Mobile Bay, August 5, 1864; attack 
on Spanish Fort, Alabama River, and capture of Mobile, April, 1865 ; burned 
by explosion of torpedo, off Mobile Point ; steam-sloop Ticonderoga, European 
Squadron, 1865-8. 

Promoted to Blaster, May 10, 1866. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, February 1, 1867. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, March 12, 1868; receiving-ship, 
Boston, 1868 ; Naval Academy, 1869-72 ; Portsmouth, N. P. Station, 1873-5 ; 
torpedo service, 1876-7. 



188 LIEUTENANT-COMMANDERS. 

LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER PURNELL F. HARRINGTON, 

Born in Delaware. Appointed from Delaware, September 20, 1861 ; Naval 
Academy, 1861-3. 

Promoted to Ensign, October 1, 1863; attached to steam-sloop Ticonderoga, 
1863 ; attached to steam-sloop Monongahela, W. Gr. B. Squadron, 1864-5 ; battle 
of Mobile Bay, August 5, 1864, and in all the operations against the rebel defences 
at the entrance of Mobile Bay during the summer of 1864; steam-sloop Monon- 
gahela, N. A. Squadron, 1865-8 ; while attached to Monongahela, that vessel was 
thrown ashore by a tidal wave, at St. Croix, Danish West Indies, November 18, 
1867. 

Promoted to Master, May 10, 1866. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, February 21, 1867. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, March 12, 1868; Naval Academy, 
as Instructor of Mathematics, 1868-70 ; California (second-rate). Pacific Fleet, 
1870-2 ; Naval Academy, 1873-6 ; Hartford, flag-ship, N. A. Station, 1876-8. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER WILLIAM BAINBRIDGE HOFF, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania, October 24, 1860 ; Naval 
Academy, 1860-3. 

Promoted to Ensign, October 1, 1863; attached to steam-frigate Niagara, 1864 ; 
East Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; steamer Shawmut, Brazil Squadron, 
1865-6. 

Promoted to Master, May 10, 1866 ; steam-frigate Franklin, flag-ship European 
Iron, 1867-8. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, February 21, 1867. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, March 12, 1868; Naval Academy, 
1869 ; Kansas (fourth-rate), T. and N. Expedition, 1870-1 ; torpedo service, 
1872; Saranac (second-rate). Pacific Fleet, 1872-4; special duty, Washington, 
1875 ; commanding Alarm (torpedo-boat), 1875-6 ; League Island Station, 1876 
-7 ; special duty, Washington, 1877-8. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER WILLIAM S. DANA, 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, October 25, 1859 ; Naval 
Academy, 1859-63. 

Promoted to Ensign, October 1, 1863 ; steam-frigate Niagara, 1863 ; steam-sloop 
Hartford, flag-ship W. G. B. Squadron, 1863^; received the thanks of Rear- 
Admiral Farragut, in General Order No. 9, dated July 6, 1864 ; battle of Mobile 
Bay, August 5, 1864 ; steam-sloop Lancaster, flag-ship Pacific Squadron, 1865 ; 
sloop St. Mary's, Pacific Squadron, 1865-6. 

Promoted to Master, May 10, 1866 ; steamer Aroostook, Asiatic Squadron, 
1867-8. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, February 21, 1867. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, March 12, 1868; steam-sloop Shen- 
andoah, Asiatic Squadron, 1868-9; steamer Ashuelot, Asiatic Squadron, 1869; 
Brooklyn (second-rate), European Fleet, 1870-2 ; Ossipee (third-rate), N. A. 
Station, 1873-5 ; R. S. Colorado, 1875-7. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDERS. 189 

LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER NICOLL LUDLOW, 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, October 28, 1859; Naval 
Academy, 1859-63. 

Promoted to Ensign, October 1, 1863; attached to steam-sloop Wacbusett, 
Brazil Squadron, 1863-5 ; attached to iron-clad Monadnock, on her passage from 
New York to San Francisco, in 1866. 

Promoted to Master, November 10, 1866 ; steam-sloop Iroquois, Asiatic Squad- 
ron, 1866-9. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, February 21, 1867. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, March 12, 1868; Naval Academy, 
1870-2 ; Monongahela (second-rate), S. A. Station, 1872-5 ; Brooklyn (second- 
rate), S. A. Station, 1876 ; torpedo duty, 1876-7 ; Trenton, flag-ship, European 
Station, 1877-8. 

LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER FRANCIS A. COOK, 

Born in Massachusetts. Appointed from Massachusetts, September 20, 1860 ; 
Naval Academy, 1860-3. 

Promoted to Ensign, October 1, 1863 ; attached to steam-sloop Seminole, West 
Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1863-5 ; steamer Vanderbilt, North Pacific Squadron, 
1865-7. 

Promoted to Master, November 10, 1866 ; North Atlantic Squadron, 1867-8. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, February 21, 1867. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, March 12, 1868; Naval Academy, 
1869 ; Saranac (second-rate), Pacific Fleet, 1870-1 ; R. S. Independence, 1872 ; 
Richmond, flag-ship S. P. Station, 1872-4 ; R. S. Sabine, 1875-6 ; Plymouth 
(second-rate), N. A. Station, 1876-8. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER COLBY M. CHESTER, 

Born in Connecticut. Appointed from Connecticut, October 31, 1859 ; Naval 
Academy, 1859-63. 

Promoted to Ensign, October 1, 1863 ; attached to steam-sloop Richmond, West 
Gulf Squadron, 1863-5; battle of Mobile Bay, August 5, 1864; operations 
against Mobile ; steam-frigate Powhatan, South Pacific Squadron, 1865-7. 

Promoted to Master, November 10, 1866. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, February 21, 1867; steamer Gettysburg, North 
Atlantic Squadron, 1868-9. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, March 12, 1868; Alaska (third- 
rate), Asiatic Station, 1870-3 ; torpedo service, 1873-4 ; Naval Academy, 
1875-8. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER ARTHUR H. WRIGHT, 

Born in Ohio. Appointed from Ohio, September 20, 1860 ; Naval Academy, 
1860-3 ; steamer Richmond, W. G. B. Squadron, 1863-4 ; battle of Mobile Bay, 
August 5, 1864 ; at the siege of Mobile, was attached to steamer INIilwaukee, till 
that vessel was destroyed by a torpedo ; transferred to steamer Osage, which being 
also destroyed by a torpedo, was ordered to the steamer Cincinnati, S. A. B. 
Squadron, 1865 ; steam-sloop Ticonderoga, European Squadron, 1865-8. 



190 LIEUTENANT-COMMANDERS. 

Promoted to Master, November 10, 1866. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, February 21, 1867 ; receiving-ship, Portsmouth, 
New Hampshire, 1868-9. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, March 12, 1868; receiving-ship, 
New York, 1869 ; Naval Academy, 1870 ; Narragansett (third-rate), N. P. Fleet, 
1870-3 ; Michigan (fourth-rate), 1873 ; Swatara (third-rate), 1874 ; commanding 
Michigan (fourth-rate), 1877-8. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER CHARLES E. CLARK, 

Born in Ohio, Appointed from Ohio, September 29, 1860 ; Naval Academy, 
1860-3. 

Promoted to Endgn, October 1, 1863; attached to steam-sloop Ossipee, West 
Gulf Squadron, 1863-5 ; battle of Mobile Bay, August 5, 1864 ; bombardment 
of Fort Morgan; steam-frigate Vanderbilt, Pacific Squadron, 1865-7. 

Promoted to Master, November 10, 1866; steamer Suwanee, North Pacific 
Squadron, 1867-8. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, February 21, 1867 ; receiving-ship, Portsmouth, 
New Hampshire, 1868-9. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, March 12, 1868; Naval Academy, 
1870-2; Mahopac (iron-clad), N. A. Station, 1873; Asiatic Station, 1874; 
Kearsarge (third-rate), Asiatic Station, 1875-6 ; Monocacy, Asiatic Station, 
1876-7. 

LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER CHARLES J. BARCLAY, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania, September 21,1860; 
Naval Academy, 1860-3. 

Promoted to Ensign, October 1, 1863; steam-sloop Wachusett, Brazil Squad- 
ron, 1863-4 ; steam-sloop Kearsarge, European Squadron, 1865-6. 

Promoted to Master, November 10, 1866 ; steam-frigate Susquehanna, special 
service, 1867. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, February 21, 1867; steam-frigate Minnesota, 
special service, 1868. 

Commissioned as Lieidenant- Commander, March 12, 1868; steamer Michigan, 
on the lakes, 1869 ; Pacific Fleet, 1870-2 ; Torpedo Station, 1873 ; commanding 
Saugus (iron-clad), N. A. Station, 1874 ; Dictator (iron-clad), N. A. Station, 
1875-6. 

LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER JOSEPH B. COGHLAN, 

Born in Kentucky. Appointed from Illinois, September 27, 1860 ; Naval School, 
1860-3. 

Promoted to Ensign, May 28, 1863 ; attached to steam-frigate Niagara, special 
service, 1864-5. 

Promoted to Master, November 10, 1865; steam-sloop Brooklyn, flag-ship 
Brazil Squadron, 1865-8. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, November 10, 1866. 

Commissioned as Liexitenant- Commander, March 12, 1868; steam-sloop Rich- 
mond, European Squadron, 1869; Richmond (second-rate), 1870-1; Hydro- 
graphic Office, 1871-3 ; sick leave, 1873-4 ; commanding Saugus (iron-clad), N. 
A. Station, 1875-6 ; R. S. Colorado, 1877-8. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDERS. 191 

LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER CHARLES V. GRIDLEY, 

Born in Indiana. Appointed from Michigan, September 26, 1860 ; Naval 
Academy, 1860-3. 

Promoted to Ensign, October 1, 1863 ; attached to steam-sloop Oneida, West 
Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1863-5 ; battle of Mobile Bay, August 5, 186-4 ; 
steam-sloop Brooklyn, flag-ship Brazil Squadron, 1865-7. 

Promoted to Master, November 10, 1866 ; steam-sloop Kearsarge, South Pacifio 
Squadron, 1867-9. 

Commissioned as Lieiitenant, February 21, 1867. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, March 12, 1868; Michigan (fourth- 
rate), 1870-2; Monongahela (second-rate), S. A. Station, 1873-4; Naval 
Academy, 1875-8. 

LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER FRANCIS MORRIS, 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, September 27, 1860 ; Naval 
Academy, 1860-3. 

Promoted to Ensign, October 1, 1863; attached to steam-sloop Powhatan, flag- 
ship West India Squadron, 1863-4 ; North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 
1864-5; both attacks on Fort Fisher; steam-sloop Monongahela, West India 
Squadron, 1865-7. 

Promoted to Master, November 10, 1866 ; steam-sloop Piscataqua, flag-ship 
Asiatic Squadron, 1867-9. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, February 21, 1867. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, March 12, 1868; Ossipee (third- 
rate), Pacific Fleet, 1871-2 ; Torpedo Station, 1873; Shawmut (third-rate), N. 
A. Station, 1874 ; Naval rendezvous, Boston, 1875-6 ; Franklin (first-rate), 
1876-7. 

LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER CHARLES D. SIGSBEE, 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, September 27, 1859 ; Naval 
Academy, 1859-63. 

Promoted to Ensign, October 1, 1863; attached to steam-sloop Monongahela, 
West Gulf Squadron, 1863-4 ; battle of Mobile Bay, August 5, 1864 ; North 
Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1865 ; both attacks on Fort Fisher, and final 
assault on the same; steam-sloop Wyoming, Asiatic Squadron, 1865-7. 

Promoted to Master, November 10, 1866. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, February 21, 1867 ; steamer Ashuelot, Asiatic 
Squadron, 1867-9. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, March 12, 1868; on duty at Naval 
Academy, 1869-71 ; Worcester, flag-ship N. A. Station, 1871-3 ; Hydrographio 
Office, 1873-4 ; Coast Survey, 1874-5 ; commanding Coast Survey, steamer 
Blake, 1876-8. 

LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER CHARLES H. PENDLETON, 

Born in Yirginia. Appointed from Kentucky, September 27, 1860 ; gradu- 
ated as Ensign, September, 1863, and ordered to steam-sloop Brooklyn, West Gulf 
Squadron, and participated, under Admiral Farragut, in the battle of Mobile Bay. 
The Brooklyn was soon after ordered to the N. A. Squadron, and took part, under 
Admiral Porter, in the attacks on Fort Fisher. 



192 LIEUTENANT-COMMANDERS. 

Promoted to Master^ U. S. frigate Colorado and steamer Frolic, Mediterranean 
Squadron, 1865-7. 

Promoted to Master, 1866, and commissioned as Lieutenant, 1867 ; Saratoga 
(third-rate), apprentice-ship, 1867-8. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, March 12, 1868 ; Portsmouth (third- 
rate), 1869; special duty. Navy Department, aid to Secretary, 1870-2 ; Pensa- 
cola, flag-ship S. P. Squadron, 1872-3 ; special duty, Washington (Observatory), 
1873-5 ; Ossipee (third-rate), and afterwards Brooklyn (second-rate), N. A. 
Squadron, 1875-6 ; waiting orders, 1876-8. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER WILLIAM H. WHITING, 

Born in New York. Appointed from Wisconsin, September 21, 1860; Naval 
Academy, 1860-3. 

Promoted to Ensign, October 1, 1863 ; attached to steam-sloop Monongahela, 
West Gulf Squadron, 1863-5 ; battle of Mobile Bay, August 5, 1864, and burn- 
ing of the blockade-runner Ivanhoe, under the guns of Fort Morgan, August 5, 
1864; surrender of Fort Gaines, August 8, 1864; bombardment and surrender 
of Fort Morgan, August 24, 1864 ; steam-sloop Kearsarge, European Squadron, 
1865-6. 

Promoted to blaster, November 10, 1866 ; steamer Frolic, European Squadron, 
1866-8. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, February 21, 1867. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, March 12, 1868; steam-sloop Ti- 
conderoga, European Squadron, 1868-9 ; Swatara (fourth-rate), N. A. Squadron, 
1870-1 ; Benicia (second-rate), N. P. Station, 1872-5 ; Navy Yard, New York, 
1875-6. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER DENNIS W. MULLAN, 

Born in Maryland. Appointed from Kentucky, September 21,1860; Naval 
Academy, 1860-3. 

Promoted to Ensign, October 1, 1863 ; attached to steam-sloop Monongahela, 
West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1863-5 ; attacks with various batteries on 
Texas coast, 1863-4 ; battle of Mobile Bay, August 5, 1864 ; two attacks on 
Fort Morgan, August, 1864 ; present at surrender of Fort Morgan ; steamer 
Malvern, N. A. Station, 1865 ; steamer Mohongo, Pacific Squadron, 1865-7. 

Promoted to Master, November 10, 1865 ; steam-sloop DeSoto, North Atlantic 
Squadron, 1867-8. 

Commissioned ^^ Lieutenant, February 21, 1867. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, March 12, 1868 ; while attached to 
North Atlantic (De Soto), selected by Commodore Charles S. Boggs to command 
steamer Glasgow, then at Pensacola Navy Yard, to co-operate with him in sup- 
pressing an expedition against Mexico, and then fitting out in New Orleans ; Mon- 
ocacy, Asiatic Station, 1868-71 ; present at the two attacks with the batteries on 
the river in Korea, on June 1 and 10, 1871 ; receiving-ship Independence, 1872-3 ; 
Saco, Asiatic Station, 1873-6 ; navigation duty. Navy Yard, Norfolk, Virginia, 
1877-8. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDERS. 193 

LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER GEORGE T. DAVIS, 

Born in Massachusetts. Appointed from Massachusetts, September 20, 1860 ; 
Naval Academy, 1860-3. 

Promoted to Ensign, October 1, 1863; attached to iron-clad steamer New Iron- 
sides, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1863-4; North Atlantic Blockading 
Squadron, 186-1-5 ; both attacks on Fort Fisher, and final assault on the same ; 
steam-sloop Dacotah, Pacific Squadron, 1865-8. 

Promoted to Master, November 10, 1866. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, February 21, 1867; steam-sloop Plymouth, Euro- 
pean Squadron, 1868. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, December 18, 1868; Worcester, 
flag-ship N. A. Squadron, 1873-5 ; Navy Yard, Boston, 1876-7. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER GEORGE D. B, GLIDDEN, 

Born in Maine. Appointed from Maine, September 24, 1860 ; Naval Academy,. 
1860-3. 

Promoted to Ensign, October 1, 1863 ; attached to steam-sloop Seminole, West 
Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1863-4 ; battle of Mobile Bay, August 5, 1864 ;. 
steam-sloop Wyoming, East India Squadron, 1865-7. 

Promoted to Master, November 10, 1866. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, February 21, 1867; steamer Monocacy, Asiatic^ 
Squadron, 1867-8. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, December 18, 1868; steamer Ash- 
uelot, Asiatic Squadron, 1868-9; on duty at Naval Academy, 1869; Tennessee 
(second-rate), special service, 1870-1 ; Wachusett (third-rate), European Fleet,, 
1872-4 ; Omaha (second-rate), S. P. Station, 1875-7 ; Navy Yard, Boston, 
1877-8. 

LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER N. MAYO DYER, 

Entered the volunteer navy in 1861 as a Master s 3Iate, and served in that grade 
in Western Gulf Squadron, until he was, for gallant and meritorious conduct, pro- 
moted to Acting Ensign, May 18, 1863, and appointed to command the Eugenie,, 
afterwards called the Glasgow, blockading ofi" Mobile and despatch duty. 

January 12, 1864, promoted to Acting blaster in consideration of gallant and 
faithful service ; July, 1864, granted two months' leave ; but relinquished it upon 
arriving at New Orleans, en route North, upon learning of the near prospect of an. 
attack upon the Mobile forts. Returning ofi" Mobile and soliciting orders, was as- 
signed to the Metacomet, July 19, 1864, in which vessel, as the consort of the 
Hartford, took part in the passage of the forts and capture of the rebel fleet, re- 
ceiving the surrender of the Selma in person. Upon the surrender of Fort Morgan 
accepted his leave, before relinquished, and, upon his return therefrom, October 
28, 1864, was ordered to the Hartford, flag-ship of Admiral Farragut. Upon that 
vessel's return North, December, 1864, Mr. Dyer was appointed to the command, 
of the U. S. S. Rodolph, with which command he co-operated with the forces 
under General Granger, during the winter of 1864-5, in their operations against 
Mobile from Pascagoula, rendering important service in this connection in Missis- 
sippi Sound and Pascagoula River. In the advance upon the defences of Mobile 
in the spring of 1865, via Blakely, his vessel, the Rodolph, was sunk by a tor- 
pedo in Blakely River, April 1, 1865. 

13 



194 LIEUTENANT-COMMANDERS. 

April 22, 1865, Mr. Dyer was promoted to an Acting Volunteer Lieutenant^ 
and, upon the surrender ol" the rebel fleet under Commodore Farrand, in the Tom- 
bigbee River, May 10, 1865, Mr. Dyer was selected to command successively two 
of the surrendered vessels, the Black Diamond and Morgan ; appointed to com- 
mand the Elk in June, 1865, and in July ordered to command the Stockdale and 
proceed to Mississippi Sound for the protection of the people along that shore, and 
to " cultivate friendly relations with the people lately in rebellion ;" September, 
1865, Stockdale ordered to New Orleans to be sold, Mr. Dyer was transferred to 
the Mahaska at Apalachicola, Florida ; in October detached from the Mahaska 
and ordered to command the Glasgow at Pensacola ; April, 1866, detached and 
ordered North to report to the Bureau of Navigation ; on special duty in that 
Bureau until May, 1868. 

Commissioned a Lieutenant in the regular navy, March 12, 1868 ; July, 1868, 
ordered to the Dacotah, South Pacific Squadron, joining at Valparaiso, August 27. 

December J 8, 1868, commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander ; Dacotah being 
ordered to San Francisco, upon her arrival there, Mr. Dyer was ordered, Sep- 
tember, 1869, to command the Cyane and proceed to Sitka, Alaska, where he re- 
mained until March, 1870, from whence he was ordered to San Francisco to join 
the Pensacola; ordered to Ossipee, July, 1870, on a short cruise to Lower Cali- 
fornia and the Mexican coast. While the Ossipee was proceeding North from the 
Mexican coast she encountered a hurricane which left the sea in a troubled state, 
and in the morning whilst making sail a man fell overboard from maintopsail-yard, 
the halyards carrying away while hoisting topsails. Striking in main-chains he was 
knocked senseless, and was drifting astern. Dyer was taking an observation on 
the poop-deck, and, immediately turning a bowline in the end of boat fall, jumped 
into the sea and saved the man from sharks or drowning. For this he was pub- 
Ucly thanked by Commodore W. R. Taylor, Commander-in-Chief, and received a 
medal, etc. In September to the South Pacific Station ; detached and ordered 
home, August 22, 1871 ; November 7, 1871, ordered to Boston Navy Yard; Sep- 
tember 1, 1873, to Torpedo School at Newport; November 24, to command tor- 
pedo-boat Mayflower at Norfolk, for duty on the North Atlantic Station ; April 
10, 1874, transferred to command of the Pinta; February, 1876, detached from 
the Pinta and ordered as Executive of the New Hampshire, fitting out at Norfolk, 
for permanent flag-ship at Port Royal ; December, 1876, detached from New 
Hampshire, ordered home ; August 8, 1877, ordered to equipment duty, Boston 
Navy Yard, where he is now serving. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER FRANCIS M. GREEN, 

Born in Massachusetts. Appointed from Massachusetts, June 18, 1861 ; entered 
the service as Acting blaster, in the volunteer navy, June 18, 1861 ; attached to 
sloop Vincennes, West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1861-2 ; passes of the Mis- 
sissippi; steam-sloop Oneida and commanding steamer Commodore, West Gulf 
Blockading Squadron, 1863. 

Promoted to Acting Volunteer Lieutenant, April 21, 1864 ; steam-frigate 
Niagara, special service, 1864 ; commanding steamer Louisiana, North Atlantic 
Blockading Squadron, 1864 ; commanding steamer Boxer, 1865 ; capture of Fort 
Fisher ; steamer Florida, North Atlantic Squadron, 1866 ; special duty, Navy De- 
partment, 1867 ; steam-sloop Guemere, flag-ship South Atlantic Squadron, 1867-8. 

Commissioned ViS Lieutenant- Commander, U. S. Navy, December 18, 1868; 
steamers Wasp and Kansas, South Atlantic Squadron, 1869 ; receiving-ship Ohio, 
1869-70; Severn (second-rate), flag-ship North Atlantic Squadron, 1870-1; 



LIE UTENANT- COMMA NDERS. 195 

torpedo service, 1872 ; commanding Fortune (fourth-rate), North Atlantic Sta- 
tion, 1873— i; Hydrographic OiBce, 1875; commanding Gettysburg (fourth-rate), 
1875-G ; Hydrographic Office, 1876-8. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER EDWARD HOOKER, 

Born in Connecticut. Appointed from Rhode Island, July 19, 1861, as Acting 
Master, and ordered to North Atlantic Blockading Squadron on board tlie gunboat 
Louisiana, and was severely wounded, October 5, 1861 ; was in the Louisiana iu 
the Burnside Expedition, and fought her, iu the absence of her commanding officer, 
at Washington, North Carolina, September 5, 1862, he being then Executive- 
Officer ; for this was promoted to Acting Volunteer Lieutenant, for gallantry iu 
action, September 20, 1862; commanded Victoria, North Atlantic Blockading 
Squadron, 1863 ; captured brig Minna and steamer Nicholas I., off Wilmington, 
North Carolina ; detached, Juue, 1863, ordered to the Potomac Flotilla ; com- 
manded the steamer Currituck two and a half months, steamer Yankee six months, 
and steamer Commodore Read during the rest of the war ; had command of the boats 
acting on the Rappahannock, when General Grant advanced ; cleared the river of 
torpedoes and opened it to the transports. 

Promoted to Acting Vohmteer Lieutenant- Co^nmander, January, 1865 ; Naval 
Store-keeper, Navy Yard, New York, from October, 1865, to October, 1867 ; 
commanding store-ship Idaho, October, 1867, to July, 1869. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, U. S. Navy, December 18, 1868; 
Receiver and Inspector of Yards and Docks, Navy Yard, New York, 1870-2 ; 
commanding R. S. St. Louis at League Island, April, 1873, to October, 1875 ; 
special light-house duty, 1875-7 ; Naval Asylum, Philadelphia, 1877-8. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER HENRY H. GORRINGE, 

Born in West Indies. Appointed from New York, October 1, 1862 ; entered the 
service as a Master s 3Iate, October 1, 1862 ; Mississippi Squadron, 1862-5. 

Promoted to Acting Ensign, 1863. 

Promoted to Acting Master, 1864. 

Promoted to Acting Volunteer Lieutenant, 1865; took part in nearly all tlie 
important battles of the Mississippi Squadron, and was three times promoted for 
gallantry in battle. 

Promoted to Acting Volunteer Lieutenant- Commander, July 10, 1865; com- 
manding steamer Memphis, Atlantic Squadron, 1867. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Conunander, December 18, 1868; Navy Yard, 
New York, 1868 ; sloop Portsmouth, South Atlantic Squadron, 1869-71 ; Hy- 
drographic Office, 1872-6 ; commanding Gettysburg (fourth- rate), special service, 
Mediterranean, 1876-8. 

LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER CHARLES O'NEIL, 

Born in England in 1842. Entered the U. S. Navy as Master s Mate, in July, 
1861, on board the sloop Cumberland, and was attached to that vessel at the cap- 
ture of Forts Hatteras and Clarke, August, 1861, and in the engagement with 
Confederate iron-clad Merrimac, March 8, 1862 ; rescued Lieutenant Morris from 
drowning, and being favorably mentioned, was promoted to Acting Master, May 1, 
1862 ; attached to gunboat Tioga, during latter part of 1862-3 to July, 1864; 
cruised in Wilkes' Special West India Squadron, and East Gulf Blockading 



196 LIEUTENANT-COMMANDERS. 

Squadron ; steamer Rhode Island, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; 
both attacks on Fort Fisher, — favorably mentioned for the same. 

Promoted to Acting Volunteer Lieutenant, May 30, 1865 ; receiving-ship 
Princeton, at Philadelphia, part of 1865-6 ; steam-gunboat Shamrock, European 
Squadron, part of 1866-7, — visited west coast of Africa, islands in Atlantic, Spain, 
France, and Italy ; store-ship Guard, European Squadron, part of 1867-8. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, March 11, 1868. 

Promoted to Lieutenant- Commander, December 18, 1868 ; receiving-ship Ohio, 
Boston, 1869 ; Aid to Port-Admiral Hiram Paulding, at Boston, 1870 ; iron-clad 
Dictator, N. A. Squadron, 1870-1 ; R. S. Boston, 1872 ; Wasp (fourth-rate), S. 
A. Squadron, 1873-6; training-ship Minnesota, 1876-7; commanding Supply 
(fourth-rate), 1877. 

LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER CASPER F. GOODRICH, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Connecticut, December 9, 1861 ; Naval 
Academy, 1861-4 ; attached to steam-frigate Colorado, flag-ship European Squad- 
ron, 1865-7. 

Promoted to Master, December 1, 1866 ; steamer Frolic, European Squadron, 
1867-8. ^ 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, March 12, 1868 ; sloop Portsmouth, South Atlantic 
Squadron, 1868-71. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, December 18, 1868 ; Naval Academy, 
1871-3 ; Tennessee (second-rate), Asiatic Squadron, 1875-6 ; Kearsarge (third- 
rate), Asiatic Station, 1876-7. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER ALBERT G. CALDWELL, 

Born in Indiana. Appointed from Indiana, December 23, 1861 ; Naval Academy, 
1861-4; attached to steam-frigate Colorado, flag-ship European Squadron, 1865-7. 

Promoted to Master, December 1, 1866 ; steamer Shamrock, European Squadron, 
1867-8. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, March 12, 1868 ; steamer Nipsic, North Atlantic 
Squadron, 1868-9. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, December 18, 1868; Lancaster, flag- 
ship S. A. Fleet, 1870-2; Naval Academy, 1873-6; Vandalia (third-rate), 
European Station, 1876-8. 

LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER CHARLES W. KENNEDY, 

Born in New York. Appointed from Wisconsin, September 28, 1861 ; Naval 
Academy, 1861-4 ; steam-sloop Susquehanna, Brazil Squadron, 1865-6. 

Promoted to Master, December 1, 1866 ; steamer Nipsic, South Atlantic Squad- 
ron, 1866-7 ; steam-sloop Kearsarge, South Pacific Squadron, 1867-8. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, March 12, 1868 ; steam-frigate Powhatan, flag-ship 
South Pacific Squadron, 1868-9. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, December 18, 1868; attached to 
steam-sloop Pensacola, flag-ship Pacific Squadron, 1869-70 ; Coast Survey, 1872 
-3 ; Naval Academy, 1875-8. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDERS. 197 

LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER BOWMAN H. McCALLA, 

Born in New Jersey. Appointed from New Jersey, November 30, 1861 ; Naval 
Academy, 1861—4 ; attached to steam-sloop Susquehanna, Brazil Squadron, 1865-6 ; 
steam-sloop Brooklyn, flag-ship South Atlantic Squadron, 1866-7. 

Promoted to Master^ December 1, 1866 ; steam-sloop Kearsarge, South Pacific 
Squadron, 1867-8. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, March 12, 1868 ; steam-sloop Tuscarora, South 
Pacific Squadron, 1868-71. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, December 18, 1868; Wabash, flag- 
ship European Fleet, 1872 ; Wachusett (third-rate), European Fleet, 1873 ; 
Naval Academy, 1875-8. 

LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER SAMUEL H. BAKER, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Arkansas, September 24, 1861 ; Naval 
Academy, 1861-4 ; attached to steam-sloop Brooklyn, flag-ship South Atlantic 
Squadron, 1865-7. 

Promoted to i/as^er, December 1, 1866; steamer Shamokin, South Atlantic 
Squadron, 1867-8. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, March 12, 1868 ; receiving-ship, Philadelphia, 
1868-9. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, December 18, 1868; Benicia 
(second-rate), Asiatic Fleet, 1870-3 ; Naval Academy, 1873-7. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER THEO. F. JEWELL, 

Appointed Acting Midshipman, and entered Naval Academy from the Seventh 
District of Virginia, November 29, 1861 ; graduated November 22, 1864 ; at- 
tached to receiving-ship Vermont, at New York, from February to April, 1865 ; 
served as Midshipman in frigate Colorado, flag-ship of Rear-Admiral Groldsborough, 
European Squadron, from April, 1865, to December, 1866. 

Promoted to Ensign, November 1, 1866 ; to Master, December 1, 1866 ; and 
to Lieutenant, March 12, 1868 ; attached to sloop Canandaigua and steamer 
Frolic, from December, 1866, to May, 1868; on duty at Hydrographic Office from 
October, 1868, to May, 1869. 

Promoted to Lieutenant- Commander, March 26, 1869; attached to frigate 
Sabine, on a cruise with a class of Midshipmen, from May, 1869, to August, 
1870 ; on duty at Naval Observatory, from September, 1870, to March, 1871 ; 
attached to Naval Academy as Assistant in Department of Physics and Chemistry, 
from March, 1871, to May, 1872 ; attached to Tuscarora, from May, 1872, to 
October, 1874, serving as Executive-Officer of that vessel during her deep-sea 
sounding expedition in the North Pacific Ocean ; attached to Naval Academy as 
Instructor in Physics and Chemistry, from December, 1874, to date (February, 
1878). 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER FRENCH E. CHADWICK, 

Born in Virginia. Appointed from Virginia, September 28, 1861 ; Naval 
Academy, 1861-4; attached to steam-sloop Susquehanna, Brazil Squadron, 
1865-6 ; steam-sloop Juniata, South Atlantic Squadron, 1866-7. 



198 LIEUTENANT-COMMANDERS. 

Promoted to Master, December 1, 1866 ; apprentice-ship Sabine, 1868. 

Commissioned as Lienfenant, March 12, 1868; steam-sloop Tuscarora, South 
Pacific Squadron, 1868-70. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, December 18, 1868; Guerriere 
(second-rate), P]uropean Fleet, 1870-2; Naval Academy, 1873-4; Powhatan 
(second-rate), N. A. Station, 1875-7. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER CHARLES F. SCHMITZ, 

Born in Indiana. Appointed from Indiana, October 19, 1861 ; Naval Academy, 
1861-4 ; attached to steam-frigate Colorado, flag-ship European Squadron, 1865-7. 

Promoted to Master, December 1, 1866 ; steam-sloop Piscataqua, flag-ship Asiatic 
Squadron, 1867-70. 

Commissioned as TJeutenant, March 12, 1868. 

Commissioned as Lieuteiiaid- Commander, December 18, 1868 ; Naval Academy, 
1870-1; Powhatan (second-rate), special service, N. A. Station, 1873; Colo- 
rado (first-rate), N. A. Station, 1874 ; Torpedo Station, 1875 ; R. S. St. Louis, 
1876-7. 

LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER DAVID C. WOODROW, 

Born in Ohio. Appointed from Ohio, September 21, 1861; Naval Academy, 
1861-5 ; attached to steam-sloop Hartford, flag-ship Asiatic Squadron, 1865-7. 

Promoted to Master, December 1, 1866 ; steamer Ashuelot, Asiatic Squadron, 
1867-70. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, March 12, 1868. 

QommisBiowedi OS, Lieutenant- Commander, December 18, 1868; Hydrographic 
i, 1871 ; Ossipee (second-rate), N. A. Station, 1872-3 ; Kansas (third-rate), 
N. A. Station, 1874 ; Canandaigua (second-rate), N. A. Station, 1875 ; S. S. 
New Hampshire, 1876-8. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER HENRY C. WHITE, 

Born in Connecticut. Appointed from New York, October 16, 1861 ; Naval 
Academy, 1861-5 ; attached to steam-sloop Susquehanna, Brazil Squadron, 1865-6. 

Promoted to Master, December 1, 1866; steam-sloop Brooklyn, flag-ship South 
Atlantic Squadron, 1866-7 ; store-ship Gruard, European Squadron, 1868-9. 

Commissioned SiS Lieutenant, March 12, 1868. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, December 18, 1868 ; flag-ship Frank- 
lin, European Squadron, 1870-1 ; Naval Academy, 1872-4 ; Swatara (third-rate), 
N. A. Station, 1875-6. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER JOHN C. KENNETT, 

Born in Missouri. Appointed from Missouri, October 2, 1861 ; Naval iVcademy, 
1861-5 ; attached to steam-sloop Susquehanna, Brazil Squadron, 1865-6 ; steamer 
Rhode Island, flag-ship North Atlantic Squadron, 1866-7. 

Promoted to Master, December 1, 1866 ; steam-sloop Susquehanna, North 
Atlantic, 1868. 

Commissioned as IJeutenant, March 12, 1868 ; steam-sloop Kearsarge, South 
Pacific Squadron, 1868-9. 



LIE VTENANT- COMMANDERS. 199 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, December 18, 1868 ; Naval Academy, 
1871-3 ; Brooklyn (second-rate), N. A. Fleet, 1874 ; commanding Coast Survey 
steamer Bache, 1875-7. 

LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER WILLIAM M. FOLGER, 

Born in Ohio. Appointed from Ohio, September 21, 1861 ; at Naval Academy 
until November 22, 1864 ; receiving-ship North Carolina, at New York, and 
school-ship Sabine, New London, from February 6, 1865, to July 25, 1865; 
steam-sloop Hartford, flag-ship Asiatic Squadron, July 25, 1865, to AugTist 6, 1868. 

Promoted to Master, December 1, 1866. 

Promoted to Lieutenant, March 12, 1868. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, December 18, 1868 ; at Norfolk Navy 
Yard, October, 1868, until ordered to the Franklin; in steam-frigate Franklin, 
flag-ship European Squadron, 1868-71 j European Fleet, 1872 ; ordnance duty, 
1873-4; leave Europe, 1875-6 ; Marion (thu-d-rate), European Station, 1877. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER H. E. ELMER, 

Born in New Jersey. Appointed an Acting Midshipman from New Jersey, Sep- 
tember 21, 1861 ; graduated, 1864 ; steam-sloop Hartford, flag-ship East India 
Squadron, 1865-8. 

Promoted to Master, 1866. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, 1868. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, April 27, 1869; Terror (iron-clad), 
North Atlantic Station, 1870-1 ; R. S. Vandalia, 1872; Colorado, North Atlantic 
Station, 1873; Congress, European Station, 1874-6; torpedo duty, 1877. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER BENJAMIN P. LAMBERTON, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania, September 21, 1861 ; 
Naval Academy, 1861-5 ; attached to steam-sloop Susquehanna, Brazil Squadron, 
1865-6 ; steam-sloop Juniata, South Atlantic Squadron, 1866-7. 

Promoted to Master, December 1, 1866 ; apprentice-ship Saratoga, 1867-9. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, March 12, 1867. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, December 18, 1868 ; Mohican (third- 
rate). Pacific Fleet, 1870-2; Dictator (iron-clad). North Atlantic Fleet, 1873-4 ; 
torpedo service, 1875; Navy Yard, Boston, 1876; Navy Yard, Portsmouth, New 
Hampshire, 1876-7. 

LIEUTENANT-COMMAND*ER JOHN SCHOULER, 

Born in Massachusetts. Appointed from Massachusetts, September 25, 1861 ; 
attached to steam-frigate Colorado, flag-ship European Squadron, 1865-7. 

Promoted to Master, December 1, 1866 ; steamer Frolic, European Squadron, 
1867-8. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, March 12, 1868; sloop Portsmouth, South 
Atlantic Squadron, 1868-71. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, DQcemh^v 18, 1869; Terror (fourth- 
rate), iron-clad, North Atlantic Fleet, 1871-2 ; Naval Academy, 1873-6 ; Essex 
(third-rate), South Atlantic Station, 1877-8. 



200 LIE UTENANT- COMMA NDERS. 

LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER FRANCIS W. DICKENS, 

Born in New York. Entered U. S. Naval Academy September 20, 1861 ; 
graduated in three years, November 22, 1864 ; on leave until February, 1865, 
then on duty on board the receiving-ship North Carolina until April, 1865, when 
he reported for duty on board the Colorado, flag-ship of the European Fleet. 

Promoted to Ensign, November 1, 1866. 

Promoted to Master, December 1, 1866; transferred to the Augusta, March, 
1867, and convoyed the Miantonomah about the Mediterranean, and home, via 
Canaries, Cape de Verdes, and West Indies; detached from Augusta at New 
York, July, 1867 ; on leave until October, 1867, and then ordered to the appren- 
tice-ship Sabine ; detached from Sabine, April, 1868, and ordered to the Tuscarora, 
fitting out for South Pacific at Mare Island, California. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, March 12, 1868 ; in June sailed in Tuscarora for 
South Pacific Station ; on duty there until May, 1869, and then Tuscarora joined 
West India Station. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, June 12, 1869 ; remained in West 
Indies until January, 1871, and then sailed for Portsmouth, New Hampshire, and 
went out of commission ; on leave until June, 1871, and then ordered to duty at 
the U. S. Torpedo Station, Newport, Rhode Island ; detached from Torpedo 
Station, January, 1872, and ordered to receiving- ship Vermont, at New York ; 
detached from Vermont, March, 1872, and ordered to Lancaster, flag-ship of 
South Atlantic Station, but could not go on account of ill health ; ou leave 
until October, 1872, and then joined the Kansas as Executive-Officer, and sailed 
on the Nicaragua Interoceanic Canal Surveying Expedition ; detached from 
Kansas, May, 1873 ; on leave until August, 1873, and then ordered to Asiatic 
Station, and joined Monocacy as Executive ; January, 1875, was transferred to 
the Kearsarge as Executive ; was transferred to Yantic for three months, and 
then ordered back to Kearsarge ; in April, 1876, was ordered to command the 
Yantic, vice Commander McCook invalided home ; was relieved by Commander 
Whitehead in August, 1876, and arrived home December, 1876 ; on leave until 
January, 1878, and then ordered to duty at the U. S. Naval Academy, as Instructor 
in Mathematics, which is his present duty. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER GEORGE F. F. WILDE, 

Born in Massachusetts. Appointed from Massachusetts, November 30, 1861 ; 
Naval Academy, 1861-5 ; attached to steam-sloop Susquehanna, Brazil Squadron, 
1865-6 ; steamer Nipsic, South Atlantic Squadron, 1866-7. 

Promoted to Master, December 1, 1866; steam-sloop Kearsarge, South Pacific 
Squadron, 1867-8. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, March 12, 1868 ; steam-sloop Contocook, flag-ship 
North Atlantic Squadron, 1868-9. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, December 18, 1868; Tennessee 
(second-rate), special service, 1871 ; Wabash, flag-ship European Fleet, 1872 ; 
commanding Canonicus (iron-clad), N. A. Fleet, 1873-4 ; Torpedo Station, 1875 ; 
Navy Yard, Boston, 1875-7. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDERS. 201 

LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER CHARLES H. DAVIS, 

Born in Massacliusetts. Appointed from Massachusetts, November 29, 1861 ; 
Naval Academy, 1861-5; attached to steam-frigate Colorado, flag-ship European 
Squadron, 1865-7. 

Promoted to Master, December 1, 1866 ; South Atlantic Squadron, 1867-8. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, March 12, 1868 ; steam-sloop Guerriere, flag-ship 
South Atlantic Squadron, 1868-9. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, December 18, 1868; receiving-ship, 
Norfolk, Virginia, 1871-2 ; Pensacola (second-rate), flag-ship South Pacific Sta- 
tion, 1873-5 ; Torpedo Station, 1875 ; Observatory, 1876-8. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER CHARLES J. TRAIN, 

Born in Massachusetts. Appointed from Massachusetts, November 27, 1861; 
Naval Academy, 1861-4 ; steam-frigate Colorado, flag-ship Mediterranean Squadron, 
1866-7. 

Promoted to Master, December 1, 1866 ; steam-sloop Frolic, European Squad- 
ron, 1868. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, March 12, 1868 ; steam-frigate Sabine, special 
cruise, 1869-70. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, June 30, 1869; Naval Academy, 
1871-2 ; special duty, 1873 ; special duty (transit of Venus), 1874-5 ; Tusca- 
rora (third-rate), N. P. Station, 1875-6 ; Navy Yard, Mare Island, 1877 ; Lack- 
awanna (second-rate), N. P. Station, 1877-8. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER EDWIN WHITE, 

Born in Ohio. Appointed from Ohio, November 29, 1861 ; Naval Academy, 
1861—4 ; steam-frigate Colorado, flag-ship Mediterranean Squadron, 1866-7. 

Promoted to Master, December 1, 1866 ; steam-sloop Shamrock, European 
Squadron, 1868. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, March 12, 1868 ; steam-sloop Yantic, North 
Atlantic Squadron, 1869. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, September 15, 1869 ; Hydrographic 
Office, 1870 ; Franklin, flag-ship European Station, 1870-1 ; Kansas (fourth-rate), 
N. A. Fleet, 1872-3 ; Naval Academy, 1873 ; commanding S. S. Onward, 1874 ; 
Tennessee, flag-ship Asiatic Station, 1875-8. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER OSCAR F. HEYERMAN, 

Born in Prussia. Appointed from Michigan, November 29, 1861 ; Naval 
School, 1861-4; steam-frigate Colorado, flag-ship Mediterranean Squadron, 
1866-7. 

Promoted to Master, December 1, 1866 ; steam-sloop Canandaigua, European 
Squadron, 1868-9. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, March 12, 1868. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, October 13, 1869; steam-frigate 
Colorado, flag-ship Asiatic Fleet, 1870-3 ; ordnance duty, New York, 1873-4 ; 



202 LIEUTENANT-COMMANDERS. 

Alert (third-rate), cruising with Naval Cadets, 1875 ; Marion (second-rate), 
1876 ; Swatara (thii-d-rate), N. A. Station, 1877-8. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER GEORGE W. PIGMAN, 

Born in Indiana. Appointed from Indiana, September 28, 1861 ; JN'aval School, 
1861-4; steam-sloop Brooklyn, flag-ship Brazil Squadron, 1866-7. 

Promoted to Master, December 1, 1866 ; steam-sloop Kansas, South Atlantic 
Squadron, 1868. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, March 12, 1868. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, October 28, 1869; iron-clad Saugus, 
North Atlantic Fleet, 1870 ; Naval Academy, 1871-3 ; Hartford, flag-ship, Asiatic 
Station, 1873-5 ; Naval Observatory, 1876-8. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER EDWARD S. KEYSER, 

Born in Rhode Island. Appointed from New York ; entered the service as an 
acting volunteer officer ; was in active service during the Rebellion. Appointed 
to the regular navy, with the rank of Master, 1867 ; receiving-ship, Philadelphia, 
1867-8. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, December, 1868 ; steam-sloop Seminole, North 
Atlantic Squadron, 1869-70. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, 1870 ; Ticonderoga (second-rate), S. 
A. Fleet, 1870-2 ; special duty, 1873 ; Roanoke (iron-clad), N. A. Fleet, 1874 ; 
commanding S. S. Onward, 1875-8. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER THOMAS NELSON, 

Born at sea. Appointed from Pennsylvania, January 1, 1862 ; entered the ser- 
vice as Acting Master'' s Mate ; attached to the steamer Currituck, Potomac Flo- 
tilla, 1862-4, co-operating with the Army of the Potomac. 

Promoted to Acting Ensign, November, 1862 ; temporarily detached from the 
Currituck, and ordered to duty as Signal-Officer of the steamer Wachusett, on a 
passage from Philadelphia to Port Royal, South Carolina, having the iron-clad San- 
gamon in tow, January, 1864 ; on arrival at Port Royal, returned to duty on board 
the Currituck ; steamer Commodore Read, February, 1864, to June, 1864 ; com- 
manded the steamer Dragon, Potomac Flotilla, fi-om June 1, 1864, to October 8, 
1864 ; commanded the steamer Mercury, blockade duty at the Great Yeocomisto 
River and adjoining creeks of Virginia, from October 8, 1864, to January 27, 
1865 ; kept in check and eventually driving ofi" the home guards and Chesapeake 
Bay pirates. 

Promoted to Acting Master, March. 27, 1865 ; commanding the steamer Coeur 
de Lion until the close of the war; Navy Department, 1865-6; steamer Don, as 
Navigator, January, 1866, to August 7, 1866 ; steamer Pensacola, Pacific Squad- 
ron, August 7, 1866, to October, 1867 ; steamer Penobscot, West India Squadron, 
as Navigator, December 9, 1867, to July 9, 1869. 

Promoted to Master, March 12, 1868. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, December 18, 1868 ; S. S. New Hampshire, as 
Executive-Officer, from September, 1869, to June, 1870. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDERS. 203 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, January 25, 1870 ; Saco (fourth- 
rate), N. A. Fleet, 1870-3; leave Kurope, 1874; Franklin, flag-ship European 
Squadron, 1875-6 ; Hydrographic Office, 1877-8. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDEE, De WITT C. KELLS, 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, December 24, 1861 ; entered 
the service as an acting volunteer officer ; was actively engaged during the Eebel- 
lion. Appointed to the regular service, with the rank of Master, 1867. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, December 18, 1868 ; special duty, New Orleans, 
1869; iron-clad Dictator, North Atlantic Fleet, 1870. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, 1870 ; commanding Pawnee (fourth- 
rate). Key West, 1871-2 ; special duty, New Orleans, 1873-4; Canonicus (iron- 
clad), Pensacola, Florida, 1874-7. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER FELIX McCURLEY, 

Born in Baltimore, Maryland. Appointed as Acting blaster, November 13, 1861 ; 
ordered to U. S. S. Winona; attached to Winona, West Gulf Squadron, 1861-2 ; 
engaged in the attack on Forts Jackson and St. Philip, April 24, 1862 ; in the 
attack and passage of Vicksburg batteries, June 28, 1862 ; in the engagement 
with iron-clad Arkansas, above Vicksburg ; attack on and passage of Vicksburg 
batteries, July 15, 1862, besides in various skirmishes on the Mississippi River ; 
1863-4, attached to U. S. steam-sloop Lackawanna, engaged in the attack and 
passage of Forts Morgan and Gaines, and subsequent engagement in Mobile Bay 
with the iron-clad Tennessee, and other vessels of the Confederate Fleet. 

Promoted to Acting Volunteer Lieutenant, November 9, 1864 ; attached to 
U. S. S. Chocura, West Gulf Squadron, 1865-7 ; July 5, 1867, to July, 1870, 
attached to U. S. S. Quinnebaug, South Atlantic Squadron. 

Commissioned as Master, March 12, 1868. 

Commissioned as Lieidenant, December 18, 1868. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, March 2, 1870 ; July, 1870, to Feb- 
ruary, 1871, on duty at Hydrographic Office, Washington ; February to August, 
1871, U. S. S. Worcester, European Station; August, 1871, to August, 1873, 
on duty at Hydrographic Office, Washington ; August, 1873, to July, 1876, at- 
tached to U. S. S. Alaska, European Squadron ; April, 1877, to October, 1877, ' 
attached to U. S. S. frigate Franklin ; at present waiting orders. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER JOHN McGOWAN, Jr., 

Born in Delaware. Appointed from New Jersey; entered the service as an 
acting volunteer officer ; was engaged during the Rebellion. Appointed to the 
regular navy with rank of Master, 1867 ; receiving-ship, Philadelphia, 1868. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, December 18, 1868 ; steam-sloop Unadilla, Asiatic 
Fleet, 1869 ; steam-sloop Iroquois, Asiatic Fleet, 1870. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, 1870; Terror (iron-clad), N. A. 
Fleet, 1871 ; Navy Yard, Philadelphia, 1872 ; Wachusett (third-rate), European 
Station, 1873; Juniata (third-rate), European Station, 1874-5; service, Europe, 
1876 ; Hydrographic Office, 1876-8. 



204 LIEUTENANT-COMMANDERS. 

LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER H. C. NIELDS, 

Entered the volunteer navy as Acting Master's Mate, October 31, 1863 ; was 
promoted to Acting Master, November 4, 1864, and at end of war was transferred 
to the regular service. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, July 1, 1870 ; Tennessee (second- 
rate), special service, 1871 ; Iroquois (third-rate), Asiatic Station, 1871-3 ; R. S. 
Potomac, 1875-6; training-ship Constitution, 1877. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER T. T. WADE, 

Entered the volunteer service May 8, 1861, as an Acting Master; served during 
the Rebellion, and at its close was transferred to the regular navy. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, 3 w\.y 1, 1870; R. S. ship Boston, 
1870-4; in charge Nitre Depot, 1876-7. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER JAMES G. GREEN, 

Entered the volunteer service as an Acting Ensign, and at close of the Rebellion 
was transferred to the regular navy. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, July 3, 1870 ; Asiatic Fleet, 1870-1 ; 
Saco (third-rate), Asiatic Station, 1872-6. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER GEORGE E. WINGATE, 

Entered the service as Acting Ensign in 1863 ; served on Blockading Squadron 
during the Rebellion ; transferred to the regular navy at end of war. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, July 13, 1870; torpedo service, 
1872 ; R. S. New Hampshire, 1874 ; commanding Ajax (iron-clad), N. A. 
Station, 1875-6 ; Adams (second-rate), S. A. Station, 1877-8. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER SAMUEL L. WILSON, 

Born in Ohio. Appointed from Ohio, September 20, 1861 ; Naval School, 
1861-4 ; steam-sloop Brooklyn, flag-ship Brazil Squadron, 1866-7. 

Promoted to Master, December 1, 1866 ; steam-sloop Monocacy, Asiatic 
Squadron, 1868-9. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, March 12, 1868. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, December 31, 1869; Naval rendez- 
vous, San Francisco, California, 1870 ; St. Mary's (fourth-rate), Pacific Fleet, 
1871-2 ; Saranac (second-rate). Pacific Fleet, 1873 ; furloughed since 1874. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER JOSHUA BISHOP, 

Born in Missouri. Appointed as Acting Midshipman from Missouri, September 
20, 1854 ; Naval Academy, 1854-8. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, 1861 ; special duty, Cincinnati, 1861 ; Missis- 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDERS. 205 

sippi Squadron, 1862-3 ; steam-sloop Tuscarora, N. A. Blockading Squadron, 
1864-5. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, March 3,1865; steam-sloop Wyo- 
ming, Asiatic Squadron, 1865-8 (out of service three years) ; Pacific Fleet, 1871-4 ; 
Torpedo Station, 1875-6 ; Plymouth (second-rate), N. A. Station, 1875-6 ; under 
suspension, 1877-8. 

LIEUTENANT-COMMANDEK GEORGE R. DURAND, 

Born in Connecticut. Appointed from Rhode Island, and rated Master's Mate, 
October 26, 1861 ; steamer Mystic, N. A. B. Squadron, part of 1861-2. 

Appointed Acting Master, April 14, 1862 ; Executive, steamer Mohawk, S. A. 
B. Squadron, part of 1862-3, and commanding same vessel latter half of 1863 ; 
Executive, sloop John Adams and steamer Paul Jones, part of 1864, same 
squadron ; in July, 1864, while on an expedition up the Ogeechee River, Georgia, 
with two men and a guide, to endeavor to burn the steamer Water Witch, lately 
captured from us by the enemy, was captured by a company of Confederates, 
thirty-four men ; was confined in Savannah and Macon, Georgia, Charleston, 
South Carolina, and Libby prison, Richmond, Virginia ; Navigator, then Executive, 
steamer Muscoota, Gulf Squadron, 1865-6. 

Promoted to Acting Vohmteer Lieutenant, June 27, 1866 ; Executive, steamer 
Penobscot, New York, latter part of 1866 ; Navigator, then Executive, steamer 
Osceola, West Indies, 1867 ; Executive, steamer Maumee, 1867-8. 

Commissioned as Master in regular navy from March 12, 1868 ; receiving-ship 
New Hampshire, Norfolk, 1868 ; Navigator, steamer Ashuelot, Asiatic Squadron, 
1869. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, from December 18, 1868 ; receiving-ships Ver- 
mont, at New York, and Vandalia, at Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 1870 ; com- 
manding steamer Speedwell, at Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 1871 ; Executive, 
steamer Nipsic, Gulf and West Indies, 1871-2 ; receiving-ships Vermont, at New 
York, and Ohio, at Boston, 1873 ; again commanding steamer Speedwell, at 
Portsmouth, New Hampshire, part of 1873-4 ; receiving-ship Ohio, 1874 ; com- 
manding iron-clad steamer Mahopac, N. A. Station, 1874-6 ; iron-clad steamer 
Canonicus, New Orleans, part of 1874 ; receiving-ship Wabash, Boston, 1877. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, from November 25, 1877 ; at present 
commanding iron-clad steamer Lehigh, N. A. Station. 



RETIRED LIEUTENANT-COMMANDERS. 



Retired in Conformity with the Twenty-third Section of the Act of August 3, 1861. 

LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER ANTOINE R. McNAIR, 

Born in Louisiana. Appointed from Missouri, September 22, 1856 ; Naval 
Academy, 1856-60; sloop-of-war Preble, 1857; sloop-of-war Plymouth, 1859; 
Midshipman, June, 1860 ; sloop-of-war Seminole, 1860-2 ; off Charleston, South 
Carolina, from August to September, 1861 ; in Potomac River, September and 
October, 1861 ; engaged with batteries at Freestone Point, Virginia, September, 
1861, and with batteries at Evansport, Virginia, October, 1861. 

Promoted to Master, August, 1861 ; battle of Port Royal, South Carolina, 
November 7, 1861 (slight splinter wound in hand) ; boat operations in the sounds 



206 LIEUTENANT-COMMANDERS. 

of Soutli Carolina and Georgia, November and December, 1861 ; boat and other 
operations incident to tbe cutting off of Fort Pulaski, Georgia, January, Febru- 
ary, and March, 1862 ; expedition to Fernandina, Florida, March, 1862 ; Skidd- 
away battery, Georgia, March, 1862 ; in Hampton Roads, Virginia, in front of 
the ram Merrimac and consorts, April and until May 10, 1862; engaged with 
battery at Sewell's Point, and capture of Norfolk, May, 1862. 

Promoted to Z/;'ei(toia)i^, July, 1862 ; sloop-of-war Powhatan, off Charleston, 
South Carolina, 1862-3 ; engaged in attack on Fort Sumter and defences of Charles- 
ton, South Carolina, April, 1863 ; engaged in the capture of batteries on Morris Island, 
South Carolina, July, 1863 (slight wound in head) ; engaged in the attack of Sep- 
tember 8, 1863, on the defences of Charleston, South Carolina; Powhatan, West 
India Squadron, from October, 1863, to June, 1864 ; in command of S. S. Gemsbok, 
West Indies, from June to August, 1864 ; Powhatan, August to October, 1864; 
frigate New Ironsides, 1864-5 ; engaged in attack on Fort Fisher, North Caro- 
lina, December 24 and 25, 1864 ; also in the capture of Fort Fisher and defences 
of Cape Fear Eiver, North Carolina, January 13-15, 1865 ; in front of rebel rams, 
James River, Virginia, February and March, 1865; steamer Chicopee, Atlantic 
Squadron, 1865-6. 

Promoted to Lieutenant- Commander., July, 1 866 ; Instructor at Naval Academy, 
1866-7; frigate Minnesota, special service, 1867-8; flag-ship Contocook, West 
India Squadron, 1868; frigate Franklin, F. S. European Squadron, 1869; sick 
leave, 1870 ; Equipment Officer and Inspector of Supplies, Norfolk Navy Yard, 
Virginia, 1871 ; sick leave, 1872 ; retired October 26, 1872, for incapacity from an 
injury received " in the line of duty" while serving on board the U. S. S. Contocook, 
in the West Indies, 1868. 

LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER CHARLES E. McKAY, 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, September 29, 1857; Naval 
Academy, 1857-61. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman., 1861. 

Promoted to blaster., 1861 ; steam-sloop Pensacola, West Gulf Blockading 
Squadron, 1861-4 ; passage of Potomac batteries ; capture of New Orleans, and 
various engagements on the Mississippi River. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER FRANCIS 0. DAVENPORT, 

Born in Michigan, October 3, 1842. Appointed from Michigan, September 26, 
1856 ; Naval Academy, 1856-60 ; attached to brig Perry, 1861 ; capture of 
privateer Savannah, 1861 ; steam-gunboat Scioto, West Gulf Blockading Squad- 
ron, 1862-3 ; bombardment and passage of Forts Jackson and St. Philip, 1862 ; 
engagement with guerillas, Galveston, Texas, July 9, 1863. While temporarily 
in charge of the Scioto, Lieutenant Davenport went on shore on the coast of Texas 
with two boats and twelve men, crossed the island (three and a half miles in 
width), and captured one schooner with one hundred bales of cotton, and one sloop 
with thirty bales. Not being able to bring them out, on account of the low water, 
he burned them. In preparing to leave he was wounded by the accidental dis- 
charge of a rifle, the ball entering the right knee and passing out at the side of 
the knee, fracturing his left arm, and rendering amputation above the elbow 
necessary. Naval Academy, 1864 ; frigate Sabine, 1865-6 ; steamer Michigan, 
on the lakes, 1866-7. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, Master, and Lieutenant, 1861. 



LIE UTENANT- COMMA NDERS. 207 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, 3v\j 25, 1866; steam-sloop Tusca- 
rora, South Pacific Squadron, 1868 ; store-sbip Onward, South Pacific Squadron, 
1869. 

LIEUTENANT- COMMANDER CHARLES F. BLAKE, 

Born in Massachusetts. Appointed from Massachusetts, October 26, 1859 ; 
Naval Academy, 1859-61 ; attached to steam-sloop Mississippi, Atlantic coast, 
1861 ; sloop Constellation, Mediterranean Squadron, 1862-3. 

Promoted to Ensign, June 26, 1863; West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1864 ; 
battle of Mobile Bay, August 5, 1864. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, February 22, 1864 ; steam-sloop Powhatan, Pacific 
Squadron, 1865-8. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, July 25, 1866; Naval Academy, 
1868-70. 

LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER FREDERICK J. NAILE, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania, October 27, 1859 ; Naval 
Academy, 1859-61 ; attached to frigate St. Lawrence, Atlantic coast, 1861 ; sink- 
ing of privateer Petrel, 1861 ; steam-sloop Oneida, Western Gulf Blockading 
Squadron, 1862 ; attack on and passage of Forts Jackson and St. Philip and 
Chalmette batteries ; capture of New Orleans ; bombardment and passage of Vicks- 
burg batteries twice. 

Promoted to Ensign, 1862; Mississippi Squadron, 1863-5; Red River Ex- 
pedition, 1864; co-operation of the Mississippi Squadron, on the Cumberland and 
Tennessee, with the army under General Thomas in the defeat of the rebel General 
Hood. 

Commissioned as Liexitenant, February 22, 1864; steamer Lenapee, Atlantic 
Squadron, 1866-7. 

Commissioned as Lientenaiit- Commander, July 25, 1866; steamer Penobscot, 
North Atlantic Squadron, 1868-9. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER GOUVERNEUR K. HASWELL, 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, November 25, 1859 ; Naval 
Academy, 1859-61 ; attached to steam-frigate Roanoke, North Atlantic Block- 
ading Squadron, 1861-2 ; engagement with rebel ram Merrimac and Sewell's 
Point batteries, March, 1862 ; steam-sloop Adirondack, West India Squadron, 
1862. 

Promoted to Ensign, October 7, 1862 ; steam-frigate Colorado, West Gulf 
Blockading Squadron, 1863-4. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, February 22, 1864 ; West Gulf Blockading 
Squadron, 1864 ; steamer Vanderbilt, special cruise, 1866-7. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, July 25, 1866 ; steam-sloop Saranac, 
Pacific Squadron, 1868 ; receiving-ship, Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 1869-71 ; 
Navy Yard, Norfolk, Virginia, 1872. 



208 LIEUTENANT-COMMANDERS. 

LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER EDWARD M. STEDMAN, 

Born in Massachusetts. Appointed from Massachusetts, September 27, 1861 ; 
Naval Academy, 1861-5 ; steam-sloop Susquehanna, Brazil Squadron, 1865-6 ; 
steam-sloop Juniata, South Atlantic Squadron, 1866-7. 

Promoted to Master^ December 1, 1866; apprentice-ship Saratoga, 1868. 

Commissioned 2i& Lieutenant, March 12, 1868 ; receiving-ship, Norfolk, 1868-9. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, December 18, 1868 ; Naval Academy, 
1871-2; sick leave, 1873-4; retired, February, 1875. 



Retired in Conformity with Act of August 3, 1861. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER JOHN WEIDMAN, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania, September 27, 1857 ; 
Naval Academy, 1857-60 ; attached to steamer Flag, 1861. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, July 16, 1862; South Atlantic Blockading 
Squadron, 1862; steam-sloop Tuscarora, special service, 1863; steam-gunboat 
Osceola, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; bombardment of Fort 
Fisher, December, 1864, and capture of Fort Fisher, January, 1865 ; bombard- 
ment of two forts on Cape Fear River, January, 1865 ; steam-sloop Susquehanna, 
Brazil Squadron, 1865-6. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, July 25, 1866 ; steam-sloop Ossipee, 
North Pacific Squadron, 1867 ; steam-sloop Kearsarge, South Pacific Squadron, 
1868; steamer Nyack, South Pacific Squadron, 1869-70; Hydrographic Office, 
1871-2; Shawmut (third-rate), N. A. Station, 1873-4. 



Retired in Conformity with the Twenty-third Section of the Act of August 3, 1861. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER HENRY C. TALLMAN, 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, September 24, 1857 ; Naval 
Academy, 1857-61 ; attached to steam-sloop Wachusett, James River Flotilla, 

1862, and later in the same year attached to West India Squadron. 
Commissioned as Lieutenant, August 1, 1862; South Atlantic Blockading 

Squadron, 1863-4; engagements with the forts in Charleston harbor, November, 

1863, on the occasion of the grounding of the iron-clad Lehigh ; engagement with 
Fort Moultrie, May 16, 1864 ; North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; 
both attacks on Fort Fisher; steam-sloop Brooklyn, flag-ship Brazil Squadron, 
1866-7. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, July 25, 1866; apprentice-ship 
Sabine, 1868; steamer Yantic, North Atlantic Squadron, 1868-9. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER GEORGE F. MORRISON, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Ohio, November 5, 1849 ; Naval 
School, 1849-50 ; attached to sloop Plymouth, East India Squadron, 1851-5. 

Promoted to Master, September 16, 1855 ; retired, 1856 ; unemployed, 1856-78. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, 1867. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDERS. 209 

Retired in Conformity with the Fourth Section of the Act of April 21, 1864. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER C. E. HAWLEY, 

Born in Connecticut. Appointed from Connecticut, December 3, 1849 ; Naval 
School, 1849-50 ; steam-frigate Susquehanna, East India Squadron, 1851-5. 

Promoted to Master, September 15, 1855 ; Coast Survey, 1856-8. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant. June 26, 1856 ; receiving-ship, Philadelphia, 
1861 ; ordnance duty, Washington Navy Yard, 1862 ; retired, 1862 ; receiving- 
ship, New York, 1863 ; receiving-ship, Boston, 1864-5 ; special duty, Maiden, 
Massachusetts, 1866. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, 1866; Light-House Inspector, Key 
West, 1868; receiving-ship, Philadelphia, 1869-70. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER EDWIN M. SHEPARD, 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, November 24, 1859 ; NavaB 
Academy, 1859-61 ; attached to sloop Vincennes, West Gulf Blockading Squad- 
ron, 1861-2 ; passes of the Mississippi River. 

Promoted to Ensign, November 22, 1862 ; steam-sloop Mississippi, West Gulf' 
Blockading Squadron, 1862-3 ; remained on board the Mississippi until her de- 
struction ; ordered thence to gunboat Essex ; remained on board during the siege- 
of Port Hudson, and served with naval battery of 19 guns on shore with the army 
for several weeks ; received a commendatory letter from General Arnold, General 
Banks' Chief of Artillery; attached to monitor Mahopac, during the siege of' 
Charleston, South Carolina, and in James River ; steam-sloop Wachusett, special, 
service, 1864-5 ; capture of rebel privateer Florida, October 7, 1864. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, February 22, 1864 ; steamer Vanderbilt, June,. 
1865, during the trial-trip of the Dictator ; steamer Tacony, Atlantic Squadron, 
1865-6. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, July 25, 1866; steamer Osceola,. 
Atlantic Squadron, 1867 ; apprentice-ship Saratoga, 1868-9. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER W. W. BASSETT, 

Entered the Navy as Midshipman, March 6, 1838. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman in 1844 ; served on board the steamer- 
Princeton four years during the Mexican War. 

Went as Master to the Brazils in the U. S. brig Bainbridge ; was Acting Lieu- 
tenant on board the Germantown six months ; returned home as Master of the 
Bainbridge, in 1853; was Master of the U. S. ship Pennsylvania; in 1853, was. 
appointed to the frigate Potomac ; was Store-keeper at Ship Island and Pensacola. 
two years and ten months ; resigned in 1865. 

Was appointed on the retired list as Lieutenant- Commander, on account of 
injuries received in line of duty, in 1872. 

14 



210 LIEUTENANTS. 

LIEUTENANTS. 



LIEUTENANT C. A. SCHETKY, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Entered the volunteer service as an Acting Ensign in 
June, 1863; transferred to regular navy in 1868. Commissioned as Lieutenant, 
December 18, 1868; Saugus (iron-clad), N. A. Station. 1869-70; receiving-ship, 
New York, 1871 ; Pawnee (store-ship), Pensacola, Florida, 1872 ; receiving-ship, 
New York, 1873-4; Tuscarora (third-rate), N. P. Squadron, 1874-5; Ports- 
mouth (training-ship), Mare Island, 1876 ; R. S. Independence, 1877 ; Constitu- 
tion (training-ship), 1877. 

LIEUTENANT JOHN K. WINN, 

Entered the volunteer navy as an Acting Ensign, June 10, 1863; transferred to 
regular service in 1868. Commissioned as Lieutenant, December 18, 1868; 
Yantic (fourth-rate), N. A. Station, 1869-71 ; receiving-ship, Boston, 1872; 
-commanding Pawnee (store-ship), 1873-6. 



LIEUTENANT THOMAS M. GARDNER, 

'Entered the volunteer service as an Acting Master, June 13, 1861, transferred to 
regular navy in 1868. Commissioned as Lieutenant, December 18, 1868 ; Idaho 
, (store-ship), Asiatic Fleet, 1869-71 ; Navy Yard, Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 
.1873 ; commanding tug Speedwell, 1874-6. 



LIEUTENANT C. H. ROCKWELL, 

Appointed Acting Master, July 5, 1862 ; Executive-Officer steamer Penguin, 
East Gulf Squadron, 1862-3 ; Executive-Officer schooner Wanderer, East "Gulf 
.Squadron, 1863 ; in command schooner Two Sisters, East Gulf Squadron, 1863. 
Promoted to Acting Volunteer Lieutenant, December 16, 1863 ; in command bark 
Gem of the Seas, East Gulf Squadron, 1864; in command steamer Hendrick 
Hudson, East Gulf Squadron, 1864-5. Promoted to Acting Volunteer Lieu- 
tenant-Commander, March 27, 1865; Naval Aid on General Newton's staff at 
the battle of Natural Bridge, Florida, 1865 ; honorably discharged, December 8, 
1865. Rcrappointed Acting Master, November 19, 1866 ; steamer Osceola, West 
Indies, 1866-7; flag-ship Guerriere, Brazil Station, 1868-9. Commissioned 
Master, regular service, March 12, 1868. Promoted to Lieutenant, December 18, 
1868; receiving-ship Vandalia, Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 1870; in command 
isteamer Palos, China Station, 1870-2; steamer Alaska, China Station, 1872-3; 
Portsmouth Navy Yard, 1873-4 ; steamer Plymouth, Gulf Squadron, 1874-5 ; 
steamer Colorado (first-rate), N. A. Station, 1875 ; Light-House Inspector, 1875 
-6 ; Adams (third-rate), 1876-7. 



LIEUTENANT eHARLES M. ANTHONY, 

Entered the volunteer navy as an Acting Ensign, December 29, 1863 ; trans- 
ferred to regular service, 1868. Commissioned as Lieutenant, December 18, 



LIE VTENA NTS. 211 

1868 ; store-ship Idaho, Asiatic Fleet, 1869-70 ; Navy Yard, Portsmouth, New 
Hampshire, 1871-2 ; Canandaigua (second-rate), N. A. Station, 1872-3 ; Navy 
Yard, Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 1875-6; R. S. Wabash, 1877 ; Powhatan 
(flag-ship), N. A. Station, 1877-8. 



LIEUTENANT JAMES M. FORSYTH, 

Entered the volunteer navy, September 25, 1861, as an Acting Master s Mate ; 
served through the Rebellion, being attached at various times to the N. and S. 
Atlantic and West Gulf Squadrons, and participating in the capture of Forts 
Clarke and Hatteras, August 27, 1861 ; the engagements under Farragut, on the 
Mississippi, from Forts Jackson and St. Philip to Vicksburg ; and the engagement 
with rebel ram Arkansas ; and, while attached to the S. A. Squadron, took part 
in the various engagements with Sumter, Moultrie, and other fortifications in 
Charleston harbor. Promoted to Acting Ensign^ September 5, 1862, and to 
Acting Master, August 1, 1864 ; Executive-Officer steamer Nyack, Pacific Squad- 
ron, 1865-8. Commissioned as Master in the regular navy, March 12, 1868, 
and commissioned as Lieutenant, December 18, 1868 ; Executive-Officer steamer 
Purveyor, special service, 1868; R. S. Potomac, May, 1869, to May, 1870; Ex- 
ecutive-Officer iron-clad Saugus, N. A. Squadron, in 1870, and Executive-Officer 
of iron-clad Ajax, N. A. Squadron, in 1871 ; Navy Yard, Philadelphia, May, 
1871, to December, 1872 ; Executive-Officer ship Supply, special service (Vienna 
Exposition), January to December, 1873 ; Navy Yard, Philadelphia, December, 
1873, to March, 1874 ; Navigating Officer steam-sloop Powhatan, N. A. Squadron, 
IMarch, 1874, to February, 1877 ; torpedo instruction, June to October, 1877 ; 
navigation duty, League Island Station, 1877-8. 



LIEUTENANT GEORGE F. WILKINS, 

Entered the volunteer navy as an Acting Ensign, May 29, 1863.; transferred 
to regular service in 1868. Commissioned as Lieutenant, l>QQ.Qm\)%r 18, 1868; 
Benicia (second-rate), Asiatic Station, 1869-72 ; Roanoke (iron-clad), N. A. 
Station, 1873; Swatara (third-rate), N. A. Station, 1874; Hydrographic Office, 
1875-6; Ashuelot (third-rate), Asiatic Station, 1876-8. 



LIEUTENANT GEORGE A. CONVERSE, 

Born in Vermont. Appointed an Acting Midshipman at Naval Academy, 
September 29, 1861 ; graduated in 1865 ; steam-sloop Canandaigua, European 
Squadron, 1865-9. Promoted to Ensign, December 1, 1866; Master, March 
12, 1868 ; Lieuteyiant, March 26, 1869 ; torpedo service, 1870-7. 



LIEUTENANT ROYAL B. BRADFORD, 

Born in Maine. Appointed an Acting Midshipman at Naval Academy, No- 
vember 18, 1861 ; graduated, 1865 ; Swatara, West India Squadron, 1866. 
Promoted to Ensign, December 1, 1866 ; steam-sloop Iroquois, Asiatic Squadron, 
1867-70. Promoted to Master, March 12, 1868, and commissioned as Lieu- 



212 LIE VTENA NTS. 

tenant, March 26, 1869; torpedo service, 1871-2; "Wabash (flag-ship), European 
Squadron, 1873; Franklin (flag-ship), European Squadron, 1874; Torpedo Station, 
1875-6 ; Alliance (third-rate), N. A. Station, 1876-8. 



LIEUTENANT FRANCIS M. BARBER, 

Born in Ohio. Appointed an Acting 3IidsMpman at Naval Academy, December 
27, 1861 ; graduated, 1865 ; Swatara (third-rate). West India Squadron, 1866. 
Promoted to Ensign, December 1, 1866 ; frigate Minnesota, special service, 
1867-8. Promoted to Master, March 12, 1868, and commissioned as Lieutenant, 
March 26, 1869; Yantic (fourth-rate), N. A. Squadron, 1868-9; Michigan 
(fourth-rate), on the lakes, 1870-1 ; torpedo duty, 1872-4 ; commanding Alarm 
(fourth-rate), special service, 1875; Vandalia, N. A. Fleet, 1875-6; Alert 
(second-rate), Asiatic Station, 1877—8. 



LIEUTENANT JACOB E. NOELL, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed an Acting 3Tidshipman at Naval Academy, 
December 3, 1861 ; graduated, 1865; steam-sloop Swatara, West India and Euro- 
pean Squadrons, 1865-9. Promoted to Ensign, December 1, 1866 ; Master, 
March 12, 1868, and commissioned as Lieutenant, March 26, 1869 ; Severn 
(second-rate), N. A. Station, 1869-71 ; receiving-ship, Norfolk, 1872; Portsmouth, 
(third-rate), surveying service. Pacific, 1873-5 ; ordnance duty, League Island, 
1876 ; Asiatic Station, 1876-8. 



LIEUTENANT CHARLES H. BLACK, 

Born in Delaware. Appointed an Acting 3Ii(Jshipman at Naval Academy, Sep- 
tember 21, 1861 ; graduated, 1865 ; Mohican (third-rate), N. P. Squadron, 
1866-9. Promoted to Ensign, December 1, 1866. Promoted to Master, March 
12, 1868. Commissioned as Lieutenant, March 29, 1869 ; Naval Academy, 1870 ; 
Brooklyn (second-rate), European Fleet, 1870-2; R. S. Potomac, 1873-4; 
Hartford (second-rate), flag-ship N. A. Station, 1875-7. 



LIEUTENANT SOCRATES HUBBARD, 

Born in New York. Appointed an Acting Midshipman at Naval Academy, 
November 20, 1861 ; graduated, 1865; Swatara (third-rate). West India Squad- 
ron, 1865-7. Promoted to Ensign, December 1, 1866 ; Guerriere (second-rate), 
flag-ship S. A. Squadron, 1867-8. Promoted to Master, March 12, 1868. 
Commissioned as Lieutenant, March 29, 1869 ; Nipsic (fourth-rate), Darien Ex- 
pedition, 1869-71 ; Omaha (second-rate), S. P. Station, 1873-5 ; Naval Acad- 
emy, 1876-8. 

LIEUTENANT GEORGE W. DE LONG, 

Born in New York. Appointed an Acting Midshipman at Naval Academy, 
October 1, 1861 ; graduated, 1865 ; Canandaigua, European Squadron, 1865-9. 



LIEUTENANTS. 213 

Promoted to Ensign, December 1, 1866. Promoted to Master, March 12, 1868. 
Commissioned as i/{eMte/ia?j<, March 29, 1869 ; Lancaster (second-rate), flag-ship 
S. A. Fleet, 1870; leave Europe, 1871 ; Brooklyn, European Station, 1873-4; 
N. A. Station, 1874 ; Nautical School-ship St. Mary's, 1875-8. 



LIEUTENANT LEONARD CHENERY, 

Entered U. S. Naval Academy, December 12, 1861. Appointed from First 
California District; graduated, September 25, 1865, taking the Fourth Star of the 
first class year; attached to the U. S. S. Swatara, from October 9, 1865, to Feb- 
ruary 27, 1867, part of the time in the West Indies, and part of the time on 
European Station. Promoted to Ensign, December 1, 1866 ; on ordnance duty, 
at Washington, from March 9, 1867, to April 30, 1867; attached to U. S. S. 
Guerriore, flag-ship of Rear-Admiral Charles H. Davis, on Brazil Station, from 
May 20, 1867, until July 29, 1869. Promoted to Master, March 12, 1868. 
Promoted to Lieutenant, March 25, 1869 ; at Naval rendezvous, San Francisco, 
from October 10, 1870, to March 25, 1871 ; Flag-Lieutenant of the Pacific Sta- 
tion, on stafi" of Commodore R. N. Stembel, from May 8, 1871, until October 
10, 1872, U. S. flag-ship Pensacola; attached to U. S. S. Saranac, from October 
10, 1872, until August 1, 1874, on Pacific Station; at Hydrographic Office, 
Washington, from October 15, 1874, until November 20, 1875 ; attached to U. S. 
monitor Catskill, North Atlantic Station, from November 20, 1875, until March 
20, 1877 ; eight months as Executive-Officer and eight months as Commanding- 
Officer. 



LIEUTENANT T. A. LYONS, 

Entered the U. S. Naval Academy at Newport, Rhode Island, January 2, 1862; 
graduated as Midshipman at Annapolis, Maryland, September 26, 1865. Pro- 
moted to Ensign, December 1, 1866; to Master, March 12, 1868; and to Lieu- 
tenant, March 26, 1869; attached to the U. S. S. Monongahela, West India 
Squadron, from November 16, 1865, until December, 1867, a month after the 
ship had been driven ashore by a tidal wave at the island of Santa Cruz ; Decem- 
ber, 1867, sent North on the IJ. S. S. De Soto, on duty with the crew of the Mo- 
nongahela ; on arrival at Norfolk was attached, by order of the Navy Department, 
to the De Soto, and served in her in the West India Squadron until August, 
1868, when the vessel was ordered to New York and put out of commission ; 
served aboard the Piscataqua, Unadilla, and Idaho, in the Asiatic Squadron, from 
September, 1868, until July, 1871 ; on duty as Instructor at the U. S. Naval 
Academy at Annapolis, Maryland, from September, 1871, until June, 1873 ; 
attached to the U. S. S. Constellation until August, 1873, when he was ordered 
to join the Pensacola at Panama, flag-ship of the Pacific Squadron ; attached to 
the Pensacola, in both the North and South Pacific Stations, from September, 
1873, until July, 1876; September 1, 1876, ordered to duty at the Hydrographic 
Office in Washington, where he is at present. 



LIEUTENANT EDWARD L. AMORY, 

Born in Massachusetts. Appointed an Acting Midshipman at Naval Academ}', 
September 30,1861; graduated, 1865; Swatara (third-rate), West India and 



214 LIEUTENANTS. 

European Stations, 1865-7. Promoted to Ensign. December 1, 1866. Promoted 
to blaster, March 12, 1868; Franklin, flag-ship European Station, 1868. Com- 
missioned as Lieutenant, March 29, 1869 ; Severn, flag-ship N. A. Squadron, 
1869-70; navigation duty, Navy Yard, Boston, 1871-2; torpedo service, 
1872 ; Kichmond fsecoud-rate), N. P. Station, 1873-4; Hartford (second-rate), 
Asiatic Station, 1874-5 ; Navy Yard, Boston, 1875-6 ; light-house duty, 
1876-7. 

LIEUTENANT JOHN STARK NEWELL, 

Born in Massachusetts. Appointed an Acting Midshipman at the Naval Acad- 
emy, from New York City, September 30, 1861 ; graduated, 1865 ; attached to 
steamer Swatara, North Atlantic and European Stations, 1865-9. Commissioned 
as Ensign, December 1, 1866; Master, March 12, 1868; and Lieutenant, March 
26, 1869 ; attached to monitor Miantonomah, 1869-70, N. A. Station ; to sailing- 
ship Guard, N. A. Station, 1870 ; monitor Mahopac, N. A. Station, 1872 ; sail- 
ingsloop Portsmouth, en route to S. Atlantic Station, 1872 ; U. S. S. Frigate 
Lancaster, flag-ship S. Atlantic Station, 1872-5 ; Navy Yard, New York, 1875- 
6; under instruction at Torpedo Station, 1876; attached to U. S. S. Huron, 
N. A. Station, 1876 ; on duty as Instructor, Torpedo Station, 1877 ; and continues 
so at this date. 



LIEUTENANT JOSEPH E. CRAIG, 

Born in New York. Appointed an Acting Midshipman at Naval Academy, 
November 29, 1861; graduated, 1865; Monongahela (second-rate). West India 
Squadron, 1865-8. Promoted to Ensign, December 1, 1866. Promoted to 
Master, March 12, 1868 ; Portsmouth (third-rate), S. A. Fleet, 1868-71. Com- 
missioned as Lieutenant, March 26, 1869 ; Naval Academy, 1872-3 ; Naval 
Observatory, 1874 ; Hydrographic Oflice, 1875-7 ; torpedo service, 1877. 



LIEUTENANT ARTHUR H. FLETCHER, 

Born in England. Appointed an Acting Midshipman at Naval Academy, No- 
vember 28, 1861; graduated, 1865; Rhode Island, flag-ship W. I. Squadron, 
1865-6. Promoted to Ensign, December 1, 1866 ; Iroquois (third-rate), Asiatic 
Station, 1867-70. Promoted to il/«s^er, March 12,1868. Commissioned as iieu- 
tenant, March 26, 1869; Idaho, store-ship Asiatic Fleet, 1871; ordnance duty, 
Navy Yard, Washington, 1872; commanding R. S. Relief, 1873; Intrepid 
(fourth-rate), 1874; Kansas (third-rate), N. A. Station, 1875; Asiatic Station, 
1876 ; Huron (third-rate), 1876-7. 



LIEUTENANT GEORGE TALCOTT, Jr., 

Born in Massachusetts. Appointed an Acting Midshipman at Naval Academy, 
November 20, 1861 ; graduated, 1865 ; Mohican (third-rate), N. P. Station, 1866- 
9. Promoted to Ensign, December 1, 1866. Promoted to Master, March 12, 1868. 
Commissioned as Lieutenant, March 29, 1869; Navy Yard, Norfolk, 1870; 
Ticonderoga (second-rate) S. A. Fleet, 1870-3; Coast Survey, 1874-6; Ranger 
(third-rate), Asiatic Station, 1876-8. 



LIEUTENANTS. 215 

LIEUTENANT CHARLES M. THOMAS, 

Entered Naval Academy November 28, 1861 ; graduated September 26, 1865 ; 
served in Shenandoah, on the Asiatic Station, from October 17, 1865, to May 3, 
1869. Promoted to Ensign, December 1, 1866. Promoted to Master, March 

12, 1868. Commissioned as Lieutenant, March 26, 1869 ; League Island, June 
1, 1869, to September 4, 1869; Supply, European Station, November 2, 1869, 
to July 26, 1870; Guerriere, European Station, August 10, 1870, to September 

13, 1871 ; receiving-ship Potomac, Philadelphia, March 18, 1872, to October 22, 
1872 ; monitor Terror, Key West, Florida, October 26, 1872, to June 18, 1873 ; 
Torpedo Station, Newport, Rhode Island, September 1, 1873, to April 20, 1874 ; 
monitor Dictator, Key West, Florida, June 22, 1874, to April 22, 1875 ; Navy 
Yard, Philadelphia, June 17, 1875, to November 15, 1875 ; Centennial Exposi- 
tion, November 17, 1875, to March 23, 1877 ; receiving-ship St. Louis, March 
24, 1877, to January 9, 1878 ; Constitution, Paris Exposition, 1878. 



LIEUTENANT ALBERT S. SNOW, 

Born in Maine. Appointed an Acting Midshipman at Naval Academy, Novem- 
ber 30, 1861 ; graduated, 1865 ; Pensacola (second-rate), N. P. Squadron, 1866-9. 
Promoted to Ensign, December 1, 1866. Promoted to Master, March 12, 1868. 
Commissioned as Lieutenant, March 26, 1869 ; Alaska (third-rate), Asiatic Fleet, 
1870-3 ; Torpedo Station, 1873 ; Congress (second-rate), European Station, 1873-6 ; 
R. S. Wabash, 1876-7. 



LIEUTENANT GEORGE C. REITER, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed an Acting Midshipman at Naval Academy, 
September 20, 1861 ; graduated, 1865 ; school-ship Sabine, 1865-6 ; Lackawanna 
(second-rate), N. P. Squadron, 1866-8. Promoted to Ensign, December 1, 1866. 
Promoted to Master, March 12, 1868. Commissioned as Lieutenant, March 26, 
1869; Plymouth (third-rate), European Fleet, 1869-72; Narragansett (third- 
rate), surveying service in the Pacific, 1872-5 ; Lehigh (iron-clad), N. A. Station, 
1875-6 ; equipment duty, Norfolk, Virginia, 1876-7. 



LIEUTENANT ROSWELL D. HITCHCOCK, 

Born in Massachusetts. Appointed an Acting Midshipman at Naval Academy, 
January 18, 1862 ; graduated, 1865 ; ordered to Ticonderoga, European Station, 
September, 1865. Promoted to Ensign, 1866. Promoted to Master, 1867, and 
ordered to Shamrock, same squadron, going out of commission with the ship at 
Philadelphia, in July, 1868 ; ordered to Nipsic, West India Station, September, 
1868. Promoted to Lieutenant, March, 1869 ; served till August, 1869 ; ordered 
as Flag-Lieutenant, on staff of Port-Admiral S. H. Stringham, at New York, 
August, 1869 ; served till December, 1869 ; ordered as Navigator of the Guard, 
on Selfridge's First Darien Expedition, December, 1869, and commanded, at dif- 
ferent times, two parties engaged in cutting lines and running lines of levels, to 
find a route for a ship-canal across the Isthmus of Darien ; ordered to duty on 
North Atlantic Station, in November, 1870 ; serving on board the Tuscarora, and 
iron-clads Saugus and Ajax, and returning North in August, 1871, as Flag-Lieu- 



216 LIEUTENANTS. 

tenant on the staff of Kear- Admiral S. P. Lee, on board the Severn ;• Torpedo 
Station, from December, 1871, till August, 1872; Hydrographic Office, from 
August, 1872, till January, 1873; Executive-Officer of Guard, Vienna Exposi- 
tion, from January, 1873, till April, 1874; Hydrographic Office, April, 1874, 
till June, 1874 ; Coast Survey, from June, 1874, till January, 1878, commanding 
the steamers Endeavor and Gedney ; Executive-Officer of Supply, Paris Exposi- 
tion, 1878. 



LIEUTENANT WM. H. BROWNSON, 

Born in New York. Appointed an Acting Midshipman at Naval Academy, No- 
vember 29, 1861; graduated, 1865; Rhode Island (second-rate), West India 
Station, 1865-7. Promoted to Ensign, December 1, 1866 ; Susquehanna (second- 
rate), N. A. Station, 1867-8. Promoted to Master, March 12, 1868 ; Dacotah 
(third-rate). Pacific Fleet, 1869-70. Commissioned as Lieutejiant, March 26, 
1869 ; Mohican (third-rate). Pacific Fleet, 1870-1 ; torpedo service, 1872 ; Naval 
Academy, 1872-4; Kearsarge (third-rate), Asiatic Station, 1875-6; Tennessee 
(second-rate), Asiatic Station, 1876-8. 



LIEUTENANT HENRY E. NICHOLS, 

Born in New York. Appointed an Acting Midshipman at Naval Academy, October 
1, 1861 ; graduated, 1865 ; Swatara (third-rate). West India and European Squad- 
rons, 1865-9. Promoted to Ensign, December 1, 1866. Promoted to Master, 
December 12, 1868. Commissioned as Lieutenant, March 26, 1869; Frolic 
(fourth -rate), Port-Admiral flag-ship. New York harbor, 1869-70 ; ordnance duty, 
Pittsburgh, 1870-1 ; S. A. Station, 1872-3; torpedo duty, 1874; Coast Survey, 
1875; Supply (fourth-rate), special service, 1876; Coast Survey, 1876-7 ; Des- 
patch (fourth-rate), special service, Europe, 1877-8. 



LIEUTENANT W. W. MEAD, 

Born in Kentucky. Appointed an Acting Midshipman at Naval Academy, De- 
cember 30,1861 ; graduated, 1865; Lackawanna (second-rate), N. P. Squadron, 
1866-9. Promoted to Ensign, December 1, 1866. Promoted to Master, March 
12, 1868. Commissioned as Lieutenant, March 26, 1869 ; Signal Office, Wash- 
ington, 1870; Colorado (first-rate), flag-ship Asiatic Fleet, 1870-3; Michigan 
(fourth-rate), 1873-4; Shawmut (third-rate), N. A. Station, 1875-6. 



LIEUTENANT EDWIN S. HOUSTON, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed an Acting Midshipman at Naval Academy, 
April 18, 1862; graduated, 1865; Lackawanna (second-rate). Pacific Fleet, 
1866-9. Promoted to Eisign, December 1, 1866. Promoted to Master, March 
12, 1868. Commissioned as Lieiitenant, March 29, 1869 ; Severn (second-rate), 
flag-ship N. A. Fleet, 1869-71 ; Lancaster (second-rate), S. A. Station, 1872^; 
Naval rendezvous, San Francisco, 1875-6 ; Nautical School-ship Jamestown, 
1876-7. 



LIEUTENANTS. 217 

LIEUTENANT BENJAMIN LONG EDES, 

Born in Maryland. Appointed an Acting MidsTiipman at Naval Academy, Septem- 
ber 23, 1861 ; graduated, 1865 ; Ticonderoga (second-rate), European Squadron, 
1865-7 ; Shamrock (third-rate), European Station, 1867-8. Promoted to Ensign, 
December 1, 1866. Promoted to Master, March 12, 1868; Lancaster (second- 
rate), S. A. Fleet, 1869-70. Commissioned as Lieutenant, March 26, 1869 ; 
Wasp (fourth-rate), S. A. Fleet, 1870-2 ; Yantic (third-rate), Asiatic Station, 
1873-5 ; Hydrographic Office, 1875-6 ; R. S. Wyoming, 1876-7. 



LIEUTENANT GEORGE M. BOOK, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed an Acting Midshipman at Naval Academy, 
November 22, 1871 ; graduated, 1865 ; W. I. Squadron, 1865-7. Promoted to 
Ensign, December 1, 1866; apprentice-ship Portsmouth, 1867-9. Promoted to 
Master, March 12, 1868. Commissioned as Lieutenant, March 29, 1869 ; sick- 
leave, 1870-1 ; retired, 1871 ; restored to active list, 1875 ; Navy Yard, Norfolk, 
1876 ; Adams (third-rate), S. A. Station, 1876-8. 



LIEUTENANT EUGENE THOMAS, 

Born in Ohio. Appointed an Acting Midshipman at Naval Academy, September 
20, 1861 ; graduated, 1865 ; Shenandoah (second-rate). East India Station, 1866 
-9. Promoted to Ensign, December 1, 1866. Promoted to Master, March 12, 
1868. Commissioned as Lieutenant, March 26, 1869 ; Congress (second-rate), 
N. A. Squadron, 1870-1 ; R. S. New York, 1872; Guard (fourth-rate), Vienna 
Exposition, 1873 ; sick-leave, 1874-6 ; special duty. Key West, 1877. 



LIEUTENANT EDWIN LONGNECKER, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed an Acting Midshipman at Naval Academy, 
September 24, 1861 ; graduated, 1865 ; Shenandoah (second-rate). East India 
Station, 1866-9. Promoted to Ensign, December 1, 1866. Promoted to Master, 
March 12, 1868. Commissioned as Lieutenant, March 26, 1869; receiving-ship, 
Philadelphia, 1869 ; Swatara (third-rate), N. A. Fleet, 1870-1 ; Colorado"(first- 
rate), N. A. Station, 1872-3 ; Alaska (third-rate), European Station, 1874-6 ; 
Wyoming (third-rate), Paris Exposition service, 1878. 



LIEUTENANT MARCUS B. BUFORD, 

Born in Kentucky. Appointed an Acting Midshipman at Naval Academy, Oc- 
tober 9, 1861 ; graduated in 1865. Promoted to Ensign, December 1, 1866, 
and to Master, March 12, 1868 ; Shenandoah (second-rate). East India Station, 
1865-8; Michigan, 1868-9. Commissioned as Lieutenant, March 26, 1869; 
Naval Observatory, 1869-70 ; Guerriere (second-rate), European Station, 1870 
-1 ; European Station, 1871-3; Michigan, 1874-5; Huron (third-rate), North 
Atlantic Station, 1876; training-ship Monongahela, 1877. 



218 LIEUTENANTS. 

LIEUTENANT ROBERT E. IMPEY, 

Born ia Ohio. Appointed an Acting Midshipman at Naval Academy, Septera 
bar 21, 1861 ; graduated in 1865 ; Tieonderoga (second-rate), European Station 
1865-6. Promoted to Ensign, December 1, 1866 ; Miantonomah (iron-clad) 
1867 ; Powhatan, flag-ship Soutb Pacific Squadron, 1867-9. Promoted to 
Master, March 12, 1868, Commissioned as Lieutenant, March 26, 1869 
Kansas, T. and N. Surveying Expedition, 1871 ; Atlantic Station, 1872-3 ; R. S. 
Independence, 1874 ; Pensacola, flag-ship South Pacific Squadron, 1875-7. 



LIEUTENANT GEORGE E. IDE, 

Born in Ohio. Appointed an Acting Midshipman at Naval Academy, September 
27, 1861 ; graduated, 1865 ; Pacific Fleet, 1866-8. Promoted to Ensign, De- 
cember 1, 1866. Promoted to Master, March 12, 1868. Commissioned as 
lAeutenant, March 26, 1869 ; Plymouth, European Squadron, 1869-72 ; Juniata, 
N. A. Squadron, 1873 ; Leave, 1875 ; training-ship Monongahela, 1875 ; R. S. 
Independence, 1876-7. 

LIEUTENANT ABRAHAM VAIL, 

Born in Indiana. Appointed an Acting Midshipman at Naval Academy, Decem- 
ber 1, 1861 ; graduated, 1865 ; school-ship Sabine, 1865-6. Promoted to Ensign, 
December 1, 1866 ; Dacotah (second-rate), South Pacific Fleet, 1867 ; Saginaw 
(fourth-rate), N. P. Squadron, 1868. Promoted to Master, March 12, 1868; 
Severn, flag-ship N. A. Fleet, 1869-70. Commissioned as Lieutenant, March 
26, 1869; Hartford, flag-ship Asiatic Station, 1872-5; Hydrographic Office, 
1876-7. 

LIEUTENANT THOMAS PERRY, 

Born in New York. Appointed an Acting Midshipman at Naval Academy, Septem- 
ber 21, 1861 ; graduated, 1865 ; school-ship Sabine, 1866. Promoted to Ensign, 
December 1, 1866; Pensacola, North Pacific Fleet, 1867; Suwanee (third-rate), 
Pacific Fleet, 1868 ; Dictator (iron-clad), N. A. Station, 1869 ; Miantonomah (sec- 
ond-rate), special service, 1870. Commissioned as Lieutenant, March 26, 1869 ; 
Shenandoah, European Fleet, 1871-2 ; Manhattan, North Atlantic Fleet, 1873-4 ; 
Omaha, South Pacific, 1875-8. 



LIEUTENANT CHARLES H. STOCKTON, 

Entered the Naval Academy in November, 1861, graduating in 1865 ; served 
in the Dacotah, Chattanooga, and Mohican, going to the North Pacific by the 
way of the Strait of Magellan, in the IMohican ; served in the Pacific from 
1866-9, returning overland ; was stationed, 1869-70, at Navy Yard, Philadel- 
phia ; was ordered to the Congress in 1870 ; made a varied cruise in the West 
Indies, Greenland, and in the Mediterranean, in the Congress ; returning from 
the Mediterranean in 1874, in the Brooklyn, was again stationed at the Navy 
Yard, Philadelphia ; left the Navy Yard in 1875, and joined the U. S. S. Swatara, 
making the cruise around the world in that ship ; on the Transit of Venus Expe- 
dition ; returning, was stationed at the Hydrographic Office, Washington, and 
from there, in 1876, to U. S. S. Plymouth, in which ship he is now serving. 



LIEUTENANTS. 219 

Commissioned as Ensign^ December 1, 1866. Commissioned as Master, March 12, 
1868. Commissioned as Lieutenant, March 26, 1869. 



LIEUTENANT LOUIS KINGSLEY, 

Born in New York. Appointed an Acting Midshipman at Naval Academy, 
September 28, 1861 ; graduated, 1865 ; school-ship Sabine, 1865-6. Promoted 
to Ensign, December 1, 1866-; Lackawanna (second-rate). Pacific Fleet, 1867-8. 
Promoted to Master, March 12, 1868 ; Hydrographic Office, 1869-70. Com- 
missioned as Lieutenant, March 26, 1869 ; Brooklyn (second-rate), European Fleet, 
1870-2; Hydrographic Office, 1873 ; Colorado (first-rate), N. A. Station, 1874; 
Torpedo Station, 1875 ; Ossipee (third-rate), N. A. Station, 1875. 



LIEUTENANT ISAAC HAZLETT, 

Born in Ohio. Appointed an Acting 3Iidshipman at Naval Academy, Septem- 
ber 27, 1861 ; graduated, 1865; Mouongahela (third-rate). West India Station, 
1865-6. Promoted to Ensign, December 1, 1866 ; Susquehanna (first-rate), 
N. A. Station, 1866-8. Promoted to Master, March 12, 1868; Lancaster 
(second-rate), flag-ship S. A. Fleet, 1869-72. Commissioned as Lieutenant, 
March 26, 1869 ; Manhattan (iron-clad), N. A. Station, 1873-4 ; R. S. Colorado, 
1875 ; Hydrographic Office, 1876-7 ; Trenton (second-rate), flag-ship, European 
Station, 1877-8. 

LIEUTENANT WILLIAM P. RANDALL, 

Born in New Bedford, Massachusetts. In 1861 was about to sail in command 
of a whale-ship when the war commenced ; was furnished with a certificate signed 
by the president of every insurance office in the city, to the efiiect that their offices 
would insure any vessel under his command at the lowest rates of insurance ; 
without further endorsement was appointed an Acting blaster in the U. S. Navy, 
July 24, 1861, and ordered to the U. S. S. Cumberland, serving on that ship at 
the capture of Forts Clarke and Hatteras, and afterwards in the engagement with 
the Merrimac at Newport News, March 8, 1862, at which time he had command 
of the after pivot-gun (which was the last gun fired from that ship) ; May 28, 
1862, promoted to the rank of Volunteer- Lieutenant, and ordered to the gunboat 
Port Royal, Commander George W. Morris, which vessel did good service on the 
James River through the summer of 1862, and joined the East Gulf Squadron 
in the fall of that year; January 26, 1863 (being at that time the Executive- 
Officer), detached from the Port Royal, and ordered to command the U. S. barque 
Pursuit ; commanded this vessel until August 12, 1864, when he was detached 
and ordered to command the U. S. barque Restless ; these vessels were engaged in 
blockading the coast of Florida, and while commanded by Lieutenant Randall did 
much injury to the enemy, for which he received two complimentary letters from 
the Admiral commanding (Admiral Stribling), with orders to read them on the 
quarter-deck at muster; February 23, 1865, took temporary command of the 
U. S. steamer Hendrick Hudson (Restless undergoing repairs at Key West), and 
went to St. Marks for General Newton, U. S. Army, and stafi", March 9, 1865. 
Promoted to the rank of Volunteer Lieutenant- Commander, March 17, 1865; 
detached from U. S. barque Reckless and ordered to take the prize steamer Ruby to 
New York ; arrived in New York with the Ruby, April 14, 1865, and waited 



220 LIEUTENANTS. 

orders until August 17, 1865, when he was granted four months' leave of absence; 
on December 19, 1865, was honorably discharged from the U. S. Navy with the 
rank of Lieutenant- Commander ; October 30, 1866, presented himself to the 
Examining Board at Hartford, Connecticut, for admission to the regular service, 
and was rejected on account of injuries received in the line of duty during the 
engagement between the Cumberland and Merrimac, but obtaining permission from 
Washington for examination, he presented himself the second time, November 
22, 1866, and on December 7, 1866, received an appointment as Acting Master 
on temporary service, and was ordered to the U. ST steamer Peoria, which vessel 
went to the West Indies and returned with yellow fever on board ; detached from 
her in Norfolk, Virginia, and went to the hospital, July 29, 1867 ; was on sick- 
leave until September, 1867, when he was ordered to the U. S. receiving-ship Ohio, 
Mai'ch 12, 1868 (three years and three days after receiving his appointment as a 
Volunteer Lieutenant-Commander) ; he received a commission as Ensign in the 
regular navy, October 12, 1868 ; detached from the Ohio and ordered to command 
theU. S. steamer Leyden, December 18, 1868. Promoted to Master^ January 27, 
1869, and detached from the Leyden and ordered to the U. S. steamer Narragan- 
sett; joined the Narragansett in Havana, March 17, 1869; in July the Narra- 
gansett went in quarantine at Portsmouth, New Hampshire, with yellow fever on 
board, when he was detached and ordered to the Boston Navy Yard ; September 
1, 1869, ordered to command the U. S. steamer Palos ; in October, 1869, was 
detached from the Palos, and took command of the U. S. steamer Leyden. Com- 
missioned as Lieutenant, March 21, 1870 ; May 18, 1870, detached from the Ley- 
den and ordered to the monitor Saugus ; joined the Saugus at Havana, June 4, 
1870 ; September 30, 1870, detached from the Saugus and ordered to command 
the U. S. steamer Mayflower; detached from the Mayflower, November 3, 1870, 
and ordered to the U. S. receiving-ship Ohio, Navy Yard, Boston ; May 5, 1871, 
temporarily detached from the Ohio and ordered to Key West, Florida, as Execu- 
tive-Officer, to assist in bringing the Saugus to Philadelphia; June 22, 1871, 
returned to the Ohio ; September 15, detached from the Ohio and ordered to the 
U. S. steamer Iroquois ; January 15, 1872, detached from the Iroquois and 
ordered to the U. S. steamer Canandaigua ; August 4, 1874, detached from the 
Canandaigua at Key West, and sent home by medical survey (with Chagres fever) 
on sick-leave ; November, 1874, ordered to the Ordnance Department, Navy Yard, 
Boston; June 10, 1875, ordered to Torpedo Station, Newport, Rhode Island; 
October 10, 1875, detached from Torpedo Station and ordered to the U. S. receiv- 
ing-ship Ohio, Navy Yard, Boston; October 28, Ohio's crew all transferred to the 
receiving-ship Wabash; April 16, 1877, granted six months' leave of absence; 
October 15, 1877, ordered back to the U. S. receiving-ship Wabash, where he is 
at present serving. 

LIEUTENANT GEORGE P. LIVINGSTON, 

Born in New York. Entered navy as a volunteer officer during the Rebellion ; 
transferred to regular service, 1868 ; Narragansett (third-rate), N. A. Station, 
1869. Commissioned as Lieutenant, March 21, 1870 ; Pacific Fleet, 1869-72 ; 
Colorado, N. A. Station, 1874 ; Plymouth (second-rate), N. A. Station, 1875 ; 
Alert (third-rate), N. A. Station, 1875-7 ; R. S. Franklin, 1878. 



LIEUTENANT JOHN J. BRICE, 

Entered the navy as a volunteer officer in 1861 ; served during the Rebellion ; 
transferred to regular service in 1868 ; Quinnebaug (third-rate), S. A. Station, 



LIEUTENANTS. 221 

1868-9. Commissioned as Lieutenant, March 21, 1870; Hydrographic Office, 
1870; Saco (fourth-rate), European Station, 1870-2; torpedo service, 1873; 
Saranac (second-rate), N. P. Fleet, 1873-5; Naval Observatory, 1876; Navy 
Yard, Mare Island, 1877-8. 



LIEUTENANT F. AUGUSTUS MILLER, 

Born in Maryland. Entered the navy as a volunteer officer in August, 1861 ; 
served during the Rebellion, and three years after its close was transferred to the 
regular service; Quinnebaug (third-rate), S. A. Station, 1868-9. Commissioned 
as Lieutenant, March 21, 1870; receiving-ship. New York, 1870; Mohican 
(third-rate), Pacific Fleet, 1870-1 ; Navy Yard, New York, 1872-4; S. S. On- 
ward, 1875-6 ; Bureau of Equipment, 1877. 



LIEUTENANT W. H. MAYER, Jr., 

Born in New York. Entered the navy as a volunteer officer, June 23, 1862, 
and in 1868 was transferred to the regular service. Commissioned as Lieutenant, 
March 21, 1870 ; Terror (iron-clad), N. A. Fleet, 1870-1 ; R. S. Vermont, 1873 ; 
Powhatan (second-rate), N. A. Fleet, 1874 ; Canonicus (iron-clad), N. A. Fleet, 
1875-7. 



LIEUTENANT OSCAR W. FARENHOLT, 

Entered the navy as seaman, April 18, 1861 ; drafted to frigate Wabash, and 
participated in the engagements of Fort Hatteras, North Carolina, Port Royal, 
South Carolina, Fort Pulaski, Georgia, and in all the boat expeditions sent from 
the Wabash in the years of 1861-2 into South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida; 
was severely wounded on October 22, 1862, at the battle of Pocotaligo, South 
Carolina, where the four howitzers of the Wabash covered the retreat of the Fed- 
eral army ; sent to the Naval Hospital, New York, and discharged from the ser- 
vice. Entered the navy again in February, 1863; especially detailed for the 
monitor Catskill ; participated in all the engagements before Charleston, South 
Carolina, in 1863 and spring of 1864 ; was at the side of Commander George W. 
Rodgers when he and Assistant Paymaster J. G. Woodbury were killed in the 
pilot'-house of the Catskill, August 17, 1863 ; was one of the storming party of 
Fort Sumter in September, 1863. Promoted to Acting Ensign, August, 1864 ; 
ordered to command ordnance schooner Henry James, attached to the squadron in 
the sounds of North Carolina; participated in the re-occupation of Plymouth, 
North Carolina, several engagements on the Chowan and Black Water Rivers, and 
capture of Fort Fisher, North Carolina ; at the end of the war was ordered to 
monitor Shawnee and duty at Boston Navy Yard ; in 1866, served in store-ship 
Purveyor and steam-frigate Susquehanna; in 1867, served in receiving-ships New 
Hampshire and Ohio; examined for the regular navy, January 14, 1867 ; Octo- 
ber, 1867, ordered to store-ship Idaho ; served in her and the Ashuelot, in the 
Asiatic Squadron, till November, 1870. Commissioned as Ensign, March 12, 
1868. Promoted to Master, December 18, 1868. Commissioned as Lieutenant, 
March 21, 1870; May, 1871, ordered to Norfolk Navy Yard; November, 1871, 
to the command of the steamer Standish ; June, 1 873, to the steamer Shenandoah ; 
June, 1874, to the command of the receiving-ship Relief, at Washington Navy 
Yard; June, 1875, ordered to the flag-ship Minnesota; June, 1876>, to the prac- 



222 LIEUTENANTS. 

tice-sliip Supply; October, 1876, to the Navy Yard, Norfolk; June, 1877, in 
charge of the Naval Nitre Depot at Maiden, Massachusetts. 



LIEUTENANT W. B. NEWMAN, 

Born in New York. Entered the navy as a volunteer officer, February 3, 1862 ; 
served during the war ; transferred to the regular service in 1868 ; receiving-ship, 
Norfolk, 1869 ; receiving-ship, New York, 1870 ; commanding tug Pilgrim, 1871 ; 
Wasp (fourth-rate), S. A. Fleet, 1872-3 ; training-ship Minnesota, 1875-7. 



LIEUTENANT A. J. IVERSON, 

Born in Norway. Entered the navy as a volunteer officer, March 19, 1863 ; 
transferred to the regular service in 1868 ; Wasp (fourth-rate), S. A. Fleet, 1868- 
70; Navy Yard, Boston, 1871-2; torpedo service, 1872; Saugus (iron-clad), 
N. A. Station, 1873; Boston, 1875; training-ship Minnesota, 1875-8. 



LIEUTENANT JOSEPH MABTHON, 

Entered the navy as seaman, October 1, 1861, on board of the R. S. Ohio, 
Boston, Massachusetts ; drafted to Pocahontas, at Hampton Boads, October 21 
served on board of her one year ; was in engagements at Port Boyal, Stono Inlet, 
and up Black River, and on blockading service ; sunk the Stone Fleet off CharleS' 
ton ; landed at Tybee Island. Appointed as Acting Master's Mate, May 23, 1863 
ordered to the steamer Princess Royal ; engaged the enemy at Donaldsonville and 
Fort Butler, Louisiana, for three hours, close range ; drove them back and captured 
several prisoners. Promoted to Acting Ensign, October 3, 1863 ; ordered to 
steamer Tennessee, W. G-. B. Squadron ; transferred to the Hartford, August 4, 
1864 ; passed the forts at Mobile Bay, August 5, 1864, in charge of the howitzers 
in the tops of that ship ; ordered to the captured steamer Selma same day, and 
engaged the batteries at Dog River and Fort Morgan ; after capture of Fort 
Morgan, transferred to steamer Mobile to take the captured officers to New 
Orleans. Promoted to Acting Master, August 5, 1864 ; was mentioned favorably 
in the report of Admiral D. G. Farragut of the Mobile fight ; detached December 
7, 1864, at New York ; ordered to steamer Chenango, January 20, 1865 ; served 
in her on South Atlantic Station till May, 1865'; captured a schooner back of 
Bull's Bay ; detached July 1, 1865 ; ordered to Pensacola Navy Yard, as Execu- 
tive-Officer, April 19, 1866 ; ordered to command the steamer Yucca, September 
14, 1867 ; brought her to Portsmouth, New Hampshire ; detached, October 10 ; 
ordered to steamer Pensacola, N. P. Station, October 23, 1867. Commissioned 
Ensign, March 12, 1868. Promoted Master, December 18, 1868 ; ordered to 
U. S. steamer Saranac, February, 1870. Commissioned as Lieutenant, March 21, 
1870 ; detached, October 31, 1870 ; ordered to R. S. Vermont, April 1, 1871 ; 
ordered to Asiatic Station, October 15, 1871 ; joined steamer Monocacy, Decem- 
ber 3, 1871, as Executive-Officer; ordered to Idaho, August, 1872; served in 
steamer Ashuelot, and came home to San Francisco, California, as Navigator of 
the steamer Lackawanna, May, 1875 ; ordered to Navy Yard, Boston, June 15 ; 
R. S. Colorado, September 24 ; granted four months' leave, and ordered to R. S. 
New Hampshire, March 1, 1876 ; ordered to command monitor Saugus, July, 
1876 ; detached, October 15 ; waited orders three months ; was ordered to R. S. 



LIEUTENANTS. 223 

Franklin, January, 1877; ordered to command U. S. S. Catskill, March 16, 
1877, which is his present duty. 



LIEUTENANT EDWAKD T. STRONG, 

Born in Massachusetts. Entered the service, December 4, 1862, as a volunteer 
officer ; transferred to regular service in 1868 ; Seminole (third-rate), N. A. 
Station, 1868-70. Commissioned as Lieutenant, March 21, 1870 ; California 
(second-rate), flag-ship Pacific Fleet, 1870-2 ; Shenandoah (second-rate), Euro- 
pean Fleet, 1873-4; R. S. Ohio, 1875 ; Vandalia, European Station, 1875-8. 



LIEUTENANT WILLIAM H. WEBB, 

Born in Indiana. Served during the closing years of the war as a volunteer 
officer; transferred to the regular service in 1868; Narragansett (third-rate), 
West India Squadron, in 1869. Commissioned as Lieutenant, March 21, 1870 ; 
Naval Station, Mound City, Illinois, 1870 ; Ajax (iron-clad), N. A. Fleet, 1871 ; 
Asiatic Fleet, 1872-5 ; S. S. Supply, 1875-6 ; commanding Saugus (iron-clad), 
1877-8. 

LIEUTENANT D. G. McRITCHIE, 

Born in Scotland. Entered the navy as an Acting Master in 1861 ; served very 
actively during the entire Rebellion ; in 1868 was transferred to the regular ser- 
vice ; commanding Tallapoosa (fourth-rate), special service, 1869-73 ; commanding 
Gettysburg, special service, 1873-4 ; was then ordered back to the Tallapoosa, 
which vessel he still (1878) commands. Commissioned as Lieutenant, March 21, 
1870. 

LIEUTENANT ZERA L. TANNER, 

Born in New York. Entered the navy as an Acting blaster, August 18, 1862 ; 
was in active service until the close of the Rebellion, when he was ordered to the 
R. S. Vermont, at New York ; Asiatic Squadron, 1867-9 ; transferred to the regular 
service in 1868. Commissioned as Lieutenant, March 21, 1870 ; receiving-ship 
at New York, 1871 ; Narragansett (third-rate), N. Pacific Fleet, 1872-3 ; Navy 
Yard, Philadelphia, 1873-4 ; on furlough, by request, 1874-8. Lieutenant Tanner 
commanded the Pacific mail-steamship Colon, from October, 1874, to December, 
1875 ; the City of Peking from January, 1876, to the present time. 



LIEUTENANT JOSEPH E. JONES, 

Born in Massachusetts. Entered the volunteer service October 9, 1861 ; served 
during the Rebellion ; appointed an Ensign in regular service in 1868. Commis- 
sioned as Lieutenant, March 21, 1870 ; Tallapoosa, special service, 1870-1 ; Paloa 
(fourth-rate), Asiatic Squadron, 1872-3 ; Gettysburg, special service, 1874 ; Talla- 
poosa, special service, 1874-8. 



224 LIEUTENANTS. 

LIEUTENANT WILLIAM WELSH, 

Born in Massachusetts. Entered the navy as a volunteer officer, June 15, 1864; 
served during the last year of the Rebellion ; in 1868 was appointed an Ensign in 
the regular service; Jamestown (third-rate), Pacific Fleet, 1869-71. Commis- 
sioned as Lieutenant, March 21, 1870 ; Pacific Fleet, 1872 ; Ticonderoga (second- 
rate), N. A. Fleet, 1873; Dictator (iron-clad), N. A. Fleet, 1874; Ossipee 
(third-rate), N. A. Fleet, 1875-6; Onward, store-ship, Asiatic Fleet, 1875-8. 



LIEUTENANT SAMUEL BELDEN, 

Born in Connecticut. Entered the volunteer service September 5, 1862, and in 
1868 was appointed an Ensign in the regular navy; Nyack (fourth-rate). Pacific 
Fleet, 1868-70. Commissioned as Lieutenant, March 21, 1870 ; Hydrographic 
Office, 1871-2 ; commanding tug Fortune, 1872-5 ; Ossipee (third-rate), N. A. 
Fleet, 1875-7 ; Naval Station, New London, Connecticut, 1877-8. 



LIEUTENANT E. W. WATSON, 

Born in Massachusetts. Entered the volunteer naval service October 15, 1862 ; 
served during the Rebellion, and three years after its close was appointed an Acting 
Ensign in the regular service. Commissioned as Lieutenant, March 21, 1870; 
Seminole (third-rate), N. A. Squadron, 1869-70 ; ordnance duty, Norfolk, 1871 ; 
Canonicus (iron-clad), N. A. Fleet, 1872 ; Norfolk Navy Yard, 1873-5 ; Ossipee 
(third-rate), N. A. Fleet, 1875. 



LIEUTENANT JOHN F. MERRY, 

Born in Maine. Entered the navy as a volunteer officer October 15, 1862 ; 
served during the Rebellion ; in 1868 was appointed an Ensign in regular service. 
Commissioned as Lieutenant, March 21, 1870; Asiatic Fleet, 1868-72; Naval 
rendezvous, Boston, 1873^ ; commanding R. S. Relief, 1875-7 ; Gettysburg 
(fourth-rate), special service in the Mediterranean, 1877-8. 



LIEUTENANT W. W. RHOADES, 

Born in Massachusetts. Entered as a volunteer officer in June, 1864. Appointed 
an Ensign in the regular service in 1868. Commissioned as Lieutenant, March 
21, 1870; Pensacola (second-rate). Pacific Fleet, 1869-70 ; Resaca (third-rate), 
Pacific Fleet, 1871 ; Navy Yard, Boston, 1872 ; Ossipee (third-rate), N. A. 
Squadron, 1873—1 ; receiving-ship Sabine, 1875-6 ; commanding Mahopac (iron- 
clad), N. A. Fleet, 1876-7. 

LIEUTENANT JOHN C. MORONG, 

Born in Maine. Appointed as an Acting Ensign, April 1, 1863, and ordered to 
the Mississippi Squadron, and served in command of the Argosy, from May, 1863, 
until the close of the war ; was in many engagements on the Mississippi ; at siege 
of Vicksburg and in the Red River Expedition. Was promoted June 1, 1864, 
for "meritorious conduct," to Acting Master ; stationed at Mound City, Illinois, 



LIEUTENANTS. 225 

1865-6 ; League Island, 1867-8. Was appointed an Ensign in the regular 
navy, March 12, 1868. Promoted to Master, December 18, 1868 ; steamer Talla- 
poosa and flag-ship Contocook, North Atlantic Station, 1869-70 ; Pacific Station, 
in flag-ship California and steamer Saranac, 1871-3 ; Asiatic Station, in steamer 
Kearsarge, 1874-6 ; returned home from the Asiatic Station in the Yantic, May 30, 
1877, "uhich was the expiration of his last cruise; was ordered to command the 
U. S. Naval rendezvous at San Francisco, California, August 28, 1877, which is, 
his present duty. 



LIEUTENANT WILLIAM C. GIBSON, 

Born in New York. Entered the service as a volunteer oflicer, December 15, 
1862 ; served during and after the Rebellion ; in 1868 was appointed an Ensign 
in regular service. Commissioned as Lieutencmf, March 21, 1870 ; Narragansett 
(third-rate). West India Station, 1869 ; Navy Yard, New York, 1870 ; Mohican 
(third-ratej. Pacific Fleet, 1871-2 ; Roanoke (iron-clad), 1873-4 ; Frolic (fourth- 
rate), S. A. Station, 1875-7. 



LIEUTENANT THOMAS G. GROVE, 

Born in New Jersey. Entered the service as a volunteer oflScer, June 18, 1862;-, 
served until 1868, when he was appointed an Ensign in the regular navy. Com- 
missioned as Lieutenant, March 21, 1870 ; Naval Station, Mound City, Illinois-,. 
1869-70 ; Terror (iron-clad), N. A. Station, 1871 ; Monocacy (third-rate),. 
Asiatic Station, 1873-6 ; Navy Yard, Pensacola, Florida, 1876-7. 



LIEUTENANT JAMES A. CHESLEY, 

Born in New Hampshire. Entered the volunteer navy in October, 1861, andi 
served during the Rebellion. In 1868 was appointed an Ensign in regular service.. 
Commissioned as Lieutenant, March 21, 1870 ; receiving-ship. New York, 1869- 
70 ; Ajax (iron-clad), N. A. Fleet, 1871 ; receiving-ship, New York, 1872 ; Juniata 
(third-rate), N. A. Fleet, 1873; Kansas (third-rate), N. A. Fleet, 1874; com- 
manding Manhattan (iron-clad), N. A. Fleet, 1875-8. 



LIEUTENANT WM. A. MORGAN, 

Born in Wales. Entered the volunteer navy in June, 1863, and served as an. 
acting cifficer until 1868, when he was appointed an Ensign in the regular ser- 
vice. Commissioned as Lieutenant, March 21, 1870; Powhatan (second-rate), 
Pacific Fleet, 1868-9 ; receiving-ship, Norfolk, 1870-1 ; Shawmut (third-rate),. 
N. A. Squadron, 1872-4 ; Navy Yard, Boston, 1875 ;. commanding MontauL 
(iron-clad), N. A. Fleet, 1875-8. 



LIEUTENANT WASHBURNE MAYNARD, 

Born in Tennessee. Entered Naval Academy in 1862 ; graduated, 1866 ; Franks 
lin, flag-ship European Fleet, 1867-8. Promoted to Ensign, April,. 1868 ; to^ 

IS 



226 LIEUTENANTS. 

Master, March 26, 1869 ; Seminole, N. A. Station, 1869-70. Commissioned as 
Lieutenant, March 21, 1870; torpedo duty, 1871-2; Suwanee, Pacific Fleet, 
1872-3 ; special duty, seal fisheries, 1874-5 ; Wyandotte (iron-clad), N. A. Sta- 
tion, 1875-6 ; Coast Survey, 1877 ; commanding C. S. steamer Fathomer, 1877-8. 



LIEUTENANT RICHARD M. CUTTS, 

Born in District of Columbia. Entered Naval Academy in 1862 ; graduated, 
1866 ; Ossipee, N. Pacific Fleet, 1867-8. Promoted to Ensign, April, 1868 ; 
Pensacola, N. P. Station, 1869. Promoted to Master, March 26, 1869. Com- 
missioned as Lieutenant, March 21, 1870 ; special duty, Washington, 1870 ; R. 
S. Independence, 1871 ; Pacific Fleet, 1871-2; Powhatan, N. A. Station, 1873; 
i^avy Yard, Mare Island, 1874-5 ; C. S. steamer Hassler, 1876-7 ; C. S. schooner 
Yukon, 1877-8. 

LIEUTENANT HENRY S. LYON, 

iBoRN in Massachusetts. Entered Naval Academy, October 7, 1862 ; graduated, 
1866 ; N. Atlantic Squadron, 1867-8. Promoted to Ensign, April, 1868 ; ord- 
inance duty, Boston, 1868; store-ship Guard, Mediterranean Squadron, 1869. 
Promoted to blaster, July 26, 1869 ; steam-sloop Richmond, European Fleet, 
1870-2. Commissioned as Lieutenant, March 21, 1870 ; frigate Franklin, N. A. 
Fleet, 1873 ; special ordnance duty, 1874; Tennessee, flag-ship European Squad- 
;ron, 1875-7. 

LIEUTENANT JAMES H. DAYTON, 

EoRN in Indiana. Entered Naval Academy, September 27, 1862 ; graduated, 
1866 ; Pensacola (second-rate), N. Pacific, 1867-9. Promoted to Ensign, April, 
1868, and to Master, March 26, 1869 ; Miantonomah (iron-clad), special service, 
1870. Commissioned as Lieutenant, March 21, 1869; Plymouth, European 
Fleet, 1871-3 ; Worcester, flag-ship N. A. Fleet, 1874 ; Naval Academy, 1875-7. 



LIEUTENANT ASA WALKER, 

Born in New Hampshire. Entered Naval Academy, November 27, 1862 ; grad- 
Tiated, 1866 ; N. Atlantic Squadron, 1867. Promoted to Ensign, April, 1868 ; 
•ordnance duty, Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 1868 ; Jamestown, Pacific Fleet, 
1868-71. Promoted to Master, March 26, 1869. Commissioned as Lieutenant, 
March 21, 1870; Naval Academy, 1872-6; Essex, S. Atlantic Station, 1876-8. 



LIEUTENANT M. R. S. MACKENZIE, 

IBORN in New York. Appointed to Naval Academy, September 27, 1862 ; grad- 
!uated, 1866 ; N. A. Station, 1867. Promoted to Ensign, April, 1868 ; ordnance 
•duty, Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 1868 ; Guard, store-ship European Fleet, 
1868-9. Promoted to Master, March 26, 1869 ; Franklin, flag-ship European 
Fleet, 1869-71. Commissioned as Lieutenant, March 21, 1870; Naval Acad- 
emy, 1873-4 ; Pensacola, flag-ship, N. Pacific Station, 1875-8. 



LIEUTENANTS. 2.21 

LIEUTENANT GEORGE M. TOTTEN, 

Born in District of Columbia. Entered Naval Academy, September 27, 1862 ; 
Ossipee (third-rate), N. Pacific Squadron, 1867-9. Promoted to Ensign^ April, 
1868. Promoted to Master^ March 26, 1869 ; Colorado, flag-ship Asiatic Fleet, 
1870-2. Commissioned as Lieutenant, March 21, 1870 ; Hydrographic Office, 
1873-4; Swatara, N. A. Squadron, 1874-7. 



LIEUTENANT CHARLES S. SPERRY, 

Born in New York. Entered Naval Academy, September 27, 1862 ; N. A. 
Squadron, 1867. Promoted to Ensign, April, 1868 ; ordnance duty, Boston, 
1868 ; Kearsarge, Pacific Fleet, 1869-70. Promoted to Master, March 26, 1869. 
Commissioned as Lieutenant, March 21, 1870 ; Worcester, flag-ship N. A. Fleet, 
1871-4; Naval Academy, 1875-7. 



LIEUTENANT FRANK COURTIS, 

Born in Ohio. Entered Naval Academy, September 24, 1862 ; graduated, 1866 ; 
Pawnee (second-rate), S. A. Station, 1867-9. Promoted to Ensign, April, 1868. 
Promoted to Master, November 26, 1869 ; Pacific Fleet, 1869-72. Commis- 
sioned as Lieutenant, March 21, 1870; Coast Survey, 1873-6 ; commanding C. 
S. S. McArthur, 1877. 



LIEUTENANT WILLIAM WATTS, 

Born in New York. Entered Naval Academy, April 10, 1862; graduated, 
1866 ; Iroquois, Asiatic Station, 1866-9. Promoted to Ensign, April, 1868 ; 
practice-ship Macedonian, 1869. Promoted to Master, March 26, 1869 ; Con- 
gress (second-rate), N. A. Fleet, 1870-71. Commissioned as Lieutenant, March 
21, 1870; torpedo service, 1872-3; Brooklyn, flag-ship S. A. Fleet, 1874-5; 
Monongahela, S. A. Station, 1876 ; ordnance duty, New York Navy Yard, 
1877-8. 



LIEUTENANT W. W. REISINGER, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Entered Naval Academy in April, 1862 ; graduated, 
1866 ; N. A. Fleet, 1866-7 ; Asiatic Station, 1867-70. Promoted to Erisign, 
April, 1868 ; to Master, March 26, 1869 ; and commissioned as Lieutenant, March 
21, 1870; torpedo service, 1871; Constellation (gunnery-ship), 1872; Rich- 
mond, flag-ship S. Pacific Squadron, 1873-4 ; Hydrographic Office, 1875-6 ; 
ordnance duty, Washington, 1877. 



LIEUTENANT JOHN C. RICH, 

Born in New York. Appointed to Naval Academy, September 23, 1862 ; gradu- 
ated in 1866 ; North Atlantic Station, 1867. Promoted to Ensign, April, 1868 ; 
Asiatic Squadron, 1868-71. Promoted to Master, March 26, 1869. Com- 
missioned as Lieutenant, March 21, 1870 ; Mahopac (iron-clad), N. A. Station. 



228 LIEUTENANTS. 

1871-2; Ossipee, N. A. Statiou, 1873; sick-leave, 1874; Alert, Asiatic Fleet, 
1875-8. 



LIEUTENANT WILLIAM T. BURWELL, 

Born in Mississippi. Entered Naval Academy, September 29, 1862 ; graduated 
in 1866; Asiatic Station, 1867-71. Promoted to Ensign in April, 1868. Pro- 
moted to Master, March 26, 1869. Commissioned as Lieutenant, March 21, 
1870; Worcester, flag-ship North Atlantic Fleet, 1872-5; Hartford, flag-ship 
N. A. Fleet, 1876; special duty. New York, 1877. 



LIEUTENANT JOHN J. HUNKER, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Entered Naval Academy, April 18, 1862 ; graduated, 
1866 ; Susquehanna, flag-ship, N. A. Station, 1866-8. Promoted to Ensign, 
April, 1868; Franklin, flag-ship European Squadron, 1869-71. Promoted to 
Master, March 26, 1869. Commissioned as Lieutenant, March 21, 1870 ; torpedo 
service, 1872 ; Michigan (fourth-rate), 1873 ; Swatara, N. A. Station, 1874-5 ; 
Michigan (fourth-rate), 1876 ; torpedo duty, 1877. 



LIEUTENANT JOHN C. SOLEY, 

Born in Massachusetts. Appointed to Naval Academy, September 20, 1862, and 
graduated in 1866 ; N. A. Station, 1867. Promoted to Ensign, April, 1868 ; 
ordnance duty, Boston, 1868 ; Nipsic (fourth-rate), N. A. Station, 1868-9. Pro- 
moted to Master, March 26, 1869; Severn, flag-ship, North Atlantic Station, 
1869-70. Commissioned as Lieutenant, March 2] , 1870 ; Naval Academy, 
1871-2 ; Wabash, flag-ship European Squadron, 1873, and Franklin, flag-ship 
same squadron, 1874-6 ; Marion, European Fleet, 1877. 



LIEUTENANT WILLIAM McLITTLE, 

Born in New York. Entered Naval Academy, March 11, 1863; graduated, 
1866; N. A. Station, 1867. Promoted to Ensign, April, 1868; Franklin, flag- 
ship European Fleet, 1868-71. Promoted to Master, March 26, 1869. Com- 
missioned as Lieutenant, March 21, 1870 ; leave in Europe, 1876 ; torpedo duty, 
1873 ; Swatara, N. A. Squadron, 1874-7. 



LIEUTENANT FRANKLIN HANFORD, 

Born in New York. Entered Naval Academy, November 29, 1862 ; graduated, 
1866 ; Kearsarge (third-rate), 1867-8. Promoted to Ensign, April, 1868 ; Tus- 
carora, N. A. Station, 1868-71. Promoted to Master, March 26, 1869 ; and com- 
missioned as Zr/eitteua/ii!, March 21, 1870; Wabash, flag-ship European Fleet, 
1872-4; torpedo duty, 1874; Tennessee, flag-ship Asiatic Squadron, 1874-6; 
Ashuelot, Asiatic Fleet, 1876-8. 



LIEUTENANTS. 229 

LIEUTENANT FREDERICK W. CROCKER, 

Born in Massachusetts. Entered Naval Academy, September 26, 1862 ; gradu- 
ated, 1866; N. A. Station, 1867. Promoted to Ensign, April, 1868; ordnance 
duty, Boston, 1868 ; Santee, N. A. Station, 1868-9. Promoted to Master, March 
26, 1869; and commissioned as Lieutenant, March 21, 1870; special duty, New 
York, 1870; Shenandoah, European Fleet, 1870-2; Brooklyn, European Fleet, 
1873; torpedo duty, 1874; Richmond, Pacific Squadron, 1875-6; Onward 
(store-ship), Callao, 1877. 

LIEUTENANT ROBERT M. BERRY, 

Born in Kentucky, Entered Naval Academy, June 31, 1862; graduated, 1866 ; 
Guerriere, flag-ship. South Atlantic Station, 1867-8; Kansas, same station, 1869. 
Promoted to Ensign, April, 1868 ; and to Master, March 26, 1869 ; Cyane, 
Pacific Fleet, 1869-72. Commissioned as Lieutenant, March 21, 1870; Dictator 
(iron-clad), N. A. Station, 1873; Franklin, flag-ship European Fleet, 1874-6; 
torpedo duty, summer of 1877. 



LIEUTENANT SAMUEL W. VERY, 

Born in England. Entered Naval Academy, February 23, 1863 ; graduated, 
1866 ; Resaca (third-rate). North Pacific Station, 1867-70 ; and Onward, same 
station, 1871. Promoted to Ensign, April, 1868 ; to blaster, March 26, 1869 ; 
and commissioned as Lieutenant, March 21, 1870; torpedo duty, 1872; Lancaster, 
flag-ship. South Atlantic Station, 1872-4 ; Richmond, flag-ship, South Pacific 
Station, 1874-7. 

LIEUTENANT DANIEL W. DAVIS, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Entered Naval Academy, September 28, 1861 ; grad- 
uated, 1866 ; Resaca (third-rate), N. P. Fleet, 1867-8 ; Mohican, same station, 
1869; and St. Mary's, 1870-2. Promoted to Ensign, April, 1868; to blaster, 
March 26, 1869; and commissioned as Lieutenant, March 21, 1870; Mayflower 
(fourth-rate), N. A. Station, 1873; Congress, European Fleet, 1874; R. S. 
Franklin, 1877 ; Monongahela, training-ship, 1877. 



LIEUTENANT CHARLES H. JUDD, 

Born in New York. Entered Naval Academy, September 23, 1863 ; graduated 
1866 ; Ossipee, North Pacific Fleet, 1867-9. Promoted to Ensign, April, 1868 
and to Master, March 26, 1869; Miantonomah, special service, Europe, 1869-70 
Commissioned as Lieutenant, March 21, 1870 ;. Michigan (fourth -rate), 1871 
Nipsic, North Atlantic Squadron, 1872 ; R. S. Vermont, 1873-4 ; Plymouth 
North Atlantic Station, 1875-8. 



LIEUTENANT RANSOM B. PECK, 

Born in New York. Entered Naval Academy, November 20, 1861 ; graduated, 
1866; Guerriere, flag-ship, South Atlantic Station, 1867-8; and Kansas, same 



230 LIEUTENANTS. 

station, 1869. Promoted to Ensign, April, 1868 ; and to Master^^orc^ 1869; 
special duty, Jefferson Barracks, 1870. Commissioned as Lieutenant, March 21, 
1870; California, Pacific Station, 1871-2; Ticonderoga, North Atlantic Squadron, 
1873—4 ; Naval rendezvous, San Francisco, 1875-6 ; Pensacola, flag-ship North 
Pacific Fleet, 1877-8. 



LIEUTENANT T. C. TERRELL, 

Born in Indiana. Entered Naval Academy, September 20, 1862 ; graduated, 
June, 1866; Gettysburg (first San Domingo Expedition), 1866-7; Guerriere, 
South Atlantic Station, 1867-8. Promoted to Ensign, March, 1868; Quinuebaug, 
Paraguay Expedition, 1868; Wasp, South Atlantic, 1869. Promoted Master, 
March, 1869 ; Quinnebaug, on return from Brazil, 1870. Promoted Lieutenant, 
March, 1870 ; Torpedo Station, 1870-1 ; on the lakes, 1871-2 ; California, 
Pacific Station, 1872-3 ; Saranae, Pacific Station, 1873-4 ; New Hampshire, 
Norfolk, 1874 ; Brooklyn, S. A. Station, 1875-6 ; commanding iron-clad Wyan- 
dotte, 1876-7 ; commanding iron-clad Passaic, 1877 ; Hydrographic Office, 
1877-8. 

LIEUTENANT GEORGE C. BICKNELL, 

Born in Indiana. Entered Naval Academy, December 2, 1861 ; graduated, 
1866 ; Iroquois, Asiatic Fleet, 1867-70. Promoted to Ensign, April, 1868 ; 
to Master, March 26, 1869 ; and commissioned as Lieutenant, March 21, 1870 ; 
Naval Academy, 1871; Worcester, flag-ship, N. Atlantic Station, 1872-5; Tor- 
pedo Station, 1875 ; South Pacific Station, 1875-6 ; Richmond (second-rate), 
Pacific Fleet, 1877-8. 

LIEUTENANT SAMUEL F. CLARKSON, 

Born in New York. Entered Naval Academy, September 20, 1862 ; graduated, 
1866 ; N. A. Station, 1867. Promoted to Ensign, April, 1868 ; Tuscarora, Pa- 
cific Fleet, 1868-70. Promoted to Master, March 26, 1869. Commissioned as 
Lieutenant, March 21, 1870; Canonicus (iron-clad), N. A. Station, 1871-2; R. 
S. New Hampshire, 1874; Omaha (second-rate), 'S. Pacific Fleet, 1874-5; On- 
ward (store-ship), Callao, 1876 ; Omaha, Pacific Fleet, 1877-8. 



LIEUTENANT MURRAY S. DAY, 

Born in New York. Entered Naval Academy, September 24, 1861 ; graduated, 
1866 ; N. A. Station, 1867. Promoted to Ensign, April, 1868 ; ordnance duty, 
Boston, 1868; Onward, Pacific Fleet, 1869-70. Promoted to Master, March 
20, 1869; and commissioned as Lieutenant, March 21, 1870; Coast Survey, 
1872 ; leave of absence, 1873-4 ; leave of absence, Japan, 1875-6 ; special service, 
1877 ; Trenton, flag-ship, European Station, 1877-8. 



LIEUTENANT HENRY N. MANNEY, 

Born in Indiana. Entered Naval Academy, September 24, 1861 ; graduated in 
1866 ; steam-sloop Resaca, N. P. Squadron, 1866-8. Promoted to Ensign in 



LIEUTENANTS. 231 

April, 1868 ; Pacific Fleet, 1869. Promoted to Master, March 26, 1869 ; Swa- 
tara, N. Atlantic Fleet, 1869-71. Commissioned as Lieutenant, March 21, 1870 ; 
steam-sloop Tuscarora, surveying duty in Pacific, 1872—4; Kearsarge, Asiatic 
Fleet, 1875 ; steamer Yantic, Asiatic Station, 1876. 



LIEUTENANT CHAPMAN C. TODD, 

Born in Kentucky. Entered Naval Academy, October 9, 1861 ; graduated in 
1866 ; steam-sloop Resaca, N. Pacific Fleet, 1866-8. Promoted to Ensign, April, 
1868 ; Pacific Fleet, 1869. Promoted to Master, March 26, 1869. Commis- 
sioned as Lieutenant, March 25, 1870 ; Pacific Fleet, 1870-1 ; Worcester, flag- 
ship, N. A. Station, 1872 ; Wyoming, N. A. Station, 1873 ; Hydrographic Office, 
1874 ; Pensacola, flag-ship, N. Pacific Station, 1875-6. 



LIEUTENANT GEORGE A. NORRIS, 

Born in Maine. Entered Naval Academy, September 27, 1862 ; graduated in 
1866 ; steam-sloop Pawnee, S. Atlantic Station, 1866-9. Promoted to Ensign 
in April, 1868; and to Master, March 26, 1869; signal duty, Washington, 
1869-70. Commissioned as Lieutenant, March 21, 1870 ; Darien Surveying Expe- 
dition, 1870-1 ; Signal Office, 1872; steam-sloop Tuscarora, surveying service in 
the Pacific, 1872-5 ; Marion (second-rate), European Station, 1876-8. 



LIEUTENANT WILLIAM I. MOORE, 

Born in Virginia. Entered Naval Academy, April 12, 1862 ; graduated, 1866 ; 
Monontiahela (second-rate), N. A. Station, 1866-8. Promoted to Ensign in 
April, 1868. Promoted to blaster, March 26, 1869 ; Pacific Fleet, 1869-72. 
Commissioned as Lieutenant, March 21, 1870 ; Ajax (iron-clad), N. A. Station, 
1873-4; Torpedo Station, 1875-6; Coast Survey, steamer Bache, 1876-8. 



LIEUTENANT WILLIAM H. PARKER, 

Born in Rhode Island, May 4, 1847. Appointed to Naval Academy from West 
Virginia, April, 1862 ; graduated, June, 1866 ; attached to practice-ships, June 
to September, 1866; steam-sloop Sacramento, special cruise, September, 1866, to 
June, 1867, when she was totally wrecked on the Coromandal coast. Bay of Ben- 
gal, India; arrived in United States from wreck, November, 1867; ordnance 
duty, Washington Navy Yard, March to August, 1868. Promoted to Ensign, 
April, 1868 ; ordnance duty, Boston Navy Yard, August to October, 1868 ; store- 
ship Guard and steam-sloop Richmond, European Squadron, October, 1868, to 
November, 1871. Promoted to Master, March 21, 1869; to Lieutenant, March 
21, 1870; Navy Yard, Portsmouth, New Hampshire, January to July, 1872; 
torpedo duty, Newport, Rhode Island, September, 1872, to July, 1873 ; Hydro- 
graphic Office, August to December, 1873 ; steam-frigate Franklin, North Atlantic 
Squadron, December, 1873, to April, 1874 ; steam-sloop Saranac, North Pacific 
Squadron, June, 1874, to June, 1875, when she was totally wrecked in Seymour 
Narrows, Gulf of Georgia; receiving-ship Independence, steam-sloops Benicia 



232 LIEUTENANTS. 

and Lackawanna, North Pacific Squadron, June, 1875, to March, 1877 ; Boston 
Navy Yard, July, 1877 ; Coast Survey Office, "Washington, August, 1877-8. 



LIEUTENANT JOSEPH N. HEMPHILL, 

Born in Ohio. Entered Naval Academy, September 27, 1862 ; graduated, 
1866; De Soto (second-rate), N. A. Station, 1866-8. Promoted to Ensign in 
April, 1868. Promoted to Master^ November 26, 1869 ; Plymouth, European 
Fleet, 1869-72. Commissioned as Lieutenant. March 21, 1870; Navy Yard, 
Norfolk, 1873-4; Tuscarora, North Pacific Station, 1875-6; Coast Survey, 
steamer Gedney, 1876-8. 

LIEUTENANT ABKAHAM B. H. LILLIE, 

Born in New York. Entered Naval Academy, September 24, 1862 ; graduated, 
1866 ; Kearsarge (third-rate). Pacific Fleet, 1867-70. Promoted to Ensign, 
April, 1868. Promoted to Master, March 26, 1869. Commissioned as Lieuten- 
ant, March 21, 1870; Shawmut (third-rate), N. A. Fleet, 1871-2; Brooklyn 
(second-rate), European Station, 1872-6 ; Navy Yard, New York, 1876-7. 



LIEUTENANT WILLIAM T. SWINBURNE, 

Born in Rhode Island. Entered Naval Academy, September 24, 1862 ; gradu- 
ated, 1866; Kearsarge (third-rate). Pacific Fleet, 1867-70. Promoted to En- 
sign, April, 1868; to Master, March 26, 1869. Commissioned as Lieutenant, 
March 21, 1870; Michigan (fourth-rate), 1871-2; Lancaster, flag-ship, South 
Atlantic Station, 1872-5 ; Torpedo Station, 1875 ; Hartford, flag-ship, N. A. 
Station, 1876-7. 

LIEUTENANT EDWARD WOODMAN, 

Born in New Hampshire. Entered Naval Academy, September 30, 1862; 
graduated, 1866 ; De Soto (second-rate), N. A. Fleet, 1867-8. Promoted to 
Ensign in April, 1868 ; Portsmouth, S. A. Fleet, 1869-72. Promoted to Master, 
March 26, 1869. Commissioned as Lieutenant, March 21, 1870 ; Worcester, 
flag-ship N. A. Fleet, 1873 ; frigate Colorado, N. A. Station, 1874 ; Nantucket 
(iron-clad), N. A. Station, 1875-6 ; R. S. Franklin, 1877-8. 



LIEUTENANT WILLIAM H. EMORY, 

Born in District of Columbia. Entered Naval Academy, September 23, 1862 
graduated in 1866 ; Iroquois (third-rate), Asiatic Station, 1867-9, and Maumee 
same station, 1869-70. Promoted to Ensign, April, 1868. Promoted to Master. 
March 26, 1869. Commissioned as Lieutenant, March 21, 1870 ; Naval Obser- 
vatory, 1871 ; Constellation (gunnery-ship), Washington, 1872 ; Hartford, flag- 
ship, Asiatic Station, 1873-4 ; Franklin, flag-ship, European Station, 1875-6 : 
Naval Academy, 1877-8. 



LIEUTENANTS. , 233 

LIEUTENANT CHARLES T. HUTCHINS, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Entered Naval Academy, June 1, 1862; graduated, 
1866 ; Asiatic Squadron, 1867-70. Promoted to Ensign, April, 1868 ; to Master^ 
March 26, 1869. Commissioned as Lieutenant, March 21, 1870 ; Naval Observa- 
tory, 1871 ; Wyoming, N. A. Station, 1872-4 ; Coast Survey, 1875 ; commanding 
Coast Survey steamer Endeavor, 1875-6 ; commanding Lehigh (iron-clad), 1876 
-7 ; Hydrographic Office, 1877-8. 



LIEUTENANT SETH M. ACKLEY, 

Born in Massachusetts. Entered Naval Academy, October 4, 1862 ; gi-aduated, 
1866; N. A. Station, 1867. Promoted to Emign in April, 1868; Gettysburg, 
N. A. Station, 1868-9. Promoted to Master, March 26, 1869 ; Yantic, N. A. 
Station, 1870-1. Commissioned as Lieutenant, March 21, 1870 ; Naval Obser- 
vatory, 1872 ; Omaha, S. P. Station, 1872-3 ; S. S. Onward, Callao, Peru, 1874- 
5 ; ordnance duty. Navy Yard, Washington, 1876 ; commanding R. S. Wyoming, 
1876-7 ; Coast Survey steamer Blake, 1877. 



LIEUTENANT R. MASON LISLE, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Entered the Naval Academy, September 25, 1862; 
graduated, 1866 ; Guerriere, flag-ship S. A. Squadron, 1867-8. Promoted to 
Ensign, April, 1868 ; Washington, S. A. Station, 1868-9. Promoted to Master, 
March 26, 1869 ; Terror (iron-clad), N. A. Station, 1864-70. Commissioned as 
Lieutenant, March 21, 1870; Navy Yard, Philadelphia, 1871; Lackawanna, 
Asiatic Station, 1872-5 ; Navy Yard, League Island, 1876 ; Alliance, European 
Station, 1877-8. 

LIEUTENANT BLOOMFIELD McILVAINE, 

Born in Pennsylvania, Entered the Naval Academy, October 8, 1862 ; gradu- 
ated, 1866 ; Kansas (fourth-rate), S. A. Squadron, 1867-8. Promoted to Ensign 
in April, 1868 ; Guerriere, flag-ship, S. A. Station, 1868-9. Promoted to Master, 
March 26, 1870 ; frigate Colorado, flag-ship Asiatic Fleet, 1869-73. Commis- 
sioned as Lieutenant, March 21, 1870 ; Torpedo Station, 1875 ; Marion, European 
Squadron, 1876-8. 

LIEUTENANT CLIFFORD B. GILL, 

Born in Maine. Entered Naval Academy, September 23, 1862 ; graduated in 
1866 ; frigate Franklin, flag-ship European Squadron, 1867-9. Promoted to 
Ensign, April, 1868. Promoted to Master, March 26, 1869 ; Pacific Fleet, 1869 
-71. Commissioned as Lieutenant, March 21, 1870 ; torpedo service, 1872 ; 
Hartford, flag-ship, Asiatic Station, 1872-5 ; R. S. Wabash, 1876-7. 



LIEUTENANT W. W. GILPATRICK, 

Born in Ohio. Entered Naval Academy, September 27, 1862 ; graduated in 
1866; Franklin, flag-ship, European Station, 1867-9. Promoted to Ensign, 



234 LIEUTENANTS. 

April, 1868. Promoted to Master, March 26, 1869; Severn, flag-ship N. A. 
Fleet, 1869-71. Commissioned as Lieutenant, March 21, 1870 ; Yantic, Asiatic 
Station, 1872-5 ; Lackawanna, N. P. Station, 1877-8. 



LIEUTENANT ISAAC L YATES, 

Born in New York. Entered Naval Academy, September 21, 1861; gradu- 
ated, 1866 ; Asiatic Squadron, 1867-70. Promoted to Ensign in April, 1868. 
Promoted to Master, March 26, 1869. Commissioned as Lieutenant, March 21, 
1870; Narragansett, N. Pacific Fleet, 1871-2; Canonicus (iron-clad), N. A. 
Station, 1873; Frolic, S. A. Squadron, 1875-6. 



LIEUTENANT BENJAMIN S. RICHARDS, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Entered Naval Academy, October 22, 1861 ; graduated, 
1866; De Soto (second-rate), N. A. Station, 1867-8. Promoted to Ensign^ 
1868; R. S. New Hampshire, 1869-70; retired, 1869; restored to active list, 
1872. Commissioned as Lieutenant, March 21, 1871 ; R. S. New Hampshire, 
1873; Portsmouth, Pacific Fleet, 1874-5; Lackawanna, N. P. Station, 1875-8. 



LIEUTENANT BENJAMIN F. TILLEY, 

Born in Rhode Island. Entered Naval Academy, September 22, 1863; grad- 
uated, 1867 ; Franklin, flag-ship European Fleet, 1867-8. Promoted to Ensign, 
1868 ; Lancaster, flag-ship S. A. Fleet, 1869-72. Promoted to Master, 1870 ; 
and commissioned as Lieutenant, 1871 ; Pensacola, flag-ship South Pacific Fleet, 
1873-5; R. S. New Hampshire, 1875; Hartford, flag-ship N. A. Station, 1876-8. 



LIEUTENANT HARRY KNOX, 

Born in Ohio. Entered Naval Academy, March 2, 1863; graduated, 1867; 
Franklin, flag-ship European Fleet, 1867-9. Promoted to Ensign, 1868. Pro- 
moted to Master, 1870 ; Pacific Fleet, 1870-2. Commissioned as Lieutenant, 
1871 ; Monongahela, S. A. Station, 1873-5 ; Naval Academy, 1876-8. 



LIEUTENANT FREDERICK COLLINS, 

Born in Maine. Entered Naval Academy, July 22, 1863 ; graduated, 1867 ; 
Franklin, flag-ship European Fleet, 1867-9. Promoted to Ensign, 1868 ; Darien 
Expedition, 1869-71. Promoted to Master, 1870 ; and commissioned as Lieur 
tenant, 1871 ; Naval Academy, 1873-4 ; special duty, Darien Survey, 1875-6 ; 
Coast Survey, 1876-8. 

LIEUTENANT CHARLES P. SHAW, 

Born in Virginia. Entered Naval Academy, September 25, 1863 ; graduated, 
1867 ; Franklin, flag-ship European Fleet, 1867-9. Promoted to Ensign, 1868 ; 



LIE UTENA NTS. 235 

Portsmouth, S. A. Fleet, 1869-71. Promoted to Master, 1870. Commissioned 
as Lieutenant, 1871 ; Pensacola, flag-ship, South Pacific Station, 1873-6 ; Hart- 
ford, flag-ship, North Atlantic Station, 1876-8. 



LIEUTENANT CLIFFORD H. WEST, 

Born in New York. Entered Naval Academy, September 21, 1863 ; graduated, 
1867 ; Ticonderoga, European Fleet, 1867-8. Promoted to Ensign, 1868 ; 
Plymouth, European Fleet, 1869-70. Promoted to Master, 1870 ; signal duty, 
1871. Commissioned as Lieutenant, 1871 ; Wyoming, Atlantic Station, 1871-2 ; 
ordnance duty. New York, 1873-4 ; Frolic, South Atlantic Fleet, 1875-8. 



LIEUTENANT JOHN P. MERRILL, 

Born in New York. Entered Naval Academy, July 20, 1863 ; graduated, 
1867 ; Ticonderoga, European Fleet, 1867-8. Promoted to Ensign, 1868 ; Ply- 
mouth, European Fleet, 1869-70; Darien Expedition, 1870-1. Promoted to 
Master, 1870 ; and commissioned as Lieutenant, 1871 ; torpedo duty, 1872-5 ; 
Swatara, North Atlantic Fleet, 1875-8. 



LIEUTENANT JOSEPH G. EATON, 

Born in Alabama. Entered Naval Academy, September 23, 1863 ; graduated, 
1867; Ticonderoga, European Fleet, 1867-8. Promoted to Ensign, 1868; 
Richmond, European Fleet, 1869 ; Darien Expedition, 1869-71. Promoted to 
Master, 1870 ; and commissioned as Lieutenant, 1871 ; ordnance duty, Boston, 
1872 ; Dictator (iron-clad), N. A. Station, 1873-4 ; special duty, Darien Survey, 
1874-5 ; Marion, European Station, 1876-8. 



LIEUTENANT CHARLES BELKNAP, 

Born in New Jersey. Entered Naval Academy, July 20, 1864 ; graduated, 1867 ; 
Ticonderoga, European Fleet, 1867-8. Promoted to Ensign, 1868 ; Pacific Fleet, 
1869-72. Promoted to Master, 1870; and commissioned as Lieutenant, 1871 ; 
Naval Academy, 1873-6 ; Kearsarge, Asiatic Fleet, 1876-8. 



LIEUTENANT WM. H. JACQUES, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Entered Naval Academy, September 29, 1863 ; gradu- 
ated, 1867 ; Canandaigua, European Station, 1867-9. Promoted to Ensign, 
1868 ; Centaur (iron-clad), N. A. Station, 1869 ; Saugus (iron-clad), N. A. Station, 
1869-70. Promoted to Master, 1870 ; torpedo duty, 1871. Commissioned as Lieu- 
tenant, 1871 ; Coast Survey, 1871-4 ; Nautical School-ship St. Mary's, 1875-8. 



LIEUTENANT FERNANDO P. GILMORE, 

Born in Ohio. Entered Naval Academy, February 28, 1863 ; graduated, 1867 ; 
Canandaigua, European Fleet, 1867-9. Promoted to Ensign, 1868; Pacific 



236 LIEUTENANTS. 

Fleet, 1869-72. Promoted to Master, 1870; and commissioned as Lieutenant, 
1871 ; Dictator (iron-clad), N. A. Station, 1873 ; Franklin, flag-ship European 
Fleet, 1874-6 ; torpedo duty, summer of 1877. 



LIEUTENANT HENRY C. HUNTER, 

Born in New York. Entered Naval Academy, September 22, 1863 ; graduated, 
1867 ; Canandaigua, European Fleet, 1867-9. Promoted to Ensign, 1868 ; New 
York Navy Yard, 1869; Severn, flag-ship N. Atlantic Fleet, 1870. Promoted 
to Master, 1870; Tuscarora, N. A. Station, 1871. Commissioned as Lieutenant, 
1871 ; Congress, special service, Europe, 1872-4; Tennessee, Asiatic Fleet, 1875 ; 
sick-leave, 1875-6 ; store-ship Supply, 1877. 



LIEUTENANT EUGENE H. C. LEUTZE, 

Born in Prussia. Entered Naval Academy, March 4, 1863 ; graduated, 1867 ; 
Canandaigua, European Fleet, 1867-9. Promoted to Ensign, 1868; receiving- 
ship at New York, 1869; Severn, flag-ship, N. A. Station, 1870-1. Promoted 
to Master, 1870 ; and commissioned as Lieutenant, 1871 ; Worcester, flag-ship 
N. A. Fleet, 1872 ; Hydrographic Office, 1873-5 ; Tuscarora, N. Pacific Fleet, 
1875-6 ; Coast Survey, 1876-7. 



LIEUTENANT URIAH SEBREE, 

Born in Wisconsin. Entered Naval Academy, July 23, 1863 ; graduated, 1867 ; 
Canandaigua, European Fleet, 1867-9. Promoted to Ensign, 1868 ; Pacific 
Fleet, 1869-72. Promoted to Master, 1870 ; and commissioned as Lieutenant, 
1871 ; Dictator (iron-clad), N. A. Station, 1873 ; Franklin, flag-ship, European 
Station, 1873-6 ; torpedo duty, summer of 1877. 



LIEUTENANT ALBERT R. COWDEN, 

Born in Indiana. Entered Naval Academy, September 26, 1863 ; graduated, 
1867 ; Franklin, flag-ship European Squadron, 1867-9. Promoted to Ensign, 
1868 ; Plymouth, European Station, 1869-70. Promoted to Master, 1870 ; 
Darien Expedition, 1871. Commissioned as Lieutenant, 1871; Wyoming, N. 
Atlantic Fleet, 1872-4; Torpedo Station, 1874-8. 



LIEUTENANT JOHN T. SULLIVAN, 

Born in New York. Entered the Naval Academy, September 28, 1862 ; gradu- 
ated, 1867 ; Quinnebaug, S. Atlantic Station, 1867-8. Promoted to Ensign, 
1868; Guerriere, flag-ship, S. A. Station, 1869. Promoted to Master, 1870; 
Quinnebaug, S. A. Station, 1870; Darien Expedition, 1871. Commissioned as 
Lieutenant, 1871 ; Wyoming, N. Atlantic Fleet, 1872 ; Ticonderoga, S. Atlantic 
Station, 1873; Roanoke (iron-clad), N. A. Station, 1874; special duty, Darien 
Survey, 1875 ; ordnance duty, New York, 1876 ; Essex, N. A. Fleet, 1876 ; and 
same ship, S. Atlantic Fleet, 1877-8. 



LIEUTENANTS. 237 

LIEUTENANT EDWARD C. PENDLETON, 

Born in Yirginia. Entered Naval Academy, October 12, 1863; graduated, 
1867 ; Minnesota, special service, 1867-8. Promoted to Ensign^ 1868; Onward, 
Pacific Fleet, 1869-70. Promoted to Master, 1870 ; Hydrographic Office, 1871. 
Commissioned as Lieutenant, 1871 ; ordnance duty, Washington, 1872-3 ; Con- 
gress, European Station, 1874-6 ; Navy Yard, Washington, 1876-7. 



LIEUTENANT GEORGE G. CLAY, 

Born in Massachusetts. Entered Naval Academy, July 22, 1863 ; graduated, 
1867 ; Susquehanna, flag-ship, N. Atlantic Station, 1867-9. Promoted to Master, 
1870 ; Frolic, special service, 1870 ; Ticonderoga, S. Atlantic Station, 1871-3. 
Commissioned as Lieutenant, 1871 ; leave in Europe, 1874; Worcester, flag-ship 
N. A. Fleet, 1874-5; R. S. Colorado, 1876; Navy Yard, New York, 1877. 



LIEUTENANT WILLIE SWIFT, 

Born in Connecticut. Entered Naval Academy, September 23, 1863; graduated, 
1867; Pacific Fleet, 1868-71. Promoted to Ensign, 1868; to Master, 1870; 
and commissioned as Lieutenant, 1871 ; Canandaigua, N. Atlantic Fleet, 1871-2; 
Colorado, N. A. Fleet, 1873-4 ; receiving- ship Colorado, 1875-6 ; equipment duty, 
New York, 1877 ; torpedo service, summer of 1877. 



LIEUTENANT HENRY B. MANSFIELD, 

Born in New York. Entered Naval Academy, February 27, 1863 ; graduated, 
1867 ; Minnesota, special service, 1867-8. Promoted to Ensign, 1868 ; Mo- 
hongo, Pacific Fleet, 1869-70. Promoted to Master, 1870. Commissioned as 
Lieutenant, 1871 ; torpedo duty, 1871 ; Coast Survey, 1872-4 ; Michigan, 1874-5 ; 
Asiatic Squadron, 1875-8. 



LIEUTENANT FREDERICK G. HYDE, 

Born in Connecticut. Entered Naval Academy, September 21, 1863 ; graduated, 
1867 ; Minnesota, special service, 1867-8. Promoted to Ensign, 1868 ; Dacotah, 
Pacific Fleet, 1869-70. Promoted to Master, 1870 ; torpedo duty, 1871. Com- 
missioned as Lieutenant, 1871 ; Nantasket, N. A. Station, 1872 ; sick-leave, 1874 ; 
Ossipee, N. A. Station, 1875-6. 



LIEUTENANT ROBERT E. CARMODY, 

Born in New York. Entered Naval Academy, September 29, 1860 ; graduated, 
1867 ; Quinnebaug, S. A. Station, 1867-70. Promoted to Ensign, 1868 ; and to 
Master, 1870 ; torpedo duty, 1871. Commissioned as Lieuteiiant, 1871 ; Terror 
(iron-clad), N. A. Station, 1871-2; Ashuelot, Asiatic Station,. 1873-6 ; Navy 
Yard, New York, 1877. 



238 LIEUTENANTS. 

LIEUTENANT EUGENE D. F. HEALD, 

Born in Maine. Entered Naval Academy, September 29, 1863 ; graduated, 1867 ; 
Susquehanna, N. A. Station, 1867-8. Promoted to Ensign, 1868; Albany, flag- 
ship, N. A. Station, 1869-70. Promoted to Master, 1870 ; Pacific Fleet, 1871-3. 
Commissioned as Lieutenant, 1871 ; North Atlantic Fleet, 1874-7. 



LIEUTENANT FREDERICK M. SYMONDS, 

Born in New York. Entered Naval Academy, September 29, 1862 ; graduated, 
1867 ; Asiatic Station, 1867-70. Promoted to Ensign, 1868 ; and to Master, 
1870. Commissioned as Lieutenant, 1871 ; Tuscarora, surveying duty in the 
Pacific, 1872-5 ; Minnesota (training-ship), 1876-8. 



LIEUTENANT CHARLES W. CHRISTOPHER, 

Born in Ohio. Entered Naval Academy, February 24, 1863 ; graduated, 1867 ; 
Minnesota, special service, 1867-8. Promoted to Ensign, 1868 ; Dacotah, Pacific 
Fleet, 1869-70. Promoted to Master, 1870 ; and commissioned as Lieutenant, 
1871 ; Pacific Fleet, 1871 ; Frolic, special service, 1872 ; Portsmouth, North 
Pacific Station, 1872-4 ; sick-leave, 1875-6. 



LIEUTENANT JOHN W. HAGENMAN, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Entered Naval Academy, July 21, 1863 ; graduated, 
1867 ; Susquehanna, N. A. Station, 1867-8. Promoted to Ensign, 1868 ; Ports- 
mouth, S. A. Fleet, 1869-71. Promoted to Master, 1870. Commissioned as 
Lieutenant, 1871 ; Coast Survey, 1872-5 ; Marion, European Fleet, 1876-8. 



LIEUTENANT EDWARD P. WOOD, 

Born in Ohio. Entered Naval Academy, September 29, 1863 ; graduated, 1867 ; 
Minnesota, special service, 1867-8. Promoted to Ensign, 1868; Dacotah, Pacific 
Fleet, 1868-70. Promoted to Master, 1870 ; Pacific Fleet, 1871. Commissioned 
as Lieutenant, 1871 ; Congress, special service, Europe, 1872-4; North Atlantic 
Station, 1875-7. 

LIEUTENANT WALTON GOODWIN, 

Born in New York. Entered Naval Academy, February 28, 1863 ; graduated, 
1867 ; Quinnebaug, S. Atlantic Station, 1867-70. Promoted to Ensign, 1868 ; 
to Master, 1870. Commissioned as Lieutenant, 1871 ; torpedo service, 1871 ; 
Terror (iron-clad), N. A. Station, 1871-2 ; Benicia, N. P. Station, 1873-5 ; Pas- 
saic (iron-clad), N. A. Station, 1876-7 ; Enterprise, 1877. 



LIEUTENANT EDWIN S. JACOB, 

Born in Virginia. Entered Naval Academy, October 14, 1862; graduated, 
1867 ; Asiatic Station, 1867-70. Promoted to Ensign, 1868 ; to Master, 1870. 



LIEUTENANTS. 239 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, 1871 ; Coast Survey, 1871-4 ; Powhatan, special 
service, N. A. Station, 1875-7 ; Hydrographic Office, 1877-8. 



LIEUTENANT ALBERT ROSS, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Entered Naval Academy, July 23, 1863 ; graduated, 
1867 ; Minnesota, special service, 1867-8. Promoted to Ensign, 1868 ; Powhatan, 
Pacific Fleet, 1868-9. Promoted to Master, 1870 ; retired, 1871 ; restored to 
active list, 1874. Commissioned as Lieutenant, 1871 ; Worcester, flag-ship N. A. 
Station, 1875; special duty, Annapolis, 1876; Passaic (iron-clad), N. A. Station, 
1876-7. 

LIEUTENANT ARTHUR A. BOYD, 

Born in Massachusetts. Entered Naval Academy, October 11, 1862 ; graduated, 
1867 ; Minnesota, special service, 1867 ; Asiatic Station, 1867-70. Promoted to 
Ensign, 1868; to Master, 1870. Commissioned as Lieutenant, 1871 ; Michigan, 
1870-1; Nipsic, N. A. Fleet, 1871-2; Kearsarge, Asiatic Squadron, 1873-^; 
North Pacific Station, 1875-6 ; Hydrographic Office, 1876-7. 



LIEUTENANT JACOB W. MILLER, 

Born in New Jersey. Entered Naval Academy, September 29, 1863 ; graduated, 
1867; Minnesota, special service, 1867-8. Promoted to Ensign, 1868; James- 
town, Pacific Fleet, 1868-70. Promoted to Master, 1870. Commissioned as 
Lieutenant, 1871 ; Narragansett, special service, 1871 ; Shawmut, N. A. Fleet, 
1871-2 ; special duty, Washington, 1873 ; Hydrographic Office, 1874-5 ; Frank- 
lin, European Station, 1875-6 ; Vandalia, European Station, 1876-8. 



LIEUTENANT RICHARDSON CLOVER, 

Born in Maryland. Entered Naval Academy, July, 1863 ; graduated, June, 
1867 ; frigate Susquehanna, West Indies, July, 1867, to January, 1868. Pro- 
moted to Ensign, 1868 ; flag-ship Albany, N. A. Station, March, 1868, to Octo- 
ber, 1869 ; Naval Observatory, October, 1869, to March, 1870. Promoted to 
Master, March 21, 1870 ; signal duty, March to July, 1870 ; Michigan, on lakes, 
July, 1870, to January, 1871. Commissioned as Lieutenant, March 21, 1871 ; 
Ticonderoga, South Atlantic Station, January, 1870, to February, 1874 ; Coast 
Survey, Pacific coast. May, 1874, to October, 1877 ; Hydrographic Office, Wash- 
ington, January to February, 1878 ; Wyoming, European Station, February, 1878. 



LIEUTENANT EDWARD W. BRIDGE, 

Born in New York. Entered Naval Academy, September 21, 1863 ; graduated, 
June 6, 1867 ; from July 1, 1867, to Januarys, 1868, attached to frigate Minne- 
sota, visiting Europe, Madeira, Barbadoes, and Aspinwall ; from January 3, 1868, to 
April 19, 1869, attached to the North Pacific Squadron, serving on board of the 
Mohican, Saranac, and Saginaw. Promoted to Ensign, December 18, 1868 ; 
from September 11, 1869, to October 28, 1870, attached to the Frolic, of the 



240 LIEUTENANTS. 

North Atlantic Squadron. Promoted to Master, Marcli 21, 1870 ; from Jan- 
uary 11, 1871, to January 20, 1872, on ordnance duty at the Navy Yard, New 
York. Promoted to Lieutenant, March 21, 1871 ; from January 20, 1872, to July 
24, 1872, attached to the Nantasket, in the West Indies; from November 29, 
1872, to July 17, 1873, attached to the Frolic, flag-ship of the Port-Admiral, at 
New York ; from September 3, 1873, to December 25, 1873, attached to the 
Monongahela, of the South Atlantic Station ; from January 21, 1874, to No- 
vember 11, 1875, on sick-leave; from November 11, 1875, to June 24, 1876, 
attached to the receiving-ship New Hampshire, at the Navy Yard, Norfolk, Vir- 
ginia; July 2, 1877, was ordered to equipment duty at League Island Navy Yard, 
where he is now serving. 

LIEUTENANT JAMES M. MILLER, 

Born in Missouri. Entered Naval Academy, September 21, 1863; graduated, 
1867 ; Minnesota, special cruise, 1867-8. Promoted to Ensign, 1868 ; James- 
town, Pacific Fleet, 1868-70. Promoted to Master, 1870 ; Kansas, T. and D. Ex- 
pedition, 1870-2. Commissioned as Lieutenant, 1871 ; special duty, Washington, 
1873 ; Monongahela, S. A- Station, 1873-5. Franklin, flag-ship European 
Squadron, 1875-6; Naval Academy, 1876-8. 



LIEUTENANT WILLIAM LITTLE, 

Born in Ohio. Entered Naval Academy, September 29, 1863 ; graduated, 1867 ; 
Minnesota, special cruise, 1867-8. Promoted to Ensign, 1868; Dictator (iron- 
clad), N. A. Fleet, 1869-70. Promoted to blaster, 1870. Commissioned as 
Lieutenant, 1871 ; Narragansett, special survey on Pacific, 1871-3 ; R. S. Poto- 
mac, 1873-4 ; Ashuelot, Asiatic Fleet, 1875-8. 



LIEUTENANT JOHN F. MEIGS, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Entered Naval Academy, October 4, 1862 ; gradu- 
ated, June, 1867; ordered to Piscataqua (afterwards Delaware), China, October 
10, 1867 ; ordered to Iroquois (transferred at Nagasaki), May 22, 1869. Pro- 
moted to Ensign, December 18, 1868 ; arrived in Iroquois at Philadelphia, and 
was detached April, 1870. Promoted to Master, March 21, 1870; reported at 
Washington for signal duty, June 15, 1870 ; detached from signal duty and or- 
dered to the Guerriere, August 16, 1870 (Europe); detached from Guerriere, 
March 11, 1872. Promoted to Lieutenant, March 21, 1871 ; ordered to League 
Island Navy Yard, March 23, 1872 ; detached July 9, 1872 ; reported at New- 
port for torpedo instruction, September 1, 1872; detached, June 23, 1873; re- 
ported on board Pensacola (South Pacific), October 1, 1873 ; transferred to 
Omaha (Callao), April 15, 1874; transferred to Onward (Callao), June 1, 1875 ; 
transferred to Richmond, July 1, 1875 ; detached from Richmond and ordered 
home, June 5, 1876 ; reported for duty at Naval Academy, September 1, 1876, 
where he is now serving. 

LIEUTENANT FREDERICK M. WISE, 

Born in District of Columbia. Entered Naval Academy, September 23, 1862; 
graduated, 1867 ; Asiatic Squadron, 1867-70. Promoted to Ensign, 1868 ; to 
Master, 1870. Commissioned as Lieutenant, 1871 ; Shenandoah, European Fleet, 



LIEUTENANTS. 241 

1871 ; Guerriere, European Fleet, 1871-2 ; New York Navy Yard, 1872-4 ; 
Woi-cester, flag-ship, N. A. Station, 1875 ; Hartford, flag-ship, N. A. Station, 
1876-8. 

LIEUTENANT JOHN V. B. BLEECHER, 

Born in New York. Entered Naval Academy, October 9, 1863 ; graduated, 
1867 ; Minnesota, special cruise, 1867-8. Promoted to Ensign^ 1868 ; Congress, 
N. A. Fleet, 1869-72. Promoted to Master, 1870. Commissioned as Lieutenant, 
1871 ; torpedo service, 1873; Colorado, N. A. Station, 1873-4; Frolic, S. A. 
Station, 1875-8. 

LIEUTENANT ANDREW DUNLAP, Jr., 

Born in New York. Entered Naval Academy, April 23, 1862 ; graduated, 1867 ; 
IMinnesota, special cruise, 1867-8. Promoted to Ensign, 1868 ; Jamestown, 
Pacific Fleet, 1868-70. Promoted to Master, 1870 ; and commissioned as Lieu- 
tenant, 1871 ; Worcester, flag-ship N. A. Fleet, 1871-4; R. S. Sabine, 1874-6 ; 
Hydrographic Office, 1877-8. 



LIEUTENANT RICHARD RUSH, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Entered Naval Academy, September 23, 1863; gradu- 
ated, 1867 ; Minnesota, special cruise, 1867-8. Promoted to Ensign, 1868 ; ]\Io- 
hongo, Pacific Fleet, 1868-70. Promoted to Master, 1870 ; and commissioned 
as Lieutenant, 1871 ; Coast Survey, 1871-4 ; Navy Yard, Philadelphia, 1875-6 ; 
Vandalia, European Squadron, 1876-8. 



LIEUTENANT EDWARD H. GHEEN, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Entered Naval Academy, September 24, 1862 ; gradu- 
ated, 1867 ; Asiatic Fleet, 1867-70. Promoted to Ensign, 1868 ; to Master, 1870. 
Commissioned as Lieutenant, 1871 ; Mahopac (iron-clad), N. A. Fleet, 1871-2 ; 
Lancaster, flag-ship S. A. Fleet, 1873-5 ; R. S. Potomac, 1875-6 ; AlUance, 
European Station, 1877-8. 

LIEUTENANT WELLS L. FIELD, 

Born in Missouri. Entered Naval Academy, November 26, 1862 ; graduated, 
1867 ; Asiatic Squadron, 1867-70. Promoted to Ensign, 1868 ; to Master, 1870. 
Commissioned as Lieutenant, 1871 ; special duty, Washington, 1872-3 ; Franklin, 
flag-ship, European Station, 1874-6 ; special light-house duty, 1877. 



LIEUTENANT HARRISON G. 0. COLBY, 

Born in Massachusetts. Entered Naval Academy, September 24, 1862; gradu- 
uated, 1867 ; Asiatic Squadron, 1868-70. Promoted to Ensign, 1868 ; to Master, 
1870. Commissioned as Lieutenant, 1871 ; Navy Yard, Boston, 1871 ; Congress, 
special service, 1871-2; Shenandoah, European Fleet, 1873-4; torpedo duty, 
1874 ; Tennessee (second-rate), 1875 ; European Station, 1877-8. 

16 



242 LIEUTENANTS. 

LIEUTENANT EDWARD P. McCLELLAN, 

Born in Maine. Entered Naval Academy, September 24, 1863 ; graduated, 1867 ; 
South Atlantic Station, 1867-70. Promoted to Ensign, 1868; to Master, 1870. 
Commissioned as Lieutenant, 1871 ; Yantic, N. A. Fleet, 1871-2; torpedo service, 
1872 ; Juniata, N. A. Fleet, 1873-6 ; training-ship Minnesota, 1876-8. 



LIEUTENANT LEAVITT C. LOGAN, 

Born in Maine. Entered Naval Academy, February 26, 1863 ; graduated, 1867 ; 
Minnesota, special cruise, 1867-8. Promoted to Ensign, 1868; Pensacola, flag- 
ship Pacific Fleet, 1868-70. Promoted to Master, 1870 ; and commissioned as 
Lieutenant, 1871 ; Hydrographic Oflace, 1871 ; Wabash, flag-ship, European Sta- 
tion, 1871-3; torpedo duty, 1874; Tennessee, Asiatic Squadron, 1875-7. 



LIEUTENANT FREDERICK H. PAINE, 

Born in New York. Entered Naval Academy, July 25, 1863 ; graduated, 1867 ; 
Asiatic Station, 1867-70. Promoted to Ensign, 1868 ; to Master, 1870 ; and 
commissioned as Lieutenant, 1871; Wachusett, European Squadron, 1871—4; 
Alarm (torpedo-boat), 1875-6; and commanding that vessel, 1876-8. 



LIEUTENANT CONWAY H. ARNOLD, 

Born in New York, Entered Naval Academy, September 29, 1863; graduated, 
1867; Minnesota, special cruise, 1867-8. Promoted to Ensign, 1868; Powhatan, 
Pacific Fleet, 1868-9 ; Pacific Fleet, 1870. Promoted to Master, 1870. Com- 
missioned as Lieutenant, 1871 ; R. S. Vermont, 1871 ; Wasp, South Atlantic 
Station, 1871-4 ; Naval Observatory, 1874-5 ; Hartford, flag-ship. North Atlantic 
Station, 1875-7. 

LIEUTENANT EDWARD W. STURDY, 

Born in Massachusetts. Entered Naval Academy, February 26, 1863 ; graduated, 
1867; Minnesota, special cruise, 1867-8. Promoted to Ensign, 1868; Pensa- 
cola, Pacific Fleet, 1868-70. Promoted to Master, 1870. Commissioned aa 
Lieutenant, 1871 ; special duty, Washington, 1871 ; Hydrographic Office, 1872 ; 
Wasp, South Atlantic Fleet, 1872-6 ; Naval Observatory, 1876-7. 



LIEUTENANT EDWARD W. VERY, 

Born in Maine. Appointed to Naval Academy from Washington Territory in 
1863 (the first appointment ever issued from that Territory) ; entered Naval 
Academy, February 20, 1863 ; in June, 1864, being granted leave of absence for 
four months, volunteered for active service, and was ordered to steamer Agawam, 
then at Dutch Gap, James River, June 7, 1864; transferred to steamer Gettys- 
burg, on the blockade off" Wilmington, July 27, 1864; returned to Naval Acad- 
emy, October 1, 1864; graduated,"june 7, 1867; ordered to steamer Michigan, 
August 6, 1867 ; ordered to steamer Piscataqua, Asiatic Squadron, September 30, 
1867 ; ordered to steamer Oneida, Asiatic Squadron, July 16, 1868. Commissioned 



LIE UTENA NTS. 243 

as Ensign, January 13, 1869 ; ordered to steamer Idaho, Asiatic Squadron, May 9, 
1869 ; ordered to steamer Monocacy, Asiatic Squadron, August 3, 1869 ; ordered 
to steamer Delaware, Asiatic Squadron, February 8, 1870. Commissioned as Master, 
December 16, 1869. Commissioned as Lietitenant, September 29, 1871 ; ordered to 
steamer Franklin, European Squadron, December 8, 1871 ; ordered to steamer Rich- 
mond, European Squadron, March 13, 1871 ; ordered to steamer Shenandoah, Eu- 
ropean Squadron, May 19, 1871 ; ordered to ordnance duty, Washington Navy Yard, 
February 11, 1874; ordered to Panama Interoceanic Canal Survey, December 7, 
1874 ; ordered to duty at Ordnance Bureau, April 19, 1875 ; ordered to Torpedo 
Station, June 1, 1875 ; ordered to experimental battery, September 19, 1875 ; took 
command of experimental battery, August 1, 1876 ; ordered to frigate Constitution, 
January 9, 1878 ; ordered to special ordnance duty in Europe, February 14, 1878. 



LIEUTENANT HAMILTON PERKINS, 

Born in New Hampshire. Entered Naval Academy, September 23, 1863 ;: 
graduated, 1867; Minnesota, special cruise, 1867-8. Promoted to Ensigyi, 1868; 
Pensacola, flag-ship Pacific Fleet, 1868-70. Promoted to blaster, 1870. Com- 
missioned as Ideutenant, 1871 ; Hydrographic Office, 1871 ; Alaska, Europeaa 
Fleet, 1873-6 ; Navy Yard, Boston, 1877. 



LIEUTENANT WILLIAM S. COWLES, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Entered Naval Academy, July 21, 1863 ; graduated,. 
1867 ; Minnesota, special cruise, 1867-8. Promoted to Ensign, 1868 ; Pacific 
Fleet, flag-ship Pensacola, 1868-70. Promoted to Master, 1870 ; Naval Observ- 
atory, 1870-1. Commissioned as Lieutenant, 1871 ; Alaska, European Squadron,, 
1873-6 ; Tennessee, Asiatic Fleet, 1877-8. 



LIEUTENANT FREDERICK W. GREENLEAF, 

Born in Maine. Entered Naval Academy, July 29, 1863 ; graduated, 1867 ; 
Quinnebaug, S. A. Station, 1867-70. Promoted to Ensign, 1868; and to Master, 
1870 ; Darien Expedition, 1870-2. Commissioned as Lieutenant, 1871 ; Mon- 
ocacy, Asiatic Squadron, 1873-7. 



LIEUTENANT ALLEN G. PAUL, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Entered Naval Academy, September 22, 1862 ; grad- 
uated, 1867; Minnesota, special cruise, 1867-8. Promoted to Ensign, 1868;. 
Onward, Asiatic Station, 1868-9 ; Navy Yard, Philadelphia, 1870. Promoted to 
Master, 1870 ; Saco, European Fleet, 1870-3. Commissioned as Lietitenant, 
1871; ordnance duty. Navy Yard, Philadelphia, 1874; special light-house duty,. 
1875-7 ; Hartford, flag-ship, N. A. Station, 1877-8. 



LIEUTENANT EDWARD W. REMEY, 

Born in Iowa. Entered Naval Academy, September 22, 1862 ; graduated, 1867 ; 
Minnesota, special cruise, 1867-8. Promoted to Ensign, 1868 ; Onward, Asiatic 
Fleet, 1868-70. Promoted to Master, 1870 ; Pawnee (store-ship), Key West^ 



244 LIEUTENANTS. 

1870-1 ; Coast Survey, 1871-4 ; torpedo duty, 1874 ; Tennessee, flag-ship 
Asiatic Fleet, 1875-8. 

LIEUTENANT JAMES M. GRIMES, 

Born in Ohio, Entered Naval Academy, July 23, 1863; graduated, 1867; 
Minnesota, special cruise, 1867-8. Promoted to Ensign, 1868 ; Dacotah, Pacific 
Fleet, 1868-71. Promoted to Master, 1870 ; and commissioned as Lieutenant, 
1871 ; Saugus (iron-clad), N. A. Fleet, 1873^ ; Coast Survey, 1874-6 ; Ranger, 
N. A. Station, 1876-7. 

LIEUTENANT EDWARD D. TAUSSIG, 

Born in Missouri. Entered Naval Academy, July 23, 1863 ; graduated, 1867 ; 
Minnesota, special cruise, 1867-8. Promoted to Ensign, 1868 ; Onward, Asiatic 
Squadron, 1868-70. Promoted to Master, 1870 ; Narragansett, Pacific Fleet, 
1871-4. Commissioned as Lieutenant, 1871 ; torpedo duty, 1874 ; special duty, 
Darien Survey, 1874-5 ; Navy Yard, Washington, 1876 ; training-ship Monon- 
gahela, 1876-7 ; Trenton, flag-ship, European Station, 1877-8. 



LIEUTENANT JOHN E. PILLSBURY, 

Born in Massachusetts. Entered Naval Academy, September 22, 1862 ; gradu- 
ated, 1867 ; Minnesota, special cruise, 1867-8. Promoted to Ensign, 1868 ; 
Navy Yard, Boston, 1869-70. Promoted to Master, 1870 ; Colorado, flag-ship 
Asiatic Fleet, 1870-2. Commissioned as Lieutenant, 1871 ; torpedo duty, 1873 ; 
Swatara, special service, 1875 ; Coast Survey, 1875-7. 



LIEUTENANT WILLIAM H. REEDER, 

Born in Iowa. Entered Naval Academy, September 25, 1862 ; graduated, 1867 
Asiatic Squadron, 1867-70. Promoted to Ensign, 1868; to blaster, 1870 
Commissioned as Lieutenant, 1872 ; Wabash, flag-ship European Fleet, 1871-2 
Shenandoah, European Fleet, 1873; Navy Yard, Boston, 1874; Navy Yard, 
Philadelphia, 1874-6 ; Powhatan, N. A. Squadron, 1877-8. 



LIEUTENANT DANIEL DELEHANTY, 

Born in New York. Entered Naval Academy, September 25, 1862 ; graduated, 
1867 ; Asiatic Fleet, 1867-9 ; Pacific Fleet, 1870. Promoted to Ensign, 1867 ; 
to Master, 1870. Commissioned as Lieutenant, 1872 ; Navy Yard, Mare Island, 
1871 ; Saranac, Pacific Fleet, 1872^ ; R. S. Independence, 1874 ; R. S. Colo- 
rado, 1875 ; Catskill (iron-clad), N. A. Station, 1875-6 ; Lackawanna, N. Pacific 
Station, 1876-8. 

LIEUTENANT FRANK W. NICHOLS, 

Born in Massachusetts. Entered Naval Academy, September 22, 1863 ; gradu- 
ated, 1867; Wasp, S. A. Station, 1867-70. Promoted to Ensign, 1868; to 



LIEUTENANTS. 245 

Master, 1870. Commissioned as Lieutenant, 1871 ; Tennessee, special service, 
1871 ; Terror (iron-clad), N. A. Station, 1871-2 ; Brooklyn, S. Atlantic Station, 
1874-6 ; K S. Colorado, 1877. 



LIEUTENANT CHAKLES 0. ALLIBONE, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Entered Naval Academy, July 23, 1863 ; graduated, 
1867 ; Asiatic Station, 1867-70. Promoted to Ensign, 1868 ; to Master, 1870. 
Commissioned as Lieutenant, 1872; Ticonderoga, S. A. Fleet, 1870-3; R. S. 
Independence, 1874; Tuscarora, N. P. Station, 1874-6; League Island Station, 
1877. 

LIEUTENANT CHARLES C. CORNWELL, 

Born in New York. Appointed an Acting Midshipman at Naval Academy, 
September 24, 1864; graduated, 1868; European Station, 1868-9. Promoted 
to Ensign, 1869 ; torpedo duty, 1870. Promoted to Master, 1870 ; Tennessee 
(sebond-rate), special service, 1870-1; Wachusett, European Station, 1871-2; 
European Squadron, 1873-4. Commissioned as Lieutenant, 1872 ; North Atlantic 
Station, 1874-7. 

LIEUTENANT R. R. INGERSOLL, 

Born in Michigan. Entered Naval Academy, July 23, 1864 ; graduated, 1868 ; 
European Station, 1868-9. Promoted to Ensign, 1869 ; Miantonomah (iron- 
clad), special service, 1869-70. Promoted to Master, 1870 ; Plymouth, Euro- 
pean Squadron, 1870-2 ; Kansas, North Atlantic Station, 1872-3 ; Juniata, 
European Station, 1874. Commissioned as Lieutenant, 1872; Yantic, Asiatic 
Station, 1875 ; and Kearsarge, same station, 1875-6 ; Naval Academy, 1876-8. 



LIEUTENANT R. M. G. BROWN, 

Born in Western Virginia. Appointed from that section by his uncle, Hon. 
William G. Brown ; entered Naval School at Newport, July, 1864 ; graduated, 
June, 1868, number three in a class of eighty; served as 3Iidshipman on North 
Pacific Station, on board of Saranac, Lackawanna, and Pensacola. Promoted to 
Ensign, 1869 ; to Master, 1870 ; sailed from New York, on the Alaska, in April, 
1870, for China; made a three years' cruise in that vessel; took part in the 
Corean Expedition ; commanding the sailors landed as infantry from that ship ; 
was in the final charge at Fort McKee, and was mentioned in the oflicial reports 
of the action as among those first in the fort ; ordered as second lieutenant to the 
New Hampshire, at Norfolk, in October, 1873 ; served there until June, 1874, 
when he was ordered to Torpedo School at Newport ; in October of same year 
was ordered as first lieutenant of the Despatch ; ordered to Swatara, June, 1875 ; 
served on Home Squadron until March, 1877, when he was ordered to the Naval 
Academy as Instructor of Navigation and Surveying. Commissioned as Lieu- 
tenant, April 13, 1872. 

LIEUTENANT ADOLPH MARIX, 

Born in Saxony. Entered Naval Academy, September 26, 1864; graduated, 
1868 ; European Station, 1868-9. Promoted to Ensign, 1869 ; Congress, special 



246 LIEUTENANTS. 

service, IStO-l. Promoted to Master, 1870 ; Canandaigua, North Atlantic 
Station, 1871-2. Commissioned as Lieutenant, 1872 ; Worcester, flag-sliip, North 
Atlantic Station, 1872-4 ; Saco, Asiatic Station, 1874-6 ; and Tennessee, same 
station, 1876-7. 

LIEUTENANT DUNCAN KENNEDY, 

Born in New York. Entered Naval Academy, July 20, 1864 ; graduated, 1868 ; 
Asiatic Station, 1868-70. Promoted to Ensign, 1869 ; to Master, 1870 ; Guer- 
riere, European Squadron, 1870-2. Commissioned as lAeutenant, 1872 ; Pensa- 
cola, Pacific Fleet, 1873; North Atlantic Station, 1876-8. 



LIEUTENANT JAMES D. J. KELLEY, 

Born in New York. Entered Naval Academy, October 5, 1864; graduated, 
1868 ; European Squadron, 1868-9. Promoted to Ensign, 1869 ; signal duty, 
Washington, 1870. Promoted to Master, 1870 ; Resaca, Pacific Fleet, 1870-3. 
Commissioned as Lieutenant, 1872; torpedo duty, 1873; Congress, European 
Squadron, 1874-5 ; Naval rendezvous. New York, 1875-6. 



LIEUTENANT JEFFERSON F. MOSER, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Entered Naval Academy, July 27, 1864 ; graduated, 
1868 ; European Squadron, 1868-9. Promoted to Ensign, 1869 ; Darien Expe- 
dition, 1869-70. Promoted to Master, 1870 ; Gruerriere, European Squadron, 
1870-2. Commissioned as Lieutenant, 1872 ; Despatch, special service, 1873—4; 
special duty, Darien Survey, 1875 ; Coast Survey, 1875-8. 



LIEUTENANT CHARLES A. STONE, 

Born in New York. Entered Naval Academy, September 26, 1864 ; graduated, 
1868 ; Jamestown, Pacific Fleet, 1868-9. Promoted to Ensign, 1869 ; Nan- 
tasket, N. A. Fleet, 1870-2. Promoted to Master, 1870. Commissioned as 
Lieutenant, 1872 ; Mahopac (iron-clad), N. A. Station, 1873 ; Fortune, special 
service, 1873-4 ; Navy Yard, Washington, 1875-7 ; Trenton, flag-ship Eui'opean 
Fleet, 1877-8. 

LIEUTENANT HOBART L. TREMAIN, 

Born in New York. Entered Naval Academy, September 30, 1864; graduated, 
1568 ; Pacific Fleet, 1868-9. Promoted to Ensign, 1869 ; Terror (iron-clad), 
N. A. Fleet, 1869-70. Promoted to Master, 1870. Commissioned as Lieutenant^ 
1872 ; Hartford, flag-ship, Asiatic Station, 1873-5 ; Minnesota (training-ship), 

1875-8. 

LIEUTENANT RAYMOND P. RODGERS, 

Born in District of Columbia. Entered Naval Academy, July 25, 1864 ; grad- 
uated, 1868 ; Guerriere, flag-ship S. A. Fleet, 1868-9. Promoted to Ensign, 



LIE UTENA NTS. 2-47 

1869 ; Franklin, flag-ship European Fleet, 1869-71 ; Juniata, same fleet, 1871-3. 
Promoted to blaster, 1870. Commissioned as Lieutenant, 1872; Naval Academy, 
1873-6 ; Pensacola, flag-ship Pacific Fleet, 1876-8. 



LIEUTENANT AMBROSE B. WYCHOFP, 

Born in Illinois. Entered Naval Academy, September 29, 1864 ; graduated, 
1868; S. A. Fleet, 1868-9. Promoted to Ensign, 1869; Nantasket, N. A. 
Fleet, 1869-70. Promoted to Master, 1870 ; sick-leave, 1871 ; Brooklyn, Euro- 
pean Squadron, 1872-3. Commissioned as Lieutenant, 1872; Wachusett, N. A. 
Station, 1874-5 ; Portsmouth (training-ship), 1875-6 ; Coast Survey, 1877-8. 



LIEUTENANT RICHARD C. DERBY, 

Born in Washington, District of Columbia, April 28, 1847 ; resident of New- 
port, Rhode Island. Appointed from Idaho Territory ; entered Naval Academy, 
September 20,1864; graduated, June 2, 1868; ordered to store-ship Gruard, 
European Station, November, 1868. Promoted to Ensign, April 19, 1869; de- 
tached from Guard, October, 1869 ; ordered to monitor Terror, November, 1869. 
Promoted to Master, July 12, 1870 ; detached from Terror, January, 1871 ; 
ordered to Torpedo Station, June, 1871 ; detached from Torpedo Station, January, 
1872 ; ordered to Powhatan, North Atlantic Station, February, 1872. Promoted 
to Lieutenant, October 27, 1872 ; detached from Powhatan and ordered to the 
Richmond, bound to N. Pacific, May, 1873 (Richmond afterwards went to S. 
Pacific); detached from Richmond, May, 1876 ; ordered to Naval Academy, 
September, 1876, where he is now serving. 



LIEUTENANT ROBERT T. JASPER, 

Born in New York. Entered Naval Academy, July 21, 1864 ; graduated, 1868 ; 
Nipsic, N. A. Fleet, 1868-70. Promoted to Ensign, 1869 ; and to Master, 1870 ; 
T. and N. Surveying Expedition, 1870-71 ; "Wabash, flag-ship European Fleet, 
1871-3. Commissioned as Lieutenant, 1872 ; S. A. Station, 1874-6 ; Naval 
Academy, 1876-8. 

LIEUTENANT SEATON SCHROEDER, 

Born in District of Columbia. Entered Naval Academy, September 26, 1864 ; 
graduated, 1868; Pacific Fleet, 1868-9. Promoted to Ensign, 1869; Benicia, 
Asiatic Station, 1869-72. Promoted to Master, 1870. Commissioned as Lieu- 
tenant, 1872; Pinta, N. A. Station, 1873; Swatara, 1874-5; Hydrographic 
Office, 1876 ; Gettysburg, special service in Mediterranean, 1876-8. 



LIEUTENANT FRANKLIN J. DRAKE, 

Born in New York. Entered Naval Academy, July 24, 1863 ; graduated, 1868; 
N. A. Fleet, 1868-9. Promoted to Ensign, 1869 ; signal duty, 1870. Promoted 
to J/as^er, 1870 ; Asiatic Fleet, 1870-3. Commissioned as Lieutenant, 1872; 
Torpedo Station, 1873 ; Portsmouth, N. P. Fleet, 1873-6 ; Coast Survey, 1876-7. 



248 LIEUTENANTS. 

LIEUTENANT THEODORUS BAILEY MYERS MASON, 

Born in New York City, May 8, 1848. Appointed Midshipman from Florida 
to U. S. Naval Academy at Newport, Rhode Island, September 20, 1864 ; served 
on board practice-ships Macedonian, Savannah, and Dale ; graduated, number 
21, June 6, 1868 ; ordered to flag-ship Guerriere, South Atlantic Station, Sep- 
tember 3, 1868; received letter of thanks from the Secretary of the Navy, gold 
medal of New York Benevolent and Life-Saving Institution, and decoration of 
the Order of the Rose from the Emperor of Brazil for saving two of the ship's 
crew in the harbor of Rio Janeiro ; detached from steamer Guerriere, at New York, 
July 21, 1869. Commissioned an Ensign, April 19, 1869 ; ordered to the flag- 
ship Franklin, European Station ; reported at Marseilles, October 23, 1869 ; de- 
tached from Franklin, at Copenhagen, and granted leave, June 30, 1871. Pro- 
moted to Master, July 12, 1870 ; ordered to Hydrographic Office, December 1, 
1871 ; detailed for duty as aid to the Secretary of the Navy, December 2, 1871 ; 
ordered to accompany President Grant to Boston, June 7, 1872 ; detached from 
Hydrographic Office, July 18, 1872 ; ordered to steamer Omaha, fitting out at 
Philadelphia for South Pacific. Promoted to Lieutenant, November 20, 1 872 ; 
detached from Omaha, at Valparaiso, and ordered to flag-ship Pensacola, February 
15, 1873; took part in landing at Panama to protect American interests during 
the spring and fall of 1873 ; detailed as Flag-Lieutenant, December 22, 1873 ; 
received silver naval medal from King of Italy for saving native bark Detaide 
from fire in harbor of Callao ; Pensacola, transferred to North Pacific Station, 
April 15, 1874; admiral and stafi" temporarily transferred to Saranac while Pen- 
sacola was undergoing repairs at Mare Island ; detached from staff and ship at 
Honolulu, July 29, 1875 ; ordered to Naval Academy, November 15, 1875 ; de- 
tailed during term of 1875-6 in Department of Modern Languages ; ordered to 
practice-steamer Mayflower, as Executive-Officer, at Philadelphia, May 11, 1876 ; 
detailed as Instructor in Ordnance and Gunnery, with special charge of Light- 
Artillery Instruction ; ordered to practice-steamer Mayflower, at New York, as 
Executive-Officer, July 26, 1877 ; now at Naval Academy, Department Ordnance 
and Gunnery. 

LIEUTENANT CHARLES W. CHIPP, 

Born in New York. Entered Naval Academy, July 23, 1863 ; graduated in 

1868 ; Franklin, flag-ship, European Station, 1868-9. Promoted to Ensign, 

1869 ; Alaska, Asiatic Fleet, 1870-2. Promoted to Master, 1870. Commis- 
sioned as Lieutenant, 1872 ; Juniata, N. A. Station, 1873-4 ; European Station, 
1874-6 ; Asiatic Station, 1876-8. 



LIEUTENANT NATHAN H. BARNES, 

Born in Connecticut. Entered Naval Academy, July 27, 1863; graduated, 
1868 ; Pacific Fleet, 1868-72. Promoted to Ensign, 1869 ; and to Master, 1870 ; 
and commissioned as Lieutenant, 1872 ; sick-leave, 1873 ; Plymouth, N. A. 
Station, 1875-6; training-ship Minnesota, 1877-8. 



LIEUTENANT THOMAS C. McLEAN, 

Born in New York. Entered Naval Academy, July 27, 1864 ; graduated, 1868 ; 
Pacific Fleet, 1868-9. Promoted to Ensign, 1869; Benicia, Asiatic Fleet, 



LIEUTENANTS. 249 

1869-73. Promoted to ilfas/er, 1870. Commissioned as 7>?ei<?enfln<, 1872 ; ex- 
perimental battery, 1873-5 ; flag-ship Tennessee, Asiatic Fleet, 1875-6 ; Torpedo 
Station, 1876-7. 



LIEUTENANT WILLIAM J. BARNETTE, 

Born in New York. Entered Naval Academy, July 27, 1864; graduated, 
1868 ; Asiatic Fleet, 1868-70. Promoted to Ensign, 1869 ; and to 3Iaster, 
1870 ; torpedo duty, 1871 ; Wabash, flag-ship European Squadron, 1871-3. 
Commissioned as Lieutenant, 1872 ; North Pacific Station, 1875-8. 



LIEUTENANT FRANCIS H. DELANO, 

Born in Ohio. Entered Naval Academy, September 22, 1863 ; graduated, 1868; 
Albany, flag-ship N. A. Fleet, 1868-9. Promoted to Ensign, 1869 ; Mohican, 
Pacific Fleet, 1870-1. Promoted to Master, 1870; Asiatic Fleet, 1871-2. 
Commissioned as Lieutenant, 1873 ; Portsmouth, N. P. Station, 1874-5 ; receiv- 
ing-ship Sabine, 1875-6 ; store-ship Supply, 1877-8. 



LIEUTENANT CHARLES T. FORCE, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Entered Naval Academy, September 23, 1864; gradu- 
ated, 1868 ; Jamestown, Pacific Fleet, 1868-9. Promoted to Ensign, 1869 ; 
Alaska, Asiatic Fleet, 1869-72. Promoted to Master, 1870 ; and commissioned 
as Lieutenant, 1873 ; Ossipee, N. A. Station, 1873-6. 



LIEUTENANT BOUTELLE NOYES, 

Born in Maine. Entered Naval Academy, September 26, 1864 ; graduated, 
1868; Guerriere, flag-ship, S. A. Station, 1868-9. Promoted to Ensign, 1869 ; 
European Fleet, 1869-72. Promoted to Master, 1870 ; and commissioned as 
Lieutenant, 1873; South Pacific Fleet, 1873-7. 



LIEUTENANT EDWARD K. MOORE, 

Born in Ohio. Entered Naval Academy, October 1, 1864; graduated, 1868; 
steam-ship Guard, European Fleet, 1868-9. Promoted to Ensign, 1869 ; signal 
duty, 1870. Promoted to Master, 1870 ; Colorado, Asiatic Fleet, 1870-2. Com- 
missioned as Lieutenant, 1873; Portsmouth, surveying on Pacific, 1873-6; 
Coast Survey, 1876-7. 



LIEUTENANT WASHINGTON 0. SHARRER, 

Born in Maryland. Entered Naval Academy, September 27, 1864; Delaware, 
flag-ship N. A. Fleet, 1868-70. Promoted to Ensign, 1867 ; to Master, 1870 ; 
Shenandoah, European Fleet, 1870-2. Commissioned as Lieutenant, 1873 ; 
Hydrographic Office, 1873-4 ; Coast Survey, 1875-7. 



250 LIEUTENANTS. 

LIEUTENANT ALBION V. WADHAMS, 

Born in New York. Entered Naval Academy, September 16, 1864 ; graduated, 
1868 ; Pacific Fleet, 1868-9. Promoted to Ensign, 1869 ; Alaska, Astatic Fleet, 
1869-73. Promoted to Master, 1870. Commissioned as Lieutenant, 1873; 
torpedo duty, 1873 ; Powhatan, N. A. Station, 1873-4 ; Alert, N. A. Station, 1875 ; 
Naval Academy, 1875-8. 

LIEUTENANT WEBSTER DOTY, 

Born in Wisconsin. Entered Naval Academy, July 27, 1864; graduated, 1868 ; 
Pacific Fleetj 1868-9. Promoted to Ensign, 1869 ; Yantic, N. A. Fleet, 1870-1. 
Promoted to Master, 1870 ; Michigan, 1872 ; Tuscarora, surveying on Pacific, 
1872-4. Commissioned as Lieutenant, 1873; Pensacola, Pacific Fleet, 1875; 
Hartford, N. A. Fleet, 1875-6 ; receiving-ship Wyoming, 1877. 



LIEUTENANT THEODORE T. WOOD, 

Born in New Jersey. Entered Naval Academy, September 29, 1864; gradu- 
ated, 1868; European Fleet, 1868-9. Promoted to Ensign, 1869; Asiatic 
Fleet, 1869-74. Promoted to Master, 1870. Commissioned as Lieutenant, 
1873; Navy Yard in New York, 1875; commanding Intrepid (torpedo-boat), 
1875-8. 

LIEUTENANT GEORGE W. TYLER, 

Born in Connecticut. Entered Naval Academy, October 3, 1864 ; graduated, 
1868; Asiatic Fleet, 1868-70. Promoted to Ensign, 1869; and to Master, 
1870 ; Guerriere, European Squadron, 1870-2. Commissioned as Lieutenant, 
1873 ; Coast Survey, 1873-5 ; Franklin, 1876-7 ; and R. S. Colorado, 1877-8. 



LIEUTENANT JOHN C. IRVINE, 

Born in Scotland. Entered Naval Academy, September 26, 1864 ; graduated, 
1868 ; Pacific Fleet, 1868-9. Promoted to Ensign, 1869 ; signal duty, Wash- 
ington, 1870. Promoted to Master, 1870 ; Pacific Fleet, 1871-4 ; Canandaigua, 
N. A. Station, 1875 ; and Montauk (iron-clad), same station, 1875-6 ; Ossipee, 
N. A. Fleet, 1876-7. Commissioned as Lieutenant, 1873. 



LIEUTENANT JEROME B. HOUSE, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Entered Naval Academy, September 27, 1864 ; grad- 
uated, 1868 ; N. A. Fleet, 1868-71. Promoted to Ensign, 1869 ; and to Master, 
1870 ; Palos, Asiatic Fleet, 1872-4. Commissioned as Lieutenant, 1873 ; Dic- 
tator (iron-clad), N. A. Station, 1875-6 ; Omaha, S. P. Station, 1876-8. 



LIEUTENANT CHARLES W. JARBOE, 

Born in Maryland. Entered Naval Academy, September 26, 1864 ; graduated, 
1868 ; N. A. Station, 1868-9. Promoted to Ensign, 1869 ; signal duty, 1870. 



LIEUTENANTS. 251 

Promoted to blaster, 1870 ; Brooklyn, European Fleet, 1870-3. Commissioned 
as Lieufenant, 1873; Navy Yard, Mare Island, 1874; Tuscarora, N. P. Fleet, 
1874-6 ; Coast Survey, 1877. 

LIEUTENANT JAMES D. ADAMS, 

Born in New York. Entered Naval Academy, September 27, 1864 ; graduated, 
1868 ; Albany, N. A. Fleet, 1868-9. Promoted to Ensign, 1869 ; St. Mary's, 
Pacific Fleet, 1869-70; Jamestown, same fleet, 1870-2. Promoted to Master, 
1870. Commissioned as Lieutenant, 1873; Coast Survey, 1872-6; Navy Yard, 
Mare Island, 1876-8. 

LIEUTENANT A. DE BLOIS, 

Born in Georgia. Entered Naval Academy, September 21, 1863 ; graduated, 

1868 ; Powhatan, Pacific Fleet, 1868-9. Promoted to Ensign, 1869 ; S. S. Frolic, 
1870. Promoted to Master, 1870 ; Brooklyn, European Fleet, 1870-1 ; Canan- 
daigua, N. A. Station, 1872-4. Commissioned as lAeutenant, 1873 ; Navy Yard, 
Pensacola, 1875-7. 

LIEUTENANT RICHARD WAINWRIGHT, 

Born in District of Columbia. Entered Naval Academy, September 28, 1864 ; 
graduated, 1868 ; Jamestown, Pacific Fleet, 1868-9. Promoted to Ensign, 

1869 ; Hydrographic Office, 1870. Promoted to Master, 1870 ; Colorado, flag- 
ship Asiatic Fleet, 1870-2. Commissioned as Lieutenant, 1873 ; Hydrographic 
Office, 1873-4 ; commanding Coast Survey vessel Arago, 1875-8. 



LIEUTENANT JAMES R. SELFRIDGE, 

Born in Massachusetts. Entered Naval Academy, July 21, 1864; graduated, 
1868 ; Pacific Fleet, 1868-9. Promoted to Ensign, 1869 ; Colorado, flag-ship 
Asiatic Fleet, 1870-2. Promoted to Master, 1870. Commissioned as Lieutenant, 
1873 ; Franklin, flag-ship European Squadron, 1873 ; Congress, same squadron, 
1874-6 ; training-ship Monongahela, 1876-7 ; torpedo duty, 1877. 



LIEUTENANT CHARLES A. ADAMS, 

Born in New York. Entered Naval Academy, July 23, 1863 ; graduated, 1868 ; 
Pacific Fleet, 1868-70. Promoted to Eisign, 1869 ; Ossipee, Pacific Fleet, 1870-2. 
Promoted to Master, 1870 ; Shenandoah, European Station, 1873. Commissioned 
as Lieutenant, 1873; Congress, European Station, 1874-6. 



LIEUTENANT WILLIAM H. EVERETT, 

Born in New York. Entered Naval Academy, July 21, 1863 ; graduated, 1868 ; 
South Atlantic Station, 1868-9. Promoted to Ensign, 1869 ; Nantasket, N. A. 
Fleet, 1870-1. Promoted to Master, 1870; S. S. Congress, 1871-2. Commis- 
sioned && Lieutenant, 1873; European Station, 1874; S. S. Alert, 1875; Asiatic 
Station, 1875-8. 



252 LIEUTENANTS. 

LIEUTENANT JOHN M. HAWLEY, 

Born in Massachusetts. Entered Naval Academy, July 23, 1863 ; graduated, 
1868 ; S. Atlantic Station, 1868-9. Promoted to Ensign, 1869 ; store-ship 
Guard, European Fleet, 1870-1. Promoted to Master, 1870 ; Wyoming, 1871-2 ; 
Ticonderoga, S. Atlantic Station, 1873-4 ; torpedo duty, 1874. Commissioned 
as Lieutenant, 1874 ; Coast Survey, 1874-8. 



LIEUTENANT THOMAS H. STEVENS, 

Born in Honolulu, Sandwich Islands. Appointed to Naval Academy, 1863, by 
President Lincoln from among sons of officers ; graduated, 1868 ; 1868-9, Pacific 
Fleet, steamer Resaca, Mexican and Lower California coasts ; Mohican, on scien- 
tific expedition to Siberia for observation of total eclipse of sun, August, 1869. 
Promoted to Ihisign, July 22, 1869; Michigan and Colorado, 1869-70. Pro- 
moted to Master, 1870 ; on duty in Pacific Squadron, 1870-3 ; flag-ship Ossipee 
and sloop Cyane ; while attached to latter ship, participated in survey of Isthmus 
of Tehuantepec for construction of Interoceanic Canal ; temporarily attached to 
Jamestown, to assist in putting her out of commission ; flag-ship Pensacola, 
1872-3, in South Pacific ; May, 1873, commanded a company of " blue jackets" 
during the temporary occupation of Panama by armed forces from Pensacola and 
Tuscarora, for protection of American interests in time of a rebellion ; latter part 
of 1873, duty at Navy Yard, Norfolk, Virginia ; November, 1873, applied for 
active service on board torpedo-boat Mayflower, at time of Spanish- American com- 
plications. Commissioned as Lieuteriaiit, January 23, 1874; flag-ship Franklin, 
European Station, 1874-6 ; Marion, same station, October, 1876, to April, 1877; 
Torpedo Station, Newport, Rhode Island, summer of 1877 ; Executive-Officer, 
receiving-ship Passaic, 1878. 



LIEUTENANT ANDREW C. McMECHAN, 

Born in Ohio. Entered Naval Academy, February 24, 1863 ; graduated, 1868 ; 
Pacific Fleet, 1868-73. Promoted to Ensign, 1869; and to Master, 1870; 
Yantic, Asiatic Station, 1874-7. Commissioned as Lieutenant, 1874. 



LIEUTENANT THOMAS N. LEE, 

Born in Maryland. Entered Naval Academy, September 13, 1863 ; gi-aduated, 
1868 ; Gruerriere, South Atlantic Station, 1868-9. Promoted to E7isign, 1869 ; 
store-ship Supply, 1870. Promoted to Master, 1870 ; Nipsic, Darien Expedition, 
1870-1 ; Hydrographic Office, 1872 ; Omaha, South Pacific Station, 1873-5. 
Commissioned as Lieutenant, 1874 ; Naval Observatory, 1876-7. * 



LIEUTENANT JOHN A. RODGERS, 

Born in Maryland. Entered Naval Academy, July 29, 1863 ; graduated, 1868. 
Promoted to Ensign, 1869 ; Pacific Fleet, 1868-9 ; S. S. Supply, 1870 ; Nipsic, 
Darien Expedition, 1870-1. Promoted to Master, 1870 ; torpedo service, 



LIEUTENANTS. 253 

1871-2 ; Hartford, Asiatic Station, 1872-5 ; Trenton, flag-ship, European Station, 
1877-8. Commissioned as Lieutenant, 1874. 



LIEUTENANT JAMES W. CARLIN, 

Born May 14, 1848. Entered Naval Academy, July, 1864; graduated, June, 
1868 ; Nipsic, West India Station, 1868-9. Promoted to Bnsign, April, 1869. 
Promoted to Master, July, 1870 ; Saco, European Station, 1870-1 ; Saco, Asiatic 
Station, 1872 ; Monocacy, Asiatic Station, 1872-3. Commissioned as Lieutenant, 
February, 1874; torpedo duty, Newport, Rhode Island, 1874; Brooklyn, S. A. 
Station, 1875; Brooklyn, West India Station, 1876; Adams, West India Sta- 
tion, 1876 ; Michigan, lakes, 1877 ; Constitution (training-ship), Philadelphia, 
1877 ; Constitution, European Station, 1878. 



LIEUTENANT GOTTFRIED BLOCKLINGER, 

Born in Ohio. Entered Naval Academy, July 21, 1863; graduated, 1868; 
Pacific Fleet, 1868-72. Promoted to Eyisign, 1869 ; to Master, 1870 ; Kear- 
sarge, Asiatic Station, 1873-6. Commissioned as Lieutenant, 1874 ; torpedo duty, 
summer of 1877. 

LIEUTENANT PERRY GARST, 

Born in Ohio. Entered Naval Academy, July 25, 1863; graduated, 1868; 
Pacific Fleet, 1868-72. Promoted to Ensign, 1869 ; to Master, 1870 ; S. S. Frolic, 
1873; Saco, Asiatic Fleet, 1874-7. Commissioned as Lieutenant, 1874. 



LIEUTENANT JAMES K. COGSWELL, 

Born in Wisconsin. Entered Naval Academy, September 23, 1863 ; graduated, 
1868; Powhatan, P. F., 1868-9. Promoted to Ensign, 1869; Pacific Fleet, 
1870-2. Promoted to Master, 1870 ; Ticonderoga, N. A. S., 1874. Commissioned 
as Lieutenant, 1874 ; Monongahela, S. A. S., 1875-6 ; Essex, 1876, N. A. S. ; 
S. A. S., 1877-8. 

LIEUTENANT FREDERICK SINGER, 

Born in Germany. Entered Naval Academy, July 27, 1863 ; graduated, 1868 
Nipsic, N. A. S., 1869. Promoted to Eisign, 1869 ; Terror (iron-clad), N. A^ 
Station, 1870. Promoted to Master, 1870 ; ordnance duty, Washington, 1871-2 
Benicia, N. P. S., 1872-5. Commissioned as Lieutenant, 1874; Canonicus (iron- 
clad), 1876-7. 

LIEUTENANT ARTHUR B. SPEYERS, 

Born in New York. Entered Naval Academy, July 23, 1863 ; graduated, 1868 ; 
N. A. Fleet, 1868-9. Promoted to Ensign, 1869 ; Benicia, Asiatic Station, 
1869-72. Promoted to 3Iaster, 1870 ; Kansas, N. A. Station, 1873^. Com- 
missioned as Lieutenant, 1874 ; Richmond, S. P. S., 1874-7. 



254 LIE UTENA NTS. 

LIEUTENANT CHARLES SEYMOUR, 

Born in New York. Entered Naval Academy, July 28, 1864 ; graduated, 1868 ; 
Juniata, European Squadron, 1869-72. Promoted to Ensign^ 1869 ; to Master, 
1870 ; Narraoansett, survey in Pacific, 1873-5. Commissioned as Lieutenant, 
1874; Navy Yard, New York, 1876; Enterprise, N. A. S., 1876-7. 



LIEUTENANT EBENEZER S. PRIME, 

Born in New York. Entered Naval Academy, September 21, 1863 ; graduated, 
1868; Pacific Fleet, 1868-9. Promoted to Ensign, 1869; Swatara, N. A. S., 
1870-1. Promoted to Master, 1870 ; Asiatic Station, 1872-5. Commissioned as 
Lieutenant, 1874 ; R. S. Colorado, 1876 ; Lackawanna, N. P. S., 1876-8. 



LIEUTENANT WILLIAM C. STRONG, 

Born in New York. Entered Naval Academy, September 22, 1864 ; graduated, 
1868 ; Benicia, Asiatic Fleet, 1869-72. Promoted to Ensign, 1869 ; to Master, 
1870 ; South Atlantic Station, 1873 ; Monongahela, South Atlantic Station, 
1874-6. Commissioned as Lieutenant, 1874 ; torpedo duty, summer of 1877. 



LIEUTENANT NATHAN E. NILES, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Entered Naval Academy, July 28, 1864 ; graduated, 
1868; Nipsic, North Atlantic Fleet, 1869-70. Promoted to Ensign, 1869; to 
3Iaster, 1870; Resaca, P. F., 1870-2; Manhattan (iron-clad), 1873; Ossipee, 
North Atlantic Station, 1874-5. Commissioned as Lieutenant, 1874 ; Torpedo 
Station, 1875; Marion, European Station, 1875-8. 



LIEUTENANT CHARLES P. PERKINS, 

Born in New Hampshire. Entered Naval Academy, July 21, 1865 ; graduated, 
1869; Lancaster, flag-ship, S. A. S., 1869-71. Promoted to Ensign, 1870; 
torpedo service, 1872. Promoted to Master, 1872 ; Richmond, N. P. S., 1872-5. 
Commissioned as Lieutenant, 1874 ; Naval Academy, 1875-7 ; Hydrographic 
Office, 1877-8. 

LIEUTENANT D. H. BUCKINaHAM, 

Born in Ohio. Entered Naval Academy, July 22, 1865; graduated, 1869; 
Sabine, special cruise, 1870. Promoted to Ensign, 1870 ; Darien Expedition, 
1870-1 ; special duty, 1872. Promoted to Master, 1872 ; Alaska, European 
Station, 1872-5. Commissioned as lAeutenant, 1874 ; special ordnance duty, 
1875-7. ' ' 1^ J'' 



LIEUTENANT CHARLES G. BOWMAN, 

Born in Indiana. Entered Naval Academy, July 29, 1865 ; graduated, 1869 ; 
Richmond, European Fleet, 1870-1. Promoted to Ensign, 1870 ; Yantic, Asiatic 



LIEUTENANTS. 255 

Station, 1872-4; Hartford, same station, 1875. Promoted io Master, 1872. 
Commissioned as Lieutenant, 1874 ; Naval Academy, 1876-8. 



LIEUTENANT WILLIAM P. POTTEK, 

Born in New York. Entered Naval Academy, September 27, 1865 ; graduated, 
1869 ; Sabine, special cruise, 1870. Promoted to Ensign, 1870 ; European Sta- 
tion, 1870-1 ; Hartford, Asiatic Station, 1871-4. Promoted to Ensign, 1870, 
and to Master, 1872 ; Naval Academy, 1874-7. Commissioned as Lieutenant, 
1874. 



LIEUTENANT W. H. BEEHLER, 

Born in Maryland. Entered Naval Academy, July 28, 1864 ; graduated, 1869 ; 
N. Atlantic Station, 1870. Promoted to Ensign, 1870 ; S. S. Frolic, 1871-2. 
Promoted to Master, 1872 ; sick-leave, 1873-4; Worcester, flag-ship, N. Atlantic 
S., 1874-5. Commissioned as Lieutenant, 1874; sick-leave, 1875-6; Alliance, 
N. Atlantic Station, 1876-7 ; Powhatan, same station, 1877-8. 



LIEUTENANT GILES B. HARBER, 

Born in Ohio. Entered Naval Academy, July 24, 1865; graduated, 1869; 
Sabine, special cruise, 1870. Promoted to Ensign, 1870 ; Franklin, European 
Squadron, 1870-1. Promoted to Master, 1872 ; Asiatic Station, 1872-5. Com- 
missioned as Lieutenant, 1874; Omaha, S. P. S., 1875-8. 



LIEUTENANT. JOHN GARVIN, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Entered Naval Academy, July 22, 1865 ; graduated, 
1869 ; Lancaster, flag-ship, S. Atlantic S., 1869-72. Promoted to Ensign, 1870 ; 
and to blaster, 1872; sick-leave, 1873; Shawmut, N. Atlantic S., 1874-6. 
Commissioned as Lieutenant, 1874 ; Hydrographic Office, 1877-8. 



LIEUTENANT SUMNER C. PAINE, 

Born in Maine. Entered Naval Academy, September 22, 1865 ; graduated, 
1869 ; Sabine, special cruise, 1869-70. Promoted to Ensign, 1870 ; Darien Ex- 
pedition, 1870-1; Wabash, flag-ship, European Station, 1871-3. Promoted to 
Master, 1872 ; Frolic, S. Atlantic Station, 1875-6. Commissioned as Lieutenant, 
1874 ; Hydrographic Office, 1877 ; Saratoga (training-ship), 1877-8. 



LIEUTENANT ARTHUR P. OSBORN, 

Born in Ohio. Entered Naval Academy, July 31, 1865 ; graduated, 1869 ; 
Lancaster, flag-ship, S. Atlantic Station, 1869-71. Promoted to Ensign, 1870 ; 
to Master, 1872; Shawmut, N. Atlantic Station, 1873-6. Commissioned as 
Lieutenant, 1874; Naval Academy, 1877-8. 



256 LIEUTENANTS. 

LIEUTENANT JOHN B. BKIGGS, 

Born in Massachusetts. Entered Naval Academy, September 30, 1865 ; grad- 
uated, 1869 ; Sabine, special cruise, 1869-70. Promoted to Ensign, 1870 ; tor- 
pedo instruction, 1871 ; Shawmut, N. Atlantic Station, 1871-2, Promoted to 
Master, 1872 ; Kansas, N. Atlantic Station, 1873-4. Commissioned as Lieutenant^ 
1874 ; Naval Academy, 1875-7. 



LIEUTENANT ALEXANDER M. THACKARA, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Entered Naval Academy, July 21, 1865 ; graduated, 
1869 ; Sabine, special cruise, 1869-70. Promoted to Ensign, 1870 ; Franklin, 
flag-ship, European Station, 1870-1 ; League Island Station, 1871-2. Promoted 
to Master, 1872 ; Ashuelot, Asiatic Station, 1872-6. Commissioned as Lieutenant, 
1874 ; Omaha, S. Pacific Station, 1877-8. 



LIEUTENANT NEWTON E. MASON, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Entered Naval Academy, July 24, 1865 ; graduated, 
1869 ; Sabine, special cruise, 1869-70. Promoted to Ensign, 1870 ; Torpedo 
Instruction, 1871 ; Wabash, European Squadron, 1871-2. Promoted to Master, 
1872 ; Manhattan (iron-clad), N. A. Station, 1873 ; Kansas, same station, 1874-5. 
Commissioned as Lieutenant, 1874 ; Catskill (iron-clad), N. A. Station, 1875-6 ; 
Ossipee, same station, 1876-7. 



LIEUTENANT HENRY 0. HANDY, 

Born in Massachusetts. Entered Naval Academy, July 28, 1865; graduated, 
1869 ; Sabine, special cruise, 1869-70. Promoted to Ensign, 1870 ; California 
(second-rate), Pacific Fleet, 1870-2. Promoted to Master, 1872 ; S. S. Frolic, 
1873 ; Coast Survey, 1874-5. Commissioned as Lieutenant, 1874 ; N. A. S., 
1875-6 ; European Station, 1876-8. 



LIEUTENANT ARTHUR P. NAZRO, 

Born in Wisconsin. Entered Naval Academy, July 22, 1865 ; graduated, 1869 ; 
Sabine, special cruise, 1869-70. Promoted to Ensign, 1870 ; Franklin, flag-ship, 
European Station, 1870-1 ; Navy Yard, Boston, 1872. Promoted to blaster, 
1872 ; Ticonderoga, South Atlantic Fleet, 1872-3 ; Congress, European Station, 
1873-5. Commissioned as Lieutenant, 1874 ; Hartford, North Atlantic Station, 
1875-6 ; Naval Academy, 1876-8. 



LIEUTENANT LEWIS E. BIXLER, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Entered Naval Academy, September 27, 1865 ; gradu- 
ated, 1869 ; Sabine, special cruise, 1869-70. Promoted to Ensign, 1869 ; torpedo 
instruction, 1870-1. Promoted to Master, 1872 ; Canandaigua, North Atlantic Sta- 
tion, 1872-4. Commissioned as Lieutenant, 1874 ; Yantic, Asiatic Station, 1875-8. 



LIEUTENANTS. 257 

LIEUTENANT WILLIAM W. KIMBALL, 

Born in Maine. Entered Naval Academy, July 31, 1865; graduated, 18G9 ; 
Sabine, special cruise, 1869-70. Promoted to Ensign, 1869 ; torpedo instruc- 
tion, 1870-1 ; Shawnee, North Atlantic Fleet, 1871-2. Promoted to Master, 
1872 ; experimental battery, 1873 ; Intrepid (torpedo-boat), 1874 ; experi- 
mental battery, 1875. Commissioned as Lieutenant, 1875 ; Alert, Asiatic 
Station, 1875-8. 

LIEUTENANT CHARLES F. NORTON, 

Born in Wisconsin. Entered Naval Academy, July 27, 1863 ; graduated, 1869 ; 
Pacific Fleet, 1869-72. Promoted to Ensign, 1869 ; to Master, 1872 ; Ajax, 
(ironclad). North Atlantic Station, 1873-4 ; Worcester, flag-ship. North Atlantic 
Station, 1875. Commissioned as Lieutenant, 1875 ; Alert, Asiatic Station,, 

1875-8. 

LIEUTENANT WILLIAM P. DAY, 

Born in New York. Entered Naval Academy, July 21, 1865 ; graduated, 1869 ,-. 
Juniata, European Station, 1869-71. Promoted to Ensign, 1869 ; Wyoming, 
(third-rate), 1872. Promoted to blaster, 1872 ; Dictator (iron-clad), North At- 
lantic Fleet, 1873-4 ; Despatch, special service, 1875-7. Commissioned as Lieu- 
tenant, 1875. 

LIEUTENANT JOHN C. WILSON, 

Born in New York. Entered Naval Academy, July 24, 1865 ; graduated,. 
1869 ; Sabine, special cruise, 1869-70. Promoted to Ensign, 1870 ; Franklin,. 
European Squadron, 1870-1 ; Navy Yard, New York, 1872 ; Monocacy, Asiatic 
Squadron, 1872-5. Commissioned as Lieutenant, 1875 ; Omaha, South Pacific 
Station, 1875-8. 

LIEUTENANT EDWARD A. FIELD, 

Born in Massachusetts. Entered Naval Academy, July 22, 1865 ; graduated, 
1869; Sabine, special cruise, 1869-70. Promoted to Ensign, 1869; torpedo in- 
struction, 1870-1 ; Shawmut, North Atlantic Station, 1871-2. Promoted to. 
Master, 1872 ; Kearsarge, Asiatic Station, 1873-6. Commissioned as Lieutenant,. 
1875; R. S. Wabash, 1877-8. 



LIEUTENANT JAMES FRANKLIN, 

Born in Maryland. Entered Naval Academy, September 26, 1865 ; graduated, 
1869 ; Sabine, special cruise, 1869-70. Promoted to Ensign, 1870 ; signal duty, 
1870-1 ; Asiatic Fleet, 1871^. Promoted to Master, 1872 ; Coast Survey, 
1874-6. Commissioned as Lieutenant, 1875 ; torpedo duty, 1877. 



LIEUTENANT URIAH R. HARRIS, 

Born in Indiana. Entered Naval Academy, July 22, 1865; graduated, 1869;, 
Sabine, special cruise, 1869-70. Promoted to Ensign, 1869 ; Pacific Fleet^ 



258 LIEUTENANTS. 

1870-2. Promoted to Master, 1872; Narragansett, Pacific Fleet, 1873-5. 
Commissioned as Lieutenant, 1875; Coast Survey, 1875-6; Navy Yard, Mare 
Island, 1876-7 ; Coast Survey, 1877-8. 



LIEUTENANT WILLIAM A. HADDEN, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Entered Naval Academy, September 28, 1865 ; gradu- 
ated, 1869 ; Sabine, special cruise, 1869-70. Promoted to Ensign, 1870 ; Cali- 
fornia, Pacific Fleet, 1871-2. Promoted to Master, 1872;' Ajax (iron-clad), N. 
A. Station, 1873-4 ; torpedo-boat Alarm, 1875. Commissioned as Lieutenant, 
1875 ; Vandalia, N. A. Station, 1875-8. 



LIEUTENANT RICHARD G. DAVENPORT, 

Born in District of Columbia. Entered Naval Academy, September 29, 1864 ; 
graduated, 1869 ; Sabine, special cruise, 1869-70. Promoted to Ensign, 1870 ; 
JRichmond, European Station, 1870-1 ; Saco, Asiatic Station, 1872-5. Promoted 
to blaster, 1872. Commissioned as Lieutenant, 1875 ; Torpedo Station, 1875 ; 
special duty at Centennial Exposition, 1876 ; Essex, N. Atlantic Station, 1876-7. 



LIEUTENANT EDWARD B. BARRY, 

Born in New York. Entered Naval Academy, July 21, 1865 ; graduated, 1869 ; 
Sabine, special cruise, 1869-70. Promoted to Ensign, 1870 ; signal duty, 1870 
-1 ; Wabash, flag-ship, European Station, 1871-2 ; Wachusett, European Station, 
1873. Promoted to Master, 1872 ; training-ship Minnesota, 1874-6. Commis- 
sioned as Lieutenant, 1875 ; store-ship New Hampshire, 1877-8. 



LIEUTENANT C. W. RUSCHENBERGER, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Entered Naval Academy, July 23, 1864 ; graduated, 
1869; Juniata, 1869; European Station, 1870-1. Promoted to Ensign, 1870; 
Iroquois, Asiatic Station, 1872-4. Promoted to Master, 1872 ; R. S. Potomac, 
1875-6. Commissioned as Lieutenant, 1875 ; Gettysburg, special service, Medi- 
terranean, 1876-8. 

LIEUTENANT, CHARLES A. BRADBURY, 

Born in Vermont. Entered Naval Academy, July 27, 1865 ; graduated, 1869 ; 
■Sabine, 1869-70. Promoted to Ensign, 1870; signal duty, 1871; Worcester, 
N. A. Station, 1871-2. Promoted to Master, 1^12.; Coast Survey, 1873-6. 
^Commissioned as Lieutenant, 1875 ; Despatch, special service in Europe, 1877-8. 



LIEUTENANT HERBERT WINSLOW, 

Born in Massachusetts. Entered Naval Academy, July '21, 1865; graduated, 
1869; Sabine, 1869-70. Promoted to Ensign, 1870; Richmond, European 



LIEUTENANTS. 259 

Fleet, 1870-1. Promoted to Master, 1872 ; Narragansett, N. Pacific, 1873-4 ; 
Benicia, 1875 ; Lackawanna, Pacific Fleet, 1875-6. Commissioned as Lieutenant, 
1876 ; Hydrographic Office, 1876-8. 



LIEUTENANT WILLIAM H. TURNER, 

Born in Oliio. Entered Naval Academy, July 22, 1865 ; graduated, 1869; 
Sabine, 1869-70. Promoted to Ensign, 1870 ; Tennessee, special service, 1870-1 ; 
Wachusett, European Squadron, 1871-2. Promoted to Master, 1872 ; Saco, 
Asiatic Station, 1872-4 ; Omaha, S. P. Fleet, 1875-6. Commissioned as Lieu- 
tenant, 1876 ; Signal Office, 1877-8. 



LIEUTENANT FLETCHER S. BASSETT, 

Born in Kentucky. Entered Naval Academy, September 21, 1865 ; graduated, 
1869; Sabine, 1869-70. Promoted to Ensign, 1870; Pacific Fleet, 1870-1; 
Colorado, flag-ship, Asiatic Station, 1871-2. Promoted to Master, 1872 ; sick- 
leave, 1872-4 ; Brooklyn, S. Atlantic Station, 1874-6, Commissioned as Lieu- 
tenant, 1876 ; R. S. Franklin, 1876-7, 



LIEUTENANT T. DIX BOLLES, 

Born in Massachusetts, Entered Naval Academy, October 1, 1864; graduated, 
1869; Sabine, 1869-70. Promoted to Ensign, 1870; Richmond, European 
Squadron, 1870-1 ; Ashuelot, Asiatic Squadron, 1872-4. Promoted to Master, 
1872; Navy Yard, Washington, 1874-5; R. S. Independence, 1875-6. Com- 
missioned as Lieutenant, 1876; Asiatic Station, 1876-8. 



LIEUTENANT GEORGE P, COLVOCORESSES, 

Born in Vermont. Entered Naval Academy, September 28, 1864,; graduated, 
1869 ; Lancaster, S. Atlantic Fleet, 1869-71. Promoted to Ensign, 1870 ; to 
blaster, 1872; Hartford, flag-ship, Asiatic Station, 1872-4; Hydrographic Office, 
1875-6. Commissioned as Lieutenant, 1876 ; S. S. Gettysburg, in Europe, 1876-8. 



LIEUTENANT CHARLES E. COLOHAN, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Entered Naval Academy, July 21, 1865 ; graduated, 
1869; Juniata, 1869-70; European Station, 1870-1. Promoted to Ensign, 
1870 ; Lancaster, S. Atlantic Station, 1872-4. Promoted to Master, 1872 ; 
R. S. Potomac, 1875-6. Commissioned as Lieutenant, 1876 ; training-ship 
Cyane, 1876-7 ; Asiatic Station, 1877-8. 



LIEUTENANT JOHN P. WALLIS, 

Born in Louisiana. Entered Naval Academy, July 26, 1864 ; graduated, 1869 ; 
Lancaster, S. A, Station, 1870-1. Promoted to Ensign, 1870; Powhatan, N. 



260 LIEUTENANTS. 

Atlantic Station, 1872-4. Promoted to Master, 1872 ; Ashuelot, Asiatic Station, 

1874-8. 

LIEUTENANT WAINWRIGHT KELLOGG, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Entered Naval Academy, September 29, 1865 ; gradu- 
ated, 1869 ; Sabine, 1869-70. Promoted to Ensign, 1870 ; Richmond, European 
Station, 1870-1 ; Lancaster, flag-ship, S. Atlantic Station, 1872-4. Promoted 
to Master, 1872 ; Wasp, S. Atlantic Station, 1874-6. Commissioned as Lieu- 
tenant, 1876 ; Essex, S. Atlantic Station, 1876-8. 



LIEUTENANT NELSON T. HOUSTON, 

Born in New York. Entered Naval Academy, July 28, 1865 ; graduated, 1869 ; 
Sabine, 1869-70. Promoted to Ensign, 1870 ; signal duty, Washington, 1870-1 ; 
Asiatic Fleet, 1871-4. Promoted to blaster, 1872 ; R. S. Independence, 1874-6. 
Commissioned as Lieutenant, 1876. 



LIEUTENANT ALBERT G. BERRY, 

Born in Tennessee. Entered Naval Academy, July 28, 1865 ; graduated, 1869 ; 
Sabine, 1869-70. Promoted to Ensign, 1870 ; Franklin, flag-ship, European Sta- 
tion, 1870-1 ; Lancaster, flag-ship, S. Atlantic Station, 1872-4. Promoted, to 
blaster, 1872 ; Wasp, S. Atlantic Station, 1874-6. Commissioned as Lieutenant, 
1876 ; training-ship Monongahela, 1876-7. 



LIEUTENANT JOHN A. NORRIS, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Entered Naval Academy, September 28, 1865 ; gradu- 
ated, 1869 ; Sabine, 1869-70 ; signal duty, 1870-1. Promoted to Ensign, 1870 ; 
Worcester, North Atlantic Fleet, 1871-2. Promoted to Master, 1872 ; Torpedo 
Station, 1873 ; Mayflower, North Atlantic Station, 1874 ; Hydrographic Office, 
1874-5 ; Gettysburg, special service, 1875-6. Commissioned as Lieutenant, 1876 ; 
Hydrographic Office, 1876-7. 



LIEUTENANT JOSEPH B. HOBSON, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Entered Naval Academy, July 25, 1865 ; graduated, 
1869; Sabine, 1869-70; Pacific Fleet, 1870-2. Promoted to Ensign, 1870. 
Promoted to Master, 1872 ; Despatch, special service, 1873-4 ; Ossipee, North 
Atlantic Station, 1875-7. Commissioned as Lieutenant, 1876. 



LIEUTENANT WILLIAM H. DRIGGS, 

Born in Michigan. Entered Naval Academy, July 21, 1865 ; graduated, 1869 ; 
Sabine, 1869. Promoted to Ensign, 1870 ; Franklin, 1870-2. Promoted to 
Master, 1872; Atlantic Fleet, 1873; Worcester, flag-ship. North Atlantic Station, 
1874-5 ; Hartford, 1875-6. Commissioned as Lieutenant, 1876 ; R. S. Colorado, 
1876-7 ; Coast Survey, 1877-8. 



LIEUTENANTS. 261 

LIEUTENANT N. J. K. PATCH, 

Born in Maine. Entered Naval Academy, September 20, 1865 ; graduated, 1869 ; 
Sabine, 1869-70. Promoted to Ensign, 1870 ; signal duty, 1870-1 ; Worcester, 
N. Atlantic Fleet, 1871-2. Promoted to Master, 1872; Richmond, N. Pacific 
Fleet, 1873-7. Commissioned as Lieutenant, 1876. 



LIEUTENANT THOMAS S. PHELPS, 

Born in Virginia. Entered Naval Academy, July 25, 1865 ; graduated, 1869 ; 
Juniata, European Station, 1869-70. Promoted to Ensign, 1870 ; European 
Station, 1870-1. Promoted to Master, 1872 ; sick-leave, 1873 ; Ricbmond, 
North Pacific Fleet, 1874 ; Pensacola, Pacific Fleet, 1876-8. Commissioned as 
Lieutenant, 1876. 



LIEUTENANT KARL ROHRER, 

Born in Germany, Appointed from Missouri. Entered Naval Academy, July, 
1865 ; graduated, June, 1869 ; frigate Sabine, 1869-70, Mediterranean and South 
America. Promoted to Ensign, 1870 ; Pawnee, West Indies, 1870-1 ; Kansas, 
West Indies, 1871-2. Promoted to Master, 1872 ; Constellation, West Indies, 
1873; Torpedo Station, 1873; Colorado, West Indies, 1873-4; Juniata, Medi- 
terranean, 1874-6. Commissioned as Lieutenant, 1876 ; Torpedo Station, 1876 ; 
Washington Navy Yard, 1876-7 ; Constitution, 1878. 



LIEUTENANT JOHN A. H. NICKELS, 

Born in Massachusetts. Entered Naval Academy, October 8, 1864; graduated, 
1869 ; Sabine, special cruise, 1869-70. Promoted to Ensign, 1870 ; Richmond, 
European Squadron, 1869-71 ; Asiatic Station, 1872-5. Promoted to Master, 
1872 ; Navy Yard, Boston, 1875 ; Montauk (iron-clad), N. A. Station, 1875-6. 
Commissioned as Lieutenant, 1876 ; Adams, S. A. Station, 1876-8. 



LIEUTENANT CLINTON K. CURTIS, 

Born in West Virginia. Entered Naval Academy, September 28, 1865 ; gradu- 
ated, 1869 ; Sabine, special cruise, 1869-70. Promoted to Ensign, 1870 ; N. A. 
Station, 1870-2. Promoted to Master, 1872 ; Powhatan, special service, 1873 ; 
N. A. Station, 1874-6. Commissioned as Lieutenant, 1876 ; R. S. Worcester, 
1876-7. 



LIEUTENANT ELLIOTT J. ARTHUR, 

Born in Vermont. Entered Naval Academy, September 27, 1865 ; graduated, 
1869; Sabine, special cruise, 1869-70. Promoted to Ensign, 1870; California, 
(second-rate). Pacific Fleet, 1870-2. Promoted to Master, 1872; Franklin, 
flag-ship, European Station, 1873-6. Commissioned as Lieutenant, 1876 ; train- 
ing-ship Monongahela, 1876-7 ; training-ship Saratoga, 1877-8. 



262 LIEUTENANTS. 

LIEUTENANT E. H. TAUNT, 

Born in New Jersey. Entered Naval Academy at Newport, Khode Island, July 
24, 1865; graduated at Annapolis, Maryland, June 4, 1869, as Midshipman; 
ordered to Sabine, June 30, 1869 ; served in Mediterranean Fleet, on board Sa- 
bine, flag-ship Franklin, steamer Guerriere, and steamer Richmond. Promoted to 
Ensign, July 12, 1870 ; served on board steamer Tuscarora in the North and 
South Pacific Squadrons, from 1872 to 1874 ; while attached to the South 
Pacific, served under Commander T. 0. Selfridge, U. S. N., on duty connected 
with Darien Canal Survey. Promoted to Master, December 28, 1872 ; Decem- 
ber, 1874, ordered to the steamer Brooklyn ; served on board of her in the South 
Atlantic Squadron, when she returned North ; transferred, April, 1876, to steamer 
Shawmut ; served on board of Shawmut in West India Squadron. Commissioned 
as Lieutenant, August 15, 1876 ; in February, 1877, ordered to Portsmouth Navy 
Yard, where he is now serving. 



LIEUTENANT THEODORIC PORTER, 

Born in District of Columbia. Entered Naval Academy, July 25, 1 865 ; 
graduated, 1869 ; Brooklyn, European Fleet, 1869-72. Promoted to Ensign 
1870 ; to Master, 1872 ; special duty, Washington, 1873-4 ; torpedo instruc- 
tion, 1874 ; special duty, Washington, 1875 ; torpedo-boat Alarm, 1875-6. Com 
missioned as Lieutenant, 1876 ; Swatara, North Atlantic Fleet, 1876-8. 



LIEUTENANT D. V. STUART, 

Born in New York. Entered Naval Academy, September 23, 1865 ; graduated, 
1869; Sabine, special cruise, 1869-70. Promoted to Ensign, 1870; California 
(second-rate), Pacific Fleet, 1870-2. Promoted to Master, 1872 ; Pinta, N. A. 
Squadron, 1873; Roanoke (iron-clad), N. A. Station, 1874; Ashuelot, Asiatic 
Station, 1874-8. Commissioned as Lieutenant, 1876. 



LIEUTENANT JOHN H. MOORE, 

Born in New York. Entered Naval Academy, July 31, 1865 ; graduated, 1869 ; 
Sabine, special cruise, 1869-70. Promoted to Ensign, 1870 ; Franklin, flag- 
ship European Fleet, 1870-1 ; Asiatic Station, 1872-7. Promoted to Master, 
7872. Commissioned as Lieutenant, 1876 ; Signal Office, Washington, 1877-8. 



LIEUTENANT KOSSUTH NILES, 

Born in Illinois. Entered Naval Academy, September 23, 1865 ; graduated, 
1869 ; Sabine, special cruise, 1869-70. Promoted to Ensign, 1870 ; North At- 
lantic Fleet, 1870-2. Promoted to Master, 1872 ; Torpedo Station, 1873 ; Coast 
Survey, 1873-7. Commissioned as Lieutenant, 1876. 



MEDICAL DIRECTORS. 263 

LIEUTENANT WILLIAM E. B. DELEHAY, 

Born in New York. Entered Naval Academy, July 22, 1864 ; graduated, 1869 ; 
Sabine, special cruise, 1869-70. Promoted to Ensign, 1870 ; Darien Expedition, 
1870-2. Promoted to blaster, 1872 ; Shawmut, N. A. Fleet, 1873-6. Com- 
missioned as Lieutenant^ 1876; Canonicus (iron-clad), N. A. Station, 1876-7. 



MEDICAL DIRECTORS. 

With Relative Rank of Captain. 



MEDICAL DIKECTOB WILLIAM GKIER, 

[Surgeon-General, with Relative Rank of Commodore.^ 

Born in Ireland. Appointed from Maryland, March 7, 1838 ; entered the ser- 
vice as Assisfaiit Surgeon; attached to sloop Cyane, Mediterranean Squadron, 
1838-41 ; store-ship Erie, Pacific Squadron, 1842-4 ; schooner Shark, Pacific 
Squadron, 1844-6; Hospital, New York, 1848; razee Independence, Mediterra- 
nean Squadron, 1849-52. Commissioned as Surgeon, April 14, 1852 ; Fleet- 
Surgeon, North Pacific Surveying Expedition, 1853-6 ; Naval Academy, 1859 ; 
sloop Macedonian, 1861 ; receiving-ship, Baltimore, 1862 ; Naval Hospital, Mem- 
phis, Tennessee, 1863-5 ; special duty, Hartford, Connecticut, 1867 ; member 
Board of Examiners, 1868-9 ; special duty, Baltimore, 1869-71 ; member of 
Examining and Retiring Boards, 1871-2 ; Naval Hospital, Annapolis, 1872 ; 
member of Naval Medical Board, 1872 ; President of Naval Medical Board, 1872 
-6 ; Chief of Bureau of Medicine and Surgery (Surgeon-General), 1877-8. 



MEDICAL DIRECTOR J. WINTHROP TAYLOR, 

Born in New York. Appointed from New Jersey, March 7, 1838 ; entered the 
service as Assistant Surgeon; attached to sloop Erie, West India Squadron, 1838 
-40 ; sloop Marion, West India Squadron, 1842-3 ; sloop John Adams, Home 
Squadron, 1845-8 ; receiving-ship, Boston, 1850 ; sloop Dale, 1851-3. Commis- 
sioned as Surgeon, May 1, 1852; rendezvous, New York, 1854-6; sloop St. 
Mary's, 1856-9 ; steam-sloop Pensacola, West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1861 
-3 ; Naval rendezvous, Boston, 1864-6 ; Fleet-Surgeon, Gulf Squadron, 1866-7 ; 
Fleet-Surgeon, North Pacific Squadron, 1868-9 ; Naval Hospital, Chelsea, 1870 
-2 ; Naval rendezvous, Boston, 1873-6. 



MEDICAL DIRECTOR SAMUEL JACKSON, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from North Carolina, June 20, 1838 ; entered 
the service as Assistant Surgeon; attached to frigate Constitution, 1839-41 ; 
frigate Congress, Mediterranean Squadron, 1841-3 ; sloop Fairfield, Mediterra- 
nean Squadron, 1844-5 ; razee Independence, flag-ship Pacific Squadron, 1846 
-9; Navy Yard, Philadelphia, 1849-50; receiving-ship, Boston, 1851; sloop 
Decatur, Home Squadron, 1851-2. Commissioned as Surgeon, September 2, 
1852 ; rendezvous. New York, 1854-5 ; steamer St. Louis, coast of Africa, 1855 
-8 ; Navy Yard, New York, 1858-61 ; frigate Cumberland, North Atlantic 



264 MEDICAL DIRECTORS. 

Blockading Squadron, 1861 ; steam-sloop Brooklyn, West Gulf Blockading Squad- 
ron, 1862-3 ; with Rear- Admiral Farragut in the passage of the forts below New 
Orleans, and in the capture of that city, and in his operations before Vicksburg ; 
Naval Academy, 1864: ; Navy Yard, Boston, 1865-6 ; Fleet-Surgeon, North Pa- 
cific Squadron, 1867-9 ; Naval Hospital, New York, 1869-72. Commissioned 
as Medical Director, March 3, 1871 ; Naval Hospital, Norfolk, 1873-5 ; Naval 
Hospital, Chelsea, 1876-8. 

MEDICAL DIRECTOR LEWIS J. WILLIAMS, 

Born in Maryland. Appointed from Maryland, January 25, 1842 ; entered the 
service as Assistant Surgeon; sloop Falmouth, Home Squadron, 1842-4 ; schooner 
Phoenix, 1844 ; sloop Yorktown, coast of Africa, 1844-6 ; brig Washington, 
1847 ; brig Porpoise, coast of Africa, 1847-8 ; sloop Jamestown, Mediterranean 
Squadron, 1848-50 ; Hospital, New York, 1850 ; steamer John Hancock, 1851 ; 
steam-frigate Mississippi, East India Squadron, 1852-3 ; sloop Saratoga, East 
Indies, 1853-4 ; Hospital, New York, 1855. Commissioned as Surgeon, August 
30, 1856; sloop Cyane, Pacific Squadron, 1858-60; Navy Yard, New York, 
1861-3; steam-sloop Richmond, West Grulf Squadron, 1863-5; battle of Mobile 
Bay, August 5, 1864; Navy Yard, Washington, 1866-9 ; member Board of Ex- 
aminers, Washington, 1871-2 ; Naval Laboratory, New York, 1872-8. 



MEDICAL DIRECTOR MARIUS DUVAL, 

Born in Maryland. Appointed from Maryland, January 25, 1842 ; entered the 
service as Assistant Surgeon; attached to frigate Constitution, Home Squadron, 
1842-3 ; was engaged in the war with the Seminole Indians, in October, 1842 ; 
frigate Brandy wine and Naval Station, Norfolk, Virginia, 1843 ; frigate Consti- 
tution, East India Squadron, 1844-5 ; visited Madagascar, Sumatra, Borneo, Co- 
chin-China, etc. ; frigate Constitution, Pacific Squadron, 1845-6 ; detached and 
ordered to sloop Portsmouth, which single vessel captured San Francisco, July 9, 
1846 ; served on land during the Mexican War, and in Sonoma was the medical 
officer of the expedition, composed of marines, seamen, and artillerists, and two 
companies of cavalry, under Captains Weber and Smith, which defeated the enemy 
at Santa Clara, January 1, 1847 ; was also aid of the commanding officer of this 
expedition ; senior medical officer of the expedition under Commodore Stockton, 
which landed at San Pedro to march to Los Angeles; steam-frigate Saranac, 
Home Squadron, 1850-1; practice-ship Preble, 1852-4; Coast Survey, 1855. 
Commissioned as Surgeon, September 12, 1856 ; sloop Jamestown, Home Squad- 
ron, 1858-60 ; Navy Yard, Washington, 1861 ; iron-clad steamer New Ironsides, 
special service, 1862, and South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862-4 ; attack 
on Fort Sumter, April 7, 1863, and subsequently in all the bombardments of 
the enemy's works ofi" Charleston ;' while on the New Ironsides, Surgeon Duval 
gave useful information to the Navy Department about the works of the enemy and 
attack of April 7, which was published by the Department; Navy Yard, Wash- 
ington, 1865-6 ; store- and hospital-ship Jamestown, Panama, 1867 ; Fleet-Sur- 
geon, South Atlantic Squadron, 1868-9 ; Naval Hospital, Norfolk, Virginia, 
1869-72. Commissioned as Medical Director, December 1, 1871 ; Naval Acad- 
emy, Annapolis, 1873 ; special duty, Baltimore, 1874-8. 



MEDICAL DIRECTORS. 265 

MEDICAL DIRECTOR JOSEPH WILSON, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania, May 13, 1843 ; entered 
the service as Assistant Surgeon; attached to sloop Levant, Pacific S(iuudron, 
1843-4; frigate Savannah, Pacific Squadron, 1844-7; in California during the 
Mexican War; present at the hoisting of the flag at Monterey, July, 184G, and 
with regiment of volunteer mounted rifles marched from Monterey to Los Ange- 
les ; present at the surrender of the last remnant of Mexican force at San Fer- 
nando Mission, near Los Angeles ; brig Bainbridge, African Squadron, 1848-50 ; 
Marine Barracks, Washington, 1850-2; store-ship Supply, Japan Expedition, 
1852-5 ; Navy Yard, Philadelphia, 1855-7. Commissioned as Surgeon^ May 
23, 1857 ; sloop Vandalia, Pacific Squadron, 1857-9 ; steam-sloop Powhatan, 
1860-1 ; steamer Michigan, on the lakes, 1862-3 ; steamer Vanderbilt, North 
Atlantic Squadron, 1864-5 ; present at the bombardments and capture of Fort 
Fisher ; Board of Naval Surgeons, 1866-7 ; Naval Hospital, Norfolk, Virginia, 
1867-9 ; Fleet-Surgeon, South Atlantic Fleet, 1869-72 ; Naval Hospital, Chel- 
sea, 1872-5; special service. Centennial, 1876; President Board of Examiners, 
1876-7. 



MEDICAL DIRECTOR ROBERT T. MACCOUN, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from New Jersey as Assistant Surgeon, 1844; 
steamer Jamestown, west coast of Africa, November, 1844-6 ; steamer Ohio, Gulf 
of Mexico and Pacific Squadron, 1846-50 ; bombardment of Vera Cruz, Mexico; 
capture of Tuspan, Mexico ; steamer Columbia, Gulf of Mexico, 1852-5 ; receiv- 
ing-ship North Carolina, New York, 1855-6 ; Resolute (of H. B. M. Navy), sent 
to England, 1856 ; Susquehanna, Mediterranean and Gulf of Mexico, 1857-8; 
receiving-ship North Carolina, New York, 1858. Commissioned as Surgeon, Sep- 
tember 21,1858; Naval rendezvous, Baltimore, 1858-61; steamer Mississippi, 
blockade, 1861-3 ; actions with Forts Jackson and St. Philip, and Confederate 
Fleet ; expedition against guerillas, near Bonnet Carre, Mississippi River ; action 
with batteries at Port Hudson, Louisiana, ship lost; Naval Station, Baltimore, 
1863-6 ; steamer Susquehanna, Gulf of Mexico, 1866-7; member Medical Board, 
Annapolis, 1867 ; steamer Delaware, Fleet-Surgeon Asiatic Station, 1867-70, 
Commissioned as Medical Inspector, March 3, 1871 ; member Board of Visitors, 
Annapolis, 1871 ; President Board of Examiners, Annapolis, 1871 ; special duty, 
Baltimore, 1871. Commissioned as Medical Director, November 7, 1872 ; mem- 
ber Board of Inspection, 1873 ; member Medical Examining Board, Washington, 
1876 ; member Board of Inspection, 1877 ; Delegate to International Medical 
Congress, at Geneva, Switzerland, 1877. 



MEDICAL DIRECTOR PHILIP LANSDALE, 

Born in Maryland. Appointed from Maryland, March 5, 1847 ; entered the 
service as Assistant Surgeon; attached to steamer Oukahyes, Brazil Squadron, 
1848 ; frigate Brandy wine, Brazil Squadron, 1849-50 ; frigate Cumberland, 
Mediterranean Squadron, 1853-5 ; Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, 1856-9 ; 
sloop John Adams, 1861. Commissioned as Surgeon, January 20, 1861 ; steam- 
sloop Pensacola, West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1863-4 ; Naval rendezvous, 
Philadelphia, 1866-8 ; Examining Board, Philadelphia, 1868-9 ; Fleet-Surgeon, 
Pacific Fleet, 1869-71. Commissioned as 3Iedical Inspector, March 3, 1871 ; 



266 MEDICAL DIRECTORS. 

Naval Academy, 1872-4. Commissioned as Medical Director, June 8, 1873; 
Fleet-Surgeon, European Station, 1874-7. 



MEDICAL DIKECTOR PHINEAS J. HORWITZ, 

Born in Maryland. Appointed from Pennsylvania, November 8, 1847 ; entered 
the service as Assistant Surgeon; attached to Home Squadron, 1847-8; frigate 
Constitution, Mediterranean Squadron, 1850 ; store-ship Relief, Brazil Squadron, 
1852 ; steamer Princeton, Home Squadron, 1854 ; Navy Yard, Pensacola, 1855 ; 
receiving-ship Norfolk, 1856 ; Coast Survey, 1857 ; store-ship Supply, Brazil 
Squadron, 1858-9 ; Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, 1861. Commissioned as 
Surgeon, April 19, 1861 ; Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, 1862-5 ; Chief of 
Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, 1866-9 ; on duty at Naval Hospital, Philadel- 
phia, 1870-1. Commissioned as Medical Inspector, March 3, 1871 ; Naval Hos- 
pital, Philadelphia, 1872-3. Commissioned as Medical Director, June 30, 1873; 
special duty, Philadelphia, 1874-8. 



MEDICAL DIRECTOR CHARLES MARTIN, 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, September 5, 1848 ; entered 
the service as Assistarit Surgeon; attached to sloop Albany, Home Squadron, 
1848-50 ; Coast Survey, California, 1850-1 ; wrecked on the way out in the 
Jefferson, off the coast of Patagonia, February, 1851 ; taken off. May, 1851 ; 
frigate Congress, Brazil Squadron, 1851-3; Naval Hospital, Chelsea, 1854; re- 
ceiving-ship, Boston, 1854-5 ; schooner Arago, Coast Survey of Texas, 1855-6 ; 
steam-frigate Minnesota, East India Squadron, 1857-9 ; Naval Asylum, Phila- 
delphia, 1859-60; steam-frigate Susquehanna, West India and Mediterranean 
Squadrons, 1860-1. Commissioned as Surgeon, April 22, 1861 ; receiving-ship, 
Boston, 1861 ; razee Cumberland, Newport News, 1861-2 ; in her engagement 
with the Merrimac, 1862; Naval rendezvous, Boston, 1862; steam-sloop Sacra- 
mento, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862-3 ; steamer Seminole, South 
Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1863-4 ; steamer Mohican, North Atlantic Block- 
ading Squadron, 1865, both attacks on and capture of Fort Fisher; receiving-ship, 
Boston, 1866-9 ; steam-frigate Franklin, Mediterranean Squadron, 1869 ; trans- 
ferred to steam-sloop Ticonderoga, 1869 ; Fleet-Surgeon, flag-ship Albany, West 
India Station, 1869 ; flag-ship Severn, West India Station, 1869-70. Commis- 
sioned as Medical Inspector, 1871 ; Naval rendezvous, Boston, 1871-3. Com- 
missioned as Medical Director, 1873; Naval Hospital, Washington, 1873-5; 
Naval Hospital, Norfolk, 1875-78. 



MEDICAL DIRECTOR FRANCIS M. GUNNELL, 

Born in District of Columbia. Appointed from District of Columbia, March 29, 
1849 ; entered the service as Assistant Surgeon; attached to sloop Falmouth, Pa- 
cific Squadron, 1849-51 ; store-ship Supply, Pacific Squadron, 1852 ; Navy Yard, 
Washington, 1853 ; frigate Independence, Pacific Squadron, 1855-7 ; steam-frigate 
Niagara, Atlantic Cable Expedition, 1858 ; receiving-ship at New York, 1858-9 ; 
steamer Fulton (wrecked), 1859 ; steam-sloop Pawnee, 1860-2 ; North and South 
Atlantic Blockading Squadrons. Commissioned as Surgeon, April 23, 1861 ; 
Naval Hospital, Washington, 1863-5 ; steam-sloop Ticonderoga, European Squad- 



MEDICAL DIRECTORS. 267 

ron, 1SG6-8 ; Naval Hospital, Washington, 1869-72. Commissioned as Medical 
Inspector, 1871; Fleet Surgeon, N. A. Fleet, 1872-3; Roanoke, 1874; Member 
Board of Examiners, 1875-6. Commissioned as Medical Director, 1875 ; Naval 
Hospital, Washington, 1875-8. 



MEDICAL DIRECTOR JAMES SUDDARDS, 

Born in England. Appointed from Pennsylvania, May 17, 1849 ; entered the 
service as Assistant Surgeon; attached to sloop John Adams, coast of Africa, 
1849-50 ; store-ship Lexington, Pacific Squadron, 1852-3 ; Coast Survey, 
1854-5; receiving-ship, Boston, 1857; Coast Survey, 1858-9. Commissioned 
as Surgeon, April 24, 1861 ; steam sloop Canandaigua, South Atlantic Blockading 
Squadron, 1862-4 ; receiving-ship Vermont, New York, 1866 ; special duty, Phil- 
adelphia, 1867 ; steam-sloop Oneida, Asiatic Squadron, 1868-9 ; Naval rendez- 
vous, Philadelphia, 1869-72. Commissioned as Medical Inspector, 1871 ; Fleet- 
Surgeon, S. P. Station, 1872-3 ; Fleet-Surgeon, N. P. Station, 1873-5 ; Naval 
Hospital, Mare Island, 1875-6. Commissioned as Medical Director, 1875 ; 
Naval Hospital, Philadelphia, 1877-8. 



MEDICAL DIRECTOR EDWARD SHIPPEN, 

Born in New Jersey. Appointed from Pennsylvania, August 7, 1849 ; entered 
the service as Assistant Surgeon ; attached to sloop Marion, East India Squadron, 
1849-52; receiving-ship Ohio, Boston, 1852-3; steamer Fulton, Fishing-Banks' 
Squadron, 1853; steamer Hetzel, Coast Survey, 1854; brig Dolphin, coast of 
Africa, 1855-7 ; rendezvous, Philadelphia, 1857 ; Naval Asylum, Philadelphia, 
1858 ; steamer Caledonia, Paraguay Expedition, 1859 ; flag-ship Congress, Brazil 
Squadron, 1859-61. Commissioned as Surgeon, April 26, 1861 ; frigate Con- 
gress, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1861-2 ; in the Congress when 
attacked by the rebel ram Merrimac at Newport News, and injured by shell ; 
Recorder of Medical Examining Board, Philadelphia, 1862 ; receiving-ship, and 
special recruiting duty. New York, 1862—4 ; frigate New Ironsides, North Atlantic 
Squadron, 1864-5 ; at both battles of Fort Fisher, and at Bermuda Hundred ; 
steam-sloop Canandaigua, European Squadron, 1866-8, during which made the 
Russian cruise, under Admiral Farragut; member of Naval Retiring Board, 
Philadelphia, 1868 ; Surgeon of the Naval Academy, Annapolis, Maryland, 
1869-71. Commissioned &?, Medical Inspector, l^^l; Fleet-Surgeon, European 
Station, 1871-3 ; Navy Yard, Philadelphia, 1873 ; Naval Hospital, Philadelphia, 
1874-8. Commissioned as Medical Director, 1876. 



MEDICAL DIRECTOR SAMUEL F. COUES, 

Born in New Hampshire. Appointed from New Hampshire, February 25, 1851 ; 
entered the service as Assistant Surgeon; attached to sloop Portsmouth, Pacific 
Squadron, 1852-5 ; Hospital, Chelsea, Massachusetts, 1857 ; Laboratory, New 
York, 1858-9; steamer Saginaw, 1861. Commissioned as Surgeon, April 26, 
1861 ; steam-sloop Housatonic, West Gulf Squadron, 1862 ; steam-sloop Housa- 
tonic, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1863 ; steam-sloop Saranac, Pacific 
Squadron, 1864-5 ; Naval Hospital, Chelsea, Massachusetts, 1866-8 ; steam-sloop 



268 MEDICAL INSPECTORS, 

Rictmond, European Squadron, 1868-71. Commissioned as Medical Inspector^ 
1871 ; leave, Europe, 1872 ; frigate Colorado, N. A. Station, 1872-3 ; Navy 
Yard, Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 1873-5; Fleet-Surgeon, N. A. Station, 
1875-6. Commissioned as Medical Director, 1876 ; Naval Hospital, Brooklyn, 
New York, 1877-8. 

MEDICAL DIRECTOR JACOB S. DUNGAN, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania, February 25, 1851 ; 
entered the service as Assistant Surgeon; attached to steamer Vixen, Home 
Squadron, 1852 ; Coast Survey, 1853 ; steamer Fulton, Home Squadron, 1854-5 ; 
Naval Hospital, Norfolk, 1857-8; Paraguay Expedition, 1859; receiving-ship, 
Philadelphia, 1861 ; sloop Portsmouth, West Gulf Squadron, 1861-4. Com- 
missioned as Surgeon, May 1, 1861 ; Naval Asylum, Philadelphia, 1865 ; Naval 
Academy, 1866 ; Navy Yard, Norfolk, 1867-8 ; steamer Ossipee, Pacific Squad- 
ron, 1869-71 ; Naval Hospital, Mare Island, 1871-5. Commissioned as Medical 
Inspector, 1871 ; and as Medical Director, 1876 ; Fleet-Surgeon, Pacific Station, 
1876-7. 



MEDICAL INSPECTORS. 

With Relative Rank of Commander. 



MEDICAL INSPECTOR GEORGE PECK, 

Born in New Jersey. Appointed from New York, February 25, 1851 ; entered 
the service as Assistant Surgeon; attached to sloop Cyane, Home Squadron, 1851 
-4; rendezvous, New York, 1855; frigate St. Lawrence, Brazil Squadron, 1857- 
9 ; steam-sloop Seminole, 1861 ; Marine rendezvous. New York, 1861-4. Com- 
missioned as Surgeon, May 30, 1861 ; steam-sloop Dictator, North Atlantic 
Squadron, 1865 ; steamer Vanderbilt, Pacific Squadron, 1866 ; Navy Yard, Nor- 
folk, 1868; frigate Sabine, special cruise, 1869-70; Navy Yard, New York, 1871 
-2. Commissioned as Medical Inspector, May 28, 1871 ; member Retiring and 
Examining Board, 1874-8. 

MEDICAL INSPECTOR JOHN M. BROWNE, 

Born in Hinsdale, New Hampshire, May 10, 1831. Graduated at the Medical 
Department of Harvard University in March, 1852. Appointed from New 
Hampshire, March 25, 1853 ; entered the service as Assistant Surgeon, and 
performed first duty on board the store-ship Warren, Lieutenant Commanding 
Fabius Stanly, at Sancelito, opposite San Francisco ; in September, 1854, the 
Warren, Lieutenant Commanding D. McDougal, proceeded to Mare Island, and 
became the temporary residence of Commander D. G. Farragut, the inaugurator 
and first Commandant of the Navy Yard ; Medical Officer of the Navy Yard 
until May 10, 1855; then duty on board Coast Survey steamer Active, Lieutenant 
Commanding James Alden ; attached to Active until November, 1857 ; Active 
employed in surveying the coast and harbors of California, Oregon and Washington 
Territories, in the winter of 1855-6, with the steamer Massachusetts and sloop 
Decatur ; Active engaged in the Indian war of Puget Sound ; and in the summer 
of 1857, in connection with H. B. M. sloop Satellite, occupied in settling the 



MEDICAL INSPECTORS. 269 

Northwest boundary. Passed Assistant Surgeon, May 12, 1858 ; brig Dolphin, 
Lieutenant Commanding John N. Maffit, June 1, 1858, Home Squadron; Au- 
gust 21, 1858, off Cape Verde, Cuba, Dolphin captured the brig Echo, with over 
300 slaves destined for the Cuban market ; Echo sent to Charleston, South Caro- 
lina, and subsequently the surviving negroes were taken to Liberia in the frigate 
Niagara; October 1, 1858, steamer Atlanta, Commander D. B. Ridgely, Paraguay 
Expedition; December 25, 1858, Hospital, Norfolk, Surgeon Ninian Pinkney ; 
May 9, 1859, sloop Constellation, Flag-Officer William Inman, Fleet-Surgeon 
Thomas L. Smith, flag-ship of African Squadron ; visited Madeira, Cape de Verde 
Islands, St. Helena, Liberia, St. Paul de Loanda, and other ports and islands 
along west coast of Africa ; September 25, 1860, at night, off Congo River, Con- 
stellation captured the bark Cora, with 705 slaves, which were sent to Liberia. 
Commissioned as Surgeon, June 19, 1861; December 23, 1861, steam-sloop Kear- 
sarge. Commander Charles W. Pickering, special duty, coast of Europe ; visited 
Cadiz, Algeciras, Gibraltar, Tangier, Ferral, Brest, Cherbourg, Boulogne-sur-Mer, 
Calais, Ostend, Flushing, London, Margate, Ramsgate, Deal, Dover, Folkstone, 
Hastings, Queenstown, Azores, Madeira, Teneriffe; off Cherbourg, June 19, 1864, 
the Kearsarge, Commander John A. Winslow, after an engagement of one hour 
and two minutes, destroyed the rebel steamer Alabama ; Kearsarge left Europe in 
August, 1864, for the Azores, and from thence proceeded to Fernando de Noronha 
and Las Rocas, off Brazil, in search of the rebel steamer Florida; returned to Bar- 
badoes, thence to St. Thomas, and arrived at Boston November 9, 1864 ; Decem- 
ber 23, 1864, temporary duty. Navy Yard, New York ; April 29, 1865, Navy 
Yard, Mare Island ; March 29, 1869, special duty to superintend the erection of 
the Naval Hospital at Mare Island ; duty, in charge of the Hospital, Mare Island, 
1870-1 ; Fleet-Surgeon, Pacific Fleet, 1872-6. Commissioned as Medical In- 
spector, December 1, 1871 ; Naval Hospital, Mare Island, 1876-8. 



MEDICAL INSPECTOR THOMAS J. TURNER, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania, December 16, 1853; en- 
tered the service as Assistant Surgeon; attached to Pacific Squadron, 1854-5; 
frigate Independence, Pacific Squadron, 1856; sloop John Adams, Pacific Squad- 
ron, 1857-8; rendezvous, Philadelphia, 1859; Laboratory, New York, 1861-2. 
Commissioned as Surgeon, June 10, 1861 ; steam-sloop Ossipee, North Atlantic 
Squadron, 1863; Naval Hospital, Pensacola, 1864-5; special duty, Philadelphia, 
1866; member Board of Examiners, 1867 ; Recorder Board of Examiners, 1868- 
9 ; attached to steam-sloop Juniata, European Squadron, 1869-72. Commis- 
sioned as Medical Inspector, April 26, 1872 ; special duty, Washington, 1872-5; 
Fleet-Surgeon, Asiatic Station, 1875-7. 



MEDICAL INSPECTOR JOHN Y. TAYLOR, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Delaware, September 26, 1853 ; entered 
the service as Assistant Surgeon ; attached to sloop Decatur, Pacific Squadron, 
1853-7 ; rendezvous, Philadelphia, 1858 ; sloop Preble, Brazil Squadron, 1859 ; 
brig Dolphin, Brazil Squadron, 1860 ; Naval Hospital, New York, 1861 ; steam- 
sloop Oneida, West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1861—4; in engagement with the 
rebel batteries at Vicksburg, June, 1862. Commissioned as Surgeon, August 1, 
1861 ; steam-sloop Tuscarora, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1865 ; Recorder 
Examining Board, Philadelphia, 1866 ; Naval Hospital, New York, 1867-8 ; steam- 



270 MEDICAL INSPECTORS. 

sloop Plymouth, European Squadron, 1868-72. Commissioned as 3Iedwal Inspector, 
June 29, 1872 ; member Board of Examiners, 1872-7. 



MEDICAL INSPECTOR WILLIAM P. HORD, 

Born in Kentucky. Appointed from Kentucky, November 1, 1854 ; entered 
the service as Assistant Surgeon ; went to Mediterranean in frigate Congress, July, 
1855 ; transferred to frigate Saranac, on that station, September, 1855 ; returned 
to United States, and detached, June, 1856; ordered to store-ship Relief, Brazil 
Squadron, August, 1856 ; detached, March, 1857 ; ordered to store-ship Supply, 
Brazil Squadron, March, 1857 ; detached, August, 1857 ; ordered to Coast Survey 
steamer Walker, October, 1857 ; detached, June, 1858 ; ordered to Naval Hospital, 
Norfolk, June, 1858 ; detached, December, 1858. Promoted to Passed Assistant 
Surgeon, April, 1859 ; ordered to steam-sloop Lancaster, Pacific Squadron, April 
9, 1859; transferred to sloop Cyane, Pacific Squadron, at Acapulco, June, 1861. 
Promoted to Surgeon, August 1, 1861 ; detached from Cyane, at Panama, and 
ordered home, November 11, 1861 ; volunteer aid on General Nelson's staff, from 
the battle of Pittsburg Landing to the evacuation of Corinth, Mississippi, by 
General Beauregard; ordered, June 14, 1861, to receiving-ship Ohio, at Boston ; 
detached, December, 1862, and ordered to steam-sloop Pawnee, attached to S. A. 
Blockading Squadron ; participated in all the operations against the enemy's works 
at Charleston, South Carolina, during the year 1863, by Admirals Du Pont and 
Dahlgren, and General Gillmore ; ordered to steam-frigate Wabash, ofi" Charleston, 
South Carolina, August 10, 1863 ; detached, sick, December, 1863 ; ordered to 
recruiting service, June 15, 1864, at Jersey City, New Jersey; detached and or- 
dered to Mound City, Illinois, August 31, 1864; detached and ordered to steam- 
sloop Monongahela, November 8, 1865, West India Squadron ; wrecked in an 
earthquake at Santa Croix, West Indies, November 18, 1867 ; Navy Yard, Nor- 
folk, Virginia, 1868-71. Commissioned as Medical Inspector, July 6, 1872; 
Fleet-Surgeon, N. A. Station, 1873-4; member Board of Examiners, 1874-6; 
Navy Yard, Boston, 1876-8, 



MEDICAL INSPECTOR ALBERT LEARY GIHON, 

Born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, September 28, 1833. Received degrees of 
A.M., M.D. (Philadelphia and Princeton) ; Professor of Chemistry and Toxicology 
in Philadelphia College of Medicine, 1853-4. Entered navy as Assistant Sur- 
geon, May 1, 1855 ; attached to sloop-of-war Levant, East India Station, 1855-8; 
was with Commander (Admiral) A. H. Foote and Lieutenant (Commodore) W. 
H. Macomb, in the sloop-of-war Portsmouth's boat, November 15, 1856, when this 
was fired upon by the Chinese while attempting to pass the Barrier Forts on the 
Canton River, and participated in the subsequent engagements which resulted in 
the capture of these forts, November 16, 20, 21, and 22, 1856 ; attached to brig 
Dolphin, 1858-9, during Paraguay Expedition ; sloop-of-war Preble, 1859, on 
the coast of Nicaragua. Passed Assistant Surgeon, May 1, 1860; attached to 
U. S. Naval Hospital, New York, 1860-1 ; attached to brig Perry, 1861, on the 
blockade of Atlantic coast of Southern States, and when rebel privateer Savannah 
was captured. Promoted to Surgeon, August 1, 1861 ; attached to Naval ren- 
dezvous, New York; attached to sloop-of-war St. Louis, 1862-4, on special ser- 
vice on European Station ; and in latter part of 1864, on blockade of coast of 
North Carolina ; attached to Navy Yard, Portsmouth, New Hamphire, as Senior 



MEDICAL INSPECTORS. 271 

Medical Officer, 1865-8 ; attached to store-ship Idaho, 1868-70, anchored at 
Nagasaki, Japan, as hospital-ship for Asiatic Station ; for services rendered the 
Portuguese colony at Dilly, Island of Timor, and the Portuguese men-of-war 
Principe Dom Carlos and Sa da Bandeira, received from the King of Portugal 
the decoration of Knight of the Military Order of Christ, and for services to H. 
B. M. S. Flirt and Dawn the thanks of the British government ; special duty at 
New York, 1870; subsequently Marine rendezvous, Philadelphia; and later, 
member of Naval Medical Board of Examiners at Philadelphia, 1870-2, and at 
Washington, 1872-3. Promoted to Medical hisjiector, November 7, 1872; 
special duty at Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, Navy Department, 1873, and 
same year ordered to flag-ship Wabash, as Surgeon of the Fleet, on the European 
Station; at Key West with Naval Expedition of 1874, and returned to European 
Station, as Surgeon of the Fleet, on board flag-ship Franklin, 1874—5 ; March 23, 
1875, ordered to Naval Academy, Annapolis, where he is still on duty. 



MEDICAL INSPECTOR RICHARD C. DEAN, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from New Jersey, April 17, 1856 ; entered 
the service as Assistant Surgeon ; attached to sloop Dale, coast of Africa, 1857- 
9 ; steamer Crusader, Home Squadron, 1860 ; steam-sloop Wyandotte, 1861 ; 
steam-sloop Tuscarora, special service, 1861-3. Commissioned as Surgeon, August 
1, 1861 ; steam-sloop Tuscarora, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864 ; 
Naval Academy, 1865-6 ; steam-sloop Sacramento, special service, 1867 ; steamer 
Michigan, on the lakes, 1868-9 ; Assistant to Chief of Bureau of Medicine, 1870 
—4. Commissioned as Medical Inspector, June 8, 1873 ; frigate Congress, Eu- 
ropean Station, 1874-6; member of Examining and Retiring Boards, 1877-8. 



MEDICAL INSPECTOR PHILIP S. WALES, 

Born in Maryland. Appointed from Maryland, August 7, 1856 ; entered the 
service zb Assistant Surgeon; attached to Naval Academy, 1857; steam-frigate 
Mississippi, East India Squadron, 1858-60 ; steamer Water Witch, 1861. Com- 
missioned as Surgeon, October 12, 1861; Naval Hospital, Norfolk, 1863; 
steamer Fort Jackson, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864; steamer Fort 
Jackson, West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1865 ; Examining Board, 1868 ; 
sloop Portsmouth, South Atlantic Squadron, 1868-9 ; steam-sloop Guerriere, Eu- 
ropean Station, 1870-2 ; member Board of Examiners, 1872-4. Commissioned 
as Medical Inspector, June 30, 1873 ; special duty, Washington, 1874-8. 



MEDICAL INSPECTOR ALBERT C. GORGAS, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania, August 30, 1856 ; en- 
tered the service as Assistant Surgeon ; attached to sloop Germantown, East India 
Squadron, 1858-60; steamer Crusader, Home Squadron, 1861. Commissioned 
as Surgeon, October 13, 1861 ; sloop Vandalia, South Atlantic Blockading Squad- 
ron, 1862-3; Naval Hospital, Norfolk, 1864; steam-sloop Juniata, South At- 
lantic Blockading Squadron, 1865 ; steam-sloop Juniata, Brazil Squadron, 1866 ; 
Navy Yard, Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 1868-70 ; Brooklyn, flag-ship, S. A. 
Station, 1870-2 ; Naval Hospital, Annapolis, 1873-7. Commissioned as Medical 
Inspector, October 16, 1863. 



272 MEDICAL INSPECTORS. 

MEDICAL INSPECTOR DELAVAN BLOODGOOD, 

Born in Erie County, New York, resident of Brooklyn. Entered the service as 
Assistant Surgeon, March 13, 1857 ; first cruise in steam-frigate Merrimac, flag- 
ship Pacific Squadron, 1857-60 ; visited the principal ports from Talcahuana to 
G-uif of California and the Sandwich Islands ; observant of revolutions in Chili, 
Peru, and some of the Central American States, besides the machinations of 
Walker, " the gray-eyed man of destiny ;" volunteered his services at a time when 
serious illness prevailed among the employes of the Pacific Steam Navigation 
Company (English), at Toboga, and attended the sick until the supposed epidemic 
abated, for which his commanding ofl&cer received a letter of thanks from the 
British consul at Panama; duty at Chelsea Hospital, May to September, i860; 
thence to steamer Mohawk, cruising for slavers about Cuba (two captures made) ; 
in same vessel at earliest monition of the rebellion ; participated in saving the 
forts at Key West and Tortugas ; next as convoy in the removal from Texas of 
the troops surrendered by Twiggs ; on the first blockade, eastern end of Santa 
Rosa Island; detached from Gulf Blockading Squadron, November, 1861, and 
arrived at Port Royal ; ordered to transport Atlantic, in charge of wounded and 
sick from the battle. Passed Assistant Surgeon, December 20, 1861 ; duty at 
rendezvous. New York, till January 24, 1862. Promoted to Surgeon, January 
24, 1862 ; attached to steam-sloop Dacotah, 1862-4, viz. : at Hampton Roads, 
from raid of ram Merrimac till her destruction, in which time occurred skirmishes 
and engagements with the rebel fleet, Sewell's Point and other batteries ; at re- 
occupation of Norfolk ; destruction of enemy's works along James River ; in 
co-operation with army in first Peninsular campaign; after which, joined the 
West India Flying Squadron and cruised for privateers until, in October, 1862, 
an epidemic of yellow fever aboard compelled a return to cold latitudes ; after 
abatement of the fever, joined blockading squadron on the coasts of the CaroHnas, 
but following autumn the ship was again disabled, in consequence of an epidemic 
of smallpox, and went North ; rid of this latter pestilence, cruised in winter of 
1863 on coast of Nova Scotia, in search of steamer Chesapeake, piratically cap- 
tured ; this mission accomplished, returned to the blockade ofi" Wilmington, and, 
though in never a prize, shared in several skirmishes with batteries and rams at 
the entrances of Cape Fear River; detached from Dacotah, July, 1864, and, ew 
route home, was one of the captured and plundered by rebel raiders at Gunpowder 
River, Maryland ; latter part of 1864, on receiving-ship Vermont, at New York ; 
in 1865, attached to steamer Michigan, on the lakes; 1866, returned to receiving- 
ship Vermont; February, 1867, ordered to the Jamestown, at Panama, after the 
breaking out of the extremely virulent epidemic of yellow fever, and is one of the 
survivino- suff'erers ; detached from Jamestown at San Francisco, and ordered to 
Cyane, but two months subsequently accompanied the expedition, aboard the 
Ossipee, to take possession of Alaska, and rejoined the Jamestown at Sitka, where 
the winter of 1867-8 was passed ; on returning to California, was ordered^ to 
steam-sloop Lackawanna, on the Mexican coast, and served there until expiration 
of her cruise ; ordered East in spring of 1869, and to the receiving-ship Vermont, 
at New York, where he served until 1872 ; Fleet-Surgeon, Pacific Station, 1872-5. 
Commissioned as Medical Inspector, February 3, 1875 ; Navy Yard, New York, 
1875-8. 

MEDICAL INSPECTOR THOMAS WALTER LEACH, 

Born in New Hampshire. Appointed from New Hampshire, July 29, 1858 ; 
entered the service as Assistant Surgeon; attached to steam-sloop Brooklyn, Home 



MEDICAL INSPECTORS. 273 

Squadron, 1858-61 ; Naval Hospital, New York, 1862. Commissioned as Siu-- 
ffeon, May 21, 1862 ; steam-sloop Lackawanna, North Atlantic Blockading Squad- 
ron, 1863, and West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; Naval Hospital, New 
York, 1866 ; steam-sloop Iroquois, Asiatic Fleet, 1867-70 ; Navy Yard, Ports- 
mouth, New Hampshire, 1871-2 ; Fleet-Surgeon, Asiatic Station, 1872-5. 
Commissioned as Medical Inspector, April 5, 1875 ; member of Board of Ex- 
aminers, 1875-8. 

MEDICAL INSPECTOR WILLIAM M. KING, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania, December 3, 1858 ; en- 
tered the service as Assistant Surgeon; temporary duty. Navy Yard, Pensacola, 
1859; attached to sloop Saratoga, Home Squadron, 1860; store-ship Supply, 
1861 ; steam-sloop Hartford, West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1862-3. Com- 
missioned as Surgeon, May 22, 1862 ; Naval Academy, 1864 ; steam-sloop Wachu- 
sett, East India Squadron, 1865-6 ; member Examining Board, 1868 ; steam-sloop 
Congress, Navy Yard, Philadelphia, 1870 ; Dictator (iron-clad), N. A. Station,. 
1870-1 ; receiving-ship Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 1872 ; Naval Hospital, 
Yokohama, Japan, 1872-5 ; Navy Yard, Norfolk, 1875-8. Commissioned as. 
Medical Inspector, May 4, 1875. 



MEDICAL INSPECTOR BENJAMIN F. GIBBS, 

Born in New Jersey. Appointed from New Jersey, November 12, 1858 ; en- 
tered the service as Assistant Surgeon; attached to steamer Memphis, Brazil 
Squadron and Paraguay Expedition, 1858-9 ; sloop John Adams, East India 
Squadron, 1859-62 ; joined the West Gulf Blockading Squadron, September, 
1862, and was ordered in charge of Naval Hospital at Navy Yard, Pensacola, 
Florida ; steam-sloop Ossipee, West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1863-5 ; battle 
of Mobile Bay, August 5, 1864 ; chased the rebel ram Webb down the Missis- 
sippi River, April, 1865; school-ship Sabine, 1865-6 ; steam-sloop Ossipee, North 
Pacific Fleet, 1867-9 ; special duty in connection with iron-clads in ordinary, at 
New Orleans, Louisiana, 1869-73 ; Navy Yard, Norfolk, 1874 ; Fleet-Surgeon, 
S. Pacific Station, 1874-7. Commissioned as Medical Inspector, 1877. 



MEDICAL INSPECTOR DAVID KINDLEBERGER, 

Born in Ohio, September 2, 1834. Appointed from Ohio, May 20, 1859 ; en- 
tered the service as Assistant Surgeon ; attached to steam-sloop San Jacinto, coast 
of Africa, June 10 to December 20, 1859 ; sloop Portsmouth, coast of Africa, De- 
cember, 1859, to October, 1861 ; Navy Yard, Philadelphia, December, 1861, to 
February, 1862 ; steamer Miami, West Gulf Blockading Squadron, February tO' 
May, 1862 ; present at the passage of Forts Jackson and St. Philip, and capture 
of New Orleans ; Navy Yard, Philadelphia, July to August, 1862. Commissioned, 
as Surgeon, August 14, 1862 ; steam-sloop Monongahela, North Atlantic Block- 
ading Squadron, December, 1862-3 ; West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; 
was in the actions of Port Hudson, Donaldsonville, forts of Mobile Bay, and the 
rebel ram Tennessee; gunboat Itasco, April to September, 1865 ; leave of absence, 
September, 1865, to October, 1866 ; steamer De Soto, North Atlantic Squadron, 
October, 1866, to January, 1868; was in her during the great earthquake at St. 
Thomas, October, 1867, when she came near being lost by the tidal waves ; Marine. 

18 



274 MEDICAL INSPECTORS. 

rendezvous, Washington, May to July, 1869 ; receiving-ship Independence, Mare 
Island, California, July to August, 1869 ; Naval rendezvous, San Francisco, Cal- 
ifornia, 1869-71; Wachusett, European Station, 1872-4; member Retiring and 
Examining Boards, 1874-7 ; Fleet-Surgeon, Asiatic Station, 1877-8. Commis- 
sioned as Medical Inspector., 1877. 



MEDICAL INSPECTOR WILLIAM E. TAYLOR, 

Born in Virginia. Appointed from Virginia, July 3, 1859 ; entered the service 
as> Assistant Surgeon ; attached to sloop Savannah, Home Squadron, 1859-60; 
sloop St. Mary's, 1861. Commissioned as Surgeon, September 5, 1862 ; steam- 
sloop Iroquois, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1863-4; receiving-ship, 
Boston, 1864-5 ; iron-clad Miantonomah, European Squadron, 1867 ; Navy 
Yard, Mare Island, California, 1869-71 ; Pensacola, N. Pacific Station, 1871-2 ; 
Saranac, same station, 1872-4 ; Navy Yard, Mare Island, 1875-8. Commissioned 
as 3Iedtcal Inspector, 1877. , 



MEDICAL INSPECTOR CHRISTOPHER JAMES CLEBORNB, 

Born in Scotland, December 16, 1838 ; graduate of University of Pennsylvania, 
1860 ; elected member of the Academy of Natural Sciences, July 31, 1860 ; mem- 
ber of Conchological Society, March 7, 1867 ; member of Pennsylvania Historical 
-Society, September 23, 1872 ; member of American Medical Association, 1876. 
Appointed from Pennsylvania, May 9, 1861 ; entered the service as an Assistant 
Surgeon, -with the rank of Master ; attached to the sloop-of-war Jamestown, North 
Atlantic Blockading Squadron, from May, 1861, to January, 1862 ; participated 
in the destruction of the blockade-runner Alvarado, under the batteries at Fer- 
nandina, Florida, August 5, 1861 ; sloop Dale, S. A. Blockading Squadron, 1862 ; 
expedition to Stono River, and engagements on South Edisto River, 1862; service 
with Forty-fifth Pennsylvania Regiment at Otter Island, South Carolina, 1862 ; 
steam-gunboat Aroostook, West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1863 ; operations 
ofi" Mobile, 1863. Commissioned as Surgeon, with rank of Lieutenant-Commander, 
November 24, 1863 ; Naval rendezvous, Philadelphia, 1864 ; surgeon of steam- 
sloop Ticonderoga, coast of Brazil, and S. A. Blockading Squadron, "1864-5 ; 
j)resent at both battles of Fort Fisher, December, 1864 ; the Ticonderoga lost, by 
the bursting of her Parrot-gun, twenty-one killed and wounded ; bombardment 
and capture of Fort Fisher, January 15, 1865 ; Judge-Advocate of Naval Re- 
tiring Board, Philadelphia, 1865 ; surgeon of flag-ship Rhode Island, West India 
Squadron, 1866.; in medical charge of U. S. S. Bienville, during epidemic of 
yellow fever, 1866; Judge- Advocate of Naval Retiring Board, Philadelphia, 
1867 ; sloop Saratoga, 1868-9 (special service) ; flag-ship Powhatan, West In- 
dies, 1870 ; member of Naval Examining Board, 1870 ; Naval Station, League 
Island, 1871 ; steam-sloops Juniata, Plymouth, Brooklyn, and Congress, European 
Squadron, 1872-4 ; Navy Yard, Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 1875-7. Commis- 
sioned as Medical Inspector, with the rank of Commander, January 6, 1878. 



SURGEONS. 275 

SURGEONS. 

With the Relative Rank of Lieutenant- Commander. 



SURGEON JOHN CRAWFORD SPEAR, 

Born in Delaware. Graduated at the University of Pennsylvania, 1861. Com- 
missioned as Assistant Surgeon, May 9, 1861. Promoted to Passed Assistant 
Surgeon^ October 26, 1863. Promoted to Surgeon, June 23, 1864 ; attached to 
steam-frigate Roanoke, Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1861-2 ; engagement be- 
tween United States vessels and rebel ram Merrimac, Hampton Roads, March 8 
and 9, 1862 ; attached to steamer Mahaska, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 
1862-3; battle of Malvern Hill, the affair at Ruggle's Point, and other similar 
engagements with the rebels on the James and York Rivers, in Virginia ; affair 
with rebel battery at mouth of Cape Fear River, North Carolina ; land expedition 
to Matthew's Court-House, Virginia ; attached to *flag-ship Minnesota, North At- 
lantic Blockading Squadron, 1863 ; Navy Yard, Philadelphia, 1863-4 ; attached 
to steamer Seminole, West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1864 ; bombardment and 
surrender of Fort Morgan^ Mobile Bay ; attached to steamer Monongahela, West 
Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1865 ; special duty, Washington, 1865 ; attached to 
steamer Swatara; cruised in West Indies, 1865-6 ; in the Mediterranean, const 
of Europe and west coast of Africa, 1866-8 ; Naval rendezvous, Philadelphia, 
1869-70 ; T. and N. Surveying Expedition, 1870-1 ; Naval Hospital, Philadel- 
phia, 1872-4; Dictator (iron-clad), North Atlantic Station, 1875-6; member 
Board of Examiners, 1877-8. 



SURGEON CHARLES H. BURBANK, 

Born in Maine. Appointed from Maine, May 9, 1861 ; entered the service as 
Assistant Surgeon; attached to Naval Hospital, Pilot Town, Mississippi, 1861-2; 
school-ship Marion, 1863 ; steam-sloop Housatonic, 1864. Commissioned as Sur- 
geon, August 24, 1864; South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1865; receiving- 
ship, Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 1866-7 ; steam-sloop Kearsarge, Pacific Squad- 
ron, 1868-70 ; Navy Yard, Mare Island, 1871-2 ; sick-leave, 1873-4; Powhatan, 
North Atlantic Station, 1874-7. 



SURGEON HENRY C. NELSON, 

Born in Maryland. Appointed from Maryland, May 9, 1861 ; entered the 
service as Assistant Surgeon ; attached to steam-sloop Susquehanna, West Gulf 
Blockading Squadron, 1861-3 ; Naval Hospital, New York, 1864. Commissioned 
as Surgeon, October 25, 1864; steam-sloop Pawnee, South Atlantic Squadron, 
1865-7 ; apprentice-ship Sabine, 1868 ; steamer Michigan, on the lakes, 1868-9; 
attached to apprentice-ship Macedonian, 1869 ; steam-sloop Benicia, Asiatic Fleet, 
1870-1 ; Naval Hospital, Yokohama, 1872-3 ; Assistant Bureau of Medicine, 
1873-7 ; Fleet-Surgeon, North Pacific Station, 1877-8. 



SURGEON SOMERSET ROBINSON, 

Born in Maryland. Appointed from District of Columbia, May 9, 1861 ; entered' 
the service as Assistant Surgeon; attached to steam-gunboat Katahdiu, West 



276 SURGEOXS. 

G-ulf Squadron, 1861-3; Navy Yard, New York, 1864. Commissioned as Sur- 
geo7i, December 18, 1864 ; sloop Cyane, Pacific Squadron, 1865-6 ; steam-sloop 
Saranac, North Pacific Squadron, 1867 ; receiving-ship Norfolk, 1868-9 ; steamer 
Monocacy, Asiatic Fleet, 1870-2; Navy Yard, Washington, 1873-4; Plymouth, 
North Atlantic Station, 1874-8. 



SURGEON ARCHIBALD C. RHOADES, 

Born in New Jersey. Appointed from New Jersey, July 30, 1861 ; entered the 
service as Assistant Surgeon ; atttached to steamer Pocahontas, West Gulf Block- 
ading Squadron, 1862-3; Naval Hospital, New York, 1864. Commissioned as 
Surgeon, March 19, 1865 ; steamer Bienville, West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 
1865 ; steam-sloop Shenandoah, East India Squadron, 1866-9 ; Naval Hospital, 
Philadelphia, 1870 ; member Board of Examiners, 1871 ; store-ship Guard, 
1873-4; R. S. Vermont, 1874-5. 



SURGEON MICHAEL BRADLEY, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Commissioned as Assistant Surgeon, July 10, 1861 ; 
August following, ordered to the gunboat Louisiana, North Atlantic Squadron ; 
present at the battle and capture of Roanoke Island, North Carolina, February 7, 
1862 ; in the naval engagement, Pasquotank River, that ended in the destruction 
of the Confederate fleet under Commodore Lynch, February 11, 1862 ; battle and 
capture of Elizabeth City, North Carolina, February 11, 1862 ; capture of Edenton, 
Albemarle Sound, North Carolina ; battle and capture of Newbern, North Carolina, 
March 14, 1862 ; capture of Washington, on the Pamlico River, and at the battle 
and capture of Winton, on the Chowan River, North Carolina. In the fall of 1862, 
part of the Southern Army of Virginia made a furious attack on Washington, North 
Carolina, and for a time held possession of the town. In the engagement that fol- 
lowed, the army gunboat Picket, before firing a shot, blew up, killing thirty-nine of 
her crew (eighty men), including the commanding officer. Captain Nicholls, of the 
Revenue service. The Louisiana, alone, succeeded in driving the enemy out, with 
great loss. April 1, 1863, the enemy held all the approaches to Washington, North 
Carolina, and for twelve successive days the Louisiana was the target for shift- 
ing swamp batteries. In the summer of 1863, detached from the Louisiana, and 
ordered to the flag-ship Minnesota, on blockade duty ofi" Fort Fisher, North Caro- 
lina; December, 1863, detached from the Minnesota, and ordered to Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania ; spring of 1864, promoted to Passed Assistant Surgeon ; July 4, 
1864, reported for duty on the flag-ship Black Hawk, Mississippi Squadron ; De- 
cember, 1864, temporarily detached and ordered to the tin-clad Reindeer, to 
engage the field batteri^ placed on both sides of the Cumberland River by Gen- 
eral Hood, to protect his columns in crossing when pursued by General Thomas ; 
a few days afterward transferred to the iron-clad Neosho, Admiral S. P. Lee in 
command,' and engaged the batteries on both sides of the Tennessee River, at 
Florence, Alabama; detached from the Black Hawk, February 14, 1865, and 
ordered to the hospital-ship Red Rover, as aid to Fleet-Surgeon Ninian Pinkney. 
Commissioned Surgeon, June 12, 1865 ; at the breaking up of the Mississippi 
Squadron, July, 1865, detached, and waiting orders; January, 1866, ordered to 
the steamer Michigan; detached, March, 1868, and the following month ordered 
to San Francisco, California, by sea, to join the steamer Tuscarora, for duty in the 
South Pacific ; ship remained on the station about one year, when she was ordered, 



SURGEONS. 277 

via Strait of Magellan, to the West India Station ; detached from the Tuscarora, 
January, 1871, and waiting orders; November, 1871, ordered to Mound City 
Station, Illinois; detached, December, 1872 ; January, 1873, reported for duty at 
the Navy Yard, New York ; detached the following May, and waiting orders ; 
August, 1873, ordered to the steamer Alaska, European Station ; detached, Sep- 
tember, 1876; January 21, 1878, ordered to the flag-ship Powhatan, as Fleet- 
Surgeon of the North Atlantic Fleet. 



SURGEON ADRIAN HUDSON, 

Born in Canada. Appointed from New York, July 30, 1861 ; entered the service 
as Assistant Surgeon; attached to Mississippi Flotilla, 1862; steam-gunboat East- 
port, Mississippi Squadron, 1863 ; appi-entice-ship Sabine, 1864-5. Commissioned 
as Surgeon, June 12, 1864 ; steam-sloop Tuscarora, South Pacific Squadron, 
1866-7; Mound City, Illinois, 1868-70; Worcester, flag-ship, N. A. Station, 
1874-5 ; Navy Yard, Washington, 1875-8. 



SURGEON NEWTON L. BATES, 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, July 30, 1861 ; entered the 
service as Assistant Surgeon ; attached to steam-gunboat Seneca, South Atlantic 
Blockading Squadron, 1861-2 ; Naval Laboratory, New York, 1863-7. Com- 
missioned as Surgeon, September 16, 1865 ; apprentice-ship Portsmouth, 1868 ; 
steam-sloop Swatara, European Squadron, 1869 ; steam-sloop Miantonomah, special 
service, 1870 ; S. S. Pawnee, at Key West, 1871 ; Navy Yard, Norfolk, 1872-3 ; 
Brooklyn, flag-ship, S. A. Station, 1873-6. 



SURGEON JAMES H. TINKHAM, 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, July 30, 1861 ; entered the 
service as Assistant Surgeon; attached to steam-frigate Roanoke, 1861; gun- 
boat Kanawha, West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1861-3; receiving-ship, Boston, 
1864; receiving-ship, Baltimore, 1864; steam-frigate Wabash, North Atlantic 
Blockading Squadron, 1865 ; with assaulting party on Fort Fisher, 1865. Com- 
missioned as Surgeon, December 5, 1865 ; steam-frigate Colorado, flag-ship Euro- 
pean Squadron, 1865-7; steamer Frolic, European Squadron, 1868; steam-sloop 
Canandaigua, European Squadron, 1869 ; Recorder Board of Examiners, 1870-1 ; 
Roanoke (iron-clad), 1873-4 ; practice-ship Constellation, 1874 ; Naval Hospital, 
Philadelphia, 1875-7 ; member Board of Examiners, 1878. 



SURGEON STEPHEN D. KENNEDY, 

Born in Virginia. Appointed from Maryland, May 9,1861 ; entered the service 
as Assistant Surgeon; attached to steam-sloops Colorado, Mohawk, Preble, and 
Hartford, West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1861-3 ; in the expedition that cut 
out the Juliet, at Pensacola, September, 1861 ; battles of Port Hudson, Grand 
Gulf, and Warrenton, Mississippi River; Navy Yard, Washington, 1863-4; re- 
signed, 1865 ; re-appointed, January 5, 1866. Commissioned as Surgeon, January 
5, 1866; steam-sloop Lackawanna, North Pacific Squadron, 1867-8 ; special duty. 



278 SURGEONS. 

New York, 1869 ; receivinsc-ship New Hampshire, Norfolk, 1870-1 ; Ossipee, 
Pacific Fleet, 1871-2 ; Powhatan, N. A. Station, 1873-4. 



SURGEON EDWARD S. BOGERT, 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, July 30, 1861 ; entered the 
service as Assistant Surgeon; attached to frigate Congress, 1861; attached to 
steam-gunboat Cayuga, West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1861-3 ; participated 
in the passage of the forts below New Orleans, and action with rebel gunboats, 
and subsequent campaign in the Mississippi River ; Naval Hospital, New York, 
1864 ; steam-frigate Niagara, special service, 1864 ; Naval Hospital, New Briton, 
1866. Commissioned as Surgeon, April 7, 1866 ; Naval Laboratory, New York, 
1867-70; Congress, special service, 1870-2; Recorder Board of Examiners, 
1873 ; Marine Barracks, Brooklyn, 1873-7. 



SURGEON WALTER K. SCHOFIELD, 

Born in Connecticut. Appointed from Connecticut, July 30, 1861 ; entered the 
service as Assistant Surgeon; attached to steam-gunboat Sagamore, East Gulf 
Blockading Squadron, 1861-3 ; steamer Union, East Gulf Blockading Squadron, 
1864; Naval Hospital, Norfolk, 1865-6; steamer Augusta, European Squadron, 
1866-7. Commissioned as Surgeon, June 19, 1866 ; Naval rendezvous, Boston, 
1868 ; sloop Saratoga, North Atlantic Squadron, 1869 ; iron-clad Terror, special 
service, 1870; R. S. Vermont, 1871-2; Lackawanna, Asiatic Station, 1873-5; 
R. S. Wabash, 1875-8. 

SURGEON A. S. OBBRLY, 

Born in Pennsylvania, April 7, 1837. Appointed from Connecticut; com- 
missioned as Assistant Surgeon, July 30, 1861 ; attached to receiving-ship Ohio, 
Boston, and to frigate Sabine, 1861 ; gunboat Kineo, West Gulf Blockading 
Squadron, 1862-3 ; present during the bombardment and passage of Forts Jack- 
son and St. Philip, 1862 ; at the attempted passage of the batteries at Port Hud- 
son by Farragut's fleet, March 14, 1863 ; engagement with batteries at Grand 
Gulf, Doualdsonville, battle of Baton Rouge, and siege of Port Hudson, 1862-3 ; 
at the request of the Medical Director, on duty with the army during the siege of 
Port Hudson ; and, owing to want of army surgeons, assisted also in caring for 
the Union and Confederate wounded after the attack on Fort Butler, 1863 ; Naval 
Academy, 1863-4, including summer cruise of the Macedonian ; steamer Santiago 
de Cuba, 1864-5 ; present during both bombardments on Fort Fisher, in Decem- 
ber, 1864, and January, 1865 ; Naval Hospital, New York, and steamer Rhode 
Island, 1865 ; Navy Yard, New York, 1866. Commissioned as Surgeon, June 
19, 1866 ; Naval Station, Mound City, Illinois, 1866-8 ; steam-sloop Narragan- 
sett. West Indies, 1869 ; sloop Portsmouth, South Atlantic Squadron, 1870-1 ; 
receiving-ship, and Navy Yard, at Boston, 1871-3; iron-clad Dictator, North 
Atlantic Fleet, 1874-5 ; Navy Yard and Hospital, Pensacola, Florida, 1875-8. 



SURGEON GROVE S. BEARDSLEY, 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, July 30, 1861 ; entered the 
service as Assistant Surgeon; attached to steam-sloop Lancaster, Pacific Squad- 



SURGEONS. 279 

ron, 1861-4 ; West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1865 ; steam-sloop Brooklyn, 
flag-ship Brazil Squadron, 1866, and South Atlantic Squadron, 1867. Com- 
missioned as Siirgeon, July 25, 1866; receiving-ship Independence, San Fran- 
cisco, 1868-9 ; St. Mary's Pacific Fleet, 1870-3 ; Naval Hospital, Norfolk, 1873 ; 
Navy Yard, Boston, 1874-7. 

SURGEON J. S. KNIGHT, 

Born in Delaware. Appointed from Delaware, July 30, 1861 ; entered the ser- 
vice as Assistant Surgeon; Navy Yard, Washington, D. C, 1861; attached to 
steam-sloops Brooklyn and Preble, 1861-3 ; remained with the Preble until she 
was destroyed by fire, in which disaster lost all his personal eff"ects ; participated 
in the passage of Forts Jackson and St. Philip, and the capture of New Orleans, 
and was three times under the batteries at Vicksburg; Navy Yard, Pensacola, 
Florida, 1863. Surgeon B. F. Gibbs, in a letter to Assistant Surgeon Knight, 
says, " It gives me great pleasure to express at this time my entire approval of 
your conduct as a student, a physician, and a gentleman while on duty with me 
at the hospital at this yard. If any other encomium were necessary, I could 
refer to nothing more praiseworthy than your willing and industrious energy 
during the dark and trying passage of our lives, while an epidemic of yellow fever 
raged so fearfully and fatally in our midst, calling forth those pure elements of our 
nature, sympathy, charity, and courage. I cannot help but recognize how well 
you combine these." Naval Asylum, Philadelphia, 1864 ; Mississippi Squadron, 
1864-5. Fleet-Surgeon Pinkney thus writes under date of November 12, 1865 : 
" Before severing my association with a squadron to which I have been attached 
during a period of more than two years and a half, I deem it an act of justice to 
tender you my thanks for the eflBciency with which you discharged the duties as 
my assistant ; your conduct was such as to entitle you to my esteem and confi- 
dence." Naval Station, Mound City, 1865-6. Commissioned as Surgeon, July 
25, 1866 ; steam-sloop Mohican, North Pacific Squadron, 1866-8 ; visited all the 
principal ports on the Pacific coast ; receiving-ship Ohio, Boston, Massachusetts, 
1870-1 ; Saranac, Pacific Fleet, 1872-3 ; receiving-ship at Boston, 1873-4 ; 
Omaha, South Pacific Station, 1874-6. 



SURGEON HENRY M. WELLS, 

Born in Massachusetts. Appointed from Massachusetts, July 30, 1861 ; entered 
the service as Assistant Surgeon; attached to Naval rendezvous and Hospital, 
Boston, 1861 ; sloop Portsmouth and steamer Tennessee, West Gulf Blockading 
Squadron, 1861-3; participated in engagements with Forts Jackson and St. 
Philip in April, 1862 ; batteries at Donaldsonville, Grand Gulf, Port Hudson, and 
Vicksburg on the Mississippi River in 1862-3 ; receiving-ship and hospital, Bos- 
ton, 1864; frigate Sabine, 1864; iron-clad Onondaga, North Atlantic Blockading 
Squadron, 1865 ; batteries on James River, Virginia, 1865 ; Navy Yard, Wash- 
ington, District of Columbia, and steamer Shamokin, Brazil Squadron, 1866-8. 
Commissioned as Surgeon, October 9, 1866 ; Naval Hospital, New York, 1869- 
71 ; Canandaigua, 1872-5 : R. S. Colorado, 1876-8. 



SURGEON EDWARD S. MATTHEWS, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from District of Columbia, July 30, 1861 ; 
entered the service as Assistant Surgeon; attached to steamer Hatteras, West Gulf 



280 SURGEONS. 

Blockading Squadron, 1861-3 ; steam-sloop Lancaster, flag-ship Pacific Squadron, 
1864; East Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1865 _; Pacific Squadron, 1866. Com- 
missioned as Surgeon, July 25, 1866 ; store-ship Fredonia, Callao, 1867 ; steam- 
sloop Saranac, North Pacific Squadron, 1868 ; Naval rendezvous, Boston, 1869- 
70 ; Ticonderoga, S. A. Fleet, 1870-3 ; leave in Europe, 1874. 



SURGEON JOHN H. CLARK, 

Born in New Hampshire. Appointed from New Hampshire, October 19, 1861 ; 
entered the service as Assistant Surgeon; attached to West Gulf Blockading 
Squadron, 1861-4 ; Navy Yard, Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 1865 ; steamer 
Mohongo, Pacific Squadron, 1865-7. Commissioned as Surgeon, May 14, 1867 ; 
receiving-ship, Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 1868-9; steam-sloop Alaska, 1870; 
December 1, 1869, to February 27, 1873, steamer Alaska, Asiatic Station ; Feb- 
ruary 28, 1873, to March 31, 1873, waiting orders at home (Amherst, New Hamp- 
shire) ; April 1, 1873, to June 14, 1873, Naval rendezvous. New York City ; June 
15, 1873, to November 15, 1875, Naval Hospital, Chelsea, Massachusetts ; November 
16, 1875, to January 17, 1876, steamer Hartford, North Atlantic Station; Jan- 
uary 18, 1876, to February 29, 1876, waiting orders at home; March 1, 1876, 
to present time, ship New Hampshire, North Atlantic Station. 



SURGEON ADOLPH A. HOEHLING, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania, August 14, 1861 ; entered 
the service as Assistant Surgeon; attached to Mortar Flotilla, 1861-3; steam- 
frigate Roanoke, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864; Naval Asylum, 
Philadelphia, 1865 ; steam-sloop Dacotah, Pacific Squadon, 1866-8. Commis- 
sioned as Surgeon, October 2, 1867 ; Retiring Board, Philadelphia, 1868-9 ; 
receiving-ship, Norfolk, 1869 ; steam-sloop Frolic, Navy Yard, New York, 1870 ; 
special duty, Brooklyn, 1870-1 ; League Island Station, 1872 ; Monongahela, 
S. A. Station, 1873-6 ; Navy Yard, League Island, 1876-8. 



SURGEON BENJAMIN H. KIDDER, 

Born in Massachusetts. Appointed from Massachusetts, September 20, 1861 ; 
entered the service as Assistant Surgeon; attached to steam-gunboat Marblehead, 
South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862-4 ; steam-frigate Colorado, flag-ship 
North Atlantic Squadron, 1865 ; steamer De Soto, special service, 1866, and North 
Atlantic Squadron, 1867. Commissioned as Surgeon, March 2, 1868 ; special 
duty, Boston, 1869-70 ; Terror (iron-clad), N. A. Squadron, 1870-1 ; Ossipee, 
N. A. Station, 1873-6; Naval Hospital, Philadelphia, 1877-8. 



SURGEON WILLIAM K. VAN REYPEN, 

Born in New Jersey. Appointed from New Jersey, November 29, 1861 ; entered 
the service as Assistant Surgeon ; attached to Naval Hospital, New York, 1862 ; 
frigate St. Lawrence, East Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1863-4 ; steamer Lenapee, 
Atlantic Squadron, 1866-7 ; steam-sloop Ticonderoga, European Squadron, 1868 ; 
steamer Frolic, European Squadron, 1868-9 ; special duty. New Orleans, 1869 ; 



SURGEONS. 281 

Naval Hospital, Chelsea, Massachusetts, 1870 ; Naval Hospital, Norfolk, 1871 ; 
Naval Hospital, Annapolis, 1872; Iroquois, Asiatic Station, 1872-4; Naval 
Hospital, New York, 1875-7. 



SUKGEON THOMAS C. WALTON, 

Born in England. Appointed from New York, October 5, 1861 ; entered the 
service as Assistant Surgeon ; attached to sloop Jamestown, East India Squadron, 
1862-5 ; receiving-ship, Boston, 1866-7 ; steamer Suwanee, North Pacific Squad- 
ron, 1868. Commissioned as Surgeon, October 22, 1868 ; steamer Resaca, Pacific 
Squadron, 1869-70 ; receiving-ship at Norfolk, 1871 ; Juniata, N. A. Station, 
1873-6 ; receiving-ship Worcester, 1876-8. 



SURGEON THEORON WOOLVERTON, 

Born in Canada. Appointed from Pennsylvania, July 17, 1862; entered the 
service as Assistant Surgeon; attached to steam-frigate Wabash, South Atlantic 
Blockading Squadron, 1863 ; Naval Hospital, Chelsea, Massachusetts, 1864 ; 
West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1865 ; Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, 1866 ; 
steamer Monocacy, Asiatic Squadron, 1867-9. Commissioned as Surgeon, 
November 23, 1868 ; steamer Michigan, 1870-1 ; Shenandoah, European Fleet, 
1872-3 ; R. S. Ohio, 1874-7. 



SURGEON THOMAS HILAND, 

Born in New Hampshire. Appointed from New Hampshire, November 22, 
1861 ; entered the service as Assistant Surgeon; attached to steam-gunboat So- 
noma, West India Squadron, 1862-3 ; West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; 
steam-sloop Canandaigua, European Squadron, 1866-8; steamer Swatara, Euro- 
pean Squadron, 1868-9. Commissioned as Surgeon, November 24, 1868 ; on 
duty at Quarantine Hospital, Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 1870 ; Wyoming, N. 
A. Station, 1872-4 ; Navy Yard, Washington, 1874 ; member Board of Exam- 
iners, 1874. 

SURGEON CHARLES H. WHITE, 

Born in New Hampshire. Entered the service as Assistant Surgeon, December 
26, 1861 ; in steam-gunboat Huron, S. A. Blockading Squadron, 1862—4; Roa- 
noke (iron-clad), 1864-f6. Promoted to Passed Assistant Surgeon, 1866 ; Navy 
Yard, New York, 1866 ; Ashuelot, Asiatic Station, 1866-9. Commissioned as 
Surgeon, November 18, 1869; Naval Laboratory, New York, 1870-2; Benicia, 
Asiatic Fleet, 1872-3 ; S. S. Idaho, Asiatic Station, 1873-5 ; Naval Laboratory, 
New York, 1875-8. 

SURGEON GEORGE W. WOODS, 

Born in Massachusetts. Appointed Assistant Surgeon, December, 1861 ; steamer 
Mohawk, S. A. B. S., 1862-1 ; R. S. Baltimore, 1865-6. Promoted to Passed 
Assistant Surgeon, 1866 ; Navy Yard, Mare Island, 1866 ; Pensacola, Pacific 
Fleet, 1867-9 ; receiving-ship Independence, 1869. Promoted to Surgeon, De- 



282 SURGEONS. 

cember 10, 1869 ; Naval Hospital, Mare Island, 1871 ; rendezvous, Sau Francisco, 
1872 ; Tuscarora, Pacific Fleet, 1872-3 ; Wachusett, N. A. Station, 1874 ; N. P. 
Station, 1875-8. 



SURGEON FRANK L. DUBOIS, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed Assistant Surgeon, May 22, 1862 ; steam- 
gunboat Tioga, N. A. B. S., 1863-4 ; Naval rendezvous, Chicago, 1865. Pro- 
moted to Passed Assistant Surgeon, 1866 ; store-ship Fredonia, 1867-8 ; Naval 
Hospital, Chelsea, 1868-71. Promoted to Surgeon, February 20, 1870 ; S. S. 
Pawnee, 1871-4 ; Michigan, 1874-7. 



SURGEON GEORGE H. COOKE, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed Assistant Surgeon, September 22, 1862 ; East 
Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1863-4 ; Navy Yard, Philadelphia, 1865-6. Pro- 
moted to Passed Assistant Surgeon, 1866 ; Resaca, Pacific Fleet, 1867-8 ; Naval 
Academy, 1868-70. Promoted to Surgeon, February 20, 1870; Constellation 
(gunnery-ship), 1871-3; Naval Hospital, Norfolk, 1874-6; Vandalia, European 
Station, 1877-8. 

SURGEON THOMAS N. PENROSE, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed Assistant Surgeon, November 11, 1861 ; 
steamer Harriet Lane, S. A. Station, 1862-3 ; steamer Massachusetts, 1863-4. 
Promoted to Passed Assistant Surgeon, 1866 ; Hartford, East India Squadron, 
1866-7 ; Wachusett, N. A. Station, 1868 ; League Island Station, 1868-9 ; Swa- 
tara, N. A. Fleet, 1870-1. Promoted to Surgeon, May 28, 1871 ; Naval Hos- 
pital, Philadelphia, 1873 ; Ticonderoga, S. A. Station, 1873-5 ; practice-ship 
Constellation, 1875 ; Marion, European Station, 1876-8. 



SURGEON SAMUEL F. SHAW, . 

Born in Massachusetts. Appointed Assistant Surgeon, October 11, 1862 ; steam- 
gunboat Sonoma, N. Atlantic B. S., 1863-5. Promoted to Passed Assistant Sur- 
geon, 1866 ; Naval Academy, 1865-6 ; League Island Station, 1867 ; Onward, 
Pacific Fleet, 1868-70 ; Nyack, Pacific Fleet, 1871. Promoted to Surgeon, 
December 23, 1871 ; Michigan, 1872 ; Kearsarge, Asiatic Station, 1873-7 ; 
training-ship Minnesota, 1877-8. 



SURGEON JOSEPH HUGG, 

Born in New Jersey. Appointed Assistant Surgeon, September 5, 1861 ; steam- 
sloop Hartford, West Gulf Squadron, 1862-3 ; R. S., New York, 1864 ; Naval 
Hospital, New York, 1864-5. Promoted to Passed Assistant Surgeon, 1866 ; 
Naval Academy, 1866 ; Guerriere, S. A. Station, 1867-9 ; Navy Yard, Philadel- 
phia, 1870 ; Brooklyn, European Fleet, 1871-3. Promoted to Surgeon, Decem- 
ber 23, 1871 ; R. S., Philadelphia, 1873-4; Canandaigua, N. A. Station, 1875 ; 
training-ship Monongahela, 1877. 



SURGEONS. 283 



SURGEON GEORGE R. BRUSH, 



Born in New York. Appointed Assistant Surgeon, September 2, 1861 ; S. S. 
Potomac, 1862-4 ; R. S., New York, 1865. Promoted to Passed Assistant Sur- 
geon, 1866 ; Wateree, Pacific Station, 1865-7 ; Naval Hospital, Norfolk, 1868 ; 
Nyack, Pacific Fleet, 1869-70; Saranac, P. S., 1870-2. Promoted to Surgeon, 
February 10, 1872; rendezvous, New York. 1873-4; North Pacific Station, 
187-4-6; Omaha, flag-ship, S. P. Station, 1876-8. 



SURGEON C. VAR MEULEN, 

Born in New York. Appointed Assistant Surgeon, November 4, 1861 ; Block- 
ading Squadron, 1861-4 ; Naval rendezvous, Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 
1864-5 ; Colorado, European Fleet, 1865-7. Promoted to Passed Assistant Sur- 
geon, 1866; Navy Yard, Philadelphia, 1868-9; Onward, Pacific Fleet, 1871-2. 
Promoted to Surgeon, April 26, 1872; League Island, 1873-6; Kearsarge, 
Asiatic Station, 1876-8. 

SURGEON DANIEL McMURTRIE, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed Assistant Surgeon, June 24, 1862 ; Naval 
Hospital, New York, 1862-3; iron-clad Sangamon, N. A. B. S., 1863-4; Mus- 
coota, B. S., 1864-5. Promoted to Passed Assistant Surgeon, 1866 ; Susquehanna, 
N. A. Station, 1867-8; Sabine, special cruise, 1869-70; Navy Yard, New York, 
1871-2. Promoted to Surgeon, June 29, 1872 ; Ashuelot, Asiatic Fleet, 1873-6 ; 
receiving-ship St. Louis, 1876-8. 



SURGEON CHARLES J. S. WELLS, 

Born in Vermont. Appointed Assistant Surgeon, November 4, 1861 ;' Missis- 
sippi Squadron, 1862-3 ; steam-frigate Niagara, special service, 1863-4 ; Missis- 
sippi Squadron, 1864-5. Promoted to Passed Assistant Surgeon, 1866 ; Naval 
Asylum, Philadelphia, 1865-6; Shamrock, S. A. S., 1867-8; Colorado, flag-ship 
Asiatic Fleet, 1869-73, Commissioned as Surgeon, July 6, 1872 ; Navy Yard, 
New York, 1873-5 ; training-ship Minnesota, 1875-6 ; Ossipee, N. A. Fleet, 
1877-8. 



SURGEON EDWARD KERSHNER, 

Born in Maryland. Appointed Assistant Surgeon, September 2, 1861 ; New 
Ironsides, S. A. S., 1862-4 ; Mississippi Squadron, 1864-5. Promoted to Passed 
Assistant Surgeon, 1866 ; Naval rendezvous, Philadelphia, 1865-7 ; Naval Hos- 
pital, New York, 1871-2. Commissioned as Surgeon, November 7, 1872 ; Swa- 
tara, N. A. S., 1874-7 ; special duty, New York, 1877-8. 



SURGEON J. RUFUS TRYON, 

Born in New York. Appointed Assistant Surgeon, September 22, 1863 ; Naval 
Hospital, Pensacola, 1863-5 ; Naval Hospital, Boston, 1865-6 ; Assistant Bureau 
of Medicine, 1866-9. Promoted to Passed Assistant Surgeon, 1866 ; S. S. 



284 SURGEONS. 

Idaho, Yokohama, Japan, 1870-3 ; Naval Hospital, New York, 1873-5. Com- 
missioned as Surgeon, June 30, 1873; Naval rendezvous, New York, 1875-7 ; 
Swatara, N. A. Fleet, 1877-8. 



SURGEON WILLIAM H. JONES, 

Born in Pennsylvania, December 15, 1840. Appointed Acting Assistant Sur- 
geon U. S. N., April, 1863 ; on duty, Naval Hospital, Norfolk, Virginia, 1863. 
Appointed Assistant Surgeon U. S. N., August 12, 1863; U. S. S. Pensacola, 
W. G. B. Squadron, 1863-4; U. S. S. Marblehead (practice-cruise), 1864; 
U. S. Naval Academy, practice-ships, 1864 ; U. S. ram Tennessee, W. G. B. 
Squadron, 1864-5 ; Naval Hospital, New Orleans, Louisiana, 1865 ; Naval 
Hospital, Pensacola, Florida, 1865-6 ; U. S. S. W. G. Anderson, W. G. B. 
Squadron, 1866 ; Navy Yard, Washington, District of Columbia, 1866-7. Pro- 
moted to Passed Assistant Surgeon, December 24, 1866; U. S. S. Maumee, 
Asiatic Station, 1867-9 ; Navy Yard, Washington, District of Columbia, 1870-1 ; 
U. S. S. Jamestown, South Pacific Station, 1871 ; U. S. S. Saranac, North 
Pacific Station, 1871; U. S. S. Pensacola, Pacific Fleet, 1871-3; U. S. S. 
Portsmouth, Survey of the Pacific, 1873-5. Commissioned as Surgeon, July, 
1873 ; U. S. training-ship Portsmouth, San Francisco, California, 1875 ; U. S. 
R. S. Potomac, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1875-7 ; U. S. training-ship Con- 
stitution, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1877 ; U. S. S. Constitution, European 
Station, 1878. 



SURGEON JOHN W. COLES, 

Born in New Jersey. Appointed Assistant Surgeon, September 22, 1862 ; 
steam-gunboat Paul Jones, S. A. B. S., 1863-5. Promoted to Passed Assistant 
Surgeon, 1866; Naval Hospital, New York, 1866; Minnesota, special service, 
1867-8 ; Lancaster (second-rate), 1869 ; Asiatic Fleet, 1869-72. Promoted to 
Surgeon, October 6, 1873 ; Naval Hospital, Philadelphia, 1872-5 ; Naval Hos- 
pital, Yokohama, Japan, 1875-8. 



SURGEON JAMES M. FLINT, 

Born in Hillsborough, New Hampshire, February 7, 1838. Graduated from the 
Medical Department of Harvard University, March, 1860. Appointed an Acting 
Assistant Surgeon, April 14, 1862 ; served on board the barque Ethan Allen, East 
Gulf Squadron, from May, 1862, until September, 1863. Commission as Assist- 
ant Surgeon dates October 25, 1863 ; service from December, 1863, to July, 
1865, on board gunboat Hastings (No. 15), Mississippi Squadron ; October, 1865, 
to July, 1866, on receiving-ship Alleghany, at Baltimore; August, 1866, ordered 
to U. S. S. Pensacola, making a cruise to the Pacific ; ordered home for examina- 
tion, August, 1867. Promoted to Passed Assistant Surgeon, to date from Decem- 
ber 13, 1866 ; December, 1867, to November, 1868, at the Naval Hospitals, New 
York and Chelsea ; from November, 1868, to April, 1870, on board the U. S. S. 
Franklin, European Station ; after a brief term of service at Mound City, Illinois, 
and at the Naval Academy, was stationed at the Navy Yard, Boston, until 
October, 1871 ; ordered to the Pacific Station ; was one year on board the Pensa- 
cola, the remainder of the cruise on the Saranac ; July, 1874, to May, 1876, at 



SURGEONS. 285 

the Torpedo Station, Newport ; and from the latter date until September, 1877, at 
the Naval Hospital, Chelsea ; is now -waiting orders. 



SURGEON GEORGE A. BRIGHT, 

Born in Maine. Appointed Assistant Surgeon, August 8, 1864 ; New Ironsides, 
N. A. B. S., 1864-5 ; Naval Academy, 18G5. Promoted to Passed Assistant 
Surgeon, 1867 ; Susquehanna, N. A. Station, 1866-7 ; Plymouth, European 
Fleet, 1869-72 ; Naval Academy, 1873-6. Promoted to Surgeon, September 
12, 1874. 



SURGEON WILLIAM J. SIMON, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed Assistant Surgeon, May 30, 1864 ; Sanga- 
mon, N. A. B. S., 1864-5 ; receiving-ship New Hampshire, 1866. Promoted to 
Passed Assistant Surgeon, 1867 ; Shawmut, N. A. Station, 1867-8 ; Nipsic, 
Darien Expedition, 1869-71 ; Navy Yard, Norfolk, 1872-4. Promoted to Sur- 
geon, February 21, 1875; Tuscarora, N. P. Station, 1874-6; practice-ship Con- 
stellation, summer of 1877. 



SURGEON GEORGE F. WINSLOW, 

Appointed an Assistant Surgeon, July 26, 1862 ; ordered to report to Rear- 
Admiral Chas. Wilkes, commanding James River Flotilla ; ordered to U. S. 
steamer Morse, N. A. Blockading Squadron ; detached from U. S. steamer Morse, 
January 8, 1864; different engagements on James River with the Army of the 
Potomac, under command of General McClellan ; White House Landing ; Brick 
House Point, Gen. Franklin; West Point, York River, Gen. Gordon; Pamunky 
and Mattapony engagements ; Nansemond River, against Gen. Longstreet, C. S. 
Army ; ordered to Osceola, February 24, 1864 ; detached, August 25, 1865 ; cross- 
ing of Grant's forces at Wilson's Landing ; James River ; both fights at Fort Fisher ; 
Fort Strong and Fort Buchanan ; Cape Fear River ; taking of Wilmington and 
capture of Richmond ; capturing prizes, — blockade-runners Blenheim, Charlotte, 
and Stag; frigate Sabine, apprentice system, September 5, 1865 ; detached, June 
25, 1867. Promoted to Passed Assistant Surgeon, May, 1867 ; South Pacific 
Squadron, Wateree, Nyack, and Powhatan, ordered, July 24, 1867 ; detached, 
December 23, 1869 ; wrecked by earthquake, August 13, 1868, at Arica, Peru; 
received thanks of the Peruvian Congress for assistance rendered to the suffering 
people of the Province of Moquega, after the earthquake ; received the thanks 
of Her Majesty's government for taking care of wrecked and frozen seamen in 
the Strait of Magellan ; Navy Yard, Boston, April 9, 1870, to January 5, 1871 ; 
U. S. Naval Hospital, Chelsea, Massachusetts, ordered, January 6, 1871 ; de- 
tached, April 10, 1871 ; practice-cruise, U. S. S. Saratoga, May 1 to September, 
1871 ; flag-ship Wabash, European Squadron, ordered, October 5, 1871 ; detached, 
April 17, 1874; Portsmouth Navy Y^'ard, apprentice-ship Sabine, November 16, 
1874, to November 13, 1875. Promoted to Surgeon, April 2, 1875; U. S. 
Torpedo Station, Newport, Rhode Island, ordered, April 22, 1876 ; still on duty 
there. 



286 SURGEONS. 

SURGEON H. N. BEAUMONT, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed Assistant Surgeon, April 29, 1864; Canoni- 
cus (iron-clad), N. A. B. S., 1864-5 ; receiving-ship, Boston, 1866. Promoted to 
Passed Assistant Sure/eon, 1868; Iroquois, Asiatic Station, 1867-8; Kansas, T. 
and N. Expedition, 1869-72 ; Michigan, 1873-4. Promoted to Surgeon, April 
5, 1875 ; Navy Yard, Pensacola, 1875. 



SURGEON FRED. M. DEARBORNE, 

Born in Massachusetts. Appointed Assistant Surgeon, September 15, 1864 ; 
receiving-ship, Boston, 1864—5 ; steamer Estrella, 1865-7. Promoted to Passed 
Assistant Surgeon, 1867 ; Navy Yard, Washington, 1868 ; Wasp, S. A. Station, 
1869-72; Franklin, flag-ship E. S., 1873-5. Promoted to Surgeon, May 21, 
1875 ; receiving-ship Sabine, 1876 ; Naval Hospital, New York, 1877-8. 



SURGEON HOSEA J. BABIN, 

Born in Canada. AT^Tpoiuted Assistant Surgeon, May 13, 1865; apprentice-ship 
Sabine, 1866-8. Promoted to Passed Assistaiit Surgeon, 1867 ; R. S. at Phila- 
delphia, 1869-70 ; Severn, flag-ship N. A. Fleet, 1870-1 ; Navy Yard, Boston, 
1871-2 ; Hartford, flag-ship Asiatic Fleet, 1873-5 ; R. S. Colorado, 1875-6. 
Commissioned as Surgeon, 1876; Marine Barracks, Brooklyn, 1876-8. 



SURGEON JEROME H. KIDDER, 

Born in Maryland. Appointed Assistant Surgeon, April 27, 1866 ; S. S. Idaho, 
1866-70. Promoted to Passed Assistant Surgeon, 1867 ; Naval Laboratory, 
N. Y., 1871-3 ; Swatara, N. A. Fleet, 1873-5 ; special duty, Washington, 1875-7. 
Commissioned as Surgeon, 1876; Alliance, European Station, 1877-8. 



SURGEON JOSEPH B. PARKER, 

Native of Pennsylvania. Entered volunteer service as Acting Assistant Sur- 
geon, March, 1863 ; attached to Mississippi Squadron ; served until October, 
1865, date of honorable discharge. Appointed Assistant Surgeon, November 24, 
1866 ; Naval Academy, 1866-67. Appointed Passed Assistant Surgeon, De- 
cember 31, 1867; De Soto, North Atlantic Squadron, 1868; rendezvous, New 
York, 1868-9 ; Tallapoosa, 1869 ; Nantasket, North Atlantic Squadron, 1869-70 ; 
Potomac, Philadelphia, 1871 ; Naval Hospital, Chelsea, 1871 ; Ohio, Boston, 
1871; Naval Hospital, Chelsea, 1871-2; Naval Hospital, New York, 1872; 
Nantasket, North Atlantic Squadron, 1872 ; Yantic, Asiatic Squadron, 1872-5 ; 
special duty. Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, 1875-7. Promoted to Surgeon, 
August 13, 1876 ; Assistant to Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, 1877-8. 



SURGEON EDWARD H. WARE, 

Born in Maine. Appointed Assistant Surgeon, July 12, 1866 ; Pawnee, S. A. 
Squadron, 1867-8. Promoted to Passed Assistant Surgeon, 1868 ; Kansas, 



PASSED ASSISTANT SURGEONS. 287 

N. A. Squadron, 1868-9 ; S. S. Tallapoosa, 1869-70 ; Naval Hospital, Phila- 
delphia, 1870-1 ; Shawmut, N. A. Fleet, 1871-4; Naval rendezvous, San Fran- 
cisco, 1874-7. Commissioned as Surgeon, 1877 ; special duty, San Francisco, 
1877-8. 

SURGEON JOSEPH G. AYRES, 

Born in New Hampshire. Appointed Assistant Surgeon, October 8, 1866 ; 
Naval Academy, 1867-9. Promoted to Passed Assistant Surgeon, 1868 ; Naval 
Hospital, Washington, 1869-70 ; Resaca, Pacific Fleet, 1870-2 ; Saco, Asiatic 
Fleet, 1872-6; Ashuelot, Asiatic Station, 1876-7. Commissioned as Surgeon, 

1878. 

PASSED ASSISTANT SURGEONS. 

With the Relative Ranh of Lieutenant. 



PASSED ASSISTANT SURGEON ABEL F. PRICE, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed Assistant Surgeon, November 10, 1868; 
Naval Hospital, Washington, 1869-70 ; Juniata, E. F., 1871-3. Promoted to 
Passed Assistant Surgeon, 1872 ; Powhatan, N. A. Fleet, 1873-4 ; R. S. Potomac, 
1875. 

PASSED ASSISTANT SURGEON HENRY STEWART, . 

Born in Louisiana. Appointed Assistant Surgeon, October 22, 1868 ; Sabine, 
special cruise, 1869-70 ; Canandaigua, N. A., 1871-2. Promoted to Passed 
Assistant Surgeon, 1872; Naval Station, New Orleans, 1873; Richmond, S. P. 
S., 1874-7. 

PASSED ASSISTANT SURGEON M. L. RUTH, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed Assistant Surgeon, April 21, 1868 ; Dictator 
(iron-clad), N. A. S., 1869-70; S. S. Tennessee, .1870-1 ; Wabash, flag-ship 
E. F., 1871-4. Promoted to Passed Assistant Surgeon, 1872 ; Bureau of Med- 
icine, 1874-5 ; Minnesota (training-ship), 1875-7 ; Enterprise, 1877. 



PASSED ASSISTANT SURGEON M. C. DRENNAN, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed an Acting Assistant Surgeon in 1863, and 
served in blockading squadron during Rebellion. Appointed Assistant Surgeon 
in 1868; practice-ship Macedonian, 1869 ; Naval Hospital, Norfolk, 1869-70; 
Naval Academy, 1871; Nantasket, N. A. S., 1871-2. Promoted to Passed 
Assistant Surgeon, 1872 ; Pawnee, N. A. S., 1874 ; Ashuelot, Asiatic Fleet, 
1875-7 ; Naval Hospital, Yokohama, 1877-8. 



PASSED ASSISTANT SURGEON JAMES ALBERT HAWKE, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed Assistant Surgeon, June 24, 1867 ; Naval 
Academy, Philadelphia, 1867-8 ; Dacotah, Pacific Fleet, 1869-70 ; St. Mary's, 



288 PASSED ASSISTANT SURGEONS. 

Pacific Fleet, 1870-2. Promoted to Passed Assistant Surgeon^ 1872 ; Wasp, S. 
A. Fleet, 1873-6 ; Naval Hospital, Philadelphia, 1876-8. 



PASSED ASSISTANT SURGEON R. A. MARMION, 

Born in Virginia. Appointed Assistant Surgeon, March 26, 1868 ; Saginaw, 
Pacific Fleet, 1869-71 ; Ossipee, P. F., 1871-2. Promoted to Passed Assistant 
Surgeon, 1872; Alaska, E. F., 1873-6. 



PASSED ASSISTANT SURGEON BENJAMIN S. MACKIE, 

Born in Louisiana. Appointed Assistant Surgeon, April 29, 1869 ; Naval Hos- 
pital, Pensacola, 1869, and N. H. at New York, 1870 ; Franklin, flag-ship E. S., 
1870-1 ; Canonicus (iron-clad), N. A. Fleet, 1871-2. Promoted to Passed As- 
sistant Surgeon, 1872 ; Naval Laboratory, New York, 1872-5 ; Tennessee, Asiatic 
Fleet, 1875-8. 

PASSED ASSISTANT SURGEON DWIGHT DICKENSON, 

Born in New York. Appointed Assistant Surgeon, April 21, 1869 ; Yantic, N. A. 
Fleet, 1870-1 ; Naval Hospital, N. A., 1871-2. Promoted to Passed Assistant 
Surgeon, 1872 ; Naval Hospital, Yokohama, 1872-7. 



PASSED ASSISTANT SURGEON WILLIAM A. CORWIN, 

Born in New Jersey. Appointed Assistant Surgeon, March 31, 1869 ; Benicia, 
A. Fleet, 1870-1 ; Colorado, A. Fleet, 1871-2. Promoted to Passed Assistant 
Surgeon, 1872; Torpedo Station, 1873-4; Congress, European Station, 1874-6; 
Naval Academy, 1876-8. 

PASSED ASSISTANT SURGEON CHARLES L. CASSIN, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed Assistant Surgeon, March 31, 1869 ; Colorado, 
Asiatic Fleet, 1869-71 ; Worcester, flag-ship N. A. Fleet, 1871-3. Promoted 
to Passed Assistant Surgeon, 1872 ; Naval rendezvous, Boston, 1873-5 ; Frolic, 
S. A. Station, 1875-7. 

PASSED ASSISTANT SURGEON ALFRED M. OWEN, 

Mat 20, 1869, appointed Assistant Surgeon; June 5, 1869, ordered to Navy 
Yard, Mare Island, California; April 20, 1870, reported on board steam-sloop 
Ossipee, flag-ship North Pacific Squadron; in 1871, Ossipee became flag-ship 
South Pacific; June 6, 1871, transferred to sloop St. Mary's, made cruise among 
South Sea Islands, and to Australia. Promoted to Passed Assistant Surgeon, 
May 20, 1872 ; June 6, 1873, St. Mary's arrived in Norfolk, Virginia, from 
San Francisco, California, via Cape Horn ; detached, July 16, 1873 ; August 7, 
1873, Marine rendezvous, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; October 22, 1873, to Navy 
Yard, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania ; November 30, 1873, to recruiting duty, De- 
troit, Michigan ; January 8, 1874, rendezvous discontinued, returned to duty at 



PASSED ASSISTANT SURGEONS. 2S9 

Philadelphia Navy Yard ; December 11, 1874, ordered to frigate Brooklyn, made 
cruise to South Atlantic Station ; Brooklyn returned to U. S. in 1876, and went 
out of commission ; July 4, 1876, ordered to receiving-ship Worcester, Norfolk, 
Virginia; March 2, 1877, transferred to frigate Franklin, Norfolk, Virginia; May 
23, 1877, detached from Franklin, and placed on waiting orders; June 5, 1877, 
ordered to marine headquarters, Washington. 



PASSED ASSISTANT SURGEON WM. a. FAREWELL, 

Born in Canada. Appointed Assistant Surgeon, November 10, 1868 ; Lancaster, 
S. A. Station, 1869-72. Promoted to Passed Assistant Surgeon, 1872 ; Naval 
Hospital, Philadelphia, 1873 ; N. Pacific Station, 1874-6 ; Naval Hospital, Mare 
Island, 1876-8. 

PASSED ASSISTANT SURGEON JOHN L. NEILSON, 

Born in Ohio. Appointed Assistant Surgeon, April 28, 1870 ; Dictator (iron- 
clad), N. A. Station, 1870-1 ; Naval Hospital, Philadelphia, 1872, Promoted to 
Passed Assistant Surgeon, 1872 ; Tuscarora, P. Fleet, 1872-5 ; Navy Yard, Phil- 
adelphia, 1876-8. 

PASSED ASSISTANT SURGEON HENRY C. ECKSTEIN, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed Assistant Surgeon, September 28, 1870. Pro- 
moted to Passed Assistant Surgeon, 1872 ; Girard, Darien Expedition, 1870-1 ; 
Narragansett, Pacific Fleet, 1871-3; Shawmut, N. A. Station, 1875-7. 



PASSED ASSISTANT SURGEON GEORGE P. BRADLEY, 

Born in Maine. Appointed Assistant Surgeon, September 7, 1870 ; Severn, flag- 
ship, N. A. Station, 1870-1 ; Naval Hospital, Washington, 1872-3; Navy Yard, 
Boston, 1874. Promoted to Passed Assistant Surgeon, 1874; Navy Yard, Nor- 
folk, 1876 ; Hartford, N. A. Station, 1876-7. 



PASSED ASSISTANT SURGEON TALLEYRAND D. MYERS, 

Born in Maryland. Appointed Assistant Surgeon, September 27, 1870 ; Terror, 
(iron-clad), N. A. Station, 1871 ; Asiatic Station, 1872-4. Promoted to Passed 
Assistant Surgeon, 1874; Portsmouth (training-ship). Mare Island, 1875-6; Navy 
Yard, Washington, 1877-8. 



PASSED ASSISTANT SURGEON THEODORE C. HEYL, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed Assista7it Surgeon, March 21, 1870; Shenan- 
doah, European Station, 1871-4. Promoted to Passed Assistant Surgeon, 1874 ; 
Navy Yard, Washington, 1874-6. 

19 



290 PASSED ASSISTANT SURGEONS. 

PASSED ASSISTANT SURGEON CHARLES U. GRAVATT, 

Born in Virginia. Appointed Assistant Surgeon, September 27, 1870 ; Pawnee, 
N. A. Station, 1871; Naval Hospital, Philadelphia, 1872; receiving-ship Ohio, 
1873, and receiving-ship Independence, 187-1. Promoted to Passed Assistant 
Surgeon, 1874 ; Yantic, Asiatic Station, 1875-7 ; receiving-ship Wyoming, 1877. 



PASSED ASSISTANT SURGEON JOHN C. WISE, 

Born in Virginia. Appointed Assistant Surgeon, April 28, 1870 ; Guerriere, 
European Station, 1870-2; Naval Hospital, Philadelphia, 1873; Navy Yard, 
Norfolk, 1874. Promoted to Passed Assistant Surgeon, 1874 ; S. S. Despatch, 
1875-8. 

PASSED ASSISTANT SURGEON HOWARD SMITH, 

Born in Ohio. Appointed Assistant Surgeon, July 13, 1871 ; Naval Hospital, 
Washington, 1871-2 ; Omaha, S. P. Station, 1872-5. Promoted to Passed As- 
sistant Surgeon, 1875 ; Naval Hospital, New York, 1876. 



PASSED ASSISTANT SURGEON JOHN W. ROSS, 

Born in Tennessee. Appointed Assistant Surgeon, March 21, 1870 ; California, 
Pacific Fleet, 1871-2 ; Naval Hospital, Norfolk, 1874 ; Franklin, European Sta- 
tion, 1875-6. Promoted to Passed Assistant Surgeon, 1875 ; Trenton, European 
Station, 1877-8. ' 

PASSED ASSISTANT SURGEON PAUL FITZSIMMONS, 

Born in Georgia. Appointed Assistant Surgeon, December 19, 1871 ; Naval 
Hospital, Philadelphia, 1871-2 ; Saranac, Pacific Fleet, 1872-3 ; Pensacola, same 
station, 1874 ; and Tuscarora, Pacific Fleet, 1875. Promoted to Passed Assistant 
Surgeon, 1875 ; Naval Hospital, New York, 1876; and Naval Hospital, Washing- 
ton, 1877-8. 

PASSED ASSISTANT SURGEON MEREDITH D. JONES, 

Born in Mississippi. Appointed Assistant Stirgeon, May 17, 1871 ; Pensacola, 
Pacific Fleet, 1871-2 ; Benicia, Pacific Fleet, 1872-5 ; Navy Yard, Washington, 
1875-7. Promoted to Passed Assistant Surgeon, 1875. 



PASSED ASSISTANT SURGEON HENRY M. MARTIN, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed Assistant Surgeon, March 21, 1870; 
Nantasket, North Atlantic Station, 1871-2 ; Colorado, North Atlantic Station, 
1872-3 ; Alert, Asiatic Station, 1875-8. Promoted to Passed Assistant Surgeon, 
1875. 

PASSED ASSISTANT SURGEON S. AUGUSTINE BROWN, 

Born in North Carolina. Appointed Assistant Surgeon, November 21, 1871 ; 
Naval Hospital, Norfolk, 1871-2; Kansas, North 'Atlantic Station, 1872-5; 



PASSED ASSISTANT SURGEONS. 291 

Naval Hospital, Philadelphia, 1875-7. Promoted to Passed Assistant Surgeon^ 
1875. 

PASSED ASSISTANT SUKGEON WILLIAM S. DIXON, 

Born in District of Columbia. Appointed Assistant Surgeon^ January 27, 1871 
Wachusett, European Station, 1871-3 ; Naval Hospital, Washington, 1874—5 
R. S. Independence, 1875-7. Promoted to Passed Assistant Surgeon, 1875 
Powhatan, North Atlantic Station, 1877-8. 



PASSED ASSISTANT SURGEON CLARENCE E. BLACK, 

Born in New Brunswick. Appointed Assistant Surgeon, November 14, 1871 ;. 
Naval Hospital, Mare Island, 1871-2 ; Lackawanna, Pacific Fleet, 1872-5. Pro- 
moted to Passed Assistant Surgeon, 1875 ; Navy Yard, New York, 1875-8. 



PASSED ASSISTANT SURGEON HAMPTON AULICK, 

Born in Virginia. Appointed Assistant Surgeon, February 3, 1870 ; Lancaster^ 

S. A. Station, 1870-2 ; S. S. Despatch, 1873 ; R. S. Colorado, 1875. Promoted 

to Passed Assistant Surgeon, 1875 ; S. S. Supply, 1875-6 ; R. S. St. Louis,. 

1876-8. 

PASSED ASSISTANT SURGEON HOMER L. LAW, 

Born in Connecticut. _ Appointed Assistant Surgeon, July 9, 1870 ; N. A. Fleet,. 
1870-3. Promoted to Passed Assistant Surgeon, 1875 ; R. S. Sabine, 1875-6 ;. 
Ranger, Asiatic Station, 1876-8. 



PASSED ASSISTANT SURGEON A. F. MAGRUDER, 

Born in District of Columbia. Appointed Assistant Surgeon, April 21, 1871 ;. 
Iroquois, Asiatic Station, 1872-4 ; Navy Yard, Mare Island, 1875. Promoted 
to Passed Assistant Surgeon, 1875 ; Navy Yard, Mare Island, 1875-6 ; Saratoga, 
(training-ship), 1877-8. 

PASSED ASSISTANT SURGEON CHARLES A. SIEGFRIED, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed Assistant Surgeon, June 8, 1872 ; Richmond,. 
Pacific Fleet, 1872-5. Promoted to Passed Assistant Surgeon, 1875 ; Naval 
Hospital, New York, 1876-8. 



PASSED ASSISTANT SURGEON REMUS C. PERSONS, 

Born in Alabama. Appointed Assistant Surgeon, March 5, 1872 ; S. S. On- 
ward, Callao, 1872-5. Promoted to Passed Assistant Surgeon, 1875 ; Montauk. 
(iron-clad), N. A. Station, 1877-8. 



292 PASSED ASSISTANT SURGEONS. 

PASSED ASSISTANT SURGEON JOHN F. BRANSFORD, 

Born in Virginia. Appointed Assistant Surgeon, June 26, 1872 ; S. S. Brook- 
lyn, 1872-5 ; Minnesota (training-ship), 1875. Promoted to Passed Assistant 
Surgeon, 1875 ; special duty, 1876-8. 



PASSED ASSISTANT SURGEON NELSON McP. FEREBEE, 

Born in North Carolina. Appointed Assistant >S?«r^eon, September 12, 1872; 
Pensacola, P. F., 1872-5. Promoted to Passed Assistant Surgeon, 1875 ; R. S. 
Worcester, 1875-6 ; Navy Yard, Norfolk, 1877-8. 



PASSED ASSISTANT SURGEON HENRY P. HARVEY, 

Born in Kentucky. Appointed Assistant Surgeon, May 28, 1872; Hartford, 
flag-ship, Asiatic Station, 1872-5 ; Naval Hospital, Philadelphia, 1875-6. Pro- 
moted to Passed Assista7it Surgeon, 1876. 



PASSED ASSISTANT SURGEON BENJAMIN F. ROGERS, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed Assistant- Surgeon, March 29, 1872 ; Juniata, 
JN. A. Fleet, 1872. Promoted to Passed Assistant Surgeon, 1876. 



PASSED ASSISTANT SURGEON JAMES P. WAGGENER, 

Born in Kentucky. Appointed Assistant Surgeon, July 29, 1872 ; Worcester, 
N. A. Station, 1872-5 ; Naval Hospital, Norfolk, 1875-8. Promoted to Passed 
Assistant Surgeon, 1876. 

PASSED ASSISTANT SURGEON THOMAS H. STREETS, 

Born in Delaware. Appointed Assistant Surgeon, April 12, 1872 ; Portsmouth, 
Pacific Fleet, 1872-5. Promoted to Passed Assistant Surgeon, 1876 ; special 
duty, Smithsonian Institution, 1876-7 ; Speedwell, N. A. Station, 1877-8. 



PASSED ASSISTANT SURGEON CHARLES K. YANCEY, 

Born in Virginia. Appointed Assistant Surgeon, March 1, 1871 ; Constellation, 
(training-ship), 1871-2 ; Navy Yard, Mare Island, 1875 ; Adams, S. A, Station, 
1876-8. Promoted to Passed Assistant Surgeon, 1876. 



PASSED ASSISTANT SURGEON MANLEY H. SIMONS, 

Born in New York. Appointed Assistant Surgeon, May 28, 1872 ; Congress, 
European Station, 1872-3 ; Powhatan, N. A. Fleet, 1873-5 ; Navy Yard, Boston, 
1875-7. Promoted to Passed Assistant Surgeon, 1876. 



PASSED ASSISTANT SURGEONS. 293 

PASSED ASSISTANT SURGEON JOHN C. BOYD, 

Born in South Carolina. Appointed Assistant Surgeon, April 3, 1873 ; Fortune, 
N. A. Station, 1873-4 ; practice-ship Constellation, 1875 ; receiving-ship Potomac, 
1876. Promoted to Passed Assistant Surgeon, 1876 ; receiving-ship Franklin, 
1877. 



PASSED ASSISTANT SURGEON GEORGE E. H. HARMON, 

Born in Maryland. Appointed Assistant Siirgeon, December 20, 1873 ; Naval 
Academy, 1874 ; Franklin, flag-ship, European Station, 1874-6 ; Naval Academy, 
1876-8. Promoted to Passed Assistant Surgeon, 1877. 



PASSED ASSISTANT SURGEON HOWARD WELLS, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed Assistant Surgeon, December 12, 1873 ; 
Colorado, N. A. Station, 1874; Worcester, N. A. Fleet, 1875 ; Hartford, N. A. 
Fleet, 1875-7. Promoted to Passed Assistant Surgeon, 1876; Naval Hospital, 
Brooklyn, 1877-8. 

PASSED ASSISTANT SURGEON JAMES H. GAINES, 

Born in Virginia. Appointed Assistant Surgeon, December 20, 1873 ; Saranac, 
Pacific Fleet, 1874; N. P. Station, 1875; Kearsarge, Asiatic Station, 1875-7. 
Promoted to Passed Assistant Surgeon, 1877 ; Bureau of Medicine, 1877-8. 



PASSED ASSISTANT SURGEON DANIEL N. BERTOLETTE, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed Assistant Surgeon, June 23, 1873 ; Worcester, 
N. A. Fleet, 1873-4. Promoted to Passed Assistant Surgeon, 1877 ; training-ship 
Minnesota, 1877-8. 

PASSED ASSISTANT SURGEON EZRA Z. DERR, 

Born in Maryland. Appointed Assistant Surgeon, March 3, 1873 ; Manhattan 
(iron-clad), N. A. Fleet, 1873-4; Monocacy, Asiatic Fleet, 1874-7. Promoted 
to Passed Assistant Surgeon, 1877 ; training-ship Constitution, 1877. 



PASSED ASSISTANT SURGEON FRANK B. STEPHENSON, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed Assistant Surgeon, March 14, 1873 ; Ossipee, 
N. A. Station, 1873-6. Promoted to Passed Assistant Surgeon, 1877. 



PASSED ASSISTANT SURGEON PRESLEY M. RIXEY, 

Born in Virginia. Appointed Assistant Surgeon, January 28, 1874; Congress, 
E. Station, 1874-6; Marine Hospital, Philadelphia, 1876-7. Promoted to 
Passed Assistant Surgeon, 1877. 



294 SURGEON-GENERALS ON THE RETIRED LIST. 

PASSED ASSISTANT SURGEON JAMES M. AMBLER, 

Born in Virginia. Appointed Assistant Siirgeon, April 1, 1874 ; Mayflower, N. 
A. Station, 1874 ; Kansas, N. A. Fleet, 1874-5 ; training-ship Minnesota, 1875-7. 
Promoted to Passed Assistant Surgeon, 1877. 



MEDICAL OFFICERS ON THE RETIRED LIST. 



SURGEON-GENERALS. 

With Relative Rank of Commodore. 



SURGEON-GENERAL WILLIAM MAXWELL WOOD, 

Born in Maryland. Appointed from Maryland, May 16, 1829 ; entered the 
service as Assistant Surgeon ; Navy Yard, Pensacola, 1830-1 ; schooner Grampus, 
West India Squadron, 1832-3; special duty, 1834-7. Commissioned as Surgeon, 
February 20, 1838 ; steamer Poinsett, Home Squadron, 1838-42 ; served at that 
time in co-operation with the army in the Seminole War ; Naval Station, Balti- 
more, 1843 ; Fleet-Surgeon, Pacific Squadron, 1844-6 ; in this period he rendered 
the service referred to in the following official documents. Commodore Sloat, 
Commander-in-Chief of the Pacific Squadron, writes him : " I am most happy to 
acknowledge the very important services you rendered the government, and the 
squadron in the Pacific, under my command, at the breaking out of the Mexican 
War. The information you furnished me at Mazatlan, from Guadalaxara (at the 
risk of your life), was the only reliable information I received of that event, and 
which induced me to proceed immediately to California, and upon my own respon- 
sibility to take possession of that country. I have always considered the per- 
formance of your journey through Mexico at that time as an extraordinary feat, 
requiring great presence of mind and address. How you escaped from the heart 
of an enemy's country and such a people has always been a wonder to me, and has 
been so characterized on all occasions." The Chairman of the Naval Committee 
of the Senate commented on his valuable services as follows: " Every intelligent 
mind must at once appreciate the importance of the service which you have ren- 
dered the country, and your personal hazard in travelling through the heart of the 
enemy's country, communicating with your military superior, and furnishing him 
with the sole and otherwise unattainable information upon which he based the 
acquisition of California. The importance of this acquisition can best be esti- 
mated by asking ourselves, what would have been our national position in the 
Pacific and upon our Oregon frontier had Great Britain, instead of ourselves, 
acquired permanent possession of it ? I have always contended that its acquisi- 
tion constitutes one of the navy's strongest claims upon the gratitude of the na- 
tion, and this chapter in its history, furnished by your own service, but strengthens 
this conviction." Receiving-ship, Baltimore, 1847-8 ; steamer Michigan, on the 
lakes, 1850-1; Naval Station, Sackett's Harbor, New York, 1853-5; Fleet- 
Surgeon, East India Squadron, 1856-8 ; during this service, taking part in the 
Chinese War, and, on board the flag-ship, participating in the brilliant capture (by 
Commodore Armstrong and the late Admiral, then Commander, Foote) of the 
four Barrier Forts on the Canton River, of which Admiral Seymour, R. N., in his 
report to the Admiralty, writes in the following terms, under date of December 
14, 1856 : " The American ships-of-war completed the destruction of the Barrier 



MEDICAL DIRECTORS ON THE RETIRED LIST. 295 

Forts, on the 6th, and dropped down to Whampoa. These forts were of enor- 
mous strength and solidity, being entirely built of large blocks of granite, with 
walls nine or ten feet thick. They were heavily armed, many of the guns being 
of seven or eight tons weight, with a bore of thirteen inches; one brass 8 3 -inch 
gun was over twenty-one feet long." Steamer Michigan, on the lakes, 1859-61 ; 
Fleet-Surgeon, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, during the Rebellion ; par- 
ticipating, on board the flag-ship Minnesota, in the first battle of iron-clads, that 
of the Monitor with the Merrimac and other vessels of the Confederate Squadron, 
in Hampton Roads, also in the capture of Sewell's Point; Baltimore, 1866-7; 
President of the Examining Board, 1868; Chief of Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, 
1870 ; retired, 1871. 

SURGEON-GENERAL JAMES C. PALMER, 

Born in Maryland. Appointed from Maryland, March 26, 1834 ; entered the 
service as Assistant Surgeon ; attached to frigate Brandywine, Pacific Squadron, 
1835 ; sloop Vincennes, cruise around the world, 1836 ; rendezvous, Baltimore, 
1837 ; Exploring Expedition, 1838-42 ; Navy Yard, Washington, 1842. Com- 
missioned as Surgeon, October 27, 1841 ; sloop St. Mary's, Home Squadron, 
1844-6 ; sloop Vandalia, Pacific Squadron, 1850-3 ; receiving-ship Baltimore, 
1853-6 ; frigate Niagara, Cable Expedition, 1857 ; sloop Macedonian, Mediterra- 
nean Squadron, 1858-60 ; Naval Academy, 1861-3 ; Fleet-Surgeon, flag-ship 
Hartford, West Gulf Squadron, 1863-5 ; battle of Mobile Bay, August 5, 1864 ; 
Naval Hospital, New York, 1866-9 ; special duty, Newport, Rhode Island, 
1870-2; Chief of Bureau Medicine and Surgery, 1872-3; retired, 1873. 



SURGEON-GENERAL JOSEPH BEALE, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania, September 8, 1837 ; en- 
tered the service as Assistant Surgeon ; attached to sloop John Adams, East India 
Squadron, 1839-41 ; brig Bainbridge, Home Squadron, 1842-3 ; Naval Hospital, 
New York, 1845 ; brig Boxer, coast of Africa, 1846-8. Commissioned as Sur- 
geon, April 19, 1848; sloop John Adams, coast of Africa, 1849-51; rendezvous, 
Baltimore, 1852-3 ; sloop Germantown, Brazil Squadron, 1853-7 ; receiving-ship, 
Philadelphia, 1858-60 ; steam-sloop Susquehanna, West Gulf Blockading Squad- 
ron, 1861-3 ; hospital, Chelsea, Massachusetts, 1863-5 ; steam-sloop Hartford, 
flag-ship East India Squadron, 1865-6 ; Fleet-Surgeon, Asiatic Squadron, 1866-8; 
rendezvous, Philadelphia, 1869; special duty, Philadelphia, 1870-1; President 
Board of Examiners, 1872-3 ; Chief of Bureau Medicine and Surgery, 1873-6 ; 
retired, 1876. 



MEDICAL DIRECTORS. 

With Relative Rank of Commodore. 



MEDICAL DIRECTOR BENJAMIN F. BACHE, 

Born in Virginia. Appointed from Pennsylvania, July 1, 1824. Commissioned 
as Surgeon, June 3, 1828; Navy Yard, Pensaeola, 1832-6; sloop Fairfield, 
Brazil Squadron, 1838-41 ; Fleet-Surgeon, Mediterranean Squadron, 1841-1 ; 



296 MEDICAL DIRECTORS ON THE RETIRED LIST. 

Naval Asylum, Philadelphia, 1845-7 ; Fleet-Surgeon, Brazil Squadron, 1848-50; 
Naval Hospital, New York, 1850-4 ; Director of Laboratory, New York, 1855-72. 



MEDICAL DIRECTOK a. R. B. HORNER, 

Born in Virginia. Appointed from Virginia, May 26, 1826 ; entered the service 
as Surgeons Mate ; attached to frigate Macedonian, Brazil Squadron, June 20, 
1826, to November, 1828 ; frigate Brandywine, Home Squadron, 1830-1. Com- 
missioned as Surgeon, April 4, 1831 ; sloop John Adams, Mediterranean Squadron, 
May, 1831-3; sloop Levant, 1833-4; frigate United States, Mediterranean 
Squadron, 1836-7 ; sloop Levant, Mediterranean Squadron, 1837 ; Fleet-Surgeon, 
frigate Delaware, Brazil Squadron, 1841-3 ; frigate Delaware, Mediterranean 
Squadron, 1843-4 ; Fleet-Surgeon, frigate Savannah, Pacific Squadron, 1849-50 ; 
frigate Wabash, October, 1856—8 ; captured the noted General Wm. Walker, at 
Greytown, in December, 1856 ; steam-frigate Colorado, flag-ship Gulf Blockading 
Squadron, 1861-2 ; steam-frigate Niagara, flag-ship East Gulf Blockading Squad- 
ron, 1861-2 ; steam-frigate San Jacinto, at Key West, Florida, 1862 ; frigate 
St. Lawrence and gunboat Magnolia, 1862-3 ; retired in May, 1863. 



MEDICAL DIRECTOR WILLIAM S. W. RUSCHENBERGER, 

Born in New Jersey, September 4, 1807. Appointed from New Jersey, August 
10, 1826 ; entered the service with the grade of Surgeons Mate, Pacific Squad- 
ron, 1826-9. Commissioned as Surgeon, April 4, 1831 ; sloop Falmouth, Pacific 
Squadron, 1831-4 ; Fleet-Surgeon, East India Squadron, 1835-7 ; Naval ren- 
dezvous, Philadelphia, 1840-2 ; Naval Hospital, New York, 1843-7 ; Fleet-Sur- 
geon, East India Squadron, 1847-50; rendezvous, Philadelphia, 1852; Fleet- 
Surgeon, Pacific Squadron, 1854-7 ; Fleet-Surgeon, Mediterranean, August, 1860, 
to July, 1861 ; Navy Yard, Boston, 1861-4 ; special duty, Philadelphia, 1865-6; 
retired, September, 1869; President Board of Examiners, 1869-70; Naval Hos- 
pital, Philadelphia, 1870-3 ; President of Academy of Natural Sciences of Phil- 
adelphia, December, 1869, to 1878 ; Vice-President of the College of Physicians 
of Philadelphia, 1875 to present date. Dr. Ruschenberger is the author of books 
on professional and other topics. 



MEDICAL DIRECTOR THOMAS L. SMITH, 

Born in and appointed from the State of New Jersey ; was commissioned a Sur- 
geons Mate, January 3, 1828, and ordered to the frigate Hudson for the Brazil 
Station. In August, 1830, while on that station, was appointed Acting Surgeon, 
and ordered to the sloop Vandalia; returned to the United States, December, 1831 ; 
after a very short leave of absence was ordered to the receiving-ship Franklin, New 
York, and continued on duty at that station until September, 1834, when ordered 
to schooner Boxer, fitting for sea at Norfolk ; sailed from that place early in No- 
vember, encountering a terrific gale off" the coast ; although receiving some damage 
continued on the cruise for the Pacific Station ; continued on duty as P. A. Sur- 
geon on that station until July, 1837, when ordered to return to the United 
States. Promoted to Surgeon, February 7. 1837 ; December, 1838, joined the 
frigate Macedonian for the West India Station ; soon after the arrival at Pensa- 
cola was transferred to the sloop Erie; the summer of 1840 the squadron sailed 
North, touching at the Boston Station, Portland, and Eastport ; on the return 



MEDICAL DIRECTORS ON THE RETIRED LIST. 297 

the Erie was put in ordinary at Boston, the officers detached ; after a leave of ab- 
sence was attached to the receiving-ship on the Boston Station, continuing on 
duty there until April, 1842, when he was transferred to the frigate Congress, 
being fitted for sea at Portsmouth, New Hampshire ; in July following sailed for 
the Mediterranean Station ; continued on that-station until December, 1843, when 
the ship was ordered to the Brazils, finishing the cruise on that station ; returned 
to the United States, arriving March, 1845 ; in 1846, did duty a short time on 
board the receiving-ship Pennsylvania at Norfolk, Virginia; in 1847-9, was at- 
tached to Navy Yard, New York, and on the Board for the examination of can- 
didates for promotion and admission into the medical corps of the navy ; August, 
1850, joined the sloop Saratoga, and sailed for the coast of China ; Commodore 
Perry arriving and taking command, the Saratoga was made one of the Japan 
expedition ; Surgeon Smith was there appointed Fleet-Surgeon and ordered to the 
flag-ship Susquehanna, where he continued until March, 1855, when he was de- 
tached to join the Saratoga, to return to the United States, arriving the 1st of 
September following; September 13, 1855, ordered to the Navy Yard, New York, 
and continued on duty at that station until May 31, 1858; April 9, 1859, received 
orders for the Constellation, as Fleet-Surgeon of the African Squadron ; Commo- 
dore Inman sailed in July for Madeira and the coast of Africa ; returned from 
that squadron, arriving in the United States August 28, 1861, in the midst of the 
troubles of the country; January 1, 1862, took charge of the Naval Hospital, 
New York, and continued in charge until December, 1865, when he was placed 
on leave until the 2()th of May, 1869, when he was put on duty at the Navy 
Yard, New York, where he continued until 1870, when, with other retired officers, 
he was put off duty. March, 1871, was commissioned as Medical Director in 
the navy. 

MEDICAL DIRECTOR LEWIS B. HUNTER, 

Born in New Jersey. Appointed from the same State, January, 1828 ; entered 
the service as Assistant Surgeon ; attached to frigate Hudson, Brazil Squadron, 
1828-33 ; Hospital, Chelsea, Massachusetts, 1830-31 ; schooner Porpoise, West 
India Squadron, 1831-2 ; frigate Java, Norfolk, Virginia, 1833—4 ; sloop John 
Adams, schooner Shark, Mediterranean Squadron, 1834-6 ; Navy Yard, New 
York, 1836-7. Commissioned as Surgeon, February, 1837 ; rendezvous, Phila- 
delphia, 1837 ; steamer Fulton, 1837-8 ; sloop Cyane, Mediterranean and coast 
of Africa, 1838-41; rendezvous, Baltimore and Philadelphia, 1842-3 ; steamer 
Princeton, 1843-5; sloop Cyane, Pacific Squadron, 1845-6; sloop Saratoga, 
Gulf of Mexico, 1847-8; rendezvous and Examining Board, Philadelphia, 
1848-50 ; frigate St. Lawrence, west coast of Europe, 1851 ; Naval Examining 
Board, Philadelphia, 1852 ; Fleet-Surgeon, Mediterranean Squadron, 1852-5 ; 
Navy Yard, Philadelphia, 1855-8 ; Fleet-Surgeon, coast of Brazil, 1859-61 ; Re- 
tiring Board, New York, 1861-2; rendezvous, Philadelphia, 1863-4; Fleet- 
Surgeon, North Atlantic Squadron, 1865 ; Retiring Board, Philadelphia, 1866 ; 
Surgeon to Retiring Board, Philadelphia, 1867 ; Naval Board of Examination, 
Philadelphia, 1868-70 ; Naval Asylum, Philadelphia, 1872-3. 



MEDICAL DIRECTOR GEORGE CLYMER, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed fi-om Pennsylvania, July 1, 1829 ; entered 
the service as Assistant Surgeon; frigates Constellation and Brandy wine, Medi- 
terranean Squadron, 1829-33 ; receiving-ship, New York, 1836 ; sloop John 



298 MEDICAL DIRECTORS ON THE RETIRED LIST. 

Adams, and frigate Constitution, Mediterranean Squadron, 1836-8. Commissioned 
as Surgeon, February 20, 1838; sloop Cyane, Pacific Squadron, 1841—1; Navy 
Yard, Washington, 1845-7 ; frigate St. Lawrence, Mediterranean Squadron, 
1848-50; Naval Observatory (special duty), Washington, 1851-4; Fleet-Sur- 
geon, African Squadron, 1855-7; Navy Yard, Washington, 1858-60; Fleet; 
Surgeon, West India Squadron, 1861 ; Fleet-Surgeon, South Atlantic Blockading 
Squadron, 1861-3 ; Naval Observatory (special duty), 1865-8 ; member of 
Medical Board, Washington, 1869-71. 



MEDICAL DIRECTOR NINIAN PINKNEY, 

Born in Maryland. Appointed from Maryland, March 26, 1834 ; entered the 
service as Assistant Surgeon ; attached to sloop Erie, Brazil Squadron, 1835-7 ; 
frigate Brandywine, Mediterranean Squadron, 1839-40. Commissioned as Sur- 
geon, October 27, 1841 ; store-ship Relief, Pacific Squadron, 1842-3 ; rendezvous, 
Baltimore, 1844-6 ; sloop Albany, Home Squadron, 1847 ; sloop Germantowu, 
Home Squadron, 1848 ; steam-frigate Saranac, Home Squadron, 1850-1 ; Naval 
Academy, 1853-5 ; steam-frigate Susquehanna, Mediterranean Squadron, 1857-8 ; 
Hospital, Norfolk, 1859 ; special duty, Washington, 1860-2 ; Fleet-Surgeon, 
Mississippi Squadron, 1863-5 ; special duty, 1868-9 ; Navy Yard, Washington, 
1870-2. 

MEDICAL DIRECTOR DAVID HARLAN, 

Born in Maryland. Appointed from Maryland, February 23, 1835 ; attached to 
sloop Peacock, East India Squadron, 1835-7 ; rendezvous, Baltimore, 1843 ; brig 
Somers, Home Squadron, 1844—5. Commissioned as Surgeon, December 6, 
1845 ; steamer Princeton, Home Squadron, 1846 ; sloop Falmouth, Pacific Squad- 
ron, 1849-51 ; receiving-ship Boston, 1852-4 ; steam-frigate Merrimac, 1855-7; 
receiving-ship Baltimore, 1859; sloop Cyane, 1861 ; steam-sloop Saranac, Pacific 
Squadron, 1863 ; Naval Asylum, Philadelphia, 1864-5 ; Naval Academy, 1867-8. 



MEDICAL DIRECTOR J. D. MILLER, 

Born in New York. Commissioned as Assistant Surgeon, December 6, 1836; 
ordered to the North Carolina, 74, flag-ship of the Pacific Squadron, Commodore 
Ballard ; in 1838, transferred to the sloop-of-war Lexington ; detached, July, 1840 ; 
in 1841, examined for promotion, and passed ; ordered to the Naval Hospital, 
Brooklyn, and transferred in the same year to the Navy Yard, Philadelphia ; in 
1843, ordered to the brig Perry, East India Squadron, and detached in 1845 ; in 
1846, ordered to the Naval Asylum, and in 1847, promoted and ordered to the Gulf 
of Mexico ; detailed for steamer Scorpion, and in 1848, ordered to take charge of 
the Naval Hospital established in Laguna ; ordered to sloop-of-war Saratoga in 
1849 ; transferred to sloop-of-war Grermantown, in 1850 ; ordered to the Philadel- 
phia Navy Yard, in 1852 ; detached and ordered to the sloop-of-war St. Louis, 
Mediterranean Squadron ; detached in 1855 ; in 1856, ordered member of a Medi- 
cal Board of Examination, convened at New Orleans ; in 1857, ordered to the 
sloop-of-war Plymouth ; detached in January, 1859 ; ordered as member of a Medi- 
cal Board of Examination, and in the same year, to the Navy Yard, Boston ; de- 
tached in 1861, and ordered to the frigate Potomac, on blockade duty in the Gulf 
of Mexico; detached in 1863, and ordered to the Colorado; in 1864, ordered to 
the receiving-ship Princeton, Philadelphia ; detached in 1866, and ordered as 



MEDICAL DIRECTORS ON THE RETIRED LIST. 299 

Fleet-Surgeon of the North Atlantic Squadron, consecutively in the vessels Rhode 
Island, Susquehanna, Wampanoag, and Contocook ; detached in 1869, and ordered 
to the receiving-ship Potomac, Philadelphia, 1869-73. 



MEDICAL DmECTOR CHARLES D. MAXWELL, 

Born in Delaware. Appointed from Delaware, September 6, 1837 ; entered the 
service as Assistant Surgeon; frigate Constitution, Pacific Squadron, 1839-42; 
Naval Hospital, Norfolk, 1843-4 ; Navy Yard, Philadelphia, 1845 ; sloop Cyane, 
Pacific Squadron, 1845-8 ; actively engaged against the enemy during the war with 
Mexico ; Marine Barracks, Washington, 1849-50. Commissioned as Surgeon, 
October 18, 1849 ; steam -frigate Powhatan, East India Squadron, 1852-6 ; special 
duty, Washington, 1857-9 ; sloop Portsmouth, 1860-1 ; Navy Yard, Washington, 
1862-4; Fleet-Surgeon, Pacific Fleet, 1864-7; Naval Hospital, Washington, 
1867-9 ; special duty, Washington, 1870-3. 



MEDICAL DIRECTOR JOHN J. ABERNETHY, 

Born in Connecticut. Appointed from Connecticut, February 9, 1837 ; sloop 
Levant, West India Squadron, 1838-42 ; store-ship Lexington, Mediterranean 
Squadron, 1844-5 ; store-ship Lexington, 'Pacific Squadron, during war with 
Mexico ; receiving-ship New York, 1850. Commissioned as Surgeon, November 7, 
1850; sloop St. Mary's, Pacific Squadron, 1850-3; receiving-ship New York, 
1854-7 ; sloop Falmouth, Brazil Squadron, 1857-9 ; receiving-ship New York, 
1860-1 ; retired, 1861 ; frigate Sabine, Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1861-3 ; 
Naval rendezvous. New York, 1865 ; waiting orders, 1866 ; Naval Hospital, Pen- 
sacola, 1867-8 ; Naval Hospital, Norfolk, 1869. 



MEDICAL DIRECTOR JOHN S. MESSERSMITH, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania, February 9, 1837 ; en- 
tered the service as Assistant Surgeon ; attached to sloop Fairfield, Brazil Squad- 
ron, 1839-40; brig Dolphin, Home Squadron, 1842-3; steamer Col. Harney, 
1845; bomb-brig ^tna, Home Squadron, 1846-8; Hospital, New York, 1850; 
store-ship Southampton, Pacific Squadron, 1850-4. Commissioned as Surgeon, 
July 13, 1853; steam-frigate Susquehanna, East India Squadron, 1855 ; Navy 
Yard, Mare Island, California, 1857-9 ; steam-sloop San Jacinto, 1861 ; sloop 
Constellation, Mediterranean Squadron, 1861-4 ; Navy Yard, Norfolk, 1866 ; 
Navy Yard, Philadelphia, 1867-8 ; member of Board of Examiners, 1871-3. 



MEDICAL DIRECTORS. 

With Relative Rank of Captain. 



MEDICAL DIRECTOR GEORGE MAULSBY, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania an Assistant Surgeon, 
March 7, 1838 ; attached to frigate Constellation, Home Squadron, 1838 ; ship- 
of-the-line Ohio and frigate Brandy wine, Mediterranean Squadron, 1839—41 ; 



300 PAYMASTER-GENERAL. 

Washington Navy Yard, 1841-2 ; brig Washington, Coast Survey, 1842 ; examined 
for Passed Assistant Surgeon, November, 1844 ; attached to brig Porpoise, coast 
of Africa, 1842-4 ; brig Porpoise, Home Squadron, 1845-7 ; employed iii Mexi- 
can War, blockading coast, and capture of Tampico ; attached to New York Hos- 
pital, 1847-9 ; store-ship Relief, 1849-51 ; Naval rendezvous, Boston, 1851-2. 
Commissioned as Surgeon, April 14, 1852 ; attached to steam-frigate Saranac, 
Brazil, 1852-3; steam-frigate Saranac, Mediterranean Squadron, 1853-6; re- 
ceiving-ship North Carolina, New York, 1856-9 ; steam-sloop Wyoming, Pacific 
Squadron, 1859-61 ; Retiring Board, New York, 1862-4; steam-frigate Brook- 
lyn, West Gulf Squadron, 1864, blockading Mobile and capture of the forts; also 
in North Atlantic Squadron, 1864-5,' at the capture of Fort Fisher, North 
Carolina ; Naval Asylum, 1865-8 ; Retiring Board, Erie, Pennsylvania, 1868 ; 
Retiring Board, Philadelphia, 1868-9 ; Examining Board, Annapolis, 1869 ; 
Medical Exanining Board, Naval Asylum, 1869-72. 



MEDICAL DIRECTOR THOMAS M. POTTER, 

Born in Rhode Island. Appointed from Rhode Island, October 17, 1839 ; en- 
tered the service as Assistayit Surgeon; attached to sloop Vandalia, Home Squad- 
ron, 1840-3 ; frigate Raritan, Brazil Squadron, 1845-6 ; sloop Yorktown, coast 
of Africa, 1849-50 ; receiving-ship, New York, 1852-3 ; store-ship Relief, Home 
Squadron, 1853-4. Commissioned as Surgeo7i, September 17, 1854; sloop John 
Adams, Pacific Squadron, 1854-8 ; receiving-ship, Boston, 1859 ; frigate Santee, 
1861-2; receiving-ship, Boston, 1863-4; steam-frigate Niagara, special service, 
European waters, 1864-5 ; Naval rendezvous, New York, 1866-9 ; Marine 
rendezvous, New York, 1872. 



PAYMASTER-GENERAL. 

With Relative Bank of Commodore. 



PAY-DIRECTOR GEORGE F. CUTTER, 

ORN in Massachusetts. Captain's Clerk, U. S. ship Cyane, Mediterranean 
Squadron, from April 18, 1838, to May 19, 1841, inclusive. Appointed Purser, 
June 5, 1844; U. S. brig Truxton, coast of Africa, June, 1844, to December, 
1845 ; U. S. brig Truxton, Gulf of Mexico, April, 1846, to August, 1846 ; 
wrecked, and taken prisoner by the Mexicans ; released on parole, September, 
1846, and exchanged, December, 1846 ; receiving-ship Franklin, at Boston, De- 
cember, 1846, to April, 1847; U. S. ship Albany, Gulf of Mexico, August, 1847, 
to September, 1850; receiving-ship Ohio, Boston, April, 1851, to April, 1854; 
U. S. steamer Massachusetts, Pacific Squadron, May, 1854, to August, 1857, 
and during the cruise was in Puget Sound, Washington Territory, in the Indian 
War of 1856-7 ; Navy Yard, Portsmouth, New Hampshire, October, 1857, to 
September, 1860 ; flag-ship Richmond, Mediterranean Squadron, October, 1860, 
to June, 1861 ; tl. S. steamer Richmond, Western Gulf Squadron, during the 
Rebellion, June, 1861, to December, 1862, and in that ship was present at the 
attack on the forts at Pensacola harbor ; passed the forts below New Orleans ; at 
the capture of the city and the passage up the river passing and repassing the 
batteries at Vicksburg ; flag-ship San Jacinto, East Gulf Blockading Squadron, 
as Fleet-Paymaster, April, 1863, to December, 1863; Inspector of Provisions 



PAY-DIRECTORS. 301 

and Clothing, Navy Yard, Boston, January, 1864, to December, 1867 ; Purchasing 
Paymaster, New York, July and August, 1867; flag-ship Piscataqua, Asiatic 
Squadron, Fleet-Paymaster, October, 1867, to July, 1869 ; Inspector of Provi- 
sions and Clothing, Navy Yard, Boston, January 1, 1870, to October, 1872 ; 
Navy Yard, New York, October, 1872, to February, 1873; Purchasing and Dis- 
bursing Office, New York, February, 1873, to March, 1877 ; General Inspector 
of Provisions and Clothing, March, 1877, to November, 1877; Paymaster- General 
since November, 1877. 



PAY-DIRECTORS. 

With Relative Rank of Captain. 



PAY-DIRECTOB JAMES H. WATMOUGH, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania, December 12, 1844 ; at- 
tached to sloop Portsmouth, Pacific Squadron, 1844-8; during the Mexican War, 
was in most of the operations in California, including the bombardment of Guay- 
mas; brig Perry, coast of Africa, 1849-51 ; frigate Constitution, coast of Africa, 
1852-5 ; steamer Michigan, on the lakes, 1857-8 ; sloOp Saratoga, Gulf of jMex- 
ico, 1859-60 ; in action with two Spanish steamers, which were captured ; Navy 
Yard, Philadelphia, 1861-3; steam-frigate Niagara, special service, 1863-4; 
Fleet-Paymaster, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; was in most of 
the operations of the squadron, including seven or eight days' operations in Stono 
River, and the subsequent operations on James' and John's Islands, previous to 
the evacuation of Charleston, South Carolina ; Navy Yard, New York, 1866-8 ; 
Inspector, etc., Navy Yard, New York, 1869-70 ; Acting Chief of Bureau Pro- 
visions and Clothing, 1873-4; Chief of Bureau Provisions and Clothing, 1874-7. 



PAY-DIRECTOR EDWARD C. DORAN, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Indiana, September 15, 1845 ; attached 
to brig Dolphin, coast of Africa, 1845-6 ; sloop Marion, coast of Africa and 
Mediterranean Squadrons, 1847-8; sloop John Adams, coast of Africa, 1849-50; 
sloop Plymouth, East India Squadron and Perry's Expedition to Japan, 1851-4 ; 
participated in land battle of Americans and English with Chinese Imperialists, 
at Shanghai, April, 1854; receiving-ship Norfolk, 1855-6; Naval Academy, 
1856 ; steam-frigates Colorado and Roanoke, 1858-60 ; Norfolk Navy Yard, 
1860-1 ; special duty, 1861 ; Navy Yard, Mare Island, California ; Paymaster of 
Station, Inspector of Provisions and Clothing, and Purchasing Paymaster, San 
Francisco, 1864-7 ; Paymaster, San Francisco, 1867-8; Fleet-Paymaster, North 
Pacific Squadron, 1868-9 ; receiving-ship. Mare Island, 1869 ; Navy Yard, Mare 
Island, 1870-3; Inspector of Provisions, etc., at Mare Island, 1873-4; special 
duty, 1874-5 ; Navy Yard, Mare Island, 1877-8. 



PAY-DIRECTOR JOSEPH C. ELDREDGE, 

Born in the city of New York. Appointed from Texas, February 2, 1847; 
attached to frigate Brandy wine, and brig Perry, of the Brazil Squadron, under 
command of Comm6dore Jacob Storer, during 1847-9 ; to the brig Porpoise, 
coast of Africa, under command of Commodore F. H. Gregory, 1850-2 ; to 
United States steam-frigate Powhatan, of the East India Squadron, 1853-6, under 



302 PA Y-DIRECTORS. 

command of Commodore M. C. Perry, participating in his expedition to open the 
ports and negotiate the first treaty with Japan ; to the United States steam-frigate 
Niagara, under command of Captain William L. Hudson, during the first and 
second expeditions, in 1857-8, for laying the Atlantic telegraph cable; Inspector 
of Provisions, etc., at Navy Yard, New York, 1858-61 ; to steam-sloop Lancaster, 
flag-ship Pacific Squadron, under command of Rear- Admiral Charles H. Bell, 
as Fleet-Paymaster, 1862-4; special duty at New York, 1865; Disbursing and 
Purchasing Paymaster at New York, 1866-9 ; special duty, 1870-1 ; Inspector 
of Provisions, etc., New York Navy Yard, 1871-8, 



PAY-DIRECTOR JOHN S. GULICK, 

Born in New Jersey. Appointed from New Jersey, February 1, 1851 ; attached 
to sloop Jamestown, Brazil Squadron, 1851-4; special duty, Washington, 1855 ; 
S. S. Supply, Brazil Squadron, 1855-6 ; steam-sloop Saranac, Pacific Squadron, 
1857-9 ; steam-frigate Wabash, flag-ship Atlantic Blockading Squadrons, 1861 ; 
present at taking of Hatteras forts and at battle of Port Royal ; Navy Yard, 
Washington, 1863 ; Navy Yard, Philadelphia, 1864 ; Fleet-Paymaster, Missis- 
sippi Squadron, 1864-5 ; Navy Yard, Philadelphia, 1865 ; Naval Academy, 
1867-8 ; Fleet-Paymaster, European Squadron, 1869-71 ; Inspector of Pro- 
visions, Navy Yard, Washington, 1873-5 ; Naval Asylum, Philadelphia, 1875-6 5 
Purchasing Paymaster at Philadelphia, 1877-8. 



PAY-DIRECTOR THOMAS H. LOOKER, 

Born in Ohio. Appointed from Ohio, August 31, 1853; attached to brig Bain- 
bridge, Brazil Squadron, 1853-6 ; sloop Portsmouth, East India Squadron, 1856-8 ; 
steam-sloop Brooklyn, Home Squadron, 1858-60 ; steam-sloop Brooklyn, Atlantic 
Squadron, 1861 ; store-ship Brandywine, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 
1862-3 ; receiving-ship Baltimore, 1864 ; steam-sloop Powhatan, South Pacific 
Squadron, 1866 ; Fleet-Paymaster, South Pacific Squadron, 1867-8 ; Paymaster 
at Baltimore, 1869-72 ; Navy Yard, Washington, 1872-5 ; Pay-Officer at Balti- 
more, 1875-7 ; Assistant to Secretary of Navy, 1877-8. 



PAY-DIRECTOR C. J. EMERY, 

Born in Maine. Appointed from New Hampshire, April, 1855 ; attached to 
United States store-ship Relief, Brazil Squadron, 1855-6 ; sloop Levant, East 
India Squadron, 1857-8; sloop Saratoga, Home Squadron, 1858-9; steam-sloop 
Narragansett, Pacific Squadron, 1859-62 ; store-ship Brandywine, North Atlantic 
Blockading Squadron, 1862-3 ; Navy Yard Inspector of Provisions and Clothing, 
and Pay and Purchasing Paymaster at Navy Yard, Portsmouth, N. H., 1863-5 ; 
Fleet-Paymaster and Naval Store-keeper, Asiatic Squalflron, 1866-9 ; Inspector 
of Provisions and Clothing, Navy Yard, New York, 1869-72 ; Inspector of Pro- 
visions and Clothing, Navy Yard, Boston, 1873-6. 



PAY-DIRECTOR CHARLES W. ABBOT, 

Born in Rhode Island. Appointed from Rhode Island, September 2, 1856 ; at- 
tached to sloop Falmouth, Brazil Squadron, 1856-8 ; frigate St. Lawrence, Brazil 
Squadron, 1859 ; steam-sloop Mohican, coast of Africa, 1859-60 ; steam-sloop 



PAY-DIRECTORS. 303 

Pawnee, Atlantic coast, 1861 ; had several engagements with the Acquia Creek 
and Mathias Point Batteries in the Potomac lliver, and participated in the capture 
of the forts at Hatteras Inlet; steam sloop Brooklyn, West Gulf Blockading 
Squadron, 1862-3 ; capture of Forts Jackson and St. Philip, and city of New 
Orleans; first attack on Vicksburg batteries; special duty, New York, 1864; 
Naval Academy, 1864-6 ; Board of Examiners at Philadelphia, 1866 ; Fleet- 
Paymaster, North Atlantic Squadron, 1867-8 ; Pay-Ofl&cer at Boston, 1869-71. 
Promoted to Pay-Inspector^ May 23, 1871, and to Pay-Director^ December 19, 
1871 ; Inspector Provisions and Clothing, Navy Yard, Portsmouth, New Hamp- 
shire, 1872^ ; Pay-Officer at Boston, 1875-6. 



PAY-DIRECTOR JOHN S. CUNNINGHAM, 

Born in Charleston, South Carolina. Appointed from South Carolina, March 
13, 1857 ; purser of sloop-of-war Dale, west coast of Africa, full cruise, 1857-9 ; 
purser of Naval Academy, Annapolis, 1859-60; Paymaster of sloop-of-war 
Plymouth, practice-cruise to Spain, Azores, Madeira, Canary Islands, etc., 1860; 
Paymaster of sloop-of-war Macedonian, Gulf of Mexico and Vera Cruz, 1860-1 ; 
Fleet- Paymaster, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, steam-frigate Wabash, 
1862-3 ; Inspector and Paymaster, Navy Yard, Washington, 1864-5 ; Fleet- 
Paymaster, European Squadron, steam-frigate Colorado, 1865-7 ; Inspector, Navy 
Yard, Philadelphia, 1868; Paymaster, Navy Yard, New York, 1869-71. Com- 
missioned as Pay-Director^ October 14, 1871 ; Inspector of Provisions and Cloth- 
ing, Navy Yard, Washington, 1871-2 ; special duty, Europe, 1873-4 ; Pay-Officer 
at San Francisco, 1875-8. 



PAY-DIRECTOR ROBERT H. CLARK, 

Born in Delaware. Appointed from Delaware, July 18, 1857 ; attached to 
steamer Fulton, Home Squadron, 1857-8; steamer Fulton, Paraguay Squadron, 
1858-9 ; steamer Iroquois, Mediterranean Squadron, 1859-61 ; steamer Iroquois, 
W^est Gulf Squadron, 1861-2 ; attack on Forts Jackson and St. Philip, in the 
Mississippi River, at the capture of New Orleans, 1862 ; attack on the batteries 
at Vicksburg, on the 28th of June and 16th of July, 1862; attack on Grand 
Gulf, and other skirmishes on the Mississippi River, 1862 ; capitulation of Baton 
Rouge, Natchez, 1862 ; Naval Station, Pensacola, Florida, 1862-5 ; Purchasing- 
Paymaster, Boston, Massachusetts, 1865-8 ; Fleet-Paymaster, South Pacific Squad- 
ron, 1869 ; Inspector of Provisions and Clothing, Navy Yard, Philadelphia, 1870- 
72. Promoted to Pay-Inspector, March 3, 1871 ; U. S. Naval Asylum, 1873-5 ; 
Inspector of Provisions and Clothing, League Island, 1877-8; Pay-Director, 
January 23, 1873. 



PAY-DIRECTOR JAMES D. MURRAY, 

Born in Maryland. Appointed from Minnesota, June 3, 1858; attached to sloop 
Cyane, Pacific Squadron, 1858-9; frigate Potomac, Atlantic coast, 1861; store- 
ship Potomac, West Gulf Squadron, 1862 ; iron-clad Roanoke, North Atlantic 
Blockading Squadron, 1863^ ; receiving-ship and Naval Asylum, Philadelphia, 
1865-7; Fleet- Paymaster, North Atlantic Squadron, 1868-9; Navy Yard, Wash- 
ington, 1870. Promoted to Pay-Inspector, March 3, 1871 ; Paymaster, Naval 



304 PAY-INSPECTORS. 

Academy, 1871-4. Promoted Pay-Director, September 25, 1875 ; Fleet-Pay- 
master, European Squadron, 1875-6 ; Naval Asylum, Philadelphia, 1877-8. 



PAY-DIRECTOR JAMES FULTON, 

Born in Tennessee. Appointed from Tennessee, November 20, 1858 ; attached 
to store-ship Relief, Home Squadron, 1859 ; steamer Saginaw, Pacific Squadron, 
1859-62 ; steam-sloop Adirondack, special service, July, 1862, until she was 
wrecked near Abaco Island, August 23, 1862 ; steam-sloop Lackawanna, West 
Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1863-4 ; battle of Mobile Bay, August 5, 1864 ; 
Navy Yard, Washington, 1865-6 ; member Board of Examiners, 1866-7 ; steam- 
frigate Minnesota, special cruise, 1867-8; Navy Yard, Philadelphia, 1868-71. 
Promoted to Pay-Inspector, March 3, 1871 ; Fleet-Paymaster, European Station, 
1871-3 ; Inspector Provisions and Clothing, Mare Island, 1874-7. Promoted to 
Pay-Director, August 28, 1876. 



PAY-DIRECTOR ALEXANDER W. RUSSELL, 

Born in Maryland. Served in the sloop-of-war Saratoga, coast of Africa, 1842- 
4, as Captain's Clerk, and in the operations against Bereby and the adjacent 
towns on that station, under Commodore M. C. Perry, December, 1843 ; also 
served in Company C (Captain Samuel H. Walker, Texan Ranger), Mounted Rifle 
Regiment, in the Mexican War ; was Clerk to the Committee of Naval Affairs, 
United States Senate, 1858-61. Nominated Paymaster in the navy from the Dis- 
trict of Columbia on the 14th and confirmed 28th February, 1861; attached to 
steamer Pocahontas, Potomac River and Chesapeake Bay, April and May, 1861 ; 
to sloop Savannah, N. and S. A. Blockading Squadron, and in Savannah River at 
capture of Tybee Island; April 1, steam-frigate Colorado, capture of the forts in 
the Mississippi River and New Orleans ; to the iron-clad steamer New Ironsides, 
special service, 1862 ; South Atlantic Squadron, 1863-4, when he was specially 
thanked by Commodore (Vice-Admiral) Rowan, commanding the New Ironsides, 
in his official despatches, " for great zeal and ability in command of the powder and 
shell division" during the various (27) engagements with the forts and batteries 
of Charleston harbor ; receiving-ship North Carolina, New York, 1864-5 ; steamer 
Chattanooga, special service, 1866 ; steam-sloop Sacramento, special service, 1866 
-7, till wrecked in the Bay of Bengal, coast of India ; Inspector Provisions and 
Clothing, Navy Yard, Washington, 1868-70; Navy Pay-Office, Philadelphia, 
1870-3. Promoted to Pay-Inspector, March 3, 1871 ; Inspector Provisions and 
Clothing, Navy Yard, Philadelphia, October, 1873, to January 15, 1874; Navy 
Pay-Office, Philadelphia, 1874-7. Promoted to Pay-Director, February 23, 
1877 ; Navy Pay-Office, Baltimore, March 31, 1877. 



PAY-mSPECTORS. 

With Relative Rank of Commander. 



PAY-INSPECTOR JAMES N. CARPENTER, 

Born in Virginia. Appointed from Kentucky, September 13, 1860 ; attached to 
sloop Saratoga, coast of Africa, 1860-2 ; Potomac Flotilla, 1863-5 ; steamer 



PAY-INSPECTORS. 3O5 

Rhode Island, North Atlantic Squadron, 1865-6; Fleet-Paymaster, North At- 
lantic Squadron, 1866-7; Navy Yard, Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 1868-9; 
Fleet-Paymaster, Asiatic Fleet, 1869-72. Promoted to Pay-Inspector^ March 3, 
1871. 

PAY-INSPECTOR GEORGE LEONARD DAVIS, 

Born in Massachusetts. Appointed from Wisconsin, April 16, 1861 ; attached 
to brig Perry, and was on board at the capture of the Savannah, first privateer 
under the first letter of marque ; also, the Hannah M. Johnson, 1861 ; Washington 
Navy Yard, 1861 ; passed down the Potomac by the rebel batteries, January, 
1862 ; attached to steam-sloop Pensacola, West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1862 
-3 ; acting Fleet-Paymaster of West Gulf Blockading Squadron, and commanded 
the Powder Division during the whole cruise, and was honorably mentioned in the 
report of that ship; engagements of Forts St. Philip and Jackson, and capture of 
New Orleans ; was ordered to take charge of the mint, and raised the United 
States flag; receiving-ship, Cairo, Illinois, 1865; steam-sloop Pensacola, flag-ship 
North Pacific Squadron, as Fleet-Paymaster, 1867-8 ; Paymaster, Navy Yard^ 
Boston, 1868-9. Promoted to Pay-Inspector, March 3, 1871 ; Navy Yard, Nor- 
folk, 1870-2 ; Fleet-Paymaster, Pacific Station, 1873-5 ; Naval Asylum, Phila- 
delphia, 1876-7 ; Fleet-Paymaster, S. A. Station, 1877-8. 



PAY-INSPECTOR AUGUSTUS J. GILMAN, 

Born in New Hampshire. Appointed from Maine, June 1, 1861 ; attached tc 
sloop Marion, Atlantic coast, 1861 ; frigate Santee, 1862 ; special duty, Cairo, 
IlUnois, 1863-5 ; Navy Yard, Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 1866-7 ; Inspector 
of Provisions, etc., Washington, 1867-8 ; Fleet-Paymaster, Asiatic Fleet, 1869 
-70. Promoted to Pay-Inspector, March 3, 1871 ; Paymaster at Boston, 1871-3 ;. 
Fleet-Paymaster, N. A. Station, 1873-5 ; Pay-Office at New York, 1877-8. 



PAY-INSPECTOR CUTHBERT P. WALLACH, 

Born in District of Columbia. Appointed from District of Columbia, June I, 
1861 ; attached to sloop Preble, Atlantic coast, 1861-2 ; steam-sloop Mississippi, 
West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1863 ; steam-sloop Powhatan, flag-ship West 
India Squadron, 1864 ; Naval Station, Mound City, Illinois, 1867-8 ; receiving- 
ship Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 1869-70 ; Guerriere, European Station, 1870-2.. 
Promoted to Pay-Inspector, March 3, 1871 ; Navy Yard, New York, 1873-6 ;. 
Inspector of Provisions, etc.. Navy Yard, League Island, 1876-7 ; Fleet Pay- 
master, S. A. Station, 1877. 

PAY-INSPECTOR CASPAR SCHENCK, 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, September 14, 1861 ; entered 
the service as Assistant Paymaster ; attached to sloop Portsmouth, West Gulf 
Blockading Squadron, 1862-4. Promoted to Paymaster, January 6, 1864; 
steam-sloop Juniata, South Atlantic Squadron, 1865; receiving-ship, Mare Island,. 
California, 1867-9; steam-sloop Congress, 1870-1. Promoted to Pay- Inspector,. 
March 3, 1871 ; Fleet-Paymaster, Pacific Fleet, 1872-3 ; Navy Yard, Mara 
Island, 1874-8. 

20 



306 PAY-INSPECTORS. 

PAY-INSPECTOK CHAKLES H. ELDREDGE, 

Born in Massachusetts. Appointed from New York, July 10, 1861 ; entered 
the service as Assistant Paymaster ; attached to steam-sloop Canandaigua, South 
Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862-4. Promoted to Paymaster, February 6, 
1862 ; special duty, Navy Yard, New York, 1866 ; Navy Yard and Station, Pen- 
sacola, Florida, 1867-8 ; Store-keeper, Asiatic Fleet, 1869-72. Promoted to Pay- 
Inspector, July 3, 1871 ; Pay-Office at Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 1873-5 ; 
Fleet-Paymaster, S. Pacific Station, 1875-6 ; and of South Atlantic Station, 
1876-8. 

PAY-INSPECTOR GILBERT E. THORNTON, 

Born in New York. Appointed from Massachusetts, September 6, 1861 ; en- 
tered the service as Assistant Paymaster ; store-ship Brandy wine, North Atlantic 
Blockading Squadron, 1862 ; steam-sloop Brooklyn, 1864-5 ; Inspector of Pro- 
visions, etc., Norfolk, 1866-7 ; Store-keeper, Naval Academy, 1868-9 ; Fleet- 
Paymaster, South Atlantic Fleet, 1869-72. Promoted to Pay- Inspector, October 
14, 1871 ; Pay-Office at Washington, 1872-5 ; Pay-Office at Boston, 1876-8. 



PAY-INSPECTOR WILLIAM W. WILLIAMS, 

Born in Ohio. Appointed from Ohio, August 29, 1861 ; entered the service as 
Assistant Paymaster ; attached to steamer Louisiana, North Atlantic Blockading 
Squadron, 1862-4 ; at battles of Roanoke Island, Elizabeth City, and Newbem, 
in 1862 ; on the Louisiana, and at the three weeks' siege of Washington, District 
of Columbia ; in command of army gunboat Eagle, and on the staff of General 
J. G. Foster for that time. Promoted to Paymaster, March 2, 1864 ; steam-sloop 
Wachusett, Brazil Squadron, 1864 ; was attached to Wachusett at time of cap- 
ture of the Florida, at Bahia, Brazil, in October, 1864 ; Inspector of Provisions 
and Clothing to the Mississippi Squadron, 1864-5 ; store-ship Fredonia, at Callao, 
1867-8 ; is one of the three surviving officers of the Fredonia, which ship was 
wrecked by tidal wave at Arica, Peru, on August 13, 1868 ; special duty. South 
Pacific Squadron, 1869 ; Navy Yard, Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 1870-3. Pro- 
moted to Pay-Inspector, October, 1871 ; in 1871, Paymaster Williams was advanced 
ten numbers in his corps for gallant and meritorious service at Wallop's Island and 
Washington, North Carolina, in 1861-63 ; Fleet-Paymaster, N. A. Station, 1874-5 ; 
Pay-Office, Washington, 1875-8. 



PAY-INSPECTOR EDWARD MAY, 

Born in Massachusetts. Appointed from Massachusetts, September 6, 1861 ; 
entered the service as Assistant Paymaster ; attached to steam-gunboat Unadilla, 
South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862. Promoted to Paymaster, February 
■6, 1862 ; Mississippi Squadron, 1863-4 ; special duty, Washington, 1865-6 ; 
eteam-sloop Lackawanna, North Pacific Squadron, 1867-9; Navy Yard, Boston, 
1869-71 ; in charge of store, Honolulu, 1871-5 ; practice-ship Constellation, 
1875. Promoted to Pay-Inspector, September 25, 1875 ; Fleet-Paymaster, N. A. 
Station, 1873-7. 



PAYMASTERS. 307 

PAY-INSPECTOR HENRY M. DENNISTON, 

Born in New York. Entered service as Assistanf Paymaster, September 9, 1861. 
Promoted to Paymaster, April 14, 1862 ; Pay- Inspector, August 19, 1876 ; duty 
as follows: November, 1861, to September, 1862, gunboat Winona; December, 
1862, and January, 1863, supply-ship Blackstone ; March, 1863, to May, 1865, 
steamer Ticonderoga ; August, 1865, to August, 1868, store-ship Onward, and 
Naval Store-keeper, Rio de Janeiro; October, 1868, to October, 1871, steamer 
Michigan ; September, 1872, to September, 1874, flag-ship Worcester; September, 
1875, to January, 1876, Navy Yard, Philadelphia; January, 1876, and still, 
attached to Navy Yard, League Island. 



PAY-INSPECTOR RICHARD WASHINGTON, 

Born in the District of Columbia. Appointed from Virginia, August 21, 1861 ; 
entered the service as Assistant Paymaster ; attached to steam-sloop Dacotah, 
West India Squadron, 1862, and North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1863-4. 
Promoted to Paymaster, April 14, 1862 ; Naval Station, Norfolk, 1865-7 ; re- 
ceiving-ship Norfolk, 1868-9 ; steam-sloop Gruerriere, South Atlantic Squadron, 
1869; Fleet-Paymaster, S. A. Station, 1872-5; Bureau of Provisions, 1875-6. 
Promoted to Pay- Inspector, August 28, 1876 ; Inspector Provisions, Navy Yard, 
Boston, 1876-8. 

PAY-INSPECTOR RUFUS PARKS, 

Born in Maine. Appointed Assistant Paymaster, September 12, 1861 ; sloop 
Vandalia, Blockading Squadron, 1862^. Promoted to Paymaster, April 14, 
1862; steam-sloop San Jacinto, Grulf Squadron, 1864-5; Monadnock (iron-clad), 
voyage from New York to San Francisco, 1865-6 ; out of the service from 1867 
to' 1873; Navy Yard, Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 1873-4; Fleet-Paymaster, 
S. A. Station, 1874-6 ; Pay-Office, Norfolk, Virginia, 1876-8. Promoted to 
Pay-Inspector in 1877. 

PAY-INSPECTOR FRANK COSBY, 

Born in Kentucky. Appointed from Kentijeky, August 24, 1861 ; entered the 
service as Assistant Paymaster; attached to Potomac Flotilla, 1862-3. Pro- 
moted to Paymaster, April 14, 1862 ; store-ship Vermont, South Atlantic Block- 
ading Squadron, 1863 ; receiving-ship Baltimore, 1865-7 ; in charge of coal, 
Honolulu, Sandwich Islands, 1868-9 ; receiving-ship Independence, San Francisco, 
1869 ; steam-sloop Saranac, Pacific Fleet, 1869-72 ; Franklin, N. A. and European 
Station, 1873-4 ; Bureau of Provisions, 1874 ; Navy Yard, Washington, 1875-7 ; 
special duty. Navy Department, 1877-8. 



PAYMASTERS. 

With Relative Rank of Lieutenant- Commander. 



PAYMASTER EDWIN STEWART, 

Born in New York City. Appointed from New York, September 9, 1861 ; 
entered the service as Assistant Paymaster ; attached to steam-gunboat Pembina, 



308 PAYMASTERS. 

South Atlantic Squadron, 1861-2, taking part in the bombardment and capture 
of Port Royal. Promoted to Paymaster, April 14, 1862 ; attached to steamer 
Richmond, West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1862-5, taking part in the engage- 
ment at Port Hudson and the capture of the forts in Mobile Bay ; steamer Michi- 
gan, on the lakes, 1865-8 ; Navy Pay-Office, at Washington, 1869-72; Fleet- 
Paymaster, Asiatic Station, flag-ship Hartford, 1872-5 ; ordered to special duty 
at New York, May 1, 1877. 



PAYMASTER JOSEPH A. SMITH, 

Born in Maine. Appointed from Maine, October 8, 1861 ; entered the service 
as Assistant Paymaster ; steam-sloop Kearsarge, special service, 1864. Promoted 
to Paymaster, August 23, 1862 ; receiving-ship, Norfolk, 1866 ; Fleet-Paymaster, 
Gulf Squadron, 1867 ; receiving-ship, Boston, 1868-70 ; California, Pacific Fleet, 
1870-1 ; Navy Yard, Boston, 1872-3 ; practice-ship Constellation, 1874 ; Fleet- 
Paymaster, Asiatic Station, 1875-8. 



PAYMASTER AMBROSE J. CLARK, 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, September 12, 1861 ; entered 
the service as Assistant Paymaster ; attached to steam-sloop Tuscarora, special 
service, 1862-3. Promoted to -Paymaster, August 19, 1863; steam-sloop Tus- 
carora, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864 ; steam-sloop Susquehanna, 
Brazil Squadron, 1865-6 ; special service, 1867 ; receiving-ship. New York, 1868 ; 
special duty, 1869; charge of stores, Key West, Florida, 1872-4; Pay-Office, 
Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 1875-6 ; Navy Yard, New York, 1877-8. 



PAYMASTER GEORGE COCHRAN, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania, September 27, 1861 ; 
entered the service as Assistant Paymaster ; attached to steam-sloop Wyoming, 
East India Squadron, 1862-4 ; during the engagement with the Japanese forts 
and vessels, Semona Saki, Japan, July 16, 1863, the Wyoming was engaged in 
the chase of the Alabama, in the China and Java seas, missing her on one occa- 
sion by twenty or thirty miles in the Straits of Sunda. Promoted to Paymaster, 
June 12, 1863 ; steam-frigate Wabash, 1864-5 ; was present at both attacks on 
Fort Fisher; steamer De Soto, special service, 1865-6 ; the De Soto on this occa- 
sion took out Hon. Wm. H. Seward, Secretary of State, Hon. Wm. T. Seward, 
Assistant Secretary, and family, on a trip to St. Thomas, St. Domingo, Hayti, and 
Havana ; North Atlantic Squadron, 1867 ; receiving-ship and Naval Asylum, 
Philadelphia, 1868-70; Congress, European Station, 1871-4; Fleet-Paymaster, 
N. P. Station, 1875-8. 

PAYMASTER THOMAS T. CASWELL, 

Born in Rhode Island. Appointed from Rhode Island, September 9, 1861 ; 
entered the service as Assistant Paymaster ; attached to steam-gunboat Huron, 
South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862 ; iron-clad steamer Sangamon, 1863 ; 
steam-sloop Seminole, West Gulf Squadron, 1863-4. Promoted to Paymaster, 
September 17, 1863 ; store-ship Guard, European Squadron, 1866-7 ; Navy Yard, 



PAYMASTERS. 309 

Norfolk, 1868-70; S. S. Tennessee, 1871; Fleet-Paymaster, Pacific Station, 
1872-5 ; Inspector of Provisions, Norfolk, 1875-8. 



PAYMASTER JAMES HOY, Jr., 

Born in New Jersey. Appointed from New York, October 11, 1861 ; entered 
the service as Assistant Paymaster ; attached to steam-sloop Mohican, special 
service, 1863-4. Promoted to Paymaster, October 8, 1864; special service, 
New York, 1865 ; steam-sloop Monongahela, West India Squadron, 1866, and 
North Atlantic Squadron, 1867-8 ; school-ship Constitution, 1869 ; Naval Store- 
keeper, Naval Academy, 1870-1; Naval Store-keeper Ville France, 1871-4; 
receiving-ship Wabash, 1876-8. 



PAYMASTER LUTHER G. BILLINGS, 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, October 24, 1862; entered 
the service as Acting Assistant Paymaster ; attached to steamer Water Witch, 
South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862-4; while attached to the Water 
Witch, took part in a number of minor engagements and expeditions, the most 
important of which were St. John's Bluff, Florida, Charleston, Pocataligo, North 
Edisto and Georgetown, South Carolina, and Ossabaw Sound, Georgia ; on June 
4, 1864, the Water Witch was attacked, while at anchor in Ossabaw Sound, by a 
large boarding party of rebels, and after a desperate hand-to-hand conflict was 
captured. Paymaster Billings took an active part in this engagement, being the 
first man on deck, killed the commanding officer of the Confederates, and several 
men in hand-to-hand conflict ; saved the life of his commanding ofl&cer by killing 
the man who had cut him down, and while in the act of despatching him, received 
a severe wound which disabled him. The Confederates suffered a loss of eight 
killed, twenty-two wounded, and four missing; was taken to the C. S. Naval 
Hospital, Savannah, the same day, remaining under treatment until June 12, 
when having incurred the displeasure of Com. Hunter, was sent to prison-camp 
Oglethorpe, Macon, Georgia, before his wounds had healed. On July 20, in com- 
pany with fifteen hundred officers, was removed to Charleston, South Carolina ; 
shortly after crossed the North Edisto River with four comrades, jumping from 
the train while in rapid motion, and, aided by the darkness, succeeding in reach- 
ing the woods, after almost unendurable suffering from fatigue and hunger, and 
after escaping the bloodhounds by crossing a large marsh, was recaptured on July 
25, when about four miles from the sea-coast, by a detachment of the Second 
South Carolina Cavalry, aided by a pack of thirty-four bloodhounds ; only escaped 
being torn to pieces by the proximity of the troopers ; was then taken to Charles- 
ton, where he arrived on July 27 ; on September 1, all the naval officers and 
men were started for Richmond, Virginia, arriving at Libby Prison on the 5th, 
having had but one ration served out to them while in transition, which caused 
the death of a number of prisoners from starvation, among whom were four of the 
Water Witch. Paymaster Billings received commendatory letters from Rear- 
Admiral H. Paulding and Commander Austin Pendergrast for his meritorious 
conduct during the defence of the Water Witch ; steamer Connecticut, special 
cruise, 1864-5 ; visited all the forts in the West Indies and Laguayra, Carthagena, 
Cumana, and Aspinwall on the main-land. Appointed Assistant Paymaster, March 
3, 1865 ; steamer Wateree, South Pacific Squadron, 1866-8 ; witnessed the 
bombardment of Callao by the Spanish fleet, and visited all the ports of the South 
Pacific Squadron, until August 14, 1868, when the cruise was brought to a sudden 



310 PAYMASTERS. 

end by the terrible earthquake at Arica, Peru, which left the ship some five hundred 
yards inland, utterly destroyed the town and the remaining shipping in the harbor, 
and caused immense loss of life ; Paymaster Billings received a commendatory 
letter from Commander Gillis for his cool and courageous bearing during the try- 
ing circumstances in which the officers of that vessel were placed. Commissioned 
as Paymaster, U. S. Navy, May 4, 1866 ; receiving-ship, Norfolk, Virginia, 
1869-72 ; S. S. Powhatan, North Atlantic Station, 1872-5 ; Navy Yard, New 
York, 1876-8. 

PAYMASTEK ARTHUR J. PRITCHARD, 

Born in Maryland. Appointed from Maryland, October 11, 1861 ; entered the 
service as Assistant Paymaster ; attached to steam-gunboat Itasca, West Gulf 
Squadron, 1861-3; steam-gunboat Wyalusing, North Atlantic Squadron, 1863-5. 
Promoted to Paymaster, November 9, 1864 ; steam-sloop Ticonderoga, European 
Squadron, 1865-8 ; steam-sloop Benicia, Asiatic Fleet, 1869-72 ; Powhatan, N. A. 
Station, 1S75-7. 

PAYMASTER ALBERT S. KENNY, 

Born in Iowa. Appointed from Vermont, March 19, 1862 ; entered the service 
as Assistant Paymaster; attached to steamer South Carolina, South Atlantic 
Blockading Squadron, 1862-4 ; steamer St. lago de Cuba, North Atlantic Block- 
ading Squadron, 1864-5 ; both attacks on Fort Fisher. Promoted to Paymaster, 
March 9, 1865 ; in charge of stores at Loando, 1866 ; Paymaster at San Fran- 
cisco, California, 1868-72 ; Roanoke (iron-clad), N. A. Station, 1873-4 ; Naval 
Academy, 1875-8. 

PAYMASTER FRANCIS H. SWAN, 

Born in Massachusetts. Appointed from Massachusetts, December 9, 1861 ; en- 
tered the service as Acting Assistant Paymaster; attached to steamer Potomska, 
South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1863-4; prisoner of war, 1864-5; ap- 
pointed Assistant Paymaster, United States Navy, March 9, 1865 ; steamer Frolic, 
European Squadron, 1865-7. Promoted to Passed Assistant Paymaster, May 4, 
1866. Commissioned as Paymaster, March 5, 1867 ; steam-sloop Saranac, North 
Pacific Squadron, 1867-8; practice-ship Macedonian, 1869-70; receiving-ship at 
Boston, 1871-2 ; Fleet-Paymaster, N. K. Station, 1874-5 ; Navy Yard, Boston, 
1876-8. 

PAYMASTER CHARLES F. GUILD, 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, October 8, 1864 ; entered the 
service as Assistant Paymaster ; special duty on the stafi" of Rear-Admiral Porter, 
North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5; steam-sloop Canandaigua, Euro- 
pean Squadron, 1865-8. Commissioned as Paymaster, May 4, 1866 ; Navy 
Yard, Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 1869-71 ; Naval Store-keeper, Asiatic Fleet, 
1871-4 ; Inspector Provisions at Portsmouth Navy Yard, 1874-8. 



PAYMASTER JAMES E. TOLFREE, 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, September 13, 1862 ; entered 
the service as Acting Assistant Paymaster; attached to steamer Vanderbilt, 



PAYMASTERS. 311 

special service, 1862-5. Appointed Assistant Paymaster, U. S. Navy, March 3, 
1865. Commisssioned as Paymaster, U. S. Navy, May 4, 1866 ; steam-sloop 
Kichmond, European Squadron, 1869-71 ; receiving-ship at New York, 1872-6 ; 
Fleet-Paymaster, European Squadron, 1877-8. 



PAYMASTER GEORGE A. LYON, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania, June 11, 1862 ; entered 
the service as Assistant Paymaster ; attached to the Lexington and Tuscumbia, 
Mississippi Flotilla, 1862-3 ; participated in the attack on Haines' Bluff, Decem- 
ber, 1862 ; in the capture of Arkansas Post, January 12, 1863 ; in several con- 
flicts on the Cumberland and Tennessee Rivers, during January, February, and 
March, 1863 ; battle of Grand Gulf, April 29, 1863, and in all the engagements 
of the Mississippi Squadron, during the siege of Vicksburg ; steam-sloop Pon- 
toosuc, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; both attacks on Fort 
Fisher, 1864-5, and in the subsequent engagement on Cape Fear River, which 
resulted in the surrender of Wilmington, North Carolina ; afterward in the James 
River, Virginia, until the fall of Richmond ; receiving-ship Potomac, Gulf Squadron, 
1866-7. Promoted to Paymaster, January 23, 1866 ; store-ship Idaho, Asiatic 
Squadron, 1867-70; Michigan, 1871-4; Inspector of Provisions, Navy Yard, 
Washington, 1875-8. 

PAYMASTER GEORGE W. BEAMAN, 

Born in Vermont. Appointed from Missouri, March 5, 1862 ; entered the 
service as Assistant Paymaster ; attached to steam-gunboat Seneca, South Atlantic 
Blockading Squadron, 1862 ; steamer Union, East Gulf Blockading Squadron, 
1863; special duty. Mound City, Illinois, 1864; steamer Algonquin, 1865-6. 
Promoted to Paymaster, March 28, 1866 ; practice-ship Marion, 1867 ; store- 
ship Cyane, Panama, 1868-9 ; steam-sloop Ossipee, Pacific Fleet, 1870—3 ; Navy 
Yard, Norfolk, 1873-6 ; Navy Yard, Washington, 1877-8. 



PAYMASTER ARTHUR BURTIS, 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, July 14, 1862 ; entered the 
service as Assistant Paymaster ; attached to steam-gunboat Sagamore, East Gulf 
Blockading Squadron, 1862 ; steamer Connecticut, special duty in Gulf and 
North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862-4 ; engaged with Fort Fisher while 
chasing blockade-runner, — the Connecticut captured several valuable prizes ; 
steamer Muscoota, Gulf Squadron, 1864-6. Promoted to Paymaster, May 4, 
1866 ; League Island, Pennsylvania, 1867-9 ; member of Board of Examiners, 
1867 ; Judge- Advocate of Court-Martial, 1868 ; steamer Brooklyn, European 
Fleet, 1870-3 ; Fleet-Paymaster, European Station, 1871 ; member of General 
Court-Martial, 1871 ; member of Board of Examiners, 1873 ; Bureau of Pro- 
visions and Clothing, Navy Department, 1873 ; Inspector of Provisions and 
Clothing, Navy Yard, Philadelphia, 1874-76 ; steamer St. Louis, 1875-6 ; mem- 
ber of General Court-Martial, 1877 ; leave of absence, 1878. 



312 PAYMASTERS. 

PAYMASTER EDWIN PUTNAM, 

Born in Maine. Appointed from Maine, September 20, 1862 ; entered the 
service as Assistant Paymaster ; attached to iron-clad steamer Nahant, North 
Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862-3 ; sloop Portsmouth, West Gulf Block- 
ading Squadron, 1864-5 ; steamer Mackinaw, North Atlantic Squadron, 1866. 
Promoted to Paymaster, May 4, 1866 ; in charge of stores at Loando, 1867-8 ; 
Paymaster at Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 1869-72 ; Benicia, N. P. Station, 
1872-5 ; Navy Yard, Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 1875-8. 



PAYMASTER GEORGE R. MARTIN, 

BoEN in New York. Appointed from New York, June 30, 1862 ; entered the 
service as Acting Assistant Paymaster ; attached to steamer Albatross, West 
Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1862-3 ; steamer Oneida, West Gulf Blockading 
Squadron, 1864-5. Appointed Assistant Paymaster, U. S. Navy, June 30, 1864; 
steamer Mohican, North Pacific Squadron, 1866. Promoted to Paymaster, May 
4, 1866 ; steamer Mohican, North Pacific Squadron, 1868 ; Juniata, European 
Squadron, 1869-72 ; Shenandoah, E. S., 1873-4 ; Ossipee, N. A. Station, 1875 ; 
Franklin, 1877. 

PAYMASTER WILLIAM N. WATMOUGH, 

Born in Maryland. Entered the United States service as Second Lieutenant, 
Co. H, 33d Infantry, Pennsylvania Volunteers, 1861 ; appointed aid-de-camp to 
General Meade, commanding Second Brigade, McCall's Division, Army of the 
Potomac, October, 1861 ; wounded in action, battle of White Oak Swamp, June 
30, 1862; resigned, and honorably discharged, November, 1862; appointed, 
same month. Acting Assistant Paymaster, U. S. Navy ; ordered to steamer Harriet 
Lane, West Gulf Squadron, December, 1862 ; steamer Calhoun, January, 1863 ; 
on service in the inland waters of Louisiana, Atchafalaya River, Red River, and 
Mississippi River ; steamer Nereus, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864. 
Appointed Assistant Paymaster, U. S. N., June 30, 1864; steamer De Soto, 
1865 ; steamer Kearsarge, 1865-6, European and African Squadrons. Appointed 
Paymaster, U. S. N., May 4, 1866 ; store-ship Onward, Asiatic Squadron, 
1867-8 ; on temporary duty at Philadelphia Navy Yard, as Inspector of Pro- 
visions and Clothing, etc., 1869 ; Naval Station, Norfolk, as Inspector of Pro- 
visions, etc., 1869-72; Brooklyn, European Station, 1873-4; receiving-ship at 
Norfolk, 1875-6 ; Naval Academy, 1877-8. 



PAYMASTER WORTHINGTON GOLDSBOROUGH, 

Born in Maryland. Appointed from Maryland, September 30, 1862; entered 
the service as Acting Assistant Paymaster ; attached to steamer Southfield, North 
Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862 ; store-ship St. Lawrence, North Atlantic 
Blockading Squadron, 1863-4. Appointed Assistant Paymaster, U. S. Navy, 
July 2, 1864 ; steamer Shamrock, European Squadron, 1866-7. Commissioned 
as Paymaster, May 4, 1866 ; frigate Constitution (school-ship), 1869-71 ; Navy 
Yard, Washington, 1871-2 ; Omaha, S. P. Station, 1872-5 ; Naval Academy, 
1876 ; Coast Survey, 1876-8. 



PAYMASTERS. 313 

PAYMASTEK FRANK H. HINMAN, 

Born in New York. Appointed from Ohio, March 7, 1863 ; entered the service 
as Acting Assistant Paymaster ; attached to steam-gunboat Penobscot, West Gulf 
Blockading Squadron, 1863-5. Appointed Assistant Paymaster, U. S. Navy, 
July 2, 1864. Commissioned as Paymaster, May 4, 1866 ; special duty, New 
Orleans, 1867-8 ; iron-clad Dictator, North Atlantic Squadron, 1869-70 ; Ticon- 
deroga, S. A., 1870-3 ; Michigan, 1874-7. 



PAYMASTER JOHN H. STEVENSON, 

"Born in New York. Appointed from New York, September 19, 1862 ; entered 
the service as Assistant Paymaster ; attached to steamer Satellite, Potomac Flo- 
tilla, 1862-3 ; was in the first battle of Fredericksburg, on land, with Hooker's 
Division ; all the battles and skirmishes of the Potomac Flotilla, from October, 
1862, to April, 1863 ; in December, 1862, took two boat's crews, went ashore on 
the banks of the Rappahannock through the enemy's pickets, several miles back, 
and captured a captain on Stonewall Jackson's staff, who was recruiting ; steamer 
Princess Royal, West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1863 ; battles of Donaldson- 
ville and College Point, Louisiana, and several skirmishes on the Mississippi ; 
while at Donaldsonville, Louisiana, went as a spy into Generals Taylor's, Morton's, 
and Magruder's camps, and brought the information of how and when the enemy 
would attack us to Captain M. B. Woolsey, U. S. Navy ; then carried despatches 
through the enemy's country, from Captain Woolsey to Admiral Farragut ; for 
this service he was nominated by the President, April 22, 1870, to the United 
States Senate for advancement fifteen numbers in his grade, " for extraordinary 
heroism;" steam-sloop Pensacola, West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1863-4; 
steamer Massasoit, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; was in the 
battle between our naval and land forces, and the rebel iron-clads under Semmes, 
shortly before the fall of Richmond, and all the skirmishes and fights on the James 
River during the last year of the war. Appointed Passed Assistant Paymaster, 
July 23, 1866 ; steamer Tacony, North Atlantic Squadron, 1866 ; steam-sloop 
Pawnee, South Atlantic Squadron, 1866-9. Commissioned as Paymaster, 1869 ; 
receiving-ship Vermont, New York, 1869-72; Lackawanna, Pacific Fleet, 1872-5 ; 
special duty. Centennial, 1876 ; charge of stores, Nagasaki, 1876-7. 



PAYMASTER CHARLES P. THOMPSON, 

Born in Virginia. Appointed from New York, January 19, 1865 ; entered the 
service as Assistant Paymaster; special duty, Navy Department, 1865-8. Com- 
missioned as Paymaster, August 1, 1866; attached to steam-sloop Plymouth, 
European Squadron, 1869-72 ; Bureau of Provisions, 1873-4 ; Congress, Euro- 
pean Squadron, 1874-7. 

PAYMASTER SAMUEL T. BROWNE, 

Born in Rhode Island. Appointed from Rhode Island, September 30, 1862; 
entered the service as Acting Assistant Paymaster ; attached to iron-clad steamer 
Montauk, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862-3 ; iron-clad Onondaga, 
North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; appointed Assistant Paymaster, 
United States Navy, March 9, 1865 ; steamer Mackinaw, North Atlantic Squad- 



314 PAYMASTERS. 

roD, 1865-6. Promoted to Passed Assistant Paymaster, May 4, 1866 ; steamer 
Ashuelot, Asiatic Squadron, 1866-9. Commissioned as Paymaster, March 22, 
1867 ; Store-keeper, Rio de Janeiro, 1870-3 ; Store-keeper, Naval Academy, 
1874-8. 

PAYMASTER ROBERT P. LISLE, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania, November 2, 1863 ; en- 
tered the service as Acting Assistant Paymaster ; special duty, Bureau of Pro- 
visions and Clothing, 1863-4. Appointed Assistant Paymaster, July 2, 1864; 
iron-clad Canonicus, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; steam-sloop 
Swatara, West India Squadron, 1865-6. Promoted to Passed Assistant Pay- 
master, May 4, 1866 ; steam-sloop Resaca, North Pacific Squadron, 1866-9/ 
Commissioned as Paymaster, December 11, 1867; League Island, 1870-2; 
Alaska, European Squadron, 1873-6 ; R. S. St. Louis, 1877-8. 



PAYMASTER ROBERT W. ALLEN, 

Born at Northampton, Massachusetts, 1837. Appointed Acting Assistant Pay- 
master, January 20, 1864 ; ordered to steamer Albatross, West Gulf Squadron ; 
detached from Albatross, June 15, 1864, she going out of commission on that 
date at Portsmouth, New Hampshire ; reported to Rear-Admiral Dahlgren, 
at Port Royal, South Carolina, for duty, August 30, 1864, and was ordered by 
Admiral Dahlgren to assist Acting Assistant Paymaster H. K. Opp, at the Naval 
Station, Bay Point, who had charge of the accounts of tugs and other small vessels 
in the harbor and on the coast ; relieved Acting Assistant Paymaster Opp, by 
order of Admiral Dahlgren, October 11, 1864; removed stores, accounts, etc., 
from Bay Point to barque Houghton, in Port Royal harbor, by order of Admiral 
Dahlgren, October 17, 1864 ; ordered by Department to ship New Hampshire, in 
Port Royal harbor (the Houghton going North), relieving Acting Assistant Pay- 
master L. L. Brigham, and continuing all his other duties, May 31, 1865 ; ordered 
by Department to relieve Paymaster C. C. Upham, as in charge of general naval 
stores at Bay Point, in addition to other duties, October 12, 1865 ; New Hampshire 
sailed for Norfolk, May 23, 1866. Commissioned as Passed Assistant Paymaster 
in regular navy, July 23, 1866 ; detached from New Hampshire at Norfolk, Octo- 
ber 1, 1866 ; reported for duty on Swatara, at Navy Yard, Washington, February 
27, 1867. (Swatara sailed from Washington in early part of March, 1867, to 
join the European Squadron, in which she remained till April 23, 1869, when 
she sailed for Philadelphia ; thence to New York, where she was put out of com- 
mission on June 21, 1869.) Commissioned Paymaster, February 1, 1869 ; re- 
ported for duty at the Bureau of Provisions and Clothing, September 9, 1869 ; 
detached from Bureau and ordered to practice-ship Savannah, at Annapolis, April 
30, 1870. (Savannah sailed June 16, 1870, for Plymouth, England; thence to 
Madeira; thence home, arriving at Annapolis September 16 ; thence, after trans- 
ferring Midshipmen, to Norfolk, where she was put out of commission late in 
October, 1870.) Reported for duty on receiving-ship Potomac, at Philadelphia, 
December 31, 1870 ; detached from Potomac and ordered to receiving-ship Van- 
dalia, at Portsmouth, New Hampshire, October 1, 1871 ; in May, 1872, Vandalia 
was relieved as receiving-ship by Sabine ; detached from Sabine, December 31, 
1872, and ordered to take steamer leaving San Francisco March 1, 1873, and re- 
port for duty on the store-ship Idaho, at Yokohama, Japan ; reported for this duty, 
March 29, 1873 ; Idaho having been put out of commission to be sold, and the 



PAYMASTERS. 315 

stores of which he had charge sent to Nagasaki, where a store-house for the use 
of the navy in Asiatic Fleet had been leased for ten years from January 1, 1874, 
he was ordered there in charge, December 30, 1873 ; reported January 11, 1874 ; 
detached from charge of store-house at Nagasaki and ordered home by recommen- 
dation of medical survey, November 9, 1874 ; reported for duty on store-ship New 
Hampshire, at Norfolk, March 6, 1876. (New Hampshire left Norfolk, May 10, 
1876 ; arrived at Port Royal, May 13.) Detached from New Hampshire at Port 
Royal, South Carolina, January 11, 1878 ; reported for duty on U. S. ship Con- 
stitution, at Philadelphia, and is at the present time in that ship, on the European 
Station. 

PAYMASTER FRANK CLARKE, 

Born in Rhode Island. Appointed from Rhode Island, December 4, 1862 ; en- 
tered the service as Acting Assistant Paymaster ; attached to steamer Carrituck, 
Potomac Flotilla, 1862-5 ; bark L. C. Kuhn, Gulf Squadron, 1865-6. Appointed 
Passed Assistant Paymaster, July 23, 1866 ; steamer Paul Jones, Gulf Squadron, 
1867. Commissioned as Paymaster, June 5, 1868 ; steamer De Soto, North 
Atlantic Squadron, 1868 ; receiving-ship Baltimore, 1869 ; steam-sloop Alaska, 
Asiatic Fleet, 1869-72 ; receiving-ship at Boston, 1873-6. 



PAYMASTER ALBERT D. BACHE, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania, November 19, 1862; 
entered the service as Acting Assistant Paymaster ; attached to steamer Hendrick 
Hudson, East Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1862-4 ; steam-gunboat Tacony, 
Atlantic Squadron, 1865-6. Appointed Passed Assistant Paymaster, United 
States Navy, July 23, 1866 ; steam-sloop Iroquois, Asiatic Squadron, 1866-9. 
Commissioned as Paymaster, June 11, 1868 ; steam-sloop Iroquois, Asiatic Fleet, 
1870 ; member of Board of Examiners, 1870-1 ; receiving-ship Potomac, 1872 ; 
charge of stores at Ville France, 1874-7. 



PAYMASTER DOMINICK B. BATIONE, 

Born in Spain. Appointed from Nevada, March 15, 1865; entered the service 
as Acting Assistant Paymaster; Potomac Flotilla, 1865. Appointed Passed 
Assistant Paymaster, United States Navy, July 23, 1866 ; steamer Conemaugh, 
Atlantic Squadron, 1866-7 ; store-ship Purveyor, 1868-9. Commissioned as 
Paymaster, August 26, 1868; Benicia, Asiatic Fleet, 1871-4; receiving-ship 
Independence, 1874-7. 



PAYMASTER LEONARD A. FRAILEY, 

Born in District of Columbia. Appointed from District of Columbia, August 
20, 1864 ; entered the service as Acting Assistant Paymaster ; attached to steamer 
Quaker City, West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; steamer Nyack, Pacific 
Squadron, 1865-7. Commissioned ?i^ Passed Assistant Paymaster, United States 
Navy, July 23, 1866 ; special duty. Navy Yard, Washington, 1867-8 ; Naval 
Station, Mound City, Illinois, 1869-71. Commissioned as Paymaster, 1869 ; 
Mound City, Illinois, 1870; Wachusett, European Fleet, 1871^;- Bureau of 
Provisions, 1875; Navy Yard, Norfolk, 1875-8. 



316 PAYMASTERS. 

PAYMASTER GEORGE E. HENDEE, 

Born in Massachusetts. Appointed from Massachusetts ; entered the service as 
Paymaster's Clerk, October 11, 1861 ; attached to the store-ship Brandy wine, 
1861-2 ; attached to the steamer Pinola, 1863. Appointed Acting Assistant Pay- 
master, March 25, 1864 ; attached to steamer Don, North Atlantic Blockading 
Squadron, 1864-5. Commissioned as Passed Assistant Paymaster, United States 
Navy, July 23, 1866 ; steam-sloop Ossipee, North Pacific Squadi-on, 1866-9. 
Commissioned as Paymaster, 1869 ; receiving-ship Independence, Mare Island, 
1869-71 ; Pacific Station, in Pensacola, Richmond, and Saranac, 1872-5 ; Bureau 
of Provisions and Clothing, December, 1875 ; Navy Pay-OfEce, Norfolk, January to 
October, 1876 ; August 1, 1877, ordered to R. S. Independence, at Mare Island, 
where he is at present stationed. 



PAYMASTER MILTON B. CUSHlN'G, 

Born in Ohio. Appointed from New York, August 20, 1864 ; entered the ser- 
vice as Acting Assistant Paymaster ; attached to steam-gunboat Seneca, North 
Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; steam-gunboat Chicora, Gulf Squadron, 
1865-6. Appointed Passed Assistant Paymaster, U. S. Navy, July 23, 1866 ; 
steamer Suwanee, North Pacific Squadron, 1866-8. Commissioned as Paymaster, 
1869; Bureau of Provisions and Clothing, 1871; Constellation (gunnery-ship), 
1871-2 ; Dictator (iron-clad), N. A. Fleet, 1873-5. 



PAYMASTER W. W. WOODHULL, 

Born in New York. Appointed Acting Assistant Paymaster, May 13, 1863 ; 
steamer Delaware, N. A. Blockading Squadron, 1873-5. Commissioned as Passed 
Assistant Paymaster in regular service on July 23, 1866 ; Yantic, N. A. Squad- 
ron, 1866-8 ; Miantonomah (iron-clad), special cruise (Europe), 1869-70 ; Shenan- 
doah, E. S., 1871-2. Commissioned as Paymaster, February 10, 1870 ; Navy 
Yard, Boston, 1873-6 ; charge of stores, Nagasaki, Japan, 1876-8. 



PAYMASTER GEORGE R. WATKINS, 

Born in Maryland. Appointed Acting Assistant Paymaster, December 31, 1863 ; 
R. S. Alleghany, 1863-4. Commissioned as Passed Assistant Paymaster in 
regular service, July 23, 1866 ; Jamestown, Pacific Station, 1868-71. Com- 
missioned as Paymaster, February 10, 1870 ; R. S. New Hampshire, 1872-5 ; 
Omaha, S. P. Station, 1875-8. 



PAYMASTER DANFORTH P. WIGHT, 

Born in Massachusetts. Appointed Assistant Paymaster, January 20, 1864 ; 
barque Pursuit, E. Gulf Squadron, 1864-6 ; Huron, S. A. Squadron, 1867-8 ; 
S. S. Supply, European Fleet, 1869-70. Commissioned as Paymaster, February 
10, 1870 ; leave in Europe, 1871 ; Monongahela, S. A. Station, 1873-5 ; special 
duty. New York, 1875-6; R. S. Colorado, 1877; Constellation, special service 
in connection with Paris Exposition, 1878. 



PAYMASTERS. 317 

PAYMASTER HENRY T. WRIGHT, 

Born in New York. Appointed an Acting Assistant Paymaster, February 19, 
186-4; Mississippi Squadron, 1864-6. Commissioned as Passed Assistant Pay- 
master, July 23, 1866 ; N. A. Station, 1866-8 ; Nantasket, N. A. Fleet, 1869-72. 
Commissioned as Paymaster, March 10, 1870; Ossipee, N. A. Station, 1873-5; 
Benicia, N. P. Station, 1875-6 ; Lackawanna, P. S., 1875-7. ' 



PAYMASTER D. A. SMITH, 

Appointed Acting Assistant Paymaster, August 31, 1863; monitor Nahant, 
S. A. B. Squadron, September 23, 1863, to November 26, 1864; Naval Brigade, 
under Captain G. H. Preble, S. A. B. Squadron, November 27 to December 31, 
1864; Wyoming, Asiatic Station, February 16, 1865, to March 31, 1868. 
Commissioned Passed Assistant Paymaster, July 23, 1866; Pensacola Navy 
Yard, Florida, September 11, 1869, to November 16, 1872. Commissioned as 
Paymaster, July 21, 1870 ; store-ship Onward, South Pacific Station, December 
17, 1872, to July 1, 1874; flag-ship Worcester, N. A. Station, August 5, 1874, 
to June 15, 1875 ; S. Plymouth, N. A. Station, June 16, 1875, to August 30, 
1877 ; R. S. Franklin, Norfolk Navy Yard, September 1, 1877. 



PAYMASTER CHARLES A. McDANIEL, 

Born in Ohio. Appointed an Acting Assistant Paymaster, January 19, 1865. 
Commissioned as Passed Assistant Paymaster, July 23, 1866 ; Gettysburg, 
special service, 1867-70 ; Terror (iron-clad), N. A. Fleet, 1870-1. Commis- 
sioned as Paymaster, September 3, 1871 ; Iroquois, Asiatic Station, 1872-5 ; R. 
S. Potomac, 1875-6 ; training-ship Constitution, 1876-7. 



PAYMASTER FRANK H. ARMS, 

Born in Connecticut. Appointed an Acting Assistant Paymaster, April 14, 1864 ; 
steamer Memphis, E. Gulf Squadron, 1864-6. Commissioned as Passed Assistant 
Paymaster, July 23, 1866 ; N. A. Station, 1866-7 ; Tuscarora, N. A. Fleet, 
1868-71 ; Terror (iron-clad), N. A. S., 1871-2. Commissioned as Paymaster, 
October 14, 1871 ; League Island Station, 1873-5 ; special duty. Centennial, 1876. 



PAYMASTER JOHN FUREY, 

Born in New York. Appointed an Acting Assistant Paymaster, October 6, 
1863 ; Monticello, N. A. S., 1864-6. Commissioned as Passed Assistant Pay- 
master, July 23, 1866 ; Quinnebaug, S. A. Station, 1867-70 ; Naval Academy, 
1871-4. Commissioned as Paymaster, October 24, 1871 ; Monongahela, S. A. 
Station, 1874-6 ; special duty. New York, 1876-7. 



PAYMASTER GEORGE H. GRIPPING, 

Born in Connecticut. Appointed an Acting Assistant Paymaster, November 18, 
1864 ; Hibiscus, East Gulf Squadron, 1864-6. Commissioned as Passed As- 



318 PAYMASTERS. 

sistant Paymaster, July 23, 1866 ; Frolic, European Station, 1867-9 ; Narra- 
gansett, Pacific Fleet, 1870-2 ; R. S. Sabine, 187-1-6. Commissioned as 
Paymaster, October 3, 1874. Enterprise, N. A. S., 1877-8. 



PAYMASTER ALBERT W. BACON, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed an Acting Assistant Paymaster, November 7, 
1863 ; steamer Galatea, West India Squadron, 1863-5. Commissioned as Passed 
Assistant Paymaster, August 1, 1866 ; Portsmouth, S. A. Station, 1869-72 ; 
Bureau of Provisions, 1872 ; charge of stores at Rio de Janeiro, 1873-6. Com- 
missioned as Paymaster, October 25, 1874; Bureau of Provisions, 1876-8. 



PAYMASTER RUFUS S. McCONNELL, 

Born in Ohio. Appointed an Acting Assistant Paymaster, December 27, 1864 ; 
Nipsic, Brazil Squadron, 1865-7. Commissioned as Passed Assistant Paymaster, 
November 27, 1866 ; Ashuelot, Asiatic Fleet, 1869-72 ; receiving-ship at Ports- 
mouth, 1873 ; Naval Station, New Orleans, 1874 ; Ossipee, N. A. S., 1875-7. 
Commissioned as Paymaster, January 15, 1875. 



PAYMASTER EMANUEL MELLACK, 

Born in Austria. Appointed an Acting Assistant Paymaster, December 18, 1861 ; 
served in blockading squadron during the war. Commissioned as Passed Assist- 
ant Paymaster, July 23, 1866 ; charge of stores at Key West, 1874-6. Commis- 
sioned as Paymaster, March 4, 1875. 



PAYMASTER CHARLES D. MANSFIELD, 

Born in Ohio. Appointed an Acting Assistant Paymaster, July 27, 1864; 
Aroostook (fourth-rate), W. Gulf Squadron, 1864-6. Commissioned as Passed 
Assistant Paymaster, Becemher 23, 1864; Mohongo, N. P. Station, 1867-70; 
Monocacy, Asiatic Station, 1870-3. Commissioned as Paymaster, September 25, 
1875 ; Swatara, N. A. Station, 1877-8. 



PAYMASTER HENRY T. SKELDING, 

Born in New York. Appointed an Acting Assistant Paymaster, December 31, 
1862 ; steamer Petrel, Mississippi Squadron, 1863-6. Commissioned as Passed 
Assistant Paymaster, March 5, 1867 ; Asiatic Squadron, 1868-9 ; Swatara, special 
cruise, 1869-72 ; S. S. Guard, 1873-4 ; Naval Store-keeper, Nagasaki, Japan, 
1875-6. Commissioned as Paymaster, August 19, 1876 ; R. S. Wyoming, 1877. 



PAYMASTER CHARLES W. SLAMM, 

Born in New York. Appointed an Acting Assistant Paymaster, November 4, 
1862 ; Mississippi Squadron, 1862-5. Commissioned as Passed Assistant Pay- 



PAYMASTERS. 319 

master, March 22, 1867 ; Bureau of Provisions, 1869 ; S. S. Frolic, 1869-70 ; 
Canandaigua, N. A. S., 1872; leave in Europe, 1873-4; Ashuelot, Asiatic 
Station, 1875-8. Commissioned as Paymaster, 1877. 



PAYMASTER JOSEPH FOSTER, 

Born in Massachusetts. Appointed from New Hampshire ; entered the service 
as Captain's Clerk, October 3, 1862 ; attached to the steamer Augusta, Com- 
mander E. G-. Parrott, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862-3 ; was present 
at the attack of the rebel iron-clads on the blockading squadron at Charleston, 
South Carolina, January 31, 1863, and at Admiral Du Pout's first attack on 
Charleston, April 7, 1863. Appointed Acting Assistant Paymaster, October 19, 
1863 ; attached to the steamer Acacia, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 
1863-5 ; most of the time off Charleston, South Carolina ; steamer Commodore 
McDonough, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1865 ; steamer Tallapoosa, 
Gulf Squadron, 1865-6 ; while attached to the steamer Commodore McDonough 
he saved his ofiicial books and papers from the wreck of that vessel, which foun- 
dered at sea, August 23, 1865, on the passage from Port Royal, South Carolina, 
to New York, nothing else being saved from the ship ; transferred to the regular 
navy and commissioned as Assistant Paymaster, July 23, 1866. Promoted to 
Passed Assistant Paymaster, May 10, 1867 ; attached to the steamer Aroostook, 
Asiatic Station, 1866-9 ; steamer Shawmut, North Atlantic Station, 1871-5 ; Tor- 
pedo Station, Newport, Rhode Island, 1876-8. Commissioned as Paymaster, 
February 23, 1877. 

PAYMASTER EDWARD N. WHITEHOUSE, 

Born in New York. Appointed an Acting Assistant Paymaster, December 4, 
1862 ; Choctaw (iron-clad), Mississippi Squadron, 1862-4 ; steamer James Adger, 
S. A. Blockading Squadron, 1865-6. Commissioned as Assistant Paymaster in 
1866, and promoted to Passed Assistant Paymaster, September 6, 1867 ; Dale 
(fourth-rate), N. A. Station, 1867-8 ; Sabine, special cruise, 1869-70 ; Ports- 
mouth (training-ship). Mare Island, 1872-5 ; S. S. Supply, 1875-6 ; Monocacy, 
Asiatic Station, 1876-8. Commissioned as Paymaster, 1877. 



PAYMASTER JOHN MACMAHON, 

Born in Massachusetts. Appointed an Acting Assistant Paymaster, November 
11, 1864. Commissioned as Assistant Paymaster, July 23, 1866, and promoted 
to Passed Assistant Paymaster, December 10, 1867; Resaca (iron-clad). Pacific 
Fleet, 1869-72; Pensacola (iron-clad), 1873-4; Navy Yard, Pensacola, 1875-8. 
Commissioned as Paymaster, 1877. 



PAYMASTER THEO. S. THOMPSON, 

Enterep, October 9, 1863, as Acting Assistant Paymaster ; same month, attached 
to steamer Rachel Seaman, supply -vessel, doing duty in all the blockading squad- 
rons ; detached, June, 1865 ; discharged, August, 1875. Commissioned as Assist- 
ant Paymaster, July 23, 1866 ; attached to steamer Toboma, West Indies and 
Gulf Squadron, August, 1866 ; detached duty, August, 1867. Promoted to 



320 PASSED ASSISTANT PAYMASTERS. 

Passed Assistant Paymaster., February 1, 1868 ; waiting orders till he joined the 
Narragansett, at New York, January 15, 1869 ; served on her in the West Indies ; 
vessel put out of commission, and he was detached in December, 1869 ; relieved 
Paymaster Mead, in charge of stores, April 8, 1870, at Key West, Florida, re- 
maining on that duty until May, 1871, when he exchanged duties with Paymaster 
Gerrard, of the Coast Survey steamer Bibb ; detached from Bibb, June 25, 1872; 
waited orders till January 15, 1873, when he was ordered to the steamer Juniata, 
doing duty on the Polaris Search Expedition, then at Santiago de Cuba, bringing 
home the Virginius' prisoners ; participated in naval drill at Key West, and sailed 
thence, April 8, 1874, to join European Station ; returned to the United States, 
and placed on special duty at Baltimore, February 6, 1876, officers and crew being 
transferred to the Monongahela, September 1, 1876 ; detached, after nearly four 
years' sea service, December 28, 1877 ; waited orders until he joined his present 
station, the steamer New Hampshire, Port Royal, South Carolina, January 1, 
1878. 

PAYMASTER WM. J. THOMSON, 

Born in District of Columbia. Appointed an Acting Assistant Paymaster., March 
29, 1865. Commissioned as Assistant Paymaster, July 23, 1866 ; Unadilla, 
Asiatic Squadron, 1867-9. Promoted to Passed Assistant Paymaster, March 
20, 1868 ; S. S. Pawnee, 1870-1 ; Navy Yard, Pensacola, 1871-4 ; Bureau of 
Provisions, 1875 ; Kearsarge, Asiatic Station, 1876-8. Commissioned as Pay- 
master, March, 1878. 

PASSED ASSISTANT PAYMASTERS. 

With Relative Rank of Lieutenant. 



PASSED ASSISTANT PAYMASTER HENRY G. COLBY, 

Born in Vermont. Appointed Acting Assistant Paymaster, June 22, 1863; 
barque Gem of the Seas, East Gulf Squadron, 1864-6. Commissioned as 
Assistant Paymaster, July 23, 1866 ; Don, N. A. Station, 1866-9. Promoted to 
Passed Assistant Paymaster, August 9, 1868 ; Cyane, Pacific Fleet, 1869-71 ; 
receiving-ship Independence, 1871-4 ; Navy Yard, Mare Island, 1874-5 ; Ports- 
mouth (training-ship), 1875-6. 



PASSED ASSISTANT PAYMASTER JOHN R. CARMODY, 

Born in New York. Appointed Acting Assistant Paymaster, August 27, 1864 : 
Mississippi Squadron, 1864-6. Commissioned as Assistant Paymaster, July 23 
1866 ; Yautic, N. A. Fleet, 1868-70. Promoted to Passed Assistant Paymaster 
June 5, 1868 ; Naval Station, New London, 1871-2 ; Naval Station, New Orleans, 
1873; Monocacy, Asiatic Station, 1875-7 ; charge of stores at Honolulu, 1877-8, 



PASSED ASSISTANT PAYMASTER J. BAYARD REDFIELD, 

Born in New York. Appointed Acting Assistant Paymaster, January 16, 1865. 
Commissioned as Assistant Paymaster, February 27, 1867 ; practice-ship Dale, 



PASSED ASSISTANT PAYMASTERS. 321 

1867 ; Mohican, Pacific Fleet, 1868-72. Promoted to Passed Assistant Farj- 
master, June 11, 1868; Monocacy, Asiatic Fleet, 1872-5 ; Coast Survey steamer 
Hassler, 1876-8. 

PASSED ASSISTANT PAYMASTER JOHN F. TARBELL, 

Born in ]\Iassachusetts. Appointed Acting Assistant Paymaster^ January 28, 1862 ; 
steamer Neptune, West India Squadron, 1862-5. Commissioned as Assistant 
Paymaster, February 7, 1867 ; Marblehead, N. A. Station, 1867-9. Promoted 
to Passed Assistant Paymaster, September 16, 1868 ; Wasp, S. A. Station, 1869- 
72 J Torpedo Station, 1874-6; Gettysburg, special service, 1876-8. 



PASSED ASSISTANT PAYMASTER I. GOODWIN HOBBS, 

Born in Maine. Appointed Acting Assistant Paymaster, August 31, 1864 ; 
Unadilla, N. A. Station, 1864-5. Commissioned as Assistant Paymaster, February 
27, 1867 ; Ascutney, special service, 1867-8 ; and Tallapoosa, special service, 
1868-70. Promoted to Passed Assista7d Paymaster, September 16, 1868 ; Bu- 
reau of Provisions, 1872 ; Tuscarora, Pacific Fleet, 1872-5 ; Despatch, European 
Station, 1875-8. 

PASSED ASSISTANT PAYMASTER J. PORTER LOOMIS, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed Acting Assistant Paymaster, October 27, 
1863 ; steamer Wyandank, Potomac Flotilla, 1863-5. Commissioned as Assistant 
Paymaster, February 27, 1867 ; Navy Yard, Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 1867-8. 
Promoted to Passed Assistant Paymaster, September 16, 1868 ; Nipsic, N. A. 
Fleet, 1868-70; Naval Station, New London, Connecticut, 1872-6; Vandalia, 
European Station, 1876-S. 



PASSED ASSISTANT PAYMASTER H. T. B. HARRIS, 

Born in Connecticut. Appointed Acting Assistant Paymaster, November 1, 1864. 
Commissioned as Assistant Paymaster, February 27, 1867 ; Nyack, South Pacific 
Station, 1867-9. Promoted to Passed Assistant Paymaster, February 17, 1869 ; 
S. S. Frolic, 1873 ; charge of stores, Honolulu, 1875-7. 



PASSED ASSISTANT PAYMASTER HENRY C. MACHETTE, 

Born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, October 27, 1842. Entered the service. May, 
1861 ; steamer Flag, 1861-2 ; steamer General Buckingham, North Atlantic Squad- 
ron, 1863-4, as Paymaster s Cleric. Appointed, April 16, 1864, Acting Assistant 
Paymaster ; steamer Undine, Mississippi Squadron, 1864 ; upon the destruction and 
capture of the latter vessel, succeeded in effecting an escape and saving the public 
funds, the attention of the Department being called to the circumstance by Rear- 
Admiral Lee; commissioned in the regular service in 1867 ; steamer Wasp, Rio 
de la Platte, 1867-70. Commissioned as Passed Assistant Paymaster, February 
26, 1869 ; iron-clad duty. New Orleans, 1871-2; iron-clad Terror, 1873, North At- 
lantic Station ; steam-sloop Canandaigua, 1873-4, West Indies ; iron-clad Canon i- 
cus, N. A. Station, 1875-6 ; in charge of stores. Key West Naval Depot, 1877-8. 

21 



322 PASSED ASSISTANT PAYMASTERS. 

PASSED ASSISTANT PAYMASTER GEOHaE H. READ, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed Acting Assistant Paymaster, ^January 14, 1865. 
Commissioned as Assistant Paymaster, February 27, 1867 ; Nipsic (fourth-rate), 
1867 ; Saginaw, Pacific Fleet, 1868-71. Promoted to Passed Assistant Pay- 
master, March 12, 1869; Torpedo Station. 1871-4; Intrepid (torpedo-boat), 
1874-5 ; Swatara, N. A. Station, 1875-7 ; Bureau of Provisions, 1877. 



PASSED ASSISTANT PAYMASTER H. TRUMBULL STANCLIFF, 

Born in Connecticut. Appointed Acting Assistant Paymaster, January 20, 
1865. Commissioned as Assistant Paymaster, February 27, 1867 ; St. Mary's, 
Pacific Fleet, 1868-71. Promoted to Passed Assistant Paymaster, May 19, 
1869; leave of absence, 1874; Tuscarora, Pacific Fleet, 1875-7; special duty, 
New York, 1877-8. 

PASSED ASSISTANT PAYMASTER FREDERICK C. ALLEY, 

Born in Massachusetts. Appointed Acting Assista7it Paymaster, September 20, 
1863; steam-gunboat Genesee, West Gulf Squadron, 1863-5. Commissioned as 
Assistant Paymaster, February 27, 1867; Maumee, Asiatic Station, 1867-70." 
Promoted to Passed Assistant Paymaster, January 25, 1870 ; Naval Store-keeper, 
Key West, 1872 ; leave in Europe, 1873-4; Dictator (iron-clad), N. A. Station, 
1875-6. 

PASSED ASSISTANT PAYMASTER JONATHAN Q. BARTON, 

Born in Maine. Appointed Acting Assistant Paymaster, January 30, 1864; 
S. S. Relief, East Indies, 1864-6. Commissioned as Assista7it Paymaster, Feb- 
ruary 27, 1867 ; Saco, N. A. Station, 1867-8 ; Nipsic, Darien Expedition, 1870 
-2. Promoted to Passed Assistant Paymaster, February 10, 1870 ; leave of ab- 
sence, 1874-7. 

PASSED ASSISTANT PAYMASTER S. DENISON HURLBURT, 

Born in Connecticut. Appointed Acting Assistant Paymaster, April 6, 1865. 
Commissioned as Assistant Paymaster, February 27, 1867 ; Naval Store-keeper, 
Spezzia, Italy, 1869-71. Promoted to Passed Assistant Paymaster, February 
12, 1870; Sago, Asiatic Fleet, 1871-2; R. S. Relief, 1874; Kansas, N. A. 
Station, 1874-6 ; Essex, S. A. Station, 1876-8. 



PASSED ASSISTANT PAYMASTER ROBERT P. PAULDING, 

Born in New York. Appointed Assistant Paymaster, July 31, 1869 ; Palos, 
Asiatic Fleet. 1870-3. Promoted to Passed Assistant Paymaster, July 31, 1873 ; 
Canonicus (iron-clad), N. A. Station, 1873-4 ; Canandaigua, N. A. Station, 1874 
-5 ; Huron, N. A. Station, 1875-6 ; Adams, N. A. Station, 1876-8. 



PASSED ASSISTANT PAYMASTERS. 323 

PASSED ASSISTANT PAYMASTER STEPHEN RAND, Jr., 

Born in Vermont. Appointed Assistant Paymaster, August 12, 1869 ; Pay 
Department, Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 1869-70; Mayflower, N. A. Station, 
1870-1 ; Kearsarge, Asiatic Station, 1873-6. Promoted to Passed Assistant Pay- 
master, July 31, 1873 ; Canouicus (iron-clad), N. A. Station, 1876-7. 



PASSED ASSISTANT PAYMASTER JOHN BREESE, 

Born in Massachusetts. Appointed Assistant Pay??z.as<er, September 1, 1869; 
Pay Department, Boston, Massachusetts, 1869-71 ; Saco, Asiatic Station, 1872-6. 
Promoted to Passed Assistant Paymaster, April 30, 1874. 



PASSED ASSISTANT PAYMASTER LAURENCE G. BOGGS, 

Born in District of Columbia. Appointed Assistant Paymaster, September 24, 
1869 ; temporary duty. Navy Department, 1869-70 ; Tallapoosa, special service, 
1870-2 ; Despatch, special service, 1872-5. Promoted to Passed Assistant Pay- 
master, October 25, 1874 ; Marion, European Station, 1875-8. 



PASSED ASSISTANT PAYMASTER S. R. CALHOUN, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed Assistant Paymaster, September 28, 1869 ;. 
Recorder to Board of Paymasters, 1869-71 ; Canonicus (iron-clad), N. A. Station, 
1871-2 ; Assistant to Paymaster at Ville France, 1873-6. Promoted to Passed 
Assistant Paymaster, January 15, 1875 ; leave in Europe, 1877. 



PASSED ASSISTANT PAYMASTER JOSEPH T. ADDICKS, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed Assistant Paymaster, October 23, 1869 ; 
Navy Yard, Philadelphia, 1870-1 ; Mahopac (iron-clad), N. A. Station, 1871-2 ; 
Asiatic Station, 1872-5. Promoted to Passed Assistant Paymaster, October 23, 
1875; Lehigh (iron-clad), N. A. Station, 1875-6; Saratoga (training-ship), 

1877-8. 



PASSED ASSISTANT PAYMASTER LOUIS A. YORKE, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed Assistant Paymaster, October 23, 1869 ; 
Navy Yard, Norfolk, 1870-1 ; Yantic, Asiatic Station, 1872-5. Promoted to 
Passed Assistant Paymaster, May 13, 1875; iron-clads at Pensacola, 1875-6; 
Navy Yard, Pensacola, 1878. 



PASSED ASSISTANT PAYMASTER WM. M. PRESTON, 

Born in Indiana. Appointed Assistant Paymaster, November 4, 1869 ; ordered 
to duty at the Navy Yard, Washington, District of Columbia, November 22, 1869 ; 
on the 29t]i of April, 1870, detached from the Navy Yard and ordered to the 



324 PASSED ASSISTANT PAYMASTERS. 

Bureau of Provisions and Clothing at Washington ; reported for duty on board 
the U. S. S. Nantasket (third-rate), at Portsmouth, New Hampshire, July 10, 
1872 ; on account of the unseaworthiness of the Nantasket she was put out of 
commission three weeks after his reporting, and he was ordered to the Yantic 
(third-rate), August 10, 1872, at Norfolk, Virginia, fitting out for a cruise in the 
East Indies ; but was detached from her, August 12, 1872, and placed on waiting 
orders ; reported for duty in the Bureau of Provisions and Clothing, Washington, 
September 23, 1872 ; ordered to and reported on board the U. S. S. Wasp (fourth- 
rate), at Montevideo, Uruguay, South Atlantic Station, May 29, 1873 ; detached 
from the Wasp, January 5, 1875, and ordered home. Promoted to Passed As- 
sistant Paymaster, July 1, 1875 ; ordered to duty on board the monitor Canonicus 
(fourth-rate), at New Orleans, Louisiana, July 1, 1877, where he remained until 
December 4, 1877, when he was detached and placed on waiting orders. 



PASSED ASSISTANT PAYMASTER CHARLES H. BARTLETT, 

Born in Massachusetts. Appointed Assistant Paymaster, December 4, 1869 ; 
Assistant to Inspector, Boston, 1870-2 ; S. S. Pawnee, N. A. Station, 1872-5. 
Promoted to Passed Assistant Paymaster, September 25, 1875 ; Montauk (iron- 
clad), N. A. Station, 1875-6 ; Alliance, European Station, 1876-8. 



PASSED ASSISTANT PAYMASTER CURTIS H. THOMSON, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed Assistant Paymaster, December 21, 1869 ; 
Naval Academy, 1870-1 ; Constellation (gunnery-ship), 1871-2 ; Palos, Asiatic 
Station, 1872-5 ; Gettysburg, special service in Europe, 1875-6. Promoted to 
Passed Assistant Paymaster, August 19, 1876 ; training-ship Monongahela, 

1876-8. 

PASSED ASSISTANT PAYMASTER JOHN C. BURNET, 

Born in Ohio. Appointed Assistant Paymaster, December 21, 1869 ; Bureau 
of Provisions, etc., 1869-70; California, Pacific Fleet, 1870-3; Colorado, N. A. 
Station, 1874 ; Franklin, European Station, 1874-6. Promoted to Passed Assist- 
ant Paymaster, August 28, 1876 ; Supply (training-ship), 1877. 



PASSED ASSISTANT PAYMASTER JAMES A. RING, 

Born in Massachusetts. Appointed Assistant Paymaster, June 24, 1870; re- 
ceiving-ship Boston, 1870-2 ; store-ship Onward, Callao, 1874 ; Wyandotte (iron- 
clad), N. A. Station, 1875-6. Promoted to Passed Assistant Paymaster in 1877. 



PASSED ASSISTANT PAYMASTER W. W. BARRY, 

Born in Massachusetts. Appointed ^ssts^a/if Paymas^e/-, March 15, 1870 ; Navy 
Yard, New York, 1870-2 ; Mayflower, N. A. Station, 1874 ; Alert, N. A. Station, 
1875; store-ship Onward, Callao, 1875-8. Promoted to Passed Assistant Pay- 
master in 1877- 



PAYMASTER-GENERALS ON RETIRED LIST. 325 



PAY OFFICERS ON RETIRED LIST. 

Retired after Forty-Jive Years Service^ or on attaining the Age of Sixty-tico Years, 
in Conformity loith Section 1 of the Act of December 21, 1861, and Act of 
March 3, 1871. 

PAYMASTER-GENERALS. 

With Relative Rank of Commodore. 



PAYMASTER-GENERAL EDWARD T. DUNN, 

Born in District of Columbia. Appointed from District of Columbia, February 
21, 1831; attached to sloop John Adams, Mediterranean Squadron, 1833-4; 
schooner Boxer, Pacific Squadron, 1835 ; sloop Vincennes, Pacific Squadron, 
1836 ; frigate Macedonian, West India Squadron, 1837-40 ; receiving-ship Nor- 
folk, 1845; frigate Columbus, East India Squadron, 1846, and in the Pacific 
Squadron during the Mexican War; Navy Yard, New York, 1850-1; frigate 
Columbia, Home Squadron, 1852-5 ; Navy Yard, Norfork, 1857-60 ; sloop St. 
Mary's, Pacific Squadron, 1861-3 ; Fleet-Paymaster, West Gulf Blockading 
Squadron, 1863-5 ; Paymaster at Baltimore, 1866-9 ; Chief of Bureau of Pro- 
visions and Clothing, 1870-3. Commissioned as Paymaster- General in 1871 ; 
placed on retired list in January, 1873; detached from the Bureau in February, 
1873, and ordered on special duty to Naval Station, New Orleans, and Navy Yards 
at Pensacola and Mare Island ; returned to Washington in August, 1873, and re- 
ported his return to the Department. 



PAYMASTER-GENERAL HORATIO BRIDGE, 

Born in 1806 in Augusta, Maine. Graduated at Bowdoin College, Maine, in 
1825 ; practiced law from 1828 to 1838, when he entered the navy as Paymaster ; 
made a cruise in the Cyane from 1838 to 1841 ; another cruise in the Saratoga 
upon the coast of Africa in 1843-4, some sketches of which were published in 
1845. under the title of " Journal of an African Cruiser," edited by his friend and 
classmate, Nathaniel Hawthorne ; in 1846 he sailed on a cruise on the coast of 
Africa and in the Mediterranean as Paymaster of the flag-ship United States, Com- 
modore George Read being the flag-officer; from 1849 to 1851 he was stationed 
at the Portsmouth Navy Yard, and late in the year last mentioned sailed for the 
Pacific in the sloop Portsmouth ; in 1854 he was ordered home to fill the position of 
Chief of the Bureau of Provisions and Clothing, the duties of which he performed 
for nearly fifteen years, comprising the whole period of the war ; in July, 1869, 
he resigned the position of Chief of Bureau, and was assigned to duty as Chief 
Inspector of Provisions and Clothing; which service he performed until 1873. 



PAYMASTER-GENERAL JOHN 0. BRADFORD, 

Born in Delaware. Appointed from Pennsylvania, March 14, 1845 ; attached 
to sloop Saratoga, 1845-6 ; sloop Germantown, Home Squadron, 1846-8 ; sloop 



326 PAY-DIRECTORS ON RETIRED LIST. 

Portsmouth, coast of Africa, 1849-51 ; Navy Yard, Boston, 1854-5 ; steam- 
frisrate San Jacinto, East India Squadron, 1855-8; receiving-ship, Boston, 
1860-1 ; Navy Yard, Boston, 1862 ; West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1863 ; 
Fleet-Paymaster, South Atlantic Blockading S(|uadron, 1863-4; Inspector of 
Provisions, etc., New York, 1865-7 ; Fleet-Paymaster, European Squadron, 
1867-9 ; Paymaster at New York, 1869-72 ; Chief of Bureau of Provisions, 
1873-7, when he was retired. 



PAY-DIRECTOR. 

With Relative Rank of Commodore. 



PAY-DIRECTOR ROBERT PETTIT, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania, April 6, 1837 ; sloop 
Falmouth, Pacific. Squadron, 1839-42; Naval Asylum, Philadelphia, 1842-3; 
at sea, 1843-4 ; Naval Asylum, Philadelphia, 1845-6 ; at sea, 1847-9 ; receiv- 
ing-ship. New York, 1850-2 ; frigate Cumberland, Mediterranean Squadron, 
1852-5 ; steam-frigate Minnesota, East India Squadron, 1857-60 ; steam-frigate 
Minnesota, Atlantic coast, 1861-2; special duty, Philadelphia, 1863-4; special 
duty, 1865-6 ; President Board of Examiners, Philadelphia, 1867 ; special duty, 
Philadelphia, 1867-9 ; Paymaster, Philadelphia, 1870-3. 



PAY-DIRECTORS. 

With Relative Rank of Captain. 



PAY-DIRECTOR HORACE M. HIESKELL, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania, September 13, 1841 ; 
attached to brig Somers, special service, 1842-4 ; sloop Falmouth, Home Squad- 
ron, 1844-6; sloop Jamestown, coast of Africa, 1847-50; Navy Yard, Ports- 
mouth, New Hampshire, 1851-4; frigate Potomac, Home Squadron, 1854-6; 
sloop Germantown, East India Squadron, 1857-60 ; frigate Constitution, school- 
ship, Naval Academy, 1861 ; Naval Academy, 1862-4 ; Fleet-Paymaster, North 
Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; Inspector of Provisions, Philadelphia, 
1867-8 ; Paymaster at Philadelphia, 1868-9. 



PAY-DIRECTOR J. GEORGE HARRIS, 

Born in Connecticut. Appointed from Tennessee, August 19, 1845 ; Navy 
Yard, Memphis, 1845-6; attached to sloop Albany, in the Gulf of Mexico, at 
the capture of Vera Cruz, Tuspan, Tobasco, etc., in the Mexican War, 1846-7 ; 
was a member of the staff of Commodore M. C. Perry in his shore expeditions 
at Vera Cruz, Tobasco, and Tuspan, during the Mexican War, and received from 
him a special letter of thanks for services rendered in that capacity ; sloop De- 
catur, suppressing the slave-trade on the western coast of Africa, 1848-9 ; sloop 
Saratoga, of the East India and China Squadron and of Perry's Expedition, which 



PAYMASTERS OX RETIRED LIST. 327 

opened Japan to the commerce of the world, 1850-4; in Commodore Perry's 
introductory report of the Japan Expedition he makes special mention of the aid 
he received from the journals of Bayard Taylor and of Purser Harris in prepar- 
ing his volumes for the use of Congress ; Navy Yard, New York, 1855-7 ; steam- 
frigate Wabash, flag-ship of the Mediterranean Squadron, 1858-9 ; steamer 
Michigan, on the lakes, 18G1 ; frigate Sabine, of the North and South Atlantic 
Blockading Squadrons, 1861-3; special duty at New York, 186-1: ; Fleet-Pay- 
master of the East Gulf Blockading Squadron, attached to flag-ships San Jacinto 
and Powhatan, 1864-5 ; Navy Yard, Boston, 1865-8 ; Inspector of Provisions 
and Clothing, Boston, 1869 ; Navy Yard, Portsmouth, New Hampshire, as In- 
spector of Provisions and Clothing, 1870-1. 



PAY-DIRECTOR CALVIN C. JACKSON, 

Born in New York. Appointed from Michigan, July 17, 1857; attached to 
sloop Vandalia, Pacific Squadron, 1857-8; steamer Memphis, Brazil Squadron, 
and Paraguay Expedition, 1858-9 ; steam-sloop Dacotah, East India Squadron, 
1859-61 ; steamer Michigan, on the lakes, 1862-3 ; special duty, Mississippi 
Squadron, 1864-5 ; Paymaster at Washington, 1866-8 ; Naval Academy, 1869-72 ; 
Pay-Office at Baltimore, 1872-5 ; retired, 1876. 



PAYMASTERS. 

With Relative Rank of Lieutenant- Commander. 



PAYMASTER GEORGE A. SAWYER, 

Born in Vermont. Appointed from Vermont ; entered the service as Assistant 
Paymaster^ August, 1861 ; ordered to join sloop-of-war Marion, blockading in the 
Gulf of Mexico, — served in- her till she was put out of commission, in July, 1862 ; 
attached to the Potomac Flotilla until October, 1862, when ordered to the double- 
ender Port Royal, and sailed again for the West Gulf Squadron ; blockaded the 
rebel steamer Chattahoochee, in the Appalachicola River, for a year and a day, at 
the end of which period the Chattahoochee exploded her boilers while looking for 
a boat expedition from the Port Royal, and was totally destroyed ; the Port Royal 
was off Mobile during the winter of 1863-4, and participated in Admiral Farra- 
gut's attack on Fort Powell, Mobile Bay. 



PAYMASTER ALEXANDER McC. BISHOP, 

Born in New Jersey. Appointed from New Jersey, March 19, 1862 ; entered 
the service as Assistant Paymaster ; attached to steamer Wyandotte, East Gulf and 
N. A. Blockading Squadrons, 1862-3 ; steamer Mendota, North Atlantic Block- 
ading Squadron, 1864 ; attached to iron-clad steamer Tonawanda (now Araphi- 
trite), 1865. Promoted to Paymaster^ November 22, 1865 ; in charge of stores, 
Bay Point, South Carolina, 1866 ; store-ship Cyane, at Panama, 1868 ; retired on 
account of ill health, disease contracted in hne of duty, 1870. 



328 CHIEF ENGINEERS. 

ENGINEER-IN-CHIEF. 

With Relative Rank of Commodore. 



CHIEF ENGINEER WILLIAM H. SHOCK. 

[Chief of Bureau, with Eelative Rank of Commodore. "[ 

Born in Maryland. Appointed from Maryland, January 18, 1845; entered the 
naval service as Third Assistant Engineer, during the Mexican "War, served on 
board the steamers General Taylor, Princeton, Spitfire, and the frigate Mississippi, 
in which vessels, at different periods, he participated in the capture of Tampico, 
under Commodore Connor, and Alvarado, Tuspan, Tlacotalpan, and Vera Cruz, 
under Commodore Perry. Promoted to Second Assistant Engineer , July 10, 1847 ; 
ordered to the steamer Engineer, Home Squadron. Promoted to First Assistant 
Engineer, October 31, 1848; 1849, was ^nior-Engineer steamer Legare, Coast 
Survey; 1850-1, special duty at Philadelphia, superintending construction of 
machinery of steam-frigate Susquehanna. Promoted to C/iief Engineer, M&rch, 
1851 ; 1851-2, special duty, Boston, Massachusetts, suf>erintending construc- 
tion of machinery of steamer Princeton; 1853-4, Inspecting Engineer of ocean 
steamers for United States mail service, and Chief Engineer of steamer Princeton, 
Home Squadron ; 1854-5, West Point, superintending construction of machinery 
for United States steam-frigate Merrimac ; 1855-6, chief engineer steam-frigate 
Merrimac, Home Squadron ; 1857-60, Chief Engineer steam-frigate Powhatan, 
East India Squadron; 1860-2, President of Examining Board of Engineers; 
1862-3, special duty at St. Louis, superintending construction of river monitors ; 
1863-5, Fleet-Engineer, West Gulf Squadron, participating in the capture of 
Forts Gaines and Morgan, under Admiral Farragut, and the Spanish Fort and city 
of Mobile, under Admiral Thatcher; 1865—6, Chief Engineer of Boston Navy 
Yard; 1867-8, Chief Engineer of Washington Navy Yard; 1868-9, Fleet- 
Engineer of European Squadron ; 1869-70, Inspector of Machinery Afloat, and 
member of Board of Visitors to Naval Academy at Annapolis, Maryland ; in the 
summer of 1870 was appointed Acting Chief of Bureau of Steam Engineering, 
retiring from the office with the written thanks of the Department for the efficient 
manner in which the duties of the Bureau were discharged; in 1871 was again 
called to take temporary charge of the Bureau of Steam Engineering, and on 
retiring from the position was actively employed on other duty in the United 
States until 1873, when he was ordered to Europe on a tour of inspection of 
jtiblic and private dock-yards, and to represent the Bureau of Steam Engineering 
at the International Exhibition at Vienna, and by direction of the President was 
appointed one of the American Judges of Awards ; returning from Europe, was 
detailed to other duty until March 3, 1877, when he was appointed and confirmed 
Engineer-in- Chief of the United States Navy. 



CHIEF ENGINEERS. 

With Relative Rank of Captain. 



CHIEF ENGINEER WILLIAM W. W. WOOD, 

Born in North Carolina. Appointed from New York, March 15, 1845 ; entered 
the service with the rank of Chief Engineer ; stationed at Navy Yard, Pensacola, 



CHIEF ENGINEERS. 329 

1845-7 ; special duty, Boston, 1849 ; steam-frigate Saranac, Home Squadron, 
1850-3 ; superintending construction of engines of steam-frigate Merrimac, Cold 
Spring, New York, 1854-7 ; special duty, Philadelphia, 1858-9 ; steam-sloop 
Lancaster, Pacific Squadron, 1859-61 ; special duty, Philadelphia, 1862 ; special 
duty. New York, 1863; special duty, Boston, 1864; special duty, New York, 
1865 ; Naval Academy, 1866-7 ; Navy Yard, New York, 1868-9 ; Inspector of 
IMachinery Afloat, New York, 1870-2 ; Engineer-in-Chief of the Navy, 1872-7 ; 
special duty, 1877-8. 

CHIEF ENGINEER BENJAMIN F. ISHERWOOD, 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, May 23, 1844; entered the 
service as First Assistant Engineer ; stationed at Navy Yard, Pensacola, 1844-5 ; 
attached to steamer General Taylor, Pensacola, 1846-7 ; special duty, 1848-50. 
Promoted to Chief Engineer, October 31, 1848 ; special duty. Navy Department, 
1852-3; steam-frigate San Jacinto, East India Squadron, 1854-8; special duty, 
1859-60; appointed Engineer-in-Chief, 1861, which position he retained until 
1869; Navy Yard, Mare Island, California, 1870-1 ; sick-leave, 1873 ; special 
duty, 1874-7. 

CHIEF ENGINEER GEORGE SEWELL, 

Born in New York, December 17, 1824. Appointed from New Jersey, March 
13, 1847 ; attached to steamer Scorpion, as Acting Second Assistant Engineer, 
and upon his arrival at Vera Cruz, passed a successful examination, and was ap- 
pointed First Assistant Engineer in the regular service ; was at the capture of 
Tobasco, and the battle of Tamaltay, three miles inland from Tobasco ; remained 
on the Scorpion during the Mexican War ; returned home in charge of the engi- 
neer department of the steamer Vixen, which, with the Spitfire, had been useless 
for over eight months, owing to defective valve connections to their bottoms ; 
Engineer Sewell re-arranged and made them seaworthy, without the use of a dry 
dock, thus giving to the government two valuable vessels that would have other- 
wise been useless ; ordered to the steamer Mississippi, 1849 ; detached to super- 
intend the construction of the machinery of the steamer Powhatan, 1849-52. 
Commissioned as Chief Engineer, July 15, 1852 ; steam-frigate Powhatan, East 
India Squadron, 1852-6 ; on the passage out the same trouble was experienced 
as mentioned with the Vixen and Spitfire, but was remedied by Engineer Sewell 
without the aid of a dry dock ; Inspector of Ocean Steamers, etc., 1857-8 ; special 
duty. Mare Island, California, 1859, building machinery for the steamer Saginaw, 
being the first vessel built in that country ; ordered as Chief Engineer to steam- 
sloop Richmond, June, 1860 ; detached and ordered to steam-sloop Susquehanna, 
European Squadron, 1860-1 ; steam-sloop Susquehanna, Atlantic Blockading 
Squadron, 1861 ; was at the capture of Hatteras and Port Royal, and bombard- 
ment of Sewell's Point, Virginia, and also at the capture of Norfolk ; steam-sloop 
Susquehanna, West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1862-3 ; capture of Fernandina, 
Florida; General Inspector of Machinery outside of Navy Yards, 1863; Navy 
Yard, Charlestown, Massachusetts, 1864-5 ; Fleet-Engineer, North Atlantic 
Squadron, 1865-8 ; special duty, Newburgh, New York, March, 1868, to April, 
1869 ; Chief Engineer, Navy Yard, New York, 1869-72 ; Inspector of Machin- 
ery, New York, 1873-4 ; special duty, 1875-6 ; Navy Yard, Norfolk, 1877-8. 



330 CHIEF ENGINEERS. 

CHIEF ENGINEER J. W. KING, 

Born in the north of Maryland ; a resident of New Jersey. Appointed Third 
Assistant Engineer, September 2, 184-1- ; served in the steamers G-eneral Taylor, 
Col. Harney, and Poinsett, on the coast of Florida ; also, on the steamer Missis- 
sippi in the Mexican War, and participated in the capture of Tobasco, Tampico, 
and Vera Cruz. Promoted to Second Assistant Engineer, July 10, 1847 ; in the 
steamer Princeton, Mediterranean, 1847 to 1849. Promoted to First Assistant 
Engineer, September 13, 1849 ; served in the steamer Saranac, Home Squadron, 
and in the steamer IMichigan, northern lakes. Promoted to Chief Engineer, No- 
vember 12, 1852 ; Inspector of Ocean Steamers, at New York, 1853-4 ; Super- 
intendent of the construction of machinery, at Philadelphia, for U. S. S. Wabash, 
1855-6 ; steam-frii^ate Wabash, Home Squadron, 1856-8 ; Chief Engineer of the 
Navy Yard, New York, April, 1858, to April, 1861 ; Chief Engineer of the South 
Atlantic Fleet, May, 1861, to June, 1862 ; participated in the capture of the forts 
at Hatteras, under Stringham, and of the forts at Port Hoyal, under Du Pont ; 
the latter battle was fought with the vessels under way, traversing a circle ; in the 
report of Admiral Du Pont, he says, " The Engineer Department was conducted, 
by Chief Engineer King with consummate skill." After the detachment of Mr. 
King, the Admiral again states, in a letter to him, " Your services have been of 
great value to the squadron, and I part with you with reluctance." Special duty, 
Pittsburgh, from June, 1862, to 1863; General Inspector of all the iron-clad ves- 
sels building west of the Alleghanies, 1863-4; latter part of 1864, was sent to 
Europe to examine the dock-yards, iron-works, and iron-clads of Great Britain and 
France ; made a report on the subject to Congress ; the Secretary of the Navy said, 
officially, of this report, " It is interesting and instructive ;" 1865, made a tour 
of inspection in the United States, examined and i-eported on all the iron vessels, 
iron-clads, and steam machinery under construction for the navy; 1866-7, Chief 
Engineer of the New York Navy Yard; 1868, special duty; March 15, 1869, 
appointed by President Grant, Chief of Bureau of Steam Engineering. Served 
the full term of four years as Chief of the Bureau, during which time the Naval 
Academy was opened to cadets of the Engineer Corps, and the compound engine 
was introduced into the navy, two important measures necessary for the advance- 
ment of the Engineer Department and good of the navy. Completed term in the 
Bureau, March 29, 1873, and left it without a dollar of indebtedness or obligations, 
and abundant appropriations of money for all work required ; appointed on the same 
day General Inspector of Engineering Works, but previous to entering on this duty, 
made an eight months' tour in Europe inspecting dock -yards, workshops, and the 
machinery of the Vienna International Exposition ; relieved from duty as General 
Inspector', August, 1875, and from this date until August, 1876, was employed 
in Europe, examining ships of war and of the mercantile marine. The result of 
this tour was published in 1877, by order of the U. S. Senate, in a book called 
" European Ships of War," etc., by Chief Engineer J. W. King, U. S. N. This 
book attracted considerable attention, received favorable criticisms, and was re- 
printed in England. March, 1878, a second edition of the work, revised and en- 
larged, was, by a resolution of both Houses of Congress, authorized to be printed. 



CHIEF ENGINEER THEODORE ZELLER, 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, Third Assistant Engineer in 
the United States Navy, June 15, 1843, and ordered to duty on board the frigate 
Missouri, for a cruise which terminated at Gibraltar, September 26, 1843, by the 



CHIEF ENGINEERS. 331 

loss of tlie ship by fire ; July 20, 1844, ordered to duty on board the steamer 
Colonel Harney, stationed in the Gulf of Mexico and in the rivers of Florida and 
Louisiana, for the protection of live-oak timber, until February 21, 1846 ; March 
23, 1846, ordered to duty in the Bureau of Construction, Equipment, and Repairs, 
as Assistant to the Eugineer-in-Chief, remained until October 23, 184G. Ex- 
amined, passed, and promoted to the grade of Second Assistant Engineer., Febru- 
ary 17, 1847 ; March 23, 1847, ordered to the steamer Union, at Washington, 
and detached. May 25, 1847, as the vessel was condemned as unfit for service ; 
October 20, 1847, ordered to the steamer Iris, as Senior Assistant Engineer, and 
after three months as Acting Chief Engineer until the termination of the war 
with Mexico ; detached, December 18, 1848 ; April 18, 1849, ordered to the 
Pacific Ocean, to join the Massachusetts as Senior-Engineer; this vessel had been 
detailed for special service with a joint commission of army and navy officers, to 
select a site for a navy yard in California, and sites for fortifications on the coast 
of California and Oregon ; the discovery of gold in California rendered it impos- 
sible to obtain white seamen for the wages then allowed, and natives of the Sand- 
wich Islands and Chinese, none of whom could speak English, were with difficulty 
'obtained to compose a crew ; with these the bays, straits, and inlets of California 
and Oregon were explored, and the object of the commission was accomplished. 
Promoted to the grade of First Assistant Engineer, November 6, 1849, while on 
the last-mentioned cruise ; detached, March 25, 1853 ; October 18, 1853, ordered 
as Senior Assistant Engineer of the frigate Saranac ; made the cruise with this 
vessel, and returned to the United States from the Mediterranean, June 26, 1856. 
Examined and promoted to the grade of Chief Engineer, August 15, 1856, with 
date of June 27, 1855 ; August 12, 1857, ordered to the frigate Saranac for duty 
in the Pacific Ocean ; detached, November 19, 1859, and returned to the United 
States; December 31, 1859, ordered to Erie, Pennsylvania, to superintend repairs 
to the steamer Michigan; November 19, 1860, appointed member of a Board on 
the Michigan, to make a series of important experiments with steam ; after the 
completion of these, was ordered again to the Michigan, for duty on the lakes ; 
June 3, 1861, detached from the Michigan and ordered to the Novelty Iron 
Works, at New York, to superintend the building of machinery for gunboats, 
screw sloops-of-war, iron-clads, and other vessels, upon which, with other duties, 
he was engaged up to May 19, 1863, when he was appointed Fleet-Engineer of 
the Eastern Gulf Squadron, and remained upon the staff of Bear- Admiral Theo- 
doras Bailey, until September 1, 1864, when the Department permitted him to 
return North to recruit his health, after severe illness from yellow fever ; he was, 
however, immediately ordered to the North Atlantic Squadron, and reported 
to Admiral David D. Porter for duty, on the 5th of October, as Fleet-Engineer, 
on which duty he remained until the close of the war ; in a letter to the Secretary 
of the Navy, dated August 6, 1864, Bear-Admiral Bailey, then in command of 
the Eastern Gulf Blockading Squadron, speaks in very complimentary terms of 
the services of Mr. Zeller as Fleet-Engineer, and in the following month, Hon. 
Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, sent a letter to Chief Engineer Zeller, 
then in New York, in which he expresses his gratification at the efficient and 
satisfactory manner in which that officer had performed his duties as Chief Engi- 
neer ; special duty, 1866-78. 



CHIEF ENGINEER ELBRIDGE LAWTON, 

Born in Massachusetts. Appointed from Massachusetts, March 23, 1848; en- 
tered the service as Third Assistant Engineer ; Home Squadron, 1848; special 



332 CHIEF ENGINEERS. 

duty, Baltimore, 1849-50. Promoted to Second Assistant Engineer, September 
13, 1849 ; steam-frigate Saranac, Home Squadron, 1850-2. Promoted to First 
Assistant Engineer, February 26, 1851 ; steamer John Hancock, North Pacific 
Expedition, 1852-5. Promoted to Chief Engineer, June 26, 1856 ; steam- 
frigate Roanoke, Home Squadron, 1859-60; steam-sloop Mississippi, West Gulf 
Blockading Squadron, 1861-2; special duty. New York, 1863-4; Fleet Engi- 
neer, East Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1865; special duty, New York, 1866-7; 
special duty, Bridgewater, Massachusetts, 1868-9 ; on duty at Navy Yard, Boston, 
1870-1; Navy Yard, Mare Island, 1871-6 ; Navy Yard, New York, 1876-8. 



CHIEF ENGINEER ROBERT DANBY, 

Born in Delaware. Appointed from Massachusetts, March 23, 1848; entered 
the service as Third Assistant Engineer ; steamer Colonel Harney, Home Squad- 
ron, 1845-7; steamer General Taylor, Home Squadron, 1847-8. Promoted to 
Second Assistant Engineer, July 10, 1847 ; steamer Mississippi, Mediterranean 
Squadron, 1849-51. Promoted to First Assistant E7igineer,Fehr\iary 1, 1851 ; 
steam-frigate Mississippi, East India Squadron, 1852-5 ; special duty. New York, 
1856-7. Promoted to Chief Engineer, June 26, 1856 ; steam-frigate Mississippi, 
flag-ship East India Squadron, 1858-60 ; Navy Yard, Philadelphia, 1861-2 ; 
special duty, Philadelphia, 1863 ; Fleet-Engineer, South Atlantic Blockading 
Squadron, 1863-5; special duty, New York, 1866-7; Inspector, Navy Yard, 
New York, 1868-9 ; Inspector Machinery Afloat, New Orleans, 1870 ; charge 
of stores. New York, 1872-5 ; Navy Yard, Norfolk, 1878. 



CHIEF ENGINEER BENJAMIN F. GARVIN, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania, March 29, 1847 ; entered 
the service as Third Assistant Engineer; steamer Spitfire, Home Squadron, 
1847-8. Promoted to Second Assistant Engineer, October 31, 1848; steamer 
Water Witch, Home Squadron, 1849-50 ; Coast Survey, 1851 ; steamer Jefiierson, 
wrecked May 25, 1851, coast of Patagonia, on the way to California. Promoted 
to First Assistant Engineer, February 26, 1851 ; steam-frigate San Jacinto, Medi- 
terranean Squadron, 1851-3; steamer Princeton, Home Squadron, 1854-5; spe- 
cial duty, Philadelphia, 1856 ; steam-frigate Wabash, Home Squadron, 1856-7. 
Promoted to Chief Engineer, May 11, 1858; steam-frigate Wabash, Mediterra- 
nean Squadron, 1858-9; Navy Yard, New York, 1861-2; special duty, New 
York, 1863; Fleet-Engineer, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864; in 
Colorado, at Fort Fisher fight, as Chief Engineer ; steam-frigate Colorado, flag- 
ship European Squadron, 1865-7 ; President Board of Examiners, 1868-9 ; In- 
spector of Machinery Afloat, Philadelphia, 1869-71 ; Navy Yard, Boston, 1871-3. 
Navy Yard, Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 1873-8. 



CHIEF ENGINEER HENRY H. STEWART, 

Born in New Jersey. Appointed from Pennsylvania, March 23, 1848 ; entered 
the service as Third Assistant Engineer; Home Squadron, 1848-9. Promoted 
to Second Assistant Engineer, September 13, 1849 ; Coast Survey, 1849 ; steam- 
frigate Susquehanna, East India Squadron, 1850-5. Promoted to First Assist- 
ant Engineer, February 26, 1851 ; special duty, Philadelphia, 1856; Coast Sur- 



CHIEF ENGINEERS. 333 

vey, 1857-8. Promoted to Chief Engineer, July 1, 1858; steam-sloop Dacotah, 
Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1861 ; special duty, Wilmington, Delaware, 
1862-4; steamer Wyalusing, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 186-1-5; 
President of Board of Examiners, 1866-7; member of Board of Examiners, 
1868-9 ; Navy Yard, Norfolk, Virginia, 1870-2 ; League Island, 1872-8. 



CHIEF ENGINEERS. 

With Relative Rank of Commander. 



CHIEF ENGINEEK HARMAN NEWELL, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania, September 22, 1849 ; 
entered the service as Third Assistant Engineer; Coast Survey, 1849-50 ; office of 
Engineer-in-Chief, 1851. Promoted to Second Assistant Engineer, February 26, 
1851 ; steamer Vixen, Home Squadron, 1851-2 ; steam-frigate Saranac, Home 
Squadron, 1853. Promoted to First Assistant Engineer, May 21, 1853 ; steamer 
Princeton, Home Squadron, 1854-5; special duty, 1856-7; steamer Fulton, 
Brazil Squadron and Paraguay Expedition, 1858-9. Promoted to Chief Engineer, 
April 23, 1859 ; steam-sloop Powhatan, Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1861 ; 
frigate New Ironsides, special service, 1862-3 ; Navy Yard, Philadelphia, 1864-5 ; 
Navy Yard, Norfolk, Virginia, 1866-9 ; Fleet-Engineer, South Atlantic Squadron, 
1870-2 ; Navy Yard, Philadelphia, 1872-5 ; special duty, Philadelphia, 1875-6 ; 
Fleet-Engineer, S. A. Station, 1876 ; special duty, Philadelphia, 1877-8. 



CHIEF ENGINEER EDMUND S. De LUCE, 

Born in New York. Appointed from New Y^'ork, September 22, 1849 ; entered 
the service as Third Assistant Engineer; office of Engineer-in-Chief, 1849-51. 
Promoted to Second Assistant Engineer, February 26, 1851 ; steamer Vixen, 
Home Squadron, 1851-2. Promoted to JFirst Assistant Engineer, May 21, 1853 ; 
Coast Survey, 1853-5 ; steam-frigate San Jacinto, East India Squadron, 1855-8 ; 
steam-sloop Brooklyn, Home Squadron, 1858-60. Promoted to Chief Engineer, 
October 12, 1861 ; special duty, 1861 ; special duty, Boston, 1862-3 ; special 
duty. New York, 1864; Navy Yard, New York, 1865; steam-sloop Brooklyn, 
flag-ship Brazil Squadron, 1865-7; special duty. New York, 1867-70; Navy 
Yard, New York, 1871-2 ; Fleet-Engineer, N. A. Station, 1873-5 ; charge of 
stores. New York, 1877-8. 

CHIEF ENGINEER EDWIN FITHIAN, 

Born in New Jersey. Appointed from Pennsylvania, October 31, 1848 ; entered 
the service as T'hird Assistant Engineer ; special duty, Boston, 1849-50. Pro- 
moted to Second Assistant Engineer, February 26, 1851 ; steam-frigate Susque- 
hanna, East India Squadron, 1851-5. Promoted to First Assistant Engineer, 
May 21, 1853; special duty, Richmond, 1856 ; steam-frigate Susquehanna, Med- 
iterranean Squadron, 1856-8; special duty, Philadelphia, 1859; steam-sloop 
Narragansett, Pacific Squadron, 1859-61. Promoted to Chief Engineer, October 
23, 1859 ; special duty. New York, 1862-3 ; steam-frigate Roanoke, North At- 
lantic Blockading Squadron, 1863-5; special duty, New York, 1866-8; Fleet- 



334 CHIEF ENGINEERS. 

Engineer, European Fleet, 1869-71 ; Navy Yard, Washington, 1871-6 ; special 
duty, Bureau of Engineering, 1876-7 ; Fleet-Engineer, European Station, 1877-8. 



CHIEF ENGINEER MONTGOMERY FLETCHER, 

Born in Virginia. Appointed from Pennsylvania, June 25, 1850; entered the 
service as Third Assistant Engineer; Coast Survey, 1850-1. Promoted to 
Second Assistant Engineer^ February 21, 1851; special duty, Norfolk, 1852-3; 
steam-frigate Saranac, Mediterranean Squadron, 1854-6. Promoted to First 
Assistant Engineer^ June 21, 1856; office of Engineer-in-Chief, 1857; steam- 
frigate Wabash, Home Squadron, 1857-8. Promoted to Chief Engineer^ Octo- 
ber 25, 1859; steam-frigate Saranac, Pacific Squadron, 1861-5; special duty, 
New York, 1866 ; Navy Yard, Mare Island, California, 1867-71 ; Fleet-Engineer, 
Pacific Squadron, 1871-3 ; Inspector Machinery Afloat, Mare Island, 1873-6 ; 
Navy Yard, Mare Island, 1877-8, 



CHIEF ENGINEER CHARLES H. LORING, 

Born in Massachusetts. Appointed from Massachusetts, February 26, 1851 ; 
entered the service as Third Assistant Engineer ; steamer John Hancock, special 
service, 1851 ; special duty, Baltimore, 1852; steamer Princeton, Home Squad- 
ron, 1853-5. Promoted to Second Assistant Engineer., May 21, 1853; steam- 
frigate Merrimac, Pacific Squadron, 1855-9. Promoted to First Assistant 
Engineer., May 9, 1857. Promoted to Chief Engineer, March 21, 1861 ; steam- 
frigate Minnesota, flag-ship North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1861-3; at cap- 
ture of Forts Hatteras and Clarke, 1861 ; in action with Merrimac, March 8 and 9, 
1862 ; special duty, Cincinnati, 1863-4 ; special duty, St. Louis, 1865-6 ; steam- 
sloop Susquehanna, special service, 1867 ; steam-frigate Minnesota, special service, 
1868; Navy Yard, Washington, 1869-71; Inspector Machinery Afloat, Navy 
Yard, Boston, 1871 ; special duty, 1872-7 ; Fleet Engineer, Asiatic Station, 
1877-8. 

CHIEF ENGINEER ALEXANDER HENDERSON, 

Born in District of Columbia. Appointed from Virginia, February 26, 1851 ; 
entered the service as Third Assistant Engineer ; steam-frigate Susquehanna, East 
India Squadron, 1852-5. Promoted to Second Assistant Engineer., May 21, 1853 ; 
office of Engineer-in-Chief, 1856 ; steam-frigate Susquehanna, Mediterranean 
Squadron, 1857-8. Promoted to First Assistant Engineer, May 9, 1857 ; steamer 
Southern Star, Brazil Squadron and Paraguay Expedition, 1858 ; steam-sloop Iro- 
quois, Mediterranean Squadron, 1859-60. Promoted to Chief Engineer, June 
28, 1861 ; special service, 1861 ; steam-sloop Adirondack, Blockading Squadron, 
1862 ; special duty, Newburgh, New York, 1863 ; iron-clad Onondaga, North 
Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5; special duty, Navy Yard, Washington, 
1866 ; Navy Yard, Boston, 1867-8 ; special duty, 1869 ; Fleet-Engineer, Asiatic 
Fleet, 1869-72 ; Navy Yard, New York, 1873-8. 



CHIEF ENGINEER STEPHEN D. HIBBERT, 

Born in Virginia. Appointed from Virginia, February 26, 1851 ; entered the 
service as Third Assistant Engineer; steam-frigate Susquehanna, East India 



CHIEF ENGINEERS. 335 

Squadron, 1851-5. Promoted to Second Assistant Engineer, May 21, 1853; 
steamer Michigan, on the lakes, 1856-7. Promoted to First Assistant Engineer, 
May 9, 1857 ; steam-frigate Merriniac, Pacific Squadron, 1857-9. Promoted to 
Chief Engineer, June 29, 1861 ; special duty, 1861 ; steam-sloop Pensacola, West 
Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1861-3; special duty, Bureau of Steam Engineering, 
1863-7; Fleet-Engineer, Asiatic Fleet, 1868-70; Navy Yard, Philadelphia, 
1871-2; President Board of Examiners, 1872-4; Fleet-Engineer, S. Pacific 
Station, 1874-7. 

CHIEF ENGINEER FRANCIS C. DADE, 

Born in Virginia. Appointed from Virginia, January 20, 1849; entered the 
service as Tliird Assistant Engineer ; steamer Water Witch, Home Squadron, 
1849-50; steam-frigate Saranac, Home Squadron, 1851-2. Promoted to Second 
Assistant Engineer, February 26, 1851 ; Coast Survey, 1852-3. Promoted to 
First Assistant Engineer, May 21, 1853; steam-frigate Saranac, Mediterranean 
Squadron, 1853-6 ; Coast Survey, 1857 ; special duty connected with the Colorado, 
1858; special duty, Boston, 1859; steam-sloop Hartford, East India Squadron, 
1859-61. Promoted to Chief Engineer, June 30, 1861 ; steam-sloop Oneida, 
West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1862-3; passage of Forts Jackson and St. 
Philip, and capture of New Orleans ; passage of the batteries at Vicksburg ; 
special duty, Philadelphia, 1864-5; steam-sloop Canandaigua, European Squadron, 
1866-7 ; member Board of Examiners, 1866-8 ; Inspector of Machinery Afloat, 
Norfolk, 1869-72; steam-sloop Lancaster, N. A. Station, 1873-4; charge of 
stores, Norfolk, 1874-8. 

CHIEF ENGINEER JOHN W. MOORE, 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, May 21, 1853; entered the 
service as Third Assistant Engineer ; duty in oifice of Engineer-in-Chief, Navy 
Department, Washington, 1853; steam-frigate Saranac, Mediterranean Squadron, 
1853-6. Promoted to Second Assistant Engineer, June 27, 1855 ; steam-frigate 
Niagara, Atlantic Cable Expedition, 1857 ; steam-frigates Colorado and Roanoke, 
Home Squadron, 1858-60. Promoted to First Assista)it Engineer, July 21, 1858 ; 
steam-sloop Richmond, Mediterranean Squadron, 1860-1 ; West Gulf Blockading 
Squadron, 1861-3. Promoted to Chief Engineer, August 5, 1861 ; participated 
in engagement at head of passes of Mississippi River with rebel batteries and 
ram Manassas, October 12, 1861 ; attack on rebel defences at Pensacola, Novem- 
ber 22, 1861 ; Forts Jackson and St. Philip, April 24, 1862 ; capture of New 
Orleans, April 25, 1862 ; passage of Vicksburg batteries, June 27, 1862 ; passage 
of Vicksburg batteries and rebel ram Arkansas, July 15, 1862 ; Port Hudson, 
March 15, 1863; capture of Port Hudson. July 8, 1863; was the originator of 
the plan adopted by the vessels composing Farragut's Fleet for protecting the 
sides of the ships with their chain cable, and also of covering the ships with a 
paint composed of the mud of the Mississippi River, to screen them from view 
{vide report of Admiral Furragut, May 6, 1862, and letter of Commander James 
Alden to Hon. Secretary of Navy, October 20, 1862), both of which devices were 
afterwards used, the cable by the Kearsarge in her memorable fight with the Ala- 
bama, and the painting the ships that color by general order of the Navy Depart- 
ment ; when Richmond returned North for repairs, in August, 1863, was detached 
and assigned duty in New York, under Admiral Gregory, superintendent iron- 
clads, in Philadelphia ; as member of Board of Examiners, and afterwards at Bos- 
ton to superintend government work building at Atlantic and other works in that 



336 CHIEF ENGINEERS. 

vicinity; May 15, 1867, ordered to frigate Franklin, as Fleet-Engineer on staff 
of Admiral Farragut ; detached, December 21, 1868, and ordered Board duty New 
York Yard ; to Navy Yard, Portsmouth, New Hampshire ; member of Board of 
which Admiral Goldsborough was President, for examination into condition of all 
vessels at different Navy Yards, after which returned to duty at Kittery Navy 
Yard ; September 3, 1872, was ordered to Hartford as Fleet-Engineer of Asiatic 
Station; detached, December 19, 1875, and ordered as Chief Engineer of the 
Washington Navy Yard, February 8, 1876, which is his present duty. 



CHIEF ENGINEER DAVID B. MACOMB, 

Born in Tallahassee, Florida. Appointed from Pennsylvania, January 11, 1849, 
as Third Assistant Engineer; office of Engineer-in-Chief, 1849-50; steamer 
Bibb, Coast Survey, 1850-1. Promoted to Second Assistant Engineer, February 
26, 1851 ; steamer Bibb, Coast Survey, 1851-2 ; steamer John Hancock, Explor- 
ing Expedition to the North Pacific, China, and Japan Seas, 1853-5. Promoted 
to First Assistant Engineer, June 26, 1856 ; steam -frigate Wabash, flag-ship 
Home Squadron, 1856-7 ; steam-frigate Saranac, Pacific Squadron, 1858-9 ; 
steam-frigate Niagara, sent to convey the Japanese Ambassadors to Yeddo, Japan, 
1860; returned to United States, April 23, 1861 ; and was the first war vessel 
on the blockade off Charleston, South Carolina ; at the bombardment of Pensa- 
cola Navy Yard, and reduction of Fort McCrae, November, 1861 ; special duty 
connected with building iron-clads, Boston, 1862; iron-clad monitors Nahant and 
Canonicus, James River Fleet and North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1863-5 ; 
iron-clad monitor Canonicus at the reduction of Howlett's House battery, James 
River, June 21, 1864 ; at the battles of Dutch Gap and Deep Bottom, August 13, 
1864 ; in the Canonicus at Fort Fisher, December 24 and 25, 1864 ; at the final 
reduction and occupation of that place by the combined army and naval forces, 
January 14, 15, and 16, 1865 ; from thence to Charleston, South Carolina ; at 
the evacuation by the rebels and occupation by United States forces of that city, 
February 18, 1865, the iron-clad Canonicus throwing the last hostile shot at the 
defences of that place ; Canonicus sent in pursuit of rebel ram Stonewall ; went 
to Havana, Cuba, June, 1865 ; first American iron-clad that ever entered a foreign 
port; special duty, Baltimore, 1866; Navy Yard, Pensacola, 1867; Navy Yard, 
Portsmouth, 1868 ; steam-sloop Tennessee, special service, 1870-1 ; Fleet-Engi- 
neer, N. A. Fleet, 1871-3 ; Navy Yard, Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 1873-7 ; 
Fleet-Engineer, N. A. Station, 1877-8. 



CHIEF ENGINEER EDWARD DUNHAM ROBIE, 

Born in Burlington, Vermont. Appointed from Binghamton, New York ; entered 
the service as Third