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Records of the 
Scottish Volunteer Force 



Records of the 

Scottish Volunteer Force 

1859-1908 



Major-General J. M. GRIERSON, 

C.V.O., C.B., C.M.G. 

COMMANDING THE FIRST DIVISION OF THE ARMY, 
ALDERSHOT COMMAND 



William Blackwood and Sons 

Edinburgh and London 

1909 



ALL RIGHTS RESERVED 



*s> 



•V 



A 






PREFACE. 



These "Records" are designed as a contribution to 
the military annals of Scotland — to " the warlike 
repute of our history." It is true that the records 
of the volunteer army cover — with the exception of 
their services, mostly in small bodies attached to 
regular units, during the war in South Africa — no 
ground of warlike exploits, yet they spread over nigh 
upon half a century of the national life, and that, too, 
a period in which the regular forces of the Crown have 
been placed upon an entirely new basis, and converted 
from a long-service army of the old type into a short- 
service, largely territorialised force, with distinct local 
associations, and with an ever and ever increasing 
connection with the second line or auxiliary forces of 
the nation. To this connection, to this increase of 
the power of the forces of the Crown, to this national 
— as distinguished from purely professional — military 
spirit, no factor has been more potent than the 
" volunteer movement," and in no part of His Majesty's 
dominions has the movement been more enthusiastically 
taken up — and maintained — than in the northern 
portion of the United Kingdom. The Scottish volun- 
teers have proved by the large proportion which their 
numbers have always borne to the male population, 
by the high degree of efficiency to which they have 
attained, as attested by the Royal approbation fre- 



418369 



vi Preface. 

quently bestowed upon them, and by the generous 
support which they have afforded in times of stress 
to their national regular regiments, that the old war- 
like spirit runs as high as ever in Scotland, and their 
chronicles cannot therefore fail to be of interest to all 
patriotic Scots. 

The present seems a peculiarly appropriate time 
when some record of the origin and history of the 
force should be compiled, as, firstly, its character and 
organisation have been changed and it has furnished 
the cadres for the territorial army of the future ; and 
secondly, in a few years' time any attempt to arrive 
at data as to the earliest formations of the volunteer 
corps would be in vain. From the list appended to 
this Preface it will be seen how few are the efforts 
which have been made to commit to paper the histories 
of volunteer corps ; indeed in the earlier days no records 
at all were kept in most cases. Nowadays, therefore, 
the bare facts disclosed by a study of army lists and 
other official documents can generally be only amplified 
by the personal recollections of those who took part 
in the movement in its early days. Those men are 
now passing away from among us, and with them their 
knowledge will be buried in the grave ; so it becomes 
a pious military duty to collect as much as possible 
of what they have to tell and to record it in a per- 
manent form. 

In Part I. of these " Records " an attempt is made 
to give a general sketch of the rise and progress of 
the volunteer movement with special reference to 
Scotland. The bulk of this portion is of necessity 
derived from official documents, returns, army orders, 
manuals, regulations, and reports of commissions, but 
special attention has been paid to accounts of the three 
great reviews of Scottish volunteers held by her late 



Preface. vii 

Majesty Queen Victoria in 1860 and 1881, and by his 
present Majesty in 1905, as typical of the state of the 
force at these periods, and general details as to the 
force have been summarised in the Appendices. Part 
II. must be read in connection with Part I., as the 
general account in the latter is common to all the 
individual records of corps in the former. 

Deprived of the details of organisation, training, 
equipment, and historical gatherings, collected together 
in Part I. and the Appendices, the individual records 
of corps reduce themselves to summaries of their special 
origin, formation, uniform, changes in strength and 
distribution, the numbers supplied for active service, 
and the names of their commanding officers. Some 
records, where published histories or private memor- 
anda were obtainable, are fuller than others, but, in 
all, every available source of information has been 
utilised. The Plates showing the uniforms have 
been drawn by me from authentic sources, mostly 
original photographs, and the colouring is taken either 
from official descriptions or, in the case of many of 
the older types, from statements made by those who 
have worn the uniform depicted, or, in a few cases, 
from the actual garments then worn, and in no case 
has any attempt been made to reproduce a uniform 
from unauthenticated data. It is hoped, therefore, 
that the Plates showing the uniforms are as near 
absolute accuracy as is possible. 

I have been assisted in the preparation of these 
" Records " by very many members of the Scottish 
volunteer force and others, but by none more effectu- 
ally than by my valued friend Major - General Sir 
Alexander J. F. Reid, K.C.B., whose efforts at un- 
earthing old records have been untiring. My grateful 
thanks are also due to the following, who have furnished 



viii Preface. 

information, lent photographs, or otherwise helped in 
the work : — 

Alexander, Captain A. C. B., Seaforth Highlanders, Adjutant 2nd 

V.B. K.O. Scottish Borderers. 
Alston, J. Carfrae, Esq., late Major 1st Lanark V.E.C. 
Anstruther, Colonel Sir E. W., Bart., 6th V.B. Black Watch. 
Arbuthnot, Major K. W., Seaforth Highlanders, Adjutant 1st 

V.B. Seaforth Highlanders. 
Bailey, Colonel R, late K.A. and 1st Orkney E.G.A.(V.) 
Baillie, Colonel J. E. B., M.V.O., V.D., Highland E.G.A.(V.) 
Balfour, E. E., Esq., Montrose. 

Batchelor, Lieut. -Colonel C, V.D., 3rd V.B. Black Watch. 
Birrell, Colonel A., V.D., 5th V.B. Highland Light Infantry. 
Black, Sergeant E. E., 6th V.B. Eoyal Scots, Penicuik. 
Brade, E. H., Esq., C.B., Assistant Secretary, War Office. 
Breadalbane, Colonel the Marquess of, KG., A.D.C., 5th V.B. 

Black Watch. 
Brock, Lieut.-Colonel H., V.D., 1st Dumbarton V.E.C. 
Browne, Thomas, Esq., late 5th Fife E.V., St Andrews. 
Campbell, Colonel C. G. P., 1st Argyll and Bute E.G.A.(V.) 
Campbell, Captain D. F., D.S.O., Lancashire Fusiliers, Adjutant 

2nd V.B. Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders. 
Campbell, Colonel F., late 1st Argyll and Bute E.G.A.(V.) 
Campbell, the late John, Esq. of Kilberry, late 93rd Highlanders. 
Campbell, Captain (hon. major) J., 1st V.B. Cameron High- 
landers. 
Cary, A. D. L., Esq., War Office. 

Chalmers, Colonel H. D. D., 2nd V.B. Highland Light Infantry. 
Chinn, Major J. H., Eoyal Artillery, Adjutant 1st Banff 

RG.A.(V.) 
Clark, Colonel Sir J. M., Bart., V.D., oth V.B. Eoyal Scots. 
Cranston, Colonel Sir E., K.C.V.O., V.D., Commanding 1st 

Lothian V.I. Brigade. 
Crawford, Colonel E. R, V.D., late 1st Lanark RE.(V.) 
Cruden, Colonel G., V.D., late 1st V.B. Gordon Highlanders. 
Dalmahoy, Colonel J. A., M. V.O., V.D., 1st Mid-Lothian RG.A.(V.) 
Darling, P. Stormonth, Esq., Kelso, late Border Mounted Eifles. 
Donald, Colonel A. H., V.D., late 1st Lanark V.E.C. 
Duncan, Colonel D., V.D., late 1st V.B. Gordon Highlanders. 



Preface. ix 

Dunlop, Colonel J. W., C.B., Koyal Artillery. 

Ewing, Captain (hon. major) James, V.D., late 1st V.B. Gordon 

Highlanders. 
Fraser, Captain (hon. major) H., 1st V.B. Cameron Highlanders. 
Gibson, Captain T., 1st V.B. Cameron Highlanders. 
Grant, Colonel A. B., M.V.O., V.D., late 1st Lanark E.G.A.(V.) 
Hadden, Lieut-Colonel A., V.D, The Border V.E.C. 
Harvey, Thomas, Esq., late Captain 1st Dumbarton V.E.C. 
Henderson, Brigadier-General David, D.S.O. 
Henderson, Major M. W., 8th V.B. Eoyal Scots. 
Hendry, Colonel P. W., V.D., Brigade-Major Highland Light 

Infantry V.I. Brigade. 
Heron-Maxwell, Sir John, Bart, late 15th Hussars and 1st 

Dumfries Mounted Eifles. 
Hill, Lieut.-Colonel H., V.D., 1st V.B. Black Watch. 
Hudleston, F. J., Esq., Librarian, General Staff, War Office. 
Johnston, Colonel C. J., V.D., Hon. Colonel 3rd V.B. Seaforth 

Highlanders. 
Johnston, Colonel J. W., M.V.O., V.D., late 1st Fife E.G.A.(V.) 
Johnston, John, Esq., Glasgow. 
Kay, Captain F. W., 1st Aberdeen E.G.A.(V.) 
Lennox, Lieut.-Colonel J., V.D., Galloway V.E.C. 
Lockie, Captain and Quartermaster J., 1st V.B. Cameron High- 
landers. 
Maclnnes, Lieut.-Colonel J., V.D., late 5th V.B. Argyll and 

Sutherland Highlanders. 
Mackenzie, Colonel E. C, V.D., Commanding Highland Light 

Infantry V.I. Brigade. 
Main, Colonel E. M., V.D.,. 7th V.B. Eoyal Scots. 
Mellis, Colonel W. A., V.D., 4th V.B. Gordon Highlanders. 
Menzies, Colonel E., V.D., late Q.E.V.B. Eoyal Scots. 
Mitford, Captain W. B. J., Gordon Highlanders, Adjutant 6th 

V.B. Eoyal Scots. 
Moncreiffe, Colonel Sir E. D., Bart., V.D., 4th V.B. Black Watch. 
Morrison, Colonel F. L., V.D., 1st V.B. Highland Light Infantry. 
Morrison, Colonel J., V.D., 1st Sutherland V.E.C. 
Morton, Major D. S., late 1st V.B. Highland Light Infantry. 
Muir, Captain G. W., Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, 

Adjutant 5th V.B. Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders. 
Munro, Lieut.-Colonel C, V.D., late 5th V.B. Black Watch. 



x Preface. 

Neish, Major F. H., Gordon Highlanders. 

Oliver, W. H., Esq., Hawick, late Border Mounted Rifles. 

Osborn, Lieut.-Colonel G., Royal Garrison Artillery. 

Outram, Colonel J., V.D., 1st V.B. Highland Light Infantry. 

Park, Colonel W. U., M.V.O., V.D., 1st V.B. Argyll and Suther- 
land Highlanders. 

Paterson, Lieut. -Colonel E., V.D., 5th V.B. Argyll and Sutherland 
Highlanders. 

Paul, Major W. J., 4th V.B. Scottish Rifles. 

Peace, Colonel T. S., V.D., 1st Orkney R.G.A.(V.) 

Ralston, Colonel T. B., V.D., 2nd V.B. Scottish Rifles. 

Reid, Lieut.-Colonel J. L., 2nd V.B. Gordon Highlanders. 

Rose, Colonel George, V.D., late 1st V.B. Cameron Highlanders. 

Sadler, Captain B., 4th V.B. Black Watch. 

Scott, Colonel R, V.D., late 3rd V.B. Gordon Highlanders. 

Shaw, Lieut.-Colonel J. K, 2nd V.B. Royal Scots Fusiliers. 

Shearer, Lieut-Colonel A. R., V.D., 6th V.B. Black Watch. 

Singleton, Captain H. T. C, D.S.O., Highland Light Infantry, 
Adjutant 5th V.B. Gordon Highlanders. 

Smith, the late C. H., Esq., late Major 1st Lanark R.V. 

Stansfeld, Captain J. R. E., D.S.O., Gordon Highlanders, Adjutant 
3rd V.B. Gordon Highlanders. 

Stevenson, Colonel J., C.B., A.D.C., late 9th Lanark V.R.C. 

Stewart-Mackenzie, Colonel J. A. F. H., of Seaforth, Honorary 
Colonel 1st V.B. Seaforth Highlanders. 

Storrar, Colonel D., late 1st Fife R.G.A.(V), Kirkcaldy. 

Stuart, Lieut.-Colonel T. R., 1st Ayr and Galloway R.G.A.(V.) 

Walker, Lieutenant H. W., Royal Field Artillery. 

Warrand, Colonel A. R. B., 1st V.B. Seaforth Highlanders. 

Wilson, Colonel J. B., V.D., 3rd Lanark V.R.C. 

Youngson, Colonel J. A. W. A., V.D., late 1st Aberdeen R.G.A.(V.) 

I shall be very glad if any one will point out to me 
errors in the work, or afford me any information to 
supplement the records. 

JAMES MONCRIEFF GRIERSON, 

Major-General. 

Aldershot, April 1909. 



CONTENTS. 



PART I. 



GENERAL ACCOUNT OF THE ORIGIN AND HISTORY OF THE FORCE. 



The political situation in 1859 ..... 

Military unpreparedness of Great Britain 

Volunteer corps existing in 1859 .... 

Attitude of the Government to the Volunteer movement 

The War Office Circular of May 12, 1859 

The second War Office Circular of May 25, 1859 

The Volunteer movement taken up by the country . 

The movement in Edinburgh ..... 

The movement in Glasgow . . . . 

The third War Office Circular of July 13, 1859 

Model rules for volunteer corps .... 

The first Volunteer Manuals ..... 

County and corps precedence ..... 

Uniform, equipment, and small-arms .... 

Progress of the force in 1859, and the Queen's first inspections of 

Scottish Volunteers ..... 

Formation of engineers and mounted rifles 
Progress of organisation early in 1860 .... 
The Queen and the volunteers. The Levee, Hyde Park Review, and 

National Rifle Association .... 

The Royal Review in Edinburgh, August 7, 1860 
The Regulations of 1861 . . 

The Volunteer force in 1861-62 .... 

The Royal Commission of 1862 .... 

The Volunteer Act of 1863 ..... 
The Volunteer Regulations of 1863 .... 
The force from 1863 to 1871 . 



rAGE 

1 



8 
10 
13 
15 
17 
21 
22 
23 
27 

29 
31 
33 



37 

44 
51 
53 
55 
56 
56 



Xll 



Contents. 



Transfer of the force from the Lords-Lieutenant to the Crown 

1872 

Territorial organisation of 1873 . . . . 

Regulations of 1878. Distinctions of uniform 

Re-armament of the volunteers, 1879 .... 

Consolidation of the administrative brigades and battalions, 1880 

Reorganisation into territorial regiments of the infantry in 1881 

New conditions of efficiency, 1881 .... 

The " Coming of Age Review " by Her Majesty, 25th August 1881 

Strength of the force in 1881 . 

1882 to 1886 

Submarine miners 

Increase of the capitation grant in 1887 

Honorary rank for officers 

Formation of the Volunteer Medical Staff Corps, 1887 

1888-90. Formation of volunteer infantry brigades . 

Formation of position batteries, 1889 . 

Cyclist sections and mounted infantry . 

1890 to 1900 .... 

Grants for equipment . 

Improvement of financial position of corps 

Camp allowances 

Increased demands for efficiency 

Limitation of periods of command 

Outfit allowance for officers 

Rewards for service in the volunteers. The Volunteer Decoration 

and Volunteer Long Service Medal 
The Queen's Diamond Jubilee, 1897 
1900 to 1902 .... 
Volunteer service companies of infantry 
Special service sections of Engineer Volunteers 
Special service of the Medical Staff Corps and Bearer Companies 
Special service of other branches . 

The contributions of the Scottish volunteers towards the South 

African War ..... 

Increase of establishment and strength of the force . 
Higher organisation ..... 
Emergency camps in 1900 .... 

Increased demands for efficiency, 1902 . 
Increase in camp allowances in 1901 
Capitation allowances in 1902 .... 
The force in 1903-1905 . . . . . 

The Royal Review by His Majesty, September 18, 1905 

1906-1908 

The Scottish Volunteer Force in 1907 . 



58 
59 
61 
64 
65 
65 
67 
71 
72 
79 
79 
80 
80 
81 
81 
82 
85 
87 
87 
88 



90 
90 
90 

91 
91 



94 
94 



95 
95 
98 
101 
101 
103 
104 
105 
106 
114 
116 



Contents. 



PAET II. 



RECORDS OF THE SEVERAL CORPS WHICH HAVE CONSTITUTED 
THE SCOTTISH VOLUNTEER FORCE, 1859-1908. 



notes common to all arms . . . . . .119 

Light Horse. 
1st fife light horse (1860-1901) ..... 119 

1st forfar light horse (1876-1901). . . . .121 

Mounted Rifles. 
1st elgin mounted rifles (1869-1871) .... 122 

1st roxburgh (the border) mounted rifles (1872-1892) . . 122 

1ST DUMFRIES MOUNTED RIFLES (1874-1880) . . . .124 

Royal Garrison Artillery Volunteers, 

notes common to all the corps . . . . .126 

1st edinburgh (city) . . . . . . .128 

1st mid-lothian . . . . . . .130 

1ST BANFF . . . . . . . . 133 

1st forfarshire . . . . . . .135 

1st renfrew and dumbarton . . . . .138 

1st fifeshire ........ 140 

1st lanarkshire . . . . . . .143 

1st ayrshire and galloway . . . . . .146 

1st argyll and bute . . . . . . . 149 

1st caithness . . . . .'..'. . . 152 

1st aberdeenshire . . . . . . .154 

1st berwickshire . . . . . . .159 

the highland . . . . . . . . 160 

1st orkney ........ 163 

Royal Engineer Volunteers. 

1st lanarkshire . . . . . . .166 

1st edinburgh city (1860-1865) . . . . .169 

1st aberdeenshire . . . . . . . 170 

2nd lanarkshire . . . . . . .172 

Electrical Engineers, 

the clyde division . . . . . . .173 

the forth division , . . . . . .174 

the tay division, submarine miners (1888-1907) . . .175 

Volunteer Battalions of Territorial Regiments, 

notes common to all corps . . . . .176 

the queen's rifle volunteer brigade, the royal scots . .177 



Contents. 



4th volunteer battalion, the royal scots 

5th ti ii M n 

6th ii ii ii ii 

7th ii ti ii ii 

8th ii it ii it 
9th 
8th 



1st 
2nd 
1st 
2nd 



VOLUNTEER BATTALION (HIGHLANDERS), THE ROYAL SCOTS 
(SCOTTISH) VOLUNTEER BATTALION, THE KING'S (LIVERPOOL 
REGIMENT) ....... 

VOLUNTEER BATTALION, THE ROYAL SCOTS FUSILIERS 



ROXBURGH AND SELKIRK (THE BORDER) V.R.C. 

(BERWICKSHIRE) VOLUNTEER BATTALION, THE KING'S OWN SCOT- 
TISH BORDERERS 

(DUMFRIES) VOLUNTEER BATTALION, THE KING'S OWN SCOTTISH 
BORDERERS ....... 

GALLOWAY V.R.C. . 
LANARKSHIRE V.R.C. 

VOLUNTEER BATTALION, SCOTTISH RIFLES 
LANARKSHIRE V.R.C. . . . . . 

VOLUNTEER BATTALION, SCOTTISH RIFLES . 

., ,. „ ii (1862-97) 

(CITY OF DUNDEE) VOLUNTEER BATTALION, THE BLACK WATCH 
(ANGUS) ii 

(DUNDEE HIGHLAND) it 

(PERTHSHIRE) n 

(PERTHSHIRE HIGHLAND) n 
(FIFESHIRE) ii 

VOLUNTEER BATTALION, THE HIGHLAND LIGHT INFANTRY 

ii ti it ii ii (INCLUD- 

ING 5TH LANARK R.V.C., 1861-1873) 
LANARKSHIRE R.V.C. 

(GLASGOW HIGHLAND) VOLUNTEER BATTALION, THE HIGHLAND 
LIGHT INFANTRY 

(ROSS HIGHLAND) VOLUNTEER BATTALION, SEAFORTH HIGH' 
LANDERS ..... 
SUTHERLAND (SUTHERLAND HIGHLAND) V.R.C. 

(MORAYSHIRE) VOLUNTEER BATTALION, SEAFORTH HIGHLANDERS 
VOLUNTEER BATTALION, GORDON HIGHLANDERS . 

3RD (BUCHAN) VOLUNTEER BATTALION, GORDON HIGHLANDERS 

4TH (DONSIDE HIGHLAND) VOLUNTEER BATTALION, GORDON HIGH 

LANDERS 

5TH (DEESIDE HIGHLAND) VOLUNTEER BATTALION, GORDON HIGH- 
LANDERS ...... 

6TH VOLUNTEER BATTALION, GORDON HIGHLANDERS . 

7TH tt it ,, „ 

1ST VOLUNTEER BATTALION, THE CAMERON HIGHLANDERS 



THE 
1ST 

2nd 
3rd 
4th 
5th 
1st 
2nd 
3rd 
4th 
5th 
6th 
1st 
2nd 
3rd 

9th 

5th 



1st 
3rd 
1st 
2ND 



185 
187 
190 
193 
196 
198 

200 
201 
204 
206 

211 

214 
217 



237 
240 
242 
245 
247 
251 
254 
257 
262 

265 
270 



276 
278 



291 
294 



301 
305 
307 
308 



Contents. xv 

1ST (RENFREWSHIRE) VOLUNTEER BATTALION, ARGYLL AND SUTHER- 
LAND HIGHLANDERS . . . . . .312 

2ND (RENFREWSHIRE) VOLUNTEER BATTALION, ARGYLL AND SUTHER- 
LAND HIGHLANDERS . . . . . .315 

3RD (RENFREWSHIRE) VOLUNTEER BATTALION, ARGYLL AND SUTHER- 
LAND HIGHLANDERS . . . . . .317 

4TH (STIRLINGSHIRE) VOLUNTEER BATTALION, ARGYLL AND SUTHER- 
LAND HIGHLANDERS ...... 320 

5TH VOLUNTEER BATTALION, ARGYLL AND SUTHERLAND HIGHLANDERS 323 

1ST DUMBARTONSHIRE V.R.C. ...... 328 

7TH (CLACKMANNAN AND KINROSS) VOLUNTEER BATTALION, ARGYLL 

AND SUTHERLAND HIGHLANDERS ..... 332 

7TH MIDDLESEX (LONDON SCOTTISH) V.R.C. . . . . 336 

ARMY SERVICE CORPS (VOLUNTEERS) ..... 341 

ROYAL ARMY MEDICAL CORPS (VOLUNTEERS) .... 343 

EDINBURGH COMPANY ...... 343 

ABERDEEN COMPANIES ...... 344 

GLASGOW COMPANIES . . . . . . 344 

BEARER COMPANIES ...... 345 



APPENDICES. 

A. LIST OF RIFLE CORPS FORMED IN THE COUNTY OF ABERDEEN . 346 

B. LIST OF RIFLE CORPS FORMED IN THE COUNTY OF FORFAR . 347 

C. LIST OF RIFLE CORPS FORMED IN THE COUNTY OF LANARK . 348 

D. LIST OF RIFLE CORPS FORMED IN THE COUNTY OF RENFREW . 350 

E. ENROLLED STRENGTH OF THE SCOTTISH VOLUNTEER FORCE ON THE 

1ST OF APRIL 1862 . . . . . .351 

F. RETURN OF THE SCOTTISH VOLUNTEER CORPS FOR THE YEAR 1881 355 

G. ESTABLISHMENTS OF THE UNITS OF THE . VOLUNTEER FORCE IN 

SCOTLAND FOR 1907-1908 . . . . . .358 

h. return of the scottish volunteer corps for the year 1907 364 
i. establishments and strength of the scottish volunteer 

force, 1880 to 1907 ...... 367 

j. table showing the units op the territorial army into 
which those of the scottish volunteer force were con- 
VERTED ON OR AFTER 1ST APRIL 1908 . . . 369 



LIST OF PLATES OF UNIFOEMS. 



OPP. PACK 



XIII. 

XIV. 
XV. 
XVI. 
XVII. 
XVIII. 
XIX. 
XX. 



XXII. 

xxni. 

XXIV. 



1ST FIFE AND 1ST FORFAR LIGHT HORSE ; 1ST DUMFRIES 

AND BORDER MOUNTED RIFLES 
1ST EDINBURGH CITY AND 1ST MID-LOTHIAN R.G.A.V. . 
1ST BANFF AND 1ST FORFAR R.G.A.V. . 
1ST RENFREW AND DUMBARTON AND 1ST FIFE R.G.A.V. 
1ST LANARK, 1ST AYR AND GALLOWAY, AND 1ST ARGYLL 

AND BUTE R.G.A.V. ..... 

1ST CAITHNESS, 1ST ABERDEEN, AND 1ST BERWICK R.G.A.V. 

THE HIGHLAND AND 1ST ORKNEY R.G.A.V. 

1ST LANARK R.E.V. ..... 

1ST ABERDEEN AND 2ND LANARK R.E.V. 

QUEEN'S RIFLE VOLUNTEER BRIGADE, ROYAL SCOTS 

4TH AND 9TH VOLUNTEER BATTALIONS, ROYAL SCOTS, AND 8TH 

VOLUNTEER BATTALION THE KING'S (LIVERPOOL) REGIMENT 
5TH VOLUNTEER BATTALION THE ROYAL SCOTS 
6TH VOLUNTEER BATTALION THE ROYAL SCOTS 
7TH AND 8TH VOLUNTEER BATTALIONS THE ROYAL SCOTS 
1ST AND 2ND VOLUNTEER BATTALIONS ROYAL SCOTS FUSILIERS 
BORDER VOLUNTEER RIFLE CORPS 
2ND VOLUNTEER BATTALION KING'S OWN SCOTTISH BORDERERS 
3RD VOLUNTEER BATTALION KING'S OWN SCOTTISH BORDERERS 
GALLOWAY VOLUNTEER RIFLE CORPS 
1ST LANARK VOLUNTEER RIFLE CORPS . 
2ND VOLUNTEER BATTALION THE SCOTTISH RIFLES, AND 3RD 

LANARK VOLUNTEER RIFLE CORPS 
4TH VOLUNTEER BATTALION THE SCOTTISH RIFLES 
5TH VOLUNTEER BATTALION THE SCOTTISH RIFLES 
1ST VOLUNTEER BATTALION THE ROYAL HIGHLANDERS 



120 
128 
134 
138 

144 
154 
160 
166 
170 
178 

186 
188 
190 
194 



212 
214 
218 
220 



234 
238 
240 



xviii List of Plates of Uniforms. 



xxv. 2nd and 3rd volunteer battalions the royal high- 
landers . . . . 

XXVI. 4th and 5th volunteer battalions the royal high- 
landers ....... 

xxvii. 6th volunteer battalion the royal highlanders 
xxviii. 1st volunteer battalion the highland light infantry 
xxix. 2nd volunteer battalion the highland light infantry 
xxx. 3rd volunteer battalion the highland light 

fantry, and 5th lanark (1861-1873) r.v.c. 
xxxi. 9th lanark volunteer rifle corps, and 5th volunteer 

battalion the highland light infantry 
xxxii. 1st volunteer battalion seaforth highlanders 
xxxiii. 1st sutherland volunteer rifle corps . 
xxxiv. 3rd volunteer battalion seaforth highlanders 
xxxv. 1st volunteer battalion gordon highlanders. 
xxxvi. 2nd and 5th volunteer battalions gordon high- 
LANDERS . . . 
XXXVII. 3RD VOLUNTEER BATTALION GORDON HIGHLANDERS 
XXXVIII. 4TH VOLUNTEER BATTALION GORDON HIGHLANDERS 

XXXIX. 6TH AND 7TH VOLUNTEER BATTALIONS GORDON HIGH- 
LANDERS ...... 

XL. 1ST VOLUNTEER BATTALION CAMERON HIGHLANDERS 
XLI. 1ST AND 2ND VOLUNTEER BATTALIONS ARGYLL AND SUTHER- 
LAND HIGHLANDERS .... 

XLII. 3RD AND 4TH VOLUNTEER BATTALIONS ARGYLL AND SUTHER- 
LAND HIGHLANDERS .... 

XLIII. 5TH VOLUNTEER BATTALION ARGYLL AND SUTHERLAND 
HIGHLANDERS ..... 

XLIV. 1ST DUMBARTON VOLUNTEER RIFLE CORPS . 
XLV. 7TH VOLUNTEER BATTALION ARGYLL AND SUTHERLAND 
HIGHLANDERS ..... 

XLVI. 7TH MIDDLESEX (LONDON SCOTTISH) VOLUNTEER RIFLE 
CORPS ...... 

XLVII. ARMY SERVICE CORPS VOLUNTEERS AND ROYAL ARMY 
MEDICAL CORPS VOLUNTEERS 



248 
254 
258 
262 



270 
276 

278 
284 



306 
310 

314 

318 

324 
328 

332 

336 

342 



LIST OF WOKKS, Ac, CONSULTED. 



Monthly Army Lists, 1859 to date. 

' Narrative of the Royal Scottish Volunteer Review in Holyrood Park on 

the 7th August I860.' By E. R. Vernon. Edinburgh : W. P. Nimmo, 

1860. 

Files of the ' Scotsman ' and ' Glasgow Herald,'" 1860 and 1881. 

'History of Defensive Organisation.' By John Crawford, Captain, late 

19th Lanark R.V. Glasgow : David Robertson & Co., 1878. 
1 History of the Volunteer Infantry.' By R. P. Berry, late Lieutenant 6th 

West York R.V. Simpkin, Marshall, Hamilton, Kent & Co., Limited, 

1903. 
Painting of "The Glasgow Volunteers, 1861-63." By Thomas Robertson, 

W.S.A., 1863, in the possession of Lieut. -Colonel R. Patterson, V.D., 

5th V.B. Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, 8 Clairmont Gardens, 

Glasgow. 
'History of the Fife Light Horse.' By Colonel Anstruther Thomson. 

Edinburgh : William Blackwood & Sons, 1892. 
' History of the Queen's Edinburgh Rifle Volunteer Brigade.' By William 

Stephen. Edinburgh : William Blackwood & Sons, 1881. 
Bazaar Handbook of the Hawick Volunteers.' 1902. 
' History of Galashiels.' By Robert Hall. Galashiels : Alexander Walker 

& Son, 1898. 
' History of the 1st Lanark Rifle Volunteers.' By David Howie. Glasgow : 

David Robertson & Co., 1887. 
' History of the 7th Lanark Rifle Volunteers.' By Captain James Orr, late 

R.E., and Adjutant of the Battalion. Glasgow : Robert Anderson, 

22 Ann Street. 1884. 
'History of the 1st Volunteer Battalion Highland Light Infantry' (written 

for their bazaar). 1891. 
' The 1st Lanark Rifles Gazette.' 
' The Pibroch ' (Glasgow Highlanders' Annual Record). 



xx List of Works, &c, Consulted. 

1 Sutherland and the Reay Country.' By the Rev. Adam Gunn, M.A., and 
John Mackay. Glasgow : 'Celtic Monthly' Office, 1897. 

' History of the 3rd Volunteer Battalion, Seaforth Highlanders, 1860-1906.' 
Elgin : ' Northern Scot ' Office, 1906. 

'History of the Aberdeen Volunteers.' By Donald Sinclair, Solicitor, 
Aberdeen. 'Aberdeen Daily Journal' Office, 1907. 

' Records of the 3rd (The Buchan) Volunteer Battalion, Gordon Highlanders.' 
By Captain and Hon. Major James Ferguson. Peterhead : David 
Scott, 1894. 

' Records of the 5th (Deeside Highland) Volunteer Battalion, Gordon High- 
landers.' Compiled by Major P. L. Davidson. Printed for private 
circulation, 1898. 

'History of the Volunteers of Clackmannan and Kinross.' By Surgeon- 
Captain E. E. Dyer, 7th V.B. Argyll & Sutherland Highlanders. Alva : 
Robert Cunningham, 1907. 

' The London Scottish Regimental Gazette.' 

' The Royal Review,' special number of ' The Scottish Review.' September 
14, 1905. 

' Historical Sketch of the 4th (Perthshire) Volunteer Battalion, The Black 
Watch.' By Captain G. D. Pullar. Edinburgh: Hillside Printing 
Works, 1907. 

'A Military History of Perthshire, 1660-1902.' Edited by the Marchioness 
of Tullibardine. Perth : R. A. & J. Hay, 1908. 



LIST OF SUBSCEIBEKS. 



Adam, Arthur, V.D., Lieut-Col. (retired), 5th V.B.RS. 

Aitken, Arthur Campbell, Lieut., 9th V.B.RS. 

Anderson, C. W., Major, 4th Bn. K.O.S.B. 

Anderson, D. P., 2nd Lieut., 8th Bn. S.R. 

Anderson, Wm, & Sons, Military Outfitters. 

Anstruther, Sir Ealph, Bart., Colonel commanding late 6th V.B. 

Black Watch (E.H.) 
Arrol, A. Theodore, Esq. 
Arthur, David S., Captain, 8th Bn. S.E. 
Atkinson, Herbert E., late Sergeant, London Scottish. 
Auld, William, Major, 1st L.E.V. 

Barnett, Hugh, V.D., Major and Hon. Lieut.-Col., 1st V.B.RS.F., 

now 4th Bn. RS.F. 
Beatson, Sir George Thomas, K.C.B., M.D., Colonel, RA.M.C. 

(Territorial). 
Bennett, Alex. J. M., Captain and Hon. Major, 8th Bn. A. & S.H. 
Bennett, Robt. J., Lieut.-Col. commanding 1st L.A.V. 
Bethune, H. A., Major, 7th Bn. Black Watch. 
Birrell, A., Colonel, 9th Bn. H.L.I. 

Blackwood, William, formerly Lieut. 1st Artisan Coy. Q.E.V.B. 
Broadfoot, Wm. R, V.D., Colonel (retired), 1st L.E.E. 
Brock, H., Colonel, 9th Bn. A. & S.H. 
Burns-Macdonald, Arch., Captain, 9th Argyllshire RV. (1860). 

Cadell, Henry M., V.D., Lieut.-Col. and Hon. Col., lately com- 
manding Forth Division E.E., Submarine Miners. 
Campbell, John, Major, 4th Q.O.C.H. 
Campbell, M. Pearce, Captain and Hon. Major (retired), 1st L.E.V. 



xxii List of Subscribers. 

Campbell, Mrs. 
Campbeltown Free Library. 
Cargill, John T., Esq. 

Chalmers, Hugh D. D., Colonel commanding 6th Bn. H.L.I. 
Clarke, Seymour, Major, Q.O.C.H. 
Cockburn, David, Major, 9th A. & S.H. 
Connal, K. H. M., Major, Queen's Own Royal Glasgow. 
Corsar, Charles, Captain, 1st Forfar RG.A.V. 
Crawford, Euing R, V.D., Lieut.-Col. and Hon. Col., late com- 
manding 1st L.R.E.V. 
Cuthbert, T. W., J.P., Captain, 4th V.B. Seaforth Highlanders. 

Dalmahoy, J. A., M.V.O., V.D., 1st Lowland Brigade E.F.A. 

Dickson, David, Lieut.-Col., Q.RV.B. 

Donald, A. H., Lieut.-Col., 1st L.R.V. 

Donald, C. G., C.B., Brigadier - General, commanding Home 

Counties Division. 
Douglas, Bailie R. A., J.P., late Q.R.V.B. 
Douglas, Eobert Jeffrey, Major, 5th Bn. S.B, 
Duke, David, V.D., Captain and Hon. Major, 2nd (Angus) V.B. 

The Black Watch (R.H.) 
Duncan, W. V., Major, 1st V.B. The Gordon Highlanders. 
Dundee Free Library. 
Dunlop, J. W., C.B., Colonel, RA. 
Dunlop, Thomas, Captain (retired), 1st L.RV. 

Edinburgh Public Library. 
Edington, George H., Captain, B.A.M.C.(T.) 
Elliot, Stuart Douglas, V.D., Lieut.-Col. and Hon. Col. (retired), 
4th V.B.RS. 

Fergusson, James, Colonel (retired), 9th V.B.RS. 

Findlay, James M., Captain, 8th Cameronians (S.R) 

Fleming, William G., V.D., Colonel, 9th Bn. H.L.I. 

Forsyth, R W., Limited. 

Fraser, Hugh Munro, Lieut.-Col., 1st V.B. Seaforth Highlanders. 

Frew, William, Surgeon-Colonel (retired), 4th V.B.RS. Fusiliers. 

Garroway, John, V.D., Major, 5th V.B.S.R 
Gentles, Norman, Captain, 6th V.B.S.R. 



List of Subscribers. xxiii 

Gilmour, Sir John, Bart., late Colonel commanding Fife and 

Forfar I.Y. 
Gordon, Alex., F.S.M., Captain, 3rd V.B. A. & S.H. 
Graham, Balfour, V.D., F.RC.S.K, Lieut. - Col., A.M.R, and 

E.A.M.C.(T.F.) 
Graham, D. Runciman, V.D., Colonel, late commanding 3rd 

V.B.H.L.I. 
Grant, A. B., M.V.O., V.D., Colonel, late commanding 1st 

L.R.G.A.V. 
Grierson, John M., V.D., Major, 5th Bn. S.R. 
Griffith, Sir R. Waldie, Bart., 1st Roxburgh and Selkirk V.R.C. 

Haddon, And., Lieut.-Col. 

Halley, George, F.R.C.S.Ed., R.A.M.C.(y) 

Hamilton, His Grace the Duke of. 

Hamilton, William, Esq. 

Hannan, H. M., Major, 8th S.R., Brigade-Major Scot. Rifle Br. 

Harvey, Thomas, late Captain 1st Dumbartonshire V.R.C. (2 

copies.) 
Hatrick, William Lindsay, Captain, 5th V.B.H.L.I. 
Henderson, M. W., Lieut.-Col., 10th R.S. 
Hendry, P. W., Colonel, Brigade-Major H.L.I. 
Heys, Z. H., Lieut.-Col., 3rd V.B. A. & S.H. 
Hill, G. W., Esq. 

Hill, Howard, Lieut.-Col. commanding 4th Bn. R.H. 
Hope, Charles, Colonel, late commanding 2nd V.B.K.O.S.B. 
Hope, James A., V.D., Lieut.-Col., A.S.C.(T.) 
Hopkins, Hugh, Esq. (2 copies.) 
Hunter, Andrew A., Esq., late London Scottish. 

Jackson, Thomas, Lieut.-Col., 7r.h L.R.V. 

Johnston, Jas. W., M.V.O., V.D., Lieut.-Col. Commandant (Hon. 
Col.) 1st Fifeshire R.G.A.V. 

Kay, W. Martin, Major, 6th S.R. 

Kennedy, Walter Philips, V.D., Major, Border Rifles. 

Knight, C. A., Hon. Major, 1st V.B.H.L.T. 

Laidlaw, D., Lieut. - Col. Commandant and Hon. Col. Scot. 
Telegraph Coys. R.E. and 2nd Highland Field Coy. R.E. 



xxiv List of Subscribers. 

Lang, James, Lieut.-Col., 1st L.K.E. (for Officers' Library). 

Lennox, Colonel. 

Leslie, John H., Major, RA. 

Lomax, S. H., Major- General. 

Loudon, J. Livingstone, Surgeon-Captain, 2nd V.B.S.R. 

Love, J. J., Captain, 4th Bn. R.S.F. 

Lowson, James, Major, 1st L.R.V. 

M'Dougal, James, Captain, 2nd V.B.K.O.S.B. 

Macfie, A. L., V.D., Lieut. - Col. and Hon. Col. commanding 
"Liverpool Scottish." 

Mackenzie, R. C, Colonel commanding H.L.I. Brigade Territorial 
Force. 

Mackenzie, Stewart, of Brahan Castle, Colonel. (2 copies.) 

Mackintosh, St Angus, Royal Horse Guards. 

M'Niel, John, V.D., Lieut.-Col. commanding Forth and Clyde 
R.G.A. 

Mann, Robert M., Major, 1st L.R.V. 

Marryat, Lieut.-Col., late commanding 1st Bn. Manchester Regi- 
ment. 

Maxwell, Warden R., Hon. Col., 8th S.R. 

Mellis, Wm. A., V.D., Colonel, 6th Bn. Gordon Highlanders. 

Melvill-Simons, Mrs H. 

Millar, A., Hon. Major, 3rd V.B.H.L.I. 

Mitchell Library, Glasgow. 

Montefiore, Cecil Sebog, Major, 2nd London Divisional En- 
gineers. (2 copies.) 

Morrison, Fred L., Lieut.-Col., 1st V.B.H.L.I. 

Morton, D. S., Lieut.-Col., 1st V.B.H.L.I. 

Nicoll, P. S., Major, 5th Bn. Black Watch. 
Outram, James, Colonel, 5th H.L.I. 

Park, J. Smith, M.V.O., V.D., Lieut.-Col. and Hon. Col., 1st 

L.R.E.V. 
Paul, Thos. Alex., Colonel, later Lieut.-Col. and Hon. Col., 1st 

L.R.V. 
Paul, W. J., Major (retired), 4th V.B.S.R. 
Pease, G. Smith, Lieut.-Col. and Hon. Col., 1st Orkney R.G.A. 



List of Subscribers. xxv 

Eae, Captain, Vancouver. 

Reid, A. T., V.D., Lieut.-Col., late 4th V.B. Black Watch (R.H.) 

Reid, James A., V.D., Hon. Col., 5th Bn. S.B. 

Eobertson, H. Gordon, Major, 1st Renfrew and Dumbarton R.G.A. 

Robertson, Robert, M.V.O., V.D., Colonel, late commanding 3rd 

V.B. Gordon Highlanders. 
Robinson, T. Eaton, Major (retired), 1st L.R.V. 
Rodger, J. G., Captain and Hon. Major (retired), 1st L.R.V. 
Ross, Arthur Victor, Lieut., 5th Bn. H.L.I. 
Rottenburg, Fritz, Esq. 
Rottenburg, Paul, Esq., LL.D. 
Roxburgh, J. A., V.D., Hon. Col., Lieut.-Col. commanding 5th 

Bn. S.R. 

Sanderson, Arthur W., Captain, 7th Bn. R.S. 

Sherriff, George, Esq. 

Signet Library, Edinburgh. 

Simpson, E., Colonel, 4th V.B. A. & S.H. 

Smith, Fred. J., Lieut.-Col. and Hon. Col. commanding 8th Bn. 

S.R. 
Smith, J. Guthrie, Hon. Major (retired), 3rd V.B.H.L.I. 
Smith, W. A., V.D., Lieut.-Col., 1st L.R.V. 
Spencer, Miss. 

Stamfield, John, Captain, Royal Scots Greys. 
Stevenson, Allan, V.D., Captain and Hon. Major, 4th Bn. K.O.S.B. 
Stewart, C. Murray, Captain, 6th Bn. Black Watch (R.H.) 
Sutherland, Jas. B., V.D., Colonel (retired), Q.R.V.B. (R.S.) 

" The Adjutant," 4th Bn. K.O.S.B. 

The Prince Consort's Library, Aldershot. 

Todd, G. Bell, V.D., Surgeon-Lieut.-Col., 9th H.L.I. 

Tulloch, W. Forbes, Captain, 8th V.B.S.R. 

University Library, King's College, Aberdeen, per P. J. Ander- 
son, Esq., Librarian. 

Urquhart, R., M.V.O., V.D., Colonel, 3rd V.B. Seaforth High- 
landers. 

Walker, H. W., Lieut., R.F.A. 

Walker, James W., Captain, 1st Ayr and Galloway R.G.A. 



xxvi List of Subscribers. 

Walker, Miss Sophia I. 

Watt, Edward W., Captain, 4th Gordon Highlanders. 

Whigham, George, Lieut.-Col., Q.R.V.B. 

Wilson, H. Arnold, Captain, 5th Bn. S.R. 

Wilson, John B., V.D., J.P., Colonel, 7th Bn. S.R. 

Wright, John P., Esq. 

Wylie, James K. M., Lieut., 8th Bn. S.R 



Records of the 



ERRATA. 



Page 183, line 18 from top, for " now " read " latterly.' 
„ 276, „ 17 „ top, delete "(later buff)." 
„ „ „ 22 „ top, for "white" read "blue." 
„ 340, „ 4 „ foot, for " Gun " read " Green." 



keep the army, on whose support the throne 
depended, employed in gathering that glory of which 
the French soldier has from all time been so avid. 
Mainly to these reasons had been due the participation 
of France in the war which, for nigh upon two years, 
had raged in the East. Fresh from its victories in the 
Crimea, the French army fancied itself, possibly with 
right, the most powerful military instrument in Europe, 
and its leaders eagerly sought for new fields wherein 



xxvi List of Subscribers. 

Walker, Miss Sophia I. 

Watt, Edward W., Captain, 4th Gordon Highlanders. 

Whigham, George, Lieut.-Col., Q.R.V.B. 

Wilson, H. Arnold, Captain, 5th Bn. S.R. 

Wilson, John B., V.D., J.P., Colonel, 7th Bn. S.R. 

Wright, John P., Esq. 

Wylie, James K. M., Lieut., 8th Bn. S.R. 



Records of the 
Scottish Volunteer Force. 



i. 

GENERAL ACCOUNT OF THE ORIGIN AND 
HISTORY OF THE FORCE. 

The year 1859 dawned amidst the mutterings of storm- 
clouds in Europe. Since the birth of the third French 
Empire, the aim of its rulers had been to distract the 
The oiitkai at t en tion °f the people of France from internal 
situation in affairs by an active foreign policy, and to 
keep the army, on whose support the throne 
depended, employed in gathering that glory of which 
the French soldier has from all time been so avid. 
Mainly to these reasons had been due the participation 
of France in the war which, for nigh upon two years, 
had raged in the East. Fresh from its victories in the 
Crimea, the French army fancied itself, possibly with 
right, the most powerful military instrument in Europe, 
and its leaders eagerly sought for new fields wherein 



2 Origin and History of the Force. 

they might add to the laurels already gained against 
Russia. To the rulers of France the cause of Italian 
unity seemed therefore a proper field for their exploits, 
and a sensation of imminent danger of war ran through 
Europe when, on the 1st January 1859, at the New 
Year's reception at the Tuileries, the Emperor Napoleon 
III. said to the Austrian Ambassador that he regretted 
that his " relations with the Austrian Government were 
not so good as in the past." Mainly directed, of course, 
against Austria as this threat was, it nevertheless 
caused alarm in other countries, as showing the mili- 
tant temper of the French Government, and nowhere 
more so than in Great Britain. There had not been 
wanting previous signs of a growing hostility to this 
country in France, especially in the army, and all the 
more so since the plot against the Emperor's life, which 
had been hatched by Orsini and others in England, and 
which had so nearly succeeded in its dastardly purpose. 
The Emperor of the French had for some time been 
strengthening his navy and pushing on the great 
harbour works and fortifications of Cherbourg, and 
the tone of the officially inspired French press had 
gradually become extremely hostile to Great Britain. 
Certain French colonels, in their congratulations to 
the Emperor on his escape from assassination, had 
permitted themselves to indulge in threats to cross the 
Channel and plant the Imperial eagles on the Tower 
of London, and these, officially published in the ' Moni- 
teur,' though afterwards disclaimed, raised public feel- 
ing in Great Britain to fever-heat. 

For long there had been an uneasy feeling in the 
Military country that its defences were in an unsatis- 
nLTo P f a ar d e'at factor y state > and tne minds of thinking 
Britain. men na( j Deen exercised on the subject ever 
since the publication in 1847 of the famous letter from 



First Offers of Volunteer Corps. 3 

the Duke of Wellington to Sir John Burgoyne, insist- 
ing on the danger of the situation and the necessity of 
preparation for war, which had made a great impres- 
sion on the country at the time. In 1852 the militia 
had been revived, and it had rendered splendid service 
during the Crimean War and Indian Mutiny ; but men's 
minds now reverted to the period when Great Britain 
had been threatened by France at the beginning of the 
century, and they remembered that at that time their 
fathers had volunteered to supplement the regular 
army and the constitutional militia in the defence of 
the country. True to the great traditions of their 
race, as their fathers had done before them so would 
they do now, and patriotic men felt that the hour had 
come to offer their services. A mass meeting was held 
in April 1859 in St Martin's Hall, Longacre, to protest 
against the insufficiency of the national defences, offers 
to form volunteer corps began to pour in upon the 
Government, and the Poet-Laureate, Tennyson, voiced 
the national attitude in an ode published in ' The 
Times ' of May 9, 1859, the first verse of which 
ran — 

" There is a sound of thunder afar, 

Storm in the South that darkens the day ! 

Storm of battle and thunder of war ! 

Well if it do not roll our way. 

Storm, Storm, Eiflemen form ! 

Eeady, be ready against the storm ! 

Eiflemen, Eiflemen, Eiflemen form ! " 

In Scotland all traces of the Volunteers of 1803 and 
the Sharpshooters of 1819, except the memory of them, 
volunteer ^ad passed away, but in England one corps 
corps exist- existed which traced its origin to the time 
of the great wars. This was the " Boyal 
Victoria Bifles," which, originally known as " The Duke 



4 Origin and History of the Force. 

of Cumberland's Sharpshooters," had been raised in 
1803 and had escaped extinction. It for long existed 
only as a rifle club in London, with a rifle-range at 
Kilburn, and only in 1853 was it allowed to assemble 
as volunteers for drill. In 1858 it only numbered 57 
men, but in it was serving as captain a Mr Hans Busk, 
who was strongly impressed with the defenceless state 
of the Kingdom and devoted his time to advocating 
the formation of a Volunteer force, and, as an example 
of what it might be made, laboured to increase the 
Victoria Rifles. In this he was successful. By the 
middle of 1859 the corps mustered 800 men, and it 
existed till 1908 as portion of the 1st Middlesex Bifle 
Volunteer Corps. 

But though undoubtedly of the greater antiquity, 
the Victoria Bifles were not awarded precedence for 
their county as the first in the volunteer force, as in 
1852 an offer had been made by certain citizens of 
Exeter to form a volunteer corps, and their services 
had been accepted by the Government of the day. 
This corps became in 1859 the 1st Devonshire Bifle 
Volunteers, and gained for its county the first place in 
the table of precedence for rifle volunteers by virtue of 
its having been constituted as a corps a year earlier 
than the Victoria Bifles. 

Liverpool also was early afoot in the formation of a 
volunteer corps, for in 1855 Mr Nathaniel Bousfield 
founded in that city the " Liverpool Drill Club," con- 
sisting of about a hundred members, who were 
uniformed and armed ; but their services were not 
accepted as volunteers until 1859, when Mr Bousfield 
had the honour of receiving the first commission 
granted to a volunteer on June 11, and his club formed 
the nucleus of the 1st Lancashire Bifle Volunteers. 

But if, prior to 1859, Scotland had no nuclei of 



The Survivors of Former Forces. 5 

volunteers, it was not long before the surviving repre- 
sentatives of the former existing forces banded them- 
selves together once more, for in February 1860 a 
meeting of the survivors of the Glasgow Light Horse 
of 1796, the volunteers of 1803, and the Sharpshooters 
of 1819 was held in Glasgow, one of the only two 
survivors of the first-named corps (Mr Robert Reid, 
eighty-eight years of age) being present. It was 
resolved that they should form themselves into a 
veteran rifle corps, to be designated " The Old Guard 
of Glasgow," armed and clothed at their own expense, 
and an offer of their services was transmitted to the 
proper authorities. This was acknowledged by the 
military secretary to the General Commanding-in-Chief 
on February 7, 1860, who added that it was "gratify- 
ing to his Royal Highness to be thus assured that the 
military spirit still exists among those who came 
forward in past years when the country was likely to 
require their services." The date of the official accept- 
ance of the services of the corps was April 3, 1860, and 
it was numbered the 78th Lanark. It does not appear 
that the members ever appeared in uniform or did any 
drill, but they set an example to the younger genera- 
tion which was of much value to the cause of volun- 
teering. The corps was subsequently merged in the 
3rd Lanark Rifle Volunteers. 

The Government of the day was slow to move in 

the matter of accepting the services of volunteer 

corps, too slow to please the ardent advocates of the 

. movement, who naturally accused the Govern- 

Attitude of ' .*'.-. 

the aovern- ment of apathy and its military advisers of 
volunteer active opposition to the " amateur soldier," 
movement, ^ut, viewed dispassionately at this lapse of 
time, the action of the authorities appears to have 
been guided by sound sense. It was desirable that, 



6 Origin and History of the Force. 

before sanctioning the formation of a new military 
force, it should be ascertained whether its establish- 
ment was likely to be a success, whether the promises 
of those offering their services were likely to be borne 
out by their performances, whether the new levies 
would interfere with the recruiting of other branches of 
the national forces, — in short, the advisability of en- 
couraging the movement had to be debated from the 
hard matter-of-fact point of view, patriotic exultation 
being put on one side. The decision was taken in the 
affirmative, and, as the official account 1 puts it : " No 
exaggerated view was held by the War Minister of 
what volunteers could achieve. It was sufficient to 
utilise the ardent feeling of the nation to create a 
defensive force of ordinary citizens of the middle class, 
and to leave that force to work out its own development 
by constantly aiming at higher military efficiency, by 
a gradual tightening of the bonds of discipline, and by 
a closer drawing of the links which attach it to the 
regular army. . . . From the first, the judicious policy 
of giving assistance in proportion to efficiency was 
adopted by the War Office, and it is probably to this 
as much as to any other cause that the system has 
developed lasting qualities." On May 12, 1$59, 
the establishment of the volunteer force in Great 
Britain was sanctioned. 

This sanction was conveyed by a War Office cir- 
cular of the date just mentioned, signed by General 
The war Peel, Secretary of State for War, which au- 
^!w of May thorised the formation of volunteer corps 
13,1859. under the provisions of Act 44, George III., 
cap. 54, dated June 5, 1804. This circular was 
addressed to the Lords -Lieutenant of counties, and 
authorised them to submit proposals for the formation 
1 The Army Book of the British Empire, p. 381. 



JVar Office Circular of May 12, 1859. 7 

of volunteer rifle corps, and of artillery corps in mari- 
time towns where there might be forts and batteries. 
The principal provisions of the Act of 1804, which were 
recapitulated in the circular, were that the officers 
should be commissioned by the Lord-Lieutenant ; that 
the members should take the oath of allegiance ; that 
the force might be called out in case of actual in- 
vasion, appearance of an enemy on the coast, or rebellion 
arising from either of these emergencies ; that while 
under arms the members should be subject to military 
law, and be paid and billeted like regular soldiers, half- 
pay or pensions being the right of those disabled in 
actual service ; that members could not quit the corps 
when on actual service, but at other times could do so 
on giving fourteen days' notice ; that members who had 
attended eight days in each four months, or a total of 
twenty-four days' drill in the year, should be returned 
as effective ; that members should be exempt from ballot 
for the militia ; that all property of the corps should be 
legally vested in the commanding officer ; and that sub- 
scriptions and fines under the rules of the corps should 
be recoverable by him before a magistrate. The circular 
went on to state that Her Majesty's Government would 
recommend to Her Majesty the acceptance of any pro- 
posal for the formation of a corps submitted by the 
Lord-Lieutenant under the above conditions, provided 
that the members undertook to provide their own arms 
and equipment, and to defray all expenses attending 
the corps, except in the event of its being assembled 
for actual service. Rules and regulations were to be 
submitted for each corps. The uniform and equipment 
might be settled by the members, subject to the ap- 
proval of the Lord-Lieutenant ; but the arms had to be 
furnished under the superintendence of the War Office, 
so as to secure uniformity of gauge. The establishments 



8 Origin and History of the Force. 

were to be fixed by the Secretary of State upon the 
Lord - Lieutenant reporting the number of privates 
recommended and the number of companies into which 
it was proposed to divide them. The closing sentence 
reminded the Lord-Lieutenant that he was responsible 
for the nomination of " proper persons " to be appointed 
officers. 

On May 25, 1859, General Peel issued a second 
circular explanatory of the views of Government on the 
organisation of the force. Premising that it 
war office was essential that volunteers should not be 
Mayas' ° left in ignorance of the nature and character 
,859 * of the service to which they were binding 

themselves, that military discipline was the first essen- 
tial, and that the conditions of service should be such 
that, while enforcing the necessary discipline, those 
classes should be induced to serve in the volunteers 
who did not enter the regular army or militia, the 
circular recommended that the system of drill and in- 
struction should not be such as to render the service 
unnecessarily irksome, or make such demands on the 
time of members as interfered with their ordinary avo- 
cations. Rifle volunteers should therefore not be drilled 
or organised " as soldiers expected to take their place 
in line," but each man should be so thoroughly instructed 
in the use of his weapon as to enable the force to act 
as a useful auxiliary to the regular army and militia. 
These objects could best be attained by the organisa- 
tion of rifle volunteers in companies of an establish- 
ment of one captain, one lieutenant, one ensign, and 
100 of all ranks as a maximum, or in subdivisions, or 
even sections of a company, the great object being that 
the members should have " a knowledge of and thorough 
dependence upon each other personally." The enclosed 
nature of the country would give peculiar importance 



War Office Circular of May 25, 1859. 9 

to the services of bodies of riflemen so composed, and 
with a thorough knowledge of their weapon, who should 
11 hang with the most telling effect upon the flanks and 
communications of a hostile army." Ranges should be 
established in each locality where volunteer corps were 
formed, and the issue, at cost price, from Government 
stores, was authorised of targets and of an annual allow- 
ance of ammunition of, for each trained volunteer, 90 
rounds of ball and 60 of blank cartridge and 165 per- 
cussion-caps, and for each recruit, of 110 ball and 20 
blank cartridges and 163 percussion -caps. The rifles 
should be uniform in gauge (0*577 in. to 0*580 in.) and 
size of nipple, and store - rooms for the arms near the 
ranges should be provided. Uniforms should be as 
simple as possible, and those of the different companies 
in each county should be similar. 

The Volunteer Artillery Corps should have as their 
first object the manning of the batteries erected for the 
protection of coast towns, and should be recruited from 
local men who might be married, or tied by business to 
the locality, or less fit for field duties, but who, never- 
theless, could find time to learn " how to work a great 
gun mounted in their immediate neighbourhood." The 
principles of organisation should be the same as for rifle 
corps, but the bodies might be even smaller. " For in- 
stance, the most effective system would be that which 
would associate ten or twelve men, all neighbours 
intimately acquainted with each other, in the charge 
and working of a particular gun mounted, so to speak, 
at their door." One man should be appointed " captain 
of the gun," an artilleryman should act as instructor, 
and " all that would be required of them would be that 
they should be able to prove, on a half-yearly inspection, 
that they had duly profited by the instruction so given, 
and had qualified themselves for the important trust re- 



io Origin and History of the Force. 

posed in them." In seaport towns, associations should 
be formed to man and work boats with a single gun in 
the bow, and it was hoped that shipowners, &c, would 
place their spare boats at the disposal of volunteers for 
this purpose. 

Under the conditions laid down in these two circulars, 
the volunteer force in Great Britain was initiated and 
The the " movement " began in earnest, each local- 

loveme'nt ity seeming to vie with the other in the work 
by k the UP °f volunteer organisation. " Defence and not 
country, defiance " was adopted as the motto of the 
force, and everywhere those in a position to head 
public efforts or to lead public opinion took up 
enthusiastically the task of organisation for the 
defence of hearth and home. The movement was 
a thoroughly national one, and all ranks and 
classes took part in it. In the counties the lairds 
put themselves at the head of their neighbours 
and tenants, and in the towns the chiefs of the 
mercantile communities organised their employes. In 
many cases, gentlemen of position formed themselves 
into self-supporting corps and purchased their own 
arms and equipment, and at first, indeed, the move- 
ment was confined to such as could afford to do so ; 
but as all classes desired to take part in the defence of 
the country, it soon became evident that men of the 
artisan class would be unable to give their services free 
unless arms and equipment were provided for them, 
and accordingly measures were taken to raise the 
necessary funds by public subscription, or by the con- 
tributions of honorary members. 

The usual way in which a volunteer corps was formed, 
was that the local authorities or some leading inhabit- 
ants called a public meeting to discuss the subject, and 
then, if it was found that the general feeling was in 



The Volunteer Movement taken tip. 1 1 

favour of the formation of a corps, lists were drawn 
up and signed by those willing to join. When the 
numbers laid down in the circulars above quoted were 
attained, an application was submitted to the Lord- 
Lieutenant for the formation of the corps, and by him 
was transmitted to the Secretary of State for War, 
who in due course, and after the necessary conditions 
had been fulfilled,. conveyed to the corps Her Majesty's 
acceptance of its services. The next step was the ap- 
pointment of officers and non-commissioned officers, and 
at first (until later regulations placed the nomination 
of the officers in the hands of the Lord-Lieutenant, and 
that of the non-commissioned officers in those of the 
commanding officer) these were elected by the members 
of the corps. These appointments were not unfre- 
quently keenly canvassed, and meetings were held at 
which the candidates were voted for. In other cases, 
corps were raised by country gentlemen among their 
tenants, or by factory owners employing large numbers 
of men, and these usually nominated themselves, their 
sons, or their managers to commissions, and paid for 
the privilege by contributing largely to the funds of 
the corps. A large voice was at first accorded to all 
members in the management of the finances of the 
corps and its general arrangements, and the diffi- 
culty as to knowing where to draw the line between 
civil and military affairs was great. Hence often arose 
a want of discipline, which was intensified in many 
cases by the military ignorance of those appointed 
officers and non-commissioned officers, many of whom 
accepted these appointments from the love of position, 
dress, or notoriety, and, once appointed, failed to take 
the necessary steps to qualify themselves for their posi- 
tion. But the general spirit of the volunteers was 
enthusiastically patriotic, and their discipline improved 



1 2 Origin and History of the Force. 

rapidly, towards which the presence of a goodly number 
of former officers of the regular army in their ranks as 
officers or in lower grades 1 contributed not a little. 

The enthusiasm displayed by all ranks in the earliest 
days of the force may well be exemplified by an extract 
from an article entitled "A Brigadier's Retrospect," 
written in 1902 by Lord Kingsburgh (Colonel the 
Right Hon. Sir J. H. A. Macdonald, K.C.B.) for 'A 
Volunteer Haversack,' published by the Queen's Edin- 
burgh V.B. He wrote : — 

The volunteer of to-day can have little idea of the enthusiasm 
of that time. When a citizen joins the volunteer ranks to-day 
he enters a developed organisation in which his duties are pre- 
scribed, all that is necessary is provided, and he fulfils his part 
if he goes through a limited amount of training. In 1859 every- 
thing was novel, unorganised, and ill-provided. But what a life 
was in it ! The volunteer of that day had no thought of 
minimum in his drills. Many went regularly to two and even 
three drills a-day. I have myself drilled at seven in the morning 
with the Writers to the Signet, in the forenoon in the Parliament 
House, and in the afternoon out of doors with the Advocates, 
and in the Queen's Park in the evening with an artisan company. 
We plunged eagerly into all the complicated cat's-cradle drill of 
the Eed Book of those days, and despised the simple Green Book 
that was specially prepared to meet our condition of greenness. 
We went to the targets in all weathers. ... No doubt much of 
our zeal was of the " zeal without knowledge " kind, but it made 
up for that by being really hot. We did as many drills before 
any arms were served out to us as a volunteer of to-day does in 
his whole training. My roll-book when I commanded a company 
showed many volunteers attending ninety drills in one season, 
and very few fell below fifty. And how and where did we drill ? 
In Exchange Squares and Meadow Walks, by the light of the 
rat's-tail gas-burners of those days, when weather permitted ; in 



1 For example, Major-General William Riddell of Camieston, C.B., late 
H.E.I.C.S., served as a private in the 3rd Roxburgh R.V. (Melrose) from 
February 26, 1861, to April 30, 1871, and never aspired to promotion. 



The Movement in Edinburgh. 13 

small steaming rooms below the Council Chambers when driven 
in by rain or snow. Night after night, through the long winter 
and into spring, we laboured. Kich companies had drill in- 
structors in their pay, but we who had artisan companies had to 
do all our own drilling, getting our musketry certificates by 
judging distance in two inches of snow in the Meadows, and 
firing our course when one was glad to warm one's fingers between 
shots on the heated barrels of our muzzle-loaders, which, after 
the fouling of a few rounds, kicked us unmercifully. Yet I will 
venture to say that no man now alive who went through that 
ordeal but looks back on those days with pleasant recollections. 
I doubt not that much of our doing was not according to know- 
ledge, and I know now that much we had to do was antiquated 
and inadequate to modern war conditions, but we did it heartily, 
with a real interest and enthusiasm which the volunteer of to-day 
would be quite unable to understand. 

As in Edinburgh, so it was throughout the country, 
and never in the course of Scottish history was the old 
warlike spirit of the nation more thoroughly aroused 
than in 1859. 

To exemplify the various methods by which corps 
were originated, and the difficulties which were met 
with, it is of interest to record the beginnings of the 
movement in Edinburgh and Glasgow. 

In the capital, in March 1859, A. W. Macrae, Esq., 

W.S. (later a major in the Queen's Edinburgh E.V.), 

and Mr A. Henry (the inventor of the rifle 

The move- . •/ \ 

mentin bearing his name) had consulted together and 
n urg ' decided to try to raise a rifle corps. The list 
for the signature of intending members remained hang- 
ing in Mr Henry's shop for some time, but few names 
were received, and it was not until May of that year 
that the movement was started effectually in Edinburgh 
by the Highland Society petitioning the Secretary of 
State for War for permission to form themselves into a 
Highland volunteer company. The Society of Advo- 



14 Origin and History of the Force. 

cates made similar application early in the month, and 
it was only on May 26, in consequence of the issue of 
the War Office circular of May 12, that a meeting of 
Lieutenancy was held to consider what steps should be 
taken, and it was agreed that a regiment of rifles should 
be formed in the city, in which all the corps raised 
should be included. The Highland Society's Company 
became the 1st Highland, the Advocates the 1st on the 
general list, and the 1st Citizens' Company, the members 
of which subscribed their names immediately after the 
above meeting to a roll, in which those on Mr Henry's 
list were also incorporated, the 2nd. The members of 
all these, and of four more companies composed of pro- 
fessional gentlemen and formed shortly afterwards, paid 
all their own expenses and provided their own arms, 
equipment, and uniform. The next company was 
formed of bank clerks, for whom the various banks 
subscribed to provide arms, equipment, and uniform, 
and then followed two companies of artisans, the first 
raised in Scotland, of which the men of the first paid a 
contribution of 30s. in instalments, the remainder of the 
expenses being defrayed by public subscription, those 
of the second paying 45s. for their uniforms, other 
charges being met out of funds subscribed by employers. 
These were the original companies of what latterly was 
termed the Queen's Rifle Volunteer Brigade, The Royal 
Scots, the premier volunteer infantry corps in Scotland, 
and they gained for the capital, by their early offer of 
service, the senior place in order of precedence of the 
counties in the force. It was not until August 31, 
however, that the officers of these companies and of the 
staff of the regiment were gazetted. 

The second city of the Kingdom was even in advance 
of the capital in the matter of publicly bestirring itself 
for defence, for on May 2, 1859, a letter signed "Pro 



The Movement in Glasgow. 15 

Bono Patriae " appeared in ' The Glasgow Herald ' ad- 
vocating the formation of volunteer corps, and on the 
following day an advertisement was placed 
movement in the same newspaper asking those who were 
asgow. .^ f avour f tn e formation of a volunteer 
rifle corps to communicate with "V.R.C., 'Herald' 
Office." The response was so satisfactory that " V.R.C." 
— Mr A. K. Murray — was able to call a meeting 
for May 4 at the Albion Hotel, 74 Argyle Street, 
which was attended by about a dozen gentlemen, 1 as 
a preliminary gathering, which was followed the same 
evening by a public meeting in the Royal Galleries, 
123 St Vincent Street. At this latter meeting about 
200 gentlemen put their names down as willing to 
join, and a committee was nominated to further the 
object and to communicate with the Secretary of State 
for War. After the issue of the circular of May 12, 
a second meeting was held, at which the Lord Provost 
occupied the chair, and at it, owing to the fact that 
no Government assistance in money or arms was prom- 
ised by the circular, a discussion took place as to 
details, which caused the resignation of the first com- 
mittee. A new one, under the presidency of the Lord 
Provost, and including the two Members of Parliament 
for Glasgow, the Sheriff of the County (Sir Archibald 
Alison, the historian of Europe), and others, was ap- 
pointed, and a meeting was held in the Trades' Hall 
on July 12, when sub - committees were appointed 
in the northern, southern, eastern, western, and central 
districts of the city, and these at once set to work to 
enrol and organise all classes of the community, — clerks, 
warehousemen, shopkeepers, and artisans. 

1 One of whom, Mr J. Carfrae Alston, served from 1859 to 1879 in the 
1st Lanark K.V., from which he retired as major, and is now president of 
the " Boys' Brigade " in Scotland. 



1 6 Origin and History of the Force. 

Meanwhile some gentlemen of the west end of 
Glasgow, impatient of the ponderous working of the 
official machine, had taken independent action, and 
immediately after the meeting on July 12 had 
drawn up and subscribed to a document offering their 
services to form "a volunteer rifle company, to be 
denominated the Glasgow Volunteer Rifle Corps, 
Western Section, No. 1," and further agreeing to 
supply their own arms and accoutrements, and to 
contribute to the extent of £2, 2s. per annum towards 
the expenses of the company. Much delay in the 
acceptance of their services was caused by the want 
of knowledge of procedure on the part of the pro- 
moters and the absence on the Continent of the Lord- 
Lieutenant, the Duke of Hamilton, but on August 
5 the services of the company were offered, and 
on September 24 they were accepted, and the 
company numbered the first in the county of Lanark. 
It subsequently became "A" Company of the 1st 
Lanark V.R.C. Consequent on the above-mentioned 
delays, Lanarkshire, though one of the earliest afield, 
was only given the 25th place among the counties in 
order of precedence in the rifle volunteer force, 
Edinburgh City (llth), Renfrewshire (14th), and 
Stirlingshire (23rd) standing before it in Scotland. 
Other corps quickly followed the example of the 1st 
Western, and, without waiting for official sanction, 
the corps equipped themselves and began to drill 
with great enthusiasm. Two corps, the 2nd Western 
(University), later 2nd Lanark, and the 1st Southern, 
later 3rd Lanark, afterwards "A" Company 3rd 
Lanark V.R.C, claimed priority of origin to the 1st 
Western, but these claims were disallowed in the 
subsequent renumbering in seniority in the county. 

During the initial stages of its development, the 



War Office Circular of July 13, 1859. 17 

Glasgow Central Committee, mentioned above, con- 
tinued to watch over and help the movement. In 
the city, as throughout the country, money was raised 
by bazaars, fancy fairs, balls, &c, and professions, large 
employers of labour, and traders contributed hand- 
somely to the funds of the corps organised from their 
members or employes, but it was thought that there 
were large numbers of merchants and manufacturers 
who could only be reached by public subscriptions. A 
public meeting was therefore summoned in the City 
Hall on 23rd November 1859, with the Lord Provost 
in the chair. It was addressed by Sir Archibald 
Alison, the Rev. Norman Macleod, and Sheriff Henry 
Bell, and so persuasive was their eloquence that in 
a short time £4000 was placed at the disposal of the 
Central Committee to assist in the formation of new 
corps. The usual contribution in artisan corps was 
for each man to pay £1 towards his uniform and an 
annual subscription of 10s. to the funds of the corps, 
and the Committee was thus enabled to subsidise 
corps requiring assistance to the extent of £1 per 
member. Twenty -four rifle and four artillery corps 
(companies) were thus assisted in Glasgow. 

In the above summaries of the progress of the 
movement in the two principal centres of formation 
_ ,_, in Scotland, no mention has been made of 

The third . . ' 

war office important instructions which were issued from 
juiy 13, the War Office in the period under review. 
The first of these was the circular of July 
13, 1859, in which the Secretary of State for War 
announced that her Majesty's Government had decided 
to issue Enfield rifles free of cost for 25 per cent of the 
effective members of the force, and to undertake the 
armament of the whole force when called out for active 
service on certain conditions (see below), and had sanc- 

B 



1 8 Origin and History of the Force. 

tioned two officers or members of each corps proceeding 
to the School of Musketry at Hythe (at their own 
expense) to undergo a modified course of musketry 
instruction. Lieutenants of counties were urged to 
specially encourage the formation of artillery rather 
than rifle corps in coast towns, and a "memorandum 
regarding the formation, organisation, establishment, 
instruction, &c, of volunteer corps in Great Britain, 
to be raised under the Act 44 Geo. III., cap. 54," 
was appended to the circular. 

The principal provisions of this latter memorandum 
were : — 

In all cases of actual invasion or appearance of any 
enemy in force on the coast of Great Britain, or of 
rebellion or insurrection arising or existing within 
the same, or the appearance of any enemy in force 
on the coast, or during any invasion, but not other- 
wise, the services of the volunteer force were to ex- 
tend to any part of Great Britain. 

Before giving sanction to the formation of a rifle 
corps, the Secretary of State required that a safe range 
of not less than 200 yards should be obtained, that 
safe storage should be provided for the arms, that 
rules, binding on the members under legal penalties, 
should be submitted and approved, and that the corps 
should be subject to periodical inspection by a military 
officer. The uniform and equipment of all corps were 
to be approved by the Lord-Lieutenant, and were to 
be similar, for artillery and rifles respectively, through- 
out the county. 

Artillery corps might be organised as companies of 
not fewer than 50 or more than 80 effectives, with 1 
captain, 1 lieutenant, and 1 2nd lieutenant, or as 
subdivisions, with not fewer than 30 effectives, with 
1 lieutenant and 1 2nd lieutenant, or as sections of not 



War Office Circular of July 13, 1859. 19 

fewer than 20 effectives under a lieutenant. Rifle 
corps were to be organised as companies of not fewer 
than 60 or more than 100 effectives, with 1 captain, 
1 lieutenant, and 1 ensign, or as subdivisions of not 
fewer than 30 effectives, with 1 lieutenant and 1 
ensign. In populous centres, where several such corps 
could be formed, in order to save expense by having 
one range and one armoury only, battalions might be 
formed, and where 8 companies, or a force not less 
than 500 strong, could be raised, sanction would be 
given to the appointment of a lieutenant -colonel, a 
major, and an adjutant (to be paid by the corps) for 
the battalion. Supernumeraries beyond establishment, 
or honorary or non-effective members "willing to 
contribute towards the expenses of the corps," were 
to be permitted. 

Artillery corps were to rank before rifle corps, and 
the whole volunteer force of a county was to take 
precedence throughout Great Britain according to the 
date of formation of the first company of their re- 
spective arms in the county, the several companies 
ranking, as artillery and rifles respectively, within 
their own counties in the order of their formation. 
Officers were to take precedence according to the 
dates of their commissions. 

Artillery volunteers were not required to have small- 
arms, only side-arms. Rifle volunteers were to have 
25 per cent of their effective members supplied with 
rifles by Government, the remainder being purchased 
by the corps ; and the equipment was to consist of 
a black or brown leather waist-belt, with sliding frog 
for the bayonet, ball -bag containing cap -pocket, and 
20-round pouch. 

Artillery ammunition for practice was to be issued 
free of cost in quantities to be determined later ; and 



20 Origin and History of the Force. 

for rifle corps the allowance of ammunition laid down 
in the circular of May 25 was changed to 100 rounds 
of ball and 60 of blank cartridge, with 176 percussion 
caps and 20 caps for snapping purposes, annually to 
all qualified effectives, including recruits. Five targets 
per company were to be issued at cost price. 

The eight days' drill in each four months required to 
make a volunteer " efficient " were not of necessity to 
be continuous, and it was to suffice if each attended 
on the prescribed number of days the ordinary drills 
laid down by the commanding officer. 

Garrison gun-drill was to be taught by instructors 
of the Royal Artillery — the volunteer artillerymen, 
after preliminary instruction, being permanently told 
off to particular guns near their homes, of which they 
were to undertake the general service. All guns and 
stores were to be provided by Government and to 
remain in charge of the Royal Artillery, and a 
* Volunteer Artilleryman's Manual ' was prepared. 

For volunteer riflemen a Manual was also prepared. 
As instructors, two Serjeants of the permanent staff 
of the disembodied militia were to be told off to 
each volunteer company, and these men were to be 
asked to volunteer for the service, and were to be 
paid one shilling a -day each by the corps. It was 
hoped that, after a short time, the services of these ■ 
non-commissioned officers could be dispensed with, the 
" most intelligent and zealous individuals " in each 
corps being then qualified to instruct the others. 
Musketry instructors were to be similarly supplied, 
and two members of each corps were to be permitted 
to proceed to Hythe at their own expense for a 
fourteen days' course of musketry instruction — the 
first class assembling there on Saturday, July 23, 
1859. 



Moral Rules for Corps. 2 1 

In pursuance of the circular of July 13, draft 

model rules and regulations for volunteer corps 

were issued from the War Office on August 

Model rules 111 -, i 

forvoiun- 10, 1859. They had been drawn up by a 
committee of volunteers, of which the presi- 
dent was Viscount Ranelagh, and the representative 
Scottish member Mr R. Blackburn of the Edinburgh 
Rifles, and were recommended to volunteer corps for 
adoption as a model to be followed — modifications 
being, if necessary, made to suit the particular cir- 
cumstances of corps. The rules were, summarily, as 
follows : — 

(1) Quoted the Act under which the corps was 
raised. (2) Defined effective, non - effective, super- 
numerary, and honorary members — the latter only 
contributing to the funds. (3) Subscriptions to be 
due on the 1st of each month. (4) Fixed the amount 
of monthly subscriptions, varying according to corps. 
(5) The commanding officer to propose gentlemen to 
the Lord - Lieutenant for commissions. (6) The com- 
manding officer to appoint non-commissioned officers. 
(7) Candidates for admission to the corps to be pro- 
posed by three members, and admitted on approval 
of the commanding officer. (8) Each member to have 
uniform and equipment of the approved pattern ; and 
(9) to be responsible for all Government arms and 
property issued to him. (10) "Corps property" to 
be all articles purchased out of the funds. (11) When 
not on service, the commanding officer to be respon- 
sible for discipline, and to have the power of assem- 
bling a court of inquiry of two officers and two 
members to investigate irregularities. (12) The com- 
manding officer to fix the time and place of parades. 
(13) The commanding officer to have the power to 
inflict fines, which might (14) be not less than — for 



22 Origin and History of the Force. 

loading contrary to orders or shooting out of turn, 
2s. 6d. ; for accidentally discharging the rifle, 5s. ; 
for pointing the rifle, loaded or unloaded, at any 
person without orders, 5s., &c. &c. ; absence from or 
lateness on parade, speaking in the ranks, and other 
sins of commission, had also penalties attached to them. 
(15) All fines to be recorded, and (16) collected on 
the 1st of each month. (17) A committee to be 
appointed to manage the corps' finances. (18) An 
abstract of the accounts to be laid before members. 
(19) Payments for extra ammunition. (20) Honorary 
members not to interfere in military duties, and not 
to be obliged to wear uniform, but (21) might use 
the practice ground, and (22) must pay a donation 
or annual subscription — the former generally £5, the 
latter usually £1, Is., but never less than that of 
ordinary members. (23) The system of musketry in- 
struction to be that taught at Hythe. (24) Members 
to provide themselves with the Volunteer Manual and 
a copy of Corps Rules. 

These rules were adopted, in the spirit and the 
letter, by all corps, and continued, with certain 
modifications, to be the basis of volunteer discipline 
till the force ceased to exist. 

How little was expected of the volunteers of 1859, 

as foreshadowed in the War Office circular of May 25, 

quoted above, is exemplified by the ' Drill and 

volunteer Rifle Instruction for Volunteer Rifle Corps,' 

published in 1859, and compiled by Colonel 

D. Lysons, C.B., Assistant Adjutant-General, a soldier 

of the highest repute. It was composed of extracts 

from the infantry drill regulations for the regular 

army. It was familiarly known as the " Green 

Book," from the colour of its binding, as compared 

with the red of the parent volume. Its price was 



" The Green Book!' 23 

sixpence, and, as its Preface stated, it contained 
"all the drill that volunteers need know," which was 
to be taught in six lessons. The first was on falling 
in and telling off a squad, position and attitude, stand- 
ing at ease, facing, opening and closing the squad, 
dressing, and dismissing. The second was on march- 
ing, stepping out, marking time, the diagonal march, 
breaking off and reassembling, the double march, and 
wheeling. The third lesson comprised the manual 
exercise and piling arms, and the fourth the platoon 
(firing) exercise. The fifth lesson dealt with the 
formation of the squad in two ranks, telling off, 
firing, skirmishing, extending and closing from the 
halt and on the march, advancing and retiring in 
skirmishing order, inclining, changing front and firing 
in that order, and forming rallying squares. The 
sixth and last lesson treated of the formation and 
movements of the company, dispersing and assem- 
bling, advancing, retiring, and wheeling ; the forma- 
tion of columns of subdivisions or sections, company 
square, skirmishing, and bugle - calls. In the Preface 
it was added that " if, when they have been thoroughly 
drilled, volunteers have spare time, they may learn to 
form fours in the manner prescribed by the Manual," 
and in an appendix a short synopsis of musketry 
instruction was given. 

It is perhaps hardly necessary to say that in a 
short time the volunteers outgrew their Manual, 
and adopted the drill regulations in force for the 
regular army. 

A vexed and much debated question in the early 
days of the volunteer movement was that 

County and ^ . 

corps pre- of county and corps precedence, which was 

settled in the manner laid down in the 

War Office circular of July 13, quoted above. The 



24 Origin and History of the Force. 

counties were to rank, in the artillery or rifle 
volunteer force, according to the date on which 
the first company of each arm in the county was 
formed, which, as a matter of fact, resolved itself 
into the date on which the offer of the services of 
that company was received by the Secretary of State 
for War. Now this, again, depended, not on the date 
on which the original members first met and deter- 
mined to offer their services as a volunteer corps, 
but on the celerity with which this offer was passed 
through the office of Lieutenancy of the county and 
arrived at the War Office. Counties in which the 
Lord - Lieutenant was an absentee were thus at a 
disadvantage, as was in several instances the case in 
Scotland, and in others traditional "canniness" de- 
layed the offers of service until the conditions had 
been more clearly defined ; but on the whole the 
Scottish counties obtained their due precedence in the 
two forces, and this was finally settled as follows : — 

Order of Precedence op the several Counties in the 
Artillery Volunteer Force. 



1. Northumberland 

2. Hampshire 

3. Devonshire 

4. Sussex 

5. Edinburgh (City) 

6. Cornwall 

7. Mid-Lothian 

8. Norfolk 

9. Banff 

10. Kent 

11. Forfarshire 

12. Essex 

13. Lancashire 

14. Kincardine 

15. Cinque Ports 

16. Renfrewshire 

17. Dorsetshire 

18. Fifeshire 

19. Glamorganshire 

20. Haddington 

21. Lanarkshire 

22. Yorkshire (E. Rid.) 



23. Ayrshire 

24. Argyll 

25. Gloucestershire 

26. Pembrokeshire 

27. Yorkshire (N. Rid.) 

28. Cheshire 

29. Caithness 

30. Lincolnshire 

31. Aberdeenshire 

32. Berwickshire 

33. Kirkcudbright 

34. Inverness -shire 

35. Elgin 

36. Stirlingshire 

37. Wigtown 

38. Dumbarton 

39. Berwick-on-Tweed 

40. Cumberland 

41. Durham 

42. Cromarty 

43. Ross-shire 



44. Orkney 

45. Nairn 

46. Sutherlandshire 

47. Shropshire 

48. Yorkshire (W. Rid.) 

49. Newcastle-on-Tyne 

50. Somerset 

51. Middlesex 

52. Suffolk 

53. Tower Hamlets 

54. Monmouthshire 

55. Surrey 

56. Anglesea 

57. Isle of Man 

58. Staffordshire 

59. Carnarvon 

60. Bute 

61. City of London 

62. Worcester 

63. Warwick 

64. Cardigan 



Precedence of Counties. 



25 



Obder of Precedence of the several Counties in the 
Rifle Volunteer Force. 



1. 


Devonshire 


33. 


Aberdeenshire 


65. 


Wigtown 


2. 


Middlesex 


34. 


Roxburgh 


66. 


Buteshire 


3. 


Lancashire 


35. 


Cinque Ports 


67. 


Yorkshire (N. Rid.) 


4. 


Surrey 


36. 


Monmouthshire 


68. 


Cumberland 


5. 


Pembrokeshire 


37. 


Cornwall 


69. 


Herefordshire 


6. 


Derbyshire 


58. 


Ross -shire 


70. 


Dumbartonshire 


7. 


Oxfordshire 


39. 


Worcestershire 


71. 


Huntingdon 


8. 


Cheshire 


40. 


Inverness-shire 


72. 


Carnarvonshire 


9. 


Wiltshire 


41. 


Warwickshire 


73. 


Montgomeryshire 


10. 


Sussex 


42. 


Lincolnshire. 


74. 


Orkney 


11. 


Edinburgh (City) 


43. 


Denbighshire 


75. 


Carmarthen 


12. 


Essex 


44. 


Hampshire 


76. 


Caithness 


IS. 


Northumberland 


45. 


Somersetshire 


77. 


Kirkcudbright 


14. 


Renfrewshire 


46. 


Forfar 


78. 


Westmorland 


15. 


Northamptonshire 


47. 


Cambridgeshire 


79. 


Fifeshire 


16. 


Dorsetshire 


4S. 


Shropshire 


80. 


Bedfordshire 


17. 


Norfolk 


49. 


London 


81. 


Newcastle-on-Tyne 


IS. 


Staffordshire 


50. 


Yorkshire (E. Rid.) 


82. 


Linlithgowshire 


19. 


Berkshire 


51. 


Hertfordshire 


83. 


Selkirkshire 


20. 


Gloucestershire 


52. 


Perthshire 


84. 


Banffshire 


21. 


Brecknockshire 


53. 


Berwickshire 


85. 


Radnorshire 


22. 


Suffolk 


54. 


Sutherland 


S6. 


Flintshire 


23. 


Stirlingshire 


55. 


Kincardineshire 


87. 


Berwick-on-Tweed 


24. 


Bucks 


56. 


Haverfordwest 


88. 


Clackmannan 


25. 


Lanarkshire 


57. 


Haddington 


89. 


Tower Hamlets 


26. 


Kent 


58. 


Isle of Wight 


90. 


Nairn 


27. 


Glamorgan 


59. 


Ayrshire 


91. 


Peeblesshire 


28. 


Nottinghamshire 


60. 


Dumfries 


92. 


Isle of Man 


29. 


Merionethshire 


61. 


Elgin 


93. 


Kinross-shire 


30. 


Yorkshire (W. Rid.) 


62. 


Argyll 


94. 


Anglesey 


31. 


Leicestershire 


63. 


Cardigan 


95. 


Shetland 


32. 


Mid -Lothian 


64. 


Durham 







Within the counties, the precedence of corps was 
settled by the date of the receipt of their offer of 
service by the Lord-Lieutenant, and this in its turn 
led to much rivalry, with the laudable desire of being 
first in the field in the county and receiving there- 
fore precedence and a lower number. As an instance 
of this, Lieut. -Colonel T. R. Stuart, commanding the 
late 1st Ayrshire and Galloway R.G.A.V., writes as 
to his corps : " Irvine is the oldest battery or com- 
pany in the regiment. In that connection I am in- 
formed that in 1859, at the start of the volunteer 
movement, there was keen rivalry between Irvine and 



26 Origin and History of the Force. 

Ayr for the honour of being premier battery. There 
was such a close run for it that the Irvine officers, 
on their return from Eglinton Castle for the purpose 
of offering their services to the Lord-Lieutenant, the 
Earl of Eglinton, actually met in the avenue of the 
Castle grounds the Ayr officers driving up post-haste 
on the same errand. Irvine thus won the distinction 
of being the 1st Ayrshire A.V., but only by the 
shortest of heads." 

On the Lord-Lieutenant forwarding the offer of ser- 
vice to the War Office, he stated the date on which it 
was received, and on this the Secretary of State for 
War, when officially accepting the services of the corps 
in question, assigned to it a number in the county in 
its order of precedence. The gazetting of officers was 
proceeded with as soon as possible after the accept- 
ance of the services of the corps ; and throughout the 
records of units in Part II. of this work the date of 
first commission of the officers has been taken as that 
of the formation of the corps, as only in a few cases 
has it been possible to ascertain the dates of accept- 
ance of services, and the number in order of preced- 
ence in the county is, with a few exceptions, sufficient 
to show the order in which the services of corps were 
accepted. The few exceptions are due to special cir- 
cumstances, in which, on account of some informality 
in the offer, reference had to be made to the corps, 
the services of which were accepted later, although it 
retained its number in order of application. Such 
exceptions will be seen in the complete list of corps 
raised in Lanarkshire given in Appendix C. 

In the matter of uniform the earliest volunteer 
riflemen frequently indulged their fancy or their taste 
in the wildest flights. Every shade of grey, green, and 
brown was adopted, and the uniforms were often richly 



Early Uniforms. 2.7 

decorated with braid or lace, especially in the corps 
equipped at their own expense. The usual uniform 
uniform, was a tunic long in the skirts, single-breasted, 
andsmau*-' an d braided and laced, with trousers of the 
arms ' same, and a cap with a peak or a shako, the 

latter frequently ornamented with cocks' feathers in 
a plume. In Scotland the almost universal colour of 
the uniform was some shade of grey, very few corps 
only adopting the green which was much in favour 
in England. The scarlet of the regular line infantry 
was the only colour not at first adopted, probably 
because the corps considered themselves " riflemen," 
as their name indicated, and no volunteer rifle corps 
wore it at the date of the Royal Review in 1860. 
The first corps to adopt scarlet at its inception was 
the 4th Sutherland, formed at Rogart in the end of 
1860, and the next was the 97th Lanarkshire, or 
Glasgow Guards, formed in the middle of 1861. The 
kilt was adopted by but few corps at first, and at the 
Royal Review in 1860 the only corps which wore it 
were the 1st and 2nd Highland Companies Edin- 
burgh R.V., 10th and 11th Renfrew R.V., 60th and 
61st Lanark R.V., 10th Forfar R.V., 3rd (three com- 
panies) Perth R.V., and 9th Argyll R.Y. The belts 
were generally of black -enamelled or brown leather, 
and consisted of a pouch-belt, generally ornamented 
with a badge for all ranks and a whistle with chain 
for officers and Serjeants, over the left shoulder, and 
a waist-belt with cartridge-box or pouch and bayonet- 
frog. Some few corps adopted knickerbockers and 
leather leggings, but greatcoats were in use in hardly 
any, and none provided themselves with haversacks, 
water-bottles, knapsacks, or other equipment. 

The artillery corps invariably adopted blue uniforms, 
some of them a close copy of those of the Royal Artil- 



28 Origin and History of the Force. 

lery, but they also frequently indulged in flights of 
fancy and embroidered their uniforms with braid. The 
engineer corps, formed later, closely copied the Royal 
Engineers, and the only mounted corps formed at first 
in Scotland, the Fife Mounted Rifles, adopted a uni- 
form as nearly approaching to their red hunting-coats 
as possible. 

Government, however, soon took up the question of 
volunteer uniforms, and a committee assembled at the 
War Office and issued a report on January 23, 1860, 
recommending a variety of patterns without deciding 
on any particular one, and leaving the matter to the 
choice of corps, subject to the approval of the Lord- 
Lieutenant. The uniform considered the best for rifle 
volunteers was brownish grey, of the pattern sub- 
mitted by Lord Elcho (now the Earl of Wemyss) and 
adopted by the London Scottish, with peg-top trousers 
made to be worn with leggings, the tunic being quite 
plain, and only piped with the regimental colour and 
ornamented with an Austrian knot on the sleeve, a 
low cap of the same cloth with peak, brown leather 
belts, and a long cape with hood. For artillery the 
pattern recommended was the same, but of blue cloth 
with scarlet piping, and black belts. Sealed patterns 
were deposited at the War Office, and it was intim- 
ated that Government would issue to volunteers at 
cost price grey cloth in four shades (Elcho grey cloth, 
Elcho grey tweed, slate-grey cloth of Roxburgh Rifles 
pattern, and dark-grey cloth), rifle-green cloth, blue 
cloth for artillery, and scarlet cloth. The corps formed 
after the date of this pronouncement generally fol- 
lowed its advice, and the vagaries of fancy seen in the 
uniforms of the earlier (and perhaps richer) corps were 
not, as a rule, continued in those raised in 1860. The 
Austrian knot on the sleeve was almost universally 



The Queen's first Inspection. 29 

adopted as the distinguishing mark of volunteer corps, 
and the badges of rank and patterns of lace of the 
officers conformed to those of the corresponding arms 
of the regular forces, with the exception that gold lace 
was not permitted to be worn. 

The arms with which the rifle corps first equipped 
themselves were usually short Enfields with sword- 
bayonets, as used by rifle regiments of the regular 
army ; but when Government took over the supply 
of arms the long Enfield rifle, as used in line regi- 
ments, with triangular bayonet, was issued, Serjeants 
only retaining the short rifle and sword-bayonet. The 
artillery at first had smooth-bore, but afterwards rifled 
carbines, with sword-bayonets with steel scabbards, 
and the engineers were given the Lancaster oval-bored 
rifle with sword-bayonet. 

During the autumn of 1859 the work of organising 
volunteer corps went on uninterruptedly in Scotland, 
pro ress of as throughout Great Britain, and in October 
the force in portions of the Scottish volunteer force had 
Queen's first the honour of parading before Her Majesty 
of Scottish Queen Victoria. The first occasion was on 
volunteers. Fridayj October 14, when 382 of all ranks 
of the 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 7th, 8th, and 10th Lanark 
Eifle Corps, under Captain David Dreghorn of the 
3rd Lanark, proceeded via Loch Lomond to Loch 
Katrine to form a guard of honour to the Queen, on 
the occasion of Her Majesty opening the City of Glas- 
gow Water- works. This was the first public appear- 
ance of the volunteers in the west of Scotland, and 
the first of the Scottish volunteer corps Her Majesty 
had seen. It is on record that while the Rob Roy, 
in which the volunteers were embarked, was steam- 
ing down Loch Katrine, H.H.H. the Prince Consort 
questioned Captain Dreghorn as to the length of time 



30 Origin and History of the Force. 

the men had been drilled, and expressed his satisfac- 
tion at the appearance they made and the efficiency 
to which they had attained in such a short time. 

The second occasion was on October 15, when the 
Edinburgh Rifle Volunteers were inspected by the 
Queen in Duke's Walk as Her Majesty drove from 
Holyrood to St Margaret's station, and the Lord 
Provost was commanded to inform them that Her 
Majesty had been "particularly struck and highly 
pleased with their appearance and fine soldierly 
bearing." 

At the close of 1859 there had been organised in 
Great Britain 16 corps of artillery volunteers with 
73 batteries, and 330 companies of rifle volunteers, 
and of these there were in Scotland, as shown in the 
monthly Army List of January 1860, 10 batteries and 
1 subdivision of artillery, and 49 corps with 67 com- 
panies and 1 subdivision of rifles, as follows, the corps 
which had been authorised, but to which officers had 
not yet been gazetted, being shown in brackets : — 



Artillery — 




Edinburgh City . 


. 1st. 


Mid-Lothian 


. (1st). 


Banff . 


. (1st), (2nd), (3rd), (1st sub- 




division). 


Forfar . 


. 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th. 


Kincardine . 


. (1st). 


Eifles— 




Edinburgh City . 


. 1st (16 companies). 


Eenfrew 


. 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th. 


Stirling 


. 1st. 


Lanark 


. 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th, 7th, 




8th, 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th, 13th, 




(14th), 15th, (16th), (17th), 




18th, (19th), (20th), 21st, 




(22nd), 23rd. 



Engineers and Mounted Rifles. 31 



Ernes— 






Aberdeen 




. (1st), 6th, 7th, 8th, 1st sub- 
division. 


Roxburgh . 




. 1st. 


Eoss 




. (1st). 


Inverness 




. 1st. 


Forfar . 




'. 1st (5 companies), 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 
5th. 


Perth . 




. 1st, 2nd. 


Berwick 




. 1st. 


Sutherland . 




. 1st, 2nd. 


The national 


and p 


itriotic character of the move- 



ment was acknowledged in the Queen's Speech from 
the Throne on the opening of Parliament in January 
1860, in which Her Majesty said: "I have accepted 
with gratification and pride the extensive offers of 
service which I have received from my subjects. This 
manifestation of public spirit has added an important 
element to our system of national defence." 

It will have been noticed that, in the earlier War 
Office circulars, no mention was made of the formation 
Formation of volunteer corps of other arms than artil- 
M^mou'iited l erv an d rifles, but this defect in the com- 
rifies. position of the force, and in the utilisation 

for military purposes of all classes of the civil popu- 
lation in the arm of the service for which they were 
best suited, soon led to offers being made for the 
formation of engineer and mounted corps. The first 
meeting with a view to the formation of a military 
engineer corps in Scotland was held in Glasgow on 
November 28, 1859, when a number of civil engineers, 
architects, surveyors, and measurers agreed to offer 
their services as a "Military Engineer Volunteer 
Corps." This was the origin of the 1st Lanark 
Engineer Volunteers. A second corps or company 
was soon formed out of the overflow of the 1st, and 



32 Origin and History of the Force. 

somewhat later a similar corps was formed in Edin- 
burgh. In the formation of engineer corps, Middlesex, 
having led the way, was awarded the 1st place in 
order of precedence, but Lanarkshire obtained 2nd, 
and Edinburgh (City) 3rd. 

The formation of mounted volunteers in Scotland 
followed somewhat later, but for continuity's sake may 
here be mentioned. It was not until March 1860 that 
a party of gentlemen in the smoking-room at Dysart 
House, Fife, read of the volunteer leve'e on March 7, 
and of the appearance of the officers of the Huntingdon 
Light Horse. Lord Loughborough (afterwards Lord 
Rosslyn) said : " Why should we not have a cavalry 
regiment in Fife ? " and asked Colonel Anstruther- 
Thomson to undertake the organisation of one. A 
paper was drawn out and passed round in the hunting- 
field and at markets, and, after 111 names had been 
signed to it, on March 20 the Lord- Lieutenant was 
addressed on the subject. After correspondence with 
the War Office, and the number of those willing to 
join having increased to 135, on June 7 the War 
Office approved of the formation of a "battalion" of 
mounted rifles in Fife, to be composed of 4 corps 
(companies). The Earl of Rosslyn was appointed to 
command, and all the four captains of corps had already 
served in the regular army. The men were mostly 
well-to-do farmers, and the uniform adopted was as 
like that of the Fife Hunt as possible. Fife was 
awarded No. 9 in order of precedence in the mounted 
rifle volunteer force. Such was the origin and com- 
position of the mounted volunteer force in Scotland, 
and it is worthy of note that it outlasted by many 
years the corresponding force of light horse or mounted 
rifles south of the Tweed. Corps were raised in Elgin, 
Roxburgh, Dumfries, and Forfarshire in succession, 



Progress in i860. 33, 

and, though the Elgin corps had a merely ephemeral 
existence, the Dumfries corps lasted from 1874 to 
1880, and the Roxburgh (Border) corps for twenty- 
years, from 1872 to 1892, and when it was disbanded 
in the latter year the Fife and Forfar corps became 
the sole representatives of the mounted arm of the 
volunteers in Great Britain, and maintained an 
honoured existence and their efficiency, in spite of 
many adverse circumstances, until they were absorbed 
in the Imperial Yeomanry force in 1901, in which 
they became the Fife and Forfar Regiment. 

On proof being afforded of the serious nature of 
the movement, further official aid was not withheld, 
progress of and on December 20, 1859, an issue of Enfield 
elffy in 8 *' " rifles, to bring the aggregate issue up to 
i860. iqq p er cen ^ f £h e effectives of the force, 

was authorised. On February 18, 1860, the attach- 
ment of non - commissioned officers of infantry and 
artillery as drill-instructors, for periods of three months 
at a time, at a rate of pay (from corps funds) of 2s. 6d. 
a-day, with lodging-money in addition, was sanctioned. 
In the same month adjutants were authorised for 
brigades of artillery or battalions of rifles, to be 
selected from officers who had served at least four 
years in the regular or East India Company's forces 
or embodied militia, who were to be paid (by Govern- 
ment) 8s. a-day, and 2s. for forage for a horse, all 
their other expenses being borne out of corps funds. 
These officers were appointed for an indefinite period, 
and it was only in 1872 that the system was changed, 
the former adjutants being compelled to retire on 
attaining sixty years of age, and all subsequent appoint- 
ments to the position being made from the regular 
army for a period of five years, during which officers 
were seconded in their regiments. 
c 



34 Origin and History of the Force, 

On March 24, 1860, a circular was issued from the 
War Office regulating the higher organisation of the 
volunteers, which had become necessary on account 
of the large and unforeseen number of independent 
companies formed. In towns where a number of 
companies existed side by side, these might be con- 
solidated into battalions, all the companies forming 
one corps for all purposes, or they might be consoli- 
dated for drill and administrative purposes only, the 
companies forming in themselves distinct and financi- 
ally independent bodies. In either case a major was 
to be allowed for a battalion of 4, a lieutenant-colonel 
for one of 6, a lieutenant-colonel and a major for one 
of 8, and a lieutenant-colonel and two majors for one 
of 9 to 12 companies, an adjutant being allowed in 
all cases. If of more than 12 companies, the corps 
was to constitute a regiment and be divided into two 
battalions, each with field-officers in the above pro- 
portions and an adjutant, the whole being commanded 
by the senior lieutenant - colonel. In rural districts 
the corps were to be grouped together in "adminis- 
trative battalions," to ensure unity of system in cor- 
respondence, drill, inspections, and returns, the corps 
remaining distinct and financially independent. To 
such battalions ("brigades" of artillery) of 4 or 5 
companies a major might be appointed, to those of 
6, 7, 8, or 9 a lieutenant-colonel, and to those of 10, 
11, or 12 companies a lieutenant-colonel and a major, 
with an adjutant in all cases. In forming an ad- 
ministrative battalion, the locality of the corps and 
not their numerical seniority was to be considered, 
and it was recommended that at the first renewal 
of clothing a uniform colour, &c, should be adopted 
for all corps in the same battalion. Further instruc- 
tions, defining the powers, duties, and responsibilities 



The Inspector-General of Volunteers. 35 

of an officer commanding an administrative battalion 
(brigade), were issued on September 4, 1860, and they 
also emphasised the independence in matters of finance, 
corps rules, &c, of the corps composing it. In con- 
sequence of these circulars, the formation of the 
hitherto independent corps (companies or batteries) 
into consolidated battalions (brigades of artillery) in 
the cities, and into administrative battalions in the 
rural districts, was actively taken in hand, and towards 
the end of the year many new companies were formed 
to complete the battalion establishments, the indi- 
vidual small corps being all gradually absorbed in one 
or other of these higher organisations in their own 
county, or, in the case of small counties, in battalions 
or brigades of artillery formed of the corps of two or 
even more counties, as shown in Part II. in the records 
of the individual corps. 

On July 7, 1860, the Secretary of State for War 
recommended to the General Commanding-in-Chief that 
general officers commanding districts should occasion- 
ally assemble and review the volunteers, and, on the 
20th, instructions were given to them accordingly. 
Colonel W. M. S. Macmurdo, C.B., who had organised 
the Land Transport Corps in the Crimea, was ap- 
pointed Inspector - General of the whole volunteer 
force, and took up his duties at the end of March 
1860, and under him were appointed, as assistant- 
inspectors, field-officers of the regular army, one to 
each of ten districts, into which the United Kingdom 
was divided, whose duties were to carry out the annual 
detailed inspections of volunteer corps, to regulate the 
transmission of returns, and to see that all regulations 
as to the storage of arms, drills, and musketry, &c, 
were carried out. The 10th (South-west Scottish) 
District, headquarters at Glasgow, comprised the 



36 Origin and History of the Force. 

counties of Dumfries, Kirkcudbright, Wigtown, Ayr, 
Bute, Renfrew, Lanark, Argyll, and Dumbarton, the 
9th (North-east Scottish), headquarters at Edinburgh, 
the rest of Scotland. To the 10th Major Young was 
appointed as assistant -inspector, to the 9th Lieut. - 
Colonel Douglas Jones. 

In keeping with the sentiments expressed in her 
speech from the Throne in January 1860, the Queen 
_ _ held a leve'e for volunteer officers at St 

The Queen 

and the James's Palace on March 7. The announce- 

volunteers. ■■«■•#• 

The Levee, ment of Her Majesty s intention aroused 
Review?and tremendous enthusiasm throughout the 
Ri a «e° naI country, and caused a redoubling of the 
Association. e ff or t s made to organise corps, so that the 
officers might have their commissions in time to ap- 
pear before their sovereign. Railway companies 
allowed volunteer officers to travel to London and 
back for single fares, Lords-Lieutenant and members 
of Parliament invited the officers of their counties 
or constituencies to banquets in London, theatres 
were thrown open to them, and the citizens of London 
announced a grand banquet and ball in honour of 
the occasion. At the levee the Queen was accom- 
panied by H.R.H. the Prince Consort and Their Royal 
Highnesses the Prince of Wales, Prince Alfred, the 
Duke of Cambridge, and Prince Frederick of the 
Netherlands. Three thousand two hundred volunteer 
officers from all parts of England and Scotland were 
presented to Her Majesty by their Lords-Lieutenant, 
or the Under-Secretary of State for War in his 
absence. The grand banquet, at which the Duke 
of Cambridge presided, was held the same evening 
in St James's Hall, when over 1000 volunteer officers 
were present, and hundreds were excluded for want 
of room. His Royal Highness proposed in glowing 



The First Volunteer Levde. 37 

terms the health of " The Volunteer Service," and 
the banquet was succeeded by a grand ball in the 
Floral Hall of the Royal Italian Opera House. 

The next honour done to the volunteer force by 
the sovereign was the review of the south of England 
corps by Her Majesty in Hyde Park, on Saturday, 
June 23, 1860. The only Scottish corps attending 
it was the 15th Middlesex (London Scottish), who 
were in the 1st Battalion, 4th Brigade (commanded 
by their colonel, Lord Elcho), 1st Division. The total 
number of volunteers reviewed was 20,890. 

Closely following on this, on July 2 the Queen 
inaugurated the first great prize meeting of the 
National Rifle Association at Wimbledon by firing 
the first shot. This association had been formed for 
the purpose of encouraging the formation of rifle 
volunteer corps and the promotion of rifle -shooting 
throughout Great Britain, and was formally consti- 
tuted at a meeting held at the Thatched House 
Tavern on November 16, 1859. The first president 
was Mr Sydney Herbert, Secretary of State for 
War, and the Queen headed the subscription list for 
prizes by giving £250 as an annual prize, the com- 
petition for which has always since been the great 
event of the meeting. The first shot was fired by 
the Queen from a Whitworth rifle, adjusted by Mr 
Whitworth himself, and the result was a bull's-eye 
at 400 yards. 

On August 7, 1860, Her Majesty did the volunteers 
of Scotland the honour of reviewing them in their 
to al turn, the ground selected being Holy rood 
Review in Park, the same on which their coming-of- 

Edinburgh, . . 

August 7, age review in 1881 and the Royal Review 

of 1905 were subsequently held. The troops 

were conveyed to Edinburgh by rail, by road, or by 



38 Origin and History of the Force. 

sea, and accommodation and refreshment were liberally- 
provided in Edinburgh for those from a distance, 
many of whom had to spend two to three days in 
coming and going. None but volunteers took part 
in the review, the ground being kept by the 13th 
Light Dragoons and 78th Highlanders, and the music 
for marching past supplied by the bands of the 29th 
and 78th Regiments and the 1st West York Rifle 
Militia. A grand stand had been erected, facing 
Arthur's Seat, for 4000 spectators, the central por- 
tion of which was draped with Royal Stuart tartan, 
and in front of this, and in rear of the saluting 
base, were drawn up the Royal Scottish Archers, 
the Queen's Bodyguard for Scotland. Spectators, 
variously estimated at from 200,000 to 300,000, cov- 
ered the slopes of Arthur's Seat and crowded round 
the review ground on all sides, giving an enthus- 
iastic reception to the various corps as they marched 
on to the ground. 

The force was under the command of Lieut.-General 
Sir G. A. Wetherall, K.C.B., and the troops reviewed 
were as follows, the figures of strengths given being 
the official totals of all ranks : — 



1st Division: Majok-Genekal Lord Eokeby, KC.B. 

1st Fife Mounted Eifle Volunteers, Major the Earl of 
Kosslyn . . . . . . .84 

1st Artillery Brigade : Colonel Maclean, R. A. 

1st Battalion : Lieut.-Col. Morris, R.A. 

1st City of Edinburgh (7 companies) ; 1st and 2nd (2 
companies) Northumberland ; 1st Haddington ; 1st, 
3rd, and 4th (3 companies) Durham ; 1st Newcastle- 
on-Tyne ; and 1st Berwick A.V. . . . 869 



The Royal Review of i860. 39 

2nd Battalion: Lieut. -Col. Sir J. G. Baird, 1st Mid- 
Lothian A.V. 

1st (8 companies) and 2nd (2 companies) Mid-Lothian ; 
1st, 2nd, 3rd, and 4th Cumberland ; 1st Berwick-on- 
Tweed j and 1st Kirkcudbright A.V. . . 714 

3rd Battalion: Lieut. -Col. Anderson, C.B., E.A. 

1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th, and 7th Forfar; 1st 
Kincardine ; 1st Caithness ; and 4th Aberdeen A.V. 353 

2nd Artillery Brigade : Colonel Gardiner, E.A. 

1st Battalion : Captain A. Montgomery, 1st Ayr A.V. 

1st, 2nd, and 3rd Eenfrew; 1st, 2nd, 3rd, and 5th 
Ayr j 1st and 3rd Argyll ; 1st "Wigtown ; and 1st 
and 2nd Dumbarton A.V. . . . .460 

2nd Battalion : Captain W. H. Maitland Dougall, R.A. 
1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th, and 8th Fife ; 1st Inver- 
ness ; 1st and 2nd Stirling ; and 1st Nairn A.V. . 652 

3rd Battalion : Major J. Reid Stewart, Lanark A.V. 

1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th, 7th, 8th, 9th, 10th, and 
11th Lanark A. V 663 

Engineers : Captain E. Johnstone, 1st Lanark E.V. 
1st and 2nd Lanark and 1st City of Edinburgh E.V. . 198 

Eifle Volunteers. 

1st Brigade : Lieut.-Col. D. Davidson, Edinburgh E.V. 

1st Battalion : Captain E. S. Gordon, Edinburgh E.V. 

1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th, 7th, 10th, 18th, and 1st 
Highland Edinburgh E.V. . . . .706 

2nd Battalion : Captain Sir G. Home, Bt., Edinburgh E.V. 
8th, 9th, 11th, 12th, 13th, 14th, 15th, 16th, 17th, and 
2nd Highland Edinburgh E.V. . . .655 

3rd Battalion : Major Arnaud, 1st Mid-Lothian E.V. 

1st (5 companies), 2nd (2 companies), and 3rd (2 
companies) Mid-Lothian; 1st and 2nd Eoxburgh; 
and 1st Selkirk E.V. . . . .715 



40 Origin and History of the Force. 

4th Battalion : Captain Hon. A. F. Cathcart, Berwick E.V. 
1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, and 5th Berwick ; 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 
and 5th Haddington ; 1st, 2nd, 4th, and 5th Kirk- 
cudbright ; and 1st Berwick-on-Tweed E.V. . . 733 

2nd Brigade : Lieut.-Col. Gordon, C.B. 
1st Battalion : Captain G. L. Alison, 1st Forfar RV. 

1st (7 companies), 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th (2 companies), 
8th, 9th, and 10th Forfar RV. . . .835 

2nd Battalion: Captain Sir T. Erskine, Bt., 3rd Fife E.V. 

1st (2 companies), 2nd, 3rd, 5th, 7th, and 8th Fife RV. 479 
3rd Battalion : Major Potter, 1st Northumberland RV. 
1st (4 companies), 2nd, 3rd, and 5th Northumberland ; 
1st, 2nd, 4th, 5th, 6th, and 7th Cumberland RV. . 674 
4th Battalion : Lieut.-Col. Sir J. Fyfe, 3rd Durham RV. 
3rd (4 companies), 6th, 7th (2 companies), 8th (2 com- 
panies), 11th, and 13th Durham, and 1st Newcastle- 
on-Tyne (7 companies) RV. .... 820 

3rd Brigade : Lieut.-Col. N. T. Christie, late 38th Foot. 

1st Battalion : Major Elton, 22nd Depot Battalion. 

1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th, 7th, 8th, and 9th Stirling, 
and 1st (2 companies) and 2nd Clackmannan B.V. . 743 
2nd Battalion : Major Pitcairn, 23rd Depot Battalion. 

1st (9 companies) and 7th Aberdeen; 1st Inverness 
Administrative Battalion (1st, 2nd, 3rd, and 4th 
Corps); 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Sutherland; and 1st 

Nairn RV. 901 

3rd Battalion: Major Sir A. Gordon Cumming, Bt., 1st 
Perth RV. 

1st (2 companies), 5th, 6th, 7th, 8th, 9th, 11th, and 
12th Perth ; 4th Kincardine ; and 1st, 2nd, 3rd, and 
4th Elgin RV. . . . . .852 

4th Battalion : Major the Marquis of Breadalbane, 3rd 
Perth RV. 

3rd Perth (3 companies) ; 2nd, 3rd (2 companies), 7th, 
9th, and 10th Argyll ; and 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Lin- 
lithgow RV. . . . . .859 



The Royal Review of i860. 41 

2nd Division: Major-General Cameron, C.B. 
1st Brigade : Colonel Walter Hamilton, C.B. 
1st Battalion : Major D. Latham, 1st A.B. Eenfrew E.V. 
1st A.B. Eenfrew E.V., consisting of 1st (4 companies), 
5th, 10th, 11th, and 22nd Corps . . .535 

2nd Battalion: Lieut.-Col. J. Graham, 3rd A.B. Eenfrew 
E.V. 

2nd A.B. Eenfrew E.V., consisting of 3rd, 6th, 9th, 
14th, 15th, 17th, and 24th Corps; and 3rd A.B. 
Eenfrew E.V., consisting of 4th, 7th, 8th, 16th, 19th, 
21st, and 23rd Corps . . . .446 

3rd Battalion : Captain Hay Boyd, 3rd Ayrshire E.V. 

1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th, 7th, and 8th Ayr E.V. . 559 

2nd Brigade : Lieut.-Col. Sir A. Islay Campbell, 1st Lanark E.V. 
1st Battalion : Major Eobertson, 1st Lanark E.V. 

1st Battalion 1st Lanark E.V., consisting of 1st, 9th, 
11th, 15th, 17th, 33rd, 39th, and 79th Corps . 535 

2nd Battalion : Major Macquorne Eankine, 1st Lanark E.V. 
2nd Battalion 1st Lanark E.V., consisting of 2nd, 18th, 
50th, 53rd, 63rd, 72nd, 76th, and 77th Corps . 517 

3rd Battalion : Major D. Eeid, 19th (2nd Glasgow Northern) 
L.E.V. 

19th Lanark E.Y. (7 companies) 1 592 

4th Battalion: Major D. B. Macbrayne, 3rd Glasgow 
Northern L.B.V. 

3rd Glasgow Northern Battalion (comprising 51st, 
67th, 74th, 80th, 81st, 83rd, 89th, and 91st Lanark 
RV.) and 1st Bute E.V. . . . .583 

3rd Brigade : Lieut.-Col. J. Tennant, 4th Lanark E.V. 

1st Battalion : Major J. F. Jamieson, 1st Glasgow Northern 
L.E.V. 

4th Lanark (1st Glasgow Northern) (6 companies); 
60th and 61st Lanark E.V. . . .562 



: Including the 85th Corps. 



42 Origin and History of the Force. 

2nd Battalion: Lieut. -Col. W. Stirling, 7th Battalion 
Lanark RV. 

5th, 21st, 34th, 35th, 49th, 58th, 59th, 64th, 65th, 
66th, and 90th Lanark RV. . . .586 

3rd Battalion : Major Rigby, 6th Battalion Lanark RV. 
25th, 26th, 27th, 40th, 43rd, 48th, 68th, 69th, 70th, 
and 71st Lanark RV. . . . .582 

4th Battalion: Major A. Crum Ewing, 4th Battalion 
Lanark E.V. 

29th, 30th, 31st, 32nd, 38th, 45th, 46th, 47th, 54th, 
75th, 84th, and 86th Lanark E.V. . . .730 

4th Brigade : Lieut.-Col. J. M. Gartshore, 1st A.B. 
Dumbarton RV. 

1st Battalion : Major S. Simpson, 3rd Battalion Lanark RV. 
16th, 42nd, 44th, 52nd, 56th, 57th, 37th, 55th, and 
73rd Lanark RV 765 

2nd Battalion : Major Dawson, 1st A.B. Dumbarton RV. 
1st A.B. Dumbarton RV, consisting of the 1st, 2nd, 
3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th, 7th, 8th, 9th, and 10th Corps . 649 

3rd Battalion : Major Walker, Inspector of Musketry. 

1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 7th, and 8th Dumfries, and 1st, 
2nd, 3rd, and 4th Wigtown RV. . . .495 

4th Battalion: Lieut.-Col. the Hon. W. F. Scarlett, Scots 
Fusilier Guards. 

3rd, 10th, 14th, 22nd, 78th, 82nd, and 87th Lanark R V. 413 

The total of all ranks on parade was 21,514, in 348 
companies. 

The Queen arrived in Edinburgh at 8 A.M. and 
drove to Holyrood Palace, escorted by the 13th Light 
Dragoons. After a visit in the forenoon to the 
Duchess of Kent, her mother, at Cramond, near 
Edinburgh, at 3.40 p.m. Her Majesty left Holyrood 
for the review ground, again escorted by the 13th 
Light Dragoons, and accompanied by Their Royal 



The Royal Review of i860. 43 

Highnesses the Prince Consort, the Duchess of Kent, 
Princes Arthur and Leopold, and Princesses Alice, 
Helena, and Louise. The Prince Consort rode on the 
right of the Queen's carriage, the Duke of Buccleuch, 
Lord-Lieutenant of Edinburgh and Captain of the 
Bodyguard of Scottish Archers, on the left, and the 
Lords-Lieutenant of counties followed on horseback. 
The troops were formed up in line of quarter- columns 
along the base of Arthur's Seat, and Her Majesty drove 
along the line and took post at the saluting base, where 
the Royal Standard of Scotland was displayed. The 
march past was then carried out, after which the troops 
again formed into line of quarter-columns, advanced in 
review order, gave a royal salute, and finished up with 
three cheers, in which the spectators lustily joined. It 
was a proud moment for Scotland ! 

The day was hot and dusty, and the troops, un- 
accustomed as they were to long periods under arms, 
were highly tried, but that they acquitted themselves 
well is evident from the following Order, published by 
the Adjutant-General after the review : — 

Hoese Guards, S.W., August 10, 1860. 

The Adjutant-General has received the Queen's command to 
convey her thanks to the several corps of Artillery and Rifle 
Volunteers assembled at Edinburgh on the 7th inst., and to 
assure them of the satisfaction and gratification with which Her 
Majesty beheld the magnificent spectacle there presented to her. 

Her Majesty could not see, without admiration, the soldier-like 
bearing of the different corps as they passed before her, and she 
finds in the high state of efficiency to which they have attained, 
in an incredibly short space of time, another proof that she may 
at all times rely on the loyalty and patriotism of her people 
for the defence, in the hour of need, of the freedom and integrity 
of the Empire. 

By order, 

J. Yokke Scarlett, A.-G. 



44 Origin and History of the Force. 

It is worthy of note that all the expenses attendant 
on this review were borne by the volunteers out of 
their own pockets or subscribed for from private 
sources. 

On January 19, 1861, were published, by authority 
of the Secretary of State for War, the first ' Regula- 
The Reguia- tions for the Volunteer Force/ which codified 
tionsof 1861. an( j consolidated all previous circulars and 
orders and superseded them. The main features of 
these regulations, by clauses, were : — 

Clause 6. The force is composed of light horse, 
artillery, engineer, mounted rifle, and rifle volunteers. 
Its objects (7) are to supplement the regular, militia, 
and other forces in the country. 

8. The establishments of all ranks of enrolled volun- 
teers for each arm are : Light horse troop, minimum 
50, maximum 80, artillery battery 50-80, engineer or 
rifle company 60-100, mounted rifle company 43-70. 
The staffs of battalions (as laid down in the circular of 
March 24, 1860) to be included in the total establish- 
ments allowed for the companies of these units. 

9 to 13. Offers for the formation of a corps are to be 
made through the Lord-Lieutenant of the county, and 
certain conditions as to numbers, headquarters, store- 
house, and range must be complied with. An officer 
will then be detailed by the War Office to inspect all 
the proposed arrangements, and only if his report be 
satisfactory will the offer of service be laid before the 
sovereign for acceptance. 

14. Engineer corps should be composed of engineers, 
masons, joiners, quarrymen, railway employes, &c. 

16 to 19. Information required before the formation 
of an artillery corps is sanctioned. 

20, 21. If an increase of a corps is projected, the 
proposed minimum establishment must have been at- 



The Regulations of 1861. 45 

tained (including those ready to be enrolled) before the 
increased establishment can be sanctioned, and, if the 
strength of a corps falls below its minimum, its estab- 
lishment is liable to be reduced. 

22 to 27. The volunteer force takes precedence after 
the militia, its arms ranking in the order given in clause 
6. The precedence of counties in each arm is separate, 
and is arrived at in the manner explained on page 23. 
Officers rank according to date of commission in their 
rank and junior to militia officers of the same rank. 

29 to 31. Corps are numbered in each arm and 
county according to their precedence, and special titles 
may be authorised in addition to the numbers. When 
a corps is disbanded or absorbed in a senior one, its 
number remains vacant. 

32 to 39. Commissioned officers, except adjutants, 
are nominated by the Lords - Lieutenant and their 
names submitted for the sovereign's approval, resigna- 
tions being similarly submitted. Certain fees have to 
be paid on officers' commissions. Officers on full pay 
are only eligible for honorary commissions. 

40, 41. Two substantive commissions in the force 
cannot be held by one individual. If two corps have 
been raised by one person, he may be appointed com- 
manding officer of both, but on actual service must 
resign the command of one of them. 

42. Captains commanding corps of more than one 
company may be appointed captains- commandant. 

43. Quartermasters and paymasters are not allowed, 
but supernumerary lieutenants may be enrolled to per- 
form these duties. 

44. 45. Officers holding 1st class musketry certifi- 
cates may be appointed musketry instructors, but if 
they have not this certificate they may only be ap- 
pointed acting instructors. 



46 Origin and History of the Force. 

46 to 50. Honorary colonels, chaplains, assistant- 
surgeons, and veterinary surgeons may be appointed, 
but the two latter classes receive no pay. 

51. Substantive officers must be effective members 
of their corps. 

52 to 54. Non-commissioned officers, including lance- 
serjeants and lance-corporals, are appointed by the 
commanding officer, and may be reduced by him after 
investigation of their conduct by a court of inquiry. 

55. No person below seventeen years of age may be 
enrolled as a volunteer, nor (56) any pensioner, without 
the consent of the Secretary of State, nor (57) any 
apprentice without that of his master. 

58, 59. Enrolled members are classed as effective 
and non-effective. To be counted effective a member 
must have taken the oath of allegiance and attended, 
properly equipped, the prescribed number of drills. 

60. Drills need not be on consecutive days, and one- 
half of them must be musters of the whole corps. 

61. All members not complying with these conditions 
are counted as non-effective. 

62. 63. Supernumerary members are not to be en- 
rolled without authority, and are not entitled to the 
exemptions granted to volunteers by Act of Parliament. 
Honorary members are not included in the muster-roll, 
and may not interfere with the military duties of the 
corps, but they may wear its uniform. 

64. Each corps must have an approved code of rules, 
which (65) must be certified by the Secretary of State. 

66. Courts of inquiry may be assembled by Lords- 
Lieutenant to investigate any subject. They are not 
judicial bodies, and cannot administer oaths. 

67 to 70. Small corps should be grouped into admin- 
istrative battalions, regiments, or brigades, to receive 
uniformity of drill and to afford them the advantage 



The Regulations of 1861. 47 

of the services of an adjutant ; but this organisation 
is not to interfere with their constitution or financial 
arrangements, nor are they to be required to meet 
for united drill save with their own cod sent. Pro- 
posals for such grouping are to be made by the 
Lords -Lieutenant, and the corps are to be grouped 
by localities. 

71. The staffs allowed for administrative battalions 
are as given in the circular of March 24, 1860 (page 

72. The administrative battalions, &c, in a county 
are to be numbered consecutively, and (73) head- 
quarters assigned to them in addition to those of the 
corps composing them. 

74. Four-company battalions, &c, are only to be 
formed when no more companies are available in the 
county, and (75) the adjutant of a corps administra- 
tively united with others will be recommissioned as 
adjutant of the administrative battalion. 

76. Corps of adjoining counties may be united into 
an administrative battalion. 

77. The field-officer commanding an administrative 
battalion has general charge of the drill and discipline 
of the several corps, inspects them occasionally, and is 
responsible that uniformity in drill is preserved. He 
commands any portion of his battalion assembled for 
drill. 

78. No officer of a corps in an administrative battalion 
has any authority over those of others, but when as- 
sembled for combined drill the senior commands. 

79 to 82. Contain regulations for the appointment of 
field-officers of administrative battalions. 

83. An administrative battalion cannot have rules 
having legal force distinct from those of the corps 
composing it. 



48 Origin and History of the Force. 

84 to 86. Small corps may be attached to others for 
drill or for the services of an adjutant. 

87 to 91. The force may not assemble in greater 
strength than one brigade without the sanction of the 
Secretary of State, obtained through the Lord- 
Lieutenant. 

92. Eeviews of volunteers may be held from time to 
time by General Officers Commanding, but no volun- 
teer corps can be compelled to attend. Volunteers 
may (93) be brigaded with other forces. 

94. At shooting matches, &c, the senior officer pres- 
ent takes command and is responsible for the main- 
tenance of order and discipline among the volunteers 
under arms. 

95 to 97. Volunteer corps choose their own uniform 
and accoutrements, subject to the approval of the 
Lord-Lieutenant. No gold lace is allowed. The colour 
should be uniform in each county or in administrative 
battalions. The Dress Regulations of the Army are to 
be followed as to badges of rank. 

98. Every volunteer should be provided with a ser- 
vice kit, in addition to the articles worn or carried on 
his person, and (99) the pouches of riflemen should hold 
sixty rounds. 

100, 101. Officers and Serjeants may wear side-arms 
when off duty. Neither standards nor colours are to 
be carried. 

102 to 112. Instructions for the issue and care of the 
Government arms to be supplied gratuitously from 
stores for the full number of enrolled members of 
corps. 

113 to 126. The proportion of ammunition to be 
issued to corps annually for each enrolled member 



The Regulations of 1861. 49 







Gratis. 




On Payment. 


1st Tear of Service — 


Ball™ 


Blank. 


Caps. 


Ball!" 


Blank. Caps. 


Light Horse 

Artillery .... 

Engineers and Rifles . 


70 
70 
110 


10 
10 
20 


98 

98 
163 


50 
50 
110 


55 
100 231 


2nd and subsequent Years of 
Service — 












Light Horse 

Artillery .... 

Engineers and Rifles . 


50 
50 
90 


60 


55 
53 
165 


70 
70 
130 


77 

77 

60 209 



Artillery are allowed 80 shot and 20 shell of big-gun 
ammunition per battery, and £7, 13s. for the purchase 
of floating, or £2, 10s. for land targets. Guns are 
issued from store, and assistance is given in the con- 
struction of batteries, but the sites for these must be 
provided by the corps. 

127 to 146. Adjutants are appointed under the 
Queen's commission on the recommendation of the 
Lord-Lieutenant. They must be under fifty years of 
age, and have previously served : for light horse, 
mounted rifles, or rifles, 4 years in the Imperial or 
Indian forces ; for artillery, 2 years as an officer or 8 
as a non-commissioned officer in the Royal, Indian, or 
Marine Artillery ; for engineers, 2 years as an officer or 
8 as a non-commissioned officer in the Royal or Indian 
Engineers ; with certain exceptions in favour of officers 
who have served in the embodied militia, and reductions 
of the obligatory periods in the case of those who hold 
1st class musketry certificates. Adjutants may not 
hold any other appointment or employment ; their pay is 
8s. a-day besides 2s. for the keep of a horse, and £4 per 
annum is allowed for every company in the battalion to 
cover contingent expenses, postage, &c. A special allow- 
ance of 2s. a-day in lieu of travelling expenses is given 
to adjutants of administrative battalions. Adjutants are 
not allowed to hold regimental commissions, nor to take 

D 



50 Origin and History of the Force. 

command in virtue of their rank when volunteer officers 
are present. They are subject to the Mutiny Act and 
Articles of War. Their duties are connected with the 
instruction of the corps and its military efficiency, but 
they are not to take part in its non- military or financial 
affairs. Special rates of pension are laid down for 
volunteer adjutants. 

147 to 170. The Serjeant instructors are under the 
adjutant, and are subject to the Mutiny Act and 
Articles of War. They are obtained by the transfer of 
non-commissioned officers of the regular army with at 
least 18 years' service, who are then borne as super- 
numeraries in their regiments until the time of their 
discharge occurs, and are provided in the proportion, for 
rifle corps, of 1 to corps of 1 to 3 companies, 2 for 4 to 
7 companies, and 3 for 8 companies or upwards, and in 
similar proportions for the other arms. One of them 
may in each corps be appointed serjeant-major. The 
daily pay is 2s. 4d. if in receipt of a pension, 2s. 7d. if 
not, and 6d. extra if acting as serjeant-major. They 
may serve on after discharge from the army. Drill in- 
structors may also be obtained under certain conditions 
from the permanent staff of the disembodied militia. 

171 to 173. Volunteers may attend classes of mus- 
ketry instruction at the School of Musketry for periods 
of fourteen working days, paying all their personal 
expenses, but having ammunition issued free. 

174. A rifle-range must extend to 200, but it is desir- 
able that it should extend to 900 yards. 

175. Corps without adjutants may not fire blank or 
ball ammunition in military formation until the assist- 
ant-inspector of the district pronounces the members 
to be qualified to do so. 

176. Only Government ammunition is to be used in 
testing the sights of Enfield rifles. 



The Regulations of 1861. 5r 

177 to 179. Refer to badges for good shooting (rifles 
embroidered horizontally on the sleeve, with 1, 2, or 
3 stars above them according to proficiency). 

180. Details the musketry practices to be performed, 
which vary with the length of the range. 

181. The drill, &c, books to be used in the instruc- 
tion of the volunteers are the same as those in use in 
the regular army. 

182 to 184. Officers of volunteers may be attached 
for instruction to the regular army or militia for periods 
not exceeding one month. 

185 to 195. Deal with correspondence and returns. 

196 to 198. Deal with the appointment and duties of 
assistant-inspectors of volunteers (see page 35). 

These regulations have been quoted at some length 
as they mark a distinct stage in the development of the 
volunteer force, and its final recognition as part of the 
defensive forces of the Crown. The former haphazard 
organisation is done away with, the small corps are 
combined into higher organisations provided with 
adequate staff, adjutants, and instructors, a system of 
inspection is provided for, a programme of drill and 
musketry laid down, and the drill regulations of the 
regular army are frankly adopted, the old idea of a 
very elementary course of instruction being sufficient 
for volunteers having become an exploded notion. 

In Scotland the carrying into effect of the provi- 
sions of the new regulations as to the higher organi- 
The force in sation of the force was actively pushed for- 

.86.-62. ward ' m lg61} an( J the extent to w hich 

consolidated corps in cities and administrative bat- 
talions or artillery brigades in the counties were 
formed may be seen from a comparison of Appendix 
E, which shows the composition and enrolled strength 
of the force on April 1, 1862, with the list of corps 



52 Origin and History of the Force. 

already given as taking part in the Royal Review of 
August 7, 1860. ' 

From the return of April 1, 1862, it will be seen 
that the force then consisted of — 

Artillery. — 3 consolidated city corps, 7 administrative brigades, 
and 35 small corps of from \ battery to 2 batteries, — in all, 
107f batteries, with 6582 enrolled members. 

Engineers. — 3 corps of 1 company each, with 235 enrolled 
members. 

Mounted Rifles. — 1 corps of 4 troops, with 160 enrolled 
members. 

Rifles. — 11 consolidated city and 1 consolidated country (1st 
Sutherland) corps of 4 or more companies, 28 administra- 
tive battalions, and 34 small corps of from \ company to 
2 companies, — in all, 372 companies, with 27,263 enrolled 
members. 

Total Force. — 34,240 enrolled members. 

The training and discipline of the force improved 
pari passu with its organisation : in shooting the 
volunteers took a leading part in the country, their 
marksmen even showing the way to the regular army, 
and through them a taste for rifle -shooting was de- 
veloped throughout the country. Prize - lists were 
subscribed for in all corps ; local bodies, landowners, 
merchants, and the heads of great works and firms 
offered prizes or trophies for shooting, and provincial 
rifle associations, on the model of the National Rifle 
Association, sprang up all over the country. A healthy 
rivalry between corps was also established by the insti- 
tution of matches, and the records of the volunteers of 
those days teem with descriptions of the interest which 
these excited, not only in the corps, but in the locality 
from which they were recruited. 

These developments in the movement, and the 
organisation of the single corps into larger units, led, 



The Royal Commission of 1862. 53 

however, to fresh outlays. Larger drill-halls and stores 
were required, and regularly organised and equipped 
ranges were demanded, and thus expenses increased. 
The uniforms first obtained also began to wear out, and 
as the first enthusiasm abated the subscriptions both 
of members and of friends of the movement began to 
fall off. Some corps disappeared altogether or became 
amalgamated with others, and all sorts of expedients — 
bazaars, concerts, balls, &c. — were resorted to to raise 
funds ; but it soon became evident that such sources of 
income were no longer to be relied upon. In all the 
large centres public meetings were held to urge upon 
Government that a money grant was absolutely neces- 
sary to the existence of the force. In Glasgow such a 
meeting was held, under the presidency of the Lord 
Provost, in the Merchants' Hall on January 9, 1861, 
and at it resolutions were passed that measures should 
be adopted for giving the force continuous national 
support, and that such measures should comprehend 
an annual pecuniary grant. The London commanding 
officers also took the matter in hand and invited the 
co-operation of their provincial brethren, and on Feb- 
ruary 23, 1861, similar resolutions were passed at a 
meeting at the Thatched House Tavern. 

The War Office was quite alive to the difficulties 
of the force, and on January 13, 1862, a letter was 
- m , addressed by the Inspector-General of Volun- 

The Royal i * • T 

commission teers to the Assistant-Inspectors, calling for 
their opinions on various points. The replies 
showed such an unsatisfactory state of affairs to exist 
in the force that on May 16 a Royal Commission was 
issued to Colonel Viscount Eversley, A.D.C., Hants 
V.C. ; the Earl of Ducie ; Lieut. - Colonel Viscount 
Hardinge, 2nd A.B. Kent R.V. ; Lieut. -Colonel Lord 
Elcho, 15th Middlesex R.V. ; Lord Overstone ; the 



54 Origin and History of the Force. 

Right Hon. E. P. Bouverie, M.P. ; Lieut. - Colonel 
Barttelot, 2nd A.B. Sussex R.V. ; Lieut. -Colonel Sir 
A. Islay Campbell, Bt., 1st Lanark R.V. ; Lieut. - 
General Sir G. A. Wetherall, K.C.B. ; Major-General 
H. Eyre ; Colonel W. M. S. Macmurdo, C.B. (Inspector- 
General of Volunteers) ; Lieut. -Colonel A. S. Glad- 
stone, 5th Lancashire R.V. ; and Major E. M. V. 
Hartcourt, 4th Cinque Ports R.V., "to inquire into 
the present condition of our Volunteer Force in Great 
Britain and into the probability of its continuance at 
its existing strength, and to report whether any meas- 
ures should be adopted for the purpose of increasing its 
efficiency as an auxiliary means of national defence." 

The Commission commenced its labours on May 27, 
and held its last meeting on July 15, between which dates 
it examined fifty-one witnesses, of whom the following 
represented Scotland : H. G. Bell, Esq., Sheriff-Sub- 
stitute of Lanarkshire ; Lieut. -Colonel Stirling Craw- 
ford, 1st Lanark A.V. ; Lieut. -Colonel D. Dreghorn, 
3rd Lanark R.V. ; Captain Innes, 1st Kincardine A.V. ; 
Captain M'Grigor and Ensign J. Lockhart, 1st Lanark 
R.V. ; Captain Page (adjutant), Captain MacGregor, 
and Colour- Sergeant Pettie, London Scottish R.V. ; 
Lieut. -Colonel Stirling, 5th Lanark R.V. ; and Major 
Warrender, Haddington R.V. The Commission also 
issued a series of questions to all officers commanding 
corps. At the conclusion of its labours the Commission 
presented its report, which was published on October 
29, 1862, and recommended that an annual capitation 
grant of £1 should be paid to the commanding officer 
of each rifle corps for every man who had attended nine 
drills in the year, six of which were to be battalion 
drills in the case of consolidated and three in that of 
administrative battalions; that a further grant of 10s. 
should be given for every rifleman who fired sixty 



The Volunteer Act of 1863. 55 

rounds in class-firing and passed out of the 3rd class ; 
and that for artillery corps the annual capitation grant 
should be 30s. for each efficient. 

The recommendations of the Commission were con- 
sidered by Government, and adopted almost in their 
The v iun en tirety, the new state-supported character of 
teer Act of the force being recognised by the passing by 
,863 ' Parliament (July 21, 1863) of the "Volun- 

teer Act, 1863," which to the end remained the con- 
trolling statute of the volunteer force. Its main provi- 
sions were that all volunteers had to take the oath of 
allegiance; that a volunteer, except when on actual 
military service, might quit his corps on giving fourteen 
days' notice, delivering up his arms and uniform in good 
order, and paying any arrears of money due from him 
under corps rules ; that, " in case of actual or appre- 
hended invasion," her Majesty might direct the Lords- 
Lieutenant to call out the volunteers for actual military 
service, when any one not responding to the call was 
liable to be dealt with as a deserter ; and that any 
volunteer so called out should be entitled to the sum 
of £2, 2s. for necessaries, and should receive pay and 
relief for his wife or family, and be billeted or quartered 
the same as a militiaman. Volunteers were to be ex- 
empt from ballot for service in the militia. The con- 
ditions of volunteer efficiency were to be defined by an 
Order in Council, issued from time to time, and accord- 
ingly on July 23, 1863, such an Order was issued laying 
down these conditions, which were as above stated in 
the recommendations of the Commission, with the addi- 
tion that recruits had to perform thirty squad, company, 
or battalion drills. It had to be certified that the volun- 
teer possessed a competent knowledge of squad, com- 
pany, and preliminary musketry drill, and had been pre- 
sent at the annual inspection of the corps, to enable him 



56 Origin and History of the Force. 

to be classed as efficient. For arms other than rifles 
the conditions of efficiency were similar to the above. 

On this Act and the Order in Council were based 
the Volunteer Regulations of 1863, which replaced 
Thevoiun- those of 1861. The principal new provisions 
tfons R e i 8:u,a " wer e that for each efficient volunteer, as de- 
1863. fined above, £1 of annual capitation grant 

should be allowed, with, in addition, 10s. for each who 
had fired twenty rounds each in the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd 
periods of musketry instruction, and, in one of the 
three, had passed into the 2nd class ; also 4s. a-year 
for each member of an administrative battalion belong- 
ing to corps at a greater distance than five miles from 
headquarters, to cover the cost of attendance at united 
drill. Among the minor changes introduced by these 
regulations was an order that all corps of an adminis- 
trative battalion were to be dressed alike, and that 
cloth for uniforms, cut out and basted, was to be issued 
at cost price from the Army Clothing Dep6t. The pay 
of adjutants was increased from 8s. to 10s. a-day, and 
they were obliged to give security in their new capacity 
as acting paymasters, for to them was now entrusted 
the receipt and disbursement of the capitation allow- 
ances. The formation of cadet corps attached to 
volunteer units, and composed of boys of twelve years 
of age and upwards, was sanctioned. They were to be 
officered by gentlemen holding honorary commissions, 
and ten per cent of arms were to be issued to enable 
those of sufficient age to carry on rifle practice. 

The regulations of 1863 were followed by a marked 
„, M improvement in the volunteer force, which 

The force r . , * 

from 1863 from that year began to increase in numbers 
and efficiency. The percentage of volunteers 
to population was 1 — 

1 From Berry's ' History of the Volunteer Infantry.' 



The Volunteers from 1863 to 1873. 57 





In 1861. 


In 1871. 


England 


•629 


•655 


Wales . 


•655 


•620 


Scotland 


1119 


1-316 



— from which figures ic is gratifying to note that the 
proportion of volunteers was in Scotland in 1861 nearly, 
and in 1871 more than, twice as great as in England or 
Wales. 

The organisation of the force in Scotland was also 
rapidly pushed forward on the lines indicated above, 
and, as will be seen from the corps' records, by the close 
of the year 1863 all the smaller corps mentioned above 
as still independent on April 1, 1862, had been either 
organised into administrative battalions or, in a very 
few cases, attached to larger corps. 

The reclothing of the force was carried out as laid 
down in the regulations, and it is noticeable how in 
Scotland the strong national military spirit asserted 
itself at this time in the matter of the assumption of 
national uniforms. In 1860 there had been little differ- 
ence between the uniforms of the Scottish and English 
corps, but in 1863 and 1864, while the whole of the 
artillery and engineer corps adopted the uniform of 
their regular branches, there were few Scottish rifle 
corps which did not adopt either tartans, in the form 
of trews or kilts, or the diced band round their caps, 
and those which did not do so simply copied the 
uniforms of the regular line infantry or rifles. It is 
remarkable how many at this period assumed the 
traditional scarlet, no fewer than thirteen battalions, 
or nearly one-third of the then organised force, having 
adopted it in 1864, at a time when it was hardly worn 
at all south of the Border. 

The cadet corps movement did not at all meet with 
approval in Scotland at first, and the only such corps 



58 Origin and History of the Force. 

formed before 1871 was that attached to the 3rd Edin- 
burgh and formed by Captain John Hope in 1867 of 
teetotallers. The next raised was a school corps, at 
Glenalmond, in 1875, attached to the 1st Perthshire 
Administrative Battalion, and it was followed by a 
third, attached to the 1st Forfarshire R.V. in Dundee, 
formed in 1881; but these three were the only cadet 
corps existing in Scotland at the date of the coming-of- 
age review in the latter year. 

There is little to chronicle in this period of steady 
development of the volunteer force ; but the end of 
it was marked by the re-armament of the infantry 
portion of it with a breech -loading rifle, for on 
September 1, 1870, it was announced that the issue 
of Snider -Enfield rifles to the volunteers was sanc- 
tioned, and the corps received them in the following 
year. 

In 1871 a most important change was made in the 
constitution of the volunteers, for in that year, by 
Transfer of the "Regulation of the Forces Act, 1871," 
tromtZm the "jurisdiction, powers, duties, command, 
tenant to*"" anc ^ privileges" over the volunteers, hitherto 
the crown, vested in the Lords-Lieutenant, were trans- 
ferred to Her Majesty, to be exercised by her through 
the Secretary of State ; and in consequence of this 
the commissions of officers were henceforth issued by 
Her Majesty in the same manner as for officers of the 
regular forces, the Lords-Lieutenant only retaining the 
power of recommending candidates for first appoint- 
ment. This Act also provided that, when any portion 
of the volunteer force was assembled for the purpose 
of being trained or exercised along with militia or 
regular forces, it should be subject to the Mutiny Act 
and Articles of War. 

The lessons taught by the Franco -German War of 



First Manoeuvres in 1872. 59 

1870-71 were taken to heart in Great Britain, and 
one of the first results of their study was 
the institution of manoeuvres of all arms on 
a large scale. These were first carried out near 
Aldershot in 1871, but in the following year were 
repeated on a more ambitious scale on Salisbury 
Plain, and in the latter manoeuvres the Scottish vol- 
unteers, for the first time as formed bodies, made their 
appearance in the great training camps of the south 
of England. The 3rd Provisional Volunteer Battalion, 
formed to take part in these manoeuvres, was com- 
manded by Lieut. -Colonel J. H. A. Macdonald of the 
Queen's Edinburgh, and in the battalion was included 
a detachment of 6 officers and 100 men of his corps, 
who, it is recorded, " acquitted themselves creditably." 
Another lesson learned was the necessity for im- 
proving the instruction of the officers of the force, 
and by "Auxiliary and Reserve Forces Circular" of 
May 28, 1872, various measures in this direction were 
ordered. An age limit of sixty years for officers was 
introduced, on attaining which they had to resign 
their commissions, five years' extension being allowed 
only in special cases. Officers were required within 
one year of first appointment or promotion to pass 
an examination for the rank to which they had been 
appointed or promoted, and those who failed to pass 
or who did not attend the number of drills required 
for efficiency were called on to resign. Schools of 
instruction for officers were opened at Shoeburyness 
for artillery, Chatham for engineers, Aldershot, 
London, Manchester, and Glasgow for rifles, with 
courses lasting a month, during which the officers 
attending were to receive 5s. a-day, together with 
quarters, fuel, light, and travelling expenses ; and at 
the conclusion of the course, and on passing the 



60 Origin and History of the Force. 

examination, each was to be given a certificate, and 
"P.S." was to be entered after his name in the Army 
List. A special capitation allowance of £2, 10s. a-year 
was granted to those who obtained this certificate, 
and this was to continue as long as the officer was 
certified proficient by his commanding officer. Officers 
might also be attached for instruction to the regulars 
or militia for a month, and at the end might be 
examined by a board of officers and granted a certifi- 
cate of proficiency, in which case "P." was to be 
placed after their names in the Army List. 

Under the provisions of the same circular, measures 
were also taken to improve the higher training of the 
units. To constitute a " battalion drill," it was laid 
down that 100 of all ranks (including 16 officers and 
Serjeants) must be present. If absent from inspection, 
volunteers were required to perform two extra drills 
to be classed as efficient, and rifle corps were required 
to attend, with at least half their strength, one brigade 
drill in the year of two hours' duration under a regular 
officer, Is. a-man being allowed for travelling expenses 
— a great advance this, indeed, on the idea of 1859 of 
the company being the highest volunteer unit ! 

" A portion " of the force was also allowed to form 
regimental camps of exercise to last three clear days, 
during which the annual inspection was to be made. 
Travelling expenses were to be borne by the public, 
and 10s. a-man was to be allowed for volunteers 
remaining eight (of which six clear) days, and £1 
for those doing thirteen clear days in camp. Officers 
were to receive 2s. 6d. a-day for field-officers, Is. 6d. 
for captains, and Is. a-day for subalterns while in 
camp, and greatcoats were to be lent from store to 
all ranks while in camp. Thus was inaugurated the 
system of volunteer training in camp, which after- 



Territorial Organisation of 1873. 61 

wards received such great extension ; but certain 
corps had already taken time by the forelock, and 
in 1869 the first volunteer camp had been held in 
Scotland, the 2nd Administrative Battalion Aberdeen- 
shire R.V., afterwards the 2nd Volunteer Battalion 
Gordon Highlanders, having in that year gone into 
and been inspected in camp at Haddo House. 

It was by this circular, as mentioned on p. 33, that 
the adjutants were directed to be appointed for five 
years only, and taken from captains of the army on 
full or half pay. 

In the year 1873 a most important step was taken 

in the organisation of the volunteer force, which was 

the beginning of their closer association 

Territorial & & . 

organisation with the regular forces and the militia. 
By General Regulations and Instructions 
of July 24, 1873, there were brought into force the 
recommendations of the Localisation Committee of 
1872. The United Kingdom was divided into seventy 
infantry sub-districts, each consisting of a certain area, 
to each of which were assigned for recruiting pur- 
poses, as a normal rule, two line battalions, two 
militia battalions, and the volunteers of the area. 
Of the line battalions, one was nominally to be 
stationed abroad, the other (which fed the foreign 
battalion in peace) at home, and two companies of 
each were to be permanently quartered at sub-district 
headquarters to form the brigade depot. The dep6t, 
the militia and volunteer battalions, and the army 
reserve men were constituted the " sub-district brigade," 
and were placed under the orders of the lieutenant- 
colonel commanding the sub-district brigade depot, who 
was charged with the training and inspection of all 
the infantry of the auxiliary forces. 

In the North British District (as the Scottish Com- 



62 Origin and History of the Force. 

mand was then termed) the infantry sub-districts were 
as follows : — 

No. 55. — Counties of Orkney and Shetland, Sutherland, Caith- 
ness, Eoss and Cromarty, Inverness, Nairn, and Elgin. Depot 
at Fort George. 

Eegular Battalions — 71st and 78th Foot. 
Militia » Highland Light Infantry and High- 

land Eifles. 
Volunteers — 1st A.B. Eoss, 1st A.B. Inverness, 1st A.B. 
Sutherland, and 1st A.B. Elgin. 

No. 56. — Counties of Aberdeen, Banff, and Kincardine. Depot 
at Aberdeen. 

Eegular Battalions — 92nd and 93rd Foot. 

Militia n Eoyal Aberdeen (2nd battalion not 

yet formed). 
Volunteers — 1st Aberdeen E.V., 1st, 2nd, and 3rd A.B. 
Aberdeen, 1st A.B. Kincardine, and 1st 
A.B. Banff. 

No. 57.— Counties of Forfar, Perth and Fife. Depot at Perth. 
Eegular Battalions — 42nd and 79th Foot. 
Militia n Eoyal Perth (2nd battalion not yet 

formed). 
Volunteers— 1st Forfar E.V., 1st A.B. Forfar, 10th Forfar 
E.V., 1st and 2nd A.B. Perth, and 1st 
A.B. Fife. 

No. 58. — Counties of Eenfrew, Bute, Stirling, Dumbarton, Argyll, 
Kinross, and Clackmannan. Depot at Stirling. 
Eegular Battalions — 72nd and 91st Foot. 
Militia n Highland Borderers L.I., and Eoyal 

Eenfrew. 
Volunteers — 1st, 2nd, and 3rd A.B. Eenfrew, 1st A.B. Stir- 
ling, 1st A.B. Argyll, 1st A.B. Dumbarton, 
and 1st A.B. Clackmannan and Kinross. 

No. 59. — County of Lanark. Depot at Hamilton. 
Eegular Battalions — 26th and 74th Foot. 
Militia m 1st Eoyal Lanark (two battalions). 

Volunteers— 1st, 3rd, 4th, 16th, and 29th Lanark E.V. 



Territorial Organisation of 1873. 63 

No. 60. — County of Lanark. Depot at Hamilton. 
Eegular Battalions — 73rd and 90th Foot. 
Militia 11 2nd Eoyal Lanark (two battalions). 

Volunteers— 19th, 25th, 31st, and 105th Lanark E.V., and 
3rd A.B. Lanark. 

No. 61. — Counties of Ayr, Wigtown, Kirkcudbright, Dumfries, 
Selkirk, and Eoxburgh. Depot at Ayr. 

Eegular Battalions — 21st Foot (two battalions). 

Militia n Scottish Borderers, and Eoyal Ayr 

and Wigtown. 
Volunteers — 1st A.B. Eoxburgh and Selkirk, 1st and 2nd 
A.B. Ayr, 1st A.B. Dumfries, and 1st A.B. 
Galloway. 

No. 62. — Counties of Edinburgh, Peebles, Haddington, Berwick, 
and Linlithgow. Depot at Glencorse. 

Eegular Battalions — 1st Foot (two battalions). 

Militia m Edinburgh L.I. (2nd battalion not 

yet formed). 
Volunteers — 1st and 3rd Edinburgh E.V., 1st Mid-Lothian 
E.V., 1st A.B. Mid-Lothian, 1st A.B. Ber- 
wick, 1st A.B. Haddington, 1st A.B. 
Linlithgow. 

For the command and training of the auxiliary 
artillery, artillery sub-districts were similarly formed, 
of which there were two in Scotland, each in charge 
of a lieutenant - colonel of the Royal Artillery, who 
commanded and inspected the corps of militia and 
volunteer artillery and the army reserve of the 
artillery in his sub -district. The 1st North British 
Sub-district, headquarters at Edinburgh, comprised 
the counties of Argyll, Ayr, Berwick, Bute, Clack- 
mannan, Dumbarton, Dumfries, Edinburgh, Fife, 
Haddington, Kinross, Kirkcudbright, Lanark, Lin- 
lithgow, Mid - Lothian, Peebles, Renfrew, Roxburgh, 
Selkirk, Stirling, and Wigtown, and the 2nd, head- 
quarters at Aberdeen, the rest (North) of Scotland. 



64 Origin and History of the Force. 

The mounted volunteers of Scotland were placed 
for command and inspection under the lieutenant- 
colonel and inspecting officer of the 1st Cavalry- 
District for Auxiliary Forces, headquarters at York, 
and the engineer volunteers were kept under the 
direct command of the Commanding Royal Engineer, 
North British District. 

Thus the volunteers were for the first time brought 
into close organic connection with the other branches of 
the forces of the Crown, and in this same year a begin- 
ning was made with a scheme of mobilisation which, 
it must be confessed, existed at first only on paper, 
according to which definite duties in the defence of the 
country were told off to the various corps on the coast, 
which were formed into " local brigades " for its watch- 
ing and defence, or as "detachments from corps" for 
the garrisoning of the fortresses. 

No further changes in the organisation of the force 
are to be chronicled until the year 1878, in which were 
Regulations published new regulations, which superseded 
Distortions those of 1863, and embodied all the changes 
of uniform, and modifications, as indicated above, which 
had been introduced in the past fifteen years. The 
main feature in them not already mentioned was the 
obligatory introduction for the first time of distinctive 
marks on the uniform to distinguish volunteers from 
other branches of the service. Artillery volunteers 
were directed to wear scarlet, and engineer volunteers 
blue Austrian knots on the sleeves of the tunic and 
bands and buttons on the forage caps, the regulars 
having all these in yellow and the militia in white. 
Infantry battalions were to wear an Austrian knot on 
the sleeve, light green for those clothed in green, and 
of the colour of the facings (or blue in the case of scarlet 
facings) for those clothed in scarlet. In corps wearing 



Regulations of 1878. 65 

the rifle busby, the lower portion of the plume was to 
be light green for those clothed in green, and of the 
colour of the facings for those in scarlet or grey. The 
initials of the county and the number of the corps (and 
of the administrative battalion or brigade, if included 
in such) were to be borne on the shoulder-straps. Silver 
officers' and Serjeants' lace and white metal buttons 
were to be worn with scarlet or blue uniforms, and 
black lace and bronze buttons with those of green. 
Corps in blue or scarlet were to wear white belts and 
black pouches, those in green black, and those in grey 
brown or black belts and pouches. The infantry sash 
was not to be worn by officers or Serjeants, and officers 
were to wear cross - belts and pouches. Where the 
corps of an administrative battalion were differently 
dressed, all had to conform to the approved pattern 
before April 1, 1879, or before five years had elapsed 
since their joining the battalion. With these excep- 
tions, no alteration in the uniforms of the volunteer 
infantry was to be permitted except for the purpose of 
assimilation to that of one of the line battalions of the 
sub-district. 

In 1879 the Martini-Henry rifle was first issued to 
the volunteers, but only to a limited extent. Its issue 
Re-arma- was n °t general till 1881, and it was not till 
!£■££? 1885 that tne Snider rifles and carbines were 
i8 79 . withdrawn, and the force completely supplied 

with the army weapon. 

In 1878 a committee had been appointed under the 
presidency of Viscount Bury, Parliamentary Under- 
consoiidation Secretary of State, to inquire into the finan- 
miBistrative c ^ state and internal organisation of the 
JJJSKmT* volunteer force, and its report was presented 
1880. m January 1879. The committee bore testi- 

mony to " the generally sound and healthy condition 



66 Origin and History of the Force. 

in which they found the volunteer force, which had 
increased from year to year in numbers, and had cheer- 
fully responded to every call upon it for increased effi- 
ciency." The maximum authorised establishment of 
the force in 1863 was 226,156, of whom 113,511 were 
efficient out of 162,935 enrolled; while in 1878 the 
establishment was 244,263, of whom 194,191 were effi- 
cient out of 203,213 enrolled. The percentages of 
efficient to enrolled had thus risen from 69*66 in 1863 
to 9 5 '5 5 in 1878. The committee did not therefore 
propose any material changes in the composition of the 
force, but recommended its closer connection with the 
territorial brigades in the sub-districts, the consolida- 
tion of the independent corps still formed in adminis- 
trative brigades and battalions with a view to increased 
economy and efficiency, and the assimilation of volun- 
teer uniforms and equipment to those of the regular 
army. An increase in the capitation grant was not 
considered desirable, but more liberal camp and travel- 
ling allowances were recommended. 

Action was taken on this report, and in the spring 
of 1880 all the administrative brigades of artillery and 
battalions of rifles were consolidated, 1 the newly- formed 
unit taking the number of the senior corps in it, and 
the batteries being numbered and the companies lettered 
consecutively in the brigade or battalion respectively. 
In counties with more than one battalion this led to a 
series of numbers with many blanks : thus in Lanark- 
shire there were the 1st, 3rd, 4th, 16th, 19th, 25th, 
29th, 31st, 37th, and 105th Rifle Corps. In June 1880, 
therefore, a general re-numbering from 1 upwards of the 

1 This was not the earliest consolidation of country administrative bat- 
talions in Scotland, for the principle had been applied in 1873 to the 1st and 
4th Administrative Battalions Lanarkshire R.V., which became the 16th 
and 29th Lanark R.V. respectively. 



Consolidation of Corps. 67 

corps took place in each of such counties. The new 
numbers were generally allotted according to the former 
seniority, but in certain cases {e.g., 3rd and 4th Lanark) 
corps preferred to retain their old numbers and permit 
junior corps to be placed in the vacant numbers above 
them {e.g., 16th Lanark became 2nd). 

The recommendations of the committee as to the 
assimilation of uniforms were carried out on April 1, 
1881, when (in a new edition of the Volunteer Regula- 
tions) it was ordered that the badges of rank worn by 
regular and militia officers on the shoulder-cords and 
shoulder-straps should be adopted by the volunteers in 
place of the former ones on the collar ; that non-com- 
missioned officers' chevrons were to be worn on the 
right arm only, instead of on both, 1-, 2-, and 3-bar 
chevrons above the elbow, points down, and 4-bar 
chevrons below the elbow, points up, and that battery 
and company serjeant - majors and colour - Serjeants 
were to wear 3 bars with a crown and badge (gun, 
colours, &c), Serjeants 3 bars and badge only, instead 
of 4 bars, badge and crown, and 3 bars, badge and 
crown, as formerly. Scarlet was to be the only colour 
to which infantry volunteers were to be permitted to 
change their uniform, and the facings then sanctioned 
were to be those of the senior regular battalion of the 
sub-district, with a black Austrian knot as a distinctive 
mark. Corps clothed in blue or scarlet were to wear 
buff belts and pouches. 

The year 1881 was marked by a sweeping change in 
r anisa- the organisation of the infantry, for in it were 
tioninto carried out the recommendations of a com- 

terntorlal , 

regiments mittee assembled in 1876 under Colonel Stan- 

fantryin ley to form territorial regiments. With this 

view, after certain changes had been made in 

their composition, the regular and militia battalions 



68 Origin and History of the Force. 

belonging to the old sub-districts were formed into 
territorial regiments with distinctive titles, the old 
numbers being dropped, except that that of the senior 
regular battalion continued to be borne as that of the 
" regimental district," which term was substituted for 
" brigade sub-district," the regular battalions constitut- 
ing the 1st and 2nd, the militia the 3rd (and 4th, if 
existing) battalions, 1 and the volunteer battalions were 
numbered in a separate sequence, from 1 upwards, 
in each regiment. The old facings were not retained, 
but it was laid down that all Scottish regiments were 
to have yellow facings 2 and thistle pattern lace, except 
royal regiments, which had blue facings, and the Scot- 
tish Rifles, which had green doublets and facings. The 
rearrangement of regimental districts in Scotland was 
mainly influenced by the desire to preserve the distinc- 
tive tartans of the old Highland regiments, and all 
Scottish infantry regiments were given doublets and 
tartan trews if not kilted. Volunteer battalions were 
to wear the uniform of the regiment and its badges, 
but not its battle honours. 

The new organisation came into force by General 
Order 70 of 1881, on July 1, 1881, and under it 
the Scottish infantry were grouped into regiments 
as follows : 3 — 

The Royal Scots (Lothian Regiment). 

Regimental District No. 1 — Glencorse. 

(1st and 2nd Battalions 1st Foot, and Edinburgh L.I. 
Militia.) 

1 The Cameron Highlanders had only one regular and one militia bat- 
talion, but in 1897 a second regular battalion was formed for it. 

a In 1899 the old buff facings were restored to the Highland Light In- 
fantry and Seaforth Highlanders. 

3 The titles of the regiments varied at first slightly from those given here, 
and shortly afterwards adopted — e.g., "Scotch Rifles," "Sutherland and 
Argyll Highlanders." 



Formation of Territorial Regiments. 69 

Volunteers: 1st and 2nd Edinburgh, 1st and 2nd Mid- 
Lothian, 1st Berwick, 1 1st Haddington, and 1st Lin- 
lithgow. 

The Royal Scots Fusiliers. 

Eegimental District No. 21 — Ayr. 

(1st and 2nd Battalions 21st Foot, Scottish Borderers, 2 

and Eoyal Ayr and Wigtown Militia.) 
Volunteers : 1st Eoxburgh and Selkirk, 2 1st and 2nd Ayr, 
1st Dumfries 2 and Galloway. 2 

The King's Own Borderers. 2 

Eegimental District No. 25 — Berwick-on-Tweed. 

(1st and 2nd Battalions 25th Foot. No Militia or Volun- 
teers.) 

The Gameronians {Scottish Rifles). 

Eegimental District No. 26 — Hamilton. 

(26th and 90th Foot, 1st and 2nd Battalions 2nd Eoyal 

Lanark Militia.) 
Volunteers : 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, and 7th Lanarkshire. 

The Black Watch {Royal Highlanders). 
Eegimental District No. 42 — Perth. 
(42nd and 73rd Foot, Perth Militia.) 
Volunteers : 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Forfar, 1st and 2nd Perth, 
and 1st Fife. 

The Highland Light Infantry. 

Eegimental District No. 71 — Hamilton. 

(71st and 74th Foot, 1st and 2nd Battalions 1st Eoyal 

Lanark Militia.) 
Volunteers : 5th, 6th, 8th, 9th, and 10th Lanarkshire. 

The Seaforth Highlanders {Ross-shire Buffs, Duke of Albany's). 
Eegimental District No. 72 — Fort George. 



1 See note to King's Own Borderers. 

2 In May 1887 The King's Own Borderers were renamed The King's Own 
Scottish Borderers, and the Scottish Borderers Militia was transferred to it 
as 3rd (Militia) Battalion from the 21st Eegimental District. At the same 
time the 1st Eoxburgh and Selkirk, 1st Berwick, and 1st Dumfries E.V. 
were transferred to it as volunteer battalions from the 1st and 21st Eegi- 
mental Districts, the Galloway Eifles being also transferred to it from the 
21st in 1899. 



7o Origin and History of the Force. 

(72nd and 78th Foot, Highland Eifle Militia.) 
Volunteers : 1st Ross, 1st Inverness, 1 1st Sutherland, and 
1st Elgin. 
The Gordon Highlanders. 

Regimental District No. 75 — Aberdeen. 

(75th and 92nd Foot, and Aberdeen Militia.) 
Volunteers : 1st, 2nd, 3rd, and 4th Aberdeen, 1st Kincar- 
dine and Aberdeen, and 1st Banff. 
The Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders. 
Regimental District No. 79 — Inverness. 

(79th Foot, and Highland Light Infantry Militia.) 
Volunteers (see note to Seaforth Highlanders.) 

Princess Louise's {Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders). 
Regimental District No. 91 — Stirling. 

(91st and 93rd Foot, Highland Borderers, and Renfrew 

Militia.) 
Volunteers : 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Renfrew, 1st Stirling, 1st 
Argyll, 1st Dumbarton, and 1st Clackmannan and 
Kinross. 

The closer connection with the regulars, and the 
assimilation of uniforms, recommended for the volun- 
teers by Lord Bury's Committee of 1878, and decreed 
by the General Order forming the territorial regiments, 
was only gradually carried out. It was not until 
February 1884 (G.O. 12) that the volunteer battalions 
affiliated to the Gordon Highlanders assumed the 
designation of volunteer battalions of that regiment, 
and they were followed in December 1887 only 
(G.O. 161) by the bulk of the battalions of the Royal 
Scots Fusiliers, King's Own Scottish Borderers, Scottish 
Rifles, Black Watch, Highland Light Infantry, and 
Seaforth, Cameron, and Argyll and Sutherland High- 
landers, and in April 1888 (A.O. 144) by those of 
the Royal Scots. Certain corps, seven in all, never 
assumed the territorial regiment's designation. These 

1 This battalion was transferred to the 79th Regimental District in 1883. 



A ssimilation of Uniforms. 71 

were the 1st Roxburgh and Selkirk, Galloway Rifles, 
1st, 3rd, and 9th Lanark, 1st Sutherland, and 1st 
Dumbarton. 

The . assumption of the uniforms of the territorial 
regiments proceeded even more slowly, partly owing 
to financial reasons and partly because certain corps 
desired to retain their original uniforms as volunteers, 
and by March 31, 1908, only 34 out of the 47 bat- 
talions in Scotland had so assimilated their uniform, 
with trews instead of kilts in certain cases, and with 
drab service-dress only in others. These, with the 
dates on which the uniforms were assumed, were : — 

Royal Scots.— 4th (1887), 5th (1890), 6th (1888), 7th (1904), 

8th (drab, 1903), 9th (kilts, 1900). 
Royal Scots Fusiliers.— 1st (1888), 2nd (1898). 
King's Own Scottish Borderers.— 2nd (1884), 3rd (1888). 
Scottish Rifles.— 2nd (drab, 1902), 4th (drab, 1904). 
Black Watch.— 2nd (trews, 1882), 3rd (trews, 1882), 4th (trews, 

1883 ; kilts, 1901). 
Highland Light Infantry.— 1st (1883), 2nd (kilts, drab, 1906), 

3rd (1886), 9th Lanark (1883). 
Seaforth Highlanders.— 1st (1888), 3rd (trews, 1886; kilts, 

1898). 
Gordon Highlanders. — 1st (trews, 1879; kilts, 1895), 2nd 

(trews, 1875), 3rd (trews, 1885 ; kilts, 1903), 4th (kilts, 

drab, 1903), 6th (trews, 1891). 
Cameron Highlanders. — 1st (1893). 
Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders. — 1st (trews, 1889 ; kilts, 

1899), 2nd (trews, 1898 ; kilts, 1903), 3rd (trews, 1889), 

4th (trews, 1886), 5th (1883), 1st Dumbarton (trews, 1887), 

7th (trews, 1888). 

The month previous to the "Coming of Age Review" 
Newcondi- of the Scottish volunteers was signalised by 
efficiency, increased demands on the force as regards 
1 88 1. efficiency being made, for on July 31, 

1881, by an Order in Council, it was laid down that 



72 Origin and History of the Force. 

the following drills had to be performed to render a 
volunteer efficient : — 

Years of Service. 



1st. 2nd. 3rd and 4th each. Subsequent. 

Light Horse and\ 19 19 9 7 

Mounted Rifles J (3 regimental) (3 regl., 6 troop) 

*— *■ • {JUST 4 } {*%?} 12g "" 

_ . J 24 squad 1/24 squad "I /9 squad "1 (5 squad \ 

engineers . . j 12 technical J j 12 technical J (6 technical] (5 technical/ 

Riflpa SO / 30 \/6 company \ - 

Klties ' * 6U \(3 battalion)/ \3 battalion/ ' 

In each year two extra drills had to be performed 
if the volunteer was absent from inspection, and all 
volunteers had to pass the regulation classes of volley 
and class- firing. Recruits were allowed to perform all 
the drills laid down for the first and second year in 
their first year of service, but in this case had to per- 
form in addition, in their second year, the number of 
drills laid down for the third year. These require- 
ments show a considerable advance on those in force 
in former years. 

Thus organised, trained, equipped, and disciplined, 
the Scottish volunteer force, after an existence of 
The "com- twenty-one years, looked forward with con- 
Revfew^by fidence to the Review which was held by 
as e th M A"iS2t Her Majesty Queen Victoria, to celebrate its 
,88 '- coming of age, on August 25, 1881, on 

the historical ground of Holyrood Park, where in its 
infancy it had paraded before her on August 7, 
1860. The Queen had, on July 9, reviewed at 
Windsor 2286 officers and 49,954 men (total 52,240) of 
the English and Welsh volunteers, towards which 
force the 7th Middlesex (London Scottish) had con- 
tributed 23 officers and 477 men, and it was evident 
that the Northern Kingdom, with its total enrolled 



The Royal Review of 1881. 73 

force, could not equal this muster. Still, every effort 
had been made during the drill-season to recruit up 
and train the corps so as to parade before their 
sovereign a force worthy of the military traditions of 
Scotland. 

The force reviewed was under the command of 
Major-General Alastair M'L M'Donald, commanding 
the North British District, and consisted of 1654 
officers and 37,819 other ranks, or a total of 39,473, 
of which 3739 all ranks belonged to English corps. 
The total was thus made up : — 



Mounted troops . 
Artillery . 
Engineers . 
Rifles 


21 officers 189 other ranks. 
. 359 .1 7,517 i. 

40 „ 1,122 „ 
. 1,234 „ 28,991 „ 



Total . . 1,654 „ 37,819 .. 

The ground was kept by the 21st Hussars, which 
also supplied the escort for Her Majesty, and the 
1st Battalion Royal Highlanders (42nd), and the music 
for the march past was furnished by the bands of the 
1st Battalion Boyal Highlanders (42nd), 1st Battalion 
Highland Light Infantry (71st), 2nd Battalion Boyal 
Dublin Fusiliers (103rd), and 2nd Battalion Inniskilling 
Fusiliers (108th). 

The organisation of the force was as follows : — 





<**«•■; as 


Cavalry Brigade — Colonel The Hon. C. W. Thesiger. 
1st Fife Light Horse— Lt. -Col. J. A. Thomson 
1st Forfar Light Horse — Captain P. A. W. Carnegy 
1st Roxburgh (Border) Mounted Rifles — Captain Viscount 
Melgund ....... 


13 
3 

5 


106 
39 

44 


Total Cavalry Brigade 


21 


189 



74 Origin and History of the Force. 





Officers. 


Other 
ranks. 


1st Division — Major-General Sir A. Alison, Bt., K.C.B. 
1st Brigade— Colonel R. R. Jones, R.A. 

1st Forfar A.V.— Lt.-Col. F. Sandeman 

1st Renfrew and Dumbarton A.V. — Lt.-Col. J. Scott 

1st Argyll and Bute A. V.— Lt.-Col. F. Campbell . 

1st Caithness A. V. — Major J. Smith 

1st Aberdeen A.V.— Lt.-Col. F. Campbell . 

1st Inverness A.V. — Lt.-Col. D. Davidson . 
2nd Brigade — Colonel S. A. Madden, C.B., 42nd Regtl. Dist. 

1st Forfar R.V.— Lt.-Col. W. Morrison 

2nd ii ii Lt.-Col. J. Dickson 

3rd ,i .. Lt.-Col. R. Lamb 

1st Perth R.V.— Lt-CoL W. Colquhoun . 

2nd m ., Lt.-Col. W. Macdonald . 
2rd Brigade — Colonel D. Macpherson, C.B., Royal High- 
landers. 

1st Stirling R.V.— Lt.-Col. C. King 

1st Kincardine and Aberdeenshire R.V. — Lt.-Col. W. B. 
Ferguson ....... 

1st Sutherland R.V.— Lt.-Col. The Duke of Sutherland . 

1st Argyll R.V.— Lt.-Col. J. W. Malcolm . 

1st Dumbarton R.V.— Lt.-Col. H. Currie . 

1st Clackmannan and Kinross R.V.— Lt.-Col. A. Mitchell 
4th Brigade— Colonel J. T. Dalyell, 1st Regtl. Dist. 

6th Lanark R.V. — Lt.-Col. A. Morrison 

7th ,i t. Li -Col. P. Forrest 

1st Aberdeen R.V.— Lt.-Col. W. Jopp 

1st Inverness R.V. — Lt.-Col. E. Macpherson, C.B. . 

1st Linlithgow R. V.— Lt.-CoL A. Gillon . 


31 
17 
22 
6 
19 
24 

21 
35 

14 
21 
24 

33 

24 
17 
22 
31 
28 

24 
24 
28 
28 
24 


831 
478 
446 
123 
461 
479 

570 
753 
309 
525 

642 

625 

521 
433 
465 
790 
542 

513 
654 
621 
735 
551 


Total 1st Division 


517 


12,067 


2nd Division— Major-General W. Cameron, C.B. 
1st Brigade— Colonel C. H. Ingilby, C.B., R.A. 

1st Northumberland A.V.— Lt.-Col. A. Potter, C.B. 

2nd H ., Lt.-Col. H. G. Earl Percy 

1st Berwick-on-Tweed A.V. — Captain J. Allan 

1st Berwick A.V. — Captain J. Johnston . 

2nd n n Captain R. Craig 

1st Haddington AV. — Captain J. Kelly 

1st Edinburgh City A. V.— Lt.-Col. Sir W. Baillie, Bt. . 

1st Mid-Lothian A. V.— Major T. E. 0. Home 

3rd Durham A.V. — Major J. Stevenson 

1st Newcastle AV.— Lt.-Col. J. R. Young . 
2nd Brigade— Colonel D. J. Baillie, 72nd Regtl. Dist. 

1st Fife AV— Lt.-Col. J. N. M'Leod 

1st Fife R.V— Lt.-Col. Sir C. T. Lindsay, Bt. 

1st Ross R.V. — Major D. Davidson .... 

1st Elgin R.V.— Lt.-CoL W. Culbard 


24 
13 
5 
3 
2 
2 
31 
28 
4 
24 

29 
34 

27 
21 


481 
267 
107 
49 
51 
56 
515 
410 
132 
277 

734 
856 
556 
533 



The Royal Review of 1881. 



75 





Officers. 


Other 
ranks. 


3rd Briqade— Col. G. G. Walker, 3rd Batt. Royal Scots Fus. 

1st Newcastle E.V.— Lt-CoL C. M. Palmer 

7th Middlesex R.V.— Lt.-Col. H. Lumsden 

1st Mid-Lothian R.V. — Lt.-Col. W. Marjorihanks . 

1st Cumberland R.V.— Lt.-Col. A. G. Thomson . 
4th Brigade— Colonel D. Davidson, C.B., 1st Edinburgh R.V. 

1st Edinburgh R.V. (2 batts.)— Lt.-Col. B. F. Primrose . 

2nd ii n Lt.-Col. J. Hope 

2nd i, m Cadet Corps— Lt. -Col. D. M'Gibbon . 

2nd Northumberland R.V.— Lt.-Col. H. F. Swan . 

1st Haddington R.V.— Lt.-Col. A. Scott . 
5th Brigade— Colonel W. P. Collingwood, C.M.G., 5th Regtl. 
Dist. 

1st Northumberland R.V. — Lt.-Col. J. Nicholson . 

2nd Mid-Lothian R.V.— Lt.-Col. Sir G. D. Clerk, Bt. 

1st Roxburgh and Selkirk R. V.— Lt.-Col. Sir G. Douglas, Bt. 

1st Berwick R.V.— Lt.-Col. Hon. R. Baillie Hamilton 

1st Newcastle R.V.— Lt.-Col. J. C. Earl of Durham 


18 
18 
35 
37 

78 
14 
9 
15 
19 

18 
23 
25 
17 
14 


611 
320 

723 

846 

1495 
506 
208 
242 
316 

478 
772 
601 
461 
406 


Total 2nd Division 


587 


13,009 


3ed Division — Major-General Sir John MacLeod, K.C.B. 
1st Brigade— Colonel G. F. Herbert, 21st Regtl. Dist. 

1st Lanark A.V.— Lt.-Col. J. Kidston 

1st Ayrshire and Galloway A.V.— Lt.-Col. M. J. Stewart . 

1st Lanark E.V.— Lt.-Col. D. Matheson, C.B. 

1st Aberdeen E. V.— Captain W. Hall 

1st Dumfries R.V.— Major W. E. Malcolm . 

Galloway R.V.— Lt.-Col. J. Maitland 
2?id Brigade— Colonel M. de la P. Beresford, 91st Regtl. Dist. 

1st Renfrew R.V.— Lt.-Col. D. M. Latham . 

2nd .. ,. Lt.-Col. W. Carlile 

3rd n „ Lt.-Col. R. King 

1st Ayrshire R.V.— Lt.-Col. J. Dickie 

2nd „ „ Lt.-Col. D. D. Whigham 
3rd Brigade— Colonel S. M. Wiseman-Clarke, 26th Regtl. Dist. 

1st Lanark R.V. (2 batts.)— Lt. -Col. J. N. Smith . 

2nd „ „ Lt.-Col. R. E. S. Harington-Stuart . 

5th ii „ Lt.-Col. J. M. Forrester 

9th „ „ Lt.-Col. J. S. Hamilton 
4th Brigade— Colonel A. Tisdall, 75th Regtl. Dist. 
3rd Lanark RV.— Lt.-Col. J. Merry 
4th „ „ Lt.-Col. H. M. Hannan 
8th „ .. Lt.-Col. A C. Campbell 

10th „ „ Lt.-CoL F. R. Reid . 


48 
26 
17 
5 
28 
21 

31 

24 
22 
26 
24 

51 
26 

27 
17 

40 
29 
35 
32 


970 
600 
389 
122 
597 
586 

744 
599 
619 
521 

482 

1,300 
767 
679 
453 

824 
641 
974 
737 


Total 3rd Division 


529 


12,604 


Grand total of the Force 


1,654 


37,819 



76 Origin and History of the Force. 

The Review may best be described in the words of 
Field-Marshal H.RH. The Duke of Cambridge, who 
wrote in his private diary, as given in vol. ii., p. 97, 
of 'George, Duke of Cambridge, a Memoir of His 
Private Life,' by Edgar Sheppard, C.V.O., D.D. 
(London, 1906) : — 

Edinburgh, August 25. — At 11 rode with Arthur 1 and some 
of the Headquarters Staff to the several rendezvous ; the town 
crowded, and nothing could exceed the loyal feeling of the public, 
and we were much cheered. At 2.40 left for Holyrood to attend 
the Queen to the Keview. All the volunteers had arrived in 
proper time, and were in position on the ground as I rode down 
the line. At 3.45 the Queen started, I riding by the carriage 
with Alfred 2 and Arthur, 1 whilst Marie 3 and Beatrice 4 drove 
with the Queen. But for the dreadful downpour of rain which 
lasted the whole time of the Eeview, or rather increased in 
intensity as evening advanced, the sight would have been mag- 
nificent — all the hillside up to Arthur's Seat and on both flanks 
being crowded with spectators, all, alas ! with umbrellas up, thus 
spoiling the coup cTceil ; the troops very picturesquely placed at 
the bottom of the hills facing Holyrood. General A. M'Donald 
was in chief command, with Alison, Cameron, and M'Leod as 
generals of division, two with four and the centre with five 
•brigades, the small mounted corps, which were excellently 
mounted, being under Thesiger. After driving down the entire 
line from left to right, the march past commenced, and went off, 
under the adverse condition of the weather, as well as it was 
reasonable to expect. About 40,000 men were on the ground, 
and their physique was very fine as a rule, better, I should say, 
than English corps in many cases, but the English regiments 
seemed to be better drilled and set, though it was difficult to 
judge, from the terrible condition of the marching-past ground, 
and the terrible discomfort of the continuous and pelting rain. 
The crowd, too, broke in at one point, coming down the hills in 



1 H.R.H. The Duke of Connaught. 

2 H.R.H. The Duke of Edinburgh. 

3 H.R.H. The Duchess of Edinburgh. 

4 H.R.H. Princess Henry of Battenberg. 



The Royal Review of 1881. 77 

dense masses to return to the town, and with great difficulty the 
rear battalions and brigades got through ; but they succeeded at 
last, after great exertions, and all passed with fairly maintained 
distances. The Queen returned with great ease through a tem- 
porary garden entrance to Holyrood ; and thoroughly drenched, 
though during the march past I had my waterproof on, by the 
Queen's permission, I reached home at six o'clock, had a hot 
bath, feeling very cold, and some brandy in my tea, and felt 
none the worse. At 8 drove with Macdonald 1 and Stephens 2 
to dine with the Queen, being myself in plain clothes, happily, 
as my coat was soaking wet. There was a large dinner-party of 
40, and the Queen seemed in excellent spirits. I handed her in 
and sat by her. We did not leave till 11. 

From the same source is extracted the following 
letter from the Queen to the Duke of Cambridge : — 

Balmoral Castle, August 31. 

I am anxious to take an early opportunity of telling you 
that I wish to confer the Order of the Thistle on you in 
remembrance of the Great Review of Volunteers in Edinburgh. 

You have, I hope, not suffered from the wet, nor any of the 
officers, who must also have been saturated ! As for the poor 
volunteers, who had to go back wet through, I hear that they 
have really not materially suffered beyond great discomfort. 

In connection with the last sentence of this letter, it 
may be noted that on August 26 the command- 
ing officer of each corps received from the Major- 
General commanding the North British District the 
following telegram : " Her Majesty desires me to 
express her congratulations and great satisfaction 
with the bearing and conduct of your men, and 
wishes to be informed as to their safe return." It 
may be imagined what were the answers to this 
gracious message. 

1 Lieutenant- General Hon. J. W. B. Macdonald, C.B., 21st Hussars, 
Private Secretary. 

2 Colonel A. H. Stephens, h.p., late Rifle Brigade, Aide-de-Camp. 



78 Origin and History of the Force. 

The following General Order was published by 
H.R.H. the Field-Marshal Commanding-in-Chief : — 

Edinburgh Castle, 26th August 1881. 

After an interval of twenty-one years the Queen has, for the 
second time, reviewed the volunteers of Scotland, but the corps 
which have now assembled for Her Majesty's inspection, includ- 
ing the volunteers from the Border counties of England, have 
amounted in number to 40,000, or nearly double the force 
brought together in 1860. 

Although unhappily marred by continuous rain, the spectacle 
yesterday presented to Her Majesty was an admirable sequel to the 
great review recently held at Windsor, and the Queen has observed 
with much gratification that the same soldier-like bearing, pro- 
gress in discipline, and uniform good conduct which distinguished 
the volunteers there assembled were conspicuous in a like degree 
on the present occasion. 

Yesterday's review and the unavoidable discomfort attending 
1 the return of the troops to their homes, necessarily without 
change of clothing and after many hours of fatiguing delay, 
furnished a trial of endurance and discipline rarely called for ; 
and Her Majesty, while deploring the cause, has learned with 
satisfaction that the conduct of her volunteers has been all that 
could be desired. 

The Field - Marshal Commanding - in - Chief has been com- 
manded by the Queen to express to the volunteers of all ranks 
her entire satisfaction with the appearance of the troops assem- 
bled ; and his Eoyal Highness, in communicating Her Majesty's 
commands to the Forces, desires on his own part to convey his 
thanks to Major-G-eneral Alastair M'Donald, on whom devolved 
the duty of organising the Review and commanding the Force, 
as well as to the Army Corps, Divisional, Brigade, and Medical 
Staffs, through whose exertions this successful gathering of corps 
scattered throughout the kingdom into one united force has been 
most successfully accomplished. 

By command, 

C. H. Ellice, A.-G. 

"Well might the Scottish volunteers of 1881 be 
content, as they were, with such encomiums ! 



Strength of the Force in 1881. 79 

The strength of the Scottish volunteer 

Strength of . ° . 

the force in force in 1881, based on returns published 
officially in January 1882, was as follows : — 



Establishment . 


55,690 (and 121 super- 




numeraries.) 


Efficients . 


47,540 


Non-efficients . 


1,396 


Total enrolled . 


48,936 


Present at inspection 


40,519 



Details showing the strength of each corps are 
given in Appendix F, and it is interesting, as showing 
the progress realised in nineteen years, to compare 
them with those given in Appendix E for the same 
corps in 1862. 

The five years following the great Review were un- 
1882 to eventful, and there were but few changes 
1886. ' n fae organisation of the force in Scotland. 

In 1882 the organisation of the artillery volunteers 
was made similar to that of the infantry, all the 
Scottish artillery corps being " affiliated " to the 
" Scottish Division " of the Royal Artillery, whose 
dep6t was at Leith Fort, and whose 1st Brigade (of 
nine batteries) was composed of regular garrison 
artillery, the 2nd to 6th Brigades being composed 
of Scottish Artillery Militia. No change was, how- 
ever, made in the designation of the corps, and the 
artillery sub - districts as formed in 1873 and the 
system of command were left unchanged. This 
"affiliation" continued till 1891, when, in consequence 
of a further reorganisation of the regular garrison 
artillery, the Scottish corps were " affiliated " to the 
" Southern Division Royal Artillery," headquarters at 
Portsmouth, with its second " sub-dep6t " at Leith Fort, 
but this again caused no change in the command or 



80 Origin and History of the Force. 

designation of corps, save that instead of "Artillery 
Volunteer Corps " they were now designated " Volunteer 
Artillery Corps." 

In 1886 sanction was given for the formation of 
" cadet battalions " in the volunteer force, but this 
submarine movement found no favour in Scotland, and 
miners. none have ever been raised. In the same 
year, by Clause 176 of Army Circulars, the formation 
of companies of volunteer submarine miners for the 
defence of commercial ports was authorised. These 
were to consist of 3 officers, 3 Serjeants, 6 corporals, 
2 buglers, and 49 sappers each, and were to undergo 
a period of 15 days' continuous training in camp each 
year, for which officers were to receive 10s. and men 
5s. a-day each, and the corps a capitation grant of £5 
for every efficient. Twenty per cent of the officers 
and non-commissioned officers might attend annually a 
course of instruction at Chatham of from 30 to 120 
days' duration. Thus a class of paid volunteers was 
formed more approximating to the militia system, and 
the arrangement worked well, for these corps quickly 
attained to a high state of efficiency. The companies 
were organised later into " divisions," of which there 
were three in Scotland, called the "Clyde," "Forth," 
and "Tay," after the estuaries in which were situated 
the submarine defences they were designed to man. 
The variations in establishment of these "divisions" 
are given in Part II. 

In 1886 a committee, presided over by Lord Harris, 
had been appointed to inquire into the money grants 
increase of to the volunteeer force, and, in consequence 
tion C gr P ant"in °^ ^ s recommendations, the following in- 
1887. creased capitation allowances were sanctioned 

by the new Regulations for the volunteer force issued 
in October 1887 :— 



The Volunteer Medical Staff Corps. 81 

£1, 15s. for every rifle volunteer who attended the prescribed 
number of drills and passed into the second musketry class, and 
for officers of rifles who had attended the prescribed number of 
drills ; also the same sum for " efficients " of the other arms. 

10s. for every volunteer who failed to pass into the 2nd musketry 
class, but who had fired 60 rounds and hit the target 12 times. 

£2, 10s. for each officer or Serjeant holding a proficiency 
certificate. 

£1, 10s. for each officer holding a certificate for tactics or for 
signalling. 

2s. for each volunteer in possession of a greatcoat. 

£10 per battery of artillery to pay for store-houses and gun- 
sheds if required, and if it could be shown that £30 a-year had 
been already expended for this purpose. 

By these same regulations of 1887 a step of honorary 

rank might be given to any field officer who had 

served 20 years as a commissioned officer. 

Honorary » 

rank for or to a captain or surgeon who had served 
15 years as such, either on continuing in 
the service or on retirement. Those who had served 
15 years might be permitted to retain their rank 
and wear their uniform on retirement, as were also 
Serjeants after 10 years' service as such. 

Up to 1887 the medical personnel of the volunteer 
force had been confined to the medical officers belong- 
ing to corps, but in that year it was decided 

Formation of i i i 

the voiun- to take advantage of the services of men 

teer Medical , • -1 • , 1 i • l • />• 

staff corps, trained in the medical or nursing professions 
to form a Medical Staff Corps, with officers 
of its own, for the volunteers. Companies were au- 
thorised to be formed of 3 surgeons, 1 quartermaster, 
and 96 other ranks, with 1 serjeant instructor, and 
these might be combined into "divisions" of 2 or 
more companies, for which a surgeon - commandant, 
a quartermaster, and an adjutant were allowed. The 
qualification for efficiency was 16 ambulance and 80 



82 Origin and History of the Force. 

other drills in the 1st and 2nd years of service each, 
and 8 ambulance and 9 other drills in subsequent years, 
with 2 extra drills in each if absent from inspection. 

In the formation of this new branch of the service 
Edinburgh took the lead ; indeed the Edinburgh com- 
pany had been formed in 1886 before actual official 
sanction had been given generally. Aberdeen followed 
in 1889 and Glasgow in 1894, the nucleus of the men 
of all the corps being formed by the medical students 
of the universities of the three cities. 

The year 1888 marked the commencement of a new 
era for the volunteer force, for in it, besides several 
1888-90. minor changes, a beginning was made with 
voi r 3ee°r n ° f an organisation of the force into units higher 
brigades. than battalions, and mobile batteries of artil- 
lery were added to it. For some years work had been 
actively pushed on at the War Office in the elabora- 
tion of a general scheme of home defence, and it had 
been decided that the available forces were to be 
grouped into three bodies, — a mobile regular force for 
active operations, a force for the defence of the capital, 
round which a series of defensive positions had been 
selected, and a force for coast and local defence. To 
the two latter the volunteers were assigned, and out 
of the Scottish infantry, by Army Orders 315 of July 
and 408 of September 1888, there were formed five 
brigades, — two for the London position, the " Highland " 
and the " South of Scotland," and three for coast and 
local defence, the "Forth," " Tay," and "Clyde" Bri- 
gades. These were composed as follows : — 

Highland — 4 battalions of Seaforth and Cameron Highlanders, 
3rd, 5th, and 6th V.B. Gordon Highlanders = 7 battalions. 

South of Scotland — 3 battalions of K.O. Scottish Borderers, 
Galloway V.R.C., 2nd and 5th V.B. Eoyal Highlanders = 6 
battalions. 



Formation of Volunteer Brigades. 83 

Forth — 8 battalions of Eoyal Scots, 4th and 6th V.B. Eoyal 
Highlanders, and 4th and 7th V.B. Argyll and Sutherland 
Highlanders = 12 battalions. 

Tay— 1st and 3rd V.B. Eoyal, and 1st, 2nd, and 4th V.B. Gordon 
Highlanders = 5 battalions. 

Clyde — 2 battalions Eoyal Scots Fusiliers, 5 each of Scottish 
Eirles and Highland Light Infantry, 1st, 2nd, 3rd, and 5th 
Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, and 1st Dumbarton 
V.E.C. = 17 battalions. 

This distribution was speedily found to be too 
cumbersome, especially in the local defence brigades. 
Accordingly in 1890 (by Army Orders 207 of June 
and 395 of December) the five brigades were increased 
to seven, and the following brigading, more in conson- 
ance with the organisation of the territorial regiments, 
was adopted : — 

Aberdeen — 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, and 5th V.B. Gordon Highlanders. 

Clyde — 1st and 2nd V.B. Eoyal Scots Fusiliers, 1st, 2nd, 3rd, and 
5th V.B. Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, and 1st Dum- 
barton V.RC. 

Forth — 8 battalions Eoyal Scots. 

Glasgow — 10 battalions Scottish Eirles and Highland Light 
Infantry. 

Highland — 1st and 3rd V.B. Seaforth, 1st V.B. Cameron and 
6th V.B. Gordon Highlanders, and 1st Sutherland V.RC. 

South of Scotland — Border and Galloway V.RC, 2nd and 3rd 
V.B. K.O. Scottish Borderers. 

Tay — 6 battalions Eoyal Highlanders, 4th and 7th V.B. Argyll 
and Sutherland Highlanders. 

In 1891 (Army Order 258 of December) the 6th and 
7th V.B. Royal Scots were transferred from the Forth 
to the South of Scotland Brigade, and the latter was 
given the title of " Scottish Border Brigade." In this 
formation the volunteer infantry remained organised 
till 1902. 



84 Origin and History of the Force. 

To the command of each brigade a colonel, either 
in the army or in the volunteer force, was appointed, 
and he was given a staff composed of a brigade-major 
(either a retired army or a volunteer officer), an aide- 
de-camp, a staff officer for supply and transport duties, 
and a brigade -surgeon lieutenant -colonel. The only 
extra Government grant for this staff was an annual 
allowance of £100 to the brigade -major to cover all 
his office and travelling expenses, and for hire of 
a horse. 

For each brigade were organised a supply detach- 
ment, a signalling detachment, and a bearer company. 
The supply detachment was composed of 1 captain as 
supply officer, with 1 non-commissioned officer as his 
assistant, 4 non-commissioned officers as issuers, and 
1 non-commissioned officer and 3 men as butchers, and 
these were borne as supernumeraries to the estab- 
lishment of one or other of the battalions of the 
brigade. For the brigade signalling detachment, each 
battalion furnished 2 non-commissioned officers and 
6 men, and the whole were placed under 2 officers 
selected from the brigade. The brigade bearer com- 
pany consisted of 3 medical officers, 7 staff Serjeants 
and Serjeants, 1 bugler, 6 corporals, and 47 privates, 
— 64 of all ranks, and might be organised either as an 
independent unit or as supernumeraries to the estab- 
lishment of one of the battalions of the brigade. 

To the command of these brigades were appointed 
officers selected either for their services with Scottish 
regiments of the regular army, or with the volunteers. 
Colonel E. H. D. Macpherson of Cluny, ret. pay, late 
93rd Highlanders, commanded the Highland Brigade, 
and Colonel the Eight Hon. Sir J. H. A. Macdonald, 
K.C.B. (Lord Kingsburgh), of the Queen's Edinburgh 
Brigade, the Forth Brigade throughout their exist- 



Officers Commanding Volunteer Brigades. 85 

ences. The command of the South of Scotland (later 
Scottish Border) Brigade was assumed by Colonel 
G. J. Viscount Melgund, who had served in the 
Scots Guards, and had raised and commanded the 
Border Mounted Rifles, and he held it till 1899, 
when, on his appointment as Governor - General of 
Canada, he was succeeded by the officer commanding 
the 25th Regimental District. To the command of 
the Tay Brigade Colonel W. D. Viscount Stormont, 
late Grenadier Guards and Royal Perth Militia, was 
nominated, and he was succeeded in 1894 by the officer 
commanding the 42nd Regimental District. Colonel 
Sir W. J. M. Cunninghame, Bart., V.C., late Scots 
Guards, was appointed to the command of the Clyde 
Brigade, but, on the latter being divided into two, he 
retained that of the Glasgow Brigade, which he held 
till 1898, when the officer commanding the 26th-7lst 
Regimental District took it over. On the formation 
of the new Clyde Brigade in 1890, its command was 
conferred on Colonel Sir D. Matheson, K.C.B., of the 
1st Lanark Engineer Volunteers, who held it until his 
death in 1898, when he was succeeded by the officer 
commanding 91st Regimental District. Lastly, till 
1892 the command of the Aberdeen Brigade was exer- 
cised by the officer commanding 75th Regimental Dis- 
trict, when it was taken over by Major-General F. S. 
Russell of Aden, C.M.G., late Royal Dragoons, who 
retained the command till 1902. 

To provide a proportion of mobile artillery to work 
with the infantry brigades, a number of volunteer artil- 
lery corps were invited to form " position " 

Formation of * . * i mi* 

position bat- batteries. This was by no means the first 
er e*. i 9 . a ^ em pt a t volunteer field artillery in Scotland, 
for the 1st Lanark had had a 4-gun field battery since 
1865, and the 1st Inverness and 4th Forfar had had 



86 Origin and History of the Force. 

horsed field guns since 1867 ; but these were not recog- 
nised officially, and no extra allowances were drawn 
for them. By Army Order 204 of May 1888 the forma- 
tion of " position batteries " was sanctioned, and in the 
following year 12 batteries of 16-pounder R.M.L. or 
40-pounder RB.L guns were issued to the Scottish 
Artillery, two each to the 1st Edinburgh, 1st Mid- 
Lothian, and 1st Lanark, and one each to the 1st 
Aberdeen, 1st Ayr, 1st Fife, 1st Forfar, Highland, 
and 1st Renfrew and Dumbarton. The conditions 
under which these batteries were formed, as laid 
down in the above quoted and modified or amplified 
by subsequent Army Orders, were that, in return for an 
annual allowance of £136 for each 40-pounder battery 
not supplied with waggons, £112 for each 40-pounder 
battery supplied with waggons, and £100 for each 
16-pounder battery, the battery should be fully and 
efficiently equipped with horses, and turn out at least 
four times a-year on four separate days (one of which 
to be the annual inspection), the length of the drill 
to be at least two hours, that the corps undertook 
to produce, when required, the full transport necessary 
for a battery in the field, that provision was made for 
the safe custody of the stores and harness, and that 
the whole equipment should be kept at all times clean 
and efficient for service. Later (in 1895) a special 
extra allowance of £40 once in three years was granted 
to each battery in aid of expenses of hire of horses for 
duty when attending camps, marches, or field days 
fully horsed. 

It was at first ordered that the horses should be 
agricultural horses with their everyday harness, the 
drivers leading them on foot, but this was soon 
modified, and part -worn artillery harness was issued 
and permission given to mount the drivers. The 



Volunteer Position Batteries. 87 

batteries were usually composed of 4 guns and 2 
ammunition waggons each, and for the manning of 
each the personnel of two garrison batteries (1891 
termed " companies ") was required. The establishment 
of these remained unchanged, but it was permitted, 
always keeping within the total establishment, to 
appoint a veterinary surgeon, a farrier Serjeant, a 
wheeler, 2 collar - makers, and 30 drivers, the last 
to be enrolled from men at least 5 ft. 4 in. in height 
and 33 in. round the chest, and the number of gunners 
being correspondingly reduced. For practice purposes, 
100 rounds of service ammunition were allowed annu- 
ally to each battery. 

To provide in some measure for the absence of 
mounted troops in the volunteers, in 1888 authority 
cyclist was given for cyclist sections, each consisting 
m^nt'ed"" 1 °^ * officer, 2 non-commissioned officers, and 
infantry. 13-21 men (including a bugler) to be formed 
in each battalion, — within its establishment, however. 
In certain corps sections or companies of mounted 
infantry were permitted to be formed, and this was 
done in the Queen's Edinburgh, 1st Lanark, and 1st 
Dumbartonshire corps, but of these only the first and 
the last continued to exist till 1908. 

The period from 1890 to 1900 was marked by a 
steady and gradual increase, both in numbers and 
1890 to efficiency, of the force, and but few organic 
l9 ° 0, changes took place. The attention of the 

authorities was mainly directed to improving its in- 
terior efficiency and its training, and to bring up its 
fighting value to a higher standard. The latter desire 
found its expression in the abolition, in 1891, of the 
term " auxiliary forces," hitherto applied to the militia, 
yeomanry, and volunteers, and the substitution for it 
of the words designating the branch of the service 



88 Origin and History of the Force. 

to which each belonged. Improvement in efficiency 
for field service was attained by the rearmament in 
1896-7 of the infantry with the Lee-Metford rifle, the 
issue of special capitation grants for equipment, by 
paying off the debts of corps, increase of the allowances 
for camps, and greater stringency in the regulations 
for efficiency in drill and musketry. Endeavours were 
made to provide for better promotion for the officers, 
and to lessen their expenses by granting an outfit 
allowance ; and finally rewards, in the form of decora- 
tions, were instituted for the force. 

Prior to 1890, but few volunteer corps had been 
provided with a suitable equipment for field-service, 
Grants for the utmost beyond the belt and pouches 
equipment, b em g a greatcoat and perhaps a haversack. 
In 1866 efforts had been made, by means of funds 
raised privately, to make good this deficiency, but the 
result was only partially successful; so in 1890, by 
Army Order 398 of December, it was ordered that 
full capitation allowances were only to be paid for 
volunteers who were fully efficient, and provided with 
waist-belt with frog, water-bottle and strap, haversack, 
mess-tin, and greatcoat with straps for all arms, and, 
in addition for light horse, artillery, and engineers, 
ammunition pouches or bandoliers to carry 20 1 rounds, 
and for mounted infantry or rifles, braces and pouches 
or bandoliers to carry 70 1 rounds. To provide these 
articles (other than greatcoats) a sum of 12s. was 
granted once for all for each volunteer enrolled on 
October 31, 1890, and an annual allowance of Is. was 
sanctioned for repairs. Greatcoats were to be issued 
free of cost from Government stores for all volunteers, 
or a sum of 12s. a man if the corps was already 
provided with greatcoats. On the establishment of a 

1 Afterwards increased to 50 rounds for engineers and 100 for rifles. 



Extra Financial Aid to Corps. 89 

corps being increased, 30s. was to be allowed per man 
for infantry and 23s. for the other arms to provide 
these essentials. 

Many corps had in the course of years amassed debts 
for the construction of drill-halls, headquarters, &c, 
improvement an d the records of the force are full of 
poaitionof 1 accoun ts of bazaars, public subscriptions, and 
corps. other private attempts to clear off these 

burdens and place the finances of corps in a satisfactory 
position. One great cause of complaint was that, 
while current expenses had to be met, the capitation 
grants were only paid in arrears — i.e., after they had 
been earned. To in a measure obviate this and to 
assist in the clearing off of debts, by Army Order 76 
of April 1896 a special extra issue of half the capitation 
grant (ordinary grant and special proficiency allow- 
ances) was made for all volunteers, in addition to the 
grant ordinarily payable on April 1, 1896, on condition 
that it was used in liquidation of any debt on the public 
funds of corps, and that steps were taken to place the 
public and private finances of corps in a satisfactory 
condition. Thanks to this liberal grant, the financial 
position of the force was greatly improved. 

In 1889 the issue of camp allowances was increased 
to 2s. a-day for not less than three or more than four 
camp clear days in camp, in addition to the actual 

allowances, travelling allowances; but in 1890, to encour- 
age the spending of longer periods under canvas, the 
allowances were raised to 2s. a-day for each day of 
continuous attendance up to six, together with 4s. for 
travelling expenses for each volunteer attending camp 
for not fewer than three continuous days. Tf in camp 
along with regular troops, the allowance of 2s. might 
be continued for thirteen days. For a brigade camp 
allowances might be issued for seven days, but three 



90 Origin and History of the Force, 

battalions with at least 300 men each had to be 
present. Brigade camps became the rule, and were 
productive of much improvement in the training of 
the force. 

In 1893, and again in 1899, the conditions of 
efficiency for earning the full capitation grant were 
made more stringent, especially in the 
demands for musketry qualification, both for trained vol- 
unteers and for recruits, but into the details 
of these it is unnecessary to enter, as the regulations 
then brought into force were superseded by those 
introduced after the war in South Africa. In 1896 
(Army Order 178), a strict physical examination before 
the enrolment of volunteers was introduced, and a 
minimum physical standard was instituted of 5 ft. 6 in. 
height for artillery gunners and 5 ft. 4 in. for artillery 
drivers, the chest measurement being 33 in. for both, 
and 5 ft. 3 in. height with 32 in. chest measurement 
for light horse, engineers, infantry, and medical staff 
corps. 

To provide for a suitable flow of promotion among 
officers, in 1896 (Army Order 206 of December) it was 
. , ,. ., decided that the tenure of command of a 

Limitation 

of periods oi volunteer corps should be for four years 
only, but extensions of four years more might 
be permitted, subject to the condition that officers 
were to be retired on attaining the age of sixty, 
unless specially granted an extension, which might be 
for two years at a time, and in no case beyond the 
age of sixty-seven. 

With a view to lessening the necessary expenses 
« .«. „ °f volunteer officers, and at the same time to 

Outfit allow- ' i.i. 

ancefor counteract the shortage of officers which, in 

certain corps, had been seriously felt, in 1896 

(Army Order 123 of June) an outfit allowance for 



Volunteer Decoration and Medal. 91 

first equipment of £20 was granted, as a personal 
allowance, to officers on first appointment and after 
obtaining a satisfactory report after a month's instruc- 
tion at a school or with the regular forces. If the 
officer did not serve for three years as an efficient or 
obtain the above report within two years, the allowance 
was to be refunded by him. 

On August 3, 1892, Her Majesty Queen Victoria 

instituted the Volunteer Officers' Decoration (V.D.), to 

be conferred upon those who had served for 

Rewards for rn i 

service in the twenty years as otncers in the volunteer 
force, years spent in the ranks to count as 
half- time towards the total service ; and by Army 
Order 85 of June 1894 the "Volunteer Long-Service 
Medal" was instituted as a distinction for those who 
had served for twenty years in the ranks of the force. 
Both are worn on the left breast, along with war 
medals, and are suspended by a green ribbon, the 
officers' decoration being in the form of a gilt wreath 
with a crown and V.R in the centre, and the medal 
being of silver and bearing on the obverse the head 
of Queen Victoria and on the reverse the inscription : 
" For Long Service in the Volunteer Force." 

Before quitting this period of the history of the 
Scottish volunteers, it must be mentioned that the 
The Queen's force was largely represented at the great 
jib"""* 1 Jubilee festivities, probably the most striking 
I 8o7- popular and patriotic demonstration of loyalty 

in history, on June 22, 1887, when Her Majesty Queen 
Victoria drove in procession from Buckingham Palace 
to St Paul's Cathedral. Each corps was represented 
by an officer and twenty other ranks, and the Scottish 
Volunteer representatives, massed by brigades, were 
formed up in the Mall, and were passed in review by 
Her Majesty on her return journey to Buckingham 



g2 Origin and History of the Force. 

Palace. The officers commanding detachments received 

for this service the Jubilee Medal. 

We now come to the most important and interesting 

years in the history of the volunteer force, those of the 

South African War, in which it was enabled, 
1900-03. 

for the first time, to show its value on active 

service in the field alongside of its comrades of the 
regular army, militia, yeomanry, and colonial forces. 

The reverses suffered by our arms in South Africa 
in December 1899 led to a call for more troops, and 
volunteer to a great outburst of national warlike en- 
^mpanies thusiasm, and accordingly, on January 2, 1900, 
of infantry. a special Army Order was issued calling upon 
the volunteers to furnish their contingent of trained 
men to reinforce the army in the field. For each 
battalion serving in South Africa a selected company 
was directed to be raised from its affiliated volunteer 
battalions and sent out to serve with it, and to be 
placed under the orders of its commanding officer. 
Each company was to be composed of 1 captain, 2 
subalterns, 1 Serjeant - instructor as pay serjeant, 4 
Serjeants, 2 buglers, 5 corporals, 99 privates, and 2 
stretcher-bearers, or 116 of all ranks, and an equal 
number of " waiting companies " was to be raised and 
maintained at home. Each volunteer battalion was 
to form a complete section at least. To surmount the 
difficulties of the Volunteer Act, the men were to be 
enlisted for the regular army for a period of one year or 
the duration of the war, those taken for the " waiting 
companies" being transferred to the reserve until re- 
quired for service. The conditions of enlistment were 
that the men should be not under 20 or more than 35 
years of age, 1st class (volunteer) shots, efficient in the 
years 1898 and 1899, of good character, medically fit, 
and, by preference, unmarried. They were to be paid, 



War Service Units for South Africa. 93 

rationed, clothed, and equipped as soldiers of the regular 
battalions (though continuing to wear the designation 
of their volunteer battalions on their shoulder-straps), 
and were to be granted wound pensions as for the 
regular army. On completion of their term of service, 
they were to be granted £5 as a gratuity, besides any 
special gratuity issued for the war. The corps to which 
the men belonged was to be given a sum of £9 to cover 
the cost of equipment of each volunteer, and the men 
were to be borne as supernumerary to their corps and 
to be considered as " efficients," the corps continuing to 
draw the full capitation grant for them. 

Needless to say, this call was met with alacrity in 
Scotland, and eleven special service companies were 
quickly formed, one for each regiment with one bat- 
talion in the field and two for the Gordon Highlanders, 
both regular battalions of which were at the seat of 
war, the London Scottish being affiliated with the local 
volunteer battalions of that regiment in the formation 
of the service companies. The companies sailed for 
South Africa in February or early in March 1900. 

On January 25, 1901, before the year's service of the 
first companies had expired, a call for companies to re- 
place those was made and responded to, and on March 
3, 1901, the formation of 8 volunteer cyclist companies 
was called for, one of them to be furnished by the 
Scottish volunteers, of a strength of 1 captain, 4 
subalterns, 1 serjeant - instructor as pay serjeant, 4 
Serjeants, 2 buglers, 5 corporals, 101 privates, and 2 
stretcher-bearers, or 120 of all ranks. The conditions 
of enlistment were much the same as for the infantry 
companies, and cycles were to be supplied to the men 
on arrival in South Africa. Enlistment for this com- 
pany was begun on March 21, and was conducted all 
over Scotland ; on May 2 the company was concentrated 



94 Origin and History of the Force. 

at Berwick-on-Tweed, and in the middle of that month 
it embarked for South Africa. 

Again, on January 9, 1902, a third call for service 
companies of infantry was made, and also responded to, 
though not m all cases to the same extent as in the first 
and second call ; but it is noteworthy that many men 
who had served in the service companies of the first call, 
and had returned home with them, rejoined the third call 
companies and proceeded with them to South Africa. 

On January 13, 1900, by a special Army Order, the 
War Office called upon the Volunteer Engineers to 
spedai ser- form special service sections from each corps 
oi C EnXe°e n r S of 1 subaltern, 1 Serjeant, 1 corporal, 1 2nd 
volunteers. cor p ral, and 22 sappers, or 26 of all ranks, 
to proceed to South Africa under the same terms as 
above detailed for the infantry. Of the Scottish corps, 
the section of the 1st Lanark was to be attached to the 
9th (Field) Company of Royal Engineers, and that of 
the 1st Aberdeen was to be used as a reserve for 
disposal on arrival in South Africa, and was actually 
attached to the 47 th (Fortress) Company of Royal 
Engineers. These sections embarked early in March 
1900. A second call for similar sections was made 
on February 5, 1901, and was responded to by both 
corps to the fullest extent. 

By Army Order 58 of March 1900, members of the 
Volunteer Medical Staff Corps and Bearer Companies 
special ser- were invited to enlist into the Army Medical 
Medicii staff Staff Corps for one year, or the duration of 
corps and ^e war, under the same conditions as in the 

Bearer Com- ' 

panies. infantry, and by Army Order 59 they were 
also invited to volunteer for six months' duty in the 
home hospitals. All the Scottish units of these ser- 
vices furnished their proportion of men for the duties 
required of them. 



Scottish Volunteers for South Africa. 95 

The nature of the war did not necessitate a call upon 

the services of the Volunteer Garrison Artillery as such, 

but it is on record that whole corps volunteered 

Other . r 

branches of their services, and that many men served in 
units of other arms during the war. The Fife 
and Forfar Light Horse contributed a company (the 
20th) towards the formation of the Imperial Yeomanry. 
It is extremely difficult to arrive at any definite 
statistics as to the actual numbers of volunteers who 
The contri- took P ar t m ^ e South African War, as many 
butions of enlisted in the regular army, or colonial forces, 

the Scottish . ° J 

volunteers or militia, or Imperial Yeomanry, and were 
south African consequently struck off the rolls of their corps 
and lost sight of by them. The only official 
figures available are those furnished to the War Office, 
details of which are given in the separate records of 
each corps, of the total number of all ranks of corps of 
volunteer infantry who, while members of the corps, 
took part in the war, and for the Scottish battalions 
these total up to (including the London and Liverpool 
Scottish) 4367 men. From another return, issued in 
September 1905, it appears that 147 of the Scottish 
Artillery, 161 of the Engineers, and 86 of the Medical 
Corps served in the war. There are no statistics avail- 
able of the numbers of the Light Horse, but it is believed 
that if the total contribution of the Scottish volunteers 
be put at about 5000 men who, as volunteers, served in 
the war, it will be well within the mark. This rep- 
resents about 10 per cent of the enrolled force. 
Not only did the volunteer force provide a con- 
. siderable number of men for active service 

Increase of 

establish- during the war period, but it also increased 
strength of at home in numbers and efficiency. The fol- 
lowing tables showing the establishments and 
strength in detail of the Scottish volunteer force on 



96 Origin and History of the Force. 

November 1, 1899, and November 1, 1900, are of 
interest as showing the actual results attained : — 







Estab- 
lish- 


Efficient. 




Total 
enrolled. 


Present 


Date. 


Arm of the service. 


ment, 

all 
ranks. 


Officers. 


Other 
ranks. 


ficients. 


inspec- 




Light Horse . 


304 


17 


163 


20 


200 


169 




Artillery . 


11,384 


451 


9,387 


229 


10,067 


8,694 




Engineers 


1,515 


42 


1,283 


108 


1,433 


1,227 


1st November 
1899. 


Do., Submarine 
Miners 


588 


33 


519 


16 


568 


510 


Infantry . 
Medical Corps 

Total . 


43,026 


1423 


34,200 


982 


36,605 


31,545 




534 


17 


420 


12 


449 


372 




57,351 


1983 


45,972 


1367 


49,322 


42,517 




Light Horse . 


304 


12 


119 


41 


172 


120 




Artillery . 


11,869 


476 


10,623 


190 


11,289 


9,891 




Engineers 


1,811 


47 


1,661 


71 


1,779 


1,534 


1st November 


Do., Submarine 














1900. 


Miners 


777 


37 


684 


19 


740 


650 




Infantry . 
Medical Corps 

Total . 


55,163 


1546 


40,546 


947 


43,039 


36,755 




560 


17 


444 


5 


466 


411 




70,484 


2135 


54,077 


1273 


57,485 


49,361 


Increase 


13,133 


152 


8105 




8,163 


6,844 



The figures for the year 1901 (see Appendix I) are 
slightly higher than those for 1900, and represent 
the maximum strength to which the force attained. 
They are — 



Establishment .... 


. 70,374 


Efficient- 




Officers .... 


. 2,163 


Other ranks 


. 55,786 


Non-efficients .... 


. 1,510 


Total enrolled .... 


. 59,459 


Present at inspection 


. 52,384 



The decrease in strength of the Light Horse is 
accounted for by the large numbers transferred to 



Increase of Force in 1900. 97 

the Imperial Yeomanry in South Africa and by the 
suspension temporarily of enrolments in the force, 
which in May 1901 was transferred to the establish- 
ment of the Imperial Yeomanry in Great Britain. 

No considerable increase of establishment took place 
in the artillery, as there were already more of that 
arm than was required to man the coast and other 
defences. The existing corps were, however, recruited 
nearly up to their full establishment, and their sphere 
of utility was enlarged by the issue, in 1901, of twelve 
more position batteries — eight to the 1st Lanark, two 
to the 1st Ayrshire and Galloway, and one each to 
the 1st Mid -Lothian and 1st Aberdeenshire, — thus 
bringing the total number of position (termed in 1902 
" heavy ") batteries in Scotland up to twenty-four. The 
company of Garrison Artillery still remained fixed at an 
establishment of 80 of all ranks, the 'personnel of two 
such companies being allowed for each heavy battery. 

The establishment of the Engineers was increased 
by three companies of fortress engineers (1st Lanark) 
and three companies of submarine miners, no change 
being made in the establishment of companies; and 
these also attained a strength of close on their 
maximum establishment. It was not until 1903 that 
the formation of a new corps of fortress engineers, 
the 2nd Lanark, was sanctioned. 

The greatest increase took place in the establish- 
ments and strength of the infantry. In the first 
place, the establishments of all companies were raised 
from 100 of all ranks, at which they had stood since 
1859, to 100 privates and 116 of all ranks (see 
Appendix G). Then many corps, as will be seen 
from their individual records, received permission to 
raise new companies. Lastly, a new battalion — the 
9th of the Royal Scots — was raised in Edinburgh in 



98 Origin and History of the Force. 

July 1900, in the Shetland Islands a small battalion 
of three companies was organised (7th V.B. Gordon 
Highlanders) in December 1900, and in October 1900 
the Scotsmen resident in Liverpool also formed a new 
battalion, — the 8th of the King's (Liverpool Regiment), 
— which, however, is not included in the figures given 
above. Authority was also given (Army Order 93 
of April 1900) to form cyclist companies in all bat- 
talions with an establishment of at least 600, each 
company of 5 officers and 95 other ranks ; while 
battalions of lower strength might enrol sections of 
1 officer and 15 to 23 other ranks, — an extra capita- 
tion grant of £2 being allowed for each efficient cyclist. 
It is doubtful, however, whether these measures added 
to the actual strength of the force, though they doubt- 
less contributed to its efficiency. It is noteworthy 
that, with all these measures, the strength of en- 
rolled infantry in 1900 almost exactly equalled the 
establishment sanctioned for 1899, but fell short by 
nearly 20 per cent of that sanctioned for 1900. 

Unconnected with the war, but falling in the same 
period, was the reorganisation of the volunteer artillery 
Higher or- sub-districts which was carried out in 1900. 
ganisation. Their number was increased from two to three ; 
each was placed under a lieutenant -colonel of Royal 
Artillery, who commanded and inspected the corps, and 
these latter were detailed to sub-districts as follows : — 

1st. Leith Fort— 1st Edinburgh City, 1st Mid-Lothian, 1st Fife, 
and 1st Berwick. 

2nd. Aberdeen — 1st Banff, 1st Forfar, 1st Caithness, 1st Aber- 
deen, The Highland, and 1st Orkney. 

3rd. Glasgow — 1st Lanark, 1st Eenfrew and Dumbarton, 1st 
Argyll and Bute, and 1st Ayr and Galloway. 

In 1902 a reorganisation of the volunteer infantry 
brigades was carried out, by which their formation was 



Reorganisation of Volunteer Brigades. 99 

brought more into consonance with the distribution of 
battalions to territorial regiments. Nine brigades (an 
increase of two) in all were formed as follows : — 

Argyll and Sutherland Brigade — Seven battalions of that 

regiment. 
Black Watch Brigade — Six battalions of that regiment. 
Gordon Brigade — Seven battalions of that regiment. 
Highland Light Infantry Brigade — Five battalions of H.L.I. 
1st Lothian Brigade— Q.E.V.B., and 4th and 9th V.B. Eoyal 

Scots. 
2nd Lothian Brigade— 5th, 6th, 7th, and 8th V.B. Eoyal Scots. 
Scottish Border Brigade — 1st and 2nd V.B. Eoyal Scots Fusiliers, 

Border V.E.C., 2nd and 3rd V.B. King's Own Scottish 

Borderers, Galloway V.E.C. 
Scottish Bine Brigade — Four battalions of Scottish Eifles. 
Seaforth and Cameron Brigade — 1st and 3rd V.B. Seaforth 

Highlanders, 1st Sutherland V.E.C., 1st V.B. Cameron 

Highlanders. 

These brigades were placed under the command of 
the officers commanding the regimental districts (the 
Scottish Border Brigade being under the officer com- 
manding the 25th Regimental District), with the ex- 
ception of the 2nd Lothian and Scottish Rifle Brigades, 
to which retired army officers — Colonel W. Gordon, late 
Durham Light Infantry, and Colonel E. C. Browne, late 
Royal Scots Fusiliers — were respectively appointed. 
The same staffs and administrative services continued 
to be provided for the new brigades. 

In the last year of the war, by special Army Order 
of March 4, 1902, was brought into force the new 
organisation of the army into six army corps, the first 
three of which were mainly regular troops, the last 
three mainly militia, yeomanry, and volunteers. The 
6th Army Corps — consisting of the 16th, 17th, and 
18th Divisions, a cavalry brigade, and corps troops — 
was assigned to Scotland, and in it were included, in 



ioo Origin and History of the Force. 

addition to units which it was proposed to raise, the 
following volunteer infantry battalions : — 

32nd Field Army Brigade, 16th Division, Edinburgh — 

A battalion of Q.K.V.B., Eoyal Scots. 

4th Vol. Bn. Eoyal Scots. 

5th Vol. Bn. Eoyal Scots. 

1st Eoxburgh and Selkirk V.E.C. 
34th Field Army Brigade, 17th Division, Glasgow — 

1st Vol. Bn. Eoyal Highlanders. 

1st Vol. Bn. Highland Light Infantry. 

3rd Vol. Bn. Highland Light Infantry. 

1st Vol. Bn. Gordon Highlanders. 
Portion of 31st Brigade, 16th Division — 

9th Vol. Bn. Eoyal Scots. 
Portion of 33rd Brigade, 17th Division — 

2nd Vol. Bn. Eoyal Scots Fusiliers. 

These battalions were not removed from the com- 
mand of the brigadiers of the volunteer infantry 
brigades to which they belonged in ordinary times, 
but when called out for training were placed under the 
command of selected officers — usually retired officers of 
the regular army. The period of training each year was 
thirteen clear days in camp, during which each battalion 
had to have present not less than 50 per cent of the 
establishment of a battalion at war strength — i.e., 15 
officers and 490 men, 1 — and higher allowances were 
granted to them than to other corps, as will be detailed 
below. This organisation continued until 1906, the 
battalions training in brigade camps at Stobs, Alder- 
shot, or Barry Links, after which training season it was 
replaced by that in force till 1908. 

1 It is of interest to note that at the training of 1906 the battalions 
named above had the following numbers (all ranks) in camp for the full 
year— viz., Q.R.V.B., 749 ; 4th Royal Scots, 655 ; 5th Royal Scots, 702 ; 
Border, 512 ; 1st Royal Highlanders, 723 ; 1st H.L.I., 635 ; 3rd H.L.I., 
906 ; 1st Gordon Highlanders, 551 ; and 2nd Royal Scots Fusiliers, 675. 



Emergency Camps in 1900. "' iof 

Under the pressure of the war emergency, and in 

view of possible complications abroad arising out of 

the war, it was decided to give the whole 

Emergency P 

camps in of the volunteer force a special extra train- 
ing in the summer of 1900. With this view 
an appeal was made to the patriotism of the force, 
and, by a special Army Order of March 29, sanction 
was given for a camp to be formed for twenty-eight 
days by each volunteer infantry brigade, in which 
particular attention was to be paid to field training 
and musketry — a special course of the latter, during 
which sixty rounds were to be fired at 300 to 600 
yards, being laid down. A special capitation grant 
of £2, 2s. was given for each volunteer attending the 
camp for fourteen clear days and firing the musketry 
course ; and in addition officers and men received pay 
and field allowances at army rates, and the men drew 
separation allowances for their families. The special 
capitation grant was only issued, however, if 50 per 
cent of the enrolled strength of the corps complied 
with the conditions. The same training facilities were 
by subsequent orders extended to position batteries 
of Artillery, Engineers, Army Medical Corps, and 
Bearer Companies — the first receiving also £5 for the 
hire of each horse for the twenty-eight days, and each 
battery being allowed fifty rounds a gun for practice 
purposes. These camps were numerously attended in 
Scotland, and in the months of June and July the coun- 
try presented the appearance of a vast camp — all the 
habitual training-grounds being filled to overflowing. 
By an Order in Council of August 11, 1902, the 
increased conditions of efficiency for volunteers were 
ett^ncy, 101 " increased in strictness, and as these remained 
1902. j n f orce till 1908 (with certain modifications, 

which have been taken note of in the context) they 



i62 Origin and History of the Force. 



are summarised here. It is to be noted that in all 
arms attendance at the annual inspection became 
obligatory, except in cases of certified sickness or of 
special leave granted by the commanding officer, and 
that corps might be exempted from obligatory camps 
by special authority, or individuals in cases of certified 
sickness. The 1st Orkney E.G. A. Volunteers and the 
7th V.B. Gordon Highlanders were not obliged to attend 
camp, but were liable to the extra attendances instead. 





Year of 


Recruit's 


Company 


Musketry. 


Camp or attachment 


ARM. 


service. 


training. 


training. 


to regular forces. 




1st 


45 attendances* 






Obligatory for 6 clear 
and consecutive 












>> 


Subsequent 




15 attendances* 




days, during which 


.2 










gun practice and 


1 

< 










inspection in man- 










ning works and fire 












discipline will take 












place. 




1st 


40 attendances! 




Optional, as 


Obligatory for 6 clear 


Jl 








per mus- 
ketry regu- 


and consecutive 


Subsequent 




10 attendances! 


days, during which 










lations 


inspection in field 


£h 










duties will take 
place. 




lst,anduntil 
qualified 




) 






| 18 attendances 


Obligatory, either — 
(a) for 8 clear and 


11 
jl 


Subsequent, 


} 




consecutive days. 


for quali- 






(b) for 2 periods of 


fied men 
who attend 


> 18 attendances 




4 clear and con- 
secutive days. 


Sa 


camp for 6 
days only 


j 




(c) for qualified men, 
6 clear and con- 




In other cases 


6 attendances 


J 


secutive days. 


£ 


1st 


40 attendances! 




Obligatory, 


Obligatory, as for 










as per mus- 


fortress engineers. 


M 


Subsequent 




10 attendances 


ketry regu- 




a 








lations 




2 11 

^« a 


1st 


45 attendances! 






Obligatory, as for 










fortress engineers. 


Subsequent 




15 attendancesi 






* §3 













* Six additional, including gun practice, if the corps is exempted from camp. 
! Six additional if the corps is exempted from attending camp. 



Efficiency Conditions and Camp Allowances. 103 

These new conditions, especially the prescription 
of obligatory attendance at camp, had in many cases 
an adverse effect upon the strength of volunteer corps, 
as may be seen from the returns in Appendix I, but 
less so in Scotland than elsewhere, and, if mere num- 
bers fell off, the increase in efficiency was undoubtedly 
great. 

By a special Army Order of March 20, 1901, a new 
increase in scale of camp allowances was introduced, 
an™s!„ ,ow " which held good till 1908, the main provi- 
190 1. sions being as follows : — 





Daily allowance (rep- 
resenting ordinary 
pay, subsistence, &c.) 


For a 

period 
in days. 


Additional allowance 
to cover time occupied 
in joining and quitting. 




Officers. 


Others. 


Officers. 


Others. 


Class I. 












Brigade camps . 

Camps with regular forces . 

Regimental camps (for gar- 
rison artillery and en- 
gineers) .... 

Heavy artillery, medical 
corps, and brigade bearer 
companies 


8 
I 8 


s. d. 
2 6 

2 6 


6 
6 or 13 


s. d. 
16 

16 


s. d. 
5 

5 


Special. 












Infantry battalions and brig- 
ade bearer companies 
specially included in the 
field army 


Vll 6 


5 


13 


23 


10 


Class II. 












Regimental camps (infantry 
and brigade bearer com- 
panies and medical corps) 


\ 8 


2 6 


6 






Class III. 












Electrical Engineers . 


10 


5 


1 to 8 







The allowances to officers were personal ones, and 
were drawn by commanding officers and paid to the 
officers. Travelling allowances to and from camp 



104 Origin and History of the Force. 

were paid for Class I. and Special camps at the rate 
of Id. a mile from the headquarters of units to camp 
up to a limit of 8 s., and for Class II. camps up to a 
limit of 4s. for each volunteer. To qualify for Class I. 
allowances in brigade camp, a battalion had to have 
at least 300 members in camp for the regulated period ; 
if not, it only drew the allowances for a Class II. or 
regimental camp. No allowances (except in the case 
of electrical engineers) were granted to any volun- 
teer who, before attending camp, had not completed 
during the year at least, if a recruit, 20 attendances 
at recruit training ; if a trained man, the battery or 
company training required for efficiency. 

Certain minor changes were made in 1901 and 1902 
in the capitation allowances, and a summary of these 
„ • , allowances may well find its place here to 

Capitation J * 

allowances, supplement the efficiency and camping regu- 
lations given above. 
The capitation allowances were — 

£1, 15s. for every efficient officer and volunteer, except in the 
electrical engineers, in which the allowance was £4. If a 
volunteer was exempted from camp, but otherwise qualified, he 
earned the so-called " lower rate " of £1, 5s. only. 

A special efficiency grant of 17s. 6d. a-head was made on an 
increase of numbers in a corps. 

£2, 10s. for every " proficient " officer or serjeant of artillery, 
fortress engineers, infantry, or medical corps. 

£1, 10s. for each officer of artillery who passed an examination 
in artillery, or for each officer of engineers or infantry who passed 
an examination in tactics. 

£1 for each efficient cyclist in possession of a suitable cycle, or 
for each efficient mounted infantryman in possession of suitable 
horse equipment. 

£1, 10s. for each efficient officer and serjeant in army service 
corps companies or the transport section of the medical corps 
who had been instructed in transport duties. 

3s. annually for each volunteer under the rank of officer 



The Force in 1903- 1905. 105 

for the maintenance of greatcoat, equipment, &c, and £1, 3s. 
each on increase of strength, for the first equipment of these 
ranks. 

Into travelling and other allowances it would lead 
too far to enter here. 

After the war, the volunteer force continued its 
work with fresh enthusiasm born of the consciousness 
The force m that it had not failed when called upon to 
1 903- 1 90s. supplement the regular army, and that it 
had secured a definite place in the defensive system 
of the Empire. In spite of the fervour begotten of 
war at the gates having passed away, and of the 
effect of the more stringent regulations as to camping, 
numbers in Scotland were well kept up, the total of 
enrolled volunteers in 1905 being only 2589 fewer 
than in 1902, while the number of non-efficients had 
sunk from 2186 to 1657. 

The only change in organisation which need be 
noted in this period is the redistribution of commands, 
introduced by special Army Order of January 6, 1905, 
by which the colonels commanding regimental districts 
were abolished and the dep6ts and the volunteer 
infantry brigades were placed under the orders of the 
Brigadier- General commanding the group of regimental 
districts (two in Scotland, "Highland" at Perth and 
" Lowland " at Hamilton), the volunteer artillery 
remaining as before under the lieutenant - colonels 
commanding artillery sub-districts, and the engineers 
under the Chief Engineer in the Scottish command. By 
a later Army Order (87 of May 1905), the Brigadier- 
General commanding the coast defences in Scotland 
was made responsible for the command and training 
of all units of artillery, engineers, and infantry allotted 
to these defences. 

The review of Scottish volunteers in 1905, for which 



106 Origin and History of the Force. 

there was no counterpart in England, was the outcome 
of a proposal made by Sir Robert Cranston 
Review by shortly after his appointment as Lord Provost 
september y ' of Edinburgh, and also as Colonel-Command- 
18, 1905. ant of the Q ueen ' s Rifle Volunteer Brigade, 
in the end of 1903, and in July 1905 Sir Robert 
received an intimation that His Majesty would be 
pleased to hold a review of Scottish volunteers at 
Edinburgh on Monday, September 18. The message 
was received with the utmost enthusiasm throughout 
Scotland; town councils voted money to help in the 
expenses of their volunteers attending, Glasgow 
contributing £750 and Edinburgh £500 in this way, 
and schools, halls, and other public buildings in 
Edinburgh were placed at the disposal of the military 
authorities to accommodate the troops coming from a 
distance, the entertainment of the majority of whom 
was undertaken by their local friends settled in the 
capital. The ground selected was the same as that 
on which the reviews of 1860 and 1881 had taken 
place, — Holyrood Park, — and the general arrange- 
ments were similar, a grand stand to hold 5000 people 
being erected, the bulk of the spectators finding places 
as before on the slopes of Arthur's Seat. Thanks to 
the development since 1881 of the railway system, 
it was possible to arrange for almost all the corps, 
except those from the extreme north and west, to 
be brought to Edinburgh and taken home again within 
the twenty -four hours, and the plan of transport 
worked without a hitch. The Army Council granted 
£4000 in aid of railway expenses, — an assistance 
not granted in former reviews, — which sufficed to 
pay about two -thirds of the expenses of travelling, 
the remainder being met by the local contri- 
butions, and the whole expenses of the journey of 



The Royal Review of 1905. 107 

the Liverpool Scottish (8th V.B. The King's) were 
borne by Lord Strathcona, the honorary colonel of 
the corps. 

The total strength of the force reviewed was, ac- 
cording to the parade state, 1744 officers and 36,639 
other ranks, or a total of 38,383 ; and although this 
total was lower than that of the 1881 review, which 
amounted to 39,473, yet of the latter 3739 belonged 
to English corps, leaving the muster of Scottish corps 
at 35,734, so that the review of 1905 represented a 
record assemblage of Scots under arms in modern days. 
Although the Light Horse and Mounted Rifles of former 
days were no longer to the fore, the force yet showed a 
small body of mounted men, and the Naval Volunteer 
Reserves, the 42 horsed field-guns, the Submarine 
Miners, the Motor Volunteer Corps, and the Medical 
Corps represented arms of the service which had no 
existence in 1860 or 1881, and typified the progress 
made in the organisation and preparation for war of 
the force. It was a force, too, which had a much 
greater resemblance to the regular army than its 
predecessors of 1860 or 1881, for it was difficult 
to distinguish at a short distance the uniforms of 
the bulk of the corps from those of the regular 
regiments to which they were affiliated and whose 
glorious names they bore, and that with a right 
now derived from close association with them on 
active service. 

The troops reviewed were under the command of 
Lieut. - General Sir Charles Tucker, K.C.B., Com- 
manding -in -Chief in Scotland, and were organised as 
follows : — 



io8 Origin and History of the Force. 



Naval Troops— Captain R. S. D. dimming, R.N. 
R.N. Volunteer Reserve, Clyde and Tay— Comman- 
der The Marquess of Graham .... 

Mounted Troops — Colonel Sir "W. J. G. Baird, Bart. 
Lothian and Berwick I.Y. — Major Wauchope, 

D.S.O 

Q.R.V.B. Mounted Infantry— Major G. G. Watson . 

Total mounted troops 



Royal Garrison Artillery Division — Brigadier- 
General Lord Playfair. 

Heavy Battery Brigade — Colonel A. B. Grant, V.D., 

1st Lanark RG.AV. 
1st Mid-Lothian R.G. A.V. \Colonel J. A. Dalmahoy, / 
1st Forfar R.G. A. V. J V.D. \ 

1st Lanark R. G. A. V. — Lieut-Col. J. Taylor, 

V.D 

1st R.G.A. Brigade— Colonel T. W. Powles, R.G.A. 
1st Edinburgh City R.G.A.V. — Lieut - Col. E. 

Campbell 

1st Mid-Lothian RG.AV. "I Major C. L. Blaikie, ( 
1st Berwick R.G.A.V. V V. D., 1st Mid- \ 

1st Fife R.G.A.V. J Lothian R.G. A. V. { 

1st Fife R. G. A. V. — Colonel J. W. Johnston. 

V.D 

2nd R.G.A. Brigade— Colonel A. B. Purvis, RG.A. 



1st Forfar R.G.A.V. 
1st Caithness R.G.A.V. 
1st Aberdeen R.G.A.V. 
1st Banff RG.AV. 



Colonel T. G. Luis, V.D, 

1st Forfar RG.AV. 

Colonel G. Milne, V.D., 

1st Aberdeeen R.G. A.V. 



The Highland RG.AV. V Colonel J. E. Baillie, 



1st Orkney RG.AV. 



Highland R.G.A.V. 



3rd R.O.A. Brigade — Colonel A. Powell, D.S.O.. 

RG.A. 
1st Renfrew and Dum-"l Lieut. -Col. C. C. Scott, 

barton R.G.A.V. I V.D., 1st Renfrew 

1st Argyll and Bute | and Dumbarton 

RG.AV. J RG.AV. 

1st Lanark RG.AV. —Lieut. -Col. A. M'l. Shaw, 

V.D 

1st Ayr and Galloway R. G. A. V— Lieut -Col. T. R. 

Stuart 



Total RG.A. Division 



23 

314 



lfi 


460 


8 


227 


2 


34 


10 


242 


16 


458 


25 


429 


17 


210 


27 


423 


17 


257 


.34 


427 


15 


165 



750 
581 



The Royal Review of 1905. 



109 





Officers. 


Other 
ranks. 


Guns. 


Royal Engineer Brigade — Colonel K. L. Hippisley, 

1st Lanark RE. V.— Colonel T. S. Park, V.D. 
1st Aberdeen RE. V.— Colonel W. S. Gill, V.D. . 
2nd Lanark RE.V. — Lieut. -Col. A. Pearson 
Clyde Division Submarine Miners — Colonel D. F. D. 

Neill 

Tay Division Submarine Miners — Lieut. -Col. F. S. 

Stephen 

Forth Division Submarine Miners — Lieut. -Col. 

H. M. Cadell, V.D 


22 
12 
35 

10 

5 

9 


421 
288 
805 

175 

124 

76 




Total RE. Brigade 


93 


1889 




1st Infantry Division — Brigadier-General 
A. Broadwood. 

1st Lothian Brigade — Colonel Sir R Cranston, Kt., 

V.D. 
1st Bn. Q.RV.B. Royal Scots — Colonel A. T. 

Hunter, V.D 

2nd Bn. Q.RV.B. Royal Scots — Lieut. - Col. R 

Clark, V.D 

3rd Bn. Q.RV.B. Royal Scots— Colonel J. Gibb, V.D. 
4th V.B. Royal Scots— Lieut. -Col. G. M'Crae, V.D. 
9th V.B. (Highlanders) Royal Scots— Lieut. -Col. J. 

Clark 

Bearer Company — Captain A. Macdonald 

2nd Lothian Brigade — Brigadier-General W. Gordon. 
5th V.B. Royal Scots— Colonel Sir J. M. Clark, 

Bart., V.D 

6th V.B. Royal Scots— Lieut. -Col. T. Rough, V.D. 
7th .. .. Colonel R M. Main, V.D. . 
8th 11 11 Lieut. -Col. C. Chalmers, 

V.D 

8th (Scottish) V.B. The King's (Liverpool Regiment) 

— Lieut. -Col. A. L. Macfie 

Scottish Border Brigade — Colonel J. H. Campbell. 
1st V.B. Royal Scots Fusiliers — Lieut. -Col. J. Gow 
2nd 1, .. 11 Lieut. -Col. J. E. 

Shaw 

1st Roxburgh and Selkirk (Border) V.RC. — Colonel 

Sir R. J. Waldie-Griffith, Bart., V.D. . 
2nd V.B. K.O. Scottish Borderers— Colonel C. Hope 
3rd .. .. .. Colonel R F. 

Dudgeon, V.D 

Galloway V.RC— Colonel J. M. Kennedy, V.D. . 
Bearer Company— Surgeon-Captain G. R Livingston 


32 

32 
31 

27 

23 
3 

20 
18 
16 

20 

20 

20 
22 

35 

21 

21 
14 
1 


603 

633 
663 

822 

517 
53 

1000 
515 
374 

574 

480 

610 

501 

711 
363 

407 
635 
35 




Total 1st Infantry Division 


376 


9496 





no Origin and History of the Force. 



2nd Infantry Division — Colonel J. W. Hughes- 
Hallett, C.B., D.S.O. 
Scottish Rifle Brigade — Brigadier - General E. C. 
Browne. 

1st Lanark V.R.C.— Colonel J. Macfarlane, V.D. . 

2nd V.B. Scottish Rifles— Colonel T. B. Ralston, 
V.D 

3rd Lanark V.R.C.— Colonel J. B. Wilson, V.D. . 

4th V.B. Scottish Rifles— Colonel F. J. Smith, V.D. 
Highland Light Infantry Brigade — Colonel J. Steven- 
son, C.B., A.D.C. 

1st V.B. H.L. I. —Colonel R. C. Mackenzie, V.D. . 

2nd ii n Colonel J. D. Young, V.D. . 

3rd n ii Colonel D. R. Graham, V.D. 

9th Lanark V.R.C. — Major J. Lancaster, V.D. 

5th (Glasgow Highland) V.B. H.L. I. —Lieut. -Col. 
P. W. Hendry, V.D. . . ... 

Bearer Company — Surgeon-Major A. D. Moffat 
Argyll and Sutherland Brigade — Colonel J. M. Hunt. 

1st V.B. A. and S. Highlanders— Colonel W. U. 
Park, V.D 

2nd V.B. A. and S. Highlanders — Colonel 
J. Paton, V.D 

3rd V.B. A. and S. Highlanders — Lieut. - Col. 
J. M. Campbell 

4th V.B. A. and S. Highlanders— Colonel R. Mor- 
ton, V.D 

5th V.B. A. and S. Highlanders— Lieut. -Col. E. P. 
Campbell 

1st Dumbarton V.R.C.— Lieut.-Col. H. Brock 

7th V.B. A. and S. Highlanders— Lieut. -Col. R. 
Haig 

Bearer Company — Captain J. A. Boyd . 

Total 2nd Infantry Division 

3rd Infantry Division— Brigadier-General Forbes 

Macbean, C.B. 

Black Watch Brigade— Colonel E. G. Grogan, C.B. 

1st V.B. Black Watch— Lieut. -CoL H. Hill, V.D. 

2nd .. ., Colonel J. Davidson, V.D. 

3rd ii ii Lieut. -Col. C. Batchelor, 

V.D 

4th V.B. Black Watch— Colonel Sir R. D. Mon- 

crieffe, Bart., V.D 

5th V.B. Black Watch— Colonel Marquis of Bread- 

albane, KG, AD.C 

6th V.B. Black Watch— Colonel Sir R. W. An 

struther, Bart 

Bearer Company — Surgeon-Major W. Kinnear 



800 
610 



750 
500 
700 
344 

770 
48 



753 

570 

624 

583 
1,271 

477 
47 



581 
439 

350 

434 

478 



The Royal Review of 1905. 





Officers. 


Other 
ranks. 


Guns. 


Gordon Brigade — Brigadier- General P. D. Trotter. 
1st V.B. Gordon Highlanders — Lieut. -Col. L. Mac- 

kinnon, V.D 

3rd V.B. Gordon Highlanders— Colonel R. Robert- 
son, V.D 

4th V.B. Gordon Highlanders— Lieut.-Col. W. A. 

Mollis, V.D 

5th V.B. Gordon Highlanders— Lieut. -Col. A. H. 

Farquharson 

6th V.B. Gordon Highlanders — Colonel J. G. 

Fleming, V.D 

7th V.B. Gordon Highlanders — Major J. C. C. Broun 
London Scottish (7th Middlesex) V.R.C.— Colonel 

J. W. Greig, V.D 

Seaforth and Cameron Brigade — Colonel N. M'Leod. 
1st V.B. Seaforth Highlanders— Colonel A. R. B. 

Warrand 

1st Sutherland V.R.C.— Colonel J. Morrison, V.D. 
3rd V.B. Seaforth Highlanders — Colonel R. 

Urquhart, V.D 

1st V.B. Cameron Highlanders — Colonel D. Shaw, 

V.D 

Bearer Company — Captain J. Macdonald 


32 

20 

27 

21 

16 
5 

20 

22 
27 

24 

19 
3 


550 

295 

328 

308 

271 
75 

240 

329 
497 

446 

453 

50 




Total 3rd Infantry Division 


396 


6941 




Royal Army Medical Corps Volunteers — Lieut. -Col. 

Croly, R.A.M.C. 
Aberdeen Companies R.A.M.C.V. — Captain F. 

Kelly 

Glasgow Companies R.A.M.C.V.— Lieut.-Col. G. T. 

Beatson, V.D. . 

6 War Ambulance Dogs — Major E. J. Richardson . 
Detachment Motor Volunteer Corps (10 cars) — Captain 

G. Macmillan. 
v ■ ( Detachment 17th Lancers 
p^S g ^ Army Service Corps . 
urouna ( Lothians and Berwick I. Y. . 


9 
21 

1 
1 
2 


157 

429 

10 
40 
40 
65 




Grand total of force 


1744 


36,639 


45 



All ranks 
Horses . 
Guns 
Motor cars 



45 
10 



The ground was kept by the 2nd Highland Light 
Infantry, and the music for the march past was 
supplied by the bands and pipers of the 2nd Scottish 



1 1 2 Origin and History of the Force. 

Rifles, 1st Black Watch, and 2nd Highland Light 
Infantry. As a guard of honour in rear of the salut- 
ing base was drawn up the Royal Bodyguard of 
Scottish Archers, under the command of the Captain- 
General, the Duke of Buccleuch, K.T. ; and in front 
of the grand stand were ranged 21 officers and 101 
men, veterans of the Crimea and Indian Mutiny of 
Scottish regular regiments, and 1830 ex -volunteers, 
many of whom wore their old uniforms, who had taken 
part in the Reviews of 1860 and 1881, including 29 
of the Loch Katrine Bodyguard of 1859. The weather 
was all that could be desired, cool and clear with 
occasional sunshine, very different from that of the 
1881 review. 

His Majesty, who had arrived in Edinburgh from 
Rufford Abbey in the morning, left Holyrood Palace 
on horseback at 11 o'clock, accompanied by Field 
Marshal H.R.H. the Duke of Connaught, and attended 
by the Marquis of Linlithgow, Secretary for Scotland, 
the Marquis of Tullibardine, and his Scottish aides-de- 
camp of the militia and volunteer forces, Colonel the 
Earl of Wemyss (London Scottish V.R.C.), Colonel 
Sir Reginald Ogilvy (Forfar and Kincardine R.G.A. 
Militia), Colonel the Earl of Kintore (3rd Gordon 
Highlanders), and Colonel the Marquis of Breadalbane 
(5th V.B. the Black Watch), a royal salute being 
fired on His Majesty entering the parade-ground by 
the 1st City of Edinburgh Artillery from their 4 "7 inch 
guns. Their Royal Highnesses the Duchess and 
Princess Patricia of Connaught were seated in the 
grand stand. After inspecting the troops, who were 
formed up in line of quarter- columns round the King's 
Park and along the base of Salisbury Crags, and the 
veterans, His Majesty took post at the saluting 
base, and the march past began, the troops quitting 



The Royal Review of 1905. 113 

the ground and proceeding straight to their temporary 
quarters after passing the saluting base, except the 
1st Lothian Brigade, which lined the streets along 
which His Majesty subsequently passed from Holy rood 
to Waverley Station. The march past was carried out 
with great precision, and the effect produced on the 
spectators may best be described in the words of His 
Majesty to some of the veterans : " Delighted to see 
you all ; a grand show, wasn't it ? " 

At the luncheon in the City Chambers after the 
Review, H.R.H. the Duke of Connaught conveyed to 
the Lord Provost the following verbal message from 
the King : " Please tell the Lord Provost and Sir 
Charles Tucker how pleased I am with the splendid 
arrangements they have made to-day. I would have 
travelled double the distance to see the very fine sight 
that I have seen this day. I am thoroughly proud 
of the Scottish volunteers. I know they came here 
under great difficulties to themselves, many of them 
travelling all night, and yet there they were on 
parade, making a splendid show, and proving what 
great and true patriotism there is in Scotland." 

In the evening the following telegram was received 
by Lieutenant-General Sir Charles Tucker from Colonel 
Davidson, Equerry-in- waiting to His Majesty : — 

Glenquoich, Invergarry, 8.35 p.m. 

The King commands me to convey to you, and to all ranks under 
your command, His Majesty's great satisfaction with the fine ap- 
pearance of the Scottish volunteer force reviewed by him to-day. 

The organisation by which so large a number of troops was 
conveyed from so many different quarters reflects the greatest 
credit on all concerned, and His Majesty fully recognises the 
patriotic spirit which has inspired the units of the force to come 
long distances, in many cases at great personal inconvenience, in 
order to be present at the Eeview. 

His Majesty was greatly pleased with the physique and appear- 
H 



ii4 Origin and History of the Force. 

ance of the troops, and commands you to convey to all ranks his 
approval of their steadiness on parade and in marching past. 

His Majesty highly appreciates the fine spirit which has 
resulted in the assembly of the magnificent force reviewed by 
him to-day, and heartily congratulates you on the success of 
the Review, to which your untiring energy has so largely con- 
tributed. 

The Lord Provost of Edinburgh also received from 
the same source the following telegram : — 

I am commanded by the King to convey to your lordship 
the expression of His Majesty's entire approval of the admirable 
arrangements (in which you have had so large a share) made in 
connection with the Eeview of the Scottish Volunteer Force 
held by the King. His Majesty wishes you to convey to the 
citizens of Edinburgh his appreciation of the loyalty and warmth 
of the reception accorded to him during his visit, which will 
always be a memorable one on account of the large number of 
Scottish volunteers assembled for inspection. His Majesty 
hopes that the extraordinarily fine appearance of the Scottish 
volunteers it was his pleasure to review to-day will act as an 
incentive to others to join a force whose patriotism is so greatly 
to be commended. — I remain, dear Lord Provost, yours sincerely, 

Akthur Davidson. 

Little now remains to be chronicled of the last three 

years of the existence of the Scottish volunteer force 

as such, and in them only three changes of 
1906- 1908. . n J ° 

any importance were made. 

The first was the reorganisation of the infantry 

brigades, which, however, only affected the Scottish 

volunteers in so far as the Argyll and Sutherland 

Brigade, which was of unwieldy size, was split up 

into two from October 1, 1906, the "Argyll and 

Sutherland " comprising the 3rd, 4th, and 7th Volunteer 

Battalions, and the " Clyde " comprising the 1st, 2nd, 

and 5th Volunteer Battalions and the 1st Dumbarton 

V.B.C. As brigadiers were appointed colonels or 



Officers Commanding Volunteer Brigades. 1 1 5 



lieutenant-colonels from the retired or half-pay lists of 
the regular forces or of the auxiliary forces, the latter 
being given the temporary rank of colonel in the army. 
These officers were to command the brigades in peace 
or war, be responsible for their training, inspect the 
battalions, and be the channel of communication between 
the latter and the brigadiers-general commanding the 
groups of regimental districts. Brigade-majors were to 
be chosen either from retired regular or from qualified 
volunteer officers, and both they and the officers com- 
manding brigades were to hold their appointments for 
five years, subject to an age limit of fifty-five for the 
former and sixty-five for the latter. To the command 
of brigades were appointed — 

Colonel A. C. Duff, half-pay, June 1, 1906. 

Colonel E. C. Grogan, C.B., retired pay. 

Colonel A. B. Purvis, half -pay, E.A., 
June 7, 1906. 

Colonel A. M. Carthew-Yorstoun, C.B., 
half-pay, June 23, 1907. 

Colonel J. W. Hughes - Hallett, C.V.O., 
C.B., D.S.O., retired pay, Aug. 6, 1906. 

Colonel (temp, colonel in army) E. C. 
Mackenzie, V.D., late Lieut.- Colonel 
1st V.B., H.L.I., June 8, 1906. 

Colonel (temp, colonel in army) Sir E. 
Cranston, Kt., K.C.V.O., late Lieut.- 
Colonel Queen's E.V.B., E.S., June 1, 
1906. 

Colonel A. C. Becher, retired pay, March 
30, 1907. 

Colonel P. D. Trotter, retired pay, June 
1, 1906. 

Colonel E. C. Browne, retired pay, June 1, 
1906. 

Colonel H. H. L. Malcolm, D.S.O., half- 
pay, June 1, 1906. 



Argyll and Sutherland, 
Black Watch 



Clyde 



Gordons 

Highland Light In- 
fantry 



1st Lothian . 

2nd Lothian . 
Scottish Borderers 
Scottish Eifles 
Seaforth and Cameron J 



The second change was the abolition of submarine 
mine defences in all ports in 1907. The services of the 



n6 Origin and History of the Force. 

Submarine Mining Volunteers were consequently not re- 
quired to anything like the same extent as before, and 
accordingly the Forth and Clyde Divisions were trans- 
formed into divisions of Electrical Engineers, and their 
numbers reduced to those necessary for working the 
electric lights in connection with the gun defences, and 
the Tay Division was disbanded. 

Lastly, the rearmament of the volunteer heavy bat- 
teries is to be noticed. In 1907 the 15 -pounder B.L. 
gun, transformed into a quick-firer, was issued to the 
1st Lanarkshire R.G.A.V., in place of its 16 -pounder 
R.M.L. guns, and the same course was ordered to be 
pursued with the other batteries armed with guns of 
the latter nature as transformed B.L.Q.F. guns became 
available. 

The general development of the force, its changes in 
organisation, equipment, training, and uniform, its re- 
views by the Sovereign and the compliments 

The Scottish . , «J . & . . , .«• 

volunteer paid to it, its progress in efficiency and military 
Force in 1907. g™^ an( j j^g services in the field, have now 
been traced through the forty-eight years of its exist- 
ence, and it now remains only to summarise its strength 
and composition at the time when it ceased to exist as 
the " Volunteer Force " and took its place as the nucleus 
of the more highly-developed " Territorial Army." l 

The establishments of the force for the year ending 
March 31, 1908, are given in detail in Appendix G, and 
may be summarised as follows :— 

The Royal Garrison Artillery Volunteers consisted of 
14 corps (of which one was a one-company corps attached 
to a larger one), comprising altogether 24 heavy bat- 
teries and 99 J garrison companies, with a total estab- 
lishment of 509 volunteer officers and 11,329 volun- 

1 See Appendix J for the units of the Territorial Army, into which those 
of the Volunteer Force were transformed. 



The Force in 1907. 117 

teers of other ranks, and a permanent staff of 14 officers 
and 97 other ranks of the regular forces. 

The Royal Engineer Volunteers consisted of 3 corps 
of Fortress Engineers, with in all 27 companies, and 
2 divisions (companies) of Electrical Engineers, with a 
total establishment of 101 volunteer officers and 2747 
volunteers of other ranks, and a permanent staff of 3 
officers and 14 other ranks of the regular forces. 

The Volunteer Infantry (including the two Scottish 
battalions in London and Liverpool) numbered in all 50 
battalions, of from 16 companies (1st Lanarkshire) down 
to 3 companies (7th V.B. Gordon Highlanders), the 
total being 476 companies, or an average of 9 to 10 per 
battalion, with an establishment of 1665 volunteer 
officers and 53,813 volunteers of other ranks, and a 
permanent staff of 49 officers and 298 other ranks of 
the regular forces. These included 1 company and 3 
sections of mounted infantry, and 19 companies and 6 
sections of cyclists. 

The Royal Army Medical Corps Volunteers consisted 
of 8 companies and transport sections for 8 field hos- 
pitals and 3 bearer companies, and there were 5 volun- 
teer brigade bearer companies, with a total establish- 
ment of 75 volunteer officers and 1321 volunteers of 
other ranks, and permanent staff of 1 officer and 11 
other ranks of the regular forces. 

Army Service Corps companies had been formed for 
seven out of the ten volunteer infantry brigades, but 
their 'personnel was borne as supernumerary to the 
establishment of one or more battalions of the brigade, 
and belonged to these battalions. 

The return of strength and efficiency of the Scot- 
tish Volunteer Force on November 1, 1907, is given 
in detail in Appendix H, and its summary is as fol- 
lows : — 



u8 Origin and History of the Force. 



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ii 9 



II. 

RECORDS OF THE SEVERAL CORPS WHICH 

HAVE CONSTITUTED THE SCOTTISH 

VOLUNTEER FORCE, 1859-1908. 

NOTES. 

The " date of formation " of a corps is given throughout as that 
on which its first officers were commissioned, as shown in the 
monthly ' Army List.' This by no means corresponds with the 
date of acceptance of the services of the corps, but it is only in 
few cases that the latter can now be ascertained, and when this 
is known it is so stated. 

In the lists of commanding-officers, all steps of honorary rank, 
orders, and decorations obtained by them during their period of 
command are shown. 

The numbers of men given as having served in South Africa 
are those of officers and other ranks who, while members of the 
corps, took part in the war of 1899-1902. 



LIGHT HORSE. 
1st FIFE LIGHT HORSE. 

(Plate I.) 

The circumstances under which this corps was raised 
have been already detailed in Part L, on page 32. 
It was originally formed as the 1st Fife Mounted 



1 20 Records of the Several Corps. 

Rifles, with headquarters at Cupar, and four troops 
(companies), 1st at Cupar, 2nd at St Andrews, 3rd at 
Kirkcaldy, and 4th at Dunfermline, the date of accept- 
ance of its services being June 7, 1860, and that of the 
first commissions of the officers July 11, 1860. The 
original uniform was scarlet tunics with blue piping, 
blue pantaloons with scarlet piping, Napoleon boots, 
black leather helmets with silver ornaments and spike, 
blue forage caps with scarlet band and top, and brown 
belts. White plumes for full dress were added to the 
helmets in 1864, and in 1879 silver-lace belts for full 
dress were adopted by the officers. The original arma- 
ment was cavalry swords and short Enfield rifles, and 
the men rode their own horses and used hunting- 
saddles. 

In 1870 the designation of the corps was changed to 
1st Fife Light Horse, mainly on account of the diffi- 
culty of keeping up the minimum establishment of four 
companies of " mounted rifles," which was fixed at 172, 
while for " light horse" it was only 144. At the same 
time Westley- Richard carbines were substituted for 
the short Enfield rifles, which were very inconvenient 
to carry on horseback. 

In 1876 the 1st Forfar Light Horse, one troop strong, 
was attached to the regiment for training and adminis- 
tration, and in 1883 a fifth troop was raised with 
headquarters at Perth. 

On the formation of the Imperial Yeomanry for 
service in South Africa in January 1900, the Fife and 
Forfar Light Horse formed the nucleus of the 20th 
company, which was embodied in the 6th (Scottish) 
battalion, two of the officers of the Fife Light Horse, 
Lieutenants J. Gilmour and J. Simpson, proceeding to 
South Africa with the company. 

In May 1901 the corps was amalgamated with the 




s si 






s 2 < J 



ist Forfar Light Horse. 121 

1st Forfar Light Horse and transferred to the Imperial 
Yeomanry establishment under the title of " Fifeshire 
and Forfarshire Imperial Yeomanry," in which " A " 
squadron represented the old 1st, 2nd, and 3rd troops, 
" B" the 4th and 5th, and " C" the 1st Forfar Light 
Horse. 

The commanding officers have been — 

Major J. A. Earl of Kosslyn (Lieut.-General and Colonel 7th 

Hussars), July 11, 1860. 
Lieut.-Colonel John Anstruther Thomson (hon. col.), late Captain 

9th Light Dragoons, August 31, 1866. 
Lieut-Colonel Sir John Gilmour, Bart., V.D., October 30, 1895, 

till transfer to Imperial Yeomanry. 



1st FORFAR LIGHT HORSE. 

(Plate I.) 

The 1st Forfar Light Horse, one troop strong, was 
raised, with headquarters at Dundee, on July 5, 1876. 
Its uniform was the same as that of the 1st Fife Light 
Horse, to which it was attached for drill and adminis- 
tration from the date of its formation, and with which 
it was finally amalgamated on the transfer of both to 
the Imperial Yeomanry in May 1901. 

Its commanding officer throughout its independent 
existence was — 

Captain Patrick A. W. Carnegy (hon. major), V.D., late Captain 
15th Hussars, July 5, 1876. 



122 Records of the Several Corps. 

MOUNTED RIFLES. 
1st ELGIN MOUNTED RIFLES. 

The 1st Elgin Mounted Rifles was formed, with the 
establishment of a company, at Elgin on January 9, 
1869, and was attached to the 1st Administrative 
Battalion Elgin R.V. 

The uniform was blue hussar tunics with white lace 
and red collars and cuffs, Bedford cord breeches with 
riding-boots, and busby with blue bag, and the arma- 
ment was swords and short Snider-Enfield rifles. 

The commanding officer was — 

Captain J. Grant Peterkin, January 9, 1869. 

The corps never attained its minimum establish- 
ment, and was only once inspected, when it mustered 
17 men. It was disbanded on November 3, 1871. 



1st ROXBURGH (THE BORDER) MOUNTED 
RIFLES. 

(Plate I.) 

This corps was raised, with an establishment of one 
company, and headquarters at St Boswells, under the 
title of 1st Roxburgh Mounted Rifles, on February 



15/ Roxburgh Mounted Rifles. 123 

13, 1872, and was attached to the 1st Roxburgh and 
Selkirk Administrative Battalion KV. Its uniform 
was slate-grey, without facings, with five rows of broad 
black braid on the breast of the tunic, black piping and 
Austrian knot, and a double black stripe on the panta- 
loons, butcher boots, busbies with scarlet bag and black 
and white plume, and brown " Sam Browne " belts. 
The armament was a cavalry sword and short Snider- 
Enfield rifle, the latter carried in a " Namaqua" bucket 
on the off wallet, the muzzle under the man's right 
arm. The saddlery consisted of hunting-bridles and 
breastplates with head-collar and white head-rope, and 
hunting-saddles with white girths, the cloak being 
carried rolled in front of the saddle. The clothing cost 
£10, 4s. 6d., the belts £1, 10s., the head-collar and rope, 
Namaqua bucket, and cloak-straps £1, Is., and spurs, 
&c, £1, Is. 3d.,— in all, £13, 16s. 9d., which each man 
had to pay on joining, besides engaging to mount 
himself on a suitable horse. The corps assembled 
annually for eight days' training, as did the yeomanry 
of those days. 

On January 22, 1880, the corps was granted the 
title of " The Border Mounted Rifles," and in that year 
grey helmets with silver star and the motto, "Wha 
daur meddle wi' me ? " replaced the busbies, and silver- 
lace edging was added to the piping on the collars, 
shoulder-straps, and the Austrian knot. In the follow- 
ing year the Martini-Henry rifles replaced the short 
Snider-Enfield in the armament. 

The corps acquired much fame in shooting competi- 
tions for its special arm, and in 1884 its teams were 
first and fifth, and in 1885 first and second, for the 
Lloyd-Lindsay competition at Wimbledon. 

In 1886 the corps attained its highest strength, 57 
members, and was then divided into two troops, "A" at 



124 Records of the Several Corps. 

Hawick and " B " at Kelso, headquarters being moved 
to Hawick. 

In 1888 bandoliers for 50 rounds were adopted in 
addition to the pouch for 20 rounds in front and that 
for 40 rounds in rear hitherto worn, and the sword was 
placed on the saddle. In the following year the corps 
was attached to the "South of Scotland" Volunteer 
Infantry Brigade, of which Viscount Melgund, who had 
till then commanded the corps, was appointed Brigadier, 
and it was supplied with four 1 -horse carts as transport. 

Unfortunately, agricultural depression had its effect 
on the corps, and the numbers gradually fell off. In 
1891 the corps did not train, and on March 31, 1892, it 
was disbanded, after an honourable existence of twenty 
years. 

The commanding officers were — 

Captain G. J. Viscount Melgund (now the Earl of Minto), late 
Ensign and Lieutenant, Scots Guards, February 13, 1872. 

Captain J. C. Earl of Dalkeith, November 27, 1889, till March 
31, 1892. 



1st DUMFRIES MOUNTED RIFLES. 

(Plate I.) 

The 1st Dumfries Mounted Rifles, with an establish- 
ment of one company and headquarters at Lockerbie, 
was formed on November 25, 1874, and was attached 
to the 1st Administrative Battalion Dumfries R.V. It 
was disbanded in 1880, numbers having fallen off on 
account of agricultural depression. 

Its uniform was scarlet without facings, blue panta- 
loons with scarlet stripes, butcher boots, black leather 



\st Dumfries Mounted Rifles. 125 

helmets with silver ornaments, brown " Sam Browne " 
belts, and scarlet forage-caps with white (silver for 
officers) bands. The armament, equipment, and sad- 
dlery were similar to those of the Border Mounted 
Rifles described above. 

Its commanding officer throughout its existence 



Captain Arthur Johnstone Douglas, late Ensign 42nd Foot, 
November 25, 1874 



1 26 Records of the Several Corps. 



ROYAL GARRISON ARTILLERY VOLUNTEERS. 

Notes common to all the Coups. 

In the following records of individual corps they have been 
placed in the order of their precedence in the whole force of 
Volunteer Garrison Artillery, which numbered sixty-eight corps, 
in the United Kingdom, namely : — 

9. 1st Edinburgh (City). 
11. 1st Mid-Lothian. 
13. 1st Banff. 
17. 1st Forfarshire. 
30. 1st Eenfrew and Dumbarton. 
32. 1st Fife. 
35. 1st Lanarkshire. 

38. 1st Ayr and Galloway. 

39. 1st Argyll and Bute. 
43. 1st Caithness. 

45. 1st Aberdeenshire. 

46. 1st Berwickshire. 

47. The Highland. 
54. 1st Orkney. 

The following changes of designation took place, and are 
common to all corps, so no mention of them has been made 
in the corps records: — 

In 1882 all the Scottish artillery volunteer corps were 
" affiliated " to the " Scottish Division, Eoyal Artillery," but 
this involved no change in their titles. 

By Army Order 166 of August 1891 the corps were termed 
" Volunteer Artillery Corps," and affiliated to the " Southern 
Division, Eoyal Artillery," but were not required to add the 
latter designation to their county titles. This affiliation to 
divisions was discontinued in 1901. 

By Army Order 27 of February 1902 the corps were desig- 
nated, e.g., "1st Edinburgh (City) Eoyal Garrison Artillery 
(Volunteers)." 



Royal Garrison Artillery Volunteers. 127 

The "companies" of volunteer artillery first raised were in 
1860 designated "batteries," and this title they continued to 
bear till 1891, when by Army Order 234 of November they 
were termed "companies," in accordance with the nomen- 
clature adopted for the regular garrison artillery. When 
" position," afterwards called " heavy," batteries were formed in 
1889, the 'personnel of two " garrison batteries " had to be 
combined to man each. This led to confusion, so in 1892 
these position batteries were made independent units, and by 
Army Order 218 of November 1892 a numbering was ordered 
by which, in corps composed entirely of position batteries or 
garrison companies, these were numbered from 1 onwards, and 
in corps composed partly of position batteries and partly of 
garrison companies the former were numbered first — e.g., 1st, 
2nd, and 3rd, — the garrison companies being numbered in 
sequence, 4th, 5th, &c. Thus in the corps records the words 
"battery" and "company" are used before and after 1892 to 
designate the same unit, "position" or "heavy" battery being 
specially used to designate units of that nature. The " position " 
batteries were designated "heavy" by Army Order 120 of May 
1902. 

The uniform of the artillery volunteers has from the first 
been closely modelled on that of the Eoyal Artillery, therefore 
it has only been considered necessary to mention in the corps 
records the original uniforms of 1859-60, which varied consider- 
ably according to the fancy of individual corps, but always were 
dark blue. It was only in 1878 that the scarlet Austrian knot 
and cap-band were ordered to be worn as the badges to distinguish 
the volunteer from the militia and regular artillery, and silver 
lace for officers and white metal buttons for all ranks were from 
the first worn. As a head-dress, the busby of the Royal Artillery 
was universally adopted in the "early sixties," and this was 
replaced in 1880-81 by the helmet, at first worn with a spike 
and afterwards with a ball. At the " Coming of Age Eeview " 
in 1881 the 1st Edinburgh (City) and the 1st Renfrew and 
Dumbarton Artillery were the only corps which still wore the 
busby. The latter gave it up shortly afterwards, and the former 
was the only corps in Scotland which, till 1908, wore the head- 
dress it assumed on its first formation. 



128 Records of the Several Corps. 

1st EDINBURGH (CITY) ROYAL GARRISON 
ARTILLERY (VOLUNTEERS). 

(Plate II.) 

Order of Precedence, 9. 

Honorary Colonel — Sir L. M'Iver, Bt., December 2, 1896. 

Headquarters — 28 York Place, Edinburgh. 

The 1st Edinburgh City Artillery Volunteers was 
formed as a brigade on September 13, 1860, from 
nine batteries raised in the city of Edinburgh : the 
1st on 4th November 1859 ; 2nd on 10th, and 3rd 
on 28th January ; 4th on 6th, and 5th on 24th March ; 
6th on 23rd May; 7th on 6th June; 8th on 13th 
August; and 9th on 16th October 1860. The 1st 
Battery was formed mainly of artists, its first com- 
mander being Joseph (later Sir Joseph) Noel Paton, 
and its first lieutenant John Faed. The men of the 
2nd and 4th Batteries were artisans ; but those of 
the others equipped themselves entirely, and the 
members of all paid subscriptions, which varied 
according to the rules of each battery : in No. 1, 
for example, members paid 10s. 6d., and honorary 
members £1, Is. annually ; and in No. 9 officers 
paid £2, 2s., Serjeants 10s., corporals 8s., bombardiers 
6s., and gunners 4s. each year. 

The first headquarters were at 21 Castle Street, 
and the corps used the Argyle Battery in the Castle, 
armed with 12-pounders, for drill, and a 32-pounder 
battery at Leith Fort for practice, carbine shooting 
being carried out at Hunter's Bog. 

The original uniform was a dark blue single-breasted 
tunic, hooked in front, with blue collar and cuffs and 
flat black braid all round, the shoulder -cords and 



ist Edinburgh Royal Garrison Artillery. 129 

Austrian knot on the sleeves being of black round 
lace. The trousers were blue, with a J-inch red 
stripe with black braid on both sides of it, the belts 
of white (buff) leather, with black pouch, and the 
head-dress was the busby — a round forage cap without 
peak, with a badge varying for each battery, being 
worn in undress. The officers had silver lace on their 
collars only, and gold badges of rank, their sleeve 
lace being black. 

In 1863 an alteration was gradually carried out, 
the cuffs and collars being changed to scarlet and 
the black lace to white (silver) cord, and a broad red 
trouser stripe being introduced (see Plate I.) ; but it 
was not till 1878 that the white cord was exchanged 
for red. The busby originally worn was always re- 
tained by this corps, the only one in Scotland which 
wore it throughout its existence (see Plate I.) 

In February 1889 two position batteries of 16- 
pounder R.M.L. guns were issued to the corps, and 
were manned by the 'personnel of four garrison bat- 
teries, and in 1892 these position batteries were 
numbered 1st and 2nd, the five garrison companies 
remaining being numbered 3rd to 7th, which was 
the formation of the corps till 1908. In February 
1903 the armament of the 1st and 2nd Batteries was 
changed to 4 7 -inch B.L. guns. 

The 1st Berwick R.G.A.(V.), a corps one company 
strong, at Eyemouth, was attached to the 1st Edin- 
burgh City for administrative purposes from 1864 to 
1908. 

Great attention was always paid to gunnery in the 
corps : in 1907 its detachment won the King's Prize 
at the National Artillery Association meeting at 
Lydd, and at the Buddon camp of the Scottish 
National Artillery Association the corps won the 



130 Records of the Several Corps. 

cup presented by Colonel Lord Playfair for general 
efficiency. 

The corps possessed a commodious headquarters 
with drill hall, &c., at 28 York Place, Edinburgh, 
and for its musketry used the Queen's Rifle Volunteer 
Brigade range at Hunter's Bog. Its gun practice 
was carried out from the Inchkeith Batteries. 

The lieutenant-colonels commanding the corps have 
been — 

William M. G. M. Wellwood, late Captain 2nd Bengal Light 

Cavalry, September 13, 1860. 
T. Bell, April 4, 1864. 

Sir Wm. Baillie, Bt. (hon. col.), December 6, 1866. 
Jas. Laing (hon. col.), July 26, 1884. 
D. M. Potter (lieut.-colonel, retired pay) (hon. col.), August 11, 

1888. 
Jas. F. Mackay, V.D. (hon. col.), November 2, 1892. 
Ewen Campbell, V.D. (hon. col.), February 6, 1904. 



1st MID-LOTHIAN ROYAL GABBISON 
ABTILLEBY (VOLUNTEERS). 

(Plate II.) 

Order of Precedence, 11. 

Honorary Colonel — The Right Hon. A. P. Earl op Rosebery, 
K.G., K.T., V.D., Jan. 7, 1903. 

Headquarters — 30 Grindlay Street, Edinburgh. 

Under the title of the 1st Mid- Lothian Coast Artillery- 
Volunteers this corps was formed on March 10, 1860, 
from six batteries raised at Leith (Nos. 1 to 6), two 
on September 16, two on November 17, 1859, and two, 



i st Mid-Lothian Royal Garrison A rtillery. 1 3 1 

which at first constituted a separate corps, the 2nd 
Mid-Lothian, on February 28, 1860, and added to the 
1st on June 4, 1860. The 7th and 8th Batteries were 
formed at Portobello and Musselburgh respectively on 
December 17, 1859, and February 28, 1860. 

The original uniform of the corps was dark blue tunics 
and trousers, the latter with broad scarlet stripes. The 
tunic had a scarlet collar with silver grenades em- 
broidered on both sides, blue cuffs, five rows of black 
cord lace on the breast, and black cord shoulder-cords 
and Austrian knot. The head-dress was a busby, a 
round forage-cap with red band being worn in undress, 
and the belts were black. The 2nd Mid-Lothian at first 
had scarlet cuffs and collar and white belts, but on 
amalgamation conformed to the dress of the 1st Corps. 
This uniform was worn down to the spring of 1881, 
when the corps changed to the regulation clothing. 

In 1864 the 1st Haddington Artillery Volunteers, 
a corps of one battery at Dunbar, raised on January 
20, 1860, was attached to the corps for administrative 
purposes. 

In 1886 the corps obtained two 40-pounder R.B.L. 
guns on travelling carriages, and these, horsed by dray- 
horses from Messrs Youngers' and Messrs M'Ewan's 
breweries, appeared at all parades until 1889, when 
two batteries of 16 -pounder R.M.L. guns were issued 
to the corps and manned by the 'personnel of four 
garrison batteries. The title of " Coast " artillery had 
been dropped in 1888, and in 1889 the headquarters 
of the corps were removed from Leith to Edinburgh. 

In 1897 the 1st Haddington Artillery was amalgam- 
ated with the 1st Mid-Lothian, of which it became the 
9th Company. 

In 1901 a third "heavy" battery of 16-pounders was 
issued to the corps and manned by the two remain- 



132 Records of the Several Corps. 

ing garrison companies in Edinburgh, and two years 
later the three heavy batteries were numbered 1st, 
2nd, and 3rd, the Portobello and Musselburgh com- 
panies being amalgamated as the 4th, and the Dunbar 
company becoming the 5th Garrison Company, which 
was the formation of the corps till 1908. 

Lieut. A. H. M. Jamieson of the 1st M.RG.A.V. 
served during the South African War as machine-gun 
commander with the 6th Battalion Imperial Yeomanry. 

Since the institution of the Scottish National Artillery 
Association Camp at Buddon, the 1st Mid-Lothian was 
always well represented at it. In 1902 the King's Cup 
for heavy batteries was won by the 1st, and in 1905 by 
the 2nd Heavy Battery, in the latter year the other 
two batteries being respectively second and third in 
the competition. 

The corps headquarters in Grindlay Street dated 
from 1888, and comprised two large drill-halls and all 
the necessary store-rooms and accessories. At Porto- 
bello and Musselburgh modern guns were available for 
drill, and in the latter the headquarters of the 4th 
Company were situated. The Dunbar Company had 
also a drill-hall, with orderly room, &c. The corps 
carried out its gun practice in camp, and its musketry 
at the Hunter's Bog range. 

The following officers have commanded the corps as 
lieutenant-colonels : — 

Sir Jas. G. Baird, Bt., late Captain 10th Hussars, Colonel, 

A.D.C., March 10, 1860. 
Thos. E. O. Home, July 18, 1883. 
Chas. G. H. Kinnear (hon. col), June 26, 1884. 
David Whitelaw, V.D., December 29, 1894. 
Jas. A. Dalmahoy, M.V.O., V.D. (hon. col), June 8, 1898. 



ist Banff Royal Garrison Artillery. 133 

1st BANFF ROYAL GARRISON ARTILLERY 

(VOLUNTEERS). 

(Aberdeen, Banff, and Elgin.) 

(Plate III.) 

Order op Precedence, 13. 

Honorary Colonel— A. W. G. Duke op Fife, K.T., G.C.V.O., V.D., 
March 15, 1884. 

Headquarters — 6 Castle Street, Banff. 

On October 22, 1861, the 1st Administrative Brigade 
Banff Artillery Volunteers was formed, with head- 
quarters at Banff, and in it were included the following 
corps of one battery each, formed in the county : — 

1st, Macduff, formed March 27, 1860. 
2nd, Banff, formed April 5, 1860. 
3rd, Banff, formed April 5, 1860. 
4th, Portsoy, formed October 8, 1860. 
5th, Cullen, formed January 18, 1861. 

The original uniform of these corps closely followed that 
of the Royal Artillery, with silver (white) lace. 

To the brigade were added in 1863 the 1st Elgin 
A. V., a battery formed at Lossiemouth on March 26, 
1860, and in 1872 the 2nd Elgin A.V., also a battery 
strong, raised at Burghead on October 16, 1872. On 
account of numbers having fallen off, in 1864 the 2nd 
and 3rd Batteries at Banff were amalgamated into one, 
as the 2nd, and the No. 3 remained vacant until Nov- 
ember 13, 1875, when a new 3rd Corps was formed at 
Gordonstown. 

In 1876 a general reorganisation of the artillery 
volunteers of the north-east of Scotland took place, 
under which the Banff Administrative Brigade was 



134 Records of the Several Corps. 

broken up, the two Elgin batteries being added to 
the 1st Administrative Brigade Inverness A.V., and 
the five Banff batteries to the 1st Administrative Bri- 
gade Aberdeenshire A.V. When the latter was con- 
solidated in May 1880, the Banff batteries were included 
in it, but in May 1882 they and batteries representing 
the former 1st and 5th Aberdeen Corps and 1st Elgin 
Corps were formed into the 1st Banff Artillery Volun- 
teers, with headquarters at Banff. The 1st Aberdeen 
Corps had been formed at Peterhead on March 13, 1860, 
with a strength of two batteries, but had been reduced 
to one battery in 1864 ; and the 5th Aberdeen, of one 
battery, had been raised in Fraserburgh on February 
15, 1860. The batteries of the new 1st Banff A.Y. 
were numbered as follows : — 

No. 1, Macduff (late 1st Banff A.V.) 
No. 2, Banff (late 2nd Banff A.V.) 
No. 3, Gordonstown (late 3rd Banff A.V.) 
No. 4, Portsoy (late 4th Banff A.V.) 
No. 5, Cullen (late 5th Banff A.V.) 
No. 6, Peterhead (late 1st Aberdeen). 
No. 7, Fraserburgh (late 5 th Aberdeen). 
No. 8, Lossiemouth (late 1st Elgin). 

In this formation the corps continued until 1904, when 
the No. 3 Gordonstown Company was, for the second 
time in its history, disbanded, and the 4th to 8th Com- 
panies became the 3rd to 7th. 

The corps had its headquarters in Castle Street, 
Banff, and was one of the few Scottish artillery corps 
which possessed a pipe band, which wore the Duff 
tartan of the honorary colonel of the corps. It latterly 
performed its annual practice in camp at Barry, and 
had five carbine ranges of its own near the headquarters 
of companies. 




2 < 



l< " 



ist Forfarshire Royal Garrison Artillery. 135 

The commanding officers have been — 

J. Cruikshank, Major, October 22, 1861; Lieut-Colonel, August 

14, 1863. 
Jas. Moir, Lieut.-Colonel, December 29, 1865. 
Francis W. Garden-Campbell, late Ensign and Lieutenant Scots 

Fusilier Guards (hon. col.), Lieut.-Colonel, November 8, 1873. 

[On amalgamation with the 1st Administrative Brigade Aberdeen 
A. V., Lieut.-Colonel Campbell was appointed second lieutenant- 
colonel therein, and in 1879 lieutenant-colonel commandant. On 
the 1st Banff being reformed in 1882, he assumed command of it.] 

Pat. Jamieson, V.D. (hon. col.), Lieut.-Colonel, October 7, 1893. 

[The command was vacant from 1896 to April 18, 1900.] 
Charles G. Masson (hon. col.), Lieut.-Colonel, April 18, 1900. 
John James George, V.D., Lieut.-Colonel, April 18, 1907. 



1st FORFARSHIRE ROYAL GARRISON ARTIL- 
LERY (VOLUNTEERS). 

(Plate III.) 

Order of Precedence, 17. 

Honorary Colonel — G. J. Lord Playfair, C.V.O., Colonel R.A. (retired pay), 
December 12, 1903. 

Headquarters— Albany Quarters, Bell Street, Dundee. 

In 1859 and 1860 the following artillery volunteer 
corps were formed in the county of Forfar: — 

1st, Arbroath, formed October 31, 1859, of one battery. In- 
creased to two batteries April 18, 1865, and to three batteries 
in 1877. Its original uniform was a blue hooked tunic and 
trousers, the latter with broad red stripes, the former with 
scarlet collar and cuffs, black flat braid all round the front 
and skirts, and black cord Austrian knot, white belts, and 
busby. 



136 Records of the Several Corps. 

2nd, Montrose, formed October 31, 1859, of one battery, increased 

to one and a half batteries June 23, 1866, and reduced to 

one battery 1875. 

3rd, Broughty Ferry, | Both raised on December 5, 1879, and 

4th, do. do., j amalgamated as the 3rd Forfar of two 

batteries in 1862. The original uniform of the 3rd Corps 

was a blue buttoned tunic with scarlet cuffs, collar, and 

piping, and black Austrian knot, the trousers with broad 

red stripes, a blue shako with red band and white plume 

of feathers, and black belts. The 4th Corps had the same 

uniform as the 1st. 

5th, Dundee, formed January 16, 1860,^ These corps, of one bat- 

6th, do., formed April 24, 1860, [■ tery each, were amal- 

7th, do., formed April 30, 1860, J gamated as the 4th 

Corps of three batteries in 1862, which corps was raised to 

four batteries in 1867, to six in 1868, and to seven in 1879. 

The seven Forfarshire corps were on December 14, 
1860, united into the 1st Administrative Brigade 
Forfarshire A.V., the headquarters of which were at 
Dundee, but these were transferred in 1862 to Broughty 
Ferry, and in 1870 back to Dundee. 

In 1876 the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th Kincardine Artillery 
Volunteers were attached to the brigade (see 1st 
Aberdeen E.G.A. (V.) 

In March 1880 the brigade as then existing — four 
Forfarshire and three Kincardine corps — was consoli- 
dated as the 1st Forfar Artillery Volunteers, with 
headquarters at Dundee and sixteen batteries, but in 
May 1882 the Kincardine batteries were transferred to 
the 1st Aberdeen Artillery Volunteers, and the corps 
reduced thereby to thirteen batteries, namely : — 

Nos. 1 to 7, Dundee (former 4th Corps). 

Nos. 8 to 10, Arbroath (former 1st Corps). 

No. 11, Montrose (former 2nd Corps). 

Nos. 12 and 13, Broughty Ferry (former 3rd Corps). 



ist Forfarshire Royal Garrison Artillery. 137 

In 1883 a fourteenth battery was formed at Perth. 

The Dundee batteries of the corps had since 1868 had 
two batteries of four field-guns each, but these were only 
occasionally turned out, and were not officially recog- 
nised, and it was only in 1889 that a position battery 
of four 16 -pounder R.M.L. guns was formed and manned 
by two of the Dundee garrison batteries. In 1892 this 
battery was termed the 1st Position Battery, and the 
remaining companies of garrison artillery were num- 
bered, the Dundee companies becoming the 2nd to 6th, 
the Arbroath companies the 7th to 9th, the Montrose 
company the 10th, the Broughty Ferry companies the 
11th and 12th, and the Perth company the 13th garri- 
son company, which formation was maintained till 1908. 
The corps, along with the other Dundee corps, had its 
headquarters in the Albany Quarters, Bell Street, 
Dundee, and used Barry Links for its gun practice. It 
had a drill battery there, and a rifle range up to 500 
yards at Monifieth Links for the Dundee and Broughty 
Ferry companies, and others at Eliot Links, near Ar- 
broath, and near Montrose for the companies at these 
places. 

The lieutenant-colonels commandant have been — 

James E. Erskine, December 14, 1860. 

Frank Stewart-Sandeman, V.D. (hon. col.), (lieutenant-colonel 
commanding 4th Forfar A.V., July 28, 1868), July 20, 1870. 
Thomas Couper, V.D. (hon. col), December 3, 1898. 
William G. Thomson, V.D. (hon. col.), April 3, 1901. 
Theodore G. Luis, V.D. (hon. col.), February 4, 1903. 
James Lindsay Henderson, March 31, 1906. 



138 Records of the Several Corps. 

1st RENFREW AND DUMBARTON ROYAL 
GARRISON ARTILLERY (VOLUNTEERS). 

(Plate IV.) 

Order of Precedence, 30. 

Honorary Colonel — J. Keid, June 17, 1905. 

Headquarters — 8 South Street, Greenock. 

The following artillery volunteer corps were raised in 
1860 in the counties of Renfrew and Dumbarton : — 

1st Renfrew, Greenock, ^ These were all formed on January 20, 
2nd do., do., >- 1860, and were amalgamated as the 

3rd do., do., J 1st Renfrew of three batteries in 

1864, which corps was increased to four batteries in 1867. 
The original uniforms were blue tunics with scarlet cord on 
the cuff, scarlet collar with black edging, the company num- 
ber on the shoulder strap, silver buttons, blue trousers with 
scarlet stripe, blue cap with scarlet band and grenade or 
Prince of Wales' plumes in front, and black waist-belts. 
1st Dumbarton, Helensburgh, formed February 9, 1860, as one 

battery. 
2d Dumbarton, Roseneath, formed March 5, 1860, as one battery. 
Headquarters transferred to Kilcreggan in 1 866. Disbanded 
1871. The original uniform of this corps was blue with 
scarlet facings and white belts. 
3rd Dumbarton, Dumbarton, formed December 24, 1860, as one 
battery, and increased to two batteries on March 22, 1869. 

These six corps were formed into the 1st Adminis- 
trative Brigade Renfrewshire A. V. on August 22, 1863, 
with headquarters at Greenock, and in May 1880 the 
brigade was consolidated as the 1st Renfrew and 
Dumbarton Artillery Volunteers, with headquarters at 
Greenock and seven batteries, namely — 

Nos. 1 to 4, Greenock (late 1st Renfrew). 
No. 5, Helensburgh (late 1st Dumbarton). 
Nos. 6 and 7, Dumbarton (late 3rd Dumbarton). 







: & i? 



i st Renfrew and Dumbarton R. G.A . 1 39 

In 1889 a position battery of 40-pounder Armstrong 
E..B.L. guns was issued to the corps and manned by 
two of the Greenock batteries, the headquarters of the 
other two being at the same time transferred to Port- 
Glasgow. In 1892 the position battery was numbered 
the 1st, the garrison companies taking the numbers 2 
and 3 (Port-Glasgow), 4 (Helensburgh), and 5 and 6 
(Dumbarton), which was the formation of the corps 
till 1908. 

During the South African War seventy- two men of 
the corps volunteered their services, but only three 
were taken. 

The drill batteries of the corps were at Greenock, 
and gun practice was carried out at Irvine. The 
corps had also a carbine range at Drumshantie, near 
Greenock. 

The list of lieutenant-colonels commanding is — 

John Scott, C.B., V.D. (hon. col.), August 22, 1863. 
William Anderson, V.D. (hon. col.), June 11, 1892. 
Kobert Duncan (hon. col.), May 13, 1894. 
Francis G. Gemmill, V.D. (hon. col.), May 18, 1898. 
Charles C. Scott, V.D. (hon. col.), January 18, 1902. 



140 Records of the Several Corps. 

1st FIFESHIRE ROYAL GARRISON ARTILLERY 

(VOLUNTEERS). 

(Fife and Stirling.) 

Plate IV. 

Order op Precedence, 32. 

Honorary Colonel — The Right Hon. V. A. Earl op Elgin and Kincardine, 

K.G., G.C.S.I., G.C.I.E., March 26, 1902. 

Headquarters — Kirkcaldy. 

On 27th November 1860 the 1st Administrative 
Brigade Fifeshire Artillery Volunteers, with head- 
quarters at Kirkcaldy, was formed, and to it were 
attached, then or on their subsequent dates of forma- 
tion, the following corps of Fifeshire Artillery Volun- 
teers of one battery each, except the 8th, which at 
first had two : — 

1st, Ferryport-on-Craig (Tayport), formed January 26, 1860. 
2nd, Newport, formed April 13, 1860. 

3rd, St Andrews, formed March 6, 1860. Uniform — blue long- 
skirted tunics with red collars and piping, four rows of 
black lace on the breast, and black Austrian knot, blue 
trousers with red piping, blue caps with turned-down peak, 
black band, and red piping, and white waist-belts. The 
officers had silver lace on their collars and silver shoulder- 
cords. 
4th, Inverkeithing, formed March 3, 1860. 

5th, Kirkcaldy, formed March 22, 1860. Uniform— blue long- 
skirted tunics bound with flat black braid, scarlet collars 
with silver grenade and black Austrian knot, blue trousers 
with black braid and red piping on both sides, caps like the 
3rd Corps, with straight peaks, and brown pouch and waist- 
belts, the former with a badge of the Royal Arms, the latter 
with the Thane of Fife on the belt-plate. 
6th, Burntisland, formed February 20, 1860. 
7th, Elie, formed March 8, 1860; headquarters transferred to 
Anstruther in 1872. 



ist Fifes hire Royal Garrison Artillery. 141 

8th, Leven, formed July 24, 1860, of two batteries. Uniform — 
tunic as for 3rd Corps (with silver cord on the collar), 
trousers, cap, and belts as for 5th Corps. Eeduced to one 
and a half batteries in 1866, and to one battery in 1875. 

9th, Dysart, formed September 19, 1860. 

10th, East Wemyss, formed January 16, 1862, out of the overflow 
of the 8th. Uniform as for the 8th. 

11th, Kinghorn, formed April 30, 1863. 

The uniforms of the corps not mentioned above were 
of the same type as that of the 5th ; some had broad 
red stripes on the trousers, some white and others 
brown belts, and all wore the peaked cap. 

In 1863 the following corps of Stirlingshire Artillery 
Volunteers were added to the brigade : — 

1st, Grangemouth, formed March 27, 1860. Uniform — long- 
skirted blue tunic with four rows of flat black braid, red 
collars with silver lace and black Austrian knot, blue 
trousers with red stripes, round forage caps with red band 
(piped with silver cord for officers), and brown belts. 

2nd, Stirling, formed May 30, 1860, as one subdivision. In- 
creased to one battery April 17, 1861. Uniform as for 
the 1st, but with white belts. 

In 1863 the whole brigade adopted the regulation 
artillery tunic with scarlet cord, busby, and forage cap 
with scarlet band, and brown belts, which were discarded 
later for white. Helmets replaced the busby in 1881. 

In 1861, headquarters of the brigade were transferred 
to St Andrews, and in 1880 the brigade was consoli- 
dated as the 1st Fifeshire Artillery Volunteers, head- 
quarters at St Andrews, with thirteen batteries, the Fife 
batteries retaining their numbers as above, and the 
Stirlingshire corps becoming Nos. 12 and 13 Batteries. 
In 1882 the 7th Battery (Anstruther) was disbanded, 
and in its place a new 7th formed at St Andrews out 
of University students. 

In 1889 a position battery of 16-pounder guns was 



142 Records of the Several Corps. 

issued to the corps and manned by the 3rd (St 
Andrews) Battery, and an extra 'personnel specially 
raised. In 1892 this became the 1st Position Battery, 
the Tayport (1st) Company became the 2nd, and the 2nd 
(Kirkcaldy, transferred thither from Newport on March 
3, 1888) became the 3rd. Lieutenant J. N. Hotchkis of 
the 1st Fife RG.A.V. served with the 18 th Battalion 
Imperial Yeomanry during the South African War. 

On March 1, 1900, a new 14th Company was formed at 
Kirkcaldy, and in 1901 the 16-pounders of the position 
battery were replaced by 4*7 guns. In October 1906 
headquarters were moved to Kirkcaldy. 

The distribution of the corps till 1908 was, — 1st 
Heavy Battery and No. 7 Company, St Andrews ; No. 
2 Company, Tayport; Nos. 3, 5, and 14, Kirkcaldy; 
No. 4, Inverkeithing ; No. 6, Burntisland; No. 8, Leven ; 
No. 9, Dysart; No. 10, East Wemyss; No. 11, King- 
horn; No. 12, Grangemouth; and No. 13, Stirling. Gun 
drill and gun practice were carried out with 4 '7-in., 
5-in., and 6-in. Mark VII. B.L. guns at Kinghornness, 
and with 6-in. Mark VII. guns at Carlingnose. The 
corps had 10 carbine ranges, and held also the Pilmuir 
Links range, near St Andrews, conjointly with the 
6th Volunteer Battalion, Black Watch. 

The lieutenant-colonels commandant have been — 

William Maitland M'Dougall of Scotscraig, Admiral, retired, 

Eoyal Navy, November 27, 1860. 
John N. M'Leod, April 29, 1874. 
E. Tod Boothby, late Major Forfar and Kincardine Artillery 

Militia, and from 1861 to 1879 Adjutant of the Brigade 

(hon. col.), June 28, 1882. 
James William Johnston, 1 M.V.O., V.D. (hon. col.), November 19, 

1892. 
Kobert C. Highet, September 30, 1907. 

1 Colonel Johnston is one of three volunteer officers who marched past at 
the Royal Reviews of 1860, 1881, and 1905, always in the same corps. 



i st Lanarkshire Royal Garrison A rtillery. 1 43 

1st LANARKSHIRE ROYAL GARRISON 

ARTILLERY (VOLUNTEERS). 

(Heavy Artillery.) 

(Plate V.) 

Order of Precedence, 35. 

Honorary Colonel— Sir C. W. Cayser, Bart., March 23, 1898. 

Headquarters — 8 Newton Terrace, Sauchiehall Street, Glasgow. 

The 1st Administrative Brigade Lanarkshire Artillery 
Volunteers was formed, with headquarters at Glasgow, 
on March 6, 1860, and in it were included, then 
or on their subsequent dates of formation, the follow- 
ing corps, of one battery each, raised in Glasgow or its 
suburbs : — 



No. 


Local name. 


Date of accept- 
ance of services. 


Date of commis- 
sion of officers. 


1st 




Dec. 30, 1859 


Dec 30, 


1859. 


2nd 




Dec. 30, 1859 


Dec. 30, 


1859. 


3rd 




Dec. 30, 1859 


Dec. 30, 


1859. 


4th 


1st Northern 


Dec. 6, 1859 


Dec 24, 


1859. 


5th 


2nd Northern 


Dec. 27, 1859 


Jan. 5, 


1860. 


6th 


3rd Northern 


Dec. 27, 1859 


Feb. 6, 


1860. 


7th 


1st Eastern, Gallowgate 


Jan. 10, 1860 


Feb. 13, 


1860. 


8th 


Ironmongers 


Jan. 10, 1860 


Feb. 2, 


1860. 


9th 


2nd Eastern 


Jan. 30, 1860 


Feb. 17, 


1860. 


10th 


Calton Artisans 


Feb. 16, 1860 


Feb. 24, 


1860. 


11th 


Maryhill Artisans 


Mar. 5, 1860 


Mar. 14, 


1860. 


12th 


Western 


May 12, 1860 


Aug. 20, 


1860. 


13th 


Hillhead and Dowanhill 


July 24, 1860 


Aug. 20, 


1860. 


14th 




July 26, 1860 


July 4, 


1860. 


15th 


Partick 


Nov. 2, 1860 


June 20, 


1860. 



The 4th, 5th, 6th, 10th, and 11th were artisan corps, 
the men of which paid 2s. 6d. entry money, and 30s. 
for their uniforms, the remaining expenses being de- 



144 Records of the Several Corps. 

frayed by outside subscriptions, and the first four being 
assisted from the Glasgow Central Fund. The 1st 
Corps was formed, it is said, at the suggestion of Prince 
Albert, made at the opening of the Loch Katrine 
Water -works on October 14, 1859, that Glasgow 
should form some artillery. Mr John Wilkie, a leading 
lawyer of the city, took the matter in hand, and so 
many members joined the corps that from the outset 
three batteries could be formed, which were numbered 
the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd. These were entirely self- 
supporting, the honorary members paying £5 each, on 
enrolment, to the funds, and the effective members 
subscribing 10s. each annually and buying their own 
uniform and belts at a cost of £4 a-head. The remain- 
ing corps were raised on similar principles. 

The original uniform of all the corps was similar to 
that of the Royal Artillery, with busbies and white 
waist-belts, but with scarlet cuffs and forage caps with 
scarlet bands. 

In 1862 the brigade was consolidated as the 1st 
Lanarkshire Artillery Volunteers of fifteen batteries, 
which retained their former numbers. Up to 1865 the 
only guns on which the batteries were drilled were 
32-pounder smooth-bores, but in that year, on December 
13, a sixteenth battery was raised, and equipped as 
a field-battery with four 6 -pounder field-guns, but no 
extra allowances were drawn in consequence. The 
17th Battery (garrison) was formed in 1868. 

In 1889 two position batteries, each of four 16- 
pounder R.M.L. guns and two waggons, were issued to 
the corps, and manned by the 'personnel of four garrison 
batteries (including the former 16th); and in 1900 the 
corps was increased to the personnel for twenty com- 
panies, eight more 16-pounder RM.L. batteries were 
issued to it, and the whole corps was reorganised into 




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f-< 



Q ^ 
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ist Lanarkshire Royal Garrison Artillery. 1 45 

ten position batteries, numbered 1st to 10th, and divided 
into five brigades. The corps, being now composed 
entirely of position batteries, was in 1901 styled a 
"position artillery corps," and in 1902 "heavy artillery." 
With the new issue of equipment in 1900, harness 
was only given for three batteries, making five in all, 
but in 1905 harness for the remaining five was issued. 
In 1907-8 the 16-pounder guns were replaced by 15- 
pounder B.L. guns transformed into quick-firers. The 
corps was the only one in Scotland composed entirely 
of heavy batteries. 

The orderly-room, officers' and Serjeants' club, and 
headquarters were at 8 Newton Terrace, Sauchiehall 
Street, Glasgow, and the corps had five separate drill- 
halls in different parts of the city, each with harness- 
rooms, gun-sheds, &c, for two batteries, the Maryhill 
drill-hall, in addition, accommodating all the ammuni- 
tion-waggons not in use in the batteries. For over 
thirty years the corps carried out its annual practice 
at Irvine, from Bogside Camp, and as a rifle-range it 
used that at Darnley belonging to the 1st and 3rd 
Lanark V.R.C. 

In 1900 the whole corps volunteered its services for 
South Africa, but, artillery not being required as such, 
they were not accepted. Sixty-two members of the 
corps, however, including Lieut. J. C. Clark, served in 
various capacities in South Africa during the war. 

The lieutenant -colonels commandant of the corps 
have been — 

Wm. S. S. Crawford, February 7, 1861. 
Jas. Keid Stewart, May 12, 1862. 
John Kidston (hon. col.), March 10, 1875. 
Kobt. J. Bennett, V.D. (hon. col.), September 27, 1890. 
Alexr. B. Grant, M.V.O., V.D. (hon. col.), January 2, 1895. 
Archibald M'l. Shaw, V.D. (hon. col.), November 16, 1907. 
K 



146 Records of the Several Corps. 

1st AYRSHIRE AND GALLOWAY ROYAL 

GARRISON ARTILLERY (VOLUNTEERS). 

(Ayr, Wigtown, and Kirkcudbright.) 

(Plate V.) 

Order op Precedence, 38. 

Honorary Colonel — Sir M. J. Stewart, Bart., V.D., December 22, 1888. 

Headquarters — Kilmarnock. 

The 1st Administrative Brigade Ayrshire Artillery 
Volunteers, with headquarters at Irvine, was formed 
on December 19, 1860, and to it were attached the 
following corps : — 

1st Ayrshire A.V., Irvine, formed December 22, 1859, as one 

and a half batteries ; reduced to one battery, 1862. 
2nd Ayrshire A.V., Ayr, formed January 31, 1860, as one 

and a half batteries ; increased to two batteries, 1874. 
3rd Ayrshire A.V., Largs, formed March 1, 1860, as one battery. 
4th Ayrshire A.V., Ardrossan, formed March 3, 1860, as one 

battery. 
5th Ayrshire A.V., Kilmarnock, formed July 12, 1860, as one 

battery ; increased in 1864 to one and a half batteries. 

The original uniform of the 1st and 2nd Ayrshire 
was blue tunics with red collars, cuffs, and piping, 
edged all round with black braid and with four rows of 
the same on the breast, blue trousers with black stripe 
with red piping, blue peaked caps with black lace 
band, scarlet piping, and silver grenade in front, and a 
black waist-belt. That of the other corps is said to 
have been the same. 

To the brigade were added in 1863 — 

1st Kirkcudbright A.V., Kirkcudbright, formed February 2, 1860, 
as one battery. 



ist Ayrshire and Galloway R.G.A. 147 

1st Wigtown A. V., Stranraer, formed February 20, 1860, as one 

battery. 
2nd Wigtown A.V., Port Patrick, formed February 22, 1860, as 

one battery. 

And in 1867 the 

3rd Wigtown A.V., Sandhead, formed May 4, 1867, as one 
battery. 

The original uniform of the 1st Wigtown was blue 
with scarlet facings, white belts, and silver ornaments. 

In 1863 brigade headquarters were moved from 
Irvine to Ayr, and in May 1880 the brigade was 
consolidated as the 1st Ayrshire and Galloway Artil- 
lery Volunteers, with headquarters at Ayr and eleven 
batteries, viz. — 

No. 1, Irvine (late 1st A.A.V.) 

Nos. 2 and 3, Ayr (late 2nd A.A.V.) 

No. 4, Largs (late 3rd A.A.V.) 

No. 5, Ardrossan (late 4th A.A.V.) 

Nos. 6 and 7, Kilmarnock (late 5th A.A.V.) 

No. 8, Kirkcudbright (late 1st K.A.V.) 

No. 9, Stranraer (late 1st W.A.V.) 

No. 10, Port Patrick (late 2nd W.AV.) 

No. 11, Sandhead (late 3rd W.AV.) 

In 1889 a position battery of 16-pounder R.M.L. 
guns was issued to the corps and manned by the two 
Kilmarnock batteries, and corps headquarters were 
moved to Kilmarnock. 

In 1892 the existing position battery took the 
number 1, absorbing the 6th and 7th Companies, and 
in 1901 two more batteries of 9 -pounder R.M.L. guns 
were issued to the corps, which took the numbers 2 
and 3 and absorbed the Irvine and Ayr Companies, 
and an extra personnel formed as a 6 th Company at 
Kilmarnock. The 8th to 11th Companies took the 



148 Records of the Several Corps. 

numbers 7 to 10. In 1903 47-inch guns replaced the 
RM.L. armament of all three heavy batteries. The 
formation of the corps till 1908 was in three heavy- 
batteries — No. 1 at Kilmarnock, Nos. 2 and 3 at Ayr — 
and six garrison companies (Nos. 4, 5, 7, 8, 9, and 10 as 
above), No. 6 being vacant, and accounted for by extra 
personnel in the heavy batteries. 

The corps carried out its gun practice at Irvine : it 
used the Ayrshire Rifle Association range at Irvine for 
the musketry of all but the 7th to 10th Companies, 
which had ranges near their own headquarters. 

In 1900 over 600 men of this corps volunteered their 
services for the war in South Africa, but as artillery- 
men were not required they were not accepted. 
Twenty-eight members actually served in South Africa 
during the war. 

The officers commanding the corps have been — 

Major Sir E. Hunter-Blair, Bart., May 8, 1861. 
Lieut.-Colonel Hon. G. E. Vernon, July 17, 1863. 
Lieut.-Colonel Sir E. Hunter-Blair, Bart, (reappointed), September 

4, 1866. 
(Vacant in 1872 and 1873.) 
Lieut.-Colonel John Shand, May 6, 1874. 

Lieut.- Colonel Sir Mark J. Stewart, Bart., V.D., February 5, 1879. 
Lieut.-Colonel John G. Sturrock, V.D. (hon. col.), December 22, 

1888. 
Lieut.-Colonel T. E. Stuart, April 5, 1905. 



15/ Argyll and Bute R.G.A. 149 

1st ARGYLL AND BUTE ROYAL GARRISON 
ARTILLERY (VOLUNTEERS). 

(Plate V.) 

Order op Precedence, 39. 

Honorary Colonel— J. D. S. Duke of Argyll, K.T., K.C.M.G., V.D., 
July 18, 1900. 

Headquarters — Tarbert, Loch Fyne. 

The 1st Administrative Brigade Argyll Artillery- 
Volunteers was formed with headquarters at Oban, 
on October 10, 1861, and to it were attached, 
then or on the date of their subsequent formation, 
the following corps of Argyll Artillery Volunteers of 
one battery each, except when otherwise stated : — 

1st, Easdale, formed March 7, 1860, as two batteries. 

2nd, Tarbert, formed April 12, 1860 ; disbanded 1862. 

3rd, Oban, formed March 8, 1860. 

4th, West Tarbert, formed April 12, 1860. Headquarters moved, 

1864, to Dunmore, and, 1866, to Eonachan. Disbanded 

1874. 
5th, Ardgour, formed January 16, 1861, as one subdivision. 

Disbanded in 1865. 
6th, Campbeltown, formed February 11, 1861. Increased to two 

batteries, 1870. 
7th, Port Ellen, Islay, formed July 3, 1861. 
8th, South Hall, formed September 10, 1861. Headquarters 

changed to Castle Toward, 1878. 
9th, Tobermory, Mull, formed May 15, 1862. Reduced to a 

half -battery, 1874. 
10th, Lochgilphead, formed May 15, 1862. 
11th, Tarbert, formed February 13, 1866. 
12th, Inveraray, formed April 2, 1867; recruited from men of the 

Furnace Quarries. 

In 1863 the 1st Bute A.V., headquarters Rothesay, 
raised on March 20, 1862, and in 1867 the 2nd Bute 



150 Records of the Several Corps. 

A. V., headquarters Millport, Cumbrae, raised on 
October 5, 1867, each one battery strong, were added 
to the brigade. 

The original uniforms varied greatly. Colonel F. 
Campbell (commanding 1884-1903) writes: "The corps 
had their separate uniforms, which were tunics or 
Garibaldi shirts ; caps with red, yellow, or white 
bands ; belts brown, black, or white. The officers' 
dress was even more varied. They joined simply to 
encourage the movement, and wore much what they 
chose, utilising any old uniform that they might have 
worn some time or other, whether cavalry, infantry, or 
other. Swords of all patterns, perhaps presentations 
to their forefathers before and after Waterloo." 

The 3rd Corps had in 1860 blue uniforms with 
scarlet facings, white pouch -belts, black waist-belts, 
and busbies ; while the 4th Corps wore a jumper and 
trousers of blue flannel, and a broad Kilmarnock 
bonnet, such as are usually worn by Tarbert fisher- 
men, of whom it was mainly composed. 

In 1864 brigade headquarters were moved to Loch- 
gilphead, and in 1870 to Rothesay. 

In May 1880 the brigade was consolidated as the 
1st Argyll and Bute Artillery Volunteers, with twelve 
and a half batteries, distributed as follows : — 

Nos. 1 and 2, Easdale (late 1st Argyll). 

No. 3, Oban (late 3rd Argyll). 

Nos. 4 and 5, Campbeltown (late 6th Argyll). 

No. 6, Port Ellen, Islay (late 7th Argyll). 

No. 7, Castle Toward (late 8th Argyll). 

No. 8, Eothesay (late 1st Bute). 

No. 9, Millport (late 2nd Bute). 

No. 10, Lochgilphead (late 10th Argyll). 

No. 11, Tarbert (late 11th Argyll). 

No. 12, Inveraray (late 12th Argyll). 

Half-battery, Tobermory, Mull (late 9th Argyll). 



15/ Argyll and Bute R.G.A. 151 

In 1887 the 12th Battery at Inveraray was disbanded, 
a new 12th being formed in its place at Rothesay, 
and in the following year the headquarters of the 8th 
Battery were removed from Castle Toward to Dunoon. 

During the South African War, 211 men of the 1st 
Argyll and Bute volunteered their services, but only 
8 were taken for active service. 

The corps was one of the most scattered in the king- 
dom, for besides the headquarter detachments, No. 6 
Company had detachments at Bowmore, Bridgend, and 
Ardbeg, and No. 12 one at Kingarth, — thus its men 
were spread over fifteen localities in every portion 
of the largest and least accessible county in Scotland. 
Owing to the varying natures of the occupations of 
the men, three-fourths of whom were Gaelic-speaking, 
no fewer than three camps had to be formed for train- 
ing at different times of the year, and the corps had 
to keep up fifteen carbine-ranges. Still, many prizes 
have been gained by the corps, both in gun practices 
and repository exercises, at the Scottish National 
Artillery Association camps, and the King's Cup was 
won at Buddon in 1903 by the Easdale companies. 
The pipe band consisted of over thirty pipers. 

The headquarters of the corps were transferred in 
March 1906 to Tarbert, Loch Fyne. 

The lieutenant-colonels (commandant since 1866) of 
the corps have been — 

J. Campbell, C.B., Major-General ; Major, October 10, 1861; 
Lieut.-Colonel, July 23, 1863. 

J. D. S. Marquis of Lome, K.T., G.C.M.G., July 13, 1866. 

Frederick Campbell, late Lieutenant K.A., C.B., V.D. (hon. col.), 
March 21, 1884. 

John W. Stewart, V.D. (hon. col.), August 1, 1903. 

Colin G. P. Campbell, late 2nd Lieutenant Scots Guards, Feb- 
ruary 17, 1906. 



152 Records of the Several Corps. 

1st CAITHNESS ROYAL GARRISON ARTIL- 
LERY (VOLUNTEERS). 
(Caithness and Sutherland.) 

(Plate VI.) 

Order op Precedence, 43. 

Honorary Colonel — Sir J. R. G. Sinclair, Bart., D.S.O., V.D. (hon. captain 
in the army), November 7, 1900. 

Headquarters — Thurso. 

In 1863 the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Caithness, 1st, 2nd, 
3rd, and 4th Orkney, and 1st Ross Artillery Volun- 
teer Corps were formed into the 1st Administrative 
Brigade Caithness Artillery Volunteers, with head- 
quarters at Wick. 

The Caithness corps which then, or on their subse- 
quent formation, formed part of the brigade were — 

1st, Wick, formed March 6, 1860, as one battery; increased to 
one and a half batteries in 1867, and to two batteries in 
1870. 

2nd, Thurso, formed April 24, 1860, as one subdivision ; increased 
to one battery on December 28, 1860, and to two batteries 
in 1870. 

3rd, Lybster, formed September 30, 1861, as one battery; dis- 
banded 1873. 

4th, Barrogill, Mey, formed December 1, 1866, as one battery. 

5th, Castletown, formed December 1, 1866, as one battery. 

6th, Thrumster, formed May 4, 1867, as one battery ; disbanded 
1878. 

The first uniform of the Caithness corps was similar 
to that of the Royal Artillery, but with scarlet cuffs 
and white cord and piping. Busbies and white belts 
were worn. The officers had silver lace, and their 
tunics were piped all round with silver cord, and had 
silver lace on the skirts. 



ist Caithness Royal Garrison Artillery. 153 

In 1867 the Orkney and Ross corps were withdrawn 
from the brigade, and to it were added the 

1st Sutherland A.V., Helmsdale, formed April 26, 1860, which 
had since 1863 been attached to the 1st Inverness A.V. 
Its uniform was similar to that of the Caithness corps, but 
the busbies had chin-chains. 

2nd Sutherland A.V., Golspie, formed February 18, 1867. This 
was a body of fishermen of wonderful physique. At its 
first parade the two flank men were each 6 ft. 6 in. The 
uniform was the same as the 1st Sutherland. 

In 1880 the brigade was consolidated as the 1st 
Caithness Artillery Volunteers, headquarters at Wick, 
with eight batteries, viz. : — 

Nos. 1 and 2, Wick (late 1st Caithness). 
Nos. 3 and 4, Thurso (late 2nd Caithness). 
No. 5, Mey (late 4th Caithness). 
No. 6, Castletown (late 5th Caithness). 
No. 7, Helmsdale (late 1st Sutherland). 
No. 8, Golspie (late 2nd Sutherland). 

In 1882 headquarters were transferred from Wick 
to Thurso. In 1894 the 1st and 2nd Companies ceased 
to exist, but in 1897 the 1st was resuscitated, since 
when the corps consisted of seven garrison companies, 
the 2nd being vacant. 

The corps had a drill battery at each station, and 
possessed six carbine-ranges. 

The lieutenant-colonels commanding have been — 

Sir Robert S. Sinclair, Bart, of Murkle, October 10, 1864. 

G. P. A. Earl of Caithness, June 17, 1882. 

George E. Lawson (hon. col.), May 25, 1889. 

Sir John R G. Sinclair, Bart, D.S.O., of Dunbeath, July 2, 1892. 

Alexander M'Donald, V.D. (hon. col.), May 9, 1900. 

David Keith Murray, V.D. (hon. col.), April 5, 1905. 



154 Records of the Several Corps. 

1st ABERDEENSHIRE ROYAL GARRISON 

ARTILLERY (VOLUNTEERS). 

(Aberdeen and Kincardine.) 

(Plate VI.) 

Order of Precedence, 45. 

Honorary Colonel — Right Hon. J. C. Earl op Aberdeen, G.C.M.G., 
January 14, 1888. 

Headquarters — North Silver Street, Aberdeen. 

On October 24, 1860, the 1st Adminstrative Brigade 
Aberdeen Artillery Volunteers, with headquarters at 
Aberdeen, was formed, and to it, then or subsequently 
on date of formation, were attached the following corps 
formed in the county : — 

1st, Peterhead, formed March 13, 1860, of two batteries, one of 
which for a short time bore the number 2nd Aberdeen. 
Reduced to one battery in 1864. The uniform was exactly 
the same as that of the Eoyal Artillery, with white (silver) 
lace (see Plate III.) 

3rd, Aberdeen, formed May 2, 1860, as an artisan battery from 
the employes of Messrs Thomson, Catto, Buchanan, & Co., 
shipbuilders and ironfounders, who contributed largely to 
the funds of the corps. The uniform was that of the Royal 
Artillery, but the tunics had four rows of black lace on the 
breast, the Austrian knots were scarlet, the caps had scarlet 
bands, and the belts were brown. 

4th, Aberdeen, formed April 14, 1860, as a citizens' battery, the 
members clothing and equipping themselves. The uniform 
was blue frockcoats with black braid all round, scarlet 
collars, and scarlet Austrian knots, blue trousers with black 
stripe edged with scarlet, blue caps with peaks and black 
band edged with scarlet, and black belts. 

5th, Fraserburgh, formed February 15, 1860, as one battery. 

6th, Aberdeen, formed February 9, 1860, as an artisan battery, 
from the employes of Messrs Blaikie Bros., shipbuilders 




;« g ? < 



H < 
< 9 



Id ,=, „ » "- • 



i st Aberdeenshire R. G.A. 1 55 

and ironfounders. The uniform was the same as that of 
the 3rd Corps, except that the belts were black. 
7th, Aberdeen, formed September 23, 1861, as one battery, and 
increased to two on July 19, 1865. The uniform was the 
same as that of the Royal Artillery, with white (silver) 
cord, busbies, and white belts. 

In 1863 the following corps, raised in Kincardine- 
shire, were added to the brigade : — 

1st, Stonehaven, formed January 10, 1860. Headquarters of 

, this battery were moved to Cowie early in 1861, and to it 
was added in June 1861, as a 2nd Battery, the 5th Kincar- 
dine A.V. formed at Cowie on January 29, 1861. The two 
batteries were amalgamated in 1875. The 1st Battery origin- 
ally wore Eoyal Artillery uniform (with white cord), the 2nd, 
being mainly composed of fishermen, a semi-naval dress. 

2nd, Johnshaven, formed August 14, 1860, as a subdivision; 
increased to a full battery in 1869. 

3rd, St Cyrus, formed July 30, 1860, as a subdivision ; increased 
to a full battery in 1863. 

4th, Bervie, formed October 29, 1860, as a subdivision; increased 
to a full battery in 1867. 

The uniform of the 7th Aberdeen — namely, R.A. 
pattern, with white cord on the tunic, white band on 
the forage cap, busbies, and white belts — was adopted 
for the whole brigade in 1864, but it was long before 
the old patterns ceased to be worn, and only in 1875 
that the pouch-belts were discontinued. 

In 1874, under authority from the War Office dated 
September 4, the 3rd, 4th, 6th, and 7th Aberdeen A.V. 
were amalgamated into one corps of five batteries, 
designated the 3rd Aberdeen Artillery Volunteers, the 
former 3rd forming No. 1, 4th No. 2, 6th No. 3, and 
7th Nos. 4 and 5 Batteries. A sixth battery was 
raised for this corps in September 1877, and a seventh 
was actually formed in 1877-78 but not officially 
sanctioned till 1880. 



156 Records of the Several Corps. 

In 1876 the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th Kincardine were 
transferred to the 1st Administrative Brigade Forfar 
A. V., and the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, and 5th Banff Corps 
were added to the brigade (see 1st Banff It. G. A. V.) 

The brigade as then constituted was consolidated in 
May 1880, under War Office authority of May 10, as 
the 1st Aberdeenshire Artillery Volunteers, with head- 
quarters at Aberdeen, and fourteen batteries as follows : — 

No. 1, Peterhead (late 1st Aberdeen A.V.) 

Nos. 2 to 7, Aberdeen (late 3rd Aberdeen A.V.) 

No. 8, Fraserburgh (late 5th Aberdeen A.V.) 

Nos. 9 to 13, in Banffshire (late 1st to 5th Banff AV.) 

No. 14, Cowie (late 1st Kincardine A.V.) 

At the end of 1880 the 14th Battery at Cowie ceased 
to exist, and a new 14th was formed at Aberdeen out 
of the 7th Battery, late 3rd A.A.V., mentioned above. 

1882 brought another change in the composition of 
the corps, for by War Office authority of May 10, the 
1st, 8th, and 9th to 13th Batteries were transferred 
to the newly-formed 1st Banffshire Artillery Volunteers 
(which see), and the batteries representing the former 
2nd, 3rd, and 4th Kincardine were re-transferred back 
to the 1st Aberdeenshire, in which the 10 batteries 
were then renumbered as follows : — 

Nos. 1 to 7, Aberdeen (the former 2nd to 7th and 14th Batteries). 
No 8, Johnshaven (former 2nd Kincardine A.V.) 
No. 9, St Cyrus (former 3rd Kincardine A.V.) 
No. 10, Bervie (former 4th Kincardine A.V.) 

In 1885 a new battery was raised in the University 
of Aberdeen which took the number 8, the 8th, 9th, 
and 10th becoming the 9th, 10th, and 11th respectively, 
and in December 1886 a new battery was formed at 
Stonehaven which was numbered the 12th. 

On January 17, 1889, a position battery of 40-pounder 



15/ Aberdeenshire R.G.A. 157 

R.B.L. guns was issued to the corps and manned by the 
5th and 8th Batteries, and on November 1, 1892, these 
two were amalgamated as the 1st Position Battery, the 
other Aberdeen garrison companies being numbered 
2nd to 7th, Johnshaven the 8th, St Cyrus the 9th, 
Bervie the 10th, and Stonehaven the 11th Company. 
In 1893 the Johnshaven and St Cyrus companies 
were amalgamated as the 8 th, and the 10th and 
11th became the 9th and 10th Companies. 

On April 1, 1901, a second position battery of 40- 
pounders was issued to the corps, and a new 'personnel 
was raised for it. It took the number 2, the 2nd Com- 
pany became the 8th, and the 8th, 9th, and 10th the 
9th, 10th, and 11th. In 1902 both position batteries 
were rearmed with 4*7 -in. guns, and were termed 
" heavy" batteries. 

Thus the latter-day composition of the corps, and 
the connection of the batteries and companies with 
the original corps, after these somewhat kaleidoscopic 
changes, were — 

1st Heavy Battery, Aberdeen, original 2nd Battery of 7th Aber- 
deen and University Battery. 
2nd Heavy Battery, Aberdeen, newly raised 1901. 
3rd Garrison Company, Aberdeen, original 4th Aberdeen A.V. 

(Citizens). 
4th Garrison Company, Aberdeen, original 6th Aberdeen A.V. 

(Artisans). 
5th Garrison Company, Aberdeen, original 1st Battery of 7th 

Aberdeen A.V. 
6th Garrison Company, Aberdeen, raised in 1877. 
7th Garrison Company, Aberdeen, raised in 1880. 
8th Garrison Company, Aberdeen, original 3rd Aberdeen A.V. 

(Artisans). 
9th Garrison Company, Johnshaven, original 2nd and 3rd Kin- 
cardine A.V. 
10th Garrison Company, Bervie, original 4th Kincardine A.V. 
11th Garrison Company, Stonehaven, re-raised 1886. 



158 Records of the Several Corps. 

During the South African war 13 men belonging to 
the corps served with various units in the field. 

The corps headquarters in North Silver Street, 
Aberdeen, were erected in 1899 at a cost of upwards 
of £7000, and contained a drill-hall in which 5-in. and 
6-in. guns were mounted for the training of the garrison 
companies, which carried out their practice from the 
Torry Point Battery, which had been rearmed with mod- 
ern guns. The headquarters' batteries and companies 
used for their musketry the Seaton Links Rifle Range 
belonging to the 1st V.B. Gordon Highlanders, and the 
companies at outstations had carbine-ranges and drill 
batteries near their headquarters. The corps carried 
out its annual training and practice for the heavy 
batteries and garrison companies in camp at Buddon. 
In 1903 the 1st Aberdeen won the "Playfair" Cup 
for the smartest corps in camp, and in 1904 the garrison 
companies won the King's Cup at the Scottish National 
Artillery Association's camp at Buddon. 

The lieutenant-colonels (commandant since May 1880) 
of the corps have been — 

Wm. Cosmo Gordon of Fyvie, late Captain Madras Artillery, 
May 21, 1862. 

Francis W. Garden-Campbell, transferred in 1876 from the 1st 
Adminstrative Brigade, Banff A.V., Lieut. - Colonel Com- 
mandant, 1st A.A.V., December 23, 1879 (retransferred to 
1st Banff A.V., 1882). 

Thomas A. W. A. Youngson, Lieut. - Colonel, March 3, 1880 
Lieut.-Colonel Commandant, October 5, 1882. 

James Ogston, V.D. (hon. col.), Lieut.-Colonel, October 26, 1887 
Lieut.-Colonel Commandant, June 24, 1893. 

Geo. Milne, V.D. (hon. col.), Lieut.-Colonel, May 15, 1901 
Lieut.-Colonel Commandant, October 8, 1904. 



15/ Berwick Royal Garrison Artillery. 159 



1st BERWICK ROYAL GARRISON ARTILLERY 
(VOLUNTEERS). 

(Plate VI.) 

Order op Precedence, 46. 

Headquarters — Eyemouth. 

This corps was formed at Eyemouth on April 6, 1860, 
as one battery, and from 1864 was attached to the 
1st Edinburgh (City) Artillery Volunteers. 

A 2nd Berwick Artillery Volunteers, also of the 
strength of one battery, was formed at Coldingham 
in 1861, and was also attached to the 1st Edinburgh 
from 1864 until its disbandment in 1883. 

The corps had a drill-battery and headquarters at 
Eyemouth and a rifle - range at Linkum, two miles 
from Eyemouth. 

The captains commanding the 1st Berwick A.V. 
have been — 

J. K. L'Amy, April 6, 1860 ; J. Gibson, February 1861 (vacant 
1862 to 1867); P. Tod, November 14, 1867 (vacant 1876 
to 1880) ; John Johnston, March 30, 1881 ; A. Johnston, 
January 9, 1889 ; D. Hume, February 1, 1898 ; G. J. Gibson, 
February 21, 1903; and Chas. M. Alexander, March 16, 
1907. 



160 Records of the Several Corps. 

THE HIGHLAND EOYAL GARRISON 

ARTILLERY (VOLUNTEERS). 

(Inverness, Cromarty, Nairn, Ross, and Elgin.) 

(Plate VII.) 

Order op Precedence, 47. 

Honorary Colonel — W. Fraser, V.D., January 2, 1901. 

Headquarters — Inverness. 

The first Artillery corps formed in the city of Inver- 
ness had its origin in a company of " Artisan Rifles," 
which was raised in consequence of a meeting held 
in the Trades' Hall on November 15, 1859. It was 
subsequently decided that this corps should become 
" Artisan Artillery Volunteers," and as such its 
services were accepted in January 1860 as the 1st 
Inverness Artillery Volunteers, of two batteries, the 
officers' commissions being dated February 4, 1860. 
So popular was the artillery arm in Inverness that 
on May 1, 1860, these batteries were doubled, the 
officers for the new 3rd and 4th Batteries being 
gazetted on June 23, 1860. In December 1864 a 
fifth, and in January 1865 a sixth, battery was added 
to the corps. The original uniform of the 1st Inver- 
ness A.V. was blue tunics with long skirts, scarlet 
collars and cuffs, black braid all round, five rows of 
black lace on the breast and black Austrian knot, 
blue trousers with scarlet stripe, a blue peaked cap with 
black band and scarlet piping, and a black waist-belt. 
Busbies were adopted in 1861, and in 1863 the uniform 
was assimilated to that of the Royal Artillery with 
white cord, white waist- and pouch-belts being also 
worn. 

In 1863 the 1st Sutherland A.V. was attached to 




£ & ~ 



°i o 



The Highland Royal Garrison Artillery. 161 

the 1st Inverness, but was transferred to the 1st 
Administrative Brigade, Caithness A.V., in 1867. 

In 1863, also, the 1st Cromarty and the 1st Nairn 
Artillery Volunteers were attached to the 1st Inver- 
ness. The former, a corps of one battery, with head- 
quarters at Cromarty, had been formed on June 8, 
1860. The 1st Nairn had been raised at Nairn on 
April 10, 1860, as one battery, but had been increased 
to two batteries on October 6, 1860. The original 
uniform was similar to that of the Royal Artillery, but 
with scarlet cuffs and white cord, and the head-dress 
was a peaked cap similar to that of the 1st Inverness, 
with an upright white horse-hair plume. 

In December 1876 the 1st Inverness, 1st Cromarty, 
1st Nairn, 1st and 2nd Elgin, and 1st and 2nd Ross 
Artillery Volunteers were formed into the 1st Adminis- 
trative Brigade, Inverness-shire Artillery Volunteers, 
with headquarters at Inverness, the whole numbering 
thirteen batteries. The 1st Elgin, of one battery, had 
been formed at Lossiemouth on March 26, 1860, and 
the 2nd, also of one battery, at Burghhead, on October 
16, 1872. These had been attached hitherto to the 
1st Administrative Brigade, Banff A. V. The 1st Ross 
had been raised at Stornoway, as a corps of one battery, 
on April 13, 1860, and was in 1863 attached to the 1st 
Administrative Brigade, Caithness A.V. The 2nd Ross 
(Loch Carron) was formed on August 21, 1866, as one 
battery, and in 1867 the 1st and 2nd Ross had been 
formed into the 1st Administrative Brigade, Ross-shire 
A.V, which lasted till the above-mentioned reorganisa- 
tion in 1876. 

In May 1880 the brigade was consolidated as the 1st 
Inverness-shire Artillery Volunteers, with headquarters 
at Inverness, and thirteen batteries, but in 1882 the 
Lossiemouth (late 1st Elgin) battery was transferred to 



1 62 Records of the Several Corps. 

the 1st Banff Artillery Volunteers, reducing the number 
of batteries to twelve, thus distributed — 

Nos. 1 to 6, Inverness (late 1st Inverness). 
No. 7, Burghhead (late 2nd Elgin). 
No. 8, Cromarty (late 1st Cromarty). 
No. 9, Stornoway (late 1st Boss). 
No. 10, Loch Carron (late 2d Ross). 
Nos. 11 and 12, Nairn (late 1st Nairn). 

Since 1867 the 1st Inverness had had two 6-pounder 
brass field-guns, which were horsed by the corps when 
required, and in 1873 these were replaced by two 
40-pounder Armstrong B.L. guns. No Government 
allowances were made for the horsing of these guns. 
In 1889 a position battery of 16 -pounders was issued to 
the corps under the usual conditions, and was manned 
by the 1st and 2d Batteries ; in 1892 these two were 
amalgamated to form the 1st Position Battery (since 
1902 1st Heavy Battery) at Inverness, and the 3rd to 
12th garrison companies took the numbers 2 to 11 in 
their proper order, which was the formation of the 
corps till 1908 — viz., one heavy battery and ten garrison 
companies. 

In 1890, by General Order 45 of February 1, the 
corps received the title of "The Highland Artillery 
Volunteers," in substitution for that hitherto borne. 

The corps had spacious headquarters, with drill-hall, 
stores, gun-sheds, &c, at Inverness. It carried out its 
training and gun practice from camp, and for its musk- 
etry used the range of the 1st V.B. Cameron Highlanders 
at Longman, near Inverness, and five carbine-ranges at 
the headquarters of outlying companies. In 1894 the 
1st Position Battery won the Queen's Cup at the Scot- 
tish National Artillery Association's Camp at Buddon. 

In 1900, 500 of the corps volunteered for South 



ist Orkney Royal Garrison Artillery. 163 

Africa, but only 28 were taken for active service 
during the war. 

The commanding officers have been — 

Of 1st Inverness A.V. — 

Major William Fraser Tytler of Ardrurie and Balnain, June 23, 
1860 ; Lieut-Colonel, January 24, 1865. 

Lieut-Colonel Eneas W. Mackintosh of Kaigmore, November 13, 
1869. 
Of 1st Administrative Brigade, Inverness A.V., and later 1st 
Inverness and Highland A.V. — 

Lieut-Colonel Commandant Eneas W. Mackintosh of Baigmore, 
December 1, 1876. 

Lieut.-Colonel Commandant Donald Davidson, January 14, 1880. 

Lieut.-Colonel Commandant W. Fraser, V.D. (hon. col.), Nov- 
ember 14, 1885. 

Lieut-Colonel Commandant James E. B. Baillie, M.V.O., V.D., 
of Dochfour (hon. col.), July 25, 1894. 



1st oekney royal garrison artillery 
(volunteers). 

(Plate VII.) 

Ohder op Precedence, 54. 

Headquarters — Kirkwall. 

The 1st Administrative Brigade, Orkney Artillery- 
Volunteers, was formed on August 15, 1867, with head- 
quarters at Kirkwall, and to it were attached, then or 
on subsequent date of formation, the following corps 
of Orkney Artillery Volunteers, of one battery each, 
except when otherwise stated : — 

1st, Kirkwall, formed May 1, 1860. 

2nd, Scar House, Sanday, formed June 23, 1863. 



164 Records of the Several Corps. 

3rd, Balfour, Shapinshay, formed July 10, 1863. 

4th, Stromness, formed June 23, 1863. 

5th, Stronsay, formed August 17, 1865. 

6th, Holm, formed November 28, 1866. 

7th, Firth, formed October 31, 1868 as a half battery. Disbanded 

in 1877. 
8th, Evie, formed June 25, 1870. 
9th, Eousay, formed December 1 3, 1874. 
10th, Birsay, formed March 2, 1878. 

The 1st to 6th Corps had since 1863, or date of for- 
mation, been attached to the 1st Administrative Brig- 
ade, Caithness A.V. 

In March 1880 the brigade was consolidated as the 
1st Orkney Artillery Volunteers, with headquarters at 
Kirkwall, and nine batteries, numbered in the above 
sequence, the 8th, 9th, and 10th Corps becoming the 
7th, 8th, and 9th Batteries respectively. In 1886 the 
headquarters of the 8th (Rousay) Battery were trans- 
ferred to Kirkwall, so that the latter-day constitution 
of the corps in nine companies was — 

Nos. 1 and 8, Kirkwall (former 1st and 9th O.A.V.) 

No. 2, Sanday (former 2d O.A.V.) 

No. 3, Shapinshay (former 3rd O.A.V.) 

No. 4, Stromness (former 4th O.A.V.) 

No. 5, Stronsay (former 5th O.A.V.) 

No. 6, Holm (former 6th O.AV.) 

No. 7, Evie (former 9th O.A.V.) 

No. 9, Birsay (former 10th O.A.V.) 

The original uniform of the 1st Orkney A.V. was 
frock-coats with blue cuffs and collars and five rows of 
black lace on the breast, the men having scarlet and 
the officers silver piping on the collar and Austrian 
knots on the sleeves, blue trousers with red stripes, 
blue peaked caps with black bands and scarlet piping, 
with the Royal Arms in front, and white belts. The 



ist Orkney Royal Garrison Artillery. 165 

uniform of this corps was assimilated in 1863 to that of 
the Royal Artillery, which the other corps adopted from 
the outset. 

The corps had erected commodious headquarters at 
Kirkwall, with drill-hall, stores, lecture and recreation 
rooms, officers' mess, &c, and had provided at each of 
its seven outstations a drill-hall with an armoury and a 
four-room cottage for the serjeant-instructor — all these 
the property of the corps and free from debt. There 
was a practice battery at each station, that at Kirkwall 
being of four and the others of two guns. These were, 
however, only armed with 64-pounder KM.L. guns, 
and the principal practice was carried out in camp with 
modern ordnance. Each of the eight practice batteries 
had a carbine-range in its immediate vicinity. 

The lieutenant-colonels commanding have been — 

David Balfour, August 15, 1867 (became honorary colonel March 

20, 1872, reappointed lieut.-colonel, December 7, 1872). 
Fred W. Burroughs, C.B., Brevet- Colonel (half pay), late 93rd 

Foot, November 1, 1873. 
J. W. Balfour, V.D., late Captain 7th D.G., October 9, 1880. 
G. F. F. Horwood, late Captain 2nd Foot (hon. col.), March 27, 

1895. 
Richard Bailey, late Captain B.A., and formerly Adjutant of the 

corps (hon. col.), January 19, 1898. 
Thomas S. Peace, V.D. (hon. col.), March 28, 1906. 



1 66 Records of the Several Corps. 



KOYAL ENGINEER VOLUNTEERS. 

1st LANARKSHIRE ROYAL ENGINEERS 
(VOLUNTEERS). 

(Plate VIII.) 

Order of Precedence, 2. 

Honorary Colonel — General H. H. Viscount Kitchener of Khartoum, 
G.C.B., O.M., G.C.M.G., Colonel-Commandant E.E., December 21, 1898. 

Headquarters — 21 Jardine Street, Glasgow. 

As already noted on page 31, the first meeting with a 
view to the formation of a Volunteer Engineer corps 
in Scotland was held in Glasgow on November 28, 1859, 
when a number of civil engineers, architects, surveyors, 
&c, agreed to offer their services as a "Military 
Engineer Volunteer Corps." The services of this 
company were accepted on February 27, but the com- 
missions of its officers to the 1st Lanark Volunteer 
Engineers were dated February 11, 1860. From the 
overflow of this company and from artisans a second was 
shortly formed, the services of which, as the 2nd Lanark 
Volunteer Engineers, was accepted on May 9, 1860, the 
officers being gazetted on May 16. A third company, 
the 3rd Lanark, was formed on April 28, 1862, with 
headquarters at Cadder Hill, its services having been 
accepted in April 4, 1862, the men being mainly 
recruited in Kirkintilloch. 

The original uniform of the 1st and 2nd Lanark E.V. 
was closely modelled upon that of the Royal Engineers, 







h <i 



ist Lanarkshire Royal Engineers. 167 

white cord (silver lace) being substituted for yellow 
(gold), and the belts being of white patent leather ; but 
while the 1st Company wore the busby with Garter 
blue bag and white plume, the 2nd wore scarlet shakos 
with a drooping white horse -hair plume. The 3rd 
adopted the same uniform as the 1st. 

On July 30, 1861, the War Office had accepted the 
services of the 97th Lanark Rifle Volunteers, a four- 
company corps, formed of men of exceptional physique, 
and termed locally the " Glasgow Guards " (see 
Appendix C). The officers of this corps, the com- 
mandant of which was Major A. K. Murray, were 
gazetted on September 3, 1861, and the uniform was 
scarlet tunics with blue collars and cuffs, blue trousers 
with red piping, brown fur caps with a scarlet hackle 
on the right side, the cap being in the form of a 
Guards' bearskin, and white belts. 

On May 19, 1863, the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Lanark 
Engineers and the 97th Rifles were amalgamated as 
the 1st Lanarkshire Engineer Volunteers, of six com- 
panies, with headquarters at 115 West Campbell Street, 
Glasgow, the drill and practice ground being on the 
river Kelvin, above the bridge on the Great Western 
Road. The newly formed battalion adopted the 
uniform hitherto worn by the 1st Lanark E.V., and 
continued to wear it until 1876, when busbies of a new 
shape, with upright white horse-hair plumes in front and 
blue cord lace (the latter for officers only) were adopted, 
in conformation with the Royal Engineers. In 1878 
the white Austrian knots on the sleeves of the tunics 
and the white band on the forage caps were changed 
to Garter blue in accordance with regulations, but in 
1883 were similarly changed back to white, helmets 
being also taken into wear in the latter year. 

In 1883 the establishment of the corps was increased 



1 68 Records of the Several Corps. 

to 8 companies, and in 1885 a 9th (Submarine Mining) 
Company was raised for the Clyde submarine defences. 
A second submarine mining company was formed in 
1888, but in the same year the bulk of both was 
detached to form the " Clyde Division " of Submarine 
Miners as an independent corps (see Clyde Division, 
Electrical E.V.), and in their place a new 9th (Kail- 
way) Company was formed. By Army Order 73 of 
March 1888, the title of the corps was changed to 
the " 1st Lanarkshire Engineer Volunteers, Fortress 
and Railway Forces, Royal Engineers," and shortly 
afterwards headquarters were removed to 4 Albany 
Place, Glasgow, as a temporary measure pending the 
building of the more commodious headquarters at 
21 Jardine Street, Kelvinside, which were occupied in 
1894. The 9th (Railway) Company was disbanded 
in 1889, and in its place a new 9th Company was 
raised in Springburn. 

On the call being made for special service sections 
for the war in South Africa, the 1st Lanarkshire ful- 
filled all requirements, and sent out two sections of the 
established strength to be attached to the 9 th Field 
Company, Royal Engineers, the first being commanded 
by Captain (hon. major) J. Lang, and the second by 
Lieutenant J. H. Fleming. In all, 99 members of the 
corps served in various capacities during the war in 
South Africa. 

In May 1900 the establishment of the corps was 
raised to twelve fortress companies, and in 1901 the 
title borne till 1908 was conferred upon the corps. 

The headquarters of the corps comprised, besides a 
drill-hall, stores, &c, a practice ground on the bank 
of the Kelvin where bridging could be practised, and for 
its musketry it held, conjointly with the 1st and 2nd 
V.B.H.L.I., a range up to 1000 yards at Dechmont, 



\st Edinburgh Engineer Volunteers. 169 

nine miles from Glasgow. The 1st Lanarkshire R.E.V. 
attained to some fame as a shooting corps, and in 1889 
Serjeant Beid won the Queen's Prize at the National 
Rifle Association Meeting. 

The lieutenant - colonels commanding (since 1900 
commandant) have been — 

Eonald Johnstone, June 18, 1863. 

Sir Donald Matheson, K.C.B., V.D., Colonel, November 25, 1865. 

Herbert D. Eobinson, V.D. (hon. col.), March 18, 1893. 

Wm. E. Broadfoot, V.D. (hon. col.), April 18, 1896. 

Ewing E. Crawford, V.D. (hon. col.), February 3, 1897. 

Duncan Campbell, V.D. (hon. col.), November 29, 1899 ; (lieut.- 
colonel commandant) April 25, 1900. 

J. Smith Park, M.V.O., V.D. (hon. col.) (lieut. - colonel com- 
mandant), May 28, 1904. 



1st EDINBURGH (CITY) ENGINEER 
VOLUNTEERS. 

This corps, which in order of procedure in the 
Engineer Volunteer force ranked immediately after 
the Lanarkshire Corps, was raised in Edinburgh, from 
the same classes as the Glasgow Engineer Corps, as a 
half-company on July 3, 1860, and on September 20 
its establishment was increased to that of a full 
company. Its uniform was the same as that of the 
Royal Engineers, but with white (silver) cord, and 
instead of the busby it wore scarlet caps with peaks 
and green ball-tufts, with a badge of a lion rampant 
within a wreath. On the white patent-leather pouch- 
belts was a badge of a fortification. 

The first commanding officer was Captain J. Millar 



170 • Records of the Several Corps. 

(September 20, 1861), but he resigned in 1862, and 
the establishment of the corps was reduced then to a 
half-company, which was attached to the 1st Lanark 
E.V. The command was exercised thenceforward by 
First-Lieutenant G. Cunningham until 1865, when the 
corps was disbanded. 



1st ABERDEENSHIRE ROYAL ENGINEERS 
(VOLUNTEERS). 

(Plate IX.) 

Order of Precedence, 20. 

Honorary Colonel — Sir A. H. Grant, Bart, of Monymusk, August 2, 1890. 

Headquarters — Hardgate, Aberdeen. 

The formation of the 1st Aberdeenshire Engineer 
Volunteers, a corps with an establishment of one 
company, was sanctioned on April 22, 1878, and the 
first officers were gazetted on June 29. For purposes 
of the capitation grant the corps was attached to the 
1st Lanarkshire Engineer Volunteers. The uniform 
was that of the Royal Engineers, with helmets, the 
Austrian knot on the sleeve and band of the forage 
caps being Garter blue, but in 1883 these were 
changed to white. 

On March 2, 1880, the corps was increased to two, 
and in 1883 to four, companies. In 1884 it was con- 
stituted an independent unit, no longer attached to 
the 1st Lanark, and in 1888 it was increased to 
six companies, all of them in the city of Aberdeen. 
In the latter year (Army Order 73 of March) its 
title was changed to "1st Aberdeenshire Engineer 



ist Aberdeenshire Royal Engineers. 171 

Volunteers, Fortress and B,ailway Forces, Royal 
Engineers " ; and this nomenclature remained in force 
till 1901, when the title at the head of this record 
was assumed. 

During the South African war the corps furnished 
two service sections, both of which were attached to 
the 47th (Fortress) Company, Boyal Engineers. The 
1st, consisting of 25 men under Lieutenant R. A. 
Duthie, left Aberdeen on March 4, 1900, the 2nd, 
also of 25 men, leaving on March 11, 1901. For 
their services with their sections Lieutenant Duthie, 
Serjeant J. Craig, Corporal W. Beveridge, and 2nd 
Corporal J. Stewart were mentioned in despatches. 
In all, 62 members of the corps served during the 
war in South Africa. 

The corps had its headquarters in Hardgate, 
Aberdeen, which were specially erected for it, and 
first occupied in 1898, and a practice and drill ground 
in Torry of about 5 acres; its rifle-range was at 
Don Mouth, 2 \ miles from Aberdeen. The training 
was carried out in camp, at various places, and several 
times the whole corps trained at the School of Military 
Engineering, Chatham. 

The commanding officers have been — 

Captain William Hall, September 28, 1878 (Major, May 9, 1883 ; 

Lieut. -Colonel, August 4, 1888). 
Lieut.-Colonel Robert H. Anstice (Major (retired pay), late 

Border Regiment), C.B. (hon. col.), January 28, 1891. 
Lieut.-Colonel William S. Gill, V.D. (hon. col.), May 28, 1904. 



172 Records of the Several Corps. 

2nd LANAEKSHIEE EOYAL ENGINEEE 
(VOLUNTEEES). 

(Plate IX.) 

Order op Precedence, 23. 

Honorary Colonel — Col. A. C. Lord Belhaven and Stenton (retired pay), 
August 1, 1903. 

Headquarters — Coatbridge. 

The formation of this corps was sanctioned on June 19, 
1903, its commanding officer being gazetted on that 
date, and the remainder of the officers on August 1. 
The establishment was fixed at nine companies, with 
headquarters : A, B, and C, Coatbridge ; D and E, 
Airdrie; F, Eutherglen ; G, Motherwell; H, Bells- 
hill ; and K, Shettleston ; and it is on record that 
within ten days of the date of sanction the corps 
was recruited up to over its establishment. Its 
recruiting district was practically that of the former 
5th Volunteer Battalion Scottish Eifles, which was 
disbanded in 1897, and since then had supplied no 
volunteers. The men were drawn principally from 
the artisan class, and about one-fifth were miners. 

The uniform was the service dress of the Eoyal 
Engineers (with red piping on the trousers and scarlet 
patch on the sleeve), drab felt hats, brown leather 
equipment, and grey putties. The officers wore the 
undress E.E. pattern caps and frock-coats. 

The corps had a rifle range of its own up to 600 
yards at Plains, near Airdrie, and the F to K Com- 
panies used the range of the 4th Volunteer Battalion 
Scottish Eifles. 

The first commanding officer was — 

Lieut.-Colonel Andrew Pearson, June 19, 1903. 



The Clyde Division Electrical Engineers. 173 



ELECTRICAL ENGINEERS, ROYAL ENGINEERS 
(VOLUNTEERS). 

THE CLYDE DIVISION. 

Order of Precedence, 4. 

Honorary Commandant — Colonel E. D. Malcolm, C.B., RE. (retired pay), 
May 29, 1901. 

Headquarters — Greenock. 

The Division had its origin in the 9th (Submarine 
Mining) Company, 1st Lanarkshire Engineer Volunteers, 
which was formed in 1885 to take charge of the sub- 
marine mining defences of the Clyde. In 1888 a second 
Submarine Mining Company was raised in the same 
corps, and on 1st February 1888 the two companies 
were formed into a separate corps, the "Clyde Division, 
Engineer Volunteers, Submarine Miners, Royal En- 
gineers," and adopted the same uniforms as the regular 
submarine miners, with white cord on the tunic. The 
headquarters, stores, practice-ground, &c, were at Fort 
Matilda, Greenock. 

In 1892 the establishment was increased to three, 
and in 1900 to four, companies. In 1901 the corps 
received the designation " Clyde Division, Submarine 
Miners, Royal Engineers (Volunteers)," and in 1903 its 
establishment was reduced to three companies. 

In consequence of the abolition of submarine mines 
in all defended ports, by Army Order 130 of June 
1907 the submarine miner volunteers were reduced to 
the numbers necessary to work the electric lights of 



1 74 Records of the Several Corps. 

the gun defences, and accordingly the Clyde Division 
became "Electrical Engineers, Royal Engineers (Vol- 
unteers)," and was reduced to an establishment of one 
company of four officers and seventy other ranks. 
The commanding officers of the division have been — 

Major A. K Black, February 1, 1888. 
Major W. W. B. Eodger, July 11, 1894. 

Major Duncan F. D. Neill, December 22, 1897, Lieut. - Colonel 
(hon. col.), April 1, 1903. 



THE FORTH DIVISION. 

Order of Precedence, 6. 
Headquarters — 14a Queen Street, Edinburgh. 

The Division was raised, with an establishment of two 
companies, at Leith, on March 31, 1888. Like the 
Clyde Division, it was increased to three companies in 
1892 and to four in 1900; but was reduced to three 
again in 1903 and to one in 1907, undergoing also all 
the changes in designation detailed for the Clyde 
Division. 

Its first headquarters were on board H.M.S Dido, off 
Leith, which was used as a storeship, &c. ; but in 1905 
a new practice -ground, with store-sheds, pier, &c, was 
completed at North Queensferry, and the headquarters 
were removed to Edinburgh. 

The commanding officers have been — 

Captain F. Grant-Ogilvie, March 31, 1888. 

Major Theodore Salvesen, December 12, 1900, Lieut.-Colonel, 

April 1, 1903. 
Lieut-Colonel Hill M. Cadell, V.D. (hon. col.), January 28, 1905 

(till 1906). 
Captain Stephen Smith (hon. major), Captain, June 6, 1900. 



The Tay Division, Submarine Miners. 175 



THE TAY DIVISION, SUBMARINE MINERS, 
R.E. (VOLUNTEERS). 

This Division was raised, with an establishment of one 
company and headquarters at Broughty Ferry, on March 
17, 1888. In 1889, 1892, and 1900 it was increased 
successively to two, three, and four companies ; but it 
was reduced to three in 1903, and finally disbanded on 
November 2, 1907. In changes of designation it fol- 
lowed the same sequence as the Clyde and Forth 
Divisions. 

Its honorary colonel was A. FitzG. Lord Kinnaird, 
appointed October 10, 1903, and the commanding 
officers were — 

Major William H. Fergusson, March 17, 1888, Lieut.-Colonel, 
April 1, 1903. 

Lieut.-Colonel Frederick S. Stephens, May 28, 1904 (till Novem- 
ber 2, 1907). 



176 Records of the Several Corps. 



VOLUNTEER BATTALIONS OF TERRITORIAL 
REGIMENTS. 

NOTE. 

The volunteer battalions of infantry are arranged in the follow- 
ing pages, not in the order of their precedence in the volunteer 
force, but in that of the Territorial Regiments to which they were 
affiliated, the number in the " Table of Precedence of Volunteer 
Rifle Corps " being given in the case of each. 

To facilitate the identification at later dates of rifle corps 
raised in the early years in four counties — Aberdeen, Forfar, 
Lanark, and Renfrew — in which three or more battalions of rifle 
volunteers were formed, lists of these corps have been compiled, 
with the dates of the first commissions of their officers, and, 
where available, those of the acceptance of services of the corps, 
and these will be found in Appendices A to D. In the separate 
records of those battalions, to avoid repetition, these dates have, 
therefore, not been inserted. 



The Queen's Rifle Volunteer Brigade. 177 

THE QUEEN'S RIFLE VOLUNTEER BRIGADE, 
THE ROYAL SCOTS (LOTHIAN REGIMENT). 

Regimental District No. 1. 

(Plate X.) 
1 South Africa, 1900-02." | Order op Precedence, 78. 

Honorary Colonels — 

The Lord Provost op Edinburgh for the time being. 

Field-Marshal Rt. Hon. G. J. Viscount Wolseley, K.P., G.C.B., O.M., 
G.C.M.G., V.D., April 24, 1889. 

Colonel Rt. Hon. Sir J. H. A Macdonald, KGB., V.D., June 5, 1901. 

Headquarters— Forrest Road, Edinburgh. 

The circumstances attending the first formation of 
this, the premier corps of rifle volunteers in Scotland, 
have been already narrated in Part I., on page 13, and 
a graphic description of the enthusiasm in drill evinced 
by the corps in those days, from the pen of Colonel 
Sir J. H. A. Macdonald, has been quoted on page 12. 

The City of Edinburgh adopted from the first the 
system of grouping the companies of riflemen raised by 
the efforts of individuals or corporations into one regi- 
ment for the city, consequently all the officers were 
gazetted, not to companies as elsewhere, but to the 1st 
City of Edinburgh Rifle Volunteer Corps, and the 
earliest dates of these commissions, for officers of the 
regimental staff, the 1st to 9th, and the 1st Highland 
companies, was August 31, 1859. This did not, how- 
ever, prevent the companies from retaining, and from 
long maintaining, a peculiar individuality, and had 
the advantage of producing from the beginning a regi- 



178 Records of the Several Corps. 

mental esprit de corps and a solidity of organisation 
which was necessarily wanting in units composed of 
companies grouped only by circumstances or chance. 

The companies which were formed before the date 
(August 7) of the Eoyal Review of 1860, and which 
took part in it, were — 

No. 1. Advocates, formed August 31, 1859. 

No. 2. 1st Citizens, formed August 31, 1859. 

No. 3. Writers to the Signet, formed August 31, 1859. 

No. 4. Edinburgh University, formed August 31, 1859. 

No. 5. Solicitors before the Supreme Court, formed August 31, 
1859. 

No. 6. Accountants, formed August 31, 1859. 

All the above were self-supporting companies — i.e., the 
members paid for their own uniforms, equipment, and arms, 
and contributed a fixed sum annually towards the general 
expenses of the company. 

No. 7. Bankers, formed August 31, 1859, from the clerks and 
employes of the various banks, which subscribed to provide 
uniforms, equipments, and arms for them. 

No. 8. 1st Artisans, formed August 31, 1859. 

No. 9. 2nd Artisans, formed August 31, 1859. 

These were the first artisan companies raised in Scot- 
land. The men paid 30s. in the 8th and 45s. in the 
9th, by instalments, for their uniform, and the rest of 
the expenses of the companies was defrayed by public 
subscription. 

No. 10. Civil Service, formed October 7, 1859, a self-supporting 
company. 

No. 11. 3rd Artisans, formed December 7, 1859, same as 8th and 
9th. 

No. 12. Freemasons, formed December 7, 1859. This company 
also formed the "Bifle Lodge, No. 405," but it soon 
dwindled in numbers and had almost ceased to exist when 
in 1861 Miss Catherine Sinclair announced her intention to 
provide funds for a Volunteer company. No. 12 was then 
reorganised and recruited chiefly from the Water of Leith 
district. 



The Queen's Rifle Volunteer Brigade. 179 

No. 13. 4th Artisans, formed December 7, 1859, same as 8th. 

No. 14. 2nd Citizens, formed December 8, 1859, a self-support- 
ing company. 

No. 15. 1st Merchants, formed December 21, 1859. Uniformed, 
equipped, and armed at the expense of members of the 
Merchant Company, of which two firms — Messrs Cowan & 
Co., and Messrs C. Lawson & Sons — paid all the expenses 
of forty of their employes. 

No. 16. Total Abstainers, formed February 29, 1860. Raised by 
Mr John Hope, W.S., from members of the British Temper- 
ance League. The company maintained its individuality 
till 1867, when the 3rd Edinburgh R.V. (see 4th Vol. Batt. 
Eoyal Scots) was formed and the majority of the members 
transferred themselves to it. The company property, how- 
ever, remained with it, and the 16th was re-constituted as 
an artisan company. 

No. 17. 2nd Merchants, formed May 11, 1860, from the overflow 
of No. 15. 

No. 18. High Constables, formed May 25, 1860, a self-supporting 
corps. 

No. 19. 5th Artisans, formed November 8, 1860, mainly from 
operative tailors. Several houses in the clothing trade 
subscribed £30, and the rest of the funds was found by 
the members themselves. After 1873 it was recruited 
from all trades. 

1st Highland, formed August 31, 1859, the services of the com- 
pany having been offered by the Highland Society of Edin- 
burgh on June 13, 1859. The company was entirely self- 
supporting. 

2nd Highland, formed May 18, 1860, from the overflow of the 
1st, and also entirely self-supporting. 

From the beginning the corps was organised in two 
battalions, and at the Royal Review on August 7, 
1860, these were composed of: 1st Battalion, Nos. 1, 
2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 10, 18, and 1st Highland; 2nd Bat- 
talion, Nos. 8, 9, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, and 2nd 
Highland. 

The 3rd Highland Company was formed of artisans 



180 Records of the Several Corps. 

on July 23, 1860, but was not able to take part in the 
review. 

On May 3, 1862, a company of Highland artisans 
was formed, mainly from the employe's of Messrs W. D. 
Young's ironworks at Fountainbridge, and, contrary to 
the practice hitherto followed in the city of Edinburgh, 
it was constituted as a separate corps, designated the 
2nd City of Edinburgh R.V., and was only " attached " 
to the 1st Edinburgh. On February 23, 1867, two 
more companies were formed for this corps, but on that 
same date all three were incorporated in the 1st Edin- 
burgh as the 4th, 5th, and 6th Highland Companies. 

The original uniform of the corps (except the High- 
land companies) was dark grey tunics, of a shade a 
little lighter than that later worn, with black braid, 
reaching almost to the knees, dark grey trousers with 
black braid, dark grey caps with black braid and a 
straight peak, and black patent leather belts, a badge 
(different for each company) being worn on the cap and 
pouch-belt. About 1862 a shako with a black ball-tuft 
replaced the cap, the tunic was assimilated in pattern 
to that of the Rifle Brigade, and piping replaced the 
braid on the trousers. The Highland companies wore 
dark grey doublets, with five rows of black lace on the 
breast and black piping, 42nd tartan kilts and belted 
plaids, goatskin sporrans with two grey horse -hair 
tails, green and black-diced hose, and belts as for the 
other companies. The 1st had a " Strathdon " and the 
3rd a " Balmoral " bonnet, but the others adopted a 
plain blue glengarry, which afterwards became the 
head-dress for all the Highland companies. 

In 1865 the corps was honoured by the conferring of 
the title "1st Queen's City of Edinburgh Rifle Volun- 
teer Brigade," and in 1867 its establishment was fixed 
at 2500 volunteers of all ranks, divided into two 



The Queen 's Rifle Volunteer Brigade. 181 

battalions, or twenty-five companies. In 1868 the 1st 
(Advocates) and 3rd (Writers to the Signet) Com- 
panies ceased to exist, and to take their place two new 
companies were raised, — the 7th Highland, mainly 
formed from natives of Caithness resident in Edin- 
burgh, on December 27, 1867, and the 20th, on March 
19, 1869. The battalions were then reorganised, the 
1st comprising Nos. 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 10, 18, and the 1st to 
7th Highland Companies, and the 2nd, Nos. 8, 9, 11, 
12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 19, and 20. 

In January 1875 a busby with black plume and chin- 
chain replaced the shako, and was worn by the brigade 
until in 1895 it was replaced by the modern (soft) form 
of busby of Astrakhan fur. The pouch - belt was 
abolished, greatcoats, worn rolled en bandouliere over 
the right shoulder, were issued, the cut of the tunic 
was assimilated again to that of the Rifle Brigade, and 
leggings were introduced. Orders were issued in the 
same year for the Highland companies to be clothed 
the same as the rest of the brigade, and this change 
was carried out in the years 1876-79. 

A beginning was made in 1886 with the formation of 
a mounted infantry detachment, one man per company, 
or 25 all ranks, formed into a section, being in that year 
authorised. 

By Army Order 144 of April 1888 the brigade was 
given the title of Queen's Rifle Volunteer Brigade, The 
Royal Scots, and at the same time it was divided into 
three battalions, the companies now giving up their old 
titles and numbers and becoming lettered companies of 
the battalions as follows : — 

C Ser ny } A B C D E F G H I 

1st Battalion 2nd 5th 6th 7th 10th 18th 1st Hd. 2nd Hd. 3rd Hd. 

2nd Battalion 8th 9th 11th 12th 13th 14th 15th 16th 

3rd Battalion 4th 17th 19th 20th 4th Hd. 5th Hd. 6th Hd. 7th Hd. 



1 82 Records of the Several Corps. 

The South African War brought a large accession of 
numbers to the brigade, for not only was it recruited up 
to its full establishment, but in 1900 a new company- 
was formed at Colin ton as " I M Company, 3rd Batta- 
lion, a cyclist company attached to brigade head- 
quarters was raised, and the mounted infantry were 
increased to three sections, or 105 all ranks. The 
brigade furnished its full contingent to the volunteer 
service companies of the Royal Scots, and in all 245 
members served in South Africa during the war. Of 
these, Lieutenant R. G. W. Adams and 54 non-com- 
missioned officers and men served with the 1st, Captain 
S. R. Dunn and 34 men with the 2nd, and Captain 
(hon. Major) S. Miller and 26 men with the 3rd 
Volunteer Service Company, Royal Scots. Of the 2nd 
Company, Corporal W. Spence died of disease and one 
private was wounded, and of the 3rd Major Miller and 
Private A. Blease were mentioned in despatches, the 
latter being promoted corporal for gallantry at Balmoral 
on April 5, 1902. Lieutenant R. W. D. Hewson and 
13 privates served with the Scottish Volunteer Cyclist 
Company, and 12 members of the mounted infantry 
joined the City of London Imperial Volunteers Mounted 
Infantry, of whom 8 subsequently received commissions 
in the regular army and 1 in the Imperial Light 
Horse. 

In the years 1900-01 a drab felt hat was worn with 
the dark grey uniform, but in 1902 this was prohibited, 
and a drab service dress with light green Austrian knot 
and trouser piping was authorised for marching and drill 
order, to be worn with a drab felt hat (with black 
plume and badge for mounted infantry, for whom it 
was the sole head-dress). The mounted infantry wore 
Bedford cord breeches and black putties. 

The brigade was detailed to furnish one battalion to 



The Queen's Rifle Volunteer Brigade. 183 

the 32nd Field Army Brigade, to train for thirteen 
clear days annually, and this it did from 1902 to 1906, 
after which year this extra organisation ceased. The 
remainder of the brigade was included in the 1st 
Lothian Brigade. 

The headquarters of the brigade in Forrest Road, 
which included a spacious drill hall, were acquired 
in 1872, and enlarged and reopened in 1905, and it 
shared, in common with the other Edinburgh corps, 
the rifle range up to 1100 yards at Hunter's Bog. 
Members of the brigade have won the Queen's (King's) 
prize at the National Bifle Association no fewer than 
four times — namely, in 1873, Serjeant (afterwards 
Major) A. Menzies ; 1891, Lieutenant D. Dear; 1896, 
Lieutenant J. C. Thomson ; and 1901, Private H. 
Ommundsen. 

The battalion commanders and lieutenant-colonels 
commandant (a title now borne by the senior battalion 
commander) of the brigade have been — 

The Kt. Hon. James, Lord Moncrieff, Lieut. -Colonel, August 31, 

1859; Lieut. -Colonel Commandant, August 31, 1859, till 

1873. 
David Davidson, C.B., V.D., late major H.M. Indian Forces, 

Lieut.-Colonel, May 2, 1860 ; Lieut.-Colonel Commandant, 

June 4, 1873, till 1882. 
Sir Alex. G. Maitland, Bt., Lieut.-Colonel, November 7, 1862, till 

1864 
Kt. Hon. Sir John Hay Athol Macdonald, Lord Kingsburgh, 

K.C.B., V.D., colonel, Volunteer force, Lieut.-Colonel, May 

10, 1864; Lieut-Colonel Commandant, May 11, 1882, till 

1892. 
E. Strathearn Gordon, Lieut.-Colonel, November 29, 1867, till 

1873. 
Hon. Bouverie F. Primrose, Lieut.-Colonel, June 4, 1873, till 

1882. 
David MacGibbon, Lieut.-Colonel, May 11, 1882, till 1886. 



184 Records of the Several Corps. 

William Taylor (hon. col.), July 29, 1882, till 1890. 

Thomas W. Jones, V.D. (hon. col.), Lieut. -Colonel, April 11, 

1885; Lieut. - Colonel Commandant, April 9, 1892, till 

1894. 
Eobert Menzies, V.D. (hon. col.), Lieut.-Colonel, May 12, 1886 ; 

Lieut-Colonel Commandant, June 23, 1894, till 1898. 
Horatio R. Macrae, V.D. (hon. col.), Lieut.-Colonel, February 22, 

1890; Lieut.-Colonel Commandant, February 3, 1898, till 

1903. 
Sir Eobert Cranston, Kt., K.C.V.O., V.D., colonel, Volunteer 

force, Lieut.-Colonel, April 9, 1892 ; Lieut.-Colonel Com- 
mandant, December 3, 1903, till 1906. 
James B. Sutherland, V.D. (hon. col.), Lieut.-Colonel 3rd Batt., 

August 15, 1894, till 1896. 
L. Bilton, V.D. (hon. col.), Lieut.-Colonel 3rd Batt., February 5, 

1896, till 1900. 
G. W. Young, V.D. (hon. col.), Lieut.-Colonel 1st Batt., January 

4, 1899, till 1901. 
James Gibb, V.D. (hon. col.), Lieut.-Colonel 3rd Batt., March 14, 

1900 ; Lieut.-Colonel Commandant, June 1, 1906, till March 

31, 1908. 
Alexander T. Hunter, V.D. (hon. col.), Lieut.-Colonel 1st Batt., 

March 9, 1901, till 1906. 
Eobert Clark, V.D. (hon. col.), Lieut.-Colonel 2nd Batt., February 

16, 1904, till March 31, 1908. 
A. Young, V.D., Lieut.-Colonel 1st Batt., June 3, 1906, till March 

31, 1908. 



Afth Volunteer Battalion the Royal Scots. 185 

4th VOLUNTEER BATTALION THE ROYAL 

SCOTS (LOTHIAN REGIMENT). 

Regimental District, No. 1. 

(Plate XI.) 

"South Africa, 1901-02." | Order op Precedence, 79. 

Honorary Colonel— General H. H. Viscount Kitchener of Khartoum, 

G.C.B., O.M., G.C.M.G., August 19, 1905. 

Headquarters— 33 Gilmore Place, Edinburgh. 

The 3rd City of Edinburgh Rifle Volunteer Corps was 
formed, as a corps of total abstainers, members of the 
British League, on May 27, 1867, by Captain John 
Hope, who had raised and commanded the 16th 
(Abstainers) Company of the Queen's Edinburgh. It 
consisted at first of two companies only, but was 
increased to three in 1868, to four in 1872, and to six 
companies in 1877. The original uniform was scarlet 
tunics with blue facings, blue trousers with a broad 
scarlet stripe, blue shakos with at first a red-and- white 
ball-tuft and later a scarlet upright horse-hair plume, 
and white belts. The corps for many years wore brass 
buttons and ornaments. To the corps was attached the 
British League Cadet Corps, formed in 1861, which 
consisted of four companies of boys, dressed in red 
Garibaldi shirts, blue forage-cap and knickerbockers, 
and brown canvas leggings. 

In 1880 the corps was renumbered the 2nd Edinburgh 
Rifle Volunteers, and two years later it was constituted 
an independent unit, having till then been " attached " 
to the Queen's Edinburgh. In 1882 also, helmets 
replaced the shakos hitherto worn. 

By Army Order 144 of 1st April 1888 it became 
the 4th Volunteer Battalion Royal Scots, and accord- 
ingly in that year adopted the uniform of the regiment, 



1 86 Records of the Several Corps. 

wearing the helmet with it till 1904, when the Kil- 
marnock bonnet was introduced for officers and the 
glengarry became the sole head-dress for other ranks. 
The uniform of the battalion has thus since 1888 been 
identical with that of the 5th V.B. (which see), and, as 
in it, the officers wore Hunting Stuart tartan trews in 
levee and mess dress only. 

The battalion furnished in all 64 members for service 
in South Africa during the war, of whom 1 5 men served 
in the 1st, 12 in the 2nd, and 19 in the 3rd Volunteer 
Service Company of the Royal Scots. No casualties 
occurred among these contingents, but Drummer R 
Robertson of the 3rd Company was mentioned in des- 
patches (June 1, 1902), and promoted corporal for 
gallantry at Balmoral on April 5, 1902. Lieutenant 
W. B. Grey and 3 men served in the Scottish Volun- 
teer Cyclist Company. The establishment of the bat- 
talion was in 1900 increased to eight companies, the 
new "G" Company being raised in Portobello, and 
" H " formed by students of the Church of Scotland 
Teachers' Training College. 

From 1902 to 1906 the battalion belonged to the 
32nd Field Army Brigade, and trained with it in camp 
for thirteen clear days annually, but in the end of 1906 
this brigading was discontinued, and the battalion re- 
verted to the 1st Lothian Brigade. Its musketry was 
carried out at the Hunter's Bog range, which it used 
in conjunction with other Edinburgh corps. 

The commanding officers have been — 

Captain John Hope (Captain 1st Edinburgh R.V., February 29, 
1860), May 27, 1867; Major, March 30, 1872; Lieut.-Colonel, 
March 2, 1878. 

Lieut-Colonel Will. U. Martin, V.D. (hon. col.), June 27, 1883. 

Lieut-Colonel Stuart D. Elliot, V.D. (hon. col.), December 20, 1899. 

Lieut-Colonel George McCrae, V.D. (hon. col.), January 28, 1905. 




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$tk Volunteer Battalion the Royal Scots. 1 87 

5th VOLUNTEER BATTALION THE ROYAL 
SCOTS (LOTHIAN REGIMENT). 

Regimental District, No. 1. 

(Plate XII.) 

" South Africa, 1900-02." | Order of Precedence, 141. 

Honorary Colonel— R. C. Maclagan, V.D. (hon. col.), August 20, 1892. 

Headquarters — Dalmeny Street, Leith Walk, Leith. 

On August 6, 1859, the services of 153 gentlemen of 
Leith were offered to form two rifle companies which 
should pay all their own expenses and provide their 
own arms, and this offer was followed by that of two 
companies of Leith artisans, who paid a contribution of 
30s. each, the rest of their expenses being defrayed by 
public subscription. These were accepted, and on De- 
cember 6, 1859, officers were gazetted to the 1st Mid- 
Lothian (Leith) Rifle Volunteer Corps, of four companies. 
A brass band of 1 8 men was formed ; a fifth company 
was added on May 28, 1860 ; a sixth on September 24, 
1860 ; a seventh on March 18, 1861 ; and an eighth on 
May 28, 1861 — all recruited in Leith. The original 
uniform of the corps was very dark grey tunic, trousers, 
and peaked cap, with black facings, leggings, and belts, 
but, to save expense, members were permitted to wear 
a plain blouse and trousers of any material, so long as 
the colour of the uniform was adhered to. The badge 
on the cap and pouch-belt was a lion rampant within 
a wreath. 

In 1863 the 4th Mid-Lothian (Corstorphine) Rifle 
Volunteer Corps, which had been formed on November 
26, 1860, and since then "attached" to the corps, was 
amalgamated with it as a 9th company, and in 1866 
and 1868 a 10th and 11th companies were raised. 



1 88 Records of the Several Corps. 

The uniform was in 1863 changed to scarlet tunics 
with black facings, blue trousers with scarlet piping, 
blue shakos with black horse- hair plumes, and black 
waist- and pouch -belts. This uniform was worn until 
1878, when blue helmets with silver ornaments replaced 
the shakos, and in 1885 white (buff) belts with com- 
plete valise equipment, greatcoat, &c, were substituted 
for the black belts. 

The establishment of the battalion was in 1884 re- 
duced to ten companies, and in 1888 (Army Order 144 
of April) it assumed its latest designation, as a con- 
sequence of which in 1890 it adopted the uniform of 
the Royal Scots, the helmet continuing to be worn till 
June 1905, when Kilmarnock bonnets with diced band 
and cock's-tail for officers, and glengarries with diced 
border for other ranks, became the head-dress. The 
battalion till 1908 wore the tartan first approved for 
the Royal Scots, officers only wearing in levee or mess 
dress the Hunting Stuart. The officers wore white 
pouch -belts till 1905, when they were replaced by 
claymore belts and sashes, which latter were worn by 
Serjeants also. A drab service dress was approved 
in 1905. 

During the South African War the battalion furnished 
196 of its members for service, besides 94 who enlisted 
into the regular army. Of the former, Captain R. 
Wemyss Campbell and 19 men served with the 1st, 
41 men with the 2nd, and 49 men with the 3rd Volun- 
teer Service Company of the Royal Scots. Of the 1st 
Company, 2 men died of disease, and Captain Campbell 
and Corporal T. H. Greig were mentioned in Lord 
Roberts' despatch of September 4, 1901, the latter 
being awarded a medal for distinguished conduct in 
the field. Of the 2nd Company, 2 men were wounded, 
and of the 3rd, Private J. G. Lockhart was mentioned 



$tk Volunteer Battalion the Royal Scots. 189 

in Lord Kitchener's despatch of June 1, 1902, and pro- 
moted corporal for gallantry at Balmoral on April 5, 
1902. In addition, 32 non-commissioned officers and 
men (of whom 1 was wounded) served in the Scottish 
Volunteer Cyclist Company, 25 joined the Imperial 
Yeomanry, 10 Baden-Powell's Police, and 19 the Scot- 
tish Horse. 

In 1900 the establishment of the battalion was again 
raised to eleven companies, but in 1901 it was reorgan- 
ised into ten, of which one was a cyclist company. 

The battalion formed part of the 32 nd Field Army 
Brigade during its existence from 1902 to 1906, 
training in camp for thirteen days annually, and in 
1906 its signallers made a record by securing 298 
points at the examination out of a possible 300. 

In 1877 a headquarters and drill-hall in Stead's 
Place, Leith, which had been built at a cost of over 
£3000, were occupied, but these were burned down in 
1900, and in 1902 new headquarters and drill-hall in 
Dalmeny Street, Leith Walk, were opened. The bat- 
talion had its own range, up to 1000 yards, at Seafield, 
near Leith. 

The commanding officers have been — 

H. H. Arnaud, late H.E.I.C.S., Major, December 6, 1859. 
Donald E. Macgregor, Major, July 27, 1861 ; Lieut.-Colonel, 

March 15, 1862. 
Wm. Marjoribanks (hon. col), Lieut.-Colonel, March 28, 1877. 
Eobt. C. Maclagan (hon. col.), Lieut.-Colonel, May 3, 1882. 
Robt. S. Adam (hon. col.), Lieut.-Colonel, December 7, 1889. 
Wm. I. Macadam, V.D. (hon. col.), Lieut.-Colonel, June 18, 1892. 
Jas. E. Bertram, V.D. (hon. col.), Lieut.-Colonel, December 16, 

1896. 
Johan T. Salvesen, V.D. (hon. col), Lieut.-Colonel, January 2, 

1901. 
Sir John M. Clark, Bart, V.D. (hon. col.), Lieut.-Colonel, February 

11, 1905. 



190 Records of the Several Corps. 

6th VOLUNTEER BATTALION THE ROYAL 
SCOTS (LOTHIAN REGIMENT). 

Regimental District, No. 1. 

(Plate XIII.) 

" South Africa, 1901." | Order of Precedence, 142. 

Honorary Colonel — Sir G. D. Clerk, Bart., V.D. (hon. col.), late Lieutenant 
2nd Life Guards, February 4, 1899. 

Headquarters — Peebles. 

On January 22, 1862, the 1st Administrative Battalion 
Mid-Lothian Rifle Volunteers, with headquarters at 
Dalkeith, was formed from the following corps : — 

2nd Mid-Lothian E.V., Dalkeith, formed May 22, 1860, of two 
companies, increased to three in 1864, and to four in 1867. 
Its original uniform was medium grey with green facings 
and piping, grey shakos with plume of cock's feathers and 
badge of a huntsman blowing a horn, and motto, " Free for 
a blast," and brown belts. 

3rd Mid-Lothian E.V., Penicuik, services accepted May 22, 1860, 
and officers gazetted June 4, 1860, of three companies — 1st 
at Penicuik, 2nd at Valleyfield, 3rd at Eoslin, which last 
was disbanded in 1864. The uniform was the same as the 
2nd Corps, but with black patent-leather belts. 

5th Mid-Lothian E.V., Musselburgh, formed April 19, 1861, of 
one company. 

To this battalion were added in 1863 — 

1st Peebles E.V., Peebles, formed as one company, August 31, 

1860, increased to two companies 1873. 
2nd Peebles E.V., Broughton, formed as one company, August 31, 

1860, disbanded 1873. 
3rd Peebles E.V., Innerleithen, formed as one company, August 

31, 1860. 




- 1 1 

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2 £ » o 

1 1 s| > 



6th Volunteer Battalion the Royal Scots. 191 

There had also existed a 4th Peebles R.V., of one 
company, formed at Linton on October 16, 1860, but it 
had been disbanded in 1862. The uniform of all the 
Peebles corps was Elcho grey, with brown belts, the 
1st having light blue facings. 

In 1864 the battalion adopted scarlet tunics with 
black facings, blue trousers with scarlet piping, blue 
shakos with scarlet ball-tuft, and black belts, the forage 
cap being round, without a peak, and with red, white, 
and blue diced border. This uniform continued to be 
worn till 1875, when white belts replaced the black, 
and a black Austrian knot the white braid on the cuff. 
Officers wore white pouch-belts and the lace of the line 
infantry in silver. 

In 1876 (April 29) the 6th Mid-Lothian R.V., at 
Loanhead, of one company, was raised and added to the 
battalion, and in April 1880 the battalion was consoli- 
dated as the 2nd Mid-Lothian and Peebles Rifle Volun- 
teers, headquarters at Penicuik, with eleven companies, 
lettered as follows : A, B, C, and D, Dalkeith (late 2nd 
Mid-Lothian) ; E, Penicuik, and F, Valleyfield (late 3rd 
Mid-Lothian) ; G, Musselburgh (late 5th Mid-Lothian) ; 
H, Loanhead (late 6th Mid-Lothian) ; I and K, Peebles 
(late 1st Peebles) ; and L, Innerleithen (late 3rd Peebles). 
At the same time the shako was abolished, and a glen- 
garry with red, white, and blue diced border adopted 
as the sole head-dress, which was worn until 1886, when 
blue helmets with silver ornaments were introduced. 

In April 1888 (Army Order 144) the battalion be- 
came the 6th Volunteer Battalion of the Royal Scots, 
and accordingly in that year the uniform of the Royal 
Scots was adopted, the helmet being worn with it until 
1900, when the glengarry again became the sole head- 
dress. In February 1904 the Hunting Stuart tartan 
trews of the Royal Scots were taken into wear, sashes 



192 Records of the Several Corps. 

were introduced for officers and Serjeants, and the 
former adopted the Kilmarnock bonnet with cock's-tail 
for review order dress. 

The battalion furnished in all 36 members for service 
in South Africa during the war, of whom 13 non-com- 
missioned officers and men served in the 1st, Lieutenant 
A. G. Ireland and 7 men in the 2nd, and 2 men in the 
3rd Volunteer Service Company of the Royal Scots. Of 
the 2nd Company, Private T. Dickson died of disease. 
One private served in the Scottish Volunteer Cyclist 
Company, and the remainder in other corps. 

About 1895 the headquarters of " D" Company were 
removed from Dalkeith to Bonnyrigg, and in February 
1907 battalion headquarters were removed to Peebles, 
otherwise the battalion experienced no changes in in- 
terior organisation after 1880. It owned eight rifle- 
ranges near the headquarters of the various companies. 

The lieutenant-colonels commanding have been — 

Alex. Learmonth, late Lieut. -Colonel 17th Lancers, December 23, 

1863. 
Sir George D. Clerk, Bart., V.D. (hon. col.), late Lieutenant 2nd 

Life Guards, July 2, 1879. 
Robert G. Wardlaw-Ramsay, V.D. (hon. col.), late Captain H.L.I., 

January 18, 1899. 
Thomas Rough, V.D. (hon. col.), November 22, 1905. 



*]tk Volunteer Battalion the Royal Scots. 193 

7th VOLUNTEER BATTALION THE ROYAL 
SCOTS (LOTHIAN REGIMENT). 

Regimental District, No. 1. 

(Plate XIV.) 

" South Africa, 1901." | Order op Precedence, 190. 

Honorary Colonel — H. R. Lord Elcho, August 28, 1906. 

Headquarters — Haddington. 

The 1st Administrative Battalion Haddingtonshire 
Rifle Volunteers, with headquarters at Haddington, 
was formed on August 19, 1860, and included the 
following corps formed in the county: — 

1st, Haddington, formed January 19, 1860, of one company, a 

self-supporting corps, providing its own arms. 
2nd, Gifford, formed January 20, 1860, of one company, composed 

of agricultural labourers, principally from Lord Tweeddale's 

estates. It was disbanded in 1874. 
3rd, Haddington, formed January 21, 1860, of one company, 

chiefly mechanics and artisans, and supported by local 

subscriptions. 
4th, Aberlady, formed March 17, 1860, of one company, raised 

from Lord Wemyss's estates, and mainly supported by his 

subscription. 
5th, East Linton, formed April 7, 1860, of one company. 
6th, Dunglass, formed August 27, 1861, as one subdivision, the 

headquarters of which were transferred in 1873 to West 

Barns, near Dunbar. 
7th, North Berwick, formed November 25, 1869, of one company. 

The county of Haddington raised a general subscrip- 
tion to provide for the necessities of the battalion, and 
to this fund over £1000 was subscribed in the first two 
years of its existence. 

The first uniform of the Haddington corps was Elcho 
grey, without facings, and brown belts; but about 



194 Records of the Several Corps. 

1861, grey tunics with magenta cuffs and collars, with 
a black Austrian knot, grey trousers with a magenta 
stripe, and grey shakos with a magenta ball- tuft and 
badge of goat and thistle, were substituted for the 
former plainer uniform. In February 1864 the bat- 
talion adopted the rifle-green uniform with scarlet 
cuffs, collars, and piping, shakos with a black ball- 
tuft, and black belts of the 60th Rifles, and this con- 
tinued to be worn until 1878, when the cuffs were 
changed, according to regulation, to dark green with 
red piping, black lace, and a light green Austrian knot. 

In April 1880 the battalion was consolidated as 
the 1st Haddingtonshire Rifle Volunteers, with head- 
quarters at Haddington, and six companies lettered : 
A and B, Haddington (late 1st and 3rd Corps) ; C, 
Aberlady (late 4th Corps) ; D, East Linton (late 5th 
Corps) ; E, West Barns (late 6th Corps) ; and F, North 
Berwick (late 7th Corps). The " E " Company had only 
the strength of a half- company, so in January 1881 
a new "E" Company was formed at Tranent with a 
section at Prestonpans, the West Barns detachment 
being transferred to "D" Company at East Linton. 
In 1880, also, the shakos were replaced by helmets 
with a bronze Maltese cross as ornament, and these 
again were replaced in 1895 by Astrakhan fur busbies 
with red-and-black plumes, serges being also supplied 
to the battalion as undress in the same year. 

In April 1888, by Army Order 144, the title of 7th 
Volunteer Battalion The Royal Scots was conferred 
upon the battalion; but it was not till January 1904 
that the dress of the Royal Scots was assumed by it, 
and then only in the shape of the drab service doublet, 
worn with Hunting Stuart tartan trews, glengarries 
with red, white, and blue diced border, and brown 
leather equipment, the pipers wearing the white jacket, 



*]th Volunteer Battalion the Royal Scots. 195 

kilt, and shoulder plaid, and the drummers the scarlet 
doublet. 

During the war in South Africa 30 members of the 
battalion saw active service, of whom Lieut. T. F. M. 
Williamson and 18 non-commissioned officers and men 
served with the 1st, 8 men with the 2nd, and 3 men 
with the 3rd Volunteer Service Company of the Royal 
Scots, and one man with the Scottish Volunteer Cyclist 
Company. Private D. Lambert of the 1st Service 
Company died of disease, and Colour- Serjeant H. Gray 
was mentioned in Lord Roberts' despatch of September 
4, 1901. 

In April 1906 the section of " E " Company at 
Prestonpans had so greatly increased in numbers that 
it was formed into a separate company and lettered 
" C," the detachment (formerly " C " Company) at 
Aberlady being added as a section to "A" Company. 
The battalion thenceforward was organised in six com- 
panies, viz. : A, Haddington, with a section at Aber- 
lady ; B, Haddington ; C, Prestonpans ; D, East Linton, 
with a section at West Barns ; E, Tranent ; and F, 
North Berwick. There was a rifle-range close to the 
headquarters of each company. 

The commanding officers have been — 

Sir George Warrender, Bart., late Captain 92nd Foot and Cold- 
stream Guards, of Lochend and Bruntsfield ; Major, Septem- 
ber 19, 1860 ; Lieut-Colonel, December 22, 1868. 

Jas. W. H. Anderson, Lieut-Colonel, June 1, 1872. 

Alex. Scott, Lieut-Colonel, June 25, 1879. 

P. Dods (hon. col.), late Lieut-Colonel Bombay Staff Corps, Lieut- 
Colonel, May 31, 1882. 

W. Guild, Lieut-Colonel, September 5, 1894. 

John D. Watson, V.D. (hon. col.), Lieut-Colonel, May 1, 1898. 

Bobert Maxwell Main, V.D. (hon. col.), Lieut-Colonel, February 
20, 1904. 



196 Records of the Several Corps. 

8th VOLUNTEER BATTALION THE ROYAL 
SCOTS (LOTHIAN REGIMENT). 

Regimental District, No. 1. 

(Plate XIV.) 

"South Africa, 1901-02." | Order op Precedence, 216. 

Honorary Colonel — Rt. Hon. A. P. Earl op Rosebery, K.G., K.T., V.D., 
April 18, 1874. 

Headquarters — Linlithgow. 

The 1st Administrative Battalion Linlithgowshire 
Rifle Volunteers was formed on October 8, 1862, with 
headquarters at Linlithgow, and included the following 
corps, of one company each, raised in the county : — 

1st, Linlithgow, raised March 19, 1860. Uniform — dark grey 
without facings and with scarlet piping, dark grey cap 
with ball-tuft, and brown belts with silver ornaments. 

2nd, Bo'ness, raised March 19, 1860. Uniform — dark grey with 
scarlet facings, dark grey cap with ball -tuft, and brown 
belts with silver ornaments. Increased to one and a half 
companies in 1866. 

3rd, Bathgate, raised April 25, 1860. Uniform as for 2nd Corps. 
Headquarters changed to Torphichen, 1864. 

4th, Bathgate, raised August 9, 1862, mainly from the employes 
of Young's Chemical Works. Uniform as for 2nd Corps. 

On May 18, 1863, the battalion adopted a rifle uni- 
form of green with scarlet facings, and shakos, the same 
as that worn by the Haddington Battalion 1864 to 1878 
(see 7th Volunteer Battalion), with which, however, the 
brown belts continued to be worn. The shakos were 
replaced by rifle busbies, with black-and-red plumes 
and bugle in front, on April 25, 1872. 

On March 18, 1872, a 5th Corps, of one company, 
was formed at Uphall, and on April 17, 1878, a 6th, 
of one and a half companies, at West Calder. 



Stk Volunteer Battalion the Royal Scots. 197 

On March 24, 1876, the lower part of the busby 
plume was changed to light green, and the cuffs of 
the tunic became rifle green, ornamented only by a 
light green Austrian knot. 

In March 1880 the battalion was consolidated as 
the 1st Linlithgow Rifle Volunteers, headquarters at 
Linlithgow, with seven companies, lettered as follows : 
A, Linlithgow (late 1st Corps) ; B, Bo'ness (late 2nd) ; 
C, Torphichen (1881 Armadale) (late 3rd) ; D, Bathgate 
(late 4th); E, Uphall (late 5th); F, Addiewell (late 
half of the 6th) ; G, West Calder (late 6th). 

In 1888, by Army Order 144 of April, the corps 
became the 8 th Volunteer Battalion The Royal Scots, 
and in 1890 the Slade- Wallace equipment, with black 
belts, was adopted by the battalion. About the same 
time, the rifle serge with red piping on the collar and 
red crow's-foot on the cuff replaced the tunic, and the 
lower part of the busby plume was changed from green 
to red. 

During the war in South Africa, 36 members of the 
battalion, including Captain M. W. Henderson and 
Lieut. P. W. Steuart, saw active service, principally 
with the Volunteer Service Companies of the Royal 
Scots. Captain Henderson commanded the 1st, and 
Lieut. Steuart served with the 2nd Volunteer Service 
Company, and of the latter Lance- Corporal A. William- 
son and Private W. Earle died of disease. 

As did other corps, the 8th V.B. increased its 
establishment during the war, an " H " Company 
being formed at South Queensferry and " I M at Kirk- 
liston, the headquarters of " F " Company being at the 
same time (March 1900) transferred to Fauldhouse ; 
but in 1906 "H" Company was disbanded again, and 
"I" relettered "H." In January 1903 authority was 
given for a drab service dress of Scottish pattern with 



198 Records of the Several Corps. 

red piping on the trousers, and glengarries with the 
Royal Scots badge and diced border, to be worn as 
the sole uniform of the battalion, along with buff belts 
and black leggings. 

The distribution of the battalion in 1908 was — 



A Company, Linlithgow. 
B Company, Bo'ness. 
C Company, Armadale. 
D Company, Bathgate. 



E Company, Uphall. 
F Company, Fauldhouse. 
G Company, West Calder. 
H Company, Kirkliston. 



The battalion had seven separate rifle-ranges. 
The commanding officers have been — 

E. H. J. Stewart, Major, October 21, 1862. 

Andrew Gillon (hon. col.), Major, April 16, 1866 ; Lieut. -Colonel, 

April 28, 1870. 
O. F. Melville, Lieut.-Colonel, June 17, 1888. 
Thomas Hope of Bridge Castle, late Captain Bombay Staff Corps 

(hon. col.), Lieut-Colonel, June 9, 1897. 
Charles Chalmers, V.D., Lieut.-Colonel, July 11, 1903. 



9th VOLUNTEER BATTALION (HIGHLANDERS) 
THE ROYAL SCOTS (LOTHIAN REGIMENT). 

Regimental District, No. 1. 

(Plate XI.) 

"South Africa, 1901-02." | Order op Precedence, 80. 

Honorary Colonel — General Sir I. S. Hamilton, K.C.B., D.S.O., 
August 31, 1901. 

Headquarters — 7 Wemyss Place, Edinburgh. 

This battalion was raised in Edinburgh during the 
war in South Africa, its first commanding officer 
being gazetted on July 24, 1900. It was the out- 
come of the yearning of the Highlanders in Edinburgh 



gth Volunteer Battalion the Royal Scots. 199 

to see a kilted battalion of volunteers recruited from 
the capital. The Queen's Edinburgh Rifle Volunteer 
Brigade had formerly included seven kilted companies 
in its ranks, but in 1875 these had been ordered to be 
clothed in the dress of the remaining companies of the 
Brigade (q.v.), and had by the subsequent reorganisa- 
tion of the Brigade lost entirely their distinctively High- 
land character. The new battalion, which was formed 
at an establishment of eight companies, was at first 
designated " The Highland Battalion, Queen's Rifle 
Volunteer Brigade Royal Scots," but in 1901 it was 
constituted an independent unit as the 9th Volunteer 
Battalion of the Royal Scots. 

The uniform, as approved on July 24, 1900, con- 
sisted of a scarlet doublet with blue facings, Hunting 
Stuart tartan kilts and belted plaids, white horse- 
hair sporrans with two black tails, red - and - black 
diced hose, white spats, glengarries with red, white, 
and blue diced borders (feather bonnets with white 
hackle for officers), and white belts, service drab 
doublets being also authorised. 

Young as the battalion was, 43 of its members 
found an opportunity of serving in South Africa 
during the war, of whom 22 men served in the 
2nd and Lieutenant J. C. C. Broun and 2 men in 
the 3rd Volunteer Service Company of the Royal 
Scots, and 18 men in the Imperial Yeomanry. From 
1902 to 1906 the battalion was included in the 
31st Field Army Brigade, and trained accordingly 
for thirteen days annually during these years. It 
used the Hunter's Bog range for its musketry. 

The lieutenant-colonels commanding have been — 

James Ferguson, V.D. (hon. col), July 24, 1900. 
James Clark, December 17, 1904. 



200 Records of the Several Corps. 

8th (SCOTTISH) VOLUNTEER BATTALION, 
THE KING'S (LIVERPOOL REGIMENT). 

Regimental District, No. 8. 

(Plate XI.) 

"South Africa, 1902." 

Honorary Colonel — Right Hon. D. A. Lord Strathcona and 
Mount Royal, G.C.M.G., February 12, 1902. 

Headquarters — Fraser Street, Liverpool. 

The battalion was raised in Liverpool during the 
South African War, and was composed of Scotsmen 
resident in that city. Its first officers were gazetted 
on October 4, 1900, and the establishment of the 
battalion was fixed at eight companies. The uniform 
consisted of drab cloth doublets with scarlet collars, 
cuffs, and piping, and silver buttons, Forbes tartan 
kilts, grey sporrans with two black tails, red - and- 
black diced hose, drab spats, belted plaids, glengarries 
with red, white, and blue diced border and blackcock's 
tail, and brown belts and equipment. 

During the war the Liverpool Scottish contributed 
a section, consisting of Lieutenant J. Watson and 22 
men, to the 4th Volunteer Service Company of the 
Gordon Highlanders (see 1st V.B. Gordon High- 
landers). 

The lieutenant-colonels commanding have been — 

C. Forbes Bell, V.D. (hon. col.), October 10, 1900. 
Andrew L. Macfie, V.D. (hon. col.), July 26, 1902. 



ist Vol. Bat. the Royal Scots Fusiliers. 201 

1st VOLUNTEER BATTALION THE ROYAL 

SCOTS FUSILIERS. 

Regimental District, No. 21. 

(Plate XV.) 

"South Africa, 1900-02." | Order op Precedekce, 192. 

Honorary Colonel — R. M. McKerrell, V.D. (hon. col.), April 23, 1904. 

Headquarters — Kilmarnock. 

On August 27, 1860, the 1st Administrative Battalion 
Ayrshire Rifle Volunteers was formed out of the 1st 
to 9th Corps, and to it were added in 1860 the 10th 
and 11th, in 1861 the 12th and 13th, and in 1862 
the 14th Corps. The battalion having become incon- 
veniently large, in March 1873 it was split up into 
two — the South Ayrshire corps forming the 1st Ad- 
ministrative Battalion, with headquarters at Ayr ; 
the North Ayrshire the 2nd, with headquarters at 
Kilmarnock. 

The corps comprising the 2nd Battalion were the 

1st, Kilmarnock, formed January 14, 1860, as one company. 
Uniform — medium grey edged with black braid, black 
piping on trousers, and black patent leather belts. 

2nd, Irvine, formed December 27, 1859, as one company. Uni- 
form — medium grey with green facings and black braid, 
brown belts, bugle and thistle badge on cap, and arms of 
Scotland on the pouch-belt. 

4th, Largs, formed February 27, 1860, as one company. 

6th, Beith, formed February 15, 1860, as one company. 

7th, Saltcoats, formed February 28, 1860, as one company, of 
which a detachment was at Stevenston. 

9th, Kilmarnock, formed May 19, 1860, as one company. Uni- 
form — medium grey with light blue facings. 

11th, Dairy, formed December 4, 1860, as one company. 



/ 



202 Records of the Several Corps. 

The uniforms of the corps not mentioned above were 
grey of various shades, and it was not until 1867 that 
the 1st Administrative Battalion, as then existing, was 
clothed uniformly in scarlet tunics with blue facings 
and trousers, blue shakos with dark green ball -tuft, 
white belts, and black leggings. 

In the same year in which the 2nd Battalion was 
constituted, a new corps, the 15th, was raised at 
Darvel as one company on December 24, 1873, and 
on October 10, 1874, another one-company corps, the 
17th, was formed at Galston, both being added to 
the battalion. In 1875, however, the 9th Corps 
(Kilmarnock) was amalgamated with the 1st, thus 
leaving the battalion eight companies strong. 

In June 1880 the battalion was consolidated as the 
1st Ayrshire Rifle Volunteers, with headquarters at 
Kilmarnock, and eight companies lettered — A, Kil- 
marnock (late 1st Corps) ; B, Irvine (late 3rd) ; C, 
Largs (late 4th); D, Beith (late 6th); E, Saltcoats 
(late 7th) ; F, Dairy (late 1 1th) ; G, Darvel (late 15th) ; 
and H, Galston (late 17th). At the same time blue 
helmets with silver ornaments replaced the shakos, 
and a black Austrian knot was added to the cuffs 
of the tunics. 

By General Order 181, of December 1887, the bat- 
talion was designated the 1st Volunteer Battalion 
Royal Scots Fusiliers, and on the following 20th April 
it was authorised to adopt the uniform of that regi- 
ment, with volunteer distinctions, but without the 
raccoon skin cap, the diced glengarry remaining the 
sole head - dress. Sashes were worn by Serjeants 
only. 

During the war in South Africa the battalion was 
represented by 94 of all ranks, of whom Captain 
C. G. Dickie, Lieutenant J. MacL. Frew, and 56 







III > 



ist Vol. Bat. the Royal Scots Fusiliers. 203 

other ranks served with the 1st Service Company, and 
Lieutenant J. Alexander and 19 men with the 2nd 
Service Section (1902) of the Royal Scots Fusiliers, 
and Captain J. M. Hunter served with the Volunteer 
Cyclist Company. Of the 1st Service Company, Private 
Agnew was wounded, and Corporal T. Winton and 
Lance- Corporal J. Risk died of disease. 

At home the battalion was increased in strength, 
for in 1900 two new companies, J and K, of which 
one was a cyclist company, were raised in Kilmarnock, 
and at the same time the headquarters of C Company 
were removed from Largs to Stewarton, and of H from 
Galston to Kilmarnock. The headquarters of the ten 
companies were, therefore, thenceforward — 



A, H, J, K, Kilmarnock. 


E, Saltcoats 


B, Irvine. 


F, Dairy. 


C, Stewarton. 


G, Darvel. 


D, Beith. 





The headquarters range of the battalion at Irvine, 
up to 1000 yards, belonged to the Ayrshire Rifle 
Association, and D, E, F, and G Companies had their 
own separate ranges near their headquarters. The 
battalion had a good musketry record, and in 1888 
it stood first in order of merit as regards musketry 
out of 212 rifle corps included in the War Office 
returns. 

The lieutenant-colonels commanding since 1873 have 
been — 

R B. Eobertson-Glasgow, March 26, 1873. 
John Dickie, V.D. (hon. col.), September 16, 1874. 
E. M. McKerrell, V.D. (hon. col.), May 10, 1895. 
J. Gow, June 11, 1904. 



204 Records of the Several Corps. 

2nd VOLUNTEER BATTALION THE ROYAL 
SCOTS FUSILIERS. 

Regimental District, No. 21. 

(Plate XV.) 

" South Africa, 1900-01." | Order op Precedence, 193. 

Honorary Colonel — R. P. Robertson-Glasgow (hon. col.), 
December 20, 1906. 



The early history of this battalion, up to 1873, is 
identical with that of the 1st Volunteer Battalion (q.v.) 
The original corps, which at the split of March 
1873 remained constituting the 1st Administrative 
Battalion Ayrshire Rifle Volunteers, were the 

3rd Ayr, formed January 19, 1860, as one company. Uniform — 
medium grey, with scarlet facings, black braid, and black 
patent-leather belts. 

5th Maybole, formed February 27, 1860, as one company. 

8th Colmonell, formed May 25, 1860, as one company. 

10th Girvan, formed October 22, 1860, as one company. 

12th Cumnock, formed January 14, 1861, as one company. 

13th Sorn, formed March 18, 1861, as one company. 

14th Ayr, formed April 14, 1862, as one subdivision, increased to 
a full company in 1871. 

At the end of 1873 there was added to the 
battalion the 16th Corps, formed at Newmilns as 
one company on December 24, 1873. 

The 8th Corps was disbanded in 1875, and in 
April 1880 the battalion was consolidated as the 3rd 
(numbered 2nd in June) Ayrshire Rifle Volunteers, 
headquarters at Ayr, with seven companies lettered 
A and B, Ayr (late 3rd and 14th Corps); C, Maybole 
(late 5th); D, Girvan (late 10th); E, Cumnock (late 
12th); F, Sorn (late 13th); and G, Newmilns (late 



2nd Vol. Bat. the Royal Scots Fusiliers. 205 

16th). In this year also the uniform, which had 
hitherto been identical with that of the 2nd Admin- 
istrative Battalion, was in so far changed that for 
the shako the glengarry with diced border was sub- 
stituted, and was ever since the sole head-dress of 
the battalion. A black Austrian knot was also added 
to the cuff of the tunic. 

In 1883 the headquarters of F Company were moved 
from Sorn to Catrine, in the same parish, and a new 
(H) company was raised at Troon. 

In 1887 (General Order 181 of December) the 
battalion assumed the designation of 2nd Volunteer 
Battalion, The Royal Scots Fusiliers, but it was 
only on January 13, 1898, that it was authorised to 
be clothed in the doublet and trews of the regiment, 
the raccoon skin cap not being worn, and Serjeants 
only wearing sashes. 

A large number of men volunteered for the war 
in South Africa, and 2 officers and 62 men actually 
served, of whom Lieutenant G. D. Porteous and 54 
other ranks belonged to the 1st Service Company 
and 4 men to the 2nd Service Section of the Royal 
Scots Fusiliers. Lieutenant R. M. M. Buntine was 
also attached to the line battalion. Of the 1st 
Service Company, Lance- Corporal J. M'Chesney and 
Privates B. Gilmore and J. M'Lean died of disease. 

In 1900 I (Cyclist) Company was formed at Ayr, 
bringing the battalion up to an establishment of nine 
companies, viz. : — 



A, B, and I, Ayr. 

C, Maybole. 

D, Girvan. 

E, Cumnock. 



F, Catrine. 

G, Newmilns. 
H, Troon. 



From 1902 to 1906 the battalion was detailed to 
the 33rd Field Army Brigade, and trained annually 
in camp for thirteen days. A, B, H, and I Companies 



206 Records of the Several Corps. 

used the range of the Ayrshire Rifle Association at 
Irvine, the other five having each their own range. 

The lieutenant-colonels commanding the former 1st 
Administrative Battalion, or this corps, have been — 

Archibald, Marquis of Ailsa, K.T., August 27, 1860. 
Jas. G. Hay Boyd, late 20th Foot, January 8, 1862. 
Eight Hon. Sir J. Fergusson, Bart, of Kilkerran, late Lieutenant 

and Captain Grenadier Guards, December 10, 1879. 
David D. Whigham, V.D. (hon. col.), August 21, 1890. 
Eobert P. Robertson-Glasgow of Montgreenan, late Lieutenant 

Durham L.I., March 29, 1896. 
James E. Shaw, June 11, 1904, to February 10, 1908. 



1st ROXBURGH AND SELKIRK (THE BORDER) 
VOLUNTEER RIFLE CORPS. 

Regimental District, No. 25. 

(Plate XVI.) 

" South Africa, 1900-02." | Order op Precedence, 147. 

Honorary Colonel — Sir R. J. Waldie-Gripfith, Bart. (hon. col.), 
September 22, 1906. 

Headquarters — Melrose. 

The 1st Administrative Battalion, Roxburghshire 
Rifle Volunteers, was formed on November 9, 1861, 
with headquarters at Melrose, and including the 1st, 
2nd, 3rd, 4th, and 5th Roxburgh Rifle Volunteer 
Corps. To it were added in 1862 the 1st and 2nd 
Selkirk Rifle Volunteer Corps. The iu dividual details 
of the origin of these corps are as follows : — 

1st Roxburgh E.V.C., Jedburgh. The corps, of one company, 
with a detachment at Denholm, which in 1863 was trans- 
ferred to the 4th Corps when the latter raised a second 



ist Roxburgh and Selkirk Vol. Rifle Corps. 207 

company, was first sworn in on September 15, 1859, its 
officers being gazetted on November 17. The uniform was 
slate-grey tunics, trousers, and caps, the tunics hooked in 
front (buttoned for officers), and with scarlet collars and 
black piping and Austrian knot, the trousers and caps with 
black piping, and the latter with a crown and bugle orna- 
ment. Shakos with a black ball -tuft were adopted in 
1862. The belts were brown leather, as for all corps of 
this battalion, the men wearing waist-belts only, officers 
and Serjeants pouch-belts with chain and whistle. 

2nd Eoxburgh E.V.C., Kelso. The first public meeting to form 
this corps was held on May 27, 1859, but its services were 
not accepted till March 1860, the men being sworn in on 
the 26th, and the officers gazetted on the 29th of that 
month. The uniform (see Plate XVI.) was as for the 1st 
Corps, but the tunics were buttoned for all ranks, the 
trousers had broad black stripes, and the cap badge was 
a St Andrew on a red ground. The corps was of the 
strength of one company. 

3rd Eoxburgh E.V.C., Melrose. Eaised on June 15, 1860, and 
men sworn in on July 15, 1860. Strength, one company. 
Uniform as for 2nd Corps. 

4th Eoxburgh E.V.C., Hawick. The first public meeting to form 
this corps, one company strong, was held on December 8, 
1859. Its services were offered on March 6, and accepted 
on June 11, 1860, the officers being gazetted, along with 
those of the 3rd Corps, on June 15, 1860. Members paid 
for their uniform and equipment, and gave an annual 
subscription of 10s. at first. The first uniform (see Plate 
XVI.) was slate-grey, with red collars and black braid on 
the tunic, with four rows on the breast, and black Austrian 
knot, blue Kilmarnock bonnets, and brown waist-belts. 
This was shortly afterwards changed to the same uniform 
as the 2nd Corps, but with grey shako with black band, 
and star badge in front and plume of cock's feathers. On 
December 1, 1863, the corps was increased to two com- 
panies, the detachment at Denholm, hitherto belonging to 
the 1st Corps, being incorporated in it. 

5th Eoxburgh E.V.C., Hawick, raised as one company on January 
15, 1861, and disbanded in 1867. 



208 Records of the Several Corps. 

1st Selkirk E.V.C., Galashiels. This corps, of one company, 
known as the "Gala Forest Rifles," was the outcome of 
a public meeting held on November 22, 1859. The officers 
were gazetted on March 27, 1860, and the corps was 
sworn in on April 9, 1860, there being then 85 effective 
and 38 honorary members. The cost of the uniform 
and equipment was £3, 10s. 7d., to which members were 
required to contribute a minimum of 30s., the balance being 
paid out of corps funds, which were formed by annual sub- 
scriptions of 10s. for each effective, and at least 21s. for 
each honorary member, and by public subscriptions. In 
1861 the annual subscriptions for effective members were 
abolished, and the payment for uniform reduced to 15s. 
The uniform (see Plate XVI.) was slate-grey tunics, trousers, 
and caps, the tunics with scarlet collars and Austrian knots, 
bound all round with black braid, and with four rows of 
the same on the breast, the trousers with scarlet piping 
and two stripes of black braid, and the caps with a black 
band and scarlet piping. The shoulder- and waist-belts 
were of brown leather. The corps was increased to two 
companies on December 1, 1869. 

2nd Selkirk R.V.C., Selkirk, known as the " Ettrick Forest Rifles," 
was raised on June 15, 1860, as one company, on the same 
conditions and with the same uniform as the 1st Selkirk. 
It was increased to two companies on November 1, 1879. 

The title of " The Border Rifles " was conferred 
upon the battalion in 1868. 

In 1863 the uniforms of all the corps were assim- 
ilated, the slate-grey colour being retained for tunics, 
trousers, and shakos. The tunics had scarlet collars 
with black braid, black piping, and black ring tracing 
on the cuff, the trousers black piping, and the shakos 
three rows of black braid, black and red ball-tuft, and 
bugle badge. Belts were of brown leather, and haver- 
sacks and greatcoats formed part of the equipment of 
the battalion. Blue Kilmarnock bonnets were worn in 
undress till 1885, when they were replaced by glen- 




2 a X £ U- 

: > 



ist Roxburgh and Selkirk Vol. Rifle Corps. 209 

garries. In 1877 the red collar on the tunic was 
abolished, and in 1879 grey helmets, with a bronze 
Maltese cross on a black ground, were introduced. 

Headquarters of the battalion were transferred on 
June 30, 1878, from Melrose to Newtown St Boswells, 
and on April 7, 1880, under War Office authority 
of March 24, the battalion was consolidated under 
the title of 1st Roxburgh and Selkirk (The Border) 
R.V.C., with 9 companies, lettered as follows : — 

A, Jedburgh (late 1st E.E.V.), B, Kelso (late 2nd E.E.V.), 
C, Melrose (late 3rd E.E.V.), D and E, Hawick (late 4th E.E.V.), 
F and G-, Galashiels (late 1st S.E.V.), H and I, Selkirk (late 
2nd S.E.V.) 

In 1887 (General Order 61 of May) the battalion 
was transferred from the 21st (Royal Scots Fusiliers) 
to the 25th (King's Own Scottish Borderers) Regi- 
mental District, and in the same year the head- 
quarters of H Company were removed from Selkirk 
to Galashiels. On April 1, 1892, a tenth (K) Com- 
pany was raised at Hawick. 

During the South African war, the battalion con- 
tributed its contingent to all the volunteer service com- 
panies raised for the King's Own Scottish Borderers : 
Major A. Haddon, Lieutenant M. Craig-Brown, and 34 
men serving in the 1st, Lieutenant J. Herbertson and 
30 men in the 2nd, and 18 men in the 3rd Service Com- 
pany. Eleven men served in the Scottish Volunteer 
Cyclist Company, and one man as a Royal Engineer 
telegraphist ; making a total of 97 members of the 
battalion who served in the war. In 1901 the 
establishment of the battalion was raised to 12 com- 
panies, but in 1902 these new companies were 
again reduced, the headquarters were transferred to 
Melrose, and the cyclists of the whole battalion were 
o 



210 Records of the Several Corps. 

formed into one company (L) with headquarters at 
Newcastleton. In this year the helmets were replaced 
by a grey felt hat with black and white feathers, turned 
up on the left side with a badge of the Douglas heart 
and crown and the motto, "Doe or die." In 1902 
the battalion was included in the 32nd Field Army 
Brigade, and trained with it for thirteen days 
annually till 1906. 

The latter-day distribution of the companies of the 
battalion was — 



A, Jedburgh. 

B, Kelso. 

C, Melrose. 

D, E, and K, Hawick. 



F, G, and H, Galashiels. 

I, Selkirk. 

L (Cyclist) Newcastleton. 



It possessed eight separate rifle-ranges near the 
headquarters of companies. 

The lieutenant- colonels commanding have been : — 

H. F. H. S. Lord Polwarth, November 9, 1861. 

Sir George H. S. Douglas, Bart., Spring wood Park, Kelso, late 

Captain 34th Foot (hon. col.), October 26, 1868. 
Jas. Paton, of Crailing, late Major 4th Foot (hon. col.), February 

6, 1886. 
Wm. S. Elliott, of Teviot Lodge, Hawick (hon. col.), September 

5, 1888. 
Sir Richard J. Waldie-Grimth, Bart, of Hendersyde Park, Kelso 

(hon. col.), January 7, 1891. 
Andrew Haddon, V.D. (hon. captain in army), December 27, 1900, 

to February 26, 1908. 



2,nd Volunteer Battalion the K.O.S.B. 211 

2nd (BERWICKSHIRE) VOLUNTEER 

BATTALION, THE KING'S OWN SCOTTISH 

BORDERERS. 

Regimental District, No. 25. 

(Plate XVII.) 

"South Africa, 1900-02." | Order op Precedence, 187. 

Honorary Colonel — A. M. Brown, late Captain R. A. (hon. col.), May 14, 1887. 

Headquarters — Duns. 

On November 19, 1863, the 1st Administrative 
Battalion, Berwickshire Rifle Volunteers, was formed, 
with headquarters at Duns, from the following 
corps : — 

1st Duns, formed December 16, 1859, as one company. Uniform 
— dark grey tunic, trousers, and cap with black braiding, and 
black patent-leather belts. 

2nd Coldstream, formed March 30, 1860, as one company. 
Uniform — medium grey tunic, with green cuffs and collar 
and black Austrian knot (for the men) and piping, medium 
grey trousers with green stripe, green cap with grey band 
and green ball-tuft, and brown waist-belts (pouch-belt also 
for officers and sergeants). 

3rd Aytoun, formed May 11, 1860, as one subdivision ; increased 
to one company, August 20, 1860. Uniform the same as 
1st Corps, but with red piping on the trousers. 

4th, Greenlaw, formed February 24, 1860, as one company. 
Uniform the same as the 2nd Corps. Badge, the March- 
mont crest (glaive in hand) and motto, " True to death." 

5th Lauderdale, formed April 10, 1860, as one subdivision ; in- 
creased to one company, March 16, 1864. Uniform the 
same as the 2nd Corps, but all ranks had pouch-belts. 

6th Earlston, formed June 5, 1863, as one company. 

7th Chirnside, formed July 7, 1863, as one subdivision, increased 
to one company, August 5, 1868. 



2 1 2 Records of the Several Corps. 

The 6th and 7th Corps adopted from the beginning 
the following uniform, which had been decided upon 
for the whole battalion at a meeting held on May 19, 
1863 : Scarlet tunics with scarlet cuffs and collar, 
black braid all round, and Austrian knot, and for 
officers four " fern leaves " in black embroidery on the 
breast (abolished in 1865), dark grey (Oxford mixture) 
trousers with \\ in. scarlet stripes, dark grey shakos 
with red band, black piping, the Royal Arms in front, 
and a light green ostrich-feather plume (cock's feathers 
for officers), and brown waist- and pouch -belts. In 
1873 white haversacks were issued, and on April 1, 
1875, the uniform was modernised, the black braid on 
the tunic being replaced by black piping, silver lace 
and buttons for officers and sergeants introduced, the 
trouser stripe replaced by piping, and the old shako 
replaced by a plain grey one, with green ball -tuft 
and bugle badge. Blue helmets with silver star and 
crown badge replaced the shakos in February 1880. 

The headquarters of the battalion were removed 
from Duns to Coldstream on November 1, 1876, and 
in April 1880 the battalion was consolidated as the 
1st Berwickshire Rifle Volunteers, with seven com- 
panies lettered from A to G in the seniority of corps. 
On April 7, 1884, the battalion adopted the uniform 
of the Royal Scots (to which it was then affiliated), 
the helmet and brown belts continuing to be worn with 
it. In 1885 headquarters were moved back to Duns, 
and in 1887 (General Order 61 of May) the battalion 
was transferred from the Royal Scots Regimental 
District to that of the King's Own Scottish Borderers, 
and assumed the title of 2nd Volunteer Battalion of 
that regiment (General Order 181 of December), serge 
doublets, with the new regimental badges, replacing 



2.nd Volunteer Battalion the K.O.S.B. 213 

at the same time those of cloth with blue cuffs hitherto 
worn. At that time the Royal Scots and the Scot- 
tish Borderers wore the same tartan. On April 1, 
1891, a new company "H" was raised at Duns, bring- 
ing the establishment of the battalion up to eight 
companies. 

During the South African war the battalion fur- 
nished its contingent to all the volunteer service com- 
panies of the King's Own Scottish Borderers, 80 
members in all serving in South Africa. Of these, 
Lieutenant R Stoddart and 34 men served with the 
1st, Lieutenant R. C. Christie-Thomson and 27 men 
with the 2nd, and Captain J. E. Stevenson and 2 men 
with the 3rd Volunteer Service Company, 2nd Lieu- 
tenant D. H. Stewart and 11 men in the Imperial 
Yeomanry, 1 man in the Post Office Corps, and 2nd 
Lieutenant W. Home with the 4th (Militia) Battalion 
Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders. At home a 
cyclist section was formed, and a new company, 
" I," at Lady kirk raised, under War Office authority of 
May 29, 1900; but in 1905 "H" company was dis- 
banded and "I" was re-lettered "H." In 1900 also 
the helmet was replaced by the glengarry with diced 
border as the sole head-dress, and the tartan of the 
trews was changed to Leslie. Sashes were permitted 
to be worn by Serjeants. 

The distribution of the battalion since 1905 was — 



Headquarters and A Company, 

Duns. 
B Company, Coldstream. 
C Company, Ayton, detachment at 

Coldingham. 
D Company, Greenlaw, detachment 

at Gordon. 



E Company, Lauder, detachment at 

Stow. 
F Company, Earlston. 
G Company, Chirnside, detachment 

at Horncliffe. 
H Company, Ladykirk, detachment 

at Swinton. 



There were 10 ranges belonging to the battalion. 



214 Records of the Several Corps. 

The lieutenant-colonels commanding have been — 

Hon. A. F. Cathcart, Brevet-Lieutenant-Colonel, December 19, 

1863. 
Sir J. Marjoribanks, Bart, December 20, 1866. 
Hon. Eobert Baillie-Hamilton, late Major 44th Foot, February 9, 

1881. 
Alex. M. Brown, late Captain (R.A), (hon. col.) January 18, 1882. 
Charles Hope (late Captain King's Royal Rifle Corps), May 14, 

1887, to March 30, 1908. 



3rd (DUMFRIES) VOLUNTEER BATTALION, 
THE KING'S OWN SCOTTISH BORDERERS. 

Regimental District, No. 25. 

(Plate XVIII.) 

" South Africa, 1900-02." | Order of Precedence, 194. 

Headquarters — Dumfries. 

On January 4, 1862, the 1st Administrative Bat- 
talion, Dumfriesshire Rifle Volunteers, was formed, with 
headquarters at Dumfries, and to it were attached the 
following corps, all of one company each : — 

1st, Dumfries, formed February 25, ( increased to two 

1860, 1 companies, 1872. 

2nd, Thornhill, „ February 28, 1860. 

3rd, Sanquhar, ., Feburary 28, 1860. 

4th, Penpont, » February 29, 1860. 

5th, Annan, n June 14, 1860. 

6th, Moffat, ., June 20, 1860. 

7th, Langholm, .. June 1, 1860. 

8th, Lockerbie, .. June 20, 1860. 

9th, Lochmaben, i. February 18, 1861. 



2>rd Volunteer Battalion the K.O.S.B. 215 

The original uniform of all corps was Elcho grey 
tunic and trousers, with scarlet collars, cuffs, piping, and 
Austrian knot, Elcho grey shakos with scarlet band 
and ball-tuft, with a bugle and crown badge and " 60 " 
(the county precedence number) in the centre of the 
bugle, and brown waist-belts. Some companies had at 
first blue facings, but these were changed to scarlet in 
1862. The undress cap was a grey Balmoral bonnet, 
with blue, grey, and red diced border ; but this was 
replaced in 1864 by a round grey forage cap with 
scarlet band. In 1876 this uniform was replaced by 
scarlet tunics with yellow facings and Austrian knot, 
blue trousers with scarlet piping, black busbies with 
yellow and black plume, with black lace and lines for 
officers, and white belts, — at first patent-leather, and 
afterwards of buff leather pipe-clayed. 

In April 1880 the battalion was consolidated as the 
1st Dumfriesshire Rifle Volunteers, with headquarters 
at Dumfries, and 10 companies, lettered — 



A and B,$Dumfries (late 1st Corps). 

C, Thornhill (late 2nd). 

D, Sanquhar (late 3rd). 

E, Penpont (late 4th). 

F, Annan (late 5th). 



G, Moffat (late 6th). 
H, Langholm (late 7th). 
I, Lockerbie (late 8th). 
K, Lochmaben (late 9th). 



On March 23, 1885, the Penpont Company became a 
section of "C," and a new " E" Company was formed 
at Ecclefechan ; and on December 7, 1888, the head- 
quarters of " K " Company were removed from Loch- 
maben to Canonbie. 

The battalion was removed, by General Order 61 of 
May 1887, from the 21st (Royal Scots Fusiliers) to the 
25th (King's Own Scottish Borderers) Regimental Dis- 
trict, and it assumed the title of 3rd Volunteer Bat- 
talion of the latter regiment by General Order 181 of 
December 1, 1887, consequent upon which, on February 



216 Records of the Several Corps. 

29, 1888, the uniform of the King's Own Scottish Bord- 
erers was adopted, serge undress doublets (with scarlet 
cuffs) being worn. The helmet was introduced with 
this uniform, and was worn until 1900, when the glen- 
garry was adopted as the sole head-dress, and the trews 
were changed to Leslie tartan. Sashes were worn by 
Serjeants only. 

During the war 1 officer and 72 men were con- 
tributed by the battalion to the volunteer service 
companies of the King's Own Scottish Borderers, — 
Lieutenant B. J. Cunningham and 32 men to the 
1st, 24 men to the 2nd, and 16 men to the 3rd : in 
addition, 4 men joined the B.A.M.C, 3 the Scottish 
Volunteer Cyclist Company, 1 the Post Office Corps, 3 
Colonial Corps, and 2 the Imperial Yeomanry, — making 
in all 86 members of the 3rd Volunteer Battalion who 
served in South Africa. 

The distribution of the battalion was latterly as 
follows : — 



A and B Companies, Dumfries. 

C Company, Thornhill ; detachment 

at Penpont. 
D Company, Sanquhar ; detachment 

at Kirkconnel. 
E Company, Ecclefechan. 



F Company, Annan. 

G Company, Moffat ; detachment at 

Wanlockhead. 
H Company, Langholm. 
I Company, Lockerbie. 
K Company, Canonbie. 



The headquarters at Dumfries included a large drill- 
hall, the Annan Company had similar arrangements, and 
the battalion in all possessed 12 rifle-ranges. 

The lieutenant-colonels commanding have been — 

Lord H. J. M. Douglas-Scott, February 8, 1862. 
J. S. D. Marquis of Queensberry, September 18, 1869. 
John G. Clark, April 25, 1871. 
Wm. E. Malcolm, August 15, 1881. 

Eobt. F. Dudgeon, V.D., late Captain K. Scots Fusiliers (hon. col.), 
May 22, 1886. 



The Galloway Volunteer Rifle Corps. 217 



THE GALLOWAY VOLUNTEER RIFLE CORPS. 

(Kirkcudbright and Wigtown.) 

Regimental District, No. 25. 

(Plate XIX.) 

"South Africa, 1900-02." | Order of Precedence, 202. 

Honorary Colonel— J. M. Kennedy, M.V.O., V.D.(hon. col.), October 13, 1906. 

Headquarters — Maxwelltown. 

The Galloway Administrative Battalion of Rifle Vol- 
unteers was formed on June 30, 1860, with head- 
quarters at Newton - Stewart, and to it, then or on 
their subsequent date of formation, were attached the 
following corps : — 

1st Kirkcudbright R V., Kirkcudbright, formed March 2, 1860, as 

one company. Uniform — steel grey, with green facings. 
2nd Kirkcudbright E.V., Castle - Douglas, formed March 2, 

1860, as one company. 
3rd Kirkcudbright E.V., New Galloway, formed March 28, 1860, 

as one company. 
4th Kirkcudbright E.V., Gatehouse, formed May 19, 1860, as a 

subdivision, disbanded in 1866. 
5th Kirkcudbright E.V., Maxwelltown, formed June 1, 1860, as 

one company, increased to one and a-half companies in 

1865 and to two companies in 1880. 
6th Kirkcudbright E.V., Dalbeattie, formed June 23, 1869, as one 

company. 
1st "Wigtown E.V., Wigtown, formed February 24, 1860, as a 

subdivision, incorporated as a section in the 3rd Corps 

in 1874. 
2nd Wigtown E.V., Stranraer, formed March 16, 1860, as one 

company. 
3rd Wigtown E.V., Newton-Stewart, formed March 21, 1860, as 

one company. 



218 Records of the Several Corps. 



4th Wigtown R.V., Whithorn, formed April 11, 1860, as a sub- 
division, disbanded in 1874. 

5th Wigtown E.V., Drumore, formed November 23, 1860, as a 
subdivision, disbanded in 1866. 

The original uniforms of the corps were steel or dark 
grey, and varied greatly, not only between corps, but 
also in the corps from year to year, one company 
appearing one year with plumes of cock's feathers 
and the next with shakos of Highland Light Infantry 
pattern, &c. 

Uniformity was first attained on December 5, 1873, 
when the whole battalion was clothed in dark grey 
tunics and trousers, with scarlet cuffs, collars, piping, 
and Austrian knot (latter with black tracing all round), 
dark grey shakos with black ball-tuft, and black belts. 

On May 9, 1883, the shako was replaced by a plain 
blue glengarry, but otherwise the 1873 uniform (which 
remained till 1908 the regulation for officers in full dress) 
was worn down to May 19, 1905, when drab service 
dress with scarlet piping on the trousers, drab putties, 
blue glengarry with regimental badge and red, white, 
and blue diced border, and brown leather equipment 
with bandolier, became the sole dress of the battalion. 

In June 1880 the battalion was consolidated under 
the title of the Galloway Rifle Volunteer Corps, with 
headquarters at Newton-Stewart, and 8 companies, 
lettered as follows : — 



A, Kirkcudbright (late 1st K.R.V.) 

B, Castle-Douglas (late 2nd K.R. V.) 

C, Stranraer (late 2nd W.R.V.) 

D, Newton-Stewart, detachments at 

Wigtown and Creetown (late 
3rd and 1st W.R.V.) 



E, New Galloway (late 3rd K.R.V.) 
F and G, Maxwelltown (late 5th 

K.R.V.) 
H, Dalbeattie (late 6th K.R.V.) 



On March 21, 1885, headquarters were transferred to 
Castle-Douglas, and in 1899, by Army Order 65, the 
battalion was removed from the 21st (Royal Scots 



The Galloway Volunteer Rifle Corps. 219 

Fusiliers) to the 25th (King's Own Scottish Borderers) 
Regimental District. 

During the war 95 members of the battalion served 
in South Africa. Of these, 34 non-commissioned officers 
and men served with the 1st, Captain J. Blacklock and 
26 men with the 2nd, and 20 men with the 3rd Volun- 
teer Service Company of the King's Own Scottish Bord- 
erers. Of the 2nd company, Colour-Serjeant R. Grier- 
son, Lance- Corporal J. M'Millan, and Private B. Dixon 
of the Galloway Rifles were mentioned for gallantry at 
the capture of Commandant Wolmarans and 30 Boers 
near Damhoek on August 10, 1901 (in Lord Kitchener's 
despatch of October 8, 1901), and the last two were 
specially promoted to corporal. In addition Lieutenant 
T. Shortridge and 2 men served in the Scottish Cyclist 
Company, Lieutenant E. S. Forde and one other as 
civil surgeons, 5 men served in the Imperial Yeomanry, 
3 in Fincastle's Horse, and 1 in the South African 
Constabulary. 

On September 6, 1904, battalion headquarters were 
removed from Castle - Douglas to Maxwelltown. The 
battalion possessed 14 separate rifle-ranges, one of 
which, at Conhuith, for F and G companies, was held 
conjointly with the 3rd Volunteer Battalion K.O.S.B. 

The lieutenant- colonels commanding have been — 

Wm. K Lawrie, June 30, 1860. 

John G-. Maitland, January 6, 1872. 

John M. Kennedy, M.V.O., V.D. (hon. col.), July 30, 1889. 

John Lennox, V.I), (hon. col.), September 8, 1906. 



220 Records of the Several Corps. 

1st LANARKSHIRE VOLUNTEER RIFLE 
CORPS. 

Regimental District, No. 26. 

(Plate XX.) 

"South Africa, 1900-02." | Order of Precedence, 111. 

Honorary Colonel — James A. Reid, V.D. (hon. col.), March 28, 1903. 

Headquarters — 261 West Princes Street, Glasgow. 

The origin of the 1st Lanarkshire Rifle Volunteer Corps, 
or Glasgow 1st Western, has already been indicated in 
Part L, on page 16. The first meeting of this corps 
for drill was held in the playground of the Glasgow 
Academy, Elmbank Street, July 27, 1859, and, after 
drill, the corps assembled in a class-room, under the 
presidency of Mr (afterwards Lieutenant) Charles Hut- 
chison Smith, 1 and decided that Sir Archibald Islay 
Campbell, Bart, of Garscube, should be recommended 
to the Lord-Lieutenant for appointment as captain, Mr 
(afterwards Ensign) Ruthven Campbell Todd 2 being 
appointed treasurer. As already narrated, the services 
of this company were offered on August 5, 1859, and 
accepted on September 24, and on October 1, 1859, the 
first officers were gazetted. 

On January 11, 1860, a meeting was held by the 
"1st Western " Corps, as a result of which the corps 
communicated with other companies with a view to 
forming a regiment, and, in consequence, on February 
28, 1860, the 1st, 2nd, 9th, 11th, 15th, 17th, 18th, 
33rd, 39th, 50th, and 53rd Corps of Lanarkshire Rifle 
Volunteers were formed into the "1st Lanarkshire Rifle 
Volunteer Corps," which was shown for the first time, 
eleven companies strong, in the Army List for April 

1 Afterwards Major 1st Lanark R.V. Retired 1872. Died July 13, 1904. 

2 Afterwards Lieut. -Colonel Commandant, and then Honorary Colonel 1st 
Lanark R.V. Resigned 1883. Died August 9, 1887. 




Ill 



15/ Lanarkshire Volunteer Rifle Corps. 221 

1860, Sir Archibald Islay Campbell, the former captain 
of the 1st Western, having been gazetted lieutenant- 
colonel to command from March 6, 1860 ('Gazette/ 
March 9, 1860). During March and April 1860 the 
63rd, 72nd, 76th, 77th, and 79th Corps of Lanarkshire 
Rifle Volunteers were added to it, bringing the total 
strength up to sixteen companies, and on June 1, 1860, 
the regiment was divided into two battalions. 

The dates of acceptance of services and of first com- 
missioning of officers of all corps are given in Appendix 
C. Each consisted originally of one company only, and 
the following notes show the first composition and uni- 
form of the separate corps : — 

1st Corps (1st Western), already mentioned. Uniform — dark 
grey tunics, trousers, and caps, first with five rows of black braid 
on the breast, and black patent leather waist- and pouch-belts. 
Badge, a Scottish lion on a shield. Motto, " Jus Patria." Arms, 
short Enfield and sword bayonet (all private property). The 
corps, as already indicated, was entirely self-supporting. After- 
wards " A " Company. 

2nd Corps (University of Glasgow). This corps, composed of 
professors, graduates, and students of the University, made a 
simultaneous offer of service with the 1st Corps, but the claims 
of the latter to' priority of formation were allowed. Uniform said 
to have been much the same as for the 1st. The company fell off 
gradually in numbers, and on March 2, 1870, was amalgamated 
with " Q " Company (77th), which had a somewhat similar origin. 

9th Corps (Bankers). Formed in consequence of a meeting on 
August 4, 1859, of tellers, clerks, &c, in the various Glasgow 
banks. Each bank, except the City of Glasgow and the 
Clydesdale, subscribed and paid for the armament and equip- 
ment of ten to fifteen men, £10 being the maximum expense for 
each man. The conditions of admission were afterwards ex- 
tended, but have always been subject to a ballot of serving 
members, and the banks have always kept up their interest in 
the company by giving prizes for shooting, &c. Uniform as for 
the 1st Corps. Badge, St Andrew's Cross. Motto, "Semper 
Paratus." Afterwards " B " Company. 

11th Corps (2nd Western). Formed at a meeting on October 



222 Records of the Several Corps. 

4, 1859, as an overflow company of the 1st Corps, the formal offer 
of service being made on the 25th, and an officer (Lieut. C. H. 
Smith) of the 1st being elected captain. Uniform and armament 
the same as for the 1st, but of a slightly lighter (reddish) grey, 
and with a bugle and crown as a badge, and black piping instead 
of braid on the trousers. 1 In 1864 the 39th Corps (see below) 
was amalgamated with the 11th. Afterwards " C " Company. 

15th Company (Procurators). Formed in consequence of a 
meeting held in the Faculty Hall on September 28, 1859, and 
composed of members of the legal profession, clerks, and ap- 
prentices. £105 was given by the Faculty towards the expenses 
of the corps, and the profession subscribed largely. Original 
uniform unknown, probably dark grey like 1st. Afterwards 
" D " Company. 

17th Corps (Stockbrokers and Accountants). The offer of this 
corps' services was made on November 18, 1859, it having been 
formed in consequence of a meeting held on the 4th. The Stock 
Exchange contributed £150, and the Institute of Accountants and 
Actuaries £100, to its funds. Uniform, medium grey. After- 
wards " E " Company. 

18 th Corps. Formed in consequence of a meeting on November 
16, 1859, from the employe's of the firm of Messrs Wylie & Loch- 
head, furnishers and undertakers, which subscribed £80 towards 
the funds, the rest of the cost of £4 per man being borne by the 
members or by outside subscriptions. Uniform — medium grey, 
with brown belts. The company maintained its distinctive 
character till 1881, when recruiting became general. Afterwards 
" L " Company. 

33rd Corps (Partick). Formed after a meeting of the inhabit- 
ants of Partick held on October 6, 1859, its services being offered 
on December 8. It was a self-supporting corps, each member 
finding his own uniform and equipment, and paying £2, 2s. 
annual subscription. Uniform the same as the 1st Corps, with 
badge of bugle-horn and crown. Afterwards " F " Company. 

39th Corps. Formed from employe's of the shipping com- 
panies, which together contributed £334 to its funds. Its ser- 
vices were offered on December 13, 1859. Uniform unknown. 



1 A specimen of this uniform is to be seen in the Glasgow Art Galleries, 
Kelvingrove Park. 



ist Lanarkshire Volunteer Rifle Corps. 223 

Numbers soon fell off, and in 1864 its remaining members were 
transferred to the 11th Corps. 

50th Corps (1st Press). A meeting of newspaper employes 
and press-men was held on October 24, 1859, and the services of 
this corps, formed of these, were offered on December 28. So 
great were the numbers, that a second overflow company, num- 
bered the 51st, was formed immediately, but this subsequently 
joined the 19th Lanark E.V. (1st V.B.H.L.I.) The uniform is 
unknown. The 50th corps fell off rapidly in numbers, and was 
broken up in 1863. 

53rd Corps. Formed in consequence of a meeting held on 
November 29, 1860, from the employe's of the firm of J. & W. 
Campbell, who gave £200 towards the funds of the corps. Its 
services were offered on December 29, 1860. The late Prime 
Minister, Sir H. Campbell-Bannerman, was at first lieutenant, 
and then, till 1867, captain of this company. In 1862, when the 
change of uniform was made, this officer paid £50, and the firm 
contributed £100, towards the expenses of the company. The 
uniform was Elcho grey, with knickerbockers, brown belts, and 
brown leggings. Afterwards " M " Company. 

63rd Corps. Formed in consequence of a meeting held on 
December 7, 1859, out of members of the grain and provision 
trades and bakers, the various firms of which subscribed £450. 
Its services were offered on January 30, 1860. Uniform un- 
known. This corps formed an overflow company, numbered the 
84th, which received half its funds and afterwards joined the 
31st Lanark (see 3d V.B.H.L.I.) Afterwards " N " Company. 

72nd Corps (Fine Arts). Formed of jewellers, watch and 
clock makers, silversmiths, engravers, &c, at a meeting held on 
December 7, 1859. Uniform — dark bluish grey, with light blue 
facings, small stiff bluish-grey shakos, plume of cock's feathers, 
and black belts. Badges, a silver wreath and crown on the shako, 
and a star with Minerva's head on the pouch-belt. The company 
fell off in numbers, and in 1863 its remaining members joined 
" P " Company (76th Corps). 

76th Corps (Port Dundas). Formed in consequence of a 
meeting on February 13, 1860, of men employed in the distil- 
leries, saw-mills, wharves, stores, and sugar-works at Port Dundas. 
The men are said to have been of quite exceptional physique. 
Uniform as for the 72nd Corps, but with ball-tufts on the shakos. 



224 



Records of the Several Corps. 



In 1863 the remains of the 72nd Corps were amalgamated with 
it. Afterwards " P " Company. 

77th Corps (City Eifle Guard, or 2d University). This corps 
at first existed as a drill class, but at a meeting on February 10, 
1860, it was resolved to form the class into a volunteer corps. 
The men were mostly of the mercantile community, but a uni- 
versity professor was captain, it drilled in College Green, and its 
headquarters were in the College. It never, however, recruited 
its ranks from the University till March 1870, when the re- 
mainder of the 2nd Corps (then " K " Company) was amalgamated 
with it. Uniform — dark green, with shakos and cock's feathers, 
and black belts. Afterwards " Q " Company. 

79th Corps (3rd Western). Like the 77th at first a drill 
class which, at a meeting held on February 23, 1880, it was 
resolved to form into a volunteer corps. Uniform — Elcho grey, 
with green facings, brown belts, and bronze ornaments. After- 
wards " G " Company. 

When the regiment was divided into two battalions in 
June 1860, the corps were renumbered, but they appear 
to have continued to use their old numbers till the end 
of that year at least. It was not till 1864 that the 
companies were lettered, and by that time several of the 
original corps had ceased to exist. The following table 
shows how the re -numbering and re -lettering were 
carried out : — 





/1st Corps became 1860 1st Company 


1864 


" A " Company. 




9th „ „ 


„ 2nd „ 


w 


«B» „ 




1 11th „ „ 


„ 3rd 


„ 


"C" „ 




1 15th » » 


n 4th n 


M 


"D" „ 


1st Battalion < 


17th „ „ 


n 5th » 


n 


"E" „ 




|33rd „ „ 


„ 6th „ 


l„ 


"W „ 




|39th „ „ 


„ 7th „ 


" 


Amalgamated 
with C Coy. 




\79th „ „ 


„ 8th „ 


„ 


" G " Company. 




/2nd ,, „ 


„ 9th „ 


„ 


"K" „ 




18th „ „ 


„ 10th „ 


J? 


"L" „ 




[50th „ „ 


ii Hth „ 


Broken up 1863. 




1 53rd „ „ 


» 12th „ 


1864 


" M " Company. 


2nd Battalion < 


63rd „ „ 


„ 13th „ 


„ 


«F 




I 72nd „ „ 


M i4th II 


1863 


Amalgamated 
with 15th Coy. 




76th „ 


„ 15th „ 


1864 


" P " Company. 




W7th „ 


ii 16th „ 


„ 


"Q" „ 



15/ Lanarkshire Volunteer Rifle Corps. 225 

To do away with the sixteen varieties of uniform 
existing in the regiment, in November 1860 a ballot 
was taken, and the choice fell upon a Government 
(Elcho) grey uniform with blue facings, the wearing of 
which became obligatory in 1862. The 1st Lanark 
shade of grey was browner than the real Elcho grey, 
and this shade was throughout adhered to by the 
corps. The blue collar had grey cord lace, the blue 
cuff a grey Austrian knot, and the trousers blue piping. 
The cap was soft, of grey cloth with diced blue and 
white band, silver bugle in front, and straight peak. 
Brown pouch- and waist-belts. Yellow leggings with 
black band at the ankle. 

In 1870 K Company was amalgamated with Q, and 
the regiment thus reduced to 12 companies, although 
the official establishment always remained at 16 com- 
panies. To remedy this, great exertions were made by 
Lieut. -Colonel R. C. Todd, then commanding, and in 
1878 two new companies, which were lettered K and 
O, were formed. In 1881 similar efforts were made to 
recruit up for the Royal Review. The recently raised 
K Company became I, and two new companies, H and 
K, were formed, thus bringing the regiment up to 
its authorised establishment. Hitherto the post of 
lieutenant-colonel had remained vacant, but in 1881 an 
officer was appointed to this post to assist the lieutenant- 
colonel commandant, and command the 2nd Battalion. 
No change since then took place in the formation or 
designation of the corps, except that since 1900 K 
Company was recruited from University students, who 
were under special regulations. For a few years also 
a section of mounted infantry was maintained in the 
corps. 

The uniform was changed very little. In 1872 grey 
busbies with blue lace and white plumes were adopted, 
p 



226 Records of the Several Corps. 

but these were discarded in 1876, and the cap alone 
worn till 1878, when grey helmets with bronze orna- 
ments were adopted, the Austrian knot on the sleeve 
being replaced by a simple round loop of cord, and blue 
cloth shoulder-straps taking the place of the cord 
hitherto worn. Elcho grey greatcoats were introduced 
in 1870, and were worn rolled " en bandouliere" but 
about 1890 these were replaced by the ordinary dark 
grey infantry greatcoat. In July 1902 a drab service 
dress with green Austrian knot was approved for the 
corps, also a grey field cap with diced band as on the 
old cap, but of smaller pattern. The loop of cord was 
removed from the cuif, and the cord from the collar of 
the tunic, and the shoulder-straps became grey with 
blue edges. 

During the South African War the corps furnished 
102 members who served in the field. Of those Lieut. 
A. A. Kennedy and 33 other ranks served with the 
1st, and Captain R. J. Douglas and 19 men with the 
2nd Volunteer Service Company of the Scottish Rifles, 
of whom Private R. Pattman died of disease. Thirty- 
six members served in the Imperial Yeomanry, and 
the rest in various corps. 

A notable fact about the 1st Lanark R.V. is the 
large number of officers who have been supplied from 
its ranks to other volunteer corps, and it is on record 
that the A Company, the former 1st Western, between 
1860 and 1881, furnished more than one hundred such, 
and that C Company, the former 2nd Western, or over- 
flow of the 1st, gave in the first year of its existence 
twenty-six officers to other volunteer corps. 

The regiment first, in 1860, rented the Burnbank 
ground in the Great Western Road, and, in the years 
1866-7, erected a drill-hall on it at a cost of £1250. 
When this ground became built over, it erected new 



\st Lanarkshire Volunteer Rifle Corps. 22"j 

headquarters at 261 West Princes Street, at a cost of 
£16,000, and acquired a new drill-ground at Yorkhill. 
Its first regimental shooting-range was at Possil, near 
Cowlairs, up to 900 yards, which it held in conjunction 
with the 19 th Lanark Rifles and 1st Lanark Engineers, 
but this was closed in 1885, and in the following year 
a new range up to 1000 yards, at Darnley, which it 
held in conjunction with the 3rd Lanark V.R.C., was 
taken into use. 

The lieutenant - colonels commandant and lieutenant- 
colonels commanding battalions have been — 

Sir Archibald Islay Campbell, Bart, of Garscube, Lieut.-Colonel 

Commandant, March 6, 1860. 
Sir George Campbell, Bart, of Garscube, late 1st Dragoons, Lieut.- 
Colonel Commandant, November 3, 1866. 
Kuthven Campbell Todd (hon. col.), Lieut.-Colonel Commandant, 

May 4, 1874. 
Joseph Newbigging Smith (hon. col.), Lieut.-Colonel Commandant, 

February 9, 1881. 
Robert Easton Aitken, Lieut.-Colonel, December 3, 1881. 
James A. Eeid, V.D. (hon. col.), Lieut.-Colonel, March 3, 1888, 

Lieut.-Colonel Commandant, January 11, 1890. 
Thomas A. Paul, V.D. (hon. col.), Lieut.-Colonel, February 8, 1890 

till 1899. 
H. A. Ker, V.D. (hon. col.), Lieut-Colonel, February 22, 1899 till 

1902. 
John Macfarlane, M.V.O., V.D. (hon. col.), Lieut.-Colonel, June 11, 

1902, Lieut-Colonel Commandant, February 21, 1903. 
John A. Roxburgh, V.D. (hon. col.), Lieut.-Colonel, March 21, 

1903, Lieut.-Colonel Commandant, March 31, 1906. 
William A. Smith, V.D., Lieut.-Colonel, May 19, 1906. 



228 Records of the Several Corps. 

2nd VOLUNTEEB BATTALION, THE CAMEB- 

ONIANS (SCOTTISH BIFLES). 

Regimental District, No. 26. 

(Plate XXI.) 

"South Africa, 1900-02." | Order of Precedence, 112. 

Honorary Colonel — A. D. Duke of Hamilton and Brandon, 
November 6, 1895. 

Headquarters — Hamilton. 

The " 3rd Battalion Lanarkshire Bifle Volunteers " ap- 
pears for the first time in the June 1860 Army List 
as formed on May 8, 1860, and composed of the 
42nd, 44th, 56th, and 57th Corps, and to these were 
added in June the 16th and 52nd Corps. In March 
1861 the battalion became the 1st Administrative 
Battalion Lanarkshire Bifle Volunteers, with head- 
quarters at Hamilton. The dates of acceptance of 
services and of commissioning of officers are given in 
Appendix C for the several corps, and the following 
were their composition and uniform : — 

16th Corps, Hamilton, one company, originally self-supporting. 

Uniform — dark green, with black braid. 
42nd Corps, Uddingston, one company, partly self-supporting, 

partly assisted by subscriptions. Uniform — medium grey, 

facings blue, brown belts. 
44th Corps, Blantyre, one company, raised amongst the workers 

of Messrs Henry Monteith & Co., and assisted by the firm's 

subscriptions. Uniform — medium grey, facings blue, brown 

belts. 
52nd Corps, Hamilton, one company, artisans, assisted by local 

subscriptions. Uniform — dark green, with black braid. 
56th Corps, Bothwell, one company, partly self-supporting, 

partly assisted. Uniform — medium grey, facings blue, 

brown belts. 
57th Corps, Wishaw, one company, partly self-supporting, partly 

assisted. Uniform — grey, facings scarlet, brown belts. 



2nd Volunteer Battalion, Scottish Rifles. 229 

Soon after the formation of the 1st Administrative 
Battalion, in 1862-3, a uniform of 60th Rifles pattern 
— rifle-green, with scarlet facings and piping, green 
shakos with black ball -tuft, and black belts — was 
adopted, busbies with black and red plumes replacing 
the shakos in 1872. 

In 1867 the 102nd (Motherwell) and 103rd (East 
Kilbride) Corps, of one company each, were raised and 
added to the battalion, in 1872 the 57th (Wishaw) 
Corps was increased to a strength of two companies, 
and in October 1873 the 106th (Strathaven) Corps, of 
one company, was raised and added. 

In November 1873 the battalion was consolidated 
as the 16th Lanarkshire Rifle Volunteers (renumbered 
the 2nd L.R.V., in June 1880), with headquarters at 
Hamilton, and 10 companies lettered as follows : — 



A and B, Hamilton (late 16th and 
52nd). 

C, Uddingston (late 42nd). 

D, Strathaven (late 106th). 

E, Bothwell (late 56th). 



F and G, Wishaw (late 57th). 
H, Motherwell (late 102nd). 
I, Blantyre (late 44th and 103rd). 
K, Motherwell (newly formed). 



The scarlet facings were changed to rifle-green, with 
light green piping and Austrian knot, in 1876, and in 
the following year the battalion adopted a uniform of 
scarlet tunics, with blue trousers, facings, and Austrian 
knots, glengarries with red and white diced border, and 
white belts. Blue helmets with silver ornaments re- 
placed the glengarries for full dress in 1881, in which 
year black leggings were adopted, and in 1891 brown 
leather equipment and leggings were obtained. 

In 1892 a new company was raised at Larkhall, and 
lettered D, the existing D and K companies being 
combined as K, with headquarters at Strathaven ; but 
in 1904 K was changed back to Motherwell, and D 
formed of half a company at Larkhall and half at 
Strathaven. L (Cyclist) company, with headquarters 
at Hamilton, was formed in 1899. 



230 Records of the Several Corps. 

The battalion assumed the title of 2nd Volunteer 
Battalion, Scottish Rifles, in accordance with General 
Order 181 of 1st December 1887, and its companies 
had since 1904 their headquarters at : A, B, and L, 
Hamilton ; C, Uddingston ; D, Larkhall, Strathaven ; 
E, Both well; F, Wishaw; G, Newmains, nearWishaw; 
H and K, Motherwell ; I, Blantyre. On 6th May 1902 
it was authorised to wear, as its sole uniform, a drab 
service dress, with green Austrian knot and piping on 
the trousers, brown belts and leggings, and drab felt 
hats turned up on the left side and fastened with a 
piece of Douglas tartan and the badge of the Scottish 
Rifles. Officers wore in full dress the uniform of the 
Scottish Rifles. 

During the war in South Africa the battalion 
furnished in all 132 of its members for active service. 
To the 1st Volunteer Service Company of the Scottish 
Rifles it contributed 28 non-commissioned officers and 
men, with a reinforcing draft of Lieut. E. J. Heilbron 
and 10 men, to the 2nd Company, 39, and to the 
3rd, 28 non-commissioned officers and men. Six men 
served in the Scottish Volunteer Cyclist Company, 12 
with the Imperial Yeomanry, and the remainder with 
other corps. Privates J. Young and J. Muir, and 
Cyclist W. Gordon, died of disease. 

The battalion headquarters, drill-hall, &c, were in 
Hamilton, close to the Depot Barracks. Its central 
rifle-range, up to 600 yards, was at Cadzow, \\ mile 
from Hamilton, and there were three local ranges for 
the use of D, F, and G Companies. 

The lieutenant -colonels commanding the battalion 
have been — 

Sam. Simpson, September 10, 1860. 
J. Eeid, August 23, 1869. 
John Austine, April 10, 1875. 




t£ 






3rd Lanarkshire Volunteer Rifle Corps. 231 

Eobt. E. S. Harington-Stuart, late Captain Eifle Brigade, V.D. 

(hon. col), May 21, 1879. 
Geo. Walker, V.D. (hon. col.), May 29, 1895. 
Jas. Scott, V.D. (hon. col.), April 22, 1899. 
Thos. B. Ealston, V.D. (hon. col.), June 13, 1903. 



3rd LANARKSHIRE VOLUNTEER RIFLE 
CORPS. 

Regimental District, No. 26. 

(Plate XXI.) 

"South Africa, 1900-02." | Order op Precedence, 113. 

Honorary Colonel — Sir J. M. Stirling-Maxwell, Bart., January 13, 1894. 

Headquarters — Victoria Road, Glasgow. 

The 3rd Lanarkshire Rifle Volunteers first appear as a 
consolidated battalion (dating from 8th August 1860) 
in the November 1860 Army List, where it was shown 
as seven companies strong, formed by the 3rd, 10th, 
14th, 22nd, 54th, 82nd, and 87th Corps. An eighth 
company was raised to complete the battalion, and is 
shown in the December 1860 Army List. In this 
corps also were absorbed what remained of the 78th 
Lanark Rifle Volunteers, or " Old Guard of Glasgow," 
concerning which see page 5. 

The dates of acceptance of services and of com- 
missioning of officers of the various original corps are 
given in Appendix C. Each was one company strong, 
and their compositions were : — 

3rd Corps (Glasgow, 1st Southern) and 10th Corps (Glasgow, 
2nd Southern) were raised in Glasgow, south of the Clyde, 
and were well endowed, £2000 having been raised in sub- 



232 Records of the Several Corps. 

scriptions for their equipment in the years 1859 and 1860, 
and the members paying for their uniforms and contributing 
an annual subscription. The 10th was an overflow company 
of the 3rd. The uniform of both was dark grey, without 
facings and with black braid, black piping on the trousers, 
dark grey caps with black braid, and black pouch- and 
waist-belts. The badges were a lion rampant on the cap 
and pouch-belt, and the arms of Glasgow on the clasp of 
the waist-belt. 

14th Corps (South- Western) was partially self-supporting and 
partially equipped from subscriptions. 

22nd Corps was raised chiefly among the workers of Messrs 
Cogan's spinning factory, and was liberally assisted by that 
firm. 

54th and 82nd Corps were formed of total abstainers, the latter 
being of artisans, and receiving aid from the Glasgow 
Central Fund. 

87th Corps was mainly formed out of the employes of Messrs 
Inglis & Wakefield's at Busby. 

The eighth Company (which never received a county number) was 
recruited from the workmen of the Etna Foundry Company. 

In 1861 the uniform of the consolidated 3rd Lanark 
became Elcho grey, with green facings and piping, 
light grey soft caps with green piping and straight 
peak, and brown belts. In 1864, scarlet tunics with 
blue collars and cuffs, the latter with an upright patch 
and three bars of white lace, blue trousers, blue shakos 
with red and white ball-tuft, and white belts, became 
the uniform. 

The establishment was raised to twelve companies in 
1877, and in 1902 a thirteenth (cyclist) company was 
formed, but with these exceptions no changes in forma- 
tion were made during the existence of the corps. 

The uniform also varied but little. In March 1878 
blue helmets with silver ornaments replaced the shakos, 
the cuff was changed to a pointed pattern with a white 
crow's-foot of braid, and black leggings, dark grey 



2>rd Lanarkshire Volunteer Rifle Corps. 233 

greatcoats, and white haversacks, were issued. In 
1891 brown ("Simplex") equipment replaced the 
white belts, and on July 12, 1902, as undress, a drab 
service dress, with green piping on the trousers, drab 
putties, and a brown felt hat. was authorised. 

During the South African War the 3rd Lanark sent 
a total of 98 of its members on active service. Of 
these Lieutenant G. W. S. Clark and 31 men served 
with the 1st, Lieutenant J. B. Wilson and 25 men 
(of whom Private H. Burton died of disease) with the 
2nd, and 4 men with the 3rd Volunteer Service Com- 
pany of the Scottish Bifles. Two men served with the 
Scottish Volunteer (Cyclist) Company, and the others 
with various units. 

The headquarters of the corps in Victoria Boad, 
Glasgow, were new and commodious, comprising drill- 
hall, lecture-rooms, stores, armoury, &c. The corps 
recruited mainly from the South Side of Glasgow, and 
shared the range at Darnley with the 1st Lanark 
V.B.C. The 3rd always bore a high reputation for 
shooting, and two of its members gained the Queen's 
Prize at the National Bifle Association Meeting — 
Private Bennie in 1894 and Lieutenant Yates in 1898. 

The lieutenant -colonels (commandant since 1877) 
have been — 

David Dreghorn, August 28, 1860. 

Wm. S. Dixon, October 27, 1863. 

H. E. C. Ewing, May 3, 1865. 

Jas. Merry (hon. col.), August 8, 1877. 

H. J. M'Dowall, March 9, 1889. 

Hugh Morton, V.D., September 19, 1894. 

Eobert Howie, V.D. (hon. col.), February 13, 1901. 

John B. Wilson, V.D. (hon. col.), May 10, 1905. 



234 Records of the Several Corps. 

4th VOLUNTEER BATTALION, THE CAMER- 

ONIANS (SCOTTISH RIFLES). 

Regimental District, No. 26. 

(Plate XXII.) 

"South Africa, 1900-02." | Order of Precedence, 114. 

Honorary Colonel — W. R. Maxwell, V.D., February 27, 1904. 

Headquarters— -149 Cathedral Street, Glasgow. 

By the 'London Gazette' of January 3, 1860, the 
4th, 6th, 7th, 8th, 12th, and 13th Lanarkshire 
Rifle Volunteer Corps were formed, with effect from 
December 12, 1859, into the 4th Lanarkshire (Glasgow 
1st Northern) Rifle Volunteer Corps, Lieut. -Colonel 
Tennant being gazetted to the command as from De- 
cember 23, 1859. This was the first consolidated 
battalion formed out of the Lanarkshire corps. The 
companies were lettered in their proper order "A" to 
"F," and in July 1861 the 60th, 61st, and 93rd Lan- 
arkshire, all Highland kilted corps, were added to the 
battalion as "G" "H" and "I" companies, thus 
bringing its strength up to nine companies, at which 
establishment it always remained, although one of the 
companies was in 1900 converted into a cyclist com- 
pany. The dates of acceptance of services, &c, of these 
original corps are given in Appendix C. Their compos- 
ition and uniforms were as follows : — 

4th Corps (Glasgow, 1st Northern), a purely self-supporting corps, 
raised on the same principles as the 1st Lanark. Its uniform 
was dark grey, with green facings and black cord lace (five 
rows on the breast), dark grey caps, and black belts. 

6th, 7th, and 8th Corps. Purely artisan corps, the members con- 
tributing £1 each to the funds, and the remainder being 
raised by public subscription, helped by the Central Com- 
mittee for Glasgow. The uniform was dark grey for all, the 



\th Volunteer Battalion, Scottish Rifles. 235 

6th Corps having four rows of black braid on the breast of 
the tunic, grey shakos, cock's plumes, and black belts. 

12th Corps (North-Eastern), a corps formed from the employe's 
of Tennant's Wellpark Brewery, was partly self-supporting, 
and partly artisans as in the 6th, 7th, and 8th Corps. 
Uniform as for the latter. 

13th Corps, an artisan corps raised in the St Eollox district on 
the same principles as the 6th, 7th, and 8th. Uniform as 
for the latter. 

60th Corps (Glasgow, 1st Highland), an entirely self-supporting 
corps of Highlanders resident in Glasgow. The uniform was 
dark green doublets, with red piping and four rows of black 
braid on the breast, Celtic Society's tartan kilts, sporrans 
white with six black tassels for officers, grey goatskin with 
six black tassels for other ranks, black and green diced hose, 
plain blue glengarries, and black belts. Highland brogues, 
without spats, were worn. 

61st Corps (Glasgow, 2nd Highland), an artisan corps, assisted 
from the Central Fund. The uniform was the same as that 
of the 60th. 

93rd Corps (Glasgow, Highland Eifle Eangers), an entirely self- 
supporting corps, like the 60th. The uniform was the same, 
but with red and white diced hose. 

In 1863 the corps assumed for the A to F companies 
scarlet tunics with green collars and cuffs, the latter 
with an upright patch and three bars of white lace, 
42nd tartan trews, blue shakos with red-and-white ball- 
tuft, and white belts. G to I companies had scarlet 
doublets with green facings (as on the tunics), 42nd 
tartan kilts, white sporrans with three black tails, green- 
and-black diced hose, white spats, plain blue glengar- 
ries with blackcock's tail, and white belts. In 1868, 
when the 105th Lanark (Glasgow Highlanders) was 
raised, 187 men of G to I companies were transferred 
to it, and these latter, having lost their distinctively 
Highland character, were clothed in tunics and trews 
like the rest of the battalion. In 1876 blue trousers 



236 Records of the Several Corps. 

replaced the tartan trews, and in 1878 the shakos were 
exchanged for helmets, a green Austrian knot was 
added to the cuff, which became pointed, and dark 
grey greatcoats and black leggings were introduced. 

In 1887, by General Order 181 of December 1, the 
battalion was entitled the 4th Volunteer Battalion, 
Scottish Rifles. 

During the South African War the battalion con- 
tributed 73 of its members for service in the field. Of 
these, Captain J. B. Young and 31 non-commissioned 
officers and men joined the 1st, Lieutenant H. M. 
Hannan and 28 non-commissioned officers and men 
the 2nd, and 3 men the 3rd Volunteer Service Com- 
pany of the Scottish Rifles, the remainder serving in 
various corps. Of the 1st Service Company, Privates 
W. M'Laren and J. Murray died of disease. 

In April 1904 a drab service dress with scarlet pip- 
ing on the trousers, grey putties, a brown felt hat 
turned up on the left side, with the Scottish Rifle 
badge and a black plume, and brown leather equipment 
was authorised as the sole uniform for the battalion. 
The officers alone wore the Scottish Rifle uniform in 
full and mess dress. 

The battalion had its own headquarters and drill- 
hall at 149 Cathedral Street, Glasgow, and its own 
rifle-range up to 800 yards at Flemington. 

The following is the list of lieutenant-colonels com- 
manding the battalion : — 

John Tennant, December 23, 1859. 

Jas. Fyfe Jamieson, April 15, 1863. 

Henry M. Hannan, March 18, 1874. 

Alexander Mein (hon. col.), March 22, 1884. 

Warden R. Maxwell, V.D. (hon. col.), January 26, 1889. 

J. F. Newlands, V.D., December 12, 1894. 

Frederick J. Smith, V.D. (hon. col.), January 2, 1901. 



$th Volunteer Battalion, Scottish Rifles. 237 

5th VOLUNTEEE BATTALION, THE CAMER- 
ONIANS (SCOTTISH RIFLES). 

(Plate XXIII.) 
Disbanded on April 1, 1897. 

On May 14, 1862, the 4th Administrative Battalion, 
Lanarkshire Rifle Volunteers, with headquarters at 
Airdrie, was formed from the 29th, 32nd, 43rd, 48th, 
and 95 th Corps of Lanark Rifle Volunteers, of one com- 
pany each. The 48th was increased to two com- 
panies on November 28, 1863, and the battalion thus 
brought up to six-company strength, entitling it to a 
lieutenant-colonel to command. The dates of forma- 
tion, &c, of these corps are given in Appendix C. 
Their composition and uniforms were as follows : — 

29th Corps, Coatbridge, a town corps, generally recruited, and 
supported by local subscriptions. Uniform — dark grey with 
black braid, green facings, dark grey cap with peak, black 
pouch and waist-belts. 

32nd Corps, Summerlee, recruited from the workmen of Messrs 
Neilson's Iron Works. Uniform — dark grey. 

43rd Corps, Gartsherrie, raised among the workmen of Messrs 
W. Baird & Co.'s Iron Works. Uniform — medium grey 
with black facings. 

48th Corps, Airdrie, a town corps, locally supported. Uniform 
— dark grey with green cuffs and collar, black braid, and 
red piping on the trousers, grey cap with green band and 
plume, and black belts. 

95th Corps, Bailliestown, a town corps, locally supported. Uni- 
form, dark grey with green facings, cap with peak and ball- 
tuft, and black belts. 

In 1863 the whole battalion adopted a uniform of 
dark grey tunics and knickerbockers, with black braid 



238 Records of the Several Corps. 



and without facings, dark grey shakos with black ball- 
tuft, black belts, and black leggings. 

The battalion rapidly increased in numbers. In 
1865 four corps of a company each — the 97th (second 
of that number in Lanarkshire, see Appendix C) at 
Woodhead, the 98th at Gartness, recruited from the 
Calderbank Iron Works and the Chapelhall Iron and 
Steel Works, the 99th at Clarkston (transferred in 1866 
to Caldercruix, Airdrie), and the 100th at Calderbank 
(transferred also in 1866 to Caldercruix) — were raised 
and added to the battalion, followed in 1866 by the 
101st at Newarthill, and in 1868 by the 104th at 
Holytown, Bellshill, recruited from Messrs Neilson's 
Mossend Works, thus bringing the total strength up to 
twelve companies. The headquarters of the 98th were 
changed in 1869 from Gartness to Wattstown, of the 
97th in 1871 from Woodhead to Coltbridge, and of the 
43rd in 1872 from Gartsherrie to Shotts. 

In May 1871 the uniform of the battalion was 
changed to dark grey Norfolk jackets without facings, 
with light green piping on the collar and light green 
Austrian knot, Breadalbane tartan trews, black busbies 
with black and light green plumes, and black belts ; 
and on September 19, 1873, the battalion was consoli- 
dated as the 29th Lanark Rifle Volunteers, with head- 
quarters at Airdrie and twelve companies, lettered as 
follows : — 



A, Coatbridge (late 29th). 

B, Airdrie (late 32nd and 

48th). 

C, Shotts (late 43rd). 

D, Airdrie (late 2nd of 48th). 

E, Bailliestown (late 95th). 

F, Coatbridge (late 97th). 



G, Greengairs, near Gartness (late 

98th). 
H, Clarkston (late 99th). 
I, Calderbank (late^OOth). 
K, Newarthill (late 101st). 
L, Bellshill (late 104th). 
M, Harthill and Benhar (overflow of 

100th). 



In 1875 a new company was formed at Cheyston 
and lettered " F," the former "F" being joined to 



$th Volunteer Battalion the Cameronians. 239 

"E," and the headquarters of "E" transferred to 
Coatbridge. Numbers now began to fall off, and on 
October 4, 1877, the establishment of the battalion 
was reduced to eight companies, as under — 



A, Coatbridge (late A). 

B, Airdrie (late B). 

C, Shotts (late C and M). 

D, Airdrie (late D and L). 



E, Coatbridge (late E). 

F, Cheyston (late F). 

G, Caldercruix (late G and H). 
H, Newarthill (late I and K). 



In March 1879 scarlet tunics with yellow collar- 
patches and cuffs and blue Austrian knot, blue 
trousers and helmets, and white belts became the 
uniform. In 1887, by General Order 181 of December 
1, the corps became the 5th Volunteer Battalion, The 
Cameronians (Scottish Rifles), and on April 1, 1897, 
in consequence of strictures passed upon its discipline 
by the officer commanding 26th - 71st Regimental 
District, it was disbanded. 

The lieutenant-colonels commanding were — 

W. W. Hozier, late 2nd Dragoons — Major, May 19, 1862 ; Lieut. - 

Colonel, January 8, 1864. 
Thos. Jackson, June 20, 1874. 
Peter Forrest, November 23, 1878. 
J. C. Forrest, August 6, 1887. 
Peter Forrest (for the second time), May 12, 1894, to end of 1895. 



240 Records of the Several Corps. 



1st (CITY OF DUNDEE) VOLUNTEER BAT- 
TALION, THE BLACK WATCH (ROYAL 
HIGHLANDERS). 

Regimental District, No. 42. 

(Plate XXIV.) 

"South Africa, 1900-02." | Order op Precedence, 171. 

Honorary Colonel — The Lord Provost of Dundee for the time being. 

Headquarters — Albany Quarters, Dundee. 

The first public meeting which led to the formation 
of the 1st Forfarshire Rifle Volunteers was held in 
Dundee on May 20, 1859, and drill began in the fol- 
lowing month, although the services of the corps were 
not formally accepted until November. The officers 
were first commissioned on November 15, 1859, and 
the corps had an establishment of five companies. Two 
more were raised on February 17, and one on April 10, 
1860, making eight in all, which continued to be the 
establishment of the battalion until 1900. 

The original uniform of the corps was dark grey 
with five rows of black lace on the tunic and black 
stripes on the trousers, dark grey shakos with a plume 
of cock's feathers (replaced in 1860 by a black ball- 
tuft), and black belts. In 1861 a red Garibaldi shirt 
was adopted, and in 1862 the uniform was changed 
to scarlet tunics with blue facings and white Austrian 
knot, blue trousers, blue shakos with red, white, and 
blue diced band, black lace, and black ball - tuft 
(Highland Light Infantry pattern), and brown belts. 
In 1877 the Austrian knot on the sleeve was changed 
to blue, and busbies with blue plumes replaced the 
shakos. In 1881 helmets replaced the busbies, and in 
1902 the black leggings hitherto worn were abolished, 




S 8. 




ist Volunteer Battalion the Black Watch. 241 

and (on December 9) a drab service dress with scarlet 
piping on the trousers, a field service cap, and drab 
puttees, were authorised. In 1904 the Austrian 
knot was removed from the tunic, and sashes were 
permitted to be worn by officers and Serjeants. 

In 1887, by General Order 181 of December 1, the 
corps assumed the title of 1st (Dundee) Volunteer 
Battalion, The Black Watch, but on February 2, 1889, 
"City of Dundee" was substituted for the word 
" Dundee." 

During the war in South Africa, in 1900 the 
establishment of the battalion was increased to ten 
companies, of which one was a cyclist company, and 
it sent 4 officers (Captain A. Valentine, Lieutenants 
E. Tosh, A. B. Corrie, and C. E. C. Walker) and 66 
men to the three volunteer service companies of the 
2nd Black Watch, 97 members of the battalion in 
all serving actively during the war. 

The headquarters and drill - hall of the battalion 
were, along with those of the other Dundee corps, 
in the Albany Quarters, Bell Street, Dundee, and its 
rifle-range, up to 600 yards, was at Monifieth Links, 
1\ miles from Dundee. 

From 1902 to 1906 the battalion formed part of the 
34th Field Army Brigade, and trained in camp for 
thirteen clear days annually. 

The lieutenant-colonels commanding have been — 

Sir John Ogilvy, Bart., July 28, 1860. 
G. L. Alison, October 10, 1865. 
P. Anderson, January 10, 1870. 
Peter Geddes Walker, April 22, 1874. 
William E. Morrison (hon. col.), March 26, 1879. 
George Mitchell (hon. col.), March 9, 1888. 
James Rankin, V.D. (hon. col.), June 6, 1891. 
Howard Hill, V.D. (hon. col.), March 13, 1901. 
Q 



242 Records of the Several Corps, 

2nd (ANGUS) VOLUNTEER BATTALION, THE 
BLACK WATCH (ROYAL HIGHLANDERS). 

Regimental District, No. 42. 

(Plate XXV.) 

" South Africa, 1900-02." | Order op Precedence, 172. 

Honorary Colonel — C. G. Earl of Strathmore and Kinghorne, 
October 22, 1904. 

Headquarters — Arbroath. 

On May 3, 1861, the rifle corps existing in the county 
of Forfar, outside of the city of Dundee, were formed 
into two administrative battalions, the 1st (locally called 
the "Eastern"), with headquarters at Montrose, com- 
prising the 3rd (Arbroath, two companies), 5th (Mon- 
trose, two companies), 7th (Brechin, one company), 
and subsequently (on June 4) the 13th (Friockheim, 
one company) ; and the 2nd (locally called the 
"Western"), with headquarters at Forfar, composed 
of the 2nd (Forfar, two companies), 8th (Newtyle, 
one company), 9th (Glamis, one company), 11th 
(Tannadice, one subdivision), 12th (Kirriemuir, one 
company), and subsequently (on August 16, 1865) 
the 15th (Cortachy, one company) Corps of Forfarshire 
Rifle Volunteers. The dates of formation of these 
companies are given in Appendix B, and their uni- 
forms, so far as known, were as follows : — 

2nd Corps, Forfar, Elcho grey. 

3rd Corps, Arbroath, dark grey uniforms with black facings and 

plumed shakos, and badge of portcullis and abbot's head. 
5th Corps, Montrose, steel grey uniforms with black facings and 

five rows of black braid on the breast of the tunic, grey caps 

with black braid, and black belts. 
7th Corps, Brechin, light grey. 



2nd Volunteer Battalion the Black JVatch. 243 

8th Corps, Newtyle, grey, with black facings. 
9th Corps, Glamis, Elcho grey. 
11th Corps, Tannadice, unknown. 
12th Corps, Kirriemuir, Elcho grey. 
13th Corps, Friockheim, unknown. 

In 1864 the uniform of both battalions was changed 
to scarlet tunics with blue facings and white Austrian 
knot, blue trousers, blue caps with red band, blue ball- 
tuft, and silver star badge, and brown belts. In 1872 
the officers adopted shakos the same as those then 
worn by the 1st Forfar (1st V.B. Black Watch), other 
ranks wearing only glengarries with red, white, and 
blue diced border, and the same badge as formerly on 
the caps. 

In 1864 the 3rd Corps was increased to four com- 
panies, and in 1865 the 7th to two; but in 1869 the 
11th and in 1872 the 15th Corps were disbanded. The 
2nd Battalion being, by the loss of those two latter 
companies, reduced to five companies, was in 1874 
amalgamated with the 1st Battalion, which then took 
the title "1st Administrative Battalion Forfarshire, 
or Angus, Bine Volunteers," with headquarters at 
Friockheim by Arbroath, and consisting of the 2nd, 
3rd, 5th, 7th, 8th, 9th, 12th, and 13th Corps— in all, 
fourteen companies. 

In March 1880 the battalion was consolidated as the 
2nd Forfar, or Angus, Rifle Volunteers, headquarters 
at Friockheim, the fourteen companies being lettered 
in succession of corps ; and on October 31, 1882, it was 
authorised to wear the uniform of the Black Watch, 
but with plain glengarries and trews, the title 
" Angus " being borne on the shoulder-straps, and the 
brown leather belts continuing to be worn. This 
uniform was till 1908 regulation for the battalion,, 
Serjeants only wearing sashes. 



244 Records of the Several Corps. 

In 1887 (General Order 181 of December 1) the 
battalion assumed the title of 2nd (Angus) Volunteer 
Battalion, The Black Watch, and soon afterwards 
headquarters were removed to Arbroath. In 1894 the 
fourth company at Arbroath was broken up and the 
companies at Newtyle and Glamis amalgamated, the 
twelve companies remaining being re-lettered : A and 
B, Forfar (late 2nd Corps); C, D, and E, Arbroath 
(late 3rd); F and G, Montrose (late 5th); H and I, 
Brechin (late 7th) ; K, Newtyle and Glamis (late 8th 
and 9th); L, Kirriemuir (late 12th); and M, Friock- 
heim (late 13th), which was the distribution of the 
battalion till 1908. 

During the war in South Africa, the Angus battalion 
sent out 2 officers (Captains — hon. majors — J. Buyers, 
V.D., and R. H. Millar, V.D., who commanded the 1st 
Service Company) and 54 other ranks to join the 
volunteer service companies of the Black Watch, and 
in all 72 members of the battalion served actively in 
the field. 

There was a drill-hall at each of the out-stations, and 
the battalion had commodious headquarters and drill- 
hall at Arbroath. It possessed eight separate rifle- 
ranges in the vicinities of company headquarters. 

The officers commanding have been — 

ILieut.-Colonel Thos. Kenny Tailyour, late Major 
Bengal Engineers, June 4, 1861. 
Lieut.-Colonel Jas. Alex. Dickson, September 25, 
1868. 
Lieut.-Colonel John Kinloch, late Colonel on the 
Staff, May 3, 1861. 
2nd Adm. Bn.,J Lieut.-Colonel the Earl of Airlie, March 14, 
1861-74. 1865. 

Lieut-Colonel G. H. Dempster, July 6, 1868. 
Major A. Black, November 20, 1872. 



2>rd Volunteer Battalion the Black Watch. 245 

1st Adm. Bn., J Lieut-Colonel Commandant J. A. Dickson (from 

1874-88. \ 1st Bn.), 1874. 
Lieut.-Colonel Commandant Hon. Francis Bowes-Lyon, January 

14, 1888. 
Lieut.-Colonel Commandant Wm. Alex. Gordon, V.D. (hon. col.), 

May 4, 1892. 
Lieut.-Colonel Commandant Alex. M'Hardy, V.D. (hon. col.), 

September 9, 1903. 
Lieut. - Colonel Commandant James Davidson, V.D. (hon. coL), 

September 3, 1904. 



3rd (DUNDEE HIGHLAND) VOLUNTEEE BAT- 
TALION, THE BLACK WATCH (ROYAL 
HIGHLANDERS). 

Regimental District, No. 42. 

(Plate XXV.) 

" South Africa, 1900-02." | Order op Precedence, 173. 

Honorary Colonel— Field-Marshal F. S. Earl Roberts, K.G., K.P., G.C.B., 
O.M., G.C.S.I., G.C.I.E., September 19, 1903. 

Headquarters — The Albany Quarters, Dundee. 

On April 10, 1860, there was raised at Dundee the 
10th, and on June 14, 1861, the 14th Forfarshire 
Rifle Volunteers, each one company strong, and from 
October 1861 both were attached to the 1st Forfarshire 
Rifle Volunteers. The original uniform of the 10 th 
was dark grey jackets with black facings, 42nd tartan 
kilt and belted plaid, green-and-black diced hose, glen- 
garry, and black belts with silver ornaments and badges, 
and that of the 14th is said to have been the same. 
In 1862 the uniform of both corps was changed to scarlet 
doublets with blue facings, 42nd tartan kilts and belted 



246 Records of the Several Corps. 

plaids, white sporrans with two black tails, red-and- 
black diced hose, white spats, glengarries with red, 
white, and blue diced border, and white belts. 

On June 29, 1867, the two corps were increased 
to two companies each ; and on September 24, 1868, 
they were amalgamated as the 10th Forfar (Dundee 
Highland) Rifle Volunteers, with an establishment of 
six companies. In March 1880 the battalion was 
re-numbered 3rd Forfar, in 1887 (General Order 181 
of December 1) it assumed the title of 3rd (Dundee 
Highland) Volunteer Battalion, The Black Watch, 
and in 1900 the establishment was raised to eight 
companies. In 1882 the kilt was replaced by trews 
of Black Watch tartan, with which the white spats 
continued to be worn, and helmets were introduced, 
but the latter were abolished in 1887 and replaced 
by the plain blue glengarry of the regular battalions. 
Sashes for Serjeants were authorised later. 

During the Boer War no fewer than 176 members 
of this battalion served in one capacity or another 
in South Africa, of whom 2 officers (Captains H. K. 
Smith and W. B. Smith) and 73 men served in the 
volunteer service companies of the Black Watch. 
Captain H. K. Smith was wounded at Retief s Nek 
on July 23, 1900. 

The headquarters and drill-hall were, along with 
those of other Dundee corps, at the Albany Quarters, 
Bell Street, Dundee, and the battalion used for its 
musketry the War Department range at Barry Links. 

The lieutenant-colonels commanding have been — 

David Guthrie of Carlogie, September 24, 1868. 

Eobert Lamb, February 4, 1880. 

Eobert N. Keid, July 22, 1882. 

William Smith, V.D. (hon. col.), November 27, 1886. 

Charles Batchelor, V.D., May 19, 1906. 



\th Volunteer Battalion the Black Watch. 247 

4th (PERTHSHIRE) VOLUNTEER BATTALION, 
THE BLACK WATCH (ROYAL HIGH- 
LANDERS). 

Regimental District, No. 42. 

(Plate XXVI.) 

" South Africa, 1900-02." | Order of Precedence, 185. 

Honorary Colonel — David E. Williamson of Lawers, V.D., late Ensign 
and Lieutenant Coldstream Guards, July 9, 1879. 

Headquarters — Perth. 

The 1st Administrative Battalion, Perthshire Rifle 
"Volunteers, with headquarters at Perth, was formed 
on November 20, 1860, and to it then, or on the 
date on which they were subsequently raised, the 
following corps of Perthshire Rifle Volunteers were 
attached : — 

1st, Perth, raised December 13, 1859, as one company. 

2nd, Perth, raised December 13, 1859, as one company. 

Of these corps the 1st was composed of "citizens," the 
2nd of "artisans," and they were amalgamated as the 1st 
Perthshire Corps, of two companies, in June 1860. The 
uniform was medium grey hooked tunics and trousers, with 
scarlet collars and cuffs and black braid, grey peaked caps 
with scarlet bands and the arms of Perth, and black pouch- 
and waist-belts. 

5th, Blairgowrie, raised March 16, 1860, as one company. Uni- 
form, dark grey with red facings. 

6th, Dunblane, services accepted December 13, 1859, officers 
commissioned May 3, 1860, as one company. Uniform, 
as for the 1st Perth, but with brown belts. 

7th, Coupar-Angus, raised May 5, 1860, as one company. Uni- 
form, dark grey with red facings. 

8th, Crieff, raised May 5, 1860, as one company. Uniform, as 
for the 1st Perth, with black belts, and with the Ochtertyre 
badge in silver on the caps. 



248 Records of the Several Corps. 

9th, Alyth, raised May 26, 1860, as one company. Uniform — 
dark grey with red facings. 

11th, Doune, raised May 26, 1860, as one company. Uniform — 
as for the 1st Perth, with a bugle badge on the caps. 

12th, Callander, raised May 26, 1860, as one subdivision. Dis- 
banded in 1865. 

13th, St Martins, raised August 22, 1860, as one company. Uni- 
form — dark grey doublets with scarlet facings, JMacdonald 
tartan kilts, plain glengarries, and black belts. 

14th, Birnam, raised November 10, 1860, as one company. Uni- 
form — dark grey doublets with scarlet facings, Eoyal Stuart 
tartan kilts, plain glengarries, and black belts. 

15th, Auchterarder, raised December 4, 1860, as one company. 
Uniform — light grey tunics and trousers with scarlet facings, 
low grey shakos, and brown belts. 

16th, Stanley, raised January 21, 1861, as one company. Dis- 
banded in 1864. 

17th, Bridge of Earn, formed in April 1863 as one subdivision, 
and disbanded in June 1863. No officers were appointed 
to it. 

18th (Highland), Perth, raised May 8, 1863, as one company. 
Uniform — dark grey doublets with scarlet cuffs and collars 
and four rows of black lace across the breast, Atholl 
(Murray) tartan trews, plain glengarries with blackcock's 
tail, and black pouch- and waist-belts. 

19th (Highland), Crieff, services accepted as one company 
December 7, 1868, officers commissioned December 11, 
1868. Uniform — dark green doublets with Eoyal Stuart 
tartan kilts and plaids, red - and - green diced hose, and 
Balmoral bonnets with feather. Absorbed in the 8th 
Corps in 1878. 

In 1868 a general uniform was adopted for the 
battalion, consisting of dark grey buttoned tunics and 
trousers with scarlet facings and piping, dark blue 
shakos with red, white, and blue diced borders, bugle 
badge, and ball-tuft black below and red above, and 
black belts; but the 13th, 14th, and 19th Corps con- 
tinued to wear their Highland dress, and the 18 th 



tfh Volunteer Battalion the Black Watch. 249 

only modified theirs in so far as to adopt the shako, 
but with a ball- tuft red below and white above. The 
8 th Corps was permitted to wear the same uniform 
as the 18th, but with Black Watch trews. 

In 1869 the 5th, 7th, 9th, 13th, and 14th Corps 
were transferred to the 2nd Administrative Battalion 
(see 5th Volunteer Battalion), and as the 12th Corps 
had been disbanded in 1865 and the 16th in 1864, 
and the 17th had only lasted two months, the 1st 
Battalion was left composed of the 1st, 6th, 8th, 11th, 
15th, 18th, and 19th Corps, with in all eight com- 
panies. In July 1875 a 21st Corps, of one company, 
was raised at Comrie, but it was disbanded in March 
1876, and in 1878 the 19th Corps was amalgamated 
with the 8th. In 1878 a busby, with a black-and-red 
plume and bugle badge, was adopted by the whole 
battalion. 

On March 13, 1880, the battalion was consolidated 
as the 1st Perthshire Rifle Volunteers, headquarters 
at Perth, with seven companies, lettered A and B, 
Perth (late 1st Corps); C, Dunblane (late 6th); D, 
Crieff (late 8th); E, Doune (late 11th); F, Auchter- 
arder (late 15th); and G, Perth (late 18th); and on 
April 24, 1883, authority was given for the adoption 
by the battalion of the uniform of the Black Watch 
— scarlet doublets with blue facings, trews with 
brown leggings, plain glengarries, and white belts. 
On March 21, 1885, the battalion was increased to 
eight companies by the formation of " H " Company 
at Bridge of Allan, and in 1887, by General Order 181 
of December 1, the battalion became the 4th Volun- 
teer Battalion, The Black Watch. 

During the South African War the battalion con- 
tributed 22 men to the 1st, Captain R. M. Christie 
and 17 men to the 2nd, and 6 men to the 3rd 



250 Records of the Several Corps. 

Volunteer Service Company of the Black Watch, all 
three of which were attached to the 2nd Battalion. 
In all, 2 officers (including Surgeon-Major R. Stirling, 
M.D., who was mentioned in despatches November 29, 
1900) and 72 members of the battalion took part in 
the war, and Sergeant J. B. Deas and Private J. 
Chalmers, both of "A" Company, were killed in action. 
Recruiting became very brisk at home, " I " and " K " 
Companies being raised at Perth under War Office 
authority of March 17, 1900, and "L" (Cyclist) Com- 
pany, also at Perth, under that of May 26, 1900 ; 
but after the war it was found impossible to maintain 
them, and "I" Company was reduced in 1902 and 
"K" and "L" in 1905, thus leaving the battalion 
with eight companies, including a cyclist section. 

On October 17, 1901, Black Watch kilts with red- 
and-black diced hose, white spats, and white sporrans 
with five black tassels were introduced, sashes for 
Serjeants being at the same time authorised. 

Battalion headquarters, with drill-hall, were in Tay 
Street, Perth, and six rifle-ranges at the headquarters 
of companies served the battalion. 

The lieutenant-colonels commanding have been — 

Sir William Keith Murray, Bart, of Ochtertyre, late Captain 

42nd Foot, November 20, 1860. 
George, 6th Duke of Atholl, late Lieutenant 2nd Dragoons, 

November 22, 1861. 
James Wedderburn Ogilvy of Eannagulzion, late Captain 25th 

Toot, March 7, 1864. 
David K. Williamson of Lawers, late Ensign and Lieutenant 

Coldstream Guards, July 23, 1873. 
William C. Colquhoun of Clathick, late 15th Foot, August 16, 

1879. 
Patrick Stirling of Kippendavie, late 92nd Foot, March 22, 1884. 
Sir Robert D. Moncreiffe, Bart, of Moncreiffe, V.D. (hon. col.), 

late Lieut. Scots Guards, April 15, 1893. 



$th Volunteer Battalion the Black Watch. 251 

5th (PERTHSHIRE HIGHLAND) VOLUNTEER 

BATTALION, THE BLACK WATCH 

(ROYAL HIGHLANDERS). 

Regimental District, No. 42. 

(Plate XXVI.) 

" South Africa, 1900-02." | Order op Precedence, 186. 

Headquarters — Birnam. 

The 3rd Perthshire (Breadalbane) Rifle Volunteer 
Corps, four companies strong, was raised in the end 
of 1859, and its officers were commissioned on February 
29, 1860, the major-commandant being John, second 
Marquess of Breadalbane, K.T. Headquarters were at 
Taymouth Castle, and those of its four companies : 1st 
at Kenmore, 2nd at Aberfeldy, 3rd at Killin, and 4th 
at Strathfillan. The uniform was plain dark green 
doublets, without facings, and with black buttons 
marked " BV," Breadalbane Campbell kilts and belted 
plaids, round deerskin sporran with three tassels, black 
and red twisted "moggans" with black spats, "Rob 
Rorison" bonnets with badge and sprigs of heather 
and bog myrtle, and black belts. To this corps was 
attached, for administrative purposes, the 10th Perth- 
shire Rifle Volunteer Corps, of one company, with 
headquarters at Strathtay, raised on May 19, 1860. 
Its first uniform was rifle-green coatees with short 
tails and brass buttons marked " SV," without facings, 
42nd tartan trews, plain glengarries, and black belts, 
but soon the uniform was assimilated to that of the 
3rd Corps, black and red diced hose, white goatskin 
sporrans without tassels, and white spats being worn. 



252 Records of the Several Corps. 

On November 12, 1861, the 2nd Administrative Bat- 
talion Perthshire Rifle Volunteers, with headquarters 
at Taymouth, was formed, comprising the 3rd and 10th 
Perth and the 9th Argyllshire Rifle Volunteers, the 
latter a corps of one company, with headquarters at 
Glenorchy, raised on April 12, 1860, from the Bread- 
albane estates in Argyllshire, and wearing grey doub- 
lets with green facings, and kilts and belted plaids of 
Breadalbane Campbell tartan. 

In 1865 the 9th Argyllshire was transferred to its 
own county battalion (see 5th V.B. Argyll and Suther- 
land Highlanders). In 1869 the 3rd Perthshire was 
reduced to two companies and split into two corps of 
one company each, the 3rd (Breadalbane) at Aberfeldy 
and the 4th (Breadalbane) at Killin, and at the same 
time the 5th (Blairgowrie), 7th (Coupar- Angus), 9th 
(Alyth), 13th (St Martins), and 14th (Birnam) Corps 
were transferred to the 2nd from the 1st Administrative 
Battalion Perthshire Rifle Volunteers, and the strength 
of the battalion was raised to nine companies by the 
formation of the 20th Corps at Pitlochry on May 27, 
1869. Battalion headquarters were at the same time 
moved to Birnam. The uniform of the battalion was 
authorised to be dark grey doublets with scarlet collars, 
cuffs, and piping, and black lace across the breast, plain 
glengarries (with blackcock's tail for officers), and black 
belts. The 3rd, 4th, and 10th Corps wore Breadalbane 
Campbell, the 13th Macdonald, the 14th Royal Stuart, 
and the 20th Atholl (Murray) kilts and belted plaids, 
while the 5th, 7th, and 9th Corps wore Atholl (Murray) 
tartan trews, which they only exchanged for kilts of 
the same tartan in 1881. 

In 1873 the 10th Corps was disbanded, and in the 
following year the title "Perthshire Highland" was 
conferred upon the battalion, which in March 1880 



$th Volunteer Battalion the Black Watch. 253 

was consolidated as the 3rd (re-numbered 2nd in April 
1880) Perthshire (Perthshire Highland) Rifle Volun- 
teers, with headquarters at Birnam, and eight com- 
panies lettered : A, Aberfeldy (late 3rd Corps) ; B, 
Killin (detachments at Crianlarich, Lochearnhead, and 
Kenmore) (late 4th) ; C, Blairgowrie (late 5th) ; D, 
Coupar-Angus (late 7th) ; E, Alyth (late 9th) ; F, St 
Martins (late 13th); G, Birnam (late 14th); and H, 
Pitlochry (late 20th). In 1883 the whole battalion 
adopted the uniform worn ever since, namely, dark 
grey doublets with scarlet collars, cuffs, and piping, 
42nd tartan kilts and belted plaids (shoulder plaids for 
officers), white sporrans with two black tails, green and 
red diced hose (black and red for officers), white spats, 
plain glengarries (with blackcocks' tails for officers), 
and black belts. Drab service doublets and khaki 
spats for marching order were authorised in 1902. 

By General Order 181 of December 1, 1887, the title 
of 5th (Perthshire Highland) Volunteer Battalion, The 
Black Watch, was conferred upon the battalion. 

During the South African War 94 members of the 
battalion served in the field, of whom 23 non-commis- 
sioned officers and men joined the 1st, Lieutenant F. B. 
Buchanan- White and 31 men the 2nd, and Lieutenant 
T. Ferguson and 10 men the 3rd Volunteer Service 
Company of the Black Watch, the remainder serving 
in various other corps. One man was wounded and 3 
died of disease. 

In 1899 the headquarters of F Company were trans- 
ferred from St Martins to New Scone, and in the same 
year two new companies, at Blairgowrie and Birnam, 
were added to the establishment of the battalion, 
but these were reduced again in 1904 and 1905 re- 
spectively. The battalion in 1907 possessed 17 separate 
rifle-ranges. 



254 Records of the Several Corps. 

The lieutenant -colonels commanding the battalion 
have been — 

John, 2nd Marquess of Breadalbane, K.T., November 12, 1861 to 
1862. 

"William M. Macdonald of St Martins (hon. col.), March 7, 1864. 

Sir Kobert Menzies of Menzies, Bart., V.D. (hon. col.), February 
28, 1885. 

Gavin, 3rd Marquess of Breadalbane, K.G., A.D.C., Colonel, Feb- 
ruary 17, 1897. 



6th (FIFESHIRE) VOLUNTEER BATTALION, 

THE BLACK WATCH (ROYAL 

HIGHLANDERS). 

Regimental District, No. 42. 

(Plate XXVII.) 

" South Africa, 1900-02." | Order of Precedence, 213. 

Honorary Colonel — Sir ff. "W. Erskine, Bt., V.D., August 11, 1900. 

Headquarters — St Andrews. 

The 1st Administrative Battalion Fifeshire Rifle Volun- 
teers, with headquarters at St Andrews, was formed 
on September 21, 1860, and to it were attached the 
following corps of Fifeshire Rifle Volunteers : — 

1st, Dunfermline, raised in consequence of a meeting held on 
November 14, 1859, when 104 names were put down to join. 
The public subscription list was headed by one of £300 from 
Mr James Kerr of Middlebank. Members paid £2 entrance 
money, and many equipped themselves. The services of the 
corps, of two companies, were accepted on February 25, 
1860, and the officers were commissioned on March 6, 1860. 
The uniform was medium grey with scarlet facings and brown 



6th Volunteer Battalion the Black Watch. 255 

belts, the officers wearing five rows of black lace on the breast 
of the tunic, and having cock's feathers in their caps. 

2nd, Cupar, raised March 6, 1860, of two companies. 

3rd, Kilconquhar, later East Anstruther, raised April 25, 1860, 
as one company. 

4th, Colinsburgh, raised April 20, 1860, as one company. 

5th, St Andrews, raised April 23, 1860, as one company. Uni- 
form — medium grey tunic with buttons in a fly, scarlet collar 
and piping, and black Austrian knot, grey trousers with 
black stripe, grey cap with black band and scarlet piping, 
to which was afterwards added a scarlet ball-tuft, and brown 
belts. 

6th, Strathleven, raised August 25, 1860, as one company. In 
1872 the corps was increased to two companies, the head- 
quarters of the 1st being placed at Leslie and of the 2nd 
at Falkland, but the latter was not officially recognised till 
1880. 

7th, Kirkcaldy, raised April 23, 1860, as one company. 

8th, Auchterderran, raised April 20, 1860, as one company; head- 
quarters transferred to Lochgelly in 1870. 

9th, Newburgh, raised July 28, 1860, as one subdivision, increased 
to one company June 2, 1862. 

In June 1861 the 1st Kinross Corps was attached to 
the battalion, but was transferred to the 1st Clack- 
mannan and Kinross Administrative Battalion in 1873. 

With the exception of the 1st and 5th Corps, the 
details of the original uniform are not known, but at 
a meeting held at Cupar early in 1860 it was decided 
that all the corps of the county should be clothed in 
medium (slate) grey with brown belts. Slight differ- 
ences between corps existed, and two of them had no 
red collars and black lace across the breast of the tunic. 
In 1863 the whole battalion was clothed in loose scarlet 
blouses with purple collars, cuffs, and piping, and " 79 " 
(the county precedence number) on the shoulder-straps, 
and blue shakos with front and rear peaks and green 
ball-tuft. The medium grey trousers were continued, 



256 Records of the Several Corps. 

but with red piping, and also the brown belts, the 
ornaments on which were changed from bronze to white 
metal. Officers had silver lace and Austrian knots. In 
1875 scarlet tunics with blue facings and blue trousers 
with red piping were adopted, and for the shako was 
substituted a plain blue glengarry, which was worn 
till 1880, when a dark green helmet took its place for 
full dress. In 1878 a blue (in 1880 black) Austrian 
knot was adopted and worn on the cuff till 1905. The 
brown belts (with pouch-belts with whistle and chain 
for officers and Serjeants) have been worn throughout. 
On January 15, 1903, drab service dress, with scarlet 
Austrian knot and trouser piping and brown felt hat, 
was authorised as undress. 

In April 1880 the battalion was consolidated as the 
1st Fifeshire Rifle Volunteers, with headquarters at St 
Andrews, and twelve companies lettered as follows : 
A and B, Dunfermline (late 1st) ; C and D, Cupar (late 
2nd); E, East Anstruther (late 3rd); F, Colinsburgh 
(late 4th) ; G, St Andrews (late 5th) ; H, Leslie (late 
1st of the 6th) ; I, Falkland (late 2nd of the 6th) ; K, 
Kirkcaldy (late 7th) ; L, Lochgelly (late 8th) ; and 
M, Newburgh (late 9th). In 1887, by General Order 
181 of 1st December, the title of 6th (Fifeshire) V.B., 
The Black Watch, was assumed by the battalion. 

Sixty -seven members of the battalion, none of 
officer's rank, served in South Africa during the war. 
At home certain interior changes only were carried out 
in the battalion, the headquarters of " C " and " D " 
Companies being changed to Kirkcaldy and of " K " to 
Cupar on March 12, 1900, the number of volunteers in 
the latter having fallen off while that in Kirkcaldy 
had much increased. A new " O " (Cyclist) Company 
was formed at Dunfermline on January 2, 1901. In 
1906 the headquarters of F Company were changed 



ist Vol. Bat. Highland Light Infantry. 257 

from Colinsburgh to Leven, so that the distribution of 
the companies of the battalion then became : A, B, 
and O, Dunfermline ; C and D, Kirkcaldy ; E, East 
Anstruther ; F, Leven ; G, St Andrews ; H, Leslie ; I, 
Falkland ; K, Cupar ; L, Lochgelly ; M, Newburgh. 
The battalion had ten rifle ranges, one of which, at 
Pilmuir Links, near St Andrews, was held conjointly 
with the 1st Fife RG.A. Volunteers. 

The list of lieutenant-colonels commandant is — 

Sir Thomas Erskine, Bt. of Cambo, September 21, 1860. 

Sir Coutts T. Lindsay, Bt., late Lieutenant and Captain Grena- 
dier Guards, September 6, 1864. 

Sir ff. W. Erskine, Bt., late Lieut.-Colonel Scots Guards, V.D. 
(hon. col.), August 16, 1884. 

Sir Ealph W. Anstruther, Bt. of Balcaskie, late Captain RE. 
(hon. col.), May 16, 1900. 



1st VOLUNTEER BATTALION, THE HIGH- 
LAND LIGHT INFANTRY. 

Regimental District, No. 71. 

(Plate XXVIII.) 

"South Africa, 1900-02." | Order op Precedence, 115. 

Honorary Colonel — General Sir Archibald Hunter, K.C.B., D.S.O., 
June 24, 1907. 

Headquarters — 24 Hill Street, Garnethill, Glasgow. 

The services of the 19th Lanark (Glasgow, 2nd 
Northern) R.V.C., a one-company corps, were accepted 
on December 5, 1859, and on December 30 its officers 
were commissioned. In the February 1860 Army List 
the 23rd, 24th, 28th, 36th, and 41st Corps are shown 
as amalgamated with it. To these were added in the 
R 



258 Records of the Several Corps. 

September 1860 List the 51st, 67th, 74th, 80th, 81st, 
83rd, and 89th Corps (of which the first six had for 
a short time formed the 5th Administrative Battalion 
Lanarkshire R.V.), and in the November 1860 List the 
85th and 91st, — the 19th Lanarkshire (Glasgow, 2nd 
Northern) R.V.C. being shown in the latter list as 
composed of 15 companies. 

In the 'Glasgow Directory' of June 1861 the corps 
is termed the " 2nd Regiment Lanarkshire Rifle 
Volunteers," but there is no mention of this title in 
any Army List. The two battalions into which it was 
divided were locally termed the 2nd and 3rd North- 
ern (the 4th Lanark R.V. being reckoned the " 1st 
Northern "), but this again was not officially recognised. 

The dates of acceptance of services and of first com- 
missions of officers of the various corps are given in 
Appendix C. All the corps were of one - company 
establishment, and their origins were as follows : — 

2nd Northern Battalion. 

19th Corps (Glasgow, 2nd Northern), artisans in the Western 
and Clyde Engineering Works, helped by the Central Fund. 

23rd Corps (Warehousemen), an entirely self-supporting body 
raised among the large drapery establishments of the city. 

24th Corps (North- Western), raised in the Cowcaddens district. 

28th Corps (Eailway), formed from employes of the Edinburgh 
and Glasgow Eailway, the directors of which contributed 
towards the expenses of its equipment. 

36th Corps, formed from the men of Messrs Edington & Co.'s 
Phoenix Ironworks, Port Dundas. Besides being most 
liberally aided by the firm, this corps was helped from the 
Central Fund. 

41st Corps (North - Western Artisans) consisted chiefly of 
masons, and was assisted in its equipment by subscrip- 
tions and out of the Central Fund. 

89th Corps (Manufacturers), a self-equipped corps raised among 
the employes of the textile manufacturers of Glasgow. 




t*2 < 



ist Vol. Bat. Highland Light Infantry. 259 

3rd Northern Battalion. 

51st Corps (2nd Press), an overflow corps of the 50th (see 1st 

Lanark V.E.C.), raised in the newspaper offices of the city, 

and assisted by the Central Fund. 
67th Corps, raised among the workmen of Messrs D. Laidlaw 

& Sons, of the Alliance Foundry, and assisted from the 

Central Fund. 
74th Corps (Grenadiers), a self - equipped corps of superior 

physique, accepting no recruits under 5 ft. 9 in. 
80th Corps, composed of the workmen of Messrs M'Gavin & Co., 

ironworkers, Windmill Croft, who subscribed liberally, the 

corps being also assisted from the Central Fund. 
81st Corps (Northern Artisans), raised mainly from the workers 

in Messrs Law & Co.'s Iron Foundry, Port Dundas, who 

subscribed to the funds, which were augmented from the 

Central Fund. 
83rd Corps (Northern Artisans), composed chiefly of joiners, and 

aided from the Central Fund. 
85th Corps (2nd North-Eastern), raised among the iron-workers 

of the North-Eastern and St Eollox districts. 
91st Corps (3rd Abstainers' Artisans), raised among the workers 

of certain total abstainer firms. 

Very little is on record of the uniforms worn by these 
corps at first, except that they were mostly grey, that 
the 74th had tall shakos with cock's feathers, and that 
the 89 th had a " handsome dark green uniform with 
shako and plume." Shortly after consolidation the 
corps adopted a medium grey uniform, without fac- 
ings, with black lace and piping, medium grey cap with 
black piping, and black belts. In 1863, however, its 
uniform was changed to rifle-green with light green 
facings, piping, and Austrian knot, rifle-green caps with 
light green and black diced band, and black belts. 

In 1864 the establishment of the corps was reduced 
to twelve companies, 1 and it was formed into one 
1 The 89th Corps became No. 2 Company and the 51st No. 10. 



260 Records of the Several Corps. 

battalion, at which strength it ever since then re- 
mained. It was re-numbered the 5th Lanark Rifle 
Volunteers in June 1880, and in 1887, by General 
Order 181 of 1st December, it assumed the desig- 
nation of 1st V.B. Highland Light Infantry. 

The uniform underwent many changes. In 1870 
rifle-green doublets with light-green collars and cuffs, 
yellow piping, and silver buttons, Breadalbane Campbell 
tartan trews, rifle-green shakos with black lace, light 
green and yellow diced band and green and yellow ball- 
tuft, and black waist-belts became the uniform, officers 
wearing lines and shoulder-plaids. This, however, only 
lasted till 1874, when the uniform of the 90th Light 
Infantry (included in the 60th Sub-District Brigade, to 
which the 19th Lanark then belonged) was adopted — 
namely, scarlet tunics with buff facings (worn with a 
white Austrian knot as volunteers), blue trousers, dark 
green shakos with black ball -tuft, and white belts. 
This gave way on May 23, 1883, to the uniform of 
the Highland Light Infantry, the officers alone wear- 
ing shakos and the men glengarries, the yellow fac- 
ings at first worn being changed to buff on April 20, 
1903, when sashes for Serjeants were also introduced. 
On January 4, 1905, a drab service dress, to be worn 
with the glengarry, was authorised in addition to the 
full dress. 

The battalion contributed to all the volunteer service 
companies of the Highland Light Infantry, sending to 
the 1st Captain D. S. Morton, Lieutenant J. Kelso, and 
27 men ; to the 2nd, Lieutenant T. L. Jowitt and 22 
men ; and to the 3rd, 5 men. In all, 70 members of 
the battalion served in South Africa. Private J. 
Jamieson died of disease, and Captain D. S. Morton 
was mentioned in despatches. In 1902 the battalion 
was placed in the 34th Field Army Brigade, and 



15/ Vol. Bat. Highland Light Infantry. 261 

trained for thirteen clear days annually with it until 
1906, when the brigade was broken up. 

The first headquarters of the corps were at 179 
West George Street, Glasgow, its drill-hall and drill- 
field being in Parliamentary Road, but in July 1876 
headquarters were changed to 13 Renfrew Street, and 
in July 1879 a new drill-hall in Ark Lane, Dennistoun, 
was purchased. This latter was blown down in the 
great gale on 25th December 1879, and the Crown 
Halls, 98 Sauchiehall Street, were rented, until in 1885 
new headquarters and drill-hall at 24 Hill Street, 
Garnethill, were built and purchased, the cost being 
finally cleared off by a bazaar held in 1891. In 1886 
a new range at Dechmont, near Cambuslang, up to 
1000 yards, which was held conjointly with the 1st 
Lanark R.E.V. and 2nd V.B.H.L.L, was opened and 
taken into use. 

The lieutenant-colonels commandant have been — 

John Middleton, December 7, 1860. 

Eobert Eobson, December 17, 1873. 

John M. Forrester, September 16, 1874. 

James Mactear, June 22, 1881. 

John A. Sillars, February 27, 1886. 

Edmund H. B. Lysons, late lieut. E.M.L.I. (hon. col.) (formerly 

adjutant of the corps, December 1, 1869 to May 21, 1888), 

May 21, 1888. 
Eobert C. Mackenzie, V.D. (hon.* col.), February 27, 1892. 
James Outram, V.D. (hon. col.), June 8, 1906. 



262 Records of the Several Corps. 

2nd VOLUNTEER BATTALION, THE 
HIGHLAND LIGHT INFANTRY. 

Regimental District , No. 71. 

(Plate XXIX.) 

"South Africa, 1900-02." | Order op Precedence, 116. 

Honorary Colonel— Sir T. J. Lipton, Bt., K.C.V.O., November 21, 1900. 

Headquarters — Yorkhill Street, Glasgow. 

The " 6th Battalion Lanarkshire Rifle Volunteers " 
appeared for the first time in the Army List for July 
1860, as consisting of the 25th, 26th, 27th, 40th, 68th, 
69th, 70th, and 71st Corps, of one company each, the 
dates of acceptance of services and of commissioning 
of officers of which are shown in Appendix 0. The 
battalion was locally known as the " Clyde Artisans," 
the corps having been all formed from the employes 
of the great Clyde shipbuilding and engineering yards 
as follows : — 

25th Corps, Messrs Barclay, Curie, & Co. 

26 th Corps, Messrs R Napier & Sons, Go van. 

27th Corps, Messrs E. Napier & Sons, Engineering Department. 

40th Corps, various smaller yards. 

68th Corps, Messrs Neilson & Co.'s Locomotive Works. 

69 th Corps, Messrs J. & G. Thompson's. 

70th Corps, Messrs A. & J. Inglis, and Todd and MacGregor's. 

71st Corps, Lancefield Forge and the Anderston Foundry. 

All these corps were liberally subscribed to by the 
firms from whose workers they were raised, the 25th 
alone being aided from the Glasgow Central Fund. 
The original uniforms were dark grey, with black or 
red facings according to corps (black for the 25th), 




n 



2nd Vol. Bat. Highland Light Infantry. 263 

and black lace, grey caps with a plume of cock's 
feathers for officers, and black belts. 

In April 1861 these eight companies were con- 
solidated as the 25th Lanark Rifle Volunteers, head- 
quarters at Kelvinhaugh Eoad, Glasgow, the com- 
panies being lettered: A, 26th; B, 68th; C, 7lst; 
D, 40th; E, 70th; F, 27th; G, 69th; and H, 25th 
Corps. At the same time the uniform was changed 
to rifle-green with scarlet cuffs, collars, and piping, 
rifle-green shakos with black ball-tufts, and black belts. 
This uniform was worn till 1873, when scarlet tunics 
with black facings and Austrian knot, blue trousers, 
blue shakos with red and white ball-tufts, and white 
belts were adopted, leggings not being worn. 

In June 1880 the corps was re-numbered the 6th 
Lanark, and blue helmets with silver ornaments 
replaced the shakos. In 1882 the establishment was 
increased to ten companies (at which it remained till 
1908, one having been since 1900 a cyclist company), 
and in 1887 the battalion assumed the designation of 
2nd V.B. The Highland Light Infantry (Army Order 
181 of 1st December). In 1898 brown leather equip- 
ment was provided, and leggings introduced. 

During the Boer War the battalion contributed 
Lieutenant J. Shearer and 24 men to the 1st, 21 
men to the 2nd, and 11 men to the 3rd Volunteer 
Service Company of the Highland Light Infantry. 
Of these Serjeant W. Black was drowned in the 
Orange River, and Private R. A. M'Gilvray died of 
disease. Captain T. K. Gardner served with the 3rd 
Battalion Scottish Rifles, and in all 79 members of 
the battalion saw active service in South Africa. 

In 1904 the facings were changed to blue, but in 
1906 (January 10) a complete change of uniform was 
sanctioned, a drab service doublet of H.L.L pattern, 



264 Records of the Several Corps. 

Mackenzie tartan kilt, black sporran with three white 
tassels, red and white hose, drab spats, blue Balmoral 
bonnet with red, white, and blue diced border and 
eagle's feather, and brown equipment being adopted 
as the sole dress. Officers wore Highland Light 
Infantry doublets and mess uniforms, with buff 
facings. 

The battalion had its own spacious and recently 
built headquarters and drill - hall, with underground 
range, in Yorkhill Street, Overnewtown, Glasgow, and 
shared since 1886 the range at Dechmont, near 
Cambuslang, with the 1st Lanark R.E.V. and the 
1st V.B.H.L.I. 

The lieutenant-colonels commanding have been — 

William Rigby, retired pay (major July 28, 1860), Lieut- 
Colonel, April 23, 1861. 
Walter M. Neilson, January 5, 1863. 
Adam Morrison (hon. col.), October 10, 1874. 
Peter W. Hall, V.D. (hon. col.), May 9, 1887. 
John D. Young, V.D. (hon. col.), July 3, 1897. 
Hugh D. D. Chalmers, V.D. (hon. col.), December 13, 1905. 



3rd Vol. Bat. Highland Light Infantry. 265 

3rd (THE BLYTHSWOOD) VOLUNTEER BAT- 
TALION, THE HIGHLAND LIGHT IN- 
FANTRY. 

Regimental District, No. 71. 

(Plate XXX.) 

"South Africa, 1900-02." | Order of Precedence, 117. 

Honorary Colonel — Colonel A. C. Lord Blythswood, A.D.C., V.D., 
late Lieut.-Colonel Scots Guards, May 28, 1902. 

Headquarters — 69 Main Street, Bridgeton, Glasgow. 

This battalion represents two corps which had a 
separate existence up to 1873, and were known as the 
5th and 31st Lanark Rifle Volunteers. The former 
was absorbed in the latter, so the 31st is the parent 
corps of the 3rd V.B. Highland Light Infantry. 

The "4th Battalion Lanarkshire Rifle Volunteers" 
was formed on the 4th July 1860 out of the 30th, 
31st, 38th, 45th, 46th, 47th, 75th, and 84th Corps. 
In March 1861 the 86th and 96th Corps were added 
to it, and the battalion was termed the " 2nd Ad- 
ministrative Battalion Lanarkshire Rifle Volunteers," 
the 88th Corps being added to it in October 1861, 
making in all twelve companies, each corps consisting 
of one company only, except the 96th, which had two. 
The dates of acceptance of services and of commission- 
ing of officers of these corps is given in Appendix C. 
Their origin and composition were as follows : — 

30th Corps (1st Central) was raised in the East Central district, 

and comprised a good number of artisans. 
31st and 75th Corps, the latter an overflow company of the 

former, were raised in the leather trade and assisted from 

the Central Fund. 



266 Records of the Several Corps. 

38th Corps (Rifle Rangers) was raised in the Central district 

among better class mechanics, and assisted from the 

Central Fund. 
45th, 46th, and 47th Corps were raised among the grocers of 

the city, the firms of which subscribed upwards of £1000 

towards their equipment. 
84th Corps was raised in the grain and provision trade out of 

the overflow of the 63rd (see 1st Lanark V.R.C.) 
86th Corps was raised among the tailors, and was assisted out 

of the Central Fund, the members making their own 

uniforms. 
88th Corps was formed from men employed in the fleshers' 

trade. 
96th Corps was a mixed self-supporting corps of citizens, raised 

as one company and afterwards increased to two. 

The original uniform of the 30th Corps was light 
grey with no facings and scarlet piping, that of the 
31st, 38th, and 75th Corps, dark grey with red collars 
and cuffs and black lace, dark grey caps with red 
piping, and black belts, and that of the 45th, 46th, 
47th, and 84th Corps, a lighter shade of grey. The 
86th Corps wore green without braid, with red collars 
and cuffs and black Austrian knot, green caps, and 
black belts, and the 96th Corps had a green uniform 
with red facings and brown belts, which only cost 
22s. 6d. a man. In July 1861 the battalion adopted 
a uniform dress of rifle-green with scarlet collars and 
piping, rifle-green shakos with a black ball-tuft, and 
black belts. 

In 1864 the 88th, and in 1865 the 30th Corps were 
disbanded, and on 10th May 1865 the battalion was 
consolidated as the 31st Lanark Rifle Volunteers, of 
ten companies, with headquarters in North John 
Street, Glasgow. Locally the battalion was called 
the" "Central Battalion," but there is no official trace 
of this title, and it was only in June 1869 that the 




■tx 

"S o 
X 



3rd Vol. Bat. Highland Light Infantry. 267 

name "Blythswood Rifles" was added to the title of 
the battalion in compliment to its commanding officer, 
Lieut. -Colonel Campbell of Blythswood. 



The "7th Battalion Lanarkshire Eifle Volunteers" 
appears for the first time in the September 1860 Army 
List, as composed of the 5th, 34th, 35th, 58th, 59th, 
64th, 65th, 66th, and 90th Corps, and in October the 
21st is added to them. The dates of acceptance of 
services and of commissioning of officers of these corps, 
which consisted of one company each, are given in 
Appendix C. Their composition was as follows : — 

5th Corps (1st Eastern). An entirely self-supporting corps, the 
members providing their own arms and equipment. Uni- 
form — dark grey with black facings and lace, and black 
belts. 



21st Corps (Parkhead Artisans). 

34th Corps (1st Eifle Eangers). 

35th Corps (2nd Eifle Eangers). 

58th Corps (Eastern Artisans). 

59th Corps (Eastern Artisans). 

66 th Corps (Eastern Eifle Eangers), 

90th Corps (Whitevale). 

of the 5th, some having cock's plumes in their caps. The 
58th had five rows of black braid on the breast of the tunic, 
no facings, black lace on the cuff, and black cord shoulder- 



Artisan corps raised in the 
eastern district of Glas- 
gow, and, with the ex- 
ceptions of the 34th and 
90th, assisted from the 
Central Fund. Uniforms 
generally similar to that 



64th Corps (1st Eutherglen). "i Corps raised in Eutherglen, and 
65th Corps (2nd Eutherglen). f liberally assisted by subscrip- 
tions in the district. Uniform — Elcho grey .with scarlet 
collars and black lace, grey caps with black band and 
scarlet piping, and brown belts. 



1 A specimen of this uniform is to be seen in the Glasgow Art Galleries, 
Kelvingrove Park. 



268 Records of the Several Corps. 

In the January 1861 Army List the above ten com- 
panies were shown as amalgamated, dated November 
27, 1860, as the 5th Lanark Rifle Volunteers, with 
an establishment of twelve companies ; so presumably 
two new companies were formed for it. On consoli- 
dation the corps adopted a rifle-green uniform with 
black facings and scarlet piping on the trousers, rifle- 
green shakos with black ball-tuft, and black belts ; in 
1869 black haversacks were adopted, and in 1872 black 
busbies with black plumes were taken into wear. The 
corps was reduced to ten companies in 1864, and its 
numbers gradually fell off until, in September 1873, 
it was amalgamated with the 31st Lanark Rifle 
Volunteers. 

Its lieutenant-colonels commanding had been — 

William Stirling, July 28, 1860. 

John Boag, April 3, 1863. 

James Farie, February 21, 1868. 

James K. Eeid, October 12, 1869, till September 16, 1873. 



The amalgamation of the remains of the 5th Lanark, 
then under Major Thomas Glen, with the 31st Lanark, 
brought to the latter no increase of establishment, but 
in 1874 the uniform was changed to scarlet tunics with 
blue facings and trousers, blue glengarries, and white 
belts, helmets being issued in 1878 and a blue Austrian 
knot added to the cuffs. In 1877 the establishment 
was increased to twelve companies; on June 20, 1880, 
the battalion was re-numbered the 8th Lanarkshire 
R.V. (The Blythswood), and in 1887, by General 
Order 181 of December 1, the title of 3rd (The 
Blythswood) V.B. The Highland Light Infantry was 
assumed. The full uniform of the Highland Light 



yd Vol, Bat. Highland Light Infantry. 269 

Infantry, with white metal ornaments and brown 
belts, was authorised to be worn on May 14, 1886, 
officers wearing white belts in full dress, and officers 
and Serjeants were authorised to wear sashes in 1904. 
The facings remained the original yellow adopted in 
1886. 

Sixty-one members of the battalion took part in the 
war in South Africa. Of those, 24 men served in the 
1st, 21 in the 2nd, and 11 in the 3rd Volunteer Service 
Company of the Highland Light Infantry, of whom 
Serjeant J. Cooper died of wounds and Private A. 
Dobie of disease ; Private H. Paterson was wounded 
at Vecht Kop. Surgeon-Major R. Pollok served with 
the KA.M.C, and Lieutenant W. H. Youden with 
the 3rd Battalion Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders. 
A cyclist section was formed in 1900, and from 1902 
to 1906 the battalion formed part of the 34th Field 
Army Brigade, training thirteen clear days in camp 
annually. 

The headquarters and drill-hall of the battalion, at 
69 Main Street, Bridgeton, were erected in 1902 at a 
cost of £12,000, and it possessed its own rifle-range, 
up to 900 yards, at Gilbertfield, near Cambuslang. 

The lieutenant - colonels (commandant since 1887) 
have been — 

Alexander Cowan Ewing, September 20, 1860. 

John Campbell of Possil, late Captain 7th Dragoon Guards, 

December 1, 1864. 
Archibald Campbell Campbell (afterwards Lord Blythswood), 

A.D.C., V.D., Colonel, late Lieutenant-Colonel Scots Fusilier 

Guards, July 25, 1867. 
William Clark, V.D. (hon. col.), January 13, 1897. 
Eobert S. Murray, Y.D. (hon. col.), April 17, 1901. 
E. Barclay Shaw, V.D. (hon. col.), March 19, 1904. 
David Eunciman Graham, V.D. (hon. col.), July 26, 1905. 
Francis J. Stevenson, V.D. (hon. col.), February 10, 1906. 



270 Records of the Several Corps. 

9th LANARKSHIRE RIFLE VOLUNTEER 
CORPS. 

Regimental District, No. 71. 

(Plate XXXI.) 

"South Africa, 1900-02." | Order of Precedence, 118. 

Headquarters — Lanark. 

The "8 th Battalion Lanarkshire Rifle Volunteers " 
appears for the first time in the January 1861 Army 
List as having been formed on December 9, 1860, 
when it was composed of the 37th (Lesmahagow), 
55th (Lanark), 73rd (Carluke), and 94th (Douglas) 
Corps of one company each, the dates of offer of 
services and of commissioning of officers of which 
are given in Appendix C. The uniform of the 37th 
Corps was Elcho grey tunics and knickerbockers, with 
scarlet piping and scarlet and black Austrian knots, 
small grey shakos with a blackcock's tail on the 
left side, scarlet piping, and bugle and crown badge, 
yellow leather leggings, and brown belts. Those of 
the 55th and 73rd Corps are given as "grey, facings 
scarlet," and are stated to have been similar to that 
of the 37th. In March 1861 the battalion became 
the 3rd Administrative Battalion Lanarkshire Rifle 
Volunteers, with headquarters at Lanark. Locally it 
was, and continued to be, known as the " Upper 
Ward Battalion." In 1862 the battalion adopted a 
scarlet tunic with blue facings and white Austrian 
knot, blue trousers with red piping, blue shakos with 
red piping and black ball-tuft, and brown belts. 

In 1863 the 62nd Corps (Biggar), which had had 
an ephemeral existence in 1860 (see Appendix C), was 
revived and added to the battalion, and in 1875 the 




it 



gth Lanarkshire Rifle Volunteer Corps. 271 

107th Corps (Leadhills) was formed, thus bringing the 
establishment of the battalion up to six companies. 

In March 1880 the battalion was consolidated and 
numbered the 37th, but in June 1880 it was re- 
numbered the 9th Lanarkshire Rifle Volunteer Corps. 
The companies were lettered — A, Lesmahagow (late 
37th); B, Lanark (late 55th); C, Biggar (late 62nd); 
D, Carluke (late 73rd) ; E, Douglas (late 94th) ; and F, 
Leadhills (late 107th). In the same year blue helmets 
took the place of the shakos, white belts replaced the 
brown, and for the tunic was substituted a red serge 
frock with blue collar, red cuffs, and white Austrian 
knot. On June 27, 1883, sanction was given for the 
adoption of the scarlet doublet with yellow facings 
and Mackenzie tartan trews of the Highland Light 
Infantry, with black leggings. The helmet was re- 
tained until 1904, when it was replaced by the diced 
shako of the H.L.I, for officers and a glengarry for 
the other ranks. In 1904, also, the facings were 
changed from yellow to buff. 

In 1894 the headquarters of "E" Company were 
transferred to Forth, and in 1901 those of "F" 
Company were moved to Law, the Leadhills de- 
tachment becoming a section of " C " Company. The 
battalion possessed five rifle-ranges. 

During the South African War 96 members of 
the battalion — including Captain J. Gray, who was 
attached to the Scottish Volunteer Cyclist Company, 
and was mentioned in despatches — saw active service. 
Of these, 25 men served with the 1st, 22 with the 2nd, 
and 18 with the 3rd Volunteer Service Company of 
the Highland Light Infantry, of whom Lance-Corporal 
J. Walker and Private A. Gray died of disease, and 
Private A. Wilson was wounded at Retief s Nek ; 26 
men served with the Imperial Yeomanry. 



272 Records of the Several Corps. 

The commanding officers of the battalion have 
been — 

Major James T. Brown, December 12, 1860. 

Major Hugh Mossman, July 15, 1868. 

Major James Stevenson Hamilton, late Captain 12th Lancers, 

September 21, 1872. 
Lieut. - Colonel J. Stevenson Hamilton (afterwards James 

Stevenson), A.D.C., C.B., V.D., Colonel, May 26, 1875. 
Lieut.-Colonel W. Bertram, Major (retired pay), late Manchester 

Eegiment, December 20, 1905, to March 10, 1908. 



5th (GLASGOW HIGHLAND) VOLUNTEER 
BATTALION, THE HIGHLAND LIGHT 
INFANTRY. 

Regimental District, No. 71. 

(Plate XXXI.) 

" South Africa, 1900-02." | Order of Precedence, 119. 

Honorary Colonel— J. D. S. Duke of Argyll, K.T., G.C.M.G., G.C.V.O., 
V.D., June 21, 1899. 

Headquarters — 81 Greendyke Street, Glasgow. 

As the outcome of a desire expressed by many High- 
landers resident in Glasgow that a Highland volunteer 
battalion should be formed, a meeting was held in 
Glasgow for the purpose on April 24, 1868, and at 
this it was announced that 200 men had already- 
given in their names as ready to join. Six hundred 
men joined that evening, and the services of the corps, 
as the 105th Lanarkshire (Glasgow Highland) Rifle 
Volunteers, of twelve companies, were accepted on July 



$th Vol. Bat. Highland Light Infantry. 273 

21, 1868, the commissions of the first officers being 
dated October 19. 187 officers and men transferred 
their services to it from the Highland companies of 
the 4th Lanarkshire (see 4th V.B. Scottish Rifles). 
"C" Company was originally recruited from residents 
of Partick, " E " from those of Crosshill, " F " from 
natives of Islay, "G" from natives of Argyllshire, 
and the other companies had general recruiting. The 
uniform, sanctioned on September 28, 1868, was 
modelled on that of the 42nd Highlanders, and con- 
sisted of scarlet doublets with blue facings, 42nd tartan 
kilts and belted plaids, white sporrans with three black 
tails, red-and-black diced hose, white spats, glengarries 
with blackcock's tail, and white belts. The cap and 
sporran badges were St Andrew with his cross within 
a garter, inscribed " Clanna nan Gaidheal ri guelibh a 
cheile" ("Highlanders, shoulder to shoulder"). 

The first public appearance of a portion of the corps 
was on October 8, 1868, when H.R.H. the Prince of 
Wales laid the foundation-stone of the new University 
buildings. 

In June 1880 the battalion was re -numbered the 
10th Lanarkshire Rifle Volunteers, and in 1877, by 
General Order 181 of December 1, it received the 
title of 5th (Glasgow Highland) V.B., The Highland 
Light Infantry. In 1885 the "set" of the tartan 
(which had been smaller) was changed to that worn 
by the Black Watch, the badges of the latter were 
adopted, the sporran received five black tassels instead 
of the three long tails, the blackcocks' tails were re- 
moved from the glengarries, and "G.H." was substi- 
tuted for "10 Lk." on the shoulder-straps. In 1902 
the officers were permitted to wear feather bonnets 
with scarlet and white hackles, and sashes for Ser- 
jeants were issued. At the same time drab service 
s 



274 Records of the Several Corps. 

doublets and drab spats were authorised as undress 
and service dress. 

134 members of the Glasgow Highlanders saw active 
service in South Africa during the war. Of these, Lieut. 
J. R. Leisk and 30 men served with the 1st, Major 
P. W. Hendry, Lieut. G. Wingate, and 24 men with 
the 2nd, and 9 men with the 3rd Volunteer Company 
of the Highland Light Infantry, of whom Private D. M. 
Rose died of disease, and Colour - Serjeant F. Willis 
and Private W. Duncan were wounded, the former at 
Vecht Kop, the latter at Retief s Nek. Captain C. C. 
Murray and 37 men served in the Imperial Yeomanry, 
and the remainder of the number in various units. 

A thirteenth (cyclist) company was added to the 
battalion in 1900. 

Of recent years, "A" Company was recruited from 
Highland residents of Springburn, " B " from White- 
inch, " C " from Partick, " E " from Queen's Park, " M " 
from Hillhead, and "F," as always, from natives of 
Islay. The headquarters and drill-hall of the battalion 
were at 81 Greendyke Street, Glasgow, and it shared 
with the 3rd V.B., Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, 
a rifle-range up to 900 yards at Patterton. 

The following is the list of lieutenant-colonels com- 
mandant : — 

Francis Robertson -Reid, late Captain Royal Renfrew Militia (hon. 

col.), May 7, 1869. 
James Todd Stewart, V.D. (hon. col.), May 10, 1890. 
Charles M. Williamson, V.D. (hon. col.), May 15, 1895. 
Thomas Ramsay, V.D. (hon. col.), July 18, 1903. 
William I. Mackenzie, V.D., February 25, 1905. 
Patrick W. Hendry, V.D. (hon. captain in the army) (hon. col.), 

September 16, 1905. 
Alexander Birrell, V.D. (hon. col.), December 1, 1906. 



15/ Vol. Battalion Seaforth Highlanders. 275 

1st (ROSS HIGHLAND) VOLUNTEER BAT- 
TALION, SEAFORTH HIGHLANDERS (ROSS- 
SHIRE BUFFS, THE DUKE OF ALBANY'S). 

Regimental District , No. 78. 

(Plate XXXII.) 

" South Africa, 1900-02." | Order op Precedence, 154. 

Honorary Colonel — J. A. F. H. Stewart-Mackenzie of Seaforth, Brevet- 
Colonel (retired pay), late 9th Lancers, November 28, 1903. 

Headquarters — Dingwall. 

The 1st Administrative Battalion, Ross -shire Rifle 
Volunteers, was formed, with headquarters at Ding- 
wall, on September 30, 1861, and the following corps, 
of one company each, raised in Ross-shire, were incor- 
porated with it on that date : — 

1st, Invergordon, raised February 15, 1860. Uniform — medium 
grey tunic, trousers, and cap with black braid, no facings, 
brown waist-belt. Headquarters removed, 1869, to Tain. 

2nd, Dingwall, raised February 15, 1860. Uniform the same as 
the 1st Corps, but with black leggings and a black plume 
in the cap. 

3rd, Avoch, raised February 17, 1860. Uniform — grey tweed 
loose jacket, knickerbockers, and cap, brown leggings and 
brown waist-belt. Headquarters changed in 1876 to Fort- 
rose, a mile from Avoch. 

4th, Knockbain, services accepted March 22, 1860 ; officers com- 
missioned April 12, 1860. Uniform — light grey tunics with 
red facings, light grey trousers with black braid, light grey 
cap with deer's-head badge, black patent-leather waist- and 
shoulder-belts, and black leggings. Headquarters trans- 
ferred in 1876 to Munlochy, in the parish of Knockbain. 

5th, Alness, raised May 20, 1861. Uniform — grey. Headquarters 
transferred in 1865 to Ullapool. 

6th, Alness, raised as one subdivision on May 21, 1861. Uniform 
— grey. Increased to one company, and headquarters trans- 
ferred to Invergordon in 1871. 



276 Records of the Several Corps. 

In 1864 it was decided to clothe the battalion in 
scarlet hooked tunics with blue facings, white cord on 
the collar and cuffs, and black braid down the front, 
blue trousers with red piping, blue shakos with red 
band, deer's-head badge, and white horse-hair plume, 
and white patent-leather waist- and pouch-belts, and 
this uniform was adopted in the following years by 
all the above companies with the exception of the 
3rd, which adopted scarlet doublets with blue facings, 
Mackenzie tartan kilts, and plain glengarries, and wore 
this uniform till 1876. 

Subsequently to 1864 the following corps were raised 
and added to the battalion : — 

7th, Evanton, raised May 12, 1866. Uniform for a short time — 
grey tunics, 42nd tartan trews, and plain glengarries; but 
in the end of 1866 the company adopted scarlet doublets 
with blue (later buff) facings, Mackenzie tartan kilts, heather 
mixture hose with green tops, no spats, grey goat -skin 
sporrans without tassels or badge, plain glengarries with 
deer's-head badge, and white patent-leather belts. 

8th, Moy, near Dingwall, raised August 11, 1866, from men of 
the Brahan estate. Uniform — scarlet doublet with white 
facings ; otherwise the same as the 7th. 

9th, Gairloch, raised February 23, 1867. Uniform — scarlet doublet 
with blue facings ; otherwise the same as the 7th. 

On November 1, 1875, a new uniform was approved 
for the battalion. It consisted of a scarlet doublet with 
blue collar and cuffs, the latter with black Austrian 
knot and blue piping, Mackenzie tartan trews, glen- 
garries with diced border and deer's-head badge, and 
white belts. This uniform was adopted by the whole 
battalion, the 3rd, 7th, 8th, and 9th Corps discon- 
tinuing the wearing of the kilt. 

In June 1800 the battalion was consolidated as 
the 1st Ross-shire (Ross Highland) Rifle Volunteers, 
with headquarters at Dingwall, and nine companies, 




Mix 



ist Vol. Battalion Seaforth Highlanders. 277 

lettered as follows : A, Tain (late 1st Corps) ; B, 
Dingwall (late 2nd) ; C, Fortrose (late 3rd) ; D, Mun- 
lochy (late 4th) ; E, Ullapool (late 5th) ; F, Inver- 
gordon (late 6th); G, Evanton (late 7th); H, Moy 
(late 8th); and I, Gairloch (late 9th). In 1887 the 
title of 1st (Ross Highland) V.B. Seaforth Highlanders 
was conferred upon the battalion by General Order 
181 of December 1, and about this time the head- 
quarters of G Company were moved to Dingwall, with 
a detachment at Alness, and of H Company to Fair- 
burn, close to Moy, on the Brahan estate. 

After 1880 the battalion had been gradually revert- 
ing to the kilted uniform, H Company having resumed 
it in 1881 and A in 1883 ; but it was only on October 
31, 1888, that authority was given for the adoption 
by the battalion of the full dress of the Seaforth 
Highlanders, the diced glengarry being substituted 
for the feather bonnet. Yellow facings were then 
worn, but these were changed to buff in 1903, in 
which year also brown belts were substituted for the 
white hitherto worn. On June 14, 1902, drab service 
doublets and drab spats were authorised for marching 
and drill order dress. 

During the war in South Africa the battalion 
furnished 110 of its members for active service. Of 
these, 43 men joined the 1st, 26 men the 2nd, and 
Lieutenant W. M. Macphail and 3 men the 3rd 
Volunteer Service Company of the Seaforth High- 
landers. The remainder, including Lieutenant J. O. 
Black, served in various corps. 

Headquarters of the battalion were at Dingwall, 
and those of companies were — 



A, Tain. 


F, Invergordon. 


B, Dingwall. 


G, Dingwall, with detachment 


C, Fortrose. 


at Alness. 


D, Munlochy. 


H, Fairburn (Brahan). 


E, Ullapool. 


I, Gairloch. 



278 Records of the Several Corps. 

The battalion had fourteen separate rifle-ranges. 
In 1865 Captain Ross of the battalion won the 
Queen's Prize at Wimbledon. 

The commanding officers have been — 

Keith W. Stewart-Mackenzie of Seaforth, late Lieutenant 90th 

Foot, Major, September 30, 1861 ; Lieut.-Colonel, May 26, 

1865. 
Duncan H. C. E. Davidson of Tulloch (hon. col.), Lieut.-Colonel, 

August 17, 1881. 
Alexander J. C. Warrand, V.D. (hon. col.), Lieut.-Colonel, March 

29, 1889. 
Alexander E. B. Warrand, Captain (retired pay), late Seaforth 

Highlanders (hon. col.), Lieut.-Colonel, July 1, 1897. 



1st SUTHERLAND (THE SUTHERLAND HIGH- 
LAND) VOLUNTEER RIFLE CORPS. 
(Sutherland, Orkney, and Caithness.) 
Regimental District, No. 72. 

(Plate XXXIII.) 

" South Africa, 1900-02." | Order of Precedence, 188. 

Honorary Colonel — His Majesty the King. 

Headquarters — Golspie. 

The first meeting which led to the formation of the 
1st Sutherland Rifle Volunteers was held in Golspie 
Inn on June 6, 1859, the chair being taken by Mr 
Charles Hood of Inverbrora, and at it a number of 
gentlemen enrolled themselves. On October 17 in- 
timation was received that the services of the Golspie 
company had been accepted, and shortly afterwards 
similar sanction was given to companies at Dornoch 




< z f> < 

5 h -o r! 



515 5 



ist Sutherland Volunteer Rifle Corps. 279 

and Brora. These three formed the 1st Sutherland 
Rifle Volunteers, a corps of three companies, the dates 
of commission of the officers being : 1st, Golspie, 
December 2, 1859; 2nd, Dornoch, December 2, 1859; 
3rd, Brora, January 3, 1860, — the date of formation 
of the three into one corps being January 1861. The 
uniform of the corps was medium grey tunics and 
trousers with blue facings and piping, grey shakos 
with band of Sutherland tartan and black horse-hair 
plume, and brown belts. The clothing, &c, for the 
three companies cost £1000, of which the Duke of 
Sutherland paid £800, the rest being raised by sub- 
scriptions in the county. A fourth company for the 
corps was formed at Rogart, the first meeting having 
been held on October 13, 1860, and its officers were 
commissioned in January 1861. Its uniform was 
scarlet doublets with yellow collars, Sutherland tartan 
kilts and belted plaids, grey goat-skin sporrans, black- 
and-red diced hose, plain glengarries, and white belts, 
with a plate on the pouch- belt bearing the inscription 
" Duchess Harriet's Company, Rogart." It is believed 
that this was the first rifle volunteer corps in Scotland 
to adopt the national scarlet uniform. In 1863 the 
1st, 2nd, and 3rd Companies adopted the same doublet 
as the 4th, with Sutherland tartan trews and white 
belts, and all four companies adopted glengarries with 
red, white, and blue diced borders. 

In Caithness three companies were at first formed, 
the 1st at Thurso on April 10, 1860, the 2nd at Wick 
on February 16, 1861, and the 3rd at Halkirk on 
April 11, 1861. Their uniform was light grey tunics 
with red piping, darker grey trousers with red piping, 
a grey shako with bugle and crown badge and red- and - 
white horse-hair plume (feathers for officers), and brown 
belts. 



280 Records of the Several Corps. 

In Orkney and Shetland a small corps, the 1st, was 
raised at Lerwick as one subdivision on April 24, 1860, 
and increased to full-company strength on August 24, 
1866. 

On January 4, 1864, the 1st Administrative Bat- 
talion, Sutherland Rifle Volunteers, with headquarters 
at Golspie, was formed out of the above corps, the 
1st Sutherland being broken up into four independent 
corps, which resumed their former numbers in the 
county, the battalion thus consisting of the 1st, 2nd, 
3rd, and 4th Sutherland, 1st Orkney and Shetland, 
and 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Caithness Corps. To these 
were added on September 25, 1867, the 4th Caithness 
Corps of one company, formed at Watt en, and on 
August 6, 1868, the 5th Sutherland Corps of one 
company, formed at Bonar Bridge. The Orkney and 
Caithness corps in 1864 adopted a uniform of scarlet 
tunics with blue facings, dark grey trousers with red 
piping, and blue shakos with red band and red-and- 
white plume, and two or three years later exchanged 
their brown belts for white. In 1870-74 the shoulder- 
belts were abolished and the plume replaced by a 
ball-tuft, and in 1879 the shakos gave way to blue 
helmets with star and crown badge in silver. The 
Sutherland companies were, in 1867, all provided with 
Sutherland tartan kilts and belted plaids, with grey 
goat-skin sporrans, red-and-green diced hose (with 
white spats from 1870), and glengarries with red-and- 
white diced borders, the 5th Corps receiving this 
uniform on its first formation. 

In September 1866 H.R.H. the Prince of Wales 
reviewed the battalion at Dunrobin and was appointed 
honorary colonel of it, which His Majesty continued 
to be till 1908. 

In June 1880 the battalion was consolidated as the 



15/ Sutherland Volunteer Rifle Corps. 281 

1st Sutherland Highland Bine Volunteers, headquarters 
at Golspie, with ten companies, lettered as follows : A, 
Golspie (late 1st Sutherland) ; B, Dornoch (late 2nd 
Sutherland) ; C, Brora (late 3rd Sutherland) ; D, 
Bogart (late 4th Sutherland) ; E, Bonar Bridge (late 
5th Sutherland) ; F, Lerwick (late 1st Orkney and 
Shetland); G, Thurso (late 1st Caithness); H, Wick 
(late 2nd Caithness) ; I, Halkirk (late 3rd Caithness) ; 
K, Watten (late 4th Caithness). 

The 1st Sutherland was always remarkable for the 
fine physique of its men, and it is on record that at 
the Boyal Beview in Edinburgh, in 1881, in the leading 
company the flank men were each 6 ft. 3 in. and the 
centre man 5 ft. 10 in. 'The Times' correspondent 
wrote : " Splendid men the Duke's corps are, reminding 
some of the spectators of the 93rd in its Crimean days. 
They marched also as well as they looked." 

The year 1883 was marked in the annals of the 
battalion by one of its members, Colour-Serjeant B. 
Mackay, winning the Queen's Prize at the National 
Bine Association Meeting. In this year also the 
Caithness companies began to conform to the dress 
of the rest of the battalion, and " G," " I," and " K " 
Companies adopted the kilt and doublet, "H" Com- 
pany following suit in the following year. In 1884 
the "F" (Lerwick) Company was disbanded and a 
new "F" Company raised in its place at Lairg, in 
Sutherland. Brass bands were abolished in the bat- 
talion in 1883, and a band of thirty pipers, besides 
drummers, formed, the pipers wearing green doublets, 
Sutherland kilt, Boyal Stuart shoulder - plaid, and 
plain glengarries with blackcock's tail. In 1890 a new 
Caithness company (L) was raised at Wick, and in 
1901 a sixth (M) at Beay, thus bringing the battalion 
up to a strength of twelve companies — six in Suther- 



282 Records of the Several Corps. 

land (A to F) and six in Caithness (G to M). In 
1899 two white tassels for the men and three for the 
officers were added to the sporrans, and on February 
19, 1906, a drab service doublet was authorised to be 
worn in undress and marching order. The officers' 
glengarries had been plain blue since 1880, and they 
wore red-and-white hose in levee dress. 

Eighty-seven members of the 1st Sutherland served 
during the South African War. Of these, Lieutenant 
R. G. Campbell and 34 men served -with the 1st, 
Captain W. C. Ross, Lieutenant J. Brims, and 18 men 
with the 2nd, and 2 men with the 3rd Volunteer 
Service Company of the Seaforth Highlanders, of whom 
1 man (transferred to the Scottish Horse) was killed 
and 3 died of disease. Sixteen men served in Lovat's 
Scouts and 9 in other corps of Imperial Yeomanry, 
3 in the South African Constabulary, and 1 in a 
volunteer service company of the Black Watch. 
Surgeon-Captain J. K. Tomory served in a medical 
capacity. 

Owing to the scattered nature of the battalion, each 
company had its own rifle range or ranges, there being 
thirteen in all. The headquarters range at Golspie, 
up to 1000 yards, belonged to the "Sutherland Rifle 
Association." 

The commanding officers of the battalion have been — 

G. G. W. Duke of Sutherland, K.G., Major, January 30, 1860 ; 
Lieut.-Colonel, January 4, 1864. 

C. Marquis of Stafford, late Lieutenant 2nd Life Guards, Lieut.- 
Colonel, April 26, 1882. 

C. G. Sinclair, younger of Ulbster, Lieut.-Colonel, June 13, 1891. 

D. Menzies of Blarich, Kogart, Lieut.-Colonel, June 10, 1893. 
J. Mackintosh, V.D., Lieut.-Colonel, August 30, 1899. 

John Morrison, V.D. (hon. col.), Lieut.-Colonel, November 2, 
1901 ; Lieut.-Colonel Commandant, October 31, 1903. 



2>rd Vol. Battalion Seaforth Highlanders. 283 

3rd (MORAYSHIRE) VOLUNTEER BATTALION, 
SEAFORTH HIGHLANDERS (ROSS-SHIRE 
BUFFS, THE DUKE OF ALBANY'S). 

Regimental District, No. 72. 

(Plate XXXIV.) 

"South Africa, 1900-02." | Order of Precedence, 195. 

Honorary Colonel — Charles J. Johnston, V.D. (hon. col.), November 22, 
1902. 

Headquarters — Elgin. 

The first public meeting with a view to the formation 
of this corps was held in Elgin on June 20, 1859 ; but 
though much enthusiasm was displayed, nothing was 
done until November 28, when the master tradesmen 
of Elgin held a meeting, at which it was resolved to 
form a rifle corps, and on December 5 a public meeting 
was held at which the formation of two companies was 
decided upon. These became the 2nd and 3rd Elgin, 
the 2nd being composed of citizens, the 3rd of artisans. 
In Forres a meeting had been held on January 4, 1860, 
the outcome of which was the 1st Elgin Corps at Forres, 
which gained the first place in precedence in the county 
by the expedition displayed in the offer of its services. 

The 1st Administrative Battalion, Elgin Rifle Volun- 
teers, with headquarters at Elgin, was formed on May 4, 
1860, and to it were attached, at that time or on the 
subsequent date of their formation, the following corps 
of Elgin Rifle Volunteers : — 

1st, Forres. Services accepted January 11, 1860, as one company. 
Officers commissioned January 3, 1860. Uniform — dark 
grey (dark green according to one authority) with black 
facings and scarlet piping, black shakos, and brown belts. 
Increased to two companies May 22, 1867. 



284 Records of the Several Corps. 

2nd, Elgin (citizens). Services accepted January 31, 1860, as one 
company. Officers commissioned February 24, 1860. Uni- 
form — Elcho grey with scarlet facings and piping, black 
caps with peak, and black belts. 

3rd, Elgin (artisans). Services accepted February 20, 1860, as 
one company. Officers commissioned March 6, 1860. Uni- 
form — Elcho grey with scarlet facings and piping, black 
shakos with black horse-hair plume, and black belts. 

4th, Eothes, formed May 28, 1860, as one company. Uniform 
— Elcho grey with black facings and piping, black caps with 
peak, and black belts. 

5th, Fochabers, formed April 10, 1861, as one company. Uniform 
— dark grey with black facings and scarlet piping, and black 
belts. 

6th, Carr Bridge, formed August 26, 1861, as one company. 
Uniform — Elcho grey with scarlet facings and piping, black 
caps with peak, and black belts. 

7th (The Duff), Lhanbryde, afterwards Urquhart. Formed April 
15, 1863, as one company. Increased to one and a half 
companies May 12, 1863. 

8th, Garmouth, formed December 2, 1867, as one company. 

9th, Grantown, formed January 9, 1871, as one company. 

In 1862 the uniform of the whole battalion was 
changed to scarlet tunics with blue facings and white 
Austrian knot, blue trousers, blue shakos with black 
ball-tuft, and black belts. The 7th, 8th, and 9th Corps 
adopted this uniform on their formation, except that 
the 7th had a band of Duff tartan round the shako. 
The 6th Corps had scarlet doublets with blue facings, 
Grant tartan kilts, green- and -black hose, goat-skin 
sporrans, glengarries, and black belts, but did not wear 
spats till 1878. In 1879 blue helmets were substituted 
for the shakos, and white belts replaced the black 
hitherto worn. 

In March 1880 the battalion was consolidated as the 
1st Elgin Rifle Volunteers, headquarters at Elgin, with 
ten companies, lettered as follows : A and H, Forres 
(late 1st Corps) ; B and C, Elgin (late 2nd and 3rd) ; 










5 .-S i 



MS 



yd Vol. Battalion Seaforth Highlanders. 285 

D, Rothes (late 4th) ; E, Fochabers (late 5th) ; F, Carr 
Bridge (late 6th) ; G, Urquhart, with a half company 
at Pluscarden (late 7th) ; I, Garmouth (late 8th) ; and 
K, Grantown (late 9th). 

On January 11, 1886, the battalion was authorised 
to wear scarlet doublets with yellow facings, Mackenzie 
tartan trews, glengarries with diced red, white, and 
blue border, and white belts; and in 1887, by General 
Order 181 of December 1, the title of 3rd (Morayshire) 
V.B., Seaforth Highlanders, was conferred upon it. 
The headquarters of F Company were at this time 
changed to Abernethy, and in 1897 the half company 
of G at Pluscarden was raised to a full company and 
lettered " L," its headquarters being moved thence to 
Alves in 1904. In 1905 the headquarters of " G " 
Company were moved back to Lhanbryde, their orig- 
inal station. 

On May 21, 1898, the kilt, sporran, hose, and spats 
of the Seaforth Highlanders were authorised to be worn 
by the battalion; on June 14, 1902, drab doublets and 
drab spats were authorised for service dress, and in 
1905 the facings were changed from yellow to buff. 

The battalion contributed in all 193 of its members 
for service in South Africa during the war. Of these, 
there joined the volunteer service companies of the 
Seaforth Highlanders, — 1st contingent, Captain C. 
Ernest Johnston and 48 others (including 6 reservists) ; 
2nd, Lieutenant W. C. Reid and 9 others ; 3rd, 64 
men ; 4th, 24 men, — in all, 2 officers and 145 other 
ranks. Of the 1st contingent, Corporal A. Paterson 
was wounded at Heilbron ; and of the 2nd, Corporal 
J. Dow received a commission in the 2nd Scottish 
Horse, and was killed on 21st December 1901. 

The distribution of the battalion from 1905 onwards 
was : A and H Companies, Forres ; B and C, Elgin ; 
D, Rothes, with a detachment at Archiestown ; E, 



286 Records of the Several Corps. 

Fochabers; F, Abernethy; G, Lhanbryde; I, Garmouth; 
K, Grantown, with a detachment at Cromdale ; and L, 
Alves. The headquarters occupied a commodious build- 
ing in the Cowper Park, Elgin, and there were two 
headquarter ranges at Garmouth, twelve miles from 
Elgin, for B, C, G, and I Companies, and nine ranges 
in other parts of the county for the others. 
The lieutenant-colonels commanding have been — 

Sir A. P. Gordon-Cumming, Bart, of Altyre, Major, May 4, 1860 ; 

Lieut-Colonel, June 12, 1861. 
Hon. James Grant, late Lieutenant 42nd Foot, October 24, 1866. 
William Culbard, September 25, 1880. 
Felix Calvert Mackenzie, Y.D. (hon. col.), May 28, 1884. 
Charles J. Johnston, V.D. (hon. col.), September 23, 1893. 
Eobert Urquhart, M.V.O., V.D. (hon. col.), September 13, 1902. 
Sir George A Cooper, Bart., V.D., December 9, 1907. 



Note. 

The 1st Nairn Eifle Volunteer Corps was raised at Nairn as 
one company on April 14, 1860. It was reduced to a subdivision 
in 1861, and disbanded in 1862. 



1st VOLUNTEER BATTALION, THE GORDON 
HIGHLANDERS. 

Regimental District, No. 75. 

(Plate XXXV.) 

"South Africa, 1900-02." | Order op Precedence 143. 

Headquarters — Aberdeen. 

With a view to forming rifle corps in the city of Aber- 
deen, a preliminary meeting was held on May 28, 1859, 
the Lord Provost in the chair, and this was followed by 



ist Vol. Bat. the Gordon Highlanders. 287 

a public meeting on May 30. There were formed the 
following corps (see Appendix A) : — 

6th. Kaised November 19, 1859 ; a self-supporting corps of one 
company. 

7th. Eaised November 19, 1859 ; a self-supporting corps of one 
company. 

8th. Raised November 26, 1859 ; a corps of one company, com- 
posed of employe's of Aberdeen merchants, and aided by the 
contributions of the latter. A second company was formed 
for it on December 30, 1859. 

9th. Eaised December 30, 1859, as one company. 

11th. Eaised January 13, 1860, as one company ; composed of 
artisans, who paid £1 towards the cost of their equipment. 

12th. Eaised January 27, 1860, as two companies ; composed of 
artisans, as in the 11th. 

13th. Eaised January 21, 1860, as one company ; mainly recruited 
from the employes of the Scottish North-Eastern Eailway. 

These corps were consolidated on March 16, 1860, as 
the 6th Aberdeenshire Rifle Volunteers, the companies 
being numbered in the order of the first commissions of 
their captains as follows : — 



No. 1 Coy. (late 6th Corps). 
No. 2 Coy. (late 7th Corps). 
No. 3 Coy. (late 1st of the 8th 

Corps). 
No. 4 Coy. (late 2nd of the 8th 

Corps). 
No. 5 Coy. (late 9th Corps). 



No. 6 Coy. (late 11th Corps). 
No. 7 Coy. (late 13th Corps). 
No. 8 Coy. (late 1st of the 12th 

Corps). 
No. 9 Coy. (late 2nd of the 12th 

Corps). 



On July 19, 1860, in consequence of the general 
re-numbering throughout the county (see Appendix A), 
the corps became the 1st Aberdeenshire Rifle Volun- 
teers. Its uniform was dark grey with black braid 
and four rows of black lace on the breast, grey caps 
with peak, and black patent-leather belts. On Nov- 
ember 10, 1860, a tenth company was added, which 
wore grey doublets with black facings, Forbes tartan 
trews and shoulder-plaids, and glengarries. On May 



•288 Records of the Several Corps. 

4, 1861, the 1st and 2nd Companies were amalgamated 
as the 1st, the others took the next higher number, and 
a new No. 10 Company was raised, which wore green 
doublets with black piping, 42nd tartan kilts, green-and- 
black diced hose, grey sporrans with three white tassels, 
Balmoral bonnets with eagle's feather, and black belts. 
The 9th Company were disbanded on November 24, 1861, 
as they had declined to change their uniform to conform 
to that of the rest of the battalion, and had been insub- 
ordinate in the matter; and the same fate befell the 
10th (kilted) Company in 1862, when (on June 27) a 
rifle-green uniform was adopted by the battalion. This 
consisted of a hooked tunic with five rows of black lace 
on the breast and black braid on the cuffs, trousers with 
black braid stripe, rifle-green shakos with black ball- 
tuft, and black patent-leather belts. In 1870 a com- 
pany at Woodside, beyond the city boundary, was 
added to the corps, bringing it up to nine companies, 
at which strength it continued until 1895, although 
throughout its official establishment was eleven com- 
panies. On June 25, 1880, the companies were lettered 
Atol. 

On December 8, 1879, authority was given to change 
the uniform to one of scarlet doublets with yellow fac- 
ings, Gordon tartan trews, blue helmets, brown belts, 
and black leggings, the officers to wear shoulder-plaids, 
white sword-belts, and dirks on white waist-belts, and 
in 1884, by General Order 12 of February 1, the title 
of 1st Volunteer Battalion, Gordon Highlanders, was 
conferred upon the battalion. The full uniform of the 
Gordon Highlanders (less the feather bonnet, which was 
replaced by the glengarry with red, white, and blue 
diced border), with white belts, was authorised on 
October 30, 1895, but the change was carried out 
gradually, a new company, "L," formed in that year 



ist Vol. Bat. the Gordon Highlanders. 289 



being the first to be kilted, and the whole battalion 
being completely re-clothed only by 1901. Drab ser- 
vice doublets were authorised for undress on July 9, 
1902, and sashes to be worn by Serjeants in full dress. 
A cyclist section was formed for the battalion in 
1890; in 1898 "H" Company was broken up and a 
new company, "U," formed from university students, 
and in 1905 D and I Companies were amalgamated 
as " D," and E and L as " M." The official establish- 
ment of the battalion was reduced from eleven to nine 
companies in 1903, but only eight actually existed 
since then, and these represented the following units 
of earlier existence : — 

A Gov. (former 6th and 7th Aber- F Coy. (former 13th Aberdeen). 

deen). G Coy. (former 1st of the 12th 
B Coy. (former 1st of the 8th Aberdeen). 

Aberdeen). M Coy. (former 11th Aberdeen and 
C Coy. (former 2nd of the 8th L Coy. of 1895). 

Aberdeen). U Coy., university company. 
D Coy. (former 9th Aberdeen and 

Woodside Company). 

During the South African War 128 members of 
the battalion served in the field. To the 1st Volun- 
teer Service Company it contributed Captain J. B. 
Buchanan, Lieutenant F. J. O. Mackinnon, and 57 
other ranks. This company left Aberdeen on February 
16, 1900, served with the 1st Battalion of the Gordon 
Highlanders, and returned to Aberdeen on May 4, 
1901. It distinguished itself at the action of Doorn- 
kop, near Johannesburg, on May 29, 1900, and there 
Captain Buchanan, Lieutenant Mackinnon, and 5 other 
ranks of the 1st Volunteer Battalion were wounded, 
and Lance- Serjeant W. Simpson and Private G. W. 
Middleton were killed. In the action at Leehoek, 
near Krugersdorp, on July 11, one man of the 1st 
Volunteer Battalion, and on September 30, at Komati 
Poort, two more men of the battalion, were wounded. 



290 Records of the Several Corps. 

To a draft sent out from Aberdeen on May 18 to 
strengthen this company, the battalion contributed 
Captain W. O. Duncan and 14 other ranks. 

The 3rd Volunteer Service Company left Aberdeen 
on March 15, 1901, and joined the 2nd Battalion in 
South Africa, returning to Aberdeen on July 6, 1902. 
To it the 1st Volunteer Battalion contributed Lieu- 
tenant R. A. Henderson and 34 other ranks, of whom 
one private (C. V. Hutchison) died of disease. The 
4th Volunteer Service Company, which left Aberdeen 
on March 2, 1902, joined the 1st Battalion, and re- 
turned to Aberdeen on July 14, 1902, included 2nd 
Lieutenant G. A. S. Chedburn and 18 other ranks of 
the 1st Volunteer Battalion. 

Captain J. B. Buchanan was mentioned in despatches 
for his services in South Africa. 

In 1902 the battalion was attached to the 34th 
Field Army Brigade, and trained in camp for thirteen 
clear days annually until 1906, when the brigade was 
broken up. 

The rifle-range of the battalion, up to 900 yards, 
was at Seaton Links, two and a half miles from 
Aberdeen. 

The lieutenant -colonels commanding the battalion 
have been — 

Napier Turner Christie, late Major 38th Foot, March 5, 1860. 
Henry Knight - Erskine of Pittodrie, late Captain 33rd Foot, 

January 13, 1862. 
William Jopp (hon. col.), December 24, 1870. 
Douglass Duncan, V.D. (hon. col), September 20, 1890. 
George Cruden, V.D. (hon. col.), September 20, 1900. 
Lachlan Mackinnon, V.D. (hon. col.), December 10, 1904. 
D. B. D. Stewart, V.D. (hon. col.), November 19, 1906. 



2.nd Vol. Bat. the Gordon Highlanders. 291 

2nd VOLUNTEER BATTALION, THE 
GORDON HIGHLANDERS. 

Regimental District, No. 75. 

(Plate XXXVI.) 

" South Africa, 1900." | Order op Precedence, 144. 

Headquarters — Old Meldrum. 

In June 1861 the 2nd Administrative Battalion, Aber- 
deenshire Rifle Volunteers, was formed from the then 
existing 2nd (Tarves, of three companies), 5th (New 
Deer, of one subdivision), 6th (Ellon, of one com- 
pany), and 19th (New Deer, of one company) Corps of 
Aberdeenshire Rifle Volunteers, headquarters being at 
Tarves. In November 1861 the 5th and 19th Corps 
were amalgamated as the 5th Corps of one company, 
which in 1862 was transferred to the 3rd Administra- 
tive Battalion (afterwards 3rd V.B., q.v.), and in the 
latter year the 13th (Turriff), 15th (Fyvie), and 16th 
(Meldrum) Corps, hitherto unattached, and each of 
one company, were added to the battalion. The 2nd 
Administrative Battalion, therefore, then consisted of 
the 2nd, 6th, 13th, 15th, and 16th Corps, the dates 
of formation of which are given in Appendix A. Their 
original uniforms were as follows : — 

2nd Corps, dark green, with black patent-leather belts. 

6th Corps, Elcho grey with scarlet piping, caps with scarlet 

piping and ball-tuft, and brown belts. 
13th Corps, Elcho grey. 
15 th Corps, Elcho grey. 
16th Corps, Elcho grey; but in 1863 this corps adopted dark 

green uniforms with black facings and belts. 

In 1864 a new 12th Corps was raised at Udny to 
replace the former 12th Corps (headquarters at Old 



292 Records of the Several Corps. 

Aberdeen, raised July 21, 1860, and hitherto un- 
attached), which had been disbanded the previous year, 
and was added to the battalion ; and in this same year, 
1864, the battalion, with the exception of the 16th 
Corps, adopted an Elcho grey uniform with scarlet 
collars, piping, and Austrian knot, and black braid on 
the collar and round the cuff, grey shakos with black 
ball-tuft, and brown belts. The 16th Corps continued 
to wear its dark green uniform, assumed in 1863, until 
1875. 

In the beginning of 1867, headquarters of the 12th 
Corps were transferred to Newmachar, and on June 11 
of that year the 2nd Corps, which had been reduced 
from three to two companies in 1862, was divided into 
two, of which the first retained the name 2nd Corps 
and had its headquarters at Methlie, while the second, 
with headquarters at Tarves, became the 18 th Corps. 
In 1868 the headquarters of the battalion were re- 
moved from Tarves to Old Meldrum, and in 1877 to 
Aberdeen, about which time also the headquarters 
of the 12th Corps were moved from Newmachar to 
Newburgh. 

In May 1875 the whole battalion was authorised 
to wear scarlet doublets with yellow facings, Gordon 
tartan trews, blue helmets, and white belts, but in 
1880 the helmets were replaced by glengarries with 
red, white, and blue diced border, and brown belts 
were reintroduced. This uniform continued to be worn 
till 1908, drab service doublets, to be worn with the 
glengarry and tartan trews in undress and marching 
order, having been sanctioned in 1906. 

The battalion was consolidated in May 1880 as the 
2nd Aberdeenshire Rifle Volunteers, with headquarters 
at Aberdeen, and seven companies, lettered as follows : 
A, Methlie (late 2nd Corps) ; B, Ellon (late 6th) ; C, 




t$ o 



•3< 



2.nd Vol. Bat. the Gordon Highlanders. 293 

Newburgh (late 12th) ; D, Turriff (late 13th) ; E, Fyvie 
(late 15th); F, Old Meldrum (late 16th); and G, Tarves 
(late 18 th). 

In 1884, by General Order 12 of February 1, the 
battalion became the 2nd Volunteer Battalion Gordon 
Highlanders, and since then the only changes in its 
formation were the raising of a cyclist section in 1890, 
and the removal of headquarters from Aberdeen to 
Old Meldrum in 1899. 

During the South African War the battalion fur- 
nished 27 of its members for active service, of whom 
22 joined the 1st Volunteer Service Company, 1 its 
reinforcing draft, and 1 the 4th Service Company of 
the Gordon Highlanders (see 1st Volunteer Battalion). 
Of the members of the battalion in the 1st Company, 
2 were wounded on May 29, 1900, at Doornkop, 
2 on July 11 at Leehoek, and 1 on September 30 
at Komati Poort, and Privates J. A. Gordon and 
W. Geddes were mentioned in Lord Roberts' despatch 
of September 4, 1901. 

The battalion possessed eleven separate rifle-ranges. 

The lieutenant-colonels commanding have been — 

Sir W. C. Seton, Bart, of Pitmedden, May 14, 1863. 

J. Kamsay, June 24, 1871. 

Henry Wolrige- Gordon of Esslemont (hon. col.), June 14, 1873. 

James Mackie, V.D. (hon. col.), May 30, 1891. 

John Rae, V.D. (hon. col.), February 10, 1894. 

John Marr, V.D. (hon. col.), March 12, 1902. 

John L. Eeid, June 2, 1906. 



294 Records of the Several Corps. 

3rd (THE BUCHAN) VOLUNTEER BATTALION, 
THE GORDON HIGHLANDERS. 

Regimental District, No. 75. 

(Plate XXXVII.) 

" South Africa, 1900-01." | Order of Precedence, 145. 

Honorary Colonel— C. G. Earl of Errol, K.T., C.B., Colonel (retired pay), 
late 2nd Life Guards, May 28, 1892. 

Headquarters — Peterhead. 

The 3rd Administrative Battalion, Aberdeenshire Rifle 
Volunteers, with headquarters at Peterhead, was formed 
in January 1862 from the following corps, the dates of 
formation of which are given in Appendix A : — 

5th, New Deer, one company. Uniform — dark grey with red 

piping, and black belts. Caps with sloping peak, black 

band, red piping, and red-and-white badge on left side. 
9th, Peterhead, two companies. Uniform — medium grey with 

red piping and black cord lace, caps with black band and 

red piping, and black belts. 
17th, Old Deer, two companies. Uniform — Elcho grey with blue 

piping, cap with black band and blue piping, and brown 

belts. 
20th, Longside, one company. Uniform — dark grey with black 

piping and cord lace, caps with black band, and black belts. 

On August 18, 1863, the whole battalion adopted 
tunics and knickerbockers of Elcho grey with black 
piping (and cord lace for officers), grey stockings, grey 
caps with black-and-white diced border, and black 
belts, but this uniform was changed in 1868 to rifle 
green tunics and trousers with scarlet collars and 
piping, green shakos with green ball-tuft, and black 
belts, the same as worn by the 4th V.B. from 1869 




o S 






S^.Sj 



a 



2>rd Vol. Bat. the Gordon Highlanders. 295 

to 1887 (see Plate XXXVIII.) ; and on May 22, 1872, 
the rifle busby with red-and-black plume was sanctioned 
for the battalion. 

In 1867 the 24th Corps (St Fergus, one subdivision), 
in 1868 the 25th Corps (New Pitsligo, one company), 
and in 1872 the 26th Corps (Cruden, one company), 
were formed and added to the battalion, which was 
granted the title " The Buchan," in 1868. In Sep- 
tember 1875 the 24th Corps was amalgamated with 
the 9th, which still retained an establishment of two 
companies, and a new 24th Corps of one company was 
formed at Fraserburgh. 

On May 23, 1880, the battalion was consolidated as 
the 5th Aberdeen (The Buchan) Bine Volunteers, but 
in June was re-numbered the 3rd. Headquarters were 
at Old Deer, and the nine companies were lettered : 
A, New Deer (late 5th Corps) ; B, Peterhead (late 1st 
of 9th) ; C, St Fergus (late 2nd of 9th) ; D, Old Deer 
(late 1st of 17th); E, Strichen (late 2nd of 17th); F, 
Longside (late 20th) ; G, Fraserburgh (late 24th) ; H, 
New Pitsligo (late 25th) ; and I, Cruden (late 26th). 

In 1883 Gordon tartan trews replaced the trousers 
and glengarries with red and dark green diced border 
the busbies, the headquarters of " H " Company were 
moved from New Pitsligo to Fraserburgh, a new " K " 
Company was formed at Boddam, and the headquarters 
of the battalion were transferred to Peterhead. In 
the following year the battalion assumed the title of 
3rd (The Buchan) V.B. Gordon Highlanders (General 
Order 12 of February 1), and in 1885 it was author- 
ised to wear the uniform and badges of the Gordon 
Highlanders, but with trews and glengarries with red, 
white, and blue diced borders, the officers wearing a 
shoulder- plaid, claymore, and dirk, and buff belts, the 
men black belts, the men's uniform being identical with 



296 Records of the Several Corps. 

that worn by the 2nd Volunteer Battalion from 1880 
to 1907 (see Plate XXXVI.) In 1885 also the head- 
quarters of "C" Company were transferred from St 
Fergus to Crimond, but in 1888 were moved to Lonmay 
with a detachment at Aberdour, the headquarters of 
" K " Company being also in this year transferred 
from Boddam to Peterhead. Brown leather equipment 
replaced the black belts in 1891. 

The battalion contributed 21 of its members for active 
service during the South African War, of whom Lieu- 
tenant A. W. Bobertson and 19 men formed the re- 
inforcing draft for the 2nd Volunteer Service Company 
(see 7 th Middlesex V.B.C.), and left Aberdeen on May 
19, 1900, and one man proceeded with the draft for 
the 1st Service Company (see 1st Volunteer Battalion). 
Of the 2nd Service Company, 1 private was wounded 
at Booikopjes on July 24, and 3 at Lydenburg on 
September 8. 

On November 23, 1900, "I" Company was broken 
up, and on March 8, 1901, "C" (Lonmay) and " E " 
(Strichen) were amalgamated as " E," with head- 
quarters at Strichen, and " K " Company became " C." 
The battalion was thus reduced to eight companies, 
and after 1901 was distributed as follows, the numbers 
of the original corps being inserted to enable their 
descent to be traced: A, New Deer (5th); B and C, 
Peterhead (1st of 9th and late K); D, Old Deer (1st 
of 17th); E, Strichen (2nd of 9th and 2nd of 17th); 
F, Longside (20th) ; G and H, Fraserburgh (24th and 
25th). The battalion had seven separate ranges. 

In 1903 the battalion was authorised to wear the 
full dress of the Gordon Highlanders except the feather 
bonnet, and a drab service doublet was permitted for 
undress and marching order, to be worn with drab 
spats. Belts and equipment were brown. 



djh Vol. Bat. the Gordon Highlanders. 297 

The lieutenant-colonels commanding have been — 

J. Eussell of Aden, June 2, 1862. 

John Ferguson, December 30, 1876. 

Alexander D. Fordyce, late Captain 71st Foot, V.D. (hon. col.), 

July 24, 1880. 
Kobert Eobertson, M.V.O., V.D. (hon. col.), October 3, 1900. 
Robert Scott, V.D. (hon. col.), March 28, 1906. 
William M'Connachie, V.D., November 2, 1907. 



4th (DONSIDE HIGHLAND) VOLUNTEER 

BATTALION, 

THE GORDON HIGHLANDERS. 

Regimental District, No. 75. 

(Plate XXXVIII.) 

"South Africa, 1900-01." | Order op Precedence, 146. 

Headquarters — 28 Guild Street, Aberdeen. 

The 1st Administrative Battalion, Aberdeenshire Rifle 
Volunteers, with headquarters at Inverurie, was formed 
in May 1860, and included the following corps (shown 
by the numbers assigned to them at the general 
re -numbering in the county in July 1860, see Ap- 
pendix A) : — 

3rd, Cluny, one company. Uniform — light grey tunic and 
trousers with scarlet piping ; light grey shako with black 
horse-hair plume ; black patent-leather waist-belt. 

4th, Alford, one company. Uniform — grey tunic and trousers 
with scarlet piping and bronze buttons ; grey shakos with 
black horse-hair plume ; brown waist and pouch belts. 

7 th, Huntly, one company. Uniform — silver grey tunic and 
trousers with grey braid, piped with blue, and four rows 



298 Records of the Several Corps. 

of grey cord lace on the breast of the tunic ; grey caps 
with blue piping, blue ball-tuft, and thistle badge ; black 
waist-belt. 
8 th, Echt, two companies. Uniform — grey. 

I Oth, Inverurie, one company. Uniform — medium grey tunic and 

trousers with light blue piping and Austrian knot (light 
blue facings for officers) ; grey cap with light blue piping 
and bugle badge ; brown waist-belts and black leggings. 

I I th, Kildrummy, one subdivision. Uniform — Elcho grey 

tweed tunic, trousers, and cap, all with scarlet piping, and 
brown waist-belts. 

The dates of formation of all corps are given in 
Appendix A. 

To these were added in October 1860 the 14th Corps 
(Tarland, one subdivision, increased to one company in 
May 1861), in 1862 the 21st (Aboyne, one company) and 
23rd (Lumphanan, one company, headquarters changed 
in 1864 to Torphins), and in 1863 the 22nd Corps 
(Auchmull, one company, uniform dark grey tunic and 
trousers with black braid and trouser stripe and lace 
on the breast, dark grey shako with black braid, bugle 
badge, and plume of black feathers, and black patent- 
leather belts with badge of St Andrew within a wreath 
of thistles). 

In 1864 the whole battalion adopted a uniform of 
Elcho grey tunics and trousers with scarlet piping, and 
brown belts. The shakos were grey with red piping 
round the top, the 10th Corps having red cord lace like 
the Highland Light Infantry, and were at first worn 
with a black horse-hair plume, which was replaced by 
a black ball- tuft in 1865. 

In 1866 the 8th Corps was reduced to an establish- 
ment of one company, but in the following year the 
11th Corps was increased from a subdivision to a full 




II 






Afth Vol. Bat. the Gordon Highlanders. 299 

company, and a new 19th Corps at Insch was formed 
and added to the battalion, which thus attained a 
strength of eleven companies. Headquarters were 
moved to Aberdeen in 1868. On April 1, 1869, the 
uniform was again changed to rifle green with scarlet 
collars and piping, green shakos with green ball-tuft, 
and black belts, which uniform continued to be worn 
till 1887. 

In 1871 the 21st Corps was increased to two com- 
panies ; the headquarters of the 3rd Corps were trans- 
ferred from Cluny to Kemnay in 1875 ; and in 1876 the 
8 th, 14th, 21st, and 23rd Corps were transferred to the 
1st Administrative Battalion Kincardine Rifle Volun- 
teers (see 5th Volunteer Battalion). In April 1880 the 
battalion was consolidated as the 3rd (re-numbered 4th 
in June) Aberdeenshire Rifle Volunteers, with head- 
quarters at Aberdeen, and seven companies, lettered as 
follows : A, Huntly (late 7th) ; B, Kildrummy (late 
11th); C, Insch (late 19th); D, Alford (late 4th); E, 
Inverurie (late 10th); F, Kemnay (late 3rd); and G, 
Auchmull (late 22nd). 

The title of the battalion was changed to 4th Volun- 
teer Battalion, The Gordon Highlanders, by General 
Order No. 12 of February 1,1884, but it was not till 1893 
(Army Order 26 of February) that the title " Donside 
Highland " was added. On April 22, 1887, the uniform 
was changed to rifle green doublets with light green 
piping, Gordon tartan trews, glengarries with red-and- 
black diced border, and black belts and leggings. In 
1897 a new "H" Company was formed at Auchmull, 
and in 1899 the headquarters of "B" Company were 
moved to Strathdon, a new " K " Company was formed 
at Kintore, and a new " L " Company at Kildrummy, 
thus bringing the establishment up to ten companies. 



300 Records of the Several Corps. 

Duriog the South African War the battalion 
contributed Lieutenant H. Forbes and 28 other 
ranks to the 1st Volunteer Service Company, 4 
privates to its reinforcing draft, and 1 serjeant, 1 
drummer, and 3 privates to the 3rd Service Com- 
pany of the Gordon Highlanders (see 1st Volunteer 
Battalion). Of the 1st Service Company Private J. M. 
Meldrum was killed and Lieutenant Forbes and 2 
privates wounded at Doornkop on May 29, 1900 ; 
one private was wounded at Komati Poort on Septem- 
ber 30, and Private W. Bennet died of disease at 
Johannesburg on June 8. Of the 3rd Service Company 
Private J. Copland died of disease at Petersburg on 
May 26, 1901. Lieutenant H. Forbes received the 
Distinguished Service Order and Serjeant J. R 
Campbell the medal for Distinguished Conduct, both 
having been mentioned in Lord Roberts' despatch of 
September 4, 1901. 

In 1903 the kilt, sporran, hose, and glengarry of 
the Gordon Highlanders were authorised for the bat- 
talion, with drab service doublet and spats (the green 
doublets being abolished), and black belts as hitherto 
worn. In this year also a cyclist section was formed, 
and the name of the headquarters of " G " and " H " 
Companies was changed from Auchmull to Bucksburn. 
In 1906 "B" and "C" Companies were amalgamated 
as " B," with headquarters at Kildrummy, although 
the battalion was till 1908 still shown in estimates as 
having an establishment of ten companies. The dis- 
tribution in 1908 of the companies was (the numbers of 
the original corps being shown, where necessary, for 
reference): A, Huntly (7th); B, Kildrummy (11th); 
C, Insch (19th) ; D, Alford (4th) ; E, Inverurie (10th) ; 
F, Kemnay (3rd); G and H, Bucksburn (22nd); and K, 
Kintore. The battalion had fourteen rifle-ranges. 



$tk Vol. Bat. the Gordon Highlanders. 301 

The lieutenant-colonels commanding have been — 

F. Fraser of Castle Fraser, June 25, 1861. 

Sir William Forbes, Bart, (afterwards Lord Sempill), July 9, 

1868. 
J. Allardyce of Colquoich, late Colonel Madras S.C. (hon. col.), 

February 26, 1887. 
George Jackson, V.D. (hon. col.), May 4, 1892. 
William A. Mellis, V.D. (hon. col.), February 7, 1903. 



5th (DEESIDE HIGHLAND) VOLUNTEER 
BATTALION, THE GORDON HIGHLANDERS. 

Regimental District, No. 75. 

(Plate XXXVI.) 
"South Africa, 1900-02." | Order of Precedence, 189. 
Honorary Colonel — C. G. Marquis of Huntly, February 23, 1876. 
Headquarters — Banchory. 

The 1st Administrative Battalion, Kincardineshire 
Rifle Volunteers, with headquarters at Stonehaven, 
was formed on May 14, 1861, from the following 
corps of Kincardineshire Rifle Volunteers : — 

1st, Fetteresso, raised January 10, 1860, as one company. Uni- 
form — Elcho grey, with peaked cap. Headquarters removed 
to Stonehaven 1867, disbanded October 1870. 

2nd, Banchory, raised January 28, 1860, as one company. Uni- 
form — Elcho grey. 

3rd, Laurencekirk, raised February 1860 as one subdivision, in- 
creased to a company May 23, 1860. Uniform — dark grey 
with black braid, and shako. Amalgamated with 5th Corps, 
1873. 

4th, Fettercairn, raised March 13, 1860, as one subdivision. 
Uniform — dark grey without facings. Amalgamated with 
the 5th Corps, February 1871. 



302 Records of the Several Corps. 

5th, Auchinblae, raised June 9, 1860, as one company. Uniform 
unknown. Headquarters changed in June 1878 to Laur- 
encekirk. 

6th, Netherley, raised May 7, 1860, as one company. Uniform — 
Elcho grey. Headquarters removed, May 1869, to Portlethen. 

7th, Durris, raised February 13, 1861, as one company. Uniform 
unknown. 

In 1864 the uniform of the whole battalion became 
Elcho grey with scarlet collars, piping, and Austrian 
knot, grey shakos with red ball-tuft and lace, and black 
belts. 

In 1869 the battalion was joined by the 8th Kincar- 
dine Corps, formed at Maryculter and Peterculter on 
October 21, 1869. 

By 1876 the strength of the battalion had been 
reduced to five companies — i.e., the 2nd, 5th, 6th, 7th, 
and 8th Corps — and it was accordingly decided to recon- 
stitute it. On February 23, 1876, headquarters were 
transferred to Banchory, the 8th (Echt, one company), 
14th (Tarland, one company), 21st (Marquis of Huntly's 
Highland, Aboyne, two companies), and 23rd (Torphins, 
one company) Corps of Aberdeenshire Rifle Volunteers 
(see Appendix A) were transferred to it from the 1st 
Administrative Battalion, Aberdeenshire Rifle Volun- 
teers, and on November 13, 1876, the title of " Deeside 
Highland" was added to that of the battalion. The 
Aberdeen corps had followed all the changes of uniform 
of their battalion (see 4th Volunteer Battalion), and on 
May 5, 1876, the following uniform was approved for 
the reconstituted battalion, and was worn till 1908 : 
rifle green doublet, with collar and cuffs of the same, 
and light green piping, Gordon tartan kilt (for all 
except the Ballater company, which, being mainly com- 
posed of Braemar men from the Invercauld estate, wore 
Farquharson tartan kilts), heather mixture hose with 



$th Vol. Bat. the Gordon Highlanders. 303 

white spats, white sporrans with two black tails, glen- 
garry with red-and-black diced border, and black 
belts. 

On March 15, 1880, the battalion was consolidated 
as the 2nd (on May 19 re-numbered 1st) Kincardine and 
Aberdeen or Deeside Highland Rifle Volunteers, with 
headquarters at Banchory, and ten companies lettered 
as follows : A, Banchory (late 2nd K.RV) ; B, Laur- 
encekirk (late 5th K.RV.); C, Portlethen (late 6th 
K.RV.); D, Durris (late 7th K.R.V.); E, Maryculter 
(late 8th K.RV.) ; F, Echt (late 8th A.RV.) ; G, Tar- 
land (late 14th A.R.V.) ; H, Aboyne (late 1st of 21st 
A.RV.) ; I, Ballater (late 2nd of 21st A.R.V.) ; and K, 
Torphins (late 23rd A.RV.) The title of 5th (Deeside 
Highland) Volunteer Battalion, The Gordon High- 
landers, was assumed on January 17, 1884 (General 
Order 12 of February l). 

On November 28, 1883, "K" Company was amal- 
gamated with "A" and a new "K" formed at 
Stonehaven, and on May 13, 1885, "G" Company was 
amalgamated with " H." Battalion headquarters were 
removed to Aberdeen in May 1886, but back to Ban- 
chory in July 1894. The headquarters of "E" Com- 
pany were changed to Peterculter on March 21, 1887, 
and of " F " to Skene on March 22, 1891. The distribu- 
tion of the battalion since then was therefore in nine 
companies : A, Banchory (detachment at Kincardine 
O'Neil) ; B, Laurencekirk ; C, Portlethen ; D, Durris ; 
E, Peterculter ; F, Skene ; H, Aboyne ; I, Ballater ; 
and K, Stonehaven. The battalion had thirteen rifle- 
ranges for the various companies. 

Seventy - eight members of the battalion served 
actively in South Africa during the war. Of these, 6 
men joined the 1st Volunteer Service Company (see 1st 
Volunteer Battalion), Lieutenant W. A. Duguid and 



304 Records of the Several Corps. 

31 other ranks the 2nd Volunteer Service Company 
(see 7th Middlesex V.E.C.), 16 men the 3rd, and 
13 men the 4th Service Company of the Gordon 
Highlanders, the others serving in various corps. 
Of the 1st Company, one man was wounded at 
Komati Poort on September 30, 1900 ; of the 2nd, two 
were wounded at Rooikopjes on July 24, and Private 
P. Stuart killed at Lydenburg on September 8 ; and 
of the 3rd, one private was wounded while escorting 
a train at Nylstrom on August 10, 1901. 

The majors or lieutenant-colonels commanding the 
battalion have been — 

William M'Inroy, late Major 91st and 69th Foot ; Major, May 

14, 1861. 
William Black Fergusson, Major, August 3, 1870 ; Lieut.- 

Colonel, February 23, 1876. 
James Eoss Farquharson of Invercauld, late Captain and Lieut. - 

Colonel Scots Fusilier Guards, Lieut. -Colonel, November 

19, 1881. 
Alexander Cochran, V.D. (hon. col.), Lieut.-Colonel, May 20, 1882. 
James Johnston, V.D. (hon. col.), Lieut.-Colonel, January 6, 

1894. 
James M. Duff, V.D. (hon. col.), Lieut.-Colonel, January 2, 1901. 
Alexander H. Farquharson of Invercauld, late Lieutenant 10th 

Hussars, Lieut.-Colonel, February 11, 1905. 



6th Vol. Bat. the Gordon Highlanders. 305 

6th VOLUNTEER BATTALION, THE GORDON 
HIGHLANDERS. 

Regimental District, No. 75. 

(Plate XXXIX.) 

"South Africa, 1900-02." | Order of Precedence, 217. 

Honorary Colonel — G. S. Grant, V.D. (hon. col.), February 5, 1902. 

Headquarters — Keith. 

The 1st Administrative Battalion, Banffshire Rifle Vol- 
unteers, with headquarters at Keith, was formed on 
August 12, 1861, and to it were attached, then or on 
their subsequent date of formation, the following corps 
of Banffshire Rifle Volunteers : l — 

2nd, Banff, raised April 18, 1860, of one company. Re-numbered 
1st in 1862. 

3rd, Aberlour, raised September 29, 1860, of one company. Re- 
numbered 2nd in 1862. 

4th, Keith, raised November 2, 1860, of two companies. These 
were separated as the 3rd and 4th Corps in 1862, but on 
July 26, 1866, were amalgamated as the 3rd Corps, of one 
company. 

5th, Buckie, raised March 12, 1863, of one company. 

6th, Minmore, Glenlivet, raised April 19, 1867, of one company. 

7th, Dufftown, raised May 1, 1868, of one and a half companies. 

The separate corps had originally grey uniforms of 
various patterns, but in 1861 the battalion adopted a 
uniform of medium grey with black cuffs, collars, and 
broad trouser stripes with white piping and Austrian 
knot, grey shako with black band with white piping 
and black ball-tuft, and black belts, the officers having 
silver lace and a silver band on the shako. In 1870 

1 A 1st Corps of one subdivision at Macduff is shown in the 1860 and 
1861 Army Lists, but it never had any officers appointed to it. 
U 



306 Records of the Several Corps. 

the wearing of the shoulder-belt and cartridge-box 
was discontinued. 

The battalion was consolidated in June 1880 as 
the 1st Banffshire Rifle Volunteers, with headquarters 
at Keith, and six and a half companies, lettered as 
follows : A, Banff (late 1st) ; B, Aberlour (late 2nd) ; C, 
Keith (late 3rd); D, Buckie (late 5th); E, Glenlivet 
(late 6 th) ; and F, Dufftown (one and a half companies, 
the half company at Glenrinnes, late 7th). In the 
same year the white piping was removed from the 
collars, trouser stripes, and shoulder-straps, and re- 
placed on the tunic by black piping and Austrian knot. 

In 1884 (General Order 12 of February 1) the 
battalion was entitled 6th V.B. The Gordon High- 
landers; in 1887 grey helmets with silver ornaments 
were adopted ; on January 17, 1891, scarlet doublets 
with yellow facings, Gordon tartan trews, glengarries 
with red, white, and blue diced border, and white 
belts became the uniform; in 1899 ; a new "G" 
Company, at Aberchirder, was formed; and in 1902 
a drab service doublet, for undress and marching order, 
to be worn with the glengarry and trews, and sashes, 
to be worn by Serjeants in full dress, were authorised. 

Eighty-five members of the battalion in all served 
in South Africa during the war. Of these, Lieut- 
enant A. M. Robertson and 25 other ranks joined 
the 2nd Volunteer Service Company, Gordon High- 
landers (see 7th Middlesex V.R.C.), and 1 corporal 
and 2 privates the reinforcing draft of the 1st Service 
Company. Of the former, 1 private was wounded on 
July 24, 1900, at Rooikopjes, and Private D. B. Stuart 
(the same who was wounded on July 24) was killed 
and 1 lance-corporal was wounded on September 8 at 
Lydenburg. Colour-Serjeant Instructor E. J. Reynolds 
and Lance -Serjeant J. Margach were mentioned in 




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7th Vol. Bat. the Gordon Highlanders. 307 

Lord Roberts' despatch of September 4, 1901. To 
the 3rd Volunteer Service Company of the Gordon 
Highlanders the battalion contributed 34 non-com- 
missioned officers and men (of whom Colour-Serjeant 
Instructor J. Craib died of disease on May 4, 1901), 
and to the 4th Company 18 privates. In addition to 
the above, Lieutenant B. M'Kerrol of the battalion 
went out early in the war, joined the Imperial Light 
Infantry (Natal), and was killed at Spion Kop. 

The headquarters of the battalion, with drill-hall, &c, 
were at Keith ; drill-halls existed for the outlying 
companies, and the battalion had nine rifle-ranges. 

The commanding officers have been — 

T. Adam, Major, August 12, 1861. 

W. Thorburn, Major, July 17, 1866 ; Lieut.-Colonel, May 1, 1868. 
William G-. Gordon-Cumming, Lieut-Colonel (retired pay) Bom- 
bay S.C. (hon. col.), Lieut. -Colonel, January 27, 1872. 
John G. Smith (hon. col.), Lieut. -Colonel, January 8, 1890. 
George S. Grant, V.D. (hon. col.), Lieut.-Colonel, March 5, 1892. 
John G. Fleming, V.D. (hon. col.), Lieut.-Colonel, May 9, 1900. 
Alfred B. Whitton, Lieut.-Colonel, May 26, 1906. 



7th VOLUNTEER BATTALION, THE GORDON 
HIGHLANDERS. 

Regimental District, No. 75. 

(Plate XXXIX.) 

Order of Precedence, 222. 

Headquarters — Lerwick (attached to 1st Volunteer Battalion). 

This battalion was raised in Shetland on December 19, 
1900, at an establishment of three companies, there 
having been no volunteers in these islands since the 
disbandment of "F" Company 1st Sutherland V.R.C. 



308 Records of the Several Corps. 

{Lerwick) in 1884. Battalion headquarters were at 
Lerwick, but only an acting-adjutant was allowed, the 
battalion being attached for administration to the 1st 
Volunteer Battalion. The headquarters of A and B 
Companies were at Lerwick, and their range, up to 
600 yards, at Ness of Sound, while those of C Com- 
pany were at Scalloway and its range at Asta. 

The uniform, as approved on February 14, 1901, con- 
sisted of drab service dress with red piping on the 
trousers and patch on the upper arm, grey felt hats, 
brown belts and equipment, and brown leather leggings. 

The commanding officers have been — 

Captain-Commandant Alexander Moffatt, December 19, 1900. 

Major-Commandant J. C. C. Broun, June 10, 1905. 



1st (INVEENESS HIGHLAND) VOLUNTEER 
BATTALION, THE QUEEN'S OWN CAM- 
ERON HIGHLANDERS. 

Regimental District, No. 79. 

(Plate XL.) 

"South Africa, 1900-02." | Order of Precedence, 157. 

Headquarters — Inverness. 

The 1st Administrative Battalion, Inverness - shire 
Rifle Volunteers, with headquarters at Inverness, was 
formed on June 18, 1860, and to it were attached, then 
or on their subsequent date of formation, the following 
corps of one company each, raised in the county — 

1st, Inverness, a self-supporting corps, raised November 18, 1859, 
as a result of a meeting held under the presidency of the 
Provost on May 21, 1859. Uniform — very dark grey with 
facings and caps of the same, flat black braid on the breast, 



ist Vol. Bat. the Cameron Highlanders. 309 

front, and skirts of the tunic, on the trousers, and round the 
cap, and black patent-leather belts. The Serjeants had 
silver cord on the collar and round the chevrons, and the 
officers had silver cord shoulder-straps. 

2nd, Fort- William (Lochaber), raised April 9, 1860. Uniform 
almost identical with that of 1st Corps, but with a band of 
Erracht Cameron tartan round the cap in place of the black 
braid. 

3rd, Inverness (Merchants), raised March 26, 1860. Uniform — 
medium (slate) grey tunics and trousers with green collars 
and cuffs, grey caps with green band and bugle badge, and 
black belts. 

4th, Inverness (Clachnacuddin), raised May 3, 1860. Uniform — 
Elcho grey tunics, trousers, and caps, scarlet collars and 
cuffs, black belts. 

5th, Inverness (Celtic), raised July 16, 1860. Uniform — medium 
(slate) grey double-breasted doublet with green collar and 
piping and silver diamond buttons, Celtic tartan kilts and 
plaids, grey goatskin sporrans, green -and -red mixed hose 
with green tops, plain glengarries with blackcock's tail, and 
black belts. 

6th, Kingussie (Badenoch), raised June 3, 1861. Uniform — Elcho 
grey tunics with bronze buttons, green cuffs and collars, grey 
piping on the latter, and black Austrian knot, grey trousers 
with black stripes, grey cap with peak and black band and 
badge of wreath and crown with V.K. in centre, and black 
patent-leather belts. 

7th, Beauly, raised July 1, 1861. Uniform — Elcho grey doublets 
with green facings, Fraser tartan trews, plain glengarries, 
and black belts. 

In 1863 the uniforms of the various companies 
were assimilated, that adopted for all being Elcho 
grey doublets with green collar and piping, plain 
glengarries with company badge and without black- 
cock's tail, and black waist-belts (except the 1st, which 
till 1872 wore pouch -belts also). The 1st Corps wore 
trews, all the others kilts and belted plaids, the 
tartans being 42nd for the 1st, 3rd, 4th, and 5th, 
Cameron of Erracht for the 2nd, Hunting Macpherson 



310 Records of the Several Corps. 

for the 6th, and Fraser for the 7th. The sporrans 
were grey goatskin (white for officers), and the hose 
red -and -green mixture with green tops (except the 
2nd Corps, which had red-and-green (79th) diced hose). 

In 1865 the battalion received the title " Inverness 
Highland," and in the following year Private Angus 
Cameron of the 6th Corps won the Queen's Prize at 
Wimbledon, a performance which he repeated in 1869. 

The following companies were added to the battalion 
about this time, all kilted and dressed in the above 
uniform : — 
8th, Portree, raised July 20, 1867. Tartan — Macdonald of the Isles. 

Increased to one and a half companies, February 7, 1868. 
9th, Campbeltown, Ardersier, raised November 12, 1867. Tartan 

—42nd. 
10th, Eoy Bridge, raised February 11, 1869. Tartan — Mackintosh. 

On February 16, 1880, sanction was given for the 
battalion to change its uniform to scarlet doublets 
with buff facings (it being then affiliated to the 71st 
and 78th Highlanders), 42nd tartan kilts (for all 
companies), grey goatskin sporrans (white for officers), 
red-and-black diced hose, white spats, plain glengarries, 
and white belts. 

In June 1880 the battalion was consolidated as the 
1st Inverness-shire (Inverness Highland) Rifle Volun- 
teers, with headquarters at Inverness, and ten companies, 
lettered : A to D, Inverness (late 1st, 3rd, 4th, and 5th 
Corps) ; E, Fort- William (late 2nd) ; F, Kingussie (late 
6th) ; G, Beauly (late 7th) ; H, Portree (late 8th) ; 
I, Ardersier (late 9th) ; and K, Roy Bridge (late 10th). 
The only change in distribution which since then took 
place was on September 30, 1903, when the headquarters 
of K Company were transferred to Fort- Augustus, with 
a section at Drumnadrochit to serve Glen Urquhart. 
The battalion had eight separate rifle-ranges. 



ist Vol. Bat. the Cameron Highlanders. 31 1 

In 1887 the title of 1st (Inverness Highland) Volun- 
teer Battalion, The Cameron Highlanders, was conferred 
upon the battalion by General Order 181 of December 1, 
and on October 20, 1893, it was authorised to adopt the 
uniform of the Cameron Highlanders. The officers wore 
the feather bonnet in full dress, the men having only 
the glengarry, and sashes were not worn by officers 
or Serjeants. 

During the South African War, the battalion 
furnished no fewer than 245 men for service, which 
is the record proportion for Scotland. Of these, 
Captain A. D. Mackinnon, Lieutenant J. Burn, Lieu- 
tenant J. Campbell, and 75 men served in the only 
Volunteer Service Company sent out to the Cameron 
Highlanders. Of this company, Serjeant A. G. Mack- 
intosh, Private A. M'Kay, and Private D. M'Lennan 
died of disease, Lieutenant J. Campbell was wounded, 
and Serjeant P. Stuart was mentioned in Lord 
Roberts' despatch of September 4, 1901. Major S. J. 
Lord Lovat, 2nd Lieutenant E. G. Eraser Tytler (both 
mentioned in despatches, September 4, 1901, and March 
1, 1902, respectively : D.S.O. for Lord Lovat), and 
80 men served in Lovat's Scouts, of whom Private 
MacLaren was killed in action on September 20, 1901, 
and the remainder joined the Imperial Yeomanry or 
other corps. 

The lieutenant - colonels commanding the battalion 
have been — 

Ewen Macpherson of Cluny, late Captain 42nd Foot, June 3, 

1861. 
Charles A. Earl of Dunmore, November 2, 1882. 
Alexander Macdonald, V.D. (hon. col.), July 22, 1896. 
David Munro, V.D., December 13, 1899. 
Duncan Shaw, V.D. (hon. col.), July 26, 1902. 
James Leslie Fraser, September 8, 1906. 



312 Records of the Several Corps. 

1st (RENFREWSHIRE) VOLUNTEER BAT- 
TALION, PRINCESS LOUISE'S (ARGYLL 
AND SUTHERLAND HIGHLANDERS). 

Regimental District, No. 91. 

(Plate XLI.) 

"South Africa, 1900-02." | Order op Precedence, 87. 

Honorary Colonel — Sir H. Shaw Stewart, Bart., March 12, 1904. 

Headquarters — Greenock. 

The 1st Administrative Battalion, Renfrewshire Rifle 
Volunteers, with headquarters at Greenock, was formed 
on August 1, 1860, from the following corps of Ren- 
frewshire Rifle Volunteers, the dates of raising, &c, 
of which are given in Appendix D : — 

1st, Greenock, four companies. Uniform — dark grey tunic, 
trousers, and cap, with black braid. 

5th, Port Glasgow, one company. Uniform — grey. 

10th, Greenock, Highlanders, one company ; and 

11th, Greenock, Highlanders, one company. Uniform of both 
companies — green doublets with five rows of black braid on 
the breast, green cuffs and collars, and black piping, 42nd 
tartan kilts and belted plaids, grey sporrans with three 
white tails, green -and -black diced hose, buckled brogues, 
Balmoral bonnets, and black belts. The officers wore pouch- 
belts, the claymore and dirk being carried on the waist-belt. 

22nd, Gourock, one company. Uniform — medium grey. 

Soon after the formation of the battalion, a county 
uniform was adopted for Renfrewshire (shown in the 
figures in Plates XLI. and XLII. for the 2nd and 3rd 
Volunteer Battalions) of medium grey tunics and 
trousers, with scarlet cuffs, collars, and piping on the 
trousers, grey shakos with black ball-tufts, and black 
belts, the 1st Battalion alone differing in that the officers 
had grey lace on the breast of the tunic. The two High- 



ii-/ Vol. Bat. Princess Louises A. & S. H. 313 

land companies continued to wear the uniform described 
above until 1889, with the exception that in 1877 glen- 
garry bonnets (with blackcock's tail for officers), black 
sporrans with six white tassels (and badger's head for 
officers), and white spats were adopted. 

In 1863 the 10th and 11th Corps were amalgamated 
as the 10th Corps of two companies, and the 1st Bute- 
shire Rifle Volunteer Corps, headquarters Rothesay, 
which had been formed on January 19, 1860, as one 
company, was added to the battalion. 

In March 1880 the battalion was consolidated as 
the 1st Renfrewshire Rifle Volunteers, headquarters 
at Greenock, with nine companies, lettered as follows : 
A, B, C, and D, Greenock (late 1st R.R.V.) ; E, Port 
Glasgow (late 5th R.R.V.) ; F and G, Greenock (High- 
landers) (late 10th R.R.V.); H, Gourock (late 22nd 
R.R.V.) ; and I, Rothesay (late 1st Bute R.V.) In 
1881 grey helmets with bronze ornaments were adopted 
by the battalion. 

In 1887, by General Order 181 of December 1, the 
corps became the 1st (Renfrewshire) V.B. Argyll and 
Sutherland Highlanders, and on December 13, 1889, 
sanction was given for a change of uniform to scarlet 
doublets with yellow facings, Sutherland tartan trews, 
glengarries with red - and - white diced border, and 
white belts, the Highland companies conforming but 
continuing to wear their kilts and hose, until on 
September 18, 1899, authority was given for the whole 
battalion to assume the kilts, sporrans, hose, and spats 
of the regular battalions, to be worn with the glen- 
garry with red-and-white diced border. A drab service 
doublet for undress and marching order was authorised 
in 1903. 

Of the battalion, Lieutenant A. E. Stewart and 18 
men served with the 1st, 18 men with the 2nd, and 



314 Records of the Several Corps. 

Lieutenant J. M. Lamont and 34 men with the 3rd 
Volunteer Service Company, Argyll and Sutherland 
Highlanders, in the war in South Africa, of whom 
Corporal D. K. Aitken (1st Company) died of enteric. 
In addition, 10 men served in the Scottish Horse, 22 
in the Imperial Yeomanry, 3 in the Scottish Cyclist 
Company, 11 in the South African Constabulary, 1 
in the R.A.M.C, and 3 in local corps, making in all 
a contribution of 2 officers and 120 men from the 
battalion. Of the 22 men serving in the Imperial 
Yeomanry, 2 were officers who served as troopers — 
Lieutenant R. E. Wilson (who was mentioned in de- 
spatches) and Lieutenant N. Rae ; Trooper G. R. 
Benson died of wounds and Troopers F. L. R. Laurent 
and A. Scorgie of enteric, and Trooper R. Calderhead 
was drowned. 

In 1900 a cyclist company was formed, but this did 
not entail an increase of establishment except on paper, 
for the " I " (Rothesay) Company had long been dwind- 
ling away, and in 1906 it finally ceased to exist. 

The headquarters of the battalion were at 37 Newton 
Street, Greenock. It had a headquarter range, up to 
800 yards, at Hole Farm, lj- mile from Greenock, and 
E and H Companies had their own ranges near their 
headquarters. 

The lieutenant -colonels commanding the battalion 
have been — 

Sir Michael K. Shaw Stewart, Bart., August 1, 1860. 

David M. Lathom, late Captain Royal Renfrew Militia, May 13, 

1869. 
William Ross (hon. col.), October 4, 1884. 
William Orr Leitch (hon. col.), February 8, 1890. 
William Lamont, V.D. (hon. col.), October 29, 1892. 
William U. Park, M.V.O., V.D. (hon. col.), December 12, 1903. 
Abram Lyle, V.D., January 28, 1908. 




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2.nd Vol. Bat. Princess Louise's A.& S. H. 315 

2nd (RENFREWSHIRE) VOLUNTEER BAT- 
TALION, PRINCESS LOUISE'S (ARGYLL 
AND SUTHERLAND HIGHLANDERS). 

Regimental District, No. 91. 

(Plate XLI.) 

"South Africa, 1900-02." | Order op Precedence, 88. 

Honorary Colonel— Sir Thos. G. Glen-Coats, Bart., V.D. (hon. col.), 
June 13, 1903. 

Headquarters — Paisley. 

The 2nd Administrative Battalion, Renfrewshire Rifle 
Volunteers, with headquarters at Paisley, was formed 
on June 2, 1860, of the 3rd, 6th, 14th, and 24th Corps 
(Paisley), 9th Corps (Johnstone), 15th Corps (Kil- 
barchan), 17th Corps (Lochwinnoch), and 20th Corps 
(Renfrew) of Renfrewshire Rifle Volunteers, of one 
company each. The dates of formation of these corps 
are given in Appendix D. 

The original uniforms of the 3rd, 6th, 14th, and 24th 
Corps were dark grey with black braid, that of the 
20th dark grey with scarlet facings, but in 1862 the 
battalion adopted the county uniform of medium grey, 
as described for the 1st Volunteer Battalion, and wore 
it until 1875, when (on November 27) scarlet tunics 
with blue facings and Austrian knot, blue trousers, blue 
shakos with ball -tuft, and white belts became the 
uniform. Blue helmets replaced the shakos in 1881. 

In March 1880 the battalion was consolidated as 
the 3rd (re-numbered 2nd in June) Renfrewshire Rifle 
Volunteers, headquarters Paisley, with eight companies, 
lettered : A, B, D, and H, Paisley (late 3rd, 6th, 14th, 
and 24th Corps) ; C, Johnstone (late 9th) ; E, Kil- 
barchan (late 15th) ; F, Lochwinnoch (late 17th) ; and 



316 Records of the Several Corps. 

G, Renfrew (late 20th). In 1884 a new company, "I," 
was formed at Paisley, and dressed in scarlet doublets 
with blue facings, Sutherland kilts, and the glengarry, 
sporran, hose, and spats of the regular battalions of the 
regiment. By General Order 181 of December 1, 1887, 
the title of 2nd (Renfrewshire) V.B. Argyll and Suther- 
land Highlanders was conferred upon the battalion, 
and on April 18, 1898, it was authorised to wear scarlet 
doublets with yellow facings, Sutherland tartan trews, 
glengarries with red-and-white diced border, and white 
belts (the same as shown in Plate XX. for the 3rd V.B., 
1889-1908), the kilted company retaining its special 
dress, but changing its facings to yellow. Helmets, 
however, continued to be worn by the non- kilted 
companies till 1903. 

During the South African War 59 members of the 
battalion saw active service, mostly with the volunteer 
service companies of the Argyll and Sutherland High- 
landers. Captain J. Cook commanded the 1st Service 
Company. Lieutenant J. L. Jack served with the 2nd 
Service Company, and on its departure for home he 
remained behind attached to the 2nd Scottish Horse, 
and was mentioned in Lord Kitchener's despatch of 
June 23, 1902. Second Lieutenant Foulds served in 
the Scottish Cyclist Company. 

In 1900 a cyclist company was formed at Paisley 
and lettered "K." In 1903 "E" Company was dis- 
banded, and the headquarters of " F " moved to Elderslie, 
with detachments at Howwood, Kilbarchan, and 
Lochwinnoch, but officially the establishment of the 
battalion remained till 1908 at ten companies. On 
November 17, 1903, the adoption of the full uniform of 
the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders was sanctioned 
for the whole battalion, except that the glengarry with 
red-and-white diced border took the place of the 



2,rd Vol. Bat. Princess Louises A. & S. H. 317 

feather bonnet, and was worn with a blackcock's tail 
by officers. A drab service doublet and drab spats 
were worn in marching order. 

The battalion possessed very fine headquarters, with 
a drill-hall and Morris-tube range, in High Street, 
Paisley, and a rifle-range up to 800 yards at Foxbar 
on the Gleniffer Hills. The former was completed and 
the latter acquired in 1901, at a total cost of £11,000, 
which was covered by public subscriptions. 

The lieutenant-colonels commanding have been — 

"William Mure of Caldwell, late Captain and Lieut.-Colonel Scots 

Fusilier Guards, December 17, 1860. 
William Carlisle, December 15, 1880. 
Andrew Millar (hon. col.), November 21, 1885. 
Sir Thomas G. Glen-Coats, Bart., V.D. (hon. col.), May 28, 1887. 
James Paton, V.D. (hon. col.), June 13, 1903. 
James Cook, V.D. (hon. captain in army), December 18, 1906. 



3rd (RENFREWSHIRE) VOLUNTEER BAT- 
TALION, PRINCESS LOUISE'S (ARGYLL 
AND SUTHERLAND HIGHLANDERS). 

Regimental District, No. 91. 

(Plate XLII.) 

" South Africa, 1901-02." | Order of Precedence, 89. 

Honorary Colonel — R. King (hon. col.), October 14, 1903. 

Headquarters — Pollockshaws. 

The 3rd Administrative Battalion, Renfrewshire Rifle 
Volunteers, with headquarters at Barrhead, was formed 
on August 4, 1860, from the 4th (Pollockshaws), 7th 
and 21st (Barrhead), 8th (Neilston), 16th (Thornlie- 



318 Records of the Several Corps. 

bank), 19th (Hurlet), and 23rd (Cathcart) Corps of 
Renfrewshire Rifle Volunteers, of one company each, 
and the 25th (Thornliebank) Corps was added in 1862. 
The dates of formation of these corps are given in 
Appendix D. 

The original uniforms of these corps were mostly 
Elcho grey, but in 1 862 the county uniform of medium 
grey, described for the 1st Volunteer Battalion, was 
adopted and was worn till 1874, when scarlet tunics 
with blue facings, blue trousers, glengarries, and white 
belts became the uniform. 

In 1880 the battalion was consolidated as the 4th 
(re-numbered 3rd in June) Renfrewshire Rifle Volun- 
teers, with headquarters at Barrhead (1881, Pollock- 
shaws) and eight companies, lettered : A, Pollockshaws 
(late 4th) ; B and F, Barrhead (late 7th and 21st) ; C, 
Neilston (late 8th) ; D and H, Thornliebank (late 16th 
and 25th) ; E, Hurlet (afterwards Newton-Mearns, late 
19th), and G, Cathcart (late 23rd). 

The title of 3rd (Renfrewshire) V.B. Argyll and 
Sutherland Highlanders was conferred upon the 
battalion by General Order 181 of December 1, 1887; 
and on January 29, 1889, sanction was given for the 
adoption of scarlet doublets with yellow facings, 
Sutherland tartan trews, glengarries with red-and- 
white diced borders, white belts, and black leggings 
as the uniform. To this was added on December 17, 
1900, a drab service dress with red piping on the 
trousers, grey felt hats, and putties, for use in undress 
and marching order. 

Forty-six members of the battalion served actively in 
the South African War. Of these, 14 men served in 
the 1st, Captain J. Paton and 11 men in the 2nd, and 
8 men in the 3rd Volunteer Service Company of 
the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders. Private J. 



yd Vol. Bat. Princess Louise's A.& S. H. 319 

Campbell (1st Company) was killed at Rustenburg on 
October 1, 1900, and Private C. Clanachan (3rd 
Company) at Kaal Spruit on March 14, 1902. Private 
J. Gilmour (2nd Company) died of disease, and Private 
G. Williams (3rd Company) of wounds received at 
Driekuil, April 3, 1902. 

In 1900 "I" and "K" (Cyclist) Companies were 
formed at Barrhead, but in 1903 the former was dis- 
banded and the battalion then reduced to its latter-day 
establishment of nine companies (one of them a cyclist 
company). The battalion shared a rifle-range up to 
900 yards at Patterton, near Thornliebank, with the 
5th Volunteer Battalion Highland Light Infantry. 
In 1892 Major Pollock of this battalion won the 
Queen's Prize at Bisley. 

The lieutenant-colonels commanding the battalion 
have been — 

John Graham (afterwards J. Barns-Graham), August 4, 1860. 

Alexander Crum, April 10, 1875. 

Eobert King (hon. col.), June 18, 1881. 

Z. J. Heys, V.D. (hon. col.), May 29, 1889. 

David Hamilton (hon. col.), April 27, 1898. 

John M. Campbell, May 28, 1904. 

J. Menzies, March 31, 1906. 



320 Records of the Several Corps. 



4th (STIBLINGSHIBE) VOLUNTEER BAT- 
TALION, PBINCESS LOUISE'S (ABGYLL 
AND SUTHEBLAND HIGHLANDEBS). 

Regimental District, No. 91. 

(Plate XLII.) 

" South Africa, 1900-02." | Order op Precedence, 108. 

Honorary Colonel— C. M. King, V.D. (hon. col.), May 5, 1897. 

Headquarters — Stirling. 

The 1st Administrative Battalion, Stirlingshire Bine 
Volunteers, with headquarters at Stirling, was formed 
on June 9, 1860, and to it, then or on their subsequent 
date of formation, were attached the following corps, 
all of one company, except the 8th, which was only- 
one subdivision strong : — 

1st, Stirling, formed October 14, 1859. A citizen corps. Uni- 
form — dark grey, facings black. 

2nd, Stirling, formed February 3, 1860. An artisan corps. 
Uniform — dark grey, facings black. 

3rd, Falkirk, formed March 27, 1860. Uniform — medium grey 
with black braid, scarlet cuffs and collars, grey caps with 
red-and-white diced band, and brown belts. 

4th, Lennoxtown, formed March 6, 1860. Uniform — Elcho grey, 
facings black with red piping. 

5th, Balfron, formed May 1, 1860. Uniform — Elcho grey, facings 
black with red piping. Disbanded 1879. 

6th, Denny, formed April 11, 1860. Uniform — Elcho grey, 
facings black. 

7th, Lennox Mill, formed May 1, 1860. Uniform — Elcho grey, 
facings green. 

8th, Strathblane, formed May 25, 1860, as one subdivision. 
Uniform — Elcho grey, facings green. Disbanded in 1863. 



^th Vol. Bat. Princess Louise's A.& S. H. 321 

9th, Bannockburn, formed May 21, 1860. Uniform — dark grey, 

facings black. 
11th, Stirling, formed December 6, 1860. 
12th, Carron, formed February 10, 1862. 
13th, Kilsyth, formed July 19, 1866. 

As a county badge all the Stirlingshire corps wore a 
band of Graham tartan (that of the Duke of Montrose, 
the Lord-Lieutenant) round their caps at the Eoyal 
Review in 1860, but this was discontinued after the 
review, except in the case of the 2nd Corps, which 
wore it in the form of a St Andrew's Cross in front 
of their caps. 

There existed a 10th Stirlingshire (Highland) Corps 
at Stirling, formed on November 10, 1860, and dis- 
banded in 1864, but it never formed part of the ad- 
ministrative battalion, and the 14th Stirlingshire 
Corps, raised at Alva on October 17, 1868, formed from 
that date portion of the 1st Administrative Battalion, 
Clackmannan E.V. (see 7th Volunteer Battalion). 
The 1st and 2nd Clackmannan Corps were from 1862 
attached to the Stirlingshire Battalion, but in 1867 
were formed into an independent battalion (see 7th 
Volunteer Battalion). 

In 1862 all the Stirlingshire rifle corps adopted 
trews of Graham tartan, continuing to wear their old 
tunics, but on November 12, 1863, the battalion 
assumed a uniform of rifle-green tunics with scarlet 
collars and cuffs with black Austrian knot, Graham 
tartan trews, green shakos with red, white, and green 
diced band and black ball -tuft, and brown belts. 
The officers wore tunics with black lace of rifle pattern, 
lines, and lace on their shakos like the Highland Light 
Infantry. 

In March 1880 the battalion was consolidated as the 
x 



322 Records of the Several Corps. 

1st Stirlingshire Rifle Volunteers, with headquarters 
at Stirling, and ten companies, lettered : A, B, and F, 
Stirling (late 1st, 2nd, and 11th Corps); C, Falkirk 
(late 3rd) ; D, Lennox Mill (afterwards Falkirk, late 
7th Corps) ; E, Lennoxtown (late 4th) ; G, Denny (late 
6th) ; H, Bannockburn (late 9th) ; I, Carron (late 
12th); and K, Kilsyth (late 13th). In 1882 the cuffs 
and collars of the tunics were changed from scarlet to 
rifle-green, and the piping and Austrian knot to light 
green, and on November 15, 1886, the uniform was 
changed to scarlet doublets with yellow facings, 
Sutherland tartan trews, glengarries with red-and- 
white diced borders, and brown belts, sashes being 
worn by Serjeants only. In 1887 (General Order 181 
of December 1 ) the battalion assumed the title of 4th 
(Stirlingshire) V.B. Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders. 

Fifty -seven members of the battalion served in 
the field during the South African War. Of these, 
Lieutenant J. Hunter (who died of enteric fever) and 
18 men served with the 1st, 13 men with the 2nd, and 
5 men with the 3rd Volunteer Service Company of the 
Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders. 

In 1904 the headquarters of "H" and "I" 
Companies were transferred from Bannockburn and 
Carron to Stenhousemuir, and in 1906 those of "F" 
Company to Falkirk, so that the distribution of the 
battalion after 1906 was : A and B Companies, Stirling ; 
C, D, and F, Falkirk ; E, Lennoxtown ; G, Denny ; 
H and I, Stenhousemuir ; and K, Kilsyth. The 
battalion range, which extended up to 1000 yards, 
was at Greenhill, and "E" Company had its own range, 
up to 600 yards, at South Brae, near its headquarters. 

In 1878 Private Rae of the 11th Stirlingshire won 
the Queen's Prize at the National Rifle Association 
meeting. 



$th Vol. Bat. Princess Louise's A.&S.H. 323 

The lieutenant-colonels commanding the battalion 
have been — 

J. Dundas, May 29, 1861. 
Alexander Wilson, V.D., October 26, 1872. 
Charles Ml. King, February 21, 1880. 
Alexander Nimmo (hon. col.), May 27, 1885. 
Donald MacFadyen, V.D. (hon. col.), March 10, 1888. 
John W. King, V.D. (hon. col.), May 2, 1900. 
Robert Morton, V.D. (hon. col.), January 2, 1904 
Ebenezer Simpson, V.D. (hon. col.), November 8, 1906. 



5th volunteer battalion, princess 
louise's (argyll and suther- 
land highlanders). 

Regimental District, No. 91. 

(Plate XLIII.) 

" South Africa, 1900-02." | Order of Precedence, 196. 

Honorary Colonel— J. D. S. Duke of Argyll, K.T., G.C.M.G., G.C.V.O., 
V.D., September 20, 1902. 

Headquarters — Dunoon. 

The following corps of rifle volunteers were raised in 
the county of Argyll : — 

2nd, 1 Inveraray, formed May 4, 1860, of one company. 

3rd, Campbeltown, formed April 16, 1860, of two companies. 

5th, 1 Mull, formed December 6, 1860, of one company ; disbanded 

1862. 
6th, Melfort, formed April 22, 1860, of two companies ; disbanded 

1864. 

1 No trace can be found of a 1st or 4th Corps. Such never appeared in 
an Army List. 



324 Records of the Several Corps. 

7th, Dunoon, formed March 28, 1860, of one company. 

8th, Cowal, formed June 4, 1860, of two companies. Head- 
quarters changed to G-lendaruel 1862, reduced to one com- 
pany 1864. 

9th, Glenorchy, formed April 12, 1860, of one company. 
Headquarters changed to Dalmally 1869, disbanded 1870. 

10th, Tayvollich, near Ardrishaig, formed June 4, 1860, by 
Campbell of Inverneill, from men of the Ross estate, as one 
company. It had medium grey uniform with green facings 
and piping, shakos with a band of Argyll (Cawdor) Campbell 
tartan, and brown belts. Disbanded in 1869, the Ardrishaig 
detachment joining the 14th Corps. 

11th, Oban, formed July 7, 1860, of one company; disbanded 
1865. 

12th, Bridgend, Islay, formed June 7, 1861, of one company ; 
disbanded 1865. 

13th, Ballachulish, formed August 31, 1867, as one company; 
increased to two companies 1873. 

14th, Kilmartin, formed January 15, 1868, of one company. 

Except the above description of the uniform of 
the 10th Corps, and statements that the 9th Corps 
wore grey doublets with green facings and kilts of 
Breadalbane Campbell tartan, and that the uniforms 
of all the other corps originally were " dark grey 
with trousers," nothing is known of the uniforms first 
worn. 

In July 1861 the 1st Administrative Battalion, 
Argyllshire Rifle Volunteers, with headquarters at 
Oban, was formed. It included the 2nd, 3rd, 7th, 
and 11th Corps, to which the 6th and 10th were 
added in 1862, the 12th in 1863, and the 8th in 1864. 
The 6th Corps was disbanded in 1864, and the 11th 
and 12th in 1865, but in the latter year the 9th Corps, 
which since December 1860 had been attached to the 
3rd Perthshire or 2nd Administrative Battalion Perth- 
shire Rifle Volunteers, was transferred to the battalion, 




3 § 

it a 



$th Vol. Bat. Princess Louise's A. & S. H. 325 

and in 1867 the 13th and in 1868 the 14th Corps were 
added to it. The 10th Corps was disbanded in 1869 
and the 9th in 1870. Battalion headquarters were in 
1866 moved to Ardrishaig, and in 1867 to Dunoon. 
The scattered nature of the battalion may be gathered 
from the fact that, on the 6th August 1868, the 2nd, 
3rd, and 7th Corps assembled for battalion drill and 
inspection at Rothesay (not in the county !), and that 
this was the first occasion since the formation of the 
battalion in which any two of its corps had met for 
drill. 

In 1863 or 1864 the battalion adopted a uniform of 
green doublets with scarlet collars, cuffs, and piping, 
Argyll (Cawdor) Campbell tartan kilts and belted 
plaids, white sporrans with three black tails, heather 
mixture hose, Highland brogues, glengarries with badge 
of bugle and crown with a boar's head in the centre 
(Balmoral bonnets with blackcock's tail for the 2nd 
Corps), and black belts. There were minor differences 
among corps — e.g., the 13th and 14th Corps had square 
cuffs with upright patch, while the others had gauntlet 
pattern, and the 14th had grey goatskin sporrans. 
Brown spats were adopted in 1870. In 1867 the 2nd 
Corps changed its uniform to scarlet doublets with 
green facings, Argyll (Cawdor) Campbell kilts, black 
sporrans with three white tails, red -and -black diced 
hose, white spats, glengarry with blackcock's tail, and 
white belts. The 9th Corps until its disbandment 
retained its grey uniform with green facings and 
Breadalbane Campbell kilts. 

On March 23, 1874, authority was given for the 
whole battalion to wear scarlet doublets with yellow 
facings, Argyll (Cawdor) Campbell tartan kilts, white 
sporrans with two black tails, red - and - black diced 
hose, white spats, plain glengarries with the badge 



326 Records of the Several Corps. 

hitherto worn, and white belts, and this change was 
finally carried out by April 1, 1879. 

On March 26, 1880, the battalion, then reduced to 
the 2nd, 3rd, 7th, 8th, 13th, and 14th Corps, was 
consolidated as the 2nd (re-numbered 1st in September) 
Argyllshire Highland Rifle Volunteers, with head- 
quarters at Dunoon, and eight companies, lettered as 
follows : A, Inveraray (late 2nd) ; B and C, Campbel- 
town (late 3rd) ; D, Dunoon (late 7th) ; E, Glendaruel 
(late 8th); F and G, Ballachulish (late 13th); and H, 
Kilmartin (late 14th). The year 1880 is also noted in 
the annals of the battalion, as in it Private Ferguson 
won the Queen's Cup at the National Rifle Association 
meeting. 

On December 1, 1882, the headquarters of G Com- 
pany were moved from Ballachulish to Southend, near 
Campbeltown, and on February 21, 1883, the tartan of 
the kilts was changed to that worn by the Argyll and 
Sutherland Highlanders, and the glengarry with red- 
and-white diced border replaced the plain one hitherto 
worn. In 1887, by General Order 181 of December 1, 
the battalion assumed the title of 5 th V.B. Argyll and 
Sutherland Highlanders. 

Sixty-one members of the battalion served in South 
Africa during the war. Of these, Lieutenant A. J. 
Macarthur and 15 men served with the 1st, 15 men 
with the 2nd, and Captain and Honorary Major 
G. H. Black and 23 men with the 3rd Volunteer 
Service Company of the Argyll and Sutherland High- 
landers. Corporal W. Gillespie of the 1st Company 
was killed at Commando Nek on October 1, 1900, this 
being the only casualty among the men of the 5th V.B. 
Surgeon-Captain J. P. Brown and Captain J. Pender 
also served in the war, the former as a civil surgeon, 
the latter in the remount department. 



$th Vol. Bat. Princess Louise's A. & S. H. 327 

In 1900 a new company, "I," was formed at Carra- 
dale, also a cyclist company, "K," with headquarters 
at Campbeltown, but recruited from all over the battalion 
area. On June 18, 1902, a blue Kilmarnock bonnet 
with red - and - white diced band and red tuft was 
adopted as the full head-dress, the glengarry being 
retained for undress. 

The distribution of the battalion from 1900 onwards 
was as follows: — 



F Company, Ballachulish. 

Q Company, Southend ; detachments 
at Kilkenzie and Glenbar. 

H Company, Kilmartin, with detach- 
ment at Ardrishaig. 

I Company, Carradale, with detach- 
ment at Tayinloan. 



A Company, Inveraray ; detachments 
at Dalmally and Furnace. 

B, C, and K (Cyclist) Companies, 

Campbeltown. 

D Company, Dunoon. 

E Company, Glendaruel ; detach- 
ments at Strachur, Tighna- 
bruaich, and Lochgoilhead. 

Corresponding to its scattered distribution, the 
battalion had nineteen rifle-ranges. 

The lieutenant -colonels commanding the battalion 
have been — 

C. A. Stewart, Major, December 9, 1861; Lieut-Colonel, Septem- 

ber 4, 1862. 
Archibald Campbell of Glendaruel, late 42nd Foot, May 31, 1867. 
John W. Malcolm of Poltalloch (afterwards Lord Malcolm), late 

Captain Kent Artillery Militia, C.B., V.D. (hon. col.), 

March 30, 1872. 
Duncan Campbell of Inverneill, late Captain 89th Foot (hon. col.), 

December 8, 1897. 
Edward P. Campbell of South Hall, Major (retired pay), late 

Eoyal Highlanders (hon. col.), May 10, 1905. 



328 Records of the Several Corps. 

1st DUMBARTONSHIRE VOLUNTEER RIFLE 
CORPS. 

Regimental District, No. 91. 

(Plate XLIV.) 

" South Africa, 1900-02." | Order of Precedence, 208. 

Honorary Colonel — J. McA. Denny, V.D. (hon. col.), February 7, 1903. 

Headquarters — Hslensburgh. 

The 1st Administrative Battalion, Dumbartonshire 
Rifle Volunteers, with headquarters at Balloch, was 
formed May 7, 1860, and in it were included, then or 
on their subsequent date of formation, the following 
corps of rifle volunteers (of one company each, except 
where otherwise stated) raised in the county : — 

1st, Kow, raised February 18, 1860. Headquarters changed 
January 1, 1873, to Helensburgh. 

2nd, East Kilpatrick, raised February 8, 1860. Uniform — slate- 
grey tunics with black collars, black braid all round and on the 
cuff, grey trousers and cap, both with black braid, and brown 
belts. Headquarters changed to Maryhill and corps in- 
creased to one and a half companies in 1868. 

3rd, Bonhill, raised February 8, 1860. 

4th, Jamestown, raised February 8, 1860. 

5th, Alexandria, raised February 8, 1860. 

^th, Dumbarton, raised February 8, 1860. Uniform — slate-grey 
tunics with double black braid all round and in four rows 
on the breast, black collar with red piping, black braid with 
red piping on the cuff, grey trousers with red piping, grey cap 
with red-and-grey diced band, and brown belts. Increased 
to one and a half companies in 1878. 

7th, Cardross, services accepted November 11, 1859 ; officers 
commissioned March 15, 1860. 

8th, Gareloch, raised February 16, 1860, as one subdivision. In- 



ist Dumbartonshire Vol. Rifle Corps. 329 

creased to one company 1863, and amalgamated with "the 

1st Corps on June 24, 1865. 
9th, Luss, raised February 8, 1860, as one subdivision. Increased 

to one company on August 28, 1868. 
10th, Kirkintilloch, raised March 5, 1860. Increased to one 

and a half companies 1874. Uniform — slate-grey, facings 

scarlet. 
11th, Cumbernauld, raised June 13, 1860. 
12th, Tarbert (with a detachment at Arrochar), raised as one 

subdivision March 7, 1861 ; disbanded 1869. 
13th, Milngavie, services accepted August 9, 1867 ; officers com- 
missioned August 23, 1867. 
14th, Clydebank, Dalmuir, services accepted May 18, 1875 ; 

officers commissioned June 23, 1875. 

The uniforms of the first twelve corps were all slate 
grey, and shortly after the formation of the battalion 
they were dressed uniformly in tunics, trousers, and 
shakos of that colour with scarlet facings and piping, 
grey - and - scarlet diced band and scarlet ball -tuft on 
the shakos, and brown waist and pouch belts. This 
uniform was worn till 1864, when it was replaced by 
a rifle-green one with scarlet collars and piping, and 
black braid on the cuffs, green shakos with black ball- 
tuft and red - and - black diced band, and black belts. 
Busbies with black and light green plumes replaced the 
shakos in 1874 (when also a double red piping was 
added to the cuffs) and were worn till November 17, 
1881, when helmets with bronze ornaments took their 
place. The 9th Corps (Luss) was in 1864 clothed in 
green doublets and Colquhoun tartan kilts, and con- 
tinued to wear this uniform till its disbandment in 
1882. 

On April 28, 1880, the battalion was consolidated 
under the title of 1st Dumbartonshire RV.C, the 
headquarters being removed to Helensburgh, with twelve 
companies, lettered as follows : A, Helensburgh (late 



33° Records of the Several Corps. 

1st Corps) ; B, Cardross (late 7th) ; C, Dumbarton 
(late 6th) ; D, Bonhill (late 3rd) ; E, Jamestown 
(late 4th) ; F, Alexandria (late 5th) ; G, Clydebank (late 
14th) ; H, Maryhill (late 2nd) ; I, Milngavie (late 
13th); K, Kirkintilloch (late 10th); L, Cumbernauld 
(late 11th); and M, Luss (late 9th). 

In 1882 the Queen's Prize at Wimbledon was won 
by Serjeant A. Lawrance of the battalion. In this 
year also (on January 1, 1882) the "M" (Luss) Com- 
pany was disbanded, and a new " M " Company was 
raised on February 12, 1882, at Eenton. In 1884 
" L n Company at Cumbernauld became a detachment 
of " K " Company, and a new " L " Company was raised 
on April 1, 1884, at Yoker. In 1900 a company of 
mounted infantry, lettered " O," with headquarters at 
Maryhill, and a cyclist company, lettered "Q," with head- 
quarters at Dumbarton, were added to the battalion. 

On March 8, 1887, sanction was given for the 
battalion to adopt the scarlet doublet with yellow 
facings and the glengarry with red -and -white diced 
border of the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, to 
be worn with Sutherland trews. The belts were 
changed to white. Officers and staff- Serjeants wore 
blackcocks' tails in the glengarries in review order, and 
all ranks white spats in review and black leggings in 
marching order. Sashes were not worn. On March 29, 
1904, a drab service dress with red piping on the 
trousers was authorised, and this was the sole uniform 
of the mounted and cyclist companies, which wore 
brown felt hats with it. 

During the South African War the 1st Dumbarton 
contributed 98 of its members to the various new 
formations. Of these, Lieutenant R. L. Stevenson and 
24 non - commissioned officers and men served in 
the 1st, 24 men in the 2nd, and 19 men in 



ist Dumbartonshire Vol. Rifle Corps. 331 

the 3rd Volunteer Service Company of the Argyll 
and Sutherland Highlanders. Of the 1st Com- 
pany, Privates J. C. Morrison, W. R. Kelly, and 
D. W. Moore died of disease in South Africa, and 
Lance - Corporal W. L. L. Fitzwilliam and Private 
R. M. Duncan after being invalided home, and of the 
2nd Company, Lance -Corporal T. Stevenson died of 
disease in South Africa. One man joined the Scot- 
tish Cyclist Company, and 29 men the Imperial 
Yeomanry, of whom Private Neilson died of disease. 
Captain R. L. Stevenson also served a second period 
with the Imperial Yeomanry. One hundred and 
seven men of the battalion, in addition, joined the 
regular army and militia during the war, and 28 
non-commissioned officers and men (including Staff- 
Serjeant Cumming, who was mentioned in despatches) 
of the A. & S. H. Brigade Bearer Company, attached 
to the battalion, served with the R.A.M.C. in South 
Africa. 

In 1906 the battalion was placed in the 31st Field 
Army Brigade, 16th Division, and attended camp for 
fifteen days. 

The distribution of the battalion since 1900 was — 

A Coy., Helensburgh. G Coy., Clydebank. 

B Coy., Cardross, with a detach- H and Coys., Maryhill. 

ment at Dalreoch. I Coy., Milngavie. 

C and Q Coys., Dumbarton. K Coy, Kirkintilloch, with a de- 
D Coy., Bonhill. tachment at Cumbernauld. 

E Coy, Jamestown. L Coy., Yoker. 

F Coy., Alexandria. M Coy., Kenton. 

The battalion had a central rifle-range at Auchin- 
carroch, in the Vale of Leven, up to 900 yards, and A, 
I, and K Companies had also ranges near their head- 
quarters, that of the latter being held in conjunction 
with E Company, 4th V.B. Argyll and Sutherland High- 
landers. 



33 2 Records of the Several Corps. 

The lieutenant-colonels commandant of the battalion 
have been — 

J. M. Gartshore, May 7, 1860. 

John Findlay of Boturich (commanded at the same time the 

Highland Borderers Militia), October 13, 1862. 
Colin J. Campbell, late Lieutenant 2nd Dragoons, December 2, 

1876. 
H. Currie, late Captain 74th and 79th Foot, and former Adjutant 

of the battalion (hon. col.), September 13, 1879. 
James R. Thomson (hon. col.), December 8, 1888. 
John McA. Denny (hon. col.), March 20, 1895. 
Henry Brock, V.D. (hon. col.), January 17, 1903. 



7th (CLACKMANNAN AND KINROSS) VOLUN- 
TEER BATTALION, PRINCESS LOUISE'S 
(ARGYLL AND SUTHERLAND HIGHLANDERS). 

Regimental District , JVo. 91. 

(Plate XLV.) 

" South Africa, 1901-02." | Order of Precedence, 219. 

Honorary Colonel — W. J. F. Earl of Mar and Kellie, August 5, 1896. 

Headquarters — Alloa. 

The first meetings with a view to the formation of 
volunteer rifle corps in Clackmannanshire were held 
at Tillicoultry on the 4th, and at Alloa on the 5th 
November 1859, but it was not till March 10, 1860, 
that the services of the Tillicoultry Corps, of one com- 
pany, and June 2 that those of the Alloa Corps, of two 
companies, were accepted, the delay being due to the 
absence of the Lord-Lieutenant. The Tillicoultry Corps 
was at first numbered " 1," but this was afterwards 



7th Vol. Bat. Princess Louise's A.& S. H. 333 

changed, the Alloa Corps becoming the 1st and the 
Tillicoultry Corps the 2nd, the officers of both being 
gazetted on June 29, 1860. Each member paid for 
his own uniform and equipment, which consisted of 
medium grey tunics and trousers, with black braid and 
lace on the breast of the tunics and green facings, a 
grey cap with green band, and brown belts. A band 
of Graham tartan was worn round the caps at the 
Royal Review of 1860 as a battalion badge (see 4th 
V.B.), and was retained by the Clackmannan Corps 
till 1863, when a grey, green, and white diced band 
was substituted for it. 

In 1862 both corps were attached to the 1st Ad- 
ministrative Battalion, Stirlingshire Rifle Volunteers, 
and in 1865 it was decided to re-clothe the two corps 
in green doublets with black braid and red collars and 
cuffs, Graham tartan trews, round green caps without 
peak and with red, white, and green diced band, and 
brown belts. 

On November 5, 1867, the 1st Corps was increased 
to four companies, the fourth (D) being at Dollar, and 
it and the 2nd Corps were taken away from the Stir- 
lingshire Battalion and formed into the 1st Adminis- 
trative Battalion, Clackmannanshire Rifle Volunteers, 
with headquarters at Alloa, to which the 14th Stirling- 
shire Corps at Alva (raised on October 17, 1868) was 
added in 1868, and the 1st Kinross Corps in 1873. 
The latter corps had been raised as a subdivision at 
Kinross on October 31, 1860, and increased to a com- 
pany on May 1, 1861, and had hitherto been attached 
to the 1st Administrative Battalion Fifeshire R.V. (see 
6th V.B. Black Watch), whose changes of uniform it 
had followed. On the battalion being formed, it was 
determined not to proceed with the change of uniform 
decided on in 1865, which had only partially been car- 



334 Records of the Several Corps. 

ried out, and instead a uniform of dark grey doublets 
with scarlet collars, cuffs, and piping, the cuffs being 
pointed and with black lace, Murray tartan trews (out 
of compliment to Lord Mansfield, the Lord-Lieutenant), 
dark grey forage caps without peaks and with red, 
white, and green diced band, and brown belts was 
adopted. The officers had black braid on the breast 
of the doublet and silver lace round the top of the 
cap. The 14th Stirlingshire were clothed in this 
uniform on their formation. In 1874 the doublets 
were changed to scarlet with blue facings, and plain 
glengarries (with blackcock's tail for officers) were 
substituted for the caps, the Murray tartan trews 
and brown belts being retained. 

In February 1880 the battalion was consolidated 
as the 1st Clackmannan and Kinross Bine Volunteers, 
with headquarters at Alloa, and seven companies, let- 
tered as follows : A and C, Alloa ; B, Sauchie ; and 
D, Dollar (all late 1st Clackmannan) ; E, Tillicoultry 
(late 2nd Clackmannan) ; F, Alva (late 14th Stirling) ; 
and G, Kinross (late 1st Kinross). In 1882 a section 
was formed at Clackmannan, and in 1883 it was in- 
creased to a complete company and lettered "H." 
Since then, with the exception of the formation in 
1900 of a section of "H" Company at Kincardine 
and of a cyclist section at Kelty, attached to the 
Kinross Company, in 1903, there were no changes in 
the organisation of the battalion. 

In 1887, by General Order 181 of December 1, the 
battalion assumed the title of 7th (Clackmannan and 
Kinross) V.B. Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, and 
on February 21, 1888, it was authorised to wear the 
uniform of the regular battalions, but with trews and 
glengarry bonnets with red-and-white diced borders, 
the brown belts being changed for white. Officers 



*]th Vol. Bat. Princess Louise's A. & S. H. 335 

wore shoulder -plaids, claymore belts, claymores, and 
dirks. 

During the South African War, 85 members of the 
battalion, including 3 officers, saw active service. Of 
these, 11 men joined the 1st Volunteer Company, 
Lieutenant C. W. L. Ross and 17 men the 2nd, and 
Lieutenant H. R. Rae and 24 men (of whom 5 had 
already served in the 1st) the 3rd Volunteer Com- 
pany of the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, and 
16 men joined the Scottish Volunteer Cyclist Company, 
Lieutenant A. M. Muir and the remaining men joining 
other corps. 

As headquarters for the battalion, Alloa prison was 
purchased in 1882, and enlarged and completed with 
drill-hall, offices, armoury, &c. The battalion had its 
rifle-range up to 900 yards at Hillend, near Alloa, and 
G Company had a separate range up to 600 yards at 
Blairadam. 

The lieutenant-colonels commanding have been — 

Alexander Mitchell, Major, November 5, 1867; Lieut. -Colonel, 

February 10, 1871. 
John B. Harvey (hon. col.), December 21, 1887. 
James Porteous, V.D. (hon. col.), January 24, 1891. 
Andrew T. Moyes, V.D. (hon. col.), March 3, 1897. 
Eobert Haig of Dollarfield, January 25, 1902. 
James Craig, September 13, 1906. 



336 Records of the Several Corps. 

7th MIDDLESEX (LONDON SCOTTISH) 

VOLUNTEER RIFLE CORPS. 

(Rifle Depot.) 

(Plate XLVI.) 

" South Africa, 1900-02." | Order op Precedence, 11. 

Honorary Colonel— 1. D. S. Duke of Argyll, K.T., G.C.M.G., G.C.V.O., 
V.D., August 11, 1900. 

Headquarters — 59 Buckingham Gate, London, S.W. 

On May 21, 1859, at a meeting of the Highland Society 
of London, it was announced that a movement was on 
foot to raise a corps of Scottish volunteers in London, 
and the outcome of this was a meeting at the Free- 
masons' Tavern on July 4, 1859, with Lord Elcho in 
the chair, at which it was resolved to form such a 
corps. On November 2, 1859, the services of the 
corps as the 15th Middlesex (London Scottish) Rifle 
Volunteer Corps, with an establishment of six com- 
panies, were accepted. The companies originally formed 
were distributed over London as follows, and their re- 
cruitment was confined to Scotsmen resident in the 
Metropolis : — 

No. 1 (Highland) Company. Headquarters, 10 Pall Mall, East. 
No. 2 (City) Company. Mainly recruited from employes of the 

Oriental Bank, with headquarters there. 
No. 3 (Northern) Company. Headquarters, Eosemary Hall, 

Islington. 
No. 4 (Central) Company. Headquarters, Scottish Corporation 

House, Crane Court. 
No. 5 (Southern) Company. Headquarters, 68 Jermyn Street, 

S.W. 
No. 6 (Western) Company. Headquarters, Chesterfield House, 

W. 



*]th Middlesex Volunteer Rifle Corps. 337 

The corps was largely aided at first by the sub- 
scriptions of Scotsmen in London, and had a large 
number of honorary members. The entrance-fee was 
fixed at £1 and the annual subscription at £1, 
members providing their own uniform and equip- 
ment; but of the 600 men originally recruited, 340 
were " artisans," who paid no entrance - fee and only 
5s. a-year subscription, and of these only 50 provided 
their own uniforms, the rest being equipped from 
corps funds. The corps was thus thoroughly repre- 
sentative of all classes of Scots in London. Two of 
the companies were mainly, but not entirely, composed 
of such "artisans," the others were mixed. In 1862 
the entrance - fee was abolished, and since then the 
necessary qualifications for entrance have been only 
the introduction of a member and Scottish nation- 
ality. 

The original uniform was, for the 1st Company, 
Elcho grey tunics, short skirted and with the skirts 
rounded in front, with blue collars and cuffs, white- 
metal buttons, grey lace on the collar, and grey 
Austrian knot, Elcho grey kilts, goatskin sporrans 
with two black tails, grey hose, laced boots, blue 
glengarries with thistle badge, and brown belts; for 
the 2nd to 6th Companies similar tunics with long 
skirts, grey trousers with blue piping, brown canvas 
leggings, and grey caps with sloping peak, blue-and- 
white diced band, and blackcock's tail on the left 
side. In 1862 the glengarry bonnet with blackcock's 
tail was adopted as head-dress for the whole battalion. 

In November 1860 the establishment of the bat- 
talion was officially increased to ten companies ; but 
this increase appears never to have been carried out, 
for in 1861 No. 2 Company became No. 7, a new 
No. 2 was raised, and a new No. 8 was formed as 



338 Records of the Several Corps. 

a kilted company, thus only raising the actual strength 
to eight companies, the two flank companies being 
kilted, the others wearing tunics and trousers, and 
all the glengarry with blackcock's tail. 

The first honorary colonel of the corps was Lieu- 
tenant-General Colin Campbell, Lord Clyde, appointed 
in 1861, and, after his death in 1863, another dis- 
tinguished Scottish officer, Lieutenant - General Sir 
James Hope Grant, was appointed to the same honour, 
which he held till his death in 1875. 

In 1865 No. 3 Company was absorbed into the 
others, and in 1866 a new kilted company was formed 
under the Marquis of Lome and lettered " B," the 
former 1st (kilted) Company becoming "A," the 2nd 
and 6th being amalgamated as " E," and the 4th, 5th, 
7th, and 8th Companies becoming " C," " D," " F," 
and "H" respectively, letter "G" being left vacant. 
" A," " B," and " H " were then the kilted companies. 
In 1870 "E," and in 1872 "C," "D," and "F" Com- 
panies were kilted, thus completing the corps as a 
kilted battalion. On November 1, 1881, a new"G" 
Company was formed, thus attaining to the establish- 
ment of eight companies, which had been laid down 
in 1865 though never reached. In 1884 authority 
was given to increase the establishment to ten com- 
panies, and on November 1 of that year "I" and 
" K " Companies were formed. 

In 1880, in accordance with an announcement in the 
' London Gazette ' of September 3, the corps was re- 
numbered the 7th Middlesex (London Scottish) Rifle 
Volunteers. No further changes in the establishment 
of the battalion (except the increase in the number 
of privates in 1901) took place after 1884. 

The original kilted dress underwent few changes. 
In 1868 all the companies (including those not kilted) 



*]tk Middlesex Volunteer Rifle Corps. 339 

were permitted to wear grey belted plaids, and in 1872 
bronze buttons were introduced in place of those of 
white metal, but in 1880 the latter were reverted to. 
In 1882 doublets with gauntlet cuff and blue piping 
replaced the tunics hitherto in use, and grey linen 
spats, worn with shoes, were taken into wear, the 
grey spats being exchanged for white ten years later. 
In 1890 the valise equipment was introduced, the 
shoulder-belts and expanse pouches being done away 
with. Till 1882 it had been the custom for each 
company to wear a separate badge in the glengarry 
on special occasions (thus, " A " Company, deer grass ; 
"B" Company, the Clan Campbell badge of myrtle, 
&c. ; the companies which had no special badge wear- 
ing holly), but in that year the holly badge was made 
common to all companies, and was worn when specially 
ordered. 

In 1872 Colour - Serjeant Michie of the London 
Scottish won the Queen's Prize at the National Rifle 
Association meeting at Wimbledon. 

During the South African War no fewer than 218 
members of the corps saw active service in the field. 
Lieutenant B. C. Green and 45 other ranks joined 
the City of London Imperial Volunteers in December 
1899, and of these Lieutenant Green, Serjeant-Major 
T. Smith, Armourer- Serjeant E. A. H. Gordon, and 
Serjeant J. T. Hutchison were mentioned in Lord 
Roberts' despatch of September 4, 1901, and Serjeant- 
Major Smith and Serjeant Hutchison received the 
medal for distinguished conduct. Nine more men 
followed as a draft for the City Imperial Volunteers 
in June 1900. 

To the 2nd Volunteer Service Company of the 
Gordon Highlanders the London Scottish contributed 
Captains A. W. Buckingham and 56 other ranks, the 



340 Records of the Several Corps. 

remainder of the company being made up from the 
5th and 6th Volunteer Battalions Gordon Highlanders. 
This company left Aberdeen on February 23, and 
joined the 2nd Battalion at Lady smith on March 25. 
Captain A. E. Rogers of the London Scottish served 
with it as a volunteer, and commanded it after Cap- 
tain Buckingham was invalided. At the action of 
Rooikopjes on July 24, Corporal E. B. M. Murray of 
the London Scottish was dangerously wounded, and 
afterwards died, and Captain Rogers was slightly 
wounded. On September 8, near Lydenburg, a shell 
burst immediately above the company, which lost 
3 killed and 16 wounded, of whom Serjeant W. F. 
Budgett, killed, and 10 men wounded belonged to 
the London Scottish. During the campaign Lance- 
Serjeant W. H. Kidd, Private D. E. Thomson, and 
Private T. P. Menzies died of disease. The company 
returned to Aberdeen on May 3. Serjeant E. Gavin 
and Corporal F. C. Thorne were mentioned in Lord 
Roberts' despatch of September 4, 1901. 

To the 3rd Volunteer Service Company of the 
Gordon Highlanders (see 1st Volunteer Battalion) 
the London Scottish sent Captain B. C. Green (who 
had already served with the City Imperial Volunteers), 
2nd Lieutenant H. G. H. Newington, and 26 other 
ranks, of whom Serjeant W. Steven was mentioned 
for gallantry on August 10, when a derailed train 
was attacked near Pietersburg (Lord Kitchener's 
despatch of October 8, 1901), and Serjeant F. H. 
Harris died of disease. To the 4th Service Company 
the London Scottish contributed 4 men, and Captain 
Gun was transferred to the command of it from 
the 3rd. Lieutenants J. H. Torrance and C. J. 
Dyke, 2nd Lieutenant W. N. Clark, and 27 men 
joined the Imperial Yeomanry in 1900, and 29 men 



Army Service Corps. 341 

in 1901, and in the latter year 1 man also joined 
Lovat's Scouts. The remainder of the 218 served in 
various corps. 

The headquarters of the corps were first established 
at 8 Aldephi Terrace, and in 1873 removed to 1a 
Adam Street, Adelphi, W.C. There they remained 
until 1886, when newly built headquarters, with drill- 
hall, armoury, &c, at 59 Buckingham Gate, S.W., 
were taken into use. The musketry of the corps 
was carried out on the Pirbright Ranges, near 
Aldershot. 

The lieutenant-colonels commanding the corps have 
been — 

F. Lord Elcho (afterwards Earl of Wemyss), Colonel, A.D.C., 

January 30, 1860. 
Henry Lumsden, late Captain Eoyal Aberdeen Militia (hon. 

col.), December 7, 1878. 
William E. Nicol, March 14, 1891. 
Eustace J. A. Balfour, April 28, 1894. 
W. E. Edmonstone Montgomerie, V.D. (hon. col.), December 3, 

1902. 
James W. Greig, V.D. (hon. col.), December 3, 1904. 



ARMY SERVICE CORPS (VOLUNTEERS). 

(Plate XL VII.) 

The Army Service Corps companies date from 1902, 
and were allotted one to each Volunteer Infantry 
Brigade. They were attached to volunteer battalions 
for administration as follows : — 

Argyll and Sutherland Brigade Coy. A.S.C.(V.) — 1st Dum- 
barton V.R.C. 



342 Records of the Several Corps. 

Black Watch Brigade Coy. A.S.C.(V.)— 4th V.B. Eoyal High- 

landers. 
Gordon Brigade Coy. A.S.C.(V.)— 4th V.B. Gordon Highlanders. 
Highland Light Infantry Brigade Coy. A.S.C.(V.) — 3rd V.B. 

Highland Light Infantry. 
1st Lothian Brigade Coy. A.S.C.(V.)— Q.R.V.B. Royal Scots. 
Scottish Border Brigade Coy. A.S.C.(V.)— 2nd V.B. King's Own 

Scottish Borderers. 
Seaforth and Cameron Brigade Coy. A.S.C.(V.) — 1st V.B. 

Cameron Highlanders. 

No companies had been formed for the Clyde, 
Scottish Rifles, and 2nd Lothian Brigades. 

Each company consisted of a headquarters and a 
supply section. The headquarters consisted of 1 
major or captain, 1 subaltern, 1 company serjeant- 
major and quartermaster - Serjeant, 2 Serjeants, 2 
corporals, 1 wheeler, 1 shoeing-smith, and 1 saddler ; 
and the supply section numbered 1 captain, 1 staff- 
serjeant, 1 Serjeant, 1 corporal and 2 privates as 
clerks and issuers, 1 corporal and 2 privates as 
butchers, 1 private as labourer, and 2 drivers for 
each vehicle. The vehicles were one 2-horsed waggon 
for each battalion of the brigade and one for com- 
pany headquarters. This 'personnel belonged to and 
was borne supernumerary to the establishment of one 
or more battalions of the brigade. 

The uniform was that of the Army Service Corps — 
blue with white facings and helmets, but with white- 
metal buttons and silver lace. 



Royal Army Medical Corps. 343 

ROYAL ARMY MEDICAL CORPS 
(VOLUNTERS). 

(Plate XLVII.) 

The Royal Army Medical Corps (Volunteers) were first 
formed as the "Volunteer Medical Staff Corps," and 
received their later title under Army Order 27 of 
February 1902. The force in Scotland was divided 
into the Edinburgh Company, the Aberdeen Companies, 
the Glasgow Companies, and a number of Brigade 
Bearer Companies, the establishments of which are 
given in Appendix G. The uniform was the same 
as that of the Royal Army Medical Corps — blue 
with dull cherry facings and helmets, but with white- 
metal buttons and silver lace. 

EDINBURGH COMPANY. 

This company was raised in Edinburgh, mainly from 
medical students of the University, as the 2nd Division 
Volunteer Medical Staff Corps, on May 22, 1886. 

Thirty-four of its members served in South Africa 
during the war, of whom Captain David Wallace 
was mentioned in despatches (' London Gazette,' April 
16, 1901). 

Its commanding officers have been — 

Surgeon David Hepburn, M.D. (afterwards Major), May 22, 

1886. 
Lieutenant D. Waterston, M.D. (Captain, August 11, 1906), 

January 7, 1903. 



344 Records of the Several Corps. 



ABERDEEN COMPANIES. 

The formation of one company, as the 7th Division 
Volunteer Medical Staff Corps, at Aberdeen was 
authorised on May 13, 1888. It was composed en- 
tirely of medical students of the University of 
Aberdeen, and its officers were first commissioned on 
April 17, 1889. In 1905 a second company was 
added, and also transport sections for two field 
hospitals and the bearer company of the Gordon 
Volunteer Infantry Brigade. Headquarters were at 
the Albert Hall, 14 Union Wynd, Aberdeen. 

Six members of the company served during the 
South African "War, of whom one, Private Alexander 
Watt, was killed in action. 

The commanding officers have been — 

Surgeon Alexander MacGregor, M.D., April 17, 1889. 

Captain (Major, 1902) James Mackenzie Booth, M.A., M.D., 

September 8, 1891. 
Major John Scott Kiddell, M.V.O., M.A., M.B., July 2, 1904. 

GLASGOW COMPANIES. 

Two companies were formed on July 11, 1894, and 
these were increased to five in 1901. To the com- 
panies were also attached transport sections for six 
field hospitals and two bearer companies. Head- 
quarters were at Gilbert Street, Yorkhill, Glasgow. 

Forty -nine members of the companies served in 
South Africa during the war. 

The commanding officer was — 

Lieut-Colonel Sir George T. Beatson, K.C.B., V.D., M.D. (hon. 
col.), who was appointed Captain Commanding June 23, 
1894, Major on July 25, 1900, and Lieutenant - Colonel 
May 8, 1901. 



Royal Army Medical Corps. 345 



BEARER COMPANIES. 

The following Brigade Bearer Companies were in- 
dependent units : — 

Argyll and Sutherland — 21 Jardine Street, Glasgow. 

Black Watch — 107 Victoria Road, Dundee. 

Highland Light Infantry — 81 Greendyke Street, Glasgow. 

1st Lothian — 71 Gilmore Place, Edinburgh. 

Seaforth and Cameron — 10 Bank Street, Inverness. 

The Bearer Company for the Gordon Brigade formed 
portion of the Aberdeen Companies RA.M.C.(V.), 
and its strength was included in that unit. That 
for the Scottish Border Brigade was borne super- 
numerary to the establishment of the 3rd Volunteer 
Battalion, King's Own Scottish Borderers, and the 
other bearer companies had not, up to 1908, been 
formed, but would have been found by the Boyal 
Army Medical Corps (Volunteers). 



346 



Appendix A, 



APPENDIX A. 

LIST OF RIFLE CORPS FORMED IN THE COUNTY OF ABERDEEN. 



No. 


Headquarters. 


Date of Officers' 
Commissions. 


Remarks. 


Included 
in Records of— 


1 


Tarves 


Feb. 


15, 1860 


2 companies. Became 2nd, July 
19, 1860, and increased to 3 
companies 


2nd V. Gordons 


2 








Apparently never existed. 1 st (see 
above) became 2nd on July 19, 
1860 

Formed as "1st Subdivision." 


., 


3 


Cluny 


Apr. 


16, 1860 


4th 










Increased to 1 company and 












became 3rd Corps, July 19, 1860 




4 


Alford 


Mar. 


12 „ 


Formed as "2nd Subdivision." 
Became 4th Corps, July 19, 1860. 
Raised to 1 company, October 
2, 1860. 


" " 


5 








Apparently never existed 




6 


Aberdeen 


Nov. 


19, 1859 


Became 1st Corps on July 19, 1860, 
the 7th, 8th, 9th, 11th, 12th, 
and 13th Corps having been 
added to it on March 16, 1860, 
making 9 companies in all 


1st V. Gordons 


7 


n 


M 


19 „ 


Added to 6th, March 16, 1860 




8 


" 


" 


26 „ 


Raised to 2 companies, December 
30, 1859. Added to 6th, March 
16, 1860 


" 


9 


,, 


Dec. 


23 „ 


Added to 6th, March 16, 1860 




10 
11 


Aberdeen 


Jan. 


13, 1860 


Apparently never existed 
Added to 6th, March 16, 1860 


1st V. Gordons 


12 


» 


" 


27 „ 


Raised as 2 companies. Added to 
6th, March 16, 1860 


" 


13 
14 
15 

16 
17 


,, 


n 


21 „ 


Added to 6th, March 16, 1860 


» 








V Apparently never existed 




New Deer 


Apr. 


iS, I860 


) 

Formed as a subdivision. Be- 


3rd V. Gordons 










came 5th Corps, July 19, 1860. 












Increased to 1 company, Nov- 












ember 1861 




18 


Ellon 




18 „ 


Became 6th Corps, July 19, 1860 


2nd 


19 


Huntly 


Mar. 


6 „ 


Became 7th Corps, July 19, 1860 


4th 


20 


Echt 


June 


9 .. 


Raised as 2 companies. Became 
8th Corps, July 19, 1860 


5th 


21 


Peterhead 


Apr. 


4 „ 


Raised as 2 companies. Became 
9th Corps, July 19, 1860 


3rd „ 


22 


Inverurie 




20 „ 


Became 10th Corps, July 19, 1860 
Raised as 1 subdivision. Became 


4th „ 


23 


Kildrummy 


June 


20 „ 












11th Corps, July 19, 1860 




12 


Old Aberdeen 


July 


21 ,, 


Disbanded, 1863. Reformed at 
Udny, 1864 


2nd 


18 


Turriff 


Aug. 


8 ,. 






14 


Tarland 


Oct. 


29 ,, 


Raised as 1 subdivision. In- 
creased to a company, May 7, 
1861 


5th 


16 


Fyvie 




1 » 


2nd 


It! 


Meldrum 




2 ., 




3rd 


17 


Old Deer 




29 „ 


Raised as 2 companies 


18 


Tarves 


June 11, 1867 


Formed from remains of 2nd Corps 


2nd 



Appendix B. 



347 



No. 


Headquarters. 


Date of Officers' 
Commissions. 


Remarks. 


Included 
in Records of— 


19 


New Deer 


June 30, 1861 


Raised as 1 company, but amal- 
gamated with 5th Corps in Nov- 
ember 1861. A new 19th was 
formed at Insch in 1867 


3rd & 4th V. Gordons 


20 


Longside 


July 30 „ 




3rd V. Gordons 


SU 


Aboyne 


Nov. 22 „ 


' ' Marquis of Huntly's Highland " 


5th 


•i-i 


Auchmull 


June 18, 1862 




4th 


23 


Lumphanan 


Mar. 29 „ 




5th 


24 


St Fergus 


Dec. 23, 1867 


Raised as 1 subdivision. Amal- 
gamated with 9th Corps, 1875. 
A new 24th Corps was formed at 
Fraserburgh in 1875 


3rd 


25 


New Pitsligo 


Apr. 14, 1868 




,, ,, 


26 


Cruden 


Sept. 25, 1872 




" 



Note.— A "6th Subdivision" was formed at Glenkindie in July 1860, but no officers were appointed 
to it, and it disappeared from the Army List in July 1861 ; its members probably joined the 11th 
(Kildrummy) Corps. 



APPENDIX B. 

LIST OF RIFLE CORPS FORMED IN THE COUNTY OF FORFAR. 



No. 


Headquarters. 


Date of Officers' 
Commissions. 


Remarks. 


Included 
in Records of— 


1 


Dundee 


Nov. 15, 1859 


Raised as 5 companies 


1st V. Black Watch 


2 


Forfar 


„ 15 „ 


Raised as 1 company ; a second 
added, January 10, 1861 


2nd 


3 


Arbroath 


„ 15 „ 


Raised as 1 company ; a second 
added, May 1860. Raised to 4 
companies, 1864 


" " 


4 






This number was borne for a few 
weeks by the 2nd Company 3rd 
Corps 

Raised as 1 company ; a second 




6 


Montrose 


Nov. 15, 1859 


2nd V. Black Watch 








added, April 10, 1860 




6 






Apparently never existed 

Raised as 1 company ; a second 




7 


Brechin 


Mar. 26, 1860 


2nd V. Black Watch 








added, April 18, 1865 




8 


Newtyle 


Apr. 4 „ 


Designated "The Wharncliffe " 


„ ,, 


9 


Glamis 


May 8 „ 






10 


Dundee 


Apr. 10 „ 


Raised as 1 company ; a second 
added, June 29, 1867 


3rd 


11 


Tannadice 


Oct. 8 „ 


Raised as 1 subdivision. In- 
creased to 1 company, Septem- 
ber 29, 1867. Disbanded 1869 


2nd 


u 


Kirriemuir 


Sept. 17 „ 




„ ,, 


I;; 


Friockheim 


June 4, 1861 






14 


Dundee 


„ 14 „ 


Raised as 1 company; a second 
added on June 29, 1867 


3rd 


15 


Cortachy 


Aug. 16, 1865 Disbanded 1872 


2nd 



348 



Appendix C. 



APPENDIX C. 
LIST OF EIFLE CORPS FORMED IN THE COUNTY OF LANARK. 



No. 


Headquarters. 


Date of Accept- 
ance of Services. 


Date of Officers' 
Commissions. 


Remarks. 


Included 
in Records of— 


1 


Glasgow 


Sept 


24, 1859 


Oct. 


1, 


1859 


"1st Western " 


1st Lanark 


2 


,, 


,, 


24 „ 


„ 


3 


,, 


" Glasgow University " 


,, 


3 






9 >i 




4 




" 1st Southern " 


3rd „ 


4 


,, 


Oct. 


10 „ 


rt 


15 




"1st Northern" 


4th V.B.S.R. 


5 


„ 




24 „ 




17 




"1st Eastern" 


3rdV.B.H.L.I. 


6 


,, 


Oct. 


10 „ 


Nov 


4 






4th V.B.S.R. 


7 


M 




10 „ 




4 








8 


M 




10 „ 




4 


; 






9 


„ 


„ 


10 „ 


M 


4 




"Bankers" 


1st Lanark 


10 


„ 




19 „ 




4 






3rd „ 


11 


„ 


Nov 


4 „ 


Dm. 


13 




" 2nd Western " 


1st „ 


12 


„ 


Dec. 


5 „ 




20 






4thV.B.S.R. 


13 


u 




5 „ 




20 








14 


„ 




5 „ 


Feb. 


% 


1890 




3rd Lanark 


15 


,, 


, 


5 „ 




20 


u 


"Procurators" 


1st „ 


16 


Hamilton 


Feb. 


24, 1860 




29 


1859 




2nd V.B.S.R. 


17 


Glasgow 


Dec. 


5, 1859 


Dec. 


28, 




1st Lanark 


18 






5 „ 




20 








19 






5 .. 




30 






lstV.B\H.L.I. 


20 


This corps wa 

existed. 
Glasgow 


s to have been 


raised from the 


Western shipbuilding yai 


ds, but never 


21 


Dec. 


5, 1859 


Dec. 


20, 


1859 




3rd V.B.H.L.I. 


22 


H 


M 


5 „ 




24 






3rd Lanark 


23 






5 ., 




20 


f 




1st V.B.H.L.I. 


24 






6 „ 




26 






,> 


25 




M 


14 „ 




98 






2nd 


26 






14 „ 




26 






ii >) 


27 


J} 




14 ,. 


Feb. 


28, 


1860 






28 




Feb. 


22 „ 


Dec. 


30, 


1859 




1st 


29 


Coatbridge 


13, 1860 


Feb. 


22, 


1860 




5thV.B.S.R. 


30 


Glasgow 


Dec. 


28, 1859 


Jan. 


7 






3rd V.B.H.L.I. 


31 






21 ,, 




7 


' 






32 


Summerlee 


•Jan. 


10, 1860 


Feb. 


11 






5thV.B.S.R. 


33 


Glasgow 


Dec. 


22, 1859 




6 




"Partick" 


1st Lanark 


34 






27 „ 


Jan. 


7 






3rd V.B.H.L.I. 


35 






27 „ 




7 


M 






36 




M 


28 .. 


t 


7 






1st „ 


37 


Lesmahagow 


Feb. 


3, 1860 


Feb. 


11 






9th Lanark 


38 


Glasgow 


Dec. 


29, 1859 


Mar 


1 


,, 




3rd V.B.H.L.I. 


39 






29 „ 


Feb. 


6 






1st Lanark 


40 






29 „ 


Jan. 


7 






2ndV.B.H.L.I. 


41 


Uddingstone 




31 „ 




7 






1st 


42 


Jan. 


81, 1860 


Feb. 


17 


, 




2ndV.B.S.R, 


43 


Gartsherrie 


t) 


10 „ 


Jan. 


31 


M 




5th 


44 


Blantyre 


Feb. 


6 „ 


Feb. 


17 


,, 




2nd „ 


45 


Glasgow 


Jan. 


10 „ 


fJ 


15 


,, 




3rd V.B.H.L.I. 


46 


M 




10 „ 




17 


„ 






47 


Airdrie 




10 ,, 




17 








48 


Feb. 


11 ii 


» 


29 


" 


2nd company added Nov. 
28, 1863 


5th V.B.S.R. 


49 


Lambhill 


May 


3 „ 


May 


16 


» 


1 subdivision only. Dis- 
banded 1862 




50 


Glasgow 


Jan. 


10 i, 


Feb. 


20 


„ 




1st Lanark 


51 






11 ii 


M 


28 






1st V.B.H.L.I. 


5-2 


Hamilton 


Feb. 


24 „ 


J} 


29 






2nd V.B.S.R. 


68 


Glasgow 


Jan. 


30 „ 




17 






1st Lanark 


54 






30 „ 




22 






3rd ,, 


55 


Lanark 


Vvh. 


23 „ 


'» 


20 


" 




9th „ 



Appendix C. 



349 



No. 


Headquarters. 


Date of Accept- 
ance of Services. 


Date of Officers' 
Commissions. 


Remarks. 


Included 
in Records of— 


56 


Bothwell 


Feb. 23, 1860 


Feb. 29, 1860 




2nd V.B.S.R. 


57 


Wishaw 


Mar. 7 „ 


Mar. 14 „ 






5< 


Glasgow 


Feb. 10 „ 


Feb. 22 „ 




3rd V.B. H.L.I. 


59 




,, 21 „ 


,, 25 „ 






60 




•i 18 „ 


Mar. 1 „ 


"1st Highland" 


4thV.B!s.R. 


61 




>, 18 „ 


1 M 


" 2nd Highland " 




62 


Biggar 


,. 22 „ 


„ 6 „ 


Disbanded Sept. 1860. 
Re-formed Mar. 17, 1863 


9th Lanark 


63 


Glasgow 


>, 15 „ 


Feb. 24 „ 




1st ,, 


64 


,, 


„ 18 „ 


Mar. 6 „ 


"1st Rutherglen" 


3rd V.B.H.L.I. 


65 


,, 


•> 18 „ 


6 „ 


"2nd Rutherglen" 


,, M 


66 




», 17 „ 


Feb. 29 „ 






67 




„ 17 „ 


>> 29 „ 




1st „ 


63 




», 17 „ 


Mar. 1 „ 




2nd 


69 




„ 17 „ 


., 1 „ 






70 




„ 17 „ 


„ 1 „ 






71 


M 


„ 17 „ 


„ 1 „ 




■ 


72 


Carluke 


„ 23 „ 


». 5 „ 




1st Lanark 


73 


Mar. 12 „ 


4 „ 




9th „ 


74 


Glasgow 


Feb. 29 „ 


„ 5 „ 




1st V.B.H.L.I. 


75 


„ 


,, 29 „ 
Mar. 26 „ 


„ 7 „ 




3rd 


76 


„ 


„ 1* „ 




1st Lanark 


77 




„ 8 „ 


AprU 2 „ 
May 28 „ 






78 


„ 


„ 29 „ 


' ' Old Guard of Glasgow " 


3rd " 


79 


,, 


,, 29 „ 


April 26 „ 




1st ,, 


SO 




•, 29 „ 


., 6 „ 




1st V.B.H.L.I. 


SI 


M 


April 2 „ 


„ 12 „ 






82 


„ 


•i 11 n 


May 11 „ 




3rd Lanark 


83 


,, 


„ 24 „ 


2 „ 




lstV.B.H.L.I. 


84 


M 


., 24 „ 


June 12 ,, 




3rd 


S5 


,, 


May 7 „ 


May 15 „ 




1st 


86 




„ 7 „ 


» 16 „ 




3rd 


87 


Busby 


». 18 „ 


n 28 „ 




3rd Lanark 


83 


Glasgow 


,. 9 „ 


•i 18 „ 


Disbanded 1864 


3rd V.B.H.L.I. 


89 


,, 


9 „ 


„ 29 „ 




1st „ 


90 


,, 


„ 24 „ 


June 5 ,, 




3rd 


91 


Whitevale 


m 24 „ 


„ 5 „ 




1st 


92 


Uddingstone 


Offer of service 


s not accepted. 






93 


Glasgow 


Aug. 8, 1860 


Aug. 31, 1860 


"3rd Highland" 


4th V.B.S.R. 


94 


Douglas 


Sept. 21 „ 


Oct. 4 „ 




9th Lanark 


95 


Bailliestown 


Oct. 16 „ 


Jan. 15, 1861 




5th V.B.S.R. 


96 


Glasgow 


Nov. 29 „ 


Dec. 12, 1860 


2nd company added Jan. 
3, 1861 


3rd V.B. H.L.I. 


97 


" 


July 30, 1861 


Sept. 3,1861 


"Glasgow Guards." 4 
companies. Amalgam- 
ated with 1st Lanark 
E. V., 1863 


1st Lanark E.V. 


97 


Woodhead 


Jan. 11, 1865 


May 27, 1865 




5th V.B.S.R. 


98 


Gartness 


May 12 „ 


June 14 ,, 






99 


Clarkston 


July 27 „ 


Aug. 3 „ 








100 


Calderbank 


„ 8 „ 


„ 4 „ 








101 


Newarthill 


June 7, 1866 


July 26, 1866 




" 


' 


102 


Motherwell 


Feb. 14, 1867 


Mar. 7, 1867 




2nd 




103 


East Kilbride 


June 6 ,, 


June 25 ,, 








104 


Holytown, 
Bellshill 
Glasgow 


April 18, 1868 


May 5, 1868 




5th 


', 


105 


July 21 „ 


Oct. 19 „ 


" Glasgow Highland," 12 


5th V.B.H.L.I. 










companies (1 in Partick, 












1 in Crosshill) 




106 


Strathaven 


Oct. 1873 


Oct. 1873 




2nd V.B.S.R. 


107 


Leadhills 


May 1875 


June 2, 1875 




9th Lanark 



35o 



Appendix D. 



APPENDIX D. 
LIST OF RIFLE CORPS FORMED IN THE COUNTY OF RENFREW. 



No. 


Headquarters. 


Date of Officers' 
Commissions. 


Remarks. 


Included 
in Records of— 


1 


Greenock 


Sept. 10, 1859 


2nd, 13th, and 18th Corps added, 
making 4 companies, in Feb- 
ruary 1860 


1st V.B. A. 


&S. H. 


2 




». io „ 


Amalgamated with 1st Corps, Feb- 
ruary 1860 


1st 




3 


Paisley 
Pollockshaws 


•i 22 „ 




2nd 




4 


,, 22 „ 






3rd 




5 


Port Glasgow 


Nov. 15 ,, 






1st 




6 


Paisley 


n 23 » 






2nd 




7 


Barrhead 


Feb. 15,1860 






3rd 




8 


Neilston 


Mar. 6 ,, 






3rd 




9 


Johnstone 


Feb. 6 ,, 






2nd 




10 


Greenock 


i. 3 „ 


' ' Highlanders. " 11th Corps added 
as 2nd company, 1863 


1st 




11 


" 


» 3 „ 


' ' Highlanders. " Added to 10th 
Corps, 1863 


1st 




12 




n 3 „ 


Disbanded 1860 






13 


" 


Jan. 24 „ 


Amalgamated with 1st Corps, Feb- 
ruary 1860 


1st V.B. A. 


&S. H. 


14 


Paisley 


Feb. 8 „ 




2nd 




15 


Kilbarchan 


Jan. 20 ,, 




2nd 




16 


Thomliebank 


Feb. 15 „ 




3rd 




17 


Lochwinnoch 


Jan. 20 „ 




2nd 




18 


Greenock 


Feb. 6 „ 


Amalgamated with 1st Corps, Feb- 
ruary 1860 


1st 




19 


Hurlet 


Mar. 6 „ 




3rd 




20 


Renfrew 


» 1 ,. 






2nd 




21 


Barrhead 


„ 12 „ 






3rd , 




22 


Gourock 


Apr. 6 „ 






1st , 




23 


Cathcart 


» 6 , 






3rd 




24 


Paisley 


rt 10 i> 






2nd 




25 


Thomliebank 


May 15, 1862 




3rd 





Appendix E. 



35i 



APPENDIX E. 

ENROLLED STRENGTH OF THE SCOTTISH VOLUNTEER FORCE 

on the 1st of April 1862. — (Extracted from a Return prepared by Colonel 
MacMurdo for the Royal Commission on the Condition of the Volunteer 
Force, 1862.) 





No. of 

Companies, 


Enrolled 
Members. 


Total of 
Arm in 
County. 




ARTILLERY. 








Aberdeen 


1st Adm. Brig. (1st, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th, 










7th Corps) . 




6 


404 


404 


Argyll . 


1st Adm. Brig. (1st, 3rd, 


4th Corps) 


4 


284 






2nd Corps . 




1 


65 






5th Corps . 




1 


32 






6th Corps . 




1 


60 






7th Corps . 




1 


78 






8th Corps . 




1 


63 






9th Corps . 




1 


51 


633 


Ayr 


1st Adm. Brig. (1st, 2nd 


3rd, 4th, 5th 








Banff 


Corps) . 
1st Adm. Brig. (1st, 2nd, 


3rd, 4th Corps) 


I 4 


320 
280 


320 

280 


Berwick . 


1st Corps . 




1 


51 






2nd Corps . 




1 


50 


101 


Caithness 


1st Corps . 




1 


61 






2nd Corps . 




1 


41 






3rd Corps . 




1 


58 


160 


Cromarty 


1st Corps . 




1 


36 


36 


Dumbarton 


1st Corps . 




1 


56 






2nd Corps . 




1 


54 






3rd Corps . 




1 


53 


163 


Edinburgh City 


1st Corps . 




9 


564 


564 


Elgin 


1st Corps . 




1 


53 


53 


Fife. 


1st Adm. Brig. (1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 










6th, 7th, 8th, 9th, 10th Corps) 


10i 


630 


630 


Forfar . 


1st Adm. Brig. (1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th Corps) 


6 


374 


374 


Haddington . 


1st Corps ..... 


1 


69 


69 


Inverness 


1st Corps . 






4 


234 


234 


Kincardine 


1st Corps . 
2nd Corps . 
3rd Corps . 
4th Corps . 






2 


123 

25 
35 

28 


211 


Kirkcudbright 


1st Corps . 






1 


50 


50 


Lanark . 


1st Adm. Brig. (1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 
6th, 7th, 8th, 9th, 10th, 12th, 13th, 


















14th, 15th Corps) 


14 


888 






11th Corps 




1 


52 


940 


Mid-Lothian . 


1st Corps . 






8 


463 






2nd Corps . 






2 


138 


601 


Nairn 


1st Corps . 






2 


125 


125 


Orkney . 


1st Corps . 






1 


72 


72 


Renfrew . 


1st Corps . 
2nd Corps . 






1 

1 


78 
56 






3rd Corps ..... 


1 


52 


186 



352 



Appendix E. 



Total of 
Arm in 
County. 



Ross 
Stirling . 

Sutherland 
Wigtown 



Edinburgh 
Lanark . 



Argyll* 



Ayr 



Banff 
Berwick . 



Clackmannan (s 



Artillery — continued. 

1st Corps . 

1st Corps . 

2nd Corps . 

1st Corps . 

1st Corps . 

2nd Corps • 

Total Artillery 



1st Corps . 
1st Corps . 
2nd Corps . 



Total Engineers 

MOUNTED RIFLES. 

1st Corps ..... 

RIFLES. 

1st Adm. Bn. (3rd, 4th, 7th, 8th, 10th, 

11th, 14th, 21st Corps) . 
2nd Adm. Bn. (2nd, 6th, 13th, 15th, 16th 

Corps) ..... 
3rd Adm. Bn. (5th, 9th, 17th, 20th Corps) 
1st Corps .... 
12th Corps 
18th Corps 
22nd Corps 
23rd Corps 
1st Adm. Bn. (2nd, 3rd, 7th, 11th Corps) 
6th Corps .... 
8th Corps .... 
10th Corps 
12th Corps 
1st Adm. Bn. (1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 

6th, 7th, 8th, 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th, 

13th Corps) 
1st Adm. Bn. (1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th Corps) 
1st Corps .... 
2nd Corps .... 
3rd Corps .... 
4th Corps .... 
5th Corps .... 
1st Corps .... 
2nd Corps .... 
3rd Corps .... 
ee Stirling). 



70 


131 


71 


71 


55 




47 


102 



111 

71 



64 
171 



* For 9th Corps, see Perth. 



Appendix E. 



353 



Dumbarton 



Riflks — continued. 
1st Adm. Bn. (1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 



6th, 7th, 8th, 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th 
Corps) ..... 

Dumfries . 1st Adm. Bn. (1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 

6th, 7th, 8th, 9th Corps) 

Edinburgh City 1st Corps 



Elgin 



Haddington 



Kinross (see Fife). 

Kirkcudbright 
& Wigtown , 
Lanark . 



1st Adm. Bn. (1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 
6th Corps) .... 

1st Adm. Bn. (1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 
6th, 7th, 8th, 9th Corps, and 1st Kin- 
ross Corps) .... 

1st Adm. Bn. (3rd, 5th, 7th, 13th Corps) 

2nd Adm. Bn. (2nd, 8th, 9th, 11th, 12th 
Corps) ..... 

1st Corps ..... 

1st Adm. Bn. (1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 
6th Corps) .... 

1st Adm. Bn. (1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 
6th, 7th Corps) 

1st Adm. Bn. (1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 
6th, 7th Corps) 



(1st Adm. Bn. (1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th 
\ Kirkcudbright, and 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th 
t Wigtown Corps) 
1st Adm. Bn. (16th, 42nd, 44th, 52nd, 

56th, 57th Corps) 
2nd Adm. Bn. (30th, 31st, 38th, 45th, 
46th, 47th, 75th, 84th, 86th, 88th, 96th 



Linlithgow 
Mid-Lothian 



Nairn 

Orkney 

Peebles 



3rd Adm. Bn. (37th, 55th, 73rd, 94th, 

Corps) . 
1st Corps . 
3rd Corps . 
4th Corps . 
5th Corps . 
19th Corps 
25th Corps 
29th Corps 
32nd Corps 
43rd Corps 
48th Corps 
49th Corps 
95th Corps 
97th Corps 
1st Corps . 
2nd Corps . 
3rd Corps . 
1st Adm. Bn. (2nd 
1st Corps . 
4th Corps . 
1st Corps . 
1st Corps . 
1st Corps . 
2nd Corps . 
3rd Corps . 
4th Corps . 



3rd, 5th Corps) 



No. of 
mpanies, 



10ft 

21 



Bft 

7 
6ft 



12 
15 



1 
1 

"i 

4 

1 
1 
1 
3 



570 
1801 



509 
501 
495 

534 
496 

813 
313 



57 

55 

71 

3 

63 

254 

84 

91 

91 

372 

449 



Total of 
Arm in 
County. 



570 
1801 



501 
495 



18 
57 



354 



Appendix E. 





No. of 
Companies, 


Enrolled 
Members. 


Total of 
County. 


Rifles — continued. 

Perth . . 1st Adm. Bh. (1st, 5th, 6th, 7th, 8th, 

9th, 11th, 13th, 14th, 15th, 16th Corps) 

2nd Adm. Bn. (3rd and 10th Corps, and 

9th Argyll) . 

Renfrew . . 1st Adm. Bn. (1st, 5th, 10th, 11th, 22nd 

Corps) ..... 

2nd Adm. Bn. (3rd, 6th, 9th, 14th, 15th, 

17th, 20th, 24th Corps) 
3rd Adm. Bn. (4th, 7th, 8th, 16th, 19th, 
21st, 23rd, 25th Corps) . 
Ross . . 1st Adm. Bn. (1st, 2nd, 4th, 5th, 6th 
Corps) . 
3rd Corps . 
Roxburgh and ) 1st Adm. Bn. (1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th Rox- 
Selkirk J burgh, and 1st and 2nd Selkirk Corps) 
Stirling . . 1st Adm. Bn. (1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 
6th, 7th, 8th, 9th, 11th, 12th Corps, 
and 1st and 2nd Clackmannan) 
10th Corps .... 
Sutherland . 1st Corps ..... 
Wigtown (see Kirkcudbright). 


m 

6 

8 
8 
8 

? 

7 

13 
1 
4 


957 

446 

602 

651 

581 

330 
68 

636 

996 
76 
354 


1403 

1834 

398 
636 

1072 
354 


Total Rifles .... 


372 


27,263 


27,263 


Grand total, all Arms . 


486| 


34,240 


34,240 



The totals in England and Wales were — 



Light Horse 
Artillery . 
Engineers . 
Mounted Rifles 
Rifles * 


Hi troops 
. 278| batteries 

42 companies 
9 „ 
. 1430 


662 enrolled members 

17,781 

2,669 

496 

106,833 


Total 

Add for Scotland 




128,441 „ 
34,240 


Grand total, United Kingdom 


162,681 „ 



* Of these, 10 companies with 673 enrolled members formed the 15th Middlesex (London 
Scottish) R.V. 



Appendix F. 



355 



APPENDIX F. 

RETURN OF THE SCOTTISH VOLUNTEER CORPS for the Year 1881. 
(Extracted from the Official Return of January 1882.) 



Corps. 


Author- 
ised es- 
tablish- 
ment. 


--- 

u ° § 

< 


Effici- 
ents. 


Non- 
effici- 
ents. 


Total 
enrolled. 


Proficients who 

have earned 

special grant 

of 50s. 


Present 




Offrs. 


Serjts. 




LIGHT HORSE. 

1st Fifeshire . 
1st Forfarshire 


243 
61 


36 


123 

48 


46 
3 


169 
51 


10 

1 


9 

7 


123 
34 


Total Light Horse . 


304 j 36 


171 


49 


220 


11 


16 


157 


ARTILLERY. 

1st Aberdeenshire (Aber- 
deen and Banff) 

1st Argyll and Bute 

1st Ayrshire and Gallo- 
way .... 

1st Berwickshire 

2nd 

1st Caithness (Caithness 
and Sutherland) 

1st Edinburgh City . 

1st Fifeshire (Fife and 
Stirling) . 

1st Forfarshire (Forfar 
and Kincardine) 

1st Haddington 

1st Inverness (Inverness, 
Cromarty, Nairn, 
Ross, Elgin) . 

1st Lanarkshire 

1st Mid-Lothian 

1st Orkney 

1st Renfrew and Dumbar- 
ton .... 


1130 
1021 

890 
81 
81 

647 
724 

1054 

1288 

81 

1049 
1366 
644 
730 

565 




1072 

688 

757 
64 
58 

561 
604 

918 

1202 

66 

897 
1331 
467 
536 

543 


16 

77 

59 
2 
3 

8 
41 

24 

67 

25 
1 
45 
43 

9 


1088 
765 

816 
66 
61 

569 
645 

942 

1269 
66 

922 
1332 
512 
579 

552 


28 
26 

24 

2 

15 
23 

27 

34 

2 

27 
42 
23 
21 

16 


59 
49 

48 

1 

35 

34 

55 
67 

53 
69 
34 
40 

28 


890 
589 

674 
59 
43 

385 
562 

837 

1103 
60 

789 
1083 
452 
464 

469 


Total Artillery . 


11,351 




9764 


420 


10,184 


312 


576 


8459 


ENGINEERS. 

1st Aberdeenshire . 
1st Lanarkshire 


201 
603 




197 
586 


3 
17 


200 
603 


6 
13 


10 
34 


163 
506 


Total Engineers . 


804 




783 


20 


803 


19 


44 


669 



356 



Appendix F. 







II . 
a H, S 

ill 

IS 








Proficients who 














have earned 




Corps. 


Author- 
ised es- 
tablish- 
ment. 


Effici- 
ents. 


Non- 
effici- 


Total 
enrolled. 


special grant 
of 50s. 


Present 
at In- 
spection. 












Ofirs. 


Serjts. 




MOUNTED RIFLES. 


















1st Roxburgh . 


61 


25 


50 


3 


53 


3 


4 


50 


RIFLES. 


















1st Aberdeenshire . 


1104 




842 


2 


844 


31 


47 


731 


2nd 


708 




519 


2 


521 


25 


33 


428 


3rd . 


910 




608 


62 


670 


26 


41 


577 


4th 


767 




552 


22 


574 


22 


33 


450 


1st Argyllshire 


807 




656 


36 


692 


21 


36 


550 


1st Ayrshire . 


809 




733 


12 


745 


24 


45 


581 


2nd „ . . . 


707 




653 


8 


661 


20 


39 


571 


1st Banffshire . 


666 




618 


3 


621 


21 


29 


513 


1st Berwickshire 


708 




532 


27 


559 


13 


34 


503 


1st Clackmannan and 


















Kinross . 


706 




655 


23 


678 


26 


33 


602 


1st Dumbartonshire 


1213 




1200 


13 


1213 


34 


64 


901 


1st Dumfriesshire . 


1010 




664 


43 


707 


25 


48 


620 


1st Edinburgh City . 


2509 




2002 


27 


2029 


74 


117 


1755 


2nd „ „ . 


602 


60 


646 


16 


662 


17 


33 


585 


1st Elginshire . 
1st Fifeshire . 


1069 




1069 




1069 


25 


51 


1066 


1211 




976 


41 


1017 


30 


55 


756 


1st Forfarshire 


804 




660 


22 


682 


18 


37 


603 


2nd 


1410 




1027 


28 


1055 


32 


60 


927 


3rd 


603 




469 


16 


485 


14 


31 


365 


Galloway 


808 




706 


19 


725 


19 


38 


611 


1st Haddington 


607 




384 


22 


406 


13 


21 


359 


1st Inverness . 


1010 




989 


4 


993 


31 


53 


912 


1st Kincardine and Aber- 


















deen .... 


1011 




684 


36 


720 


22 


39 


526 


1st Lanarkshire 


1606 




1534 


18 


1552 


48 


78 


1207 


2nd ,, 


1010 




967 


19 


986 


26 


51 


746 


3rd 


1205 




1046 


15 


1061 


39 


63 


901 


4th 


904 




754 


6 


760 


31 


48 


622 


5th 


1205 




782 


79 


861 


19 


58 


476 


6th „ 


805 




805 


1 


806 


20 


44 


686 


7th 


808 




805 


3 


808 


18 


43 


733 


8th 


1205 




1203 


1 


1204 


27 


64 


946 


9th 


607 




544 


9 


553 


15 


34 


507 


10th 


1205 




1025 


9 


1034 


29 


64 


708 


1st Linlithgowshire . 


707 




689 


9 


698 


18 


41 


612 


1st Mid-Lothian 


1105 




828 


32 


860 


24 


53 


734 


2nd Mid-Lothian and 


















Peebles . 


1108 




919 


55 


974 


26 


57 


782 


1st Perthshire . 


706 




535 


16 


551 


16 


36 


496 


2nd „ . . . 


809 




693 


18 


711 


20 


35 


624 


1st Renfrewshire . 


907 




882 


5 


887 


26 


42 


768 


2nd 


807 




718 


50 


768 


22 


41 


583 


3rd 


807 




772 


18 


790 


20 


40 


645 


1st Ross-shire . 


910 




896 


8 


904 


26 


50 


712 


1st Roxburgh and Selkirk 


907 




784 


14 


798 


26 


49 


728 


1st Stirlingshire 
1st Sutherland 


1008 




758 


17 


775 


27 


48 


674 


1070 




989 


18 


1007 


25 


50 


802 


Total Rifles 


43,170 


60 


36,772 


904 


37,676 


1131 


2106 


31,184 



Appendix F. 



357 



Corps. 


Author- 
ised es- 
tablish- 
ment. 


lid 


1 Effici- 
1 ents. 


; Non- 
effici- 
ents. 


Total 
enrolled. 


Proficients who 

have earned 

special grant 

of 50s. 


Present 
at In- 
spection. 




fill 

< 


Oflrs. 


Serjts. 




Grand total, all Arms 
The totals in England 
and Wales were — 

Light Horse 

Artillery 

Engineers . 

Mounted Eifles . 

Rifles* 


55,690 

306 
32,551 
9,114 

147,768 


121 

9 
50 
90 

340 


47.540 

48 
26,755 
8,057 

117,789 


1396 

209 
1329 
304 

4908 


48,936 

257 
28,084 
8,361 

122,670 


1476 

1 
756 
163 

3208 


2746 

4 
1684 
458 

6983 


40,519 

44 

23,636 
7,129 

104,323 


Total . 
Add for Scotland . 


189,739 
55,690 


489 
121 


152,622 
47,540 


6750 
1396 


159,372 
48,936 


4128 
1476 


9129 
2746 


135,132 
40,519 


Grand total, United 
Kingdom . 


245,429 


610 


200,162 


8146 


208,308 


5604 


11,875 


175,651 


* Of these— 
7th Middlesex (London 
Scottish) . 


804 




596 


60 


656 


20 


34 


540 



g > 

q a 





« 


qjj 


w 




H 


X 


8 


M 


P 


w 


h3 




O 
> 


Ph 


\A 









ft 



3 pa 

I g 

E Qh 

1 P3 



w i 



(3)'JtfW|S luatreuuad ! 

jo OAisnp 
-aj 'qaw ire r«tox 


1,048 

1,020 

1,051 

568 

81 

567 

725 

1,211 

1,128 

998 

1,612 

646 

729 

565 




•jjkjs futmuuad 
jo OAjsnpxa 'i«»oi 


1,040 

1,009 

1,040 

560 

80 

560 

720 

1,200 

1,120 

989 

1,600 

640 

720 

560 


1 


•8J8l89qAV 


cn |co ; ; i <n,i-i i-h rt 2 co ; rn 


35 


•&K>lpp«g 


■* :«B • • • -* cm cm cm °, <o ■ in 


s§ 


•sqHtns-8upoqs 


■* JO J ; |tH(NCMCM§CO 1 CM 


9 


VBAim 


o ;0 : : :©©©©°>© j o 


1 


•sjrauuno 


OOlN^NN^OOINOOOllOKl^ CM 

tOrHMTjltO-^OMtDOTjIOW r-l 


S 


saajadunux 


CMlO©-*CM-*-*CO<C>CO©CMCO CM 
CMCMCMrH HHWlNlNINrlH rH 


© 


•ejsjpJBqiuoa 


50 W «0 -tf CM -* CO © 00 -* © <» CO -* 


i 


•spsjoitoo 


CMrHCMOOTjICOeOOCOOOeNje© 00 
■OlOiOIN (NWfOOlOOOCOCO CN 


ca 


•SJUTOfjag IKJOi 


lOlOlOCO CO -* <0 <ffl lO OS CO -tl CO 


CO 


•s^ireaf.iag 


COCOCOCM CN CM "* 5|l CO «0 CM CM CM 


1 


•Kltreaprag 1 __#»_ _ 1 ■* 

lU0OJ-X t I9 P a 1 ^ '~"~ l ^ irHrHrHrHrHCMrHrH rt | H 


•RUreafJag-flwjS ! _, _ _ — -rHrH — rHrHfMrHrH rH 1"* 

J9.HIOHUV Snnoy | I- "-' •"' i -1 ;HrtHHHIMrtH rH | ,_, 


•siaiJiB^-^nijafjag 


CM |CO • 1 iCMrHrHrH^CO \ H |^ 


•Kjireafiag 
-I3}SBUU8}JBnO JueftBg 


n :« : : : N hhhO m : _ j £ 


•aiofujv-JiuaCias 
ifauduioo ao xiawsg 


H(NOr-.r-iNNHio5HO«n« eo | g§ 


•Sia^aduirux-in'Bafiag 


HHHH iHHHHHNHH rH J* 


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^^^^^^rH^pH^CNIt-lrH rH I 


| 


•sjopn.iisuj 
-qmjafrag j9ino 


tocooxoi-nocooxoi^co-Hit- eo g§ 


3| 


MOfBK 

-in'Bafjag Surpy 


HHHH | ,-H rH rH rH rH CM rH rH rH 


3 


•RUmnrpy 


rHrHrHrH | rH rH rH rH rH CM rH rH rH 


3 


•saaotijo TO°X 


•* -* "HI CM (M M O HI tH (O jq M CM 


1 


(q)iranadtfqo Sarpy 




3 


•SJ93BJ0 JtreouaiaA 


rH |rH = : :rHrHr-,rH<NrH ! rH 


oT 


(Qj-aiaoajo reorpajt |-<ti"*-tticOrHeocOTt<'*f**<«©eoeo eo 


•8J8IJOTUUa}I8n5 I-ll-Hl-ll-l JrHrHrHrHrHCMrHrH rH 


3 


(r>)-ttHnraa:ir\an 
pus pne s^uBna^nan 


© O© I— ICM rH -HI CO rH O© CM ^ rH 
CMCMCMrH rH rH CM CM CM CO rH rH rH 


1 


■su]B5d«o 


CO CM CO t>. rH t^ OS VO -* CM © CO e» t>. 


s 


•BiOfBM 


(NCMCMrH j rH CM CO CM CM 'H CM CM <-> 


8 


•siauoioo-'jtretiajiian 


CMCMCMrH j 1-, rH CM CM CM CM rH rH rH 


§ 


CORPS. 


(P 2) 1st Aberdeenshire . 

1st Argyll & Bute . 
(P 3) 1st Ayr & Galloway 

1st Banff . 

1st Berwickshire 

1st Caithness . 
(P 2) 1st Edinburgh (City) 
(P 1) 1st Fifeshire . 
(P 1) 1st Forfarshire 
(P 1) The Highland . 
(P a) 1st Lanarkshire 
(P 3) 1st Mid-Lothian 

1st Orkney 
(P 1) 1st Renfrew & Dum- 
barton . 

Total 



"!| 



** as. 

^§ IS. 

„KSR 



fSSl 



^ & SrO 
14 Sr3 



lifl 

ill J 

-111 
ji.ll 



E- 1 o-J3 si 

Trill 



5 "a i 3 

~34S 
J2S 



Appendix G. 



359 



(»)-jj«is (ja9a*uu9d 

JO 9Al8tnOOl 


OOO t^t- 

©(NO) 


^5 


JO 8AI8I110X8 'IB^OX 


ooS i^?l 


i 


•sjaddBg 


CJOJC3 -*•* 


1 


•sj8i8na 


233 <™ 


2 


•si^aodjoo puooag 


ooo \a\sn 


3 


•siBJodjoo 


ooo *Q\a 


a 


•sfjireaCiag re^ox 


W«OTji 


M 


•ajuBaCiag 


SjSSm C ° e ° 


•8^UB9fiag 

uiooj-A^ijapjo 


— i i 


eo 


•s»n«9fi9g-jjwjg 
wjnouuv Sacpv 


— : : 


eo 


•WOfBH 

•;uwfj9g A*usduioo 


«0(N« F-Hi-H 


a 


•8J8i8na-^UBapi8g 


— i i 


CO 


-s^avspiag 


— : : 


* 


i 

1 


•siaptuisui 

-1089 fjog 
J9q»0 


*.„ =: 


eo 


SJOfBK 

8an9V 


— i 


•siowjnfpv 


— - ; ; 


eo 


•8J801BO iwjoj 


8S3 ^ |S 


(»)-sureidBqo Sai^oy 


— i : 


» 


(»)-siaDi«o I«oipaK 


co^co : ! 


o 


•SJ8^8BUU»^re n b 


— : : 


N 


(w)-«}Trecra}n9!i pug 
pus s^ireiiaanaiT 


*22 «« 


55 


•saiB^d-BO 


^s* — 


a 


•saofBK 


i-h<m<m : : 


* 


•spnoioo-iuBua^naii 


HNH | ; 


- 


I 


1st Aberdeenshire . 

1st Lanarkshire 

2nd Lanarkshire 

Electrical Engineers- 
Clyde Division (1 Coy.) 
Forth Division (1 Coy.) 

Total 



& -Sill § s 

111*;*!!. 



ell 


l-t <N ;M®HH 


3 


Sb 






. 






oSg 






i «5 
Hgt5 


: e* :<N-«*<rHO 


a 


• • • 


• 


S£ 






u 






13 


: i-h :ihco ;o 


U3 


*<s 






. 












SM 






ill 




rH 


s6£ 






w 








M ^ ^ :,^g 


1 


o 










s»»»; 








fl 


rH <N rH :-*IO(NO lH 

s • 8,8 


Oo 


rH J J* 












'"*- I 




I £ 




"illl " " " ' 




3^t3 §.2 g o &-§ 
fl'llfifl 



360 



Appendix G. 





(3) ■jjwjb ^naireouad 

JO a AtStl[a 
-UJ 'MJUB4 HB Wl 


OlMOOrJ<eO«0(NlMCOCDOOI>.-<tltO(N05b-.IMOOi-l(M"3rHeO 

lOM<0 00005e4CON10 00 00NW<DOQHlO<00«l«lTtlN 
(NOiHNN05»01HO(NO>r-lO>OONinOrHT)IO)050>lO 




•jjbjs ^nauuuii.id 
jo OAisnpxa 'revx 


3239 
928 
1164 
1276 
696 
928 
928 
928 
1164 
1048 
1280 
928 
1164 
928 
1856 
1280 
1512 
1048 
1164 
1392 
928 
928 
932 
1512 




•sajBAiJd 


lOOMTilooOOOKIIMlOOmOOOlOtONM^OOOffl 
050000JOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO 

g-coOi-Hio 0000 oo©05j-< 00 000 <£>>-< cooso <N ooooooeo 




•8J9[Sna 


!§SSSSSSS83SS8S8a838SSS58 




'spModjoQ 


(MOr-liOOOOOi-l«DCDOT-lOOi»<»tOi-iQOOi-i<r> 




•sjuiofrag mox 


0-rtHrt<05-^'-«*<-*-*-*0505-^-*T}(Tj4050505-<H^fl'*<Tj('^05 
vO-*lTSlOCO-*-*-*OTt<v0 1 <l<lOTj100lO!0-*0«DM<-<tlrt<«D 




•BJUBSfiag 


HINO^^NNlNOtO^iNOWTfTtiNtoooolMINININ 
i-lirorp-^CNJCOOOCOTtlCOTjlCC-^COtO-^incO-^TttCOOOCOO 




•RHIT!8fl9g 

uiooa-^papjo 










•sitreafias-jj^s 
isjnouuv Suijay 










•Kjurofjas-Jnoioo 


NOOOiHtOOOOOCOOO)HOOOOO!OHKIO>ONOOOOOOm 




•sjeiSna-iaBafiag 










•e»uB9fjag 
-aajBBnuajJwnh 










1 -uovmxisni 
g -^tregfiag J9mo 


lO(NNteiO®(NNN®ieNOOtO^NWIMNNN10t*« 




4;';', 

I 










•surejnfpy 










•SJ93UJ0 t«»Oi 


05I<JCOCO<NC^<NcNCOeOCO<NCOC<IOCOT*<COCOTl(<MNC<3Tj< 




(0.) -snretdBqO Snj*>v 










(q) -&I9DW0 PS3JP8W 


05 c* W eoeoco M eo WM ««,=oeo^co^coo,,* cocoes 




•sa9^8miu9iaBnt) 










(») •gjaBueinan 
puj pun aiuBuainaii 


?0(M00t^05(N<M(M00eO05(M00<M->!>'O5(Me00000IM(N»ON 




•sn^d'BO 


h.OOO^«IOOOOXOO>HOOOOO»H«IO!0<N»OOOOM 




saof'BM 


OCSltN^i-iC^C^C^lNCqiNfNC^C^^iNC^C^C^C^fNINNIN 




•si9uoioo-}UBU9;n9n 


eOrH^HrHr-lr-lrHrHi-lr-li-lrH^H^KNl-KMi-lrHINrHrHi-KN 




l 






Scot 
rs 




Queen's Vol. Rifle Brig. Royal 

(Lothian Regt.) 
4th V.B. Royal Scots . 
5th „ „ 
6th „ „ 
7th „ „ . . 
8th „ „ . . 
9th „ „ 
8th V.B. Liverpool Regt. . 
1st V.B. Royal Scots Fusiliers 
2nd „ ,, 
1st Roxburgh and Selkirk . 
2nd V.B. K.O. Scottish Bordere 
3rd „ „ 
Galloway .... 
1st Lanarkshire . 
2nd V.B. Scottish Rifles . 
3rd Lanarkshire . 
4th V.B. Scottish Rifles . 
1st V.B. Royal Highlanders 
2nd „ „ 
3rd 
4th 
5th 
6th ,, „ 




imii9ui[J*a}{ jo "OK 


|^ ^^^"sJSaasaSSSSgSSSSSI 



Appendix G. 



361 



o><»o>©t-ho©o( 

sis s s> s 



III 



NINlNHNrlf; 



S^SSSSSSSSS 



©ooo«oioou-;oio©o>oooioo<Oi-i!o©>-ieo©o 



Xc^OiOiCTi-^-^axNCO-^CJ-fl 



ji^WMrHTHCON« 



*(BCOnOtOH^O<DO(OOONNf 



NODtOmffiNHONOOOOlSMOOJOfflOOfOt 



eococomcooooooiNcDkOt^oo^DC^r^^-^otDt^eoTtiiM 



O(CONOHO®H«00(0HMNW05!enW!DO00 00 

-«icO'afCq"*cO'>3<eoeo(M(Hcoco(Mi-iciseococoe<5«ikOiMiN 






COC00005W-*OOb»-<)lrHN10T)lW010tOOO<C>Oa 



NON»nOiNHOiN00001NSOOOOO)OOT((0( 



^(NNrH?5(SINN(NH(NiNNrtrH«N(NINN«INNIN gj 



2§ 



1 s ^lllls : - = - s "II = ~ r =1 S?S 

pq c M cq 5 W w pa PQ @ w 35 

■ga'StS5 - S« , Sx'a'H5' :C £ ,ja "S'S'a' r5 ' cl ' r: » x; 5 



H^iNNioaioiQioioinoi!- 



^OiClCiCiCiOCJgi 



3 §< 
1 & 



5 *• s 

"3 *S -3 

r° a 

I ri 



jglgji 'S.S 




li-9 »3 








ScsOi s=_X 




. I 

be 

oan 








ompan 
any wi 
os maj 

cting c 
and 3 




"£•3 «£ 

<3 O^ 9 § 




one p 
each c 
ing ch£ 

additio 
t comp 


>, 






•2 a § 2 


£ 


tenants 
to two 
nts aiic 
lations. 
cal offic 
lies, 1 c 


8 

5 


ishnient of lieu 
Der of subalterns 

surgeon-lieutena 

Volunteer Regu 
f additional medi 

ordinary compa 
cyclist company, 
cyclist section. 


11 
il 

■'iS 

- c 
■St ■= 


b estab 
le num 
iitional 
of the 
[usive 
enty-six 
udes 1 
hides a 


il 

a 3 






362 



Appendix G. 



& 

o 
> 

ft 

n £ 

I ^ 

IS 

o as 
SP ^ 

s « 

o 



ft 



2 

o 



- jad jo aAisupui 
'sjprej rre 'rojbi 


|| g 1 


1 


•JJ^B 
"}UatTBUII9(I JO 

aAisnpxa 'i«ioi 


11*S||S| 


1 


*Sa^'BAIJ < J 


t^ B CO CO I- 3 CO 


1 
53 


•sjaiSng 


cn ■* : : : : m 


•siBJodioo 


00 CO ■# <M CO !N ■* 


Oi 


•S^UB9fl9g i*}OX 


t — ^H -tf (M t— <M -* 10 


3 


•sjireafiag 


^OOCN^^OCMg 


§ 


•jaigng-^UBafjag 


: : : ; - ; : : 


- 


•S^aB9fj3g-JJB^g 


<n <* : : : • 10 


55 


•s^UBaprag 


i-H <M <M i-ivo «D <M lO 


S3 


i 


OWVH 
'joqonj^sni 
-lusafaag 


h i-H : : co : ; 10 





'ao^otia^sui 
-^iraaprag 


: ; : : ; ^^ ; 


- 


•^u^nfpv 


■ ; : ■ ^ : ; : 


~* 


•saaowo TO°X 


10 «o : : : : w j 


•uretd'Biio Sarjoy 


** ~ ; \ * i ; ; 


CO 


•SJ8!)SBmi*lJ13Tl£) 


i-h w : »o : : 


CO 


•SJ90IJJO XuBdraoQ 


3, 

co r-i : : eg : : jo 


s 


•JOfBK 


: 1 ■" = i : 


CM 


•paoioo 
-^uBuainan 


: i i = - : i 


- 








6 


Edinburgh Company 

2 Aberdeen Companies 

Transport sections for 2 fielc 
hospitals . 

Transport section for 1 
bearer company 

5 Glasgow Companies 

Transport sections for 6 fiek 
hospitals . 

Transport sections for 5 
bearer companies 

5 Volunteer Brigade Beare 
Companies . 

Total 



Appendix G. 



363 



Is 

3*3 



Royal Garrison Artillery (V.) . 

Royal Engineers (V.) 

Volunteer Infantry 

Royal Army Medical Corps and Bearer 
Companies 

Grand total 



11,838 
2,848 
55,478 

1,396 



11,949 
2,865 
55,825 



364 



Appendix H. 



APPENDIX H. 



RETURN OF THE SCOTTISH VOLUNTEER CORPS FOR THE 
YEAR 1907. 



{Extracted from the 



Return of 1st November 1907.) 







Estab- 
lish- 
ment.* 


Efficients, t 


Non-efficients, t 


Total t 

all 
ranks. 


Present 

at 
Inspec- 
tion, all 
ranks. 


Cyclists 


Corps. 


Officers. 


N.C.O. 

Men. 


Officers. 


N.C.O. 

and 
Men. 


included 
in fore- 
going. 


Royal Garrison Artillery 


















( Volunteers). 


















1st Aberdeenshire . 


1040 


34 


701 




8 


743 


458 




1st Argyll and Bute 




1009 


40 


869 




42 


951 


385 




1st Ayr and Galloway 




1040 


34 


870 


i 


4 


909 


531 




1st Banff 




560 


31 


430 




3 


464 


152 




1st Berwickshire . 




80 


3 


44 




6 


53 


21 




1st Caithness. 




560 


20 


360 




61 


441 


163 




1st Edinburgh (City) 




720 


28 


602 


2' 


33 


665 


378 




1st Fifeshire . 




1200 


39 


946 


3 


45 


1033 


464 




1st Forfarshire 




1120 


36 


885 


1 


21 


943 


632 




The Highland 




989 


41 


743 




16 


800 


277 




1st Lanarkshire . 




1600 


37 


1107 


'2 


11 


1157 


604 




1st Midlothian 




640 


22 


406 


1 


34 


463 


247 




1st Orkney . 




720 


30 


521 


1 


3 


555 


266 




1st Renfrew and Dumbarton . 


560 


20 


504 




6 


530 


279 




TotalR.G.A.(V.) 


11,838 


427 


9069 


11 


294 


9801 


4857 




Royal Engineers ( Volunteers). 


















1st Aberdeenshire . 


600 


22 


447 


1 


31 


501 


350 




1st Lanarkshire 


1200 


28 


796 


1 


41 


866 


743 




2nd Lanarkshire . 


900 


36 


777 


5 


61 


879 


533 




Electrical Engineers — 


















Clyde Division . 


74 


7 


64 


1 


4 


76 


70 




Forth Division . 


74 


9 


65 




4 


78 


71 




Total R.E.(V.) 


2848 


105 


2163 


8 


141 


2417 


1767 




Volunteer Infantry. 


















Q.RV.B. Royal Scots . 


3239 


106 


2260 


3 


48 


2417 


2014 


117(a) 


4th V.B. do. 


928 


31 


893 


1 


2 


927 


755 


30 


5th V.B. do. 


1164 


26 


968 






994 


810 


50 


6th V.B. do. 


1276 


29 


654 


3 


44 


730 


294 


18 


7th V.B. do. 


696 


17 


454 


1 


5 


477 


224 




8th V.B. do. 


928 


24 


708 


1 


• 7 


740 


411 




9th V.B. do. 


928 


24 


661 


3 


46 


734 


551 





* Excluding permanent staff. 

t These figures for the corps refer only to volunteers, but the totals for each a 
permanent staffs, which it is not necessary to show separately for each corps, 
(a) And 75 mounted infantry. 



Appendix H. 



36S 







Efficients. 


Non-efficients. 




















Total 

all 
ranks. 


Present 


Cyclists 


Corps. 


lish 
ment. 


Officers 


N.C.O. 
and 
Men. 


Officers 


N.C.O. 
and 
Men. 


Inspec- 
tion, all 
ranks. 


included 
going. 


Volunteer Infantry — contd. 


















1st V.B. Koyal Scots Fusiliers 


1164 


24 


669 


1 


10 


704 


396 


33 


2nd V.B. do. do. 


1048 


22 


730 


1 


29 


782 


337 


57 


1st Roxburgh and Selkirk . 
2nd V.B. K.O.S. Borderers . 


1280 


37 


817 


4 


5 


863 


428 


61 


928 


33 


483 


1 


19 


536 


300 


29 


3rd V.B. do. 


1164 


28 


569 


1 


8 


606 


340 


41 


Scottish Border Bearer Coy. . 




1 


41 


1 


1 


44 


26 




Galloway V.R.C. . 


928 


27 


741 






768 


418 


22 


1st Lanarkshire V.R.C. 


1856 


54 


1194 




18 


1266 


467 




2nd V.B. Scottish Rifles 


1280 


35 


963 


1 


13 


1012 


620 


99 


3rd Lanarkshire V.R.C. 


1512 


42 


931 




29 


1002 


614 


65 


4th V.B. Scottish Rifles 


1048 


28 


817 


2 


24 


871 


517 


80 


1st V.B. Royal Highlanders . 


1164 


29 


844 




9 


882 


698 


60 


2nd V.B. do. 


1392 


26 


606 


1 


16 


649 


369 


13 


3rd V.B. do. 


928 


19 


522 


3 


20 


564 


432 


40 


4th V.B. do. 


928 


27 


567 


3 


6 


603 


254 


35 


5th V.B. do. 


932 


23 


624 


4 


14 


665 


350 


22. 


6th V.B. do. 


1512 


49 


1077 


2 


36 


1164 


700 


50 


1st V.B. Highland L.I. 


1392 


25 


761 


3 


55 


844 


327 


33 


2nd V.B. do. 


1164 


27 


951 


1 


18 


997 


544 


59 


3rd V.B. do. 


1392 


37 


987 




18 


1042 


631 


38 


9th Lanarkshire V.R.C. 


696 


23 


540 




3 


566 


397 


12 


5th V.B. Highland L.I. 


1512 


35 


1130 


i 


23 


1189 


628 


65 


1st V.B. Seaforth Highlanders 


1044 


33 


789 


1 


12 


835 


421 




1st Sutherland V.R.C. . 


1392 


34 


835 


1 


37 


907 


442 


34 


3rd V.B. Seaforth Highlanders 


1276 


28 


695 


1 


9 


733 


359 


15 


1st V.B. Gordon Highlanders 


1044 


29 


554 




5 


588 


337 




2nd V.B. do. 


812 


27 


357 






384 


240 




3rd V.B. do. 


928 


33 


494 


2 


14 


543 


155 




4th V.B. do. 


1160 


47 


631 


2 


20 


700 


291 


35 


5th V.B. do. 


1044 


28 


519 






547 


338 




6th V.B. do. 


870 


30 


517 




"6 


553 


307 




7th V.B. do. 


348 


10 


191 


1 


23 


225 


182 




1st V.B. Cameron Highlanders 


1160 


25 


866 


1 


10 


902 


435 


29 


1st V. B. Argyll and Sutherland 


















Highlanders 
2nd V.B. do. do. 


1048 


37 


678 




32 


747 


438 


97 


1164 


29 


862 


"2 


30 


923 


653 


36 


3rd V.B. do. do. 


1048 


32 


778 




16 


826 


347 


70 


4th V.B. do. do. 


1160 


31 


738 




4 


773 


691 




5th V.B. do. do. 


1164 


23 


849 




1 


873 


267 


48 


1st Dumbartonshire V.R.C. . 


1653 


56 


1407 


T 


20 


1484 


1214 


79(6). 


7th V. B. Argyll and Sutherland 


















Highlanders 


928 


26 


655 


1 


10 


692 


356 


30 


Total Infantry 


53,622 


1510 


35,863 


55 


776 


38,204 


22,325 


1593(c) 


R.A. Medical Corps ( V.) 


















Edinburgh Company . 


100 


5 


84 




4 


93 


60 




Aberdeen Companies . 


278 


14 


263 


i' 




278 


219 




Gordon V.I.B. Bearer Coy. . 




2 


59 


1 


8 


65 


45 




Glasgow Companies 


698 


25 


527 




1 


553 


511 




TotalR.A.M.C.(V.) 


1076 


47 


940 


2 


8 


997 


835 





(b) And 128 mounted infantry. 



(c) And 203 mounted infantry. 



366 



Appendix H. 





Estab- 
lish- 
ment. 


Efficients. 


Non-efficients. 


Total 

all 
ranks. 


Present 

at 
Inspec- 
tion, all 




Cows. 


Officers. 


N.C.O. 
and 
Men. 


Officers. 


N.C.O. 
and 
Men. 


included 
in fore- 
going. 


V.I.B. Bearer Companies. 
Argyll and Sutherland . 
Black Watch 
Highland Light Infantry 
1st Lothian .... 
Seaforth and Cameron . 


64 
64 
64 
64 
64 


2 
1 
3 

2 
2 


59 
61 
58 
61 

46 


1 


1 
3 
5 


62 
65 
66 

64 

48 


55 
46 
65 
51 
34 




Total Bearer Companies 


320 


10 


290 


1 


9 


310 


237 




Grand total, all Arms . 


69,704 


2099 


48,325 


77 


1228 


51,729 


30,021 


1593 


The totals in England and 
Wales were — 
Royal Garrison Artillery (V.) 
Royal Engineers (V.) . 
Volunteer Infantry * 
Royal Army Medical Corps (V. ) 
Brigade Bearer Companies . 


37,840 
16,466 
204,357 
2,838 
2,624 


1108 
522 

4459 
79 
51 


27,566 
13,164 
141,060 
2,336 
1,446 


56 
43 

227 
5 
2 


1796 
682 

4360 
5i 
43 


30,526 

14,411 

150,106 

2,472 

1,542 


21,862 
10,996 
111,040 
1,603 
1,289 


8776 


Total . 

Add for Scotland . 


264,125 
69,704 


6219 
2099 


185,572 
48,325 


333 

77 


6933 
1228 


199,057 
51,729 


146,790 
30,021 


8,776 
1,593 


Grand total, United 
Kingdom 


333,829 


8318 


233,897 


410 


8161 


250,786 


176,811 


10,369 


* Of these— 

8th (Scottish) V.B. Liverpool 
Regiment 

7th Middlesex (London Scot- 
tish) V.R.C. 


928 
928 


23 
30 


623 
712 


2 
2 


49 
38 


697 

782 


340 

682 





Appendix I. 



367 



APPENDIX I. 



ESTABLISHMENTS AND STRENGTH OF THE SCOTTISH VOL- 
UNTEER FORCE, 1880 to 1907.*— (From the Official Annual Returns 
of the 1st November of each year. No Annual Returns were published 
prior to 1875, and those from 1875 to 1879 are not tabulated by 
) 





Establishment, 


Efficient. 








Year. 


all ranks, 
including per- 






Non-efficients 
all ranks. 


Total 

enrolled. 


Present at 






Inspection. 




manent staff. 


Officers. 


Other ranks. 








1880 


55,245 




45,303 


1967 


47,270 


39,534 


1881 


55,690 


■g 


47,540 


1396 


48,936 


40,519 


1882 


55,992 


2 


45,734 


1817 


47,551 


39,758 


1883 


56,453 


1 


45,902 


1350 


47,252 


40,155 


1884 


56,699 





47,730 


1111 


48,841 


41,852 


1885 


56,945 


50,530 


903 


51,433 


44,987 


1886 


57,179 


'o 


50,585 


913 


51,498 


44,505 


1887 


57,342 


■a 


50,276 


996 


51,272 


44,491 


1888 


57,797 





49,677 


1026 


50,703 


43,825 


1889 


58,094 


a 


49,351 


1111 


50,462 


43,463 


1890 


57,986 


1 


47,981 


1459 


49,440 


42,598 


1891 


58,289 


48,248 


1183 


49,431 


42,369 


1892 


58,428 


% 


47,420 


1580 


49,000 


41,935 


1893 


58,268 


£ 


47,595 


1709 


49,304 


42,455 


1894 


58,067 


1896 


46,190 


1548 


49,634 


43,613 


1895 


57,822 


1916 


46,960 


1407 


50,283 


43,761 


1896 


57,904 


1973 


47,724 


1508 


51,205 


45,127 


1897 


57,221 


1973 


46,801 


1344 


50,118 


43.431 


1898 


57,221 


1994 


46,421 


1305 


49,720 


43,128 


1899 


57,351 


1983 


45,972 


1367 


49,322 


42,517 


1900 


70,484 


2135 


54,077 


1273 


57,485 


49,361 


1901 


70,374 


2163 


55,786 


1510 


59,459 


52,384 


1902 


71,002 


2181 


51,432 


2186 


55,799 


42,111 


1903 


71,861 


2194 


50,096 


1921 


54,211 


37,969 


1904 


71,441 


2145 


49,891 


1561 


53,597 


40,440 


1905 


71,205 


2095 


49,458 


1657 


53,210 


34,248 


1906 


70,945 


2110 


50,092 


1550 


53,752 


32,440 


1907 


70,445 


2099 


48,325 


1305 


51,729 


30,021 



* Exclusive of the 7th Middlesex (London Scottish) V.R.C. and 8th (Liverpool Scottish) V.B. 
The King's. 



368 



Appendix I. 



In connection with the above and the figures given on p. 57> 
it is interesting to note the following figures showing the pro- 
portion of enrolled volunteers to male population in the years 
1881, 1891, and 1901 in Scotland and in England and Wales. 
They are — 





Scotland. 


England and Walks. 


Year. 


Male 
population. 


Enrolled 
Volunteers. 


Proportion of 
Volunteers 

to male 
population. 


Male 
population. 


Enrolled 
Volunteers. 


Proportion of 
Volunteers 

to male 
population. 


1881 

1891 
1901 


1,799,475 
1,942,717 
2,173,755 


48,936 
49,431 
59,459 


Iin36 
lin39 
1 in 36 


12,639,902 
14,052,901 
15,728,613 


159,372 
172,615 
229,017 


1 in 79 
1 in 81 
lin68 



Appendix y. 



369 



APPENDIX J. 

TABLE SHOWING THE UNITS OF THE TERRITORIAL ARMY 

INTO WHICH THOSE OF THE SCOTTISH VOLUNTEER FORCE WERE 
CONVERTED ON OR AFTER 1ST APRIL 1908. 



Unit of the Volunteer Force. 



Unit of the Territorial Army. 



Royal Garrison Artillery. 
1st Aberdeenshire 

1st Argyll and Bute . 

1st Ayrshire and Galloway 



1st Berwickshire 

1st Caithness .... 

1st City of Edinburgh (exceptl 
left half 1st Heavy Battery) 1 



1st Fifeshire (except 
Company) 



1st Forfarshire . 



No. 7 j 



1st and 2nd City of Aberdeen Batteries 

R.F.A. 
•2nd Highland Ammunition Column 

R.F.A. 
North Scottish R.G.A. (2 cos.) 
Forth and Clyde R.G.A. (1 coy.) 
Argyllshire (Mountain) Battery R.G.A. 
Buteshire (Mountain) Battery R.G.A. 
3rd Highland Ammunition Column 

R.G.A. 
3rd Lowland Brigade R.F.A. (Ayrshire, 

Wigtownshire, and Kirkcudbrightshire 

Batteries). 
3rd Lowland Ammunition Column R.F.A. 
Lowland Mounted Brigade Transport and 

Supply Column AS.C. 
Banffshire Battery R.F.A. 
Banffshire Small-arm Section, Ammuni- 
tion Column R.F.A. 
Disbanded. 
Disbanded. 

Forth and Clyde R.G.A. (4 cos.) 
1st City of Edinburgh Battery R.F.A. 
Lowland (City of Edinburgh) R.G.A. (1 

heavy battery and ammunition column). 
North Scottish R.G.A. (2 cos.) 
Fifeshire Battery R.F.A. 
Highland (Fifeshire) R.G.A. (1 heavy 

battery and ammunition column). 
North Scottish R.G.A. (2 cos.) 
City of Dundee Battery R.F.A. 
Forfarshire Battery R.F.A. 
1st Highland Ammunition Column R.F.A. 

2 A 



37o 



Appendix y. 



Unit of the Volunteer Force. 



The Highland 



1st Lanarkshire 



1st Mid-Lothian 
1st Orkney 

1st Renfrew and Dumbarton 

Royal Engineers. 
1st Aberdeenshire 

Clyde Div. Electrical Engineers 
Forth Div. Electrical Engineers 

1st Lanarkshire 

2nd Lanarkshire 

Infantry. 
Queen's Rifle Volunteer Brigade, 

The Royal Scots (except No. 

4 Company) 
4th V.B. Royal Scots 
5th u ii 

6th H H 

7th „ it 

8th ii ii 

9th ,i n (except "H" 
Company) 



Unit of the Territorial Army. 



North Scottish R.G.A. (1 coy. and 1 de- 
tachment in the Hebrides). 

Highland Mounted Brigade Transport 
and Supply Column A.S.C. 

Inverness - shire (Mountain) Battery 

3rd Highland Ammunition Column 
R.G.A. 

6th Battalion Seaforth Highlanders (1 
company in Nairnshire). 

1st Lowland Brigade R.F.A. (1st, 2nd, 
and 3rd City of Glasgow Batteries). 

1st Lowland Ammunition Column R.F.A. 

4th Lowland (Howitzer) Brigade R.F.A. 
(4th and 5th City of Glasgow Batteries). 

4th Lowland Ammunition Column R.F.A. 

2nd City of Edinburgh Battery R.F.A. 

Mid-Lothian Battery R.F.A. 

2nd Lowland Ammunition Column R.F.A. 

Orkney R.G.A. (7 cos.) 

Forth and Clyde R.G.A. (2 cos. in Dum- 
barton, 1 coy. in Renfrew). 

4th Highland (Howitzer) Brigade R.F.A. 
(1st and 2nd Renfrewshire Batteries). 

4th Highland Ammunition Column R.F.A. 

City of Aberdeen (Fortress) R.E. (1 coy.) 
1st Highland Field Company RE. 
Highland Div. Telegraph Company R.E. 
Renfrewshire (Fortress) RE. (1 coy.) 
City of Edinburgh (Fortress) R.E. (1 coy.) 
1st Lowland Field Company R.E. 
Scottish Wireless Telegraph Coy. R.E. 
Scottish Air Line Telegraph Coy. RE. 
Scottish Cable Telegraph Company R.E. 
2nd Highland Field Company R.E. 
Lanarkshire (Fortress) R.E. (1 coy.) 
2nd Lowland Field Company R.E. 
Lowland Div. Telegraph Company RE. 

4th and 5th Bns. Royal Scots. 



6th Bn. Royal Scots. 

7th ,. „ 

Mid-Lothian, 2 cos.*| 

Peebles, 2 cos. J- 8th Bn. Royal Scots. 

Haddington, 4 cos. J 

10th Bn. Royal Scots (Cyclists). 

9th „ ,. 



Appendix y. 



371 



Unit of the Volunteer Force. 



Unit of the Territorial Army. 



8th (Scottish) V.B. Liverpool 

Eegiment 
1st V.B. Royal Scots Fusiliers . 
2nd „ 11 11 

1st Roxburgh and Selkirk f 

V.R.C \ 

2nd V.B. K.O. Scot. Borderers 
3rd ,. n „ 

Galloway V.R.C. . . j 

1st Lanarkshire V.R.C. (except 

"K" Company) 
2nd V.B. Scottish Rifles . 
3rd Lanarkshire V.R.C. . 
4th V.B. Scottish Rifles . 
1st V.B. Royal Highlanders 
2nd 11 „ 

3rd ,1 „ 

4th „ ,, 

5th 11 „ 

6th „ „ 

1st V.B. Highland L.I. . 

2nd ., 11 „ 

3rd 1, 11 

9th Lanarkshire V.R.C. . 

5th V.B. Highland L.I. . 

1st V.B. Seaforth Highlanders . 

1st Sutherland V.R.C. 

3rd V.B. Seaforth Highlanders j 

1st V.B. Gordon Highanders . 
2nd „ 
3rd 11 
4th 11 



6th „ 

7th 11 

1st V.B. Cameron Highlanders . 

1st V.B. A. and S. Highlanders 

2nd „ 

3rd 11 „ 

4th 11 M .. \ 

5th n „ n 

1st Dumbartonshire V.R.C. 
7th V.B. A. and S. Highlanders! 

7th Middlesex' (London Scottish) 
V.R.C. 



10th Bn. Liverpool Regiment. 

4th Bn. Royal Scots Fusiliers. 
5th ., n .t 

SSSS^'f'W Bn. K.O. Scottish 
Selkirk, 3 cos. f D ,„ miK 

Berwick, 2 cos. J Bo ^ rers - 
Dumfries, 4 cos. 1 _,, -r, -, T r. , 

Kirkcudbright, 3 cos. 1 51 *.?% K -?- fecot " 
Wigtown, 1 coy. J tish Borderers. 
5th Bn. Scottish Rifles. 

6th n „ 

7th 11 n 

8th 11 ., 

4th Bn. Royal Highlanders. 

Forfarshire, 4 cos. \5th Bn. Royal 

City of Dundee, 4 cos. J Highlanders. 

6th Bn. Royal Highlanders. 

4 cos. of 8th Bn. Royal Highlanders 

(Cyclists). 
7th Bn. Royal Highlanders. 
5th Bn. Highland L.I. 
6th H m .. 

7th .. >i m 

8th H II M 

9th II ,, M 

4th Bn. Seaforth Highlanders. 

5th 11 11 

Elginshire, 6 cos. \6th Bn. Seaforth 

Inverness-shire, 1 coy./ Highlanders. 

6 cos. 4th Bn. Gordon Highlanders. 

5th Bn. „ 

4 cos. 6th Bn. 11 

Aberdeen, 4 cos. \7th Bn. Gordon High- 
Kincardine, 4 cos./ landers. 

4 cos. 6th Bn. Gordon Highlanders. 

2 cos. 4th n 11 

4th Bn. Cameron Highlanders. 

5th Bn. A. and S. Highlanders. 

5 cos.) „,, t, 

3 cos. j 6th Bn - " 

4 cos. 7th it 11 ti 

4 cos. 8th Bn. Royal Highlanders 

(Cyclists). 
8th Bn. A. and S. Highlanders. 
9th i. 11 „ 

Clackmannan, 3 cos. \ 7th Bn. A. and S. 
Kinross, 1 coy. / Highlanders. 

14th Bn. County of London Regiment. 



372 



Appendix y. 



Unit of the Volunteer Force. 



Medical Units. 
Aberdeen Companies, R.A.M.C. 

(Vol.) 
Seaforth and Cameron Brigade 

Bearer Company 
Gordon Brigade Bearer Company 
Black Watch Brigade Bearer 

Company 
Glasgow Companies R.AM.C.^1 

(Vol.) 
Argyll and Sutherland Brigade I 

Bearer Company j 

Highland Light Infantry Brig- 
ade Bearer Company J 
1st Lothian Brigade 

Company 



Unit of the Territorial Army. 



1st Highland Field Ambulance R.A.M.C. 

Highland Mounted Brigade Field Ambu- 
lance R.AM.C. 
2nd Highland Field Ambulance R.A.M.C. 
3rd „ n h ' ii 



Lowland Mounted Brigade Field Ambu- 
lance R.A.M.C. 
1st Lowland Field Ambulance R.A.M.C. 
2nd .1 I. .1 i, 

3rd ,. ii M „ 



The following units continued to serve as volunteer corps under 
the Act of 1863, until a decision as to their transformation into 
" Officers' Training Corps " had been arrived at s — 

Left half, 1st Heavy Battery, 1st Edinburgh^ 
R.G.A.V 

N °' Sc C or Pany QU6en ' S RV * Brigade ' ThG E ° yal [ Edinburgh University. 

" H " Company 9th V.B. The Royal Scots 

Edinburgh Company R.A.M.C.V. J 

No. 7 Company 1st Fifeshire R.G.A.V. . . St Andrews University. 

"K" Company 1st Lanark V.R.C. . . . Glasgow University. 



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