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Full text of "The Red and white"

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1939 



LOIURL HIGH SCHOOL 

voLumt siny-THfiff 

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PUBLISHED BY 



LOyyfLL HIGH SCHOOL SlOOfOI flSSOCIfll 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 



«iZ*«— ^ ,^/^>i^^_e. 



fORtyyoRD 




llTH the birth of Treasure Island and The 
Golden Gate International Exposition on San 
Francisco Bay, a magical city has been cre- 
ated for all the world to see and adnnire. As 
loyal San Franciscans we are portraying the 
Exposition in this "Red and White," which 
we have garbed in its official blue and gold 
colors. Grateful that we have been privi- 
leged to receive many hours of extra-cur- 
ricular instruction on tKisy|wonderful island, 
we hope that the^apLlJPnturs spent will be 

reimpressed/jpWrour ni^mories as we 
turn tljg'^aves of this book. 





ift 




Poet, essayist, humorist, editor, teacher, scholar, diplomat, orator, 

and greatest of all, patriot 

JAMES RUSSELL LOWELL 

whose bust stands at the main entrance of our school, watches over the destiny of 

passing students. Lowell High School, rich in academic tradition, is proud 

of the heritage of name which is hers. 




DfDICflllOn 



UD AND WATER, capital and labor, blue prints and 
shovels alone could not have created our Exposition. The 
dream and realization of Treasure Island embody the en- 
thusiasm and leadership of a man whose vision and hard 
work Inspired his fellowmen to the very highest degree of 
co-operation — Mr. Leiand W. Cutler, upon whom 
the title "Father of the Exposition" may well 
be bestowed. In pride and deep gratitude 
we dedicate this, our sixty-third volume 
of the "Red and White" to this 
great San Franciscan. 



L 




Our beloved principal. Mr. Leroy H. Stephens, never too busy ^t his desk 
for a friendly greeting. 




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ociPflL's nfsseef 



HE YEAR finds Lowell with the largest enrollment in its history. The school 
has won its full share of honors in sports, in dramatics, in debating and ora- 
tory. The honor roll of students who have qualified for membership in the 
California Scholarship Federation attests to its scholarship. Increasing num- 
bers have brought added obligations and greater responsibilities, which both 
faculty and students have met with admirable success. 

Numbers, however, do not make a school. A school is made by the spirit 
that has grown with the years and gives meaning and significance to the 
work that goes on day after day within its walls. It is the spirit of the school, 
resulting from co-operation, from friendliness, from unselfish regard for 
others. It is the spirit that makes Lowell, the first school in California, also 
the friendliest. 

Mr. A. J. Cloud, President of the San Francisco Junior College, when a 
teacher in Lowell gave an interpretation to our name which describes so 
well the Lowell Spirit that I quote it here: 

"L" is for Loyalty, no place for traitors. 

"O" is for Opportunity, open to everyone. 

"W" is for Work, no tolerance of idlers. 

"E" is for Energy, belonging to youth. 

■"L" and ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 

"L" stand for Love for Lowell, enriching our lives. 



^ir<w-- ^W^^H*^^"^ 






'%&/y(/ 



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Chapter 



fl Hfleic isLflfio IS borh 



FOR YEARS, ever since the success of the Panama Pacific International Exposi- 
tion of 1915, the dream of another great exhibition of beauty has been har- 
bored in the hearts of San Franciscans. Especially, as the dream of two huge 
bridges spanning San Francisco Bay became a reality, the thought of having a 
magnificent exposition to celebrate their completion became more concrete. 
Many sites and ideas for the Fair were discussed, until finally It was decided that 
we would make our own site by bringing up sand from the bottom of the bay 
and making an island — Treasure Island. With the aid of government funds and 
labor this engineering feat was accomplished, and so well was it done that even 
after the Exposition is gone from Treasure Island, It will live on, serving the Bay 
Region as a huge airport, greeting and bidding farewell to mighty Clippers 
of the sky. 




Turning to OUR LEADERS 



PRtSfdllllG-fOfifllflLLy 




DONALD MINKLER 
President 



GAVIN HIGH 
Editor "Lowell" 



TERESA GUILFOIL 

Vice-President 



ROBERT BACIGALUPI 
Editor "Red i White" 



CLIFFORD WILEY 
Secretary 



ROBERT CURLEY 
Head Yell Leader 



JOHN COONEY 

Treasurer 



JAMES CAMPBELL 
Cafeteria Manager 




SPRIOG SIUDtni Booy 

OfflCfRS 





SflfiD ififOfinfiLLy 



Bob Curley in a "get behind 
■ t;. everybody" yell for the 
Oprinq, '39, officers. 




Prexy Don calling the Board of 
Directors meeting to order 
with the famous tw<inkler smile. 



■^^.ff^^A^^^'^^^-'''^ 



Vice-Prexy "Tae" Guilfoil 
"wandering" from her book; 
she's concocting a "bon mot" 
for the rally. 






Secretary Cliff Wiley hard 
pressed to keep up with those 
minutes at a busy Board ses- 
sion. 



Editor Bob Bacigalupi Inspect- 
ing proof; there's a "long, 
hard road to hoe" till we sign 
our annuals. 



Editor Gavin High in a 
reminiscent mood — it's 
that special souvenir 
issue of the "Lowell." 



Treasurer Jack Cooney 
in a grin; this receipt 
raises Lowell's student 
body card thermome- 
ter above Gatlleo's. 



Smiling Caf. Manager Jim 
Campbell, who seems to like 
Lowell "Kitchen Police." 




MR. CURTS 
Th« "watch dog" 
of oiif trcdtury. 
Boy! do«t fhii 
mdthemdticidn 
tdk* good cart 
of it. 



f fl c u L I y 




MISS SEELY 
Our new assistant 
librarian busily 
pounds the type- 
writer — orders 
some new books, 
we hope. 



MR. DUNN 
Our young and so- 
ciable Chem. 
"prof," serious now 
as he checks ref- 
erence boohs. 



MISS WILSON 
Our girls' riding 
advisor and 
"driller" of our 
graduation. Is what 
everyone calls a 
"good sport." 



Mr. Leroy H. Stephens Principal 

Mist Eugenie Ldcoste Vice-Principal, Daan of Girli 

Mr. Hudson Monroe Vice-Principal, Dean of Boys 

Special Officers 

Miss E. P. Harrison Secretary 

Mrs. R. Miller Attandance Clerk 

Mrs. M. Dieser Nurse 

Mr. C. A. Church Engineer 

Janitorial Force 

Mr. Felix McHugh (Head) Miss C. Meyers 

Mr. E. Cassidy Mr. J. Volpatti 

Mr. H. Coulman Mr. J. Wilbrand 

Classroom Teachers 
Adams, Miss R. M. Physical Education 

Alexander. Miss H. J. Music 

Alger. Mr. I. G. History, BDokroom 

Angus, Miss M. ^- /^ _/f vQ . . . y .- French 

Austin, Mr. A. A.^-lWgft;*fr^. .S-^.f' . ll ;? ^ Mathematics 

Babrti, Mr. M. Science 

Bach. Mrs. A. L Spanish 

Balensiefer, MIsj F English 

Barker, Mr. I. C Mathematics 

Barnes. Mr. L. B Science (Head) 

Barrett. Miss K. C. Latin 

Bass. Mr. G. W History, Economics 

Baxter. Miss M. A. Science 

Beardsley. Miss L. J English 

Belli, Miss E. L. English, Italian, Typing 

'Butler, Miss L Mathematics 

Chase. Miss M Art 

Close, Mrs. M. S. Science 

Cleghorn, Mr. A. M History (Head) 

Croker, Mrs. F, M. History 

Curts. Mr. J. G Mathematics. Bank 

Devlin. Mr. M., Music 

Dobson, Mr. R. J. .... Science 

Duffy, Miss A. G English (Head) 

DuHy. Miss M. M History, Spanish. Latin 

Dunn. Mr. R. L. Science, Mathematics 

Edmtnster, Mr. H. W. English 

Fast. Mr. N. C. Science 

Flexsenhar. Capt. H. J R. O. T. C. 

Flynn, Miss D. Physical Education 

Gallagher, Mr. E. Mathematics, Typing 

Ger lough, Mr. L. S History 

Grayblel, Mr. J. M. Science 

Harris, Mr. E. H. Physical Education 

Henderson, Mrs. E. W English 

Henrich, Mr. L. J. Science 

Herrmann, Miss F. L Art 

Hill, Mrs. ! French 

• Absent on leave. 



MISS ADAMS 
Always keeps busy 
in the girls' yard 
during gym pe- 
riods. Is she turn- 
ing around to see 
who got that 
base hit? 



MISS EUG£NIE LACOSTE 
Vice-Principal and Dean of Girls 




^V 



■■'W 






f fi c u L I y 



Classroom Teachers 

Jelinski, Miii L. English 

Johnston, Mr, F. E Science 

Jordan, Mrs. M. W English 

Kdst, Mr. G. Science 

Kellogg. MIij E. E. Science 

Kitchen, Mr. C. L. Physical Education (Head) 

Kuhnle, Mrs. V. T English, "Red and White" 

Lee, Mr. A. C. English 

Lee, Miss E. S Mathematics. Latin 

LeSeur, Miss M. H Eng., Hist., Coun.. Hyg. 

Libby, Mr. B. B Mathematics 

LIghtner. Mrs. A Salesmanship, English 

Lighty. Mr. S. J. Physical Education 

Lindborg, Mr. A. E. Mechanical Drawing 

Lo Forti, Mrs. J. M. Spanish, Typing, Mathematics 

Lorbeer, Mr. G. C, History 

Martine. Dr. E. M. German 

Matchette, Miss O English 

McBride, Miss M. K Mathematics 

McCord. Mr. O. H Mechanical Drawing 

•McDonald. Mrs. M. E English 

Mensing, Miss B. M German, English 

Metcatf. Miss G Spanish 

Moore, Mr. S. W. History 

•Morrin. Miss M. I English 

Neff. Mr. B. H Physical Education 

Neppert. Miss J. M Music 

O'Malley. Miss H Art 

Oliver. Mrs. M. M. Spanish 

Osborn, Miss E. M. English, Latin, Journalism 

Osuna, Miss A. M Spanish 

Peckham, Miss G. C. History 

Peterson, Mr. M Science 

Polland, Mr. S. K. Dramatics 

Power, Mr. M. S French, English 

Reston, Miss G. I. French 

Revoy, Miss H. M. French 

Robertson. Mr. A. J. M. Science 

Sanders, Mr. J. B. ...Mathematics, Lockers 

Schneider, Mr. D. Music 

Schou. Miss E. M. History 

Schwarti, Mr, A. Science 

Scott. Miss E. G. Library 

Seely, Miss W. W Library, English 

Smith, Miss A. G French 

Smith, Mrs. L. D. Physical Education 

Tucker, Mr. F. 6 Latin (Head) 

Voyne, Mr. M. Physical Education 

Walsh, Mr. C. F English 

Welch, Miss H. A Mathematics (Head) 

Whitaker, Miss A. Latin 

Williams, Mr. S History, French 

Wilson. Miss J. Physical Education 

* Absent on leave. 



MR. HUDSON MONROE 
Vice-Principal and Dean of Boys 





MR. DEVLIN 

Only has four or* 
chestras, two 
bands and (you 
guess how many 
instruments) to 
watch over — no 
wonder he's 






HR 



i 



Y\ 



MISS KELLOGG 

Knows her stuff 

when it comes to 

physiology. We 

know we like to 

get Into her 

classes. 





All dressed 

going to see 

someone else's 

play? It'll have to 

be good to beat 

a "Skippy" 

oroduction. 



MR. CLEGHORN 
Good old stand-by 
as head of our his- 
tory department. 
Wonder what he's 
telling them? 



MISS REVOY 

Ooo-la-la! Our 

French teacher is 

real Pah-ree-see-en 

All the girls envv 

her her "chic. 




Chapter 



fl Cliy IS BUILDfO 

THE ARCHITECTURE OF THE EXPOSITION is of the new Pacifc type that 
blends the old Mayan, Incan, Malayan and Cambodian forms. The finish on 
all of the buildings is an iridescent stucco of such a sort that it reflects the sun- 
light and kindles softly under artificial lighting. Thus night on the Island becomes 
a bright sunny day. The unique architecture is further emphasized by the science 
of color applied to all of the Fair's illumination. Dominating the entire island 
Is the Tower of the Sun, four hundred feet high and crowned by the golden 
Phoenix, symbolic of the rise of San Francisco from Its ashes of 1906. From this 
tower radiates the entire exposition, the Court of the Seven Seas, the theme 
Court of Pacifica, the Courts of Flowers and Reflections, the Courts of the 
Moon and of the Trade Winds. Rather than size, the designers have empha- 
sized beauty and glamor. 







Turning to OUR CLASSMATES 




HIGH 
StillOfiS 



Room Representatives 

Second Row — Levin, Korn. Horn, Rogers, Hagg, McCarty, 
Riss. First Row — Larson, Schwartz, Arnold, Palmer. Butcher, 

Sanders, Jorgensen. 

Candidates Bob Dawson, Stan Bernhard, Frank Laycock, John 

Rosenblatt, Ben Parkinson, Carl Livingston and Marion Leary 

await their turn as Yvonne Cyr delivers the winning Class 

Historian campaign speech. 



MEMBERS OF THE High Senior Class were intensely interested in activities, busied themselves in all services, 
and gave their time and efforts toward furthering enthusiasm and participation in every event connected with 
school life. Leading the graduating class were Clark Grant, President; Claire Ridgway, Vice-President; and Jean 
Arnold, Secretary. 

Holding Student Body Offices were President Donald Minkler, Vice-President Teresa Guilfoil, Secretary Clif- 
ford Wiley, and Treasurer John Cooney. 

Robert Bacigalupi edited this "Red and White," his assistants, members of the staff, being Claire Butcher, Gert- 
rude Ferris, Teresa Guilfoil, Shirley Joy, Jeanne Katz, Edith McFarlane, Betty Sanders, and Floyd Smith. The 
"Lowell" was put out by Gavin High, editor, helped by staff members Dorothy Heiss, Dorothy Lee, Richard 
Noah, Benjamin Parkinson, Claire Ridgway, and Muriel Trendt, assistant editor. 

At the head of the Shield and "L" was Gertrude Ferris, and the High Senior members of the girls' service society 
were Myla Bailey, Maryiee Callow, Helen Conlisk, Yvonne Cyr, Dorothea Franklin, Priscilla Finley, Grace Gom- 
perts, Sophie Gorter, Teresa Guilfoil, Shirley Joy, Ruth Knoph, Dorothy Libby, Elsa Schlamm, and Janet Smith. 
Gerald Todd was President of the Scroll and "L", with Robert Bacigalupi, John Cooney, Robert Elliott, Clark 
Grant, William Harrison, Gordon Kenny, Donald Minkler, Sidney Smith, Clifford Wiley, and David Wilson, High 
Senior members of the Boys' Service Society. 

Elected from the High Four room representatives were Thomas McCarty, President of the Boys' Council, and 
Jean Arnold, Girls' Council Head, while Frank Laycock was chosen by the C. S. F. to be the conductor of its affairs. 
Upholding our high standards in debating, Forrest Cobb, Richard Cohn, Selma Cornet, Robert Dawson, Joseph 
Friedman, Donald Minkler, and John Rosenblatt, Society President, and San Francisco Debating League Presi- 
dent, spoke for Lowell. Thespians Jean Arnold, Yvonne Cyr, Priscilla Finley, Dorothy Fltzpatrick, President of the 
Dramatics Society, Teresa Guilfoil, Joseph Horn, Gordon Kenny, Donald Peters, and Clifford Wiley trod the 
boards of the Lowell stage. Donald Peters took second place for Lowell in the All-City Shakespearean contest; 
Robert Dawson represented Lowell in the Native Sons' and San Francisco in the Crusaders' Oratorical Compe- 
titions. He covered himself, his school and his city with glory by becoming the one among 15,000 high school 
orators in California to be awarded first place and an all-expense trip to Hawaii in the Crusaders' Contest. Eliza- 
beth Baget won first place in the competition with all the high school students of San Francisco for her essay on 
the topic "Organized Labor — America's Problem or Opportunity," sponsored by the San Francisco Labor Coun- 
cil. Those especially talented and interested in music were Hugh Houston, President of the Boys' Glee and a 



14 




Dance Committee 

Second /!ow— Molinari. Elliott, Marron, Todd, Sjolund. Firsf 

Row — Ferris, Gorter, Arnold, Grant, Ridqway, Franklin. Trendt. 

The Senior Ball, held this year at the St. Francis. "The end 

of the perfect day" of graduation. 



HIGH 
SfdlOfiS 



member of the Boys' Double Quartet; Gordon Kenny, Boys' Double Quartet: and Priscilla Finley, who sang in 
the Girls' Triple Trio. Robert Dawson directed the school Dance Orchestra, which plays at all the Lowell dances. 
Presiding over the various clubs were Richard Cohn, Advanced Chess: Joseph Friedman, Psychology: Marshall 
Taft, Radio: Richard Rafael. Town hHail and Literary: and Victor Rundle, Camera Club. 

Clifford Wiley attained the highest rank in the R.O.T.C., that of Lieutenant Colonel, and marching under him 
were Captain Adjutant Richard Callaghan, Captains Forrest Cobb, Roland Ghiselli, Gavin hiigh, and Marshall 
Taft: First Lieutenant Oliver Berven, and Second Lieutenant John Aaronson. 

In the Girls' Block "L" Dorothy Libby regulated all business as the President, and June Meese helped her as Clerk 
of Awards. Priscilla Finley led the G.A.A., the largest in the city, with Marylee Callow as badminton manager, 
and Ruth Carew as hockey manager. Peter Delos was President of the Boys' Block "L", and assisting him as Clerk 
of Awards was Carl Sjolund. High Seniors playing Varsity basketball were Peter Delos, Ward Lame, and Joseph 
Marron, while Terrence Kilpatrick and Thomas McCarty played Thirties. On the baseball diamond were James 
Cunha, Peter Delos, and Gerald Todd; on the gridiron were John Cooney, Edward Epting, Chase Gregory, Walter 
Kracke, Madison Marcus, William Tlbbs and Gerald Todd. Varsity crew claimed John Rosenblatt, Clark Grant, 
and Robert Elliott, while George Hagg, Frederick Sandrock, and Coxswain Bruce Bonner rowed Thirties. Samuel 
Mendelson was a lightweight track captain. 

Switching from studies to a lighter vein, the erstwhile High Four's held their semi-annual Senior Day. and having 
been excused from classes both lunch periods, frolicked and made merry in the auditorium with dancing and 
other festivities, to the delight of all, while the lower classmen looked forward to the time when they too might 
be able to have a similar day in which to disport themselves likewise. 

The class of June, 1939, after electing John Rosenblatt as Class Valedictorian and Yvonne Cyr as Class His- 
torian, chose to follow the example set by the last graduates, and wear caps and gowns in which to receive their 
diplomas. With an aura of seriousness prevailing, the graduation was a most effective sight, rendered even more 
striking by the departure from the black and white caps and gowns of last term, the graduates adopting this 
time a dark blue and cream color scheme, which was exceedingly attractive. The diplomas were given out at 
the War Memorial Opera House on the afternoon of June 13th. 

Climaxing the gay round of commencement festivities, the Senior Ball was held at the close of graduation day in 
the Colonial Room of the St. Francis Hotel. Thus ended four years of happiness, joy, and work at Lowell High 
School. 



15 




AARONSON, JOHN 
John wat intervitad in mu- 
tic. H« pdrticip<]1«d in R. 
O. T. C. bdnd dnd In the 
ddnctt orchaitrd. Hit ath- 
letic interest was swim- 
ming. 



ABE. ALICE 

Alice was a swimming en- 
thusiast. After graduating 
ihe plans to study to be a 
dietician. 



ADAMS. NATALIE 
Natalie was greatly inter- 
ested in sports, signing up 
for both golf and ice-skat- 
ing. She also worked in the 
library. 



ANDERSON. MARION 
Marion, a transfer from 
British Columbia, interest- 
ed herself in golf and ice- 
skating, A girls' restroom 
attendant and in the or- 
chestra. 



ANDERSON. ROBERT 
Robert was a member of 
the R. O. T. C. His name 
was consistently on the 
Honor Roll, and he plant 
to enter Stanford. 



ARNOLD. JEAN 

Jean was a member of the 
Dramatics Society. In H4 
she was both president of 

the Girls' Council and class 
secretary. 



BACIGALUPI. ROBERT 
Bob was the Editor of this 
"Red and White, ' and was 
elected to membership in 
the Scroll and L. 



BAGET, ELIZABETH 
Elizabeth was honored by 
membership in the C. S. F. 
She was secretary of the 
Debating Society, and 
worked in the offices. 



BAILEY, MYLA 

Myla was on Shield and L, 
and in her L3 term was a 
room rep. She worked for 
Mr. Monroe. 



BAILEY. WALTER 
Walter was on the Honor 
Roll many times. He plans 
to go first to Junior Col- 
lege and then to U. C. 



BAKER. JAMES 

James was sports-minded. 

He chose the football 

squad as the scene of his 

participation. 



BAKER, MARGARET 
Peggy was assistant man- 
ager of hockey. She was in- 
terested also in ice-skating. 
Became a member of the 
Block L. 



u 



BANTON, MAYBETH 
Maye went out for swim- 
ming and tennis as a lower 
classman. Later she made 
the Girls' Advanced Glee 
Club. 



BARR. ELIZABETH 

6«tte was a room rep. She 
signed up for swimming 
and golf. Plans to go to 
U. C. 



BERNHARD. STANLEY 
Stan won his Block L in 
track by throwing the shot 
and discus. Ha was also 
interested in crew. 



BERVEN. OLIVER 
Oliver received the com- 
mission of lit Lt. in the R. 
O. T. C. He also turned 
his interests in the direc- 
tion of debating. 



BICKEL. JOAN 
(CHANDLER) 
Joan was a member of 
C. S. F. and Girls' Block 
L. She was a room rep. 
and a "Lowell " staff re- 
porter. 



BLONDER, ELIZABETH 
Betty made the Honor Roll 
many times. She plans to 
start 6i S. F. State and 
then go to U. C. 



BLOOM. DOROTHY 
Dorothy, an honor student 
and history major, was a 
member of the Contract 
Bridge Club and the Dra- 
matics Society. 



BLUM, BARBARA 

Barbara, a 3'/; year grad, 
was a restroom attendant 
and member of the C. S. F. 
and the Dramatics Society. 
Enjoyed golf and swim- 
ming. 



BONAL, GENEVIEVE 

Genevieve was on the li- 
brary staff and on the 
girls' tennis team. Plans to 
study iournalism. 



BONNER, BRUCE 
Bruce, in the Debating So- 
ciety; was Varsity coiswain 
for two years. On the 
swimming team and a caf. 
worker. 



HARMON 
was interested 



BONTE. 
Harmon 
soccer in his early years at 
Lowell. Upon his gradua- 
tion he plans to enter Stan- 
ford. 



BRECK, ROBERT 
Bob was greatly interested 
in sports. He played foot- 
ball in both his junior and 
senior years. 



16 





BRODIE, WARREN 
Warren enjoyed riding very 
much. Upon grdduatlng he 
pidns to enter California 
Aggies to study animal 
husbandry. 



BUENGER, GISELA 
GIsela took tennis through- 
out her terms df Lowell. 
She was an active member 
of the German Club. 



BUENGER. INGE 
Inge, a member of Girls' 
Block L, was greatly inter- 
ested in tennis. She joined 
the German and the Bridge 
Clubs. 



BURKE. JOHN 
John !s a conscientious, 
hard worker who made the 
Honor Roll. His ambition 
is to study ai U. C. 



BUTCHER. CLAIRE 

Claire, a H4 room rep. 
earned her Block L in ice- 
skating. She worked In Mr. 
Monroe's office. 



CAIN, CHARLES 
Charlie went out for crew 
and football and won his 
letter in both sports. Was 
also on the traffic squad. 



CAINELL, WILBUR 
Wilbur was quite interest- 
ed in track, and sufficient- 
ly prominent in it to win 
his letter in that sport. 



CALLAGHAN, RICHARD 
Richard, a Captain Adju- 
tant in HA, went out for 
crew. He was also conspic- 
uous in Orchestra and 
Band. 



CALLOW. MARYLEE 
Marylee was badminton 
manager, participated in 
swimming, basketball and 
ice-skating. In Shield, th« 
Debating and Dramatics 
Societies, Spanish Club 
secretary. 



CAREW. RUTH 
Ruth, a member of the 
Girls' Block L. managed 
hockey and enjoyed riding, 
hockey. Was a restroom at- 
tendant. 



CARSCADDEN. BETTY 

Betty, greatly interested in 
Ice-skating and badminton, 
was also a Glee Club mem- 
ber. She plans to attend 
U. C. 



CASSIDY, EDMUND 

Ed, musically Inclined, was 

a member of the advanced 

Band. Athletically -minded 

also, he participated in 

basketball. 



CHABAN, RUTH 
Ruth, a G. A. A. member, 
went out for riding and 
golf often enough to earn 
her Block L. 




CHIN, LOUISE 
Louise, another C. S, F. 
member, interested herself 
in the Camera Club and 
in swimming. She will con- 
tinue her studies at U. C. 



CHONG, CAROLYN 
Carolyn was a C. S. F. 
member, but found time to 
go out for badminton. She 
will study to be a social 
service worker. 



CHU, ANNA 

Anna was on the Honor 
Roll almost every term, 
and C. S. F. membership 
Is proof of her fine schol- 
arship. 



. MYLES 

was a member of 

the R. O. T. C. and the 

oys" Riding Club. He was 

a motion picture operator 

and a cafeteria worker. 



CLARK. WILLIAM 
William, a math and Eng- 
lish major, plans to go to 
the University of Pennsyl- 
vania to study architecture 
and structural engineering. 



CLEWANS, BEN 
Ben belonged to the Pho- 
tography Club, and en- 
joyed all sports. He was 
consistently on the Honor 
Roll. 



COBB, FORREST 

Forrest was a Captain in 

the R. O. T. C. He was 

also interested in debating 

and in playing In the dance 

orchestra. 



COHN, RICHARD 

Richard was president of 
the Advanced Chess Club 
and also prominent In the 
Debating Society. 



COLLINS, RUSSELL 
Russell, an honor student, 
worked In the offices of 
both Mr, Monroe and Miss 
Harrison. He was secretary 
of the Psychology Club. 



CONLISK. HELEN 
Helen's enthusiasm for rid- 
ing caused her to be elect- 
ed riding manager in L4. 
She was on the Shield. 



17 





^15. 



CONNELLY, MARY 
Mdry, d Burlinqdme Uan%- 
f«r. majored in Frtnch and 
took hockey. Sh« wantt to 
enter U. C. 



COOLEY, ANNE 
Anne, while dt Lowell, took 
d gredt Intereit In riding. 
When she grddudtes the 
plans to enter Mills Col- 
lege. 



COONEY, JOHN 
Jdck, in L4, wds first string 
end In football. A member 
of the Scroll and Block L; 
L. H. 5. S. A. tredsurer. 



CORBETT, HAROLD 
Hdroid, d member of the 
lightweight track team. Is 
planning to go to Cdllfor- 
nid Polytechnic School to 
study dir-conditioning. 



CORNET. SELMA 

Selma belonged to the De- 
bating Society and en- 
tered several oratorical 
contests. She was the as- 
sistant head of C. S. F, 
coaches. 



CRAI8, DORATHY 
Oorathy, a history maior, 
plans to attend U. C. and 
study medicine. Her hobby 
is skating. 



CRAIN, MELVIN 
Melvtn, when a H3, was 
Feature Edit or of the 
"Lowell." Later, he turned 
his interests toward sports. 



CUNHA. JAMES 

Jim was twice a room rep, 

and occupied a prominent 

pidce on the baseball 

tedm. Mdde his Block L in 

H4. 



CYR. YVONNE 

Yvonne, Block L and Shield 
member, signed up for 
badminton, ice-skating and 
tennis. She was L4 vice- 
president, H4 historian. 



DAVIS. DONALD 
Don has shown strong in- 
terest in track and was a 
track manager. He was al- 
so a room representative. 



DAVIS, MILDRED 
Mildred participated in 
ice-skating and won her 
Block L in hockey. She was 
a C. S. F. member. 



DAWSON. ROBERT 
Bob. In the Concert Or- 
chestra, was Dance Orches- 
tra leader. In C. S. F. An 
orator, who won State Cru- 
saders' Contest. 



u 



DELOS. PETER 
Pete was All-City two suc- 
cessive years in basketball. 
He also ranked high in 
football and baseball; 
Block L Preiy. 



DE MARTIN. MARJORIE 

Marjorie went out for rid- 
ing and ice-skating. When 
she graduates she hopes to 
go io Mills College. 



DEREBERRY. PHYLLIS 
Phyllis majored In math 
and science. Took part in 
Concert Orchestra, Band. 
Made C. S. F. several 
times. 



DE VRIES. PIETER 
Pete was a Block L mem- 
ber, due to his stellar work 
in track. He also was a 
traffic boy. 



DOOLING, PATRICK 
Pdt won his Block in swim- 
ming. He also played soc- 
cer, and both Varsity dnd 
lightweight, American. 
Worked In Mr. Monroe's 
office. 



DUNCAN, DONALD 
Don wds d member of the 
C. S. F. dnd diso went out 
for basketball. He plans 
to enter State or U. C. 



DUNCAN, JEAN 
Jean went out for swim- 
ming In her freshman year. 
She hopes to go to State 

to take pre-nursing course. 



ECHEVERRIA. ALBERT 
Albert won his Block In 
track. He is dIso a member 
of the traffic squad. Archi- 
tecture is his Interest. 



ELLINGSON, FRANCES 
Frances devoted her spdre 
time to drt. She was three 
terms on the Art Staff of 
the "Red and White." 



ELLIOTT, ROBERT 
Bob mdde first string dnd 
his Block in crew. In Scroll, 
LA secretary, on L3. L4. 
H4 dance committees. 



EPTING. EDWARD 
Ed was first string football 
tackle and a shot and dis- 
cus thrower. He was a 
Block L member. 



FARWIG. THEODORE 
Ted went out for track. He 
was vict-prtiident of the 
Hi-Y Club. 



18 





FELTON. DOROTHY 
Dorothy participated In 
hockey and was a Block L 
member. She also worked 
in the attendance office. 



FERRIS, GERTRUDE 
Gertrude, prominent on 
the "Red and White," as 
HA was elected Shield pres> 
ident. Earned her Block !n 
riding. 



PRISCILLA 
was Girls' 



FINLEY, 

Priscilla was Girls' Yell 
Leader. Dramatics Society 
president, secretary and 
president of G. A. A. 
Member of Shield. 



FINOCCHIO. LEONILDA 
Leonilda took two sports, 
riding, ice-skating. Room 
rep. as L4, and aims to do 
Civil Service work. 



FITZPATRtCK, DOROTHY 

LEE 
Dorothy was active in dra- 
matics, being president of 
the Dramatics Society. Was 
assistant manager of bad- 
minton and a C. S. F. 
coach. 



FRANKLIN. DOROTHEA 
Dorothea has brought 
many honors to this school, 
due to her swimming skill. 
She was a member of the 
Shield and L. 



FRANKLIN, ROBERT 

Robert was greatly Inter- 
ested in both military and 
music. After graduation he 
plans to study mining. 



FREED. SONYA 
Sonya belDnged to the Mu- 
sic Club and the Dramatics 
Society. She worked in the 
Library, and plans a future 



FRIEDMAN. JOSEPH 
Joseph, a debater and ora- 
tor, was secretary of the 
Town Hall Club and presi- 
dent of the Psychology 
club. 



FUKUI, GEORGE 
George was an outstand- 
ing member of the track 
team, and there earned his 
Block L. Was quite inter- 
ested in music. 



GANNON. MARY CLARE 
Mary Clare signed up for 
two sports, badminton and 
volley ball. After her grad- 
uation she plans to enter 
U. C. 



GHISELLI. ROLAND 
Roland, in HI, was a room 
rep. He worked In the caf. 
and the bookroom. and be- 
came an R. O. T. C. Cap- 



u 



GIL8ART. LORAINE 
Loralne went out for 
nis in her H I year 
study to be 
sistant. 



ock- 

wlorl her 

that sporV^ She 

busy office worker. 




GILLIN, 4^A 
Jean *iiiay«d ice-skating, 
and was a rWember of the 
Girls' GleeClub. Wants to 
sing with We Scarlett's or- 
chestra. 



GIMOV, ERWIN 
Erwtn. a 3',2 year graduate, 
played In the dance or- 
chestra and was concert 
master of the orchestra. 



GLASS, JOSEPH 
Joseph was a room rep. as 
a L4, and his name was al- 
most always to be found 
on the Honor Roll. 



GOMPERTS. GRACE 
Grace worked In the caf, 
junior 



the 



and a 
"Red and White." Was 
C. S. F. and Shield mem- 
ber. 



GORTER, SOPHIE 
Sophie was financial man- 
ager of the "Red and 
White " In H4. She was a 
member of both the Shield 
and the C. S. F. 



GRANT, CLARK 
Clark, on the first string 
crew for two years, also 
played soccer. Block L, 
Scroll, L3 secretary, and 
H4 preiy. 



GRANT. ESTHER 
Esther interested herself In 
debating and dramatics. 
She was an active member 
of the Town Hall Club. 



GRAVEM. NICK 
Nick was a soccer player 
for three years and won his 
Block In that sport. He 
plans to enter college. 



GREEN. BETTY 

Betty transferred from 
Washington in her H3 
term, and participated in 
badminton. She plans to 
study nursing. 



GREGORY. CHASE 
Chase was first string in 
track and football and was 
a member of the Block L. 
Plans to enter Stanford. 




19 







GREY. MARGARET 
Mdrqdret rtcvntly trans- 
ferred from Holy Cross, 
where she wds very dctive. 
Hds devoted har time at 
Lowell to studies. 



GUILFOIL. TERESA 
Teresa, a "Red and Wtiife" 
leader, on Shield, was H3 
vice-prexy and in H4 was 
chosen L. H, S. S. A. vice- 
president. 



HAGG. GEORGE 
George made two first 
strings in sports, one in 
track, the other in thirties 
crew. .y( 



HAMILTON. HELEN 
Helen worked in the library 
and went out for swimming 
and ice-skating for her ath- 
letic interests. 



HARRISON. JACK 
Jack worked in Mr. Mon- 
roe's office. He was also a 
room rep. and active as a 
debater. 



HARRISON. BILL 

Bill took crew as a junior 

one-time Journal photog 

rapher. on H4 dance com' 

mittee. a Scroll member 

and a helper to Mr. Mort 

roe. 



HASSON. RUTH 
Ruth signed up for bad- 
minton, riding, and volley 
ball. She plans entering 
U. C. to study dress de- 
signing. 



HAUCK. CAMELIA 
Camelia was a member of 
the C. S. F. coaching staff. 
In sports she played volley 
ball and badminton. 



HAUCK. SEVERANCE 
Severance has been presi- 
dent of the Hi-Y Club for 
several terms. He was also 
head of the Motion Picture 
Club. 



HEtSS. DOROTHY 
Dorothy has been on the 
"Lowell" staff and a mem- 
ber of the Debating Soci- 
ety. She plant to ertttr 
U. C. 



HERRINGTON, BAMBIE 
Bambie worked for Mr. 
Monroe, and headed the 
hall guards for three 
terms. Took swimming, ice- 
skating, and debating. 



HEWITT. MARGARET 
Margaret came back from 
the West Indies to finish. 
She majored in French and 
made Honor Roll. Took 
ice-skating. 



u 



HIGH. GAVIN 
Gavin rose to the rank of 
R. O. T. C. captain in HA. 
He was Editor of this 
term's Lowell. 



HOFFMAN, HOWARD 
Howard, a math major, has 
made the Honor Roll al- 
most every time. He plans 
to go to Cal. Tech. 



HOLSCLAW. DONALD 
Don was coiswain of the 
20's crew in his freshman 
year. Later he worked in 
the Library. 



HONG. FREDERICK 
Frederick, a C. S. F. mem- 
ber, was always interested 
!n his studies, and went out 
for basketball as well. 



HORIO, TOSHIO 
Toshio made the tens and 
twenties basketball teams 
and won a Block L on both. 



HORN, JOSEPH 
Joseph was a H4 room rep. 
a hall guard, and an office 
worker. He took part in 
"Stop Thief." 



HOUSTON, HUGH 
Hugh earned his Block in 
soccer. He was also Preiy 
of the Boys' Advanced 
Glee and in the Double 
Quartet. 



HOWARD. MARY 
Mary, through her efforts 
in tennis, volley ball and 
ice-skdting, became mem- 
ber of the Girls' Block L. 



HYAMS. STANLEY 
Stanley, while at Lowell, 
went out for the tennis 
team. Upon graduating, he 
intends to enter Stanford. 



INGLES, HUGH 
Hugh worked his way up to 
a Cadet Major In the R. 
O. T. C. He also belonged 
to the Saber Club. 



IREDALE. BRUCE 

Bruce, a 3'/j year graduate, 
was interested in public 
speaking and in tennis. He 
wants to attend Stanford. 



IRWIN. HELEN 

Helen worked in Mr. Mon- 
roe's office. When she 
graduates she plans to 
launch a career as a Civil 
Service clerk. 



20 





JACOBY. FRANCES 
Frances majored in French 
and history. Her hobby is 
photography. She joined 
the Contract Bridge Club 
and liked ice-skating. 



JANG, GEORGE 
George, during his stay at 
Lowell, devoted most of 
his time to his studies, be- 
coming a C. S. F. mem- 
ber. 



IRVING 
ng was a H4 room rep- 
resentative and a tennis 
enthusiast. He plans a fu- 
ture in architecture. 



JENKINS, BERT 
Bert was a member of the 
C. S. F. a number of times, 
which is proof of his out- 
standing scholarship. 



JOHANSON. LAURA 
Laura, all the way through 
her stay ai Lowell, has 
pointed toward her am- 
bition to enter secretarial 
school. 



JOHNSTON. BARBARA 
Barbara acquired her Block 
L through her efforts in 
riding, tennis, and ice-skat- 
ing. 



JONES. E5PERANZA 
Esperania played in the 
Advanced Orchestra and 
was accompanist for Girls' 
Glee. She liked ice-skating 
and swimming. 



JORDAN. MARION 
Marion came from Canada 
and took swimming for two 
terms. Upon graduation 
she plans to study nursing. 



JORGENSEN. DOROTHA 
Dorotha managed golf and 
played also tennis and 
badminton. A member of 
the Girls' Block L. 



JOY. SHIRLEY 
Shirley was a member of 
the Shield and L, and on 
the art staff of the "Red 
and White." 



KALTHOFF, BARBARA 
Barbara went out for bas- 
ketball while ai Lowell, 
and upon her graduation 
plans to study modeling. 



KARP. GERTRUDE 
Gertrude, a history major, 
became a member of the 
Girls' Gtee Club and also 
played tennis. 



u 






'A 



KATO, KIKU 

Kiku participated in sports 
and was also an honor stu- 
dent. She hopes to study 
biochemistry at U. C. 



KILPATRICK. TERRENCE 
Terry was a star on the 
lO's, 20's, and 30's basket- 
ball championship teams. 
He made All-City in H4. 



KATZ, JEANNE 
Jeanne was a member of 
the "Red and White" art 
staff and the Dramatics 
Society. Plans to attend 
Art School. 



KELLOGG. BARBARA 
Barbara worked in the li- 
brary and enjoyed golf 
and riding. She was a 
member of the G. A. A. 



KIUCHI. JACK 
Jack, a science major, was 
a room rep ai LI. He was 
honored by membership in 
the C. S. F. 



KENNY, GORDON 
Gordon was Boys' Glee 
Club president and in the 
Double Quartet. He won 
the Dramatics Award in 
Dec. '38. In Scroll. 



KIYASU. YULIE 
Yulie took swimming as 
her sport. She was inter- 
ested in her studies and 
became a member of the 
C. S. F. 



KNAUBER. WILLIAM 
Bill has been very active in 
soccer, and as a result of 
his enthusiasm became a 
Block L member. 



KNOPH. RUTH 

Ruth, a member of Shield 

and C. S. F., went out for 

tennis and swimming. On 

Block L; a caf. and library 

worker. 



KOLHEDE. JOSEPH 
Joseph attended Lowell 
for only one term. He 
came from Calaveras 
County, and majored in 
Spanish, history, and sci- 
ence. 



KORN. WILLIAM 
Bill was out for track for 
two terms, and he was a 
room representative twice. 



KORTICK. DONALD 
Don was on the H3 dance 
committee, and he also 
played soccer. Upon grad- 
uation, he plans to study 
architecture. 



21 








KRACKE. WALTER 
Wdit, d member of Block 
L and the trdfflc squdd. 
ptdyod footbdil dnd dt one 
time 30'i bdiketbdil. 



KRUGER, CONSTANCE 
Constdnce, intereited 
-ut, hopes to mdjor !n 
.it college. She wds d 
room rep. 



KUHN. DOROTHY 
Dorothy found time for 
two majors: science and 
history, and two sports: 
tennis and swimming. 



LAMe. WARD 

Ward won two Blocks for 

his outstanding efforts In 

Varsity basketball and 

baseball. 



LANG. PATRICIA 
Pdt wdt a room rep. in 
H2 and 19. She was on the 
L3 and H3 dance commit* 
tees. Ptdyed tennis. 



LARKINS. ALBERTA 
Alberta was a recent trans- 
fer from Galileo High. She 
plans to attend the San 
Francisco College for 
Women. 



LARSON. RUTH 
Ruth was a room rep. in 
her H2 and H4 terms. She 
participated in tennis, 
badminton and Ice-skat- 
ing. 



LAYCOCK. FRANK 
Frank, in H4, as C. S. F. 
president was a member of 
board of directors. He al- 
so made All-City Band. 



LEARY. MARION 
Marion was supervisor of 
the C. S. P. coaching staff. 
She was also out for golf 
dnd riding dnd interested 
in music. 



LEE. DOROTHY 
Dorothy, in her H4 yedr. 
was eichange editor of the 
"Lowell." She went out for 
tennis and swimming. 



LEE. PAULINE 
Pauline was a L3 and H3 
room rep. She was a mem- 
ber of the Camera Club 
and a C. S. F. student. 



LEITNER. JOSEPH 
Joseph's liking for sports 
did not keep him from be- 
ing on the Honor Roll. He 
came from Burlingame. 



u 



LERER. RUTH 
Ruth enjoyed playing bad- 
minton and was chosen a 
member of the L4 dance 
committee. 



LEVIN. JOSEPH 

Joseph, a life member of 
the C. S. F.. played basket- 
ball. He was a room rep. 
and a Red Cross council 
member. 



LEWIS, MARILYN 
Marilyn, a Block L and 
G. A. A. girl, enjoyed 
swimming, tennis, ice-skat- 
ing and riding. She be- 
longed to Girls' Glee 
Club. 



LI. YOK QUON 
Yok Quon was a fine stu- 
dent who was able to grad- 
uate in 3'/] years and be- 
came a member of the 
C. S. F. 



LIBBY. DOROTHY 
Dorothy was hockey man- 
ager and president of both 
G. A. A. In L4 and Girls' 
Block L in H4; a Shield 
member. 



LIM. JANE 

Jane was able to graduate 
In 3'/; years and find time 
for two sports, swimming 
and riding. 



LIVINGSTON. CARL 
Carl won his letter on the 
Varsity tennis team. He 
has been on the Honor 
Roll often. 



LOCKHART. ROBERT 
Robert hds often been on 
the Honor Roll. He was a 
member of the Figure 
Skating Club. 



LOEWENSTEIN. GAITHER 
Galther was a history ma- 
jor. He became a member 
of the Boys' Glee Club. 



LOWENSTEIN, URSULA 
Ursula has only quite re- 
cently come to this coun- 
try from Germany. She 
likes Lowell and badmin- 
ton. 



LUCY. EDNA 

Edna was to be found out 
in the girls' riding group 
and was also a member of 
the Dramatics Society. 



LULL. DAVID 

David has been on the 
Honor Roll many times 
dnd hat been a consistent 
member of the R. O. T, C. 








22 








LUM. EMILY 

Emtly. an eiceptlonal stu- 
dent, is a life member of 
the C. S. F. She has been 
greatly interested in bad- 
minton. 



LYMES. HELEN 

Helen worked in the at- 
tendance office and be- 
came a Girls* Block L 
member through her efforts 
in hockey- 



MACIEL. JAMES 
Jim won his Block In base- 
ball. He was one time on 
the I20's basketball team 
and worked for Mr, Mon- 
roe. 



MacWILLIAMS. ALICE 
Alice has had a perfect at- 
tendance record since en- 
tering Lowell. She is in- 
terested in singing and in 
commercial art. 



MARCUS. MADISON 
"Marc" was a fullback 



on 



the football team for 2 yrs. 
Also on the track team. 
Block L member. 



MARRON. JOSEPH 
Joe, in H4, made first 
string in basketball. On 
Block L and traffic squad, 
and L4 and H4 dance com- 
mittees. 



MARTELL. PATRICIA 
Pat worked in the library 
for Miss Scott and went 
out for swimming, volley 
ball and basketball. 



MATHEWS, JOHN 
John, a language major, 
was a laboratory assistant 
who found time to interest 
himself in track as well. 



MAYER, MARJORIE 
Marjorle became a Block L 
girl because of her efforts 
in 3 sports: tennis, ice- 
skating, and badminton. 



McBRIDE. LEONARD 

Leonard majored In math- 
ematics but for pleasure 
chose basketball as his fa- 
vorite sport. 



McCABE. MARY 
Mary was in the Triple 
Trio and likes sports, too. 
She was badminton man- 
ager and played basket- 
ball as well. 



McCALLUM. MARGARET 
Margaret was very Inter- 
ested in riding and In de- 
bating. Her ambition Is to 
study to be an embalmer. 



u 



McCAHTY. THOMAS 
Tom made the 1939 All- 
City 130-lb. basketball 
team. He presided over 
Boys' Council in H4, 



McFARLAND, EDITH 
Edith was a Freshman. 
Sophomore and Junior 
room rep. Earned her Block 
L in swimming, tennis, bad- 
minton, and Ice-skating. 



McFARLANE. BARBARA 
Barbara worked in Mr 
Monroe's office. She took 
golf and ice-skating and 
won her Block In these 



sports. 



MEESE, JUNE 



June managed both tennis 
and volley ball and served 
as G. A. A. Clerk of 
Awards. In Girls" Block L. 



MEIER, JOHN 

John was a member of the 

track squad and a Block L 

society. and the traffic 

squad. 



MENDELSON, SAMUEL 
Sam held two Captaincies, 
he headed the lightweight 
track team and the traffic 
squad as well. 



MICHAEL. LEEANA 
Leeana went out for ice- 
skating and also took part 
in dramatics. She hopes to 
attend Vassar. 



MINGST. HERMAN 
Herman was a room rep. 
twice. He swam and was a 
member of the Boys' Glee 
and Hi-Y clubs. 



MINKLER. DONALD 
Don. a star debater and 
Scroll member. was L3 
class prexy. head yell lead- 
er in L4. and L. H. S, S. A. 
prexy In H4, 



MOLINARI, ROBERT 
Bob was a member of the 
Dramatics Society and 
twice, in L3 and H4, was 
a dance committee mem- 
ber. 



MOORE. JACK 

Jack transferred from Pol> 
as a H3, He played foot 
ball and joined the "Red 
and White " art staff. 



MORAFKA. DANIEL 
Dan was Psychology Club 
President. Went out for 
20 s basketball team. En- 
tertained with rally skits. 
H3 room rep. 



23 





^'k 





NAFTALY, RICHARD 
Rkhdrd was a H3 room 
r«p. H« pldv«d football 
and mad* th« Honor Roll 
several timet. Will tnter 
U. S. F. 



NELSON, FLORENCE 
Florence worked in the I!- 
brdry and chose swimming 
as her sport. She hopes to 
be a proofreader. 



NISHIMURA.YOSHIMITSU 
Yoshimitsu devoted most 
of his time to his studies 
and as a result has repea'- 
edly made the Honor Roll. 



NOAH. RICHARD 
Richard was a member of 
the Hi-Y Club and was also 
a motion picture operator 
and photography enthusi- 
ast. 



NORTH. LORETTE 
Lorette was a H3 room 
rep. and she was alto quite 
active in golf. 



OKUNO. ARTHUR 
Arthur was a very promi* 
nent member of (he Radio 
and Camera Clubs. 



O'CONNELL, JEAN 
Jean was interested in 
swimming and ice-tkating 
and earned her Block. She 
was d member of the Triple 
Trio. 



OOTKIN. ZINA 
ZIna worked in the library 
and attendance office. She 
was a Block L girl and 
managed hockey. 



OKAWACHI. TORU 



PALMER. CAROLYN 
Toru has been consistently Caroylin. in her H4 term, 
on the Honor Roll. He was a room rep. She wai 
plans to be a mortician. alto quite interested in 

tennis. 



O'KEEFE. JAMES 
Jim was a room rep. when 
he was a L2, Upon gradu- 
ation he hopes to enter 
S. F. J. C. 



PANTON. BETSEY 
Betsey has been a great 
help in Miss Harrison's of- 
fice. She chose riding as 
her sport. 



u 



PARKINSON, BEN 
Ben, a recent transfer from 
Portland. Ore., became 
Sports Editor of the "Low- 
ell." He was a star per- 
former at rallies. 



PEACH. ANNE 
Anne, who transferred from 
Girls' High, belonged to 
the Medical Club there 
and hopes to be a nurse. 



PENNELL. RUSSELL 

Russell wai in the R. O. 
T. C. and also went out for 
tennis. He hopes to be a 
draftsman. 



PETERS. ALVIN 
Al helped Mr. Monro*, was 
in Block L, played basket- 
ball, track and football. 
Took part in funny rally 
skits. 



PETERS, DONALD 
Don was LI room rep.. Bi- 
cycle Club prexy. A crew 
and dramatics man. Low- 
ell's representative in the 
Shakespearean contest. 



PONOMAREF. BORIS 
Boris went out for both 
soccer and crew for his 
sporting activities He will 
enter S. F. J. C, 



POWELL, JOY 
Joy turned out for 3 sports: 
swimming, badminton and 
ice-skating. Was a mem- 
ber of Psychology Club. 



PURRINGTON. DAVID 
David, a 3'/i yr. graduate, 
wet club-minded, being a 
member of the Ptychology, 
Literary and Town Hall 
Clubi. 



RADKE. AMELIA 
Amelia was d Girls' Block 
L member, through her ef- 
forts in swimming, tennis, 
volley ball and Ice-skating. 



RAFAEL, RICHARD 
Richard was prexy of the 
Town Hall Club and Lit- 
erary Society. He was also 
interested in debating and 
psychology. 



RASMUSSEN. RUTH 
Ruth, who came to Lowell 
from Hawaii at a senior, 
was a room rep. in her L4 
term. 

REGIN, NEAL 
Neal belonged to the Fig- 
ure Skating Club and was 
a French major. After 
graduating, he will go to 
Deerfield, Matt. 



24 





RICKETSON. CARLOS 
Carlos transferred from 
Geo. Washington as a L2. 
He is interested in swim- 
ming. 



RIDGWAY. CLAIRE 

Claire, who came from 
Shanghai, was on the "Low- 
eir' staff for 3 terms. She 
was H4 vice preiy. 



RIEBELING. CLAIRE 
Claire participated in 
hockey while at Lowell. She 
is interested in becoming a 
nurse. 



RILOVICH. RITA 
Rita, a member of the G. 
A. A,, took golf and ten- 
nis. She came to Lowell 
from Galileo as a junior. 



RIORDAN. BERNARD 
Bernard came to Lowell 
from the Philippines. He 
participated in golf while 
he was here. 



RIPPE. HELENE 
Helene took part in ice- 
skating and dancing. She 
was a H2 room rep. and 
member of the Psychology 
Club. 



RISS. EDWARD 
Edward, a room rep. in 
HI. H2. L4. and H4, was 
a member of the C. S. F. 
He will study chemistry. 



ROBACK. GEORGE 
George worked in the book 
room. He was on the track 
team. In the Dramatics So- 
ciety and a C. S. F. mem- 
ber. 



ROGERS. CHARLES 
Charles was a H3 room 
rep. and a member of De- 
bating Society. He wants 
to go to business college. 



ROGERS, WILLIAM 
William was a member of 
the band and orchestra. 
He also played tennis and 
was a room rep. 



ROITENSTEIN, FRANCES 
Frances was a member of 
the Girls' Block L as a re- 
ward for badminton, ice- 
skating and tennis. 



ROOT. WALTER 
Walter was only here for 
one term, having come 
from Missoula. Mont., but 
he was able to make the 
rifle team. 



ROSEN. MANUEL 
Manuel was a 3'/; yr. grad- 
uate who made the Honor 
Roll. He majored in sci- 
ence and mathematics. 



ROSENBLATT, JOHN 
John was member of De- 
bating Society and League 
president; graduated in 3'/; 
years. In H4 signed for 
crew and was elected vale- 
dictorian. 



ROYAL. WILLIAM 

Bill was a L3 room rep. He 
was a member of the 30"s 
and the Varsity crew. 



RUNDLE. VICTOR 
Victor was very active in 
the field of photography. 
He was elected president 
of the Camera Club. 



SANDERS. BETTY 
Betty worked in Mr. Mon- 
roe's oHIce and was a rest 
room attendant. She plans 
to enter S. F. State. 



SANDROCK. FREDERICK 
Fred made the 30's crew 
for two years. He majored 
in science and plans to 
study forestry at U. C. 



SCHERER, MARTHA 
Martha was supervisor of 
the C. S. F. in H4. She 
went out for tennis, ice- 
skating, swimming, bad- 
minton. 



SCHLAMM. ELSA 
Elsa, a member of the 
Block L, and Shield and L, 
worked in Miss Harrison's 



office. 



SCHMUCK. MARGARET 
Margaret transferred from 
San Rafael High. She took 
part in Girls" Glee Club 
and in A Capella Choir. 



SCHOMAKER. GALE 
Gale became a member of 
Girls' Block L because of 
4 sports: golf, riding, bad* 
minton and ice-skating. 



SCHRAEMLI, JEAN 

Jean was a member of the 
Girls' Block L. She took 
part in ice-skating, swim- 
ming and badminton. 



SCHUNICK, IRENE 
Irene took part in basket- 
ball, hockey, tennis, and 
badminton. She plans en- 
tering University of Cali- 
fornia. 



25 









SCHUNtCK. JUNE 
June wax an dCtiva pdrticr> 
pant in four girit' iports: 
hockvy, t«nnis, baik«tbdll 
dnd bddminton. 



SCHWARTZ. ROSALIE 
Rotdlie wd» d mftmber of 
the Block L and d C. S. F. 
She wdi d room rep. in her 
H4 term. 



SCHWAR2ENBEK. JEAN 
Jedn wdt Girls' Block L 
secretdry dnd d member of 
C. S. F. She took tennij. 
riding and ice-ikating. 



SCOTT, BARBARA 
Barbdra. who was a con- 
sistent member of the C. 
S. F,, interested herself in 
both riding and basket- 
ball. 



SCOTT. ROBERT 
Robert turned out for 
bdiebdil in hit Junior year. 
Work prevented him from 
continuing in hit Senior. 



SCOTT. VIRGINIA 
Virginid took bddminton in 
her flrtt term at Lowell. 
Later (he choie ice-tkating. 
She worked in the library. 



SCOTT. WILLIAM 

Bill took track for one 

term. He wants to study 
deronautics at either Ran- 
dolph Field or Pensecold. 



SCADDEN. THOMAS 
Thomas was a room rep. as 
d H2 and a member of the 
basketball 30's in his Soph- 
omore year. 



SELLECK. RALPH 
Ralph was made a member 
of the Boys' Block L be- 
cause of his work in bdse> 
ball. 



SHAW. JACQUELINE 
Jacqueline, vice president 
of Girls' Advanced Glee, 
as a Junior worked on the 
Journal. Took tennis and 
badminton. 



SHINKAI. JOHN 
John played basketball 
and was a star in track. He 
was secretary of the Boys' 

Block L. 



SIEGEL. JACOB 
Jacob was a member of 
both the Psychology and 
Chemistry Clubs. For sports 
he liked to play basket- 
ball. 



A 



SILVA. KENNETH 
Kenneth majored in lan- 
guages and was nearly al- 
ways on the Honor Roll. 
He participated in dra- 
matics and baseball. 



SILVERMAN. ROBERT 
Robert was here about I'/j 
years, having transferred 
from Washington. A sci- 
ence and mathematics ma- 
jor, he was very interested 
in sports. 



SIMPERS. MARGARET 
Peggy worked in Mrs. Mil- 
ler's office. She was a room 
rep. in HI and L2. Enjoyed 



ice-skating. 



SJOLUND. CARL 
Carl was clerk of awards 
and in Block L through 
track. A member of the H4 
dance committee. 



SMITH. BETTY LOU 
Betty Lou was a 6. A. A. 
member who participated 
in tennis and golf. She 
came to Lowell as a Junior. 



SMITH. FLOYD 
Floyd made the art staff of 
the "Red and White." He 
was a member of the Cam- 
era Club. 



SMITH. JANET 
Janet was a member of the 
Girls' Block L and was 
Shield and L secretary. She 
worked in the library. 



SMITH, NELLIE-JO 
Nellie-Jo transferred from 
Galileo as a Junior. She 
was a member of the G. 
A. A. who chose golf and 
tennis. 



SMITH. SIDNEY 
Sid made his Block L in 
basketball and track. He 
was on L3 dance commit- 
tee, in Scroll. 



SPIESS. INGER 
Inger was a member of the 
Girls' Block L. She worked 
in Mr. Monroe's office and 
was a restroom attendant. 



STAMATIS. ROBERT 
Robert was on the basket- 
ball team as a Sophomore. 
He was consistently on the 
Honor Roll. 



STOBENER. JEANNE 
Jeanne want out for tennis 
and swimming while she 
was at Lowell. She hopes 
to attend business school. 



26 





STONE, HAROLD 
Harold turned out for bas- 
ketball after corning to 
Lowell from George Wash- 
ington. He plans to study 
law. 



SUGtYAWA. TAOAYOSHI 
Tadayoshi went out for 
basketball while at Lowell. 
He was a rnember of the 
Japanese Students' Club. 



SUTHERLAND, JEAN 
Jean was a restroom at- 
tendant. Upon graduating, 
she plans a business career. 



SWARTZ. JAYNE 

Jayne went out for tennis. 

Her Interests center in 

dress designing. So Moly- 

neux may have a future 

rival. 



TAFT, MARSHALL 
Marshall was an R. O. T. C. 
Captain and a camera fan. 
He was president of both 
the Chemistry and Radio 
Clubs. 



TEZA. FLORENCE 
Florence was a member of 
the Debating Society. She 
was sports minded, choos- 
ing tennis, ice-skatlrg and 
badminton. 



THRELFALL. FRANCIS 

Francis showed an active 
interest in swimming. He 
was a laboratory assistant 
as well. 



TI5CORNIA, LORRAINE 
Lorraine worked in the li- 
brary and was a member 
of the Debating Society 
and the ice-skating team. 



TOBIN. BEVERLEE 
Beverlee. who Is going to 
attend the College of the 
Pacific, was a golf enthusi- 
ast. 



TODD. GERALD 
Garry was H3 class presi- 
dent. Scroll and L preiy !n 
H4. Block L for Varsity 
baseball and football. 



JONG. WILLIAM 

William, a 3'/; yr. gradu- 
ate, was nevertheless a 
C. S. F. member, labora- 
tory assistant, and a hall 
guard. 



TRENDT, MURIEL 
Muriel was a member of 
the H3 and H4 dance com- 
mittees. She also became 
Associate Editor of the 
"Lowell." 



A 



TSURUOKA, SHOTARO 
Shotaro, a recent transfer 
from Commerce, promptly 
made the Honor Roll and 
was a member of Chem- 
istry Club. 



TURNER, ELAINE 
Elaine was Interested In 
sports, especially ice-skat- 
ing, tennis, and swimming. 
She was H3 room rep. and 
in Girls' Glee. 



TWOHY, JOHN 
John was a Red Cross rep. 
and on the Honor Roll. He 
was vice president of the 
Camera Club. 



UNGER. GOLDIE 
Goldie went out for both 
ice-skating and basketball. 
She was a member of the 
Psychology Club. 



VASgUEZ. LOUIS 
Louis turned out for soc- 
cer, track and football. He 
was an active member of 
the BiDck L Society. 



VOLENS. CLYDE 
Clyde played in the dance 
orchestra and also engaged 
in basketball for one term. 



WAITE, MADELEINE 
Madeleine transferred from 
Galileo as a Junior. She 
became a member of both 
the G. A. A. and C. S. F. 



WALDRON, WALLACE 
Wallace transferred from 
St. Ignatius last year. 
While here he played foot- 
fall and also reported for 
track. 



WALKER, MARY ANN 
Mary Ann was a H3 room 
rep. She also took part In 
two sports: ice-skatIng and 
golf. 



WALLERSTEIN. RALPH 

Ralph entered Lowell In 
January from a German 
high school. He hopes to 
study medicine at U. S. C. 



WASHAUER, HENRY 
Henry, a member of the 
Boys' Block L Society, man- 
aged the basketball team 
for several terms. 



WATANABE. WARREN 
Warren was a member of 
the C. S. F.. the Camera 
Club and also the Contract 
Bridge Club. 



27 





WEBER. MARJORIE 
Mdjori* wdt a room r«p. 
ai A H2. Sha took riding, 
!c«-ikd1ing dnd badminton 
dnd mdd* h«r Blocks. 



WEED, IRENE MARIE 
Irene chose swimming, ice- 
skdting, badminton. She 
was d member of the C, 
S. F. 



WEIMAN, ANN 
Ann was quite active in 
tennis. She wants to study 
to be a secretary. 



WEINSHENK. JACK 
Jack worked In Mr. Mon- 
roe's office. He earned his 
Block L in treck and wds 
on the trdffic squad. 



WEISMAN. SHIRLEY 

Shirley took dramatics and 
glee. She worked in Mr. 
Monroe's office. She wants 
to be a dental nurse. 



WHERRY. ROSEMARY 
Rosemary was active in 
riding and worked In Mrs. 
Miller's office. She hopes 
to enter the College of the 
Pacific. 



WILEY. CLIFFORD 
Cliff, secretary of the L. H. 
S. S. A. and Lt. Col. in the 
R. O. T. C, was on the 
Scroll and a dramatic star. 



WILSON. DAVID 

Ddve wdS L4 class presi- 
dent and a member of the 
Block L and Scroll and L. 
He played 20's basketball. 



WILSON, DOROTHY 
Dorothy was a member of 
the G. A. A. who partici- 
pated In riding and volley 
ball. She wants to go to 
U. C. 



u 



WOLF. HAROLD 
Harold came from Ger- 
many as a Junior and in- 
terested himself In tennis 
and the Spanish Ctub. A 
C. S. F. student. 



WORRALL, PATRICIA 
Pat was on the L4 dance 
committee. She was out 
for swimming and ice-skat- 
ing. Hopes to go to U. C. 



WRIGHT, JACQUELINE 
Jacqueline, newcomer from 
Cast lemon t High In Oak- 
land, did not have a 
chance to prove herself in 
activities. 



YIP, DORIS 

Doris went out for bad- 
minton and WdS a fine 
enough student to be 
elected to the C. S. F. 



ZELINSKY, HERBERT 
Herbert was a member of 
the Debating Society and 
was a room rep. as H2. He 
was In the C. S. F. 




ZAMLOCH. ROBERT 
Bob was Block L and on the 
traffic squad. He played 
on the golf squad for three 
years. 



ZAMMITT, IDAMAY 
Ida. L3 vice preiy and H3 
class secretary, was on the 
L4 and H4 dance commit- 
tees as well. 



ZION. WILLIAM 
William worked in the of- 
fice and was active in both 
football and track. 





'm 




.\VXf 




GOOD LUCfi, Sf 



ORS 



28 



ROSHR Of GRflDUflHS 

junf 1030 



BOYS 



John PhiUp Aaronson 

Robert Anderson 

Robert John Bacigdlupi 

Walter Bailey 

James Baker 

Stanley J. Bernhard 

Oliver J. Berven, Jr. 

Bruce Thomas Bonner 

Harmon Bonte 

Robert Breck 

Warren Robert Brodie 

John James Burke 

Charles Patrick Cain, Jr. 

Wilbur Huqh Cainell, Jr. 

Richard Bright Callaghan 

Edmund Joseph Cassidy 

Myles Clark 

William Harold Clark 

Ben Clewans 

Forrest A. Cobb, Jr. 

Richard G. Cohn 

William Russell Collins. Jr. 

John F. Cooney 

Metvin Crain 

James Cunha 

Donald William Davis 

Robert Merriman Dawson 

Peter A. Delos 

Pieter Arnoldus de Vrles 

Patrick James Edward Doclinq I 

James Alden Drummond 

Donald Francis Duncan 

R. Albert Echeverria 

Robert Elliott 

Edward Epting 

Theodore Farwig 

Robert Benjamin Franklifi 

Joseph Friedman 



George M. Fukui 

Roland F. Ghlselll 

Erwin Esiah Gimov 

Joseph Glass 

Clark H. Grant 

Nick Graven 

Chase E. Gregory 

George Haqg 

Bill Harrison 

Jack Allen Harrison 

Harry Severance Hauck 

Gavin N. High 

Howard Hoffman 

Donald Vincent Holsclaw 

Frederick H. Hong 

Toshio Horio 

Joseph J. Horn 

Huqh H. Houston 

Stanley Sanford Hyams 

Hugh Ingles 

Thomas Bruce Iredale 

George T. Jang 

Irving Jarkovsky 

Bert J. Jenkins 

Gordon Lee Kenny 

Terrence Kilpatrick 

Jack T. Kiuchi 

Bill Knauber 

Joseph Karl Kolhede 

William F. Korn 

Donald Edward Kortick 

Walter Kracke 

Ward Lame 

Frank Laycock 

Joseph Louis Leitner. Jr. 

Joseph Mervin Levin 

Carl Livingston. Jr. 

Robert William Lockhart 



Gaither Loewenstein 
David Summers Lull 
James Allen Maciel 
Madison Marcus 
Joseph Marron 
John James Mathews 
Leonard McBride 
Thomas Allen McCarty 
John Gabriel Meier 
Samuel Mendelson 
Robert Louis Molinari 
Jack Moore 
Daniel Morafka 
Herman Mingst 
Donald Minkler 
Richard H. Naftaly 
Yoshimitsu Nishimura 
Richard Byrd Noah 
Toru Michael Okawachi 
James O'Keefe 
Arthur Fujio Okuno 
Ben H. Parkinson. Jr. 
Russell W. Pennetl 
Alvin Stanley Peters 
Don A. Peters 
Boris Ponomaref 
David Russell Purrington 
Richard V. Rafael 
Neal Francis Reqin 
Carlos Ricketson 
Bernard N. Riordan 
Edward A. Riss 
George S. Roback 
Charles Josef Rogers 
William Roqers 
Walter H. Root. Jr. 
Manuel J. Rosen 
John M. Rosenblatt 



William F. Royal 
Victor Arden Rundle 
Frederick Sandrock 
Thomas A. Scadden, Jr. 

Robert Loten Scott 
William J. Scott 
Ralph Lester Selleck 
John Hikaru Shinkai 
Kenneth Thomas Silva 
Jacob Siegel 
Robert P. Silverman 
Carl Arnold Siolund, Jr. 
Floyd Ransdell Smith 
Sidney Smith 
Robert Basil Stamatis 
Harold Sheridan Stone 
TadayoshI Suglyama 
Marshall Taft 
Thomas Tate 
Francis Richard Threlfall 
Gerald B. Todd. Jr. 
William Lun Tonq 
Shotaro Tsuruoka 
John Daniel Twohy 
Louis P. Vasquei 
Clyde Volens 
Ralph Wallerstein 
Henry Aaron Washauer 
Wallace Waldron 
Warren H. Watanabe 
Jack Welnshenk 
Clifford Joseph Wiley 
David Eugene Wilson 
Harold H. Wolf 
Cart Robert Zamloch 
Herbert E. Zelinsky. Jr. 
William R. Zion 



GIRLS 



Alice Abe 

Natalie Charlotte Adams 

Marion Azuba Anderson 

Jean Claire Arnold 

Elizabeth Baget 

Myla Marie Bailey 

Margaret Susan Baker 

Maybeth Jean Banton 

Bette Jayne Barr 

Betty G. Blonder 

Barbara Corinne Blum 

Dorothy Elizabeth Bloom 

Genevieve R. Bonal 

Giseld Buenqer 

Frances Claire Butcher 

Marylee Callow 

Ruth Carew 

Betty Jane Carscadden 

Ethel Ruth Chaban 

Charmian Joan Chandler 

Mary Mae Cheong 

Louise H, Chin 

Carolyn Kaye Chonq 

Anna Cecelia Chu 

Helen F. Conlisk 

Mary Elizabeth Connelly 

Anne Holllngsworth Cooley 

Selma Ray Cornet 

Dorathy Cralb 

YvAfine Cyr 

Mildred Lorraine Davis 

Mariorie De Martin 

Phylli! Euqene Dereberry 

Jean Duncan 

Frances Coop-Ellinqson 

Dorothy J. Felton 

Gertrude Ferris 

Priscilla Carolyn Finley 

Leonilda L. Finocchio 



Dorothy Jones Fitzpatrick 

Dorothea Franklin 

Sonya Freed 

Mary Clare Gannon 

Loralne Gilbart 

Jeanne Carolyn Glllln 

Elena Giorni 

Marion Thelma Glos 

Grace Gompers 

Sophie Gorter 

Esther L. Grant 

Betty Irene Green 

Margaret Natalie Grey 

Maria Teresa Gullfoil 

Helen Grace Hamilton 

Ruth Maria Hasson 

Cameiia Ann Hauck 

Dorothy Helss 

Bambie Herrlngton 

Margaret Kingsland Hewitt 

Mary K. Howard 

Helen Louise Irwin 

Frances Jacoby 

Laura Johanson 

Barbara T. Johnston 

Esperanza Jones 

Marian Lois Jordan 

Dorotha Grace Jorgensen 

Shirley K. Joy 

Barbara Lou Kalthoff 

Gertrude Karp 

Kiku Kato 

Jeanne Katz 

Barbara Kellogg 

Yulie Klyasu 

Ruth-Marlon Knoph 

Constance Hart Kruger 

Dorothy Kuhn 

Patricia Marie Lanq 



Alberta Marie Larkins 

Ruth Eleanor Larson 

Marion Leary 

Dorothy Lee 

Pauline Lee 

Ruth Lerer 

Marilyn Lewis 

Yok Quon Li 

Dorothy Lee Llbby 

Jane M. Lim 

Ursula Loewenstein 

Edna Adele Lucy 

Emily Lum 

Helen Lynes 

Alice Mac Williams 

Patricia Martell 

Mariorie Jean Mayer 

Mary Elizabeth McCabe 

Margaret Elizabeth McCallum 

Edith May McFarland 

Barbara Jane McFarlane 

June Ellen Meese 

Leeana Gay Michael 

Florence Nelson 

Lorette J. North 

Zlna Ootkin 

Jean Claire O'Connell 

Carolyn Palmer 

Elizabeth Panton 

Anne Peach 

Joy Evelyn Powell 

Amelia Louise Radke 

Ruth Patricia Rasmussen 

Claire Angela RIdgway 

Claire Anne Riebeling 

Rita Kathryn Rilovich 

Helene Elsbeth Rippe 

Frances Roitensteln 



Betty Rose Sanders 

Martha Scherer 

Elsa Louise Schlamm 

Margaret Anne Schmuck 

Gale Schomaker 

Joan Schraemli 

Rosalie May Schwartz 

Jean Schwarzenbek 

Barbara Jayne Scott 

Virginia Dorothy Scott 

Irene Schunick 

June Schunick 

Jacqueline Ames Shaw 

Marqaret Anne Simpers 

Betty Lou Smith 

Janet Smith 

Nellie-Jo Smith 

Inqer Elisabeth Spiess 

Jeanne Stobener 

Jean Marie Sutherland 

Jayne Swartz 

Florence Teza 

Lorraine L. Tiscornia 

Beverlee Tobin 

Muriel Trendt 

Elaine Turner 

Goldie Unqer 

Madeleine Elizabeth Walte 

Mary Ann Walker 

Mariorie Weber 

Irene Marie Wood 

Ann Weiman 

Shirley Sadie Welsman 

Rosemary Chaoman Wherry 

Dorothy M. Wilson 

Patricia Jean Worrall 

Jacqueline M. Wright 

Doris Yip 

Idamay Zammitt 



29 




CLASS HlSIOfiy 



YVONNE CYR 
CIdis Historian 



FOUR YEARS OF HIGH SCHOOL life are ending. Meanwhile, in the world, events of great 
consequence have occurred. Vital to our parents and to those who realized fully their significance, 
they meant little to us who were starting a history which seemed far more important. 

1935 — News of the Italo-Ethiopian conflict startled the world. Yet our chief concern was that we 
had to start our high school careers under the roof of our traditional rival, Polytechnic. Our own 
building was being made safe and habitable. 

Our first weeks teemed with new activities, new confusions, new adjustments. Our new surroundings 
were unfamiliar even to our teachers. Coming from smaller schools we were impressed by the 
strangeness of hordes of new people. Half-day sessions gave us too little time for real acquaint- 
ance with our work and teachers. We crossed the paths of other students in their daily routines 
who, though unknown to us, became familiar through this repeated patterned weaving of our 
steps. We chatted with erstwhile strangers whose lockers adjoined ours. We laughed together 
at the same classroom incidents. We were vexed or pleased at the same problems. And our shy- 
ness gave way to the feeling that we were as important a part of Lowell as those older students 
who seemed so well versed In the complexities o' high school life. 

Our school patriotism was aroused at rallies. We cheered our football team on to victory or sor- 
rowed in its defeat. Our first feeling of belonging came when the upper classmen entertained us 
at a Freshman Reception. They told us of the work of the service societies. We were urged to 
investigate and join the numerous clubs organized around the special enthusiasms of students. 
And we were encouraged to harmonize physical activities with the intellectual, to make sports as 
invigorating a part of our lives as books. 

Grand climax to the first term was our jubilant return to our own Lowell building where the re- 
mainder of our history was to be enacted. In our own building, with a full day's schedule, we 
found more opportunity to make the friendships which have accompanied us through these four 
years. There was something about being in our own building that brought us closer together 
and developed a pride In the school. 

Patient, sympathetic, and helpful in guiding us through our first timorous year were Mr. Stephens, 
our vice-principals, our faculty, and the upper classmen. 

In the Old World, Japan and China had renewed hostilities. Our one year at Lowell had given 
us some conception of this spread of international strife in the world. We returned to Lowell as 
sophomores. 

At the beginning of this year we made many new friendships among the Junior High School grad- 
uates who supplemented our numbers. With these new friends we formed the complete class of 
June 1939. First opportunity to help our fellow students came when we could serve them in the 
library, the offices, the cafeteria, and all of Lowell's other student-staffed activities. The Cali- 
fornia Scholarship Federation welcomed many of us. Proudly we saw a large number of the boys 
in our class earn membership in the Block L Society. And with equal pride we found that a ma- 
jority of the girls helped to constitute the largest Girls' Athletic Association in the city. 

At the end of our second year we felt ourselves well established as Lowellltes. 



30 



CLASS HISIORy 

Again, in our third year, we were faced with aspects of international conflict. Our sympathetic 
Interest was kindled by the news of civil strife in Spain. It was during our Junior Year that we 
achieved the independence for which we had been striving. 

As upper classmen we no longer needed to follow the courses prescribed for us. We now con- 
trolled the conditions under which we existed. Demonstrating our training in competence we se- 
lected carefully our subjects and arranged our programs. And we chose wisely our class officers, 
who, with the help of the dance committee, presented the Low Junior Dance, our first big social 
occasion. 

An increasingly important part of the affairs of the school was taken by members of our class. 
Some were selected from membership in the service societies because their group responsibility had 
been proved efficient. Talented members of the class represented the school in debates, enter- 
tained the student body in plays, or formed the staffs of the "Lowell" and the "Red and White." 
We were delighted by the promise that some of our students were demonstrating in musical and 
artistic fields. 

As a result of our activities outside of courses, there was borne to us the first realization of the 
necessity of preparing ourselves for the world outside of Lowell. Many of us became conscious 
of the needs for grades and courses of study that would conform with college requirements. 

Then while the smaller nations of Central Europe were threatened with loss of the personalliberty 
and political freedom that it is our heritage to enjoy, we reached our Senior Year. Foremost in 
our minds were serious thoughts of what the furure might hold. 

As Seniors we were swept up by the current of final Lowell activities — taking of pictures, collection 
of dues, and preparation for graduation and Senior Ball. 

Sorely needed, vigorously championed, and enthusiastically received, the boys' new gymnasium 
was completed during this term. And the Board of Education rewarded the efforts of the school, 
the girls, and their parents with promise of provision for the equally necessary girls' gymnasium. 
While the girls of our class will not be able to enjoy a modern gymnasium, we are glad that those 
who follow us will benefit from adequate facilities which both the boys and girls of this class 
helped to achieve. 

Our four year record of athletic triumphs and academic honors added many trophies to Lowell's 
enviable collection. Our class has initiated a special souvenir edition of our school paper, in which 
Lowell's history and tradition are recorded. 

Along with the other responsibilities of our Senior Year came leadership in student body affairs. 
Our turn came to receive, set at their ease, and guide the Freshmen and newcomers. 

Now, closing our fourth year, we, grown older, have become more aware of the international strife 
and domestic problems that surround us. From our more mature courses in our Senior Year we have 
been made cognizant of these tensions and discords. We also realize more fully the responsi- 
bility that we must soon share in the affairs of the world. 

Our Lowell hiigh School preparation has been of a constructive nature. The significance of this 
world unrest, of these destructive forces at work outside our own small sphere has been revealed 
to us. 

We appreciate that our part in the activities of the future may be only a small one. Yet, if we 
can employ the constructive viewpoints that we have been trained to use at Lowell, those of 
health, growth, and progress, in contributing to the security of our country In the coming years, 
we will have justified the Investment that San Francisco and society have made in our education. 
We will give a good account of ourselves in the future. 

YVONNE CYR 



31 



LOWELL HIGH SCHOOL 
June 13, 1939 
Dear Alumnus: 

You wanted to know what the class of June 1939 was doing when not in classes; so I scouted around 
madly with my chalk and blackboard to get you the information, and here it is. 

I began my tour at North Beach, where TERRY KILPATRICK and TOM McCARTY have a spa- 
ghetti factory, and found GORDON KENNY, using his voice to advantage, calling "Fresh fish today"; 
also saw CLARK GRANT with Elaine Stevens admiring the "view" from Telegraph Hill. Borrowing their 
opera glasses, I espied BOB BACIGALUPI enthusiastically hooking goldfish in the bay. Then, in hot 
pursuit of graduates, your reporter went over to Land's End, where she discovered, of all people, HAR- 
MON BONTE showing BOB DAWSON flying to Hawaii on the Clipper to Fran Hubbard. I went to the 
beach, having felt the urge for a hot dog, but was distracted by diver DOTTY FRANKLIN cavorting near 
Seal Rocks, and by twin bathing beauties BETTY LOU and NELLIE-JO SMITH, to say nothing of IDA 
ZAMMITT fishing for a rubber-toothed shark! GRACE GOMPERTS, I saw out at the Zoo. She's act- 
ing as proprietress now, and told me that she saw Rookie CLIFF WILEY at the Presidio swabbing out 
guns. DOTTIE LIBBY, taking a constitutional in the Park, helped me carry my blackboard, but I had to 
take it back to write about mighty muscle man STAN BERNHARD rowing around Strawberry Hill on 
Stow Lake, AL PETERS working on calm days blowing the windmill sails around, and guards in the de 
Young Museum PAT DOOLING and JIM MACIEL, resplendent in their uniforms. DON KORTICK and 
RUTH LERER, you won't be surprised to hear, were discovered on Twin Peaks, but they gave me a lift 
into town, detouring around via Ingleside, where BOB ZAMLOCK was shooting an 85 (on the first 
hole!), and also around by Yacht Harbor where BOB ELLIOTT and FLOYD SMITH were discussing the 
relative merits of two brands of brass polish for yacht and ship fixtures. Having said "hello" at the 
City Hall to DON MINKLER, mayor-for-a-day, I meandered into a nearby office building, and there, 
working hard, were executive JACK COONEY and secretary PAT LANG. "Inspiration." I suddenly 
shouted, and grabbing a spy-glass, from the top floor of the building I had a clear view to Tanforan, 
seeing horse-lover HELEN CONLISK rooting for jockey BILL HARRISON. 

The Fair seemed fraught with possibilities of news-getting, so hastily donning my spring-shus, I 
hopped to the Embarcadero, and I was really amazed to see NEAL REGIN in jeans and shirt-sleeves as 
a dock-worker, but not so unexpected was the sight of GERTRUDE FERRIS and GARRY TODD who, 
excitedly watching the movies, were out for an afternoon's entertainment. Leaving them, I dashed to 
make the ferry, and found JEAN ARNOLD and YVONNE CYR having their palms read. While chatting 
together, we happened to look up, and there on the Bay Bridge above us was DON DAVIS taking 
tickets on the train. Suddenly, "Ahoy, there," we heard, and in the crow's nest of a huge battleship was 
DICK CALLAGHAN, now Admiral. The Exposition certainly lived up to my expectations, for at once 
I perceived, sitting in the shade of the Tower of the Sun, exhausted, were PETE DELOS and JOE MAR- 
RON. I sympathized with them, leaving a bottle of liniment, and went into the Foods Building, where 
"TUBBY" LUCY dashed by with a handful of fudge and Aplets. In "Vacationland" I came across 
SOPHIE GORTER and GAVIN HIGH arguing over the best place for a vacation; BOB MOLINARI, 
now an eminent geologist, exhibiting a "gold" nugget (formula FeS2!) In the Machines and Mines Build- 
ing: MARSHALL TAFT lecturing in the Science Building; SHIRLEY JOY and EDITH McFARLAND 
studying Botticelli in the Arts Building; and CLAIRE RIDGWAY exploring again the roads of old China 
in the Chinese Village. Along the Gayway, the roller coaster came shooting down, bearing with It, 
yelling lustily, RITA RILOVICH, ROSEMARY WHERRY, and BEVERLEE TOBIN. MARION LEARY, 
LORETTE NORTH and MARY ANN WALKER had just arrived, and were in the parking lot debating 
whether to go to the Gayway or the Folles Bergere, but I left them before they set+leci the question. 
In the airplane hangar BETSEY PANTON was picking out the fastest plane to Berkeley, so I joined her, 
landing at the Berkeley Yacht Harbor, where FRED SANDROCK and BRUCE BONNER were rowing 
a heated race. Just then the Campanile chimes rang out to the tune of "The Bells of St. Mary's" to 
much booing from the U. C. students, while accompanying the chimes, HUGH HOUSTON. CARL 
SJOLUND, PRISCILLA FINLEY, and JEANNE GILLIN formed a quartet. In the U. C. Stadium I found 
gladiators ED EPTING and CHASE GREGORY fighting a fearful and bloody duel with feathers, and 
speed demon JOHNNY MEIER, In the midget auto races, tearing around the track, with BERNARD 
RIORDAN as chief bandager. 

There, dear Alumnus, is the story of the doings of our busy graduating class, all of whom took 
"time out" to say hello to you. 

Very sincerely yours, 

TERESA "TAE" GUILFOIL. 

P.S. — I went back to Lowell the other day and there was poor FRANK LAYCOCK still plugging 
away at Latin I!! Tae. 



32 




sfoiOR PLflyGfiouno 



33 




L 



Dance Committee 

Second Row — Hale. Lucia, Hall, Hunter, Garcia. Pint Row 
— Goldman, Brunton. Wollman, Larrieu. Schwerln. 

Room Representatives 

Second Row — Chandler, Lucia. Peters, Campbell. First Row 
— YaHee, Thomas, Lann, Schwerin. 



LOW SENIOR CLASS OFFICERS, Glenn Wollman, President; Barbara Bammann, 
Vice-President; Albert Garcia, Secretary, aided a capable dance connnalttee to choose 
an attractive class pin and a class sweater and present the highly successful L4 dance. 
The "Gay Nineties" was the thenne of the class dance, held on May 5. 

Jannes Campbell was Cafeteria Manager. The Scroll and L claimed Campbell, Cerf, 
Clifford, Joslyn, Milton, Moore and Wollman; the Shield and L, Barbara Don, Marianne 
Goldman, Jean Levinson, and Betty Larrieu. William Adams presided over the Chem- 
istry Club. "Red and White" workers were Jean Levinson and Elena Thomas; Clare Bush, 
Edward Jellins, Joan Scheyer, and Allen Wong were on the art staff. Robert Rockwell, 
Jean Cohen and Phyllis Roos wrote for the "Lowell." Leading debaters were Hans Beetz, 
Barbara Don, Frank Gillio and Jean Levinson. Earl Anderson, Jean Levinson, Jack Lynch 
and Vera Sedloff acted. The R.O.T.C. commissioned Anderson, Brooks, Griffin, Mason, 
Miralda and Prugh. Tibbs and Yuen sang in the Boys' Glee; Patricia Thomas, President; 
Irene Old, Shirley Rouse, Lorraine Thomas, and Gloria Yaffee, in Girls' Glee. Carol 
Christian was girls' yell leader and managed golf. Betty Larrieu managed ice-skating. 

Cerf, Ericcson, Joslyn and Thurm were basketball stars. Garcia, Havey and Kranich 
played baseball. Conradi and Palmer made first boat In crew. Brown, Hale, Havey and 
Manning played golf. Gllkey, Hall, Hunter and Lowe were swimmers. Good captained 
track; Foff. tennis. 



34 




Room Representatives 

Second Row — Malone, Smithson. Sullivan, Reyburn. Kellar. First 
Row — Burson. Glafkides, Neustadt. Falen, Sweeney, Garry. 

Donee Committee 

Second Row — Niello, Clark, Council, Buttlmer, Reyburn. Fint 

/?ow— White, Visalli. Hubbard, Stoffers, Sutherland, Kellar. 

Buchholz, Andersen. 



THE CLASS OF JUNE 1940 was capably led by President Bruce Sutherland, Vice- 
President Betty Stoffers, and Secretary Eugene Clark. Together with the dance com- 
mittee they arranged the successful March 31st term dance, "Spring Fever Frolic." 

Members of the Scroll and L were Clark, Curley, Dallmar and Ross; Shield and L, Bobby 
Harter, Betty Stoffers, and Sheila Yelland. This class boasted four of the five yell leaders, 
Curley, head; Mitchell, and Reyburn, assistants; Pearl Steiner, girls' assistant. 

"The Red and White" claimed Myra Buchholz, Inga Friedman, Joseph Mitchell, Claire 
Moody, Caxton Rhodes, Bruce Sutherland; the Art Staff, Nancy Anderson, Anna June 
Crook, Peggy Warde. "The Lowell" Staff includes Katinka Gallin, and Roberta Falen. 
President of the Contract Bridge Club was Constance Knoph. Debaters were Frances 
Hubbard, Barbara McRae, Marion Neustadt, and Pearl Steiner; thespians, Joseph Cul- 
len, Richard Davis, William Garry, Betty and Lois Longland, Betty Peterson. O'Sullivan 
was R.O.T.C. Major; Aronsen, De Fremery, Forbes, Garry, Harding, Koser, Rubke. 
Smithson and Whitesides, Lieutenants. 

Dallmar starred in Varsity basketball and baseball. Basketball I 30 pounders were Owen, 
Ray, and Swift. Members of the unlimited crew were Culver and McGinn; lightweight, 
Reyburn, Roy Smith, and Sutherland. Lightweight track captains were Ellis and Fry. 
Bobby Harter, Marion Shook, Betty Stoffers were G.A.A. leaders. 

Such unusual leadership predicts well for next year's seniors. 



35 




WILLIAM CHANDLER 
President 



AGNES JONES 
VicfPreiident 



CARL RAAKA 
Sacretdry 



L 

JUOIOfiS 




'> 







Room Representatives 

Second Row — Bait. Sonnenberg. Stahmer. Myeri. Firii Row — 
Thompson, Hayward, Gorman, Morris. Mouradian. 

Dance Committee 

Second Row — Kepon, Raaka, Sonnenberg, Hartford. Hevman, 
Robins. First Row — Kasper, Krase. Chandler. Jones. Decl[man. 



Class Pres. Bill Chandler dances with 

Vice-Pres. Agnes Jones at the "Sweet 

Shop ShuHle." 



RECEIVING THE DISTINGUISHED title of upperclassmen for the first time, the Low-3 class elected as its first 
class officers, William Chandler, president: Agnes Jones, vice-president, and Car! Raaka, secretary. These three 
capably aided the dance committee to make successful their first class dance, the unique "Sweet Shop Shuffle," 
held February 24. 

The Low-3's participated in all activities. "Red and White" workers were Pauline DeCarlo, Alvln Heyman, Carl 

Raaka: on the special art staff were Helen Lechleiter, 
Peggy May and Theima Selix. The "Lowell" claimed Mar- 
jorie Wilson. Dramatics captured the interest of Warren 
Mohr and Frank Quinn, prominent in "The Fortune Hunt- 
er." Wyona Lindner was president of the German Club, 
Bertram Larson, of the Hi-Y. Sonia Hayward sang in the 
Triple Trio. William Bush and William Flexsenhar were both 
R.O.T.C. Second Lieutenants. 

Edward Goldstein and Carl Raaka played in 130-lb. bas- 
ketball, Wayne Marsh, Unlimited. In crew were Peter Ke- 
pon, Alexander Vladmiroff and Hans Wiedenhofer. Donald 
Beanston, Donald Grannis, and Alvin Heyman went out for 
swimming: Bertram Hartford for golf. A large number of 
Low Junior girls were members of the G.A.A. 

Though it is early to predict, the fine students of the 
Low-3 class have all the earmarks of being one of Lowell's 
finest classes. 




36 



Newcomers capture Lowell spirit 
at their first dance. 




Scroll boys demonstrate the new- 
est dance with such pretty "girls" 
as Jack Cooney, Bill Joslyn and 
Bob Bacigalupi. Their partners are 
Jim Moore. Bill Harrison and 
Sid Smith. - 



Cliff Wiley and Eddie Cerf 

show Freshman girls how 

we dance at Lowell. 



Jean Levinson, the wicked queen, plots 

to kill Teresa Guilfoil, as ' 

"Snow White." 



LOUJffi CLflSSHlfO... 

FRESHMEN AND SOPHOMORES were welcomed to Lowell at the Newcomers' Reception on 
February I Among the entertainment presented were skits by the Scroll and L and Shield and L 
teaturing Snow Wh.te and the Seven Dwarfs," a ballet by the basketball team, selections from 
both folee Clubs, and music from the orchestra. Jack Menary, representing a medicine man In- 
troduced the various acts. 1 The Lower Classmen have not been idle this term, as Is shown In 
their participation in many of Lowell's activities. Many joined clubs, with Jerry Kilty president of 
the Music Club, Robert Knox, president of the General Science Club, Nlel Lansing, president of 
the Chess Club Pierre Salinger, president of the Stamp Club, and Geraldine Stowell, president 
ot the Figure Skating Club. A large number joined the library staff, "j The California Scholarship 
t-ederation had many Lower Classmen members. Nineteen made fifty points or over The three 
who had sixty were Clifford Clemo, Marion De Berry, and Leo Talkov. 1 Sports interested many 
both boys and girls. Basketball claimed the attention of Mac Ashton, Leo Doyle Edward Eassa 
Robert Troppmann, and Frank Wlgmore, who were among the I 30's, while on the Unllmlteds were 
Robert Arnold, Ka| Blomqulst, Robert Cherry, and Edward Russell. Lower Classmen have shown 
ttiat their Lowell spirit will make them even more conspicuous before they graduate. 

Lower Class Room Representatives 

Kit5f.n?.''n"'"['^l!'.'^7"fc- '*»'^^''' °'c"°' Ii''='°"' »'^"""- ''"'*''■ ^•l"'"». Edwards. Nackard, Wlqmor. Crowder 

rll^ln ^ '-'V'l.-m' '"■ ?""%": S«°"<' Ro'-Pe'eriO". Lackman. L«. Brown. Wise, Coffey Centurion Hel.berq 

Gowell, Sproul, M.lhqan. Lee, Thompson, Goto, Rose. Fir,, /?ow-Houstoun. Farb. Files Solomon. William's Housfon' 

LoBianco. Wiqle. Johnson, Austin, Thompson, Righatti, Moyse, Tracy, Reeves, Case. 




4^' 




>«^ 




Chapter 



fl eeifo By oey-fl Jia ey fiii 

I HE Exposition's four hundred acres cover an area more than a mile in length 
and more than two-thirds of a mile in width. Nearly four million dollars of 
WPA money and a fleet of army dredges joined to make this huge island by 
scooping sand from the bay and placing it on the Verba Buena shoals. Cali- 
fornia displays its beautiful flowers; hyacinths, violas, fruit blossoms of early 
spring are succeeded by rhododendrons, roses, eschscholtzias, chrysanthemums, 
as the seasons advance, with the splendor of mesembryanthemums in the 
Magic Carpet and the buxom confidence of the cabbages gladdening all the 
year. Truly, the Fair is a garden land of beauty. At night the boulevards of 
flowers give way to the mystery and gayety of multi-colored lights which can 
be seen from all the surrounding cities and which make the Island seem like a 
fantasy too beautiful to be real. 




39 



Turning to OUR ORGANIZATIONS 



Robart Bacigdiupi 


Jdmas CampbttI 


Edgar Carf 


Eugsn* Clark 


Douglai CIIHord 


Jack Cooney 


Robert Curley 


Howard Ddllmdr 


Robvrt Elliot 


Clark Grant 


William Harrison 


William Jotlyn 


Gordon Kenny 


Raymond Milton 


Donald Minkltr 


Jdm«» Moore 


William Rosi 


Sidney Smith 


CliHord Wiley 


David WiUon 


Glenn Wollman 




YELL LEADERS' COMMITTEE 
CIdrk, Curley, Minkler 

BANNER AND GAMES COMMITTEE 
Wollman, Harriion, Todd 



AUDITORIUM COMMITTEE 
Conlilk, Elliott, Harrison, CliHord, Yelland, Libby 

COURT AND GARDEN COMMITTEE 

Second Row — Wiley, Smith. First Row — Pinley, 

Levinson, Goldman, Knoph. 



FLAG COMMITTEE 
Wilton, Cooney 

REFRESHMENT COMMITTEE 
Bacigalupi. Harriion, Elliott 



GERALD TODD, President of the Scroll and L, and the other members 
of this society have carried out their school activities with great success. 
The twenty-two boys have helped in rally preparations and have made 
their term's Freshman Reception a never-to-be-forgotten event. 

SCROLL 11 II D L 






GERALD TODD 
Preiident 



•40 




S H I U D fl n D L 

THE TWENTY-TWO GIRLS selected to be members of the Shield and L 
because of their outstanding work in Lowell showed their ability to serve Lowell 
by carrying out many activities well this term. Gertrude Ferris, their president, 
aided the girls in presenting two plays for the Newcomers. 



GERTRUDE FERRIS 






President 






LITTLE SISTERS COMMITTEE 


POSTER COMMITTEE 
Clifford, Ross, Moore 


CARDSTUNTS COMMITTEE 


Smith, Don, C/r, Guilfoil 

CLEANUP COMMITTEE 

Smith, Wiley, Kenny 


RALLY COMMITTEE 

Second Row — Kenny, Todd. Harrison. Grant. Fint 

Row — Eerris, GornDerts. Gorter, Franklin. 


Minkler, Bacigalupi, Moore 

P. T. A. COMMITTEE 

Callow, Bailey, Schlamr 




Myla Bdilev 


Marylee Callow 


Helen Conlisk 


Yvonne Cyr 


Barbara Don 


Priscilla FinUy 


Dorothia Franklin 


Marianne Goldman 


Grace Gomperts 


Sophie Gorter 


Teresa Guilfoil 


Bobby Harter 


Shirley Joy 


Ruth Knoph 


Betty Larrieu 


Jean Levinson 


Dorothy Llbby 


Elsa Schlamm 


Janet Smith 


Betty Stoffers 


Sheila Yelland 



41 




Traffic Squad 

Second Row — Cassidy, MacKinnon, Lucy, Tibbs. Council. Woodfield, Meier, Curley, Sllversteln, Kraclce, Hale, Wilson. 
First Row — Made), Cain, Good, Harrison, Dooling, Zamloch. Williams, Mendelson, Cooney, Peters. Ellis, Zapanta, 

Chigris. Mr. Walsh. 

Boys' Block L Society 

Fourth Row — Heyman. Silverstlen, Barkley, Owen, Jellins, Levy, Mastensen, Thurm, Lucy, McKinnon, Ericsson, Ellis, 
Sjolund, Woodfield. Hardesty, Eassa, Mendelson, Curley. Meier, Hale, Campbell. Third Row — Scheldt, Williams, 
Tibbi, Cassidy, Council, Burmelster, Brose, Kracke. Hoffman, Thompson, Selchau, Shinkai, Horita, Katase, Gravem, 
Good, Larson. DeMartini. Second Row — Mr. Neff, Lowe, Zapanta, Lim, Kil pa trick, Beaver, McDonough. DeVrtes, 
Marron. Rhodes, Marcus, Elliott, Weinshank, Hall, Beanston, Gilkey, Grannis, Livingston, Ferris. First Row — Mr. Mon- 
roe Masten, Raaka, Marsh, Smith, Dooling, Maciel, Zamlock. Gregory, Manning, Chigris, Harless, Peters, Todd. 
Joslyn. Ross. Keller. Cainell. Fukui. Mr. Walsh. 



PETER DELOS 

President 
Boyi' Block L 



BOyS' BLOCK L SOCifiy 

THE BOYS' BLOCK L SOCIETY accomplished another fine term of service to Lowell. 
Much credit is due to Its officers: Peter Delos, president; James Honnert, vice-president, 
and William Joslyn, secretary. The Block L was under the supervision of Mr. Monroe, 
Dean of Boys, with Mr. Walsh and Mr. Neff acting as advisers. The 150 members acted 
as big brothers to the new students, prepared the court for rallies, and kept order at 
the basketball games. The first annual joint Boys' and Girls' Block L dance, held on 
March 16, was a huge success. 

The traffic squad, under the direction of Mr. Walsh and Captain Samuel Mendelson, 
rendered another valuable service to Lowell. Besides doing their regular duty of assist- 
ing students to cross streets in safety they took part in a statewide competition held at 
the Fair Grounds on May 17. The winning units cannot be published as this article goes 
to press, but the 32 members of the squad stand a good chance of receiving recognition. 



42 



<vr 



\ 







•fiu^;^ 



-k ^ 








f^ O <^ n 



A' 



\c:«*M 




NK LAYCOCK 
> sident, C.S.F. 



Freshmen and Sophomores 



Third Ro"-— Lackmann, Hunt. Waechtler, Clemo. Kilty. Applegarth. Zcile, Arnold. Smith. Myers. Scheldt. Divito. 
OConnell. Kno«. Second Row— Brouillet. PInger. Kingston. Warblane, Stimson. MacDonald. LIbby. Vukasovlchi 
Coftey. Sail. Rosenblatt, Sullivan. DeMartlni. Granichcr. Robinson. Morse. Witike. Oiaki. Pint Row— Yew. Coulam] 
Granucci. Lagarlo. Smith, Hanley. Katten. Salinger. Gross, R.. Gross. E.. Johnson. Neal. Elliott. Wise. Walmough] 

DeBerry, Job. Day. Sears, Wigle, Dewey. 

Juniors and Seniors 

Fourth Row — Stafford, Jenkins. Anderson. Unna. Wolf, Watanabe. Levin. Tong. Jang. Lambert, Lowe Sakai, Kiyasu, 
Murai. Third Row — Sauer. Cyr. Scherer. Smith. Knoph, McFarland. Cornet. Fitzpatrick. Foster, Manuel'. Lewis', 
Dawson. Gallin, Davis. White. Schnittger. Essmann. Thompson, Schwariinbek. Second Row — Thomas. O'SullivanI 
Walter, Conn. Kiyasu, Abe, Wagner. Lindner. Rennick, Jordan, Rosevear. Work, White. Hill. Lee. Chin. Hunter'. 
Rods. Bustamante. Fir%t Row— Weed. North. Leary. Van der Wal. Cooley, Hubbard. Miller. Hauck. Taylor. Cal- 
lander. Swearlngen. Christian. Laycock. Cummings. Surtees. Finley, Nell, Bittles, Bickel, Davis. 



SCHOLARSHIP ffDfRflllOO 

THE LOWELL CHAPTER of the California Scholarship Federaflon continued its helpful work this 
term with a membership of a little over one hundred and seventy students. Elected for the presi- 
dency was Frank Laycock. Carol Christian was the vice-president and Marie Cummings, for the 
second time, was elected secretary. 1 Some of the meetings were held on Treasure Island. At the 
regional meeting of February 7, Alameda was the host chapter of the semi-annual event. Future 
plans for more meetings at the Fair site sometime in April are well under way. 1 Of all the com- 
mittees in the C. S. F., probably the one most important is the Coaching Committee. There are 
eight supervisors, who are: Barbara Bammann, Selma Cornet, Dorothy Fitzpatrick, Marion Leary, 
Martha Scherer, Jean Schwarzenbek, Irene Weed, and Patricia Worrell. They are in charge of a 
number of coaches who meet daily in room 142. Their purpose is to help those students who need 
help in such difficult subjects as algebra, geometry, Latin, and French. Students who volunteer 
for coaching duty deserve much praise, for they give up their study period to do this work, f The 
other committees consist of membership, headed by Marlon Neustadt, program; Earl Anderson, 
and Barbara Bammann in charge of the dance committee. ^ An invitation to present to the honor 
students of Presentation Academy the scholarship pins March I, was accepted. Lowell repre- 
sentatives were President Frank Laycock, Vice-President Carol Christian, and Secretary Marie 
Cummings. 1 The C.S.F. has rendered fine service to Lowell and it is a society to which members 
should feel honored to be elected. 



43 



PflfifnT-TfflCHfli flSSOCIflllOfI 



THE LOWELL PARENT-TEACHER ASSOCIATION is an essential and important part 
of the school. It strives to educate the public in regard to the physical needs of the 
school. It also helps students to complete their education through scholarships and other 
methods of student aid. It contributes from time to time to such projects for the benefit 
of the student body in general as are necessary and cannot be cared for in any other 
way. 

In addition to helping the students, the P.-T.A. has been interested for some years in the 
school library. A sum of money has been set aside, known as the Library Fund, from which 
the Librarian draws at her discretion for such books as she feels are needed from time 
to time. When the Library Fund grows too low, it is replenished from the treasury of the 
P.-T.A. 

This year the P.-T.A. has co-operated with Mr. Stephens in bringing to the attention of 
the proper authorities the need for better lighting in the school. A great many rooms in 
the building have been much improved as a result of this campaign. The completion and 
opening of the Boys' Gymnasium was an occasion of rejoicing to the P.-T.A. members, 
for it was only because of several years of constant effort that this building was finally 
achieved. Now a new Girls' Gymnasium has been promised. The P.-T.A. hopes that 
1940 will see the culmination of its efforts to secure this building for the Lowell girls. 

The Lowell P.-T.A. is proud of the fact that for the past five years it has had the largest 
membership of any unit in Second District (San Francisco). This shows how vitally the 
parents of Lowell students are interested in the welfare of the school. 

The business of the P.-T.A. for the year 1938-1939 has been in the capable hands of the 
following officers: President, Mrs. M. McMillan; Honorary Vice-President, Mr. Leroy 
Stephens; First Vice-President, Mrs. Ward Royal; Second Vice-President, Mrs. M. R. 
Knoph; Treasurer, Mrs. Wm. Hunter; Financial Secretary, Mrs. W. A. Cyr; Recording 
Secretary, Mrs. J. W. Farnow, Jr.; Auditor, Mrs. R. H. Carscadden; Historian, Mrs. 
W. H. Sawtelle; Parliamentarian, Mrs. George Beanston, Jr. 



^4 



1 






r ' o> ^ o'f"V"f f « ^ 




R.O.T.C. Bond 

Second Row — May, Ginther. Walker, Mieike, Gibion, Keller, Graves, Kendall, Beaton, Farrell, Shaw. First Row — Edgar, 
Auyong. Mihailoff, Wanderer, Lowen, Rubke, Smithson, Aaronson, Shanks, Aaronson. Rustic!, Hansen. 

Rifle Team 

MacFarlane, Bush, Dunne, Root, Truby. Fint Row — Forbes. deFremery Portltio, 
Rahlmann, Yamamoto, Shanks, Flensenhar. 



Second Row — Sauer, Whitesides, 



R. 0. I. C. 





LT. COLONEL WILEY 
Battalion Commander 



CAPT. H. J. FLEXSENHAR 
Veteran R.O.T.C. Instructor 






MAJOR O SULLIVAN 



LOWELL'S R.O.T.C. BATTALION, under the command of Captain H. J. Flexsenhar and Lieu- 
tenant Colonel Clifford J. Wiley, student commander, made a great deal of progress this term. 
The battalion parades were on Wednesday of every week. This term over 200 members were di- 
vided into three companies: Company A, under Capt. Marshall Taft; Company B, under Capt. 
Roland Chiselli; Company C, under Capt. Forrest Cobb. Heading the Saber Club was Roland 
Ghiselli. Presiding over the Officers' and Sergeants' Club was Lieut. Col. Clifford Wiley. The 
marching head of the band was Jack Rubke. Allen Smithson was the musical director. High point 
man on the Rifle Team was William Flexsenhar. 

High-lighting the term was the Federal Inspection in May. The winning unit cannot be published 
as this article goes to press. However, it looks as if Lowell stands a good chance of receiving 
Honor School rating. 

The R.O.T.C. entered into other competitions: The Exposition Fiesta Parade held February 14 on 
Market Street, the Memorial Day Parade on Lombard Street, and the annual high school compe- 
tition in May at the Civic Auditorium. 

The Lowell R.O.T.C. Battalion was awarded two first places at the Annual Competition. Allen 
Smithson was awarded the drum major's medal and Arthur Aaronson the platoon leader's saber. 
The annual R.O.T.C. banquet at the end of the semester was a great success. 

45 




Headquarters and Color Guard 

Andarton, Callaghdn, W!l«y, O'Sullivdn, High, Frdnklln, Grauerholz, Flemcnhdr. Prugh, Rdhlmann, Murphy. Handarion. 

Saber Club 

Second /?ow— Forbet. Brooks, Koser. Buth, Griffin, Garry, Harding. Sauar. Sfrithion, Whitaiidoj, Walch, Fla«»anhar. Firtt Row— Miralda, 
Barvan, Prugh, Ghisalli, Taft, Callaghan, Wilay, O'Sullivan, H!gh, Cobb, Andarson, Aaronion, daFramary, Mason. 

Officers and Sergeants 

Third Wow— Walkar, Gunthcrp, Crowall, Mahonay, Stafford. Quinn, Barr, Dudlay, Davii, Callahan. Salfridga, Pohlmann, Root. Chan. 
O'Connall, Schuli. Saco/id ffow— Griffin, Flaitanhar, Whitaiidai, Buih, Sauar. Forbat, Brooki, Walch, Kotar, Smithton, Rahlmann, Grauar- 
holi, Franklin, Handarion, Yamamoto, Murphy. Flrit Row — Aaronton, Prugh, Miralda. Barvan. daFramary, TafI, Ghiialli, Wilay. O'Sullivan. 

Callaghan. High, Cobb, Maton, Andarton, Garry. 



46 




t. Adjutant Cdllaghdn 
Lt. Aaronson 



Lt. Anderson 



Capt. Cobb 
Lt. Berven 



Capt. Ghiselli 
Lt. Snf>ithson 



Capt. High 
Lt. Griffin 



Capt. Taft 
Lt. Koser 



Company A 

Fourth Row — Green, Scott, Kritsky. Evans, Bruch, Ward. Knoi. Gamba, Takai. Third Row — Conway, McGuire, Gee. McLaughlin. Clarvoo. 
Guthrie, Anderson, Smith. Huiter, B. Conway, Blum, Frank, Rose. Williams, Lansing. Second Row — O'Neill. Barreto. Edwards, Dunne, Mc- 
Knew, Savage, Mieike, Schmidt, Vaurs, Lindstrom Haase, Blankenship, Appel, Seartes. Eckart. fint Row — Gray, Lindauer, Roush, Giltio, 
Yamamato, Harding, Aaronson, GhiselU, Pennel, Mlralda, Griften, Anderson, Selfridge, Sagehorn, Pohlmann. 

Company B 

fourth Row — Grove, Garcia, Harris, McMillen, Eloesser, Gindrat, Haney. Fay. Shije. Third Row — Conway, Truby, O'Brien, Gorman, Scheidt, 
Backes, Rohde, Gibson, Chan, McClure, Cole, Miyahara, Daniloff, Waechtler. Second Row — Calhan, Gille, Weidler, Portillo. Dormody. 
Warnke, Dudley, Ryan, Imbeck, Paltenghi, Cohelan, Abeles. Root, Rcssick. flnt Row — Ball. Ryan, Ipuinn, Stafford, Brooks, Bush, Berven, 

Cobb, Sauer, Whitesides, Mason, Lull, Callahan, Davis. 

Company C 

Third Row — Chinn, Peach, Leicester, Archbold, Melody. Gillespie, Muller, Fowler, Smathers, Schulz. Pierce. Speiier, Maiwell. Second Row 

— McDuffie, Whistler, Growell, MacFarfane. Mahoney, Selig, Walker. Brennan. Gonthorp, McFarland, Sommer, DeJarnett, O'Connell, Barr. 

First Row — Rembold, Hauser, Potter, Stahmer, Garry. deFremery, Taft, Koser, Forbes, Welch. Lineer, Campbell. Craig. Selene. 



47 



S M V I C f GROUPS 



Cafeteria Force 
Secon</ Row — F«rney, Cooper, Mihdiloff. Clifford, Cjmpbell, J. H<sll, Pcnnell, Thompson, Androvich, 8rew«r. firit 
Row — Otto, Gotdtworthy. Raid, Fcwier. Bdler. Ffldthtri, Prim, Huqhei, Schd«Her, Ldrrieu, Don, Thompion. Cdmp- 

br'l B Fn.^lo^ Kniph Hr^qirlnsnn Andorion, Gomperts. 




R ^ e <^i i^ ?t ? 1 




O O (^ (^ 



MISS HARRISONS OF- 
FICE. Second Pow— Bittl«i. 
M««ia. Krdte. Zimmtrmdn, 
Minkltfj Feteri, Kitchen. 
Conradi, Todd, Moore, E. 
Kitchen. Stevens, Schwerin, 
MdcDondld. Armstrona. 
Pint Row — Centurion, Mor. 
r!s, Bettencourt. Hynndn, 
Kdsper, Goldmdn, Miis 
Mdrrison, ftoien Meek, 
Hill, Pdnton. Scniemm. 
Bunton, Don, L«rri«u. 
Garry. 

MR. MONROES OFFICE 
Second Row — Scheuer, 
Stdfottin, Calender, Horn, 
Bonner, Maciel, Welnshank, 
White, Arnold. Harrison, 
Marsh, Smith Burmeitter. 
Chiqris, O'Brien, Johnston, 
Rennick. Wilson. First 
Row — Glos. Butcher. Irwin, 
Weisman, Noel. Herrinq- 
ton, Frdnklin, McFarldne. 
Jorgensen. Mr. Monroe, 
Conllsk. Goicovich, Stew- 
art. Miller. Sw«nson, Whit- 
more. Irwin, Coyle. 

LIBRARY STAFF. Second 
Row — Zelechow«r, Lang, 
Glafkides. Hutchins. 
Reeves. Rosevear, Drouil- 
Idrd, Salinger. Sipple, 
Boardman, Shook, Snell, 
Spivey. Kelly, Loyten, 
Smith, Cyr Griffin, Car- 
penter, Arkdtov, Coffee, 
Schwdrfz. f//jf Row — Lewit, 
Gdllin, Crook, Ames, Burt, 
Burke, Weinhold, McRae, 
King. Schaeffer. Moore. 
Demartini. Gomperts, Bow- 
man, Knoph Scherer. 
Thomas. Burke. Williams. 
Nelson, Hubbard. 

BOOKROOM. Seconrf 
Row — Ghiselli. Sockolov, 
Pohlmann. first Row— 
Mathews, Ridgway, 
Callow, Mr. Alger. 

MRS. MILLER'S OFFICE 
Second Row — Hughes, 
Goldiworthy, May, Helmi, 
Greenback. Flower. Ka- 
buskco. Glos. First Row— 
Felton, Ootkin, Baccei 
Mrs. Miller, Bartholomew, 
Jones, Oietterle. Faltln. 
O Shea. 



HALLGU/. r[.-. 

Second Row — Noel, Stranton. Selig. Sorensen, Crohare. 

first Row — Weed, Gutman, Krill, Stimson, Loysen, 

Bravinder. 



GIRLS REST ROO^' 
Carscadden, Bailey, Sullivan, Wise, Cummings (Chairman) 



LOST AND FOUND 

Watierileben, Drouillard, 

Shook. 



LOCKER 

Swearingen. Wilton. 



TAXI 

Gregory, Kracke. 



TICKET 
Marcus. Kracke. Silverstein, Peters, Weinshenk. 



48 



CLUBS 



CLUBS PLAYED THEIR usual Important part 
for hobby-minded Lowellites. New clubs were 
founded, while memberships in veteran organi- 
zations increased. 1 New and popular was the 
Figure Skating Club which, under the direction 
of Miss Chase, met at a local ice-rink weekly. 
■] Also new is the Contract Bridge Club, its 
sponsor being Mr. Dunn, who has been busy 
teaching the fine points of bridge. ^ The Music 
Club continued to be instructional as well as 
enjoyable. 1 A number of prominent outside 
speakers addressed the Psychology Club. 
1 Contests were held and many beautiful and 
original snapshots were submitted by the Cam- 
era enthusiasts. "[ Many interesting experi- 
ments, but no explosions, were performed at 
the Chemistry Club meetings. 1 The Stamp 
Club has succeeded in gathering its collection 
from all over the world. 1 Perhaps one of the 
most interesting, is the Radio Club. This group 
has some very fine equipment and hopes to 
have its own school station. ■[ The Chess Club 
has grown so rapidly that there are now three 
groups: beginners, intermediate, and ad- 
vanced, which compete in heated tournaments. 
1 The General Science Club specialized in the 
study of tropical fish and has added several 
novel species this term, f All in all, the Clubs 
have gained greatly in Importance at Lowell. 




WILLIAM ADAMS 

Chemistry 

RICHARD COHN 
Advanced Chess 

JOSEPH FRIEDMAN 
Psychology 

SONIE HAYWARD 
Spanish 

JEROME KILTY 
Music 



CONSTANCE KNOPH 
Contract Bridge 
ROBERT KNOX 
General Science 
NEIL LANSING 
Intermediate Chess 
BERT LARSON 
Hi-Y 

WYONA LINDNER 

German 

RICHARD RAFAEL 
Literary 



RICHARD RAFAEL 

Town Hall 
VICTOR RUNDLE 

Camera 

PIERRE SALINGER 

Stamp 

GERALDINE STOWELL 

Figure Skating 

MARSHALL TAFT 
Radio 

CLIFFORD TOOLEY 
Beginners' Chess 



49 




CLUBS 




« 



ft A 







■iKiAW. : J 



Advanced Chess 

Second /?ow — Pool, Cohn. Edwards. Neustadter. firtt 
Roif — Kdtten, Johnson, Goldman, Lobell. 



Music 

Second Ro*f — Blanch, Pohtmann, Kilty, Httxer, daRoza, Murray, ^'ftt 
Ro^ — Pellisoon, Gronberg, Strauss, Day, Hepper, Damele. 



Beginners' Chess 

Second Ro*" — daRoia, Divito, Clarvoe, Blum. Fini 

Row — Van Becker, Canfagni, Murray, Elsbach, 

Tooley. 



Science 

Second Row — Goldman, Knot, Clarvoe. Kuhleman. Edwards, Lake, Kageyama. 

First Row — Riss, Whitchurch. Giiin, Schwedhelm, Brouillet, Tracy, Loystn, 

Suzuki, Hipper, Kagel. 



Psychology 

Second Row — Kilty, Bik, Marron, Zelinsky, Siegel, Compton. First Row — Powell, 
Roitenstein, Friedman, Unger, Schwartz, Larson, Rippe. 



Figure Skating 

Second Row — Tully, Cook, Sharp, Lafitte. First Row — Mor* 
gan, Stowell, Regin, Lockhart. 



50 



CLUBS 




Camera Club 

Second Row— Rcdlnqer, Haase. Haber, Eckert, Walker, Lackmann. Fir%l Ro»— Schroth, 
Tafl, Rundte, Murphy. Smith. Galvin. 



Town Hall Club 

Second Row— Compton, Bil, WlUon. tint Row— Sutlon, 
Campbell, Anderson. Grant. Davii. 



German Club 

Second Row— Iredale. Pereyra. White. Wagner. C. Crosby, Holt. 

First Row- Roitenstein, Phillips, Lindner. Knose, Nell, Wilson, 

Wagner. E. 



Contract Bridge Club 

Second Row— Voion, Wallersteln, Cohn, Mr. Dunn, (?uinn. Watanabe. 

Fffit Row— Armstrong, Hutchins. Gantner, Knoph, Buenqer, 

Dunnelt, Kruger. 



Stamp Club 

Second Row— Lane. SIpple. Edwards. Kuhleman. Hewlett. Weiier, 

Grown. Finf Row— Von Becker. daRoza. Carfagni. Kritsky, 

Salinger, Lake. Borst. 



Fish, plants, yea, even mice, cannot escape the close 
scrutiny of the Science Club. 



Spanish Club 

Paccioretto, Sant. Haywood, Casey, Neil 



Radio Club 

O'Connell, Taft, Duane 



Bid or pass? A busy foursome of the 
new Contract Bridge Club. 



SI 




Chapter IV 

fl raSUfif HOUSf Of fXHIBlIS 



EXHIBITS OF THIRTY-FIVE nations, represenfing ail the major countries that 
border on the Pacific Ocean, and many of the continent of Europe, are now 
being shown on Treasure Island. Some of the more important ones represented 
are the Netherlands. East Indies, Brazil, French Indo-China. Johore, France, 
Norway, Argentina, Chile, Italy, New Zealand, Peru, Costa Rica, the Philip- 
pine Commonwealth, and Australia. The United States Government has a one 
and a half million dollar Federal building exhibit which is a panorama of United 
States history and government; it includes over seven acres of Federal exhibits. 
Many of the states also have wondrous exhibitions of their products. Two hun- 
dred and fifty of America's leading industries dramatize their products and 
services in vivid displays. There is also a history-making collection of fine arts, 
from those of Renaissance and modern Europe to the decorative arts of the 
Pacific Basin. 




53 



Turning to OUR ACTIVITIES 



S*cond Ho* — Yu«n. Mdttan, Kilty Buchan, Brdqg, Kohlar, Katttn. Lynch, Robartt, BUnch, Psdrln. 
firtt Row — Pullmdn, Gdrry, Tibbi, M»hn«r, Archbold, Bdckman, Houiton, K«nny, H«ti«r, Somm«ri, 

Smith, Wdrran, MJkdnni. 



■ I 



5L n t^ f^ j^, 




Left to Right— y/WWam Garry, 
Gordon Kenny, Jerome Kilty, 
John Mehner, William Tibbs, 
Foiter Yuen, Hugh Houston. 



B yS' GL£{ 



HUGH HOUSTON 
Presldant 



G«org« 

Sdckman 

The Double Quar> 
tet — dlwayi d 
',3vor!te with 
todiences. 



Auditorium 
rehedrsdis preced* 
Commencement 
singinq. 



I 



WITH MISS J. M. NEPPERT In charge, the Boys' Advanced Glee Club has had a very suc- 
cessful and busy semester. 1 The first occasion upon which the boys sang was for the New- 
comers' Reception. ^ Among their other activities was a radio broadcast early In February, 
when the Double Quartet entertained for the Parent-Teacher Association. ^ In April, they 
were Invited to sing at the International Exposition, and they plan to sing there again 
later this term. It is a tradition that at Commencement the Boys' Glee Club render several 
selections. ^The members of the Double Quartet are: Gordon Kenny and John Mehner, first 
tenors; William Tibbs and Foster Yuen, second tenors; William Garry and Jerry Kilty, bari- 
tones, and Hugh Houston and George Backman, bass. ^ The officers for the term were: presi- 
dent, Hugh Houston; vice-president, George Backman; secretary, Gordon Kenny, and Ray 
Blanch and William Tibbs. the two librarians. ^ An interesting fact about the Boys' Glee is 
that they specialize In A Capella singing. Instrumental accompaniment of any kind is very 
seldom used. ] The splendid work of the Boys' Glee, both in and out of Lowell, has helped 
to show the public what a fine music department this school has. 



I 



54 




Third Row — Hayes, Reld. Arnault, Rouie, Bcdll, Libby. Poynor. Karp, Radonovlch, Morgan. Hay- 
ward. Raeston, Sherriffj. Second Row — Durkin, Hendenon. McKendrIck, N«al. Prim, flenatar, 
Cartcadden, Erwtn, Finley, Old, Foster, Spivak, Winterbottom, Gould. Firit Row — Aleiander, 
Schmuck. NIemeyer, Steiner, Lewis, Mann. Thomas, Miss Alexander, Tedrow. Weisbaum, 
McGrath, Fain, Roberts, Yaffee. 

«. ^ -re « - n.^'^^ '^ ^ 1. R •f 



ft^^^.** ^.'^;^i^/'i '* f^ 



^£1 




-!^ir>%^->^-^':>>s^ 'V^^^ 



President 

PATRICIATHOMAS 

Priscilld Finley 

Stiirley Foster. 



A part of the 

triple trio in 

rehearsal. 



The girls attentively 

listening to the 

instructions of 

Miss Alexander. 




Left io right: Sonia Hayward 

Irene Old. Lee Poyner. Jun 

Roberts, Pearl Steiner. Lorram 

Thomas, Gloria Yaffee. 



UNDER THE LEADERSHIP of Miss H. J. Alexander, the Girls' advanced 
Glee Club took part in many enjoyable programs. 1 The term's activities 
opened with the Newcomers' Reception held in the auditorium, February 
1 . 1 Some of the Glee Club members went to Treasure Island to partici- 
pate in the special Lowell broadcast, not only by singing, but by humming 
accompaniment to the speakers. 1 The Parent-Teacher Association has 
been entertained by the Girls' advanced Glee Club and the Triple Trio, 
which is composed of nine girls: Shirley Foster, Lee Poyner. and June 
Roberts, first sopranos, Sonia Hayward, Lorraine Thomas, and Gloria 
Yaffee, second sopranos. Priscllla Finley, Irene Old, Pearl Steiner, altos, 
and Shirley Rouse, piano accompanist. ■[ They sang for the Daughters of the American Revolu- 
tion at the Fairmont Hotel in February, and will sing at Commencement, as they have always 
done. 1 The officers for the term were president, Patricia Thomas; vice-president, Priscilla Finley; 
secretary, Betty Roos; and librarian, Shirley Button. 1 This vocal group deserve much credit for the 
enjoyable entertainment they have given us. 




SHIRLEY ROUSE 
Accompanist. 



55 







Third /?ow— Beri^Ick. Leininger. Hansen, Gunfhorp, Peckham. Hdmersldg, HoHmdn. Duncan, B., Duncan, J., El kind, Glnther. Rohde. Tremure. 
Rogers. Second Wo**— Elliot. Case. Connelly, Wallar. Koche. Aaronson, C., Auyoung. May. McLaughlin. Dereberry. Gibson. Shanks. Geppert. Shilx. 
Shaw. Meusch. First Wow— Mihailoff, Lowen, Forbes, Wanderer. Peterson. Blum, Smithson, Miller. Sullivan, Fukui, Retry. Dodge. Graves, Beaton, 

Keller, Rubke, Aaronson, J. Kendall. 



JOE MITCHELL 



BOB CURLEY 

Head 



NOEL REYBURN 




JACK RUBKE 
Band Leader 



y£LL LtflDtfiS flflD BflflD 

FOR TWO SUCCESSIVE TERMS Jack Rubke has led the band, under the 
direction of Mr. Madison Devlin, f At all rallies and games this spirit-firing 
group has been present. Many of the members are in the All-City Band, which 
is composed of students from the different high schools. Helping to cheer our 
teams on to victory, the band has been heard to play "On, Cardinal," and 
after the game is over, the "Lowell Hymn." 1 Along with our band at every 
rally and game the three yell leaders, headed by Robert Curley, and assisted 
by Joseph Mitchell and Noel Reyburn, have led the school yells and songs. 
To cheer the teams, they led the student body in the "Whispering Cardinal," 
"Our Team Is Red Hot," and the coach and players yell to show appreciation 
of our athletes' hard work. 1 Much credit is due to our band and yell leaders, 
who add spirit to the games and rallies and help our teams win victory. 



56 



R C H £ S I R fl S 



UNDER THE DIRECTION of Mr. Madison Devlin, with Claire Wllklns as Concert Mis- 
tress, the advanced orchestra played for the special Lowell radio broadcast on Treasure 
Island In February. They played "Poupee-Valsant," by Poidinl, "Ballet Sentimental" and 
"Bon Vivant," by Zammlcek, and the "Lowell hlymn" for this occasion, and they also 
accompanied the speaking parts. In April they played for the Pageant given by the 
San Francisco school department at the Opera House. The orchestra first presented 
their music this term at the Newcomers' Reception, for which they played selections 
from "The Three Musketeers." They also rendered the same selections for a Parent- 
Teacher Association meeting, and participated at the Commencement Exercises and 
at the term play. Court concerts, which began last term and proved to be successful, 
were continued, with both the band and orchestra participating. ■[ Robert Dawson was 
the leader of the dance orchestra, which supplied music for all the school dances and 
entertained at Aptos Junior High by playing popular dance tunes. 1 Mr. Madison 
Devlin, who has been four years in charge of Lowell's instrumental groups, has earned for 
the school the reputation of having one of the finest music departments in San Fran- 
cisco. Among these groups, which number nine in all, are the advanced orchestra and 
band, the dance orchestra, and the beginners' and Intermediate orchestras. These 
instrumental classes never fail to add new names to their lists every term. Both the ad- 
vanced orchestra and the band have interested an increased number in joining them. 
Without such cultural music groups our school life would not be as enjoyable nor as 
entertaining. Their fine performances are the result of numerous rehearsals and hard 
work. 




Concert Orchestra 

Third Row — Cdllaghan, Gunthorp. Forbei, Rubke, J. Aaronson. Laycock, Sullivan. LeNoach, Lerninger, C. Aaronson, Berv«n, Rogers Gmther Dere- 

berry. Kawahato. Jonej, Geppert. Second Ro»— Wiley. Groth, White. Meese. Downey. Taub. Chriitian. Edgar. Kait. Kendall. Dawson, 'Appel, 

Manus. Blanlcenship. Wilike. Hayward. Kohanovich. Fint Row— Volens. Surlees. Reid. Sapir. Jones. E.. Wiseman. Farb. Sears. ' Wilkens.' Spivey,' 

Yashiiato. Gimov, Schwabacher. Ryan. B. Longland. Nast. Vernon. Lewis. Armstrong'. 

Dance Orchestra 

Second Row-Rubke. J. Aaronson. Laycock. Sullivan. Dodge. Ginther, L.inin- •'°'"^ DAWSON MADISON DEVLIN CLAIRE WILKINS 

ger, LeNoach. Finf Row— Volens, Surtees. Gimov. Dawson. Jones, C. Aaron- Leader Instructor of Mistress 

son, Gunthorp, Forbes. Dance Orchestra Instrumental Music Concert Orchestra 

57 



S*co/id Row — P*t«rf, W«inth«nk. Scott, Lyncti, Kenny, Swift, Wiia, Potilmann, Wilsy, Mohr, Andarson. FIrtt ffow — Blum, Cyr, Arnold, 
Guilfoil, FinUy, Rotavadr, McRd«, Flowtr, Hubbard, Lonqland, B., LongUnd, L,, Pitipatrick, Malont, 

H.in«Y, Hoplilni, SedloH, Steeq*, Gronberq. 




Jean Arnold 
Earl Anderson 
Myra Buctihotz 
Joieph Cullen 



Mr. Polland "maktl 
up" Star Actrais 
Jean Arnold. 



Left to Rig/if— Yvonne Cyr, 
Richard Davis, Priscilla FInley, 
William Garry, Teresa Guilfoil, 
Joseph Horn, Agnes Jones, 
Gordon Kenny. 



THE FIRST PROGRAM of the Dramatics Club, presented to an all-girls' assembly, featured twc 
one-act plays: "Pot Boiler" — Concerning the trying but comical troubles confronting an eccentric 
director (Warren Mohr) while rehearsing his cast — Anderson, Jean Arnold, Teresa Guilfoil, Patri- 
cia Hopkins, Quinn and Wiley. These two comedies were, by demand, repeated at a mixed as- 
sembly, 1 Later, two more one-act plays were presented before an all-girls' and a mixed assembly. 
In "Five for Bad Luck," the small town girl outwits the college hero who had accepted five dollars 
to date her. Participating were: Yvonne Cyr, Teresa Guilfoil, Horn, Frances McNeil, Leeana Mich- 
aels, Peters, Quinn and Wiley. "And Silently Steal Away" dealt with the efforts of a young mar- 
ried couple (Priscilla FInley and Gordon Kenny) to move from their apartment, unknown to the 
landlady. William Garry and Betty Peterson had Important roles. 1 The annual Shaksperlan 
contest called forth additional dramatic talent. Dorothy MacKenzie and Donald Peters, coached 
by Mr. Lee, represented Lowell in the All-City competition, held at Humboldt, April 27. 
1 Lowell's successful broadcast at Treasure Island on February 28 featured the greatness of James 
Russell Lowell. John MacKinnon acted as commentator. Other speakers were: Barbara Betten- 
court, Davis, Dawson, Gillio, Jean Levlnson, Quinn and Wiley. The concert orchestra played se- 
lections under the direction of Mr. Devlin; the mixed glee accompaniment was directed by Miss 
Alexander. 



58 



Prejld«nt 

Dorothy FitzpatricV 



Actor Quinn en route 
to the "Folies." 



"Swam!" Garry tells Vera Sedloff's 

fortune in "There's Money Coming 

to You." 



"Croolt" Guilfoil and "Absent Minded 

Professor" Mohr wash dishes in 

"The Tangled Web." 



Jean Levinson 

Betty Longland 

Lois Longland 

Jack Lynch 



Staging Committee: 

Joseph Horn 

Jacl( Lynch 




LeII to Rij/it — Warren Mohr. 
Claire Moody. Patricia Nie- 
meyer, Donald Peters. Betty 
Peterson. Frank Quinn, ^^ta 
Sedloff. Clifford Wiley. 



THE TERM PLAY, "The Fortune Hunter," by Wlnchell Smith, was presented on May 23, 24, 25 and 26, 
before four enthusiastic audiences. This production, with its elaborate settings and splendid acting, 
proved to be one of the most successful presentations ever enjoyed by Lowell students. 1 The plot con- 
cerns the struggles of a young ne'er-do-well, Nat Duncan (William Garry). He is sent away to a small town 
by his close friend, Harry Kellogg (Clifford Wiley), with a profitable marriage in mind. He soon estab- 
lishes himself by working for a kindly old druggist, Sam Graham (Gordon Kenny), and promptly falls in 
love with his daughter, Betty (Agnes Jones and Claire Moody). He is pursued by the wealthy banker's 
daughter, Josie Lockwood (Patricia Niemeyer and Betty Peterson), and her close friend Angle (Myra 
Buchholz and Rose Marie Young). Josie and Nat promptly become engaged. After much ado — 
being mistaken for an escaped convict and becoming engaged to the wrong girl, things straighten 
themselves out for the "Fortune Hunter" and a happy ending is had by all! 1 Others having important 
parts were George Burnham, played by Frank Quinn; James Long, played by James Chandler; Lau- 
rence Miller, played by Richard Noah; Willie Bartlett, played by Gerald MacDonald; Robins, played 
by Warren Mohr; Mr. Lockwood, played by Frank Gillio; Tracy Tanner, played by Charles McGuire; 
Pete, the sheriff, played by Jack Lynch, "Watty" played by Carlos Ricketson, and "Hi," played by 
Harry Buttimer. \ Samuel Kay Polland, Lowell's expert dramatic coach, is to be highly commended 
once again for the splendid scenery and action. The soda fountain and rain scenes were greatly admired 
novelties. Much of this credit is rightfully due the untiring work of the staging committee, consisting of 
Joseph Horn, Jack Lynch and Theodore Pohlmann. 



59 



Forrtit Cobb ipsdlit In the 

Sf.ite Tourndfnent. 



JOHN ROSENBLATT 



Helen Conliik ipaakt . . 
Clark Grant standi by. 




LtU to Right — Forrest Cobb, 
Richard Cohn, Selma Cornet, 
Robert Dawson, Barbara Don, 
Joseph Friedman. Frank Giliio. 



Lowell's specialty is winning cups . . . thanks 
to Giltio, Ellen Shank and Oawson. 



LIVING UP TO the excellenf standards set In the past by ace Lowell debaters, the Debating So- 
ciety once again showed its great ability. Led by John Rosenblatt, president of both the San 
Francisco Debating League and the Lowell Society, Vice President Pearl Steiner, and Secretary 
Barbara McRae, and instructed by Lowell's excellent debating coach, George C. Lorbeer, more 
than one hundred students were given opportunity in debating and oratory. 1 The first of Lowell's 
spring victories connmenced with the State Tournament, held over from the fall semester. Second 
place in debating was claimed by Frank Giliio and Ellen Shank. Other teams making good were: 
Hans Beetz and Barbara McRae, Benjamin Parkinson and Pearl Steiner, Marian Neustadt and 
John Rosenblatt, Forrest Cobb and Frances Hubbard. In the extemporaneous contest Frank 
Giliio won for Lowell, while Robert Dawson placed second in the boys' oratorical. To complete, 
the Debating Society claimed the much-coveted "Sweepstakes Trophy." 1 Robert Dawson was 
Lowell's representative in the Native Sons of the Golden West oratorical contest on January 27. 
1 In the Tracy Extemporaneous Contest, held on February I I, Frank Giliio took first place, and Bar- 
bara McRae and Pearl Steiner made the final round. 1 On March 15 in the first League Debate, 
Donald Minkler and Pearl Steiner were defeated at Mission; but Marian Neustadt and John Rosen- 
blatt won at Lowell. "Compulsory Arbitration" was the subject. ^ At the Ripon tournament on 
March 25, Nancy Mays and Seymour Meister reached the finals, while Frank Giliio and Ellen Shank 
were the only team to go beyond the fourth round. 1 In a non-decision debate against the Cali- 



60 



Third Row — Greenberq, Zelinsky, Rogers, Karonsky, Dai^vson. GMlio, Robins, Conn Thomson. Morse, Levy, Perrrn. Harrison. Second 
Row — Friedman, Ryan, Shank, Ross. MdcNell. Ruct, Meehan. Hubbard, Avrin. Bailey. Cassidy. Fong, Livingston, Kilty, Minkler, Bik. 
Fif%t Row — Miller, McRae, J., King, Sutton, Farb, Beeti, Lee, Swaaringen, Johns, Nahman, McRae, B., Steiner, Heiss, McCallum, 

Greig, Wagner, De Andreis, Falen, O'Brien. 




Left to P/g/i/ — Frances Hub- 
bard, Jean Levinson, Barbara 
McRae. Donald Minkler. Mar- 
ian Neu&tadt, Ben Parkinson, 
Pearl Steiner. 



Are our debaters happy about their cups? 

Too bad Coach Lorbeer, largely responsible 

for the victories, is hiding so far behind! 






fornla Freshmen, Ben Parkinson, John Rosenblatt and Pearl Steiner, met former Lowell debaters, 
Ralph Kramer and Charlotte Newell. The subject was: Resolved, "That the power of the press be 
curtailed." 1 An excellent showing was made at the Fresno tournament on April 22. Three teams 
went to the finals In debating, and eight speakers competed in the extemporaneous and oratorical 
finals. Subjects were the "British Alliance" and "Compulsory Arbitration." 1 Two more League 
Contests were held on May 3. Marian Neustadt and John Rosenblatt debated Girls' High; For- 
rest Cobb and Frank Gllllo fought Polytechnic. The subject for both was. Resolved, "That a com- 
plete and mandatory embargo be placed against all belligerents." 1 Robert Dawson won the 
Crusaders' Contest with his brilliant oration on Americanism. This is only the third of these ora- 
torical contests — the first being won by Lowell's Carol Channing; and once again Lowell has 
captured the title through the merits of Robert Dawson. 1 Lowell won five of the nine trophies at 
the State College Debating Tournament on May 6: first place debating, Pearl Steiner and Don 
Minkler; first extempore. Pearl Steiner; second extempore, Jerome Kilty; third extempore, Donald 
Minkler; second oratory, Frank Gillio: third oratory, Ellen Shank. Lowell also won, for the third con- 
secutive year, the "Grand Sweepstakes Trophy" for more tournament points than any other school. 
On May 20 the Central California Oratorical and Debating League held Its tournament on Treas- 
ure Island; the Stockton tournament closed all tournaments for another splendid debating semester 
for Lowell. Results of these tournaments are not known at press time. 



61 




:>^ 



m. M f 





BRUCE SUTHERLAND SOPHIE 


GORTER 


GERTRUDE 


FERRIS 


TERESA GUILFOIL 


Co-S«nior Edito 


Financid 


Manager 


Literary 


Editor 


Co-Senior Editor 


Myrd Buchhoti 


Elena Thonrtas 


Edith McFarla 


nd 




I^S 


Pauline De Carlo 


Ctdire Bush 


John Moore 






ff M 


Inqa Friedman 


Claire Butcher 


Betty Sanders 






V» 0^% 


Alvin Heyman 


Helen Christie 


Joan Scheyer 








Jean Levinson 


June Crook 


Thelma Selii 






'^:i^M. 


Joseph Mitchell 


Shirley Joy 


Floyd Smith 






J^ 


Claire Moody 


Jeanne Kati 


Ian Snrtith 






^J^ 


Carl Raaka 


Helen Lechleiter 


Peqqy Warde 






\ ^^^H 


Caxton Rhodes 


Peggy May 








ROBERT BACIGALUPI 
Editor 



R t D fl 



f] IH 



DONNED IN THE GALA colors of the Golden Gate Interna- 
tional Exposition, and faithfully carrying out this timely thenne 
throughout the book, the "Red and White" staff presents this 
edition of the semi-annual publication with the hope that it will 
prove to be one of the best so far issued. 1 The journal is the re- 
sult of the untiring efforts of the entire staff, of which Robert 
Bacigalupi was the capable editor: Sophie Gorter, the hard- 
working Financial Manager, and Joseph Mitchell, her assistant; 
Alvin Heyman, Boys' Sports Editor; Elena Thomas, Girls' Sports 
Editor; Teresa Guilfoil and Bruce Sutherland, Senior Editors; 
Gertrude Ferris, Literary Editor; and Carl Raaka, Technical 
Editor, "j An energetic staff of reporters, composed of Myra 
Buchholz, Pauline De Carlo, Inga Friedman, Jean Levinson, Claire 
Moody and Caxton Rhodes, covered the various school activities 
that appear throughout the book. Mrs. V. T. Kuhnle Is their 
most able and helpful faculty adviser. 1 The very attractive art 
work, of which Miss F. L. Herrmann Is in charge, has been well 
handled by Nancy Anderson, Claire Butcher, Helen Christie, 
Emma May Cowden, June Crook, Shirley Joy, Jeanne Katz, 
Helen Moore, Betty Sanders, Joan Scheyer, Thelma Selix, Floyd 
Smith, Ian Smith, Peggy Warde and Allen Wong. \ Mr. O. H. 
McCord, as usual, expertly handled the taking of all group pic- 
tures and gave the book an excellent layout. 



The busy staff, working hard, thinking only of gttting the neit 
"Red and White" out on time. 






i\ \\[ Miir.i \\\ 

/.t fifiiifif f ifii ' 
../ 1/..- 

/"... fllh Innii.if 

1... I'll: ■ 1. 1.. I'll') 








("2 ^ 4 



■^^, 



JOAN BICKEL 
RICHARD NOAH 




ROBERTA FALEN KATINKA GALLIN 

BENJAMIN PARKINSON CLAIRE RIDGWAY 



DOROTHY HEISS 
MURIEL TRENOT 



DOROTHY LEE 
MARJORIE WILSON 




If] f LO HI f LL 



WORKING ESPECIALLY hard this term to put out a special edition 
of "The Lowell," entailing much research into Lowell's illustrious his- 
tory, "The Lowell" staff deserves much acclamation. A vote was 
J -y taken throughout the entire student body to determine how many 

^^^ ^T^^^ would purchase such an issue and approximately 75 per cent were 

^^^^ ^1^^^ interested. 1 Editor Gavin hligh had no easy job on his hands and 
should be sincerely congratulated on his never-tiring and most fruit- 
ful attempts to make this paper worthwhile. Miss E. M. Osborn, as 
faculty adviser, gave her usual experienced help to the staff, and it would have been 
very difficult to do without the assistance of Muriel Trendt, assistant editor. ■] Special 
staff assignments were most capably handled by staff veterans: Ben Parkinson, Sports 
Editor; Katinka Gallin, Girls' Sports Editor; Robert Rockwell, Circulation Manager; 
Claire Ridgway, articles to the "San Francisco News"; Marjorie Wilson, Staff Typist. 
Much credit is due the reporters who knew and wrote everything that was of interest 
to or which concerned Lowell. ■[ A new column appeared this term, "Lowell Day by 
Day," written by Richard Noah, and was heartily received. Additional features were 
the ever popular "Tepee Tattle Tales," in charge of Roberta Falen; "Exchanges," under 
Dorothy Lee; and "The Letter Box," with answers by the editor. 



GAVIN HIGH 
Editor 




One of the big news stories of the year was Lowell's 

broadcast from Treasure Island. Here Barbara Bettencourt 

speaks of James Russell Lowell. Jean Levinson (left) and 

Bob Dawson (right) were also on the program. 




Reporters 

Second Row — Cohen, Lewis, Sears, Degenhardt. 
First Row — Rocs, Appel. Lombard!, Essmann. 



63 




Chapter V 

fl DHffln COUlf IfiUf 

lODAY A MAGIC CITY further enhances the picturesque beauty of San 
Francisco Bay. Set in the middle of our bridge-spanned harbor, Treasure Island 
displays her breath-taking loveliness. The whole setting is awe-inspiring; vast 
San Francisco Bay almost inclosed by hills, arched by the two bridges, enshrines 
a man-made island on which a fairy tale of beauty is presented. From all over 
the world creators in every line imaginable have been brought to the Fair to 
lend their talents toward the perfection of our Exposition. Inspired landscaping 
has made it a garden by day; electricity has made it a jewel by night. As San 
Franciscans we are privileged and justly proud to have such a spectacle bearing 
the name of our own Golden Gate, for it contains not only many beautiful ex 
hiblts, but also much that is of educational and entertainment value. 



I 




Turning to OUR ATHLETES 




mmu 




Joslyn and Delos go up after 

a rebound in the Poiy qafne. 

Note Dallmar, No. 1 1. 



Dallmar tips in one against St. 
Ignatius. Feerick, No. 11, and 
Deasy try hard to prevent him. 



COACH BEN NEFF 
Builder of Champions 



FEATURING SUCH PLAYERS as All-City Pete Debs and Dave Thurm, veterans Ed Cerf. Hov/ard 
Dallmar, Paul Harless, Bill Joslyn, and Joe Marron, the highly favored Lowell cagers. under the peer- 
less coaching of Ben Neff, fought their way to a fifth straight AAA hoop championship. ^ Lowell 
breezed by Balboa, 31-16, in the League opener, "j A stubborn defensive Polytechnic quintet was met 
in the midst of a mild "ice cream cone" proselyting scandal, and the Cards were defeated for the first 
time in three seasons by the score of 22-20. A basket in the last 30 seconds brought Poly the victory. 
1 In their next tilt Lowell met a fighting Saint Ignatius team and succeeded in coming out on top after 
playing a ragged game, 16-13. 1 Led by Dave Thurm, who swished 7 points through the hoop, the 
Indians went into the "crucial" against Sacred Heart to win 21-1 I. A ten-minute stall and a riot were 
the highlights of the game. 1 In the Mission tussle the Lowell "untouchables" played their first previously 
canceled game, employing a much faster game than in previous encounters and shellacked the Bears, 
31-18. 1 The Commerce Bulldogs were the next to face the Indians but they, too, fell before the superior 
Neffmen to the tune of 21-20. In this game, Paul Harless showed that he was, along with Dallmar, one of 
the most promising ball players for the 1940 varsity, "j Pressing forward at top speed, our casaba tossers 
practically walked out of Kezar with the championship in their hip pocket when they defeated Galileo. 
27-17. Howie Dallmar and Eddie Cerf starred both defensively and offensively. ^ Then came the all 
important Washington game. The Lowell student body and team were filled with enthusiasm and spirit 
for this game and were out to win. Every man on the team was out to beat the Eagles and as a result 
Lowell came home with a victory and a fifth straight championship. The team played its best game of 
the season and ran up the score to 30-23. Every man on the squad saw action. Smooth-playing Pete 
Delos, dominating the Cardinal team play, closed a brilliant Lowell basketball career spectacularly. Dallmar, 
playing his best game to date, showed individual, spectacular rebounding work. He, Delos and Cerf 
shared high point honors with eight apiece. This victory officially gave Lowell the 1939 prep basketball 
championship. •] In their pre-season games, the Lowellites won 21 out of 23 practice tilts. Included in 
their triumphs were the California and Stanford Freshmen. Cerf gave a flawless exhibition of dribbling 
in the Stanford game. In League games the Lowell cagers rolled up a total of 197 points to their op- 
ponents' 140. ^ Capable substitutes were Bob Arnold, Jake Battat, Bob Cherry, Ward Ericcson, Ward 
Lame, Edward Lee, Wayne Marsh, Bob Paulson and Ed Russell. They all held up the basketball stand- 
ards of Lowell and showed possibilities of bringing the sixth straight championship to Lowell and Benny 
Neff in 1940. 

66 



1 



CHflHI 





Thurm. No. 17. makei a spec- 
tacular rebound while Joslyn, 
No. 9, and Deles, No. 3. are 
ready to help. 



Jim Pollard of Oakland Tech. 

has difficulty shooting with De- 

los, No. 3, and Thurm, No. 17. 

guarding. 



REVIEWING THE VARSITY basketball season through the statistical end of the race we find many in- 
teresting facts proving Lowell's superiority on the hardwoods. Through the game schedule, Lowell rolled 
up a total of 197 points, second highest by team scoring in the League. Seventy-seven field goals and 
43 shots from the free throw line made up the total. The average points scored by the Indians per game 
was about 25, a comfortable margin over their opponents' 18. Lowell's 25 point average is nothing to 
brag about but when they can keep their opponents' average below 20 they should be competent for 
any high school league. Our cagers were also second in the least number of fouls committed. They 
fouled about 8 times a game for a total of 65. 1 Turning now to the individual statistics of our players 
we give praise to Pete Delos, Dave Thurm, Howie Dallmar and Eddie Cerf for their super ball playing. 
The following is a glance at each of these players' season. All-City Pete Delos accounted for 20 field 
goals and 12 fouls for a total of 53 points which was high for the team and fifth in League standings. 
Delos was the best all-around player on the team and was noted for his ruggedness, coolness, and 
scoring ability. At the other forward position was Eddie Cerf with 18 field goals and 8 free throws, 44 
points In all, for a good average for any ball player. Cerf was the hardest man to stop because of 
his speed and tricky dribbling, which incidentally practically won a couple of our tight ball games for us. 
Howie Dallmar scored 36 points during the season for a good scoring average, but did most of his work 
by rebounding and recovering the ball for our team. Dallmar will be the mainstay of the team next 
year. Dave Thurm, another All-City player, was one of the most valuable players on the team. His 
stellar defensive work, his ability to play as a team player, earned him a starting position and All-City 
recognition. He made 40 points, a very good quota for a guard. Another first string man was Bill Joslyn, 
who was out a part of the season because of injuries, but did much to help his team with his rugged- 
ness, rebounding ability, and his co-operative playing. Delos, Cerf. Dallmar, Thurm and Joslyn com- 
posed the original starting line-up, but when Joslyn was out, Joe Marron, Ward Lame and Paul Harless 
alternated for him. ^ The season should not be forgotten without saying a word for the excellent coach- 
ing of Ben Neff. "Benny" spent his time after school every day coaching the team and was really over half 
the reason that Lowell won another championship. All through the "Ice Cream Cone" scandal, "Benny" 
had regular practice and showed his willingness to play any team in the League. Peaches and Cream to 
Benny Neff for his hard work and good spirit, for that's the kind of a coach a school likes and we do like 
"Our Benny." 



67 




o-^^*' 




Kilpatrick, No. 31. dnd Rddkd, 

No. 33, go after a loote bdtl 

in the Poly gdm*. 



Kilpatrick guardi a Poly man 

cloiely with Owen, No. 32, and 

Doyle closing In. 



Bfl HETBfl LL 3 O's 

ALTHOUGH NOT A championship quinfet, the Lowell 30's boasted a determined, spirited, and well 
organized team. The Individual stars were All-City Tommy McCarty and "Fighting Terry" Kilpatrick, 
the only seniors on the team. McCarty and Kilpatrick occupied regular starting positions, with Leo 
Doyle, Ed Goldstein, John Owen, Carl Raaka, and Bobby Troppmann alternating at the other posts. 
1 The 30's opened their season against Balboa and the outlook was very dark as they went into the 
short end of a 9-0 score. But the game wasn't over at that time and in the second half the rejuvenated 
team put the ball through the mesh from all angles and won out in the end, 16- 12. The team as a whole 
worked together and pulled the game out of the fire. 1 The 30-lb. hoopsters then met their traditional 
rivals — Polytechnic. The pressure was on in this game, but the Papooses won, 22-15. McCarty put the 
ball through the net six times and added a free throw for 13 points for high point honors. ^ The light- 
weights then ho-hummed to victories over Saint Ignatius and Sacred Heart, 34-31 and 35-34, respec- 
tively. 1 In what was expected to be a "thriller" our 30's played their best game of the season and 
trounced Mission, 40-26. McCarty tanked 13 points. 1 In the biggest upset of the season in the light- 
weight division, Lowell was defeated by Commerce, 19-18. Kilpatrick's field goal with 20 seconds to 
go went as just another two points as Commerce put one through the hoop to put them one point in 
the lead just as the gun sounded. 1 After this, the defeat to Lowell at the hands of Galileo walked away 
with Lowell's championship hopes. The score was 27-20. ^ The Washington game was the final game of 
the season and on the outcome depended the Papooses' second place standing. Led by forward Carl 
Raaka with 9 points, the Papooses defeated the fighting Eaglet quintet, 20-18, in a last second thriller. 
Behind a few points throughout the game, Johnny Owen tanked a foul to knot the count at 18-18. 
McCarty intercepted the ball which was in the Eaglet's possession, passed to Doyle, who fed to Raaka. 
In the clear, Raaka, in the "come thru" role, swished a 35 footer through the mesh to bring Lowell a 
victory and a second place in the League. 1 The 30's ran up a total of 205 points to their opponents' 
162. They won 18 out of 20 practice tilts. Frank Wigmore, a sophomore, and Harry Swift were very 
competent players and were paced by Mac Ashton, Dean Bush, Ed Eassa, and Jimmie Ray to round 
out the 30's squad. 



70 



"^"^o. 




V. 



X 



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ie 



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^>?. 



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Iv, 



/G, 



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^*, 








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-^/?r 



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A7^, 





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f/V 



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H 



H/V 



^-^i 



B fl S ( B (1 I L 




Coach Vojru J.J ttti; Dcloi look the 
situation over in the Galileo game. 



Ed Russell at bat just 

before he singled to 

center. 



The boys on the bench anxiously awaiting their turn to 
crack out bingles. 



FOLLOWING A FAIRLY successful practice season, hurlers Garcia and Lame, coached by "Mike" 
Voyne, led Lowell nine to the Shaughnessy League Championships after defeating six out of eight 
schools. 1 Washington first met the Cardinals' hard hitting batters, and were downed 15-8 on March 
14. Garcia, Lame, and Delos pitched, with sophomore Paulson backstopplng. 1 Championship hopes 
fell March 21, when St. Ignatius trounced the Indians 8-1. The Ignatians held Lowell to three hits, two 
being Lame's. Selleck was walked, Cherry hit a single and Kranich sacrificed so Selleck could score. 
1 On March 24, Balboa set back the Indian nine, 4-2. Although Lame peppered the Pirates for seven 
strikeouts, poor fielding yielded four runs, hlitters were Dallmar, Kranich, Paulson, and Selleck. 1 In a 
fast and loose game, the Cards eked a 10-9 victory over Sacred Heart, March 27. Lame, on the 
mound for three Innings, was batted out of the box; Garcia, taking over, knocked a "homer" deep into 
left field for three runs, and in the sixth Cherry made a winning three bagger. Next to meet the Cardinal 
onslaught was Poly, March 30, where Cherry, Dallmar, Delos, Ken Silva, Russell, and Paulson collected 
hits to win, 10-2. 1 Again "hot," they defeated Commerce 6-1, April I I. Selleck led the barrage with 
two hits as Lame held Commerce to one run. "j Lowell was the only team able to defeat Galileo. On 
April 14 a constant succession of hits made possible a 13-6 score. 1 April IB, in their final Leaguer, the 
Cards defeated Mission, 6-5, cinching a place in the playoffs. Lame and Garcia traded off in the box. 
At bat, Delos smacked the longest "homer" this season to tie it at three all in the third. In the fifth, 
Lowell won on Mission errors. 1 Meeting Galileo in the playoffs, April 20, the Cards took an 8-6 victory. 
Behind, 6-2, at the sixth, they acquired two runs, and in the seventh Kranich started a four run rally to 
victory. •] Lion championship hopes were definitely broken April 22 when the Indians won, 10-7, in a bat- 
ting spree. Starring, Dallmar scored a "homer" and a couple of singles. 1 The championship had not 
been decided when this journal went to press, but Lowell, originally not conceded a chance, by sheer 
batting power, broke into the playoffs. 1 Jim Cunha played a steady game at second all season. Show- 
ing promise for next year are Dean Marchucci and Paul Harless. 



72 




Reading down; 

PAUL HARLESS 
GARRY TODD 
JIM CUNHA 



ED RUSSELL 
BOB PAULSON 
HOWIE DALLMAR 



SYLVESTER HAVEY 
AL GARCIA 
WARD LAM£ 



BOB CHERRY 
RALPH SELLECK 
COACh VOYNE 



73 



I fi e c H 



fiipions 




-ij^ 



CAPT, GEORGE GOOD 

Upper Row — Capt. Good "talces" Gordon Lee of Lakeport in ttieir practice meet. Johnny Meier heads Provost of Commerce in the low hurdles. 

Lowtr Row — Ben Silva wins a close 100 from Bartlett of Commerce with Korn (Mission) and Cressy (Balboa) third and fourth. Capt. Good sprints hard to 

beat Dreher (S.I.) and CliH (Poly). 

WITH STALWART GEORGE CANFIELD setting the pace, the Lowell track team defeated Com- 
merce to \aVe the City Championship, for the first time in seven years, 5M/2-48, at Kezar Stadium 
on April 29. 1 Canfield was high point man with 91/2 points, when he won the pole vault, came 
from behind to take a second in the 440, took fourth in the 220 and ran a lap on the second place 
relay team. Pete DeVries garnered 8 points when he won the high jump, and was second in the 
high hurdles. Bill Joslyn won the discus and took third in the shot put to make 7 points. Stanley 
Bernhard was second in the discus and shot put, acquiring 6. Johnny Meier was another surprise 
"come through" when he tied for second in the high jump, was second in the low hurdles, and ran 
on the relay team, accounting for 6 tallies. Gene Clark won the mile handily, getting 5 points. 
Next was Chase Gregory with 41/2. which he made when he took thirds in the low and high hurdles, 
and ran a lap on the relay team. Hoffmann and Tibbs made 3 and I points, respectively, in the 
broad jump and shot put. Capt. Good, Silva, and Ellis each made '/j point when they ran on the 
relay team. 1 The Cards' varsity track team for the first time in the history of the school won every 
meet this season. The first to fall before the Indians was Burlingame on February I I, at Burlin- 



74 




Unlimited Track 

Second /?o>*'— Shinkai. Halt, Chapman, Bimrose. Thompson. Alvord, Sullivan. Tibbs. Joslyn, Bernhard, Arnot, Wakefield, Manning. 
Ferris. Fir%t Wow— Douglas, Hoffman. Braun. Weinshenk. sllva. Gregory. Lucy, Holti, Clark. Good. Canfield, DeVries. Johnston, 

Zion, O'Brien. 

ufiLifniHD \mi CHempions 



game, when Lowell scored 75 2/3 points to the 36 1/3 of Burlingame. Bob Curley, in winning the 
440, defeated the P.A.L. champ, "j Next came Balboa on February 23, who was whipped to sub- 
mission by a score of 70-39. 1 Jefferson was thoroughly trounced next when the Red and White 
won 98-5 on March 3. 1 Santa Rosa fell before the speedy harriers on March 17, 77 2/3-36 1/3. 
Capt. George Good turned in the speediest times for the century and 220, up to this part of the 
season, and Clark turned in the fastest time: 4 min., 40 sec, for the mile, "j Piedmont was next to 
bow before the Cardinal aggregation, March 24, 67-37. Bernhard, the rugged shot putter, put the 
shot 50' 2" which is very good for these parts. 1 In our "Big Meet" with Commerce on March 23, 
a real thriller occurred, when, in the final lap of the relay, Capt. Good came from behind to tie the 
great Commerce ace, Bartlett, and "sew up" the meet at 561/2 ^"- Other commendable services 
rendered by Card men were Meier, who was only l/IO off the city record, in the low hurdles; De 
Vries, who was y^" off the record in the high jump, and Clark, who again turned in the speedy 
time of 4 min. 40 sec. for the mile. 1 Poly was defeated April 14, 87-26. Starring was 
Canfield, who pole vaulted 12 feet 6 inches, to break the Lowell record of I I feet 6 
inches. 1 Last to oppose the Indian fury was Vallejo, April 19, where they were defeated, 
721/2-401/2- 1 Canfield proved to be the most versatile man on the team during the 
season when he ran the 220, 440, a lap on the relay team, pole vaulted and sometimes 
broad jumped. Bob Curley was a possible point winner this year In the 440, but due to 
an injury was not able to run, although he turned in some good performances during 
the early season. Qualifying, but not placing, in the A. A. A. meet, were Capt. Good 
In the 100 and 220, Chapman, Halt, and Douglas in the mile, Ellis In the 440, Sllva in 
the 220, DeVries in the low hurdles, Clark, Johnston, Douglas, and Wakefield In the 
880. Much credit is due to Coach Harris, who whipped these boys into shape during 
the fall and then trained them diligently during the spring, "j George Klemmer of 
Galileo and Jack Delaney of Sacred Heart turned in marvelous A. A. A. performances. 
Klemmer ran a 49.5 440 and a 2:00.7 880, setting new city records. Delaney threw the 
shot 58 feet 4I/2 Inches, setting a new record and missing the national high school 
mark by 51/2 Inches, "j The team point summary of the 1939 A.A.A. is: Lowell, 5 1 1/2; 
Commerce, 48; Galileo, 10; Sacred Heart, 8; Polytechnic, 6; St. Ignatius, 5'/2: George 
Washington, 5; Balboa, 4I/2; Mission, 4I/2. As there are not too many track graduates, 
Lowell again should be high in the total next year. 

75 



ELMER HARRIS 
Coach 



^J^.%^. X 



L-f^ 



^^,g^€c*^ 






n f^ 



i. 




Lightweight Track 

r/i/rd /low— Hill. Feibebrau. Auyong Goldflnqer. Stone. McGlade. Haber, Lee, Clemo. Kawahata. Gianopulos. Buise. Johnjton. Obayashi, 
Braun. Poulo. Second /?ow— Pfile, Allen, Bauer. Hagen, Sheridan. WItike. Coblentz. Kittlemen. Crellin. MacKinnon. Roach. Kilday, Abeitt, 
Reinhardt. Vaurs. Powers. Hardesty. First /?ow— Mulcrevy. Dettner, Donate, Arennana, Meister, Tashin. Freethy, Sjolund. Cainell, Mendel- 
son, Ellis, Sebumacker. Strand. Gardner, Suiuki, Beneira, Brush, DcMarttni, 



LIGHTiyflGHI TRACK 

WITH JOHNNY SHINKAI and Ed Jellins turning in record performances, Lowell, with 26 points, 
was third to Commerce's 66, and Polytechnic's 64, in the A. A. A. 1 Shinkai broke the city record of 
20 feet I 11/2 inches in winning the broad jump at 21 feet 1/2 i"'^'^- Jellins won the 130-lb. broad 
jump, having qualified with a record jump of 21 feet 4 inches. Others placing in this division 
were Co-Capt. Mendelson, fourth In the 220, Finlayson, third in the high jump, Sjolund, second 
in the 100. The relay team of Sjolund, Coblentz, Jellins, and Mendelson placed. 1 In the 120-lb. 
division, Hardesty was fourth in the low hurdles, Brush in the 220. Gardner took second in the 
high jump and Yaki fourth in the broad. 1 Meister was fourth In the I 1 0-lb. broad jump; the relay 
team of Meister, Benezra, Wong, and Reinhardt also took a fourth. 1 Qualifiers were De Martini, 
120-lb. low hurdles; Cainell, 130-lb. low hurdles; Dettner, 440; Troppman, shot, and Schumacker in 
the broad jump. John O'Brien, a probable winner in the 130-lb. hurdles, was lost earlier In the 
Injury. 1 During the practice season the Cardinals didn't fare so well, but under 
ervision should develop into fine material for next year. 



season becaus' 
Coach L; 



/*^ CAPT. 




CAPT, FRY 



CAPT. MENDELSON 



CAPT. ELLIS 



Johnny Shinkai cracks A. A. A. broad 
jump record with a teap of 21 ft. '/} in. 




76 




Don Beanston 
Jack Gilkey 
Don Grannii 
Al Heyman 
Howard Hall 



Allen Keller 
Len Levy 
Herb Lowe 
Robert KnoK 
Bill Hunter 



Second Row — Shragge, Mackie, Knox, Fay, Heuter. Beanston, Bohter. Samuel. Hevman. F'rst 
Row — Dickson, Scheldt, Resleure, Seagreaves, Larson, Vayssie, Keller, Gilkey, Aoki, Modlin. 



S UJ 



m 



G 



LED BY AN UNBEATABLE 130 lb. squad, the lightweight mermen swept to their second consecu- 
tive A. A. A. title at Fleishhacker on May 6, garnering 127 points, to 47 of Poly, their nearest com- 
petitor. 1 The varsity, came in fifth with 16 tallies. Poly, Galileo, George Washington and St. 
Ignatius coming before, hiunter. Hall and Lowe took a first in the medley relay. Hall was a third 
and Threllfall a fifth in the breaststroke, and Hunter a fourth in the "back." 1 In the I 30 division of 
the lightweights, record breakers were: Beanston in the 100 yd. freestyle and the medley relay of 
Keller, Heyman and Beanston. Other firsts were Levy in the 50 yd. crawl, Keller in the back and the 
4 man relay team of Gilkey, Middleton, DeLano and Levy. Those placing were: DeLano third in the 
50, Grannis second and Heyman fourth in the breaststroke, Gilkey and Middleton third in the 100 
free and 50 back. The medley relay of Shragge, Scheidt and Dickson established a record, "j In 
the 20's Shragge was first in the backstroke. Dickson third in the 50 free, Trautz fourth and Scheidt 
fifth in the breaststroke and the 4 man relay of Bloch, Aoki, Hoppe and Selchau third. 1 Bolster in 
the 110 lb. division swam the 50 and 100 in record time. And the medley relay was the only team 
entered, thereby setting a record. Larson, Modlin and Knox composed it. Larson won the back- 
stroke and Knox was second. Modlin was second in the breaststroke and the 4 man relay of Fay, 
Samuel, Hebbron and Holmberg was second. 1 Under Coach Kitchen's supervision the '30's 
completed an undefeated practice season against Berkeley, Tamalpais, Sequoia, Palo Alto, Ga- 
lileo and San Mateo, pointing the way to a championship varsity next year. The A. A. A. adopted 
the N. C. A. A. rules, thereby receiving five places instead of four. 



77 



?"^^ 




Bactiman 


K«pon 


Bros* 


McGinn 


C«l«nd«r 


Patm*r 


Conradl 


Wtlcoma 


CuU«r 


Wi*d«nhof«r 


Etiiott 
er«n» 


Bonn«r 

(Co..) 

Burhtton 

(Pilot) 



vfiRsiiy cfifui 



THE VARSITY, with only three veterans, Bob Elliott, Clark 
Grant and Bob Palmer, undertook the tremendous task of 
building a strong, dependable crew. With the aid of "Doc" 
Fast, coach, and hiarvey Retry, manager, this job was ac- 
complished. 1 Those who, after three months of practice, 
proved themselves worthy of the first boat were, on the star- 
board, stroke. Bob Palmer; 5, Captain Clark Grant; 4, Bob 
Elliott; 3, Don McGinn; 2, George Conradi; bow, George 
Backman, and on the port, stroke, Clayton Calander; 5, Don 
Welcome; 4, Dick Culver; 3, Dick Eustace; 2, Frank Masten; 
bow, Howard Brose. Strong substitutes were Stan Bernhard 
and Bill Royal. Bruce Bonner was cox and Alex Vladlmiroff 
was pilot. 1 The first race was against Galileo on April 22. 
This was a first race for many of the fellows but despite this 
strain, the newcomers did well. They held a pace all along the 
course but Galileo's more experienced crew finally came 
through with a victory of one length. 1 On the 6th of May, 
the Varsity met St. Ignatius and in spite of a valiant attempt 
the Saints proved too much for the Indians. They passed the 
finish line 4 lengths ahead. 1 This book went to press before 
the Cards had met either Mission or Balboa. "Doc" Fast 
favors Lowell to take the Bears because of better timing. The 
Balboa race seems to be a toss up; critics, however, pick 
Balboa to take the championship. ^ With seven members 
of the first varsity boat and nine from this year's 30's ex- 
pected back, hopes are high for the 1940 championship. 

The Varsity in a stiff worliout at Yacht Harbor 




Stcofid Row— Mr. Fait, Evant, Gilion, Conradi. Royal, Elliott, Ktpon, Backman, Patry. Firtf 
Row — Caiandar, McGinn, Grant, Hinman, t«tattan, Vitra, Walcoma, Bonnar, Barnhardt. 



30's C R £ ID 



UNDER THE COACHING of "Doc" Fast and the managing 
of Norman Jaslow, the 30's, with only George Simmons, Willis 
Hitchcock and Bruce Sutherland as veterans, practiced hard 
and long at Yacht Harbor, both morning and evening, to 
develop a sturdy crew. 1 At the end of three months prac- 
tice, the first boat was announced as: port side, stroke, Cap- 
tain George Simmons: 5, Willis Hitchcock; 4, Jim Montrose: 
3, Fred Beaver: 2, Tom Strel: bow, Edward Pringle; starboard: 
stroke, Bruce Sutherland; 5, Noel Reyburn; 4, Jack Geary; 3, 
Fred Sandrock; bow, George Hagg. Alex Vladimiroff was 
coxswain and Herbert Salinger pilot, f The 30's first met 
Galileo in what proved to be one of the most thrilling races 
of the season. Galileo first took the lead but was soon over- 
taken and passed by the Cards at the three-quarter mark. 
At this point Lowell lost all ground gained because of the 
obstruction of a buoy. The Indians, after averting the buoy, 
picked up on the Lions but not enough to catch the leaders. 
Galileo won by one-quarter of a length. 1 On May 6, Lowell 
was severely crushed by St. Ignatius which seems to be point- 
ing to the championship. ^ This book went to press before 
the races with Sacred Heart and Balboa. In these contests 
the Indians are heavy favorites to take Sacred Heart's Irish, 
but experts pick Balboa to take the Cards in the last race of 
the season. Nine of the 30's will vie with the 7 varsity veterans 
for seats in next year's varsity boat. 



The 30'$ pull long and hard 






i y J:UU'J:ylU';U> 



Lightweight Crew 

Second Row— Mr. Fast. Tully, Reyburn. Strel, Hitchcock. Fint Row— Haqq. Sandrock. Pringle 
Simmons, Smith, Geary, Salinger, Clapp, Yamanaka. 



Beaver 


Sherman 


Hagg 


Simmons 


Hitchcock 


Smifh 


Montroi* 


Sutherland 


Pringl* 


Vladimiroff 


Reyburn 
Sandrock 


Feebeck 
(Co..) 
Salinger 



(Pilot) 




GEORGE BROWN CHARLIE MANNING ALF FARREN DAVE WILSON BOB HALE 

SYLVESTER HAVEY BOB ZAMLOCH BERNARD RIORDAN HENRY TRUEDE 

G L f c H 11 m p I n s 

THE CARDINAL LARRUPfRS, Lowell's most consistent champions, won the top spot again, 
May I at Ingleside, when Alf Farren's 71 and Charles Manning's 76 led the field and helped edge 
out Polytechnic by three strokes. Farren's steady playing accounted for the lowest qualifying score 
ever shot in the prep tournament. Manning, pre-tournament favorite, missed his chances in the 
first nine, but coming back shot a low score. George Brown, state junior champ, tied for third with 
Pabst and Kamper of Poly, who shot 77, this boosting Lowell's score. Stewart Smith completed the 
four lowest Lowell scores with 84. Schwartz was next with an 85, Zamlock an 88. Truede, Hale and 
Wilson followed with 96, 97 and 100. Others who were on the golf ladder but didn't play in the 
tournament were Hartford, Havey, Farrell and Riordan. 1 Coach Voyne scheduled meets with the 
California and Stanford Frosh and some of the junior colleges, which went poorly for the golfers. 
Next year Farrell, Farren, Hartford, Smith, and Truede are back, and the championship for the 
third consecutive year looks slim, but Coach Voyne is on the lookout for "young hopefuls." 1 Total 
team scores are: Lowell, 310: Polytechnic, 313: George Washington, 332: Sacred Heart, 336: and 
St. Ignatius, 365. 



80 




TED MYERS 
HARRY BUTTIMER 



CAPT. ART FOFF 
JOE GREELY JIM LIVINGSTONE 



HARRY LIKAS 

CARL LIVINGSTON 



Hums 



THE CARD NET STARS were slated for another A. A. A. tennis championship, when it was played 
May 15-20, but the tourney wasn't completed at the time this journal went to press. ^ The net- 
sters who played singles in the tournament were Carl Livingston, Jim Livingstone, Ted Myers, Harry 
Likas and Joe Greely. In the doubles it was Roche and Buttimer, last year's champs, Kuhn, Mc- 
Donough, Hartwig, Pennel, Cunha, and Capt. Foff. "j Against the Standard Frosh these stellar 
players lost in a closely contested match, 5 to 4. Six- single sets and three doubles were played, 
with Harry Buttimer, Harry Roche, Jim Livingstone, Carl Livingston, Joseph Greely and Ted 
Myers representing Lowell. 1 No one represented Lowell at the Ojai Valley Tournament on April 
27, 28 and 29, which was won by Harry Lllcas for boys und.er 15 last year, but Lowell was ably rep- 
resented at Bay Region tournaments. 1 Although Carl Livingston, Art Foff, and Harry Likas are 
graduating, Harry Roche, Harry Buttimer, Jim Livingstone, Ted Myers, Joe Greely, Rudy Kuhn, 
"Dick" McDonough and many others will form a very good nucleus for Coach Kitchen to work 
for a possible championship next year. 



81 



CARL bJULUND 
Clerk of Awdrdi 



FtRRIS, SJOLUND. HOF-FMAN 
Awdrdi Committee 



CIduJu Kitctiuri, twimrnin^ and tennit cudch Le<iquc rcprc- 
tontdtive, and Lowell director of phyticdl eauCdtton. dlwayt 

find-, 1 h -y -i<^-V .iwdiiinq him. 




DONALD DAVIS 
Athletic Manager 



Boys' Managerial Staff 

Modlin. Ddvis, Conn. Glafkides. Wiard, Gilkey, Retry, Cardinal, Nealis 



spofiis eo in I [iisififliio n 

THIS SPRING THE heavy sport program was smoothly conducted by Athletic Manager Donald 
Davis, aided by Arthur Foff, tennis manager; William Manning, track manager; Robert Zamloch, 
golf manager; Jack Gilkey, swimming manager; Kenneth Berber, Roy Cauwet, Edwin Conn, Con 
Glafkides, Donald Modlin and Jack Nealis, basketball managers; Paterson Allen, Robert Cardinal, 
Charles Davis and Hubert Soher, baseball managers. 1 Clerk of Awards Carl Sjolund, assisted by 
Jack Ferris and Skiles Hoffman, counted Block L points for hundreds of Lowell boys. 1 This term 
nearly 800 girls, almost 70 per cent of the total enrollment, became members of Lowell's G.A.A. 
by participating in at least one of eight sports. This organization had a fine term under the 
leadership of President Priscilla Finley, Secretary Betty Stoffers, and Clerk of Awards June Meese. 
A Girls' Jinx, May 12, and a supper at the end of the term were enjoyed. 1 Fifty-five girls, who 
participated in sports six semesters, were in the Block L. For the first time they joined the boys in 
presenting a Block L dance on March 16. Miss Flynn was faculty adviser; Dorothy Libby, presi- 
dent; and Jean Schwarzenbek, secretary. 

G. A. A. 



PRISCILLA FINLEY 
President G.A.A. 



BETTY STOFFERS 
Secretary 




Second Row — Libby, Carew, Nell. Cal- 
low, Meese. Flnt Row — Harter, Chris- 
tian, Fintey, Gullfoil. Larrlau, 

et >^ r> 5'^~ 



JUNE MEESE 
Clerk of Awards 



DOROTHY LI8BY 
Pres:dent Girls' Block L 






A o o rv (} ( i r> n 




Block L 

Third Wow— Bdker Fetton, Spieti. Schworti. Roitenstein, Smith. MdcFdrland, MdcFdrlano, M. Gloi, Johnston. Second Row— Waite. Jorq. 

enten, Mayer, Schraemli, Plum, Ettmdnn, Radke, Finley, Old, Bickel, Howdrd. Miete. Weed. Butcher. Firit Row— O'Connell. Knoph, 

Otto, Ldrsen, Schnittger. Bittlet. Cdrew. Schwdrzenbek. Libby. Misi Flynn, Lev/it. Schomaker, Cyr, Hill, Lynes. Ootkin. Schlamm. 



82 



0i ^\^ 





Marylee Callow, Badminfon 
Ru*h Carew, HockcY 

Carol Christian. Golf 




Bobby Harter, Riding 

Bofty Larrieu, Ice Skating 

Grace Nell, Boiketball 

Marion Shook, Swimming 



S P fi IS 



MISS FLYNN AND Manager Carol Chrisfian supervised 60 golfers. The advanced 

group held an elimination tournament, the winner receiving an engraved cup. ■] One 

hundred and ten girls took part in badminton, guided by Miss Flynn, Marylee Callow 

manager), Lorraine Schwerin, Elena Thomas and Ramona Vincent, assistants. Ladder 

and oHvnination tournaments were held. 1 One hundred and forty-five girls swam at the 

A. pool. Beginners learned fundamentals, while advanced swimmers practiced 

diving and breast stroke, aided by Miss Adams, Manager Marion Shook, Katinka 

and Olga Stimson, assistants, "j Seventy girls played tennis at the Park courts, 

90 girls enjoyed basketball. Miss Adams, with Manager Grace Nell and Assistants 

e Crook and Barbara Krase, directed both sports. 1 Ice skating claimed the largest 

75, who met at the Forty-eighth Ave. Rink. Beginners studied fundamentals, 

ced learned figure skating, coached by Mrs. Smith, Betty Larrieu (manager). Vera 

ff and Doris Dietterle, assistants, "j Miss Wilson, Manager Bobby Harter, Assistants 

Cohen and Kay Greenbach, conducted rides and held a horse show with 90 girls 

clpating. 1 Two teams, chosen from 27 girls, competed for the hockey cup. Direct- 

ere Mrs. Smith, Ruth Carew (manager), Velma Fowler, and Marian Glos, assistants. 

he Girls' 49'er Jinx was held on May I 2 and was a real success. 




Head Girk' Yell Leader 



PEARL STt,,Strv 

Asil. Girls' Yell Leader 



S3 



GIRLS 



S P R I S 




<3Aa p O ^ (S 



O^ ^00 



> 



A <jv r> B r^ t > f% Q 








ilLv^. 



a ft ^, ^^ (^ a r^ o 



/i 





MISS DOROTHY FLYNN 
Golf and Badminton 
Coach 
Ice Skating 

Fourth Row — P. Foyer. Llbby, Roberts, McFarlane, Lesh, Wenzke, Kroger, Vernon. Solomon, King, 0"Connell. Flynn, Day. Leibach. Gumpel. 
Hunt, Shirpser, Lang. Gyselbrecht, Lynch. Tomlinson, Spiegelman, Mensch. Third Row — Friedrichi. E. Scott, Daily, Smith, C. Lewlj, Weatherty. 
Friedman, Delano. Crook, Warde. K inkle. Finn, Armstrong. Blair. Nickson, M. Scott, Sutton, Walker, G. Foyer. Anderson. Nobmann. 
Second Row — Berry, V. Scott, Schraemli, Butcher. Weed, Alves, Sullivan, Smaltwood. Schumacher. Parker, Emmons, Starostin. E. Radke, _ 

A. Radke, Howard. Kelly. Schreger, Zinkand, Arrigotti. Parodi, Meehan. Fir%t Pow— Gisln. Howell. Cohen. Bates. Ireland, Burt. Gwinn, 
Nelson, O'Brien. Schnittger, Filiatrault, Dietterle, Larrieu, Winter, Reeves. Hodshire, Babbitt, Lechleiter, Carr, Warren, Callahan. 



■0 



/ 



^ 



Tennis 

Second Row—Scoii, Schreyer, Russ, Bettencourt, Rilovich. Stcwell, Stringfield, Weick, Swearingen, Klinker. Dennlss, 

Lindner, Phillips, Esmond, Essmann, Meese, Bartelme. Walsh. Fint Row— Friedman. De Andreis. R. Falen, D. Lewis, 

L. Falen. Meyor, Crook. Krase, Miss Adams, Nell, Waelder, Bonal, G. Buenger, Bickel. M. Lewis, 

Schwarzenbek. Wagner. 

Golf 

Third Row — Jorgensen. Spiess. Cummingi, Seidkin. Mengol, Neil, Casey, Swift. Prather. Weinhold, Galvan. Second 

Row — Leary. Waite, Henderson, Beeti, Walter, Gatlln, Doty, McCleland, Turner. Jacobs, Hughes, Moore. Fint Row 

— Dietterle, Steege, Kirk, Dewey, Kilcourse, Ames. Simon, Christian, Miss Flynn, Drutkin, Said, McPherion, 

Wilson. Ruck, laist. 

Hockay 

Second /low— Spaulding, Steiner. Rouse. Finley, Old. Connelly, Libby, Meese, L. Glos. Fint /7ow— Baker, Felton, 
de Pereni. Mrs. Smith. M. Gtos. Carew, Fowler, Schtamm, Lynei, Ootkin. 

84 




GIfiLS fli PLfly 



85 



GIRLS 



S P R I S 




Cv«<;tail 







■ ton, Price, Ldnq. DcAndreii, Stewiirf, Heo- 



Swimming 

Third /?oM^ — Happer, M. Filet, Chin, Cheong, Abe. Kiyasu. K. Nao, Matsumoto, Pickering, Ellison, Knee, Lang, 
ifrom, Beall. Brownell, Houiton. Benn, Spieqiman, Farb, Feibelman, Sackman. Second Row — Roberts, Schareiy. Wise, Rosevear, PInqer. 
Williams, Seers, L. Longtand, B. Longland, Young, Watmough,. Hodgkinson. Greig. Asher, Harrison, Flower, Burke, Gomperls, Brouillet, 
Laird, Stranton, Dawson. First Row — Jordan, Nelson, Johnson. Hamilton, Frankttn. Fullalove. Hausel, Kreekis, Scherer, Slimson. Miss Adams, 
Shook, Brazil, Mclncrney, Chadick, Stoackman, Taylor, Hamill, Lapkin, Wilson, Boone, Gallin. 

Badminton 

Second Row — Mouradian, Hasson, MacFarlane. Lum, Wu, Yip, Schwartz, Roitenstein. Crohare, Huff, Elliott. Johnson. 

Hara, Anderson, Heiss, McCabe, Land, Mclntyre, Powell, Deuttch. Firit Row — Fletcher, Knoph, Pellisson, O'Mel- 

vcny, Gantncr, Dewey. McPherson, Schomaker, Cyr, Miss Flynn. Callow, Thomas, Filiatrault, Ritter, Hutchins. Neal, 

Jacobs. Wickersham, Wynn, Schwedhelm, Tau. 

Basketball 

Second Row — Sabbato, McRao, Price. LeBuanie, MacDonald, Kenfield. Sayre, Croharo, Currie, 

PoiiUcn. first Row — Lewis. Loyien, Kilcourse, O'Connell. Arnault. Miii Ada mi, Burq.ird. 

Walter, Houston. Paccioretti, Chu. Heiman. 



86 



OUR G. (1. fl. "Pin-UlfflRERS 



M 



JOAN BICKEL — Tool badminton, golf, hockey. Ice- 
skating, swinnming and tennis. Also managed the pub- 
licity campaign for our new girls' gym. 

CLAIRE BUTCHER— An all-round sportsgirl. She went 
out for badminton, golf, ice-skating and riding, but 
preferred ice-skating. 

INGE BUENGER— Inge participated in basketball and 
volleyball, but liked tpnni<; hp^i and was a tennis assist- 
ant manager. 

RUTH CAREW— "Snookie to her friends. She's a real 
athlete and this term's hockey manager. 

DOROTHY FELTON— Dot first tried tennis and swim- 
ming, but since her H2 term has devoted her time to 
hockey. 

GERTRUDE FERRIS— Swimming for a year, then three 
years of riding; she's on the Block L Dance Commit- 
tee. 

PRISCILLA FINLEY— A star at badminton and hockey. 
Badminton manager, then G. A. A. secretary in '38. 
G. A. A. Prexy in '39. 

MARION GLOS — Marion went out for ice-skating and 
tennis, but preferred hockey, in which she was assistant 
manager. 

RUTH KNOPH— Ruth took time out from her many 
school activities to participate In swimming and tennis. 

MARILYN LEWIS — She believed in variety — went out 
for ice-skating, riding, swimming and tennis; member 
of Block L Dance Committee. 

DOROTHY LIBBY— Went out for hockey, which she 
managed. Was G. A. A. Prexy in Fall '38 and Block L 

Prexy in Spring '39. 

HELEN LYNES — Another all-around athlete— bad- 
ton, riding, swimming, tennis and assistant hockey man- 
ager. 



BARBARA McFARLANE— "Babs" earned her pin by 
participating In badminton, golf, ice-skating and tennis. 

EDITH McFARLAND— Edith greatly enjoyed her parti- 
cipation In badminton, ice-skating, swimming and 
tennis. 

JUNE MEESE — A tennis star. Managed both volleyball 
and tennis last term; Clerk of Awards of G. A. A. this 
term. 

JEAN O'CONNELL— Went out for basketball, Ice- 
skating and swimming. Twice swimming assistant man- 
ager. 

ZINA OOTKIN — Participated in hockey, swimming and 
tennis, and was assistant hockey manager. 

ELSA SCHLAMM — Elsa went out for four sports dur- 
ing her four years — badminton, hockey, ice-skating 
and tennis. 

GALE SCHOMAKER— Gale has tried badminton, golf, 
ice-skating and riding, but received her pin for her 
riding. 

JUNE SCHUNICK — Earned her pin by participating 
in badminton, basketball, tennis and volleyball. 

IRENE SCHUNICK— Also took badminton, basketball, 
tennis and volleyball. Was assistant tennis manager. 

JEAN SCHWARZENBEK— Took ice-skating, swimming, 
riding and tennis. Is Secretary of Block L and on the 
dance committee. 

JANET SMITH — Anorner gin who likes variety. Janet 
has gone out for badminton, golf, Ice-skating, riding 
and tennis. 

INGA SPIESS — Has taken swimming most of her time 
at Lowell, but also went out for golf and hockey. 

MADELEINE WAITE— "Mad" was golf manager during 
her two years at Galileo and continued the sporf when 
she transferred here. 



instructor Cuneo tedches Kdtinka 

Gallln and Janice Lee Casey tiow 

to "swing it." 



Anita Ames 
does it. 



Helen Hamilton doesn't seem to mind 
the ducking she's going to get from 
Jane Griffin (left) and Dorothea Frank- 
lin (right). 

Star Swimmer Dot Hauser 
in action. 



Sasketers Bertha dePereni and 

"Marge " Sorensen jump for 

the "tip." 








f^' 



flPPfifClflllOO 



T WOULD have been 
Impossible to produce this edition of the "Red and White" 
without the honored advice of Mr. Leroy Stephens, our prin- 
cipal, and Miss Eugenie Lacoste and Mr. Hudson Monroe, our 
vice-principals. I thank Mr. Kenneth Elder and Mr. Raymond 
Peterson of the Walter J. Mann Co., and Mr. Robert 
Abarta and Mr. Wm. P. Cariile of the Borden Printing Co., 
Inc., for their painstaking care in the engraving and printing 
of this book; Mr. and Mrs. John Doherty of Fisher Studios for 
their vifholehearted co-operation and good photography; Miss 
hiarrlson and Mrs. Miller for the use of their offices; Mr. Curts 
and Mr. Tucker for recording and auditing our financial ac- 
counts; Mr. Barker, the Camera Club and Marylee Callow for 
their candid camera snaps; The San Francisco "Examiner" for 
the loan of basketball action shots: the editor of the "Lowell" 
for the loan of special cuts. To our faculty advisers, Mrs. 
Kuhnle, Mr. McCord, Miss FHerrmann, the members of our 
hard-working staff, and to the many others whose bit has 
made this book possible, I gratefully extend my appreciation. 
Without the ability and enthusiasm of our Art Staff we would 
not have had the little clay modeled figures that appear op- 
posite each division page. 



BOB BACIGALUPI, 

Editor. 





i 



i 



0^7 



'^^l^i'^ls, 



(Mcmbcr(*^[sT I:?!??,"^) 1 93 6 -39)