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Full text of "The reed organ; how to give it the proper care, simple complaints and easy remedies. With full explanations of the value of the stops, and directions for their proper use"

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SEARS, ROEBUCK AND COMPANY, CHICAGO 



The Reed Organ 




Hang This in the Back of Your Organ Where Yoa Can Always Find It 



THE REED ORGAN, 

HOW TO GIVE IT THE PROPER CARE 

Simple Complaints and 
Easy Remedies 

With Full Explanation of the Valae of the 
Stops, and Directions for Their Proper Use 

In case yoa should have any trouble of any 
natare with your organ, refer to this book before 
writing to us. Remember that ALL organs of 
every make are made of materials which must 
obey natural laws, and any organ exposed to 
moisture or dirt may give cause for complaint. 



SEARS, ROEBUCK AND CO., CHICAGO 

Copyright 1910, by Sears, Roebuck and Co. 



F426T.4.10.31.13.3 



THE REED ORGAN 



IN point of mechanical construction the Reed Organ is of a very simple character, and so 
perfect is the material, workmanship and construction in the Beckwith, that if it receives 
fair treatment at the hands of the owner it will remain perfect in action and musical 

quality during the entire life of the guarantee and even longer. If, however, it is neg 
lected, if it is allowed to absorb dampness and dust, or should it become the home of moths 
or mice, it will in time become unfit for use. 

Should the organ become disabled on account of any of the above mentioned causes, 
it would be manifestly unfair to expect the manufacturer to make good any repairs made 
necessary through such mistreatment, under the provisions Of his guarantee, and no manu- 
facturer would agree to do so. 

The Beckwith Organ represents skilled workmanship of the highest character, and the 
very best material that can be obtained is used in its making. "The Beckwith Organ Com- 
pany's factory is the best, finest equipped, and largest exclusive organ factory in the world, 
and while every possible precaution and care is taken, it will sometimes happen that some 
part of the organ may not act with the same promptness that it should. This is especially 
true when it is first unloaded from the car. A key may stick, a note may sound after the 
key has been pressed and released. , It may produce an unpleasant, jarring sound, or it may 
not sound at all, or other seeming defect may manifest itself, which is not a defect 
in any sense of the word, but which if only understood could be readily adjusted. Any 
organ, no matter what the name or make, will show the same results under the same con- 
ditions, and should you buy an organ from us, or from anyone else, and have any com- 
plaint of any nature to make, first turn to the pages in this book, where you will find all 
possible complaints very carefully explained, as well as an easy and simple remedy. 

Remember that all Reed Organs are made largely of wood. It is well to bear in mind 
the fact that moisture is one of the chief enemies of an organ, and that it is the tendency 
of all wood, and especially of well seasoned wood, to swell in damp weather, and to shrink 
in dry weather, when the moisture has entirely evaporated. 

Practically all the trouble that can possibly come to an organ can be directly traced to 
dirt or dampness. These are natural conditions, against which the manufacturer is power- 
less, and the manufacturer's guarantee against defect is not a guarantee that the material in 
an organ will not obey ordinary natural laws. It would be unfair to expect the guarantee 
to mean that the metal parts, would not rust when exposed to moisture, and that the thor- 
oughly kiln dried wood from which it is made would not swell when exposed in the same 
way. No organ maker can prevent the metal parts of an organ from rusting when ex- 
posed to moisture, or the kiln dried wood from swelling under certain conditions, jlist as it 
will shrink in dry weather, and nothing on earth can prevent it. It is just as reasonable 
to expect water to run up hill as to expect that the wood and metal in an organ will not 
show the natural results of natural causes. 

No doubt you have noticed that in damp weather the doors in your house will stick, 
the windows will stick, the drawers in the tables and bureaus will swell up to such an ex- 

We are not responsible for any bills for repairs not authorized by us in writing. 



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tent that it is almost impossible to open them. Do you blame this to defect in material or 
workmanship? No. You realize that it results from the tendency of all matter to show the 
result of natural causes. From experience you know that when the atmosphere is free from 
moisture all these matters will adjust themselves, and by the natural orocess of evapo- 
ration the parts will return to their normal condition. 

Through a mistaken idea, some have been led to believe that an organ, for some reason, 
will not respond to these natural conditions. It is an unfortunate fact that some irre- 
sponsible dealers or agents will state that these conditions will never arise in an organ that 
they offer for sale, but if the matter was only given some consideration, this claim, on the 
face of it, would show that it was absurd, and anyone, be he agent or manufacturer, who 
claims that his particular organ, or the one he offers for sale, will not show these natural 
results, is not to be trusted. 

If moisture has such an effect on ordinary doors and windows, it must be expected 
that the same effect should show in the mechanism of an organ. 

When moisture settles on metal it causes rust, and when it is absorbed by kiln dried 
wood it causes it to swell. If any part of your organ action swells it means that that part 
of the action will stick, and if it does stick it means that your organ has been exposed to 
moisture. The very nature of your complaint would prove it, and your complaint is no 
more than what is to be expected. It would be an injustice to the manufacturer and to us, 
to look for impossibilities in an organ, especially when exposed in this manner, and to 
expect anything else but natural results to arise from natural causes, 

DIRT AND DAMPNESS. 

As already stated, practically all 
the trouble that can possibly arise can 
be directly traced to dirt or dampness. 

Dirt in an organ will sometimes 
cause a reed to become silent, or it 
might cause it to give out an unpleas- 
ant jarring sound. This is more hkely 
to occur when the shipment is first un- 
packed. During its transportation it 
is an easy matter for a small particle of 
dust or some other foreign substance 
to become lodged in a reed. This 
prevents the tongue from vibrating 
freely. Sometimes a key will stick or 
will remain down after you press it. 
Perhaps a tracker pin swells up, and 
the owner of the organ might jump to 
the conclusion that the manufacturer 
had slighted the organ in its making, or 
had not given sufficient care to its con- 
struction, when, in point of fact, the 
result is due entirely to natural causes 
and beyond any manufacturer's power 
to prevent. If you were to buy a reed 
organ for $1,000.00 and expose it to ex- 
actly the same conditions you would 



READ THIS 



It Was No Trouble at All to Remove the 

Complaint by Following Direction* 

in the Book. 

Box 66, Loomis, Michigan. 
Sears, Roebuck and Co., Chicago, 111. 

Dear Sirs: — I received your letter and in accord- 
ance with your advice I followed directions in the 
Reed Organ Book you sent me and found out what 
the trouble was with my organ. I immediately and 
permanently removed the difficulty without any tools 
whatever and I want to write you to tell you how 
easily the trouble was removed and how much I 
thank you foe your advice. I now know more than 
I ever did before about organs. 

I have read the Reed Organ Book carefully and 
feel that I have perfect confidence in myself, not.only 
to give my organ more intelligent care, but to correct 
any slight derangement caused by dirt and dampness 
which I have found by careful inquiry is common 
to all organs of all makes. 

I again thank you for your kindness. 
Yours truly, 

MILLIE POLMATIER 



We are not responsible for any bills for repairs not authorized by us in writing. 

2 



have exactly the same result. This is not an evidence of any defect in material or work- 
manship, but is due to dampness or dirt and nothing else. 

A little assistance on the part of the owner of an organ, with the directions given in the 
following pages before him, will enable him to immediately and permanently overcome 
all the trouble, and he will never be compelled, with these complete directions in his pos- 
session, to depend on any organ repair man. Not only will he be able to keep his organ 
in first class condition and overcome any slight derangement, but he will have a much bet- 
ter idea of the workings of an organ and its mechanical parts than otherwise would be 
possible, and will, therefore be in a position to give it more intelligent care. We know 
that if these directions are carefully followed, if the inner workings of the Beckwith Organ 
are fully examined, you will be convinced of the high grade of workmanship used in its 
construction, because quality and workmanship are shown in every part of the instrument 
as well as in its outside appearance. 

People have been led to believe that there is something mysterious about an organ. 
If your sewing machine does not work right, do you call in a repair man? No. You 
tighten up the parts, perhaps, here and there, and as a result it works as well as ever. Why 
do you do the work yourself? Merely because you know about the workings of a sewing 
machine, and you know that it would be a useless expense to call in a repair man when you 
can do it yourself. If this is true in a sewing machine, it is certainly true in an organ, es- 
pecially when the work to be done is of such a trifling nature, and also when you know 
that you hold our guarantee, that you hold our personal pledge, that by so doing you can- 
not hurt the instrument in any way. 

With this introduction, we ask you, even though you have no complaint to make at this 
time, that you carefully read every word of the following pages so as to obtain some idea 
of the small amount of work necessary to be done to overcome what might appear to be a 
serious complaint. Keep these directions always in the back of the organ. Place a tack 
inside of the organ and hang them near the reed hook, so that you will always know 
where they are. The chances are that you may never have occasion to. refer to them, but 
if you do have any complaint of any nature to make, then save the valuable time necessary 
to write to us; don't be without the use of your organ all of this time, but immediately fol- 
low these directions, and if you cannot overcome the difficulty, it will then be time enough 
to write us, and we promise to take the matter up with, you in our usual liberal spirit 
under the provisions of our guarantee. 



THE CARE OF AN ORGAN 



COMMON ORGAN COMPLAINTS AND SIMPLE HOME REMEDIES. 

Following we very carefully explain practically every complaint that can possibly arise 
regarding your organ. You must not forget that organs are constructed almost entirely 
of wood and therefore are bound to feel the effect of moisture and excessive dryness. 

Before following instructions given here, be sure to read all about reed organs as shown 
on pages 1 to 3 inclusive. It will pay you. 

OUR GUARANTEE. 

Remember, we guarantee if you will follow the directions that you cannot possibly 
he ' -reran. Do not he afraid to follow these suggestions, nor hesitate through a mis- 
taken idea of tin- amount of work involved, because it requires very little effort on your part 

V'r- are not resDonsible for any bills for repairs not authorized by us in writing. 

3 



and absolutely no risk. It will not take you over ten or fifteen minutes' time to remove 
any one of the following complaints : 

1. SOMETIMES A NOTE WILL NOT SOUND. This interferes greatly with the 
playing of the organ, but the remedy is simple. Some foreign substance, such as a little 
dirt, has lodged between the tongue of the reed and the reed block, which prevents it from 
vibrating, thus causing it to be silent. 

THE REMEDY. 

The reed should be removed, when it can be examined closely. If you will draw the 
reed as explained below, and strike the side of the reed block with the reed hook, being 
careful not to touch the tongue of the reed, you will dislodge the foreign substance, what- 
ever it may be, and the reed will sound as it should. Sometimes, however, the vibrating 
of the reed in time causes it to crack. This happens with the best of reeds, and does not 
indicate inferiority of material. In that event the broken reed should be sent to us, together 
with another from the same set, one octave above or one octave below the one that is 
broken, by which we will tune the reed to be replaced in perfect harmony. If the reed is 
in the front set, take off the key slip, the strip of wood immediately in front of and below 
the keys, when it can easily be reached. If the reed is in the back set remove the back of 
the organ. Pull out all of the stops and this will expose the ends of the reeds. Inside the 
back of the organ you will find the reed hook, fastened securely. Use this hook for pull- 
ing out the reed, by placing the end of the hook in the slot found in the end of the reed 
block, using care not to put the point of the reed hook farther in than the little slot across 
the end of the reed. If you should call in a repair man to remove your complaint, he would 
do no more than what we have directed you to do (and our directions are simple enough 
to be followed by a child), but he would naturally be compelled to charge you for his time. 

2. SOMETIMES A REED MAKES AN UNPLEASANT JARRING SOUND, which is 
in nearly every case caused by foreign substances in the reeds, which can be removed as 
stated in paragraph 1, or perhaps something rests on the sounding board which causes the 
rattle. 

THE REMEDY. 

Take off the back of the organ, and look at the sounding board. It will occur oc- 
casionally that the swell- rod becomes disconnected and rests on the sounding board, which 
would cause the trouble. If you find that the swell rod is not disconnected, then tighten up 
any and all screws that you may find which hold the sounding board down on the founda- 
tion board. If this does not overcome the difficulty, then remove the reed as explained in 
paragraph 1, and if there is nothing wrong with it, then see whether or not the reed fits 
tightly in the reed cell. Sometimes the wood of the reed cell shrinks a little, and this 
might possibly cause the rattle. Draw the reed as before explained, take beeswax or com- 
mon laundry soap (beeswax preferred) rub it on the edges of the reed block and put it back. 
This will make the reed stick fast in the reed cell, and will stop the rattle. 

3. SOMETIMES A REED WILL SOUND CONTINUALLY and still the key itself 
may be level with the balance of the keyboard. This is caused from dirt having lodged in 
the valve, thus preventing it from seating properly, which would allow the air to rush into 
the bellows and produce a sound by passing through the reed. 

THE REMEDY. 

Many times this can be overcome in a very simple way as follows : Pump the bellows 
to their fullest capacity, open all the stops and then strike the key affected, with at least 
one key on each side, a number of quick blows, striking them all together. By doing so 
you allow the air to forcibly rush in the bellows, and this almost invariably draws the dirt 
out of the valve. If this does not remove the trouble, then tip the organ forward as far as 

We are not responsible for any bills for repairs not authorized by us in writing. 



possible, first taking off the top of the organ, if any, pump the organ hard and strike the 
keys exactly as explained on page 4, at the same time take a hammer or any blunt instrument 
and strike under the organ up against the foundation board, directly under the affected 
reed several quick, successive blows, which will have a tendency to dislodge the dirt, and the 
suction at the same time will draw it out. If this does not overcome the trouble, then 
draw the affected reed (always the lower set in case there is more than one) ; now take a 

thin piece of wire, bend it at an angle at the end thus | , insert this wire along th< 

sides of the slot and you can tell to which side the valve is displaced, and work your wire 
accordingly. With this method you are also close to the seat of operation and there is 
little danger, if you are careful, of throwing the valve off entirely. If you find that these 
directions do not overcome the complaint, then we suggest that you get at the valve itself, 
which you can do in a simple manner by referring to paragraph 14 in this book. 

4. SOMETIMES A KEY DROPS DOWN LOWER THAN THE OTHERS and 
allows the reed to sing continually. This is either caused by the swelling of the tracker 
pin, thus preventing it from moving freely in its socket, or the key may have absorbed 
moisture and has swelled to such an extent that it binds on the guide pin, or else the key 
has received a severe blow, such as a book falling, from the top of the organ on to it, which 
has caused the valve of the organ to jump down far enough to catch on the ends of the 
valve pins. This latter, however, is something that very rarely occurs. 

THE REMEDY. 

Please refer to Figure 1, in which the guide pin is shown by the letter "G." This pin 

goes into the lower part of the key, preventing it from moving sideways. If you will 



AA — Feeder Valves. 

BB— Pedal Straps. 

C — Stop Connections. 

DD— Swell Rods. 

E — Coupler Wires. 

F— Tracker Pin. 

G — Guide Pins. 

HH — Foundation Board. 

I — Escape or Excess Pressure 
Valves. 




Fig. 1 



grasp the front of the key firmly, working it sideways and up and down, this will serve to 
enlarge the opening and allow freedom of motion. If after you do this the key still stays 
down, the difficulty is in the tracker pin. The tracker pin is shown by the letter "F." If it 
is the tracker pin, have some one hold down the key that is affected, then go around to the 
back of the organ when you can easily locate this key, push this key upward from the 
back of the organ, then take some narrow flat instrument, put it on top of the tracker pin 
and push it up and down ; if it comes up of its own accord after being forced down, this is 
evidence that it is free. When the tracker pin that is affected has a collar on it, you can 
apply the pressure on top of the collar, which is much easier than forcing up the key and 
getting the pressure from, the end of the tracker pin. 

We are not responsible for any bills for repairs not authorized by us in writing. 




If this pin does not move freely in its socket, but stays down, you know that it has ab- 
sorbed moisture and has swelled up. If you sandpaper it lightly, thus reducing its size, 
you will remove the trouble. If, however, it moves freely in its socket, and does not line 
up with the others, then you know that the trouble is in the valve. In that event refer to 
paragraph 3, and follow directions given for using the bent wire fully explained therein. 
If the trouble is in the valve, by proceeding as above you will remove the complaint; but 
as a matter of further information we desire you to learn just what a 
valve pin is, as it might be the cause of the trouble. Please refer to 
Figure 2. This shows the end of the valve (A) as well as the valve pin 
Fig. 2 (B) which holds it in place. If this valve is pushed down far enough 

to pass the end of the valve pin which holds it in place, it would naturally permit the air 
to rush through it, as it would be held open. It is a very simple matter to adjust such a 

complaint if you will follow the suggestion as given in paragraph 3. 

5. SOMETIMES NOTES MAY SOUND when the organ is pumped and the keys are 

pressed without any stops being drawn. This would indicate that the mutes which control 
the various sets and which are in turn operated by the stops, do not fit tightly over the 
opening to the reed cells. 

THE REMEDY. 

First, ascertain which mute it is that is giving the trouble by pumping the organ, 
finger the keys, then after the key slip has been removed and the back let down press down 
each mute, one at a time, with your fingers; you will know when you find the one that is 
giving you the trouble because the sound should instantly cease when you press down the 
mutes. Ordinarily, the cause of the mute not coming down is that the wire that is con- 
nected to the end of the connecting stick, which in turn is fastened to the mute, has been 
bent and is not allowed sufficient motion for the mute to come down tight. If this is the 
trouble, you -will know it immediately when you unhook this connecting stick from the 
wire. If after this has been done the mute comes down tight, just bend the wire toward 
the direction in which the mute is fixed ; this will allow the mute free action and overcome 
the difficulty. 

6. SOMETIMES ALL THE KEYS OF YOUR ORGAN DROP DOWN; that is to 
say, if they lay flat down and do not stay up into place when you lift them with your 
hand, then this arises from one of two reasons, one of which is a simple complaint, and the 
other is of a more serious nature. 

THE REMEDY. 

Examine the piece screwed on the back of the frame at the end of the keys, inside the 
organ, called the key binder, and if it is loose, by tightening the screws you can place it 
where it belongs and overcome the trouble at once. If the key binder is in place, then it 
is a serious matter and will need your immediate attention. This would indicate that the 
spring rail to which the valve springs are fastened has become unglued through the effect 
of excessive moisture. In order to be sure about this, pull out all of the stops, and pump 
the organ without placing your hands on the keys. Pump hard, and advise us whether or 
not the organ makes a sound. If it makes no sound you may rest assured that the trouble 
is in the key binder having become loose. If you find the key binder in place then be sure 
to make a 'thorough examination and report to us in detail, and await our further advices 
before taking any steps in the matter. 

7. SOMETIMES THERE IS A ROARING SOUND WHEN YOU PUMP. If so, 
you may know at once that your organ has been exposed to undue moisture, as your 
trouble is caused by the wood in the bellows swelling up and tightening the feeder valves. 
We are not responsible for any bills for repairs not authorized by us in writing. 

6 



THE REMEDY. 

The material in your organ is only obeying natural laws. The wood in the bellows 
has been exposed to undue moisture and has consequently swelled. When it swells it 
naturally must stretch the valve cloth, causing the valves to be tighter than the manufacturer 
had them when the organ left the factory. If you pump the bellows the rushing air passes 
these valves and if very tight will cause them to vibrate to such an extent as to give out a 
sound. The bellows in organs, as ordinarily placed in houses, are next to the floor, which 
frequently is damp and continues damp; at any rate it is seldom that the atmospheric con- 
ditions get so dry as to again thoroughly evaporate all the moisture that they have ab- 
sorbed unless the room is kept well heated. If you will refer to Figure 1, page 5, and to 
the valves which are on the feeders, which are indicated by the letters "AA," this will aid 
you in overcoming the trouble. Remove the front panel of your organ, immediately over 
the pedals, and you will have easy access to these valves. You can pump the organ by 
hand ; if the valves are too tight they will make a "wolfing" sound when you work the 
pedals (here also be sure that the little valve between the two feeders opens when you have 
pumped the organ hard so as to entirely exhaust the reservoir). If they do, place your 
finger under them and stretch them slightly. If these outside valves are not too tight, then 
the trouble is in the inner valve. You can see the inner valve if you lift up one of the out- 
side valves indicated by the letter "A" in Figure 1, page 5, aforesaid. Reach in with your 
finger and slightly stretch the inner valve, and the trouble will be entirely and immedi- 
ately overcome. 

8. SOMETIMES THE BELLOWS SEEMS TO LEAK. This trouble may be caused 
by several different things. In the first place, ordinary wear and tear in an organ which re- 
ceives the very best attention and care naturally will wear through little pin holes in time, 
which will cause the trouble. 
THE REMEDY. 

You can ascertain if this is the cause of your complaint by taking off the back of your 
organ, running your hand around each end of the bellows, feeling for a little hole or tear in 
the cloth. By tipping up the bottom of the instrument you can examine the bottom of the 
bellows without any trouble. Should you find any hole in the cloth, write us, telling us how 
large a hole it is, and we will send you some special Rubber Bellows Cloth and Special 
Cement, which you can apply without any trouble whatever. It is just as easy to fix a little 
hole in the bellows as to place a postage stamp on a letter. 

In case there is no hole in the bellows, examine the sounding board to see if there is a 
leak in it. Examine the escape valve on the front of the bellows, immediately between the 
two feeders, as indicated by the letter "I" in Figure 1, page 5. It may be that it does not 
close properly, and that the spring which should hold it in place is twisted. Examine this 
point closely. Perhaps this is the trouble. Also examine the Vox Humana mechanism by 
removing the back of the organ. See that the sheepskin valve is closed tight over the open- 
ing in the fan wheel when the Vox Humana stop is pushed in, and that when this stop 
is drawn, the lever so uncovers the opening to the fan wheel as to allow the air to rush in 
freely, causing only an even sound, such as an ordinary influx of air. Sometimes the pin that 
holds the loose end of this leather valve has been bent so that it does not cover and uncover 
the hole in the fan wheel properly. When closed it should lie down tight and when open 
the pin should pass quite up to the inner edge of the hole in the fan wheel, turning the leather 
valve up in a loop. Let someone pump the organ while you are at the back of it, and see if 
you hear any noise at this point. The only place that air can rush out of the organ so as 
to be perceptible is around the feeder valves when the organ is pumped. While the organ 

We are not responsible for any bills for repairs not authorized by us in writing. 



is being pumped, you no doubt will feel the air. Some people write us that they feel 
the air rushing out of the bellows when they pump it, thinking, therefore, that the organ 
leaks, when in point of fact the organ would not be work'ng properly if you did not feel this 
exhaust. Remember that organs are built on the suction plan and not on the blast principle. 
When you pump the organ you are pumping out the air, therefore you should feel it. If 
these suggestions do not locate a leak, then you can determine whether or not there is a ieak 
by closing all the stops except the Melodia stop, then pump the bellows to their fullest 
capacity, or until the escape valve opens; when the bellows are as full as you can get them 
then push down C, with" the Melodia stop out, one octave above middle C, and with 
watch in hand see how many seconds the organ produces a sound, and report to us. Also 
push in all the stops, and again pumping the bellows to their fullest capacity, put your 
hand down flat, when the bellows are full, on the highest seven or eight keys on the right 
hand side of your organ, and advise us whether or not you hear a sound. This informa- 
tion is very important, and we should be glad to have you give it to us in detail, in case 
you do not overcome the trouble yourself. 

9. SOMETIMES AN ORGAN WILL PUMP HARD. Thii is a very simple com- 
plaint and can easily be remedied. 

THE REMEDY. 

As the trouble is entirely due to the fact that the feeder or pedal valves are too tight, 
thus preventing an easy pumping of the bellows, you can readily remedy this as sug 
gested in paragraph 7. 

10. SOMETIMES THE COUPLERS MAY NOT ACT JUST AS THEY SHOULD. 
Sometimes when you pull out a coupler it might raise one or two keys above the rest, or 
when the coupler is not pulled out a key may appear to be locked, that is to say you cannot 
press it down. This is not at all serious and really is a very simple complaint that may 
happen to any organ. There is only one make of coupler action used in any organ — the 
Hammond Coupler. This is the coupler action used in the Beckwith. Therefore, any com- 
plaint which you may have with the coupler of the Beckwith is liable to happen in the 
coupler of any organ of any other make. 

THE REMEDY. 

You can locate the coupler action by removing the key slip, which is the strip of wood 
immediately in front of and below the keys. This will expose the entire coupler action to 
view, and will permit you to examine the wires. If you find that the wire which is sup- 
posed to rest on the collar of the tracker pin has by some means slipped under the collar, 
reach in from the back of the organ, lift the tracker pin affected as high as you can, forcing 
the wire forward and upward until it passes the collar. Then let the tracker pin fall to 
its natural position, and the wire will then rest in its proper place. If any of the front ends 
of the coupler wires on which the coupler buttons work have been turned, thus throwing 
the inside end of the wire upward, they can be replaced from the front by forcing up the 
key against which it should naturally strike, thus throwing the wire back into place. 

11. SOMETIMES WHEN THE PERFORMER STOPS PLAYING, A KNOCKING 
NOISE WILL BE HEARD IN THE ORGAN. This is a very rare complaint but is 
readily removed. 

THE REMEDY. 

Open the back of the organ and you undoubtedly will find that one of the bellows 
springs on the outside of the bellows is tipped over and rubs against the side of the organ 
case or against the bellow? brace. By moving it into a vertical position you will imme- 
diately overcome the trouble. This trouble is caused by the bello ws spring being jarred 

We are not responsible for any bills for repairs not authorized by us in writing. 

8 



or moved out of place, either being forced out of a vertical position toward the side of the 
case, or inward toward the bellows. If it rests or rubs against either the case or the bel- 
lows brace, then very naturally as the spring forces the bellows out to its normal position 
after the music ceases,, and as this motion is very slow, it does not drag the end of the 
spring across the side of the case or across the brace, but jumps a fraction of an inch at a 
time, which produces the knocking sound. 

12. SOMETIMES THE CUSTOMER COMPLAINS THAT THE RIGHT KNEE 
SWELL IS USELESS AND DOES NOT WORK PROPERLY. To one who ii not 
familiar with organ construction and tries the organ for the firtt time, the difference ap- 
parent between the two knee swells is misunderstood and the customer assumes that there 
is something wrong with the right knee swell. 

THE REMEDY. 

In this case undoubtedly no remedy is needed except an explanation of the function or 
the use of the two knee swells. The left knee swell throws on the Grand Organ or opens 
all the stops, mechanical and otherwise, in the organ, excepting the Vox Humana and the 
Sub-Bass where the organ is fitted with the Sub-Bass stop. It requires considerable pres- 
sure to force the left knee swell open and to hold it in position because it opens up every 
mute in the instrument. The larger the action, that is to say, the more reeds and stops the 
action has, the greater the pressure required to operate the Grand Organ or left knee swell. 
With the right knee swell, however, the conditions are entirely different. The function of 
the right knee swell is only to open the Principal and Diapason Forte Stops or the lids 
over the swell boxes, and it requires but a few ounces of pressure to move it. If the 
Diapason and Principal Stops are open, and you then attempt to use the right knee swell, 
it will stay wherever you put it, simply because there is nothing for it to operate against, 
as by drawing out the Principal and Diapason Forte Stops you open the swells which it 
controls. To prove whether or not the right knee swell is working properly push in all 
the stops except the Melodia and Diapason, for instance, play a chord and then push the 
right knee swell over and let it come back again. It should swell out the tone, making it 
louder, and as the knee swell comes back into position, the tone should be subdued again. 
That is the function of the right knee swell. It might be well to take out the back of your 
organ and have someone operate first the Grand Organ or left knee swell and the right 
knee swell or Swell Organ, you watching how this operates on the action. 

Very rarely a little moisture will settle in the block through which the swell rod (D) 
runs (Fig. 1, page 5.) If, when the swell rod is pushed to the right, this wire sticks, 
then moisture has settled in the guide block, swelling it and binding on the wire. It 
you will remove the key slip you will have access to this block, and with the use of an 
ordinary kitchen knife you can reach down and loosen the screws that hold it, thus giv- 
ing the rod more room, and this will overcome any complaint of the sticking of the swell 
rod. 

13. SOMETIMES THE KEYS OF AN ORGAN TURN PINK OR BLUE. This is 
a common complaint and is fully explained herewith, together with a simple means of 
removing the trouble. 

THE REMEDY. 

There are no organs made, except pipe organs, which are fitted with ivory keys. The 
keys are all composition and this is true of all organs of all makes, and in all organs, no 
matter what the name or make, the keys under certain conditions are liable to show a dis- 
coloration, either of a blue, red or pink shade. Sometimes, but very rarely, they become 
yellow also. This complaint is not one that is made of the Beckwith alone but is common 

We are not responsible for any bills for repairs not authorized by us in writing. 



to all reed organs of all makes where the keys come into indirect contact with the pecu- 
liar chemical properties of aniline dye. 

At the present time practically all fabrics, silk as well as all other cloth, are colored 
with dyes that have aniline as their basis, and the peculiar chemical properties of the aniline 
are communicated to the keys of an organ in an indirect way. Sometimes the performer's 
hands are moist and the chemical properties are communicated from articles dyed with 
aniline dye as a basis through the medium of the perspiration on the hands, and are carried 
to the keys, not the color itself, but the chemical properties of the dye, which, when trans- 
ferred to the organ keys, will in time produce one of the shades of color as stated. 
Another cause is carelessness on the part of the performer in not entirely rinsing the soap 
from the hands after washing. All soap contains a certain percentage of lye and this at 
times and under certain conditions will cause discoloration of the keys. Care used in keep- 
ing the hands and fingers both free from perspiration, as well as soap, should entirely 
remove any possibility of your organ keys changing color. If they do, then moisten a soft 
cloth with equal pirts of water and alcohol (do not, however, use wood alcohol), and dip 
it into ordinary whiting, such as you use for cleaning silver, or powdered pumice stone, 
and rub the keys well, 'using care not to Use so much alcohol as to let it run down between 
the keys. By proceeding thus you will entirely remove this discoloration which is caused 
by transferring the chemical properties of aniline dye to the keys through the action of 
perspiration or a soapy condition of the hands. If you do not succeed, then send to us. 
We sell the Universal Organ Key Cleaner at 10 cents a bottle. This is the same identical 
cleaner that all organ manufacturers recommend. 

14. SOMETIMES FOR SOME REASON IT IS NECESSARY TO TAKE OUT THE 
ACTION OF AN ORGAN. This is the simplest way to get at the valve in case the valve 
it caught on the guide pin, or to get at the valves for any reason whatsoever. 

HOW TO REMOVE THE ACTION. 

First take off the top of the organ, if it has a top. Then take off the flat board on top 
of the base by removing the screws that hold it. Then take out the fall board and you will 
be right down to the action. Now remove the back of the organ and take off the keyslip 
in front. At the back of the organ you will find some screws which go down through the 
sounding board into the foundation board which is indicated by the letters "HH" in the 
illustration (Fig. 1 on page 5). Remove all the screws going down through the sounding 
board, working from the back of the organ. Then go around to the front and you will find 
some screws which go up through the foundation board into the sounding board from 
beneath the keyboard. Take these out and the action is ready to be removed. Now refer 
again to Figure 1, page 5, and you will note the two knee swell wires indicated by the letters 
"DD." If you will take hold of the front of the action and lift it up so that these knee 
swell wires are raised above the foundation board, you can then slide the action right out 
and can then tip it up and look at the valves. This requires no mechanical knowledge. All 
that is necessary is that you know how to take out the screws. In putting the action back 
again you cannot make a mistake because it must be set properly before the screws will find 
the old screw holes, so you see there will be no risk on your part. In putting it back, be 
sure that the packing is placed between the sounding board rim and the foundation board, 
and that the screws are driven in as tight as they will go. 

15. SOMETIMES A SQUEALING NOISE IS HEARD WHEN THE PEDALS 
ARE PUMPED. This is unavoidable at tjmes, but is not any more serious than the squeak- 
ing of a buggy wheel that needs oiling. The pedal rollers need lubricating ; that is all. _ 
We are not responsible for any bills for repairs not authorized by us in writing. 



THE REMEDY. 

If the noise sounds like a growl or what is called a "wolfing" or roaring sound, then the 
pedal rollers are not at fault but the trouble lies with the feeder valves, as explained in 
paragraph 7, but if the noise is like the squeaking of a hinge or buggy wheel that needs 
oiling, then the trouble is in the pedal rollers. Take off the lower panel immediately above 
the pedals and below the keyboard and the pedal rollers will be in plain view. Secure 
about two or three cents worth of plumbago at any drug store and mix it into a thick, stiff 
paste with a few drops of sewing machine oil. Force this paste into the opening in the 
pedal rollers, using a common kitchen knife for the purpose. This will form a perfect 
graphite lubrication and will coat the inside roller completely, which will prevent further 
trouble on this score. Do not use any other lubricant; oil, mutton tallow or lard alone are 
liable to pause the rollers <;o swell up, binding on the bearing and, therefore, they will work 
too hard. 
MOUSE PROOF ORGANS. 

No matter how an organ is .built, without the customer's co-operation the organ is 
not mouse proof. It is a mistaken idea to think that mice damage an organ by getting into 
the instrument around the pedals or from underneath the organ. The trouble caused by 
mice is the result of their getting into the action where they destroy the high grade leathers 
and felts in the action as well as cutting their way through the tracker pins. If mice get 
into the lower part of a Beckwith organ, they cannot get into the upper part of the action 
because they are prevented from so doing, owing to the foundation board which bars their 
further progress. If organ owners would only close their organs at night, mice could not 
enter the instrument so as to damage it, because they get into organs by climbing up on to 
the keys, and if the organ is open it is a simple matter for them to squeeze in under or 
over the fall board and then the damage is done. Keep your organ closed at night if mice 
are in your home and you will effectually prevent their damaging the action, the only part 
of the instrument where damage can be done. 

IT IS ABSOLUTELY IMPOSSIBLE FOR YOU TO DAMAGE THE ORGAN BY 
FOLLOWING DIRECTIONS, and we hereby pledge ourselves that you will not do so. 
Do not write us until you have exhausted every means at your disposal, with these direc- 
tions before you, for removing your complaint; then if you are not successful, take the 
matter up with us and we promise, to write you fully and at once. 

When writing us in regard to any trouble, be sure to give all the information you can, 
as that will save a great deal of correspondence and, therefore, much time. Your organ 
may give you a little trouble whether it is a Beckwith or some other well known make, 
but do not jump to the conclusion that the organ is of inferior quality, because all organs 
are subject to changes of atmosphere and temperature. All we ask is, if you have a com- 
plaint, that you follow these directions very carefully, and then if you do not overcome the 
trouble, write to us at once and in full. 

It is well to repeat here that the complaints shown in this book are those which will 
show from time to time in all organs made, regardless of name or price asked. The reme- 
dies given are those which would be suggested to you by any organ factoiy or any organ 
expert. If you were to call in an experienced repair man, he would do no more than is 
shown in these pages. 

It is well to remember that organ actions are made almost entirely of wood, and in the 
Beckwith Organs this wood is the finest quality of straight grained, thoroughly air seasoned 
and honestly kiln dried. It is also true that the drier wood is the more easily it is affected 
by moisture. A dry sponge will absorb moisture more quickly than a wet sponge. The 
action in a Pipe Organ costing ten thousand dollars or more, made with the highest degree 
of skill and the choicest material, will show the same conditions if exposed to moisture, for 
well seasoned wood will swell in wet weather and shrink in dry weather, and no power on 
earth will prevent it. 

Keep your organ free from the operation of moisture and all extremes of temperature, 
and you should have no trouble with it at any time. 

We are not responsible for any bills for repairs not authorized by us in writing. 



FOLLOWING IS AN EXTRACT TAKEN FROM A CIRCULAR PUBLISHED BY 
THE NATIONAL PIANO MANUFACTURERS* ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA. 
THE ARGUMENTS ADVANCED BY THOSE MANUFACTURERS APPLY 
WITH EQUAL FORCE TO AN ORGAN, AND WE ASK YOU TO READ IT 
CAREFULLY: 

"Tne warrant against defective material and workmanship is not a warrant against 
inherent qualities of the materials which must be used. No court and no real expert would 
think of holding a piano manufacturer responsible because thoroughly kiln dried wood 
swells in damp weather and shrinks again in a furnace heated house, or because the iron, 
and steel parts rust. The watch manufacturer, when he warrants, a watch, does not war- 
rant that the case will not become scratched and grow dull in the pocket; or that there 
will be no necessity of the watch being cleaned and regulated. A carriage manufacturer 
who makes and warrants first class carriages does not make a wheel that will not get loose 
and shaky if it is allowed to stand still in a dry stable without use and washing, for it 
will inevitably obey the laws of nature, and good .workmanship and good material cannot 
alter these well known facts. 

"To warrant matter — materials — as being free from their destructive natural qualities 
would be to grossly misrepresent, and would be absurd on the face of it, because it would in- 
volve an impossibility ; and only an ignorant or dishonest person would warrant that the metal 
parts shall not rust; that the wood of the case or action shall not shrink and swell with the 
varying conditions of dryness and humidity of the atmosphere; nor, in short, that it will not 
suffer one and all the effects of the passage of time, beginning from the very moment it 
leaves the manufacturer's hands. Common sense and all the laws of nature join in warrant- 
ing that it will immediately begin so to suffer. 

"It is an actual fact there are people who, because the purchase is to them an important 
event, claim that a manufacturer's warrant against defective materials means that the lumber 
has been seasoned in such a way that it cannot swell and shrink. Thes,e people are honest; 
they are reasonable In their intentions; they really think their claims are just. They know 
by experience that the best flannel in the world will begin to shrink at its first washing, and 
continue to shrink for all time, that no warrant could save it, and that its shrinking is one of 
the proofs that it is flannel and 'all. wool;' but not having had experience in pianos they un- 
thinkingly expect impossibilities of materials. They are, in a sense, unreasoning, though 
not meaning to be unreasonable. Now it is as impossible to prevent the rusting of steel and 
iron, the swelling of seasoned wood in damp weather as the shrinking of flannel in the or- 
dinary process of washing and drying. 

"There is one thing of which people rarely think when they assert that the musical instru- 
ment in their house has not been subjected to seveYe and sudden changes of temperature. 
The woman who owns the piano will say that the room where the piano stands is always 
kept at a uniformly comfortable temperature day and night. But if she were told that the 
room was dirty, never swept and never aired, she would be indignant. Her neighbors could 
testify that once in so many days — and frequently too — the windows of that room are thrown 
wide open, whether summer or winter, hot or cold, and that there is sweeping, dusting and 
airing going on for some time. The colder the weather is, in all probability the warmer 
the house from artificial heat just before the windows were opened. Here we have a sudden 
change that 5s brought about every few days in a well kept house. The delicate child will 
be hustled out of the room while the cold draft is there, but the delicate musical instrument 
is left to stand it, and very properly too, for it is not worth the same amount of care. 

"The fact is, it has no right to be exalted in any one's mind to any such position in the 
cloudland of unreason as to lead to the expectation that it isn't going to show the natural 
effects of time, of wear, and what is sometimes called 'the inherent cussedness of matter.' 

"Respectfully, 
"The National Piano Manufacturers' Association of America." 

We are not responsible for any bills for repairs not authorized by us in writing. 



The Refining Influence of Music 

The study of ancient history shows that man has always been attracted by rhythmical 
or musical sound. The ancient Greeks, the Phoenicians, and before them the half civilized 
inhabitants of the world had their music, crude music it is true, but nevertheless har- 
monious sounds, that had an influence in shaping their destiny. 

Today in the jungles of Africa, in the wilderness of Australia, in the glare of the 
tropical sun, wherever man is found there also will be found music in its primitive form. 
Music has always been a potent force in shaping the destinies of man. While it is true that 
"Music hath charms to soothe the savage breast," it is also just as true that in all wars, 
whether for a righteous 'or unrighteous cause, man has been stirred by music to desperate 
deeds. As man has, developed in civilization, in. his mode of living, in thought and in intel- 
lect, so music has also developed ; and at the present time in the vast majority of homes, of 
all the forces in the home circle that serve to bind the members of the home circle together 
in closer bonds of interest and affection, music is the most forceful and potent. 

Music uplifts the mind to higher things. With many a grown man and woman, one 
of the fondest recollections is the memory of the happy evenings at home, given up to the 
enjoyment of music of varied character. Many a youth about to take his first downward 
step has been turned back into the paths of rectitude by hearing some familiar tune closely 
associated with his childhood, with his mother and home. 

The recollection of our childhood is everlasting, and as the years pass by the mind in- 
stinctively turns to the days of youth and the happy hours spent in the old home, and to 
those homes in which music has been a large factor in character building, the memory of 
the grown man and woman turns with unspeakable tenderness, and as we grow older we 
realize the power that music exerts over us for that which is good and ennobling. 

Organ music has a certain grandeur that is lacking in other instrumental music. It 
was almost entirely the music of our forefathers, and the organ holds a place in the hearts 
of the people of the present day from which it would be hard to dislodge it. A good organ 
played with taste and good judgment produces music that stirs the emotions. Many or- 
ganists of real talent, through a misunderstanding of the value of the stops on an organ, 
while playing the instrument very acceptably, nevertheless fail to secure the best combina- 
tions of reeds on the instrument and hence do not secure the most desirable quality of tone. 

In the following pages will be found full descriptions of all the Beckwith Grand Or- 
chestral Actions, showing the different sets of reeds in each action, the number of reeds in 
each set, the number and the names of the stops controlling these reeds, the value of the 
stops, as well as timely suggestions for using them so as to secure the best results, the best 
combinations of sound, the most satisfactory results in organ playing. A careful reading 
of these suggestions will prove instructive and valuable to you. 



SUGGESTIONS FOR THE USE OF THE BECKWITH GRAND ORCHESTRAL 
ACTIONS A, B, C, D, E, F AND G. 

GRAND ORCHESTRAL ACTION A, 5 OCTAVES, 11 STOPS, 

Containing 122 extra quality double riveted, specially treated grand orchestral reeds, 
as follows : 

Bass Side. Treble Side. 

Diapason Reeds 24 notes Melodia Reeds 37 notes 

Principal Reeds 24 notes Celeste Reeds 37 notes 

We are not responsible for any bills fo£ repairs not authorized by us in writing. 



These reeds produce a delightful quality of tone and are controlled by the following 
stops : 

@©@0©@®000© 

For your complete information we list these stops with their tone quality and pitch, 
as follows : 

Bass Coupler A mechanical stop, coupling the octaves in the bass. 
Diapason Round, full and sonorous; 8-foot pitch. 

Dulciana Sweet and soothing. Soft stop of the Diapason. 

Principal Full, soft and clear; 4-foot pitch. 

Diapason Forte A mechanical stop that increases the volume of tone in the treble. 
Vox Humana A mechanical stop that produces a wavy, undulating effect. 
Principal Forte A mechanical stop that increases the volume of tone in the bass. 
Celeste Beautifully sympathetic and brilliant ; 8-foot pitch. 

Cremona Soft and soothing. Soft stop of the Melodia. 

Melodia Sweet and full ; 8-foot pitch. 

Treble Coupler A mechanical stop, coupling the octaves in the treble. 

This action also includes two knee swells, the Grand Organ and the Swell Organ. 

To guide you to a proper use of the stops in this beautiful action we make the following 
suggestions : 

If you wish to play very soft music, draw the Dulciana and Cremona stops, These are 
the soft stops of the Diapason and Melodia set of reeds and work on the same set as the 
Melodia and Diapason stops, as explained in the foregoing list of stops. To build up the 
tone and make it still louder, draw the Diapason and Melodia stops. This permits the full 
value of these two sets of reeds to sing out in all their purity. For still louder work, as an 
accompaniment to voices, etc., draw the Principal and Celeste. This makes a very pleasing 
combination with much body of tone. To build the tone still further, draw the Treble 
Coupler and the Bass Coupler. Then you have a ponderous quality of tone, and to get the 
full power of the organ without using the knee swells, draw the Diapason Forte and Prin- 
cipal Forte stops. Then you have the same effect that you can secure by using both knee 
swells at once, even with all the other stops closed. 

For solo work use the Dulciana and Celeste stops, together with the Vox Humana, but 
you must, be sure not to play the accompaniment higher than the first F below middle C, 
because that is where one set of reeds ends and the other begins. 

A louder effect can be secured with the Principal stop for an accompaniment and the 
Cremona and Celeste for the melody, either with or without the Vox Humana. 

The use of the Vox Humana is a matter of personal taste and your own judgment will 
tell you when you can use it to best advantage. The right knee swell is used for increasing 
the tone. You can play the organ very softly and by pressing very slowly on the right knee 
swell you can swell out the tone just as in a great pipe organ. 

GRAND ORCHESTRAL ACTION B, 5 OCTAVES, 15 STOPS, 

Containing 183 extra quality, double riveted, specially treated grand orchestral reeds, 
as follows: 

Bass Side. Treble Side. 

Diapason Reeds 24 notes Melodia Reeds 37 notes 

Principal Reeds 24 notes Celeste Reeds 37 notes 

Bourdon Reeds 24 notes Flute Reeds 37 notes 

We are not responsible for any bill* for repairs not authorized by us in writing. 

14 



These reeds produce a delightful quality of tone and are all controlled by the following 
stops : 



For your complete information we list these stops with their tone quality and pitch, as 
follows : 

Bass Coupler A mechanical stop, coupling the octaves in the bass. 

Bourdon Deep, full tone, substrata of the organ ; 16-foot pitch. 

Diapason Round, full and sonorous ; 8-foot pitch. 

Dulciana Sweet and soothing. Soft stop of the Diapason. 

Principal Full, soft and clear; 4-foot pitch. 

Viola Soft and sweet. Soft stop of the Principal. 

Principal Forte A mechanical stop that increases the volume of tone in the treble. 
Vox Humana A mechanical stop that produces a wavy, undulating effect. 
Diapason Forte A mechanical stop that increases the volume of tone in the bass. 
Flute Brilliant and clear with beautiful flute quality ; 8-foot pitch. 

Cremona Soft and soothing. Soft stop of the Melodia. 

Melodia Sweet and full ; 8-foot pitch. 

Dulcet Very pleasing and of soft quality. Soft stop of the Celeste. 

Celeste Beautiful, sympathetic and brilliant; 8-foot pitch. 

Treble Coupler A mechanical stop for coupling the octaves in the treble. 

This action also includes two knee swells, the Grand Organ and the Swell Organ. 

To guide you to a proper use of the stops in this beautiful action we make the following 
suggestions : 

If you wish to play very soft music, draw the Dulciana and Cremona stops. These 
are the soft stops of the Diapason and Melodia set of reeds and work on the same sets as 
the Melodia and Diapason stops, as explained in the list of stops above given. To build up 
the tone and make it still louder, draw the Diapason and Melodia stops. This permits the 
full value of these two sets of reeds to sing out in all their purity. For still louder work, 
as an accompaniment to voices, etc., draw the Principal and Celeste. This makes a very 
pleasing combination with much body of tone. To build' the tone still further, draw the 
Flute stop and the Bourdon. The tone may be further increased by drawing the Bass 
Coupler and Treble Coupler, and the Principal Forte and Diapason Forte as well. This 
will secure the full power of the organ, which may also be secured by opening both knee 
swells to their fullest capacity. For solo work use the Dulciana stop and Celeste stop, 
together with the Vox Humana. In this event you must be sure not to play the accom- 
paniment higher than the first F above middle C, because that is where one set of reeds ends 
and the other begins. 

Another beautiful and louder solo effect may be secured by using the Principal stop 
for the accompaniment with the Cremona and Celeste for the melody, with or without the 
Vox Humana. 

Another effective combination is obtained by drawing the Celeste and Flute in the treble 
with the Principal accompaniment in the bass, or another can be secured by drawing the 
Melodia and Flute in the treble and the Viola in the bass. A combination of the Celeste as 
a solo stop, accompaniment by the Dulciana in the bass, is also much used, and with the 
addition of the Vox Humana makes a very effective combination, provided the accompani- 
ment is light. 

The couplers should never be used except as an auxiliary to the full organ, as the 
practice of using them on combinations of two or more stops is not correct and does not 

We are not responsible for any bills for repairs not authorized by us in writing. 

15 



secure the best effects. For accompanying four to eight instruments or voices, an effective 
combination is secured by using the Celeste and Melodia in the treble with the Bourdon 
and Diapason in the bass. • This may be reinforced with the Flute if necessary, although 
the Flute, being essentially a solo stop, should not be used for accompaniments unless it is 
necessary to increase the volume. The use of the Vox Humana is a matter of personal taste 
and your own judgment will tell you when you can use it to best advantage. The right 
knee swell is used for increasing the tone. You can play the organ very softly if desired, 
and by pressing very slowly on the right knee swell you can swell out the tone just as the 
tone is swelled out in the great pipe organ. 

GRAND ORCHESTRAL ACTION C, 5 OCTAVES, 17 STOPS, 

Containing 244 extra quality, double riveted, specially treated grand orchestral reeds, 
as follows : 

Bass Side. Treble Side. 

Diapason Reeds 24 notes Melodia Reeds 37 notes 

Principal Reeds 24 notes Celeste Reeds 37 notes 

Clarionet Reeds 24 notes Flute Reeds 37 notes 

Bourdon Reeds 24 notes Cornet Echo Reeds 37 notes 

These reeds produce a delightful quality of tone and are all controlled by the following 
stops : 



For your complete information we list these stops with their tone quality and pitch, as 
follows : 

Bass Coupler A mechanical stop, coupling the octaves in the bass. 

Bourdon Deep, full tone, substrata of the organ ; lG-foot pitch. 

Cornet Echo Beautiful, soft cornet quality of tone ; 4-foot pitch. 

Principal Full, soft and clear; 4-foot pitch. 

Viola Soft and sweet. Soft stop of the Principal. 

Diapason Round, full and sonorous ; 8-foot pitch. 

Dulciana Sweet and soothing. Soft stop of the Diapason. 

Principal Forte A mechanical stop that increases the volume of tone in the treble. 
Vox Humana A mechanical stop that produces a wavy, undulating effect. 
Diapason Forte A mechanical stop that increases the volume of tone in the bass. 
Cremona Soft and soothing. Soft stop of the Melodia. 

Melodia Sweet and full; 8-foot pitch. 

Cornet Soft and sweet. Soft stop of the Celeste. 

Celeste Beautiful, sympathetic and brilliant; 8-foot pitch. 

Flute Brilliant with beautiful flute quality; 4 foot pitch. 

Clarionet A beautiful solo stop of strong reedy quality; 16-foot pitch. 

Treble Coupler A mechanical stop for coupling the octaves in the treble. 

This action also includes two knee swells, the Grand Organ and the Swell Organ. 

To guide you to a proper use of the stops in this beautiful action we make the folio v- 
ing suggestions : 

If you wish to play very soft music, draw the Dulciana and Cremona stops. These are 
the soft stops of the Diapason and Melodia set of reeds and work on the same sets as the 
Melodia and Diapason stops, as explained in the list of stops above given. To build up 
the tone and make it still louder, draw the Diapason and Melodia stops. This permits the 
full value of these two sets of reeds to sing out in all their purity. For still louder work, 

We are not responsible for any bills foe repairs not authorised by US in writing. 



as an accompaniment to voices, etc., draw the Principal and Celeste: This makes a very 
pleasing combination with much body of tone. Now, by drawing the Flute and Bourdon 
stops, the volume will be largely increased. To build up the tone to the full capacity of 
the organ, draw the Clarionet and Cornet Echo, then the Bass and Treble Coupler, to which 
may be added, if desired, both the Principal and Diapason Forte stops. As the Viola is a 
soft stop of the Principal, and the Comet is a soft stop of the Celeste set of reeds, the above 
combination will secure the full power of the Grand Organ, just as it may be secured by 
opening both of the knee swells to their fullest capacity. 

For solo work use the Dulciana stop and Celeste stop, together with the Vox Humana. 
You must be sure not to play the accompaniment higher than the first F below middle C, 
because that is where one set of reeds ends and the other begins. 

Another beautiful and louder solo effect may be secured by using the Principal stop for 
the accompaniment with the Cremona and Celeste for the melody, with or without the Vox 
Humana. 

Another effective combination is obtained by drawing the Celeste and Flute in the treble 
with the Principal for accompaniment in the bass; or another can be secured by drawing 
the Melodia and Flute in the treble and the Viola in the bass. A combination of the 
Celeste as a solo stop, accompanied by the Dulciana in the bass is also much used, and with 
the addition of the Vox Humana makes a very effective combination, provided the accom- 
paniment is light. 

For ordinary playing sufficient volume may be secured by drawing the Diapason, 
Melodia, Principal and Celeste. These stops will combine the two solid 8-foot sets and 
give considerable volume. 

On no account should you draw the Clarionet when playing an accompaniment for four 
or eight voices ; but, should the occasion warrant, the combination can be reinforced with 
the Flute. 

Other charming combinations may be had as follows : 

A combination of the Clarionet in the treble with the Cornet Echo in the bass, using 
care not to play the accompaniment above first F below middle C. This may be rein- 
forced with the Flute in the treble and Viola in the bass for slightly heavier work. 

Another combination is to use the Cremona and the Cornet stops with the Viola accom- 
paniment. 

Do not overdo the use of the Vox Humana stop ; it should be used with discrimination. 
Your own artistic sense will prompt you when to use it to advantage. Never use the Vox 
Humana with the full organ; it is not necessary. It is only a valuable accessory in com- 
bination with solo stops. 

The Bourdon bass should never be drawn except as an aid to the full organ, provided 
the knee swell is not used. Being of a 16-foot pitch it necessarily would produce an over- 
powering accompaniment which would ruin an ordinary combination. The organist should 
pay particular attention to this, as many otherwise fine effects are ruined by attempting to 
use this stop in the bass against the lighter stops in the treble. 

Use the couplers with discrimination. Unless nearly the full organ is used it is liable 
to produce a squeaky result, caused by the fact that the Treble Coupler couples up higher 
than the Bass Coupler does, not only in the Beckwith but in all organs, thus making the 
organ top heavy. Many organists have a tendency to use the couplers with one or two 
stops in the bass and treble. This is a mistake and should be avoided. 

A further fine combination is the Diapason, Melodia, Principal, Celeste, Cornet Echo 
and Flute, adding the couplers if required to give an increased volume of tone, using the 

We are not responsible for any bills for repairs not authorized by us in writing. 

17 



right knee swell when necessary. Such a combination in this organ will carry from 200 to 
300 voices effectively and will sustain them without any trouble whatever. 

It might be well to add a word of warning and to repeat that the Clarionet stop is 
essentially a solo stop and should not be used in ordinary accompaniments such as the one 
above mentioned. 

Another combination is the Celeste and Melodia, Bourdon and Diapason. According 
to taste, this may be reinforced with the Flute, although the Flute, being essentially a s6lo 
st^op, should not be used for accompaniments unless it is desirable to increase the volume. 

Many organists, wfyen they sit down to an organ, press the right knee swell over and 
keep it there all the time. By so doing the maximum volume of the organ is produced and it 
leaves the organist nothing to help out with if he wishes to secure louder effects. 

The right knee swell is used for increasing the tone. You can play the organ very 
softly if desired, and by pressing very slowly on the right knee swell you can build up the 
tone, just as the tone is swelled out in a great pipe organ. The left knee swell brings into 
use every set of reeds in the organ and all the mechanical stops excepting those controlled 
by the right knee swell, namely, the Principal Forte and Diapason Forte. 

GRAND ORCHESTRAL ACTION D, 6 OCTAVES, 11 STOPS, 

Containing 146 extra quality, double riveted, specially treated grand orchestral reeds, 
as follows: 

Bass Side. Treble Side. 

Diapason Reeds 24 notes Melodia Reeds 49 notes 

Principal Reeds 24 notes Celeste Reeds 49 notes 

These reeds produce a delightful quality of tone and are all controlled by the following 

For your complete information we list these stops with their tone quality and pitch, as 
follows : 

Bass Coupler A mechanical stop, coupling the octaves in the bass. 
Diapason Round, full and sonorous ; 8-foot pitch. 

Dulciana Sweet and soothing. Soft stop of the Diapason. 

Principal Full, soft and clear; 4-foot pitch. 

Diapason Forte A mechanical stop that increases the volume of tone in the bass. 
Vox Humana A mechanical stop that produces a wavy, undulating effect. 
Principal Forte A mechanical stop that increases the volume of tone in the treble. 
Celeste Beautifully sympathetic and brilliant ; 8-foot pitch. 

Cremona Soft and soothing. Soft stop of the Melodia. 

Melodia Sweet and full ; 8-foot pitch. 

Treble Coupler A mechanical stop coupling the octaves in the treble. 

This action also includes two knee swells, the Grand Organ and the Swell Organ. 

To guide you to a proper use of the stops in this beautiful action we would ask you to 
read. the suggestions shown on page 14, referring to Grand Orchestral Action A, 5 octaves. 
This is the same action identically, except that it has two extra octaves of reeds on the 
treble side, but all controlled by the same stops. Therefore, by following the suggestions 
for using the stops in Grand Orchestral Action A, you will get the best effects possible to 
secure in this action as well, for it has the same sets of reeds as Grand Orchestral Action 
A. It has identically the same action, is built the same, controlled by the same stops, the 
only difference being the two extra octaves of reeds on the right hand side, a total of 

14fi in all 

We are not responsible for any bills for repairs not authorized by us in writing. 

18 



GRAND ORCHESTRAL ACTION E, 6 OCTAVES, 17 STOPS, 

Containing 292 extra quality, double riveted, specially treated grand orchestral reeds, as 
follows : 

Bass Side. Treble Side. 

Diapason Reeds 24 notes Melodia Reeds 49 notes 

Principal Reeds 24 notes Celeste Reeds 49 note* 

Clarionet Reeds 24 notes Flute Reeds 49 notes 

Bourdon Reeds 24 notes Cornet Reeds 49 notes 

These reeds produce a delightful quality of tone and are all controlled by the following 
stops : 

/""*\ /Z^\ /"~\ /*~N /~"\ /""N /^N /T\ /^Tik i 

citmul (meum) icormetI fausnl faun J 

For your complete information we list these stops with their tone quality and pitch, as 
follows : 

Bass Coupler A mechanical stop, coupling the octaves in the bass. 

Bourdon Deep, full tone, substrata of the organ ; 16-foot pitch. 

Cornet Echo Beautiful, soft cornet quality of tone; 2-foot pitch. 

Principal Full, soft and clear; 4-foot pitch. 

Viola Soft and sweet. Soft stop of the Principal. 

Diapason Round, full and sonorous; 8-foot pitch. 

Dulciana Sweet and soothing. Soft stop of the Diapason. 

Principal Forte A mechanical stop that increases the volume of tone in the treble. 

Vox Humana A mechanical stop that produces a wavy, undulating effect. 

Diapason Forte A mechanical stop that increases the volume of tone in the bass. 

Cremona Soft and soothing. Soft stop of the Melodia. 

Melodia Sweet and full; 8-foot pitch. 

Cornet Clear and brilliant cornet quality of tone. Soft stop of Celeste. 

Celeste Beautiful, sympathetic and brilliant; 8-foot pitch. 

Flute Brilliant and clear with beautiful flute quality; 4-foot pitch. 

Clarionet A beautiful solo stop of strong reedy quality; 16-foot pitch. 

Treble Coupler A mechanical stop for coupling the octaves in the treble. 

This action also includes two knee swells, the Grand Organ and the Swell Organ. 

To guide you to a proper use of the stops in this beautiful action we would ask you to 
read the suggestions given on pages 16 and 17, referring to Grand Orchestral Action C, 5 oc- 
taves. This is the same action identically, except that it has four extra octaves of reeds on the 
treble side, but all controlled by the same stops. Therefore, by following the suggestions 
for using the stops in Grand Orchestral Action C, you will get the best effects possible to 
secure in this action as well, for it has the same sets of reeds as Grand Orchestral Action C. 
It has identically the same action, is built the same, controlled by the same stops, the only 
difference being the four extra octaves of reeds on the right hand side, a total of 292 in all. 

GRAND ORCHESTRAL ACTION F, 5 OCTAVES, 18 STOPS, 

Containing 257 extra quality, double riveted, specially treated grand orchestral reeds, 
as follows : 

Bass Side. Treble Side. 

Diapason Reeds 24 notes Melodia Reeds 37 notes 

Principal Reeds 24 notes Celeste Reeds 37 notes 

Clarionet Reeds 24 notes Flute Reeds 37 notes 

Bourdon Reeds 24 notes Cornet Echo Reeds 37 notes 

Sub-Bass Reeds 13 notes 

We are not responsible for any bills for repairs not authorized by us in writing. 

19 



These reeds produce a delightful quality of tone and are all controlled by the following 
stops : 



For your complete information we list these stops with their tone quality and pitch, as 
follows : 

Bass Coupler A mechanical stop, coupling the octaves in the bass. 

Sub-Bass Deep and majestic, a ponderous pipe organ tone; 16-foot pitch. 

Bourdon Deep, full tone, substrata of the organ : 16-foot pitch. 

Cornet Echo Beautiful, soft cornet quality of tone; 2 -foot -pitch. 

Principal Full, soft and clear; 4-foot pitch. 

Viola Soft and sweet. Soft stop of the Principal. 

Diapason Round, full and sonorous ; 8-foot pitch. 

Dulciana Sweet and soothing. Soft stop of the Diapason. 

Principal Forte A mechanical stop that increases the volume of tone in the treble. 

Vox Humana A mechanical stop that produces a wavy, undulating effect. 

Diapason Forte A mechanical stop that increases the volume of tone in the bass. 

Cremona Soft and soothing. Soft stop of the Melodia. 

Melodia Sweet and full ; 8-foot pitch. 

Cornet Soft and sweet. Soft stop of the Celeste. 

Celeste Beautiful, sympathetic and brilliant; 8-foot pitch. 

Flute Brilliant with beautiful flute quality ; 4 -foot pitch. 

Clarionet A beautiful solo stop of strong reedy quality ; 16-ioot pitch 

Treble Coupler A mechanical stop for coupling the octaves in the treble. 

This action also includes two knee swells, the Grand Organ and the Swell Organ. 

To guide you to a proper use of the stops in this beautiful action we make the following 
suggestions : 

If you wish to play very soft, music, draw the Dulciana and Cremona stops. These are 
the soft stops of the Diapason and Melodia set of reeds and work on the same sets as the 
Melodia and Diapason stops, as explained in the list of stops above given. To build up the 
tone, draw the Diapason and Melodia stops. This permits the full value of these two sets of 
reeds to sing out in all their purity. For still louder work, as an accompaniment to voices, etc.. 
draw the Principal and Celeste. This makes a very pleasing combination with much body of 
tone. By adding the Flute and Bourdon stops, the volume will be largely increased. To build 
up the tone to the full capacity of the organ, draw the Clarionet and Cornet Echo, then the 
Bass and Treble Coupler, to which may be- added, if desired, both the Principal and Diapason 
Forte stops. As the Viola is a soft stop of the Principal, and the Cornet is a soft stop of the 
Celeste set of reeds, the above combination will secure the full power of the Grand Organ, 
just as it may be secured by opening both of the knee swells to their fullest capacity. 

For solo work use the Dulciana stop and Celeste stop, together with the Vox Humana. 
You must be sure not to play the accompaniment higher than the first F below middle C, 
because that is where one set of reeds ends and the other begins. 

Another beautiful solo effect may be secured by using the Principal stop for the accom- 
paniment with the Cremona and Celeste for the melody, with or without the Vox Humana. 

Another effective combination is obtained by drawing the Celeste and Flute in the treble 
with the Principal for accompaniment in the bass; or another can be secured bv drawing the 
Melodiaand Flute in the treble and the Viola in the bass. A combination oi the Celeste 
as a solo stop, accompanied by the Dulciana in the bass i- also much used, and witl 
addition of the Vox Humana makes a verv effective combination, provided the accompani- 
ment is light. 

For ordinary playing sufficient volume may be secured by drawing fW I ' tpason, 
Melodia. Principal and Celeste. These si ' combine the two solid S-f t sets and 

give considerable volume. 

We are not responsible for any bills for repairs not authorized by us in writing. 

20 



Do not draw the Clarionet when playing an accompaniment f6r four or eight voires; 
but, should the occasion warrant, the combination can be reinforced with the Flute. 

A combination of the Clarionet in the treble with the Cornet Echo in the bass, using 
care not to play the accompaniment above first F below middle C. This "may be rein- 
forced with the Flute in the treble and Viola in the bass for slightly heavier work. 

Another combination is to use the Cremona and the Cornet stops with the Viola accom- 
paniment. 

Do not overdo the use of the Vox Humana stop ; it should be used with discrimination. 
Your own artistic sense will prompt you when to use it to advantage. Never use the Vox 
Humana with the full organ { it is not necessary. It is only a valuable accessory in com- 
bination with solo stops. 

The Bourdon bass should never be drawn except as an aid to the full organ, provided 
the knee swell is not used. Being of a 16-foot pitch it necessarily would produce an over- 
powering accompaniment which would ruin an ordinary combination. The organist should 
pay particular attention to this, as many otherwise fine effects are ruined by attempting to 
use this stop in the bass against the lighter stops in the treble. 

Use the couplers with discrimination. Unless nearly the full organ is used it is liable 
to produce a squeaky result, caused by the fact that the Treble Coupler couples up higher 
than the Bass Coupler does, not only in the Beckwith but in all organs, thus making the 
organ top heavy. Many organists have a tendency to use the couplers with one or two 
stops in the bass and treble. This is a rnistake and should be avoided. 

A further fine' combination is the Diapason, Melodia, Principal, Celeste, Cornet Echo 
and Flute, adding the couplers if required to give an increased volume of tone, using the 
right knee swell when necessary. Such a combination in this organ will carry from 400 to 
600 voices effectively and will sustain them without any trouble whatever. 

It might be well to add ,a word of warning and to repeat that the Clarionet stop is 
essentially a solo stop and should not be used in ordinary accompaniments, 

Another combination is the Celeste and Melodia, Bourdon and Diapason. According 
to taste, this may be reinforced with the Flute, although the Flute being essentially a solo 
stop, should not be used for accompaniments unless it is desirable to increase the volume. 

Many organists, when they sit down to an organ, press the right knee swell over ano 
keep it there all the time. By so doing the maximum volume of the organ is produced and 
it leaves the organist nothing to secure louder effects. 

The right knee swell is used for increasing th^ tone. You can play the organ very 
softly if desired, and by pressing very slowly on the right knee swell you. can build up the 
tone, just as the tone is swelled out in a great pipe organ. The left knee swell brings into 
use every set of reeds in the organ and all the mechanical stops excepting the Sub-Bass 
reeds and those controlled by the right knee swell, namely, the Principal Forte and Diapason 
Forte. 

The Sub-Bass in this organ is extremely powerful and heavy, too much so to be used 
for anything except with the full organ, and is primarily meant for that particular class of 
work. By the full organ is meant the full organ with all the stops drawn out except the 
two couplers and the two Forte stops. It may also be used as an accompaniment to con- 
gregational 1 singing when the full organ is in nearly every instance in use, and you will find 
that this ponderous set of reeds gives wonderful foundation to the singing. 

GRAND ORCHESTRAL ACTION G, 6 OCTAVES, 18 STOPS, 

Containing 305 extra quality, double riveted, specially treated grand orchestral reeds, 
as follows : 

Bass Side. Treble Side. 

Diapson Reeds 24 notes Melodia Reeds 49 notes 

Principal Reeds 24 notes Celeste Reeds 49 notes 

Clarionet Reeds 24 notes Flute Reeds 49 notes 

Bourdon Reeds. 24 notes Cornet Reeds 49 notes 

Sub-Bass Reeds 13 notes 

We are not responsible for any bills for repairs not authorized by us in writing. 



These reeds produce a delightful quality of tone and are all controlled by the follpw- 
ing stops : 

"""\ /C5v /"~N S~\ /^"*\ /*"*\ /£Z\ SZ\ /CZ^ i 

«wl bam) (coimtrJ fman) (rum J 

For your complete information we list these stops with their tone quality and pitch, 
as follows : 

Bass Coupler A mechanical stop, coupling the octaves in the. bass. 

Sub-Bass Deep and majestic, a ponderous pipe organ tone; 16-foot pitch. 

Bourdon Deep, full tone, substrata of the organ ; 16-foot pitch. 

Cornet Echo Beautiful, soft cornet quality of tone; 2-foot' pitch. 

Principal Full, soft and clear; 4-foot pitch. 

Viola Soft and sweet. Soft stop of the Principal. 

Diapason Round, full and sonorous ; 8-foot pitch. 

Dulciana Sweet and soothing. Soft stop of the Diapason. 

Principal Forte A mechanical stop that increases the volume of tone in the treble. 

Vox Humana A mechanical stop that produces a wavy, undulating effect. 

Diapason Forte A mechanical stop that increases the volume of tone in the bass. 

Cremona Soft and soothing. Soft stop of the Melodia. 

Melodia Sweet and full ; 8-foot pitch. 

Cornet Clear and brilliant cornet quality of toiiv. Soft stop of Celeste. 

Celeste Beautiful, sympathetic and brilliant; 8-foot pitch. 

Flute Brilliant and clear with beautiful flute quality; 4-foot pitch. 

Clarionet A beautiful solo stop of strong reedy quality ; 16-toot pitch. 

Treble Coupler A mechanical stop for coupling the octaves in the treble. 

This action also includes two knee swells, the Grand Organ and the Swell Organ. 

To guide you to a proper use of the stops in this beautiful action we would ask you to 
read the suggestions given on pages 19, 20 and 21, referring to Grand Orchestral Action F, 
5 octaves. This is the same action identically, except that it has four extra octaves of reeds 
on the treble side, but all controlled by the same stops. Therefore, by following the sugges- 
tions for using the stops in Grand Orchestral Action F, you will get the best effects possible 
to secure in this action as well, for it has the same sets of reeds as Grand Orchestral Action 
F. It has identically the same action, is built the same, controlled by the same stops, the 
only difference being the four extra' octaves of reeds on the right hand side, a total of 305 
in all. 




A— Valve Chnt 
B— Ucert Cell 
C— Mute. 
D— Sonudlng : 
E — Reservoir. 



racker Pin Chimber. 



THE BECKWITH SUB-BASS. 

The mechanism of the Sub-Bass used in the Beck- 
with Organ is a distinctive Beckwith feature. A very 
large reed is used, and instead of placing it inside of 
the reservoir the reed is placed outside. This construc- 
tion, together with the improved Sub-Bass action, the 
delicately adjusted valves and the' manner of placing 
the tracker pin so as to overcome all lost motion, is a 
very valuable improvement in organ construction. 
This Sub-Bass set of reeds is only furnished in Grand 
Orchestral Actions F and G with which the Cathedral 
Pipe Tone Organ is fitted. 



We are not responsible for any bills for repairs not authorized by us in writing. 



1 ' 






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ss.-usmz <&■ s^zb**' 



-SKA 



3 1205 00155 2452 
4~ 



THE LIBRARY 
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 

Santa Barbara 



THIS BOOK IS DUE ON THE LAST DATE 
STAMPED BELOW. 




OCT 4 1977 



«*rma 



Al/P 




Series 9482 







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