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Full text of "Register of Milligan College, 1880-1894"

P.H. WELSH'MER MEMORIAL LIBRARY 
MILLIGAN COLLEGE, TN 37682 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/registerofmillig1893mill 




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ANNUAL- 



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MILLIGM l COLLEG 



HUH 



FORMERLY BUFFALO INSTITUTE, 



N:M JOHNSON CITY, TENNESSEE. 



SESSION 1880-1881', 



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(FORMERLY BUFFALO INSTITUTE,) 



Me-ar Johnson (E]ifr?, T'-eiin. 



SESSION I88O-I88L 



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98906 



BRISTOL: 

PKIXTED AT THE BRISTOL NEWS A.N'I) JOB OFFICII 

18 8 1. 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE. 



KflM&ftilSllsi 



The Institution is situated eleven miles east from Jones- 
boro, four miles from Johnson City, and half a mile from a 
new line, the E. T. & W. N. C. Railroad. 

The natural scenery is pleasant to see and remember. — 
From a fine promontory in the bend of the creek, we can 
look far up the beautiful valley to the mountains about its 
sources, then on to higher and higher summits, which in the 
back-ground are often capped with snow, when the fields 
around us are pleasant and green. Then follows the silvery 
stream, winding its way through fields and shades, until it 
passes around the college promontory and little village, and 
with a few steps remove we can see it go on to the crystal 
waters of the Watauga and behold the grand mountains bar- 
ricade that stream's rich, broad plains, until the view is lost 
in the distant curve of the valley walls. 

We invite persons passing to come up on the hill and enjoy 
the scene. 






The permanent organization is not complete, but under 
close study. 

It is designed to gather the ripest judgment and experi- 
ence of many who have tried the various plans of manage- 
ment. In the meantime the house and grounds have been 
leased to Prof. ]. Hopwood, who has personal control of the 
institution. This, with the hearty co-operation and counsel 
of some of the best teachers and citizens in this country, to 
say nothing of the friendly work and manly conduct of so 
many students, makes the movements of the school easier, 
and the work done by the teachers more cheerful and hearty 
than could be done under the dictation of any clumsy school- 
board. 



ANNUAL OF 



sv. c. McKkkiikx, 

s. F. Vm .\(i 

K. s. Thkahway, 

S. F. r.vnoN 

,| , .\ . WHITEHEAD, 

]» |>. 1 IdNNF.LI.V, ... 

[I, II. Walker 

T. A. Wills, . 

A . ( i . li KAYSUN. 

W M. LoVD ( <>LK, 

Fl.OKKNCK PlUtE, 
Mm. i.u. K. Williams. 
Florence Andkkson. 
Anna W ii.i.iams, 

l.KTTIK < 'oKNl'OKTM. 
\V II. I. IK G. FoKKN. 

T. F. LfKK. 

.1. M. M AKI1N 

(IIAKI-KS llOWKL, .... 

S. T. Williams, 

.1 . K. Holly, 

M. 1>- Fkick, 
Nathaniel Williams. 
Mdi.i.u-: Brc'K, 

W . A . V I'N CANS' 
,I(»1IN < '. Wll ' 

.1. F. <'«" 
(i. W 
II. ' 



Cave Spring, Temv. 

Dry Creek, TVi'in. 

Eli/lH'tliton, Tenn. 

..Johnson < it y , Trim. 

I niter's Ferry, Tenn. 

Taylorsville, Tt'im. 

Fandoia, Tenn, 

Tnylorsville, Tenn. 
ShownV X Koa.Ks Tenn. 

Csive Spring, Tenn. 



( >kalona, Tenn. 
( 'avt- Spring. Tenn, 



Mw in v: 



I )iv ( 'rct'k. Tenn. 

Ilakersville, N..G-. 

( 'avt' Spring, Tenn 

Fli/alx'tliton, ' r 

( 'avc Spri' 
' ........ Lies. 



JAMES F. SWINGLE, 

Assistant in La n<; lacks. 



•MRS. S. E. H0PW00D. 

Principal of Primary Department and Preparatory 

Classes. 



MRS. R. J. CORNFORTH, 

Assistant in Primary Department 



MISS MINNIE SHELBURNE, 



Teacher ok Music. 



■ r 

MILLIGflN COLLEGE. 13' 

The Contingent Fee and Tuition, for each Term, is clue 
when the Term opens. Only protracted sickness obligates us to 
return money, or make any deductions; and students having 
rooms of the Principal for the year t or term, and leaving the 
institution for money, pleasure, or any other cause, besides 
providential hindrance prohibiting attendance, will be al- 
lowed only one dollar per week deduction from total expen- 
ses, from the time they leave, until the close of the Term. It 
is well that we learn not only to take hold, but to hold on to 
a good purpose. 



ECONOMY. 

The incidental expenses of a student here are very small. 
One of our best students, and one who had the respect of all, 
went through the year and spent, for everything outside of 
published dues, less than five dollars. Many others have 
spent very little. Plain and inexpensive clothing is all that 
is desired, but it is hoped that this will be kept neat. 

Youth is the right time to learn neatness and economy. 



EXAMINATIONS. 

We have studied and tried almost every method of exami- 
nation. None seems free from objections ; but it is believed 
that the following which will be practical during the coming 
session, will, on the whole, bring the best results. Besides a 
short advance lesson, a close review each Monday. The 
most spirited and earliest recitations, looking to an under- 
standing of the subject, during the remainder of the week, 
the teacher noting any special failures or inattention. 

At the close and middle of each Term exhaustive written 
examinations. Two-fifths value to Monday's work. Two- 
fifths to written work. One fifth to notes and observations 
of the teacher during the week. 

The student must reach 80 in a scale of 100 before he can 
pass to any higher class. 



REPORTS. 

Statements of attendance on classes, of industry and de- 
portment will be sent once each month to parents or guardi- 
ans. Proficiency in studies sent with monthly report, after 
each written examination. 



* 



14 ANNUAL OF 



GRADUATION 



The movers in this College enterprise desire real work and 
prefer scholarship and thoroughly sound moral character in 
those who go out to represent the institution much before 
large numbers. In fact, we cannot conscientiously, and 
hence will not testify that a graduate has a good moral 
character, unless his former conduct assures us that he has. 

The curriculum embraces three courses : the Classical, the 
Latin Scientific, and the Scientific. The degree of A. B. 
will be conferred upon those satisfactorily completing the 
Classical, \\. S. L. for the Latin Scientific, and B. S. for the 
Scientific Course. 

No distinction as to sex in studies, examinations, or the 
giving of Diplomas. 



GOVERNMENT. 

Other things equal, that civil government is most prosper- 
ous which has the most active producers. That church has 
most spiritual life which furnishes practical christian work 
for each member and shows him the joy to come from do- 
ing it. 

A few things form the basis of good school government : 

ist. Plenty of hard work and a realization that it must be 
done. 

2d. A wideawkc active interest in that work. 

y\. A thoroughly good example and prcept by every one 
of the Faculty : Many students will then cheerfully aid the 
work. 

4th. A sharp, clear understanding, that no student how- 
ever rich, talented or advanced will be retained when it is 
learned that his influence is for evil, unless there is strong 
hope of immediate change. 

Upon these principles we shall endeavor to teach young 
people the power and worth Of self-government ; that it is 
a necessary part of the foundation for success in business, or 
any true happiness here or hereafter. 

The present Faculty are determined to furnish plenty of 
hard work, and awaken the highest possible interest which 
experience, close study of the subject in hand, educational 
works, and school journals will enable them to arouse. 



MILLIGflN COLLEGE 15 



CO-EDUCATION. 



The idea that boys and girls should be educated separately, 
is not true to human nature. The family circle is a divine 
institution. In it are boys and girls. The Sunday School is 
the result of the highest reflection and christian character. — 
They are there educated together. The church is the school 
of Christ. In it are men and women. What parent send- 
ing boys and girls from home would not prefer sending them 
together ? Many cases have come under our own observa- 
tion where brothers have derived, and given in turn, advan- 
tages from the presence of sisters in school. Some will say 
"it is impossible to keep young people from talking to each 
other." We do not know how this is, never having tried it ; 
nor do we expect to. try it until we are able to keep a body, 
unsurported, from falling to the ground. Down the stream of 
life we go ; as the little rivulets come in on the right hand or 
the left, by ditching and leading, each one can be drawn into 
the onward stream of society, almost at the place you wish ; 
but who would or could build a dam to hold a four or six 
year's current ? How surely it would break around and go 
into the great channel by the shortest route. We would not 
then prohibit proper courtesies of class-room and school-life, 
but as God enables us, point out and lead the thoughts and 
habits ol the young in the wisest steps of social life. 

Co-education tends to lead young men to good morals and 
gentle manners. It helps to govern and develop them. It 
gives strength and easier address to young ladies. It enables 
them to contrast, observe and learn the ways of life. With 
wise oversight it brings less occasion for clandestine notes, 
letters, runaways, and such evils as are connected with entire 
prohibition, but encourages manly frankness, truth and hon- 
or. Its difficulties are acknowledged, but it is believed by 
the wisest and most progressive men who have tried it that the 
beauties and excellencies of the system are more and its 
defects are fewer than any other plan of education. It is the 
plan of the home, ot the Sunday School, of the church, of 
life, and of many colleges and great universities, which twen- 
ty years ago practiced the contrary. 



NORMAL DEPARTMENT. 



If we wish to build a house, a man is sought who has learn- 
ed how to work on wood. If we wish to have a horse shod a 
man skilled in working with iron is found. If we want to 
make a deed we seek some justice or lawyer who knows how 
to write the transfer. If the child's mind is better than 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE. 17 

the last two departments can be readily converted into other 
uses. We sincerely wish that philanthropists who are giving 
millions for public charities, which reach only a few, and 
men who are giving more for princely residences, could ride 
over our mountains and along the valleys, and witness the 
Bii>ii>ands, even millions, of children hungering — starving 
for intellectual and moral food. Half a dozen palatial resi- 
dences of New York or Sanlrancisco would make a fund suf- 
ficient to educate every child in Tennessee, and with State 
aid, to educate them forever, and still the donors would have 
brincely fortunes left. May God enable each one of us, 
rich or poor, to know and to do his duty. 



THE CHILDREN'S BOARDING DEPARTMENT. 

Mere and there all over this country are citizens who desire 
to begin the education of their children at the right time. — 
However much to the shame of our State the public schools 
are short, and often unsatisfactory. We are therefore organ- 
izing a Children's Hoarding House. 

Mrs. R. J. Corn forth, our former Primary teacher, having 
purchased property, will have immediate charge of the chil- 
dren at her own home, 150 yards from the college. Outside 
ii\ school hours she will give personal -supervision to their 
studies, plays and daily lives, having regular hours for study, 
rest and recreation. 

Board Si. 25 per week. From Monday until Friday eve- 
ning or Saturday morning, 51.00. 

Washing, oversight and repair of clothe:-., 25 cts. per week, 
or, what is better, board, washing, tuition and fee> for school 
year, $67.00. 

We think none can reasonably ask it lower. That amount 
is frequently paid for the tuition of a child. We speak for 
the little folks, tender, watchful care, clear and exact educa- 
tion. Inquire of Capt D. P. Jenkins, and J. P. Scott, of 
Elizabethton, who have tried Mrs. Cornforth's supervision, 
even when the advantages were much inferior to the present 
arrangements. 



VISITOR'S RECORD. 



A record will be kept of visitors to the class-room during 
the year, and we hope that all those interested in the educa- 
tional work, and wishing to encourage those who are striving 
for higher manhood and womanhood will manifest that desire 
by their frequent presence. Walk into our class-rooms fe 
any hour you wish. 



MILLIGflN COLLEGE. 19 



soul ? Put away these relics of Olympic, Gladiatorial and 
Feudal contests, and we can point young people to the beau- 
|y and power of oratory, to the treasures of wisdom, to the 
pleasures of search for the new and undeveloped in science, 
to manly, generous feelings for each other's success, and the 
glorious growth of knowledge and wisdom among men, until 
they will eagerly search for excellence itself instead of the 
sign. Nobility of character — Christian manhood — is the 
real prize of life, and will bless its possessor. 



LITERARY SOCIETIES. 



The 1'hilomathean Society has been organized manv years. 
Its members are in many parts of the State, and different 
States. Its voice has been heard in the halls of Congress, 
and its influence felt over many public meetings. It has a 
large working membership. 

The Henry W. Longfellow Literary Society is only four 
years old, but their drill and discipline is excellent. No ex- 
cuses or apologies are allowed, but straight-forward business 
and hard work is their pleasure. Both societies meet each 
Friday night. 

The Tibfserian Society (young ladies) meets weekly. — 
Elocution, select reading, essays, colloquies, form part of 
their exercises. Some of the most entertaining programmes 
we have ever had at the institution has been by the young 
ladies of the Tibiserian ranks. 

Each of the societies will hereafter admit the Faculty to 
any and all of its exercises. One teacher, at least, will 
usually be present as a friendly adviser and co-worker. 



MORAL CULTURE. 

Better that the boy or girl be at home under Christian in- 
fluence, much better, than in the best school for mental de- 
velopment, drilled and moulded by careless or scoffing 
masters of art and science. The higher powers of thought 
and reason, without the love of honor, justice and humanity, 
will be a curse to an individual, a state, or a nation. 

After years of experience in the school-room, God being 
our wisdom and strength in the decision, we solemnly deter- 
mined not to retain any student in school, no matter what 
his wealth, influence or talent, who will use profane or ob- 
scene language', intoxicating drinks, or persist in any unwor- 
thy conduct. And we invite all young men, who will not 



T 



ANNUAL OF 



LECTURES. 



For the force and influence of the morning lectures, touch- 
ing almost every department of practical, social and ethical 
life, we refer you to the students and friends who hear them. 
Hereafter a series of lectures from other speakers will be kept 
up through the year, [besides short addresses, carefully pre- 
pared, by different teachers and senior students. 



READING. 

The new 'building enables us to establish one of the most 
pleasant and valuable auxiliaries of an institution of learning 
— a good Rkamno Room. One room has been set apart, 
and will be furnished for that purpose. Scribner's, Harper's, 
Hall's Journal of Health, Youth's Companion, Scholar's 
Companion, and many other periodicals of that class, with 
a few of the finest weeklies, will give an idea of its character. 
The Reading Club will have its officers. Fifty cents secures 
to any student a ticket tor one term, or until violation of the 
In -laws. 



MEDALS. 



They are not new things. They have come to us from the 
hoary past. Many good men have advocated their use. Ma- j 
ny institutions use them freely. As much might be j 
said, though, of many Other things, which the world would 
grow better without. To fight for a belt, to shoot for a tur- 
key, to run your horse for a purse, to speak for a medal, are 
not all the same, but are all on the same side of the moral 
line, and are simply actions of different classes in society. — 
Prizes never beget philanthropic love and generosity, but 
develop clannish attachments and strife. They tend to dis- 
appoint ten and make one vain. Besides, what judge can say 
•T know the medal should go to B." Three young men are ; 
classmates; one is prostrated with sickness; his associates 
are rivals for the medal to be given the next day. The noble, 
generous one remains with his friend, tenderly caring for him 
through the night. On the morrow they come upon the stage. 
The true one, with the best heart and mind, and industry, 
but relaxed nerves, falls below himself. The selfish one- 
knew that he must rest if he would win, and comes fresh and 
confident, wins the medal, boasts of superiority. Is that the 
way to educate young men and women ? Are there not no- 
bler avenues through which to call out energies of the human 



20 



ANNUAL C 



refrain from these practices and put forth their best energies 
to rise to a purer manhood, to stay away. 

We arc thankful that through practical, moral lectures, 
reasonings, and illustrations, God enables us to deeply engraft 
into the students's minds that it is neither wise, honorable, 
or good to follow such habits, but that the government of 
the tongue, the appetites, and the passions, with an enthusi- 
astic and reverent search for knowledge, will lead us through 
the paths of duty to places of honor, usefulness and happi- 
ness. Young people will learn, and learn to practice the 
great principles of good morals as surely as they will learn 
the relation of numbers or the facts of science. Not all in 
the same degree, neither will all develop equally in any other 
department of mind ; but the moral nature is just as suscep- 
tible of systematic cultivation as is the intellect or the body. 
To the same extent that any course of general education 
does not recognize this truth and conform its practices to 
the development of the thought, it is deficient — wrong. On- 
ly when educators realize this, and try earnestly and system- 
atically to develop the student's moral faculties, and thus fit 
him for life, and lay the foundation for a solid, Christian 
character, are the}' fulfilling the highest duties of their call- 
ing. 







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IS 80S ©If W. SBKS< 



SESSION 1881-82, 



#*77W ANNOUNCEMENTS FOR iSSj.Sj. 



AGE QUID AGIS. 



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BRISTOL: 

PKINTKD AT THE BRISTOL NEWS HOOK AND .)()» OFFICE, 

18 8 2. 



MILL1GAN .COLLEGE. 



@tl Mwm, 



Large circles of men and women in many parts of the 
world, either by character or in person, have known R. MlL- 
lioan, Kentucky University. To know him was certain ad 
miration, and almost as surely love. His authorship is 
scholarly, showing close and critical research. Yet it is clear. 
full and pleasant % to read. His character was beautiful ami 
strong, but tempered with deepest love. 

Personal association was a real pleasure to his students and 
friends, and is a happy memory now. He was a patient suf- 
ferer, a hard worker, a man who walked with God, and gave 
the strength of his years to increase wisdom and virtue among 
men. Hence the name Milligan College. 



-%■**,. ^*"«p^aStf"*^538S «H%f 



$*tteftam from Charter. 

From Article 3D : — The property vested, or which may 
be vested, in this Institution shall be held by a Board of 
Trustees. And a majority of the members of the Board 
sh ill constitute a quorum to transact businesss, and said Board 
of Trustees is hereby constituted a body politic and corporate 
as a Literary, Scientific, and Religious Institution, and is in- 
vested with power to confer degrees, to sue and be sued by 
the corporate name, to purchase and hold or receive by gift 
bequest or device any personal property or real estate, neces- 
sary for the transaction of corporate business or as an endow- 
ment fund, and also to purchase or accept any personal prop 
erty or real estate in payment or part payment of any debt 
due to the corporation and to sell or alien the same. 

Article 41H : —In case of a vacancy in the Board of Trus- 
tees by death, resignation or otherwise, such vacancy shall be 
filled by election at such time and place and in such way as 
may be fixed by the By-Laws, and at such election each 'Trus- 
tee present shall have one vote by virtue of his Trusteeship, 
and each donor including 'Trustees to said College who shall 
hold a certificate of donation from the President and Secre 
tary of the Board of 'Trustees shall have one vote for each 
fifty dollars donated as shown by such certificate of donation. 

From Article 7TH: — The general welfare of Society and 
not individual profit being the object for which tin's Charter 
is obtained, the members are not Stockholders in the legal 
sense of the term, and no dividends or profits shrill be divid 
ed among themselves. 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE. 



The Buildup and lorafiotu 

The building is both convenient and handsome. Its halls 
cloak rooms and elegant apartments make it a pleasant place 
for study and school life. 

The Institution is situated eleven miles East from Jones- 
boro, tour miles from Johnson City, and half a mile from a 
new line, the E. T. & W. N. C. Railroad. 

The natural scenery is pleasant to see and remember. — 
From a fine promontory in the bend of the creek, we can 
look fir up the beautiful valley to the mountains about its 
sources, then on to higher and higher summits, which in tlu 
back-ground are often capped with snow, when the fields 
around us are pleasant and green. Then follows the silvery 
stream, winding its way through fields and shades, until it 
passes around the College promontory and little village, and 
with a few steps remove we can see it go on to the crystal 
waters of the Watauga and behold the grand mountains bar- 
ricade that stream's rich, broad plains, until the- view is lost 
in the distant curve of the vallev walls. 



DoiiTd of. TnisiteeSi 



J. C. Hardin, Johnson City, Tenn. 

C. C. Taylor, Milligan, " 

Geo. T. Williams, Elizabeihton, " 

J. Hopwood Milligan, " 

S. W. Hvdkr, Milligan, " 

-Officers of W&mi* 



J. C. Hardin, President. 

Geo, T. Williams, Secretary. 

S. W. Hvder, . ." . Treasurer. 



:3K3f ?£>iO£= 



Board of lltstfoTs and €otnt$dl 



VVm. J- Shelhurne, ' Christiansburg, Va. 

George W. Gillespie Knob, Va. 

Lewis Tilman, Jr Knoxville, Tenn. 

j. I). Hamaker, Snowville, Va. 

11). Price Milligan, Tenn. 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE. 






J. HOPWOOD, President, 
Logic, Ethics, Normal and Bible Classes. 

o 

W. A. KITE, Vice President, 
Mac he mattes, Geology, and German. 

— o 

JAMES A. TATE, Secretary, 
Natural Science and Preparatory Department. 

o 

JAMES H. EPPS, 
Ancient Languages. 

MRS. S. E. HOPWOOD, 

English Literature and Principal Primary Department. 

o 

MRS. J. BULLARD, 
Assistant. 



H. R. CHRISTIE, 

Prof, of Theory and Practice in Voice, Building, Book-Keep- 
ing, and all Business Forms. 



T. H. R. CHRISTIE, 

Prof, of Instrumental Music, Theory and Practice in Voice 
Culture, Ornamental Penmanship and Draiuing. 



-HI— t 



MILLIGRN COLLEGE. 



lltiisls 



GRADUATES, 

J. II. Butrough Litt.lt; River, Va. 

George W. Hardin, .... Johnson City, Tenn. 

(jiKOUOK E. BORKN, Miliigan, " 

A aeon A. Feeoi son, ... Lebanon, Va. 

( '. B. Armentrout, Limestone, Temi. 

( !. V. < Jarhon, Telford, " 

James H. Smith Elizabeihton, '* 

James A. Tate, ,...,.., Million, " 

Lula Crockett, k * " 

LUCY Hakdin, Johnson ( it y, " 

UNDER G RAD UA FES. 

Joseph N. Edens, Elizabethton, Tenn. 

VVm. .1. Shelburxe, .In Christianshnrjj, Va. 

VV. R. Henry, Eliznbelliton, Tcnn. 

R. B. Gillespie, Knob, Va. 

Carrie Wade, Mexico, Mo. 

James D. Wilson, Taylorsville, Tcnn. 

('. M. Taylor, Johnson ( 'ity, Tcnn. 

George N. Grisham Jonesboro, Tcnn. 

Joseph A. Wilson, Taylorsville, Tcnn. 

Addie Anderson, Milliwatt, Tcnn. 

E. J. Baxter, Telford, Tcnn. 

K. P. Wade, Mexico, Mo. 

K. ( '. M ason, Jonesboro, Tcnn. 

W. M. Straley, Staifordsville, Va 

It If, Walker, Pandora, T.-nn. 

M \ ! i IK .1 Alt VIS. Sim cdville, " 

George M. Akers, Havter's Gap, Va. 

E. E. Crouch, Keebler's X float Is, Tcnn. 

liiiODA Crockett, Mi!ii;j;an, Tcnn. 

J. W. Giles, Burwellville, Va. 

W. E. Ramsey. Sandy Level, Va. 

Willie G. Boren, Mi!!i-an, Tcnn. 

Lettie Cornforth, " " 

Richard II. Campbkll, Sneedville, " 

P. W. Finely, Whit Icy, ( '. II. Ky. 

George W. Hvdeii . :....... Gap Creek, Torn. 

Edmund A. Miller, Jonesboro, Teuu. 

Temca Patton, Milligan, Tenn. 

Mollik Payne, Tazewell, Tcnn. 

Ceo hoe C. Simmons, Miliigau, Tenn. 

Wm, A. Sin in. Bntier, Tcnn. 

N oaij T. Shown, pandora. Tcnn. 

Marshall Tinsley, White Sulphur Springs, Va. 

Mollie Taylor Johnson City, Tenn. 

Jessie Y. Wade, Mexico, Mo. 

W. C. Witciikk .Bnrwellville, Va, 

Sami'kl T. Williams, Milligan, Tenn. 

VVm. Williams, Leadvillc, Col. 

L. 1). Wells Kendriek's ('reck, Tenn. 



MILLIGRN COLLEGE. 



Henry C Wright, Johnson City, Tenw. 

Rok't K. Williams, Rnsselvlfle, " 

Macgie Williams, Milligan, '• 

Annie Williams, Milligan, " 

Mollie E. Williams, .... Milligan, " 

Samukl Yoitng, T>vy < Jreek, " 

Mollie Anderson, Milligan, " 

Robert P. Berry, •. . Lemolite, '• 

L. W. Burlinson, Little Rock Creek, NT. C. 

Scott Bowman, Okolona, Tenn. 

Charles W. Cojrnforth, Milligan, .** 

John M. Crowell, Bristol, .'« 

Frank Crumley, Johnson ( ity, *' 

John D. Davis, Sneedville, " 

John W. Dickenson, Holston, Va. 

Robert M. Ellis, Red Hill, N. C. 

Charles W. Ei>knh, Elizabethton, Tehn. 

IIob't R. Emmert, Ervin, " 

J. B. Goiuley, Elizabethton, " 

Calvin Garland, Herald, X. C. 

Wm. Gouge, Little Rock Creek, Tenn. 

Alice Giles, Milligan, ** 

Thomas R. Hyder, " " 

S. P. Hyder, Elizabethton, " 

Nathaniel Williams, Milligan, " 

B. G. Hyder, , Limestone (Jove, " 

W. P. Hunt, Johnson City, " 

Samuel C. Hyder \ . Milligan, " 

George Hughs, " " 

Campbell Henninger, Bristol, '« 

S. C. Hyder, Milligan, " 

W. B. C. Hyder Elizabethton, " 

Lynn Haiix, " «' 

U. S. G. Jarvis, Sneedville, '« 

Wm. E. Keller Kcnd rick's Creek, " 

Mark LaRue, Louisville, Ky. 

George E. Lyon Milligan, Tenn. 

James P. Lyon, " " 

Coxley L. Lee, Lee's Mill, Va. 

Wm. A. Miller, Milligan, Tenn. 

W, B. McNab, Ervin, " 

J. S. .mcIntosh, Piney Flats, " 

Charlie G. Prick Milligan, " 

M. 1). Price, " " 

George Peoples Okolona, " 

Geokge M. Smith, Baptist Valley, Va. 

J. S. Sheluukne, Milligan, Tenn. 

J. C. Snodgrass, 4k " 

B. E. Smith, Elizabethton, " 

Wm. H. Sanders, Bristol, " 

Annie Hyder, : Gap Creek, " 

John B. Buck, Okolona, " 

John Smalling, Milligan, Ji 

Harry Swarthout, Bakersville, N. C. 

Ellen Shelburne, Milligan, Tenn. 

John Stevens, '. . Limestone Cove, " 

G. W. Taylor, Okolona, " 

W.C.Tony, Ervin, •« 

Rachel Toncray, Elizabethton, li 

Lucy N. Taylor, Milligan, " 



MILLIGRN COLLEGE. 



Laura Tate, Fairview, Va. 

Sanna Taylor, Elizabeth ton, Tenn. 

Sam i el A. Williams, Milligan, " 

John C. Williams, Milligan, " 

Laura Young, . . Dry Creek, " 

Anderson, Britt Dry Creek, * k 

PRIMARY DEPARTMENT, 

Willie Anderson. Milligan, Tenn. 

• Joseph Anderson, " " 

Willie Adams, " " 

Emma Boyd, " " 

Beulah Boyd, " " 

Willie Britt, Dry (reek, " 

i Daniel Britt, " *' 

Thomas Buck, Okolona, " 

" John Cates, Milligan, " 

Callus Dunbar, " " 

nora dunrar, " " 

v Julia IJnsor, 

S. D. Fair, 

Samuel Fair, " " 

'Willie Giles, " " 

i Charlie Giles, " l * 

Alfred Gourley, " " 

^ James H. Hardin, , Johnson City, " 

Flora Hoss, Millgan, " 

'Jane L. Haun, Dry Creek, " 

John K. Heaton Heaton 's Creek, " 

Frankie Hyder, Milligan, " 

Wayland Hoss, " •' 

'Emma E. Hart, 

'David Hart, " '* 

I Joseph Hart, " " 

' Charlie Hart, " " 

Ada Kite, Tnsenlitm, " 

Jesse Landreth, Johnson City, " 

• David Lyon, Milligaii, " 

Willie Nave, k * " 

James Nave, : " " 

Andrew Nave, " " 

1 Cora Payne, " " 

- John P. Snodgrass, " " 

JlMMIE SHELBURNE " " 

■ George Snodgrass, " «.' 

1 Amanda Smalling, '• 

Noka Snodgrass, '* *« 

Lucy Snodgrass, •» " 

'Charlie Snodgrass, lk " 

Caddie Smalling, " " 

LlLLIE SHELBURNE, " " 

/Nora Swaunkr, " " 

iMollie Swaunkr, " " 

'Julia Swaunkr, " " 

Nat F. Taylor, • Carter's Depot, " 

James P. Taylor, " " " 

Axdrkd K. Taylor, Milligan, " 

,Wm. Taylor, " " 

.Willie Taylor " " 



8 MILLIGAN COLLEGE. 

Geokgk C. Taylor, Milligan, Te 

Columbus Taylor Johnson < 'ity, 

BonftiK Taylor .Johnson City, 

Lucy L. Taylor, Johnson City, 

Maoojk Taylok, : . . Millig.-m, 

Lula &L Taylor, kk 

Taylor Cai.uk, 

Tuukkk Addik, 

Gkohgk I). Williams, 

( 'addik Williams, " 

Xaitik Williams, " 

Akcii ik Williams, . " 

RoBRiti Williams, '* 

John P. Williams, " 

Annif Williams, " 

Lizzie Williams ' " 

linoDA Williams, u 

Mattik Williams,. " 

J. T. B. Williams, 

Total, 18( 

jlrciniruiarM jlenartment " 



nn. 



A careful preparation in the first principles of the classics, 
elementary mathematics, and a thorough primary English 
education are necessary to the enjoyment and profit of a Col- 
lege Course. The following studies belong to the Preparato- 
ry Department and must he understood before entering the 
Freshman Class in either one of the courses: 

English. — Geography, U. S. History, Elementary Composi- 
tion. English Grammar. 

Physics. — Physiology, Primary Philosophy, Mathematics, 
Practical Arithmetic, Primary Algebra. 

Latin. — Latin Grammar, Elementary Composition, Selec- 
tions from Caesar. 

Grkkk.— Harkness' First Greek Book, /Ksop's Fables. 



fttnltsL 





FRESHMAN YEAR. 

Second Term. — English Composition and 
Rhetoric. (Practical and interesting.) 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



Elements of 



First Term. — General History, Philosophy ol History. 
Second Term. — English and American Literature, by pe- 
riods and leading authors. 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE. 



JUNIOR YEAR. 

Second Term. — Study of living authors. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

First Term. — Study and Criticism of English Language, 
its structure and philosophy. 

Some of the above studies recite only twice each week, but 
it is intended that the important points shall be well studied. 

This is the field where friends of an institution, living in # 
many parts of a country, can help the school. Labeled spec- 
imens, models of invention, peculiar growths of rock or wood, 
fossils of various kinds, Indian relics, the skins of animals, 
birds, or reptiles, neatly filled with any light substance, to 
preserve well the form, are all interesting and necesessary for 
the department. What is very common to you at home may 
be of the highest interest in another part. Remember these 
facts, and send specimens, noting when and where found, 
how surrounded, with local names. 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 

First Term.— Primary Astronomy. (Steele.) 
SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

First Term. — Zoology, Agricultural Geology. 
Second Term. — Geology and Mineralogy. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

First Term. — Chemistry. 
Second Term. — Botany. 



Ittaf hematics.. 

This department includes Pure and Applied Mathematics. 
The course of Pun; Mathematics is completed in the Junior 
year, but candidates for graduation are subjected, near the 
close of the senior year to a searching <ieneral examination 
upon the. entire course. Those not qualified to enter this 
department can become so by joining the Preparatory De- 
partment, i The objects of Mathematics in a course of liberal 
education, are always kept in view. The endeavor is to train 
the mind to habits of industrious, patient, and independent 'in 
vestigation. Students are encouraged to leave the technical 



10 MILLTGAN COLLEGE. 

rules of the books and to explore new fields. They are 
taught accuracy, dispatch, and neatness; to reason from the 
known to the unknown, and to know that they can and must 
do the work themselves, believing that he who is igno- 
rant of Pure Mathematics is a stranger to the sublimest realm 
of mental effort. The History and Philosophy of the science 
will be given throughout, the course. 

Books of Reference : Huton'sand Bartlett's Math.; Com- 
fce's Philosophy of Math.; Davies and Peck's Diet.; Hardy's 
Quartern ions Nystronis Mechanics and the Mathematical 
Visitor. 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 

Science of Arithmetic, (University), LIniversity Algebra, 
(Olney). 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

Geometry and Trigonometry, (Olnev's Univ. Ed.), Sur- 
veying — Field Work. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

General Geometry and Calculus, (Olney), Introduction to 
Civil Engineering. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

Natural Philosophy (Snell's Olmsted), Astronomy and Re- 
view. 



■^^mVs-V^?-* 



Entirely too many English words find their roots and pri- 
mary meanings, and too many grammatical principles find 
their explanation in the Latin language to deny its great im- 
portance and interest in a correct course of education. Its 
study will lead us into a fuller understanding of ancient 
thought and customs. It will give us a better vocabulary 
and a much more accurate understanding of our own lan- 
guage. Besides developing a liner taste in the choice of 
words and constructions, it excels in cultivating the art of 
reasoning from probabilities and causes of remote bearings. 
As to methods of instruction, we use any and every means 
and illustration to lead the student to a clear understanding 
of the construction, its relation to English, and give him a 
right appreciation of the author's meaning. 



MILLIGilN COLLEGE. 11 



FRESHMAN YEAR. 

First Term. — Finishing Ccesar, reading Sallust. 

Second Term. — Cicero's Orations, Bingham's Latin Gram- 
mar, Roman History relating to the subjects and periods of 
these authors, studied during the year. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

First Term. — Virgil's ^neid. 

Second Term. — Livy, reading from books I., and XXI. 
Mythology and Roman History in constant use. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

First Term.— Horace's Odes and Satires. 
Second Term. — Tacitus's Germania and Agricola. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

First Term. — Seneca and Cicero de Senectute. 
Second Term. — Review of Principles, Selections by class. 
Special comparison of Latin and English. 



Some of the reasons for the study of Latin are equally ap- 
plicable to the study of the Greek language. It is, besides, 
the chief source of scientific terms, and more than all, the 
fossil cast, bearing the impress of God's plan for human re- 
demption. 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 

First Term. — Xenophon's Anabasis. 
Second Term. — 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

First Term. — Herodotus. 
Second Term. — Homer's Illiad. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

First Term. — Demosthenes de Corona. 
Second Term. — Thueydides. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

First Term. — Xenophon's Memorabilia, Selections from 
Plato. 

Second Term. — Greek Testament, Review of Principles. 
The equivalent of any one of the above authors is sometimes 
substituted. 



12 MILLIGM COLLEGE. 

Ulttairlrustcs. 



W**^-» i 



A comprehensive study of the flights in this field would 
take a life time, but the development of ideas through the 
life of modern society's and the close study of mental science 
renders much of the speculation of the dark past as unneces- 
sary to the present mental and moral philosopher as would 
be the theories of many of the old alchemists to the work- 
man of today in the science of chemistry. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

Second Term. — Logic. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

First Term.— Political Economy and Civl Government. 

Second Term. — Mental and Moral Science, Reason and 
Revelation. 

The first reciting twice, and the latter three times each 
week. 

Students should bring what text books they have on any 
given study in the curriculum. Such books are good for ref- 
erence. 

JXJJCII$C$> 

Board and washing at private houses from $1.60 to $2.00 
per week. 

Tuition First Primary Classes, per term $ 7.00 

Tuition Second Primary Classes, per term 9.00 

Tuition Preparatory Department, per term ...*.. 14.00 

Tuition College Department, per term 16.00 

Tuition Board and Washing of Preparatory Students at 

Home of President, per term 50.00 

Tuition Board and Washing of College students at the 

home of President, per term 52/00 

Board and Washing for Young Ladies at the home of 

Samuel Shelburne, per term 37-oo 

.No contingent fee is charged, but the expenses of each 
term are due in advance, and must be paid in cash, or defi- 
nite contract with Treasurer on enrollment. Where settle- 
ments are necessarily made for a fractional part of a term, 
the amount in the scale of five nearest the actual average 
will be taken. Only protracted sickness obligates us to re- 
turn money, or make any deduction. Students having rooms 
of the Principal for the year or term, and leaving the insti- 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE. 17 



The new building has enabled us to establish one of the 
most pleasant and valuable auxiliaries of an institution of 
learning — a good Reading Room. One room has been set 
apart for that purpose. Scribner's, Harper's, Hall's Journal 
of Health, Youth's Companion, and many other periodicals 
of that class, with a few of the finest weeklies, will give an 
idea of its character. The Reading Club will have its offi- 
cers. Fifty cents secures to any student a ticket for one 
term, or until violation of the by-laws. It proved to be an 
attractive apartment the last term, and will be still better 
fitted up and the number of periodicals increased for the 
next year. 



They are not new things. They come to us from the 
hoary past. Many good men have advocated their use. 
Many institutions use them freely. As much might be said, 
though, of many other things, which the world would grow 
better without. To fight for a belt, to shoot for a turkey, to 
run your horse for a purse, to speak for a medal, are not all 
the same, but are all on the same side of the moral line, and 
are simply actions of different classes in society. Prizes nev- 
er beget philanthropic love and generosity, but beget clan- 
nish attachments and strife. They tend to disappoint ten 
and make one vain. Besides, what judges can say, "I know 
the medal should go to 11." Three young men are class- 
mates ; one is prostrated with sickness ; his associates are ri- 
vals for the medal to be given the next day. The noble, 
generous one remains with his friend, tenderly caring for 
him through the night. On the morrow they come upon the 
stage. The true one, with the best heart and mind, and in- 
dustry, but relaxed nerves, falls below himself. The selfish 
one knew that he must rest if he would win, and comes fresh 
and confident, wins the medal, boasts of superiority. Is 
that the way to educate young men and women ? Are there 
not nobler avenues through which to call out energies of the 
soul? Put awa\ these relics of Olympic, Gladiatorial, and 
Feudal contests, and we can point young people to the beau- 
ty and power of oratory, to the treasures of wisdom, to the 
pleasures of search for the new and undeveloped in science, 
to manly, generous feelings for each other's success, and the 
glorious growth of knowledge and wisdom among men, un- 
til they will eagerly search for excellence itself instead of the 
sign. Nobility of character — Christian manhood— is the 
real prize of life, and will bless its possessor. 



18 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE. 



-f 



These are valuable auxiliaries in leading students to con- 
fidence, readiness, and facility in speaking, writing, and bus 
iness forms. To reap the highest advantages though, the 
students must be united by love, kinship of spirit, interest of 
study and literary work. 

To increase the usefulness of the organizations and real 
pleasure of the students, the teachers of Milligan College will 
be counsellors and coworkers in the societies, and their con- 
stitutions and by-laws must at all times be subject to the in- 
spection and approval of the faculty. 

MOJUL 8UILTUM. 

Better that the boy or girl be at home under Christian in- 
fluence, much better, than in the best school for mental de- 
velopment, drilled and moulded by careless or scoffing mas- 
ters of art and science. The higher powers of thought and 
reason, without the love of honor, justice and humanity, will 
be a curse to an individual, a state, or a nation. 

After years of experience in the school-room, God being 
our wisdom and strength in the decision, we solemnly deter- 
mined not to retain any student in the school, no matter 
what his wealth, influence or talent, who will use profane or 
obscene language, intoxicating drinks, or persist in any un- 
worthy conduct. And we invite all young men, who will 
not refrain from these practices and put forth their best en- 
ergies to rise to a purer manhood, to stay away. 

We are thankful that, through practical, moral lectures, 
reasonings, and illustrations, thoughts may be deeply en- 
grafted into the student's mind that it is neither wise, honor- 
able, or good to follow such habits, the government of the 
tongue, the appetites, and the passions, with an enthusiastic 
■a\m\ reverent search for knowledge, will lead us through the 
paths of duty to places of honor, usefulness, and happiness. 
Young people will learn, and learn Us practice the great prin- 
ciples of good morals as surely as they will learn the relation 
of numbers or the facts of science. Not all in the same de- 
gree, neither will all develop equally in any other depart- 
ment of mind ; but the moral nature is just as susceptible of 
systematic cultivation as is the intelle* t or the body. To the 
same extent that any course of general education does not 
recognize this truth and conform its practices to the de- 
velopment of the thought, it is deficient — wrong. Only 
when educators realize this, and try earnestly and systematic- 
ally to develop the student's moral faculties, and thus fit him 
for life, and lav the foundation for a solid, Christian charac- 
ter, are they fulfilling the highest duties of their calling. 



CATALOGUE 



OF THE 



Bagujtf am| IJupfe 



OF THE 



WstMita stasia 



A N D 




—OF- 



HILUGAH COLLEG 



II. R. CHRISTIE, Principal. 

Theory and Practical Voice- Building, anil Normal Instruction, 

Theoretical and Practical Book-keeping, and all 

Business Forms. 



PROF. T. H. R. CHRISTIE. 

Instrumental Music, Practical Voice Cudure, Practical, and 
Ornamental Penmanship, and Drawing. 



20 MILLIGRN COLLEGE. 

The Musical Institute was established in 1877. Since that 
period it has held nine Normal sessions : 1st, at Concord, 
VV. Va., in connection with the State Norma' School. 2nd, 
Princeton, W. Va. 3rd, Rural Retreat, Va., and 4th, 5th, 
6th, 7th, and 8th, Snowville, Va., and 9th, at Rural Retreat, 
Virginia. 

The Commercial Institute was established in 1881. Its 
course of instruction is thorough and practical, and adapted 
to the wants of both ladies and gentlemen, who seek a busi- 
ness education. It is liberal in its terms, and thus meets the 
demands of all classes. 

A student may enter and pursue a course in business, mu- 
sic, or literature, alone, or all in connection. A student en- 
tering the Musical or Commercial Institute, also becomes a 
member of Milligan College, and will attend chapel service 
every morning, and enjoy the benefit of the lectures, literary 
societies, etc. 

The Faculty of the Christie Musical and Commercial In- 
stitute were educated at first class institutions. H. R. Chris- 
tie, in music, under R. M. Mcintosh, of theVanderbilt Uni- 
versity, and in business at the Commercial College, of Ken- 
tucky University. T. H. R. Christie, at Dana's Musical In- 
stitute, Warren, Ohio. They are the authors of "Favorite 
Songs", a work of merit, and having reached a saleof nearly 
fifty thousand copies. They have extensive experience in 
the best methods of teaching, and, as vocalists, possess train- 
ed voices of fine tone and capacity. 



Milky Sakver, , Sinking Creek, Va, 

Gillie Saever, " kt '* 

Lci.a Williams, Maybrook, " 

Monnie Games, Rural Retreat. '* 

Emma Groceclose, Marion, " 

Eliza Lowman, Newborn, " 

Callie Coley, '. Speedville, " 

Ella Peterman, Little River, '* 

Eugenia Hall, Snowville, " 

N kttie Caldwell, "• " 

Lee HaffoRD Speedwell, " 

Rosxe Evans, ...-.....' Bbieksburg, " 

Moi.LlK CORMANY, Rural Retreat, " 

M AGGIE FOGLESONG, Sharon. " 

Rosie Smith, Dublin, '* 

Katie Gibson, Rural Retreat, " 

Willie Feigle, Camp Creek, '•* 

Judib Hall, Rural Retreat, " 

Lola Smith, • Alleghany, M 

E. A, Crockett, •* " 

Laura 11 ali Rural Retreat, lk 

Lula Baumoardner, 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE. 21 

I). ( '. A LLISON, Allisonia, V:i. 

( '. (i. Shaw \ kk, Shaw vcr's Mill, " 

W. (J. Kluot, Sharon, " 

c. P. Pence, Pembrook, " 

W. M. Straley, Staffonlsville, " 

S. A. Siiawvek Shawvcr's Mill, " 

|. J. Rowan, ' Laurel Branch, VV. Va. 

F. M. Breeding, Blooimlale, Tenn. 

\V. L. Caldwell, Snow vi lie, Va. 

I. S. A8WORTH, Black Lk'k, " 

('has. Crawford, McDonald's Mills, " 

Iohn Grekver, „ Rura] Retreat, " 

<iEO. Ma noon, Sharon, " 

John II. Batmgardner, Rural Retreat, " 



Great care will be taken to render this department thor- 
ough and systematic. Perhaps no department of musical cul- 
ture is more generally neglected than the proper training 
and cultivation of the voice — a subject that embraces the me- 
chanical formation of the voice and the respiratory organs. 
a disuse of which does not only fail to properly develop the 
powers and beauties of the voice, but frequently produces 
broiu liitis and throat affections. The popular opinion is 
that frequent singing or public speaking is injurious: but it 
has been practically proven that a scientific use of the voice 
tends to develop and strengthen the whole vocal apparatus. 
No people living in a country where thro.it and lung diseas- 
es are prevalent can afford to dispense with vocal training, but 
this task should be trusted to those who thoroughly under- 
stand the mechanism and capabilities of the voice in all its 
stages. The age in which we live is eminently an age of 
•'Sacred Song" and the importance of an intelligent song 
service in the family, Sunday School and Church is being 
fully realized in many p irts of the religious world. The 
grand mission of the gospel shall end ; but we shall sing 
throughout all eternity. Then away with the idea that a 
musical education is not of practical untility, if it constitute 
Praise Service of earth and heaven. 

xjoums m TO@&(L study* 

j st . grade. Notation and Scale Exercises. 

2nd. grade. Reading and Plain Vocalization. 

3rd, Sight Reading and Choral Practice. 

41 h. Choral Practice and Chorus drill. 

5th, Chorus Drill and Higher Vocalization. 

6th, Congregational and Sunday School Music. 

yth, Texture, or Quality ol Voice. 

8th, Articulation of Language. 

nth, Articulation or Vocalization of Sound. 

10th. Development of the voice. 



4 



22 ' M I LLIGAN COLLEGE. 

| 1 1 th, Movements and Positions' used in Forming Elements 

of Language. 
i 2th, Concentration of Power, or Forms of Vibration. 
i3th. Increase of Compass and Power. 
14th, Solo and Oratorio Singing. 
15th, Technical Voice Culture and Sight Execution. 
19th, Physiology of the Voice. 
17th, The Voice as a musical instrument, with Medical Hints 

as to its Proper Training and Cultivation. 
18th, The Art of Breathing and the Elocutionary Treatment 

of the Voice. 

This department is intended for those who wish to make 
music a profession. As the "name" signifies, it is to train 
students how to teach. Students in this department will be 
furnished with a series of practical lectures, systematically 
arranged, and they will be required to deliver them until 
they acquire proficiency in the art of teaching. In order to 
teach successfully, a teacher must possess a thorough knowl- 
edge of the subject and be able to impart it to others. 

The courses in this department are in conformity with the 
Pestalozzian System, and embraces all the modern improve 
ments in the art of piano-forte and organ playing. In ac- 
quiring a true musical education the student will realize that 
theory is one thing and practice is another. These, howev- 
er, should go hand in hand, theory being the only founda- 
tion of an intelligent performance. Asa rule, the student 
will be required to give a reason for his execution, this be- 
ing the surest way of bringing out the hidden depths of tal- 
ent, and giving the student a correct idea of the principles 
upon which the doctrine of music rests. 

©<©(MiB©m Mattel. 

This college will supply a long felt want in this country. 
All colleges of the kind are generally located in cities which 
necessitates high tuition, board, travelling expenses. This be- 
ing the case, a business education is placed beyond the reach 
of many who might otherwise distinguish themselves in the 
great business world. Hence the aim will be to offer facili- 
ties for a complete business education upon terms that will 
not debar those in moderate circumstances. A "good clerk" 
or a "bad clerks" often turns the scale of success. Honora- 
ble and energetic students who complete the full Diploma 
course, will be aided in procuring situations. 

Deeming it important that girls should be educated in the 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE. 23 



ordinary forms of business, a special course will be arranged 
for this purpose. As silent as it is kept, men's success in 
business depends largely upon the business qualifications of 
their wives. 

Our course of study is adapted to the wants of every day 
life of every Merchant, Banker, Lawyer, Clergyman, Doctor, 
Clerk, Book-keeper, Farmer, Artisan, Mechanic, Manufac- 
turer, Navigator, Musician, Miner, Stock-factor, Laborer, 
Capitalist, Publisher, Trader and Public Officer. 

Its universal usage in every civilized nation is alone suffi- 
cient evidence of its importance, though it is not possible 
for all to become really artistic penmen, even if application 
is guided by the best skill, yet with the proper means of de- 
velopment it is possible for all to become good business pen- 
men. 

There will be two courses given. A practical course, de- 
signed for all who wish to become business penmen, and an 
ornamental course designed for those who wish to become 
artistic in all the ornamental branches of this Art. 

IB!RA89<DINS8. 

Book keeping by single and double entry for Stock Sets, 
Individual Partnership Sets, Wholesale, Retail, Merchandis 
ir.g, Compound Co., Commission, importing, Jobbing, 
joint-stock, Railroading, Real Estate, Collection, and Insu- 
rance. 

Banking under State and National Laws, including the or- 
ganization and management of the same. Transportation, 
Furnacing, Printing, Mining, Milling, Steamboating, and 
Official Business. . 

&©MgBmiL (LAW. 

Contracts, Sales, Agencies, Partnerships, Notes, Drafts and 
Exchange, Bailments, Endorsements, Liens, &c, &c. 

Business Writing, Ladies' Writing, Pen Drawing, Card 
Marking, Lettering, Flourishing, Methods and manner of 

teaching. 

Position of Parts, Complimentary Address, Body of the 
Letter, Perspicuity, cSa:., Diction and Precision, Complimen- 
tary closing. Signature, Superscription, Capitalization, Punc- 
tuation. 



c - ■ ■■■'-■; 



24 MILLIGflN COLLEGE. 

Institute Count- I Nine Months). 

Piano Forte . . .• $27.00 

Organ . 27.00 

Use of Instrument 0.00 

Vocal Music 18.00 

Terms per Session of Eight Weeks. 

Teacher's Course (Normal and Vocal) $25.00 

Vocal Music 8.00 

Organ or Piano (including forty lessons) 10.00 

Use of Instrument 2 00 

Vocal and Organ, or Piano-forte 15.00 

Life Scholarship, including Penmanship $25.00 

Ladies' Special Course 12.00 

Board, including Washing and Lights, per Month . 8.00 

One-half payable on the day of entrance, the remainder at 
middle session. A discount of ten per cent, will be made 
when two or more are received from the same family. 

D sL h ri i. £ -sj » 

Students pursuing the Institute Course for two years and 
passing a satisfactory examination wijl be granted a Diploma. 

Students pursuing Teachers' Course Normal Department 
for two sessions and passing a satisfactory examination will 
be granted a Diploma in Church and Sunday School Music. 

Students pursuing a Commercial Course, and passing a sat- 
isfactory examination, will be granted a Diploma. Ten 
weeks is generally sufficient for the completion of the course. 

GSttSRAIL RUMS. 

[st. No student who does not possess, and sustain a good 
moral character, and strictly conform to the rules of the 
school, will be permitted to remain a student. 2nd, students 
must attend recitations promptly. 3rd, students must prac- 
tice the whole time assigned them. 4th, no student will be 
absent from a class without liberty. 5th. students must 
guard against boisterous behavior. 6th, students must treat 
all persons with proper courtesy. 

The Normal Department of the Musical Institute and Com- 
mercial College will begin April the 6th, 1882, and continue 
eight weeks. 

All correspondence should be addressed to 

PROF. H. R. CHRISTIE, Principle of M. & C. 

Institute, Milligan College, Carter Co., Tenn. 







C. B, of P. 

Print Shop 

St. T ouis 



■ 

1 



' 



1 



m- 






^gj/jr&d' 






'.--<-'" 



SEAR: 






iTfli\W 



SESSION z884r^Sx 






WIT* 1 ANNOUNCEMENTS FG$R 1886.. 



j^htistjij^t. 



IlLLIG/IN * 




JOHNSON CITY, TENN 



! 

With ilnnauncBiTLRnts fDr lBBb-'BB. 



AG-E QUID AGIS. 



CINCINNATI: 

Elm Street Printing Company, Nos. 176 and 178 Elm Street. 

1885. 



INTRODUCTION. 



ELEMENTS OF A TRUE EDUCATION. 

A true education reaches from the heart's center to the detail of 
man's handiwork. His feelings, the strength of his brain, the skill 
of his hand, all depend much upon his training. 

An institution of learning is for the whole man what the gym- 
nasium is for the athlete. The best school work will include care- 
ful study for the development and training of the social and 
Jeligious forces in human nature. It need not be said a college is 
not for Lhat purpose, since youth-life and earliest manhood which 
colleges have control of, is the very time when the moral nature 
deeds most attention. 

As we dig iron ore and run it into pig metal, and on to other 
forms, and at last give it a heating and tempering to become steel 
for the world's use and benefit ; so, after several changes, through, 
childhood and youth, college life gives a final shaping and temper- 
ing of character for work in the world. If the dross of sin has been 
exchanged for the temper of love and a zeal for right works, society 
will be benefited; but if the student leave the halls of training 
worldly-minded and without Christ, his career is doubtful; his value 
uncertain. 

No one can well overestimate intellectual training. It makes the 
difference between Edward Everett setting forth a finished oration 
on the science of government and a schoolboy delivering declama- 
tions ; or the difference between Kepler learning to add and subtract 
and Kepler twenty-five years later hunting down the laws of the 
.lanets and systems ; or Newton learning the names of the digits 
ad afterward extending his calculations to the infinities. Mental 

veiopment made the difference in each case. It is beautiful. It 

wonderful. 

Let science, skill and philosophy be exacted ; but a correct view 
iieh-a subject, as revenge or deception, business integrity, over- 
ling evil with good, respect for others' rights and privileges, cor- 
iliooghts of what life is for and the things of most value in it, 
t understanding of the difference between things having a tem- 

m 



4 MILLIGAN COLLEGE. 

porary pleasure or importance and tho eternal essentials of* good 
character is of far more value to the student and to the world than 
all that Kepler and Newton knew beside. 

If we are made in the image of (rod, our training ought to have 
reference to his image in us; if we are eternal, our education ought 
to include the eternal essentials of happiness. 

Godless schools, with one in twenty attending religious service; 
others boasting of agnosticism and sneering at Christian conviction, 
the whole developing as hotbeds of youthful sin, vanity and infi- 
delity, are shames to the people who have them in charge, and 
make the personal habits and modes of thought of a student give 
an average far more sinful and dangerous when leaving school than 
when they entered. And a goodish, compromising, smoothing-over 
system of teaching is not much better, as it develops deception and 
mistrust in both teachers and students, and is to be despised for its 
sham and meanness. 

Positive and aggressive moral and Christian work will turn the 
current of youthful thought and conduct away from the rude and 
often sinful customs and habits so common in college life, and de- 
velop a devotion and love for study and for the manly and the <>-ood 
there is in us. 

The Faculty of this Institution have in them the spirit of hearty 
cooperation and help for each other, and deep personal desires to 
benefit the student. They deem it duty and pleasure to make the 
student's life happy, and a blessing to his future, which they realize 
can best be done by furnishing him abundance of the right kind of 
employment and leading him to a happy freedom from the slavery 
of unworthy practices and the weight of sin. 

OUR NAME. 

Large circles of men and women in many parts of the world, 
either by character or in person, have known R. Milligan, Ken- 
tucky University. His authorship is scholarly, showing close and 
critical research. It is clear, full and pleasant to read. His char- 
acter was beautiful and strong, but tempered with deepest love. 

Personal association was a real pleasure to his students and 
friends, and is a happy memory now. He was a patient sufferer, a 
hard worker, a man who walked with God and gave the strength 
of his years to increase wisdom and virtue among men. Hence the 
name Milligan College. 



BOARD jQF TRUSTEES. 



J. D. PRICE, . 
J. C. HARDIN, . 
,0. C. TAYLOR, 
.GEO. T. WILLIAMS, 
J. HOPWOOD, 
8. W. HYDER, . 
W. J. SHELBURNE, 
GEO. W. GILLESPIE, 



Milligan, ' 
Johnson City, 

Milligan, ' 

Elizabethton, 

Milligan, 

• . Milligan, 

. Christians!) >r 

. Cedar Mh 



OFFICERS OF THE BOARD. 

J. D. PRICE, . . 

GEO. T. WILLIAMS, £ 

S. W. HYDER, T 



The following referees have each some personal knowledge of the 
tution, and the character of the work done. 

L. A. Cutler, 
Thomas Munell, 



Mrs. K. W. Williams, 

A. S. Johnson, . 

C. H. Calfee, 

J. D. Hamaker, 

P. S. Rhodes, 

Samuel Millard, 

N. G. Taylor, 

Charles K. Ober, 

H. R. and T. H. R. Christie, 

Isaac Campbell, 

A. M. Ferguson, . 

John M. Tate, . 

S. E. Jones, . 

M. F. Penland, 

W. K. Brooks, 

Joshua Williams, 

J. W. Roberts, 

G. W. Coleman, 



52 E. 



(6) 



Richmond, Vr 
. Mt. Sterling, J 

Cynthiana, Ky 
. Knoxville, TV 

Reed Island, V 
. Snowville, Va. 

Danville, Va. 
. Johnson City, 1 

Elizabethton, I 
23d St., New York 

Concord, W. V< 
. Sneedville, Ten 

Lebanon, Va. 
, Blackwater, Va 

Mossy Creek, T 
. Bakers vi lie, N. 

Broad Ford, Va 
. Burnsville, N. C 

Kansas, Tenn. 
, Athens, Tenn. 



FACULTY. 



J. HOP WOOD, A.M., President, 

Ethics, Science and Normal Department. 

W. M. STRALEY, A. B., 

Ancient Languages. 

JAMES A. TATE, A. B., 

Mathematics and Preparatory Department. 

MRS. S. E. HOPWOOD, 

Preparatory and English Department. 

JAMES W. GILES, 

General Geometry and Calculus. 

MISS NELLIE B. PORTER, 

Instrumental Music, French and German. 



MILLIGAN BUSINESS COLLEGE. 



JAMES A. T4TE, Principal. 

CHAS. G. PRICE, Assist, and Penman. 

(7) 



STUDENTS. 



Abbott, Burdine A., . 
Anderson, William T. , 
Anderson, Freeman R., 
Anderson, William W., 
Alley, Columbus P., 
Anderson, Robert, . 
Adams, Nattie, 
Adams, Willie, 
Anderson, Willie E., . 
Anderson, Joseph, . 
Barrier, Dottie, . 
Buchanan, Nettie D., 
Branscom, James I., 
Buck, Thomas N., 
Bailey, Nannie, . 
Bailey, Wauneta B., 
Bailey, Callie D., 
Bailey, Emmet L., . 
Bailey, Lizzie M., 
Barrier, N. Almedia, 
Broyles, Nola, 
Broyles, Franklin, 
Broyles, Linnie, 
Bowman, King, 
Boyd, Beula, 
Boyd, Emma, 
Bacon, Flora, 
Borders, John, 
Brooks, Frank, 



Abbott, Va, 
Blackwater, Va. 
Kyle's Ford, Ter 
Fairview, Va. 
Pound, Va. 
Okolona, Tenn. 
Milligan, Tenn. 
Milligan, Tenn. 
Milligan, Tenn. 
Milligan, Tenn. 
Milligan, Tenn, 
Gratton, Va. 
Jonesboro, Tenn. 
Okolona, Tenn. 
Ada, West Va. 
Ada, West Va. 
Ada, West Va. 
Ada, West Va. 
Graham, Va. 
Milligan, Tenn. 
Chuckey Valley, Ter 
Chuckey Valley, Ter 
Chuckey Valley, Ter 
Johnson City, Tenn. 
Milligan, Tenn. 
Milligan, Tenn. 
Boon's Creek, Tenn. 
Milligan, Tenn. 
Broad Ford, Va. 



(8) 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE. 



9 



-^Baber, Fannie E., 
-_Baber, Ella M., . 
• Bullard, F. F., 

Bullock, Louise E., 

Bullock, Crockett M., 

Bailey, Flora, 

Collins, James, 

Collins, Toba, 

Collins, John, . 

Campbell, David, 

Charlton, Victor JS., 

Crouch, Julia, 
"""Crouch, Eugene M., 
nCox, David II., 
—Cox, Flora, 

Cox, Thomas J., 

Cox, Edward,. . 
~~~Cornforth, Lettie L., 

~ CORNFORTH, CHARLES W 

Chrisman, Henry C, 
Charlton, Charles R., 
Campbell, Isaac W., 
Campbell, Cordis V., 
Cowling, Fletcher R., 
Dunbar, Callie, 
Dunbar, Nora, 
Devault, Weldon W», 
Devault, Robert, 
Eprs, Warner, 
Ensor, Julia, 
Fair, Charles, 
Fair, George, 
Finley, Frank W., . 
Finley, Katie, 
Finley, Maggie, 
Frost, Horace L., 
Furrow, John R. A., 
**-Garnett, Frank E., 
Giles, Charlie, 



Indian Mills, West Va. 
Indian Mills, West Va. 
Snowville, Va. 
Blountville, Tenn. 
Blount ville, Tenn. 
Ada, West Va. 
Milligan, Tenn. 
Milligan, Tenn. 
Milligan, Tenn. 
Dry Creek, Tenn. 
Christiansbnrg, Va. 
Carr ville, Tenn. 
Carrville, Tenn. 
Boon's Creek, Tenn. 
Boon's Creek, Tenn. 
Boon's Creek, Tenn. 
Boon's Creek, Tenn. 
Milligan, Tenn. 
Milligan, Tenn. 
Christian sb org, Va. 
Bangs, Va. 
Sneed ville, Tenn. 
Sneedville, Tenn. 
East River, West Va. 
Milligan, Tenn. 
Milligan, Tenn. 
Austin Springs, Tenn. 
Austin Springs, Tenn. 
Hawes Cross Roads, Tenn. 
.Dry Creek, Tenn. 
Milligan, Tenn. 
Milligan, Tenn. 
Williamsburg, Ky. 
Williamsburg, Ky. 
Williamsburg, Ky. 
Bristol, Tenn. 
Salem, Va. 
Gordonsville, Va. 
Milligan, Tenn. 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE. 



11 



Kegley, William B., 
Keen, Edmund S., 
La Rue, Bessie, 
Lenard, Fletcher, 
Menard, John, . 
iENARD, William, 
A)N(i, Charles N., . 
aon, David S., 
jINKOUS, Mollie M., 
viNKOiis, Eddie, . 
vEFFEL, Dexter A., . 
,ove, Frank D., . 
,illy, Robert W., . 
.illy, David B., . 
Turray, Andrew J., 
[addox, Charles, 
[urduck, James C, 

JLLER, E. A., 

Iiller, Arthur I., . 
[iller, Mollie S. f 
i Claugherty, Madison, 
rice, Charles G., 
\yne, John, 
enland, Pink, 
\yne, fairby, 
vyne, Cora, 

iNe, Rosa, 
tit, John U., . 
mer, Turner, 
. , William E., 

berts, Charlie, 

cker, Archie, . 

cker, Tipton, 

pflE, Dora, 

pGE, Anna, . 

,nge, Charles E., 

tlege, George P., 

fer, Samuel H., . 

iodes, John A., 



. . Wytheville, Va. 

Sago, Va. 
. Louisville, Ky. 

Milligan, Term. 
. Austin Springs, Tenn. 

Milligan, Tenn. 
. Milligan, Tenn. 

Milligan, Tenn. 
. Graham, Va. 

Graham, Va. 
. Shawver's Mills, Va. 

Ashville, N. C. 
. Union, Tenn. 

Union, Tenn. 
. Milligan, Tenn. 

Wytheville, Va. 
. Bangs, Va. 

Jonesboro, Tenn. 
. Snowville, Va. 

Jonesboro, Tenn. 
. Pearisburg, Va. 

Milligan, Tenn. 
. Milligan, Tenn, 

Bakersville, N. C. 
, Milligan, Tenn. 

Milligan, Tenn. 
. Milligan, Tenn. 

Vicar's Switch, Va. 
. Carter's Depot, Tenn. 

Pocahontas, Va. 
. Kansas, Tenn. 

Johnson City, Tenn. 
. Johnson City, Tenn. 

Johnson City, Tenn. 
. . Jolinson City, Tenn. 

Johnson City, Tenn. 
. Huffman, Va. 

Little Creek, N. C. 
. Cuckoo, Va. 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE. 



13 



Williams, AVillie 



Watkins, Lottie, 
"Williams, John W., 
Witcher, Excie, . 
Williams, Samuel W., 
Williams, Robert, 
Williams, Charles, . 
"Williams, Willie S., . 
Williams, Archie, 
Williams, John P., 
Williams, Caddie, 
Williams, Samuel A., . 
Wright, Henry C, . 
Walker, Gertie, 
Williams, Wright, . 
Williams, Larrence S., 
Williams, Jessie P., 
Walker, Robert H., 
Wilson, Edward C, 
poRLEY, Ada, 
Wade, Edward B., . 
Waldo, H. Camden, 
Young, Ralph, 



Milligan, Tenn. 

Hin ton, West Va. 
Milligan, Tenn. 
Sandy Level, Va. 
Milligan, Tenn. 
Milligan, Tenn. 
Milligan, Tenn. 
Milligan, Tenn. 
t Milligan, Tenn. 
Milligan, Tenn. 
Milligan, Tenn. 
Milligan, Tenn. 
Johnson City, Tenn. 
Staytide, Va. 
Cynthiana, Ky. 
Cynthiana, Ky. 
Cynthiana, Ky. 
Tavlorsville, Tenn. 
Little Doe, Tenn. 
Johnson City, Tenn. 
Christiansburg, Va. 
Hin ton, West Va. 
Avery, N. C. 



Total—207, 



GRADUATES. 



CLASSICAL. 



Bulla RD, F. F., . 
Miller, E. A., . 
Maddox, Charles, 
Straley, W. M., 



Hardin, Mollis, . 
Read, William E., . 
Walker, Robert H., 



Anderson, W. T. 
Anderson, F. R., . 
Anderson, W. W., . 
Chrisman, Henry C, 
Gaenett, John M., . 
Gentry, J. Herbert, 
Keen, Edmund S., 
Murduck, J. C., 
Rhodes, John A., 
Smith, James P., . 
Walker, Robert II., 
Williams, Larrence S., 



scientific. 



business. 



Snowville, Va. 
Jonesboro, Tenn. 
Wytheville, Va. 
Staytide, Va. 



Johnson City Tenn, 
Pocahontas, Tenn. 
Tavlorsville, Tenn. 



Black water, Va. 
Kyle's Ford, Tenn. 
Fairview, Va. 
Christiansburg, Va. 
Gordons ville, Va. 
Gordonsville, Va. 
Sago, Va. 
Bangs, Va. 
Danville, Va. 
Pin hook, Va. 
Tavlorsville, Tenn. 
Cynthiana, Ky. 



(14) 



COURSE OF STUDY. 



FIRST YEAR— PREPARATORY. 

Classical. Latin-Scientific, Scientific, Normal, 

netic. Arithmetic. Arithmetic. Arithmetic, 

id -Grammar. English Grammar. English Grammar. English Grammar, 

.iphy. Geography. Geography. Geography. 

History. U. S. History. U. S. History. U. S. History. 
: ra'y & Read'g. Orthogra'y & Read'g. Orthogra'y & Read'g. Orthogra'y & Read'g. 

tnship. Penmanship. Penmanship. Penmanship, 

•writing. Letter-writing. Letter-writing. Letter-writing. 

SECOND YEAR— PREPARATORY. 

y Algebra. Primary Algebra. Primary Algebra. Primary Algebra. 
I'y & Hygiene. Physiol' y & Hygiene. Physiol'y & Hygiene. Physiol' y & Hygiene. 
3 . Physics. Physics. Physics, 

al Compost- Practical Composi- Practical Composi- Practical Composi- 
and Drill. tion and Drill. tion and Drill. tion and Drill, 

al Geography. Physical Geography. Physical Geography. Physical Geography. 
;i;iss. Drill Class. Drill Class. Drill Class, 

nts of Critic'm. Elements of Critic'm. Elements of Critic' m. Elements of Critic'm. 
.; & Debating. Essays <& Debating. Essays & Debating. Essays & Debating. 
Grammar. Ancient History. Ancient History. Ancient History. 
Grammar. Latin Grammar. Latin Grammar. Read'g & Eloeution. 
Fables. Read'g & Elocution. Read'g & Elocution. Read'g & Study of 

Page, Parker and 

Kellogg. 

Lectures on Theory 
& Prac. of Teach'g. 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 

assical. Latin-Scientific. Scientific. Normal. 

,f Arith'tic. Science of Arith'tic. Science of Arith'tic. Science of Arith'tic. 
ly Algebra. University Algebra. University Algebra. Latin Grammar. 
,u\ Rhetoric. Rhetoric & Comp. Analysis of English, 

femy. Astronomy. Astronomy. Debating and Parlia- 

, sis of English. Analysis of English. Analysis of English. mentary Law. 
3 & Debating. Essays & Debating. Essays & Debating. Civil Government. 

Ctesar. Roman & Grecian Hist. & Prog, of Edu- 

i. Sallust. History. cation. 

o'b Orations. Cicero's Orations. Zoology. Hist. & Geog. Drill. 

phon'sAnabasis.Roman History. Geom'try, Trigonom. Lectures on Theory 
'» Apology. Hist. & Geog. Drill. and Practice, 

in History. A ithors to be read: 

Phelps, Holbrook 
& DeTocqueville. 
Bible History. 



16 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE. 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



Classical. 
Zoology. 
Mythology. 
Geology. 

English Literature. 
Bible History. 
Geometry & Trigonometry. 
Surveying. 
Roman History. 
Virgil's Mneid. 
Livy. 

Herodotus. 
Homer's Iliad. 
Orations. 

Civil Government. 

Logic. 

Political Economy. 

Botany. 

Shakespeare and Standard 

Authors. 
Elocution. 

Gen. Geom. and Calculus. 
Horace. 
Tacitus. 
Demosthenes. 
Thucydides. 



Latin-Scientific. 

Zoology. 

Mythology. 

(I oology. 

English Literature. 

Bible History. 

Geometry & Trigonometry. 

Surveying. 

Roman History. 

Virgil's JRneid. 

Livy. 

Elocution. 



JUNIOR YEAR. 

Civil Government. 

Logic. 

Political Economy. 

Botany. 

Shakespeare and Standard 

Authors. 
Elocution. 

Gen. Geom. and Calculus. 
Horace. 
Tacitus. 
German or French. 



Scientific. 
Mineralogy. 
Mythology. 
Geology. 

English Literature. 
Bible History. 
Gen. Geom. and ' 
Surveying. 
Botany. 

Civil Government. 
Logic. 
German. 
Orations and Elocuti 



Meteorology. 
Chemistry. 
Christian Evidences. 
Mechanics. 

Mathematical Astromv 
Shakespeare and Stan* 

Authors. 
Moral Philosophy. 
Mental Philosophy. 
Chemistry. 
Lectures by Seniors. 
Scientific Senior Year. 



SENIOR YEAR. 



Classical. 
Moral Philosophy. 
Mental Philosophy. 
Chemistry. 
Meteorology. 
Christian Evidences. 
Mechanics. 

Mathematical Astronomy. 
Lectures by Senior Students. 
Seneca. 

Cicero DeSenectute. 
Xenophon's Memorabilia. 
Plato. 
Greek Testament. 



Latin-Scientific. 
Moral Philosophy. 
Mental Philosophy. 
Chemistry. 
Meteorology. 
Christian Evidences. 
Mechanics. 

Mathematical Astronomy. 
Lectures by Seniors. 
Seneca. 
Cicero DeSenectute. 



REMARKS ON DEPARTMENTS. 



PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT. 

Here is an important place. It is where the new students really 
begin. It is where various orders of mind and advancement must 
be blended and wrought into harmony. - Where many students learn 
for the first time in life how to study ; or have the ambition roused 
to become students. 

The teachers of this Department have had years of experience and 
ire especially adapted to the place, going in and out before the classes 
with cheerful activity and happy command and appreciation of the 
work to be done. 

The Department is a place of good humor and hard work with 
xcellent drill. 

New students will find it an excellent beginning place, and thor- 

igh work in this is a necessity to the enjoyment and profit of a 

lege Course. 

ENGLISH. 

Observation and experience both teach that, while the study of 
lish is generally neglected in common school training, it is a 
ziost imperative and practically beneficial element in any proper in- 
tellectual or business education. 

Part of a late session was spent in special observation, study and 
., xpei'mient in teaching Practical English to beginning students. 
The subject in all its departments, by the natural method, can be 
made fascinating and highly valuable to students. 

Including the common school department, one class will be kept 
in this study the entire session, and one-half the year, two. These 
classes combine in each the principles commonly known as Gram- 

(17) 



18 MILLNJAN COLLEGE. 

mar, Elementary Rhetoric and Composition, giving life, natural- 
ness and utility to the thoughts of those studies, combining them 
into one, thus developing a lively interest in the art of writing 
thoughts. One of these classes in Practical English is Preparatory — 
the other is in the College Course. 

This introduction makes a pleasant and valuable preparation for 
the regular course of critical analysis of English (Reed and Kellogg), 
Quackenbos' Rhetoric and Composition, Shaw's English Literature, 
Study of Shakespeare and Standard Authors, Elements of Criticif * 
all of which makes a valuable English Course. 

NATURAL SCIENCE. 

This is the field where friends of an institution, living in m- 
parts of a country, can help the school. Labeled specimens, v 
of various kinds, Indian relics, the skins of animals, birds or r< 
tiles, neatly filled with any light substance, to preserve well th 
form, are all interesting and necessary for the department. Wha 
is very common to you at home may be of the highest interest in 
another part. Remember these facts, and send specimens, noting 
when and where found, how surrounded, with local names. 

The College is especially well situated for the study of Geology 
and Botany, from the face of Nature herself. 

The top of Roan Mountain, 30 miles east of us, presenting some 
of the oldest formations in the United States, while abundant coal- 
beds are but little over 100 miles the other way, with numbers of 
the wildest, deepest and most varied gorges between, making a com- 
plete field for the study of a large number of Geological phenomena, 
and at the same time the timbers, grasses and flowers are especially 
varied. 

LATIN AND GREEK. • 

Entirely too many English words find their roots and primary 
meanings, and too many grammatical principles find their explana- 
tion, in the Latin language, to deny its great importance and interest 
in a correct course of education. Its study will lead us into a fuller 
understanding of ancient thoughts and customs. It will give us a 
better vocabulary and a much more accurate understanding of our 
own language. Besides developing a finer taste in the choice of 
words and constructions, it excels in cultivating the art of reasoning 
from probabilities and causes of remote bearings. As to methods 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE. 19 

of instruction, wo use any and every means and illustration to lead 
the students to a clear understanding of the construction, its rela- 
tion to English, and give him a right appreciation of the author's 
meaning. The study of Mythology, and especially the hearing of 
ancient history on the authors read, will be connected with the en- 
ire Classical Course. 

Many of the reasons for the study of Latin are, equally applicable 
o the study of the Greek language. It is, besides, the chief source 
f scientific terms, and, more than all the fossils cast, bearing the 
npress of God's plan for human redemption. Grecian Mythology 
nd History with the entire course. 

MATHEMATICS. 

This course in this department includes pure and applied Mathe- 
tatics, and requires four years after reaching Olney's University 
Jgebra. Concentration of mind and patience of study are the 
ading objects of the study. These objects are best reached by 

ill, requirement of accuracy and skillfully leading the student to 

flight in doing' the work himself. 

i 

METAPHYSICS. 

A comprehensive study of the flights in this field would require 
ifetime, but he who has not learned to look within his own mind, 
I (tn toward the origin of his own thoughts, purposes and choices,, 
tut enjoyed the spiritual element of human nature. The 
• sf Metaphysics is a weird and fascinating chase after the in- 
dole elements, the source of nature and manifestations of hu- 
si thought. It tends to develop a more reflective and deeper 
1 and life. It makes men rich who hold no goods of this world, 
student of Psychology touches realms of thought and has im- 
, es of life that the uncultivated mind never feels, of which it 
a not know. Each young man can be his Own book, each human 
ing about him a living volume. 

NORMAL DEPARTMENT. 

If we wish to build a house, a man is sought who has learned 
:\v to work on wood. If we wish to have a horse shod, a man 
jlled in working with iron is found. If we want to make a 
sed, we seek some justice or lawyer who knows how to write the 



20 MILLKJAN COLLEGE. 

transfer. J.f the child's mind is better than wood, and its heart and 
conscience more valuable than iron, give us trained teachers to 
fashion these into beauty and usefulness. If experience and skill 
must train athletes and race-horses how to lay out their strength, 
how can green tyros train boys and girls to put forth their best 
powers? The blind are not good guides for the blind. 

Our country needs classes or institutions to awaken flic spirit of 
teaching, to develop a love for that calling which, in its bearing for 
weal or woe upon human society, after agriculture, to say the least- 
is second of all the callings among men. Give 113 hopeful, learned 
hard-working men and women to educate the next two generate 
of our Sunny South, and this world will have no finer start t 
liberal, noble humanity. 

Our Normal Course will consist of a close study and review of as 
common school branches, with opportunities to train classes uride; 
the suggestions and help of a skilled teacher. 

One year's study in the Principles of Science, Elementary Alge- 
bra and English Literature. 

The last half a school year is devoted to the study of Page, Kel- 
logg and Parker, with thoughts and questions upon the subjects 
treated and a careful culling from the leading school journals, be- 
side practical illustrations of the different methods of elnss and 
school work, with daily lectures, setting forth the best thoughts we 
can give for every work of the district teacher, from seeking a lo- 
cation and making contracts to the closing day's work of a session. 

Young people proposing to teach will find it greatly to their in- 
terest and advantage to make close inquiry into the workings of 
this department, and to examine the Normal Course laid down in 
the curriculum. 

INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC, FRENCH AND GERMAN. 

These branches are placed under the charge of one teacher, Miss 
Porter, to have sjch assistance as may be necessary. The study of 
German and French are optional, except one year of either is re- 
quired in the Latin-Scientific and Scientific Courses. One and a 
half year of either language can be substituted for the Sophomore 
year of Greek. 

Instrumental Music is optional, but so necessary have organs and 
pianos become to complement the songs of home, that almost every 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE. 21 

Lwiv feels a strong desire to be able to fill her place at the instru- 
ment, and we use all diligence to secure teachers who are skilled to 
aach and train in this science and art. 
Readers are referred to thcarticle on Teachers, for an acquaint- 
ed with the teacher in this department. 

EXPENSES. 

The tuition rates are low. The session is divided into three terms, 
2 weeks each. 
A ticket giving all the rights, privileges and advantages of 

regular preparatory and college classes, will be sold to each stu- 
nt. 

This, and this only, is the receipt and card of admission to the 

1 as a member of the Institution. 

These privileges and whatever advantages he may obtain, are 
t at he buys. 

If the student does not use them, it is not the fault of the Insti- 
rion. 

No money paid for such tickets of admission will be returned. If 
i owner chooses or is compelled to leave before the time of his card 
expired, the treasurer will mark on the back of it the time of 
.ion due, and the student can fill the period whenever he pleases 
the future. 

We will positively refuse to enroll students unless the money is 
(1, or a definitely satisfactory arrangement is made. 

t Preparatory Classes, per term, 12 weeks, 
md Preparatory Classes, per term, 12 weeks, . 

.e Classes, per term, 12 weeks, 

c Lessons on Organ and Piano, and use of Instrument, 

^er term, 12 weeks, ..... 
ess College, Full Diploma Course, 

d in private house, per month, 

hing, per month, . . . 

Hates for Advance Payment — More Than One Term. 

FIRST PREPARATORY. 

Term, 12 weeks, . . . . .• . . $8 00 

: Terms, 24 weeks, 15 20 

. ee Terms, 36 weeks, ...... 22 40 



. $8 00 


10 00 


. 11 


00 


ment, 

12 


00 


. 25 


00 


£6 50 to 8 


00 


50tol 


00 



$10 


o- 


19 





28 


1 


$11 




20 




30 


I 



22 MILLTOAN COLLEGE. 

SECOND PREPARATORY. 

One Term, 12 weeks, ...... 

Two Terms, 24 weeks, . . . * 

Three Terms, 36 weeks, ...... 

COLLEGE CLASSES. 

One Term, 12 weeks, ...... 

Two Terms, 24 weeks, ...... 

Three Terms, 36 weeks, , . . . 

Board, washing, tuition and all society and library fees, trur 
conveyed to and from the train on arrival and departure, a n 
messenger employed to go to and from the office three times er 
day, one school year, $110. Including music lessons on piano 
organ, with use of instrument, $146. 

Including all the items in the above lines, with the use of all nee 
essary text-books for the session, $150. 

The young lady then, not taking music, can have a home, Liter- 
ary Society, Library, and the other items, with the use of the text- 
books necessary for the session, for $115. These are totals, not- 
followed by a long list of extras. 

Considering these figures, and the new house for the comfort of 
the students, the association in it of two accomplished lady teach 
ers, with many other advantages of the Institution, certainly Milli- 
gan College should claim the honor of greatly reducing young 
ladies' expenses at college, without lessening the high quality of the 
labor bestowed on them. 

THE YOUNG LADIES' HOME. 

We can .accommodate 35 to 40 girls with the new building which 
is now being finished, furnished and made attractive. 

Our location is on a high and beautiful hill, forty yards from the 
college door. A level walk leads to the building, so that no one 
needs to have wet feet from walking through mud. 

The rooms for the girls will be on the second floor, very comfort- 
able and convenient. 

We shall continue to make ours not a boarding-house, but a home 
where the young ladies' minds and K ves shall enjoy all the freedom 
that is good for their progress and development, physically, iucd- 
tally and morally. 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE. 23 

Many privileges are allowed ; indeed, all that could be reasonably 
asked ; yet there are limits beyond which they can not go. We oc- 
cupy, for the time, the place of parents or guardians, as well as 
teachers, and home discipline is quite as necessary for developing 
gentle and refined ladies as school discipline, and will be as rigidly 
enforced. 

If parents send us their daughters, their health will be guarded, 
their minds cultivated, their habits noted and corrected, and their 
spiritual natures strengthened. 

We do not say all the young ladies must board at this home; but 
it will be better for them to do so — better opportunities and less ex- 
posure. 

Send them on and we will do them all the good we can, and we 
conscientiously believe it will be at less expense than in any other 
institution affording similar advantages to young ladies in the North, 
or South either. 

We call your attention and inquiry to this statement. 

THINGS A YOUNG LADY MUST BRING. 

Besides other toilet articles, she will be expected to supply herself 
with towels, one pair of pillowcases and one pair of sheets. 

THINGS A YOUNG LADY OUGHT TO HAVE. 

A waterproof wrap, plenty of plain clothing and a good supply 

jf flannel. In our climate it is a serious mistake for parents to 

allow their children to go through the chilly evenings and mornings 

f fall and spring, and the hard cold of winter, without woolen un- 

rwear. Nature nowhere compels the lower animals to endure ex- 

.iie cold without warm clothing. As much then as human 

t;mgs are above the lower animals, by so much is the necessity 

greater which rests upon us ; that of protecting those in our care 

against rheumatism, neuralgia and consumption, by furnishing 

them with warm clothing, and, if necessary, compelling them to 

wear it. 

FEES! FEES!! ^EES!!! 

Every unexpected expense is a hurt to the student and parent. 
When the extras are nearly half the expense, doubt and unpleasant 
feelings arise. We charge no contingent fee, nor library, nor read- 
ing-room, nor doctor's fees, and ask no stu'derit to pay a society club 



24 MILU(JAN (OLLECJE. 

fee, nor extra for modern language, nor any of the troublesome 
list ; but to pay his tuition year by year on entrance, derive all the 
advantages and pleasures offered him by the Institution, and at the 
close of his course pay for his diploma, go forward into the world and 
begin to work at once. 

The Reading-room and Library will be furnished without extra 
fees to the student. The organization of students into sections for 
Debate, Essay, Elocution and Literary drill under a trained teacher, 
will be far more valuable than former methods, with their fines, 
troubles and careless ways. 

It does not take money shows and costly furniture, indebted for 
by poor, but bravely-struggling students, that a young man may 
learn to think, to speak and to reach scholarship ; but it requires 
patience, study and brains. 

Let him exercise these and rejoice in the privilege, not indulging 
the waste of money, time and good feeling which comes of medals, 
society debts, quarrels and half-performed literary work. Let him 
be sure that he is building into his mind only the pure, the wise, 
and the good of an education. 

ECONOMY. 

Parents often do their children a permanent injury by too great 
allowance of pocket money; this not only injures the son or daughter 
who is indulged, but it often induces a feeling of envy or discontent 
on the part of those whose parents can not or do not indulge them 
in the same manner. 

The necessary incidental expenses here are very small. Some of 
our best students and those who had the respect of all, went through 
the school year, and spent for everything, outside of published dues, 
less than five dollars. Many others have spent very little. Plain 
and inexpensive clothing, neatly kept, is all that is desired by the 
teachers. 

Youth is the time to practice neatness and learn habits of economy. 

GRADUATION. 

Scholarship and thoroughly sound moral character are preferred 
in those who go out to represent the institution much before large 
numbers. In fact, we can not conscientiously, and hence will not, 
testify that a graduate has a good moral character, unless his former 
conduct assures us that he has. 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE. 25 

The curriculum embraces four courses : the Classical, the Latin- 
Scientific, the Scientific and the Normal. The degree of A.B. will 
be conferred upon those satisfactorily completing the Classical, B. 
L. for the Latin-Scientific, 15. S. for the Scientific, and certificate 
for the Normal Course. 

No distinction, as to sex, in studies, examinations, or giving of 

Diplomas. 

Diploma fee $5.00. 

REPORTS. 

Statements of attendance on classes, of industry and deportment, 
will be sent to parents or guardians when they desire them. 

GOVERNMENT. 

Other things equal, that civil government is most prosperous 
which has the most active producers. That church has most spiritual 
life which furnishes practical Christian work for each member and 
shows him the joy to come from doing it. 

A few things from the basis of good school government : 

1st. Plenty of hard work and a realization that it must be done. 

2d. A wide-awake, active interest in that work. 

3d. A thoroughly good example and precept by every one of the 
Faculty. Many students will then cheerfully aid the work. 

4th. A sharp, clear understanding, that no student, however 
rich, talented or advanced, will be retained when it is learned that 
his influence is for evil. 

Upon these principles we shall endeavor to teach young people 

lie power and worth of self-government ; that it is a necessary part 

f the foundation for success in business, or any true happiness 

ire or hereafter. 

SATURDAY-MONDAY. 

It has become proverbial that Monday's lessons are failures. A 
little reflection will give the theory of a much better plan. Practice 
has already shown and continues weekly to more clearly demonstrate 
its advantage. 

Milligan College conducts her classes regularly arid fully on Satur- 
day. Even Society meetings are held on Saturday night. Then- 
our week's work is done. We awake on Lord's day morning with a 
day of rest and change of thought before us. No unprepared Mon- 
day lessons haunt the student. lie ca!n and does more willingly 



26 MIL LIU AN COLLEGE. 

and cheerfully give himself to Sunday-school, church, and at night 
to the Young Men's Prayer-meeting. The day is indeed enjoyed as 
one of change and rest. 

Monday comes, we are fresh. It is close to the recitation d 
Students realize this and work accordingly. There is no hindrai 
to study and reviews this day, but every encouragement. Student: 
who go home on Saturday evening can be here on time, all tl 
trains running on Monday. 

So with fresh life and good lessons the week's class-work begin 
on Tuesday morning, and the first day's lessons arc as good as any 
day in the week, and with some students better. The change is 
-especially beneficial to all regular boarding students, and is an 
actual disadvantage to none. We believe its general adoption by 
boarding-schools would be a real blessing to the cause of education. 

MORNING CLASS. 

Each day at 8:15 A. M., the Faculty and students assemble in 
the College Chapel. After devotional services, consisting of songs, 
reading and prayer, immediately follow the morning talks or lec- 
tures by the President or another of the teachers on topics pertain- 
ing almost to all departments of human life. 

"Those lectures made us think," "Nothing ever did us more 
good than the morning talks," "It was the logic of the morning 
•class that changed me," are expressions of students gone out to work 
in the world. 

READING-ROOM AND LIBRARY. 

Improvements are in contemplation that will enlarge and beautify 
the Library and Reading-room. Students have access to all the 
books and magazines without any additional expense whatever. 

The encyclopedias and other books are freely used by many pu- 
pils in the preparation of recitations and the gathering of general 
information. 

. The teachers make many valuable suggestions and encourage this 
kind of research. 

MEDALS. 

They are not new. They come to us from the hoary past. Many 
good men have advocated their use. Many institutions use them 
freely. As much might be said, though, of many other things, 
which the world would grow better without. To fight for a belt, 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE. 27 

to shoot for a turkey, to run your horse for a purse, to speak for a 
medal, are not all the same, but are all on the same side of the 
moral line, and are simply actions of different classes in society. 
Prizes never beget philanthropic love and generosity, but beget 
clannish attachments and strife. They tend to disappoint ten and 
make one vain. Besides, what judges can say, "I know the medal 
should go to B." Three young men are classmates ; one is prostrated 
with sickness; his associates are rivals for the medal to be given 
the next day. The noble, generous one remains with his friend, 
tenderly caring for him through the night. On the morrow they 
come upon the stage. The true one, with the best heart and mind, 
and industry, but relaxed nerves, falls below himself. The selfish 
one knew that he must rest if he would win, and comes fresh and 
confident, wins the medal, boasts of superiority. Is that the way 
to educate young men and women? Arc there no nobler avenues 
through which to call out energies of the soul? Put away these 
relics of Olympic, gladiatorial and feudal contests, and we can point 
young people to the beauty and power of oratory, to the treasures 
of wisdom, to the pleasures of search for the new and undeveloped 
in science, to manly, generous feelings for each other's success, and 
the glorious growth of knowledge and wisdom among men, until 
they will eagerly search for excellence itself instead of the sign. 
Nobility of character — Christian manhood — is the real prize of life, 
and will bless its possessor. 

ROWDYISM. 

The purposes, thoughts and exercise of the student's mind will 

ermine his character. If he thinks and exercises himself in 

:k-faces, coarse songs, making effigies, destroying other people's 

property, disturbing their rest, night-spreeing, playing dummy or 

telling falsehoods to conceal the part himself or others play — the 

hole influence will be make him a fast young man, with cigar in 
mouth, whisky on his breath, profanity iii his language, filled with 
conceit, self and snobbery, unfit for presence in any decent family 
or trust in society. 

Never did a young man engage in such a practice, from a rough, 
practical joke to the falsehood concealing his own and others' guilt 
in worse affairs, without loss. Loss in beauty, excellency or dig- 
nity of character ; loss in right wisdom ; loss in the quality of his 



28 ^HLI.KJAN COLLEGE. 

friends - always loss in some way. It leads toward dissipation. But 
a short distance beyond the cigar and the bottle stands the gambling 
hall and its complement. Any conduct of students which leads to 
the first is on the road to ,the second. In each institution of learn- 
ing a few students develop nearly % all of the evil forces. Observing 
teachers know those on very short acquaintance. 

Tn proportion to the number and surrounding, probably not an 
institution within one thousand miles has a higher moral and Christian 
tone among its students than Milligan College. Profanity, whisky, 
and tobacco in course of a session almost disappear. Hazing anc 
rowdyism, with their idle, brutalizing and hateful influences, hard! 
begin. They are just the reverse of manly, earnest work and c 
thusiasm. Teachers have no right to indulge or to countcnam 
such conduct, but are obligated to fill the minds and spirits of sti 
dents with better and happier purposes. If any will not be thu 
influenced, let them return home without delay or ceremony. Ac 
institution of learning is a place offering superior advantages for 
young people to get wisdom and understanding; to train themselves 
to bear honors ; to be useful and do good. Young people, when rightly 
taught and led, will learn the better way in ethics as they will the 
correct way in mathematics. Clean habits, cheerfulness and hard 
work will make a happy and successful student-life. To reach this 
end, the Faculty of Milligan College have a unity of purpose in all 
departments, from the playground to the Lord's house. 

Better that the boy or girl be at home under Christian influence, 

much better, than in the best school for mental development, drilled 

and molded by careless or scoffing masters of art and science. The 

higher powers of thought and reason, without the love of honor, 

justice and humanity, will be a curse to an individual, a state or a 

nation. 

CO-EDUCATION. 

From the plainest kind of common sense reasoning, co-education 
is right, if there had been no experiment of the kind since Adam. 

If, on the other hand, human beings possessed no powers of ab- 
stract reason, but were dependent solely upon the results of experi- 
ment for their conclusions, the system of co-education has been 
demonstrated to be the correct one. 

1 . The effect of the system upon both sexes is to increase self- 
respect and dignity of bearing. 



MILLKJAN COLLEGE,' 29 

2. As tliis is adopted, hazing and ruffianism, in general, give 
way, and tire students become ladies and gentlemen — unconsciously 
observing the proprieties of life that belong to the highest circles 
they have known. 

3. If woman is to be a helpmeet, she can only be such in the 
best sense by understanding her husband's lines of thought; hence 
the necessity of a similar course of study. 

4. If man and woman are to become associated in future life, 
they should understand well each other's disposition and character. 
Under the strong light of daily class association the traits of each 
gradually become known. 

5. God instituted the system. Boys and girls are in the same 
home ; men and women in the church — Christ's school. 

"One by one the great schools of Europe and America throw off 
the shackles of a past barbarism and admit our daughters as well as 
our sons to all their privileges. Within a few decades, co-education 
promises to become universal, and schools for one sex, male or fe- 
male, will doubtless be classed with the relics of a past age." — 
Baldwin. 

"The co-education of the sexes is conducive to good order. 

Boys become less rude and girls less frivolous when in the society 

of each other. This is particularly true where the two sexes study 

and recite in the same room under the guidance of a judicious 

eacher. The presence of each sex has a beneficial effect on the 

ther, not only in preserving good order, but also in giving the 

'embers of each more confidence in themselves and a greater 

eadth of thought and culture." — liaub. 

"lie ties of brother and sister, friends and early playmates, genial 
ds and honest minds are elevated and made more beautiful and 
istian life rendered safer by co-education. 

OUR TEACHERS. 

>r. Mayo, of Boston, in speaking lately of common school work, 

( there was but one thing absolutely necessary to make a good 

iiool — a good teacher. General Garfield, a few years since, said 

he were a young man again, seeking an education, he would pre- 

er Dr. Hopkins in his prime without Williams College, to all Will- 

ams College without Dr. Hopkins. 

There is a silent character influence passing from teachers to 



30 MrLLIOAN COLLEGE. 

students, whatever the age, that is not seen, neither always felt, 
but is as certain as the influence of warmth and light upon the 
planted germ. Let students look well to the habits and character 
of those whom they choose as teachers and associates, Man can 
exercise his own powers in the choice of place and friends, but he 
can not turn back the influence from those chosen. It is the aroma 
of other spirits than thine own, man, and will be something in the 
flavor of thy thoughts and life. 

The Faculty of this Institution are men and women of clean 
habits. Not one of them uses strong drink, wine, beer or tobacco 
in any form; and, except one, who comes to us with the highest 
commendation of moral character, all are active, aggressive Chris- 
tian workers. We think it but just that the new teachers be intro- 
duced : — 

Miss Nellie B. Porter 

Comes to us from Deerfield, Mass. In music she had the best of 
New England teachers from childhood until about grown, then 
studied in the New England Conservatory of Music, in Boston, and 
in '80, '81 and '82 gave special attention to the piano, organ and 
harmony, under Prof. Blodgett, of Smitli College, Northampton, 
Mass. She is a superior performer, and lias taught successfully for 
years. She has made a specialty of French, and speaks the lan- 
guage ; has studied both French and German in Dr. ►Sauveur's 
School of Languages, and w r e speak for her a splendid work in this 
Southland. 

The following direct testimonial is from an associated teacher: — 

RrjSSEL, Kan., October 22, 1883. 
This will certify that Miss Nellie I>. Porter was associated with me in the 
management of Shorehara Academy, Vermont, during the year ending May 
4, 1883, as teacher of Instrumental Music and French, and it gives me great 
pleasure to testify to the worth of one so deserving. She is a lady of rare 
attainments and broad culture, possessed of superior native abilities, and, in 
her chosen profession, stands in the front rank. I can not commend her too 
highly to all whom these presents may reach, knowing her to be faithful, dili- 
gent and ambitious to the last degree. C. H. French. 

Mr. James W. Giles, 

Pittsylvania County, Va., is twenty-three years old; has completed 
the Mathematical Course of this College ; has an earnest, Christian 
character; is a close reasoner; has clear and comprehensive powers, 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE. 31 

and is an industrious student, He is giving the entire summer to 
special study, to have charge of two classes in higher mathematics. 
He luis attended the normal classes, and has this session had a few 
months of successful experience in teaching. 

Mr. W. M. Straley 

Is twenty-four years old. He has been a close student for many 
years ; has been enrolled in this Institution four sessions ; has com- 
pleted the Classical Course, and taught, with delight to his students, 
one of the Greek Classics during the entire, last session. His pa- 
tience of study; his earnest piety, industry and talent, give him, 
with all, a most honored character and influence. He is spending 
the summer in special observation and study at the National Normal, 
Lebanon, Ohio. 

The other three members of the Faculty, who are preparing to do 
more teaching than usual the coming session, have stood before the 
public in this work from five to ten years each, and are well known 
to former students and the general public. 

NOTES. 

Milligan College offers special inducements to young men who 
desire elementary instruction and are unable tt> have their wants 
met in their immediate neighborhoods. Many young men, wanting 
to get into active life, are hesitating, feeling deeply their need of a 
letter education; but, believing their advancement too little and 
heir age too great, are disposed to abandon the thought of further 
cental development. We invite such friends to come and see us. 
r ou will receive a hearty welcome from teachers and advanced stu- 
., nts, who have passed through similar difficulties and know how to 
i ico u rage others. 
Why not go to school at home ? 

1. The organization and classification are not sufficient to meet 
your wants. Your time is too important to spend next winter 
drumming over the same text-books that you studied last winter 
and probably the winter before. • 

2. Remembering that you must eat Whenever you study, you 
will find that you can live here about as cheaply as you can at 
home. 

3. You will avoid the inconveniences and embarrassments that 



32 MILLIUAN COLLEGE. 

come from association with children in the class-room, and will en- 
joy the pleasure and excitement that naturally comes from well 
organized class work. 

4. Your instruction will probably be better. The hindrances o 
home and neighborhood-work will be removed ; new facilities an< 
surroundings will be yours ; all will be changed, and you will fin 
yourself in the midst of many active, busy young people from differen 
States and sections of country, engaged in the same struggle as your 
self for information and a higher life, This introduction to a 
miniature world will be a factor in life's success. 

DEBATING. 

The literary work of the Institution will be conducted differently 
from that of most universities and colleges. We want it known that 
we are friends to parents and students, and we have learned by ob- 
servation and experience that the society plan does not reach the 
end desired. It is kept up because it saves time and trouble to 
teachers, notwithstanding the poor work, heavy expense, clannish 
spirit and ill-will the members are often forced to bear. 

Forensic and literary training is too valuable to the student to be 
given into the hands of inexperience. The system is wrong. Our 
work will be under the care of the Faculty, who will suggest ques- 
tions, instruct in parliamentary usages and have an oversight of the 
parts that properly belong to them — not depriving the student of 
any of the advantages that come to him from exercising his indi- 
viduality as presiding officer, secretary or critic of the body. 

OBSERVATIONS. 

1. East Tennessee is noted for its health. No epidemic has ever 
visited Milligan College or the county in which it is located. 

2. The natural scenery is pleasant. We are only twelve miles 
from the wild mountain scenery of the "Gorge," through which 
the E. T. & W. N. R. R. passes. 

3. The College is on a beautiful eminence, shaded by large oaks 
and other trees. 

4. All the families and parties living near are directly interested 
in the good work of the students. 

5. No display is made in the way of dress. Personal habits and 
general character of the students determine social standing. 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE. 33 

6. The teachers have no commanding tones or titled formality to 
estrange students, but are ready to extend a hearty welcome to all. 

7. The students are chiefly Christian young men and women, and 
are ready to encourage new students rather than discourage by word 
or deed. 

8. The teachers hold their positions from the quality of the work 
done, and the pupils feel that they are interested in their growth 
and arc their personal friends. They search out and endeavor to 
practice the most improved methods of teaching, whether new or 
old, doing efficient work in a wide-awake and earnest manner. 

9. Monday is used as a holiday instead of Saturday. We have 
put the change on trial and find it highly satisfactory to both students 
and teachers. Read the article on that subject. 

10. If a parent or student will pay to the treasurer $103, cash 
in advance, the student's expenses for board, washing and tuition 
will be borne during the school year. 

11. If parents do not want boys to spend money foolishly, they 
ought not to give it to them. 

12. Read carefully the article on expenses. 

13. Write for information on any subject not discussed or not un- 
derstood in the catalogue. 

14. The development of manly Christian character is the first 
purpose of this institution, and the habits, manners and lives of 

hose trained here show that God is blessing the work. 



Milligan Business College Will Carry Forwa 
Business Education, That Young and W 
die- Aged Men in the South Mag Have 
Advantage of a Thorough Business Ed- 
Hon, with One- Half the Usual Expense 
Commercial Colleges* 



THE COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT. 

MILLIGAN BUSINESS COLLEGE 

Sends a pleasant greeting to all the students who have been here 
the past, and to the many friends who have in various ways aidi 
in bringing the Literary Institution to its present growth. 

Milligan College is rapidly becoming known as a center of pi 
gressive education, being faithful to fulfill every promise in the re< 
tation rooms that is made to the public on paper. 

Conscientious men will not, for love or money, adverti e a woi 
to the public beyond their strength and ability, but 

WILL CARRY FORWARD 

To the satisfaction of patrons and students the curriculum of tl 
Institution. 

A wrong conception of what life is for will sometimes caus* 
men to misrepresent the truth, that their personal interests may 1 
advanced. The school-room ought especially be freed from sue 
men and motives, for within its walls, boys and girls are trained t 
act their parts in riper years. As a factor in the education of men 
an institution ought to so instruct, that all who come under its in- 
fluence may see and be made to feel the beauty and richness that 

(34) 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE. 35 

come to the human spirit from living in the consciousness of work 
well-done and duties met. 
An increased interest in 

BUSINESS EDUCATION 

Has developed in this Southland during the past few years, and it 
is the duty of educators to meet this demand, as it will make minds 
strongei, homes happier and the country more prosperous. 

Every profession or industry in which men can engage, can fitly 
he termed a business. If you arc going to be a farmer, a merchant, 
a lawyer or a mechanic, your success depends largely upon your ability 
to conduct your interests upon business principles. Careful prepara- 
tion has been made, and on the 1st of September our halls will be 
reopened, 

THAT YOUNG MEN AND MIDDLE-AGED MEN 

May understand book-keeping, have a knowledge of the philosophy 
of trade, and know the forms and customs of life. 

Has the reader of this article an ambition to do something for 
himself ? If so, when you engage in some active field of labor, you 
night to be able to produce a balance sheet, showing your assets and 
liabilities, gains and losses. The want of this power is the chief 
cause of much trouble and great financial embarrassment. The 
failure of the Grant family on Wall Street would not have been a 
matter of history, had they themselves conducted and kept an ac- 
urate account of their business transactions. 

Educated brains, willing hands and honest hearts are needed 

IN THE SOUTH, 

at the enterprise and progress of the people may more fully de- 
op the wealth of our country and bring comforts to the home 
rcles. 

Young friend, have you been thinking about how to make money, 
.ke care of yourself, and be an enterprising, useful citizen ? Is your 
tucation sufficient to permit you to enter at once upon such re- 
^onsible duties ? Exercise your best thoughts in this matter before 
•mking your start in life. Do not be deceived in your powers. A 
ian can not be a good blacksmith until he has first learned the use 
jf his tools. 



36 MULLIGAN COLLEGE. 

If you have started wrong, stop. Start right, keep right, and you 
will end right. 

Our Commercial Department is substantially organized, and \vc 
hope yon 

MAY HAVE THE ADVANTAGE 

Of its Course of Study, which answers the purposes of a business 
man. 

In connection with the jtjieory and practice of Book-keeping by 
Single and Double Entry, we will have regular classes in Commercial 
Law, Business Customs, Mercantile Usages, Commercial Arithmetic, 
Lectures on Political Economy, etc. If you realize the need 

OF A THOROUGH BUSINESS EDUCATION, 

That you may more successfully cope with men in the battles of 
commercial dealing, we will gladly welcome you to our halls, satis- 
fied that we offer inducements in the way of expense, thought, lo- 
cation and honest, practical work. 

Never was the demand greater than now for men who understand 
what they profess to do. 

Be master of your profession. Clerks and other employes lose 
their positions from bad habits or their inability to do their work 
well. Every village or town has reserved seats for the faithful. 
You can make your fortune 

WITH ONE-HALF 

The wear of mind and body, if you will first develop the powers 
within you. You will succeed in proportion to the attention you 
give to preparation. 

Men can be found everywhere who have failed in life because 
they neglected, or had not the opportunities of a useful and syste- 
matic drill in practical matters. 

All thoughtful men appreciate these truths, and also know that 

THE USUAL EXPENSE 

Of obtaining such an education is so great, that the majority of in- 
telligent and ambitious young men are totally deprived of these 
benefits. 

This Business College lives for the many, and not the few, and 
any boy with mind and pluck can receive instruction here with a 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE. 37 

very reasonable outlay of money. The total expense need not ex- 
ceed $55. This a variation somewhat from the rule 

OF COMMERCIAL COLLEGES, 

As this amount is often charged for tuition alone. 

$55 vs. $105. 

Our friends will remember that the total expense for a term of 
twelve weeks at permanently-established business colleges is uni- 
formly from $85 to $125. For the accommodation of young men 
with talent and a purpose to do something in life, and yet have 
little capital with which to begin, we will furnish board, washing, 
tuition and books for one term, which is time sufficient to complete 
he Business Course, for the nominal sum of $55. This is your op- 
portunity. 

TIME FOR GRADUATION. 

The Full Diploma Course will require about twelve weeks' time, 
f" the student gives his entire attention to it. It will require about 
line months' time if taken in connection with the regular school 
utiea of the Literary College. 

DIPLOMAS. 

The College Diploma is given to those who finish the prescribed 
jurse satisfactory to the teachers, and is delivered when the Course 
completed, or at Commencement, according to the pleasure of the 
*.dent. 

PARENTS. 

toys about sixteen years old feel that they want to make a for- 

.:. They therefore become restless for some employment that 

ats that way. Put them in a business collecje, and the thought 

at they are doing something for themselves will arouse powers of 

mind that other schools have failed t6 develop. Once aroused 

on mind development it will not be so difficult to induce them to 

atinue their education until they are really and truly prepared for 

ife's work. 

PRIVILEGES GRANTED. 

Students have access to the Morning Class lectures, Library, 
leading-room and Debating Clubs without any additional fees 
whatever. 



38 MIXJiK JAN COLLEGE. 

MERCHANTS' SCIENTIFIC COURSE. 

Honesty and Truth will not allow us to recommend a young man 
or woman to "keep books," by giving them a diploma, when wc 
are satisfied that they would make bad work of it. We have no 
short and very quick course for this reason. 

But any person can enter the Business College by paying 815. 
This will entitle him to instruction in what is generally known as 
the Merchants' Scientific Course. No diploma will be given him. 
Many active minde can stop here and be able to take charge of a 
set of books. All will get forms, customs and business principles 
that will be valuable to them through life. 

Milligan Business College is and will be sustained in the thor- 
oughness of the work done and the character and support of its 

graduates. 

WHAT WE THINK. 

We are not of the class of business educators who say that a col- 
lege or academic education is unprofitable, and, therefore, a loss of 
time and money. We do not believe it. College training gives 
thought; thought moves the world. Art, science, literature and 
invention are the results of thinking minds. 

If your circumstances will permit you to spend from one to five 
years in college, you can not do better. We say, Go ! Use care in 
the selection of your institution, for your association will be a factor 
in forming your character. 

If you can not reach a college life, spend at least twelve w r eeks in 
profitable business training. The bu^ness habits, thoughts and 
impulses gathered here you probably will never gather from 
experience. 

We will be pleased to furnish any further information wanted. 

Address, James A. Tate, 

Milligan, Tenn. 



CALENDAR- 1885-86. 



^irst term begins Tuesday, September 1. 
irst term ends Saturday, November 21. 
icond term begins Tuesday, November 24. 
cond term ends Saturday, February 13. 
iird term begins Tuesday, February 16. 
ial Examinations, May 3, 4, 5 and 6. 
dergraduate Declaimers, Friday, May 7, 7:30 p. m. 
erary Entertainment, Saturday, May 8, 10 A. m. 
iry Entertainment, Saturday, May 8, 2:15 p. te. 
s College Commencement, Saturday, May 8, 7:30 p. m. 
•school, Sunday, May 9, 9:15 a. m. 
aireate Sermon, Sunday, May 9, 10:30 A. M. 
n, Sunday, May 9, 3:30 p. m. 
uts' Prayer-meeting, Sunday, May 9, 7:30 p. m. 
' gmduate Orators, Monday, May 10, 10 A. m. 
.1 Programme, Monday, ]\Iay 10, 2:30 p. m. 
Ladies, Monday, May 10, 7:30 p. m. 
mutative Orators, Tuesday, May 11, 9:30 A. m. 
iry Address, Tuesday, May 11, 11 A. m. 
_d term ends Tuesday, May 11. 



Where is the College Located? 

AND 

HOW CAN I REACH IT P 



The Institution is situated at Mill igan, near Johnson City, 
Upper East Tennessee. To all .'persons living east and north 
that locality, the following will give a clear idea of the route.' 
Lynchburg, Va., thence westward to Koanoke, Salem and Jok 
City; here change cars for Milligan, four miles out. 

Those coming from the South or West should select the best n 
from their place to Chattanooga or j£uoxviIle, Tennessee,- thene 
Johnson City, where they change cars for Milligan. 

Those from South Carolina and parts of North Carolina com 
Asheyille, thence to Morristown, thence to Johnson City and IVftlh, 

Distance from Lynchburg, by railroad, 238 miles. 

Distance from Rnoxville, by railroad,, 110 miles. 



NDEX 



Introduction, . • . 

Board oi Trustees, 

References, 

Faculty, 

Students, 

Graduates, 

Course of Study, 

Remarks on Departments. 

Milligan Business College, 

Calendar, 




G^NE A K-^Z5 



m era €mw 3 Twm* 



SESSION i888~'87» 



VITH ANNOUNCEMENTS FOR 1888. 












A.isrifcTUA.rj 



OF 



jYEILLsI 



NEAR 



JOHNSON CITY, TENN. 



BEBStos mm*f.. 



With Announcements for 1BB7-B 



AGE QUID AGrl-i 



CINCINNATI: 
Ehn Street Printing Company, Nos. 176 and 1/8 Elm Street. 

1887. 



•H3isaa^\ — "uoiprjnp9 u% 
ngsudmoo si siip uy 'SdJUOfsuinoMD jjd jtjpun p9fvjinoui fyipojiow 
und pun ( p9H'i}sui 9q 0} si tiuipjf snoilhpjb punofadd v .' p9.iids 
-wi 9q of 9.iv s9aijom faffdocn, put) oruq i pouwjqsQJL 9q o% 9jlx> suots 
-and 91 ff ' p9ui^diosip 9q o? 9xv s&uij99f 9VJJ 'NOLLVOficia fa wju9% 

9$UVj 9\ff U% p9Uir>}U00 81 ipiipi jJV 9SlMluiO0 fOU S90p 90p9J(nOUJ>J 



jVTilligfkq College 



SESSION OF 188G-1887. 

It was filled with hard study and good will. Its history is crowded 
with happy memories. Strifes, medals, honor bubbles, and College 
cliques, with their bad influence, were lost and hardly spoken of in 
the enthusiastic search for knowledge under the natural system of 
study and government. The class-rooms and literary clubs were 
mental gymnasiums. The prayer-meeting, Sunday-school and Band 
of Hope were places of refreshing for the spiritual life. The social 
atmosphere was that of a cheerful Christian home. As a body, 
young ladies and young men, boys and girls, teachers and friends, 
alike enjoyed the session. Only the evil-doer could be unhappy. 
The authorities and Faculty of the Institution offer thanks unto all 
who tried to make the session a successful and happy one. 

MAN'S GROWTH. 

"Jesus increased in wisdom and statiire and in favor with God 
and man." 

Man becomes wise by growing into wisdom. This growth is the 
result of mental feeding and exercise. As each animal, well fed 
and properly exercised, grows into a beauty and strength of its own, 
so each human being with proper mental food and training may 
grow into a strong and beautiful self. 

When he acquires knowledge, exercises his faculties and fulfills 
duty with reference to this individual worth and responsibility, he 
is growing into a true manhood. 

Any system of education which does not recognize this truth is 

(3) 



pm: j&\wbiv,\\o 'aouaiasuoa 'raopsiM jo q^ioM jt:aj aq^ no pasiojaxa 
pirn paxu ajtt spuiui Jiaq^ jj 'pasiojaxa ;soui ajtt qoiqM ajn^ttu jo 
siuatuaja asoq^ ui -jsoui a\oj# [jia\ ajdoad Suno ^ -uaippqa joj ittq? 
eu s^pip'e joj pourao^uoo aq o^ qonra Stt si 'sapaioos putt sjouoq 's[tt 
-paua joj a jii^s t\%u& 'Sui^uauiap put? SuiA*ds jo unnsAs ^uasaad aqj^ 

MO^Sttin aq-} jo uavojj putt :jasop >(Uttp aq^ 'poj 
aq; A(\ sttAv iiiaunuaAoS [ooqog Ajrguiud aauM aiuu tt sha\ ajaqj, 

•s^qSnoqi Jiaqi jaquiamaj o% paiuttqstt ajtt 
a\ou oqAv uaui A"q pa^ttOOAptt aauo st?A\ XjaAtqs uuumq jo aouttnurj 
-uoa aqj[^ 'aatqd sqi ^oo^ q^u.q aq} ajojaq pjo XjaA si?a\ a^uouojjstj 
s^uiajoij ^i puaiuuioaaj 3011 saop oSh sjj 'Suoja\ si maisXs oqj, 
•aauapuuoo qsuqas ssa{ SniAttq 'i{}joa\ puoui putt luapu 'iCjqsnpni 
aa^ttajS jaAO jouoq }sju jo |ttpam tt uia\ a"uiu ssauqsujas 1003 

•jojaiuuqo putt [jp(S 'mop 
-siM — iqSnos sSuiqj p:aj aq.} uo jjttaq siq s^as inapn^s aq; ssa[ aq} 
'[ooqos jo sjouoq poB sazijd 'saptuS 0} uaAiS uoi}ua}}tt aioui aq} oy 
•uopoajjod siq ui caiq 40 A\o'u>f ooiu aqi ssaj aq} 'po*j jo suoi}B}uas 
-ajda.t asaq} 0} uaAiS uoi}ua}}tt ajoui aqj y 'uoiSijaji siq 0} ajtt sjopi 
putt saSttun 'sajn}aid }ttqA\ uoi}ttonpa s ( uttiu oi ajtt A'aqx -uiaq} ui 
s}uanjaja jaqSiq ou aAt?q anbip aq} putt ^Jttui aq} putt p:pam aqj^ 

'uoiSqaa ni iust}aas uo soip.jod ui A^red aAoqtt sSuiqi 
joj 9AU)s 0} unq UlttJ} jo pre }0u saop }ttq} utttu 0} pooS tt qons 
aq utto jo {{iav ^utq^ou ^nq 'ajij ui Suissayq tt aq 0% iqSno uoiittanpg; 
•uopttanpa pi;q aiuoojaAO scq asuas poo3 asnwaaq aq {{im^t 'aAqos^ou 
op pauittj^ snq; Xutt jj 'uoiSqaj ai suttuinoas putt sorjqod ui subs 
-UJttd |ttju^ttu araooaq Aoq^ pm: '[ooqas in saijaiaos putt sanbija XittJ 
-a^q jo; ajiJ^s putt uoi]ua;uoa 0^ paiuo^snaott aq uaiu SunoX ^a^ 

'sri 05 ajn^ttu tt stt 
saiuoaaq %\ 'Av\\ uitt)jaa b ui %&$ putt ^uiqj o^ anupuoo oa\ uaq^ 
•joj aAu^s o} paiuo^suoatt si aq ;uqv\ aAoqtt aq JOB ||!M ajq jo SA\aiA 
i 'Xpoq s^i jo auq aqj uo aq -jsntu uoisia jo aSuttJ asoqA\ ^sttaq 
aTjij sjouoq puu sapttjS 'sp?paui uodn ^as aq pui?u s.uimi tt ^aq 

•Aauoui joj paajS 
qaAap-jjas siq 01 aAiqs tt aiuooaq suq 51 ^ui>[ttui apijA\ :jnq 's^jom 
jooS joj aunijoj v. a^ttiu 0; ^ittaq siq ui pasodjnd sttq uttin tt A*uttj\r 

(utt^qo 01 ^ittaq putt awodjnd siq s"}as 
oq qoiqAV niqi aAO{ o; siuuaj a]_{ -sa'AOj aq qoiqw s.^uiq^ aq} 05]i| 
sauiooaq ajj "japttjttqo siq ui saojoj asaq^ dopAap Ajuo m?o uopiquitt 
qsy[as putt Xjiuba sjiruu o; {ttaddtt stt saAi;uaoui qons putt s^yajq'j 's^i 
-jaiuap 'sjouoq 'sjttpaiu dn Siup[Ofy *qToq jo Suojav jo ^bdav joqua 



MlLLlGAN COLLEGE. * 5 

the image of God within us, they will think higher, and choose no- 
bler ends for action. Any system which awakens lower ambitions, 
clannish, strife or jealous feelings, ought to die and he lost to mem- 
ory, so that the whole energy and affections may be set upon things 
of greater worth. 

OUR NAME. 

Large circles of men and women in many parts of the world, 
either by character or in person, have known R. MlLLlGAN, Ken- 
tucky University. His authorship is scholarly, showing close and 
critical research. It is clear, full and pleasant to read. His char- 
acter was beautiful and strong, but tempered with deepest love. 

Personal association was a real pleasure to his students and 
friends, and is a happy memory now. He was a patient, sufferer, a 
hard worker, a man who walked with (rod and gave the strength 
of his years to increase wisdom and virtue among men. Hence the 
name Milligan College. 

THE BUILDING AND LOCATION. 

The building is both convenient and handsome. Its halls, cloak- 
rooms and elegant apartments make it a pleasant place for study 
and school life. 

The Institution is situated at Milligan, four miles from Johnson 
City, Tenn., and half a mile from a new line, the E. T. & W. N. 
C, Railroad. 

The natural scenery is pleasant to see and remember. From a 
line promontory in the bend of the creek we can look far up the 
beautiful valley to the mountains about its sources, then on to 
higher and higher summits, which in the background are often 
;&pped with snow when the fields around us are pleasant and green, 
i'hen follow the silvery stream, winding its way through fields and 
hades, until it passes around the College promontory and little vil- 
lage, and with a few steps' remove we can see it go on to the crystal 
waters of the Watauga, and behold the grand mountains barricade 
the stream's rich, broad plains, until the view is lost in the distant 
curve of the vallev walls. 



MI I, LIU AN COLLIOCK. 



SELECTIONS FROM CHARTER. 

From Article 3,d. — The property vested, or which may he 
vested, in this Institution, shall he held hy a Board of Trustees. 
And a majority of the members of the Board shall constitute a quo- 
rum to transact business, and said Board of Trustees is hereby con- 
stituted a body politic and corporate, as Literary, Scientific and 
Religious Institution, and is invested with power to confer degrees, 
to sue and be sued by the corporate name, to purchase and hold or 
receive by gift, bequest or device any personal property or real 
estate necessary for the transaction of corporate business or as an 
endowment fund, and also to purchase or accept any personal prop- 
erty or real estate in payment or part payment of any debt due the 
corporation, and to sell or alien the same. 

Article 4th. — In case of a vacancy in the Board of Trustees by 
death, resignation or otherwise, such vacancy shall be filled by elec- 
tion at such time and place and in such way as may be fixed by the 
By-laws, and at such election each Trustee present shall have one 
vote by virtue of his Trusteeship ; and each donor, including Trus- 
tees, to said College, who shall hold a certificate of donation from 
the President and Secretary of the Board of Trustees, shall have 
one vote for each fifty dollars donated as shown by such certificate 
of donation. 

From Article 7th. — The general welfare of society and not in- 
dividual profit being the object for which this charter is obtained, 
the members are not stockholders in the legal sense of the term, 
and no dividends or profits shall be divided among themselves. 



DOciM of 1 ru$tee$. 



J. I). PRICE, Milligan, Tenn. 

J. C. HARDIN, Johnson City, Tenn. 

C. C. TAYLOR, Milligan, Tenn. 

GEO. T. WILLIAMS, Elizabethton, Tenn. 

J. HOPWOOD, Milligan, Tenn. 

S. W. IIYDER, Milligan, Tenn. 

GEO. W. GILLESPIE, Cedar Bluff, Va. 

JAMES A. TATE, Milligan, Tenn. 

Officers of the Board. 

J. D. PRICE, President. 

GEO. T. WILLIAMS, . . Secretary. 

S. W. HYDER, Treasurer. 



The following referees have each some personal knowledge of the Insti- 
tution and the character of the work done. 



S. M. Thomas, 

L. A. Cutler, 

Thomas Munell, . 

Mrs. K. W. Williams, 

A. S. Johnson, 

C. A. Calfee, 

J. D. Hamaker, . , 

P. S. Rhodes, 

Samuel Millard, . 

Wit. H. Hickey, 

H. R. and T. H. R. Christie, 

Isaac Campbell, 

A. M. Ferguson, 

John M. Tate, . 

S. E. Jones, 

M. F. Penland, . 

W. K. Brooks, 

Joshua Williams, 

j. w. roberts, 

G. W. Coleman, 

Walter S. Mill, 

Wm. Jas. Shelburne, 

P. B. Baber, . 

Jas. White, 

T. M. Myers, . 

I. J. Spencer, 

A. A. Taylor, 

Gov. R. L. Taylor, 

M. nV. Lakue, 



f the 



. Thomas Mills, Tenn. 

Richmond, Va. 
. Mt. Sterling, Ky. 

Cynthiana, Ky. 
. Augusta, Ga. 

Reed Island, Va. 
. Snow vi He, Va. 

. Johnson City, Tenn. 

Bakersville,*N. C. 
. Concord, W. Va. 

Sneedville, Tenn. 
. Lebanon, Va. 

Blackwater, Va. 
. Mossy Creek, Tenn. 

Bakersville, N. C. 
. Broad Ford, Va. 

Burnsville, X. C. 
. Kansas, Tenn. 

Athens, Tenn. 
Voice) New York City. 

Christiansburg, Va. 
. Indian Mills, Va. 

Rogersville, Tenn. 
. Asheville, Tenn. 

Cuckoo, Va. 
. Johnson City, Tenn. 

Nashville, Tenn. 
. Win ton Place, O. 



(7) 



faulty. 



J. HOPWOOD, A.M., President, 

Ethics, Science and Normal Department. 

W. M. STRALEY, A.B., 

Professor of Ancient Languages and Literature. 

JAMES A. TATE, A.B., 

Professor of Pure and Applied Mathematics. 

MRS. S. E. HOPWOOD, 

Preparatory and English Department. 



Teacher of Instrumental Music, Piano and Organ. 

MRS. EMMA SHELOR, 

Primary Classes, Painting and Drawing. 

H. R. GARRET, 

Tutor in Mathematics. 

J. J. KANODE, 

Assistant in Preparatory Department. 

MISS F. E. BARER, 

Librarian. 

JAMES A. TATE, 

Secretary of the Faculty. 

To be supplied. 

(8). 



\ 



$tudeqt$. 



> 



Name. 

Abbott, Byrdine A., 
Anderson, Willie E., 
Anderson, Joseph, . 
Anderson, Robert, 
Anderson, Malla K., 
Barer, Fannie E., 
Brown, Walter S., . 
Bagby, Richard, , 
*u run son, sinclair, 
;ook, William H., 
(g^REN, Willie G., 
fMZcWN, George A., 
ttfty^'N, Robert L., . 
ner, John L., . 
i:r, Bascom, 

p.uYLES, NOLA, 

| coyles, Frank, 

y^OYLES, LlNNIE, . 

ver, Isaac, . 
.., Isaac, . 
. k, Sue, 

ouch, Eugene M. L., 
\ >rnforth, Lettie, 
} >rnforth, Charles W m 
»csjns, William P., . 
:aft, ArchelusC. 



l'ost-omrc arul State. 

A1>!h)U, V r a. 
Milligan, Tenn. 

it «< 

Okolona, " 
Ervin, *' 

Indian Mills, W. Va. 
Dickinson, Va. 
Stevonsville, Va. 
Limestone Cove, Tenn 
New Castle, Va. 
Miliignn, Tenn, 
Dickinson, Va. 
Abingdon, M 
limner's Elk, N. C. 
Dry Creek, Tenn. 
Chuckey Valley, Tenn, 



Banner's Elk, N. C. 
Okolofia, Tenn. 

Miliignn, Tenn. 



Era, Va. 
Purchase, Va. 



(9) 



10 



MULLIGAN 



rOLLEOE. 



Name. 

CViriciTKB, James (J., 
( ! rook ett, U< > i t ert A . , 
Collins, William T., 

Collins, John N,, 
Ciiesnut, Am: a ham A., 
Cooper, Nora B,, 
J)k Vault, Kop.eut I)., . 
I)i: Vault, Weluon W., 
Divers, A. Lee, 
Dunn, Georhe .15., 
Denny, Myrtle, . 
English, Lou Ella, . 
Em, Warner, 
Finley. Woj.fred, 
Freeman, Nellie, . 

FiNLEY, MA(J(i!K, 

Finlky, Kate, 
Finley, Annie, . 
FeaLIN, RoiJERT If., 

Frost, Eugene D., . 
Felts, Thomas L,, 
Felts, James M., 
Freeman, Geoeoe M„ . 
Gillespie, William T., 
Gibson, Sue A., 
G a en Err, John M., . 
Garnett, Henry K., 
Giles, James W., 
Gillespie, Thomas S., . 
Gillespie, Barnes, . 
Gatliff, Citrns, . 
Goon, Walter C, . 
Giles, Willie, 

GlLLESPIE, SaLLIE, 

GlLLESPIE, Mamir, . 
Gillespie, John L., . 
Giles, Cha jm.es, . 
Gilmer, William 10., 
Hurt, Sallie, . 



Post office ami sum-. 
Phopc, N. C. 
Happy Valley, Tcnn. 
Milligan, 

Woo<U>ine, Ky. 

Flizaltcthton, Tcnn. 

Austin Springs, TcttH. 
<< tt tt 

Rocky Mount, Va. 
Indian Mills, W. Va. 
Elizal>cthton, Tenn. 
Glade Hill, Va. 
Haw's X Uoads, Tcnn. 
Williamsburg, Ky. 



4 | 

> ( 



Dickinson's, Va. 
Bristol, Tent!, 
Woodlawn, Va. 

Williamsburg, Ky. 

liatliff, Va. 

Cbristinnsburg, Va. 

Uapidan Station, Va. 

(ir(H'ndal(\ 

Bunvellville. 

Fall's Mills, 

RatliiT, 

Williamsburg, Ky. 

Brovnisboro, Tcnn. 

Milligau, M 

*» •* 

H a 

H 1 1 

tt it 

Lebanon, Va. 
Uosodalc, " 



i 



i 



MILLIOAN COLLI* IK. 



11 



Kuute. 

Hurt, Amanda, 
Hurt, John, 
Hall, A. Leonard, 
Houck, Jesse F., 
Helm, Bettie, 
Hurt, Bettie, . 
Hammit, Charles C, . 
Haun, William II., . 
Hand, Ulysses S., 
Hamaker, Arthur II., 
Harrison, Joseph, 
Hendeickson, Mary J., . 
Hendrickson, Andrew K., 
Hart, Emma, 
Hardin, James II., 
Henley, Clarence W., 
Hart, Charles, 
Hart, David, . 
Hart, Joseph, 
Hart, Ella, 
Hyder, Frank, 
Hart, Carrie, . 
Hammit, Emma, 
Jon eh, Alvin, . 
Keuley, William 13., 
K anode, John J., 
Keefauver, Shelton B. 
!Cinsie, Cn a rlem E., . 
i\ in/j:r, Frank D., 
Lyon, George E., 
I^^ove, Frank D., . 
ii^vH^E, Byron, . 
i., yon, [David $., . 
LaHue,*B ESSIE E., 
Miller, Arthur I., 
McWane, Charles W., 
McWane, James K., 
Matthews, "John G., . 
Miller^Clyde, 



pMst-oll'Mv ami Statu. 

Rosedale, Va. 

Knoxville, Tcnn. 

Baldwin, N. C. 

Witt's Foundry, Tcnn. 

Rosedale, Va. 

Bristol, TeiMi. 

Barbourville, Ky. 

Rctdsviitc, N. C. 

Snowville, Va. 

Tazewell C. 11. 

Pincvillc, Ky. 
(i • i 

Milligan, Tcnn. 
Johnson City, Tenn.* 
Chuckey Valley, Tcnn, 
Milligan, 



HainjvhH), 
Wythcville, Va. 
Mtllipin, Tenn. 
Blizzard, " 
Troutville, Va. 
Biackslmrg, Va. 
Milligan, Tenn. 
Asheville, N. C. 
Glendale, Ky. 
Milligan, Tcnn. 
Win ton Place, O. 
Snowvillc, Va. 
Wythcville, Va. 

Barbourville, Ky. 
Snowville, Va. 



12 



MILLIGAN GSOLLSGE. 



Name. 

McKenry, John A., . 
Murduck, Benjamin F. 
Mooklar, Richard, 
Martin, Wesley W., 
Matthews, Bettie, 
McKee, Matth:, 
McKee, Ollie, 
Mayhew, Daugh, 
Miller, Annie L., '. 
Miller, Isaac C, 
Miller, Lula, 
MoFarland, James, . 
Madden, John L., 
Mayhew, GeobSge W., 
Murray, Andrew J., 
Miller, Ella J., 
McKeehen, David F., 
Merideth, John, 
Miller, Cennie, 
Murray, Thomas, 
Murray, Joseph, . 
Morrell, Bailey, 
Overhulser, Mollie, 

OVERHULSER, WlLSON, 

Overhulser, Thomas, 
Overhulser, Lucinda, 
Overhulser, Robert, 
Overhulser, Ottie B., 
Trice, Charles G., 
Preston, Annie M., . 
Plummer, Turner, 
Peed, Joseph W., 
Phipps, David C, . 
Perry, Emma, . 
Perry, Nathaniel, 
Patrick, Maggie, 
Payne, Charles, . 
Patton, Samuel, 
Patton, Robert, . 



Post-Office and State. 

Gross, Tenn. 

Ronald, Va. 

Mangohick, Va. 

Floyd C. IL, Va. 

Barbourville, Ky. 

Punxsutawnev, Pa. 

Barbourville, Ky. 
< « t* 

Milligan, Term. 



Woodbine, Ky. 
Knox vi lie, Tenn. 
Barbourville, Ky. 
Milligan, Tenn. 



Roan Mountain, Tenn, 
Bakersville, N. C. 
Milligan, Tenn. 

Okolona, " 
Elizabetbton, Tenn. 



Milligan, " 

Glade Hill, Va. 
Carter's Depot, Tenn, 
Foneswood, Va. 
Clintwood, " 
Elizabetbton, Tenn. 

Boone, N. C. 
Milligan, Tenn. 



MfLLIGAN COLLEGE. 



13 



Name. 

Rutlege, George P., 
Rose, James J., 

ROBINETT, LOYD, 

Button, Samuel G., . 
Smith, Merredith C, 
Straley, Mrs. Sallie B 
Simmons, George C, 
Steffner, Cora C, . 
Shelor, Mamie S., 
Shelburne, Helen, . 
Shell, Robert W., 
Shelburne, John M., 
Si'KOWles, William J., 
Steel, Alexander, . 
Shelburne, James O., 
St. John, Frank B., . 
Smalling, Amanda, 
Shelor, Abel, . 
Shelburne, Birdie, 
Smalling, Caswell, . 
Baylor, Charles, . 
Scott, Bernice, 
Snodgrass, Charles., 
Sizemore, Minnie, 
Snodgrass, John, . 
Shull, Stella V., 
Snodgrass, George, 
Snodgrass, Sallle, . 
Sizemore, James T., 
5$jODGRASS, Carrie, . 

fyl^MAs, John V., . 
e, George W., 

^•^•omas, Jennie A., 
-^j}ylor, Nathaniel F., 

T pYLOK, James P., 
-£'|\ylor, Andrew K., 

ilor, Maggie, . 
h aylor, George C, . 
Taylor, Napoleon, 



Post-office and State. 

Huffman, Va. 
Abingdon, Va. 
Fair view, " 
Newbern, " 
Greenville, S. C. 
Staytide, Va. 
Milligan, Tenn. 
Bristol, 



Milligan, " 



Pridemore, Va. 
Lynchburg, Va. 
Woodbine, Ky. 
Milligan, Tenn. 
Carter's Depot, Tenn. 
Milligai., 
Snowville, Va. 
Milligan, Tenn. 



Elizabeth ton, Tenn. 
Milligan, Tenn. 



Boone, N. C. 
Milligan, Tenn. 



Fall's Mills, Va. 
Barbourville, Ky. 
Salem, Va. 
Elizabethton, Tenn, 



Milligan, 



Elizabethton, 



14 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE. 



Name. 

Thomas, Vint. M., 
Thomas, Joseph V., 
Tipton, Albert, 
Venters, George W., . 
Vunoannon, Charles, 
Wilson, Edward C, 
Walker, Rowland II., 
Waters, William P., . 
Worrell, Everett E., 
Williams, Annie L., 
Williams, Lizzie, 
Williams, Samuel A., . 
Williams, Ollie E., . 
Williams, Samuel, 
Wilder, Stewart, 
Williams, Nathaniel M. T., 
Williams, Caswell, . 
Williams, Mattie A., . 
Williams, Archibald E., 
Williams, Rhoda J., 
Williams, Robert, . 



Post-omee and State. 

Thomas' Mills, Term. 

a ft n 

Elizabeth ton, " 
Wright, Ky. 
Banner's Elk, N. C. 
Little Doe, Tenn. 
Stevensville, Va. 
Hopson, Tenn. 
Hellsville, Va. 
Milligan, Tenn. 



Johnson City, Tenn. 

Roan Mountain, Tenn. 

Milligan, " 

tt a 



Total, 



205. 





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IS 



Classical. 

Zoology. 

Mythology. 

Geology. 

English Literature. 

Bible History. 

Geometry & Trigonometry. 

Surveying. 

Roman History. 

Virgil's vEneid. 

Livy. 

Herodotus. 

Homer's Iliad. 

Orations. 



Civil Government. 

Logic. 

Political Economy. 

Botany. 

Shakespeare and Standard 

Authors. 
Elocution. 

(Jen. Geom. and Calculus. 
Horace. 
Tacitus. 
Demosthenes. 
Thucydides. 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE. 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Latin-Scientific. 
Zoology. 
Mythology. 
Geology. 

English Literature. 
Bible History. 
Geometry & Trigonometry. 
Surveying. 
Roman History. 
Virgil's iEneid. 
Livy. 
Elocution. 



JUNIOR YEAR. 

Civil Government. 

Logic. 

Political Economy. 

Botany. 

Shakespeare and Standard 

Authors. 
Elocution. 

Gen. Geom. and Calculus. 
Horace. 
Tacitus. 
German or French. 



Scientific. 
Mineralogy. 
Mythology. 
Geology. 

English Literature. 
Bible History. 
Gen. Geom. and Calculus. 
Surveying. 
Botany. 

Civil Government. 
Logic. 
German. 
Orations and Elocution. 



Meteorology. 
Chemistry. 
Christian Evidences. 
Mechanics. 

Mathematical A stronomy« 
Shakespeare and Standard 

Authors. 
Moral Philosophy. 
Mental Philosophy- 
Chemistry. 
Lectures by Seniors. 
Scientific Senior Year. 



SENIOR YEAR. 



Classical. 

Moral Philosophy. 

Mental Philosophy. 

Chemistry. 

Meteorology. 

Christian Evidences. 

Mechanics. 

Mathematical Astronomy. 

Lectures by Senior Students. 

Seneca. 

Cicero De Senectute. 

Xenophon's Memorabilia. 

Plato. 

Greek Testament. 



Latin-Scientific. 
Moral Philosophy. 
Mental Philosophy. 
Chemistry. 
Meteorology. 
Christian Evidences. 
Mechanics. 
Mathematics. 
Lectures by Seniors. 
Seneca. 
Cicero De Senectute. 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE. 19 

BOOKS. 

The text-books used in the College, with all necessary school sup- 
plies, as tablets, stationery, etc., tor sale beside the College campus. 

The supplies are sold at less than the ordinary retail price, 
and cash payment is required. The business has no connection 
with tuition, board, fees or any other school expense. 

Patrons and students are requested to so consider it, and not blend 
payment for separate interests. 

Let the books be paid for, and all confusion is avoided. 

The cost of text-books per year for preparatory and College stu- 
dents varies from $4 to $12 each. If you have text-books used at 
other institutions, bring* them along. If they are not used here, they 
will be often valuable for comparison or reference. 

T1IK TEACHERS. 

Endowments, apparatus nor renown of a college can be a substi- 
tute for good teachers. This Institution boasts neither of money nor 
extensive fame, but there are teachers in it whose works in the 
class-room would honor any school in the land ; whose lives of faith 
and consecration do more to encourage and develop close study and 
higher character in students than all gold, or than famous men with 
great lore, having not the tact or the heart of a teacher born and 
trained to the profession. Careful observation has shown that many 
eachers employed by renowned and endowed institutions at fair or 
_h salaries would not be engaged here at any price. Their indo- 
it, routine, soulless work, brought in comparison with the energetic, 
ihusiastic, independent system of natural teaching daily practiced 
\lilligan College, would make their work seem worthless. Neither, 
iom the contrast, would students respect their dull work. Teach- 
ig is a pleasure both to the class and the manager when the laws 
mental growth are followed, when each one is doing his best and 
flighted in the exercise. To recall some of the humdrum ways 
>f college recitation fifteen or twenty years ago, is to think of going 
rom the express train back to the jolt- wagon, or from the telegraph 
o the weekly horseback mail ; yet there are thousands of teachers 
and institutions that plod along with scold and medals and shams 
of honor, developing strife, jealousies and bitterness that only years 
of Christian life or death itself can remove. The teachers of this 
Institution rejoice in better methods, and in reaching higher forces 



20 m!l,i4gan College. 

in human nature, and leading the largest number of students to do 
their best, from incentives that give more enjoyment, last longer 
and have a healthier influence on life and character. To under- 
stand this inquire of the students or visit the class-room and enjoy 
yourself. 

MORNING CLASS. 

After devotional exercises and announcements there follows a lec- 
ture of fifteen to thirty minutes. In this lecture every field of 
thought is entered; every duty and relation of life discussed. Liv- 
ing questions are brought before the students' minds, and they are 
taught to think on the issues which every citizen must meet and 
decide for himself. 

Individual, national and international duties are explained, and 
a constant effort is ! tade to impress each one with ideas that will 
cause him to choose the highest welfare of himself and the whole 
people. On Saturday mornings any teacher or student is asked to 
give an item of news. Necessary explanations or comments may 
be added, and thus a variety is secured which all enjoy and by 
which many are profited. 

We sincerely believe this Morning Class has been a power for 
good to a large number of students, and through them to society in 
the sections to which they have gone as active workers in the cause of 
right and truth. The oft-expressed thought of those who have 
gone out is: "Hold up that Morning ('lass." "Those talks did 
me more good than anything else." "Nothing but the clear logic 
of those morning talks ever caused me to see the error of my course.'' 
"I used to think too much time and attention were given to the 
morning lectures, but now I am thankful for them, and find them 
of great use to me in actual life." 



f^enikfk^ o:q ©epkftir^eiit^. 



PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT. 

Here is an important place. It is where the new students really 
begin. It is where various orders of mind and advancement must 
be blended and wrought into harmony ; where many students learn 
for the first time in life how to study, or have the ambition roused 
to become students. 

The teachers of this department have had years of experience and 
are especially adapted to the place, going in and out before the 
classes with cheerful activity and happy command and appreciation 
of the work to be done. 

The department is a place of good humor and hard work, with 

oellent drill. 

\'ew students will find it an excellent beginning place, and thor- 
h work in this is a necessity to the enjoyment and profit of a 
lege Course. 

ENGLISH. 

) ne or two classes in Practical English are conducted each session, 

iidln beginners in correct and prompt expression of thought on 

imon subjects, visits, journeys, scenes and incidents. This is 

e with little reference to a text-book, and is made a spirited and 

o^ant exercise, serving as a practical and valuable preparation 

v the regular course of Analysis of English (Reed and Kellogg), 

jetoric and Composition (Hill), English Literature (Shaw), and 

udy of Shakespeare and Standard Authors, Elements of Criticism, 

ii of which makes a valuable English Course. 

NATURAL SCIENCE. 

This is the field where friend* of an institution, living in many 
arts of a country, can help the school. Labeled specimens, models 

(21) 



22 milligan college. 

of various kinds, Indian relics, the skins of animals, birds or rep- 
tiles, neatly filled with any light substance, to preserve well the 
form, are all interesting and necessary for the department. What 
is very common to you at home may be of tin* highest interest in 
another part. Remember these facts, and send specimens, noting 
when and where found, how surrounded, with local names. 

The College is especially well situated for the study of Geology 
and Botany, from the face of Nature herself. 

The top of Roan Mountain, thirty miles east of us, presents some 
of the oldest formations in the United States, while abundant coal- 
beds are but little over 100 miles the other way, with numbers of 
the wildest, deepest and most varied gorges between, making a com- 
plete field for the study of a large number of geological phenomena, 
and at the same time the timbers, grasses and flowers are especially 
varied. 

LATIN AND GREEK. 

Entirely too many English words find their roots and primary 
meanings, and too many grammatical principles find their explana- 
tion, in the Latin language, to deny its great importance and inter- 
est iti a correct course of education. 

Its study will lead us into a fuller understanding of ancient 
thoughts and customs. 

It will give us a better vocabulary and a much more accurate un- 
derstanding of our own language. 

It develops a finer taste in the choice of words and constructions. 

It excels in cultivating the art of reasoning from probabilities and 
causes of remote bearings, which is the way we reason daily in 
practical life. 

As to methods of instruction, w r c use any and every means and 
illustration to lead the student to a clear understanding of the con- 
struction, its relation to English, and give him a right appreciation 
of the author's meaning. The study of Mythology, and especially 
the bearing of ancient history on the authors read, will be connected 
with the entire Classical Course. 

Many of the reasons for the study of Latin are equally applicable 
to the study of the Greek language. It is, besides, the chief source 
of scientific terms, and, more than all, the fossil cast bearing the 
impress of God's plan for human redemption. 

Grecian Mythology and History with the entire course. 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE. 2.8 

MATHEMATICS. 

The course includes pure and applied Mathematics, and requires 
four years after entering University Algebra. 

The subject reaches from the infant learning to count its fingers, 
to Newton evolving the laws of the universe; while the difficulty 
of its mastery and the certainty of each step gained place the study 
among the first in developing habits of accuracy and patient concen- 
tration of mind. The large, enthusiastic classes in this department 
witness the fact that Mathematics is no dry, dull task-work,, but 
full of interest and importance. * 

METAPHYSICS. 

A comprehensive study of the flights in this field would require 
a lifetime, but he who has not learned to look within his own mind, 
and on toward the origin of his own thoughts, purposes and choices, 
has not enjoyed the spiritual element of human nature. The study 
of Metaphysics is a weird and fascinating chase after the intangible 
elements, the source of nature and manifestations of human thought. 
It tends to develop a more reflective and deeper soul-life. It makes 
men rich who hold no goods of this world. The student of Psy- 
chology touches realms of thought and has impulses of life that the 
uncultivated mind never feels, of which it can not know. Each 
young man can oe his own book, each human being about him a 



living volume. 



NORMAL DEPARTMENT. 



If the child's mind is better than wood, and its heart and con- 
science more valuable than iron, give us trained teachers to fashion 
these into beauty and usefulness. If experience and skill must 
train athletes and ratee-horses how to lay out their strength, much 
more boys and girls deserve trained intellect and honest hearts to 
lend them to receive the greatest good and put forth their best 
i towers. 
Our country needs classes or institutions to awaken the spirit of 
aching, to develop a love for that calling which, in its bearing for 
al or woe upon human society, after agriculture, to say the least, 
second of all the callings among men. Give us hopeful, learned, 
aid- working men and women to educate the next two generations 
;f our Sunny South, and this world will have no finer start for 
liberal, noble humanity. 



24 MILIEU AN COLLEGE. 

Our Normal Course will consist of a close study and review of all 
Common school branches, with opportunities to train classes under 
the suggestions and help of a skilled teacher. 

One year's study in the Principles of Science, Elementary Alge- 
bra and English Literature. 

During two terms of the school year direction will be given to the 
student in selecting educational journals and reading of standard 
authors on the subject, together with a prepared weekly lecture, 
setting forth the best thoughts for every work of the district teacher, 
from seekiug a location, making contracts and government of school 
to the closing day's work of a session. 

Young people proposing to teach will find it greatly to their in- 
terest and advantage to make close inquiry into the workings of 
this department, and to examine the Normal Course laid down in 
the curriculum. 

INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC, 

Instrumental Music is optional, but so necessary have organs and 
pianos become to complement the songs of home, that almost every 
lady feels a strong desire to be able to fill her place at the instru- 
ment, and we use all diligence to secure teachers who are skilled to 
teach and train in this science and art. Our last teacher, Miss 
Mary Sitz, had attended t-e Musical Conservatory at Leipsic, Ger- 
many, four years. She was" a skilled performer, and had studied 
the science from a love of it and a purpose to teach. 

EXPENSES. 

The session is divided into three terms of twelve weeks each. 

A ticket giving all the rights, privileges and advantages of the 
regular preparatory and college classes, will be sold to each student. 

This, and this only, is the receipt for settlement and card of admis- 
sion to the roll as a member of the Institution. 

These privileges and whatever advantages he may obtain, are what 
he buys. 

If the student does not use them, it is not the fault of the Institu- 
tion. 

No money paid for such tickets of admission will be returned. If 
the owner chooses or is compelled to leave before the time of his 
card has expired, the treasurer will mark on the back of it the time 
of tuition due, and the student can Jill the period whenever he pleases 



MTLLIOAN COLLEGE. 25 

in the future; provided, of course, that his leaving the Institution 
was honorable. 

We will positively refuse to enroll students unless the money is 
paid, or a definitely satisfactory arrangement is made. 

First Preparatory Classes, per term, 12 weeks, . . $ 8 00 

Second Preparatory Classes, per term, 12 weeks, . . 10 00 

College Classes, per term, 12 weeks, . . ' . .11 00 
Music Lessons on Organ and Piano, and use of Instrument, 

per term, 12 weeks, . . . . . . 12 00 

Painting or Drawing, per term, or 24 lessons, . . . 10 00 

Business College, Full Diploma Course, . . . 25 00 

Board in private house, per month, . . $7 50 to 8 50 

Washing, per month, . . . . . 50 to 1 00 

Rates for Advance Payment — More Than One Term. 

FIRST PREPAR \TORY. 

One Term, 12 weeks, ...... 

Two Terms, 24 weeks, ...... 

Three Terms, 36 weeks, ..... 

SECOND PRE PA RATO R Y . 

One Term, 12 weeks, ...... 

Two Terms, 24 weeks, . . ... 

Three Terras, 36 weeks, ..... 

COLLEGE CLASSES. 
One Term, 12 weeks, ...... 

'o Terms, 24 weeks, ...... 

1 Terms, 36 weeks, * 

EXPENSES, ADVANTAGES AND REQUIREMENTS OF 
YOUNG LADIES' HOME. 

Board, washing, tuition and all society and library fees, trunks 

jiveyed to and from the train on arrival and departure, a mail 
aessenger to go to and from the office, one school year, $114. In- 
cluding music lessons on piano or organ, with use oL instrument, 
$150. 

Milligan College claims the honor of greatly reducing young la- 
dies' expenses at college, without lessening the high quality of the 
labor bestowed on them. 

Our location is on a high and beautiful hill, forty yards from the 



$ 8 


00 


J 5 


20 


22 


40 


$10 00 


19 


00 


28 


00 


$11 00 


20 


90 


30 


80 



2b" »ULLJ<;AJ* COLLEGE. 

College door. A level -wn<l;{{ ;le : ads to the building, so that no one 
needs to have wet feet from ,yva>lking through mud. 

The rooms for the girls are on the second floor, very comfortable 
and convenient. 

We shall continue to make ours not a boarding-house, but a home 
where the young ladies' minds and lives shall enjoy all the freedom 
that is good for their progress and development, physically, men- 
tally and morally. 

Many privileges are allowed; indeed, all that could be reasonably 
asked ; yet there are limits beyond which they can not go. We oc- 
cupy for the time the place of parents or guardians, as well as 
teachers, and home discipline is quite as necessary for developing 
gentle and refined ladies as school discipline. 

If parents send us their daughters, their health will be guarded, 
their minds cultivated, their habits noted and corrected, and their 
spiritual natures strengthened. 

THINGS A YOUNG LADY MUST BRING. 

Besides all toilet articles, she will be expected to supply herself 
with towels, napkins, one pair of pillowcases and one pair of sheets. 

THINGS A YOUNG LADY OUGHT TO HAVE. 

A waterproof wrap, plenty of plain clothing and a good supply 
of flannel. In our climate it is a serious mistake for parents to 
allow their children to go through the chilly evenings and mornings 
of fall and spring, and the hard cold of winter, without Woolen un- 
derwear. Nature nowhere compels the lower animals to endure 
extreme cold without warm clothing. 

FEES! FEES!! FEES!!! 

Every unexpected expense is a hurt to the student and parent. 
When the extras are nearly half the expense, doubt and unpleasant 
feelings rise. We charge no contingent fee, nor library, nor read- 
ing-room, nor doctor's fees, and ask no student to pay a society club 
fee, nor extra for modern language, nor any of the troublesome 
list; but to pay his tuition year by year on entrance, derive all the 
advantages and pleasures offered him by the Institution, and at the 
close of his course pay for his diploma, go forward into the world 
and begin to work at once. 

Papers and books from Reading-room and Library, while used in 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE. 27 

the building, will be furnished without extra fees to the student. 
The organization of students into sections for Debate, Essay, Pvloeu- 
tion and Literary drill under a trained teacher, will be far more 
valuable than former methods, with their fines, fees, troubles and 
careless ways. 

It does not take money shows and costly furniture, indebted for 
by poor but bravely-struggling students, that a young man may 
learn to think, to speak and to reach scholarship ; but it requires 
patience, study and brains. 

Let him exercise these and rejoice in the privilege, not indulging 
the waste of money, time and good feeling which comes of medals, 
society debts, quarrels and half-performed literary work. Let him 
be sure that he is building into his mind only the pure, the wise 
and the good of an education. 

ECONOMY. 

It is a fair rule that as a student increases his incidental expenses 
his class-work grades lower. In proportion as habits in school life 
requiring much money grow, application to study lessens. 

The necessary incidental expenses here are very small. Some of 

our best students and those who had the respect of all, went through 

the school year, and spent for everything, outside of published dues, 

'ess than jive dollars. Many others have spent very little. Plain 

aid inexpensive clothing, neatly kept, is all that is desired by the 

eachers. 

Youth is the time to practice neatness and learn habits of economy. 

GRADUATION. 

holarship and thoroughly sound moral character are preferred 

tiose who go out to represent the Institution much before large 

1 ers. In fact, we can not conscientiously, and hence will not, 

ay that a graduate has a good moral character, unless his former 

uduct assures us that he has. 

The curriculum embraces four courses: the Classical, the Latin - 
scientific, the Scientific and the Normal, 'the degree of A.B. will 
<><> conferred upon those satisfactorily completing the Classical, B.L, 
lor the Latin-Scientific, B.S. for the Scientific, and certificate for 
the Normal Course. 

No distinction, as to sex, in studies, examinations, or giving of 
Diplomas. 

Diploma fee $5.00. 



2S MIUJOAN COLLEGE. 

REPORTS. 

Statements of attendance on classes, of industry and deportment, 
will be sent to parents or guardians, or given to the student, a* 
seems best at the close of each term. 

(GOVERNMENT. 

Other things equal, that civil government is most prosperous 
which has the most active producers. That church has most 
spiritual life which furnishes practical Christian work for each 
member, and shows him the joy to come from doing it. 

A few things from the basis of good school government: 

1st. Plenty of hard work and a realization that it must be done. 

2d. A wide-awake and cheerful interest by both teacher and stu- 
dent. 

3<L A thoroughly good example and precept by each one of the 
Faculty. Most students will then cheerfully aid the work. 

4th. A sharp, clear understanding that an institution of learning 
is not the place for hazing, swearing, drinking and general wicked- 
ness. 

Upon these principles we shall endeavor to teach young people 
the power and worth of self-government; that it is a necessary part 
of the foundation for success in business, or any true happiness 
here or hereafter. 

ROWDYISM. 

Never did a young man engage in coarse songs, making effigies, 
destroying other people's property, disturbing their rest, night- 
spreeing, playing dummy, or telling falsehoods to conceal the part 
himself or others play, without loss. Loss in beauty, excellency 
and dignity of character ; loss in right wisdom ; loss in the quality 
of his friends — always ultimate loss. It leads toward dissipation. 
But a short distance beyond the cigar and the bottle stands the 
gambling hall and its complement. Any conduct of students which 
leads to the first is on the road to the second. 

Teachers have no right to indulge or to countenance such con- 
duct, but are obligated to fill the minds and spirits of students with 
better and happier purposes. An institution of learning is a place 
offering superior advantages for young people to get wisdom and 
understanding; to train themselves to bear honors; to be useful 
and do good. Young people, when rightly taught and led, will 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE. 31 



OBSERVATIONS. 



1. The natural scenery about the College is pleasing and beauti- 
ful ; the location high and healthy. 

2. There is no marked display of dress or wealth to advance a 
student. His personal habits and character determine his social 
standing. 

3. The teachers have no commanding formalities to estrange stu- 
dents, but are ready to extend a hearty welcome to all. 

4. The students are chiefly Christian young men and women, and 
are ready to encourage new students rather than discourage by word 
or deed. 

5. The teachers hold their positions from the quality of the work 
done, and the pupils feel that they are interested in their growth, 
and are their personal friends. They search out and endeavor to 
practice the most improved methods of teaching, whether new or 
old, doing efficient work in a wide-awake and earnest manner. 

(J. Monday is used as a holiday instead of Saturday. We have 
put the change on trial, and find it highly satisfactory to both stu- 
dents and teachers. 

7. If a parent or student will pay to the treasurer $103, cash in 
advance, the student's expenses for board, washing and tuition will 
be borne during the school year. 

8. If parents do not want boys to spend money foolishly, they 
ought not to give to them. 

9. Read Carefully the article on Expenses. 

10. Write for information on any subject not discussed or not 
understood in the catalogue. 

11. The development of manly Christian character is the first 
purpose of this Institution ; and the habits, manners and lives of 
those trained here show that God is blessing the work. 

THINGS TO IX). 

1. Come to try diligently the student-lite at least one school year, 
ihus giving yourself and teachers a fair trial. 

2. Come fully determined to leave off any and every unworthy 
habit, and with your college life begin the nobler way . 

3. Bring w r ith you or buy a good reference Bible. Study it, and 
honestly try to live by its teachings. 

4. Do not promise to correspond with many persons ;but to a few 



32 MrLMGAN COLLEGE* 

of the wisest, who are interested in you, write regularly, and always 
do your best. 

5. Come determined not to spend one dollar of money for any- 
thing which will not advance you in intellect or tend to the deveb 
opment of better character. 

6. When you arrive you will stop at a depot nearly three-quartc 
of a mile from the College vjjUage. Early in the session, or at any 
time when notice is given, parties will meet you at the train. Come 
directly to the office and get any information needed. Come there 
first, especially if you have never been here before. It is the busi* 
ness and pleasure of the teachers to know you first, and to be of 
all the advantage they can to you. 

7. Get your ticket, buy your books, enter classes, and go to work 
the first day. 

8. A young man can be a student at Milligan College and use 
tobacco. But he finds no teacher using it ; most of the old students 
free from it ; some of the homes objecting to its use in their rooms ; 
no gentleman using it in or about the College building ; an ener- 
getic current of thought about the Institution that the habit is 
expensive, filthy and usually unhealthy. From these and their 
own reflections, young men generally conclude they are much 
better off without it, and stop its use, which is a good thing to do. 

9. Bring such late school-books as you have. They will, at least, 
be good for reference. All text- books and stationery needed can 
be had at Milligan for cash, at less than the usual prices. 

THINGS NOT TO DO. 

Do not begin or continue your school life without a good reference 
Bible. 

Do not expect or try to continue any bad habits on the sly. You 
would lose both good name and self-respect. Do not rely upon 
family influence to hold you up, but depend upon your own study 
and worthy conduct through Him who can uphold you. 

AVOID MISTAKES. 

The Commercial College is separate from the regular course 

and costs ........ $25 00 

Instrumental Music, with use of instrument, per year, will 

cost 36 00 

Painting, per term, or twenty -four lessons, . . . 10 00 

Drawing, per term, or twenty-four lessons, . . 10 00 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE. 3.3 

When tuition is settled for, each student receives a ticket with 
one or more terms marked upon it. This constitutes him a member 
of the school, and from this ticket his name is taken for enrollment 
in any classes he may enter. If any circumstances render it im- 
possible for him to attend the full time the ticket calls for, the 
Secretary will credit the time upon the ticket, and he will be enti- 
tled to that amount of tuition on any other term he may choose to 
come. 

Regular Course, Business Course and Art Course require separate 
tickets. 

The tuition for each term is due at the beginning of the term, 
not at any time during it. 

EXCURSIONS. 

A proper amount of recreation is essential to the best develop- 
ment of young people. After weeks and months of regular work, 
l\\oy enjoy keenly a day of rest. 

Following this thought, we have almost every session taken a 
lay for each of the following tours : 
1st. To Buffalo Mountain, four miles distant. From its top, nearly 
000 feet above the sea, we have a magnificent prospect, Villages, 
>\vns, plantations and rivers spread at our feet, or stretch away in 
ie distance, where imagination follows and revels In glimpses of 
e infinite. 

2d. The Rock House, one and a half miles distant, is enjoyed by 

lovers of nature. It is an immense cave, whose opening gives 

name, being a huge room with solid stone walls, 30 to 40 feet 

••: -,, and the arched ceiling ranging from 10 to 30 feet froni the 

iti this is an underground passage into Saltpeter Cave, half a 
distant. 
The star trip of the year is a railroad excursion to the end of 
.dTow-gauge line running by us to Cranberry, a distance of 
miles. 
;e scenery is beautiful beyond description. Tourists from the 
World and distant parts of the New come to enjoy its unrivaled 
deur. 

e pass through Watagua Valley, a rich and beautiful farming 

cm, on through Elizabeth ton, after which we enter the Gorge. 

is an eight-mile gap through a spin* of Ihvaka Mountain, cut 



34 MlJ.UdAN COLLEGE. 

by Doe River, a mad, deep mountain stream which is foaming aiv< 
leaping past you. 

Emerging from the Gorge, we have a full view of Roan Moun 
tain, more than 6,000 feet high. 

The journey ends at Cranberry Iron Works, where immpn- 
quantities of the finest iron ore in the world are being mined. Drill 
are driven by compressed air. and much new ami interesting ma- 
chinery is operated, which makes the visit instructive as well as 
recreative. 

These excursions are looked back upon with happiest recollections. 



Cklendkr— l8§6-§F- 



First Term begins Wednesday, August 31st. 
First Term ends Tuesday, November 22d. 
Second Term begins Wednesday, November 23d. 
Second Term ends Tuesday, February 14th. 
Third Term begins Wednesday, February 15th. 
Third Term ends Tuesday, May 9th. 
Final Examinations, May 2d, 3d, 4th and 5th. 
Primary Exercises, 7:30 p. M., Friday, May 6th. 
Essays and Declamations, 2:30 p. M., Saturday, May Gth. 
Literary Entertainment, 7:30 p. m., Saturday, May 6th. 
Sunday-school, 9:15 a. m., Sunday, May 7th. 
Baccalaureate Sermon, 11 a. m. , Sunday, May 7th. 
Sermon, 3:30 p. m., Sunday, May 7th. 
Young Men's Prayer-meeting, 7:30 p. m., Sunday, May 7th. 
Undergraduate Orations, 9:30 a. m., Monday, May 8th. 
Historic and Literary Entertainment, 2:30 p. m., Monday, May 
8th. 

Young Ladies' Entertainment, 7:30 p. m., Monday, May 8th. 
Graduates' Programme, 9:30 a. m., Tuesday, May 9th. 
Annual Address, 11 a. m., Tuesday, May 9th. 
Awarding of Diplomas. . * 

Benediction. 7 8 9 U 



MILLIGAN 

•^Su^e^ College.* 



FACULTY. 

J. H0PW00D, President, 

Lecturer on Political Economy. 
JAMES A. TATE, Principal, 

Single and Double Entry Hook-keeping, Commercial Law, Business 

Arithmetic. 

CHARLES G. PRICE, 

Penmanship Department, Business Paper and Legal Forms. 

B. F. MURDOCK, 

Assistant. 



m 






hi 



) 



lo ll^c i\eadef\ 



Dear Friend : — In sending out this announcement it is our pur- 
pose to promise nothing, nor will we hold out hopes and induce- 
ments to the public, that the experience of the students who have 
been with us will not fully confirm. 

A valuable addition has been made to the Faculty, the Corns?' 
of Study has been revised and iiu proved, and our past experi- 
ence has found for us no way to avoid hard labor and still enjoy its 
rewards. 

We intend to do what we do, this being the College motto. 

An invitation is extended and a hearty welcome given to all 
young men and women who desire to rise in the world and are will- 
ing to attend faithfully and patiently to business principles. To 
such our course will be of immense value in making a success in 
life. Believing that we understand the demands of our Southern 
country in regard to Business Education, that we give to young 
men and boys profitable training for life's work, and having a con- 
sciousness of the good results already accomplished by the Institu- 
tion, with entire confidence we submit its claims to the public for 
future encouragement and support. 

Respectfully, James A. Tate, 



36) 



Course of Study, 



BOOK-KEEPING 



First Principles (2 sets). 
Condensation. 

Simple Partnership (3 sets). 
Real Estate and Steam boat- 
ing. 
Assets and Liabilities. 
Assets and Loss in Business. 
Different Investments. 
Loss and Gain (2 sets). 
Insolvency and Solvency (2 

sets). 
•>ix Column Journal. 
Vholesale and Retail Mer- 
■handising. 
a pound Company. 



Commission (3 sets). 

Banking (2 sets). 

Furnacing. 

Joint Stock. 

Railroading. 

Real Estate and Insurance. 

Farming. 

Single Entry. 

(hanging Single to Double 

Entry. 
Cash Book. 
Bills Payable Book. 
Bills Receivable Book. 
Original Composition (3 sets). 
Examination. 



COMMERCIAL LAW 



tracts. 






Partnership). 


rsonal Pro 


pei 


*y. 


Bailment. 


liable P 


aper. 


Common Carriers. 


iest. 






Law of Host and Guest 


ncy. 






Real Estate. 
BUSINP;SS PAPER. 


lers. 






Notes. 


it'ts. 






Checks. 


e Bills. 






Bills. 


eipts. 






Invoices. 



(37) 



38 MILLIGAN COLLEGE. 

] WHINED FORMS. 

Copartnership. Deed. 

Merchant and Clerk. Mortgage. 

Lease of Farm and Buildings. Will. 
Assignment. 

BUSINESS A KITHMETIC. 

Fractions. True and Bank Discount. 

Decimals. Ratio and Proportion. 

Percentage. Partnership. 

Interest. Mensuration. 

Profit and Loss. Short Methods. 

BOOK-KEEPING. 

In our method of teaching we have no Complicated Rules, but 
have each student to Understand Thoroughly the First Princi- 
ples that lie at the base of the Science and then to intelligently 
build upon His Own Foundation. 

Teachers are always ready to make a practical suggestion or ad- 
vance a new idea according to the requirements of the pupil's mind. 

The object is not to make them mere groove book-keepers, but 
to so develop their own thinking powers as to make them self-reliant 
and competent to take their places in any calling for which they 
might have adaptation. 

Our students are first made familiar with the principles of 
Double Entry Book-keeping. Single Entry, afterward. The 
beauty and accuracy of the first always gain the confidence of the 
learner. 

The Course of Instruction is carefully graded from the simplest 
entries that can possibly be made in a Day-book to some as intricate 
and difficult transactions as are common to the Science of Ac- 
counts. 

COMMERCIAL LAW. 

Law is something under which we all must live, and there are 
certain principles of Statute and Common Law that every man 



This is a kind of knowledge that every man finds important in all 
his progress through life. The success of business men will always 
mainly depend upon their knowledge of their profession. — Peter 
Cooper. 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE. 39 

should understand. If a man has property of his own or is doing 
business for others, he often falls a victim to sharpers unless he 
knows his rights and privileges and can demand them without hesi- 
tation. 

Young men who go into business with comparatively no prepara- 
tion learn these severe lessons in the school of experience at a cost 
of time and money many times greater than is charged here for the 
same instruction. 

Our Law classes are pleasant and practical, the teacher illustrating 
these points of difference by examples, while the students enter into 
the fullest discussion of the principles of law and equity involved 
with the usual freedom and interest characteristic of the Institution. 

PENMANSHIP. 

This beautiful art is one of the essentials of a Business Educa- 
tion ; besides its public usefulness it is a private necessity. The 
idea is exploded long since that penmanship is a "natural gift." 
There are some who have better taste and skill in executing it, but 
it is governed by rules which any person can understand who can 
understand arithmetic. 

It is the purpose of this institution to give each student a good 

PRACTICAL BUSINESS STYLE. 

The style of Penmanship used in the preparation of the text- 
hooks for this college is neat and business-like, thus giving the stu- 
dents additional preparation for the practice hour. 

BUSINESS ARITHMETIC. 

This essential department of a Business Education receives special 
ution. We are peculiarly blessed with the advantages received 

ii this BRANCH OF STUDY. 

The Business College being in the same building as the Literary 

illege, arrangements have been made for the Business Students to 

u\ e access to all the Arithmetic Classes in the Literary College 

hout any additional expense whatever. 

To know the interest and enthusiasm prevailing in those 



"Young man, educate yourself for business! The professions 
,re full, and the age demands it. A bu's'fness man for the farm, 
he counting-house, or commercial pursuits; and you will succeed 
low and hereafter." — Henry Clay. 



40 MILLIGAN COLLEGE. 

classes, one must see them in session in order to fully appreciate 
the work. 

The calculations are accurate, clear and rapid, which beget a 
feeling of strength and confidence. 

The method of instruction is chiefly original with this institu- 
tion, and is not practiced or taught in any other business college. 

EXPENSES. 

Single Scholarship, $25 00 

Commercial Books, ...... 3 00 

Commercial Law, ....... 75 

Stationery, about, ...... 1 00 

* 
Board, per month, $8 50 to 9 00 

When a scholarship is purchased it gives the student full privi- 
leges of the College for any length of time he may desire. 

After graduation he can return and review the entire course 
without any charge whatever. 

Board can be had in private families cheaper than that quoted 
above, and no one need to pay more. 

To prevent any misunderstanding in regard to expenses, we make 
the following proposition : The cash to be paid in advance. 
Board, washing, scholarship, books and ink, for 10 weeks . §50 00 

tt U a << ct a J2 " m - 55 Q0 

An active young man, who is a rapid penman, can finish the full 
Diploma Course in ten to twelve weeks. 

WHO SHOULD ATTEND A BUSINESS COLLEGE? 

Young men who are beginning to look round and think for them- 
selves. We do not believe a man can be too well educated, if he has 
good purposes, and energy to carry them out ; but all can not take a 
regular college course, and no young man can well afford to begin 
life without the best preparation at his command. 

Business training has become an essential to the greatest success 
in every avocation of life. 

Teachers who have long felt the need of information on business 
topics and have had a desire to understand and to give instruction 

"Let no man start in business life who is ignorant of the manner 
of keeping accounts, or until he has been trained in some manner 
for business duties.'" — William H. Seward. 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE. 41 

in the first principles of Book-keeping as set forth in the text-books 
on the subject. 

Middle-aged men who are not satisfied with their present trade or 
profession, and believe they can do better in a new field of labor. 

Young ladies who would rather do for themselves than to have 
somebody else to do for them. Such will find in the knowledge 
gained here a capital always at their command. 

Every man who has a business of his own, and does not work 
systematically, and does not know definitely his financial condi- 
tion, and can not tell the direct causes of his gains and losses. 

COMMERCIAL EDUCATION FOR LADIES. 

The changing scenes of this life bring many changes to individ- 
uals. Many ladies have very unexpectedly found the manage- 
ment of an estate and a home left upon their hands, and with no 
knowledge of business affairs have had to give it over to others, 
laying large fees and then run the risk of losing all. The educa- 
ton of young ladies in all the departments of life has been grow- 
jg in favor for a number of years. 

The Young Ladies' Home, the nearest door to the College build- 
g, furnishes ample accommodations in the way of board, and, as 
is the home of the President, any personal wants receive imme- 
e attention. 

-KS IT PAY TO ATTEND A BUSINESS COLLEGE. 

k doctors never attend Medical Colleges. Third rate law- 

ver attend Law Schools. Fogy teachers never attend a 

Bad farmers never take an agricultural paper. But let me 

u if it is not the successful physician that attends the lectures, 

dsst lawyers the law schools, the progressive teachers the 

the excellent farmers the farmers' conventions ? Medical 

^:s pay ! Law Schools pay ! Normals pay ! Lit- 

Colleges pay ! Business Colleges pay ! Granted, that 

rn some principles of business from experience ; but it costs 

i and take3 so long, aud then is only imperfectly learned. 



N:o lady could have a better safeguard against adversities of for- 
, or a better resource in time of need, than a knowledge of 
-keeping and business affairs." — Harriet Beecker Stowe. 



42 MILLJGAN COLLEGE. 

What will it cost n?,e at ^filligan? We candidly believe 
that we have the cheapest Jietsiness College in the United 
States giving anything lih,e the same advantage. 

An active young man can finish the course in twelve weeks, and 
an advance payment of $55 wall entitle him to board, tuition, hooks, 
ink, and all fees for the term. 

COMPARED. — The expenses for twelve weeks at other busi- 
ness colleges are from $85 to $125. Similar advantages with us 

\ COSt $55 AND NO MORE. 



-■+— *t> ♦ 



Qeqei'kl Inform ktioiL 



WHEN TO BEGIN. — The entire session each year is divided 
into three terms of twelve weeks each. The session opens the 1st 
of September and closes the IOtii of May. 

As the instruction in the Business College is chiefly individual, 
persons may enter at any time during the session with equal 
advantage. Those desiring studies in the Literary College should 
begin the Commercial at the opening of the session, so as to avoid 
being pressed for time. , 

TIME REQUIRED FOR GRADUATION.— This depends 
largely upon the student himself. If he has ability, some ex- 
perience, and his previous education has been thorough, by close 
application he will finish the entire course in ten to fourteen weeks. 

Many are profitably employed from four to nine months. 

OUR TEACHERS.— The Faculty has been chosen with special , j 
reference to their ability to give satisfaction in the different depart- 
ments, and are all active, working Christian men. 



"If a parent wishes to make a business man out of his son, I can 
recommend no better course than to send him to a Commercial 
college."- John W. Hale, Governor of Delaware. 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE. 43 

GOVERNMENT.— The intimate relations that exist between 
■teachers and pupil make this an easy problem. We all try to be 
ladies and gentlemen together, while we give our strength to prof- 
itable improvement. Trifling and mean fellows generally learn 
this before coming, and influence their cursing fathers to send 
them to some institution where the Faculty have no moral back- 
bone. 

REPORTS. — We will take pleasure in sending reports to all 
parents and guardians who will kindly notify us that such is ex- 
pected. 

DIPLOMA. — Those who complete the prescribed Course of 
Study and pass a satisfactory examination are awarded the Col- 
lege Diploma. 

The Diploma is given when the course is completed, or during 
Commencement Exercises at the close of each session, according to 
the pleasure of the student. 

We make no promises as to situations. 

The world is ready and willing to receive you, young men, if you 
have solid sense, clean habits, honest character, and are 
willing to work. 

YOUNG MEN DELIGHT IN IT.— When boys are about six- 
teen years old they feel that they want to raako a fortune, and 
become restless for some employment that points that way. Let 
nem enter a business college, and the thought that they are doing 
mething for themselves will arouse powers of the mind that other 
>ls have failed to develop, and by careful training they can be 
Into some useful industry or into more extensive mind cul- 

THE COLLEGE OFFICE. - On arrival at the depot, come 
direct to the College office, as your own interest will be best 
erved by getting there your first information. 



" I regard the practical education to be derived from a first-class 
business college of prime importance. —J. A. Smith, Superintend- 
ent Public Instruction for Mississippi.] 



ANNUAL REGISTER 






MILLIGAN COLLEGE 



THE SCHOLASTIC YEAR 1888-'89, 



Ann d mi cements far 1BBS-'5D, 



CINCINNATI: 

Elm Street Printing Company, Nos. 176 and i'/3 Elm Street, 

i88q. 



Education is the only interest worth?/ the deep, controlling anxiety 
of the thoughtful man. — Wendell Phillips. 

Education alone can conduct us to that enjoyment which is, at once, 
best in quality and infinite in quantity. — Mann. 

The true purpose of education is to cherish and unfold the seed 
of immortality already sown within us ; to develop to their fulled 
extent, the capacities of every kind with which the God who made ui 
has endowed us. — Mrs. Jameson. 



l$oai]fl u\ Kijustecs. 



J. I). PRICE Milligan, Tenn. 

C. C.TAYLOR " 

GEO. T. WILLIAMS " 

GEO. W. GILLESPIE Cedar Bluff, Va. 

J. UOPWOOD Milligan, Tenn. 

JAMES A. TATE Nashville, " 

S. W. HYDEK Milligan, •' 

\V. M. STR ALEY 

J. D. PRICE President. 

GEO. T. WILLIAMS Secretary. 

8. W. HYDEK Treasurer. 



The following referees have each some personal knowledge of the 
Institution and the character of its work. 

8. M. Thomas-. ( atlettsburg, Ky. 

■ L. A. Cutler Richmond, Va. 

Mrs. K. W. Williams Cynthiana, Ky. 

A. S. Johnson Knoxville. Tenn. 

C. A. Calfee. ... Reed Island, Ky. 

J. P. IIamaker . . Strasburg, Va. 

P. 8. Rhodes ... Indiana. 

Isaac Campbell Sneedville, Tenn. 

\. M. Ferguson. . Lebanon, Va. 

hk M. Tate Blackwater, Va. 

Jones . . Murfreesboro, Tenn. 

Peneand. ... Bakersville, N. C 

k. Brooks .. Marion, Va. 

7. Roberts .Kansas, Tenn. 

y. Coleman. . . ; Athens, Tenn. 

er T. Mill, (of the Statesman) Chicago, 111. 

\mks Shelburne Christiansburg, Va. 

s ber I ndian Mills, W. Va. 

■ Viiite . Rogersville, Tenn. 

_. Myers Asheville, N. C. 

Spencer , Cuckoo, Va. 

A. A. Taylor Johnson City, Tenn. 

i . R. L. Taylor Nashville, Tenn. 

vV. LaRue Winton Place, Ohio. 

i I. Epps Jonesboro, Tenn. 

U. Miller Pulaski City, Va. 

tf i:nry McWa.SE Lynchburg, Va. 

• H, Book Pulaski City, Va. 

ilbert J. Ellis Knoxville, Tenn. 

(5) 



J. IIOPWQOD, A. M., President, 

Ethics, Science and Normal Department. 

W. M. STRALEY, A. B. s 

Professor of Ancient Languages and Literature. 

H. R. GARRETT, A. B., 

Professor of Pure and Applied Mathematics. 

Mrs. S. E. L. HOPWOOD, 

Rhetoric, English and American Literature. 

Miss F. E, BABER, B. S., 

Preparatory Department and History. 

GEORGE SIMMONS, 

Assistant in Preparatory Depart mem. 

Miss T. A. MARSILLIOTT, 

Instrumental Music, Piano and Organ. 

* 



Painting and Drawing. 

C. G. PRICE, B. S., 

Penman and Principal of Commercial College. 

GEORGE SIMMONS, 

Secretary of Faculty. 

J. P. McCONNELL and J. W. PRESTON, 

Librarians, 

Student teachers, who may hear one or two classes during 
part or all of the session. 

J. P. McCONNELL, S. G. SUTTON, D. S. BURLESON, 
C. W. CORNFORTH, J. W. PRESTON, 

Three of these are already successful teachers. 



*To he supplied. 



St u floats. 



Two names in the following list enrolled, but performed "■ 
school duties; three or four other persons performed some duties 
school, but did not enroll. 

The classes of 1890 and 1891 are included in the first of the li 
The class of 1891 has from twenty to twenty-five members. 



W. P. Cousins, . 

R. A. MOOKLAR, 
C. W. CoRNFORTH, 

T. J. Cox, 
J. F. Alley, 
S. T. Willis, . 
W. R. Motley, . 
J. F. Houck, . 
G. A. Brown, 
John V. Thomas, 
W. H. Haun, 

C. D. M. Showalter, 
Etta Brown, 
Mamie LaRue, 
Elma E. R. Ellis, 

D. S. Burleson, 
W. J. Matthews, 
G. C. Simmons, 
W. W. Martin, . 
Mary Hendriokson, 

J. P. McCONNELL, 

H. C. Weber, . 

J. C. COGGINS, 

T. L. Filts, 

W. L. Kinzie, 

S. J. Brown, . 

T. A. Cox, . 

J. P. Taylor, Jr., . 



Era, Va. 
Richmond, Va. 
Milligan, Tenn. 
Blizzard, (< 
Pound, Va. 
Ivnoxville, Tenn. 
Chatham, Va. 
Baldwin, N. C. 
Martinsville, Va. 
Falls' Mills, « 
Barbourville, Ky. 
Snowville, Va. 
Staffordsville, Va. 
Lagrange, Ky. 
Portsmouth, Ohio. 
Limestone Cove, Tenn. 
Barbourville, Ky. 
Milligan, Tenn. 
Lynchburg, Va. 
Pineville, Ky. 
Wayland, Va. 
Knoxville, Tenn. 
Shope, N. C. 
Woodlawn, Va. 
Ronald, Va. 
Witten's Mills, Va. 
Johnson City, Tenn. 



(8) 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE. 



9 



Eddie 10. Hawkins, 

\V. L. Dudley, 
' 8. T. La Rue, 
lBettik Matthews, . 
" James II. Hardin, 

Kate Myers, . 

4 ames E. Stuart, 

Nellie Williams, . 

R. B. Durham, 

George \V. Venters, 

Cordie Henderson, 

Iv W. Elliott, 

John W. Preston, 

\V. D. Taylor, 

Sallie Butler, . 

Charles Evans, 

Shakespear, Taylor, . 

I). K. Garnett, 

\X . A. St A RETT, . 
Holland Kibler, 
Napoleon Taylor, 
Jsj. D. Hendrix, 
I ames Robert Williams, 
J^jin L. Gillespie, . 
vet Gillespie, 

B. WORLEY, . 
aj Hendrickson, 
McWane, 
ite Thomas, . 
iiE Taylor, 
Taylor, 
n Gillie, 
■. Lucado, . 
IIyder, . 
Parsons, . 
v . Kinzie, . 
F. Murduck, . 
J. Murduck, 
vDe Parsons, . 
E. Alley, . 



Kay, N. C. 
Fails' Mills, Va. 
Glendale, Ky. 
Barbour vi lie, Ky. 
John sou City, Tenn. 
Springfield, Mo. 
Pulaski City, Va. 
Eggleston's Springs, Va. 
Staff ordsville, " 

Wright, Ky. 
Holston Bridge, Va. 
Valley Creek, 
Glade Hill, 
Hartford, Kan. 

Dry Creek, Tenn. 

Atlanta, Ga. 

Milligan, Tenn. , 

Dunnsville, Va. 

Wabash, 

Kimball, 

Milligan, Tenn. 



Fall's Mills, Va. 
< r « < it 

Johnson City, Tenn. 

Pineville, Ky. 

Wytheville, Va. 

Fall's Mills, " 

Milligan, Tenn. 
< < << 

Eggleston's Springs,Va. 



t i i ( 



Milligan, Tenn. 
Pikeville, Ky. 
ftofiald, Va. 



Pkeville, Ky. 
Pound, Va. 



10 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE. 



George P. Rutledge, 
Charles Parsons, 
S. S. Stevens, . 
E. M. C. Garrett, 
Rose Ham ['ton, 
E. S. Minton, 
Gertrude Weber, . 
Ma tie Weber, 
A- Moore, 

Nannie B. Anderson, 
John J. Hampton, . 
S. R. Miller, 
T. S. Murray, . 
Ida Hampton, 
Nat M. Williams, . 
Willie Anderson, 
Baxter Taylor, 
James St. John, . 
Olive Hanen, . 
B. P. Hanen, 
Julia Persinger, 
Dora Range, 
Mattie Williams,- . 
Robert Anderson, 
G. B. McCarthy, 
Lucy E. Shell, . 
Lula Simerley, 
Lucy Young, 
Mary Treadway, 
W. R. Coffee. . 
E. T. Fish, 
B. F. Scott, 
J. M. Venteks,* 
Isaac Briggs, 
Della Cog gins, 
H. S. Dillard, 
William Pun. lips, . 
David Louis, 
Wayland IIoks, 
J. N.'Bordwind, . 



Milligan, Tenn. 

Pikovillc, Ky. 

Wytheville, Va. 

Greendale, " 

Milligan, Tenn. 

Elizabeth ton, Tenn. 

Knoxville, Tenn. 
< < < « 

Barbour ville, Ky. 

Milligan, Tenn. 
Johnson City, Tenn. 
Milligan, ■' 



i t 



Carter's Depot, Tenn. 
Mt. Olive, Va. 

Milligan, Tenn. 
Johnson City, Tenn. 
Milligan, 
Okolona, 
Johnson City, 
Milligan, 
Elizabeth ton, 
Dry Creek, 

Snowville, Va. 
Mt. Vernon, Ky. 
Mountain City, Tenn. 
Wright, Ky. 
Cranberry, N. C. 
Shape, 

Spencer's, Va. 
Erwin, Tenn. 
Rip Shin, Tenn. 
Johnson City, Tenn. 
Greendale, Va. 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE. 



11 



J. 8. Rhea, 
D. R Smalling . 
Lula Miller, . 
Raciiie Dennky, . 
Willie Lin villi-:, 
David J. Hart, . 
Joseph R. Young, . 
R. A Crockett, . 
Genet Felts, . 
Maggie Garrett, 
Willie Oijrien, 
J. F. Leonard, 
Willie Scott, . 
Nola Scott, 
James McIntosii, 
J. C. Green, 
Ike G. Buck, . 
Samuel T. Williams, 
Mrs. J. F. Alley, . 
Ollie Williams, . 
Mollie Lyons, 
L. B. Larmar, 
C. P. Triplett, 
Rose Penlani>, 



Ricevillc, N. C. 
Carter's Depot, Tenn, 
Milligan, 
Elizabethton, 
Okolona, 
Milligan, 
Dry Creek, 
Happy Valley, 
Wood lawn, Va. 
Greendale, ' ' 
Johnson City, Tenn. 



Piney Flats, " 

Bakersville, N. C. 

Okolona, Tenn. 

Milligan, 4< 

Pound, Va. 

Milligan, Tenn. 
a tt 

Osceola, Va. 

Maple Springs, N. C. 

Bakersville, " 



Selections from Charter. 

tiOM Article III. — The property vested, or which may be 

■ ied, in this Institution, shall be held by a Board of Trustees, 

1 a .majority of the members of the Board shall constitute a 

■ urn to transact business; and said Board of Trustees is hereby 

ituted a body politic and corporate, as Literary, Scientific and 

ugious Institution, and is invested with power to confer degrees, 

sue and be sued by the corporate name, to purchase and hold, or 

've by gift, bequest or devise, any personal property or real 

estate necessary for the transaction of Corporate business or as an 

endowment fund, and also to purchase or accept any personal 

property or real estate in payment or parf; payment of any debt due 

the corporation, and to sell or alien the sdnie. 



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14 



MTLIJGAN COLLEGE. 



Classical. 

Zoology. 

Mythology. 

Geology. 

English Literature. 

Bible. 

Geometry & Trigonometry, 

Surveying. 

Roman History. 

Virgil's iEneid. 

Livy. 

Herodotus. 

Homer's Iliad. 

Orations. 



Civil Government. 

Logic. 

Political Economy. 

Botany. 

Shakespeare and Standard 

Authors. 
Elocution. 

•General Geom. & Calculus. 
Horace. 
Tacitus. 
Demosthenes. 
Thucydides. 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

Latin-Scientific. 

Zoology. 

Mythology. 

Geology. 

English Literature. 

Bible. 

Geometry & Trigonometry. 

Surveying. 

Roman History. 

Virgil's yEneid. 

Livy. 

Elocution. 



Scientific. 

Mineralogy. 

Mythology. 

Geology, 

English Literature. 

Bible. 

General Geom. & Calculus. 

Surveying. 

Botany. 

Civil Government. 

Logic. 

German. 

Orations and Elocution. 



JUNIOR YEAR. 

Civil Government. 

Logic. 

Political Economy. 

Botany. 

Shakespeare and Standard 

Authors. 
Elocution. 

General Geom. & Calculus. 
Horace. 
Tacitus. 
German or French. 



Meteorology. 
Chemistry. 
Christian Evidences. 
Mechanics. 

Mathematical Astronomy. 
Shakespeare and Standai 

Authors. 
Moral Philosophy. 
Mental Philosophy. 
Chemistry. 
Lectures by Seniors. 
Scientific Senior Year. 



SENIOR YEAR. 



Classical. 

Moral Philosophy. 

Mental Philosophy. 

Chemistry. 

Meteorology. 

Christian Evidences. 

Mechanics. 

Mathematical Astronomy. 

Lectures by Senior Students. 

Seneca. 

Cicero De Seneclute. 

Xenophon's Memorabilia. 

Plato. 

Greek Testament and Bibie. 



Latin-Scientific. 

Moral Philosophy. 

Mental Philosophy. 

Chemistry. 

Meteorology. 

Christian Evidences. 

Mechanics. 

Mathematics. 

Lectures by Seniors. 

Seneca. 

Cicero He Senectute. 

Bible. 



College Yext-fJookg kqd $tatior\efy. 



Text-books, with all necessary school supplies, as tablets, paper, 
pencils, etc., are kept in or near the college building. The supplies 
are sold at the lowest cash price. The business belongs to Mr. W. 
W. Martin, and has no connection with the home or tuition fees or 
any other school expense. No teacher has anything to do with it, 
except to designate what books are needed when classes are to be 
formed. 

A student's books for one school year need to cost from $5 to 
$15. This amount will generally, though not always, include 
tablets, pencils and paper. 

If a student has text-books not u-ed here, let him bring them 
along, as they are useful for comparison and reference. 

Let no one expect to get college text-books without payment at 
the time the books are received. 



UttfE} M^XGif^ES- 



Garfield's estimate of the comparative value of school buildings 
1 teachers is a very just one. 

t is true that fine buildings, endowments, apparatus and renown 
>llege, help; but they can not be a substitute for good teachers. 
.... Instil ution has neither large sums of money, nor claims wide 
as some of the older schools, but careful observation has 
. ..wwii that many teachers employed by renowned and endowed 
institutions, at fair or high salaries, would not be engaged here at 
any price. Their soulless routine, when compared with the ener- 
getic, independent system of natural tea'ehing dailv practiced at 

(15) 



16 



U I LLIQAN COLLEGE. 



Milligan College, would seem worthless. And not only is the class 
work enthusiastic and happy, tout the ends for which the student 
is encouraged to labor are far beyond any that could be attained 1)/ 
the use of the old medal and pjrj/^e system, which happily are pass 
ing into decay. 

The teachers of this Institution put forth every energy of a con- 
secrated mind and heart to reach the highest elements in human 
nature, to lead the largest number of students to do their best from 
incentives that give more enjoyment, last longer and have a health- 
ier influence on life and character. 

Every teacher is an earnest Christian worker, laboring for the 
highest good of the student, both in and out of school. The every- 
day conduct is watched with tender care, and parents can feel 
assured, when they send sons or daughters here, that each teacher 
is their personal friend and helper. 

Are You Coming to Milltf/ant 

Remember that no display of dress, no social influence or posi- 
tion will advance you in the eyes of the Faculty or students. It 
is your own conduct, your personal habits, your talent and industry, 
that determine your social and class standing. 

Remember that every teacher is a friend and helper, ready to 
greet new students and old with a warm welcome ; and that the 
students themselves are chiefly Christian boys and girls, ready to 
help and encourage by a cheerful word or a kind action. 

Remember that teachers hold their positions because they are 
skillful and efficient workmen, and have a real interest in the 
welfare and happiness of the students, practicing the most approved 
methods of instruction and leading the most exemplary Christian 
lives. 

Remember that while intellectual training and mental power are 
held of great importance, and are cultivated with persistent care, a 
still higher purpose is the development of manly and womanly 
character. 



Three miles from the College is Buffalo Mountain, a grim warder 
who seems to be eternally gazing down and taking note of our 
doings. When the lovely autumn days come on he seems to invite 
all nature lovers to a closer inspection of his charms. The brilliant 
and varied coloring of foliage, the calm mellow distances, beckon 
the hard- worked teacher and pupil with more than human impor- 
tunity — and we go. 



Vocal and Instrumental — Methods of Work and Prioe*> 



* 



The demands of the age make it necessary for a young lady to 
know something of this most delightful art. Nothing adds more to 
the attractions of home, and for that reason, if for no other, it 
should be cultivated. 

We have made special efforts in the last few years to obtain the 
very best of work in this department, and with such success that 
both vocal and instrumental proficiency have been greatly increased. 
And to those desiring to become good musicians, the Institution 
offers fine facilities, both in instrumental music and vocalization. 

Real proficiency in piano playing can only be attained by those 
who have undergone a systematic course of instruction. As all 
real progress depends principally upon the flexibility and strength- 
ening of the fingers and wrists, technical exercise will be required 
from the beginning. Pieces adapted to the ability of the pupil 
will be chosen, with a view of improving the musical taste and 
making the pupil familiar with the different styles of standard 
composers. Ensemble playing is practiced during the session, in 
order to acquire promptness and accuracy in keeping time. 

Monthly Musicales are given by the pupils, that the interest of 
the class may be promoted, and the habit of playing and singing in 
the presence of others may be acquired. 

The aim of the Principal is, not only to train them to execute 
well, but to instruct them in the science of music, and qualify them 
to teach, if desirable. 

Hunt's and Filmore's History of Music is taught in class, sup- 
plemented with other works of the kind; also Burrows' Rudiments 
of Music, Stainer's Thorough Bass and Harmony. 

The technical studies embrace Cramer, dementi and other lead- 
ing composers, with frequent practice of the major and minor scaler 
the more advanced also studying selections from Schumann, Men- 
delssohn, Chopin, Liszt and Beethoven. 

In Vocal Music particular attention is paid to the placing of the 
voice, and studies are given with reference to its proper develop- 
ment. 

(18) 



MILLIUAN COLLEGE. 



11) 



CHARGES. 

Instrumental Music, Piano and Organ, with Use of Instru- 
ment for practice one hour and a half per day, per 

session, . . . $39 00 

Private Vocal Lessons, with Use of Piano, ... 39 00 
Thorough Bass, Harmony and History, . . . . 10 00 
Sight-singing, for pupils who do not take private vocal les- 
sons, 10 00 

Competent assistance will be employed as needed. 
The class for general musical instruction will be open to all 
music pupils free of charge. 



Music 

Mrs. James A. Tate, 
Mary Hendrickson, 
Gertie Weber, 
Nannie Anderson, 
Bettik Matthews, 
Mrs. J. F. Alley, 
Ollie Williams, 
Mamie LaRue, 
Etta Brown, 
Matie Weber, 
Kate Parsons, 
Rose Hampton, 
Mrs. W. M. Straley, 



Students, 

Nora Snodorass. 
Mattie Williams, 
Dora Range, 
Olive Hanen, 
Kate Myers, 

L*TLA SlMERLY, 

Annie Preston, 
Nellie Williams, 
Fannie Barer, 
Bertie Thomas, 
Rose Penland, 
Elma Ellis, 
Mollie Lyon. 



Monday Holiday, 

Monday holiday instead of Saturday was begun six years ago. 

othing could tempt us to return to the old system. Our work 

ves on up to Saturday evening. The literary clubs then meet. 

Sunday morning finds the mind free and ready to engage in proper 

rcises of the day without the tormenting thought : "To-morrow 

citations will be here, and I am not prepared." 

Monday forms the freest and happiest day possible for study and 
recreation. The Monday holiday has come to stay. Let it be 
idopted by every college. 



Ynuny tj&ditfs' tfomK. 



The largest factor in human development is family influence. 
Children are engaged in copying the thoughts, actions, and entire 
character of those about them from early infancy. Nor does this 
copying process cease when the child has grown old enough to ho 
sent off to school. On the contrary, it is hastened as the age of 
Bashful self-consciousness comes in. The glances and remarks 
from strange associates serve as a most powerful incentive to bring 
all into a line of uniform conduct. 

How important, then, that the social as well as class conditions 
of students receive the most careful attention. Being removed from 
parents, brothers and sisters, the lack of these should he supplied 
as much as possible by their new surroundings. Without this, the 
work of training is unnatural, and can not accomplish the best 
results. For this reason it has been our constant effort to establish 
a young ladies' home, where the womanly graces of mind and heart 
shall bloom out in a healthful, genial atmosphere. 

Nature has done much to assist in making the place attractive, 
the location being a grassy level top of a high promontory, around 
the base of which a beautiful stream winds and hurries away toward 
the northeast, emptying into the Watauga River, two miles below. 
The air is always sweet, the scenery unusually attractive. For 
healthfulness it can not be surpassed. No epidemic was ever known 
to exist here. 

The building is new and conveniently arranged for the comfort 
and safety of the young ladies. Only two persons are allowed to a 
room, except in three larger apartments especially suited to accom- 
modate three. 

The music rooms are all in the Home, so that no one has to go 
out of doors to reach her place of practice. 

Heretofore a limited number of young men have been admitted 
as members of the family, they occupying a wing of the building 
cut off from the rest of the house. These rooms on the upper floor 
are being changed this summer, and being made to open on a new 

(20) 



M1LLIGAN COLLEGE. 21 



extension of the south porch, and used for the accommodation of 
the young ladies. These are all new and handsome rooms. 

Five teachers are situated in different parts of the Home. These 
mingle with the students as close friends and counselors. The girls 
feel that they are loved by them, and are shown that every regula- 
tion they are asked to observe is for their good, as helping to fash- 
ion, of themselves, that perfect model of inward and outward 
loveliness which none but a sweet young girl can wholly attain. 

On Tuesday evening, after literary club exercises, the lady 
teachers meet the girls in an informal body for general counsel. 
Any little point of conduct observed through the week not in keep- 
ing with the gentlest and most lady-like deportment is pointed out, 
and they are urged to greater vigilance in watching themselves; the 
fact that self-government is the highest possible government being 
constantly pressed upon them. By this means a feeling grows up 
in their minds day by day of individual responsibility — and a 
decision to do right because it is right and beautiful to do so. 

We verily believe that the air of loving friendship by which all 
are surrounded is the only atmosphere which can give the mind 
that perfect freedom necessary for its best work. 

YOUNG LADIES FURNISH 

Their own toilet articles, matches, towels, napkins, pillowcases and 
sheets. 

Young ladies should bring plenty of warm, substantial clothing, 
and, besides the main winter wrap, a light shawl each. Severe colds 
are sometimes contracted for lack of such convenient wrap. Buy 
uotir daughter one. 

Besides these a knife, fork, spoon or glass is frequently needed 

in the room, while those furnished at the Home are for the dining- 

•oom, and must not be carried from there. If these things are put 

Hie trunk on leaving home, it will be found convenient, and will 

annoyance all around. 

LJur rooms are pleasant-looking, neatly finished and papered, 
suad this summer will be freshened by new paint, and paper where 
it is needed; but they are plainly furnished with only such things 
as health and comfort require; hence, any little article of adornment, 
easily carried and of no use at home, will' often add greatly to the 
beauty of the girl's room here, develop' h'er taste and make of her a 
better student; pretty, home-like su'nS)'u ; n dings tending to compose 
the mind for study, and to cultivate A sweet and cheerful dispo- 
sition. 



T^emai&s on Depantments. 



PREPA RAT( )RY DEPARTMENT. 

l\rach of the pleasure and benefit of a course of study depends 
upon the careful training in preparatory work. Hence it is very 
important to have competent teachers, not only ready to instruct 
but able to create in the mind of the pupil a love for learning 
Those selected for this department are admirably suited to the plac^- 
and will make the class-work happy and enthusiastic. 

RHETORIC— LITERATURE. 

The origin and growth of the English language forms a study of 
the most thrilling interest. It sprang from the Anglo-Saxon, 
which, coming from the bleak plains of the north, planted itself in 
Britain and overcame almost wholly the native Celtic tongue. Bold, 
defiant, self-sufficient, the brusque and forceful Anglo-Saxon fitly 
represented the race who spoke it. As they were destined to subdue 
every people with whom they should come in contact-by force, when 
possible, and, when baffled by overwhelming numbers, triumphing 
by the power of endurance — so the language lived on under every 
difficulty through three hundred years of suppression which to 
others would have been extinction. It courted no alliances, ac- 
cepted no friendships, but when a common interest made i! neces- 
sary, it blended with the Norman French, and from that union 
sprang the English language, combining in itself northern vigor 
with southern sweetness and melody. This forms the proudest 
mother-tongue the world has ever known, and from every indication 
must one day become the universal language. 

Students in this department, after learning the principles of the 
language, the various forms and government of words and construc- 
tion of sentences, are next introduced into the study of Rhetoric— 
the fitting-room, where thought is to be appropriately clothed and 
adorned. With a thorough knowledge of this branch, one is pre- 
pared to express himself on any subject in the most agreeable and 

effective manner. 

(22) 



MILL1GAN COLLEGE. 23 



But the study of Literature, both English and American, is the 
especial pleasure of one who loves his language, and admires the 
master minds that have made it the vehicle of their thoughts. The 
subject, including extracts from leading authors, original discussion 
of their character and comparative literary merit, and biographical 
sketches, extends through the session. One or more public enter- 
tainments are given by the class during the year, in honor of 
Shakespeare, Milton or some other noted author. The work is 
pleasant and very helpful. The student is benefited by noting 
the points of success and failure in the history of the most emi- 
nent men, and in being furnished with examples of the kind of 
thought and expression that have influenced the public mind of 
all ages. 

MATHEMATICS. 

The course includes pure and applied Mathematics. The subject 
is far-reaching, and develops that patient concentration of thought 
which gives a mind power to figure correctly in the affairs of life. 
Its mastery is difficult, but when clearly comprehended affords the 
greatest pleasure and profit. The teaching is of such a character 
as to clear up difficulties and make study, not a drudgery, but an 
enjoyable exercise. A visit to our class-rooms will give a proof of 
this. 

For developing habits of close and accurate reasoning, this branch 
...,{ study is unsurpassed. 

LATIN AND GREEK. 

s he study of Latin and Greek, when properly pursued, is both 
sant and profitable. It enables the student to obtain a more 
ct view of the ancients in the Various relations of life. It 
>ds him to a better understanding of his own language, both as to 
afication and construction — hence, to clearness and elegance of 
session . 
It trains him in the art of reasoning, not only on certainties, 
ach it most assuredly does, but pre-eminently on probabilities — 
ihe method so much needed in e very-day life. It secures for him 
independence in making his investigations, and ofttimes freedom 
from the whims and prejudices of others. 
All the encouragement and help needed will be given the student. 
Roman and Grecian history and mythology will be studied in 
connection with the course. 



24 M^IJ^ttAJ? COLLEGE. 



MENTAL AND MORAL SCIENCE. 

A comprehensive study of the (lights in this field would require 
a lifetime, but he who has not learned to look within his own mind, 
and on toward the origin of his own thoughts, purposes and choice?, 
has not enjoyed the spiritual element of human nature. The study 
of Metaphysics is a weird and fascinating chase after the intangihle 
elements, the source of nature and manifestations of human thought. 
It tends to develop a more reflective and deeper soul-life. It makes 
men rich who hold no goods of this world . The student of Psychology 
touches realms of thought and has impulses of life that the unculti- 
vated mind never feels, of which it can not know. Each young 
man can be his own book, each human being about him a living 
volume. 

NORMAL DEPARTMENT. 

If the child's mind is better than wood, and its heart and con- 
science more valuable than iron, give us trained teachers to fashion 
these into beauty and usefulness. If experience and skill must 
train athletes and race-horses how to lay out their strength, much 
more boys and girls deserve trained intellects and honest hearts to 
lead them to receive the greatest good and put forth their best 
powers. 

Our country needs classes of institutions to awaken the spirit of 
teaching, to develop a love for that calling which, in its bearing for 
weal or woe upon human society, after agriculture, to say the least, 
is second of all the callings among men. Give us hopeful, learned, 
hard-working men and women to educate the next tw 7 o generation? 
of our Sunny South, and this world will have no finer start for 
liberal, noble humanity. 

We expect to give more special attention to young teachers this 
session than for years past. 

THE SCIENCES. 

No branch of study is more beautiful or elevating in its tendency 
than that of the natural sciences. One is irresistably led to admire 
the exhaustless wisdom of the mind that could conceive, and the 
hand that could execute, the wonderful tasks accomplished. 

The College is especially well situated for the study of Geology 
and Botany, from the face of Nature herself. 

The top of Roan Mountain, thirty miles east of us, presents some 
of the oldest formations in the United States, while abundant coal- 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE. 25 



beds are but a little over one hundred miles the other way, with 
numbers of wildest, deepest and most varied gorges between, mak- 
ing a complete field for the study of a large number of geological 
phenomena, and at the same time the timbers, grasses and flowers 
are especially varied and interesting to those who would learn of 
this great kingdom. We are gathering and preparing for a fuller 
Scientific Department in all principal branches. For Astronomy 
we have a new and valuable tellurion, costing $25.00 ; a solar 
Camera with scenes and fixtures, costing $20000. 

GRADUATION. 

A diploma will be awarded to any student who has satisfactorily 
completed either of the four courses, and given convincing evidence 
of a sound moral character. 

The curriculum embraces four courses : Classical, Latin Scien- 
tific, Scientific and Normal. The degree of A.B. will be conferred 
upon those completing the Classical ; B.L. for the Latin Scientific; 
13. S. for the Scientific, and a certificate for the Normal. 

Diploma fee, $5.00. 

GOVERNMENT. 

uing people require the exercise of others' authority in different 
and degrees. Sometimes the student has by nature and 
caining become so well established in right-doing, that an 
i :il appeal to that inner sense will hold him to the line of 
and safe deportment. 
ers with naturally a more difficult disposition, must feel that 
uilty is directly attached to every violation of law; and that 
ty must be the loss of something which he values— it may be 
■proval of a friend or teacher, or his standing as an honorable 
i of the school. But every step taken should, in some way, 
develop the principle of self-government, without which a 
■ .j» woman is but imperfectly educated. 
i\ lew principles form the basis of good school government, 
straining the lower and building up th'e higher propensities of 
se human heart. 
First, furnish the student all the work he is able to do, and 
aake him realize that it must be done. 

Second, arouse in his mind an active, cheerful interest in the 
/ork, kindled to warmth by the zeal of the teacher. 



26 



MILUUAN COLLEGE. 



Third, a wholesome precept and example must be furnished by 
each member of the Faculty. 

Fourth, a sharp, clear understanding must be had that an insti- 
tution of learning is no place for hazing, swearing, drinking, of 
any of those forms of rowdyism which not only disgrace the student! 
■engaged in them, but hurt every member of the school which toler- 
ates such conduct. 

Upon these principles we endeavor to teach young people tb< 
exceeding worth of self-government as a necessary element in any 
measure of true success here or hereafter, and that clean, pure 
characters and energetic devotion to duty are the elements which 
make the happy, honored student. 

To this true end the Faculty of Milligan College are a unit in 
everything from the play -ground to the house of the Lord. 



Understand* 

Milligan Business College is a distinct institution, and a 

Diploma Course costs, ..... $25 00 

Instrumental Music, with use of instrument, for 

one year, will cost, ..... 39 00 

Painting, per term, or twenty-four lessons, . 10 00 

Drawing, per term, or twenty-four lessons, . 10 00 

When payment is made for tuition in one or several depart- 
ments, as Literary or Music, etc., one ticket is given to thfi 
student, with each department in which he is enrolled, marked. 
On these tickets is marked the term or terms for which he has 
enrolled. This constitutes him a member of the school, and from 
this ticket his name is taken for enrollment in any class he may 
wish to enter. If, after the ticket is bought, any circumstance 
renders it impossible for the student to attend the full time the 
ticket calls for, the Secretary will credit the time not taken up,and 
he will be entitled to that amount of tuition in any other term he 
may choose to come. No student can transfer this ticket unless to 
4ome member of his own family. 

Tuition for each term is due at the beginning of that term. 



lifcudy y all, LTibpapy and Reading Reem. 



This is an elegant hall forty feet by twenty-five, the tall ceiling 
supported by two iron columns. It is handsomely finished and well 
located ; being separated from all the recitation looms by the main 
hallway. 

It contains about five hundred carefully selected volumes, includ- 
ing two of the finest cyclopedias in the English language. One or 
two hundred new volumes will be put in for use during the next 
session. 

Students are pleased and benefited by spending daily their leis- 
ure hours in pursuing some subject in general literature, or hunting 
points in history and science. 

On the tables are found a dozen or fifteen of the leading news- 
papers and periodicals of the day — including Pack, Judge, The 

<>rum, The Statesman, Our Day, Homiletic Review, The Century, 
leading English paper, and many of the safest daily and weekly 
is, representing the various sections of the United States. 

! ne Librarian will be present at all times when the Library is 

perience has proved the necessity of the following regulations, 
will be most rigidly enforced : 

book can be taken from the Library except the value of it 

posited in cash in the hands of the Librarian. When the 

>* is returned the money will be returned or held for another 

»k, except payment for rent and a joist compensation for any 

<al damage. 

he room will be kept pleasant arid comfortable during regular 
ay hours, and a student can have free use of any book he may 
ssh to take from the shelf and read in the room, provided always 
uit he returns the book to its proper place. 

Newspapers and magazines are free to b& read at all times, but 
lot to be removed from the room for any jbu¥pose unless after date 
jid by the Librarians express permission. 

(27) 



JVloi<i]ir^ Clkfti. 



POP (JLAR INSTRUCTION . 

At the ringing of the second bell, 8:15, the students are expected 
to be present, while the teachers are seated on the stage overlook- 
ing the school. The roll-captains, one of whom is appointed f«> r 
each fifteen or twenty students, quietly inspect at this point to note 
any member of their squads who may be absent — these absentee? 
being reported weekly at a meeting for that purpose. 

The exercises are opened by a song in which teachers and stu- 
dents join. Reading and prayer by the President or some mem her 
of the Faculty then takes place, followed by another song, at the 
close of which a lecture is given, treating subjects of most vital 
importance in every relation and duty of life. Questions of popu- 
lar thought, national bearings, business success, social life and per- 
sonal conduct are brought before the mind, and thus young people 
are taught to think upon issues which each must in future meet and 
decide for himself. A constant effort is made to impress upon all 
the thought of individual responsibility in church, in state and in 
society ; and to cause them to choose and act for the highest welfare 
of themselves and the whole people. The style and spirit of thew 
Morning Talks is established. They must come with the directness 
and force of clear sight and deep conviction. On all questions of 
right and wrong they are without compromise, and are a strong 
force to quicken the conscience and develop worthy character. 

Saturday mornings are devoted to the news of the day. One 
week in advance department editors are appointed among the stu- 
dents, to prepare budgets to read on home affairs, foreign affairs, 
politics, etc. All enjoy and are greatly profited by this variety. 

The warm, generous tributes which so often reach us by letter 
concerning the Morning Class, abundantly attes.t its value as a 
power for good to a large number of students, and through them 
to the people among whom their future lots may be cast. 

(28) 



M1LLIUAN COLLEGE. 29 



Clubs. 

The literary work of the Institution is carried on through clubs. 
Xiiis plan has many advantages over the old society system. 

J. Clubs are limited in their membership so as to allow each the 
privilege of weekly performance. 

2. It saves the student the expense of fitting up and running 

Lhnll. 

3. It prevents the ill-will and clannish spirit generally existing 
between members of rival societies. 

4. The students are not left to themselves, but each club is 
under the general management of the Faculty in everything ; at 
the same time the members exercise their individual talents in 
electing their own officers and carrying out the business of the 
body, often with marked ability. 

5. Young people trained under this system make better mem- 
bers of the family, neighborhood, state and nation. Their sympa- 
thies not having been trained to cling around their own fraternity 
Usc'iool, they become able to look abroad and choose that which 
? best and truest in religion, politics and every question of life, 
jstead of looking with the eyes of their clan, and deciding on great 
ue^tions with the weakened because compromised judgment of 
leir own faction, they become individuals and act for themselves. 

Some Suf/gestions and Why, 

! . Try earnestly to be honest and faithful in class work, pure in 
gentle in deportment. 

students that attend are, as a class, bright-minded and 
rious, quick to help each other along toward higher life. 
fay long enough, and work hard enough, to give yourself and 
-hers a fair trial. 
is is but the plainest kind of justice. Condemnation or 
ail without trial is as unfair in an institution of learning as 
•ourt-room. 

Leave off every unworthy habit. 
very sentiment of wisdom and honor declares the human being 
e living far below the dignity of his nature if he persists in 
•tices which he knows are hurtful to himself or others. It is 
business to do rational, sensible acts, and leave unreasonable, 
degrading action to fools and those whodo not ivspect them- 

08. 



30 



MILLIG^ COLLEGE. 



4. Spend money only for that which is in some way a real benefit 
to your life. 

The practice of spending grows with but little cultivation, and 
often reaches the point of sinful indulgence. The character is fre- 
quently started on the downward road, simply by a young person 
allowing the habit of spending money to control him. A you? 
man came here several years ago and gained the confident 
friends and teachers by his frank and manly bearing, 
possessed was he with the habit of spending, that lie used < 
self the money sent from home to pay his dues — and owes it to-d 

5. Bring your Bible, and cultivate the habit of reading it regular- 
Familiarity with its sublime style is the greatest single mean 

advancement toward true culture, even if the reader stops short 
its supreme value. But above all, its absolute perfection, as 
guide in this life and a revelation of that which is to come, make?* 
it the one companion without which no one should try to live. 

Co- Edit cation. 

It was once observed that, of a large number of studenti 
assembled in a mixed school, four young men habitually wore 
unpolished shoes and no collars, while other points in their dress 
and manners corresponded with these. Investigation disclosed that 
they had been attending a male school for years. They had bright 
minds, were well up in science and mathematics, but had not learned 
the value of neat and cleanly apparel. 

Many such observations, with the plainest kind of reasoning on 
the subject, brought the conviction that exclusive male schools are 
damaging to the student. They give him a one sided development, 
make him a cripple, as it were, and all after-lessons he may chance 
to get will scarely serve to bring the mental and social faculties 
into a just and proper equilibrium. 

On the other hand, one of the loveliest of girls, having had 
every opportunity that brain, wealth and social standing could give, 
used the coarsest slang, and hardly stopped short of profanity when 
she felt like something startling was needed to amuse the crowd. 
She had practiced this with others at a female school of the very 
highest standing. 

Another young lady who came from a girls' school, said: "I 
think it so strange the girls are not quarreling here; they did an 
amount of it at ." 



MILLKJAN COLLEGE. 31 



Another, who had been attending one of the oldest and most 
reputable female colleges in the land, said in substance: "Before 
coming here I had never been made to feel any responsibility for 
my own conduct. I thought my teachers wholly reponsible for 
that, and she was the hero among us who could best defeat the 
teachers in their efforts to make us behave." 

A fourth, from a more distant State, said: "I wonder the girls 
do no fussing here; they were always quarreling at .'• 

Parents have said: "Mixed schools are all right for my boys, 
but my girls can not attend them." If there is any difference at 
all, we verily believe girls receive the greater advantage from 
co-educatiou. They derive inestimable value from the warm but 
good-tempered rivalries and competitions in class- work. Under 
such conditions girls take hold of hard subjects, wrestle and con- 
quer with a naturalness and ease that would astound the originators 
of the milksop curriculum of the ordinary female college. Woman 
needs every measure of strength she can possibly receive. Out 
upon any method that shuts off from her the food that supplies 
the highest degree of intellectual vigor. 

To say nothing of similar testimony from hundreds who have 
engaged in the work, and the fact that it has become so established 
in many of the States that scarcely an exclusive school exists, in 
spite of every malicious thing which jealousy or ignorance may 
say of the system ; after fourteen years of most faithful trial we 
are certain that the work of elevating the human race to the high- 
est possible plane is hindered when any school in the land refuses 
to open its doors to girls and boys alike. 

Building, Location and Surroundings. 

The Institution is situated at Milligan, four miles from Johnson 
City, Tennessee, and half a mile from the East Tennessee and West- 
on North Carolina Railroad. It is surrounded by a small, olean vil- 
e, in whose families the youug men find excellent homes. 
Many points of natural scenery around it are peculiarly beauti- 
and pleasant to remember. The building is situated on a fine 
, .,montory in the bend of the creek, where one can look far up 
beautiful valley to the mountains about its source, then on to- 
ner and higher summits, which are often covered with snow, 
rile the fields around us are a bright green. Then following the 
ttle stream, as it winds through shady groves and sunny meadows, 



MI,U,IGA# COLLEGE. 



we find it, two miles further ,o^, emptying its waters into a boU 
mountain river, whose picturesque banks and foaming cascade* 
well deserve the Indian name, Watauga — Beautiful River. 

Within a distance of one to throe miles are many spots of historic 
interest. Among these are : The starting point of the patriotic 
mountaineers, who faced death on J&ing's Mountain, and by their 
gallant victory changed the .Colonial Jlebellion into a successful 
Revolution ; the battlefield where, in 1788, the force of arras 
decided that East Tennessee and Western North Carolina should 
not remain as the separate State of Franklin ; the seat of the firsi 
legislative body ever assembled in Tennessee ; the bed-log of the 
first grist mill ever built west of the Allegheny Mountains, and 
many other points of interest. These may all be seen in our reg- 
ular yearly excursions, and form pleasant and instructive feature? 
of the surroundings. 

The elevation of its immediate grounds, the purity and sweet- 
ness of its air, ma^e this a most desirable and safe location for an 
institution of learning. 



Pocket Change. 

But little spending money is needed, and parents frequently do 
their children a wrong by allowing them all the money they ask 
for. Many of our best students go through the year and use only 
three or four dollars outside regular expenses. This may not be 
best for all, but surely economy is a most excellent quality, and 
youth is the time to implant it in the mind. 



IVfilliuan Business College. 



FACULTY. 

J. HOPWOOD, President, 

Lecturer on Elocution and Political Economy. 

CHARLES G. PRICE, Principal, 

ngle and Double Entry Book-keeping, Commercial Law, Correspondence and 

Spelling. 

H. R. GARRETT, 

Business Arithmetic. 



$$ 



Mo tl|e ^EaflEi[. 



Dear Reader ; 

In sending out this announcement, we desire to extend 
thanks to those who have patronized the College, and to those 
have spoken kind words in its behalf, with a hope that the sai: 
interest will be manifested in the future. 

We shall endeavor to sustain the high character of the Insti' 
tion for thorough work. 

We will promise to do nothing that our present ability and past 
experience does not warrant. 

We are going to do what we do, this being the College motto. 

An invitation is extended, and a hearty welcome given, to all 
young men and ladies who desire to rise in the world, and are will- 
ing to attend faithfully to business principles. To such, our course 
will be of immense value in making a success in life. 

Believing that we understand the demands of our Southern 
country in regard to business education, that we give to young 
men and boys profitable training for life's work, and having a con- 
sciousness of the good results already accomplished by the Institu- 
tion, with entire confidence we submit its claims to the public for 
future encouragement and support. 

With respect, 

Charles Price. 



(34) 



jVlilligki) I3u^ii\e^0 College 



Is known to its friends as being faithful to fulfill every promise in 
the recitation room that is made to tin; public on paper. 

Conscientious men will not, for love or money, advertise a work 
to the public beyond their strength and ability, but 

WILL CARRY FORWARD 

To the satisfaction of patrons and students the curriculum of the 
Institution. 

A wrong conception of what life is for will sometimes cause men 
to misrepresent the truth, that their personal interests may be 
advanced. The school-room ought especially to be freed from such 
men and motives, for within its walls, boys and girls are trained to 
act their parts in riper years. 

An increased interest in 

BUSINESS EDUCATION 

Has developed in this Southland during the past few years, and it 
i,s the duty of educators to meet this demand, as it will make 
minds stronger, homes happier and the country more prosperous. 
Careful preparation is being made, and on the Uh of September 
our halls will be reopened, 

THAT YOUNG MEN AND MIDDLE-AGED MEN 

May understand book-keeping, have a knowledge of the philosophy 
of trade, and know the forms and customs of life. 

Ha* the reader of this article an ambition to do something for him- 
x lff Then you ought to be able to produce a balance sheet, show- 
ing your assets and liabilities, gains and losses. 

Educated brains, willing hands and honest hearts are needed 



Whatever you would have appear in a nation's life you must put 
to its schools. — //. G. Eastman. 

(35) 



36 MILLIGAN' COLLEGE. 



IN THE SOUTH, 

That the enterprise and progress of the people may more 
develop the wealth of our eountry and bring comforts to the h 
circles. 

Our Commercial Department is substantially organized, and 
hope you 

MAY HAVE THE ADVANTAGE 

Of its Course of Study, which answers the purpose of a business* 
man. 

If you realize the need 

OF A THOROUGH BUSINESS EDUCATION, 

That you may more successfully cope with men in the battles of 
commercial dealing, we will gladly welcome you to our halls, satis- 
fied that we offer inducements in the way of expense, thought, 
location and honest, practical work. 

Be master of your profession. You can make your fortune 

WITH ONE-HALF 

The wear of mind and body, if you will first develop the powers 
within you. You will succeed in proportion to the attention you 
give to preparation. 

All thoughtful men appreciate these truths, and also know that 

THE USUAL EXPENSE 

Of obtaining such an education is so great, that the majority of 
intelligent and ambitious young men are totally deprived of these 
benefits. 

This Business College lives for the many and not the few, aud 
any boy with mind and pluck can receive instruction here with a 
very reasonable outlay of money. The total expense need not 
exceed $60, This is a variation somewhat from the rule 

OF COMMERCIAL COLLEGES, 
As almost this amount is often charged for tuition alone. 

If a father wishes to give his son a legacy better than house?, 
land, gold or silver, let him send him to an institution where he 
can obtain a practical business education. — Horace Mann. 



Gcurse nlj ^tufly. 



BOOK-KEEPING. 

First Principles (two sets), Journalizing, Posting, Trial Bal- 
ances, Closing, Condensation, Simple Partnership (three sets), Real 
gfctateand Steamboating, Assets and Liabilities, Assets and Loss 
jo Business, Different Investments, Loss and Gain (two sets), 
Insolvency and Solvency (two sets), Six Column Journal, Whole- 
gale and Retail Merchandising, Compound Company, Commission 
(three sets), Day Book and Journal combined, Banking (two sets), 
Ifusselman's Banking, Furnacing, Joint Stock, Railroading, Real 
Estate and Insurance, Farming (Day Book, Journal and Ledger 
combined), Single Entry, changing ** : -. ; Doubk Entry, ( 
,, Bilk Parable B k Osi> . C< 

tjrWia in g ■ Entrr, Ex: 






COMMERCIAL LAW. 

Contracts, Personal Property, Negotiable Paper, Interest, 
Agency, Partnership, Bailment, Common Carriers, Law of Host 
and Guest, Real Estate. 

BUSINESS ARITHMETIC. 

Fractions, Decimals, Percentage, Interest, Profit and Loss, 
Trust and Bank Discount, Ratio and Proportion, Partnership, 
Mensuration Short Methods. 

BUSINESS WRITING. 

Position of Body, Hand, Pen and Paper, Muscular Movement, 
Best Form of Letters and Figures for Business Writing, Forms of 
Notes, Drafts, Receipts, etc., Standard Size, Corresponding Size, 
Day Book and Journal Explanations, Ledger Headings, Legal 
Forms, Contracts, Bonds, Assignments, Deeds, Mortgages, Wills, 
Leases, etc. 



Teach your boys that which they will practice when they beconn 
m. — Agesilaus, King of Sparta. 



men 

(37) 



38 MILIIOAN COLLKOE. 



BUSINESS CORRESPONDENCE. 

Position of Parts of the Letter, Complimentary Address, Body of 
the Letter, Perspicuity, Section and Precision, Complimentary 
Closing Signature, Superscription, Capitalization, Punctual 

SPELLING AND DEFINING. 

Written Exercises, Words of Frequent Occurrence, Comnie 1 
Words and Phrases, Geographical Proper Names, Synonyms. 

Hook- keep i h ff. 

Systematic and thorough Book-keeping is of great importance to 
every individual. It is a Science that all men desire to understand 
and many a business man buys a text-book on the subject, ana 
endeavors to keep a record of his affairs by following a list of blind 
rules for debit and credit. The result is generally failure ana 
disgust. 

In our method of teaching we have no Complicated Rules, but 
have each student to Understand Thoroughly the First Princi- 
ples that lie at the base of the Science, and then to intelligently 
build upon His Own Foundation. 

Teachers are always ready to make a practical suggestion or 
advance a new idea, according to the requirements of the pupil's 
mind. 

The object is not to make them mere groove book-keepers, but 
to so develop their own thinking powers as to make them self-reliant 
and competent to take their places in any calling for which they 
may have adaptation. 

Our students are first made familiar with the principles of 
Double Entry Book-keeping, Single Entry afterward. The 
beauty and accuracy of the first always gain the confidence of the 
learner. 

The Course of Instruction is carefully graded, from the simplest 
entries that can possibly be made in a Day-book, to some as intricate 
and difficult transactions as are common to the Science of 
Accounts. 

Students are instructed in the use of the Day-book, Journal and 
Ledger, also the principles of Journalizing, Posting, Trial Bal- 
ances, Balance Sheets, Closing and Opening Ledger, and then begin 
actual practice. 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE. 39 

Commercial Law. 

' J/ivv is something under which we all must live, ami there are 
rrtrtin principles of Statute and Common Law that every man 
LquM understand. If a man has property of his own, nr is doing 
usiness for others, he often falls a victim to sharpers, unless he 
lows his rights and privileges, and can demand them without 
Litation. Then study these laws. 

11 us i h ess A r it It metic, 

This essential department of a Business Education receives 
fecial attention. We are peculiarly blessed with the advantages 
Lived in this Branch of Study. 

(The Business College being in the same building as the Literary 
>llege, arrangements have been made for the Business Students to - 
ive access to all the Arithmetic Classes in the Literary College 
■bout any additional expenses whatever. 

To know the interest and enthusiasm prevailing in these 
asses, one must see them in session in order to fully appreciate 
e work. 

The calculations are accurate, clear and rapid, which beget a 
eling of strength and confidence. 

The method of instruction is chiefly original with this Institu- 
n\, and is not practiced or taught in any other Business College. 
Financial success in life is impossible without arithmetical 
low ledge, and young men who have been unfortunate in early 
lining, whose education from various causes has been neglected, 
II find teachers here who understand their case thoroughly, have 
d much experience, and take pleasure in arousing ambition, 
awing out such latent powers, and utilizing the energies of a class 
clear and practical illustrations, making the subject matter 
der discussion the property of every intelligent mind. 

Business Writing. 

This important branch of a business education receives special 
,entiou. All the students in the Business College are given daily 
itruction in Business Writing from the time they begin the 



Deliver all things in number and weight and nut all in writing 
at thou givest out or receivest in. — Etcl. xiii. 7. 



40 MILLJGAN COLLEGE. 



course until completed. Xhey are taught muscular movement 
writing, which is most rapidly written, moat easily read, with 
enough grace and beauty to make it pleasing to the eye. 

Our plan of teaching is new and practical. The students are 
given a variety of copies in connection with a clear explanation on 
blackboard of the style and construction of letters. Each student 
also receives instructions at his desk, and is much benefited by 
teacher pointing out mistakes and suggesting new plans. 

Lessons are given in Spelling and Letter Writing which will be 
invaluable to the pupil. To write a letter in good style, arranging 
the address, subscription, paragraphs, etc., nicely and spelling ' y 
the words correctly, is certainly a point in favor of any corres? 
ent. There is no excuse for not knowing these things. 

In book-keeping, writing legal forms and commercial papers, the 
student is continually practicing with the pen from good models of 
bold business writing. 

No one completing a course in this Institution, who is thoughtful 
and careful, can fail to greatly improve in writing. 

B usiness Co rresp o n d e n ce. 

So much business is now being done through correspondence that 
it is made a very important subject in a business education. 

All classes of persons should have a knowledge of this subject, 
that they may be able to express themselves on paper in a courteous, 
business-like wav. 

Business correspondence will receive due attention in this Insti- 
tution. 

One lesson will be given each week in Townsend's Letter 
Writer. A variety of business letters will be copied by the stu- 
dents and their different parts examined and studied. The students 
will then be given a subject upon which to write a letter according 
to their own judgment. They are to decide whether it is to be 
personal or business, and the proper style of paper to be used, the 
manner of address, complimentary closing, etc. 



Let no man start in business life who is ignorant of the manner 
of keeping accounts, or until he has been trained in some manner 
for business duties. — William II. Sewanl. 



'■ 

MILLIGAN college. 41 



Spelling* 

Every person should know the correct form of his own words, 
go exacting is the public mind on this point that the most correct 
• fpelling gains for no one a reputation for scholarship, while incor- 
rect spelling is always discreditable. 

All persons can not acquire this art with equal facility. And 
some have been neglected in their early training until the labor of 
learning is more than doubled by the labor of unteaching. But 
constant use of lexicons, with a careful observation of the form of 
words in daily standard readings, will insure final success, even in- 
the most difficult cases. 

Our course in Spelling consists of seventy lessons of twenty-five 
words each. 

These words are of most frequent occurrence, and commercial 
words and phrases, geographical names, synonyms, etc. 

Expenses. 

Single Scholarship, $25 00 

Commercial Books, ..... 3 00 

Business Arithmetic, . . . . 1 00 

Townseud's Letter Writer, .... 1 25 

Commercial Law, ...... 75 

Seventy Lessons in Spelling, ... 30 

Stationery, about, . . . . . . 1 25 

Board per month, ..... 9 00 

When a scholarship is purchased it gives the student full priv- 
ies of the College for any length of time he may desire, provided 
>ea not spend it in idleness. Fifteen dollars and the cost of 
s must be paid on entrance, ten dollars when diploma is deliv- 
d. After graduation he can return and review the entire course 
Kout any charge for tuition. To prevent any misunderstanding 
■u regard to expenses we make the following proposition -the 

ASH TO BE PAID IN ADVANCE I 

Board, washing, scholarship, books and ink for 12 weeks, $55 00 

14 weeks, 60 00 
An active young man or woman who #rites rapidly can finish 
the Full Diploma Course in twelve to fourteen weeks. 



42 MILLION COLLEGE. 

How to lleach Mityigmi Business College. 

The College is situated in barter County, East Tennessee. 

Parties living east of the Institution will take the Norfolk and 
Western Railroad to Bristol, Tenn., thence to Johnson City, where 
you change cars for Milligan, four miles distant. 

Coming from the northwest or south, select your best route to 
Chattanooga or Knoxviile, Tennessee. Then take the E 
Tennessee, Virginia and Georgia Railroad to Johnson City. 

Coming from South Carolina and Western North Carolina, ta- 
best route to Asheville, thence to Morristown, thence to John- 
City, and out to Milligan. 

Who Should Attend a Business College? 

Young men who are beginning to look round and think foi 
themselves. We do not believe a man can be too well educated, if 
he has good purposes and energy to carry them out; but all can not 
take a regular college course, and no young man can well afford to 
begin life without the best preparation at his command. 

Business training has become an essential to the greatest success 
in every avocation of life. 

Teachers who have long felt the need of information on busi- 
ness topics, and have had a desire to understand and to give 
instruction in the first principles of book-keeping as set forth in the 
text-books on the subject. 

Middle-aged nen who are not satisfied with their present trade 
or profession, and believe they can do better in a new field of labor- 
Young ladies who would rather do for themselves than to have 
somebody else to do for them. Such will find in the knowledge 
gained here a capi:al always at their command. 

Every man who has a business of his own, and does not work 
systematically, and does not know definitely his financial condition, 
and can not tell the direct causes of his gains and losses. 

Commercial Education for Ladies. 

The changing scenes of this life bring many changes to individ- 
uals. Many ladies have very unexpectedly found the management 



No lady could have a better safeguard against adversities of 
fortune, or better resource in time of need, than a knowledge of 
book-keeping and business affairs. — Harriet Beerher Stowe. 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE. 43 



of rn estate and a home left upon their hands, and, with no knowl- 
edge of business affairs, have had to give it over to others, paying 
large fees and then run the risk of losing all. No harm can corne 
from being prepared for the worst. The education of young ladies 
in all departments of life has been growing in favor for a number 
of years. 

Are they not better adapted to be cashiers, book-keepers and 
correspondents, than manufacturing employes, seamstresses and 
sales- women? 

The Young Ladies' Home, the nearest door to the college build- 
ing, furnishes ample accommodation in the way of board, and as it 
is the home of the President, any personal wants receive immediate 
attention. 

Does it Pay to Attend a Business College? 

Quack doctors never attend a medical college. Third-rate law- 
yers never attend law schools. Fogy teachers never attend a 
normal. Bad farmers never take an agricultural paper. But let 
me ask you if it is not the successful physician that attends the 
lectures ; the greatest lawyers, the law schools ; the progressive 
teachers, the normal ; the excellent farmers, the farmers' conven- 
tions ? Medical Colleges pay! Law Schools pay! Normals 
pay! Literary Colleges pay! Business Colleges pay! 
Granted that you learn some principles of business from experience, 
but it costs so much and takes so long, and then only imperfectly 
learned! 

What We Think. 

We are not of the class of business educators who say that a 
college or academic education is unprofitable, and, therefore, a 
iosa of time and money. We do not believe it. College traili- 
ng gives thought; thought moves the world. Art, science, 
literature and invention are the results of thinking minds. 
If your circumstances will permit you to spend from one to five 
irs in college, you can not do better. We say. Go! Use care in 
election of your institution, for your associations will be a fac- 
iei in forming your character. 



Book-keeping is an art w inch no condiUdn of life can render use- 
I Jets, which must contribute to the advantage of all who desire to be 
I rich, and of all who desire to be wise. —A*. Johnson. 



44 MJLJJUAJJ qOLLEGE. 



A fter you have finished your academic or college course, spend 
at least twelve weeks ;i,n p,rr«frtable training at Milligan Business 
College. The business h&i^ts, thoughts and impulses gathered 
here you probably will never gather from experience. 

What Will it Cfwt Me at Milligan ? 

We candidly believe that we have the cheapest Business Col- 
lege in the United States giving the same advantages. 

An active young man can finish the course in twelve weeks, and 
an advance payment of $55 will entitle him to Board, Tuition. 
Books, Ink and all Fees for the term. 



I regard the practical education to be derived from a first-elas^ 
business college of prime importance. Too many young men qu ; 
our highest institutions of learning versed in the sciences and Ian 
guages, but are ignorant of the application which can be obtained 
at a good business college. — J. A. Smith, Superintendent Public 
Instruction for Mississippi 



Special ^vantages. 



READING ROOM AND LIBRARY. 

The Library has been purchased with reference to quality of 
reading matter that should fall into the hands of young people 
seeking information, and not the quantity that might be stored 
away on dusty shelves and never read. We encourage a spirit of 
research among standard authors. 

All books, magazines and papers are free if used in the Reading 
Room. 

Our students have the privilege to, and usually do, take part 

with the debating clubs and all speaking exercises in the Literary 

College. 

ENTERTAINMENTS. 

These make up a very interesting and instructive feature of the 
work. Something like bi-monthly entertainments of different kinds 
ire given and are always enjoyed by the students. 

LECTURES. 

^rom one to three lectures a week are given in the College 
Apel. The lectures are by some member of the Faculty, or 
s e invited speaker from abroad, and deal with questions that 
ain directly to real life. 

COMPARED 

The expenses for twelve weeks at other business colleges are from 
to §125. Similar advantages with us cost $55, and no moke. 

IToupg men with talent and purpose, yet have little capital, 
friends here willing to aid them in t!heir start in life. 



(45) 



<^«mpji ^fnijmatinn. 



WHEN TO BEGIN. 

The entire session each year is divided into three terms of twelve 
weeks each. The session opens on the 4th of September, and 
closes on the I3tii of May. 

As the instruction in the Business College is chiefly individual, 
persons may enter at any TIME DURING the session with cqu: 
advantage. Those desiring studies in the Literary College shouM 
begin the Commercial at the opening of the session so as to avoid 
being pressed for time. 

TIME REQUIRED FOR GRADUATION. 

This depends largely upon the student himself. If he has ability, 
some experience, and his previous education has been thorough, by 
close application he will finish the entire course in from ten to four- 
teen weeks. 

GOVERNMENT. 

The intimate relations that exist between teachers and pupils 
make this an easy problem. We all try to be ladies and gentle- 
men together, while we give our strength to profitable improvement. 
Trifling and mean fellows generally learn this before coming, 
and influence their CURSING fathers to send them to some institu- 
tion where the faculty have no moral batkbone. 

REPORTS. 

We will take pleasure in sending reports to all parents and 
guardians who will kindly notify us that such is expected. 

DIPLOMA. 

Those who complete the prescribed Course of Study and pass a 
satisfactory examination are awarded the College Diploma. 

The Diploma is given when the course is completed, or during 
Commencement Exercises at the close of each session, according to 

the pleasure of the student. 

(40) 



MILLKJAN COLLEGE. 47 

SITUATIONS. 

We do not now, nor never will, hold out as an inducement to 
attend this College, that we will procure situations for its graduates. 
The instruction given is worth many times more than is paid for it. 
And again, we can not tell what a young man will develop into 
until he is tried. It all depends upon ability, habits and character. 

The world is ready and willing to receive you, young men, if 
you have solid SENSE, CLEAN IIAHITS, HONEST CHARACTER, AND 
AKi: WILLING TO WORK. 

YOUNG MEN DELIGHT IN IT. 

When boys are about sixteen years old they feel that they want 
to make a fortune, and become restless for some employment that 
points that way. Let them then enter a business college, and the 
thought that they are doing something for themselves will arouse 
powers of the mind that other schools have failed to develop, and 
by careful training they can be led into some useful industry, or 
into more extensive mind CULTURE, 

NOTIFY US. 

The College building is a little over one-half mile from the rail- 
road. If you will notify us of the time you expect to be here, we 
will meet you at the depot and have your baggage conveyed to your 
boarding-house. 

THE COLLEGE OFFICE. 

On arrival at the depot, come direct to the College Office, as 
T B own interest will be best served by getting there your first 

j oRMATION. 



\Tm$, 



The following Students 
ness College within a few 

Angle, J. W., . 
-Anderson, W. T., 

Anderson, F. R., 
-Alley, J. F., 

Alley, P. C, 

Anderson, W. W., 

l BROWN, TtORERT L., . 

Brown, G. A,, 
^Burleson, D. S., 

Baber, Fannie E., 
-Bailey, Nannie, 

Brown, W. S., 

Boren, W. G., . 
^Buck, T. N., . 

Brooks, Frank, 

Bloomer, W. H., . 
^Chrisman, H. C, 
u^Charlton, V. S., . 

Charlton, C. R., 
'^Cowling, F. R., 

Cornfortii, C. W., . 
1 -Craft, A, G, 
Hoggins, J. G, . 

Calfee, B. B., 
-Ohesnut, A. A., 

Edwards, C. Q., . 

Evans, C. H., . 

Finley, F. W., 

Felts, T. L., . 

Fish, E. T., . 

Fralin, R. H., . 



I 



have been members of the Milligan Bu 
years past : 

. Union Hall, Va. 
Black water, " 
Kyle's Ford, Tenn. 
Pound, V r a. 

a a 

Fairview, Va. 
. Abingdon, Va. 

Martinsville, Va. 
. Limestone Cove, Tenn. 

Indian Mills, W. Va. 
. Ada, W. Va. 

Martinsville, Va. 
. Milligan, Tenn. 

Okolona, " 
. Broad Ford, Va. 

War Gap, Tenn. 

Christ iansburg, Va. 

it it 

. Bangs, Va. 

East River, \V. Va. 
. Milligan, Tenn. 
. • Purchase, Va. 
. Shope, N. C. 

Lomond, Va. 
. Woodbine, Kv. 

Sycamore, Va. 
. Atlanta, Ga. 

Williamsburg, Ky. 

Woodlawn, Va. 

Mount Vernon, Ky. 
. Dickinson's, Va. 
(48) 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE. 



49 



Garrett, S. B , 
Gillespie, W. T., 
I wGarnett, F. E., 
Ujarnett, John M., . 

Gentry, J. H., 
c^Garnett, D. K., 
VHarrisson, Joseph, 

HUKIINE, W. F., 

t^HoucK, J. F., 
Hughes, G. W., 
u-Hanen, S. P., 
^Haun, W. H., . 

1/ilAMAKER, A. H.., . 
t^HENDRICKSON, A. K., 

u41yder, S. C, 
Jones, L. J., 
kKinzie, C. E., 
kKinzer, Frank I)., . 
u-Keen, E. 8., . 
Long, C. N., 
Love. F. D., . 
^Leonard, J. F., 
v Li in kocs, Mollis, . 
" URue, Byron, . 
L-Iarmar, L. B., 

KTIN, W. W., 
,,LER, LC, 
Y lAaoKLAR, R. A., 

t^u .er, Clyde, 

s [woo ft*E, A., 
IN TOSH, 
ARTHY, G. B., 
Ir*u. (T.DUCK, B. F., . 
1-fVV^ »UCK, J. C, 

I y*cWane, C. W., . 
.(Wane, R. C, 

^ iJRRAY, A. J., 

\atthevvs, John G., . 

| fdvENRY, 

Mayhew, J, D., 



Greendale, Va. 
Ratliff, Va. 

Gordonsville* Va. 



Dunnsville, Va. 
Tazewell C. H., Va. 
Johnson City, Tenn. 
Baldwin, N. C. 
Milligin, Tenn. 
Mount Olive, Va. 
Barbourville, Ky. 
Snowville, Va. 
Pineville, Ivy. 
Happy Valley, Tenn 



^ 



Troutville, Va. 
Blacksburg, " 
Sago, Va. 

Austin's Springs, Tenn. 
Knoxville, Tenn. 
Johnson City, Tenn. 
Graham, Va. 
Glendale, Ky. 
Osceola, Va. 
Lynchburg, Va. 
Milligan, Tenn. 
Richmond, Va. 
Pulaski City, Va. 
Barbourville, Ky. 
Piney Flats, Tenn. 
Johnson City, " 
Ronald, Va. 

#ytheville, Va. 

J^i'lligan, Tenn. 
iaVbburville, Ky. 
Gross, Tenn. 
Barbourville, Ky. 



50 



MIWiAV COLLEGE. 



Nave, J. A., . 

OvERHELSER, J. VV., . 

•-Preston, J. W., 

Plummer, W. T., 
vPhipps, D. C, 

Rankin, C. R., . 
^Rhodes, John A., • 

^Kose, J. J., 
vRoiilNETT, LOYD, 

Rogers, C. P., . 
HSmith, James P., . 
^Stephens, S. S., 

Smith, Edith E., . 
c/Scott, B. F., 
^Shelburne, J. M., 

v/SpROWLE8, W. J., 

Tye, G. W., . 
Taylor, James P., Jr., 
^Taylor, W. D., . 

^ Thomas, Vint. M., 

-Til "TON, A. II 

\-Thomas, 0. C, . 

Tye, Lucy, .... 
uTate, Mrs. L. L. C, M . 
v Venters, A. J 

White, G. S., . 
^Werer, H. C, 
i^Williams, Lawrence, 
u Walker, R, H., . 
^Williams, S. A., 
^Williams, 8. T., . 

Wells, M. V., . 
^ Waters, W. P., . 

For personal inquiries, write to 



Mountain City, Tenn. 
. Hampton, Tenn. 

Glade Hill, Va. 
. Eiampton, Tenn. 

Clint wood, Va. 
. Home, Tenn. 

Cuckoo, Va. 
. Abingdon, Va. 

Fairview, <; 
. Pattonsville, Va. 

Pinhook, 
. Wythe ville, " 

Asheville, X, C. 
. Mountain City, Tenn. 

Pridemore, Va. 
. Lynchburg, Va. 

Barbourville, Ky. 
. Johnson City, Tenn. 

Hartford, Kan. 
. Catlettsburg, Ky. 

FClizabethton, Tenn. 
. Salem, Va. 

Barbourville, Ky. 

Nashville, Tenn. 

Venters, Ky. 
. Virginia. 

Knox ville, Tenn. 
. Cynthiana, Ky. 

Mountain City, Tenn. 

. Milligan, Tenn. 
i t it 

. Big Stone Gap, Va. 
Hopson, Tenn. 

Charles G. Price, 

Milligan, Tenn. 



Galenflan for 18$9-'90. 



First Terra begins Wednesday, September 4. 

First Term ends Tuesday, November 26. 

Second Term begins Wednesday, November 27. 

Second Term ends Tuesday, February 11. 

Third Term begins Wednesday, February 12. 

Third Term ends Tuesday, May 13. 

Excursion to Cave, last Monday in September. 

Excursion to Mountain, and Literary Entertainment, fourth Thurs 

day in October. 
Excursion to Cranberry, fourth Thursday in April. 
Arbor Day, according to the season 
Final Examinations, May 6, 7, 8 and 9. 
First Entertainment, Friday, May 9, 7:30 r. M. 
Literary Entertainment, Saturday, May 10, 10 a. m. 
Farmers' Meeting, Saturday, May 10, 2 p. M. 
Literary Entertainment, Saturday, May 10, 7:30 P. iw. 
Sunday-school, Sunday, May 11, 9:15 a. m. 
baccalaureate Sermon, Sunday, May 11, 10:30 a. m. 
rmon, Sunday, May 1J, 3:30 i'.m. 
ddents' Prayer-meeting,' Sunday, May 11, 7:30 P. m. 

aterary Entertainment, Monday, May 12, 10 a. m. 
Young Ladies, Monday, May 12, 2:30 p. M. 
College Entertainment, Monday, May 12, 7:30 p. m. 
Graduates' Programme, Tuesday, May 13, 9:30 a. m. 
Annual Address", Tuesday, May 13, 11 a. m. 
Awarding of Diplomas. 

Benediction. 



(M) 



HORACE GREELY, AT COOPER INSTITUTE. 

"The objection has been made to our old-fashioned college 
they are not practical. I do not think that is an accurate stat< 
of the objection.' What I would say is that they are practical 
reference to two or three pursuits, but that the demands of the u 
require nin ^tenths of our young men in other pursuits than those, m 
they are not practical with reference to these. 

" What I hope, then, from our business colleges is, that they sh;. 
educate and send out a class of young men qualified to direct tb 
various processes of industry, with a regular, careful, methodical 
account of profit and loss ; and that thus, making each year an 
improvement on the last, we shall, at no distant day, come to have 
a very much more productive and national industry than we have 
to-day." 

I welcome the business college in the form it has taken in the 
United States, because it meets an acknowledged want, by affording 
to young people of common scholastic attainments, and even the 
graduate from Harvard and Yale, an opportunity to learn impor- 
tant and indispensable lessons before they go out into the business 
of life. — James A. Garfield. 



W) 



Annual Register 



OF . . . 



VHLLIGAN COLLEGE, 



. . . FOR 



THE SCHOLASTIC YEAR 1892-9}, 



WITH . . . 



ANNOUNCEMENTS FOR 1893-94. 



CINCINNATI, ().: 

Elm Street Printing Co., Nos. 176 and 178 Elm Street. 

1893. 




HOW TO 

REACH 

MILLIGAN. 



All Eastern students can come to Bristol, Tenn., 
thence to Johnson City. 

All Western students can come to Knoxville, 
Tenn., thence to Johnson City. 

Southern students can come via Ashevilie, N. C, 
and Morristown, Tenn., to Johnson City. 

Milligan Station is three miles from Johnson City 
by the Narrow-Gauge Railroad. 




CALENDAR FOR 1893-94. 



First Term begins Wednesday, August 30. 

First Term ends Tuesday, November 28. 

Second Term begins Wednesday, November 29. 

Second Term ends Tuesday, February 28 

Third Term begins Wednesday, March 1. 

Third Term ends Monday, May 30. 

Final Examinations, last two weeks of session. 

First Entertainment, Friday, May 27, 7:30 P.M. 

Literary Address, Saturday, May 28, 10 a.m. 

Alumni Class Day, Saturday, May 28, 2:30 p.m. 

Club Representative Program, Saturday, May 28, 7:30 p.m. 

Sunday-school, Sunday, May 29, 9:15 a.m. 

Baccalaureate Address, Sunday, May 29, 10:30 a.m. 

Sermon, Sunday, May 29, 3:30 p.m. 

Christian Workers Program, Sunday, May 29, 7:30 p.m. 

Graduates' Day, Monday, May 30, 10:30 a.m. 

Awarding Diplomas, Announcements, Benediction. 



Board of Trustees. 

J. D. PRICE, Milligan, Tenn. 

C. C. TAYLOR, Milligan, Tenn. 

GEO. T. WILLIAMS, .... Milligan, Tenn. 

GEO. W. GILLESPIE, . . . Tazewell C. H. 

J. HOPWOOD, Milligan, Tenn. 

JAMES A. TATE, . . . - . Fayetteville, Tenn. 

S. W. HYDER. ..... Milligan, Tenn. 

W. M. STRALEY, .... Eggleston, Va. 

H.R.GARRETT, . . . . . Milligan, Tenn. 



OFFICERS OF THE BOARD. 

J. D. PRICE, President. 

GEORGE T. WILLIAMS, . . . Secretary. 
S. W. HYDER, Treasurer. 



Faculty. 

J. HOPWOOD, A.M., President, 
Ethics and Science, 

J. P. McCONNELL, A.B., 

Professor of Ancient Languages and Literature. 

H. R. GARRETT, A.B., 

Professor of Pure and Applied Mathematics. 

Mrs. S. E. L. HOPWOOD, 

Rhetoric^ English and American Literature. 

J. V. THOMAS, A.B,, 

Preparatory Department and Assistant in Languages. 

Mrs. OLIVE GARRETT, 
Vocal and Instrumental Music. 

Mrs. CLARA McCONNELL, Ph.B., 
Assistant in Science. 

Mrs. ROSA J. COMFORTH, 
Assistant in Preparatory Department. 

W. J. SHELBOURNE, 

Tutor. 

J. J. JOHNSON, 

Shorthand and Penmanship. 

Miss ETTIE BROWN, B.S., 

Librarian. 

W. B. KEGLEY, LL.B., 

Lectm'es on Selected Topics in Common and Constittitional Law. 

ELBERT ELLIOTT, 

Principal Business College. 



Referees in Different States. 



Who have personal knowledge of the place and of the College 



Elder L. A. Cutler, 
Hon. John' G. Mathews, 
Dr. M. F. Penland, 
Elder P. B. Bablr, 
Ex-Gov. Robert L. Taylor, 
Hon. S. H. Snider, 
Wm. E. Hall, . 
Walter T. Mills, 
Hon. M. W. LaRue, 
J. H. Garrison, . 
Elder P. S. Rhodes, 
Mrs. Daniel Sommer, . 
Elder Thomas Munnell, 
J. B. Briney, . 
W. G. Barker, . 
J as. A. Tate, . 
Geo. P. Rutledge, 
Henry McWane, 



Richmond, Va. 
Barboursville, Ky. 
Bakersville, N. C. 
Indian Mills, W. Va. 
Johnson City, Tenn. 
Kingman, Kan. 
New York City, N. Y. 
Harvey, 111. 
Cincinnati, O. 
St. Louis, Mb. 
Watertown, S. D. 
Richwood, O. 

, Ga. 

Moberly, Mo. 
Mexico, Mo. 
Nashville, Tenn. 
Norfolk, Va. 
Lynchburg, Va. 



A Day in Detail. 

During a part of the year it is found necessary for one or more classes 
to recite before morning class ; that is, before the beginning of the school- 
day proper. Such recitations begin at 7:30 and close with the bell for morn- 
ing class, which rings at a quarter past eight. After fifteen minutes, the 
second or assembling bell calls teachers and pupils to take their places in 
the main hall. Five minutes later the bell taps for closing doors, and devo- 
tional exercises begin. Song-books — Popular Hymns— are distributed among 
the students. The vocal leader stands on the stage in front of the school, 
and, assisted by the organist, leads the song, in which nearly all the students 
join. A selected Scripture is then read, with or without comment, sometimes 
in concert with the school. Prayer is then offered. Another song forms the 
introduction to the morning talk, and puts the mind in a frame to listen to 
the solid reasoning and direct appeal that always fill the hour and yield the 
highest possible benefit to the students. These talks are by the President or 
some member of the Faculty previously notified, and touch upon every subject, 
from commonplace social and domestic affairs to the highest ethical concerns. 
They have always been an especial feature of the institution, and one of in- 
estimable value in molding and developing the character. This is attested 
by hundretls of voluntary letters in which students have expressed' their 
gratitude for the good influence exerted upon their lives by these morning 
lectures. 

On adjournment, the classes assemble in their respective rooms for forty- 
five-minute recitations. The library is now opened for the entire day, and all 
who are not reciting during any particular period may have the privileges of 
the room for study, or reading, or examination of any volume for facts to be 
used i« some coming recitation, the librarian keeping excellent order, and 
also rendering any needed assistance in searching for books or points of in- 
formation. 

The forenoon is divided into four periods, closing at 12:15. One hour is 
given for dinner, after which classes are heard through three or four periods, 
according to the necessity of arrangement. 

After school hours students are encouraged to exercise themselves in 
walks and sports. This they are generally very willing to do, since every 
hill-top affords a charming view, and the playground is convenient and level, 
affording an excellent baseball, croquet or tennis ground. 



MII.LIGAN COLLEGE. 



STUDENTS. 

SENIORS. 

A. J. Wolfe Dungannon, Va. 

Etta Brown Stafford's ville, Va. 

Nannie Givens . . . Blacksburg, Va. 

Agatha. Miller .... Simmonsville, Va. 

G. C. Simmons Fayetteville, Tenn. 

R. W. Lilley Bluff City, Tenn. 

JUNIORS.- Class of »94. 

L. R. Dingus Clinch, Va. 

D. E. Motley Chatham, Va. 

- E. E. Hawkins Ray, N. C. 

W. J. Shelburne Stickley ville, Va. 

-J. P. Givens ' . . .Simmonsville, Va. 

W. S. Givens Simmonsville, Va. 

J. J. Cole Stickley ville, Va. 

soK»aio:fiN»i£r,w.— t'lasH <»f »ob, 

Stokes Buchanan Brighton, N. C. 

Charles Hart Milligan, Tenn. 

J.N. Hammitt February, Tenn. 

Ina Yoakly Douglas Shed, Tenn. 

C. B. Reynolds Simmonsville, Va. 

T. B. McCartney New Castle, Va. 

T. L. Sergent - Brewster, Va. 

L. C. Felts. (lit.fyWA . M! .... ). . . Woodlawn, Va. 
Dora Fulton Gibson Station, Va. 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE. 



FRESHMEN.— Class of '96. 

c Ed Crouch Boone's Creek, Tenn. 

W. G. Walters Mechanicsburg, Va. 

Daisy Boring February, Tenn. 

Sallie Gunn Newbern, Va. 

N. D. Hendrix Milligan, Tenn. 

J. A. C. Hanen Mt. Olive, Va. 

Isaac Buck Okalona, Tenn. 

E. L. Anderson Okalona, Tenn. 

C. W. Johnson. .*. Rockdell, Va. 

A. K. Ramey Rosedalc, Va. 

Butler Clevinger Praise, Ky. 

John N. Shelburne Snowville, Va. 

Geo. R. Cheves Unicoi City, Tenn. 

J. M. Coffee Snowville, Va. 

Arthur Maupin . Johnson City, Tenn. 

Lafayette Burleson Brighton, N. C. 

Emma Burleson .... Milligan, Tenn. 

C. B. Sells Milligan, Tenn. 

SECOND PREPARATORY. 

Pinkney Fulton Gibson Station, Va. 

Baxter Wilson Mountain City, Tenn. 

- J. G. Johnson Rockdell, Va. 

John Hannurn Unicoi City, Tenn. 

Geo. E. Grisham Jonesboro, Tenn. 

W. R. Treadway Dry Creek, Tenn. 

Bobbie Campbell Sneedville, Tenn. 

W. E. Haun Dry Creek, Tenn. 

G. F. Keen Okolona, Tenn. 

Nat Bray Lee Valley, Tenn. 

J. W. Rogers Pattonsville, Va. 

J. E. Rowe. Dry Creek, Tenn. 



10 MILLIGAN COLLEGE. 



F. S. Butler Dry Creek, Tenn. 

Ollie Williams Milligan, Tenn. 

Lelia Meadows Staffordsville, Va. 

S. W. Price Johnson City, Tenn. 

Henry Case Fairfield, Neb. 

Ella Hart . .Milligan, Tenn. 

C. H. Payne Milligan, Tenn. 

A. E. Williams Milligan, Tenn. 

J. T. E. Williams Unicoi City, Tenn. 

Henry Simmons .Milligan, Tenn. 

J. D. Eads Rose Hill, Va. 

FIRST PREPARATORY. ' 

G. S. Scott February, Tenn. 

John Shell , Milligan, Tenn. 

Rebecca L. McConnell Wayland, Va. 

Delia Elliott Valley Creek, Va. 

Beatrice Chase Fordtown, Tenn. 

C. W. Persinger Milligan, Tenn. 

S. E. Williams Milligan, Tenn. 

Thomas Murray Milligan, Tenn. 

J. H. Reynolds Bristol, Tenn. 

T. C. Hendrix Milligan, Tenn. 

Chas. Barry Unicoi City, Tenn. 

John Adkins Venters, Ky. 

J. F. Williams Milligan, Tenn. 

Richard Barry Unicoi City, Tenn. 

Chas. Parsons Pikeville, Ky. 

W. T. Givens Midway, Ky. 

Angus Bolton Milligan, Tenn. 

Nola Broyles Milligan, Tenn. 

Kathleen Barry Unicoi City, Tenn. 

L. Hundley ; Dunnsville, Va. 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE. 11 



Linnie Broyles Milligan, Tenn. 

Frank Broyles Milligan, Tenn. 

Chas. Bolton Milligan, Tenn. 

C. M. Hobbs : . . .Rose Hill, Va. 

Chas. Kloman Johnson City, Tenn. 

G. N. Humphreys Milligan, Tenn. 

Andrew Kloman Johnson City, Tenn. 

Zeb. V. Summer Alexander, N. C. 

A. J. Sanders Norther's Creek, N. C. 

Jennie Jessie Montgomery's, Va. 

A. D. Hughes Johnson City, Tenn. 

Emma Johnson . Milligan, Tenn. 

C. L. Price Johnson City, Tenn. 

J. T. Sells Milligan, Tenn. 

Sam Lewis Milligan, Tenn. 

J. T. Williams Milligan, Tenn. 

J. M. Wilkinson Milligan, Tenn. 

N. T. Hendrix Milligan, Tenn. 

Lizzie Wilkinson Milligan, Tenn. 

PRIMARY. 

Hattie Peoples . . . Milligan, Tenn. 

Burlie Rowe Milligan, Tenn. 

Ida Williams Milligan, Tenn. 

Maud Chase Fordtown, Tenn. 

Kate Parsons Pikeville, Ky. 

Wade Parsons Pikeville, Ky. 

S. H. Hawkins Ray, N. C. 

Nola Fagan Okolona, Tenn. 

Bettie Weddle Montgomery, Va. 

L. T. Anderson Unicoi City, Tenn. 

Alice Mosley Milligan, Tenn. 

Robert Fagan Okolona, Tenn. 



12 MILLIGAN COLLEGE. 



W. R. Pagan Okolona, Tenn. 

Minnie Bell Limestone Cove, Tenn. 

Gertrude Peoples Milligan, Tenn. 

Samuel Maupin . Milligan, Tenn. 

Hugh Perry '. Cranberry, N. C. 

Eddie Payne Milligan, Tenn. 

Lizzie Payne Milligan, Tenn. 

Joe Anderson Milligan, Tenn. 

Willie Hampton Milligan, Tenn. 

Jas. C. Strong Mililgan, Tenn. 

Henderson Dunbar. . Milligan, Tenn. 

Eddie Kloman . Johnson City, Tenn. 

Hamilton Kite Gap Creek, Tenn. 

Alfred Kite Gap Creek, Tenn. 

E. S. Butler Milligan, Tenn. 

Malm Wilcox Okolona, Tenn. 

Wra. Maston Milligan, Tenn. 

Maud Bolton Milligan , Tenn. 

Minnie Sizemore. • • .Milligan, Tenn. 

Sudie Shell Milligan, Tenn. 

David Shell Milligan, Tenn. 

Cordie Broyles Milligan, Tenn. 

Horace Burleson Milligan, Tenn. 

Arthur Burleson Milligan, Tenn. 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE. 13 



ALUMNI. 

A general meeting of the Alumni Association has .been appointed for 

Saturday, May 27, 1894. Already many former undergraduate students are 

expecting to attend with the alumni. It will be a day of pleasant memories 

for many. 

CXASS OF 1882. 

James A. Tate, A.M. Nashville, Tenn. 

A. A. Ferguson, A.B Tazewell C. II., Va. 

J. H. Rutrough, A.M Hylton, Va. 

C. B. Armentrout, A.B Limestone, Tenn. 

J. H. Smith, B.L Butler, Tenn. 

G. W. Hardin, B.L Johnson City, Tenn. 

Lulu Wilson, nee Crockett, B.L Morristown, Tenn. 

G. E. Boren, B.L Elizabethton, Tenn. 

Lucy C. Hardin, B.S Johnson City, Tenn. 

C. F. Carson, B.S .Telford, Tenn. 

CLASS OF 188.-J. 

*W. J. Shelburne, A.B Christiansburg, Va. 

S. B. Carson, A.B. Sneedville, Tenn. 

W. K. Henry, B.S Elizabethton, Tenn. 

CIjASS OF 1885. 

F. F. Bullard, A.M Lynchburg, Va. 

E. A. Miller, A.M Lordsburg, Cal. 

P. B. Hall, A.M Richmond, Ky. 

Charles Maddox, A.B Crockett's, Va. 

W. M. Straley, A.B Fayetteville, Tenn. 

Mollie E. Epps, nee Hardin, B.S Jonesboro, Tenn. 

R. H. Walker, B.S Mountain Ciiy, Tenn. 

William E. Read, B.S Pocahontas, Va. 

* Deceased. 



14 MILLIGAN COLLEGE. 



CLASS OF 1887. 

Letitia L. C. Tate, nee Cornforth, A.B Nashville, Tenn. 

E. C. Wilson, A.B Mountain City, Tenn. 

E. M. Crouch, A.B Charlottesville, Va. 

J. W. Giles, A.B „ . . . .Lynchburg, Va. 

CLASS OF 1888. 

W. B. Kegley, A.B Wytheville, Va. 

Sue A. Kegley, B.I., nee Gibson Wytheville, Va. 

A. I. Miller, B.L. Pulaski City, Va. 

Fan E. Baber, B.S Indian Mills, W. Va. 

CLASS OF 1889. 

H. R. Garrett, A.B '. Milligan, Tenn. 

Annie M. Preston, B.S Glade Hill, Va. 

Charles G. Price, B.S Atlanta, Ga. 

Frank I). Love, B.S Happy Valley, Tenn. 

CLASS OF 1890. 

J. P. McConncll, A.B, Milligan, Tenn. 

T. J. Cox, A.B Johnson City, Tenn. 

S. G. Sutton, A.B Bluefield, W. Va. 

Mamie Haun, B.S., nee LaRue Paris, Ky. 

Charles Cornforth, A.B Nashville, Tenn. 

ft* W. P. Cousins, B.S Baltimore, Md. 

W. H. Haun, B.S '...'. Paris, Ky. 

<n^ Mrs. W. M. Straley, B.S Fayetteville, Tenn. 

CLASS OF 1891. 

J. V. Thomas, A.B Milligan, Tenn. 

Mary Hendrickson, B.S Lexington, Ky. 

<j(\r Bettie Cox, B.S., nee Matthews ; Johnson City, Tenn. 

qA D. S. Burleson, A.B Milligan, Tenn. 

^ C. D. M. Showalter, A.B Tazewell C. H., Va. 

W. R. Motley, A.B West Rupert, Vt. 

G. E. Lyon, Ph.B Bristol, Tenn. 

Mp Lou Ella Showalter, B.S., nee English Tazewell C. H., Va. 



MILL1GAN COLLEGE. 15 



CLASS OF 1892. 

• ^^t ]• E. Stewart, Ph.B Rockwood. Tenn. 

^% W. L. Dudley, A.B Ronceverte, W. Va. 

^t ! Mary E. Dew, B.S West Point, Va. 

David Lyon, B.S Mountain City, Tenn. 

S. T. Willis, A.B New York City. 

^nS Cordie P. Henderson, B.S Holston Bridge, Va. 

<\%o J. F. Sergent, B.S Locust Lane, Va. 

t^l Clara McConnell, Ph.B Milligan, Tenn. 

CLASS OF 1893. 

<^<\%A. J- Wolfe, Ph.B Dungannon, Va. 

^ cvA Agatha Miller, B.S. Simmonsville, Va. 

Nannie Givens, Ph.B Blacksburg, Va. 

'« R. W. Lilley, B.S Simmonsville, Va. 

Geo. C. Simmons, B.S , Fayetteville, Tenn. 

Etta Brown, B.S Milligan, Tenn. 



^; «*.?«. $£, 

*s^ irf? */W 






16 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE. 



Course of Study. 

The studies are continued from one Term to the full Session, 
and students are required to remain in a class, or to re- study a 
work, until the teacher of that department is satisfied with their 
knowledge of the work. This may require one student a longer 
time than another. 



FIRST YEAR— PREPARATORY. 



Classical, 

Arithmetic. 

English Grammar. 

Geography. 

United States History. 

Orthography a*nd Reading. 

Penmanship. 

Letter-writing. 



Latin- Scientific . 

Arithmetic. 

English Grammar. 

Geography. 

United States History. 

Orthography and Reading. 

Penmanship. 

Letter-writing. 



Scientific. 

Arithmetic. 

English Grammar. 

Geography. 

United States History. 

Orthography and Reading. 

Penmanship. 

Letter-writing. 



Normal. 

Arithmetic. 

English Grammar. 

Geography. 

United States History. 

Orthography and Reading 

Penmanship. 

Letter-writing. 



MI LUG AN COLLEGE. 



17 



SECOND YEAR- PREPARATORY. 



Classical. 

Primary Algebra. 
Physiology and Hygiene. 
Practical Composition and 

Drill. 
Physical Geography. 
Drill Class. 

Higher Lessons in English. 
Essays and Debating. 
Greek Grammar 
/Esop's Fables. 



Latin - Scientific . 

Primary Algebra. 

Physiology and Hygiene. 

Practical Composition and Drill. 

Physical Geography. 

Drill Class. 

Higher Lessons in English. 

Essays and Debating. 

Ancient History. 

Latin Grammar. 

Latin Grammar and Composition. 



Latin Grammar and Composition. 



Scientific. 

Primary Algebra. 
Physiology and Hygiene. 
Practical Composition and 

Drill. 
Physical Geography. 
Drill Class. 

Higher Lessons in English. 
Essays and Debating. 
Ancient History, two terms. 
Latin Grammar. 
Reading and Elocution. 



Normal. 

Primary Algebra. 

Physiology and Hygiene. 

Practical Composition and Drill. 

Physical Geography. 

Drill Class. 

Higher Lessons in English. 

Essays and Debating. 

Ancient History. 

Reading and Elocution. 

Reading and Study of Page, Par- 
ker and Kellogg. 

Lectures on Theory and Practice 
of Teaching. 



18 



MIJ.T.IGAN COLLEGE. 



FRESHMAN YEAR. 



Classical. 

Science of Arithmetic. 

University Algebra. 

Rhetoric. 

Physics. 

Astronomy. 

Analysis of English. 

Essays and Debating. 

Caesar and Composition. 

Sail ust. 

Cicero's Orations. 

Xenophon's Anabasis. 

Plato's Apology. 

Roman History. 

Scientific. 

Science of Arithmetic. 

University Algebra, 

Rhetoric and Composition . 

Physics. 

Astronomy. 

Analysis of English, two 

terms. 
Essays and Debating. 

Scientific. 
General History, three 

terms. 
Zoology. 

Geometry, Trigonometry. 
History a n d Geography 

Drill. 



Latin - Scientific . 

Science of Arithmetic. 

University Algebra. 

Rhetoric. 

Physics. 

Astronomy. 

Analysis of English, two terms. 

P^ssays and Debating. 

Caesar and Composition. 

Sal lust. 

Cicero's Orations, 

Roman History. 



Normal. 

Science of Arithmetic. 
Latin Grammar. 
Analysis of English. 
Physics. 

Debating and Parliamentary Law. 
Civil Government. 
History and Progress of Educa- 
tion. 

Normal. 
History and Geography Drill. 
Lectures on Theory and Practice. 
Authors to be read: Phelps, De- 

Tocqueville, Payne, White. 
Bible History. 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE. 



i'J 



"> 



Classical. 

Zoology. 

Mythology. 

Geology. 

English Literature. 

Bible, three terms. 

Geometry and Trig- 
onometry. 

Surveying. 

Grecian and Roman 
History. 

Virgil's .Eneid. 

Livy. 

Herodotus. 

Homer's Iliad. 

Orations. 

Civil Government. 

Logic. 

Political Economy. 

Shakespeare and 

Standard Authors. 
Elocution. 
General Geometry 

and Calculus. 
Horace. 
Tacitus. 
Demosthenes. 
Thucydides. 
Botany. 
Roman and Greek 

History. 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

Latin- Scientific. 

Zoology. 

Mythology. 

Geology. 

English Literature. 

Bible, three terms. 

Geometry and Trig- 
onometry. 

Surveying. 

Grecian and Roman 
History. 

Virgil's .-Eneid. 

Livy. 

Elocution. 

Ancient History. 



JUNIOR YEAR. 

Civil Government. 

Logic. 

Political Economy. 

Botany. 

Shakespeare and 

Standard Authors. 
Elocution. 
General Geometry 

and Calculus. 
Horace. 
Tacitus. 

German or French. 
Roman and Greek 

History. 



Scientific. 

Mineralogy. 

Mythology. 

Geology. 

English Literature. 

Bible, three terms. 

Geometry and Trigo- 
nometry. 

Surveying. # 

Botany. 

Civil Government. 

Logic. 

German. 

Orations and Elocu- 
tion. 



Meteorology. 

Chemistry. 

Christian Evidences. 

Mechanics. 

Mathematical Astron- 
omy. 

Shakespeare and 
Standard Authors. 

Moral Philosophy. 

Mental Philosophy. 

Chemistry. 

Lectures by Seniors. 

Scientific Senior Year. 



20 



MILLIGAN COLLK(JK. 



SENIOR YEAR. 



Classical. 



Moral Philosophy. 
Mental Philosophy. 
Chemistry. 

Meteorology. 

Christian Evidences. 

Mechanics. 

Mathematical Astronomy. 

Lectures by Senior Students. 

Seneca. 

Cicero De Senectute. 

Xenophon's Memorabilia. 

Plato. 

Greek Testament and Bible. 



Latin- Scientific. 

Moral Philosophy. 
Mental Philosophy. 
Chemistry. 
Meteorology. 
Christian Evidences. 
Mechanics. 
Mathematics. 
Lectures by Seniors. 
Seneca. 

Cicero De Senectute. 
Bible. 

Comparative History and 
Growth of Nations. 



College Text-Books and Stationery. 

Text -books, with all necessary school supplies — as tablets, 
paper, pencils, etc. — -are kept near the College building. The 
supplies are sold at the lowest cash price. The business has no 
connection with home or tuition fees, or any other school expense. 

A student's books for one year need to cost from $8 to $20. 
This amount .will generally, though not always, include tablets, 
pencils and paper. 

If a student has text-books not used here, let him bring them 
with him, as they are often useful for comparison and reference. 

Let no one expect to get College text- books without payment at the 
time they are received. 

If books are changed, it is for the good of the students/ We 
desire to use the freshest and best text-books throughout. 



M1LLIGAN COLLEGE. 21 

Expenses, and Conditions of Payment. 

The session is divided into three terms of thirteen weeks each. 

A ticket, giving all the rights, privileges and advantages of the 
regular preparatory and College classes, will he sold to each stu- 
dent on entering. 

This, and this only, is the receipt for settlement and card of admis- 
sion to the roll as a member of the Institution. 

These privileges, and whatever advantages he may obtain, are what 
he buys. 

If the student does not use them, it is not the fault of the Institu- 
tion. All term payments are required in advance. 

No money paid for such ticket of admission for one term will 
be returned. If the owner chooses or is compelled to leave before 
the time of his card has expired, the Treasurer will mark on the 
back of it the time of tuition due, and the student can fill the period 
7vhenever lie pleases. 

First Preparatory Classes, per term of thirteen weeks $ 9 00 

Second Preparatory Classes, per term of thirteen weeks. ... 11 00 

College Classes, per term of thirteen weeks 13 00 

Music Lessons on Organ or Piano, and Use of Instrument, 

per term of thirteen weeks 14 00 

Use of Instrument alone, per term of thirteen weeks 4 00 

Painting and Drawing, per term, twenty-four lessons 10 00 

Business College Diploma Course 25 00 

Board in private families, per month $8 00 to 10 00 

Washing, per month 50 cents to 1 00 

1. Students entering the second or third week of any term 
must pay the same tuition as those entering the first week. 



22 MILL1GAN COLLEGE. 



2. Students coming in after the third week of a term will pay 
for First Preparatory classes seventy-five cents; Second Prepar- 
atory, eighty-five cents, and College classes, $1.00 per week for the 
remainder of that term. 

3. These bills are required when the ticket of admission 
is delivered. 



Rates for Advance Payment of Tuition for One Session. 

First Preparatory, one session in advance $25 00 

Second Preparatory, one session in advance 30 00 

College Classes 36 00. 



^G^ 



^pj>6 



"mm 



i 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE. 23 



Music. 



Vocal and Instrumental—Methods of Work and Prices. 

The demands of the age make it necessary for a young lady 
to know something of this most delightful art. Nothing adds more 
to the attractions of home, and for that reason, if for no other, it 
should be cultivated. 

Pveal proficiency in piano playing can only be attained by those 
who have undergone a systematic course of instruction. As all real 
progress depends principally upon the flexibility and strengthening 
of the fingers and wrists, technical exercise will be required from 
the beginning. Pieces adapted to the ability of the pupil will be 
chosen, with a view of improving the musical taste and making 
the pupil familiar with the different styles of standard composers. 
Ensemble playing is practiced during the session, in order to ac- 
quire promptness and accuracy in keeping time. 

Monthly Musicales are given by the pupils, that the interest 
of the class may be promoted, and the habit of playing and singing 
in the presence of others may be acquired. 

The aim of the Principal is, not only to train them to execute 
well, but to instruct them in the science of music. 

Hunt's and Fillmore's History of Music is taught in class, sup- 
plemented with other works of the kind; also Burrows' Rudiments 
of Music, Stainer's Thorough Bass and Harmony. 

The technical studies embrace Cramer, Clementi and other 
leading composers, with frequent practice of the major and minor 
scales, the more advanced also studying selections from Schumann, 
Mendelssohn, Chopin, Liszt and Beethoven. 

Instrumental lessons, with practice one and one-half hours per 
•day, $42, or $r4 per term of thirteen weeks. 



24 MII-I.I(;an COLLEGE. 



Methods and Departments. 

A true teacher will generally conduct his work in some waj 
peculiar to himself. He will be alive to the value of his own ob 
servations and experience. He will note carefully the best thought 
of the day on awakening and training mind. But his highest inter 
est will be the development of those before him, as well as of him 
self, into an energy of manhood and divinity of character which 
will show to the world that his mission is from God. Hence, whe? 
men having the natural ability, proper training and this deep sense 
of moral obligation to look after a student's whole welfare, are se- 
lected to conduct a department, they should have a large liberty in 
its management. The instructors of this Institution have this lib- 
erty, and become thoroughly interested in each student's progress. 
They co-operate in teachers' meetings, and seek to advance the 
welfare of all. 

PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT. 

The Principal in the Preparatory Department is a classical 
graduate, a diligent student. Much of the pleasure and benefit of 
a course of study depends upon careful training in this depart- 
ment. Hence it is very important to have competent teachers, 
not only ready to instruct, but able to create in the mind of the 
pupil a love for learning, and a noble purpose to strive for excel- 
lence in both scholarship and character. 

The teachers in the other departments are established in the 
Institution, and their excellent fitness for their respective places 
which they hold makes a happy memory for those who have recited 
to them, and gives a guarantee to parents of certain advancement 
to those who enter their classes. 



\ 

M1EE1GAN COLLEGE. ' , 25 



RHETORIC -LITERATURE. 

The origin and growth of the English language forms a study 
of the most thrilling interest. It sprang from the Anglo-Saxon, 
which, coming from the bleak plains of the north, planted itself in 
Britain, and overcame almost wholly the native Celtic tongue. 
Bold, defiant, self sufficient, the brusque and forceful Anglo-Saxon 
fitly represented the race who spoke it. As they were destined to 
subdue every people with whom they should come in contact — by 
force, when possible, and, when baffled by overwhelming numbers, 
triumphing by the power of endurance — so the language lived on 
under every difficulty through three hundred years of suppression, 
which to others would have been extinction. It courted no alli- 
ances, accepted no friendships, but when a common interest made 
it necessary, it blended with the Norman French, and from that 
union sprang the English language, combining in itself northern 
vigor with southern sweetness and melody. This forms the proud- 
est mother-tongue the world has ever known, and from every indi- 
cation must one day become the universal language. 

Students in this department, after learning the principles of 
the language, the various forms and government of words and 
construction of sentences, are next introduced into the study of 
Rhetoric — the fitting-room, where thought is to be appropriately 
clothed and adorned. With a thorough knowledge of this branch, 
one is prepared to express himself on any subject in the most 
agreeable and effective manner. 

But the study of literature, both English and American, is the 
especial pleasure of one who loves his language, and admires the 
master minds that have made it the vehicle of their thoughts. The 
subject, including extracts from leading authors, original discus- 
sion of their character and comparative literary merit, and bio- 
graphical sketches, extends through the session. One or more 



20 ' MILLIGAN COLLEGE. 

public entertainments are given by the class during the year, in 
honor of Shakespeare. Milton or some other noted author. The 
work is pleasant and very helpful. The student is benefited by 
noting the points of success and failure in the history of the most 
eminent men, and in being furnished with examples of the kind of 
thought and expression that have influenced the public mind of all 
ages. 

MATHEMATICS. 

The course includes pure and applied Mathematics. The sub- 
ject is far-reaching, and develops that patient concentration of 
thought which gives a mind power to figure correctly in the affairs 
of life. Its mastery is difficult, but when clearly comprehended 
affords the greatest pleasure and profit. The teaching is of such a 
character as to clear up difficulties and make study, not a drudgery, 
but an enjoyable exercise. A visit to our class-rooms will give 
proof of this. The methods have reference both to the value of 
this study as a mental discipline and to its usefulness in practical 
life. 

For developing habits of close and accurate reasoning, this 
branch of study is unsurpassed. The world knows the incalcula- 
ble value of the study of Mathematics, without discussion. 

LATIN AND GREEK. 

The study of Latin and Greek, when properly pursued, is 
both pleasant and profitable. It enables the student to obtain a 
more Correct view of the ancients in the various relations of life. 
It leads him to a better understanding of his own language, both 
as to signification and construction — hence, to clearness and ele- 
gance of expression. 

It trains him in the art of reasoning, not only on certainties, 
which it most assuredly does, but pre-eminently on probabilities — 
the method so much needed in every-day life. It secures for him 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE. 27 



independence in making his investigations, and ofttimes freedom 
from the whims and prejudices of others. 

All the encouragement and help needed will be given the stu- 
dent, but translations and copying and depending upon others are 
positively hurtful and not recognized as helps. 

LOGIC, MENTAL PHILOSOPHY, ETHICS. 

The art of using thought, the science of thinking, the motive 
and right ends of thought, are three expressions which fairly define 
these terms. Study in this field makes men reflective, and sets 
them to inquiring for the intangible forces behind matter which 
work through the visible to some glory in the unseen. It is a 
weird peering into the spiritual realm— a study of our relations to 
things invisible, and even to the unlived future. This study tends 
to develop a deeper soul-life. It makes men rich who hold no 
goods of this world. The student of Psychology touches realms 
of thought and has impulses of life that the uncultivated mind 
never feels, of which it can not know. 

We will not only use standard works in these classes, but cur- 
rent articles and original questions as they arise in the reflections 
of the students and teachers. Thus, besides our text-work, each 
young man can be his own book, and each associate a living vol- 
ume. Practical questions are daily used, so that students discuss 
the subjects in their general associations, until one lady reported 
they had had Moral Philosophy at dinner every day for a week. 
Such study takes deep hold on life. 

THE SCIENCES. 

No branch of study is more beautiful or elevating in its tend- 
ency than that of the natural sciences. One is irresistibly led to 
admire the exhaustless wisdom of the mind that could conceive, 
and the hand that could execute, the wonderful tasks accomplished. 



28 MILLIGAN COLLEGE. 



The College is especially well situated for the study of (ieol- 
ogy and Botany, from the face of Nature herself. 

The top of Roan Mountain, thirty miles east of us, presents 
some of the oldest formations in the United States, while abundant 
'coal-beds are but a little over one hundred miles the other way, 
with numbers of the wildest, deepest and most varied gorges be- 
tween, making a complete field for the study of a large number of 
geological phenomena ; and at the same time the timbers, grasses 
and flowers are especially interesting and varied to those who would 
learn of this great kingdom. We are gathering and preparing for 
a fuller Scientific Department in all principal branches. Friends 
of science can help much in this gathering work. We have lately 
received some valuable specimens from different parts, and espe- 
cially from the phosphate fields of Florida. Others can help. 
This Institution would love to exchange a great variety of mineral 
specimens — ores, mica, etc. — for tropical woods, shells and such 
as are not common tu us. 

NORMAL DEPARTMENT. 

If the child's mind is better than wood, and its heart and con- 
science more valuable than iron, give us trained teachers to fashion 
these into beauty and usefulness. If experience and skill must 
train athletes and race-horses how to lay out their strength, much 
more boys and girls deserve trained intellects and honest hearts to 
lead them to receive the greatest good and put forth their best 
powers. 

Our country needs institutions to awaken the spirit of teach- 
ing, to develop a love for that calling which, in its bearing for weal 
or woe upon human society, after agriculture, to say the least, is 
second of all the callings among men. Give us hopeful, learned, 
hard-working men and women to educate the next two generations 
of our Sunny South, and this world will have no finer start for 
liberal, noble humanity. 



M If. LIU AN COLLEGE. v>!) 



YOUNG TEACHERS. 

We especially Invite young teachers to visit the school and 
witness class-work, and inquire into the methods and results. The 
young men and women who have gone from the College as teach- 
ers are succeeding remarkably well. They constitute a class- 
clean, enthusiastic and ambitious to succeed. As a class, the high 
moral and Christian standard, both for themselves and their stu- 
dents, is becoming so much a matter of general knowledge over 
the country as to give them great advantages in locating and in 
conducting their schools. 

Places are open, and opportunities (or such young teachers. 
Correspondence is invited. 

Graduation— Degrees. 

The course requires four years after passing all common school 
branches, Elementary Algebra, one year in Latin, two terms in 
Greek, Elementary Astronomy, and other preparatory studies of 
the same grade. 

The English Bible, as a work of history and literature, with 
the character of Christ as a standard of life, Is now positively re- 
quired, for one school year in order to graduation. 

The cnrricalmn embraces four courses: Classical, Latin Sci- 
entific, Scientific and Normal, 

The Classical course offers the ct^:tt Bachelor c: Arts. The 
Latin Scientific is the same as the Classic, except it requires but 
one year in Greek, and offers the degree Bachelor of Philosophy. 

The Scientific course requires but one year each in Greek a 
Latin, and gives the degree Bachelor of Science. 

A certificate is given to those who finish the Normal course. 
These honors are given, without distinction of sex ; to any 
student who has completed either of the courses, and has given 
convincing evidence of sound moral character. 



30 MILL1GAN COT. LEGE. 



'The degree of A.M. or Ph.M. will not be conferred upon any 
student under five years after graduation. Then, at the option of 
the Faculty and Board of Trustees, it will be given to those who 
have finished a post-graduate course of study, or made worthy 
success in one of the learned professions. 



Literary Work— Clubs. 

The literary work of the Institution is carried on through 
clubs. This plan has many advantages over the old society system. 

i. Clubs are limited in their membership, so as to allow the 
privilege of weekly performance. 

2. It saves the student the expense of fitting up and running 
a hall. 

3. It prevents the ill-will and clannish spirit generally existing 
between members of rival societies. 

4. The students are not left to themselves, but each club is 
under the general management of the Faculty in everything. At 
the same time, the members exercise their individual talents in 
electing their own officers and carrying out the business of the 
body, often with marked ability. 

5. Secret fraternities in college are hot - beds for growing 
hazing, revelry and clannishness. Any association in school life 
which brings terror, violence, branding young men's faces and 
even death, ought not only to be contemned by honest people, but 
stamped out of custom by civil law. The new—the Christian — 
education does not bear such fruit. 

6. Young people trained under this open system make better 
members of the family, neighborhood, State and nation. Their 
sympathies not having been trained to cling around their own 
fraternity at school, they become able to look abroad and choose 
that which is best and truest in religion, politics and every question 



M1LLIGAN COLLEGE. 31 



Of life. Instead of looking with the eyes of their clan, and deciding 
on great questions with the weakened, because compromised, judg- 
ment of their own faction, they become individuals, and act for 
themselves. It has, been found, also, that special work is more 
readily undertaken. When a few young men desire to give more 
attention to history or the Bible, or debating en some phase of 
current thought, they can promptly form a club and enter on their 
work. Under the old system they must have a permit, or make a 
payment, to withdraw or remain in the old society and undertake 
more duty in the new, and do neither one well. The club system 
gives a freer and broader training. 



Study Hall, Library and Reading-Room. 

Each year in College work shows the greater use, even require- 
ment, of a good working Library and Reading-room. It is to the 
literary student what the work-shop is to the industrial school. A 
librarian ought to be as much a master of general knowledge and 
its applications as the director of a shop is of his tools. As a be- 
ginning in this direction, we have several hundred well-selected 
volumes and magazines, among which there are three of the most 
extensive Cyclopedias; lines of Ancient, Mediaeval, English, French 
and American histories; the leading English and American poets, 
from Chaucer to Longfellow and Lowell, inclusive ; Shakespeare, 
Macaulay, Addison and others; a line of purely literary works; 
then leading works of fiction, as Scott, Dickens and others; a 
few shelves of carefully gathered religious works, with some books 
especially designed for young people; lectures to young men; Dr. 
J. G. Holland's works, and so on. The current papers and maga- 
zines for the Reading-room are of the safest and best. The Forum, 
Revieiv of Reviews, the Homiletic Review, Our Day, the Century, 
rm the class of magazines found on the table, which, with many 



:\"2 MIIJ.IGAN COLLEGE. 



more publications of the day, give us not only the great thought: 
of the times, but the news as well. Arrangements are now being 
made to add $1,000 worth of books to the Library. Some of there 
have been placed. Others are ready and will be in before the 
session opens. 

The Librarian will be present at all times when the Library is 
open, from eight to ten hours each day. 

The room is kept pleasant and comfortable during regular 
library hours, and a student can have free use of any book he may 
wish to take from the shelf and read in the room, provided always 
that he returns the book to its proper place. 

Newspapers and magazines are free to be read at all times, but 
not to be removed from the room for any purpose, unless after date 
and by the Librarian's express permission. 

The Library Hall is elegant, forty feet by twenty-five; its tall 
ceiling is supported by iron columns. It is handsomely finished 
and well located, being separated from all the recitation-rooms by 
the main hallway. 

Government and Moral Training. 

, The successful government of a school depends upon a few 
elementary principles of thought and conduct. 

First, a certain understanding among students that an institu- 
tion of learning carries with its privileges and blessings certain 
rights, with authority to secure them. Second, a belief in the sin- 
cerity of the Faculty. Third, a faith in the moral courage or 
back-bone of this body to do and stand by the right. Not vigilant 
and strict by spells, but constantly and systematically directing the 
current of school thought against hazing ; against lying to conceal 
another's bad conduct; against stealing in the country and calling it 
sport; against destroying public or private property and calling it 
"painting the town"; against night sprees, and wine suppers, and 



MULLIGAN COLLEGE. 33 

billiard games, to the destruction of all gentler impulses, and call- 
ing such waste " having a good time." 

Two-thirds of all this catalogue, and a longer one, of student 
crime and low conduct is solely due to lazy, timid, bread-and- 
butter Faculties. Young men and women, under proper influence, 
•will just as surely delight in helping new students, as they will in 
hazing them under the old barbaric ideas. With right direction, 
they will no more steal honey or chickens or fruit at college than 
at home. It is only an inheritance transmitted from the schools 
of dark days and low morals that will make young men conceal 
each other's evil conduct and call it honor. 

When taught from the Christian standpoint, they will as 
quickly co-operate with the Faculty to save and elevate every stu- 
dent who may need their help, as, when left alone morally, they 
will drift to hazing, marauding and concealment. Young men, 
in their deepest sense, know that the whole current of such college 
life is debasing and unworthy, and they only follow it through 
tradition, treating others and acting themselves as they were treated 
and instructed. 

With each year of after-life they will more and more honor 
the Faculty that stands square in the breach and turns back every 
such evil custom and points to nobler lines of activity. 

When their young and hopeful ambitions are turned in a sen- 
sible, and Christian direction, love becomes the law of the school 
and duty its binding force. 

Young Ladies' Home. 

It is important that the social as well as class conditions of 
students receive the most careful attention. Being removed from 
parents, brothers and sisters, the lack of these should be supplied 
as much as possible by their new surroundings. Without this, the 
work of training is unnatural, and can not accomplish the best re- 



:»4 MII.L.IGAN COI.LKGK. 

suits. For this reason it has been our constant effort to establish a 
young ladies' home, where the womanly graces of mind and heart 
shall bloom out in a healthful, genial atmosphere. 

Nature has done much to assist in making the place attractive, 
the location being a grassy level top of a high promontory, around 
the base of which a beautiful stream winds and hurries away toward 
the northeast, emptying into the Watauga River, two miles below. 
The air is always sweet, the scenery unusually attractive. For 
healthfulness it can not be surpassed. No epidemic was ever 
known to exist here. 

The music-rooms are all in the Home, so that no one has to 
go out of doors to reach the place of practice. 

The teachers in the Home mingle with the students as close 
friends and counselors. The girls feel that they are loved by them, 
and are shown that every regulation they are asked to observe is 
for their good, as helping to fashion, of themselves, that perfect 
model of inward and outward loveliness which none but a sweet 
young girl can wholly attain. 

The lady teachers meet the girls weekly in an informal body 
for general counsel. Any point of conduct observed through the 
week not in keeping with the gentlest and most lady-like deport- 
ment is pointed out, and they are urged to greater vigilance in 
watching themselves, the fact that self-government is the highest 
possible government being constantly pressed upon them. By this 
means a feeling grows up in their minds day by day of individual 
responsibility, and a decision to do right because it is right and 
beautiful to do so. 

YOUNG LADIES FURNISH 

their own toilet articles, matches, towels, napkins, pillow-cases 
and sheets, and one blanket each. 

Young ladies should bring plenty of warm, substantial cloth- 
ing, and, besides the main winter wrap, a light shawl each. Se- 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE. 85 



~\ 



vere colds are sometimes contracted for lack of such convenient 
wrap. Beside these, a knife, fork, spoon or glass is frequently 
needed in the room, while those furnished at the Home are for the 
dining-room, and must not be carried from there. If these things 
are put into the trunk on leaving home, it will be found convenient, 
and will save annoyance all around. 

Rooms are neatly finished and papered, but they are plainly 
furnished with only such things as health and comfort require ; 
hence, any little article of adornment, easily carried and of no use 
at home, will often add greatly to the beauty of the girl's room 
here, develop her taste, and make of her a better student. 

EXPENSES. 

For home, tuition, fuel and lights, for one term of 

thirteen weeks, payable in advance $45 50 

For one school year, cash in advance 130 00 

The same, including instrumental music or vocal- 
ization, per term of thirteen weeks 59 00 

The same, including music for one school year, 

cash in advance 165 00 

These figures do not include washing. 

Experience in the Home has shown that it is better for the 
young ladies to pay and care for their own washing. Excellent 
washerwomen come to the Home on Monday, our holiday, and 
carry the clothes away for laundry. Washing costs from 50 cents 
to $1.00 per month. 

Co-Educaticm. 

The days of monk and nun life are numbered, except with 
those who still live and educate under the influences of the Middle 
Ages, when such separation of the sexes was the most marked re- 
ligious feature. The cause of co-education has triumphed, and 






3() M1I.MGAN COLLEGE. 



young women and young men are to enter colleges and universities 
in the future as they enter the Sunday-school or church, or other 
popular gathering, and each obtain such benefits as his nature fits 
him to receive. Still, opposition will exist. N6 new development 
in society is at first received with favor. Seventy years ago any 
education for woman beyond the most elementary was generally 
regarded as useless. The elders and deacons then thought hospi- 
tality required them to take toddy with their guests, and most 
especially to treat the preacher. In those days, a child in the 
common school studied Webster's Spelling-book one or two years 
before reading a line or drawing a hook with his pen. He now 
reads well in the Third Reader and writes a letter to his cousin the 
first session. 

Ye pedagogues of exclusive schools, the world is progressing. 
We invite you forward into the more trying, but far richer, fields of 
co-education, where you can have all the advantages of working 
according to the Creator's laws, and of seeing young people grow 
harmoniously and beautifully into Christian citizenship 

The Teachers. 



ion 



ilOI 



Our teachers for the coming session are consecrated, energetic 
and close students. Careful observation has shown that many 
teachers employed by renowned institutions, at high salaries, would 
not be engaged here at any price. • Their soulless routine, when 
compared with the energetic, independent system of natural teach- 
ing daily practiced at Milligan College, would seem worthless. 
And not only is the class-work enthusiastic and happy, but the ends ; 
for which the student is encouraged to labor are far beyond any 
that could be attained by the use of the old medal and prize sys- |' ea 
tern, which happily is passing into decay. 

The teachers of this Institution put forth every energy of con- 
secrated minds and hearts to reach the highest elements in human Is 

I 



M1LLIGAN COLLEGE. 



37 



fttture, to lead the largest number of students to do their best from 
I incentives that give more enjoyment, last longer and have a healthier 
influence on life and character. 

Every, teacher is an earnest Christian worker, with clean hab- 
[gl, laboring for the highest good of the student, both in and out of 
ool. Their associations with students tend to a pleasant co- 
.^peration in study and school government. 



Excursions. 

The teachers of this Institution have not grown too old to enjoy 
jjl holiday excursion, or to appreciate the exhilarating effect upon 
student of these out-of-door runs after a long season of close, 
wd school work. 

Three miles from the College is Buffalo Mountain, a grim 
^arder who seems to be eternally gazing down and taking note of 
Our doings. When the lovely autumn days come on, he seems to 
£5t te a " nature-lovers to a closer inspection of his charms. The 
gttuliant and varied coloring of foliage, the calm, mellow distances, 
beckon the hard worked teacher and pupil with more than human 
^Importunity, and we go. 

A halfday excursion takes us to the Rock House and Saltpetre 

V**e, two caverns lying near together and two miles from the Col- 

a *&* Both are objects of intense interest to students, and a close 

^tumination of some of their really exquisite beauties gives a deep 

ttalization of the marvels of God's creation. 

Arbor Day comes as early in the spring as the weather will 
AUow - The tall, thrifty young maples that shade the walks and 
^,qot the whole campus are all the result of this enjoyable holiday. 
-Each student wants to plant a tree, and the prettiest one, so there 
**e mam trees, and all well-nigh perfect as to their form and health. . 
Another excursion takes us to Cranberry, North Carolina, the 
Kiminus of the Narrow Gauge Railroad. The scenery is peculiarly 



***■ 



"■»■"»' 



38 MILLIGAN COLLEGE. 



attractive, and this trip is called the best of the year. It takes us 
into another State, though only thirty miles distant, and gives an 
opportunity to inspect the vast iron mines, whose reputation is 
known wherever iron is used to any extent. 

For this excursion we have once substituted a trip of twelve 
miles to an immense, old, leaning beech-tree, with the following 
historic inscription in great, woody letters, hoary with age, doubt- 
. less by Boone himself : " D. Boon cilled a bar on tree 1760." But 
the word comes now that the letters chipped from this historic tree 
must be seen in Chicago. 

TO PARENTS. 

Of late some thoughtful men, owing to the dangers of irrelig- 
ious college associations and the tendency among students to bad 
habits, have, questioned the wisdom of sending to college at all, 
preferring less intellectual training with the safer morals of home. 
Milligan College explicitly denies the necessity of any such evils in 
, college life more than in home life or church life, or any proper or- 
ganization of society, and submits the testimony of the hundreds 
who have come to Christ under her influence as evidence that, as 
a rule, bad habits are unlearned and correct ones established ; that the 
students "cease to do evil and learn to do well." 

BUILDING, LOCATION AND SURROUNDINGS. 

The Institution is situated at Milligan, three miles from John- 
son City, Tenn., and half a mile from the East Tennessee and 
Western North Carolina Railroad. It is surrounded by a small, 
clean village, in whose families the young men find excellent 
homes. 

The building is situated on a fine promontory in the bend of 
the creek, where one can look far up the beautiful valley to the 



*•*''•"' "•*/ ;•,-■' ' : '-%$C '*'''' .": ' 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE. 39 






mountains about its source, then on to higher and higher summits, 
which are often covered with snow, while the fields around us. are 
a bright green. Then, following the little stream, as it winds 
through sl.ady groves and sunny meadows, we find it, two miles 
farther on, emptying its waters into a bold mountain river, whose' 
picturesque banks and foaming cascades well deserve the Indian 
name, Watauga — Beautiful River. . * "* ; 

Within a distance of one to three miles are marry spots of his- < 
toric interest. Among these are : The starting-point of the patriotic 
mountaineers who faced death on King's Mountain^ ^nd by^Jheir' 
gallant victory changed the Colonial Rebellion ipto 'a successful 
Revolution; the battlefield where, in 1788, the force of arm£ de->, 
cided that East Tennessee and Western North Carolina should not ' 
remain as the separate State of Franklin; the seat ©f the first leg-i 
islative body ever assembled in Tennessee; the bed-log of tbjirstv 
grist-mill ever built west of the Allegheny Mountains, and^jfejiny^ 
other points of interest. These may all be seen in our excursions^ 

The elevation of its immediate grounds, the purity and sfweetr^ 
ness of its air, makes this a most desirable and safe location for Can 
institution of learning, and a pleasant home. '. / . ' . f^> *, 

Four important town sites are within eight miles of the College. * 
These places are midway between the great Blue Ridge 'ironf* and 
copper fields on one side, and the Cumberland coal fields oil the 
other, and four railroads are already at Johnson City, only r three ^ 
miles from us. Milligan College is becoming a handsome suburb. 
and, with some improved roads, will be near enough for business 
and far enough out for health, beauty and good educational advan- 
tages. ' 



m 



'■■ 



-.v. 



m 









r 



40 MILL1GAN COLLEGE. 



SOME SUGGESTIONS, AND WHY. 

i . Stay long enough, and work hard enough, to give yourself and 
your teachers a fair trial. 

This is but the plainest kind of justice. Condemnation or 
acquittal without trial is as unfair in an institution of learning as in 
a court-room. 

2. Leave off every univorthy habit. 

Every sentiment of wisdom and honor declares the human be- 
ing to be living far below the dignity of his nature if he persists in 
practices which he knows are hurtful to himself or others. -It is 
his business to do rational, sensible acts, and to leave unreasonable, 
self-degrading action to fools and those who do not respect them- 
selves. I 

3 . Spend money only for that which is in some way a real benefit 
to your life. . - t m 

The practice of spending grows with but little cultivation, and 
often reaches the point of sinful indulgence. The charactejr is 
frequently started on the downward road, simply by a young per- 
son allowing the habit of spending money to control him. fj A 
young man came here several years ago and gained the confidence 
of friends and teachers by his frank and manly bearing. But so 
possessed was he with the habit of spending, that he used on him- 
self money sent from home to pay his dues — and owes it to day. fy 

4. Bring your Bible, and cultivate the habit of reading it regularly. 
Familiarity with its sublime style is the greatest single means 

of advancement toward true culture, even if the reader stops short 
of its supreme value. But above all, its absolute perfection, as a 
guide in this life and a reyelation of that which is to, come, makes 
it the one companion without which no one should try to live. ; 

- 



- 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE. '• 41 



MONDAY HOLIDAY. 



•' 



Monday holiday instead of Saturday was begun ten years, 
ago. Nothing could tempt us to return to the old system. Our 
work moves on up to Saturday evening. The literary clubs then ! 
meet. Sunday morning finds the mind free and ready to engage 
in proper exercises of the day without the tormenting thought:; , 
«* To-morrow recitations will be here, and I am not prepared." 

Monday forms the freest and happiest day possible for study 
and recreation. The Monday holiday has come tp stay. Let it be ; 
adopted by every college. 

NOTES. 

i. Milligan Business College is a separate institution. 

2. A student in the regular college is entered for three months, 
unless that much time does not remain' before the close of the 
session. ■■•*' ''•"''•".; 

3 . Four weeks constitute a sehool month. 

4. A school month is not reckoned as a calendar month, but Jv 
is four weeks. . 

5. Tuition is due on enrollment. You pay in advance for a 
ticket which calls for three months' tuition in college the same as 
you pay for a ticket which calls for three hundred miles' ride on 
the cars. : * 

6. Money paid for one term of tuition is not returned. If a 
student is compelled to leave before the expiration of any term, he 
can make up the time in any future term. 

7. Students can rent rooms, do their own housework and go 
the session through, including books, tuition, board, fuel, light, 
rent — all for less than seventy-five dollars. Young men who did so 
this session have finest health, diligent student habits and most 
worthy characters. One did it for less than fifty dollars, and paid 



« *«V- ' • & • * 



42 M1LLIGAN COLLEGE. 



part of that in work. For the coming session a boarding hall has 
been rented. Cooks will be employed. Students will furnish in 
part their own rooms, and board will be given at cost. Prof. J. V. 
Thomas will live in the hall and have full charge. 

8. No teacher or tutor in Milligan College ever uses tobacco 
in any form. They are men and women of Christian character, 
clean habits, able and willing to do high-grade work, and they 
earnestly try to live according to the counsel they give to- others. 

9. The example of the Faculty, the Wednesday night prayer- 
meeting, the Sunday night prayer-meeting and the morning talks, 
make a current of safe religious thought for the school, which 
carries a large per cent, of the better students into a working 
Christian manhood. 

Milligan Business College. 

The Principal of this school received his general education at - 
home academies, Milligan College and three sessions in the Uni- 
versity at Athens, Tenn. He is a graduate of Milligan Business 
College, and after graduating here, took a special course at Pough- 
keepsie, N. Y. He has also had considerable experience in teach- 
ing and in actual business life, and is, with all of these, a lover of 
his work. His preparation is therefore complete, his talent gener- 
ous, his hope and enthusiasm full. Any young man or woman 
desiring a thorough business education may feel assured that he will 
receive here the best of assistance. Professor Elliott will give all 
his time and energy to this single work, and each student is thus 
the beneficiary of his personal attention and help. 

The course is full and extensive, and the cost is much below 

that of any Business College of like grade. Book-keeping, full 

Diploma Course, $25.00; Shorthand, $20.00; Typewriting, 

$10.00; Penmanship, $10.00. For further information and full 

particulars, address 

E. W. Elliot r, Principal. 



m 



.;■■ 



• • 



"■\ 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE. 



*3, 






Notes. 



Read the Catalogue. 

Examine the expense page carefully. 

Payments for each term are due at its beginning. 

Money paid on tuition for one term will not be returned. 

Students can enter at any time, but will be enrolled for one 
term, or thirteen weeks, unless the session closes before that limit. 
6 All students should expect to fulfill the conditions laid 
down in the Catalogue. . . ,f 

7. The Business College is a separate organization. Prof. 
Elbert Elliott, a graduate of two business colleges, is Principal.; ;; (' 

8. The term of probation for students of uncertain conduct >&< ' it- 
has been shortened. ■ y - v . , « - --. A '$•■;, ' i /( ^ 

9. Every young man. or woman worthy to be educated is 
willing to be guided by his own best nature and the counsels of 
experience. ^ U - 

10. Remember, -it is your own conduct, your personal habits,^ 
your talent and industry, that determine your social and class 
standing. ^: '•' •■' . . <■-' ! 

11. Intellectual power and skill are of infinite value to theV 
human race ; social graces &a£!&gc£g8f* quicken the soul's sense of 
gentleness and beauty; large political wisdom and statesmanship'; 
give man the world's honors, jeum tho^ughijeaichin^in these fields ' ? 
and for these ends is 6s S ^ws^ Sr^Qgj Sa a^^sM^ P^^^ ^»ri ; but 
the final purpose, the trfle efd, theCsoul of the work, is to cleanse, 
to purify, to energize all intellectual training, all social life and , 
political institutions wjth ^ thoughts, with the spirit of Jesus 

yy './" 






V . TVWS 



r 



44 MILLIGAN COLLEGE, 



Education is the only interest worthy the deep, controlling 
anxiety of the thoughtful man. — Wendell Phillips. 

Education alone can conduct us to that enjoyment which is, at 
once, best in quality and infinite in quantity. — Mann. 

The true purpose of education is to cherish and unfold the 
seed of immortality already sown within us; to develop, to their 
fullest extent, the capacities of every kind with which 1&0* God 
^^who^^J^^^atte^w has endowed us. — Mrs. Jameson. 

Knowledge does not comprise all which is contained in the 
large term of education. The feelings are to be disciplined ; the 
passions are to be restrained; true and worthy motives are to be 
inspired; a profound religious feeling is to be instilled/-w »ebg^ re 
rj&Of#litj£mE&K All this is comprised 

in education. — Webster. 

FROM THE CHARTER. 

From Article III. — The property vested, or which may be 
vested, in this Institution, shall be held by a Board of Trustees, 
and a majority of the members of the Board shall constitute a quo- 
rum to transact business; and said Board of Trustees is hereby 
constituted a body politic and corporate, as Literary, Scientific and 
Religious Institution, and is invested with power to confer degrees, 
to sue and to be sued by the corporate name, to purchase and: hold, 
or receive by gift, bequest or devise, any personal property or real 
estate necessary for the transaction of corporate business or as an 
endowment fund, and also to purchase or accept any personal 
property or real estate in payment or part payment of any debt due 
the corporation, and to sell or alien the same. 



- 









mSZ 



i ii 



►♦»•»»»»»«»♦»♦♦♦« 



REGISTER 



OF 



Milligmn College 



FOR 



The Scholastic Year 1893^94, 



With Announcements 
For i894-'95. 



w 



►*<*■♦*♦»©*»•«*»••♦♦<»♦*»*<»*+»«« 



P,H. Wel: 



r> a n^ 



MILLIGAN. COLLEGE, TN 37682 



>\ 



REGISTER 



>!• . 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE, 



FOR 



THE SCHOLASTIC YEAR 1893-94, 



WITH 



ANNOUNCEMENTS FOR 1894-95. 



CINCINNATI, O : 
Elm Street Printing Co., 176 and 178 Elm Street. 

1894, 






Ml 




HOW TO 

REACH 

MILLIGAN 



All Eastern students can come to Bristol, Tenn., 
thence to Johnson City. 

All Western students can come to Knoxville, 
Tenn., thence to Johnson City. 

Southern students can come via Ashevill^, N. C, 
and MorrUtown, Tenn., to Johnson City. < 

Milli^an Station is three miles from Johnson City 
l>y the Narrow-Gauge Railroad. 




"^ 



CALENDAR FOR 1893-94. 



First Term begins Wednesday, September 5. 

First Term ends Tuesday, December 4. 

Second Term begins Wednesday, December 5. 

Second Term ends Tuesday, March 5. 

Third Term begins Wednesday, March 6. 

Third Term ends Monday, May 20. 

Final Examinations, last two weeks of session. 

First Entertainment, Friday, May 17, 7:30 p.m. 

Literary Address, Saturday, May 18, 10 a.m. 

Alumni Class Day, Saturday, May 18, 1:30-3:30 p.m. 

Club Representative Program, Saturday, May 18, 7:30 p.m. 

Sunday-school, Sunday, May 19, 9:15 a.m. 

Baccalaureate Address, Sunday, May 19, 10:30 a.m. 

Sermon, Sunday, May 19, 3:30 p.m. 

Christian Workers Program, Sunday May 19, 7:30. p.m. 

Graduates Day, Monday, May 20, 10:30 a.m. 

Awarding Diplomas, Announcements, Benediction. 



^ 



— -"-> L . ■ ■■ . . 



Board of Trustees, 

J. D. PRICE, ...... Milligan, Tenn. 

C. C. TAYLOR, Milligan, Tenn. 

GEO. T. WILLIAMS, .....-.;■.; Milligan, Term. 

GEO. W. GILLESPIE, .... Tazewell C. H. 

J. HOFWOOD, ...... Milligan, Tenn. 

JAMES A. TATE, . Fayetteville, Tenn. 

S. W. HYDER, ..... Milligan, Tenn. 

H. R. GARRETT, .... Milligan, Tenn. 



OFFICERS OF THE BOARD, 

j. D. PRICE, ..... PRESIDENT. 

GEORGE T. WILLIAMS. , . . Secretary. 

S. W. HYDER, ..... Treasurer 



r 



Faculty, 



J. HOP WOOD, A.M., President, 
Ethics and Science. 

J. P, MeCONNELL, A.B., 

Professor of Ancient Languages and Literature 

C. D. M. SHOWALTER, A.B., 

Professor of Pure and Applied Mathematics. 

Mrs. S. E. L. HOP WOOD, 

Rhetoric^ English and American Literature. 

J. V. THOMAS, A. 13., 

Preparatory Department and Assistant in Languages. 

Miss SALLIE WADE, 
Vocal and Instrumental Music. 

Mrs. CLARA MeCONNELL, Ph.B., 

Assistant in Science. 

Mrs. LOUELLA SHOWALTER, B.S., 

Assistant in Preparatory Department. 

W. J. SHELBURNE, A.B., 

Commercial Law } Book-keeping and Business Forms. 

J. J. JOHNSON, 

Shorthand and Penmanship. 

W. J. SHELBURNE, A.B., 
Librarian. 

W. B. KEGLEY, LL.B., 
Lectures on Selected Topics in Common and Constitutional La7c 

Mrs. ROSA J. COMKORTH, 
Primary Department and Assistant Librarian. 

C. D. M. SHOWALTER, A.B., 

Business Manager and Treasurer. 



V. 



Notes of Business. 

i. Read the Catalogue. , 

2. Examine the expense page carefully. 

3. Payments for each term are due at its beginning. 

4. Money paid on tuition for one term will not be returned. 

5. Students can enter at any time, bat will be enrolled for 
one term, or thirteen weeks, unless the session closes before that 
limit. 

6. All students should expect to fulfill the conditions laid 
down in the Catalogue. 

7. A student in the regular college is entered for term unless 
that much time does not remain before the close of the session. 

8. Four weeks constitute a school month. 

9. A school month is not reckoned as a calender month, but 
is four weeks. 

10. Tuition is due on enrollment. You pay in advance for a 
ticket which calls for one terms' tuition in college the same as you 
pay for a ticket which calls for one hundred miles' ride on the cars. 

n. Money paid for one term of tuition is not returned. If a 
student is compelled to leave before the expiration of any term, he 
can make up the time in any future term. 

12. Students can rent rooms, do their own housework and go 
the session through, including books, tuition, food, fuel, light, 
rent — all for less than seventy five dollars. Young men who did so 
this session have finest health, diligent student habits and most 
worthy characters. One did it for less than fifty dollars, and paid 
part of that in work. 

13. Any student who has two studies in a higher department, 
is graded and charged in that department. 



w\ mi 11 jBiunmm ■ 



J 



Notes and Sugestions of Conduct 

i. Do right. 

2. Do that which becomes a man. 

3. Try diligently to practice the Golden Rule. 

4 Do not spend money jor any thing which will not do y m j 

5. Give an open account to parents for every cent of money usi 

6. Stay long enough, and work hard enough, to give yourself a 
your /car hers a fair trial. 

This is but the plainest kind of justice. Condemnation o 
acquittal without trial is as unfair in an institution of learning as in 
a court-room. 

7 . Leave off every unworthy habit. 

It is the business of a student to do rational, sensible acts, and 
to leave unreasonable, self-degrading action to fools and those who 
do not respect themselves. 

8. The term of probation for students of uncertain conduct 
has been shortened. 

9. Every young man or woman worthy to be educated i:* 
willing to be guided by his own best nature and the counsels o< 
experience. 

10. Remember, it is your own conduct, your personal habits, 
your talent and industry, that determine your social and class 
standing. 

n. Not teacher or tutor in Milligan College ever uses tobacco 
in any form. They are men and women of Christian character, 
clean habits, able and willing to do high-grade work, and they 
earnestly try to live according to the counsel they give to others. 

12. The example of the Faculty, the Wednesday night prayer- 
meeting, the Sunday night prayer-meeting and the morning talks, 
make a current of safe religious thought for the school, which 
carries a large per cent, of the better students into a working 
Christian manhood and womanhood. 



To Parents. 

13. Of late, some thoughtful men, owing to the dangers of irrelig- 
ious college associations and the tendency among students to bad 
habits, have questioned the wisdom of sending to college at all, 
preferring less intellectual training with the safer morals of home. 
Miiligan College explicitly denies the necessity of any such evils in 
c >llege life more than in home life or church life, or any proper or-* 
ganization of society, and submits the testimony of hundreds who 
have here come to Christ that in this college as a rule, bad habits 
arc unlearned and correct ones established; that the students ''cease 
to do evil and learn to do well." 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS. 

CI.AKN OF HI. 

Cole, j . J Rocky Station, Va. 

^x 1 Coggins, J. C Ottawa, Kan. 

n* n Dingus, L. R Clinch, Va. 

^°°Givins, J. P Simmonsville, Va. 

Motley, D. E Chatham, Va. 

1 1)0 Mathews, W. J Johnson City, Tenn. 

n ^ Shelburne, W.J Stickley ville, Va. 

liJ- Showalter, J. W Snowville, Va. 

<XASS OF *9a. 

Buchanan, Stokes Brighton, N. C. 

Cheves, G. R Unicoi, Tenn. 

Clark, Laura B Radford Furnace, Va, 

<go^ Felts, L. C. . .( Vf/Vi . ; ,6f*C Wood Lawn, Va. 

<&\°Fulton, Dora R Gibson Station, Va. 

Givens W. S. Newport, Va. , member of ("lass but not in 'gy'oi 

Hagy, Lulu M Greendale, Va. 

Hart, Charles S Milligan, Tenn. 

Hawkins, E. E Ray, N. C. 

McCartney, T. B New Castle, Va. 

^Reynolds, C. B Simmonsville, Va. 

Showalter, G. H. P Snowville, Va. 

Shelburne, H. Pearle Stickley ville, Va. 

Taylor, George C Milligan, Tenn. 

Thomas, Bertie E Falls Mills, Va. 

Wiilburn, Sarah E Prospect Dale, Va. 

Yoakiey, Ina P Wahoo, Tenn. 



ROLL OF STUDENTS 

ALPHABETICALLY ARRANGED. 

Anderson, E. L Okalona, Tenn. 

Anderson, Frank Okalona, Tenn. 

Anderson, Lizzie Erwin, Tenn 

Anderson, Joe Miliigan, Tenn. 

Anderson, Lucy Okalona, Tenn. 

Boring, Daisy February, Tenn. r3 

Burleson, Emma Miliigan, Tenn. 

Bunts, A.J Pulaski, Va. 

Barry, Charles Unicoi, Tenn. 

Barry, Kathleen Unicoi, Tenn. 

Barry, Richard Unicoi, Tenn. 

Butler, Frazier Dry Creek, Tenn. 

Briggs, Thomas Shell Creek, Tenn. 

Briggs, Isaac. Shell Creek, Tenn. 

Briggs, Mary E Shell Creek, Tenn. 

Briggs, Dicie Shell Creek, Tenn. 

Brummit, S. B Dry Creek, Tenn. 

Bray, N. T Lee Valley, Tenn. 

Bray J. E Lee Valley, Tenn. 

Buckland, G. R Falls Mills, Va. 

Bolton, Angus Miliigan, Tenn. 

Bolton, Maud Miliigan, Tenn. 

Bolton, Ua Miliigan, Tenn. 

Burleson, Florence Miliigan, Tenn. 

Burleson, Horace Miliigan, Tenn. 

Butler, E. S Miliigan, Tenn. 

Broyles, Nola Miliigan, Tenn. 



12 MILLIGAN COLLEGE. 



Broyles, Frank Milligan, Tenn. 

Broyles, Lennie Milligan, Tenn. ' 

Broyles, Cordie Milligan, Tenn. ^/3 

Bolton, Chas Milligan, Tenn. 

Buck, G. W Okalona, Tenn, 

Buck, Daniel Okalona, Tenn. 

Britt, J. R Milligan, Tenn. 

Chase, Beatrice . Fordtovvn, Tenn. 8"£ 

Chase, Maude Fordtown. , Tenn. 

Chase, Pet Fordtown, Tenn. 

Chase^ Bradley Fordtown, Tenn. 

Carper, Wood Blacksburg, Va. 

Case, H. L Fairfield, Neb. 

Campbell, A Roan Mt., Tenn. 

Craig, Roberta Glade Springs, Va. 

Carleton, Jas Maple Springs, N. C. 

Crow, Bessie Milligan, Tenn. 

Cumbo, Elbert Greendale, Va. 

Carson, Cainie. Telford, Tenn. 

Clark, Susie Greendale, Va. 

Dudley, H.J Falls Mills, Va. 

Dunbar, Henderson Milligan, Tenn. 

Davis, A. P Lee Valley, Tenn. 

Ewing, Alice Van, Va. 

Ewing, Maggie Van, Va. 

Ewing, H. C. T Van, Va. 

Ewing, Jas Van, Va. 

Fipps, Blanche Telford, Tenn. 

Frazier, J. T Norton, Va. 

Frazier, Ada B Norton, Va. 

Fagan, Willie Okalona, Tenn. 

Fagan, Robt Okalona, Tenn. c 

Fair, Geo Milligan, Tenn. 



M1LLK5AN COLLEGE. 13 



Givens, Mahetta Newport, Va. 

Grant, Margaret Milligan, Tenn. 

Garrett, J. R Greendale, Va. 

Hendrix, A. D Milligan, Tenn. 

Hendrix, F. C. . . . : Milligan, Tenn. 

Hyder, Mor.tie Milligan, Tenn. 

Hyder, Willie Milligan, Tenn. 

Hyder, J. O. L Valley Forge, Tenn. 

Hyder, Launa Gap Creek, Tenn. 

Hyder, Mary P Gap Creek, Tenn. 

Hawkins, Rebecca Ray, N. C. 

Han urn, John Unicoi, Tenn. 9 b 

Hart, D. J Milligan, Tenn. 

Hart, Carrie Milligan, Tenn. 

Hendrix, N. F Milligan, Tenn. 

Hoss, Russell . Erwin, Tenn. 

Hampton, W. H Milligan, Tenn. 

Hughs, David Johnson City, Tenn. 

Johnson, J. G Rockdell, Tenn. 

Jones, Mellie Newport, Va. 

Johnson, J. H Edom, Tenn. 

Johnson, Maggie Johnson City, Tenn. 

Jones, W. A Shell Creek, Tenn. 

Kegly, Mollie Wytheville, Va. 

Kegly, Maud Wytheville, Va. 

Kane, W. C Pulaski, Va. 

Keen, J. F Okalona, Tenn. 

Keen, Martha Okalona, Tenn. 

Kuhn, Birdie Milligan, Tenn. 

Linville, W. D . . Okalona, Tenn. 

Linville, Retta Okalona, Tenn. 

Linvilie, CM Oklalona, Tenn. 

Lucas, Annie Childress, Va. 



14 MILLIGAN COLLKGli. 

Lighter, J. W Bristol, Tenn 

Maston, W. C Milligan, Tenn. 

Murray, T. S Milligan, Tenn 

Mosley, Alice Dry Creek, Tenn. 

McConnell, Rebecca Wayland, Va. s 1 *' 

Newberry, VV. H Steelsburg, Va. 

Payne, C. H Milligan, Tenn. 

Payne, E. F Milligan, Tenn. 

Payne, Willie Milligan, Tenn. 

Payne, Elizabeth Milligan, Tenn. 

Parsons, George Pridehiore, Va. 

Peoples, Hattie Milligan, Tenn. 

Peoples, Gertrude Milligan, Tenn. 

Payne, R. W Lone ML, Tenn. 

Payne, L. G Lone Mt. , Tenn. 

Price Charles Milligan, Tenn. 

Porch, Walter Milligan, Tenn. 

Patton, Robert Milligan, Tenn. 

Patton, D. B Dry Creek, Tenn. 

Powell, Geo. W Ruckersville, K v. 

Persinger, J as Milligan. Tenn. 

Pugh, Elmer Johnson City, Tenn. 

Rowe, J. E Dry Creek, Tenn. 

Rowe, Hurley Milligan, Tenn. 

Reynolds, J. H Bristol, Tenn. 

Ross, G. S ... Pond Creek, Oklahoma. 

Ross, A, K Pond Creek, Oklahoma. 

Ross, Lydia Pond Creek, Oklahoma 

Ross, Kate Pond Creek, Oklahoma. 

Rambo, Wade H Osceola, Va. 

Rhea, Birdie Happy Valley, Tenn. 

Range, G. W Gap Run, Tenn, 

Roberts, W. A Erwin, Tenn. 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE. 1, 



Shelburne, M. M. B Stickleyville, Va. 

Shelburne, Jennie Stickleyville, Va. 

Shelburne, A. M Stickleyville, Va. 

Shelburne, J. O Stickleyville, Va. 

Shelburne, Geo Stickleyville, Va. 

Swartliout, Elijah Milligan, Tenn. 

Shell, J. F Milligan, Tenn. 

Shell, David Milligan, Tenn. 

Shell, Sudie Milligan, Tenn. 

Sells, J. B Milligan, Tenn. 

Sells, Geo ... Milligan, Tenn. 

Sells, Mack T Milligan, Tenn. 

Shonn, E. M Little Doe, Tenn. 

Shonn, Laura Little Doe, Tenn. 

Simmons, Henry Milligan, Tenn. 

Sizemore, Minnie Milligan, Tenn. 

Treadway, G. E Dry Creek, Tenn. 

Thomas, S. S Falls Mills, Va. 

Thomas, J. W Falls Mills, Va. 

Thomas, E. M Falls Mills, Va. 

Tabor, R. J Falls Mills, Va. 

Taylor, Frank Milligan, Tenn. 

Taylor, W. D . .ft-*} Milligan, Tenn. 

Taylor, Robert Okalona, Tenn. 

Thomas, Chas Happy Valley, Tenn. 

Taylor, [as W Milligan, Tenn. 

Walters, W. G .1 Rural Retreat, Va. 

Williams, Mattie Milligan, Tenn, 

Wilkinson, Lizzie Milligan, Tenn. 

Williams, J . T. E Unicoi, Tenn. 

Williams, S. E Milligan, Tenn. ?* 

Williams, Lucy Milligan, Tenn. 

Williams, A. E . . Milligan, Tenn. 



r 



10 



Mil. MOAN COLLEGE. 



Williams, Frank Johnson City, Tenn. 

Wilson, Chas Mountain City, Tenn. 

Wilkins, L. B Rogersville, Tenn. 

Wright, N. S Osceola, Va. 

Williams, Ollie Milligan, Tenn. "?5 

Williams, W. F Milligan, Tenn. 

Williams, Madie Milligan, Tenn. 

Wilson, Paxter . Little Doe, Va. 

Wilson, R. F Edom, Tenn. 

Watson, Geo. A Middleton, Va. 

Wilcox, M. M Okalona, Tenn. fyl 

Williams, Arthur Goodwin's Ferry, Vn, 

Yoakley, Russell Wahoo, Tenn. 

Young, Geo Dry Creek, Tenn 




v_ 



MILLIGAN COLI.KGK. J 7 



Alumni Organization. 

Many developments indicate that this young organization will be loved 
and fostered. There are no society quarrels, clannish strifes, and prize con 
tots in Milligan College. For this reason the Alumni are as one in happy 
memories and kind friendships. 

Three years ago the first general meeting was called ; about twenty-five 
were present. The exercises consisted of a short meeting, in which J. 11. 
Smith was elected President, II. R. Garrett Secretary. Plans for future 
action were discussed. After adjournment came dinner and toasts, followed 
hy an hour of social intercourse and old-time enjoyment. The next meeting 
vas appointed for May, 1894. Accordingly on Saturday, May 26, the Associa- 
tion met, nearly half of the entire membership being present. An easy, family- 
like feeling prevailed. Each seemed to feel that in some good degree every 
other one present was a sister or brother, and all were for the time enjoying 
the hospitality of a common home. 

After the family dinner the literary progamme was given in Colleg - 
Chapel. Miss Lucy Hardin, class of '82 opened with "Woman in Philan- 
thropy," a pleasing and valuable paper. A. A. Furgeson, E. M. Crouch, E. 
C. Wilson, A. I. Miller, II. R. Garrett carried us forward most happily 
until time closed the programme, leaving memory and human life richer for 
lis rendering. 

MEMBERS OF THE ASSOCIATION BY CLASSES. 

C'liASS OF 1SS2. 

James A. Tate, A.M Nashville, Tenn. 

A. A. Ferguson, A. 15 Tazewell C. II., Va. 

J. II. Rutrough, A.M Hylton, Vr. 

C. B. Armentrout, A. 15 Limestone, Tcnn. 

J, II. Smith, A.M Butler, Tenn. 

G. \\ r . Hardin, B.L Johnson Ciiy, Tenn. 

Lulu Wilson, nee Crockett, B. L M orris! own, Tenn. 

G. E. Boren, B.L Elizabethton, Tenn. 

I.ucy C. Hardin, B.S Johnson City, Tenn. 

C. F. Carson, B.S , Ga. 



r 



18 



M 1 1 . 1 . .1 G A N CQI.L KG K . 



«'I.ASS Or B883. 

£ W. J. Shclburne, A.B Christiansburg, Va. 

S. B. Carson, A.B Term. 

W. R. Henry, B.S Sherman, Texas. 

CLASS or 1885. 

F. F. Bullard, A. M Lynchburg, Va. 

E. A. Miller, A.M. Lordsburg, Cal. 

P. B. Hall, A.M Cal. 

Charles Maddox, A.B Crockett's, Va. 

W. M, Straley, A.B Fayetteville, Tenn. 

Mollie E. Epps, ncc Hardin, B.S Jonesboro, Tenn, 

R. H. Walker, B.S Texas. 

William E. Read, B.S Pocahontas, Va. 

CLASS Of 1887. 

Letitia L. C. Tate, nee Cornforth, A.B Nashville, Tenn. 

E. C. Wilson, A.B Mountain City, Tenn. 

E, M. Crouch, A. B Lordsburg, Cal. 

J . W. Giles, A.B* Lynchburg, Va. 

CLASS Or 1888. 

W. 13. Kegley. A.B Wytheville, Va. 

Sue A. Kegley, nee Gib on, B.I Wytheville, Va. 

A. I. Miller, B. L Pulaski City, Va. 

F. E. Baber, B.S Indian Mills, W. Va. 

CB.ASS «>F 1SS1). 

II. R. Garrett, A.B Stewart, Va. 

Annie M. Finley, nee Preston, B.S. Williamsburg, Ky. 

Charles G. Price, B.S Atlanta, Ga. 

Frank P. Love, B.S . Happy Valley, Tenn. 

CLASS OF 1890. 

J. P. McConnell, A.B Milligan, Tenn. 

T. J. Cox, A.B Johnson City, Tenn. 

S. G. Sutton, A.B Bluefield, W. Va.# 

Mamie Haun, nee La.Rue, B.S Paris, Ky. 

Charles Cornforth, A.B . .Nashville, Tenn. 

Deceased. 



MU.LIGAN COl.I.KGIi:. 



11) 



W. P. Cousins B.S Baltimore, M.I. 

W. H. Iloun, B.S. Paris, Ky. 

Mrs. W. M. Straley, B.S Fayetteville. Tenn. 

CLANK OF 1891. 

}. V. Thomas, A.P> Milligan, Tenn. 

Mary llendrickson, I! S Lexington, Ky. 

Bettie Cox, nee Mathews, B.S. Johnson City, Tenn 

D. S. Burleson, A.B ^ Newcastle, Va. 

C. 1). M. Showalter, A.B. Milligan, Tenn. 

W. R. Motley, A.B Va. 

(J. K. Lyon, Ph. B. ... Bristol, Tenn. 

Lou Ella Showalter, nee English, B.S. Milligan, Tenn. 

CJIiASN OF 1892. 

J. E. Stewart, Ph.B Jackson, Tenn. 

W. L. Dudley, A.B Ronceverte, W. Va. 

Mary E. Burleson, nee Dew, B.S . .Newcastle, Va. 

David Lyon, B.S Mountain City, Tenn. 

J. T. Willis, A.B New York City. 

Cordie P. Henderson, B.S Ilolston Bridge, Va. 

S. F. Sergent, B.S Locust Lane, Va. 

Clara McConncll, Ph.B Milligan, Tenn. 

«XASS OF 1898. 

A. J. Wolfe, Ph.B Clinton, Ills. 

Agatha Lilley, nee Miller, B.S. East Radford, Va. 

Nannie Givens, Ph. B Blaekshurg, Va. 

R. W. Lilley, B.S East Radford, Va. 

Ceo. C. Simmons, B. S Fayetteville, Tenn. 

Etta Brown, B,S Staffordsville, Va. 

CXANS OF 189 «. 

John P. Givens Simmonsville, Va. 

Daniel E. Motley , .Chatham, Va. 

James C. Coggins Ottawa, Kan. 

W. J. Mathews Johnson City, Tenn. 

L. R. Dingus Clinch pott, Va. 

J. J. Cole Rocky Station, Va. 

J. W. Showalter Gillen water, Tenn. 

W. J. Shelburne Milligan, Tenn. 



r 



20 



Mi I.1.IO A \ CO 1. 1. !'".(. \i 



Course of Study. 



The value of college courses for discipline is not so \\wv~. 
whtit is studied as in how the work is done. But from otic 
reasons it is very tmportant what studies and sometimes wh. 
authors are placed in a college curriculum. The following stud' 
ire continued from one term to the full session, and students a 
required to remain in a class, or to re-study a work, until 
teacher of that department is satisfied with their knowledge of th 
work. This may require one student a longer time than another. 
Students having as many as three full studies, cannot require new 
classes formed. 

FIRST YEAR-PREPARATORY. 



Classical. 

Arithmetic. 
English Grammar. 
Geography. 
United States History 



Latin- Scientific 
Arithmetic. 
English Grammar. 
Geography. 
United States History. 



Orthography and Reading Orthography and Reading. 



Penmanship. 
Letter-writing. 

Scientific. 
Arithmetic. 
English Grammar. 
Geography. 
United States History 



Penmanship. 
Letter-writing. 

Normal. 

Arithmetic. 

English Grammar. 

Geography. 

United States History. 



Orthography and Reading. Orthography and Reading. 
Penmanship. Penmanship. 

Letter- writing. Letter writing. 



MILI.IGAN COLLEGE. 



21 



SECOND YEAR 

Classical. 

Primary Algebra. 

Physiology and Hygiene. 

Practical Composition and 
Drill. 

Physical Geography. 

Higher Lessons in English. 

Greek Grammar. 

/Esop's Fables 

Latin Grammar and Com- 
position. 

Scientific. 

Primary Algebra. 
Physiology and Hygiene. 
Practical Composition and 

Drill. 
Physical Geography. 



-PREPARATORY. 

Latin- Scientific. 

Primary Algebra. 

Physiology and Hygiene. 

Practical Composition and Drill. 

Physical Geography. 

Drill Class. 

Higher Lessons in English. 

Essays and Debating. 

Latin Grammar. 

Latin Grammar and Composition, 

Scientific. 

Higher Lessons in English. 
Essays and Debating. 
Ancient History, three terms. 
Latin Grammar. 
Reading and Elocution. 



FRESHMAN YlAR. 



Classical. 
Science of Arithmetic. 
University Algebra. 
Rhetoric. 
Physics. 
Astronomy. 
Analysis of English. 
Caisar and Composition. 
Sallust. 

Cicero's Orations. 
Xenophon's Anabasis. 
Plato's Apology. 
Roman History. 



Latin- Scientific. 
Science of Arithmetic. 
University Algebra. 
Rhetoric. 
Physics. 
Astronomy. 

Analysis of English, two terms. 
Caesar and Composition. 
Sallust. 

Cicero's Orations. 
Roman History. 



22 



MILIJUAN COI.I.IJUK. 



Scientific. 

Science of Arithmetic. 

University Algebra. 

Rhetoric and Composition. 

Physic. 

Astronomy. 

Analysis of English, two 

terms. 
Essays and Debating. 



Sientijic. 

General History, three terms. 

Zoology. 

Geometry, Trigonometry. 

History and Geography Drill. 



Classical. 

Zoology. 

Mythology. 

Geology. 

English Literature. 

Bible, three terms. 

Geometry and Trigo- 
nometry. 

Surveying. 

Grecian and Roman 
History. 

Virgil's yEneid. 

Eivy. 

Herodotus. 

Homer's Iliad 

Orations. 



Civil Government. 

Logic. 

Political Economy. 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 
Latin Scientific. 

Zoology. 

Mythology. 

Geology. 

English Literature. 

Bible, three terms. 

Geometry and Trigo- 
nometry. 

Surveying. 

Grecian and Roman 
History. 

Virgil's yEneid. 

Livy. 

Elocution. 

Ancient History. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

Civil Government. 

Logic. 

Political Economy. 



Scientific. 

Mineralogy. 

Mythology. 

Geology. 

English Literature. 

Bible, three terms. 

Geometry and Trigo- 
nometry. 

Surveying. 

Botany. 

Civil Government. 

Logic. 

German. 

Orations and Elocu- 
tion. 



Meteorology. 
Chemistry. " 
Christian Evidences. 



M1LLIGAN COLLEGE. 



23 



Classical. 

Shakespeare and 
Standard Authors. 

Elocution. 

General Geometry 
and Calculus. 

Horace. 

Tacitus. 

Demosthenes. 

Thucydtdes. 

Botany. 

Roman and Greek 
History. 



UNIOR YEAR -Continued. 

Latin Scientific. 

Botany. 
Shakespeare and 

Standard Authors 
Elocution. 
General Geometry 

and Calculus 
Horace. 
Tacitus. 

German or French. 
Roman and Greek 

History. 



Scientific. 

Mechanics. 

Mathematical Astron- 
omy. 

Shakespeare and 
Standard Authors. 

Moral Philosophy. 

Mental Philosophy. 

Chemistry. 

Lectures by Seniors 
on scientific sub- 
jects assigned. 

Scientific Senior Year. 



SEN 

Classical. 

Moral Philosophy. 
Mental Philosophy. 
Chemistry. 
Meteorology. 
Christian Evidences. 
Mechanics. 

Mathematical Astronomy 
Lectures by Senior 

Students. 
Seneca. 

Cicero I)e Senectute. 
Xenophon's Memorabilia, 
Plato. 



IOR YEAR. 

Liit in- Scientific. 

Moral Philosophy. 
Mental Philosophy. 

Chemistry. 

Meteorology. 

Christian Evidences. 

Mechanics. 

Mathematics. 

Lectures by Seniors on 

scientific subjects. 
Seneca. 

Cicero De Senectute. 
Bible (three terms). 
Comparative History and 



Greek Testament and Bible. Growth of Nations. 



r 



24 



MULLIGAN COLLEGE. 



College Text-books and Stationery. 

Text-books, with all necessary school supplies — as tablets, 
paper, pencils, etc. — are kept near the College building. The 
supplies are sold at the lowest cash price. The business has no 
connection with home or tuition fees, or any other school expense. 

A student's books for one year need to cost from $8 to $20. 
This amount will generally, though not always, Include tablets, 
pencils and paper. 

[fa student has text books not used here, let him bring them 
with him, as they are oiten useful for comparison and reference. 

Let no one expect to get College text-books without payment at the 
time they are received. 

If books are changed, it is for the good of students. We 
desire to use the freshest and best text-books throughout. 



MILLKiAN COLLEGE. '1.) 



Business Management. 

The management of the current receipts for tuition and feis 
of the school, and for board at the Young Ladies Home and pay- 
ment of all current expenses has been placed in the hands of Prof. 
C. 1). M. Showalter. This is virtually to say that these matteis 
will be promptly and thoroughly attended to. His energy and 
business habits assure this inference. 

This arrangement has no connection with the notes already 
given as a part of the ten thousand dollar fund to pay for the 
Young Ladies Home, enlarge the library, and extend the campus 
Those notes are due as drawn and for the purposes named in 
them. All current expense business matters, should be addressed 
to Prof. C. D. M. Showalter, Milligan, Tenn. 

Expenses, and Conditions of Payment. 

The session is devided into two terms of thirteen weeks each, 
and one term eleven weeks. 

A ticket, giving all the rights, privileges and advantages of 
the regular Preparatory and College classes, will be sold to each 
student on entering. 

T/iis, and this only, is the receipt for settlement and card of aduns 
sion to the roll as a member of the Institution. 

These privileges, and whatever advantages he may obtain, are 
what he. buys. 

If the student does not use them, it is not the fault of the Institu- 
tion. All term payments are required in advance. 



20 M1LLIGAN COLLEGE. 



No money paid for such ticket of admission for one term will 
be returned. If the owner chooses or is compelled to leave befi re 
the time of his card has expired, the Treasurer will mark on the 
back of it the time of tuition due, and the student can fill the period 
whenever lie p/e<ises. 

First Preparatory Classes, per term of thirteen weeks $ 9 00 

Second Preparatory Classes, per term of thirteen weeks ... 11 00 

College Classes, per term of thirteen weeks 13 00 

For the third term, 11 weeks, $7.50, $9.50, $11.00, respectively. 
Music Lessons on Organ or Piano, and Use of Instrument, 

per term of thirteen weeks, $14.00; for third term . . 1 2 00 

Use of Instrument alone, per term of thirteen weeks \ 00 

Painting and Drawing, per term, twenty-four lessous 10 co 

Business Classes 7 00 

Board in private families, per month $3 00 to 10 00 

Washing, per month 50 cents to 1 co 

Board in the Young Men's Club, per month. . . .$5 50 to $ 6 00 

• 1. Students entering the second or third week of any term 
must pay the same tuition as those entering the first week. 

2. These bills are required when the ticket of admission is 
delivered. 

Hard Times. 

This subject is old„ and the hope is it will soon wear out. But 
to meet it, last year a Young Men's Club was organized. Stu- 
dents furnished their own bed clothing, brooms, buckets, lamps, 
and such other small articles as they chose. They cared for their 
own rooms, but employed a cook and paid for the management of 
the club affairs. 

The Total Expense for rents, wood, board and hire, all was 
$5.65 per month. No young men in school, had better health, 
better recitations or more good cheer. This was done, too, with- 



MULLIGAN COLLEGE. 



27 



out experience and with some losses which experience would have 
prevented. This is an economical and pleasant way for young 
men to learn both self government and economy. 

The club house will be finished, and its surroundings made 
better than before. Young men who desire to become members of /he 
elub for the coming year, should make application to Prof. J. V. 
Thomas at once, and save all transient board when they arrive. 

Students of Milligan College meet the call of hard times also 
in the location. We are in the country, and hence are not subject 
Bo the incidental requirements that come so continuously in towns 
Ind cities. We invite parents to study this feature of our work, 
both for economy to themselves and good to their children. 

Another way in which the money pressure is made lighter to 
parents is the economy practiced in dress. Young men and 
young women are encouraged to give less attention to the fineness 
m their apparel and more to the storing of useful knowledge in 
liie mind. Strictest cleanliness and neatness is directly taught and 
insisted upon, but avoidable and unnecessary expense is at all 
dmes discouraged. 

Many of our happiest, handsomest and best girls went through 
commencement with an outlay of less than $to, while several 
ethers, as worthy and high in the esteem of teachers and students, 
[spent less than half that amount. 

Students are taught that it is not clothes but character that 
-aks best, and that to waste a father's money is to wrong both 
ent and child. 






28 MILLIGAN COLLEGE 



Methods and Departments. 

A true teacher will generally conduct his work in some ways 
peculiar to himself. He will be alive to the value of his own ob- 
servations and experience. He will note carefully the best thoughts 
of the day on awakening and training minds. But his highest in- 
terest will be the development of those before him, as well as of 
himself, into an energy of manhood and divinity of character 
which will show to the world that his mission is from God. Hence, 
when teachers having the natural ability, proper training and this 
deep sense of moral obligation to look after a student's whole wel- 
fare, are selected to conduct a department, they should have a large 
liberty in its management. The instructors of this Institution have 
this liberty, and become thoroughly interested in each student's 
progress. They co-operate in teacher's meetings, and seek to ad- 
vance the welfare of all. 

PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT. 

The Principal in the Preparatory Department, Prof. J. V. 
Thomas, is a classical graduate, a diligent student. Much of the 
benefit of a course of study depends upon careful training in this 
department. Hence, it is very important to have teachers, not 
only ready to instruct, but able to create in the mind of the pupil a 
love for learning, and a noble purpose to strive for excellence in 
both scholarship and character. This we have. 

Most of the teachers in the other departments are established 
in the Institution, and their excellent fitness for the respective 



M1LL1GAN COLLEGE. 21) 



places which they hold makes a happy memory for those who have 
recited to them, and gives a guarantee to parents of certain ad- 
vancement to those who enter their classes. 

RHETORIC-LITERATURE. 

The origin and growth of the English language forms a study 
of the most thrilling interest. It sprang from the Anglo-Saxon, 
which, coming from the bleak plains of the north, planted itself 
in Britain, and overcame almost wholly the native Celtic tongue. 
Bold, defiant, self-sufficient, the brusque and forceful Anglo-Saxon 
fitly represented the race who spoke it. As they were destined to 
subdue every people with whom they should come in contact — by 
force, when possible, and, when baffled by overwhelming numbers, 
triumphing by the power of endurance— so the language lived on 
under every difficulty through three hundred years of suppression, 
which to others would have been extinction. It courted no alli- 
ances, accepted no friendships, but when a common interest made 
it necessary, it blended with the Norman French, and from that 
union sprang t! e English language, combining in itself northern 
vigor with southern sweetness and melody. This forms the proud- 
est mother-tongue the world has ever known, and from every indi- 
cation must one day become the universal language. 

Students in this department, after learning the principles of 
the language, the various forms and government of words and 
construction of sentences, are next introduced into the study of 
Rhetoric — the fitting-room, where thought is to be appropriately 
clothed'and adorned. With a thorough knowledge of this branch, 
one is prepared to express himself on any subject in the most 
agreeable and effective manner. 

But the study of literature, both English and American, is the 
especial pleasure of one who loves his language, and admires the 
master minds that have made it the vehicle of their thoughts. The 
subject, including extracts from leading authors, original discus- 



MO MILLIGAN COLLEGE. 



sion'of their characters and comparative literary merit, and bio- 
graphical sketches, extends through the session. One or more 
public entertainments are given by the class during the year, in 
honor of Shakespeare, Milton or some other noted author. The 
work is pleasant and very helpful. The student is benefitted by 
noting the points of success and failure in the history of the most 
eminent men, and in being furnished with examples of the kind of 
thought and expression that have influenced the public mind of all 
ages. 

MATHEMATICS. 

For developing habits of close and accurate reasoning, this 
department of a College course is unsurpassed. The world knows 
the incalculable value of Mathematics without discussion. 

The study of the science — 

1. Leads to exact reasoning. 

2. Gives patient energy to the mind. 

3. Cultivates the expectation of certainty in general affairs ; 
thus developes more dilligent effort to reach certainty. 

4. Its principles underlie all fuller developements in the 
physical sciences. It is the frame-work of all progress in them 

5. The value of the study has appreciated with the advance of 
the ages. The course in this Institution will require four years 
diligent, work, five recitations each week after the student reaches 
Higher Algebra. 

Prof. C. 1). M. Showalter accepts Higher Mathematics this 
session, and his talents in this science, as shown both when a 
student and since his graduation, promise great interest and suc- 
cess in this department. Thoroughness will mark his work, and 
this will increase the interest and value to each student who re- 
ceives the training. 



MILL1GAN COI.Lb.GE. 31 



LATIN AND GREEK. 



In the present age every department of education must stand 
or fall on its merits. No course can summon to its support the 
practice or opinions of what in the past centuries was considered of 
educational value. Is this or that field of culture of most value to 
human life, intellect and character? is the question now asked. 

The aims of the Department of Ancient Languages are as fol- 
lows : 

i. To furnish thorough intellectual discipline to the studeni 
by training in the art of reasoning, .not only on certainties, but pre- 
eminently on probabilities, which is the method of reasoning most 
used in every-day life. 

2. The development of a healthy and correct literary taste 
and ideals, which are acquired by study and contemplation of the 
creat productions of Roman and Grecian masters. 

3. A systematic study of the life of those ancient people in its 
various aspects — political, legal, social and religious— thus giving a 
more perfect understanding of our own religious and political life 
than is otherwise attainable. 

4. To give the student a more appreciative understanding of 
English, our own language, as a very large per cent, of our words in 
current literature are derived from classic sources, while most of 
the scientific and religious terms can claim this origin. 

LOGIC, MENTAL PHILOSOPHY, ETHICS. 

The art of using thought, the science of thinking, the motive 
and right ends of thought, are three expressions which fairly define 
these terms. Study in this field makes men reflective, and sets 
them to inquiring for the intangible force*? behind matter which 
work through the visible to some glory in the unseen. It is a 
weird peefing-into the spiritual realm — a study of our relations to 
things invisible, and even to the unlived future. This study tends 



MILI.IOAN COI.I. EGE. 



to develop a deeper soul-life. It makes men rich who hold no 
goods of this world. The student of Psychology touches realms 
of thought and has impulses of life that the uncultivated mind 
never feels, of which it cannot know. 

We will not only use standard works in these classes, but cur- 
rent articles and original questions as they arise in the reflections 
of the students and teachers. Thus, besides our text work, each 
young man can be his own book, and each associate a living vol- 
ume. Practical questions are daily used, so that students discuss 
the subjects in tlieir general associations, until such stud)' takes 
deep hold on current life. 

THE SCIENCES. 

No branch of study is more fascinating in its tendency than 
that of the Natural Sciences. One is irresistibly led to admire 
the exhaustless wisdom of the mind that could conceive, and the 
hand that could execute, the wonderful tasks accomplished. 

The College is especially well situated for the study of Geol- 
ogy and Botany, from the face of Nature herself. 

The top of Roan Mountain, thirty miles east of us, presents 
some of the oldest formations in the United States, while abundant 
coal-beds are but a little over one hundred miles the other way, 
with numbers of the wildest, deepest and most varied gorges be- 
tween, making a complete field for the study of a large number of 
geological phenomena; and at the same time the timbers, grass's 
and flowers are especially interesting and varied to those who would 
learn of this great kingdom. We are gathering and preparing for 
a fuller Scientific Department in all principal branches. Friends 
of science can help much in this gathering work. We have lately 
received some valuable specimens from different parts, and espe- 
cially from the phosphate fields of Florida. Others can help. 
This Institution would love to exchange a great variety % of mineral 
specimens — ores, mica, etc. — for tropical woods, shells and such 
as are not common to us. 



i 



M II.I.Ki A N COU.KGK. 



Graduation— Degrees. 

The course requires four years after passing all common school 
branches, Elementary Algebra, one year in Latin, two terms in 
Greek, Elementary Astronomy, and other preparatory studies of 
the same grade. 

The English Bible, as a work of history and literature, with 
the character of Christ as a standard of life, is now positively re- 
quired for one school year in order to graduation. 

The curriculum embraces four courses: Classical, Latin, Sci- 
entific, Scientific and Normal. 

The Classical Course offers the degree Bachelor of Arts. The 
Latin Scientific is the same as the Classic, except it requires but 
one year in Greek, and offers the degree Bachelor of Literature. 

The Scientific Course requires but one year each in Greek and 
Latin, and gives the degree Bachelor of Science. 

A certificate is given to those who finish the Normal Course. 

These honors are given, without distinction of sex, to any 
student who has completed either of the courses, and has given 
convincing evidence of sound moral character. 

The degree of A.M. or M. L. will not be conferred upon any 
student under five years after graduation. Then, at the option of 
the Faculty and Board of Trustees, it will be given to those who 
have finished a post-graduate course of study, or made worthy 
success in one of the learned professions. 

NORMAL DEPARTMENT. 

The regular courses, as laid down in high schools and colleges, 
usually include the best training studies in the range of human 



34 MILI.IGAN COJ.LKGE. 



thought. Hence, a Teacher's Course will include them. A larger 
number of the students who come to this College become teachers, 
and their interests are considered in all of the work. 

From January 15th, or near that time, a daily leciuie an! 
questions are given on the Theory and Practice of Teaching. Some- 
times two of these lectures each week are given on other subjects, 
and by different members of the Faculty, but are alike valuable to 
teachers extending their knowledge, and leading to generalizing 
power of thought along different lines. 

1. The Normal lectures are varied from general history of 
education to the details of class work. 

2, Lives of great educators of the past and theories of present 
leaders in the field are examined. 

3 Recitation work, school government and examinations, all 
come in for discussion. 

4. The honor of the teacher's profession, its influence in the 
social problems of the day, and what it can do for the future, are 
ever extending fields of inquiry and interest. 

5. Those who have gone through the Freshman class studies 
in either of the College courses, have read closely, " Educational 
Reformers" (R. H. Quick) ; " Theory and Practice of Teaching " 
(Page); "Elements of Pedagogy" (White); "Spencer on 
Education;" " ivellogg's School Management;" some one of 
Parker's works', or half a dozen other standard authors on the 
subject than these mentioned, and who are acquainted with at 
least three school journals, having read them for a time, and have 
attended the lectures two session in this College, will receive a 
handsome certificate for the Normal Course. 

The teachers who have gone out from the Normal classes of 
this school are almost uniformly successful, and correspondence is 
invited as to the interests of this department. 



m 1 1. 1. k; an college, ;{f> 



COMMERCIAL LAW. BOOK-KEEPING AND BUSINESS 

FORMS. 

The Institution has had a full commercial school connected 
with it for twelve years. It has employed graduates from the best 
schools of the kind in the United States. The effects of the work 
have been steadily watched, until the conclusion has been reached 
that it is best to discontinue this form of individual instruction, and 
substitute for it Classes in Commercial Law, Book- Keeping and Busi- 
ness Forms, and charge only $7.00 per student. 

Two classes will be formed during the school year, one the 
first part of the session, the other at the middle of the school year. 
There will be one recitation each week in Commercial Law, one 
in Business Forms, and three lessons each week in Book-keeping, 
lesson period to be the same length as all other classes in the In- 
stitution, 

The purpose of this change is to secure to the student equal 
or greater advantages, at the same time reducing the expense and 
making the College work more uniform. 




36 MILEIGAN COLLEGE 



Literary Work—Clubs. 

The literary work of the Institution is carried on through 
clubs. This plan has many advantages over the old society system. 

i. Clubs are limited in their membership, so as to allow the 
privilege of weekly performance. 

■ 2. It saves the student the expense of fitting up and running 
a hull. 

3. It prevents the ill-will and clannish spirit generally existing 
between members of rival societies. 

4. The students are not left to themselves, but each club is 
under the general management of the Faculty in everything. At 
the same time, the members exercise their individual talents in 
electing their own officers and carrying out the business of the 
body, often with marked ability. 

5. Secret fraternities in college are hot -beds for growing 
hazing, revelry and clannishess. Any association in school life 
which brings terror, violence, branding young men's faces and 
even death, ought not only to be contemned by honest people, but 
stamped out of custom by civil law. The new — the Christian — 
education does not bear such fruit. 

6. Young people trained under this open system make better 
members of the family, neighborhood, State and nation. Their 
sympathies not having been trained to cling around their own 
fraternity at school, they become able to look abroad and choose 
that which is best and truest in religion, politics, and every question 
of life. Instead of looking with the eves of their clan, and deciding 



MU.IJGAN COLLKGK. 37 



1 



on great questions with the weakened, because compromised, judg- 
ment of their own faction, they become individuals, and act for 
themselves. It has been found also, that special work is more 
readily undertaken. When a few young men desire to give more 
attention to history or the Bible* or debating on some phase ol 
current thought, they can promptly form a club and enter on their 
work. Under the old system they must have a permit, or make a 
payment to withdraw or remain in the old society and undertake 
more duty in the new, and do neither one well. The club system 
gives a freer and broader training. 

A Current News Association, meeting twice each week* was 
found valuable and pleasant. 

STUDY HALL, LIBRARY AND READING ROOM. 
Each year in college work shows the greater use, even require- 
ment, of a good working library and reading-room. It is to the 
literary student what the work-shop is to the industrial school. A 
librarian ought to be as much a master of general knowledge and 
its applications as the director of a shop is of his tools. As a be- 
ginning in this direction, we have several hundred well-selected 
volumes and magazines, among which there are three of the most 
extensive Cyclopedias; lines of Ancient, Mediaeval, English, French 
and American histories; the leading English and American poets, 
from Chaucer to Longfellow and Lowell, inclusive ; Shakespeare f 
Macaulay, Addison and others; a line of purely literary works; 
then leading works of fiction, as Scott, Dickens and others; a 
few shelves of carefully gathered religious works, with some books 
especially designed for young people ; lectures to young men ; Dr. 
j. G. Holland's works, and so on. The current papers and maga- 
zines for the reading-room are of the safest and best. The forum, 
Review of Reviews, the Homiktk Review, Our Day, the Century, 
form the class of magazines found on the table, which, with many 
more publications of the day, give us not only the great thoughts 



38 



MILLIGAN COLLJEGE. 



of the times, but the news as well. Arrangements are now being 
made to add $1,000 worth of books to the Library. Some of these 
have been placed. Others are ready and will be in before the 
session opens. 

The Librarian will be present at all times, when the library is 
open, from eight to ten hours each day. 

The room is kept pleasant and comfortable during regular 
library hours, and a student can have free use of any book he may 
wish to take from the shelf and read in the room, provided always 
that he returns the book to its proper place. 

Newspapers and magazines are free to be read at all times, but 
not to be removed from the room for any purpose, unless after date 
and by the Librarian's express permission. 

The Library Hall is elegant, forty feet by twenty five; its tall 
ceiling is supported by iron columns. It is handsomely finished 
and well located, being separated from all the recitation-rooms by 
the main hallway. Several valuable donations have been made to 
the library this year. 




MILLIGAN COLLEGE. 39 



Government and Moral Training. 

The successful government of a school depends upon a few 
elementary principles of thought and conduct. 

First, a certain understanding among students that an institu- 
tion of learning carries with its privileges and blessings, certain 
rights, with authority to secure them. Second, a belief in the 
sincerity of the Faculty. Third, a faith in the moral courage or 
hick-bone of this body to do and stand by the right, constantly 
and systematically directing the current of school thought against 
hazing; against lying to conceal another's bad conduct; against 
stealing in the country and calling it sport ; against destroying 
public or private property and calling it "painting the town"; 
against night sprees, and wine suppers, and billiard games, to the 
destruction of all gentler impulses, and calling such waste "hav- 
ing a good time." 

Young men and women, under proper influence, will just as 
surely delight in helping new students, as they will in hazing them 
under the old barbaric ideas. With right direction, they will no 
more steal honey or chickens or fruit at college than at home. It 
is only an inheritance transmitted from the schools of dark days 
and low morals that will make young men conceal each other's 
evil conduct and call it honor. 

When taught from the Christian standpoint, they will as 
quickly co-operate with the Faculty to save and elevate every stu- 
dent who may need their help, as, when left alone morally, they 
will drift to hazing, marauding and concealment. Young men, in 
their deepest sense, know that the whole current of such college 
life is debasing and unworthy, and they only follow it through 
tradition, treating others a fid acting themselves as they were treated 
and instructed. 



40 MII.LIGAN (COLLEGE. 



With each year of after-life they will more and more honor 
the Faculty that stands square in the breach and turns back every 
such evil custom and points to nobler lines of activity. 

When their young and hopeful ambitions are turned in a sen- 
sible and Christian direction, love becomes the law of the school 
and duty its binding force. 

PRIVILEGES OBTAINED FROM HOME. 

For parents to write to their children, that they can go to 
Johnson City when they please; 

That they can board where they think best ; that they need 
not take history, but they can read at home, and such like permits 
and prohibitions is not best for the students themselves. 

Parents may know better how to sell goods, plead law or 
plant corn than teachers well experienced in school work, but they 
do not know better how to interest, classify and advance young 
people in college life, or better how to guide them toward the fields 
of future usefulness. These works are the specialties of the true 
teacher. 

Parents should select schools with the greatest c ire, study the 
talents and characters of the teachers, know their habits and the 
general habits in the school. When these are found worthy, trust 
the young people to their general direction. 

Write the teachers your thoughts and feelings, with all the in- 
terest you have; consult with them as to the best course. They are 
on the ground, in the class room, and in presence of all the circum- 
stances, and can almost certainly decide what are the interests of 
the student better than even wiser men who do not have like ad- 
vantages. This applies to direction of studies, selections of homes, 
visiting friends, reading of books and handling of money. 

Every parent, whether he furnishes the student a small or a 
larger sum of money, should require an open account from him of 
every cent expended. 



millk;an college. 11 



Young Ladies' Home. 

It is important that the social as well as class conditions of 
students receive the most careful attention. Iking removed from 
parents, brothers and sisters, the lack of these should he supplied 
as much as possible by their new surroundings. Without this, the 
work of training is unnatural, and cannot accomplish the best re- 
sults. For this reason it has been our constant effort to establish a 
Young Ladies' Home, where the womanly graces of mind and heart 
shall bloom out in a healthful, genial atmosphere. 

Nature has done much to assist in making the place attractive, 
the location being a grassy level top of a high promontory, around 
the base of which a beautiful stream winds and hurries away toward 
the northeast, emptying into the Watauga River, two miles below. 
The air is always sweet, the scenery unusually attractive. For 
healthfulness it cannot be surpassed. No epidemic was ever 
known to exist here. 

The music-rooms are all in the Home, so that no one has to 
go out of doors to reach the place of practice. 

The teachers in the Home mingle with the students as close 
friends and counselors. The girls feel that they are loved by them, 
and are shown that every regulation they are asked to observe is 
f>r their good, as helping to fashion, of themselves, that perfect 
model of inward and outward loveliness which none but a sweet 
young girl can wholly attain. 

The lady teachers meet the girls weekly in an informal body 
for general counsel.. Any point of conduct observed through the 
week, not in keeping with the gentlest and most lady-like deport- 
ment, is pointed out, and they are urged to great r vigilance in 
watching themselves, the fact that self-government is the highest 
possible government being constantly pressed upon them. By this 
means a feeling grows up in their rninds day by day of individual 
responsibility, and a decision to do right because it is right and 
beautiful to do so. 



42 M1LLIGAJ* COLLEGE. 



YOUNG LADIES FURNISH 
their own toilet articles, matches, towels, napkins, pillow-cases and 
sheets, and one blanket each. 

Young ladies should bring plenty of warm, substantial cloth- 
ing, and, besides the main winter wrap, a light shawl each. Se 
vere colds are sometimes contracted for lack of such convenient 
wrap. Beside these, a knife, fork, spoon or glass is frequently 
needed in the room, while those furnished at the Home are for the 
dining-room, and must not be carried from there. If these things 
are put into the trunk on leaving home, it will be found convenient, 
and will s we annoyance all around. 

Rooms are neatly finished and papered, but they are plainly 
furnished with only such things as health and comfort require; 
hence, any little article of adornment, easily carried and of no use 
at home, will often add greatly to the beauty of the girl's room 
here, develop her taste, and make of her a better student. 

EXPENSES. 

For home, tuition, fuel and lights, for one term of 

thirteen weeks, payable in advance $45 50 

For one school year, thirty-seven weeks, cash in 

advance 1 25 00 

The same, including instrumental music or vocal- 
ization, per term of thirteen weeks 59 00 

The same, including music for one school year, 

cash in advance 1 60 00 

These figures do not include washing. 

Experience in the Home has shown that it is better for the 
young ladies to pay and care for their own washing. Excellent 
washerwomen come to the Home on Monday, our holiday, and 
carry the clothes away for laundry. Washing costs from 50 cents 
to $1.00 per month. 



. 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE. 1:5 



Music. 

Vocal and Instrumental — Methods of Work and Prices. 

The culture of the age makes it necessary for a young lady 
to know something of this most delightful art. Nothing adds more 
to the attractions of home, and for that reason, if for no other, it 
should be cultivated. 

Real proficiency in piano playing can only be attained by those 
who have undergone a systematic course of instruction, Pieces 
adapted to the ability of the pupil will be chosen, with a view of 
improving the musical taste and making the pupil familiar with the 
different styles of standard composers. Ensemble playing is prac- 
ticed during the session, in order to acquire promptness and accu 
racy in keeping time. 

Monthly Musicales are given by the pupils, that the interest 
of the class may be promoted, and the habit of playing and singing 
in the presence of others may be acquired. 

The aim of the Principal is, not only to train them to execute 
well, but to instruct them in the science of music. 

Hunt's and Fillmore's History of Music is taught in class, 
supplemented with other works of the kind; also, Burrows' Rudi- 
ments of Music. Stainer's Thorough Bass and Harmony. 

The technical studies embrace the leading composers, with 
frequent practice of the major and minor scales, the more advanced 
also studying selections from Schumann, Mendelssohn, Chopin, 
Liszt and Beethoven. 

Instrumental lessons, with practice one and one-half hours per 
day, $42, or $14 per term of thirteen weeks; $12 for eleven weeks. 

Miss Sallie Wade, of Mexico, Mo., is Principal of the Music 
Department. Her natural love for music, and more than twelve 
years of close study and practice in the science, with her brilliant 
successes in teaching, assure us of a good work in this department. 
Vocal culture will be of especial interest. 



r 



u 



MI I J. IG AN C.OI.I.KUI-: 



Co-Edugation. 

The days of monk and nun life are numbered, except wit! 
those who still live and educate under the influences of the middle 
ages, when such separation of the sexes was the most marked re- 
ligious feature. The cmse of co-education has triumphed, and 
young women and young men are to enter colleges and universities 
in the future as they enter the Sunday-school or church, or other 
popular gathering, and each obtain such benefits as his nature fits 
him to receive. Still, opposition will exist. No new development 
in society is at first received with favor. Seventy years ago any 
education for woman beyond the most elementary r was generally 
regarded as useless. The elders and deacons then thought hospi- 
tality required them to take toddy with their guests, and most 
especially to treat the preacher. In those days, a child in the 
common school studied Webster's Spelling-book one or two years 
before reading a line or drawing a hook with his pen. lie now 
reads well in the Third Reader and writes a letter to his cousin the 
first session. 

Ye pedagogues of exclusive schools, the world is progressing. 
We invite you forward into the more trying but far richer fields of 
co-education, where you can have all the advantages of working 
according to the Creator's laws, and of seeing young people grow 
harmoniously and beautifully into Christian citizenship. 



MII-I.HiAN COLLEGE. 4, r ) 



Building, Location and Surroundings. 

The Institution is situated at Milligan, three miles from John- 
son City, Tenn., and half a mile from the East Tennessee and 
Western North Carolina Railroad. It is surrounded by a small, 
clean village, in whose families the young men find excellent 
homes. 

The building is situated on a fine promontory in the bend of 
the creek, where one can look far up the beautiful valley to the 
mountains about its source, then on to higher and higher summits, 
which are often covered with snow, while the fields around us are 
a bright green. Then, following the little stream, as it winds 
through shady groves and sunny meadows, we find it, two miles 
farther on, emptying its waters into a bold mountain river, whose 
picturesque banks and foaming cascades well deserve the Indian 
name, Watauga — Beautiful River. 

Within a distance of one to three miles are many spots of 
historic interest. Among these are: The starting' point of the 
patriotic mountaineers who faced death on King's Mountain, and 
by their gallant victory changed the Colonial Rebellion into a 
successful Revolution; the battlefield where, in 1788, the force of 
arms decided that East Tennessee and Western North Carolina 
should not remain as the separate Staik of Franklin; the seat 
of the first legislative body ever assembled in Tennessee; the bed- 
j of the first grist-mill ever built west of the Allegheny Mount- 
ains, and many other points of interest. These may all be seen in 
our excursions. 



46 MJLMGAN COI.I.KGK. 



The elevation of its immediate grounds, the purity and sweet- 
ness of its air, makes this a most desirable and safe location for an 
institution of learning, and a pleasant home. 

Four important town sites are within eight miles of the Col- 
lege. These places are midway between the great Blue Ridge iron 
and copper fields on one side, and the Cumberland coal fields on 
the other, and four railroads are already at Johnson City, only 
three miles from us. Millignn College is becoming a handsome 
suburb, and, with some improved roads, will be near enough for 
business and far enough out for health, beauty and good educa- 
tional advantages. 

MONDAY HOLIDAY. 

Monday holiday instead of Saturday was begun eleven years 
ago. Nothing could tempt us to return to the old system. Our 
work moves on up to Saturday evening. The literary clubs then 
meet. Sunday morning finds the mind free and ready to engage 
in proper exercises of the day without the tormenting thought : 
"To-morrow recitations will be here, and I am not prepared." 

Monday forms the freest and happiest day possible for study 
and recreation. The Monday holiday has many advantages. 




IUILLIGAN COLLEGE. 



47 




FROM THE CHARTER. 

From Article III. — The property vested, or which may be 
vested, in this Institution, shall be held by a Board of Trustees, 
and a majority of the members of the Board shall constitute a quo- 
rum to transact business; and said Board of Trustees is hereby 
constituted a body politic and corporate, as Literary, Scientific and 
Religious Institution, and is invested with power to confer degrees, 
to sue and to be sued by the corporate name, to purchase and hold, 
or receive by gift, bequest or devise, any personal property or real 
estate necessary for the transaction of corporate business or as an 
endowment fund, and also to purchase or accept any personal 
property or real estate in payment or part payment of any debt 
due the corporation, and to sell or alien the same. 







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