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Full text of "The Relief Society magazine : organ of the Relief Society of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints"

Relief Society Bulletin 



Volume 1 




Number 1 




Issued by the Officers and Directors of the 

GENERAL BOARD OF THE RELIEF SOCIETY 

1914 



HUMAN SERVICE 

has come to be a consideration of political parties, or social 
organizations, and of educational institutions. 

THE RELIEF SOCIETY 

has been an iuvstruraent of human service for more than half a 
century. It ministers to the immediate material wants of the 
community. It has been pronounced by many students an 
institution for community charity. 

THE UTAH AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

at Logan aims in a very definite way to make each member 
of society a more capable producer, a better farmer, house- 
wife, tradenman, agricultural engineer, or business man and 
thus aims to eliminate want. Its field of work therefore, 
properly co-operates with the work of relief societies in serv- 
ing the men and women of the State. While its courses are 
distinctly practical, it deals in abroad and fundamental way 
with the basic industries of the State. Liberal instruction is 
given in the natural and physical sciences, in mathematics, 
history, English, economics, literature and languages 

The College has been slowly built into an embodiment of 
the State's idealism. 

NOTE-— The Farmers' Round-Uo and Housekeepers' Conference convenes at 
Logan from January 26 to February 7, 1914. The Utah Dry Farmers' Association, 
the State Dairymen's Association, the State Beekeepers' Association, and the 
.State Poultrymen's Association meet at the College on the same dates. Reduced 
rates are announced over all railroads. 



Willes-Horne Drug Company 

News Building, Salt Lake City. 

©ur S)ruG Store is Complete. 

TREATMENT PERFECT. PRICES RIGHT. 

WE SOLICIT YOUR PATRONAGE. 

Prompt Attention to Mail Orders. 



Lambourne Floral Dept. 
EVERYTHING FLORAL. 

DECORATIONS. FUNERAL WORK. Etc., Etc. 




Special Notice to 
Garment Users. 

It is recommended and advised by 
the most particular and careful buyers 
of L. D. S. Garments that TEMPLE 
BRAND GARMENTS be used exclu- 
sively because of their superior quality, 
fit and finish. Be sure when making 
your purchases to look carefully in the 
neck of garments for the words TEM- 
PLE BRAND, found immediately below 
the approved label. If they are not 
there the garment is not the AP- 
PROVED TEMPLE BRAND, manufac- 
tured exclusively by the Salt Lake Knitting Works for the better class of trade 
and discriminating purchasers. If your local dealer does not handle TEMPLE 
BRAND GARMENTS send your orders to Salt Lake Knitting Store, 70 Main 
Street. Salt Lake City. 

Postage free to all parts of the United States. Prices as follows; 

Best grade of combed cotton, gauze weight $1.00 

Best grade of combed cotton, medium weight 1.25 

Superior cotton, unbleached, medium weight ... 1.2.5 

Superior cotton, bleached, medimn weight . . 1.50 

Superior cotton, unbleached, extra heavy weight . . . 1.50 

Best grade Sea Island lisle, gauze weight . . 1.50 

Best grade combed cotton, heavy weight, fleeced . . . 1.75 

Best grade Sea Island mercerized, light weight ....... 2.00 

Wash shrunk, part wooh medium weight ... ... 2.00 

Wash shrunk. Merino wool, heavy weight • . 2.25 

Wash shrunk. Utah wool, extra heavy weight ... 3.00 

Wash shrunk, imported part wool, light weight, extra fine ... 3.00 

Pure Australian Wool, medium weight ... 4,00 

Remember that postage is free, also that there is no substitution for Temple 
Brand (iarments, and if you are not wearing them now you will some day. Then 
regret not having done so before. 

SALT LAKE KNITTING STORE 

Salt Lake City, Utah 



INDEX TO LESSON STATEMENTS. 

PAGE 

President's Address 1 

Current Events • • 3 

Genealogical Department 5 

Home Ethics 7 

Home Gardening 8 

Literary Department 11 

Architecture and Art 13 

Instructions 14 



ADVERTISERS' DIRECTORY 



Patronize those who have made it possible for this paper to 

exist. 

1. AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE, Logan, Utah. 

2. WILLES-HORNE DRUG CO., 8 South Main, Salt Lake City. 

3. SALT LAKE KNITTING WORKS, 70 Main St., Salt Lake City. 

4. ELIAS MORRIS & SONS CO., 21 West South Temple, Salt Lake 

City. 

5. S. M. TAYLOR & CO., 251-259 E. First South, Salt Lake City. 

6. L. D. S. BUSINESS COLLEGE, Salt Lake City. 

7. LARKIN AND HULL, 255 South Second East, Salt Lake City. 

8. KEELEY ICE CREAM CO., 555 Main, 260 State Sts., Salt Lake 

City. 

9. UNIVERSITY OF UTAH, Salt Lake City. 

10. CO-OP. FURNITURE, 35 South Main St., Salt Lake City. 

11. RELIEF SOCIETY BURIAL CLOTHES, Bee Hive House, Salt 

Lake City. 

12. RELIEF SOCIETY HOME, 36 West North Temple St., Salt 

Lake City. 

13. STAR PRINTING CO., 35 P. O. Place, Salt Lake City. 

14. BENEFICIAL LIFE INSURANCE CO., Vermont Building, Salt 

Lake City. 



IVIonuments, Mantels & 
Tile, Cement Chimneys 

Mantels and Tile set in all parts of 
Utah and Southern Idaho 

Write for free catalogues of Mantels, 
also of Monuments 

Elias Morris & Sons Go. 

"Where the Fire Burns" Geo. Q. Morris, Mgr. 
21 West South Temple St. Salt Lake City, Utah 





Established 1860 



Incorporated 1908 



S. M. TAYLOR & CO. 

UNDERTAKERS AND 
EMBALMERS 

Successors to 

JOSEPH E. TAYLOR 

The Pioneer Undertaker of the West 
53 years in one location 

251=253=255=257 East First South St. 
Salt Lake City, Utah 



MODERN METHODS 



COMPLETE EQUIPMENT 



EFFICIENT SERVICE 



THE LEADING 
COMMERCIAL SCHOOL OF THE WEST 

L D. S. BUSINESS COLLEGE 

SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH 

Highest Efficiency. Lowest Rates. 

Ask for our Circular. Phone Wasatch 320 



RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN. 

VOL. I. January, 1914 NO. 1 

ADDRESS TO BE READ AT WORK AND BUSINESS 

MEETING 



Beloved Sisters of the Relief Society Throughout the World: 
For years we have toiled and joyed together in this glori- 
ous work of love and amelioration of suffering which we call 
Relief Society work. We have seen the church glorified with 
the presence of its Prophet and Seer, and we have witnessed 
the awful scenes which took him from this earth. We have 
made a part of that historic exodus froni inhospitable Missouri 
into the Valleys of the Mountains. We have watched, nay, we 
have participated, in the pioneer toils which have made this 
desert blossom as the rose, and we have followed in the line of 
colonization which has planted the feet of this people from the 
soft snowy hills of Canada to the red desert wilds of Mexico. 
Wherever our people have gone there have been Relief Society 
workers gathering up their means from each other's scanty 
stores to minister to those who were sick or in want, giving en- 
couragement to the weary and heartsick, while warning the 
wayward and thoughtless. We have nursed the sick of our 
people, robed the dying for their last resting-place, fed the 
hungry, visited the orphan and succored the needy. This, 
sisters, is, has been, and ever will be the true spirit and genius 
of this whole organization. It was inculcated by the Prophet 
in its beginning and has been reiterated again and again by 
the leaders of this church who have succeeded him and 
by the leaders of this organization. We charge you to keep 
this spirit burning bright in your bosoms. 

The fact that the lessons which are now to be presented 
to your consideration dwell more upon the temporal things 
of the Kingdom than on the spiritual, is not meant to empha- 
size the temporal side of our work in this Society. For all the 
gifts and learning of the world are valueless when placed 
in the scale with the pure things of this Gospel. But, sisters, 
let us seek to make a portion of our meetings sufficiently at- 
tractive to call in the bright and eager minds amongst the 
younger portion of the community, so that when we leave this 
sphere of action, the younger women will b'e trained in both 
the spiritual and practical things of this work. 



2 RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 

We would have you, while your hands are busy with the 
shaping of clothing for the poor or the making ot articles for 
disposition in your ward in this meeting, to listen to these 
words with your spirits. For we would speak to you of 
Charity. Charity that never faileth. That Charity which 
counts the gifts and powers of the Gospel of not so much 
worth as the sympathetic forgiveness and understanding which 
should exist between the women of our community. Remember 
that we all may offend, for we are all mortal ; but let us be 
quick to forgive. 

Our goods to the poor and our bodies to be burned, but, 
oh, let our souls bow down in prayer for those who offend us. 
If they need higher light, better understanding of principle, let 
us kneel before the Throne of Grace in their behalf. It may 
well happen that the beam is in our own eye, not in our neigh- 
bor's; and prayer for him will do more to remove the beam 
from our eye than all other means. 

We would have you keep in mind the foundation princi- 
ple of this organization as of the Church : namely, that we must 
get and keep the spirit of testimony in our hearts, while we seek 
to awaken and develop in the minds of others that same 
elevating spirit. The women who have born the heat and 
burden of the day, beginning with the present President of this 
organization, have been women who have partaken ,of that 
spirit of testimony in their early youth. But it is not enough 
that you have that spirit in your own heart, you must con- 
stantly and faithfully try to impart that spirit to the members 
of your household and to the members of this Society. 

Invite the young women into your Society; urge them to 
speak and take part in your lesson work. You may need the 
fresh young vigor and enthusiasm of the girls of this church 
in your work — but they need your sweet testimonies far more 
and the fruitful examples that you set before them in this 
organization. Manifest an abiding reverence for the priesthood 
— as held by the men of your household and the household of 
faith. Seek their counsel and take it. You can not err here or 
hereafter in following their counsel. Teach your sons and 
daughters this saving principle. 

No more inspiring lesson has been taught this Board whila 
preparing these lessons for you than the instructions given us 
by our venerable and honored President, who declares that we 
must keep before our eyes continually, in all this lesson work 
and in all our labors, the genuine spirit of the Gospel, which is 
the spirit of testimony and of obedience. We wish every mem- 
of the Society to receive her inspired message. It is this mes- 
sage which we are now endeavoring to pass on to you in this 



RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 3 

address. Words are weak, but they embody thought and it 
is her thought which we are conveying to you. 

Let these reflections garnish your thoughts by day and 
comfort your evening meditations. Sisters of the Relief Society, 
your lives are a living example of charity, pure and undefiled. 
Of such is the Kingdom of Heaven. 



SAMPLE LESSON FOR THE CURRENT TOPIC. 
Local Topics (Three Minutes) 

(Prepared Dec. 6, 1913.) 

Ten Minutes' Talk on Current Topics. 

Utah Day for All Salt Lake City Merchants. 

Dedication of Mesa Chapels. 

Utah Marble for Capitol Building. 

Shop Early. 

Schools. 

Theatres and Moving Picture Sliows. 

Town Topics. 

While it may be unavoidable to speak at times of crimei 
and scandals as a part of the daily news, the conductor of 
Current Topics should lead away from sensational subjects and 
to a consistent interest in that which builds up truth and 
righteousness in the earth. The human mind can contain but 
one thought at a time ; see to it that the momentary visitant 
of your mind be of clean habits and pure influence. 

The schools of your own district should come in for earnest 
attention. The mothers can make or mar the efforts of good 
or weak-minded teachers and build up or tear down the schools 
of any district. 

Censor your own Moving Picture shows. Be sure that the 
INDIRECT effect of a film is not evil. More harm comes from 
veiled suggestions than from open exposures or teachings. 
Study your play-houses, and protect, if you can, the young 
from the pernicious effects of loose-moraled plays and shows. 

Add local topics of interest to your locality. It is good 
to read of the progress of our church affairs, both local and 
general. 

National Topics (Three Minutes.) 

Suffrage Methods in Washington. 

Denver Lies Under Heavy Mantle of Snow. 



4 RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 

Shall Religious Songs be Sung in the Schools of the 

United States? 
Does Cold Storage Affect Prices. 
Money Markets Unsteady. 
Message of President Woodrow Wilson. 

Let the members of the Relief Society understand that 
one of the good things hoped for in this department will be 
that discussions on various phases of public policy and public 
men can be taken up without engendering feeling or producing 
strife. There should be no contention of any sort in the meet- 
ings of this body. Argument, the Prophet told us, brings the 
spirit of evil into our midst. But we should all acquaint our- 
selves with the vital issues of the day, whether religious, polit- 
ical or social, and discuss them in that spirit of broad charity 
and human sympathy, which was so beautifully portrayed to us 
by President Joseph F. Smith in his sermon at our last Con- 
ference. 

It is well to keep abreast of the day in the study of our 
money markets. We hope to become trained in the adminis- 
tration of our financial resources, whether they be great or 
small. And Ave may well begin by following the methods of 
our brethren, who observe these questions closely. 

Every citizen of the United States should read carefully 
any message that is sent out by the President of the United 
States. And this recent one is short, simple and easily under- 
tsood by the mass of the people. You may or may not agree 
with all its items and recommendations, but you should become 
familiar with it. 



International Topics (Three Minutes.) 

The Mexican Situation. 

Votes for Women as An International Issue. 

Ludwig of Bavaria — the New King. 

Secretary Bryan Negotiating Treaty with Denmark. 

Great German Firms Will Exhibit at Panama Exposition. 

Emperor William Recovers From Long Illness. 

These topics are only selected as models or suggestions. 
It is important that the current topics of international interest 
shall be taken, and in order to comprehend the tenor and drift 
of them it would be necessary to begin by giving a brief 
explanation of the general condition in any one country or a 
single situation in that country. After that, it would only be 
necessary to touch lightly upon the subject to bring it up 
to date. 



BELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 5 

General Suggestions: 

The topics here selected are but indicative, yet it will be 
seen that they cover the various phases of current progress. 
"We suggest that your topics be grouped — for the beginners — 
into several heads, such as War, Education, Government, Relig- 
ion, Art, Ethics, Music and Philanthropy. These may be varied, 
added to or set aside as conditions and circumstances may re- 
quire. Indeed, this is but suggestive after all. "Whatever is 
said, or whatever is brought forward, let us remember that the 
spirit of argument, or dissension must be strictly avoided. Get 
light, get information, but get it from the standard . of the 
Gospel. In every phase of these Current Topics, as of all 
Relief Society work, try to bring out of every discussion, from 
each piece of news, local, national or international, the germ 
of truth, and adapt every truth to your own local needs and 
conditions. "We trust this will prove of benefit to all con- 
cerned. 



SECOND MEETING 
Ten Minutes Talk on Current Events. 

GENEALOGY 



Testimony Bearing. 

Lesson Statement for First Lesson (Twenty Minutes.) 

THE SPIRIT OF ELIJAH. "I will turn the hearts of the 
fathers to the children and the hearts of the children to 
their fathers."— Malachi. Ch. IV. Ver. 6. 

(a) Its effects on the church. 

(b) Its effects on the world. 

(c) Genealogical societies of the world, 
(d) Genealogical Society of Utah. 

What is the Spirit of Elijah? 

The Saviour told His disciples that He had ' ' come to them 
in the spirit and power of Elias, to turn the hearts of the chil- 
dren to the fathers." (Luke, Chap. I, Verse 17.) All of His 
friends who write of Him in the New Testament, — Matthew, 
Mark, Luke and John, — repeat more or less of this important 
message which He delivered in the beginning of His short 
career. And it was surely true — witness the fact that the 
graves were opened at his death and many came forth. While 
we know from both Peter and Paul's testimony that baptism 



e RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 

— if no other ordinance work — was a very important and proba- 
bly frequent part of the Temple labors in that city of Jerusa- 
lem, where Jesus lived and died. Paul uses this fact as an 
argument to the doubting saints at Corinth, saying "else what 
shall they do which are baptized for the dead, if the dead rise 
not at all? Why are they then baptized for the deed?" (I Cor. 
Chap. 15, Verse 29). It might be remarked in passing that 
these pregnant words are used in every formal burial service 
of the Christian world, and yet none of the ministers believe 
the words they utter. 

What are the effects of this spirit of Elijah on this church? 
It had a most powerful effect on the mind of the Prophet 
Joseph Smith, for he said, "that the greatest responsibility 
that rested upon the Saints was to seek after their dead." He 
laid the foundation, built and dedicated the Kirtland Temple, 
and laid the foundation of the Navoo Temple and revealed and 
established all the ordinances now practiced in our Temples. 
It had that same effect upon the mind of his successor, Presi- 
dent Brigham Young, for he laid the foundations of the tem- 
ple in Salt Lake City in the first years of poverty and struggle 
which this people endured in these Valleys. He built also the 
Temple in St. George, laid the foundation stones of those in 
Manti and Logan, and left his testimony with the people on 
this subject. His successor, President John Taylor, was like- 
wis engaged in completing Temples. He dedicated the Tem- 
ple at Logan, and told the people at that service that no mat- 
ter how much they could do for their dead in their earthly 
conditions, "our dead could do far more for us in their con- 
dition on the Other Side." His successor was President Wil- 
ford Woodruff, and no man in this church was more earnestly 
committed to this work of vicarious salvation. He was so 
vitally engaged in his spirit and feeling in this work that he 
received more than one important revelation on the regula- 
tion and further9,nee of the ordinance work in the Temples. He 
dedicated the temple in Salt Lake City, and had charge of the 
dedication of the Manti Temple, although President Lorenzo 
Snow conducted that service. President Woodruff stated in 
the dedication of the Salt Lake Temple that he "now turned 
the key for the world to favor Zion." ; 

President Lorenzo Snow was the head of the Salt Lak^ 
Temple for year^ and his; devotion 4p that work was knowH^ 
to all .people. His successor. President Joseph F. Smith, was a 
^thful worker in.the old Endowment House for many years.; 
l^e is as devotedly, efigg^ed in^phe advancement of this work-as^ 
^y one of his .p^f^<^e«e|S9irs. < jBfe ^^i^ ;a§sisted in the dedicationr 
Qcremonies of all ih^.^'TepfiJes: in -Utah . and has dedicated : the/ 



RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 7 

site for the Temple in Canada, the land where his mother 
received the Gospel, and he is filled with the spirit of encour- 
agement and assistance in this glorious cause. 

What are the people doing to carry out their part of this 
mission ? 

The people of the world — always "wiser in their generation 
than the children of light," have received liberally of this spirit 
of Elijah or Elias, and they have organized Genealogical Soci- 
eties in every country and in most of the states of the United 
States. They are publishing books, by the thousands, estab- 
lishing libraries, and have gathered millions of the names and 
dates of their dead — which are our dead — for we are of their 
kith and kin. They have done and are doing their full part — 
what are we doing? 

The authorities of this church organized a society on the 
lines followed by the original New England Society at Boston, 
Mass., and in 1894 the Genealogical Society of Utah came into 
existence. It was formed for the "assisting of the Saints in 
securing aad preparing the records of their dead.'' It has 
headquarters in the Historian's Office of this city, has a good, 
if small, library of books, publishes a magazine devoted to the 
interests of this work, which is sent as an exchange to every 
similar society in the world and which should be in the home 
of every Latter-day Saint, and it is this Society, which has pre- 
pared and issued this series of lessons for the Relief Society. 
The leaders of this people are alive and awake to tneir duty 
and responsibility to the dead, but what about the people? 
Each Ward and the Saints composing the Ward must answer 
this important question for herself and themselves, and the 
sisters composing the Relief Society. (See Doc. and Gov., Sec. 
127 and 128, Compendium, Baptism for the Dead and Spirits in 
Prison.) 



THIRD MEETING 
Ten Minutes Talk on Current Events. 
HOME ETHICS 



Civic Piide (Twenty Bffiimtes. 

Topic 'IV Personal pride in making one's owtiVhbinestead clean 

'-' -'and beautiful. . =i 

Topic 2. Our share and responsibility as citizens in^ making 
and maintaining a'^otldr' tvater system: 



8 BELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 

Topic 3. What we could do to improve the streets and thor- 
oughfares near us. 

Topic 4. How we can help in making parks and playgrounds. 

Topic 5. Our responsibility and share in beautifying the 
grounds upon which church buildings are erected. 

Assignments — 

(a) Make a sketch to show how the grounds upon which 
your Relief Society Hall stands could be laid out in lawns, 
walks, trees and flower beds. 

(b) Make a sketch showing how grounds upon wOiich 
your Stake Tabernacle is erected could be beautified. 

(c) Make a design of a new public park for your own 
town, with details in lawns, trees, flower beds, swings, etc. 

(d) Write a five-minute statement as to what methods 
could be best emploj^ed to rid neighboring thoroughfares of 
weeds. 

(e) Write a five-minute paper on how to secure pure 
water for your town. 

(f) Enumerate all the trees that will grow in your local- 
ity. 

(g) Name the wild shrubs and trees that grow in the 
mountains near by. 

(h) Tell in three minutes what could be done in reforest- 
ing desolate hills that were once timbered. 



LESSONS IN HOME GARDENING FOR WOMEN 



Twenty Minutes. 

LESSON 1. ''While the earth remaineth, seedtime and har- 
vest, and cold and heat, and summer and winter, and day 
- and night shall not cease." (Gen. Ch. 8, Ver. 22.) 

(a) City Gardens, Flowers, Kitchen Gardens. 

(b) Country Gardens, Flowers, Kitchen Gardens. 

(c) Study Bulletins and Catalogues. 

(d) Study of Soils. 

(e) Wasted Grounds about the Homes of Relief So- 
ciety Women. 

(f) Gardening for Women Pays: In Money, in 
Health and Character-building. Children should 
assist. 

(g) Ideal Home Companionship. 



RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 9 

Perhaps no promise in the Scripture is more precious nor 
comforting to the human family at large than that one made 
to Noah which heads this lesson. There is another one which 
complements this: "In the sweat of thy face shalt thou eat 
bread." (Gen. Ch. 3. Ver. 19.) Those who eat without labor 
are the sick ones of this earth. Some people work at that 
which hath no profit ; but the man or woman who works— with 
head and hand— in the earth, bringing forth seed and fruit, 
flower and vegetation, develops forces which bring health, hap- 
piness, upward growth of character and joy unspeakable. 

When the pioneers settled these western vales, Brigham 
Young told the people to choose one acre and a quarter, which 
was enough ground to grow sufficient fruit and vegetables for 
that family to become independent. Not taking land which 
would not^ be cultivated and profitable, but enough for the 
raising of summer and winter vegetables for the family's use, 
while the beautifying of the home with flowers was as faith- 
fully taught. Few men and fewer women are so closely occu- 
pied that one hour in the early dawn could not be given to the 
planting of a flower and vegetable garden about the home. 
. If parents and children united in this love-labor, no home 
lot would be too small, none too large, in city or country, for 
the cultivation of few or many such valuable adjuncts to fam- 
ily life. How is it today? Let each answer this question in 
city or in country. How much land have you about your 
home place? How much of a flower garden have you? How 
many vegetables do you raise? 

Acres and acres of wasted land lie about our city lots, 
while miles of ground lie idle or cluttered with weeds around 
the neglected homes in our country towns. Whose fault is this? 
No matter whose the fault, the remedy lies with the mothers 
and daughters of this people. Few tables are spread with the 
luxuries of the varying season's vegetables — grown by the 
family. A city lot, six rods by three, with a large house on it, 
is made to produce all the lettuce, onions, asparagus, rhubarb, 
beets, carrots, summer squash and herbs the family use, while 
on this same lot there stands three varieties of productive 
cherries, three plum trees, two fine peach trees, two apple 
trees, and some good grape vines. All the trees are fruit trees 
and made to yield. Women make as good gardeners as men. 
One grandmother, aged 76, raised all her vegetables, except 
winter potatoes. She lives in a southern town, is a widow, 
hires a man to do the spading and ploughing. Dr. Romania B. 
Penrose, eighty years young, raises as fine a garden in her city 
lot as can be found anywhere. 



10 RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 

Let any woman present who has done similar work here 
state her experience. 

When the still, cold months of winter are upon us, let the 
bulletins and catalogues from the seed houses occupy a portion 
of our leisure time. From these we may gleam much help 
and inspiration for our coming season's planting. It is a part 
of wisdom not to begin this work we are outlining with too big 
plans and calculations. If a woman is alone, or has children too 
young to assist, let her firmly decide to select only a few plants 
to start her first year's gardening. Better make a success of 
carrots and marigolds, than to try so many things that noth- 
ing succeeds. 

Study the nature of the soil in your neighborhood. You^ 
State Agricultural College will supply you with all the infor- 
mation you wish on this detail. Read U. E. Bulletin 257, and ac- 
quaint yourself with the conditions in your own section. You 
may begin this work only to comply with this lesson require- 
ment ; but you will also find yourself engaged in an occupation 
that will eventually bring health, worldly prosperity and hap- 
piness to yourself and loved ones. 

Gardening for women pays. It brings you in close con- 
tact with mother earth, keeps you young and spry, drives out 
blues and melancholy, brings the dawn and the stars to your 
doorstep, and opens an easy channel between you and your 
Heavenly Father and Mother. They were the first gardeners. 
It may not pay you to raise vegetables to sell in country' 
towns, but it will give you the wealth of the land in your own: 
homes, it will build up your shattered nerves, and above all, 
it will teach your children habits of thrift and industry, if- 
you will gather them about you in your gardening, there will 
be a companionship grow up between you and your dear ones- 
that pays large dividends of affection. Children should be 
taught to raise fiowers and vegetables as they are taught to 
raise standards and flags. 

Mix your gardening with brain. A great painter, when 
asked how he mixed his paints said he ''mixed them with" 
brains." No force in the universe gives such rich returns to 
human beings as do the processes of life in field and gardenv^ 
Intelligence plus industry in agricultural life pays the largest: 
interest known to physical existence. Associate with plaiiits:. 
and flowers, with babies and home folks if you would be 'truly 
cultured. : fi - .>- 



RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 11 

FOURTH MEETING. 

Ten Minutes Talk on Current Events. 

LITERATURE 



Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin (Thirty Minutes.) 

The object of this course is to give Relief Society members 
an opportunity to study from first hand sources the life of one 
of America's greatest men. This can be done by reading the 
story of his life as he himself has told it. In reading the book 
itself we achieve two things: first, we learn from Franklm's 
own words how he won his way from the humble walks of life 
to positions of trust and fame; second, we acquaint ourselves 
with one of the best books ever written. The Autobiography 
of Benjamin Franklin is regarded by eminent critics as a lit- 
erary masterpiece. 

In speaking of Ftranklin one writer says: "Benjamin 
Franklin is the best example of a self-made man that history 
affords. No other American has achieved greatness in so many 
directions. He was a writer, a scientist, an inventor, a states- 
man, a diplomat and a philosopher. 

"In science he made the discovery that electricity is the 
cause of lightning and he wrote papers on electricity that won 
the admiration of Europe. He invented the stove, the light- 
ning rod and the water organ. He organized the first police 
force and the first fire company. He was one of the greatest 
statesman of his age and is perhaps the ablest representative 
our nation ever sent abroad." 

The autobiography was written in Franklin's 79th year. 
It tells the story of his life up to the age of 51 years and is 
intensely interesting frona start to finish. It has been so popu- 
lar that over 50 editions have been disposed of in this country 
and it has been translated into French and German. 

This course of study will consist of ten lessons. The first 
nine will be taken from the autobiography and the tenth will 
consist of a discussion of the great things Franklin did for this 
country after his 51st year. The edition of the book used by 
the committee in arranging the lessons is published by the 
Henry Altinus. Co. of Philadelphia, and can be had at the 
Deseret News Book Store for 25c per. copy; 30c postpaid^ 

It will be necessary for each ward association tcrha'Ve at 
least one copy of the book and it would be gratifyihg if every 
member of the Relief Society w<)uld purchase A copy for her 



12 RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 

own library. Money could not be invested in a better book. 
Every school boy reads it or parts of it, every parent should 
read, study and own it. 

Sentiments will be placed at the head of each lesson and 
should be learned by everybody. They will be taken from 
"Poor Richard's Almanac," by Benjamin Franklin, and are 
known the world over as Franklin's Proverbs. 

Ancestry, Parentage and Youth. 

Reference : Chap. I. Autobiography. 

"Early to bed and early to rise . 
Makes a man healthy, wealthy and wise." 

1. Ancestry — 

(a) Origin of family, 

(b) Nationality. 

(c Type of People. 

1. Religion. 

2. Occupation. 

(d) Franklin's Father. 
(fe) Franklin's Mother. 

2. Parental Training and Direction — 

(a) Father puts children out to learn trades. 

(b) Studies them to see where their inclinations lie. 

(c) Franklin's love of books leads father to make 
printer of him. 

(d) Corrects son's style of writing. 

(e) Establishes custom of instructive table talk. 

3. Schooling — 

(a) Grammar school. 

(b) School for writing and arithmetic. 

4. Learning a Trade — 

(a) Taken from father's shop and apprenticed to his 
brother, James, in the printing business. 

(b) Advantage of change. 

1. Contact with well-informed men. 

2. Access to books. 

3. Through being allowed to board himself saves 
money to buy books and gains time in which 
to study. 

(c) Disagreement of brothers and separation. 

5. How Franklin Taught Himself — 

(a) Studied "Spectator" (by Addison and Steele), 
and imitated it. 



RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 13 

(b) Studied Arithmetic, Navigation, Philosophy, 
Rhetoric and Logic. 

(c) Studied Socratic method of discussion and prac- 
ticed it. 

6. Anecdotes — 

(a) Building a wharf. 

(b) Anonymous writing for newspapers. 

Questions. 

1. "Why did Franklin write the story of his life? 

2. How does he acknowledge God? 

3. Discuss Franklin's ancestry. 

4. Describe character of his father. 

5. Describe character of his mother. 

6. Discuss method of Franklin's father in bringing better 
table talk into his home. 

7. What do you think of plan Franklin adopted to edu- 
cate himself? to become an author? 

8. How may the method of Socrates be used to advan- 
tage by all? 

9. What does Franklin say about vanity? 

10. How did Franklin show honor to his parents? 



ART AND ARCHITECTURE 



"The Bmigfalow" (Ten Minutes.) 

"Is your house honest?" 

Utility the necessity of Art. 

Derivation of the name, "Bungalow." 

How adapted by the English. 

The California Bungalow. 

The essentials of the true Bungalow in regard to character 
of openings, shelter, etc. 

Compactness in kitchen and adjoining parts of the house. 

Study of pleasing proportions; the element of art in the 
placing of windows, doors and chimneys. 

Accessories and surroundings that add beauty to an artis- 
tic Bungalow. 

The motive which should dominate all home builidng is a 
feeling of domestic architecture. A sense of privacy should be 
expressed in every home. Not only should this idea be con- 
veyed through the individuality shown in the selection of furni- 



14 RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 

ture, pictures, floor coverings, light fixtures, etc., but the exte- 
rior should impress even the passerby with dignity, good breed- 
ing and in a measure, with the sanctity of the family circle 
within its walls. The main lines of a successfully-built home 
should (if built with the best art), indicate frankness, honestv 
in construction and even directness of purpose. All this very 
naturally tends toward the making of a beautiful home life 
and such influences reach out to all those who pass under its 
roof. The spirit of honesty, characteristic of Pioneer land 
marks appears to be again entering into its own. Utility is 
and has always been the foundation of all true art and no more 
beautiful types of architecture can be found in the length and 
breadth of the state than the historic Lion House, "White House, 
Beehive House or the old Historian Office, which were built 
during a period of study of fitness and when simplicity and 
originality, and an undivided purpose abounded in the hearts 
and homes of the Saints. 

Reference: Young "Woman's Journal for January, 1914. 

Assignments. 

What is the derivation of the word, "Bungalow?" 

What application did the English make of the East Indian 
name and idea of the Bungalow? 

By whom was it borrowed from the English? 

How was the California Bungalow developed? 

What are the essential characteristics of the true Bunga- 
low? Illustrate as to openness, shelter and compactness. 

What means do we of the mountains employ to adapt thft 
California Bungalow to our own uses? 

What are the effects of the steep roof on height of ceilings, 
house-work and economy? 

What is the real foundation of the best architecture? 

What materials would be most profitably used in building 
a Bungalow in your town ? 

Plan a Bungalow to suit your own family needs. 

What opportunities for beauty are afforded by such open- 
ings as windows, doors and the placing of chimneys? 

Sketch surroundings that you would like that you could 
make for your home. 



RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 15 

INSTRUCTIONS. 

In presenting the GUIDE AND BULLETIN to you, dear 
sisters, we ask for your co-operation and assistance in making 
this trial year a success. You can do this by accepting the 
Lessons we have prepared, insofar as your varying circum- 
stances will permit. We repeat what was said in the GUIDE, 
that all the Lessons, with the exception of the Lessons on 
Geneaology, are optional with each stake. You may wish to 
take a part of the Lessons only, and that, too, is quite agree- 
able with the General Board. But at least, we do ask your 
loyal support of the ideas contained herein, and if you should 
find anything in any one Lesson, or any set of Lessons which 
you object to, may we ask you to state that objection to us. 

We are giving you a certain number of GUIDES AND 
BULLETINS this year free of charge. But we must ask you 
to take care of them, for we will not be able to supply more 
than those first sent out, unless it be in some case of actual 
need. For it would be extremely expensive to make a reprint 
of this or the other book — hence our request. 

We suggest that you appoint Stake and Ward Commit- 
tees in the various Lessons we have given which you may de- 
sire to take up. For instance, let there be a Committee on 
Geneaology in your Stake Board and in the Wards. Also 
Committees on Ethics, Home Gardening, Art and Architec- 
ture, Literature and Current Events. These committees will 
have an especial oversight of the topics and will also enable 
you to bring in the various talented women in your Stake 
and Ward to work in their several specialties. Remember, 
also, that these Lessons can be shortened by choosing only one 
or more of the sub-headings which will give you the i-nost 
applicable line of thought. 

Our Lessons are arranged for four meetings monthly, the 
first for business and the work which has always occupied your 
time. The second meeting is devoted to testimony-bearing and 
Genealogy. It is vitally important that your Testimony meet- 
ings shall not be interfered with in any way. But it was 
thought possible to combine the subject of Geneaology with 
Testimony-bearing, as one supplements the other. 

The topics of Art and Architecture have been designed to 
give some practical and helpful suggestions for those who do 
not live where architects abound, and we have hoped that 
ary and all of you would get at least a few suggestions which 
would be helpful in your own lives. It may be that few of 
our beloved sisters can benefit by these ideas, but there are 
those of the younger generation who will eagerly seek help 



16 RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 

in the forming of their home ideals and in the actual building 
of their houses. It is for such that we have planned. In the 
lessons on Art we have aimed only to give a brief idea of the 
lives and works of our foremost American painters and artists. 
To those who love the beautiful these Lessons will appeal. 

The Lessons on Home Ethics — ethics being the study of 
manners and morals — have been designed to bring free dis- 
cussion into our midst regarding the betterment of our home 
lives and home surroundings. The Parents' Classes of the 
Sunday Schools have led the way, and most of our sitsers are 
already awake and alive. While we may not be able to reach 
these high points and ideals ourselves, we can be reading and 
talking of them so that our children and our grandchildren 
will receive this inspiration. The same is true of the work in 
Literature. One of the simplest and most useful books ever 
written in the domain of history has been chosen for your 
consideration, and Franklin's useful life will furnish many 
texts for our home circles. Thus we have sought to reach 
out and bring in all classes of women, interesting them in the 
glorious work of the Relief Society. 

The Current Events has been tried successfully in several 
Stakes and has proven so good that we now suggest it to you. 
But do not take too many subjects, nor too much time in this 
weekly resume of the world's events. Ten minutes will be 
sufficient if the one who conducts the exercises is familiar with 
her subject. 

In the Home Gardening for Women we have tried to 
awaken our sisters to some home conditions which have been 
neglected of late ; to introduce them to the wealth of nature 
which lies at our doors for the planting and the garnering. 
It may be that few will take up this work, but those who do 
will be well rewarded for their pains. 

Indeed, we may say that we have sought to greet and 
meet you all in some one avenue of study and work. We do 
most earnestly pray that our efforts will not prove fruitless. 

It will be remembered that a series of Lessons on Geneal- 
ogy are to be given at the next April Conference in this city, 
under the auspices of this Board. And we particularly ask 
ench stake to choose two delegates to attend that Convention 
who have bright, quick minds, are ready and apt in taking 
notes and preparing lessons. For it is expected that they will 
go back to their Stakes prepared to assist in teaching Geneal- 
ogy to the Stakes and Wards from which they come. We ask 
the Stake Presidents to take this matter up at once and be 
p'^epared to send such delegates for this coming Conference. 



ICE CREAM— SHERBETS— PUNCHES 
and CAi^DIES are the "BEST BY TEST" 

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Prompt Delivery Phones: Wasatch 3223-3224 



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GEO. W. LARKIN ALMA J. LARKIN 

LARKIN-HULL 

UNDERTAKING CO. 

EMBALMERS AND 
FUNERAL DaRECTORS. 

CHAPEL & PARLORS 255 SO. 2nd EAST ST. . 
Phone Wasatch 5132 SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH 



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Guaranteed Furniture at Lowest Prices 

Our magnificent stock comprises p:oods from America's 
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THE STATE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 

Preparation for Teaching in common schools and high schools. 

A school that has drawn favorable attention from educators of 
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in relation to modern educational theory. 

THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

Offering a combined course in Arts and Medicine (four years.) 

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Offering full preparation for the practice of law A young depart- 
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advantages. 

All the work in these several schools is fully up to the standard 
requirements, and is accepted in full by the best Universities in the 
United States For full particulars, address UNI V FR-SITY OF 

UTAH, Salt Lake City. Utah 



Z. C. M. I. 

GIVES SATISFACTION 



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Rates for room without 

bath S1.50andS2.00. 

With bath S2.oO per day 

and upwards. 

Under the Management o( 
GEORGE O. RELF 



BURIAL CLOTHES 

Relief Society General Board 

FURNISHES COmPLET^j^WlAL^imS.^^^ ^ >_ 

Phones 'WasatchS^SancM^^ 207 '''^^fc«^^*<-<^-j^ 
Salt Lake City Utah 

RELIEF SOCIETY HOME FOR 
WOMEN AND GIRLS 

ROOMS REASONABLE 

Employment Bureau in connection with home. 
36 West North Temple St. Phone Wasatch 4478 J. 



Star Printing Conipanp 

35 Post Office Place Phone Wasatch 1370 

Salt Lake Cit^, Utah 



WHILE LABORING FOR THE POOR 

AND AIDING THE WIDOW IN WANT, 

DON'T NEGLECT YOURSELF AND FAMILY 

Have they the proper protection in ease of 
sickness or death of 
3'our bread winner or 
will 3"ou be compelled 
to look for charit}'? 

Has he sufficient life 
insurance to assure 
you this protection? 





JOHN C. CUTLER 
1st. Vice President. 



INSURANCE 
IN FORCE 





LORENZO N. STOHL 
2iid. Vice Pres. & Mgr. 



OVER 
$12,000,000.00 



JOSEPH F. SMITH 
President. 



Beneficial Life 
Insurance Co. 

Home office, Vermont 

Building 

Salt Lake City, Utah 




C. \V. NIBLEY 
Member Ex. Com. 



RICHARD W. YOUKG 
Counsel 



Relief Society Bulletin 

Volume 1 ^r/hx Number 2 






Issued by the Officers and Directors of the 

GENERAL BOARD OF THE RELIEF SOCIETY 
1914 



HUMAN SERVICE 

has come to be a consideration of political parties, or social 
organizations, and of educational institutions. 

THE RELIEF SOCIETY 

has been an instrument of human service for more than half a 
century. It ministers to the immediate material wants of the 
community. It has been pronounced by many students an 
institution for community charity. 

THE UTAH AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

at Logan aims^ in a very definite way to make each member 
of society a more capable producer, a better farmer, house- 
wife, tradesman, agricultural engineer, or business man and 
thus aims to eliminate want. Its field of work therefore, 
properly co-operates with the work of relief societies in serv- 
ing the men and women of the State. While Its courses are 
distinctly practical, it deals in a broad and fundamental way 
with the basic industries of the State. Liberal instruction is 
given in the natural and physical sciences, in mathematics, 
history, English, economics, literature and languages. 

The tJollege has been slowly built into an embodiment of 
the State's idealism. 



Willes-Horne Drug Company 

News Building, Salt Lake City. 

Our Drug Store Is Complete 

TREATMENT PERFECT. PRICES RIGHT. 

WE SOLICIT YOUR PATRONAGE. 

Prompt Attention to Mail Orders. 



Lamboume Floral Dept. 
EVERYTHING FLORAL. 

DECORATIONS. FUNERAL WORK. Etc., Etc. 




Special Notice to 
Garment Users. 

It is recommended and advised by 
the most particular and careful buyers 
of L. D. S. Garments that TEMPLE 
BRAND GARMENTS be used exclu- 
sively because of their superior quality, 
fit and finish. Be sure when making 
your purchases to look carefully in the 
neck of garments for the words TEM- 
PLE BRAND, found immediately below 
the approved label. If they are not 
there the garment is not the AP- 
PROVED TEMPLE BRAND, manufac- 
tured exclusively by the Salt Lake Knitting Works for the better class of trade 
and discriminating purchasers. If your local dealer does not handle TEMPLE 
BRAND GARMENTS send your orders to Salt Lake Knitting Store, 70 Main 
treet. Salt Lake City. 

Postatse free to all parts of the United States. Prices as follows ; 

Best grade of combed cotton, gauze weight $1.00 

Best grade of combed cotton, medium weight 1.25 

Superior cotton, unbleached, medium weight 1.25 

Superior cotton, bleached, medium weight 1.50 

Superior cotton, unbleached, extra hea\'y weight 1.50 

Best grade Sea Island lisle, gauze weight 1.50 

Best grade combed cotton, heavy weight, fleeced • • .... . . 1.75 

Best grade Sea Island mercerized, light weight 2.00 

Wash shrunk, part wooh medium weight 2.00 

Wash shrunk. Merino wool, heavy weight 2.25 

Wash shrunk. Utah wool, extra heavy weight • • • • 3.00 

Wash shrunk, imported part wool, light weight, extra fine • • • . . . 3.00 

Pure Australian Wool, medium weight ... • • 4,00 

Remember that postage is free, also that there is no substitution for Temple 
Brand Garments, and if you are not wearing them now you will some day. Then 
regret not having done so before. 

SALT LAKE KNITTING STORE 

Salt Lake City, Utah 



Application for entry as second class matter for this publication 
made at Post Office, Salt Lake City, Utah — Pending. 

INDEX TO LESSON STATEMENTS. 

PAGE 

Address 1 

Genealogy 4 

Home Ethics 6 

Home Gardens 7 

Literature 12 

Architecture 13 

Relief Society Convention 14 

Books for the Reading Course 15 

Relief Society Home for Women and Girls 1€ 

Future Activities of the Society 22 



ADVERTISERS' DIRECTORY 



Patronize those who have made it possible for this paper t» 

exist. 

1. AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE, Logan, Utah. 

2. WILLES-HORNE DRUG CO., 8 South Main, Salt Lake City. 

3. SALT LAKE KNITTING WORKS, 70 Main St., Salt Lake City. 

4. CRISMON & NICHOLS, 229-231 So. West Temple, Salt Lake City. 

5. S. M. TAYLOR & CO., 251-259 E. First South, Salt Lake City. 

6. L. D. S. BUSINESS COLLEGE, Salt Lake City. 

7. KEELEY ICE CREAM CO., 555 Main, 260 State Sts., Salt Lake 

City. 

8. LARKIN-HULL UNDERTAKING CO., 255 South 2nd East St, 

Salt Lake City. 

9. UNIVERSITY OF UTAH, Salt Lake City. 

10. CO-OP. FURNITURE, 35 South Main St., Salt Lake City. 

11. Z. C. M. I., Salt Lake City. 

12. HOTEL UTAH, Salt Lake City. 

13. RELIEF SOCIETY BURIAL CLOTHES, Beehive House, Salt 

Lake City. 

14. RELIEF SOCIETY HOME, 36 W. North Temple St., Salt Lake 

City. 

15. STAR PRINTING CO., 35 P. O. Place, Salt Lake City. 

16. MORRISON BAKING CO., 158 So. Main St., Salt Lake City. 

17. BENEFICIAL LIFE INSURANCE CO., Vermont Building, Salt 

Lake City. 



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Successors to 

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Ask for our Circular. Phone Wasatch 320 



RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN- 



VOL. 1. February, 1914. NO. 2 



ADDRESS. 



Occasionally inquiries reach the General Board concerning 
the duties and labors of new Presidents and Officers in the 
wards and stakes of Zion. The work of this Society has been so 
long before the people, the method of conducting our meetings, 
of administering our affairs, has so long ago been settled by 
tradition and custom that it seems as if all ought to be familiar 
with them. And indeed, there are only general rules and gen- 
eral lines, which mark our labors. Wards, stakes and individual 
officers are allowed great liberty in the adjustment of details 
and in the conduct of their Society affairs. 

There is one rule, however, which should be written deep 
in the heart of every woman in this kingdom — and conned fre- 
quently by those who hold office in this great organization, 
namely, respect for the priesthood. No woman who slights or 
neglects this primary law of the Church can hope to have that 
full degree of liberty and pleasure in her labors which is her 
privilege to enjoy. 

We seldom hear the good old-fashioned counsel on tliii 
point that used to ring from our pulpits. But it is none the 
less a saving principle of the Gospel. Obedience to law — obed- 
ience to the authority of the Priesthood. 

Everybody is quite willing to admit that we should obey 
law— the laws of health, the laws of chastity, the laws of hon- 
esty, the laws of charity, and indeed all law and laws. Even 
those so-called laws of man, such as city ordinances, 
should be obeyed. And yet, could there be a law, with- 
out a law-giver and without an executioner of the law! 
What use would there be in having a law if there were no per- 
son to pronounce the law, no one to obey or to disobey itt 
No one to reward those who keep or punish those who break 
the law. Every community renders obedience to law, with few 
exceptions. If a law comes in contact with our prejudice or 
pleasures, we may try to evade the same, although we admit its 
justice. Today, women are restlessly trying to change laws 
in their favor. The women of this Church should honor th» 
law of God. 

What is the Priesthood? It is the power to administer in 



2 RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 

the ordinances of the Gospel. Other churches have ordinances, 
many of them similar to those obtaining in this church; but 
none of them have the authority to administer those ordinances. 
This power and Priesthood was entirely lost during the Dark 
Ages, when the Catholic Church ruled the Christian world. By 
the way, there was one woman Pope appeared during those 
dark and stormy days in Rome. Associated with this Priest- 
hood is the right of presidency. Out of this grows the func- 
tions and offices of the presiding authority; of the Church, and 
of every quorum in the Church. Those who preside over the 
auxiliary organizations receive their authority from the pre- 
siding Priesthood. 

Women do not hold the Priesthood. This fact must be 
faced calmly by mothers and explained clearly to young 
women, for the spirit that is now abroad in the world makes 
for women's demand for every place and office enjoyed by 
men, and a few more that men can't enter. Women in this 
Church must not forget that they have rights which men do 
not possess. They have their own field, their own duties, their 
own privileges. It is cowardly to dodge this question in 
dealing with young women. But let the whole facts be stated. 
Then women will see how richly they are endowed and how 
righteously their place in this life and the life to come has been 
provided for. 

Women in this Church, choose to be womanly. They choose 
to honor their fathers and husbands. They choose their own 
sphere and duties with that calm, and gracious dignity which 
ensures to them a full life here and eternal happiness here- 
after. There are some men, perhaps, that are the inferiors 
of some women, mentally, morally and physically. But 
a superior woman is not expected to look up to an inferior 
man in her own home — which is her sphere. When the one 
man comes who is the right one, he will be just one or more 
degrees superior in intelligence and power to the superior 
woman. But to all men, when in their priestly office, women 
owe the reverence due that priesthood. The man who holds 
that office and Priesthood may of himself be not the equal of 
some of the w^omen who are associated with him in his ward 
or his public labors ; but if he holds an office in the Priesthood 
and is sustained by his brethren in that office, women every- 
where, as men who may be under his jurisdiction, should render 
that reverence and olsedience that belongs of right to the 
Priesthood which he holds. 

The women of the Relief Society have long ago proved 
the value of obedience to law, and to law-givers. So that, 
when we suggest to our new officers that they shall go to their 
ward or stake authorities for counsel, and shall never refuse 



RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN I 

that advice, we are only repeating the same things that have 
been told in this organization from its beginning. Especially waa 
Sister Eliza R. Snow — that great Mormon woman who 
presided over the Society after we came to these Valleys, and 
those who have followed her, Sister Zina D. Young, Bathsheba 
W. Smith and our present President, Emmeline B. Wells — these 
have been insistent in their advice to the sisters to seek counsel 
of the Priesthood and to honor those who held it. 

In any case where there is a question arising in your minda 
or between the members of your board, go to your bishop, or to 
the president of your stake and ask him or them for counseL 
Then accept it. The presidency of a stake has complete juria- 
diction over the saints who reside in that stake. All the quo- 
rums and auxiliary organizations are under their direct super- 
vision, and their counsel on any given point would be final. 
The same with the bishop of any ward. It is true that 
the general board of any auxiliary organization has direct 
charge of the various stake and ward organizations under 
them ; to arrange details of work, dates of conferences, mode of 
procedure, choice of officers, or plans and arrangements of all 
kinds. But if the bishop of a ward or the president of a stake 
should raise an objection to such plans or details, his wish 
would be paramount in his ward or stake — until such time 
as a harmonious settlement of the question at issue could be 
obtained between the general officers and that local presiding 
officer. This is the order of the Priesthood and this should be 
understood by all members. Men, as well as women, are sub- 
ject to this law of the Church. Only so could there exist that 
perfect order which is the cornerstone of this kingdom. 

We are asked concerning the customs of clothing onr 
dead, washing and anointing the sick, the proper storing of 
grain, using outlines, choosing new officers; and all these ques- 
tions come into the rightful jurisdiction of this society, and 
we will gladly answer according to the precedents of our So- 
ciety. Yet any and all of these questions might be referred to 
the ward or stake Priesthood and their answers should be takem 
as final. We would always be glad to hear of such decisions, 
but would respect the authority in any given instance. Thii 
may be taken as the general rule or law of this Society. 

Let the sisters of this Society study the organization of 
the Church, the wonderful plan of its foundation and thus ac- 
quaint themselves with the order of the Priesthood. 



RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 
SECOND MEETING. 



GENEALOGY. 

(Twenty Minutes.) 

Testimony bearing. 

WHAT IS GENEALOGY? "Saviors shall come up on Mount 
Zion." Obediah. 

Oenealogy is the science of keeping and preparing indi- 
vidual and family records, or pedigrees. This science is as old 
as Adam, as shown by The Pearl of Great Price. All nations 
have done more or less at keeping genealogies, for property is 
held in entail, land is bought and sold, on matters of inheri- 
tance and pedigree. For the sentimental or ethical side of this 
subject, there are the motives that move kings and potentates, 
and in greater degree all men and women, to learn something 
of their fathers and to be proud of good birth and parentage. 
These motives are the surf ace motives ; but the Lord has planted 
in the hearts of His children a desire to keep records of genea- 
logical information for a vital and essential reason^they 
form the basis of the principle of universal salvation. The 
Christian world does not attempt to tell what will become of 
those individuals who die without a knowledge of the Christ, 
but "Mormonism, " the Gospel of Jesus Christ, does explain that 
point clearly. This subject treats of this principle of vicarious 
salvation. 

Every man or woman who stands at the head of his or 
her family should begin the actual work in genealogy by pre- 
paring their own personal records and that of their families. 
They should begin with their own dates and genealogy. Then 
take their children's, and then their grandchildren's, and 
80 on to the last generation. The precious names and dates of 
our own fathers and mothers are too many of them left unre- 
corded. Who were your father and mother? What were their 
full names? Your grandmother, or your uncle? When and 
where were they born and reared? What was the color of 
hair, the size, the general description, and the primal 
facts of their lives? This is what may well occupy our 
first attention. For this lesson's practical exercise, write out 
in a pencil note book your own name. Where you were born. 
When you were baptized. Who baptized you. When you were 
married. The name of your husband. When and where was he 
born? When was he baptized? When were your children born? 
Where? What are the death dates of all your family? When 



RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 5 

were your husband and sons ordained to the priesthood? 
When did they start upon their missions? For your own 
record you should tell just when you were chosen to various 
offices in the auxiliary organizations. Your own dates of 
missions or events of importance. All these items are a part 
of your history. Those who desire can obtain a book, specially 
prepared by Elder Duncan McAllister, in which will be 
found places for all this information and much more. It is on 
sale for $1.25 at the Deseret News Book Store. We ought to 
begin with ourselves, and then go back to our fathers, and 
then our mothers' families. When we begin on our genealogi- 
cal work for the dead, we take the oldest known ancestor. But 
start now with your own record and you will soon get in- 
terested in a work that is both fascinating and most profitable, 
and which will lead you on and on. 

Now, let me sound a warning. Don't try to put more than 
one family in one book, either note book or record book. It is 
a false economy that would crowd two or more lines or famil- 
ies in one note book or one record book. Books are cheap. 
Everybody will have plenty of names sooner or later, to fill up 
many books. And it is distracting and confusing to jumble 
up lines and families in one book. Keep each family separate 
and distinct. State relationship always to yourself. Use no 
initials if you know what they stand for. Write out the full 
names. If you do not know the Christian name of a married 
woman, write her as Mrs. So and So. 

Begin all your work with the pencil note book. Then copy 
from that into your record book. Mistakes are bound to occur. 
Omissions also creep in. Genealogists write out all their 
information first in pencil note books, and then tran- 
scribe them in proper records. Use the best ink. Carter's 
record ink — mind Carter's Record Ink — is what we recom- 
mend. Your country stores will get this if you demand it, and 
it has the sanction of genealogists. It is safe and practi- 
cally indelible, and it would be a great calamity for your 
records to fade, as have some of ours, who did not know this 
fact years ago. Use soft and good pencils, with good erasers. 
Write out the names of your husband and family. When you 
leave this meeting go home resolved to prepare individual 
records before another month rolls by. 

CORRECTION. 

In the opening sentence of the lesson statement, for first 
lesson, an erroneous application of verse 17, 1st chap, of Luke, 
was inadvertently made by the writer, who keenly regrets its 
publication. A reading of the text clearly shows that the 
matter relates to an important feature of the mission of John 
the Baptist. 



i RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 

THIKD MEETING 
Ten Minutes' Talk on Current Topics. 

HOME ETHICS 

Civic Pride (Twenty Minutes.) 

The foundation of every successful home is honesty. 

There should be honesty of motive in the union of two 
lives, the husband and wife filled with a genuine respect and 
love for each other, while they study each other's character- 
ifltics and temperament; and above all, they should possess 
the same religious faith. These two should live in a home 
built, according to their means, in a simple, honest way, 
everything corresponding along the lines of beauty, economy 
and utility throughout, the main and prime object being to 
better and ennoble their own lives and the lives of their chil- 
dren, if they are blessed with them, and to set a worthy ex- 
ample in the city, town or village where they reside. 

Honesty points in many directions in our path. Do we 
live up to what we profess? Are we the true genuine women 
we wish our friends to believe us to be? Are we, indeed, the 
loving, loyal, high-souled sisters our Relief Society calling 
would indicate? If we are, all will be well with us, but if 
we are not, if selfishness form any part of our natures, if to 
aggrandize ourselves alone we labor, then we are not true to 
the high and noble position of a Relief Society officer or mem- 
ber ; neither are we fulfilling that mission for which our revered 
Phophet John Smith, organized our great sistedhood of 
women in 1842. 

Our homes are the primary, as well as the finishing and the 
graduating school for each of us. Here we lay permanently 
the foundation for every useful enterprise, every honorable 
life work ; here we take on the indelible stamp of reliability, of 
integrity, of honest doing and dealing with our own household 
and our fellow-men. 

Our families represent the community, the state and the 
nation. The intellectual, moral, physical, political, social and 
religious impress of the home life radiates out into the ward, 
the city and the nation. Hence, the necessity from every point 
of view for men and women in every avenue of life to be 
honest, live honestly and act honestly every day of their 
lives. 

(a) Honesty the foundation of every home. 

(b) Honest unity of purpose, interest and faith. 



RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 7 

(c) Congeniality of temperament and taste in the highest 
ideals. 

(d) Are we honest in our lives? 

■(e) What the Relief Society stands for. 
(f) Honesty of the home reflected in the community, 
state and nation. 



HOME GARDENS FOR WOMEN. 



(Twenty Minutes.) 

LESSON II. — "Raise up, ye women that are at ease." — 
Isaiah, 32d ch., 9th, 10th verse. 

Perhaps no more frequent objection is made to the intro- 
duction of flower and kitchen gardening for women than this 
statement : "It doesn't pay. AVe can't get anything for our fruih 
or our vegetables, and flowers take so much time and we have 
to carry water to keep them alive. So I can't raise things in 
my lot." Let our sisters read the whole of the quotation at 
the head of this lesson. Much of the work that is done by 
women is both unprofitable as well as unnecessary. Let us 
leave off some of the things we do and instead do the things 
that will give us health and home prosperity. 

Our Heavenly Father has generously created everything 
needful for the use of His children, and all He expects of ua 
is to learn the proper use of the materials and elements He has 
so wisely provided. 

To begin with, interest the male portion of the household ; 
get the small boy and his older brothers to assist you in spad- 
ing and ploughing the garden. This is February, and there- 
fore a good time to talk over the plans for the summer's work. 
Decide just how much land you can successfully handle, and 
do not take more. Suggest to the boys and the girls that each 
may have a bit of land for his or her own individual planting, 
and give to him or her a chance to raise a few vegetables, a 
bed of flowers, and some sugar beets which shall be the child's 
own exclusive property. No better place to inculcate the rights 
of children to possess their own things and not be interfered 
with by either parents or other children can be found than In 
this matter of growing flowers or vegetables. If the piece of 
land be given for the season to one child let the whole family 
guard that child's right as zealousy as each would his own. 
The father is easily persuaded to assist the mother in her 



8 RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 

efforts to plough and prepare her soil ; but the mother, for the 
sake of her children, must interest and secure the co-operation 
of each one of them in this life-giving toil. 

The next point to be considered is the fertilization of the 
soil. It is much better to do this in the fall, so that the snows 
and rains will carry deep into the earth the richness and life- 
giving principles contained in the various fertilizers. Farmers 
have an abundance of this material right in our own barn- 
yards and are not dependent upon the expensive and commer- 
cial fertilizers. See that the boys pile up the manure properly 
from week to week, so that another good coat of that material 
may be spread over your soil in the early spring.. The soil. 
after being spaded and ploughed, should be covered in fall with 
manure, then left to lie till spring when it is again ploughed 
Tip, and raked, removing all rocks and clods taken out of it, 
Another coating of fine manure is required in most instances, 
for a good garden, when the soil is ready for the seeds of 
spring-time. 

Some parts of our country are so fortunate as to require 
little or no fertilization — witness the rich lands of the Salt 
River Valley — but the rule is as stated above. 

After the severe months of winter, the latter weeks of 
February bring to us thoughts of green things soon to spring 
up on the face of the land and our desires turn from the heavy 
and monotonous diet of winter to the lighter and more succu- 
lent early vegetables. The blood needs this thinning and the 
system loudly calls for the change in diet. It will do us quite 
as much good to grow the delicious lettuce, radishes, young 
onions and pepper-grass as it will to eat them when they begin 
to come in next month. 

Let us now decide what to plant, how to plant it, and 
when to plant. Our catalogues and bulletins will here aid us 
in this choice. Remember, however, that your space must be 
considered and the choice of seeds and plants must be gov- 
erned to some extent by the piece of land they are to be put 
in. For instance, it would be foolish to attempt to grow melons 
and winter potatoes on a city lot, while corn, melons, potatoes 
and all varieties of large vegetables can be planted in country 
lots. 

Select good seed. It is foolish to think we can raise fine 
flowers or vegetables from poor or inferior seed. Seeds cost 
little; and it is usually better to buy them from reliable per- 
sons or firms than to try to grow them ourselves. Learn thus 
early the habits and requirements of the plants you have chosen 
for your garden, the proper distance between each seed, the 
depth of plant root and water required and all other features 



RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 9 

of your plants. Some need constant hoeing, others do not. 
Study all these small matters, for upon this depends the sue-, 
cess or failure of your garden. 

Climatic conditions govern the times and seasons when you 
shall plant your seeds and plants. In the northern counties, 
April is early, while in the southern part of our state Febru- 
ary sees lettuce and radishes well along. So that no rule can 
be given on this point. Consult old residents, if this is your 
first year of experience, and despise not the sayings of veteran 
gardeners. Use your intelligence in choosing between the ex- 
tremes of any advice and work early, late and most of the time. 

Properly planting the right kind of trees, shrubs, and 
plants on the home grounds means much more than mere 
beauty — it has a decidedly practical side. It is cheaper to 
beautify the home grounds than to allow them to go bare and 
uninviting. 

Decorating the home grounds transforms a house into a 
home. It makes the house a part of a beautiful picture and 
surrounds it with such evidence of loving care that it imme- 
diately impresses the beholder with the feeling that people 
"LIVE" in the house — that they do not merely exist there. 

Many a man passing a farm home made lovely by trees 
and shrubbery has been lifted up above the sordid conditions 
which surround him and has immediately commenced to trans- 
form his own grounds in keeping with those of his neighbor. 
And so the gospel spreads. 



The Essentials to the Production of Choice Vegetables, ShrubSj 
Beautiful Flowers, etc. 

SOIL. 

A fair degree of success may be secured from any soil 
which can be made rich and pliable, but the very best results 
are obtained from a deep rich sandy loam. There are very 
few plants that do well on barren sand, a cold, hard, lumpy 
clay or in the shade of orchard or other trees. 

FERTILIZERS. 

A soil which does not need enriching to produce the best 
results is rarely, if ever, found, so the degree of success we 
attain is usually in proportion to the liberality with which 
fertilizers have been used. 



10 RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 

Well decomposed stable manure, where straw bedding has 
been used is the best; that where sawdust has been used is not 
80 good. Often wood ashes, at the rate of one peek up to one 
bushel per square rod will be of great benefit. Commercial 
fertilizers are excellent and may be used at the rate of four to 
twelve pounds to the square rod. A mass or lump of any of 
the commercial fertilizers, even if it is not over a quarter of 
an inch in diameter, is liable to kill any seed or young plant 
which comes in direct contact with it, so it is very important 
that they be thoroughly pulverized and mixed with the soil. 

PREPARATION OF THE SOIL. 

Rich soil and liberal manuring will avail little without 
thorough preparation of the soil. It must be made friable by 
thorough and judicious working; if it is neglected only par- 
tial success is possible, and that at the cost of a great deal of 
hard work. The garden should be well ploughed or dug to 
a good depth, taking care, if it is a clay soil, that the work 
is not done when it is too wet. If a handful from the furrow 
moulds with slight pressure into a ball which can not be easily 
crumbled into fine earth again, the soil is too wet, and if 
stirred then, will be hard to work all summer. The surface 
should be made as fine and smooth as possible with the har- 
row or rake. It is generally necessary to plough the whole 
garden at once, and to do this in time for the earliest crops, 
but the part which is not planted for some time should be 
kept mellow by frequent cultivation. 

PLANTING PROPERLY. 

There is no greater source of disappointment and failure 
among amateur gardeners than hasty, careless or improper 
sowing of the seed. To secure germination, moisture, heat and 
a certain amount of air are necessary. The first steps are the 
softening of the hard outer shell from the absorption of the 
water, and the changing of plant food from the form of starch 
to that of sugar. In the first condition the food is easily pre- 
served, but the plant cannot use it while in its sugary condition 
it is very easily appropriated, but perishable, and if not used 
it speedily decays itself and causes decay in the plant. A dry 
seed may retain its vitality and remain unchanged for years, 
i)ut after germination has commenced, a check of a day or two 
in the process may be fatal. There is no time in the life of the 
plant when it is so susceptible to fatal injury from the over- 
abundance or want of sufficient heat and moisture as at that 



RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 11 

between the commencement of germination and the formation 
of the first true leaves, and it is just then that it needs the aid 
of the gardener to secure favorable conditions. Therefore, 
the following must be kept in mind : 

First: A proper and constant degree of moisture. The 
soil should always be moist, never wet. This is secured by 
making the surface of the freshly dug soil so fine and the press- 
ing it over the seeds so firmly with the feet or the back of a 
hoe that the degree of moisture remains as nearly uniform as 
possible. 

Second : A proper degree of heat secured by sowing the 
seed when the temperature of the soil is that most favorable 
to the germination of the seed of the particular plant we wish 
to grow. Too high a temperature is often as detrimental as 
one which is too low. As every crop varies in this particu- 
lar, the gardener should make a careful study of the require- 
ments of each variety he wishes to plant. Such information 
is usually found on the seed package or in seed catalogues. 

Third: Covering the seed to such a depth that while a 
uniform degree of heat and moisture is preserved, the necessary 
air can readily reach the germinating seed, and the tiny stem 
push the forming leaves into the light and air. This depth 
will vary with tfie different seeds and conditions of the soil, 
and can be learned only by practical experience. Some very 
fine seeds and spores are sowed on the top of moist soil, others 
barely covered while others such as sweet peas, are planted 
Tery deep. 

Fourth: The soil should be in such a condition that the 
ascending stem can easily penetrate it and the young roots 
speedily find suitable food. This is usually secured by thor- 
ough preparation of the soil before planting. 

CULTIVATION. 

After the plant has germinated and become established, 
not only should every weed be removed as soon as it appears, 
but the crust which forms after a rain should be broken up and 
the ground stirred as soon as it is dry enough to permit it. 
The more frequently and deeply the soil is stirred while the 
plants are young, the better, but as they develop and the roots 
occupy the ground, cultivation should be shallower, until it 
becomes a mere stirring of the surface. A very small garden 
well cultivated and cared for will give larger returns and be 
in every way more satisfactory than a much larger one poorly 
prepared and neglected. 



12 RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 

WHAT TO PLANT. 

What to plant will depend entirely upon the likes and dis- 
likes of the family. However, in a good home garden, crops 
should be so arranged that there are some vegetables that can 
be used at any time during the growing season. 

When to plant these crops is usually indicated on the pack- 
ages, but a little practical experience will soon put a person 
right. 

These subjects are treated in the U. S. Bulletin 257, which 
will be furnished, with many others, to anyone who applies at 
this office, through the courtesy of Senator Eeed Smoot and 
Congressman Joseph Howells. The Utah Agricultural College 
has assisted in the preparation of this lesson and will send 
further information to any who apply to that College. 



FOURTH MEETING 
Ten Minutes Talk on Current Events. 
LITERATURE. 



Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin (Thirty Minutes.) 

LESSON II. 

Subject: Early Struggles in Philadelphia. Reference: 
Chapter II, Autobiography. 

''The cat in gloves catches no mice." 

1. Franklin's first appearance in Philadelphia. 

Tired and hungry and in working clothes. Story of 
rolls. 

2. Franklin's Self-reliance. 

(a) Independent at age of 17. 

(b) Earns money to clothe and feed himself and to 
take trip home. 

3. Work with Keimer. 

(a) Character of Keimer. 

(b) Condition of office. 

(c) First work. 

(d) Anecdotes. 

(e) Keimer 's plan of religion. 

(f) Vegetable diet adopted. 

4. Governor Keith's Attentions and Plans. 

(a) First meeting. 



RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 13 

(b) Subsequent meetings. 

(c) Keith's plans and promises. 

5. Trip to Boston to Seek Father's Aid. 

(a) Presents Governor's letter. Father refuses as 
sistanee, but makes wise promise, 
(b) Franklin visits brother's office, 
(e) Learns valuable lesson from Quakeress on return trip, 

e.Franklin's First Great Error. 

Story of Vernon's money. 

7. Franklin's Friends. 

(a) Miss Read. 

(b) Charles Osborne. 

(c) Joseph Watson. 

(d) James Ralph. 

(e) Collins. 

8. Anecdotes. 

(a) Franklin returns to animal food. 

(b) Franklin and friends at composition. 

Questions. 

1. How does Franklin's cure for cold and fever compare 
with present-day remedies? 

2. What advantage was Franklin's trade to him? 

3. How did his early life tend to make him reliant? 

4. What do you think of the refusal of Franklin's father 
to assist his son in setting up in business? 

5. Relate three instances where Franklin attracted the 
attention of prominent people because of his attain- 
ments. 

6. Relate the experiences of Franklin and his young 
friends in their efforts at literary composition. 



THE NEW AMERICAN ARCHITECTURE. 
(Ten Minutes.) 

Though the California Bungalow has its admirers there 
are those who think it too sombre a style with its wide pro- 
jecting eaves and porches for our mountain climate that is 
nearly half the year locked in frost. 

Those who prefer a house open to the direct rays of sun- 
shine will appreciate the new American style of architecture, 
for it seems to be the acme of simplicity. Nothing is used 
except for necessity. There is no lathe work; all lines are 
straight and simple. 



14 RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 

To a Chicago architect, Frank Lloyd Wright, we are in- 
debted for this, perhaps the greatest inspiration that has been 
sent forth in the interest of honest house building. 

The foundation principle of the new American style is 
utility and when utility is wedded to beauty the union will 
result in the best art. There is a demand for beauty in the 
architecture of the home, but if it is to become great art and 
really take hold of the imagination, the beautiful must be 
constructive, must be a part of the very stones, the foundation, 
the walls, the roof, the doors, windows and porches of the 
building. 

There are three elements in house making that are sure 
to make or mar the beauty of a home, these are color, balance 
and proportions. 

Whn you come to select building material the color must 
be selected. You have an interesting field in which to choose. 
The most expensive and best fire brick is full of mottled, beau- 
tiful tones. Then there are red pressed brick and white pressed 
brick. Cement, which may be any selected color, and frame, 
which permits the greatest scope for the exhibition of taste in 
color are the materials most often used. 

Are the windows and doors too large or too small for 
your house? Study the subject of balance in the December, 
1913, Delineator. 

Mr. Wright has made his fame in the new American 
architecture by a skilfull use of the panel which he uses both 
in construction and detail of finish. The panel is a vehicle 
well suited for revealing beautiful proportions, balance and 
color schemes. Note the Young Woman's Journal, Febru- 
ary, 1914. 



RELIEF SOCIETY CONVENTION. 

Under the auspices of the General Board of the Relief So- 
ciety there will be a three-days' convention held April 1, 2 and 
3 in the Bishop's Building, twice daily, at 10 a. m. and at 2 
in the afternoon. This Convention is held for the study of 
Genealogy, and to assist our class conductors and teachers 
to prepare themselves in this study. Each stake will be ex- 
pected to send at least two delegates to this Convention — 
bright, active women who are familiar with taking notes and 
studying outlines. These sisters will be expected to return 
to their respective stakes and become in turn teachers in this 
subject in their various localities. At the three days' classes 
the ten lessons on Genealogy which appeared in our Guide as 
Outlines will be taken up in detail and given in the form of 



RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 15 

regular lessons to those assembled. We will have specially 
ruled note books, which will be on sale for 10 cents; these 
books are prepared by the Genealogical Society for this work. 
The Lesson Book on Genealogy can be purchased here at our 
Belief Society at the reduced rate of 20 cents. 

Although these classes will be held especially for chosen 
stake delegates of the Relief Society, all saints, both men and 
women, who may be in the city will be welcomed, to the extent 
of the seating capacity in the hall on the fourth floor of the 
Bishop's Building. There are no fees to pay, and only the 
note books and lesson books to purchase for the study of this 
■ubject. 



BOOKS FOR THE READING COURSE. 

There is some inquiry concerning the books recommended 
in our various lessons. We wish to announce that any or all 
of these books, with the exception of the United States Bulle- 
tins, will be sent on application to the city book stores, 
if the money be sent for them. Those who wish the U. S. 
Bulletins for the Home Gardening Lessons, of which there are 
nearly twenty, will please send their names and addresses to 
this office ; for these must be sent to Senator Reed Smoot and 
Congressman Howell at Washington. The Bulletins will be 
furnished free, but, of course, could not be sent without the 
address of those who desire them. 

In the Art Lessons we would recommend the purchase of 
"Sadakichi Hartman's History of American Art." It is quite 
profusely illustrated from photographs and in photogravures, 
and the subjects cover not only painting, but American sculp- 
ture, and the various fields of American Art. The work is in 
two volumes, 8vo cloth, and is published and sold for $4.00 net. 
If we can secure several hundred orders for this work we can 
get it for about $2.00, or just half its retail price. It is pub- 
lished by Himebaugh & Browne, 415 Fifth Ave., at 37th St., 
New York City. But the orders for it may be sent to this 
office, and to the Deseret News Book store or the Deseret S. S. 
Union Book store, of this city. 

"The American City" is for the use of those who take up 
the Home Ethics Lessons, and is full of excellent suggestions 
and ideas for making beautiful surroundings, and sanitary con- 
ditions in our cities and in the home. This will be ordered 
also from the book stores. Cost, $1.25. It will be mailed in 
t»n days after the order reaches here, as it must be ordered 
fron the east. 



16 



RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 




RELIEF SOCIETY HOME FOR WOMEN AND GIRLS. 



The Relief Society Home for Women and Girls was 
opened formally December 19, 1913, with brief and modest 
dedicatory services. The Home is situated opposite the North 
Gate of the Temple grounds, 36 West North Temple St. It 
represents the culmination of a long cherished hope and plan. 

Every woman in the Relief Society will rejoice at this 
new feature of our work. For there are many reasons why 
we should have such a place in this city. Women, without 
relatives or friends, come to this city to do work in the Temple, 
or to visit the conferences of the Church. They have no place 
to go, and they shrink from seeking lodging in the many public 
hotels, which offer all kinds of accommodations but security, 
friendship and association with our people. The hotels 
are good in their time and place, but not what is needed by 
such visiting women. Girls, who insist on coming to this ciiy 
to get big wages, are too often allowed to drift about with no 
secure quarters where they may lodge until they can secure 
work, nor a place to go to while one place is exchanged for 
another or more desirable one. All these needs have been 



KELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 17 

felt and realized for a long time by members of the General 
Board. 

In the olden days the saints in this city entertained the 
saints from the country and everybody knew everybody else, 
and there was no question of lodging houses or hotels. But 
times have changed; and some of our visitors now feel obliged 
to seek temporary lodgings in the various hotels and rooming 
houses. Our sisters do not want nor expect to have this ac- 
commodation without paying sufficient to keep up the expenses 
of the place, for they are possessed of the proper pride and dig- 
nity of character which makes them self-supporting under all 
circumstances. The sisters of this Society have contributed of 
their mites to build meeting houses, carpet temples, purchase 
silver for sacrament purposes ; have sent money to the mis- 
sionaries, nursed the sick, educated the nurses, clothed the 
dead and nurtured the orphan. But the day has come 
when they are going to be placed in positions where they can 
do some wise and kind things for themselves. This Home is 
such an enterprise. 

"When we were discussing the Home before President E. 

B. Wells one day she remarked that the Prophet Joseph 
Smith had given the Belief Society in Nauvoo a home for just 
such a purpose as this. And the question at once arose — is there 
anything that this wonderful man did not inaugurate and give 
the initial impetus for? What a Prophet he was and is. We 
bow to his kindly intelligence and reverence his god-like 
memory. 

The plan for establishing such a refuge was laid before 
the General Board of the Relief Society two years ago, and 
a Committee was appointed to look into such a project. Mrs. 
Rebecca Neibaur Nibley was appointed as Chairman of this 
Committee, with Sisters Elizabeth C. McCune and Elizabeth 

C. Crismon as the other members. Later on, because of the 
temporary absence of Mrs. McCune, Mrs. Janette A. Hyde 
was added to the Committee. These sisters have worked inde- 
fatigably to bring about the successful conclusion now mani 
fested. 

When the Presidency of the Church and the Presiding 
Bishop were approached, they gave the project their heartiest 
support. Several houses were offered to the Committee to 
choose from and after careful consideration the one named 
was chosen. It is somewhat limited for room and will not be 
adequate long for the purposes of the Home. But it is a 
modest beginning, and it was felt wiser to begin thus simply 
and spread out as occasion may require. The house itself was 
built for Sister Jane Carrington Young in 1874 by her husband, 



18 BELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 

Apostle Brigham Young, Jr., and at her death passed into the 
hands of the Church. President Joseph F. Smith suggested 
the name when the matter was presented to him of "The Relief 
Society Home for Women and Girls," and such it has been 
named. 

On the evening of December 19th there were assembled 
in the cosy parlor of the Home President Joseph F. Smith, 
Presiding Bishop C. W. Nibley, Elder R. K. Thomas and 
Elders Arnold Schultess, C. E. Martin and A. B. Olsen, who 
where there as members of the Temple Quartette. 

Of the sisters present there were President Emmeline B. 
"Wells, her two Counsellors, Sisters Clarissa S. Williams and 
Julina L. Smith; Mrs. Rebecca Neibaur Nibley, who had 
charge of the services as the Chairman of the Home Committee ; 
Mrs. Elizabth C. McCune, Elizabeth C. Crismon and Janette 
A. Hyde of the Home committee ; Mrs. Carrie S. Thomas ; Mrs. 
Susa Young Gates' and Miss Sarah M. McLelland of the General 
Board, and the Temple Quartette, with Sister Agnes McMillian 
Bolto as the contralto of that quartette. 

The Chairman, Sister Nibley, introduced the singers, who 
rendered the hymn, beginning "When Dark and Drear" in a 
feeling manner. Bishop Nibley offered the opening prayer, 
and the quartette sang "Gallilee." 

Sister Nibley then expressed her great joy shared by the 
Board in seeing the completion of this happy enterprise. She 
related the circumstance of the hurried opening of the Home 
in July to accommodate the visitors to the N. E. A. But not 
until the present time had the Committee been able to com- 
plete their plans and arrange for the formal dedication of 
the Home. She spoke of the generosity of the Church in 
giving the Board this spacious house for the beginning of our 
Home and they had been equally generous in the assistance 
needed to further renovate and remodel the place to suit 
our needs. She referred to the donations made by the Y. 
L. M. I. A., the Primary Board, the Tooele Stake Relief Society, 
the private donations of Sisters Annie Watson and Clarissa 
Smith Williams, Sisters Beatie, Jennings, Crismon and others, 
all of whom had contributed of their means and furniture to 
make the Home attractive and suitable. Bedding had been do- 
aated in goodly quantities by various Relief Societies, while in- 
dividuals and firms had also given liberally. The moderate price 
for the rooms, from $6 to $25 a month, brought the Home with- 
in the reach of all the sisters who require its benefits. There had 
been already seventy-two guests entertained in the Home, and 
each one had given expression to their great pleasure in finding 
such a place, permeated as it was with the spirit of kindness 



RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 19 

and charity. Sister Nibley read the House Rules, which were 
simple and yet effective. There had been non-members of 
the Church entertained at the Home, but all had united in 
like expressions of praise and appreciation. She spoke of the 
Employment Bureau which had been established in connec- 
tion with the Home and hoped that the Latter-Day Saints girls 
who came to this city for work would avail themselves of its as- 
sistance and protection. The members of the Home Committee 
were remembered by the speaker and their labors referred to, 
while those members of the Board (Sisters Sarah McLelland, 
Edna May Davis and our kind Sister Maria B. Winder), who 
had served various terms as temporary n;iatrons of the Home, 
were recalled with grateful words. The present matron, Mrs. 
Cornelia Home Clayton, is a woman of excellent character 
and kindly manners and received all who came in the proper 
spirit, and none were wounded or forgotten in her ministra- 
tions. 

President Emmeline B. Wells next expressed her great 
pleasure in having the President of the Church and the Presid- 
ing Bishop with us on this occasion. It had long been the 
desire of her heart to see such a place as this provided for the 
care of the girls and women who need this protection and 
comfort. She invoked the blessing of God upon all who came 
here, the priesthood and all who are interested in this good 
work. 

President Joseph F. Smith then offered the Dedicatory 
prayer. He said in part: "Our Father in Heaven; we Thy 
children have assembled here this evening for the purpose of 
dedicating this House for the object and purpose for which it 
is designed. While we call upon Thy name, may Thy spirit 
direct our minds and thoughts. We are very grateful for this 
expression of Thy kindness towards us Thy children in per- 
mitting us to obtain a Home for those who may seek its 
shelter. We would always remember Thy kindness and Thy 
much mercy towards us in all these things. To this end we 
ask Thee to bless those of thy daughters who have contributed 
of their means to this enterprise; may they feel abundantly 
blessed and may their reward be multiplied unto them; for 
inasmuch as they have cast in their mites may they feel that 
they have not invested them in that which perishes with the 
using. To this end wilt Thou bless the General Board of this 
great Society. May they be united as the heart of one. May 
they be joined together in the bonds of love and true fellow- 
ship; and may each one have a voice in the affairs of this 
organization, and each therefore feel the responsibility which 
rests upon all. So wilt Thou bless Thy handmaids. Especially 



20 RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 

bless those who preside over this Society and the sisters who 
are in immediate charge of this home. May each receive the 
spirit of her work and calling. Bless the Matron, that she 
may be inspired in all her duties and labors. That wisdom and 
great intelligence may go hand in hand with the spirit of 
human kindness which would pervade this Home. That kind- 
ness which is tempered with prudence and wisdom. Let all 
work together for the good of the whole ; that nothing out 
of harmony with the principles of truth and righteousness may 
enter or obtain in these walls. Bless and sanctify the sisters who 
labored to this purpose. And if at times they are called upon to 
assist the poor or succor the afficted, may they help and minis- 
ter in the spirit of charity and love, with the aid of those prin- 
ciples that make for happiness here and hereafter. Father, 
look upon this Home and bless it we pray Thee. Accept all 
that has been done and contributed by the Church, and by the 
sisters who have assisted. Bless this building; preserve it 
from the devouring elements. ^lay it be solid in its founda- 
tions, and safe in its appointments. May it be indeed an abode 
of peace and righteousness. May the walls of the rooms 
thereof be filled with the spirit of peace and that spirit which 
gives us all understanding and joy. May every object desired 
be realized by all who need that assistance. We dedicate this 
Home and bless it and ask Thee to sanctify it as a place of 
peace and rest for the weary. That the poor may not be 
spurned from its doors, but that they may be ministered to as 
they need and require. That in the day of judgment we may 
realize that it may be said of us: "I was an hungered and ye 
fed me ; I was sick and ye ministered unto me ; I was in 
■prison and ye visited me." For inasmuch as we do this unto 
the least of His children we have so ministered unto Him. We 
do dedicate and bless this Home, and we do it by virtue of 
the Holy priesthood invested in us. Amen." 

Counsellor Clarissa S. Williams then moved a rising vote 
of thanks by the members of the General Board there present 
to the Presidency of the Church and to the Presiding Bishopric 
for their generous gift and assistance. It was unanimously 
carried. 

Bishop C. W. Nibley then made a few but most timely re- 
marks. He endorsed the proceedings and the whole project. 
He complimented the members of the Committee and all the 
sisters engaged in this Relief Society work. The speaker 
quoted the words of the Savior — "Seek ye first the kingdom 
of God, and his righteousness" — that should be the ideal of 
the sisters engaged in this great work. Seek first the kingdom 
of God. the interests of that kingdom. His purpose and power 
and not seek our own purposes and desires. We should do 



RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 21 

what we can in the saving of souls, in assisting those who are 
in need, being prudent and careful in all these matters and 
in the expenditure of all funds -iatrusted to our care. "I com- 
mend this Society for its work throughout the Church. If we 
can only hold to the ideals laid down by the Prophet Joseph 
Smith in the organization of the Society we shall not go astray. 
I dont believe," said the speaker, "that we appreciate the 
magnitude and greatness of the work you sisters are engaged 
in. To be ministering angels, to wear the garb of charity, to 
bless and teach mankind— this is a wonderful work and calling. 
*Ye are not of the world for I have chosen you out of the 
world,' said the Savior. This organization should be different 
from anything in the world, greater in its scope, bigger in its 
work than anything the world can do, and not patterned after 
the foolish habits of those who know not God and His king- 
dom. Rivet the sayings of the Savior on your minds, sisters, 
and seek ye first His righteousness. If ever there w^as a tim6 
when we needed to follow the counsel of our leaders and live 
according to the principles of the Gospel independent of the 
world and its ways it is now. May the Lord bless this Home 
and those who come here and those who labor here. Amen." 

The quartette sang, "We thank Thee, God, for a 
Prophet," and the prayer of dismissal was pronounced by 
Elder R. K. Thomas. 

In closing this article we would like to emphasize the 
importance and value of the Employment Bureau which we 
have established in our Home for our Latter-Day Saint girls 
who desire work in this city. They will be certain to find 
friends and assistance in securing respectable places. Bishops 
and parents would do well to note this feature of our work. 
The prices are moderate and service is prompt and reliable. 



22 RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 

FUTURE ACTIVITIES OF THE SOCIETY. 



The unrelated work done by the various auxiliary organi- 
zations of the Church and the confused and crowding confer- 
ence dates on which the auxiliaries hold their various confer- 
ences, has been the subject of much thought and discussion. 
Recently a co-relation committee was appointed by the Presi- 
dency of the Church, with representatives from the Council of 
the Twelve — ^Elder David McKay being chairman of that com- 
mittee — and two or more members of each general board. 
These brethren and sisters have labored now for some time in 
preparing their comprehensive and excellent report, covering 
all points connected with conference dates, mode of apportion- 
ing time at those conferences, with the study along theological 
lines to be followed by each organization. This report has not 
yet been made public ; but we are pleased to acquaint our own 
organization with the matters that it contains belonging to us. 

According to this arrangement all auxiliary organizations 
are to hold their conferences at the same time that the stake 
conferences are in session. That is, the Relief Society, as all 
the other organizations will have a portion of the time on both 
Saturday and Sunday when the regular stake conference con- 
venes. The time each organization has for the presentation of 
its particular work is the same, but the dates are arranged in 
rotation. The months for the holding of our Relief Society con- 
ferences are May, June and July; with the exception of the 
Salt Lake City stakes and those very close to this city. These 
are to be held in November. The time given for our work at the 
stake conferences is Saturday forenoon, with an officers' meet- 
ing on Sunday morning between 9 a. m. and 10 :25 a. m.. and 
Sunday evening. This gives the Relief Society one private 
meeting on Saturday morning, an officers' meeting on Sunday 
morning and a public session on Sunday evening. The rest of 
the time will be occupied with the business of the stake con- 
ference. 

The study which is to be provided for our Relief Society 
theological department is to be the same as that taken up by 
the quorums of the Melchisedek Priesthood. For this year, 
however, we have been permitted to use our genealogical study 
in its place. 



REFIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN. 23 

ANNUAL DUES. 

Stake officers will be reminded that our Annual Day is ap- 
proaching. While making arrangements for the festivities 
and programes which mark that event, let us not forget the 
annual dues. The officers should explain in the spirit of love 
and kindness the many and good reasons why the dues have 
been raised from ten cents to twenty-five cents. This matter 
was entered into fully and was agreed upon at our annual 
business meeting of the October (1913) conference, by the rep- 
resentatives of the stakes there assembled. Take up this work 
of explanation and conversion in due season so that all shall 
understand and be prepared for this change. Our society is 
growing rapidly and new lines of activity are springing up. 
The harvest is ripening fast and our laborers must be prepared 
to thrust in our sickles and reap. 



BURIAL CLOTHING. 



Sister Julina L. Smith, chairman of the Temple Clothing 
Committee, wishes to thank the saints for their support in this 
new undertaking. But owing to delays and misunderstand- 
ings which arise, the saints residing outside of Salt Lake City 
are urgently requested to write either to Larkin-Hull Co., un- 
dertakers, or to S. M. Taylor & Co., undertakers, both of this 
city, for anything in this line they may desire. This will prove 
more satisfactory to all concerned. Those residing in this city 
are invited to call at the Beehive House for any clothing de- 
sired for this purpose. 



COMMUNICATIONS. 



All inquiries or communications about our lessons, book, 
advertising and Bulletin business generally should be ad- 

RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN, 
Room 28, Bishop's Building, Salt Lake City, Utah. 



ICE CREAM— SHERBETS— PUNCHES 
and CANDIES are the "BEST BY TEST" 

Special prices to all Ward and School Socials etc. 

TWO STORES 55 Main St. 260 State St. 

Prompt Delivery Phones: Wasatch 3223—3224 



THOMAS HULL ELIJAH A. LARKIN 

GEO. W. LARKIN ALMA J. LARKIN 

LARKIN-HULL 

UNDERTAKING CO. 

EMBALMERS AND 
FUNERAL DIRECTORS. 

CHAPEL & PARLORS 255 SO. 2nd EAST ST. 
Phone Wasatch 5132 SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH 



W . N. Williams, Supt. Clarissa S. Williams, Sec'y & Treas R. N. Wilson. Asst. Supt 

Guaranteed Furniture at Lowest Prices 

Our maj^aificeat stock comprises soods from America's ' 'Zi 
most representative lines and our prices are always reasonable. 

Carpets, Rugs, Draperies, Linoleum, Ranges, 
Heaters, Qo-Carts, Etc. 

Home Furnishings of all descriptions for 

CASH OR CREDIT 

Co-op. Furniture Co. 

Next Door South of Z. C. M. I. 



THE UNIVERSITY OF UTAH 

AT YOUR SERVICE 

THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Preparation to make a life as well as a living. Courses in general 
science, liberal arts, commerce, and preparation for business 

THE STATE SCHOOL OF MINES 

Preparation for all branches of Engineering. 

A school in the west where a great country is in the making ; where the building of 
highways, railroads, power plants, canals, and commercial and industrial structures of all 
kinds must push forward rapidly to keep pace with an expanding population ; a school 
in the heart of one of the biggest mining regions of America, where are the greatest 
copper mines of the world, and the most extensive smelting plants. 

THE STATE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 

Preparation for Teaching in common schools and high schools. 

A school that has drawn favorable attention from educators of 
high standing in our country, for its sensitive and sensible attitude 
In relation to modern educational theory. 

THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

Offering a combined course in Arts and Medicine (four years.) 

THE SCHOOL OF LAW 

Offering full preparation for the practice of law. A young depart- 
ment with high standards, thorough methods, and some novel 
advantages. 

All the work in these several schools is fully up to the standard 
requirements, and is accepted in full bv the best Universities in the 
United States. For full particulars, address UNIVERSITY OF 

UTAH. Salt Lake City. Utah. 



SUPPORT HOME INDUSTRY 

Ask your dealer for Z. C. M. I. Factory 
School Shoes for boys— they keep the feet 
warm and dry. 

Men's solid serviceable Shoes 
for the farmer, the laborer, the 
mechanic. Try our Summit, 
Bannock, Wyoming or West= 
ern Scout Shoes. 



We manufacture the famous 
**Mountaineer" or"The Leader" 
Overalls ask for them. 




HOTEL XJTAH: 




500 Rooms. Fireproof 

Opened June 8, 1911 

"The very best of every, 
thing at sensible prices." 

Rates for room without 

bath $1.50 and $2.00. 

With bath $2. 50 per day 

and upwards. 

Under the Management of 

GEORGE O. RELF 



BURIAL CLOTHES 
Relief Society General Board 

FURNISHES COMPLETE BURIAL SUITS 

Phones Wasatch 3455 and Wasatch 207 
Salt Lake City Utah 

RELIEF SOCIETY HOME FOR 
WOMEN AND GIRLS 

ROOMS REASONABLE 

Employment Bureau in connection with home. 
36 West North Temple St. Phone Wasatch 4478 J. 



Star Printing Company 

35 Post Office Place Phone Wasatch 1370 

Salt Lake Citi), Utah 



"Big Oaks From Little Acorns Grow" 

''the story 
of the hot 
scotch pie 

IN SIX CHAPTERS 




CHAPTER ONE 






JUST THIRTY YEARS AGO 

With a little old fashioned "pie can," on the 
corner of First South and Main Streets, T. H. 
Morrison introduced his now famous "Hot 
Scotch Meat Pie" to Salt Lake's lovers of good 
things to eat. The beginning was humble, but, 
like all great things, it began in a humble way, 
and surely but steadily won its way into the 
hearts (and stomachs) of the people, with the 
result that 

TODAY, MORRISON HOT SCOTCH 
PIES ARE A HOUSEHOLD WORD 

You'll find them served with their iuimitahle flavor and 
crisp brown crust, in every up-to-date restaurant — Get 
the Morrison Hot Scotch Pie habit— it's a healthy habit, 
buy them where y ou see our card — take them home for the 
evening meal — but be sure they'er Morrison's Hot Scotch 
Pies. 




**BETTER THINGS TO EAT'* 
TWO PLACES CIORNER MAIN & 1st SO. 



158 SOUTH MAIN ST. 



WHILE LABORING FOR THE POOR 

AND AIDING THE WIDOW IN WANT, 

DON'T NEGLECT YOURSELF AND FAMILY 

Have they the proper protection in case of 
sickness or death of 
your bread winner or 
will you be compelled 
to look for charity? 

Has he sufficient life 
insurance to assure 
you this protection? 





JOHN C. CUTLER 
1st. Vice President. 



INSURANCE 
IN FORCE 





LORENZO N. STOHL 
2nd. Vice Pres. & Mgr. 



OVER 
$12,000,000.00 



JOSEPH F. SMITH 

President. 



Beneficial Life 
Insurance Co. 

Home office, Vermont 

Building 

Salt Lake City, Utah 




C. W. NIBLEY 
Member Ex. Com. 



RICHARD W. YOUNG 

Counsel 



Relict Society Bulletin 

Volume 1 ^fi^. Number 3 






Issued by the Officers and Directors of the 

GENERAL BOARD OF THE RELIEF SOCIETY 
1914 



HUMAN SERVICE 

has come to be a consideration of political parties, or social 
organizations, and of educational institutions. 

THE RELIEF SOCIETY 

has been an instrument of human service for more than half a 
century. ]t ministers to the immediate material wants of the 
community. It has been pronounced by many students an 
Institution for community charity. 

THE UTAH AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

at Logan aims, in a very definite way to make each member 
of society a more capable producer, a better farmer, house- 
wife, tradesman, agricultural engineer, or business man and 
thus aims to eliminate want. Its field of work therefore, 
properly co-operates with the work of relief societies in serv- 
ing the men and women of the State. While Its courses are 
distinctly practical, it deals in a broad and fundamental way 
with the basic industries of the State. Liberal instruction Is 
given in the natural and physical sciences, in mathematics, 
history, English, economics, literature and languages. 

The 'Jollege has been slowly built into an embodiment of 
the State's idealism. 



Willes-Horne Drug Company 

News Building, Salt Lake City. 

Our Drug Store Is Complete 

TREATMENT PERFECT. PRICES RIGHT. 

WE SOLICIT YOUR PATRONAGE. 

Prompt Attention to Mail Orders. 



Lambourne Floral Dept. 
EVERYTHING FLORAL. 

DECORATIONS. FUNERAL WORK. Etc., Etc. 




Special Notice to 
Garment Users. 

It is recommended and advised by 
the most particular and careful buyers 
of L. D. S. Garments that TEMPLE 
BRAND GARMENTS be used exclu- 
sively because of their superior quality, 
fit and finish. Be sure when making 
your purchases to look carefully in the 
neck of garments for the words TEM- 
PLE BRAND, found immediately below 
the approved label. If they are not 
there the garment is not the AP- 
PROVED TEMPLE BRAND, manufac- 
tured exclusively by the Salt Lake Knitting Works for the better class of trade 
and discriminating purchasers. If your local dealer does not handle TEMPLE 
BRAND GARMENTS send your orders to Salt Lake Knitting Store, 70 Main 
treet. Salt Lake City. 

Postage free to all parts of the United States. Prices as follows; 

Best grade of combed cotton, gauze weight .... $1.00 

Best grade of combed cotton, medium weight 1.25 

Superior cotton, unbleached, medium weight 1.25 

Superior cotton, bleached, medium weight • • 1.50 

Superior cotton, unbleached, extra hea\'y weight ... 1.50 

Best grade Sea Island lisle, gauze weight 1.50 

Best grade combed cotton, heavy weight, fleeced • • . ,• • . . 1.75 

Best grade Sea Island mercerized, light weight • - • . 2.00 

Wash shrunk, part wool, medium weight 2.00 

Wash shrunk. Merino wool, hea\'y weight 2.25 

Wash shrunk. Utah wool, extra heavy weight • • • . . . . 3.00 

Wash shrunk, imported part wool, light weight, extra fine ..... 3.00 

Pure Australian Wool, medium weight ... . . 4.00 

Remember that postage is free, also that there is no substitution for Temple 
Brand Garments, and if you are not wearing them now you will some day. Then 
regret not having done so before. 

SALT LAKE KNITTING STORE 



Salt Lake City, Utah 



INDEX TO LESSON STATEMENTS. 

PAGE 

The Saving Habit 1 

Genealogy 3 

Home Ethics 6 

Home Gardening • • • 7 

Literature 10 

Architecture 11 

Bulletins 12 

Officers' Meeting at Conference 12 

Relief Society Convention in Genealogy 13 

Benefit Insurance 13 

Book on Art and Architecture 15 



ADVERTISERS' DIRECTORY 



Patronize those who have made it possible for this paper to 

exist. 

1. AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE, Logan, Utah. 

2. WILLES-HORNE DRUG CO., 8 South Main, Salt Lake City. 

3. SALT LAKE KNITTING WORKS, 70 Main St., Salt Lake City 

4. CRISMON & NICHOLS, 229-231 So. West Temple, Salt Lake City. 

5. S. M. TAYLOR & CO., 251-259 E. First South, Salt Lake City. 

6. L. D. S. BUSINESS COLLEGE, Salt Lake City. 

7. KEELEY ICE CREAM CO., 555 Main, 260 State Sts., Salt Lake 

City. 

8. LARKIN-HULL UNDERTAKING CO., 255 South 2nd East St., 

Salt Lake City. 

9. L. D. S. HOSPITAL TRAINING SCHOOL FOR NURSES, Salt 

Lake City. 

10. CO-OP. FURNITURE, 35 South Main St., Salt Lake City. 

11. Z. C. M. I., Salt Lake City. 

12. HOTEL UTAH, Salt Lake City. 

13. RELIEF SOCIETY BURIAL CLOTHES, Beehive House, Salt 

Lake City. 

14. CUTLER BROS. CO., 36 So. Main St., Salt Lake City. 

15. STAR PRINTING CO., 35 P. O. Place, Salt Lake City. 

16. MORRISON BAKING CO., 158 So. Main St., Salt Lake City. 

17. BENEFICIAL LIFE INSURANCE CO., Vermont Building, Salt 

Lake City. 

18. McCONAHAY, THE JEWELER, 64 Main St., Sa't Lake City. 



F. J. NICHOLS C. C. CRISMON 

COLD TESTS 

Melted, Assayed, Purchased Cyanide, Concentration, 

Amalgamation 

CRISMON & NICHOLS 

ASSAYERS and CHEMISTS 

Office and Laboratory— 229 & 231 So. West Temple St. 
Wasatch 2393. P. O. Box 78 Salt Lake City, Utah 

Established 1860 Incorporated 1908 

S. M. TAYLOR & CO. 

UNDERTAKERS AND 
EMBALMERS 

Successors to 

JOSEPH E. TAYLOR 

The Pioneer Undertaker of the West 
53 years in one location 

251=253=255=257 East First South St. 
Salt Lake City, Utah 

MODERN METHODS COMPLETE EQUIPMENT 

EFFICJENT SERVICE 

THE LEADING 
COMMERCIAL SCHOOL OF THE WEST 

L D. S. BUSINESS COLLEGE 

SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH 

Highest Efficiency. Lowest Rates. 

Ask for our Circular. Phone Wasatch 320 



RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 

ORGAN OF THK WOMAN'S RELIEF SOCIETY OF THE 
CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS 

Vol. 1. March, 1914. No. 3 

Editor Mrs. Susa Yoxjng Gates 

Business Manager Mrs. Janette A. Hyde 

Assistant Manager Mrs. Amy Brown Lyman 

Advisory Committee 

Mrs. Clarissa S. Williams Mrs. Jclina L. Smith Mrs. Rebecca N. Nibley 



Publishers and Proprietors General Board of the Relief Society 

Oflace • Room 28 Bishop's Building, Salt Lake City 

One Dollar a Year Ten Cents> Copy 

Application made for entry as secottdclass matter at Post Office, 

Salt Lake City. 

EDITORIAL. 
THE SAVING HABIT. 



Many of the women in the Relief Society have been reared 
by careful New England or European mothers who taught 
them the value of money, time and physical strength. But few 
of these women have had either the opportunity or the dispo- 
sition to train their daughters in the same careful way. The 
spirit of today, and especially the American spirit, is one of 
reckless waste — a waste of time, of money and of bodily vigor. 
The very air is surcharged with extravagance ; with careless 
habits and pleasure seeking hours, while most of us pawn the 
present and possess only debt-burdened futures. The want of 
today is the debt of tomorrow. If the hour be spent strenu- 
ously, it matters little whether it be spent in wasteful shop- 
ping, in the deceptively cheap picture-houses, or in giving or 
going to extravagant social affairs. If ten cents be saved 
with a trifling self-denial of one extravagant expenditure to- 
day, a dollar is thrown away tomorrow on the strength of that 
first economy. 

Who measures out his hours as he would priceless radium? 
Who takes cognizance of his days as a miser would of his 
hoarded coin? Who guards his rare leisure moments from the 
devastating demands of silly gossiping telephone calls or idle 
repinings on his own part for past mistakes? What woman 
maps out her daily and weekly time as would a soldier, or the 



2 RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 

head of a successful shoe-shop? What girl is taught to choose 
her studies in school and her hours of relaxation, with the same 
care that marks the long family consultation over the school- 
ing periods of the boy? 

Into these questions enter some of the vital principles of 
the Gospel of our Lord. For the time is very close, and those 
whose lamps are burning, must learn to conserve time, oil and 
purchase-money lest they shall be found among the foolish 
ones. 

Time, money, vigor of mind and body, these are our re- 
sources. Let us consider them for a moment. 

The experience of centuries has proved that time is 
saved by an orderly disposition of the moments and hours that 
comprise the working day. Moreover, habit, that slave or 
master, will take charge of much of the waste products of odd 
moments; and if we have formed the "habit" of using these 
as well as all the other moments profitably, habit will oil the 
bearings, smooth out the rough places, and practically assume 
charge of all our time. And the comfort of following 
quietly in the path of habit. It is not work, nor burdens that 
destroy the human system, physical and mental, it is the fail- 
ure to achieve that which we have planned and desired to do, 
the misery of seeing the hours slip by without the accomplish- 
ment of our cherished desires. Or, worse, it is the feeling of 
tasks piling up while we recklessly permit interruptions of 
minor importance to squander our moments, skimp our hours 
and dull our decisions of what to choose out in the multiplicity 
of duties that confront us after a wasted afternoon. Such un- 
regulated time numbs the sense of choosing, destroys all poise 
in the human equation, and unfits any woman for wise living. 
She becomes a straw thrown on the waves of circumstance, a 
feather blown by the winds of chance, and a whisper breathed 
into the uncertain ear of fate. 

When we approach the question of money-spending we are 
face to face with the great crying evil of civilized society. 
For the really poor people are those who waste their financial 
resources, whether it be ten-cent wastes or ten-dollar wastes, 
We approach the end of our days in fear and dread lest there 
shall be no provision for our last sickness, no funds to bury us 
decently out of sight. The habits of saving can be acquired, 
any time in life, though far more easily in youth than in age; 
and far more easily can they be acquired in families where 
that trait predominates than in families where the habit of ex- 
travagance has been the rule for generations. But this habit can 
be, and certainly should be acquired. How? Let the sisters 
of this Society answer this question. 



RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN « 

Any woman whose strength is thrown recklessly away in 
doing useless tasks, whose vitality is burned up in her scram- 
bling to keep up a modicum of house-work, so that her 
strength may be given to clubs and picture shows, or to 
the incessant pleasure-seeking indulged in by the dwellers in 
some of our larger cities, she is the bankrupt woman of the 
community. How shall we save our strength? Is not work — 
housework — healthful? Are we not counselled to take time 
for recreation? Must we not cultivate our gifts and mental 
powers? Shall we not attend the places of amusement as 
chaperons to guard our growing children? Ah, yes, indeed- 
But just how? just when? just how much? these are the ques- 
tions which each woman must sternly set herself to 
answer. The dear, patient women of the Relief Society who 
read this appeal for saving habits, will need to talk it over 
among themselves, and then prayerfully and carefully dis- 
cover if there is not room for improvement even amongst our- 
selves. 



March— GENEALOGY AND TESTIMONY— Lesson n. 

Ten minutes talk on Current Events. 

How to Prepare Home Material : 

"And a book of remembrance was kept." — Pearl of Great 
Price: 6th Chap., 5th verse. 

(a) Personal information on hand. 

(b) Bibles; information on loose papers, temple forms, etc. 

(c) Information from living relatives and friends. 

(d) Writing to relatives, parish clerks, ministers, etc. 
(Forms for reply may be had at the Genealogical Society's 
office.) 

(e) Tradition, its uses and dangers. Tombstone inscrip- 
tions. 

(f) Care of genealogical material. 

(g) Family organizations as an aid in gathering informa- 
tion and doing temple work. 

Some of our sisters may think it difficult to take up these 
lessons on genealogy without a teacher. But here is a lesson 
that all can take, without teacher or outside help, if the direc- 
tions are carefully followed. 

The personal information on hand may include old let- 
ters, old books, bits of papers, scraps of envelopes, all material 
on which is written the names and data of ourselves or our 
dead. Where have you, my sister, kept your own name and 



4 RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 

birth date, the dates of your baptism, confirmation, endow- 
ments, marriage, and date of your appointment to office? 
Where have you kept the data of your father, mother and all 
your dead kindred? Have you a carefully prepared, a living 
record, for your own family, and also one or more records for 
your kindred dead? If not, why not? 

If you have such papers, gather them all together into one 
place, go over them carefully, note things that are obscure, 
add all missing dates and clues that you can procure, and then 
get a tin box, with a lock on it, and into this box put all your 
genealogical books, papers, and letters. This is your most 
precious possession. No jewels or deeds to property are half 
«o valuable as these records of your dead, and of your own liv. 
ing family. For in one hundred years from now there will be 
nothing left of you, as there is nothing left of your forefathers 
today, except a few written words on a sheet of paper. Think 
how important it is that this genealogical data shall be prop- 
erly prepared and most carefully preserved. 

Keep a family Bible. Write in the dates and vital statis- 
tics of your family. Or. better still, use one of our Society 
Living Record Books. The old Bibles of our forefathers are 
reliable and valuable sources of genealogical information. 
Write to your relatives out of the church for their old Bibles 
or get at least a copy of the information contained therein. 

When you do not know your own or your parents birth, 
marriage, baptism, death or other dates, write letters to the 
ward clerks here at home ; or to the parish clerks from whence 
you or your parents came. Write to your relatives both in 
and out of the church. Don't let this day go by until you have 
written that long neglected letter for the information which 
you need and which may be easily obtained. Write to the 
European or American parish minister. He will charge you a 
shilling or a quarter a name, perhaps, for copying your 
names, but is worth the money. Forms for replies, that is, 
sheets printed with blank spaces for the writing in of birth, 
marriage and death data, should be sent. This makes it easy 
for your correspondents to reply and send all the information 
you need. If you simply ask a few indirect and vaguely- 
worded questions you are apt to get only short and fragmentary 
replies. If you send, however, a blank such as we recommend, 
you are almost certain to get back much information that you 
would not otherwise procure. Be sure and send a stamped en- 
velope for the reply. 

Write down all that your memory or the memory of your 
relatives can supply, both historical and genealogical. Even if 
it is not accurate, write it down, saying that it is "Tradi- 



RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 6 

tion," and then no one will be misled by such information ; and 
yet clues are often obtained from such tradition with which 
to bind up scattered information. Your Lesson book has 
plenty of information on this subject. 

Family organizations permit us to work as women, where 
many times we would not otherwise be allowed to do so. And 
many men who are too busy to go into the temples, will con- 
tribute money if there is a strong family organization where 
money can be given and used judiciously. Let the sisters set 
about forming a family organization in each family unit of 
the church. Here, also, your Lesson book will give you the 
needed help. 

A good work can be done by visiting the cemeteries and 
copying carefully all the information there found concerning 
our own families. For our ward and cemetery records have 
been very poorly kept in the early days. 



Review Questions. 



1. What is genealogy? 

2. "When was the Genealogical Society of Utah organ- 

ized? 

3. How old is the practice and study of genealogy and 

where do we go for the first lessons in it? 

4. "Why did the people of Egypt and Asia keep gen- 

ealogy? 

5. "Why should we be so careful and accurate in keeping 

and preparing our genealogy? 

6. How can we become Saviors on Mount Zion? 

7. What is the first step a Latter-day Saint should take 

in preparing genealogy? 

8. Why do the Latter-day Saints build Temples? 

9. What has the spirit of Elijah done for the world 

and why has it come to the earth? 

10. Have you prepared your own record? 

11. What is the condition of your parents' record? 

12. Have you formed a family organization? 



• RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 

March— HOME ETHICS (20 minutes)— Lesson IIL 
Ten minutes' talk on Current Events. 
Sanctity of the Family — Love Should Rule: 

"A house divided against itself can not stand." 
Mutual Confidence: 

(a) Prayer. Every home should be a house of prayer; 
the influence of such will reach to the ends of the earth and 
eventually draw back to its shelter even the hearts of way- 
ward children. 

(b) The glorious sisterhood of women opened up by the 
organization of the Relief Society at Nauvoo, 111., March 17, 
1842. 

Home Education is the Foundation of Society. 

(a) Home education. 

(b) How the conduct of parents affects the children. 

(c) Home education as important as the building of a 
city or nation. 

(d) Each word and act has an effect for good or evil. 

(e) Young people need anchors. 

(f) Pure and refined parents bequeath these tendencies 
to their children. 

(g) No one else does, or should have the influence with 
children that fathers and mothers have. 

If the thoughts of parents were more centered in their 
homes, and if they were as earnestly exercised in the consider- 
ation of ways and means for rightly educating the moral and 
intellectual natures of their children as in procuring food and 
raiment for the perishing body, they would render a service 
to society as important as if they built a city or founded a 
nation. 

Fathers and mothers do not always realize the vital im- 
portance of their every word and act on the minds of theii 
young sons and daughters. 

The impressions formed in childhood are lasting, hence the 
necessity for constant watchfulness in this regard. Home sur- 
rounding and influences are strong elements in laying the 
foundations for a life of happiness and usefulness, in more ways 
than one. Young people need an anchor; there is a period 
in their lives when they have sand-bars and danger points to 
steer past, and if, in their homes, there is the binding chords 
of a sure anchor those safeguards will bring them into a good 
harbor eventually, with but few exceptions. 



RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 7 

No one else does, or should have the power to shape the 
destinies of our children that the parents themselves possess. 
Innocence and kindliness are inborn, culture and education 
acquired; but neither of the latter have sufficient influence 
without the possession of the former qualities. We have some 
times met the most perfect ladies and gentlemen in log cabins, 
and uncouth, ignorant and selfish people living in homes of 
grandeur and beauty. The costly dress does not indicate the 
superior character. 

What is it makes a lady? 

'Tis not her outward dress, 

But a spirit taught by wisdom 

A willingness to bless. 

A soul that loves all virtue, 

A heart both meek and kind, 

Will mould the human character 

And add culture to the mind. 



March— HOME GARDENING FOR WOMEN— Lesson III 

(Twenty Minutes.) 

(a) House boxes. 

In the propagation of some of the flowering plants and 
various garden crops, such as tomatoes, peppers, egg plants, 
etc., house boxes have been found to be very valuable. 

Especially is this the case when just a few plants are 
wanted, because it would not be economical to construct a hot- 
bed for the starting of a few plants. 

The box is constructed so that it will fit the window sill. 
After the box has been properly made it should be filled with 
a good friable soil. This soil should not bake, because the 
tender plants will not grow under such conditions. A good 
soil can be prepared in the following manner : 

Manure. 

3 parts garden loam. 
2 parts well rotted manure. 
1 part sand. 
The above parts should all be screened to avoid lumps of 
soil, etc. 

Place the box of soil in position in the window, and after 
the soil reaches a growing temperature of 60° F., the seeds or 
cuttings may be planted. 



8 RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 

Mignonette. It is doubtful if there is any flowering 
plant more universally known or better liked than mignonette. 
The mignonette, whether grown for cutting or for pots must 
have the fullest possible light and air on all permissible occas- 
ions. Light and air and a cool temperature will just make 
the difference between stout, heavy spikes and thin, spindling 
ones. 

Sow in August for winter house plants. Sow in the same 
pots as they are to be maintained in, as they do not stand 
transplating. Pot should have plenty of drainage in the bot- 
tom, and be filled with a good soil. 

(b) Hotbeds. 

Many plants can be advantageously started in hotbeds. 
The hotbed should be built in a place where there is good drain- 
age so that the fermentation of the manure will not be inter- 
fered with by standing water during storms, because this 
might stop the fermentation to such an extent that the plants 
will be killed by the cold air. 

The hotbed should be constructed of good, fresh horse 
manure, containing straw bedding. The manure should be 
turned at least two times before putting it into the hotbed. 
This will cause it to be of uniform texture throughout and an 
even heat will be the result. The manure should be two or 
three feet deep and should be well tramped down. It should 
be piled high and project at least 1% feet from the frame 
on all sides. 

The bed should be about 10 inches high in front and 18 
inches in the back. A convenient sized hotbed is one that will 
carry six, 3x6 feet sash. This will give ample room for many 
plants. 

(c) Early Planting. 

Lettuce is a hard, cool season, short season, succession or 
companion crop, requiring mellow, moist soil, quickly available 
fertilizers and continuous growth from start to finish. Its 
culture is very easy and simple. It can be grown successfully 
both spring and fall. In order to secure a quick growth, it 
is sometimes advisable to apply nitrate of soda after the plants 
are set. It is sprinkled broadcast on the surface and raked 
or cultivated into the soil, at the rate of 200 to 300 pounds 
per acre. It can be sown as soon as the ground can be worked 
in the spring. 

Radishes are known chiefly as an early spring crop in 
America, although they are sometimes grown in the fall. Rad- 
ishes are usually used as a companion crop when grown in the 



RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 9 

field. The seeds are quick to germinate and can be sown early 
in the spring. 

Onions. Early green onions are secured by planting 
mother onions or sets late in the fall or early in the spring. 
Sets or mother onions will respond to almost any kind of soil, 
except soils containing too many mineral salts. 

(d) Early Flowers. There are many beautiful early flow- 
ers among which are found the Easter lily, azaleas, rhododen- 
drons, lilacs, metrosideros, spiraea, mignonette (grown in the 
house), Dutch hyacinth, tulips and violets. They are all 
handled a little difi^erently, and time will not permit of a dis- 
cussion of each of the early spring flowers. 

Bulbs. There are several very pretty flowers that are 
grown from bulbs, such as the Dutch hyacinths, Easter lilies, 
freesias, tulips and calla lilies. 

They require a good, rich soil composed of about 50 per 
cent rich loam, 25 per cent well rotted manure, and 25 per 
cent sand. Practically all bulbs are imported from Holland, 
between the months of August and November. For forcing 
they should be potted at once after being received. 

Tulips, hyacinths, and narcissus can be grown in shallow 
pans, that will hold about 15 bulbs. They require good drain- 
age. Small bits of broken pots or gravel should be placed in 
the bottom of each pant or pot. Fill pan with soil. Plant the 
bulbs so that about one-fourth of them remain above the soil. 
"Water as soon as they are planted and store in a cool place at 
first, so only the root will grow, cover them with about 3 or 4 
inches of coal ashes. Leave them in a cool place for a month 
or six weeks until the roots fill the pot. After taking them out 
into the light keep them in a cool place for about two weeks, 
then take them to a temperature above 70 degrees. Dutch hy- 
acinths can also be grown in a water dish. 

Freesias. These can be started right ofi: in the house and 
be grown very successfully under home conditions. Easter 
lilies can be planted in six-inch pots. They should be started 
slow, like the narcissus, sometimes two or three months being 
required before the roots are w^ell started. Take into the house 
the latter part of November for Easter blooming. 

Calla Lilies are the easiest to force. They are potted in 
August in rich soil and require much water. After the plant 
reaches a height of 10 to 12 inches mulch the top of pot with 
manure. These bulbs are good for years. After the blooming 
season lay pot and all on their sides in a cool airy place. 



10 RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 

March— LITERATURE— Lesson III. 

(Twenty Minutes.) 

Ten minutes talk on Current Events. 
Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin: 

LESSON III.— Subject: Franklin's struggle in England. 
Reference : Chap. II and III, Autobiography. 

1. Franklin's disappointment in regard to letter of as- 
sistance. 

(a) Gov. Keith breaks promises. 

(b) Franklin left on own resources in a strange land. 

2. Work in English Printing Houses. 

(a) Spends first year at Palmer's. Writes pamphlet. 

(b) "Works for Watts. Works at press, in composing 
room, and at dispatch work. 

3. Effects of Franklin's habits of temperance. 

(a) On himself. , 

(b) On companions in printing house. 

4. Friendships with landlady in Duke street. 

5. Franklin as a swimmer. Effect on health. 

6. Negotiations with Mr. Denham for mercantile busi- 
ness. 



QUESTIONS. 

1. What was the secret of Franklin's success in making 
friends so readily? 

2. Were Franklin's experiences with Gov. Keith a hin- 
drance or a benefit to him? Why? 

3. Mention two advantages he had over his associates in 
the office because of his temperate habits. 

4. What opportunities did he have for obtaining books 
to read? 

5. What was the basis of his friendship with his landlady? 

6. In summing up, what would you say Franklin gained 
by his residence in England? 



RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 11 

March— ARCHITECTURE— Lesson III. 

(Ten Minutes.) 

The Mountain Home: 

The mountain home: A screened porch or a series of 
porches. 

The dining porch. 

The Mountain Home. 

The mountain home should be a porch, or a series of 
porches, all screened, with at least one room added, that can 
in stormy weather be closed in and easily and quickly warmed 
by stove or fireplace, preferably the latter. 

The closed room may be provided with a sliding door on 
one side, that when open will make the room a part of the large 
porch. 

The kitchen should be devised to be open or closed tightly, 
for in stormy weather the food cools quickly and in hot, dry 
weather the cook must have the cool breeze that generally 
stirs in the mountains. 

If the cabin is set on a steep slope where the view nat- 
urally becomes the theme of interest and is the cause for 
selection of the site, the building may be set up on stilts, as it 
were. Back of the house the earth should be shoveled away to 
make room for a path and from this should descend the path 
leading to the water supply — the creek. 

Two rooms may be built below the porch and if more 
bedrooms be desired the loft (with screens on either end) may 
be used as a large sleeping porch. 

There is one absolute necessity for comfort and health in a 
canyon home, that is good screens — no loop-holes left for the 
curious gnat, horsefly, mosquito, or house-fly. All porches, 
windows and doors should be screened and even more im- 
portant than this, the privy should be screened — door, win- 
dow and vault. An adjustable screen at the back of the vault 
will save life and prevent sickness. 

Preparation. 

Let each member design a mountain home for her own 
family. In this plan provide for a kitchen with stove and 
work-table and shelves, bathroom, if possible; if not, means 
for keeping wash basins and bath tub, etc. A protected porch 



12 RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 

cover for stationary dining table and cupboard for dishes. 
Place for storing provisions. Clothes presses; book shelves. 
Suitable place for hammock. Doors leading to creek, privy 
and necessary windows in kitchen. Screened living porch. 
Closed room with sliding door on porch. 



ABOUT OUR BULLETINS. 



Stake Presidents are expected to apportion the Bulletins 
to Ward Presidents in strict accordance with the average at- 
tendance of the various wards, as reported in 1913. 

It is also suggested that these Bulletins shall be distrib- 
uted at the Stake monthly meetings, which will avoid extra 
mailing expense. 

"When the ward officers fail to receive their regular or al- 
lotted number of Bulletin, complaints should be made to their 
Stake Presidents and not to this office. For no wards are or 
may be supplied from this office, except when they desire to 
pay for extra numbers. 

Extra numbers of the Bulletins for Wards or for indi- 
viduals can be had at ten cents apiece, so long as they last. 
The January Bulletins are all exhausted. There are still 
some Guides left, and plenty of Februrary Bulletins, as we 
printed a thousand extra to supply the unusual and gratifying 
demands of our friends. 

Address all inquiries and Bulletin business letters to 
Relief Society Bulletin, Room 28, Bishops' Building, Salt Lake 
City. 



OFFICERS' MEETING AT CONFERENCE. 



To comply with a number of requests, and to oblige our 
out-of-town visiting sisters at the April Relief Society Confer- 
ence, it has been decided to hold the regular Officers' meeting 
on the second morning of our Conference, instead of the Mon- 
day or Tuesday morning, following the General Conference, as 
heretofore. This will enable all our sisters to be present and 
to take part in this important meeting. As our Relief So- 
ciety Conference will convene on April 2nd, Thursday, the 



RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 13 

officers' meeting Avill be held Friday morning. The General 
Conference itself is to be held on April -Ith, 5th and 6th, Satur- 
day, Sunday and Monday, which would put our officers' meet- 
ing off till the 7th. But our convention will begin on the 7th, 
continuing on the 8th and 9th. The notice of the change in the 
dates for our Genealogical Conventi'^n follows: 



Relief Society Convention in Genealogy. 



The Convention which was announced for April 1st, 2nd, 
and 3rd, is postponed to the following week, owing to failure 
to secure railroad rates. The Convention will be held on 
the 7th, 8th and 9th. The tickets of all delegates will hold 
good till this convention is over, and none should plan to 
come to the Convention only part of the time. This is a serious 
matter, sisters, and needs serious attention. If your delegates 
are sent here to take these lessons, let that be their prime 
consideration. All lesson matters should give way to this 
Convention. 



BENEFIT INSURANCE FOR THE RELIEF SOCIETY. 



The General Board of the Relief Society have been con- 
sidering for some time the advisability of introducing insur- 
ance as one department of our many activities. Insurance has 
proved to be a step in the right direction in many ways ; and 
whatever there is of good or profit for women, this we eagerly 
seek to incorporate in our work. "With this end in view, a 
letter was addressed to the First Presidency and an answer 
received. We append both letters, which are self-explanatory. 
This matter will be laid fully before you at the coming April 
Conference. 



Salt Lake City, Utah, Jan. 21, 1914. 

Pres. Joseph F. Smith and Counsellors : 

Dear Brethren: We would like to know your mind in 



14 RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 

regard to introducing some benefit insurance into the Relief 
Society. 

A number of social and other insurance companies for 
women are doing quite a profitable business in this community, 
among them being the Ladies of the Maccabees, the "Women of 
"Woodcraft, The Rebecca Lodge, as well as others. These fra- 
ternal orders — for men and women — took out of the state last 
year $177,213.79. The Ladies of the Macabees alone took out 
$11,455.91. 

Some of our sisters join those lodges, while others take out 
the small benefit insurance from regular companies, some of 
them located in foreign lands. The idea of having a little 
fund put by with which to meet burial expense is very attrac- 
tive to our women. 

Our sisters have contributed liberally to every form of 
charity and public activity, such as the building of temples 
and meeting houses, schools and amusement halls; while doing 
very much towards furnishing these places. Few have ac- 
quired the saving habit, and fewer still are inculcating saving 
habits in the minds of the young children of today. Too many 
of our sisters, when they die, are left to the indifferent mercy 
of relatives, or to the ward authorities. They would be glad 
to be placed where they could have this last liberal service 
performed without being a burden on anyone. They could, 
and many would be willing, to pay a small sum monthly which 
would insure them their modest burial expenses. 

Some of our young sisters would gladly pay a small 
monthly sum that would mature in five, ten, or twenty years. 
"While most children could be taught to put by small sums 
monthly towards paying for their schooling or missions when 
old enough for that need. The habits of saving would be of 
more value to them in developing character than the monetary 
benefits. 

"We have applied to the Beneficial Life Insurance Company 
which has our President Joseph F. Smith at its head, and which 
is also officered by our own brethren, to give us rates and 
details of such a scheme as we have suggested. "We enclose a 
copy of the rate list made out for us. "We would expect to 
work entirely through the powerful, reliable and courteous 
company named. Agents would be appointed in each ward 
and stake, but the business details would be handled by the 
Beneficial Life Insurance Company. W^hat premiums accrued 
to our Board over and above the running expenses would be 
turned to Relief Society work. 



RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 15 

"We lay this matter before you, and trust to hear from you 
as soon as convenient. "We are 

Your sisters in the Gospel, 
Emmeline B. Wells, President. 
Clarissa S. "Williams, First Counsellor, 
Julina L. Smith, Second Counsellor, 



Salt Lake City, Utah, Jan. 27, 1913. 

Prests. Emmeline B. "Wells, 
Clarissa S. "Williams, 
Julina L. Smith, 

Relief Society. 

Dear Sisters : "We approve the suggestion outlined in 
yours of the 21st inst., to introduce and maintain a system of 
benefit insurance in connection with Relief Society, believing 
that this departure from relief work would be a means of 
supplying an income for the Society itself, as well as be the 
means of inducing and encouraging our sisters to form the 
habit of saving means which otherwise would doubtless be 
disposed of unwisely. It is understood by us that the officials 
of the company with whom you have been talking in regard 
to this matter are to render you all the necessary clerical as- 
sistance, especially at the outset, also that the company is to 
furnish the Society with the necessary books, etc., and other- 
wise co-operate with you with a view to making this move- 
ment the success we all wish it to become. 
Your brethren, 

Joseph F. Smith, 
Anthon H. Lund, 
Charles W. Penrose, 

First Presidency. 



BOOK ON ART AND ARCHITECTURE. 



Inasmuch as there are so many inquiries for the expen- 
sive books on Art and Architecture, the General Board of our 
Society have asked Sister Alice Merrill Home to prepare a 



16 RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 

book suitable for our lessons and our Utah home conditions 
on these subjects, the cost not to exceed one dollar. The 
book will be illustrated and will contain many suggestions 
for the improving and beautifying of our modest homes and 
home surroundings. It will contain a chapter on the architec- 
tural designs for meeting houses and Relief Society halls. Some 
guiding principles in the study of art will be given with illus- 
trations. The book will embrace a two-years' lesson course, 
or more, and will prove indispensable to all Relief Society 
workers. Exteriors and interiors will both be treated in a sim- 
ple, but effective, way. Each ward will, no doubt, require at 
least one of these books, while officers and members will be 
glad of this unique and valuable work. We suggest to our 
officers that they do not purchase other books on this line, but 
wait for our home product, which will be ready in April. The 
supply will be limited, and orders may be sent in at once to 
this office. This is our first attempt to supply and pre- 
pare a lesson book, and we trust our friends will support this 
enterprise liberally. 



BURIAL CLOTHES 

Relief Society General Board 
FURNISHES COMPLETE BURIAL SUITS 

Phones Wasatch 3455 and Wasatch 207 
Salt Lake City Utah 



Star Printing Compani^ 

35 Post Office Place Phone Wasatch 1370 

Salt Lake Citi;, Utah 



ICE CREAM— SHERBETS— PUNCHES 
and CANDIES are the "BEST BY TEST" 

Special prices to all Ward aud School Socials etc. 
TWO STORES 55 Main St. 260 State St. 

Prompt Delivery Phones: Wasatch 3223—3224 



THOMAS HULL ELIJAH A. LARKIN 

GEO. W. LARKIN ALMA J. LARKIN 

LARKIN-HULL 

UNDERTAKING CO. 

EMBALMERS AND 
FUNERAL DIRECTORS. 

CHAPEL & PARLORS 255 SO. 2nd EAST ST. 
Phone Wasatch 5132 SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH 



W. N. Williams, Supt. Clarissa S. Williams. Sec'y & Treas R. N. Wilson. Asst. Supt 

Guaranteed Furniture at Lowest Prices 

Our magnificent stock comprises ffoods from America's 
most representative lines and our prices are always reasonable. 

Carpets, Rugs, Draperies, Linoleum, Ranges, 
Heaters, Go-Carts, Etc. 

Home Furnishings of a,ll descriptions for 

CASH OR CREDIT 

Co-op. Furniture Co. 

Next Door South of Z. C. M. I. 



L. D. S. HOSPITAL TRAINING 
SCHOOL FOR NURSES 

The Dr. W. H Groves Latter-day Saints Hospital tias a Train- 
ing School for nurses, which has an averap:e attendance of about 
one hundred nurses in training. Tiie Hospital, with the new wing, 
has a capacity of 250 beds, and gives a thorough course in surgicHl, 
medical, obstetrical, infant and accident nursing. It is also equip- 
ped ["with a department for giving hydro and electro-therapy 
treatments. 

]f you w^ant a training equal to any in the United States, take 
this course at the L. D S. Hospital, 

If you want to be classed as one of the best nurses in the United 
States, take a Training at the L. D. S. Hospital. 

If you want to b.^ the possessor of a diploma which wili place 
you among the best in this profession, take the course given at the 
L. D. S. Hospital 

If you want an occupation that will help you through life, take 
a course of training at the L D. S. Hospital 

If you wish to become a better citizen, better wife, or better 
mother, take this course of training. 

Some schools may give a diploma in six months or a year, but 
If you are ambitious nothing less than a course at the L. D. S. 
Hospital wili ever satisfy you. Write at once to the Supt. of Nurses 
for further particulars 



Ask your Dealer For 

Z. C. M. I. 

School Shoes 

They keep the children's 

feet warm and dry- 
prevent doctor's bills, 



^'MOUNTAINEER" 



or "THE LEADER 



II 



Overalls don't rip. 
See you get them 




CUTLER'S UTAH MADE GOODS 

Command Attention— Buy At Home 

Approved Garments— Bleached or Unbleached 

75c Lwht Weight - = $1.00 Lisle Thread 

$1.00 Medium Weight - $1.25 Heavy Weight 

POSTAGE PREPAID. 

Provo Dress Goods==Suitings==Blankets. 

SAMPLES SENT ON REQUEST. SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH 



HOTEL UTAH 




500 Rooms. Fireproof 

Opened June 8, 1911 

"The very best of every, 
thing at sensible prices " 

Rates for room without 

bath $1.50 and $2.00. 

With bath $2. 50 per day 

and upwards. 

Under the Management of 

QEORQE O. RELF 



We want your name on 
our mailing Iist== 

To get it we will send you post 
paid a high grade cut glass jelly 
dish— or a heavy solid gold real 
stone set scarf pin for $1. 

MONEY REFUNDED IF NOT SATISFACTORY 

McConahay,tlie Jeweler 

64 MAIN ST. SALT LAKE CITY 





**BETTER THINGS TO EAT" 

CORNER MAIN & 1st SO. 
158 SOUTH MAIN ST. 



TWO^^S 






WHILE LABORING FOR THE POOR 

AND AIDING THE WIDOW IN WANT, 

DON'T NEGLECT YOURSELF AND FAMILY 

Have they the proper protection in ease of 
sickness or death of 
your bread winner or 
will you be compelled 
to look for charity? 

Has he sufficient life 
insurance to assure 
you this protection? 





JOHN C. CUTLER 
1st. Vice President. 



INSURANCE 
IN FORCE 





LORENZO N. STOHL 
2nd. Vice Pres. & Mgr. 



OVER 

$12,000,000.00 



JOSEPH F. SMITH 
President. 



Beneficial Life 
Insurance Co. 

Home office, Vermont 

Building 

Salt Lake City, Utah 




C. W. NIBLEY 
Member Ex. Com. 



RICHARD W. YOUNG 

Counsel 



Relict Society Bulletin 

Volume 1 April, 1914. Number 4 






Issued by the Officers and Directors of the 

GENERAL BOARD OF THE RELIEF SOCIETY 
1914 



HUMAN SERVICE 

has come to be a consideration of political parties, or social 
organizations, and of educational institutions. ■ 

THE RELIEF SOCIETY 

has been an instrument of human service for more than half a 
century. It ministers to the immediate material wants of tlie 
community. It has been pronounced by many students an 
institution for community charity. 

THE UTAH AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

at Logan aims in a very definite way to make each member 
of society a more capable producer, a better farmer, house- 
wife, tradesman, agricultural engineer, or business man and 
thus aims to eliminate want. Its field of work therefore, 
properly co-operates with the work of relief societies in serv- 
ing the men and women of the State. While Its courses are 
distinctly practical, it deals in a broad and fundamental way 
with the basic industries of the State. Liberal instruction Is 
given in the natuicil and physical sciences, in mathematics, 
history, English, cc- )nomic8, literature and languages. 

The <Jollege has been slowly built into an embodiment of 
the State's idealism. 



Willes-Horne Drug Company 

News Building, Salt Lake City. 

Our Drug Store Is Complete 

TREATMENT PERFECT. PRICES RIGHT. 

WE SOLICIT YOUR PATRONAGE. 

Prompt Attention to Mail Orders. 



Lambourne Floral Dept. 
EVERYTHING FLORAL. 

DECORATIONS. FUNERAL WORK. Etc., Etc. 




Special Notice to 
Garment Users. 

It is recommended and advised by 
the most particular and careful buyers 
of L. D. S. Garments that TEMPLE 
BRAND GARMENTS be used exclu- 
sively because of their superior quality, 
fit and finish. Be sure when making 
your purchases to look carefully in the 
neck of garments for the words TEM- 
PLE BRAND, found immediately below 
the approved label. If they are not 
there the garment is not the AP- 
PROVED TEMPLE BRAND, manufac- 
tured exclusively by the Salt Lake Knitting Works for the better class of trade 
and discriminating purchasers. If your local dealer does not handle TEMPLE 
BRAND GARMENTS send your orders to Salt Lake Knitting Store, 70 Main 
treet. Salt Lake City. 

Post ate free to all parts of the United States. Prices as follows ; 

Best grade of combed cotton, gauze weight $1.00 

Best grade of combed cotton, medium weight ... 1.25 

Superior cotton, unbleached, medium weight 1.25 

Superior cotton, bleached, medium weight • • 1.50 

Superior cotton, unbleached, extra heavy weight .... 1.50 

Best grade Sea Island lisle, gauze weight 1.50 

Best grade combed cotton, heavy weight, fleeced • • . . ■ • . . 1.75 

Best grade Sea Island mercerized, light weight ■ • • • 2.0O 

Wash shrunk, part wooli medium weight 2.00 

Wash shrunk. Merino wool, heavy weight 2.25 

Wash shrunk. Utah wool, extra heavy weight • • 3.00 

Wash shrunk, imported part wool, light weight, extra fine 3.00 

Pure Australian Wool, medium weight ... 4,00 

Remember that postage is free, also that there is no substitution for Temple 
Brand Garments, and if you are not wearing them now you will some day Then 
regret not having done so before. 

SALT LAKE KNITTING STORE 

Salt Lake City, Utah 



INDEX TO LESSON STATEMENTS. 

PAGE 

Charity and Faith 1 

Tithing in the Relief Society 3 

Genealogy and Testimony 5 

Home Ethics .' ... 6 

Home Gardening for Women / '.-; i-.m • •' ir r " • • • (''-.^ 

Literature . .' '.\"..'. . . '.'".' . . . . 12 

Art and Architecture .... /.■■^*t^-^ 14 

Report Blanks . . . .- . . , . : . , . ; . . . ... . v ; . -. 14 

The A merican City ....,......,., 1^ 



ADVERTISERS' DIRECTORY 



Patronize those who have made it possible for this paper to 

exist. 

1. AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE, Logan, Utah. 

2. WILLES-HORNE DRUG CO., 8 South Main, Salt Lake City. 

3. SALT LAKE KNITTING WORKS, 70 Main St., Salt Lake City. 

4. CRISMON & NICHOLS, 229-231 So. West Temple, Salt Lake City. 

5. S. M. TAYLOR & CO., 251-259 E. First South, Sak*Lake City. 

6. L. D. S. BUSINESS COLLEGE, Salt Lake City. 

7. KEELEY ICE CREAM CO., 555 Main, 260 State Sts., Salt Lake 

City. 

8. LARKIN-HULL UNDERTAKING CO., 255 South 2nd East St., 

Salt Lake City. 

9. L. D. S. HOSPITAL TRAINING SCHOOL FOR NURSES, Salt 

Lake City. 

10. CO-OP. FURNITURE, 35 South Main St., Salt Lake City. 

11. Z. C. M. I., Salt Lake City, 

12. HOTEL UTAH, Salt Lake City. 

13. RELIEF SOCIETY BURIAL CLOTHES, Beehive House, Salt 

Lake City. 

14. CUTLER BROS. CO., 36 So. Main St., Salt Lake City. 

15. STAR PRINTING CO., 35 P. O. Place, Salt Lake City. 

16. MORRISON BAKING CO., 158 So. Main St., Salt Lake City. 

17. BENEFICIAL LIFE INSURANCE CO., Vermont Building, Salt 

Lake City. 

18. McCONAHAY, THE JEWELER, 64 Main St., Sa't Lake City. 

19. PORTER-WALTON CO., Salt Lake City, Utah. 



F. J. NICHOLS C. C. CRISMON 

GOLD TESTS 

Melted, Assayed, Purchased Cyanide, Concentration, 

Amalgamation 

CRISMON & NICHOLS 

ASSAYERS and CHEMISTS 

Office and Laboratory— 229 & 231 So. West Temple St. 
Wasatch 2393. P. O. Box 78 Salt Lake City, Utah 

Established 1860 Incorporated 1908 

S. M. TAYLOR & CO. 

UNDERTAKERS AND 
EMBALMERS 

Successors to 

JOSEPH E. TAYLOR 

The Pioneer Undertaker of the West 
53 years in one location 

251=253=255-257 East First South St. 

Salt Lake City, Utah 

modern methods complete equipment 

efficient service 

SPECIAL NOTICE 

SONS & DAUGHTERS of the UTAH PIONEERS 

-THE- 

L D. S. BUSINESS COLLEGE 

was established by your FATHERS for YOU. 

OPEN ALL THE YEAR. Day and Evening Sessions. 



RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 

ORGAN OF THK WOMAN'S RELIEF SOCIETY OF THE 
CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS 

VoL 1. April, 1914. No. 4 

Editor Mrs. Susa Yoxing Gate» 

Business Manager Mrs. Janette A. Hyde 

Assistant Manager Mrs. Amy Brown Lyman 

Advisory Committee 

Mrs. Clarissa S. Williams Mrs. Julina L. Smith Mrs. Rebecca N. Nibley 



Publishers and Proprietors General Board of the Relief Society 

Office Room 28 Bishop's Building:, Salt Lake City 

One Dollar a Year Ten Cents a Copy 

Kntered as second-class matter on February 18, 1914, at the Post Office 
at Salt Lake City, Utah, under the Act of March 3, 1879. 

CHARITY AND FAITH. 

"Charity Never Faileth." 

This motto has been adopted by the Relief Society, and 
indeed it seems most applicable for our organization, whose 
chief work is in that direction. 

The New Testament abounds in texts upon this and rela- 
tive subjects and the daily life of the Savior is replete with 
testimony of His acts of charity and deeds of mercy and kind- 
ness, setting for his followers this pattern of going about doing- 
good. 

In the lives of the sisters who devote themselves to Relief 
Society work, we see the resmeblance to those who followed 
the example of the Master; ministering to the wants of the 
needy and the sick and the sorrowing, and coming into the 
homes of the people like rays of sunshine. It is truly a labor 
of love to go among the people with a cheerful countenance, 
proving that there is a delight in the work of scattering sun- 
shine as well as sowing seed that will spring up and yield good 
fruit; and persuading those whom they visit to live lives of 
usefulness and not neglect the duties and obligations that de- 
volve upon all who would have the spirit of the Grospel within 
their hearts. In this way only can we become recipients of the 
blessings that follow in the pathway of those that love the 
Lord. The Savior himself said: "If ye love me, ye will keep 
my commandments;" and this must not be simply in form 
and ceremony but from the heart, and with an abiding faith in 
God and in his Son, Jesus Christ, ^he Savior of the world. 



2 BELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 

"Strong Son of God — Immortal Love, 
"Whom we who have not seen Thy Face 
By faith and faith alone embrace, 
Believing where we cannot prove." 

Faith must be the foundation upon which to build ; the 
apostle says: "Faith without works is dead." In the Relief 
Society and in the home there is abundant opportunity to 
manifest our faith by our works. The sisters should not lose 
sight of the principles of Faith, Hope and Charity, and we 
might add to these, Mercy, which we are told in the scrip- 
tures, endureth forever. 

Beloved sisters, do not be afraid of being thought old- 
fashioned if you continue to bear testimony, for in this way 
your own faith and the faith of others is strengthened. The 
testimony of the Gospel carries with it light ; and we help 
others even more than we are aware, when we impart of that 
which we have received. We must not become weary in well- 
doing, but keep our Gospel Armor bright, being diligent in 
season and out of season to preserve in our lives and in the 
hearts of the children of Zion the living testimony of the truth, 
that we may not be found wanting in energy and in diligence 
in the latter-day work. It is worth every effort we can put 
forth, this "prize of the high calling.'' 

It is difficult to realize all that the Gospel implies, all that 
it means to this generation now living, the height and depth 
and intelligence necessary to comprehend it in its fullness. 

When we look back and take into consideration the prin- 
•ciples revealed to the Prophet Joseph and which he taught 
to the people during the few years of his ministry, we can 
only exclaim in the language of the Bible, "a marvelous work 
and a wonder;" and we cannot doubt, if we take time to con- 
sider, that he could have been instructed in and prepared for 
his work only by the Lord himself; for he received thoughts 
and truthss that had been hidden from before the foundations 
of this world were laid. 

The Relief Society since its first organization has done a 
great work, not only materially but spiritually, and the women 
engaged in this work have grown in grace and in knowledge 
of right living. Many of those who have been valiant in the 
work have passed away and another generation is on the stage 
of action. Comparatively few of the veterans of the Society 
are now living to instruct and persuade and remind these 
younger members of the conditions and the struggles associated 
with the establishment of the Relief Society. But what an 
education, both temporal and spiritual, the Society has been to 
the women who have labored in it ! Those who have devoted 



I 



BELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 3 

time and effort in helping to build it up and maintain it have 
been marvelously blessed and benefited, and have received 
true knowledge, surpassing in many respects the benefits de- 
rived from schools and colleges. The writer has sometimes 
thought that a mission was more beneficial to boys and young 
men than a college course; and the sisters have a parallel op- 
portunity in the Belief Society if they do their work well and 
acquit themselves honorably. Let them therefore live up to 
the highest standard of excellence ; as a people we should be a 
light to the world, "a city set upon a hill." Let us be faithful 
and true, and cause our light to shine, so that others may fol- 
low that light. After all, light is life and we can not attain to 
great excellence without light. When the Lord created the 
earth on which we live he said, "Let there be light," and im- 
mediately at His command the world became a thing of beauty. 
Kemember the parable of the virgins and be ye among the 
wise ones who kept their lamps trimmed and burning, that ye 
may be ready to meet the great bridegoom when he comes. 

EMMELINE B. "WELLS. 



EDITORIAL. 



TITHING IN THE RELIEF SOCIETY. 

If the statistics of the various quorums and auxiliary 
organizations in the Church could be segregated, we feel sure 
that the officers and members of the Relief Society would 
prove to be among the best and most faithful of tithe-payers. 
Not tithe-payers who contribute the greatest amount indi- 
vidually, but tithe-payers who are both diligent and honest in 
their dealings with the Lord. Women, as a rule, are less selfish, 
less grasping, and more willing to share their blessings with 
each other, and with the Lord, than men. The seventy odd 
years of training which our beloved Relief Society sisters have 
received in charitable and philanthropic works, have so imbued 
them with the spirit of true devotion and unselfish principle 
that tithing is an easy law for them to observe. 

There is, however, another duty that confronts the Relief 
Society workers in regard to this principle: it is not enough 
that we shall be tithe-payers ourselves, we must exercise all 
our powers in an endeavor to inculcate this principle in the 
minds of our children and grandchildren. Even then, our duty 
does not cease. We should encourage our husbands and our 
sons to be exact and scrupulous in the observance of this law. 



4 RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 

Not by haranguing them, nor by nagging at them, for this 
policy will defeat the very end we are seeking to accomplish; 
but with loving tact and tender suggestion, coupled with con- 
stant prayer, we may help our husbands and our sons to keep 
the law. 

Having done all this, dear sisters, our duty is not dis- 
charged completely, for we should teach this principle in our 
Relief Society meetings, through exchanging our experiences, 
reading the Scriptures, and discussing the principle. More- 
over, when the teachers visit the members, they may tactfully 
call attention to the observance of this principle by the house- 
mother, and the children. To be sure, it is unwise for the So- 
ciety teachers to criticise in any way the conduct of the Priest- 
hood, in the home, but they are surely at liberty to admonish 
and encourage the women to observe the laws of God. 

Some women suppose that if their husbands and sons pay 
tithing, nothing is required of them, but the fact that our hus- 
bands and sons observe the Word of Wisdom, or keep holy the 
Sabbath day does not absolve us from obeying these laws. If 
we have any source of income, such as the sale of eggs, butter, 
or milk ; if we earn anything, either on the farm or in the city, 
we are in duty bound to tithe our earnings. Brigham Young 
once said to Sister Zina D. Young, that he regretted the fact 
that he had always paid the tithing for his family, and added 
that if he had his life to live over again, he would arrange 
matters so that every wife and child should be permitted to 
pay a personal tithing. 

Another fallacy is that some of our worthy poor, who are 
supported or assisted by the Eelief Society or the Church, think 
they do not need to pay their tithing on what they thus re- 
ceive. These sisters, who are so supported, are as much in duty 
bound to tithe their income as other women in the Church. A 
good widow who received ten dollars from the Church asked 
President Joseph F. Smith if it was required of her to tithe 
that small charity fund. He replied, most emphatically, in the 
affirmative; and this should be an example for all such cases. 
For unless we pay tithing, our names do not appear on the 
Church tithing records, and if they do not appear, we are under 
condemnation according to the word of the Lord, as recorded 
in Sec. 119, Doc. and Cov. 

Tithing is a principle with promise, and should be so con- 
sidered and studied by the Relief Society. Has any other prin- 
ciple resulted in greater rewards to the faithful than this par- 
ticular law? Sisters of the Relief Society, what are your opin- 
ions, and what are your practices in regard to tithing? 



RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 

April— GENEALOGY AND TESTIMONY— Lesson IV. 

Ten minutes talk on Current Events. 



Note-Books and Family Records. 

The importance of making correct records of our dead 
and of preserving these most carefully is amply attested in 
the revelations to the Prophet Joseph Smith. We would sug- 
gest that the sisters in the Relief Society begin this lesson by 
reading the 128th Section of the Doctrine and Covenants. Es- 
pecially do we emphasize those sentences in verse 8 which 
reads: ''Whatsoever you record on earth, shall be recorded 
in heaven; for out of the books shall your dead be judged, 
according to their own works, whether they themselves have 
attended to the ordinances in their own 'propria persona,' 
or by the means of their own agents, according to the ordi- 
nance which God has prepared for their salvation from before 
the foundation of the world, according to the records which 
they have kept concerning their dead." 

The genealogical data should be placed first in a pencil 
note-book and then copied with ink into the family records. 
The Genealogical Society have printed a special note-book for 
the use of the Saints in preparing their genealogical data 
which materially assists to simplify their work. The penciled 
note-book may be one of those suggested costing 10c each, or an 
ordinary note-book, size about 8y2 by 14. This size is selected 
because of its convenience in taking sufficient data on one 
page. 

On the fly-leaf of this book should be the full name of the 
person who records the data, the address of that person, the 
date of the beginning of the Avork in the book, and the date of 
its completion. These dates give little history clues in the 
making up of the genealogical data. On the fly-leaf also should 
be placed the fact of whether it is English names, or American 
names that are gathered in the book, or whether they are names 
taken from a traditional source or some genealogical or public 
library, or a written or printed record. Moreover, on the top 
of each page of the note-book as well as on each page of the 
Family Record for temple use, the particular book or register 
from which that page of information is taken, should always be 
recorded. This source of information is invaluable for the re- 
placing of neglected data, or for future reference. For in- 
stance, if we had searched Vol. Ill of London Marriages, we 
should not want to search that again, and this recording of the 
source of information prevents duplication of research and 
confusion. 



6 RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 

The names of our dead are the symbols in which their 
images are called up to our own minds and to the minds of those 
who read these symbols on a written or printed page; indeed 
these symbols are in very many cases the only earthly remains 
of our ancestral dead. The bodies of our fathers sleep in the 
dust, the tombstones in the cemeteries have fallen into the 
earth or have given place in the centuries to others crowding 
in upon them. There is nothing left, therefore, of these, our 
forefathers, except the written church records, or a printed 
book upon which the symbols that represent the Christian, or 
surname of the individual may be recorded. How carefully 
then should the Latter-Day Saints preserve every scrap of 
paper upon which is written or printed the names of their an- 
cestors. 

The Family Eecord for temple work can be purchased from 
the Deseret News Book Store or the Sunday School Union Book 
Store at various prices. It is always better to take a three- 
quire book which is cheaper proportionately, because there are 
more pages for the same price in the three-quire book than in 
the one-quire book. The binding is the expensive part of it, 
and there is no student but what will have plenty of names 
to fill up, not only one, but many, many books with the names 
of his dead. After the note-book has been carefully arranged 
and filled, this data may be copied into the Family Record of 
temple work. All of the rules and suggestions that have been 
laid down for the pencil note-book in regard to name, ad- 
dress, date of work done, and sources of information, should 
be followed in the Family Record quite as scrupulously as in 
the note-book. A sample of the note-book form of preparing 
data is given on page 15 of this Bulletin. 



April— HOME ETHICS— Lesson IV. 

(Twenty Minutes.) 
Ten minutes talk on Current Events. 

(a) Respect and mutual interest in the home. 

(b) No one person is independent of any and all other 
persons. 

(c) The home circle may be compared to an intricate 
piece of machinery. 

(d) Parents are responsible for order and system in their 
homes, or for the lack of that condition. 

(e) Children pattern largely after their parents. 



RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 7 

(f) Eespect for right and authority begin at home. 

(g) Washington and Lincoln merit respect and love. 

(h) Parents should be the confidants and companions of 

their children, 
(i) No worldly pleasure can ever compensate a mother 

for the loss of one soul from her own family, 
(j) To our pioneer fathers and mothers we owe respect, 

love and veneration. 

Respect and Mutual Interest in the Home. 

In every complete and perfectly ordered home, there should 
be mutual interest existing between all the members and in- 
mates thereof. Fathers and mothers, sons and daughters, 
should be bound together, not shutting out the help employed 
in the family. Each person is in a large way dependent on 
every other person. The home circle is, in comparision, simi- 
lar to a fine piece of machinery, every little cog, brace or bal- 
ance-wheel, has its duty to perform and is alike important in 
its own particular place. Order and system, respect and rev- 
erence in the home, are largely in the hands of parents, or 
guardians. Their example permeates every branch and corner 
of the home nest. Children copy largely from fathers and 
mothers in what they do; therefore, how necessary it is that 
the parents plan and achieve right and proper ends. If the 
interest of the heads of the home be cemented with their chil- 
dren's best interests, all who enter such an abode will feel and 
recognize the sweet and precious influence. Respect begins in 
the immediate family; it is gained or lost around the hearth- 
stone. The standard of each household is measured by the true 
faith, love, honor and dignity maintained in that elementary 
community. 

"When we read the histories of foreign countries and their 
leaders' lives, and compare them with those of our own 
America, we cannot fail to appreciate and revere our great 
"Washington, the founder, and Lincoln, the preserver, of our 
Union. Their example, under the most trying difficulties, is 
worthy of emulation. The respect, the love, and the united 
interest, which these two men inspired, even in their colored 
servants and humblest subjects, are truly admirable and praise- 
worthy. 

Respect is essential to success in every walk in life ; respect 
for the rights of others, and for mutual interest engenders re- 
spect for ourselves and our own rights. 

In the home it is necessary to show interest in what the 
children do, in their friends, their pleasures and in their edu- 
cation; we should show interest in their religious, mental, 



8 BELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 

moral, and social life ; we should read the literature they read, 
and thus understand what effect their pursuits have upon their 
characters. We should discuss with them the subjects that lie 
near their hearts, be companions and confidants to them. 
Mothers will suffer more regret, more sorrow, over one beauti- 
ful soul lost through lack of proper care, than they will receive 
pleasures in all that the world can ever offer. 

'Tis not our province to give lengthy topics along "Home 
Ethics," but, dear sisters, we do wish to impress you with faith 
and belief in the importance of proper family life and its great 
responsibility. 

As we sit here thinking and writing, our mind goes back 
over a long life. We see our childhood again, and the worthy, 
noble, heroic, good men and women, our parents and pioneers, 
who have left a heritage, better, stronger and more lasting to 
us, than all the wealth, grandeur or distintcion of this world. 
Their sacrifice of all they possessed on the altar of principle; 
their unsullied life work; their patient surmounting of diffi- 
culties — all these are precious bequests to us by our valiant 
fathers and mothers, the "Mormon" pioneers! Their hope 
and faith in God, their respect for each other, and their united 
interest in the Church leaders and in their homes, brought to 
them success and spiritual victory, and to us, their descend- 
ants, these virtues should be as rich heritages. 



April— HOME GARDENING FOR WOMEN— Lesson IV. 

(Twenty Minutes.) 

*'In the morning sow thy seed, and in the evening with- 
hold not thy hand ; for thou knowest not whether shall prosper 
this or that, or whether they both shall be alike good." — 
Eceles. 2 :6. 

The home garden should be situated in the richest and 
ll)est land to be found in the whole city lot ; and if it is not, it 
should be made so by proper drainage, and fertilization. It 
should be given plenty of sunlight, and removed from the 
shade of fences and trees. With these conditions favorably 
ivorked out, with good, selected seeds, with care taken in 
planting, and with the usual average climatic conditions, there 
is no reason why it should not be a most successful garden. 
Xiet taste and space determine first of all what shall be planted. 

Asparagus. — A perennial plant of the lily family, largely 
developed by cultivation, and which is grown as an article of 



RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 9 

food. It is propagated in beds heavily mulched, the young 
shoots being the only portion eaten. It is one of the earliest 
spring vegetables. 

It should not be cut after the middle of June, when it 
should be left to seed and dry down preparatory for the next 
season's crop; during the cutting season, cut the stalks deep 
down in the earth, and keep them cut constantly if you wish 
them to be tender and brittle. Asparagus requires plenty of 
water and sunshine to create rapid growth. 

Beets. — Beets are well known vegetables, valued as food 
owing to the large quantities of sugar they contain. There are 
four kinds of beets cultivated, the common beet, the Chard, the 
Sea and the mangel-wurzel. They are easily grown, and very 
profitable for table use. 

Peas and Beans. — There are many varieties of each suit- 
able for our climate. Peas can be planted much earlier than 
beans, as they are not so easily nipped by the frost. Stake as 
soon as they begin to form tendrils. Keep off the ground, as 
they sometimes mildew; as soon as the first crop yields, plant 
another, and you will have new peas and beans all season. 
Let us recommend for your use the Telephone, Marrow-fat, 
and an early pea called the Tom Thumb. These are of the 
finest varieties grown. Keep the soil loose and well hilled up 
around the plants. 

Rhubarb. — Homely old rhubarb is the best blood tonic, and 
the easiest grown of almost any plant in the world, once you 
get it well rooted. The plant bulbs or doubled tuber roots can 
be taken up and divided year after year and replanted until 
you and all your friends have rhubarb the season through. 
In the fall when the leaves have died down, loosen the dirt 
around the roots, cover with rotted manure, and as soon as the 
snow is melted in the spring, rake off part of its covering and 
place old barrels or pans over the top. This gives extra warmth 
and draws the sun, and before you are aware, the red and 
green tops are pushing their way through the earth. Give 
plenty of water and keep the soil loose about the plants. 

Sage. — Sage is an extensive genus of plants of the mint 
family which is widely distributed in warm regions, embracing 
450 species. Most varieties are perennials of shrubby nature. 
It is very easily grown, and should be sown in open ground and 
kept well watered and hoed. It is used extensively for flavor- 
ing meat, especially for dressing in poultry, and the leaves 
are employed in making a slightly stimulating tea. Sage seed 
can be purchased at any seed store, and should be planted in 



10 RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 

shallow trenches and covered lightly. Just pluck the leaves 
and the stalks vrill dry dowji. 

Parsley. — Parsely is one of the most used and easily 
grown herbs, having almost an endless life. It can be sown on 
top of well prepared soil, lightly raked in and patted down 
with a hoe. Keep well sprinkled, but do not get discouraged 
as it requires some thirty days before you see little Miss 
Parsely peeping through the ground. Do not pull up, but 
cut off the tops. It will soon grow again, and can be taken 
up in the fall, put in pots or boxes, and kept in the kitchen 
window green all winter for table use. If I only had a piece 
of ground 2x6 feet, I'd have all the above named things 
planted on it. 

Flowers. — Marigold, Phlox, Zinnias, Nasturtiums, Bachelor- 
Buttons, Lark Spur, Columbines, etc., are the old-fashioned 
flowers our mothers used to grow. All are grown from seed, 
and require about similar conditions to make them mature. 
Let us put on our bonnets, walk out in the sunshine and begin 
now to plan for our garden, and choose from nature's gift some 
of its wonderful plant life to fill our lives with new thoughts 
and new ambition. 

Sweet Peas. — Just a word about these beautiful flowers. 
Sweet peas can l)e grown almost anywhere, where soil and sun- 
shine meet. Like all other plants, success begins with the 
seeds, although home-grown seed is less likely to be satisfac- 
tory than are the home-grown Bachelor-Buttons or Cosmos, 
or almost any other common garden flower. Preparation of 
the soil is now the first thing to consider; drainage is also 
an important factor towards success. It is almost impossible 
to plant too early. As soon as able to work the ground, one 
may get ready to plant sweet peas. Let us next consider get- 
ting the seed well down in the ground. Dig a trench about a 
foot deep and six inches wide — now pulverize the soil taken 
out, see that it is rich and somewhat sandy — partly fill in the 
trench leaving about four inches to be filled in later — sprinkle 
either margin of the trench with the pea seed, then cover with 
about two inches of soil. They are strong and vigorous, and 
will soon find their way through the covering. Keep the soil 
loose, adding more as the plants grow, until the trench is filled 
and on a level with the rest of the garden plot. Stick in at 
once plenty of good strong willows, and do not over-water. In 
July, August and September you will be amply paid for all 
time and money spent, for each day you will be able to pluck 
great handfuls of these fragrant and sweet butterfly-like 
flowers. 



BELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 



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12 RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 

April— LITERATURE— Lesson IV. 

(Thirty Minutes.) 

Ten minutes talk on Current Events. 

Note — Because of the great demand for the Autobiography 
bf Benjamin Franklin, it has been impossible for the publishers 
of the edition we were using to supply the book stores in 
sufficient numbers to fill our orders promptly. There was so 
much delay that another edition has been ordered from a second 
publishing house. Aside from the notes and explanations, the 
reading matter in the two books is identical. References to 
both books will be given in the lessons. 

AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF BENJAMIN FRANKLIN. 

Statement. 

These literary lessons, as stated in the beginning, have 
two objects: First, to acquaint ourselves with the life of a 
great man, and second, to study his method of expressing him- 
self, with the view of improving our own language. In read- 
ing and re-reading the "Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin," 
we are bound to be benefited in our own manner of expression. 

The importance of speaking properly and well needs no 
argument. The man who can explain himself perfectly, usually 
commands what he wants, while, on the other hand, the man 
who lacks this power is defeated by his own disability. We 
often hear people say, "I know what I want to say, but I do 
not know how to say it." It is within the reach of all to study 
and to use good language — language that expresses exactly that 
which is felt ; and while some have a natural aptitude in this 
direction, any person who sets out to improve his own speech 
may do so. so long as he has access to good books. Power in 
this direction once obtained, is his forever. 

In reading over the chapters, let us pay special attention 
to the choice of words, and the formation of sentences. We 
shall find that the words are not large and uncommon, but are 
simple and well chosen, and that the sentences are so clear as to 
be understood by school children. If we will read them over 
and over we will unconsciously gather words and expressions 
that will in time become our own, and our speech will be thus 
greatly enriched. In chapter one, Franklin tells us exactly how 
he studied and trained himself in the art of expression. 

LESSON IV. 

Subject: Franklin beginning business for himself. 

References: Extracts from chapters 4. 5 and 6 in Altemus 
edition, and from page 71 to 115 in Crowell edition. 



RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 13 

''He that riseth late must trot all day and shall scarce 
overtake himself at night, while laziness travels so slowly that 
poverty soon overtakes him." 

1. Mercantile Experience. (Altemus edition, pages 98- 
100; Crowell edition, pages 71-72). 

2. Superintendent of Keimer's printing office. (Altemus, 
100-107; Crowell, 73-80). 

(a) Keimer's plan. 

(b) Workmen in the office. 

(c) Break with Keimer. 

(d) Plans with Meredith for a partnership. 

(e) Re-employed by Keimer to assist in printing 

paper money in New Jersey. 

3. Sets up business. (Altemus, pages 114-115; Crowell, 
pages 82-83). 

(a) Made public printers, (pp. 122-125, Altemus; 

88-89 Crowell). 

(b) Partnership dissolved. (Altemus, pp. 126-128; 

Crowell, pp. 89-92). 

(c) Franklin prints paper money. (Altemus, pp. 129- 

131; Crowell, pp. 92-83). 

(d) Opens stationery shop. (Altemus, p. 131; 

Crowell, p. 93). 

4. Habits of industry and frugality. (Altemus, pp. 119- 
132; Crowell, pp. 86, 87, 94). 

5. Courtship and marriage. (Altemus, pp. 134-136; 
Crowell, pp. 96-98). 

6. Thrives in business with his wife's assistance. (Alte- 
mus, pp. 143-144; Crowell, pp. 113-115). 



b 



QUESTIONS. 

1. How did Franklin show ingenuity in Keimer's office? 

2. What inspiration and benefits did he receive by going 
to Burlington with Keimer? 

3. What does Franklin say about croakers? 

4. Discuss Franklin's rivals in the printing business. 
Draw a comparison between Franklin and David Harry. 

5. What was the great secret of Franklin's success in 
business ? 

6. Tell the story of the china bowl and silver spoon, as 
nearly in Franklin's words as you can. 

7. What particular inspiration or help do you get from 
this lesson. 



14 RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 

April— ART AND ARCHITECTURE— Lesson IV. 

(Ten Minutes.) 
Porches: Use and Possibilities: 

The bungalow responsible for the popularity of porches. 

How the porch may be made the means for a natural 
transition from our indoor winter life to our outdoor summer 
life. 

The porch as dining room, living room and nursery. 

Screened sleeping porches for the poor as well as the 
well-to-do. 

Americans are fast learning the possibilities of porches. 
Formerly the porch was used as a means of beautifying a 
plain house, and often took on the character of an after- 
thought. "We are learning that the porch should be a part of 
the structure, and have its beginning in the foundation, or, at 
least, be a part of that which gives it strength and support. 

The porch is valuable in supplying a delightful means of 
transition from our indoor life in winter to our outdoor life 
in summer. It is the best means of bringing us into the fresh 
air. The screened sleeping porch is possible for both the rank- 
and-file and the well-to-do, and becomes the culmination of 
luxury and comfort. In many of our modern cottages the 
living-room and dining-room, as well as the sleeping apart- 
ments, are convertible, by various devices, into screened 
porches. The dining porch, perched in some "coign of vant- 
age," may provide a cool living room in summer, and a sun- 
room in winter, and is not too expensive for the house of the 
man with moderate means. The screened porch around the 
kitchen, may serve for the breakfast porch, and it also secures 
the house from contamination by the disease-spreading house- 
fly, stable-fly and mosquito. 



REPORT BLANKS. 



Those who wish to purchase Relief Society Report Blanks 
should write to the Deseret News Book Store or the Sunday 
School Union Book Store, where they are on sale for 25 cents 
a dozen. The Minute-books and Roll-books should also be pur- 
chased from the same places, as we do not keep them in the 
Relief Society Headquarters. Roll-books cost from 35 cents 
up to $1.25. Minute-books from 25 cents to $4.00, according 
to size and binding. Both stores carry all these books. 



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16 EELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 

THE AMERICAN CITY. 

We would advise our sisters not to purchase the expen- 
sive book called "The American City," which was first recom- 
mended in our Giude. It is not as suitable as we could wish, 
and it is very expensive. We hope to have our book of Art 
and Architecture, written by Mrs. Alice Merrill Horne- ready 
for use very soon, and this will contain a chapter or two 
which will cover most of the ground of home and civic im- 
provement. Therefore, we suggest that the sisters wait for 
this book soon to be issued. 

OUR ADVERTISERS. 

We desire to call attention to the various firms who advertise 
in our pages, as each and all of them deserve well at the hands of 
the thousands of women who read this Bulletin. Not only are they 
loyal in the support tliey have siven this Bulletin, and therefore are 
loyal to the Relief Society Cause, but also efach and all of them are 
absolutely Tellable and worthy of the united support of the women 
of the Relief Society. We suggest to those who live in this city, or 
vicinity, to make their purchases from the firm« which we adver- 
tise, while those visitors who come from a distance at Conference 
time, or on all other occasions, should patronize our friends who 
advertise with us. We would appreciate it if you Sisters would 
mention the fact to our business firms, that you saw their adver- 
tisement iu the Bulletin and thus was led to patronize them. Let 
us be loyal to those who are loyal to us. 

BURIAL CLOTHES 

Relief Society General Board 

FURNISHES COMPLETE BURIAL SUITS 

Phones Wasatch 3455 and Wasatch 207 
Salt Lake City Utah 

THE L. D. S. HOSPITAL TRAINING 
SCHOOL FOR NURSES 

has an average enrollment of about 100 Nurses In training. 
The hospital has capacity of 250 beds. The training school is 
under the direction and supervision of highly trained gradu- 
ate nurses from schools of national reputation. It gives a 
three years course in training in nursing in all its branches. 
For further particulars address the Superintendent of Nurses 

Dr.W.H. GROVES LATTER-DAY SAINTS HOSPITAL, 

SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH. 



ICE CREAM— SHERBETS— PUNCHES 
and CANDIES are the "BEST BY TEST' ' 

Special prices to all Ward aud School Socials etc. 

TWO STORES 55 Main St. 260 State St. 

Prompt Delivery Phones : Wasatch 3223—3224 



THOMAS HULL ELIJAH A. LARKIN 

GEO. W. LARKIN ALMA J. LARKIN 

LARKIN-HULL 

UNDERTAKING CO. 

EMBALMERS AND 
FUNERAL DIRECTORS. 

CHAPEL & PARLORS 255 SO. 2nd EAST ST. 
Phone Wasatch 5132 SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH 



W . N. Williams, 8upt. Clarissa S. Williams, Sec'y & Treas R. N. WUson. Asst. Supt 

Guaranteed Furniture at Lowest Prices 

Our maf^nificent stock comprises goods from America's 
most represeutative lines and our prices are always reasonable. 

Carpets, Rugs, Draperies, Linoleum, Ranges, 
Heaters, Go-Carts, Etc. 

Home FurnishinjiR of all descriptions for 

CASH OR CREDIT 

Co-op. Furniture Co. 

Next Door South of Z. C. M. I. 



SEED and NURSERY BOOK 

FOR 1914 NOW READY 

This up to the minute Guide Book is brimming full of infor- 
mation that means Dollars to every Planter of Seeds, Plants, 
Roses, Shrubs and Trees. It gives complete details for 
Lawn, Garden, Orchard and Farm. Mention this paper and 
write for FREE COPY. 

PORTER=WALTON CO. 

SEEDSMEN, NURSERYMEN & FLORISTS 

SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH. 

Star Printing Company 

35 Post Qff ice Place Phone Wasatch 1370 

Salt Lake Citi;, Utah 



Ask your Dealer For 

Z. C. M. I. 

School Shoes 

They keep the children's 

feel warm and dry- 
prevent doctor's bills, 



''MOUNTAINEER 



THE LEADER' 



9) 



or 



It 



Overalls don't rip. 
See you get them 




CUTLER'S UTAH MADE GOODS 

Command Attention— Buy At Home 

Approved Garments— Bleached or Unbleached 

75c Li^ht Weight - - $ LOO Lisle Thread 

$ LOO Medium Weight - $L25 Heavy Weight 

POSTAGE PREPAID. 

Provo Dress Qoods==Suitings==Blankets. 

SAMPLES SENT ON REQUEST. SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH 



HOTEL UTAH 




500 Rooms. Fireproof 

Opened June 8, 1911 

"The very best of every, 
thing at sensible prices " 

Rates for room without 

bath $1.50 and $2.00. 

With bath $2.50 per day 

and upwards. 

Under the Management of 
GEORGE O. RELF 



We want your name on 
our mailing iist== 

To get it we will send you post 
paid a high grade cut glass jelly 
dish— or a heavy solid gold real 
stone set scarf pin for $1. 

MONEY REFUNDED IF NOT SATISFACTORY 

McConahay,the Jeweler 

64 MAIN ST. SALT LAKE CITY 





* BETTER THINGS TO EAT'' 
TlS/rt PI ATPC CORNER MAIN & 1st SO. 
A W V rUiXl^^O 158 SO UTH M AIN S T. 



WHILE LABORING FOR THE POOR 

AND AIDING THE WIDOW IN WANT, 

DON'T NEGLECT YOURSELF AND FAMILY 

Have they the proper protection in ease of 
sickness or death of 
your bread winner or 
will you be compelled 
to look for charity? 

Has he sufficient life 
insurance to assure 
you this protection? 





JOHN C. CUTLER 
1st. Vice President. 



INSURANCE 
IN FORCE 




C. W. MbLEY 
Member Ex. Com. 




LORENZO N.STOHL 
2nd. Vice Pres. & Mgr. 



OVER 
12,000,000.00 



JOSEPH F. SMITH 

President. 



Beneficial Life 
Insurance Co. 

Home office, Vermont 

Building 

Salt Lake City, Utah 




RICHARD W. YOUNG 
counsel 






Relief Society Bulletin 



Volume 1 



May, 1914. 



Number 5 






Issued by the Officers and Directors of the 

GENERAL BOARD OF THE BELIEF SOCIETY 
1914 



HUMAN SERVICE 

has come to be a consideration of political parties, or social 
organizations, and of educational institutions. 

THE RELIEF SOCIETY 

has been an instrument of human service for more than half a 
century. It ministers to the immediate material wants of the 
community. It has been pronounced by many students an 
institution for community charity. 

THE UTAH AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

at Logan aims in a very definite way to make each member 
of society a more capable producer, a better farmer, house- 
wife, tradesman, agricultural engineer, or business man and 
thus aims to eliminate want. Its field of work therefore, 
properly co-operates with the work of relief societies in serv- 
ing the men and women of the State. While its courses are 
distinctly practical, it deals in a broad and fundamental way 
with the basic industries of the State. Liberal instruction Is 
given in the natural and physical sciences, in mathematics, 
history, English, economics, literature and languages. 

The College has been slowly built into an embodiment of 
the State's idealism. 



Willes-Horne Drug Company 

News Building, Salt Lake City. 

Our Drug Store Is Complete 

TREATMENT PERFECT. PRICES RIGHT. 

WE SOLICIT YOUR PATRONAGE. 

Prompt Attention to Mail Orders. 



Lambourne Floral Dept. 
EVERYTHING ELOKAL. 

DECORATIONS. FUNERAL WORK. Etc., Etc. 

THE L. D. S. HOSPITAL TRAINING 
SCHOOL FOR NURSES 

has an average enrollment of about 100 Nurses In training. 
The hospital has capacity of 250 beds. The training school is 
under the direction and supervision of highly trained gradu- 
ate nurses from schools of national reputation. It gives a 
three years course in training in nursing in all its branches. 
For further particulars address the Superintendent of Nurses 

Dr.W.H. GROVES LATTER-DAY SAINTS HOSPITAL, 

SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH. 




INDEX TO LESSON STATEMENTS. 

PAGE 

Relief Society Memories 1 

Editorial — Peace 4 

Genealogy 6 

Home Ethics 8 

Home Gardening for Women 10 

Literature 13 

Art and Architecture 14 

Music 15 

Notices ; 16 



ADVERTISERS' DIRECTORY 



Patronize those who have made it possible for this paper to 

exist. 

1. AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE, Logan, Utah. 

2. WILLES-HORNE DRUG CO., 8 South Main, Salt Lake City. 

3. WHITE SEWING MACHINE CO., 29 W. First South St. Phone 

Was. 5234, Salt Lake City. 

4. CRISMON & NICHOLS, 229-231 So. West Temple, Salt Lake City. 

5. S. M. TAYLOR & CO., UNDERTAKERS, 251-259 E. First South 

St., Salt Lake City. 

6. L. D. S. BUSINESS COLLEGE, Salt Lake City. 

7. KEELEY ICE CREAM CO., 555 Main, 260 State Sts., Salt Lake 

City. 

8. LARKIN-HULL UNDERTAKING CO., 255 South 2nd East St., 

Salt Lake City. 

9. L. D. S. HOSPITAL TRAINING SCHOOL FOR NURSES, Salt 

Lake City. 

10. CO-OP. FURNITURE, 35 South Main St., Salt Lake City. 

11. Z. C. M. I., Salt Lake City. 

12. HOTEL UTAH, Salt Lake City. 

13. RELIEF SOCIETY BURIAL CLOTHES, Beehive House, Salt 

Lake City. 

14. CUTLER BROS. CO., 36 So. Main St., Salt Lake City. 

15. STAR PRINTING CO., 35 P. O. Place, Salt Lake City. 

16. MORRISON BAKING CO., 158 So. Main St., Salt Lake City. 

17. BENEFICIAL LIFE INSURANCE CO., Vermont Building, Salt 

Lake City. 

18. McCONAHAY, THE JEWELER, 64 Main St., Sa't Lake City. 

19. PORTER-WALTON CO., Salt Lake City, Utah. 

20. DAYNES-BEEBE MUSIC CO., 45 S. Main, Salt Lake City. 



F. J. NICHOLS • C. C. CRISMON 

COLD TESTS 

Melted, Assayed, Purchased Cyanide, Concentration, 

Amalgamation 

CRISMON & NICHOLS 

ASSAYERS and CHEMISTS 

Office and Laboratory— 229 & 231 So. West Temple St. 
Wasatch 2.393. P. O. Box 78 Salt Lake City, Utah 

Established 1860 Incorporated 1908 

S. M. TAYLOR & CO. 

UNDERTAKERS AND 
EIVSBALMERS 

Successors to 

JOSEPH E. TAYLOR 

The Pioneer Undertaker of the West 
53 3^ears in one location 

251=253=255=257 East First South St. 

Salt Lake City, Utah 

modern methods complete equipment 

efficjent service 



SPECIAL NOTICE 

SONS & DAUGHTERS of the UTAH PIONEERS 

-THE- 

L D. S. BUSINESS COLLEGE 

was established by your FATHERS for YOU. 

OPEN ALL THE YEAR. Day and Evening Sessions. 



RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 

ORGAN OF THE WOMAN'S RELIEF SOCIETY OF THE 
CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS 

Vol. I. May, 1914. No. 5 

Editob Mrs. Susa Young Oatb* 

Business Manager Mrs. Janette A. Htdb 

Assistant Manager Mrs. Amy Brown Ltman 

Advisory Committee 

Mrs. Clarissa S. Williams Mrs. Julina L. Smith Mrs. Rebecca N. Niblby 



Publishers and Proprietors General Board of the Relief Society 

Office Room 28 Bishop's Building, Salt Lake City 

One Dollar a Year Ten Cents'a Oopy 

Entered as secoud-class matter on February IS, 1914, at the Post Odce 
at Salt Lake City, Utah, under the Act of March 3, 1879. 

RELIEF SOCIETY MEMORIES. 



The seventeenth of March has come to be recognized as a 
day set apart for special significance ; to commemorate the day 
and occasion when the first woman's society of any great im- 
portance was organized, and more especially to emphasize the 
fact that the organization was effected under the Priesthood 
and by the authority of the same. 

It is my idea that this society of women was established 
previous to any such organization of women in the world. We 
know that the Prophet Joseph Smith at that time turned the key 
of knowledge for women, and the record of this edict, if it can 
be so called, is on the pages of history and the fulfillment there- 
of is apparent. Since that time woman everywhere among civ- 
ilized nations has been struggling for greater freedom from the 
conditions that had existed previously, and very much greater 
liberty has been brought about towards the elevation of woman- 
hood, until greater progress and a higher civilization for all has 
been attained. This fact has been proclaimed and reiterated 
until it has become established in the minds of all our own peo- 
ple, and many others have been convinced of its validity. 

We need not now dwell especially upon this matter in its 
broad sense, but we do desire that our sisters in the Church 
should realize the great importance of this Society and appre- 
ciate its benefits, not only in a temporal service, giving relief 
to the poor and the needy, the sick and the afflicted; but also 
in its educational development spiritually, to those who come 



2 RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 

within its influence. Humility brings down the blessings of 
heaven upon all who really and truly seek to know the will of 
the Lord, and to observe the rule, "Love thy neighbor as thy- 
self." 

While perhaps none of us in this mortal state can quite 
fulfill this commandment, we can at least come nearer to this 
condition by constantly improving our minds and following 
the example of the Master. 

Kind words are like healing balm to those in sorrow or in 
trouble. Smiles and a cheerful countenance are helpful. In 
the seventy-two years since this organization was established 
thousands have been thus benefited ; but those who have minis- 
tered to the needy, the sick and the suffering have received 
even greater blessing in their own hearts and souls than have 
those to whom they have ministered. 

We hold that the best education for women and girls is 
that which they gain through charity and benevolence; one 
cannot too deeply appreciate the benefits and results of min- 
gling together in these works of love and usefulness. 

To enter into any dissertation that would give even a faint 
idea of the work itself as a whole, would require pages of manu- 
script; "the half can never be told." But as a Society we are 
trying to gain from time to time more details of this work and 
to establish facts that will strengthen the faith of the younger 
generation and lead them to follow in the footsteps of those 
who laid the foundation upon which they may build more 
effectively in the future. 

The first woman's jubilee that we have knowledge of was 
held in the great Tabernacle in this city March 17, 1892, when 
Zina D. H. Young presided and made the opening address. Her 
counselors, Sisters Jane S. Richards and Bathsheba W. Smith, 
each spoke eloquently upon the beneficial work in which they 
were engaged and in the organizing of which they had trav- 
eled so extensively. Some of us who were younger wrote 
papers that were read by Apostle Abraham H. Cannon. Pre- 
vious to this letters had been sent to all parts of the world 
where the Relief Society had been organized, asking that the 
seventeenth of March be celebrated as a Jubilee day at the 
same time that we observed the day here in the United States. 
We may truly say, therefore, that this Jubilee encircled the 
world. There were present at the great meeting in this city 
and participating in the exercises. President Joseph F. Smith, 
who offered prayer at high noon ; Apostles John Henry Smith, 
Abraham H. Cannon, James E. Talmage and President Angus 
M. Cannon, who also offered prayer. There were many other 
notable men and women present. 



BELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 3 

In three years from now will be another Jubilee, the 
seventy-fifth anniversary; and perhaps the event will be cele- 
brated with greater magnificence than even the first jubilee. 
Many of those who participated in that memorable occasion in 
1892, even among the younger ones, have joined the innumer- 
able company on the other side. But we who are living should 
continue to testify and prove ourselves diligent in encouraging 
the generation of younger women, who have all the advantages 
of this wonderful age, to hold steadfast to the truths revealed 
through the great prophet, seer and revelator Joseph Smith. 
Our 3'ounger women should be valiant in proclaiming the truths 
which have been revealed, in defending the faith and bearing 
record of those who laid the foundation of the principles for 
which we stand today. 

It is a notable fact that as a people Mormon women have 
always voted in a Church capacity the same as men — whereas 
at that early time when the Church was in its infancy, no other 
people except the Quakers enjoyed that privilege. 

Looking forward into the future years, with the larger 
opportunities and the enlightenment of the people, what may 
not be expected of those who are living today? "When one 
looks at the many activities in which Mormon women of the 
present day are taking part — social, political, intellectual and 
religious — one is compelled to believe that no agency has done 
more towards correcting the morals and awakening latent 
thought and promoting self-helpfulness than the Relief Society 
of "Mormon Women." Being among the first, if not the very 
first of its kind, it has rendered signal service from its incep- 
tion seventy-two years ago. Its founders an^ first members 
have long since passed away — not one now remains : but the 
writer of this brief paper has heard the story often repeated by 
those who were present at the time of the organization and were 
active in performing the works of charity and benevolence 
enjoined during the early stages of the work. Perhaps there 
is no one now living more familiar with the work in the be- 
ginning than the writer; and it is her strongest desire that our 
young women of today be made to comprehend the work of 
the early members who, without the facilities of the present 
time, comforted the sad and distressed, visited the widow and 
fatherless, and were like ministering angels going hither and 
thither on their errands of mercy and compassion. The Lord 
must have been very near to the women at that early period 
and braced them up for the new duty which had been given 
them of such great value to humanity. 

Nauvoo the beautiful, on the bank of the Mississippi, was 
a swampy country. Steamboats coming from New Orleans 



4 RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 

brought the foreign emigrants, many of whom were sick when 
they landed and required constant care and special attention. 
But great faith was exercised not only by the converts, but 
also by those who ministered among them; instances of the 
power of God were shown. To be sure, the Prophet Joseph 
Smith assisted and advised the women workers, as did other 
great men of that day; and they officiated according to the 
pattern given them by the leaders of the Church. In the light 
of the twentieth century it is difficult to realize what these 
heroines had to encounter; but the recollection of their ex- 
periences and a comparison with the advantages of the pres- 
ent should appeal to the better nature and higher aspirations 
of all now engaged in the glorious work, and fill them with 
determination to render even more active service ; working 
heart and soul and without thought of ceasing for the better- 
ment of the race. 
"Till the war-drums throb no longer, and the battle-flags are 

furled 
In the Parliament of man, the Federation of the world." 

Emmeline B. Wells. 



EDITORIAL. 
PEACE. 



The month of May, with its world-wide celebrations of 
peace, suggests the beauty and the value of this ideal condition, 
while it also brings to mind the dangers and difficulties of its 
counterfeit. 

What is peace? It is a condition of mind, it may be ours 
in the midst of sorrow and affliction, of poverty and alleged 
disgrace. It may also, however, take its flight in the midst of 
prosperity, health and congenial surroundings. Too many 
people fail to weigh their emotions in the balance of good judg- 
ment, and are swayed solely by their feelings and impulses. 

Latter-day Saints, if they but stop to consider, can easily 
define the quality of peace, and describe the persons who pos- 
sess it. Peace is the harmony of the human soul with the 
Infinite will, 

I have seen mothers weeping over their children, wives 
desolate in their fresh widowhood, yet deep in their hearts lay 
the perfect peace that passeth understanding; for peace and 
joy are not necessarily close companions. The mother's heart 
may be torn with sorrow over the death of her beautiful babe, 
but there may be no quality in that sorrow which disturbs the 



RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 5 

deep foundation of her perfect peace. If that mother stands 
helpless and distraught while her son or her daughter glides 
over the precipice of personal virtue, or apostasy, peace cannot 
be hers, for her heart is torn with the bitterness of a second 
death. 

If peace is ours when we are in harmony with Infinite law, 
how are we dispossessed of that exquisite quality? The answer 
is obvious. If we are out of harmony with our neighbors, with 
our husbands or wives, with those who are over us in the 
Relief Society or in the Church, there is no possibility of peace 
in our souls. We may be unconscious of the source of the con- 
stant misery which gnaws at our vitals, but a spirit of dis- 
turbance or rebellion against constituted authority in this 
Church, whether in the home, or in the broader fields of Church 
activity, will poison the very springs of our peace. But when 
we have conquered our stubborn pride, or shall have bowed in 
submission to the proper authority, then comes peace, heavenly 
peace. It is amusing, if not distracting, to listen to foolish 
people who see things only from surface indications, talking 
about the glories of peace. Such people would set aside the 
discipline of the home, the state, and the nation. They would 
have us believe that peace is only gained when the child, the 
youth, the man, or the nation pursues the foolish path of per- 
sonal and national self-will. 

It is impossible for each child, or for each individual, to 
have his own way completely, and not thereby interfere with 
the rights and privileges of others. There must be a constant 
submission of one will to another, in order to have peace in a 
household, in a state, or in a nation. To give and to take is the 
universal law. 

Especially is this true in religious matters. He who spake 
as no man ever spake has told us that He came not to bring 
peace, but a sword; and He gave the one and only law by 
which we may achieve in the fullest degree that peace which 
we so ardently crave. Love thy neighbor as thyself, was his 
perfect counsel. In other words, seek the welfare of others, 
in preference to your own, or at least, with equal ardor and 
justice. Yet, in that consummation comes the point of the 
sword into our own hearts and into every discussion and prob- 
lem, both in the home and in the nation. Discipline must nec- 
essarily precede peace. Do not forget that, you mothers, and 
grandmothers, if you would have peace in your homes, in your 
society, and in your community. Discipline your children and 
yourselves, before asking for the priceless boon of perfect 
peace. 



6 RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 

May— GENEALOGY— Lesson V. 

(Twenty Minutes.) 
Approximating Dates. 

Our students often ask why it is that we are so particular 
and careful to have no guesswork done with names in Gene- 
alogy, and yet that we recommend the approximation of dates 
and places of residence. A little consideration will convince 
you that there is no contradiction in our suggestions in regard 
to these matters. In the first place, we do not guess at facts 
and dates in Genealogy; or, where so, we clearly state the fact 
that it is guesswork. Neither do we record a single date or res- 
idence place which is, or may be, doubtful, without adding the 
word "of" or "about." 

As a matter of fact, guesswork done in Genealogy is fool- 
ish, if not criminal, if done without any clues as to the fact 
that it is guesswork. Let me illustrate this point. A man 
named David Young marries a woman named Alice Martin. 
Some people in order to increase the number of names which 
they may be supplying to a client will add to these two names 
a Mr. and Mrs. Young as the father and mother of David 
Young, and a Mr, and Mrs. Martin as the father and mother of 
Alice Martin. You can readily see that this would soon become 
mockery, for if it is permissible to go back in this way one gen- 
eration, why not one hundred generations? And we all know 
that twenty generations ago there were no surnames known 
in the world; and to further complicate matters, after people 
did take surnames, about one thousand years ago, they changed 
them for any and every reason. They spelled them differently, 
on frequent occasions, and the number of surnames which have 
come down to us in an unbroken chain of one thousand years 
is so limited that trained genealogists know them all. Another 
complication arises when we remember the fact that the Com- 
mon Law marriages in Scotland, England and the continent 
were very common a few years ago. A Common Law marriage 
was not a Church marriage, and the woman took the man's 
name only by sufferance; while few if any of the titled and 
noble families of Europe are descended in a straight, clean 
line from a legitimate heir of any family. The rule is that only 
the peasantry and yeomanry of any nation have anything like 
an unbroken, legitimate pedigree for four or five hundred 
years. To speak plainly, not one of us may be sure that David 
Young's father and mother, or Alice Martin's father and 
mother, were married. Then why should we assume that un- 
known fact on our records? 



RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 7 

Again, some careless people give the birthplace of their 
forefathers recklessly. If their descendants lived in a certain 
place, they are quick to assume that the forefathers were born 
and lived in the same place. This, of course, is vain guess- 
work. 

On the other hand, we have a perfect right to state some 
guess dates and guess facts, if we label them as such. For 
instance, if we have the record of the marriage of David 
Young and Alice Martin, and the name of Alice Martin's father 
given as Henry Martin, we are perfectly safe in assuming that 
he had a wife ; and if we do not know her maiden name, we 
may call her Mrs. Henry Martin. And vice versa, if we found 
the name of Mrs. Alice Martin as the mother we would name 
her husband as Mr. Martin. Moreover, if we know that Alice 
Martin was married at a certain time, we may be reasonably 
safe in guessing her age to be about 20 when she was married, 
then that would give us a clue to the birth date of her father 
and mother, for genealogists have found that a safe average 
of age between the oldest child and the parents is twenty-three 
years for the mother, at the birth of her first child. In other 
words, if we had the birth date of the oldest child, we would 
assume that the father was twenty-five years old when the child 
was born, and the mother twenty-three years old. Of course, 
it often happens that the particular child may be born when 
the parents are older or younger, but twenty-five years is a fair 
average, and genealogists who have followed up approximating 
dates find that this makes a pretty safe average for approx- 
imating dates. 

There are some little clues which aid us in determining 
whether the person named is an adult or not. For instance, if we 
were to find the name of David Young as a witness in a will 
or a marriage certificate, we would know at once that he was 
a man of mature years, whether there were any other date 
clues or not. We do not approximate marriage dates under 
any circumstances ; birth dates are approximated, and some- 
times death dates. As an instance of approximating a death 
date, we would suggest the fact that if a person was named in 
a record as a widow, or widower, we would be safe in assuming 
that the widower's wife died prior to his second marriage, or 
that the widow's husband died prior to her second marriage, 
and in that case we would write in the death column "Died 
before" the date of the second marriage. 

In the same way we approximate the fact of residence. "We 
never place a person's birth in a town when we are uncertain 
as to that fact, but if we know that an individual lived in a 
certain town, we write the name of the town and place and 
the word "of" just before the name of the town; this indicates 



8 RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 

that it is an approximate or guess statement. In every case 
where we are uncertain as to the town, shire, or country, in 
which a person was born, or lived, we place the word "of" 
with the best and nearest clue town that we have. The stu- 
dents who will bear these instructions in mind will generally 
be able to make a pretty good and 'full record of their dates, 
and at the same time will so carefully place their caution and 
guess words in front of their facts of birth and residence that 
anyone will not be misled. Let me summarize : 

Genealogists do no guesswork, unless that guesswork be 
properly labeled. 

Dates are approximated when one sure date is given in 
a pedigree. 

The rule for approximating dates is, allow twenty-three 
years between the birth of the first child and the mother, 
twenty-five years between the birth of the child and the 
father. The word "about" is used before the guess date. 

Marriage dates are never approximated. 

Death dates are approximated if some clues thereto have 
been given in wills, or in the statement of individuals as being 
widows or widowers. 

When it is known where the person lived the word "of 
precedes the name of the place, indicating that it is not nec- 
essarily his birthplace, but his place of one-time residence. 



May— HOME ETHICS— Lesson V. 

(a) "Work is the gospel of life." 

(b) Order and system a necessity. 

(c) Every member in the family should have good and 
sufficient work for the brain and hands. 

(d) To become efficient in any branch of business one 
must be orderly and systematic in the habits of work. 

(e) Contrast the difference in individuals and homes 
where the above qualities are practiced and where they are 
not. 

(f ) Work is necessary to physical and mental health. 

(g) Our mortal bodies are the homes for our spirits to 
dwell in. 

(h) Necessary that the bodies be kept pure and undefiled. 

Work, System, and Order in the Home. 

Thomas Carl vie says that "Work is the gospel of life." 
We feel that this is true, and the more we study the problems 
of right living, the plainer this is made to our understanding. 



RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 9 

The poet Pope said, "Order is Heaven's first law." Therefore, 
the earthly home should have, as one of its prime factors, order 
and system, that the work and discipline may proceed with 
the least possible friction. 

Every member of the household should have work for the 
hands and brains to do, systematically arranged and lived up 
to, in order to accomplish the highest physical destiny of each 
family organization. Nature teaches this law of order. As 
intelligent women we have tested the value and force thereof. 
To be efficient business women, or to adopt a certain profes- 
sion, we study along the line we are to follow; then, how 
doubly important that every woman who takes upon herself 
the responsibility of wife and mother should make preparation 
for this most important of all professions and business. 

Care and discretion are needed here, in order that we may 
regulate our duties wisely. Our Heavenly Father is willing 
to give help, to bestow wisdom, if we go to Him, in humility 
and prayer, "Who giveth liberally and upbraideth not." 

Let us visit a home where work is done with order and 
system. All perform their several duties properly; there you 
will find peace, happiness and comfort. All are contented, 
cheerful and thrifty. Then go into an adjacent home. Here 
neglect, indifference, extravagance, disorder and indolence 
reign. Mark the contrast. In the latter home selfishness, dis- 
courtesy, wretchedness, sorrow and misery follow this unreg- 
ulated course. 

No woman who understands the laws of health will shirk 
activity. All hygienic advisers will tell you that beauty is 
attained only by right physical exercise ; brain work is an abso- 
lute necessity for mental health ; so is physical labor, to a cer- 
tain extent, while neither is complete without the other. Spir- 
itual life could not long survive without the support of the 
physical being. The development of body and soul, heart and 
mind, is accomplished simultaneously, if both are properly 
exercised. 

Our mortal structures are the houses in which our spir- 
itual beings dwell. Then, how all-important that we keep our 
bodies pure, and well sustained, in form and structure. 

We are given reasoning faculties. We have intellects. We 
have inspired writings to instruct us, and many other avenues 
through which to gain knowledge and information, for we have 
our free agency. Then, how absolutely imperative that at all 
times we should work with a will, and keep in order our indi- 
vidual and family life, guard sacredly our obligations to God 
and all His children, thereby making for ourselves and our peo- 
ple a record clear and untarnished. Let us prove worthy all 



10 RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 

our lives to claim the protection and guidance of Heaven. Let 
us so arrange our work and our time that order and system 
will guide us every day of the week. Let us utilize the pre- 
cious moments and opportunities that present themselves 'for 
the development of our mental and physical organizations, and 
our religious desires. 



May— HOME GARDENING FOR WOMEN— Lesson V. 

"Thou shalt not sew thy seed with mingled seed." — Lev. 
xix: 10. 

The moral and spiritual lesson of mingling seeds: "Be ye 
not unequally yoked together." 

The question has been asked, Of what use are the lessons 
on home gardening to our women ? 

Let us say in answer to this query : First, to stimulate the 
mother to action, and to secure the co-operation of husband and 
children in assisting to meet the needs there are for a greater 
variety of vegetables and food products for our own home use. 
Second, to demonstrate, by word at least, that gardening pays. 
It occupies a portion of time for the smaller children, culti- 
vates a desire in them to see something grow; and, we hope, a 
still greater anxiety to work in the garden and to assist 
mother. 

Reliability and responsibility start with the light chores 
of childhood. We feel that the pendulum must swing back 
and that we shall all have our little garden patches as our 
mothers had them in olden days. Thus we may find ourselves 
producing more of life's necessities. With this little begin- 
ning, we hope to prove further the real need of home gardening 
for women. 

We trust that in previous lessons we have given you suffi- 
cient information to have stimulated you to action, and that 
you will now have ready your plants for transplanting. 

We can describe to you in no better way the great need of 
properly worked soil than by giving the following story, told 
in an old school reader: "A father, upon his dying bed, ad- 
vised his sons to dig up the garden, as in it was a buried treas- 
ure." They dug it up so thoroughly that it yielded an enor- 
mous crop that fall, which showed them where the fortune 
really lay — In good tillage. 

Transplanting. 

Cabbage and Cauliflovrer. — Cool weather and moist land 
are desirable for both. These may be grown on ground that 



RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 11 

has been well drained. When transplanting, the young plants 
should be kept damp and cool. Planting in the cool of the day- 
gives better results. Have the ground moist, and water as soon 
as your plants are in the ground. Try the red and purple, as 
well as the white, variety of cabbage. If the cabbage industry 
is carried on properly, it is one of the most profitable enter- 
prises of the country. A farm of one hundred and ninety acres, 
located near Chicago, produces about 1,200,000 cabbages an- 
nually. 

Tomatoes, Pepper and Egg Plants. — Some provision should 
be made for a few extra tomato, pepper and egg plants. Take 
them from the hotbed, keep them in a slightly cooler place, 
transplant them in paper cups. The soil for egg plant should 
be equal parts of fine, rich manure and sandy loam. "When 
setting out the plant, shift them quickly, wet the paper cups, 
tear out the bottoms, and set cups and all in the hill. Let them 
have full effect of the sun, as this hastens the maturing of the 
fruit, especially tomatoes. Beware of frost, and keep covered 
at night when you have only a few plants. Let this be the 
duty of the children. 

Potatoes. — Light, rich, loamy soil is preferable for pota- 
toes. . Do not select your seed from the first crop. Take those 
that were not matured when the early fall frost nipped the 
vines. They produce more vigorously, will mature earlier, and 
yield a decided increase per acre. You will notice that pota- 
toes having the greatest number of eyes are beginning to run 
out; it is not necessary that seed potatoes should be as large 
as those grown for market, but they should contain fewer eyes. 

Place seed potatoes in a dark room. When the sprouting 
begins to take place, do not allow the sprouts to become too 
tender, but expose them to light and air, for a few days before 
the planting begins. Early Rose and Beauty Hebron are both 
excellent for quality and quantity. 

Corn. — In selecting a space for corn, let the children also 
have a spot, allowing them to plant a few hills of popcorn. 
They will be able to sell sufficient to give them their Christ- 
mas pin money. Hundreds of pounds are sold in Utah alone. 
Any soil that is good for field corn is good for popcorn. It 
should be planted at least twenty rods from yellow field corn, 
as the wind and insects can carry the pollen dust from one to 
the other and ruin both varieties. A good table corn is the 
Sweet Ever Green; on good average soil two stalks to a hill 
and three and one-half feet part each way is preferable. 

Cucumbers.— And who with a small piece of ground would 



12 RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 

be without a few hills of cucumbers? — about four seeds in a 
hiU. Plants may also be started in the hotbed and then trans- 
planted. The White Spine is considered one of the best varie- 
ties. 

Watermelons, Muskmelons and Squash. — Melons and 
squash thrive best in temperate districts. They require a rich, 
sandy loam, with plenty of sunlight and water. They should' 
not be planted too close together, as they pollenate, as in the 
case of corn, and ruin both crops. 

We wish to encourage the raising of muskmelon, especially 
the old-fashioned kind. 

Flowers. — Dahlias are a tuber-like plant and require 
plenty of moisture. They should be planted about the last of 
May or the first of June, as they are tender and easily affected 
by frost. 

There are many varieties both in shape and color. 

Poppies, Asters and Pinks. — May be sown in the open 
ground. Asters, however, bloom much earlier if planted in a 
house box, and then transplanted in May or June. 

Verbenas and Petunias. — Do well in house boxes, trans- 
planted in May or June. Do not crowd together, as they re- 
quire more room than many other varieties. The double pe- 
tunias are very beautiful and easy to raise. 

Plants that are raised in house boxes should be well pro- 
tected when planted in the open, as they are tender, and the 
warm sun, or the frosty nights, will destroy all your past ef- 
forts with them. 

For planting vegetables, follow the rules given in the 
tables in our April issue, on page eleven. 

A shallow box placed in the window, with well-fertilized 
soil, makes up in richness what it lacks in depth. In this you 
may plant mustard and cress, which will serve as the basis 
for many a green salad. These two plants grow and will be 
ready for use in from, two or three weeks ; a constant supply 
can be sown at regular intervals, until the ground outside is in 
condition to give us other salads which cannot be procured 
from the indoor garden. An abundance of water must be 
provided for these plants. If they are to flourish, water them 
frequently, as the warmth of the kitchen will soon dry the soil. 

Table of Reliable Kinds of Vegetables. 

Cabbage (white) — Wakefield and Sunhead. 

Cabbage (red) — Savoy and Red. 

Tomatoes — Dwarf, Champion, Stone, Beauty. 



RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 13 

Peppers — Bull Nose, Ruby, King. 

Watermelons — Cuban Queen, Kolb. 

Muskmelons — Jeremy, Lind, Rocky Ford, Montreal. 

Squash (winter) — Golden Hubbard, Boston, Marron. 

Squash (early) — Summer, Crook Neck. 



May— LITERATURE— Lesson V. 

(Thirty Minutes.) 
Ten Minutes Talk on Current Events. 
Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin. 
Subject — Beginning of Public Career. 

References — In the future the lessons will be taken top- 
ically, or according to subject, rather than by chapters. Read 
chapters 5 and 7, Altemus edition, and pages 83-100 and 136- 
145, Crowell edition. 

Sentiment — "He that lives on hope will die fasting." 

1. The Junto Club (Altemus, pp. 116-118 and 178-179; 
Crowell, pp. 83-86 and 144-145). 

(a) Object of the Club. 

(b) Methods of study. 

(c) Collection of books (Altemus, p. 139; Cro- 

well, p. 111). 

(d) Txtension of Junto Club into a system of 

societies for mutual improvement, 

2. Establishes a Newspaper (Altemus, pp. 120-121 and 
170-172; Crowell, pp. 87-88 and 138-139). 

(a) Busy body. 

(b) Contents of Franklin's newspaper. 

(c) Policy of paper. 

3. Poor Richard's Almanac (Altemus, pp. 167-170; Cro- 
well, pp. 136-137, also p. 262, notes). 

(a) Nature of publication, contents. 

(b) Benefits to people. 



Questions. 

1. How was the Junto Club similar in its purpose to the 
Mutual Improvement organizations in our Church? 



14 RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 

2. What class of young men did Franklin associate with 
him in this endeavor for mutual improvement? "What walks 
of life did they represent? 

3. In what way did the Junto Club become a force for 
the uplift of the community? 

4. What kind of material did Franklin use to fill the col- 
umns of his paper? 

5. What was his answer to people who wanted to use his 
paper to spread sensational matter? 

6. In what way was Poor Richard's Almanac a practical 
help to the people? 

7. What influence would you say it had on its readers? 

8. Give quotations from the Almanac showing Franklin's 
homely wisdom. 

9. Tell the story of the woman who made a success of 
her deceased husband's business which she found in a dilapi- 
dated condition. 

10. Give other such examples that you may have heard &i. 

11. How did Franklin make amends to his brother James 
for deserting him ? 

12. Franklin uses the word "ingenious" very frequently 
throughout the book. Give the definition of this word. 



May— ART AND ARCHITECTURE— Lesson V. 

(Ten Minutes.) 

"Be it ever so humble, 
There is no place like home." 

— Thomas Paine. 

Unity of house, barns, pens, walks, fences, trees, gardens 
and flower beds. 

Dependence of each detail upon the successful planning of 
every other part. 

Build your house not only to satisfy the needs of its occu- 
pants, but to make possible the best use of all the opportunities 
afforded by your especial building site, the neighborhood and 
location. 

How may an adjustment of line be made by grouping of 
trees with the house? 

How may a hedge or collection of shrubs be used to bal- 
ance the design? 



RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 15 

Home Preparation. 

Assign one of the following topics to each member : 

Design walks for your house. 

Make a plan for clusters of trees for shade and orchard 
varieties to suit the lines of your own home. 

Plan sanitary pens and a garage or barn for your own 
yard. 

Make a design for flower beds. 

Design arrangement for trellises for grapes or hops, etc. 

Plan a window for flower tables. 

Design flower boxes for windows, and what shall be 
planted in them. 



For enlargement of this lesson, see Mrs. Alice Merrill 
Home's book, "Devotees and Their Shrines." Price $1.00. 



MUSIC. 

The General Board of the Relief Society desire to call the 
attention of Stake and "Ward Presidents to the beautiful music 
that was rendered by our General Choir under the inspirational 
baton of our General Chorister, Mrs. Lizzie Thomas Edward, 
at the late Relief Society Conference in this city. The sympa- 
thetic accompaniments on the organ and the exquisitely beau- 
tiful organ solo rendered by our organist. Miss Edna Coray, are 
also worthy of the highest praise. Stake and Ward officers, 
can you not see an opportunity to follow suit along these lines? 
There are plenty of good voices in the Relief Society ranks, and 
the possessors thereof are usually quite willing to spend time 
and effort in the preparation of music for our "Ward and Stake 
meetings if only encouraged to do so. Any information of a 
special character or questions concerning musical selections 
suitable for such choirs can be obtained if you will address Mrs. 
Lizzie Thomas Edward, General Chorister, Room 28 Bishop's 
Building. 



16 RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 

WHERE ANNUAL DUES SHALL BE PAID. 



Please do not send money orders or financial affairs of 
any nature to the President, Secretary or Corresponding Sec- 
retary of the organization. 

All money for yearly dues or for general Eelief Society 
purposes of any nature should be sent to Mrs. Emma A. Empey, 
Room 28 Bishop's Building. 



MONEY FOR BULLETINS AND LESSON BOOKS. 



All orders for Bulletins or Lesson Books, all money to be 
expended in this direction should be sent to the Relief Society 
Bulletin, Room 28 Bishop's Building. 



BURIAL CLOTHES 
Relief Society General Board 

FURNISHES COMPLETE BURIAL SUITS 

Phones Wasatch 3455 and Wasatch 207 
Salt Lake City Utah 




A Qrafonola 
for the Ward 

$25 Upward 
$10 Cash— $5 a Mo. 

Play over in your Ward House 
records of the singing of the 
famous TABERNACLE CHOIR 

Also any records you want for 
any occasion — dance — popular — 
sacred, etc. 

-^- ""^"^g >n ■■■! I leso. _ 



Z^SMA/N srT 



Older than the State of Utah 



Write for Catalogue and FREE calendar. 



ICE CREAM— SHERBETS— PUNCHES 
and CANDIES are the "BEST BY TEST" 

Special prices to all Ward aud School Socials etc. 

TWO STORES 55 Main St. 260 State St. 

Prompt Delivery Phones: Wasatch 3223—3224 



THOMAS HULL ELIJAH A. LARKLN 

GEO. W. LARKIN ALMA J. LARKIN 

LARKIN-HULL 

UNDERTAKING CO. 

EIVIBALMERS AND 
FUNERAL DIRECTORS. 

CHAPEL & PARLORS 255 SO. 2nd EAST ST. 
Phone Wasatch 5132 SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH 



W . N. Williams, Supt. Clarissa S. Williams, Sec'y & Treas R. N. Wilson. Asst. Supt 

Guaranteed Furniture at Lowest Prices 

Our niafjnificent stock comprises soods from America's 
most representative lines anfi our prices are always reasonable. 

Carpets, Rugs, Draperies, Linoleum, Ranges, 
Heaters, Go-Carts, Etc. 

Home FurnishintiS of a.ll descriptions for 

CASH OR CREDIT 

Co-op. Furniture Co. 

Next Door South of Z. C. M. I. 



SEED and NURSERY BOOK 

FOR 1914 NOW READY 

This up to the minute Guide Book is brimming full of infor- 
mation that means Dollars to every Planter of Seeds, Plants, 
Roses, Shrubs and Trees. It gives complete details for 
Lawn, Garden, Orchard and Farm. Mention this paper and 
write for FREE COPY. 

PORTER=WALTON CO. 

SEEDSMEN, NURSERYMEN & FLORISTS 

Cor. State and Broadway. Phone Ex. 717 

SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH. 

Star Printing Company 

35 Post Office Place Phone Wasatch 1370 

Salt Lake Citi;, Utah 



Ask your Dealer For 

Z. C. M. I. 

School Shoes 

They keep the children's 

feet warm and dry- 
prevent doctor's bills, 



''MOUNTAINEER" 

or "THE LEADER" 

Overalls don't rip. 

See you get them 




CUTLER'S UTAH MADE GOODS 

Command Attention— Buy At Home 

Approved Garments— Bleached or Unbleached 

75c Li^ht Weight - - $1.00 Lisle Thread 

$1.00 Medium Weight - $1.25 Heavy Weight 

POSTAGE PREPAID. 

Provo Dress Goods==Suitings==Blankets. 

SAMPLES SENT ON REQUEST. SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH 



HOTEL UTAH 




500 Rooms. Fireproof 

Opened June 8, 1911 

"The very best of every, 
thing at sensible prices " 

Rates for room without 

bath $1.50 and $2.00. 

With bath $2.50 per day 

and upwards. 

Under the Management of 
GEORGE O. RELF 




We want your name on 
our mailing list== 

To get it we will send you post 
paid a high grade cut glass jelly 
dish— or a heavy solid gold real 
stone set scarf pin for $1. 

MONEY REFUNDED IF NOT SATISFACTORY 

McConahay,the Jeweler 

64 MAIN ST. SALT LAKE CITY 




**BETTER THINGS TO EAT' 
TPWfA Of AfPC CORNER MAIN & 1st SO. 
I WU rijAVbD 158 SOUTH MAIN ST. 









WHILE LABORING FOR THE POOR 

AND AIDING THE WIDOW IN WANT, 

DON'T NEGLECT YOURSELF AND FAMILY 

Have they the proper protection in case of 
sickness or death of 
your bread winner or 
will you be compelled 
to look for charity? 

Has he sufficient life 
insurance to assure 
you this protection? 





JOHN C. CUTLER 
1st. Vice President. 



INSURANCE 
IN FORCE 





LORENZO N. STOHL 
2nd. Vice Pres. & Mgr. 



OVER 
$12,000,000.00 



JOSEPH F. SMITH 

President. 



Beneficial Life 
Insurance Co. 

Home office, Vermont 

Building 

Salt Lake City, Utah 




C. W. NIBLEY 
Member Ex. Com. 



RICHARD W. YOUNG 
Counsel 



Relief Society Bulletin 



Volume I 



June, 1914. 



Number 6 





Issued by the Officers and Directors of the 

GENERAL BOARD OF THE RELIEF SOCIETY 
1914 



HUMAN SERVICE 

has come to be a consideration of political parties, or social 
organizations, and of educational institutions. 

THE RELIEF SOCIETY 

has been an instrument of human service for more than half a 
century. It ministers to the immediate material wants of the 
community. It has been pronounced by many students an 
institution for community charity. 

THE UTAH AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

at Logan aims in a very definite way to malie each member 
of society a more capable producer, a better farmer, house- 
wife, tradesman, agricultural engineer, or business man and 
thus aims to eliminate want. Its field of work therefore, 
properly co-operates with the work of relief societies in serv- 
ing the men and women of the State. While its courses are 
distinctly practical, it deals in a broad and fundamental way 
with the basic industries of the Stale. Liberal instruction Is 
given in the natuuil and physical sciences, in mathematics, 
history, English, economics, literature and languages. 

The Oollege has been slowly built into an embodiment of 
the State's idealism. 



Willes-Horne Drug Company 

News Building, Salt Lake City. 

Our Drug Store Is Complete 

TREATMENT PERFECT. PRICES RIGHT. 

WE SOLICIT YOUR PATRONAGE. 

Prompt Attention to Mail Orders, 



Lambourne Floral Dept. 
EVERYTHING FLORAL. 

DECORATIONS. FUNERAL WORK. Etc., Etc. 

THE L. D. S. HOSPITAL TRAINING 
SCHOOL FOR NURSES 

has an average enrollment of about 100 Nurses in training. 
The hospital has capacity of 250 beds. The training school is 
under the direction and supervision of highly trained gradu° 
ate nurses from schools of national reputation. It gives a 
three years course in training in nursing in all its branches. 
For further particulars address the Superintendent of Nurses 

Dr.W. H. GROVES LATTER-DAY SAINTS HOSPITAL, 

SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH. 




INDEX TO LESSON STATEMENTS. 

PAGE 

Editorial^ — Insurance 1 

Genealogy 5 

Home Ethics 7 

Home Gardening for Women 9 

Literature ... 12 

Art and Architecture 13 

Notes on the Relief Society Conference 14 



ADVERTISERS' DIRECTORY 



Patronize those who have made it possible for this paper to 

exist. 

1. AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE, Logan, Utah. 

2. WILLES-HORNE DRUG CO., 8 South Main, Salt Lake City. 

3. WHITE SEWING MACHINE CO., 29 W. First South St. Phone 

Was. 5234, Salt Lake City. 

4. L. S. SMITH & BROS., Typewriter, 379, So. Main St., Salt 

Lake City. 

5. S. M. TAYLOR & CO., UNDERTAKERS, 251-259 E. First South 

St., Salt Lake City. 

6. L. D. S. BUSINESS COLLEGE, Salt Lake City. 

7. KEELEY ICE CREAM CO., 555 Main, 260 State Sts., Salt Lake 

City. 

8. LARKIN-HULL UNDERTAKING CO., 255 South 2nd East St., 

Salt Lake City. 

9. L. D. S. HOSPITAL TRAINING SCHOOL FOR NURSES, Salt 

Lake City. 

10. CO-OP. FURNITURE, 35 South Main St., Salt Lake City. 

11. Z. C. M. I., Salt Lake City. 

12. HOTEL UTAH, Salt Lake City. 

13. RELIEF SOCIETY BURIAL CLOTHES, Beehive House, Salt 

Lake City. 

14. CUTLER BROS. CO., 36 So. Main St., Salt Lake City. 

15. STAR PRINTING CO., 35 P. O. Place, Salt Lake City. 

16. MORRISON BAKING CO., 158 So. Main St., Salt Lake City. 

17. BENEFICIAL LIFE INSURANCE CO., Vermont Building, Salt 

Lake City. 

18. McCONAHAY, THE JEWELER, 64 Main St., Sa't Lake City. 

19. PORTER-WALTON CO., Salt Lake City, Utah. 

20. DAYNES-BEEBE MUSIC CO., 45 S. Main, Salt Lake City. 

21. JENSEN CREAMERY COMPANY, Salt Lake. 

22. MARION BANKS, Millinery, and Charlton's Suit & Cloak Co., 321 

So. Mdin, Salt Lake. 



Ball Bearings Give Greater Speed and Stability to the 

L. C. Smith & Bros. Typewriter 

(Ball Bearing?. L()ni>: Wearing) 

Because of ball bearing: tyy^ebars, the keys respond as readily 
as perfect piano keys. The capital shift works w-ith equal ease — no 
lifting of a heavy carriage but simply shifting the light typebar 
segment, thus insuring absolute accuracy 

Another advantage— this machine is complete in itself for all 
kinds of work: tabulating, billing, large envelopes, cards or paper 
as narrow as a postage stamp. 

. WRITE FOR CATALOGUE 

To L. C. SMITH & BROS. TYPEWRITER CO. 

379 SO. MAIN STREET Salt Lake City, Utah 

Established 1860 Incorporated 1908 

S. M. TAYLOR & CO. 

UNDERTAKERS AND 
EMBALMERS 

Successors to 

JOSEPH E. TAYLOR 

The Pioneer Undertaker of the West 
53 years in one location 

251=253=255=257 East First South St. 
Salt Lake City, Utah 

MODERN METHODS COMPLETE EQUIPMENT 

EFFICIENT SERVICE 



SPECIAL NOTICE 

SONS & DAUGHTERS of the UTAH PIONEERS 

-THE- 

L D. S. BUSINESS COLLEGE 

was established by your FATHERS for YOU. 

OPEN ALL THE YEAR. Day and Evening Sessions. 



RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 

ORGAN OF THE WOMAN'S RELIEF SOCIETY OF THE 
CHUKCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS 

Vol. 1. June, 1914. No. 6 

Editor Mrs. Scsa Youug Gath» 

Business Manager Mrs. Janettb A. Htdb 

Assistant Manager Mrs. Amy Brown Lyman 

Advisory Committee 

Mrs. Clarissa S. Williams Mrs. Julina L. Smith Mrs. Rebecca N. Niblby 



Publishers and Proprietors General Board of the Relief Society 

Office Room 28 Bishop's Building, Salt Lake City 

One Dollar a Year Ten Centsia Copy 

Entered as second-class matter on February 18, 1914, at the Post Ofllee 
at Salt Lake City, Utah, under the Act of March 3, 1879. 



EDITORIAL. 



INSURANCE. 



The General Board of the Belief Society have been mak- 
ing somewhat of a study through a chosen Committee of the 
insurance conditions in this state looking to the establishment 
of an Insurance Benefit plan in the Relief Society. We gave 
in a former Bulletin the letter from this Board to the Presi- 
dency of the Church, and their favorable reply to our sugges- 
tion, but it must be remembered that it takes time and thought 
to establish anything so important and so complicated as in- 
surance, for women who have had no experience in handling 
such business. 

Our investigations have brought to light several interest- 
ing features connected with the insurance companies operat- 
ing in this state. Most, if not all, of the women's insurance 
companies of the United States have associated themselves 
with Lodges, or Hives, as they are termed. These Hives meet 
regularly in social functions and programmed entertainments. 
There are some secret grips and passwords connected with 
the initiation of the candidates into the Hives or Lodges. 
This is a striking feature, and when the president of one of 
the great organizations was asked why this secret sign and 
grip formula was used in her initiation ceremonies, she replied 
that such a feature was very attractive to the human mind. 
Secret signs, grips, passwords, and insignia were as old as the 



2 RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN. 

race, and all people are influenced more or le^s by the secret 
qharm attached to such phases of human beings associated to- 
gether for any purpose whatsoever. She told the writer to 
observe how popular this feature was in school fraternities, 
among the young people of the United States, and this sugges- 
tion certainly came in the nature of a surprising shock, for 
personally I was not aware at that time that the custom of 
using passwords, grips, tokens, and signs was at all prevalent 
amongst any class of people except the Masons. However, 
the statement is quite true, and its methods of introducing a 
candidate into any of these insurance Hives or Lodges is prac- 
tically universal. 

The social side of the Hive and Lodge work is also made 
attractive through well selected programs, through the careful 
cultivation of all the arts of courtesy and gentle manners, 
which in reality form the asset of all insurance agents. 

The women of this society may be considerably surprised 
to learn how many women belonging to our Church have 
alligned themselves with these Lodges and Hives. Some of 
them, when questioned, say that the reason for their joining 
is on account of the pleasant social features connected with the 
regular meetings held in any special Hive or Lodge. Others 
say frankly that they want the insurance benefit of the Hive 
or Lodge, and accept the other features simply to get the in- 
surance. 

Now, be it understood most emphatically that we have no 
quarrel with any of these Lodges or Hives, for all of them, so 
far as we know, are composed of very estimable women, while 
their business affairs are conducted after the most approved 
and honorable methods, but we do object seriously to our 
women joining with any organizations outside of those which 
are approved by the authorities of the Church. 

If there is anything virtuous, lovely, or of good report, or 
praiseworthy, we seek after these things. "We are preparing 
now to offer all of the benefits and blessings both financially 
and socially to the members of this Society in our own ranks 
and strictly among ourselves. This is not the time nor the 
place to make any arguments in support of the foregoing 
statements. There will be time enough to discuss these prin- 
ciples in later issues of the Bulletin. Just now we are con- 
cerned only in presenting for your consideration some facts 
and reasons why you will be asked to accept the Insurance 
Benefit plan as a part of the Relief Society work. 

Before leaving the subject of the benefit insurance com- 
panies, operated by women in the United States, let us in- 
quire a little into their financial requirements. The rule for 



RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN. 3 

these companies is that the candidate pays two dollars for an 
initiation fee into the Lodge or Hive. After that she pays 35 
cents a month dues to the Lodge or Hive. Please notice, sis- 
ters, that this is 35 cents a month, not 25 cents a year, as our 
sisters are now asked to contribute to the general expense 
fund of this great and rapidly growing Relief Society. This 
35 cents a month is distributed between the local Lodge and 
the Supreme Hive, whose headquarters are in the eastern 
states. The two dollars initiation fee and the 35 cents monthly 
dues do not have any bearing financially on the insurance 
question of the candidate. The candidate must pay for her 
insurance, either monthly or quarterly, according to previous, 
arrangements, outside of her Hive or Lodge dues. If she 
takes out $100, $200, $500 or $5,000 worth of insurance, she 
actually pays more in proportion than we are arranging to 
pay in the Relief Society for the same insurance, and this in 
addition to her lodge dues. Moreover, when any social 
affair is given at which refreshments are served in the loca» 
Hive (and, by the way, that is quite frequently), the members 
are expected to furnish the cakes and other articles of food 
used for refreshment. Again let us emphasize the fact that 
these statements are not made in any sense of criticism for 
the energetic women outside of this Church who are making 
such success of their insurance labors, but they form a basis of 
argument and permit us to present our facts before our mem- 
bers in comparison, and with some degree of clarity and pre- 
cision. 

And now what are the benefits to be derived by the mem- 
bers of the Relief Society who desire to take out either a burial 
insurance, a mission insurance, for young children, or school 
insurance for such children, or indeed for women who desire 
straight life insurance? What are the benefits? 

In the first place, the almost unknown virtues of saving 
are taught and inculcated by this method of forced saving, and 
it surely does become irksome at times to pay dues in insur- 
ance matters, yet long experience teaches us that the irksome- 
ness of discipline is the best character-moulder next to human 
life. We are an extravagant people, as all Americans are. 
Mothers humor their children with all sorts of needless ex- 
penditures, and themselves keep no account, nor take stock of 
financial, personal conditions. Grandmothers too often live 
on the scant patience and scrimped generosity of children and 
children-in-law. These elderly women face the prospect of 
death and burial with more or less shrinking dread, not be- 
cause they fear for the spiritual future, but because their 
own life experience teaches them that niggardly children are 



4 RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN. 

apt to breed life-long quarrels over the death and burial ex- 
penses of an elderly relative or parent ; or, on the other hand, 
that their death and burial expenses will create a burdensome 
debt which may last through years, souring the memory of the 
overgenerous children left behind who face the necessity of 
meeting extravagant burial expenses. 

We may philosophize all we will in regard to the reverence 
due old age and our own tender emotions toward our aged 
parents and relatives, but would we face the actual fact of a 
more or less expensive funeral for that same parent or rela- 
tive, and we ourselves already staggering under unbearable 
loads of debt and depression? Sympathy, affection, loyalty, 
and tender emotion fly out of the window. There is the hun- 
dred or two hundred dollars' debt to meet, and easy-going, 
or selfish-minded sons-in-law are very apt to refuse to lend a 
hand in the payment of the debt. 

How few grandmothers retain the ownership of their own 
homes! They are cajoled and persuaded by bustling sons, or 
coaxing daughters, and daughters-in-law, into disposing of 
their property rights in their homes, for the brilliant prospects 
of their children and children-in-law. Alas, alas, how many 
such mothers and grandmothers, right among our own people, 
eat the bitter bread of dependence and wonder why Provi- 
«'enee permits them to suffer from their own weakness and 
lack of common sense. The laws of the universe are not 
founded on sentiment, much less on sentimentality, and the 
human being must abide by the results of his own, or her own 
actions. The kindness that breeds extravagance and selfish- 
ness in children will grow its own crop of forgetful and cruel 
children. Another class of women who have perhaps reached 
a measure of worldly prosperity still look forward with dread 
to the uncertain conditions that may surround their last 
obsequies. To these the insurance offered by the Relief So- 
ciety will come as a boon and a blessing by the payment of a 
trifling sum weekly or monthly, in which a woman can be 
assured of sufficient money at her death to bury her decently 
and independently out of sight without taxing a single rela- 
tive or friend left behind. Oh, the comfort of going to rest at 
night and tucking under one's pillow the thought that no mat- 
ter how soon death might approach, there is ample provision 
for comfortable burial expense made by one's self and inde- 
pendently provided for one's own burial. 

In the matter of any mission or school insurance, the ex- 
ceedingly low rates which we are prepared to offer, makes pos- 
sible two of the very best conditions that can be offered to the 
children of the Latter-day Saints. By the payment of a tri- 



RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN. 5 

fling sum weekly or monthly, a boy or girl, can be assured of 
sufficient money to have a year's schooling in an eastern uni- 
versity, or to send him upon a mission, and more or less as- 
sistance while he is there. What an object to work for! What 
an ideal to place before the mind of a growing boy when he is 
preparing himself financially, as well as spiritually, for the 
greatest event that can happen in his young life, namely, a 
mission. How every honorable and unselfish emotion is strug- 
gling in the breast of parent and child who assists in the 
foundation of such a purpose. Insensibly the boy or youth will 
look forward to such an event as the culmination of his young 
life's purpose. Then consider what the saving habit means 
to an individual or to a family, when children are taught the 
value and importance of putting five or ten cents weekly into 
an insurance fund. The object for which they thus save will 
be settled firmly in their own minds for the future benefit 
of themselves and all associated with them. To be able to 
have one, two, or three hundred dollars saved up in small 
'monthly sums, and draw it out in the course of ten, fifteen, or 
twenty years, is something to work for. which stimulates the 
best there is in every boy. He is to be the future wage earner 
of a family, and this early lesson of thrift and economy, of 
saving for a definite purpose, lays the strongest possible founda- 
tions in his character. Is this object worthy of our best en- 
deavors? 

Our agents will be chosen and equipped in due time, and 
when they get out among the people they will be able to ex- 
plain in greater detail this plan of benefit insurance. We be- 
speak for them and for the work in general your hearty sup- 
port. 

It must be understood by our sisters that only those who 
are enrolled as members of the Relief Society can take out 
the insurance as given by us. 



.June— GENEALOGY— Lesson VI 

(Twenty Minutes.) 

Numbering. 

In preparing the data for pedigrees and for genealogical 
information of all kinds for use in the Temples, it is neces- 
sary that we give all possible marks of identification that will 
help us to identify the dead through their surnames, and places 
of residence, and their relations to the living heir. There is 



6 RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN. 

also another necessity, and that is that the names of our dead 
shall be so placed in our records that we can readily put them 
where they belong when taking them out on Temple sheets, 
or recording them after the Temple work is done. In order 
to do this carefully, orderly, and clearly, it has been found 
necessary to number each name, and that that name shall re- 
tain its number always. 

Children in orphans' asylums, individuals in penal institu- 
tions, and indeed in many public institutions, are numbered. 
It was an old-fashioned custom in the pioneer schools to num- 
ber the pupils. Numbers are symbols as much as Christian and 
surnames are; and, in order that the students of these lessons 
shall have the forms used in this society, you will find a sample 
sheet numbered in the Genealogical Lesson book. The value of 
numbering is too great to detail here, but it may be stated 
that individuals whose names we record are numbered con- 
secutively. The first name being number one. the second 
number two, the third number three, and so on. If number one 
and two are parents, and number three, four, five, six, and 
seven, are children, when number three occurs again as the 
parent of other children, it would be confusing unless he re- 
tained his original number, and that is what is done. If he 
was number three in the original entry, the three would be, 
repeated when his name occurs the second time; but when it 
is repeated, we write the name in red ink, so that the eye may 
catch it quickly and readily know that this is a repeated num- 
ber. The same with all numbers. The repeated numbers in the 
lead pencil notebook have a dash under them and over them, 
in ot-der to distinguish them for the eye to catch quickly. A 
cross is placed against the name or number of any child who 
appears the second time in a record, as the head of a family, 
so that when we see a cross against a name we understand 
that this name will occur again on a subsequent page in the 
record. 

It sometimes happens that we secure the additional in- 
formation, or names of children or husbands, or wives, of 
which we were ignorant when we first recorded the family. 
When that is the case, if it is only one child, say, or another 
wife, the one name might be crowded in under the others and 
numbered the same as the last child with the addition of (a) 
which would make it (8 — a). If there is considerable addi- 
tional information, say three or five more children in a 
family, the whole family would better he repeated in later 
pages or books with an entry stating that the family first ap- 
peared on page so and so, and that this is a continuation of 
the family; but when this is done, the names of the family 



RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN. 7 

which were entered in the first place should be numbered in 
red ink with the same numbers that they had in the first place, 
while the additional names are numbered in consecutive form 
the same as any other name. Perhaps a little study of a sam- 
ple page will be more useful than any further explanations 
which might be given here. A study of pages 48 and 49 in the 
lessons in genealogy will illustrate this principle of number- 
ing. 



June— HOME ETHICS— Lesson VI. 

Economy in the Home. 

Economy in the home is very necessary for the promo- 
tion and security of a substantial foundation for the family. 
Want comes to many people who do not practice economy in 
early life. Our greatest financiers have often been boys of 
poor parentage who had many hardships to meet early in the 
beginning of their careers, but through strict economy and the 
careful use of time and means, they managed to save some- 
thing , each month. We need not go out of our own state 
to verify this declaration. 

In our best-kept homes and the happiest surroundings, this 
custom of economy will always be found in evidence every- 
where. We do not mean closeness, nor penuriousness, but the 
care and proper regard for our own and other people's things, 
and their right use, and the correct place in Avhich to keep 
them. In the home every daughter should be taught the use 
of money, and the ability to audit the expenses of the home, 
keep a strict account of her expenditures throughout the year, 
know what her income is, and where she has spent it. No 
young woman has a right to marry a good young man if she 
can be only an ornament. The time is past when this, if it 
ever were the case, brings happiness. In this enlightened age,, 
as much is expected from a woman as from a man. His sphere 
in life is different, but none the less important. Every small 
child should have its savings bank, then if later he or she can 
take out insurance, well and good. In a well-ordered home, 
the mother and each daughter should have some line of work 
to superintend; the making of clothing, mending and darning, 
marketing, cooking, and dusting, etc. What an economy of 
time it is if every one has a system, and sees that it is cor- 
rectly carried out in each department! 



8 RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN. 

We do not believe in the so-called economy where inferior 
articles are used in the building of a home, making of a 
home, or in the living, but in choosing the best materials al- 
ways and in using care to protect and guard them from in- 
jury. It is strictly economical to always use only the best of 
everything. Domestic economy is as important as a bank ac- 
count, because, it is what will produce the funds to be banked. 
It is often the small leaks, and what may be thought unimport- 
ant losses, that sometimes are the serious drains in our homes. 
A competent housekeeper will always watch these points, and 
correct them as soon as discovered. 

We should not only have the daughters take an interest 
in the careful expense of the family living, but the help in the 
house should be instructed as well. Respect shown towards those 
employed in the home begets respect from them to us. If we 
are kind and considerate of their best interests, they will usu- 
ally take an interest in us and in our homes. If we practice 
economy of the best kind, in all that we do, we readily find the 
members of the household practicing the same rules. 

The economy, the comfort, and the pleasantness of all the 
surroundings in our homes are largely dependent upon the 
mother's attitude. Fathers and sons build the houses, but 
mothers and daughters certainly provide the interior arrange- 
ment, as we find them to a greater or less degree, and their in- 
■fluence has a great deal to do with the success or failure of the 
family. 

The lives of many girls are ruined by the indulgence of 
parents. Mothers, there is no economy in rearing girls who are 
helpless, who have had no responsibility in the parental home. 

Review. 

(a) Economy in the home is necessary for the promotion 
and security of a substantial foundation. 

(b) Many of our greatest financiers have been boys of 
of poor parentage. We need not go out of our own 
state to verify this. 

<c) In our best kept and most prosperous homes, econ- 
omy is in evidence everywhere. 

(d) Girls should be taught the use of money, and to 
audit and keep their accounts. 

(e) Our daughters should share in the responsibility of 
the homes. 

(f) Girls have no right to marry good young men unless 
they are willing to help bear the responsibilities ot 
home-making. 



RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN. 9 

(g) We believe in the savings bank; and in the economy 
that always uses only the best materials in building 
homes, in furnishing them, and in the living of the 
family. 

(h) Mothers, wives, and daughters make the atmosphere 
of the interior of the home. 

(i) There is no economy in rearing a helpless family of 
daughters and sons. 



June— HOME GARDENING FOR WOMEN.— Lesson VI. 

"Ask ye of the Lord rain in the time of the latter rain; so 
the Lord shall make bright clouds, and give them showers of 
rain, to every one, grass in the field." — (Zech. 10:1.) 

Weeding. — By digging the whole garden just as soon as 
the soil is in condition, the early germination of weed seeds 
will be aided, and as soon as they appear above the ground 
can be killed by proper cultivation. Some gardeners think 
that so long as the weeds are exterminated and the soil 
watered, nothing more is required. 

Watering. — Great care should be exercised in the use of 
water, especially in the early stages of plant life. A heavy 
watering of the soil, whether applied with hose or by nature, 
or sometimes by the ever generous sprinkling cart, will pack 
most soils down so hard that they become almost impervious 
to air. Air should be present in the soil to assist in the decom- 
positions and chemical changes that must continually go on in 
the conversion of plant-food into forms that the plants can use. 
Proper cultivation, constant stirring about, pulverizing and 
aeration of the soil, are essential, especially in the beginning. 
The amount of water to apply can only be determined by ex- 
perience with the type of soil being used. A general rule to 
follow is to water thoroughly, but not often, as soon as dry 
enough. After the application of water, cultivate to prevent 
the formation of a surface crust. 

Second Planting of Corn, Peas, etc.— We wish to encour- 
age the planting of a second crop of peas, corn, etc., that we 
may have an extension of the production of green vegetables 
so complimentary to securing good health. 

When planting seeds in mid-summer, prepare the surface 
of the soil before you are ready to sow. Aim to get the seeds 
covered while the soil is still damp, be sure that the earth is 



10 RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN. 

pressed firmly around the seeds on all sides. This is an im- 
portant point to remember, also planting should be much 
deeper than in early spring, since we are more sure that the 
earth is cool and moist deeper down than near the surface. 
Gardening is one of the privileges and pleasures that should 
be enjoyed by a large majority of families. May the time 
soon come when more interest will be taken in the production 
of the home supply of fresh vegetables. 

Asparagus Bed Left to Seed.— Do not cut asparagus after 
the middle of June. It should be left to seed and dry down 
for the fall mulching and fertilizing, thus giving it a better 
start for the next year. 

Drying Apples, Peaches, Corn, etc. — Last fall, while visit- 
ing through some of of the country towns, we saw bushels of 
plums, peaches, and apples still hanging on the trees, while 
the ground was fairly carpeted with these delicious fruits. It 
seems so strange, and we who have to purchase these fruits 
must pay the price for those that are wasted on the ground 
or left for the frost to spoil. Would it be possible to have 
fruit dried on shares? Or hire boys and girls to assist in pre- 
paring it for drying? 

It is strange that in our country stores, as well as in the 
city, we find imported evaporated fruits. If there is a de- 
mand for dried fruits, why not supply the demand with our 
own home-grown products, which are much better in flavor 
and taste, and requires less time in which to cook? Then, too, 
there is the fact that we are using instead of wasting the 
bounteous gifts of our Creator, and are also giving employ- 
ment to hundreds of boys and girls who are out of school. We 
are placing on the market better and more suitable fruits for 
which people are willing to pay a good price, and at the same 
time the purchaser is made to feel that he has received sonie- 
thing for his money. After the process of drying has been 
accomplished, each kind of fruit should be placed by itself, 
marked according to name, and sold for its value. There is 
a great deal of difference in the cooking qualities of apples 
— for instance, one would pay more for Astrakhan or Golden 
Duchess than for the eating, or ordinary table apples dried. 
In preparing them, be as careful as if you were going to bot- 
tle the fruit, taking all the skin off. See to it that the whole 
core is taken out. Fruit should not be too ripe before drying, 
as then it loses much of its flavor and juice. Choose good, 
sound fruit, peal, core, and place on tables or boards covered 
with a clean, white cloth, in the sun ; cover with white mosquito 
netting to keep out the flies and other insects, turn often, and 



RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN. 11 

leave out in the open until all moisture has evaporated — 
sack in clean bags, tie, and mark. Good dried apples can be 
sold at any time of the year at from 8c to 10c per pound. They 
are very successfully dried in the house or on the summer 
porch, strung on white thread and hung up where the heat of 
the sun can reach them. They are white and have a fine flavor 
when cured in this way. 

Dried Corn. — Sweet corn should be plucked while tender 
and young, boiled in the inner shuck until the milk has set, 
then husked off, cut from the cob, placed in the sun, and cov- 
ered with white mosquito netting. Do not allow it to become 
damp, or it will turn dark. Stir it often, and dry until all 
moisture has evaporated. Then place in sacks marked and well 
tied and keep in a cool place. There is a great demand for 
home-cured corn, and it finds a ready sale at 12c to 15c per 
pound. Have yours of the very best, and it will keep you busy 
supplying the demands. 

Peaches, Apricots, Plums, and Pears are all Pealed, Stoned, 
and Cored. — They are dried in the same manner as description 
herein given for apples. A much higher price is usually paid 
for these fruits than for apples, because they are more difficult 
to handle. Some of our young people do not know what dried 
fruit looks like. Let us teach them by having them assist 
us in drying this season's crop. 

Food Values of Fruits. — In all our experiences we are con- 
vinced that with a sufficient fruit diet the average man or 
child has thrived better than on a diet which does not con- 
tain a sufficient amount of fruit food value. The body re- 
quires the acids contained in the various fruits such as malic 
and citric acid, and we are not at our best unless the body is 
supplied with these as well as with mineral matter, such as 
potatoes, salts, phosphorous, iron, lime, and others which are 
also found in fruits. The sugars in fruits are distinctly valu- 
able, they are the one kind which stands ready for our direct 
assimilation, requiring less work for the body than the ordin- 
ary cane sugar; these sugars do not require so much making 
over in the intestinal tract, and are of greater value in re- 
lieving muscular fatigue; for the relief of such fatigue we 
recommend grapes, sweet cherries, apples, gooseberries, rasp- 
berries. We also call attention to the dried fruits which con- 
tain a great quantity of sugar. Prunes contain 32 per cent, 
English currents, 54 per cent, raisins, 61 per cent, figs, 48 per 
cent, dates. 66 per cent. Aside from the sugar value of fruit, 
it has another which should not be overlooked, and that is as 



12 RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN. 

a laxative. Of course, green vegetables aid in a similar way, 
but should not be relied on wholly. For this purpose use a 
judicious mixture of both vegetables and fruit for the best 
results. Of dried fruits, figs, prunes, peaches, apricots, pears, 
and apples in the order named, as these appear to be the most 
useful. They should always be washed thoroughly in luke- 
warm water, soaked in cold water over night, then cooked in 
the water in which they have been soaked, using a double boiler 
or casserole, and placing on the back of the stove to simmer, 
for two or three hours or more. For best results, if not for 
taste, sugar should never be added. 



June— LITERATURE— Lesson VI. 

(Thirty Minutes.) 
Ten-Minute Talk on Current Events. 

Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin. 

Subject: Franklin's Plan of Life. 

References : Altemus edition. Chapter 8, beginning page 
147, and Crowell edition, pages 117-132. 

Sentiment: "Beware of little expenses; a small leak will 
sink a great ship." 

1. The thirteen virtues as outlined by Franklin with pre- 
cepts added. 

2. Order of arrangement according to Franklin's idea's. 

3. Rules adopted for practicing these virtues; book, 
method of marking, etc. 

4. Scheme of employment for the twenty-four hours of a 
natural day, or daily program. 

5. Benefits derived from practicing the virtues. 

6. Franklin's prayer. 



Questions. 

1. What was the object of the plan of life? 

2. What obstacles did Franklin encounter in trying to 
overcome his faults? 

3. How did he compare his method of eradicating faults 
with that of the gardener? 



RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN. 13 

4. Give the motto selected from Addison's Cato. 

5. Give the motto on wisdom selected from the Proverbs 
of Solomon. 

6. In studying himself, how was Franklin surprised? 

7. Which scheme gave Franklin the most trouble? 

8. Tell the story of the axe and apply it. 

9. In his old age what were Franklin's observations on 
his "scheme of life?" 

10. Why was religious sentiment avoided in arranging 
the scheme? 

11. Give the relation between virtue and happiness. 

12. What two qualities are mentioned as a foundation 
for worldly success? 

13. Why was "humility" added to the list? 

14. How was it practiced? 

15. What does Franklin say about "pride?" 



June— ART AND ARCHITECTURE— Lesson VI. 

(Ten Minutes.) 

I. Topic — Lee Greene Richards, Painter. 

Tell of his parentage and gift. How did his mission to 
England aid in his art career? What honors did he win in 
art study abroad? Where did he study in Paris? What has 
he painted for the Relief Society? What for the memorial cot- 
tage at Sharon, Vermont? Where was the hearthstone ob- 
tained which adorns this cottage? Why are flowers kept on 
the mantel under pictures of Lucy Mack Smith and Joseph and 
^yrum? Who has visited this shrine — the memorial cottage? 
AYhat are Lee Greene Richards' greatest qualities as a painter? 
Which of his paintings, if any, have you seen? 

II. Topic — M. M. Young, Sculptor and Painter. 

Parentage, gift, honors, study, monument to _ sea-gulls. 
Story of the locusts, and sea-gulls averting destruction to the 
crops. Monuments to Joseph and Hyrum, in the Temple 
block. Other art productions. 

The story of these two artists are in the book which Mrs. 
Alice Merrill Home is publishing, "Devotees and Their 
Shrines," a handbook of Utah art. The publishers promise 
the book for June 1. 



14 RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN. 

NOTES ON THE RELIEF SOCIETY CONFERENCE. 



With a large attendance from practically all of the stakes 
of the Church, the annual conference of the Relief Society 
was held on April 2 and 3. At the opening session, President 
Emmeline B. Wells extended a cordial welcome to those in at- 
tendance. The response was given in a few well chosen words 
by Dicy W. Henderson, president of Pocatello stake. 

Stake reports were made as follows — St. Johns stake, by 
E. L. S. Udall; Yellowstone, by Julia A. Miller; Bingham, by 
Elvira C. Steele ; Snowflake, by Nellie W. Smith ; Duchesne, by 
Aroetta Hale Holgate; Alberta, by Grace Cazier. 

Dr. Stauffer gave an address on "Diseases of the Nose 
and Throat," in which he spoke of the effects of adenoids and 
disease of the tonsils on the mentality of children, and gave 
valuable suggestions. 

The second session of the conference was devoted to a dis- 
cussion of the "Guide" and "Bulletin." Coun&jtlor Clarissa S. 
Williams gave a general discussion of the subject. The follow- 
ing named speakers gave addresses on the topics indicated : Pro- 
fessor J. Leo Fairbanks, "Civic Pride;" Mrs. Annie Wells Can- 
non, "Home Ethics;" Professor John Henry Evans, "Autobiog- 
raphy of Benjamin Franklin." 

The important features of the business meeting on Friday 
morning were short discussions as follows: "Official Publica- 
tion for the Coming Year," by Counselor Clarissa S. Williams; 
"Betterment Work, "by Sarah M. McLelland; "Nurse Class," 
by Elizabeth Crismon and Dr. Margaret C. Roberts; "Burial 
of the Dead." by Julina L. Smith; "Insurance," by Janette A. 
Hyde; "Peace," by Emily S. Richards; "Membership Fund," 
by Sarah J. Cannon; "Public Health," by Alice Merrill 
Home. 

With regard to Relief Society report blanks and record 
books, it was reported by Counselor Clarissa S. Williams that a 
committee has been appointed and is at work investigating the 
advisability of remodeling them so as to meet more adequately 
the present needs of the Society. This committee expects to 
make report at the October conference. Additional remarks 
were made by Presilent Emmeline B. Wells. 

At the closing session, Mrs. Julia P. M. Rirnsworth read 
a paper on the subject, "What the Relief Society Has Done 
for Women." Janette A. Hyde treated the subject, "Home 
Gardening for Women." Remarks were also made by Susa 
Y. Gates, Elizabeth C. McCune, and Romania B. Penrose, of the 
General Board. 



RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN. 15 

The closing address of the conference was made by Presi- 
dent Emmeline B. Wells. She paid a high tribute to the late 
Susan Noble Grant, a member of the General Board, who had 
passed away since the last conference. Attention was called 
particularly to the happy disposition and guiltless life of the 
deceased. President Wells expressed herself as being proud 
of the Relief Society, as an organization, and she was well 
pleased with the earnest efforts of the members who are striv- 
ing to keep up the standard set for the organization in the 
beginning. 

On motion of Elvira C. Steele, President of the Bingham 
stake, a rising vote of thanks and appreciation was given to 
President E. B. Wells for her long, faithful and efficient ser- 
vice as editor of the "Woman's Exponent." 

Genealogical Convention. 

The Genealogical Convention was held as scheduled, at the 
close of the General Conference of the Church. About four 
hundred delegates attended. These delegates represented the 
sixty-five stakes of the Church, and some of the missions. The 
Convention lasted three days, and much interest and enthu- 
siasm were manifested throughout the session. 

New Board Member. 

Miss Sarah Eddington has been appointed a member of the 
General Board of the Relief Society, to fill the vacancy caused 
by the death of Susan Noble Grant. Miss Eddington has long 
been an efficient worker on the board of the Y. L. M. I. A., and 
comes to us ably prepared and with a wide experience. 



Marion Banks 



FINE 



Millinery 



Charlton's 

G LOAK & SUIT CO. 



The right place for j 
practical styles in 
Women's Wear 



AT REASONABLE PRICES 

GOODWIN CORSETS 

This ad. will redeem 10 per cent on purchase at regular price 

321 SO. MAIN STREET, 0pp. Walkers 



16 RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN. 

MONEY FOR BULLETINS AND LESSON BOOKS. 



All orders for Bulletins or Lesson Books, all money to be 
expended in this direction should be sent to the Relief Society 
Bulletin, Room 28 Bishop's Building. 



THOMAS HULL 
GEO. W. LARKIN 



ELLJAH A. LARKIN 
ALMA J. LARKIN 



LARKIN-HULL 

UNDERTAKING CO. 

EMBALMERS AND 
FUNERAL DIRECTORS. 

CHAPEL & PARLORS 255 SO. 2nd EAST ST. 
Phone Wasatch 5132 SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH 




A Qrafonola 
for the Ward 

$25 Upward 
$10 Cash— $5 a Mo. 

IMay over in your Ward House 
records of the singing of the 
famous TABERNACLE CHOIR 

Also any records you want for 
any occasion— dance — popular — 
sacred, etc. 



Older than the State of Utah 



Write for Catalogue and FREE calendar. 



ICE CREAM— SHERBETS— PUNCHES 
and CANDIES are the "BEST BY TEST" 

Special prices to all Ward and Sch(X)l Socials etc. 
TWO STORES 55 Main St. 260 State St. 

Prompt Delivery Phones: Wasatch 3223--3224 



Jensen's 

Blanchard 

Butter 

(Single Brick) 



Jensen's Butters possess a 
wondrous flavor — a flavor that's 
irresistible. To secure it, only 
the choicest cream is used. Every 
ounce is selected by test- That 
which doesn't nass inspection is 
discarded. Jensen's Butters are 
practically the only butter in 
which such high-grade cream is 
used, still no advance in price 
is asked. Buy Jensen's But- 
ters. Enjoy their premier qual- 
ity aid delightful flavor. Tell 
your neigubors to use them. 



Jensen's 

Four-in-One 

Butter 



(Four Individual 
Bricks) 



JENSEN CREAMERY COMPANY, Salt Lake 



W. N. Williams, Supt. Clarissa S. Williams. Sec'y & Treas R. N. Wilson. Asst. Supt 

Guaranteed Furniture at Lowest Prices 

Our magnificent stock comprises goods from America's 
most representative lines and (>ur prices are always reasonable. 

Carpets, Rugs, Draperies, Linoleum, Ranges, 
Heaters, Qo-Carts, Etc. 

Home Furnishings of a,Il descriptions for 

CASH OR CREDIT 

Co-op. Furniture Co. 

Next Door South of Z. C. M. I. 



BURIAL CLOTHES 

Relief Society General Board 

FURNISHES COMPLETE BURIAL SUITS 

Phones Wasatch 3455 and Wasatch 207 
Salt Lake City Utah 



SEEDS AND PLANTS 

Fresh, pure acclimated seeds for lawn, flower and vegetable 
gardens. Bedding Plants, Choice Cut Flowers, fresh from 
our greenhouse. Make the "home beautiful." Our free guide 
book tells how. Ask for it. 

PORTER=WALTON CO. 

SEEDSMEN, NURSERYMEN & FLORISTS 

Cor. State and Broadway. Phone Ex. 717 

SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH. 

Star Printing Company 

35 Post Office Place Phone Wasatch 1370 

Salt Lake Citp, Utah 



ASK YOUR DEALER FOR Z. C. M. I. 

Western Scout Shoes 

The Ideal Out-door Shoe For 

Men, Youths, Boys, 

Cheap, serviceable. Used 
extensively by Carpenters, 
Iron workers, boy scouts,eto. 
'■MOUNTAINEER" or "THE 
LEADER" Overalls are hon- 
estly made. They don't rip. 




CUTLER'S UTAH MADE GOODS 

Command Attention— Buy At Home 

Approved Garments— Bleached or Unbleached 

75c Li^ht Weight - - $1.00 Lisle Thread 

$1.00 Medium Weight = $1.25 Heavy Weight 

POSTAGE PREPAID. 

Provo Dress Goods==Suitings==Blankets. 

SAMPLES SENT ON REQUEST. SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH 



HOTEL UTAH 




500 Rooms. Fireproof 

Opened June 8, 1911 

•'The very best of every, 
thing at sensible prices." 

Rates for room without 

bath $1.50 and $2.00. 

With bath $2.50 per day 

and upwards. 

Under the Management of 
GEORGE O. RELF 



SEE McCONAHAY 
For Diamonds 

64 MAIN ST. 

The Jeweler — Salt Lake 
$22 and up 




**BETTER ^THINGS TO EAT'* 
TlS/rt PI AfPC CORNER MAIN & 1st SO. 
I W U rLai X%^E»0 158 SOUTH M AIN S T« 



WHILE LABORING FOR THE POOR 

AND AIDING THE WIDOW IN WANT, 

DON'T NEGLECT YOURSELF AND FAMILY 

Have they the proper protection in ease of 
sickness or death of 
your bread winner or 
will you be compelled 
to look for charity? 

Has he sufficient life 
insurance to assure 
you this protection? 





JOHN C. CUTLER 
1st. Vice President. 



INSURANCE 
IN FORCE 





I ORENZO N. STOHT. 
2nd. Vice Pres. & Mgr. 



OVER 
$ 1 2,000,000.00 



JOSEPH F. SMITH 
President. 



Beneficial Life 
Insurance Co. 

Home office, Vermont 
Building- 
Salt Lake City, Utah 




C. W. NIBLEY 
Member Ex. Com. 



RICHARD W. YOUNG 
Counsel 



Relict Society Bulletin 



Volume 1 



July, 1914. 



Number 7 






Issued by the Officers and Directors of the 

GEKERAL BOARD OF THE RELIEF SOCIETY 
1914 



HUMAiyS SERVICE 

has come to be a consideration of political parties, or social 
organizations, and of educational institutions. 

THE RELIEF SOCIETY 

has been an instrument of human service for more than half a 
century. It ministers to the Immediate material wants of the 
community. It has been pronounced by many students an 
institution for community charity. 

THE UTAH AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

at Logan aims in a very definite way to make each member 
of society a more capable producer, a better farmer, house- 
wife, tradesman, agricultural engineer, or business man and 
thus aims to eliminate want. Its field of work therefore, 
properly co-operates with the work of relief societies in serv- 
ing the men and women of the State. While Its courses are 
distinctly practical, it deals in a broad and fundamental way 
with the basic industries of the State. Liberal instruction la 
given in the natuial and physical sciences, in mathematics, 
history, English, economics, literature and languages. 

The Oollege has been slowly built into an embodiment of 
the State's idealism. 



Willes-Horne Drug Company 

News Building, Salt Lake City. 

Our Drug Store Is Complete 

TREATMENT PERFECT. PRICES RIGHT. 

WE SOLICIT YOUR PATRONAGE. 

Prompt Attention to Mail Oiders. 



Lambourne Floral Dept. 
EVERYTHING FLORAL. 

DECORATIONS. FUNERAL WORK. Etc., Etc. 

THE L. D. S. HOSPITAL TRAINING 
SCHOOL FOR NURSES 

has an average enrollment of about 100 Nurses In training. 
The hospital has capacity of 250 beds. The training school is 
under the direction and supervision of highly trained gradu° 
ate nurses from schools of national reputation. It gives a 
three years course in training in nursing in all its branches. 
For further particulars address the Superintendent of Nurses 

Dr.W.H. GROVES LATTER-DAY SAINTS HOSPITAL, 

SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH. 




INDEX TO LESSON STATEMENTS. 

PAGE 

Loyalty 1 

Editorial— Success 3 

Health and Hygiene — Lesson II 5 

Lesson III 8 

" " " Lesson IV 11 

Notes for Officers 11 



ADVERTISERS' DIRECTORY 



Patronize those who have made it possible for this paper lo 

exist. 

1. AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE, Logan, Utah. 

2. WILLES-HORNE DRUG CO., 8 South Main, Salt Lake City. 

3. WHITE SEWING MACHINE CO., 29 W. First South St. Phone 

Was. 5234, Salt Lake City. 

4. L. S. SMITH &. BROS., Typewriter, 379, So. Main St., Salt 

Lake City. 

5. S. M. TAYLOR & CO., UNDERTAKERS, 251-259 E. First South 

St., Salt Lake City. 

6. L. D. S. BUSINESS COLLEGE, Salt Lake City. 

7. KEELEY ICE CREAM CO., 555 Main, 260 State Sts., Salt Lake 

City. 

8. LARKIN-HULL UNDERTAKING CO., 255 South 2nd East St., 

Salt Lake City. 

9. L. D. S. HOSPITAL TRAINING SCHOOL FOR NURSES, Salt 

Lake City. 

10. CO-OP. FURNITURE, 35 South Main St., Salt Lake City. 

11. Z. C. M. I., Salt Lake City. 

12. HOTEL UTAH, Salt Lake City. 

13. RELIEF SOCIETY BURIAL CLOTHES, Beehive House, Salt 

Lake City. 

14. CUTLER BROS. CO.. 36 So. Main St., Salt Lake City. 

15. STAR PRINTING CO., 35 P. O, Place, Salt Lake City. 

16. MORRISON BAKING CO., 158 So. Main St., Salt Lake City. 

17. BENEFICIAL LIFE INSURANCE CO., Vermont Building, Salt 

Lake City. 

18. McCONAHAY, THE JEWELER, 64 Main St., Sa't Lake City. 

19. PORTER-WALTON CO., Salt Lake City, Utah. 

20. DAYNES-BEEBE MUSIC CO., 45 S. Main, Salt Lake City. 

21. JENSEN CREAMERY COMPANY, Salt Lake. 

22. MARION BANKS, Millinery, and Charlton's Suit & Cloak Co., 321 

So. Mdin, Salt Lake. 

23. THE UNIVERSITY OF UTAH, Salt Lake City, Utah. 



Ball Bearings Give Greater Speed and StabiHty to ffie 

L. C. Smith & Bros. Typewriter 

(Ball Bearing, Long Wearing) 

Because of ball bearing typebars, the keys respond as readily 
as perfect piano keys. The capital shift works with equal ease — no- 
lifting of a heavy carriage but simply shifting the light typebar^ 
segment, thus insuring absolute accuracy. 

Another advantage — this machine is complete in itself for all 
kinds of work: t ibulating, billing, large envelopes, cards or paper 
as narrow as a postage stamp. 

WRITE FOR CATALOGUE 

To L. C. SMITH & BROS. TYPEWRITER CO. 

379 SO. MAIN STREET Salt Lake City, Utah 

Established 1860 Incorporated 190& 

S. M. TAYLOR & CO. 

UNDERTAKERS AND 
EI¥8BALIVIERS 

Successors to 

JOSEPH E. TAYLOR 

The Pioneer Undertaker of the West 
53 years in one location 

251=253=255=257 East First South St. 
Salt Lake City, Utah 

MODERN METHODS COMPLETE EQUIPMENT 

EFFICIENT SERVICE 



SPECIAL NOTICE 

SONS & DAUGHTERS of the UTAH PIONEERS 

-THE- 

L D. S. BUSINESS COLLEGE 

was established by your FATHERS for YOU. 

OPEN ALL THE YEAR. Day and Evening Sessions. 



RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 

ORGAN OF THE WOMAN'S KKLIEF SOCIETY OF THE 
CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS 

Vol. 1. July, 1914. No. 7 

Editor Mrs. S0Sa Young Gate* 

Business Manager Mrs. Jaitette A. Hyde 

Assistant Manager . Mrs. Amy Brown Lyman 

Advisory Committee 

Mrs. Clarissa S. Williams Mrs. Juli.va L. Smith Mrs. Rebecc.'V N. Nibley 



E>ublishers and Proprietors General Board of the Relief Society 

OflSce Room 28 Bishop's Building. Salt Lake City 

One Dollar a Year Ten Cents a Copy 

Entered as second-class matter on February IS, 1914, at the Post Ofllce 
at Salt Lake City, Utah, under the Act of March 3, 1879. 



LOYALTY. 



Perhaps the title "Fidelity," might be as appropriate as 
the one I have chosen, for the two subjects are both significant 
of the ideas I have in mind, in writing this article. 

There are many beautiful instances of loyalty recorde 1 of 
ancient times, as well as in the present day. One of the most 
notable of the former is the exquisite Bible story of Ruth and 
Naomi — a story which has rung down the ages, without losing 
a particle of its charm. So great was the fidelity of Euth, to 
her mother-in-law, that though entreated to leave her and re- 
turn to her own people, she could not be persuaded and replied 
in those memorable words: "lutreat me not to leave thee, or to 
return from following after thee : for whither thou goest, I will 
go ; and where thou lodgest, I will lodge : thy people shall be 
my people, and thy God my God. Where thou diest, will I die, 
and there will I be buried : the Lord do so to me, and more also. 
if ought but death part thee and me." 

Ancient history gives us another rema'rkable inistanee 
of this attitude in the story of Damon and Pythias, which has 
been quoted the world over, as illustrating the strength of the 
loyalty and affection that united these two historic figures, in 
such undying friendship as to be an example to all suceeding 
generations. 



2 RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN. 

A not less beautiful illustration is furnished in this our 
own day and time in the loyalty and love binding together the 
hearts and lives of our revered martyr leaders, Joseph and 
Hyrum Smith, who even in death were not separated. 

Those of us who have lived long and passed through varied 
experiences, are well aware of what it means to have false 
friends; and none are better able to appreciate to the fullest 
extent, true and unswerving loyalty, especially among or be- 
tween those who have interests in common and to whom every 
trust should be sacred, even without the formality of covenant 
or promise ; there is a loyalty in friendship, which is better 
understood than expressed, and this is the kind that calls 
forth the highest admiration, especially when observed by those 
not bound together by common interests. 

It is one of the most excellent qualities in human nature, 
and yet people, in general, possess it only in small degree. 

Loyalty does not always imply loftiness of sentiment or 
superior education.. It seems to be exemplified often in un- 
cultured men and women, who have not even had the advan- 
tages of common education. We recall personally many such 
instances — for example, in our own history, the case of Porter 
Rockwell, whose loyalty to the Prophet Joseph Smith, was al- 
most beyond belief. 

Realizing that there is much more in the term loyalty 
than the mere dictionary definition, that it has a meaning quite 
impossible to express in words, let us, as women, cultivate its 
true spirit towards one another and toward our own organiza- 
tion, the Relief Society. Let us be loyal to all its interests and 
hold our membership in its ranks sacred. Let us be loyal to 
the instructions given by the Prophet Joseph Smith in the be- 
ginning, and never depart from his words of counsel. Let us 
•keep ever in mind the Thirteenth Chapter of 1st Corinthians, 
which was read in one of the first meetings of the Society con- 
cerning the value of charity and the other principles laid down 
at that time — progress and advancement in all good works. 
This will be true loyalty to the teachings of the Prophet, who 
turned the key of knowledge for all women and made it pos- 
sible for them to stand upon a higher plane. Let us, of all 
women in the world, thus prove our loyalty to the Society 
which the Prophet organized, thus giving assurance of our 
fidelity to the church, of which we are members, and to the 
free country, of which we are citizens. 

EMMELINE B WELLS. 



RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN. 
EDITORIAL. 



SUCCESS. 



The measure of success or failure is as varied as the esti- 
mates of the persons who judg^e and decide. What is success 
for one would be an abject failure in the eyes of another. The 
successful man of business, the succeesful professional, the 
successful writer, or artist, is looked upon by his fellows as a 
shining example of what men call success, while the recipient 
of their envious compliments may look upon himself, or herself, 
as a dismal failure, or they may not. God does not measure us 
in human scales. How fortunate that this is so, for the suc- 
cessful of this world will rarely be the heroes of the next. 

AVhat is success? Sisters, what do you look upon as suc- 
cessful achievements in life? If I could hear your answers, 
I should know what manner of women you are. Do you ad- 
mire, and set up as ideals, the women in our community who 
occupy high offices in the Relief Society, or other organiza- 
tions? Are school teachers, to you, the embodiment of suc- 
cess? Great singers, or musicians, are these j^our ideals of 
successful girls and women? AVriters, poets, painters — 
wherein does success lie according to your judgment? 

These are not idle questions I am asking. On the con- 
trary, they are weighed doAvn with character-building thoughts. 
Our ideals as to success are subject to change with maturity 
and a better comprehension of life's realities. 

Who are the successful husbands? And who are the suc- 
cessful wives? Who are the successful mothers, and who are 
the successful daughters? Are the successful husbands the 
men who have made money, who have built fine homes for their 
wives, who have bought automobiles, and who have taken their 
wives upon foreign trips? It may be so. but it rarely is. As 
a rule the successful business man has no time for his family. 
He has no time or sympathy to give to his wife or his children. 
What home training there may be given to the children comes 
entirely from the mother, or from hired help. In my way of 
thinking the successful husband and father is a man of mod- 
erate means — a man who has kept his nose above the waves of 
debt, and who has led his family on the upward plane of spir- 
itual ratl'er than of material things. AVe sometimes hear it 
said in this Church that only the rich men are put into office. 
If this were true, which it is not, it would still mean that these 
same rich men were reared in homes of comparative poverty. 



4 RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN. 

where both parents had time to father and mother their chil- 
dren. The children of rich men, no matter what their place 
or position, rarely have had any fathering given them. 

"Who are the successful wives? They are not necessarily 
the women who have kept their houses scrupulously clean and 
who are the best breadmakers in the neighborhood, although 
both of these achievements make for home righteousness. The 
successful wives are not the women who give all their time and 
strength and thought to their houses, or even to their children. 
The successful wives are the women who learn to balance their 
lives so that they can give a portion of themselves, unreservedly 
and with loving generosity, in personal ministrations to their 
husbands, no matter how exacting the home cares, nor how 
taxing the responsibilities of the children may be. The wife, 
to be successful, must preserve sufficient vitality to give gen- 
erously of love, sympathy, comradeship and service to her 
husband, whenever he is near her. 

Who are the successful mothers? Not the women who 
gratify every wish and desire of their children, and who neg- 
lect every other duty and responsibility in life, except that oC 
waiting upon children and giving way to all of their 
selfish exactions. The successful mothers are the women who 
have cultivated their intelligence from day to day, so that it 
has kept pace with the development of their own children. 
Mind that I say "intelligence," and not intellectuality. For 
some very intelligent people are not very intellectual, and vice 
versa. The successful mother has been and is the companion 
of her children, no matter where their own paths in life may 
lie. She may or may not be a successful wife, that all de- 
pends. Some women are naturally good wives, and some are 
naturally good mothers ; a few women are both. But it is a 
mistaken idea that all the women who are married and who 
bear children are either successful as wives or as mothers. 
What a happy thought it is, however, that to the husbands and 
children of the world, all wives and all mothers are ideal. 
The Lord did a very gracious thing for mothers when he thus 
converted the men of the world and helped them to forget the 
shortcomings of their wives and their mothers. 

Who are the successful daughters? Not those who 
think of mother only when they want a favor. Not the daugh- 
ter who demands constant service from her mother, boundless 
sympathy and unlimited time, but who has no thought or time 
to return that mother's priceless service. The successful 
daughter may be bright or dull, rich or poor — if she be sym- 
pathetic and tenderly unselfish to her mother, she is truly suc- 
cessful. 



BELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN. 5 

This is the accepted day and time when you and I, mothers 

and s,'randmothers, can weigh ourselves in the standards of our 

c'vji ideals, and discover whether we are a success, or a failure, 

whatever way that decision may turn, this is the day and 

.le when you and I can climb one step further upward on the 

; jad to success. 



July— HEALTH AND HYGIENE— Lesson II. 

(Forty Minutes.) 

NOTE — According to the plan outlined in the Relief So- 
ciety Guide the work for July and August will consist of les- 
sons on Health and Hygiene. In September the regular work 
in Genealogy, Home Ethics, Gardening, Literature, Art and 
Architecture will be resumed. 

I— Care of the Body. 

Next to a sound mind, a sound body is one of our most 
valuable possessions. Every care should be taken to maintain 
or to create health. It is a sin to injure the health through 
carelessness, vanity, love of pleasure, overwork, or immoderate 
eating. 

Fresh air, wholesome food, and proper exercise are essen- 
tials of health. The underlying principle in maintaining health 
consists in the elimination from the body of effete material. 
This waste material is continually being produced by oxidation 
and breaking down of the various tissues. 

The use of water in the economy of the system is of the 
utmost importance. It is the one universal solvent and the 
medium by which foods are rendered soluble by digestion and 
conveyed to the tissues to be assimilated. It distributes the 
heat of the body and acts as an agent in cleansing, both ex- 
ternally and internally. 

The skin, kidnej-s, and bowels eliminate waste from the 
system and should be kept constantly active. The skin should 
be kept in health by proper bathing; the kidneys, by drinking 
freely of pure water; and the bowels, by the use of foods which 
maintain or promote activity. Fruits or fruit juices are very 
helpful to most people. Buttermilk is tonic and wholesome in 
its effects. The appetite, or special craving for foods, is often 
nature's best indication as to what the body requires. ]Milk 
and milk foods are best for children. 



6 RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN. 

Sudden changes of temperature should be guarded against, 
whether in the ball room or the kitchen, the tennis court, or 
the hay-field. Death has been caused by drinking very cold 
water while the body was overheated from exercise. 

Different kinds of clothing for the different kinds of 
weather should be kept at hand. 

Diet according to the season. Human beings should ac- 
quire such habits of caring for the health that all the little at- 
tentions will be given almost unconsciously ; thus avoiding 
worry and fret. 

II.— The Bath. 

Reference has been made to the internal cleansing of the 
body by the elimination of waste products. The external care 
of our earthly tabernacle must not be overlooked. Bathing 
should be given frequent attention. It is important not only 
as to our health but from an ethical standpoint. The Bath is 
most essential. Have you ever experienced the discomfort of 
sitting in public assemblies uear some one who did not bathe or 
change underwear with sufficient frequency? 

The Bath should be taken more with the idea of keeping 
clean than with the idea of getting clean. 

The temperature of the bath should be according to the 
habit, desire, or need of the individual. There is also much 
in the purpose for which it is taken. Warm baths are more 
for cleansing, while cold baths are for purposes of stimulation. 
^V little baking soda or ammonia added to the warm bath softens 
the water and makes it more cleansing. Care should be taken 
that children or old people do not suffer from chilliness after 
bathing. In such a case rubbing the skin or taking exercise 
should follow, to restore circulation. A warm soda bath fol- 
lowed by good and gentle rubbing of body with olive oil is ex- 
cellent treatment for fevered children. 

Every home that can afford it should have a bathroom. 
When there is no better way an end of a room with comfort- 
able temperature may be screened off for the occasion and a 
wash tub may be used. If there is no laundry tub then take a 
swim in the wash basin. 

The Foot Bath. — A foot bath at least should be taken 
every day; not only for the sake of health and cleanliness, but 
to promote the comfort of the feet and discourage the growth 
of corns. 



RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN. 7 

Towel, Soap, Brush and Comb. — It is well for each member 
of the family to have his individual towel, soap, brush and 
comb. Strict sanitation requires it. The towels may be marked 
with needle work or indelible ink. 

When circumstances make needful a common use of towels, 
be sure, iu case of illness, to supply the patient with individual 
articles. Diseases, and particularly skin troubles, are very 
readily communicated by general use of towels. 

Conscience and common sense are our best guides in daily 
life. 

Ill — Suggestions. 

Further knowledge may be obtained from local physicians 
or available text-books on the subjects. Also, members learn 
much from each other in discussing the subjects. 

Topics might be divided and given by several members. 
Time should be be reserved for general discussion after tne 
topics have been given. 

IV — Questions. 

How should health be valued? 
Name some of the essentials of health? 
What is the underlying principle in maintaining health? 
What can you say of the use of water? 
Methods of elimination of waste products. 
• Give some methods that are helpful. 

Discuss bathing from standpoint given, and from your own 
viewpoint. 

RECIPES FOR BENEFICIAL DRINKS. 

Apple Water. — Take apple parings and cores (or thin sliced 
whole apples if preferred) and cover with boiling water. Let 
stand eight or ten hours. Drink several times a day. (Given 
by Madam Davenport in her "Health and Beauty" talks.) 

Unfermented Grape-Juice. — Twenty pounds of Concord 
grapes. Boil and put through jelly bag as for jelly. Then 
take the juice and add three pounds of sugar and boil three 
minutes, and bottle hot, the same as fruit. (Through the 
courtesy of Dr. Romania B. Penrose.) 



8 RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN. 

July— HEALTH AND HYaiENE— Lesson III. 

(Forty Minutes.) 
I— Public Health. 

Public health may best be maintained through the interest 
and efforts of individuals in accordance with principles of 
Hygiene. 

Every member of a community should have at heart the 
welfare of all the others. 

The conduct of each day should be prompted by con- 
science and active interest. When a country is newly settled 
there is less likely to be sickness of certain kinds; but as the 
communities get older, and the soil becomes more impreg- 
nated with waste matter, it becomes more and more necessary 
to guard the sanitary conditions and use precautions against 
sickness. 

Families as well as individuals should use the greatest 
precautions against the spread of disease. Very valuable lives 
have been sacrificed just for want of care. Every community, 
no matter how young, or small, should have a health committee 
to look after a pure water supply, drainage and sanitary con- 
ditions generally. Quarantine regulations should be carefully 
carried out. 

'The wonderful preservation of health among the Jewish 
people is attributed to the observance of the wise Mosaic laws 
which gave such ample advice on hygiene, sanitation, and the 
isolation of people who were sick. When nations about them 
were stricken with epidemics of disease, the law-abiding Jews 
seemed immune. 

The topic giver may name some of these Mosaic laws as ob- 
tained from the Bible. Consider the Word of Wisdom and the 
promises made therein. To promote the welfare of the com- 
munity, the individuals must cultivate habits of cleanliness and 
nieeness. 

Special habits, such as use of tobacco, narcotics, food or 
drink that is injurious, must be overcome. All evil passions 
must be placed and kept under control. "An ounce of pre- 
vention is worth a pound of cure." 

II— A Few Dont's. 

(They will help to prevent the spread of disease.) 

Don't sneeze in public. If you must sneeze, use your 
handkerchief. 



RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN. 9 

Don't cough in public. It is largely a matter of habit. If 
you must cough, screen it with handkerchief or hand. 

Don't spit. Above all things, don't spit on sidewalk or in 
public places. 

Don't go from any case of contagious disease without hav- 
ing body, and particularly hair and clothing, thoroughly disin- 
fected. 

Ill — Breathing-. 

In the first place, have the best air obtainable. We can 
live for a time without food or without drink, but we cannot 
live_ long without air. We should always sit or stand in an 
upright position and take deep breaths. 

Lips Closed. — The lips should be kept closed for breathing 
purposes and the air inhaled through the nose. When children 
breathe habitually with open mouths, their parents should con- 
sult a physician. 

Drinking Cups.— It is a well-known fact that people should 
have' their individual drinking vessels. Some states have laws 
that do not permit of public drinking cups. On the Pullman 
cars glasses are not provided unless asked for. 

It is a good thing when wearied from indoor routine or 
sitting long, to step outside and with lips closed, head erect, 
shoulders back and elbows down, to inhale the fresh air slowly, 
and exhale slowly. Some people raise themselves on the balls 
of the feet while inhaling and lower themselves while exhaling. 
Try some of these simple exercises and see how restful and 
renewing they are. 

If chilled while out in cold weather, some warmth and com- 
fort may be obtained by taking a few specially long, deep 
breaths. When leaving a Avarm room to go out into the cold air, 
be sure to close the lips before the first intake into the lungs of 
the changed atmosphere. 

People whose business requires them to remain much in- 
doors will derive benefit from observing these simple directions. 
Sleeping porches or outside beds, to supply plentiful fresh air 
while sleeping, are coming to be considered necessities by many 
people. 

Also, there are those who make a practice of eating or liv- 
ing outdoors as much as circumstances will allow. The people 
whose business requires them to be outdoors have many ad- 
vantages over the indoor workers, as well as some disadvan- 
tages. 



lu RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN. 

IV — Fresh Air in the Home. 

As people grow in civilization they seem to consider more 
the need of fresh air in the homes and public buildings. All 
modern school buildings have special thought and care as to 
ventilation. Places of public worship should also be well ven- 
tilated. If doors and windows were thrown wide open after 
each service it would be a good practice. No matter how cold 
the weather, where people sleep in houses, each bedroom slept 
in should have the windows open every night. It is also a good 
plan to open wide the doors, letting a full draught of air sweep 
through the house for a short time each morning. 

There should be a constant inflow of fresh air into the 
homes, even in cold weather. Windows lowered slightly 
from the top give fresh air without exposing the inmates of the 
home to danger. Or the lower sash may be raised slightly and 
the space between sash and Avindow filled with a strip of wood 
or with other material. Fresh air will enter between the upper 
and lower sashes. 

A fire on the hearth or in the grate, besides being so cheer- 
ful and pleasant, produces a change of atmosphere that is con- 
sidered very beneficial. 



V — Review Questions. 



How may public health best be maintained? 

What about quarantine regulations? 

To what is attributed the great health of the Jews as a 
people? 

Mention some of the Mosaic laws. 

"What bearing has the Word of Wisdom on health? 

Speak of some of the actions which menace the health of 
the public. 

What provision is made in your town for individual drink- 
ing cups? 

What about the air we breathe? 

What about lips when breathing? 

Name some breathing exercises. 

What can you say of outdoor living for health? 

What about fresh air in the homes and public places? 



RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN. . 11 

July— HEALTH AND HYGIENE— Lesson IV. 

Use the pamphlet accompanying the "Bulletin" as your 
text. 

NOTE. — Reading matter on the subject of the ear may be 
forthcoming later. 

I — Review Questions. 

"What is the most important of the special senses? 

Name some of the things which depend upon good eye- 
sight. 

Name some results of eye-strain. 

Give some causes of eye-strain. 

"When should the care of the eye begin. 

How may the eyes of infants and children be cared for? 

Give one of the most frequent causes of blindness and the 
per cent of cases due to that cause. 

Cite the instance given in the pamphlet. 

Tell some ways of preventing blindness or defective sight 
in children. 

What about school work required at home? 

Can you make any suggestions for improvements in school 
work? 

Tell some consequences of reading too long at a time and 
how to correct it. 

"What can you say of the lighting of school rooms? 

The quantity and the direction of light? 

Tell about the effect of artificial light. 

Tell about the effect in print. 

AVhat about the effect of motion pictures on the sight ? 

Speak on the diseases mentioned in the text. 

Tell Avhat should be done in case of the accident men- 
tioned. 



NOTES FOR OFFICERS. 



It is desired that all presidents and other officers in the 
Relief Society, in writing to this office, use their own names 
written in full. Many are in the habit of using their initials, 
or their husband's names or initials. The full names of the 
sisters are preferred. 



12 RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN. 

Within the last year, a few new stakes have been organ- 
ized and several old stakes have been reorganized with new 
officers. It is extremely important that all such changes be 
reported, as soon as they occur, to the President or General Sec- 
retary. The Board is continually sending matter to the various 
organizations, and when the records do not show the correct 
names and addresses of officers, serious delays and incon- 
veniences result. 

The members of the General Board are gratified indeed 
with the excellent showing that has been made by the Stake 
officers in collecting the 25c annual dues. 

In reply to the statement that has come from a few stakes, 
however, to the eff'ect that they have been unable to collect the 
dues from some of the members, and therefore have asked if 
it is necessary for each stake organization to pay 25c for 
each enrolled member, attention is called to the decision that 
was reached at a special meeting of the officers held April 5, 
1913. After a long and careful consideration oJ: the financial 
condition of the Society, the following action was taken : 

''It was moved and carried unanimously that the 10c 
membership fee in the Relief Society be increased to 25c for 
each enrolled member." Those in attendance at this meeting 
were the members of the General Board and representatives 
from practically every stake of Zion. This action was made 
necessary because the expenses of this great and growing or- 
ganization have increased very materially in the last few j'ears. 
One important item of increased expense is the maintenance 
of the Relief Societ}^ Headquarters, which is a source of pride 
to everybody connected with the organization. Another item 
is the traveling expense which has been increased on account 
of the fact that we are unable to get rates that were formerly 
allowed us. Other individual expenses are continually made 
necessary in order to sustain with proper dignity the enviable 
position we hold as the greatest woman's organization in the 
world. 



SPECIAL NOTICE. 



Members of the Relief Society are entitled to the Hand 
Book on Art and Architecture (Devotees and their Shrines) at 
the net price of $1.00, with the addition of 10c postage. All 
orders at the above price must be received at this office by 
Aug. 1st, as after that date the contract will expire and the 
book will be sold for $1.25. at the Deseret News Book Store. 



RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN. 13 

NOTICE. 

We are sending to our sisters with this month's Bulletin 
an excellent paper on the '"Safe Guarding of the Child's 
Eye Sight," by Dr. L. "SV. Snow, who addressed the Relief So- 
ciety conference on this important subject at the October con- 
ference. 



Salt Lake City, June 11, 1914. 

The party of sisters who represented our organization at 
the International Council at Rome, have arrived home and re- 
port conditions pointing to a most successful future for coun- 
cil activities. 

Counsellor Clarissa S. Williams, in company with her hus- 
band (Senator AYilliams), is still visiting abroad^ will see all 
Europe before return home. 



The Utah division of Farm Women's Movement is very 
active, sending out literature and coupons to our societies. Its 
purpose is to assist in the erection of a model farmhouse, to be 
maintained at the San Francisco Exposition in 1915, where all 
the latest improved methods of farm household articles and 
their uses will be demonstrated. 



We are enclosing also bulletins for our Public Health Com- 
mittee. We urge our sisters to assist in giving publicity to 
these bulletins, and to do all in their power toward the ex- 
termination of the death dealing fly. 

The fly trap should be made and used. 



The Presidency and General Board of the Relief Society 
announce that the next class in the Relief Society Nurse School 
will commence Monday. September 21, 191-1. and continue eight 
months, in Salt Lake City. Dr. ^^largaret C. Roberts will be 
the instructor. 

It is requested that the Stake Presidents will at once con- 
sult with their Ward Presidents for the purpose of selecting 



14 RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN. 

intelligent and energetic women of suitable age and of good 
moral character to take this course in nursing. 

We sincerely trust that members of the Relief Society 
realize the value and necessity of this Course of Nursing, as it 
is a fact that 95 per cent of the inhabitants of our country 
cannot afford to pay the price of a graduate, hospital nurse, 
and yet our sick of the masses should receive trained and 
skilful nursing. 

We can also recommend this course in nursing as a much- 
needed part of every young woman's education. 

The tuition for the course will be $20.00, and it is ex- 
pected that the Relief Society organization in each ward will 
pay the tuition free for their representatives. However, any 
student who wishes to pay the tuition herself may do so, if she 
is willing to accept and sign the Relief Society Nurse Contract, 
a copy of which follows : 

Contract. 

In consideration of obtaining instruction free in the Relief 
Society Nurse School, I promise to answer all calls made upon 
me by the Superintendent of Relief Society Nurses where I live, 
to give thirty days' charity nursing, and also nurse for what- 
ever remuneration may be designated by said Superintendent 
for the term of one year following graduation. 

Students who do not wish to sign the aforesaid Relief 
Society contract may attend the school by paying the usual fee 
of $50.00. Cost of books $5.00. 

A course in cooking having special reference to preparing 
and serving food for the sick and convalescent will be pro- 
vided for the class commencing after the Christmas holidays. 
The students to meet the cost, which, however, will be but nom- 
inal — not to exceed $3.00. 

Homes where students may assist with the housework for 

their board and room can always be furnished in good families. 

Dr. Roberts will also teach a class in Obstetrics ; and as 

skilful midwives are needed in every town we recommend this 

class. 

For full particulars write to 

CLARISSA S. WILLIAMS, 

37 North West Temple Street, 
Or 
DR. MARGARET C. ROBERTS, 

79 C Street, Salt Lake City. 



RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN. 15 



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The State School of Education 

Preparation for Teaching in common schools and high schools. 

A school that has drawn favorable attention from educators of 
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in relation to modern educational theorj\ 

The School of Medicine 

Offering a combined course in Arts and Medicine (four years) 

The School of Law 

Offering full preparation for the practice of law. A young 
department with high standards, thorough methods, and some 



novel advantages. 

For full particulars^ address 



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16 



RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN. 



MONEY FOR BULLETINS AND LESSON BOOKS. 



All orders for Bulletins or Lesson Books, all money to be 
expended in this direction should be sent to the Relief Society 
Bulletin, Room 28 Bishop's Building. 



THOMAS HULL 
GEO. W. LARKIN 



ELIJAH A. LARKIN 
ALMA J. LARKIN 



LARKIN-HULL 

UNDERTAKING CO. 

EIVSBALMERS AND 
FUNERAL DIRECTORS. 

CHAPEL & PARLORS 255 SO. 2nd EAST ST. 
Phone Wasatch 5132 SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH 




A Qrafonola 
for the Ward 

$25 Upward 
$10 Cash— $5 a Mo. 

Play over in your Ward House 
records of the singing of the 
famous TABERNACLE CHOIR 

Also any records you want for 
any occasion— dance — popular — 
sacred, etc. 



Older than the State of Utah 



Write for Catalogue and FREE calendar. 



ICE CREAM— SHERBETS— PUNCHES 
and CANDIES are the "BEST BY TEST" 

Special prices to all Ward and School Socials etc. 

TWO STORES 55 Main St. 260 State St. 

Prompt Delivery Phones: Wasatch 3223- -3224 



Jensen's 

Blanchard 

Butter 

(Single Brick) 



.leii<ieii'<t Butters possess a 
wondrous flavor— a flavor that's 
irresistible. To secure it. only 
the choicest cream is used. Every 
ounce is selected by test That 
which doesn't nass inspection is 
discarded. Jensen's Butters are 
practically the only butter in 
which such hi^h-grade creana is 
used. Still no advance in price 
is aske 1. Buy Jensen's But- 
ters. Enjoy their premier qual- 
ity and deligrhtful flavor. Tell 
your neighbors to use them. 



Jensen's 

Four-in-One 

Butter 



(Four Individual 
Bricks) 



JENSEN CREAMERY COMPANY, Salt Lake 

W. N. Williams, Supt. Clarissa S. Williams, Sec'y & Treas R. N. Wilson. Asst. Supt 

Guaranteed Furniture at Lowest Prices 

Our ma^niticeni stock comprises goods from America's 
most represeutative lines and our prices are always reasonable. 

Carpets, Rugs, Draperies, Linoleum, Ranges, 
Heaters, Go-Carts, Etc. 

Home Furnishings of all descriptions for 

CASH OR CREDIT 

Co-op. Furniture Co. 

Next Door South of Z. C. M. I. 



BURIAL CLOTHES 
Relief Society General Board 

FURNISHES COMPLETE BURIAL SUITS 

Phones Wasatch 3455 and Wasatch 207 
Salt Lake City Utah 



SEEDS AND PLANTS 

Fresh, pure acclimated seeds for lawn, flower and vegetable 
gardens. Bedding Plants, Choice Cut Flowers, fresh from 
our greenhouse. Make the "home beautiful." Our free guide 
book tells how. Ask for it. 

PORTER=WALTON CO. 

SEEDSMEN, NURSERYMEN & FLORISTS 

Cor. State and Broadway. Phone Ex. 717 

SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH. 

Star Printing Company 

35 Post Office Place Phone Wasatch 1370 

Salt Lake Citi^, Utah 



ASK YOUR DEALER FOR Z. C. M. I. 

Western Scout Shoes 

The Ideal Out-door Shoe For 

Men, Youths, Boys, 

Cheap, serviceable. Used 
extensively by Carpenters, 
iron workers, boy scouts,etc. 
'■MOUNTAINEER" or "THE 
LEADER" Overalls are hon- 
estly made. They don't rip. 




CUTLER'S UTAH MADE GOODS 

Command Attention— Buy At Home 

Approved Garments— Bleached or Unbleached 

75c Li^ht Weight = - $L00 Lisle Thread 

$L00 Medium Weight - $L25 Heavy Weight 

POSTAGE PREPAID. 

Provo Dress Goods==Suitings — Blankets. 

SAMPLES SENT ON REQUEST. SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH 



HOTEL XJTAH 




500 Rooms. Fireproof 

Opened June 8, 1911 

"The very best of every, 
thing at sensible prices " 

Rates for room without 

bath $1.50 and $2.00. 

With bath $2.50 per day 

and upwards. 

Under the Management of 
GEORGE O. RELF 



SEE McCONAHAY 
For Diamonds 

64 MAIN ST. 

The Jeweler===Salt Lake 

$22 and up 




^'BETTER THINGS TO EAT'* 

TU/A PI ATFC CORNER MAIN & 1st SO. 
A W^ rUiW^taO 158 SOUTH MAIN ST. 



WHILE LABORING FOR THE POOR 

AND AIDING THE WIDOW IN WANT, 

DON'T NEGLECT YOURSELF AND FAMILY 

Have they the proper protection in ease of 
sickness or death of 
your bread winner or 
will you be compelled 
to look for charity? 

Has he sufficient life 
insurance to assure 
you this protection? 





JOHN C. CUTLER 
1st. Vice President. 



INSURANCE 
IN FORCE 





T,ORENZO N. STOHL 
2n(i. Vice Pres. & Mgr. 



OVER 

$ I 2,000,000.00 



JOSEPH F. SMITH 
President. 



Beneficial Life 
Insurance Co. 

Home office, Vermont 
Building- 
Salt Lake City, Utah 




C. W. NIBLEY 
Member Ex. Com. 



RICHARD W. YOUNG 
Counsel 



Relict Society Bulletin 



Volume 1 



August, 1914. 



Number 8 






Issued by the Officers and Directors of the 

GENERAL BOARD OF TKE RELIEF SOCIETY 
1914 



HUMAN SERVICE 

has come to be a consideration of political parties, or social 
organizations, and of educational institutions. 

THE RELIEF SOCIETY 

has been an Instrument of human service for more than half a 
century. It ministers to the Immediate material wants of the 
community. It has been pronounced by many students an 
Institution for community charity. 

THE UTAH AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

at Logan aims in a very definite way to make each member 
of society a more capable producer, a better farmer, house- 
wife, tradesman, agricultural engineer, or business man and 
thus aims to eliminate w^ant. Its field of worlc therefore, 
properly co-operates with the work of relief societies In serv- 
ing the men and women of the State. While its courses are 
distinctly practical, it deals in a broad and fundamental way 
with the basic industries of the State. Liberal instruction Is 
given in the natuuil and physical sciences, In mathematics, 
history, English, economics, literature and languages. 

The College has been slowly built into an embodiment of 
the State's idealism. 



Willes-Horne Drug Company 

News Building, Salt Lake City. 

Our Drug Store Is Complete 

TREATMENT PERFECT. PRICES RIGHT. 

WE SOLICIT YOUR PATRONAGE. 

Prompt Attention to Mail Orders. 



Lambourne Floral Dept. 
EVERYTHING FLORAL. 

DECORATIONS. FUNERAL WORK. Etc., Etc. 

THE L D. S. HOSPITAL TRAINING 
SCHOOL FOR NURSES 

has an average enrollment of about 100 Nurses in training. 
The hospital has capacity of 250 beds. The training school is 
under the direction and supervision of highly trained gradu= 
ate nurses from schools of national reputation. It gives a 
three years course in training in nursing in all its branches. 
For further particulars address the Superintendent of Nurses 

Dr.W. H. GROVES LATTER-DAY SAINTS HOSPITAL, 

SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH. 




INDEX TO LESSON STATEMENTS. 

PAGE 

Historical Gathering 1 

Editorial— Faith 5 

Health and Hygiene — Lesson I .... 7 

" " *' Lesson II 9 

" " '' Lesson III 11 

Work and Business — Lesson I .... . . . . 13 

Salt Lake City's Fly Campaign 14 

ADVERTISERS' DIRECTORY 



Patronize those who have made it possible for this paper to 

exist. 

1. AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE, Logan, Utah. 

2. WILLES-HORNE DRUG CO., 8 South Main, Salt Lake City. 

3. WHITE SEWING MACHINE CO., 29 W. First South St. Phone 

Was. 5234, Salt Lal<e City. 

4. L. S. SMITH & BROS., Typewriter, 379, So. Main St., Salt 

Lake City. 

5. S. M. TAYLOR &. CO., UNDERTAKERS, 251-259, E. First South 

St., Salt Lake City. 

6. L. D. S. BUSINESS COLLEGE, Salt Lake City, 

7. KEELEY ICE CREAM CO., 555 Main, 260 State Sts., Salt Lake 

City. 

8. LARKIN-HULL UNDERTAKING CO., 255 South 2nd East St. 

Salt Lake City. 

9. L. D. S. HOSPITAL TRAINING SCHOOL FOR NURSES, Sal» 

Lake City. 

10. CO-OP. FURNITURE, 35 South Main St., Salt Lake City. 

11. Z. C. M. I., Salt Lake City. 

12. HOTEL UTAH, Salt Lake City. 

13. RELIEF SOCIETY BURIAL CLOTHES, Beehive House, Sail 

Lake City. 

14. DESERET NEWS BOOK STORE, 8 Main St., Salt Lake City. 

15. STAR PRINTING CO., 35 P. O. Place, Salt Lake City. 

16. MORRISON BAKING CO., 158 So. Main St., Salt Lake City. 

17. BENEFICIAL LIFE INSURANCE CO., Vermont Building, Salt 

Lake City. 

18. McCONAHAY, THE JEWELER, 64 Main St., Sa't Lake City. 
20. DAYNES-BEEBE MUSIC CO., 45 S. Main, Salt Lake City. 
2(. JENSEN CREAMERY COMPANY, Salt Lake. 

22. MARION BANKS, Millinery, and Charlton's Suit & Cloak Co., 321 
So. Main, Salt Lake. 



Ball Bearings Give Greater Speed and Stability to the 

L. C. Smith & Bros. Typewriter 

(Ball Bearing, Long Wearing) 

Because of ball bearing tvpebara, the keys respond as ' readily 
as perfect piano keys. The capital shift works with equal ease — no 
lifting of a heavy carriage but simply shifting the light typebar 
segment, thus insuring absolute accuracy. 

Another advantage — this machine is complete in itself for all 
kinds of work: tH,biilating, billing, large envelopes, cards or paper 
as narrow as a postage stamp. 

WRITE FOR CATALOGUE 

To L. C. SMITH & BROS. TYPEWRITER CO. 

379 SO. MAIN STREET Salt Lake City, Utah 

Established 1860 Incorporated 1908 

S. M. TAYLOR & CO. 

UNDERTAKERS AND 
EMBALMERS 

Successors to 

JOSEPH E. TAYLOR 

The Pioneer Undertaker of the West 
53 years in one location 

251=253=255=257 East First South St. 
Salt Lake City, Utah 

VKJDERN METHODS COMPLETE EQUIPAIENT 

EFFICIENT SERVICE 



SPECIAL NOTICE 

SONS & DAUGHTERS of the UTAH PIONEERS 

-THK- 

L D. S. BUSINESS COLLEGE 

was established by your FATHERS for YOU. 

OPEN ALL THE YEAR. Day and Evening Sessions. 



RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 

ORGAN OF THK WOMAN'S RELIEF SOCIETY OF THE 
CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTKR-DAY SAINTS 

Vol.1. August, 1914. No. 8 

Editor Mrs. Susa Young Gatbs 

Business Manager Mrs. Janette A. Hydb 

Assistant Manager Mrs. Amy Brown Lyman 

Advisory Committee 

Mrs. Clarissa S. Williams Mrs. Julina L. Smith Mrs. Rebecca N. Niblby 



Publishers and Proprietors General Board of the Relief Society 

Office Room 28 Bishop's Building, Salt Lake City 

One Dollar a Year Ten Centsla Copy 

Entered as second-class matter on February 18, 1914, at the Post Odce 
at Salt Lake Cltr, Utah, under the Act of March 3, 1879. 



HISTORICAL GATHERING. 

The Relief Society of the Box Elder Stake of Zion has set 
the pace, so to speak, for other stakes to follow, if they so de- 
sire, in holding a sort of reunion in recognition of the services 
rendered by those sisters who were first in the field, and who 
commenced and laid, as it were, the foundation on which to 
build and enlarge the work of charity and benevolence, opening 
up the work by devising ways and means by which the society 
has been enabled to accomplish much good for humanity. 

President Stohl issued invitations to all the former mem.- 
bers now living, wherever they might be, and also asked that 
the names of members who had died be collected and be en- 
rolled, to make a complete total as far as possible, of those who 
had in any sense been helpful in bringing about the prosperity 
and aiding in the growth and success of this magnificent organi- 
zation. 

President Stohl has had this meeting under advisement for 
some time past and has now succeeded in demonstrating what 
patience and perseverance can accomplish, when many hands 
are set to work systematically, when forces are united in a 
given work. 

This reunion covers a period of over fifty years, back to the 
time of the first ward organization in Box Elder County. 

These initial names of those now long since departed 
awakened memories that were dear to the hearts and souls of 
relatives and friends, and were tenderly touching. 



2 RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN. 

We admire the courage of this President, in her efforts to 
collect all these names and gather as much as possible from the 
records kept by these faithiul Secretaries, when conditions were 
not so favorable as at the present time. 

The women of today owe much to the founders of this so- 
ciety who, under difficulties that would seem insurmountable 
to this generation, established this society that has spread 
on both continents, wherever a branch of the Church has been 
organized. It is something over half a century since the 
sisters in this desert land met here and there, in each others' 
homes or in the rude log meeting houses, or wherever it was 
possible, to unite their eft'orts for charitable purposes with faith 
hope and prayers, sing the songs of Zion, and make the most 
of their small means. 

The Lord blessed them in their work, and it was crowned 
with success in many cases. 

The history of these faithful wives and mothers, were it 
written, would fill many books. We cannot honor them too 
much ; language fails in the attempt to do justice to the efforts 
made to accomplish the results recorded, alleviating suffering 
and caring for the needy and helpless. 

The old saying that many hands make labor light, was 
self-evident in this gathering and there is every reason to be- 
lieve that those who made this large assembly an achievement 
have surely proved that they have very much satisfaction in 
the results of their noble and unselfish work. 

The feast was in every sense most enjoyable ; 600 peo- 
ple were seated. The expressions of delight on every face, 
told the story of happiness in unmistakable terms. The house 
was full of faces beaming with pleasure and the yard was 
filled with women in holiday attire, with sunshine in their 
hearts which shed its radiance on all that came near. 

It was a magnificent spectacle to gaze upon and they all 
seemed full of joy and gladness. 

There were flowers everywhere in abundance, in festoons 
and garlands, which, of course, added to the picture, but the 
radiant faces beaming with delight, were certainly the greater 
attraction. 

After the feast, the company repaired to the Tabernacle, 
which had been artistically decorated by the Y. L. M. I. A. The 
stand was literally covered with flowers, and when the au- 
dience was seated and the organ pealed forth its sweet strains, 
which were most entrancing, the choir and congregation sang 
"Glorious Things Are Sung of Zion." Invocation offered by 
Annie Wells Cannon, after which Sister Farnham sang "Silver 
Threads Among the Gold." The Secretary opened the old 



RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN. ' 3 

record and called the names of the members of the first or- 
ganization in Brigham City. Fifty-seven answered to the call, 
but "where are the others?" was the thought of many pres- 
ent, "Where have ye tied, ye vanished? "We ask, ve do not 
tell." 

The minutes of the first organization were read after the 
roll call, and were very interesting; the few speakers could not 
express what was in their hearts — this was very apparent, the 
heart can feel what the lips cannot utter ; in fact, it seemed the 
occasion was one to call for silent solemnity. It was almost 
as though one were in the presence of those departed, whose 
names had echoed through the building when the roll was 
called. 

After the services were closed, there was a time of greeting 
each other and shaking hands, "when the old friends meet to- 
gether." 

This was indeed a historical gathering, and we sincerely 
hope and trust that other Stakes of Zion "will go and do like- 
wise." 

While we have the memory of those who helped to estab- 
lish this work we must not forget those who need us today; the 
assistance we render, whether in word or deed, all comes 
back to us in blessing and in comfort to add to our own happi- 
ness and to help us in our daily lives. 

There is much to do, there are hearts to cheer, there are 
expectations to be realized, there are heights to be attained, 
there are souls to be saved, and there is abundant work for us 
all. 

Do we realize the blessings that have come to us as a 
people, through the gospel revealed in this dispensation? Are 
we grateful to our Heavenly Father for the blessings we enjoy, 
life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness, our homes and loved 
ones? 

How much of up-lifting has come to the homes of this peo- 
ple, through the Relief Society, what love for each other, what 
hopes engendered and realized, what difficulties encountered 
and overcome by our faith and our association! What sorrows 
alleviated that seemed overwhelming ! We have most of us 
learned to be brave under difficulties, and to be cheerful if only 
for the sake of others. 

We must not neglect to make honorable mention of the 
kindness of the brethren who so generously aided the sisters 
in honoring the illustrious dead, and those witnesses still liv- 
ing, who assisted in opening up the work of the Relief Society, 
when all was difficult to establish, and. in fact, to convert 
the people to the idea of the need of such an association. 



4 RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN. 

This is a momentous age in which we now live, and there 
are new ideas, new thoughts, new efforts being put forth to 
bring about the purposes that are destined to make Zion the 
pride and joy of which the Prophets have foretold. It will 
not be done without efforts, and therefore we must be wide 
awake and diligent in the duties pertaining to this organiza- 
tion. 

In closing this brief sketch of one of the most interesting 
reunions of the Relief Society ever held, it seems essential to 
record the names of some of the Stake Presidents who were suc- 
cessful when there was little means to use and the sisters were 
necessarily compelled to practice the strictest economy to carry 
out the purposes of the society. 

Harriet A. Snow, wife of Lorenzo Snow, was the first Stake 
President, Olivette D AYiderborg the next, and Susanna Booth 
the third. She was followed by Sarah P. Stohl, the present 
President; although for a time Sister Emilia D. Madsen, 
counselor to President Booth, acted with goodly credit until 
Sister Stohl was appointed. 

There is a very strong Relief Society of sisters in that 
stake, composed of women who have not acquired our language 
sufficiently to be able to express their feelings. 

This society has accumulated means and brought 
a number of Saints from their native land to Zion. In fact, it is 
quite remarkable what they have succeeded in doing. 

The sisters who were invited to speak at this great meet- 
ing were surely equal to the representative occasion. 

The depth of intense feeling was apparent in every one 
who made an effort to give expression to a few words of con- 
gratulation. In fact, at the close of the meeting, the spirit that 
had pervaded the assembly was more deeply intensified than 
heretofore. 

It was an occasion never to be forgotten by those present. 

The closing prayer was offered by Sister Emelia D. Mad- 
sen. Sister Emily S. Richards and Annie Wells Cannon each 
spoke a few words. President Sarah P. Stohl made a short but 
very sympathetic address. 

President Stohl gave a very appropriate address and ex- 
pressed his great pleasure in being present on such a remark- 
able occasion. The music was very fijie, but no doubt the feel- 
ing prevailed that the spirits of the departed were near. 

The General President of the Relief Society, who had 
known all the former leaders in this work, made a few appro- 
priate remarks, alluding to the original founders of this so- 
ciety, throughout Zion. 

The closing prayer was offered by Emelia D. Madsen, then 



RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN. 5 

there was a social hour of hand-shaking and greeting, with 
parting words of love and blessings; the scene was pathetic. 
yet in respects joyful and hope inspiring. 



EDITORIAL. 



FAITH. 



The custom of appealing to physicians for medical assist- 
ance in all cases of sickness has become so prevalent even 
among the Latter-day Saints, that faith in the healing of the 
sick has been measurably relegated to the rear. It is true, we 
still send for the elders, but the physician is, or will be, in the 
house as well, and we are apt to rely more upon his skill than 
upon the administration of the Priesthood. While if there is 
a return of health, we are pretty sure to give the credit to the 
physician. 

This people are not narrow in their views on the subject 
of physicians, but we must sound a warning cry in the ears of 
the women of the Relief Society, that they fail not in their duty 
to teach lessons of faith in God and in the laying on of hands 
for the healing of the sick, to their families. 

In the rise of this Church, faith was the one and the only 
recourse in all cases of sickness and disease. Simple remedieg 
were administered and were perhaps a part of the household 
equipment. But the bottle of consecrated oil occupied the most 
prominent place in the sick rooms of the Latter-day Saints. 
The pages of the old 'IMillennial Star teemed with the cases 
of miraculous healings under the hands of the elders. M^ho is 
there that has not seen the wonderful healings made manifest 
among this people from time to time? Is there any lack of 
power in the Priesthood? On the contrary, there has prob- 
ably never been a time in the history of the Church when there 
has been more power and efficacy in the united ranks of the 
Priesthood than at the present time. What, then, may be the 
difference ? It is an entirely individual trouble : You and I, 
dear sister, may be at fault. The moment we are sick, do we 
take a remedy, or hunt up a physician? And if we hear of a 
neighbor who has been taken ill, is our first question, who is 
the doctor, or what does the doctor say? Too much of our 
time in social affairs is spent in discussing medical problems 
and medical treatment. The children hear all this and con- 



6 RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN. 

sequently when they are sick their first thought is not to inquire 
for a spoonful of consecrated oil, but to lean upon the doctor 
and his advice. 

If we are to retain the established principle of faith for- 
the healing of the sick, we must work at it as we would at any 
other principle or doctrine which we wish to make a part of 
our lives. Whenever the need arises with ourselves, or with 
our dear ones, then call in the elders, as we are told to do in the 
Scriptures, and if we are not healed on their first visit, 
let us call them in again and yet again. The Lord will surely 
heal us if we surely call. We sometimes say ne need a physi- 
cian to tell us what ails us. The Lord is perfectly cognizant 
of our condition, and he is as able to heal one difficulty as an- 
other. 1 wish the sisters would read Alma's description of 
faith as given in Alma, chapter 32, verses 26-43, in this con- 
nection. This is the simplest and finest description of the 
manner in which we can acquire that wonderful gift of faith 
ever recorded in the Scriptures. 

Hygiene is a necessary part of our religion. AVe should 
be clean. We should keep the laws of Moses which were the 
laws of health. We should be hygienic in all our outgoings 
and incomings. We should keep the Word of Wisdom and the 
laws of God, but above all, if we are to have abiding health, 
we should cultivate daily the gift of faith. 

In closing let me quote that wonderful passage in the 
eighty-eighth section of the Doctrine and Covenants just pre- 
ceding the Word of Wisdom. For this is the epitome of all 
hybienic laws as well as the foundation upon which are 
erected that flimsy superstructure known as so-called science ! 

"Cease to be idle; cease to be unclean; cease to find fault 
with one another; cease to sleep longer than is needful; retire 
to thy bed early, that ye may not be weary.; arise early, that 
your bodies and your minds may be invigorated. * * * 
And above all clothe yourselves with the bonds of charity as 
with a mantle, which is the bond of perfection and peace." 

AVe have been giving some summer lessons on the laws of 
hygiene and sanitation in the home. These follow closely the 
instructions of Moses translated into modern language and 
usage. But we must not make even these laws the foundation 
of our health — but seek faith in God and the Priesthood as our 
foundation stones, building up the superstructure of such 
hygienic laws and observances as ancient and modern wise 
men prescribe for us. Above all things, let us cleanse our 
hearts from envy, strife, jealousy and hatred, thus indeed fold- 
ing about us the mantle of charity which we are told is the 
basis of all health of body and mind. 



RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN. 
August— HEALTH AND HYGIENE— Lesson I. 



Care of the Ear. 

(Forty Minutes.) 

The ear is a delicate organ easily affected by weakness or 
disease, and it is particularly sensitive in childhood. 

It consists of three parts, the external or fleshy part, the 
middle ear or drum and the internal ear. 

The deafness which is often a sequel of diseases affecting 
healthy and beautiful children is a dreadful handicap. AVhen 
such diseases and fevers come early in life the little patients 
forget the speech they have earlier learned and thus become 
deaf-mutes. 

Deafness sometimes follov\'s measles or smallpox, but more 
frequently it follows scarlet fever and meningitis. There are 
also other diseases which cause deafness, such as ulceration, 
thickening, or perforation of the tympanum (eardrum). Deaf- 
ness may be caused by obstruction of the lining membrane of 
the Eustachian tube, or from throat diseases which affect the 
Eustachian tube. 

Earache is frequently caused by a cold which gives rise to 
some of the affections mentioned or it may be from a neuralgic 
pain. Partial deafness or a ringing in the ears may be caused 
by an accumulation of wax which becomes hardened, causing 
pressure on the tympanum. 

A severe slap on the ear has been known to rupture the 
tympanum and cause deafness. 

Ear troubles may be avoided by keeping the child in the 
best possible condition of health. It is now a recognized fact 
that by exercising care many children grow to maturity with- 
out having the so-called children's diseases. 

In case of pain in the ear hot fermentation or hot dry ap- 
plications give relief. Sometimes the neuralgic pain that comes 
from teething may be relieved by putting in the ear a piece of 
cotton dipped in warm consecrated oil. 

To remove hardened wax or foreign substances from the 
ear take the syringe and very gently indeed give douches of 
warm water to which has been added soda in the proportion 
of a level teaspoonful to a pint. The ear should be held down- 
ward to help the escape of the foreign matter. The greatest 
care should be exercised or permanent injury may be done 
the patient. When this treatment does not succeed, then call 
a physician — a specialist if possible. 



8 - RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN. 

Nose and Throat. 

Tlie nose is not only the organ of smell, but it also bears 
a most important part in the act of breathing. By passing 
through the nose the air is both warmed and strained before 
entering the lungs. Children should naturally inhale the air 
through the nose, but sometimes obstructive growths occur 
and the child becomes a mouth breather. The habit of breath- 
ing through the mouth is detrimental to the looks; and more 
important still, it is detrimental to health, as many diseases are 
contracted in that way. 

The throat also bears an important part in breathing, and 
should be kept free from disease. The obstruction to nose 
breathing most frequently met with in childhood, and one that 
is very common is — 

Adenoids — This disease, which is an enlargement of small 
glands situated at the opening of the nasal passage with the 
throat, gives rise to many and sometimes severe troubles. The 
condition is recognized by the difficulty the patient manifests 
in breathing, particularly at night. The patient sleeps with 
mouth open and the breathing is noisy. He is restless and 
sleep is disturbed. The disease is usually attended by enlarged 
tonsils, which is also a frequent cause of earache. 

The sufferers make slow progress in school. Their coun- 
tenances are affected, and in case of tonsilitis or diphtheria 
there is an added danger from this trouble. Rheumatism fre- 
quently accompanies these conditions, caused by the absorp- 
tion of poisons which are generated in the system on account 
of imperfect aeration of the blood. The respiratory passages 
being closed, it is difficult to get sufficient air into the lung*. 

As a preventive measure children should be taught to 
breathe properly and they should be guarded against taking 
cold. Also they should be kept outdoors as much as possible, 
night and day. Indoor children are more likely to have these 
diseases because they are more susceptible to colds and ca- 
tarrhal conditions. 

The removal of tonsils and adenoids by surgical operation 
usually creates a marked improvement in health. 

Care of tlie Teeth. 

The care of the teeth from first dentition is of the utmost 
importance. Sound and even teeth add much to the expres- 
sion of the face and to the health of the individual. Their 



RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN. 9 

chief purpose is for the mastication of food. "Well masticated 
food, being finely separated and mixed with saliva, is much 
more easily digested than is possible with the mastication pro- 
duced by poor teeth. 

Good teeth also assist in clear articulation when speaking. 
Dental decay is caused largely by acid fermentation in the 
stomach, and also by particles of food allowed to remain be- 
tween the teeth. The teeth should be brushed two or three 
times daily with soft brush and suitable dentifrice. 

Teeth are injured by using them for cracking nuts, biting 
hard materials, or by great contrasts in temperature. Very hot 
or very cold food or drink is liable to crack the enamel and 
cause decay. Tartar on the teeth is also very destructive. 

A competent dentist should be consulted at least twice a 
year. He will remove tartar and fill cavities and greatly pro- 
long the usefulness of the teeth. 

Crooked teeth should be straightened in childhood or 
early youth by a capable practitioner. Teeth are sometimes 
made crooked and malformation of the gums occurs by the 
infantile habit of sucking the thumb or finger. The habit 
should be broken without delay. It is pitiful to see mouths 
disfigured by bad habits when they might be symmetrical and 
pleasing. 

Listeners can often add life and interest to the lesson as 
given by the class leaders by adding their own ideas and sug- 
gestion to the discussion which should follow each of these 
health topics. 



August— HEALTH AND HYGIENE— Lesson II. 



Note — The Health Committee, having been fortunately put 
into possession of a group of leaflets from the Salt Lake City 
Board of Health, have changed the August Outlines, giving the 
following topics in place of those found in the guide, believing 
them to be best for all parties. 

Suggestion — It is respectfully suggested and earnestly 
urged that each Relief Society Ward President appoint a cus- 
todian to take charge of the literature sent out by our General 
Board, who is a conscientious and a capable woman, and that 
this literature be kept where it may readily be used for ref- 
erence. If the ward has no library started, this will form a 



10 RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN. 

cucleiis for one. If there is a library already, these circulars 
Avill prove a valuable addition. 

Note — We are well aware that despite all precautions, 
children become ill, and people die. But also we know how 
well it can be proved that the percentage of deaths has been 
so greatly decreased by the more intelligent and improved 
methods in caring for human life- 
How to Take Care of Babies During- Hot Weather. 

Note — Find answers in leaflets with above heading. 

What is the best food for babies? 

If baby cries should you feed it? 

What about the baby's sleep? 

Its clothing? 

Its bath? 

Should babies be tossed about or fondled too much? 

How may baby sickness be measurably prevented? 

Give the suggestions as to fresh air, and the effect of much 
heat. 

What about keeping the house cool and clean? 

The arrangement of doors and windows? 

What about baby sleeping out of doors during hot 
weather? 

How protect him? 

Name some things which should never remain in baby's 
room. 

Food and Water. 

What is a mother's first duty? 

We have already told what is the best food for a baby, 
but repetition will impress this upon us. 

Give one of the chief causes of sickness in babies. 
What about diarrhoea? 

Nurse Regularly. — Give suggestions as to nursing the baby. 
AVhat about weaning the baby? 

Bottle Children. 

What is the best food for children who have not mother's 
milk. 

What is your duty in regard to your dairyman and hia 
dairy ? 

What about the care of the milk? 

How may the milk become contaminated? 



RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN. 11 

Nursing Bottles and Nipples. 

Is it needful to have more than one bottle and nipple? 
Give directions for caring for them. 

Sleep. 

What about habits of sleep in babies? 

Letting the Baby Alone. 

"What about holding a baby a great deal? 

Do children like to play by themselves when not trained 
to it? 

Never relax watchful care, but give them as much freedom 
as possible. 

Clothing. 

Give directions for clothing the baby in summer 

Bathing. 

Should babies be bathed frequently? 
How often? 

Why do some children not like their bath? 
What should be the temperature of the bath? 
Give some of the rules suggested for caring for sick chil- 
dren. 

Give some of the DON'TS in regard to feeding. 
(See cover of leaflet.) 

The Care of Milk in the Home. 

Read carefully all the directions given in the pamphlet 
with the above title, and see that each Relief Society member 
gets a thorough understanding of the matter contained in 
leaflet with above heading. 

If there is time, follow with general discussion and helpful 
experience from members. 

Note — Read and make use of A Warning to Mothers. 

August— HEALTH AND HYGIENE— Lesson in. 
The Fly, A Disease Carrier — Forty Minutes. 
Typhoid Fever— Its Prevention. 

Note — Please be sure to read carefully the leaflets accom- 
panying the Bulletin and get the full meaning of the illustrated 
page on the fly. Also suggest that each member of the Relief 
Society shall commit to memory and repeat to herself each day 
the four Dont's on the illustrated page. 



12 RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN. 

The Fly. 

What can you say of the fly in regard to filth? 

How many stages of development of the fly are there? 

Please name them. 

Where are the eggs deposited? 

Describe the stages of growth and tell how long it takes 
for the fly to 'become fully developed. 

How many eggs will one fly lay? 

Where are the greatest number of flies hatched? 

Is there any way of eliminating flies? How? 

Name some of the diseases which are carried by flies. 

How can footstuffs exposed for sale be protected? 

What can you, as an individual, do toward exterminating 
flies? 

May a neighmbodhood be kept free from flies? How? 

How may "bottle babies" be protected from the sickness 
that is carried by flies? 

Would you consider the cost in labor, cleanliness and ma- 
terials too much if you could get rid of flies? 

Exterminatingf the Flies. 

Please name all the methods that can be suggested for ex- 
terminating the fly pest in its breeding places. 

How may mature flies be destroyed? 

Which is the most efficient way of all for destroying 
flies? How may they be killed after being hatched? 

IMay we not all be justified in assuming that the campaign 
against the fly will ere long render our cities and our country 
places entirely free from this dangerous pest? 

Typhoid Fever, 

What is typhoid fever? 

How is the typhoid baccillus, or germ, given off? 
How is the fever caused? 
How does the disease enter the system? 
How may typhoid be transmitted or passed from one per- 
son to another? 

Water Supply. 

When there is no water system to carry the supply from 
an elevated source, what may happen to the water? 

Where there is no sewer system to carry off the waste 
from homes, tell how the outbuildings become the source of 
danger. 

What is the most usual way of carrying typhoid fever? 

Name three ways in which milk may become infested. 



RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN. 13 

Tell three ways in Avliich fresh vegetables may become in- 
fected. 

Can you give any reason for outbreaks or epidemics of 
typhoid ? 

Are there any ways of checking or preventing this dread- 
ful disease? 

Where there is no sewer system what should every home 
have? 

Answer: A sanitary privy. 

Tell all you can about the following points: 

First — Keeping milk supph^ 

Second — Keeping water supply. 

Third — The sanitary privy. 

Tell all you can about the sanitary care of a typhoid 
patient and what should always be done with excreta from the 
sick room. Also tell what should be done with the washable 
clothing, the bed linen, and the eating utensils. How dispose 
of valueless articles from sick room? 

How to take care of slops from the sickroom when there 
is a sewer? 

When there is not a sewer? 

How should the nurse take care of her hands? 

What is used for different per cent solutions? 

What can be said of carbolic acid as a disinfectant? 

Tell something important to remember about persons ap- 
parently recovered from the disease. 

Note. — In general discussions exchange views as to sani- 
tary conditions of your own homes and your own town. 

It would be interesting and profitable for the sisters to 
read the inspired sanitary laws taug'ht by Moses to his people 
as found in Exodus and Leviticus in connection with these 
modern lessons and suggestions on hygiene. 



August— WORK AND BUSINESS— Lesson I. 

"Sisters, do not find fault, especially with the Priesthood 
of God. Be patient, be charitable, and remember, 'a house 
divided against itself cannot stand.' " — Zina D. H. Young. 

Ten minutes talk on Current Events. 



14 RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN. 

SALT LAKE CITY'S FLY CAMPAIGN. 

By W. C. Stark, Secretary Commercial Club. 

When the Sanitation Committee of the Commercial Club 
organized the tiy campaign in the spring of this year the mem- 
bers of the committee little dreamed that it would receive such 
unanimous support, for the iirst year, at least. 

Articles on the subject, which had been carefully studied 
by the committee, all made plain that the extermination of the 
fiy was a matter of tedious education and that little of no re- 
sults could be expected during the first year of the work. 

Results in Salt Lake City, on the contrary, have been very 
gratifying and if the accomplishment of the first year may be 
taken as an indication of what is to follow, we may confidently 
look for the complete extermination of the housefly here. 

Very little general public attention has been given to the 
subject and it was not intended by those in charge that it should 
be. An effort was made to actively interest those who were in 
a position to actually catch fles, and a glance at the 1914 fly 
statistics in the office of the City Board of Health will prove the 
wisdom and efficacy of this plan. 

The first move was made early in the spring. It consisted 
of a booklet addressed to adults. The booklet contained a story 
of the fly, its habits and its ahility to carry disease. It told 
where flies breed an^d how often. It urged the co-operation of 
every one in the campaign about to be launched. These book- 
lets were distributed through the public schools. 

Much of the success of the campaign is due to the earnest 
co-operation of all departments of the city, and especial credit 
is due to the office of the superintendent of schools, the Board 
of Health and the City Commission. 

The City Commission, was then petitioned to declare a 
bounty on flies. Dr. S. G. Paul joined in the petition presented 
by the Commercial Club with the result that the City Commis- 
sion declared a bounty of ten cents a hundred until June 15th, 
and a bounty of flfteen cents a pint after that time and until 
fall. 

A little later another booklet was printed and distributed 
to school children. It also contained a story of the fly but in 
simpler form than the one used in the previous book. In ad- 
dition to the story, practical suggestions were given on how to 
catch flies. Traps were suggested, baits were discussed and 
particular mention made of the bounties to be paid. A credit- 
able list of prizes, donated by Salt Lake merchants was ap- 
pended. The campaign was on. 



RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN. 15 

Slides were placed in all the moving picture houses. T'he 
dangers from Hies were depicted m cartoon. Special bulle'tins 
were distributed, the newspapers responded nobiy and Hies 
came into the Board of Health so fast that extra help had to be 
employed to redeem them. 

Every advantage was followed. AVhen an abnormal quan- 
tity of flies was brought in from any one district an inspector 
was despatched on a motorcycle to look up and destroy the 
breeding places. Man}' were discovered. Old manure piles, 
and 95 per cent of all iiies are thus bred, were hauled away and 
obstinate offenders prosecuted. Slaughter house owners were 
descended upon and made to clean, up under threat of fine and 
imprisonment. Even some private homes were found support- 
ing open garbage piles and made to improve conditions. 

Meantime the toll of flies had crept sloAvly but surely to the 
million mark. On June 15th, when the bounty of ten cents a 
hundred expired, well over a million flies had been turned in 
In addition it is estimated that at least another million were 
caught and killed in the large traps placed in market row and 
in restaurants. This work was directly in charge of Mrs. Cook, 
an inspector of the Health Department, who did valiant service 
all during the campaign. Mrs.. Cook is authority for the state- 
ment that at least a million flies were caught through this 
source. They were not presented for bounty and credit is due 
both employers and employees for the broad-mindedness of their 
attitude. 

Some flies are now being turned in for the fifteen cents a 
pint being paid. There are not many, however, and it was not 
expected that many would be. The heavy work of this year's 
campaign is over and the committee feels well repaid for the 
efforts made. 

Later in the year plans will be laid for another campaign 
in 1915. Lessons learned this year will help its success. Every- 
one has promised to co-operatp and the expert advice of the 
University of Utah is to be given freely. 

There are at least two school teachers who will give it un- 
qualified support. One is Miss Ida Roberts, who won a special 
prize of a trip to Yellowstone Park, because her pupils caught 
more flies than any other grade in the city from May loth to 
June 15th. and the other is Miss Mary Rose, who Avon a second 
prize, a check for $15 from the Ladies Literary Club, in this 
same contest. 



16 



RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN. 



MONEY FOR BULLETINS AND LESSON BOOKS. 



All orders for Bulletins or Lesson Books, all money to be 
expended in this direction should be sent to the Relief Society 
Bulletin, Room 28 Bishop's Building. 



THOMAS HULL 
GEO. W. LARKIN 



ELIJAH A. LARKIN 
ALMA J. LARKIN 



LARKIN-HULL 

UNDERTAKING CO. 

EMBALMERS AND 
FUNERAL DIRECTORS. 

CHAPEL & PARLORS 255 SO. 2nd EAST ST. 
Phone Wasatch 5132 SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH 




A Qrafonola 
for the Ward 

$25 Upward 

$10 Cash— $5 a Mo. 

Play over In your Ward House 
records of the singing of the 
famous TABERNACLE CHOIR 

Also any records you want for 
any occasion— dance — popular — 
sacred, etc. 



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Older than the State of Utah 



Write for Catalogue and FREE calendar. 



ICE CREAM— SHERBETS— PUNCHES 
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Special prices to all Ward and School Socials etc. 

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Utah should spread their bread with 

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FURNISHES COMPLETE BURIAL SUITS 

Phones Wasatch 3455 and Wasatch 207 
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Marion Banks 



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We are prepared to supply you with 
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RELIEF SOCIETY CLASSES 

ALSO ALL RELIEF SOCIETY BLANKS, 

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DESERET NEWS BOOK STORE 



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$22 and up 




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WHILE LABORING FOR THE POOR 

AND AIDING THE WIDOW IN WANT, 

DON'T NEGLECT YOURSELF AND FAMILY 

Have they the proper protection in case of 
sickness or death of 
your bread winner or 
will j^ou be compelled 
to look for charity? 

Has he sufficient life 
insurance to assure 
you this protection? 





JOHN C. CUTLER 
1st. Vice President. 



INSURANCE 
IN FORCE 





LORENZO N. STOHL 
2nd. Vice Pres. & Mgr. 



OVER 

$12,000,000.00 



JOSEPH F. SMITH 
President. 



Beneficial Life 
Insurance Co. 

Home office, Vermont 

Building 

Salt Lake City, Utah 




(' W. NTBLEY 
Member Ex. Com. 



RICHARD W. YOUNG 
Counsel 



Relict Society Bulletin 



Volume 1 



September, 1914. Number 9 






Issued by the Officers and Directors of the 

GENERAL BOARD OF THE RELIEF SOCIETY 
1914 



HUMAN SERVICE 

has come to be a consideration of political parties, or social 
organizations, and of educational institutions. 

THE RELIEF SOCIETY 

has been an instrument of human service for more than half a 
century. It ministers to the immediate material wants of the 
community. It has been pronounced by many students an 
Institution for community charity. 

THE UTAH AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

at Logan aims in a very definite way to make each member 
of society a more capable producer, a better faimer, house- 
wife, tradesman, agricultural eugiueer, or business man and 
thus aims to eliminate want. Its field of work therefore, 
properly co-operates with the work of relief societies in serv- 
ing the men and women of the State. While Its courses are 
distinctlj' practical, it deals in a broad and fundamental way 
with the basic industries of the State. Liberal instruction is 
given in the natuuil and physical sciences, in mathematics, 
history, English, economics, literature and languages. 

The 'JoUege Las been slowly built into an embodiment of 
the State's idealism. 



Willes-Horne Drug Company 

News Building, Salt Lake City. 

Our Drug Store Is Complete 

TREATMENT PERFECT. PRICES RIGHT. 

WE SOLICIT YOUR PATRONAGE. 

Prompt Attention to Mail Orders, 



Lambourne Floral Dept. 
EVERYTHING FLORAL. 

DECORATIONS. FUNERAL WORK. Etc., Etc. 

THE L. D. S. HOSPITAL TRAINING 
SCHOOL FOR NURSES 

has an average enrollment of about 100 Nurses in training. 
The hospital has capacity of 250 beds. The training school is 
under the direction and supervision of highly trained gradu- 
ate nurses from schools of national reputation. It gives a 
three years course in training in nursing in all its branches. 
For further particulars address the Superintendent of Nurses 

Dr.W.H. GROVES LATTER-DAY SAINTS HOSPITAL, 

SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH. 




INDEX TO LESSON STATEMENTS. 

PAGE 

The Grain Question 1 

Editorial— War 3 

Great American Marine Painters 5 

Heirship 8 

Home Ethics 10 

Home Gardening 13 

Literature 15 

Relief Society Nurse School ... IH 

ADVERTISERS' DIRECTORY 



Patronize those who have made it possible for this paper to 

exist. 

1. AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE, Logan, Utah. 

2. WILLES-HORNE DRUG CO., 8 South Main, Salt Lake City. 

3. WHITE SEWING IVIACHINE CO., 29 W. First South St. Phone 

Was. 5234, Salt Lake City. ^ 

4. L. S. SMITH & BROS., Typewriter, 379,, So. Matin St., Salt 

Lake City. 

5. S. M. TAYLOR & CO., UNDERTAKERS, 251-259 E. First South 

St., Salt Lake City. 

6. L. D. S. BUSINESS COLLEGE, Salt Lake City. 

7. KEELEY ICE CREAM CO., 555 Main, 260 State Sts., Salt Lake 

City. 

8. LARKIN-HULL UNDERTAKING CO., 255 South 2nd East St. 

Salt Lake City. 

9. L. D. S. HOSPITAL TRAINING SCHOOL f6r NURSES, Sail 

Lake City. 

10, CO-OP. FURNITURE, 35 South Main St., Salt Lak« City. 

11. Z. C. M. I., Salt Lake City. 

13. RELIEF SOCIETY BURIAL CLOTHES, Beehive House, Salt 

Lake City. 

14. DESERET NEWS BOOK STORE, 8 Main St., Salt Lake City. 

15. STAR PRINTING CO., 35 P. O. Place, Salt Lake City. 

16. MORRISON BAKING CO., 158 So. Main St., Salt Lake City. 

17. BENEFICIAL LIFE INSURANCE CO., Vermont Building, Salt 

Lake City. 

18. McCONAHAY, THE JEWELER, 64 Main St., Sa't Lake City. 

20. DAYNES-BEEBE MUSIC CO., 45 S. Main, Salt Lake City. 

21. JENSEN CREAMERY COMPANY, Salt Lake. 

22. MARION BANKS, Millinery, and Charlton's Suit & Cloak Co., 32.1 

So. Muin, Salt Lake. 



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Another advantage — this machine is complete in itself for i\\l 
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To L. C. SMITH & BROS. TYPEWRITER CO. 

379 SO. MAIN STREET Salt Lake City, Utah 



Established 1860 Incorporated 1908 

S. M. TAYLOR & CO. 

UNDERTAKERS AND 
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Successors to 

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L D. S. BUSINESS COLLEGE 

SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH 

Day Sessions Night Sessions 

seven dollars a month four dollars a month 



RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 

ORGAN OF THB WOMAN'S RELIEF SOCIETY OF THE 
CHDRCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS 

Vol. 1. September, 1914. No. 9 

Editor Mrs. Scsa YouNGi,GAT«i 

Business Manager Mrs. Janette A. Htdb 

Assistant Manager Mrs. Amy Brown Lyman 

Advisory Committee 

Mrs. Clarissa S. Williams Mrs. Julina L. Smith Mrs. Rebecca N. Niblbt 



Publishers and Proprietors General Board of the Relief Society 

OflBce Room 28 Bishop's Building, Salt Lake City 

One Dollar a Year Ten Centsja Copy 

Entered as second-class matter on February 18, 1014, at the Post OJtle* 
at Salt Lake City, Utah, under the Act of JMarch 3, 1879. 

THE GRAIN QUESTION. 



Just after the October conference, in 1876, President Young 
sent for me to come to his office and instructed me to write an 
editorial urging the sisters to begin laying up grain against a 
day of need. I felt very timid about giving this important ad- 
vice, and went to Sister Eliza R. Snow, but she said: "Yoa 
have been called to do this and it is for you to comply." I 
then went to President Daniel H. Wells, who gave me the same 
answer that Sister Eliza had given and then 1 wrote the article 
and submitted it to President Young for approval. He was satis- 
fied with it, but dictated another paragraph, which contained 
advice to the brethren to assist the sisters in this new enter- 
prise. This was the first advice ever given to women to com- 
mence the storing of grain for a time of need. President Young 
said: "I have called upon and urged the brethren to lay up 
grain against a day of want, and they do not follow my advice ; 
they excuse themselves by saying their wives and daughters 
want the proceeds of the grain to buy hats and bonnets," etc. 
In fact, he gave me quite a dissertation on the excuses made by 
the brethren, and then explained that if the sisters were told 
to save grain they would not sell it. Ever since that time our 
sisters have continued this work to save grain, and some won- 
derful experiences have been realized along these lines. 

In all these years we have not had much need to use the 
grain stored away for the purpose it was designed, but with 
the dark cloud hovering over the world as it now does, we can 



2 RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN. 

see the prophetic wisdom of President Young in calling upon 
the sisters to save grain against a time of need. 

All Europe and practically the eastern continent are in- 
volved in this conflict of war, and there seems little prospect 
of matters being adjusted at present for permanent peace. The 
efforts made during the last few years to establish peace among 
nations and peoples seem particlarly significant of the disturb- 
ances soon to come which would enhance the value of peace. 
When the world's greatest advocates for the reign of peace 
met at The Hague we might have understood (if we did not) 
that war was about to come upon the people, and now — behold, 
it is almost at our own door, and, significantly enough, is raging 
with the greatest fury in Belgium itself. 

From the first prophetic advice given us by President Brig- 
ham Young, we have been doing more or less «<= ^he years 
went by, and have kept on urging the sisters to do what they 
could in storing grain against a day of need. Heber C. Kim- 
ball, who was very prophetic in his preaching and teaching ut- 
tered many predictions warning the people against a day of 
scarcity and famine : at one time he said the day would come 
when a barrel of flour would be worth a barrel of gold. 

Some who are not in hearty sympathy with our wheat- 
gathering policy are fond of telling us that it is very little we 
have done thus far compared with what would be needed if 
famine really came. But who knows how that little might be 
increased to a great deal should occasion require it ! Miracles 
have been wrought in this Church and may be again, according 
to our faith. At all events, let us do all that is possible to in- 
crease our measures of grain this incoming harvest, and trust 
the Heavenly Father to aid and assist us in our undertakings 
in this direction. 

This may be the beginning of the very war that the Prophet 
Joseph Smith prophesied would cover the earth, when there 
would be no peace found anywhere, and people would flee to 
Zion in the mountains for safety ; there would be such confus- 
ion and difficulties that people would be glad to come to escape 
from the dangers of all kinds that threaten the world. Already 
there has been war in Mexico that has caused our people to 
flee to the United States. 

We cannot be too prudent in saving grain, and in fact 
everything that can be kept, that would supply want. Beans, 
for instance, are' capable of being kept an indefinite length of 
time. It used to be that when men went to sea on long voy- 
ages for six or seven years, beans were the staple article they 
carried with them. 

I feel that we as the women of Zion cannot too strongly 
urge the necessity of being prepared to assist others and take 
care of those who mav come to us for relief and assistance in 



RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN. 3 

the days of trouble that seem now to be drawing near, and ire 
seen through the dark shadows that are threatening fandne 
which nearly always follows when great wars prevail. Wu 
must be on the alert to assist in every possible way and by all 
the means in our power, not only materially, but by our faith 
and prayers, to give relief in every way possible, as the name 
of our society implies. 

EMMELINE B. WELLS. 



EDITORIAL. 



WAR! WAR! AND WHY WAR? 

The very air about us today is surcharged with war and 
rumors of war. The writer of this little article was present in 
Rome three months ago and was appointed by Mrs. Kate Walter 
Barrett to act as proxy for the United 'States delegate, Mrs. 
Lucia Ames Mead, on the powerful and active International 
Peace Committee. 

There sat in the elegant parlor of the leading hotel rep- 
resentatives from twenty nations, women of every civilized 
speech, and all were inspired only with the one thought — 
peace ! how to bring about peace ! how to continue peace, and 
how to educate children with the ideals of peace, so that war 
would be impossible on this earth ! This was the theme of that 
long day's meeting. Hours were spent in giving reports of the 
work already done by this great body of peace women, and other 
hours were consumed in suggesting and acting upon future 
plans and activities. This committee proposed to the Inter- 
national Executive Body that a cable should be sent to Presi- 
dent Wilson, urging him to consider the claims of peace in 
dealing with the turbulent nation of Mexico, and it was sec- 
onded by the whole council with a rising vote. 

Above all topics, the helplessness of the women, who are 
and who may be concerned in this struggle, was laid before the 
President of the United States, Mobile the same thought was 
emphasized in many sessions of the council. 

War in the last days was predicted by the Savior, and his 
words are repeated for us by three of his diciples — ]\Iatthew, 
]\rark and Luke. There was to be "wars and rumors of wars." 
The Prophet Joseph foresaw this condition and portrayed it 
plainly. But the hearts of women, looking upon their sons and 
their son's sons, have sunk in their bosoms, and they have 
sought to avert the dread time when this war should be poured 
out on every nation. 



4 RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN. 

What is war? General Sherman said, "War is hell." And 
that brief description fits the condition as no other could do. 
War is madness. 

Have you ever considered the condition of a man, a group 
of men, or a nation so filled with the spirit of anger and fury 
that they lose all control of their reason and become actually 
mad? There is an old Greek saying, that — "Whomso- 
ever the gods would destroy they first make mad." And this 
terrible condition is as much to be deplored in a man as in a 
group of men, or in a nation. For men are veritably mad when 
the spirit of blood-lust is upon them. 

We hear occasionally of the "psychologj- of the mob," and 
the dread dangers that attend such a body of men. What one 
man will do when he is so furiously angry that he becomes 
really "mad" is exactly what the group of men will do, moved 
by the same spirit, while the effect of that madness is multiplied 
by the number of madmen who comprise that group. Were it 
not that some sane person or persons give such a crowd of in- 
furiated human beasts a check, there might be no end to their 
fierce destruction. Consider the Nephites in their final dissolu- 
tion around the hill Cumorah. The wife of the man who owned 
the hill some years ago, a Mrs. Sampson, told the writer that 
bushel baskets of arrow heads were dug up in and around the 
hill. A gruesome testimony to the truth of the Book of Mor- 
mon, and also to the fierce blood-lust which finally destroyed 
the Nephite nation. 

Men nowadays discuss this quality of the spirit that some- 
times takes hold of groups of men, and suggest ways of utilizing 
it in such places as theatres and other public assemblies to 
achieve success for their jubilee enterprises. A man may be 
quite normal and peaceable in his whole habit of life, but put 
such a man in the midst of a crowd who are wildly clamoring 
about any one subject that influences and attracts men, and he 
is almost sure to be caught up by that spirit and at once he be- 
comes a part of "the mob." He may repent of his silliness or 
his wickedness afterwards, but while he is a part of that seeth- 
ing mass of humanity, called "a mob;" when they are vitally 
moved or excited on any one subject, if his own mind be at all 
receptive, he is is sure to be swept off his feet and become a 
madman with the rest. 

So with nations. What this war in Europe may terminate 
in is, as the old Greeks said, "on the knees of the gods." 
Rather, let us say, the results are hidden in the bosom of eter- 
nity. And yet, how helpless women feel in the face of such 
world-harrowing calamities. We may have a child — a son 
preaching the gospel — or a daughter studying music — out .in 
that vortex of war excitement now in the nations of Europe. 
Our heart contracts, and we mothers know at once hovr the 



RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN. 6 

mothers of those Servian, German, French and English soldiers 
feel at even the suggestion of war. ^len may fight ana kill, 
but women must suifer and Aveep. 

What shall we do, we women of the chosen people of God? 
I know what you will say — pray — pray to the God of battles 
that he will stay their hands — yet a little while. That our son, 
our daughter, may reach our home in safety and peace. And 
what of the Servian's son and daughter? Ah. women of the 
Church of Jesus Christ, let us pray— for so many men and 
women in the world have not learned how to pray — that the 
God of peace will do what he has to do quickly, and bring his 
stubborn sons to their knees in every nation and amongst every 
kindred, tongue and people. We can pray — and wait — and 
trust. That is the mission of woman. 



GREAT AMERICAN MARINE PAINTERS. 

Winslow Homer and Charles H. Woodbury, both New 
England artists, are foremost among the few marine painters 
of note in America. Woodbury is still alive. One of his great 
marines may be seen in the beautiful art room of the Univer- 
sity of Utah. This picture is a part of the Alice Art Collection, 
and was bought through the efforts of Edwin Evans, a fellow 
artist with Woodbury in the Julian studio in Paris. Homer 
died in his seventy-fifth year, in 1910. 

Winslow Homer. 

"Talent!" said Homer, "there's no such thing as talent. 
What they call talent is nothing but capacity for doing con- 
tinuous hard work in the right way." 

Homer detested hypocrisy and pretense, and preferred as 
associates his own kin, and the simple fishing people of the 
neighborhood. He was conscious of his own powers, and there- 
fore paid no attention to criticism, ill or good; he had no de- 
sire to please the public. He gave his whole life to art. 

Homer first saw the light of day in Boston, and entered his 
long apprenticeship to art there in a lithographing establish- 
ment, but at the age of 23 we find him seeking a greater art 
center, New York, and in April, 1858, Harpers' published his 
first drawing — a street scene with thirty figures in the composi- 
tion. 

He was immediately offered a position in Harpers' estab- 
lishment, but says, "from the time I took my nose off that litho- 
graphic stone, I have had no one I would call master, and 
never shall." He took a private studio in New York, and was 



€ RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN. 

able to support himself with his "black and white" work. He 
got an appointment from the Harpers as artist-correspondent 
at the seat of the Civil War, going first to make sketches of 
Lincoln's inauguration, March, 1859, and then to the front 
with the first troop of volunteers. He departed from all precie- 
dent. Unlike the world-famed pictures at the Palaces of Ver- 
sailes, and at the galleries in all of Europe, which were painted 
in the studio and depict the gallant commander, his sword high 
in air, leading the armed hosts to battle, — an unknown thing in 
any real battle, — Homer made drawings from actual life and on 
the spot. "Thanksgiving in Camp of 1862," "Pay Day in the 
Army of the Potomac of 1863," "Soldiers Playing Football. 
1865." "The Newspaper Train," "Wounded," "Home from 
the War," — each wrought a personal touch that electrified 
readers of war news at home. 

His first paintings in oil, "The Last Goose at Yorktown," 
and "Home Sweet Home," were admitted at the National 
Academy, 1863. "Prisoners from the Front" followed and 
went over the water to the Paris International Exposition. 
Homer's candor and truthfulness won friends abroad for the 
brave young artist. John La Farge, another great American 
artist, on his deathbed said of "Prisoners at the Front:" 
"Homer made a marvelous painting, marvelous in every way, 
especially in the grasp of the moment. ' ' 

Homer next returned to Old Virginia, where he painted 
negro subjects, thereby adding to his fame. 

In 1880, he began to feel the lure of the sea, and abandoned 
the illustrated press, believing there was a greater field in oils 
and water color. Now began a series of paintings in which 
pattern became a potent influence to guide his brush. These 
pictures are filled with wonderful designs in line and mass, 
which carried his work far ahead of M^hat it had been. He 
crossed and recrossed the ocean, studying the North Sea coast 
at Tynemouth-on-Tyne, and there painted a wonderful group of 
sea pictures. Sailors and fishing folk were often painted into 
these mystic pictures of the sea. His greatest works, however, 
were painted from American subjects. These he found in the 
Bahamas, Cuba and at Key West, Florida. But the most won- 
derful of all are his pictures of the rock-bound sea coast of 
Maine, painted from the windows of his own studio. In those 
pictures you are made to feel the power, the weight, and the 
thrust of the Atlantic billow. 

The year following Homer's death, two memorial exhibi- 
tions were given for him in America — Boston and New York 
vieing with each other in doing honor to this great painter. 



RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN. 7 

Charles Woodbury. 

Charles H. Woodbury, through his mother, is a relative of 
the Prophet Joseph Smith, so he told the writer, who visited 
his studio in the east, and who later received from him a beau- 
tiful study of the sea from his own brush. 

In his studio were boxes and boxes of small color sketches 
which were very rapidly painted, and which show the great 
work and dexterity of the artist. Woodbury spends most of 
his time at sea. There, strapped to the mast, he paints while the 
seas run high. As an old salt, he never suffers seasickness. 

Alertness and memory are necessary in a powerful degree 
to a successful marine painter. He must select his pictures 
as he watches the waves, for it comes and is gone in a moment. 
His picture he must paint from memory. He must get his tone 
from the quick study and keep to that, though for details aside 
from color he may use dozens of other such studies. It takes 
years of watchful, alert study and work to prepare a painter to 
portray the sea. This is one of the reasons there are so few 
marine painters. Landscapists find difficulty in painting be- 
cause of the changing lights, but when everything is changing 
the difficulties are tremendous. 

Woodbury loves work. He is intensely intellectual, alert, 
and enthusiastic, high minded, and has a grasp of vision and 
openness of understanding that act with a veloeity akin to 
lightning. He has a more delicate color-sense than Homer, 
He is clean in his life, and honest at the foundation, convincing 
in style. He has won a place among the great American paint- 
ers, and is always seen in important pictures at the great ex- 
positions. 

Mr. Woodbury has warm friends among the Utah artists, 
and is planning to stay over in Utah en route to the 1915 Cali- 
fornia exposition. 

Note: Two excellent marines by Mary Teasdel may be seen 
in Devotees and Their Shrines. 

QUESTIONS. 

1. Compare the lives of Homer and Woodbury, and M. M. 
Young and Lee Greene Richards. 

2. What is the main difference in their art field? 

3. What preparation is necessary for an artist? 

4. Tell something of studio work (Mary Teasdel's Story). 

5. Give Rose Hartwell's ideas of what preparation an 
artist student should make before entering an art school abroad. 

Reference Book : Devotees and Their Shrines. 



RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN. 
HEIRSHIP. 



Most of the Latter-day Saints feel that they are sufficiently 
familiar with the subject of heirship. The ancient customs of 
Israel, which have been incorporated in the laws of all the 
civilized nations — that of the inheritance of the oldest son- 
seem very simple and easy for all to understand. But it is a 
curious fact that amongst all of the patriarchs and prophets 
spoken of in the Bible, or, so far as we know, in the Book of 
Mormon, not one was the oldest son of the oldest son. In other 
words, the heir has seldom or never been the oldest son of the 
oldest sou. Geikie tells us that the mother of Jesus, Mary, was 
a second wife. Seth, Shem, Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, Joseph, 
Moses, David, Solomon, and so on down the list, as far as we 
know, all were younger sons. Nephi was not the oldest son, nor 
did his sons inherit the leadership of his people; but it was the 
sons of his younger brother, Jacob, who carried down the his- 
tory of the plates. This, however, does not prove anything 
except that it seems to be somewhat difficult for the heir to 
walk in the godly footsteps of his father. 

The principle of heirship is vital, and we suggest that our 
sisters take time to become interested in it, with the help of 
the Bible, and Book of Mormon ; and, perhaps, they might listen 
to a lecture from someone qualified to enter more deeply into 
this subject. Not the Prophet Joseph, nor his successor, Brig- 
ham Young, were the eldest sons. Just now, however, we are 
obliged to confine ourselves to the point of heirship as it af- 
fects genealogical w^ork, in connection with temple ordinances. 

Heirship in Temple Genealogy has recently become a fixed 
point. For years the records of families who entered into our 
temples were constantly subjected to change as to "the heir at 
whose instance the work was done." Perhaps an example will 
illustrate this better than any explanation : 

When the first temple work was done by the Brigham 
Young family, it was done in St. George by President Brigham 
Young, and some female members of his family. His name, 
therefore, appeared at the top of the sheets, as, "The Heir at 
Whose Instance the Work Is Done." He died shortly after that 
— 1877 — and his brother Lorenzo — the youngest of the five 
Young brothers, who were John, Joseph, Brigham, Phineas and 
Lorenzo — took up the temple work. When Lorenzo assumed 
charge, he called the Young family together, money was sub- 
scribed, and Uncle Lorenzo's son, Franklin, went east to secure 
genealogical information. Therefore, the sheets bore the names 
of both Lorenzo Young (when he was present in the Manti 
Temple), and of his son Franklin W., when Franklin did the 



RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN. 9 

work. After some years there was an organization effected by 
some of the Brigham Young daughters, and Apostle Brigham 
Young was made President, and the temple work was recorded 
as being done under his heirship. He died, and then it was 
deemed right to place President Seymour B. Young's name 
as the heir, who was the oldest son of Joseph Young — Joseph 
being the second son of Grandfather John Young. In another 
few years, the oldest son — John M. Young — of the eldest son, 
John, came forward to take part in this work. What was to be 
done now? The heirship of this family had veered around 
from pillar to post, from Dan to Beersheba. And the really 
vital point of it all, so far as genealogy was concerned, was not 
so much who was the patriarchal heir, but to select the heir, 
and then never change him, making the heir a fixed point. Re- 
lationships are counted from the heir, and when these relation- 
ships are constantly changing, confusion is bound to follow. 

It is not so important to the genealogist of the Young 
family that John M. Young, or Brigham Young, or Lorenzo 
Young, or Seymour B. Young, or Franklin W. Young, was the 
heir, but it is vitally important that whichever shall be named 
as the Young famil.y heir shall remain unchanged on the tem- 
ple and family record books forever and a day. Then the 
Young family genealogist can get the relationships right, and 
keep them clear, with a straight line running down through 
centuries of records. This, therefore, is clear : The genealogi- 
cal heir of the family must not be changed. 

Rule : In temple affairs, for the purpose of establishing 
uniformity in designating relationships, the genealogical heir 
of the family is the representative of the family who started 
the work in a temple ; this should be the eldest living male of 
the family line. 

Exception : Where a woman has begun the work, having 
no male members of her family to do this for her, her name 
should be retained as the heiress. 

An invariable question which accompanies this lesson is: 
What shall be done when the rightful heir refuses to do his 
part ? This can be answered in two ways. First : Consult the 
president of the temple in your district, as to what may be 
done. Second : Form a family organization and appoint a 
temple committee, leaving the work in their hands. This 
latter procedure is usually the wiser, for many obdurate or in- 
different men are won over with a little kindness or attention. 
And if such a one be made president of the organization, he 
will probably be glad to leave all temple matters in the hands 
of a proper committee. Do not take up your work with a spirit 
of resentment in your heart for any member of the family, no 
matter how dilatory he or she may be. Seek to win over with 
love and consideration those who are indifferent and stubborn. 



10 RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN. 

Out of this situation grows another genealogical rule: No 
man has the right to block the way of his family in temple 
work. If he will not act, other members of his family may be 
justified in proceeding without his consent, provided they re- 
ceive permission from the proper authority to do so. 

Women are sometimes justified in going on with temple 
work, because their male relatives are too busy, or indifferent, 
or too engrossed in money-getting to take up this necessary 
and glorious work. But other things being equal, the righteous 
woman will use her womanly tact to encourage, persuade and 
lovingly win her menfolk into activity in this work. If she can- 
not succeed in this, then she may be justified, by and with the 
consent of the president of the temple in her district, in lead- 
ing out as the heiress of her family. But this, only under per- 
mission of the proper authorities. Women ot proper mind 
will be glad to shift the heaviest burden of responsibility on to 
the shoulders of those holding the priesthood. And her joy in 
the world to come will be in the success which she may have 
achieved in thus winning her loved ones over to the right. 
What difference whose the honor? What difference will it 
make to us who may take the credit, if we have the exquisite 
privilege of doing the work? If the honor or credit will 
awaken one spark of true spiritual manliness in the breast of 
our menfolk, then we should relinquish that trifling honor with 
a smile and a blessing upon them. 

Let us close this lesson with the motto of the woman's com- 
mittee of the Genealogical Society of Utah : 

"We will provoke the brethren to good works, but we 
will not provoke the brethren while we are thus engaged.", 



September— HOME ETHICS— Lesson VIL 



The Complete Home. 

The fundamental principle which promotes gentleness, love, 
and abiding content in the home is consideration for the feel- 
ings of others. 

That principle and the great love prompting their actions 
cause parents to make the immense sacrifice which they are 
sometimes called upon to endure for the sake of their children. 

We believe the training of a child begins in the ccnduct of 
its ancestors long before its own birth. That is called heredity. 
But we know that good parents do everything that lies in their 
power to give their children strong healthy bodies, good mental- 



RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN. 11 

ity, and then to impart and to train the religious feelings. 

It is one of the greatest of misfortunes to the child and 
one of the greatest omissions on the part of parents not to 
have religious training from infancy. In childhood faith in 
Deity is naturally strong and belief in the wisdom and knowl- 
edge of parents is unbounded. The impressions made in infancy 
and childhood are apt to remain forever. No home life can be 
complete or perfect while there are defective members. And 
toward the wayward ones there should be exercised enduring 
patience, abiding faith, and endless love. Those qualities exer- 
cised in the home promote tranquility and often work wonders 
A'ith erring ones. 

That saying of the Prophet Joseph Smith, "The Glory of 
God is intelligence," is one of the most frequently quoted of 
his remarks. That his followers take it literally is evidenced 
by the church schools which have been established, and also by 
the great desire to accumulate knowledge which is manifested 
by Church members generally. To those who have not had the 
opportunities they desire, it is good to remember that a little 
knowledge gained every day makes great accumulations in 
time. 

Parents have the advantage over their children in the 
wisdom that comes with the experience of the years. Children 
in their turn often enjoy educational advantages in the schools, 
of which their parents were deprived. Each should remember 
in his daily life and conduct his own advantages and the lesser 
advantages of the other. Consideration for the feelings of 
others begets sympathy which enlarges the understanding. 

There is nothing more beautiful than a home where love 
for each member prevails, and a determination on the part of 
each individual to do his duty every day and to attain to the 
highest within him. That is ideal. But there is sorrow, none 
the less real because it may be concealed, where a member is 
deficient. 

How the instructions of our blessed Savior taught conse- 
cration of one's self to the ideal. His golden rule is really the 
basic idea in ethics. To practice the golden rule and the great- 
est commandment ofttimes means sacrifice of personal desire, 
but a spiritual uplifht is the result. When we really love, we 
desire to serve. Our Heavenly Father knew that when he said, 
"If ye love me. keep my commandments." 

A teacher in early Utah days, noted for her good instruc- 
tions, often repeated the axiom to keep her pupils reminded — 
"Good manners spring from the heart." 

One reason parents so love their children is because of the 
loving service they give them during the years of helplessness 
and dependence. Then it is only just to the children themselves 



12 RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN. 

that they be taught to render in turn loving service to their 
parents. The following quotation seems appropriate here : "It is 
characteristic of human nature that our love for any object is in- 
creased by doing loving service for it. If we do not train our 
children to the loving service to parents, and to each other, we 
sadly weaken the bonds of family unity. This is doubtless one 
reason that we often find these bonds strongest, not among the 
rich, where plenty of servants take away the necessity and 
often the opportunity of doing kindly deeds to others, but in 
the home of moderate competence, where loving hands min- 
ister to each other's necessities." 

The Bible in the home should be a strong factor in the 
training of children. Learning Scripture passages and chap- 
ters in childhood is sure to be a comfort in the years to come. 
Everyone should be able to repeat without mental effort, giving 
chapter and verse, the Ten Commandments, the Lord's Prayer, 
the Sermon on the Mount, the Twenty-third Psalm, the Golden 
Rule, and the greatest commandment ; also many others, but 
particularly those six. The study of the Book of Mormon is 
fascinating to children when led by a good instructor. The 
Faith Promoting Series inspires a belief in the happenings of 
our own times, and what might be our ow^n experience. By let- 
ting our minds dwell upon higher things we often are lifted 
out of our own petty difficulties and attain the habit of cheer- 
fulness and composure. Cheerfulness is often a matter of habit 
and may be attained by faith in the Divine power, and de- 
termination to conquer weakness and besetting sins. 

"It is easy enough to be cheerful. 
When life goes by like a song, 

But the man worth while is the man who can smile 
When everything goes dead wrong." 

QUESTIONS. 

1. AVhat great principle promotes the qualities so desir- 
able in a home? 

2. When should parents begin the religious training of 
their children? 

3. What is the attitude of young children toward things 
Divine? Toward their parents? 

4. How should we feel towards the weaknesses of rela- 
tives or friends? 

5. What do you consider the fundamental principle of 
ethics? 

6. What effect is produced by the giving of loving 
•ervice ? 



RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN. 13 

7. Name the parts of the Bible mentioned in the text 
that everyone should be able to repeat. Where are they 
found? 

8. \Yhat did Christ declare to be the greatest command- 
ment? Give chapter and verses. 

9. Relate some faith promoting experiences with wnich 
you are acquainted. 

10. What effect on our own lives has the contemplation of 
matters spiritual or highly moral? 



September— HOME GARDENING FOR WOMEN— Lesson VII. 

"For the seed shall be prosperous; the vine shall give 
her fruit, and the ground shall give her increase, and the 
heavens shall give their due ; and I will cause the remnant ot 
this people to possess all these things." — Zech. :8 :12. 

May we hope the above quotation has been literally ful- 
filled, that our yields of both gardens and fields have been most 
bounteous and fruitful, that in sowing, and with proper cultiva- 
tion on our own part, that nature has given to us all we could 
hope to have received? And in this, as in all other gifts from 
our Creator, we are thankful and appreciative of the same. 

It is now time, even in the midst of harvest of this year's 
yields, to begin the preparation for another year of vegetables, 
fruits and flowers. 

Fall Planting, or early planting of onion and spinach seeds, 
etc. : 

The preparation of soil as given in the March and April 
numbers of the Bulletin will also apply to the soil conditions 
for fall planting; only this difference: in planting, it should be 
remembered that the earth is now warmed to a greater depth, 
and the digging and plowing must of necessity be much deeper, 
also the planting of seed should be some deeper than in early 
spring. 

Onions and spinach, planted sufficiently early to get a 
good start, and then properly protected, in extreme cold 
climates, will be ready to continue growing as soon as the warm 
days of spring come, and thus produce a good early harvest for 
•family and market use. We should begin preparation of tho 
soil and planting at once, in order to succeed for next spring's 
early productions. 

Sweet Peas: Select for planting sweet peas seeds that are 
well ripened ; home grown ones are not usually satisfactory, 
unless great care has been taken to secure them from the best 
sturdy producers of bloom, and well ripened. By trenching, 



14 RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN. 

filling with sandy soil well fertilized, plant on both side ct 
trench, so that your trellis come* in the middle of the two 
rows, having plenty of sunlight and water. The seeds will soon 
germinate and push through the soil. When the cold, fall storms 
set in, cover them with leaves; by this they are well protected 
and have an early start for spring, and will give you rich re- 
turns, by having peas in bloom very much earlier than oy 
spring planting. 

Pansies: Pansies may be treated in like manner as sweet 
peas, only in beds instead of trenches, and not so deep as pea 
seeds. Pansies planted in August will be early bloomers. Re- 
member how even they must be covered with leaves, or some 
other suitable covering, in late fall. If you will refer to March, 
April and May numbers of the Bulletin you will find tables 
for planting, also kinds of seeds to plant. The "Little Giant" 
pansy seed is considered very fine. 

Preserving, Pickling and Jelly-making: Preserving, pick- 
ling and jelly-making form an important part in the house- 
wife's busy life, and should be done as far as possible by the 
adoption of scientific methods, in order that less time and fruit 
be wasted. 

Sterilization by heat is the basis of the preservation of 
food to be bottled or canned. The presence of bacteria is the 
cause of fermentation and decay. Let us master this by prop- 
erly cleaning, scalding and sterilizing all utensils, bottles and 
cans to be used, thus mastering the essential principles. 

Fruits that are not quite ripe are better adapted for pre- 
serving, and especially for jelly-making, than over-ripe fruit. 
All fruits should be freshly picked, and that of inferior quality 
should be discarded and used immediately. 

To sterilize jars, have two pans partly filled with cold 
water, place jars in one, laying them on their sides, place covers 
or lids in the other pan ; now let them heat to boiling point, 
and let boil five or ten minutes. Having attended strictly to 
this, we are now prepared to bottle our fruit. 

Use only fresh rubbers ; it is poor economy to buy cheap 
rubbers or use them a second time ; as a general rule black rub- 
bers are more durable than white ones. 

Jellies: Acid fruit is most suitable for jelly-making, though 
in some of the acid fruits there is but little of the substance 
called pectin, such as strawberries, which causes the fruit to 
jell, and the pectin must be in the right condition. Such fruits 
as red currants, black currants, raspberries, strawberries, crab- 
apples, quinces, grapes, etc., are most desirable for preserves 
and jellies. 

For further information write U. A. College for Circular 
No. 25, Vol. II, U. S. Dept. of Agriculture, Farmers Bulletin 359. 



RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN. 15 

September— LITERATURE— Lesson VII. 

(Thirty Minutes.) 

Ten minute talk on current events. 

Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin. 

Subject: Franklin's attitude toward religion. 
References : Altemus edition, chapters 6, 1, and 8. Crowell 
edition, pp. 115 to 156. 

Sentiment: "God helps them that help themselves." 

1. Franklin's account of his religious beliefs and practices 
(Altemus edition, pp. 144-147; Crowell, pp. 115-117). 

2. Sermon of the day too narrow to satisfy Franklin. 

3. Scheme of a society for extending the influence of 
virtue. (Altemus, pp. 164-167; Crowell, pp. 133-136). 

(a) Need of such society. 

(b) Establishment of society. Name. 

4. Religious unrest of the times. 

Revivals of Whitefield and others. (Altemus, pp. 185-192 ; 
Crowell, pp. 150-156.) 

QUESTIONS. 

1. In this discussion on religion, Franklin does not men- 
tion the name or mission of the Savior, nor does he say anything 
about revealed religion. While his beliefs are inadequate and 
incomplete, he still holds to some principles that are funda- 
mental to the truth. Mention some of these. 

2. What does Franklin say about public worship? 

3. What was his attitude toward prayer? 

4. AVould you call Franklin a spiritual-minded man, or a 
practical man? Why? 

5. What were the requirements of those who would join 
Franklin's creed? 

6. What objections have you to the proposed method of 
obtaining members? 

7. Compare this method of bringing people together for 
spiritual uplift with that used by the Savior; with that used 
by the Latter-day Saints. 

8. A spirit of unrest seemed to be hovering over the 
whole country at this time. It was a period of revolution, both 
politically and religiously. What connection had the religious 
revivals of Whitefield and others with the later introduction of 
the gospel of Jesus Christ? 

9. What evidence can you give as proof that the people 
were anxious to find the truth? 



16 RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN. 

RELIEF SOCIETY NURSE SCHOOL 



The Presidency and General Board of the Relief Society 
announce that the next class in the Relief Society Nurse School 
will commence Monday, September 21, 1914, and continue eight 
months, in Salt Lake Cit3^ Dr. Margaret C. Roberts will be 
the instructor. 

It is requested that the Stake Presidents will at once con- 
sult with their Ward Presidents for the purpose of selecting 
intelligent and energetic women of suitable age and of good 
moral character to take this course in nursing. 

We sincerely trust that members of the Relief Society 
realize the value and necessity of this Course of Nursing, as it 
is a fact that 95 per cent of the inhabitants of our country 
cannot afford to pay the price of a graduate, hospital nurse, 
and yet our sick of the masses should receive trained and 
skilful nursing. 

We can also recommend this course in nursing as a much- 
needed part of every young woman's education. 

The tuition for the course will be $20.00, and it is ex- 
pected that the Belief Society organization in each ward will 
pay the tuition fee for their representatives. However, any 
student who wishes to pay the tuition herself may do so, if she 
is willing to accept and sign the Relief Society Nurse Contract, 
as published in the July Bulletin, page 14. 

For full particulars write Clarissa S. Williams, 37 North 
West Temple, or Dr. Margaret C. Roberts, 79 C street. Salt Lake 



THOMAS HULL ELIJAH A. LARKIN 

GEO. W. LARKIN ALMA J. LARKIN 

LARKIN-HULL 

UNDERTAKING CO. 

EMBALMERS AND 
FUNERAL DIRECTORS. 

CHAPEL & PARLORS 255 SO. 2nd EAST ST. 
Phone Wasatch 5132 SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH 



ICE CREAIVI— SHERBETS— PUNCHES 
and CANDIES are the "BEST BY TEST" 

Special prices to all Ward aud School Socials etc. 

TWO STORES 55 Main St. 260 State St. 

Prompt Delivery Phones: Wasatch 3223—3224 



Jensen's JSutters 

"Blanchard" and "Four-in-One" 

EXCEL IN QUALITY AND FLAVOR 



W. N. Williams, Supt. Clarissa S. Williams. Sec'y & Treas R. N. Wilson. Asst. Supt 

Guaranteed Furniture at Lowest Prices 

Our raafjnificent stock comprises ffoods from America's 
most representative lines and our prices are always reasonable. 

Carpets, Rugs, Draperies, Linoleum, Ranges^ 

Heaters, Qo-Carts, Etc. 

Home Furnishings of all descriptions for 

CASH OR CREDIT 

Co-op. Furniture Co. 

Next Door South of Z. C. M. I. 

BURIAL CLOTHES 
Relief Society General Board 

FURNISHES COMPLETE BURIAL SUITS 

Phones Wasatch 3455 and Wasatch 207 
Salt Lake City Utah 



Marion Banks 



FINE 



Millinery 



Charlton's 

CLOAK & SUIT GO. 



The right place for 

practical styles in 

Women's Wear 



AT REASONABLE PRICES 

GOODWIN CORSETS 

This ad. will redeem 10 per cent on purchase at regular price 

321 SO. MAIN STREET, 0pp. Walkers 

Clearance Sale Now On. Come or Send Mail Orders 



Star Printing Companp 

35 Post Office Place Phone Wasatch 1370 

Salt Lake Citp, Utah 



ASK YOUR DEALER FOR Z. O. M. I. 

Western Scout Shoes 

The Ideal Out-door Shoe For 

Men, Youths, Boys, 

Cheap, serviceable. Used 
extensively by Carpenters, 
Iron workers, boy scouts, etc. 
''MOUNTAINEER" or "THE 
LEADER" Overalls are hon- 
estly made. They don't rip. 




We are prepared to supply you with 
all books recommended for 

RELIEF SOCIETY CLASSES 

ALSO ALL RELIEF SOCIETY BLANKS, 

BLANK BOOKS and RECORDS 

DESERET NEWS BOOK STORE 



LEADING BOOK CONCERN 
No. 6 MAIN STREET 



A Qrafonola 
for the Ward 

$25 Upward 

$10 Cash— $5 a Mo. 

Play over in your Ward House 
records of the singing of the 
famous TABERNACLE CHOIR 

Jlso any records you want for 
any occasion — dance— populai — 
sacred, etc. 

Older than the State of Utah 
Write for Catalogue and FREE calendar. 




SEE McCONAHAY 
For Diamonds 

64 MAIN ST. 

The Jeweier===Sait Lake 
$22 and up 




BETTER THINGS TO EAT'* 
CORNER MAI? 
158 SOUTH MAIN ST. 



TWrt PI ATF^ ^^^^^^^^'^^^^^^*-^' 






WHILE LABORING FOR THE POOR 

AND AIDING THE WIDOW IN WANT, 

DON'T NEGLECT YOURSELF AND FAMILY 

Have they the proper protection in ease of 
sickness or death of 
your bread winner or 
will you be compelled 
to look for charity? 

Has he sufficient life 
insurance to assure 
you this protection? 





JOHN C. r'UTLER 
1st. Vice President. 



INSURANCE 
IN FORCE 





LORENZO N. STOHL 
2nd. Vice Pres. & Mgr. 



OVER 
5 1 2.0C0,000.00 



JOSEPH F. SMITH 
President. 



Beneficial Life 
Insurance Co. 

Home office, Vermont 

Building 

Salt Lake City, Utah 




C. VV. NIBLEY 
Member Ex. Com. 



RICHAKD W. YOU^G 
Counsel 



Relict Society Bulletin 



Volume 1 



October, 1914. Number 10 





Issued by the Officers and Directors of ttie 

GENERAL BOARD OF THE RELIEF SOCIETY 
1914 



HUMAN SERVICE 

lias come to be a consideration of political parties, or social 
organizations, and of educational institutions. 

THE RELIEF SOCIETY 

has been an instrument of human service for more than half a 
century. It ministers to the immediate material wants of the 
community. It has been pronounced by many students an 
Institution for community charity. 

THE UTAH AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

at Logan aims in a very definite way to make each member 
of society a more capable producer, a better farmer, house- 
wife, tradesman, agricultural engineer, or business man and 
thus aims to eliminate want. Its field of work therefore, 
properly co-operates with the work of relief societies in serv- 
ing the men and women of the State. While Its courses are 
distinctly practical, it deals in a broad and fundamental way 
with the basic industries of the State. Liberal instruction Is 
given in the natuifil and physical sciences, in mathematics, 
history, English, €j)nomic8, literature and languages. 

The 'Jollege lias l^een slowly built into an eml)odiment of 
the State's idealism. 



Willes-Horne Drug Company 

News Building, Salt Lake City. 

Our Drug Store Is Complete 

TREATMENT PERFECT. PRICES RIGHT. 

WE SOLICIT YOUR PATRONAGE. 

Prompt Attention to Mail Orders. 

Lambourne Floral Dept. 
EVERYTHING FLORAL. 

DECORATIONS. FUNERAL WORK. Etc., Etc. 

THE L. D. S. HOSPITAL TRAINING 
SCHOOL FOR NURSES 

has an average enrollment of about 100 Nurses in training. 
The hospital has capacity of 250 beds. The training school is 
under the direction and supervision of highly trained gradu- 
ate nurses from schools of national reputation. It gives a 
three years course in training in nursing in all its branches. 
For further particulars address the Superintendent of Nurses 

Dr.W.H. GROVES LATTER-DAY SAINTS HOSPITAL, 

SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH. 



INDEX TO LESSON STATEMENTS. 

PAGE 

Editorial 1 

Work and Business 2 

Genealogy and Testimony 3 

Art 4 

Literature 8 

Home-Ethics 9 

Home Gardening for Women 11 

Notices 13-14 

ADVERTISERS' DIRECTORY 



Patronize those who have made it possible for this paper to 

exist. 

1. AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE, Logan, Utah. 

2. WILLES-HORNE DRUG CO., 8 South Main, Salt Lake City. 

3. WHITE SEWING MACHINE CO., 29 W. First South St. Phone 

Was. 5234, Salt Lake City. 

4. L. S. SMITH & BROS., Typewriter, 379, So. Main St., Salt 

Lake City. 

5. S. M. TAYLOR & CO., UNDERTAKERS, 251-259 E. First South 

St., Salt Lake City. 

6. L. D. S. BUSINESS COLLEGE, Salt Lake City. 

7. KEELEY ICE CREAM CO., 555 Main, 260 State Sts., Salt Lake 

City. 

8. LARKIN-HULL UNDERTAKING CO., 255 South 2nd East St. 

Salt Lake City. 

9. L. D. S. HOSPITAL TRAINING SCHOOL FOR NURSES, Sair 

Lake City. 

10. CO-OP. FURNITURE, 35 South Main St., Salt Lake City. 

11. Z. C. M. I., Salt Lake City. 

13. RELIEF SOCIETY BURIAL CLOTHES, Beehive House. San 

Lake City. 

14. DESERET NEWS BOOK STORE, 8 Main St., Salt Lake City. 
'5. STAR PRINTING CO., 35 P. O. Place, Salt Lake City. 

16. CUTLERS, 36 S. Main St., Salt Lake City 

17. BENEFICIAL LIFE INSURANCE CO., Vermont Building, Sar 

Lake City. 

18. McCOrMAHAY, THE JEWELER, 64 Main St., Sa't Lake City. 

19. UTAH STATE NATIONAL BANK, Salt Lake City. 

20 DAYNES-BEEBE MUSIC CO., 45 S. Main, Salt Lake City. 

21. JENSEN CREAMERY COMPANY, Salt Lake. 

22. MARION BANKS, Millinery, and Charlton's Suit & Cloak Co., 32' 

So. Muin, Salt Lake. 

23. SCRACE'S BAKERY, 24 S. Main, Salt Lake City. 




Ball Bearings Give Greater Speed and Stability to the 

L. C. Smith & Bros. Typewriter 

(Ball Bearing, Long Wearing) 
Because of ball bearing typebara, the keys- 
respond as readily as perfect piano keys. 
The capital shift works with equal ease — no 
lifting of a heavy carriage but simply 
shifting the light type bar segment, thu» 
insuring absolute aicurae.v 

Another advantage— this machine is com- 
plete in itself for all kinds of work: tabu- 
lating, billing, large envelopes, cards or 
paper as narrow as a postage stamp. 

WRITE FOR CATALOGUE 

To L. C. SMITH & BROS. TYPEWRITER CO. 

379 SO. MAIN STREET Salt Lake City, Utah 

Established 1860 Incorporated 1908 

S. M. TAYLOR & CO. 

UNDERTAKERS AND 
EMBALMERS 

Successors to 

JOSEPH E. TAYLOR 

The Pioneer Undertaker of the West 

53 years in one location 

251=253=255=257 East First South St. 

Salt Lake City, Utah 

XfODERN METHODS COMPLETE EQUIPMENT 

EFFK^IENT SEliVICE 

A SUCCESSFUL COLLEGE GROWS 

In one year our increase has been forty per cent. 

L D. S. BUSINESS COLLEGE 

SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH 
Day Sessions Night Sessions 

seven dollars a month four dollars a month 



RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 

ORGAN OF THK WOMAN'S KELIEF SOCIETY OF THE 
CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS 

Vol. 1. October, 1914. No. 10 

Editor Mrs. Scsa Y'ounq Qatbs 

Business Manager Mrs. Janette A. Htdb 

AssiSTAJsT Manager Mrs. Amy Brown Lymam 

Advisory Committee 

Mbs. Clarissa S. Williams Mrs. Julina L. Smith Mrs. Rebecca N. Niblby 



Publishers aiid Proprietors General Board of the Relief Societx 

Office Room 28 Bishop's Building-, Salt Lake City 

One Dollar a Year Ten Centals Oopy 

Entered as second-class matter on February 18, 1914, at the Poat Ode* 
at Salt Lake City, Utah, under the Act of March 3, 1879. 



EDITORIAL. 

Conserving' Our Resources. 

With all Europe at war, with prices in our country 
steadily rising to unbelievable heights, with famine and pesti- 
lence sure to follow close on the heels of war, the women of the 
Latter-day Saints have much to do. President Emmeline B. 
Wells has published a call in the Deseret News for the sisters of 
the Relief Society to form companies and to gather up the fruit 
that is wasting in so many places and dry it for the poor in the 
winter season that will come. 

What else may we do? Many women in the East, in fact 
all over this land, are storing up flour, fruit, beans, dried corn, 
clothing, in short all that can be conveniently stored, for two 
or three years ahead. Shall the sisters of our Society be less 
cautious and fore-handed than the women of the world? Many 
of the sisters in Salt Lake City have bought one and two thou- 
sand pounds of flour, storing in in their small garrets for lack 
of proper bins, and they are putting up all the fruit that they 
can secure for a future possible shortage. The spirit of conser- 
vation of all our resources, both within and without the home, 
is abroad. "Men's hearts are failing them for fear." 

There is no doubt that this war will bring much suffering 
all over the earth, but be ye not moved, for "the end is not 
yet." There may be many more such wars, and many calami- 
ties. The Lord has blessed us with most bounteous harvests, 



2 RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN. 

this year, and this people should not waste their means nor 
their opportunities. 

Amusement houses and department stores in this city are 
alarmed with the falling off of their custom this early in the 
season. But the people have caught the spirit of rigid 
economy, and what with unsettled conditions in our own coun- 
try, and wars abroad in the world, there is need for the most 
careful summing up of our resources, and of keeping a check on 
all lines of needless expenditures. There is no occasion for fear 
or for excitement amongst this people. At one time Apostle 
Brigham Young was returning from Europe when a great 
storm arose at sea, which found him whistling and singing in 
his usual cheerful mood, as he rolled about the upper deck. 
Approached by one of the elders and asked why he was thus 
engaged when the rest of the company were on their knees 
in prayer in the cabins below, Apostle Young replied : "I said my 
prayers when it was calm. I expect the Lord to take care 
of me in the storms." 

Thus, we should be calm, restrain all excitement and con- 
fusion, but we should go steadily forward in our efforts to lay 
aside all the supplies that are in our possession. Many of our 
sisters live in country places, and they will feel it something 
of a hardship to take care of so much fruit and grain, for there 
is a surplus everywhere. But let them study carefully ways and 
means to do this ; while sisters in the city should husband 
their pennies to purchase supplies, and thus both in city and 
country we will be prepared for whatever may come. And if 
the famine or hard times do not come this winter, these 
things will eat nor drink nothing, so that we may renew our 
stores from year to year, and go to bed at night with the com- 
fortable feeling that we have at least done our duty. Sisters, 
let us prepare for storms in times of calm and comparative 
peace, for this has been the advice of our leaders from the days 
of the Prophet Joseph Smith, and it is today the advice of 
President Joseph F. Smith, and of our own Presidency of this 
Society. 



October— WORK AND BUSINESS— Lesson I. 

"Have we brought gladness unto any heart, or cheered 
with tender words or acts of love, the lowly or sorrowing, or 
the poor? If so, 'tis well; angels approve such acts." — Emme- 
line B. Wells. 

Ten minutes talk on Current Events, 



RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN. S 

October— GENEALOGY AND TESTIMONY— Lesson II. 

Ten minutes talk on Current Events. 

Relationship : 

"In thy seed shall all the kindred of the earth be blessed." 
Acts : 3 :25. 

Following is the prevailing mode of designating relation- 
ship : 

The parents of your father or mother are your grandfather 
and grandmother. 

The parents of your grandfather or grandmother are your 
great grandfather and great grandmother. 

The parents of your great grandfather or great grand- 
mother are your 2nd great grandfather and 2nd great grand- 
mother. 

The parents of your 2nd great grandfather or 2nd great 
grandmother are your 3rd great grand father and 3rd great 
great grandmother, etc., etc. 

The children of your brother or sister are your nephews 
and nieces. 

The children of your nephews or nieces are your grand 
nephews or grand nieces. 

The children of your grand nephews or grand nieces 
are your great grand nephews or great grand nieces. 

The children of your great grand nephews or great grand 
nieces nieces are your 2nd great grand nephews or 2ud great 
grand nieces, etc., etc. 

Your father's brother or sister is your uncle or aunt. 

Your grandfather's brother or sister is your grand uncle 
or grant aunt. 

Your great grandfather's brother or sister is your great 
grand uncle or great grand aunt. 

Your 2nd great grandfather's brother or sister is your 
2nd great grand uncle or 2nd great grand aunt. 

Your 3rd great grandfather's brother is your 3rd great 
grand uncle or 3rd great grand aunt, etc., etc. 

The children of your uncle or aunt are your (1st) cousins. 

The children of your (1st) cousins are your (2nd) cousins. 

The children of your (2nd) cousins are you (3rd) cousins. 

The children of your (3rd) cousins are your (4th) cousins, 
etc., etc. 

The children of your grand uncle or grand aunt are your 
2nd cousins. 



4 RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN. 

The children of your great grand uncle or great grand aunt 
are your 3rd cousins. 

The children of your 2nd great grand uncle or 2nd great 
grand aunt are your 4th cousins. 

The children of your 3rd great grand uncle or 3rd great 
grand aunt are your 5th cousins, etc., etc. 

Rule : — The relationship is always counted FROM the heir 
to the dead. As : 

John Young (son), b. 6 Mar., 1763, d. 12 Oct., 1839. 

That is, Brigham Young, the Heir, is the "son" of John. It 
is very important to establish a relationship from the heir in 
the family to the head individual. For it is another clue by 
which to identify the dead. While it establishes our claim to 
our friends and relatives. Dates, names and relationship 
might be compared to the features of a man's face. The more 
clearly we can discern them the better is the chance for identi- 
fication. There may be and are thousands of John Youngs, 
and there were certainly over nineteen John Youngs who fought 
in the Revolutionary AVar ; but only one of them was the father 
of Brigham Young; so with all our names and relatives. 

In order to avoid confusion and duplication in temple 
work, it has been decided by the proper authorities that there 
shall be a limitation in the line which we are at liberty to 
follow in our ancestry. The four lines are, the father's line, 
the mother's line, the mother's mother's line, and the father's 
mother's line. If we desire to take up collateral lines pr to 
follow back our own ancestors' lines beyond this limitation, 
we may be permitted to do so if we first secure the consent of 
the President of the Temple in the district in which we reside. 
Secondly, we should write to the Deseret News Department of 
Genealogy notifying any one who may be of that lineage, of 
our desire to take up the line, and send up a similar notice to 
the Genealogical Society of Utah. This will make everything 
clear and avoid confusion. 



October— ART — Lesson III. 



John Singer Sargent. 

John S. Sargent has been called the greatest portrait 
painter since Sir Joshua Reynolds, and many rank him with 
Van Dyke. • 

Even the great American (Whistler divided honors in 
Europe with his countryman, Sargent. These rivals in art, 
though both were compared with Velasquez, were totally un- 



RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN. ft 

like, both as men and as artists. Whistler, ''the observed of all 
observers," loved company and fenced with words to the 
humiliation of lawyer, critic and wit. But for his etchings 
and paintings he hunted out subjects of which laymen never 
so much as dreamed. Forever divorced from the commonplace, 
his art was aloof, poetic and filled with mystery. John Sar- 
gent, on the other hand, built a wall of reserve about himself 
and kept the whole world at a distance. When he mingled in 
society he never became its life, nor even a part of it. Strange 
then, is it not, that he should choose his sitters from its de- 
votees, the wealthy, the fashionable and the proud? He painted 
those who could pay the price — which was not small. Five 
thousand dollars is dear when the artist deliberately paints 
the worst side of his subject and even keeps true to the model, 
but ignores beauty. Instead of trying to please his patrons, 
Sargent often seemed to delight in showing up the shallow, 
the grasping. And still the crowds came for portraits. 

Whistler died in 1903, and the writer saw in all the local 
and international exhibits of 1904, his last pictures hung Avitb 
erepe. Sargent still paints ; is perhaps even now painting the 
portrait of Emperor William in Berlin or of Franz Josef in 
Austria — his whereabouts is unknown since war so suddenly 
enveloped Europe with her cultured peoples and treasures of 
art. 

Like Whistler and Brush, Sargent sprang from a race of 
fighters and statesmen, of men of science, whose mothers were 
artists — painters. 

Whistler's life was one continuous battlefield. He forced 
recognition for his art, after long struggles. His many jeering, 
taunting enemies, he silenced with his tongue, but his brush and 
pen, mightier than legions of swords, won him, before he died, 
the tribute — "As great as Rembrandt." On the other hand, 
Sargent was recognized from the first. He was born and 
cradled in Florence, — "name to conjure with." — where his 
American parents were resting on their travels. He found 
painting easy, in fact, he could always paint and draw. This 
facility enabled him to finish a portrait in one sitting. Lest 
you should think Sargent one of those "natural born" artists, 
who thinks he need not study because of his great talent, let 
me whisper ever so lowly, Sargent thinks it not too much to 
paint a head and scrape it off thirty or forty times or until 
it suits him. Then it is very near perfection — perfect in color; 
fresh, clean, simple, vigorous, strong, and never marred by 
varying moods. That tells you. I hope, what a Sargent portrait 
means. 

Sargent, while abroad with his parents, learned to speak six 
lanfuacres with enso. but was loyal to his ancestry, and when 



6 RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN. 

offered the privilege of English citizenship by Queen Victoria, 
declined, claiming to be an American. He learned to pamt at 
his mother's knee, and while a boy met Frederick Leighton, 
an English painter of note, who gave him encouragement. In 
1874 he went to Paris and entered the class of Carolus Duran, 
who soon discovered his unusual talent. He was accepted at 
the Salon at the age of 22 and the following year showed a 
painting of his teacher which appeared to be the work of a 
mature artist. 

Sargent went to Spain to worship at the shrine of Valas- 
quez; then to North Africa, where he painted his famous "El 
Jaleo, " now in the Boston Museum of Art. It is a dancing girl, 
swaying to the rhythm of stringed instruments. Already 
famous for his portraits, he returned to Paris to open a studio 
but it was in London that he made his permanent home. There 
favors and honors were tendered him. After three years he 
went to New York, his fame preceding him. The Americans 
crowded him with orders as they did always at each recurring 
visit home. In 1880 he was commissioned to decorate a hall in 
the Boston Public Library. — "The Frieze of the Prophets," 
and was well received by the Bostonians. The artist went to 
Egypt to make preparation for this work by studying Egyp- 
tion color, sybolism and life. Edwin A. Abbey, another noted 
American, had also a commission and the two painters worked 
together for two years in England. The result was the "Sar- 
gent Gallery" and Abbey's "Quest of the Holy Grail," now 
to be seen in the Boston Library. 

In 1899 Sargent exhibited, under the Art Students' League, 
a large collection of his work, mostly portraits. Of his many 
portraits that of "Marquand" is one of the greatest. In 1907 
Sargent was honored by being invited to paint a portrait of 
himself for the Uffizi of Florence, — this privilege is reserved 
for those who have conquered for themselves. Sargent would 
have made a great musician. Often he rests himself by playing 
Chopin and Beethoven. Could Sargent break through his 
critical shell of reserve more completely we would know better 
the real Sargent, the greatest Sargent, which has only been 
suggested in the Boston Library decorations and in one portrait 
called "Carnation Lily, Lily, Rose." This was only a picture of 
a child in a garden of flowers. Whistler, who liked to say 
clever, witty things almost as well as he loved to paint wonder- 
ful pictures, called it "Darnation Silly, Silly Pose." 
George De Forest Brush. 

George de Forest Brush, the painter of — not Madonnas — 
but "Mother and Child" — is, in the humble opinion of the 
writer, the greatest of all Americans in art, save only "Whistler. 



RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN. 7 

He lives in Florence surrounded by the environment of the best 
Italian art. 

Brush has created his own style, which is very different 
from his two contemporaries, Whistler and Sargent. He has 
chosen to portray the human emotions — love of mother for the 
child, and teaches us the value of a few models well understood 
over superficial study of many. For years he has painted his 
wife and brood of little ones. His wife is a beautiful, refined, 
sensitive Swede. Is there a sweeter beauty than that of the 
Americanized Scandinavian? If you have the good fortune to 
visit the great American cities, look for a "Mother and Child" 
by Brush. There are famous ones in the Pennsylvania 
Academy of Fine Arts, Museum of Boston, Corcoran Art Gal- 
lery, and at the Metropolitan in New York City. The writer 
saw his famous group of ' ' Mother and Children. ' ' There were 
seven of the latter at last accounts. The cartoons which fol- 
low Brush invariably have a stork landing a new baby. The 
family group, already referred to, seemed filled with the deco- 
rative quality, with sentiment, feeling, purity of tone and color, 
and the handling so dextrous, so free from the appearance of 
effort, impressed the writer with much the same power as did 
the work of AYhistler, Puvis de Chavaunes and Bottichelli. 

Brush is a native of Tennessee. He went to Paris and 
studied under Jerome, remaining at the Beaux Arts six years. 
He first painted the Indian and was so interested in this study 
that he lived among the Western red men a year and a half. 
He won marked recognition by "The Silence Broken" and 
"The Sculptor and the King," both Indian subjects. Marriage 
again opened his field and he now devotes himself, in the city 
of Florence, to painting his beautiful and artistic family, im- 
mortalizing them with his work. 

Artistic Europe will probably be destroyed in the great 
war now raging. The next art center must be America. It is 
well that our country has now such splendid art collections and 
so many artists who are entering the higher fields. When 
Europe emerges from her wounds she must come to our shores 
to be taught. Shall we be ready to do for her what she has so 
long and generously done for Americans? 

QUESTIONS. 

What opinion is expressed in Brush? Tell of his models 
and life. What do you think of his subjects? What does 
Hafen say of John Sargent? How did he become the greatest 
modern portrait painter? What effect has work had on his 
art ? What is his sweetest work ? What would you call the true 



8 RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN. 

Sargent? What of Sargent's present whereabouts? If the art 
of Europe is destroyed in the present and approaching wars 
where will the new art centers arise? What preparation have 
American artists made to each are in America, should 
the other grea;t art centers be destroyed? What work 
must be done by the American people before they can sustain 
at home the many gifted Americans who will be forced to re- 
turn to their native land for subsistence? Why should every 
Amercian know who are our best artists and be posted on their 
art work? What do you think of the destruction of Louvain? 
Do you think the present wars are directly or indirectly the 
result of commercialism as against art? Where are Sargent 
and Whistler placed by Hafen? Read Hafen's letter. 



October— LITERATURE— Lesson VL 

(Thirty Minutes.) 
Ten Minute Talk on Current Events. 
Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin: 

Subject : Franklin as a public benefactor. 

Sentiment: "A quarrelsome man has no good neighbors." 

1. Establishes public library. (First project of a public 
nature.) Altemus edition, pp. 136-143. Crowell edition, 

pp. 98-100; 111-113. 

2. Establishes police force. Altemus, pp. 182-183. Crowell, 
pp. 148-149. 

3. Establishes fire company known as the Union Fire 
Company. Altemus, pp. 184-185. Crowell, pp. 149-150. 

4. Invents open stove. Altemus, pp. 207-209. Crowell, 
pp. 168-169. 

5. In connection with Dr. Bond, establishes hospital in 
Philadelphia. Altemus, pp. 216-219. Crowell pp. 176-79. 

6. Suggested plans for cleaning and paving streets. Al- 
temus, pp. 221-223. Crowell, pp. 180-182. 

QUESTIONS. 

1. How did Franklin begin the first subscription library 
in America? 

2. What name was given to the library? 

3. In what vear was it established? 



RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN. 9 

4. What are the benefits of a public library? 

5. What use did Franklin make of the library? 

6. Compare the original fire company in Philadelphia with 
a modern fire department in a large city. 

7. What advantage was the open stove over the old fire- 
place? 

8. Compare Franklin's attitude relative to patents with 
that of the inventors today. 

9. How were the Philadelphians converted to the idea of 
lighting the streets? 

10. How did Franklin secure funds from the Assembly 
to assist in the establishment of a hospital? 

11. Whenever Franklin wished to promote a scheme, what 
was his first step in the matter? 

12. Name the public benefactions of Benjamin Franklin. 



October— HOME ETHICS— Lesson VL 

Causes of Infidelity and Indifference to the Gospel of Christ: 

1. If parents fail to live up to the principles in which they 
outwardly profess to believe, the child in the home will detect 
it. The religion that is but a veneer will destroy confidence in 
the family circle and will create a weakening of confidence, 
which Avill result in indifference to religion. 

2. Parents have a first duty to teach their offspring the 
gospel of Christ which has been given solely for a guide to 
present action and a goal for future effort. How many child- 
ren would know how to even try to be Christ-like, without this 
knowledge was obtained from the father and mother? 

We teach our children what their many pioneer ancestor? 
have done in the redemption of a desert, but neglect to tell them 
why they came. 

Are you assisting your sons to get an understanding of the 
saving power of the Priesthood and to attend their Quorum 
meetings faithfully? 

How to Choose Between Good and Evil. 

3. An understanding of art will aid in teaching young 
people how vulgar and inartistic are rag-time ai?d rag dancing. 
Take your children to Mutual and Primary, where they will 
learn the beautiful dances. Help them to distinguish and un- 
derstand between the vulgar and common and the pure, the 
beautiful and dignified. Three great principles of art are sim- 



10 RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN. 

plicity, dignity and technical rendition. .Learn to dance per- 
fectly, daintily, and yet with dignity. 

In topic 4 we refer to learning the principles of the Gospel 
so that we may know how to be good. A person once said to 
President John Henry Smith: "So and So is such a good 
man!" He asked in reply : "What is he good for?" When no 
answer seemed forthcoming, he said : "Every man and woman 
must be good for something, if their goodness is to avail!" 
From this we glean that we have a second duty as parents, to 
teach our children technically how to take part in the home 
activities and how to do something perfectly so that they may 
sustain themselves and not be a burden. Do you desire that your 
child shall grow up in purity and truth? Then see to it that 
idleness shall not destroy him. There is no surer way of train- 
ing a child in the way he should walk than to teach him 
how to work, how to make something, how to add to the sweet- 
ness of home. There is no better way to teach fortitude, hon- 
esty, integrity, courage, dignity and self-respect than by mak- 
ing things with the hands, that are perfect ni use and beauty. 
Not trying once, but daily receiving the same training which 
must go a long way toward strengthening the purpose and 
power of the child to live up to the principles of the gospel. 
There couldn't be a better saving machine than the getting of 
head and hand to work together in making something of 
use and beauty. How wicked to allow children to grow up 
without home cares, with no flowers to tend, no trees, no gar- 
den, but only a dirty yard, a filthy house. 

How dreadfully dulled will be the child who never learns 
how to play and "play fair." The boy who understands town 
ball, and plays well, and who "plays fair," will not be the one 
to raise prices when war gives him such an opportunity. 

Discussion. 
To what liberties is a child entitled? When should a boy 
and a girl be at home? When may the child be trusted away 
from home influence? Is the street a safe place for children? 
Why not? When is absence from home dangerous and de- 
structive of modesty and virtue? Do you believe in the chap- 
erone and why? What effect has the parents' example upon 
the religion of the child? What effect has neglect to teach the 
gospel on a child? What do you think of hypocrisy? Do you 
think that a person who does right for personal ends is apt 
to be a rogue and known as such to the child in the home? 
Why are work and competence saving powers? Why are idle- 
ness and incompetence destructive to true religion? In what 
• way do ugliness, filthiness, the low and inartistic tear down 
true religion? 



RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN. 11 

HOME GARDENING FOR WOMEN. 

"Go to the ant, thou sluggard, consider her ways and be 
wise, which, having no guide, overseer or rules, provideth her 
meat in summer, and gathereth her food in harvest." — 
Proverbs 6:6 7, 8. 

Most women, and especially the Latter-day Saints women, 
have developed wonderfully the instinct of providing against a 
day of need and want. In the early periods of the Church the 
teachings of the leaders, on this point, was most emphatic and 
necessary, for being isolated from the other parts of the world, 
with no means of rapid transportation, people were forced to 
raise practically everything they consumed, hence they learned 
the great and valuable lesson of planting, caring for, harvest- 
ing and providing for the next season's wants and necessities. 
There was never a more opportune time than the present to 
continue the practice of thrift and industry so wonderfully in- 
stituted by our pioneer fathers and mothers. 

Fall Planting: Do not neglect the golden opportunity now 
of putting your next year's garden in proper condition. Es- 
pecially have it well drained and fertilized for bulbs. Rhubarb 
and asparagus beds should be given proper attention by loosen- 
ing up the soil around the roots, and giving a good mulching. 
Great care should be taken in selecting seeds for next season's 
planting. Only those well matured and from choice plants 
should be chosen, then dry and sack or place in bottles or tin 
cans, mark and store them away in a cool, dry place where they 
will not freeze. Children can be taught to do this work and 
assist the parents. They will be more anxious next spring to 
help in the planting if they are taught the value of caring for 
the supply of seeds this fall. 

For lack of space in our last issue, pickle receipts and 
table of syrups was omitted. 

One pint of sugar to one gill of water makes a syrup of 
40 degrees density. 

One pint of sugar to one-half pint of water makes a syrup 
of 32 degrees density. 

One pint of sugar to one pint of water makes a syrup of 
24 degrees density. 

One pint of sugar to one and one-half pints of water makes 
a syrup of 17 degrees density. 

One pint of sugar to two pints of water makes a syrup of 
14 degrees density. 



12 RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN. 

For preserving cherries, strawberries, etc., a syrup of 40 
degrees density is used. For preserving currants, peaches, 
plums, quinces, etc., a syrup of 24 degrees to 32 degrees density 
is used. 

For canning blackberries, blueberries, cherries, peaches, 
pears, plums and raspberries, a syrup of 14 degrees to 17 de- 
grees densit}^ is used. 

Brine. 

Ordinary brine is made by dissolving one-half quart of 
salt in twenty-five quarts of water. By dissolving one quart 
of salt in twelve and one-half gallons of water the percentage 
of salt in the brine is 1 per cent in one pound, 2 per cent in 
two pounds, etc. 

Allowing one-half-pint of water to each quart of fruit. 

"We are indebted to the Utah Agricultural College for the 
above table. 

In pickle-making use but the best brand of vinegar. Cider 
vinegar is considered less liable to have mould accumulate than 
malt vinegar. Pickles should be kept in a dark, cool, dry 
place and examined often for the first few weeks. If soft white 
spots appear, drain off the vinegar, add one-half cup sugar to 
each gallon, scald, and pour over pickles again ; bits of horse- 
radish and cloves assist in preserving the life of vinegar. Se- 
lect fresh vegetables or fruits for pickling, using only por- 
celain kettles, never metal. 

"When giving pickles their first scalding, add to % gallon 
vinegar pulverized alum size of nutmeg; it will make them 
crisp. Do not add too much alum, as it is injurious. 

A medium spicing for a quart of pickles is a teaspoon of 
pepper corns (whole black pepper) same of allspice, a table- 
spoon of broken cinnamon, 1/2 teaspoon of cloves, mustard seed 
or horseradish, 1 piece of ginger root an inch long — ginger is 
the most wholesome of the spices. 

Pickles made at home are more desirable than those pur- 
chased on the markets, as the latter are usually colored a beau- 
tiful green with sulphate of copper, or made in brass kettles, 
producing same results in an indirect way, and both are deadly 
poison. Vinegar should be brought to a boiling point only, as 
too much heat destroys its strength. Nasturtium pods make ex- 
cellent flavor for mixed pickles. 



RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN. 13 

Oiled Pickles : 

50 cucumbers (dill pickle size). 
2 tablespoons celery seed. 
% pint olive oil. 

% pint salt, ^ lb. brown sugar. 
2 tablespoons Utah black mustard. 
2 tablespoons white mustard. 
1 gallon vinegar. 
8 good sized onions. 
Peel, slice cucumbers and onions, put them in layers with 
salt over night, drain in cloth bag until dry, place in stone jar 
with spices and sugar, pour oil over top, then cover with vine- 
gar. • They are excellent and easy to make. — J. A. H. 

Green Tomato Pickles: 

8 lbs. green tomatoes. 

1 qt. vinegar. 

1 teaspoon cinnamon. 

4 lbs. brown sugar. 

1 teaspoon mace. 
% teaspoon cloves. 

Chop tomatoes fine, add sugar and boil one hour, then ada 
the other ingredients and boil about 15 minutes. Try this one, 
you will not be without it. — J. A. H. 

Spiced Pickled Grapes : 

Fill jar with alternate layers of sugar and bunches of nice, 
fresh grapes (either white or black), put in a few whole spices, 
fill 1-3 full of good, cold vinegar, cover tightly. — J. A. H. 

Syrup does not add anything to the keeping qualities of 
canned fruits and is not necessary. Sterilization, good jars, 
good rubbers, lids and cleanliness are the essentials to be re- 
lied on. 



RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE. 

We wish to call the attention of the Relief Society officers 
and members, to the fact that the time is now here to begin 
active work in the interests of the Relief Society Magazine. 

It will be remembered that it was decided in the officers 
meeting at the last April conference that we would publish a 
monthly magazine devoted to Relief Society work. 

It is earnestly requested that the Stake Presidents take up 



14 RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN. 

this matter at ouce and canvas their Stakes to secure paid sub- 
scriptions by the October Conference. 

This is necessary in order to have funds with which to 
begin work on the publication at once. 

Every effort will be made to meet the demands of the or- 
ganization, in making the magazine a medium of instruction, 
along Relief Society lines, as well as educational and interest- 
ing. 

The price of the magazine will be one dollar in advance per 
annum, and it will be published monthly. 

It will require tAvelve thousand paid subscriptions to make 
the magazine self-supporting, and we expect each Stake to 
subscribe for as many as they have had free Bulletins during 
the present year. 



ANNOUNCEMENT. 



Three classes in Genealogy will be held during the Relief 
Society Conference in the Bishop's Building, Friday, Oct. 2nd, 
at 2 p. m., and at 5:30 p. m.. and on Saturday. Oct. 3d, at 5:30 
p. m. This allows us to have our Relief Society Conference and 
our class work in the two days, Frida}" and Saturday, which will 
enable all to attend both of these important gatherings. Special 
delegates are not required, although it would be desirable to 
send those who attended the spring convention where practic- 
able. These classes are held in response to a wide-spread ap- 
peal for more help in this work. 



NEW REPORT BLANK. 

The committee appointed to prepare a new report blank 
are at work and will be able to report at the October Con- 
ference. 



WHERE ANNUAL DUES SHALL BE PAID. 

Please do not send money orders or financial affairs of 
any nature to the President, Secretary or Corresponding Sec- 
retary of the organization. 

All money for yearly dues or for general Relief Society 
purposes of any nature should be sent to Mrs. Emma A. Empey, 
Room 28 Bishop's Building. 



^ RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN. 15 

RELIEF SOCIETY NURSE SCHOOL 



The Presidency and General Board of the Relief Society 
announce that the next class in the Relief Society Nurse School 
will commence Monday, September 21, 1914, and continue eight 
months, in Salt Lake City. Dr. Margaret C. Roberts will be 
the instructor. 

It is requested that the Stake Presidents will at once con- 
sult with their Ward Presidents for the purpose of selecting 
intelligent and energetic women of suitable age and of good 
moral character to take this course in nursing. 

We sincerely trust that members of the Relief Society 
realize the value and necessity of this Course of Nursing, as it 
is a fact that 95 per cent of the inhabitants of our country 
cannot afford to pay the price of a graduate, hospital nurse, 
and yet our sick of the masses should receive trained and 
skilful nursing. 

We can also recommend this course in nursing as a much- 
needed part of every young woman's education.' 

The tuition for the course will be $20.00, and it is ex- 
pected that the Relief Society organization in each ward will 
pay the tuition fee for their representatives. However, any 
student who wishes to pay the tuition herself may do so, if she 
is willing to accept and sign the Relief Society Nurse Contract, 
as published in the July Bulletin, page 14. 

For full particulars write Clarissa S. Williams. 37 North 
West Temple, or Dr. Margaret C. Roberts, 79 C street. Salt Lake 



THOMAS HULL ELIJAH A. LARKIN 

GEO. W. LARKIX ALMA J. LARKIN 

LARKIN-HULL 

UNDERTAKING CO. 

EMBALMERS AND 
FUNERAL DIRECTORS. 

CHAPEL «Sc PARLORS 255 SO. 2nd EAST ST. 
Phone Wasatch 5132 SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH 



16 RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN. 

Relief Societies' Headquarters 

For Approved Garments and Ladies' 
Utah Made Dress Goods. 

Postage Prepaid and Samples Sent on Request. 

CUTLER^S, 36 Main Street 

SCRACE'S BAKERY 
and CAFE 

Fresh Bread, Cakes and Pastry Daily 

Headquarters for Relief Society Visitors. 
A GOOD PLACE TO EAT. 

E. L. SAUNDERS, Prop. 
Phone Wasatch 1230. 24 So. MAIN STREET 



THEl 

UTAH STATE 

NATIONAL 

BANK 

SALT LAKE CITY 
UTAH 



It is the pur= 
pose of this 
Bank at ail 
tin:es to ren- 
der helpful ser- 
vice, and make the 
handling of your bank- 
ing business satisfac- 
tory and Dleasant. 

Utah State National Bank 

Your Account is Cordially Invited 

JOS. F. SMITH, Pres. 



ICE CREAM— SHERBETS— PUNCHES 
and CANDIES are the "BEST BY TEST" 

Special prices to all Ward aud School Socials etc. 

TWO STORES 55 Main St. 260 State St. 

Prompt Delivery Phones: Wasatch 3223—3224 



JENSEN'S BUTTERS 

OA'E QUALITY-TWO PACKAGES 

"Four-in-One" "Blanchard" 

FOUR CUBES STANDARD PRIJ^T 

What a delightful flavor these butters possess! We've 
offtimes been asked how we secure it. The secret lies mostly 
in the cream It,8 gathered from mile high pastures it's 
selected --- the choicest produced. In making Jensen's 
Butters, the cream's full flavor is retained. Give Jensen's 
Butters a trial. 



W. N. Williams, Supt. Clarissa S. Williams, Sec'y & Treas R. N. Wilson. Asst. Supt 

Guaranteed Furniture at Lowest Prices 

Our magnificent stock comprises goods from America's 
most representative lines and our prices are always reasonable 

Carpets, Rugs, Draperies, Linoleum, Ranges, 
Heaters, Qo-Carts, Etc. 

Home Furnishings of all descriptions for 

CASH OR CREDIT 

Co-op. Furniture Co. 

Next Door South of Z. C. M. I. 

BURIAL CLOTHES 
Relief Society General Board 

FURNISHES COMPLETE BURIAL SUITS 

Phones Wasatch 3455 and Wasatch 207 
Salt Lake City Utah 




A Qrafonoia 
for the Ward 

$25 Upward 
$10 Cash— $5 a Mo. 

Play over in your Ward House 
records of the singing of the 
famous TABERNACLE CHOIK 

Also any records you want for 
any occasion — dance — popular — 
sacred, etc. 



Older than the State of Utah 



Write for Catalogue and FREE calendar. 



SEE McCONAHAY 
For Diamonds 

64 MAIN ST. 

The Jeweler===Salt Lake 
$22 and up 



We are prepared to supply you with 
all books recommended for 

RELIEF SOCIETY CLASSES 

ALSO ALL RELIEF SOCIETY BLANKS, 

BLANK BOOKS and RECORDS 

DESERET NEWS BOOK STORE 

LEADING BOOK CONCERN 
No. 6 MAIN STREET 



ASK YOUR DEALER FOR 

Z. C. M. I. Factory Shoes 

A few of our most serviceable lines — Western 
Scout, Utah, Summit, Wyoming. 



"MOUNTAIN" or "THE 
LEADER" Ov^eralls are honestly 
made. They don't rip. 




Star Printing Companp 

35 Post Office Place Phone Wasatch 1370 

Salt Lake Cit^, Utah 



Marion Banks 



FINE 



Charlton's 

CLOAK & SUIT GO. 

Up=to=Date Styles 
for Ladies and 

Misses. 

This ad. will redeem 10 per cent on purchase at regular price 

Moved to 24^ South Main Street 



Millinery 

AT REASONABLE PRICES 

GOODWIN CORSETS 



WHILE LABORING FOR THE POOR 

AND AIDING THE WIDOW IN WANT, 

DON'T NEGLECT YOURSELF AND FAMILY 

Have they the proper protection in ease of 
sickness or death of 
your bread winner or 
will you be compelled 
to look for charity? 

Has he sufficient life 
insurance to assure 
you this protection? 




JOHN C. CUTLER 
1st. Vice President. 



INSURANCE 
IN FORCE 




JOSEPH F. SMITH 
President. 



Beneficial Life 
Insurance Co. 

Home office, Vermont 

Building 

Salt Lake City, Utah 





LORENZO N. STOHL 
2nd. Vice Pres. & Mgt. 



OVER 
$ 1 2,000,000.00 




C. W. NIBLEY 
Member Ex. Com. 



RICHARD W. YOU^Q 
Counsel 



Relief Society Bulletin 

Volume I November, 1914. Number 11 






Issued by the Officers and Directors of the 

GENERAL BOARD OF THE RELIEF SOCIETY 
1914 



HUMAN SERVICE 

has come to be a consideration of political parties, or social 
organizations, and of educational institutions. 

THE RELIEF SOCIETY 

has been an instrument of human service for more than half a 
century. It ministers to the immediate material wants of the 
community. It has been pronounced by many studentn an 
institution for community charity. 

THE UTAH AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

at Logan aims in a very definite way to make each member 
of society a more capable producer, a better farmer, house- 
wife, tradesman, agricultural engineer, or business man and 
thus aims to eliminate want. Its field of work therefore, 
properly co-operates with the work of relief societies in serv- 
ing the men and women of the State. While its courses are 
distinctly practical, it deals in a broad and fundamental way 
with the basic industries of the State. Liberal instruction is 
given in the natural and physical sciences, in mathematics, 
history, English, economics, literature and languages. 

The College has been slowly built into an embodiment of 
the State's idealism. 



Willes-Horne Drug Company 

News Building, Salt Lake City. 

Our Drug Store Is Complete 

TREATMENT PERFECT. PRICES RIGHT. 

WE SOLICIT YOUR PATRONAGE. 

Prompt Attention to Mail Orders. 



Lambourne Floral Dept. 
EVERYTHING FLORAL. 

DECORATIONS. FUNERAL WORK. Etc., Etc. 

THE L. D. S. HOSPITAL TRAINING 
SCHOOL FOR NURSES 

has an average enrollment of about 100 Nurses in training. 
The hospital has capacity of 250 beds. The training school is 
under the direction and supervision of highly trained gradu- 
ate nurses from schools of national reputation. It gives a 
three years course in training in nursing in all its branches. 
For further particulars address the Superintendent of Nurses 

Dr.W.H. GROVES LATTER-DAY SAINTS HOSPITAL, 

SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH. 




INDEX TO LESSON STATEMENTS. 

PAGE 

Remarks — Pres. Emmeline B. Wells .... 1 

Editorial 4 

Genealogy and Testimony 5 

Home-Ethics 6 

Home Gardening for Women 6 

Literature 8 

Art 9 

October Conference 10 

Notices 14 

ADVERTISERS' DIRECTORY 



Patronize those who have made it possible, for this paper to 

exist. 

1. AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE, Logan, Utah. 

2. WILLES-HORNE DRUG CO., 8 South Main, Salt Lake City. 

3. WHITE SEWING MACHINE CO., 29 W. First South St. Phone 

Was. 5234, Salt Lake City. 

4. L. S. SMITH & BROS., Typewriter, 379, So. Main St., Salt 

Lake City. 

5. S. M. TAYLOR & CO., UNDERTAKERS, 251-259 E. First South 

St., Salt Lake City. 

6. L. D. S. BUSINESS COLLEGE, Salt Lake City. 

7. KEELEY ICE CREAM CO., 555 Main, 260 State Sts., Salt Lake 

City. 

8. LARKIN-HULL UNDERTAKING CO., 255 South 2nd East St. 

Salt Lake City. 

9. L. D. S. HOSPITAL TRAINING SCHOOL FOR NURSES, Salt 

Lake City. 

10. CO-OP. FURNITURE, 35 South Main St., Salt Lake City. 

11. Z. C. M. I., Salt Lake City. 

13. RELIEF SOCIETY BURIAL CLOTHES, Beehive House, Salt 

Lake City. 

14. DESERET NEWS BOOK STORE, 8 Main St., Salt Lake City. 

15. STAR PRINTING CO., 35 P. O. Place, Salt Lake City. 

16. CUTLERS, 36 S. Main St., Salt Lake City 

17. BENEFICIAL LIFE INSURANCE CO., Vermont Building, Sail 

Lake City. 

18. McCONAHAY, THE JEWELER, 64 Main St., Sa't Lake City. 

19. UTAH STATE NATIONAL BANK, Salt Lake City. 

20. DAYNES-BEEBE MUSIC CO., 45 S. Main, Salt Lake City. 

21. JENSEN CREAMERY COMPANY, Salt Lake. 

22. MARION BANKS, Millinery, and Charlton's Suit & Cloak Co., 321 

So. Main, Salt Lake. 

23. SCRACE'S BAKERY, 24 S, Main, Salt Lake City. 




Ball Bearings Give Greater Speed and Stability to the 

L. C. Smith & Bros, Typewriter 

(Ball Bearing, Long Wearing) 
Because of ball bearing tj'pebars, the keys 
respond as readily as perfect piano keys. 
The capital shift works with equal ease — no 
lifting of a heavy carriage but simply 
shifting the light type bar segment, thu8 
insuring absolute accuracy 

Another advantage— this machine is com- 
plete in itself for all kinds of work: tabu- 
lating, billing, large envelopes, cards or 
paper as narrow as a postage stamp. 

WRITE FOR CATALOGUE 

To L. C. SMITH & BROS. TYPEWRITER CO. 

379 SO. MAIN STREET Salt Lake City, Utah 



Established 1860 Incorporated 1908 

S. M. TAYLOR & CO. 

UNDERTAKERS AND 
EMBALMERS 

Successors to 

JOSEPH E. TAYLOR 

The Pioneer Undertaker of the West 

53 years in one location 

251=253=255=257 East First South St. 

Salt Lake City, Utah 

MODERN METHODS COMPLETE EQUIPMENT 

EFFK^IENT SERVICE 

A SUCCESSFUL COLLEGE GROWS 

In one year our increase has been forty per cent. 

L D. S. BUSINESS COLLEGE 

SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH 
Day Sessions Night Sessions 

seven dollars a month four dollars a month 



RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 

ORGAN OF THE WOMAN'S BELIEF SOCIETY OF THE 
CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS 

Vol. 1. November, 1914. No. II 

Editor Mks. Susa Young Gatba 

Business Manager Mrs. Janette A. Hydb 

Assistant Manager Mrs. Amy Brown Lyhan 

Advisory Committee 

Mrs. Clarissa S. Williams Mrs. Julina L. Smith Mrs. Rebecca N. Niblby 



Publishers and Proprietors General Board of the Relief Society 

Ofl&ce Room 28 Bishop's Building-, Salt Lake City 

One Dollar a Year Ten Cents^a Copy 

Bntered as second-clasfi matter on February 18, 1914, at the Poat Ode* 
at Salt Lake City, Utah, under the Act of March 3, 1879. 

The following beautiful and characteristic remarks were 
made by our President, Emmeline B. Wells, at the Relief So- 
ciety conferenice, Oct. 3, 1914. That portion which dwelt upon 
the grain question will appear later in our Magazine : 

My beloved sisters and brethren, I think we can all say 
and feel that we have had a great deal of good in this con- 
ference, both in the way of speaking and of singing and music, 
vocal and instrumental. And really it seems to me that we 
have had what we might call a genuine treat at this conference, 
because today we have had the President of the Church, the 
man above all others who stands at the head of this Church 
and kingdom here upon the earth, and we all, of course, love 
him, and love to hear him, and we are glad that he approves of 
some of our work any way, and he really cannot possibly have 
a conception of all that is done. That is impossible. But some 
who have visited many of the Stakes of Zion and many of the 
conferences of the Relief Society, and heard our sisters testify 
and report in our general conferences from year to year, have 
a very good idea of the work ; and we don't know it all. Those 
in their own localities who call upon the sick and minister to 
them and who prepare them for burial, and who do all that 
beautiful work — and it is the finest work in the world, the very 
best work, the best charity that can possibly be — because they 
do both, they administer to their temporal wants, and they 
help to make them really what they ought to be made after 
death, personally clean and beautiful, beautiful in the robes 



2 RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 

that are given to the saints, and which we all prize so highly, 

I am quite sure. 

* * * * 

You remember at our last conference, and also in the con- 
ferences that have been visited during the present year, and I 
think there have been 130 visited, some of them a very long 
way off, we have said that we wanted to know the number of 
certain things. I hope you will remember that still. We 
do want to get the number of quilts that have been made, 
the number of yards of yarn carded, and a number of other 
things that I wont mention today, but I think you have all 
heard it until you are well aware of it, — we want that reported. 
We have not had an opportunity to do it at this conference, but 
we will, perhaps, next April. And next April I think that we 
will be able to report a great deal of work, that has not been 
done yet, necessary work, essential work, in the several stakes 
and in the missions as well, because they are included also along 
with the Stakes of Zion, and we know that a great deal has 
been done abroad, and especially in Great Britain and in 
Scandinavian countries, Norway, Sweden and Denmark, a vast 
amount of work has been done by the organizations of the Re- 
lief Society that has never been reported, as well as the work 
of the Relief Society on the islands of the sea, and at one time 
we had Relief Society branches, you know, in Africa. I don't 
know that we have any now. At any rate, we want to keep our 
organizations as perfect as we can. We want to accomplish 
all the temporal work that we can, that is necessary; but above 
all things in the world, Ave want faith and charity, and espec- 
ially in the hearts of our children and of our young people and 
of each other — faith and charity. You remember the words 
that the Prophet Joseph gave us. You have all read them, I 
am sure. At any rate, the larger part of you have. The ma- 
jority of you have read the minutes of the first organization, 
that have been published seven times in the Woman's Expo- 
nent, also distributed in leaflets, etc. The words of the 
Prophet Joseph, in the Relief Society, in the beginning, that 
charity was one of the things that we should be full of, full of 
compassion for each other. The word "compassion" was used. 
Full of meekness for each other. And you know the scriptures 
say it. We should forgive each other, and not hold grudges 
against each other, but forgive even before forgiveness is asked, 
and then you would be ready when forgiveness is asked. But 
we can forgive. We are obliged, almost, to forgive our 
enemies ; we have to. It seemxS necessary because we pray for 
them, and if we pray for them we must forgive them. Teach 
'these things, faith, charity and mercy. The scriptures say 



RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 3 

mercy endureth forever, and you all know the little passages 
that we apply in our meetings to each other, and I am sure 
that it is not possible for any president who is here today, or 
any president of any ward in all the Stakes of Zion, to tell all 
the beautiful things that have been done and felt and realized. 
Compission is well for the sick, because they need it, those 
that are in want, and those that are weak in the faith, 
they need it. We need to remember them if they have 
been a grieved, and if there is anything the matter, and visit 
them, and make them feel better, in the wards and in all the 
Stakes of Zion wherever they are, or the missions throughout 
the church. Let us do all these little things, and while we are 
doing the great things, let us also remember the little things, 
and I do hope and pray that we may all be spared to meet 
again in our conference next April, and we shall know, next 
April, a great deal more than we know now concerning that 
which is abroad in the world, because I realize, and you realize, 
no doubt, that great things are taking place in the world, great 
changes. There will be greater freedom, at any rate, in some 
of those countries after these wars ; for after the nations have 
been subdued by war, and they have to pursue peace— and I 
hope that you will all pray that we may not have war m our 
own land, not even in Mexico, because that. has been a grievous 

thing. 

I prav the Lord will be with us all durmg the conference 
that is before us, that commences tomorrow morning, and that 
as manv of us as possible will be present in the tabernacle at 
the opening of that conference, for that will be, perhaps, some- 
thing that will giye us an idea of what the conference will be 
throughout— always is. The opening meeting gives the key- 
note of the conference, generally, and will in all probability be 
tomorrow morning, and I hope that we will all be able to be 
there, and that nothing will prevent us, and that we shall all, 
and manv more of us, come together again in our Relief Society 
conference next April, and have something wonderful, all of us, 
to tell each other there, and after we have had an opportunity 
of attending the conference here. 

May the Lord be and abide with the Relief Society through- 
out the world as well as with all those that love the Lord and 
obev His commandments. Amen.— And the others, too. Amen. 



4 RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 

EDITORIAL. 
"OUR THANKSGIVING." 

It may seem somewhat selfish for the people of the United 
States to be offering up thanks for peace and plenty, when the 
whole civilized world is filled with riot, carnage and distress. 
It may also seem selfish in the individual, who dedicates one 
day a year to the public giving of thanks for personal peace 
and prosperity, while his neighbor may be suffering poverty 
and sickness. Distress, like health, is a relative condition; the 
poor of any land may well be thankful for such blessings as they 
possess, while the rich and prosperous may sometimes bear 
other burdens quite as grievous as poverty or sickness. 

Only the Creator of us all may decide fully w^hich are our 
blessings, and which are our distresses. A trial that may seem 
most grievous to be borne can easily have a pure and exalting 
effect upon the individual or the nation. Riches and success too 
often produce most lamentable effects upon persons as well as 
upon peoples. All in all, every person on this earth has reason to 
give thanks to the Creator for life upon the earth. Life is the 
greatest gift of God to man. How it shall be used and de- 
veloped to the highest point, is a lesson which has as much to 
do with sickness, distress and poverty as it has to do Avith pros- 
perity, health and success. 

When the sisters of the Relief Society offer up their thanks, 
this Thanksgiving month, let us be grateful lor some of the 
large gifts which belong to us all alike. Let us be grateful for 
life upon the earth ; for comparative health, or. for an instruc- 
tive faith-promoting illness; for the bounteous crops of garden 
and farm, whether our share thereof be much or little; for 
liberty of conscience, and for the agency which permits us to 
travel ever upward, albeit we ever go in a zig-zag and irregular 
climb ; let us be thankful for citizenship in this wonderful coun- 
try, where the will of the individual is subordinate to the 
good of the whole people. Above all, let us give thanks for a 
membership in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 
where liberty, love, and peace are daily possibilities, no matter 
what circumstances or conditions may surround us. For all 
these things, then, we offer up our thanks to the Giver of all 
Good, while we pray for similar blessings to descend upon all 
God's children everywhere. 



BELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 5 

November— GENEALOGY AND TESTIMONY— Lesson II. 

Ten Minutes Talk on Current Events. 

Preparing- Sheets for Temple Use : 

"Whatsoever you record on earth shall be recorded in 
heaven, and whatsoever you do not record on earth shall not 
be recorded in heaven." — Doc. and Cov.. 128: 8. 

In preparing this lesson, the class teacher will need to se- 
cure blanks from the temple in her district. There are three 
kinds of blanks issued for recording information to be used 
in our temple ordinance Avork. They are : Baptismal sheets, 
which are used also for endowment purposes; marriage sheets, 
which are used only for names of the dead who are to be 
sealed ; adoption sheets, which are used only for the purpose 
of recording the names of the two parents and the family of 
children who are to be adopted to the parents. 

Each member of the class should have a sample sheet of 
all three of these record sheets, that this lesson might be pre- 
pared intelligently and carefully. 

Let the class teacher read the instructions on the baptismal 
sheet first, and then ask the class to prepare the sheet accord- 
ing to those instructions, and the same plan should be followed ^ 
with all of the other sheets. 

You will observe several points; first, that all the men's 
names are put upon one sheet together for baptism and endow- 
ment purposes, and that all of the women's names are arranged 
in like manner. The marriage sheets have only the names of 
the couples to be sealed, without adding their children. 

The adoption sheets are arranged for recording one family 
thereon. Where there are but one or two children in a family, 
more than one family can be written on one sheet. 

Another point to be noted is that the numbering of these 
names is the clue by which the genealogist keeps order in his 
records. The numbers should be copied from the written family 
record, and not numbered on the sheet itself. For instance, if 
John Young is numbered in my temple record as 15, I should 
copv that number on my temple sheet, no matter whether he 
were first, last, or in the middle of the sheet. This allows the 
genealogist to know at a glance where the names belong m his 
record when he receives the sheet back from the temple. 

If the genealogist has several record books at home, and 
they are lettered a, b, c, etc., he should know exactly where the 
particular John Young belongs. It sometimes happens that the 
genalogists carrv their numbers only up to 5,000, and then 



6 RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 

begin at number 1, so that the number of the book as well as the 
number of the name should be noted on the temple sheet. 

The blank forms are reproduced in miniature in your 
Genealogical Lesson Book, to which please refer. 



November— HOME ETHICS— Lesson III. 
Christ, Our Example. 

"If a man say, 'I love God' and hateth his brother, he is a 
liar ; for he that loveth not his brother whom he hath seen, how 
can he love God, whom he hath not seen?" 

In the centuries far back, when Britain was unknown, 
when the Germans were defying Caesar's staunch legions, 
Christ lived and was crucified in a small, despised section of 
the Roman empire. Though Christ never crossed the borders 
of his native country, save in his infancy, and though few ever 
beheld him in the flesh, he is today worshipped by millions upon 
millions of men. He is worshipped for his divinity, and for 
his atonement. He is known by us through those sacred books, 
the Bible and the Book of Mormon. Our knowledge of him 
is illuminated by the witness of the Spirit, to the extent that he 
appears to us as indeed our Elder Brother, our Teacher, and as 
the great Exemplar. Through the study of the gospels of 
Matthew, Mark, Luke and John, it is borne in upon us that liv- 
ing up to the teachings of Christ would, in the ages, cause men 
to approach the wisdom and power of God. The almost as- 
tounding truth is that his teachings, though of the highest ethi- 
cal form, are not only workable but practical, and we discover 
that if we will, we each can order the conduct of our daily 
lives after the manner of the Son of Man. Let us read his life 
as recorded by the apostles, seeking to fasten into our hearts 
his every act and teaching, so that we may know how to emu- 
late his example. Was he frank, sincere, just, reasonable, hum- 
ble, patient, long-suffering, forgiving, generous, kind, thought- 
ful, courageous, truthful, sympathetic, willing to bless and 
comfort? Was he serene, calm and unruffled, in trial? Let 
each member recite at least one of his sayings, that will be a 
guiding principle in life. Let each member relate an incident 
in the life of Christ that came as a blessing to some one else, 
and remains an example to us for better living. 

HOME GARDENING FOR WOMEN. 

"Every herb in the season thereof, and every fruit in the 



RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 7 

.season thereof, all these to be used with prudence and thanks- 
giving Doc. & Gov. Sd, 11 ; also see Job 14 :7, 8, 9. 

The spirit of thanksgiving is conducive to health and happi- 
ness. Appoint one of the sisters to prepare a paper on Thanks- 
giving. Tell when it was first observed in America, what its 
prime object was, and if, in her opinion, one still observes 
Thanksgiving in the same spirit as originally intended. 

Native Currant Bushes. — Native currants, otherwise known 
as black, yellow or wild currants, should always be found in 
the farm or home garden space. They should be given proper 
attention by not over-crowding. Keep well preserved and 
cultivated; do not allow suckers to grow and divide the 
strength of the main or original plant. In Lovell, Wyoming, 
the writer saw cultivated native currants, both black and yel- 
low, almost as large as ordinary marbles, and the family pro- 
ducing them said that they were not able to supply the de- 
mand. They sold at a very good price, too, thus proving again 
the assertion, that it pays to produce the best of anything we 
raise or make.. Native currants thrive in almost any climate 
where vegetation will grow. Try planting a few bushes this 
fall. If you do not like the fruit yourselves, you can dispose of 
it at a very profitable figure to your neighbor or at the market. 

Rose Slips, Geranium Slips, etc., etc. — ^You may, if you 
Lave a fine rose bush, still have another by cutting off slips or 
the stroEg undergrowth of the bush. Place it in moist sand, 
cover with a glass, put in a darkened place, and leave to germ- 
inate. Just the tips should be planted; or, take a long limb, 
bury it in the ground, leaving it attached to the original rose 
tree, cover all but the tip of the limb deep in the ground. In 
the spring, cut off and plant. Geraniums that have been grow- 
ing in the gardens all summer are too large to move into the 
house. Just take slips, placing in pots or boxes of moist sand 
and keep in a cool, dark place. They will soon put forth new 
leaves and bloom in early winter, and supply you with garden 
geraniums for the next spring and without extra cost. Pe- 
tunias, and many other varieties of flowers that are propa- 
gated by slips may be treated very successfully in the same 
manner as the rose and geranium. 

Bulbs: Hyacinths, Narcissus, Tulips, Snow-Drops, etc.— 
November is the month in which to plant your bulbs. Convert 
the children to the idea and have the boys assist you after 
school hours to spade up the ground. Get old fertilizer from 
the barn yard, and mix with sand. Use a spade and work over 
very thoroughly ; or, better still, get leaf mold or soil from the 
mountains, work the soil until it is pulverized and free from 
lumps. Drainage, too, must be considered in selecting the 
place for bulb planting, as too much standing water will cause 



8 RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 

the bulbs to rot. and disappointment will greet you instead of 
flowers. Bad draioage may be overcome by placing small cobble 
rocks about fifteen inches down in the bottom of the flower 
bed, which allows the water to seep between the rocks and thus 
prevents the rotting of any of the bulbs, which is so often the 
ease. Select good, solid bulbs free from rot ; and avoid dry, in- 
ferior looking ones. It is impossible to produce good healthy 
blooms unless good seed is used. The soil may be properly pre- 
pared, and in the most thorough manner, the moisture may be 
ample, the season perfect, but with poor seed, you have corre- 
sponding results. 

Osage Orange, or Mock Orange, is very fine for hedges, 
but does not grow as rapidly as some others. It also has the 
disadvantage of producing the mock fruit, which, although 
children love to pluck, sometimes destroys, when they do so, 
the symmetry and shape of the hedges. 

We recommend to our readers Farmers' Bulletin No. 183, 
TJ. S. Department of Agriculture. 

By sending your name and address to the Department, or 
to Senator Reed Smoot or Congressman Joseph Howell, you 
will receive this bulletin, which contains valuable information. 

We hope you have received the Pure Fabric Bulletins, sent 
out by the Utah Agricultural College of Logan, and this, as well 
as all other literature sent to our presidents, must be preserved 
for future reference. We are indebted to the A. C. College 
for this and many other publications. 



November— LITERATURE— Lesson IV. 

(Thirty Minutes.) 
Ten minute talk on Current Events. 

Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin. 

Subject: Franklin's Interest in Education. 
Sentiment: "Experience keeps a dear school but fools 
will learn in no other and scarce in that." 

1. Franklin as a student. 

a. Early struggles for knowledge. Altemus, pp. 35- 
44. Crowell. pp. 14.23. 

b. Language studies. Altemus, pp. 175-176. 

c. Scientific studies. Altemus, pp. 266-273 ; Crowell, 
pp. 223-228. 

2. Franklin establishes Academy, which later becomes 



RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 9 

the University of Philadelphia. Altemus. pp. 209-213, Crowell, 
pp. 169-173. 

a. Development of the scheme. 

b. Financial basis of the school. 

3. Establishes free charity school. Altemus (see note. p. 
213.) 

(Reference to this school is found in the Altemus edition 
only.) 

Two years after the academy was established a free school 
v/as advertised in "Franklin's Gazette," as follows: 

"Notice is hereby given, that on Monday, the 16th of Sep- 
tember, a free school will be opened, under the care and di- 
rection of the Trustees of the Academy, at the new building, 
for the instruction of poor children, gratis, in reading, writing, 
and arithmetic. Those who are desirous of having their chil- 
dren admitted, may apply to any of the Trustees." 

A year later the following notice appeared in the same 
paper : 

'"The charity school opened by the Trustees in the 
Academy, now teaches reading, writing, and arithmetic to a 
hundred poor children, most of whom, though from eight to 
thirteen years of age. had never been sent to any school before ; 
nor did it seem likely many of them would ever have been sent 
to any school if it had not been for this institution." 

QUESTIONS. 

1. Discuss the subject, "Franklin, a Self-Made Man." 

2. What is really the important thing in acquiring an 
education? 

3. Compare Franklin with the type of man who is anxious 
to educate and inform himself only. 

4. What do you think of Franklin's "free school?" 

5. What great scientific discovery was made by Franklin 
as a result of his extensive experiments ? 

6. AMiat honor came to him through this discovery? 

ART. 

Whistler — Innes : 

James A. McNiel Whistler is the greatest modern artist. 
He discovered to Europe the wonderful Japanese art. He 
was not appreciated by his countrymen, — Americans, nor ye> 
by the English, among whom he made his home. The French, 
after long years, gave him his proper place. He was always ap- 
preciated by a few who were a source of consolation to the 



10 RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 

great artist, whose life is art — and art was his whole life — led 
through long years of harsh jeering, taunting, acrid criticism, 
before he converted the world to his greatness. His etchings 
are marvels of beauty, and he is as wonderful in painting as in 
etching. 

Whistler has had a tremendous influence on the art of 
today. His art is subtle, delicate, original and spontaneous. 
To those who can not understand him, it is useless to explain, 
for art can not be explained — especially the highest art — for 
that can only be felt. (Read the October Bulletin on Whistler, 
Sargeant and Brush. Read Hafen's letter and Mary Teasdel's 
story in "Devotees and their Shrines," for references to 
Whistler; also the introductory and extracts by Whistler, on 
pages 17, 18, 41, 94, 103, 109.) 

George Innes was the greatest American landscapist next 
to Whistler. He was indeed an artist. His work in studios 
was very independent. He studied nature closely, sympa- 
thetically, and was wonderful in feeling. He was emotional 
when contemplating nature. In his early life he suffered from 
epilepsy, but grew stronger through later years. Read Hafen's 
tribute to George Innes, in his letter. Innes died several years 
ago, but as he becomes better known, he will be recognized and 
given his right place among the greatest Americans. George 
Innes was a dreamer, but his visions were in the highest, loftiest 
realms of the beautiful. 

No American should be ignorant of Whistler, Sargeant, 
Innes. Winslow, Homer, Brush and Woodbury, and no Utahn 
should neglect to learn something of John Hafen, John Fair- 
banks, J. T. Harwood, Edwin Evans, Cyrus Dallin, Mary Teas- 
del, Rost Hartwell, M. M. Young, Lee Greene Richards, Donald 
Beauregard, A. B. Wright, Wesley BroAvning, Myra Sawyer, 
and those noble pioneers, Weggeland. Ottinger and a score of 
others whose names could well be added. 



OCTOBER CONFERENCE. 



The semi-annual conference of the Relief Society was held 
in the Salt Lake Assembly Hall October 2, 3, 1914, President 
Emmeline B. Wells presiding. 

At the opening session a brief and affectionate address of 
welcome was made by President Emmeline B. Wells. 

The response was given in the same gentle spirit by Eliza- 
beth W. Layton of St. Joseph Stake. 

An eloquent address concerning her new duties was made 
by the new General Board member, Sarah Eddington. 

Four Stake reports were made — all very encouraging — as 



RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 11 

• follows: Shelley Stake, by Mary F. Freeman; Blackfoot, by 
Juliet Blackburn ; Summit, by Sarah Lewis ; Hyrum, by Louisa 
Allen; Malad, by Elizabeth Jones; Morgan, by Nettie Dur- 
rant; Nebo, by Eliza Dixon; North San Pete, by Wilhelmina 
Eriekson; Josepa, by Ellen K. Makaiau (interpreted by Ellen 
F. Genison. This last report, being given in Hawaiian by our 
native Relief Society President at Josepa, was both striking and 
' interesting. 

At the second session. Friday, at 2 p. m.. Relief Society 
Insurance was clearly and simply explained by Elder John 
D. Giles, who impressed upon the sisters the value and im- 
portance of the new movement. 

The report of the International Council at Rome was given 
by Counsellor Clarissa S. Williams. Susa Young Gates spoke 
on the "Mormon" Women in Europe. It is hoped that we 
shall have these reports published in full in our magazine in one 
of the early numbers. 

The address by Ida S. Dusenberry on "Simplicity, Sym- 
pathy, Charity." was feelingly given, and the beautiful senti- 
ments found an echo in the listeners' hearts. 

Officers' meeting at 10 on Saturday, Oct. 3rd, was held in 
the Assembly Hall of the Bishop's building. Reports of the 
following missions were given : Northwestern States, by Sister 
Margaret Sloan. Six branches. Anaconda, Tacoma, Portland, 
Spokane, Vancouver, Butte. This mission is newer than the 
others, but is already in a most fluorishing and prosperous 
condition. The Bulletins are freely used, and good results have 
followed all efforts put forth, 
forth. 

Northern States, by Sister Mary E. Ellsworth. Five 
branches. Winnipeg. Milwaukee, Rock Island, Bloomington, 
Chicago. 

Central States, by Sister Lottie Benuion. Both of these 
two last reports were extremely interesting and instructive. 

The Bulletins are eagerly sought for in the mission Relief 
Society work, the lessons on genealogy being the best material 
ever used in those missions to attract and hold the interest ol 
strangers as well as new converts. The Relief Society branches 
in the Northwestern mission has tAventy-two mothers' classes 
studying genealogy and ethics. Sewing for the poor as well as 
mending for the elders is also a feature of their work. In the 
Central States mission there are ten branches, one in Texas, 
consisting of 300 members — probably the largest single Relief 
Society in the world. The average attendance is also large, 
being 85 per cent of the membership. Many of these sisters 
travel four and five miles to attend meetings, but few are ab- 
sent. 



12 RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 

Counsellor Clarissa S. Williams spoke, of the New Report 
Blanks. She said: "The blanks have been arranged and would 
be ready to mail out to the branches of the Society in November. 
The work has been done on these blanks by a committee from 
the General Board and it has been tedious. AVe were assisted 
by Brother John Wells of the Presiding Bishop's Office." 
Sister Williams also reported that the Outline Guide Work 
will be continued along the same lines next year as we followed 
this season. In regard to the annual dues, she said that in ac- 
cordance with the decision made in April, 1914, annual dues 
are to be paid January 1st, each year. She spoke of our new 
magazine. Said the Exponent had ceased publication and the 
Bulletin was temporary. Now, we are to have a magazine to 
be known as the Relief Society Magazine. It will consist of 
forty-eight pages, will be illustrated, and the price will be one 
dollar a year. It will be issued monthly. It is necessaary to get 
in subscriptions as soon as possible in order to determine the 
number to be published. We shall expect the stakes to send 
us as many subscribers as we sent out Bulletins, and as many 
more as their enterprise and generosity can secure. The cir- 
cular on the magazine was read. It will be sent to all the 
stakes. 

Remarks were made by President Emmeline B. Wells, who 
asked the sisters to pray for peace, and for mothers and 
children who are bereft. She invoked blessings on all present. 

Closing session, Saturday afternoon. The first address 
was "Attitude of Utah Woman to Peace," by Emily S. Rich- 
ards. The points dwelt upon were : Women as a rule are for 
peace. They bear the brunt of war. All men and women should 
unite to prevent war, and to establish an international commis- 
sion of peace. Sister Richards was listened to with marked 
attention, and her words were timely and interesting. 

The inspiring remarks by President Joseph F. Smith will 
appear in our January Magazine. President Wells' remarks 
appear in this Bulletin. 

A few timely remarks were made by Sister Emma A. 
Empey, explanatory of the nurse class work. 

President Louisa Benson of Oneida Stake moved a vote of 
thanks to the musical director, Lizzie Thomas Edward, to the 
organist, Edna Coray, to the members of the choir and to all 
soloists, for the beautiful music furnished during the confer- 
ence. Counsellor Clarissa S. Williams read affectionate senti- 
ments from the members of the Relief Society choir, expressing 
their pleasure and gratitude for the work done by the choir 
leader. Sister Lizzie Thomas Edward, from the members of the 
choir, and the organist. Sister Edna Coray. After which two 
exquisite bouquets of flowers were presented to these sisters. 



RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 13 

The music furnished throughout the whole conference was 
of a high character and pleased all with the lovely strains and 
sounds, both of instrument and voice. The following is the 
program: 

Soprano Solo .Lizzie T. Edward 

Organ Solo Edna Coray 

Soprano Solo Pearl Larson 

Solo AYillard AVeihe, accompanied by John J. McClellan 

Chorus L. D. S. U. Quartette 

Selection Schettler Trio 

Baritone Solo Alvin Keddington 

Tenor Solo Alfred Best 

Contralto Solo Evangeline Thomas 

Congregational hymns and special choral numbers, the most 
beautiful being the ''Bridal of the Birds." and the "Pilgrim's 
Chorus," were interspersed throughout the meetings. 

Three genealogical classes were held at 4 :30 p. m. Friday 
and Saturday, and Monday, at which there was a large and 
appreciative attendance. These classes were taught by Elder 
Nephi Anderson, assisted by Sisters Susa Young Gates and 
Lillian Cameron. The subject matter was a Review of Family 
Group Forms. Numbering, Heirship and Relationship. There 
was a general feeling that the lessons for the coming year 
should cover the same ground taken in the past year, in a 
slower and more detailed manner. A few stakes, notably 
Ogden and Utah, have completely finished the outline already 
given, and are ready for new material. But the rest of the 
stakes desire more time and more careful consideration of the 
lessons already given. 

A meeting of stake officers was held on Tuesday at noon 
to discuss our new insurance work. It was decided to send out 
a qualified agent from this board to assist the stakes in getting 
this work started. It was urged upon all the stakes to appoint 
insurance agents at once in every town, at least, so that they 
may be prepared to go to work at once. If our agent is desired 
Stake Presidents should acquaint the General Secretary with 
that fact. 

The usual noon luncheon was served and the same fellow- 
ship, and sweet comradeship that marks all Relief Society work, 
attended every meeting and parting of this splendid conference 
of October, 1914. President Emmeline B. Wells was in her 
happiest mood, and she was ably assisted and sustained by her 
counsellors and the members of the board. We had the Presi- 
dent of the Church with us. and he was filled with the spirit of 
inspiration and encouragement. All in all, it was a conference 
long to be remembered. 

AMY BROWN LYMAN, General Secretary. 



14 RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 

NOTICE. 

All Presidents of Stakes are urged to take up the subscrip- 
tions to our new magazine at once. "We have the full subscrip- 
tions of only two states as yet, and it is vitally important that 
we should have every Stake fully represented and in our office 
as soon as possible. Please take up this work, dear fellow- 
workers, in the genuine whole-hearted manner that all our 
Relief Society work is done. 

RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE. 

All communications relating to the general business of the 
Relief Society should be addressed to the General Secretary, 
Mrs. Amy Bro'wn Lyman, 28 Bishop's Building, Salt Lake City. 

All communications containing membership dues or gen- 
eral funds should be sent to the General Treasure^, Mrs. Emma 
A. Empey, 28 Bishop's Building, Salt Lake City. 

All communications containing subscriptions to the Relief 
Society Magazine or relating in any way to the business of the 
Magazine should be addressed to Mrs. Janette A. Hyde, Busi- 
ness Manager Relief Society Magazine, 28 Bishop's Building, 
Salt Lake City. 

All literary contributions should be addressed to Mrs. Susa 
Young Gates, Editor, room. 28, Bishop's Building, Salt Lake 
City, Utah. 

RELIEF SOCIETY AND YOUNG LADIES MUTUAL 
CAFETERIA. 

We are pleased to note the fact that the Salt Lake City 
Stake Relief Society and Young Ladies Mutual Improvement 
have joined in a commendable effort to provide a quiet cafe- 
teria for busy women at the Old Social Hall on State street, 
where excellent food, well cooked — the writers bear testimony 
to the cooking — is served daily. Prices low, five and tea cents 
only for each article. Rest rooms above in the Art Gallery are 
also provided. Success to the cafeteria. 

OUR ADVERTISERS. 

We desire to call the intimate attention of all our readers — 
and they number tens of thousands — to the business firms 
which have advertised in these pages. We have sought the 
patronage of the best firms only, the highest class dealers in this 
community. Those ,who have stood loyally by the Relief 
Society should in turn receive the loyal and hearty support of 
every member of the Society. We urge this upon one and all. 
THE RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN COMMITTEE. 



RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN. 15 

RELIEF SOCIETY NURSE SCHOOL 



The Presidency and General Board of the Relief Society 
announce that the next class in the Relief Society Nurse School 
will commence Monday, September 21, 1914, and continue eight 
months, in Salt Lake City. Dr. Margaret C. Roberts will be 
the instructor. 

It is requested that the Stake Presidents will at once con- 
sult with their Ward Presidents for the purpose of selecting 
intelligent and energetic women of suitable age and of good 
moral character to take this course in nursing. 

We sincerely trust that members of the Relief Society 
realize the value and necessity of this Course of Nursing, as it 
is a fact that 95 per cent of the inhabitants of our country 
cannot afford to pay the price of a graduate, hospital nurse, 
and yet our sick of the masses should receive trained and 
skilful nursing. 

We can also recommend this course in nursing as a much- 
needed part of every young woman's education. 

The tuition for the course will be $20.00, and it is ex- 
pected that the Relief Society organization in each ward will 
pay the tuition fee for their representatives. However, any 
student who wishes to pay the tuition herself may do so, if she 
is willing to accept and sign the Relief Society Nurse Contract, 
as published in the July Bulletin, page 14. 

For full particulars write Clarissa S. Williams, 37 North 
West Temple, or Dr. Margaret C. Roberts, 79 C street. Salt Lake 



THOMAS HULL ELI.JAH A. LARKIN 

GEO. W. LARKIN ALMA J. LARKIN 

LARKIN-HULL 

UNDERTAKING CO. 

EMBALMERS AND 
FUNERAL DIRECTORS. 

CHAPEL & PARLORS 255 SO. 2nd EAST ST. 
Phone Wasatch 5132 SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH 



16 RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN. 

Relief Societies' Headquarters 

For Approved Garments and Ladies' 
Utah Made Dress Goods. 

Postage Prepaid and Samples Sent on Request. 

CUTLER^S, 36 Main Street 

SCRACE'S BAKERY 
and CAFE 

Fresh Bread, Cakes and Pastry Daily 

Headquarters for Relief Society Visitors. 
A GOOD PLACE TO EAT. 

E. L. SAUNDERS, Prop. 
Phone Wasatch 1230. 24 So. MAIN STREET 



THE I 

UTAH STATE 

NATIONAL 

BANK 

SALT LAKE CITY 
UTAH 



It is the pur= 
pose of this 
Bank at all 
times to ren= 
der helpful ser= 
vice, and make the 
handling of your bank- 
ing business satisfac- 
tory and pleasant. 

Utah State National Bank 

Your Account is Cordially Invited 

.JOS. F. SMITH, Pres. 



ICE CREAM— SHERBETS— PUNCHES 
and CANDIES are the "BEST BY TEST" 

Special prices to all Ward and School Socials etc. 

TWO STORES 55 Main St. 260 State St. 

Prompt Delivery Phones:. Wasatch 3223—3224 



Two Packages —One Quality 

"Four-in-One" 



No housewife should 
style herself partic- 
ular or exactinsf who 



FOUR CUBES 



doesn't use 

"Blanchard" 



OME PRIXT 



Jensen's Butters 



W. N. Williams, Supt. Clarissa S. Williams, Sec'y & Treas R. N. Wilson. Asst. Supt 

Guaranteed Furniture at Lowest Prices 

Our magnificent stock comprises goods from America's 
most representative lines and our prices are always reasonable. 

Carpets, Rugs, Draperies, Linoleum, Ranges, 
Heaters, Qo=Carts, Etc. 

Home Furnishings of a,ll descriptions for 

CASH OR CREDIT 

Co-op. Furniture Co. 

Next Door South of Z. C. M. I. 

BURIAL CLOTHES 
Relief Society General Board 

FURNISHES COMPLETE BURIAL SUITS 

Address JULINA L. SMITH, 

Phone Wasatch 207. 67 South Temple Street 

Salt Lake City Utah 




A Qrafonola 
for the Ward 

$25 Upward 
$10 Cash— $5 a Mo. 

Play over in your Ward House 
records of the singing of the 
famous TABERNACLE CHOIR 

Also any records you want for 
any occasion — dance — popular — 
sacred, etc. 



Older than the State of Utah 



Wrtte for Catalogue and FREE calendar. 



When you buy a Diamond 

of McCONAHAY 

you don't spend the money 

you save it. 

64 MAIN ST., Salt Lake City. 

$22 and up 



We are prepared to supply you with 
all books recommended for 

RELIEF SOCIETY CLASSES 

ALSO ALL RELIEF SOCIETY BLANKS, 

BLANK BOOKS and RECORDS 

DESEBET NEWS BOOK STORE 

LEADING BOOK CONCERN 
No. 6 MAIN STREET 



ASK YOUR DEALER FOR 

Z. C. M. I. School Shoes 

They keep the Children's feet warm and dry. 

Our RANCHO SHOES 

Will stand the ammonia of 
the barn yard. 

"MOUNTAIN" and "THE 
LEADER" Ov-eralls don't rip. 




Star Printing Company 

35 Post Office Place Phone Wasatch 1370 

Salt Lake Citi^, Utah 



Charlton's 

CLOAK & SUIT CO. 

Up=to=Date Styles 

for Ladies and 

Misses. 

This ad. will redeem 10 per cent on purchase at regular price 

Moved to 242 South Main Street 



Marion Banks 

FINE 

Millinery 

AT REASONABLE PRICES 

GOODWIN CORSETS 



LIFE INSURANCE 
and the RELIEF SOCIETY 

Two Great Institutions working in the same great 
cause — the service and comfort of humanity. 

Life Insurance pro- 
vides against poverty 
and want and distress. 
If more of our people 
provided life insurance 
for their families the 
burden of the Relief 
Society workers would 
be made ligfhter. 





JOHN C. CUTLER 
1st. Vice President. 




LORENZO N. STOHL 
2nd. Vice Pres. & Mgr 



The 
Beneficial 

Has 

Insurance 

of over 

$14,000,000 



C. W. NIBLEY 
Member Ex. Com. 



JOEPH F. SMITH 
President. 

Beneficial Life 
Insurance Co. 

Home office, Vermont 

BuildinjD- 
. Salt Lake City, Utah 




RICHARD .> . VOUNG 
Counsel 



Beneficial Agents everywhere will 

gladly explain how insurance 
helps you to save, at the same 
time it is protecting yonr family' 



''Western Insurance 
for Western People'' 



Relief Society Bulletin 

Volume 1 December, 1914. Number 12 






Issued by the Officers and Directors of the 

GENERAL BOARD OF THE RELIEF SOCIETY 
1914 



HUMAN SERVICE 

has come to be a consideration of political parties, or social 
organizations, and of educational institutions. 

THE RELIEF SOCIETY 

has been an instrument of human service for moie than half a 
century. It ministers to the immediate material wants of the 
community. It has been pronounced by many students an 
institution for community charity. 

THE UTAH AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

at iyogan aims in a very definite way to make each member 
of society a more capable producer, a better farmer, house- 
wife, tradesman, agricultural engineer, or business man and 
thus aims to eliminate want. Its field of work therefore, 
properly co-operates with the work of relief societies in serv- 
ing the men and women of the State. While its courses are 
distinctly practical, it deals in a broad and fundamental way 
with the basic industries of the State. Liberal instruction Is 
given in the natuicil and physical sciences, in mathematics, 
history, English, economics, literature and languages. 

The College has been slowly built into an embodiment of 
the State's idealism. 



Willes-Horne Drug Company 

News Building, Salt Lake City. 

Our Drug Store Is Complete 

TREATMENT PERFECT. PRICES RIGHT. 

WE SOLICIT YOUR PATRONAGE. 

Prompt Attention to Mail Orders. 



Lambourne Floral Dept. 
EVERYTHING FLORAL. 

DECORATIONS. FUNERAL WORK. Etc., Etc. 



Relief Societies' Headquarters 

For Approved Garments and Ladies' 
Utah Made Dress Goods. 

Postage Prepaid and Samples Sent on Request. 

CUTLER'S, 36 Main Street 




INDEX TO LESSON STATEMENTS. 

PAGE 

Thoughts and Reflections 1 

Editorial — Star of Bethlehem 3 

Work and Business 5 

Genealogy and Testimony 5 

Home-Ethics 7 

Home Gardening for Women 9 

Literature 12 

Art and Architecture 14 

Note 15 

ADVERTISERS' DIRECTORY 



Patronize those who have made it possible for this paper to 

exist. 

1. AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE, Logan, UUh. 

2. WILLES-HORNE DRUG CO., 8 South Main, Salt Lake City. 

3. WHITE SEWING MACHINE CO., 29 W. First South St. Phone 

Was. 5234, Salt Lake City. 

4. L. S. SMITH & BROS., Typewriter, 379, So. Main St., Salt 

Lake City. 

5. S. M. TAYLOR & CO., UNDERTAKERS, 251-259 E. First South 

St., Salt Lake City. 

6. L. D. S. BUSINESS COLLEGE, Salt Lake City. 

7. KEELEY ICE CREAM CO., 555 Main, 260 State Sts., Salt Lake 

City. 

8. LARKIN-HULL UNDERTAKING CO., 255 South 2nd East St.. 

Salt Lake City. 

10. CO-OP. FURNITURE, 35 South Main St., Salt Lake City. 

11. Z. C. M. I., Salt Lake City. 

13. RELIEF SOCIETY BURIAL CLOTHES, Beehive House, Sail 

Lake City. 

14. DESERET NEWS BOOK STORE, 8 Main St., Salt Lake City. 
'5. STAR PRINTING CO., 35 P. O. Place, Salt Lake City. 

16. CUTLERS, 36 S. Main St., Salt Lake City 

17. BENEFICIAL LIFE INSURANCE CO., Vermont Building, Salt 

Lake City. 

18. McCONAHAY, THE JEWELER, 64 Main St., Sa't Lake City. 

19. UTAH STATE NATIONAL BANK, Salt Lake City. 

20. DAYNES-BEEBE MUSIC CO., 45 S. Main, Salt Lake City. 

21. JENSEN CREAMERY COMPANY, Salt Lake. 

22. MARION BANKS, Millinery, and Charlton's Suit & Cloak Co., 321 

So. Main, Salt Lake. 

23. SCRACE'S BAKERY, 24 S. Main, Salt Lake City. 



Ball Bearings Give Greater Speed and Stability to the 

L. C. Smith & Bros. Typewriter 

0^^^^^^^^^«^^^fev f^f'C^"''^ of l)all bearing typebars. the keys 

fcjfrj^'^^l^j^^ffM^Qr^ respond as readily as perfect piano keys. 

^S^^HMM^^^^Hr \ The capital shift works with equal ease — no 

A^^^^^^^^^^fl fsbifting the light type bar segment, thus 

^^BPBMm Another advantage— this machine is com- 

^^B^^ gS^^ ^St Salafe plete in itself for all kinds of work: tabu- 
paper as narrow as a postage stamp. 
WRITE FOR CATALOGUE 

To L. C. SMITH & BROS. TYPEWRITER CO. 

379 SO. MAIN STREET Salt Lake City. Utah 

Established 1860 Incorporated 1908 

S. M. TAYLOR & CO. 

UNDERTAKERS AND 
EMBALMERS 

Successors to 

JOSEPH E. TAYLOR 

The Pioneer Undertaker of the West 
53 years in one location 

251=253=255=257 East First South St. 
Salt Lake City, Utah 

MODERN METHODS COM P LET K EQUIPMENT 

EFFK^JENT SERVICE 

A SUCCESSFUL COLLEGE GROWS 

In one year our increase has been forty per cent. 

L D. S. BUSINESS COLLEGE 

SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH 
Day Sessions Night Sessions 

seven dollars a month four dollars a month 



RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 

ORGAN OF THE WOMAN'S RELIEF SOCIETY OF THE 
CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS 

Vol. I. December, 1914. No. 12 

Editok Mrs. Sdsa Young:Qat»b 

Business Manager Mrs. Janette A. Htdi 

Assistant Manager Mrs. Amy Brown Ltmak 

Advisory Committee 

Mrs. Clarissa S. Williams Mrs. Julina L. Smith Mrs. Rebecca N. Nibuit 



Publishers and Proprietors General Board of the Relief Society 

Office Room 28 Bishop's Building, Salt Lake City 

One Dollar a Year Ten Centaja Copy 

■■tered a* 8econd-eIas« matter oa February 18, 1914, at the Peat 04n«a 
at Salt Lake City, Utah, under the Act of 31 arch 3, 1879. 



THOUGHTS AND REFLECTIONS. 

As the year draws to its close, we naturally turn to con- 
template the past and to consider what has been accomplished 
worthy of merit or to be remembered as contributing to the 
general good of the world, or the people at large, and whether 
the year has been one of growth, in the larger sense, for man- 
kind. 

In looking back this year we cannothelp feeling that every 
other consideration falls into insignificance in view of the un- 
called for and totally unnecessary war in which Europe is in- 
volved, and which surpasses in cruelty and horror any war 
since modern civilization began. In this terrible conflict the 
ambition of kings and rulers has surely reached its climax. 
Upon the slightest pretext, the horrid enginery and agencies 
of bloodshed have been set in motion, battle has been forced 
upon friendlj" nations, and countries whose dreams and labors 
were all directed along the lines of universal peace have been 
compelled, in order to save their honor and their life, to take up 
the sword. 

Who is to answer for the lives lost in the conflict and the 
widows and orphans, whose sufferings must be beyond de- 
scription? Who is to still the prayers, tears and entreaties 
which avail so little against armed hosts, called into battle 
under orders from their leaders, whom they must obey? 



2 RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 

The lines of Kipling's poem continually force, themselves 
into the mind: 

"Lord God of Hosts, be with us yet, 
Lest we forget, lest we forget!" 

Alas, there is no fear now of our forgetting — it would be 
a relief indeed could we but forget the awful situation across 
the sea. But this is a relief impossible to those whose hearts 
are filled with pity and compassion. The dreadful spectre of 
bloodshed and carnage leaves neither peace nor rest in the 
minds of those who love their fellow men, and whose aim and 
struggle has been to bring about an era when «v^ar should be 
known no more. 

However, though our hearts bleed because of the desola- 
tion and strife, yet we should remember that there is a God in 
Heaven, who watches over all, and put our trust in Him, know- 
ing of a surety that He doeth all things well. We should not 
be forgetful of the peace in our own land of promise, for we 
all know that America is the promised land, choice above all 
others. It is cause for gratitude that we as a nation are at 
peace with all the world; for though Mexico, our southern 
neighbor, has been and continues to be disturbed, there is no 
need for anxiety on our part except by way of sympathy with 
those who are being troubled and injured. As a nation we for- 
tunately still seem free from any entanglement or participation 
in the unhappy conditions existing beyond the Rio Grande. 

The Latter-day Saints, as a people, have every reason to 
rejoice in the prosperity that has been showered upon them 
this year, especially in vegetation and fruits, the cattle upon 
a thousand hills, the sheep, and every living thing that adds to 
the support and sustenance of the people who inhabit these 
mountain vales. Great things are expected of this peculiar 
people, and they should keep in mind the counsel given by our 
leaders in days past and present, concerning the fulfillment of 
prophecies, when those who are in trouble and in want will 
flee to Zion for assistance. We who know these things and be- 
lieve them, should be active and diligent, and on the alert at all 
times, making preparations for the fulfillment of prophecy, 
that the people may not be taken unawares, but be ready for 
emergencies with our lamps trimmed and burning. 

In these perilous and distracting times, great wisdom 
should be exercised by those who teach among the sisters in 
the Church. They should be careful and wise in giving advice, 
seeking diligently in prayer for the spirit of the Lord to guide 
them in all their sayings and doings, and duly recognize those 
who preside over them in the Relief Society. Our organization is 
expected to be in perfect harmony with the Priesthood in each 



RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 3 

locality; and if this is done, there is safety for all, and no 
danger of getting wrong ideas on any subject. Pride, says 
the Scripture, goeth before a fall, and the warning is a true 
one. Humility is one of the noblest attributes of human char- 
acter, and it will bring down upon its possessor the blessings of 
Heaven. Finally, in view of the dire condition of the world 
today and the events about to transpire in the near future, it 
behooves us as women of Zion to set an example of excellence 
to all the world ; having that true charity that never faileth, 
exercising at all times wisdom, in season and out of season ; and 
in all respects ordering our lives and conduct in accordance 
with our high profession as Latter-day Saints. 

EMMELINE B. WELLS. 



EDITORIAL. 
STAR OF BETHLEHEM. 



Into the eastern heavens, there shines today the first faint 
glimmer of that star or comet which astronomers tell us shone 
over the cave in Bethlehem. 

It has shone once before when great destructions and 
devastations swept over the earth, in the year 1300 ; and today 
men who study the heavens are questioning the portent of that 
glistening star which may be seen about ten o'clock on clear 
nights, at a point almost directly below the polar star. As the 
night wanes, it arises higher in the heavens, and in the early 
morning, between 2 and 4 o'clock, it reaches its greatest alti- 
tude above the horizon. Scholars are asked if this world-war 
be not the battle of Armageddon, referred to in the 16th chap- 
ter of the Book of Revelations. Astronomers have been fore- 
casting for years the coming of this star. One prophesy which 
was made by a monk named Brother Johannes, in the year 
1600, written in Latin, is translated into the French papers 
of the present day. 

Says Prof. Sothnos Latillier : 

This is the predestined year in which the Star of Bethlehem r*- 
appears in the heavens to herald the battle of Armageddon. Already 
in the evening skies the star, which is really a comet, is dimly dis- 
cernible, and as the titanic conflict now raging reaches its climax it 
will be visible to all eyes. 

We know what events happened in the year when the Star of 
Bethlehem first appeared, and we know what has happened on every 
appearance of the star since then. Can we doubt that the mighty 
events of this year are connected with its return? 

Will any reasonable man question that this world-war is the battl« 
of Armageddon foretold in the Bible, in the 16th chapter of the Book 
of Revelation? 



4 RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 

Truly, my beloved sisters, we are on the threshold of great 
events. The Star of Bethlehem shines over every cradle and 
threshold in this present year. 

As it was in the days of Noah, so it is in these days which 
are so near the ooming of Christ. We are busy with the tem- 
poral things of the Kingdom ; we are giving gifts and making 
merry, Avhen our thoughts should rather dwell on the solemni- 
ties of the eternities which are understood only by the Latter- 
day Saints. 



One year is a very short, or a very long time. It is one 
year ago since the General Board of the Relief Society pre- 
pared outlines of study, and one year ago since they decided 
to publish a monthly Bulletin which should contain these les- 
sons and some other notes. Those who have received the 
Bulletin are the best judges as to the success or failure of this 
experiment. 

This is the month in which we celebrate the nativity of 
Christ, and although we are reasonably certain he was born in 
April, and not in December, still we join with the Christian 
world in making the 25th of December a memorial day to our 
worshipped Savior and Redeemer. 

When we go to lay our gifts on the altar of the future, as 
did the wise men in the cave of Bethlehem, we are minded to 
question ourselves as to the value and potency of those gifts. 

When I see a mother with a babe at her breast, to whom 
she has given the gift of a body, through her own body ; when 
I see a father's loving arms around the shoulders of his grow- 
ing sons; when I see a teacher forming character in the little 
students gathered about her desk, when I see a man cheerfully 
relinquishing a coveted prize that another may profit thereby; 
when I see our leaders giving of themselves withiut stint nor 
withholding in their labors of guidance and wise direction 
amongst people ; when I see the women of the Relief Society 
trudging about the snowy streets with their gifts for the poor, 
and their words of encouragement for all, when I see men and 
women going down into the waters of baptism to bring their 
kindred dead out from their prison houses, — when I see all of 
these things, then I say, these noble men and women all have 
gifts of inestimable value to lay at the feet of the Babe of 
Bethlehem, and I ask myself, are any of these gifts mine to 
give? 



RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN S 

What have I done for the sick, the poor, the tempted, the 
tried, the widow and orphan, the weak and erring, or for the 
spirits in prison? Have I saved a soul, or have I fed and nour- 
ished a starving body, or administered to a hungry spirit? 
If I have, then these are my gifts of frankincense and myrrh. 

I know a good woman Avho has gathered over $-400 to dis- 
tribute to the destitute Saints in the European missions 
through President Hyruni M. Smitli. Many of the givers of 
these gifts were poor widows themselves, struggling and al- 
most destitute, but they have gladly denied themselves, and 
have appealed to the tender impulses of their friends to use 
their Christmas money in thus relieving the wants of our own 
Saints in Europe, whose fathers and husbands have gone out 
to this dreadful war. This, indeed, is a work of love and 
charity. Such work and kindred labors will prepare a Christ- 
mas atmosphere that will envelope us all in a robe of love and 
peace. 

What are you giving this Christmas to the Master? 



December— WOKK AI^D BUSINESS— Lesson I. 

"Charity is the pure love of Christ and it endureth for- 
ever; and whoso is found possessed of it at the last day, it 
shall.be well with them."- — Book of Moroni, 7:47. 



December— GENEALOGY AND TESTIMONY— Lesson IL 

Ten minutes talk on Current Events. 

How to Secure More Genealogical Data : 

"For the children of this world are in their generation 
wiser than the children of light." — Luke, 16:8. 

"The greatest responsibility in this world, that God has 
laid upon us, is to seek after our dead. "—Joseph Smith. 

The people of the world have done vastly more in securing 
and preparing their genealogical data than the Latter-day 
Saints have done in utilizing that information and data in their 
temple work. The libraries and printing offices of the world 
are engaged frequently in storing and publishing the family 



6 RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 

histories, and parish and church records, which antiquarians 
in Europe and America have prepared for this purpose. The 
Prophet Joseph Smith has told us that ' ' The greatest responsi- 
bility in this world, that God has laid upon us, is to seek after 
our dead." 

Write to all your relatives at home and abroad for informa- 
tion concerning theirs and your dead relatives. Ask them for 
names and dates, and all historical facts which they can re- 
member or secure. If they do not answer promptly, write 
again, and if they still are dilatory, write again. Always en- 
close a stamped envelope for reply. This is an invariable rule 
in correspondence. Keep on w^riting for information. It 
might be said that one is to write for information as often as 
one is to forgive one's enemy, and that was seventy times 
seven. 

Write the Genealogical Society, Salt Lake City, Utah; 
state your facts and difficulties; ask for information. They 
may not be able to supply it, but you will certainly receive a 
courteous answer. Join the Genealogical Society of Utah. This 
will prove of much help spiritually for you in your work for 
the dead. Truth is truth, whether you believe the truth or 
not. The gospel is true whether you embrace it or not, but if 
you are converted to its truth, and go down into the waters of 
baptism, wonderful powers and gifts and blessings will follow 
your entrance into the Kingdom of God. In like manner, you 
may be converted to the necessity of working for your dead, 
or you may not be. That does not alter the truth or the prin- 
ciple of salvation for the dead, nor lessen the spiritual value 
of membership in the Genealogical Society of Utah. If you 
will take out a membership in that society a flood of genealogi- 
cal light and inspiration and assistance will come to you on 
all sides, and from many hidden sources. Practically speaking, 
your membership in that society at $1 a year entitles you to 
free study in the library, while you secure the services of the 
trained genealogist at a reduction of 40 cents an hour. Your 
subscription to the Genealogical Magazine is, $1.50 a year, if 
you are not a member, and it is only $1 a year, if you are. 

Whatever you do or do not do, be sure to prepare the data 
already in your possession, in the manner indicated in these 
lessons. Group your families in proper form, giving all the 
data obtainable, record sources of information and relations-hip 
to the heir, number them properly and after having written all 
your data in your lead pencil note-book, then copy with ink in 
your record book for temple use. 

If all you who have followed these lessons will take the 
counsel given in this last lesson, we will promise you freely 



RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 7 

that the good spirit will constantly lead your mind to those 
persons and places where you can secure further light and in- 
formation concerning your dead. You may experience diffi- 
culties, you may find obstacles in your path, but if you will 
persist, the angels will assist you, your dead will pray for you, 
and finally, you will achieve such a labor as will crown your 
whole life here and hereafter with perfection and peace. 



December— HOME ETHICS AND GARDENING— Lesson IIL 

Ten minutes talk on Current Events. 

Ethics — The Christmas Spirit: 

Christmas Greeting to our Relief Society sisters. 

Loving thoughts, good will toward all. 

After reading of the birth, life, suffering and death of 
Christ, one cannot fail to appreciate more fully the causes for 
celebrating his birthday. His biography from the night the 
Star appeared in the heavens, when the Shepherds of 
Judea were tending their herds in the vicinity of Bthle- 
hem, down to that period of time when he was betrayed and 
crucified, is one of the saddest, as also, the most interesting 
stories of which poet or historian ever gave us record. It 
touches the heart and awakens the deepest sympathy that frail 
mortal is capable of experiencing. 

Following him through vicissitudes or childhood, we have 
but the meagre accounts of his home life and associations, yet we 
have the rich influences of his association with the poor unfor- 
tunates, his never failing humility and charity, and one is lost 
in reflection. These, together with his humble parentage, the 
want, privation and frugal habits of his life present them- 
selves ; and then we see later how he was besieged by enemies 
and seeming friends, persecuted and scoffed at; yet, how pa- 
tiently he bore the sneers, sarcasms, and unjust taunts of all. 
Grandly living by precept and example, he gloriously died on 
the Cross to save the sinners of the world ; meanwhile pleading 
with his Father for their forgiveness, when he was suffering 
the most excruciating pain at their hands that a human being 
could be called upon to experience. And while the Romans 
would have set him free, and spared his life, and their gov- 
ernor, Pontius Pilate, would have honorably and justly exon- 
erated him, yet his own people, the sons of Judea, cried out, 
^'Let his blood be upon us, he must surely die!" 

When we contemplate these facts, and compare his life 



8 RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 

with our own selfish, careless, and indifferent way of laboring 
and living, we cannot help wishing that we had better improved 
our time, and had shown ourselves more worthy; for Christ's 
life was a good, grand, noble, unselfish and maganimous one ! 
His character was without a blemish; not one single w^rong act, 
deed, wish, or even thought, marred the purity of its whiteness. 

Therefore, let us never fail to commemorate and celebrate 
his birthday ; let us teach our children to honor and revere his 
name, while we constantly cherish and make indelible the re- 
membrance, of his mission here on earth. 

What an extensive and elaborate definition has this day of 
all other days, to the juvenile mind. It is the one great event 
of the year, and includes untold wonders and unexplained 
pleasures. The brightest dreams of childhood, the most inno- 
cent anticipations of babyhood concentrate upon the coming 
holiday. The Christmas trees and dear old Santa Claus' visit 
to the chimney corner, where hangs the varied-colored and 
many-sized stockings of the anxious little ones, show that these 
feelings are shared by babies all, whether the occupants dwell 
in palace or dreary hovel. 

Then comes the dainty, blushing maiden in her teens, 
along with the comely gallant near her own age, their thoughts 
are all in a flutter, for 'tis not toys and sweetmeats they are 
looking for, but their tastes turn to books, music, painting, 
poetry, etc., aside from the opera, theatre, and ball which they 
anticipate attending at Christmas time during vacation. 

Papa and mama have also their hopes, loves and fond ex- 
pectations. Perhaps there is a neglected or long-forgotten 
life-dream to be again awakened, a chord in the heart once 
more to vibrate in that inner harmony. Christmas is ever an ap- 
propriate period to reunite the members of the home circle ; to 
strengthen the weak, and to banish any little unpleasantness 
that may have disturbed our intercourse in the past. It will 
make us better men and women to extend charity and sym- 
pathy to one another. 

Even on this day, grandpa and grandma come in for their 
full share of consideration. They have their joyous thoughts 
of past happy periods, when their own genial, glowing fireside 
sheltered a host of bright-faced sons and daughters, and who 
now look w^ith pleasure to the coming Merry Christmas, sur- 
rounded by generous, loving, healthy grandchildren w^io, to be 
sure, never forget to pray and send word to Santa Claus to fill 
to the brim their grandparents' stocking with pretty, also use- 
ful presents. 



RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 9 

HOME ETHICS. 

I. Christmas greetings to our Relief Society sisters. 

II. One should read, study and give sincere attention to 
the birth, life, and mission of our Savior. 

III. Follow him through all the different vicissitudes from 
birth until his crucifixion. 

IV. Ater doing this, one can more fully appreciate the 
greatness, beauty, and magnificence of Christ's character. 

V. Why we celebrate this day. 

VI. How the children, old and young, papas and mamas, 
and grandparents, join in its observance. 



HOME GARDENING FOR WOMEN. 

"I am the true vine, and my Father is the Husbandman." 
— John, 15 :1. 

House Plants: Geraniums are the most popular and easiest 
grown of all house plants. They require less attention, a 
moderate heat, and but little moisture, compared with many 
other varieties. This is a very good time of year for starting 
new plants, taking slips from those which have been growing 
in summer gardens. For this, provide a shallow box of sand, 
and place in a dark closet or room, planting the slips in the 
box, keeping it rather cool and moist. They will soon show 
signs of germination, and be ready to transplant into pots. 
Then bring into the warm room and give sunlight. They will 
soon put forth blooms. Have good, thick mountain loam, or 
sandy soil, with good stable manure mixed thoroughly, before 
placing in pots or boxes for use. Always put a few small 
pebbles in the bottom of the pot, then put in the soil, thus as- 
suring proper drainage. 

Mignonette : Can be planted anew by planting fresh seeds 
as you did in the spring, or by taking up the plants from the 
garden, with plenty of dirt around the roots, so they do not 
feel too much disturbed. Place the plants in a cool place for a 
few days. They will soon begin a new life, and continue to 
bloom, giving a dainty fragrance to the whole house. There 
are many who prefer the perfume of mignonette to the fra- 
grance of any other house plant. 

Begonias: There are many varieties and kinds. All are 
beautiful, whether of the blossoming variety or the wonderfully 



10 RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 

ornamental begonias with their variegated leaves. Begonias 
are also easily propagated from slips. They, however, require a 
great deal of moisture and indirect sunlight ; they are like the 
geranium in that they are almost perpetual bloomers, if they 
are of the flowery varieties. 

Fuschias: Once you get a good fuschia plant and give it 
the proper care, study its wants as to light and heat, spraying 
its leaves, etc., you can keep it easily for three or four years, or 
until it grows into a large tree-shaped plant. Fuschias like a 
south window in winter, plenty of moisture and a good tub 
bath once a week. Try the purple Storm King if you are fond 
of fuschias. Give it the treatment and care mentioned above, 
and you will be rewarded with a plant filled with blossoms 
the year round. Treat the slips from fuschias as you would 
geraniums, begonias and other plants. They will bring like 
results. Placing glass over the slips assists their growth and 
helps to retain the moisture in the sand. 

Bulbs: Try the following method of planting bulbs. 
It will be interesting to the children, as they can watch the 
development of the roots, and better understand how things 
mature: Take an ordinary drinking glass or old-fashioned 
spoon-holder or sugar bowl. Place in the glass a piece of cot- 
ton batting about three inches deep, then set in a hyacinth or 
tulip, crocus, or snow-drop bulb. Keep the glass filled with 
sufficient water to cover the cotton. Place in a cool, dark closet 
for ten days ; then bring it out, place in a north or east window 
where there is but little heat or sun, as too much of either will 
cause too rapid a growth. In a few days the roots begin to 
push through the cotton, green leaves shoot up from the top, 
and soon it blossoms. Through the glass the children watch 
the growth of the plants. Let the mother talk to the children 
about plant life. Teach them how to plant and care for flow- 
ers. This will be both instructive and interesting to the wholft 
family, more especially to the children. 

Christmas Trees: There is no other people in all the 
world that makes such extensive preparations for Christmag 
as do the German-speaking people. The poorest of the poor 
have the Christmas tree, with its glittering decorations. Its 
message of good will and friendly wishes for all mankind are 
better understood and more deeply felt by them than by any 
other people. The trees most extensively used are red pine, 
black balsam, red cedar and fir, the red and white pine being 
generally preferred for Christmas trees, on account of the 
symmetry and exquisite beauty of this tree. 



RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 11 

Holly: This is a plant used extensively in America for 
decorative purposes during the Christmas holiday seasons. 

There are several varieties of the shrub, and it is found 
mostly in temperate climates. The leaves are glossy, blossoms 
white, and the fruit mostly a bright scarlet. Holly bears cut- 
ting extensively and this makes it excellent for hedge fences. 
Its wood is white and hard, and it is useful in making knife- 
handles and wood instruments. It grows very extensively in 
the United States and Africa. The state of Oregon produces a 
most beautiful variety, which is shipped by tons into our own 
western cities and states. It is made into wreaths and orna- 
mental designs and sold at Christmas time on our market. 

Mistletoe : This is a parasitic plant growing on many varie- 
ties of plants, especially oak, poplar, ash, apple and other fruit 
trees. There are about 30 varieties. It grows in length from 
two to five feet. Its leaves are oblong, and are of a green yel- 
lowish tint. It is found extensively in the United States and 
Eurasia. The ancient Celtic peoples of Europe and the Druids 
regarded the mistletoe with much veneration. It was thought 
to be very effective in curing diseases, and in preventing sick- 
ness. There are still many old supersitions in Germany and 
Europe regarding the mistletoe, such as kissing under the mis- 
tletoe at Christmas, which is a proof that it is an emblem of 
love. In Europe it is used very extensively for decorative 
purposes during the Yuletide season. 

Potted Plants and Bulbs as Christmas Gifts : While the 
suggestion may be somewhat late for this year's gifts, especially 
if we are depending on giving gifts from our own slips and 
planting, they can be purchased cheaply at florists. We 
should begin e.arly in September and October to have bulbs and 
plants, named and marked for our friends whom we love and 
admire, for Christmas remembrance. A spirit of moderate and 
sensible giving and receiving may be encouraged in this way. 
Chinese lily bulbs planted in small pebbles in an earthen or 
china bowl makes an appropriate gift, and are not expensive, 
andare more lasting than cut flowers. Any kind of bulbs may 
be planted in the same way as the Chinese lilies. Of course, they 
require plenty of water and but little heat, especially at the 
first stages of germination. 



12 RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 

December— LITERATURE— Lesson X. 

(Thirty Minutes.) 
Ten minutes talk on Current Events. 
Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin: 

Subject : Franklin as a Patriot and Statesman. 
Sentiment: "He is a lucky fellow who is made prudent 
by other men's perils." 

1. Franklin represents Pennsylvania in a General Con- 
vention at Albany. (Altemus, pp. 230-233 ; Crowell, pp. 188-191.) 

a. Proposes a plan of union for colonies. 

b. Conventions adopt plan which is later rejected by 
Colonial Assemblies. 

2. Franklin assists Braddock in preparing for his expedi- 
tion against the French and Indians. (Altemus, pp. 238-252 ; 
Crowell, pp. 195-210.) 

3. Franklin takes charge of frontier, builds line of forts. 
(Altemus, pp. 254-260; Crowell, pp. 212-217.) 

4. Franklin sent to England to insist upon the rights of 
the province to tax the proprietors of land, still held under 
the Pennsylvania Charter, for their share of expense in the 
Indian war. (Altemus, pp. 235-236; pp. 252-253; p. 264, Chap. 

'12; Crowell, pp. 193-194; pp. 210-211; pp. 221-222; pp. 228 to 
end.) See introductions to Altemus and Crowell. 

Explanatory: Pennsylvania was founded by Wm. Penn. 
King Charles of England owed Penn's father 16,000 pounds on 
a debt, and settled this account by a grant of wild land in 
America (40,000 square miles), afterwards known as Penn- 
sylvania. The proprietorship of Pennsylvania was hereditary 
in the Penn family. There were other proprietors of land in 
America, and they all objected to paying taxes on their vast 
estates for the defense of the colonies. Franklin was com- 
pletely successful in his mission. (See introductions.) 

5. Positions of trust held by Benjamin Franklin. 

1. Member of City Council. 

2. Alderman. 

3. Justice of Peace. 

4. Clerk of Assembly. 

5. Member of Assembly (elected to this position 

every year for ten years) . 

6. Delegate to Convention at Albany. 

7. Postmaster General of America. 

8. Agent to carry petition to King of England, in- 

sisting on the rights of the province to tax the 
proprietary estates to help defray expense of de- 



RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 13 

fence against Indians. Acts as agent for Massa- 
chusetts, Maryland and Georgia. 
9. Sent on second mission to England by colonies to 
protest against taxation without representation. 

10. Delegate to second Continental Congress. 

11. Member of committee appointed to draw up 

Declaration of Independence. 

12. Special envoy to France to negotiate a treaty of 

alliance. Franklin signed treaty of peace be- 
tween America and England. 

13. Minister to France for nine years. 

14. Elected President of the State of Pennsylvania. 

Twice unanimously re-elected to this office. 

15. Delegate for Pennsylvania to the convention which 

framed the Constitution of the United States. 
(See any American History, and introductions to 
Altemus and Crowell.) 
6. Description of Franklin's reception in France, when he 
went to form a French alliance. 

On his first arrival in Paris, he is thus described : 

"Doctor Franklin, who lately arrived. . .is very much run 

after, and feted. . .by all people who can get hold of him. . . 

this Quaker wears the full costume of his sect. He has an 

agreeable physiognomy, spectacles always on his eyes, but little 

hair,— a fur cap is always on his head. He wears no powder, 

.linen very white, a brown coat make his dress.", 

One of the most famous French women of that time thus 

describes his 'reception, after he became our full minister to 

France : • j i, 

"Elegant fetes were given to Dr. Franklin, who united the 
renown of one of the most skilful naturalists, with the patriotic 
virtues which had made him embrace the noble role of Apostle 
of Liberty. I was present at one of these fetes, where the most 
beautiful of three hundred women was designated to go and 
place on the philosopher's white locks a crown of laurel, and 
to give the old man two kisses on his cheeks." 

QUESTIONS. 

1. What was the object of the Congress at Albany? 

2. Why were the Assemblies opposed to Franklin's plan 

of union? 

3. Why was England opposed to the plan? 

4. If this plan had been universally adopted, what might 
have been the result? 

5. Read and discuss the paragraph on work. (Altemus, 
p. 258; Crowell, pp. 215-216.) 



14 RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN 

6. What was Franklin's scheme to get the soldiers to 
prayers. (Altemus, pp. 2'59-260; Crowell, p. 217.) 

7. Franklin is known as one of the notable figures of the 
world. Why ? 

8. Mention his chief characteristics. 

9. Prove that he was highly intellectual; that he was 
industrious; that he was shrewd; that he was practical; that 
he was versatile beyond almost any other man. 

10. Enumerate the public benefactions of Franklin. (See 
Lessons VIII and IX.) 

11. What can you say of Franklin's style? 

12. In looking back over Franklin's life, which act of his, 
or which quality of his, do you admire most? 

ART AND ARCHITECTURE. 
Our Own John Hafen. 

"And all mine are thine, and thine are mine; and I am 
glorified in them." — Words of Christ. 

Native Country. Conversion to Mormonism. Acceptance 
of the Word of Wisdom in youth. Trials of poverty and hun- 
ger. Ideal of himself and wife. Devotion to his "calling." 
Sudden death on the threshold of success and recognition. 

Reference: Young Woman's Journal, February, 1910. 
John Haf ftn, by Alice Herrill Home ; also Devotees and Their 
Shrines, 41-49. 

Not all individuals meet fame quickly, but Time will 
immortalize the truly great, eventually. The constructive 
type (such as Hafen) will be remembered. The scale of great- 
ness depends upon the measure of soul-sympathy. When you 
study Hafen 's art for sympathy you learn where to place him. 
"Home in Springville" and "Corn Fields," pages 41-45, offer 
two paintings in which even the layman may discover the 
quality of sympathy — artists call it feeling. Here everything 
is built around the thought of home, and the feeling of home 
permeates the whole scheme. The home essence that Hafen 
idealized is lofty, dignified, simple, humble. Now these beauti- 
ful pictures did not just happen, but they sprung from Hafen's 
heart, experience, thought, study, and they have feeling be- 
cause they reflect the inner life of a great soul. They could 
not have feeling if they were photographs from even a beautiful 
scene. Open your books, compare these pictures with a pho- 
tograph until you discover for yourself the difference between 
art and commercial pictures. Feeling is the greatest quality 
a picture can have. It can not be made, but it comes without 
effort from the gifted. There are other Utah artists who paint 



RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN. 15 

with feeling, but our dear Hafen can never paint for us 
again, so it is well for us now to understand what he has done. 
I hope his lessons are not in vain, nor his heroism and fidelity 
forgotten by us. We are glad Hafen has sons. Speed them on 
their toilsome pathway of art. They are doubly blest, for theirs 
also is the gift of a sympathetic mother. The State Fair shows 
canvases by one of Hafen 's sons— but if he would achieve, he, 
too, must begin humbly and keep his humility. 
' (a) Tell of John Hafen 's life. 

(b) Describe his qualities of heart. 

(c) What can you say of his devotion to art? 

(d) What influence did Brigham Young exert on him? 

(e) How did Hafen find his gift? 

(f ) Have you found yours ? 

(g) Why was he true to his gift? 

(h) Why are you seeking to be loyal to yourself and 

what God hath given you? ,c ^ r.. 

(i) If you are not making the most of yourself, why are 

you not? ,. ,„„ 

(j) What could you do to better realize yourselt? 
(k) What could you do for another to foster his or 

her talents? ' ^ . . , , ^^ 

(1) Name some of the talented people in your neighbor- 
Cm) What is a talent or gift, and whence came that gift? 
(Foot note : As this is John Hafen 's day. endeavor to have 

as many pictures by that artist as you can hang m the Reliet 

Society hall during the lesson.) 



NOTE ON GENEALOGICAL LESSON. 

The blanks provided by the temple are intended to be 
used only by persons coming to the temple to perform ordi- 
nances. They should not be used as practice sheets m genea- 
logical class work. . , . ., «?• * +i,« 

The note books, that can be obtained at the office of the 
Genealogical Society, 60 E. So. Temple St., furnish sufficient op- 
portunity for the practice that may be needed to become 
familiar with preparation of forms for temple work. 

Yours very truly. 

RECORDER. 



16 RELIEF SOCIETY BULLETIN. 

THOMAS HULL ELIJAH A. LARKIN 

GEO. W. LARKIN ALMA J. LARKIN 

LARKIN-HULL 

UNDERTAKING CO. 

EMBALMERS AND 
FUNERAL DIRECTORS. 

CHAPEL & PARLORS 255 SO. 2nd EAST ST. 
Phone Wasatch 5132 SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH 

SCRACE'S BAKERY 
and CAFE 

Fresh Bread, Cakes and Pastry Daily 

Headquarters for Relief Society Visitors. 
A GOOD PLACE TO EAT. 

E. L. SAUNDERS, Prop. 
Phone Wasatch 12.30. 24 So. MAIN STREET 



THE I 

UTAH STATE 

NATIONAL 

BANK 

SALT LAKE CITY 
UTAH 



It is the pur= 
pose of this 
Bank at all 
times to ren- 
der helpful ser- 
vice, and make the 
handling of your bank- 
ing business satisfac- 
tory and pleasant. 

Utah StateNational Bank 

Your Account Is Cordially Invited 

JOS. F. SMITH, Pres. 



ICE CREAM— SHERBETS— PUNCHES 
and CANDIES are the "BEST BY TEST" 

Special prices to all Ward and School Socials etc. 

TWO STORES 55 Main St. 260 State St. 

Prompt Deliver}- Phones: Wasatch 3223—3224 

When you buy a Diamond 

of McCONAHAY 

you don't spend the money 

you save it. 

64 MAIN ST., Salt Lake City. 

$22 and up 

W. N. "Williams. Supt. Clarissa S. Williams, Sec'y & Treas R. N. Wilson. Asst. Snp 

Guaranteed Furniture at Lowest Prices 

Our niaji:nificeiit stock comprises groods from America's 
most representative lines anri our prices are always reasonable 

Carpets, Rugs, Draperies, Linoleum, Ranges. 
Heaters, Qo=Carts, Etc. 

Home Furuishinjis of all descriptions for 

CASH OR CREDIT 

Co-op. Furniture Co. 

Next Door South of Z. C. M. I. 

BURIAL CLOTHES 
Relief Society General Board 

FURNISHES COMPLETE BURIAL SUITS 

Address JULINA L. SMITH. 

Phone Wasatch 207. 67 South Temple Street 

Salt Lake Citj^ Utah 



A Qrafonola 
for the Ward 

$25 Upward 
$10 Cash— $5 a Mo. 

Play over in your Ward House 
records of the singing of the 
famous TABERNACLE CHOIK 

Also any records you want for 
any occasion — dance — popular — 
sacred, etc. 

Older than the State of Utah 
Write for Catalogue and FREE calendar. 




"Jensen's"— r/;e Every Meal Butter 

Two Kinds — One Quality. 

"Four-in-One" "Blanchard" 

Four separately wrapped cubes. One standard size print 

Made from the heart of the mountain states' finest cream. 
Pasteurized. Better butter is impossible At triple the price, 
we couldn't make it better. Your grocer will supply you. 

JENSEN CREAMERY CO. 



We are prepared to supply you with 
all books recommended for 



J^ELIEF SOCIETY CLASSES 

ALSO ALL RELIEF SOCIETY BLANKS, 

BLANK BOOKS and RECORDS 

DESERET NEWS BOOK STORE 



LEADING BOOK CONCERN 
No. 6 MAIN STREET 



ASK YOUR DEALER FOR 

Z. C. M. I. School Shoes 

They keep the Children's feet warm and dry. 

Our RANCHO SHOES 



Will stand the ammonia of 
the barn yard. 

''MOUNTAIN" and "THE 
LEADER" Ov^eralls don't rip. 




Star Printing Conipanp 

35 Post Office Place Phone Wasatch 1370 

Salt Lake Citi;, Utah 



Marion Banks 



FINE 



Millinery 

AT REASONABLE PRICES 

GOODWIN CORSETS 



Charlton's 

CLOAK & SUIT CO. 

Up=to=Date Styles 
for Ladies and 
Misses. 



This ad. will redeem 10 per cent on purchase at regular price 

Moved to 242 South Main Street 



LIFE INSURANCE 
and the RELIEF SOCIETY 

Tw I Great Institutions working in the same great 
cause — the service and comfort of humanity. 

Life Insurance pro- 
vides against poverty 
and want and distress. 
If more of our people 
provided life insurance 
for their families the 
burden of the Relief 
Societ}^ workers would 
be made lighter. 





JOHN C. CUTLER 
Ist. Vice President. 




LORENZO N.STOHL 
2ad. Vice Pres. & Mgr 



The 
Beneficial 

Has 

Insurance 

of over 

$11,000,000 



C. W. NIBLEY 
Member Ex. Com. 



JOEPH F. SMITH 
President. 

Beneficial Life 
Insurance Co. 

Home office, Vermont 

Buildinw- 

Salt Lake City, Utah 




Rlv 1. AKi) V .UUiNG 

Counsel 



Beneficial Agents everywhere will ** Western Insurance 

gladly explain how insurance 
helps you to save, at the same 
time it is protecting your family. 



for Western People"