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Full text of "The Relief Society magazine : organ of the Relief Society of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints"

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VOL 38. NO. 1 


Lessons for April 




JANUARY 1951 



THE RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE 

Monthly publication of the Relief Society of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints 

RELIEF SOCIETY GENERAL BOARD 
Belle S. Spafford .__-.. President 

Marianne C. Sharp __.-•- First Counselor 

Velma N. Simonsen - Second Counselor 

Margaret C. Pickering ----- Secretary-Treasurer 

Achsa E. Paxman Leone G. Layton Lillie C. Adams Christine H. Robinson 

Mary G. Judd Blanche B. Stoddard Louise W. Madsen Alberta H. Christensen 

Anna B. Hart Evon W. Peterson Aleine M. Young Nellie W. Neal 

Edith S. Elliott Leone O. Jacobs Josie B. Bay Mildred B. Eyring 

Florence J. Madsen Mary J. Wilson Alta J. Vance Helen W. Anderson 

RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE 

Editor ___------- Marianne C. Sharp 

Associate Editor --------- Vesta P. Crawford 

General Manager --------- Belle S. Spafford 

Vol. 38 JANUARY 1951 No. 1 



(contents 



SPECIAL FEATURES 

A New Year Wish General Presidency of Relief Society 5 

Ernest L. Wilkinson, President of Brigham Young University Ivor Sharp 5 

Award Winners — Eliza R. Snow Poem Contest 10 

Lot's Wife — First Prize Poem Alice Morrey Bailey 11 

Old Home — Second Prize Poem Julia M. Nelson 12 

Pioneer Wagon Wheels — Third Prize Poem Ruth Horsley Chadwick 13 

Award Winners — Annual Relief Society Short Story Contest 15 

"But Covet Earnestly" — First Prize Story Mirla Greenwood Thayne 16 

Polio Strikes Again 37 

Pioneering in the Big Horn Basin Botilda Berthelson McBlain 39 

FICTION 

A Christmas Gift for Teacher Fae Decker Dix 23 

GENERAL FEATURES 

Sixty Years Ago 28 

Woman's Sphere Ramona W. Cannon 29 

Editorial: The Old and the New Vesta P. Crawford 30 

New Serial ("For the Strength of the Hills") to Begin in February 31 

Notes to the Field Relief Society Assigned Evening Meeting of Fast Sunday in March 32 

Bound Volumes of 1950 Relief Society Magazines, 32; Award Subscriptions 
Presented in April, 32; Relief Society Not a Selling Agent, 33; Pictures of all 
General Presidents of Relief Society Now Available, 33. 

Notes From the Field: Relief Society Socials, Bazaars, and Other Activities 

General Secretary-Treasurer, Margaret C. Pickering 43 

From Near and Far 72 

LESSON DEPARTMENT 

Theology: "The Long Night of Apostasy" Don B. Colton 50 

Visiting Teacher Messages: "And Jesus Answering Saith Unto Them . . ." .Mary Grant Judd 54 

Work Meeting: Pictures, Mirrors, and Wall Accessories Christine H. Robinson 55 

Literature: Oliver Goldsmith Britant S. Jacobs 57 

Social Science: The Role of Ancient Israel Archibald F. Bennett 63 

Music: Theories Underlying Singing, Accompanying, and Conducting Florence J. Madsen 67 

FEATURES FOR THE HOME 

A Gingerbread House Phyllis Snow 34 

The Low Cost of Happiness Caroline Eyring Miner 40 

From Commode Into Buffet Rachel K. Laurgaard 41 

Crocheting Keeps Her Busy and Happy Rosella F. Larkin 42 

POETRY 

The Heart Will Find It — Frontispiece Dorothy J. Roberts 4 

"Boys Are Dear," by Christie Lund Coles, 22; "Letter From a Daughter," by Clara Laster, 22; 
"Rosemary," by Margery S. Stewart, 31; "The Wild Geesa Fly," by Marvin Jones, 33; "Pro- 
gress," by Anges Just Reid, 36; "The Dying Year," by Beatric K. Ekman, 38; "Sketches," by 
Evelyn Fjeldsted, 40; "Recompense," by Matia McClelland Burk, 40; "Mirror, Mirror," by Mabel 
Jones Gabbott," 49; "My Choice," by Marion W. Garibaldi, 71; "My Child," by Marylou Shaver, 
71; "Within My Heart," by Grace Sayre, 71. 



PUBLISHED MONTHLY BY THE GENERAL BOARD OF RELIEF SOCIETY 

Editorial and Business Offices: 28 Bishop's Building, Salt Lake City 1, Utah, Phone 3-2741: Sub- 
scriptions 246; Editorial Dept. 245. Subscription Price: $1.50 a year; foreign, $2.00 a year; 
payable in advance. Single copy, 15c. The Magazine is not sent after subscription expires. No 
back numbers can be supplied. Renew promptly so that no copies will be missed. Report change 
of address at once, giving old and new address. 

Entered as second-class matter February 18, 1914, at the Post Office, Salt Lake City, Utah, under 
the Act of March 3, 1879. Acceptance for mailing at special rate of postage provided for in 
section 1103, Act of October 8, 1917, authorized June 29, 1918. Manuscripts will not be returned 
unless return postage is enclosed. Rejected manuscripts will be retained for six months only. 
The Magazine is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts. 




"VTES, you are invited to accept 
1 ANY THREE of the books 
shown on this page for only $1.89, 
with membership in the Family 
Reading Club. Founded to select 
and distribute books which are 
WORTHWHILE. INTERESTING 
and ENTERTAINING without 
being objectionable, the Family 
Reading Club is just what you have 
been looking for! Each month pub- 
lishers submit books they believe will 
meet the Family Reading Club 
standards. Our Editors then select 
the book they can recommend most 
enthusiastically to members. These 
are books which EVERY MEMBER 
OF YOUR FAMILY CAN READ 
— books to read with pleasure and 
retain in your home library with 
pride. 

HOW MEMBERS SAVE 50% 

There is no charge for membership 
in the Family Reading Club beyond 
the cost of the books themselves. 
You pay only $1.89 each (plus 
postage and handling) for the books 
you purchase after reading the book 
review magazine which will come 
to your home each month. It is not 
necessary to purchase a book every 
month — you may accept as few 
as four each year to retain your 
membership. And you will receive 
a wonderful new "Bonus" Book 
FREE for each four selections you 
take. 

Thus, the purchase of books through 
the Club for only $1.89 each ~ in- 
stead of the publishers' regular re- 
tail prices of $2.50 to $4.00 — saves 
you 25% to 35% of your book dol- 
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Join Now — Send No Money 

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Membership Gifts, and one as your 
first selection — for only $1.89! 
Send no money, just mail the cou- 
pon today. However, as this un- 
usual offer may be withdrawn at 
any time, we urge you to mail the 
coupon NOW! 

FAMILY READING CLUB 
MINEOLA, NEW YORK 



Funk & Wagnalls STANDARD BIBLE 
DICTIONARY— An indispensable aid 
to a full understanding of the 
Scriptures. Contains authoritative 
information •about persons, places 
and things mentioned in the Bible. 
965 pages. Publisher's edition, $3.95. 

ROOM FOR ONE MORE By A n n a 

Perrott Rose — A true story about 
a woman, her husband and their 
three children — and how they 
opened their home to three waifs 
who had never before known the 
joy of a family circle. Publisher's 
edition, $2.75. 

FAMILY BOOK OF FAVORITE 
HYMNS By Authur Austin — The 
words and music to more than 100 
hymns Americans love most. In- 
cludes short commentaries about 
each. Color illustrations by George 
Louden, Jr. Publisher's edition, 
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THE GREATEST STORY EVER TOLD 

By Fulton Oursler — A reverent 
and faithful retelling of the sublime 
story of Jesus, bringing Him and 
those whose lives were entwined 
with His excitingly close to you. 
Publisher's edition, $2.95. 

UNTIL THE DAY BREAK By Sallie 
Lee Bell — This is a stirring story 
of Palestine at the time of Christ 
— of beautiful Mara, who was con- 
tent to be a slave until she learned 
the real meaning of love! Pub- 
lisher's edition, $2.75. 



AMERICA COOKS By The Browns 
~ Contains over 1600 recipes — the 
finest of each of the 48 states — 
from old-fashioned favorites to 
brand-new taste delights! Crystal- 
clear directions keep you from go- 
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$2.49. 







MAIL COUPON NOW! 

FAMILY READING CLUB, Dept. 1-RSM 
MINEOLA, NEW YORK 

Please send me the three books I have checked below as my Member- 
ship Gift Books and first selection, and bill me only $1.89 (plus de- 
livery) for all three. 

□ New Standard Bible Dictionary □ The Greatest Story Ever Told 
Q Room for One More □ Until the Day Break 

□ Family Book of Favorite Hymns Q America Cooks 

Also enroll me as a member of the Family Reading Club and send 
me, each month, a review of the Club's forthcoming selection. I have 
the' privilege of notifying you in advance if I do not wish to accept 
any selection, or whether I wish to purchase any of the alternate 
books offered — at the special members' price of only $1.89 each 
(plus postage and handling). There are no membership dues or 
fees and I may accept as few as four selections or alternates during 
the coming twelve months. As a member, I will receive a free Bonus 
Book with each four Club selections or alternates I accept. 



Mr. 
Mrs 

Miss 

Address. 



City. 



(Please Print) 



.Zone State 



Age, if f Same price in Canda: 105 Bond St., Toronto 2 "I 

Under 21 L Offer good only in the U. S. A. and Canada. J 




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THE RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE 

VOL 38, NO. 1 JANUARY 1951 



Jx flew LJear vi/tsk 



The approaching year 1951 sails from the horizon freighted with fears 
and blessings, with despair and joy, and each person will unload from its 
cargo that portion which he chooses for his own. Moreover, each indi- 
vidual may lay hold an anchor to his soul which will keep him from drift- 
ing to his destruction onto the shoals of unbelief and unrighteousness. 

Ether describes this anchor in these* words: 'Therefore whoso be- 
lieveth in God might with surety hope for a better world . . . which hope 
cometh of faith, making an anchor to the souls of men." 

It is the wish of the general board that, during the year 1951, service 
in Relief Society may strengthen Latter-day Saint women, "'making them 
sure and steadfast, always abounding in good works, being led to glorify 
God/' This service will return to bless the giver and will increase her hope 
and faith to forge an anchor to weight her soul in the stream of eternal life. 

May the New Year bring these rich blessings and joy to all Relief 
Society members. 



Affectionately, 

Belle S. Sp afford 
Marianne C. Sharp 
Velma N. Simonsen 
General Presidency 



j=g*g=i *=^*§=* E= *r§=' 



oJhe uieart vi/iU (yind S/i 



t 



Doiothy J. Roberts , 

There should be, always, some rich echo stored 
Within the spirit's vault as flaming dower, 
Some golden fruitage of a season kept 
As sustenance saved for a darkened hour. 

There is one long, unbroken thoroughfare 
From grace to grace forever for such eyes; 
The heart will find it, if it has not yet, 
The heart, grown glad, will learn it— and be wise. 

Then shall beauty have no death nor end, 
For when the autumn fades there is the dream, 
The lucent amber threaded on the mind, 
The coral heaped as by the canyon stream. 

Memory can bridge the winter's white abyss 
And stir the flame still embered in its sight, 
The little space till glory shall return 
In some new guise, and all the land be bright. 



The Cover: Cabin at Jackson Hole, Wyoming, Photograph by Ray Loomis. 
Cover Design by Evan Jensen. 



Ernest L. Wilkinson, President 
of Brigham Young University 

Ivor Sharp 
Executive Vice-President, Radio Service Corporation of Utah (KSL — KSL-TV) 



ONE cannot work with Ernest 
L. Wilkinson without recog- 
nizing and appreciating his 
great ability. Also, one is soon im- 
pressed with the meticulous and 
scholarly way he goes about his 
work, with the vast amount of 
energy that he puts into it, and the 
steady way he moves forward with 
dogged determination, plowing into 
the furrow behind him all of the 
disappointments and discourage- 
ments that may have beset his ef- 
forts. And, quickly, one will ob- 
serve that here is a man who places 
his Church obligations first; a per- 
son never too busy for Church serv- 
ice. 

To set aside for a later day a meas- 
ure of worldly success that might be 
had today; to postpone home com- 
forts comparable to those enjoyed 
by one's friends; to curtail enter- 
tainment and to stand with a tiny 
group in a great city for a cause, 
takes faith, courage, and the will-to- 
do— all essential qualities of leader- 
ship. Ernest L. Wilkinson did 
that. In so doing, he was sustained 
by a small group of friends who did 
likewise, but none of them gave 
more generously of time, ability, 
means, and energy. And in the 
background he had the full support 
of his wife, Alice Ludlow Wilkin- 
son. Alice, loved and respected by 
all her associates, moved with quiet 
and gentle dignity. Endowed with 
an unusual intellect and devoted to 



her Church, she kept their home in 
good order, joined her husband in 
Church service, and serenely and 
cheerfully met each day with calm 
assurance. 

In those New York days President 
Wilkinson was associated with the 
law firm of Charles Evans Hughes, 
then Chief Justice of the United 
States Supreme Court. He had been 
selected for a position in this firm 
on the basis of his excellent record 
at Harvard Law School. He had 
earned and won the right to test his 
legal ability in company with men 
standing high in that profession. 
And if he were to succeed, he would 
do so by reason of his own ability 
and strength of character; there was 
no one supporting him for any oth- 
er reason. During those years and 
all the years since, he worked each 
day and well into the night. Often 
he undertook assignments that oth- 
ers considered too unlikely of suc- 
cess. The four legal cases involv- 
ing claims for settlement from the 
United States Government to cer- 
tain Ute Indian tribes were under- 
taken by him after others had de- 
cided the prospects too improbable. 

For over fifteen years Ernest L. 
Wilkinson fought in behalf of his 
Indians. He was facetiously referred 
to as "that Indian man." His great- 
est trial during that period was that 
of staving off discouragement. And 
anyone closely associated with Presi- 
dent Wilkinson will understand 

Page 5 



RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— JANUARY 1951 



that days are very dark indeed when 
he despairs. Many times he would 
be seen briefly in Salt Lake City, 
when he was hurrying to or from 
some Indian reservation. In Wash- 
ington he was ever working and 
rushing; his office seemed literally 
bulging with work and activity. 
Into those cases on behalf of the 
Indians he poured his full ability, 
his vast source of energy, and 
practically all of his own resources, 
excepting only that part of his life 
always reserved for his Church. 

The magnitude, as well as the im- 
portance, of the decision recently 
handed down by the Court may 
better be understood from the fol- 
lowing: 

i. The Court awarded final judgments 
in the four cases aggregating $31,938,473. 
The largest prior final judgment ever 
entered by the United States Court of 
Claims was around $7,000,000 plus in- 
terest. 

2. One hearing in the Court of Claims 
on one of the Ute cases involved over 
11,000 pages of testimony and 23,000 
pages of exhibits. 

3. One of the hearings was the longest 
continuous hearing on trial in the history 
of the United States Court of Claims. 

4. Work on these cases extended over 
a period of more than fifteen years. 

5. Relative to the services of President 
Wilkinson, the Honorable Seth W. Rich- 
ardson, formerly Chairman of the Presi- 
dent's Loyalty Board and now Chairman 
of the Subversive Activities Control Board, 
in testifying before the United States 
Court of Claims recently, stated: 

"Neither you nor I ever had an op- 
portunity to contact human work in the 
profession of the law that compares to 
this case. It is the most extraordinary 
thing I ever saw." 



"IATHEN success comes to one un- 
der such conditions, those on 
the outside, those who have little 
knowledge of what has gone before, 
are prone to be mindful only of the 
moment. To them the disappoint- 
ments, the difficulties, and the dark- 
ness along the way are not under- 
stood. They fail to comprehend 
the sheer tenacity necessary, at 
times, to continue the work; to ap- 
preciate that most of that time, vic- 
tory, if ever to be attained, seemed 
so very far away. To pursue wisely, 
intelligently, relentlessly, doggedly, 
the ramifications of law cases of that 
nature takes the kind of substance 
that only leaders possess. President 
Wilkinson's resolute steadfastness is 
further evidenced by his strict ad- 
herence to principle. No matter 
how great the financial pressure up- 
on him, and most of the time dur- 
ing those "Indian" years and earlier, 
it was heavy indeed, he always found 
a way to pay his tithing. He be- 
lieved in the law of tithing and 
honored it, he had the strength of 
purpose to hold to standards and 
ideals. That is the way he con- 
ducts his life; that manner of living 
explains why he won his cases, why 
he succeeds in doing the things he 
undertakes. 

Accordingly, to those who knew 
him, it was not surprising that when 
a new president of the Brigham 
Young University was to be selected 
the name of Ernest L. Wilkinson 
was soon heard as a possible choice. 
He has always had a love for the in- 
stitution, as has his wife, Alice; and 
this love they have passed down to 
their children. Their son Ernest L. 
graduated from the "Y" in 1946; 
their daughter Marian, in 1949; a 
daughter Alice Ann is at present a 



ERNEST L WILKINSON 




Photograph by Glogau 

PRESIDENT ERNEST L. WILKINSON AND FAMILY 

Alice Ludlow Wilkinson; Marian; Alice Ann; Douglas (sitting in front); Ernest 
Ludlow, M.D.; David; Dr. Ernest L. Wilkinson. 



student there. President Wilkinson 
has demonstrated his devotion and 
loyalty to the Church; his training 
has prepared him for the great re- 
sponsibility of being President of 
the Brigham Young University. 

"IA7TTH ripening wisdom he ap- 
proaches his task humbly. He 
exhibits a spirit of deep appreciation 
for those who, in the past, have 
served, as well as for those who are 
now serving Brigham Young Uni- 
versity; for all that the faculty and 
others have done to build a great 
institution. Upon the announce- 



ment of his selection as president of 
the University, he made the follow- 
ing statement, which is significant: 

I accept in a spirit of humility and 
with the hope I may be of assistance to 
the great faculty of that institution in 
causing the Brigham Young University to 
fulfill the measure of its destiny. Be- 
cause I am convinced that the ills of the 
world will never be cured by purely po- 
litical action whether that action be trans- 
lated into international pacts, atom 
bombs, burdensome armament, or other- 
wise. 

I welcome the opportunity of returning 
to my alma mater where chief emphasis is 
placed on individual responsibility and 



8 



RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— JANUARY 1951 



righteous living — the only key to person- 
al and international peace. 

I anticipate, barring another world con- 
flagration, that it will not be many years 
until the Brigham Young University will 
have a regular enrollment of around 
10,000 students, who will come from all 
parts of the Christian world. Already over 
fifty per cent of its students come from 
without the State of Utah, nearly every 
State being represented. I will be happy 
to devote my energies to encouraging that 
growth. 



President Wilkinson will work 
with the faculty and with others 
concerned to make the Brigham 
Young University a leader in all 
fields of University training. He 
and Mrs. Wilkinson attended the 
exercises commemorating the 75th 
anniversary of the founding of the 
University held the week of October 
i6 7 1950, and they will move to 
Provo shortly after January 1, 1951. 



a 



[Biographical Ujata 



Birth and Parents: 

Native of Ogden, Utah. Born May 4, 1899, to Robert Brown and Cecelia 
Anderson Wilkinson. 

Education: 

Graduate of Ogden public schools and Weber College, where he was stu- 
dent body president two years, represented the school in debating two years, 
and a member of the State championship debating team. Awarded Lewis Ef- 
ficiency Medal for highest standard in scholarship. 

Graduate of Brigham Young University, Class of 1921, with B.A. degree. 
At the "Y" he was editor of the school paper, president of his class, member 
of several debating teams, winner of speaking contests, founder and first presi- 
dent of the Public Service Bureau. 

Graduate 1926 summa cum Jaude, George Washington University Law 
School with LL.B. degree. Graduate 1927 from Harvard Law School with 
degree of Doctor of Juridical Science. Under Harvard standards this degree 
was awarded only to students maintaining -straight "A" average. 

Marriage and Family: 

Married Alice Ludlow of Spanish Fork, Utah, a graduate of B.Y.U., 
teacher in Provo High School and, later, teacher in high schools in Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

Children: Ernest Ludlow Wilkinson, M.D.; Marian; Alice Ann; David, 
and Douglas. Dr. Wilkinson, a graduate of John Hopkins Medical School, is 
practicing medicine in Salt Lake City, and Marian is on a mission in the 
Texas-Louisiana Mission. 



Work: 



Organized the Ogden Transportation Company in 1918. 

Member of the faculty Weber College, 1921-23. 

Member of the faculty Business High School, Washington, D. C. 1923-26. 

Superintendent — Camp Good Will — operated by Associated Charities 

of Washington, D. C. 

Full professor of law at New Jersey Law School — Newark, New Jersey. 

Member of the law firm of Charles Evans Hughes, New York City. 



ERNEST L WILKINSON 



Partner — Law firm of Moyle and Wilkinson, Washington, D. C 
Own law firm, Washington, D. C. 

Church Service: 

Superintendent Tenth Ward Sunday School, Ogden, at age fifteen. 
Member of the North Weber Stake Sunday School Board at twenty-one. 
Counselor to the late Fred G. Taylor, President of the Manhattan 
Branch, Eastern States Mission. (Dr. Carl Eyring, now Dean of the 
College of Arts and Sciences, Brigham Young University, was the other 
counselor. ) 

President of the Manhattan Branch, New York District, Eastern States 
Mission. 

President of the Queens Branch, New York District. 

First bishop of Queens Ward, New York Stake. 

Counselor in the Washington Stake presidency for eight years under 
both Edgar B. Brossard and Ezra Taft Benson. 




Hal Rumel 



WINTER SOLITUDE, ALTA, UTAH 



*jLward vi/trifiers 

ibliza U\. Snow [Poem (contest 

^PHE Relief Society general board prize for two consecutive years must 

is pleased to announce the wait two years before she is again 

names of the three prize winners in eligible to enter the contest, 

the 1950 Eliza R. Snow Poem con- There were one hundred eleven 

test. poems submitted in this year's con- 

This contest was announced in test, as compared with ninety-seven 

the June 1950 issue of the Maga- entered last year. Many of the 

zine, and closed September 15, 1950. poems submitted this year revealed 

The first prize of twenty-five dol- beaut y °[ thought and nearly all 
lars is awarded to Alice Morrey of the subjects of the entries were 
Bailey, Salt Lake City, Utah, for ba f <* U P™ an interesting and sig- 
ner poem "Lot's Wife." m ^ *™ • _ . _ 

The second prize of twenty dol- £ S * xteen states and the Dominion 

lars is awarded to Julia M. Nelson, of Canada were represented in this 

Mountain View, Alberta, Canada, years contest, the largest number 

for her poem "Old Home." of en nes f mn S *? m Utah > f wlth 

_, \. , . r rCt in seventeen from California, ten from 

The third prize of fifteen dollars I(kh seyen frQm Colorado? six 

is awarded to Ruth H. Chadwick, frQm Ad four from Neyad 

Salt Lake City, Utah for her poem three frQm Massachusetts? tw0 each 

"Pioneer Wagon Wheels. frQm Flodd ^ Washington> Oregon, 

This poem contest has been con- Wyoming, and Canada. One entry 
ducted annually by the Relief So- eac h came f rom Texas, Wisconsin, 
ciety general board since 1932, m Montana, Minnesota, and Con- 
honor of Eliza R. Snow, second necticut 

general president of Relief Society, One of the 1950 prize winners 

a gifted poet and beloved leader. h as received previous awards in the 

The contest is open to all Latter- Eliza R. Snow Poem Contest, and 

day Saint women, and is designed two new poets are represented. The 

to encourage poetry writing, and to general board congratulates the 

increase appreciation for creative prize winners and expresses ap- 

writing and the beauty and value of preciation to all entrants for their 

poetry. interest in the contest. 

Prize-winning poems are the The general board wishes, also, 
property of the Relief Society gen- to thank the judges for their care 
eral board, and may not be used for and diligence in selecting the prize- 
publication by others except upon winning poems. The services of the 
written permission from the gen- poetry committee of the general 
eral board. The general board al- board are very much appreciated, 
so reserves the right to publish any The prize-winning poems, to- 
of the other poems submitted, pay- gether with photographs and bio- 
ing for them at the time of publica- graphical sketches of the prize-win- 
tion at the regular Magazine rate, ning contestants, are published 
A writer who has received the first herewith. 

Page 10 



[Prize - vi/trintng Lroems 

kttza Lrloxey Snow 1 1 lemonal Lroem Contest 




ALICE MORREY BAILEY 
First Prize Poem 

JLot s vl/tfe 

Alice Morrey Bailey 

She merely turned for one last, stolen look 

Before her woman's lingering mind forsook 

The home her hands had decked, her smile made sweet, 

The memories of her children in the street. 

A spirit, set on right, must keep front-face 

Forever rigid toward the chosen place 

And eyes firm-narrowed in the lane of duty. 

No wayside resting place and no lush beauty 

Should tempt the soul to longing, no lost 

Love or glory, and no treasure mete their cost 

In nostalgic indecision, not even pity 

For a wanton, doomed, and wicked city, 

Lest the will be drawn into the sucking blaze, 

Consumed to smoke and ash. The backward gaze 

Can bend desire, compel the step to halt, 

And slowly, slowly turn the heart to salt. 



Page 11 



12 RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— JANUARY 1951 




JULIA M. NELSON 
Second Prize Poem 

Kyta (Home 

Julia. M. Nelson 

Come this way, it is softer even now 
To walk where he has labored with his plow 
Between these rows; how proudly tall they stand 
That once were saplings on the barren land. 

Not that way; tangled vines have overrun 
The garden path . . . She stood there in the sun 
To breathe the warming fragrance of her flowers; 
She bought their beauty with such precious hours! 

Step lightly, for the robins come each spring 
To rear their nestling brood beside the swing; 
They loved the laughing noise that children made. 
The silence has been long . . . they are afraid. 

Come softly through the door; the house is old, 
Love's fire is out, the sheltering walls are cold . . . 
The windows dark where shone a sacred light 
Of trust and harmony into the night. 

Pray humbly that the choice and fruitful years 
Upon this altar laid with joy . . . with tears . . . 
May reach to heaven from this dead home, until 
It stands a city, set upon a hill! 



PRIZE-WINNING POEMS 13 




RUTH HORSLEY CHADWICK 



Third Prize Poem 



[Pioneer vi/agon vi/heets 

Ruth H. Chadwick 

They screeched against the river's icy crust 

And groaned in protest to the freezing night; 

Behind, the inky skies were red with lust, 

A crimson emblem formed by fires of might. 

Through dust-green grasses, seared by summer's sua 

They cut with steady unrelentless pace 

A double line of etching, slowly spun 

Across the lonesome prairie's swarthy face. 

They strained beneath perpetual wear and weight, 

Defying nature's cruel, untamed force 

Of ruthless weather spelling out their fate, 

And craggy mountain peaks that blocked their course. 

They built new worlds for men who would be free; 

Then on they rolled to their eternity. 



[Biographical Sketches of tbliza U\. Snow 
LPoem Looniest VUinners 



Alice Money Bailey, musician, composer, sculptor, artist, and writer, is a 
remarkably gifted Latter-day Saint woman. Alice and her husband, DeWitt 
Bailey, have three children. 

Mrs. Bailey has served in all of the Church auxiliary organizations and 
is now organist in the Sunday School of the Eleventh Ward, Salt Lake City. 

The literary work of Mrs. Bailey has been recognized by many publica- 
tions and has received awards in several contests. 

Readers of The Relief Society Magazine are familiar with Mrs. Bailey's 
poems, many of them frontispieces, and with her excellent short stories and 
serials which have appeared from time to time in the Magazine. Her story, 
"The Wilderness," placed first in the 1941 Annual Relief Society Short Story 
Contest, and 'The Ring of Strength" placed second in 1945. In the 1948 
Relief Society contests, Mrs. Bailey was awarded first prize in the short story 
and second prize in poetry. This is her first appearance as winner of the first 
prize in the Eliza R. Snow Poem Contest. 



Julia Mecham Nelson was born in Taber, Alberta, Canada. She married 
George A. Nelson and now lives on a ranch near Mountain View, Alberta. 
They have three daughters and two sons, the oldest is twelve years old and 
the youngest three and a half. 

Mrs. Nelson has contributed stories and poems to the Church magazines 
and has been represented in The Relief Society Magazine by several poems. 
This is her first appearance as a winner in the Eliza R. Snow Poem Contest. 
Mrs. Nelson has always had a strong urge to write, she tells us. "I taught my- 
self touch typing at home, about two months before my fourth child was born. 
I have often tried to give up writing, but I can't." 

Over a period of twenty-five years, Mrs. Nelson has served in all the 
auxiliary organizations of the Church. In October 1950 she was appointed 
president of the Mountain View Ward Relief Society. 



Ruth HorsJey Chadwick was born in Brigham City, Utah, the daughter of 
May Mathias Horsley, and the late Ernest P. Horsley. She graduated from 
Box Elder High School and studied at the University of Utah and the Utah 
Agricultural College, graduating from the latter with a teaching major in 
English. Marriage cut short her teaching career after one year at Logan High 
School. She is the wife of LeRoi C. Chadwick. They have three children. 

Mrs. Chadwick is an active member of the League of Utah Writers, the 
Utah Poetry Society, and the National League of American Pen Women, 
of which she is now Utah State President. 

In January 1944, Mrs. Chadwick was called to the Primary general board, 
and soon after was appointed a member of the editorial staff of The Children s 
Friend. In that capacity, she spends most of her time editing and writing. 



Page 14 



J^iward vi/t 



tuners 



^rLnnuai [Relief Society Short Story (contest 



npHE Relief Society general board 
is pleased to announce the 
award winners in the short story 
contest which was announced in 
the June 1950 issue of the Magazine, 
and which closed September 15, 
1950. 

The first prize of fifty dollars is 
awarded to Mirla Greenwood 
Thayne, Provo, Utah, for her story 
"But Covet Earnestly;' 

The second prize of forty dollars 
is awarded to Inez Bagnell of Kam- 
as, Utah, for her story "We'll Al- 
ways Remember." 

The third prize of thirty dollars 
is awarded to Frances Carter Yost, 
Bancroft, Idaho, for her story "She 
Shall Have Music." 

All three winners in this year's 
short story contest are busy mothers 
and homemakers. 

This contest, first conducted by 
the Relief Society general board in 
1941, as a feature of the Relief So- 
ciety centennial observance, was 
made an annual contest in 1942. 
The contest is open only to Latter- 
day Saint women who have had at 
least one literary composition pub- 
lished or accepted for publication 
by a periodical of recognized merit. 

The three prize-winning stories 
will be published consecutively in 
the first three issues of the Maga- 
zine for 1951. 

Thirty eight manuscripts were 
submitted in the contest for 1950, 
as compared with twenty-four for 
last year. All three of the women 



receiving awards this year are mak- 
ing their first appearance as winners 
in the Relief Society Short Story 
Contest, although each of them has 
previously contributed to the Maga- 
zine. Most of the stories entered in 
this contest were well-written, many 
of them revealing professional 
quality in organization and tech- 
nique. 

The contest was initiated to en- 
courage Latter-day Saint women to 
express themselves in the field of 
fiction. The general board feels 
that the response to this oppor- 
tunity will continue to increase the 
literary quality of The Relief Society 
Magazine, and will aid the women 
of the Church in the development 
of their gifts in creative writing. 

The Relief Society Magazine has 
subscribers in every state of the 
Union, and in many foreign coun- 
tries, thus providing a varied and 
interested group of readers. Writ- 
ers, recognizing this large and ap- 
preciative audience, realize the im- 
portance of entering in the contest 
their very best work. 

The general board congratulates 
the prize-winning contestants, and 
expresses appreciation to all those 
who submitted stories. Sincere 
gratitude is extended to the three 
judges for their discernment and 
skill in selecting the prize-winning 
stories. The general board also ac- 
knowledges, with appreciation, the 
work of the short story committee 
in supervising the contest. 

Page 15 



M 



LPrtze - vl/t fining Story 

Kjinnual [Relief Society Snort Story (contest 

First Prize Story 

"But Covet Earnestly" 

Mirla Greenwood Thayne 

and the rhythmic swish of the swirl- 
ing dolly often set her to singing. 

This morning there was no sun 
in Marcia's heart. Her throat was 
too tight for singing. She worked 
mechanically, her lips drawn into a 
thin line. 

"Whatsa* matter, Mommy?" 
Young Stephen followed her from 
the kitchen to the screen porch, his 
brown eyes registering concern. "Is 
you tired, Mommy?" 

"Yes Stephen, a little tired," 
Marcia answered petulantly. She 
brushed a damp hand across her 
eyes and turned her head quickly to 
hide the signs of a deluge that she 
knew were beginning to appear. 

"Run in the front room, Stephie, 
pick up the Sunday paper for Moth- 
er, hustle now!" She gathered up 
a basket of clothes and hurried to 
the line. 

Other Mondays Stephen had fol- 
lowed her there. They had chat- 
ted joyously together, about the 
flowers, the tiny red-winged hum- 
ming birds that nested in Marcia's 
Dianthus. Stephen had handed her 
the pins while her deft fingers se- 
cured a panorama of clothes to the 
line. This morning she could not 
bear his questioning, so she was re- 
lieved to hear the story hour com- 
ing over the morning broadcast. 
Stephen would be lost in fairyland 
for a while. 




MIRLA GREENWOOD THAYNE 



ONDAY dawned blue for 
Marcia, blue as indigo, 
though the sky was cloud- 
less, and the sun rose triumphantly 
over the rain-drenched hills. Marcia 
had said that Monday need never 
be blue. Synonymous with the first 
day of creation, each Monday to 
Marcia meant a new beginning. 
She invariably arose early and by 
the time old Sol made his singular 
appearance her washing was usually 
well underway. She rather liked the 
clean smell of suds against duds, 

Page 16 



'BUT COVET EARNESTLY" 



17 



Not many Mondays ago she had 
found joy in so many little things; 
the cool grass beneath her sandled 
feet; the flowers that were yielding 
to her own nurturing; neatly folded 
linens that seemed to retain their 
share of the subtle sachet of grow- 
ing things. Then, at the close of 
dav, there was the satisfaction of 
work well done and, as she relaxed 
her strength to the coolness of 
fresh sheets, she imagined she rea- 
lized, in part, how God must have 
felt when he viewed his labor of 
the first day and saw that it was 
good. 

But something had happened to 
Marcia lately. The children annoyed 
her. The little house smothered 
her. Stephen was right, she was 
tired; tired of crowding a million 
thankless tasks into a single day. 
She was tired of the endless mole- 
hills that kept her from scanning 
the mountains of her dreams. Late- 
ly her thoughts had been taking 
detours into the past. 

'Things could have been different 
for you, Marcia," her conscience 
chided. "You were not meant to 
wear the shoes of a Biblical Martha. 
If you had married Brad Stanley, 
things would have been quite dif- 
ferent." 

True, Doc Stanley had appreciat- 
ed her abilities. He still did. Last 
week she had met him quite by 
chance. He had seemed pleased to 
see her. 

"Are you still writing, Marcia?" 
he had inquired. 

Marcia's negative answer had 
brought exclamations of regret. 

"Marcia," he had said, "you are 
not being true to yourself. Your 
talent is you, Marcia." 



MOW, as she folded soft towels, 
Marcia remembered that some- 
where in the scriptures a penalty 
was prescribed for procrastination 
such as hers. She couldn't recall 
just what it was. Perhaps she 
should have followed Miss Holten's 
advice and considered her career 
first. 

"Marcia, you have an unusual tal- 
ent," Miss Holten had said. "Keep 
writing. The time will come when 
you will enjoy real success," and the 
elderly teacher had returned the 
manuscript that she had just fin- 
ished reading to the English class. 

Marcia had often noticed a look 
of loneliness foreshadowing the face 
of the gray-haired teacher. 

"I shall keep writing," Marcia had 
told herself, "but please God let me 
live first." 

,r PHE next time they met Marcia 
showed Miss Holten a small dia- 
mond on her engagement finger. 

"I'm disappointed in you, Mar- 
cia," Miss Holten had said. "What 
about your talent?" 

"Oh, but I shall write, too," 
Marcia had said, and she was sure 
then that she spoke the truth. 

It had all seemed so right then. 
She and Jim had little in the way of 
worldly possessions, but they had 
young strength and the faith of the 
untried. They had bought the lit- 
tle house on Lake Street, not be- 
cause it suited their needs, but be- 
cause it was within their means. 

"It's small now, Honey, but we'll 
make it grow with us," Jim had said. 

However, the little house had 
grown only smaller as its contents 
increased. 



18 RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— JANUARY 1951 

Each baby contributed its share of trees wove variegated green lace 
happiness. Marcia had loved the against the sky. 
little tasks of preparation, tiny em- 
broidery on soft flaxen garments, T IM swerved the car eastward and 
the poignantlv clean smell of cedar J brought it to a sudden stop, 
from the little chest Jim had made There it was! Iris on tall stems, a 
especially for her baby things; the field of them, orchid, yellow, royal 
morning ritual of bathing her bab- purple, a fusion of many colors, all 
ies, their tiny bodies warm against washed by rain! 
her own. This was real creation. "Flowers!" cried Stephen, clap- 
Marcia had been happy then, and P^g chubby brown hands. "Flow- 
at times so full of the sweetness of ers, Mommy, more n forty of 'em." 
living that she would find release Marcia was silent. Carelessly 
for her emotions through the writ- spoken words could not justly de- 
ten word, and when time refused to scribe this sudden beauty, 
allow for their completion, the un- They are like real orchids, bathed 
finished manuscripts found their i n rainbow mist, she thought, 
way into a little drawer in the old April was being temperamental, 
mahogany desk. she banished clouds enough to 

This little drawer, with its di- make way for a sudden shaft of sun- 

sheveled heap of papers, was partly light. A rainbow arched across the 

responsible for Marcia's present sky. 

frustration. She had labeled it A radiant trellis, an ethereal line, 

'Tomorrow/' and its deserted con- Marcia visioned. No wonder the 

tents waited on for a tomorrow that makers of myths called the rainbow 

just didn't come. Lately it had their roadway to Valhalla, 

tugged at Marcia and appeared as Her mediation was interrupted by 

forlorn as a neglected child. the approach of Eric, the tall, lean 

Yesterday's experiences had added keeper of the Lawn Dell Iris Farm, 

another unfinished poem to the lit- "You like flowers?" he asked 

tie drawer. It had also added fuel Marcia. 

to the fire of Marcia's discontent. "They are beautiful," she re- 
Jim had come in from Sunday sponded almost reverently. 
School, followed by Stephen and Proudly Eric pointed out his most 
±>rent. prized species, while Stephen lis- 

"Want to go for a ride, Momsey?" tened in wide-eyed wonder. 

Jim had inquired. "There's some- "I crossed this White Goddess 

thing on East Drive that you must with the Golden Eagle variety," 

see!" Eric said, handing a hybrid bloom 

So they had all clambered into to Marcia. "See the bright yellow 

the little car, with Jim in the driv- of the father plant blended with 

er's seat, Stephen perched on his the delicacy of the mother." He 

knee, ready to match maniature man plucked another iris. "This orchid 

hands with his father's at the wheel, bloom resulted from crossing the 

The road stretched before them Great Lakes species with the An- 

like a silver ribbon. Newly budded geles pink." 



"BUT COVET EARNESTLY" 19 

"Mommy/' Stephen broke in, "Of course you are hungry, Son." 

"do flowers have mommies and Marcia looked at the clock. True, 

daddies, too?" Stephen had exaggerated, but it was 

"Yes, Stephen, all living things past supper time, 

have fathers and mothers." Their hunger appeased, the chil- 

Stephen's wide eyes searched the dren went back to their play. Marcia 

garden as if he expected the lithe resumed her writing, 

flowers to adopt human forms. "Where'i Mother?" 

"Come here, Sonny." The gentle She was suddenly brought to re- 
caretaker had drawn Stephen to his ality by Connie's tremulously young 
side and, taking stamen and pollen voice. Marcia's frustration mount- 
from the delicate blooms, he ex- ed. The door opened gently, 
plained to the curious child the "Hi, Mother! Busy? I have a 
miracle of the flowers. problem. Let's just talk for a few 

On the way home Marcia re- minutes, Momsey?" Connie sat on 

mained silent, trying to hold fast to the edge of the desk, her slim legs 

the words that had come to her in dangling. "Shall I ask Ken to go 

the garden. The loss of a single to Cynthia's party with me tomor- 

simile would be abortive to this row night? Jean is going to take 

conception of beauty that was hers. Hal. What do you think of Ken, 

Back in the confines of her own Mother?" Connie talked on and 

little room, she wrote swiftly, con- on. 

fidently. Here was one word pic- Marcia anchored her attention to 

ture that would not go into the the problem of the hour and coun- 

drawer unfinished— she hoped. seled her daughter lovingly. 

"You are sweet, Moms," Connie 
said, as she planted a breathlessly 
"T'M hungry, Mom," young Brent soft kiss on Marcia's cheek and flit- 
boomed into the kitchen, ted from the room on butterfly 
"When do we eat?" wings. 

Marcia's throat tightened. She Just fourteen, thought Marcia, a 

tried not to hear. living poem of fourteen years, but 

"I'm hungry, Mommy," Stephen surely not a sonnet, just a sweet 

echoed. "When do we eat?" simple lyric. 

Marcia walked into the kitchen. The old-fashioned clock struck 

She might as well care for their seven. Where had the day gone? 

needs now. Time seemed to deliberately evade 

"You don't know what hunger her. 

is," she told them, trying to keep "Time for church!" Jim's big 

the bitterness out of her voice, voice boomed through the little 

Didn't the male of the species ever house. "Come on, Kids, let's get 

consider anything but his stomach? ready." 

"But, Mommy, a man gets hun- Marcia heard the back door slam, 

gry often and we ate 'bout forty and she knew that Brent had an- 

hours ago." Forty had been Steph- swered the summons. She heard 

en's pet number ever since Marcia Stephen calling for the towel, 

had told him the story of Ali Baba. "Ready, Mother?" Jim queried. 



20 



RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— JANUARY 1951 



Marcia stepped to the door. "I 
believe I won't go tonight, Jim," 
she said, hesitantly, knowing full 
well the outcome of such a sugges- 
tion. 

"I don't want to go tonight, 
either," said Brent, and Stephen 
made a beeline for the tack door to 
resume his play. 

"Oh, let's all go," Marcia had said, 
as she gathered her little brood 
around her. "Church is our place 
on Sunday night." 



# 3[t }Jj # 



WHEN, after church, Bishop Cal- 
lister approached Marcia and 
asked her to accept the position of 
president of the Relief Society, she 
felt that she had reached the acme 
of her defeat. 

Her first impulse was to say no. 

"I am sure the Lord will bless 
you, Marcia," the Bishop said. 
"He'll make you equal to this call- 
ing." 

Marcia wanted to tell the bishop 
that he was asking too much, that 
she had other plans, but all she 
could do was to answer simply, 
"I'll let you know. I must think it 
over." 

And she had thought it over, and 
over, and over, while walking home, 
while reading Stephen his bedtime 
story and when, after hours of think- 
ing, she finally gave herself up to 
Morpheus, it was to restless dream- 
ing of long hours of welfare work, 
of planning and organizing, of visits 
to the sick. 

A far-flung deviation from iris 
and rainbow mist, she thought. 



* * * * 



B 



Y bedtime Monday, Marcia had 
made up her mind. Her answer 
was going to be an emphatic "No." 



There were others who could devote 
their time to the Church. From 
now on she was going to be unselfish 
to herself alone, while she pursued 
her ambitions. 

She would begin this minute. 
She drew the little drawer from its 
place and set it on the front room 
floor. Seating herself beside it, she 
began exploring its contents. 

There was a feeble knock at the 
door. Marcia looked up, to see the 
pallid features of her neighbor Ned- 
ra Cowan. 

Oh, no, Marcia said to herself, 
not her again. She was in no mood 
to hear her distraught neighbor to- 
night. Night after night she had 
listened to the same agonizing 
story. She had wanted to help, but 
Nedra had refused to be comforted. 

Marcia opened the door. Nedra 
was twisting nervously at the print 
apron that hung from her waist. 

"I'm glad you're home, Marcia." 
Nedra's swollen eyes searched Mar- 
cia's pleadingly. "I must talk to 
someone. Oh, Marcia, what can I 
do?" The words ended in a sob. 

"Nedra, Nedra, get hold of your- 
self." Marcia put her arm around 
her troubled neighbor. 

"Marcia," Nedra sobbed, "will 
you walk with me? I can't sleep. 
All night I think of Bob. He was 
alone, Marcia. He died all alone out 
there. He needed me, and I was 
not with him. He had so much 
faith, too, Marcia. Before he left 
he said to me, 'Mother, keep pray- 
ing that I shall never be forced to 
kill.' He was all that I had, Marcia. 
Why did God take him from me? 
How could he, if— if there is a 
God?" Heartbreak, fear, and disil- 
lusionment combined in agonized 
weeping. 



"BUT COVET EARNESTLY' 



21 



"Nedra, oh, Nedra," was all that 
Marcia could say. Of what use 
were words and the gift to use them 
if they failed you at a time like this? 

Nedra continued, "When he 
came home from the last war I 
thanked God every day of my life. 
I had given one son to the cause, 
but I still felt that God was good. 
He had given back one of my boys. 
Then they took him again, and I 
kept saying, 'He'll come back. God 
will take care of him. He did before. 
He will again/ But now he's gone 
and something has happened to 
me. I can't pray anymore, Marcia. 
I can't be sure that God lives. Oh, 
Marcia!" 

Marcia's arm tightened around 
her neighbor. She wanted so much 
to give Nedra of her strength. 

The two women walked along 
the moonlit path. The air was still; 
silver shafts of light interspersed the 
shadows of the lilac trees that bor- 
dered the walk. Nedra's sobs con- 
tinued. Marcia prayed secretly again. 
She must do something to relieve 
this burdened soul. "Please, God, 
give me words," she prayed. 

From somewhere out of the still 
night, words came to Marcia. 

"Nedra, dear, death is not dread- 
ful. People have seen beyond the 
veil and they all say that if we knew 
the sweetness of death we wouldn't 
care to live. I wish you had been to 
church last night. Brother Clayton 
gave a wonderful talk. He said that 
God has promised us that the 
righteous of our loved ones who die, 
die in Christ and do not really taste 
of death, but death will be sweet to 
them. From the Book of Mormon 
he read a promise that God gave to 
those who die for their country. 
The promise is that they shall find 



happiness in death. From Alma he 
read that God allows the righteous 
to be killed to bring judgment upon 
the wicked. God says we needn't 
suppose that the righteous are lost 
when they die in the war, because 
they go to their Father in heaven. 
Nedra, I believe that angels minister 
to the wants of those boys whose 
loved ones are praying for them, 
just as they ministered to Nephi 
and to Daniel of old. Bob did not 
die alone, Nedra." 

lyiARCIA talked on into the night. 
Nedra's sobs had ceased, and 
a serenity seemed to prevail over the 
women as they walked arm in arm 
through the stillness. 

"Now is the time we all need 
God and his gospel, Nedra. Promise 
me, you will never doubt again." 

"Thanks, Marcia," Nedra said. 
"I promise." 

Marcia walked slowly back to the 
house. It was late. Jim and the 
children were asleep. The little 
drawer was still on the floor where 
she had left it. She knelt down be- 
side it and began to explore its con- 
tents, reading a line here, a verse 
there. Somehow, tonight, the little 
unfinished manuscripts seemed for 
the most part quite shallow and 
immature. She wondered how she 
could have imagined that they were 
good. She must live much, much 
more, if she would write. Every- 
thing that she had ever written was 
an outgrowth of her own experi- 
ence—and for a moment she had 
thought to shut herself off from the 
main source of her inspiration. 

Tonight she had learned the need 
of a greater gift, so she prayed; not 
for her selfish ambitions, but for 
her grief-stricken neighbor, and for 



22 



RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— JANUARY 1951 



other mothers who must walk the 
"way of Calvary." Only once did 
she pray for herself, and the words 
of this prayer she wrote and placed 
above the little desk where she 
could see them each day. 

Give me this gift, an understanding heart. 

Of all life's gifts — this is the master art — 

The power to comfort those who pass 
my way. 

Give me the strength to do — the words 
to say. 



Now Marcia was sure that she 
understood the words of one of 
Tarsus, that man of letters whose 
deep discriminating spirituality en- 
abled him to always put first things 
first. 

"But covet earnestly the best 
gifts: and yet shew I unto you a 
more excellent way. Though I 
speak with the tongues of men and 
of angels, and have not charity .... 
it profiteth me nothing .... Char- 
ity never faileth." 



Iiltrta (greenwood cfhayae 

Mirla Greenwood Thayne, daughter of Thomas F. and Emma Green- 
wood, and wife of Clifton E. Thayne, Provo, Utah, is the mother of four 
children. 

Mrs. Thayne's literary work has been published in The Relief Society 
Magazine, her latest publication being an article, 'The Vow of Oberammergau," 
in June 1950, and in The Improvement Era. She is the composer of several 
songs, one of which, a sacred anthem, has been published. Recently Mrs. 
Thayne won two first prizes and one second prize in a Provo, Utah, literary 
contest. She is a member of the League of Utah Writers and is affiliated 
with the writer's section of the Provo Women's Council. 

As an active Relief Society leader, Mrs. Thayne has been literature class 
leader in the Provo Eighth Ward, and is at present a counselor in her ward 
Relief Society presidency. 



Looi/5 Jxre LUear 

Christie Lund Coles 

Boys are dear, but they're off to find 
New worlds to conquer beyond the fence, 
For wherever wonder and mystery lie 
They seem to know with their boys' 
sixth sense. 

They must build a plane and fish and swim, 
Play with pebbles in silver water. 
Boys are dear . . . but for company 
A mother needs a daughter. 



better 6/rom a LOaughter 

Clara Laster 

Words link hands across the page, 
Like actors on a square-white stage. 
Words that tell of falling snow, 
And nights of doing thus and so. 
"Hope you are well. I'm feeling fine, 
The days are long, but I don't mind." 
Just bits of news from someone dear — 
Brief happenings a mother likes to hear. 

It's strange how youth creeps into age, 
When words link hands across a page. 



A Christmas Gift for Teacher 

Fae Decker Dix 

MISS Brown was staying late permitted herself the luxury of 
the night before school slumping. It might ease the ache 
closed for the holidays. She between her shoulder blades. She 
must rearrange the last bit of tin- pushed her hands up through her 
sel, and set the star aright at the smooth brown hair, removed and 
top of the tree, and hang the candy replaced her side combs, sighing a 
canes just so along the red and green little as she contemplated the bus- 
paper ropes that the children had tling tomorrow ahead. Getting ready 
stretched across the back of the for the holidays of a school year was 
room. The candy canes were her ne of the fun things in a school 
gift to the children. Each year she teacher's life, and one of the hard 
saved carefully from her salary things, too. You barely had the 
check to buy sizable ones for every Halloween goblins behind your 
child. back, when Thanksgiving was there 
Being a stickler for sanitation, she in the hall, and the children were 
re-examined the canes to make cer- brimming with ideas for painting 
tain their cellophane wrappings turkeys and filling cornucopias with 
were secure, and that each bore its the colorful harvest from their own 
own Christmas tag tied on with autumn gardens. The turkeys had 
red ribbons. To Mary from Miss only just had time to follow the 
Brown, To Paul from Miss Brown, Pilgrims down from the borders 
To Joe— Miss Brown sighed. To and bulletin boards, when holly and 
think of Joe was to stir in her heart mistletoe and gay Christmas bells 
the old longing to help him find trooped in for their place, 
status in the room with the other Billy Jenkins had announced on 
children. Perhaps her own love November thirtieth that he and his 
and understanding were the only daddy would bring the class their 
way now. To Peter from Miss Christmas tree this year. On De- 
Brown, To Sharon— To Jimmy. Her cember first it was there, with wide 
blue eyes lighted with laughter as green boughs outstretched like be- 
she thought of Jimmy Mack's grimy nevolent arms. The children 
hands which would have the cello- beamed and screeched in delight 
phane peeled and gone in no time, when they came next morning to 
and the bright red and white stripes be greeted by the woodsy odor of 
of the candy cane interspersed with the pine. They began at once to 
smudgy stripes of his own making, think of the proper ornament for 
Phyllis Lawn, who sat next to him, each twig, and what to put at the 
would look with immaculate dis- top, and what to wrap around the 
dain upon his greed, but Jimmy base. They wanted to make their 
would be happy with the elaborate wn Christmas chains for it. And 
unconcern of most third grade boys, for weeks the room had shimmered 
Miss Brown sat for a moment with red and green circles linked 
upon the edge of the sandbox and together in long, pasted chains. 

Page 23 



24 



RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— JANUARY 1951 



And teacher's desk was piled high 
with pictures of the Christ Child, 
and of Santa Claus, and reindeer 
on the rooftops, always rooftops 
with the high, imaginative chim- 
neys a young child draws with his 
own free abandon. 

Thinking of the chains brought 
another smile to Miss Brown's face 
—the day she looked up from hear- 
ing group two read, and saw Susan 
Beeley, a small elflike child taut 
with anger and humiliation, stand- 
ing over Peter Fromm, the biggest 
boy in the room. Susan had just 
slapped him hard on the cheek. 
Peter stared at her with guilt and 
surprise and a bright pink spot 
written on his face. 

"I couldn't help it, Miss Brown. 
I just couldn't help it. He broke 
my paper chain and I'd worked so 
hard on it," cried Susan. 

The whole class could see the 
bright evidence of Peter's crime 
still dangling from his clenched 
fist. 

He looked down at his seat- 
work a moment and then suddenly 
he was saying, and with true re- 
pentance, "I'm sorry, Susan, I'll give 
you my paper, the red and the green 
both. Here . . . ." And he pushed 
his own share of the colored squares 
not yet cut toward Susan, who sat 
down and grimly began again. 

HPHERE are priceless gems along 
the way of a teacher's day, Miss 
Brown thought, as she turned from 
the sandbox to watch the sun sink 
into the lavender of winter twilight. 
For eleven years she had taught in 
this same room. It had become a 
part of her. She loved the wide 
west windows that looked across 
weaving fields into the flaming 
winter sunsets. She loved the 



warped window sills, with their 
rows of potted plants in fluted 
crepe-paper coverings, and the long 
blackboards with erasers and chalk 
neatly spaced along the troughs, 
and the gay and newsy bulletin 
board. There was a rough place on 
the east blackboard so she kept it 
covered with the monthly calendar, 
designed and painted by the chil- 
dren. 

Thinking of the calendar brought 
her mind back to Joe Grandon. 
It had been his turn to design the 
December calendar. Miss Brown 
had purposely seen to that. Her 
face clouded now as she thought 
on the ways of saving Joe from the 
scathing jibes of the other children. 
How is it, she found herself won- 
dering, that children are so loving 
and so cruel? It would be part of 
their long growingup to learn to 
drop this cruelty in favor of kind- 
ness and understanding. 

She had tried first to block the 
taunts meant for Joe by approach- 
ing Peter and Billy, who most fre- 
quently headed the "peer group" 
in the room. They were housekeep- 
ers during an early week in Sep- 
tember, and, while they were vigor- 
ously dusting the books and bang- 
ing them into their places on the 
corner book shelves, she had spok- 
en matter-of-factly. 

"I couldn't help noticing," she 
said, "that Joe wasn't playing in the 
ball game at recess time this morn- 
ing." 

"Um-mm," muttered Billy. 

But, Peter, being the open one, 
immediately blurted out, "Nope, 
he's part Injun. Besides he don't 
know how to play ball." 

Miss Brown flushed with quick 
anger, but minded her words, "No 



A CHRISTMAS GIFT FOR TEACHER 



25 



one knows how if he doesn't get a 
chance to play." 

The boys had moved over to the 
windows now and were busy pour- 
ing water in the plant pots along 
the sill. Billy set his watering can 
down and observed casually, "He 
might could play with Jake/' Jake 
was the only full-blood Indian boy 
in the room. 

"Yeah," agreed Peter readily, 
"they'd make a good team— good 
idea." 

Miss Brown saw there was work 
to be done, and she began by find- 
ing ways to interest the class in the 
Pahute legends of Jake's people. 
Thanksgiving Day had been a good 
time to use Jake in a program de- 
picting the Pilgrim's first feast day. 
He wore the native dress of his 
people and shyly repeated a chant 
that old Minnie, his grandmother, 
had taught him. 

OUT Joe's was a different prob- 
lem. She had called at his 
home and found his parents help- 
ful and willing, despite their pover- 
ty. The dark eyes of the mother, 
looking out upon the world with 
patience and without complaint, 
told her there would always be an 
ally in the home for Joe. 

Dear, quiet Joe, with his own 
great dark eyes looking up from 
the desk in the middle of row four. 
He would push his grubby little 
hands through his hair as he strug- 
gled to understand the words in his 
reader, and look up with pleading 
in his gentle face each time he 
realized he couldn't say the word. 
And, if he got it right, he would 
look up again with enchanted an- 
ticipation for the friendly word he 



knew she'd say. "That's good, Joe. 
You keep trying and I'll be back 
to help." And his face reflected a 
glowing light rippling from childish 
curved lips to the roots of his hair, 
as she smilingly passed onto the 
next pupil, her heart falling as she 
sensed how much he needed her 
to stay. But there were forty others 
in the room, each with a different 
need. Shy and fearful to the point 
of muteness, Joe would shrink back 
into himself, darting frightened 
side glances across the aisle, expect- 
ing disapproval, but hoping always 
for acceptance. 

The day came for him to choose 
his helper for the Christmas calen- 
dar. Humbly he glanced at Peter, 
strong and tall, and full of confi- 
dence—but he dared not ask Peter. 
His eyes fell upon Billy. Maybe 
Billy would work with him. Miss 
Brown was ready to offer protec- 
tion if Billy said no— but he said, 
"Sure." And again there was the 
momentary light of pure joy rip- 
pling up in Joe's face, for he was 
now one of the class. 

The next morning Joe had 
brought many things to choose 
from, worked out with the help of 
his mother the night before. Mrs. 
Grandon was an artist in many 
ways, and Joe came bearing a lovely 
figure of the Christ Child in his 
mother's arms, and many shepherds 
to kneel outside the stable which 
he and Billy would draw, and a 
glorious shining star that his moth- 
er had helped him make from 
scraps of tinfoil. It was all for the 
precious calendar. And he brought 
it with happiness on his counte- 
nance, and a feeling of belonging- 
ness singing in his heart. Billy, 



26 



RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— JANUARY 1951 



falling in with the spirit of Joe, 
worked hard, measuring and draw- 
ing and helping to mount the love- 
ly Christmas figures. 

Miss Brown turned back to the 
room and noticed how the last rays 
of the sun lingered on the star. It 
gave her an idea. She would make 
a halo for the Christ Child's head, 
and one for the Mother Mary, too. 
It would please Joe tomorrow when 
he saw what she had done. 



* # * * 



^PHE children came in at one 
o'clock, all eager with anticipa- 
tion. The girls wore their best 
dresses, and the boys had clean 
shirts and slicked-up hair. They 
were going to sing together in the 
hall— all the grades together, be- 
fore they distributed their class 
gifts. Miss Brown struck a chord 
on the piano, and they began re- 
hearsing. It lifts the heart to hear 
them, she thought, and pondered 
over the grace that little children 
find under the guardian eyes of 
heaven at Christmas time. 

The bell rang to call the school 
to assembly in the hall. Solemnly 
the children took their places be- 
fore the towering Christmas tree, 
which bedecked the front entrance. 
The smaller children settled first 
and turned to watch the upper 
grades come down the steps and 
rustle into their places on the long 
stairs flanking each end of the hall. 
Three boys from the sixth grade 
stood at the top of the stairs and 
lifted their trumpets to play the 
strains of "Deck the Halls," which 
was the signal to come to order for 
the caroling. 



Miss Smith, the music teacher, 
raised her hand to give the second 
signal, and the young voices rose 
in high, silvery tones, the pure ca- 
dence of their blithe songs swell- 
ing, advancing, receding into the 
unchecked joy of the Christmas 
spirit. 

"Up on the Housetop," they 
sang— and "J^ty Old Saint Nichol- 
as," and then the tender songs, "O, 
Little Town of Bethlehem," "It 
Came Upon the Midnight Clear," 
"Luther's Cradle Hymn," and "Far, 
Far Away on Judea's Plains." Then, 
finishing with the loving words of 
Longfellow's benediction, "I Heard 
the Bells on Christmas Day," they 
turned back to their rooms softly 
singing the last verse: 

Till ringing, singing on its way 

The world revolved from night to day, 

A voice, a chime, a chant sublime, 

Of peace on earth, good will toward men. 

They had behaved like angels 
all during the singing, and now 
Miss Brown smiled upon them at 
their neat desks, sitting in stiff and 
unaccustomed politeness under the 
magic of their own goodness. 
Christmas was good for them— 
very good. The giving and the 
singing together, and now the wait- 
ing for what came from the Christ- 
mas tree. Some of the boys were 
self-consciously nudging each other 
and smirking a little. The girls, 
with hands neatly folded on top of 
their desks, looked upon these dis- 
turbers of the spirit with adult 
sternness in their dark glances and 
pursed mouths. 

Miss Brown looked down at Joe, 
who sat proud and still, glancing 
now at the bespangled tree and 
now at his beloved calendar. John 



A CHRISTMAS GIFT FOR TEACHER 



27 



and Mary Beth were to be messen- 
gers to carry the gifts which each 
child had brought for the name- 
drawing in the room. Miss Brown 
began taking the gaily-wrapped 
parcels down from the tree, and a 
gradual murmur of pleasure broke 
into gleeful outbursts as the chil- 
dren unwrapped gay and funny 
things and shared them with their 
classmates. She passed the cook- 
ies and apples donated by the 
mothers, and the children were 
soon gathering their possessions to- 
gether ready for the long winter 
holiday. 

OACK at her desk, she looked 
down upon a stack of berib- 
boned gifts meant for herself. Their 
gifts always embarrassed Miss 
Brown. She loved them, but she 
felt so sorry about the youngsters 
who could not bring something for 
teacher. The deepest wish she 
could have was to make each child 
feel his own excellence and worth 
in his world. 

They were filing out of the room 
now. "Goodbye, Miss Brown. Mer- 
ry Christmas, Miss Brown. See you 
after holidays. Goodbye." 

The room was filling with quiet 
after the festivities. A few strag- 
glers were still fumbling with their 
wraps and galoshes in the hall. Miss 
Brown sat down at her desk and 
stared at the packages for herself. 
She knew there would be many 
handkerchiefs, which she always 
loved, and some sweet-smelling soap 
from Phyllis and Jean— they had 
told her ahead of time— and some 
bath salts from Virginia. All of it 
was too much to give, but she ap- 
preciated the thoughts behind the 



giving. And she must get busy 
now for there was much to be done 
before she took the night bus home. 

Light footsteps caught her at- 
tention. Joe was crossing the room. 
His great velvet eyes were fastened 
upon her face, and his breath came 
in quick little gasps as he marched 
steadily toward her. 

"Miss Brown— Miss Brown," he 
said coming up to the desk, "here 
is something for you. I brought 
this— for you." And he thrust out 
his tightly closed fist and opened 
it to display two shining copper 
pennies— warm from the sweat of 
his hand. He turned them over 
and laid them on her desk. 

"Why, Joe." She looked into 
his proud young face. "Thank you 
—thank you very much for think- 
ing of me, Joe." And she moved 
the pennies over with the rest of 
the gifts. Joe still lingered. His 
eyes were still fastened upon hers 
and he swallowed quickly against 
the revelation of some other pent- 
up excitement. Miss Brown knew 
the strange wonder of the grownup 
before the guileless innocence of 
the child. 

"Are you going to have a happy 
Christmas at your house, Joe?" 

He nodded. "The best one. My 
mother says it's the very best one. 
Look . . ." and again he was thrust- 
ing something toward her. A 
crumpled slip of paper. A grocery 
list from the corner store. "The 
strike's off at the mines and my 
daddy bought all this list of groc- 
eries last night with money. He 
didn't have to charge a thing. He 
paid for all of these. My mother 
says it'll be the best Christmas 
we've ever had." 

(Continued on page 70) 



Sixty Ljears ^Slgo 

Excerpts from the Woman's Exponent, January 1, and January 15, 1891 

"For the Rights of the Women of Zion and the Rights of the 
Women of All Nations" 

A HAPPY NEW YEAR: Here let us pause for one retrospective moment, and 
look back over the hills of the radiant past, and ask our own hearts some solemn ques- 
tions, which each one is best prepared to answer for himself. What precious fruit have 
we garnered for the soul's heritage? What evil have we overcome in our own erring 
natures, and what sacrifices have we made of self? If we have not been seeking wisdom 
from the living fountain of knowledge, it is a good time now to commence. The year 
is slipping fast away, soon the New Year will be upon us. It is an eve of sadness and 
yet of joy; there are many pleasant realisms, which fill the lap of life with blessings; and 
if there are some sorrows, some regrets, some human pain, let us acknowledge God in 
all things, and trustful in His providence, look into the bright new year with hopeful 
glance, never doubting His kind care and protection. Let it be one of the fresh, green 
places in our lives towards which, in after years, we may turn with a sense of infinite 
restfulness, a refuge of peace in moments of pain. — Aunt Em. 

MEMORIA 

If only in my dreams I may behold thee, 

Still hath the day a goal; 
If only in my dreams I may enfold thee, 

Still hath the night a soul. 

Ten thousand blossoms earth's gay gardens cherish; 

One pale, pale rose is mine; 
Of frost or blight the rest may quickly perish, 

Not so that rose divine. 

— Florence Earle Coates 

HOME THOUGHTS: To make home a delightsome and an attractive place, 
does not depend upon a large, fine house, with plenty of costly furniture, and expensive 
surroundings, although these are very pleasing and attractive to the eye; but the true 
secrets and attributes of a happy home are not purchased with gold or silver, but are 
placed there by the hearts and the united efforts of the inmates of that dwelling. What 
are riches compared with the love of sincere and honest hearts? It does not matter if 
the floor is bare, the rooms limited and the furniture unpainted, the home may be far 
more pleasant and enjoyable than the finest mansion that is without the peace and 
quietude of loving hearts. In a home where the Spirit of the Lord is an inmate, the 
husband and wife are each striving for the welfare of the other, and unitedly striving 
for the welfare of their children. — M. E. H. 

DAVIS STAKE RELIEF SOCIETY CONFERENCE: Bro. Wm. Muir, being 
called upon said, I feel to add my mite to your Conference, it really does me good to 
look at these aged sisters, I think they are the ones who stand at the helm — they are 
the ones who have rocked the cradle, and their course has been onward, and the Latter- 
day Saints do not stop progressing. It is what we do we get credit for, and not what we 
leave undone. Pres. Z. D. H. Young then addressed the meeting. . . . My heart aches 
for those who do not come to meeting, for we need the bread of life for our spirits. 
By and by, when pay day comes, those who do not attend to their duties will want just 
as much as those who do, but they will fall short. — Phebe C. Sessions, Secretary 

Page 28 




Worn an* s Sphere 



Ramona W. Cannon 



jytRS. BELLE S. SPAFFORD, 
general president of Relief 
Society, has been re-elected third 
vice-president of the National Coun- 
cil of Women in the United States. 
Mrs. Spafford conducted two of the 
general sessions of the National 
Council convention held in New 
York City in October 1950, and 
presented the annual report of Re- 
lief Society. Mrs. Florence Jep- 
person Madsen, a member of the 
general board of Relief Society, ac- 
companied Mrs. Spafford to New 
York City and presented the annual 
report of the Young Women's Mu- 
tual Improvement Association. The 
members of the National Council 
were greatly interested in the out- 
standing activities of these two aux- 
iliaries of the Church. 

"r\ON CARLO/' the first per- 
formance of the Metropolitan 
Opera's 1950-51 season, heard over 
the air, was staged by Margaret 
Webster, a famous figure in the 
theater of both Great Britain and 
America. Miss Webster has re- 
vived many classical plays, one not- 
able example being The Trojan 
Women, which she directed and in 
which she played the leading role. 
Included in the cast was Miss Web- 
ster's mother, the famous Dame 
May Whitty. Miss Webster has 
also directed her mother very suc- 
cessfully in plays in New York. 



Dame May, beloved in Britain and 
America, and a very popular actress 
in our moving pictures, died in 
1948. 

TANE COWL, playwright and act- 
^ ress, noted for several Shake- 
spearean roles on the American 
stage, died last June. 

DUTH MAY FOX, former presi- 
dent of the Young Women's 
Mutual Improvement Association, 
celebrated her ninety-seventh birth- 
day on November 16, 1950. Among 
other accomplishments, she walked 
about after having been invalided 
for several months by a fractured 
hip. Though her eyesight has failed 
considerably, she still writes poetry 
and memorizes entire chapters of 
scripture. 

PLARA BRYANT FORD, eighty- 
three, widow of Henry Ford, 
died in September 1950. She kept 
up his hopes and his spirits during 
the difficult years of experimenting 
with the "mechanical buggy." Lie 
often called her "the believer." 

MRS- CHARLES B. KNOX, 

ninety-two, died in September 
1950. When her husband, the 
gelatine manufacturer, died in 1908, 
she took over the tiny factory and 
made it into a model business. Ilcr 
explanation of her success was: 
"I just used common sense." 

Page 29 



EDITORJA 



VOL. 38 



JANUARY 1951 



NO. 1 



c/he Kyld and the 1 1 



ew 



Blessed of the Lord be his land, for the precious things of heaven, for the dew and 
for the deep . . . and for the precious fruits brought forth by the sun . . . and for the 
chief things of the ancient mountains, and for the precious things of the lasting 
hills . . . (Deuteronomy 33:13-15). 



TN this time of the year's begin- 
ning, we look toward the new 
days with a desire to enrich our 
lives and the lives of our associates. 
We wish to use our limited time 
with prudence and with rejoicing. 
Moments of evaluation come to us, 
when we seek to find "the chief 
things" of the earth. Again we ask 
ourselves if we have found steadfast 
wisdom and guidance for our lives. 

Many people are perplexed re- 
garding the seeming conflict be- 
tween the old and the new, between 
that which is traditional and that 
which seems to be newly discovered. 
There are those who say that be- 
cause an idea or a possession is old 
it should be discarded, and all new 
thoughts and new things should be 
accepted without question because 
they are new. 

There is no depth of thought be- 
neath this surface generalization. 
Shall we throw away something 
beautiful because it has been in the 
family a long time? Shall we refuse 
to listen to the wisdom that has 
been tested through the ages? Shall 
we say that faith in God is supersti- 
tion because it has long lived in the 
hearts of men? To do so would be 
to deny the testing power of time. 
It would be to say that the efforts 
of the good and the great have been 
in vain, that the work of their hands 

Page 30 



and the majesty of their words have 
passed away. To forget the long- 
cherished ideal of life would be to 
deny that there is an eternal plan, 
unchanging and unchangeable, in 
its law and order, by which all men 
are bound. 

Everywhere the old and the new 
are inseparable. The young mother 
who first looks into the face of her 
child, and the elderly woman who 
looks with faith upon her return to 
the spirit world are both a part of 
eternal life. 

The clean snows of January cover 
the old leaves and the stubble fields 
of many seasons, and the green leaf 
of April springs from a dark and 
seemingly barren bough. Think of 
walking on the turf of pine needles 
in the forest— how deep with years 
—and yet looking up and seeing the 
fresh green plume shining on the 
end of the bough. Everywhere the 
old and the permanent, the endur- 
ing things of earth, are linked 
inseparably with renewal, and with 
the spirit of morning. 

The old and the new are one. 
They are the cycles of eternity, and 
that which we call change is but the 
turning of a wheel bringing us to a 
time when our troubles and per- 
plexities shall be made plain, "for 
now we see through a glass, darkly; 
but then face to face." Even the 



EDITORIAL 



31 



new discoveries in science are but 
the application of laws and forces 
that have existed before the world 
was formed. Many of the so-called 
new social theories, some of them 
already found wanting, many of 
them misguided and unprogressive, 
are but an attempt to find a way 
that men may deal justly with each 
other. That way has long been 
found. It was set forth on the en- 
during tablets of stone. It is not a 
new pattern which we need, but a 
new devotion to an ancient plan. 

When Jesus stood upon a moun- 
tain in the Holy Land, his words 
fell upon the multitudes as a new 
light, as a great illumination, but 
he spoke the truth of the ages— even 
that gospel which was established 



in the spirit world. When the 
young boy, Joseph Smith, prayed 
in the grove of tall trees, an olden 
truth was restored to him, and he 
saw it with the wonder and the 
glory of youth. 

It was given to a great poet to 
ask: ''Why wander round . . . why 
wander vainly round? What canst 
thou find with seeking, which hath 
not long been found?" It is the 
cry of many "Oh, that I might be- 
lieve, for then I should be strength- 
ened. I would not be alone." 
Those who recognize in their own 
lives and in the world the operation 
of divine and eternal law, find a 
stability and a serenity unknown to 
those who seek, unguided, for that 
which is new. _y p Q 



/ lew Serial to iu 



eg 



in tn 



Sfeb 



ruaryi 



The first chapter of "For the Strength of the Hills," a new serial by 
Mabel S. Harmer, will begin in the February issue of the Magazine. The 
story relates the problems which confront a young schoolteacher who 
leaves her California home to live in an Idaho ranching community. 

Mrs. Harmer, an experienced and widely published author, writes 
with ease and distinction, and presents her characters realistically and with 
sympathy. The close relationship between people and their home en- 
vironment is well presented, and Camilla Fenton, who tries to change her 
home and her surroundings, is a girl you will like to meet. 



(R, 



osemary 

Margery S. Stewart 



In my mother's window there were 
Green things growing, 
Violets, begonias, and ivy 
Of her sowing. 

It was as if in winter months ' 
She fought against the dearth 
Of dipping yellow butterflies 
And warmly prescient earth. 



And I have seen her eyes grow dark 

In wonder and delight 

To find the frail Narcissi 

Had blossomed in the night. 

Now, though our roads be far apart, 

I know her presence still, 

In windows where the summer blooms 

All winter on a sill. 



TloieA, 



TO THE FIELD 



[Relief Society xjlssigned (overling 1 1 Leeting of 
cyast Sunday in if larch 

^PHE Sunday night meeting to be held on Fast Day, March 4, 1951, has 
been assigned by the First Presidency for use by the Relief Society. 
Suggestive plans for this evening meeting are being prepared by the 
general board and will be sent to the stakes in bulletin form. 

It is suggested that ward Relief Society presidents confer with their 
bishops immediately to arrange for this meeting. 



■ ♦ • 



{Bound Volumes of *Q5o [Relief Society 1 1 iagazines 

"DELIEF Society officers and members who wish to have their 1950 issues 
of The Reliei Society Magazine bound may do so through the office of 
the General Board, 40 North Main Street, Salt Lake City 1, Utah. The cost 
for binding the twelve issues in a permanent cloth binding is $2.25, includ- 
ing the index. If the leather binding is preferred the cost is $3.25. 
If bound volumes are requested and the Magazines for binding are not 
supplied by the person making the request, the charge for furnishing 
the Magazines will be $1.50, which will be added to the cost of binding, 
thus making the total cost for cloth-bound volumes $375 and for leather- 
bound volumes $475. Only a limited number of Magazines are available 
for binding. 

It is suggested that wards and stakes have one volume of the 1950 
Magazines bound for preservation in ward and stake Relief Society libraries. 



J^iward Subscriptions [Presented in *J\prd 

HPHE award subscriptions presented to Magazine representatives for hav- 
ing obtained 75 per cent or more subscriptions to the Magazine in rela- 
tion to their enrolled Relief Society members, are not awarded until after 
the stake Magazine representatives' annual reports have been audited. 
Award cards for these subscriptions for the year 1950 will be mailed to 
ward and stake Magazine representatives about April 1, 1951. 

Page 32 



NOTES TO THE FIELD 33 

LKelief Society I lot a (betting *J\qent 

All Relief Society presidents are requested by the general board to 
note the following counsel which was given by President Belle S. Spafford 
in her "Official Instructions" in the 1949 annual general Relief Society 
conference: 

We are aware that you are occasionally approached by commercial institutions or 
by individuals for the purpose of having you sell their product on a commission basis. 
Such an undertaking should be weighed carefully and the counsel of the Priesthood 
should be sought. Care must be exercised to make sure that Relief Society does not 
become a selling agent, and that people are not solicited in the name of the society to 
the point where the society becomes subject to criticism (The Relief Society Magazine, 
December 1949, page 808). 



^Pictures of J/Lli (general [Presidents of IKelief Society 

1 low J/Lvattaoie 

To complete the set of pictures of the general presidents of Relief 
Society, prints of a photograph of President Belle S. Spafford are now avail- 
able. Pictures of the other general presidents are also available: Emma 
Hale Smith, Eliza Roxey Snow, Zina D. H. Young, Bathsheba W. Smith, 
Emmeline B. Wells, Clarissa S. Williams, Louise Y. Robison, and Amy 
Brown Lyman. These prints, in oval form, appropriately 3% by 5^ inches 
in size, may be ordered for 25c for the complete set, or 5c for each indi- 
vidual picture. Address: General Board of Relief Society, 40 North Main 
Street, Salt Lake City 1, Utah. 



of he Wild Cheese cyiy 

Marvin Jones 

Pencil lines etched in a wind-swept sky, 
Far over the river the wild geese fly, 
High-wavering wedges, a tremulous skein 
In the yarn of adventure; their wild refrain 
An undulant, resonant, vibrating call 
Echoing, beckoning wanderers all. 
Far-ranging nomads, unfettered — free, 
Seeking instinctively life's destiny; 
Beating their way through a wind-weary sky, 
Far over the river the wild geese fly. 



Jt (gingerbread uiouse 

Phyllis Snow 

Home Service Department, Mountain Fuel Supply Company 




Photograph by Hal Rumel 



GINGERBREAD HOUSE 



[As shown at the work meeting demonstration of the Annual General Relief 
Society Conference, September 27, 1950] 



1. Sift together- 



Baking temperature: 375' 
Time: 12 Minutes 



2 3 A c. flour 

3 tsp. baking powder 

Vi tsp. salt 
1 tsp. ginger 
1 tsp. cinnamon 

Y» tsp. cloves 



2. Combin< 



% c. molasses 
% c. brown sugar 

1 e gg 

% c. shortening, melted 

3. Combine the two mixtures and chill one hour. 

4. Roll dough on the back of cookie sheets. Cover with paper patterns and trace with 
a sharp knife. Remove extra dough. (Scraps may be re-rolled for other sections 
or figures, but must be kept chilled.) 

5. Bake. 

Page 34 



A GINGERBREAD HOUSE 



35 



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36 



RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— JANUARY 1$51 




DOOH 
(Cut 1 piece 



(Cut 2 pieces) 



6. Remove to cake racks and cool thoroughly. 

7. Beat until fluffy and thick — 
1 egg white 

1 c. powdered sugar 

8. Tint as desired and use to decorate the house. 
Decorating lines are indicated on the pattern pieces. 
A cake decorating set helps. 

9. Melt (caramelize) — 
1 c. sugar 

10. Use to hold pieces together when combining them into the house. 

11. Make a Christmas star tree. 

12. Make a fence of orange chocolate sticks, held together with toothpicks and gumdrops. 

13. Make a seven-minute icing or a divinity icing, and spread thickly over a cardboard 
square large enough to be the yard. 

14. Center Gingerbread House as desired. 

15. Locate Christmas star tree or popcorn tree and fence. 

16. If figures are made, they may also be added. 

17. Let all stand until firm in a cool, dry place. 
Yield: 1 House 



[Progress 

Agnes Just Reid 



Great-grandma had a cabin, 
No windows at all, I'm told, 
Just a tiny shelter 
To keep out the winter cold. 

Grandma had some windows 

To let in sun and light, 

But she was very careful 

To keep the shades drawn tight. 



Mother had a mansion 
With windows on every side, 
But covered them with heavy drapes 
When she came in as a bride. 

I have a picture window, 
And oh, what a welcome change, 
It has no blinds, no curtains, 
And it lets in a mountain range. 



[Potto Strtnes ijtgatn 

Information Compiled by 
The National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis 

lT^oJio struck again in 1950. For the third consecutive year, infantile 
I paralysis went on a rampage across the nation, striking more than 
30,000 men, women, and children. 

Only once before— in 1949— had polio attacked with greater violence. 
The toll of that tragic year was still being counted as the fresh onslaught 
began. Hospitals and clinics were still crowded with polio patients from 
previous epidemics who were depending upon MARCH OF DIMES aid 
for continuing treatment. Polio played no favorites in 1950. Every section 
of the country suffered heavy attacks. 

The last three years have been the three blackest polio years in the 
nation's history. Cumulative incidence for this period reached the 
monstrous total of 100,000 cases— almost as many as the entire case load 
for the preceding ten years. 

Fortunately, wherever polio hit, a Chapter of the National Founda- 
tion for Infantile Paralysis was on the spot, ready to help the patient, his 
family, and the entire community, as necessary. 

The staggering blow of the 1950 epidemic was absorbed— the shock 
eased— by prompt and efficient use of MARCH OF DIMES funds. 

MARCH OF DIMES money paid hospital bills for thousands of 
families who could not meet the high cost of polio care unaided. Four 
out of every five of the stricken needed— and received— financial assist- 
ance from the National Foundation and its chapters. 

MARCH OF DIMES money paid for nursing care, physical therapy, 
transportation, wheel chairs, braces, and crutches wherever necessary. Help 
was given to all who needed it, without regard to age, race, creed, or color. 

MARCH OF DIMES money paid salaries, travel expenses and main- 
tenance of more than 1,600 desperately needed nurses recruited for the 
National Foundation by the Red Cross for emergency service in high- 
incidence areas in 37 states. Other personnel furnished on the same basis 
included more than 100 physical therapists and approximately 120 nursing 
consultants. 

MARCH OF DIMES money shipped more than $1,000,000 worth 
of iron lungs, hot pack machines, and other vital equipment on spot notice 
from seven equipment depots strategically located throughout the Nation. 
Up to mid-October these depots had rushed into epidemic zones 521 res- 
pirators, 299 hot pack machines, more than 200 cribs and beds, and a heavy 
volume of miscellaneous hospital supplies and equipment. 

If polio strikes again in 1951, we must be prepared to strike back. 
Epidemics cannot yet be prevented. We can no longer anticipate "light" 
polio years. More people are being stricken, more patients need care, 
more money is needed than ever before. 

Your Chapter stands ready today to serve you when polio strikes. It 
will continue to serve as long as you give it your wholehearted support. 
Please give generously to the 1951 MARCH OF DIMES. 

Page 37 




Hal Rumel 



SOLITUDE AND SILENCE 



o)he ^Jjytng LJear 

Beatrice K. Ekman 

Where storm has laid covers of white down 
Over roofs and gardens silently, 
The bright, full moon has spread spun-silver now, 
And snow-wrapped hills add grave austerity. 

Behind a passing cloud the round moon flees, 
And down the little street a cold wind blows, 
A sudden tremor shudders through the trees — 
Another year is drawing to a close. 

Some, on this last and fleeting old year night, 
Sit by the hearth in warmth of fireglow 
And hug their old and happier memories tight, 
Living again the days they used to know. 

They, who have grown more patient and more wise, 
Remembering other hearths and other fires, 
Look to the New Year with expectant eyes — 
Forsaking old regrets for new desires. 



Page 38 



Pioneering in the Big Horn Basin 



Botitaa Beithelson McBhin 






THE early settlement made by 
Latter-day Saints in the Big 
Horn Basin in the early ic/do's 
was like the growth of certain plants 
which spread by sending out run- 
ners which reached out until they 
found conditions favorable and then 
took root— forming a new unit, and 
only God could see the results of 
the early starts. Strange that the 
gospel of Jesus Christ should bring 
my husband and me to the land of 
America, gathering us from the 
pathway of Denmark. Strange that 
we should meet here in America 
and establish ourselves in the val- 
leys of the mountains, but stranger 
still, how we came to the Big Horn 
Basin of Wyoming. 

In 1905 the Berthelson family 
included four living children, two 
had passed in death. The first steps 
in community pioneering in San- 
ford, Colorado, were past, and we 
were settled in a comfortable pio- 
neer home among relatives and 
friends. Why then should our eyes 
and fancy be caught by the head- 
lines in the paper on that spring 
morning? 

LAND IN THE BIG HORN BASIN 
FOR HOMESTEADERS. TEN ACRES 
WOULD MAKE A LIVING FOR A 
FAMILY. EVERY OPPORTUNITY 
FOR BEAUTIFUL HOMES AND 
FINE LIVING. 

HPHE advertisement didn't men- 
tion that the Big Horn Basin 
at that time was one of the most 
desolate, barren-looking places ever 
to meet the eye, or tell of the big 
responsibility of bringing water to 



the land, only later to have fertile 
fields disappear in alkali that had 
to be drained, and the land re- 
claimed. The advertisement didn't 
tell that my quilts, which had been 
so carefully cleaned for my new 
home, would find their first use in 
a cow barn— cleaned for our oc- 
cupancy, and that the built-in cup- 
board which I had planned so care- 
fully would be forty years in the 
making. But nothing is done with- 
out dreams— and working to fulfill 
those dreams— and it was work to 
feed and clothe and educate a fam- 
ily of eight children. It meant 
planting a garden and carefully con- 
serving, and then selling the sur- 
plus. It meant working together 
as a family and a community. 
Friends were friends who stood by 
you in sickness and in health, and 
joined in the work and the fun. 

There was the first log cabin that 
served for church and school and 
social life. There was the first com- 
munity Thanksgiving, with the best 
of everything saved for the occa- 
sion. There was singing and recit- 
ing and dancing on the crude rough 
floor. The first Christmas was a 
community Christmas, and though 
the hills were silent and deserted, 
the hearts were full of the Christ- 
mas spirit, and the children were 
impatient for Santa to come. And 
the Fourth of July was really an 
affair, with bowers and programs 
and contests. 

CO many memories run from the 

one-roomed barn we borrowed 

for our temporary home, then two 

Page 39 



40 



RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— JANUARY 1951 



rooms, and then six, and on through 
time to our own present home, with 
electricity and all its modern con- 
veniences. 

The small farms now right in the 
center of town, and tractors, trucks, 
and other modern conveyances 
have taken the place of the horse 
and wagon. The good neighbors 
and their kindly deeds are not for- 
gotten, and a few remain in the 
place where they started together, 
but others have found new com- 
munities, and many have gone on. 



In our comfortable car we travel 
at will from place to place, scarcely 
remembering the long and cold 
ways of traveling when we first 
came to Penrose. I used to wish 
not only that the desert would 
bloom like a rose, but even that a 
few weeds would grow for the pig; 
and so in time all of our wishes 
have been granted, and we now 
produce enough of everything for 
a good living. As we look back 
over the ups and downs, we know 
we were given strength and cour- 
age, for the task, and life is good. 



Sketch 



etches 

Evelyn Fjeldsted 

The silver mist around the moon 
Is but the shadow of a storm; 
The golden leaf that falls too soon, 
A hurried sketch of winter's form. 



& 



ecompense 

Maria McClelland Burk 

I shall not rue my grieving 

If God still lets me sing, 

Nor count all loss a broken heart 

If I have wrought one perfect thin^ 



cJhe JLow Lost of OTapptness 

Caroline Eyiing Miner 

T \ JE hear constantly now about the high cost of living, and it is true that food 
■ ■ and clothes, and housing cost a great deal. Living happily, however, means 
much more than just keeping our bodies fed and clothed and housed, and the cost of 
most things that make for happiness is still surprisingly low. 

Free of charge are the glory of a sunrise, the magnificence of a sunset, the rising 
of a full moon over the mountains, the ever-changing variety of the clouds, the wonder 
of growth. Free for the taking are walks in the summer rain, or through the crisp 
newly fallen autumn leaves, or through the freshly fallen snow. It costs nothing to sit 
in the sunshine of a bright fall day with the heat penetrating every part of you and 
filling you with health and strength. 

Free are the confidential talks with old friends, the warm handclasp of someone 
who sympathizes. I don't know of any excessive cost of a glass of sparkling cold water, 
of a good healthy supply of fresh air, of the song of a bluebird in spring, of the babble 
of a mountain stream, or of the musical rustling of the wind in the pines. 



No matter that the cost of material living soars, the cost of happiness is still low 
because the best of its ingredients are free. 



From Commode into Buffet 

Rachel K. Laurgaard 
Illustrations by Elizabeth Williamson 







QO many dining rooms these days are just not large enough to hold that most useful 
^ of pieces — the buffet. And yet there are those table linens to store, and the most 
convenient place for them is in the dining room. 

Did you ever think of converting a double commode — the old-fashioned kind 
with two doors and a drawer, made of walnut, with beautiful leaf and fruit carving 
on the handles — into a neat little depository for linens and silver? It can be done. 




If you are lucky enough to find a walnut, rosewood, or mahogany commode, re- 
finish it in its natural wood finish, by all means. If it is oak, or something not 
so pretty, put a carefully painted finish on it. Paint or paper the interior to make 

Page 41 



42 



RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— JANUARY 1951 



it fresh and clean, and fit it out with shelves. Firtex or beaver board are inexpensive 
shelving materials, so put in several. These shelves are perfect for storing linens neatly. 

Tarnish-proof flannel can be purchased at jewelry stores for lining the silverware 
drawer, and you will find it possible to store away in this modest little cabinet almost 
as much linen and silver as the larger buffet would hold. 




Crocheting Jxeeps (Tier {Busy and utappy 

iy/fRS. Alice Maw Poulter, Ogden, Utah, keeps her fingers flying and her heart happy 
•*• * with her crochet hook. Hot pads, afghans, tablecloths, doilies, dresser scarfs, 
pillow tops, and many other items are skillfully made by her nimble fingers, and the 
intricate designs and beautifully even stitches are a joy to see. Mrs. Poulter, as she 
sometimes says, laughingly, gives herself away in crocheting. Her entries in the 
Arizona State Fair in 1949 were awarded the first prize. 

Another "happiness hobby" of Mrs. Poulter is reading. She owns a much-read 
copy of the Book of Mormon, an edition of 1879, with an inscription in gold letters 
"Miss Alice Maw." She reads on Sundays, and every night before she goes to bed she 
reads from the Doctrine and Covenants, the "Church Section" of The Deseret News, 
or some other inspirational material. At present she is reading The Life of Karl G. 
Maeser. 

Mrs. Poulter was born in Yorkshire, England, in 1859, and her third birthday 
came while she was aboard the ship Tapscott, enroute to the United States. The 
family settled in Ogden, and later moved to Plain City. Now, after a full life of work, 
service, and happiness, with her family grown and living in homes of their own, Mrs. 
Poulter refuses to give up and grow old. She makes her home with a daughter, Mrs. 
A. J. Knapp, of Ogden, and there she is busy and useful, bright-eyed, and contented. 

— Rosella F. Larkin 




From The Field 



Margaret C. Pickering, General Secretary -Treasurer 

All material submitted for publication in this department should be sent through 
stake and mission Relief Society presidents. See regulations governing the submittal of 
material for "Notes From the Field" in the Magazine for April 1950, page 278, and 
the Handbook oi Instructions, page 123. 



RELIEF SOCIETY SOCIALS, BAZAARS, AND 
OTHER ACTIVITIES 




Photograph submitted by I vie H. Jones 



SPANISH-AMERICAN MISSION, LAREDO (TEXAS) BRANCH 
VISITING TEACHERS 

Left to right: Celedonia Duarte; Noemi Dorado; Raquel Rodriquez; Lorenza 
Duarte; Arminda Rodriquez; Margarita Duarte; Ofelia Alday; Dora Elia Ruiz. 

Sister Ivie H. Jones, President, Spanish-American Mission Relief Society, reports 
that the young women of this branch are assuming their share of responsibility. They 
have the youngest branch presidency in the mission and a very high percentage of 
young women members. The membership of the branch is scattered, and bus service 
is inadequate. To solve this problem and to give the young members the blessings 
that come from faithfully discharging this duty, the young members go out two by 
two and visit the active members, while the Relief Society presidency visits the in- 
active members and investigators. The idea originated in the branch itself and is 
working in a very splendid manner. The branch organization began in 1936, when 
Sister Julia Cervantes Duarte, a widow, with four sons and one daughter, was chosen 
president. 

Page 43 



44 



RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— JANUARY 1951 




Photograph submitted by Sadie Kamaile Kauhini 

OAHU STAKE (HAWAII) SINGING MOTHERS PRESENT MUSICAL 

PROGRAM AT HAWAIIAN MISSION CENTENNIAL 

August 12, 1950 

Ruth Ah Nee, the chorister, stands at the right on the third row, and Lei Sniffen, 
the organist, stands at the left on the third row. 

Seven hundred and eighty-one Relief Society workers of Oahu Stake and the 
Hawaiian Mission attended the Relief Society Centennial meeting. The Singing Mothers, 
beautifully attired in white blouses and dark skirts, and wearing leis, presented a varied 
program which was outstanding for its sincerity and the quality of its musicianship. 

Sadie Kamaile Kauhini is president of Oahu Stake Relief Society. 




Photograph submitted by Irene P. Clissold 



HAWAIIAN MISSION RELIEF SOCIETY OFFICERS AND OAHU STAKE 

RELIEF SOCIETY BOARD 
September 26, 1950 

Front row, left to right: Lydia Spencer, Oahu Stake sewing leader; Joyce Teruya, 
Hawaiian Mission Relilef Society; Irene P. Clissold, President, Hawaiian Mission Relief 
Society; Stella Nelson, Hawaiian Mission Relief Society; Lillie Deering, member, Oahu 
Stake Relief Society Board; Hana Kaahanui, Oahu Stake Board member. 

Back row, left to right, Oahu Stake Board members: Angeline Nahoi, Secretary; 
Louise Haanapu, Magazine representative; Ann Doak, First Counselor; Sadie Kamaile 
Kauhini, President; Lydia Colburn, Second Counselor; Ama Bodnar, board member; 
Ruth Ah Nee, chorister. 



NOTES FROM THE FIELD 



45 




Photograph submitted by Florence P. Nielson 

ROOSEVELT STAKE (UTAH), RANDLETT INDIAN RELIEF SOCIETY 

DISPLAYS QUILT 

Left to right: Lucy Ashta; Hazel Brough; Etta McMullin; Lula Wash; Madge 
Wall: Gladys Chegup; Permania Trujillo, who pieced the quilt. 




Photograph submitted by Helen W. Anderson 

BIG COTTONWOOD STAKE (UTAH), HOLLADAY FIRST WARD RELIEF 

SOCIETY BAZAAR, March 1950 

Ward officers in insert, left to right: President Blanche J. Richards; First Coun- 
selor Vera S. Summers; Second Counselor Sarah D. Linton; Secretary-Treasurer Mar- 
garet B. Jensen. 

This was the largest and most successful bazaar ever held in the ward. On display 
were 137 aprons, 14 articles of children's clothing, 10 pairs of pillow cases, 4 guest 
towels, 10 hot pads, as well as many other articles, including mat sets, needle-point pil- 
lows, luncheon cloths, dish towels, toys, rugs, and quilts. Dinners were served and a 
baked goods and candy sale conducted. 

Helen W. Anderson, now a member of the general board of Relief Society, is 
former president of Big Cottonwood Stake Relief Societv. The new president is Grace 
E. Berndt 



46 



RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— JANUARY 1951 




Photograph submitted by Rose B. Astle 

SOUTH LOS ANGELES STAKE (CALIFORNIA) RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE 
REPRESENTATIVES ATTAIN HIGH SUBSCRIPTION QUOTAS 

Front row, seated, left to right: Betty Gleason, Grant Ward (130%); Marie 
DeSpain, South Gate Ward (224%); Sarah Billiard, Maywood Ward (111%); Nancy 
Rupp, stake Magazine representative; Villet Trip, Vermont Ward (120%). 

Back row, standing, left to right: Letha Henrickson, Downey Ward (105%); 
Irene Bracken, Manchester Ward (130%); Josie Newy, Matthews Ward (134%); 
Delpha Watson, Walnut Park Ward (107%); Rhea Warren, Huntington Park Ward 
(124%). 

Insert: Anna Struhs, Miramonte Ward (177%). 

Rose B. Astle, President, South Los Angeles Stake Relief Society, reports that 
these energetic Magazine representatievs placed 1193 Magazines in the homes of Los 
Angeles Stake during 1949 and sent 150 subscriptions to European and other missions. 




Photograph submitted by Eva L. Clinger 

SHELLEY STAKE (IDAHO) SINGING MOTHERS PRESENT CONCERT 

April 30, 1950 
Front row: at left, Barbara Larsen, organist; fourth from left, Eva L. Clinger, stake 
Relief Society president; seventh from the left, Melba Longhurst, pianist; eighth from 
left, Florence Dye, director. 



NOTES FROM THE FIELD 



47 



This chorus was organized in January 1950, and the group presented a concert in 
April, sang at the stake Relief Society convention, and plan to sing in the Idaho Falls 
Temple. The April concert featured the following compositions: "How Lovely Are Thy 
Dwellings," by Liddle; "Thanks Be to God," by Dickson; "The Lord's Prayer," by 
Francois Copee; "The Twenty-third Psalm," by Malotte, as well as several other chorus 
numbers, an organ and piano duet, a violin solo, and a musical reading. 

Ward choristers of Shelley Stake Relief Society are: Berneice Balmforth, Wood- 
ville Ward; Doris Cox, Jameston Ward; Lela Wiseman, Basalt Ward; Florence Dye, 
Firth Ward; Shirley Teeples, Goshen Ward; Carrie Nielson, Kimball Ward; Edith 
Hanks, Shelley First Ward; Rosetta Jensen, Shelley Second Ward; Mona Leavitt, Shel- 
ley Third Ward; Janice Priest, Taylor Ward. 




Photograph submitted by Harriet P. Mack 

PALO ALTO STAKE (CALIFORNIA) RELIEF SOCIETY OFFICERS 
ASSEMBLED FOR MUSIC FESTIVAL, May 5, 1950 



Front row, left to right: Ruby Slade, music director; Marion Vernon, assistant 
work director; Leila A. Gates, President; Chloe Nelson, visiting teacher leader; Beryl 
Warner, theology class leader. 

Back row, left to right: Erma Hannibal, pianist; Ethel Beckstrand, work director; 
Harriet P. Mack, counselor; Myra Thulin, literature class leader; Julia Webb, secretary; 
Sarah Avery, Magazine representative. 

The printed program and the presentation of the numbers in this festival were 
outstanding. The program featured the Relief Society colors, a gold background, with 
blue printing. Theda Farnsworth, who acted as the reader, also prepared the script. 
Each of the seven wards of Palo Alto Stake (Burlingame, San Mateo, Redwood City, 
Palo Alto, San Jose, Willow Glen, and Naglee Park) presented a number and the com- 
bined chorus of the stake Singing Mothers rendered "Song of the Soul" and "Let All 
My Life Be Music," with Fredona Neilson as the organist, Irma Hannibal at the piano, 
and Ruby Slade as the chorister. 

Leila A. Gates is president of Palo Alto Stake Relief Society. 



48 



RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— JANUARY 1951 




Photograph submitted by Emily S. Romish 

WEST POCATELLO STAKE (IDAHO) SINGING MOTHERS ASSEMBLED 
FOR STAKE CONFERENCE, August 13, 1950 

The chorister Idalia Huff, and the organist, Sadie Stolworthy, are seated at the 
organ. 

This chorus also sang at a three-stake Relief Society Convention, held in Pocatello, 
Idaho, September 8, 1950. Ten members were not present when this photograph was 
taken. 

Emily S. Romish is president of West Pocatello Stake Relief Society. 




Photograph submitted by Marjorie M. Ward 

SALT LAKE STAKE (UTAH), FOURTEENTH WARD VISITING TEACHERS 
HONORED AT A LUNCHEON IN THE LION HOUSE, September 7, 1950 

Front row, left to right: Officers of the Fourteenth Ward Relief Society, left to 
right: Secretary Maud S. Richins; First Counselor Allene B. Keeney; President Martha 
McDougall; Second Counselor Ida A. Sessions. 

Second row, elderly visiting teachers who have long served Relief Society, left to 
right: Alice B. Hoagland; Sylvia A. West; Agnes M. Merrill (over ninety years old); 
Anna Hamilton (an Indian Relief Society member and visiting teacher) : Pauline B. 
Wale; Alice M. Hansen; Margaret F. Eccles; Emma R. Jacobs (mother of Sister Mary 
J. Wilson of the Relief Society general board). 

The luncheon at which these sisters were honored was held in the garden of the 
historic Lion House, Salt Lake City, and the photograph was taken in the Fourteenth 
Ward chapel. 

Marjorie M. Ward is president of Salt Lake Stake Relief Society. 



NOTES FROM THE FIELD 



49 




Photograph submitted by Georgia R. Livingston 

EASTERN STATES MISSION, CATTARAUGUS (NEW YORK) 
BRANCH RELIEF SOCIETY " 

Left to right: Secretary Florence Parker; Rhoda Parker; Louise Tallchief; Blanche 
Maybee; Genieve Mohawk; Anna Weaver; Margaret Seneca; President Inez Maybee. 

Georgia R. Livingston, President, Eastern States Mission Relief Society, submits 
a very interesting article by Elder James R. Dixon, describing the activities of this 
branch. Excerpts from his letter follow. 

* 'Last year we did not know the meaning of the word Relief Society, but look 
what has happened now.' Those words sum up the initial year of Relief Society work 
among the Seneca Indian women on the Cattaraugus Reservation ... a year of 
growth and development for the members, the raising of funds for a chapel, and a firm 
entrenching of Latter-day Saint standards, action, and ideals on the reservation. . . . 
The original craft work of the Senecas — beadwork, basket and moccasin making — has 
been turned into useful projects .... and the Relief Society has established a flourish- 
ing Indian curio project. . . . All through the late winter and early spring the women 
prepared warm, nourishing meals for the men who, each Saturday, contributed their 
time to cutting logs and preparing them for the wood pulp mills, as their contribution 
to the building fund. When land and seed were needed for a branch welfare project, 
members of the Relief Society donated two and one half acres of land, with sufficient 
lima bean and corn seed to plant the entire plot .... Red letter day of the year was 
the visit of Georgia R. Livingston, President of the Eastern States Mission Relief So- 
ciety. The occasion was highlighted by a beautiful testimony meeting, following 
Sister Livingston's inspiring talk. Signal recognition came to Sister Livingston when 
she was adopted by the sisters into the Snipe Clan of the Seneca Nation and given the 
Indian name meaning 'White Flower' " 



II lirror, 1 1 it 



trror 

Mabel Jones Gabbott 

I need no mirror on the wall 
To tell me I must mend my ways; 
My daughter, playing with her doll, 
Reflects each manner, tone, and phrase. 



LESSON 




DEPARTMENT 



cJheology — The Life and Ministry of the Savior 

Lesson 31— "The Long Night of Apostasy" 

Elder Don B. Colton 

(Reference: Jesus the Christ, by Elder James E. Talmage, chapter 40.) 
For Tuesday, April 3, 1951 

Objective: To prove that there was an apostasy from the Primitive Church and 
that the Lord Jesus ceased to reveal himself to men for centuries. 



TT is doubtful if there are any 
Christian churches that claim 
there was direct revelation from 
God after the apostles were taken 
from the earth until the year 1820. 
In fact, most of these churches in- 
sist that no new revelation has yet 
come. Indeed, they say it is not 
necessary; that the Bible is a suf- 
ficient guide. This position is tak- 
en in the face of the plain declara- 
tion of the Bible: "Surely the Lord 
God will do nothing, but he re- 
vealeth his secret unto his servants 
the prophets'' (Amos 3:7). 

"The passing of the apostles was 
followed by the rapid development 
of a universal apostasy as had been 
foreseen and predicted." Both ex- 
ternal and internal causes were back 
of this apostasy. The Church, from 
the beginning, met with opposition 
from both Jews and pagans. The 
severe and cruel persecution caused 
many to desert the cause. This 
was true of many of the officers 
holding positions of responsibility 
in the Church. There were some 
whose zeal was stimulated, but 
many more could not endure and 

Page 50 



fell away. The worst cause, how- 
ever, was the internal dissension, 
division, and turning from the 
truth, all of which resulted in a 
complete apostasy. 

It has already been shown how 
bitter most of the Jews were and 
how relentlessly and cruelly they 
persecuted the members of the 
Church. The Romans soon joined 
in vigorous hostilities. These per- 
secutions were general during Ne- 
ro's reign and extended from about 
64 A.D. until about 305 A.D., with 
only occasional respites. History 
records the cruel, inhuman, and 
barbarous atrocities of that period. 
We do not have space for details. 

Early in the fourth century, Con- 
stantine the Great became emperor. 
He made a complete change. He 
soon made Christianity the state re- 
ligion within his empire. The 
church of that day, however, had 
been almost completely changed 
and bore little resemblance to the 
Church founded by the Savior and 
named for him. There was only a 
crude outline of the original organ- 
ization. The emperor had not been 



LESSON DEPARTMENT 51 

baptized, but he made himself the received only after proper water 
head of the church. Paul said: "And baptism by immersion and the lay- 
no man taketh this honour unto ing on of hands by authorized 
himself, but he that is called of servants of God. Therefore, the 
God, as was Aaron" (Heb. 5:4). members lost the only means by 
Church offices were more widely which man can sa Y that "J esus 1S 
sought than either military or po- the Lord " ( See l Cor - 12: 3)- Ba P; 
litical positions. The bishop of tism > havin g been changed, lost all 
Rome, without direct revelation, its symbolism and meaning. Instead 
claimed supremacy over the other of administering the sacrament of 
officers of the church, but when the Lord ' s supper as emblems of 
Constantine made Constantinople his broken body and spilt blood, 
his capital, the bishop there claimed the Y invented the doctrine of 
equal authority with the one at transubstantiation. (This false doc- 
Rome. The dispute divided the trine claimed that by priestly power 
church, a division which has con- the emblems of Christ's flesh and 
tinued to this day. As a result, we blood are transmuted into the act- 
have the Roman Catholic and ual flesh and blood of the Redeem- 
Greek Orthodox churches, both of er T^ practice of celibacy 
which have been in existence since amon g the clergy was established, 
the fourth century, each claiming The people were penalized for 
to be the church of God. The reading the scriptures. In short, the 
bishop of Rome assumed secular church completely departed from 
as well as spiritual powers, and in the plan of life as taught by Jesus 
the twelfth and thirteenth cen- and substituted doctrines and prac- 
turies, his authority was superior tices wholly at variance with the 
to kings and emperors. The spiritual simple gospel of the Lord. (See 
powers claimed were even more Clark, J. Reuben, Jr., On the Way 
audacious than the temporal pow- to Immortality and Eternal Life; 
ers. He pretended to forgive sins and Barker, James L., Piotestois of 
and remit penalties here and here- Christendom.) 
after. He even sold the right to TnQ author of our text sum ' 
commit future sins in this life and marizes the important internal 
extended forgiveness on earth and causes of the apostasy under the 
in heaven. Read Paul's prophecy thre e following headings: 
of the powers that would be (1) The corrupting of the simple doc- 
USUrped (2 TheSS. 2:3-4). (Isaiah trines of the gospel of Christ by admix 

24:5) prophecied that the earth it- *"? T 7 th 5° " call j d P^taophic systems. 

if : 1 i it. u 1 n 1 i L i • (2) Unauthorized additions to the pre- 

self would be defiled under the in- s v cr | bed rites of the Church and the in . 

habitants thereof; because they troduction of vital alterations in essential 

have transgressed the laws, changed ordinances. (3) Unauthorized changes 

the ordinance, broken the everlast- in church organization and government, 

ing covenant/' which is the gospel The world commenced to 

of Jesus Christ. The apostate emerge from the period known as 

church changed the ordinance of the Dark Ages in the fifteenth cen- 

baptism. The Holy Ghost can be tury. The movement is known as 



52 



RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— JANUARY 1951 



the Renaissance or Revival of 
Learning. Strong men arose in a 
determined effort to arouse the 
people from indolence and igno- 
rance. We regard it as the work of 
God in preparation for the restora- 
tion of the gospel and the establish- 
ment of the true Church of Jesus 
Christ. 

With the intellectual awakening 
and material betterment, people be- 
gan to protest and then revolt 
against the abuses of members of 
the clergy who represented the ec- 
clesiastical authority of the Pope 
at Rome. There was revolt in 
France as early as the thirteenth 
century. Early in the four- 
teenth century, John Wickliffe of 
Oxford University in England re- 
fused to comply with the order that 
the people should not study the 
scriptures, and he gave to the 
world a version of the Holy Bible 
in English. For this he suffered 
severe persecution and, after his 
death, officials of the Roman 
church had his body exhumed and 
burned and his ashes scattered to 
the wind. Many other similar in- 
stances occurred. In the year 1517 
Martin Luther, a German monk, 
led a revolt in Middle Europe 
which resulted in the establishment 
of Protestant churches in many 
countries, known as the Reforma- 
tion. These Protestants, however, 
soon became divided on church 
government and doctrine. There 
was no divine authority in any of 
them and consequently they could 
not properly be guided in the gos- 
pel of the Savior. 

The Roman church resorted to 
extreme cruelty in trying to crush 
the Protestant movement. The tor- 



tures inflicted on those accused of 
heresy are beyond description and, 
perhaps, no good would come from 
a detailed recital. We are interested 
more in the churches that came in- 
to existence as a result of the Ref- 
ormation instigated by Luther. 

We must bear in mind that many 
honest men and women were still 
trying to follow Christ and many 
gave their lives rather than to 
stultify themselves by denying that 
which they believed to be true. On 
the other hand, many wicked men 
used the "cloak of religion" to gain 
desired results. As an example, Hen- 
ry VIII, King of England, in the 
early stages of Luther's movement, 
declared that he was a supporter of 
the Pope and was given the title of 
"Defender of the Faith/' A few 
years later, however, this king want- 
ed to divorce his wife, Queen Cath- 
erine, in order that he might marry 
another. In 1534, the British Par- 
liament passed an act declaring the 
nation free from all allegiance to 
the Pope. It also passed an act 
making the king the head of the 
Church of England. It cannot be 
denied that this church came into 
existence as the direct result of the 
"licentious amours of a debauched 
and infamous king" who provided 
his own clergy and proclaimed him- 
self the head of spiritual as well as 
temporal matters. There was no 
divine commission, notwithstand- 
ing Paul affirms: "no man taketh 
this honour unto himself, but he 
that is called of God, as was 
Aaron" (Heb. 5:4), as stated above. 
Aaron was called by direct revela- 
tion. 

In Great Britain and in many 
other countries of Europe there 



LESSON DEPARTMENT 



53 



was bitter hatred and warfare be- 
tween Catholics and Protestants. 
The latter, especially, went to ex- 
cesses with their newly acquired 
liberties. "The mis-called Age of 
Reason, and the atheistical abomi- 
nations culminating in the French 
Revolution stand as an ineffaceable 
testimony of what man may become 
when glorying in his denial of 
God." The world today is threat- 
ened again by forces that deny God 
and reject his love and mercy. 

Men, unauthorized of God, have 
organized literally hundreds of 
churches. These churches have 
been named for men or "from the 
circumstances of their origin"; some 
are known because of distinctive 
doctrines. It is significant and 
challenging that in the beginning 
of the year 1830 there was no 
church on the earth that bore the 
name of Jesus Christ. Further there 
was only one church— the Catho- 
lic—that claimed authority to act 
for the Lord by succession, and 
none by direct revelation. If we 
are convinced that the original 
Church lost its authority through 
apostasy, then surely no other 
church could claim the right to 
officiate in the laws and ordinances 
of the gospel until divine authority 
was again restored. 

Many thoughtful men have ad- 
mitted frankly the lack of divine 
authority in the world. It is worthy 
of note that the Church of Eng- 
land admits an awful state of apos- 
tasy in the "Homily Against Peril 
of Idolatry," published during the 
sixteenth century. Let us consider 
one sentence: 

So that laity and clergy, learned and 
unlearned, all ages, sects, and degrees of 



men, women, and children of whole 
Christendom- — an horrible and most 
dreadful thing to think — have been at 
once drowned in abominable idolatry; 
of all other vices most detested of God, 
and most damnable to man; and that by 
the space of eight hundred years and 
more. 

So, we may conclude that God 
always gives to people "all that he 
seeth fit that they should have" 
(B. of M, Alma 29:8). We may 
well add that he gives them all that 
they will receive. During the pe- 
riod of the universal apostasy, the 
spirit of God strove with men and 
influenced them greatly. John, the 
apostle, and the three Nephites 
ministered somewhere on the face 
of the earth. No doubt during that 
time good men and women did the 
best they could in carrying out what 
they believed was the will of God; 
but the churches organized by hu- 
man beings were without divine 
authority. Only one church claimed 
a direct line of authority back to 
Jesus Christ and we have shown 
how that church completely lost its 
power through apostasy and sin. 
This is all in accordance with the 
prophecies found in the Holy Bible. 
Individual characters such as Co- 
lumbus, Washington, the Pilgrim 
Fathers, and others too numerous 
to mention, were led by the inspira- 
tion of God to. do great and marvel- 
ous things in preparation for the 
restoration of the gospel. We have 
direct revelation affirming that God 
raised up wise men to write the 
Constitution of the United States. 
He guided the founders of this great 
Government. 

But this inspiration and help 
from the Lord must not be mistak- 
en for direct revelation given to 



54 



RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— JANUARY 1$51 



prophets and apostles who stand 
with power and authority at the 
head of the true Church of Jesus 
the Christ. "Through the opera- 
tion of the genius of intelligence, 
which is the Spirit of Truth, the 
soul of the race had been under- 
going a preparation," and, in 1820, 
the Eternal Father and Jesus our 
Lord came to earth and inaugurated 
the great dispensation of the ful- 
ness of times. 



Questions and Suggestions for 
Discussion 

1. Enumerate the main causes which 
led to the apostasy. 

2. What led to the division of the 
Roman and Greek Catholic churches? 

3. Name some of the principles and 
ordinances of the true gospel which were 
changed during the apostasy. 

4. What led to the establishment of 
the Church of England? 

5. Discuss the Renaissance. 



Visiting cJeacher t/lessages — Our Savior 

Speaks 

Lesson 15— "And Jesus Answering Saith Unto Them, Have Faith In God" 

(Mark 11:22). 

Mary Grant Judd 

For Tuesday, April 3, 1951 

Objective: To point out that faith in God is fundamental to true success in life. 



"pAITH," says President David 
O. McKay, "is an anchor to 
the soul of man which brings bless- 
ings and peace." 

The trouble today is that mod- 
ern man, in his self-sufficiency, de- 
pends upon his own strength, fail- 
ing to even admit the need for the 
anchor of faith in God. Indifference 
is one of the dangers that seriously 
threaten us. When -man finds the 
world in chaos, he fails to blame 
himself. And yet whose fault is it, 
if not his? Chase S. Osborn, one 
of America's hopeful philosophers, 
in a letter to a friend recently said: 

You ask when things are going to be 
better. I might retort by asking "what 
things?" There is absolutely nothing wrong 
with the earth. The sun performs its 
functions. The earth is still in its orbit 



and on its axis. The clouds move hither 
and thither as usual and drench the 
thirsty footstool. The soil has all the 
elements of nourishment that sustain 
human life and everything else that it 
ever had. There is nothing wrong with 
the earth and with heaven, but somewhere 
between there has been a good deal of 
a mess. What then is wrong? It must 
be man. 

As Shakespeare expressed it, 
"The fault ... is not in our stars, 
but in ourselves, that we are under- 
lings." 

Charles A. Lindbergh, the first 
man to solo the Atlantic, recently 
called upon scientists "for a reorien- 
tation of our standards to place the 
character of man above the value of 
his products." 

It was a simple, childlike faith 
in God that was taught by the 



LESSON DEPARTMENT 



55 



Christ. "Ask, and it shall be given 
you; seek, and ye shall find; knock, 
and it shall be opened unto you," 
he told his disciples (Matt. 7:7). 
These promises our Savior is ready 
to make good in our day. But it 
must be realized that it will only 
be through our individual effort. 
The acquiring of faith is a personal 
thing. No one else can give it to 
us, although they may help in its 
attainment. It must come from 



within as a result of a quickening of 
the spirit which produces an inner 
conviction. Faith must come from 
the spiritual part of our beings. It 
is the eternal part of our natures 
that is nurtured when we increase 
our faith in God. 

Let us understand the importance 
of this admonition of Christ and 
make it active in our lives, "Have 
faith in God." 



Work 7TleeUng—The Art of Homemaking 

(A Course for Optional Use by Wards and Branches at Work Meeting) 

Lesson 7-Pictures, Mirrors, and Wall Accessories 

Christine H. Robinson 

For Tuesday, April 10, 1951 



CONSIDERABLE time and 
thought can be expended in se- 
lecting colors and arranging furni- 
ture, but, if any important decora- 
tive details in your home are over- 
looked, the attractive, livable re- 
sults desired may not be achieved. 
One of these important details, all 
too frequently overlooked, is the 
proper use of wall hangings, includ- 
ing pictures, mirrors, brackets, and 
other wall accessories. Wall hang- 
ings of all types provide an unusual 
opportunity for you to give your 
home that personal touch. With 
the possible exception of draperies, 
there is no other phase of home dec- 
orating in which individuality can 
be expressed so quickly, effectively, 
and inexpensively as in the selec- 
tion and placement of pictures and 
other wall hangings. 



Pictures can flatter and dress up 
a wall; they can dramatize a furni- 
ture grouping; they can make a small 
piece of furniture appear important 
and they can provide that added 
touch which gives a room interest, 
balance, and hospitality. 

In selecting pictures, avoid the 
error of buying just anything to fill 
up wall space. Select your pictures 
as carefully as any other item in 
your home furnishings, paying par- 
ticular attention to color, size, and 
type. Remember that color in pic- 
tures can make or break a room's 
decoration. If colors in a picture 
clash with patterned wallpaper, or 
with colors or design in furniture, 
the effect will be confusing and un- 
interesting. If, on the other hand, 
vour pictures pick up and accent the 
colors in your draperies, upholstery, 



56 RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— JANUARY 1951 

rug, and walls, the effect will be pattern on the wall for size and in- 
pleasing and harmonious. terest. If it creates the desired ef- 

The size of pictures, also, is im- feet, then hang the pictures them- 

portant. The picture or picture selves exactly as the pattern, 

grouping should bear a proper re- For interest and balance, pictures 

lationship in size to the furniture should form a part of a furniture 

with which it is used, and also to grouping, and not hang in independ- 

the wall area occupied. In deter- ent areas of their own. When hung 

mining the size of your pictures, do over a chest or sofa they should be 

not feel that you must always choose hung close enough together to form 

single, large ones. A wall area a single unit. Pictures should be 

which requires a considerable hung low, placed flat against the 

amount of coverage often can be wall, and set so that neither cord 

more effectively treated with a group nor nails show. When two or more 

of smaller pictures than with a large pictures are hung together, the bot- 

single one. torn line of the frames should be on 

Good decorating recommends the same level regardless of the size 
that small pictures should not be of the pictures, 
scattered around the room, but, In order to get the maximum 
rather, should be grouped together pleasure and decorative effect from 
on wall areas or over furniture your pictures, they need not be ex- 
groups or pieces which you wish to pensive commercial oils or prints, 
emphasize or dramatize. In creating You can have fun assembling and 
these groups, the pictures should be framing your own. Try cutting var- 
arranged to form horizontal and ious flower pictures from a seed cata- 
vertical rectangles, squares, or tri- logue, arranging them artistically to 
angles. Pictures should not be hung form a bouquet on a large colored 
in step-up fashion unless running piece of blotting paper. Frame the 
up a staircase. All pictures in the pictures yourself with molding pur- 
group should be hung close together chased from your lumber dealer, af- 
so that they form an integral unit, ter painting the molding a harmoni- 
to give a feeling of one large picture, ous color. Flower or bird prints can 
In forming a group of pictures, be often be found in magazines. You 
sure the subjects are related. For can mount these on colored mats 
instance, you would not hang oil that pick up a color from the print 
paintings, flower or bird prints, and and hang in groups for an effective 
etchings in the same group. You splash of color in your room. Use 
can, however, use various types of your imagination, and you will think 
pictures in the same room, but not of many more interesting and help- 
in the same group. One way to be ful ideas. Remember, in framing 
sure of an interesting arrangement your pictures, the rules are simple— 
without marring your walls, is to express your own personality, suit 
arrange the pictures first on the the frame to the picture itself and 
floor, and then cut patterns of them to the character of your room, 
out of brown paper and attach these The same basic principles of good 
together with Scotch tape. Try this taste and judgment applied to the 



LESSON DEPARTMENT 



57 



use of pictures also apply to the 
selection and hanging of mirrors. 
Mirrors add life, gaiety, and spa- 
ciousness to a home and perform a 
function which cannot be filled by 
any other type of home furnishing. 
In hanging your mirrors, see that 
they reflect something interesting 
and that their size is appropriate to 
the wall space. 

If a mirror is too small for proper 
balance over a piece of furniture or 
on a wall area, it can be built out 
by hanging, on each side, a group 
of pictures, colorful china plates, 
or wall brackets holding interesting 
objects. 

In decorating your walls do not 
overlook the possibilities of brackets 
and colorful plates. These can be 
used to add importance and size 



to a picture or mirror, or they can 
be used in interesting groups of 
their own. In using plates as wall 
decorations, again make sure they 
express the feeling of your room, 
formality or informality, and that 
they have the same general coloring 
as the rest of your room. 

Discussion Points 

i. Discuss the importance of pictures 
and wall hangings which express the char- 
acter of a room. 

2. Give ideas on framing pictures. Why, 
with the exception of oil paintings, should 
most pictures have mats? 

3. Demonstrate various ways of hanging 
a group of pictures. 

4. Show how a small piece of furniture 
can be made to look important by the use 
of suitable wall decorations. 



jCtterature — The Literature of England 

Lesson 15— Oliver Goldsmith 
Elder Biiant S. Jacobs 

For Tuesday, April 17, 1951 



HpHE need to look at a man's face 
in order to "know" either him 
or his works is a strong and natural 
one, but there is something of the 
mystical about it as well. In seeing 
an author's likeness, most of us 
like to flatter ourselves that in his 
features we can discern the qualities 
which characterize the most inti- 
mate self-revelation which, recorded 
in communicable form, has come to 
be known as literature. The process 
also works in reverse: oftentimes, 
while reading a passage which is so 
particularly immediate that it comes 
alive in our imagination suddenly, 



and without being summoned, the 
image of the author looms heavily 
across our subconscious mental 
screen, almost like Hamlet's ghost. 
Instantaneously, we relate the 
essence of the passage to the per- 
sonal traits we like to see in his 
face and say within ourselves, "Yes, 
this indeed is his. I see it all, now, 
and all is one. His looks are of the 
same breed as his poetry. I like 
them both." 

When Sir Joshua Reynolds paint- 
ed the portrait of his friend Oliver 
Goldsmith, he caught those quali- 
ties (or at least seemed to) which 



58 



RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— JANUARY 1951 



made Goldsmith the most charm- 
ing, graceful stylist of his century, 
and one of the most pleasant writers 
one will ever read. A full, high 
forehead, heavy eyebrows, large, 
alert eyes, a mouth delicately shaped, 
yet full, and rounded cheeks, 
still scarred by the pox which had 
disfigured him as a child and which 
made him resent his ugliness even 
as he did his poverty. "Here," we 
might say, "is a man neither cun- 
ning, aloof, nor profound. His eye 
seems poised between a wink and a 
perpetual twinkle. From the side 
view portrait he might well turn to 
us full face, with warmth and cheer 
radiating toward us, unknown to 
him as we are. Having just met 
him, nonetheless we feel him to be 
one of us. Even as he seems to 
enjoy life, here is someone to enjoy. 
Tell us more about him." Whether 
such thoughts originate from the 
portrait alone, from his works alone, 
or from a combination of the two, 
is a mystery, but an unimportant 
one. The fact remains that such 
impressions arise, and pervade our 
acquaintance with every aspect of 
the man. 

But there is one other significant 
point in Reynolds' interpretation of 
Oliver Goldsmith that merits com- 
ment. In the portrait Goldsmith's 
left hand rests upon an open note- 
book; his right hand, holding a 
nibbed goose quill, is poised above 
the page, as if waiting for the proper 
phrasing to come before recording 
it. While he did not find himself 
as a writer until he was nearly thirty 
years of age, Goldsmith for decades 
fought off starvation with his pen 
as his sole weapon. During these 
desperate years of struggle he pro- 




A Perry Picture Copyright 1909 

OLIVER GOLDSMITH 

1728-1774 

duced a volume of work which even 
by his fellow hack writers would be 
considered vast. He contributed to 
at least ten different periodicals, and 
wrote, revised, translated, compiled, 
or supervised at least forty volumes 
of work, some of them as sizeable 
as his eight-volume History of the 
Earth and Animated Nature. Nor 
did he receive just pay for his 
labors, since he was helpless to pre- 
vent his work for periodicals from 
being pirated by other publications. 
As he once remarked, "If there be 
a pride in multiple editions, I have 
seen some of my labors sixteen times 
reprinted, and claimed by different 
parents as their own." 

We must also credit his achieve- 
ment on a level higher than writing 



LESSON DEPARTMENT 59 

to keep from starving. Like Dryden, pounds his uncle had given him and 

in the generation preceding, Gold- returned home. Next his uncle 

smith wrote and excelled in drama, financed him in his desire to be- 

poetry, and essay. Goldsmith wrote come a doctor. He stayed in Edin- 

as well the most popular novel of burgh for a time, then Leyden, and 

the century, The Vicar of Wake- finally walked throughout most of 

field, which has also proved to be the countries of Europe on a grand 

one of the best-known novels of the tour of enjoyment and ease, paying 

English people. Judging by his his way by playing the flute and 

versatile excellences in polite litera- debating before learned groups. He 

ture, we can see how far he rose returned penniless, and in rapid 

above a lowly beginning and long order was an apothecary's assistant, 

years of wasted young manhood. a school teacher, a poor man's phy- 

Oliver Goldsmith was born in sician, a printer's devil, and finally 

1728 in rural Ireland, and though a hack writer in London's famous 

he left Ireland forever at twenty- Grub Street. 

three, he always carried in his heart In 1760-1761 Goldsmith wrote 
the warm Irish virtues; he was care- his most important series of essays, 
free, considerate, and willing to which were collected the following 
give his friends whatever he had. year as The Citizen oi the World: 
His kind uncle sent him to Trinity Oi y Letteis horn a Chinese Philos- 
College in Dublin, but school work opher Residing in London to His 
bored him. After dunking a teacher Fiiends in the East (text, pp. 1024- 
in a well, Goldsmith impetuously 1032). Here, as always in Gold- 
sold his books and was ready to smith, we see him drawing almost 
seek his fortune in America, but entirely on personal experience for 
his uncle persuaded him to return material; he appraised England with 
to college. He finally managed to the traveler's eye which he had 
graduate at twenty-one, but he acquired during his European jaunt, 
was near the bottom of his class. Because of the intensifying interest 
Behind him he left a reputation in the Orient, he found it advan- 
for unpaid bills, and for selling his tageous to make the narrator a 
ballads for five shillings apiece, Chinese. The Oriental viewpoint 
then sneaking out at night to hear was also useful because Goldsmith 
them sung in the local taverns. wished to point out the foibles of 

After college he enjoyed life and England by showing how unreason- 
youth by staying for a time with able they were, and the Chinese 
various relatives, fishing and hunting were noted for their cool wisdom 
in the countryside, playing his flute and common sense. But it was not 
to the accompaniment of his cousin so much this device as it was his 
at the harpsichord, and enjoying the style which charmed his audience, 
local tavern society. When his These essays, written in the manner 
application to take religious orders of Addison and Steele, are not only 
was denied, Goldsmith started for smooth and graceful; they are in- 
London to become a lawyer, but in formal, and warm, flowing with the 
Dublin he gambled away the fifty freshness of a personality who 



60 



RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— JANUARY 1951 



writes for the joy of writing, just as 
he lived and laughed and sang for 
the joys of living happily. The 
charm of his style is unique, since 
it is the charm of Goldsmith him- 
self, who was vivid, fluent, and 
always at his ease. The musical, 
flowing quality of his style is un- 
deniable from the first sentence: 

May the wings of peace rest upon thy 
dwelling, and the shield of conscience 
preserve thee from vice and misery! (text, 
page 1025) 

These essays are satirical, but of 
a warmer, kindlier tone than we 
have studied earlier. After poking 
mild fun at the British for being 
such sea-dogs, he calls London 
gloomy, and describes "a great lazy 
puddle" which were her streets, her 
dingy architecture, and the un- 
imaginative quality of her riches: 
"A man's riches may be seen in his 
eyes: if we judge of the English by 
this rule, there is not a poorer na- 
tion under the sun/' Letter III 
praises reason, points that such 
variables as the definition of female 
beauty depends on the point of 
view, and chides the English gentle- 
man and gentlewoman for the 
foolish fads they worship as aids to 
what they define as personal beauty. 
In Letter IV he finds the English 
proud, unwilling to be the first to 
speak, ignorant of the true meaning 
of liberty, far too willing to tell the 
King how the country should be 
run, and valuing esteem and posi- 
tion more than love and social en- 
joyment of friends. Letter CVI 
satirizes the custom of honoring the 
dead by writing poetry which is 
mechanically written by the under- 
taker as a part of his service. The 



following passage might well be 
autobiographical : 

... I am induced to pity the poet, 
whose trade is thus to make demigods and 
heroes for a dinner. There is not in na- 
ture a more dismal figure than a man 
who sits down to premeditated flattery: 
every stanza he writes tacitly reproaches 
the meanness of his occupation, till, at 
last, his stupidity becomes more stupid, 
and his dullness more diminutive (text 
page 1030). 

His creation of Beau Tibbs (text, 
page 1031) is a masterful piece of 
writing. In less than a page and a 
half we come to know him inti- 
mately: his pretense at wealth while 
he is in want; his ability to lie so 
habitually that he cannot remember 
truth; his fawning agreement with 
whatever is said in order to please; 
his fundamental hypocrisy; and 
finally, the climax of all his previous 
small talk: 

. . . but dear Drybone, you are an hon- 
est creature, lend me half-a-crown for a 
minute or two, or so, just till — but 
hearkee, ask me for it the next time we 
meet, or it may be twenty to one but 
I forget to pay you (10, text, page 1032). 

Herein is the very stuff of which 
we weak humans are made. 

Soon after coming to London, 
Goldsmith became an intimate of 
Samuel Johnson, a great distinction 
for anyone. When Johnson found- 
ed his "Club" in 1764, "Goldy," 
was a charter member— "Goldy," 
whom everyone liked— even Boswell, 
who sometimes seemed slightly 
jealous of his wit and nearness to 
Johnson. It was Goldsmith who 
stood alone against the great roar- 
ings of Johnson, ignoring the con- 
demnations and bluster as if he 



LESSON DEPARTMENT 



61 



didn't know he was the object of 
the "Great Bears/' attack, and soon 
they would once more be on the 
friendliest of terms. And it was 
Johnson who rescued "Goldy" from 
a landlady who had him arrested 
for not paying his rent by taking 
Goldsmith's novel to the printer 
and returning the sixty pounds to 
the author. It was in this novel, 
The Vicar of Wakefield, that Gold- 
smith immortalized his clergyman 
father as Dr. Primrose, the simple, 
kind, but impractical man who has 
stolen the hearts of generations of 
readers. Later on, in 1771, Gold- 
smith achieved equal success on 
the stage when, in his She Stoops to 
Conquer (text, page 1039), he also 
used an actual incident from his 
own boyhood as the plot for this 
comedy, which still remains one of 
our best. But now we should con- 
sider his verse, particularly his best 
and most famous poem, The De- 
serted Village (text, page 1032), 
published in 1770. 

Eight years earlier Goldsmith had 
published an essay, "The Revolu- 
tion in Low Life," in which he stat- 
ed the same convictions as those of 
his greatest poem. England was 
rapidly being transformed from an 
agricultural nation into an indus- 
trial one, and in this transition the 
rights, and consequently the inno- 
cent happiness of the rural peasan- 
try, were being harshly violated and 
finally made extinct. The Deserted 
Village appears on the surface to be 
a satire on the luxury-loving wealthy 
class and their callous destruction 
of entire villages in order to enlarge 
their estates and beautify them 
through extensive landscaping. 
Elsewhere he had praised material 



progress, nor does he oppose it now; 
he does oppose the insane love of 
luxury which sudden industrial and 
commercial wealth had brought to 
the upper classes. 

The poem consists of the poet's 
memories of his boyhood village of 
Auburn as now he pokes among 
the uncultivated wildernesses where 
once it stood. Frequently he pauses 
in his bitter comparison between 
then and now to exclaim, 

luxury, thou cursed by Heaven's decree 
How ill exchanged are things like these 

for thee! 
How do thy potions, with insidious joy, 
Diffuse their pleasures only to destroy! 
(385-388, text, page 1038) 

Actually, the poem achieves its 
universal appeal, not in condemning 
luxury, but in presenting, through 
selected detail and powerful senti- 
ment, the bygone days of the pure 
rural virtues and the complementing 
joys of youth and old age living to- 
gether. Here we find the melan- 
choly longing for the blissful yester- 
days which was to play so strong a 
role in nineteenth-century Romanti- 
cism. Indeed, the range of senti- 
mental appeal is so broad that al- 
most everyone finds in the poem a 
description somewhat approximat- 
ing his present frame of mind, what- 
ever it might be. 

If the reader is young, he identi- 
fies himself with 

The bashful virgin's side-long looks of 
love. 

(29, text, page 1033) 

If he is old, he reads most care- 
fully the following: 

1 still had hopes, my latest hours to crown 
Amidst these humble bowers to lay me 

down; 



62 



RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— JANUARY 1951 



To husband out life's taper at the close 
And keep the flame from wasting by re- 
pose. 

(85-89, text, page 1034) 

Should the reader be a mother, 
she sees herself as she 

. . . Kissed her thoughtless babes with 
many a tear 
And clasped them close in sorrow doubly 
dear. 

(381-382, text, page 1038) 

The father consoles his homeless 
wife in "silent manliness of grief," 
recalling that 

A time there was, ere England's griefs 

began, 
When every rood of ground maintained its 

man . . . 
His best companions, innocence and 

health; 
And his best riches, ignorance of wealth. 
(57-61, text, page 1033) 

Further to intensify each reader's 
identification with the glorious past, 
Goldsmith next describes the 
church, the school, and the tavern: 

Yes: let the rich deride, the proud disdain, 
These simple blessings of the lowly train; 
To me more dear, congenial to my heart, 
One native charm, than all the gloss of art. 
(251-254, text, page 1036) 

Spontaneous joys, where nature has its 
play, 

The soul adopts and owns their first-born 
sway; 

Lightly they frolic o'er the vacant mind, 

Unenvied, unmolested, unconfined: 

But the long pomp, the midnight mas- 
querade, 

With all the freaks of wanton wealth ar- 
rayed, 

In these, ere triflers half their wish obtain, 

The toiling pleasure sickens into pain; 

And, e'en while fashion's brightest arts 
decoy, 

The heart distrusting asks, if this be joy. 
(255-264, text, page 1036) 



Thus, in his flowing lines, Gold- 
smith described the warm human- 
ity, the fruitful, carefree life of his 
boyhood in tones so rich with nos- 
talgia and melancholy that the poem 
has come to be a minor English 
classic. 

His "Retaliation" (text, page 
1039) reveals the convivial, hearty 
fun Goldsmith found in supping 
and talking with a group of the 
keen, accomplished men who above 
all else, were his friends. When 
David Garrick, the great actor, 
spontaneously composed the follow- 
ing epitaph for Goldsmith, 

Here lies Nolly Goldsmith, for shortness 

called Noll, 
Who wrote like an angel, but talked like 

poor Poll, 

he "retaliated" some weeks later 
with a friendly satirical sketch of 
each of his friends. While some- 
times his tone bears a mild cutting 
edge, here predominantly is the 
sparkling wit and the joy that comes 
when "Good fellows get together." 

When Oliver Goldsmith died in 
his forty-sixth year, he took with 
him certain weaknesses which he 
never overcame. He spent far too 
much of his substance on elegant 
clothes, and was always giving far 
more than he should to his needv 
friends; consequently throughout 
his life, even when he made a good 
wage, he was so deeply in debt that 
at critical moments he had to leave 
town to escape his creditors. He 
was so engrossed with the joys of 
living that in many ways he was 
irresponsible. Yet beside his ac- 
complishments such details hardly 
deserve mention. While he was 
not a great thinker, he was interested 



LESSON DEPARTMENT 



63 



in ideas; in presenting his own to 
us he is never tedious nor depress- 
ing. Because of the charm of his 
personality and his style, his writ- 
ings are pleasant and familiar. He 
enjoyed writing his views on a life 
which he found congenial and good; 
therefore we enjoy reading what 
was so happily penned. As Samuel 
Johnson said of him, "Let not his 
frailties be remembered; he was a 
very great man/' The verdict of 
time has not proved Johnson wrong. 



Questions for Discussion 

i. Characterize Oliver Goldsmith: (a) 
as a man; (b) as a writer. 

2. Was Goldsmith's youth entirely 
wasted? Discuss his early years as source 
material for his writings. 

3. Discuss Goldsmith's literary pro- 
ductiveness and versatility. 

4. Why is Goldsmith's style so pleas- 
ant to read? 

5. Why did Goldsmith write The De- 
serted Village? 

6. If time permits, have several choice 
passages read from The Deserted Village. 



Social Science— The Progress of Man 

Part 1— The Lesson of History 
Lesson 6— The Role of Ancient Israel 
Elder Archibald F. Bennett 
(Text: The Progress of Man, by Elder Joseph Fielding Smith, chapter 10.) 

For Tuesday, April 24, 1951 

Objective: To portray how Israel's mission, as the Lord's chosen people, was to 
preserve in the world the knowledge of God and the true gospel, and to exercise divine 
authority for the good of all mankind. 



The Call of Abraham 
COME seventeen hundred years be- 
fore the birth of our Savior there 
lived in Ur of the Chaldees a young 
man who found himself very much 
out of harmony with his surround- 
ings. The city of Erech, or Ur, as 
it is called in the scriptures, was a 
place of considerable importance in 
the land of Chaldea, about two 
thousand years b.c. At the time 
of which we write it was under the 
dominion of Pharaoh, King of 
Egypt. The inhabitants of the land 
had turned from the worship of the 
true God to the worship of the gods 
of the heathen. Abraham writes of 
these times as follows: 



My fathers having turned from their 
righteousness, and from the holy com- 
mandments which the Lord their God 
had given unto them, unto the worship- 
ing of the gods of the heathen, utterly re- 
fused to hearken to my voice; 

For their hearts were set to do evil, 
and were wholly turned to the god of 
Elkenah, and the god of Libnah, and the 
god of Mahmackrah, and the god of 
Korash, and the god of Pharoah, king of 
Egypt; 

Therefore they turned their hearts to 
the sacrifice of the heathen in offering up 
their children unto their dumb idols, and 
hearkened not unto my voice, but en- 
deavored to take away my life by the 
hand of the priest of Elkenah. The priest 
of Elkenah was also the priest of Pharaoh 
(Pearl of Great Price, Abraham 1:5-7). 



64 RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— JANUARY 1951 

Now Abraham had refused to fol- Terah, the father of Abraham, 
low the teachings of his fathers for found Haran a pleasant place and 
he had in his hands the records he remained there, having turned 
which had come down from the again to his idolatry. Abraham, in 
earliest fathers, containing the his- answer to this call of the Lord, 
tory of the patriarchs from the days journeyed on until he arrived in 
of Adam to his own time, which Canaan. Here Abraham manifest- 
the Lord had preserved in his hands, ed his faith and integrity before the 
In this manner, and perhaps because Lord in his willingness to offer his 
Abraham had also listened to the dearest possession, his son Isaac, up- 
teachings of Noah and Shem, he on the altar of sacrifice, at the corn- 
understood the truth. Under all mand of the Lord. Thus being 
these conditions, and finding op- proved and found not wanting, Abra- 
position even in his own house- ham was greatly blessed. (See Abra- 
hold, Abraham found it necessary ham 2:8-11.) 

to leave his place of residence. Abra- We have already mentioned the 
ham was a prayerful man, and it fact that the Lord would have glad- 
was in answer to his fervent prayer ly conferred the blessings of the 
that the Lord spoke to him saying: gospel and the power of the Priest- 
"Get thee out of thy country, and hood upon all peoples, if they would 
from thy kindred, and from thy fa- have received it, but in their failure 
ther's house, unto a land that I will he called Abraham and placed upon 
show thee" (Pearl of Great Price, him this wonderful blessing, because 
Abraham 2:3). Therefore he left of his faithfulness. This honor and 
the land of Ur to go into the land blessing places Abraham as the fa- 
of Canaan, taking with him his ther of all those who receive the 
wife, his brother's son and his wife, gospel from his day to the end of 
and also his father who had consent- time. No person can receive the 
ed to go because of the severity of gospel and the Priesthood without 
the famine. becoming of the seed of Abraham. 

The scattering of Israel, which came 

The Lord's Covenant with Abraham because of rebellion, the Lord 

For a time Abraham and his col- turned into a blessing in behalf of 
ony dwelt in a place they called ot her nations by infusing the blood 
Haran, presumably named after f Abraham among other peoples. 
Abraham's brother who was the fa- 
ther of Lot. In the land of Haran j ne House oi Israel 
the word of the Lord came to Abra- We are informed that there were 
ham again: certain intelligences who were en- 

. . . Arise, and take Lot with thee; for titled to come to the earth through 

I have purposed to take thee away out of a chosen lineage. These are the 

Haran, and to make of thee a minister to spirits who have belonged to the 

bear my name in a strange land which I house of Israel and who were sep- 
wffl give unto thy seed after thee for an t d befor£ th Lord diyided ftfc 

everlasting possession, when they hearken . _ . 

to my voice (Pearl of Great Price, Abra- inheritances among the nations, 

ham 2:6). (See Deut. 32:7-9; Acts 17:26.) 



LESSON DEPARTMENT 65 

The promised blessings given to two of the sons of Israel in the 

Abraham have come down more reckoning, 
particularly through the seed of 

Isaac and Jacob, son and grandson The Da Y of Israel ' s Greatness 

of Abraham, respectively. Jacob, lt was decreed h Y the Almighty, 

son of Isaac, is spoken of as the fccord.ng to the promise of Abra- 

founder of the house of Israel. His ham ' tha * th * Israelites should re- 

, , , ,. . ,. . mam m Egypt for a period. During 

name was changed by divine edict ,,. ,. fr f • ^ « 

5 J this time they were to grow into a 

from Jacob to Israel. Jacob had mighty peop]e In keeping with 

four wives and twelve sons. These this prediction i srae l wen t down in- 
twelve sons became the heads of to Egypt and there remained four 
the twelve tribes of Israel, with this hundred years. In the fourth gen- 
exception: When Jacob went down eration under Moses a great multi- 
into Egypt and found Joseph there, tude of people came out of Egypt, 
who had been sold by his brothers, for the time had come for them to 
he also found that Joseph had two possess their inheritance in the land 
sons, Manasseh and Ephraim. The of Canaan. 

Lord directed Jacob to adopt these When they entered into the land 

two grandsons as his own. Jacob, to possess it, the Lord gave them 

by blessing and adoption, took these definite and pointed instructions, 

two sons of Joseph and numbered They were admonished and com- 

them with his own sons, saying that manded to keep the statutes and 

all the other children of Joseph judgments thus given unto them, 

should also be named after Ephraim They were promised if they would 

and Manasseh and be numbered do so that they would always pos- 

among the tribes issuing from these sess the land in peace and safety, 

two sons. The choosing of these two the land would produce in abund- 

grandsons to be the heads of tribes ance, happiness and prosperity 

in Israel did not increase the num- should follow them all their days; 

ber of tribes from twelve to four- and they would have the constant 

teen, however. The Lord blessed companionship and blessings of 

Joseph with a double portion be- righteous leaders, and the revelations 

cause of his faithfulness. He does of heaven. 

not appear by name as a tribe, but is Israel was duly warned that if the 

represented by his two sons. Later, people rebelled against the Lord, 

when the children of Israel came and refused to accept his statutes 

out of Egypt, the Lord instructed and judgments, and to hearken to 

Moses to take the males of the tribe his prophets, that a curse would be 

of Levi and make them priests of placed upon the land. All kinds of 

the people. In this capacity, they trouble and sorrow would be meted 

were not to be numbered as a tribe, out to them, and they would find 

but were to be scattered among the themselves in bondage to other 

people. We see, then, that the num- peoples. Nor was this all, it was 

ber of the tribes remained at twelve, predicted the time would come 

two of the sons of Joseph replacing when they would be driven forth 



66 RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— JANUARY 1951 

from the land and scattered among and known as the kingdom of Ju- 

all peoples. dah, remained in their inheritance 

From the days of Moses until the until about the time that Lehi left 

days of the prophet Samuel, Israel Jerusalem, 600 b.c. The people 

was governed by judges raised up were inclined to repent more read- 

from among the people. In the days ily and therefore the Lord spared 

of Samuel they demanded a king, them a little longer than their kins- 

They desired to be ruled by a king men of the northern kingdom, 

as were the nations around them. Eventually, however, their iniquity 

So Israel was given a king. Saul, son brought this kingdom to its end. 

of Kish, of the tribe of Benjamin, They were carried off captive by 

was chosen. His story is a sad one. Nebuchadnezzar in the reign of 

In course of time Saul became ar- Zedekiah and planted in the land of 

rogant, selfish, and cruel, and lost Babylon, 
his kingdom. He was succeeded by 

David, son of Jesse, of the tribe of A State of Wicked Rebellion 
Judah. Once again a righteous and They remained in Babylon seven- 
goodly person was chosen, for David ty years. Then under the reign of 
was a man of exceptional faith and the Persians, they were privileged 
great ability. -Yet, even with David, to return. In the land of Babylon, 
power brought him to the verge of under their suffering, they had lost 
destruction. their besetting sin, that of idol wor- 
ship. Again they built the temple. 
Apostasy and Captivity Again a measure of prosperity came 

Following the reign of the third to them. And again their repentance 

king, Solomon, who was honored did not last very long before once 

with the duty of building the tern- more they had fallen into grievous 

pie, there came a division among sin. 

the people. Ten of the twelve tribes Much of this time was spent in 

rebelled, and set up another king- spiritual darkness, and a portion of 

dom. These two kingdoms existed their subsequent history is recorded 

side by side until about 730 b.c, in the Apocrypha. When Christ 

when the ten tribes, known as the came he found the Jews in a state 

kingdom of Israel, were carried off of most wicked apostasy, perhaps 

captive into Assyria by Shalmaneser. such as had never been known 

From that captivity they never re- among their people amidst their 

turned to their own land, and are darkest hours of unbelief while gov- 

known as the Lost Tribes to this erned by their kings. When they 

day. The Lord had set prophets cried out against the Son of God, 

among them, but their warnings who came to bring them the fulness 

were not heeded and the Lord ful- of salvation, the anger of the Al- 

filled his promise made through mighty was kindled against them, 

Moses that they should be banished and they were persecuted, driven, 

from the land. and scattered, until they became a 

The other kingdom, comprising hiss and a byword among all na- 

the tribes of Judah and Benjamin, tions. 



LESSON DEPARTMENT 



67 



A Day oi Fulfillment Promised 

Today the words of the prophets 
are being fulfilled. Judah is being 
gathered. Jerusalem is being rebuilt 
and the Lord is preparing to redeem 
his ancient people. Eventually they 
will be sitting under their own vine 
and fig tree, enjoying the fulness of 
the gospel, and the blessings of the 
house of the Lord, in fulfillment of 
the words of Ezekiel: 

Moreover I will make a covenant of 
peace with them, it shall be an everlast- 
ing covenant with them: and I will place 
them, and multiply them, and will set my 
sanctuary in the midst of them for ever- 
more (Ezekiel 37:26). 

Thoughts for Discussion 

1. What was the distinctive mission of 
Israel in the world? 

2. Why was Israel made a chosen na- 
tion so greatly blessed? 



3. What is the chief lesson to be 
learned from the history of the house of 
Israel? 

4. Are there evidences of progression 
and retrogression in the history of Israel? 

5. Have a class member assigned to 
prepare and enumerate the essentials of 
the covenant the Lord made with Abra- 
ham and his posterity as to: 

a. numbers 

b. bearing the gospel to all nations 

c. the Priesthood 

d. bringing blessings to all families of 
the earth 

e. everlasting land inheritance. 

6. Have parts of the covenants been 
fulfilled? If not, will they yet be? 

7. Show how the dispersion of Israel 
has proved a blessing to the nations. 

8. Will any of the covenants of the 
Lord with Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, Joseph 
and Ephraim fail to be fulfilled? (Com- 
pare Book of Mormon, Mormon 8:21-23; 
D. & C. 1:37-38; Genesis 28:13-14.) 



T/lustc — Fundamentals of Musicianship 

Conducting, Singing, and Accompanying 

(For Music Department at Union Meeting) 
Textbook: Fundamentals of Conducting, by J. Spencer Cornwall. 

Lesson 7-Theories Underlying Singing, Accompanying, and Conducting 

Florence /. Madsen 

Objective: To focus attention on the importance of harmonious activity between singers, 
accompanist, and conductor. 

united with a melody of sustaining 
tones, with repeated sentences, 
declamatory words, increasing 
volume and height, or diminishing 
power and range, evolves as a mes- 
sage of lasting worth and lives in 
the hearts of the many. 

2. Theories Underlying Singing 

"... I will sing with the spirit, and 
I will sing with the understanding also" 
(St. Paul, I Cor. 14:15). 



1. Interpretation of Song Material 

(a) The duty of the interpreter of mu- 
sic is to bring out of a composition 
its full meaning and significance; 
to express beautifully and simply 
the intent of the composer. 

(b) In singing there are two mediums 
through which to work — the mu- 
sic and the text. The first con- 
sideration should be given to the 
text. The poem which, though 
lovely, might have lived only in 
the memories of the few, when 



68 



RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— JANUARY 1951 



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.8942 I Will Thank Thee, O Lord— 

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.962 Invocation — Moore 16 



My Soul Is Athirst for God — 
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.CM650 O Day of Rest and Gladness 

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.6221 Unto Thee I Lift Mine Eyes- 
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The following are a few basic the- 
ories that have been adopted by great 
singers : 

'The training of the Voice to sing, 
without training the Singer's Mind, and 
the Singer's Body, is no training at all" 
(Withrow). 

"Every vocal tone is, in fact, a men- 
tal concept reproduced as voice by the 
physical organs of voice-production, so 
that every vocal tone is, in its origin, 
a mental phenomenon" (Frane E. 
Miller, M.D.). 

"Sing as if the breath remained in 
the body, never as if blowing the breath 
out . . . Attack (tone) almost as if 
continuing to take breath" (G. B. 
Lamperti). 

"He who knows how to speak and 
to breathe, knows how to sing" (Pac- 
chierotti). 

"When you can start your voice 
with your mouth shut as well as you 
can with it open, you can sing. When 
the voice retains the same hum-like 
sound and feeling after the lips part, 
as it has before they separate, you can 
sing" (Lamperti). 

Great singers have applied the the- 
ory that to sing correctly one must 
stand erect, with the torso comfortably 
expanded, and with weight of body on 
the balls of the feet. 

3. Theories and Practice of Accom- 
panying 

(a) "The minds of conductor and ac- 
companist must work as one" (Dr. 
Gehrkens). 

(b) The accompanist should be able 
at all times to see the conductor 
without having to turn her head. 

(c) To fully express the intended 
mood and message of a song the 
accompanist should become famil- 
iar with the words and be guided 
in her playing by their inspiration. 

(d) Practice playing the following 
hymns and apply: 

1. Correct tempo 

2. Appropriate mood 

3. Proper style 

4. Consistent nuances (variation 
of volume) 



LESSON DEPARTMENT 



69 



L.D.S. Hymns, pp. 75, 82 (marcato, 

accented rhythm), 76, 111 (legato, 

smooth and connected). 

Deseret Sunday School Songs, pp. 13, 

22, 33, 138. 

Hymns (new book) pp. 51, 85, 162, 

163 

4. Conducting 

(a) Study the 3/4 baton-pattern in 
the textbook, page 11, fig. 4. Prac- 
tice this pattern thoroughly in 
both maximum and medium beats 
and apply to the following hymns: 
Deseret Sunday School Songs, pp. 215 
(sing the correct words), 124, 254 (ar- 
ranged differently in new Hymn Book) 
126, 139, 141, 147, 148, 151, 174, 220 
(Begin hymn 220 by counting and con- 
ducting the complete measure of which 
only half appears in the beginning of 
the song; the missing half is in the 
last measure. This song appears in an- 
other rhythm in the new Hymn Book, 
pp. 97 and 366. 5, 11 (3/2) 12, 13, 
14, 162, 167, 206, 239, 246, 257 
(3/8) 252 (3/2) 16, 259, 273. In 
this hymn, page 16, observe the fer- 
mati — the hold over the notes. 

5. The Fermata or Hold 

A note, or rest, having a fermati over 
or under it, should be sustained until 
the sense of rhythm is satisfied. This is 
done by continuing the baton-beat 
more slowly toward the next beat. (See 
textbook. ) 

L.D.S. Hymns, pp.' 2, 10, 15, 85, 87, 
98, 148, 393 (page 393—3/2, start 
with up beat.) 

Questions and Suggestions 
for Discussion 

1. What is meant by interpretation? 
(a) Name several of the important 

points. 

2. What should the audience expect to 
hear and feel through music? 

3. Name a few of the philosophies un- 
derlying singing: 

(a) What is singing? (b) Who 
should sing? (c) Why? (d) 
How may the tone quality in 
singing be improved? 

4. Should the accompanist know the 
words of the song? Why? 



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A Christmas Gift 
for Teacher 

(Continued from page 27) 

He folded the paper up again and 
pushed it deep into his pocket. "I 
have to take it back to mother. I 
only just borrowed it for you to 
see a minute." 

"Thank you, Joe. You take it 
back safely to mother. I'm very 
happy for all of you." 

There was Yuletide gladness still 
echoing from the school halls, but 
the greatest gladness rang in Joe's 
soft voice, "Well, Merry Christmas, 
Miss Brown, and good night." 

"Goodnight, Joe." And Miss 
Brown put two shining copper pen- 
nies away in her heart forever. 



^jror 



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While some men strive toward distant 

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And scorn the path they tread, 
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With love, and work, and bread! 



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Young as spring, 

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Warm as April's sun, 

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My child is summer's laughter 

Gay with life, 

Springing from her tiptoes, singing from 

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My child is fall's companion 
Warm as fire, 
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My child is winter 

Bright as snow, 

Loud at morning, soft at moonglow. 



VUttktn II ly drear t 

Grace Sayre 

You waved your hand to me far down 

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But though you were at least a block away 
'Hie distance telescoped, and you were 

here 
Within my heart today. 

You smiled at me across a span of years; 
Your smile has nourished tenderly the 

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Memorial Mortuary 

125 No. Main Phone 3-7624 

Salt Lake City. Utah 

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Three consecutive generations 
have devoted their lives to the 
funeral service standards of this 
community. 

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JOSEPH E. TAYLOR 

The Intermountain West's first 
mortician — appointed by Pres. 
Brigham Young in 1860 — 91 years 
ago. 



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JOSEPH WM. TAYLOR 

Eldest son of Joseph E. Taylor, 
starting his career with his father 
as a boy of 13 years, established 
his own business in 1882 — 69 
years ago this month. 

MARGUERITE TAYLOR 
BECK 

Daughter of 

JOSEPH WM. TAYLOR 

who now is carrying on the family tradi- 
tion, assisted by her husband Charles 
Asher Beck, daughter Gloria, and a com- 
petent staff. 



Page 1' 



Qjrorn I Lear and QJt 



ar 



Fae Decker Dix, author of "A Christmas 

Gift for Teacher/' wife of D. C. Dix, 
and mother of two children, is a former 
school teacher now acting as coordinator 
for community councils and other adult 
education programs in Iron County, Utah. 
She has served for many years as litera- 
ture class leader in Cedar City First Ward 
and as a teacher in other auxiliary organ- 
izations of the Church. She has written 
many poems and pageants, and much of 
her work has been published in poetry 
magazines and in Church publications. 
She was awarded the Deseret News Christ- 
mas Story prize in 1936 for her offering 
"Empty Stocking." 

I wish to express my thanks for the fine 
work done by The Relief Society Maga- 
zine. I find that too often we take things 
for granted and do not express our thanks 
and appreciation of the Church. I enjoy 
the variety of things that can be found in 
The Relief Society Magazine, because this 
is evidence of the well-rounded life of 
Latter-day Saint women. I'm not the 
only one to give praise to the Magazine, 
because I know of a small branch here in 
England which gets a few copies of the 
Magazine and each copy goes from hand 
to hand until everyone in the branch has 
read it. There isn't much left of the 
Magazine when they get through, but 
each copy shows how well it has been 
used. 

— Elder Robert William Smith 

Halifax, Yorkshire, England 

I have just read the formula for home- 
made soap in the November issue of the 
Magazine (page 758). May I make an 
addition? If one cup of Clorox and three 
tablespoons of powdered borax are added 
to the soap while it is cooking, the soap 
will be whiter and there will be no smell 
to it, even if rancid grease is used. I also 
add a finely ground bar of good perfumed 
toilet soap. 

— Mrs. L. H. Merriam, Grace, Idaho 

I have taken the Magazine for many 
years, and it has given me many happy 
hours. I love every part of it, and the 
sermons from our great leaders have given 
us faith and understanding. 

— Mrs. Genevieve Moreton, 

Pasadena, California 



The brief message by Caroline Eyring 
Miner in the November issue of the 
Magazine (page 773) should be put in a 
frame and hung before us at all times. 
Our ultimate acceptance of the words of 
Jesus, without reservations, is my desire. 
It is my prayer that in time all men will 
come to know that the kingdom of God 
is to be found in the brotherhood of men. 
— Laura R. Merrill, Logan, Utah 

My mother not long ago having been a 
subscriber to The Relief Society Magazine, 
I had the pleasure of reading and enjoying 
it very much, especially the poetry, as read- 
ing and writing poetry is one of my favorite 
pastimes. 

— Melva Cox, 

Cane Beds Valley, 
Moccasin, Arizona 

I do so much appreciate The Relief 
Society Magazine — a gift from a dear 
friend. To me the most challenging and 
thrilling things I ever heard are the 
stories of the power of God in the lives 
of those who contribute to it . 
— Mrs. Muriel Goodnight 

Mesquite, Nevada 

I was president of a ward Relief So- 
ciety when we had the Woman's Expon- 
ent and also when the first issue of The 
Relief Society Magazine was published, 
and have taken it ever since. I have found 
the Magazine to be a great help and it is 
so dear to me that my home would not 
be complete without it. I have had a 
number of the Magazines bound and have 
used them for birthday and Christmas 
gifts and my family use them as refer- 
ences for lessons in other organizations, 
for readings and poems, and for other pur- 
poses. I very much enjoy the "From 
Near and Far" page. 

— Mrs. Janet M. Ott, 

Tropic, Utah 

I am proud to be a contributor to The 
Relief Society Magazine (see November, 
1950, page 731) because I think the 
Magazine is one of the finest of publica- 
tions. 

— S ylvia Probst Young, Midvale, Utah 



Your "College grade" courses in 
education, offered in 

RELIEF SOCIETY 

use eminent textbooks in every field: 

Theology: The Life and Ministry of the Savior 

Reference: JESUS THE CHRIST, by James E. Talmage 

Cloth $2.75, Leather $7.00 

Visiting Teachers Message: Our Savior Speaks 

Reference: THE HOLY BIBLE 

L.D.S. Missionary Edition $11.00; Others $1.75 to $20.00 

Work Meeting: The Art of Homemaking 

Reference: "THE COMPLETE BOOK OF SEWING/' 

by Constance Talbot 

$2.98 

Literature: The Literature of England 

Reference: THE LITERATURE OF ENGLAND VOL. I 

by Woods, Watt and Anderson 

$4.50, by mail $4.75 

1950-51 LESSONS FEATURE: 
Paradise Lost 

Paradise Regained and Samson Agonistes 
John Dryden, Richard Steele, and Joseph Addison 
Jonathan Swift, Alexander Pope, 
Oliver Goldsmith, Samuel Johnson, and James Boswell 

Social Science: "The Progress of Man" 

Reference: "THE PROGRESS OF MAN," 

by Joseph Fielding Smith 

(Temporarily out of print) 

— All prices are subject to change without notice — 

Deseret Book Company 

44 East South Temple Street 
Salt Lake City, Utah 



Mention The Relief Society Magazine When Buying From Advertisers 




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FEBRUARY 1951 



THE RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE 

Monthly publication of the Relief Society of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints 

RELIEF SOCIETY GENERAL BOARD 
Belle S. Spafford ------ President 

Marianne C. Sharp ------ First Counselor 

Velma N. Simonsen - - Second Counselor 

Margaret C. Pickering - Secretary-Treasurer 

Achsa E. Paxman Leone G. Layton Lillie C. Adams Christine H. Robinson 

Mary G. Judd Blanche B. Stoddard Louise W. Madsen Alberta H. Christensen 

Anna B. Hart Evon W. Peterson Aleine M. Young Nellie W. Neal 

Edith S. Elliott Leone O. Jacobs Josie B. Bay Mildred B. Eyring 

Florence J. Madsen Mary J. Wilson Alta J. Vance Helen W. Anderson 

RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE 

Editor ----------- Marianne C. Sharp 

Associate Editor --------- Vesta P. Crawford 

General Manager --------- Belle S. Spafford 

Vol. 38 FEBRUARY 1951 No. 2 



Con tents 

SPECIAL FEATURES 

The Great Mission of Relief Society ..: LeGrand Richards 76 

A Key to the Occurrences of History I Archibald F. Bennett 86 

FICTION 

We'll Always Remember — Second Prize Story Inez B. Bagnell 81 

For the Strength of the Hills — Chapter 1 Mabel Harmer 92 

Miss Breech's Boy Pansye H. Powell 97 

"In the Twinkling of a Toe" Maryhale Woolsey 108 

GENERAL FEATURES 
Sixty Years Ago 102 

Woman's Sphere Ramona W. Cannon 103 

Editorial: "Say Nothing But Repentance Unto This Generation" Marianne C. Sharp 104 

Birthday Greetings to President Amy Brown Lyman 105 

Notes From the Field: Conventions, Welfare Work, Bazaars, and Other Activtites 

General Secretary-Treasurer, Margaret C. Pickering 113 

From Near and Far 144 

LESSON DEPARTMENT 

Theology: "Personal Manifestations of God and of His Son Jesus Christ in Modern Times" 

and "Jesus the Christ to Return" Don B. Colton 118 

Visiting Teacher Messages: "Lo, I am With You Alway, Even Unto the End of the World" 

Mary Grant Judd 124 

Work Meeting: Table Settings and Service Christine H. Robinson 125 

Literature: Samuel Johnson and James Boswell Briant S. Jacobs 128 

Social Science: Universal Peace Must Come From God Archibald F. Bennett 133 

Music: New Hymns, Anthems, and Standard Literature About Music Florence J. Madsen 137 

FEATURE FOR THE HOME 
Buying Food for the Family Ruth P. Tippetts 106 

POETRY 

February Thaw — Frontispiece Margery S. Stewart 75 

Dawn Is the Gateway Ruth H. Chadwick 80 

Too Bound of Earth Berta H. Christensen 91 

Defaulted Bertha A. Kleinman 107 

Where Glory Lies Dorothy J. Roberts 117 

Blackbirds in Winter Clara Laster 117 

The Perishables C. Cameron Johns 139 



PUBLISHED MONTHLY BY THE GENERAL BOARD OF RELIEF SOCIETY 

Editorial and Business Offices: 28 Bishop's Building, Salt Lake City 1, Utah, Phone 3-2741: Sub- 
scriptions 246; Editorial Dept. 245. Subscription Price: $1.50 a year; foreign, $2.00 a year; 
payable in advance. Single copy, 15c. The Magazine is not sent after subscription expires. No 
back numbers can be supplied. Renew promptly so that no copies will be missed. Report change 
of address at once, giving old and new address. 

Entered as second-class matter February 18, 1914, at the Post Office, Salt Lake City, Utah, under 
the Act of March 3, 1879. Acceptance for mailing at special rate of postage provided for in 
section 1103, Act of October 8, 1917, authorized June 29, 1918. Manuscripts will not be returned 
unless return postage is enclosed. Rejected manuscripts will be retained for six months only. 
The Magazine is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts. 



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THE RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE 

VOL 38, NO. 2 FEBRUARY 1951 

CJebruary cJhaw 

Margery S. Stewart 

Last night I heard across the sky 

The star-spurred horseman riding by; 

Hand light upon the silver rein, 

He galloped through the moon-white plain. 

I heard his thundering horse's hooves 

Splinter the ice-held mountain grooves. 

His hot breath flared upon the lake 

And life leaped up in willowed brake; 

Naked of snow the trees sprang up 

Caught at his presence like a cup. 

High above the earth he fled, 

But in the darkness woke the dead; 

Seed and root, they woke and heard, 

And in their icy prisons stirred. 

Last night I heard across the sky 

The star-spurred horseman riding by. 

Out I ran in roar and rain 

To watch his fearsome flight again, 

Across my face his mantle swept 

And my heart, too, awoke and wept. 



The Cover: Lookout Above Casper, Wyoming, Photograph by Ray Loomis. 
Cover Design by Evan Jensen. 



The Great Mission of Relief Society 

Bishop LeGiand Richards 

Presiding Bishop of the Church 

[Address delivered at the Annual General Relief Society Conference, September 
28, 1950.] 



YOU just don't know how ner- 
vous I feel up here with all 
you women, being the only 
man, surely the black sheep in the 
herd. If I didn't know that you 
women can and do do things so 
much better than we men can, 
probably I wouldn't feel so nervous. 
I was telling my wife that this morn- 
ing, and she said, "Well, Daddy, 
don't worry, those wonderful wom- 
en will pray for you and you will 
be all right." So you must pray for 
me this morning. And then, be- 
sides that, I think so much of Sister 
Spafford and her counselors, and as 
she has already indicated, we work 
so closely together, that I wouldn't 
want to disappoint them. I told 
them that I didn't know what in 
the world I could say to the women, 
but I am supposed to say something 
about your work and your relation- 
ship to the Welfare Program. 

I do mean it when I tell you that 
I think Sister Spafford and her 
counselors are doing a great work 
in this Church, and they love the 
Lord, and they love his work and 
they love you sisters, and the way 
you get back of them and sustain 
them is a marvelous thing. I think 
the Relief Society is wonderful. Of 
course, I have had a little experi- 
ence, too, with the Relief Society, 
because I have been bishop of three 
different wards, and I have always 
said I thought my Relief Society 
president was worth as much to me 

Page 16 



as my first counselor in each case. 
And then I was president of a stake 
and I felt the same in the stake. 
They used to say, if you want any- 
thing done, give it to the busy man. 
Now I paraphrase that and say, if 
you want anything done, give it to 
the Relief Society because they 
never fail when you make them an 
assignment. 

I think the women of the Church 
are marvelous. When I was presi- 
dent of the Southern States Mis- 
sion, Sister Richards and I had the 
privilege of taking her mother to 
North Carolina where she was born 
and where she spent her youth, be- 
fore she came West for the gospel's 
sake. We met many of her old 
friends and associates. We were in 
a group one night and a lady told 
us this experience unsolicited. She 
said: 

I went out to Utah to teach school, 
but I didn't stay very long. I came home. 
I couldn't keep up with those Mormon 
women. They raise large families; they 
work in the Church; they work in civic 
organizations. They made me tired. I had 
to come back where I could take it a 
little easier. 

Last spring I picked up the news- 
paper and read an announcement 
of one of my missonary girls from 
the South who had just achieved 
her master's degree here at the Uni- 
versity of Utah. The paper also re- 
ported that she had filled a mission 



THE GREAT MISSION OF RELIEF SOCIETY 



77 



for the Church and was the mother 
of five children. This week we had 
a phone call from one of our own 
daughters in California who is the 
mother of five kiddies and she told 
her mother she had just registered 
at college. So you see you really do 
things, you women, and we are 
proud of you. You have great ca- 
pacity, even the raising of families. 

Now that I have told you how 
wonderful I think you are, I want 
to tell you how wonderful I think 
your organization is. I feel that 
when the Prophet of this dispen- 
sation organized the sisters, gave 
them this Relief Society organiza- 
tion and gave them their charge in 
taking care of the sick and the af- 
flicted and the poor and the op- 
pressed, that that was one of the 
greatest steps forward in the de- 
velopment of social work in all the 
world. And I think it is pretty well 
conceded that it was the stepping- 
stone, largely, to woman's suffrage 
even here in our own country. We 
recognize the ability of our women 
and their capacity and feel that 
through their efforts, leadership of 
women throughout the land began 
to spread. 

We are told in Holy Writ by the 
apostle James of old that "Pure 
religion and undefiled before God 
and the Father is this, To visit 
the fatherless and widows in their 
affliction, and to keep himself un- 
spotted from the world." If this is 
pure religion, pure religion can't 
then be exercised and carried on 
nearly as well on an individual basis 
as it can in organized form. In 
other words, if we individually do 
all we can do, we still cannot ac- 
complish what could be accom- 



plished when we are united and or- 
ganized. I tell the brethren of the 
Priesthood quorums that if they 
have never been in an auto assem- 
bling plant they should go. You 
will see 5,000 men or more enter 
the gates in the morning. If they 
were not organized there wouldn't 
be very many automobiles run off 
the conveyor during the day. But 
each man has his work to do, and 
each man takes his place and, in 
that organized form, automobiles 
start with just a chassis thrown on 
the conveyor, and they run off al- 
most like running dishes out of 
your pan— fully assembled automo- 
biles on their own power. 

^PHE greatest good and greatest 
achievements in the world call 
for organization, and the Relief So- 
ciety is an organization for carrying 
on pure religion and undefiled be- 
fore God. 

Think for a moment of what was 
accomplished during the World 
War and following the World War 
when we sent all those supplies to 
Europe, over 130 carloads, besides 
all the packages. That couldn't have 
been done to help our distressed 
people and members there on an 
individual basis, but in organized 
form it was not a great task because 
each contributed his and her part. 

As you travel through the Church 
and go through the great Welfare 
storehouses, you see the evidences 
of the handiwork of our women. 
You can't help thinking how mar- 
velously God inspired his Prophet 
of this dispensation when he set 
up this organization. All through 
the years thousands and tens of 
thousands have borne testimony of 



78 



RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— FEBRUARY 1951 



the loving touch of the hands of the 
Relief Society women in the service 
they have rendered to those who 
are in distress. 

We were holding a conference 
in South Georgia one Sunday, and 
a knock came at the door during 
our conference; and I learned after 
that there was a death in the com- 
munity, not in the Church, but 
they wanted the Relief Society to 
come into that home. So they got 
the Relief Society sisters and they 
went and organized the work nec- 
essary to meet the emergency. And 
all over the world the superior work 
of our Relief Society is felt. I went 
into an office in Atlanta, Georgia, 
one day, and a man came rushing 
in. He said, "They tell me you are 
from Salt Lake City," and I said, 
"Yes, Sir." Then he said, "Put her 
here/' So we shook hands. His story 
was that he had lived here in Salt 
Lake, and he wasn't a member of 
our Church. He engaged in busi- 
ness here, and when he sold out he 
did it with the understanding that 
he wouldn't come back and go in 
business for at least ten years. He 
said, "Every few days my wife keeps 
saying, 'When can we go back to 
Salt Lake?' " Now there isn't time to 
tell you all he said, but one thing he 
did say, "When we went to move 
into our home, it took us a few days 
to assemble furniture, to get a stove; 
but the Relief Society was there 
when we brought our first things. 
They came with dinner for us, and 
they said, We knew you wouldn't 
have a stove to cook on, so we 
thought we would bring you a little 
dinner to take care of you.'" He 
told me they did that for several 
days until they got all their furni- 



ture together. When he got through 
and gave me a chance I was going 
to ask him why he didn't join the 
Church. He said, "Wait a minute, 
I know what you are going to ask 
me, you are going to ask me why I 
don't join your Church?" I said, 
"You took the words right off the 
end of my tongue." He answered, 
"Well, I will tell you why, I am 
not good enough to belong to your 
Church." But he couldn't forget 
the work the Relief Society had 
done. 

''PHE Savior gave us a marvelous 
parable when he told how the 
Son of man should come in his 
glory and with him all the holy an- 
gels, and before him should be 
gathered all nations of men, and 
as the shepherd separates the sheep 
from the goats, the king would say 
unto those on his right hand: 

Come, ye blessed of my Father, in- 
herit the kingdom prepared for you from 
the foundation of the world: For I was 
an hungred, and ye gave me meat: I was 
thirsty, and ye gave me drink: I was sick 
and ye visited me: I was in prison, and 
ye came unto me. 

And then the righteous should 
say to the king, "When saw we 
thee an hungred, and fed thee? or 
thirsty, and gave thee drink?" and 
so forth. And then the King should 
answer: "Inasmuch as ye have done 
it unto one of the least of these mv 
brethren, ye have done it unto me." 

I think in all the world you could- 
n't find a parallel for organized ef- 
fort of women who are so capable 
in doing the very things the Mas- 
ter mentioned as in the great Re- 
lief Society organization of the 
Church. Furthermore, the develop- 



THE GREAT MISSION OF RELIEF SOCIETY 



79 



ment of the Welfare Program of 
the Church has added to the facil- 
ities, the vehicle, as it were, for 
the women to carry on this great 
work of ministering to those who 
are in need and distress in our com- 
munities. And the bishop is the 
head of it, the Relief Society presi- 
dent is his right-hand assistant. And 
just to the extent that the Relief 
Society and the bishop work to- 
gether can they really perform the 
work that the Lord expects them to 
do. 

Now there may be times when 
requests will come from people that 
you almost, from your natural im- 
pulses, feel like you don't want to 
help. You say that they ought to 
know better, they ought not to be 
in the condition they are in. Maybe 
they shouldn't, but it is just be- 
cause they lack that judgment, and 
that wisdom, and that ability, in 
many cases, that they are in the con- 
dition that they are in. Probably 
there is a reason for that, too. 

You know, Paul tells us that the 
Church is likened unto the human 
body, and every member is neces- 
sary. The eye cannot say to the ear, 
I have no need of thee, and then 
he adds that even the least mem- 
ber is necessary. If we did not have 
any poor, we did not have any sick, 
how could he say, "I was an hun- 
gred and ye gave me meat: I was 
thirsty, and ye gave me drink. . . . 
Naked, and ye clothed me: I was 
sick, and ye visited me." You see, 
with these weak members, there is 
an opportunity for those who are 
strong to serve. 

'THROUGH the great Welfare 

Program of the Church, God 

has organized his people with the 



help of the Relief Society so that 
they can really render the assistance 
that the membership of the Church 
is so much in need of. Now I take 
it that this conference is being held 
to increase your ability to render 
your part of the service, and I know 
how the Relief Societies are at- 
tempting throughout all their or- 
ganizations to teach and train the 
sisters so that they can render this 
efficient service. And I would like 
to say to you that you should do 
it with an eye single to the glory 
of God, knowing that even God 
cannot take care of all his people 
in the way that he would have them 
taken care of without someone 
through whom he can work, and 
the Relief Societies are the ones 
who are charged with carrying for- 
ward this great program of pure 
religion and undefiled before God 
and the Father. 

Speaking of the Lord having to 
have agencies through which he 
works, a few years ago I was invited 
to speak before a high priests' group 
here in the city. I said, "I'll meet 
you at the meetinghouse," and the 
brother who invited me said, "No, 
I want the privilege of taking you 
there and bringing you home." I 
said, "All right." I never refuse to 
let them serve me because they like 
me better when they do. I found 
that to be true in the mission field, 
and on the way to the meeting this 
man told me of an experience he 
had. 

He was engaged in work for the 
city. One day he was driving up 
Main Street, and saw a boy in uni- 
form who was drunk, and a wicked 
street woman trying to lead him 
away. 



80 



RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— FEBRUARY 1951 



He said, "Something said to me, 
you rescue that boy/ I found a 
place to park my car, and went 
back and took the boy by the arm 
and said, Tou come with me/ and 
the woman said, 'Oh, no, you don't, 
he's mine.' " 

And this man said, 'There is a 
policeman right on that corner, and 
if you want to be turned over to 
him you just interfere." 

She saw the policeman and 
walked away. He took the boy and 
drove him around until he sobered 
up, and then took him to a hotel 
and got him a room. 

The man said to me, "I don't 
know why I did it. I have never 
done a thing like that before in my 
life." This good brother left his 
calling card with the boy, and a 
little later he received a letter from 
the boy's mother. As I recall, it 
came from New Jersey. She wrote: 
"I don't know why you stopped to 
help my boy that night unless it was 



that I prayed for him that night as 
I think I had never prayed for him 
before." 

You see, God wanted to answer 
her prayer, but he had to have some- 
one through whom he could an- 
swer it. 

As far as I can see, you women 
are the ministering angels through 
whom God blesses so many thou- 
sands of people, so I say, "God 
bless you." I leave you my love and 
blessings. I leave my love and 
blessings with Sister Spafford and 
her counselors. I love and admire 
them for the things they are doing. 
I know that all over this Church 
you are doing a magnificent job to 
help our Father's children in the 
execution of the work that he would 
have done, and he must have in- 
struments through whom he can 
work. And he will say to you, "Well 
done, thou good and faithful serv- 
ant," when your work is completed. 
God bless each one of you, I pray. 



LDawri S/s the C^ateway 

Ruth H. Chadwick 

The night draws close her tattered, graying shroud, 

Worn thin by lengthened hours of somber toil; 

She prods her lagging feet while pungent soil 

Breathes out a fragrant, cool farewell; a cloud, 

White-frilled and pale among the dimming stars, 

Salutes night's weary wending toward the gate. 

Exhausted, still she does not hesitate 

Before the dawn's majestic, lucent bars. 

The lintelled arch of opalescent light, 

Upheld by shafts of rainbow brilliancy, 

Reflects its aura, pearl-edged filigree, 

As purpled space and living gold unite. 

Dawn is the gateway, sparkling, crystalline, 

Through which the night must pass and day come in. 



We'll Always Remember 

Second Prize Story 

Annual Relief Society Short Story Contest 
Inez B. Bagnell 

full of contentment. "I like this 
rambling old place of ours. I even 
like the nice people who live here." 

"It's a wonderful place/' Sue said. 
"So much room." 

"Those boys of ours need a lot of 
room. They cover the territory, 
don't they?" Neil chuckled. 

If it could just last, Sue thought. 
If they could just spend one pre- 
cious hour, or half hour, in complete 
relaxation. But already his restless 
blue eyes were studying the expanse 
of green lawn. 

"The boys didn't do such a good 
job of mowing the lawn today," he 
said. 

"No," Sue answered. "I guess 
they were in too big a hurry. Neil, 
aren't the roses lovely?" 

"I'll say they are." But his pen- 
sive eyes had left the roses, finding 
the weeds, all the small imperfect 
places in the garden. The frown 
creased his forehead again, and his 
eyes became preoccupied, shutting 
out Sue and the loveliness of the 
evening. 

"Someday I'm going to make 
enough money so that we can hire 
a gardener. You and the boys won't 
have to grovel in the dirt to keep 
things nice. Someday, I'm going 
to give you everything." 

"Neil, dear, we like to do it," Sue 
protested. 

"It's nice of you to say it, any- 
way." He rose and started for the 
door. "Well, I'd better get busy. 

Page 81 




INEZ BLAZZARD BAGNELL 

DINNER was over and the 
dishes were still on the table. 
Just for a moment Sue 
stepped onto the porch and sat on 
the steps breathing in the fragrant- 
ly cool evening air. Neil came 
through the kitchen door, a tall 
slim figure whose shoulders were 
square and straight, in spite of the 
hours he spent bent over a desk. 

He dropped down by her, his 
hand resting quietly on hers, while 
a stray breeze lifted a lock of his 
unruly blonde hair. His face was 
relaxed, temporarily free of the little 
creases that were lately becoming a 
part of his face. 

He turned and smiled good- 
naturedly at her, his face and voice 



82 RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— FEBRUARY 1951 

Sitting here won't accomplish any- Watching them go, Sue was 

thing." seized by an impulse. I'll play with 

He stopped with one hand on the them, she thought. I'll bet I could 

screen just as three shouting boys still knock a pretty wicked one. 

came running around the corner of After all, she was still young and 

the house. Gerald, the tall gangling pliant, without an ounce of extra 

one, carried a baseball. Tim, a padding to slow her down, 

smaller edition of Neil, had the bat. Then her eyes caught sight of 

Cory, the freckled four-year-old, was the belated dishes gleaming through 

the last one to come running around the window. It was a curious 

the corner on short legs that never thing, she thought, that a table 

seemed to go fast enough to get which looked so attractive and ap- 

him there as quickly as the other petizing before dinner could, by the 

two. passing of a few short minutes, be 

"Hey, Dad, come and play flies rendered so untidy and distasteful 

and rollers with us," Gerald invited, in appearance. She went into the 

"Yeah, Dad," Tim put it hope- house, 

fully, "come and show us how you Dishes done, she idled into the 

used to throw those curves when homey living room. Neil was at 

you played with the Cubs." the small cluttered desk in the 

Neil hesitated. "Sorry, boys, I'd corner, utterly engrossed, figuring, 

like to, but I can't. I've a ton of drawing lines with a ruler, turning 

work to do." the paper this way and that. Sue 

. "Ah, that's what you always say," gave one wistful look toward the 

Gerald pouted. "You haven't played piano in the corner, then picked up 

with us for a long time." her darning box and started on the 

Cory jumped up on the porch stockings, 

and fastened both arms around one As she darned she was very con- 

of Neil's legs, pulling and tugging scious of Neil's bent head, his ab- 

at him. For a moment Neil wav- sorbed expression. I wish I could 

ered, undecided, then he picked understand more of what he's trying 

Cory up in his arms, kissed him to do, she thought. It looked so 

soundly, and set him firmly on the complicated, all those figures and 

ground a few feet in front of him. lines that a draftsman used. 

"Go on, boys, and have your- He was so determined, she 
selves a good ball game," he said, thought, to make her and the boys 
"I'll play with you some other time." happy by giving them all the world- 
He went into the house, the screen ly possessions he could accumulate 
banging decisively behind him. for them. His ambition was a driv- 

For a moment the boys stood in ing force that gave him no rest, leav- 

a small disappointed cluster. Then ing him so little time for the family 

they straggled on around the corner which hung on his every word, lov- 

of the house. ing the precious moments he gave 

"Oh, well, I knew he wouldn't, them, hungering for more of him. 

anyway," Gerald said. "He's Sue thought of all the things 

always too busy." they missed— the times she and the 



WE'LL ALWAYS REMEMBER 



83 



boys went alone to church and to 
the movies, the family picnics they 
hadn't had, the silent piano, the un- 
shared thoughts, the house she tried 
to keep so quiet so that Neil could 
work. She knew that it wasn't 
worth it. No amount of fancy 
clothes, cars, or furniture could 
make it worth it. An uncontrol- 
lable desire to tell him, to make him 
understand, swept over her, and she 
fought with it. She had tried before 
and failed. 

Neil looked up. "Hello," he said 
softly. He came over to her, a 
disturbed look on his face. He 
seemed to read her thoughts, and 
his lips were warm on hers. "Some- 
day," he said, "I'm going to make 
it all up to you. Someday, Sue, I'm 
going to give you everything." 

Sue sighed helplessly as he went 
back to the desk. 

A few days later when Neil came 
home from work Sue knew the mo- 
ment she looked at him that some- 
thing wonderful had happened. He 
was like a small jubilant boy, strug- 
gling as long as he could, to hold 
back a surprise. 

"How did everything go today?" 
she asked innocently. 

"Oh, so, so," Neil smirked mad- 
deningly. 

AT last, when it seemed that he 
was never going to tell her, he 
came around behind her and put 
his hands over her eyes. "Shut 
them tight. Don't open till I tell 
you to. Now, open easy." 

In front of her face was a long 
yellow check. "Pay to the order of 
Neil Patterson," she read breath- 
lessly, "five hundred and no one 
hundredths dollars." 



She whirled around. "What's this 
all about? Explain yourself, Neil 
Patterson. Don't keep me in the 
dark." 

Neil grinned proudly. "That, my 
dear, is a small remuneration for an 
idea I had for cutting down ex- 
penses on the assembly line. A 
token of gratitude from my employ- 
ers, you might say. And that was 
just one small idea. There's plenty 
more where that came from." He 
tapped his forehead. 

"Who'd have thought it?" Sue 
scoffed. "Who'd have dreamed 
there was anything besides sawdust 
in that old blonde head." She ruf- 
fled his hair till it stood on end. 

Neil's face became very serious. 
"What do you think we ought to 
do with it? There are so many 
things we ought to do that I don't 
know where to start. Of course, 
five hundred dollars doesn't sound 
like much, but when it's entirelv 
extra it's quite a bit. Sue, this mon- 
ey represents sort of a milestone to 
me, a symbol. I'd like to use it for 
something very special that would 
make the whole family happy, some- 
thing that we will always remember. 
What do you think?" 

"That sounds wonderful. But 
right quickly I can't say what we 
want most." 

"What are some of the things 
we've been wanting so badly? 
Bicycles and electric trains for the 
kids, and a play room. A movie 
camera for the family, and you need 
clothes and something nice for the 
house to make things easier for you. 
And we've been wanting a trip. 
Sure," he said ruefully, "it should 
have been something like five thou- 
sand instead of five hundred." 



84 



RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— FEBRUARY 1951 



"Well, if you want to start figur- 
ing that way I dare say the five thou- 
sand wouldn't amount to much 
either. Personally, I think five hun- 
dred dollars is a lot of money, and 
we should appreciate having it." 

"Okay, Susie, I guess I deserved 
that little lecture. I'll tell you 
what we'll do. Let's find out what 
the boys would like most of all to 
do with it, and do it." 

The boys didn't find it any easier 
to decide in a hurry than had Neil 
and Sue. 

"Do you mean we can do any- 
thing we want to?" Gerald asked. 

"Well, not exactly anything, but 
as near as we can on five hundred 
dollars." 

"I'll have to think," said Gerald. 

"Is five hundred dollars a lot of 
money?" Tim asked. 

"How much money is five hun- 
dred dollars?" Cory wanted to 
know. "Would it buy a new base- 
ball bat? We've cracked ours." 

Neil and Sue exchanged a help- 
less glance. "I'll tell you," Neil 
said, "don't worry about the 
amount. Just each of you think of 
the things you would like most to 
do or have of anything in the whole 
world. We might go on a trip or 
buy something we've all wanted. 
Well, anyway, think it over. We'll 
get together and decide what we 
can use it for that will please all of 
us the most." 

"I know what I'd like," Gerald 
offered. 

"Let's not decide so quickly. Let's 
give us all time to think it over and 
be sure. Till tomorrow, anyway." 

"We can make a game of it," Sue 
suggested. "You could write your 



wish down on a piece of paper and 
we'll read them all at once." 

"We could all drop them in a 
box— like valentines," Tim piped. 
"Say, Cory, do we still have that 
old valentine box in the basement?" 

There was a regular traffic jam in 
the doorway leading to the base- 
ment as Gerald, Tim, and Cory all 
tried to be the first one through it 
to bring up the suddenly important 
old valentine box. 

A LL next day the boys whispered 
and planned together. Then 
there was a spell when they scrib- 
bled and erased and asked Sue how 
to spell words. Then they were 
quiet, and first thing she knew they 
were erasing, tearing up, and writing 
again. Cory worked doggedly over a 
small piece of paper, bothering the 
older boys to make letters that he 
clumsily copied. Cory printed very 
well for a four-year-old. 

By late afternoon it seemed that 
the boys were at last content with 
the slips of paper. They dropped 
them into the box and went out 
back for a game of ball before din- 
ner. 

Sue was setting the table when 
Neil came in, looking tired and 
strained. His eyes went immediate- 
ly to the box, then grinning self- 
consciously, he bent and peeked 
through the slot. 

"Aren't we silly?" he laughed. 

"Not so silly, I don't think. After 
all, it's something that's pretty im- 
portant to all of us." 

"Sue, do you think it would hurt 
—do you think the kids would mind 
if we just peeked at them now? 
After all, I'd like to get an idea 
whether we can do what they'd like 



WE'LL ALWAYS REMEMBER 



85 



to on five hundred dollars. Sort 
of prepare myself." 

"I can't see that it would do any 
harm. They needn't know." 

Neil removed the lid from the 
box and took out three dog-eared 
pieces of paper. "Come on, let's 
go out on the porch where there's a 
breeze/' he said. 

Gerald's paper was the largest and 
had the most writing on it. Neil 
pressed its folds with loving fingers. 
"Our oldest son," he whispered. 
"His heart's desire. How I'd love 
to be able to give it to him." Then 
he unfolded it and began to read. 

Dear Dad and Mom, 

I have decided that more than any- 
thing in the world I would like to have 
Daddy stay home from work and help us 
build a fireplace out of those old bricks 
and everybody have a weenie and marsh- 
mallow roast. Then sing songs while Moth- 
er plays the piano. 

Lovingly, 

Gerald. 

Neil didn't look up for a while. 
When he did there was a baffled 
expression on his face. "Well, that 
shouldn't be hard. And it will leave 
the five hundred practically intact. 
Well, what do you suppose our son 
Tim wants?" He unfolded the 
paper slowly, then sat staring at it, 
not reading aloud. Sue slid over 
so she could see. 

Please, could we go fishing and Daddy 
teach me how to catch a big one. With 
love, Tim. P.S. We could fry chicken. 
P.S. number 2. We could eat water- 
melon. 

'M'EIL'S face began working, play- 
ing havoc with his features. 
Cory's paper hadn't been folded. It 
lay face up, its ill-shaped letters 
strung together in one unbroken 
line: 



I want to go to church with you and 
not alone. 

Neil looked stunned, his face was 
white. "With you and not alone," 
he repeated numbly. "And that's 
what they want more than any- 
thing." He sat without moving, 
staring at nothing in particular. Sue 
watched him anxiously, her heart 
reaching out to him as one emotion 
after another was mirrored in his 
sensitive face. 

"I wouldn't have believed it. All 
the things I've worked and worried 
and fretted about, they don't mean 
a thing to them, do they?" 

"You, and what you do means 
everything to them," Sue said care- 
fully. "And to me." 

"But I've tried so hard ... I 
thought . . . ." Neil floundered 
helplessly. "Well, it's for sure I 
haven't sold them my idea that it 
takes money to make them happy." 

"I'm not so sure that's really your 
idea. Neil, if you had written a 
wish yourself what would you have 
chosen to do?" 

"Oh, I don't know. Buy you a 
new coat and an electric dish wash- 
er, I guess." 

"But, don't you see, that would 
be for me. You're supposed to wish 
for something for yourself." 

His look silenced her. "You 
should know by now that your joy 
is my joy," the look told her plainer 
than words. 

"All right, Sue, while we're at it, 
what would you have wished for?" 

"I don't know either, except may- 
be just to have the money in the 
bank so you wouldn't have to worry 
about what would happen if you 
missed a day's work or if any of us 
got sick." 



86 



RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— FEBRUARY 1951 



He laughed. "Now who's making 
a wish for whom?" He took her 
hand and held it tightly. "Sue, may- 
be we needed that five hundred dol- 
lars to show us just how rich we 
already are." 

He looked deeply into her eyes 
and she knew that now he was see- 
ing only her and the richness that 
was theirs. The roses unshadowed 
by the weeds. Their life, free from 
the marring specter of unattained 
wealth. 

He folded the papers and tucked 
them into his shirt pocket just as 
three shouting boys came around 
the house. 

"Come and play flies and rollers 
with us," Gerald invited. 

Neil jumped up. "Come on, 
Mom." 



"The last one to home plate is a 
rotten egg," Tim yelled, and every- 
body started to run. Cory's short 
legs churned desperately. There 
was an anguished look on his face 
as the others passed him by. Neil 
turned, grabbing him up in his 
arms. 

"Come on, Son, we'll both use 
my legs." 

Sue panted after them. No star- 
studded event could ever be better 
than this, she thought. This was 
the simple joy that they would al- 
ways remember, this and rows and 
rows of moments like it. 

The flying feet of her men were 
leaving her farther behind every sec- 
ond. Well, one of their group had 
to be the rotten egg, and this time 
she didn't mind if it were she. No, 
this time she didn't mind at all. 



K^lnez iulazzard iuagnett 

Inez B. Bagnell was born in Ashurst, Arizona, and came to Utah at the 
age of five, with her parents John and Laura Pack Blazzard. She attended 
Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah. She is the wife of Kenneth Bagnell, 
Kamas, Utah, and the mother of three children, thirteen-year-old Loa, ten- 
year-old Glade, and Carma, age six. 

Mrs. Bagnell has had three stories published. One of them, "I Know 
Where You Are," a beautifully written story, published in The Relief Society 
Magazine, February 1950, has received much very favorable comment from 
our readers. Mrs. Bagnell is now working on a novel, which, she says, "goes 
very slowly as homemaking is a full-time job. I love to write, and there is a 
constant tug of war between my sewing machine and my typewriter. I am 
very proud and happy to have placed in the Relief Society Short Story Con- 
test. It gives me great encouragement." 

Active in Church work, Mrs. Bagnell is a Sunday School chorister and 
a member of the Relief Society Singing Mothers chorus in her ward. 



A Key to the Occurrences 
of History 

Archibald F. Bennett 

Secretary, Genealogical Society 

[Address delivered at the afternoon session of the Annual General Relief Society 
Conference, September 27, 1950] 



THIS is indeed a great privi- 
lege, my sisters, to meet with 
you, and to feel the spirit 
of this fine gathering. 

Perhaps I can help most today by 
presenting briefly a key to the in- 
terpretation of the events of his- 
tory, past, present, and future. 

As Sister Elliott has pointed out, 
the world today is perplexed and 
confused, on the brink of a great 
crisis. Amid wars and rumors of 
wars, tribulation and suffering, hat- 
reds and antagonisms, men's hearts 
are failing them, and there is a fear- 
ful looking forward to that which 
is to come, even to the prospect of 
perhaps world-wide and total de- 
struction. Beset with a bewilder- 
ing outcry of conflicting theories 
and plans of government, we need 
some key to the meaning of all 
these events taking place around us 
today, to those that have occurred 
in the past, and to those events still 
greater that are yet to come. 

Many persons studying history 
and these present events have grown 
bitter and cynical. Some declare 
openly that Christianity has utterly 
failed, that all religion has failed. I 
heard one army general declare, 
'There have always been wars; there 
will always be wars, despite any- 
thing we can do." Even the great 
and eloquent British statesman, 



Lloyd-George, in his later years, 
wrote that many have fondly be- 
lieved that right has always tri- 
umphed over might and over wrong. 
But history, he announced, proves 
that it is always the strongest who 
win wars and dominance over the 
weak, and that it is preparedness 
that will always win wars in the fu- 
ture, and not the righteousness of 
the cause. 

The American poet Lowell was 
privileged to glimpse a greater truth. 
He saw behind the apparent truth 
of this conclusion a loftier concep- 
tion. Although he recognized that 
through the centuries wrong has 
always seemed to triumph, yet he 
could write: 

Truth forever on the scaffold; wrong for- 
ever on the throne; 

Yet that scaffold sways the future, and 
behind the dim unknown 

Standeth God within the shadow, keeping 
watch above His own. 

The truth of that inspired view 
of the poet is borne out by a study 
of history. But it must be history 
rightly interpreted! Most authors of 
histories take the ground-view of 
events, as did Lloyd-George. What 
we need today is a sky-view of hu- 
man happenings, history read by 
the light of revelation, interpreted 
by the vision and power of God. 

Page 87 



88 



RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— FEBRUARY 1951 



The Lord gave such a sky-view oi 
history to Enoch. The record says 
that Enoch was high and lifted up; 
and he beheld all the nations of 
the earth, generation after genera- 
tion: 

. . . and behold, the power of Satan 
was upon all the face of the earth . . . 
And he beheld Satan; and he had a great 
chain in his hand, and it veiled the whole 
face of the earth with darkness; and he 
looked up and laughed, and his angels re- 
joiced (Moses 7:24, 26). 

At the side of Enoch stood the 
Lord himself, to show him the 
meaning of all these things. What 
a pity it is that the writers of the 
world do not accept this divine 
interpretation. It shows plainly 
that when men and women in any 
age of the world have obeyed the 
commandments of God they have 
been blessed with peace and pros- 
perity, harmony and happiness; 
when they have forsaken God and 
rebelled against his commandments 
they have been led captive by Satan 
down to misery and suffering, con- 
tention and strife, war and blood- 
shed, degradation and death. 

The Lord gave a similar sky-view 
of world history to the brother of 
Jared and to Nephi. Each saw the 
destruction of his people through 
wickedness, proving convincingly 
the truth of the statement in the 
Book of Mormon that "wickedness 
never was happiness" (Alma 41 :io) . 

In my younger years, while study- 
ing and teaching history, I was 
troubled in accepting the current 
theory that mankind has made a 
gradual up-climb, a continual ascent 
from the brute-like, savage, al- 
most bestial cave man, to the pres- 
ent high pinnacle of civilization, 



so-called. For at our highest pin- 
nacle, it was all too evident that 
man today is more capable of the 
wholesale destruction of his fellow 
man than ever before, and we are 
far from a state of peace and happi- 
ness. 

HPHEN one day I was fortunate 
enough to come across an 
article printed in the Improvement 
Era. It provided a true key to the 
interpretation of history. It bore 
the title, "Progression and Retro- 
gression," and was written by Elder 
Joseph Fielding Smith. He pointed 
out the fact, quoting scripture to 
prove it, that the first man Adam 
was a highly intelligent and civilized 
man, an almost perfect being. He 
showed that Adam had a language 
that was pure and undeflled; that 
he and his wife were instructed by 
God himself. They and their chil- 
dren were blessed as long as they 
kept the commandments of God; 
yet when their descendants rebelled 
against God, and '"loved Satan more 
than God," then they fell from their 
high estate and descended to war 
and murder, contention and savage- 
ry. 

There was another upclimb in 
the days of Enoch, when his people 
reached an almost perfect state; but 
succeeding generations declined 
rapidly to the almost total destruc- 
tion at the time of the flood. They 
rose in civilization under Abraham 
and Isaac and Israel, but in sin went 
down to the crucifixion and the 
long night of the apostasy, when 
darkness covered the earth, and Sat- 
an could look up and laugh, and 
his angels rejoiced. 

History, then, has been a series 
of ascents with righteousness and 



A KEY TO THE OCCURRENCES OF HISTORY 89 

descents through wickedness. The Elder Smith has since been expand- 
degree of civilization of a people ed into a volume called The Prog- 
has been determined by the extent ^ss of Man, the chosen text for the 
to which they kept the command- Social Science course for the next 
ments of God. three years. The world needs such 

It has been a long climb from the a book toda ^ we in the Church 

days of the Dark Ages. The Spirit need to study and understand its 

of the Lord touched the hearts of message. Elder Smith is a life-long 

good men. They sought for free- student of history; he is also 

dom, because freedom is a cardinal thoroughly versed in the revelations 

principle of the gospel. The Book of the Lord - His 1S a precious con- 

of Mormon speaks of "the founda- tribution. 

tion of liberty which God had T ™e social science in its purest 
granted unto them, or which bless- form is the gospel of Jesus Christ, 
ing God had sent upon the face of Thi s gospel-this art of human be- 
the land for the righteous' sake" ings living together successfully and 
(Alma 46:10). There came brave happily-has been tried and proved 
souls who struggled for political effective in leading the people of in- 
freedom and those who fought and numerable myriads of worlds to ex- 
died as martyrs for religious free- altation and eternal happiness. The 
dom. In our own land and in immense number of these worlds 
other lands the fight for liberty went may be faintly indicated by what 
on; and the liberty thus gained made the Lord showed to Enoch. When 
possible the restoration of the Enoch saw the worlds the Lord had 
Church. created, he exclaimed in awe, 

The battle is not yet over, but " Were lt possible that man could 

we are assured of the final victory, number the particles of the earth, 

We fondly look forward to the time Y ea > millions of earths like this, it 

when peace shall reign over all the would not be a beginning to the 

earth, and the will of God will be number of thy creations" (Moses 

done on earth as it is in heaven. 7 : 3 )- Sur ely a plan that has 

Satan is determined. He wants to P roved successful so many times 

win, and he sees the danger of before can be trusted here. When- 

every new gain now being made. ever jt has been g iven a ful1 chance 

But God has told us in the Doctrine here h Y an Y considerable number of 

and Covenants (10:43): "I will not people, it has proved an effective 

suffer that they shall destroy my plan, as on all other worlds, 
work; yea, I will show unto them 

that my wisdom is greater than the JN the days of Enoch it brought 

cunning of the devil." So we do peace and happiness for 365 

know something about the out- years. Of Enoch's people, Zion, it 

come, even though there are is written: 
troubles ahead between now and 

that period of victorv ^" ne Lord came and dwelt with his 

mi. r 1 i r \ . • i people, and they dwelt in righteousness 

That first helpful article on ^ ^ rea t was the glory of the Lrd which 

"Progression and Retrogression" by was upon his people. And the Lord 



90 



RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— FEBRUARY 1951 



blessed the land, and they were blessed 
upon the mountains, and upon the high 
places, and did flourish. 

And the Lord called his people Zion, 
because they were of one heart and one 
mind, and dwelt in righteousness; and 
there was no poor among them (Moses 
7:17-18). 

And all the days of Zion, in the days 
of Enoch, were three hundred and sixty- 
five years. 

And Enoch and all his people walked 
with God, and he dwelt in the midst of 
Zion (Moses 7:68-69). 

What a pity that such plain and 
precious teachings are not known 
to the leaders of nations and the 
students of the history of the world! 

Following the Savior's visit to 
America: 

. . . the people were all converted unto 
the Lord, upon all the face of the land, 
both Nephites and Lamanites, and there 
were no contentions and disputations 
among them, and every man did deal 
justly one with another. 

And they had all things common 
among them; therefore there were not 
rich and poor, bond and free, but they 
were all made free and partakers of the 
heavenly gift (4 Nephi 1:2-3). 

You will notice that freedom is 
spoken of as a gift from heaven. 

There was no contention among all the 
people in all the land, because of the 
love of God which did dwell in the 
hearts of the people. And there were no 
envyings, nor strifes, nor tumults, nor 
whoredoms, nor lyings, nor murders, nor 
any manner of lasciviousness; and surely 
there could not be a happier people 
among all the people who had been 
created by the hand of God . . . And 
how blessed were they! For the Lord did 
bless them in all their doings (4 Nephi 
1:15-18). 



That beautiful condition endured 
for 165 years. 

Now, in conclusion, I should like 
to read to you some inspired in- 
terpretations of history by the 
Prophet Joseph Smith. He wrote 
an article (it is the last chapter for 
this year's study), called the "Gov- 
ernment of God." Here was a 
prophet of the Lord qualified to in- 
terpret the events of history, as the 
Lord would have them interpreted. 
We might call these sayings "axioms 
of social science from a prophet." 

The government of God has always 
tended to promote peace, unity, harmony, 
strength and happiness; while that of 
man has been productive of confusion, 
disorder, weakness and misery. 

Man is not able to govern himself, to 
legislate for himself, to promote his own 
good, nor the good of the world. 

If there was anything great or good in 
the world it came from God. 

Other attempts to promote universal 
peace and happiness in the human family 
have proved abortive; every effort has 
failed; every plan and design has fallen to 
the ground; it needs the wisdom of God, 
the intelligence of God, and the power of 
God to accomplish this. The world has 
had a fair trial for six thousand years; the 
Lord will try the seventh thousand Him- 
self. 

This course of lessons leads up 
to the final destiny of the earth and 
man when they shall, if faithful, 
reach eternal perfection and eternal 
happiness. 

The designs of God have been to pro- 
mote the universal good of the universal 
world; to establish peace and good will 
among men; to promote the principles of 
eternal truth; to bring about a state of 
things that shall unite man to hi6 fellow 
(Continued on page 141) 




Don Knight 



cJoo Ujound of ibarth 

Beita Huish Chiistensen 

Let me not grow too fond of life to leave 
The mellow, emerald earth; too fond of light 
Cut to a summer's length. Let me not cleave 
Too ardently to winter's sheltered night. 
Let me not hold too close the amber cord 
That threads the autumn's intricate design, 
Nor cling to heirlooms from a treasured hoard, 
Too transient and elusive to define. 
And I would not be captive to the cry 
Of sorrow, nor too closely housed by mirth, 
Nor hemmed in flight by traveled lanes of sky. 
I must not be too bound or fond of earth, 
For I would go unfettered to the door, 
To meet with eagerness, one gone before. 



Page 91 



For the Strength of the Hills 

Chapter i 

Mabel Harmer 

CAMILLA stood on the plat- "Not at all," he replied, picking 

form in front of the little up the bag and placing it on top of 

station and watched the the two that she had checked. "The 

train grow small in the distance, store is at the other end of the 

It finally disappeared around a hill block. You can't miss it." 

and left her feeling very much a Not until Camilla had started 

stranger in a strange land. What down the unpaved sidewalk did she 

if Idaho was just a thousand miles begin to wonder how she would 

from California? To all purposes, identify Mr. Rodgers. She hadn't 

for the time being, it might just as even asked his approximate age. 

well have been a hundred thousand. Well, she could always ask his name. 

Well, she had insisted upon coming Peebles' store had the combined 

and here she was. odors of practically everything from 

She picked up her bag and walked leather goods to candy. There were 

around to the other side of the sta- half a dozen customers, but only 

tion where a short, plump station two of them were men, so she took 

master was hauling some express a chance on the younger and said, 

packages into the side room. "You i'm looking for a Mr. Rodgers." 

stoppin' here?" he paused to ask. "Speaking," he answered briefly 

She resisted an impulse to an- and to the point. "What can I do 

swer, "Obviously," and said instead, for you?" 

"Fm going to Crandall. Can you "My name is Camilla Fenton, 

tell me how to get there?" and Fd like a lift to Crandall, if 

"On shanks' ponies, unless you you can manage the room. I have 

can catch a ride with Stan Rodgers," three bags." 

he said cheerfully. "He come in "I can manage if you can," he 

for a piece of machinery, but I countered. "I only have a jeep, 

reckon he could make room for Think you want to ride in that?" 

you. Or you can wait and go out "I want to ride in anything that 

with the mail in the morning." will take me where Fm going," she 

"Where would I be able to find said with a faint smile. 

Mr. Rodgers?" she asked, brushing "Okay. I'll be leaving in about 

aside the suggestion of a ride with a quarter of an hour. Want me to 

the mail. pick you up over at the station?" 

"Hard to say. Maybe over at "If you will, please," she an- 

Peeble's store. Most everyone who swered gratefully. "I'll have my 

comes in goes there sooner or lat- luggage ready." 

er." She walked back, feeling very 

"Thank you. I'll just put this much cheered and, this time, took 

bag with the others, if you don't occasion to look around at the town, 

mind, until I'm ready to leave." There were half a dozen stores, in- 

Page 92 



FOR THE STRENGTH OF THE HILLS 



93 



eluding a movie house that adver- 
tised shows Wednesdays and Satur- 
days, and a few groups of houses, 
each with lawn and flowers in front 
and a vegetable garden at the rear. 
There seemed to be sunflowers 
everywhere, and over to the east 
rose a high range of purple moun- 
tains. 

"I'm going to like it," she prom- 
ised herself defiantly. "It will be 
high adventure." 

The defiance was to her aunt in 
California, who had "raised the 
roof" at her proposal to teach school 
in Idaho, and to her friends, who 
had expressed skepticism and dis- 
approval by everything from raised 
eyebrows to open scoffing. 

"Did you get 'im?" asked the 
plump station master. 

"Yes, thank you. He'll be around 
in a few minutes." 

She brought out her checks and 
assembled her luggage at the end 
of the platform so that it could be 
easily picked up. Then she waited 
while a quarter hour passed and 
dragged into a half hour, standing 
first on one foot and then the other. 
She had to remind herself very 
forcefully that the man was doing 
her a favor to take her at all, and 
that if his business kept him longer 
than he had thought, it was up to 
her to make the best of it. 

''PHE jeep finally rattled up and 
the young man jumped out. 
"Sorry to keep you waiting," he 
called with a grin, piling her bags 
in the rear of the jeep alongside his 
purchases. He helped her into the 
seat beside him and, with a couple 
of jerks, they started down the road. 



"Schoolteacher," he said above 
the clatter. 

"Yes, how did you know?" 

"Oh, the time of the year and 
general get-up. They're not hard 
to figure out. Where do you come 
from?" 

Santa Monica, California," she re- 
plied, trying not to say it boast- 
fully. 

To her satisfaction, he was prop- 
erly impressed. "Well, we've had 
them from most everywhere else, 
but you're the first I ever heard of 
coming from California. I don't 
suppose that anyone ever left there 
of his own free will. Or is that 
only Chamber of Commerce pub- 
licity?" 

"I guess not many people leave," 
she agreed. "Not for very long, 
anyway." 

She had no intention of explain- 
ing why she herself had come. It 
wasn't something that one could 
explain to a complete stranger. "I 
think it's fun to go different places," 
she said, "and I'm sure that I'm 
going to like it here." 

"I hope so. I wouldn't trade our 
town for the whole State. It gets 
sort of cold, though," he ended 
cheerfully. 

"How cold?" she asked curiously. 

"Oh, sometimes ten below. 
There's a good stove in the school- 
house," he grinned. 

She couldn't tell if he was joking, 
so she let it pass and asked instead, 
"What's growing in the fields? It 
looks like all the same crop." 

"It is. Spuds— you know, the 
famous Idaho potato. That's all we 
eat out here. That and a bit of 
bacon once in awhile." 



94 



RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— FEBRUARY 1951 



'That will be a nice change," she 
replied airily. "At home we eat 
nothing but oranges and avocados." 

From an occasional glance she 
could see that he was quite good 
looking— that he just escaped being 
handsome, in fact. He was very 
tanned, and his hair seemed to be 
just a shade lighter than his skin. 
In contrast, his eyes were a very 
deep gray, set off by black eyebrows 
and lashes. He wore a broad- 
brimmed hat and a blue plaid shirt 
in best western style. 

They rode along in silence for a 
time until she ventured, "How far 
is it to Crandall?" 

"Thirty miles. Getting tired?" 
he asked. "Old Betsy here sure 
bumps along." 

"No, not at all. I just wondered." 

They swung into a small ravine 
lined with aspen trees, and when 
they came up again he exclaimed, 
"That's it." 

Camilla saw farms here and there, 
the barns usually larger than the 
houses. There was a small center 
with a church, schoolhouse, and 
one or two other buildings. The 
mountains seemed very close, and 
it reminded her of what Uncle Evan 
called "a jumping off place." 

He gave her a moment and then 
asked, "Well, what do you think 
of it?" 

"It looks very pretty and— peace- 
ful," she replied trying to think of 
something nice to say. 

"It's peaceful all right," he agreed. 
"I guess you want to go to Mrs. 
Whipple's?" 

"Yes. How did you know?" 

"She always boards the school- 
teacher. There's a different one 
every year." 



"Don't they ever come back a 
second year?" asked Camilla in 
vague concern. 

"Nope, but some of them stay. 
The good-looking ones always get 
married." 

"Then I'm safe," she said, and 
immediately wanted to bite her 
tongue. It was exactly as if she 
were inviting him to say that she 
was good-looking. 

Unexpectedly, however, he an- 
swered, "Oh, I don't know al>out 
that. We hang on to the red-head- 
ed ones whether they're good-look- 
ing or not." 

And, with feminine contrariness, 
Camilla found that she was an- 
noyed with him now instead of with 
herself. 

HpHEY stopped in front of a small 
weatherbeaten cottage, and he 
said, "This is it. I'll carry your 
things in." 

Camilla wasn't at all sure just 
what she had expected, but she 
knew that it wasn't this. For a 
fleeting moment she contrasted the 
gracious white stucco house in San- 
ta Monica, and once more she re- 
minded herself very vigorously that 
this was what she had asked for. 

Mr. Rodgers was already on his 
way up the walk with the two larg- 
er pieces, and she followed with the 
smaller. Before they reached the 
door it was opened, and a small, 
wiry woman, looking almost as 
weatherbeaten as the house, was 
smiling at her. 

"Miss Fenton," she said, reach- 
ing out a hand, "Fm real glad to 
see you. It's nice you were in town 
today, Stan. Bring the things right 
in here. How's your digging com- 
ing along?" 



FOR THE STRENGTH OF THE HILLS 



95 



"Okay, I guess/' he answered 
easily. "We'll be through in a 
couple of weeks if the weather holds 
out." 

Camilla stifled an impulse to in- 
quire if the weather sometimes gave 
out, and instead asked, a trifle self- 
consciously, how much she owed 
him for the ride. She could see at 
once that the comment on the 
weather would have been more in 
order. 

"Forget it," he said with a slight 
shrug. 

"Then, thank, you very much in- 
deed," she said stiffly. Why did he 
have to make her sound like a nit- 
wit for asking a perfectly natural 
question? She wished that he 
would get out before he made her 
feel even more ill at ease. 

He might have done so had not 
Mrs. Whipple invited him to have 
a look at the big squash she was 
sending to the county fair and 
sample the blueberry pie she had 
just finished making. That, together 
with a string of lively chatter, made 
Camilla sure of one thing. Her 
landlady was decidedly social-mind- 
ed and would be good company. 

He finally left, with the piece of 
pie in one hand, and Mrs. Whipple 
took Camilla into her own room, a 
front bedroom just off the living 
room. 

"I'll set on supper and call Wil- 
liam," she said. "I guess you must 
be hungry and tired, too." 

Camilla was more confused than 
ever, but she smiled and Mrs. 
Whipple went out. 

She hung up her clothes and put 
her toilet articles out on the dresser, 
along with Boyd's picture. He 
looked handsome and even more 



correct than usual. Maybe I am in 
love with you and just don't know 
it, she thought. Anyhow, this 
should be one way of finding out. 

William turned out to be a 
twelve-year-old-son, and during the 
course of the evening she learned 
that Mr. Whipple had passed away 
five years ago. Since that time the 
widow had made her own way by 
running the small farm as best she 
could, and boarding the school- 
teacher. 

Camilla wished that she could 
think of some subtle way to find out 
whether or not Stan Rodgers was 
married. Not that it mattered, 
really, but the winter would pass 
much more happily if there were 
some congenial young people about. 
Finally the talk came around to the 
school, and she asked casually, 
"Does that Mr. Rodgers have any 
children in school?" 

"He doesn't have any, period," 
answered William helpfully. 

"He isn't married yet," Mrs. 
Whipple added, "although he goes 
quiet a bit with Marcia Ellertson. I 
expect she'll get him, in time." 

Not married yet, but had a steady 
girl— or almost. The picture, on 
the whole, was not too bad, Camilla 
decided. 

T ATER, as she lay in bed in the 

sparsely furnished little room, 
she had the first real misgiving about 
her venture . Since her parents' 
death, almost ten years before, her 
home with Aunt Lillian had been 
more pleasant than otherwise. If 
only Aunt Lillian weren't so domi- 
neering and so determined to shape 
every detail of one's life. There 
had been times when Camilla felt 
that she would stifle unless she got 



96 



RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— FEBRUARY 1951 



away. Then there was Boyd. He 
was everything that a sensible girl 
could want, as her aunt had pointed 
out many times, good-looking, prop- 
er background, a rising young archi- 
tect, and their interests, on the 
whole, were the same. What more 
could a girl want? She wasn't sure, 
but she had a vague idea that there 
was something— at least a feeling 
that it mattered whether or not he 
came or went. Maybe that was the 
trouble. He was always coming. 
Well, she would have a wonderful 
opportunity now to find out if she 
missed him, and the chances were 
that she would. 

The next day was Saturday, and 
she awakened to leaden skies, a 
steady downpour of rain, and a case 
of appalling homesickness. 

All the reasoning of the past night 
was swept away. She had been every 
kind of an idiot to come out here, 
and she would give her front teeth 
to be back among the palms and 
flowers of Santa Monica. Even 
Aunt Lillian assumed the role of a 
charming, solicitous guardian, and 
Boyd was a paragon among young 
men who would surely be plucked 
off before she could get back to him 
again. The odor of frying bacon 
was of some consolation, and she 
got up and dressed. 

Mrs. Whipple was bustling about 
and the table in the kitchen was 
set for one. 

'Tm glad you could sleep late," 
she said. "It will help the time to 
pass away, because I guess there 
isn't much you can do in this rain. 
There's a dance in the recreation 
hall tonight, though, and I asked 
Emery to come and take us over. I 
thought it would be a good chance 



for you to get acquainted with some 
of our young people. Emery's my 
brother," she explained in answer 
to Camilla's look of surprise. "He's 
never married, and he isn't much to 
step out, but he'll take us over to- 
night." 

It seemed like an odd arrange- 
ment for a dance date, but it sound- 
ed better than nothing. One thing 
she was sure of, she couldn't sit 
around letting this drizzle nurture 
her homesickness or she wouldn't 
last the month out. 

She wondered what to wear to 
the dance, and finally decided on a 
kelly green crepe that contrasted 
well with her auburn hair. She sup- 
posed that she would be looked 
over rather carefully by old and 
young alike. 

Emery drove up about nine, and 
they left— William included— for 
the dance. Mrs. Whipple instruct- 
ed her brother to dance with Camil- 
la first and then to bring over some 
of the young folks. He did his 
duty with some slight embarrass- 
ment, and she danced with one boy 
after another, acknowledging to 
each that she was having a very 
good time, thank you, and that she 
was sure she was going to like teach- 
ing in Crandall. All the time she 
was searching each new group that 
came in to see if Stan Rodgers was 
among the crowd. 

It was ten o'clock before he came, 
bringing a pretty, fair-haired girl- 
probably the Marcia Ellertson Mrs. 
Whipple had mentioned. He 
danced twice with his partner and 
once with another girl before he 
came over. Then he said easily, 
"Good evening, Miss Fen ton. May 
(Continued on page 142) 



Miss Breech's Boy 

Pansy e H. Powell 

DING! man, her weary head resting against 

_ ■' n , . .. . the soft cushion. 

A snowball flattened itself against There was more than physica] 

the white clapboard of Miss Sally wea riness and exasperation with a 

Breech's house. bunch of exuberant boys in Miss 

Miss Breech sighed exasperatedly. Breech's sigh. It was true that at 

"Drat those boys," she exclaimed sixty-five she could no longer do 

—to no one in particular, since she the work she once could; she had 

lived alone, and there was no one learned to rest frequently, but she 

to exclaim to. was still much more energetic than 

She did not rise from her chair many of the teachers who were still 
to investigate the origin of the mis- going to classes every day, while 
sile. In the first place, she knew Miss Breech stayed home in the 
that the neighborhood boys, out of ranks of those recently retired. No, 
school for the Christmas holidays, it was not physical weariness nor 
were probably the instigators of the entirely her vexation at the neigh- 
attack. She had been aware all borhood boys that made her sigh, 
day as she went about her cleaning as she sat relaxing after her day of 
that the street was alive with boys, housecleaning. 
They had played fox and hounds Miss Breech's sigh came from 
on the next door neighbor's yard, something she would have scoffed 
and now they were holding a mimic at, had she known anyone was go- 
battle in the street in front of her ing to label it spiritual fatigue, 
house. Even Butch, the little boy "Rats," she would have said, "I've 
from next door, was out there, get- nothing on my mind. Free as the 
ting wet and probably "catching birds— no school, no pupils to wor- 
his death of cold," as Miss Breech ry about, no Christmas program to 
put it. prepare for the first time in forty 

In the second place, Miss Breech years. Wonderful feeling, this!" 
was too tired to be chasing boys That is what she would have said, 
away. She was too tired to do much but that would have been camou- 
of anything. She had worked all flage. Deep down in her she knew 
day, cleaning her little house, that she was lonely and a little de- 
which was perfectly clean when she pressed. This was the first Christ- 
started; but Miss Breech was a mas in forty years that she had not 
good housekeeper and would have been busy every minute, decorating 
thought herself remiss if she had a tree, putting on it the little gifts 
not gone over her house thoroughly brought her at school by her ador- 
on this day before Christmas. She ing third graders. Several times to- 
had swept and dusted and waxed day she had thought of those gifts, 
and washed windows. Now she awkwardly wrapped by the pupils 
sat in her comfortable overstuffed themselves or daintily packaged by 
chair, her feet placed on the otto- willing mothers. Though Miss 

Page 97 



98 



RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— FEBRUARY 1951 



Breech had never opened her gifts 
at school, she knew by long experi- 
ence that the little square pack- 
ages with small round ends were 
bottles of dime store perfume, 
usually gardenia; that the thin flat 
packages were handkerchiefs; and 
the long wide boxes were probably 
chocolates. She had always brought 
them all home from her room at 
school, placed them on or under 
the big tree, and opened them on 
Christmas morning, writing down 
each child's name and gift so she 
could thank him personally. But 
this year she had no eager roomful 
of third graders; there would be no 
tree, for pension money didn't 
stretch so far as that; no gardenia 
perfume would be stored away un- 
opened. 

ALL this Miss Breech had been 
thinking as she rested in her 
living room. It was an attractive 
room, neat and clean, not elaborate- 
ly furnished but tastefully arranged 
with old walnut furniture that had 
been her grandmother's, and bright- 
ened with chintz slipcovers and 
drapes that Miss Breech had made 
herself. 

Miss Breech had always enjoyed 
her home and had never felt lonely 
in it before. Even though she had 
no near relatives to join her on 
Christmas Eve, always there had 
been school to keep her busy right 
up to the very night. But today 
she felt tired and lonely and de- 
pressed by the yelling voices out- 
side, as the snow fight in front of 
her house waxed more lively. 

She brushed her hands across 
wet eyes and then said to herself— 
she had developed the habit of 



talking out loud to herself only 
this winter: 'This house looks pe- 
culiar without a tree. I really can't 
remember a Christmas when I 
didn't have a tree. I've bought 
forty trees and have seen them set 
up in my room at school. Anyway, 
those silver bells over the doors and 
windows do look pretty, and those 
holly wreaths are beautiful, with 
the big red ties on them. Christ- 
mas trees aren't really necessary to 
a Christmas at all." 

Miss Breech jumped nervously 
as a snowball slithered over her 
veranda. But she did not rise 
from her resting position. She con- 
tinued thinking aloud: "Does seem 
odd not to be getting a program 
ready. Guess that part's all over 
by now. School let out yesterday. 
I ought to know. Those pesky boys 
on this street have been yelling and 
throwing snowballs all day. They've 
had Butch out there all day, teach- 
ing him how to make snowmen and 
to throw balls." 

The thought of Butch irritated 
Miss Breech so much that she rose 
from her chair and went to the 
front window. Peering out through 
the clean shining surface of her 
recently washed window, she looked 
for a familiar little figure among 
the swarm of older boys in the front 
street. There he was— sturdy and 
independent— trying so hard to be 
big with the boys who were not 
his companions during school 
hours, since he was too young to 
be in school yet. 

"He's just getting too smart," 
Miss Breech soliloquized. "Not 
good for little fellows to be around 
those older boys so much. No 
wonder he's such a noisy child all 
the time." 



MISS BREECH'S BOY 



99 



She watched the chubby little 
figure in the red woolen coat and 
cap and blue overalls scampering 
around, making snowballs, and de- 
livering them to an older boy who 
promptly hurled them at his op- 
ponents in the fight. The scene 
was a lively one and would have 
provided amusement to an ordi- 
nary observer; but Miss Breech was 
no ordinary observer. 

CHE had reason to look with dis- 
favor on Butch. The family 
had moved next door to Miss 
Breech in June, and from the first 
day of his arrival Butch had made 
himself at home on Miss Breech's 
lawn. He ran through her back 
yard, pursued by a yapping scrag- 
gly terrier. Neither of them regard- 
ed her zinnias and marigolds as 
more than pretty colored grass, a 
little nicer to step on than ordi- 
nary lawn covering. The terrier 
had a propensity for sleuthing in 
hedges, and Butch had no respect 
whatever for Miss Breech's elab- 
orately worked out borders. That 
first day, when she recovered from 
the surprise of their unannounced 
visit, she had stopped Butch in a 
pre-emptory manner as he ran wildly 
through the yard a second time in 
pursuit of an imaginary robber. 

"Little boy," she had said in her 
best school teacher manner, "I 
want you to be careful not to run 
over my flowers." 

He had paused momentarily in 
his mad flight, and the yapping 
terrier had yanked at his heels to 
prompt him to move on. Butch 
had looked up at Miss Breech with 
sparkling blue eyes from under a 
bemedaled beanie. 



"Sure," he had answered in a 
startlingly loud voice. "We'll be 
careful. Come on, Chippy," and 
away they had scampered, lopping 
off a branch of a chrysanthemum 
plant as they rounded the corner 
of the house. 

That was only the beginning. 
Numerous episodes followed. Most 
of them involved the terrier, which 
Butch stoutly defended from all 
attack. "Chippy is a good dog," 
he would say. "He doesn't know 
they are roses." 

Miss Breech would answer, 
"Butch, you will have to keep that 
dog off my yard, or I'll have to tell 
your mother to put him on a 
chain." 

"Okay, I'll tell him," Butch 
promised, and Miss Breech later 
heard him doing just that. 

"Now, Chippy/' he was saying, 
on the other side of the hedge be- 
tween the two yards, "you will 
hafta stay out of Miss Breech's 
flowers. You'll hafta, do you hear?" 

But Chippy was back before 
evening, chasing butterflies and 
beetles, regardless of Miss Breech's 
protestations. 

Finally she went to Butch's 
mother, a warm, friendly person, 
much disturbed by Miss Breech's 
disapproval of Butch and Chippy, 
and trying to curb the lively spirits 
of both offenders with small suc- 
cess. 

"If you wish, Miss Breech," she 
said on this occasion, "we'll give 
Chippy away. We know he is 
causing you trouble, and Butch's 
father and I have talked about 
what we could do about it." 

"Oh, no," Miss Breech hastened 
to reply, "you musn't do anything 



100 RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— FEBRUARY 1951 

like that. Butch is so fond of Chip- one galosh in a decidedly debilitated 

py. It's just that I've always been state. There were unmistakable 

able to have a nice garden, and signs that something had tried to 

they do run across things without masticate the galosh. Chippy was 

much consideration for what they guilty on circumstantial evidence, 

may be doing." Miss Breech saw red. She dashed 

After this visit of Miss Breech, a t Chippy and managed to land on 

Butch and Chippy made fewer for- him one blow from the handle of 

ays into her yard. Then had oc- her fork. Chippy departed, after 

curred the case of the missing ga- giving an anguished howl, his tail 

loshes. between his legs. 

OAVING come home rather late Miss Breech went to Butch's 
11 one rainy night, Miss Breech moth 1 er a § am > and from that time 
removed her galoshes and left them on the **? ^factors were not 
on the front porch. Usually she seen in Miss Breech s garden ex- 
was very careful to leave nothing cept once in a great while when 
loose around the house, but to- But( *> a naturall 7 friendly child, 
night she had been late and ready would come over bnefl y to adl ™ e 
to go to bed, so the galoshes were som( [ ^ owers that Particularly 
left outside. The next morning- caught his eye. On these occa- 
no galoshes. Miss Breech looked sions Miss Breech now and then 
everywhere; being a systematic per- P™ ^ som % flower * to , tak f home 
son, she knew she had left her with him, and so a kind of peace 

galoshes outside the door, but be- had been estab is ^ d ' b ^ * was 

ing also more absent-minded than an armed truce r liable to break out 

formerly, she knew it could just be 2*° °P en f wa y fare at an y time - 

possible that they were somewhere mat the famil y dld to kee P Chl P- 

in the house. But no galoshes J* home J ^ 1SS 1 ? r f ech 1 dld "°* 

could be found know, and she told herself she did 

' Later that day Miss Breech went J?* ca / e > but sec ; retl y ? he *? lt a 

out into her yard to do her daily ll 1 ttle blt , ashamed of herself, al- 

stint with her flowers. Under the tbou g b she felt at the same time 

forsythia bush where she had re- that she was n % ht 

cently freshly spaded the dirt be- That was why Miss Breech 

fore watering the lawn, she saw a looked with disfavor at Butch's ac- 

suspicious hump in the soil. Just tivities in the snow fight. 'They're 

at that moment Chippy made a teaching him more meanness," she 

sortie into the yard, approached soliloquized, "like as not." 

the hump of dirt, and sniffed Just as she turned away from the 

reminiscently. As Miss Breech ap- window to go back to her chair, a 

proached, he withdrew hastily to a plump snowball landed squarely in 

safe distance. the middle of. the big clean pane. 

Then she saw a bit of dark gray Luckily, the pane did not break, 

rubber protruding from the side of but the spattered snow immediate- 

the hump. She jabbed her garden ly removed all traces of Miss 

fork into the dirt and unearthed Breech's labor of the morning. She 



MISS BREECH'S BOY 

quickly opened the front door to 
catch the person who had done 
this. The street was empty, except 
for Butch and Chippy, both of 
whom were looking at her with 
fear. Not an older boy was in 
sight. Chippy crept over close to 
Butch's feet. 

"Butch/' Miss Breech called, 
"come here, Butch." 

Butch started toward her obedi- 
ently. Chippy cocked one ear in- 
quisitively, then followed at a dis- 
creet distance. As Butch stepped 
up on the porch, Miss Breech de- 
manded, "Did you throw that 
snowball?" 

Chippy remained at the foot of 
the porch steps, an expression of 
suspicion upon his bristly face. 
Butch faced Miss Breech's frown 
and spoke right up, "No'm!" 

"Well, if you didn't, I'd like to 
know who did. Somebody threw 
it. I'm sure Chippy didn't." 

At mention of his name Chippy 
barked inquiringly, but settled 
down dejectedly with his head on 
his paws when Miss Breech sharply 
reprimanded him: "Hush! Be 
quiet!" 

"Well, Butch," she reiterated, "I 
want to know who threw that ball. 
If you didn't, do you know who 
did?" 

Butch had learned his lesson well 
from the neighborhood boys. It 
was not in his code to tell on any- 
body. He did not answer Miss 
Breech, but looked past her 
through the open door to the living 
room, brave in its Christmas green 
and red. His eyes played around 
the room, searching. Then, be- 
cause it was more important to him 
to have Christmas trees than to 
know who threw a snowball, he 



101 

abruptly changed the subject by de- 
manding, "Don't you have a Christ- 
mas tree?" 

"No, I don't have a Christmas 
tree. But that is not what I asked 
you. Do you know . . . ." Miss 
Breech stopped suddenly. Years 
of experience in the ways of boys 
warned her that this was not the 
way to go about this matter. Why 
should she force little Butch to tell 
on his friends? But there was little 
relenting in the tone with which 
she said, "All right; you go on home 
now, and take that dog with you. I 
don't want him muddying up my 
steps and porch." 

TT is doubtful that Butch regis- 
tered her tone or what she said. 
After his discovery that Miss 
Breech wasn't having a Christmas 
tree, his little one-track mind had 
refused to admit more than the 
one idea. 

"Okay," he said with his usual 
cheerfulness. A moment later he 
and Chippy were gone, neither 
giving so much as a backward look 
at the lonely spinster who was 
watching their departure. 

Miss Breech closed the door with 
a bang and went to hunt up her 
window cleaning tools, which she 
had put away earlier in the day. It 
did not take long to clean up the 
effects of the snowball, but any- 
thing is a hard chore when one is 
tired and lonely and a bit sorry for 
one's self on Christmas Eve. 

Miss Breech made herself a 
simple supper of hot milk and toast. 
She was too tired to do more. She 
was finishing the last piece of toast 
when the doorbell rang. She slowly 
walked to the door and opened it. 
(Continued on page 140) 



Sixty Ljears kJxqo 

Excerpts from the Woman's Exponent, February 1, and February 15, 1891 

"For the Rights of the Women of Zion and the Rights of the 
Women of All Nations" 

THE BABY: We love the baby and at all times we bid it a hearty welcome. With 
its hue of pinks and carnations and roses, its eyes bespeaking the tenderness just brought 
from a shore we cannot recall even in dreams, its voice so plaintive as to defy rudeness, 
and its whole presence so like the embodiment and eternal fitness of things superani- 
mate — the angels themselves — how purifying is its presence and how sacred the in- 
fluence which its presence implies! — The Standard 

SHADOW-LAND 

Oh, what is this longing, this yearning to know? 

This germ of an impulse we cannot restrain? 
And why should it haunt me and follow me so, 

If the quest it awakens is fruitless and vain? 
Nay, I feel that beyond the scope of my dreaming, 
The star of intelligence onward is streaming. 

I call in the night-time for strength from on high, 
To open the flood-gates of knowledge for me, 

I wait and I listen, but only the sigh 

Of the murmuring winds, in quaint melody, 

Chant the song of my heart tho' its music is clear, 

We've lived heretofore in some loftier sphere. 

— E. B. W. 

MALAD STAKE RELIEF SOCIETY CONFERENCE: Pres. O. C. Hoskins 
felt happy to hear the testimonies of the sisters. Spoke of the progress the Church is 
making; said it has cost the best blood of the nation, besides thousands of dollars, to 
bring us to the place we are standing in today. Spoke of the condition of our day 
schools and the necessity of teaching our children in the ways of the Lord. Pres. Lucinda 
Hoskins felt thankful for the good instructions given in this conference; said as mothers 
we need information on a great many subjects especially those things pertaining to our 
religion. — Eliza A. Hall, Sec. 

NOTES AND NEWS: The Princess of Wales has given orders that nothing 
need be submitted for her inspection, or that of her daughters, in which birds are used 
as trimming. 

George Bancroft, the historian, is dead. He passed away at the age of ninety, full 
of years and honors. Tributes sent by the sovereigns of Europe, on the announcement 
of his death, were added to many similar ones here. The following fitting and ap- 
preciative words were spoken of him by A. R. Spofford, the Librarian of Congress, be- 
tween whom and Mr. Bancroft the warmest personal friendship existed for many years: 
"His is the most beautiful old age I have ever seen; calm, peaceful, cultured, surrounded 
by friends, and admired and revered by a whole nation, the drawing to a close of his 
life is as grand and beautiful and peaceful as the gradual fall of night on a mountain 
peak/— Ex. 

Page 102 




Woman's Sphere 



W ] 



'HEN Ellen Wilkinson, "be- 
loved rebel/' of Britain's Labor 
Party, died during the past year, 
both Prime Minister Clement R. 
Attlee and opposition leader Wins- 
ton Churchill paid her high trib- 
ute. Red-haired Miss Wilkinson 
worked her way from dire poverty 
through higher university training 
and into the British political scene, 
where she has been a dominating 
figure for more than twenty years, 
fighting with fiery oratory for what 
she believed to be just. She was 
Minister of Education in the Labor 
Government, the second woman in 
British history to hold a cabinet 
office. 

jyrARYHALE WOOLSEY, con- 
tributor to The Relief Society 
Magazine and other western peri- 
odicals, and author of the words to 
"Springtime in the Rockies," won 
the Deseret News Christmas Story 
contest with her offering "Anything 
Lovely." 

ERTHA A. KLEINMAN of 
Mesa, Arizona, won third place 
with her poem, "The Empire of the 
Free," among 3,000 entries in the 
National Thanksgiving Associa- 
tion's annual poetry contest. The 
purpose of the organization is to 
render Thanksgiving Day a more 
religious and patriotic celebration 
through the expression of higher 
sentiments, displaying of the flag, 



B 



Ramona W. Cannon 



and by study of the Mayflower 
Compact, and other historic docu- 
ments. Her poem appears in the 
anthology This Is America, which 
also contains poems by two other 
Utahns, Grace Candland and Betty 
Wall Madsen. 

jyjRS. RUTH WAHLQUIST, of 
Ogden, is state president of 
the American Association of Uni- 
versity Women. Recently in this 
column we referred to Dr. Olivia 
McHugh as state president. This 
was an error. Dr. McHugh is presi- 
dent of the Salt Lake City chapter. 

HPHE Bronte sisters, Charlotte, 
Emily, and Anne, and their un- 
heroic brother, Bramwell, are once 
again the subjects of a biography, 
this time by Lawrence and E. M. 
Hanson, The Four Brontes (New 
York, Oxford University Press.) 
Readers become aware of their in- 
most reactions and of the intertwin- 
ing of their lives. Charlotte's Jane 
Eyie and Emily's Wutheiing 
Heights both appeared in 1847. An 
earlier excellent biography is Fan- 
ny Ratchford's Web of Childhood. 

QUEEN ELIZABETH and King 
^ George of Great Britain sent to 
Mrs. Matilda Coppins, of Hastings, 
birthday greetings in late Septem- 
ber. Mrs. Coppins, believed to be 
the oldest woman in the United 
Kingdom, turned 108. 

Page 103 



EDITORIAL 



VOL 38 



FEBRUARY 1951 



NO. 2 



Say /lotmng [But [Repentance LLnto 
Q/hts (generation 



TN May 1829, almost a year before 
the organization of the Church, 
the key of the second great prin- 
ciple of the gospel— repentance- 
was restored to the earth. Repeated- 
ly thereafter the Lord declared, 
"Say nothing but repentance unto 
this generation" (D.&C. 6:9) . From 
that time it would seem conditions 
in the world have been such as to 
demand that the cry of repentance 
be heard continuously. The gospel 
message with its word of warning 
has spread slowly but irresistibly 
throughout the world. Still there re- 
main large areas of the earth where 
the cry of repentance may not be 
heard, where any faithful are denied 
the voice of warning and the bless- 
ing of drinking of the waters of ever- 
lasting life. 

The tempo of world affairs ac- 
celerates and the wicked are rush- 
ing to their own destruction. In 
June 1829, the Lord warned, "The 
world is ripening in iniquity; and 
it must needs be that the children 
of men are stirred up unto repent- 
ance, both the Gentiles and also the 
house of Israel" (D. & C. 18:6). In 
February 1831, the Lord issued a 
warning, proclamation, and com- 
mandment. Upon his faithful 
servants he enjoined, "Lift up your 
voices and spare not. Call upon 
the nations to repent, both old 
and young, both bond and free, 
saying: Prepare yourselves for the 

Page 104 



great day of the Lord" (D. & C. 
43:20). Ever since that time the 
Church has obeyed this command- 
ment through pronouncements and 
writings of the prophets of the 
Lord, and the call to repentance by 
the missionaries. 

A Latter-day Saint, viewing the 
dread situation which the world has 
brought upon itself through wick- 
edness and iniquity, may question 
the power of an individual repent- 
ance. Let him recall these words 
of the Lord, "Remember the worth 
of souls is great in the sight of 
God . . . And how great is his joy 
in the soul that repenteth" (D. & C. 
18:10, 13). Let him also recall that 
Abraham bargained with the Lord 
and was given the promise that the 
Lord would spare all the place, 
( Sodom and Gomorrah ) if ten 
righteous should be found in it. Let 
him recall also that the city of 
Nineveh, comprising more than 
sixscore thousand persons, was 
spared from destruction because the 
people repented at the pleading of 
Jonah. 

Individual repentance can change 
the course of events. Parents in 
Zion not only are responsible for 
their own repentance, but the Lord 
has stated, "Inasmuch as parents 
have children in Zion, or in any of 
her stakes which are organized, 
that teach them not to understand 
the doctrine of repentance . . . the 



EDITORIAL 



105 



sin be upon the heads of the par- 
ents" (D. & C. 68:25). Children 
must be taught the meaning of 
repentance, "By this ye may know 
if a man repenteth of his sins- 
behold, he will confess them and 
forsake them" (D. & C. 58:43). 
The Lord cannot look upon sin 
with the least degree of allowance, 
but he promises, "Behold, he who 
has repented of his sins, the same 
is forgiven, and I the Lord remem- 
ber them no more/' 

The person who is striving for 
perfection, continually repents of 
his past evils. When one fault or 
sin is overcome, there always re- 
main other failings to conquer, if 



he would become perfect as his 
Father in heaven and love his 
neighbor as himself. Repentance 
leads him along the pathway to 
eternal life. 

The one hope of the world today 
lies in the repentance of the indi- 
viduals comprising the nations of 
the earth. To all people everywhere 
the Lord will extend mercy if they 
come to him with broken hearts 
and contrite spirits. May the world 
heed the cry to repentance of the 
prophets of this day, and may every 
Latter-day Saint look to himself that 
he will be counted as a part of the 
leaven which will leaven the whole. 

-M. C. S. 



■4 * 



BIRTHDAY GREETINGS TO PRESIDENT AMY BROWN LYMAN 

February 7th 

f\N this seventh day of February, 1951, Relief Society women in many 
lands, throughout the stakes and missions of the Church, extend their 
love and congratulations to Amy Brown Lyman, former general president 
of Relief Society. 

A brilliant, well-trained, and capable leader, Sister Lyman became a 
member of the general board in 1909. In 1940 she was appointed general 
president and served in that capacity until 1945, giving freely of her broad 
vision, and her varied experience. Sister Lyman was president of the so- 
ciety during the centennial year of 1942 and officiated in the events of that 
memorable year. 

Sister Lyman is now literature class leader in her own ward, the East 
Twenty-seventh Ward in Emigration Stake, Salt Lake City, where her 
gifts of educational and cultural background and her love of literature are 
being shared with her sisters in her ward Relief Society. 

Devoted to The Relief Society Magazine, Sister Lyman has worked 
for its success by urging all Latter-day Saint women to keep the Magazine 
in their homes and use its messages of inspiration for the benefit of their 
families. 



Buying Food for the Family 

Contributed by the Utah State Nutrition Council 
Ruth P. Tippetts 

Consumer Education Specialist, Utah State Agricultural College 



WOULD your habits bear a 
microscopic inspection to 
see how many buying 
judgments are based on "accurate 
information/' and how many are 
just ' 'taking a chance"? 

Can you pick the right cut of 
meat for the price you want to pay, 
or does it seem to be sheer luck 
that one time you get a tender 
steak, and the next time, for the 
same price, a tough one? If canned 
salmon is available at several prices, 
can you tell which can is suitable 
for salmon loaf, salad, or a main 
dish? Do you give up in trying to 
evaluate, and just buy the cheapest? 
Or do you try to "play safe" and 
buy the most expensive? 

The job of purchasing the family 
food is a hard one, because the 
number of products to choose from 
is almost endless and, in some 
cases, there's no way of telling good 
from bad. A retail grocer, in talk- 
ing about the different grades and 
price variations of tuna, said one 
can't always depend on either price 
or label to determine the quality of 
tuna. Often, in order to sell, a 
grocer will mark down the price on 
a first grade product, but the con- 
sumer, thinking it second or third 
grade, will avoid it. Producers and 
sellers often add to our confusion 
by pressuring us to buy their prod- 
ucts. They appeal to our hidden 
desires and emotions, and we buy 
against our best judgment. 

Page 106 - 



In order to know quality in 
products and receive the most satis- 
faction for money spent, the con- 
sumer can do three things: 

i. Ask the advice of the person who 
sells the particular product. 2. Compare 
the labels on various brands of the same 
canned item for whatever information 
each gives. 3. Buy various brands of the 
same product and compare the contents, 
then buy whichever brand is most satis- 
factory. 

Some information may occasionally be 
gained through the experiences of friends 
and neighbors, or from listening to ad- 
vertisements of products over the radio. 
However, care must be taken in buying 
highly advertised products, for many 
products not so highly advertised are of 
equal value and yet less in price. 

An honest analysis of needs and 
wants is the cornerstone of good 
shopping. Planning before buying 
saves both time and money. If 
you select what you want, after 
careful investigation, you get more 
for your money, and it's far more 
sensible to buy what you want than 
what you run into. 

To determine requirements be- 
fore buying there are three decis- 
ions that must be made: 

1. How much money can be spent? 

2. What nutritional requirements must 
be met? 

3. What are the taste preferences of 
the family? 

How much money can be spent 
will be determined by the food 



BUYING FOOD FOR THE FAMILY 



107 



budget. In buying meat, for in- 
stance, if the budget is rather 
limited, stew cuts of meat give as 
much food value as more expensive 
cuts. But for taste preference and 
ease of preparation, perhaps the 
choice would be a T-bone steak. 

There's another thing not to be 
overlooked, and that is the matter 
of family happiness. Kale may be 
the best buy in the market, and of 
course it is filled with good vitamins 
and minerals. But if, no matter 
how deliciously you prepare it, the 
family refuses to eat it, then it is 
hardly a good buy. 

VOW let's take the weekly food 
shopping expedition. All 
through the week notes and ideas 
should be jotted down concerning 
the items needed and wanted. 
Perhaps on Wednesday the market 
adviser said that the strawberry 
season is in full swing and it's time 
to check on them for canning. 
Maybe Friday morning the adver- 
tisement from the corner grocery 
store listed reduced prices on 
canned peas and several citrus juices. 
Suppose the order would look some- 
thing like this: 

Meat Department: 

2 lbs. round (or flank) steak, com- 
mercial grade for stew 
1 lb. bacon 



Fresh Produce: 
i head lettuce 
\Vi lbs. broccoli, if fresh 

i crate strawberries 

Groceries: 

5 lbs. granulated sugar (However, it is 
more economical to buy sugar in 
larger quantities.) 

l No. 10 can orange juice (check price 
and brand) 

1 large box quick-cooking oatmeal 

2 No. 2 cans peas (check brand) 
l No. 2 can corn, cream style 

In the meat department the meat 
dealer will help you make selections, 
and your own experience and infor- 
mation will help in final choices. 
In the fresh produce department, 
you will be free to pick up and in- 
spect the items, if done carefully, 
and perhaps you will select the nice- 
looking tomatoes if they are in 
season, in place of the broccoli, 
which looks rather tired. 

Yes, a weekly session with your- 
self — planning, giving serious 
thought to balancing your food 
budget, and also to balancing the 
diet itself — can bring dividends. 
What makes the greatest difference 
in the quality of your shopping 
may well be the half hour spent at 
home getting ready to buy, and in 
this way learning something about 
what you plan to buy. 



LOefaulted 

Bertha A. KJeinman 

Don't weep too much if one you idolize 
Should totter on his pedestal and fall — 
From out the ruins he may still arise 
To find your friendship wasted — not at all. 
Conserve your tears, your powers to amend, 
For when you stand defaulted as a friend! 



"In the Twinkling of a Toe" 

Maryhale Woolsey 

THE sun was climbing up the told me almost nothing about it- 
brilliant sky and growing except that Hap Franklin's so won- 
warmer by the minute. Madge derful to let them use the company 
Riley leaned on her garden rake auditorium, and that the harvest 
and wished Janice Dowson would ball really should have been held 
say what she had come over to say. before school started. I don't even 
Madge had so much to do today— know what the girls have been do- 
grape jelly and jam to make, and ing, except working a lot harder at 
pears to can; already they were over- their projects than they're willing 
ripe. to work at . . . ." She stopped 

She eyed Janice again with the abruptly. Did she know what any 

incredulousness she always felt for girls, other than Colleen, did at 

Janice's plumpness. It made Madge home? And even Colleen does 

overconscious of her own still slen- what I've asked hei to. It's her 

der figure, and her energy, though always hunying to get away, as if 

she was past fifty-seven, and her home's hateful, that hurts! 

hair was graying. Janice's was, too; "But you really should be there 

but Janice retained an endless joy tonight. It's not right that Colleen 

in living, whereas Madge had long should be without anyone of her 

since lost all will for anything but wn to take an interest in what 

work. she's done .... Please, don't be 

Of course, Janice had her jolly hurt, Madge. I know how it's been 
big family— married sons and daugh- f or you; you've had my sympathy, 
ters and adorable grandchildren. an d other folks'. But Colleen 
Madge had only her one grand- nee ds you— in ways she hasn't had 
daughter, Colleen— who had never y 0U . Oh, my phone's ringing, 
seemed close to her. Colleen had Might be Jim calling from Wood- 
been a care, really! side— he was going to!" Away Jan- 

"I hope you're going to the har- ice ran, awkwardly as a puppy, and 

vest ball tonight, Madge," Janice as happily. 

was urging suddenly. "I hear it'll Madge resumed her leaf raking, 

be quite a celebration." She worked rapidly; she'd have to 

Madge stiffened. This was it! hurry things a little . . . Surprising- 

"Oh?" she questioned. ly, she felt no negation in her. Not, 

"Yes. Those kids have really ac- "ShaH I go?" Simply, 'Til have to 

complished things. Brenda— my hurry!" Perhaps it was because 

Jerry's wife, you know— has been ad- Janice had made her see it as a 

vising them a little. I'd be going duty. 

myself, except that it's my teaching Even her intense dislike of 

night. I may come later, anyway." crowds— amounting to a phobia 

"I never go anyplace like that, these recent years— seemed now a 

Janice. You know that. I don't minor consideration. Over her 

know why I should. Colleen has work, Madge found her mind ex- 
Page 108 



'IN THE TWINKLING OF A TOE' 



109 



ploring unaccustomed paths. What 
had been behind Janice's resolute 
admonition? Her hesitancy might 
infer something disagreeable; Col- 
leen's wilfulness, her uncommunica- 
tiveness, her eagerness to be any- 
where but at home— all these had 
indicated to Madge that Colleen 
was a "problem." She had been 
an ordeal from the beginning, her 
very presence a continual reminder 
of their bereavements, too many 
and near together, and too shock- 
ing not to have induced serious re- 
action. First, Madge's husband had 
died, then her son Gilbert had been 
killed in the war, and last, his 
young wife had been killed in an 
automobile accident— all within the 
space of a year. And Madge had 
been far from well, herself. No 
wonder she and Colleen had got 
off to a bad start, the sick and grief- 
stricken grandmother and the be- 
wildered, frightened child! But 
Madge had regained health and 
strength; Colleen had adjusted. 
What was the distance between 
them which could not be bridged? 

/^OLLEEN, fourteen now, was 
older than her years, with an 
air of knowingness and self-sufficien- 
cy which could easily have led her 
into difficulties. Still, in that case 
Madge surely would have heard; 
there would have been someone 
who would feel it a duty to inform 
her! 

Madge prepared dinner early and 
let it wait while she dressed, putting 
on a becoming full-skirted print 
dress she had bought a year ago but 
had never worn. Colleen, dashing 
in to bathe, eat, dress and "take off 
again," regarded her with surprised 
and wordless questioning. 



"I'm coming to your ball. I hear 
it's too good to miss," Madge said 
quietly. 

"Why-that's fine!" Was there 
a flash of consternation, turning to 
defiance, behind the widening 
brown eyes, an unsteadiness in the 
red lips, so quickly pressed into a 
firm set line? Madge half smiled, 
noticing all at once how like her 
own firm jaw was the line of Col- 
leen's! 

She went on talking matter-of- 
factly, "I guess your club has been a 
good thing for you. For all of you 
girls, I mean." 

"Of course it has. We'd have 
hated this long, hot summer if we 
hadn't had our projects to keep us 
busy. We're going to have it next 
summer, too, we think." There 
was a vehemence in Colleen's tone, 
and a guardedness. She determined- 
ly picked up her fork and began to 
eat. "Oh, I have to go early, Grand- 
mother. Do you mind?" 

"Of course not. I wouldn't ex- 
pect you to change any arrange- 
ments because I decided at the last 
minute to come." 

"Okay, then . . . thanks." Un- 
certainly, Colleen bent her face 
over her glass of water. A small 
frown wrinkled her smooth fore- 
head. 

The meal continued in its custom- 
ary silence, but with an undercur- 
rent of tension. Having finished, 
Colleen hurried to her room to 
dress. Madge was hanging up her 
dish towel when Colleen reappeared 
in the kitchen. "I'm taking off," 
she said. And hesitantly added, 
"Grandmother, did you know I'm 
singing on our program?" 

"Why, no! Didn't you want me 
to know?" 



no 



RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— FEBRUARY 1951 



"I sort of wanted to tell you . . . 
but it might have seemed like I 
was— well— trying to get you to— 
to " Confused, Colleen stopped. 

Madge spoke gently, 'To come, 
especially to applaud you? It could 
have seemed that way, all right. 
Don't let it bother you." 

The frown disappeared. "Okay, 
then " 

"You look very pretty," Madge 
called hurriedly. From the front 
door Colleen looked back, a picture- 
book gypsy. Her dark hair lay like 
a smooth satin cap. She wore a 
yellow-flowered, short-sleeved blouse 
of yellow cotton drawn up around 
the shoulders with a black ribbon, 
and a full skirt, black with colorful 
daisies and tulips bordering it. She 
could be going to a costume party, 
Madge thought, as she watched Col- 
leen hurrying down the path. 

TV/IADGE brought out her coat 
and purse, and went out to sit 
awhile in the old rocking chair on 
the porch. In the west a faint rosy 
glow lingered from the sunset. 
Madge felt a nostalgia for sunsets of 
old days when broad green fields 
had stretched away to the hills; 
acres and acres of them had be- 
longed to Mart and Madge Riley. 
Madge had sold them, piece by 
piece, reluctantly but profitably, see- 
ing only folly in holding land she 
could not successfully employ. Her 
son had wanted only to be a flier; 
flying had taken him away— even- 
tually, not to return. In the postwar 
building period Madge had con- 
tinued selling, keeping for herself 
only an acre, with her house— old 
and shabby now among the smart, 
modern homes rising around it. The 
Dowson's place was nearest. The 



road was hard-surfaced and had at- 
tained a name, Broadview. Along 
it at nights lights glowed and twink- 
led on and off; voices and music and 
traffic noises replaced former si- 
lences, and Madge learned deeper 
loneliness than ever. Colleen, pre- 
sumably, found satisfactions else- 
where, as she was always "taking 
off." 

Madge stood up, drawing a long 
unsteady breath. She tested the 
lock of the door, and started down 
the path. Walking was pleasant; 
the staccato tap-tap of her heels on 
the sidewalk had a good sound. 

She arrived early, as anticipated; 
only a few seats were occupied by 
young people she did not know. 
She took a place near the front, and 
avoided looking back at the gather- 
ing crowd. For the first time, she 
felt a resentment at her continued 
aversion to social contacts; she won- 
dered if she ever would overcome 
it. She was relieved when finally 
the lights dimmed and the stage cur- 
tains opened. 

It was a good program, she 
thought, watching skits, stunts, and 
tap dancing. Hearing Colleen sing 
a couple of popular songs in the 
crooning, throaty modern style, was 
a surprise, but not too exciting, she 
decided .... Or could it be she 
couldn't appreciate it, she won- 
dered as she left, lingering behind 
the crowd. 

Janice Dowson met her at the 
auditorium door. "I saw you and 
waited, thought we'd like seeing the 
exhibits together." 

They made the rounds of a 
miniature fair, viewing displays of 
handwork, paintings, wood carvings. 
Madge looked in each space for 
Colleen's name, finding it at the 



"IN THE TWINKLING OF A TOE' 



111 



very last table with what at first 
seemed to be a doll's house. Then 
she saw that it was, instead, a home 
decoration project, with a cardboard 
house as a model, and sketches ac- 
companying it. Madge caught her 
breath then, for the house was- 
her own! With a few alterations: 
a widened window, the fireplace re- 
opened and restored, the "front 
room" and dining room made into 
one large lovely space by removal 
of the dividing wall. The "Before" 
sketches were flawless. Madge 
groaned inwardly. Did her house 
really look so unattractive, so unin- 
viting? 

Janice, beside her, said softly, 
"You may as well look now, Madge. 
You've got a gifted girl on your 
hands." 

"It's my house/' Madge's voice 
was flat. "She seems to have looked 
at it more than I ever thought she 
did." 

"No drastic changes," Janice mur- 
mured. "Mostly, she's done a 
bringing alive of it ... . What a 
sense for color!" Janice's tone spoke 
only honest admiration for Colleen's 
work. 

Madge was silent, trying to fath- 
om Janice's deep thoughts and her 
own strange emotion. 

HpHEN Janice was saying, "Shall 
we go in? They've cleared the 
floor for square dancing. It'll be 
fun to watch." 

It began as special exhibition 
dances, but, presently, the urge to 
participate took over the audience 
and soon the whole scene was one 
bright kaleidoscope of colorful ani- 
mation and gayety. Madge found 
her own feet tapping in time with 
the music, old tunes she had not ex- 



pected ever to hear again in such 
surroundings. Time slid backward, 
unrolling memories of decades . . . 
and she found herself smiling back 
at smiles from old friends, some of 
whom she had not seen in years. 

Suddenly, a white-haired but live- 
ly man was standing in front of 
her. "Madge Walters Riley, it's 
been a long time since you and I 
ornamented a dance floor together. 
Winnie and I are both in favor of 
our doing it again." 

"Well-Frank Peters! What are 
you doing back in this town?" 

"Vacation trip— visiting Ralph's 
folks. Come over and see Winnie. 
She saw you first and sent me over." 
He was leading Madge along the 
edge of the dance floor, in front of 
the seated spectators. Madge saw 
Winnie Peters' eager smile first, and 
then the wheel chair. Pity swept 
her as she took Winnie's hand. 

"Madge— after all these years- 
wonderful to see you! We must 
have a good visit, but right now, 
dance with Frank, will you? He 
loves it so— and I can't; darn my 
legs. You two used to dance to- 
gether so beautifully!" 

"They're starting the varso- 
vienne," Frank said. "Come on, 
Madge!" He had drawn her onto 
the floor before she knew what was 
happening. Dismay filled her . . . 
this was ridiculous! Oh, she 
couldn't! 

But she could; her feet remem- 
bered! And into her mind came 
silly little words learned long ago 
in a dancing class to help her master 
this very dance: ". . . Do you see my, 
do you see my, do you see my new 
shoes? . . . With the tips on, with 
the tips on, with the tips on the 
toes!" With a sudden recklessness, 



112 



RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— FEBRUARY 1951 



a surging will for adventure, Madge 
lifted her skirt in one hand, let her 
body sway into the music. Forward, 
back . . . glancing down, she could 
see her patent-leather toes twinkling 
in and out beneath her skirt. 

She did not notice the crowd's 
thinning until all at once she rea- 
lized that she and Frank alone 
were dancing in the center of a 
watching circle. Frank's smile and 
nod, his gay whispered, "Doin' 
okay, aren't we?" impelled her to 
continue. When the music stopped, 
applause roared around them. "Keep 
going!" someone shouted; the music 
began again and, as if hypnotized, 
Madge nodded and took Frank's 
arm. 

TT was later, after the adventure 
was ended and Madge was at 
home, getting ready for bed, that 
the reaction came. What had pos- 
sessed her? She'd made a fool of 
herself . . . the applause, the laugh- 
ing compliments, must have gone 
to her head completely. Oh, well, 
to those youngsters she was just an 
old lady, cutting capers— What did 
it matter? Besides, the dancing 
had been fun! She stretched her 
toes pleasurably between the cool 
sheets. 

She thought of Colleen. "Grand- 
mother, you were wonderful!" Col- 
leen had said. "I didn't know you 
could dance like that!" Then, 
"Kay's folks will bring me home . . . 
you'll go with Mrs. Dowson, won't 
you?" Colleen had not been smil- 
ing. What had been in her mind, 
behind the wide brown eyes? Madge 
lay still, trying to puzzle it out. And 
dreading the morning .... 

She slept at last and wakened to 
a gray sky and a wind gusty with 



storm threat. Colleen was already 
up, and almost ready for school. 
Her "Good morning, Grandmoth- 
er," was quiet as usual, but her eyes 
still wore the questioning look, and 
her young body was tense. 

"You sang very nicely, Colleen. 
And I thought your exhibit was 
lovely— and well done." 

Colleen's tenseness relaxed. "Did 
you? I didn't know whether you'd 
like it." 

"I did wonder why you chose 
this old house instead of a new mod- 
ern type," Madge ventured. 

"Why— because this one interests 
me more," Colleen answered, sur- 
prised. "It's the one I like best." 

"You-Iike it best? Really?" 

"Of course. It could be lovely," 
Colleen faltered, her cheeks flush- 
ing. "Of course, I understand it's 
already lovely to you, Grandmoth- 
er. But I had to experiment with 
my ideas, I guess; you see, I want 
to be an interior decorator, some 
day. There can't be anything more 
wonderful to do, than making homes 
beautiful!" For one brief moment 
the wide eyes let fall their guarding 
mask. Madge could look behind 
and see the wistful dreams. . . . 
She wants to make homes beautiful! 

In that moment Madge Riley 
made a decision faster than ever 
before in her life. Watching Col- 
leen's face closely, she asked, 
"Would you like to begin on this 
one, in reality?" 

Colleen gasped and stared. Then 
acceptance of what she had heard, 
transformed her ... as the sun for 
a moment pierced the clouds and 
beamed across the kitchen, touch- 
ing its dullness with gold. "Oh! 
You don't mean .,..?" 

(Continued on page 142) 




From The Field 



Margaret C. Pickering, General Secretary-Treasurer 

All material submitted for publication in this department should be sent through 
stake and mission Relief Society presidents. See regulations governing the submittal 
of material for "Notes From the Field" in the Magazine for April 1950, page 278, and 
the Handbook of Instructions, page 123. 

CONVENTIONS, WELFARE WORK, BAZAARS, 
AND OTHER ACTIVITIES 




Photograph submitted by Ida M. Dean 

GRANITE STAKE (UTAH), FOREST DALE WARD RELIEF SOCIETY 
PRESIDENTS HONORED AT SOCIAL, October 2, 1950 

Front row, seated, left to right: Nellie Whitaker (1946-47); Sentella Pace, pres- 
ent president; Printha Bitter (1929-30 and 1939-40). 

Back row, standing, left to right: Jennie Naegle Biesinger (1936-37); Eva Tobia- 

son (1944-46); Ida M. Dean (1942-43); Laura Bradshaw (1937 and 1941); Agnes 
Lundgren (1938). 

Inset photographs: at left, Jeannette J. Fullmer (1931-35); and at right, Lucille 
C. Bennion (1940). 

These women represent twenty-one years as presidents of Forest Dale Ward, 1929 
to 1950. 

Ida M. Dean is president of Granite Stake Relief Society. 



Page 113 



114 



RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— FEBRUARY 1951 




Photograph submitted by Laura M. Hawkes 

NORTH CENTRAL STATES MISSION, VIRGINIA (MINNESOTA) RELIEF 
SOCIETY MEMBERS WHO SUPERVISED A RUMMAGE SALE 

September 9, 1950 

Left to right: First Counselor Maxine Crapo; Charlotte Bagley; Mary Culver; 
Secretary-treasurer Clara Niemi; Esther Moyle; second Counselor Violet H. Larson; 
seated, President Elvira Erspamer. 

This photograph was taken in April 1950, when the women met to discuss plans 
for the rummage sale. The sale, held on September 9th, was the first project of this 
kind sponsored by the Virginia Relief Society, and the profit made was $102. Mission- 
aries assisting on the day of the sale were Donna Bird and Betty Ann Martinson. 

Laura M. Hawkes is president of the North Central States Mission Relief Society. 




Photograph submitted by Annie M. Ellsworth 

CENTRAL STATES MISSION, EAST OKLAHOMA DISTRICT RELIEF 
SOCIETY CONVENTION, September 26, 1950 

Front row, left to right: Laura Stephens, regional supervisor; Annie M. Ellsworth, 
President, Central States Mission Relief Society; Mary Krider, supervisor, East Okla- 
homa District. 



NOTES FROM THE FIELD 



115 



The other sisters in the photograph represent seven of the eight Relief Societies 
in the district. 

This convention, the first one ever held in the East Oklahoma District, was 
planned by the mission Relief Society President, Annie M. Ellsworth, with the assist- 
ance of Sister Stephens and Sister Krider. Sister Katherine Vaclaw, President, Bartles- 
• ville Branch, assisted with the various demonstrations, with the co-operation of the 
visiting teachers of her branch. Other officers who assisted with the convention were: 
Ella J. Hubler, Gore Community Relief Society (Oklahoma); Effie Reynolds, Presi- 
dent, Ft. Smith Branch (Arkansas); Gladys Fortner, President, Muskogee Branch 
(Oklahoma); Joan Venable, President, Seminole Relief Society (Oklahoma); Hilda M. 
Barker, President, Henryetta Branch (Oklahoma); Margaret Oliver, President, Tulsa 
Branch (Oklahoma). 

Some of these sisters traveled as far as three hundred miles in order to receive 
instruction in the history, organization, and procedures of Relief Society. 




Photograph submitted by Mabel A. Price 



CENTRAL ATLANTIC STATES MISSION, NORTH CAROLINA EAST 

DISTRICT RELIEF SOCIETY CONVENTION AND FASHION 

SHOW, WILMINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA 

Children in the foreground, left to right: Cheryl Padrick; Mary Henderson; Sarah 
Lee Flowers; Sandra, Lynn, and Karen Henderson. 

Back row, standing, left to right: Lillie Leandis; Helen Henderson; Doris Flowers; 
Sister Durance (hidden); Eugenia Cochran; Myrna Henderson. 

Sister Mabel A. Price, President, Central Atlantic States Mission Relief Society, 
reports that the fashion show, held in connection with the annual Relief Society 
convention, was a very fine demonstration ©f what can be done in the way of made- 
over clothing, with little or no money. Sister Myrna Henderson, with her three daugh- 
ters, all had dresses made from scraps or remnants, at very little cost. Sisters Helen 
Henderson and Doris Flowers spent as little as $2 for both their mother's and 
daughter's dresses. 

In the background of the picture are quilts made with the star and crescent pat- 
tern by the different branches of the district. Some of the sisters who made these 
beautiful quilts had never worked on quilts until recently. Quilts were submitted 
by Dulah, Ash, Harkers Island, Chinquapin, and Wilmington Branches. Many of the 
articles of clothing and the handwork showed marked ability and skill. 



116 



RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— FEBRUARY 1951 




Photograph submitted by Mildred G. Lamb 

CANADIAN MISSION, BROCKVILLE BRANCH RELIEF SOCIETY BAZAAR 

November 18, 1950 * 

Left to right: Ada Whiteley; Juliette Brown; Mildred Lamb; Joy Heckman; Miriam 
Forrester; Edna Morrison; Luella Ross; Vivian Wood Hill. 

The time and talents of these Relief Society sisters for the past six months were 
much in evidence at the first bazaar sponsored by this small branch. Ten women 
worked diligently in the preparation of home cooking, sewing, and handwork articles. 
The enterprise was successful not only in a monetary sense, but also as a means of in- 
troducing the Relief Society and its activities to the community. This Relief Society, 
as yet, is not fully organized and is presided over by young women missionaries. 

LaPriel R. Eyre is president of the Canadian Mission Relief Society. 




Photograph submitted by Mima C. Hainsworth 
and Georgina F. Richards 

PORTLAND STAKE AND NORTHWESTERN STATES MISSION DISPLAY 

OF PART OF THEIR WELFARE ASSIGNMENT 

October 23, 1950 

The photograph represents only a small part of the articles completed for the 
1950 Welfare assignment, which was exhibited during Relief Society convention. 



NOTES FROM THE FIELD 



117 



Mima C. Hainsworth is president of the Portland Stake Relief Society; Georgina 
F. Richards is former president of the Northwestern States Mission Relief Society, and 
Mavil A. McMurrin is the newly appointed president. 




Photograph submitted by Daphne B. Smith 

GARFIELD STAKE (UTAH), CIRCLEVILLE WARD RELIEF SOCIETY 
PRESIDENTS HONORED AT SOCIAL, March, 1950 

Left to right: Mary C. Norton; Indra C. Johnson; Daphne B. Smith (now stake 
Relief Society president); Lois W. Haycock; Eventa H. Fullmer; Eva N. Dalton, pres- 
ent president, Circleville Ward Relief Society. 

Under the direction of these presidents an effective program of visiting teaching 
has been carried forward for many years. In 1938 a one hundred per cent record of 
visiting teaching was achieved, and this record, with few exceptions, has been main- 
tained to the present time. Hazel W. Cannon, deceased, served as ward Relief Society 
president from 1932 to 1934, and served later as a stake Relief Society president. 



VUhere \£lory JLies 



Doiothy J. Roberts 

Glory is heaped upon the hills forever; 
Only its pattern alters to the view. 
Dull mauve which follows scarlet on the ridges 
Is the slate of the artist showing through. 

Glory is heaped within the heart forever 
That finds a joy in such monotony, 
That learns to love the plain, gray stitch of duty 
Which forms the background of her tapestry. 



{Blackbirds in vUtnter 

Chra Laster 

Today I saw a thrilling sight, 
Blackbirds on a tree of white. 
Against the silent winter's rage, 
They sat like words upon a page, 
Until an angry, driving breeze 
Erased them from the frozen trees. 
They fell to earth, then soaring high, 
Became a smudge against the sky. 



LESSON 




DEPARTMENT 



cJheoloqtj — The Life and Ministry of the Savior 

Lesson 32— "Personal Manifestations of God the Eternal Father and of His 
Son Jesus Christ in Modern Times''; and "Jesus the Christ to Return" 

Elder Don B. Colton 

(Reference: Jesus the Christ, by Elder James E. Talmage, chapters 41 and 42.) 

For Tuesday, May 1, 1951 

Objective: To show that God, the Eternal Father, and his Son, Jesus Christ, have 
manifested themselves on earth in modern times, and that Christ the Lord will return 
as a resurrected, glorified being to reign on earth. 

rpVEN though it is well known the circumstances, that was a per- 

among Latter-day Saints, the fectly natural frame of mind, 
account of the Prophet Joseph 

Smith's first vision in 1820 ought A New Dispensation 

to be read as a part of the prepara- One day, while the boy was so 

tion of this lesson. (See Pearl of disturbed, he was reading his Bible 

Great Price, Joseph Smith 2:5-26.) and came to James 1:5, which reads: 

The boy Joseph had been pro- "If any of you lack wisdom, let 

foundly affected by the wave of re- him ask of God, that giveth to all 

ligious agitation which swept the men liberally, and upbraideth not; 

neighborhood in western New York and it shall be given him." Is it not 

where he resided. He came from perfectly natural that this scrip- 

an honorable, intelligent family, ture should sink into the mind and 

Most of the members had joined soul of this boy? He had not been 

one or the other of the churches at schooled in the man-made doctrine 

Manchester. Young Joseph was and sophistry of men that God no 

puzzled. He was especially con- longer answered prayers directly 

cerned because of the bitterness when the necessity arose. He came 

among believers and even among the ultimately to the conclusion that 

ministers when the so-called con- the only way he could get light 

verts began to choose "or file off, was to ask God. He selected a se- 

some to one party and some to an- eluded place in the woods and went 

other." In the midst of this confu- to make the attempt, 

sion he often asked: "Who of all Surely, there was nothing wrong 

these parties are right? ... If any or irregular in his actions thus far. 

one of them be right, which is it, He was doing only what he had 

and how shall I know it?" Under all been told to do. Others had done 

Page 118 



LESSON DEPARTMENT 



119 




JOSEPH SMITH'S FIRST VISION 



it in ancient times, why could he 
not do it? After earnestly and sin- 
cerely praying, the heavens opened 
and there stood before him two 
glorious Personages. Their bright- 
ness and glory defied all descrip- 



tion. One of them spoke unto Jo- 
seph, calling him "by name, and 
said, pointing to the other— This is 
My Beloved Son, Hear Him!" 
Critics have gone far out of their 
way to vilify and condemn Joseph 



120 RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— FEBRUARY 1951 

for saying that God heard and an- visited with him during most of one 
swered his prayer. -Why? He an- entire night. The angel announced 
swered the prayers of Adam, Enoch, himself as Moroni, an ancient Ne- 
Moses, Abraham, Isaiah, the apost- phite prophet, and, among many 
les whom Jesus called, and scores other things, told of a record en- 
of others. Why was it wrong to graven on plates of gold which con- 
answer Joseph? Surely the world tained a history of the ancient in- 
needed direct communication from habitants of America and it con- 
the heavens which were sealed dur- tained also the fulness of the gospel 
ing the Dark Ages. of the Redeemer. In vision, Joseph 

The boy's prayer was answered, was shown the place where the rec- 

He beheld and listened to the Fa- ord was deposited. So clear was 

ther and his Beloved Son. He was the vision that he had no trouble in 

told that none of the churches were finding the place the next day. The 

right and he was not to join any boy was directed by Moroni to tell 

of them. They had a "form of his father of the vision and all that 

godliness, but they deny the power he had seen and heard. This he did 

thereof." Except by members of and was told by his father to obey 

his own family and a very few oth- implicitly all the instructions given 

ers, wherever he told of his experi- by the angel. Four years later the 

ence, he was ridiculed and perse- record was given to Joseph and, 

cuted. One cannot help but wonder when translated by the gift and 

why there was not a Gamaliel in power of God, was published as 

that community. (Read Acts the Book of Mormon. 
5:34-39.) The boy prophet had 

seen a vision; he knew he had and The Aaronic Priesthood Conferred 

he knew that God knew. Praise be by John the Baptist; the Melchize- 

to his memory, he bore that testi- dek Priesthood Conferred by Peter, 

mony to his dying day. James, and John 

The dispensation of the fulness On the 15th day of May, 1829, 

of times was ushered in by the per- the Aaronic Priesthood was con- 

sonal appearance of the Eternal ferred upon Joseph Smith and Oliv- 

Father and Jesus, the Redeemer. It er Cowdery by a heavenly mes- 

was the beginning of a glorious era senger, John the Baptist, who acted 

of revelation and restoration of under the direction of Peter, James, 

power from heaven. Note the logic and John. John the Baptist pre- 

of events. dieted that the higher or Melchize- 

dek Priesthood would be restored 

A Messenger Sent From the Pres- later. This prediction was fulfilled 

ence oi God shortly after when the three presid- 

About three and one-half years ing apostles came to Joseph and 

after the appearance of the Father Oliver, conferring upon them the 

and Son to Joseph Smith and in an- Melchizedek Priesthood and or- 

swer to earnest prayer, a heavenly dained them to the holy apostle- 

"messenger sent from the presence ship. The first baptisms in this dis- 

of God" appeared to the boy and pensation were supervised by John 



LESSON DEPARTMENT 



121 



the Baptist at the time he conferred 
the Aaronic Priesthood. 

Establishment oi The Church oi 
Jesus Christ oi Latter-day Saints; 
Further Communications from the 
Heavens to Man 

The New Testament clearly bears 
record that Jesus organized his 
Church while upon earth. By reve- 
lation to Joseph Smith the Lord di- 
rected that his Church should again 
be organized in this day. Instruc- 
tions were given as to how and 
when this should be done. In the 
revelation, the plan of Church gov- 
ernment was given and detailed in- 
structions as to baptism by immer- 
sion; the duties of the various of- 
fices in the Priesthood; confirming 
members; the correct form and 
meaning of the sacrament; and 
many other essential principles and 
ordinances were explained. "The 
Author of these several revelations 
declared Himself definitely to be 
Jesus Christ, God, the Son of God, 
the Redeemer, the Light and Life 
of the World, Alpha and Omega, 
Christ, the Lord, the Lord and 
Savior." There was no doubt of 
the necessity of the inauguration of 
a new dispensation of the gospel 
and a restoration of the Priesthood 
following the universal apostasy. 
All the power, keys, and authority 
necessary for the complete estab- 
lishment of Christ's Church were 
given to Joseph Smith and Oliver 
Cowdery. The gospel is the "pow- 
er of God unto salvation" and every 
key and power necessary has been 
restored in this day. Read D. & 
C. sec. 76:11-24 for an account of a 
glorious revelation of the Lord 
Jesus Christ. 



Personal Appearing oi the Lord 
Jesus Christ in the Kirthnd Temple; 
Jesus the Christ Is With His 
Church Today 

It is a great tribute to the faith 
and integrity of the early members 
of the Church that, within six years 
after the organization of the 
Church, the first temple in modern 
times was erected by them. Tem- 
ples are distinctive and are "sacred 
to the ordinances of the Holy 
Priesthood" which may not be per- 
formed in chapels, or tabernacles. 
The first temple was built at Kirt- 
land, Ohio. On the Sunday fol- 
lowing the dedicatory service, after 
a service of solemn worship, the 
Lord Jesus Christ appeared to the 
Prophet Joseph and Oliver Cowd- 
ery in the temple (D. & C. 110: 
1-10). Visits of other heavenly be- 
ings were made to Joseph and 
Oliver. Moses came and commit- 
ted the keys of the gathering of 
Israel; Elias committed the dispen- 
sation of the gospel of Abraham; 
Elijah the prophet, who was taken 
to heaven without tasting death, 
came and delivered the sealing keys 
of this dispensation (D. & C. 
110:11-16). 

While the Prophet Joseph was 
martyred June 27, 1844, other apos- 
tles and prophets have been raised 
up, and the glorious work of the 
Redeemer has been carried forward. 

We believe all that God has revealed, 
all that He does now reveal, and we be- 
lieve that He will yet reveal many great 
and important things pertaining to the 
Kingdom of God (Articles of Faith, 
No. 9). 

Jesus, our royal Leader, has and 
does manifest himself whenever it 
is necessary. "He points the way." 



122 



RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— FEBRUARY 1951 



"Jesus the Christ to Return" 
(chapter 42) 

The Lords Second Advent Predict- 
ed in Ancient Scripture; 
The Coming of the Lord Pro- 
claimed Through Modern Revela- 
tion 

"By the second advent we under- 
stand not the personal appearing of 
the Son of God to a few, such as 
His visitation to Saul of Tarsus, to 
Joseph Smith in 1820, and again in 
the Kirtland Temple in 1836; nor 
later manifestations to His worthy 
servants as specifically promised; 
but His yet future coming in power 
and great glory, accompanied by 
hosts of resurrected and glorified 
beings, to execute judgment upon 
the earth and to inaugurate a reign 
of righteousness." 

That Christ the Lord will come 
again is clearly foretold in the scrip- 
tures. "Ye men of Galilee, why 
stand ye gazing up into heaven? 
this same Jesus, which is taken up 
from you into heaven, shall so come 
in like manner as ye have seen him 
go into heaven" (Acts 1:11). The 
statements of Jesus himself, during 
his ministry upon earth, are direct 
and sure. Space will permit only 
one or two quotations: "For the 
Son of man shall come in the glory 
of his Father with his angels; and 
then he shall reward every man ac- 
cording to his works" (Matt. 
16:27). When before the high 
priest as a prisoner, Jesus answered 
that official's adjuration, "that thou 
tell us whether thou be the Christ, 
the Son of God," by saying: "I say 
unto you, Hereafter shall ye see the 
Son of man sitting on the right 



hand of power, and coming in the 
clouds of heaven" (Matt. 26:64). 
Class members should read carefully 
the 24th chapter of Matthew as re- 
vised by the Prophet Joseph 
Smith in the Pearl of Great Price. 

The Lord revealed to righteous 
Enoch that he would come in the 
last days. In answer to that worthy 
man's question, the Lord said: 

As I live, even so will I come in the 
last days, in the days of wickedness and 
vengeance to fulfill the oath which I 
have made unto you concerning the chil- 
dren of Noah. . . . And it came to pass 
that Enoch saw the day of the coming 
of the Son of Man, in the last days, to 
dwell on the earth in righteousness for 
the space of a thousand years (P. of 
G. P., Moses 7:59, 60, 65). (See Isaiah 
35:4; and 40:10.) 

The Book of Mormon also is 
clear and definite as to the second 
advent of the Savior (B. of M., 3 
Nephi 26:3, 4 and also 3 Nephi 
28:7-8). In many places in the 
Doctrine and Covenants it is clear- 
ly and definitely revealed that the 
Messiah will come again to earth 
to rule and reign (See D. & C. 
33:17-18; 34:4-12; 64:23). 

The Time and Accompaniments oi 
the Lord's Coming 

It has not been revealed to man 
just when the second advent of 
Christ will occur. We have the 
words of Jesus himself on this sub- 
ject: "But of that day and hour 
knoweth no man, no, not the angels 
of heaven, but my Father only" 
(Matt. 24:36). In this day the 
Eternal Father has made one of 
his rare announcements: "I, the 
Lord God, have spoken it, but the 
hour and the day no man knoweth, 



LESSON DEPARTMENT 



123 



neither the angels in heaven, nor 
shall they know until he come." 
The faithful will watch and pray 
that the signs which are to precede 
his coming may be recognized. The 
wicked will not recognize the signs 
anyway. Prior to the second ad- 
vent the land of Zion will be the 
only place of safety. 

There will be two capitals— one 
on the Western Continent and 
one on the Eastern Continent. The 
lost tribes shall come forth and 
Jesus will reign over all the earth. 
While his coming will not be the 
final judgment, it will be a time of 
great rejoicing for the righteous. 
At the final judgment the whole 
race of mankind shall stand in the 
resurrected state before the judg- 
ment bar of God to receive just 
recompense for the deeds done in 
life. When Jesus comes, he will 
bring those already resurrected and 
there will be a resurrection of the 
righteous dead. The pure and 
righteous who are still in the flesh 
shall be caught up to meet the 
Lord. (See I Thess. 4:14-17.) 

The Kingdom oi Heaven to Come 
A distinction is made in modern 
revelation between the ' 'kingdom 
of God/' which is the Church with 
full and complete divine authority, 
and the "kingdom of heaven," 
which is the "divinely ordained sys- 
tem of government and dominion 
in all matters, temporal and spirit- 
ual; this will be established in earth 
only when its rightful Head, the 
King of Kings, Jesus the Christ, 
comes to reign." (Read D. & C. 
sec. 65.) 



The Millennium 

When the kingdom of heaven is 
established upon earth and Christ 
reigns personally, a new era will be 
ushered in and for a thousand years 
peace and good will among all peo- 
ple will prevail. During that pe- 
riod Satan will be bound and the 
wicked who have died will remain 
unresurrected until the end of the 
Millennium. The faithful in Christ 
may look forward to a glorious pe- 
riod in earth's history. (Read P. of 
G. P., Moses 7:63-65.) 

The Celestial Consummation 

The vanquishment of Satan and 
his hosts shall be complete. The 
dead shall all be resurrected and 
shall stand before God to be judged 
according to the record, and the 
glorious mission of the Christ shall 
be consummated. 

Then cometh the end, when he shall 
have delivered up the kingdom to God, 
even the Father; when he shall have put 
down all rule and all authority and pow- 
er. For he must reign, till he hath put 
all enemies under his feet. The last 
enemy that shall be destroyed is death 
(I Cor. 15:24-26). 

Then shall he be crowned with the 
crown of his glory, to sit on the throne 
of his power to reign forever and ever 
(D. & C. 76:108). 

The earth shall become glorified 
and celestialized and those who 
have been exalted will abide there 
forever. "Forever shall they reign, 
kings and priests to the Most High, 
redeemed, sanctified, and exalted 
through their Lord and God, Jesus 
the Christ." 

Questions and Suggestions for 
Discussion 

1. Relate Joseph Smith's account of the 
First Vision. Show its consistency with 



124 



RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— FEBRUARY 1951 



God's previous appearances. 

2. Enumerate the keys which have 
been committed or restored in this gen- 
eration. 

3. What are some of the signs which 
are to precede the second coming of the 
Savior? 

4. What is the Millennium? 

References in the Gospels 

Matt. 16:27; 19:28; 24; 25:13; 26:64. 
Mark 8:38; 13:26, 32-37. 



Luke 9:26; 12:39, 4°' 21:5-36. 
John 2:28. 

See also, B. of M. 3 Nephi 12:9, 10; 
26:3, 4; 27:27; 28:7, 8; 29:2; Mormon 
6:6; Moroni 10:2. 

D. & C. sections 5, 6, 8, 10-20; 21:11; 
27:8, 12, 13; 29:8-17, 22; 33:17, 18; 
34:4-8; 36:8; 42:36; 43:18, 30-34, 40; 
45:37-44, 68-71; 49:7, 23-25, 28; 
63:50, 51; 64:23-25; 65; 76:11-119; 
84:63, 64; 88:86-92, 95-98; 95:4; 97:15, 
16; 101:23-32. 

P. of G. P., Joseph Smith 1:31, 36; 
2:5-59, 68-69. Moses 7:59, 60, 63-65. 



Visiting cJeacher lliessages — Our Savior 

Speaks 

Lesson 1 6-"Lo, I Am With You Alway, Even Unto the End of the World" 

(Matt. 28:20). 

Mary Grant Judd 

For Tuesday, May 1, 1951 

Objective: To leave a concluding message of hope and comfort in all of the 
homes visited. 



TOURING a period of three years 
there have been carried into 
tens of thousands of homes 
(through the efforts of a vast corps 
of faithful visiting teachers), in- 
spirational sayings of the Savior. 
Twenty-three messages in all have 
been given. Now, with the twenty- 
fourth, with which we conclude this 
series, "Our Savior Speaks," it seems 
desirable to have left with those 
visited the following appropriate 
declaration of the Master, "Lo, I am 
with you alway, even unto the end 
of the world" (Matt. 28:20). 

What reassurance and comfort, 
in this day of perplexity, to know 
that this promise is to each one of 
us who is willing to keep Christ's 



commandments. In a time of fear 
and uncertainty we may have as- 
surance, for he has said: "Let not 
your heart be troubled: neither let 
it be afraid" (John 14:27). 

These words are to be found in 
the fourteenth chapter of John, one 
of the most impressive and beautiful 
chapters in the whole of the New 
Testament. We suggest that the 
beauty of this chapter be pointed 
out and that the following excerpts 
from it be read in the homes visited 
as a fitting conclusion to this series 
of visiting teacher messages: 

In my Father's house are many man- 
sions: if it were not so, I would have 
told you. I go to prepare a place for 
you ... I will come again, and receive 



LESSON DEPARTMENT 



125 



you unto myself; that where I am, there 
ye may be also. ... I am the way, the 
truth, and the life: no man cometh unto 
the Father, but by me. ... If ye shall ask 
any thing in my name, I will do it. If 
ye love me, keep my commandments. . . . 
I will not leave you comfortless: I will 
come to you. Yet a little while, and the 
world seeth me no more; but ye see me: 



because I live, ye shall live also. . . . Peace 
I leave with you, my peace I give unto 
you: not as the world giveth, give I 
unto you. Let not your heart be troubled, 
neither let it be afraid. 

"Lo, I am with you alway, even 
unto the end of the world/' 



Work 77leeting—The Art of Homemaking 

(A Course for Optional Use by Wards and Branches at Work Meeting) 

Lesson 8-Table Settings and Service 

Christine H. Robinson 

For Tuesday, May 8, 1951 



ALTHOUGH the previous ar- 
ticles in this series of lessons 
have emphasized primarily the 
home decorating aspects of home- 
making, a discussion of this im- 
portant subject would be incom- 
plete without a consideration of 
table settings and the art of serv- 
ing food attractively. 

It is not the purpose of this les- 
son to discuss the preparation of 
food nor the development of reci- 
pes. Rather, we are concerned 
here with how to achieve attrac- 
tive and inviting table settings. 

There is little doubt but that the 
way food is served is second in im- 
portance only to the food itself. 
The same good wholesome food 
can be made more or less appetiz- 
ing, depending upon ■ the thought 
and care used in serving it. Fur- 
thermore, mealtimes and the serv- 
ing of food offer the thoughtful 
homemaker some important and 
unusual opportunities: 



First, in most families, mealtime 
provides the best regular occasions 
for getting the members of the fam- 
ily together as a group, and for 
establishing a home atmosphere of 
friendliness, understanding, and 
thanksgiving. 

Second, well-served food sets the 
pattern for the development of cor- 
rect social habits on the part of the 
children, which will do so much to 
help them develop well-balanced 
personalities. 

Third, the serving of food has im- 
portant social implications. It is a 
fundamental part of the entertain- 
ment of friends and relatives. On 
those occasions when neighbors and 
friends are invited into the home, 
the way refreshments are served, 
formally or informally, can make 
lasting impressions, and can do 
much to strengthen the bonds of 
friendship and understanding. 

In today's decorating, table set- 
tings are considered a fundamental 



126 RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— FEBRUARY 1951 

part of the over-all decorative more rough type of texture, in 

scheme. Many of the new books brighter colors, with bold designs, 

on interior decorating have separate plaids, and stripes can be used ef- 

sections which treat this important fectively with pottery, as long as it 

phase of homemaking. There is is in keeping with the general color 

hardly a home magazine which does and design of the dinnerware it- 

not feature ideas and suggestions self. Table coverings which har- 

for attractive table settings and monize, contrast, or pick up and 

food service. emphasize some hue in the china 

One of the first steps in achiev- can make table setting fun and food 
ing attractive table settings con- look glamorous, 
sists in the choice of table cover- One important guide to follow 
ings. Fundamentally, the same in choosing table linens is similar 
basic principles which are used as to the "rule of three" in home dec- 
guides in the selection of home orating. A dinnerware bold in de- 
furnishings may be applied to the sign, with a conspicuous pattern, 
choice of table linens, china, and usually looks its best when set off 
glassware, and in the creation of with a plain white or solid colored 
table decorations. This is true in cloth. A stripe or plaid can be 
respect to formality and informality used with an informal patterned 
in table settings, as well as in the pottery. On the other hand, solid 
use of color. colored dinnerware often takes on 

Fragile porcelains with tradition- new life and freshness when used 
al designs and colorings seem with a gaily patterned cloth. All 
naturally to suggest a more formal china used on the table need not 
type of table setting. With this be of the same pattern or color, 
type of china we would use fine Effective table settings can be cre- 
linens, organdies, laces, or finely ated by using patterned dinner 
woven rayon cloths and table mats, plates with solid blending colored 
This does not mean, however, that cups and saucers, dessert or salad 
with this type of china we must plates. Variety in table settings 
always be content to dress our can also be achieved by using col- 
tables in traditional white cloths, ored glassware and crystal which 
Color can be a fascinating and stim- contrast or harmonize with a hue 
ulating part of our table settings, in the china. 
In fact, china with a cream or In the field of table accessories 
ivory background, often looks more and centerpieces, imagination and 
at home on a delicate pastel cloth ingenuity can be exercised to the 
of pink, ivory, green, or blue. If maximum as long as the elements 
your dinnerware is one of the love- of good taste dominate. Of course 
ly semi-porcelain patterns or a gay the more conventional type of table 
pottery, there are limitless possi- decorations are always appropriate, 
bilities in colors and fabrics which such as the use of flowers or fruit, 
can be used to help put gaiety into In addition to these more common 
table setting and fun into house- types of table decoration, there are 
keeping. Table coverings of a countless and unusual possibilities 



LESSON DEPARTMENT 



127 



in various garden vegetables and 
berries. For example, highly pol- 
ished purple egg plant, green pep- 
pers, and, for texture, dark green 
artichokes skillfully arranged with 
a few sprays of ivy, or some other 
garden green, look cool and invit- 
ing. This type of centerpiece 
would be especially appealing if ar- 
ranged on a light pink table cloth 
and used with china with a pink 
and purple design. 

As emphasized in the beginning 
of this lesson, food itself, to be ap- 
petizing, should also look appeal- 
ing. Color, too, plays an important 
part in the selection of foods. Bright 
red tomatoes, white potatoes, green 
peas, or a similar green vegetable, 
cooked to retain its color, then 
served with dark brown meat, is not 
only highly nutritious, but appeal- 
ing looking as well. Rich color con- 
trasts in food not only flatter the 
food, but by so doing actually make 
it more digestible. On the other 
hand, a meal composed of white 
fish, white potatoes, turnips, cab- 
bage, cauliflower, or onions, would 
probably meet the needs of whole- 
some nourishment, but would fall 
far short of attractive appearance. 
Such a meal, because of lack of 
color contrasts, would be drab and 
unappetizing. The thoughtful 
homemaker plans menus which are 



not only nutritious but colorful as 
well. 

To summarize, care and thought- 
fulness in the serving of food are 
essential to successful homemak- 
ing. Lasting satisfactions come 
from serving simple foods in ap- 
pealing ways. It is important, too, 
to remember that these satisfac- 
tions can be obtained with little 
expense to the family in the pur- 
chase of china, table linens, and 
other table accessories. It costs no 
more to achieve sparkling colorful 
combinations than it does to do it 
the drab, uninteresting way. It all 
depends upon the employment of 
a little imagination and good taste. 

Discussion Points 

i. Discuss: the care of table linens; 
importance of removing stains promptly; 
how to store table linens (keeping in 
mind that they should be stored in a 
cool, dry place, away from radiators and 
steam pipes ) . Why should linen, to be 
stored for a long time, not be starched, 
and why should creases be avoided? 

2. How table silver can be cared for? 
Why is rinsing so important in the wash- 
ing and care of silver? What can be 
done to avoid scratching silver? 

3. Discuss how the serving of food at- 
tractively can help children develop well- 
balanced personalities. 

4. Why is food that looks appealing 
actually more digestible? 



"I have always thought that all men should be free; but if any should 
be slaves, it should be, first, those who desire it for themselves, and, 
secondly, those who desire it for others." 

—Abraham Lincoln 



128 



RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— FEBRUARY 1951 



jCtterature — The Literature of England 

Lesson 16— Samuel Johnson and James Boswell 
Eldei Briant S. Jacobs 

For Tuesday, May 15, 1951 

FJURING our present course of 
study various authors have 
passed before us, each bearing upon 
his tray that gift, or that combina- 
tion of talents, in which he excels 
and which will most ravishingly 
dazzle us. Alternately, their high 
achievements, conveying to us beau- 
ty, power, majesty, depth, wit, sa- 
tire, moral force and whimsical play, 
have exacted from us willing tributes 
of admiration, respect, and grati- 
tude. It is now fitting that our sea- 
son end by our studying a man who 
brings to us many gifts, while de- 
manding of us nothing but a sharp 
attention; and yet to him we are in- 
wardly forced to give that which 
neither can be demanded nor priced; 
our understanding and our love. 

It was one of Samuel Johnson's 
most powerful critical beliefs that 
literature is not an end in itself. 
He believed, and practiced, that 

Virtue is the highest proof of under- 
standing and the only solid basis of great- 
ness; and that vice is the natural conse- 
quence of narrow thoughts; that it begins 
in mistake and ends in ignominy (Ramb- 
ler, No. 4; text, page 1048, lines 82-6). 

For him the greatest justification 
of literature was its ability to teach 
religion and the moral virtues. "Re- 
ligion is the only source of what- 
ever happiness we have," he wrote, 
and early in his career he states as 
his own purpose, which was also 
that of the Rambler f "the propaga- 




A Perry Picture 

SAMUEL JOHNSON 

tion of truth ... to inculcate wis- 
dom or piety." Throughout his life 
he was devoutly religious, Christian- 
ity and the moral virtues being the 
values which he loved more than 
literature and criticism. The rela- 
tionship between these realms is 
clearly pointed out in Johnson's ob- 
servation that "He who thinks 
reasonably must think morally," a 
surprising statement indeed from 
England's last literary dictator who, 
as the final dominant voice of the 
Neo-Classical Age, honored reason 
as the cornerstone upon which all 



LESSON DEPARTMENT 



129 



great art and philosophy must be 
built. Always he took refuge from 
his own abysmal spells of melan- 
choly in his simple, unswerving 
Christian faith. Here was his truth* 
his rock. What Taine said of him 
in criticism of his failure to com- 
promise, we can repeat in praise: 
"His truths are too true." Here we 
find that rare integrity of thought 
and action which ever walks hand 
in hand with greatness. 

From another point of view, 
Johnson made literature, particular- 
ly biography, a means to another 
end. One of the greatest biogra- 
phers in English literature, Johnson 
particularly valued this form of 
literature because he believed it to 
be "of all kinds of narrative writing 
that which is most easily read and 
applied to the purposes of life" 
(Idler, No. 84). But in his excel- 
lent Life of Savage, as in the fifty- 
two sketches which comprise his 
Lives of the Poets (text, page 1053), 
Johnson was interested in the litera- 
ture each man wrote only so far as 
it revealed to us the qualities of the 
poet himself; always his great aim 
was to define the man behind the 
work. But in doing this, Johnson 
never sugar-coated his subjects in 
order to prove a moral or preach a 
lesson. He told the whole truth; 
then the evident morals to be drawn 
were true as well. As he said to 
Boswell, 

The value of every story depends upon 
its being true. A story is a picture wheth- 
er of an individual or of human nature 
in general; if it be false, it is a picture of 
nothing (Life of Johnson, II, 496). 

Thus, for Johnson, biography was 
a useful tool whereby a skillful 



artist might reveal and perpetuate 
great human personalities. 

Never did teacher teach so well 
as did Johnson when he taught his 
critical principles of the art of bi- 
ography to James Boswell. John- 
son himself, at the hands of James 
Boswell, became the subject of the 
greatest biography in all English 
literature, if not the greatest ever 
written. At the same time he be- 
came the best-known and best-loved 
figure in the English tradition. Thus 
it is that generations have known 
him more intimately than any other 
literary personage, without ever read- 
ing a word he has written. 

In the century following Johnson, 
Walt Whitman wrote of his own 
Leaves of Glass: 

This is no book 
Who touches this, touches a man! 

This also might be eminently 
true of Boswell's Life of Samuel 
Johnson (text, page 1067), but it is 
not the whole truth, since it pre- 
sents only the oral Johnson, mag- 
nificent as this portrait is. In order 
to know the complete man, we must 
allow him to "speak for himself/' 
But before we go to his writings, we 
should first sketch the events of his 
life. 

Samuel Johnson was born in Lich- 
field in 1709 to a bookseller and 
his middle-aged wife who, typical 
of their trade, were respected but 
poor. At school, where he had a 
great deal of Latin whipped into 
him, he was brilliant, but far more 
interested in reading voraciously in 
his father's bookshop. He attended 
Oxford a little more than a year 
and then his poverty forced him to 
leave. While still in his twenties, 



130 



RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— FEBRUARY 1951 




JAMES BOSWELL 

he married a woman almost twenty 
years his senior. He did hack writ- 
ing before and after this marriage; 
he also attempted school teaching. 
Failing in this, he went to London 
where he continued grinding out 
enough words to make a living, but 
he was terribly poor, and was im- 
prisoned several times for debt. He 
loved his wife devotedly, and when 
she died he was still obscure and 
in need; losing his companion was 
therefore a crushing experience. 

He had won praise from Pope for 
his poem 'The Vanity of Human 
Wishes," and the worth of his Life 
oi Savage in 1755, the first enjoy- 
able, comprehensive dictionary in 
English. With no encouragement 
or financial aid (see his letter to 
Lord Chesterfield, text, page 1051), 
he worked on the project for eight 
years. Still notable for its spon- 
taneous humor and excellent defi- 
nitions (see text, page 1045), the 
Dictionary was long the standard of 
English usage. 



During this period, Dr. Johnson 
also published the Rambler (1750- 
52) and the Idler (1758-60), pe- 
riodical essays which revealed his 
scholarship, intellectual honesty, 
warm-hearted kindliness, and above 
all the intense, masculine power of 
his literary style (text, pp. 1046-51). 
Not only do we find herein illus- 
trious common sense seen with a 
keen eye, but also a certain direct, 
condensed quality of style which 
at once gets to the heart of the prob- 
lem and in few words clarifies the 
issue and states the author's usual- 
ly reliable opinion. "Romances and 
Morality" discusses the problem of 
teaching virtue to the young and in- 
nocent through fiction which is not 
factually accurate and which might 
contain evil examples which the 
author might define as good. "Mr. 
Minim as a Critic" (text, page 
1048) is a telling satirical attack on 
a typical literary critic, whose 
"opinion was asked by all who had 
no opinion of their own, though 
they loved to debate and decide," 
yet who, until he . . . 

. . . knows the success of a composition, 
. . . intrenches himself in general terms. 
. . .He has several favorite epithets of 
which he has never settled the meaning, 
but which are very commodiously applied 
to books which he has not read, or can- 
not understand. One is manJy, another 
is dry, another stiff, and another flimsy; 
sometimes he discovers delicacy oi style, 
and sometimes meets with strange expres- 
sions (text, page 1049, 87 ff.). 

In the essay on "Books" from the 
Idler, Johnson is concerned that so 
many books promise their readers 
short cuts to learning and wisdom 
"on easier terms than our progeni- 
tors." He also finds most new books 



LESSON DEPARTMENT 131 

but rephrasing of older books which strange oblivion has overspread me, 

in themselves might have been valu- so that I know not what has be- 

a bj e come of the last year." Finally, 

after being publicly nicknamed 
It is observed that "a corrupt society "p omposo » the "great moralist" 
has many laws," and I know not whether £ fl fa rf h{ subscribers 
it is equally true that an ignorant age has ^"^ lia,a v '" v ' a ^ . j 
many books. When the treasures of Johnson produced the promised 
ancient knowledge lie unexamined, and work in 1765, nine years after it 
original authors are neglected and forgot- was promised. The preface was par- 
ten compilers and plagiaries are encour- ticukrl excellent, showing how he 
aged, who give us again what we had be- J . j. 7 , ° i:g~:^ 
fore, and grow great by setting before us fearlessly denied whatever artificial 
what our own sloth had hidden from rules of Neo-Classicism interfered 
our view (text, page 1050, 72 ff.). with a just evaluation of Shake- 
speare's genius. 
In 1762, for what he had done when he was sev enty-two and 
and not for what he was to do, had } been uncha llenged as the 
Johnson was granted an annual pen- test r and literary critic in 
sion of three hundred pounds by the En gi and? h e published his Lives of 
Tory government; henceforth his rh e Poets (text, page 1053), still one 
life was ease, good food, good talk, of ftc best critical works we have 
and doing as he pleased. He be- whi]e j ohnson made such notable 
came the Johnson whom Boswell mistakes as underestimating Milton, 
immortalizes, who "loves to fold particu i ar i y his "Lycidas," his criti- 
his legs and have his talk out." His cal insi ht was usually nothing short 
greatest sin had always been indo- of brilliant> as W as his balanced, ma- 
lence, and this new carefree exist- estic st le Consider, for example, 
ence did not encourage him to ere- ^e following* 
ate and write (which is the hardest 
work in the world) when he could The style of Dryden is capricious and 

visit a coffee-house or tavern where, varied ; that of P°P e is , cautious and uni- 

1 . form. Dryden obeys the motions or his 

as ne wrote: own mind . j> ope constrains ^ m i nc j t0 

As soon as I enter the door, I experi- his own rules of composition. Dryden is 
ence an oblivion of care, and a freedom sometimes vehement and rapid; Pop? is 
from solicitude. ... I dogmatize and am always smooth, uniform, and gentle. Dry- 
contradicted, and in this conflict of opin- den 's page is a natural field, rising into 
ions and sentiments I find delight. inequalities, and diversified by the varied 

exuberance of abundant vegetation; Pope s 

However, in 1756, when he had is * ■ vd ^t lawn, shaven by the scythe, 

u r La. jIui l i_ j and leveled by the roller (text, page 1059, 

been famous but destitute, he had 6 ff \ J 

received money from many sub- 
scribers for a new edition of Shake- Such a diet must be taken in small 
speare which he planned to edit bites and chewed slowly; rarely is 
and publish. His refusal to face this writing so concentrated. But it is 
task became disgraceful, and he sent rich to overflowing, as was the mind 
himself reproachful notes. In 1764 that produced it. 
he wrote, "My indolence has sunk Throughout the selections in our 
into grosser sluggishness. A kind of text from Johnson's writings one 



132 RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— FEBRUARY 1951 

can find similar passages: clear, pre- hesitation because of his somewhat 
cise, energetic, sometimes humor- unstable habits, he was admitted as 
ous, and always dignified and pol- a member into Johnson's "Club." 
ished. If occasionally he uses big He told Dr. Johnson of his desire 
words, the rugged strength of his to record his life, and Johnson 
thought soon carries us away. The agreed to assist him. At Boswell' s 
direct forthrightness of his manner suggestion, the two friends made a 
reminds us that Johnson had tour of the Scottish Hebrides Is- 
throughout his lifetime thought in- lands when Johnson was well past 
tensely, and now knew what he middle age, all to enable the report- 
thought; he believed in the Tightness er to study his subject more care- 
of his judgment. At times he was fully. Although the two knew each 
bullheaded (he was called the other for more than twenty years, 
"Great Bear"). Often he was they were together less than three 
brusque; rarely was he impolite. But hundred days. In this relatively 
for his sins we forgive him, par- brief time, Boswell caught the es- 
ticularly when he not only defines sence of Johnson with such reality 
as the true enemies of criticism, that oftentimes in reading Bosweli's 
"the anarchy of ignorance, the ca- book we forget there ever was a 
prices of fancy, and the tyranny of Boswell, so actually does Johnson 
prescription," but throughout his seem to be with us in the room, 
life so scrupulously avoided these shaking his head, rubbing his knee, 
timeless hazards to forming a "just and blowing out his breath like a 
estimate" of literature, and of life, sperm whale to show his disgust. 

Johnson's letters (text, pp. 1051- Boswell, of course, could not 

1052) are as a bridge between his have succeeded so brilliantly had he 

more formal writings and his com- not chosen so salty and vigorous a 

pletely informal self brought to life subject. But, having recognized in 

in the pages of James Boswell. But, Johnson the great character he had 

for a completely intimate picture of always dreamed of sketching, Bos- 

this slovenly, eccentric, lovable gen- well followed him about with a 

ius, we must go directly to Boswell, faithfulness no less remarkable than 

who until recently was not acknowl- his ability to write down in his notes 

edged as the great artist that he every evening the pertinent conver- 

was. sations— not word for word, but so 

Born in 1740 in the Edinburgh skillfully selected that he made 
which Johnson roundly abhorred, Johnson more Johnsonian than he 
as he did all Scots, James Boswell really was, as recent scholarship has 
was born into a wealthy family, edu- proved. By such skillful selection of 
cated at Edinburgh and Glasgow the most characteristic words and 
University, and reared as the son gestures of Johnson; by being able 
of a gentleman. When he was to catch the significance of the most 
twenty-three years of age he first minute detail, Boswell re-created 
met Johnson; then he made a grand the very texture of Johnson's speech, 
tour of the Continent, and later re- habits, manners and mind. Con- 
turned to London where, after some cerned only with representing the 



LESSON DEPARTMENT 



133 



true Johnson, he exaggerated noth- 
ing, nor did he omit unflattering de- 
tails—he merely told what he knew 
to be so. Had he used any other 
method, he would not have suc- 
ceeded so magnificently as he has 
in making Johnson immortal. 

To someone who has never tasted 
it, the taste of strawberries and 
cream cannot be described; neither 
can the feeling of transport, and 
nearness to a great man, which one 
receives repeatedly from each page 
of Boswell (see text, pp. 1067-1083). 
Here indeed is great literature, writ- 
ten about the great character, by a 
skilled, self-effacing, but nonethe- 
less great artist. Few passages 
should be more enjoyable than those 
you select from Boswell to read 
aloud to your group. While, in 
Dryden's phrase, "Here is God's 
plenty/' it will probably but whet 



your desire to read more of Boswell 
than our text contains. 

Katherine Mansfield has told us 
that "Literature is an initiation into 
truth." Here we find truth and 
goodness and greatness; equally im- 
portant is our realization that, here 
at least, these high virtues can be 
coupled with great delight and hu- 
manity as well. 

Questions for Discussion 

1. What was Johnson's theory of bi- 
ography? What was it for? How could 
it achieve greatness? 

2. Why was Johnson called "the great 
moralist"? 

3. Why is his Dictionary important? 
Why memorable? 

4. Why is Johnson referred to as the 
"last of England's literary dictators"? 

5. Suggest reasons to justify the state- 
ment that Boswell's Life oi Samuel John- 
son is perhaps the greatest biography ever 
written. 



Social Science — The Progress of Man 

Part I— The Lesson of History 

Lesson 7— Universal Peace Must Come From God 

Elder Archibald F. Bennett 

(Text: The Progress of Man, by Elder Joseph Fielding Smith, chapter 4.) 

For Tuesday, May 22, 1951 

Objective: To prove that man-made governments have always failed tragically; 
and that it needs the wisdom, intelligence, and power of God to bring universal peace 
and happiness. 



Joseph Smith on Government 
''FHE following article was written 
by the Prophet Joseph Smith 
when he was editor of the Times 
and Seasons, a publication issued by 
the Church in Nauvoo, Illinois. 
This editorial appeared in the issue 



for July 15, 1842, and is found in 
Vol. 3, pages 855-858. It would 
seem that this editorial was pre- 
pared expressly for our present day. 
If it was timely in 1842 as a warning 
and for instructions, it is much more 
so today. The remainder of this les- 



134 



RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— FEBRUARY 1951 



son consists of excerpts from this 
editorial written by the Prophet Jo- 
seph Smith. 

The Government of God 
by the Prophet Joseph Smith 

'The government of the Almighty 
has always been very dissimilar to 
the governments of men, whether 
we refer to his religious government, 
or to the government of nations. 
The government of God has always 
tended to promote peace, unity, 
harmony, strength and happiness; 
while that of man has been produc- 
tive of confusion, disorder, weakness, 
and misery. 

Man's Government Brings 
Misery and Destruction 

"The greatest acts of the mighty 
men have been to depopulate na- 
tions and to overthrow kingdoms; 
and whilst they have exalted them- 
selves and become glorious, it has 
been at the expense of the lives 
of the innocent, the blood of the 
oppressed, the moans of the widow, 
and the tears of the orphan. 

"Egypt, Babylon, Greece, Persia, 
Carthage, Rome— each was raised to 
dignity amidst the clash of arms and 
the din of war; and whilst their tri- 
umphant leaders led forth their vic- 
torious armies to glory and victory, 
their ears were saluted with the 
groans of the dying and the misery 
and distress of the human family; 
before them the earth was a para- 
dise, and behind them a desolate 
wilderness; their kingdoms were 
founded in carnage and bloodshed, 
and sustained by oppression, tyran- 
ny, and despotism. The designs of 
God, on the other hand, have been 



to promote the universal good of 
the universal world; to establish 
peace and good will among men; to 
promote the principles of eternal 
truth; to bring about a state of 
things that shall unite man to his 
fellow man; cause the world to 'beat 
their swords into plowshares, and 
their swords into pruning hooks/ 
make the nations of the earth dwell 
in peace, and to bring about the 
millennial glory, when 'the earth 
shall yield its increase, resume its 
paradisean glory, and become as the 
garden of the Lord/ 

Failure oi the Governments oi Men 
"The great and wise of ancient 
days have failed in all their at- 
tempts to promote eternal power, 
peace, and happiness. Their nations 
have crumbled to pieces; their 
thrones have been cast down in 
their turn, and their cities, and their 
mightiest works of art have been 
annihilated; or their dilapidated tow- 
ers of time-worn monuments have 
left us but feeble traces of their 
former magnificence and ancient 
grandeur. They proclaim as with a 
voice of thunder those imperishable 
truths— that man's strength is weak- 
ness, his wisdom is folly, his glory 
is his shame. 

"Monarchial, aristocratical, and re- 
publican governments of their vari- 
ous kinds and grades have, in their 
turn, been raised to dignity and 
prostrated in the dust. The plans of 
the greatest politicians, the wisest 
senators, and most profound states- 
men have been exploded; and the 
proceedings of the greatest chief- 
tains, the bravest generals, and the 
wisest kings have fallen to the 
ground. Nation has succeeded na- 



LESSON DEPARTMENT 135 

tion, and we have inherited nothing archy and confusion will be de- 
but their folly. History records stroyed, and 'nations will learn war 
their puerile plans, their short-lived no more/ It is for want of this 
glory, their feeble intellect, and great governing principle, that all 
their ignoble deeds. this confusion has existed; 'for it is 

not in man that walketh, to direct 

Has Man Increased in Intelligence? his steps;' this we have fully shown. 

"Have we increased in knowledge "If there was anything great or 

or intelligence? Where is there a good in the world, it came from 

man that can step forth and alter God. . . . Wisdom to govern the 

the destiny of nations and promote house of Israel was given to Solo- 

the happiness of the world? Or mon, and to the judges of Israel; 

where is there a kingdom or nation and if he had always been their king, 

that can promote the universal hap- and they subject to his mandate, 

piness of its own subjects, or even and obedient to his laws, they would 

their general well-being? Our nation, still have been "a great and mighty 

which possesses greater resources people— the rulers of the universe, 

than any other, is rent, from center and the wonder of the world. ... So 

to circumference, with party strife, will it be when the purposes of God 

political intrigues, and sectional in- shall be accomplished: when 'the 

terest; our counselors are panic Lord shall be King over the whole 

stricken, our legislators are aston- earth/ and 'Jerusalem His throne/ 

ished, and our senators are con- 'The law shall go forth from Zion, 

founded, our merchants are para- and the word of the Lord from Je- 

lyzed, our tradesmen are disheart- rusalem/ 

ened, our mechanics out of employ, "This is the only thing that can 

our farmers distressed, and our poor bring about the 'restitution of all 

crying for bread, our banks are brok- things spoken of by all the holy 

en, our credit ruined, and our states Prophets since the world was'— 

overwhelmed in debt, yet we are 'the dispensation of the fulness of 

and have been in peace .... Man times, when God shall gather to- 

is not able to govern himself, to gether all things in one/ Other at- 

legislate for himself, to protect him- tempts to promote universal peace 

self, to promote his own good, nor and happiness in the human family 

the good of the world. have proved abortive; every effort 

has failed; every plan and design 

The Design oi Jehovah has fallen to the ground; it needs 

"It has been the design of Jehovah, the wisdom of God, the intelligence 

from the commencement of the of God, and the power of God to 

world, and is His purpose now, to accomplish this. The world has 

regulate the affairs of the world in had a fair trial for six thousand years; 

His own time, to stand as a head of the Lord will try the seventh thou- 

the universe, and take the reins of sand Himself; 'He whose right it 

government in His own hand. When is, will possess the kingdom, and 

that is done, judgment will be ad- reign until He has put all things un- 

ministered in righteousness; an- der His feet, iniquity will hide its 



136 RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— FEBRUARY 1951 

hoary head, Satan will be bound, all, shall be saved upon the same 

and the works of darkness destroyed; principle. As God governed Abra- 

righteousness will be put to the line, ham, Isaac and Jacob as families, 

and judgment to the plummet, and and the children of Israel as a na- 

'he that fears the Lord will alone tion; so we, as a Church, must be 

be exalted in that day . . . / under His guidance if we are pros- 
pered, preserved and sustained. Our 

Eaith Now Groaning Under only confidence can be in God; our 

Conuption only wisdom obtained from Him; 

'The earth is groaning under cor- and He alone must be our protector 
ruption, oppression, tyranny and and safeguard, spiritually and temp- 
bloodshed; and God is coming out orally, or we fall, 
of his hiding place, as he said he "We have been chastened by the 
would do, to vex the nations of the hand of God heretofore for not 
earth. Daniel, in his vision, saw obeying His commands, although we 
convulsion upon convulsion; he never violated any human law, or 
'beheld till the thrones were cast transgressed any human precept; yet 
down, and the Ancient of Days did we have treated lightly His corn- 
sit;' and one was brought before mands, and departed from His ordi- 
him like unto the Son of Man; and nances, and the Lord has chastened 
all nations, kindred, tongues, and us sore, and we have felt His arm 
people, did serve and obey him. It and kissed the rod; let us be wise in 
is for us to be righteous, that we time to come and ever remember 
may be wise and understand; for that 'to obey is better than sacri- 
none of the wicked shall understand; fice, and to hearken than the fat of 
but the wise shall understand, and rams. . . / 
they that turn many to righteous- 
ness shall shine as the stars for ever The Saints Subject to 
and ever. Divine Counsel 

"In regard to the building up of 

It Behooves Us to Be Wise Zion, it has to be done by the coun- 

"As a Church and a people it be- sel of Jehovah, by the revelations of 
hooves us to be wise, and to seek heaven; and we should feel to say, 
to know the will of God, and then 'If the Lord go not with us, carry 
be willing to do it; for 'blessed is us not up hence/ We would say 
he that heareth the word of the to the Saints that come here, we 
Lord, and keepeth it/ say the Scrip- have laid the foundation for the 
tures. 'Watch and pray always/ gathering of God's people to this 
says our Savior, 'that ye may be ac- place, and they expect that when the 
counted worthy to escape the things Saints do come, they will be under 
that are to come on the earth, and the counsel that God has appointed, 
to stand before the Son of Man/ The Twelve are set apart to coun- 
If Enoch, Abraham, Moses and the sel the Saints pertaining to this mat- 
children of Israel, and all God's peo- ter; and we expect that those who 
pie were saved by keeping the com- come here will send before them 
mandments of God, we, if saved at their wise men according to revela- 



LESSON DEPARTMENT 



137 



tion; or if not practicable, be sub- 
ject to the counsel that God has 
given, or they cannot receive an in- 
heritance among the Saints, or be 
considered as God's people, and 
they will be dealt with as transgres- 
sors of the laws of God. We are 
trying here to gird up our loins, and 
purge from our midst the workers 
of iniquity; and we hope that when 
our brethren arrive from abroad, 
they will assist us to roll forth this 
good work, and to accomplish this 
great design, that 'Zion may be 
built up in righteousness; and all 
nations flock to her standard;' that 
as God's people, under His direc- 
tion, and obedient to His law, we 
may grow up in righteousness and 
truth; that when His purposes shall 
be accomplished, we may receive 
an inheritance among those that 
are sanctified" (D.H.C. V, pp. 
61-66). 

Thoughts for Discussion 

1. Under what conditions have nations 
prospered? 



2. When have nations crumbled and 
fallen? 

3. Cite examples from the Book of 
Moses in the Pearl of Great Price, the 
Book of Mormon and the Bible to show 
that God's government promotes happi- 
ness, peace, unity, harmony, and 
strength. 

4. Prove from other examples that man- 
made governments are productive of con- 
fusion, disorder, weakness, misery, blood- 
shed, oppression, destruction, and ruin. 

5. Justify the statement that without 
God, the plans of the wisest statesmen 
and the greatest rulers have fallen to the 
ground. Are there modern examples of 
this? 

6. Present evidences that "if there was 
anything great or good in the world it 
came from God." 

7. In the light of the lesson of past 
and present history show that this con- 
clusion of the Prophet is correct: "Other 
attempts to promote universal peace and 
happiness in the human family have 
proved abortive; every effort has failed; 
every plan and design has fallen to the 
ground; it needs the wisdom of God, the 
intelligence of God, and the power of 
God to accomplish this." 



777 



ustc — Fundamentals of Musicianship 

Conducting, Singing, and Accompanying 
(For Music Department at Union Meeting) 
Textbook: Fundamentals of Conducting, by J. Spencer Cornwall 

Lesson 8-New Hymns, Anthems, and Standard Literature About Music 

Florence /. Madsen 

Objective: To bring to our organizations added interest through new music and a wider 
knowledge and a deeper appreciation of its value and importance in our lives. 



TNTEREST is revived or increased in a 
- 1 singing group or organization in propor- 
tion as new, stimulating songs are learned, 
and correlated materials are presented. 
Suggested lists of new or unfamiliar hymns 
and anthems, together with essential books 



for reference and guidance, are submitted. 
From these lists the music directors and 
the accompanists may select the needed 
music and books for use during the cur- 
rent month and also as bases for the prep- 
aration and presentation of the lessons to 
be given throughout 1951-52. 



138 



RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— FEBRUARY 1951 



It is important that those in charge of 
the musical activities in the Relief So- 
ciety shall have a definite goal in mind and 
this should be to help our organization 
consummate its spiritual, educational, and 
cultural program. This necessitates an 
acquaintance with the Bible and other 
Church books, authentic books pertain- 
ing to education, great literature, and 
standard books appertaining to music, the 
other arts and culture. 

New or Unfamiliar Hymns 

L.D.S. Hymns (Green book) : pp 3 
(transpose to B flat); 13, 27 (transpose 
to C);9i, 115, 227, 273, 349. 

Deseret Sunday School Songs: pp. 10 
(transpose to A flat); 94, 135, 210 
(transpose to A flat or G); 223 (trans- 
pose to D flat) 241, 249, 287. 

Hymns (New L.D.S. Hymn Book) pp. 
5 (Christmas); 22, 32, 35, 38, 53, 59, 
63, 72, 113, 355, 361. 

There are various ways of transposing 
music. Perhaps the easiest way is through 
a combination of letter and interval (as- 
sociation of two tones) . For example: if 
the original melody is in the key of G 
Major and reads g-a-b-d and you wish it 



transposed- a whole step (major second) 
lower, change the key signature from G 
Major (one sharp) to F Major (one flat). 
The melody g-a-b-d will now read f-g-a-c. 

When possible sing the hymns in two 
parts (soprano and alto); or, in three 
parts, if so arranged. Be sure that the 
tempo (speed of rhythm) is not too fast 
for the singing group. Transpose hymns 
that are too high to a more suitable key. 
The accompanist should make a copy of 
the hymns in the new key and have it 
ready for use when needed. 

Before practicing a hymn, and, if the 
necessary information is available, tell 
briefly something about the author and 
the composer. Also draw attention to 
the message and philosophy present in 
the text. Emphasize important words and 
sentences. Have a good reader from the 
group read the words before practicing 
the hymn. Have the accompanist play it 
through. Note the style and character of 
the music. Sing the first stanza. Single 
out and practice difficult phrases. Sing 
the complete hymn. Observe all punc- 
tuation and expression marks. 

Make the practice period an enjoyable 
experience. 



ANTHEMS, (Three-part, S.S.A.) COMPOSER 

Come Gracious Spirit (Chorals) Bach-McCurdy 

The Birthday of a King (Christmas) Neidlinger 

Build Thee More Stately Mansions Andrews 

Sheep and Lambs May Safely Graze Bach-Trehayne 

Unto Thee I Lift Mine Eyes Beethoven-Wilson 

The Twenty-Third Psalm Malotte 

How Lovely Are Thy Dwellings Smart 



PUBLISHER 

Boosey & Hawkes 

G. Schirmer 

G. Schirmer 

G. Schirmer 

Lorenz 

G. Schirmer 

Presser Co. 



ANTHEMS (Two-part, S.A., not difficult) 

The Good Shepherd Barri 

God Bless Our Land Kountz 

I Walked Today Where Jesus Walked O'Hara 

The Lord Is My Shepherd Smart 

Grateful, O Lord, Am I Roma 

At the Cradle (Christmas) .....Franck 



G. Schirmer 
G. Schirmer 
G. Schirmer 
G. Schirmer 
Witmark 
E. C. Schirmer 



LESSON DEPARTMENT 



139 



Use the same procedure for practicing 
and learning the anthems as suggested for 
the hymns. 



What We Hear In 



Latter-day Saint 
Encyclopedia of 



Books 

FAULKNER, 
Music 

BARTHOLOMEW, The Relation ot 
Music to Psychology 

PYPER, Stories of 
Hymns 

PRATT, The New 
Music and Musicians 

SEYMOUR, What Music Can Do Foi 
You (Philosophy of Music) 

LINDO, The Art of Accompanying 

WODELL, Choir and Chorus Con- 
ducting 

STEINER, The Music oi the Bible 

SWISHER, Music in Worship 

WEDGE, Ear-training and Sight-sing- 
ing (Volumes I and II) 

GEHRKENS, Music Notation and 
Terminology 

These books may be ordered from the 
following Salt Lake City music dealers: 

Beesley Music Company, 70 South 
Main. 

Daynes Music Company, 45-47 South 
Main. 

Glen Bros. Music Company, 74 South 
Main. 

Summerhays Music Company, 21 East 
1st South. 



cJhe Lrenshabh 



es 



C. Cameron Johns 

■ 
I am a silver note 

And the silence conspires against me. 
I am a fragile wing 
And the wind is my foe. 

I am a scented flower 

And the thick air engulfs me. 

I am a cold black stone 

And the hill-sped waters erode me. 

I am a single breath 

And the deeps of earth aspire me. 



3—ParL-> 

Sacred Choruses 

for 
Singing o^ftothers 



CM6603 I! Ye Love Me, Keep My 

Commandments — Madsen.. .20 

.8943 Hear My Prayer — James 15 

.312-05984 How Lovely Are Thy 

Dwellings — Smart 16 

.8723 I Walked Today Where Jesus 

Walked— O'Hara 20 

.8942 I Will Thank Thee. O Lord 12 

.962 Invocation — Moore 16 

My Soul Is Athirst for God — 

Stickles 15 

.CM650 O Day of Rest and Gladness 

— Schumann _ -15 

.337 O. Shepherd of Israel — 

Morrison (SSAA) 15 

.6221 Unto Thee I Lift Mine Eyes- 
Beethoven - «16 



Music Sent On Approval 

WE PAY POSTAGE 
Use this advertisement as your order blank 

I DAYNES MUSIC COMPANY 

I 45-47 South Main 

I Salt Lake City 1. Utah 

Please send postpaid the music indicated , 
j above. 

□ On Approval D Charge 

D Money Enclosed 

I : 

j Name j 

j Address j 

j City & State _ 



D 



FIRST Of ALL- RELIABILITY 



45-47 SOUTH 

MAIN STREET 



lines „ 



SALT LAKE CITY 1, UTAH 



140 RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— FEBRUARY 1951 

Miss Breech's Boy 

(Continued from page 101) 

There stood Butch in his warm not annoy you. When he found 

red jacket and overalls. At his out you did not have a tree, noth- 

side was Chippy, who evidently ing would do him but he must take 

thought amicable relations had over his own little tree that Aunt 

been resumed with the woman in Mary sent him. We have the oth- 

the white cottage. Without a word er big tree, and he thought you 

Butch walked into the room, wet wouldn't have a real Christmas, if 

galoshes and all. Chippy followed, you didn't have a tree." 

his tail frisking merrily. Miss Breech cried, "Oh, Butch," 

Miss Breech shouted at them: and ran to him. She gathered him 

"Butch, you get out of here. And in her arms, dog, tree, and all. "Oh, 

take that pesky dog along. Look Butch, you bring that tree right 

at my clean carpet! Don't you know over to my house and we'll put it 

better than to walk in here like up right now." 

that? Get out!" Butch's tears disappeared like 

Without a word Butch turned magic. A smile that exposed every 
and started for the door. Chippy absent tooth in his head was on 
had left at the first angry tone, his face as Miss Breech clasped 
Butch slowly walked across the his sweaty little hand in hers and 
porch and down the steps. Only led him out the door. "We'll be 
when he was on the walk did Miss back after while," she said to 
Breech look up from her angry Butch's mother. "Come on, Chip- 
stare at the muddy wet tracks on py," she called, "you're coming, 
her living room rug. Then she too." 

saw what she had been too angry Such goings-on as there were in 

to notice before. Under Butch's Miss Breech's house that night! 

coat and protruding in the rear of Popcorn was popped and paper 

his stocky little body was a little decorations were pasted. When 

artificial Christmas tree. the last little trinket was in place 

"Oh," she gasped. "Oh, what and the lovely silver star was atop 

have I done?" the tree, Miss Breech sat down in 

Grabbing her big woolen shawl, her big chair with Butch on her 

she hastily set out for her neigh- lap and read, as she had on so many 

bor's house. When she knocked days at school, " 'Twas the Night 

on the door, Butch's mother opened before Christmas," as a tired little 

it. Butch was standing by the door boy rested his head against her 

to the kitchen, big tears streaming shoulder, and an equally tired little 

down his face. Chippy was gently dog looked up at them in perplexed 

licking Butch's one free hand that acceptance of his new role, 

hung by his side, while the other After Butch and Chippy had 

still was helping to hold up the taken a somewhat belated depar- 

little tree under his coat. ture, Miss Breech straightened up 

"Come in, Miss Breech," Butch's her living room once more. She 

mother said. "I hope Butch did didn't feel lonely at all; in fact, she 



MISS BREECH'S BOY 



141 



was humming "Up On the House- 
top, Click, Click, Click," as she 
straightened the runner on the 
table under the little tree. It was 
then she discovered what she had 
been too busy to note before. Un- 
der the tree lay a little parcel, 
clumsily tied in colored paper and 
tinseled ribbon. She did not open 
it. Instead she did what she had 
always done with her children's 
gifts. She carefully placed the 
package on the tree, to be opened 
in the morning. 

"Bless his little heart," she mur- 
mured softly to herself. "Bless his 
little heart!" 

A Key to the 
Occurrences of History 

(Continued from page go) 

man; to cause the world to beat their 
swords into ploughshares, and their spears 
into pruning hooks, make the nations of 
the earth dwell in peace, and to bring 
about the millennial glory, when the 
earth shall yield its increase, resume its 
paradisean glory, and become as the gar- 
den of the Lord. 

Then he tells us in simple and 
understandable terms how to 
achieve this glorious objective. 

As a church and a people it behooves 
us to be wise, and to seek to know the 
will of God, and then be willing to do it. 

If Enoch, Abraham, Moses and the 
children of Israel, and all God's- people 
were saved by keeping the commandments 
of God, we, if saved at all, shall be saved 
upon the same principle. 

Finally a statement from the 
Prophet that I wish could be framed 
and kept before us as a motto every 
day of our lives: 

"Happiness is the object and de- 
sign oi our existence; and will be 



PRESERVE YOUR 

RELIEF SOCIETY 

MAGAZINES 

Have the valuable informa- 
tion contained therein read- 
ily available for easy ac- 
cess permanently bound. 



Deseret News Press 

40 Richards Street 
Salt Lake City 1, Utah 



BEESLEY MUSIC COMPANY 

Utah's Pioneer Music House 

presents 

Relief Society Special Program Music 

for Sunday Evening, March 4, 1951 

THEME: 

If Ye Love Me, Keep My Commandments, 

S. S. A., by Florence J. Madsen 20c 

Suggested song for carrying out the theme: 
If With All Your Hearts, S. S. A., by 
Mendelssohn-Harris 15c 

Order now on the convenient order blank below: 



BEESLEY MUSIC CO. 70 South Main 
Salt Lake City 1, Utah 
Please send following to: 

Name 

Address 

Enclosed find remittance 

Please charge to 

Name 

Address 

Copies 

If Ye Love Me, Keep My Command- 
ments, at 20c per copy 

If With All Your Hearts, at 15c per 

copy 

(No Postage Necessary) 



BEESLEY MUSIC CO. 

Pioneer Piano People 
70 S. MAIN ST. SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH 



142 



RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— FEBRUARY 1951 



"If Ye Love Me, 
Keep My Commandments" 

BY FLORENCE J. MADSEN 

and all 

Music suggested for Relief So- 
ciety Singing Mothers and for 
Special Programs. 

MUSIC-N-RECORDS 

SELDON N. HEAPS, Lessee 
with 

Summerhays 
Music Co., Inc. 

21 East First South 
SALT LAKE CITY 1. UTAH 



the end thereof, if we pursue the 
path that leads to it; and this path 
is virtue, uprightness, faithfulness, 
holiness, and keeping all the com- 
mandments of God" (The Piogiess 
of Man, page 448). 

That is the magic key to the oc- 
currences of history that can help 
you throughout your three year 
study of these fine chapters by 
Brother Joseph Fielding Smith. 

President George Albert Smith 
has often taught us how to use this 
key. He has what he calls a * 'formu- 
la for happiness." 

"Happiness is what we are all 
seeking, and it is what our Father 
in heaven desires for us. . . . 

"I think the finest recipe that I 
could give to obtain happiness 
would be: Keep the commandments 
of the Lord. That is easy to remem- 
ber, and if we will do that, we may 



be sure of success. The gospel of 
Jesus Christ is the only code of 
conduct whereby prosperity, peace 
and happiness may he preserved" 
(The Improvement Era, January 
1950, pp. 13,43). 

God bless you all, that you may 
obtain that abiding happiness. 

For the Strength 
of the Hills 

(Continued from page 96) 
I have a dance with visiting roy- 
alty?" 

"If you happen to mean me— 
yes," she answered, hoping that she 
looked much calmer than she felt. 

She slipped into his arms, trying 
to decide whether it was his man- 
ner that made her temperature ap- 
pear to rise, or if it was all within 
herself. Were her pulses really 
throbbing, or did she only imagine 
it? No country boy, she decided 
haughtily, was going to make her 
act like a stammering schoolgirl. No, 
indeed. To her chagrin, she was 
practically a silent schoolgirl, while 
he quipped and wise-cracked, and 
left her at the end of an all-too- 
brief dance with an absurd feeling 
of standing about in a vacuum. 
(To be continued) 

'In the Twinkling 
of a Toe' 5 

(Continued horn page 112) 

lyf ADGE nodded. "I guess it does 
need fixing up. I guess I 
haven't cared enough about keep- 
ing it up-to-date." 

"Oh, Grandmother! Would I 
like to! And would I love having 
the girls come then, sometimes! Can 
we really?" 



IN THE TWINKLING OF A TOE' 



143 



So that's it. I should have 
guessed! "I don't know why not. 
We'll get that window fixed right 
away, before winter sets in. The 
rest— the inside things— we could 
do as we get time. I mean, you 
could by yourself, if that's . . . ." 

"Doing it together would be more 
fun. Grandmother, you know, 
last night when you danced, you 
were so cute and I was so proud of 
you! I had a sort of funny thought. 
Here I've lived with you more than 
half my life and never knew you!" 

"Grandmother, you're just— won- 
derful! 'In the twinkling of a toe!' " 
Again the exuberant laughter 
trilled. "How come we haven't 
understood each other before?" 

"I don't know, dear. Maybe we 
had to grow up to each other. We 
might make a project of getting ac- 
quainted." 

Colleen giggled. "We'll take 
that one on, Grandmother. I'll be 
seeing you. I almost can't wait to 
get home, today . . ." 

The outside door sounded an ex- 
clamation point after the final 
words. Madge looked around com- 
fortably, feeling warmed and com- 
panioned. "I'll be seeing you," 
Colleen had said, not, "I'm taking 
off." Was the difference symbolic 
of something joyful coming into her 
life through this granddaughter she 
had understood so little? 

Clearing the table, Madge heard 
herself humming a tune. Words 
slipped into place:". . . Do you 
see my new shoes . . . with the tips 
on the toes . . .?" Recklessly she 
executed the steps down the nar- 
row space between the table and 
the cabinets. And then she stood 
still, and threw back her head, and 
listened to laughter of her own. 



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And all other 

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QJrom I tear and c/ar 



Mabel Harmer, author of the new seri- 
al "For the Strength of the Hills," tells 
us something about herself in the follow- 
ing note: 

"I was born in Logan, the eldest in a 
family of seven girls — all of whom have 
been more or less interested in writing. 
After being graduated from the Utah 
State Agricultural College with an English 
major, I taught school for several years. 
Since my marriage to Earl W. Harmer, 
we have made our home in Salt Lake 
City. I began writing about midway in 
the production of my family and have 
kept an even balance, having five children 
and five books. There are also three 
lovely grandchildren. The books are 
Brigham Young at Home (written in col- 
laboration with Clarissa Young Spencer); 
The Story of the Mormon Pioneers; Den- 
nis and the Mormon Battalion; Famous 
Mascots and Kqs; and Storytime. My ac- 
tivities seem to have followed the same 
number, for I have also served on five 
stake boards. I believe that I have held 
every position in the women's Church 
organization from organist to president, 
with the exception of secretary. Most 
recently, and I believe the most enjoyable, 
was as literature leader last year in the 
Thirty-First Ward Relief Society. Our 
family has since moved into the Garden 
Park Ward. I have been chairman of the 
Barnacles writing group, president of the 
Salt Lake Chapter, League of Utah Writ- 
ers, and am currently State president of 
the League. My hobbies are music, 
needlepoint, and gardening — the latter 
much more in theory than in practice." 

I am sending a number of new sub- 
scriptions to The Relief Society Magazine. 
The first name on the list, is a man, 
Brother Reginald D. Shaffer, a new con- 
vert to the Church. He is a very faithful 
member. 

— Ruby H. Lundberg , Malad, Idaho 

Please renew my subscription to The 
Relief Society Magazine. It is all I have 
of Relief Society since moving out here, 
and as there are no visiting teachers, I 
still get the messages from the Magazine. 

— Mrs. Luetta Gilchrist , Mackay, Idaho 

Page 144 



I am sending a number of new sub- 
scriptions. The Magazine always gives 
me a thought for each day. 

— Iletta D. Reid, Panguitch, Utah 

It is a pleasure to again this year receive 
The Relief Society Magazine as a gift from 
my mother. I wish to express my ap- 
preciation to all of you for the continued 
variety of inspiring messages it brings 
each month. Kindly note address change, 
as I am anxious to receive the Magazine 
after my arrival in the Near East. 
Miss Maud Pearson, Baltimore, Maryland 
New address: Beirut, Lebanon 

In 1948 the April issue of the Maga- 
zine published a special short story by 
Dorothy Clapp Robinson entitled "The 
Gift" (page 224), which is one of the 
many short stories I have enjoyed reading. 
But there is not a gift more tenderly re- 
ceived by me than The Relief Society- 
Magazine. With every number there is a 
new, original design on the cover shining 
with beauty. One special feature article, 
"And This Is Life Eternal," written by 
Elder Harold B. Lee (April 1949, page 
222) should be a lasting memory to every- 
one who reads it. The features and the 
poetry are all timely contributions to lit- 
erature, and are indeed a rich inheritance 
gained from our pioneer parents, as of 
my own mother, Eliza Stephensen Winn, 
who gave immeasurably to the cause of 
Relief Society. She was a guiding light 
to a large family where she resided seventy 
years ago in Richfield, Utah. 

— Mrs. John Gee , Rexburg, Idaho 

We want to tell you how much the 
Relief Society sisters in our ward enjoy 
the Magazine. It contains so many things 
of interest to our Latter-day Saint women. 
Our advice to the class leaders is: Be 
sure to use the material given in the 
Magazines, together with the listed ref- 
erences. Also, the stories, articles, and 
poetry are very fine. Of course, I especial- 
ly enjoy the poetry. We are happy that 
we have reached a 100 per cent quota 
for our ward. 

— Iva Lou Nebeker, Perry, Utah 



Your "College grade" courses in 
education, offered in 

RELIEF SOCIETY 

use eminent textbooks in every field: 

Theology: The Life and Ministry of the Savior 

Reference: JESUS THE CHRIST, by James E. Talmage 

Cloth $2.75, Leather $7.00 

Visiting Teachers Message: Our Savior Speaks 

Reference: THE HOLY BIBLE 

L.D.S. Missionary Edition $11.00; Others $1.75 to $20.00 

Work Meeting: The Art of Homemaking 

Reference: "THE COMPLETE BOOK OF SEWING" 

by Constance Talbot 

$2.98 

Literature: The Literature of England 

Reference: THE LITERATURE OF ENGLAND VOL. I 

by Woods, Watt and Anderson 

$4.50, by mail $4.75 

1950-51 LESSONS FEATURE: 
Paradise Lost 

Paradise Regained and Samson Agonistes 
John Dryden, Richard Steele, and Joseph Addison 
Jonathan Swift, Alexander Pope, 
Oliver Goldsmith, Samuel Johnson, and James Boswell 

Social Science: "The Progress of Man" 

Reference: "THE PROGRESS OF MAN," 

by Joseph Fielding Smith 

(Temporarily out of print) 

— All prices are subject to change without notice — 

Deseret Book Company 

44 East South Temple Street 
Salt Lake City, Utah 



Mention The Relief Society Magazine When Buying From Advertisers 



The Ideal Gift for All Special Occasions 

&Sirtnaau6 — lA/eadinad — — ~/?nniverdarie& 

For Brides and Missionaries 



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THE RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE 

Monthly publication of the Relief Society of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints 



Belle S. Spafford 

Marianne C. Sharp 

Velma N. Simonsen 

Margaret C. Pickering 
Achsa E. Paxman Leone G. Layton 

Mary G. Judd Blanche B. Stoddard 

Anna B. Hart Evon W. Peterson 

Edith S. Elliott Leone O. Jacobs 

Florence J. Madsen Mary J. Wilson 



RELIEF SOCIETY GENERAL BOARD 



Editor 

Associate Editor 
General Manager 



President 

- First Counselor 

Second Counselor 

Secretary-Treasurer 

Lillie C. Adams Christine H. Robinson 

Louise W. Madsen Alberta H. Christensen 

Aleine M. Young Nellie W. Neal 

Josie B. Bay Mildred B. Eyring 

Alta J. Vance Helen W. Anderson 



RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE 



Marianne C. Sharp 

Vesta P. Crawford 

Belle S. Spafford 



Vol. 38 



MARCH 1951 



No. 3 



e 



on tents 



SPECIAL FEATURES 

Highlights of the Past - - Amy Brown Lyman 148 

The Prophet Joseph Smith '. M. Isabella Home 158 

The American National Red Cross - 169 

FICTION 

She Shall Have Music — Third Prize Story Frances Carter Yost 153 

The Sewing Kit Speaks Lillian S. Feltman 162 

Growing Pains Dorothy Clapp Robinson 182 

For the Strength of the Hills — Chapter 2 Mabel Harmer 192 

Anniversary Alms - Mildred R. Stutz 199 

GENERAL FEATURES 

Sixty Years Ago 170 

Woman's Sphere Romona W. Cannon 171 

Editorial: "Nov/, Let Us Rejoice" Vesta P. Crawford 172 

Announcing the Special April Short Story Issue 173 

Notes to the Field: Organizations and Reorganizations of Mission and Stake Relief Societies.... 174 

Notes from the Field: Bazaars, Conventions, and Other Activities 

General Secretary-Treasurer Margaret C. Pickering 202 

From Near and Far 216 

FEATURES FOR THE HOME 

Spring House Cleaning Caroline Eyring Miner 175 

Flower Arrangements for Springtime Dorothy J. Roberts 177 

Be a Guest at Your Own Party Phyllis Snow 186 

Three Hobbies Gladys K. Wagner 191 

Soup Makes the Meal Sara Mills 197 

Pull a New Apron From the Rag Bag Rachel K. Laurgaard 209 

POETRY 

The Miracle Returns — Frontispiece Christie Lund Coles 147 

Love Story Sadie O. Clark 152 

A Robin's Cheer Grace Sayre 160 

After Deep Winter Katherine F. Larsen 161 

Beyond This Moment Pansye H. Powell 173 

To a Fountain Dana Benson 196 

A Square of Grass „ Ida L. Belnap 201 

Another Spring Nyal W. Anderson 201 

The Silent Margery S. Stewart 201 

The Story Hour Norma Wrathhall 209 

The Awakening Celia Van Cott 213 

Against the Breath C. Cameron Johns 213 

Visiting Teachers Eva J. Lillywhite 214 

PUBLISHED MONTHLY BY THE GENERAL BOARD OF RELIEF SOCIETY 

Editorial and Business Offices: 28 Bishop's Building, Salt Lake City 1, Utah, Phone 3-2741: Sub- 
scriptions 246; Editorial Dept. 245. Subscription Price: $1.50 a year; foreign, $2.00 a year; 
payable in advance. Single copy, 15c. The Magazine is not sent after subscription expires. No 
back numbers can be supplied. Renew promptly so that no copies will be missed. Report change 
of address at once, giving old and new address. 

Entered as second-class matter February 18, 1914, at the Post Office, Salt Lake City, Utah, under 
the Act of March 3, 1879. Acceptance for mailing at special rate of postage provided for in 
section 1103, Act of October 8, 1917, authorized June 29, 1918. Manuscripts will not be returned 
unless return postage is enclosed. Rejected manuscripts will be retained for six months only. 
The Magazine is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts. 




T0 HIW KUHII Of THI FAMILY MAOINO Clul 



Dr. Harry Emerson Fosdich's 

Three Famous Boohs 

Atom In One Big Volume 




A BOOK THAT SHOULD BE IN EVERY AMERICAN HOME 

In these turbulent times, when only a strong, unshakable belief 
in God can help us face the future calmly and confidently— perhaps 
no book, other than the Holy Bible itself, can be of greater in- 
spiration and spiritual help than "The Three Meanings." This 
single volume of over 750 pages contains all three of Dr. Fosdick's 
world-famous Meaning books— three books that have helped many 
thousands of people understand and appreciate more fully the 
Christian way of life. Your copy, plus a copy of Greville Cooke's 
"The Light of the World" are both free as your Gift if you 
join the Family Reading Club at this time. 



ALSO FREE 



With 
Membership 

"THE LIGHT OF THE WORLD" 

By Greville Cooke 
Every member of your family will 
be thrilled by this warm reconstruc- 
tion and interpretation of the life of 
Christ. Published at $3.95, your copy 
of this inspired portrait of the Master 
is free with membership. 



BOOKS FOR THE WHOLE FAMILY 

The Family Reading Club distributes books 
which are worthwhile, interesting and enter- 
taining without being objectionable. Each month 
publishers submit books which they believe 
will meet our standards, and our Editors select 
the one book they can recommend most en- 
thusiastically to members. 

HOW MEMBERS SAVE 50%-There is no 
charge for membership in the Family Reading 
Club beyond the cost of the books themselves. 
•You pay only $1.89 each (plus postage and 
handling) for the books you purchase after 
reading the book review magazine which will 
come to your home each month It is not neces- 
sary to purchase a book every month — you may 
accept as few as four each year to retain your 
membership. And you will receive a handsome 
new "Bonus" Book free for each four selections 
you take. Thus, the purchase of books from 
the Club for only $1.89 each — instead of the 
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JOIN NOW - SEND NO MONEY - If you 
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coupon NOW1 

FAMILY READING CLUB - MINEOLA, N. Y. 



Mail Coupon Now! CS 

BOTH FREE 

WITH MEMBERSHIP 

THE THREE MEANINGS and 
THE LIGHT OF THE WORLD 

FAMILY READING CLUB, Dept. 3 RSM 
MINEOLA, NEW YORK 

Please send me the two books listed above as my 
free Membership Gift Books and enroll me as a 
member of the Family Reading Club. Each month you 
will send me a review of the Club's forthcoming 
selection. I have the privilege of notifying you in 
advance if I do not wish to accept any selection, or 
whether I wish to purchase any of the alternate 
books offered — at the special members' price of only 
$1.89 each (plus postage and handling). There are 
no membership dues or fees, and I may accept as few 
as four selections or alternates during the coming 
twelve months, beginning with the current Club 
selection. As a member, I will receive a free Bonus 
Book with each four Club selections or alternates I 
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Street and No 



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Same price in Canada: 105 Bond St.. Toronto 2 
Offer good only in the U.S.A. and Canada 




Josef Muench 



OPUNTIA BLOSSOMS 



THE RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE 

VOL. 38, NO. 3 MARCH 1951 



cJhe II itracle Lrieturns 

Christie Lund Coles 

The lengthening sunlight spills across the floor, 
The shadows softly, delicately trace 
The beauty of the lilac by the door 
In an intricate, dark filigree of lace; 
Music peals forth as birds in upward flight 
Brush wings across the morning-glory sky. 
The spirit, too, soars up to tiptoe height 
As awareness moves us like a sudden cry. 
The miracle returns, and with it comes 
The old, wild longing as an ancient hope 
Pounding against the veins like beat of drums, 
Timeless and lovely as the mind's wide scope. 
All that has questioned, doubted, reaffirms 
Faith in the verities ... as spring returns. 



The Cover: "Picture Window," Monument Valley, Utah, Photograph by Ray 
Loomis. Cover Design by Evan Jensen. 



Highlights of the Past 

President Amy Brown Lyman 

[Address delivered at the Annual General Relief Society Conference, September 
28, 1950.] 

THE life of the Relief Society seemed at its height, Emma Smith, 
has covered what is consid- accompanied by Eliza R. Snow and 
ered one of the most inter- Amanda Smith, journeyed to Quin- 
esting, important, and eventful pe- cy, Illinois, the capital of the State, 
riods of history— the last half of the and presented a petition or me- 
nineteenth century and the first half morial to Governor Ford in behalf 
of the twentieth. It was a period of the Mormon people, asking for 
of scientific discovery and invention, justice and protection, 
a period of transition and change, Soon after the Deseret News 
which included the emergence of was established in 1850, Relief So- 
American women into public. life, ciety women began to contribute 
It was the period when the gospel to its columns, both prose and verse, 
was restored. This step inspired them with the 

And in this changing world the idea of publishing a woman's paper, 
Relief Society, wherever it has and, in June 1872, they established 
functioned, has, in addition to its the Woman's Exponent, forerun- 
immediate "home work/' made its ner of The Relief Society Magazine. 
full share of helpful contributions This paper opened new avenues for 
to society. Many a stream of prog- women writers, developed talent, 
ress has sprung from its sources. In and gave opportunity for women to 
its program of self-improvement express their views, As a result, a 
and community betterment it has sizable group of writers and journal- 
many achievements to its credit, ists was produced, and, within a 
with which we are all familiar. A few years, several books of poems 
few examples only we shall be able and prose were published by them, 
to mention today. Through their interest in health 

As early as August 1842 (when and welfare work, Relief Society 

the Relief Society was only five women felt the need of educating 

months old) and at a time when themselves in this field. As early 

"females" (as women then were as 1873, when women doctors were 

designated) were not supposed or just beginning to appear in the 

even permitted to take part in pub- United States, a Relief Society 

lie affairs, the president of the so-' woman, Romania B. Penrose, set 

ciety bravely disregarded all con- out for Philadelphia where she en- 

ventions of the day and assumed tered the newly established Wom- 

the role of ambassador to the gov- an's Medical College, and complet- 

ernor of her State. in the interest of ed the four-year course. She was 

her people. soon followed by two others, then 

On that August day, when the four more, and finally there were a 

persecution of the saints in Nauvoo dozen Utah women doctors. 

Page 148 



HIGHLIGHTS OF THE PAST 



149 



A few years after this the society 
established the Deseret Hospital, 
the first Latter-day Saint hospital, 
and introduced training courses in 
obstetrics and nursing. Then there 
were the wheat storage movement, 
seri-culture, and the building of Re- 
lief Society halls. 

Several decades later (1914), an 
educational program for members 
was inaugurated with uniform 
courses of studv and with formal 
class instruction. 

In more recent times, after a few 
years' study of mental hygiene, Re- 
lief Society women, convinced of 
the need of an institution for the 
training and care of children who 
never grow up, were the chief fac- 
tors in the establishment of the 
Utah State Training School at 
American Fork. The state legisla- 
ture could not ignore the petitions 
they received from the women of 
this organization with hundreds of 
signatures. 

The establishment of the Mor- 
mon Handicraft Shop, and the in- 
troduction of choirs of Singing 
Mothers throughout the society, 
are high points of later day activi- 
ties of which we are justly proud. 

One of the outstanding and satis- 
fying experiences of the organiza- 
tion, which came in the seventies, 
was the recognition it received out- 
side the confines of the Church. 
I refer especially to that recognition 
coming from the national leaders 
of the Women's Movement, which 
later resulted in an affiliation be- 
tween our women and the organized 
womanhood of America, and which 
was a means of allaying much preju- 
dice against the Latter-day Saint 
people. 



It was remarkable that the com- 
paratively small group of pioneer 
Relief Society women in this, the 
isolated West, should have attract- 
ed the attention and aroused the 
interest of the great national lead- 
ers in the faraway East; and to such 
an extent that they invited the Utah 
women to co-operate with them, 
first in the campaign they were wag- 
ing for national woman's suffrage, 
and, later, in other important move- 
ments in the interest of human 
welfare. Such a step would not be 
surprising in this more liberal day, 
but it was a surprise in those days 
of intense prejudice against Latter- 
day Saints, and even persecution 
and prosecution of the Latter-day 
Saint people. 

Accepting this invitation, the 
Utah women, from this time on, 
worked in the suffrage cause both 
locally and nationally, and attended 
the national conventions. Salt Lake 
City soon became a continuous 
rallying ground for suffrage. 

There is no doubt but that Mor- 
mon women were a real asset to 
the suffrage cause for they had had 
some unique political experiences 
at home, which had sharpened 
their wits and made of them wise 
and capable workers. During their 
first few years in Utah, they enjoyed 
the franchise. This right, however, 
was taken away for a period of eight- 
een years when Utah became a ter- 
ritory. Later, in 1870, it was grant- 
ed for seventeen years, then lost 
once more for eight years. Then 
finally it was restored permanently 
when Utah became a state in 1896. 
When the national and inter- 
national federations or councils of 
women were formed in Washing- 



150 



RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— MARCH 1951 



ton, D. C. in 1888, Utah women 
were not only invited to attend, but 
also to become, through their or- 
ganizations, charter members of the 
national group. At a preliminary 
meeting on arrangements for the 
convention, when a prejudiced 
committee member asked, "Why 
this invitation to Mormon women?" 
the great Susan B. Anthony, gen- 
eral chairman, and president of the 
National Suffrage Association, re- 
plied, with some spirit: 

These are among the first I would in- 
vite. I know them well. I have worked 
with them. I have visited them in their 
home state, and have seen them in ac- 
tion. They are earnest, progressive, able 
women, valiant champions of every wor- 
thy cause. They stood firmly for anti- 
slavery, although they were far removed 
from the campaigns and agitation while 
pioneering in the far West. And today, 
they stand for peace and arbitration, for 
temperance and even prohibition, for 
woman suffrage, and for all other hu- 
manitarian causes. These Mormon wom- 
en know how to organize, they know 
how to preside over and conduct large 
assemblies, they can debate, they can 
preach, they can pray. 

I might add here, in passing, that 
this era was the era when oratory 
was a major art, different from to- 
day, when oratory has declined to 
mere plain, logical speaking; and 
that the American women of the 
seventies, eighties, and nineties com- 
pared favorably with men as orators 
and public speakers. And the Re- 
lief Society women of that period 
were not found wanting. Many of 
their leaders were eloquent and stir- 
ring public speakers, reaching a 
peak of perfection that few can at- 
tain. They not only excelled in 
delivering prepared addresses and 
orations, but also in giving ex- 



temporaneous speeches. In this lat- 
ter respect they would have made 
excellent impromptu radio com- 
mentators—and their earnest pray- 
ers were classic. 

These stirring, bold, and genu- 
inely great accomplishments, which 
no doubt resulted from their often 
trying and soul-testing experiences 
as refugees and as pioneers, I my- 
self witnessed as a young woman. 
The thrilling impressions they made 
upon me I can never forget. 

Again, Utah women were hon- 
ored by being invited to participate 
in the great Woman's Congress 
which was held at the World's Fair 
in Chicago in 1893. This was ^ ne 
greatest gathering of women that 
had ever convened. The Congress 
proper consisted of general sessions 
by the Congress itself, and sub-con- 
gresses or section meetings where 
national and international groups 
were invited to hold their own sep- 
arate meetings to present their own 
work to the public. 

All meetings were held in the 
many-roomed Women's Building, 
at times several sections being held 
simultaneously. The Relief Society 
readily accepted the invitation to 
be represented at the Congress, and 
availed itself of the opportunity of 
holding a session and presenting 
and explaining its work. 

The following few extracts from 
a report made by Mrs. Gilchrist, 
a news columnist, for her Ohio 
home paper will show the degree 
of success that followed the efforts 
of the Relief Society on that im- 
portant occasion: 

This morning we attended one of the 
most interesting of the Congresses thus 
far, to me, that of the Utah women, in 



HIGHLIGHTS OF THE PAST 



151 



the National Women's Relief Society 
Congress. Among the speakers were 
Madame Zina D. H. Young, wife of 
Brigham Young, or one of the wives, 
who as President of the Society, made 
the opening remarks, although my friend, 
Mrs. Emmeline B. Wells, widow of 
President Daniel H. Wells, acted as 
chairman and introduced the speakers. 
They were Sarah M. Kimball, and Jane 
S. Richards, wives of Mormons high in 
the Church; and Isabella M. Home, one 
of the mothers in Zion. Mrs. Home 
told the story of trials and privations, as 
she was one of those who were driven 
from Nauvoo that dreadful winter of 
1846, as through ice, snow and rain they 
made their weary journey across Iowa, 
taking them three and one-half months 
to accomplish. A child was born to her 
on the way. To hear Mrs. Home one 
could not but think of the Bible story 
of the Hebrews and their deliverance 
from the Egyptians. 

Zina Young Card, daughter of Brigham 
Young, a very bright and comely woman, 
spoke of the children of Utah and told 
how they are taught lessons of patriotism 
and purity. 

Nellie Little told of their amusements 
and referred to the time when they were 
having a celebration, singing patriotic 
songs and listening to the reading of the 
Declaration of Independence, news came 
to them that U. S. troops [Johnston's 
Army] were on the way to quell a sup- 
posed insurrection. The dance and the 
theatre are their universal amusement. 
They always invoke the blessings of Deity 
at the beginning and end of all enter- 
tainments. Brigham Young was a great 
patron of the theatre, his name a monu- 
ment of the drama. 

Mrs. Emmeline B. Wells, a sweet faced 
mother in Zion, spoke of the authors 
and journalists in Utah, and the grain sav- 
ing women. She said they had known 
what it was to be hungry, to hear their 
children cry for bread, and, said she, "If 
ever there is a famine, come to Zion." 

Dr. Mattie Hughes Cannon, a beautiful, 
bright, young woman, gave a wonderful 



address upon the "types of women in 
Utah." 

Before the session closed, Mrs. Wells 
called me to the platform and I went 
and sat by Brigham Young's wife and 
took by the hand each of those women 
with whom my sympathy has been so 
long. Truly their forbearance and kind- 
ness is saint-like. This one meeting was 
to me worth coming to Chicago for. 

Both Susan B. Anthony and 
Anna Howard Shaw visited briefly 
the large Relief Society session, as 
they made their rounds calling upon 
other groups meeting at the same 
hour. 

The address of Emmeline B. 
Wells on "Utah Women Authors 
and Journalists" was published at 
this time in the Chicago Daily 
Inter-Ocean. 

These experiences and this co- 
operation show the greatness of the 
women of that day— of both na- 
tional leaders and the Latter-day 
Saint women of Utah. 

But over and above all the other 
achievements of the Relief Society, 
and by far its greatest asset, is the 
spirit of the organization— the 
spirit which has been created and 
developed within it— and which dis- 
tinguishes it and makes it so po- 
tent in its life and efforts. 

This spirit, which seemed to 
come with the very inception of the 
organization, was nurtured, and 
shaped, and developed, by the pio- 
neer women of the society; and 
made by them so permanent that 
it has persisted continuously for 
these 108 years. 

And in turn it has motivated the 
society itself and inspired it to great 
deeds and achievements. It has al- 
so motivated and inspired the mem- 



152 



RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— MARCH 1951 



bers, guided their footsteps, and 
safeguarded their activities. 

The Relief Society spirit was born 
of the circumstances under which 
the organization was effected— of 
being instituted by a Prophet of 
God under direct inspiration, who 
recognized the potentialities of 
women; and of a sublime belief in 
him and an unfaltering faith in his 
mission. 

This spirit has been fostered and 
accelerated by the following fac- 
tors: (1) by the burning testimon- 
ies of the individual members of 
the Society of the divinity of the 
restored gospel; (2) by their abid- 
ing and unfaltering faith in God 
and their strict obedience to the 
laws and commandments of the 
Church; by a deep-seated recogni- 



tion of the divine authority of the 
holy Priesthood and a willingness 
to follow its leadership; and, by a 
sincere belief in the great destiny 
of 'the organization as a sure and 
important aid to the Priesthood in 
the establishment, finally, of the 
kingdom of God here on the earth. 

Let us of the present day, who 
are the beneficiaries of the great 
accomplishments of pioneer wom- 
en of . the past, give proof of our 
appreciation and gratitude for their 
noble efforts by dedicating our- 
selves to the carrying forward of the 
work, and to the keeping fresh in 
our souls and in our hearts this 
spirit which has made our organi- 
zation so truly great. 

That we may do this is my earn- 
est prayer. 



JLove Story 

Sadie O. Clark 



In March the dogwood bloomed beneath the pine; 
She clothed herself in white from twig to stem, 
Lace scarf on head, embroidery to the hem, 
And to him whispered, "May your strength be mine. 

"Your arms protect me from the wind and sun, 
I could not live without your gracious shade." 
She spread her blossoming petals; through the glade 
Her slender form and sweet perfume were one 

The pine tree's lifted arms were eloquent, 
His silence seemed to mark him unaware, 
But one stray branch, its shining needles bent, 
Caressed the flowering fragrance of her hair 



cJhtrd [Prize Story 

KsLnnual [Relief Society Snort Story Contest 

She Shall Have Music 



Frances Carter Yost 



THE warm golden sunlight 
poured over the valley like 
butter and honey. The leaves 
of the climbing vine outside the 
window turned listlessly. As Ann 
Marley watched Parley working in 
the nearby field, time seemed to 
dissolve with the sound of his 
mower. 

For three days now Ann had 
wanted to tell Parley about the 
spinet piano the Warrens had for 
sale, but every time he was around 
words congealed in her throat. If 
it had been a new washer, or a sew- 
ing machine, or even a deep freeze, 
practical Parley would understand 
the need. He would even get busy 
doing some dickering to see that 
she had it. But a piano, to Parley, 
would be considered a toy, some- 
thing to play with. Parley wouldn't 
want to pay his hard-earned money 
for a piano. Parley didn't know 
either about the inward music in 
Ann's soul, the deep desire which 
had somehow spun itself, through 
the years, into a hard ball of dissatis- 
faction. 

Then from nowhere and every- 
where the memory came. It surged 
into Ann's mind like a wave break- 
ing on a beach and washed away 
the view of vine and scented hay 
fields. Ann fought against the 
memory, for the recollections were 
distasteful .... 

Ann was twelve years of age, 
twelve, with its problems and per- 




FRANCES CARTER YOST 

plexities, and a deep urge for music. 
"Daddy do you s'pose we could buy 
a piano? Oh, it doesn't have to be 
a brand new one," Ann added quick- 
ly, "just an upright that has keys 
and will sound the right notes." 

Jacob Coles looked over his news- 
paper at his youngest daughter, a 
thin, gangling, skimmed-milk slip of 
a girl. "What do you want with a 
piano?" Ann's father inquired. His 
older daughters hadn't pestered him 
about such things. Ann seemed to 
be different. 

"I want one to play, Daddy. If 
I had a piano here at home to prac- 
tice on I could learn to play well 
enough to play for church. I just 

Page 153 



154 RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— MARCH 1951 

know I could, Daddy!" Ann pleaded ness being his policy. "And remem- 

her case with her eyes water-logged, ber, no going into the church again 

and her hands tight clasped. except for services." 

"How do you know you can Mr. Coles resumed his reading, 

play?" Jacob Coles hadn't taken Ann knew her interview was over, 

the time to get acquainted with She had humbled herself, had re- 

this daughter before. It was hard vealed her secrets— her innermost 

at this late date. He found him- desires. Even the daily rendezvous 

self wishing she would go about at the church must stop. She had 

her play, so he could return to his gambled everything she had on a 

newspaper. What was she saying? chance of getting a piano in her 

"Oh, I can play, Daddy. I can! home, but she had failed to con- 

I play on the church piano every vince her father, 

day the doors are open." Ann blurt- Ann never mentioned the piano, 

ed out her secret and immediately or music lessons to anyone from 

regretted it. that day forward. She hadn't gone 

"And who gave you permission to the church to play the piano, for 

to enter the church?" Jacob Coles Jacob Coles' family followed his 

snatched at an opportunity to be wishes to the letter. Ann had 

done with the piano subject. His grown up, had moved about in the 

long, narrow eyes were surprisingly whirlpool of life, with the desire 

green, like blades of grass. for music burning in her being. 



* * * * 



"Why . . . Why no one," Ann 

stammered. "But nobody would «t mus t talk to Parley about the 

care. I just play the piano. I don't * Warren piano right today," £nn 

hurt anything." Ann made an im- said a i 0U( ^ though no one was with- 

pulsive gesture with her hands. j n earshot. "If I don't someone 

"Don't raise your voice, Ann." e i se w i\\ buy it first." She opened 
Jacob Coles modulated his own the screen door and started walk- 
voice and turned the corners of his i n g toward the hay field, 
mouth into a somewhat uncertain n ow the logical time to bring 
smile. "Who taught you to play, up an important subject with Par- 
Ann?" ley was when he was rested and 

"Nobody, Daddy. I just pick well-fed, and sitting in his chair 

tunes out by ear. I know they with his slippers on and his even- 

aren't exactly right," Ann added, ing paper in his hands. But Ann 

hopefully, "though they do sound saw again, in her mind's eye, her 

good. If I had a piano I could take father's long, slit green eyes as they 

some lessons." Ann regretted this peered at her over a newspaper, 

last statement. She hadn't meant That approach hadn't worked out 

to approach the subject of lessons then, and she wouldn't risk it now. 

until she had safely acquired a pi- She decided to try the hay field 

ano. this time, and hurried faster toward 

"I couldn't give you advantages the moving mowing machine, 

your older sisters didn't have, Ann," As Parley mowed the fresh green 

Mr. Coles said, fairness and firm- hay, the scented clover sprayed the 



SHE SHALL HAVE MUSIC 



155 



air with sweet perfume. Ann 
watched him riding the mower 
around and around the field, cut- 
ting wide swaths. Usually he re- 
minded Ann of a Roman in a two- 
wheel chariot when he worked on 
the tractor. Today, however, her 
mind tugged at the spinet piano 
which the Warrens had for sale. 
She started to run through the cut 
hay, then stopped, for she didn't 
want to appear like a house afire. 
She must be calm and collected 
with her approach. She musn't 
fumble now as she had done so 
many years ago. As she neared 
the mower, Parley stopped the trac- 
tor and wiped the sweat from his 
brow with the -back of his glove and 
jumped off into the shade of the 
tractor. 

"I made some punch," Ann said, 
pouring out a glass, 'and some 
cookies." 

"Good girl," Parley said, with a 
grin. "Let's sit here in the tractor 
shade and eat some together. The 
hay is clean and cool." 

Parley Marley was a handsome 
fellow, even with the dirt of the 
day upon him. He had a lean, 
brown face under thick waves of 
dark, unruly hair. He had won his 
callouses as an honest hard-working 
farmer, and enjoyed the fruits of 
his labor. He drove a good bargain 
in selling his product, and was 
known for his ability to get the bet- 
ter of a deal in all tradings. 

Within Ann's soul, timidity 
fought a battle with desire. To ap- 
proach the subject of the piano 
was now or never. Parley noted a 
bright pink flush on her cheeks, and 
her lips trembled. When she spoke, 
however, it was with her usual 
calmness. 



"Parley, the Warrens have their 
spinet piano for sale. I ... I want 
to buy it." Ann had laid her prob- 
lem out in one sentence. She rea- 
lized she should have been more 
conniving, but it was good to have 
worded her desire, as if she had dis- 
pelled a large gas balloon from 
around her heart. 

"A spinet piano! Good grief, 
Girl! What are you thinking of?" 
Parley whistled. Then he smiled at 
Ann as if she were joking. 

"I mean it, Parley, I want to buy 
it." Ann's blue eyes looked direct- 
ly into his brown ones. Now the 
subject was out, she had to see it 
through. "We can manage. I'll 
skimp and save, honest I will." 

Parley pointed to the sky get- 
ting black behind the deep blue of 
the afternoon. "See those clouds, 
Ann. I've got to get this hay down 
and baled before the rain breaks." 

With one leap Parley straddled 
his tractor seat, and started the mo- 
tor. Ann called above the tractor's 
hum: "What about the piano?" 

Parley merely waved as he start- 
ed mowing again. 

Ann picked up the empty pitch- 
er, the glasses, and the cookie plate. 
Again she had gambled everything 
on her inward desire for music. 
Again she had failed. She found 
herself balancing her father's an- 
swer— "I couldn't give you advan- 
tages the older girls didn't have," 
with that of Parley's, "Good grief, 
Girl, a spinet piano! What are you 
thinking of?" The scales balanced. 



* * * * 



ANN had fried chicken, hot rolls, 
and sliced tomato salad arranged 
attractively on the table when Par- 
ley entered the cheery breakfast 



156 



RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— MARCH 1951 



nook after his shower that evening. 
He was dressed in a tan sports shirt 
and gabardine slacks. He hadn't 
said he had a Farm Bureau meet- 
ing, and it wasn't ball practice 
night. 

"Going places?" Ann questioned 
as they finished eating. 

"Yeah, yeah. I have to see a fel- 
low. I'm dickering on some ma- 
chinery," Parley said, wiping his 
mouth with his napkin. 

"Machinery?" Ann almost bit 
the word. Why, Parley had the 
latest and best machinery for his 
farming. Was machinery always 
more important than a piano? Was 
it wrong, Ann asked herself, to in- 
vest in inner qualities, the heart, 
the mind, the spirit? Yet to bring 
up the subject of the Warren pi- 
ano again would be useless. 

Parley folded his napkin carefully, 
pushed in his chair, and went over 
to the back of Ann's chair and 
tipped her chin up. "Good supper. 
Good girl. Now excuse me, honey. 
I gotta hurry, but I'll be back soon." 
He kissed her on both cheeks and 
was gone. 

"More machinery," Ann sobbed, 
"more machinery." Tears so veiled 
her vision that she didn't see the 
car drive away. 

Ann was in the living room em- 
broidering some dish towels for the 
Relief Society bazaar, when the car 
slid to the curb. Parley unfolded 
himself as he got out of the car, and 
walked up to the house. He wasn't 
whistling, which meant one thing, 
he hadn't been successful. He 
dropped into his favorite easy chair, 
not even bothering to take off his 
sports jacket. But he didn't pick 
up the evening paper as usual. He 
just sat, chewing on the end of a 



match, a trait he always had when 
he figured and dickered. 

After a long silence, Ann said: 
"Did you buy?" She kept her eyes 
glued on her sewing. 

"Buy what?" Parley questioned 
back. He had thrown one leg over 
the arm of the chair, but still 
chewed on the match and mentally 
tabulated and figured. 

"Why the machinery you went 
to see about," Ann answered. Her 
outward placid disposition was a 
triumph of mind over matter. There 
was a long silence. 

"Ann," Parley spoke at length, 
his voice almost inaudible, "is a 
piano worth two fifty?" 

"Piano!" The word lifted Ann's 
soul, and sent it off into space again. 

"Yeah, a piano like that spinet 
of Warren's," Parley said in a wry 
way of his, still chewing on the 
match and making mental tabula- 
tions. 

"Oh, Parley!" Ann dropped her 
sewing and came over and put her 
arms around his neck. "You're a 
dear." 

"Wait a minute!" Parley chewed 
his match and stopped to recon- 
noiter. "I didn't say I bought a 
piano. I merely stated that they 
wanted two hundred and fifty dol- 
lars for it." 

"Then you turned that grand of- 
fer down? Oh, Parley, that was a 
wonderful buy," Ann reasoned un- 
reasonably. Her arms fell limp 
from his neck with disappointment 
and hung at her sides. 

"What else could I do? They 
wouldn't dicker, Baby." It was not 
so much a question of money with 
Parley, as a question of values. 
"They wouldn't even knock off ten 
bucks. What was I to do?" 



SHE SHALL HAVE MUSIC 



157 



ANN felt the tears streak down 
her face. She turned to run to 
her bedroom before Parley saw 
that her emotions were out of con- 
trol, but it was too late. Parley 
was out of the chair and was at her 
heels. She felt his arms, like bands 
of steel about her. Parley was be- 
hind her walking her to the large 
dressing mirror. Panic made her 
rigid in his arms. 

Parley stood her in front of the 
mirror and jokingly said: "See how 
pretty you are when you cry!" His 
arms held her firmly, she could not 
escape. Since she could not break 
the bands of his grip, there was but 
one way to avoid her reflection in 
the mirror, drop her eyes. Through 
the veil of moisture Ann saw Par- 
ley's checkbook lying open on the 
vanity. There it was in black and 
white, the stub of a check which 
was made out to Mark Warren, for 
two hundred fifty dollars. 

Parley still held Ann's hands 
firmly. She bent her face and wiped 
the tears on her sleeve, then looked 



at Parley's reflection in the mirror. 
His smile was different now, not 
teasing, not blundering, but touch- 
ing the corners of his mouth and 
gently. 

"But, Parley, I don't understand. 
You said the Warrens were asking 
two fifty. That's what you paid!" 
Ann was baffled. 

"Well, I made Warren come 
through with delivery at that price." 
Parley smiled. Parley had capitu- 
lated without losing his pride. 
Everything was wonderful. 

It seemed to Ann the world had 
never been so beautiful. She could 
take lessons now. She would make 
up for every wasted moment since 
she was twelve. It was never too 
late to begin a life's dream. She 
would still learn to be an accom- 
panist for the church. 

It had been a queer day, like a 

patchwork quilt, with light and 

dark places. Ann blinked the last 

tears from their ducts and smiled 

(Continued on page 214) 



FRANCES CARTER YOST 

Frances Carter Yost, Bancroft, Idaho, daughter of Leo T. and 
Caroline Webb Carter, is the wife of a rancher, Glenn F. Yost, and the 
mother of four children. Mrs. Yost collaborated in writing and compiling Ban- 
croft's Book of Remembrance, published in January 1949. Proceeds from the 
sale of this book are being used for Bancroft's new Latter-day Saint chapel. 
Her book of poetry, Brim With Joy, was published in 1950, and is receiv- 
ing praiseworthy recognition. At present, Mrs. Yost writes a column for two 
weekly papers, the Soda Springs Sun, and the Grace Herald, and she is cor- 
respondent for The Deseret News (Salt Lake City), and the Idaho State 
Journal. Three of Mrs. Yost's stories have been published in The Relief Society 
Magazine: "Filleth the Hungry Soul" (May 1946); 'There Is Still Life'' 
September 1946); and "Prelude to Christmas" (December 1946). This is 
her first appearance as a winner in the Relief Society Short Story Contest. 

Active in Church work, Mrs. Yost is now the president of the Ban- 
croft Consolidated Primary, which includes five wards. 



cJhe [Prophet Joseph Smith 

TESTIMONY OF SISTER M. ISABELLA HORNE* 

(Found in the papers of Martha Home Tingey, daughter of M. Isabella Home, and 
submitted to the Magazine by Bertha K. Tingey) 

TTAVING been requested by the late apostle, Abraham Owen Woodruff, some 
■*■ *■ months prior to his death, to leave my personal testimony to my children concern- 
ing the life, character, labors, and mission of the Prophet Joseph Smith ... I cheerfully 
comply, as follows: 

I first met the Prophet Joseph Smith in the fall of 1837, at my home in the town 
of Scarborough, Canada West. 

When I first shook hands with him I was thrilled through and through and I 
knew that he was a Prophet of God, and that testimony has never left me, but is still 
strong within me, and has been a monitor to me, so that I can now bear a faithful 
testimony to the divinity of the mission of that great man of God. 

During the three days series of meetings held in a new barn which my husband 
had built, the Prophet made his home with us. The use of this barn became a neces- 
sity because the Methodists, who were bitterly opposed to us, refused to let their 
churches to the Prophet and saints. 

As an example of Brother Joseph's humility, as well as his respect for authority, 
I mention the following: As soon as he reached Toronto, Canada, he inquired who 
the presiding officer was. On learning that it was the late President John Taylor, the 
Prophet said, "Send for him, as I desire to hold a meeting with the people." When 
President Taylor arrived, Brother Joseph said, "Brother Taylor, I am the Prophet 
Joseph. I want you to call a meeting, as I would like to talk to the saints." 

While in Canada he visited all the branches of the Church, and gave the saints 
instructions on the organization and order of the Priesthood, respect for proper au- 
thority, corrected some of the mis-translations of the Bible, and took pleasure in an- 
swering questions pertaining to the gospel and the organization of the Church. Brother 
and Sister Taylor, my husband, and I enjoyed the privilege of accompanying the Prophet 
on these visits. 

During the year following the Prophet's visit to Canada, my husband and I re- 
moved to the United States, and finally settled in Quincy, Illinois. 



*Sister M. Isabella (Mary I.) Home, a prominent pioneer leader in Relief Society 
activities, was born in Kent, England, in 1818, the daughter of Stephen and Mary Ann 
Hales. The family moved to Canada in 1832, and in 1836 Isabella married Joseph 
Home. That same year she became acquainted with the missionaries Orson and 
Parley Pratt and soon thereafter joined the Church. The Home family later made 
their home in Nauvoo, Illinois, and were close friends of the Prophet Joseph Smith. 
In Utah, Sister Home served for many years as general treasurer of Relief Society and 
was a member of the executive board of the Deseret Hospital Association, which was 
organizd in 1882. For thirty years she was president of the Senior Retrenchment As- 
sociation. She also served as president of the Woman's Co-operative Mercantile and 
Manufacturing Association, established to encourage manufacturing in the mountain 
valleys and to give women an opportunity to use their sewing skills. She was counselor 
to Sister Zina D. H. Young in the Silk Association of pioneer days, and was outstand- 
ing for her leadership in the suffrage movement. Sister Home died in 1906. Many 
of the descendants of her fifteen children are now active and outstanding social and 
religious leaders. 

Page 158 



THE PROPHET JOSEPH SMITH 



159 




PIONEER RELIEF SOCIETY LEADERS 

Many of these women were friends and associates of the Prophet Joseph Smith, 
and some of them officiated in Relief Society work. 

Front row, seated,, left to right: Phebe C. Woodruff, wife of President Wilford 
Woodruff, and an active organizer of pioneer Relief Societies; Mary I. Home, 
Relief Society general board member from 1888 to 1905; Eliza R. Snow, poet and 
leader of women, present at the first meeting of Relief Society in 1842 and appointed 
secretary at that time; general president of Relief Society from 1866 to 1887; Zina 
D. H. Young, general president from 1888 to 1901; Marinda N. Hyde, wife of the 
apostle Orson Hyde, and prominent leader of Latter-day Saint women, admitted 
to membership at the first meeting of Relief Society. 

Back row, standing, left to right: Romania B. Pratt (Penrose), physician, edu- 
cator, and member of the general board from 1888 to 1921; Bathsheba W. Smith, 
present at the first meeting of the Relief Society in Nauvoo, Illinois, and general 
president from 1901 to 1910; Elizabeth Howard, prominent leader of early Re- 
lief Societies, member of the executive board of the Deseret Hospital Association, 
and general board member 1892 to 1893; Jane S. Richards, wife of the apostle, 
Franklin D. Richards, and member of the general board 1888 to 1910; Emmeline B. 
Wells, poet and editor of the Woman's Exponent, and general president from 
1910 to 1921. 



In compliance with a revelation from the Lord commanding him to lay our 
grievances before the judges, governors, and even the President of the United States, 
the Prophet Joseph, in company with a number of the brethren, came to Quincy, and 
the Prophet laid the condition of the affairs of the Church before Governor Carlin. 

On his return from his visit to Governor Carlin, the Prophet sent the brethren 
ahead on their return trip, telling them he would follow later. When he reached 
Lima, where they intended to remain over night, he found officers of the law awaiting 
him. They arrested him and brought him back to Quincy. This was Friday evening. 
About noon the next day the Prophet came to our house and said, "Sister Home, the 
Spirit always draws me to your home." "Brother Joseph," I said, "you are always wel- 
come. But how is it you are here when I thought you were almost home?" "Haven't 



160 



RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— MARCH 1951 



you heard that I have been in court all morning?" he asked. I replied that I had not. 
"Well I have," he said. "I told the officers that I would be forthcoming at any hour 
in the morning they might name, if they would let me go, so here I am. What am I 
to do? They won't let me have my trial in Nauvoo, but are going to take me to 
Walla Walla. I thought I should be at home by this time where my wife would look 
after my clothing, as it is in need of attention." "I will wash your clothing," I an- 
swered. "Indeed, Sister Home, you do not look able to do it." I insisted, and he 
finally consented, as I told him my Saturday's work was all done. I prepared his cloth- 
ing that afternoon, so that he was ready for his journey in the morning. 

Sister Cleveland, who had heard of the Prophet's arrest, came to see him, and 
met him at the door'just as he was leaving. As she shook hands with him, she began 
speaking in tongues. Brother Joseph listened until she had finished, then turned to us 
and said, "You need have no fears for me, as Sister Cleveland says, I shall have my 
trial and be acquitted." He was acquitted, and was received with great honors on his 
arrival at his home. 

The last time I shook hands with the Prophet was at the Mansion House, on an 
occasion when I had called to see part of the family. 

I testify that Joseph Smith was the greatest Prophet that ever lived on this earth, 
the Savior, only, excepted. There was a personal magnetism about him which drew 
all people who became acquainted with him, to him. 

I feel greatly honored when I realize that I have had the privilege of personally 
entertaining this great man, of ministering to his temporal wants, of shaking hands 
with him, and listening to his voice. I heard him relate his first vision when the Father 
and Son appeared to him: also his receiving the Gold Plates from the Angel Moroni. 
This recital was given in compliance with a special request of a few particular friends 
in the home of Sister Walton, whose house was ever open to the saints. While he 
was relating the circumstances, the Prophet's countenance lighted up, and so wonder- 
ful a power accompanied his words that everybody who heard them felt his influence 
and power, and none could doubt the truth of his narration. I know that he was true 
to his trust, and that the principles that he advanced and taught are true. 



k/L LKobtn s CA 



eer 



Grace Sayre 



Here upon the window sill, 

Singing in the rain, 
An early robin pours his heart 

Out to her again. 

She who looks upon the spring, 

From a rocking chair, 
Knows he comes to cheer her, with 

A jubilant refrain. 



And to make her doubly glad 

He will wed and nest 
Where her square of windowpane 

Frames a bit of the west. 

Robin, with his cheerful song, 
With his red-gold breast, 

Here he'll sing his happy tune 
Joyfully expressed. 




Willard Luce 



THE BLUE MOUNTAINS, SAN JUAN COUNTY, UTAH 

tf •*? -4 •# 

Kjlfter LOeep VU inter 

^Catherine F. Laisen 

Spring will come like a thunderclap, 
After winter's still, white cold; 

Trees will burgeon suddenly, 
And the robin's song be bold. 

Spring will strike across the land 
With full impact of surprise, 

Breaking the breath-held iron spell — 
Green astounding snow-blind eyes. 

Spring will be a trumpet call 
Clear and challenging, a sound 

To mark the swell and surge of life 
Teeming up from underground. 



Page 161 



The Sewing Kit Speaks 



Lillian S. Feltman 



I'M not a very big person. And 
I'm really not important at all. 
Mostly I just sit in my own 
little spot back on the shelf, and 
usually no one notices me. I'm not 
a bit fancy. On the outside I'm a 
warm brown wood, and on the in- 
side I'm green velvet. Trudy's father 
and mother planned me from start 
to finish when Trudy was a sweet 
little girl with yellow curls and big 
blue eyes and chubby dimples and 
smiles. Trudy was just eight years 
old then, and I was waiting for her 
on Christmas morning when she 
came down the wide stairs in her 
woolly pajamas, brushing the sleep 
from her eyes, to see what Santa had 
left for her under the Christmas 
tree. 

Trudy gave a little inarticulate 
series of "ohs" and * ahs" and picked 
me up. She looked at herself in the 
little mirror that's glued on the in- 
side of my lid. I guess I must have 
looked very interesting that morn- 
ing with my imposing array of spools 
of different colored threads, many- 
sized buttons, neat pin-cushion, a 
package of needles, and another of 
pins, blunt scissors, and a measur- 
ing tape. There was a card of snap- 
fasteners, some scraps of dress trim- 
ming and material, and some hooks 
and eyes for Trudy's family's ward- 
robe. 

Throughout the years Trudy and 
I were together many hours each 
day. And we had such fun watching 
her dolls' various articles of cloth- 
ing take shape and grow under 
Trudy's nimble fingers. Trudy loved 
Page 162 



her family very dearly, and every 
scrap of material her mother gave to 
her was used to make them beauti- 
ful. And it made me happy, too— - 
to think that I could help her a 
tiny bit. I always felt so warm and 
cozy holding the lovely pieces of 
cloth close to me as I watched 
Trudy at her work with other bits 
of silk or lace or calico or woolen. 

I remember when Trudy gradu- 
ated from high school, and how she 
cut off a too-long end of her sash 
and tucked the piece in under my 
lid. I was very proud of Trudy that 
day, I can tell you. 

And then I wakened one after- 
noon from my nap to hear Trudy 
say, "Mother, do you think it's too 
soon to marry him next month?" 

And Mrs. March, Trudy's mother, 
said lightly, "Why, no, dear, not if 
that's when you and he want to be 
married." 

And not long afterward I began 
to get glimpses of white satin, now 
and then, as the day of the wed- 
ding drew near. 

Trudy was very happy those days, 
always humming gaily to herself. 
Once, when she picked me up to 
carry me out onto the porch to do 
some sewing, she hugged me close 
in her arms and said, "Oh, I love 
him so!" 

My, you'd have thought I was 
"him" the way she squeezed me! 

I wasn't in on the wedding re- 
ception because I was back on my 
shelf. How I wished Trudy would 
forget and leave me in an incon- 
spicuous spot; but Trudy is a very 



THE SEWING KIT SPEAKS 



163 



tidy girl, so of course that was wish- 
ing for too much. Finally I went to 
live in Joe's and Trudy's house, such 
a dear little dream house tucked 
away under the maples that grew 
tall and stalwart, as if to guard it 
from the outside world. 

r^NE day a button from Joe's 
shirt came in to keep me com- 
pany. And not long after, there was 
one from his coat, and then another 
off his vest. I guessed Trudy must 
be awfully busy not to put them 
back in their proper places. 

Then I learned that Trudy had 
met some new friends, and just 
knowing them took up so much of 
her time that there wasn't much 
left for other things. And one night 
I heard Joe say, "If you'd spend 
more time at home and less run- 
ning around with that crowd, you 
wouldn't be so rushed all the time 
and could get around to these things 
that need to be done." 

And Trudy snapped — really 
snapped— at Joe. "Don't you criti- 
cize my friends. You're always so 
busy and I have to have something 
to do!" 

"I have to keep busy to get 
ahead," said Joe. "And if you could 
see straight you'd see there was 
plenty to do here at home— if you'd 
run things right." 

"Oh!" gasped Trudy. "I think 
you're horrid!" 

Trudy slammed the door then, 
so I didn't get to hear any more, 
but I wondered what had become 
of Trudy's good nature. It wasn't 
like her to shout at Joe in that 
fashion. 



The buttons kept coming in— 
one or two at a time— and occa- 
sionally one was taken out, but not 
very often. I began to wonder how 
clothes could hang on when so 
many buttons were off. One of the 
shining, beautiful buttons from 
Trudy's wedding gown came too,, 
and I loved having it there among 
all the rest. But when it stayed and 
stayed I fretted and worried about 
it. Though I loved having it, it 
should have been with me for only 
a short while. It belonged back on 
the white satin gown, and being 
off so long made it look like neglect 
on Trudy's part. And that didn't 
look good to me. 

i^NE night Trudy carried me into 
the living room after supper. 
I wondered where Joe was. Trudy 
looked a bit unhappy. She tried 
humming a tune as she started 
some embroidery work, but it didn't 
go so well. Trudy's heart wasn't in 
it. Presently the doorbell rang and 
some of Trudy's new friends greeted 
her noisily. 

"All alone again/" one of the girls 
said in mock disbelief. "Well, no- 
body can tell me Joe needs to work 
late that many nights!" 

"He'd rather work than do any- 
thing else," Trudy explained rue- 
fully. 

"Well," someone else chimed in, 
"we're not going to stand by and 
let you wear yourself out just sitting 
at home, waiting for him/ Grab 
your coat and let's go! We're on 
our way out to the Sapphire Club. 
You should see it. It's really some- 
thing!" 



164 



RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— MARCH 1951 



"Oh, I couldn't go there without 
Joe," Trudy protested. 

"Sure you can/' a girl named 
Mavis contributed. "Neddie's work- 
ing late and I'm going without him. 
Rita's going without her husband, 
too." 

It didn't take much persuading 
after that. Trudy put her coat on 
and went on out with them. She 
had forgotten all about me. 

They had been gone $mly a few 
minutes when Joe came home. 

"Hi, sweetheart," he called, as he 
shut the door and threw his hat 
expertly in a certain spot on the 
couch. He frowned at the silence 
that greeted him. 

"Trudy, are you here?" he called. 

He went on into the kitchen and 
the house was quiet for a few min- 
utes. Then he came back, growling 
to himself. "If that bunch of play- 
women would leave her alone she'd 
be all right. I shouldn't have stayed 
so late, but Perrson wanted that re- 
port first thing in the morning. . . . 
She was busy, too. There's her 
fancy work. . . . Why can't they 
leave her alone?" 

Trudy came in a little before 
midnight. Joe was sitting in a big 
chair doing exactly nothing. 

"Oh, Joe," Trudy said breath- 
lessly, "I'm sorry to be so late. I 
wanted to come home hours ago, 
but no one else was ready, and I 
hadn't any way to come by myself." 

Joe gazed at her for a long mo- 
ment. 

"I suppose you couldn't have 
walked!" he volunteered sarcasti- 
cally. 

"Why, no," Trudy answered 
honestly, "not from the Sapphire 
Club. It's too far." 



"The Sapphire Club/" Joe ex- 
ploded. "Is that where you've 
been?" 

Trudy's face turned white. "Don't 
be angry, Joe," she pleaded softly. 
"The crowd said it was all right if 
I went while you were working. 
Others do it." 

"Oh, the crowd says it's all right, 
so that makes it just ducky!" Joe 
snapped. "Don't you know what 
people think of a girl who goes 
there without an escort?" 

"But I'm married!" gasped Trudy. 

"Yes, you're married! And does 
it look any better for you to go there 
without me, just because you hap- 
pen to be married to me?" 

"I don't just happen to be mar- 
ried to you," Trudy said, still gentle. 
"And I didn't know it wasn't all 
right to go there unescorted, as 
long as there was a crowd of us. 
I wouldn't have gone alone." 

"Oh, you wouldn't have gone 
alone!" Joe echoed. 

"That isn't necessary," Trudy an- 
swered tiredly. 

"OUT Joe had spent the evening 
alone, brooding over too many 
possibilities of things that might 
have happened to heed the warning 
note in Trudy's voice. 

"I wouldn't mind knowing just 
what you do think is necessary," 
said Joe, steel in his tone. "Isn't 
keeping up your home necessary— 
and having some sort of a meal 
ready when I come in from work?" 

"I never know when you're com- 
ing," Trudy defended herself. 

Joe went on as if she hadn't 
spoken. "And sewing on a few 
much-needed buttons. ... By 



THE SEWING KIT SPEAKS 



165 



George, I could do the whole thing 
better by myself!" 

Trudy looked as if he had slapped 
her face, hard. 

'Then perhaps you'd better do 
it by yourself— and leave me out of 
it," she said icily. 

"Perhaps I'd better," Joe agreed. 
"You can begin any time you 
like," suggested Trudy. 

"And the sooner the better!" 
snapped Joe. "No time like the 
present!" 

Trudy shrugged. 

"Tonight!" Joe said firmly, and 
went out of the room. 

Presently he came back with a 
suitcase in his hand, a tie sticking 
out one side and the edge of a sock 
from an end. 

Trudy hadn't moved, and she 
kept her gaze fastened carefully to 
the opposite wall as if she were 
studying some remote aspect of a 
certain spot on the wallpaper. 

Perhaps Joe expected her to make 
some move to let him know that 
he was still welcome to stay— that 
she wanted him to stay. But she 
just stood there stonily, not mov- 
ing, not saying anything. 

Joe picked up his hat and jammed 
it on his head. He looked at Trudy 
once again, speculatively, before he 
opened the door and went out into 
the midnight air, closing the door 
solidly behind him. 

Trudy stood motionless for two 
whole minutes, and then she crump- 
led up into a corner of the couch 
and sobbed heartbrokenly. 

I wished that there was some- 
thing I could say or do to help her. 
But then I guess there wasn't any- 



thing anyone could do or say after 
what had happened. 

Trudy was still in a corner of the 
couch when a knock came at the 
door next morning. I had watched 
her sobbing fitfully there all night, 
and had seen daylight come through 
the little window in the front door 
and, later, the soft rosy rays of the 
morning sun. 

Trudy raised her tear-streaked face 
when the knock came and tiptoed 
warily to where she could see 
through the tiny square of glass. 
She tiptoed back again and sat 
down. Plainly she didn't want to 
see whoever it was. 

Presently footsteps sounded on 
the walk and Trudy looked out to 
see her visitors go. Then she came 
over and sat down by me. 

"I guess Mavis and Delia couldn't 
wait to see what came of my stay- 
ing at the Sapphire so late with 
them. Well— they can just wonder. 
They don't need to know!" 

TN the days following Trudy 
moved about the house like a 
little gray ghost. She didn't go out- 
side, and when someone knocked 
at the door— as they did several 
times— she waited quietly for them 
to go away again. Until one day, 
Mrs. March— she lived across town 
—came to the door. Trudy let her 
in, and then she closed the door 
quickly. 

Trudy's mother is a very wise 
woman, and one look at her daugh- 
ter's face told her that everything 
was not just right. But she sat down 
and said in an ordinary tone of 
voice, "Just thought I'd drop in and 



166 



RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— MARCH 1951 



see how you were. We hadn't seen 
you around for a day or two." 

Day or two! It had been more 
than a week since Trudy had seen 
anyone. 

"No/ 7 Trudy offered, "I haven't 
been out. I haven't wanted to see 
anybody." 

"Oh/' said Mrs. March. "Well, 
I'm glad you're all right." 

"Yes." said Trudy. She glanced 
at the clock. "It's almost time for 
lunch. Will you have lunch with 
me, Mother?" 

"Why, yes, thank you," Mrs. 
March answered. "I set something 
on for your father in case I didn't 
get right back." 

"You wait here, Mother," Trudy 
said, "and I'll have it ready in a 
jiffy." 

Mrs. March waited. It was just 
twelve o'clock when Trudy came to 
the door from the kitchen and an- 
nounced, "You can come now. It's 
all ready." 

Mrs. March got up. "Aren't you 
going to wait for Joe?" 

"No," Trudy said, too quietly. 
"Joe isn't coming— not ever." 

"Well, let's eat, then," Mrs. 
March suggested briskly, "and we 
can visit afterward." 

I could hear the dishes clinking 
softly from where I sat, and the 
occasional murmur of their voices, 
and after a while they came back 
into the living room. 

"You're a good housekeeper," 
Mrs. March observed matter-of- 
factly, "and your house shows it. 
It keeps you pretty busy, doesn't 
it?" 

"Not busy enough," Trudy an- 
swered. "It leaves me too much 
time to think." 



"Does us all good to think once 
in awhile," her mother replied. 

"I guess that was the trouble," 
Trudy said quietly. "I was too busy 
—outside my house— to think soon 
enough. Now it's too late." 

"Thought is never wasted," Mrs. 
March commented. "We can al- 
ways use it to good advantage— if 
not now, at some later time." 

"I've been very foolish, Mother," 
Trudy confessed, holding her voice 
steady. "And now I suppose every- 
thing's finished. Joe's been gone 
nine days." 

"Do you know where he is?" 
Mrs. March asked calmly. 

"No," Trudy replied. "I haven't 
the faintest idea. I've not been any- 
where—and when someone comes 
I just wait till they go away again." 

"Perhaps Joe was one," her 
mother said. 

'"No— he has his key," Trudy an- 
swered. "He could come in. And I 
look through the glass to see. Ex- 
cept at night. That's how I knew 
to let you in. I suppose I shall have 
to go to the grocer's soon. But I 
don't want to. I won't go until I 
just have to." 

"I'll bring some supplies after 
dark," said Mrs. March. "Write 
down what you want. It's better not 
to go out. The fewer people seen, 
the less said. And the less said, the 
less to live down later." 

"If I hadn't gone to the Sapphire 
Club it wouldn't have happened," 
Trudy said, and went on to tell her 
mother about that evening. 

"We're all just learning," said 
Mrs. March, when Trudy had fin- 
ished. "No one knows all the an- 
swers. We learn as we go along, 
just as you're learning now. And 



THE SEWING KIT SPEAKS 



167 



that's how we learn to help our- 
selves later on. Your father can find 
out where Joe is— and ease your 
mind on that point. But this is 
something that will have to work 
itself out in its own way. And it 
will. You are wise in keeping away 
from everyone. Let them think 
you've gone away on a little trip 
somewhere. Would you like to come 
home with me for a few days— after 
dark, of course?" 

"Oh, no," answered Trudy. "I 
want to be here— if Joe does come." 

"That's right," Mrs. March nod- 
ded. "I'll bring some groceries then, 
tonight." 

HPRUDY'S mother stayed until 

along in the afternoon, and after 
she had gone Trudy sat down by 
me and took up her embroidery 
work. 

After a while she picked me up 
and began searching through my 
contents. As she picked up one 
button and then another that had 
come off Joe's clothes, she began to 
cry. "I should have sewed them 
right back on," she sobbed for- 
lornly. "He needs them— wherever 
he is— and they're here where they 
can't do anyone any good." 

Mrs. March came back later with 
her arms full of packages. "Joe has 
an apartment not far from us," she 
reported, giving Trudy the exact 
address. 

"Oh, then he's all right," Trudy 
said with relief. 

A day or two later Trudy sat down 
beside me and took out all the but- 
tons that belonged on Joe's clothes. 
She laid them on the little table 
top, and it was awfully quiet for 
a long time, while Trudy just sat 



there looking at them. And then, 
after a time, she sighed, and all of 
a sudden she put her head down on 
her arms and cried. I wanted so to 
comfort her, but if I could have 
talked I could only have said, "May- 
be you could sew them on again. . ." 

When the storm had passed 
Trudy dried her eyes and said, sen- 
sibly, "The least I can do is to sew 
these buttons on where they belong, 
now. Joe won't ever know how sorry 
I am about everything— and he 
won't notice the buttons on again. 
I'll go while he's at the office so 
he won't know anything about it." 
All at once she seemed to have for- 
gotten that she didn't want any- 
one to see her. The buttons had 
become more important. 

She tucked me under her arm and 
walked across town. The door to 
Joe's apartment wasn't locked. It 
was almost like he was hoping she'd 
come, and Trudy opened the door 
and went in without having to 
bother the janitor. 

Sunlight slanted across the small 
bed-sitting-room, and Trudy walked 
over and set me down on the desk. 
I heard her catch her breath in a 
small gasp as she looked at the large 
framed picture of herself that was 
the only thing adorning the desk. 
The only thing, that is, beside a 
tiny scrap of crumpled paper that 
had been tossed to one side. 

Trudy picked up the paper and 
smoothed it out in an absent sort 
of way. She stood there looking 
down at the few scribbled words 
that stared up at her. Words that 
didn't make sense at all, but were 
criss-crossed any old way on the 
paper. There were a half-dozen 
"darlings," interspersed with a few 



168 



RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— MARCH 1951 



'Trudys/' and down at the bottom 
of the page the heartbroken words 
"I can't stand it." 

Trudy's head came up when she 
read that. "He doesn't have to stand 
anything with me," she whispered 
fiercely. "I only came to sew on 
some buttons. I won't bother him. 
He doesn't have to stand me!" 

I thought, Trudy how can you 
be so dense? You're supposed to 
have a brain! 

npRUDY settled down to work, 
sewing on buttons here, patch- 
ing a spot there, darning in another 
place. The afternoon sped and soon 
it was almost time for Joe to come 
home from work— if he came 
straight home. I was hoping Trudy 
would forget the time, but she re- 
membered, and put everything 
away. She stood by the door and 
took one last look around the room 
to be sure that she hadn't left any 
tell-tale signs of her presence there 
that day. 

She had left nothing. Nothing 
that is, except a few buttons and 
bits of thread, and material applied 
to the proper unnoticeable places 
in Joe's wardrobe. There hadn't 
been any dishes that needed wash- 
ing, in his tiny microscopic kitchen- 
ette. Everything had been ship- 
shape. Joe didn't need a wife, I 
guess. He was an excellent house- 
keeper by himself. 

Trudy closed the door with a 
tiny click and back we went across 
town to the little house. Trudy sat 
down on the couch, with me on 
her lap, and sobs shook her slender 
shoulders as she clutched me like 
I was the only friend she had left 
on earth. 



But Trudy isn't one to mope. 
Presently she set me to one side 
and dried her eyes. She got up and 
wandered through the house and 
back again. She started to look 
through a magazine, then put it 
carefully back in its place. 'Til have 
to get a job," she murmured. "I 
can't go on like this day after day." 

She went into the bedroom and 
came back with a bit of sewing in 
her hands and sat down again. It 
was very cozy with her sitting there, 
sewing— except that I knew she 
missed Joe, and always would. 

Someone knocked on the door, 
and there were women's muted 
voices. Trudy went on calmly sew- 
ing, and the ladies at the door went 
away. The clock went on ticking 
very faintly, and I looked at it after 
a while and saw that it was time 
for Trudy to eat her supper. 

But she was still sewing, minutes 
later, when a little click came at the 
door and it opened and Joe came 
in. 

He pushed the door shut and 
didn't even wait to sail his hat onto 
the exact spot on the couch. In 
just two steps he was beside Trudy, 
and had her gathered into his arms 
—sewing and all. Goodness! You'd 
think he would be afraid he would 
get a needle stuck into him— acci- 
dentally, of course. 

I just sat there and beamed at 
them as he murmured over and 
over, "Trudy— darling!" And her 
soft white arms went around his 
neck, holding him close to her. 

Ah, me! You know, I really en- 
joy being a sewing kit. But some- 
times I wonder— would it be nicer 
to be a Trudy— or a Joe? 



of he xytmertcan I lattonat LKed L^ross 

On Guard — At All Times — At Home and Abroad 
Information submitted by Pacific Area Office, American National Red Cross 

''FHE seventy-year-old history of the American Red Cross is the king-size 
story of more than five thousand disasters which have at one time or 
another seriously affected virtually every section of our Nation. 

Last year alone, aid was extended through Red Cross to 223,400 per- 
sons who were victims of 390 regional disasters. 

Red cross relief specialists are . . . still handling the rehabilitation of 
hundreds of damaged homes, farms and businesses on the basis of actual 
needs . . . not by financial loans but by outright money grants ... on behalf 
of the American people. 

A goal of $85,000,000 has been set to achieve Red Cross objectives 
for the 1951 fiscal year. 

On the nation's civil defense front, the responsibility of Red Cross is 
a major one since government officials have assigned it the gigantic task 
of training 20,000,000 persons in First Aid. In addition, a quarter-million 
women will receive training as Nurse's Aids, while another million women 
will be instructed in Home Nursing. 

The past year— bringing with it the grim Korean conflict— has seen 
the rapid stepping-up of Red Cross assistance to servicemen and veterans. 
Red Cross representatives were dispatched with the first troops sent into 
Korea. They distributed supplies, under battle conditions, and helped 
maintain GI morale. 

At scores of veterans' hospitals, Red Cross specialists and trained 
volunteers have assisted Veterans Administration officials in fulfilling 
medical, recreational, and welfare duties. Several million more vets have 
depended upon Red Cross guidance in applying for government benefits. 

The Armed Forces have asked the Red Cross to use its resources to 
collect blood to save the lives of battle-wounded servicemen. This assign- 
ment is in addition to its normal program of providing the life-giving fluid 
to hospitals and clinics in areas served by its regional centers here at home. 
Added to this is the staggering problem of planning for reserves of blood 
plasma for civilian defense— which also the Red Cross must do. And the 
organization is playing a vital role in co-ordinating research in the develop- 
ment and production of blood by-products, such as serum albumin and 
dried plasma. 

The Secretary of Defense recently said, "We, of the national military 
establishment, need the work of the Red Cross as we need a strong right 
arm. . . ." Help keep it strong during our national emergency .... Mobi- 
lize for Defense by Supporting Your Red Cross 1951 Fund. 

Page 169' 



Sixty LJears ^/igo 

Excerpts from the Woman's Exponent, March 1, and March 15, 1891 

"Foil the Rights of the Women of Zion and the Rights of the 
Women of All Nations" 

AN OLD BOOK 

An old torn book, with one pale rose 

Crushed in its yellow pages: 
I have not held it in my hand. 

Nor read it thus for ages. 

Nay, formerly, the print was good, 

Or else mine eyes were better; 
For now they're full of tears — too full 

To see a single letter. 

— Lady Lindsay 

SUFFRAGE: Why are women not as competent to vote as men? They are 
oftener sober. Woman has the early care and training of the child, she plants the first 
seeds, makes the first and lasting impressions; and the influences that she exerts over 
the child's mind remain with it to its dying day. It is impossible for man to go very 
far in advance of woman, or for woman to far surpass man in intellectuality, but the 
development of the one means the onward march of the other, and a systematic de- 
development of both, for do they not have the same origin? We cannot impart to 
others what we do not possess; and when it becomes an acknowledged fact that she is 
best fitted to perform the duties of a wife and mother, and to have the care and train- 
ing of the representatives of our future government, who is best informed upon po- 
litical, civil, religious and domestic affairs, the zenith of woman's glory will have been 
reached, and great things may be expected from the offspring of such a people. 

— Lexia Harris 

A CALL 

Awaken! Arise! Let thy slumbering heart 

In the march of Right take a noble part! 

Thou shalt share the palm by the victor's side, 

And rejoice with them who for Truth have died. 

— Ruby Lamont 

THE MOTHER OF OUR SAVIOR: To contemplate the life and mission of 
this most noble woman, creates within the mind the deepest, purest reverence and ad- 
miration that mortal is capable of feeling for mortal. What an incentive the con- 
templation of this beautiful character and divine mission should be to every young 
woman, to guard her purity and virtue with the strictest tenacity, to "magnify the Lord 
and rejoice in God." — L. L. G. Richards 

RELEF SOCIETY CONFERENCE: The second annual conference of the 
Relief Society will be held in the Salt Lake Assembly Hall, in this city, on Tuesday, 
April 7, 1891. The officers and members of the Relief Society and all those interested 
in this benevolent work are cordially invited to attend the Conference. 

— Relief Society Presidency 

Page 170 




Woman's Sphere 



ORESIDENT and Mrs. David O. 
McKay, dearly beloved through- 
out the Church, celebrated their 
golden wedding on January 2, with 
a festive dinner with their six chil- 
dren, eight of their sixteen grand- 
children, and a few other relatives, 
numbering altogether about sixty 
in attendance. They were showered 
with good wishes and remembrances 
from many friends. Their family 
life has been gracious, happy, and 
rewarding. A former educator, 
Mrs. McKay is talented in music 
and very much interested in drama. 
This writer remembers her when, as 
Emma Rae Riggs, she was an im- 
pressive Sunday School teacher to 
the little girls in the Seventeenth 
Ward, Salt Lake City. We also 
heard members of the Church in 
Great Britain comment on the love- 
ly way in which Sister McKay had 
told inspirational stories at their 
conferences some years before. 

r PHE nine women members of 
the eighty-second Congress are: 
Senator Margaret Chase Smith 
(Maine); Representative Mar- 
guerite S. Church (Illinois); Kath- 
erine St. George (New York); Ruth 
Thompson (Michigan); Frances P. 
Bolton (Ohio); Reva Beck Bosone 
(Utah); Cecil M. Harden (Indi- 
ana); Edna F. Kelley (New York); 
Edith Nourse Rogers (Massa- 
chusetts). 



Ramona W. Cannon 



AMONG the twenty-four Utahns 
in attendance at the Mid-cen- 
tury White House Conference on 
Children and Youth was Miss Jen- 
nie Campbell, State Director of 
Elementary Education and also 
president of the Association for 
Childhood Education, Internation- 
al, an appointment, by the way, 
which was a signal honor for Miss 
Campbell, for Utah, and for the 
West. The theme of the confer- 
ence was: "Let every child be giv- 
en an equal opportunity to de- 
velop the finest personality pos- 
sible for him." A spirit of high 
enthusiasm was prevalent. 

T IEUTENANT Commander Ber- 
nice Walters is the first wom- 
an doctor ever assigned to a Navy 
ship. She is serving on the hos- 
pital ship Consolation, destination 
Korea. Her father says, "I am 
proud of her. She has always been 
a humanitarian. Her husband was 
killed in an aircraft-carrier accident 
last spring." 

ELIZABETH R. HUNTER 
U MATTHEWS, ninety-nine, the 
oldest resident in Grantsville, Utah, 
died recently. 

TN the largest convention of scien- 
tists held in America in 1950 
one out of every five in the learned 
group, meeting in New York City, 
was a woman. 

Page 171 



EDITORIAL 



VOL 38 



MARCH 1951 



NO. 3 



I low, Jiet Lis ifi 



ejotce 



AT the close of the first Relief 
Society meeting in Nauvoo, 
Illinois, March 17, 1842, the words 
of a well-beloved song echoed 
through the room. "Now, Let Us 
Rejoice" was not only the closing 
song of that meeting, but the words 
fell as a benediction upon the sis- 
ters. Truly, they had cause for re- 
joicing. The desire of their hearts 
had been accomplished, and they 
were organized together, that in 
unison their willing hands might 
help forward the work of the 
Church and lift the burdens from 
the poor and the oppressed. 

It was, as Sarah M. Kimball, who 
became a member at the first meet- 
ting, expressed the events im- 
mediately preceding the organiza- 
tion: "It was then suggested that 
some of the neighbors might wish 
to combine means and efforts . . . 
and we decided to invite a few to 
come and consult with us on the 
subject of forming a Ladies' So- 
ciety." 

Thus, in the beginning, we see 
how deeply the spirit of service- 
united service— touched the hearts 
of the women of Nauvoo. They 
realized a great truth— as individuals 
we are weak, and the area wherein 
we may express ourselves is limited; 
but as an organization we are strong, 
and our field of personal develop- 
ment and of service to others is 
immeasurably increased. As the 
Prophet Joseph Smith is reported 
to have sai^o^^s^C^l^vyas^ 

Page 172 



■I, -! ■] :, >, 



•< i 



k An 



never perfectly organized until the 
women were thus organized." 

Even in its beginning, the dual 
nature of Relief Society became ap- 
parent. It was to be an organiza- 
tion through which the women of 
the Church might give abundantly 
of their time and their means, and 
their solicitude, and through which 
they might receive in its fulness the 
blessed spirit of unity, the faith and 
prayers, and the kindly assistance 
of their sisters in time of need. 

The words of the beloved song 
further express the thought: "No 
longer as strangers on earth need 
we roam. . . ." No woman needed 
to be a stranger, even in a newly 
restored Church, in a frontier city, 
when she became a member of a 
group who made themselves respon- 
sible for her welfare, and gave her, 
at the same time, a scope for the 
offerings of the love within her own 
heart and the work her hands 
might accomplish. Surrounded by 
love and service of the many, no 
woman would need to stand alone 
in doubt, or discouragement, or sor- 
row, for she would be closely bound 
to all. 

Lucy Smith, the mother of the 
Prophet, who rejoiced greatly in the 
opportunities afforded by the new 
organization, expressed herself in 
words that have become a theme 
for Relief Society activities through- 
out the succeeding years: 

This institution is a good one .... 
We must cherish one another, watch over 






EDITORIAL 



173 



one another, and gain instruction, that 
we may all sit down in Heaven together. 

The organization gave to its first 
members, as it gives to us in our 
day, the security and the direction 
of a pattern set forth by the Proph- 
et under divine guidance. In that 
early day specific details of organ- 
ization were given, and the duties 
of Relief Society outlined in 
strength and magnitude. The pat- 
tern and the service and the strength 
have continued, and the society has 
grown in numbers, in its opportuni- 
ties for giving relief and solace, in 
its influence, and in the comforting 
spirit of its unity. 

Today, one hundred and nine 
years after that first meeting, Relief 



Society women number more than 
one hundred and twenty thousand. 
Today, in many lands, there is re- 
joicing, and Relief Society women 
offer their gratitude to their Heav- 
enly Father, that their activities are 
directed by an inspired pattern. 
Though we may be called upon to 
endure many disappointments, and 
much loss and sorrow, still there is 
not one of us who stands alone. 
Therefore, we are not weak. We are 
strong in unity and love and faith, 
and the touching of our hands and 
hearts wil continue to be a light 
upon the land and a healing power 
upon the earth. 

-V. P. C. 



^rLnriounctria the Special J/Lpril Short Story tissue 

HPHE April 1951 issue of The Relief Society Magazine will be the special 
short story number, with four authors being represented, each with an 
interesting story. Enjoy these stories in April: 

"Herman and the Birthday Dinner," by Hazel K. Todd 
■"A Girl's Point of View," by Deone R. Sutherland 
"Who Laughs Last," by Olive W. Burt 
"Now Is the Time," by Carol Read Flake 



[Beyond cJhts llloment 

Pansye H. Powell 

However rich the chords of music are 

That lift our dreams beyond the farthest star; 

That match our moods, that lead us on strange trails, 

And take us where our vagrant fancy sails; 

However wise the compass of their arc 

To tell of life and death, of dawn and dark — 

That power is the best which helps men see 

Beyond this moment to eternity! 



MiDjtcA. 



TO THE FIELD 



(Organizations and [Reorganizations of illission 
ana Stake [Relief Societies 

Since the last report, printed in the March 1950 issue of The Relief Society Magazine, 

to and including December 1950. 



NEW ORGANIZATIONS 



Missions 



Formerly Part oi 



Appointed President Date oi AppoinU 
_ ment 



West Central States Northwestern States, Reta F. Broadbent October 4, 1950 

North Central, and 
Western States 
Missions 



Stakes 

East Long Beach 
East Los Angeles 
Nyssa 
Richland 



University 



Long Beach 

Pasadena 

Weiser 

Union Stake and 

Northwestern States 

Mission, Yakima Dist, 

Emigration 



Mildred D. Harper 
Ruby G. Choate 
Emma Chytraus 
Lucile J. Erickson 



February 27, 1950 
February 26, 1950 
January 15, 1950 
July 18, 1950 



Fanny S. Kienitz March 23, 1950 



REORGANIZATIONS 



Missions 

Australian 

British 
California 
Central States 
Central Pacific 

East Central States 
French 
Hawaiian 
Mexican 
Northern States 
Northwestern States 

Tongan 

West German 



Released President 

Blanche K. Rich- 
mond 
Gladys S. Boyer 
Vivian R. McConkie 
Martha W. Brown 
Georgia H. Weenig 

Hilda M. Richards 
Kate M. Baker 
Mary H. Smith 
Mary D. Pierce 
Elna P. Haymond 
Georgina F. Rich- 
ards 
Evelyn H. Dunn 

Jane B. Wunderlich 



Appointed President Date oi Appoint- 

__»_«____, ment 

Myrtle J. Christensen April 14, 1950 

Jane F. T. Richards January 11, 1950 
Mary H. Stoddard August 26, 1950 
Annie M. Ellsworth March 20, 1950 
(Combined with Hawaiian Mission Feb 

1950) 

April 29 



ruary 3 
Edna H. Matheson 
Beth C. Woolf 
Irene P. Clissold 
Kate B. Mecham 
Lucy T. Andersen 
Mavil A. McMurrin 



1950 

March 31, 1950 
February 3, 1950 
April 12, 1950 
January 30, 1950 
December 12, 1950 

July 6, 1950 



Martha Elnora G. 

Huntsman 
Luella W. Cannon October 6, 1950 



Page 174 



NOTES TO THE FIELD 



175 



Stakes 

Bannock 

Bear Lake 

Big Cottonwood 

Bonneville 

Davis 

Deseret 

Humboldt 

Juarez 

Kolob 

Long Beach 

Los Angeles 

Montpelier 

Mount Graham 

Mount Ogden 

Nevada 

Park 

Pocatello 

Reno 

Salt Lake 

Seattle 

Sharon 

South Box Elder 

South Davis 

South Salt Lake 

South Sevier 

South Sanpete 

Weber 

Young 



Released President 



Appointed President Date of Appoint- 
ment 



Eliza B. Christensen 
Clarissa B. Ward 
Helen W. Anderson 
Florence Cowan 
Abby W. Webb 
Maria T. Moody 
Jenet S. Clyde 
Nellie S. Hatch 
Zelma P. Beardall 
Frances S. Wilcox 
Dorothy H. Koer 
Louisa Stephens 
Erma M. Stewart 
Adaliene B. Bailey 
Koa Taylor 
Ruby S. Karpowitz 
Helga H. Pugmire 
Isabel Cooke 
Maude F. Hanks 
Vera M. Leishman 
Ruby S. Hunn 
May L. Jensen 
Reva F. Wicker 
LauRene K. Lind- 

quist 
Floral M. Rasmussen 

sen 
Bell O. Hansen Leona F. Wintch 

Ada Lindquist Pearl Van Dyke 

Harriet D. Foutz Ida L. Allen 
(died April 7, 1950) 



Edith Hubbard 
Delia R. Hulme 
Grace E. Berndt 
Elna P. Haymond 
Edna R. France 
Mary L. Henrie 
Rose Burner 
Gladys K. Wagner 
Gladys S. Boyer 
Nina L. Riley 
Alice A. Call 
Virginia R. Vaterlaus 
Thelma G. Maloy 
Belva J. Petersen 
Marietta T. Call . 
Naomi W. Seaich 
Helen B. Walker 
Lena Oxborrow 
Marjorie M. Ward 
Birdie S. Bean 
Jane B. Larsen 
Ezma L. Knudson 
Leila G. Eldredge 
Delia D. Walton 



September 10, 1950 
June 4, 1950 
October 7, 1950 
September 10, 1950 
September 10, 1950 
November 26, 1950 
January 13, 1950 
September 3, 1950 
August 20, 1950 
March 12, 1950 
October 15, 1950 
December 3, 1950 
September 10, 1950 
September 3, 1950 
November 26, 1950 
May 28, 1950 
October 8, 1950 
November 14, 1950 
June ii, 1950 
March 21, 1950 
June 20, 1950 
February 12, 1950 
September 8, 1950 
September 22, 1950 



Montez O. Christian- July 1, 1950 



August 27, 1950 
August 2, 1950 
May 7, 1950 



Spring aiouse (cleaning 

Caroline Eyring Miner 

r pHE wind is doing a good job of house cleaning these March days. She is whipping 
•*• the old dead branches from the trees, blowing the molded leaves into little piles 
wherever there is some object to catch and hold them. She is drying up the little pud- 
dles of muddy water, dusting off the ivy and evergreens after the long winter. 

We need a spring house cleaning, too. We need to pull out the dead wood of 
prejudice and self-complacency. We need to gather the scattered leaves of frivolity, 
selfishness, vanity, insincerity, and self-pity, and burn them. We need to dry up the 
little puddles of gossip, faultfinding, backbiting. We need to keep verdant the desire 
in our hearts to grow, and keep growing, as the evergreens do. We need to brighten 
the kind helpfulness that is our better nature. 



Spring house cleaning is a tedious and painful process sometimes, but it is never- 
theless very necessary. 




Warren Lee 

FLOWERING CHERRY, UTAH STATE CAPITOL GROUNDS 

Page 176 



Flower Arrangements for 
Springtime 

Doiothy J. Roberts 



LIKE music, flowers speak a 
universal language. They tell 
of refinement, gentleness, and 
love of beauty; of festivity, of trib- 
ute in joy or sorrow. A life is given 
or one is taken away, and the elo- 
quence of flowers received, is under- 
stood, interpreted in the language 
of the heart. From their throats 
come the message of solace, the 
voice of peace, or the song of spring. 
Enhanced by harmonious con- 
tainers and settings, flowers can 
bring distinction to the plainest sur- 
roundings. Let each woman try 
her hand at more original and 
gratifying arrangements, of the 
growing things at her command. 
She will develop her personality and 
delight her family and friends. 

CONTAINERS 

Plain containers are best for general 
use. 

Ornate vases are hard to harmonize 
with various flowers and backgrounds. 
Pale, pastel colors, dull greens, blues, and 
ivories, whites, and browns are good. Use 
a shallow, oblong bowl for low arrange- 
ments, and an urn and a taller bowl or 
square type container for taller designs. 
Wide-mouthed containers are more con- 
venient than narrow-necked ones. But 
don't be content with only these con- 
ventional containers. Have a daring eye, 
open for anything to fill your need, as 
plates, platters, vegetable dishes, tureens, 
bowls, compotes, goblets, chocolate pots, 
odd bottles, sprinkling cans, or brass, cop- 
per, silver, pewter, and wood articles, 
weathered pieces of wood or tree stumps. 
Some containers may be painted with oil 
or water-mixed paints. 




Willard Luce 



FLOWER HOLDERS 

The best for all purposes are the heavy 
lead-base, needle-point holders in various 
sizes. Impale the flower stems firmly on 
the sharp needle points. Use for all shal- 
low containers. Hide them well with 
petals, blossoms, foliage, pebbles, or rocks. 

FLORAL CLAY 

Clay must be kept dry until the ar- 
rangement is completed. Put a piece on 
the bottom of the needle holder, then 
press firmly to the bottom of the con- 
tainer. This will hold heavy arrange- 
ments from falling. Use also on top of 
the needles to keep small stems in place. 

Page 177 



178 



RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— MARCH 1951 




W. Atlee Burpee 

ARRANGEMENT OF ALLDOUBLE PETUNIAS (AMERICA) 



WIRE IN VASES 

A strip of chicken wire about two 
inches wide, crumpled up into tall vases 
or the necks of narrow-necked jars will 
hold flowers in place. 

ROCKS AND PEBBLES 

Dark, weathered and pitted rocks are 
useful and ornamental in weighting down 
a flower holder. Pebbles serve a like pur- 
pose. 

FLORIST WIRE 

Use to twine around stems and flowers 
or through stems to shape them. You 
will need a heavy and a light gauge. 

ELASTIC BANDS, RAFFIA, 
AND STRING 

Tie small flowers, as pansies and vio- 
lets, into bunches before arranging. 



DISCS 

Circles of plywood, painted to harmo- 
nize, and used as a background, will drama- 
tize and add interest to some arrangements, 
if you do not have copper, brass, silver, or 
other colored plates on hand. 



FIGURINES 

Colorful or graceful figurines used in 
the proper place will enhance many ar- 
rangements. They should be used only 
after thought and planning, and placed 
inside or outside the container. Ducks 
would be appropriate in or beside low 
dishes where the water shows. Birds go 
with boughs or many flower types. Hu- 
man figures should be used in scale, so 
neither the figure nor the arrangement 
dwarfs the other. Line or color in the 
figurine may be repeated in the arange- 
ment. 



FLOWER ARRANGEMENTS FOR SPRINGTIME 



179 



FOLIAGE 

Develop an open mind toward foliage 
to use with flowers or alone. Unrelated 
leaves often lend new grace to a flower. 
Borrow from weeds, shrubs, ferns, grasses, 
or potted plants. Combine ivy, trailing 
to the tablecloth, with stiff flowers. Try 
all-green arrangements, or one of varie- 
gated greens, vegetables not excluded. 
Remember, Salina said in So Big, "Cab- 
bages are beautiful!" Many leaves can 
be brightened to a rich sheen with cotton 
dipped in oil. The delicate young green 
of boughs "forced" into early bloom is 
delightful. 

FLOWERS 

What a panorama of color and form 
bursts upon the mind at the word. For 
the first breath of spring, go outdoors in 
February or March and prune off a few 
boughs from any flowering shrub or tree 



and "force" them into bloom a month 
early by bringing them into the house 
and putting them in deep water. They 
will burst into delicate bloom in a week 
or two, more or less, and will last as long 
or longer than those matured in the 
garden. Their stems, along with all 
woody stems, should be pounded with a 
hammer, from the ends up about two 
to five inches; not enough to break, but 
just to bruise them. This allows for more 
absorption of water. Try this on pussy 
willows, Forsythia, flowering quince, and 
almond, bridal wreath, apple, currant, 
pear, jasmine, alder, and honeysuckle. 

The twigs of plants which bear only 
leaves are beautiful, too, the horse chest- 
nut, beech, birch, oak, mountain ash, 
maple, and barberry. Then soon the early 
spring flowers, hyacinths, pansies, daffo- 
dils, tulips, will be out and are effective 
combined with the blossomed twigs. And 
don't scorn the dandelion. Pick it with 




W. Atlee Burpee 

NEW GIANT SWEET PEAS (FRAGRANCE) 

These blossoms are exceedingly fragrant, large, beautifully ruffled, heavily duplexed, 
and they grow on long, strong stems. 



180 



RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— MARCH 1951 





The Hograth Curve, called "The Line 
of Beauty/' is a relaxed "S". 



The triangle, especially the asymetrical 
triangle, is a form which has been de- 
veloped into a fine art by the Japanese. 
To them, the form symbolizes heaven, 
earth, and man. This container is a 
piece of weathered wood with spring blos- 
soms and daffodils set in floral clay. The 
figure of the faun is appropriate here. 




Blue ducks go with the water which is 
visible in this flat container, a white bowl, 
lined in blue, and with spring blossoms 
set in a needle holder, off center in the 
dish. 




The "Crescent" is patterned after one 
of the loveliest forms in nature, the cresc- 
ent moon. In this design daffodils are 
combined with pussy willows and For- 
sythia, bent into shape while the stems 
were wet and tied with strings until the 
curves were set. 



FLOWER ARRANGEMENTS FOR SPRINGTIME 



181 



tall and short stems and combine it with 
other flowers. Don't neglect the blos- 
soms of any weed or vegetable as an ad- 
dition to your arrangement. Their possi- 
bilities are suggested in the many il- 
lustrated books on the subject. 

Be daring with color. Make trials for 
the daring, dramatic, or stirring, or the 
restful and cool effects. Flowers should 
be picked in early morning or late even- 
ing, and immediately set in deep con- 
tainers filled with cold water to "hard- 
en" for a few hours, or overnight. All 
flowers should be treated in this manner; 
they will last longer and are more man- 
ageable for arranging. Clip the stems 
various lengths for effect as you make 
the design for your floral arrangement. 
Select flowers from buds to full bloom for 
variety. 



ARRANGING 

A flower arrangement should be a liv- 
ing picture; having all the elements of a 
piece of art. Strive for beauty of line 
and contour in your pieces. Never push 
all the blooms it will hold into a con- 
tainer. 

The accompanying illustrations empha- 
size "line." These types of lines can be 
filled in with more flowers and foliage 
for variety. These are some of the more 
popular types used in modern flower ar- 
ranging. The better known styles of 
"mass" arranging are omitted. 

Join in the pleasure of combining color 
and line, in flowers, foliage, and contain- 
ers, with sometimes figurines and other 
accessories, to make works of art all your 
own! 



i':':'K»hM: 




W. Atlee Burpee 



ARRANGEMENT OF SUNNY MARIGOLDS 



Growing Pains 

Doiothy Clapp Robinson 



SKEETS heaved himself up the "Rings is with them." 
last two yards to the top of Mom had blinked hard at that 
the hill. Safely there he but almost at once had asked, "How 
stopped to blow. Bill shifted in the do you know?" 
saddle as his glance went swiftly, "Because I know, and he's the 
then carefully, over the pageantry one I'm . . . ." 
unfolding about him. The undula- "He knows his way around," 
tion of hills, spotted with jack pine Jake had interrupted, "and if he 
and seamed with canyons, moved doesn't he isn't worth the risk you 
majestically among shifting cloud are taking. There is a bad storm 
curtains. Nothing in sight. He brewing. Don't leave the ranch to- 
reached for the glasses that hung on morrow." 

his saddle horn and lifted them to "And who are you to be giving me 

his eyes. Still nothing, except those orders?" Bills eyes had demanded, 

warning curtains. but because of Mom he had kept 

An aching heaviness settled the quiet. He would never forgive Jake 

boy deeper in the saddle. Those for that crack— never. And he would 

colts must be somewhere near. For never treat him as a father, even if 

days he had ridden the lower slopes he was Mom's new husband, 

without a glimpse of them. A cold Rings was all that Bill had left 

wind struck his face and his hopes now that Mom had turned traitor, 

soared. Maybe the wind would A year last summer to have seen 

drive the clouds away. More likely Rings was to have seen Dad, and 

it would close the curtain complete- the other way about. Why, that 

ly. Something was haywire for, horse was practically human. That's 

with this weather, the horses should why he had run away. Bill might 

have been headed for the valley. try it himself. He would like to 

"Let them go," Jake, Mom's new run so fast and so far he would leave 

husband, had said last night. "Colts behind forever the aching empti- 

have wintered out before and, with ness left by Dad's going. He had 

this spell of weather on the way, thought he was forgetting a little 

you are more likely to run into when this situation over Rings had 

trouble than horses." come up. Maybe if he and Rings 

"Yes," Mom had echoed, tried they could find that mysterious 

"They'll come home when they get place where Dad was. 

hungry." Kid stuff! He shook his head to 

Bill hadn't answered that. Mom clear his eyes. It didn't do much 

could sure play dumb sometimes, good. Oh, well, he could bawl all 

She knew as well as Bill that there he wanted. There was no one to 

were several reasons why a horse see or care since Mom was so 

might not come back to the ranch, wrapped up in Jake. His mouth 

Every fall Dad had combed these tightened stubbornly. After that 

hills for colts and geldings that had crack by Jake he would find Rings 

summered out. or die trying. 

Page 182 



GROWING PAINS 183 

Now Bill turned in the saddle stippled with shrubs and boulders, 

and looked back the way he had but they pushed relentlessly ahead, 

come. Through a break in the hills It was not far as the crow flies, but 

he could see the toy buildings that Skeets was not a crow, 
marked the Home Ranch, and back The next time Bill stopped to 

of this last ridge, but out of sight, look he had trouble locating the 

was the Halfway Ranch. The men spot. When his eyes finally caught 

there still hadn't gone to the valley it he expelled his breath with re- 

for the winter. lief. It was Rings. He could tell 

A stinging wind struck his face, by his size and by the way he held 

It felt like snow and he'd better get his head. There was something so 

a move on. No one but Dad had like Dad in the proud free way the 

ever found his way out of these hills horse threw his head. The sight 

in a blizzard. Jake had been right brought back the aching. The colts 

about one thing, Rings did know were there, too, but they were mill- 

his way around, and that was why ing around instead of traveling. Bill 

he should have been home. And knew the spot. It was a bare high 

every horse had his blind spot, even knob jutting out from a broken 

Rings. point of the mountain. He and 

Skeets jumped at an unexpected Dad had often passed there when 

dig with the spurs and started to they went fishing in Crystal Lake, 
run down the short slope. He was The knob and Crystal Lake 

still running when the upward brought fresh memories of Dad and 

slope of another hill slowed him. of home that wasn't a home any 

Again Bill searched the landscape, longer. If only Dad hadn't tried 

Skeets grew restless but was held by to ride that black bronc. He had 
the pressure of his rider's knees. . ridden wilder ones, but this time 

something had slipped. Later Jake 

HPHE drifting clouds had massed had shot the bronc, but that hadn't 

for an attack. The hills were a brought Dad back. Jake had been 

confusing hotchpotch of dull lights foreman of the Home Ranch ever 

and darker shadows. Back of the hills since Bill could remember. He had 

the mountains thrust their white a place joining on the south, but 

peaks above the clouds. Bill was ever since his wife's death he had 

alone in a world of silence and lived with the rest of them. Now 

space. Why hope to find a horse he was running the Home Ranch 

in this expanse of eternity? and trying to run Bill. Some day 

With a grunt of despair Bill Bill would run that ranch himself 

dropped his glasses, then raised with no help from anyone— least of 

them abruptly. Something had all Jake. 

moved, a shadow had emerged from It took a long half hour to reach 

a clump of pines. Bill's heart the slope opposite the knob. Bill 

knocked hard against his ribs. It saw at a glance why the colts 

was a horse. Skeets jumped at his weren't traveling. There was but . 

yell of triumph, but headed north one way down from the knob and 

by east as the reins directed. The that way lead across a steep nar- 

ground was seamed by gulches and row cut. From there it zigzagged 



184 RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— MARCH 1951 

down to meet the forestry road, ing, they milled about the older 

There was no snow on the bluff, horse. 

but a blanket of it lay across the Hunched so the collar of his 

gulch. Undoubtedly the horses had sheepskin jacket protected his head, 

taken shelter in the grove of trees Bill considered. The only way to 

during an earlier storm, and when release these cayuses was to break 

it was over snow blocked their way a trail for them, but it was now or 

either up or down. With all their never. If he took time to go for 

sense, horses were sure dumb about help the storm would block the 

some things. They might break passes before he could get back, 

through a fence but they would "No horse is worth the risk you 

never cross the snow. are taking/' Jake had said. Maybe 

"Hi, Rings!" not. If he had a gun he might 

A dark roan, with white rings shoot them, but now that he was 

about his eyes, had been watching here he wasn't leaving them to 

their approach. At Bill's greeting starve. From the looks of them, 

he came galloping down the short that wouldn't take too long, 

slope, but stopped abruptly at the Tentatively Bill put out a foot 

edge of the snowdrift. He tossed to test the snow. There should be 

his head and whistled excitedly, a crust from an earlier storm that 

Bill swung from the saddle and would hold his weight. The gulch 

went to stand opposite him. With was twenty or thirty yards across, 

reins dangling, Skeets followed. but the snow might vary from six 

"You are half-starved." inches to twenty feet in depth. He 

studied the slope to determine 

HPHERE was a deep hollow below where the gulch might be the shal- 
the horse's hip bone, and his - lowest. The colts followed Rings 

ribs could be counted at a glance, back and forth slowly, as if they had 

The colts had taken an even harder no part in what was going on. 

beating. A quick look at the trees Bill started across. He had gone 

in the background showed how a dozen feet when the crust broke 

hungry they were. and he was floundering in snow to 

"Come on, Rings, come on his armpits. Panic seized him, and 

across." Bill took a handful of oats he twisted about and fought his way 

from his pocket and held it out back to solid footing. He stamped 

coaxingly. The horse sniffed and hard, beating the snow from his 

stepped forward gingerly. Bill held boots and levis. He beat his hands 

his breath as one powerful foot after together to warm them. He looked 

another tested the snow. Rings about for help but there was none, 

gained confidence, but abruptly one There were only the hills and the 

leg sank to the shoulder in snow, silence and the storm that was com- 

Squealing with terror, the horse ing his way on the double. A few 

plunged back to solid footing, nor stinging flakes struck his face and 

could Bill coax or threaten him in- sifted under his collar, 

to making the attempt again. The "I can't do it." He turned, and 

yearlings had followed Rings down Rings, as if sensing his doubt, 

the slope and, excited by Bill's coax- whinnied softly. Misery clouded the 



GROWING PAINS 185 

boy's eyes. "If I stop to help you maybe. Skeets could help. Bill un- 

out the storm will take you and me, coiled a rope from his saddle horn 

and the colts/' and tied the loose end about his 

Wasn't that what Jake had said? waist. If he got in too deep he 

But Jake— with vivid clarity, a mem- could climb out hand over hand, 

ory came to Bill, something out of "Hold it," he told Skeets. 

his life with Dad. The time had The frozen ground creaked under 

been the Fourth of July and the his boots. Bill studied the slope 

occasion a community rodeo. His carefully and chose a spot slightly 

Dad had won several events, and below where he had tried before. 

Bill had decided he wanted to ride Carefully, tentatively, he pushed 

a calf. one foot ahead of the other. Maybe, 

"No," his father had told him just maybe, he would have luck all 

several times, "you will get hurt." the way across. Here the blanket 

"No, I won't." might be shallow enough to— the 

"But you will. In five years you thought ended abruptly, as one leg 

may ask me again." went through the crust. Once brok- 

But Bill had persisted. "I ride en, the snow refused to hold him. 

them at home all the time and I For a frightening moment he 

want to try." floundered, but gradually his feet 

"All right." Dad's mouth had packed the snow so he could work 

looked grim even to a six-year-old. forward. He shuffled and stamped, 

"You might as well have your les- going ahead by falls rather than by 

son right now, but don't expect steps. In five minutes he had brok- 

sympathy." en into a sweat that chilled instantly 

when he stopped to rest. The sharp 
"DILL still remembered the awful wind, sweeping down from the 
sting of the sand as he had slopes, picked up and loosened snow 
plowed face first into it. He had and flung it in his eyes and under 
wanted horribly to cry, but he had the cuffs and collar of his jacket, 
blinked hard and staggered away. He lost track of time. There was 
The next thing he remembered he only one thing in the universe, and 
and Dad had been sitting on high that was the need for speed. Slow- 
stools sipping ice cream sodas. The ly, slowly, he lessened the distance 
cool inside his throat helped a little between him and "the horses, 
to make him forget the burn on He reached the part of the snow 
his face and hands. That night Mom that should be the deepest. This 
had laid them both out while she was where the test would come. If 
was trying to wash the grains of the snow were too deep, his cause 
sand from his face. was lost. He lurched ahead and 

"When a man asks for some- was jerked abruptly onto his back, 

thing," Dad had answered, watch- Scrambling frantically to his feet he 

ing the washing with one eye and looked about— he had just come to 

his paper with the other, "he has the end of his rope, 

to take what he gets." Without hesitation, he took off 

Okay. He had lived through his gloves and held them under his 

that, he could live through this— (Continued on page 210) 



iue a i^uest at Ljour Kywn [Party 

Phyllis Snow 
Home Service Director, Salt Lake City Area, Mountain Fuel Supply Company 

V^OU don't think it can be done? Then you need to try a buffet dinner. Gone are 
* the days when cooks spent hours over the stove and the table groaned under its 
load of food. Living today is more- casual and informal, and entertaining is simpler. 

The buffet meal, which enlists the aid of the guests themselves, is a delightful 
innovation which fits in beautifully and is becoming increasingly popular. 

Anyone can entertain with a buffet meal — the older couple now moved from the 
big family home to a small apartment just big enough for two; the woman who works 
and can't be home to prepare a big dinner; the woman with small children and a big 
house to keep up; the man or girl living in one room, and who must serve from a small 
table; and even the newly marrieds on a "two can live as cheaply as one" budget. . 

The menu may be merely a cheese tray with crackers and fruit, or as much as a 
two course dinner. Seldom is it more complicated. In any case it should be possible 
to do the preparation in advance. With last minute dashing practically eliminated, 
you can be a guest at your own party. 

Plates, napkins, silver, and food are arranged attractively and conveniently on the 
buffet table, and guests serve themselves. Though they may balance their filled plates 
on their laps during the meal, it is, of course, more convenient if trays or small tables 
are provided. 

There are many kinds of buffet meals, and therefore no one set of directions is 
possible. The size of your apartment or house, the facilities of your kitchen or kitchen- 
ette, whether you have a garden, terrace, porch, or barbecue pit, your own personality, 
and that of your proposed guests, your financial situation, the time of day, and many 
other things will influence your plans. 

Do, however: 

1. Invite only the number of guests you can handle conveniently. 

2. Select a menu that can be prepared before serving time, and which will not 
become unappetizing if allowed to stand. 

3. Avoid too much food. Quality, not quantity, is the important thing, and the 
food need not be expensive to be delicious. A casserole may be just as tempt- 
ing and good as a ham or turkey, if it is properly prepared and attractively 
served. 

4. Try out any new dishes on the family the week before the party. 

5. Serve hot foods hot and cold foods cold. 

6. Arrange the table and its appointments so that traffic to the buffet does not 
interfere with that leaving it. 

7. Plan your party carefully and organize the preparation so as to conserve your 
energies and sunny disposition and enable you to enjoy your guests, not just 
be thankful when it is time for them to go. 

8. Plan so that the conclusion of your buffet will go as smoothly as the beginning. 
Page 186 



BE A GUEST AT YOUR OWN PARTY 



187 



9. If necessary enlist the aid of one or two close friends to help with the serving. 

10. Be nonchalant whatever happens — never make a party seem a task. Avoid any 
sign of fidgeting or hurrying on your part. 

Remember, delicious food, attractively arranged conveys the wish of the poised, 
relaxed hostess. "Accept this hospitality that comes from my heart and share with me 
the best I have to offer." 

Here is a sample of how we organized one buffet dinner. By following a similar 
plan you can easily fit buffet entertaining into your own schedule. It is not always 
necessary to write out plans in this much detail, but it is necessary to think them 
through completely. 

MENU 

Spizzerinktum (Served by host or a friend as guests arrive) 
Salmon Delmonico in a Rice Ring 

Peas 

Orange-Grapefruit Salad ' Poppy Seed Dressing 

Relish Trays 

Bran Rolls 
Almond Torte Hot Spiced Grape Juice 




Hal Rumel 



TABLE SET FOR BUFFET DINNER 



188 RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— MARCH 1951 

Put the empty serving dishes and serving silver where they will go when the food is 
served. This is a grand way to see the picture your table will make for the guests. 
When the picture satisfies you, stack the serving dishes ready for use in the kitchen. 

Remember to arrange dishes in a consistent fashion so that the food is put on the 
plate in the order of its importance. Beverages should come last. Napkins and silver 
are secured after the food has all been served. 

Don't forget salt and pepper shakers somewhere on the buffet, for some tastes call 
for extra seasoning. Guests may not want to ask for them if they are not in sight. A 
pitcher of water and glasses should also be handy. Be as conventional or different as 
you please in decorating your buffet. Hothouse flowers in a lovely bowl may be 
centered on the table. Or push the table against the wall and arrange greens, autumn 
leaves, pine cones, and harvest vegetables, or fruit in a wide basket at one end away 
from the service of food. Keynote the setting with the occasion: a country supper 
is amusing if a row of geraniums, in freshly painted white pots borders the table where 
it has been pushed against a brick or summerhouse wall. 

Candlelight, for a town apartment or. a winter night in the country, brings out the 
best in everybody. But do have enough candles. 

Arrange a tray of dessert china and silver and leave in the kitchen. 

Arrange trays for passing Spizzerinktum. 

Following are the recipes we used. 

As you see, thorough advance planning and preparation eliminate guesswork and 
worry and make a buffet dinner one of the most pleasant ways of entertaining for 
hostess and guest alike. 

RECIPES 

Spizzerinktum 

i. Beat until thick and lemon colored 2 eggs 

Vz c. sugar 
Vs tsp. salt 

2. Blend in . . Juice of three oranges 

2 c. cranberry juice 
Juice of one lemon 

3. Pour over cracked ice in glasses 
Yield: 6 glasses 

Salmon Delmonico In A Rice Ring 

1. Melt in a saucepan , % c. butter 

2. Blend in % c. flour 

X A tsp. salt 
% tsp. pepper 

3. Add gradually while stirring constantly 2 c. milk 

4. Stir and cook until smooth and thickened (about 
4 minutes) 

5. Pour hot mixture on 1 egg yolk, slightly beaten 

6. Cook over low heat about 1 minute 

7. Add and mix well , 1 1 -lb . can red salmon, 

drained and flaked 
1 4-oz. can sliced mushrooms, 
drained 



BE A GUEST AT YOUR OWN PARTY 189 

Rice Ring 

Temperature: 400 °; Time: 45 min. if chilled prior to baking, 30 min. if hot when 
ready to bake. 

1. Wash thoroughly in several waters 2 c. rice 

2. Drain 

3. Slowly drop rice into 5 c. boiling water 

Make sure that the boiling does not stop. 1 tsp. salt 

4. Cover and simmer 25 minutes. Do not stir. 

5. When rice is soft but firm, drain in a colander, 
but do not rinse. 

6. Add and mix well % C. minced parsley 

6 tbsp. melted butter 

7. Press into a well-greased 8-inch ring mold. 

8. Set mold into a pan of hot water. 

9. Bake 

10. Remove from oven, invert on a serving plate, and 
fill center with Salmon Delmonico. 

11. Surround mold with buttered peas 

Yield: 6-8 servings 

Relish Tray 

Carrot curls: Wash and scrape tender young carrots, cut into paper thin slices 
lengthwise with a vegetable peeler, roll tightly and fasten with toothpicks. Crisp in ice 
water. Remove toothpicks before serving. 

Stuffed celery: Stuff small sticks of celery with softened pimiento cheese. 
Garnish with chopped nuts or paprika. 

Olives and pickles: Choose very large (colossal is a good size) stuffed green and 
ripe olives. Small gherkins go well with this. 

Orange-Grapefruit Salad 

1. Using a sharp knife, peel as though paring an 

apple 2 Texas pink grapefruit 

3 medium oranges 
(Remove narrow strips of peel and use a sawing 
motion with the knife, not a pushing motion. 
Be sure all white membrane is removed as you go.) 

2. Remove pulp by sections, cutting away from tough 
portion, first on one side of section, then on other. 

3. Chill thoroughly. 

4. Arrange in lettuce cups 

5. Garnish with pomegranate seeds 

6. Serve with P°PPY see d dressing 

Yield: 6 servings 

Poppy Seed Dressing 

1. Mix together i c. sugar 

Vz tbsp. flour 

X A tsp. mustard 

1 tbsp. paprika 

2. Add, and cook 2 minutes Vz c. vinegar 

3. Cool 

4. Add 2 Vz tsp. onion juice 



190 



RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— MARCH 1951 



5. Beat in slowly 1 c. salad oil 

6. Add 1 tsp. poppy seed 

Note: Celery seed may be substituted for the poppy seed. This is particularly good 
on fruit salads, especially grapefruit and avocado or grapefruit and orange. 

Bran Rolls 

Temperature 400 °; Time: 12 to 15 minutes 

1. Mix in large mixing bowl 1 c. bran 

l A c. mashed potatoes 
Vz c. lard or butter 
V2, c. sugar 

2. Add 2 c. scalded milk 

3. Cool until tepid. 

4. Soften 1 cake compressed yeast in 

Vz c. lukewarm water 

5. Add to milk mixture. 

6. Add 2 beaten eggs 

7. Sift together and add 2 c. sifted flour 

2 tsp. salt 
1 tsp. baking powder 
Vz tsp. soda 

8. Beat thoroughly 

9. Gradually add enough more flour to make a dough (about 4-6 a). 

10. Knead 2 minutes. 

11. Grease top of dough. Cover tightly and place in refrigerator over night. (May be 
stored in refrigerator 4 to 5 days before using.) 

12. Shape and place in pans about two hours before baking. 

Yield: 4 dozen rolls. 



Almond Torte 

1. Cream until soft and pliable Vz c. soft butter 

2. Work in Vz c. sugar 

3. Beat in one at a time 4 egg yolks 

4. Sift together 3 times 1 c. sifted cake flour 

% tsp. salt 

i/4 tsp. baking powder 

5. Add dry ingredients alternately by thirds with 5 tbsp. milk 

(Use a stroke count of 50, 50, 125.) 

6. Spread the thick batter evenly in 2 well-greased, 
8-inch layer tins. 

7. Beat until stiff 4 egg whites 

8. Beat in, 2 tbsp. at a time 1 c. sugar 

9. Add 1 tsp. vanilla, dash salt 

10. Spread over batter, sealing to pan sides. 

11. Sprinkle with % c. blanched almonds, 

shredded 

12. Bake. Temperature 32 5 °; Time: 30 Minutes 

13. Cool. 

14. Whip . t 1 c. heavy cream 

15. Fold in 2 tbsp. sugar 

Vz tsp. vanilla 

16. Put torte together with cake surfaces in the middle and the sweetened, whipped 
cream between. (The meringue will be on the bottom of the torte and also on 
the top.) 



BE A GUEST AT YOUR OWN PARTY 



191 



17. Chill thoroughly. 
Yield: I cake 

Hot Spiced Grape Juice 

1. Tie in a bag -'— 1 tbsp. whole cloves 

2 sticks cinnamon 

2. Add to 2 C. water 

3. Simmer 5 minutes 

4. Add and reheat to boiling 1 qt. grape juice 

*A c. orange juice 
% c. lemon juice 

5. Serve hot. 



ofhree diobbt 



tes 



Maria C. Hardy of Colonia Dublan, 

Mexico, Is Skilled in Netting, Cake 

Making, and Modeling Figurines 

Maria C. Hardy, seventy years old, a 
Relief Society visiting teacher, a practi- 
cal nurse, and a homemaker, has still 
found time and energy for the develop- 
ment and perfecting of three unusual 
hobbies: netting, cake making, and mod- 
eling figurines. The exquisite tablecloth, 
shown in the picture, is sixty-four inches 
wide and seventy-two inches long, and 
was made in two years. Sister Hardy 
also crochets and embroiders, making many 
unusual and beautifully designed articles. 

In cake making Sister Hardy special- 
izes in wedding cakes, which she deco- 
rates with a mixture of powdered sugar, 
egg whites, and cream of tartar, or lemon 
juice. Her favorite motifs for decoration 
are the bride and groom, roses, hearts, 
lattice work, and forget-me-nots. The 
bride and groom for the wedding cake are 
made from granulated sugar poured into 
molds which were purchased in Mexico 
City. The center figure in the lower 
right-hand corner is a representation of a 
young woman in a fancy dress, and the 
right-hand figurine is a bust made for a 
birthday cake. 

In her work as obstetrical nurse, Maria 
Hardy has delivered 705 babies, and is 
well-known and well-loved in her com- 




MARIA C. HARDY 

m unity for the service she renders to all 
who are ill or in trouble. 

— Gladys K. Wagner 



For the Strength of the Hills 



Chapter 2 
Mabel Harmer 



Synopsis: Camilla Fen ton, an orphan 
who lives with an aunt in Santa Monica, 
California, arrives at the railroad station 
near Crandall, Idaho, where she is em- 
ployed as the new schoolteacher. Stanley 
Rodgers, a farmer, takes her in his jeep 
to the home of Mrs. Whipple, a widow 
who takes boarders. Camilla finds out 
that Stanley is unmarried and that he is 
going out with Marcia Ellertson. At a 
dance, Stan dances with her. 

THE first week of school passed 
somehow, much to Camilla's 
surprise. Twenty-five stu- 
dents in four different grades, she 
decided, was something only a para- 
gon should be required to cope with, 
and she readily admitted to herself 
that she was far from being a para- 
gon—as far as schoolteaching was 
concerned, anyway. 

At any rate I have today and to- 
morrow in which to catch my 
breath, she thought gratefully as 
she ate breakfast on Saturday morn- 
ing. By noon she had not only 
caught her breath but had become 
thoroughly bored even with reading 
and letter writing. 

"I'll go sketching," she an- 
nounced, with sudden inspiration. 
''It would be a shame to waste this 
lovely day indoors." 

She dug out paper and crayons, 
put on a woolen suit and Oxfords, 
and started out for the foothills, 
where the yellow aspens were inter- 
spersed with clumps of crimson 
scrub oak and maple. 

There was absolutely no reason, 
she told herself, why she shouldn't 
go by way of the Rodgers farm. The 

Page 192 



road there was as good as any, prob- 
ably better. The view from the hill 
would also be as good, or better 
than any. 

There were men working out in 
the fields when she passed, but at 
such a distance she couldn't tell one 
from another. Her boredom of the 
morning vanished, and she felt hap- 
py all through. The contrast of the 
purple sage and yellow aspens was 
fascinating, and she sketched with 
the most genuine pleasure she had 
felt in months. 

It is absurd, she told herself, to 
spend all of one's life in the same 
place. Maybe next year I'll go to 
Alaska or Canada, well, Puget 
Sound, anyway. 

Her pleasant daydreaming was in- 
terrupted by a faint rustle, and she 
looked up to see a grayish brown 
animal watching her from a short 
distance away. For a moment she 
sat paralyzed with fright. She sup- 
posed it was a coyote— it just 
couldn't be a wolf— and people said 
that coyotes weren't dangerous. But 
it could probably tell that she was 
scared to death and would come 
right at her. She knew that the 
proper thing to do would be to stand 
her ground and act defiant, but she 
couldn't. Picking up her things, 
she fled down the hillside as fast 
as she could go, not even looking 
behind to see if the beast was fol- 
lowing her. 

Even when she had reached the 
edge of the Rodgers farm she 
couldn't slow down, although she 



FOR THE STRENGTH OF THE HILLS 



193 



was so weak from fright that she all 
but dropped in the road. 

She had another fright when Stan 
popped up from behind a clump of 
bushes and called, "What's your 
hurry, lady? Going to catch a 
train?" 

"No," she replied, her fright melt- 
ing away, "but I'd like to, at the 
moment. I went up on the hill to 
sketch, and I was surrounded by 
wild beasts." 

"You don't say!" he drawled. 
"How many and what species?" 

"Only one, that I actually saw," 
she admitted. "But Fm sure that 
he had a whole pack right behind 
him." 

"Cougar?" he asked. 

She was tempted to let it go at 
that, but, after a moment's pause, 
confessed, "No, it was a coyote, I 
think, although it might have been 
a wolf." 

"There aren't any wolves around 
here," he scoffed, "and I didn't 
think that a big girl like you would 
be afraid of a coyote. All you'd 
have to do is throw one rock and 
he'd hightail it for the peaks so fast 
you couldn't see him for dust." 

"Well, I didn't happen to know 
that, so I did the hightailing in- 
stead." 

He grinned tolerantly and offered, 
"Wait until I get the jeep and I'll 
run you down." 

She accepted his offer gratefully, 
for the hills were much farther 
away than they had looked, and 
the run had tired her considerably. 
When they stopped in front of 
Mrs. Whipple's house he produced 
a pair of apples from somewhere 
and handed her one, which she sat 
munching with a curious sense of 



elation. At the moment she could 
think of no pastime more desirable 
than sitting in a jeep and eating 
apples. 

"Would you like to go to a barn 
dance tonight?" he asked, throwing 
his core across the road. 

"A real barn dance! Oh, I'd love 
it!" she exclaimed, her eyes glow- 
ing. 

"Okay. I'll pick you up about 
eight— if I can get the chores done 
by then. And listen," he cautioned, 
"don't let on to anyone else that 
you ran away from a poor little old 
coyote." 

CHE laughed as he helped her out 
and ran up the path to the 
house. A barn dance! It would be 
lots of fun. What should she wear? 
A cotton print, probably. She had a 
very nice paisley print with a wide 
skirt. 

She put away her drawing ma- 
terials and brought out the dress to 
give it a pressing. She really would 
have liked to check with Mrs. Whip- 
ple to be sure that it was appro- 
priate, but her landlady had gone in- 
to town, as the next place was 
known, and had left supper out on 
the table. 

It won't matter anyway, she 
thought. People wear prints every- 
where now. I can't go wrong. 
She tied a yellow ribbon around her 
auburn curls and waited impatient- 
ly for Stan to come. "The chores!" 
she grumbled as the clock hands 
moved around to eighty-thirty. 
"What a country. Even a Satur- 
day night date has to wait on the 
chores." 

He came whistling up the walk 
and made no apologies when she 
opened the door. Instead, he 



194 



RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— MARCH 1951 



handed her a white kitten and said 
amiably, "Here's something to take 
the place of your beau back home." 

"Thanks very much/' she said. "It 
won't be quite the same, but it will 
help." She held it up to her cheek 
as she added, "It really is sweet. I 
had a kitten once long before, be- 
fore—" she stopped. It was hard 
to explain Aunt Lillian, who be- 
lieved in so few of the things that 
Camilla herself believed in. 

She set the kitten on the floor 
and asked, "Do I look all right? I 
mean— the other girls will be wear- 
ing dresses, won't they?" 

"To a barn dance? You're all 
right. You look good enough to 
eat." 

"That should be good enough," 
she smiled. 

A few minutes later when they 
arrived at the dance she saw that 
her outfit was definitely not all 
right. She was the only girl there 
not wearing a pair of levis, and she 
was very much afraid they would 
think she was acting "high hat." 
She was almost sure that there was 
a noticeable coolness towards her, 
although she couldn't determine 
whether it was due to her clothes 
or the fact that she had taken Stan 
away from a local girl. 

She did her very best to be friend- 
ly with everyone and had a good 
time in spite of the undercurrent of 
disapproval. It was impossible not 
to have a good time with Stan, she 
decided. 

The thought crossed her mind 
that perhaps it was just because she 
was away from home that he seemed 
so fascinating and that it might be 
different in her familiar back- 
ground. Then she remembered 



that Boyd had seemed uninterest- 
ing for the very same reason and 
that she had hoped to make up her 
mind by going away. What kind of 
a mugwump was she, anyway, she 
asked herself? Did she have to get 
her friends against a particular back- 
ground to know what kind of feel- 
ings she had towards them? She 
had no answer. All she knew was 
that she enjoyed every minute of 
the time she spent with Stan. 

^PHE first real snowstorm of the 
winter came early in December 
and she donned the galoshes that 
Mrs. Whipple had warned her to 
buy. She hadn't dreamed that the 
mere matter of keeping warm could 
be such a problem. At Mrs. Whip- 
ple's the only heat came from the 
kitchen range and a heatrola in the 
front room, while at school there 
was only a stove in the middle of 
the room that roasted one side while 
the other practically froze. 

She was sitting at her desk one 
Friday afternoon correcting papers 
when she happened to glance up 
and see little Aline Wakely still in 
her seat. 

"Why didn't you go in the school 
bus?" she asked. 

"Daddy said that he might come 
into town and that if he did he 
would pick me up." 

"Oh, dear, you shouldn't have 
waited," said Camilla, very much 
disturbed. "I'm ready to go home 
now, and I can't leave you here. I 
suppose that I had best walk down 
the road with you until we meet 
him." 

They put on their wraps and hur- 
ried out. As they started down the 
road Camilla called to one of the 



FOR THE STRENGTH OF THE HILLS 



195 



school children, "Will you please 
go over and tell Mrs. Whipple that 
I'm walking home with Aline 
Wakely. I'll get back as soon as 
I can." 

She was hopeful that she 
wouldn't have to go any great dis- 
tance, for Mr. Wakely surely was 
on the way. She noticed the 
clouds were getting very dark and 
the wind was beginning to rise. It 
might even storm before she got 
back, she worried. In fact, she'd 
be awfully lucky if it didn't. She 
really shouldn't have let herself in 
for this, she reasoned, now that it 
was too late to turn back. She 
should have insisted that the child 
come home with her. She had just 
about given up hope now that Mr. 
Wakely would meet them. If he 
had been coming into town, he 
would have come long before this. 

They tramped along, the wind 
whipping against them, and at last 
Aline said, "That's our house over 
there." 

"Then I'll stand here and watch 
until you reach the door/' said 
Camilla. "In that way I'll know 
that you are getting home all 
right." There was no need, she 
told herself, to struggle through 
any more of that snow than she 
had to. 

Aline left, and Camilla waited 
impatiently, thumping her cold feet 
one against the other to try to 
work up the circulation. When the 
child had reached the house and 
disappeared inside, she turned to go 
back down the road. 

The snowflakes were beginning 
to fall now, and the wind was ris- 
ing. She would have to hurry or 
she might be in for a serious time. 



She couldn't get caught in a storm 
out here. It was all of a mile to 
the house— maybe more. It certain- 
ly seemed like more. In a few min- 
utes the storm broke in earnest, 
and she couldn't even see the farm- 
houses along the way, otherwise she 
would have turned into one of them 
and phoned for help or asked some- 
one to take her on home. 

'PHE wind had risen now so that 
the snow stung her face and 
drifted about her feet. Why hadn't 
someone warned her, she thought 
bitterly, what a terrible thing a bliz- 
zard could be? But then, who 
would ever have supposed that she 
would take off into one by herself? 
Oh, to be back in California where, 
in spite of earthquakes or floods, 
you could always see where you 
were going! At this very moment 
her aunt might be sitting out on 
the patio enjoying the sunshine. 
Boyd might be driving along the 
ocean front, without a coat, and 
with the top of his convertible 
rolled down, while she was stum- 
bling along in a blinding snowstorm. 

Once she fell and had to force 
herself to get back on her feet 
again. She had a feeling that if it 
happened once more she wouldn't 
be able to get up. She was so 
weary from struggling against the 
wind and drifting snow that she 
could hardly push one foot in front 
of the other. I can't possibly drag 
myself all the way back, she thought. 
I might just as well give up now. 

But she found that she couldn't 
give up— that she had to fight on as 
long as she had an ounce of energy 
left. Another gust of snow-laden 
wind hit her with such force that 



196 



RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— MARCH 1951 



she cried out and thought that she 
must have been imagining when 
she heard Stan's voice call, "Cam- 
illa! Where are you?' 7 

"Here! Here!" she cried, sinking 
down into the snow, now that she 
no longer had to rely on her own 
efforts. 

The next minute his arms were 
around her, and he was helping her 
into the jeep. 

"What in the world were you 
thinking of to go out in this storm?" 
he scolded as he wrapped blankets 
around her. "I never saw anyone 
so crazy. You're scared of a coy- 
ote, but you tackle a blizzard." 

The scolding was too much for 
Camilla, on top of everything else, 
and she started to cry. 

"I'm sorry, honey," he said, tak- 
ing her in his arms. "It's just be- 
cause I was nearly crazy myself. 
When Mrs. Whipple phoned that 
you had gone to take that kid home 
in this storm I was scared to death." 



He tucked the blankets more 
closely around her and started up 
the jeep. 

Camilla sat in a daze. I can't be 
in love, she thought. I can't be 
tingling with joy at the thought of 
spending my life in a place like 
this. It must be that I'm only half- 
conscious. But, in spite of her be- 
wildered questioning, the fact re- 
mained that nothing in her whole 
life before had ever stirred her as 
his words had done. 

They were at the house in a few 
minutes, where Mrs. Whipple was 
waiting anxiously with hot water 
bottles, hot broth, and everything 
else that she had been able to lay 
her hands on. 

Stan stayed just long enough to 
see that she was going to be all 
right, but before he left he took her 
hand for a moment and whispered, 
"I told you that we always keep the 
red-headed ones." 

(To be continued) 



o/o a QJountain 

Dana Benson 



I stood and watched a fountain playing in the square, 
A shining jet of silver bursting through the air. 
Here was a living, leaping thing, a laughing spray 
Of singing water gleaming in the sunless day. 

I wished poetic thoughts could come like this to me, 
A freshly springing fountain flowing strong and free 
To force the inward joy that nothing could suppress- 
In spite of fogs that come and dim real happiness. 

Play on, gay fountain, let the world go roaring by 
And fling your message like a challenge to the sky. 
Lift up your argent voice above the busy town, 
And let your misty joys bring sorrows tumbling down. 



Soup 1 1 Lakes the 1 1 leal 

Sara Mills 

A French politician once urged that before a woman be allowed to marry she should 
first learn how to make soup. That was nearly two hundred years ago, and no law 
came from his efforts. But today there are still men who wish he had succeeded. 

Good soup nourishes not only the body but the heart of man. It can soothe him 
when he is worried and bolster his courage when the day is dark and the world is 
gray. Soup is necessary in summer as well as in winter. It can be an appetizer to a 
meal or the meal itself. The woman who serves an inspired soup is forgiven if the 
roast is burned or the pie crust soggy. 

For purposes of brevity, we may discuss three kinds of soup: (1) thin clear soups 
to stimulate the appetite — consomme, bouillon, broth; (2) hearty soups — thick vege- 
table soups, chowders, pepper pot, and minestrone; (3) cream soups, thin or light. 

All meat soups have stock for a base. Master the art of stock making, and you are 
well on the way. Fresh, uncooked meat, aided by cracked bones, is the best source. 
The bones are important because they provide nourishment and flavor. The jelly-like 
content of cold stock will tell you if you have enough of the bone substance. 

Of all the soup meats, the shin is the most popular. The neck takes longer cook- 
ing, but its soup has more flavor and strength. A veal knuckle is a good choice to go 
with the shin or neck. You may instead use chicken or turkey bones, or the bones of 
wild game birds if you are lucky enough to have them. 

Now for the cooking technique. Soup meat should always be put to cook in cold 
water and allowed to simmer slowly until the meat is tender. You may even allow the 
cold water to stand over the meat for an hour before cooking. The cooking stock 
should never be boiled fast. If more water is needed, add it boiling to retain the 
flavor. And underline this last, please: If you want brown stock, sear the meat and 
bones in their own fat before cooking. When the stock is made, you have your base 
for a light or hearty soup. Remember, the stock can be stored in the refrigerator for 
several days. Stock kept over a day is best sealed with its own fat, to be removed 
before reheating. 

CLEAR BEEF SOUP 

For each one and one-half pounds of beef, use one pound of bone and one quart 
of cold water, and about one-half teaspoon of salt for each quart of water. Wash the 
meat and bones in cold water and place in a soup kettle. Add cold water and salt. 
Bring to a gradual boil and let boil gently for a few minutes while the scum is care- 
fully removed. 

When the scum is gone add the following vegetables (amounts are for each two 
quarts of water used): 

1 scraped carrot cut in several pieces 

1 small white turnip pared and quartered 

1 large onion, peeled and studded with 2 whole cloves 

1 thin slice of garlic 

1 piece of parsnip the size of a walnut, pared and cut in 

several pieces 

1 stalk of celery cut into inch pieces 

Page 197 



19S RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— MARCH 1951 

1 bay leaf 

1 dozen sprigs of fresh parsley 

i sprig of thyme 

i leek 

8 peppercorns, gently crushed 

(Tie bay leaf, parsley, thyme, and leek together with 

white thread) 

Bring the stock and vegetables to a boil and let simmer until the meat is tender. 
To serve, strain the hot soup, season to taste, and serve. If you wish a clear consomme, 
let cool and remove the cake of fat. If you wish a vegetable soup, add vegetables finely 
cut to the hot stock, and let boil gently until the vegetables are just tender. You may 
also add tomatoes, solid or juice, and any or a number of the soup pastes or rice, and 
cook until done. Serve with a handful of finely chopped parsley on top and grated 
Parmesan cheese, along with oven-toasted, buttered French bread. 

MINESTRONE 

Minestrone is to me the soup of soups. I waited years for a certain wandering 
gentleman who promised that he would someday come to our home to make mine- 
strone for us. The recipe that follows is my version of his method. Minestrone should 
use only young and tender vegetables. It must be thick with them, and don't serve 
it unless you have freshly grated Parmesan cheese. • 

Bring two quarts of the beef stock made by the above recipe to a boil and add: 
several strips of salt pork (about l A lb.) 
i c. cooked chick peas 

i c. fresh kidney beans (cooked dried ones may be substituted) 
2 stalks celery, scraped and cut fine 
i c. new peas 
i Vz c. shredded cabbage 

i c. shredded spinach (chard for second choice) 
Vz c. diced carrots 
2 or 3 peeled fresh tomatoes chopped (juice to taste may be substituted) 
Vz c. uncooked white rice 
salt, pepper, a sprig of sage 
i c. sliced potatoes may be used. 

Simmer until the vegetables are tender, taste for seasoning, and add enough hot 

.stock to thin the soup to your liking. 

■* 

ONION SOUP FROM BROWN STOCK 

This is a soup for soup lovers and is served as an appetizer. For each four per- 
sons to be served, use one pound of lean chuck or boiling meat (cut into inch cubes). 
Brown the cubes in beef fat, add five cups cold water, bring to a boil, add the salt, and 
let simmer until the meat is tender. 

For each four persons use: 

4 good sized red onions butter 

i level tbsp. flour salt and pepper 

Peel and slice onions and brown in butter until the onions are a delicate brown 
and tender. Add flour and stir until the flour has been absorbed and lightly browned. 
To the boiling stock add the onions and boil gently for thirty-five minutes. Season to 
taste with salt and pepper. 

To serve, pour the soup into a large oven-proof serving dish, top with slices of but- 
tered toast on which have been placed slices of Swiss or Parmesan cheese. Slide the 
dish into the oven and leave until the cheese is melted. Serve at once in the same dish. 



Anniversary Alms 



Mildred R. Stutz 



M 



ELISSA and Dan had been 
married fifteen years and had 
five children. It isn't easy to 
save money for such things as an- 
niversary gifts, with tonsilectomies 
and haircuts and new shoes to wor- 
ry about. But Melissa had done it. 
She had saved twenty dollars! 
Twenty dollars shaved off the groc- 
ery bill, from tinting and mending 
the upstairs curtains, and from giv- 
ing herself a home permanent. 

Dan was to have a sports coat. 
For fifteen years Melissa had seen 
Dan attend every high-school foot- 
ball game of the season looking 
overdressed and uncomfortable in 
his business suit. This year things 
would be different. Dan would 
have a smart, brand new sports 
coat. 

Melissa spoke to herself as she 
went about her kitchen, 'There's 
a sale on at Mercers, I'll go there 
and— no, I won't either. I'll go to 
Taylors. Their things are just a 
little nicer than Mercers'. I'll buy 
Dan a coat he can really be proud 
of. After the children have their 
lunch and go back to school, I'll 
take little Davey and we'll go shop- 
ping. How would you like that, 
Davey?" she asked, turning to her 
three-year-old son who had entered 
the kitchen and was standing quiet- 
ly beside the screened door. For 
a moment he returned her smile 
and then guiltily followed her eyes 
to his muddy shoes. 

"Oh, David," Melissa moaned, 
"you've been playing in the water 
again, and I've told you over and 
over to stay out of it." She knelt 



on the floor and examined the little 
shoes, and David, having received 
his punishment, promptly started 
pulling bobby pins from his moth- 
er's hair. 

"Just look at your shoes," Melissa 
continued, "the soles are complete- 
ly worn through, and you've worn 
them less than two weeks. David, 
I ought to spank you for this." Me- 
lissa arose, returned the bobby pins 
to her hair, and Davey scampered 
out of doors, the scolding forgotten. 

Melissa continued to herself as 
she went about the kitchen, "May- 
be, if I can get Dan a coat for six- 
teen dollars, I'll have enough left 
to buy David a pair of shoes. I 
hate to do it, but he can't go bare- 
foot and the budget is already 
stretched to the bursting point." 
She finished the dishes thoughtful- 
ly and then, smiling to herself, said 
optimistically, "Well, I'll go to the 
sale at Mercers. They have good 
merchandise, too." 

CHE finished her kitchen work 
and started lunch, then she 
sudsed out her hose and Bonnie's 
white sweater so David could wear 
it that afternoon to go uptown. 
She was hanging it to dry when the 
telephone rang. She glanced anx- 
iously at lunch simmering on the 
stove and hurried to answer. 

"Hello-oh, hello, Edith. No, 
I'm not busy. How are you any- 
way? I haven't seen you since our 
last meeting." Melissa listened for 
a moment and a smile crept across 
her face. "Edith, that's wonderful," 
she exclaimed, "I'm so happy for 

Page 199 



200 



RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— MARCH 1951 



you! It will be so much company 
for you with Jim gone so much and 
the older ones in school. Believe 
me, I enjoy Davey no end. How 
are you feeling?" Melissa glanced 
toward the kitchen. It was wonder- 
ful, of course, but lunch was begin- 
ning to scorch. "Look, Edie," she 
cut in, "why don't you drop in some 
afternoon and we'll have a real 
visit? . . . Oh, yes, the Children's 
Hospital fund. I'll pay you next 
time I see you," she promised vague- 
ly. .. . "Oh, I don't blame you for 
wanting to wind everything up, but 
Edith, you mean that I'm the only 
one who hasn't paid? I'm so sor- 
ry. How much did we decide to 
donate? Five dollars? I'll stop in 
this afternoon and pay you. Bye." 

Back in the kitchen she rescued 
lunch from a fiery doom and pro- 
ceeded to set the table. The dickens 
with the money! 

iy/f ELISSA murmured again to her- 
self as she went about her 
kitchen, "Twenty dollars, minus 
four for shoes, and five for the hos- 
pital leaves . . . eleven dollars for 
Dan's sport coat. I can't even look 
at one for that price." 

She finished setting the table 
thoughtfully and then, smiling tri- 
umphantly, decided, "I know what 
I'll do. I'll go to a secondhand 
store! You can buy anything for a 
song at one of those places. It's a 
beautiful idea and Dan can still 
have his sports coat!" 

The front door closed quietly, 
and Melissa's fourteen-year-old 
daughter, Helen, came in. She was 
a tall, thin girl, immature for her 
age and very sensitive. Melissa had 
lengthened her skirt by adding a 



ruffle at the bottom, but nothing 
could be done about her coat, which 
stopped far above her knees, and 
whose cuffs failed to cover her 
bony wrists. 

"Hello, Helen, you're a little 
early, aren't you?" greeted Melissa. 

"Hello, Mother." The girl stood 
awkwardly for a moment as if sum- 
moning courage for a plunge. 
"Mother," she began again and 
then, taking a deep breath, con^ 
tinued, "Mother, can't I possibly 
have a new coat?" 

Melissa cringed inwardly. "Darl- 
ing, you know I'd get you a new 
coat today if I had the money." 

"But, Mother, couldn't you bor- 
row from the grocery money or 
something? There's a sale at Mer- 
cers . . . Ada got one for only twelve 
and a half and . . . Oh, Mom, it's 
just awful to be gawky." 

Melissa refused to meet the 
pleading look in her daughter's 
eyes. "Helen," she said firmly, 
"you're not gawky. You're a very 
lovely little girl. As for the coat, 
Dear, I'll definitely get one for you 
before Christmas. Maybe, if all 
goes well, you can have it before 
Thanksgiving. But right now, I 
just don't have the money. You 
understand don't you, Darling?" 

"Yes, Mother, I guess so." The 
child turned away, and Melissa 
knew she was hiding tears. Her 
thin little shoulders slumped in de- 
feat, and the ugly old coat strained 
across them. Melissa braced her- 
self. 

CHE thought, what fun would 

Dan have wearing a new sports 

coat when his daughter was eating 

her heart out? Weakly she started 



ANNIVERSARY ALMS 



201 



to speak, "Helen," then paused and 
said decisively, "Helen, come here. 
I have an idea. I've got eleven dol- 
lars. I've saved it for an anniver- 
sary gift for your father. But we'll 
take this eleven dollars and borrow 
a dollar and a half from the grocery 
money, and we'll go to Mercers 
after school and buy you a new 
coat!" 

Tears of joy rose in Helen's eyes 
and ran down her thin little cheeks. 

"Oh, Mother, I couldn't take 
your money. ... I just couldn't! 
There's a darling gray coat . . . 
there's a blue one I like, too. Oh, 



Mom, you're so swell! I know we 
can get a beautiful coat for twelve 
fifty." 

"I'm sure we can, too, Dear," 
smiled Melissa. 

Melissa said to herself, as she 
cleared away the lunch dishes, "I 
know what I'll do. I'll make him 
a cake. It will be a chocolate cake 
with nuts on top. I'll get some ice 
cream and invite the Bradys and 
Cromwells in for the evening. Dan 
seemed to thoroughly enjoy him- 
self last year. But next year Dan 
will definitely get his sports coat," 
said Melissa. 



k/L Square of L^rass 

Ida L. Belnap 

A place where friendly folks, 
Sit at the close of day 
And watch the ebbing hues 
That leap from the sun's last ray. 

A master artist mixed 

The colors of richest dye, 

And with one purpose made all things 

"To gladden the heart and please the eye." 



*j\nother Spring 

Nyal W. Anderson 

Here, morning bears the willow-winds 
That fence the furtive flow 
And follow sumac red with rust 
Skirting the sun-carved snow. 

Deep in their shadows sabled, 
Where liquid mouths green jade 
Lapping the roots of cherry wood, 
White petals fall and fade. 



cJhe Silent 

Margery S. Stewart 

Oh, I would be a trumpeter and stand 

On the high hills calling and calling, 

Or the song in a great singer's throat, 

The strong notes rising and falling, 

For thee, my Lord, for thee. 

Or a bird crying from mountains or the plain, 

Or a river singing thy praise in secret places, 

Or wild things in their unheard sweet refrain, 

Or children with their rapt uplifted faces, 

Singing, my Lord, for thee. 

But all I have is this deep inward singing, 

This beat of wings in upflung melody, 

This gratitude that rises like the swell 

Of music from the greatest symphony, 

Singing, my Lord, for thee. 




From The Field 



Margaret C. Pickering, General Secretary-Treasurer 

All material submitted for publication in this department should be sent through 
stake and mission Relief Society presidents. See regulations governing the submittal 
of material for "Notes From the Field" in the Magazine for April 1950, page 278, and 
the Handbook of Instructions, page 123. 

BAZAARS, CONVENTIONS, AND OTHER ACTIVITIES 




Photograph submitted by Josephine Jenkins 

FLORIDA STAKE RELIEF SOCIETY CONVENTION 
October 30, 1950 

Admiring the beautifully decorated cake prepared especially for the convention, 
left to right, Florence J. Madsen, member of the general board of Relief Society; 
General President Belle S. Spafford; Josephine Jenkins, President, Florida Stake 
Relief Society. 

Sister Jenkins, in expressing her appreciation for the visit of the general board 
members, writes as follows: "We feel so grateful for the privilege of having President 
Spafford and Sister Madsen with us at our convention. The sisters here expressed 
themselves freely, and said it was such an inspirational meeting. We hope they can 
visit us again soon." 

Page 202 



NOTES FROM THE FIELD 



203 




Photograph submitted by Beth C. Woolf 

FRENCH MISSION, BELGIUM DISTRICT SINGING MOTHERS 
PRESENT MUSIC FOR BELGIUM DISTRICT CONFERENCE 

May 7, 1950 

Relief Society women from five cities of Belgium sang together in this chorus 
in the chapel at Liege. The music was learned and rehearsed in each branch sepa- 
rately. Beth C. Woolf, President, French Mission Relief Society, reports: "Singing 
together as a large group was a new and satisfying experience for these sisters. This, 
the first Singing Mothers chorus to sing in Belgium, was directed by Jeanne Bowen 
and Jeen Hyer, missionaries. We have several fine active organizations of the Relief 
Society in our mission which w.e are very proud of. They would do justice to any 
branch or ward anywhere in the Church." 




Photograph submitted by Lavena L. Rohner 



INGLEWOOD STAKE (CALIFORNIA), NINE PRESIDENTS OF 
REDONDO BEACH WARD RELIEF SOCIETY 

The first president of this Relief Society, Sister Lorraine Cox, is seated in the center. 

Standing, left to right, in order of their terms of service, beginning with the sec- 
ond president: Essie Jensen; Jane Cobabe; Linnie Evans; Hazel Smith; Beatrice Kid- 
man; Mildred Vansina; Geraldine Twitty; Estella Spurrier. 

At the present time all of these women are living in Redondo Beach Ward. 

Lavena L. Rohner is president of Inglewood Stake Relief Society. 



204 



RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— MARCH 1951 




Photograph submitted by Ethel L. Mauss 

JAPANESE MISSION RELIEF SOCIETY, IKEBUKURO AND MEGURO 

BRANCH OFFICERS AND OTHER RELIEF SOCIETY LEADERS 

ASSEMBLED AT THE MISSION HOME ifr TOKYO 

Top photograph, left side, Ikebukuro Branch Relief Society officers, left to right: 
Sister Sagara, President; Sister Hata, Second Counselor; Sister Matsumoto, Secretary; 
Sister Ogawa, First Counselor. 

Top photograph, right side, Meguro Branch Relief Society officers, left to right: 
Sister Ueda, First Counselor; Sister Yoshino, Secretary; Sister Yamaguchi, President; 
Sister Mitome, Second Counselor. 

Bottom photograph, Relief Society leaders of the Japanese Mission assembled 
at the mission home in Tokyo, bottom row, left to right: Sisters Yamaguchi; Hata; 



NOTES FROM THE FIELD 



205 



Matsumoto; Yoshino; Ueda. Back row, left to right: Sisters Dorothy Koolau, mis- 
sionary; Sagara; Ethel L. Mauss, President, Japanese Mission Relief Society; Ogawa; 
Mitome; Ruth Needham, missionary. 

Sister Mauss, in reporting Relief Society activities in the Japanese Mission, ex- 
presses her love for these dear sisters, and her appreciation of their diligence and faith- 
fulness. "They are all such fine women. We have grown to love and respect them 
all. . . . We feel that we have been blessed abundantly in our efforts and we are humbly 
grateful for our opportunities here for service." 

Sister Sagara, President of the Ikebukuro Branch, tells of her joy in the re-opening 
of the Japanese Mission: "I am very grateful for the grace of the Lord by which the 
Japanese Mission has been developed step by step, and at the present time, branches 
have been established in Tokyo, Osaka, Kyoto, Hokkaido, Niigata, Kanazawa, Sendai, 
Kofu, Nagano, etc., having continuously increased in number of converts. . . . Our 
primary desire is to build our own chapel. . . . Our second desire is to help the needy." 




Photograph submitted by Lola M. Shumway 



PHOENIX STAKE (ARIZONA), FIFTH WARD RELIEF SOCIETY BAZAAR 

Left to right: Counselor Cornelia Hatch; President Lilly Harris; Secretary- 
Treasurer Florence Evans. 

Articles displayed at this bazaar included beautifully embroidered pillowslips; 
many doilies and other crocheted articles; an attractive display of aprons, and some 
unusually beautiful quilts. 

Lola M. Shumway is president of Phoenix Stake Relief Society. 



206 



RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— MARCH 1951 




NOTES FROM THE FIELD 



207 



Photographs submitted by Minnie B. Sorensen 

DANISH MISSION RELIEF SOCIETY, CENTENNIAL DISPLAY 
OF RELIEF SOCIETY HANDWORK AND SEWING AT COPENHAGEN 

June 1950 

The two photographs on the page at the left show only a part of the varied and 
beautiful display, which included over 300 articles. Sister Minnie B. Sorensen, Presi- 
dent, Danish Mission Relief Society, reports: "We were happy and very proud of the 
wonderful work of our sisters and friends in making this display possible. These were 
the first quilts that most of our sisters had ever worked on." 




Photograph submitted by Mabel A. Price 



CENTRAL ATLANTIC STATES MISSION, NORTH CAROLINA CENTRAL 
. • DISTRICT RELIEF SOCIETY OFFICERS ASSEMBLED FOR RELIEF 
SOCIETY CONVENTION, September 10, 1950 

Front row, seated, left to right: Ruby Braddock; Clara Brown; Eunice Pateat; 
Alice Bremer; Mabel A. Price, President, Central Atlantic States Mission Relief Society; 
Vena Draughan; Lake Snow; Laura Dove; Loraine Childress; Edna Karley. 

Second row, standing, left to right: Olive Webb; Maggie Hiatt; Grace Hiatt; 
Bertha Hiatt; Vera Joyce; Daisy Allridge; Lillian King; Zelma Stowe; Allene Blanks; 
Irene Dixon; Grace Rudd; Mary Cooper. 

Back row, standing, left to right: Vernie Hiatt; Lucy Hodge; Peachie Love; Zella 
Welch; Vinnie Futtrell; Stella Morgan; Carrie Stevens; Rosa Harris; Anna Lee Pres- 
sler; Mary Puckett; Maude Dixon; Rosa Wilson. 

Sister Mabel A. Price, President, Central States Mission Relief Society, 
reports that the quilts, shown in the background, were made by the women of the 
Relief Society organizations of the district. 'The quilt, furnished by the Colfax Branch 
was adjudged first place in workmanship and beauty of arrangement and color. In second 
place was the quilt furnished by the Durham Branch. The purpose of the contest 
was to encourage better workmanship among the Relief Society sisters, and I believe 
our purpose was fulfilled, as there was a fine response and the workmanship was much 
improved." 



208 



RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— MARCH 1951 




Photograph submitted by Lucile H. Spencer 

NEBO STAKE (UTAH), PAYSON FIRST WARD SINGING MOTHERS 
FURNISH MUSIC FOR STAKE CONFERENCE 

Front row, left to right: Daisy Francom; chorister Mary Wyler; accompanist Viva 
Allen; Allene Christensen; Ruth Miller; Ella Money; Tillie Haskell; Lucille Drollinger; 
Ricka Wyler, president of the chorus. 

Back row, left to right: Vanetta Argyle; Flora Bissell; Jennie Elmer, President, 
Payson First Ward Relief Society; Charlotte King; Jennie Flanders; Eva Garner; Clea 
Crump; Hazel Gasser. 

Lucille H. Spencer is president of Nebo Stake Relief Society. 




Photograph submitted by Delia H. Teeter 

DENVER STAKE, LARAMIE (WYOMING) WARD SINGING MOTHERS 
FURNISH MUSIC FOR STAKE QUARTERLY CONFERENCE 

Front row, left to right: Geneva Stevens; Helen Lewis; Second Counselor Rose 
Eads; Bernice Frost; Phyllis Leishman; President Pearl S. Black. 

Back row, left to right: director Roma Jean Stock; Jacqueline Williams; Lois Rol- 
lins; Ida Mae Smith; Amy Willis; First Counselor Frieda Nottage; Margaret Williams; 
Chloe B. Peterson; Lucille Craven; Geniveve Bell; Valear Jensen; Pauline Brenting; 
organist Hortense Burton. 

These women traveled more than one hundred twenty-five miles to sing at the 
stake conference. They also furnished a musical program once a week for four months 
on the radio in Laramie, as well as giving many fine musicals in their own ward. 

Delia H. Teeter is president of Denver Stake Relief Society. 



Pull a New Apron From the Rag Bag 

Rachel K. Laurgaaid 

yet, its colors are still true and 
bright, don't discard it. With a 
little sleight of hand, it can be 
turned into a brand new apron. 

Housewives must do a lot of 
reaching; their dresses have such a 
way of wearing out around the arms 
and shoulders, while the skirt, 
especially the back, is often as good 
as new. So, why not take advantage 
of it? 

Rip off the waist. Open one 

seam of the skirt. Cut a strip for 

waistband and ties from the lower 

edge. Stitch in a narrow hem 

along sides and bottom, and gather 

the top onto the waistband. Presto! 

VI7HEN that pretty percale house you have pulled a new apron from 

dress has become worn and the rag bag as easily as a magician 

torn, and ready for the rag bag, and pulls a rabbit from a top hat. 




cJhe Story (flour 

Norma Wrathall 



"Read us a story, Mother, 
Of Indians in the night, 
Or read about the pirates bold, 
With hoarded jewels bright." 
So while the shadows gather 
To frame our lamp-lit nook, 
Their eyes glpw deep with wonder, 
Or they laugh at Captain Hook. 

Oh, these are fleeting minutes, 
The clock ticks swiftly on, 
First thing you know, it's bedtime, 
And the magic hour is gone 



Then put a bookmark in the place, 
And lay the book away, 
It's hard to wait till story time, 
Clear through another day! 
The years will rob the pirates 
Of their shining, golden lore; 
Indians, with feathered heads, 
Thrill childish dreams no more; 
Rut the chime of children's voices, 
When evening shadows start, 
Will echo on forever 
In the dim rooms of my heart. 



Page 209 



210 



RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— MARCH 1951 



Growing Pains 



(Continued horn page 185) 
arm while he fumbled with the 
knot. The rope was frozen and re- 
fused to yield. From the pocket 
of his levis he took his knife and 
when he had managed to get the 
blade open he cut the rope. Skeets 
whinnied, not understanding the 
sudden slack. 

How he made the remaining dis- 
tance and how long it took him Bill 
merely guessed afterward. He sud- 
denly became aware that he was 
lying on the ground and Rings was 
nuzzling him. There were tiny 
icicles clinging to the hairs about 
the horse's nostrils. Bill fished for 
the oats and let Rings nibble them 
from his hand. Then he turned 
his attention to his problem. 

He had not made much of a trail, 
and he doubted if the horses would 
attempt it. He clutched his fingers 
in Ring's long mane and, talking 
soothingly, started across. Rings 
went willingly until he felt snow 
against his belly. Snorting, he 
whirled back, almost jerking Bill 
from his feet. The boy's temper 
flared. 

"You knothead! You think I'm 
doing this for fun? Darn horses, 
anyway. They don't have a lick 
of sense sometimes." Guess at that 
they showed as much sense as he 
had. He scanned the horizon anx- 
iously. Another hour. Taking a 
deep breath, he plunged back into 
the snow. 

Going across was not hard this 
time, or wouldn't have been had 
his muscles been less tired. Back 
and forth, back and forth, he went 
trampling the snow with his heavy 
boots. 



HPHERE. He had done all he 
could do. The temperature had 
risen, which meant the storm was 
near. Peaks and shadows that had 
guided him here were now cur- 
tained out. A sense of hurry made 
his cold fingers even clumsier than 
they had been. Making a hacka- 
more of his rope, he led Rings onto 
the trail. Rings, contrarily, lead as 
willingly as if they were crossing a 
pasture. The colts followed close 
behind. 

By the time they were headed 
home the storm was on them. 
Flakes swept down the slopes with 
an alertness and precision that spoke 
of unlimited reserves. As the storm 
thickened one side of Skeet's neck 
was covered with snow. Bill tried 
to beat it from his own clothes with 
the reins, but in less time than it 
took to remove it he was covered 
again. He thought grimly of old 
Gil Tanner who had started for his 
place on the Wolverine before just 
such a storm. The next March he 
had been found sitting with his 
back to a tree. A kindly blanket of 
snow had kept the coyotes away. 
His horse had never been found. 
Maybe— maybe this was his and 
Ring's way of joining Dad. 

Gradually Bill became aware of 
the snow hitting them in the face. 
Had the storm turned, or had he? 
For a moment he was incapable of 
deciding, then he turned Skeets 
and went on. Rings protested, but 
he spoke sharply to him. 

On and on. Unnoticed by Bill, 
their progress became slower and 
slower. When he did become 
aware of it he kicked his horse to 



GROWING PAINS 



211 



hurry him, but Skeets stopped in- 
stead. No amount of urging would 
move him. In dull desperation Bill 
dismounted. The jar of setting his 
numbed feet to the ground brought 
him fully awake. 

What a jam! He didn't know 
south from north, and he couldn't 
see a yard ahead. No wonder Jake 
had ordered him to stay on the 
ranch. Well, he had always known 
that no one but Dad could find his 
way out of these hills in a blizzard, 
and he had made his choice back 
there when he stopped to rescue 
Rings. Rings. Yeah— if Rings was 
so 'smart, let him take them to 
safety. Why hadn't he thought of 
it before? Taking the rope from 
Ring's halter, he tied it to his tail. 
It took a lot of fumbling and cut- 
ting before he had a knot that would 
hold. The colts were crowded to- 
gether with their backs bowed and 
their heads down. When the im- 
possible was finally accomplished, 
Bill wiped the snow from the saddle 
and swung back into it. 

"Go on, Rings," he commanded. 
"We're tied to you so we go where 
you go." 

OINGS didn't move. Bill repeat- 
ed his command, and slowly the 
horse raised his face to the wind. 
He stepped tentatively ahead, then, 
realizing he was no longer being 
lead, he turned and started off at 
right angles to the course they had 
been traveling. Bill's heart leaped 
with fear, but he knew Rings was 
his last hope. 

Darkness thickened the snow, and 
he could no longer see the colts. 
Soon he couldn't see Rings, but the 
pull on the rope was there. He 
dozed and came awake as Skeets 



9VW9VWWMVV 



Blaster 
Cantatas 

for 

Singing oJfttotbers 



Cross of Redemption (SA) Norman... .75 

Easter Angels (SSA) Fearis... 75 

Easter Sunrise Song (SSA) Holton... .75 

Eastertide (SSA) Avery .75 

Eastertide (SSA) Protheroe 75 

From Darkness to Light (SSA) 

Tschaikowski ~ .75 

Memories of Easter Morn (SSA) 

Lorenz — — — - -75 

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RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— MARCH 1951 



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bumped into the leader. Rings was 
standing, and Bill sensed he was 
listening. 

"Get going/' Bill urged. 

Instead of moving, Rings whin- 
nied, a loud clear call that brought 
the colts crowding about him. There 
was no answer. Again Rings called, 
and this time an answer came, faint 
but unmistakable. Hope went 
through Bill with the force of an 
electric shock and brought him up- 
right in the saddle. Where there 
was another horse there might be 
another rider. He put all his 
strength into a loud "Hello!" His 
heart beat so thunderingly he half 
heard a thousand answers and was 
not certain of one. Again he called, 
and incredibly a man answered. 
Bill held to the saddle horn to keep 
from falling. Good old Jake. 

Calling back and forth, some- 
times losing each other's voice, but 
always regaining it, they drew near 
each other. Then out of the storm 
a shadow appeared. 

"Where did you find them?" 
Jake's voice was so matter-of-fact 
it took away the terror of the whirl- 
ing darkness. 

"On the knob going to Crystal 
Lake." 

"I thought of that. Rings was 
stranded there once before." 

Hurt still rankled in Bill. "Why 
did you come when you hate Rings 
so?" 

"I don't hate him, Bill, but your 
mother took one mighty stiff jolt 
from a horse. She couldn't take 
another." He hesitated a moment 
then added, "We'll try for the Half- 
way Ranch." 

Bill lost all sense of time. On 
and on they went, until dark and 
storm and time had lost their mean- 



GROWING PAINS 



213 



ing. He was jarred into conscious- 
ness by a loud whistle from Rings 
and the rough feel of his ribs as 
they rubbed against Bill's leg. The 
wind was bringing the smell of 
burning wood. They were against 
a fence and two men were helping 
Jake from his horse. He could not 
see, but the sounds told their story. 
They were safe at Halfway Ranch, 
and Dad could have done no better. 
Jake came up to help him, and for 
the first time Bill realized he was 
tied to the saddle. 

"Well, Son, we made it." 
A great weight lifted from Bill's 
chest. For the first time in a year 
and a half he was not alone. With 
a sigh of deep satisfaction, he 
reached out and found Jake's hand. 



c/he iSCwaAemrig 

Celia Van Cott 

Drink deeply of heaven: 
Perfume fills the air, 
Spring blossoms have dotted the glen. 

With resurging life 
In bud and blade, 
Resurrection is with us again. 

Jxgatnst the [Breath 

C. Cameron Johns 

Though silence clarions for a spoken word 

To fill its depths, 

The heart is hesitant in giving 

Broken phrases that the lips rehearsed; 

Once . . . words came as quickly 

As the flow of hill-sped rivers; 

Now they are dissolved 

Like mists caught in the sun. 

The soul draws closer to its own candle 

As if to hoard its warmth 

Against the breath 

Blowing through the halls of loneliness. 



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214 



RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— MARCH 1951 



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She Shall Have Music 

(Continued horn page 157) 

at Parley. She realized now it was 
his little imperfections that made 
him lovable. Behind Parley's dick- 
ering and conniving, she saw a 
quality of warmth, a lovingness that 
had been lying fallow. Ann wanted 
to tell him these things, how won- 
derful she thought he was, for new 
love had opened up like a water lily 
in her heart. But the words couldn't 
leap the lump in her throat. 

Parley's arms encircled her then, 
and holding her tightly and leaning 
over gently, he placed his lips on 
her pink flushed ear. Each word 
was laid out alone, like an important 
jewel, as he whispered . . . "She . . . 
shall . . . have . . . music." 



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Page 215 



CJrom I Lear and c/ar 



Lillian Swenson Feltman, wife of Lynn 
Merrill Feltman, and mother of three 
sons, was educated in the schools of Lo- 
gan, Utah, and has been interested in 
writing since early childhood. She has 
written many short stories and several 
novels. Some of her work has achieved 
publication, and her story "The Sewing 
Kit Speaks," marks her first appearance 
in The Relief Society Magazine. Mrs. 
Feltman is very much interested in gen- 
ealogical research, and finds much pleas- 
ure in research and record keeping. 

The Magazine, is better and better each 
year. I am always so proud of it. Many 
of my friends in the writers' club are 
delighted to see it, and I loan them copies 
quite often. I loved Alice Morrey Bailey's 
poem "Lot's Wife" (first prize poem, 
January 1951). It impressed me very 
much. Mrs. Bailey is a very gifted person. 

— Beatrice K. Ekman, Portland, Oregon 

I love the writings of Anna Prince Redd. 
I knew her when I was a girl living in 
Monticello, Utah. She has always been 
an inspiration to me. I look forward to 
every story, poem, and article which she 
writes for the Magazine. Incidentally, 
Mary Ann Baker, who wrote the words 
for the song "Master, The Tempest Is 
Raging," was my great-grandmother. She 
wrote the words to this song while on the 
high seas on her voyage from London to 
America, with her three children, one of 
whom was my grandmother Fannie God- 
frey DeFrieze Jarvis. 

— Millie E. J. Titus, Tucson, Arizona 

I was very happy to place in the Eliza 
R. Snow Poem Contest, since I have 
tried to do so many times before. I enjoy 
the good company of former winners, and 
with the moving poems of Julia Nelson 
and Ruth Chadwick who placed with me 
(January 1951). The literary quality and 
the fine religious tone of the Magazine 
make me proud that it is an organ of my 
Church, and I am always proud to have 
my work appear within its pages. 
— Alice Morrey Bailey, 
Salt Lake City, Utah 
Page 216 



I desire to thank you for publishing my 
poem "Things to Remember" in the Aug- 
ust (1950) issue of our Magazine. It is not 
often that I get up the courage to try, 
but I do love the Magazine so much. We 
have felt in our home that you have made 
The Relief Society Magazine very beauti- 
ful and most interesting. My husband 
always reads it through, and seems to like 
it best of all the magazines we subscribe 
to. He was a little disappointed that 
there was no Christmas story to read aloud 
this time. I think that if . . . our sisters 
would read the articles in The Relief So- 
ciety Magazine they might find great help 
and comfort in so doing. 
: — Eleanor W. Schow, Brigham City, Utah 



Today I received the January issue of 

The Relief Society Magazine. I like Mrs. 

Bailey's poem "Lot's Wife" (first prize 

poem) exceptionally well. It is unique. 

— Grace Ingles Frost, Provo, Utah 



I have just been rereading my December 
issue of the Magazine, and I am truly 
looking forward to the January issue. I 
have been, enjoying this Magazine for 
almost two years now, thanks to a precious 
little lady at Riverton, Utah, Gladys 
Butterfield. May our Eternal Father 
shower his richest blessings on her and 
on the people who put out the Magazine, 
and on the organization behind the 
Magazine, and on the Church. I read 
my Magazines through and through. Then 
I reread many of the articles and pass 
the Magazines around to my neighbors. 
— Mrs. Shelby Echols, 

Glenwood, Arkansas 

When you notice our Magazine sub- 
scriptions you will see what a lot of good 
it did me to come to conference. We 
have Arlington, Chevy Chase, and Wash- 
ington Wards with over 100 per cent, 
and most of the rest over seventy-five 
per cent. We made charts such as I 
saw demonstrated in the Magazine meet- 
ing. • 

— Ruth Knudson, Arlington, Virginia 



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Reference: THE LITERATURE OF ENGLAND VOL. I 

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John Dryden, Richard Steele, and Joseph Addison 
Jonathan Swift, Alexander Pope, 
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Social Science: "The Progress of Man" 

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VOL. 38 NO. 4 



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/ .-•' 



THE RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE 

Monthly publication of the Relief Society of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints 

RELIEF SOCIETY GENERAL BOARD 
Belle S. Spafford ------ President 

Marianne C. Sharp - - - - - - First Counselor 

Velma N. Simonsen ----- Second Counselor 

Margaret C. Pickering - Secretary-Treasurer 

Achsa E. Paxman Leone G. Layton Lillie C. Adams Christine H. Robinson 

Mary G. Judd Blanche B. Stoddard Louise W. Madsen Alberta H. Christensen 

Anna B. Hart Evon W. Peterson Aleine M. Young Nellie W. Neal 

Edith S. Elliott Leone O. Jacobs Josie B. Bay Mildred B. Eyring 

Florence J. Madsen Mary J. Wilson Alta J. Vance Helen W. Anderson 

RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE 
Editor ----------- Marianne C. Sharp 

Associate Editor --------- Vesta P. Crawford 

General Manager --------- Belle S. Spafford 

Vol. 38 APRIL 1951 No. 4 



e 



on tents 

SPECIAL FEATURES 

Congratulations to President George Albert Smith on His Eighty-First Birthday 220 

"Meet Together Often" — The Historic Conferences of the Church Preston Nibley 221 

Enlist in the Fight Against Cancer Lucybeth C. Rampton 269 

APRIL SHORT STORIES 

Herman and the Birthday Dinne" Hazel K. Todd 226 

A Girl's Point of View Deone R. Sutherland 231 

Who Laughs Last Olive W. Burt 239 

"Now Is the Time" Carol Read Flake 246 

SERIAL 
For the Strength of the Hills — Chapter 3 Mabel Harmer 263 

GENERAL FEATURES 

Sixty Years Ago 250 

Woman's Sphere Ramona W. Cannon 251 

Editorial: "Therewith to Be Content" Marianne C. Sharp 252 

Notes From the Field: Socials, Bazaars, and Other Activities 

General Secretary-Treasurer, Margaret C. Pickering 274 

From Near and Far 288 

FEATURES FOR THE HOME 

Meals of Our Time Sara Mills 254 

Gardens in Pattern Eva Willes Wangsgaard 257 

Favors for Baby Showers Clara Laster 270 

Increase That Shelf Space Rachel K. Laurgaard 272 

Apple Sauce or Fruitcake Alice Bartlett 272 

Jane Bybee Coltrin Makes Quilt Tops as a Hobby 273 

A New Outlook Caroline Eyring Miner 281 

POETRY 

"Living Water" — Frontispiece Alberta H. Christensen 219 

A Symbol Grace Sayre 225 

Utah Gulls in Spring Richard F. Armknecht 237 

Showered Petals in the Spring „ Bertha A. Kleinman 238 

April Hour Leone E. McCune 253 

Garden Riches Jeanette P. Parry 253 

Miracle Marian Schroder Crothers 253 

Two Sunsets Juliaetta B. Jensen 262 

Anticipation Maude O. Cook 268 

That I May See LeRoy Burke Meagher 268 

Prayer Beatrice K. Ekman 268 

Peach Trees in Bloom Mabel Jones Gabbott 273 

One Time Glimpsed Iris W. Schow 281 

Who Has Loved the Earth Christie Lund Coles 287 

Spring Fashions Ruth H. Chadwick 287 

The Silence Margery S. Stewart 287 

PUBLISHED MONTHLY BY THE GENERAL BOARD OF RELIEF SOCIETY 

Editorial and Business Offices: 28 Bishop's Building, Salt Lake City 1, Utah, Phone 3-2741: Sub- 
scriptions 246; Editorial Dept. 245. Subscription Price: $1.50 a year; foreign, $2.00 a year; 
payable in advance. Single copy, 15c. The Magazine is not sent after subscription expires. No 
back numbers can be supplied. Renew promptly so that no copies will be missed. Report change 
of address at once, giving old and new address. 

Entered as second-class matter February 18, 1914, at the Post Office, Salt Lake City, Utah, under 
the Act of March 3, 1879. Acceptance for mailing at special rate of postage provided for in 
section 1103, Act of October 8, 1917, authorized June 29, 1918. Manuscripts will not be returned 
unless return postage is enclosed. Rejected manuscripts will be retained for six months only. 
The Magazine is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts. 



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Camera Clix, New York City From a Painting by B. Plockhorst (1825-1907) 

JESUS AND THE SAMARITAN WOMAN AT THE WELL 



THE RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE 

VOL 38, NO. 4 APRIL 1951 



JLiving vl/ater 

(John 4:3-42) 

Alberta H. Chiistensen 

She had come, no doubt, innumerable times before, 

Threading the rocky, dust-white path that led 

To the wayside well of Jacob, near to the land 

Parcelled to Joseph as a father's gift, 

Beloved and reverenced now for memory's sake. 

She had drawn from the coolness of the well's deep core 

Innumerable times— but in this precious hour, 

This treasured sixth one of the day, 

A miracle had come— to her, a woman of Samaria, 

Of an alien people scorned and hated as a foe. 

He was of Galilee— that Stranger— with a voice 

Gentle as shadows when the dusk is warm 

Upon the ancient peaks of Gerizim, 

His eyes more kind than sunlight on the mountain rim; 

Though his discernment, sharp and saber-swift, 

Had opened the covered seasons to lay bare 

Her veiled and unvoiced past. A prophet surely! 

"I know Messias cometh," she had said. 

And he had answered, "I that speak ... am he." 

How eagerness outran her sandaled feet 
To Sychar swiftly; others too must know 
Of everlasting life, of living water- 
That they who drink thereof shall thirst no more. 
Though all the doubting world might be deceived, 
Truth was in his word— and she believed. 



The Cover: Calla Lilies, Photograph by Josef Muench 
Cover Design by Evan Jensen. 




PRESIDENT GEORGE ALBERT SMITH 



Congratulations to [President t^eorge iSClvert Smith 
on diis sbightu-QJirst [Birthday 

T^HIS year, on April 4th, President George Albert Smith reaches his 
eighty-first birthday. At this time members of the Church through- 
out the world and many other friends and associates of President Smith 
extend to him their greetings and best wishes. Our beloved President is 
remembered in the prayers of Relief Society women everywhere, and we 
rejoice that his life has been spared to give us comfort and inspiration and 
the spiritual leadership which guides us to the eternal principles of love 
and service. 

It is a great blessing that in this time when confusion and uncertainty 
have dimmed the forces of hope and high achievement in so much of the 
world and among so many people, that we have been given a Prophet whose 
personality and whose desires express love and tolerance and kindness— 
a breadth of sympathy and a voice of guidance like unto those quali- 
ties exemplified by the apostles and prophets of old. May we, as women 
of the Church, continue to join in the thoughts expressed in the familiar 
hymn. . . . "We ever pray for thee, our Prophet dear, that God will give 
to thee, comfort and cheer. . . ." 

Page 220 



"Meet Together Often" 

The Historic Conferences of the Church Have Been Interesting and Inspiring Occasions 

Preston Nibley 



THE annual and semi-annual 
conferences of the Church of 
Jesus Christ of Latter-day 
Saints, held on Temple Square in 
Salt Lake City during the first week 
of April and near the beginning of 
October each year, are interesting, 
unique, and faith-promoting institu- 
tions. On these occasions the faith- 
ful members of the Church, num- 
bering into the thousands, gather 
from far and near to listen to the 
teachings of their leaders, and to be 
built up in their most holy faith. 
It is a rare and valuable experience 
to be able to attend the sessions of a 
general conference. 

During the year in which the 
Church was organized (April 1830), 
the saints were commanded by reve- 
lation ''to meet together often." 
This command received the atten- 
tion of the youthful Prophet Jo- 
seph Smith when, early in June 
1830, he called the first conference 
of the Church. I find the follow- 
ing in his history: 

On the ninth day of June, 1830, we 
held our first conference as an organized 
Church. Our numbers were about thirty, 
besides whom many assembled with us, 
who were either believers or anxious to 
learn. Having opened by singing and 
prayer, we partook together of the em- 
blems of the body and blood of our Lord 
Jesus Christ. We then proceeded to 
confirm several who had lately been bap- 
tized, after which we called out and 
ordained several to the various offices of 
the Priesthood. Much exhortation and 
instruction was given, and the Holy Ghost 
was poured out upon us in a miraculous 
manner . . . (D.H.C., I, pp. 84-85). 



This historic conference, held in 
the Whitmer home, where the 
Church was organized, set a pattern, 
in a measure, for all the general 
conferences that have followed. It 
was soon found necessary, however, 
on account of the rapid growth of 
the Church, to discontinue the 
practice of administering the sacra- 
ment and presenting the names 
of the brethren who were to be 
advanced in the Priesthood, though 
this practice was again resumed, for 
a time, after the arrival of the 
saints in the valleys. 

When the first conference closed, 
it was adjourned to convene again 
at the same place on the 26th of 
September, 1830. This second 
general conference also set a prece- 
dent; meetings were held for three 
days. We are fortunate in having 
a brief description of this confer- 
ence, dictated by the Prophet Jo- 
seph Smith: 

At length our conference assembled 
.... We now partook of the Sacrament, 
confirmed and ordained many, and at- 
tended to a great variety of Church busi- 
ness on the first and the following days 
of the conference, during which time we 
had much of the power of God manifested 
among us; the Holy Ghost came upon us, 
and filled us with joy unspeakable and 
peace, and faith, and hope, and charity 
abounded in our midst (Ibid., page 115). 

During the early years of the 
Church, from 1830 to 1840, there 
was, apparently, no set time for 
holding general conferences of the 
membership. For example, three 

Page 221 



222 RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— APRIL 1951 

conferences were held in 1831; the land. The conference meetings 
first on January 2, at the Whitmer continued three days; the organiza- 
home in Fayette; the second at tions of the Church in Missouri 
Kirtland on June 3d; and the third wer e strengthened; reports were 
in Jackson County, Missouri, on ma d e by the elders who had been 
August 4th, "the first conference n missions; and the Prophet de- 
in the land of Zion." The Prophet Hvered several interesting and in- 
Joseph Smith was in attendance at structive discourses. When the con- 
each of these conferences. ference adjourned, it was agreed to 
When and where the practice be- meet again in a similar capacity, 
gan of holding the general con- "on the first Friday in July, next/' 
ferences of the Church on April 6th, However, no more general confer- 
is not exactly clear. The Journal ences were held in Missouri, as bit- 
History informs us that on Saturday, ter persecution broke out against 
April 6, 1833, eighty members of the saints; the Prophet and others 
the Church who resided on the Big were confined in Liberty prison, and 
Blue River in Jackson County, Mis- the members of the Church were 
souri, "met to celebrate for the expelled from the state, 
first time, the birthday of the The next place of settlement for 
Church." The Prophet Joseph the saints was in Commerce, Illi- 
Smith was not present at this gath- nois. Here they began to gather 
ering, but he learned about it and in the summer of 1839, and here 
wrote a beautiful description of it the Prophet called "'a general con- 
in his history, although he did not ference" to convene on October 6th 
follow the precedent that had been of the same year. The conference 
set, as he called the annual con- continued for three days. Before it 
ference in 1834 to meet at Kirtland closed "the next conference was 
on May 3d. Two years later the appointed to be held on the 6th of 
Kirtland Temple was dedicated on April, 1840." Thus began the reg- 
March 27 (1836) and, in the fall ular schedule of the annual and 
of that year, an important confer- semi-annual conferences of the 
ence was held at Far West, Mis- Church; a schedule which has been 
souri, on November 7th. So it followed, with some variations, un- 
appears that up to this time there til the present time, 
were no set dates for holding the As there was no building in Nau- 
annual or semi-annual conferences voo large enough to hold all the 
of the Church. people who attended a general con- 
ference, the saints met in a grove, 
TT was not until 1838 that a gen- west of the temple. The com- 
eral conference was called to munity grew so rapidly that it was 
meet on April 6th. This important estimated that at the last great 
gathering was held at Far West, conference presided over by the 
Missouri, which had become the Prophet Joseph Smith, between 
headquarters of the Church since fifteen and twenty thousand people 
the arrival of the Prophet Joseph, were in attendance. It was on this 
a few weeks previously, from Kirt- occasion (April 7, 1844), that the 



"'MEET TOGETHER OFTEN" 223 

Prophet delivered the most famous Valley. This important gathering 
sermon of his entire career— the convened in "the Log Tabernacle, 
"King Follett sermon." George Q. in Miller's Hollow" (Council 
Cannon, who was present, wrote Bluffs, Iowa), during the last week 
the following regarding this great of December. It was at this con- 
speech: ference, on the 27th day of Decem- 

tu a a ■ a o. v a ber > l8 47> tnat Brigham Young was 

The address occupied three hours and . • 1 -o-j . r.i_ 

a half in delivery, and the multitude were sustained as President of the 

held spell-bound by its power. The Proph- Church, with Heber C. Kimball 

et seemed to rise above the world. It was and Willard Richards as his coun- 

as if the light of heaven already encircled selors 

his physical being. . . . Those who heard ' . r ' . . ., Xyr . 

that sermon never forgot its power After remaining on the Missouri 

(George Q. Cannon, Life of Joseph River during the winter of 1847-48, 

Smith, second edition, page 478). President Young and his counselors 

xrj. 1.1. j mx. c u, r> i,«i. led three large companies of saints 

After the death of the Prophet, c ,. T , ?, „ K . .* o , 

., , r £ 1.1, • to Salt Lake Valley during the sum- 

the general conference or the , ,,, Af J QjQ ?r. .1 • 

^,, \ .- j • a i j r\ mer and fall of 1848. Atter their 

Church continued in April and Oc- . , , . c iI TO i™ n,^ rr^ o4 . 

. , c 1 J\ tx. • ,.„ arrival, late in September, the first 

tober of each year, until the saints . , r n c 

j m. j £ xt • t? v semi-annual general conference was 

departed from Nauvoo in February * k 

1846. In that year, due to the undef ^ t £ ^ 

scattered condition of the mem- „ ., 

, , £ Presidency. 

bers, no general conferences were __ 7 f , „. ,, _, 

held, but on the 6th of April, 1 847, I he conference met in the Bow- 
just prior to the departure of the eT V ° n October 6th, but ad- 
original band of pioneers on their l ou ,. rned after £ e °Pf in S exerci * es 
historic journey across the plains, a u ? fal the 8 D th ' , in order to S lv t e th _ e 
one-day conference was called at Mormon ? atta ! on an opportunity 
Winter Quarters, at which time the ° f celebrating their return home 
General Authorities of the Church 0n the *j* ,* e saint * convened 
were sustained and other business a § ain ? nd he f ■ one ' da y s< : ssi0n > 
transacted adjourned for one week to 
An interesting special conference aw f {t ^e arrival of Willard Rich- 
was held in Salt Lake Valley on ards and A ,masa Lyman ' Wlth the 'J 
August 22, 1847, under the direc- companies, who were expected 
tion of President Brigham Young wlthm a few da y s - 
and the Twelve, at which time the ° n the 1 S th the conference con- 
new settlement was named "The vened again, and meetings were 
Great Salt Lake City of the Great held throughout the day, but as the 
Basin of North America." It was absent apostles had not yet ar- 
at this conference, also, that the rived > ir was agreed to meet on Oc- 
Jordan River, City Creek, and Red tober 22d for the final sessions. On 
Butte Creek received their names. October 19th the brethren and 

their companies came into the val- 

ANOTHER general conference ley; on Sunday, the 22d, the final 

was held in 1847, after the re- meetings of the conference were 

turn of the pioneers from Salt Lake held. 



224 



RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— APRIL 1951 



From October 1848 until the 
present time, the annual and semi- 
annual conferences of the Church 
have been held regularly on Temple 
Block in Salt Lake City, with few 
exceptions. Many stirring events 
have transpired at these conferences. 
During the October conference in 
1849, approval was given for the 
opening of foreign missions in Den- 
mark, France, and Italy, and three 
of the apostles, Erastus Snow, John 
Taylor, and Lorenzo Snow were 
sent to preside over those missions. 
At the April conference in 1851, 
Heber C. Kimball presented a mo- 
tion that the saints should "'build 
a Temple to the name of the Lord 
our God in Salt Lake Valley." Two 
years later, on the opening day of 
the April conference in 1853, the 
cornerstones of the great building 
were laid with appropriate cere- 
monies. 

The early conferences in Salt 
Lake Valley were held in boweries, 
in the old fort, or on Temple Block, 
but, in April 1852, the saints were 
privileged to meet for the first time 
in their new adobe Tabernacle. 
This building, constructed to seat 
2,500 people, stood near the site 
where the Assembly Hall now 
stands. President Young was grate- 
ful for this building; he said on the 
opening day: 

It is a great privilege which we enjoy 
this morning of assembling ourselves to- 
gether in this comfortable edifice, which 
has been erected in the short space of 
about four months, in the most incle- 
ment season of the year. We have now a 
commodious place in which we can wor- 
ship the Lord without fear of being 
driven from our seats by the wet and 
cold, or of standing exposed to the 
weather (Journal History, April 6, 1852). 



In the fall of 1858, a few months 
after the arrival of "Johnston's 
Army" in Utah, President Brigham 
Young decided that it would not 
be wise to hold the semi-annual 
general conference of the Church. 
Instead, he called a "Conference of 
Elders," at which time the brethren 
were instructed in their duties "in 
the present crisis." 

TN 1867, the large new Tabernacle 
was completed, so that the semi- 
annual conference could convene in 
the great building in October. This 
was a notable occasion. The Taber- 
nacle was filled to capacity, and 
President Young remarked that he 
thought the Latter-day Saints 
would never be able to construct a 
building large enough to seat all 
the people who desired to attend 
a general conference. 

From 1867 to 1877 tne annua l 
and semi-annual conferences of the 
Church were held regularly in the 
great Tabernacle, but, early in the 
year 1877, President Young an- 
nounced that the next general con- 
ference would be held in the temple 
at St. George, which noted struc- 
ture, the first temple to be finished 
by the Latter-day Saints in the val- 
leys of the mountains, was then 
nearing completion. During the 
latter part of March, and the first 
week of April, 1877, hundreds of 
members of the Church lined the 
dusty roads of southern Utah, as 
they traveled in carriages, wagons, 
or on horseback, to attend the first 
general conference ever held out- 
side of Salt Lake City, since the 
advent of the saints to the valleys 
of the mountains in 1848. 



'MEET TOGETHER OFTEN' 



225 



A notable general conference was 
held in April 1880, under the di- 
rection of President John Taylor, 
the fiftieth anniversary of the found- 
ing of the Church. It was on this 
occasion that President Taylor pre- 
sented a motion "to remit $802,000 
of the indebtedness to the Perpetual 
Emigration Fund, in favor of the 
worthy poor, and to distribute 1,000 
cows and 5,000 sheep, owned by the 
Church, among the needy." 

In April 1885, the fifty-fifth an- 
nual conference of the Church was 
held in Logan, Cache County. This 
was during the anti-polygamy cru- 
sade, and only a few of the Authori- 
ties of the Church were present. 
The semi-annual conference in Oc- 
tober of that year was also held in 
Logan. 



In April 1886, the annual con- 
ference convened in Provo, under 
the direction of Apostle Franklin 
D. Richards. The semi-annual con- 
ference of the same year was held 
in Coalville, Summit County. 

In 1887, *he annual conference 
was again held in Provo, under the 
direction of apostle Lorenzo Snow, 
but, in October of that year, the 
semi-annual conference was held in 
the Tabernacle in Salt Lake City. 
All the general conferences of the 
Church since that time, according 
to the best information I have been 
able to obtain, have convened in 
the great TaberSacle on Temple 
Square. On one occasion, however, 
an annual conference of the Church 
was postponed from April to June. 
This was during the great influenza 
epidemic of 1919. 



J/L Symbol 

Grace Sayre 

Beauty may perish where its kind 
Is poised on wings of bird or bee, 
Or in a butterfly's bright glow 
That lilts in joyous ecstasy. 

But beauty can never die within 
The heart that measures note of these: 
The patterned grace of line and tint, 
The perfect symmetry designed. . . . 

Oh, be assured that though it fall 
To earth, its passing beauty spent, 
Each wing is symboled artistry, 
Its grace and poise and color blent 
To meet the need assured to me. 



And I shall see, with each new spring, 
Beaut)' renewed in blossoming. 



Herman and the Birthday Dinner 

Hazel K. Todd 

MOTHER is one of those un- much good they do, you forget 
derstanding souls who can about their ugly shapes, 
always find the nice things Mariar used to come and sit for 
about people. As Sue says, 'It hours and watch mother. She was 
doesn't do any good to say some- tickled to death if mother would 
thing unkind about anyone. Moth- let her pare the potatoes or some- 
er will always prove you're wrong, thing. She ate dinner with us all 
and then you will wish you hadn't the Sundays and every holiday. In 
said it." Even when Sue and I fact, Sue said she was sure that 
were just eight and peeked through Mariar had had more pieces of 
the hole in the barn door while the cake at our house than both of us, 
hired man sucked all the eggs being twins, had in our fifteen 
mother had been*sure the skunks years. Sue would look out the win- 
were carrying off, mother couldn't dow and say, "Well, here comes 
be convinced he was wicked and Mariar." Only she'd draw out the 
father should fire him at once. She last syllable so that it sounded like 
just said, when we made her watch a cat in trouble. Mother would 
and find it was true, that the poor look a little hurt, but, after all, she 
man must be hungry, and she must knew that Sue was only teasing, 
give him better meals. And once Of course we didn't really mind 
when father, who is really a good Mariar. That is, nobody minded 
scout and seldom complains, re- until Mr. Burton came along. Mr. 
marked that you couldn't trust Burton was the new English teach- 
"So-and-so" as far as you could er at junior high, and, when you 
throw a bull by the horns, mother listened to him, even gerunds and 
just laughed. The reason, she said, participles were nice things, 
that father talked in terms of bulls * "Sanny," Sue said to me one 
was because of Herman, our gen- night after school, "isn't he wonder- 
tleman cow. ful! I think we should invite him 

People like to be with mother, to the October birthday dinner." 

They just happen by for a pickle October was the month when Sue 

recipe, or some advice on sewing and I were born. And when our 

a dress, or just to visit. Mother has little brother Billie came along in 

a place in her heart for them all. October, too, mother said that was 

Just like Mariar. Mother has a reason enough for a special celebra- 

deep sense of duty toward Mariar tion, so we chose the Sunday near- 

who, she says, is all alone in the est both dates, and had a real feast, 

world. She pays no attention to It was a new idea to invite any- 

her cross eyes and her nose. As one else to the October birthday 

Sue said after it was all over, home- dinner since that had always been 

ly people are like garden toads to a day for just the family, except for 

mother. When you know how Mariar. Mariar had eaten our 

Page 226 



HERMAN AND THE BIRTHDAY DINNER 



227 



birthday dinner with us ever since 
I could remember. 

Sue had stopped and leaned 
against the pasture fence. I looked 
at her and knew there was some- 
thing going on in her red head. 

"Sanny," she said, "Mariar would 
just be out of place having dinner 
with Mr. Burton." 

I thought of Mariar' s chin wig- 
gling up and down on account of 
no teeth to hold it straight. 

"Why," Sue continued, "why, 
Sanny, he'd think we're looney to 
have such odd friends!" 

T looked across the pasture fence 

and watched Herman eating 
quietly, his big head moving from 
one side to the other. Presently 
Sue picked up a stick and flipped 
it into the air so that it spun around 
like a humming bird. "I know 
what," she said, "let's not have 
Mariar to our birthday dinner!" 

I looked at her, and her nose was 
turned up like a March morning. 

"But, Sue," I explained very 
carefully, as if she might have for- 
gotten that Mariar was as much a 
part of October birthday as the 
fried chicken and the birthday cake, 
"Mariar always eats October birth- 
day with us." I ran my hand along 
the wire. "Why, mother wouldn't 
think of leaving her out. Besides, 
Mariar expects it." 

"Well, after all, Sanny," Sue said, 
"isn't October birthday our birth- 
day, and aren't there two of us! 
That should count, shouldn't it?" 

I didn't say any more, but I had 
a depressed feeling that something 
was going to happen. 

That night when Billie had been 
tucked into bed and father was 



settled in his favorite chair and his 
stocking feet, Sue motioned to me, 
and I followed her into the kitch- 
en, where mother was fussing over 
some pickles. Sue squeezed into 
Billie's high chair and perched her 
legs upon the footstool so that she 
looked .like a little girl, instead of 
a young lady in junior high. 

Mother smiled at her over her 
pickle jar. "Sue," she laughed, "how 
long do you think you can squeeze 
into that chair?" 

Sue didn't say anything. She just 
grinned in a way that always 
brought a little sigh of pride from 
mother. But I didn't smile. I 
just squirmed and wished she'd 
hurry and get it over. 

I didn't have to wait long. Sue 
began very carefully, explaining to 
mother that we should like to in- 
vite Mr. Burton to the birthday 
dinner, and that she thought Ma- 
riar was sort of different, "odd," 
she called it, and would mother 
please not invite Mariar this year. 

She looked at me for acknowledg- 
ment. But mother's expression 
wasn't just what you'd call reassur- 
ing, so I just sort of nodded my 
head and looked out the window. 

But when mother spoke, her 
voice was very quiet, and there was 
no trace of what her face had shown. 
"Very well, dear." She hesitated 
a moment. "Mariar has been like 
one of the family for a long time. 
She has eaten your birthday din- 
ner with you since you were very 
small girls, and I am sure she will 
be very hurt." 

I felt like a heel. But Sue al- 
ways knows how to get out of 
things. 



228 



RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— APRIL 1951 



"Oh, she won't mind this once, 
Mother. And then we can have 
her over the next Sunday." 

TV/IOTHER began putting away 
her utensils. "Of course, Sue, 
other Sundays aren't birthday Sun- 
days, but we will not ask Mariar." 
She laid her hand lovingly on Sue's 
red head for a minute, and then 
turned quickly and went into the 
living room where father was asleep 
in his chair. 

"Whew!" Sue sighed, "I wish 
mother wouldn't always have to be 
so loyal." 

"And we wouldn't have to be so 
disloyal," I added, just for a little 
spice to the situation. And then I 
went out and stood by the pasture 
gate where Herman was quietly 
feeding. He raised his big, mean- 
looking head and shook it at me 
belligerently. "What's the matter 
with you?" I asked, feeling as if I'd 
stolen some little child's ice cream. 
"Nobody left you out of a birthday 
dinner." 

But maybe Herman wasn't so 
sure, for I heard father say the next 
evening that something had cer- 
tainly stirred Herman's temper up. 

I was getting my English, but 
mostly gazing out the window. I 
forgot all about conjugating verbs 
when I saw Mariar coming through 
the gate. She had on her old red 
sweater, the same one I'd seen her 
wear ever since I could remember. 
It was darned at the elbows and 
the pockets sagged until father 
always wanted to know what she'd 
had in them. 

"Here comes Mariar," I said to 
Sue. 

But Sue just said, "Mariar is 
coming, Mother," 



"Yes," mother said, "Go to the 
door, will you please?" 

Mother was sitting by the table 
with some recipes or something. 
Mariar sat down beside her. 

Father came in hunting for the 
newspaper. "You'd better not let 
Herman see that sweater tonight, 
Mariar," he said, "he's in a bad 
mood." 

"Oh, go on about your business," 
Mariar laughed. "That old bull of 
yours wouldn't chase anything. Be- 
sides, he's seen this red sweater so 
much he doesn't pay any more at- 
tention to it than he would a pair 
of blue overalls." 

Father found his newspaper and 
went out on the porch where it was 
quieter. Mariar looked at mother 
fondly, while she fumbled around 
inside her sweater and brought forth 
a peculiar-looking object and set it 
carefully on the table before moth- 
er. It took a few minutes to dis- 
tinguish what was under the rib- 
bons and paper flowers and other 
bright stuff. Then I saw that it 
was just a plain, old, white summer 
squash. Instinctively I looked at 
Sue, but from her puzzled expres- 
sion I knew she hadn't yet discov- 
ered what it was. 

iyf OTHER had caught the joyous 
expectation on Mariar's face. 
"It's lovely," she said. 

Mariar beamed like a child who 
had just eaten all her oatmeal and 
was being praised by the mother. 
"I thought we could use it for a 
table decoration for the birthday 
dinner." 

I looked at it again with the new 
light of identity upon it. Now I 
understood. The scallops of the 
squash represented a basket. The 



HERMAN AND THE BIRTHDAY DINNER 229 

flowers and ribbons and things I looked at her sitting so alone 

went in it. I looked at Sue help- and homely in her old red sweater, 

lessly. But I knew from her pained and I wished Sue had never thought 

expression what she was thinking, of Mr. Burton. 

I pictured in my mind Mr. Burton But Sue was doing something in 

sitting at the table, while in front the cabinet, rattling pans around. 

of him, bedecked in all its glory, She didn't look up. 

rested Mariar's masterpiece. He I turned back to Mariar, and she 

would twist his head to one side of was rubbing her old wrinkled hands 

it and say, "Miss Sue, may I have together in sort of a helpless ges- 

the butter, please?" ture. "I guess I ought to be going," 

Sue turned beseeching eyes upon she said, 
mother. 

Mother is a dear. I think she CHE stood up and reached for the 

understood in that one look just table decoration, 

how much it meant to Sue to have But mother's hand on her arm 

Mr. Burton impressed at the birth- stopped her. "No, don't take it, 

day dinner. She reached over and Mariar," she said. "I'd love to have 

laid her hand tenderly on Mariar's. it." 

"Mariar," she said, with no trace Mariar flashed her a quick look 
of the emotional strain that I knew of thankfulness and then she left, 
was going on inside her, "I wanted Nobody said anything, 
to ask you something. You see, Father came into the house. He 
the twins have invited some friends looked around and remarked, 
from school this year to their birth- "What's everybody so glum about? 
day dinner." Mother hesitated a You look as if you'd all been suck- 
moment. "I thought perhaps we ing pickles." 

had better leave the dinner to the Mother said, "Oh, it must be the 

young people this year." She weather." But that was odd, for 

glanced at Sue, but Sue didn't say it was lovely autumn weather, 

anything. So she continued, "May- Father put on his hat and went 

be we should have Billie's birthday out somewhere into the yard, 

separately this year. You could Mother picked up a pink shawl 

help me with it." from the chair back, and went out, 

She had tacked this last thought saying something about some 

about Billie on, on the spur of the plums. 

moment, for I knew mother loved Sue was sitting in Billie's high 
the way we had all our birthdays chair. She was unconsciously twist- 
together. She was looking at Ma- ing a piece of her red hair around 
riar for reassurance, and so was I. her finger. "Well," she said, look- 
But I saw the color slowly drain ing at me defensively, "I'm glad 
from her face, leaving it forlorn and that's over." 
helpless. "Yes," I said. 

"Oh, sure, Mrs. Simpson," she "She'll get over it," Sue said, 
said, struggling for control. "Of "It's nothing to fuss about. I'm go- 
course that would be right." ing outside." 



230 



RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— APRIL 1951 



After she'd gone I walked aim- 
lessly around the kitchen. Billie 
called for a drink, and I took him 
some water, spilling some on the 
cabinet. I took a dish towel and 
wiped it up. It seemed as though 
everyone was going outside, so I 
went out too, unconsciously carry- 
ing the dish towel with me. 

Sue was leaning on the orchard 
fence, sort of looking at nothing, 
so I went and leaned on it, too. 

"How'd you like Mariar's center- 
piece?" she asked dryly. 

"But maybe if you sort of scooped 
out the middle of the squash . . . ." 
I began, and then I saw Herman. 
He was standing under the Delicious 
apple tree, and he was tearing up 
the earth with his horns and his 
feet, and letting out unearthly 
noises. 

"Sue," I said, clutching her arm, 
"what's Herman doing in the orch- 
ard, and what's he so angry about?" 

But even as I glanced at Sue and 
saw the color drain from her face, 
I caught a glimpse of mother's pink 
shawl. She was picking plums and, 
even in the anxiety of the moment 
I knew she was thinking of Mariar, 
for she was utterly oblivious to 
Herman. And it was plain to see 
that mother was the object of Her- 
man's annoyance. He lifted his huge 
head and snorted. 

CUE was white as a sheet. I was 
thinking desperately what to do. 
Mother was too far to run to her 
and, if she ran, Herman would sure- 
ly run, too. 

"But Herman has never chased 
anyone before. Surely he wouldn't 
harm mother." But, even as I said 
it, he lifted his head and roared 



with anger, and I knew that what 
I had just said was not true. 

"Mother!" I screamed, and Sue 
screamed it right after me. 

Mother started and then, when 
she saw Herman, she clutched the 
shawl around her shoulders and be- 
gan to run. 

Herman pawed again and the 
dirt flew like a dust storm. And he 
took two terrible steps. 

"It's the pink shawl!" I screamed. 
"Drop the shawl, Mother!" 

But mother was too scared to 
know what we said. Instead of 
dropping it, she only clutched it 
tighter and tried to run faster. 

Sue was clinging to me wildly, 
and I could feel her heart pound- 
ing against my sleeve. Then Her- 
man put down his massive head 
and started forward, and I heard 
Sue praying aloud. 

"Father!" I cried, "Father, where 
are you!" 

Then I saw Mariar. She must 
have been sitting in the grape ar- 
bor. She was running toward Her- 
man with the old red sweater in 
front of her. She shook it wildly 
at him. I swallowed to keep my 
heart from leaping out of my 
throat. 

"Mariar!" Sue sobbed. "It's Ma- 
riar!" 

Herman had seen the sweater 
now, and he roared with rage. Some- 
thing had come into his way, 
something that was red instead of 
pink. He hesitated in his horrible 
purpose, and pawed the earth like 
something mad. Through the cor- 
ner of my eye I could see mother 
running, still running, without 
looking back to know that a third 
(Continued on page 284) 



A Girl's Point of View 

Deone R. Sutherland 

WHEN my sister Meredith don't mind going along with him 

got married, Mother cried, for that. Besides, I'll have him. 

In fact, she cried for a It's not his fault the army slowed 

whole week before. "Young people everything up. I'll go on working, 

take too many chances nowadays," Bill's car is all paid for. Everything 

Mother said, walking up and down will be easy." 

the living room with a handkerchief I knew they wouldn't wait. Any- 

while Father read the paper and body that pays that little attention 

looked up sympathetically only to food when he eats at our place, 

when absolutely necessary. "Bill has is serious. 

years of school ahead of him— my I got a promotion and a raise in 

lovely Meredith. Such hardships!" the advertising department where I 

"Never mind, Mother," I said, work just about the same time 

"I'm going to be a career girl a Meredith and Bill got in the stu- 

long time before I marry. I like dent housing project near the 

buying my own nylons." campus. 

"You're selfish," said Father. "It's dreadful," said Mother, but 

"Selfish!" cried Mother, not let- Meredith said it was cute. They 

ting me answer, "selfish to wish liked small places. Meredith did 

your children security! And safety?" seem clever and fixed curtains and 

Her voice rose, and Father had to a dressing table and painted a great 

pacify her. Bill was coming to din- deal. I gave them some fancy Len- 

ner. ox. I told them that I looked for 

"You ought to wait to get mar- a cuckoo bird, but I couldn't find 

ried until Bill is through school," one. 

Mother said to Meredith as soon as "Your little sister is bitter about 

they came in. our small quarters and poverty." 

"Nonsense," said Father, "we've Bill smiled at Meredith, 

gone over all that. Now that "Not really," I said, "I've just got 

they're just about married, leave good sense." 

them in peace." "You wait," said Bill, "until 

"I agree with you," said Bill to Mitch pops the question. No more 

mother, his jaw line tightening, "I career woman then." 

have no right to ask Meredith to "Mitchell," said mother, "hasn't 

make sacrifices." a penny. His law practice is just 

"Yes, you have," said Meredith, beginning. I'm glad my baby, any- 

emphatically. She was dark with a way, has the good sense to wait for 

curved, sweet mouth and beautiful a little security before she marries." 

eyes. She'd been popular on the Mother was sneaking steak into 

nearby campus of the university Meredith's refrigerator, 

where she'd met Bill. "Bill won't "No, not me," I said, 'and Mitch 

have a Ph.D. for five more years. I agrees. I can tell he thinks the way 

Page 231 



232 



RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— APRIL 1951 



I do. He's practical. Have every- 
thing first or you never get any- 
thing." 

"Why, that's what I'm doing/' 
said Meredith; "I'm having every- 
thing first." She smiled at Bill and 
shut us out so completely for a 
moment that I felt a twinge of ir- 
ritation. Meredith is too senti- 
mental, I thought. I also should 
have suspected Baby Joe, but I'm 
not quick at things like that. 

'Tour point of view about chil- 
dren changes after you're married," 
Meredith explained, while she 
sewed the inexpensive layette. "You 
don't realize before how important 
they are. Then after you're married 
you want them more than any- 
thing." 

'pHEY brought Little Joe home 
in the usual blue blanket to the 
students' housing project. But he 
made a difference. Meredith bought 
less and was unusually busy. 

"I couldn't stand that kind of 
life," I told Mitchell, "doing house- 
work all the time." 

"No," agreed Mitchell, ducking 
his head from habit, though all our 
doors are tall enough for him. "Just 
doing dishes isn't much of a life." 

I pinned on his orchid, and he 
watched from the fireplace. I came 
over to the mirror to check. 

"You make a lovely career girl," 
he said, looking at me in the mir- 
ror. But I wasn't sure what he was 
thinking. 

"Mitchell West is a coming law- 
yer," said father. 

"It's taking a chance to marry a 
lawyer until he's established. Too 
many starve! There are too many 



prospective clients who have never 
heard of him," said mother. 

I agreed with mother. I bought a 
purple coat and a black velvet hat 
with sweeping purple feathers. 
When Mitchell watched me come 
down the stairs, his approving glanc- 
es were worth a dozen times my 
weekly checks. 

"You're a peacock," Mitch said, 
and though his eyes were mocking 
when he kissed my cheek ever so 
lightly, his hand on my arm was 
hard. I glanced across to the mir- 
ror, and saw his hand fall. The coat 
had very good lines, I thought. 

The development of Little Joe 
was phenomenal. We all spoiled 
him, but he seemed unusually in- 
telligent and quite able to absorb 
it. Since I worked and saw Mitch 
an evening or two a week, I never 
really tended Baby Joe for very 
long periods at a time. Since moth- 
er was always begging Meredith and 
Bill to bring him home, he learned 
to recognize us at what we thought 
was an early age. Father thought 
he made the sun set and rise. You 
know how babies are. I didn't 
change my mind about the work, 
though. Meredith didn't look the 
same as before she was married. I 
knew the difference between rins- 
ing out nylons and three or four 
baby washes a week. 

I got another raise just before 
Christmas, and Mitch bought a new 
car. I took a few days off, and 
Meredith and Bill called in to say 
they had to do Christmas shop- 
ping. 

"Baby Joe should appreciate 
Christmas this year," said Bill. He 
had been only four or five months 
old the Christmas before. 



A GIRL'S POINT OF VIEW 



233 



'Til tend him" I said. "I have a 
date later, but I've got the whole 
day off/' 

Mother was doing Christmas 
cooking or she'd have insisted on 
staying with him herself. 

CO I tended Joe while Meredith 
and Bill did their Christmas 
shopping. 

"Don't let anything happen to 
him." Meredith came back to kiss 
him goodbye again for the third 
time. 

"Bye, bye/' said Joe waving his 
hand, but clearly wanting to con- 
centrate on the two-piece wooden 
puzzle I had brought. 

"Don't let anything happen to 
you," Bill laughed at me. "Mere- 
dith frequently comes out the los- 
er." 

"Mitchell says I can take care of 
myself anywhere," I said. "Every- 
thing's under control." They ran 
down the flight of wooden steps, 
and I went back to baby Joe. He 
looked at me speculatively. He 
grunted to his feet, his face coming 
up red. He grinned, said some- 
thing like "dat, dat" and threw the 
two-piece wooden puzzle. One piece 
fell short, but I stopped the other 
with my forehead. 

"No, no," I said calmly, "musn't 
throw." 

"No, no," he said, throwing the 
puzzle toward the front window. I 
put the puzzle away and looked for 
something else to take his attention. 
He began pulling the books out of 
Bill's bookcase. I held him until 
I was sure his attention was focused 
on his blocks and cart. Then I 
picked up the books, keeping an 
eye on him all the time. 



"Wa, waw," said baby Joe. I 
poured him a glass of water. He 
wouldn't touch it until I let him 
hold it himself. He drank slowly, 
pausing to smile at me and cry 
energetically, "No, no" if I began 
to take the glass. 

I waited patiently, and finally Joe 
held out the glass. "Oh, thank you, 
Joe," I said elaborately, and he 
dumped the half glass of water on 
my feet. He beamed up at me. 
"Hi," he said, "hi!" 

I wound his truck for him, and 
went into the bathroom to dry off 
a little. My hair was looking wild 
already. I began to comb it and 
looked down in time to save the 
towels from Little Joe's obvious in- 
tentions. Mothers must not ever 
get to comb their hair, I thought. 
I closed the bathroom door behind 
us. They must not wear lipstick or 
do anything except try to survive 
their children. I was beginning to 
feel definitely weary, but Joe re- 
fused to rest. I turned on the 
Christmas tree lights even though 
it was the middle of the day. Joe 
liked that. The tree was on top 
the phonograph on top the table. 
It was safe. I leaned down and 
kissed Joe standing in front of the 
tree. 

"Li, ligh," he said, laughing. Joe 
seemed to take after our side of 
the family, I thought. He was 
bright. I ruffled his silky hair. 

HTHE telephone rang, and it was 
mother asking how Joe was. 
"The heartstealer is fine," I told 
her, and just then he bit into an 
extra blue light bulb that matched 
the set on the tree. There must 
have been one in the desk drawers 



234 



RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— APRIL 1951 



or the closet he'd been ducking in- 
to. He was spitting glass and look- 
ing disturbed. 

I dropped the phone and wiped 
his mouth out frantically. ''Spit," I 
cried, "spit!" 

When I saw blood on the cloth, 
I nearly died. Mother hung up 
and was on her way over while I 
phoned the doctor. No, I didn't 
know for sure if he'd swallowed 
any. He'd swallowed all the time 
I was wiping out his mouth. 

"Bread and potatoes," the doctor 
said. "Watch him for signs of 
pain." 

He wouldn't eat the bread. 
"Please eat it," I pleaded and 
coaxed. I stood him by the sink. 
I stood him on the cupboard. I let 
him play with the ice trays in the 
refrigerator. He ate three slices of 
bread and four ice cubes, and then 
mother came. 

"Perhaps he didn't swallow any 
glass at all," Mother tried to com- 
fort me. 

"It's hard to chew," I said, "let 
alone swallow. I tried some to see. 
The glass is too thick to swallow." 

"A blue one," said Mother, look- 
ing at the broken fragments and 
holding Joe while I fixed the po- 
tatoes. 

Mitchell called to see what time 
he could pick me up. "Don't," I 
moaned, "I've let baby Joe kill him- 
self, maybe, and I can't face any- 
one." 

"I'll be over anyway," Mitchell 
insisted. 

Meredith and Bill came home, 
and mother and I told them. I was 
walking and bouncing Joe. 

"Don't worry so," said Meredith, 
"we got the letter box key all right 



after he swallowed that, so perhaps 
if there was any glass swal- 
lowed . . ." 

"We'll get it," said Bill, "but I 
don't think he could swallow those 
pieces and not choke." 

I felt better and blew my nose. 
Mitchell knocked, but I couldn't 
get to the bathroom in time. He 
grinned at me. "Don't tell me 
Little Sister's gone domestic—" 

"Certainly not," I said. "I look a 
mess is all." I kissed Little Joe, 
and even though Mitchell was 
there silently laughing at me, I felt 
a lump in my throat. If anything 
happened to Joe .... 

I put on lipstick in Mitchell's 
car. "Career woman again?" asked 
Mitchell. "Don't tell me you 
have no secret longings for the fire- 
side. Surely we should have stayed 
so you could have demonstrated the 
advantages of home . . . ." 

Was he worried about my want- 
ing to settle down? He needn't be. 
I opened the window a little and 
let the cold air cool my flushed 
face. "I'm really relieved to be 
finished with that job," I said. My 
conversation followed the old pat- 
tern while I worried about Joe and 
the glass. "No, it's too dreadful, 
Mitchell, living like that, working 
like that. Why, I was only there 
three hours. How could a person 
keep his sanity day after day? I 
mean, Joe's sweet, but you need a 
big house and a fenced in yard and 
plenty of help . . . ." 

"Sure," agreed Mitchell. "It's 
hard on a person to do without the 
things he should have. A man 
would want his wife to have every- 
thing he could give her." He 
stopped talking then, and when he 



A GIRL'S POINT OF VIEW 



235 



spoke again it was about a play we 
were going to. I leaned against the 
seat. I was too exhausted to in- 
vestigate vague uneasy feelings. It 
was only the worry about Joe that 
really bothered me, anyway. It was 
nice to have Mitchell to drive me 
around. 

\A7"E were having a family gather- 
ing Christmas Eve, but I 
wore my new wine wool dress be- 
cause Mitchell was coming. 

"It makes your hair look marvel- 
ous/' said mother. 

"You look perfect/' Mitchell re- 
marked when he came in. A drop 
of watered snow glistened in his 
dark hair. 

"I thought I'd better make up 
for the terrible impression at Mere- 
dith's/' I laughed. 

"Oh, I didn't mind," said Mitch- 
ell. He looked very tall in our front 
hall, slipping off his overcoat. We 
went into the living room, and I 
could feel him following me. He 
walked so evenly; it was one of the 
first things I'd ever noticed about 
him. 

Baby Joe was already in bed up- 
stairs, so Mitchell left his present 
under the tree. After our late din- 
ner, Bill said he had an announce- 
ment to make. 

"Not yet," warned Meredith, but 
she was smiling so happily that Bill 
proudly went ahead. "Baby Joe is 
going to have company next sum- 
mer." 

"Oh!" exclaimed Mother. 

"No!" I repeated. 

"We thought it would be a 
shame to raise Joe alone. He'll have 
somebody to play with. We're so 
happy, and we'll be able to manage 
it " 



It was incredible, but Meredith 
really looked happy. 

Father kissed her on the cheek. 

"I kind of like large families," 
Mitchell said, and he also kissed 
Meredith on the cheek. 

"I'll check on Joe/' I volunteered. 
I couldn't stand the feeling in my 
chest. It was hard to pity Meredith 
when she looked like that. I felt 
confused. Joe was asleep on my 
bed. He was beautiful like Mere- 
dith, and his lashes lay against his 
cheek in the light from the door. 
He didn't look as if he'd eaten glass. 
I leaned over him to make sure he 
was breathing. 

"He's sweet, isn't he?" Mitchell 
was leaning in the doorway. 

"Don't," I said. "This senti- 
mental scene has been played in 
too many stories and movies." 

Mitchell stepped back. "Right 
you are," he agreed, giving me a 
long, hard look, and he turned and 
went down the stairs without glanc- 
ing back. 

Mitchell was busy during the 
holidays, except for New Years and 
then Meredith and Bill were with 
us for a kind of farewell party. 
They were to leave the day follow- 
ing for California. 

"The last lap for the last degree," 
said Bill. "I'm lucky to be able to 
start in the middle of the year and 
save time." 

"We're lucky to be able to get 
an apartment so near the campus," 
Meredith said contentedly. "I can 
see Bill often even if he is always 
holding a book in front of him." 

"You people carry a rabbit's foot," 
Mitchell commented. "You have all 
the luck." 



236 



RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— APRIL 1951 



I looked to see if he were joking. 
He never looked at me at all. He 
drove me home and said good night 
quickly. I stood in the hall with 
the light off and watched Mitchell 
start his car very fast and the red 
tail light disappear. I went upstairs 
and took off my new gray hat with 
the pink rose. I set it on the 
dresser and looked into the mirror 
until I began to cry. 

T didn't see Mitchell for a week. 

And then for another week. He 
didn't call. 

Father said tactfully, "Mitchell 
must be having a lot of work." 

"He's doing fine, I guess," I an- 
swered. 

"You mean he's able to pay the 
rent on that office," suggested 
mother. "A girl takes a lot of 
chances when she marries a lawyer." 

"Everybody takes chances," Fa- 
ther said, speaking louder than he 
usually did. "If we didn't take 
risks, everything would die out from 
inactivity." He folded his news- 
paper with a jerk. "Mitchell's a fine 
man." 

I went upstairs. I opened my 
closet and looked at my rows of 
shoes. I put on green ones, with 
three-inch heels. Then I took 
them off. I put on my saddle Ox- 
fords and my tweed skirt that was 
threadbare and sagged where I sat 
down. I put on my coat. I'd never 
see anyone walking around our 
block. Just lighted windows with 
families inside. I went downstairs 
and stopped at the living room door. 
Father was reading Meredith's let- 
ter that had come that afternoon. 
Mother had mentioned it when I 
had come in. 



"She says she feels fine," said Fa- 
ther looking pleased. 

"She always says that," mother 
interrupted. "Read on. Wait'll you 
get to the important part near the 
end. It's terrible, it really is." 

"What?" I asked. "Read it out 
loud. I haven't read it." 

"My word," exclaimed Father, 
"Bill's broken his arm!" 

"Right after they got there," 
added Mother. "Can you imagine 
such a calamity?" 

"Read it," I said. 

"Their couch wouldn't go in the 
door," Father explained, "so Bill 
was having it pulled up to go 
through the window. He only fell 
two stories. Listen to this: We're 
very lucky since this won't really 
interfere with his school work. It 
was his left arm, and he's able to go 
right on with his classes. Aren't 
we fortunate!' 

"Baby Joe has learned how to 
open our refrigerator door. We've 
tied a rope around it, but that takes 
too long when I need to get in it. 
We'll have to think of something 
else " 

T went out into the hall. It was 

snowing, so I stopped to find an 
umbrella. I could hear Father talk- 
ing. 

"This reminds me of us, doesn't 
it you, Mother?" 

"Well, we had a lot of trouble." 
I could hear mother's knitting 
needles clicking. 

"No, I mean we were the same 
kind of crazy youngsters. We got 
married on fifty dollars, remember?" 

"Hush," said mother, I'd forgot- 
ten all about that." 

"And right off we had Meredith," 
father laughed. "You'll have to 



A GIRL'S POINT OF VIEW 



237 



admit we took terrible chances . . . ." 
His voice sounded the way it does 
when he teases and loves someone 
at the same time. 

I opened the door and shut it 
with a bang. Here was something 
to think about. But I didn't want 
to think. I ran down the front 
sidewalk, jerking my umbrella up, 
and swung, not into the gate, but 
into someone's overcoat. 

"You're crying!" commented 
Mitchell. 

"I am not," I argued. 

"You shouldn't be," he said, "be- 
cause you have no heart, no blood, 
but you are. Here's a paradox for 
you." Then his voice changed. 
"You're getting snowed on." He 
took my umbrella. 

I leaned against the gate. I 
couldn't bear to look at him, and I 
couldn't bear not to. But no mat- 
ter how I tried I couldn't get past 
his chin. I could feel his eyes on 
me, and knew the quizzical smile. 

"You look like a high school 
girl," he said. "You even look vul- 



nerable, but that couldn't be, be- 
cause you'd never take a chance on 
being hurt in any way." 

"Don't, Mitchell!" I tried to 
keep my voice from disappearing. 
"I've changed. I've found me," and 
I meant it. Chains of hesitation 
dropped off there by the gate, and 
I began to know what I wanted. 

Then all of a sudden I knew that 
what I wanted now was what Mitch- 
ell had wanted all along. Perhaps 
he saw that realization, for his face 
was suddenly different under the 
street lamp, in the snow. It went 
young, and with a surge of feeling, 
I felt that I must protect him. 

"It took you such a long time to 
grow up," Mitchell said, watching 
me. 

"We can manage," I remarked, 
finding it hard to get my breath. 
"I can work for a few months. . . ." 

"Oh, sure," he agreed, smiling at 
me, tipping the umbrella between 
us and the street and the light and 
any curious people passing by. 



Utah vaults in Spring 

Richard F. Aimknecht 

A regiment of gulls is on parade 

In single line along the furrow's lip. 
They break before the tractor's fusillade 

And form again behind the gang-plow ship. 

They skirmish briefly as the new-turned loam 
Reveals its flotsam — shining grub and worm. 

They dip strong beaks in stubborn, sandy foam 
And then resume their line, unruffled, firm. 

These gulls have never waited by a shore 
Nor followed vessels out of sight of land. 

Their lake is flat and sterile, but the lore 
Of waves is in their blood. They understand 

The ancient curling things. Long years from now 
These Utah gulls will know, when spring is waking, 

The harvest to be had behind a plow, 
With the brown waves breaking. 




Josef Muench 



Showered Lretats in the Spring 

Bertha A. Kleinman 

I do not mind the years that come and go, 

That winter strews her silver in my hair; 

I do not mind the snow, 

For this I know — 

The promise of the spring is cradled there. 

I do not mind the autumn's falling leaves, 
Nor do I pine the summers that are gone; 
I love the harvest with its ripened sheaves, 
The friendly rain, 
The twilight coming on. 

I do not mind the growing elderly, 
For every day unfolds some precious thing — 
With friends like you to walk apace with me, 
I live in showered petals of the spring. 



Page 238 



Who Laughs Last 



Olive W. Burt 



ANNABELL glanced impa- 
tiently at the clock. It was 
getting late and she ought 
to be home. That was the worst 
of teaching! Everyone said, "Bank- 
er's hours! Getting out of work 
before four, you have plenty of 
time to get home before Clay. 
You've certainly worked things out 
right!" 

What they didn't know was that 
very often, like today, she had to 
stay to see students about their 
work, had to stay, whether she want- 
ed to or not. 

This fellow now, that she was 
waiting for when she ought to be 
home starting Clay's dinner, get- 
ting Libby ready to meet her daddy 
—what did she care about his prob- 
lems, really? But as vocational 
consultant she had to seem to care, 
had to appear interested, but calm, 
though she was quivering with 
impatience to get away. Thank 
heavens there was only one more 
week of school this year! 

It was past five when she finally 
stood up behind her big desk and 
said, smiling warmly, "You'll be all 
right now, Mr. Graham. Now that 
you've recognized your problem, 
I'm sure you can handle it suc- 
cessfully. You're adult and sen- 
sible. But, if you have difficulty, 
don't hesitate to come to me again." 

She was thinking, "Please hur- 
ry! I've got a hot-headed husband 
coming home in an hour, and a 
child to pick up, and some market- 
ing to do!" 



As soon as the door closed be- 
hind Graham, Annabell grabbed 
her hat and coat and ran down the 
hall and across to the parking lot. 
She swung her car violently out of 
its place and headed toward town. 

She glanced at her wrist watch 
and thought impatiently, I'd bet- 
ter not stop for Libby. Mother can 
just keep her till after dinner, then 
Clay and I can drive down and 
pick her up. And I'll not stop at 
the market, either. I'll get by with 
what I've got on hand. It makes 
Clay furious when I'm not there— 
and I don't want him to be furi- 
ous, or even ruffled, till after I sign 
my contract for next year. Then 
I don't care so much! 

That contract and her foolish 
promise to Clay. When he gave 
his consent to her teaching this 
year— taking a position to help the 
university in its emergency of re- 
turned veterans and depleted facul- 
ty—he had made her promise she 
would not sign up for another year 
without his express consent. 

"I don't like it," he said from 
the first. "Oh, I know they need 
help, but so do I, and so does 
Libby. Libby, most of all. Isn't 
that right, Mother Lewis?" He'd 
appealed to her mother. 

Her mother had answered reason- 
ably, "You children must figure 
this out for yourselves. Don't bring 
me into it." Then she had added 
as an afterthought, "Of course, 
Annabell is the only available per- 
son with the right training and 

Page 239 



240 

qualifications— and after all, it is 
what she had planned to do." 

"I thought she changed her plans 
when she married me," Clay had 
replied bitterly. "Apparently I was 
wrong. But what about Libby? 
There's no decent help ..-.." 

"Well, I can help there," Libby's 
grandmother smiled her most dis- 
arming smile.- 'Til be glad to take 
Libby during the day till you do 
find a housekeeper." 

A NNABELL grinned wryly, ma- 
neuvering the car expertly 
through the traffic. Her mother had 
certainly got more than she had 
bargained for. They'd had girls, 
of course, from time to time, but 
not one of them had lasted very 
long, and then it had been back to 
mother with Libby. Annabell had 
rather fancied her mother was get- 
ting just a little weary of the ar- 
rangement, but since it had been 
her suggestion, she couldn't very 
well make a fuss. 

Annabell left the car in the drive- 
way, since they'd have to go for 
Libby later, and dashed into the 
house. 

As she opened the door the frag- 
rance of roast meat and apples 
cooking with sugar and cinnamon 
greeted her nostrils, and her hurry 
subsided into an immense relief. 
Mother had brought Libby home 
and started dinner. 

She went into the living room 
and there sat Clay, his slippered 
feet high, his paper at a comfort- 
able angle as he scanned the sports 
page. 

"Hello, darling!" Annabell lilted, 
happy that everything was under 
control. 



RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— APRIL 1951 

Clay dropped his paper, came and 
took hold of her arms, bending his 
long body to kiss her. 

"Where's Libby?" he asked 
casually. 

Annabell's eyes widened. "Isn't 
she— didn't Mother bring her?" she 
asked. 

Clay shook his head. "Haven't 
seen your mother. If she came, it 
must have been before I got home." 

Annabell motioned toward the 
kitchen. "Then who . . .?" 

"Oh," Clay smiled, "that's Mar- 
tha Dennis, our new housekeeper." 

Annabell started toward the 
kitchen impulsively. Then she 
stopped and turned to face her 
husband. 

"What is this, Clay?" she asked. 

He was suspiciously casual. "The 
greatest stroke of luck, darling. 
Bill Dixon, you know Bill, has been 
sent to Europe for a year. Couldn't 
take Martha with him, so he lent 
her to us. He wants her back 
again when he returns, of course. 
But I grabbed at the chance. You 
seemed set on signing the contract 
for next year, and this seemed the 
solution. Libby and I will have a 
real home life, anyway— and you, 
too, darling. Come and meet her, 
and you'll see." 

Annabell tried to collect her 
thoughts. There was something 
strange about this. Clay had never 
tried to hire household help before, 
had always left it up to her. And 
his whole manner— sort of smug 
... a cat-that's-swallowed-the-canary 
sort of look. 

They went into the kitchen. 
"Martha," Clay said, "this is Mrs. 
Patrick." 



WHO LAUGHS LAST 



241 



Annabell stiffened. Clay had in- 
troduced her to the servant. Oh, 
he probably didn't mean anything 
by it, but in her mother's proper 
household she had been trained to 
expect correct introductions. Mar- 
tha came forward. 

CHE doesn't look like a servant! 
Annabell thought swiftly, tak- 
ing in the refined, almost beautiful 
face; the neat gray hair, the mother- 
ly smile with which Martha greet- 
ed her. Annabell felt that she was 
staring, but she couldn't help it, 
and she found that her surprise at 
this housekeeper was making her 
tongue stumble over what should 
have been easy words of greeting. 
What was wrong? Surely she 
should be as glad as anyone that 
Clay had found such a housekeep- 
er. 

Finally she said cooly, "We eat 
at six," and turned to leave the 
room. 

"Yes, Mrs. Patrick," Martha an- 
swered, quietly. 

Clay interrupted, "Make it six 
fifteen, Martha. Then I'll have 
time to dash down and get Libby. 
I want her to get acquainted with 
Martha. They're going to be great 
friends, I know." 

He didn't wait for an answer or 
a remonstrance, but hurried out to 
the car, whistling. He hadn't 
whistled for months. 

Annabell went into her bedroom 
and threw her hat and coat across 
the bed. She stared at herself in 
the mirror, at her straight black 
hair in its dignified coil at the nape 
of her neck; at her hazel-flecked 
eyes and her straight, set chin. 



Why, I look like a sour old 
woman, she thought bitterly, and 
then wondered why this idea had 
crossed her mind. "Maybe it's be- 
cause that— that woman looks so 
comfortable!' " she muttered. "But 
in my job you can't look motherly. 
Everyone would weep on your 
shoulder. You have to look ef- 
ficient; you have to inspire confi- 
dence and self respect. You can't 
baby grown men . . . ." 

"Or can you?" a tiny voice seemed 
to whisper. 

Well, if Clay wanted mothering, 
he could have it, she decided cross- 

She pulled the pins furiously 
from her hair and brushed the 
thick, dark curls back loosely, 
watching the mirror for a miracle. 

Annabell did not go out until 
she heard Clay and Libby come 
noisily in. As she stepped into the 
hall she saw them go into the 
kitchen, Libby crowing from her 
Daddy's shoulder, where she rode 
triumphantly. 

"Martha!" Clay cried. "Here's 
Libby— here's the little queen her- 
self!" 

"Hello, Libby!" Martha's voice 
was cheerful and friendly. "I've 
made cinnamon apples for you. 
Your daddy said they're your fav- 
orite!" 

Annabell couldn't help thinking, 
Well, how could I make cinnamon 
apples when I don't get home till 
five and after! 

Libby was crowing, "Pretty, pret- 
ty Martha!" and all three were 
laughing. 

"She'll be bossing you, Martha, 
if you don't watch out," Clay 
chuckled. "She can boss with a vel- 



242 

vet hand, but it's bossing, just the 
same. And with her mother away, 
she'll be the one you'll be trying 
to please." 

Oh, yeah? Annabell thought 
slangily. She'd better please me, 
too. Libby bossing, indeed! How 
foolish could Clay be? 

'lAT'HEN she met her husband 
and daughter in the dining 
room, the color in her cheeks was 
not due to rouge. 

The dinner was good, but Anna- 
bell couldn't eat it. Clay's appetite, 
on the other hand, was excellent, 
as were his humor and wit. Annabell 
was reminded of the way Clay 
showed off when they had im- 
portant guests to dinner, and since 
he never displayed this charm for 
her alone— not for nearly a year, 
anyway— it gave to the presence of 
the new housekeeper a significance 
it didn't merit. Or did it? 

When Libby was ready for bed 
she cried suddenly, "Want to kiss 
Martha good night! Want to kiss 
Martha good night." 

She eluded Annabell's hands and 
ran down the hall shrieking, "Mar- 
tha! Martha!" 

Annabell caught her lower lip 
between her teeth. How stupid to 
be jealous of a stranger! she thought. 
Then, I'm not jealous! I'm just be- 
wildered. 

Clay was saying casually, "She's 
the funniest child to take to cer- 
tain people. I suppose it's because 
she's had so many people take care 
of her. She doesn't have a chance 
to form the silly inhibitions that 
make other children cling to one 
person." 



RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— APRIL 1951 

Oh, Clay, that's cruel! Annabell 
thought, and turned her face swiftly 
away so that he might not see her 
hurt. 

It was a terrible evening, with 
Clay making frequent trips kitchen- 
ward for ice water or a snack or 
merely to see whether the screen 
was fastened. Every time he went, 
Annabell found herself tensed into 
listening to the cheery remarks 
that passed between him and the 
busy housekeeper. 

Her head was aching when she 
went to bed, but she couldn't sleep. 
She lay there thinking of the even- 
ing and trying to lay her finger 
on just what had disturbed her so. 
It wasn't anything in Martha, her- 
self, she had to admit. The woman 
had been perfect in her attitude. 
Annabell sighed. No, it was in 
Clay and Libby. It was their evi- 
dent joy in the new housekeeper, 
their turning to her all the time, 
almost as if Annabell were not 
there. 

When Annabell awoke the next 
morning, she found that Clay had 
already risen. She started to dress, 
and then remembered that she 
didn't have to hurry quite so fast- 
she didn't have to rush a breakfast 
on the table, get clothes onto Lib- 
by, and dash away. 

It was with a feeling of relief 
that she smelled the bacon frying 
while she dressed. But the relief 
vanished when she went into the 
kitchen and found Libby already at 
the table, bright and sweet in her 
red-checked pinafore. Martha's 
cheerful good morning did nothing 
to make Annabell happier. Clay 
came into the kitchen with a hand- 
ful of roses which he handed to 



WHO LAUGHS LAST 243 

Martha as he came to give Anna- you didn't. But I've been named 

bell his morning kiss. to the library board— and I've got 

"This is something like it!" he a great deal of work to do. I don't 

beamed, taking the table, charm- know what you'd have done if 

ingly set with a low bowl of spring Clay hadn't . . . ." 

flowers in the center, and sliced "Mother!" Annabell forced her 

oranges arranged in a cherry-topped voice into the stream of words, 

circle on each blue plate. "Home "Mother, do you mean you can't 

was never like this," he added un- take Libby today?" 

necessarily. "Not today or for some time, I'm 

"My, you are all up early!" Anna- afraid, dear. You see, it's the li- 

bell remarked tartly. brary board. We've got to . . . ." 

"Oh," Clay answered, "I knew "Sorry, Mother, I can't talk now. 

Martha would have a good break- I'm coming down on my way to 

fast for us, so I worked in the school. Tell me then." She cradled 

garden, so I could do it justice." the receiver and rose from the 

"Well, darling!" she put her arms table, 

about Libby, "you look very nice She picked Libby up from her 

this morning. All ready to go to half-finished meal, wiped her mouth 

grandmother's?" on her napkin, handed her another 

piece of toast, and carried her out 
CHE had made up her mind, and to the car. Clay came to the door. 
Clay might as well know it. "What's the idea?" he cried. 
"Daddy says I can stay here with "Why not leave Libby here? Mar- 
Martha," Libby answered, over a tha doesn't mind, and it's better 
mouthful of buttered toast. "Mar- for the child." 
tha is going to make sugar cookies." That last phrase settled it. Anna- 
"But, darling, what will Grand- bell wasn't going to leave Libby 
mother think?" there to be taken in completely by 
Before Libby could answer the Martha's "motherliness." Phooey! 
phone rang, and Annabell turned she thought. Mother's spoiled 
to take the receiver from the cradle. Libby badly enough, but then she 
It was her mother. is her grandmother, and that's what 
"Oh, Annabell, darling!" she grandmothers are for. But a house- 
crooned, "Clay told me about your keeper, beaming on the child like 
wonderful luck. Isn't it fortunate? that, doing everything to please 
And I'm so glad . . . ." her! The child would be ruined in 

"But, Mother!" Annabell inter- no time, 

rupted determinedly, "it isn't at all As Annabell drove furiously along, 

definite. I mean . . . ." her analytical mind insisted on 

"Oh, yes it is, dear. Clay told me checking over her reasons for her 

all the details. I guess you were so unreasonable behavior. Smiling a 

relieved you didn't bother— and it little ruefully, she had to admit 

came at such a fortunate moment, that it wasn't so much fear of Lib- 

I was going to tell you last night by's being spoiled as it was fear 

when you picked up Libby, only that Martha, a mere servant, would 



244 



RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— APRIL 1951 



swiftly replace Annabell in the 
child's affection. She hadn't really 
worried about that with her moth- 
er, because her mother was like 
Annabell, calm and efficient, and 
not given to spoiling anyone. 

"Annabell, didn't you under- 
stand me?" her mother asked, show- 
ing her exasperation and annoy- 
ance when she saw her daughter 
and grandchild. 

"Of course I understood you, 
Mother. But you didn't under- 
stand me. I don't know how to 
explain it, but I know that woman 
isn't a regular housekeeper. Oh, 
maybe she kept house for Bill Dix- 
on— but I'll bet she was his aunt, 
or something. And look how 
spoiled Bill was! Always had to 
have everything just so. Mother, 
she's the kind of person that men 
and children just adore . . . ." 

"Well, what's wrong about being 
that kind of woman, Annabell? 
Surely," her mother's eyes crinkled 
at the corners, "you're not jealous? 
Clay said she was an elderly per- 
son." 

"Oh, that's not it," Annabell re- 
torted, "I'm not jealous of her ex- 
actly. But if you'd seen how Clay 
and Libby looked at her, as if she 
were— were— well, they don't look 
at me like that!" she ended lamely, 
almost in tears. 

"No?" her mother asked, "do you 
give them reason to, Annabell? You 
know I've found that people are 
like mirrors— remember that silly 
story you used to read that pointed 
that moral very clearly? But it's true, 
nevertheless. If you took time to 
look at Clay and Libby as if they 
were something special— took time 
to spoil them— maybe . . . ." 



"I don't have time—" Annabell 
began, and then stopped. "Well, 
Mother, can't you help me out just 
once more— can't you keep Libby 
just one more day?" 

OER mother shook her head. "I 
don't see how, darling. When 
Clay told me you had such a treas- 
ure of a housekeeper I called up 
Mrs. Wilson and Lou Adams and 
told them I'd meet them at ten. 
I'll have to rush as it is." She looked 
impatiently at the clock. 

"Okay," Annabell said. "It's all 
right. Thanks for tending her so 
much." 

She was holding Libby by the 
hand when she entered the presi- 
dent's office. 

"I'm sorry, Miss Gleason," she 
told the president's secretary. "I 
can't be in my office today. Nor 
at all this next week. It will be a 
little inconvenient, I guess, but if 
you'll just post a notice that ap- 
pointments will have to be kept 
at my home— I believe we can man- 
age since there is just a week left." 

Miss Gleason's eyebrows were 
high. 

"He will ask me for the reason, 
Mrs. Patrick." 

"A personal emergency," Anna- 
bell answered shortly. "Oh, and 
give him this, please." She handed 
the girl a long envelope and turned 
to go. 

"Your contract!" Miss Gleason 
beamed again. "You'll be with us 
next year, then?" 

"No," Annabell said, "'it isn't- 
signed." 

She went out of the door and 
drove home. 



WHO LAUGHS LAST 245 

Martha was singing in the kitch- "Yes, she does, Mommy. Martha 
en. Annabell stood and looked at and Daddy and Granny had a par- 
her a moment. Then she said, ty. I woke up and came down- 
making her voice as calm as pos- stairs and they gave me ice cream." 
sible, "I'm sorry, Martha, but I Annabell stared at her daughter, 
won't be needing you any longer. "Are you sure, darling? When did 
If you will tell me what Mr. Pat- they have the party?" 
rick agreed- to pay you, I will give "Last day when I was at Gran- 
you a check for two weeks pay and ny's." 
you may go." Anger flowed through Annabell. 

Martha looked up, surprised, but She had been right. Martha was no 

cool. "Mr. Patrick hired me, Mrs. ordinary housekeeper. They had 

Patrick," she said. "I'm afraid I ma de it up between them— that was 

can't leave without his consent." why she was all sweetness and 

"Oh, yes you can!" Annabell's light! Of course no housekeeper 

voice was really calm now. "You would put herself out like that! 

can complain to Mr. Patrick if you Her mother and Clay had schemed 

wish, but I simply won't need you. this just because they didn't want 

There's not enough work here to her to teach; her mother didn't want 

require a maid. A taxi will be here to be tied down with Libby any 

for you in half an hour." m0 re. How childish of them! Why 

hadn't they simply told her? No, 

TT was as easy as that. When they had gone into this childish 

Martha was gone, Annabell took plot and she had let them get by 

off her school dress and slipped in- with it! 

to a red and white pinafore just Well, it wasn't too late— she 

like Libby's. She pulled the pins could get back her contract and 

from her hair and tied her dark sign it. She could .... 

curls back with a red ribbon. But it might have been real, she 

"So you want sugar cookies, thought in panic again. I was more 

darling?" she asked. "Do you want scared than I dared admit, even to 

to help Mommy make them?" myself— Oh, Clay, Clay! I couldn't 

"Oh, Mommy! Mommy!" Libby bear it for you and Libby to grow 

danced up and down. "Can I? Can away from me! 

I?" She looked at Libby, busily cut- 

"Of course, pet. Here, pull up ting stars from a piece of smudgy 

a chair and I'll show you, And then dough. Suddenly Annabell laughed 

we'll make some strawberry tarts and caught her daughter close, kiss- 

for daddy. He loves them." ing the flour-daubed cheeks. 

They were cutting funny shapes "I'm glad!" she cried, "glad it 

from the soft dough when Libby was a frame-up! I'll never let them 

asked, "Where's Martha? Did she know I found out!" 

go back to Granny's?" Libby leaned against her mother 

"No, pet. Martha doesn't know and laughed, too. 

Granny," Annabell answered ab- "I'm glad!" she echoed. "I'm 

sently. glad, too, Mommy!" 



44 



Now Is the Time' 



Carol Read Flake 



THE elaborate cutwork de- 
sign on the pillow case 
blurred before Martha Lane's 
eyes and she lowered the hoops to 
her lap, blinking back the tears that 
had flowed too freely all day to 
be easily checked now in her hus- 
band's presence. Not that he was 
apt to notice! Half hidden by the 
evening paper, Harvey sprawled 
comfortably in the big chair, his 
long legs crossed on the ottoman, 
completely oblivious of his wife's 
unhappiness. Resentment stirred 
in her, deepening the hurt, the 
disappointment that had lain like a 
stone on her heart all this bright 
spring day. 

May second, their daughter's wed- 
ding day. Tall, vivacious Dianne 
had been married that morning in 
the Idaho Falls Temple to Arthur 
Rowell. They had been accom- 
panied by the groom's parents, but 
not by the bride's. Martha bit her 
lip and resolutely returned to her 
needlework. 

"Well, Mother dear," Harvey ex- 
claimed on the end of a noisy yawn, 
as he folded the paper, "how does 
it seem to have the first of our 
flock leave the nest?" He watched 
as she deftly brought the thread 
around and drew the needle through 
the cloth. "Still on those pillow 
slips of Dianne's?" 

Martha pursed her lips and made 
no reply. How could he be so in- 
sensitive to her mood? How could 
he sit there, relaxed and compla- 
cent, feeling no twinge of con- 
science? 



Reaching up, he switched off the 
lamp and settled back in his chair 
with another prodigious yawn. 
"Lovely warm evening for this time 
of year. Hope it's this nice in the 
Park. The kids'll have a great time. 
When'd you say they're coming 
home?" 

"Saturday," she answered shortly. 
"Arthur has to be on the job Mon- 
day morning." 

"Fine steady boy, that Art. Oh, 
say, I ran into Bishop Jenkins this 
morning. He was all praise for our 
Dianne; and said we'd done a 
splendid job rearing her. I told 
him, by jing, it wasn't any of my 
doings, that all the credit went to 
her mother. And you know what 
he said? He said, 'Harv, your wife 
is one of the finest, most faithful 
women in the ward/ " 

Martha turned quickly for the 
floss that lay on the davenport, al- 
though her needle was full. She 
thought with something near hys- 
teria, Why can't he stop? Why 
doesn't he just go on to bed and 
leave me alone? 

"You seem sorta quiet tonight, 
Mother," he observed after a mo- 
ment. "I'd think you'd be real hap- 
py, having your oldest girl married 
to a fine young fellow, and in the 
temple the way you've always want- 
ed for her." 

And the way I've always wanted 
ioi myself, she thought bitterly. But 
there was no point in mentioning 
that. Not after twenty-two years. 

"Phyllis out tonight?" He had 
risen and gone to peer out the 
screen door. 



Page 246 



J 



'NOW IS THE TIME' 



247 



"No, she's in bed/' Martha's 
gray eyes clouded at thought of 
their sixteen-year-old. "We may not 
receive congratulations on Phyllis/' 
she remarked quietly. 

Her husband turned. "Phyllis? 
Oh, she's all right. Just in that 
mixed-up adolescent age." 

"She wasn't very mixed-up in her 
scorn and ridicule of Dianne for 
not having a smart church wedding 
like Amy Hanford. She says 
there'll be none of this for her." 

Harvey's laugh rang out. "That 
sounds like her, little monkey. She 
has a rebellious streak, but you can 
take it out of her." 

"I?" she queried. "Is it my ex- 
clusive job to rear this family? And 
the boys," she went on, her voice 
rising, "you know how they are be- 
ginning to balk at going to Pri- 
mary—even Sunday School. And 
Jimmy will be twelve next month." 
She stopped to let that sink in. 

UARVEY was back in his chair, 
but he no longer looked com- 
fortable. "I know it's a problem, 
Martha. I've left these things to 
you because— well, I don't set much 
of an example in the way of attend- 
ance and such." He leaned for- 
ward, elbows on knees, and studied 
his clasped hands thoughtfully. "I 
don't know— I guess I got started 
off wrong, with my dad so careless- 
like. And then my work . . . ." 
His voice trailed off. 

Martha glanced up, needle poised. 
"Harvey Lane, you can't use your 
work as an excuse any longer. 
You've been off the road and right 
here in the home office for almost 
a year. Besides, lots of men who 



travel find time for Church activ- 
ity." 

A car door slammed nearby and 
their eyes met questioningly. There 
was the sound of voices and foot- 
steps on the walk. Martha laid aside 
her work and went to the door. 

"Why, Kate Rowell," she cried 
eagerly, holding the door wide. 
"And Leslie. I didn't dream you 
were coming back today." 

"I told Les I couldn't relax any 
place but home. Oh, what a day!" 
Kate laughed, letting her shoulders 
droop and her arms dangle at her 
side to show how weary she was. 

"Leslie, old man!" Harvey strode 
forward to shake hands with her 
husband. "What does this make 
us — brothers-in-law? Come in, 
come in and tell us all about it." 

"This makes fathers-in-law of us, 
Harv." Leslie smiled his warm, 
friendly smile as he laid an arm 
across Harvey's shoulder. "All I can 
say is you should have been there, 
you and Martha. It would have 
made you glow all over to see what 
a beautiful bride your Dianne made. 
Our Dianne," he corrected, his 
smile broadening. "And, Martha, 
I've never seen her when she looked 
more like you." 

"Did she?" Martha flushed, her 
eyes glistening. "Oh, I wanted to 
be there. You'll never know. Kate, 
tell me," she hurried on in a cas- 
cade of words, "was everything all 
right? Did she seem very flus- 
tered?" 

Kate threw up her hands in pro- 
test. "Wait, Martha— slow down," 
she laughed. "Sit down here by me 
and I'll tell you all about it. Oh, 
I wish you could have seen your 
daughter." She closed her eyes 



248 



RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— APRIL 1951 



rapturously. ''Honestly, she was 
beautiful— just like a queen, tall and 
graceful. But she must have said a 
dozen times, If only mother and 
daddy could be here with us.' " 

Martha, listening with rapt at- 
tention, had kept her composure, 
but at mention of her daughter's 
wistful remark, something seemed 
to break inside her, filling her 
throat, choking her. She caught her 
breath on a sob. 

Kate's chatter ended abruptly. 
"I-I'm so silly/' 

Martha managed a shaky laugh. 
"Acting this way when I'm really 
thrilled and happy for her." 

Kate put an arm about her. "I 
know, darling," she soothed. "Mar- 
rying Arthur off hasn't seemed so 
bad. But a daughter. Wait till 
it's Linda," she laughed. "I'll be 
weeping all over the place." 

TV/f ARTHA was uncomfortably 
aware of her husband's gaze 
as she went about tidying the room 
after the Ro well's departure. 

"Mother," he spoke at length, 
"I had no idea you felt the way 
you do about being with Dianne." 

Her hand trembled as she re- 
placed a book in the case, so that 
another became dislodged and clat- 
tered to the floor. She bent to re- 
trieve it. 

He regarded her soberly. "I've let 
you down, Martha. I know it and 
I'm sorry. Marriage in the temple 
means a lot to you. I guess I didn't 
realize how much." 

"Doesn't it mean anything to 
you?" 

"Yes," he answered slowly. "I 
want you to be happy." 



"Harvey!" she cried. "It isn't 
just for me. It's for both of us— 
all of us. Our whole family." Still 
holding the book, she came and sat 
on the ottoman staring at him in 
wonder. "Don't you understand 
what eternal marriage is? Don't 
you believe in it?" 

"Yes. Certainly. But it's just 
for the worthy." 

"Well?" 

"What do you mean, 'Well'? I'm 
only a teacher." 

"What does it take to become a 
priest?" she prompted gently. "And 
an elder?" 

He rose abruptly. "More time 
than I've got now," he replied, 
heading for their room. "Maybe 
later." 

Martha moaned a little, watching 
him go. Later, always later. She 
rose, sighed deeply, and went to put 
the book away. Dear Lord, she 
prayed, help me reach him. Please 
show me a way. 

She glanced at the book in her 
hand so she could put it in, title up, 
and saw that it was Dianne's Book 
of Mormon she had used in semi- 
nary. Opening it from the back, 
she let the pages ripple past her 
thumb, noticing how many passages 
were underscored in red. The book 
came to rest open near the center, 
chapter 34 of Alma. 

Her gaze wandered idly to the 
marked passage: 

For behold, now is the time and the 
day of your salvation. . . . For behold, 
this life is the time for men to prepare 
to meet God; yea, behold the day of this 
life is the day for men to perform their 
labors. ... I beseech of you that ye do 
not procrastinate the day of your repent- 
ance until the end; for after this day of 
life, which is given us to prepare for 



'NOW IS THE TIME' 



249 



eternity, behold if we do not improve 
our time while in this life, then cometh 
the night of darkness wherein there can 
be no labor performed. 

Martha caught her breath, her 
whole being electrified. She re- 
turned to the opening words, "Be- 
hold, now is the time . . . " 

Now is the time! Oh, Harvey, 
she cried in her heart, this is for 
you! If only he would read and 
understand. 

She found him in his pajamas 
adjusting the windows. "Dear," 
she said, trying to keep excitement 
from her voice, "I was just glanc- 
ing through this book of Dianne's. 
She has this part underlined. Won't 
you read it? It's some of Alma's 
teachings." 

Scowling a little, he took the 
book and sat down on the edge of 
the bed. Martha wanted to watch 
as he read, but fearful of distracting 
him, she took her gown and went 
into the bathroom to prepare for 
bed. 

He was still reading when she re- 
turned and he did not look up. Her 
heart sank when she saw that he 
was not reading on the page she 
had indicated. She said nothing, 
however, and sat down at her van- 
ity to brush her hair. 

"Hmm," he murmured after sev- 
eral minutes. "Quite a sermon. But 
you're wrong, Mother. It isn't Al- 
ma. 

"What?" She rose, deeply disap- 
pointed. He had missed the pas- 
sage. 

He turned back two pages. "It's 
Amulek. See, right here— 'And 
Amulek arose and began to teach 
them.' " 



"Oh!" He was right. Color rose 
in her cheeks. But it was from joy 
more than embarrassment. He had 
read the entire chapter from the 
beginning. 

"Hmm," he said again, moving 
his finger down the column, "I be- 
seech of you that ye do not pro- 
crastinate the day of your repent- 
ance ....'" He raised his head and 
gazed thoughtfully into space. 

Martha reached impulsively to 
lay her hand over his. "We both 
need to repent," she said earnest- 
ly. "We have these wonderful 
children. We must teach them the 
gospel and set an example before 
them." 

He nodded, pressing her fingers 
into her palm. "I know. I always 
mean to do better. I really do, 
Martha. I guess I just don't know 
how. And now with Jimmy—" He 
stopped. "I've been blaming my 
father's carelessness for my own at- 
titude, and here I am letting history 
repeat itself." 

Harvey bent one knee upon the 
bed, his brow knit pensively. "It 
takes an awful lot to qualify. I 
was just thinking about Bishop 
Jenkins. And Leslie Rowell. They're 
good men— righteous, worthy men. 
I could never be in their class." 

"Harvey," she said in a low, firm 
voice, "they have only one thing 
that you haven't. That is a strong, 
living testimony that this gospel is 
true. That and that alone makes a 
man or woman strong in the 
Church. You know how such a 
testimony is gained, don't you?" 

He shook his head lugubriously 
as he flung back the covers and 

(Continued on page 282) 



Sixty L/ears <J\qo 

Excerpts from the Woman's Exponent, April 1, and April 15, 1891 

"For the Rights of the Women of Zion and the Rights of the 
Women of All Nations" 

A SONNET 

"I love you" — ah 'tis but a little thing — 
A sentence short, three tiny words, — and still, 
Not poet's art, nor yet musician's skill, 
Such wondrous happiness can bring 
As these. O mystery-breathing spell, 
Come to this heart of mine, and tell 
The stories garnered through the years. 

— M. G. McClelland 

IN MEMORIAM: President Daniel H. Wells never shrank from trials however 
severe, but grew strong and valiant for the truth, the more he was tried. Making the 
acquaintance of the Prophet Joseph Smith he became strongly attached to him tnough 
then unconnected with the Church. At the time of the exodus of the main body of 
the Church from Nauvoo, and the remnant that was left being attacked by their 
enemies after having been promised protection, Squire Wells espoused the cau.^c of 
this oppressed and persecuted people. His "gallant defense" of the "Mormons" at that 
time will never be forgotten, his fortitude and courage were "a tower of strength" 
to those who were defending themselves against their enemies. The story of his valor 
is graphically told by those who participated in that terrible struggle, when the aged, 
the poor and helpless were compelled to leave Nauvoo and camp upon the opposite 
banks of the Mississippi River. He was the last one to leave when the city was 
evacuated, and was fired upon after crossing over into Iowa. 

PRESIDENT WELLS 

A brave true heart, that wore no worldly mask, 

Nor ever shrank from any proving test, 
A strong, kind hand, ne'er known to shirk its task 

Now calmly rest. 

Eternal One, this Friend hath served Thee well; 

Thy mercies to his family still increase; 
For love like his, Thine only can excel, 

Grant them its peace. 

— Lula 

ST. JOHNS STAKE RELIEF SOCIETY CONFERENCE: The subjects spoken 
of were prayer, the vision of Nephi, bearing of testimony, influence of mothers over 
their children, condition of woman among the nations of the earth. E. S. Udall after 
making some timely remarks regarding the duties of R. S. presidents, read an article 
from the Gazette on the "Woman Suffrage Bill" now before the Territorial Legisla- 
ture. The meeting was a very interesting and instructive one, the remarks being ac- 
companied by that Holy Spirit which brings peace and joy to the soul. 

— Mary E. B. Farr, Sec. 

Page 250 




Woman's Sphere 



HpHREE women of national in- 
terest recently passed away. Hat- 
tie Wyatt Caraway, seventy-two, 
was the first woman elected to the 
United States Senate. At her hus- 
band's death she was appointed to 
fill his seat and was elected twice, 
serving thirteen years altogether. 

Mrs. Ida Ringling North, sev- 
enty-six, was a sister of the 
Ringling brothers of circus fame, 
and mother of the present president 
of the organization, John Ringling 
North. Sallie Lindsay White, 
eighty-one, was the wife of William 
Allen White, courageous editor of 
the Emporia Gazette and mother of 
author-editor William Lindsay 
White. 

BARBARA Bidwell, a Utah girl, 
but a graduate of Kentucky 
State University, is official hostess 
for her father, Colonel Bruce W, 
Bidwell, military attache in The 
Hague, Holland. With the inflex- 
ible protocol of high diplomatic 
circles in Europe, this is a difficult 
position to fill. Miss Bidwell has 
been officially presented at the 
Netherlands court, held in Queen 
Juliana's palace. 

^THE Children's Dance Theater of 
Salt Lake City, personally di- 
rected by the well-known dance 
artist, Virginia Tanner, has pene- 
trated the "Iron Curtain" by way 
of the magazine America, which is 
sponsored by the Department of 



Ramona W. Cannon 



State in Washington, printed in 
Russian, and circulated behind the 
"Curtain." The purpose is to show 
Russians the American way of life. 
This unusual group has also been 
featured in This Week, in National 
Dance Magazine, and in a movie 
made by the Swedish Film Corpora- 
tion. 

TyiISS JUNE BARLOW, lovely 
1 l blonde of Bountiful and "Miss 
Utah" for 1949, is now serving the 
Church as a missionary in England. 

iyt RS. ELLEN ASH PETERSON, 
ninety-six, of Logan, Utah, 
cares for herself, crochets babies' 
bootees by the hundreds, and writes 
her own checks and birthday cards. 
She emigrated from England, and 
was a member of the first handcart 
company to cross the plains in 1856. 

AT eighteen, Elizabeth Bryan of 
Salt Lake City won the grand 
prize in the "Make-It-Yourself- 
With-Wool" national sewing con- 
test. She is now enrolled at the 
Traphagen School of Fashion De- 
sign in New York, a year's tuition 
at that school being a part of her 
grand prize award. 

N Blanches Ovei the Wall, recent- 
ly off the press, well-known Utah 
author, Ora Pate Stewart, retells 
with clarity, easy-to-follow conti- 
nuity, and great condensation, the 
story contained in the Book of 
Mormon. 

Page 251 



I 



EDITORIAL 



VOL 38 



APRIL 1951 



NO. 4 



c/herewith to ioe (content 



W ] 



'HEN conditions in the world 
or in one's personal life be- 
come a cause of anxiety and wor- 
ry, there are always paths open for 
receiving needed strength and in- 
creased faith. One of these paths 
is prayer to the all-wise and loving 
Heavenly Father, and another path 
is to study the words given by the 
Father to his children. 

Through prayerful reading of the 
trials and tribulations experienced 
by servants of the Lord in all ages 
of the world, and how they con- 
tinued "to stand fast in the Lord/' 
one receives a renewed determina- 
tion not to become disheartened 
because of his own cares and sor- 
rows. In the revelation to Emma 
Smith, the Lord commanded, 
". . . Thou shalt lay aside the things 
of this world, and seek for the 
things of a better" (D. & C. 25:10). 
Studying the scriptures is of in- 
calculable help in obeying this 
commandment. 

The words of one inspired writer 
will seem to carry a special message 
to one person, while those of an- 
other will heal another's wounds. 
It remains for every Latter-day Saint 
to search all the scriptures, and take 
to himself that which will most 
comfort and apply to him in a par- 
ticular situation. 

Today men and boys are being 
taken from their homes and sent to 
many parts of the world. Now one 
may read of the far-flung mission- 
ary journeys of the apostle Paul 

Page 252 



with heightened appreciation and 
deepened import. Pondering upon 
Paul's words one realizes that he 
carried on in spite of sickness and 
"a thorn in the flesh"; in addition 
to his heavy missionary duties he, 
at times of necessity, worked at his 
trade of tentmaker. As one reads 
of his loneliness and fears and 
trembling, one feels drawn nearer 
in spirit, to this great man. He 
went through grave persecutions; 
he was stoned; he was scourged; he 
was chained to guards in a dread 
dungeon; yet, in the midst of years 
of such treatment he penned inspir- 
ing and comforting letters to his 
beloved saints. One to the Philip- 
pians he wrote while still in bonds 
at Rome. Though written par- 
ticularly to his friends in that city, 
they are also to all living today who 
will heed his words. One sentence 
carries a great message for today: 
"For J have learned in whatsoever 
state I am, therewith to be content 77 
(Phil. 4:11). 

Paul had "learned" in a harsh, 
even in a cruel school. The "state" 
wherein he found himself innumer- 
able times was one of physical pain 
or spiritual anguish. For periods of 
time the only persons to whom he 
could pour out his testimony of 
the divinity of Jesus Christ were 
his gaolers. Yet he accepted those 
things which he had to undergo in 
a spirit of contentment, placing 
utter trust in the Lord. 



EDITORIAL 



253 



Are the stressful conditions which 
Latter-day Saints are now experienc- 
ing worse than those of Paul? 
Should not each Latter-day Saint, 
forewarned of conditions to exist 
in the world in the last days, strive 
to attain to the contentment of 
which Paul spoke? "For I have 
learned in whatsoever state I am, 
therewith to be content." 

What an acknowledgment and 
full acceptance of the wisdom of 
God is expressed in that sentence! 
It is a re-echoing of the spirit of 
the Master when he prayed, "Not 
my will but thine be done." To 
know the principles of the gospel 
and to live by them, realizing that 
the Lord's loving care surrounds 



one at all times and in all situa- 
tions, and in all parts of the world, 
brings contentment to the soul. It 
is a perfect attitude for a Latter- 
day Saint to acquire, one which will 
be a source of inspiration to others 
and an abiding source of joy and 
contentment to the possessor. 

Mothers who instil this spirit into 
their sons who leave home will give 
them a priceless possession. Their 
footsteps will be placed on the path 
along which Paul toiled. They will 
grasp every opportunity to preach 
the gospel of Jesus Christ by their 
exemplary lives as well as by their 
spoken word. Thus a seeming mis- 
fortune may turn to a glorious out- 
come. 

-M. C. S. 



^/Lprtt (flour 

Leone E. McCune 

As fragile as a vase of windblown glass, 

Unreal as all the lovely dreams that pass, 

As haunting as some half-forgotten tune, 

Enchanting as a scarlet rose in June, 

An unnamed wish, a piercing, sweet desire, 

Soft, gold-green days, rain strumming on the lyre; 

Ethereal the magic of this hour, 

Brief interlude between the bud and flower. 



(garden [Riches 

/eanette P. Parry 

I sowed snapdragon seeds today 
Beside the garden walk, 
And visioned miracles in May 
Upon each graceful stalk. 
Such delicate black seeds to hold 
Rich velvet colors, fold on fold, 
Rare fragrance for my garden space, 
And riches for my tall, blue vase. 



1 1 tirade 



Marian Schroder Crothers 

He plowed the land; 

The warm earth lay in brown furrows 

In suppliant waiting. 

From work-worn hands he scattered 

Back into the ground 

The seeds from last year's crop. 

Then patiently, he waited for 

The miracle of growth again. 



1 1 teals of (cJur cfime 

Sara MiUs 

In this year of 1951 housewives are particularly interested in preparing thrifty, 
attractive, and nutritious meals. The following menus are relatively inexpensive, they 
have an appetizing appearance, and provide vitamins, minerals, and calories. 



MENU ONE 



Spanish beans 

Tossed green salad with avocado 

Hot corn bread or French bread 



Apple pie or fresh fruit and cheese 
Hot chocolate or fruit punch 



This menu is an inspired one for an outdoor gathering of friends or family, and 
it tastes just as good indoors any season. 

Spanish Beans 

4 c. red kidney beans 2 cloves garlic, minced 

1 small ham hock 2 small cans tomato hot sauce 

2 onions sliced 2-3 tsp. chili powder 
1 large bell pepper salt to taste 

Wash the beans and soak them overnight in two quarts of warm water. Heat in 
the same water until the water boils. Drain off the water and add all the other in- 
gredients, with enough fresh water for simmering. Let simmer gently for several hours 
until the beans are very tender. Shortly before the beans are to be served, remove the 
ham hock and any surface fat. Shred the ham and return it to the beans. For varia- 
tion, place the beans in a casserole, sprinkle with your favorite grated cheese, and 
place in the oven until the cheese bubbles. 



MENU TWO 



Chicken tamale 
Fresh summer squash or other 
green vegetable 



Tossed green salad 

Dinner rolls 

Fresh fruit compote 



This recipe came to me from a farm wife. It will serve a goodly number and is 
particularly appropriate for a potluck supper. If children are to be served, the amount 
of red pepper and chili powder should be reduced 



Chicken Tamale 



1 large chicken, cooked until tender 
1 quart chicken broth 
1 c. corn meal 



1 tbsp. chili powder 
1 tbsp. butter 
salt to taste 



Add the corn meal, chili powder, butter, and salt to the broth and steam in a 
double boiler about one hour. While this mixture is steaming proceed with the sauce. 

Sauce for Chicken Tamale 



Vi c. butter or cooking oil 

1 onion, sliced thin 

2 cloves garlic 
Vz c. flour 

1 can tomatoes (size i x A ) 


1 

V: 
1 

4 
1 


tbsp. chili powder 
i tsp. cayenne pepper 
small can sliced, ripe olives 
hard-boiled eggs, chopped 
can corn 


Page 254 







MEALS OF OUR TIME 



255 



GJently saute the sliced onion and garlic in the butter and add the flour to make 
a paste. Add tomatoes, chili powder, red pepper, olives, eggs, and corn. Lay the 
chicken in pieces in a roaster or large baking pan. Pour the sauce over the chicken 
and bake about one hour at 300 F. 



MENU THREE 



Chicken tomato soup (thick) 
Pear and cheese salad 



Oven-toasted bread with butter 
Cake or pudding 



Chicken Tomato Soup 

Place chicken neck, gizzard, wings, back, and other bones in a large soup kettle, 
cover with cold water, and let stand for one hour. Bring chicken to a boil and remove 
scum. Then add the following ingredients: 

6 peppercorns 

6 sprigs parsley 

1 stalk celery 

1 carrot 



1 bay leaf 
1 pinch rosemary 
salt to taste 



Cover kettle and simmer mixture slowly until chicken is very tender. Remove 
chicken parts and vegetables and strain. Bring the stock to a boil and add l A c. 
brown rice. 

While rice is cooking in the soup, saute in 2 tbsp. butter, the following in- 
gredients: 



1 carrot, diced 
1 c. celery, diced 



1 potato, diced 

2 tbsp. chopped onion 



Saute for about 7 minutes, stirring gently, then add 1 tbsp. flour and stir until 
the flour is absorbed. When the rice in the soup is nearly done, add the sauted 
vegetables and cook until the vegetables are barely tender. Then add 1 can condensed 
tomato soup and a scant cup of finely cut spinach or young chard. Let the soup boil 
gently for two or three minutes and serve at once, preferably with grated Parmesan 
cheese. 



MENU FOUR 



Potato chips and tuna casserole 
Hot muffins 
Fresh peas 



Shredded cabbage and carrot salad, 

with nuts 
Fruit pie or peach cobbler 



Potato Chips and Tuna Casserole 



large package potato chips 
large can shredded tuna 
can condensed mushroom soup 
cup whole milk 
c. chopped celery 



V% c. chopped green peppers 
% c. chopped parsley 
% c. grated onion 

salt 

pepper 



In a lightly buttered casserole dish, lay 1/3 of the potato chips, crushed. Add 
a layer of minced tuna, then a layer of celery, green peppers, and parsley. On this 
layer sprinkle some grated onion with a light hand. Now add a layer of mushroom 
soup mixed with the milk. Make, in all, two layers of tuna, soup, and vegetables, and 
three layers of potato chips. Add salt and pepper to taste, and bake in moderate oven 
until the vegetables are thoroughly tender, about 45 minutes. 




Ray Loom is 

Page 256 



HOLLYHOCKS 



Gardens in Pattern 



Eva. Willes Wangsgaard 



"A garden is a lyric 
Man may write in seed . . ." 

GARDEN colors, like all col- 
ors, are most effective when 
displayed in a pattern, and 
the simpler the pattern the more 
effective. 

Mexican Sash Garden 

A design my neighbor uses every 
year is as colorful as a Mexican 
sash and more dependable than 
summer sunshine. It is a long, 
narrow garden about four feet deep 
and extending the length of the 
front porch, about twenty-six feet. 
First he fertilizes and pulverizes 
the soil, then in a row next to the 
foundation go the dahlias, the great 
towering species that send out 
enormous blooms beginning in July. 
He mixes these colors, but the great 
bronze beauties dominate. Sixteen 
inches in front of the dahlias he 
plants a row of giant African mari- 
golds, then fourteen inches in front 
of the marigolds goes a line of the 
new chrysanthemum-like, lemon- 
yellow marigolds followed by a row 
of zinnias. He finishes with a 
border of tiny marigolds or dwarf 
zinnias which also border the lawn 
and tie the whole front yard into a 
dashing picture that stays bright 
from July until frost. Many cut 
bouquets also come from this 
simple garden on the south front 
of his home. 

Circular Garden 

Another neighbor has a corner 
curb and a circular garden spot on 



his back lawn made glorious by 
Cannas. A small circular garden 
can be created within an old wagon 
tire, a larger one can be bordered 
by rocks, as is my neighbor's. The 
circle is filled with Canna bulbs in 
scarlet with a border of sage-green 
foliage. Cannas also come in 
pinks and yellows and make beauti- 
ful pictures with a border of Blue 
Cap Ageratum, Little Gem Sweet 
Alyssum, or violas in white, yellow, 
or purple. The Canna stalk yields 
a triple bud which sends out three 
sets of blooms a season in succes- 
sion, so that a continuous display 
results over a period of more than 
two months. 

Shade-Loving Flowers 

If you have a shaded spot the 
Canterbury bells will love it and 
reward you with a mass of bloom. 
However, these are biennials and 
bloom late in the season when 
started from seed and reach their 
height of bloom the second season. 
The best effect is obtained early by 
using plants instead of waiting for 
seed growth. But once started they 
yield yearly bloom, as they seed 
themselves and can be transplanted 
for pattern. During the blooming 
season their pyramid of bells is a 
thrilling sight. 

Another shade-loving flower, and 
much more glamorous, even exotic, 
is the tuberous begonia. These lux- 
urious blooms are best secured by 
buying the bulbs already started by 
the nurserymen and the florists, as 
the further along they are at plant- 

Page 257 



258 



RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— APRIL 1951 




Don Knight 



TUBEROUS-ROOTED BEGONIAS 



ing time the sooner the blooms be- 
gin to decorate your garden. They 
need a little tempered sunlight, very, 
very rich loam, about one-third 
sandy loam, one- third barnyard ma- 
nure, and one-third peat moss, along 
with plenty of water, including fine 
daily spraying of the plants them- 
selves. Their exquisite blooms are 
a continuous delight till frost in- 
terrupts. Their color range is wide 
and can be used singly or variegated. 
They make marvelous show pieces, 
floating cut-arrangements, and house 
plants when the outdoor season is 
over. 

Gladioli and Asters 

A summer without gladioli is like 
a spring without lilacs. They come 
in such a wide variety of colors that 
one can plant them in the back- 
ground of lower-growing plants for 



color effects, or in clumps around 
shrubs for naturalizing, or in circles 
or rows in a garden spot all their 
own. You can hardly make a mis- 
take on gladioli, but they do re- 
quire a gardener's eye for thrips, and 
frequent spraying. Also, it is a 
good idea to fumigate the soil with 
one of the commercial fumigating 
compounds before planting gladi- 
oli. 

As autumn and asters are insep- 
arable so spring is the time to make 
sure of them. Such a range of 
color and variety are offered the 
gardener that it is harder to hold 
back than to buy them. One wants 
them all. But here again restraint 
pays. A great bed of asters can be 
obtained from seed planted direct- 
ly in the garden and thinned later 
or planted in seed beds and trans- 



GARDENS IN PATTERN 



259 



planted to a permanent home. The 
effect is better if the colors are ar- 
ranged in schemes and kept down 
to two colors and a white. Such a 
generous supply of cut bouquets 
is assured from an aster bed! 

Iris for Variety and Beauty 

The once scorned "flag" has be- 
come the aristocratic iris and is now 
welcome and sought after in any 
garden and well worth the cultivat- 
ing. If water is a problem in your 
garden, the iris is your friend. It 
blooms early in the summer or late 
spring on stored winter moisture 
and requires the minimum of ir- 
rigating when the blooming season 
is over. Such voluptuousness! Such 
grace! Such delight! And such va- 
riety! Every year there are fabu- 
lous new varieties introduced to 
tempt the eye and the purse. Many 
of the varieties that have been out 
a few years have unsurpassed beauty 





Don Knight 



IRIS 



Josef Muench 



JAPANESE IRIS 



and can be bought at a nominal 
price, while the newer varieties are 
collectors' items and priced ac- 
cordingly. 

The Morh varieties (Elmohr, 
Grace Mohr, Wm. Mohr, and Or 
Mohr) are marvelous for colossal 
size and ruffled luxury in varying 
tones of lavenders, and there are 
such beautiful tones of golden yel- 
lows to contrast with them in your 
garden and in your cut-flower ar- 
rangements.' But irises come in 
many colors, including reds, blues, 
and the iciest of whites, all in large, 
ruffled, showy flowers. 

You will want an acre of ground 
to grow irises, and you will need it 
if you don't use restraint in buying 
the rhizomes as they multiply rather 
rapidly. The best way to choose 
irises is to visit a garden in bloom 
and note the names of the varieties, 
then order them by name. They 



260 



RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— APRIL 1951 




Josef Muench 



EASTER LILIES 



are usually planted in the early fall, 
but may be transplanted in the 
spring, and again just after the 
blooming season. 

Another delightful member of 
the iris family is the Dutch iris, 
that delightful orchid /ike variety 
that the florist puts into springtime 
corsages. The color range is wide, 
and Dutch iris plants are hardy if 
not planted in too exposed a posi- 
tion in a very frosty climate. In 
northern regions a south-of-a-build- 
ing location suits them well. 

Lilies for Exquisite Dignity 

And lilies! Such lilies as a gar- 
dener can grow for herself in these 
modern gardens! The improved 
regals that grow ten feet tall and 



bear up to two dozen great white 
star-lipped bells with pale green or 
blush-pink throats, are easily grown. 
These like deep planting in moist 
sandy loam with partial shade and 
then to be let alone. Lilies hate 
being disturbed and will reward 
you amply for privacy. Their little 
sister, the Madonna, is a hardy and 
prolific beauty and not too choosy 
about soil conditions. 

In front of the giant regal lilies may 
be grown the graceful and colorful 
tiger lilies, and in front of these and 
sunward, the elegans and centii- 
hlium (Easter lilies) will produce 
a lovely effect. The lily you had at 
Easter can be tucked into the soil 
as soon as the bloom is gone, but 



GARDENS IN PATTERN 



261 




Josef Muench 



TIGER LILY 



will not bloom again until the fol- 
lowing year, and then perhaps in 
August, not at Easter. 

After all the other lilies are long 
gone, the Formosanas will raise their 
stalks of pure white bells to delight 
you. And be sure to tuck a stately 
yucca or two among your lilies, and 
the rubrums will yield you garden 
grace and cut-flower glory. 

The day lilies are hardy back- 
ground and border material, and 
the corn or lemon varieties are 
beautiful for spiking peony baskets 
on Decoration Day. 

Petunias 

For simplicity and generosity of 
bloom, nothing outdoes the pe- 
tunia. In a planting around a very 
new home which stands on a knoll 
with a very sharp slope, the incline 
was planted with Morning Rose 
dwarf petunias, and the gorgeous 
mass of deep dawn-pink was breath- 



taking all summer and late into the 
autumn. Small borders of dwarf 
petunias glorified the landscape 
long after flowers in this locality 
are usually forfeited to frost. 

Another petunia picture I shall 
always remember is of a white cot- 
tage with green shutters, banked by 
evergreen shrubs, with a curving 
walk bordered with great white 
ruffled petunias, a symphony in 
green and white. A singleness of 
effect is usually more striking and 
memorable than trying to capture 
all the colors of the rainbow at 
once in one garden. 

Peienniah 

Spring is the season to set out 
your favorite perennials, except for 
the loveliest of them all, the peony, 
which requires autumn planting. 
The gorgeous and generous coreop- 




W. Atlee Burpee 

ROSE-COLORED, ALL-DOUBLE 
PETUNIAS 



262 RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— APRIL 1951 

sis that adds such a wealth of sun- Both of these yield generous sum- 
light to any garden or bouquet can mer bloom. The delphiniums grow 
be set out in springtime, along with as high as ten feet in favorable sites 
the daisies— the shasta, single, and yield yard-long spikes of florets 
double, and chiffon, the lovely several inches in diameter, and in a 
painted varieties from pink through wide color range from deep purple 
maroon, and the dainty but sturdy to pure white. The phlox add 
columbines. Be sure, though, to get fragrance to their pannicles of vari- 
the newer, larger-bloomed colum- colored beauty and grow less tall so 
bines, as garden space is too pre- that they can be banked against the 
cious to waste on inferior varieties delphinium for a stunning back- 
of any flower. ground effect. 

The king and queen of the peren- From the great variety of floral 

nial garden, if we except the lovely forms, colors, and fragrance, select 

varieties of peonies which are a your favorites and plan and plant 

must in any yard, are the Pacific hy- a garden that will give pleasure un- 

brid delphiniums and the phlox, til the winter comes again. 









c/wo Sunsets 

Juliaetta B. Jensen 

The Crucifixion 

I saw a sunset from my hill 

So dark and drear, foreboding, 

All my heart with fear was still, 

Black clouds frowning from beneath, above, 

Shut out all hope of peace and love, 

One thin, red streak as if of blood, 

Was all I saw in that dull, dark, western sky, 

One moment, and even that was gone. 

My path blacked out, and with a bitter cry, 

I fell upon the shaking earth, and wept alone. 



The Resurrection 

The next night, I saw another sunset 

From my hill, so different 

My heart was still, and lifted up 

With joy and hope and peace. 

It was as if some artist from on high 

Had dipped his brush into the rainbow dew 

And painted all the western sky 

With pastel colors of every hue; 

That shouted to the heavens about, above, 

Of One who gave his all for love 

That you and I might never die. 



For the Strength of the Hills 



Chapter 3 
Mabel Haimei 



Synopsis: Camilla Fen ton, an orphan 
from California, is the new schoolteacher 
in Crandall, Idaho. She becomes inter- 
ested in Stanley Rodgers, a young farmer. 
During the first big snowstorm Camilla 
walks home with one of her students and 
is caught in a blizzard. Stanley rescues 
her. That night he tells her that they 
always keep the red-headed schoolteachers 
in Crandall. 

CAMILLA had written blithely 
to her aunt that she was mar- 
rying Stan as soon as school 
was out, and that, because of his 
work, they would have to wait un- 
til winter to come down to Cali- 
fornia. Then they would come 
down for a nice, long visit. She 
ended by saying, "You'll be simply 
crazy about Stan. Everyone is." 
She really believed that it was so. 
Not even Aunt Lillian, she thought, 
could be proof against his charm. 

Her aunt replied with a note of 
congratulations and wishes for her 
happiness, which Camilla was sure 
she had tried very hard to write 
sincerely, even if she had failed. 
She also sent a set of sterling silver, 
which Stan remarked might come 
in handy to pawn if the crops failed. 

'Indeed we won't pawn it," she 
retorted. "We're going to have 
things as nice in our home as if it 
were located on Malibu Beach, and 
there'll be much nicer people liv- 
ing in it," she ended, smiling. 

After their marriage they spent a 
week at Sun Valley, where it was 
rather quiet because of being in be- 
tween seasons, and where they rode 



horseback, swam in the lovely pool, 
took long hikes over the hills, and 
learned with new surprise each day 
how completely in love they were. 

"It's been a wonderful week," 
said Camilla, with a sigh, as she 
sat back in the car to begin the 
ride home. "Imagine! my one and 
only honeymoon, and it's ended." 

"Well, I should hope so," replied 
her new husband. "I mean your 
one and only honeymoon. You 
don't really think it's ended, do 
you?" 

"Of course not," she agreed snug- 
gling down against his shoulder. 
"Our marriage is really going to be 
different. I know that a million other 
girls have said that, but not one of 
them married you." 

When, at the end of the ride, 
they drove up to the farm that Stan 
had bought— "or rather made a 
down payment on the chicken 
coops," as he put it, she looked at 
the big, ugly house that she had 
never been inside of, and thanked 
her stars that she was indeed very 
much in love. 

"Gay old castle, isn't it?" asked 
Stan lightly, as if reading her 
thoughts. "But we can do some- 
thing with it. How about painting 
it pink? Don't they do that in Cali- 
fornia?" 

"Sometimes, but this house isn't 
quite the type," grinned Camilla. 
"But it would look rather nice 
painted white, with red roof and 
shutters." 

Page 263 



264 



RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— APRIL 1951 



"Okay, Mrs. Rodgers. We'll start 
in the morning. Right now we'd 
best see where Mom has put our 
doodads and if Mickey has let the 
stock starve to death/' 

The "doodads" were their wed- 
ding gifts, which his folks had 
promised to bring over and place 
in the house. Camilla hoped wild- 
ly that, the inside would be better 
than the out but, as she stood in 
the front room after Stan had gal- 
lantly carried her in, she had all 
she could do to keep back her dis- 
may. 

The ceilings were high, the wood- 
work plentiful and old-fashioned. 
The paper on the walls a nonde- 
script brown. The only redeeming 
feature was a huge fireplace, with 
really good, simple lines. 

"Did anyone ever live here— with 
walls looking like this?" she asked. 

"Sure. Lived, loved, and prob- 
ably liked them this way," he an- 
swered airily. "How about making 
the inside pink, if you won't con- 
sider it for the outside?" 

He went back to the car for their 
bags, and Camilla slumped down 
onto the bumpy gray sofa that had 
come with the place. 

"Patience, my girl," she said 
against her rising dismay. "You can 
change all this. You can even have 
big windows cut to open up a view 
of the mountains." 

CHE got up and walked over to 
the east window. "There is 
nothing wrong here that I can't 
change," she said to the distant 
peaks. "I can be strong, too." 

Having thrown out her challenge, 
she turned and went into the bed- 
room to change to a house dress. 



She supposed that Stan was out 
looking over the place to see how 
things had fared under his young 
brother, so she went on into the 
kitchen to prepare supper. 

Here was a fresh shock. Against 
one wall was a great black cooking 
range, such as she had imagined ex- 
isted only in books written about 
the so-called gay nineties. Beneath 
the window was a sink. "At least 
there's running water in the house," 
she said, somewhat in surprise. On 
the table was a box of groceries, 
thoughtfully provided by Stan's 
mother, several bottles of fruit and 
jam, and two loaves of freshly baked 
bread. 

She put the things away in the 
cupboards and set the table with 
one of her pretty luncheon cloths. 
Then she ran outside and gathered 
a few sprigs of the larkspur that, was 
growing by the side of the house. 
Fir have lots of flowers, too, she 
thought happily, pansies, roses— 
everything. 

She was grateful that she didn't 
have to tackle cooking anything in 
the big black stove tonight, since 
Mrs. Rodgers had left plenty of 
food for their supper. But she 
couldn't resist the feeling that it 
lay in waiting, a dragon ready to 
do battle for supremacy. 

Stan was late coming in from his 
chores, and her hunger, along with 
her weariness and dismay at the 
ugliness of the house, came close 
to disheartening her. She managed 
to smile when he finally came in, 
however, and greeted him with, "I 
hope you don't mind dining in the 
kitchen?" 

"Not so long as I'm dining with 
royalty," he answered, picking her 



FOR THE STRENGTH OF THE HILLS 265 

up and swinging her high in the for the rest of it. Right now I could 

air. Then he added seriously, sink every last dime into a tractor." 

"Just keep smiling, ladybird. I'll "Can't we even do the window?" 

have everything the way you want she pleaded. "We have to get that 

it some day. I promise." cut out before we can touch the 

The next morning she found it walls anyway." 
much harder to keep smiling, for "Sorry, dear, but we really can't, 
the time had come when she could Cutting out windows is a rather ex- 
no longer delay battle with the pensive proposition. I can man- 
black range. Stan had built the age paint for the kitchen. We'll go 
fire and gone outside to his work into town tomorrow and stock up 
when she came into the kitchen, on red, yellow, and purple paint." 
She managed bacon and eggs with- "Blue— not purple," she correct- 
out too much difficulty, but found ed, and managed to smile in spite 
it impossible to toast the bread with of her disappointment, 
anything approaching evenness. 

"They talk about a bride's burned HpHEY bought the paint, and she 

biscuits," she moaned, "and I can't found that doing the inside of 

even toast bread." her kitchen cupboards was all she 

She had used up half a loaf try- could manage that summer any- 

ing to get four slices that would way. Her entire time seemed to be 

suit her, when she was struck by a taken up with putting things into 

still grimmer thought. Where was cans— berries, peas, string beans, 

more bread coming from when this cherries, and apricots. The season 

was gone? Not from a bakery or for canning one crop would barely 

corner store. Farm women made be over before the next started, 

their own bread, and she was a Mrs. Rodgers came over with her 

farm woman now. pressure cooker and the two of 

Later in the day she began tell- them worked in the hot kitchen, 

ing Stan her plans for the house, with a roaring fire in the coal range 

"We'll begin in that east window," until the perspiration streamed from 

she said. "It can easily be cut two their faces. More than once Cam- 

or three times its present size. Then ilia thought that it would be far 

we'll paint all the walls and wood- pleasanter and more comfortable to 

work. I want them light. Pale go hungry. 

blue would be pretty. Then we'll "I don't see why you come over 

cover this old furniture with some here and slave," Camilla remarked 

bright flowered chintzes. I'd like a to her mother-in-law one day. "You 

Mexican kitchen— bright blue, yel- have all of your own work to do, 

low, and red. Doesn't it sound and then you come over here and 

gay?" help do mine, too." 

"It sounds terrific," Stan agreed, "Work is never half as hard for 

"and if I didn't need such a lot of two as it is for one," replied the 

farm machinery we'd start tomor- older woman, and then added with 

row. But the crops have to come a faint smile, "I was a bride, too, 

first or there'll never be any money once, you know." 



266 



RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— APRIL 1951 



''What kind of a home did you 
come to?" asked Camilla curiously. 

"One that would have made this 
house look like a palace. It had two 
rooms— or rather, a room and a 
'lean-to/ and we homesteaded the 
land, which meant that not a fur- 
row had been turned. I had a fun- 
ny little cookstove with only two 
lids. Steven made all the rest of 
our furniture. But we were very 
happy. Happiness is never a mat- 
ter of worldly goods. At least, I've 
never found it so/' 

"At the moment I can't help 
thinking that a deep freeze would 
make me extremely happy," said 
Camilla, pushing back her hair with 
her sleeve, "and save both of us a 
lot of work and discomfort." 

"You're quite right," agreed Mrs. 
Rodgers, "and I hope that you get 
one before too many years." 

"After an electric range, a refrig- 
erator, and a big east window," re- 
cited Camilla. 

The summer, with all its heat, 
work, and discomfort, finally passed 
away, and she viewed the rows of 
bottles on her cupboard shelves 
with considerable pride. With can- 
ning and gardening done for the 
season, she decided that she could 
take time to go on with her plans 
for painting the interior of the 
house— especially now that the po- 
tato crop was sold and there was 
money for at least a part of the 
necessary materials. 

We'll go to town Saturday, she 
thought complacently, but on Fri- 
day evening Stan came in and said, 
"The bank roll is busting out all 
over. Want to take that jaunt to 
California?" 



"Oh, Stan, of course!" she cried 
in delight. "It will be wonderful 
to show you off to all my friends." 

"Well, that wasn't exactly what 
I had in mind," he returned dryly, 
"but I don't want your Aunt Lil- 
lian to think that you've gone back 
to the good earth for good. When 
shall we leave?" 

"Um— next week. Will the bank 
roll allow for a new suit? I'd hate 
to have my friends say 'My good- 
ness—the same duds she was wear- 
ing here a year and a half ago.' " 

"The bank roll is yours, dear, as 
far as it will go," he agreed, "just 
leave enough for potato seed next 
spring, a chicken coop, and a har- 
row." 

"I thought so," she laughed. 
"Also, the paint for these rooms, 
that I've been dying to get at all 
summer. But I'm going to have 
a new suit just the same. It will be 
fun to shop at Bullocks and Mays 
again. Another thing I'm going to 
have is a manicure," she added, 
looking ruefully at her work-rough- 
ened hands. "And I'll wear mitts 
with cold cream from now until 
the time I leave." 

"Are you trying to scare me 
out?" asked Stan. "I'm afraid that 
I have just a touch of dishpan 
hands, too." 

"Of course not," said Camilla 
quickly, but she didn't wear the 
mitts, and she didn't have a mani- 
cure, even after she had arrived in 
California. 

From the Los Angeles station 
they took a bus out to Santa Mon- 
ica and then a taxi up to the white 
stucco house. 

"Whew!" said Stan with a low 
whistle as they went up the walk. 



FOR THE STRENGTH OF THE HILLS 



267 



"Do I bow to the butler or does 
he bow to me?" 

"Don't be a goose," she retorted. 
"There isn't a butler, or even a 
maid. Just a cleaning woman a 
couple of times a week, unless Aunt 
Lillian has changed mightily. She 
can't get along with help in the 
house. Nobody ever does anything 
to suit her." 

'Including choosing a husband, I 
expect." 

To which Camilla merely 
shrugged and opened the door. 

HTHE front of the house was 
empty, and she looked around 
with delight at the lovely rooms 
that had been home for so many 
years. As her eyes traveled over the 
soft blue carpeting, the inviting 
arm chairs, and the charming pic- 
tures, she realized that she had 
missed them more than she had 
ever admitted to herself. 

As she met Stan's glance she gave 
him a bright smile, slipped her 
hand in his, and led him out to 
the patio in the rear which she 
knew to be the most likely place 
to find her aunt. 

She was sitting in a garden chair, 
reading a book and, as Stan would 
have said, "Dressed to the hilt." 

She greeted Camilla with some- 
what restrained affection, then of- 
fered her hand to Stan, saying, 
"And this is the wonderful hus- 
band?" 

"This is the husband," amended 
Stan. 

"This is the wonderful husband," 
repeated Camilla, with emphasis. 

"Now you must sit down and tell 
me all about Idaho and your farm," 



her aunt went on in her "grand 
dame" manner. 

"It's simply marvelous!" ex- 
claimed Camilla. "You never saw 
such mountains! And the colors in 
autumn are unbelievable. The hills 
are simply covered with gold and 
crimson." 

"And your house?" 

"It's a big old place," she went 
on, with the same enthusiasm as if 
she were describing a French villa. 
"I'm going to have a circus doing 
it over. You know how I love to 
dabble with interior decorating? 
Well, this really gives me a chal- 
lenge. Next summer you'll have 
to come up and see it." 

"How nice," was the noncom- 
mital reply. Then she added 
casually, "I've invited a few friends 
in for tonight. They're all so eager 
to see you again." 

"Tonight!" gasped Camilla. She 
was about to add, "But we're barely 
off the train." Instead she said, 
"That was thoughtful of you. It 
will be fun to see everyone again. 
How many are coming?" 

"Oh, maybe thirty or forty. I'm 
having a caterer serve light refresh- 
ments out here in the garden." 

After lunch, when they were un- 
packing, Camilla said, "We've got 
to dash into town and buy you a 
white jacket. There's probably 
more to this affair than she lets on 
and I won't have you looking out 
of place." 

"You mean I have to dress up in 
a movie star outfit?" he demanded. 
"I'd feel and look like a chump." 

"You'll look like Sterling Hayden, 
or better. You've a much better 
sun tan and your eyebrows are 
stunning." 



268 



RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— APRIL 1951 



"Okay, ladybug, if you say so," 
he agreed. 'This is your party and 
we'll go down fighting." 

"Your metaphors are mixed, but 
your attitude is beautiful," she said, 
picking up her bag and hat. "Come 
on, let's go." 

They bought the white jacket, 
and Camilla was immensely proud 
of her husband as she presented 
him to her old friends that evening. 
Aunt Lillian insisted upon introduc- 
ing him as the owner of a huge 
ranch in Idaho, and he was equally 
insistent upon correcting her, until 
she finally gave up and allowed him 
to be a plain, ordinary potato farm- 
er. 

When it was over, Stan asked, 
"Now, do we get to enjoy ourselves 
the rest of the time?" 

"We do," she answered firmly. 
"We'll do all the fun things there 



are to do in this part of the coun- 
try." 

They did have fun— in a way. If 
they could have gone off by them- 
selves they would have had a de- 
lightful time, but most of their 
days were spent with Aunt Lillian, 
and she was never anything but 
coolly polite to Stan. 

At the end of two weeks Stan 
asked Camilla, "You wouldn't be 
getting a trifle homesick for the 
sagebrush and wide-open spaces, 
would you?" 

She thought of the bjg, ugly 
house and the coal range, and for 
an instant was tempted to echo, 
"I wouldn't." Instead, she smiled 
and said, "That's the wrong ap- 
proach, and you've no business mak- 
ing a sale, but you did. I'm ready 
to go back whenever you are." 
(To be continued) 



^/tntictpa tion 

Maude O. Cool: 



I gathered from the garden of the years 

The seeds to plant in fertile fields today; 

I watch with patience, through the smiles and tears, 

For blossoms to adorn some future way. 



ofkat <y Tflay Si 

LeRoy Burke Meagher 



>ee 



. s 



Time 

Must be quarried carefully, 

Gathered piece by particle, 

Cupped frugally and bosom-tight, 

That I may see another dawn 

Brightening the clovered meadow 

While robins 

Wing out from the new-leafed elm. 



0* 



'rayer 

Beatrice K. Ekman 

Father, I think thee for my sight 
That sees the beauty of the night, 
That sees the changing seasons pass,, 
The green of sedge, of meadow grass, 
The trees that fling their branches high, 
The drift of clouds across the sky. -■ " 
O let me have the grace to see 
My brother's need of being free. 



tbaust in the Qltght xjLgaiast dancer 

Lucybeth C. Rampton 
Utah Division, American Cancer Society 

THAT there is as yet no known cure for advanced cancer is general knowledge. But 
do you know that early cancer can often be cured? It is true — early cancer can 
often be cured. This is the message which the American Cancer Society is striving to 
bring to every person in this country. If cancer is diagnosed early and given prompt 
treatment, it can be destroyed and a third of the lives lost to it each year can be saved. 

This knowledge is of particular importance to women. Cancer strikes women 
principally between the ages of thirty-five and fifty-five — the years when the loss of the 
mother usually means a broken home. By far the majority of these cases are cancer 
of the breast or of the cervix. Yet informed women know that of all types of cancer, 
breast cancer is most easily controlled if it is detected early. Seventy per cent of breast 
cancer victims can be saved by early diagnosis, and the same is true of cancer of the 
cervix. ... 

Cancer attacks children, too. We associate the disease with middle and old age; 
but cancer each year attacks more children than do measles, whooping cough, scarlet 
fever, diphtheria, and poliomyelitis combined. Cancer in infancy and childhood pro- 
gresses more rapidly than it does in later life. Happily, though, cancer in children re- 
sponds more readily to X-Ray therapy. It is therefore imperative that these cancers 
in the very young receive early diagnosis and proper treatment. Not all stricken chil- 
dren can be saved yet, but many can if they get help in time. 

Women are practical. If a danger confronts them, they want to take positive 
action against it. What can you do to provide intelligent protection for yourself and 
your family? 

The American Cancer Society offers the surest answer. The Society is a nationwide 
organization of the highest integrity, working closely on both national and state levels 
with the American Medical Association. 

Until the riddle of cancer's origin can be solved through research, the Society is 
convinced that at least a third of the lives now lost to the disease could be saved through 
education. . . . Over and over again the Society prints and distributes its "seven danger 
signals" of cancer to which you should be alert: 

1. Any sore that does not heal. 

2. A lump or thickening in the breast or elsewhere. 

3. Unusual bleeding or discharge. 

4. Any change in a wart or mole. 

5. Persistent indigestion or difficulty in swallowing. 

6. Persistent hoarseness or cough. 

7. Any change in normal bowel habits. 

Emphasis is laid on the fact that these symptoms do not always mean cancer, but 
that only professional diagnosis can determine the facts. 

What, then, can you do about cancer? You can learn the facts about the disease, 
including the seven danger signals, and act promptly and sensibly if they appear in 
your family. You can insist on periodic check-ups for the entire family. And you can 
contribute generously to the American Cancer Society — financially, of course, and by 
volunteering your services if possible. 

Page 269 



Favors for Baby Showers 

Clara Laster 

IF you've ever attended a stork made into a bow and placed under 

shower, you will remember the the chin of the baby picture, which 

importance of refreshment you have cut out and pasted to 

time. Do you recall the attractive the lid. 

favor by your plate? The hostess If you desire to enlarge upon this 

probably spent more time fixing favor idea, serve cookies in the shape 

those gay little charmers than on of a bonnet. You might try mak- 

the food she served. Most of us ing a large bonnet from half of an 

struggle to find an original idea. oatmeal box. You could place cut 

Favors are important. The hostess flowers in a glass, and fit the glass 

can enlarge upon the idea and carry into the large bonnet. This makes 

out the theme through her entire a charming centerpiece, 
party. 

4 'Baby in a Wagon' 

"Baby Bonnet Favois" Another unusual favor is very 

Let us, for instance, consider the easily made. I call it "Baby in a 

bonnet theme, and plan favors ac- Wagon/' You will need some 

cordingly. Buy some plain nut cups, matchboxes, crepe paper, gumdrops, 

one yard of net, one roll crepe paper, toothpicks, and a stapler. First, 

one sheet construction paper, and cover the bottom of the matchbox 

some narrow ribbon. Yellow is a with crepe paper. You will have to 

very popular color for babies these use a stapler here, and the paper 

days, so these materials may be this must be just large enough to cover 

color, or any other color you desire, over the inside to be stapled down. 

The idea behind this favor is to If you are at a loss as to how the 

fix the nut cups to resemble baby crepe paper should fit on the box 

bonnets. Cut round lids for the you might tear a matchbox apart 

nut cups and paste pictures of and use it as a pattern for cutting 

babies' faces on top. After the cups the paper. When you have the 

are filled with nuts, the lids go on, box covered, make the wheels of 

and the finished favors will look gumdrops, and attach to the wagon 

like babies wearing bonnets. by running toothpicks through the 

The bonnets are easy to make, box, one at each end. Stick a gum- 
but you will need a stapler, thread, drop on the end of each toothpick, 
needle, and scissors to work with. When this is done, fill the wagon 
The bonnet brims are made from with gumdrops. If you are good 
construction paper, then covered at drawing, take white construction 
with net. The nut cup is covered paper and make a picture of a baby 
first with crepe paper, then with sitting down. Fill in the details 
net. The brim is stapled to the with an art pencil, cut the drawing, 
nut cup. A narrow strip of ribbon and set it on top of the gumdrops. 
is used to hide the staples and is If you prefer a fancy wagon, glue 

Page 270 



FAVORS FOR BABY SHOWERS 



271 



a narrow piece of ribbon around 
the wagon and tie it in a bow. 

These favors are really very at- 
tractive. You might wish to make 
a large wagon for a centerpiece and 
serve pinwheel sandwiches to carry 
out the theme. 

"Baby in a Swing" 

Another unique favor which calls 
for gumdrops is worked out with 
a "swing" motif. You could use any 
other soft, small pieces of candy. 
You will need, also, some colored 
toothpicks and a number of very 
small dolls. The small dolls can be 
bought at five and dime stores for 
just a nickel. To make the swing 
frame, use five toothpicks and eight 
gumdrops. The idea is to slant 
the picks into the gumdrops to re- 
semble the swings in your park. 
Take a toothpick and run it through 
two gumdrops. Then place one 
gumdrop on each end, with the bot- 
tom of the gumdrop downward. 
Now, place the other toothpicks in- 
to the end drops. After this is fin- 
ished, break a pick in two and make 
the swing. You will need two more 
small gumdrops and a small piece 
of a toothpick. Place a small doll 
in the swing. You can tie her in 
with ribbon or tape her in. Either 
way, this is a cute favor. 

"Play-Pen Favors" 

For making the play pen you will 
need 24 small gumdrops, 8 whole 
toothpicks, and six toothpicks brok- 
en in halves, making twelve shorter 
picks. Take four whole toothpicks 
and place four gumdrops on each 
pick, two in the center of each 
pick and one at each end. Then 
place two gum drops in the center 



of each of the remaining four whole 
toothpicks. Now you have com- 
pleted the eight bars of the play 
pen. For the top you will use two 
of each of the two kinds of bars, 
and two of each, also, for the bot- 
tom of the play pen. Take one of 
the bars containing two gumdrops 
and insert the end of the toothpick 
into the gumdrop at the end of a 
bar containing four gumdrops, and 
then repeat this process with the 
other two bars for the top of the 
play pen. For the bottom of the 
pen use the four remaining bars in. 
exactly the same manner. Use the 
twelve half picks to connect the 
top and bottom bars, first at the 
four corners, and then to join the 
two center gumdrops at the top and 
the two center gumdrops at the 
bottom on each of the four sides of 
the play pen. The sides of this play 
pen will be rather low, but will fit 
a very small doll. If a taller doll is 
used, whole toothpicks may be sub- 
stituted for the half picks in making 
the bars which connect the top and 
bottom of the play pen. Place a 
square cookie on the bottom of the 
play pen to represent the floor. 

"Rosebud Favors" 

Select small pasteboard boxes and 
wrap the bottoms of them with 
plain-colored crepe paper or dec- 
orated gift wrapping paper. Fill 
the boxes with nuts. Then make 
a rosebud of ribbon or crepe paper, 
attach it to a wire stem and place 
it in the box. Then cut from a 
magazine or a greeting card the pic- 
ture of a baby's head. Paste a nar- 
row strip of heavy cardboard to the 



272 



RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— APRIL 1951 



back of the baby's head, allowing an 
extension of about two inches to 
insert into the center of the rose- 
bud. Attach firmly with a pin or 
with a stapler. 



Many of your guests will take the 
favors home with them. That is a 
compliment to the hostess and you 
will feel well repaid for making 
unique and original favors. 



Increase That Shelf Space 

Rachel K. Laurgaard 
Illustration by Elizabeth WiJJiamson 

space. It need not be wide— three or 
four inches is enough to hold a row 
of cups or glasses. 

Cut a strip of shelving material 
long enough to slide easily into your 
cupboard. Sand it smooth, and 
paint it to match the interior. When 
it has dried thoroughly, fasten it on- 
to small blocks of wood also painted 
and nailed to the sides of the cup- 
board. Or, using the little angle 
A little mezzanine shelf fitted into irons which can be purchased at 
the back of your dish cupboard the ten-cent store, screw the shelf 
will make use of some of that wasted in place. 




APPLE SAUCE OR FRUITCAKE 
Alice Bartlett 



c. sugar 

c. vegetable shortening 

c. unsweetened apple sauce 

(quite thick) 

tsp. soda scalded in 

tbsp. hot water 

tsp. cinnamon 



1 tsp. cloves 

i tsp. allspice 

i Vz c. raisins 

i c. nuts 

any other fruit you care to add 

4 c. plain flour 

Vi tsp. salt 



Cream sugar and shortening together in a mixing bowl and add the apple sauce 
and the soda dissolved in water. Then measure into a sifter all of the dry ingredients 
except i c. of the flour. Sift dry ingredients into mixing bowl. Stir the remaining i c. 
of flour into the raisins and add to mixture. Add the nuts. 

Bake for 45 minutes in a moderate oven, 375°. 

This is a cheap cake — no eggs, no milk, no butter, and it is a very good cake. 




JANE BYBEE COLTRIN MAKES QUILT TOPS AS A HOBBY 

"PVURING the 1948-49 season, Jane Bybee Coltrin, seventy-four, pieced eighteen 
*^* beautiful quilt tops for the Boise, Idaho, Third Ward Relief Society. Many of 
the patterns were unusual, and all of them were exquisitely stitched. 

Sister Coltrin has been a Relief Society worker for many years, having served 
as president of the Hazel Ward Relief Society, Boise Second Ward Relief Society, as 
a counselor in two wards, as a work director, and as a class leader in theology, literature, 
and visiting teacher message leader. She has also served on the Boise Stake Relief So- 
ciety Board. At present she is a member of the work meeting committee in Boise Third 
Ward and an active visiting teacher. 

She has reared nine children and has thirty-eight great-grandchildren, and is an 
excellent example of the old saying that a woman who already has many responsibilities 
is the one to call on when you want to get something done. Work has made Sister 
Coltrin a happy and a useful woman in her home circle and in Relief Society. 



[Peach cJi 



rees in 



m 



00m 



Mabel Jones Gabbott 

Through pastel-tinted days the peach trees blushed. 
Until one rain-swept night their bloom was crushed; 
I grieved for broken petals at my door; m 

It was not that I loved the blossoms more 
Than promised fruit beneath each greening leaf, 
But that their beauty was so brief. 



Page 273 




From The Field 



Margaret C. Pickering, General Secretary-Treasurer 

All material submitted for publication in this department should be sent through 
stake and mission Relief Society presidents. See regulations governing the submittal 
of material for "Notes From the Field" in the Magazine for April 1950, page 278, and 
the Handbook of Instructions, page 123. 

SOCIALS, BAZAARS, AND OTHER ACTIVITIES 




Photograph submitted by Amelia P. Gardner 

NORTHERN CALIFORNIA MISSION, SAN RAFAEL BRANCH RELIEF 

SOCIETY BAZAAR 

Standing at the table, front, left: Neva Beckstrand and Emily Trottir. 

Standing in center of picture, left to right, Secretary-Treasurer Eileen McClure 
and President Bertha Davis. At table extreme right, First Counselor Rachel Greenland. 

Standing at table (pillowslip display) at left: Margaret Goff and Norene Deaver. 
Standing at right, rear, June Monson. 

At left in background: Freda Tommilinson; Mary Spencer; Cleone Marshell. 

Amelia P. Gardner, President, Northern California Mission Relief Society, in 
describing this large and beautifully arranged bazaar, reports: 'The sisters were very 
proud of the bazaar. It showered down rain all day, but the spirit of the Lord was 
with them as they went humbly forth that morning, and they received good support 
from the members." 

Page 274 



NOTES FROM THE FIELD 



275 




Photograph submitted by Dulcie W. Francom 

JUAB STAKE (UTAH), LEVAN WARD VISITING TEACHERS ACHIEVE 
100 PER CENT RECORD FOR NINE MONTHS 

President Dulcie W. Francom is seen standing at the right on the second row. 

This large group of visiting teachers has achieved this record by careful and devoted 
observance of their duties, and have experienced great joy and satisfaction in this phase 
of Relief Society work. 

Lyle C. Pratt is president of Juab Stake Relief Society. 




Photograph submitted by Reta F. Broadbent 



WEST CENTRAL STATES MISSION, BUTTE (MONTANA) BRANCH 
RELIEF SOCIETY ENTERTAINS AT SOCIAL, October 24, 1950 

Front row, seated, left to right: Secretary-Treasurer Lillian McVicars; Counselor 
Elodies Hamilton; theology class leader Harriet Millecam; Ellen Anderson; Carol Ann 
Summers; Elizabeth (Granny) Jensen, the honored guest; Sadie Burt; President Lura 
Henderson; Lillian Hubber, visiting teachers message leader. 

Back row, standing, left to right: Vazale Denning; Ellen Powell; Erna Rowe; 
Ardelle Pitts; Bernice Turner; Beulah Ford, work meeting leader; Marjorie Burt; Alene 
Summers, social science class leader; Gladys Hewett; Margretta Osborne; Pearl Em- 
mett; Glee Potter, literature class leader; Viva Hailstone; Wyona Dobb. 

Sister Jensen, age ninety-eight, who was especially honored at this social, arrived 
in Salt Lake Valley before her tenth birthday. Today she enjoys good health, lives 
alone, and does all her own housework. 

Reta F. Broadbent is president of the West Central States Mission Relief Society. 



276 



RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— APRIL 1951 




Photograph submitted by Florence D. Benson 

PAROWAN STAKE (UTAH), PAROWAN WEST WARD VISITING TEACH- 
ERS MAKE 100 PER CENT RECORD FOR THREE SUCCESSIVE YEARS 

Front row, seated, left to right: Rebecca Miller; Verda Orton; Cora Rowley; 
Alice Stevens; Florence D. Benson; Bertha Matheson; Sara Hulet; Alice Holyoak; Nanie 
Eyre. 

Second row, left to right: Dorothy Rowley; Mary Stubbs; Anna Rasmussen; Louise 
Robinson; Mettie Robinson; Mamie D. Orton; Delia Marsden; Ida Smith; Amelia Top- 
ham; Mildred Gilger; Lillian Heap; Zilpha Dalton. 

Third row, left to right: Grace Burt; Rebecca Smith; Ramola Smith; Libbie Mathe- 
son; Eva Taylor; Elizabeth Lyman; Nellie Dalton; Merle Rasmussen; Lily Ward; Eva 
Robinson; Twila Thornton; Arvilla Mortensen. 

Back row, left to right: Phebe Taylor; Clara Benson; Marie Crawford; Margaret 
Stubbs; Leone Lyman; Sara Crawford; Vilate Joseph; Eulala Orton; Monta Warren; 
Retta Reed; Janette Bayles. 

Edna S. Hatch is president of Parowan Stake Relief Society. 




Photograph submitted by Delia H. Teeter 

DENVER STAKE, CHEYENNE (WYOMING) WARD VISITING TEACHERS 
ACHIEVE 100 PER CENT RECORD FOR 1950 

Front row, seated, left to right: Marie Ward; Catherine Ovard; Mary Cherry; 
Vida Birge; Second Counselor Frances Carter; Lois Wilde. 



NOTES FROM THE FIELD 



277 



Back row, standing, left to right: First Counselor Luella Brown; Ida Williams; 
Hazel Boyack; Jane Davies; Nona Schilling; President Verda Hatch; Thora Nelson; 
Alta Atark; Ruth Yeoman. 

Delia H. Teeter, President, Denver Stake Relief Society, reports that these sisters 
are unusually faithful in attending their duties as visiting teachers: "They have ac- 
complished the excellent record of 100 per cent. Their districts are widely scattered, 
and they travel many miles to make their visits. They have made three times as many 
visits during 1950 as were made the previous year." 




Photograph submitted by Holly W. Fisher 



WESTERN CANADIAN MISSION, EDMONTON BRANCH HOLDS FIRST 
BAZAAR IN NEW CHAPEL, December 1950 



At left, Second Counselor Alberta Maxwell; and at right, Secretary Rhoda 
Rodgers. 

The bazaar was under the direction of the Relief Society presidency: Jean Low, 
Elizabeth Hammond, Alberta Maxwell, and Rhoda Rodgers. Sister Emma Sheppard 
was in charge of the linens, and was assisted by Jessie Houle and Pauline Prince. The 
toys and dolls display was under the direction of Rhoda Rodgers and Alberta Max- 
well, assisted by Melba McMullin. Elfonda Marshall directed the art display, and 
Marie Low had charge of the quilts, with Enid Hass and Esther Strate in charge of the 
aprons. Other sisters in charge of booths and displays were: Marguerete Low. Dorothy 
Muirhead, Lois Bennett, Ruth Walker, Sara Tanner, Maurine Miller, Beth Spackman, 
Ruby Walker, Lorraine Wood, Amy Sykes, Urinda Wood, and Martha Johnson. There 
were twelve displays at the bazaar. 

Holly W. Fisher is president of the Western Canadian Mission Relief Society. 



278 



RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— APRIL 1951 




Photograph submitted by Vera B. Faroes 

BIG HORN STAKE (WYOMING), BURLINGTON WARD RELIEF SOCIETY 
PRESIDENTS HONORED AT SOCIAL, October 3, 1950 

Left to right: Margaret Preator; Rachel Snyder; Mary J. Cottrell; Sarah Mcintosh; 
Ila J. Tonkvich, present president. 

All of these women are still active in Relief Society work. A former president, 
Harriett Johnson, is now living in Salt Lake City, Utah. 

Amelia H. Robertson is president of Big Horn Stake Relief Society. 




Photograph submitted by Ida S. Hendrickson 

SNOWFLAKE STAKE (ARIZONA), HOLBROOK WARD RELIEF SOCIETY 

BAZAAR, August 16, 1950 

Left to right: First Counselor Gertrude Nickols; President Rowana Crowther; 
Second Counselor Peggie Anderson. 

This bazaar featured a large and varied display of children's clothing. Many 
beautifully trimmed aprons, handmade clothing for infants, embroidered pillowcases, 
and many small items, including table mats and pot holders. Jams, jellies, cakes, bread, 
pies, and candy were also sold at the bazaar. 

Ida S. Hendrickson is president of Snowflake Stake Relief Society, 



NOTES FROM THE FIELD 



279 




Photograph submitted by Mary Isabel! Cassity 

STAR VALLEY STAKE (WYOMING), THAYNE WARD YOUNG MOTHERS 
WHO ARE OFFICERS IN RELIEF SOCIETY 

Center row, standing, left to right: Secretary Velma S. Broadbent; Second Coun- 
selor Ada H. Aullman; First Counselor Shirley C. Dean. 
Standing at the back: President Vera S. Humpherys. 
Nellie B. Jensen is president of Star Valley Stake Relief Society. 




Photograph submitted by Florence N. Singleton 

COTTONWOOD STAKE (UTAH) SINGING MOTHERS PRESENT MUSIC 
FESTIVAL "AROUND THE WORLD WITH SONG," June 1950 

This large group of Singing Mothers presented musical selections from many 
nations. Seated in front are children and young women costumed to represent some 
of the countries and nationalities portrayed in the musical renditions. 

The organist, Lu Baker, is seated at the right on the third row, and second from 
the right on the same row, the chorister, Myra Cassity. 

Florence N. Singleton is president of Cottonwood Stake Relief Society. 



280 



RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— APRIL 1951 




Photograph submitted by Alice L. Voyles 

SOUTH CAROLINA STAKE, CHARLESTON WARD RELIEF SOCIETY 

ENTERTAINS AT A LUNCHEON FOR VISITING MEMBERS 

OF THE GENERAL BOARD 

October 27, 1950 

Eleventh from the left: Ruby Evans, Secretary, Charleston Ward Relief Society; 
thirteenth from the left (wearing light-colored hat), Breta McBride, First Counselor, 
South Carolina Stake Relief Society; Alice L. Voyles, Stake Relief Society President; 
Florence J. Madsen, member, General Board of Relief Society; seventeenth from the 
left (wearing hat), Belle S. Spafford, General President of Relief Society; Jean P. 
Hyde* First Counselor, Charleston Ward Relief Society; Alyce O. Hanha, President/ 
Charleston Ward Relief Society; Beatrice Mazyck, Second Counselor, Charleston 
Ward Relief Society. 




Photograph submitted by Annie R. Parker 

CARBON STAKE AND NORTH CARBON STAKE (UTAH) COMMEMORATE 

THE SIXTY-FIFTH ANNIVERSARY OF THE FIRST RELIEF 

SOCIETY IN PRICE, November 5, 1950 

: Front row, seated, left to right: Enid Bean, President, Price First Ward Relief 
Society; Ramona Walter, President, Price Second Ward Relief Society; Sarah Jane 
Warren, who, as a child, attended the first Relief Society meeting in Price; Margaret 



NOTES FROM THE FIELD 281 

Ann Horsley, the only living member of the first Relief Society organization in Price. 

Back row, standing, left to right: Neva Jackson, President, Price Third Ward 
Relief Society; Harriet Hammond, President, Price Fourth Ward Relief Society; 
Crystal Guymon, President at the time the Price Ward was divided, and one of three 
living former Relief Society presidents; Delia Higgins and Hannah Goodall, former 
presidents of Price Ward Relief Satiety, before division of the ward. 

Annie R. Parker is president of North Carbon Stake Relief Society. 



» ♦ » 



c/t i Lew \yutlook 

Caroline Eyring Miner 

<(T TOW long since you tried doing something new and different during your spare 
* *■ time?" my good friend Mary asked me. I had been complaining about how 
monotonous life was. 

I was startled. For years I'd been doing the same pillowslip patterns, reading the 
same kind of books, listening to the same radio programs, doing the same things over 
and over. I needed a face lifting in my leisure time activities. 

In the county recreation program at that very time a class in painting was being 
offered for adults. I had never painted and felt self-conscious even about the presump- 
tion that I could, but at Mary's insistence, I went to the first class. 

We sat on the lawn and sketched poplar trees against the beautiful Wasatch 
Mountains as a background. We learned how to proportion the picture, how to get 
interest into it. I was fascinated. I kept going to the class, and I made a number of 
pictures that really surprised me. 

After the class was over, I invested in some paints and other supplies, and I have 
found a new interest; my appreciation for the art of others has increased; my world 
has become a little larger. 



y^Jne cJtme t^iimpsed 

his W. Schow 

We have no time to watch the fountain play, 

Or let a winter sunset hold us long; 
Machines drown the soft murmur of the rain, 

And stress deprives us of the robin's song. 

We pass the lily by at duty's word; 

One instant from our grief we give the rose, 
While heedless of our impulse or our dream, 

Relentlessly life moves toward its close. 

Yet on the path of memory we find 

We have adorned the milestones of the years 

With beauty noticed glancing up from toil 

And glory we have one time glimpsed through tears. 



282 



RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— APRIL 1951 



4 4 



Now Is the Time" 

(Continued from page 249) 



got in. "I don't know as much as 
Jimmy." 

Martha wanted to cry out to him, 
Pray, Harvey. Pray with me now. 
But he had turned his back and 
was burrowing down on his pillow. 
She stood a moment gazing at him, 
then knelt, alone as always, and 
poured out her heart's gratitude for 
Amulek's testimony. It had stirred 
her husband to thought. If it could 
stir him to action the battle would 
be almost won. 

TN the days that followed Harvey 
made no reference whatever to 
their discussion. Although Martha 
had purposely never moved Di- 
anne's book from the night table, 
as far as she could determine, neith- 
er had he. On Mutual night when 
she asked if he would like to come 
with them, he replied without even 
glancing up from the magazine he 
was reading, "No, I've got to tele- 
phone one of the salesmen after a 
bit." 

It was as if their conversation had 
never been. The bright hope she 
entertained at first began to fade 
and she felt heartsick that what she 
regarded as an almost miraculous 
incident should have failed to bear 
fruit. 

Only her eager anticipation of 
Dianne and Arthur's return saved 
Martha from complete despair. On 
Saturday, from noon on, she found 
herself straining for sight or sound 
of the familiar green sedan. The 
day wore on and night came with 
no newlyweds. Just when Harvey 
suggested calling the Rowells to see 



if they had received any word, the 
telephone rang. 

It was Dianne, her voice vibrant 
and breathless, as she explained that 
they had arrived an hour or so 
earlier, but were simply swamped 
getting settled in their apartment, 
and on top of that Bishop Jenkins 
had been over talking with Art, and 
all in all it looked as if they couldn't 
possibly get over tonight, and did 
she mind terribly. 

Then, almost on the same breath, 
she exclaimed how absolutely per- 
fect everything had been and how 
marvelous it was knowing that she 
and Art were married forever. 

Although Martha thrilled while 
her daughter spoke, she felt drained 
and empty the minute she hung up, 
so let-down in spirit that life 
seemed an unbearable burden. For 
the thing she had been counting on 
so heavily was spoiled. She must 
pass on to Harvey another second- 
hand account that Dianne was 
"simply thrilled with everything." 
He had missed the glowing en- 
thusiasm and spontaneity of her 
first report, the ring of pure joy 
and gratitude that could not be 
transmitted in retelling. 

"What the dickens do they have 
to settle in that two-by-four apart- 
ment of theirs?" Harvey grumbled, 
rattling his paper in annoyance. 
"Looks like she could have called 
sooner. Saved you all this fretting." 

Martha nodded absently, think- 
ing with a little twist of pain how 
strange it was going to seem to 
have this child live elsewhere than 
home. 



"NOW IS THE TIME" 283 

FT seemed barely five minutes lat- beside him on the davenport. "I 

er that they heard the blare of a didn't tell Dianne because— well, I 

horn, a very familiar horn. They was thinking. Tonight when I 

sprang up together. mentioned it to the bishop, he 

"I didn't think the little monkey really went for the idea." 

could stay away," Harvey chuckled, He raised his head and looked 

hurrying to the door. over at Harvey, who sat with a 

"Daddy!" Dianne rushed to em- polite, interested smile. 'The bish- 

brace them both. "Oh, Mums, this op has asked me to take charge of 

husband of mine," she cried, dis- the Adult Aaron ic program and try 

engaging herself to go into his and work out something to interest 

arms. "Do you know, he threat- the men and reactivate them, so to 

ened to beat me when I told him speak. He said I was to select one 

I'd telephoned that we couldn't from the group to assist in making 

come over tonight?" visits to the others, and so on." He 

Harvey beamed with pleasure as leaned forward intently. "I keep 

he grasped the young man's hand, thinking of you, Mr. Lane, and how 

"Good for you, Son. You want to I'd like working with you." 
use a firm hand with this young 

lady." MARTHA stopped breathing. Her 

Arthur Rowell had the same eyes flew to Harvey, who was 

warm, friendly smile as his father, wearing a look of utter stupefac- 

"I figured on coming all along, tion. 

Bishop Jenkins . . . ." "Oh, darling!" Dianne hugged 

"Oh, yes," Dianne exclaimed her husband's arm ecstatically, 

eagerly, her dark eyes wide with "That's a perfectly marvelous idea, 

pride. "He's given Art the most having daddy." 

wonderful assignment." "Everyone likes you," Arthur 

Arthur glanced at his bride, vis- went on. "I know you'd have some 
ibly embarrassed. "Well, honey, good ideas on approach." He 
you don't know what I had in laughed. "After all, you're a sales- 
mind," he said quietly. "It wasn't man." 

to boast about the assignment, be- Harvey shook his head slowly, 

cause it isn't a big job or anything, "Arthur, that's a big job, all right, 

although it— well, it's mighty im- and you're just the one for it. But 

portant and I'm going to need I sure don't feel that I'm the one 

plenty of help from the Lord and to assist you." 

several others." "I wish you would consider it, 

"Sit down, Arthur— all of you, Sir," the boy urged. "The Bishop 

and tell us all about it." Martha was really enthusiastic about having 

was impressed with the boy's hu- you." 

mility. The room was silent, all eyes 

"Well, Bishop Jenkins spoke to focused on Harvey, who sat with 

me about this a couple of weeks his chin on his clasped hands, 

ago, wanted me to be giving it some thoughtfully chewing a knuckle. 

thought." He smiled rather apolo- Finally he turned, smiling, to 

getically at his bride, who sat close Martha. "What was it Amulek 



284 



RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— APRIL 1951 



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said, Mother—never procrastinate? 
This is the time to do your good 
works— something to that effect." 

He stood up, facing Arthur. 
"Well, Son, I guess you can try 
me. But you'll find me mighty 
green— or maybe rusty is the word/' 
He took out his watch. "What time 
is Priesthood meeting?" 

Arthur and Dianne rose as one, 
their faces beaming. "At nine, Sir. 
I'll call by for you." 

"Oh, Harvey— Harvey!" Martha 
moved quickly to his side and 
slipped her arm through his. 

"Well, Mother!" He smiled a bit 
self-consciously, as he patted her 
hand. "Looks as if I'm about to be- 
come one of those fanatics I was 
talking about, doesn't it?" 

Herman and the 
Birthday Dinner 

(Continued horn page 230) 
party was on the scene. She was 
headed for the gate that led to the 
house. 

Herman gave another roar, and I 
turned to see him plunge at the 
red sweater. I felt Sue hide her 
face in my dress, and I closed my 
eyes to hide the awful thing that 
was about to happen. I strained my 
ears for Mariar's scream, but in- 
stead, it was father's voice, clear 
and commanding. "You old heath- 
en! What do you think you're do- 
ing! 

There is nothing sweeter when 
situations are tense than the re- 
lief that comes with complete 
faith in someone who will handle 
the situation. I opened my eyes, 
knowing that father had made 
things right. He was ramming a 



HERMAN AND THE BIRTHDAY DINNER 



2*5 



pitchfork at Herman. And Herman 
was backing off like an exploding 
volcano, while, shaken and white, 
Mariar leaned against the apple 
tree. 

CUE was crying aloud as she used 
to when she was a little girl. 
She reached over and took the dish 
towel that I had been unconsciously 
winding around the fence post. 
She wiped her face and handed it 
back to me. 

"Sanny," she asked, "how could 
I have been so selfish? Here Mariar 
would have given her life for moth- 
er, and because she has crooked 
eyes and a funny nose, I would 
have denied her our birthday din- 
ner just to make an impression on 
some old guy who teaches us how 
to parse sentences." 

"Oh, Sue, darling!" I sobbed, 
with my arms around her. And then 
we were both crying together. 

"Come on, Sanny," she said, 
breaking loose, "we must invite 
Mariar to the birthday dinner." 

"And don't you suppose," I sug- 
gested, wiping my eyes, in turn, on 
the dish towel, "that we could 
scoop out the middle of the squash 
and make a nice table decoration?" 

"Of course," said Sue, leaving a 
piece of her plaid skirt on the 
orchard fence. "And if Mr. Burton 
doesn't like it, we'll feed it to him 
for dessert." 

That night as I was going down 
the hall to bed I heard mother say- 
ing to father, "No, John, we won't 
get rid of Herman. He isn't really 
bad. You see, I had a problem to- 
night I didn't know how to an- 
swer. It was Herman who solved 
it for me." 



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286 



RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— APRIL 1951 



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Kyur iA,pril Short Story 

Vl/rtters 

Hazel K. Todd, North Salt Lake, Utah, 
is the wife of a civil engineer, and the 
mother of five children. She is the the- 
ology class leader in her ward Relief 
Society and speech director in the M.I.A. 
Mrs. Todd tells us: "Writing is a hobby 
I want very much to follow, and always 
promise myself I will do something about, 
but seldom get around to. Perhaps some- 
time I will fulfill this desire." Mrs. Todd 
has already been introduced to readers of 
the Magazine through her two published 
stories: "Sweeter Than Any Story" (April 
1948) and "Through the Darkness" 
(April 1949). 

Deone R. Sutherland is the daughter 
of George Cecil and Linnie Fisher Robin- 
son. Her mother is a well-known and 
gifted Utah poet, and Deone, who now 
lives in Evanston, Illinois, is also beau- 
tifully combining two careers — mother- 
hood and writing. Her husband, Harold 
Pratt Sutherland, is a medical student at 
Northwestern University. A graduate of 
the University of Utah, she was editor 
of the Pen and active in dramatics. Deone 
tells us that the best thing that ever hap- 
pened to her was the birth of "Hal" Jr. 
in December 1948. Six of Mrs. Suther- 
land's delightful short stories have already 
appeared in The Reliei Society Magazine. 

Olive W. Burt is well-known to our 

readers as the author of many poems, 
articles, short stories, and serials which 
have been published in the Magazine 
during the last ten years. Mrs. Burt is an 
author of national reputation, and her 
stories and articles have appeared in many 
magazines and newspapers. Some of her re- 
cent books are: Piince of the Ranch, 
Canyon Treasure, and Adventure in Buck- 
skin. A member of the editorial staff 
of the Deseiet News Magazine, Mrs. 
Burt has contributed much to the suc- 
cess of that excellent publication. She 
is the wife of Clinton R. Burt and the 
mother of three children. 



OUR APRIL SHORT STORY WRITERS 



287 



Carol Read Flake, Boise, Idaho, is the 

wife of Dennis E. Flake and the mother 
of six children. She writes as follows: 
"I still conduct the theology class in our 
ward Relief Society and enjoy giving the 
splendid lessons prepared by Brother Don 
B. Colton, my former mission president. 
My time for writing continues to be ex- 
tremely limited. I had a story in the No- 
vember Improvement Era and they also 
purchased a short article of mine." Two 
of Mrs. Flake's stories have been pub- 
lished in The Relief Society Magazine 
"Sudden Storm (September 1948) and 
"And All Eternity" (April 1949). 



VUko uias JLoved the ibarth 

Christie Lund Coles 

He who has loved the earth, 
To the earth returns, 
Knowing well its gentleness, 
Knowing how it burns 

Beneath the fingered, summer sun, 
How cool it lies beneath bright rain. 
He who has seen its blossoming, 
Knows its green comforting of pain. 

He who has pushed the bladed plow, 
Has seen the dark clods move and break, 
Comes reconciled, at last, as one 
Returning for a loved one's sake. 



Spring cfashioas 

Ruth H. Chadwick 

Gray veiling streams across the sky 
From Mother Earth's new hat; 
Beneath its folds gay colors lie, 
An impish flower mat. 

A turquoise band holds all in place, 

And anchors down the swirls 

Of wispy gauze that frames her face, 

Scalloped round with curls. 

A gusty breeze torments the frills, 

And rumples up the flowers; 

It piles the veiling up in hills 

That spell sweet springtime showers. 



PRESERVE YOUR 

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Deseret News Press 

40 Richards Street 
Salt Lake City 1, Utah 



cJhe Siu 



ence 



Margery S. Stewart 

No house can be so very still 
As one where a small boy lies ill 
The turbulence of rattling trains, 
Or noisy balls, or clattering chains, 
Or noisy things all youngsters do 
Is lost in silence creeping through 
The empty rooms. The clock is heard 
And creaking boards that once were 

stirred 
By sturdy feet that stamped or ran 
Now make their presence clear. 
No ban on trinkets, let them grace 
The little tables in their place. 
Their lovely dullness shows how much 
A house demands a small boy's touch. 



Qjrom 



ear an 



a 3fc 



ar 



Each year on my birthday my dear 
mother sends me a subscription to The 
Relief Society Magazine — and what a 
wonderful gift it makes. I read it from 
cover to cover, enjoying every word, 
especially the Literature of England sec- 
tion and all the wonderful articles on 
home decorating. My husband also en- 
joys reading the Magazine. 

— Cora H. Crompton, Chicago, Illinois 

Because of the illness of my husband 
I have been unable to contact the Maga- 
zine agent and I do not want to miss any 
of the Magazines. I am mailing direct to 
you, hoping I will not miss a single copy, 
for we as a family enjoy so much having 
this wonderful Magazine in our home, 
with its many faith-promoting and en- 
couraging articles that help us to meet 
life with our chins up and to really ap- 
preciate the wonderful joy and satisfac- 
tion our gospel gives us. 

— Mrs. Annie N. Farley, Mesa, Arizona 

I am crippled and have to walk on 
crutches, so I never go out of the house, 
and I love to read those good stories in 
the Magazine, such as "We'll Always 
Remember" by Inez Bagnell (February 
1950). That is a very good story. When 
my children were small they would say, 
"Read us a story from the Relief Society 
book," and when they were older they 
would ask me to find a good story for 
them. 

— Mrs. Rose Herzog, Logan, Utah 

The Magazine is a source of inspira- 
tion and strength to me, not only in my 
Relief Society duties, but in my home 
activities as well. 

-^- Verda P. Bollschweiler 
Salt Lake City, Utah 

May I add a word to the many com- 
ments on The Relief Society Magazine. 
It is like a splendid dinner, a variety of all 
good things that everyone enjoys. 
— Nan S. Richardson, 



Salt Lake City, Utah 



I am really enjoying the Magazine, and 
am thrilled with the new music depart- 
ment. 

— Florence H. Dye , Firth, Idaho 

I am writing because I enjoy The Relief 
Society Magazine so much, and my hus- 
band also enjoys reading the stories and 
poems. After we have finished reading the 
magazines I send them to my mother who 
is confined in a hospital. 

— Mrs. Lila Cunningham, 
San Bernardino, California 

The Relief Society Magazine is a joy 
and inspiration to me. Especially do I 
enjoy the lovely poems scattered through 
its pages. 

— Mrs. John A. Gardner 

Alameda, California 

I enjoy the Magazine very much out 
here. We are forty miles from the near- 
est Relief Society, and I am, of course, 
teaching school. I loan my Magazine to 
others who enjoy it as well as I do. 
— Matia McClelland Burk 

Candy, via Garrison, Utah 

I have taken The Relief Society Maga- 
zine for the past eleven years and before 
that time enjoyed it in my mother's home, 
it has always been an inspiration to me. 
— Isabelle Dunn Hanson 
Shelley, Idaho 

To say that I enjoy the Magazine is 
an understatement. It is thoroughly a 
publication of excellent reading. 
— Mrs. Lincoln E. Robinson 

Murray, Utah 

• 
I read the Magazine practically through 
at one sitting, then when the feverish 
desire to read it all has been satisfied, I 
find I have a whole month to study it 
over and gain the deeper purposes of its 
messages. 

— Emily Wilkerson, Roosevelt, Utah 



Page 288 



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$8. A (9 A © H KT 









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THE RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE 

Monthly publication of the Relief Society of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints 

RELIEF SOCIETY GENERAL BOARD 

Belle S. Spafford ..._.- President 

Marianne C. Sharp ------ First Counselor 

Velma N. Simonsen ----- Second Counselor 

Margaret C. Pickering - Secretary-Treasurer 

Achsa E. Paxman Leone G. Layton Lillie C. Adams Christine H. Robinson 

Mary G. Judd Blanche B. Stoddard Louise W. Madsen Alberta H. Christensen 

Anna B. Hart Evon W. Peterson Aleine M. Young Nellie W. Neal 

Edith S. Elliott Leone O. Jacobs Josie B. Bay Mildred B. Eyring 

Florence J. Madsen Mary J. Wilson Alta J. Vance Helen W. Anderson 

RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE 

Editor ----------- Marianne C. Sharp 

Associate Editor --------- Vesta P. Crawford 

General Manager -_._______ Belle S. Spafford 

Vol. 38 MAY 1951 No. 5 



e 



ontents 

SPECIAL FEATURES 

President George Albert Smith Joseph Fielding Smith 292 

First Presidency Reorganized 294 

Mother — Three Pictures Stephen L Richards 295 

Joy in Service Achsa E. Paxman 305 

"Seek After These Things" Ruth M. McKay 310 

The Spirit of Motherhood Hazel McAllister 320 

FICTION 

A Mother's Day Surprise Lydia Bennett Egbert 298 

For the Strength of the Hills — Chapter 4 Mabel Harmer 314 

You Can Learn Katherine Kelly 317 

GENERAL FEATURES 

Sixty Years Ago 306 

Woman's Sphere Rarriona W. Cannon 307 

Editorial: The Safe Harbor of Home Vesta P. Crawford 308 

Magazine Subscriptions for 1950 Marianne C. Sharp 322 

The Magazine Honor Roll for 1950 326 

From Near and Far 360 

FEATURES FOR THE HOME 

Floral Arrangements for the Home Inez R Allen 311 

Start With Yourself Caroline Eyring Miner 354 

POETRY 

Blue Spring — Frontispiece Anna Prince Redd 291 

In a Very New Garden Eva Willes Wangsgaard 297 

Dewdrops Margaret B. Shomaker 303 

In May Gene Romolo 304 

l? a y e c? e , U , r ,f d ^ ^ he Valle Y Dorothy J. Roberts 305 

What Shall We Hold? Margery S. Stewart 309 

gehef Grace s 3Q 9 

The Ancient Prayer Pansye H. Powell 309 

£ e ? lot Ora Lee Parthesius 320 

lnlogy Mirla Greenwood Thayne 321 

;he Promise Maud MilIer Cook 354 

Blossoming ■-------... Ruth Harwood 359 

The Road Is Marked Grace Barker Wilson 359 

My Heart Is Bound Josephine J. Harvey 359 

PUBLISHED MONTHLY BY THE GENERAL BOARD OF RELIEF SOCIETY 

Editorial and Business Offices: 28 Bishop's Building, Salt Lake City 1, Utah, Phone 3-2741- Sub- 
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Entered as second-class matter February 18, 1914, at the Post Office, Salt Lake City, Utah, under 
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BIG LAKE, ARIZONA 



THE RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE 

VOL 38, NO. 5 MAY 1951 



{Jolue Spring 



Anna Prince Redd 

Oh, slower, please! Cars are so swift. 

Let me know how it feels 

To want to be there, 

Yet held to the pace 

Of my father's gray team 

And the creaking turn of wagon wheels; 

The gray horses tossing their heads, 

Flecking the mountain road with foam. 

Let me meet the wind, my body taut, 

Let me feel as I felt 

When, at last, they would bring 

The family of us to the picnic spring! 

Let me be the first to slippery slide 

Down the black leaf mould 

Of the crater pit; 

First to balance on the pinion log 

That halfway bridges the spring 

And dips with our weight 

Into the ice-cold, blue, blue water — 

Not the blue of harebells or bluebells 

Or larkspur stars — 

Water the color of robin eggs, 

Yet as clear as the shining tin of my cup 

When I lean far out and dip it up. 

I have waited so long to come back — 

And now I am here .... 

But time has turned memory to tears. 

I shall not run down the crater pit, 

Let seven and ten do that; 

I must go down by the winding path 

Once fringed with ferns and wild geranium 

But now they are gone! The silver aspens 

Beaver-cut, lie branchless and tangled, 

Gray as time — and my hair. 

I had forgotten that earth ages, too; 

But the spring remains — and is just as blue! 



The Cover: Desert Yucca Blossoms, Photograph by Josef Muench 
Cover Design by Evan Jensen. 




[President K^eorge *jLlbert Smith 



President George Albert Smith 

A Tribute 

President Joseph Fielding Smith 
Of the Council of the Twelve 



SHAKESPEARE in his play 
Julius Caesar ascribes to 
Mark Antony the following 
tribute as he stands over the fallen 
body of Brutus after the battle of 
Philippi: 

His life was gentle, and the elements 
So mix'd in him, that Nature might 

stand up 
And say to all the world "This was a man/" 

With far better grace and truth 
this can be said of President George 

Page 292 



Albert Smith. He was a man in the 
full sense in which Shakespeare used 
this expression. In character and 
nobility he stood out pre-eminently 
among his fellows. But President 
Smith was not only a man by all 
the critical measurements that could 
be applied to him by human stand- 
ards; he was a son of God! Is this 
blasphemy? In the eyes of the 
ignorant and the ungodly this state- 
ment may be so considered. Such 
was the accusation brought against 



PRESIDENT GEORGE ALBERT SMITH 293 

the Redeemer of this world by his constantly employed in the interest 
enemies. Because he declared to of the wayward whom he tried to 
them that he was sent by his bring into a better way of life. He 
Father and was verily his Only never spoke evil of any man; al- 
Begotten Son, they took up stones though he deplored the actions of 
to stone him. His answer to them the wicked, he was ever ready to 
was that the scriptures so declared extend the hand of forgiveness to 
it; and not only this regarding him- them if they would repent, 
self, but to all others: "Is it not To him all men were his broth- 
written in your law, I said, Ye are ers, children of God created in his 
gods? If he called them gods, un- image. He filled all the require- 
to whom the word of God came, ments of divine law in the visiting 
and the scripture cannot be broken; of the sick, extending the hand of 
Say ye of him, whom the Father mercy to the wayward, comforting 
hath sanctified, and sent into the those who mourned, cheering the 
world, Thou blasphemest; because depressed, and in doing good to all 
I said, I am the Son of God?" men. 

Moreover, to Adam was this truth In all my long acquaintance with 

first made known and the Lord him, which dates as far back as 

said to him, "And thou art after memory goes, I never heard a vul- 

the order of him who was without gar expression, an unclean word, 

beginning of days or end of years come from his lips. His friends 

from all eternity to all eternity, were numberless and were spread 

Behold, thou art one in me, a son over the four quarters of the earth, 

of God; and thus may all become He may have had some enemies, 

mv sons Amen " ^ or * ms * s * ne heritage of every 

righteous man; but if there were 

He that overcometh shall inherit all things; such, they were SO without justifica- 

and I will be his God, and he shall be tion, and the only reason that could 

my son (Rev. 21:7). be given for such a thing is that 

there are some who hate the truth 

President George Albert Smith anc j a n those who endeavor to live 

never faltered no matter how diffi- it. 

cult the task, and like Nephi he His testimony of the Truth was 

knew that when the Lord called, perfect. He knew that there is a 

he would prepare the way that his God in heaven; that Jesus Christ 

purposes could be accomplished. 1S his Only Begotten Son in the 

Every commandment he sacredly fl es h. That Joseph Smith was in 

observed. He loved his brethren very c i ee d a prophet and that he 

with a righteous love and honored was called to open and stand at 

and respected them, each in his giv- the head of this glorious last dispen- 

en calling. sa ti on of the fulness of times. He 

He kept the second great com- never faltered in this testimony 

mandment as faithfully as any man and bore it to the great and small, 

I ever knew. His thoughts were to kings and princes, presidents and 



294 



RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— MAY 1951 



potentates, without fear or favor. Like Abou Ben Adhem he was 

To him all were alike, the rich and one who loved his fellow men, and 

the poor, the great and the small— his name has found its proper place 

all the children of God. written in the Lamb's Book of Life. 



cftrst {Presidency LK 



residency uxeorganize 



J 



f\N Monday, April 9, 1951, at 
a solemn assembly— the sixth 
and concluding session of the 
121st annual conference of the 
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter- 
day Saints— President David Oman 
McKay was sustained as the ninth 
President of the Church of Jesus 
Christ of Latter-day Saints. Also 
sustained were Elder Stephen L 
Richards as First Counselor and 
Elder Joshua Reuben Clark, Jr. as 
Second Counselor in the First Presi- 
dency. President McKay and his 
two counselors have proved them- 
selves great and inspired leaders 
and have endeared themselves to 
Church membership over their long 
years of service. Elder Joseph Field- 
ing Smith was sustained as the Presi- 
dent of the Quorum of the Twelve. 
President Smith has been acting 
head of the Quorum of the Twelve 
since last October. He is recognized 
and esteemed as a true servant of 
the Lord, untiring in the discharge 
of his duties. 

The procedure followed in voting 
was in the manner prescribed by 
President John Taylor, third Presi- 
dent of the Church. The voting 
for the First Presidency, Council of 

i? i? 



the Twelve, and the Presiding 
Patriarch was by quorums from the 
First Presidency down to the lesser 
Priesthood and then by the mem- 
bership of the Church present, 
standing and signifying their ap- 
proval by their uplifted hands. The 
voting for the other General Au-' 
thorities, general officers, and auxil- 
iary boards was in the usual manner 
by the uplifted hands of the seated 
congregation. 

The conference, which was 
adjourned on Saturday to hold the 
funeral services of the great and 
beloved leader President George 
Albert Smith, was one of the most 
unusual ones ever held. The historic 
Tabernacle was filled to capacity 
and thousands participated in the 
proceedings through television and 
radio. The proceedings were charac- 
terized by a spirit of love and self- 
lessness to be found in no other 
assemblies in the world today. The 
spirit of the Lord was present in 
power and the solemnity of the con- 
cluding session and the inspiration 
of the entire conference have etched 
indelibly upon the hearts of Latter- 
day Saints that this is indeed the 
Church of Jesus Christ. 



a 



Because of the press date for the May Relief Society Magazine, articles on the new 
leaders of the Church will be printed in the June issue of The Relief Society Magazine. 



Mother — Three Pictures 



President Stephen L Richards 

Of the First Presidency 



WHILE contemplating Moth- 
er's Day and motherhood, 
I happened to notice in 
the public press the picture of a 
woman— a refugee from one of the 
Korean fields of battle. She was 
leading a small child by the hand, 
nursing an infant, and carrying a 
huge load (perhaps all her worldly 
possessions) on her head. One 
could well imagine that her South 
Korean husband was either fighting 
in the war or dead, that all family 
ties had been disrupted, and her 
kindred lost to her in the great con- 
fusion. She was trudging wearily 
and painfully on to save life, while 
the armies which had encompassed 
her country were engaged in the ter- 
rible, methodical business of taking 
life. It is not likely that anyone in 
America in the shelter and security 
of even our poorest homes could 
realize and visualize the desperate 
plight of this desperate woman. No 
matter how weary and discouraged 
she w r as, she could not stop. Had 
she been alone she might have taken 
a chance on surrender, but she could 
not take that chance, she was a 
mother. She was entrusted with 
life more precious than her own. 
She had to preserve it. 

There is a delightful picture of 
mother which comes to us with the 
annual observance of her day. There 
she sits in a cozy room in a cozy 
rocker, hair gray or graying, a soft 
and tender light in lovely eyes, 
placidly knitting, sewing, or reading, 
a perfect picture of serenity and ma- 



ture loveliness. It is not difficult 
to imagine the thinking and the 
happiness of this dear lady. She has 
given her life to her children, and 
they have given their love and de- 
votion back to her. She rejoices in 
their successes even more than in 
her own— their happiness is her hap- 
piness, their welfare, her deepest 
concern. What a pity it is that 
this portrayal does not characterize 
motherhood throughout the world. 

There is yet another picture of 
motherhood which I hesitate to 
draw, perhaps it is indelicate to in- 
clude it within a Mother's Day 
tribute. I justify its inclusion on 
the ground that it may serve to en- 
hance appreciation for the nobility 
of character which so universally 
commands our esteem and affection 
on this occasion. This other picture 
is one of neglect and failure to ac- 
cept the responsibilities incident to 
this most vital of all human relation- 
ships. It arises, usually, out of un- 
wanted and unwelcome children, 
or desertion of home and children 
for other loves and ambitions, or 
for unmitigated frivolity. It is an 
unnatural, sorry picture. The result- 
ing consequences are tragic, too ex- 
tensive in all their ramifications 
even to be mentioned here. But the 
picture is necessary to point up the 
precise things to which we give hon- 
or and reverence on Mother's Day. 

It is by no means the biology 
alone of this universal institution 
which commands respect, although 
there is always a measure of defer- 

Page 295 



296 



RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— MAY 1951 



ence and regard for one who brings 
children into the world, irrespective 
of the fidelities involved. This is 
perhaps as it should be, but the 
fervent tributes we offer to mother- 
hood are chiefly directed, whether 
consciously or not, to the qualities 
of mind and heart and soul which 
normally, naturally, and rightly 
characterize this sacred relationship. 

It is a sacred relationship if any- 
thing ordained of God is sacred. And 
I think it safe to say, generally 
speaking, that those who live to the 
highest ideals of this institution are 
prompted and sustained by religious 
considerations. I know of no lof- 
tier concepts of home and family 
and motherhood than those coming 
from the restored gospel of our Lord 
set forth in the revelations to the 
latter-day Prophet, Joseph Smith. 
In these interpretations, the sphere 
of mother is exalted beyond com- 
pare. She is entrusted with the 
mortal life of the spirit-child of 
God, our eternal and universal par- 
ent. She nurtures the prenatal life 
in self-sacrifice, and she brings that 
life into the world with an instinct 
for its protection and defense at 
once tender and combative. God 
placed that instinct in her for the 
preservation of the life he gave. 

A woman blessed with this lofty 
understanding recognizes in her 
call to motherhood an obligation 
higher and even more demanding 
than the physical protection of her 
offspring. She knows that it is her 
duty to do all that lies within her 
power to help the child pass 
through mortality as a loyal and 
devoted son or daughter of God 
that the child may be returned to 



the eternal parent, acceptable to 
him, the Judge of life. Such a 
mother knows that in the mortal 
probation there will be innumerable 
vicissitudes of fortune, condition, 
and environment; she knows that 
she cannot be with her child 
through all of these, but she has 
faith that if she can bless the life 
entrusted to her care, especially in 
its early stages, with knowledge of 
the fatherhood of God and his 
providence in all things and with 
faith, humility, courage, fortitude, 
and resolution always to uphold the 
right, she will have performed her 
mission of motherhood. 

In such a concept, duty comes 
first. Duty is always rigorous and 
exacting. It does not tolerate neg- 
lect, and it will not permit itself to 
be subordinated to pleasure and 
levity. It entails seeming sacrifice, 
but sacrifice is a word of many defi- 
nitions and constructions. If we 
mean by it foregoing many of the 
quests and liberties for personal 
pleasure outside family and home, 
then there are many sacrifices. If 
we include sleepless nights, physical 
exhaustion, and incessant toil, there 
is more sacrifice. But if our vision 
is raised, and we look ahead to the 
maturity and nobility of lives whom 
the mother has nurtured and de- 
veloped, then we interpret all of the 
self-denial, all of the patient labor 
and exertion as opportunity for the 
fulfillment of the greatest mission 
that can ever come to woman- 
motherhood, which brings into the 
world and guides back to God the 
eternal souls of men. 

What such an exalted concept of 
motherhood, if universally under- 
stood and accepted, would do for 



MOTHER— THREE PICTURES 



297 



the homes of men and, through 
them, for the nations of the world, 
no one can estimate. It makes a 
home the mission of a lifetime; it 
deters divorce; it provides its own 
rewards; it makes for the safest 
sanctuary of all the virtues; and, in 
its higher aspects, it serves to create 
the prototype of the heavenly sta- 
tus—the eternal home which awaits 
the faithful of all of God's children. 
Perhaps we can add something, 
and we should certainly try, to the 
joy and happiness of mothers in 
the observance of the day set apart 
in their honor. Our tributes may 
do something to stir some sense of 
pride and responsibility in neglected 
homes. If it should bring about 
even a little more tender solicitude 
for starving children, starving for 
affection, starving for the warmth 
and security of a home, it would be 
worthwhile. But to the mothers 
who are as priestesses in the temple 
of the home, who have accepted 
the obligations and the opportuni- 
ties of their missions, who have 



brought nobility of character and 
divinity of purpose to their children 
and are in process of doing so, our 
encomiums can add but little. The 
satisfactions they experience tran- 
scend all our words of praise and 
tribute. 

So it is that the highest tribute 
of love and respect we can pay to 
mother— the one most acceptable to 
her— is the tribute of a good life, a 
life compatible with her own ideals, 
which will give her assurance of 
blessed reunion with her loved ones 
in the life to come. 

Mother's Day is, therefore, a time 
of consecration and devotion to the 
ideals of home and family. Every 
flower which is presented, every 
verse that is written, every song that 
is sung, may be, if we will it so, not 
only a token of love to those who 
have begotten and loved us, but 
also an enduring dedication of our 
lives to the greatest and most per- 
manent of all institutions of society 
—home and family and mother. 



o/fi a Very I Lew (garden 

Eva Willes Wangsgaard 

Scant yesterdays, this plot was barren waste 
Of sand and rubble parched by wind and heat, 
Where scented lilies now are making haste 
To open paths where moth and pollen meet. 
Against the drought no bee of striped gold, 
No dragon fly spreads iridescent wing. 
Now petaled branches lift all they can hold 
Of humming life and feathered caroling. 
And whether I or garden first shall take 
The way to dust or far alluvial stone 
Can matter not at all, for both will make 
The certain change, alone, yet not alone. 
And who can think the spirit, being more, 
Will cease to be without the form it wore? 



A Mother's Day Surprise 

Lydia Bennett Egbert 



IT was six o'clock when Marilyn 
Harwood turned in at Central 
Market. 

"Just in the nick of time," re- 
marked the man at the door who 
was ready to lock up. 

"I'm sorry to be such a late cus- 
tomer, but I won't take long/' she 
apologized. 

"Quite all right, lady. Take your 
time— we're used to it." The man 
was good-natured. 

Drawing a cart from the row, 
Marilyn wheeled it hurriedly 
through the aisles, taking down 
items from the half-empty shelves 
and tossing them into the basket. 
Knowing only too well the feeling 
of a clerk toward a late customer, 
she meant to make good her promise 
by not making unnecessary pur- 
chases. Though the man at the 
door had appeared pleasant, he 
probably felt like shoving her out. 
But usually by the time she finished 
the typing which she did at home, 
and then delivered the finished 
manuscripts to her customers, it was 
too late for efficient shopping. 

Still suffering from shock at the 
death of her husband six months 
before, Marilyn sometimes felt that 
the continual work at the typewriter 
was more than she could endure. 
This, to a great extent, however, 
she was overcoming. Time had 
done much for her. With the pass- 
ing of the months, she had regained 
her composure, and her strength. 

Wheeling her cart to the vege- 
table department, she came to a 
pause and critically eyed the count- 
ers with their picked-over vegetables. 
She thought, I never can get here 

Page 298 



in time to choose from the best. 
Why couldn't my trouble have 
happened to someone who was 
more qualified for such a responsi- 
bility? Supporting a family of three 
children wasn't an easy task for 
anyone these days, much less for a 
widow with only the wages of a 
typist. And yet she was fortunate 
that there was something which 
she could do in her own home to 
earn money. 

There wouldn't be as much as 
even a garden, either, to help out 
this year. With Fred, the raising 
of a garden had been more or less 
a hobby, rather than for economy's 
sake. But often he had admitted 
that it was a saving on the grocery 
bill, and surely it was a satisfaction 
to know that you could pick your 
own fresh vegetables without having 
to depend upon a tasteless variety 
from the store counter. 

As she emerged from the grocery 
store, the thought of her chil- 
dren quickened her steps, her heart 
mellowing in thankfulness for her 
precious family. In contrast to her 
former despondent thinking, her 
mind enumerated her many bless- 
ings. 

Why had she given way to such 
an ungrateful mood? It was not 
that she had lost faith in the Lord, 
nor was it that she had become less 
appreciative of his goodness to her. 
Many friends had been sent to com- 
fort and offer their sustaining love 
and assistance. Through the months 
that had elapsed, their thoughtful 
services had never been withdrawn. 
The kind and generous neighbors 
who lived near— it was as if they 



A MOTHER'S DAY SURPRISE 



299 



had been placed there as guardian 
angels for her and her little family, 
and her heart flooded with gratitude 
as she remembered the Aliens who 
helped to look after the children 
when she was especially busy. 

EWEN the children had become 
remarkable in their behavior 
since their father's death. Eleven- 
year-old Susan and Richard, nine, 
it seemed, had suddenly grown up, 
working harmoniously together, 
helping about the home, and look- 
ing after little Jerry who was in his 
first year of school. 

Financially, she had been equally 
blessed. The insurance had made 
the final payment on the home and 
had cleared her of all other debts. 
Besides, she had a little extra that 
had been placed in reserve for the 
children's education. 

Marilyn looked up to see the sun 
sinking behind the amber clouds 
over the western hills and realized 
that already she had reached home. 

With the click of the gate, two 
rollicking round-faced boys came 
running. Eagerly Michael relieved 
her of the small bag of groceries; 
Jerry, chattering cheerily, clung to 
her arm as they proceeded along the 
walk and into the house. 

"Where is Susan?" Marilyn in- 
quired. She placed her light-weight 
coat on a hanger in the cloak closet. 

"I'm here, Mother!" echoed Su- 
san's voice from the kitchen. "Come 
on in and see what we have good 
to eat!" 

The boys speeded up their gait, 
Marilyn following. 

"What is it, Susan?" Michael 
called in a high-pitched voice. 

"Bet I can guess— chocolate cake!" 
shouted young Jerry. 



"Um-m, I do smell something 
lucious. But it's certainly not choc- 
olate cake," Marilyn said. She en- 
tered the kitchen. '"Have you been 
trying your hand at cooking, Sus- 
an?" 

"No, Mother. It's beef stew with 
dumplings. Mrs. Allen brought it. 
She just left." 

Lifting the lid, Marilyn whiffed 
the delicious aroma that ascended 
from the bright aluminum pot. 
"Dear Mrs. Allen! My own mother 
couldn't do more." 

"But that isn't all, Mother. 
Look!" Susan opened a cabinet 
door and slid from the shelf a fluffy 
cocoanut-covered pie. 

Marilyn stood speechless, the 
rapturous exclamation of two hun- 
gry boys ringing in her ears. 

FT was after quieting the boys and 

rushing them off to the bathroom 
to wash, that Marilyn collected her 
wits and began putting the finish- 
ing touches to the meal. Taking 
a loaf of bread from the bag of 
groceries, she placed a few slices 
on a plate. 

"Only one thing could make our 
meal more complete," she com- 
mented, moving toward the table 
that Susan had already set. "Salads 
are so refreshing in the spring." 

"You mean you brought some- 
thing for salad, Mother? I'll cut 
the lettuce. It will only take a 
minute." Susan reached over and 
pulled the paper bag toward her. 

"No, dear. The vegetable count- 
ers were practically stripped to- 
night. Even worse than usual. I 
suppose we'll just have to keep eat- 
ing from a can. It seems that, for 
us, fresh vegetables are a thing of 
the past." 



300 



RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— MAY 1951 



"Aren't you glad that it's almost 
time to plant the garden, Mother?" 

"I'm afraid there'll be no garden 
this year, Susan. It would be too 
much for me to try to raise a garden 
alone with all of my other responsi- 
bilities, when I must spend so many 
hours at the typewriter." 

Susan detected a tremor in her 
mother's voice and wished that she 
could take back her words. 

Marilyn spoke softly to the boys 
as they returned to the kitchen. 
"Did you boys get washed, Mich- 
ael? Come on, Jerry. Everything's 
ready. We can eat now." 

^HE next evening when Susan re- 
turned from school, she slipped 
into her house dress, and, while the 
boys were busy playing in the yard, 
ran cheerfully over to Mrs. Allen's 
while her mother was out delivering 
manuscripts. 

"Hello, Susan! Come right in," 
Mrs. Allen greeted her warmly, 
"and tell me of your plans for this 
afternoon." 

"I brought back your kettle and 
plate, Mrs. Allen. The food was 
delicious. Mother was later than 
usual getting home after delivering 
the manuscripts and buying groc- 
eries, and she really appreciated 
finding the dinner already pre- 
pared. She said to tell you thanks 
so very much, and that when she 
has a day off she'll do some baking 
and give you something in return." 

The look of satisfaction that 
swept over Mrs. Allen's face was 
proof enough of the fact that she 
had already been amply repaid. 

"I'm glad it helped out, Susan. 
But you tell your mother that 
when she does take a day off from 
typing she needn't plan on any 



baking. Because when that day 
comes the Harwoods and the Al- 
iens are all going to bundle into 
the car and take off for the hills. 
And we'll see to it that the baking 
gets done the day before!" 

"What's that you're saying, Mol- 
ly, about taking off for the hills? 
Sounds mighty good to me!" Mr. 
Allen remarked. He mopped the 
perspiration from his wrinkled brow 
as he seated himself. "Getting spring 
fever, I reckon. Why, that sun's 
so warm out there everything's pop- 
ping up out of the ground faster 
than Jack's beanstalk. Makes me 
itch to get my green thumb to 
working. Don't know that renting 
our farm was such a good idea, 
after all." 

"No doubt I can find plenty 
around here to keep that green 
thumb of yours busy," remarked 
Mrs. Allen, jovially. "There's all 
that stretch of perennials to work 
around, the rose bushes to prune, 
and the beds to get ready for plant- 
ing. 

"Why, shucks, Molly, I can do 
that in one afternoon. Anyhow, 
you can't eat that stuff. My green 
thumb's more for growing the 
eatables." 

"Well, now, that does give me 
an idea!" Mrs. Allen exclaimed. 
"What does your mother intend 
to do about the garden this year, 
Susan?" 

"Nothing, I guess, Mrs. Allen. 1 
mentioned the garden to Mother 
last night, after she said that she 
had arrived too late at the store to 
find anything fit for salad. But I 
was sorry afterwards. I think it 
made her feel sad to think of not 
being able to have a garden." 



A MOTHER'S DAY SURPRISE 



301 



HPHE elderly couple exchanged 
winks. Mr. Allen arose and 
strolled over to the window. He 
stood with his hands in his pock- 
ets, viewing the little garden spot 
across the fence and watching the 
boys at play. After a moment's 
meditation he spoke, his words com- 
ing slowly and sympathetically. 

"I reckon it would be too much 
of a job for your mother, Susan. 
Got about all she can do as it is— 
earning money and caring for a 
family." Pausing, he sighed deep- 
ly. "A fair-sized piece of ground 
there, too. A shame to see it lying 
idle." 

"I'll say it's a shame," Mrs. Allen 
agreed heartily. "Land sakes, how 
Marilyn has enjoyed that garden 
other years! Why, it seems I can 
see her out there now in her fresh 
gingham, cheerful as a lark, gather- 
ing the garden stuff." 

Presently Mr. Allen looked up. 
"Susan," he said, "do you suppose 
your mother would want an old 
man like me to take over the gar- 
dening? Won't be much around 
our own place to keep me busy- 
cut the lawn and fuss around Mol- 
ly's flowers a bit. I'd be a heap 
happier keeping myself busy." 

"Oh, I'm sure Mother would like 
you to, Mr. Allen. Only . . . ." 

"Only what, Susan?" 

"Only Mother says that you and 
Mrs. Allen are already doing so 
much for our family that she'll 
never be able to repay you. I'm 
afraid she'd think it too impossible 
to let you do the gardening." 

"Shucks, Susan, Molly and me 
haven't done anything for you folks 
that wasn't paid for long before 
your father passed on." 



"Indeed we haven't!" Mrs. Allen 
added. "And goodness me, what 
are neighbors good for anyway, if it 
isn't to help one another?" 

Unlocking his hands, Mr. Allen 
rose and strolled back to the win- 
dow. For a moment there was si- 
lence. Then, with a sudden start 
that brought Molly to the edge of 
her chair, he whirled on his heel 
and faced the two females. 

"Susan!" he said, his countenance 
beaming, "Susan, what kind of 
gardeners do you think you and 
the boys would make? Do you sup- 
pose, with a little help from me, 
you could grow a garden?" 

Susan's eyes shone like jewels as 
she slid from the sofa and stood be- 
fore Mr. Allen. "Oh, yes, Mr. Al- 
len, I'm sure we could! Michael 
and Jerry and I would work very 
hard— we even have money we could 
use for buying the seed— that 
is " 

"That is what, Susan?" 

"Well, you see, Mj Allen, Mich- 
ael and Jerry and I have been sav- 
ing our allowance to buy a Moth- 
er's Day present." There was a 
moment's hesitation. "Do you 
think," she continued, "that Moth- 
er would just as soon have the 
garden?" 

"Why, stars alive, Child, there's 
no doubt about it!" Mrs. Allen 
chipped in. "Why, bless my soul, 
think what it would mean— happi- 
ness and good things to eat all sum- 
mer long." 

"How about making it a Moth- 
er's Day surprise?" suggested Mr. 
Allen. "Do you suppose we could 
keep it a secret, Susan? Or is it 
likely your mother might do a little 
investigating in the back yard?" 



302 



RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— MAY 1951 



"Mother never has time to do 
much looking around the back 
yard, Mr. Allen. She stays right at 
the typewriter. I'm sure we could 
keep it a secret," and Susan's face 
glowed in delightful anticipation. 

•HTHE following Saturday, as soon 
as Marilyn had left to deliver 
her day's manuscripts, a truck ar- 
rived from Mr. Allen's farm, bring- 
ing a modern garden tractor, which, 
besides providing excitement for 
the children, made quick and easy 
work of preparing the ground. In 
no time at all the small enthusiasts, 
under the direction of Mr. Allen, 
were taking turns at wielding the 
rake and hoe. 

The sun was still well up in the 
sky, though hidden by a cloud that 
afternoon, when the weary but 
exultant group gathered at one end 
of the garden, radiantly praising 
themselves over their accomplish- 
ments. Even Mrs. Allen, who had 
claimed her share of the work by 
soaking large,* hard-shelled varieties 
of seed, managed to be on the scene. 

"Well, now, if that don't cap the 
climax!" exclaimed Mr. Allen, 
when a large-sized raindrop came 
splashing onto the end of his nose. 
"Blessed if I'm not beginning to 
believe that good luck's a part of 
this business. There it is right 
over our heads, another of those 
late afternoon showers— reckon it 
couldn't have come at a more con- 
venient time!" he ended with a 
chuckle. 

"We'd better find shelter," Mrs. 
Allen suggested. "Might be a good 
idea for you children to get a bit 
of that dirt washed off before your 
mother sees you." 



From the bib of her apron she 
took a small, flat package and hand- 
ed it to Susan. "This," she said, 
"is what I bought with the amount 
left from the seed money. Thought 
you children might like to give a 
little personal gift to your Mother." 

"You mean there was money left 
over, Mrs. Allen? I was afraid 
there wouldn't even be enough for 
the seed." 

"Remember, Susan? I told you 
Molly was good at stretchin' a dol- 
lar. Seems she's even better than 
I thought she was," chuckled Mr. 
Allen. 

AT the Harwood house, Sunday 
morning might have seemed 
like Christmas, had it not been 
for the song of spring chirped from 
the barberry bush to the rhythm of 
a bright red tulip that waved be- 
neath Marilyn's window. 

With the first slanting rays of 
sun that crept below the blind, 
Marilyn was aware of young feet 
tiptoeing about the house. In- 
stinctively she surmised that, be- 
cause of excitement over a Moth- 
er's Day gift that had been hidden 
away, the children had not been 
able to sleep and had arisen with 
the break of dawn. To Marilyn, 
however, this was just another of 
those memorable days when the 
door of her heart stood open, hope- 
lessly waiting for the lovable tok- 
ens that only a husband can be- 
stow. 

Drawing the crisp, white sheet 
more closely about her, she turned 
her face on her tear-moist pillow 
and prayed silently. 

It was half an hour later when a 
light tapping at her door aroused 
her from peaceful slumber. 



A MOTHER'S DAY SURPRISE 303 

''Mother! Are you awake, Moth- surprise. What in the world can it 

er?" be?" 

Marilyn pushed the covers from "It really is a nice surprise!" Sus- 

her face and lifted herself on her an assured her. "Will you let us 

elbow. "Yes, dear, I'm awake. You blindfold you and lead "you to it, 

may come in." Mother?" 

Instantly the door opened and "Well, I suppose," Marilyn 
three merry voices echoed, "Happy agreed. 'I'm terribly curious." 
Mother's Day! Happy Mother's Everybody laughed merrily. Sus- 
Day!" an hastened to bring robe and slip- 
Marilyn sat up, smiling at the pers while Michael placed on the 
little group. Susan, holding a blindfold. With one at each side, 
daintily wrapped package, laid it holding an arm, they proceeded to- 
on the bed in front of her. "Open ward the garden, 
it, Mother! It's from all of us!" At their destination Marilyn 
she laughed. lifted the blindfold and waited for 

Marilyn slipped the accompany- her eyes to clear. Spellbound, she 
ing card from the envelope, and stood for a full moment, viewing 
with moist eyes read the affection- the level stretch of ground— a mas- 
ate verse signed with three names, terpiece of professional gardening! 
Then, carefully removing the wrap- Breathlessly she floundered for 
ping from the package, she saw an words. "Why . . . why, I hardly 
exquisitely beautiful linen handker- know what to say— except— except 
chief. this is a happy Mother's Day! In- 

"Oh, it is lovely!" she breathed, deed, I have been blessed with the 

smoothing with a caress the lux- dearest little family in all the 

urious lace, while profound silence world!" 

permeated the room. Looking toward the small, white 

Suddenly breaking the spell, Jer- house across the lot, she saw, 

ry blurted out, "But that isn't all, framed in the kitchen window, two 

Mother!" smiling elderly faces. 

"Isn't all?" Marilyn gasped, won- "And certainly," she continued, 

deringly. "the most loving neighbors any 

"No, Mother," chimed Michael, woman could have, 

"we have a big surprise for you." "Come now, Children, we must 

"Well, this is a really thrilling hurry or we'll be late for Sunday 

Mother's Day," Marilyn laughed. School, on this wonderful Mother's 

"First a beautiful gift, then a big Day." 



LOewdrops 

Margaret B. Shomaker 

Over the silken ropes of grass 
The morning sprinkled 
Tears of crystal, 
For the sunbeams' looking glass. 




Don Knight 

PRUNE ORCHARD, SANTA CLARA VALLEY, CALIFORNIA 

■4 4 tf tf 



itri // lay 

Gene Romolo 

In May, young laughter echoes from the hills 
Where children climb to fill their eager hands 
With gay, wild beauty blown at spring's commands 
Their mirth as lilting as the mountain rills. 

In May, the plum tree puts on nuptial white, 
And peach boughs in pink-petaled perfume dressed, 
Like fair-faced bridesmaids, are their loveliest, 
Caressed by golden fingertips of light. 

In May, the mavis and the bluebird swing 
From branch to branch among the orchard bloom, 
Joyous as girls who flit from room to room 
And, in exuberance of being, sing. 

In May, we twine syringa and snowballs 
For wreaths of tribute on Memorial Day, 
But not to death. On life's progressive way, 
Our eyes turn ever toward where summer calls. 



Page 304 



& 



in &e 







oy in oervice 

Achsa E. Paxman 
Member, General Board of Relief Society 

N a wall in the beautiful memorial Church at Stanford University is 
an inscription which reads as follows: 

If every person in the world should wrap his troubles in a package and bring his 
package to throw into a heap with all the other troubles of the world; and then if every 
person were told that he could go to the heap and select whatever package of trouble 
he cared to choose, each would take his own package away with him. 

All humanity is seeking greater life satisfaction. All are searching for 
the things that will bring into their lives the greatest sense of accomplish- 
ment, the greatest happiness. 

fesus said, "Whosoever shall compel thee to go a mile, go with him 
twain." 

Our Prophet Joseph Smith said to Relief Society women: 

You are now placed in a situation where you can act according to those sympathies 
which God has planted in your bosoms. If you live up to your privileges, the angels 
cannot be restrained from being your associates. 

Do you know of any other organization which holds out such promise 
to its members? 

We receive only in measure as we give. Yes, we must give if we are 
to receive. Let us have consideration for others, love, friendship, devotion. 

Arise and do something worthwhile, and the blessings of the Lord 
will be with you. We are not here to play, drift, or dream. There is hard 
work to do, and hands to lift. Shun not the struggle, face it, it is God's gift. 

Quoting from the closing paragraph of A Century of Relief Society: 

May the women of Relief Society continue to trust in their God, make their 
homes holy places, train up their children in the pure love of Christ, and clothe them- 
selves with the mantle of charity, that in their homes and in their ministrations abroad 
they may exercise that charity which never faileth. 



HAVE RETURNED TO THE VALLEY 

Dororhv J. Roberts 

I have returned to the valley and to shade, 
Daily growing deeper on the lawn; 
Far from the plain where lace of leaves is laid, 
I come to elms embroidering the dawn. 

From treeless regions of the hurricane, 
From reaches tempered not by bough or blade, 
Which soothe sun and tempest and rebuke the rain, 
I return, for healing, to the cool, green peace of shade. 



Page 305 



Sixty LJears J/Lgo 

Excerpts from the Woman's Exponent, May 1, and May 15, 1891 

"For the Rights of the Women of Zion and the Rights of the 
Women of All Nations" 

A PLEASANT PARTY: A very pleasant party of ladies met by invitation at the 
residence of Mrs. Bathsheba W. Smith on the evening of the second of May to cele- 
brate the sixty-ninth anniversary of her birth. All those assembled were particular 
friends of hers, and some of them had been associated with her for many long years in 
labors of love; several of these sisters had been acquaintances or neighbors away back in 
Nauvoo in the early days of the Church. "Sister Bathsheba" as she is best known, has 
had in many respects a serene and happy life, owing mainly to her even temperament 
and cheerful disposition. She is one of those well-organized or evenly balanced persons, 
that little things do not ruffle, and that even great troubles do not overwhelm with 
doubt and melancholy. She has passed through trials that many women would have 
sunk under, and yet she always looked upon them with heroism and fortitude, and now 
in her seventieth year, she stands alone, as independent as the evergreen tree, youthful 
in her spirit, cheerful in demeanor and gentle and gracious as though her grand and 
noble husband were still by her side to lean upon, though he has long since passed 
to "the other side." 



RETURN LOVE 

They had a quarrel and she sent 

His letters back next day, 
His ring and all his presents went 

To him without delay. 

"Pray send my kisses back to me," 

He wrote, "Could vou forget them?" 

She answered speedily that he 

Must come himself and get them. 

SPEECH BY E. R. SNOW: Eighth meeting of Relief Society, Sugar House Ward, 
July 29, 1868. Miss Eliza R. Snow being present by invitation, addressed the sisters as fol- 
lows: "We have met in the capacity of a Relief Society. I consider this a matter of 
great importance. A Society of this kind has always existed whenever the priesthood 
has been upon the earth, and the allusion of the Apostle to the Elect Lady as recorded 
in the New Testament, means the one who presided over each Society in his day. The 
duties of the members of this Society are extensive, our minds are liable to be led off, 
it is necessary that we meet together often to stir up our minds to diligence; this organ- 
ization gives us an opportunity to meet legally, it is not a mere plaything but a sacred 
holy duty, under the direction of your Bishop, do not run to him with every trifle. 

— S. E. Angell, Sec. 

RECOMPENSE 

Worthless the gold while yet untried by fire; 

The finest statue grows by many a blow. 
He who has much to meet may much aspire, 

He of the even way must stay below. 

Page 306 




Woman's Sphere 



Ramona W. Cannon 



MRS. FRANK A. JOHNSON 

(Edna Evans), prominent 
Salt Lake musician, received notable 
recognition when Salt Lake was 
chosen as the place to hold the 
twenty-sixth national biennial con- 
vention of the National Federation 
of Music Clubs and the Music 
Festival in May. Mrs. Johnson is 
largely responsible for bringing this 
convention to Salt Lake as she was 
the Utah representative at the com- 
mittee meeting last May when this 
decision was made. Six hundred 
Relief Society Singing Mothers and 
twelve hundred singers from the 
Mutual Improvement Association, 
besides a large group of their danc- 
ers, the Tabernacle Choir, Utah 
State Symphony, and Grant Jo- 
hannesen, nationally famous pianist 
from Utah, will participate. In ad- 
dition, there will be famous national 
choruses, soloists, ensembles, and 
national and international speakers. 
Four thousand dollars will be dis- 
tributed in awards. This will be a 
cultural highlight in Utah. 

RETURNING to the Metropoli- 
tan Opera after ten years' ab- 
sence, Kirsten Flagstad, at fifty-five, 
received a tremendous ovation in 
her greatest role, Isolde. The most 
famous Wagnerian soprano of her 
generation, she still has an incom- 
parable voice, which shows no de- 
cline. Although she has been a 
singer all her life, she did not de- 



velop her astonishing vocal power 
until she was thirty-seven. Her voice, 
becoming thus powerful, lost none 
of its heart-stirring beauty. She just 
recently announced her retirement 
from opera. 

ANNA PRINCE REDD (Mrs. 
James Monroe Redd), well- 
known and gifted Latter-day Saint 
author of two Relief Society Maga- 
zine serials ("Tomorrow's Cup" and 
"Where Trails Run Out,") and 
many poems, passed away March 17, 
1951. She has particularly enriched 
the literary heritage of her people 
with her stories and poems of the 
San Juan country of Southeastern 
Utah. 

FT was interesting to note the 
change of sentiment in the words 
of the old Hebrew prayer, "Blessed 
art thou, O Lord, who hast not 
made me a woman," and the recent 
statement of Rabbi Maurice Eisen- 
drath, "There is nothing in the prac- 
tice and principles of liberal Juda- 
ism which precludes the possibility 
of a woman serving as a rabbi." The 
rabbi, president of the union of 
American - Hebrew Congregations 
(Reform) was approving the ap- 
pointment of the widow of Rabbi 
William Ackerman to act as rabbi 
in her husband's place, at least for 
the present. She is the first woman 
in America to hold rabbinical 
authority. 

Page 307 



EDITORIAL 



VOL 38 



MAY 1951 



NO. 5 



cJhe Safe uiaroor of aii 



ome 



This is the true nature of home — it is the place of Peace; the shelter, not only from all 
injury, but from all terror, doubt, and division. — John Ruskin 



•HPO many of us has come the 
poignant experience of return- 
ing to our childhood home, after 
long years of absence. And we have 
wondered, seeing again the familiar 
place, the guarding trees, the stone 
walk— we have wondered what has 
made this spot the most precious 
of all the earth. Seeing the walls 
and the windows, the long-loved 
doors, we have sought to compre- 
hend the ineffable and elusive spirit 
of home. 

It is, as the poet Oliver Wendell 
Holmes so well expressed the 
thought, "Where we love is home, 
home that our feet may leave, but 
not our hearts." And so, in return- 
ing home, we come to that place 
which has never been forgotten; we 
return to that bright memory which 
has held us firm and has directed 
our journeys in far places. 

Even as our footsteps echo on the 
walk, we note the tall trees that fa- 
ther planted, the fence he built with 
the glad ring of his hammer pound- 
ing the nails. We see the oval 
space in the lawn where mother 
planted tall blue delphiniums, 
bordered with a ribbon of yellow 
pansies. And if our blessings have 
been great, we may see the place 
where grandfather planted the 
vegetable garden, and that small 
fragrant plot where grandmother 
tended the green herbs. 

Page 308 



One opens the door at the thresh- 
old of home with a pause that is 
full of memories— and they are deep 
and moving memories because they 
have shaped our lives, and they will 
be with us forever. One opens the 
door quietly, remembering when 
mother was there, how beautiful it 
was, warm with love and welcoming. 
How many times have we returned 
in the projection of thoughts and 
longings to this place, for there will 
never come to us an experience 
more heartfelt and more lasting 
than returning home to mother, for 
therewith we return to peace, and 
understanding, and quiet. 

Remember how it was with this 
room, when father came home at 
night— the swift clatter of children's 
feet, shrill voices from the stairs, 

"Daddy Daddy " and the 

race to reach him first. Remember- 
ing how strong and how tender fa- 
ther was, it is no wonder that his 
influence has gone with us wher- 
ever we have been since the time of 
childhood, that his strength has 
made us strong, and his tenderness 
has given us compassion for others. 
How truly are we the glad inheri- 
tors of those qualities of which our 
father seldom spoke, but which he 
exemplified in his own life. How 
truly are we blessed for this— love 
and tenderness are never lost. They 
are the everlasting heritage. 



EDITORIAL 



309 



How long in our lives the child- 
hood home endures! Remember 
how quickly we grew up, how we 
left the home shelter one by one. 
Remember that there was so much 
more than words in mother's fare- 
well. There was that silent unity 
of the family, which is one of the 
choicest gifts that life and eternity 
have to offer. Mother knew that we 
would never really leave home, that 
we would never really leave her. 
She knew that we would return 
often in spirit there, and that we 



would wait eagerly for the time of 
actual reunion within the welcom- 
ing walls. 

It is a sober thought to know 
that the homes which we are build- 
ing today will become the guiding 
strength and a light of inspiration 
in the lives of our children. May 
they return to our homes with the 
same devotion, and with the pre- 
cious joy that we have known. Let 
us never light a lesser lamp within 
our homes. 

-V. P. C. 



(Belief 



What Shall We (Hold? 

Margery S. Stewart 

The horsemen thunder now upon the north, 
Rage for release against the evening sky, 
The shadows faint upon the waiting earth, 
The lamps of hope grow dimmer and some die 
Now mothers count again their scanty store, 
Men search for stronger weapons while they wait. 
All the little houses as in fear 
Seem closer to the earth. The hour is late. 
What shall we hold against the coming night? 
For lantern and for food . . . against the cold? 
Against new treasons, and the broken words, 
The secret places where our lives are sold? 
Let every heart as one forge spears of hope. 
Faith still can shatter vaunted Jerichos, 
Endure again a bitter Valley Forge, 
Retake a Taejon ravished by the foes 
Let our love go abroad in dark and rain, 
Bring the lost to glowing hearths, to bread. 
He shall not fear the horsemen's raging hooves, 
Who has the light and by that light is led. 



of he *jLncient LP\ 



Grace Sayre 

He said he gave no thought to faith, 
Did not believe in God; 
Yet every year he stored his seed 
And each spring turned the sod. 
Could anything but faith bring hope 
That seeds would bear their kind? 
Could he have hope of future fruits 
And be so blind? 



rayer 

Pansye H. Powell 

One burden has haunted the song of man 
From the time when the world was young, 
Borne on the sighs of war-torn lands 
And chanted in every tongue. 
One longing has echoed in every heart, 
A prayer out of grief and pain: 
"Give us the power to make men free! 
Bring peace to the world again!" 



Seen *YLfter cJhese cJhtngs 

Ruth M. McKay 
Melbourne Branch, Australian Mission 

A few weeks ago one of our women investigators questioned me regarding women's 
*» activities in the Church. I would like to answer that question. Life, you know, 
is like climbing a mountain. You know full well that on reaching the top there will 
be unfolded to you, vistas that you never even dreamed of. 

But as you struggle upwards, pebbles get into your shoes and hurt your feet, briars 
tear and scratch you, and suddenly you trip and fall, having been unaware of a hidden 
rock in the ground. These can be likened to difficulties we meet with in everyday life. 
The pebble which hurts our feet can be likened to the unkind word, the briar which 
scratches and tears, the unkind act; and the hidden rock, the covert criticism of leaders. 
But the stout of heart, obeying the Lord's commandments, and despite their many 
hurts, follow the path with increased endurance. Aware of the beauty of life, they 
look for that beauty in everything they see, even in the things which have been misused 
against them, the symmetry of the pebble, the form of the briar bush, the color of 
the rock. 

So those who are pure in heart toss the pebble from the shoe, bind the bleeding 
scratches, and lift themselves from the fall upon the hidden rock, and go on their way 
with peace in their hearts, leaving far behind those who use against them the unkind 
word, the unkind act, or the covert criticism; for the time they spent in searching for 
the pebbles and briars, could have been better utilized in climbing the mountain them- 
selves, and those who use these devices of Satan are retarding their own development. 

As the worthy approach the top, the gloriousness of life is etched before them. 
They have progressed so far that the pebbles, the briars, and the rocks cannot be seen 
amidst the breath-taking panorama which lies before them; and they look back over 
the way they have come with a sense of completeness permeating their being, fully 
aware that the way has been long and arduous, and that they have had to develop all 
their faculties to the fullest in order to reach their goal. 

It was in accordance with this desire to raise human life to its highest level that 
the women's organization of the Church, the Relief Society, was formed. What better 
way to give service to humanity, than by giving loving administration with gentle hands 
to the sick — to help the needy — to give a ready hand to those who need to rehabilitate 
themselves in society — to help our Latter-day Saint families by sending out visiting 
teachers — by helping each of our sisters develop to the highest degree, through monthly 
lessons in theology, where we learn of our Lord's work — in culture where we study the 
best of the world's literature — in music where we gain an appreciation of this lovely 
gift — in social science, which we can apply to everyday affairs — in our work meetings, 
held once a month, which provide an opportunity for the younger members to learn 
the skill of arts and crafts and homemaking under the guidance of the older members. 

This, then, is the work of the Relief Society — to help in any way we can ... 
spiritually — materially — culturally, or practically, anyone desiring to attain the complete- 
ness of soul and the highest degree of happiness in this life. 

I pray, that we may toss the pebbles of unkind words from our lives, brush aside 
the briars of unkind acts that tear and scratch us, and even though we falter because 
of unjust criticism, that we may straighten up again, and through obedience to the 
Lord's commandments, set out for our goal, giving a helping hand, without stint, wher- 
ever possible. 

Page 310 



Floral Arrangements for the Home 



Inez R. Allen 



IS there anything more delightful 
for us to bring into our homes 
than the beautiful flowers our 
Creator has so generously bestowed 
upon us? His garden covers the 
whole earth. We have but to open 
our eyes to find its beauty. Each 
season brings a wealth of material 
challenging us to use and enjoy it. 

Any time of year, if we walk out 
into the nearby woods and fields, 
along the streams and by the road- 
side, we will find the rarest of gems. 
Weeds of various forms, colors, and 
textures, are just waiting there to be 
transformed into some pleasing and 
effective design. 

The mullein plant, with its velvety 
green leaves, if placed in a low flat 
dish or in a pillow vase, becomes a 
thing of beauty. There is the dock 
by the roadside. During the sum- 
mer its long, flat leaves and seeds 
are a pretty green, sometimes with 
a rosy tint. In autumn it turns a 
beautiful russet. Not only does this 
weed make a beautiful arrangement 
by itself, but very often it may be 
used to give height to some of the 
loveliest designs. Another roadside 
weed is the '"horsetail," or joint 
grass. Varying lengths arranged in 
a round, flat dish with a flamingo 
ceramic, are lovely in a wall niche or 
window, on the buffet, or at the 
end of your dining table. 

The grasses, both short and tall, 
the leaves, rocks, reeds, bits of 
gnarled branches or roots, will weep 
if passed by unnoticed. 

Even the dry desert lands present 
their rare specimens to be used in 
some pleasing arrangement. 



How fortunate are those who live 
in the more productive parts of this 
beautiful garden where variety and 
color vie for prominence. Their 
possibilities are unlimited. Yes, the 
world is full of beautiful materials 
for us to use. 

If we live where the cold winters 
make it impossible for us to have a 
garden the year around, we can sup- 
plement by growing plants indoors. 
Geraniums are easy to grow and give 
us much color. Their round leaves 
may be the very shape you want to 
give balance to your arrangement. 
There are the ivy, begonia, little 
marguerites, Philodendron, Chinese 
evergreen, and Aspidistra. An all- 
green arrangement using some of 
these leaves and vines will delight 
you. A combination of the simplest 
flowers and leaves will give pleasing 
and striking results. 

Flower arrangements in the home 
seem to be a necessary part of our 
everyday living. They help us to 
translate the mood of the moment 
into something we can enjoy, and 
often supply that very touch for 
which we have been looking. They 
can express personality and taste. 

The arrangement becomes the 
highlight in the room. Therefore, 
we will have better results if we 
first select its position. If it is to be 
placed on the piano, it needs to be 
bold and large, made of heavy ma- 
terial so that it will seem to belong 
there. On an occasional table a 
dainty arrangement would be in 
scale. The long lines of the book- 
case suggest far-reaching branches, 
or trailing vines, and the arrange- 

Page 311 



312 



RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— MAY 1951 






ment would look much better placed 
near the end rather than in the 
center. The mantel could be treat- 
ed much the same, unless there are 
candlesticks or other objects of bal- 
ance at the ends, then the arrange- 
ment would need to be symmetrical- 
ly balanced. If it is to be placed 
before a mirror, the rear view must 
be pleasing. Another formal treat- 
ment for the mantel would be to 
make identical or twin arrange- 
ments. It is most satisfactory. 

Suppose you wish to make a de- 
sign for a table placed between two 
windows, or between a door and 
window. This narrow wall space 
would call for tall vertical lines with 
large, dark-colored flowers placed 
low in the arrangement to give prop- 
er interest and balance. Leaves of 
yucca, cattail, bearded iris, and tall 
grasses may be used to produce these 
tall, reaching lines. 

After you decide upon the place- 
ment of the bouquet and the lines 
that will best fit that placement, you 
will be concerned as to color. Flow- 
ers that harmonize with the color 
scheme of the room or some promi- 
nent piece of furniture will give it 
relationship. Try not to have or- 
phan arrangements. 

The next problem, perhaps, would 
be the kind of container to use. We 
need not have expensive or highly 
decorated vases, bowls, or trays; 
something plain and substantial for 
heavy material, something pretty 
and dainty for smaller designs. A 
well-proportioned container is eith- 
er higher than the width, or broader 
than the height. Besides earthen- 
ware, containers may be of porcelain, 
crystal, wood, and such metals as 
brass, silver, pewter, bronze, or 
aluminum. Why not use a grace- 



FLORAL ARRANGEMENTS FOR THE HOME 



313 




ful but simple basket on your porch 
or in your game room? Simple 
forms and neutral colors in dishes 
and vases will make your efforts 
more successful. Oval dishes, shal- 
low, but with straight sides, or the 
pillow vase, which resembles a brick 
set on end, are among the best. Flar- 
ing jars do not do as much for your 
arrangement as do the straight-sided 
round ones. 

Flowers with delicate texture, 
such as Camellias, Gardenias, and 
roses, would be enhanced in a lovely 
silver bowl or one made of very fine 
china or crystal. 

The container becomes part of 
the design and harmonizes with it 
in size, color, and texture. The ar- 
rangement must carry the interest, 
not the container. Often the color 
of some part of the arrangement 
will be repeated in the vase. If just 
one color of flower is used, the con- 
tainer may carry that same tint or 
shade, or be in a color that is com- 
plementary. 

One of the best aids to flower ar- 
rangement is a suitable holder. It 
is a must for good arrangements. 
There are many kinds in various 
colors, weights, and materials on 
the market. The needle-point frog 
serves best for many things and 
especially for predominant stem 
lines. For thick-stemmed branches 



and flowers a wire holder gives good 
support. A good flower holder 
should be heavy and rustproof. Ex- 
periment to find the one which 
serves you best. 

The flowers are apt to tip over 
if the frog is not made secure. This 
can be done by using modeling clay, 
which does not dissolve in water. 
Your florist will sell this to you. 
Until the frog is securely placed, 
care must be taken to have both the 
container and the frog perfectly dry. 
For vases, chicken wire makes a 
very good holder, or a square of 
one-half inch mesh wire cloth rolled 
or bent and wedged vertically into 
the vase will do. Allow for space 
between the folds for stems or 
branches. Foliage is sometimes 
crowded into the vase to hold the 
stems, but if it is to be used for 
more than a few hours, the water 
will become polluted and the flowers 
will die. 

We make flower arrangements 
for two reasons: to feel the joy of 
handling cut flowers and to create 
beautiful pictures rich in meaning. 
The joy we get in arranging flowers 
cannot be realized without a certain 
amount of patient practice. Lose 
yourself in projecting the mood you 
wish to portray. Let your emotions 
sink deep within you. Your results 
will be a thrill. 



The Omnipotent has sown his name on the heavens in glittering stars; but upon 
the earth he planteth his name in tender flowers. — Richter 



For the Strength of the Hills 

Chapter 4 
Mabel Harmer 

Synopsis: Camilla Fenton, an orphan come over and make fires/' decided 

from Santa Monica, California, comes to § tan? poking paper and wood into 

Crandall Idaho, to teach, and marries the ran ge, "or we could have Stopped 

Stanley Rodgers- in the spring when school i- » 

is out. Camilla is disappointed in their tnere for dinner, 

big, ugly farmhouse, but all summer she "Yes, we could, she agreed. Now 

cans fruits and vegetables, and in the fall that he had put the idea into her 

she and Stanley go to California for a visit head> sne d ec id e d that he had been 

with Camilla's Aunt Lillian. extremely thoughtless to bring her 

into the house cold and hungry 

THEY arrived home from Cali- when they could so easily have 

fornia on a gray day in early stopped in at his mother's for a hot 

November, when there was meal, 

neither the majestic whiteness of And the house looked so awful 

winter nor the green and purple of with two week's dust on the furni- 

summer to relieve the monotony of ture, especially in the gray Novem- 

the landscape. ber light, or half light. Maybe they 

"I guess it looks sort of bleak to should have stayed in California for 

you, after all the sunshine and flow- the rest of the winter. Aunt Lillian 

ers," suggested Stan as they drove would have been glad to have them, 

along the country road. Maybe they would do that next 

'"Sort of," Camilla admitted. "It winter. The thought cheered her 

really is the worst time of the year, somewhat, although she knew well 

isn't it? But we'll have plenty to enough that Stan and her aunt 

do to take our minds off the land- couldn't possibly spend several 

scape— if they need taking off. I'm months in the same house. Two 

simply bursting with plans for the weeks had been enough of a strain, 

house, now that I don't have to After a dinner of thick steaks 

grow a million things and then stick which Stan fried, and stringbeans 

them in cans. And another thing, and peaches from their own store, 

you can start paying me proper at- she felt in a happier frame of mind, 

tention. You've hardly looked at Especially when he had built a fire 

me all summer while you had those in the grate and pulled up two 

spuds on your mind." shabby chairs, shutting out the rest 

'"Lady, I'm certainly going to of the room, 

make up for lost time," he asserted, "I must be an awfully primitive 

putting one arm around her shoul- creature," she said. "Warmth and 

ders. f°°d seem to make all the difference 

The rosy glow that enveloped her between being happy and contented 

lasted until they stepped into the or feeling like a banshee." 

cold, dismal kitchen. Tm attracted to some of the 

"I guess that I should have sent same myself," he agreed, stretching 

a note to the folks and had someone out his long legs to the fire. "Give 

Page 314 



FOR THE STRENGTH OF THE HILLS 



315 



me three good meals a day, plenty 
of firewood, the most beautiful red- 
headed wife in the world, and I 
don't ask for much else." 

"Modest creature/' she laughed. 
Then, looking around at the shad- 
ows flickering on the walls, she pro- 
posed, "Let's go to town tomorrow 
and buy paint. I think that I want 
light blue for this room and bright 
flowered chintzes for the furniture. 
The window will have to go until 
next summer, of course. We can't 
go cutting holes in the house in 
this weather." 

"You talk of paint and chintzes 
at a moment like this?" he sighed. 
"All right, if you have a one-track 
mind I suppose you have a one-track 
mind, and I'll have to get used to 
it. We'll go shopping for paint to- 
morrow." 

CHE went to bed glowing with 
enthusiasm and plans for work- 
ing on the house through all the 
winter months. When she put her 
feet to the floor the next morning, 
a wave of nausea sent her back 
under the blankets. The odor of 
frying bacon, which ordinarily 
would have brought her out with a 
bound, only made her turn her face 
to the wall, as if by so doing she 
could also cut out the smell. 

A minute later Stan appeared in 
the doorway to announce, "Break- 
fast is served, Madam. And if you 
don't get the heck out of there, I'll 
put a glass of cold water down your 
neck." 

His gaiety made her feel even 
worse, and she muttered, "'Stop it! 
I'm sick." 

"Sick," he repeated. "You can't 
be. Those steaks weren't as bad as 
that." 



"Please don't joke," she begged. 
"And shut the door so that I can't 
smell that bacon." 

He shut the door quickly and 
came to her bed. "What is it, 
then?" he asked anxiously. "Shall 
I phone for a doctor?" 

"No, we can see him when we 
go into town for the paint. Any- 
way, there'll be all kinds of time. 
I'm probably going to have a baby." 

"A baby!" he shouted. "Jumping 
grasshoppers! You don't mean it!" 

"I rather think I do. And I 
thought that prospective fathers 
greeted such an announcement with 
considerable sentiment and not 
with 'jumping grasshoppers/ ' 

"Jumping grasshoppers!" he re- 
peated. "Imagine us with a red- 
headed boy! Blackie's colt will be 
just right for him to ride in a year 
or two. What do you think you'd 
like to eat? Name it and I'll get it, 
if I have to go to China." 

'"Some fruit perhaps and a couple 
of soda crackers," she smiled. "We'll 
send to China later." 

She felt better after she had eat- 
en. There was an exuberance, in 
fact, that she had never imagined 
even the prospects of a baby would 
bring. They would have lots of 
children— sons and daughters who 
would grow up fine and splendid, 
like the country about them. The 
old house would not be too big, and 
it must not be ugly. It was the be- 
ginning of new and wonderful 
things all the way through. 

After lunch they rode into town 
and bought the bright colors to 
paint the "Mexican" kitchen. 

"There's no need of getting more 
at one time than we can use," she 
said, "as long as the store is only 
a couple of hours away." Later on 



316 



RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— MAY 1951 



she was to find she had made a 
most fortunate decision. 

The next morning Stan brought 
her breakfast to bed, and she felt 
reasonably well after she had eaten 
and dressed. "Bring on your paint/' 
she said, after the dishes were 
washed, 'I can't believe that we are 
really starting." 

"I bought two brushes," he an- 
nounced. "You get to do all the 
medium places, and I do the high 
and low. That's to prove that I 
love you and that I can reach the 
farthest." 

"Nobility at its finest flower," she 
agreed as he handed her a can of 
paint. She took three strokes across 
the wall by the side of the window 
and put the can down quickly. 
"O-o-oh, I can't bear it!" she cried, 
running to the door. "Another 
whiff of this paint and I'd die with- 
out a struggle." 

CTAN closed up the cans. "You 
take the car and go down to 
mother's," he suggested. "Til do the 
painting. I'll have at least two 
walls done by the time you get 
back. Shall I do one yellow and 
the other red?" 

"I don't care," she flung back at 
him, as she grabbed her coat and 
went out. 

When she returned, just about 
dinner time, the smell of paint was 
worse than ever. Almost as hard 
to bear was the thought that this 
meant further postponements of 
her dreams for doing anything to 
the house. 

"First it's too much summer work 
and no money. Now it's this," she 
wailed. "Next summer it will be 
too much work again. Do you think 
we'll ever get it done?" 



"You might go. away for a month 
while I do it," he suggested. 

Camilla considered it briefly, 
then shook her head. "No, I'm 
afraid that wouldn't work. Where 
would I go? I can't go chasing back 
to California again. Anyway I don't 
want to. Maybe we can do it 
later in the year. And, in the mean- 
time, I can work on some slip cov- 
ers. They'll make a big difference 
in the living room." 

They agreed that he would at 
least have to finish the kitchen. 
"And the back bedroom must be 
made into a pink and white nursery, 
no matter what," she declared. "I 
can go down to Mother Rodgers 
while you do that. You can do a 
few dabs each day and air it out 
good before I come back." 

Following this method he man- 
aged to get the kitchen and nursery 
done, and that was all. Camilla 
made slip covers for the lumpy 
couch and two chairs in the living 
room and then couldn't decide 
whether they looked better or 
worse against the nondescript walls. 
She finally concluded that anything 
would be an improvement over the 
way the room looked when they first 
moved in. 

She felt better as winter gave way 
to spring and took considerable 
pleasure in working out in the flow- 
er garden. Stan never went to 
town or to one of the neighbors that 
he didn't bring back a start of some- 
thing or other, and by May she 
had pansies and iris blooming, with 
many other plants showing great 
promise. 

Stan took over the vegetable 

garden, with the help of his young 

brother Mickey, and as for canning, 

(Continued on page 355) 



You Can Learn 

kl o/s for kluaaaary ana IK o/s for LKoger 

Katheiine Kelly 

WELL, that was the end of Tom took his hat from the rack 

the petunia-bed for this by the door, lifted my chin 7 and 

year! Twice before I had kissed me all in one gesture, 

rescued the little seedlings and re- "Lift up your head, my love, and 

planted them, but this time they see farther than the yard This farm 

had been far enough along to be Wlll look beautiful e h to me if 

crushed and broken. Just another we can eyer . it id for „ 

result of my turkey raising expen- MJft ^ damed oM bb]er! „ 

ment. 1 here mst wasn t any use! , , ° , , . 

Confound that turkey gobbler any- ra p d '. resentment *° hot I had to 

how! Was there no other place on take rt out on something. That 

the whole farm where he could gobbler is nothing but a nuisance, 

take his dust bath! When the little turkeys hatch, he'll 

My face must have looked like a stmt round and round the P ens > 

storm cloud as I entered the kitchen and step on the little turkeys with 

where the rest of the family were his bl § feet > and eat their food > and 

finishing breakfast even threaten me when I go to feed 

"My dear, you have watered **?■ Fd like to cho P his head 
those petunias with your tears for, 

this is the third year, now," Tom, " A necessary evil, Mother," my 

my husband, spoke reasonably, husband chuckled, as he went 

"Won't you ever give up? You just through the door, 

can't have turkeys and flowers, too." Then l became aware that Ernie, 

"Then you knew they had ruined our oldest child > was trying to comb 

my petunias and never said a his own hair - Tt stl11 seemed im- 

word " I accused. possible that he was old enough 

"Yes, they are early risers. I drove to §° to school. What kind of a 

the old gobbler out first thing this mother was I anyway? 

morning. I don't know how he got "Here, Son, mother will help you 

through the fence this time. Any- with that part. Did you get your 

way, honey, they are your petunias ears clean?" Ernie squirmed a lit- 

and your turkeys. Looks like you tie as I examined his ears and 

will have to make a choice. We straightened his shirt collar. "Where 

thought the turkeys were all right did Kathy and Roger go?" 

when we got that check last fall. "Outside someplace. Please hur- 

It more than paid the interest on ry, Mother, it's nearly time for the 

the farm, remember?" bus." 

"Of course we have to have mon- "All right. Don't forget your 

ey, but what's the use of owning a lunch." 

place if we can't have it pleasant As I followed him to the door, 

and— and beautiful/" I slumped in my eyes searched the yard for Kathy. 

a chair. I knew that wherever she was Roger 

Page 317 



318 



RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— MAY 1951 



would be also. She was a regular 
little mother to him. There they 
were, kneeling by the flower bed 
trying to replant my 'petunias, 
Kathy's dark head and Roger's blond 
one close together. My heart gave 
a tug, and quick tears came to my 
eyes. 

"Don't cry, Mama, we fix 'em," 
Kathy comforted me as she left the 
broken flowers. Roger looked up 
into my face. 

Roger, our youngest, was only a 
year and a half, but he was a husky 
little man. From the first it had 
seemed that he had come into this 
world with a definite purpose, and 
come what might, he was going to 
stay and accomplish it. 

Kathy had come into the circle 
of my arms and was searching my 
face doubtfully. 

"We don't care too much about 
the petunias, we'll have sweet peas 
in a few weeks," I continued. "See, 
the turkeys can't hurt the sweet 
peas because these sticks we put for 
them to climb on, protect them." 

"Mummy!" Kathy always called 
me mummy when we were close like 
this. "Can't we put sticks in the 
petunias, too?" 

"Well, it might be an idea for 
another year." 

The bus honked over at Jensen's 
crossing, and I glanced up the lane 
to be sure that Ernie was going to 
make it. He had reached the gate, 
he would make it all right. I tingled 
with pride. Ernie knew where he 
wanted to go also. In the set of his 
shoulders I could read determina- 
tion enough to take him through 
all the years, as far as he wanted to 
go. And I knew that it would be 
far. Somehow that long lane was 
symbolic. 



Such wonderful children! They 
would be strong where I was weak, 
and they would have and do all the 
things we could only dream about. 

T had scarcely finished the dishes 

when I heard the call of the 
turkey hen, the high-pitched, cluck- 
ing noise the hens make when they 
are going to lay their eggs. They 
use it to coax the other turkeys to 
follow them and sort of cover for 
them while they go to their nests. 
It was my signal to follow and find 
the nest. 

I looked out the window and saw 
one hen leading the way and acting 
nonchalant, as she pecked here and 
there, to show her indifference, but 
all the time she aimed directly to- 
ward the bushes along the fence at 
the far end of the field. The other 
hens followed along, obedient to 
the call, and the gobbler strutted 
after them, dragging his wings and 
showing off as usual. 

I watched from the window and 
worked intermittently till they were 
nearly to the top field, then I 
caught up my big straw hat and 
started across the yard in a hurry. 

Kathy and Roger had finished 
their fence and were watering their 
stick horses in the ditch. Roger 
dropped his with a splash and ran 
toward me. "Me go, too, Mama, 
me go wif." 

"No you can't go, honey. Mama 
has to hurry, and she has to go quiet- 
ly so she can find where the turkey 
will lay her egg. You play with 
Kathy. Kathy, come and get him 
and watch him carefully. That 
turkey gobbler isn't too far away." 

Kathy took him by the hand and 
her voice was at once provocative 



YOU CAN LEARN 



319 



and persuasive, as she told him that 
he must feed and take care of his 
horse or it would run away. 

The first hen had gone out of 
sight, but the others, trailing after, 
told me which way she had gone. 
I made a wide circle around them 
and came in among the brush above 
the railroad track where I could 
watch without making a sound. 
The gobbler and the other hen had 
stayed back in the field- now, and 
the hen I was watching was going 
up the road very leisurely, stopping 
to listen and to call occasionally. 
Once in a while she made an ex- 
cursion into the willows by the road- 
side only to come out again and 
make a semblance of eating in the 
grass. 

I followed slowly keeping her 
always in sight. The earth was 
green and alive between the banks 
of white clay, the birds were busy in 
the willows, and little waves of heat 
shimmered above the green fields. 

The hen I had been watching had 
disappeared in the willows. When 
I crept quietly up to the place, she 
was settled on her nest. I selected 
a good sized rock and laid it by the 
roadside to mark the spot so I 
could get the egg later, and started 
back for the house, fairly bursting 
with satisfaction. 

While the bushes still hid the 
house from view I heard Roger 
scream. I burst through the wil- 
lows in time to see him fall and 
the turkey gobbler start towards 
him. I had heard a fantastic story 
somewhere, that turkey gobblers 
picked children's eyes out because 
they were bright and shiny. But that 
couldn't be true! And yet Roger 
was so small and helpless and that 
gobbler was big and mean. 



Why were my feet made of lead 
and glued to the ground! It was 
like one of those nightmares where, 
try as you will, you can make no 
progress. 

Then I heard the screen door 
slam, saw a little streak of red dress 
cross the lawn, and in a moment 
little Kathy was beating the turkev 
with one of her stick horses. Mo- 
mentarily the gobbler dropped his 
feathers and stepped back from the 
onslaught. In a flash Kathy was 
between it and her baby brother, 
standing her ground like a little 
burst of red fury, and beating hard- 
er and harder, as the turkey ruffled 
his feathers and gobbled menacing- 

iy- 

The brave little darling, how did 
she dare to do it! 

In another moment I was there 
with the club I had picked up some- 
where on the way, and the old gob- 
bler turned and fled for his life. 

My knees gave way under me and 
I sank to the ground. All Kathy's 
bravado was gone now, and she 
wilted, sobbing, into my arms. Rog- 
er's tears had made mud of the 
dirt on his face, but when I wiped 
it away with my apron, his face was 
all right. He was a little bruised 
and mussed up, but mostly just 
scared. 

'There, there," I soothed. "Don't 
you cry, We'll kill that old gobble- 
gobble and eat him for Daddy's 
birthday." 

"When is Daddy's birthday?" 
Kathy asked. 

"Day after tomorrow, and Daddv 
will kill the turkey tonight. We'll 
have both grandmas and both grand- 
pas up to dinner." 



cJhe Spirit of 1 1 iotherhood 

Hazel McAllister 

SINCE I have been old enough to become aware of these things, I have heard and 
read a great deal of eloquent oratory on the beauty, the dignity, and the glory of 
motherhood. There have been times in my life, and I daresay in the lives of countless 
other mothers, also, when they have recalled such words with some questioning. 

But, fortunately, there is more to being a mother than the menial tasks. With the 
experiences come wisdom and a tempering of the spirit. Sometimes when we go to bed 
at night, before sleep comes, the events of the day go in review before us. Some of the 
day's happenings touch our heartstrings as we remember, with a smile, the child with 
the bright and vibrant spirit who has given so much sunshine and happiness to all our 
family circle. We think of another child with his problems and inability to make 
social adjustment; and we recall, with a twinge of regret, the quick and angry rebuke 
given in thoughtless haste. We think of all the aches, the hurts, the tears of our chil- 
dren, and the heaviness which comes to the heart is not quickly dispelled. Then comes 
a realization of our shortcomings, for mothers are only human beings, and, with it, 
comes a resolve to do better the next day; to comfort, to lead, to guide our children in 
gentleness and understanding. 

It has been said by the poets that the bravest battles ever fought cannot be found 
on the maps of the world, but in the hearts of the mothers of men, and they go on 
from babyhood to the grave. 

Most women can accomplish the biological function of bringing children into the 
world, but to earn the name of mother, the true spirit of unselfish motherhood must 
become a part of us. No love in all the world equals the love of a true mother. 
President Joseph F. Smith said that no love in all the world comes nearer to being like 
the love of God. Knowing this, I think most mothers do not realize how much their 
influence affects the destiny of their children, an influence which reaches into eternity! 
Upon Latter-day Saint mothers the obligation is tenfold because of their enlightened 
understanding of the gospel standards. If all mothers in the world realized and put to 
use their potential power in influencing for righteousness the lives of their children 
through love and kindness, persuasion and example, what a different world this would 
bel Greatness in character comes when human needs are rightfully met and when the 
human soul may develop secure in love and understanding. 



cJoealot 

Oia. Lee Parthesius 

At eighty-odd, and nearly blind, 
Her hours of joy could lie behind; 

But, leaning hard upon her cane, 
She dares the dark and wind and rain 

As eagerly she goes to meet 
The future with its bittersweet. 



Page 320 






C/ruogy 

Mirla Greenwood Thayne 

Yesterday 

My heart conceived a song one yesterday; 
I walked alone where beauty beckoned me, 
And saw a field of iris washed by rain, 
Rain that left jeweled mist on leaf and tree. 

"Beauty," I said, "gives birth to words that sing, 
So I shall write a trilogy of spring." 

I saw a rainbow arched across the sky, 
A radiant trellis, an ethereal line, 
Curved in majesty, and heaven bent, 
Linking the mortal with the great Divine. 

A meadow lark in sudden rhapsody, 

Made haste to lend my song a melody. 

And soon a gray-veiled earth knew sudden light, 

Clouds vanished as if by Supreme command, 

Hills were transformed from mauve to sunset rose, 

As if an artist could not stay his hand. 

Here was more beauty than my heart could hold, 
Would I know peace until my song was told? 

Today 

I grasp my pen to give birth to my song, 
To fashion words into a lyric sweet, 
When suddenly I hear from corridor 
The pattering of tiny baby feet. 

"A story, Mommy, come and read to me." 

Tonight, a lullaby my song will be. 

"I'm hungry, Mom." The supper hour brings 

An anxious brood in need of daily bread; 

My hands must deftly spread my humble board, 

Reality must sway my dream-filled head. 

My song can wait. Tomorrow I shall sing, 

Of wooded hills, and flowers, and rains of spring. 

My own sweet lyric of just fourteen years 

Comes to my chair and, kneeling by my side, 

She chatters on about so many things; 

I must take time to love, direct, and guide. 
Another day my trilogy shall find 
Birth from my heart, transition from my mind. 

Tomorrow 

No longer do my halls resound the noise 
Of baby feet and "bustin'-bronco" boys, 
My lyric into sonnethood has grown, 
And has a house and garden of her own. 
The laughter and the songs of yesterday 
Are echoes from the cherished days gone by. 
But still in spring, the iris bids the rain, 
A rainbow highway links the earth with sky. 

Yet when the birds fly homeward on the wing, 

My heart conceives another song of spring. 

Page 321 



Magazine Subscriptions for 1950 

Counselor Marianne C. Sharp 

''PHE general board acknowledges Since the Magazine contains the 

with deep appreciation and lessons studied in Relief Society, it 

gratitude the devotion of Relief So- serves not only for general reading 

ciety presidents, Magazine repre- interest but is also the means of 

sentatives, and subscribers, who bringing the educational work into 

have increased the number of sub- the homes of all its SUDScribers . it 

scnptions to the Relief Society {s thus almost indis ble for Re , 

Magazine to an all-time high or ,. £ c . , , r , . ., 

b o • • £ o - her Society members, and is the 

02, cq8 in 1 a co, an increase or 8,1:47 . J . . ' r , ._ . 

over 1949. In 1948, following the me J ans of conveying the lofty ideals 

necessary increase in subscription and Purposes of Relief Society into 

price, the subscriptions were 78,166; the homes of non-Latter-day Saint 

in 1949, they increased to 84,048; subscribers. 

and this past year, in December The general board considers the 

1950, the subscriptions rose to calling of Magazine representative 

92,598. to be one of importance. The great 

The general board strives to main- increase in subscriptions this past 

tain a periodical of high merit par- year attests to the devotion to Re- 

ticularly suited to Latter-day Saint lief Society and the gospel of sisters 

women, but it recognizes that with- who have a responsibility in this 

out the faithful service of the sisters work. All who have successfully 

throughout the Church who are carried through their assignments 

called to assist in Magazine work, are to be commended and con- 

the circulation would be far less. gra tula ted. 

uionors for uttghest LKatings 

Stake 

South Los Angeles (California), 140% 
Magazine Representative — Nancy M. Rupp 

Ward 

South Gate Ward, South Los Angeles Stake (California), 244% 
Magazine Representative — Marie DeSpain 

Mission 

California Mission, 93% 
Mission Relief Society President — Mary H. Stoddard 

Mission District 
South East Arkansas District, Central States Mission, 129% 
Page 322 



MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTIONS FOR 1950 323 

Mission Branch 

Williams Branch (Arizona), California Mission, 250% 
Magazine Representative — Alice Muirhead 

Stakes Achieving Highest Percentages 

South Los Angeles (California) 140.... Nancy M. Rupp 

Provo Stake (Utah) i36....Flora Buggert 

Nyssa Stake (Oregon) i32....Mae A. Boyer 

Oquirrh Stake (Utah) i28....Ione C. Fuller 

San Joaquin Stake (California) i22....Wealtha Mendenhall 

Glendale Stake (California) i2o....Elsie Weber 

East Los Angeles (California) ii9....Zelma Beck 

Moapa Stake (Nevada- Arizona) 118.— Eunice B. Johnson 

Idaho Falls Stake (Idaho) ii4-...Clemey Young 

Missions Achieving Highest Percentages 

California 93-...Mary H. Stoddard, President 

Northern States 84....Lucy T. Anderson, President 

Central States 82....Annie M. Ellsworth, President 

East Central States 8o....Edna H. Matheson, President 

Northwestern States 8o....Mavil A. McMurrin, President 

Texas-Louisiana 8o....Leone R. Bowring, President 

Southern States 79..„Rula H. Choules, President 

Canadian y8....LaPriel R. Eyre, President 

Western States 78....Mildred M. Dillman, President 

Stakes in Which All the Waids Achieved 100% 01 Above 

Big Cottonwood Stake (Utah) Martha W. Paulsen 

East Long Beach Stake (California) Margaret Bryan 

East Los Angeles Stake (California) Zelma Beck 

Glendale Stake (California) Elsie Weber 

Granite Stake (Utah) Elizabeth W. McLelland 

Grant Stake (Utah) Alleen F. Keller 

Idaho Falls Stake (Idaho) Clemey Young 

Liberty Stake (Utah) Lila B. Pressler 

Moapa Stake (Nevada-Arizona) Eunice B. Johnson 

Nyssa Stake (Oregon) Mae A. Boyer 

Oquirrh Stake (Utah) lone C. Fuller 

Pasadena Stake (California) Blanche Calvert 

Provo Stake (Utah) Flora Buggert 

San Joaquin Stake (California) Wealtha Mendenhall 

Shelley Stake (Idaho) Genevieve Weatherston 

South Idaho Falls Stake (Idaho) Valerea Blatter 



324 



RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— MAY 1951 



Wards and Blanches in Stakes and Missions Achieving 200% or Higher 

Williams Branch (Arizona), California Mission 250%.... Alice Muirhead 

South Gate Ward, South Los Angeles Stake (Cali- 
fornia) 244%.... Marie DeSpain 

Galesburg Branch (Illinois), Northern States Mis- 
sion 243%.... Rena P. Custer 

Oak Grove Branch, Florida Stake (Florida) 243%.... Iva Williams 

Manavu Ward, Provo Stake (Utah) 240%.... Flora Buggert 

Starke Branch, Florida Stake (Florida) 238%.... Jenene Manning 

Vista Branch (California), California Mission 225%.... Florence Reiney 

Phoenix Seventh Ward, Phoenix Stake (Arizona) ....205%.... Minerva B. Gillette 
Miramonte Ward, South Los Angeles Stake (Cali- 
fornia 202%.... Anna Struhs 

Nyssa Second Ward, Nyssa Stake (Oregon) 202%.... Hazel J. Hunter 

Storrs Ward, North Carbon Stake (Utah) 200% Mildred Brinkerhoff 



Stakes by {Percentages 



South Los Angeles 

Provo 

Nyssa 

Oquirrh 

San Joaquin 

Glendale 

East Los Angeles 

Moapa 

Idaho Falls 

Big Cottonwood 

Shelley 

San Fernando 

Palo Alto 

Liberty 

Sharon 

Nampa 

Florida 

Burley 

Pasadena 

South Idaho Falls 

East Long Beach 

San Bernardino 

San Juan 

Rexburg 

Cassia 

Grant 

South Salt Lake 

Phoenix 

Ingle wood 

North Idaho Falls 

West Pocatello 

Granite 

Humboldt 

Sugar House 

Sevier 



140 


Taylor 


136 


Bannock 


132 


Ogden 


128 


Union 


122 


Wasatch 


120 


Rigby 


119 


Kolob 


118 


Long Beach 


114 


South Box Elder 


112 


North Jordan 


112 


Bonneville 


112 


Park 


110 


Blackfoot 


110 


Highland 


108 


Ensign 


108 


Uvada 


107 


South Bear River 


107 


Emigration 


107 


East Rigby 


106 


Farr West 


106 


Minidoka 


105 


St. Joseph 


105 


San Francisco 


105 


Sacramento 


105 


Young 


104 


North Box Elder 


104 


University 


104 


Malad 


104 


Alpine 


103 


Los Angeles 


102 


Pocatello 


102 


Chicago 


101 


Gridley 


101 


Mesa 


101 


West Jordan 



100 
100 
100 
99 
98 
97 
97 
96 
95 
95 
95 
94 
94 
93 
92 
92 
91 
91 
91 
91 
91 
91 
90 
90 
89 
89 
88 
88 
88 
88 
88 
88 
88 
87 
86 



MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTIONS FOR 1950 



325 



Cottonwood 

Oakland 

Cache 

Portneuf 

Southern Arizona 

Mt. Graham 

Oneida 

Seattle 

Ben Lomond 

West Utah 

Alberta 

Bear Lake 

San Diego 

Bear River 

New York 

Raft River 

Twin Falls 

Denver 

Timpanogos 

Weiser 

Boise 

Reno 

Idaho 

North Rexburg 

Utah 

North Davis 

Weber 

Parowan 

Big Horn 

Richland 

Hillside 

South Ogden 

Wells 

Berkeley 

Maricopa 

Snowflake 

Lehi 

Uintah 

Yellowstone 

Pioneer 

Grantsville 

South Davis 

Beaver 

North Weber 

Palmyra 

East Jordan 

Salt Lake 

Millard 

Nevada 

Franklin 

Lethbridge 

St. George 

East Cache 

Orem 

East Mill Creek 



86 
85 
85 
85 
85 
85 
85 
85 
84 
84 
84 
84 
84 
84 
83 
83 
82 
81 
81 
81 
81 
81 
81 
81 
80 
80 
79 
79 
79 
79 
78 
78 
78 
78 
78 
78 
78 
77 
77 
76 
76 
76 
76 
76 
75 
75 
75 
75 
75 
75 
74 
74 
74 
74 
74 



Mt. Jordan 

East Provo 

St. Johns 

American Falls 

Juarez 

Tooele 

San Luis 

South Carolina 

Riverside 

Washington 

East Riverside 

Spokane 

Lake View 

Juab 

Carbon 

Teton 

Garfield 

Mount Logan 

Kanab 

Star Valley 

Emery 

North Sanpete 

Wayne 

South Sanpete 

Mount Ogden 

Lost River 

Duchesne 

Smithfield 

Summit 

Logan 

Deseret 

Montpelier 

Nebo 

Portland 

Cedar 

Temple View 

Davis 

Zion Park 

North Carbon 

Blaine 

Lyman 

South Sevier 

South Summit 

North Sevier 

Morgan 

Woodruff 

Roosevelt 

Benson 

Panguitch 

Gunnison 

Santaquin-Tintic 

Moon Lake 

Moroni 

Oahu 



73 
73 
72 
72 
72 
72 
72 
72 
71 
71 
70 
70 
70 
69 
69 
68 
67 
67 
67 
66 
66 
66 
66 
66 
65 
65 
64 
64 
64 
64 
63 
63 
63 
63 
62 
62 
62 
61 
61 
61 
59 
58 
57 
57 
56 
55 
54 
53 
51 
49 
48 
42 
40 
26 



326 



RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— MAY 1951 



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Start Vi/ttk LJourself 

Caroline Eyiing Miner 

ffJF you want to put the world right, start with yourself." This statement which I 
■*• read recently set me to thinking. I remembered that Jesus gave us to understand 
that we were not to criticize others unless we were perfect. You recall his writing in 
the sand while he allowed the accusers of the woman who had been taken in sin to 
depart, as he startled them by saying, ". . . he that is without sin among you, let him 
first cast a stone at her." 

How often do we hear: "I wish Margaret would keep her children at home, and 
teach them some manners." "I wish Mrs. Smith would keep her yard clean." 

These criticisms indicate a natural desire to improve the world, and we all have 
this desire. 

Along with this desire, we all seem to want to start the improvement outside our- 
selves. This is very natural, but unfortunately it is an unsuccessful way to begin to 
improve the world. 

A person must start reforms with himself. If I wish Margaret to keep her chil- 
dren at home, and to train them in good manners, I must see that I do these things, 
and then perhaps Margaret will imitate me. Nothing is truer than that we carry our 
good times within ourselves, and within ourselves, we may find the source of our dis- 
pleasure with many things. 

When I feel concern about Mrs. Smith's untidy yard, I might ask, "Is my yard 
clean?" Could I offer some help to Mrs. Smith when I find she has no time nor equip- 
ment to help her keep her yard in order? I might also ask myself: "Am I looking only 
at superficial matters and forgetting to find in others the worthwhile qualities of depend- 
ability, optimism, genuine goodness?" 

If we become critical about the world, about people, we should look at ourselves. 
Are we above criticism? Are we judging by a false set of values? Are we looking at 
matters in a helpful, constructive way? Many things about us need improvement, but 
the place to begin is with ourselves. 



&ke 9>> 



romtse 



Maud Miller Cook 

Peace — a sweet tranquility, 

Soothing as the dawn, 
When faith and hope are high, 

And doubts and fears are gone; 

It is a glowing light, 

A quiet, restful calm, 
That fills the soul of those 

Who seek this heavenly balm; 

Although the world is ruled by strife, 
His promise still holds true, 

That all who will may claim — 
"My peace I give to you." 



Page 354 



FOR THE STRENGTH OF THE HILLS 



355 



For the Strength of the Hills 

(Continued from page 316) 

he said curtly, "We'll just forget 'Tm afraid that we're going to have 

to go to the hospital. I thought 
there'd be two weeks yet— but there 
isn t. 
Both of them were remembering 



it," although she suspected that his 
mother was doing theirs along with 
her own. 

Camilla was extremely grateful 



for having such a wonderful mother- that the hospital was fifty miles 
in-law. She had boundless energy away, and that she had been warned 
and an efficiency that almost any- not to lose any time in coming be- 



one would have envied. She thought 
nothing of coming over for an hour 
or two to help with the work in 
spite of her own numerous duties. 
If she had been at all superior 
about it, there could easily have 



fore she became too uncomfortable. 

"We just can't leave in a cloud- 
burst like this," he said. "I'll get 
you there in plenty of time. Just 
take it easy and relax." 

"Relax yourself," she managed to 



been hurt feelings, but she never say with a smile. "You have the 
was. "I've always worked hard," she look of a man about to enter a tig- 
said once with a slight shrug. "I er's cage." 

guess I'm happiest that way." "Okay, so we'll both relax," he 

agreed. "Only, I'll get your things 

/^NE day, early in July, Camilla here by the door so that we'll be 

watched in some anxiety as the ready to scat the minute this lets 

sky darkened and great black up." 

thunderclouds began rolling in from The last of his sentence was 
the west. "I hope that it doesn't drowned in a terrific crash of thun- 
lightning," she said to Stan, who der, and he looked out of the win- 
was in for his lunch. "I'll never dow apprehensively as the rain beat 



get used to these awful thunder- 
storms." 

"If it does I'll have an excuse to 
stay in here and hold your hand," 
he remarked cheerfully. "I was go- 
ing to do some weeding in the lower 
field, but that can always wait." 

Half an hour later the thunder 
was crashing about them as if it 



still harder upon the panes. 

"It would have to happen to- 
day," he scowled, "the worst rain 
of the year and it has to come to- 
day." 

"Maybe it's the other way 
around," she suggested, trying to 
keep her voice normal. "I've heard 
that electrical storms help fill up 



would bring down the very moun- the hospitals, but I thought it was 

tains, and she sat huddled close in just an old wive's tale. Only, I'm 

his arms. The accompanying rain not an old wife, and I'm so scared 

began coming down in torrents, and of lightning that I could almost 

Stan remarked, "I'm sure glad that die— and not be struck either." 



I don't have to get out in this." 

Camilla turned to him with a 
look of deep concern on her 
already pale face and said slowly, 



They waited tensely for another 
quarter of an hour, and then Stan 
said hopefully, "It's beginning to 
let up a little now. I think that I 



356 



RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— MAY 1951 



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can get the car up to the door in 
just a few minutes." 

She put on a light coat and a 
scarf and stood by the window 
looking into the yard where small 
rivers were running about and form- 
ing into great puddles in all the 
low spots. 

"We could get stuck in the mud 
on that old dirt road," she said to 
herself, then tried to put the 
thought away, deciding that there 
was no need of borrowing more 
trouble than she already had. 

CTAN had the same thought, how- 
ever, so she knew it wasn't en- 
tirely a matter of borrowed trouble. 
"I'm going to take the jeep," he 
announced. "I know that it sounds 
awful to go to a hospital in a jeep, 
but I'm just a little afraid of this 
road. Maybe we'll trade to the 
folks' car when we get down there 
where the road is better." 

He drove the jeep up to the door 
and held an umbrella over her while 
she got in. Then they splashed 
their way out of the yard and onto 
the dirt road. The rain was still 
coming down, and they splashed 
through one great puddle after an- 
other. 

"It's a good thing that I know 
this road so well," he remarked 
with forced cheerfulness. "We'll be 
at dad's place in a few minutes. 
Then we'll trade to their car and 
have it easy. I'm doing my best 
to avoid the bumps, honey. It's not 
always easy to locate them when 
they're covered with water." 

She gave a sigh of relief as they 
drove into the driveway of the 
Rodgers home. "You'd best go in 
the house until I get the car out," 



FOR THE STRENGTH OF THE HILLS 



357 



he said. "Mother will likely want 
to go with us 7 anyway." 

"Oh, yes/' she answered grate- 
fully. 'Til be so glad to have her." 

Her mother-in-law was at the 
door now and she exclaimed, "What 
in the wide world are you doing out 
in all this storm?" 

"I think that maybe we're out 
because of the storm," answered 
Camilla. "Just because I'm so ter- 
rified of the thunder and lightning. 
Anyway, with fifty miles to go, we 
didn't dare wait any longer." 

"I know how it goes," said Mrs. 
Rodgers in a matter-of-fact tone. 
"Babies don't show the least bit of 
consideration as to their time of 
arrival. I had one on Christmas 
eve when I was terribly busy— or 
should have been. Come in and 
sit down. You probably have a lot 
more time than you think." 

OER calmness and casual attitude 
did more to allay Camilla's 
fears than she would have thought 
possible. She sank down into a 
chair and thought with something 
akin to amazement of all the babies 
that had been born in the world 
while time and tide went on about 
as usual. 

It seemed that for the first time 
in her life her mother-in-law was 
slow getting ready to leave, but the 
delay brought one great blessing. 
By the time they were ready to go 
the rain had almost entirely stopped. 

They had just turned out of the 
yard and started down the road 
when Sam Mickelson, a neighbor, 
waved at them frantically. 

Stan stopped the car, much 
to Camilla's annoyance, for she 
thought that nothing a neighbor 



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358 



RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— MAY 1951 



could want, was of any possible im- 
portance now. 

"You folks going to town?" Sam 
yelled. 

"Yes," answered Stan briefly. 

"Well, you can't go that way," 
he continued. "The bridge is out. 
Went down just a few minutes ago. 
The bank gave way with this cloud- 
burst." 

Camilla sat stunned. Now what? 
she asked herself. Aloud she said, 
"Surely there's another bridge." 

"Yes," answered Stan slowly, 
"but it's twenty miles further down 
and it's worse than this one. I'd 
hate to cross it even in good weath- 
er, and the road down to it is likely 
to be bad. We'd have to change 
back to the jeep, and even then . . ." 

He seemed to be merely thinking 
aloud, and his mother cut in de- 



cisively, "Come back into the house. 
There's no need of gallivanting all 
around the country just to have a 
baby. Stan can go and fetch Dr. 
Bramwell in the jeep. How about 
it?" 

"Oh, yes," answered Camilla, 
feeling that nothing in all the world 
mattered except to find herself safe 
in a bed. 

Stan left at once for the doctor. 
Several hours later her mother-in- 
law smiled at her and said, "You 
have a beautiful boy." 

"Red-headed, too, by cracky." 
Stan spoke in a shaky voice. 

"Then I guess we'll keep him," 
said Camilla, with a slight smile. 
"We always keep the red-headed 
ones." 

(To be continued) 



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Often what seems greatest worth 

In world's esteem 
Is but the transient, shifting substance 

Of a dream. 
And sometimes shining love 
May reach triumphantly above 

A bed of pain 
And lift a glowing blossom of beauty 

That will remain. 



cJhe LKoad o/s 1 1 Larked 

Grace Barker Wilson 

The road is marked, 
But here a little path 
Winds away 
Almost unnoticed; 
A little path, 
No signs, no warnings, 
Just the faint beckoning 
Of lightly trodden grass, 
And an alluring curve 
As it drops from sight 
Over the hill. 



/ / lu Crieart Us {Bound 

Josephine J. Harvey 

As the constant hours pass 
And lengthen into years, 
I will treasure loveliness. 

I will see a white bird soar, 
Above a tropic, wave-washed shore, 
Beautiful against the night. 

I will walk among the ferns, 

The new fronds curled, 

And gather Fuchsia, moist with dew. 

Far down the golden years, as now, 
The frost-blue hills will claim my love. 
Catalpa bloom that scents the evening air 
Will bind my heart to earthly beauty, 
As strong arms bind my life to yours. 



OUR MOTTO: 




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RONNIE JOHNSON, Owner 

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A Utah Power & Light Co. Message 



Page 359 



cfrom l Lear and c/c 



I have just received my second copy of 
The Relief Society Magazine and I really 
do appreciate it. It is a wonderful Maga- 
zine to have to read for both pleasure and 
education. Here in Denmark the work 
of the Relief Society is going very well 
and I find myself attending meetings and 
enjoying them though the language is 
still a little strange to me. But the spirit 
is the same wherever the sisters meet to- 
gether. 

— Alice Faye Rasmussen 

Odense, Denmark 

I feel that I should write you and ex- 
press my appreciation for the Magazine. 
It is truly an inspiration. I am one of the 
younger members of Relief Society, hav- 
ing been a member for just two years, 
and I find there is much for me at the 
age of twenty-four. 

— Eleda Vee Stoker, 
Tremonton, Utah 

I look forward to receiving the Maga- 
zine each month and find the visiting 
teacher messages especially timely and 
comforting. The poetry is beautiful. One 
of my favorites is the frontispiece in the 
February 1951 issue called "February 
Thaw" by Margery S. Stewart. Everything 
from cover to cover is interesting and well 
worth reading. 

— Kay Stockseth 

Inglewood, California 

I am enjoying Mabel Harmer's serial 
"For the Strength of the Hills" (February 
to July 1951), and have also enjoyed the 
other Relief Society Magazine serials. Our 
Magazine is surely a help and inspiration. 
— Norma Wrathall 
American Fork, Utah 

I have taken the Magazine most of my 
thirty-eight years of married life and am 
deeply appreciative of its contents. We, 
meaning the family, read it from cover to 
cover. The gospel at its best is taught 
in plainness and beauty within its pages. 
It truly breathes the spirit of Relief So- 
ciety. 

— Adelaide R. Clark, 



Los Angeles, California 



ar 

I'm not in the habit of writing fan let- 
ters, but that is what you can call this. 
I'm an enthusiastic fan of our Magazine, 
and have been for years. However, my en- 
thusiasm reached a new high when I 
read the article ("Ring in Your Christmas 
Cards," December 1950); the poems "Let- 
ter From a Daughter," January 1951, and 
"Blackbirds in Winter," February 1951, 
by Clara Laster. We are very proud of 
Clara here in the Central States Mission, 
and believe she is the first from here to 
"make" our Magazine, a truly literary 
Magazine and a great inspiration to all 
who read it. 

— Darliene Thompson 

Tulsa, Oklahoma 

I would like to tell you how much I 
enjoy and appreciate The Relief Society 
Magazine. The articles, stories, poems, 
and other information are certainly enjoy- 
able and inspiring. 

— Mary Duke, Mesa, Arizona 

I would like to take this opportunity 
to express my high regard for the Maga- 
zine. While living in San Francisco I 
took one of the copies to my writing class. 
With much pride I showed it to the 
members and they were very favorably im- 
pressed. One woman, an excellent writer, 
asked to borrow it. She kept it for 
weeks. When she finally returned it she 
was extravagant, yet sincere in her praise. 
May you continue in your fine efforts of 
encouraging writers and in maintaining 
the high level of standards the Magazine 
has attained. 

— Florence R. Clark 

Logan, Utah 

I enjoy the Magazine very much. I 
always look forward to the first of the 
month when it arrives. The sermons, the 
lessons, and the literature are of the great- 
est and most uplifting and educational na- 
ture. Before immigrating to Canada, 
November 1947, I used to translate these 
lessons for the use of the Relief Society 
in the Danish Mission, and I dare say that 
I have hardly learned so much from any- 
thing else I have studied as from our 
Relief Society lessons. 

— Karen Margretha Andersen 

Cardston, Alberta, Canada 



Page 360 



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Getorge Albert Smith, Pres. 



© © JMP A 



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#W>J 




THE RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE 

Monthly publication of the Relief Society of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints 

RELIEF SOCIETY GENERAL BOARD 
Belle S. Spafford ------ President 

Marianne C. Sharp ------ First Counselor 

Velma N. Simonsen ----- Second Counselor 

Margaret C. Pickering - Secretary-Treasurer 

Achsa E. Paxman Leone G. Layton Lillie C. Adams Christine H. Robinson 

Mary G. Judd Blanche B. Stoddard Louise W. Madsen Alberta H. Christensen 

Anna B. Hart Evon W. Peterson Aleine M. Young Nellie W. Neal 

Edith S. Elliott Leone O. Jacobs Josie B. Bay Mildred B. Eyring 

Florence J. Madsen Mary J. Wilson Alta J. Vance Helen W. Anderson 

RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE 

Editor ----------- Marianne C. Sharp 

Associate Editor --______- Vesta P. Crawford 

General Manager --_______ Belle S. Spafford 

Vol. 38 JUNE 1951 No. 6 



G 



on tents 



SPECIAL FEATURES 

President David O. McKay — An Appreciation Stephen L Richards 364 

Stephen L Richards Sustained First Counselor in the First Presidency John A. Widtsoe 369 

The Most Recent Call of President J. Reuben Clark to 

Service in the First Presidency Henry D. Moyle 373 

Elder Joseph Fielding Smith Sustained as President of the Twelve Aocstles.-Mark E. Petersen 378 

Tribute to Adele Cannon Howells . * LaVern W. Parmley 382 

Contest Announcements — 1951 383 

Eliza R. Snow Poem Contest 383 

Relief Society Short Story Contest 384 

Lefs Write a Poem Alberta H. Christensen 386 

Let's Write a Story Alice Morrey Bailey 387 

Nursing — A Lifetime of Satisfaction Elaine Mellor 401 

Conservation Looks to the Future Helen C. Payne 411 

FICTION 

Polly Played for Keeps Sylvia Probst Young 393 

For the Strength of the Hills — Chapter 5 Mabel Harmer 402 

How Dad Became a Salesman Luzelle S. Eliason 408 

Christine's Extravagance Beth Bernice Johnson 415 

GENERAL FEATURES 

Sixty Years Ago 398 

Woman's Sphere .l...ZZZZZZZR^ona'wr Cannon 389 

Editorial: The Blessing of Work Marianne C. Sharp 390 

In Memoriam — Emma Lucy Gates Bowen 391 

Notes From the Field: Relief Society Activities 

„ — :- ,--"■ General Secretary-Treasurer, Margaret C. Pickering 420 

From Near and Far 432 

T 4f _ , „ , FEATURE FOR THE HOME 

r^ S t?^? B fl rea< r v - ™ : -v Josie B. Bay 398 

Bad Habits Are Like Weeds Naom i S. MacCabe 416 

POETRY 

How Much a Heart Can Gather! — Frontispiece Eva Willes Wangsgaard 363 

AharrSr Iris W " Schow 372 

yShI^ 

FulfillSen 1 ? 6 !^ NOt Mabel L £ w A %™™ 381 

Su g mme F r r NooS aPltal *" " Ma % a ^ *• Shomaker 385 

gS ^"^ ^ Z: ==^ Cha'dwS ^ 

Lost Love Matia McClelland Burk 392 

Mother and DaughTe7\z:::::.:;::;:: r~;;S ou T% Fi w er Iudd ™? 

Only the Bees Remain Genevieve J VanWagenen 397 

The Unraveling " ~"Mary Gustafson 419 

I Love My Little Kitchen ........_..".; C Cameron Johns 419 

I Lydia B. Egbert 426 

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Josef Muench 



JOSHUA TREES IN SPRING 



THE RELIEF SOCIETY M AGAZINE 

VOL 38, NO. 6 JUNE 1951 



cHow li luck Lsan a uieart (gather! 

Eva Willes Wangsgaard 



The chestnut's chubby candles 
Are lighted, tier on tier; 

The locust bells are scented 
And not a sound to hear. 

The hollyhocks are steeples 

With pink and yellow bells 
Whose tongues are stilled in pollen 
* Where mystic rhythm swells. 

Delphinium spires are reaching 

Forever up and up; 
The bells of morning glories 

Swing high to make a cup. 

How much a heart can gather 
For dark impatient hours 

While walking through a garden 
In conference with flowers! 



The Cover: "Blossoms in the Desert," Photograph by Josef Muench 
Cover Design by Evan Jensen. 



President David O. McKay 
— An Appreciation 

Sustained President of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, April 9, 1951 

President Stephen L Richards 
Of the First Presidency 

America, but also throughout 
Europe, the islands of the seas, and 
in nearly all of the continents of 
the world. 

A teacher by profession, he has 
brought, to the edification and 
stimulation of people, the finest 
characteristics of that noble art. 
Few, if any, within the community 
of the Church have ever been able 
to use the art to such high pur- 
poses as has he. He has been a 
teacher of children and adults, and 
a teacher of teachers. In his ca- 
pacity of general superintendent 
of the Deseret Sunday School 
Union, he did more than any other 
man of his time to systematize the 
orderly teaching of the gospel and 
the establishment of effective pro- 
cedures in that largest of all the 
auxiliary organizations of the 
Church. There are thousands of 
teachers all over the land who have 
developed their love of the work 
and a capacity to inspire youth in 
large measure through his inspiring 
instructions and example. 

His capacity for effective ad- 
ministration arises largely out of his 
consideration for others. His deep 
sympathies are easily touched, and 
he so generously bestows his love 
that it begets eager response in oth- 
ers. He is quick to recognize the 




PRESIDENT DAVID OMAN McKAY 

TO sit under the spell . of a 
handsome, magnetic pres- 
ence and listen to the ex- 
position of the gospel of our Lord, 
embellished with touching, impres- 
sive illustrations and incidents, has 
been the experience of many thou- 
sands within and without the 
Church of Christ who have been 
privileged to hear the eloquent 
sermons and addresses of our be- 
loved President, David O. McKay. 

For more than forty-five years 
this able, devoted servant of the 
Lord has carried on his ministry 
not only in all the establishments 
of the Church on the continent of 

Page 364 



PRESIDENT DAVID 0. McKAY— AN APPRECIATION 



365 



good in his associates and accord of the public life of our President 

full measure of praise for every con- cannot be expected to convey to 

tribution. His courtesy is unfailing the stranger any adequate idea of 

and genuine, in evidence with all the personality, the charm, and 

whom he meets, young and old, rich strength of this good man. But per- 

and poor. He is impeccably honest haps to the members of the Church 

and creates an atmosphere of trust it may serve in a meager way to re- 

and confidence wherever he goes. call impressions which have come 

This altogether too brief sketch to thousands upon thousands dur- 




DAVID McKAY AND JENNETTE EVANS McKAY 
PARENTS OF PRESIDENT DAVID O. McKAY 

David McKay, the father, was born May 3, 1844, in Thurso, Scotland, and died 
November 17, 1917, in Ogden, Utah. The mother, Jennette Evans McKay, was born 
August 28, 1850, in Wales, and died January 5, 1905, in Ogden, Utah. 



Brother and Sister McKay are buried in Huntsville, and Brother McKay deeded 
the old family home to the eight children as common property, to which all could re- 
turn for companionship and enjoyment. The McKay brothers and sisters often go 
back to this home for holidays, and for special occasions. The home is beautiful and 
spacious and the surrounding grounds provide opportunities for many outdoor 
activities. 



366 



RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— JUNE 1951 










THE FOUR SISTERS OF PRESIDENT McKAY 

At front, left to right: Jeanette McKay Morrell; Elizabeth McKay Hill. 
At back, left to right: Katherine McKay Ricks; Ann McKay Farr. 



All of these women have been active in Relief Society work for many years. Sister 
Morrell was formerly literature class leader in the Twelfth Ward in Ogden, Utah, and 
is now theology class leader in that ward; Sister Hill has served on the Liberty Stake 
and Bonneville Stake Relief Society Boards and also as theology class leader, at present 
she is visiting teacher in Yale Ward, Salt Lake City, and a member of the advisory com- 
mittee of the Mormon Handicraft Shop; Sister Ricks has served as literature class leader 
in Logan Fifth Ward; Sister Farr has been stake Relief Society president in Smithfield 
and Benson stakes, serving in this capacity a total of sixteen years. 



PRESIDENT DAVID 0. McKAY— AN APPRECIATION 



367 




EMMA RAY RIGGS (McKAY) AND DAVID OMAN McKAY 
AT THE TIME OF THEIR MARRIAGE 



ing the many years of his devoted 
public service. 

Among the readers of this Maga- 
zine, there will be many who will 
recognize in the foregoing account 
an omission which must not be 
ignored even in this short state- 
ment. It is his remarkable capacity 
for friendship and affection. This 
talent with which he has been so 
richly blessed cannot well be set 
out in words on the printed page; 
it is something that must be felt 
and experienced to be appreciated. 
Those who have looked into his 
loving eyes and seen the smile on 
his handsome countenance, and 
felt the warmth of his handclasp, 
and the pressure of his embrace, 
will understand. He can make a 
friend feel like a blood brother. He 
can cement and fuse his own soul 
with the soul of a kindred spirit. 



He can transform worldly friend- 
ship into a bond of such intensity 
and durability as to invest this 
noble relation with divine charac- 
ter. He is a living exponent and 
exemplar of the true brotherhood 
of Christ. 

With such a precious gift as his 
endowment, both inherited and 
cultivated, it is not difficult to 
imagine his beautiful relations with 
his beloved wife, Emma Ray Riggs 
McKay, their children and kinsfolk. 
I have been a witness over many 
years to the exquisitely beautiful 
family life of this devoted husband, 
father, and brother. It is no won- 
der that the love of his kinsfolk has 
encircled him, protected and en- 
couraged him for many long years. 
They have but requited the affec- 
tion and deep solicitude he has ever 
had for them. 



368 



RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— JUNE 1951 




PRESIDENT DAVID O. McKAY, HIS WIFE, EMMA RAY RIGGS McKAY, 

AND THEIR FAMILY 



Front row, left to right: Francis Ellen Anderson McKay; Robert R. McKay; Sister 
Emma Ray Riggs McKay; President David O. McKay; Lou Jean McKay Blood; 
Llewelyn R. McKay, Ph.D.; Alice Smith McKay. 

Back row, left to right: Conway A. Ashton; Emma Rae McKay Ashton; Dr. Edward 
R. McKay; Lottie Lund McKay; David Lawrence McKay; Mildred Calderwood McKay. 

One son-in-law, Dr. R. Russell Blood, a Commander in the United States Navy, 
was absent from the group, as he was serving with the United Nations forces in Korea 
when this photograph was taken. He is still on active duty in the Pacific. 



I have tried but have never been 
able to express the gratitude I feel 
for the high privilege of being ad- 
mitted to the circle of his intimate 
friends. If I may be permitted to 
remain within that circle for the 
period of this life, and for the life 
to come, I shall feel that I have 



won a blessing of incomparable 
value. 

It is thus I pay a brief and humble 
tribute to this noble man, faithful 
and exalted servant of the Most 
High God, lover of mankind— my 
friend. 



President Stephen L Richards 

Sustained First Counselor in the First Presidency, April 9, 1951 
Elder John A. Widtsoe 



Of the Council of the Twelve 



THERE is strength in Zion. 
That is never more evident 
than when official vacancies 
in offices of the Church are to be 
filled. Only a few weeks ago, after 
the demise of the beloved leader, 
President George Albert Smith, 
men were at once found to consti- 
tute the First Presidency. They are 
strong, intelligent men, David O. 
McKay, Stephen L Richards, and 
J. Reuben Clark, Jr., who stand 
shoulder high with the foremost in 
the world. 

That is the way of the restored 
Church, whether in ward, stake, or 
general concerns. Looking back over 
the years, there seems always to have 
been men ready to meet the issues 
of the day, and to carry forward the 
Lord's work. If there are more 
problems in this wayward age, there 
is also more strength among us with 
which to give battle to evil. Latter- 
day Saints look upward with secure 
eyes. Progress is assured within the 
restored Church of Christ. 

Stephen L Richards who was 
called to serve as President McKay's 
first counselor comes of a lineage 
distinguished for faith, intelligence, 
loyalty and courage. 

In the troublous days of Nauvoo, 
when enemies were hounding the 
Prophet's life, Willard Richards, 
the grandfather of Stephen L, wait- 
ed upon the Prophet, and made 
the dire trials easier to bear. At 
length in Carthage Jail, Willard 
Richards was by the side of the 







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PRESIDENT STEPHEN L RICHARDS 

Prophet when the fatal shot was 
fired. His brief account of the 
assassinations is a Mormon classic. 
He later became a counselor to 
President Brigham Young. 

Stephen L Richards was born of 
Emma Louise Stayner and Dr. 
Stephen L. Richards on June 18, 
1879, in the village of Mendon, 
Cache County, Utah. There and 
elsewhere as the family set up a 
home, conditions were primitive in 
terms of modern comforts. The 
State was just emerging from pio- 
neer surroundings, after a grip to 
the finish with an unfriendly desert. 
But, toil and struggle, with ulti- 
mate conquest, only made pioneer 

Page 369 



370 RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— JUNE 1951 

blood rich in courage. Stephen taking, and will serve the Church 

L's forebears had not been afraid, well in his new calling in the First 

he was not afraid, but wise in com- Presidency, 
pelling the world to come to his 

™ s * , , . j ., UIS gift of good judgment, always 
At twenty-one he married the 11 , b , m_ i.- > 
girl of his choice, Irene Merrill, al- based u P on the examination of 
so of distinguished ancestry, and &** was early recognized by his 
herself a personality to match wits ^ ellows - He practiced law success- 
with the best. Her kindly humor full y; was clt Y attorney for Murray 
is today good medicine for all who Cl ty instructor m law at the Um- 
are fortunate enough to be her versit y of Utah ; secretary for the 
friends. To them were born nine Utah Bar Association, and Utah 
children, four boys and five girls, representative of the American 
of whom seven are living; stalwart Bar Association. It was a loss to 
citizens of the State. The family the Bar when his Church call end- 
is an example that should be ed his professional labors, 
followed in this decadent age when It followed that a mind so con- 
children are often accounted a stituted would become interested 
burden. m business. Indeed, business need- 
Then came the necessity of a ed him and called for his help, 
life's career. He had already taken Brother Richards' business career is 
a brief whirl at the ranch and at also outstanding. He is connected 
school teaching, the memory of with prosperous enterprises in many 
which still thrills him. A force fields: sugar, land, cemetery, oxy- 
within him, a longing for knowl- gen, banking, merchandising, pow- 
edge, drove him to books. He er and light, coal, books, oil, furni- 
would have become a magnificent ture, and others. All of them are 
teacher had he adopted the profes- stronger for his association with 
sion; but the choice fell naturally them. 

upon law. After studying general Civic duties, many as honorable 

subjects at the University of Utah, rewards for valiant service, have 

he took up the study of law at been thrust upon him. They all 

Michigan University and completed carry the insignia of service, else 

the course at Chicago University he would not have accepted them, 

where he graduated with the LL.B. He served with distinction as a 

degree, cum laude (with honors) regent of the University of Utah, a 

in 1904. member of the State Board of Cor- 

Brother Richards' mind is ana- rections, State Chairman for Utah 

lytical. He dissects and puts to- State Works Administration, and 

gether again in better form the others of like importance. To the 

ideas presented to him. He has Rotary Club he has given steady 
walked through life a careful, ob- . attention. He has taken pride in 

serving, and tolerant judge of men honoring his ancestors in his mem- 

and affairs. That has been a fore- bership in the Sons of the Amerp 

most characteristic, one that has can Revolution. To minor but im- 

made him useful in his every under- portant causes he has given liberally 



STEPHEN L RICHARDS . 371 

of his time, strength, and sub- of an automobile. Where nature 

stance. reigns he sleeps well. In the great 

Stephen L Richards is not the peace of nature his own mind tinds 

usual type of business man who peace. 

grabs for money first and last, and Really, in all his work he reaches 

lowers the respect of people foi the out for perfection. That is why he 

necessary and altruistic path of com- loves the beautiful. Any one of 

merce. True, he has been success- his conference sermons shows the 

ful, how could he avoid it? But not meticulous and persistent care giv- 

to the surrender of the high ideals en to every word and turn of a sen- 

of life. His innate courtesy to all tence. Such an objective requires 

people whether high or low, his work, and much work, of which he 

generous estimate of people and is not afraid. The cause he repre- 

their works, friend or foe, marks sents is entitled to all he can give, 

him a true gentleman, whom it is That is his guiding principle of ac- 

good to meet. He takes a deep in- tion in and out of the Church— 

terest in the 'other fellow" who though in his philosophy every act 

gives him loyalty in return. Even and need of man may find proper 

in heated debate, and Brother Rich- place in the gospel of the Lord 

ards will fight for his convictions, Jesus Christ, 
he is fair to the antagonist who is 

not wounded nor made to feel in- ALL this and more lifts Stephen 
ferior in defeat. This graciousness L Richards to unusual heights 
of life and action is an integral part among men, and betokens a person 
of Brother Richards' make-up. highly endowed by nature. But 
His soul responds quickly to all there awaited him world-wide serv- 
that is lofty and beautiful. Fine ice, the greatest of all. 
words well placed and spoken; the As a lad he took interest in the 
artist's conception well designed; organizations of the Church. In 
the sunshine peering through rifted May 1906 he was called to member- 
clouds after the rain; the morning ship on the general board of the 
glow on the mountain; the tumult Deseret Sunday School Union, 
of color when the sun sets; the There he served so well that when 
simple beauty of the pine tree after George Reynolds died Stephen L 
the snow. Such everyday things Richards was appointed second 
find a response in him because he counselor in the superintendency 
has a living soul. Lovers of beauty in April 1909. The superintendent 
will find support in Stephen L then was President Joseph F. Smith, 
Richards. Men without artistic and the other counselor was Apostle 
souls find it difficult to visualize David O. McKay, now President of 
the purposes of God for man. the Church. To be an associate of 
He is a lover of nature. During such men was a great education 
his free days, it is a pretty sure for the youthful man. 
guess that he may be found in his On January 18, 1917, he was or- 
canyon home, or in his boat on the dained an apostle and set apart as 
lake, or at the right end of a fish- one of the Quorum of Twelve 
pole, or trying out the latest model Apostles of the Church. With the 



372 . RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— JUNE 1951 

call, dreams of leadership in law for present needs. Such service to 

and other activities vanished. He the Church means sacrifice to all 

stood before the Lord charged members of a family, but the reward 

henceforth to carry forward the lat- in making men fit for the building 

ter-day work. He accepted the call of God's kingdom, surpasses all the 

and its challenge with the certainty gifts of earth, 

that the Lord's work is the greatest The people listen joyfully when 

in the world, and that it will even- the splendid voice of Brother Rich- 

tually vanquish all enemies and cov- ards, a beautiful natural endowment, 

er the earth. is heard carrying to the world the 

So, for thirty-four years, in season eternal call to repentance, 

and out of season, often at real sac- The people welcome Stephen L 

rifices of physical comfort, he has Richards in his new position. As 

traveled over the Church, preacn- a member of the First Presidency 

ing, teaching, leading, and pleading, every power will be used for the 

under the spirit of revelation. The benefit of the Church. He knows 

people have learned to know him the gospel, he loves it; he loves his 

and to love him. His work has fellow men; he trusts the conquer- 

called him to South America, ing nature of the Priesthood of 

Europe, Asia Minor, and some of God; and he will strive to listen 

the islands of the sea. Hundreds of when the mighty voice of Jehovah 

commissions have been well con- speaks, 

summated by him. Thank God for President Steph- 

When he speaks his words re- en L Richards. May he long be 

sound with knowledge, and an un- preserved to us in health and 

derstanding of God's purposes, and strength. 



» ♦ » 



his W. Schow 

An opening umbrella in the rain 

Has always held for me a subtle charm, 

Remindful that our little acts of care 

Can make a small safe world within a storm. 



GL 



\armer 

Pansye H. Powell 

Lulled by the gentle, soothing touch of sound 

Falling on thought like rain on thirsty ground, 

What man is there who never has been wooed 

By music's magic from a bitter mood? 

If he is happy, music is as gay, 

And in his sorrow charms his grief away! 



President J. Reuben Clark, Jr. 

Called Back as a Counselor in the 

First Presidency of the Church 

Sustained Second Counselor in the First Presidency, April 9, 1951 

Elder Henry D. Moyle 
Of the Council of the Twelve 

WE had read repeatedly of the 
many accomplishments of 
President J. Reuben Clark, 
Jr., prior to his initial call to the 
First Presidency of the Church of 
Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. 
His work had already distinguished 
him as a man of great capacity. A 
lifetime of effort had fully qualified 
him for that office, which first came 
at a time in life when most men re- 
tire. Now, added to this, is the 
experience of the last eighteen years 
to further qualify him for present 
membership in the newly organized 
First Presidency to serve President 
David O. McKay as he has served 
President George Albert Smith, and 
before that, President Heber J. 
Grant. 

His career in public service as an 
international lawyer, soldier, and 
teacher was distinguished. It was 
climaxed by his appointment as 
Under Secretary of State, and Unit- 
ed States Ambassador to Mexico. 
Nevertheless, his crowning achieve- 
ment, a result of a humbler activity, 
is and shall ever remain his service 
in the cause of the Master and his 
fellow men, as a member of the 
First Presidency. 

No words can do justice to a life 
such as his, unselfishly devoted to 
others. Men in high places have 




PRESIDENT J. REUBEN CLARK, JR. 

for years borne record of his ac- 
complishments. For example: Pres- 
ident Hoover in a letter accepting 
President Clark's resignation as Am- 
bassador to Mexico, wrote among 
other things: "Never have our re- 
lations been lifted to so high a point 
of confidence and cooperation and 
there is no more important service 
in the whole of foreign relations of 
the United States/' 

Secretary of State Stimson de- 
clared: "Your distinguished service 
as American Ambassador to Mex- 

Page 373 



374 



RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— JUNE 1951 



ico has reflected signal credit upon 
our Department of State." 

When President Clark was ap- 
pointed Ambassador to Mexico, one 
newspaper printed the following: 

Mr. Clark stands among the few diplo- 
mats of the first order that the West has 
produced. 

It is somewhat unfair to Ambassador 
Clark, however, to say that the West 
produced him. As a matter of fact, J. 
Reuben Clark, the Ambassador, is the 
product of J. Reuben Clark, the student, 
the investigator, the worker and the faith- 
ful servant of the government. There is 
no finer example of a man who has risen 
through sheer merit in the whole history 
of the foreign service. Mr. Clark is re- 
sponsible for his own success. Through- 
out his life he has scorned political favor- 
itism and has expected every man to stand 
on his own feet. This crowning achieve- 
ment in his career comes as a natural se- 
quence of his devoted service to the 
government in many capacities. 

Elder Albert E. Bowen of the 
Council of the Twelve, an intimate 
friend and business associate, when 
asked many years ago to give 
an estimate of President Clark's 
character, wrote: 

The personal endowment and qualities 
which have made possible his varied and 
distinguished achievements are perhaps 
three, with their corollaries: 

First: A vigorous and discriminating 
intellect. His is the rare power of pene- 
trating through all confusing, superficial 
envelopments to the root and marrow 
of a confronting problem. 

Second: A prodigious power of work — 
a constitution which seems able to re- 
spond to any draft that may be made 
upon it. Work is his vocation and his 
avocation, his pursuit and his pastime. 

Third: An uncompromising, undeviat- 
ing honesty — intellectual and moral hon- 
esty. "Face the Facts," is a characteristic 
expression of his. He spends no time in 



working upon schemes of evasion. Hav- 
ing been surrounded with abundant op- 
portunity for graft and acquisition, he 
has come through without the smell of 
fire upon his garments. No opprobrium 
has ever attached to his name. To him 
sham and pretense are an abomination. 

Years after the foregoing testi- 
monials, how wonderful it is 
that President Clark's ability and 
devotion are even greater and in- 
creasingly recognized. 

President David O. McKay on 
taking office recently said: "Presi- 
dent Clark is a wonderful servant. 
You have had demonstrated here 
this morning his ability to carry out 
details and he is just that efficient 
in everything pertaining to the 
work." 

No matter what the task has been, 
his performance has represented the 
best. 



H 



IS formula for success is hard 
work, and he still follows that 
formula. 

Likely more enlightening than 
any words one might write of this 
great man are his own expressed 
thoughts. At' the beginning of his 
ministry eighteen years ago he dis- 
closed his great foresight and virtue 
in a sermon given by him in the 
Tabernacle at the general confer- 
ence of the Church. The following 
is an excerpt therefrom: 

The world is moaning in tribulation. 
I do not know the cure. The questions 
involved are so nearly infinite in their 
vision that I question whether any hu- 
man mind can answer them. But it is my 
faith that if the people will shun idle- 
ness, if they shall cast out from their 
hearts those twin usurpers, ambition and 
greed, and then shall re-enthrone brother- 
ly love and return to the old virtues — 
industry, thrift, honesty, self-reliance, in- 



PRESIDENT J. REUBEN CLARK, JR. 



375 



dependence of spirit, self-discipline, and 
mutual goodness — we shall be far on our 
way to a returned prosperity and worldly 
happiness. We must again yield fealty 
to the law that wealth, however great, 
is a mere shadow compared with the liv- 
ing, enduring riches of mind and heart. 
. . . The world problem is not primarily 
one of finance, but of unselfishness, in- 
dustry, courage, confidence, character, 
heart, temperance, integrity and righteous- 
ness. The world has been on a wild de- 
bauch materially and spiritually; it must 
recover the same way the drunkard repro- 
bate recovers — by repentance and right 
living. 

What was said by his friends ten 
years ago of President Clark is true 
today. 

"He is vigorous in body, keen in 
intellect, sound in his thinking, 
sagacious, studious, prayerful in 
heart, with a rare penetration of 
mind. He is a tower of strength 
among his people and acknowledged 
everywhere (in and out of the 
Church) as a leader." 

With it all, he is considerate, 
thoughtful, and ever mindful of all, 
high and low. Firmness and kind- 
ness are blended by him in all his 
decisions, almost to perfection. He 
is solicitous of the welfare of all his 
brothers and sisters in the Church. 
He constantly attends their needs. 

It is no wonder the Church Wel- 
fare Program has enlisted his deep- 
est interest and consequently his 
most active support. He has said: 

The prime duty of help to the poor 
by the Church is not to bring temporal 
relief to their needs but salvation to their 
souls. 

The rule of the bishop in all these mat- 
ters is the rule of the Priesthood, a rule 
of kindness, charity, love, righteousness. 

Little is known of his philan- 
thropy beyond his beneficiaries. It 



would form an interesting chapter 
were we able to disclose but a part 
of what he has done for others. No 
one in the service of the Church 
has a better friend. He knows what 
it is to work and he appreciates the 
feelings of those who toil daily for 
their livelihood. He concerns him- 
self with the unfortunate, seeks to 
assist them, to bless the sick and to 
comfort those who mourn. 

Voltaire disclosed a spirit shared 
by President Clark when he wrote: 

"Love truth but pardon error. 
The mortal who goes astray is still 
a man and thy brother. Be wise 
for thyself alone, compassionate for 
him. Achieve thine own welfare 
by blessing others." 

Time is his most precious pos- 
session. He is methodical in the 
extreme. To him there is a time 
and place for each of his many 
activities and each is orderly and 
punctually accomplished. 

One key to his success is his abil- 
ity to delegate to others those things 
which others can do for him. At 
the same time, no matter falling 
within the sphere of his responsi- 
bility is too small to receive his 
careful attention. 

To him the disposition of the 
tithes and offerings of the people 
is a most sacred trust. He zealous- 
ly guards the interest of the Church 
in all matters with an unselfishness 
seldom equalled among men. 

To know President Clark is to 
love him. His friends and admir- 
ers are legion. The true test of 
greatness is found in the personal 
appraisal of those most intimate. 
The closer your association with 
President Clark, the deeper and 
more lasting your affection for him. 



376 RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— JUNE 1951 

TT is a joy to go into the home of men. The great, generous heart of 

President Clark for here we find this man has preserved for future 

his true character reflected. Except generations the old school in Grants- 

for the absence of Sister Luacine v ille where his father taught and 

Savage Clark, his home now is as w here he went to school on week 

ideal as it was years ago in Wash- days and wors hi pe d on the Sab- 

ington when the children were bath This buildi now restored 

young The devotion of his son tQ ^ Q ^ nal conditi with some 

and three daughters to their father modern i mprovem ents, will long 

is matched only by their great re- stand fo hi / mem as a mute ey f 

spect and admiration for him. Truly dence of hi$ loye of ' home and ^ 

the family honor their father as they muni Hi$ nei hbors a 

do the memory of heir devoted whon / he ha 6 ve reci p rocate I 

mother President Clark s concern ^ a ^ ^ esteen / that is 

is ever for the welfare of his family shown fa 

to the latest generation Latd testimonial, the peo- 

Hiseulogy to his mother enb led * c ^ J 

"To Them of the Last Wagon, i £ sti ished service a y ward in rec . 

an inspiration. It discloses his great ^ outst anding achieve- 

affection for his mother. It likewise JS fa ^ rf our 

reveals the philosophy of life she ^ and ^ F ^^ rf ^ 

must have taught him. I quote ^ p resid rf the church of 

from this writing: Jesus christ rf Lat te r .day Saints. 

In living our lives let us never forget President Clark can express his 

that the deeds of our fathers and mothers thoughts in words that are clear and 

are theirs, not ours; that their works can- s ; ] e and with a mean j n g unmis- 
not be counted to our glory; that we can ,<, £ ,. . ^ 

claim no excellence and no place, because taKaDie. Jiven ms poerry discloses 

of what they did; that we must rise by his command of language and tar 

our own labor, and that labor failing we more important, the depth of his 

shall fall. We may claim no honor, no sou i jjis most important religious 

reward, no respect, nor special positron wQrk ^ Qn tJ]e w tQ r mmolta li ty 

or recognition no «**J^«*5£ and Eternal Lite. This treatise on 

our fathers were or what tney orougnt. ... r 

We stand upon our own feet in our own the apostasy and the restoration ot 

shoes. There is no aristocracy of birth the gospel is unsurpassed in the 

in this Church; it belongs equally to the wr itingS of the Church. It is a work 

highest and the lowliest. For as Peter Qf ^ scholarship written with 

said to Cornelius, the Roman centurion, * _ . , r 

seeking him: "Of a truth I perceive that fortbnghtaess and conviction. J 

God is no respecter of persons: But in Reuben Clark, Jr. has the moral 

every nation he that feareth him, and courage to say without faltering 

worketh righteousness, is accepted with w h at fa knows to be right and the 

him" (Acts 10:34-35). physical courage to do as he says. 
The people of Grantsville, his To the Priesthood of the Church, 

birthplace, claim him as their own, he has throughout the years, called 

and do homage to him as he fre- their attention forcibly to the theme 

quently returns to his home there, nearest to his heart: "Except ye are 

They are his neighbors and kins- one ye are not mine." 



PRESIDENT J. REUBEN CLARK, JR. 377 

His ministry has been character- prophet of God, whom he stands 

ized by a firm, resolute, continuing ever ready to serve as he may be 

determination to bring unity into directed. 

the lives of the Church membership, The testimony which he last pub- 

as well as into quorums and other m bore at Qur recent conference 

organizations or the Church. Re- i .i t?- *. r> -j 

& . 11 1 i i,-ji.i,i. when the First Presidency were 

peatedly he has emphasized that . . , , ,, _ . . J . 

"we cannot be one unless we are sustained by the Priesthood and 

one in spirit, in belief, in knowl- P eo P le in solemn assembly, follows: 

edge and in action. There is no . ' 

other wav " My Brothers and Sisters > * be g in . b 7 

ttt-'.i .i • . r -. bearing again my testimony that this is 

With this concept of unity the work of the Lord, that Joseph Smith 

always uppermost in his mind, he i s a prophet, that those who have fol- 

could never fail to fulfill the high lowed afterward have been his prophets, 

calling which is his and tnat tne one whom we have sustained 

Above all, he has and bears a is * e " inth in , re S ul , ar t succession as a 

, , ' , . . prophet, seer, and revelator to this Church 

powerful, enduring, convincing £ n( f t0 ^ world< 

testimony of the fatherhood of God j. know that Jesus is the christ> the 

and the brotherhood of man, the Redeemer of the world, I know that he 

divine mission of the Savior, the is the first fruits of the resurrection, and 

restoration of the Priesthood of God that h Y and through him we are re- 

• von l^ t^c^u c^,4-u n ^A r^i\r^ deemed from the fall, and thus able to 

given to Joseph ISmitn and Oliver ., ,. \ ., £ „ , 

% j J K ,, . overcome the results or the fall and get 

Cowdery, and the presence here back int0 the pre sence of our Heavenly 

upon the earth today of a true Father. 



■ ♦ i 



(bunday m the Lsouatry 

Christie Lund Coles 

Sunday in the country was a day 
Quite set apart, even by the way 

The sun shone, more luminously bright 
Between the shadows cool and dark as night; 

Sunday was a day of worship, rest, 
Of dressing in our stiffly-ironed best, 

Walking the graveled pathway to the church 
Set amid poplars and the lean, white birch, 

And flanked by yellow roses that were bent 
In rich abundance, giving the air a scent 

That wakes us to homesickness even yet. 
And there was organ music. We can forget 

Much, but not that, nor our child-world, then 
Simple as life will not be again. 



Elder Joseph Fielding Smith 
Sustained as President 
of the Twelve Apostles 



April 9, 1951 

Elder Marie E. Petersen 
Of the Council of the Twelve 




PRESIDENT JOSEPH FIELDING 
SMITH 



THE Council of the Twelve 
Apostles is a unique body of 
men, different from any oth- 
er group in all the world. In ancient 
and modern times, the Twelve 
have been the Lord's ambassadors 
to all the world, building up the 
kingdom of God, and preparing 
the ways of the Lord. 

In modern, as well as in ancient 
times, these men have been called 
from many walks in life. Each one 
has placed his all upon the altar, 

Page 378 



and willingly given of his time, tal- 
ents, and possessions, for the work 
of the Lord. 

They have appeared before kings 
and presidents, industrialists and 
educators, and have mingled with 
the humble and the lowly, in all 
cases representing the one great 
cause. In doing so some have suf- 
fered many hardships and priva- 
tions, nearly all have been persecut- 
ed, and in some cases, they have 
made the supreme sacrifice. 

To preside over such a group of 
men is a great responsibility, re- 
quiring much wisdom, great cour- 
age, inspired foresight. Throughout 
the years, the Lord has provided 
great leadership in the men who 
have presided over the Council of 
the Twelve. These presidents have 
been men of power, men of great 
and enduring faith, and yet pos- 
sessed of those other Christ-like 
qualities which have made them 
more than ever beloved of the 
people— love, patience, understand- 
ing, and compassion. 

During the proceedings of the 
last general conference of the 
Church, a new president of the 
Council was installed. By vote of 
the Priesthood and the general 
membership of the Church in the 



ELDER JOSEPH FIELDING SMITH 379 

Salt Lake Tabernacle, Monday, President George Albeit Smith 

April 9, Elder Joseph Fielding when he invited President George 

Smith was sustained in this position. F. Richards of the Council of the 

The night before, at a special Twelve, to be voice in his ordina- 

meeting of the Twelve, he was sus- tion as President of the Chinch, 
tained as president by his colleagues. 

Then on the following Thursday, AN honor such as this, to be chos- 

Apnl 12, 1951, at a meeting of the ^ en to pre side over the Council 

First Presidency and the Twelve in of the Twelve, and then to be voice 

the Salt Lake Temple, he was set m or dammg a President of the 

apart to this position by President church, can come only to one 

David O. McKay. w i 10se jif e has been consistently 

It was a great honor which had Christ-like, and whose service has 

come to him. But in his character- been unfailing in the work of the 

istic manner, he accepted it in a Master. 

great spirit of humility. But that Such has been the life of Presi- 

was not the only honor that came dent Joseph Fielding Smith. Such 

to President Joseph Fielding Smith has been his service. Loyal and 

during this history-making week. He true to his brethren, devoted to the 

was chosen to ordain and set apart Church and its principles, he has 

the new President of the Church, walked down through the decades 

President David O. McKay. for seventy-four years as an inspira- 

As the newly organized First tion to all who have truly known 

Presidency and the Council of the him. 

Twelve met in the temple on April One of the most thoughtful of 

12, and prepared to lay hands on men, one of the most kindly and 

the new members of the First Presi- generous, President Smith has won 

dency, President McKay announced a lasting place in the hearts of the 

that it was his wish that Joseph people of the Church. 

Fielding Smith be voice in ordain- I n times of need, they come to 

ing him as the President of the him, whether that need be spiritual 

Church. President Smith is the r temporal, whether it be to solve 

next in line of seniority among the some family problem, or whether 

presiding brethren, coming directly it be to obtain a proper interpreta 

after President McKay. As all the tion and statement of the doctrine 

brethren present placed their hands of the Church, 

upon the head of President McKay, His life has been such as to instil 

President Smith acted as voice for confidence in the minds of all. 

the group, and ordained him and When President Smith speaks on 

set him apart to his new high of- doctrine, what he says is authorita 

fice. It was an impressive occasion, tive. When he speaks on a matter 

It was a great honor bestowed upon Q f history, he sets forth the un- 

President Smith. embellished facts as they should be 

President McKay's action in thus presented. People accept what he 

choosing President Smith for this says, because they know he is an 

honor followed the pattern set by authority. When they read his 



380 RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— JUNE 1951 

books, they know they can depend He has labored in the Church His- 

upon what he says. There is no torian's office most of his life, be- 

idle speculation in them, there is ginning as an employee there upon 

no vacillating. He comes to the his return from filling a mission in 

point, and explains it so that all Great Britain from 1899 to 1901. 

may readily understand. In 1906 he was sustained as an 

President Smith's activities are assistant Church Historian, and 

wide, but all of them advance the subsequently was made Church His- 

affairs of the Church to which he torian and Recorder, 
gives his undivided time. He has 

toured Europe in the interest of DRESIDENT Smith brings to his 
the missionary work, and directed r position as President of the 
the exodus of the elders from that Council of the Twelve, forty-one 
continent at the beginning of years of experience in that body. 
World War II. He has presided He knows the work well, he is be- 
over the Salt Lake Temple, he is loved of his brethren who make 
president of and actively supervises up that quorum. For the past six 
the work of the Genealogical So- months he has carried most of the 
ciety of the Church. He takes a burdens of the office, being acting 
leading part in education, both on president of the Council during the 
the general board of education for time President David O. McKay 
the Church, and on the board of served both as President of the 
trustees of the Brigham Young Council of the Twelve and as a 
University. member of the First Presidency un- 

As a member of the Twelve he der President George Albert Smith, 

visits stakes of the Church from President Smith's family life is 

week to week, conducting stake an inspiration to the Church. His 

conferences and other business. He wife, the former Jessie Evans, soloist 

tours missions from time to time with the Tabernacle Choir, gives 

in the interest of that work. He him wonderful support. Often she 

is a member of the missionary com- travels with him, and thrills the 

mittee of the Church, and also people of the stakes and missions 

serves on various other committees, with her singing. She provides for 

This greatly varied activity, this him a home life which is an ex- 
busy life in the Church, began in ample for every family, 
his early youth. He has filled of- President Smith's sons and daugh- 
fices in the various grades of the ters are splendid citizens, active 
Priesthood and in the auxiliary members of the Church, mission- 
organizations of the Church; he aries, auxiliary workers, Priesthood 
has been a high councilman, a mem- leaders. One of his sons was killed 
ber of the Y. M. M. I. A. general during the last World War. 
board; and a Seventy's quorum When he accepted this new po- 
president. sition, President Smith once more 

One of his most important posi- exhibited that humble attitude 

tions, one which he fills with great which has won so many friends for 

skill, is that of Church Historian, him. As he spoke in that mem- 



ELDER JOSEPH FIELDING SMITH 



381 



orable meeting which closed the 
last general conference, held in the 
Tabernacle Monday morning, April 
9, he said: 

First I wish to say before this vast 
congregation of Priesthood and members 
of the Church that I pledge myself to 
support my brethren of the First Presi- 
dency. They have my full support, my 
love and fellowship, and I pray that the 
Spirit of the Lord may rest upon them 
in great abundance to guide them and 
direct them in all things pertaining to 
their high and holy callings. 



I feel humble in standing here, con- 
sidering myself the weakest of my breth- 
ren, I love each one of them; the First 
Presidency, the Council of the Twelve, 
and the other brethren whose names have 
been presented and approved here this 
day. And may the Lord be with us to 
help each one of us to magnify his calling. 

I realize the position I have been 
called to fulfill is one of great importance. 
It makes me humble. I am grateful for 
the expressions that I have received from 
my brethren. They have expressed their 
confidence, and already have given unto 
me their support. 



>*» • 



Ljet 1 1 tan dieeds Hot 

Mabel Law Atkinson 

The coyote, trapped, escaping, keeps a wary eye; 

The mother robin learns to wait the stealthy tread . . . 

Yet man, divinely sired, heeds not the warning cry 

Of nations, buried . . . but sins on, then mourns his dead. 



CJutfiltment 

Grace Sayre 

As long as winds shall walk the earth 

And stars burn with exultant flame, 

As long as old trails know rebirth 

In dogwood sprays, spring will reclaim 

This heart, the winter's hour has dulled. 

And where these blooms have now fulfilled 

Their symbol sheaths in bud and root, 

A robin in an apple tree, 

In vibrant chords of ecstasy, 

Can make the season with his flute. 



Tribute to Adele Cannon Howells 

LaVern W. Parmley 

First Counselor to Sister Howells in the Presidency of the Primary Association 

A life of devoted service to the 
principles of her faith came 
to a close Saturday, April 
14, 1951, with the passing of Adele 
Cannon Howells. She was born in 
Salt Lake City, January 11, 1886, a 
daughter of George M. Cannon and 
Marion A. Morris Cannon. She 
attended the L. D. S. High School 
and graduated from the University 
of Utah in 1909. She taught school 
for a short period and then became 
associated with the Salt Lake Rec- 
reation Department for a number 
of years. She was married to David 



P. Howells, March 12, 1913, in the 
Salt Lake Temple. 

Sister Howells was called to be 
first counselor to May Green 
Hinckley, General President of the 
Primary Association, January 1, 
1940. After the death of Sister 
Hinckley she became General Presi- 
dent of the Primary Association, 
July 20, 1943. 

As president of the Primary Chil- 
dren's Hospital Board and editor 
of The Children's Friend, Sister 
Howells was a tireless and diligent 
worker. She served the Primaries 
throughout the Church with a keen 
and personal interest. She so glori- 
fied work that she translated duty 
into privilege. 

On January 12, 1948, she was 
elected to the Hall of Fame of the 
Salt Lake Council of Women be- 
cause of her outstanding accom- 
plishments. 

Sister Howells walked each morn- 
ing with a new sense of goodness; 
she opened her heart wide to all 

Page 382 




ADELE CANNON HOWELLS 

beauty and wisdom. She interested 
herself in life and mingled kindly 
with its joys and sorrows. She 
treasured friendships, she judged 
kindly, she did small tasks gracious- 
ly. She had charity in her heart 
for all. 

She believed in the everlasting 
beauty of the universe, in the su- 
premacy of good over evil, in the 
conquering power of love, the 
brotherhood of man, and the 
omnipotence of the spirit. She be- 
lieved in judgment without preju- 
dice and that there is nothing so 
contagious as happiness. 

(Continued on page 427) 



Contest Announcements — 1951 

THE Eliza R. Snow Poem Contest and the Relief Society Short Story 
Contest are conducted annually by the general board of Relief So- 
ciety to stimulate creative writing among Latter-day Saint women 
and to encourage high standards of work. Latter-day Saint women who 
qualify under the rules of the respective contests are invited to enter their 
work in either or both contests. 

The general board would be pleased to receive entries from the out- 
lying stakes and missions of the Church as well as from those in and near 
Utah. Since the two contests are entirely separate, requiring different writ- 
ing skills, the winning of an award in one of them in no way precludes 
winning in the other. It is suggested that authors who plan to enter the 
contest study carefully the articles on creative writing which appear in this 
Magazine, and also similar articles in the June issue for 1947, 1948, and 
1949: ''The Art of Poetry Writing— A Symposium of Opinions/' page 370, 
June 1947, and "We Want to Write/' page 375, June 1947; "For Makers 
of Rhythmic Beauty," page 370, June 1948; "You Can Write a Prize 
Winner," page 372, June 1948; "Points for Poets to Remember," page 
371, June 1949; "On Writing a Short Story," page 374, June 1949; "On 
Building a Poem," page 376, June 1950; "The Short Story With a Plot," 
page 379, June 1950. 

ibltza U\. Snow [Poem (contest 



'TMrlE Eliza R. Snow Poem Contest poems submitted, paying for them 

opens with this announcement at the time of publication at the 

and closes September 15, 1951. 

Prizes will be awarded as follows: 



regular Magazine rates. 



First prize $25 

Second prize $20 

Third prize $15 

Prize poems will be published in 
the January 1952 issue of The Re- 
lief Society Magazine (the birth 
month of Eliza R. Snow). 

Prize-winning poems become the 
property of the Relief Society gen- 
eral board and may not be pub- 
lished by others except upon writ- 
ten permission from the general 
board. The general board reserves 
the right to publish any of the other 



Rules for the contest: 

1. This contest is open to all Latter-day 
Saint women, exclusive of members of the 
Relief Society general board, and em- 
ployees of the Relief Society general board. 

2. Only one poem may be submitted by 
each contestant. 

3. The poem must not exceed fifty 
lines and should be typewritten, if pos- 
sible; where this cannot be done, it 
should be legibly written. Only one side 
of the paper is to be used. (A duplicate 
copy of the poem should be retained by 
contestant to insure against loss.) 

4. The sheet on which the poem is 
written is to be without signature or other 
identifying marks. 

Page 383 



384 



RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— JUNE 1951 



5. No explanatory material or picture 
is to accompany the poem. 

6. Each poem is to be accompanied by 
a stamped envelope on which is written 
the contestant's name and address. Nom 
de plumes are not to be used. 

7. A signed statement is to accompany 
the poem submitted, certifying: 

a. That the author is a member of the 
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day 
Saints. 

b. That the poem (state the title) is 
the contestant's original work. 

c. That it has never been published. 

d. That it is not in the hands of an 
editor or other person with a view 
to publication. 

That it will not be published nor 
submitted elsewhere for publication 
until the contest is decided. 
A writer who has received the first 

prize for two consecutive years must wait 
two years before she is again eligible to 
enter the contest. 



e. 



8. 



9. The judges shall consist of one mem- 
ber of the general board, one person from 
the English department of an educational 
institution, and one person who is a 
recognized writer. In case of complete dis- 
agreement among judges, all poems select- 
ed for a place by the various judges will be 
submitted to a specially selected commit- 
tee for final decision. 

In evaluating the poems, consideration 
will be given to the following points: 

a. Message or theme 

b. Form and pattern 

c. Rhythm and meter 

d. Accomplishment of the purpose of 
the poem 

e. Climax 

10. Entries must be postmarked not 
later than September 15, 1951. 

11. All entries are to be addressed to 
Relief Society Eliza R. Snow Poem Con- 
test, 40 North Main, Salt Lake City 1, 
Utah. 



[Relief Society Short Story (contest 



'PHE Relief Society Short Story 
' Contest for 1951 opens with 
this announcement and closes Sep- 
tember 15, 1951. 

The prizes this year will be as 
follows: 

First prize $50 

Second prize ......-..$40 

Third prize $30 

The three prize-winning stories 
will be published consecutively in 
the first three issues of The Relief 
Society Magazine for 1952. Prize- 
winning stories become the property 
of the Relief Society general board 
and may not be published by others 
except upon written permission 
from the general board. The general 
board reserves the right to publish 
any of the other stories entered in 
the contest, paying for them at the 
time of publication at the regular 
Magazine rates. 



Rules for the contest: 

1. This contest is open to Latter-day 
Saint women — exclusive of members of 
the Relief Society general board and em- 
ployees of the general board — who have 
had at least one literary composition pub- 
lished or accepted for publication. 

2. Only one story may be submitted by 
each contestant. 

3. The story must not exceed 3,000 
words in length and must be typewritten. 
( A duplicate copy of the story should be 
retained by contestants to insure against 
loss.) 

4. The contestant's name is not to ap- 
pear anywhere on the manuscript, but a 
stamped envelope on which is written 
the contestant's name and address is to be 
enclosed with the story. Nom de plumes 
are not to be used. 

5. A signed statement is to accompany 
the story submitted certifying: 

a. That the author is a member of the 
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day 
Saints. 

b. That the author has had at least one 
literary composition published or ac- 
cepted for publication. (This state- 
ment must give name and date of 



CONTEST ANNOUNCEMENTS 



385 



publication in which the contest- 
ant's work has appeared, or, if not 
yet published, evidence of accept- 
ance for publication.) 

c. That the story submitted (state the 
title and number of words) is the 
contestant's original work. 

d. That it has never been published, 
that it is not in the hands of an 
editor or other person with a view 
to publication, and that it will not 
be published nor submitted else- 
where for publication until the con- 
test is decided. 

6. No explanatory material or picture is 
to accompany the story. 

7. A writer who has received the first 
prize for two consecutive years must wait 
for two years before she is again eligible 
to enter the contest. 



8. The judges shall consist of one mem- 
ber of the general board, one person from 
the English department of an educational 
institution, and one person who is a rec- 
ognized writer. In case of complete dis- 
agreement among the judges, all stories se- 
lected for a place by the various judges 
will be sbmitted to a specially selected 
committee for final decision. 

In evaluating the stories, consideration 
will be given to the following points: 

a. Characters and their presentation 

b. Plot development 

c. Message of the story 

d. Writing style 

9. Entries must be postmarked not 
later than September 15, 1951. 

10. All entries are to be addressed to 
Relief Society Short Story Contest, 40 
North Main, Salt Lake City 1, Utah. 



Qjragraat 1 1 lemories 

Grace Barker Wilson 

Remembered things are poignant as today: 

The scent of violet, 
The young, green odor of a fresh-cut lawn, 

Essence of mignonette; 

Elusive sweetness from the orchard trees 

When apples are in flower, 
The clean smell of a forest glade 

After a summer shower. 



1 Itgfit ofrom Lapitol 
(Hill 

Salt Lake City, Utah 

Margaret B. Shomaker 

The city lights its rich array 

Of window stars. . . . 

Yellow, orange, and red 

On the deepening blue. 

Temple spires pierce through the dark, 

And silence fills my heart. 



Summer I loon 

Beatrice K. Ekman 

Metallic silence broods on land and sea, 
And bunch grass waits as motionless as stone. 
Surf creeps upon the tidelands quietly 
And sweltering heat throbs down in monotone. 
White rays of torrid sun proclaim the noon 
And shimmering heat waves move across the 
dune. 



Let's Write a Poem 



Alberta H. Chiistensen 
Member, General Board of Relief Society 



POETRY, it has been said, is 
an attitude toward life, and 
poems are a by-product of 
experiencing the poetic spirit. If 
we take this viewpoint, all people 
are poets at one time or another 
and no one is a poet all the time. 
Even the most practical housewife 
becomes enthusiastic over some 
idea occasionally, is moved by im- 
pulses of idealism, or feels deeply 
sympathetic towards others, all 
facets of what we might call the 
poetic attitude. On such occasions 
she is a poet, although she may not 
express herself in a single rhythmic 
line. 

We need to cultivate poetry if 
by the poetic attitude we mean a 
reaching out beyond ourselves in 
sympathy and understanding to all 
people, identifying our own vital 
experiences with those of others. 
We need to know that poetry is 
far more practical than most people 
realize, for it can shape the ideas 
of individuals, nourishing the buds 
that flower into action. Poetry can 
heighten our own appreciations, 
help us clarify our ideas, and ma- 
ture our emotions. 

Let's write a poem, when and if 
we feel that we have something to 
say that could be said in a poem. 
If we are aware of beauty as mani- 
fest everywhere in nature; if we 
know the experience of parenthood 
or the lack of it; if we are among 
those who see a light beyond sor- 
row, a gain above loss; if we sense 
the need and possibility of raising 
man's level of living, then we do 

Page 386 



have something to say. If our emo- 
tional reaction to any of these or 
other phases of life is honest and 
intense, let's write a poem. 

Writing poetry can be a reward- 
ing experience even for the woman 
who writes only occasionally, if she 
will be realistic about her work. If 
it has been written merely as emo- 
tional release— to get a certain con- 
viction "out of the system/' she is 
free to cast it into the waste basket 
or the dresser drawer. But if the 
poem is to reach out beyond her- 
self and be enjoyably shared by oth- 
ers, the author must fulfill certain 
obligations to the poem itself and 
to its readers. An emotional re- 
lease may be sufficient reason for 
writing, but it is not sufficient to 
assure poetic quality. She must 
be willing to examine her poem ob- 
jectively, as if she had never met 
the author. She must know that all 
poets, and especially amateurs, must 
study and revise their work where 
necessary, that the poems may com- 
municate as nearly as possible the 
meaning and feeling the author 
wishes to convey. Emotion may 
be personal, intense, and very real to 
us, and there is a tendency to feel 
that the poem shaped from it is 
faultless. Very few poems are 
"born" full grown and perfect. 

Every poem which is entered in 
a contest is submitted with the be- 
lief (however slight) on the part 
of its author that it has a chance 
of- winning. Otherwise it would 
not be entered. And most of the 
(Continued on page 417) 



Let's Write a Story 

Alice Money Bailey 

WHEN the first campfire lit assuming that the intelligence of 

a ring of listening faces his readers is at least equal to his 

the short story as a means own. Nothing pleases a reader so 

of creative expression and aesthetic much as finding a hidden truth 

satisfaction was established. The which he thinks might have escaped 

printed page has widened that ring everyone else, including the author, 

and preserved great stories from the A good premise is the skeleton 

foundation of the world. The fasci- upon which to hang the flesh and 

nation of story-telling grips every- blood of character and plot, 

one, from the very young child to The characters for our stories 

the old man reliving his life in cannot be made up without 

reminiscence. thought. We must know their 

Self-expression is not sufficient backgrounds, the physical make-up, 

justification for writing a short the ancestry, and the sociology and 

story; its purpose is to strengthen religion that have colored their 

or entertain the reader. thinking. We must know their 

Let us choose a purpose and psychology, age, health, and the 
take the first step: find out what it type of work they do. Whether 
is we really wish to say. The de- we put these into the story or not, 
termination of this destination has they will direct the actions and con- 
many names: story idea, wot idea, versations of the characters and re- 
theme, thesis, goal, aim, driving veal them as personalities. 
force, to name a few. Old-fashioned Perhaps a person met with in real 
writers called it the "moral" and life is such a one as to suggest 
tacked it on the end of fables for premise and plot to an author. If 
the benefit of readers who might so, there is danger in portraying 
have missed it in the story. One him. If too faithfully done, harm 
competent teacher calls this prem- may result to him or his family and 
ise. the author will be promptly and 

Premise, according to the diction- thoroughly sued. He should be 
ary, is a proposition previously stat- disguised and firmly transplanted, 
ed or assumed as leading to a con- On the other hand, the author who 
elusion, antecedently supposed or draws too much from his imagina- 
proved; a basis of argument. If the tion runs the same danger as the 
premise of our story cannot be artist who uses no models; his 
summed up in a sentence, such as characters may be all glorified 
"Pride goeth before a fall," "Vio- replicas of himself, 
lent living brings violent death," We must select or create our 
"A fool and his money are soon characters, select a pivotal person- 
parted," it is not a good story. ality, and surround him with those 

The clever writer conceals his who will react against him to the 

premise in fine writing, never set- advantage of the story. Maybe our 

ting it out in so many words, but central or pivotal character is not 

proving it with subtlety and drama, (Continued on page 427) 

Page 387 



Sixty LJears Jxgo 

Excerpts from the Woman's Exponent, June 1, and June 15, 1891 

"For the Rights of the Women of Zion and the Rights of the 
Women of All Nations" 

ROYALTY AT WORK: The daughters of the Princess of Wales, says Lady 
Elizabeth Hilary in The Ladies' Home Journal, are sensibly educated. They know how 
to sew so well that they can make their own gowns, and their knowledge of every art 
taught them is thorough. They can go into the kitchen and cook — cook well; they 
understand the art of breadmaking, and if they were thrown upon their own resources 
would be able to take care of themselves. And this has been done not only as an 
example to other mothers in the kingdom, but because her Royal Highness thought 
it right for her daughters. 

PEACE 

God give you peace! your life will have its longings, 
I would not ask they be less keen and deep; . 

The soul that firmly stands upon the mountains 
Must know the footing of the pathway steep; 

It must have trod the valleys dim and low 

And tented where the streams of silence flow. 

— A. Furber 

ITEMS FROM OVERTON: Thinking that some of our friends would like to 
know about our little village away out in the southern part of Nevada, I thought I 
would write a few lines to the Woman's Exponent. We are enjoying very cool weather 
for this time of year, have had a few nice showers of rain which makes things look more 
beautiful, men are busy harvesting grain, you can hear the song of the birds and the 
rattle of the machine in almost every field of beautiful golden grain; we have plenty 
of early vegetables; our little town is in a beautiful valley as nice as any one could wish 
to make a home in. We can raise almost anything that we put in the ground; we 
enjoy pleasant winters, snow is a very rare thing, I have lived here for ten years and 
have seen snow once. We want more settlers to help build up the place; we have 
good society, but we want more people to help use the abundance of water we have, 
then we will be more free from chills; the health of the people is generally good; no 
diseases of any kind bother us much. — Kate. 

MY LOVE 

How do I love you? so well that your face, 
Thoughtful, and earnest, and calm has a place 
Down in the depths, dearest one, of my heart, 
Plainly engraven, to never depart 

— Clara M. Saunders 

UTAH STAKE RELIEF SOCIETY CONFERENCE: Pres. Mary John presid- 
ing, was grateful to see so many at the conference as it proves their faithfulness. I feel 
the sisters are doing a good work, wished the younger sisters would meet with us even 
if they bring their children. The old will not always be with us, and the responsibilities 
will rest with the young. Sister Goodman spoke on the silk question; did not like to 
see the interest dying out, thought it would eventually be a source of profit to us. 
Coun. Marilla Daniels felt to endorse what Sister Goodman had said about silk; but it 
would need unity of purpose to make it a success. Sister E. E. Richards felt pleased 
to be with us, had always tried to meet with the Relief Society, had enjoyed meeting 
with Sister Eliza and Sister Zina in years gone by, this is the place to get strength. 

— C. Daniels, Secy. 
Page 388 




Woman's Sphere 



AT an institute on gerontology 
(study of the aging) held in the 
Union Building of the University 
of Utah in April, Mrs. Belle S. 
Spafford, General President of Re- 
lief Society, gave a talk as a repre- 
sentative of the Church of Jesus 
Christ of Latter-day Saints on the 
work and care for the aging. Her 
explanation was very well received 
by the audience and by Dr. Robert 
J. Havighurst, eminent national fig- 
ure in sociology, particularly in ger- 
ontology, and guest-lecturer for the 
institute week. 

^HE first Sunday in June is ob- 
served in many states as "Shut- 
in's Day." This type of service is 
part of the general program of Relief 
Society and members make visits to 
the homebound throughout the 
year. 

*TpHE Daughters of Utah Pioneers 
on April 7th, celebrated the 
fiftieth anniversary of the birth of 
their organization, April 11, 1901. 
Especially honored were the three 
surviving charter members: Mary 
Schwartz Smith (widow of Presi- 
dent Joseph F. Smith), Rosan- 
nah Cannon (Mrs. Alonzo Blair) 
Irvine, and Rachel Grant (Mrs. 
John H.) Taylor. In February the 
"Daughters" entertained both legis- 



Ramona W. Cannon 



lative bodies at a luncheon as an ex- 
pression of appreciation for the fi- 
nancial help received from them to- 
ward the erection of their new build- 
ing. 

MRS. JOHN C. SWENSON, of 
Provo, Utah's Mother of the 
Year, has spent much of her time 
for the last seven years in assisting 
her eighty-year-old blind neighbor, 
Mrs. Fannie Patton, in the work of 
converting into Braille type choice 
selections of literature and religious 
writings. Mrs. Swenson, mother 
of nine children, is the wife of Pro- 
fessor Emeritus John C. Swenson 
of Brigham Young University, and 
the couple still live in the home 
which they entered as bride and 
groom fifty- two years ago. A success- 
ful teacher for many years, Mrs. 
Swenson still acts as a special tutor 
for children and young people in 
music and reading. 

TyiRS. MARY T. MARTIN 
X l SLOOP, of Crossmore, North 
Carolina, a seventy-seven-year-old 
doctor, known as "the grand lady 
of the Blue Ridge" for her work 
with mountain children, has re- 
ceived the honor of "American 
Mother of 1951." She is the wife 
of a country doctor and the mother 
of a son and a daughter, both 
doctors. 

Page 389 



EDITORJA 



VOL. 38 



JUNE 1951 



NO. 6 



3he m 



essiag 



of VUork 



" r PHE night cometh when no 
man can work." This caution 
was given by the Lord to his dis- 
ciples. If kept ever in mind, then 
the need to do required work at an 
appointed hour becomes acceptable, 
as the realization grows that time 
never returns to offer again this 
precise moment for a given work. 
With passing time come new tasks. 

"Work is the scythe of time," 
wrote Napoleon as he contemplated 
years of living in exile, cut off from 
the stream of life, and planned work 
which would engross him to the 
exclusion of crawling days and 
months and years. 

Young mothers recognize the 
truth of Napoleon's comment. 
There never seems to be sufficient 
time for their innumerable tasks 
to be done in each twenty-four 
hours. And yet a mother's satis- 
faction increases in proportion as 
she perfects herself in her work, as 
she plans her work so as to include 
also the work of teaching and train- 
ing her children. She discovers 
that in experiences involving worry, 
regret, or sorrow, that work wears 
a comforting face, that it is a solace 
to her to work with her hands. A 
burden becomes lightened as it is 
leavened with physical or even 
mental work. Finally, to the moth- 
er forced to lie in bed and see her 
household disrupted by her inac- 
tivity, comes the final recognition of 
the ability to work as a blessing 
Page 390 



and a privilege. Work no longer 
is something to battle and conquer, 
work is a necessity to her feeling of 
fulfillment. 

The pressure of work, moreover, 
grows less through application. 
However monotonous or distaste- 
ful certain work appears to be, 
through earnest effort and an 
acknowledgment of its necessity, 
it becomes at first less distasteful 
and, in time, even enjoyable. 

The gospel plan offers work to 
be done throughout life. Valued 
service suited to the physical con- 
dition of an individual may be 
always engaged in, and there is no 
arbitrary age beyond which service 
is not accepted. The plan of salva- 
tion recognizes that the spirit is 
eternal and, change as time will the 
outer shell— this mortal body— the 
spirit remains young and forward- 
looking— only refined by wisdom 
and understanding as it is schooled 
by the years. 

Charles Kingsley wrote: 

Thank God every morning when you 
get up that you have something to do that 
day which must be done, whether you 
like it or not. Being forced to work, and 
forced to do your best, will breed in you 
temperance and self-control, diligence and 
strength of will, cheerfulness and content, 
and a hundred virtues which the idle 
never know. 

Some religions teach of a heaven 
where angels sit and play harps 
eternally, of a heaven where in- 



EDITORIAL 



391 



activity reigns. This is contrary to 
the knowledge of Latter-day Saints. 
Heaven means eternal progression, 
wherein the Lord stated, 'Tor this 
is my work and my glory, to bring 
to pass the immortality and eternal 
life of man." 

God has work to do and he pro- 
nounced a blessing upon man in 
that commandment, "By the sweat 
of thy face shalt thou eat bread." 



Through the accomplishment of 
righteous work, man has joy. 

Work, and thou wilt bless the day 
Ere the toil be done; 
They that work not, can not pray, 
Can not feel the sun. 
God is living, working still, 
All things work and move; 
Work, or lose the power to will, 
Lose the power to love. 

— John Sullivan Dwight 

-M. C. S. 



o/n 1 1 le mo nam — ibmma oLucy spates Ujoweri 

November 5, 1880— April 30, 1951 

Emma Lucy Gates Bowen, granddaughter of President Brigham 
Young, and wife of Elder Albert E. Bowen, of the Council of the Twelve, 
died April 30, 1951, in Salt Lake City, Utah. A beautiful and gracious 
woman, she was richly gifted and greatly loved. 

Emma Lucy Gates was born in St. George, Utah, November 5, 1880, 
a daughter of Jacob F. Gates and Susa Young Gates, and the third in a 
family of thirteen children. She was proud of her ancestry and of her 
Church, and during her long public career she always availed herself of 
every opportunityy to serve her people. 

Her musical education began at an early age, and when she was six 
years old she made her vocal debut by singing "Aloha Oe" to its composer, 
Queen Liliuokalam during the time that Emma Lucy's parents were serv- 
ing as missionaries in Hawaii. At the age of thirteen, she won first prize 
in a piano competition in the first Welsh Eisteddfod held in the Salt Lake 
Tabernacle. When she was seventeen, Emma Lucy went to Europe 
with her sister Leah and her brother-in-law, Elder John A. Widtsoe, now 
a member of the Council of the Twelve. In Europe she sang as guest 
artist in many opera houses and made concert appearances in nearly all 
the large cities. Later, in the United States, she sang grand opera roles in 
New York, Philadelphia, Chicago, Seattle, and many other cities. Her 
unusually rich voice was magnificent in roles ranging from the highest 
coloratura soprano scores, such as Mozart's "Queen of the Night," to the 
mezzo-soprano role of "Carmen." As "Utah's First Lady of Music," she 
was especially honored on October 25, 1948, in the Assembly Hall, Salt 
Lake City, where she was given an enthusiastic ovation at a "command" 
performance. 



392 



RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— JUNE 1951 



Emma Lucy Gates was married to Elder Albert E. Bowen in 1916. She 
reared as her own his twin sons whose mother had died at their birth 
in 1905. Since her husband's appointment to the Council of the Twelve 
in 1937, Sister Bowen has traveled widely throughout the Church, and is 
lovingly remembered by Latter-day-Saint women in the stakes and missions. 

She has been most liberal with her great gifts and has encouraged and 
instructed many young musicians whose voices will long be heard, and 
who owe much of their success to her training and inspiration. 

Hers was a great soul— and the testimony of her Savior and the living 
of the second great commandment were the guiding beacons of her life. 
The general board of the Relief Society and Relief Society members every- 
where, in gratitude for Sister Bowen's life of devotion and service, tender 
their heartfelt sympathy to Elder Bowen and members of the family. They 
know that memories of her, and her sweet influence, will continue to en- 
rich their lives and the lives of all who have known and loved Emma Lucy 
Gates Bowen. 



Q 



uestton 



Matfa McClelland Buik 

Grandma planted yellow roses 
Beside her cabin door; 
Each year they spread a golden fleece 
Though she is here no more. 

I prune my costly hybrids 
And tend them year by year. 
Will they bloom with such abandon 
When I am no longer here? 



JLost JLi 



ove 



a 



reative 



*jLi 



rtist 



Nehuise Fisher Judd 

She asks about • 

Her many friends. 

But you? 

She never breathes 

Your name. 

She's too afraid 

That folks will guess 

She loves you just the same. 



Ruth H. Chadwick 

She who molds an idea 

Into a printed word, 
Or turns the tunes within her heart 

To music yet unheard, 
Or gives to pigments life and age, 

And shapes the common sod, 
Lifts herself to hallowed realms — 

Shares kinship then with God. 



Polly Played for Keeps 



Sylvia Piobst Young 



FROM his chair at the supper 
table Pa surveyed us with 
his usual good-natured smile 
which came to rest on Polly, as Pa's 
smiles always did, for Polly is the 
apple of Pa's eye. Who could 
doubt that Polly, with her dancing 
eyes and freckled nose, would be 
the family favorite, for Polly, you 
see, is our only sister, and boys — 
there are a half dozen of us. 

"Well, Sis," Pa said (we've always 
called her Sis), "how does it seem 
to be in high school? They tell me 
there's a new schoolmarm over 
there." 

Polly beamed, and the freckles 
across her nose shone in the lamp- 
light. It seemed quite impossible 
that she should be starting high 
school, this red-headed, mischiev- 
ous, tree-climbing little sister. 

"Oh, Pa," she exclaimed, "she's 
our teacher for English. Her name's 
Kate Morton, and she's just beauti- 
ful, and more fun." 

Ma, her fork in mid-air, looked 
up with interest. No doubt she had 
heard all about Miss Morton when 
Polly got home, but it was still 
news, for a new high school teacher 
was something Hillcreek hadn't had 
for a couple of years. 

"She sounds interesting," was 
Sid's quick comment. "Guess I'll 
have to meet this schoolmarm." 

"What about Johnnie?" put in 
Leon. "He's the old man around 
here. "I had her spotted for John- 
nie soon as I saw her." 

"Oh, you did?" I answered. 
"Well, Leon boy, being twenty-two 
doesn't exactlv put me in the old 



man class, and I'm in no hurry for 
a wife. But we'll see. One never 
knows." 

"No, one never knows," said Pa. 
"But it seems to me both Sid and 
Johnnie should start giving mar- 
riage some serious thought." Then 
he winked at Polly and started talk- 
ing about picking the transparent 
apples, so nothing more was said 
about Miss Morton. But I remem- 
bered Polly's glowing account of 
her, and I resolved that I'd have to 
meet this Miss Morton as soon as 
the opportunity came my way, and 
it wasn't long in coming. For the 
next Saturday night was the harvest 
dance at Winkle's ranch, and I had 
the pleasure of meeting Kate Mor- 
ton there and discovering that 
everything Polly had said about her 
was true. 

I was a little late getting to the 
dance that night because I had 
helped Pa doctor a sick calf, but 
when I came into the ranch parlor 
I spotted the new teacher first 
thing, and she was dancing with 
Sid. You could tell she was no 
local product. She was too fair 
and fragile looking for that . . . 
sorta reminded me of the Dresden 
china doll on Ma's what-not shelf. 

I gave Sid the high sign, but he 
ignored me completely. However, 
when the music stopped, he 
brought her around. (Sid's a good 

guy-) 

"Miss Morton," he said, "I'd like 
you to meet my big brother here. 
This is Johnnie Sullivan. He's been 
dying to meet you." 

Page 393 



394 

I felt my face burning, and I 
could have choked Sid, but Kate 
Morton was smiling in an under- 
standing sort of way. 

"How do you do, Johnnie Sulli- 
van," she said, "and how many 
Sullivans are there?" 

"Well there's quite a tribe of us 
in these parts," I told her, my com- 
posure regained. "And may this 
Sullivan have the pleasure of the 
next dance with you?" 

CHE was a perfect dancer, and the 
fact that she was the new 
schoolmarm made her the belle of 
the ball. In spite of that fact, I 
managed to have her for a dancing 
partner three times, and she prom- 
ised to ride over to Diamond Lake 
with me next Saturday afternoon. 

As soon as dinner was over on 
Saturday, I went out and cranked 
up the new Ford and rode over to 
Pyper's. That's where Miss Morton 
was staying. Old Jonathan Pyper 
was in his rocker on the front porch, 
and he greeted me with a sly smile. 

"I expected to see one of you 
Sullivan boys over here about now 
or sooner. Well, Miss Kate 'pears 
to be as fine a gal as ever I see. Sit 
down, Feller, she'll be out in no 
time." 

And then she came. Her blond 
locks were tied up with a blue vel- 
vet band, and she was wearing some 
kind of silk dress as golden as her 
hair. 

"Hello," she smiled. "Isn't it a 
perfectly lovely afternoon for a 
ride?" 

Mrs. Pyper, round and jolly, was 
standing in the doorway as we 
started to go. "Johnnie be careful 
with that gas machine," she teased. 
"Think you should have brought 



RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— JUNE 1951 

old Nell and the buggy, don't you?" 
I helped Miss Morton into the 
car, then climbed in and took the 
wheel. A lazy breeze stirred in the 
trees along the road, and the air was 
filled with the smell of apples and 
wood smoke. 

"It's beautiful up here," Miss 
Morton said. "I know I'm going 
to like this town very much." 

We talked about everything from 
schoolboys to politicians, and by 
the time we got back to Hillcreek 
we were firm friends. She was call- 
ing me Johnnie and I was calling 
her Kate, and she had promised to 
go to the dance with me next Sat- 
urday night. 

Ma was putting our Saturday 
night lunch on the table when I 
got home, and the minute I opened 
the door the whole gang started in 
on me: 
"How's Kate, Johnnie?" 
"Got another date, Johnnie?" 
"How's your heartbeat, Johnnie?" 
And Bill, who was studying Ten- 
nyson's Idylls of the King, threw 
out his arms dramatically and re- 
cited from "Lancelot and Elaine," 
substituting Kate: 

Kate the fair, Kate the lovable, 
Kate, the lily maid of Astolat . . . 

From then on I seemed to have 
the inside track with Miss Kate 
Morton. I never really asked her 
to go steady, but I always managed 
to be the boy who took her to 
church functions, school dances, or 
anything else. That is, until she 
decided I was taking her too much 
for granted, and then she took mat- 
ters into her own hands. 

I had been seeing her about 
twice a week from October until 



POLLY PLAYED FOR KEEPS 395 

February, when I decided it was "I'm sorry, I'm sorry as the dick- 

about time i told her what my heart ens," I told her, "but I've been 

had been telling me for several your steady since last October/' 

months. As I walked over to "And so that gives you the right 

Pyper's that February evening, it to expect me to be waiting when- 

suddenly occurred to me that Val- ever you chance to come. As a mat- 

entine's Day was only a couple of ter of fact, Johnnie, I don't remem- 

days away, and I hadn't asked Kate ber your ever asking me to go 

to go to the dance. Of course I steady." 

figured she would understand, and "I should have, and I meant to, 

everything would be all right. After an d i promise never to take you for 

all, hadn't I been her beau for granted again. Now how about 

quite awhile? telling Clarence you have a date 

It was Mrs. Pyper who came to f or the dance?" 

the door, and she looked like the "j can 't do that Johnnie. He's 

cat who swallowed the canary. Mrs Pyper > s nepfl ew, and I'm liv- 

"Kate isn't here," she said. "My ing at p ypers ^ Besides I couldn't 

nephew Clarence came up for a do q^ anvwa y » 

few days and she went to the mov- 1 ' ss l t reall mad then> and 

ies with him. You know Clarence, said a lot of things j didn>t really 

J°V^ ie ; i ™ ™ mean > but so did she. When I left 

Did I know Clarence? Clarence the sch oolhouse that night I felt 

was the typical dude, a Lord Font- like the world had come to an end? 

leroy grown tall, who didn t know for Kate and l had come to the 

on which side to milk a cow Yes, ti of the wa and j had 

I knew Clarence, and it made my lanned on aski her tQ m me 

blood boil. • T . . ., j . * , 

1 went to the dance alone, and 

AT three-thirty next day I was up I didn't miss one dance. I acted 
at the school, and after the kids hke I was having the time of my 
had all come out, I went in to see hfe, Du t that was only acting. All 
Kate. I didn't dream we were go- the time I was looking at Kate, 
ing to quarrel, but we did. And, Once I about decided to go ask 
looking back on it now, I'm sure it her for a dance and try to patch 
was all my fault because Clarence things up, but I didn't. Stubborn 
had always rubbed my fur in the fool that I was, I kept remember- 
wrong direction. I couldn't stand * n g her saying, "If that's the way 
to think of him taking Kate, espe- you feel, Johnnie, don't bother to 
daily not to the Valentine dance, come around any more." 
and that, I found out, was exactly Of course my family learned 
whom she was going with. about it. They didn't say much, 
"Johnnie," Kate said, and her but I think they thought I was a 
blue eyes were a little icy, "I'm get- mule, especially Polly, 
ting just a little tired of being taken "I think it's so silly," she told me 
for granted. Today is February more than once, "for people like 
thirteenth, and you hadn't men- you and Miss Morton not to make 
tioned the dance until now." up." 



396 



RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE— JUNE 1951 



"But suppose she doesn't want 
to, what then?" 

"You know very well she wants 
to, but she's waiting for you. It's 
a man's place." 

"Aren't you a bit young to know 
all those things?" I teased. 

"Maybe I am." She tossed her 
red locks. "But if I were you, John- 
nie Sullivan, I wouldn't mope away 
my life because I was too stubborn 
to make the first move.' 

"Now don't feel sorry for me, lit- 
tle Sis. Haven't I been dating 
Mary Hammond ever since?" 

"Sure, but she isn't Kate Morton, 
Johnnie." 

"Too bad Beth Ritchy's got py 
heart right now, or I'd give you a 
run," Sid put in. 



W 1 



'ELL, call it mulishness or what 
you will, the winter wore on, 
and I continued dating Mary Ham- 
mond and wishing she were Kate. 
Polly, it seemed, made a special ef- 
fort to go into detail about her 
English class at supper every night. 
But it looked like school would 
close, and Kate would leave for the 
summer or get herself engaged to 
Clarence Newbold. The thought 
of it almost drove me crazy, but 
then I would persist in remember- 
ing that she had told me not to 
come back. If she really wanted 
to see me she could drop a hint. 
So I suffered in silence until that 
eventful April day when a wonder- 
ful thing happened. 

I had been plowing in the south 
field, and I had just finished the 
upper flat, when I looked up and 
saw Polly coming toward me. 

"Hi, Johnnie," she called, and she 
seemed excited about something. 



I stopped the horses and waited 
while she stumbled through the 
plowed furrows. 

"Johnnie, I've got a message for 
you." 

"A what?" 

"A message, from Miss Kate 
Morton." 

"What did you say?" 

"Johnnie Sullivan are you listen- 
ing or not?" 

"Yes— yes, of course I am! Did 
you say Kate Morton sent me a 
message? Well, what did she say? 
Don't just stand there!" 

"That's what I'm trying to tell 
you. She said, Tolly will you do me 
a favor? Will you tell Johnnie that 
I'd like very much to see him. It's 
very important. Ask him if he will 
meet me tonight about eight o'clock 
by the Hillcreek bridge?' " 

"Did she say that? Are you sure, 
Polly?" 

"Didn't I just tell you so?" 

"Yes, you did. Gosh, I guess she 
does want to see me again after all." 

I finished that plowing in record 
time, and left the milking and night 
chores for the others. 

"Got a big date," I told Ma, as 
I was washing up in the kitchen. 
"Kate Morton sent word with Polly 
that she'd like to see me." 

"Well, I'm glad of that. If she 
had waited for you she'd have wait- 
ed till doom's day. You're as stub- 
born as your old Grandpa Sullivan, 
I'd say." 

\ spring moon was peeking over 
Mount Baldy, and the night 
was filled with the perfume of ap- 
ple blossoms. As I walked toward 
the creek it seemed to me there 
had never been such a night. I 



POLLY PLAYED FOR KEEPS 



397 



waited on the bridge for a moment, 
looking down at the starlight shad- 
ows, and then I saw her coming. It 
was like seeing the fairy queen com- 
ing across the field. 

''Hello, Johnnie/' she called, and 
then she was on the bridge beside 
me. 

For a moment there was an awk- 
ward silence, then I found my 
tongue. 

"Kate," I began in a clumsy sort 
of way. "I don't know how to tell 
you how downright miserable I've 
been all this while wanting to see 
you. So much I've wanted to tell 
you. I wonder if you can ever for- 
give me for being such a stubborn 
fool. If you hadn't asked m& to 
meet you up here tonight, I guess 
you'd have gone away and . . . ." 

"Johnnie," she interrupted, "John- 
nie, what did you say? I didn't ask 
you to meet me here. Polly brought 
me a message from you. She said 
you asked her to tell me that you'd 
like to see me, and that I should 
meet you up here. Didn't you tell 
Polly that, Johnnie?" 

"But Polly told me, Kate. She 
brought a message from you to me." 

Then it was Polly. For a mo- 
ment we were both knocked 
speechless, as the truth dawned. 
And the next moment we were 
both laughing, and everything was 
all right. 



"Kate!" I caught her hands in 
mine. "I think I have the most 
wonderful, meddling little sister in 
the world. She knows that I love 
you, and there's no one in the 
world like you, as far as she is con- 
cerned. All winter long she's been 
telling me how stubborn and pig- 
headed I am. But I kept remem- 
bering your telling me not to come 
around any more." 

"Oh, Johnnie, you don't know 
how I've wanted you to come. I 
only said that because I was angry. 
Didn't you know that? I've been 
perfectly miserable, too, and I 
think Clarence Newbold is nothing 
but a bore." 

"And Johnnie Sullivan, what do 
you think of him?" 

She gave her head a cocky toss 
an