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Full text of "The religious life of London"

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GREATER LONDON 



Editor's Note to Greater London 

The methods employed in the enumeration of the attendance 
at places of worship in Greater London differed slightly from those 
adopted in London. In the case of smaller churches and mission- 
halls an exception was made to the rule, religiously observed in 
the twenty-nine boroughs, of one man per door. In certain rare 
instances volunteers were accepted; these volunteers, however, 
did not assist in the enumeration of the churches to which they 
were attached, but were drafted off to neighbouring places of 
worship. Each volunteer was placed under a superintendent 
belonging to the Census staff. Not more than twenty such instances 
of voluntary assistance occurred throughout the whole of our 
work in Greater London. 

The distance of many of the suburban districts from town 
rendered our task one of considerable difficulty. The problem of 
getting the enumerators to their destinations in view of the lack 
of early trains, of providing food for them in country districts 
during their twelve or fifteen hours' absence from home, and of 
finding a shelter for them in wet weather between the morning and 
evening services, had constantly to be faced and mastered. 






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THE RELIGIOUS 
LIFE OF LONDON 




There is not a hamlet where poor peasants congregate, but, by- 
one means and another, a church apparatus has been got together — 
roofed edifice, with revenues and belfries ; pulpit, reading-desk, with 
books and methods : possibility, in short, and strict prescription, 
That a man stand there and speak of spiritual things to men. It 
is beautiful ; even in its great obscuration and decadence, it is 
among the beautifulest, most touching objects one sees on the 
earth. This Speaking Man has indeed, in these times, wandered 
terribly from the point ; has, alas, as it were, totally lost sight of 
the point ; yet, at bottom, whom have we to compare with him ? 
Of all public functionaries boarded and lodged on the industry of 
modern Europe, is there one worthier of the board he has? A 
man even professing, and never so languidly making still some 
endeavour, to save the souls of men ; contrast him with a man 
professing to do little but shoot the partridges of men ! I wish 
he could find the point again, this Speaking One, and stick to it 
with tenacity, with deadly energy, for there is need of him yet ! 
The Speaking Function, this of truth coming to us with a living 
voice— nay, in a living shape, and as a concrete practical exemplar ; 
this, with all our writing and printing functions, has a perennial 
place. Could he but find the point again — take the old spectacles 
off his nose, and looking up discover, almost in contact with him, 
what the real Satanas, and soul-devouring, world-devouring Devil, 
now is ! Original sin and suchlike are bad enough, I doubt not ; 
but distilled gin, dark ignorance, stupidity, dark corn-law, bastille 
and company, what are they ! Will he discover our new real 
Satan, whom he has to fight, or go on droning through his old 
nose-spectacles about old extinct Satans, and never see the real 
one till he feel him at his own throat and ours? That is a 
question for the world ! — Carlyle. 



THE RELIGIOUS 
LIFE OF LONDON 



EDITED BY 

RICHARD MUDIE-SMITH 



'And he came to Nazareth, where he had been 

BROUGHT up: AND HE ENTERED, AS HIS CUSTOM 
WAS, INTO THE SYNAGOGUE ON THE SABBATH DAY." 

St. Luke iv. i6. 

' Not FORSAKING THE ASSEMBLING OF OURSELVES 
TOGETHER, AS THE CUSTOM OF SOME IS." 

Hebrrws x. 25, 



LONDON 

HODDER AND STOUGHTON 

27, PATERNOSTER ROW 

1904 



It is to keep a man awake, to keep him alive to his own soul 
and its fixed design of righteousness, that the better part of 
moral and religious education is directed ; not only that of 
words and doctors, but the sharp ferule of calamity under 
which we are all God's scholars till we die. If, as teachers, 
Tve are to say anything to the purpose, we must say what will 
remind the pupil of his soul; we must speak that soul's 
dialect; we must talk of life and conduct as his soul would 
have him think of them. If, from some conformity between 
us and the pupil, or perhaps among all men, we do in truth 
speak in such a dialect and express such views, bej'^ond question 
we shall touch in him a spring ; beyond question he will 
recognise the dialect as one that he himself has spoken in 
his better hours ; beyond question he will cry, " I had forgotten, 
but now I remember; I too have eyes, and I had foigot to 
use them ! I too have a soul of my own, arrogantly upright, 
and to that I will listen and conform." In short, say to him 
anything that he has once thought, or been on the point of 
thinking, or show him any view of life that he has once clearly 
seen, or been on the point of clearly seeing; and you have 
done your part and may leave him to complete the education 
for himself.— Robert Louis Stevenson. 



' R K 



PREFACE 

" Men need the experience of the past to help them in 
practical endeavours, to enable them to understand the 
position of actual questions with which they and their 
age are engaged. For this purpose accurate facts are 
needed — not opinions, however plausible, which are unsus- 
tained by facts." These words, taken from the late 
Bishop Creighton's "Introduction" to the Cambridge Modern 
History, justify, if any justification is necessary, the 
publication of this book. The one aim of those responsible 
for its appearance is to stimulate the Churches to renewed 
activity by presenting them with accurate facts in place 
of plausible opinions. In order that the statistics might 
prove of immediate practical utility, various writers, 
specialists in their own respective departments, were asked 
to interpret their significance. It will be observed that 
there is not entire agreement in the conclusions at which 
they arrive. This, however, was neither expected nor 
desired, — it was not expected, since each writer was given 
cm^te blanche; it was not desired, since vigorous individu- 
ality of utterance was preferred to an apparent uniformity, 
which might have been obtained by means either of 
emendations or additions. The editor is indebted to 
Mr. H. J. B. Steele for valuable assistance in preparing 
these pages for the press, and to Mr. Wm. Scott Durrant, 
M.A., for kindly reading through the final proof-sheets. 






What greater calamity can fall upon a nation than the loss of 
woi-ship? Then all things go to decay. Genius leaves the temple 
to haunt the senate or the market. Literature becomes frirolous. 
Science is cold. The eye of youth is not lighted by the hope of 
other worlds, and age is without honour. Society lives to trifles; 
and when men die we do not mention them. — Emerson. 

If for eveiy rebuke that we utter of men's vices we put forth 
a claim upon their hearts ; if for every assertion of God's demands 
from them we could substitute a display of His kindness to them ; 
if side by side with every warning of death we could exhibit proofs 
and promises of immortality ; if, in fine, instead of assuming the 
being of an awful Deity — which men, though they cannot and dare 
not deny, are always unwilling, sometimes unable, to conceive — we 
were to show them a near, visible, inevitable, but all beneficent 
Deity, whose presence makes the earth itself a heaven, I think 
there would be fewer deaf children sitting in the market-place. — 

RUSKIN. 



I 



CONTENTS 



PAGE 

T. Methods and; Lessons of the Census 1 

The Editor, Superintendent of the Census. 

II. The Results of the Census 15 

The Editor. 

III. The Problem of East London 19 

Percy Alden, M.A., Hon. Warden, Mansfield House, Unirersity 
Settlement. 

IV. The Ideal Church for East London . . . . .43 

Percy Alden, M.A. 

V. The Problem of West London , . . . . , .69 
Arthur Sherwell, Author of Life in West London. 

VI. The Problem of North London 127 

Walter R. Warren, LL.B., Author of The History of Private 
Property {The New Party). 

VII. The Problem of South London . . . . . .187 

Charles F. G. Masterman, M.A., Fellow of Christ's College, 
Cambridge, Author of From the Abyss. 

VIIL Facts and Forces not Enumerated 273 

The Rev. Henry Mann, Religious News Editor of The Daily News. 

IX. The Daily News Census of 1902-3 Compared with the British 

Weekly Census of 1886 280 

Jane T. Stoddaet — " Lorna," of Tlie British Weekly. 

X. The Settlement Ideal 29'! 

P. Whitwell Wilson, B.A., Author of The Distributio7i of Industry 
{The Heart of the Empire'). 



viii CONTENTS 



PAGE 



XI. Men's Services in the Church of England .... 302 

The Kbv. J. E. Watts Ditchfibld, Vicar of St. James the Less, 
Bethnal Green. 



XII. Week-Evening Services ........ 307 

Charles T. Bateman, Author of G. F. Watts. 

XIII. Missionary Efforts in the Metropolis 314 

Charles T. Bateman. 

XIV. The P.S.A. Movement 320 

The Rev. E. Goold, M.A., Editor of Tlie P.S.A. Leader. 

XV. The Children op the Slums : Their Relation to the Churches 324 

The Kev. Henry T. Meakin, Superintendent of the Wesleyan 
Methodist Great Central Mission, Bermondsey. 

XVI. The Adult-School Movement ....... 331 

William C. Braithwaite, B.A., LL.B., President of the National 
Council of Adult- Schools Associations. 

XVII. The Problem of Greater London 337 

George Haw, Author of No Room to Live, Britain's Homes. 



I 



TABLE OF STATISTICS 

COUNTY OF LONDON 

EAST 

Returns for the Borough of Poplar . 

„ Stepney. 
J, „ „ Bethnal Green 

„ Shoreditcu . 
„ Hackney 

WEST 

„ ,, „ „ Marylebone . 

„ Paddington . 
jj „ City of Westminster 

,, ,, Borough of Kensington . 

„ Chelsea 
„ „ „ „ Hammersmith 

„ Fulham 
„ „ City of London 

NORTH 
„ ,, Borough of Stoke Newinqton 

„ „ Hampstead 
„ Islington 
„ St. Pancras 

„ HOLBORN 
„ FiNSBURY 

SOUTH 

» 5, M n Wandsworth 

„ Lambeth 

„ „ ,, „ Camberwell 

„ Lewisham 

„ Deptford 

„ Greenwich 

„ Woolwich 

„ „ „ „ Battersea 

„ „ •, „ Southwark 

„ „ ,, „ Bermondsey 

Table showing Attendance at Jewish Synagogues in London 
„ „ Ratio of Attendance for each Borough . 

„ „ THE Attendances of Men and Women in the Estab 

LISHED, THE NONCONFORMIST, AND THE RoMAN CaTHOLIC 

Churches ......••• 

„ „ State of Weather for each Borough on Day of 

Enumeration, Population of each Borough, Total 
Attendances, and Ratios ....•• 



267 



268 



TABLE OF STATISTICS 



Table showing Contribution of each Church in each Borough to 
Total Attendances ....... 

„ ,, Contribution of each Borough to Total Attendances 

Denominational Totals for Inner London . 



GREATER LONDON 

Returns for the District of Acton . 

„ Barnes . 



Barnet, East . 

,, Friern 

„ High . 
Beckenham 
Brentford 
Bromley 
Carshalton . 
Chislehurst . 
Chiswick 

CooMBE, see Malden 
Croydon, C.B.* 

„ RD.* . 
Dittons, see Esher 
Ealing, M.B.* 
Edmonton 
Enfield . 
Esher and the Dittons 

FiNCHLEY 

Greenford 
Ham (Surrey) 

„ East 

„ West, C.B. . 
Hampton 

,, Wick 
Hanwell 

Harrow-on-the-Hill 
Hendon . 

Heston and Isleworth 
hornsey, m.b. 
Ilford . 

Isleworth, see Heston 
Kingsbury 
Kingston, M.B. 
Leyton . 

Malden and Coombe 
MoLESEY, East and West 
Norwood (Middlesex) see Southall 
Pbnge ...... 



269 
270 
271 



388 



C.B. lepieaents County Borough. K.D. represents Rural District. M.B. rejiresents Municipal Borough. 



TABLE OF STATISTICS 



XI 



















PAGE 


Returns 


FOR THE 


District 


OF 


Richmond, M.B 345 


j> 


55 


55 


55 


SOUTHALL AND NoRWOOD (MiDDLESEX) . 433 


)) 


55 


55 


)5 


SOUTHGATE 398 


» 


55 


55 


55 


SURBITON 








. 379 


55 


55 


55 


5) 


SUTTON . 








. 349 


55 


55 


55 


55 


Teddington 








. 374 


»5 


55 


55 


15 


Tottenham 








. 404 


55 


55 


55 


5) 


Twickenham . 








. 439 


55 


55 


55 


55 


Walthamstow 








. 367 


55 


55 


55 


55 


Wanstead 








. 363 


55 


55 


55 


55 


^YEALDSTONE . 








. 420 


55 


55 


55 


)5 


Wembley 








. 423 


55 


55 


55 


55 


Willesden 








. 414 


55 


55 


55 


5» 


Wimbledon 








. 377 


55 


55 


55 


55 


Woodford 








. 370 


55 


55 


55 




Wood Green . 








. 402 



Table showing Ratio of Attendance for each District . . .441 
„ „ the Attendances of Men and Women in the Estab- 

lished, the Nonconformist, and the Roman Catholic 

Churches ......... 442 

„ ,, State of Weather for each District on Day of 

Enumeration, Population of each District, Total 

Attendances, and Ratios ...... 443 

„ ,, Contribution of each Church in each District to 

Total Attendances ....... 444 

,, „ Contribution of each District to Total Attendances 445 

,, „ Denominational Totals for Greater London . . 446 
„ „ Percentage Contributed by each Church to Total 

Attendances for the Census Area .... 447 

„ ,, Total Number of Places OF Worship in THE Census Area 447 

APPENDIXES 

A. Table showing Proportion of " Twicers " 449 

B. ,, ,, Specimen Attendances at Early Communion Ser- 

vices . . . . . . . . .451 

C. „ „ Attendances at every Service in the Borough of 

Chelsea on a certain Sunday ..... 456 

D. ,, ,, Attendances at Adult Schools .... 458 

E. ,, ,, Specimen Attendances at Afternoon Services . 459 

F. „ „ Specimen Attendances at Open-Air Services . 460 

G. ,, „ Specimen Attendances at Week-Evening Services 461 
H. ,, ,, Specimen Attendances at Week-Morning Services 461 
ADDENDA AND ERRATA 462 

INDEXES 

I. Index to Articles ......... 463 

II. „ ,, Places of Worship in Inner London .... 475 

III. „ ,, ,, ,, ., „ Greater London . . . 504 



I then in ignorance and weakness, 

Taking God's help, have attained to think 

My heart does best to receive in meekness 

That mode of worship, as most to his mind, 

Where, earthly aids being cast behind. 

His All in All appears serene 

With the thinnest human veil between, 

Letting the mystic lamps, the seven. 

The many motions of his spirit, 

Pass, as they list, to earth from heaven. 

For the preacher's merit or demerit. 

It were to be wished the flaws were fewer 

In the earthen vessel, holding treasure 

Which lies as safe in a golden ewer; 

But the main thing is, does it hold good measure ? 

Heaven soon sets right all other matters. 

Browning {Christmas Eve). 

He that loves God's abode, and to combine 

With saints on earth, shall one day with tliem shine. 

George Herbert. 

Though private prayer be a brave design. 

Yet public hath more promises, more love ; 

And love's a weight to hearts, to eyes a sign. 

We all are but cold suitors; let us move 

Where it is warmest. Leave thy six and seven ; 

Pray with the most ; for where most pray is heaven. 

George Herbert. 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS 



The Diagrams have been designed and p?'epa?'eo? by W. Harold Klosz 



Metropolit 


^N Boroughs .... 


Frontispiece 




EAST 


FACING PAGE 


ATTENDANCE, 


Poplar 


. 48 


ANALYSIS OF 


ATTENDANCE, PoPLAR 




. 48 


ATTENDANCE, 


Stepney .... 




. 54 


ANALYSIS OF 


ATTENDANCE, StEPNEY 




. 54 


ATTENDANCE, 


Bethnal Green 




. 58 


ANALYSIS OF 


ATTENDANCE, BeTHNAL GrEEN 




. 58 


AllENDANCE, 


Shoreditch .... 




62 


ANALYSIS OF 


ATTENDANCE, ShOREDITCH 




. 62 


ATTENDANCE, 


Hackney .... 




68 


ANALYSIS OF 


ATTENDANCE, HaCKNEY . 




68 


ATTENDANCE, 


TOTALS FOR EaST LoNDON 




68 


ANALYSIS OF 


ATTENDANCE, TOTALS FOR EaST LoI 


JDON 


68 




WEST 




ATTENDANCE, 


Marylebone 




100 


ANALYSIS OF 


ATTENDANCE, MarYLECONE 




100 


ATTENDANCE, 


Paddington .... 




104 


ANALYSIS OF 


ATTENDANCE, PadDINGTON 




104 


ATTENDANCE, 


Westminster 




108 


ANALYSIS OF 


ATTENDANCE, WESTMINSTER . 




108 


ATTENDANCE, 


Kensington . . . . . 




112 


ANALYSIS OF 


ATTENDANCE, KENSINGTON 




112 


ATTENDANCE, 


Chelsea 




116 


ANALYSIS OF 


ATTENDANCE, ChELSEA . 




116 



XIV 



LIST OF ILLUSTEATIONS 



FACING PAGE 



Diagram shewing attendance, Hammersmith 

„ analysis of attendance, Hammersmith 

,, „ attendance, Fulham. 

J J „ analysis of attendance, Fulham 

jj „ attendance. City of London . 

^, „ ANALYSIS of ATTENDANCE, CiTY OF LoNDON 

^^ ,, ATTENDANCE, TOTALS FOR WeST LoNDON 

,j „ ANALYSIS OF ATTENDANCE, TOTALS FOR WeST LoNDON 

NORTH 

„ „ ATTENDANCE, StOKE NeWINGTON . 

„ „ ANALYSIS OF ATTENDANCE, StOKE NeWINGTON 

„ „ ATTENDANCE, HaMPSTEAD . 

„ „ ANALYSIS OF ATTENDANCE, HaMPSTEAD 

„ „ ATTENDANCE, ISLINGTON 

„ „ ANALYSIS OP ATTENDANCE, ISLINGTON . 

„ „ ATTENDANCE, St. PaNCRAS . 

,, „ ANALYSIS OF ATTENDANCE, St. PaXCRAS 

„ „ ATTENDANCE, HOLBORN 

„ ,, ANALYSIS OF ATTENDANCE, HoLBORN . 

„ „ ATTENDANCE, FiNSBURY 

„ „ ANALYSIS OF ATTENDANCE, FiNSBURY , 

„ „ ATTENDANCE, TOTALS FOR NoRTH LoNDON 

„ ,, ANALYSIS OF ATTENDANCE, TOTALS FOE NORTH LONDON 

SOUTH 

„ „ ATTENDANCE, WaNDSWORTH 

„ „ ANALYSIS OF ATTENDANCE, WaNDSWORTH 

„ „ ATTENDANCE, LaMBETH 

„ „ ANALYSIS OF ATTENDANCE, LaMBETH . 

„ „ ATTENDANCE, CaMBERWELL . 

„ „ ANALYSIS OF ATTENDANCE, CaMBERWELL 

„ ,, ATTENDANCE, LewISHAM 

„ 5, ANALYSIS OF ATTENDANCE, LkWISHAM . 

„ „ ATTENDANCE, DePTFORD 

„ „ ANALYSIS OF ATTENDANCE, DePTFORD . 



120 
120 

124 
124 
126 
126 
126 
126 

164 
164 
168 
168 
174 
174 
180 
180 
182 
182 
186 
186 
186 
186 

224 
224 
230 
230 
236 
236 
240 
240 
244 
244 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS 



XV 



FACING PAGE 

Diagram shewing attendance, Greenwich 248 

ANALYSIS OF attendance, GREENWICH . . . 248 

attendance, Woolwich 252 

analysis of attendance, woolwich . . .252 

attendance, Battersea ...... 256 

ANALYSIS OF ATTENDANCE, BaTTERSEA .... 256 

attendance, Southwark ...... 260 

analysis of attendance, southwark . . . 260 

ATTENDANCE, BeEMONDSEY 264 

ANALYSIS OF ATTENDANCE, BeRMONDSEY . . . 264 

ATTENDANCE, TOTALS FOR SoUTH LONDON . . . 264 

ANALYSIS OF ATTENDANCE, TOTALS FOR SoUTH LONDON 264 

ATTENDANCE, InnER LoNDON ..... 272 

ANALYSIS OF ATTENDANCE, InNER LoNDON . . . 272 
ATTENDANCE OF MeN, WoMEN, AND CHILDREN', 



Inner London .... 
Composite Diagram shewing attendance. Inner London 



272 
272 



GREATER LONDON 

Map of the Suburbs of London ........ 335 

Diagram shewing total Church attendance. Greater London . . 448 

,, ANALYSING TOTAL ChURCH ATTENDANCE, GREATER LONDON . . 448 



A flourishing churcli requires a vast and complicated organi- 
sation, which should aflord a place for everyone who is ready to 
work in the service of humanity. The enthusiasm should not be 
suflered to die out in anyone for want of the occupation best 
calcuhited to keep it alive. Those who meet within the church 
walls on Sunday should not meet as strangers who find them- 
selves together in the same lecture-hall, but as co-operators in a 
public work, the object of which all understand, and to his own 
department of which each man habitually applies his mind and 
contriving power. Thus meeting, with the esprit cle corps strong 
among them, and with a clear perception of the purpose of their 
union and their meeting, they would not desii-e that the exhorta- 
tion of the preacher sliouk' be, what in the nature of things it 
seldom can be, eloquent. It might cease then to be either a 
despairing and over-wrought appeal to feelings which grow more 
callous the oftener they are thus excited to no definite purpose, 
or a childish discussion of some deep point in morality or divinity 
better left to philosophers. It might then become weighty with 
business, and impressive as an officer's address to his troops before 
a battle. For it would be addressed by a soldier to soldiers in 
the presence of an enemy whose character they understood, and 
in the war with whom they had given and received telling blows. 
It would be addressed to an ardent and hopeful association who 
had united for the purpose of contending within a given district 
against disease and distress, of diminishing by every contrivance 
of kindly sympathy the rudeness, coarseness, ignorance, and im- 
prudence of the poor, and the heartlessness and hardness of the 
rich ; for the purpose of securing to all that moderate happiness 
which gives leisure for virtue, and that moderate occupation which 
removes the temptation of vice ; for the purpose of providing a 
large and wise education for the young; lastly, for the purpose of 
handing on the tradition of Christ's life, death, and resurrection, 
maintaining the enthusiasm of humanity in all the baptised, and 
preserving, in opposition to all temptations to superstition or 
fanaticism, the fdial freedom of their worship of God.— SiB 
John Seeley. 



The Methods and Lessons of the Census 

BY THE EDITOR 

The results recorded in this volume represent the first scientific 
attempt in the history of this country to discover the number of 
those who attend places of worship in the Metropolis. In stating 
this I do not forget either the Census of 1851 or the Census of 1886. 
The former, instituted by the Goverment acting through Mr. Horace 
Mann, is, however, of little value, owing to the fact that the 
churches themselves furnished the returns.* For the latter we 
are indebted to the enterprise of Dr. "W. Robertson Nicoll, who in 
1886 started the British Weekly, the first issues of which journal 
contained the results of his enumeration. The worth of these 
results is incomparably greater than that of the results of 1851. The 
fatal defect of Mr. Horace Mann's figures was recognised and 
avoided. The principle of counting the worshippers as they 
entered the various places of worship was adopted ; for this, I need 
hardly say, is the only way by which to obtain accurate data. 
But, although the Census of 1886 was conducted on this scientific 
principle, it had certain drawbacks which I will briefly point out. 
First, the enumeration of the whole of London, with the exception 
of mission-halls, took place on one day — a heroic, gigantic, and, 
in view of accuracy, well-nigh impossible task. Secondly, by re- 
stricting attention to one day you only discover the attendance 
under conditions of weather peculiar to that day If it is fine 
you get an over, if wet an under, estimate. In the third place, 

* On the first appearance of this statement in print, I received several indignant 
letters from incensed correspondents charging me with gross unfairness to the 
churches. It cannot be denied, however, that interested witnesses are biassed 
witnesses, and though I should be quite ready to admit that the majority of 
church members who acted as enumerators were, as regards honesty, above 
suspicion, the fact remains that the presence of one "black sheep" would be 
sufficient to vitiate the value of the returns. 

I 1 



2 THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 

the Census in question took no account of any services, eitlier 
Masses of the Roman Catholic Church or early Communions of 
the Established Church, preceding the 11 a.m. service; neither was 
any attempt made to differentiate the sexes, nor to distinguish 
children from adults; and, moreover, in the case of mission-halls, 
"the returns were furnished by the parties in charge of the 
haUs." 

These are the considerations which lead me to speak of the 
Daily News Census as the first "scientific attempt to discover the 
number of those who attend places of worship in the MetropoHs." 
The British Weekly returns are, nevertheless, most valuable for 
purposes of comparison. Without them it would be impossible 
for us to tell whether we are advancing or retreating in the matter 
of social worship. On a later page it will be seen that Miss Jane T. 
Stoddart has dealt in detail with this question. 

As the value of figures depends upon the methods employed 
in obtaining them, I will briefly describe those adopted in the 
present instance. 

I.— THE METHODS 

Our first task was to get enumerators. For this purpose we 
approached the Arm}'- and Navy Pensioners' Employment Society, 
the Bessbrook Homes for Men, the Keates Advertising Agency, 
and kindred organisations. By means of these and by advertising 
we enrolled the names of six hundred men. By carefully weeding 
out the unfit we secured four hundred picked workers, most of 
whom had learnt, either in the Army or the Nav}^, habits of 
punctuality, discipline, and obedience. From these four hundred 
we selected two hundred superintendents, and from these two 
hundred superintendents we made a further selection of thirteen 
inspectors. Each enumerator received 2s. 6d. per Sunday, and Is. 
for his expenses ; each superintendent 3s. Qd. per Sunday, and 
Is. for his expenses ; each inspector 5s. per Sunday, and his actual 
expenses.* The work was divided as follows : — At least one 
enumerator was provided for each church door, and where necessary 
two were appointed — one to count the women and girls, the other 
the men and boys. In charge of the batch of enumerators attached 
to a church was a superintendent, who was responsible for the 
conduct of the men under him. He stationed them as the exigencies 
of the case demanded, and signed a conduct report card which 

* Those ratcB of pay were increas'^d proportionately in Greater London. 



THE METHODS AND LESSONS OF THE CENSUS 3 

each enumerator possessed. This card had to be shown before 
the holder received his 'pa.j. Above the superintendents were the 
inspectors. Each inspector visited the churches named on his 
written instructions (varying in number according to their proximity 
or distance apart) and saw that they were adequately manned; that 
the men were neatly dressed, and were well supplied with material 
for doing their work satisfactorily. His duty it was to sign the 
superintendents' conduct cards, and to fill in and return to me by 
the first post on Monday morning a report stating whether any men 
had been late or absent, inefficient or idle. By this means I knew 
before the men were paid on Monday night exactly how each 
had behaved on the previous day. For recording the worshippers 
I devised a card eight inches by six-and-a-half. At the top was 
a space for the enumerator's name and address and the place of 
worship to which he was appointed. The remaining space was 
divided into small squares, with pronounced black lines separating 
the portions devoted to registering the men and women respectively, 
and less strongly marked lines for distinguishing the men and boys 
and the women and girls. As each person entered the building 
the enumerator made a stroke in the square to which that person 
belonged. If several entered at once he put down the exact 
number, e.g. 4 or 6, as the case might be. Thus it was possible for 
one man at a place of worship sparsely attended to count all who 
entered at one door. If a place of worship were largely attended 
(which we ascertained beforehand) two enumerators were placed 
at each door, one to count the women and girls, the other the 
men and boys. The enumerators were present at the place of 
worship half an hour before the doors were open, and they 
remained for three-quarters of an hour after the service began. 
At the conclusion of the morning enumeration the cards I have 
described were handed to the superintendent, who distributed them 
again when the men gathered for the evening enumeration, the 
reverse side being used for this purpose. "When the evening 
worshippers had been counted the superintendent collected the 
cards, added up the figures, and transferred the totals to a stamped 
addressed card, which he posted the same night, handing in his 
enumeration cards on the following day. We thus had on Monday 
morning the results of the enumeration of the attendance at every 
church or mission-hall in the borough we had visited the day before. 
The rule was one borough per Sunday, though occasionally we 
were obliged by circumstances to make an exception and take two 



4 THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 

boroughs. The most difficult portion of our work was finding out 
the names and addresses of all the places of worship in the various 
districts. Our list is the first complete record of these. Many of 
the missions we discovered are not to be found either in the 
Registrar-General's return or in any directories, official or otherwise. 
I might state almost with truth that every street in the twenty-nine 
boroughs has been individually investigated in order to discover 
mission-rooms, mission-halls, and houses of God of the humbler 
sort. Frequently no notice of times of service was exhibited out- 
side places of worship, and often no board or bill of any description 
witnessed to the presence of a tabernacle of the Most High. The 
men were instructed by means of postcards as to where they were 
to proceed on the Sunday, and by what means they could get 
there. These instructions were sent out on Friday, and every 
man employed was put on his honour not to divulge the borough 
to be visited. The penalty for a breach of this trust was dis- 
missal. I am glad to be able to report that, as far as I can trace, 
in not a single instance was this confidence betrayed. Special 
arrangements were made, and special rates of pay given, for early 
morning and afternoon services. I have said enough to prove, 
I think, that nothing was left undone that would ensure accuracy 
and impartiality. 

It is necessary that the services included in our enumeration 
should be clearly defined. The morning returns for the Roman 
Catholic Church include the attendance at every Mass from 6 a.m. 
to 12 a.m. inclusive. The reason that we enumerated the attendance 
at each Mass of the Roman Catholic Church is that attendance 
at one Mass is compulsory, and those present at a particular Mass 
do not attend again during the morning. Attendance at early 
Communion, however, is not compulsory, and, as our investigations 
proved, many of those attending these services do come again later 
on in the morning. Our aim throughout has been to discover the 
number of worshippers at the principal services. The Roman 
Catholic Church not having one service which is, so to speak, 
exalted above another, we had no option, but were obliged to enu- 
merate the attendance at each Mass. In the Established Church 
one service stands out because of its universality — viz., the Order 
for Morning Prayer. The figures for the Established Church in 
the morning represent all who were present at services held 
from 9.30 to 11.45 inclusive. This was rendered necessary, and is 
explained by the fact that in some instances two, and even three, 



THE METHODS AND LESSONS OF THE CENSUS 5 

services were held during the period I have named instead of one 
principal service at eleven o'clock. The Nonconformist returns 
for the morning represent those present at the eleven o'clock service 
only. In the evening the attendance at the ordinary service alone 
was enumerated : this applies to all the Churches alike. Distinct 
from the services I have named, and not coming within the main 
scope of our intention, were early Communion services, afternoon 
services, weekday services, and Adult Schools. Early Communion 
services were included in nine of the twenty-nine boroughs — viz., 
Stepney, Bethnal Green, Lewisham, Kensington, St. Marylebone, 
Hackney, Southwark, Chelsea, and Camberwell. It will be observed 
that the North, South, East, and West of London are all represented. 
Moreover, each of these boroughs was selected because of its typical 
character. Thus you have wealthy St. Marylebone and Kensington, 
poor Stepney and Bethnal Green, working class Camberwell and 
Southwark, middle class Hackney and Lewisham, while Chelsea 
combines wealth and poverty. The returns for afternoon services 
comprised meetings for men in the Established Church, P.S.A.'s 
connected with the Nonconformist Churches, gatherings at Poly- 
technics, Settlements, Y.M.C.A.'s, Y.W.C.A.'s, and conferences. One 
day — viz., the first in Passover week — was devoted to enumerating 
the attendance at every Jewish synagogue in London. 

Our aim being to discover the number of those who were 
voluntarily present at social worship, we excluded services held 
in hospitals, workhouses, prisons, and other institutions. In every 
borough, however, the number of those dwelling in these was 
deducted from the population totals. Naturally wo were obliged 
to leave the question, " When is a child not a child ? " to be 
answered according to the common-sense of the enumerators. I 
carefully instructed them to reckon those individuals as adults 
whom they judged to be above fifteen years old. This age was 
decided upon owing to its being the general legal limit to childhood. 
Sunday schools, whether held in the morning or afternoon, were 
not comprised in our object. Wherever there were separate services 
for children, distinct from the Sunday school, held at an hour 
corresponding to that of either the morning or evening service, 
their attendance was enumerated, and the figures included in that 
church's totals to which the children's service belonged. In every 
case those officially connected with a place of worship, such as the 
vicar, pastor, organist, verger, chapel-keeper, and members of 
the choir, were included in the returns. In only seven cases were 



e THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 

our figures disputed. In each of these a recount was made which 
completely substantiated and verified our first enumeration. We 
were convicted of three errors on the ordinary returns, and four in 
connection with early Communion services. In order to ascertain 
the proportion of those who attend a place of worship both morning 
and evening on a Sunday, various representative churches in several 
boroughs were selected, and a slip of coloured paper (a different 
colour for each church) was handed to every person as he or she 
left the building in the morning, requesting the possessor to return 
the said slip to one of the collectors were he or she present in 
the evening. No objection to our request was ever raised bj-- the 
worshippers ; the idea was courteously welcomed by them, and any 
failure to bring the slips in the evening was apologised for to the 
superintendent. By this means we obtained authoritative informa- 
tion regarding " Twicers," * which will be found in Appendix A. 

II.— THE LESSONS 

Having explained the manner in which we secured our results, 
I will proceed to draw the lessons I think they teach. The former 
cannot be disproved ; time alone can justify or condemn the latter. 
When I say the results cannot be disproved, I do not mean to assert 
that the statistics which have been obtained with so much labour are 
absolutely inerrant. Such inerrancy is an impossibility. They do, 
nevertheless, approach as closely to perfect accuracy as is possible. 
They are the nearest approximation that has yet been made, or 
that is likely to be made, to an ideal which must remain for ever 
incapable of realisation. Just as successive explorers, profiting by 
the experience of their predecessors, have surpassed those pre- 
decessors in their efforts to reach the Pole, so we, in our endeavour 
to arrive at actual facts, may inscribe over our undertaking the 
words, "Farthest North!" 

I entirely agree with those who deny that, in matters pertaining 
to religion, statistics are either the best or the final criterion. To 
assert that the place of worship with the largest congregation is the 
most successful would be as incorrect as to affirm the opposite. 
Standards of success current in the market-place and on the Stock 
Exchange are clumsy and inadequate scales to weigh "all, the world's 
coarse thumb and finger fail to plumb." " In the sight of Him with 

* The word " Twicers " was coined by Mr. Gladstone to denominate those who 
attended a pUcj of worship twice on a Sunday. 



THE METHODS AND LESSONS OF THE CENSUS 7 

Whom we have to do," the work carried on in the humblest mission- 
room in this great city may be opulent with success ; witnessing to 
a piety amid palpitating temptations, and a self-sacrifice in the 
presence of pressing poverty, to which crowded, wealthy, beautiful 
buildings may be almost, if not utter, strangers. It would, indeed, 
argue preposterous presumption if, with the story of the Founder 
of Christianity before us, we reserved our encomiums for the note 
of praise sounded by numerous and well-dressed worshippers 
gathered in the "long-drawn aisle" beneath "the fretted vault," 
and had but words of half-veiled contempt for the " upper room," 
or the ugly mission-hall. On the other hand, it is indisputable that 
figures are unimpeachable witnesses to vigour, progress, and interest. 
The outstanding lesson of the Census is that the power of 
preaching is undiminished. AVherever there is the right man in 
the pulpit there are few, if any, empty pews. By the " right man " 
I do not mean a genius. On the contrary, the preacher may be 
"an extraordinarily ordinary" man, so long as he possesses strong 
convictions, keen sympathies, and a magnetic personality. He must 
have a large heart, and, if he is to be believed in by the people, 
a small salary. Whatever may have been the case in the past, 
I feel sure that to-day for a minister of the Gospel to receive an 
income in excess of what is needed for ordinary comfort is a 
stumbling-stone and a rock of offence. The masses subconsciously 
believe that a large stipend is not in harmony with the teaching 
and example of Jesus Christ. Each of us must determine for him 
or herself whether that belief is justified. That it exists is 
beyond question.* It will be noted that the Free Church f has a 

* " But still it may be asked whether it would not have been an extraordinary- 
gain to Christianity if those who are called to be its ministers, the missionaries 
and pastors, had followed the Lord's rules. At the very least, it ought to be 
a strict principle with them to concern themselves with property and worldly goods 
only so far as will prevent them being a burden to others, and beyond that to 
renounce them. I entertain no doubt that the time will come when the world will 
tolerate a Hfe of luxury among those who are charged with the cure of souls as 
little as it tolerates priestly government. Our feelings in this respect are becoming 
finer, and that is an advantage. It will no longer be thought fitting, in the higher 
sense of the word, for anyone to preach resignation and contentment to the poor, 
who is well off himself, and zealously concerned for the increase of his property. 
A healthy man may well offer consolation to the sick ; but how shall a man of 
property convince those who have none that worldly goods are of no value ? The 
Lord's injunction that the minister of the Word is to divest himself of worldly 
possessions will still come to ibe honoured in the history of his communion." — 
Adolf Haenack. 

t The term " Free Church " includes those bodies represented on, and affiliated 
with, the National Council of Free Evangelical Churches of England and Wales. 



8 THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 

larger proportion of men attending her places of worship than the 
Established Church. This, I think, is accounted for by the fact that 
in the Free Church the emphasis is laid upon the sermon, whereas 
in the Established Church it is laid upon the service. Men are 
attracted by the former, women by the latter. It is frequently 
urged by many that this emphasis on the sermon is misplaced ; that 
a congregation should assemble to render homage to the Creator 
rather than to receive instruction from His creatures. For my own 
part, I fail to see the incompatibility of these two ideas. At the 
same time, those who lay the greater stress on the sermon have 
ample and sufficient warrant in the practice of Jesus Christ. 
Extremely little is said in the reports of His work about the service ; 
they are almost entirely concerned with the sermon. Moreover, 
those who gathered about Him came most decidedly to listen to 
"the gracious words which proceeded out of His mouth"; and 
when they dispersed their prevailing impression was not of the 
homage they had rendered, but of the " strange things " they 
had heard. 

The worship most acceptable to God is that of character. Such 
worship must be perpetual, and, for the most part, unconscious. 
Unless this state of waiting upon God is habitual, the adoption of 
the attitude at set times and seasons is an empty farce. If my 
contention be true, it follows that the service which is most 
worshipful is the one that best aids the growth and development 
of character. In this work the sermon plays, or should play, no 
unimportant part. If the preacher is to apologise for his presence, 
Christianity will soon have to explain its absence. In the 
Established Church the sermon does not have the place to which 
it is entitled ; in consequence, the preaching standard is not high, 
I do not think it can be denied that the average sermon in the 
Established Church is below the average Free Church sermon. In 
the latter Church the service is sometimes so little regarded that 
the items composing it are termed " preliminaries." In consequence, 
those who appreciate music, a true aid to devotion, too often 
have to endure semi-torment. No amount of grace will make 
singing out of time or tune enjoyable, nor need the injunction to 
" shout with a loud voice " be literally interpreted. It seems 
to be imagined that beauty and simplicity must for ever be 
divorced, whereas the very fact that the Free Church service is 
so simple makes it all the more imperative that each item should 
be carried out with th© utmost care. What is needed is increased 



THE METHODS AND LESSONS OF THE CENSUS 9 

attention to little things. Let the Established Church give a more 
prominent place to the pulpit, and let the Free Church celebrate 
the marriage of simplicity and beauty. If men are won by the 
"foolishness of preaching," they are repelled by the foolishness of 
preachers. The man for to-day and the future must believe 
intensely and work indefatigably. He must proclaim the Christian 
certainties, and wrestle with his doubts behind closed doors. He 
must be sincere through and through, and touch hfe at every 
point. He must be simple in his habits, and complex in his 
interests. He must be enthralled with enthusiasm, and love men 
well enough to make them crucify him. If it is possible, he should 
have six years at college, but not at the expense of losing grip of 
things as they are. However young he be, he must speak from 
experience — that irrefutable witness — and "count all things but 
loss for the excellency of the knowledge of Christ Jesus." Such 
a man will never lack a congregation, even though, like his Master, 
he have no desired beauty, or, with Paul, possess but a feeble 
presence and a stammering tongue. 

The second lesson the Census teaches is that the buildings we 
erect in the future must be the antithesis of those now in existence, 
if the working classes, and those below the working classes, are 
to be found within them. Churches with cold, repellent stone 
walls, furnished with forbidding, divisive pews (some cushioned and 
carpeted, others bare and uncomfortable), badly lighted and worse 
ventilated, must give place to large, handsome, central halls, well 
lit and well ventilated, furnished throughout with seats of one 
pattern, which permit of no arbitrary divisions based on class 
distinctions. Pews with their attendant rents and proprietary 
rights must provide " alms for obhvion." In a word, the 
churches, instead of being built in a style which fosters the 
spirit of caste, must symbolise in their architectui'e and their 
adornment the universal Fatherhood of God, the universal 
brotherhood of Man. 

This hall or institutional church must be, will of necessity be, 
the centre of active, aggressive, social work. Open seven days a 
week, it will aim at the redemption and development of body, 
mind, and soul, and, while seeking to transform the lives of men, 
women, and children, will, at the same time, be equally anxious 
to transform their environment. The establishment of society upon 
the basis of brotherhood, of labour upon the basis of justice, of 
commerce upon the basis of honesty, of patriotism upon the basis 



10 THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 

of chant}', will be fought for as tenaciously and enthusiastically 
as is the salvation of the individual. 

This institutional church is, I am convinced, the solution of 
the problem presented by closely-congested, densely-populated 
neighbourhoods. In the returns given in this volume these 
buildings shine, as regards the numbers attending them, like stars 
in an inky firmament of failure. I do not deny that, given an 
exceptionally able man, much may be done with places of worship 
of a Gothic character, but the work is accomplished in spite of the 
buildings ; and as extraordinary ability is the exception and ordinary 
ability is the rule, it is desirable that the structures should aid, 
not hinder, those in charge of them. I claim for the halls in 
question that thej^ attract the people instead of deterring them. 
The statistics for the Weslcyan Methodist Church amply sub- 
stantiate this claim. The only places where, judging by figures, 
they can be said to be successful, are their Central Missions ; 
these illuminate an otherwise sombre record. The three years 
system is, I believe, responsible in a large degree for that record. 
That system, however well adapted for small towns and country 
villages, is ill adapted for large towns and cities ; for it is a sheer 
impossibility to build up a church in a large town or city in 
less than five years, whilst in London it takes ten.* The returns 
for the Baptist Church are a further proof of my contention. 
Her tabernacles differ little from the Central Mission-halls of 
the Wesleyan Methodist Church, and witness to a like success. 
Both these bodies reach the masses. Apart from the Methodists 
and the Baptists, the only other prosperous instances are due to 
special men rather than sj)ecial methods ; and such instances, I 
regret to say, are few and far between. 

The third lesson emphatically enforced by the Census is that 
even in neighbourhoods where both men and methods are alike 
admirable, the majority of the inhabitants remain, owing to either 
indifference or hostility, uninfluenced and untouched. How are 
these to be reclaimed ? There is only one way — since they will 
not come to us we must go to them, and go to them with our best, 
not our feeblest. It is manifest from John Wesley's Journal that, 
under God, we owe the religious revival of the eighteenth century 
to the rc-discovery of Open-Air preaching. To-day that divine 

* A special Commission was appointed by the Wesleyan Methodist Conference, 
which met at Canibourne in 1903, to examine and report upon the condition of 
the Wesleyan Methodist Church in London as revealed by the Census. 



THE METHODS AND LESSONS OF THE CENSUS 11 

method of winning men has fallen into desuetude and disrepute, 
"We have thought that anything or anybody was good enough for 
this work. As a result, preaching in the open air is almost the 
monopoly of men as earnest as they are unwise. On Sunday 
evenings, at occasional corners, a brother may be seen and heard 
addressing a handful of people, the majority of whom have accom- 
panied him from the church or mission to which he is attached. 
The speaker has zeal, but it is " not according to knowledge," and 
none who are jealous for the Christian religion can listen to him 
without pain. Either text after text is hurled at the unfortunate 
and unhappy auditor, without connection, rhyme, or reason ; or 
statements are made, narrow in thought, exaggerated in language, 
accompanied by promises of Heaven and threats of Hell, with an 
intensity worthy a Savonarola and an omniscience unpardonable 
in a Lord Chief Justice.* 

I fail to understand why a method adopted so habitually and 
with such success by Jesus Christ and His immediate disciples 
should be left to those least able to make efEcient use of it. That 
the noblest sermon the world has ever heard was delivered on a 
mountain side is not without significance. We shall make no 
progress in this direction, unless, instead of imagining that anything 
or anybody is good enough for the open air, we select our tools 
and do our work believing that nothing is too good. If there is 
one place that makes greater demands than another it is the out- 
door pulpit. Wisdom, tact, culture, experience, elocution, delivery 
" are requisite and necessary, as well for the body as the soul." 
Strong lungs and enthusiasm are not sufficient for these things. 
There must be the wooing note, the reasoning together, combined 
withrpersuasiveness and charm, if we are to accomplish what our 
predecessors accomplished. The "man in the street" is suffering 
from soul atrophy, the natural result of disuse of that organ, 
and needs the aid of the most skilful physicians if he is to be 
restored. It is the spiritual specialist who in the future must 
be found in the open air, even though he have to leave his own 
congregation to the tender mercies of an inexperienced practitioner ; 
better " the whole " should suffer than " they that are sick." My 
proposal is that during the summer months, on fine evenings, the 
most influential preachers should close their churches, and with 

* I gladly acknowledge that the Church Army, the West London Mission, 
the Open-Air Mission, and other kindred bodies hold open-air services, when 
trained preachers address the people. This but enforces my appeal. 



12 THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 

their choirs and congregations, go out into the streets and lanes 
of the city, and compel the people to listen to them. I do not 
think they would need much compelling. The " common people " 
would hear them gladly ; the uncommon people, too, would 
listen to the right men. Many are full of secret loathing ; " deep 
weariness and sated lust" have "made human life a hell." At 
least, let the experiment be tried. Let the Bishop of London, 
Dr. Clifford, the Dean of Westminster, Dr. Horton, the Eev. R. J. 
Campbell, and the Rev. F. B. Meyer, to name but a few, preach 
in the various parks, and the movement would spread. The 
provinces would follow suit, the villages in turn would respond, 
and there would bo a shaking of the nation such as has not 
been witnessed since "Wesley's death. Apart from the effect on 
the unconverted, the good resulting to the churches would be 
incalculable. Many congregations are suffering from spiritual 
indigestion, brought on by over-indulgence at a table which 
groans beneath the " means of grace." Freely they have received ; 
let them as freelj'^ give. 

Again, who can say what indirect good might be done, what 
misunderstandings might be removed in the presence of clamant 
needs and hungry necessities ? Things would assume their true pro- 
portions. There would be a readjustment of the focus which 
would enable us to distinguish between the temporal and the 
eternal, between the real and the superficial, between the gnat 
and the camel, between trees and men. Faced by the halt, the 
lame, the blind, the leprous, the devil-possessed, the weary, the 
burdened, the despairing — a pitiful host — our differences might 
melt in the white heat of a passionate compassion. We should 
be constrained to proclaim the one truth the Churches ggree 
upon — viz., that Jesus Christ is the only Saviour of our 
sin-sick humanity. With our present methods we preach to 
almost the same congregations Sunday after Sunday. Those 
outside do not come in — they will not come in; we must go to 
lanes and docks, to wharves and parks, to courts and squares, to 
highways and byways ; otherwise we lack the true missionary 
spirit, nor are we treading in the footsteps of Him who, moved 
by a divine discontent, was not satisfied with the ordinary and 
seasonable opportunities of worship prescribed by custom or laid 
down by law, but " went about doing good," and remains for 
ever the pattern and type of that ample spirit which seeks in order 
that it may save. 



THE METHODS AND LESSONS OF THE CENSUS 13 

The fourth and last lesson I draw from the Census is that, if 
the future is to be more bright than the present, the gospel we 
preach must cover the whole of a man's life. "We owe the revival 
of the eighteenth century to the rediscovery of the worth of 
the individual soul and its personal responsibility. The revival 
of the twentieth century we shall owe to the discovery of the 
worth of the entire man and the responsibilities of the community. 
Our forefathers were content with a Heaven after death ; we 
demand a Heaven here. They regarded themselves as pilgrims 
with no continuing city, " mere desert-land sojourners " ; we are 
determined that this Metropolis shall become the City of God. 
Nothing has so alienated the people from the ministrations of the 
"Word as the age-long opposition of the Churches to their most 
elementary rights as human beings. Institutions are conservative, 
and the Churches as institutions have almost invariably been on 
the side of tyranny and oppression. It is to the reformer we owe 
our progress, not to the Churches ; to the man who has broken 
away from institutions in order that he may act in accordance 
with the light of the knowledge which has been revealed to 
him. The people have wrested every privilege they possess out 
of tightly-grasped, unwilling hands. If the Churches are to be 
loved they must lead. They must be in the van, not the rear, 
of progress if they are to be believed in. That gospel which 
does not concern itself with man's body, mind, and environment, 
as well as his soul, is a contradiction in terms, a travesty of 
truth, a mockery of religion ; it is no " good news," and usurps a 
title to which it has no claim. U we cannot make our politics 
part of our religion, we have no right to cast even a vote. If we 
cannot take our Christianity into a Borough Council, we ourselves 
ought to remain outside. If the message we believe in does not 
rank us in eternal, vehement opposition against the sweater, the 
slum-landlord, the trafficker in human lives, we need not expect 
the masses to take seriously either it or us. If cleaner streets, 
better housing, sweeter homes do not come within the scope of 
our aim, neither wiU those who are convinced that they have a 
right to these things come within the shadow of our places of 
worship. If we are not for ever seeking to remove the shackles 
which fetter men's bodies, minds, and spirits, we have yet to learn 
the alphabet of the programme of Christianity. The Spirit of the 
Lord is not upon us unless our tidings to the poor are "good 
tidings." If they are, each of us wiU be able to take the ancient 



14 THE EELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 

noble words — and I know none more lovely — of the old Arab 
Sheik to himself, and the problem of the Churches will be solved : 

For when the ear heard me, then it blessed me ; 

And when the eye saw me, it gave witness unto me : 

Because I dehvered the poor that cried, 

The fatherless also, that had none to help him. 

The blessing of him that was ready to perish came upon me ; 

And I caused the widow's heart to sing for joy. 

I put on righteousness, and it clothed me ; 

My justice was as a robe and a diadem. 

I was eyes to the blind. 

And feet was I to the lame. 

I was a father to the needy : 

And the cause of him that I knew not I searched out. 



The Results of the Census 

BY THE EDITOR 

The investigations made by the Daily News extended over a 
year — namely, from November 1902 to November 1903; and the 
actual time occupied in obtaining the returns was eleven months, 
the month of August being observed as a holiday. The first day 
in Passover week, the day on which we enumerated the attendance 
at Jewish synagogues, fell on Easter Sunday; with this notable 
exception, no enumeration took place on Easter Sunday, neither 
was the attendance at any place of worship enumerated on Christmas 
or Whit Sunday. Unfortunately for the Churches, the year 1903 
has been an abnormal one as regards weather. Up to 1903, the 
year 1824 held the rain-fall record. In that year, 36-3 inches fell ; 
in the present year, writing in November, 36*34 inches have already 
fallen. Though an abnormal year is for many reasons to be 
regretted, I hope to prove later on that adverse weather conditions 
do not affect church attendance to the extent generally imagined. 
I will first deal with the results for London proper. The total 
number of places of worship visited by the enumerators was 
2,688; of this number 62 were Jewish synagogues. The area 
represented by London is that covered by the twenty-nine 
municipal units. The following is a brief summary of the results. 

The total number of attendances recorded in London was 1,003,361. 
A large number of worshippers included in this total attended 
chiu'ch twice on a Sunday. By a method detailed in the previous 
article we discovered that the percentage of " Twicers " for the 
whole of London is 39 per cent.* This reduces the total from 
1,003,361 to 832,051. This, therefore, is the total number of 
ivorshippers^ as distinguished from the total number of attendances. 
The population of the twenty-nine boroughs forming London is 
4,536,641. From this figure, however, must be deducted the number 
of those who live in institutions — namely, 66,237 ; this reduces the 
total available population to 4,470,304. Writing in the Daily N&ivs of 

* This is the revised estimate ; the original estimate, given in the Daily News of 
July 9th, 1903, was 35 per cent. 

15 



16 



THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 



July 9th, 1903, I estimated that 50 per cent, of the population could, 
if they wished, attend a place of worship at least once on a 
Sunda}'. Further thought and examination of available data have 
confirmed rather than altered that estimate. At the same time I 
must admit it is a generous estimate ; if it errs it is on the side of 
charity. The estimate allows, of course, for the inmates of insti- 
tutions already referred to, and includes, in addition, all who are : 

1. Too young to go to church. 

2. Too old. 

3. Too busy. 

4. Too sick. 

Presuming this estimate to be correct, we find that the number of 
those who could, if they would, go to a place of worship regularly 
is 2,285,152. This leaves a difference between the ideal and 
the actual of 1,403,101 persons, or 58 per cent., giving us an 
actual one out of a possible three.* It is upon these 1,403,101 
persons, this 58 per cent., that the Churches have to concen- 
trate their energies. If each church-goer made him or herself 
responsible for one non-church-goer, there would still be 571,050 
persons unaccounted for. I have already referred to adverse weather 
conditions. In order to discover to what extent these conditions 
are responsible for non-church-going, we enumerated the attendances 
at certain churches on both wet and fine days, with the following 
interesting results : 



WEATHER. 


CHURCH. 


Mopiing. 


Afternoon. 


BTening. 


Total. 


Fine Day. 


St. Margaret's, Chevening 












Road, Croydon. 


222 




174 


396 


Wet „ 


St. Margaret's, Chevening 












Road, Croydon. 


223 




221 


444 


Wet „ (Dec). 


Chatsworth Road, Baptist, 












Lambeth. 


888 




1050 


1938 


Fine „ (May). 


Chatsworth Road, Baptist, 












Lambeth. 


942 


... 


966 


1908 


Wet „ 


St. Paul's Cathedral. 




958 


1325 


2283 


Fair „ 


)> 1) 




2327 


2412 


4739 


Wet „ 


St. .Tames the Less, Bethnal 
Green, Men's Afternoon 












Service. 




3.57 


\ 


357 


Fine „ 


St. James the Less, Bethnal 
Green, Men's Afternoon 






i 






Service. 




735 


••• 


735 



The exact figure is 2"68, 



THE RESULTS OF THE CENSUS 17 

The difference of attendance between the two days in the case 
of morning and evening services is not great. Those who are 
detained at home by wet weather are : 

1. The delicate. 

2. The aged. 

3. Young children. 

4. Those who are on the look-out for an excuse to remain 

at home. 

Those who form the habit of attending a place of worship on a 
Sunday go rain or shine. Nevertheless, weather conditions do 
affect to a considerable extent afternoon services, also services 
held in such centres as St. Paul's Cathedral. 

I now come to the results for Greater London. Here the 
enumerators visited 1,338 places of worship. The area of our 
investigations was the urban districts lying wholly or partly 
within a twelve mile radius of Charing Cross, with the exception 
of Barking, Erith, and Bexley.* The population of these investi- 
gated districts, excluding dwellers in institutions, is 1,770,032. The 
total number of attendances recorded is 510,664, From this total 
36 per cent, (the average of " Twicers " in Greater London) must 
be deducted ; the actual number of worshippers is therefore 
420,382. Carrying the estimate of those; who could if they desired 
attend a place of worship at least once on a Sunday — viz., 50 
per cent. — into Greater London, we find the number of possible 
worshippers to be 886,016. This leaves a difference on the debit 
side of 464,634 or 63 per cent,, an actual one out of a possible 
two.f 

The Churches have to fix their attention in Greater London 
on these 464,634 persons. If each person who goes to church 
in Greater London made him or herself responsible for one non- 
church-goer, there would still be 44,262 persons unaccounted for. 

Combining the results for London and Greater London, we 
find that the total population is 6,240,336, exclusive of those 
dwelling in institutions. The combined attendances amount to 
1,514,025, giving a ratio of 1 in 4*11 of the population. The 

* The reason these districts were not included is due to the fact that only very 
small portions of them lie -within the radius named ; the borders of the County of 
London on the south-eastern side being almost conterminous with the said radius, 
A portion of the Croydon Rural District, immediately adjoining the County of 
London, lying wholly within the area described, is included in our returns. 

t The exact figure is 1 in 2 "10, 

2 



18 THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 

average of those attending a place of worship twice on a 
Sunday in London and Greater London is 38 per cent.; this 
reduces the total of 1,514,025 (attendances) to 1,262,433 (worshippers), 
giving a ratio of 1 in 5 of the population. In other words, four 
persons out of every five, not dwelling in institutions, are either 
careless or hostile as regards public worship. 

The total number of worshippers, as distinct from attendances, 
is made up as follows : 

Church of England 538,477 

Nonconformist Churches 545,317 

Roman CathoUc Church 96,281 

Other Services 72,358 

Total 1,252,433 

Before concluding, I wish to point out that we found after 
long and careful observation that the number of those at- 
tending Mass twice on a Sunday morning at Eoman Catholic 
places of worship did not average one per cent, of the attend- 
ances. On the other hand we discovered that those attending 
early Communion services in the Church of England do, in the 
majoiity of cases, come again to a later morning or evening 
service. We were not able to arrive at any definite conclusions,] 
in London, as to the effect of weather conditions on attendance 
in different districts. In Greater London, however it was possible 
to secure valuable data, owing to the fact that several areas' 
were visited on one Sunday. Curiously enough, the districts 
showing the highest and lowest ratio of attendance were enumerated] 
on the same day — viz., Barnet, with a ratio of 1 in 1"66, andj 
Tottenham, with a ratio of 1 in 6-06. On another occasion, when 
wet weather prevailed, the ratio varied from 2-63 in Bromley 
(possessing a scattered population), to 3-48 in Penge (possessing] 
a concentrated population). 



The Problem of East London 

BY PERCY ALDEN, M.A. 

The publication of tlie Daily News Census, togetlaer with the 
almost simultaneous appearance of Mr. Charles Booth's book on 
the religious influences of London, has roused into strenuous 
activity not only the critics in different religious denominations, 
but thoughtful people in every section of society. Nothing creates 
greater interest in men's minds than the subject of religion, or its 
twin sister politics — which, rightly understood, is only applied 
religion. The churches have had to submit to a very severe and 
drastic test ; the result is some considerable degree of friction 
between the critics and the criticised. The splendid achievement of 
the Daily News now enables us to estimate with fair accuracy the 
number of church-goers in any district of London ; and not only 
so, but to discriminate between the sexes, and between adults and 
children. In addition to this, we have also a rough and ready, 
but approximate, test for determining the number of those who 
attend more than once on any one Sunday; the number of men 
attending at Pleasant Sunday Afternoons; and, in the case of the 
Church of England, the number of those who are in the habit of 
attending Early Communion. 

The last religious Census of the London churches was in 
October 1886, when, at the instance of the British Weekly, a hurried 
and somewhat insufficient numbering of the people of Israel was 
made. Nevertheless, this attempt enables us to perceive that 
since that date great changes have taken place in the religious 
life of the people, and some of these changes offer serious food 
for reflection, not only to those who are especially concerned in 
the subject, but also to all reformers and statesmen. There can 
be no doubt that the altered attitude, especially of the working 
classes, towards the churches, and in a lesser degree towards 
religion, can be traced to a few great main causes, and chief 
among them the industrial revolution which has transformed 

19 



20 THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 

England from an agricultural community living in villages and 
small towns to an industrial population aggregated together in 
large cities, or, as in the case of London, in a congeries of large 
cities. It is true, as the old Greek philosopher said, that man is 
by nature a social animal, and it is in the very nature of things 
that growing social desires should play a large part in the rapid 
development of the city; but more powerful still is the effect of 
machinery and the factory system, together with the stress of 
competition which has been the inevitable result. In England 
to-day 72 per cent, of the population live in urban sanitary 
districts — they are, by the way, sometimes insanitary districts — 
and only 28 per cent, reside in rural districts. These figures 
would not have the same gravity were it not for the fact that 
a considerable proportion of the 72 per cent, live together under 
conditions that are unfavourable to health, in overcrowded tene- 
ments and insanitary areas. The effect upon the moral and 
physical nature is so undoubtedly bad that the city, to some 
reformers, is no longer the objective embodiment of the higher 
life of man, but a terrible maelstrom of degradation, into which 
men and women are being rapidly sucked, and in which they are 
finally engulfed. Those of us who have lived in such districts 
have seen the process of demoralisation and destruction. Some 
go down in silence, with dull apathy stamped upon their faces; 
some are swallowed up shrieking and cursing, knowing only too 
weU the fate that awaits them. But the victims do not decrease ; 
year after year they pour in, hordes of helpless creatures, sinned 
against and sinning, yet all with some desire for happiness, some 
spark of divinity, some possibility of redemption. Life in the 
peaceful little country village, with its many disadvantages, did 
certainly offer more opportunities of cultivating the higher nature, 
wherever the inclination was present. Generally speaking, the 
labourer had no desire to forsake the traditions of his forefathers 
who slept in the little churchyard. The parson was almost as 
powerful as the squire, and attendance at church was certainly 
expected, even if such anticipations were not always realised. The 
Dissenter, on the other hand, also attended regularly his place of 
worship, although in his case, perhaps, the driving force was 
more often within than without. In those days there was no 
doubt in men's minds as to the verbal inspiration of the Bible, 
and very little doubt as to the infallibility of the parson. Church- 
going was cu55tomary and respectable. Men and women regarded 



THE PROBLEM OF EAST LONDON 21 

tlie House of God, with all its associations at baptism, marriage, 
and death, as almost, if not quite, the chief factor in their lives. 
A change has come over the spirit of the scene. It is not merely 
that the doctrine of evolution, the higher criticism, the general 
feeling of unrest have affected the old traditional habit of mind 
and thought, although these have been very powerful influences 
in many sections of society; but Hfe is absolutely not the same 
thing — we live under conditions which seem to divorce us from 
the past. The metamorphosis is complete. Trees and fields have 
given way to bricks and mortar; streets and not gardens are the 
playground; homes are changed to "rents"; men have become 
" hands " ; the neighbour and friend is the " lady that lives next 
door " ; the pubHc-house takes the place of the church — for it is 
almost the only social link in some poor districts, and everywhere 
it enters largely into the new social scheme. All ties with the 
past have been broken, and especially the bond of religion; 
disintegration has set in. 

Under the competitive regime^ when the wheels of progress are 
whirling at such tremendous speed, to use a phrase of an American 
writer, "the centrifugal force acts powerfully," and under this 
process men tend to become disconnected, unsympathetic, and 
antagonistic. Li fact, the social bond is weakened in every 
direction. We are accustomed to say that in all healthy comj)e- 
tition there should be mobility of labour ; but the more mobile the 
working classes are, the less social do they become, so that all 
neighbourly affection disappears — there are no common interests 
to cement the scattered units. With the other social ties 
disappears the powerful uniting force of religion. How far the 
Churches will be able to counteract this centrifugal tendency I 
cannot tell, but I feel sure that it is the centripetal force we 
need, something that will keep the various elements in their 
place, making a social cosmos a possibility. Are we to witness, 
during the next ten years, a renaissance of the Christian social 
spirit? If not, it seems to me that the problem, in East London 
at any rate, is beyond solution. We are all agreed that the 
application of Christianity to the social conditions of our common 
life, through the regeneration of the individual man, would effect 
all that is required. We aU feel that our present civilisation will 
not stand the test of " absolute ethics," and that any progress 
in the future will be co-extensive with and dependent upon the 
development of religious feeling, thought, and action. Business 



22 THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 

must be spiritualised, the State Christianised, and religion 
humanised. 

I may be allo^red to say this aU the more emphatically because 
it is the result of nearly twelve years' experience in East London. 
If the churches have a problem in the City, how much greater 
is that problem in East London, and how crying the necessity 
for a religion which wiU alchemise the base dross of slum life 
into something like pure and refined gold! Later on I may, 
perhaps, be allowed to state my own conclusions as to the methods 
that must be employed ; but for the moment, let us glance at East 
London, which is assuredly the crux of the whole situation. 

East London is not essentially criminal ; it is not the haunt and 
home of the hooligan and ruffian to anything like the extent that is 
generally supposed ; it is simply a huge, aggregated mass of sordid 
poverty, relieved by many touches of that unfailing generosity 
and sympathy which are essentially the virtues of the working 
classes. 

I shall never forget almost my first sight of East London. It 
was a wild and stormy day, and the wind seemed to bear with it 
sheets of cold and piercing rain. As I passed down the street, 
the crouching figure of a little girl about nine years old, forcing 
her way against the rain and wind, attracted my attention. She 
tottered along under the weight of a bundle she was carrying, 
vainly trying to protect herself and it by a thin, worn shawl which 
she pulled tightly about her. 

Knowing that she must be drenched to the skin, I crossed 
the road and asked her where she was going. She mentioned 
the shop of a weU-known maker of cheap clothing who acted 
as middleman and contractor for a considerable portion of East 
London. Her mother had been machining shirts at the rate of 
eightpence per dozen, and her little daughter, to save time, was 
taking them back to the factory. After paying her fare to the 
factory (for the Uttle girl was an East End child, and unwilling 
to trust me to see that the clothes were sent) I paid a visit to 
the home. It was the usual story ; the mother was a widow 
whose husband had been killed by an accident in the docks, 
breaking his back by falling down the hold of a ship. The 
widow was too young to receive help from the Poor Law 
Authorities, and she would probably have refused it even if it 
had been offered. Several children at home made it impossible 
for her to go out to work, so there was nothing for it but a 



THE PROBLEM OF EAST LONDON 23 

sewing machine, and twelve hours a day of sweated, underpaid 
labour. Like Dr. Johnson's washerwoman, she had no time to 
weep and little time to rest. The utmost labour of which she 
was capable would just produce the absolute necessaries of life 
for herself and her children. 

The story is typical of tens of thousands of others, and only 
faintly indicates the far lower deeps to be found in the slums 
of our great towns. In East London alone there are one 
hundred thousand men and women who have reached so low a 
point in the social ab3^ss that it may be safely said that their 
removal would mean an immense gain to the people left behind. 
A materialist would add that if they were drowned in the middle 
of the Atlantic, the world would be all the better. 

While this is true of a very large part of the population, we 
must be careful not to judge the East End by a Great Pearl 
Street or a Dorset Street of Whitechapel, an Orchard House of 
Blackwall, or the Devons Road and Carr Street areas of Lime- 
house ; these are black spots, and give little idea of the general 
average of life, which is, at the worst, unfortunate and sordid. 
It is possible, of course, to tell tales of vice and crime about 
many mean streets, but in these same mean streets we may 
witness the heroism of both men and women, and everywhere 
we may find some laughter, some happiness, and abundant self- 
sacrifice. East London itself has greatly changed within the 
memory of middle-aged men. At one time shipowners, wealthy 
and enterprising, made their home in Poplar and Stepney, just 
as on the other side of the River Lea, until a comparatively 
recent date, a colon}'- of Quakers made Plaistow a beautiful 
village. Many working men have told me of market gardens 
and dairy farms on the fields at the back of Poplar Hospital, 
where now radiate long lines of jerry-built, monotonous streets. 
The movement has been outward; the well-to-do have left East 
London altogether; the middle classes have migrated to the outer 
East ; the spread of the Jews and the changes in the shipping trade, 
the various clearances of insanitary property, the erection of model 
block-dwellings, — all these have had their effect upon the East 
End. There is far more uniformity now than there ever was, 
and unfortunately the average is lower rather than higher. In 
this sense, certainly, poverty has increased, although it is 
probable that the great extremes are not found so^frequently as 
in the past. 



24 THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 

RESULTS OF THE CENSUS 

On the whole, perhaps, it may be said that Mr. Charles 
Booth's book is not inconsistent with the results of the Daily 
News Census, though it must be admitted that, , so far as figures 
and details are concerned, one would prefer to trust the work 
of the newspaper rather than that of the investigator. Some of 
Mr. Booth's judgments we shall refer to in the course of this 
article ; but for the present let us examine the totals in East 
London. The population of East London, comprising the districts 
of Shoreditch, Bethnal Green, Poplar, Hackney, and Stepney, 
amounts to 919,043, and the number of attendances at churches 
and chapels resulting from the Census (the weather in every 
case being fine), is as foUows : men, 47,282 ; women, 61,301 ; 
and children, 70,930. It must be remembered that the Census, 
rightly or wrongly, fixes on the age of fifteen as the limit of 
childhood, and for that reason we must expect that, amongst the 
number of so-called "adults," there would be a large number of 
boys and girls between the ages of fifteen and eighteen ; of 
course, this in no way invalidates the general conclusions arrived 
at by the Census ; but it may modify our judgment in deciding 
what proportion of men or women attend a place of worship. 
"We have also to remember that the investigations made at a 
large number of churches and chapels disclosed the fact that 
35 per cent., or roughly one-third, of those attending a place of 
worship, attend twice in one day. This means that some 30,000 
men, 39,000 women, and 48,000 children put in regular rather 
than casual attendances. It ought to be added that these figures 
include the Jewish Church, and that 12,627 are enumerated as 
attending Jewish services, some of the synagogues being crowded 
to overflowing. In considering these figures we must also bear 
in mind that a very much larger proportion of the middle class 
in East London — namely, the shopkeepers, clerks, etc. — attend a 
place of worship than the working classes proper. It is almost a 
universal rule that, as the middle classes move out, congregations 
decline, though this is partly accounted for by the difficulty which 
the churches seem to find in adapting themselves to their altered 
conditions. 

The first and most noticeable result of our examination of the 
census totals is the discovery that the Anglican Church, which 
is supposed to be strongest in poor districts owing to the 



THE PEOBLEM OF EAST LONDON 25 

excellent work done by a certain section of the High Church 
clergy, is not nearlj'- as strong as was anticipated. The Non- 
conformists, on the other hand, were generally supposed to be 
weak in East London ; but their numbers are on the increase. 
Thus the attendances at the Established Church amounted to 
60,086, as against the attendance at the Nonconformist churches 
of 81,816. This result is, of course, quite independent of the 
Roman Catholics and the Jews, and of all services which cannot 
be classed as Nonconformist. As to the relative strength of the 
Free Churches, it is only necessary to state that the Congre- 
gationalists, who come in for such severe condemnation at the 
hands of Mr, Booth, number 24,223 ; the Baptists, who are praised 
for their austerity, 18,686; and the "Wesleyans, whose methods 
are criticised, 13,308. "VVe fear it must be admitted that in all 
three denominations there are some churches which might almost 
as well be closed, so little work do they do, and so little influence 
do they exercise ; but, on the other hand, many of them, Congre- 
gationalists included, are doing magnificent work amid surroundings 
that would make the bravest man despair. There are several 
reasons which might be adduced for the relative weakness of the 
Church of England, but undoubtedly one cause of its non-success 
in East London, as compared with West London, is that attendance 
at the Established Church in the East End confers nothing like the 
social status and prestige that it does in the West ; other causes 
we will discuss later. Another point that emerges is the extra- 
ordinary weakness of the Salvation Army. The attendances in 
1886 were 3,123 ; in 1903 they have doubled, it is true, and are 
now 6,376 ; but this is a wretchedly inadequate total for a population 
of nearly a million after all these years of unremitting work, 
and points to some serious weakness in Army methods. Even 
from the total that we have given we fear we must deduct a 
considerable number in the persons of those who attend the 
services held in shelters. Thus the Whitechapel Road shelter 
had 232, and Hanbury Street 200. While attendance may not 
have been compulsory, it is more or less regarded as such b}^ all 
those who use the shelters, and, indeed, we may be quite sure 
that not five per cent, of the shelter inmates would attend a 
place of worship in the ordinary course of events. When we 
remember that the Congress Hall in Linscott Road, Hackney, 
furnishes 2,649, and Mare Street, Hackney, 708, we can easily see 
how powerless the Salvation Army is in the remaining districts 



26 THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 

of the East End. But for their social work and the great hall 
at Clapton, the Salvation Army would have been wiped out. 



POVERTY AND LOW ATTENDANCES 

An examination of the attendance figures in the different 
districts seems to prove that the poorer the district the less inclina- 
tion is there to attend a place of worship ; and if this be so, it 
can only be accounted for either on the ground that poverty 
brings its disability and makes attendance impossible, or on the 
supposition that poverty and the social conditions implied by 
poverty produce a condition of carelessness and apathy, ' which 
will account not only for the infrequency of attendance at church 
or chapel, but for the lack of interest in life as a whole. Let 
us look at this point in the light of the great housing problem. 
It seems to me an undoubted fact that, as overcrowding and single- 
roomed tenements produce demoralisation and degradation, these 
influences will undoubtedly have a deteriorating effect upon the 
religious life of the people. The figures seem to prove that 
the better the district in this respect the better the attendance. 
An examination of Hackney, as compared with Hackney Wick, 
a much poorer district, bears out this view. Thus in Hackney, 
where the density of the population is only 65, and on the area 
available for building about 80 per acre, we have a fairly good 
attendance — the best in East London— in the morning one in eight, 
and in the evening one in seven, the aggregate attendance being 
one in four of the population. Now Hackney happens to have very 
large open spaces, and of^its 3,299 acres 618 cannot be built upon — 
a proportion of 18'7 per cent. If Hackney could be as thickly 
populated as Marylebone, there would be room for 120,000 more 
people. A very large percentage of those attending church — 
nearly 35 per cent. — is present both morning and evening. Hackney 
Wick, on the other hand, is a much poorer district, made up 
of failures and the very poor who have drifted in from other 
parts of East London. They are the flotsam and jetsam of the 
East End — not criminal in any sense, merely the crushed and 
downtrodden, , the wrecks of humanity. In this district we find 
the universal verdict to be that the people are hard to move, 
and that the attendances will not bear comparison with Hackney 
proper. Thus Church of England, Wesleyans, Baptists, and Salva- 
tion Army aU find the same difficulty. The success of the Roman 



THE PROBLEM OF EAST LONDON 27 

Catholics goes to prove that a considerable portion of the popu- 
lation is Irish or Italian. On the other hand, in the district 
around Dalston, which seems to have kept some considerable pro- 
portion of the middle classes, and where, on certain estates, no 
liquor licences are allowed, the attendance at places of worship 
is surprisingly good. 

Now let us compare with Hackney the comparatively small 
borough of Shoreditch, the third smallest in London, only one 
square mile in area. It is so fully built upon that its population 
per acre is 189, and the neighbourhood has reached " saturation 
point." It possesses 6,705 one-room and 7,609 two-room tenements, 
together with 290 public-houses— one to every 449 inhabitants. 
As we should expect, if our hypothesis is a sound one, it is 
extremely low down in the list of attendances, being last but one. 
In the morning one person in sixteen, and in the evening one 
person in eleven, was present at a place of worship. The men 
are conspicuous by their absence both • morning and evening : in 
the morning one in twenty-three, and in the evening one in 
nineteen ; while the women are one in nineteen in the morning 
and one in ten at night. This same test may be applied to 
the other districts that are overcrowded and poor. Stepney, 
Poplar, and Bethnal Green are all low down on the list, Bethnal 
G-reen being last but four, and Poplar last but six. Bethnal G-reen 
is also one of the smallest and one of the poorest of the London 
boroughs. It has a population of 127,601, with a density of 169 
to the acre ; it possesses 5,378 one-room and 7.264 two-room 
tenements, and some portions of Bethnal Green have a greater 
percentage of poverty than almost any part of London. In 
Bethnal Green there is a great lack of open spaces, one of the 
very few spots being the recreation-ground at the Boundary Street 
area managed by the L.C.C., a district that has not been wholly 
redeemed by the clearance of the Council and the new dwellings. 
All denominations alike are in agreement as to the difficulty of 
working in Bethnal Green, especially in the worst areas, and the 
figures, even when allowances are made for the large number of 
Jews, are extremely suggestive. Neither does there seem to be 
any improvement during the last few years. If the attendances 
are stationary, and in some cases decreasing, we may point out 
that both indoor and outdoor pauperism have grown rapidly. 
Between 1878 and 1895 they more than doubled ; and since 1895, 
notwithstanding the careful administration of the Board of Guardians, 



28 THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 

indoor pauperism has made headway. Of course, it would be unfair 
to suppose that any hard-and-fast rule could possibly apply in all 
cases when considering the connection between poverty and church- 
attendance ; but it seems fairly certain that in the majority of 
instances the rule holds good, and if so, we have a clue at once 
to one of the root-difficulties of the whole question. 



CLASSES OF NON-ATTENDANTS 

"Who are these people who fail to attend any place of worship ? 
Are they working classes or the middle class ? Why do they fail 
to attend ? Are they antagonistic or merely apathetic ? Does 
their social condition make it easy or difficult to be present at a 
place of worship on Sunday? These are some of the questions 
which we all naturally ask, and so far as East London is 
concerned and my experience goes, I should be inclined to say 
that those who fail to attend are chiefly the working classes, and 
not the shopkeepers, except the very small shopkeepers of the 
lowest type. The two classes who abstain from attendance at a 
place of worship are : — 

1. The estranged and antagonistic. 

2. The apathetic and the careless. 

There are, of course, many subdivisions of these two classes, 
not to speak of the criminal population, but for all practical 
purposes these two divisions cover the great majority of non- 
attendants. 

There is far less open antagonism and hostility to religion and 
religious influences than there used to be. Ten years ago I found 
a considerable amount of undisguised hatred both of the parson 
and of the Church. To-day there is little of this to be found, 
although it must be admitted that neither Church nor parson is 
loved by the Socialist working man, or the Trade Unionist with 
a strong political leaning. Moreover, an intimate acquaintance 
with many thousands of men has taught me that, even when 
there is no hostility whatever to religion, there is a sort of sub- 
conscious and unrecognised feeling of antagonism, to the Church 
as an institution or corporate body, and to the parson as a paid 
teacher of religion. Much of this can be overcome, and is constantly 
being overcome, by the man who makes his church the home of 
the people during the week, and who meets them both Sundays 
and week-days on a footing of equality, as a man among men, 



THE PROBLEM OF EAST LONDON 29 

a brother and a friend. Wherever a clinrch. is successful in the 
highest and truest sense, one may be perfectly sure that it is the 
man and not the clergyman — the personality and not the pro- 
fession—that has appealed. Mr. Booth says that the mass of the 
population remains " alienated or unconcerned." On the whole it 
seems to me to be a true verdict, and so far as this is the 
effect of professionalism in the Church, or disregard for the social 
welfare of the working classes, the evil can surely be remedied. 

The question of apathy and unconcern is really more difficult 
than the question of antagonism. It seems to me to be due as 
much as anything to the social conditions which make life not 
only hard and tiresome, but also empty and vacuous. The 
opportunities in East London for healthy interests are few and 
far between ; the poor are weighed down by disadvantages of 
which even they themselves are unconscious. Many of them are 
ignorant of the nature of their own position. The pity of it is 
that they do not desire 'anything better or higher. The poverty- 
stricken East-Ender is like Lazarus, dead and buried under a mass 
of social disability and injustice : long hours of monotonous toil, 
long weeks of unemployment, insanitary houses, overcrowding, 
inadequate wages, irregular work, lack of contact with nature, 
lack of fresh air and water, a dearth of healthy amusement and 
recreations — all these things are so many stones laid at the mouth 
of the sepulchre, which the churches are called upon to roll away 
in order that the spiritual nature of man may arise from the dead. 
"We expect too much if we expect that these people, with little 
or no hope in life, will ever be anything but apathetic towards 
the Church ; they must be given more outlook and more uplook ; 
they must be taught to comprehend the evil conditions of their 
own life ; they must be trained to remedy these conditions, and 
so far as possible the strong arm of the Church and the still 
stronger arm of the municipality must give that opportunity for 
physical and mental development, without which, I fear, the spiritual 
life becomes an impossibility. 

Meanwhile we hear that in many parts of the East End, especi- 
ally in the poorest districts, the people will take to anything that 
is novel and fresh, but they have no persistence ; they go to 
church as a favour to the visitor who calls ; they desire some 
attraction beyond the ordinary service ; they need, in fact, a 
special service every day — something which will give a little 
interest to a hfe which is dull and monotonous. Nothing surprises 



30 THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 

me more than the attendance at a Harvest Festival. To very few 
has the harvest any special significance, and many of them have 
never seen a field of ripened corn ; but nothing gives them greater 
pleasure than the sight of huge stacks of corn and oats, of vege- 
tables and fruits, of flowers and garden produce. Even legs of 
mutton have been known on one or two occasions to have been 
presented as gifts and hung up with the fruits of the field, to 
the great satisfaction of the donor. 

The attendance at the Harvest Festival has not the same ex- 
planation as that of the New Year's Eve services. The latter is 
due as largely as anything to superstition ; men and women who 
never attend any place of worship will crowd out of the public 
houses on New Year's Eve and fill the biggest churches in the 
immediate neighbourhood. It is their one concession to the forms 
of religious life, and they seem to think that this single attendance 
has salved their consciences and made light their responsibility 
for the rest of the year. I only mention it because it proves that 
in a very large percentage of cases there is no thought of anta- 
gonism — it is simply and solely sheer indifference and apathy. 

I see that Mr. Booth thinks that dress does not count, that 
the working classes would come if they wanted to, whether they 
had the right sort of clothing or not. " For non-attendance," he 
says, " dress is a common and perfectly sincere excuse ; but it is 
only an excuse " ; and later on he adds, " but to dress with pro- 
priety does not involve much expense, and even to dress well for 
an occasion like church-going is consistent with considerable 
poverty." My own experience leads me to think this is a 
mistake ; it is quite true that dress is often only an excuse, but 
in many cases it is a sincere and valid objection, especially if, 
as is often the case, a proportion of the congregation consists 
of the middle class. Poor people who have any respect for 
themselves are not likely to attend a place of worship where 
their clothes compare very unfavourably with the clothing of 
other regular attendants. The people who object on this score 
are, of course, very poor; but when you know as a fact that 
they are anxious to come, and when they put forward the excuse 
with tears in their eyes, it is hardly likely to be a mere excuse. 
In the case of the artisan it could only be an excuse ; he absents 
himself either because he is hostile or because he cares nothing 
whatever for the forms of religion. The objection on the score 
of dress can be overcome if the services are held in some large 



THE PROBLEM OF EAST LONDON 31 

music-liall, where large masses of the working classes sit closely 
packed together; the ill-clad pass unnoticed in the throng, and 
feel themselves less out of place. A magnificent Gothic church 
seems to compel attention to their poverty. We are all agreed 
that a well-built and a well-designed church is " a thing of beauty 
and a joy for ever," but most of us, at any rate, are also agreed 
that, for the mass of the people, the very beauty of the church 
presents some difficulties, and for my own part I have not the 
slightest doubt that until the moral sanctions have much greater 
weight than at present the very poor will not habitually attend 
the magnificent Gothic structure. 

I lay stress upon this point because Mr. Booth seems to think 
that the average Nonconformist building, plain and simple both 
within and without, rather detracts from the dignity of worship. 
He quotes, as an illustration, the Shoreditch Tabernacle — one of 
the most successful illustrations, by the way, of what the Baptists 
have done in East London ; his reference is simply amusing to 
those who know the true history of Nonconformity. " The 
Tabernacle," he says, " is perfect in its way, but its way is not 
that of being a House of God. No feeling of sacredness attached 
to it " ; i and he contrasts it later on with Christ Church, in the 
Westminster Bridge Road, " manifestly a House of God " because 
of its " inspiring Gothic architecture." I wonder what Mr. Booth 
would have thought of the old Covenanters, compelled to worship 
on the hillside or in barns. What is his opinion of the Inde- 
pendents, who had to meet in times of persecution in little back 
streets and small upper rooms ? We always understood that it 
was the spiritual fervour and intensity of the worshippers that 
gave sanctity to the building, and if it is possible to show — and 
I think it is — that the average working man is less able to 
worship and is less at home in a splendid Gothic building, which 
to him seems cold and severe, than he is in a plain hall simply 
furnished, brightly lighted, and well warmed, then it seems to 
me that the advantage is all on the side of the hall. At the 
same time, I offer no excuse for the scores of Nonconformist 
buildings which are not only ugly in the extreme, but absolutely 
unsuitable for the purpose they have in view. The church of 
the people must be the home of the people ; many of these 
chapels and mission halls remind one of nothing so much as a 
second-rate mortuary ; the walls are damp and discoloured, the 
pews stiff and formidable ; a general musty odour hangs about the 



32 THE RELIGIOUS LIEE OF LONDON 

building, and reveals only too plainly the fact that the ventilation 
is bad, and that the church or chapel is scarcely ever used except 
on the Sunday. 

While I am on this subject, may I say that these places ought 
to be swept away and rebuilt; they should be succeeded by large, 
bright halls, and chairs should take the place of pews. The hall 
should be at the disposal of the people, not only for services on 
the Sunday, but for concerts and entertainments and lectures 
during the week. In the course of several visits to America I 
have had the opportunity of inspecting many large churches 
which are run on lines called " Institutional." In some of these 
churches the pews have disappeared with the pulpit, the church 
is nothing but a central auditorium, round which are gathered all 
the various adjuncts of a successful institute, small halls and rooms 
set aside for lectures, classes, games, gymnasia, and a great variety 
of other purposes. Everybody is catered for — old and young all 
find some form of recreation and instruction during the week, 
with the result that half the temptations of life are removed and 
healthy interests created which are a valuable safeguard, especially 
to the young. I still have a very distinct recollection of speaking 
in such a church in Cleveland, Ohio, and I was especially struck 
with the fact that on that Sunday night large bodies of Trade 
Unionists marched in procession to worship at this church. On 
very much the same lines scores of churches in the United States 
have been successful ; I only need mention St. Bartholomew's 
Church in New York ; Grace Baptist Church, Philadelphia ; Ruggle 
Street Baptist Church, Boston ; Lagonda Avenue Congregational 
Church, Springfield, Ohio ; Fourth Congregational Church, Hertford, 
Conn. ; Plymouth Church, Milwaukee ; and the People's Church, 
St. Paul — aU of which are extremely successful — to prove that it 
is by such methods we are most likely to attach the working 
classes to the Church. We are not by any means without such 
churches in East London, but little more than a start has been 
made. The Institutional Church is just beginning to be under- 
stood, and I cannot help feeling that, so far as the young, at any 
rate, are concerned, it ought to be largely a solution of the 
problem. I do not ignore the fact that a man may be religious 
and yet not attend church ; but it is useless to deny that if the 
Churches fail to bring the right rehgious influence to bear upon the 
lives of the working classes, the sentiment of religion is likely to 
decay. I feel, moreover, very strongly that Christianity, rightly 



THE PROBLEM OF EAST LONDON 33 

interpreted, is the only power that can save East London; 
Christianity interpreted by and embodied in the life of Christian 
citizenship and well-doing. When the church becomes not only 
the centre of the spiritual and social life of the people, but also 
the home of every true reformer and every sincere democrat, it 
will be on the high road to the fulfilment of its great mission. 
A close examination of the various churches and chapels in 
East London reveals the fact that wherever you have a successful 
church or a successful mission, it is due to one of two principal 
causes — either the clergyman or minister is a powerful preacher 
and a real personality, or the church is run upon the lines I have 
indicated above, with every possible form of social work in con- 
nection with it. Why are small missions admittedly a failure ? 
Because, as a rule, you have given the poor not something first-rate 
in the way of a building, but something third-rate ; it is often 
the most neglected and forlorn-looking edifice in the whole street, 
and the missioner is too frequently an underpaid and overworked 
man — quite hopeless and despairing. I regret to have to add 
that sometimes he is a man who has utterly failed in every other 
walk of life. Where you find unusual success you are sure to 
discover that the man in charge has considerable power and ability, 
and is worthy of a much better position. The large missions, 
on the other hand, are almost always better filled, whether they 
be denominational or strictly undenominational. They are run on 
democratic, if somewhat narrow, lines, and though they cannot 
offer the same advantages as some institutional churches I have 
visited, they none the less do make it quite clear that they care 
for all sorts and conditions of men, and every part of a man. 
They may not succeed, they do not succeed, in reaching the man 
who has been estranged, or the artisan who is sceptical, but for 
the mass of the people, apathetic and rather ignorant, their methods 
are undeniably well adapted. Such are the mission-churches con- 
nected with the Baptists, Berger Hall and the Lighthouse ; 
also the East London Mission of the Wesleyans, and the Lycett 
Memorial Church in the Mile End Eoad ; while, in the case of 
undenominational missions, we have such excellent examples as the 
King Edward Ragged School Mission in Mile End New Town, 
and the Holland Mission in George Yard, the services at which, 
however, are not nearly so well attended as those at the Great 
Assembly Hall or Edinburgh Castle, both of which places offer 
special attractions in the way of music. Perhaps one secret of 

3 



34 THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 

the success of these places is the fact that the East Londoner 
is extremely gregarious — nothing pleases him better than to be 
one of a huge mass of people, such as can be found any Sunday 
evening in Mr. Charrington's Hall. 

RELIEF WORK 

Mr. Booth's great complaint with regard to such missions is 
that they offer too much in the nature of an attendance bribe, 
that large sums of money are spent on relief work, that even 
where .' relief is not given directly it is given indirectly, and his 
contention is that women especially learn to cadge and attend 
the services for what they can get. " These missions," he says, 
inculcate every virtue except independence." While I feel most 
strongly that there is a great deal of truth in this accusation, 
and that it applies not only to missions, small and great, but to 
the majority of the churches in East London, I cannot refrain 
from offering one word of excuse, both for the giver and the 
recipient. In every poor district the clergyman, the minister, or 
the missioner, if he take the trouble to visit in his parish, will 
be sure to find an immense amount of undeserved poverty and 
suffering. Such people, it is argued, should be immediately 
helped ; it is the thriftless, the lazy, and the cadging who should 
be discriminated against. Nothing is easier than to make such 
a statement ; nothing is more difficult than to carry it into effect. 
It is generally possible to find some fault, even in the most 
deserving, and virtues have not infrequently been discovered in 
the thriftless cadger. It is also quite true that the independent 
and hard-working man or woman sometimes becomes a cadger, 
as a result of constantly receiving relief. The form their gratitude 
takes is that of attendance at the place of worship ; in time it de- 
generates into a lively sense of favours to come ; but what can be 
expected from a poor woman whose husband has been out of 
work for months, who is struggling to do the best she can to 
keep her children from starvation, to whom every ticket for 
groceries or every article of clothing represents the life-buoy 
that will keep her afloat for the time being. Let those who 
condemn so unreservedly make the attempt to help in any poor 
district, and they will ,soon discover how difficult it is to live up 
to their ideals in the matter of relief. 

Of course, it would be an excellent thing if we could entirely 
divorce the work of relief from religious work, and some clergymen 



THE PROBLEM OF EAST LONDON 35 

and ministers make it a rule never to give relief in their own 
person ; but it is hardly in human nature to resist the chance of 
attracting worshippers by such means, especially when we remember 
that the view of a large number of religious workers is that the 
salvation of the soul by the preaching of the Gospel dwarfs into 
insignificance every other result to be attained. Even if no 
attempt is made to attract, and even if there is no desire to 
attract by such methods, the recipients of the relief — women for 
the most part — often give cause for the reproach. The men are far 
slower to offer attendance in return for assistance rendered ; this is 
partly because they are more independent by nature, and partly 
because they seem to feel that they have done their duty to the 
church when they have despatched their wives and children to 
worship for them. To a large extent, however, it is because they 
do not feel the strain of keeping the home together in the same 
way as the women, who must contrive and scheme day by day 
and hour by hour in order to pay the rent and obtain the bare 
necessaries of life. Charity — using the word in the ordinary 
sense — nearly always degrades both the giver and the recipient. 
A different kind of charity is needed, and if the word is to be 
used, let us " depolarise " it, and make it once more to signify 
the spontaneous outflow of love in the heart of man for his 
fellow-creature. If it always had this significance, there would 
be far less likelihood that the giving of assistance would be 
attended with such evil consequences. 

I remember once, in the winter of 1895, receiving a visit 
from a sturdy Trade Unionist and Friendly Society man, who 
had probably never asked for help in his life before. I expressed 
some surprise when he entered the room, for I knew his face 
quite well. Very simply and unaffectedly he told me his story. 
He was a stevedore, and had broken his leg — compound fracture 
— being knocked down by a falling bale of wool. For nine 
months this accident and a subsequent illness disabled him, 
and then six weeks of frost proved the rather large straw which 
broke the camel's back. I knew him to be a teetotaler, and a 
steady, industrious man, and in helping him I said that he was 
not to consider himself under any obligation to me ; it was merely 
one brother helping another, and that I felt sure he would do 
the same for me if ever I happened to be in such an unfortunate 
position. Up to this point his face had been hard and stern, and 
his lips very tightly pressed together. As I spoke to him, I saw 



36 THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 

his face soften and his lip begin to quiver. Suddenly, without a 
word of warning, he covered his face with his hands and sobbed 
like a little child, and I am not ashamed to confess that more 
than one man was crying in that room. 

Perhaps the best antidote to relief work is the work of the 
provident societies, the loan society, the sick club, the penny bank. 
Habits of intelligent and reasonable thrift can be readily cultivated 
if the Churches will only take the trouble to provide the necessary 
machinery. Shoreditch Tabernacle, for example, has a mission, 
and one of the social enterprises of this mission is a provident 
and loan society, with a turnover of no less than £3,000 per annum. 
A coal club and a society for providing hospital letters, both very 
successful in some places, might with advantage be added to the 
list of provident societies. The people in this way pay for all they 
get, and their independence is in no way undermined. 

ATTENDANCES OF MEN 

I have already alluded to the fact that men do not attend a 
place of worship in such numbers as women, and I have hinted 
at some reasons for their absence. The actual figures for East 
London are not without their lesson. The attendances for the 
whole of the East End are : men, 47,282 ; women, 61,301. Stepney 
is the only borough in which the attendances of the men exceed 
the attendances of the women, and this result is to be accounted 
for by two facts. The first is that the Jewish services are invari- 
ably attended by more men than women. For example, there 
were 7,959 men as against 1,106 women at the various syna- 
gogues. The second fact is not so important, but none the 
less has some bearing on the argument. The Stepney district 
contains a good many shelters, some of them " free," like Medland 
Hall. Medland Hall and the Whitechapel shelter (Salvation Army) 
alone are responsible for over 700 men, the attendance being to 
all intents and purposes compulsory. When we deduct the pro- 
portion of " twicers," we find that not more than 31,000 r}ien, includ- 
mg 8,000 Jews, are regular worshippers in East London. Many 
of these are lads between the ages of fifteen and eighteen. In the 
morning the men are almost as numerous as the women ; in the 
evening the women outnumber the men by two to one. The reasons 
for this, of course, are domestic — the preparation of the dinner and 
the care of the children. It still further convinces us that we 



THE PROBLEM OF EAST LONDON 37 

cannot ignore the social conditions of the poor when weighing 
up their responsibility in this matter. All denominations, except 
the Jews, seem to find it difficult to reach the men, the figures 
being 12,403 Church of England as against 20,786 Free Churches, 
thus bearing out the general conclusion that the methods of the 
Free Churches are more calculated to reach the working men in 
East London than the methods employed, as a rule, by the 
Established Church. 

Sunday labour may be, and probably is, responsible for the 
absence of many men from a place of worship. Railwaymen, 
tram- and bus-men, and thousands of others do not get more than 
one Sunday off in three or four, or even six. It is hardly to be 
wondered at if they choose to spend that day in the country, or 
to visit friends and relatives whom they seldom see. Long hours 
of hard toil, ten, twelve, and sometimes fourteen hours a day, tend 
to make men careless about religious worship, even if it does not 
unfit them for meetings of any sort. It is only one amongst many 
causes, but the Church ought to take account of it, and join hands 
with the working men in asking for a shorter working day and 
at least every other Sunday free. 

The High Church— or at least the Ritualist section of the High 
Church — does not seem to have made the progress that everybody 
anticipated. Here and there an able, devoted man has built up 
a strong and flourishing church, but there are many instances of 
ineffectiveness and incapacity. So far as the working man is 
concerned, he seldom feels at home in a church with a highly 
ornate ritual, in which he takes little part. If he does attend, 
it is because he approves of the Socialist leanings of the parson 
and finds in him a real friend and brother. Even the women are 
not attracted to the extent that we were led to expect. The working 
classes prefer a simpler form of worship, not too elaborate or 
symbolic; the priestly ceremonial strikes them as lacking in sin- 
cerity, though this may not be the case in the slightest degree. 
It is Lessing's parable of the ebony bow over again, which was 
so ornamented and carved that finally it broke. The only hope 
for the Ritualists, in my opinion, is to get hold of the children, 
and accustom them gradually to the forms and ceremonies of the 
Church. Men like Mr. Osborne Jay and the late Father Dolling 
could always attract a fair number of worshippers, because they 
put the man before the priest. They call nothing common or 
unclean, and are willing to share aU that they possess with the 



38 THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON, 

people whom they serve. So far as early morning communion is 
concerned, the figures are not very promising. In Hackney on a 
fine day at the eight o'clock communion, the only one worth 
considering, the largest number of men in attendance was twenty- 
one, at St. Matthew's, Clapton, and the largest number of women 
sixty, at St. John's, Vartry Road. The average number of men 
is under seven, and of women twenty-two — a result which goes 
to prove that the Bishop of London over-estimated the number 
of attendances at these services. 

The Roman Catholics occupy a somewhat unique position in 
East London, a position analogous to that of the Jews ; it is not 
for them to convert or proselytise — they could fill all their churches 
to overflowing if professing Catholics alone attended. Their priests 
experience in very poor districts the same difficulty in getting a 
regular attendance that other denominations find ; a further proof, 
if proof were required, that poverty is a bar to attendance at 
church. They are least successful in the Isle of Dogs, where the 
conditions are all against them, and where other denominations 
suffer in equal measure. Men like Father Gordon Thompson, who 
works in the Devons Road area, are able, however, to influence 
the poor Irish labourers who have grown careless about their 
religious life, and it must be admitted that both he and the 
Catholic priests generally seem to succeed in making the poor 
pay much of the cost both of the church and of the school. At 
the Limehouse Mission there is an organised school collection 
from house to' house every Sunday afternoon; no doubt this will 
be dropped as a result of the London Education Act, but the 
people will still be expected to give the same amount of money 
in other ways. 

The settlements and college missions do not profess to compete 
with the church, and some of them, like Toynbee Hall, hold no 
religious service of any kind. Oxford House naturally throws in 
its lot with the parish church in Bethnal Green, though some 
meetings are held apart from the church. These are the two 
largest settlements in East London proper, and we must look for 
their greatest sphere of influence in other directions— Toynbee Hall 
chiefly, though not altogether, in the direction of education ; Oxford 
House in its clubs for working men and lads. Missions like the 
Eton Mission, which approximates to a settlement, have adopted 
many new ideas, amongst them the P.S.A., but so far as numbers 
are concerned they cannot be said to be specially successful. The 



THE PROBLEM OF EAST LONDON 39 

P.S.A. itseK has never been so popular in London as in the 
Midlands, but there is an extremely successful one held at the 
Bow and Bromley Institute, in connection with Harley Street 
Congregational Church — a church, by the way, that is doing 
excellent work on sound lines under the leadership of Mr. 
McLuckie. Another very successful meeting is that held by 
Rev. "Watts Ditchfield, the vicar of St. James the Less, of Bethnal 
Green, who seems to have worked up his church to a very high 
state of prosperity and usefulness ; he is a notable example of the 
successful evangelical clergyman. The lesson of the settlements 
and of the college missions seems to us to be that if their methods 
could be linked on to those of the church — that is to say, if the 
church could be made not only institutional in its character, but 
also something in the nature of a settlement — we should probably 
find that we had discovered the most effective way of reaching all 
sorts and conditions of the working classes. 

GENERAL CONCLUSIONS 

" Familiar acquaintance is often mistaken for accurate know- 
ledge," and we make no pretence to inerrancy in our conclusions 
or in the methods which we suggest; there is always something 
fresh to learn about the life of the working classes in the East 
End, and no man, however great his experience, can be absolutely 
certain that he is right in all his conclusions. I should wish to 
preface these suggestions by saying that for my own part I do 
not attach too great an importance to statistics ; the Spirit of God 
does much more than can be put into religious committee reports ; 
the spirit of praise and prayer, of true worship "bloweth where 
it listeth " ; one of the most religious men I ever met in East 
London was an old Chartist who never attended a place of 
worship, and who made no profession of religion. Nevertheless, 
figures are some guide, and it cannot be denied that this Census 
enables us to "size up" the religious forces that are at work 
throughout London. It visualises, so to speak, what before has 
been obscure and vague ; it throws into relief the inveterate 
apathy of the working classes, and even if some amount of strife 
and contention has emerged as a result, let us remember that 
anything is better than stagnation. What is needed in East 
London, as everywhere else, is the revival of the Spirit of Christ, 
the spirit of brotherhood and self-sacrifice. The working classes 



40 THE EELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 

have never loved the priest qua priest. He is only influential in 
so far as he is a man of devotion and sympathy ; they are tired 
of being preached at. " We all of us have a parlous lot too 
much pulpit in us," says George Meredith ; but they are alwaj^s 
ready and willing to hear the direct appeal made by the man 
who understands their needs and sympathises with them in the 
efforts they are making to improve their conditions. The preacher 
must be, whatever his views, a broad-minded man, open to convic- 
tion, willing to listen to others, willing to reason with them about 
the subjects that perplex. If thoughtful young men, who are 
somewhat " antagonistic," are to be reached and helped, they must 
not be shut up with a non-possuTnits, with a " thus far and no 
farther " kind of attitude ; their doubts and their difficulties must 
be treated as serious questions. I once knew a minister in East 
London who lost the whole of his young men's Bible-class 
because he refused to allow them to discuss a biblical difficulty 
that seemed to require solution. The first desideratum, then, is 
the devoted, broad-minded, able man — above all, the " man." 
Then we come to methods, and here I should like to say that I 
see no need for the perpetual warfare between those who advocate 
the care for the body and those who think only of the soul ; men 
and women are flesh and blood, and not disembodied spirits ; we 
have no right to talk as though they could be separated off into 
departments. At present there are sections' of the church which, 
instead of being at war, ought to be working together; some of 
the most warlike are, I fear, the most ignorant. One is reminded 
of the constant strife between the rival factions of Dante and 
Ariosto : on one occasion an admirer of Dante was struck down ; he 
had always contended that the Divina Comrnedia was a far finer^ 
poem than the Orlando Fiirioso] he fought for his belief on 
twelve occasions, and at last was mortally wounded ; just before 
he died he expressed the wish that he had a few months to live 
in which to read the poems of Dante. Perhaps some of us are 
in the position of that misguided man. 

The Church has, to a large extent, done away with the reproach 
that it is " other-worldly " ; yet there are still many men who would 
agree with Cardinal Newman in the following expression of 
opinion : 

"The Church regards this world, and all that is in it, as a 
mere shadow, as dust and ashes, compared with the value of one 
single soul. She holds that unless she can, in her own way, do 



THE PROBLEM OF EAST LONDON 41 

good to souls, it is no use her doing anything; she holds that it 
were better for sun and moon to drop from heaven, for the earth 
to fail, and for all the many millions who are upon it to die of 
starvation in extremest agony, so far as temporal affliction goes, 
than that one soul, I will not say should be lost, but should commit 
one single venial sin, should tell one wilful untruth, though it 
harmed no one, or steal one poor farthing without excuse." 

To a large extent, no doubt. Moody and Spurgeon would have 
concurred in this view; and even Mr. Archibald Brown, who was 
so successful at the East London Tabernacle, in his letter on the 
completion of thirty years ministry, seems to doubt the possibiUty 
of any improvement as the result of social amelioration : " Amid 
all these things, the hope of my heart is the speedy personal 
return of the Lord Jesus. Nothing but the coming of the King 
can put things right." 

What seems to me to be important to remember is, that this 
care for the souls of men ought not to be in the slightest degree 
inconsistent with an overpowering desire for their bodily welfare. 
It is true that the appeal of Christ was chiefly to the individual 
conscience ; but it was his social initiative that has given impulse 
to the many present-day redemptive movements, and He never in 
the slightest degree, so far as one can tell, neglected an opportunity 
of helping those who were oppressed by disease and hunger. I 
have urged the importance of the housing question and the 
question of overcrowding, because I think that evil conditions of 
this nature affect men and women in every part of their life — that 
is to say, degrade their higher natures through their lower, limit 
the horizon of the soul. A pious but somewhat narrow-minded 
friend, on one occasion, said to me that he had never noticed 
anything in the teaching of Christ about the housing question ; 
and I answered, neither had we anything directly on the subject 
of slavery, yet no Christian is now in favour of slavery. I 
added that, of course, the housing question was not of the same 
importance in Nazareth as in Stepney. The fact is, that Hfe in 
the East bears little resemblance to life in England under our 
industrial conditions. In Palestine, at the time of Christ, tradition, 
custom, and religion all required that you should give food 
to the traveller who asked for it at your door. The feeling 
is not yet extinct in the rural districts of England ; but we 
do not, on that account — certainly the C.O.S. does not — advocate 
its wholesale adoption to-day. Instead of disputing about methods, 



42 THE EELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 

let us agree, then, that everything which makes it possible for 
man to live the higher life is worthy of our consideration ; and 
if it can be shown that the East-Ender's environment vitiates his 
spiritual growth and makes for apathy and indifference in religious 
matters, then obviously it becomes our duty to press forward 
those social and legislative measures which tend to the amelioration 
and betterment of the working classes. 

Meanwhile, there is no necessity to relax any of our efforts to 
reach the few who have a " genius for religion," to uplift the 
many who have fallen into indifference or even vice. Let us 
send our best men to the street corners, men who know what to 
say and how to say it. Some people seem to think that noise 
is synonymous with successful open-air preaching ; that we must 
" roar like the Atrides " before the Eternal God will reveal Himself 
to men. It is not true ; the working classes want sincerity and 
knowledge in their speakers. They themselves take their religion 
seriously, and they like to find that same seriousness in those who 
preach to them. Finally, we must have the Institutional Church 
at any cost, with every possible form of social work attached to it. 
For several years, in season and out of season, I have advocated 
such churches, and my position has been rather that of a Prometheus 
reproved by the demi-gods : " Why troublest thou the night with 
thy exhortations ? " Has not the time come for the Churches with 
wealth and influence to lend their powerful aid to their poorer 
brethren in East and South London, and remove this stain from 
the escutcheon of Christian civilisation? 



The Ideal Church for East London 

BY PERCY ALDEN, M.A. 

A LARGE, spacious building, seating at least one thousand people, 
with a good organ, a platform instead of a pulpit, chairs instead 
of pews, surrounded by class rooms and games rooms, with at least 
one smaller hall at the side, so constructed that it can be thrown 
into the larger building, if required. 

Residence for clergyman, or minister, or superintendent, and 
several helpers, close to the hall. 

RELIGIOUS MEETINGS AND SOCIETIES 

(In addition to Sunday services, modified to suit the conditions 
of the district, the Sunday school, Bible-classes, and Young People's 
Guilds, etc.) 

1. Adult school for men. (Not earlier than 9 a.m. in East End.) 

2. Service for very poor children. (By invitation in the poorest 

streets.) 

3. P.S.A. for men, and P.S.A. for women, if possible. 

4. One evening meeting a week for women only. 

5. Open-air meetings in summer, with Band and best speaker 

available. 

SOCIAL AND EDUCATIONAL 

1. Working Men's Club, attached to Coffee Palace. (Cp. Red 

House, Commercial Road, East.) 

2. Working Lads' Club, separate premises and rooms with life- 

saving brigade, gymnasium, etc. 

3. Working Girls' Club. 

4. Gymnasium and Athletic Clubs. 

5. Music. — Orchestral Band for Services and Concerts. 

Glee and Choral Societies. 

Brass Band for open-air meetings, processions, festivals, 
etc. 

43 



44 THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 

6. "At Homes." — Invitation by streets; cards to be left with 

every family. 

7. Guilds of play for children. 

8. Museum. (Saturday afternoon rambles supply material.) 

9. Citizens' League for Municipal Reforms. 

10. Young Citizens' League. (Where teaching should be given 

respecting duties and rights of citizenship, with illustrations.) 

11. Classes.— In subjects suited to the needs of the people. (Care 

must be taken not to clash with polytechnics or 
Evening continuation classes.) 

12. Saturday night concerts and popular lectures. (Free, or 

nominal charge of one penny.) 

PROVIDENT AND BENEVOLENT SOCIETIES 

1. Poor man's lawyer (free). 

2. Medical dispensary with lady doctor and nurses. (Small 

charge for medicine.) 

3. Maternity club. (Loan of linen, blankets, etc.) 

4. Coal Club. 

5. Loan Society. 

6. Penny Bank. 

7. Christmas Clubs. 

8. Sick Benefit Society. 

9. Hospital Letter Society. 
10. Boys' Employment Bureau. 

N.B. — Every church should render assistance to friendly societies 
and working-class organisations, by lending rooms at the 
lowest possible charge. Assistance should also be given to 
the Children's Country Holidays Fund and similar societies. 
The activities of the church should be as wide as the needs 
of the district. 



Borough of Poplar 

CHURCH OF EN-GLAND 



CHURCH. 


MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 


















for the 




Men. 


Women. 


Chldm. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldm. 


Total. 


Day. 


All Hallows', Bromley. 


22 


23 


50 


95 


19 


43 


96 


158 


253 


All Hallows', East India 




















Dock Road 


43 


54 


93 


190 


66 


157 


134 


357 


547 


All Saints', Poplar 


38 


90 


125 


253 


107 


249 


92 


448 


701 


St. Nicholas, Blackwall 


16 


18 


58 


92 


i 26 


36 


47 


109 


201 


St. John's, Isle of Dogs 


39 


51 


117 


207 


! 40 


100 


90 


236 


443 


Christ Church, Isle of Dogs 


28 


24 


110 


162 


! 71 


95 


102 


268 


430 


St. Cuthbert's, Millwall . 


13 


11 


223 


247 


1 23 


36 


50 


109 


3.56 


St. Frideswide's, Bromley . 


.53 


90 


153 


296 


1 67 


168 


95 


330 


620 


St. Gabriel's, Bromley. 


30 


45 


205 


280 


i 4'' 


88 


90 


231 


511 


St. Mary's, Bromley St. 










1 










Leonard .... 


G7 


105 


119 


291 


83 


210 


107 


400 


691 


St. Andrew's, Bromley 


41 


18 


85 


144 


40 


76 


65 


181 


325 


St. Luke's, Millwall . 


46 


21 


129 


196 


52 


55 


83 


190 


386 


St. Mark's, Victoria Park . 


52 


68 


61 


181 


54 


84 


43 


181 


362 


Christ Church, Old Ford . 


13 


15 


62 


90 


14 


57 


27 


98 


188 


St. Mary's, Stratford-le-Bow 


55 


82 


104 


241 


67 


162 


78 


307 


548 


St. Matthias', High Street , 


56 


28 


74 


158 


60 


115 


57 


232 


390 


St. Michael and AH Angels', 




















Bromley .... 


24 


35 


291 


350 


52 


106 


139 


297 


647 


St. Paul's, Old Ford . 


3 


8 


11 


22 


4 


23 


27 


54 


70 


St. Saviour's, Northumber- 




















land Street 


35 


30 


276 


347 


41 


100 


94 


235 


582 


St. Stephen's, North Bow . 


79 


113 


112 


304 


1 119 


278 


1.30 


527 


831 


St. Stephen's, East India 




















Dock Road 


29 


08 


107 


204 


61 


no 


60 


231 


435 


St. Peter's (Danish), King St. 


21 


6 


4 


31 










31 


St. Peter's, Limehouse 


20 


13 


62 


95 


"57 


"(S3 


"86 


206 


301 


Total .... 


823 


1,022 


2,631 


4,476 


1,176 


2,411 


1,798 


5,385 


9,861 





Churcli of England Missions 










All Hallows', Leven Road . 


1 


2 


86 


89 




2 


14 


16 


105 


All Saints', Orchard House 




















Place 




1 


45 


46 


6 


25 


30 


61 


107 


♦All Saints', Arnold Rd. ,Bow 


1 


1 


41 


43 


7 


23 


32 


62 


105 


* Good Shepherd, Back Alley, 




















Bromley .... 










18 


95 


191 


304 


304 


*Red Schools, St. Leonard's 




















Street .... 


1 


2 


50 


53 




... 






53 


Osborne Hall, Allanmouth 




















Road 










11 


41 


18 


70 


70 


Park Hall Medical Mission, 




















Old Ford .... 










19 


56 


20 


95 


95 


St. Mark's Hall, Victoria 




















Park 


2 




64 


66 










66 


St. Mary's, Bow, Old Ford 




















Road 


1 


o 


35 


38 


7 


11 


10 


28 


66 


St. Matthias', Grundy Street 


6 


5 


89 


100 


5 


2 


62 


69 


169 


St, Michael's, Uam Var St. 










10 


8 


67 


85 


85 


St. Paul's, Libra Road 




1 


19 


20 










20 


St. Stephen's Hall, Saxon 




















Road 


9 


10 


167 


186 


4 


4 


72 


80 1 


266 


Clifden House Room, Fair- 




















field Road. 










1 


27 


22 


50 


50 


St. Mary's Schools, Alfred 




















Street, Bow 


1 


3 


50 


54 










54 


Total .... 


22 


27 


646 


695 


88 


294 


538 


920 


1,615 



* These Mission Seryices are in connection with the Church of St. Mary, Bromley St. Leonard. 

45 



46 



THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 



WESLEYAN METHODIST CHURCH 



CHURCH. 


MORNING. j 


EVENING. 


Total 
for the 








, . 












Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


•I'otel. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldm. 


Total. 


Day. 


Devons Road, Bow 


9 


8 


G3 


80 1 


34 


42 


76 


152 


232 


JStebondale Street 


44 


32 


91 


167 , 


36 


50 


25 


111 


278 


Bow Road .... 


84 


82 


74 


240 I 


109 


164 


80 


353 


593 


Alpha Road, Millwall . 
Old Ford Road . 


25 


15 


161 


201 ' 


28 


24 


42 


94 


295 


20 


18 


83 


121 


45 


127 


98 


270 


391 


East India Dock Road 


76 


GG 


77 


219 


130 


181 


110 


421 


640 


Duflf Street (Welsh) . 


17 


12 


11 


40 j 


12 


12 


2 


26 


66 


Total . . . . 


1 275 

1 


233 


560 


1,068 ! 


394 


600 


433 


1,427 


2,495 



WeBleyan Methodist Mission 



Sailors' Home, Jeremiah St. 133 



138 



24 



10 



18 



52 



190 



PRIMITIVE METHODIST CHURCH 



Kenledi Street 


4 


1 


59 


64 


20 


21 


29 


70 


134 


Manchester Road. 


40 


28 


50 


118 


45 


57 


16 


118 


236 


Chrisp Street 


32 


23 


133 


188 


63 


68 


22 


153 


341 


Maria Street 


16 


11 


50 


83 


32 


33 


54 


119 


202 


Smeed Road. 


3 


1 


24 


28 


8 


10 


88 


106 


134 


Driffield Road 


10 


9 


41 


60 


16 


44 


55 


115 


175 


Total .... 


105 


73 


^ 363 


541 


184 


233 


264 


681 


1,222 



UNITED METHODIST FREE CHURCH 



East India Dock Road 
Bruce Road .... 


64 
25 


59 
17 


69 
50 


192 

92 


i 84 
28 


123 
45 


184 391 , 583 
22 95 1 187 


Total .... 


89 


76 j 119 


284 


112 


168 


206 I 486 770 



BAPTIST CHURCH 



Lighthouse Chapel, Bow . 


27 


32 


143 


202 


68 


132 


107 


307 


509 


Bethel, High Street . 


4 


5 


7 


16 


5 


13 


18 


36 


52 


Cotton Street 


25 


24 


48 


97 


35 


67 


118 


220 


317 


Mount Zion, Botolph Road 


14 


16 




30 


17 


18 


2 


37 


67 


Bow Road .... 


53 


49 


143 


245 


76 


118 


279 


473 


718 


Poplar and Bromley Taber- 




















nacle 


117 


97 


216 


430 


215 


303 


287 


805 


1,235 


Klim, Pekin Street 


27 


14 


47 


88 


36 


32 


19 


87 


175 


Berger }Iall .... 


52 


120 


178 


350 


135 


250 


473 


858 


1,208 


Total .... 


319 


357 


782 


1,458 


587 


933 


1,303 


2,823 


4,281 



Baptist Missions 



Tryphena Hall, Bow Com- 
mon Lane .... 
Blackthorn Street, Bow 


1 




145 


146 


18 
1 


29 
3 


65 
86 


112 
90 


258 
90 


Total .... 


1 




145 


146 


19 


32 


151 


202 


348 



EAST LONDON— POPLAR 



47 



CONGREQATIONAL CHURCH 



CHURCH. 


MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 


Men. 


Wonien. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


ChJdrn. 


Total. 


Day. 


Bruce Road .... 
MiUwall Chapel . 
Harley Street 

Roman Road, North Bow . 
East India Dock Road 


11 

14 

120 

9 

40 


9 

10 

135 

9 

39 


49 
80 
112 
11 
44 


69 
104 
367 

29 
123 


27 
21 
113 
15 
62 


35 

31 

355 

39 

117 


74 
35 
97 
68 
40 


1.36 
87 
565 
122 
219 


205 
191 
923 
151 
342 


Total .... 


194 


202 


296 


692 


238 


577 


314 


1,129 


1,821 



Congregational Mission 



Old Ford Road 



33 



35 



35 



PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 



St. Paul's, Millwall . 
Bow Road .... 
Plimsoll Street . 


31 
23 
54 


17 
32 
42 


23 
19 
35 


71 

74 

131 


100 
37 

72 


62 
53 
97 


90 

27 
53 


258 
117 
222 


329 
191 
353 


Total .... 


108 


91 


77 


276 


215 


212 


170 


597 


873 



Presbyterian Mission 



Shaftesbury Mission, Arnold 
Road ..... 



51 



55 



55 



BRETHREN- 



Hall, 223, Devons Road . 
Seamen's Rest, Millwall 
Assembly Hall, Glengall Rd. 
1, Pennyfields 

Total . . . . 



9 


8 


12 


29 


8 


16 


8 


32 


7 


4 




11 


29 


9 


10 


48 


6 


9 


10 


25 


13 


22 


28 


63 


11 


8 


7 


26 


12 


11 


5 


28 


33 


29 


29 


91 


62 


58 


51 


171 



61 

59 
88 
54 



262 



SALVATION ARMY 



Fern Street, Devons Road . 
Malabar Street, Millwall . 
Kirby Street. 
Parnell Road, Old Ford 


14 
13 
32 
16 


4 

4 

31 

30 


8 
25 
74 


26 

42 

137 

46 


8 
10 
80 
23 


12 
15 
97 
37 


62 
16 

48 
101 


82 

41 

225 

161 


108 

83 

362 

207 


Total .... 


75 


69 


107 


251 


121 


161 


227 


509 


760 



FOREIGN PROTESTANT SERVICES 



Finnish Mission, North St. 
Scandinavian Sailors' Home, 
Garford Street . 

Total . . . . 











8 


1 




9 










36 


5 




41 










44 


6 




50 




ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH 



St. Edmund's, Millwall 
Refuge of Sinners, Bow 
St. Mary and St. Joseph . 


67 
129 
166 


112 
194 
315 


122 
207 
441 


301 
530 
922 


32 
35 
66 


49 

55 

133 


30 

50 

169 


111 
140 

368 


412 
670 

1,290 


Total .... 


362 


621 


770 


1,753 


133 


237 


249 


619 2,372 



48 



THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 



OTHER SERVICES 



CHURCH. 


MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 

for the 

Day. 


Men. 


Wotwen. 


Cbldrn. 


Total, 


Men. 


Women. 


Cbldrn. 


Total. 


Somerset Hall, 207, Devons 


i 


















Road .... 


4 




G3 


G7 


12 


25 


12 


49 


116 


Latter Day Saints, Bow 








1 












Common Lane . 


1) 


5 


9 


23 


13 


9 


« 


28 


51 


Tobago St. Hall, Millwall 


8 


2 


29 


39 


16 


14 


30 


60 


99 


Emmanuel Hall, 275, OL 




















Ford Road 


7 


2 


120 


135 1 


15 


11 


6 


32 


167 


Railway Miss., Fairfield Rd 


a 


7 


49 


59 


15 


26 


39 


80 


139 


Christian Community, llo 




















High Street 










4 


13 


15 


32 


32 


" Out and Out " Mission 




















Bow Baths 










98 


168 


160 


426 


426 


Farnan Hall, Bow 










17 


34 


52 


103 


103 


Seamen's Mission, E. India 




















Dock Road 


27 


13 


13 


53 


63 


13 


16 


92 


145 


Ethical Society, Bow Road 










44 


13 


2 


59 


59 


Old Ford 


4 


17 




21 










21 


London City INIiss. , Shaf tes 




















bury Memorial Hall. 


G 


3 


34 


43 


22 


24 


10 


56 


99 


London City Miss., Stebon 




















dale Street 


9 




GO 


68 


16 


39 


17 


72 


140 


London City Mission, 130 




















Grundy Street . 










26 


47 


32 


105 


105 


London City Mission, 33 




















Pennyfielda 










30 


1 




31 


31 


London City Mission, 77 




















Augusta Street . 










10 


15 


31 


56 


56 


Peculiar People, Grundy St 


11 


11 


21 


43 


13 


15 


11 


39 


82 


Total . 


81 


60 


410 


551 


414 


467 


439 


1,320 


1,871 



DENOMINATIONAL TOTALS 



DENOMINATION, 



Churcli of England 
„ „ Missions 

Wesleyan Meth. Church 
„ „ Mission 

Primitive Meth.Chuich 

U. Meth. Free Church 

Baptist Church 
„ Missions . 

Congregational Church 
„ Missioi 

Presbyterian Church 
„ Mission 

Brethren 

Salvation Army . 

Foreign Prot. Services 

Roman Catholic Church 

Other Services 

Jewish Church 

Grand Totals . 



MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


823 


1,022 


2,631 


4,476 


1,176 


2,411 


1,798 


5,385 


22 


27 


646 


695 


88 


294 


538 


920 


275 


233 


560 


1,068 


394 


600 


433 


1,427 


133 


5 


... 


138 


24 


10 


18 


52 1 


105 


73 


363 


f)41 


184 


233 


264 


681 


89 


76 


119 


284 


112 


168 


206 


486 


319 


357 


782 


1,458 


587 


933 


1,303 


2,823 1 


1 




145 


14C 


19 


32 


151 


202! 


194 


202 


296 


692 


238 


577 


ol4 


1,129 


2 




33 


35 


... 








108 


91 


77 


276 


215 


212 


170 


5*97 


... 








2 


2 


51 


55 


33 


29 


29 


91 


62 


58 


51 


171 


75 


69 


107 


251 


121 
44 


161 

6 


227 


509 
50 


362 


621 


770 


1,753 


133 


237 


249 


619 


81 


60 


410 


551 


414 


467 


439 


1,320 


28 


1 


43 


72 


... 


... 


... 


... 


2,650 


2,866 


7,011 


12,527 


3,813 


6,401 


6,212 


16,426 



c 
o 


3 


cd 


^_^ 






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cfl 


Q. 




O 


;- 


P^ 


.2 



c 






jS 




u 


bo 




'" 


ti 


en 

a 


o 


■B 


J 


U 


x; 


c 
o 


c 



?fnUOO 



90 



80 



70 



60 



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Populatio; Roman Catholic 



Other Services 




All Churches 



ChurcIN of England 



Nonconformist 



Roman Catholic 



Other Services 




Borough of Stepney 

CHURCH OP ENGLAND 







MORNING. 






EVENING. 




Total 


CHURCH. 


















for the 
Day. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


"Women. 


Chldm. 


Total. 


St. Anne's, Limehouse 


67 


129 


194 


390 


165 


195 


470 


830 


1,220 


St. James', Ratcliflf 


16 


17 


26 


59 


19 


46 


60 


125 


184 


St. John's, Limehouse . 


15 


53 


60 


128 


14 


10 


81 


105 


233 


St. George-in-the-East, 




















Cannon Sti-eet Road 


46 


37 


51 


134 


46 


202 


72 


320 


454 


Christ Church, Watney St. 


45 


45 


108 


198 


20 


71 


54 


145 


343 


St. John's, Grove Street 


11 


10 


27 


48 


17 


25 


14 


56 


104 


St. Mary's, Johnson Street 


38 


47 


79 


164 


28 


61 


40 


129 


293 


St. Peter's, London Docks . 


153 


147 


584 


884 


51 


67 


90 


208 


1,092 


St. Paul's, Shadwell . 


15 


11 


114 


140 


18 


17 


19 


54 


194 


St. Dunstan's, High Street . 


99 


172 


145 


416 


107 


261 


94 


462 


878 


St. Faith's, Shandy Street . 


32 


71 


203 


306 


37 


121 


77 


235 


541 


St. Augustine's, Settles St. 


123 


296 


132 


551 


64 


185 


34 


283 


834 


St. Benet's, Mile End Road 


29 


28 


128 


185 


30 


75 


61 


166 


351 


Christ Church, Jamaica St. 


32 


43 


109 


184 


55 


109 


120 


284 


468 


Holy Trinity, Tredegar Sq. 
St Luke's, Burdett Road . 


45 


91 


172 


308 


64 


126 


94 


284 


592 


14 


9 


40 


63 


13 


16 


45 


74 


137 


St. Matthew's, Commercial 




















Road East. 


26 


13 


110 


149 


25 


53 


37 


115 


264 


St. Paul's, St. Paul's Road . 


43 


87 


243 


373 


39 


109 


92 


240 


613 


St. Peter's, St. Peter's Road 


7 


11 


24 


42 


6 


11 




17 


59 


St. Philip's, Oxford Street . 


44 


172 


60 


276 


47 


139 


"70 


256 


532 


St. Thomas', Arbour Square 


19 


50 


35 


104 


28 


79 


51 


158 


262 


All Saints', Mile End New 




















Town .... 


32 


43 


151 


226 


31 


71 


58 


160 


386 


St. Olave's, Hanbury Street 


8 


4 


18 


30 


8 


24 


23 


55 


85 


Christ Church, Spitalfields . 


25 


24 


81 


130 


26 


35 


54 


115 


245 


St. Mary's, Spitalfields 


10 


11 


43 


64 


22 


27 


75 


124 


188 


St. Stephen's, Spitalfields . 
St. Mary Matfelon, White- 


10 


8 


59 


77 


21 


39 


49 


109 


186 




















chapel .... 


89 


112 


70 


271 


434 


315 


148 


897 


1,168 


St. Barnabas', Whitechapel 


3 


3 


48 


54 


5 


12 


74 


91 


145 


St. Jude's, Whitechapel 


24 


19 


90 


133 


72 


119 


51 


242 


375 


St. Mark's, Whitechapel . 


23 


10 


59 


92 


29 


41 


34 


104 


196 


St. Paul's, Whitechapel 


27 


36 


90 


153 


31 


57 


43 


131 


284 


St. John of Wapping, Ch. St. 


12 


13 


112 


137 


17 


46 


94 


157 


294 


St. Peter ad Vincula, Tower 




















of London .... 


114 


36 


30 


180 


3 


5 


53 


61 


241 


Total .... 


1,296 


1,858 


3,495 


6,649 


1,592 


2,769 


2,431 


6,792 


13,441 



Church of England Missions 



St. Anne's, Three Colt St. 
St. James', 14, Dod Street 
St. George's, 137, St. George 
Street . . . . 
St. John's, Christian Street 
St. Dunstari's, Old Ch. Rd 
Grosvenor Street Hall . 
St. Clemcnt's,Longf ellow Rd 
Welsh, Bridge Street . 
St. Matthew's, Carr Street 
St. Matthew's, York Road 
St. Peter's, Eagle Place 
St. Thomas', Devonport St 
St. Thomas', Bromehead St 
Christ Ch. Hall, Hanbury St 
St. Mary's, 4, Steward St. 
St. Mary's, 62, Fieldgate St 
St. Mary's Schs., St. Mary St 
Good Shepherd, Dean Street 
St. John's, Carr Street 
Jewish Miss., Goulston St 

Total ... 



100 
34 



64 



449 



49 



106 
38 



40 
120 



70 



513 



4 
9 

"15 
2 
6 
3 

12 

3 

133 

10 

14 

"1 

2 

10 

226 



22 

4 

110 

17 

24 

"'5 
3 
4 

257 



122 



17 
116 
26 
18 
43 
11 

"21 
11 



133 



26 
143 
29 
56 
47 
17 
11 
55 
18 
243 
33 
44 

"'45 
23 
14 



454 937 1,450 



239 
38 

64 
24 
26 

143 
66 
62 

. 47 
57 
11 

175 
18 

243 
33 
44 
70 
45 
23 
22 



60 



THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 

WESLEYAN METHODIST CHURCH 





MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 

for the 

Day. 


CHUBCU. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldm. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldm. 


Total. 


Brunswick Chul., Limehouse 

St. George's Chpl., Cable St. 

German Chapel, Commercial 
Road 

Paddy's Goose, Shadwell . 

Lycett Chpl., Mile End Rd. 

Stepney Temple, Commer- 
cial Koad .... 

Old Mahogany Bar, Grace's 
Alley 

Redmead Lane Hall, Wap- 
ping 

"Mitre" Children's Miss., 
Limehouse 


30 
17 

21 

"41 

50 

23 




23 

73 

22 
"31 

50 
18 


68 
113 

13 

214 

191 

34 

45 


121 

203 

56 

286 

291 

75 

47 


36 
67 

20 
25 
85 

113 

32 

4 

4 


72 
151 

22 

30 

161 

167 

43 

5 

26 


75 
140 

10 

11 

136 

226 

90 

72 
250 


183 
358 

52 

66 

382 

506 

165 

81 

280 


304 
561 

108 

66 

668 

797 

240 

128 

280 


Total .... 


184 


217 


678 


1,079 


386 


677 


1,010 


2,073 


3,152 



PRIMITIVE METHODIST CHURCH 



Tabernacle, Stepney Green 

Working Lads' Institute, 

279, Whitechapel Road . 


15 
17 


7 
4 


41 63 

77 98 


29 
251 


32 
51 


25 
135 


86 
437 


149 
535 


ToUl .... 


32 


11 


118 161 


280 


83 


160 


523 


684 



WELSH CALVIlSriSTIC METHODIST CHURCH 



Welsh Church, 211, Mile 
End Road 



21 



15 



40 



49 



71 



47 



167 



207 



UNITED METHODIST TREE CHURCH 



Piggott Street, Limehouse 



11 



15 



85 



111 



29 



38 



84 195 



BAPTIST CHURCH 



Commercial Road 


27 


32 


34 


93 


29 


70 


13 


112 


205 


East London Tabernacle, 




















Burdett Road . 


274 


246 


378 


898 


316 


667 


335 


1,318 


2,216 


"Rehoboth," Wellesley St. 


16 


9 


47 


72 


14 


27 


11 


52 


124 


Devonport Street. 


2 




15 


17 


16 


47 


78 


141 


158 


" Zoar," Great Alia Street . 


35 


39 


30 


104 


51 


88 


14 


153 


257 


Little Alie Street. 


16 


11 


28 


55 


24 


29 


19 


72 


127 


Commercial Street 


10 


9 


5 


24 


20 


20 


7 


47 


71 


Welsh Commercial Street 




















Chapel Schools. 


17 


7 


1 


25 


70 


56 


6 


132 


157 


ToUl .... 


397 


353 


538 


1,288 


540 


1,004 


483 


2,027 


3,315 



Baptist Mission 



37, Ben Jonaon Road 



10 



10 



CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 



Coverdale, Limehouse. 


21 


9 


79 


109 


31 


42 


67 


140 


249 


Medland Hall, Rj.tclifl 










586 


2 




588 


588 


Seamen's Betliel, 19, Old 




















Gravel Lane . 


52 


1 


28 


81 


16 


13 


8 


37 


lis 


" Ebenezer," Watney Street 


15 


18 


47 


80 


33 


67 


66 


166 


246 


Hall, Old Gravel Lane 


2 


1 


40 


43 


4 


16 


10 


30 


73 


Spring Garden Place Meet- 
ing House. 




















32 


52 


124 


208 


51 


102 


214 


367 


575 


•' Latimer," Bridge Street . 
Burdett Road 

" Wycliff," PhihKjt Strw-t . 
"Brunswick," Wliitechaixjl 


68 
43 
21 


63 
79 
25 


223 

72 
52 


354 
194 

98 


92 

59 
28 


157 

183 

42 


73 

116 

18 


322 

358 

88 


676 
552 

180 




















Road. . . . . 


5 


8 


37 


50 


15 


38 


7 


60 


110 


Total .... 


259 


256 


702 


1,217 


915 


662 


579 


2,156 


3,373 



EAST LONDON— STEPNEY 

Congregational Missions 



51 



CHURCH. 




MORNING. 




EVENING. 


Total 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


for the 
Day. 


Latimer, Ernest Street 
King Edward's, Albert St. 
King Edward's, King Ed- 
ward Street 


3 
3 

20 


"2 
32 


49 
125 

17 


52 
130 

69 


23 
61 

41 


37 
108 

79 


22 

648 

9 


82 
817 

129 


134 
947 

198 


Total .... 


26 


34 


191 


251 


125 


224 


679 


1,028 


1,279 





PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 










" John Knox," Oxford St. . 
Jewish Mission, 58, White- 
chapel Road 


35 


39 


44 1 118 

1 


40 
8 


59 
10 


45 

1 


144 
19 


262 
19 


Total .... 


35 39 


44 118 


48 


69 


46 


163 


281 



EVANGELISTIC MISSION 


SERVICES 








Edinburgh Castle, Rhodes- 
well Road .... 

Edinburgh Castle Schools, 
Canal Road 

Great Assembly Hall, Mile 
End Road .... 

Working Men's Mission, 59, 
Mile End Road. 


155 

306 
6 


86 

326 
5 


948 

266 
2 


1,189 

898 
13 


260 
15 

i 503 

1 

i 10 


454 

22 

1,045 

11 


271 

484 

593 

5 


975 

521 

2,141 

26 


2,164 

521 

3,039 

39 


Total .... 


467 


417 1 1,216 


2,100 


778 


1,532 


1,353 


3,663 


5,763 



UNITARIAN CHURCH 



Burning Hall, Limehouse . ' 1 
College ChpL, Stepney Gn. ^ 4 


"2 


29 30 
39 45 


12 
9 


24 

8 


46 
12 


82 
29 


112 

74 


Total . . . . i 5 


2 


68 75 


21 


32 


58 


111 i 


186 



BRETHREN 



Hall, 13, Three Colt Street . 
Hall, 394b, Mile End Road 
Assembly Hall, Maidman St. 
Hall, 70, Sidney Street 
Gospel Hall, James' Street . 


15 

24 

10 

6 


9 

19 

9 

9 


6 

1 
1 
3 


30 
44 
20 

18 


14 
21 
11 
12 
3 


12 
24 
12 

7 


3 
3 
4 

10 

2 


29 
48 
27 
29 
5 


59 
92 
47 
47 
5 


Total .... 


55 


46 


11 112 


61 


55 


22 


138 


250 





SOCIETY OP 


FRIENDS 










Bedford Inst., Quaker St. . 
Commercial Road Institute 
Meeting House, Brook St. 
(closed for repairs) . 


182 
13 


164 

7 


57 

7 


403 
27 


36 
13 


84 
22 

1 


117 
14 


237 
49 


640 
76 


Total .... 


195 


171 


64 


430 


49 


106 


131 


286 


716 



SALVATION ARMY 



769, Commercial Road 


22 


7 


13 


42 


37 


35 


25 


97 i 


139 


Slum Post, 263, Cable St. . 


7 


6 


7 


20 


10 


15 


5 


30 


50 


398, Mile End Road . 


6 


13 


1 


20 


9 


17 


8 


34 


54 


192, Hanbury St. (Shelter) . 












200 




200 


200 


22,WhitechapelRd. (Shelter) 










232 






232 ' 


232 


Slum Post, 78, Wentworth 




















Street .... 


10 


9 




19 


18 


10 


... 


28 


47 


Total .... 


45 


35 


21 


101 


306 


277 


38 


621 


722 



52 



THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 



BOMAN CATHOLIC CHUKCH 





MORNING. 


EVENING. 


TotAl 

for the 
Day. 


CHURCH. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldm. 


Total. 


Out Latlv Imiuaculj^te and 




















St. Frederick, Liniehoiis*' 


52 


151 


110 


313 


8 


29 


18 


00 


368 


St. Mary and St. Michael, 




















Commercial Road . 


438 


828 


844 


2,110 


87 


135 


99 


321 


2,431 


St. Boniface (German), 




















Whitechajiel 


221 


205 


244 


670 


88 


117 


62 


267 


937 


Guardian Angek, Mile End 




















Koad 


154 


251 


246 


651 


49 


92 


100 


241 


892 


Church of tlie Holy Name, 




















St. Paul's Road 


47 


99 


130 


276 


9 


25 


37 


71 


347 


St. .\nne's. Spitalfields 


165 


331 


258 


754 


129 


247 


279 


655 


1,409 


English Mart\TS, Gt. Pres- 




















cott Street. 


228 


474 


399 


1,101 


42 


58 


39 


139 


1,240 


St. Patrick's, Wapping 


104 


268 


298 


670 


27 


47 


34 


108 


778 


Total .... 


1,409 


2,607 


2,529 


6,545 


439 


750 


668 


1,857 


8,402 



FOREIGN PROTESTANT 


SERVICES 








Norwegian Mission, 723, 

Commercial Road . 
Swedish Ch., Prince's Sq. . 
St. George's (German), Little 

AJie Street 
St Paul's (German), Goul- 

ston Street 
German Y.M.C.A., 90, 

Lenian Street . 
German Seamen's Church, 

214, St. George's Street . 
German Sailors' Home, 8, 

East India Dock Road . 


"46 
66 
34 


"9 
58 
13 


""8 

42 

2 


"63 

166 

49 


12 

53 
29 
10 
26 


63 

1 
5 


10 
3 


12 

... 

126 
29 
11 
34 


12 

63 

166 

175 

29 

11 

34 


Totel .... 


146 


80 


52 


278 


130 


69 


13 


212 


490 



OTHER SERVICES 



Jack's Palace, Limehouse . 
Mildmay Mission (Jews), 

PhiJpot Street . 
Strangers Rest, 163, St. 

George Street . 
British and Foreign Sailors' 

Institute, Shaflwell . 
London City Mission, Love 

Lane, Shad well 
Ixiiidon City Mission, Twine 

Court .... 

lyondon City Mission, Silver 

Strp«>t .... 
Iy^)ndon City Mission, 87, 

f)ld Montague Street 
Salmon Lane Mission, Con- 

dr)r Stnvet .... 
Earl Cairns*' Mission, 

Salmon I>ane 
Christian Community, 6, 

Flower and Dean Street . 
HebrewChrintian Testimony 

to Israel, 189, Whitechai^l 

Roa<l . . 

George Yard Miss,, Whitt;- 

chikwd .... 
Gap Miss., Johnfujn's Court 
Seiimen's Chapel, 214, St 

George Street . 

Total .... 



60 



22 



114 



84 



13 



19 
133 



132 
18 



28 



45 
262 



22 

142 

19 



32 



149 



509 



14 
16 
11 
13 

7 
13 
21 
11 

9 
18 

49 

34 

8 

48 
347 



43 
24 
1 
19 
31 
14 
10 
46 
30 
36 
22 

22 

99 
10 

56 

463 



27 
13 

17 
20 
19 
2 
7 
13 
18 

52 

23 

37 

32 



145 
51 
17 
47 
64 
40 
25 
74 
54 
63 
40 

123 

156 
55 

136 



280 I 1,090 



EAST LONDON-STEPNEY 



5b 



DENOMINATIONAL TOTALS 





MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 
for the 


DENOMINATION. 




















Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Day. 


Church of England 


1,296 


1,858 


3,495 


6,649 


1,592 


2,769 


2,431 


6,792 


13,441 


„ „ Missions 


36 


28 


449 


513 


226 


257 


454 


937 


1,450 


Wesleyan Meth. Church 


184 


217 


678 


1,079 


386 


677 


1,010 


2,073 


3,152 


Primitive Meth. Church 


32 


11 


118 


161 


280 


83 


160 


523 


684 


Welsh Cal.Meth.Church 


21 


4 


15 


40 


49 


71 


47 


167 


207 


U. Meth. Free Church . 


11 


15 


85 


111 


17 


29 


38 


84 


195 


Baptist Church 


397 


353 


538 


1,288 


540 


1,004 


483 


2,027 


3,315 


„ Mission 


... 






... 


3 


2 


5 


10 


10 


Congregational Church. 


259 


256 


702 


1,217 


915 


662 


579 


2,156 


3,373 


„ Missions 


26 


34 


191 


251 


125 


224 


679 


1,028 


1,279 


Presbyterian Church . 


35 


39 


44 


118 


48 


69 


46 


163 


281 


Evan. Mission Services. 


467 


417 


1,216 


2,100 


778 


1,532 


1,353 


3,663 


5,763 


Unitarian Church . 


5 


2 


68 


75 


21 


32 


58 


111 


186 


Brethren 


55 


46 


11 


112 


61 


55 


22 


138 


250 


Society of Friends. 


195 


171 


64 


430 


49 


106 


131 


286 


716 


Salvation Army . 


45 


35 


21 


101 


306 


277 


38 


621 


722 


Foreign Prot. Services . 


146 


80 


52 


278 


130 


69 


13 


212 


490 


Roman Catholic Church 


1,409 


2,607 


2,529 


6,545 


439 


750 


668 


1,857 


8,402 


Other Services 


114 


133 


262 


509 


347 


463 


280 


1,090 


1,599 


Jewish Church 


7,959 


1,106 


3,562 


12,627 




... 






12,627 


Grand Totals . 


12,692 


7,412 


14,100 


34,204 


6,312 


9,131 


8,495 


23,938 


58,142 



Population Roman Catholic 



c 
a; 






S 2 

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c 



other Services 



E 
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Black = All Services Red = Morning S'"* ' Evening 

NOTE -The remarkable attendance o( Men in "Other Services" is due to the number of Jewish Maie Worshipper 



G 



Borough of Bethnal Green 

CHURCH OF ENGLAND 







MORNING. 






EVENING. 




Total 


__ 




















CHURCH. 






















Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 




St. Matthew's, Church Row 


41 


65 


315 


421 


59 


149 


53 


261 


682 


St. James the Great, Bethnal 




















Green Road 


12 


21 


100 


133 


34 


129 


91 


254 


387 


St. Jude's, Old Bethnal 




















Green Road 


21 


25 


80 


126 


37 


83 


159 


279 


405 


St. Paul's, Virginia Road . 


31 


43 


62 


136 


47 


94 


60 


201 


337 


St. Peter's, St. Peter's Sq. 


42 


6 


31 


79 


71 


21 


48 


140 


219 


St. Philip's, Mount Street . 


26 


23 


73 


122 


25 


53 


38 


116 


238 


St. Thomas', Baroness Rd. 


14 


21 


121 


156 


22 


68 


104 


194 


350 


Holy Trinity, Old Nichol St. 


20 


8 


146 


174 


39 


54 


49 


142 


316 


All Saints' Mission, Vyner 








1 












Street .... 


3 




27 


30 


5 


12 


10 


27 


57 


St. Andrew's, Viaduct St. . 


41 


77 


62 


180 


64 


177 


108 


349 


529 


St. Bartholomew's, Buck- 




















hurst Street 


16 


27 


49 


92 


21 


58 


39 


118 


210 


St. Matthias', Hare Street . 


21 


29 


65 


115 


47 


62 


54 


163 


278 


St. Barnabas', Grove Road . 


18 


15 


34 


67 


26 


84 


102 


212 


279 


St. James the Less, St. 




















James' Road . 


109 


159 


109 


377 


629 


555 


138 


1,322 


1,699 


St. John's, Bethnal Green . 


22 


26 


53 


101 


36 


98 


77 


211 


312 


St. Simon Zelotes', Warley 




















Street .... 


17 


19 


147 


183 


48 


92 


76 


216 


399 


St. Anthony's, Globe Road 


20 


35 


115 


170 


40 


101 


86 


227 


397 


Chest Hospital Chapel, Vic- 




















toria Park. 


16 


15 


16 


47 










47 


Total .... 


490 


614 


1,605 


2,709 


1,250 


1,890 


1,292 


4,432 


7,141 



Church of England Missions 



St. Andrew's, 255, Cam- 
bridge Road 

St. Martin's, Somerford St. 

*St. James' Hall, Seward- 
stone Road 

""St. James', 19, Ames Street 

*St. James', Sidney Street . 

*St. James', St. James' Rd. 

St. Peter's Schools 

Total .... 


4 

o 

... 


7 

... 


158 
'14 


169 
"16 


5 
9 

3 
2 
6 
2 
2 


21 
34 

8 

11 

29 

3 

3 


8 
26 

168 
66 
89 
75 
96 


34 
69 

179 
79 

124 
80 

101 


34 
69 

348 
79 

140 
80 

101 


6 


7 


172 


185 


29 


109 


528 


666 


851 


* In c 
WE 


onnection with St. James the Less, 

SLEYAN METHODIST 


St. Jam 

• CHI 


68' Road 

IRCH 








Shoreditch Chapel, Hackney 
Road 

Children's Home Chapel, 
Bonner Street . 

Gordon Hall, Globe Road . 

Total .... 


75 

74 

18 


72 

123 
10 


92 

318 

38 


239 

515 
66 


155 

71 
15 


193 

136 
40 


123 

238 
63 


471 

445 
118 


710 

960 
184 


167 


205 


448 


820 


241 


369 


424 


1,034 


1,854 




Wesleyan Methodist M 


issioni 


3 








1 Cripples' Church, Bonner St. 
Twig Folly, Hartley Street 

Total .... 


"5 


■'6 


"75 


"86 


"io 


6 
20 


40 
268 


46 
298 


46 

384 


5 


6 


75 


86 


10 


26 


308 


344 1 

1 


430 








55 















66 



THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 

PRIMITIVE METHODIST CHURCH 





MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 

for th« 

Day. 


CHURCH. 


Men. 


Women. Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Cooper's Gardens Memorial 
Church, Cambridge Heath 


15 


7 35 


57 


20 


21 


20 


61 


118 



BAPTIST CHURCH 



Shoreditch Tabernacle, 




















Hacknoy Koad . 


216 


202 


128 


546 


369 


489 


362 


1,220 


1,766 


liethnal (Ireen Rt)ad . 


9 


7 




16 


9 


12 


o 


23 


39 


Vi-toria Park Chapel, Grove 




















Ko.-»<l 


67 


84 


133 


284 


90 


200 


142 


432 


716 


Hope Chapel, Norton Street 
"Sh:ilom,''The Oval, Cam- 


32 


32 


24 


88 


21 


55 


14 


90 


178 




















bridge Heath . 


16 


4 


3 


23 


19 


23 


12 


.54 


77 


Gibraltar Cliapel, Gibraltar 




















Walk 










36 


79 


12 


127 


127 


Total .... 


340 


329 


288 


957 


544 


858 


544 


1,946 


2,903 



Baptist Missions 



.Shoreditcli Tabernacle, 




















Austin Street . 










1 


16 


6 


29 


29 


Gibraltar Walk Schools, 




















Shacklewell Street . 


3 




29 


32 


12 


5 


146 


163 


195 


ilarnhani Hall, DarlingRow 










10 


29 


19 


68 


58 


Aniea Place Mission, Prit- 




















fhard's Road 


4 


6 


329 


339 


.30 


50 


79 


159 


498 


Total .... 


7 


6 


358 


371 


59 


100 


250 


409 


780 



CONGREGATIONAIi CHURCH 



Adelphi Chapel, Hackney 




















Ro;id 


51 


93 


84 


228 


92 


202 


152 


446 


674 


Union Chapel, Old Nichol 




















Street .... 


10 


8 


2 


20 


45 


44 


6 


95 


115 


Betiiiial Green Koad . 


■M 


34 


23 


88 


65 


95 


45 


205 


293 


Vidoria Park Church, Ap- 




















{iroach Road 


146 


207 


.59 


412 


189 


383 


53 


625 


1,037 


ToUl .... 


238 


342 


168 


748:- 


391 


724 


256 


1,371 


2,119 



Congregational Missions 



Old Nichol Stre»5t Sclioi.la . 


5 




50 


55 


7 




548 


555 


610 


•Vict<jria H;ill, Approach 




















R<ja<l 


3 


4 


93 


100 


36 


121 


.327 


484 


684 


Victona Park Hall 


2 


1 


20 


23 


14 


23 


33 


70 


93 


Pott Stre.-t .... 


14 


3 


35 


52 


3 




147 


150 


202 


ToUl .... 


24 


8 


198 


230 


60 


144 


1,055 


1,259 


1,489 



Connected with Victoria Park CUiiruh. 



EAST LONDON-BETHNAL GREEN 

UNITARIAN CHURCH 



57 



CHURCH 


MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 




Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Day. 


Mansford Street . 


2 


3 


34 


39 


20 


42 


20 


82 


121 


BRETHREN 


Gospel Hall, 117, Coventry 
Street 








5 


3 


73 


81 


81 



SOCIETY OF FRIENDS 



Hall, Barnet Grove 



29 



27 180 236 



39 116 243 398 634 



SALVATION ARMY 



Slum Post, 374, Hackney Kd. 
Slum Post, 86, Sclater Street 
Slum Post, Tent Street 


6 
3 
2 


5 

3 

10 


"2 


11 

6 

14 


G 

8 

1 


14 
9 
5 


3 

7 


20 
20 
13 


31 
26 

27 


Total .... 


11 


18 


2 


31 


15 


28 


10 


53 


84 



ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH 



St. Casimir and St. Joseph, 
Cambridge Road 

Our Lady of the Assump- 
tion, North Passage . 

St. Patrick's School Chapel 


135 

47 
6 


93 

76 
33 


24 

74 
66 


252 

197 
105 


29 

27 


40 
20 


27 
32 


96 
79 


348 

276 
105 


Total .... 


188 202 


164 


554 


56 


60 


59 


175 


729 



OTHER SERVICES 



•Abbey St. Schools, Mans- 




















ford Street 


3 


3 


40 


46 










46 


Home of Industry, 29, Beth- 




















nal Green Road 










29 


78 


423 


530 


530 


*Ashley ]\Iission, Peel Grove 


o 




55 


57 


10 


18 


20 


48 


105 


*Good Shepherd, Three 




















Colts Lane 


2 


1 


70 


73 


38 


49 


178 


265 


338 


London City Mission, Gos- 




















sett Street. 


2 




13 


15 


12 


33 


22 


67 


82 


London City Mission, 160, 




















Brick Lane 










10 


12 


1 


23 


23 


Mildmay Miss. Hall, Sweet 




















Apple Square . 










15 


28 


29 


72 


72 


Mildmay Miss. Hall, Cross 














1 




Street .... 








23 


51 


10 


84 


84 


Christian Communitj' Me- 


















morial Hall, London St. . 


1 j ... 


2 


3 


17 


20 


42 


79 


82 


Total .... 


10 1 4 


180 


194 


154 


289 


725 


1.168 


1,362 



In oonnection with ths Ragged Sehool Union. 



58 



THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 
DENOMINATIONAL TOTALS 





MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 

for the 

Day. 




Men. 


.Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldm. 


Total. 


Church of England 


490 


614 


1,605 


2,709 


1,250 


1,890 


1,292 


4,432 


7,141 


„ „ Missions 


6 


7 


172 


185 


29 


109 


528 


666 


851 


Wesleyan Meth. Church 


167 


205 


448 


820 


241 


369 


424 


1,034 


1,854 


„ „ Mis.sions 


5 


6 


75 


86 


10 


26 


308 


344 


430 


Primitive Meth. Church 


15 


7 


35 


57 


20 


21 


20 


61 


118 


Baptist Church 


340 


329 


288 


957 


544 


858 


544 


1,946 


2,903 


„ Missions . 


7 


6 


358 


371 


59 


100 


2C0 


409 


780 


Congregational Church 


238 


342 


168 


748 


391 


724 


256 


1.371 


2,119 


„ Missions 


24 


8 


198 


230 


60 


144 


1,055 


1,259 


1,489 


Unitarian Church . 


2 


3 


34 


39 


20 


42 


20 


82 


121 


Brethren 








... 


5 


3 


73 


81 


81 


Society of Friends. 


29 


27 


180 


236 


39 


116 


243 


398 


634 


Salvation Army . 


11 


18 


2 


31 


15 


28 


10 


53 


84 


Roman Catholic Church 


188 


202 


164 


554 


56 


60 


59 


175 


729 


Other Services 


10 


4 


180 


194 


154 


289 


725 


1,168 


1,362 


Grand Totals . 


1,532 


1,778 


3,907 


7,217 


2,893 


4,779 


5,807 


13,479 


20,696 



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Other Services 




Blue = Evening. 



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Nonconformist 



Roman Catholic 



Other Services 



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Black = All Servlceft 



Red = Morning. 



Blue = Evening. 



Borough of Shoreditch 





CHURCH 


OF 


ENGLAND 












MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 
for the 


CHURCH. 




















Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Day. 


St. Leonard's, High Street . 


53 


100 


124 


277 


46 


173 


49 


268 


545 


St. Andrew's, Canal Road . 


14 


20 


79 


113 


21 


64 


107 


192 


305 


St. Agatha's, Finsbury Av. 


4 




14 


18 


20 


16 


66 


102 


120 


All Saints', Haggerston 


33 


52 


245 


330 


34 


97 


35 


166 


496 


St. Anne's, Hemsworth St. 


9 


12 


18 


39 


9 


11 


16 


36 


75 


St. Augustine's, York Street 


35 


43 


73 


151 


33 


85 


45 


163 


314 


St. Chad's, Niehol Square . 


23 


46 


116 


185 


26 


53 


57 


136 


321 


St.Columba'3,Kingsland Rd. 


64 


91 


172 


327 


48 


119 


54 


221 


548 


Christ Church, Hoxton 


20 


34 


100 


154 


29 


72 


42 


143 


297 


Holy Trinity, Hoxton . 


14 


11 


101 


126 


29 


59 


90 


178 


304 


St. James', Curtain Road . 


12 


17 


90 


119 


18 


29 


63 


110 


229 


St. John the Baptist, Hoxton 


42 


89 


92 


223 


126 


164 


235 


525 


748 


St. Mark's, Old Street 


18 


13 


37 


68 


26 


37 


24 


87 


155 


St. Mary's, Hoxton 


23 


29 


82 


134 


25 


42 


77 


144 


278 


St. Mary's, Haggerston 


41 


86 


185 


312 


48 


113 


92 


253 


565 


St. Michael's, Mark Street . 


28 


21 


83 


132 


15 


57 


73 


145 


277 


St. Paul's, Dalston 


40 


75 


48 


163 


64 


125 


58 


247 


410 


St. Peter's, Hoxton Square. 


4 


10 


30 


44 


11 


22 


9 


42 


86 


St. Saviour's, Penn Street . 


34 


60 


114 


208 


63 


210 


56 


329 


537 


St. Stephen's, Goldsmith 




















Row 


23 


26 


47 


96 


24 


44 


54 


122 


218 


Total .... 


534 


835 


1,850 


3,219 


715 


1,592 


1,302 


3,609 


6,828 



Church of England Missions 



St. Andrew'slnstitute, Canal 




















Road 










4 


14 


7 


25 


25 


St. Mary's Mission, Nile St. 




1 


75 


76 










76 


All Saints' Miss. , Haggerston 










4 


3 


75 


82 


82 


St. Mary's Institute, Mans- 




















field Street 










3 


18 


1 


22 


22 


St. Patrick's Mission . 










8 


24 




32 


32 


St. George's Mission . 










4 


30 


19 


53 


53 


Total .... 




1 75 76 


23 


89 


102 


214 


290 





WESLEYAN METHODIST 


CHURCH 








New North Road . 
Hilcot Street 




63 

7 


50 
4 


54 

52 


167 1 
63 


145 
18 


214 

48 


178 
84 


537 
150 


704 
213 


Total . 


70 


54 


106 


230 


163 


262 


262 


687 


917 



UNITED METHODIST FREE CHURCH 



Willow Street 

" Harbour Light " 

Total . 



41 



25 



52 



118 



28 i 
31 



43 
59 



10 
109 



59 



102 



119 



59 



81 
199 



280 



117 
281 



398 



BIBLE CHRISTIAN CHURCH 


Jubilee Memorial, East Rd. | 31 40 48 | 119 | 50 ] 61 


78 


189 


308 


PRIMITIVE METHODIST CHURCH 


Philip Street 


6 ' 10 j 15 j 31 |j 10 ! 28 I 


19 


57 i 


88 



60 



THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 



BAPTIST CHURCH 





MORNING. 


EVENING. 


ToUI 

for the 

Day. 




Men. 


Women. 


Chldm. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldm. 


Total. 


Queen's Road, Dalston 
Costers' Hall, Hoxton Strwt 
Wileou Street 
"Jireh," East Road . 


39 
94 
10 
79 


45 

82 

16 

104 


52 

49 

4 

10 


136 

225 

193 


85 
128 

17 
85 


146 

139 

12 

124 


112 

194 

3 

10 


343 

461 

32 

219 


479 

686 

68 

412 


ToUl .... 


228 


247 


115 


590 


315 


421 


319 


1,055 


1,645 



Baptist Missions 



Shoreditoh Tabernacle Mias. 


4 


3 




7 


10 


25 


9 


44 


51 


Old Vinegar Ground Mias. 










9 


31 


28 


68 


68 


Union Street 










21 


44 


39 


104 


104 


Shap Street .... 


3 


1 


50 


54 


5 


7 


161 


173 


227 


Red vera Street 










9 


19 


135 


163 


IG.-I 


Total .... 


7 


4 


50 


61 


54 


126 


372 


552 


613 



( 


DGNaREQATIONAL CHURCH 








Barbican Chapel . 

New Tabernacle, Old Street 

Pownall Road 


63 
46 
39 


64 
30 
29 


106 

7 

60 


233 

83 

128 


141 
49 
37 


243 
81 
66 


370 
79 
34 


754 
209 
137 


9^7 
2V)-' 
26-. 


Total .... 


148 


123 


173 


444 


227 


390 


483 


1,100 


1,544 



Congregational Missions 



Basing Place 


5 


1 


77 


83 


32 


67 


20 


119 


202 


Hammond Square 


1 




31 


32 


8 


39 


126 


173 


205 


Dove Row .... 


9 




45 


54 


42 


28 


226 


296 


350 


Hoxton Academy 


6 


1 


75 


82 


26 


29 


7 


62 


144 


Christian Institute 










6 


12 


4 


22 


22 


Total .... 


21 


2 


228 


251 


114 


175 


383 


672 


923 



SALVATION ARMY 



Maidstone Street . 
Newton Street 
King>iland Ruad . 
Ivy Street 

Total 



10 


32 


10 


52 


1 13 


59 


26 


98 


150 


46 


33 


48 


127 


1 55 


112 


29 


196 


323 


22 


33 


32 


87 


1 27 


75 


65 


167 


254 


1 


7 


12 


20 


'^ 


13 


22 


39 


59 


79 


105 


102 


286 


1 99 


259 


142 


500 


786 



PRESBYTERIAN MISSION 



Park Ch. Miss., Harvey St. 



19 



12 



143 174 



28 



60 



157 



245 



419 



SOCIETY OF FRIENDS 



Hoxton Hall 



7 I 3 I 



11 



21 



29 



55 



16 



100 



121 



BRETHREN 



*'Bethe«da," New North Rd. 
Uummond S<juar« Schoolu . 


15 


14 


3 


32 


17 
3 


29 
2 


6 
75 


52 
80 


84 
80 


Total .... 


15 


14 


3 


32 


20 


31 


81 


132 


164 



EAST LONDON— SHOREDITCH 

ROMAN" CATHOLIC CHURCH 



61 



CHURCH. 


MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 

for the 

Day. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


St. Monica, Hoxton Square 
St. Mary, Eldon Street 


300 
114 


348 
137 


192 
85 


840 
356 


23 

40 


43 

52 


17 

38 


83 
130 


923 

486 


Total .... 


414 


505 


277 


1,196 


63 


95 


55 


213 


1,409 



OTHER SERVICES 



London City Mission, 

Nasmyth Hall . 
London City Mission, 

Bishopsgate Station . 
Christian Institute, Hoxton 

Market .... 
Felton Street Schools . 

Total . . . . 



10 


1 
1 


30 
26 


41 
27 


12 
38 
14 


20 
63 
31 


8 

77 
7 


1 
40 

178 

52 


10 


2 


56 


68 


64 


114 


92 


270 



40 
178 



93 
27 



338 



DENOMINATIONAL TOTALS 





MORNING. 


EVENING. 


' Total 




Men, 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Day. 


Church of England 


534 


835 


1,850 


3,219 


715 


1,592 


1,302 


3,609 


6,828 


„ „ Missions 




1 


75 


76 


23 


89 


102 


214 


290 


Wesleyan Meth. Church 


70 


54 


106 


230 


163 


262 


262 


687 


917 


U. Meth. Free Church . 


41 


25 


52 


118 


59 


1C2 


119 


280 


398 


Bible Christian Church 


31 


40 


48 


119 


50 


61 


78 


189 


308 


Primitive Meth. Church 


6 


10 


15 


31 


10 


28 


19 


57 


88 


Baptist Church 


228 


247 


115 


590 


315 


421 


319 


1,055 


1,645 


„ Missions . 


7 


4 


50 


61 1 


54 


126 


372 


552 


613 


Congregational Church 


148 


123 


173 


444 , 


227 


390 


483 


1,100 


1,544 


„ Missions 


21 


2 


228 


251 


114 


175 


383 


672 


923 


Salvation Army . 


79 


105 


102 


286 


99 


259 


142 


500 


786 


Presbyterian Mission . 


19 


12 


143 


174 j 


28 


60 


157 


245 


419 


Society of Friends 


7 


3 


11 


21 


29 


55 


16 


100 


121 


Brethren 


15 


14 


3 


32 


20 


31 


81 


132 


164 


Roman Catholic Church 


414 


505 


277 


1,196 


63 


95 


55 


213 


1,409 


Other Services 


10 


2 


56 


68 I 


64 


114 


92 


270 


338 


Grand Totals . 


1,630 


1,982 


3,304 


6,916 


2,033 


3,860 


3,982 


9,875 


1 16,791 



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DIAGRAM 

^wing' Analysis of Attendance. 

shore:dit< 




Blacli 



Blue = Evening 



All Churches 



Church of England 



Nonconformist 



Roman Catholic 



Other Services 




Borough of Hackney 



CHURCH OF ENGLAND 







HORNING. 






EVENING. 






CHURCH 










Men. 












Men. 


WomeD. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Woiuen. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Day. 


St. John's, Mare iStreet 


162 


276 


276 


714 


204 


420 


132 


756 


1,470 


Christ Church, Clapton 


31 


50 


72 


153 


i 40 


88 


33 


161 


314 


St. James', Clapton 


103 


176 


202 


481 


m 


235 


70 


416 


897 


St. Thomas', Upper Clapton 
St. Michael's, Stoke New- 


86 


151 


134 


371 


88 


155 


45 


288 


659 


ington .... 


104 


245 


159 


608 


112 


248 


91 


451 


959 


St. Matthew's, Up. Clapton 


178 


313 


140 


631 


174 


312 


64 


550 


1,181 


St. James', West Hackney . 


151 


252 


237 


640 


221 


543 


114 


878 


1,518 


All Saints', Clapton Park . 


68 


137 


182 


387 


96 


216 


66 


378 


765 


All Souls', Clapton Park . 


40 


78 


136 


254 


71 


152 


77 


300 


554 


St. Barnabas', Homerton . 


25 


38 


90 


153 


58 


104 


79 


241 


394 


Rams Episcopal Chapel, 




















Homerton .... 


41 


65 


151 


257 


56 


86 


37 


179 


436 


St. Paul's, Homerton . 


26 


18 


113 


157 


46 


63 


62 


171 


328 


Holy Trinity, Dalston. 


19 


35 


41 


95 


43 


106 


48 


197 


292 


St. Bartholomew's, Dalston 




















Lane 


63 


72 


81 


216 


79 


163 


44 


286 


502 


St. Mark's, Dalston 


84 


140 


133 


357 


143 


238 


64 


445 


802 


St. Philip's, Dalston . 


79 


144 


105 


328 


124 


224 


77 


425 


753 


St. Peter's, Kingsland 


16 


31 


44 


91 


28 


49 


59 


136 


227 


St. Michael and All Angels', 




















London Fields . 


36 


62 


191 


289 


67 


126 


59 


252 


541 


St. Mary of Eton, Hackney 




















Wick .... 


41 


70 


112 


223 


78 


190 


168 


436 


659 


St. Luke's, Homerton Terr. 


64 


125 


49 


238 


74 


226 


62 


362 


600 


Christ Church, Victoria Pk. 


39 


69 


133 


241 


41 


73 


37 


151 


392 


St. Augustine's, S. Hackney 


49 


86 


90 


225 


36 


162 


63 


261 


486 


St. John of Jerusalem, S. 




















Hackney .... 


65 


101 


118 


284 


114 


226 


61 


401 


685 


*St. John's, Vartry Road . 


57 


119 


189 


365 


101 


260 


178 


539 


904 


Total .... 


1,627 


2,853 


3,178 


7,658 


2,205 


4,665 


1,790 


8,660 


16,318 



* This church is partly in Hackney and partly in Tottenham. We have included it in this return 
proportion of the congregation la drawn from Hackney. 



as a large 



Church of England Missions 



St. John's, The Grove 
St. James', Lea Bridge 
Holy Cross, Ravensdale St 
St. Michael's, Ros-sington St. 
Good Shepherd, Harrington 

Hill .... 
HolyTrin., Southwold Rd. 
St. Barnabas', Shacklewell 

Row ..... 
St. Paul's, Clevedon Street 
St. Mary's, Chatsworth Rd. 
Good Shepherd, Rushmore 

Road .... 
St. Mark's, Boleyn Road 
St. Luke's, Kenton Road 
Holy Trinity, Forest Road 
Good Shepherd, Wilman Gr 
St. Michael's, Ada Street 
St. Andrew's, Wells Street , 
St. Jude's, 37, BallsPond Rd. 
St. Mary of Eton, Chapman 

Road .... 
St. Paul's, Duncan Street 

Total . 



71 



11 



10 



133 



118 

121 
89 

45 

18 

2 

39 

"44 
65 
17 
17 
41 
39 



79 

867 

63 



150 



121 

131 
99 

69 
25 
10 

46 

"48 
72 
23 
18 
78 
44 



84 
1,018 



194 



72 


33 


135 


12 


19 


34 


12 


8 


25 


15 


11 


31 


20 


39 


73 


20 


25 


54 


53 


66 


145 


23 


28 


59 


32 


22 


63 


23 


31 


71 


30 


9 


47 


11 


73 


96 


3 


60 


67 


24 


27 


58 


3 


59 


65 


44 


69 


135 


28 


17 


51 


23 


6 


34 


19 


10 


30 


467 


612 


1,273 



285 
34 
26 

152 

204 
153 

214 
84 
73 

117 
47 

144 

139 
81 
83 

213 
95 

34 
114 

2,291 



64 



THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 

WESLEYAN METHODIST CHURCH 





MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 

for the 


CHURCH. 




















Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Day. 


Richmond Road . 


80 


84 


71 


235 


95 


144 


55 


294 


529 


Lower Clapton Road . 
High St., Stoke Newington 


113 


154 


59 


326 


90 


194 


44 


328 


6.54 


121 


110 


120 


351 


152 


226 


83 


461 


812 


Blenco Road, Clapton Park 


i) 


3 


44 


52 


34 


63 


66 


163 


215 


Chapman Road, Hackney 
Wick .... 




















23 


22 


52 


97 


39 


70 


41 


150 


247 


Church Road, Homerton 


8 


7 


103 


118 


22 


55 


.32 


109 


227 


Mayfield Road, Dalston 


55 


56 


114 


225 


132 


240 


221 


593 


818 


Cassland Road, S. Hackney 


77 


107 


211 


395 


116 


173 


84 


373 


768 


Total .... 


482 


543 


774 


1,799 


680 


1,165 


626 


2,471 


4,270 



UNITED METHODIST FREE CHURCH 



Pembury Grove, Lr. Clapton 



129 



87 293 



57 137 74 268 



PRIMITIVE METHODIST CHURCH 



Olinda Road, Stamford Hill 


16 


12 


60 


88 


12 


16 


21 


49 


137 


Southwold Rd., Up. Clapton 


3 


6 


50 


59 


8 


14 


24 


46 


105 


Northwold Road, Stoke 




















Newington 
Blurton Road, Clapton Pk. 


62 


62 


134 


258 


97 


176 


66 


339 


597 


36 


27 


74 


137 


59 


82 


29 


170 


307 


lirookfield Rd., Victoria Pk. 


6 


2 


66 


74 


14 


31 


108 


153 


227 


Exmouth PI. , London Fields 


25 


15 


20 


60 


23 


32 


13 


68 


128 


Total .... 


148 


124 


404 


676 


213 


351 


261 


825 


1,501 



BAPTIST CHURCH 



Hackney Down« Cha^)el 
Old Baptist Union, isorfolk 


178 


248 


114 


540 


182 


386 


83 


651 


1,191 




















Road 


3 


4 


33 


40 


12 


20 


10 


42 


82 


Chataworth Road, Clapton . 


74 


80 


142 


29R 


72 


1.53 


88 


313 


609 


Homerton Row . 


37 


33 


51 


121 


36 


60 


21 


117 


238 


Ashwin Street, Dalston 




















.Ttmction .... 


164 


213 


155 


5.32 


186 


427 


102 


715 


1,247 


Mare Street, Ha<jkney 


93 


117 


101 


311 


106 


191 


240 


537 


848 


Hampden Chapel, Lauriston 




















Road 


26 


32 


56 


114 


31 


67 


18 


116 


230 


ToUl .... 


575 


727 


652 


1,954 


625 


1,304 


562 


2,491 


4,445 



Baptist Missions 



Rendleeham Rooms, Hea- 

therlev Street 
Waterl(X) Rfxjma, Prout Rd. 
Bethaaida, Hackney Wick . 


6 
3 


3 
3 


65 
30 


74 
30 


14 

17 

4 


42 
34 
15 


89 

17 

4 


145 
68 
23 


219 

104 

23 


ToUl .... 


9 


6 


95 


110 


35 


91 


110 


236 


346 



EAST LONDON— HACKNEY 



65 



CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 



CHURCH. 



Lower Clapton, Amhurst 
Road. . . . 

"Trinity," Devonshire Rd. 

Stamford Hill . 

Upper Clapton Road . 

Rectory Road, Stoke New- 
ington . . . . 

Clapton Pk., Lower Clapton 
Road 

Kingsland Church, High St. 

"Bethany," Victoria Park 
Road . . . . 

Middleton Road, Dalston . 

Cambridge Heath Church, 
Mare Street 

Brotherhood Church, South- 
gate Road 

Shrubland Road, London 
Fields . . . . 

"Trinity," Lauriston Road 



Total 



MORNING. 1 


EVENING. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


118 

61 

355 

139 


192 

72 
572 
186 


Ill 

115 

192 

99 


421 

248 

1,119 

424 


142 

59 

500 

133 


2.59 
122 
746 
266 


32 

69 
90 
81 


433 

250 
1,336 

480 


94 


149 


103 


346 


137 


237 


53 


427 


227 
62 


328 

82 


232 
52 


787 
196 


191 
96 


347 
163 


170 
46 


708 
305 


15 
50 


15 
88 


35 
HI 


65 
249 


22 
56 


44 
98 


28 
79 


94 
233 


44 


69 


140 


253 


49 


64 


156 


269 


26 


17 


14 


57 


81 


91 


33 


205 


9 

59 


15 
63 


39 
109 


63 
231 


20 
90 


34 

167 


20 
100 


74 
357 


1,259 


1,848 


1,352 


4,459 


1,576 


2,638 


957 


5,171 



Total 

for the 

Day. 



854 

498 

2,455 

904 

773 

1,495 
501 

159 
482 

522 

262 

137 
588 

9,630 





Congregational 


Missions 










Morning Lane 


1 


6 


136 


143 


14 


57 


142 


213 


356 


Stamford Terrace, Stamford 




















Hill 


5 


6 


109 


120 


13 


25 


71 


109 


229 


Conduit St., North wold Rd. 


1 


4 


43 


48 


18 


48 


45 


111 


159 


Spensley Mission, Law- 




















rence's Buildings 


10 


5 


69 


84 


33 


64 


54 


151 


235 


Dunn St., Shackle well Lane 


12 


9 


151 


172 


6 


18 


2 


26 


198 


Glyn Road, Clapton Park . 


1 


2 


28 


31 


38 


74 


36 


148 


179 


Grove Miss., BrooksbyWalk 


7 


4 


168 


179 


33 


44 


166 


243 


422 


Chapman Road Hall . 


1 


1 


32 


34 


12 


48 


18 


78 


112 


Orchard Mission, Wells St. 


3 


3 


37 


43 


15 


33 


29 


77 


120 


Total .... 


41 


40 


773 


854 


182 


411 


563 


1,156 


2,010 





PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 








Downs Park Road 
St. Thomas Square 


35 
21 


37 
25 


42 114 
21 67 


58 
28 


63 
42 


22 
13 


143 
83 


257 
150 


Total .... 


56 


62 


63 181 


86 


105 


35 


226 


407 



UNITARIAN CHURCH 



New Gravel Pit, Chatham PI. 



15 



36 



54 



26 



28 



BRETHREN 



57 



111 



6, Twemlow Terr., London 




















Fields .... 


12 


9 


5 


26 


11 


8 


10 


29 


55 


Gospel Hall, Paragon Road 


23 


30 


13 


66 


21 


44 


28 


93 


159 


Christian Church, Loddiges 




















Road 


12 


14 


5 


31 


13 


26 


8 


47 


78 


Clapton Hall, Alkham Rd. 


99 


136 


51 


286 


73 


200 


51 


324 


610 


Ferry Gospel Hall, Upper 




















Clapton .... 










14 


25 


57 


96 




Blurton Road Hall 


34 


53 


36 


123 


21 


40 


34 


95 


218 


Homer House Room, Bloom- 




















field Street 


22 


13 


6 


41 


20 


19 


7 


46 


87 


West Side Gospel Hall, 




















London Fields . 


9 


10 


9 


28 


6 


10 


11 


27 


55 


Hall, 68, Downham Road, 




















Kingsland. 


28 


26 


9 


63 


30 


34 


13 


77 


140 


Total .... 


239 


291 


134 


664 


209 


406 


219 


834 


1,498 



66 



THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 

FOREIGN" PROTESTANT SERVICES 





MOHNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 

for the 

Day. 


CHURCH. 


Men. 


Women. 


ChWrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Ritson Road, Dalston . 


28 


26 


32 


86 


11 


52 


69 


132 


218 



CATHOLIC APOSTOLIC CHURCH 



Mare Street . 



84 



79 



36 



199 



87 



49 



213 



SALVATION ARMY 



Congress Hall, Linscott Rd. 


296 


455 


163 


914 


443 


882 


310 


1,635 


2,549 


Temple, Alniack Road 


8 


6 


91 


105 


10 


8 


106 


124 


229 


High Street, Homerton 


11 


25 


12 


48 


23 


70 


56 


149 


197 


Mallard St., Hackney Wick 


6 


21 


8 


35 


13 


38 


6 


57 


92 


Mare Street .... 


47 


117 


85 


249 


62 


198 


199 


459 


708 


Havelock Road, Well Street 


13 


24 


29 


66 


14 


41 


17 


72 


138 


81, Balls Pond Road . 


20 


23 


12 


55 


26 


81 


8 


115 


170 


Total .... 


401 


671 


400 


1,472 


591 


1,318 


702 


2,611 


4,083 



ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH 



St. Scholastica, Clapton 

St. Mary and St. Dominic, 
Hackney Wick . 

Our Lady and St. Joseph, 
Kingsland. 

St. John the Baptibt, Hack- 
ney 

Totel . . . . 



51 


166 


55 


272 


29 


75 


23 


127 


139 


252 


255 


646 


29 


61 


51 


141 


252 


405 


255 


912 


111 


225 


102 


438 


247 


245 


156 


648 


35 


61 


32 


128 


689 


1,068 


721 


2,478 


204 


422 


208 


834 



OTHER SERVICES 



London City Mission, Castle 




















Street .... 










14 


35 


22 


71 


71 


London City Miss., Hassett 




















R'jad 










17 


34 


78 


129 


129 


Brrnmwick Mission, Retreat 




















Place .... 


5 


3 


15 


23 


10 


19 


18 


47 


70 


"Spiritualists," Manor 




















Rooms, Kenraure Road . 










51 


77 


8 


136 


136 


Y.M.C.A., Mare Street . 










33 


32 


3 


68 


68 


Kingnland Gosjjel Mission, 




















Tottenham Square . 
Working Mens Mission, 


2 


1 


23 


26 


3 


11 


25 


39 


65 




















Nimrwl Alley . 
Benyon Road Hall, South- 


4 






4 


3 


6 


25 


34 


38 




















gate Road 










6 


9 


7 


22 


22 


Morley Hall, 123, Mare St. 










42 


81 


52 


176 


175 


Earlham Hall, Balls Pond 




















Road 


16 


27 


67 


110 


33 


95 


131 


259 


369 


Church fif Martin Luther, 




















SjK'ldhurst l{oa<l 


8 


11 


2 


21 


9 


22 


6 


37 


58 


Weisli Servic, M.jrley Hall 










12 


6 


13 


31 


31 


Bruce Hall Mission 










20 


23 


198 


241 


241 


Old Gravel Pit Mission 


9 


5 


231 


245 


82 


158 


124 


364 


609 


John St. Ragged Schools . 




12 


32 


44 


4 


3 


111 


118 


162 


Total .... 


44 


59 


370 


473 


339 


611 


821 


1,771 


2,244 



EAST LONDON— HACKNEY 



67 



1 DENOMINATIONAL 


TOTALS 








T»t3'XT/~\TLf TX^ A 'PT/'^'W 


MOKNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 


DENUMIIN AilUJN. 


















for the 




Men. 


Women. 


Chldm. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldm. 


Total. 


Day. 


Church of England 


1,627 


2,853 


3,178 


7,658 


2,205 


4,665 


1,790 


8,660 


16,318 


„ „ Missions 


71 


80 


867 


1,018 


194 


467 


612 


1,273 


2,291 


Wesleyan Meth. Church 


482 


543 


774 


1,799 


680 


1,165 


626 


2,471 


4,270 


U. Meth. Free Church . 


77 


129 


87 


293 


57 


137 


74 


268 


561 


Primitive Meth. Church 


148 


124 


404 


676 


213 


351 


261 


825 


1,501 


Baptist Church 


575 


727 


652 


1,954 


625 


1,304 


562 


2,491 


4,445 


„ Missions . 


9 


6 


95 


110 


35 


91 


110 


236 


346 


Congregational Church. 


1,259 


1,848 


1,352 


4,459 


1,576 


2,638 


957 


5,171 


9,630 


„ Missions 


41 


40 


773 


854 


182 


411 


563 


1,156 


2,010 


Presbyterian Church . 


56 


62 


63 


181 


86 


105 


35 


226 


407 


Unitarian Church 


15 


36 


3 


54 


26 


28 


3 


57 


111 


Brethren 


239 


291 


134 


664 


209 


406 


219 


834 


1,498 


Foreign Prot. Services . 


28 


26 


32 


86 


11 


52 


69 


132 


218 


Cath. Apostolic Church 


84 


79 


36 


199 


77 


87 


49 


213 


412 


Salvation Army . 


401 


671 


400 


1,472 


591 


1,318 


702 


2,611 


4,083 


Boman Catholic Church 


689 


1,068 


721 


2,478 


204 


422 


208 


834 


3,312 


Other Services 


44 


59 


370 


473 


339 


611 


821 


1,771 


2,244 


Jewish Church 


572 


192 


510 


1,274 






... 


... 


1,274 


Grand Totals . 


6,417 


8,834 


10,451 


25,702 


7,310 


14,258 


7,661 


29,229 


54,931 



Population i^oman Catholic 



Other Services 



s 

O 

a. 



rtlOO 



O 



yo 



80 



'm 



_. .1 L _^ 



■^ttt 



DIAGRAM 



^■wing A.nalysis of A-ttendance. 
HACnNHT. 




4^ 



-L_l- 



t 



Blue = Eveninf' 



I 



All Churches 



Church of Engrland 



Nonconformist 



Roman Catholic 



Other Services 




Black := All ServtcoB 



Red - Morning. 



Blue = Evening 



Pel- 
Cent 



O 



w 



o 

u 

E 

o 



100 



90 



80 



70 



G(^ 



50 



40 



50 



20 



10 



LI J 1 [. ' . _ 1 ^ _' _,_|i.^ ^ L ' ,_44 ^^ 




1 ' ' 


I ' 


\ 


..I. ■ 1 ■ : ■ --f- 




1 1 


\ 1 




\ "♦" 1 1 


I i 1 ' 


\ ' .1 . , ! 1 M 






\ III A fflL^ A X(4 


1 LJ 1 vV vjf Jr cTik. m 




\ **.iv^...;^ u' A** J 


\ ooe>vinR jrvittMidance. 


1 1- T^ — _j — 


\ ~. _ _ 


TOTALS FOR FAST LONDON, " r 






' ' ' ' i '1 


I ! ! ' 1 ' 


\ M 1 


... ...L. . 1 I 1 






I 


1 






1 \ 1 i 


1 1 


1 \ ' ' 


1 1 L 


1 i 1 J 1 ' 

1 1 






i \ } 


\ 11 


1 \ 1 ■ I 




1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


'11 • [ 




'■ \ i ^ , 1 . ..^i— ..- —1 ... . — 1— U *-_L__ _ 


' ' i !\ 1 




i j I i\ ! ' i 




1 ' ! ' 


1 I It f 


ill j i 


III 


j 1 ! 


\ \ \ ■ ! 1 


I ' 1 \ ' 1 1 






1 1 ' 


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I 1 < 


1 \ 


1 1 


\ 1- 




i 1 1 1 i 


1 1 1 ! 1 


1 


\ 




j 1 


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N 


V 


k 


\^ 


i\ ' 


1 \i ' 4 


1 c 1 


j ^ ^^ 


\ i 


_i_^ C---^ -^ ' s^ ■ _^ ■ _^ ^ -r 




^ 1 ,^^"^^ ^S,^ 1 


*^^ j 


^*^ 


'V 


I 1^ ^ 


"Nfc- — ■* 




till L..; 1 . 1 \ \ 



Popi Roman Catholic 



!T5 

a 
o 



^. 



Other Services 



-uur ^ n-^-rm — rn — "Tn — ir — 1 1 ; i i i i n - i i i - i i 


V^ -f-J-M R ' 


tr rj , i iji 1 1 ' iv ' 1 




QO -*— — i— T\ 1 A y^ T\ A V # _1_ 


-^"1: zi ' , L)iyVGK7\M \ — 




i\ - 1 1 1 1 tie*virinfi?-A.ria lysis of .A^ttenrlnnr*^ ' 




so I ' 


i \ i 1 H T#^TAI C XSCkD 17 ACT I rkNIHf^M _1 L_ 




ill 1 


It 1 FT "^ M K i \i ' 


70 I i i i . i \ i \i 




1 \ . |_i~ \ \ 


i \ i ^ \ 1 


\ l\ ^ J_ I \ \ 


HO ' 1 iiLl 'I 




1 i 1 \' I ' 1 


1 i i j 1 \ \ 1 


, I , J L- ' j\ 1 1 i ' \ \ • 


;^o 1 i |\ -. [— iTt \\ 1 




1 \ \ ij"\ \ j L V ' ' 


— p- I— X- '— L \ \i ' ' \ \ 


1 L i 1 L 11 ■ ' \ \ L 


^0 -^-4--^ L-^l \\ " \ \ 




_l 1 I I : 1 "^ IT ,' *^sj ' 1 \ Y 


, J . 1 _^ \ 1 ^ ■> i \ \ — i ^ 


- 1 ' 1 — -""^ 11 ' > 1 i \ \ i ,' 


-.0 ~ 1 1 .J „i U 1 / L »^ 1 1 ! \ \ IT 




[_ —lit 1 J /! '^ 1 ' \ \ 1 / ,__ 


i \ \ f / 'iV ^\lr/ 


\ 1 -j'T/ \ \\ 1 ^ 


r»ri \ X \ \ \ r / 


T -t_.^. / j... . .j^ ,. ii\7 


-1 1 1 ■ V ^ \ ' ' / 


, ! [ 1 i 1 \ i \l y 


\ V ' i \ / 


in — 1 1-| — ^,._i \ — -^^ i ^ \l y^'^^ 


"+" ~^\- -^-^-^^^'^-»— -|4 1 \ \-i;^4^^ 


— i— ' 


1 ■ — 1 — — i — — 1- —f -f H — 

^^ ' — 1 1 1 ' 11 1 


' x", ,..j_i_-r " 1 ! ! i 1 1 


Blue ^ Evening 



All Churches 



Church of Eng^land c Nonconformist 



Roman Catholic 



Other Services 




The Problem of West London 

BY ARTHUR SHERWELL 

It would be a profound mistake to attempt to analyse tlie results 
of a religious census^ and to deduce conclusions from those results, 
without previously relating them to the general social conditions 
which prevail in the districts concerned. As I have elsewhere 
pointed out, the precise relation of poverty statistics (to take but 
a single illustration) to the religious problem of a district may not 
at first seem very obvious, but it is none the less real and indis- 
putable. Poverty in itself may not seriously affect the problem 
of morals, but destitution undoubtedly does ; and while it is easy 
to exaggerate its influence, it is folly, and worse than folly, to 
ignore it. Aristotle claimed that it is " needful first to have a 
maintenance, and then to practise virtue " ; and while we should 
protest that this is not so absolutely, yet historically and prac- 
tically the statement has in it a large measure of truth. The 
general law of progress, or civilisation — call it what we will — is 
an ascent from physical to moral. It is not a question of the 
intrinsic superiority of the one over the other, but of natural 
order^ and any analysis of moral or religious facts which ignores 
this order must by so much be inconclusive and misleading. 
Physical destitution tends to intensify, if it does not actually 
create, moral obliquity and weakness, and hence religious work 
among the most destitute classes must always be judged by its 
own standards. Its results will be relative rather than absolute, 
although the ideal which inspires it will still be, as always, uncon- 
ditioned and free. And what is true of poverty holds true of 
other social conditions also. Even its opposite — wealth — is a fact 
to be seriously reckoned with in any estimate of religious con- 
ditions. Such considerations apply to all districts, but they are 
peculiarly appropriate when considering the conditions of religious 
life in that group of boroughs which, for the purposes of the Daily 
Neivs Census, are denominated "West London." The selection is, 

69 



70 TSE .;BELIGI0U^ llFE OF LONDON 



of course, an arbitrary one, just as the boundaries of the separate 
boroughs which comprise the group are themselves arbitrary ; but 
this is a difficulty which cannot be avoided and can only be 
allowed for in stating the facts and in drawing conclusions. In 
estimating the religious problem of West London a much more 
careful analysis is required than would be necessary, probably, in 
an}' other district in Europe. While there are here all the ordinary 
conditions that determine the moral and religious atmosphere of a 
district, there are also present other conditions which, so far as 
England at least is concerned, are peculiar to West London. What 
these conditions are it is necessary to make plain before considering 
the results of the religious census. 

GROWTH AND DRIFT OF POPULATION 

The districts themselves are not homogeneous, and their history 
clearly illustrates the law and habits of a city's growth. Taking 
the seven boroughs as a whole, there has been a notable increase 
in population, especially in recent years, but this is almost en- 
tirely due to the growth of the outer districts. The population of 
Fulham, for example, has more than trebled in twenty years, while 
that of Hammersmith has increased by 55 per cent. Kensington, 
on the other hand, has remained nearly stationary ; Marylebone 
has actually declined ; while the population of that strangely 
heterogeneous group of districts known as the City of West- 
minster has materially decreased. That decline, however, with all 
that it involves in changing social conditions, dates farther back 
than twenty years. The prosperous classes, driven from Soho, 
pressed over into St. George's, Hanover Square. Forty or fifty 
years ago St. George's began noticeably to decline, and Kensington 
sprang up with a mad rush of growth. But in the seventies 
decline was noticeable even here. The district continued to grow, 
but at a greatly reduced rate, until between 1881 and 1891 things 
were practically stationary, the increase being only 1*9 per 
cent. ; while in the same interval Paddington increased 10*1 
per cent., and Fulham 64-5 per cent. The same law of change 
and expansion is noticeable, of course, in other districts, only 
it has not elsewhere the same aspect of realism, nor is it so 
sweeping and revolutionary. It is only in very wealth}'- districts 
that the realism and pathos of the change become conspicuously 
apparent. 



THE PROBLEM OF WEST LONDON 



71 



THE WEALTH OF THE DISTRICTS 

For, after all, it is the wealth of the districts that is the imme- 
diately obvious fact about them. Within their borders lie hidden 
the accumulated riches of the Empire. In this respect comparisons 
with other districts are unequal and, except as they make for the 
awakening of a social conscience and an equalisation of civic 
burdens, absurd ; but they may be useful here. Rateable values 
are far from satisfactory tests of wealth, and I will take no account 
of them here. The fact that a penny rate produces less than 
£2,000 (£1,893) in Bermondsey, and just over £2,000 (£2,159) in 
Bethnal Green, but more than £9,000 (£9,308) in Kensington, and 
nearly £23,000 (£22,805) in Westminster, has its own significance, 
but it is not an exhaustive test of relative prosperity. It is 
a more direct clue to realise that the proportion of domestic 
indoor servants to families or separate occupiers does not, in 
the case of five out of seven West London boroughs, fall below 
60 per cent., and rises in Kensington as high as 80 per cent. ; 
whereas in Bethnal Green and Shoreditch it is less than 6 per 
cent., in Bermondsey 6"6 per cent., and in Poplar 8*1 per cent. 
The figures presented in tabular form show the position at a 
glance : 





Proportions per 




Proportions per 




cent, of domestic 




cent, of domestic 


BOROUGH. 


indoor servants to 


BOROUGH. 


indoor servants to 




familiea or separate 




families or separate 




occupiers. 




occupiers. 


Kensington . 


80-0 


Poplar . 


8-1 


Westminster . 


65-8 


Southwark . 


7-8 


Chelsea . 


55-2 


Bermondsey . 


6-6 


St. Marylebone . 


51-4 


Bethnal Green 


5-8 


Paddington . 


50-2 


Shoreditch . 


57 



NUMBER OF PERSONS OF INDEPENDENT MEANS 

Another clue is afforded by the number of persons (excluding 
married women) of ten years of age and upwards who are 
living on their own means. In the seven West London 
boroughs the number is 17,038, or practically 3 per cent. (2-9) 
of the total number of males and unmarried females above ten 
years of age. In the five East London boroughs (representing 
an almost equal aggregate of population) the number is only 



72 



THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 



2,800, or 0-5 per cent. Tlie following figures will make the 
contrast clear: 



BOROUGH. 


Total number of 

males and unmarried 

females of 10 years 

and upwards (1901). 


Number living 
on own means. 


Tor cent. 


Kensington . 
Paddington . 
St. Marylebone 
Westminster . 

Southwark . 
Poplar . 
Stepney . 
Bermondsey . 






112,111 

88,427 

84,475 

121,921 

112,752 
91,741 

162,291 
70,390 


4519 
3038 
2243 
3106 

526 
377 
457 
241 


4-0 
3-4 

2-6 
2-5 

0-5 
0-4 
0-3 
0-3 



PROFESSIONAL AND COMMERCIAL CLASSES 

The contrast is made further apparent in an analysis of occu- 
pations. In Kensington the professional classes (males) represent 
8'5 per cent, of the total occupied males in the borough, and in 
Paddington 7 per cent. In Southwark, on the other hand, the 
professional classes form only 2'6 per cent, of the occupied males, 
and in Stepney 1'6 per cent. The commercial class, again, forms 
10"4 per cent, of the occupied males in Paddington, and 9"5 per 
cent, in Kensington, as against 6'8 per cent, in Southwark and 
4*6 per cent, in Stepney. 

SIZE AND CHARACTER OF HOUSES 

Another clue is presented in the size and character of the 
houses. In Kensington the tenements containing five rooms and 
upwards represent 45 per cent, of the whole, in "Westminster 
36 per cent., and in Paddington 36 per cent. In Bethnal Green, 
on the other hand, the proportion is only 16 per cent., in Shore- 
ditch 15, and in Southwark 17. The arbitrary arrangement of 
boundaries makes the contrast less striking than it would be if 
we confined the comparison to typical districts, but, even as it is, 
it is sufficiently suggestive. 



EVIDENCES OF POVERTY 

If we reverse the method of comparison and have regard to 
the facts not of wealth but of poverty, as evidenced in the conditions 



THE PROBLEM OF WEST LONDON 73 

of housing and healtli, the contrast is less apparent. This arises 
partly from the arbitrary grouping of boroughs. The inclusion, 
for instance, of Hammersmith and Fulham in the West London 
division ; of Lewisham, Greenwich, and Wandsworth in the South 
London division ; of Hampstead in the Northern division, and of 
Hackney in East London, considerably affects the averages of the 
separate divisions. We may take as an illustration of this the facts 
of overcrowding. The density of jjopidation in West London (taking 
the whole of the seven boroughs) shows an average of 78 persons 
to the acre. In North London the average is 87 ; in East London 
106; while in South London, owing to the inclusion of Lewisham, 
Woolwich, Greenwich, and Wandsworth, the average for the ten 
boroughs is only 40. If we take typical boroughs in each division 
instead, the contrast is at once clear. In Kensington the density 
of population is 77 persons to the acre ; in Westminster 73, and in 
Paddington 106. In Soathwark, on the other hand, the average 
is 182, in Shoreditch 180, in Bethnal Green 171, and in 
Stepney 169. 

But the arbitrary grouping of the boroughs is only a part 
of the explanation. It is chiefly due to the fact that, while there 
is in the principal West London boroughs a great and unpre- 
cedented concentration of wealth, there is in most of them a 
large measure of poverty also, and this causes the statistics of 
overcrowding, and other similar statistics, to approximate much 
more nearly to the statistics of East and South London than 
would be generally expected. 



OVERCROWDING 

If we take, as an instance, the number of persons living in 
one-room tenements^ the average for West London is 7 per cent, 
of the population. In North London the average is 9*2 per cent., 
in East London 8-6 per cent., while in the South London group it 
is only 4*4 per cent. If we compare separate boroughs, selecting 
those with the highest figures in each division, we find that while 
St. Marylebone has 12 per cent, of its total population living in 
one-room tenements, Finsbury has 14-2 per cent., Shoreditch 12'7 
per cent., Stepney 11-6 per cent., and Southwark 9-8 per cent. 
The average for London as a whole is 6-7 per cent. If we turn 
to the number of persons living under overcrowded conditions {i.e., 



74 



THE EELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 



more than two persons to a room) the figures again approximate 
more nearly than we should expect. The proportion of over- 
crowded persons in the West London group of boroughs is 14-2 
per cent, of the total population. In East London it is 23'8 per 
cent., in North London 19'9 per cent., and in South London 10'9 
per cent. In London as a whole the proportion is 16 per cent. 
If instead of entire divisions or groups we take the separate 
boroughs, a greater divergence is seen. Of the West London 
boroughs, St. Marylebone has the highest proportion of overcrowded 
persons — namely, 21 "1 per cent. ; Kensington being next with 14-8 
per cent. Of the East London boroughs, on the other hand. 
Stepney has 33-2 per cent, of its population overcrowded. Shore- 
ditch 29*9 per cent., and Bethnal Green 29-6 per cent. Of the 
North London boroughs, Finsbury has 35-2 per cent, of its popu- 
lation overcrowded, Holborn 25 per cent., and St. Pancras 23*9 
per cent. In South London, Southwark has 22'3 per cent, of its 
population overcrowded, and Bermondsey 19"6 per cent. 

It may be convenient to summarise the comparison in the 
following table : 



BOROUGH. 



( St. Marylebone 
West London -j Kensington 
( Paddington 



East London 



South London 



<■ Stepney . 
•j Shoreditch 
(Bethnal Green 

I Southwark 

•^ Bermondsey 

Lambeth . 



!■ Finsbury. 
North London ■{ Holborn . 
(St. Pancras 



Number of 
peraons per acre. 



90 

77 
106 

169 
180 
171 

182 
87 
74 

172 
147 

87 



Percentafte of popu- 
lation living in 
one-room tenements. 



12-.3 
6-4 
6-4 

11-6 

127 
9-8 

98 
6-7 
63 

14-2 
14-3 
11-7 



Percentage of 

population 
overcrowded. 



21-1 
14-8 
13-5 

33-21 

29-9 

29-6 

22-3 
19-6 
12'2 

35-2 
25-0 
23-9 



MORTALITY STATISTICS 



The conditions of housing are generally reflected in the statistics 
of mortality, and for this reason it may be well to carry the com- 
parison further. The grouping of the boroughs again hides the 
full force of the contrast, except as between West London and 
East London, but a reference to the separate boroughs brings it 
out more clearly : 



THE PROBLEM OF WEST LONDON 



75 



BOROUGH. 


Corrected Death Rate 

(1901). 
Deaths per 1000 living. 


(St. Marylebone . 
West London i Kensington . 
( Paddington . 

|Shoreditch , 
East London < Stepney 

(Bethnal Green . 

1 Southwark . 
South London -jBermondsey 
< Lambeth 

j Finsbury 
North London-^ Holborn 

(St. Pancras. 


1V8 
16-2 
15-2 

22-3 
22-0 
20-5 

22-6 
21-6 
17-8 

231 
227 
19-3 



INFANT MORTALITY 

The waste of infant life is ordinarily an even surer test of 
the social and economic conditions, and here again the comparison 
is favourable to West London, although, for reasons which will 
shortly appear, it is not so convincingly so as the difference in 
wealth would lead us to expect : 



GROUP. 


Number of Deaths under 
1 year of age per 
1000 births (1901). 


West London .... 

East London 

South London .... 
North London .... 


143 
163 
145 
130 



If we take typical boroughs the force of the contrast more 
plainly appears ^ : 



BOROUGH. 


Number of Deaths under 
1 year of age per 1000 births. 


^Kensington. 
West London -(Paddington. 

(St. Marylebone 

[Shoreditch . 
East London < Stepney 

( Betnnal Green 

( Bermondsey 
South London -j Southwark . 
( Lambeth 

rSt. Pancras . 
North London^ Finsbury . 
I Holborn 




163 
136 

107 

197 
163 
153 

169 
168 
139 

154 
142 
124 



' The boroughs selected do not in all cases show the highest figures, but for 
the sake of uniformity I adopt the same sets throughout. 



76 



THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OP LONDON 



DEATHS FROM PRINCIPAL EPIDEMIC DISEASES. 

The deaths from the principal epidemic diseases offer another 
test, although, where one year's statistics only are concerned 
the comparison must not be pressed too far. Where, however, 
the districts compared are so large, the comparison becomes much 
more reliable. 



GROUP. 


Deaths from Principal 

Epidemic Diseases (1901). 

Rate per 1000 living. 


West London .... 
East London .... 
South London .... 
North London .... 


1-93 
272 
2-26 
1-95 



Or, if we take separate boroughs, the following result appears 



BOROUGH. 


Deaths from Principal 

Epidemic Diseiises (1901). 

Rate per 1000 Uving. 


TKensington . 
West London -^^ Paddington. 

1st. Marylebone . 

rShoreditch , 
East London '. Bethnal Green . 
I Stepney 

rSouthwark . 
South London-^ Bermondsey 
I Lambeth 

j" Finsbury . 
North London-^ St. Pancras . 
( Holborn 


1-83 
1-73 
1-65 

2-99 

2-88 
2-54 

3-02 
2-90 
215 

278 
2-39 

2-28 



DEATHS FROM PHTHISIS AND RESPIRATORY DISEASES 

Lastly, in order thoroughly to exhaust the comparison, we will 
take the deaths from phthisis, pneumonia, and other respiratory 
diseases. These are pre-eminently forms of disease where an 
amehoration of the conditions of life, and especially an improvement 
of air space within the dwelling, tends to reduce mortality. In 
the opinion of the International Congress on Tuberculosis held 
in London in 1901, overcrowding, defective ventilation, damp and 
general insanitary conditions in the houses of the working classes 
diminish the chance of curing consumption, and aid in predisposing 
to and spreading the disease. A comparison between East and 



THE PROBLEM OF WEST LONDON 



77 



"West London undoubtedly confirms this conclusion. The figures 
for the two divisions are as follow : 

DEATH-EATE PEE 100,000 LIVING (1901). 



GROUP. 


PhthUig. 


other 1 i Other i Total of 

tubercular i Pneumonia, i respiratory | i classes of 

diseases. | diseases. j diseases. 

' 1 i 


West London . 
East London . 


151 
194 


16 
26 


115 
158 


200 
238 


482 
616 



A comparison of tj'pical boroughs in each of the four divisions 
of London discloses a similar result : 



DEATH-EATE PEE ] 


L 00,000 LIVING (1901). 




BOROUGH. 


1 

Phthisis. 


Other 

tuhercular 

diseases. 


Pneumonia. 


Other 

respiratory 

diseases. 


Total of 

4 classes of 

diseases. 


^St. Marylebone 
West London - Kensington 
(Paddington 


182 
137 
110 


23 
10 
16 


120 

100 

97 


217 
177 
177 


542 
424 
400 


( Shoreditch 
East London ■{ Bethnal Green 
( Stepney . 


215 
216 
210 


30 
21 
31 


180 
183 
188 


291 
254 
239 


716 
674 
668 


( Southwark 
South London-^ Bermondsey 
(Lambeth . 


248 
176 
166 


28 
33 
21 


199 
237 
139 


245 
226 
193 


720 
672 
519 


j^Holborn . 
North London^ Finsbury . 
(St. Pancras 


277 
223 

184 


12 

22 
14 


157 
185 
153 


279 
281 
179 


725 
711 
530 



CONTRASTS OF WEALTH AND POVERTY 

But while the West London boroughs, considered as complete 
areas, compare thus favourably with other parts of London, it is 
to be remembered that the boroughs themselves are strangely 
heterogeneous in their character, and contain within their borders 
the most violent and startling contrasts. It is precisely these 
contrasts which make the religious problem of West London so 
difficult and complicated, and which distinguish it as a thing 
apart. In the central districts especially — and in this category I 
include Westminster, St. Marjdebone, and parts of Paddington— are 
found aU. the ordinary facts of social life in crowded districts, — 
insanitary dwellings, irregular emploj^ment, sweated wages, and 
chronic physical weakness, intensified by higher rents and a 
relatively higher cost of living ; and, what is worse still, aggravated 
by the close proximity of those extremes of wealth and poverty 



78 THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 

which are the special and peculiar miseries of West London. As 
I have elsewhere pointed out, in the east and south of London 
life has its deep and extended miseries, but this is not one of 
them. There the colour of life, if deadly dull, is more even ; it 
knows nothing of those violent extremes of luxury and want which 
fix irrevocably and hopelessly before the worker's eyes the gulf 
which divides the classes. 

Westminster. — Let me take as a first illustration the City of 
Westminster. I will omit from the illustration the poverty of 
the eastern parts of the borough, such as St. Clement Danes, 
St. Mary-le-Strand, and St. Paul, Covent Garden, and compare the 
more distinctively western portions of the borough only. Nothing 
could well be more abrupt and startling than the contrast between 
(say) Soho and the adjacent district of St. George's, Hanover 
Square. In the district of Soho, taking an area with a popula- 
tion of more than 30,000, the percentage of poverty has been 
estimated at 42-4. In certain parts of the district it is even higher. 
One area, which includes a population of about 6,000 persons, 
has a poverty percentage of 46'6, while another, with a larger 
population, actually shows a percentage of 51-6. In the neigh- 
bouring district of Mayfair, on the other hand, the percentage of 
poverty is only 2"7 ; while in one area, representing a population 
of 4,000 persons, it is only 0'5. In Belgravia again the percentage 
is 6. In Mayfair the upper classes form 19 per cent, of the 
population. In St. James and Soho they form 7 per cent., and 
in St. John's, Westminster, but 2 per cent. On the other hand, 
in St. John's parish the "poor" form nearly 46 per cent, of the 
population, and the " crowded " 62 per cent. Taking the City of 
Westminster as a whole, the death-rate for all ages during the 
fifty-three weeks ending January 3rd, 1903, was 16 per 1,000 of 
population, but in the St. John ward it was 23-3, and in the 
Strand ward 24-3. In the Conduit ward, on the other hand, it 
was only 9-8, and in the ward of Knightsbridge St. George 9-6. 
The deaths of infants under one year of age during the same 
period averaged 127 per 1,000 births for the borough as a whole, 
but 163 in the Strand ward and 230 in Charing Cross ward. 
In the Grosvenor ward they averaged only 96 per 1,000, and in 
Knightsbridge St. George 92. Altogether it may be said that no 
other borough is so strangely and even startlingly heterogenous 
in its character, although violent contrasts abound in each of the 
central West London boroughs. 



THE PROBLEM OF WEST LONDON 79 

St. Marylebone. — In St. Marylebone the population as a whole 
is more settled than is the case in Westminster, but extremes 
of wealth and poverty meet here also. In the parish of Christ 
Church, especially, they lie very near together. According to 
Mr. Booth, 37 per cent, of the population of that parish belong 
to the "central" (i.e., not crowded) class, while 31 per cent, are 
"poor" and 51 per cent, "crowded." That parish indeed ap- 
proximates very closely to certain parts of Westminster. There 
is the same absence of ordinary family life among the lodging- 
house people on the one hand, and a similar tendency among 
the wealthy flat-dwellers on the other, each of these classes 
forming a large element in the population of the district. Taking 
the borough as a whole, the death-rate in 1902 was 18 per 1,000. 
In the sub-district of All Souls it was only 13*9, whereas in Christ 
Church it was 19*2, and in St. John 22. 

Paddtngton. — Paddington is a wealthier district than St. Mary- 
lebone, having indeed, a higher average rateable value than any 
other London district. Of the inhabitants of the borough, how- 
ever, 51 per cent, live in houses of less than five rooms. In the 
registration sub-district of St. Mary the proportion is 61 per cent., 
whereas in the sub-district of St. John the proportion is only 21 
per cent. If we take separate wards the force of the contrast is 
much more striking. In the Harrow Road ward 75 per cent, of 
the population live in homes of less than five rooms, while in 
Lancaster Gate West the proportion is only 15 per cent. In 
Lancaster Gate East only 1 per cent, of the population live in one- 
room tenements, whereas in Church ward more than 15 per cent, 
live in one-room tenements. In the matter of overcrowding the 
contrast is equally striking. In the two wards of Lancaster Gate 
(East and West) the proportion of overcrowded persons is 2*15 
and 2-58 respectively. In Church ward, on the other hand, it 
is no less than 32'76. The death-rate for the borough in 1901 
was 14*26 per 1,000 of the population. In Lancaster Gate East 
it was 7-67, in Lancaster Gate West 9"08, but in Church ward it 
was 18-37. 

Kensington. — The word Kensington has come to be almost a 
synonym for wealth, and the marvellous development of the district 
during the latter half of the last century almost justifies it. Eighty 
years ago the rateable value of Kensington was only £75,000. 
Thirty years later it was just over a quarter of a million. Twenty 
years later still (1873) it had grown to nearly a million, while at 



80 THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 

the present time it is well over two and a quarter millions. Kensing- 
ton is also remarkable as possessing a larger proportion of persons 
of independent means than any other borough in the kingdom. 
But great as the wealth of the district is, it yet has within its 
borders patches of poverty and vicious squalor which equal almost 
anything to be found elsewhere. In the sub-district known as 
Kensington Town, which comprises more than 70 per cent, of the 
population of the borough, the percentage of poverty is estimated 
by Mr. Booth at 32 "8, although it is also the district containing 
the second largest proportion of " upper classes," coming, indeed, 
next to Mayfair. The population is poorest and most dense in 
the north of the borough, the wards of St. Charles, Golborne, and 
Norland offering the most striking contrast to the wealth of the 
districts in South Kensington. No greater antithesis to the wealth 
and refinement that are usually associated with "West London is, 
indeed, anywhere to be found than that presented by what is 
known as the " Notting-Dale " area in the Norland ward. That 
area comprises a population of some 4,000 people who are more 
vicious and criminal than poor, and whose habits and manner 
of life constitute one of the gravest challenges to Christian civilisa- 
tion that could be found in all London. During the last seven 
years the death-rate for all ages in the area has averaged nearly 
49 per 1,000, rising in 1899 as high as 69 per 1,000. In 1902 it 
was 45-5, as against 15-2 per 1,000 for the borough as a whole. 
The rate of infant mortality was actually 427 per 1,000 births, 
as against 148 for the entire borough, and that this was not 
exceptional is shown by the fact that during the six years 
1896-1901 it averaged 447 per 1,000 births! It is clear, there- 
fore, that even Kensington presents the same startling contrasts 
that mark the other districts in West London. 

But enough has been said to show the reality and force of 
these contrasts. It remains to consider some of the other directions 
in which exceptional social conditions complicate the task of the 
Churches, and act more or less directly as disintegrating forces 
where morals and religion are concerned. 

INDUSTRIAL CONDITIONS 

Industrially the majority of the West London districts are 
singularly invertebrate in their character, the prevailing trades, 
in the central districts especially, being " season " trades which, 



THE PROBLEM OF WEST LONDON 81 

while ministering to luxury, intensify the pressure of poverty and 
attract a large number of casual workers for whom no adequate per- 
manent provision is possible. The dress and food trades are the 
predominant trades in the central districts, although " conveyance " 
(-i.e., railway employment, carriers, carmen, cabmen, etc.) accounts 
for a largo proportion of the occupied males in all the West 
London boroughs. " General labourers " are few in typical districts 
such as Westminster, Paddington, and St. Marylebone, but more 
numerous in the outlying districts of Chelsea, Fulham, and Hammer- 
smith, where the building trades occupy a large proportion of the 
male workers. Industrially, Fulham and Hammersmith and parts 
of Chelsea more nearly approximate to what may be called normal 
industrial conditions than any other districts of West London. 
The central districts of the West also abound in those who may 
be called " industrial parasites " — i.e., the miscellaneous army of 
"touts," "loafers," and "casuals" who are attracted by the wealth 
of the West End, and who succeed, by wonderful and almost 
incredible resource, in eking out a sort of parasitic existence, 
feeding upon the follies and vices and pleasures of wealthy West 
London. Included in this large army are hotel, theatrical, and 
music-hall employes, cab " touts," sandwich-men, and " dossers " 
of every description — a class who do more than is generally 
supposed to vitiate the moral, as well as the industrial, life of 
the districts in which they are found. 

The predominant women's trades are, of course, the dress and 
food trades, and these, with laundry work and domestic service, 
practically absorb all the female workers. In respect of conditions 
of employment, women in the West suffer more than men. Work 
(outside of domestic service) is extremely intermittent and, to 
a large extent, badly paid, while the hours of work are often 
excessive. A brief analysis of the industrial conditions in the 
various districts will serve to show the prevailing conditions and 
afford a clue to part of the problem which the social and religious 
worker has to face. 

Westminster. — In this borough the largest proportion (19 per 
cent.) of the male workers are employed in domestic ofEces or 
services (i.e., hotels, restaurants, lodging-houses, private domestic 
service, etc.). The food and drink trades come next, occupying 
12 per cent, of the male workers, while the conveyance of men, 
goods, and messages employs Hi per cent. The commercial occu- 
pations employ 7 per cent, of the male workers, and the dress 

6 



82 THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 

trades 6 per cent. Of the female workers, domestic offices and 
services account for no less than 62 per cent., the dress trades 
for 16i per cent., and the food trades for 6 per cent. 

St. Marylebone. — In this borough the prevailing occupations 
among male workers are " conveyance " (-i.e., railways, carriers, 
cabmen, etc.), 17 per cent. ; the food and drink trades, 11 per cent. ; 
building, etc., 11 per cent. ; domestic offices or services, 10 per 
cent. ; dress trades, 7 per cent. ; commercial occupations, 7 per cent. ; 
while the various professions also account for 7 per cent, of the 
occupied males. Of the female workers, domestic offices and services 
claim 54 per cent., the dress trades 23 per cent., while 8 per cent, 
follow various professions. 

Paddingtox. — The largest proportion of the male workers in 
this district (22 per cent.) are employed in " conveyance." Building, 
etc., occupies 13 per cent. ; the food and drink trades, 10 per cent. ; 
commercial occupations, 10 per cent. ; and domestic offices and 
services, nearly 7 per cent. The various professions occupy another 
7 per cent, of the male workers. Among the women workers the 
two principal occupations are domestic offices and services and the 
dress trades. The former occupy 61 per cent, of the female workers, 
and the latter 17 per cent. 

Kensington, —Here, again, "conveyance" employs the largest 
proportion of male workers — namely, nearly 17 per cent. The 
building trades and " works of construction " occupy 13 per cent. ; 
food, drink, and lodging, 10 per cent. ; domestic offices and services, 
10 per cent, ; commercial occupations, 9^ per cent. ; while Sh per 
cent, follow professions. Of the female workers, the overwhelming 
proportion (75 per cent.) are employed in domestic offices and 
services, while the dress trades employ 9 per cent. 

Chelsea. — As we get nearer the outer ring of London the 
character of the prevailing industries changes. Chelsea has not 
a very determinate industrial identity. The various forms of 
"conveyance" occupy 16 per cent, of the male workers, while 
building and works of construction occupy 15 per cent. Domestic 
offices and services account for 11 per cent., and the food and 
drink trades for lOi per cent. "General labourers" are more 
numerous, and represent 5^ per cent, of the occupied males. Of 
the women workers, domestic offices and services claim 63 per cent. 
(52 per cent, are domestic servants proper, 5 per cent, laundry 
workers, and 4 per cent, charwomen), while the dress trades claim 
nearly 17 per cent. 



THE PROBLEM OF WEST LONDON 83 

FuLHAM. — In this borough we approach more nearly to normal 
industrial conditions. The building and cognate trades claim the 
highest proportion of male workers — namely, 19 per cent. " Con- 
veyance " occupies 17^ per cent., the food and drink trades 11 per 
cent., and commercial occupations 9| per cent. General labourers 
form 5 per cent, of the male workers. Of the women workers, 
53 per cent, are employed in domestic offices and services (33 
per cent, are domestic servants proper, and 15 per cent, laundry 
workers), 19 per cent, in the dress trades, while the various pro- 
fessions claim the third largest proportion — viz., 10| per cent. 

Hammersmith. — In this, the last of the West London boroughs, 
the chief trades are " building and works of construction," which 
occupy 17^ per cent, of the male workers, and " conveyance," which 
occupies 15| per cent. Commercial occupations engage the energies 
of nearly 11 per cent., and the food and drink trades of 9^ per cent^ 
The metal trades employ 6 per cent., while general labourers are 
more numerous than elsewhere in West London, forming nearly 
7 per cent, of the male workers. Of the female workers, 60 per 
cent, are employed in domestic offices and services (30 per cent, 
are domestic servants proper, and 20 per cent, laundry workers), 
and 18 per cent, in the dress trades, while 10 per cent, follow 
professions. 

COMPAEISON WITH EAST AND SOUTH LONDON 
It may be of interest to compare the more typical of the fore- 
going districts with typical East and South London districts. For 
this purpose I select the boroughs of Stepney and Southwark. 

Stepney. — In this borough the professions claim less than 2 per 
cent, of the occupied males, and domestic offices and services only 
1 per cent. Commercial occupations, again, engage less than 5 per 
cent. The chief industries are " conveyance," which occupies 23 
per cent. ; and the dress trades, which employ 20 per cent. Food, 
drink, and lodging account for 11 per cent. ; while building (5| per 
cent.), the metal trades (4| per cent.), and general labourers (6 per 
cent.), are the principal remaining trades. Among the female 
workers the cheap dress trades occupy 28 per cent., domestic 
offices and services 24|- per cent. (13 per cent, are domestic 
servants proper, 6 per cent, charwomen, and 4 per cent, laundry 
workers), while food, drink, and lodging occupy 12| per cent. 

Southwark. — In this borough the industries are more varied as 
well as more evenly distributed. " Conveyance " occupies one-fifth 



84 THE EELIGIOUS LIFE OP LONDON 

of the total number of male workers, but tliis is the only large or 
predominant industr3\ The food and drink trades occupy 10 per 
cent, of the male workers, the building trades nearly 10 per cent., 
the metal trades 8 per cent., and the printing trades nearly 7 per 
cent. Commercial occupations engage less than 6 per cent., and 
the various professions 2-|- per cent. Of the female workers, 
domestic offices and services occupy nearly 27 per cent. (12 per 
cent, are domestic servants proper, 6^ per cent, are laundry 
workers, and 5 per cent, charwomen), the dress trades 25 per 
cent., printing and bookbinding 15 per cent., and the food and 
drink trades 11 per cent. 

The effect of the comparison, so far as it concerns the male 
workers, is to show (1) the much higher percentage of the profes- 
sional classes in the West London boroughs, the average being 
just over 6 per cent., as against 2 per cent, in the East and 
South; (2) the higher proportion of the commercial classes, the 
average being 9 per cent, against 6 per cent. ; (3) the far higher 
proportion of men engaged in domestic offices and services, the 
average percentage being 9 in the "West as against 1 in Stepney 
and 2 in Southwark ; and (4) the almost identically similar pro- 
portion of male workers engaged in the food, drink, and lodging 
trades in the West, East, and South. So far as the female workers 
are concerned the outstanding feature of the comparison is the 
extraordinary preponderance of women engaged in domestic offices 
and services in the West. Taking the whole of the seven West 
London boroughs the average is 61 per cent., as against 24 in 
Stepney and 27 in Southwark. This preponderance, and also the 
relatively higher proportion of men servants in the West, are 
facts to be remembered when analysing and comparing the 
statistics of church attendance. 



RESULTS OF THE EELIGIOUS CENSUS 

So much by way of rapid survey of the general social and 
economic conditions of the districts. Something remains to be 
said as to the general moral conditions, but this may with advan- 
tage be deferred until we have analysed the actual records of 
church attendance. In considering these for particular localities, 
one fact which applies with special force to West London must be 
allowed for. The attendance at particular churches is not always 
a sure test of the religious habits of the local residents. Many of 



THE PEOBLEM OF WEST LONDON 85 

the churches in "West London draw a large proportion of their 
congregations from places outside the limits of the parish or 
district in which they are situated — the fame of the preacher, or 
some special feature in the service, coupled with a certain extra- 
parochial feeling which widely prevails in West London, chiefly 
accounting for this. For this reason stress cannot uniformly be 
laid upon the records of particular churches. But conditions tend 
to equalise themselves when we consider larger districts, and it is 
this broad survey that I wish to take. 

The fact that the Census had to be spread over a long period 
of time was bound in our uncertain climate to affect some districts 
injuriously, and it happened that adverse conditions fell quite dis- 
proportionately to the lot of West London. Of the seven boroughs 
in the West London group, three — viz., Kensington, Hammersmith, 
and Fulham — had tlioroughly wet days, rain falling heavily through- 
out the day, while a fourth — Chelsea — was enumerated on a showery 
day. Fulham and Hammersmith were peculiarly unfortunate. On 
the date of the original census a fog prevailed from noon till 
night. The church attendance in these boroughs was therefore 
re-enumerated on June 14th, and on this date rain fell unceasingly 
all day. As the total number of boroughs in London experiencing 
thoroughly wet days was only six out of twenty-nine. West 
London, with a proportion of three out of seven, was particularly 
unfortunate. On the other hand, three of the West London 
boroughs — viz., Paddington, Westminster, and St. Marylebone — 
had fine days. In London as a whole, fourteen out of twenty-nine 
boroughs had fine days. If we pay no regard for the moment to 
general social conditions and the presumption that arises out of 
them, the position of the West London boroughs compared with 
London as a whole is not unsatisfactory. Omitting from the 
comparison (as we properly may) the City of London, St. 
Marylebone heads the list for London with a ratio of 1 person 
in every 3* attending some place of religious worship; West- 
minster is fourth with a ratio of 1 in 3-68; Kensington is eighth 
with a ratio of 1 in 3-90 ; Chelsea is eleventh with a ratio of 
1 in 4-11 ; and Paddington is fourteenth with a ratio of 1 in 4-55. 
That is to say, five out of seven boroughs are included in the 
first half of the list. On the other hand. Hammersmith is 
twenty-fifth in the list with a ratio of 1 in 6-23, and Fulham 
is actually last with a ratio of 1 in 7*41. If general social and 

* No deduction is made for " Twicers " in any of the ratios here given. 



86 THE EELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 

economic conditions count for canything, as we know they do, in 
affecting churcli attendance, we should expect the two last-named 
boroughs to be lowest in the West London group, but their actual 
record establishes a relative position that is obviously too bad to 
be true, and the figures suggest that the peculiarly bad weather 
conditions under which the census was taken have stamped both 
boroughs with a relative inferiority that is not wholly deserved. 
Similarly, the presumption is that Kensington has suffered in 
comparison with Westminster, although the latter borough un- 
doubtedly also gains from the non-local character of many of the 
worshippers in its churches. The influence of the weather is 
seen by a close analysis of the returns for all the London 
boroughs. It is not, of course, a dominating factor, but it is 
clearly one uf several factors that must be allowed for. It is less 
apparent than the more powerful influence of social and economic 
conditions, but conjoined with these it explains much that is 
otherwise difficult of explanation. In the table on page 87 an 
attempt has been made to indicate broadly the effect of both 
weather and social and economic conditions (so far as these 
latter are suggested by overcrowding) upon church attendance. 
It is not suggested that the relation is uniformly clear and direct, 
or that other influences are not present. In some instances the 
relation is certainly obscure, but, allowance being made for other 
factors, there would seem to be a broad relation, especially 
between the social conditions of the people and their religious 
habits. 

Now if we divide the list into two equal divisions, taking 
the fourteen boroughs with the best ratios of church attendance 
as the first group, and the fourteen with the lowest ratio of 
church attendance as the second group, we have this interesting 
fact, that the general social and economic conditions are decidedly 
superior in the first group where the church attendance is highest. 
In the first fourteen boroughs the average proportion of over- 
crowding is 11 per cent. In the second group of fourteen the 
average proportion of overcrowding is 20 per cent. The com- 
parison, if we take individual boroughs, is not at once decisive, 
since certain boroughs in the first group have a comparatively 
high proportion of overcrowded persons within their borders. But 
an analysis of the returns shows that in these cases the high 
attendances are due, not to the overcrowded classes, but to the 
prosperous classes in those boroughs. This is certainly true of 



THE PROBLEM OF WEST LONDON 



87 



the four West London boroughs — namely, St. Marylebone, West- 
minster, Kensington, and Chelsea. Each of these boroughs has a 
comparatively high proportion of overcrowded persons in its 
population, but its churches are filled not by these overcrowded 
persons, but chiefly by the prosperous classes within its borders. 
Without pressing the point unduly or attempting to suggest an 
absolutely precise relation of cause and effect, it is a significant 
fact that all the typical overcrowded and poverty-ridden boroughs 
of the East and South are found in the group where the ratios 
of church attendance are lowest, while the prosperous suburban 
and wealthy West London boroughs are found in the group 
where the ratios of church attendance are highest. Paddington, 
though only just inside the first group, has, nevertheless, a 
proportion of nearly 14 per cent, of overcrowded persons. 





Ratio of 


Per cent, of 


Month 




BOROUGH. 


religious 


population 


when 


Weather. 




attendance. 


overcrowded. 


census taken 




St. Marylebone 


1 in 3-00 


21-12^ 




March 


Fine. 


Stoke Newington . 


1 in 304 


5-52 




February 


Dull morning, damp evening. 


Lewisham 


1 in 3-04 


2-67 


^.d 


March 


Fine. 


City of Westminster 


1 in 3-58 


13 03 


S 


January 


Fine. 


Woolwich 


1 in 3-68 


6-60 


w 


April 


Fine. 


Greenwich 


1 in 372 


8-30 




March 


Fine. 


Hampstead 


1 in 386 


6-37 




November 


Heavy rain all day. 


Kensington 


1 in 3-90 


14-84 


November 


Heavy rain all day. 


Hackney . 


1 in 3-92 


1018 


03 


March 


Fine. 


Camberwell . 


1 in 3-99 


9-65 


ci3 


February 


Fine morning, wet evening. 


Chelsea . 


1 in 4-11 


14-43 


03 

> 


May 


Showery day. 


Wandsworth . 


1 in 4-13 


4-46 


< 


January 


Fine morning, wet evening. 


Holborn . 


1 in 4-16 


25-05 




June 


Fine. 


Paddington 


1 in 4-55 


13-57, 




December 


Fine. 


Islington . 


1 in 4-57 


17-00^1 




January 


Fair day (neither wet nor fine). 


Bermondsey . 


1 in 4-68 


19-66 




^larch 


Fine morning, wet evening. 


Ijambeth . 


1 in 4-78 


12-22 


-tJ- 


December 


Warm, damp day. 


Stepney . 


1 in 5-06 


33-21 




June 


Fine. 


Southwark 


1 in 5-06 


22-35 


o 


February 


Fine morning, raw evening. 


Finsbury . 


1 in 5-10 


35-22 


03 


May 


Fine. 


St. Pancras 


1 in 5-49 


23-98 


P4 


December 


Warm, damp day. 


Deptford. 


1 in 5-63 


9-06 


April 


Heavy rain all day. 


Poplar 


1 in 5-71 


16-41 


03 


February 


Fine. 


Bethnal Green 


1 in 6-16 


29-62 


^ 


April 


Fine. 


Hammersmith 


1 in 6-23 


11-76 


> 


June 


Heavy rain all day. 


Battersea 


1 in 6-43 


10-89 


< 


December 


Fine. 


Shoreditch 


1 in 6-89 


29-95 




May 


Fine. 


Fulham . 


1 in 7-41 


10-85, 




June 


Heavy rain all day. 



88 THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 

PROPORTION OF POPULATION ATTENDING RELIGIOUS 

SERVICES 

But while West London compares thus favourably with London 
as a whole an analysis of the figures makes it clear that the 
Churches unitedly attract but a small proportion of the population 
to their services. Out of an aggregate population of nearly 950.000 
persons, only 215,000 persons, or 22-7 per cent., attend any place 
of worship. If we make allowance for "Twicers" the proportion 
is only 18-4 per cent. The Church of England attracts far the 
highest proportion of the population, its aggregate congregations 
(making no allowance for " Twicers ") amounting to 12-6 per cent. 
of the total population. The Nonconformist Churches* attract 
6*8 per cent, of the population, the Roman Catholic Church 3'2 
per cent., while other religious societies and services attract 1"2 per 
cent, of the total population. 

But of course the aggregate attendance is misleading. To get 
at the true condition of things it is necessary to make allowance 
for " Twicers," and this is done in the following table which gives 
the net figures for each borough in West London. The proportion 
of persons actually attending a place of religious worship on 
Simday, ranges, it will be seen, from 26 per cent, of the popula- 
tion in St. Marylebone to 11 per cent, in Fuiham: 



BOROUGH. 


Proportion of separate persons 

(after deductinR " Twicers") 

attendinc public worship. 

Per cent, of Population. 


St. Marylebone 

Westminster 

Kensington 

Chelsea 

Paddington 

Hammersmith 

Fuiham . 






26-1 
22-3 
20-6 
19-8 
16-V 
13-2 

iro 



The measure of the religious influence of the different Churches, 
so far as this is indicated by church attendance, is set forth in 
the following tabic. It will be noticed that in the wealthy 
boroughs the proportion of the population attracted to the Church 

* It may he well to state that throughout these conii)arisons the Nonconformist 
Churches include the Presbyterians, Congregationalists, Baptists, Methodists, Society 
of Friends, the Brethren, Salvation Army, and Unitarians. The last-named are, 
however, comparatively few in West London, and arc found in two boroughs only. 



THE PROBLEM OF WEST LONDON 



89 



of England is more than twice as great as that reached by the 
Nonconformist Churches. In Kensington the proportion is actually 
three times as great. In Hammersmith, however, the proportions 
are equal, 

PROPORTION OF PERSONS (AFTER DEDUCTING "TWICERS") 
ATTENDING PUBLIC WORSHIP. 



BOROUGH. 


Church of England. 
Per cent, of 
population. 


NonconformiBt Churches. 
Per cent, of 
population. 


Roman Catholics. 
Per cent, of 
population. 


Others. 
Per cent, of 
population. 


St. Marvlebone 


13-1 


7-6 


3 3 


2-1 


Westminster . 


13-0 


bTi 


3-2 


0-6 


Kensington . 
Chelsea . 


11-9 
10-9 


3-8 
5-0 


3-9 
2-2 


ro 

17 


Paddington . 
Hammersmith 


9-6 
5'5 


4-8 
5-3 


1-2 

1-7 


1-1 

0-7 


Fulham . 


5-8 


3-4 


13 


0-5 



The figures are serious enough to startle the most inveterate 
optimist. It is impossible to explain them away. They contain 
an indictment as well as a challenge, and demand the most serious 
consideration of the Churches. The gravity of the aggregate 
figures makes denominational comparisons almost irrelevant, but 
the Nonconformist Churches especially will do well to consider if 
exceptional efforts are not required to enable them to fulfil their 
great responsibilities in "West London. The social conditions of 
the district, and especially its great wealth, are, it is true, largely 
unfavourable to them ; but on the other hand, there are in each of 
the West London boroughs large numbers of the classes to whom 
the freedom and spontaneity of a Nonconformist service have 
always specially appealed. The emplo^'^ees of the large business 
houses of the West alone provide unique opportunities for Non- 
conformist initiative and enterprise, for the overwhelming majority 
of these young men and young women are by birth and religious 
education Nonconformists, who have gravitated to London from 
the provinces. Experience has shown that a strong and vital 
message never fails to attract a congregation in West London, 
and its success is especially great where it is united with a real 
social sympathy and an appreciation of the solitariness which is 
the permanent portion of so many thousands of young men and 
young women in these districts. Certainly to have succeeded in 
attracting but 5 per cent, of the total population in so vast a 
district is a fact full of humiliation. Nor are the results of the 



90 



THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 



Census less humiliating to the Established Church of England. It 
is true that, compared with the Nonconformist Churches, the figures 
are more favourable ; but when regard is had to the prevalent 
social conditions and to the great advantages which a State 
Established Church naturally possesses in prestige and resources 
in such a district, the figures leave no room for complacency or 
satisfaction, but may well provoke earnest searchings of heart. 
To attract but some 10 per cent, of the population is not an 
achievement which will satisfy the devout earnestness of the West 
London clergy. 



PROPORTION OF ADULT POPULATION REACHED BY 
THE CHURCHES 

So far I have dealt with the total attendance ('i.e., of men, 
women, and children) at public services in "West London. It may 
be well to test the matter further by omitting children altogether 
from the inquiry, and confining the comparison to adults (i.e., 
persons of fifteen years and upwards). The following table gives 
for each borough the total number of adult worshippers during 
the day (after deducting "Twicers") and the percentage which 
they form of the total population. 



BOROUGH. 


Total 13111111)61 of adult 

worshippers (after 
deducting " Twicers "). 


Proportion per cent. 

of the 

adult population. 


St. Marylebone . 

Westminster 

Kensington . 

Chelsea 

Paddington . 

Hammersmith 

Fulham 






23,317 

31,992 

28,218 

9,946 

18,766 

9,970 

9,329 


23-2 
217 
21-1 
18-9 
17-2 
12-9 
10-4 



If the figures be compared with others given earlier in this 
article, it will be seen that in five of the boroughs — viz., St. 
Marylebone, Westminster, Chelsea, Hammersmith, and Fulham— the 
proportion of the adult population attending public worship is less 
than the proportion of the total population (i.e., adults and 
children together) ; while in two of the boroughs — viz., Kensington 
and Paddington — the proportion is slightly greater. The result 
of this further analysis is therefore to increase the conviction of 
comparative failure suggested by the earlier figures. 



THE PEOBLEM OF WEST LONDON 



91 



PEEPONDERANCE OF WOMEN AT EELIGIOUS 

SEEVICES 

A noticeable feature of the West London figures is the prepon- 
derance of women at the various religious services. It is most 
marked in the wealthy districts, and is notable at morning and 
evening services alike. If we take the aggregate number of adult 
attenders for the entire West London division, without regard to 
separate boroughs or separate churches, we find that both in the 
morning and in the evening the proportion of women is 66 per 
cent, of the total number of adult worshippers, whereas, taking 
the whole of the West London division, women form 58 per cent, 
only of the adult population. 

The subjoined table shows that the disproportion between the 
sexes is most noticeable in the case of the Church of England 
and the Eoman Catholic churches, and is less marked in the case 
of the Nonconformist churches, where, although the women largely 
preponderate, the proportion of men is relatively greater : 

WEST LONDON (Aggregate of Seven Boroughs). 
Proportion op Sexes in Adult Attenders. 



Church of England 
Nonconformist 
Eoman Catholics 
Others 



Proportion per cent, of 
Men. Women. 



31 

44 
30 
46 



69 
56 
70 
54 



Evening. 



Proportion per cent, of 
Men. Wonien. 



30 
40 
29 
37 



70 
60 
71 
63 



The number of female domestic servants may account in some 
small measure for this relative excess in the proportion of women 
in the congregations of the Church of England, for the wealthy 
servant-keeping class belong chiefly to the Church of England, 
and servants in AVest London tend to worship at the same churches 
as their employers — indeed, this is often made a condition of 
engagement. But this can be but a small part of the explanation, 
for the servants chiefly attend the evening service, whereas, as 
the following table shows, the disproportion in three boroughs — 
"i.e., St. Marylebone, Kensington, and Paddington — where servants 
are very numerous, is actually greater in the morning than in 
evening. This is particularly true of Kensington, where the 



92 



THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 



number of domestic servants in proportion to families is far 
higher than in any other district in London. 

PROPORTION PER CENT. OF ADULT ATTENDERS. 



BOROUGH. 


Morning. 


Evening. 


Church 


Nonconformist 


Church 


NonconformiBt 




of England. 


Ch\irche3. 


of England. 


Churches. 




Men. 


Women. 


Men. 


Women. 


Men. 


Women. 


Men. 


Women. 


St. Marylebone 


27 


73 


39 


61 


28 


72 


37 


63 


Westminster . 


38 


62 


45 


55 


32 


68 


39 


61 


Kensington 


26 


74 


41 


59 


29 


71 


35 


65 


Chelsea . 


31 


69 


37 


63 


29 


71 


35 


65 


Paddington 


25 


75 


43 


57 


30 


70 


42 


58 


Hammersmith . 


37 


63 


50 


50 


35 


65 


44 


56 


Fulham . 


40 


60 


46 


44 


37 


63 


46 


54 



If we compare the above figures with the relative distribution 
of the sexes in the adult population of the same boroughs, we 
see how great the preponderance of women is in the attendance 
at the churches : 





Proportions per cent. 


BOROUGH. 


of sexes in 
adult population. 




Men. 


Women. 


St. Marylebone .... 


42 


58 


Westminster .... 


46 


54 


Kensington 


36 


64 


Chelsea 


42 


58 


Paddington 


41 


59 


Hammersmith .... 


45 


55 


Fulham 


46 


54 



The deficiency of men in the congregations of the churches is 
certainly disquieting, and while the Nonconformist figures are 
far from satisfactory, in this respect at least they compare very 
favourably with those for the Church of England, where the 
failure to attract men is conspicuous enough to occasion concern. 
It is noteworthy that the highest proportion of men is found in 
the two boroughs (Hammersmith* and Fulham) where, as I have 
already pointed out, the industrial conditions are more normal 
than elsewhere in West London, and where the distinctively artisan 
class is relatively more numerous. 

* The morning figures for Westminster (Church of England) show a higher 
proportion of men than those for Hammersmith, but this is owing to the Guards' 
Chapels at Wellington Parracks and Chelsea Barracks, and to Holy Trinity, 
Knightsbridgc. 



THE PROBLEM OF WEST LONDON 93 

CONCLUSION 

In summing up the results of the Religious Census in West 
London, it is but fair to urge that, while the figures undoubtedly 
suggest comparative failure on the part of the Churches, the moral 
and social conditions which prevail in the district present excep- 
tional difficulties to the religious worker. West London is really 
the outstanding challenge to civilisation and to religion. The 
questions it provokes cut deeper than the questions provoked by 
any other area in Christendom. I have tried to indicate the part 
which poverty, overcrowding, and exceptional industrial conditions 
play in complicating the religious problem. It remains only to 
suggest the greater and more difficult obstacles for which the 
wealth of the districts is responsible. That the responsibility is 
not always direct may be admitted; but the indirect influence of 
ill-spent wealth in vitiating the moral atmosphere of a district is 
indubitable. A few years ago I pointed out that in West London 
" Evil ceases to be a theory and is subtler and deeper than fact. 
It surrounds one ever as a subtle and penetrating atmosphere." 
The years that have passed since I wrote those words have 
certainly not diminished their truth and force. It is not that 
virtue and true religion do not find place in the life of the district. 
It is not that the standards of personal life are not, in tens of 
thousands of instances, lofty and pure. It is not that all wealth 
is held and used with an inadequate sense of social responsibility. 
It is simply that the dominant, the characteristic note of life in 
West London is unspiritual and materialistic. So subtle and 
pervasive and penetrating is this note of materialism that it 
seems sometimes as if all life were vibrant with it. Unbridled 
luxury must always be a vicious and disintegrating influence in 
the life of a community, especially where, as in West London, a 
considerable portion of the population lives merely to minister 
to and maintain it. And herein we have the explanation of that 
essentially unspiritual and often actively vicious atmosphere which 
besets and thwarts the religious worker in West London. The 
growth — for the fact of growth must be admitted — of frankly 
vicious standards of conduct and life in West London is a serious and 
disquieting fact. The increase in prostitution is indisputable, and 
the fact that it is allowed to flaunt itself publicly and shamelessly 
in the streets must be held responsible for an amount of moral 
disaster which no community ought to be able to contemplate 



94 THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 

witliout searching misgivings and shame. But the prostitution 
that is ostentatious in the street is but a part of the evil. The 
"West London boroughs contain streets and blocks of flats which 
are largely — in the case of some buildings almost entirely — occupied 
by kept women and prostitutes. In the south-west ^^oi'tions of 
Westminster, in Pimlico, Chelsea, West Brompton, and especially 
Fulham, the evil is plainly apparent. Now and again local 
authorities take action, but the evil does not abate. It has a 
deeper hold upon West London than ever before, and unless the 
ideals of life can be raised, and the religious motive be powerfully 
appealed to and enforced, recovery is hopeless. The causes of the 
evil lie deep in moral facts, and in the investigation of these facts 
the Churches may find the message that they require for the 
religious conquest of West London. 

But vice is not the outstanding fact in the life of West London 
nor is it the chief difficulty which the Churches have to overcome. 
The religious instincts of the people have been dulled by other 
influences. It must be remembered that West London is rapidly 
becoming the pleasure-ground not merely of England but of 
Europe, and this fact has an important bearing upon religious 
experience and work. It helps to create an atmosphere unfavour- 
able to religious work by fostering ideals that conflict with the 
simpler and more strenuous ideals which religion inspires. 

In these and similar facts * lies the special difficulty of religious 
work in West London. They affect not one class only, but all 
classes in varying degree, for the habits of the rich inHuence the 
habits of the less rich and ultimately the habits of the poor. 
Certain it is that the shadow of artificial and materialistic ideals 
rests upon all classes of the population in the district. But the 
disease suggests the remedy. The deeper the analysis is pushed 
the more certain the conclusion becomes that in West London at 
least the instrument required is not a ^method but a Tnessage. 
Methods no doubt are important, and new ones will have to be 
devised to supplement the old. In such a district — to give but 

• Had space permitted, mention might also have been made of the large foreign 
element which crowds certain parts of the district. In the boroughs grouped as 
*' West London " there are 25,000 foreigners. In the City of Westminster alone 
there are no fewer than 12,000, representing 6 J per cent, of the population. In 
the Regent Ward they form 18 per cent, of the population ; in the Great Marlboro' 
Ward 21 per cent. ; and in the St. Anne Ward 28 per cent. This foreign element 
is largely and avowedly irreligious, and its influence cannot be ignored. Its habits, 
traditions, and ideals play a part in the creation of the moral atmosphere of the 
district. 



THE PROBLEM OF WEST LONDON 95 

one example— every theatre, music-liall, and concert-hall should 
long ago have been called into requisition for Sunday services 
by the Churches. But the invention of new methods is as 
nothing in comparison with the discovery of the right message. 
To re-discover for the people of West London the meaning and 
value and ultimate significance of life is the real problem set 
before the Churches. 



\ 



Borough of Marylebon^ 

CHURCH OF ENGLAND 







MORNING. 






EVENING. 




Total 


CHURCH. 




















Men. 


Women. 


Chldm. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldm. 


Total. 


Day. 


St. Mary-le-Bone, Maryle- 




















bone Road 


164 


436 


246 


846 


199 


399 


93 


691 


1,537 


Parish Chapel, High Street 


24 


48 


33 


105 


7 


17 


15 


39 


144 


All Souls', Langham Place 


139 


411 


111 


661 


202 


508 


80 


790 


1,451 


Christ Church, Stafford St. 


41 


131 


233 


405 


40 


154 


57 


251 


656 


All Saints', Margaret St. 


101 


296 


60 


457 


73 


176 


28 


277 


734 


Holy Trinity, Marylebone 




















Road 


158 


491 


125 


774 


221 


591 


127 


939 


1,7K 


St. Andrew's, Wells Street . 


15.3 


289 


59 


501 


126 


259 


186 


571 


1,072 


St. Cyprian's, Glentworth St. 
St. Barnabas', Bell Street . 


6 


53 


7 


66 


12 


66 


3 


81 


147 


11 


15 


108 


134 


20 


30 


55 


105 


239 


St. James', Westmoreland 




















Street .... 


27 


68 


30 


125 


31 


40 


13 


84 


209 


St. Luke's, Nutford Place . 


36 


103 


49 


188 


57 


i 1 


45 


179 


367 


St. Mark's, Hamilton Terr. 


108 


408 


178 


694 


99 


313 


96 


508 


1,202 


St. Mark's, Marylebone Rd. 


111 


284 


77 


472 


36 


165 


56 


257 


729 


St. Mary's, Bryanston Sq. . 


85 


358 


292 


735 


60 


207 


55 


322 


1,057 


St. Matthew's, Carlisle St. . 


10 


19 


54 


83 


19 


35 


44 


98 


181 


St. Paul's. Gt. Portland St. 


45 


127 


23 


195 


38 


111 


16 


165 


360 


St. Paul's, Rossmore Road . 


29 


26 


100 


155 


40 


72 


36 


148 


303 


St. Paul's, Baker Street 


106 


385 


115 


606 


97 


358 


36 


491 


1,097 


St. Peter's, Vere Street 


281 


691 


61 


1,033 


177 


336 


61 


574 


1,607 


St. Thomas', Orchard Street, 


58 


162 


135 


355 


38 


103 


40 


181 


536 


Church of the Annunciation, 




















Old Quebec Street . 


125 


425 


103 


653 


42 


195 


41 


278 


931 


All Saints', Finchley Road . 


136 


186 


1.33 


455 


50 


125 


53 


228 


683 


St. John's, Park Road . 


35 


86 


33 


154 


41 


90 


41 


172 


326 


Emmanuel, Maida Hill 


48 


114 


195 


357 


52 


132 


115 


299 


656 


Brunswick Chapel, Upper 




















Berkeley Street 


79 


212 


48 


339 


158 


508 


217 


883 


1,222 


Total .... 


2,116 


5,824 


2,608 


10,548 


1,935 


5,067 


1,609 


8,611 


19,159 





Church of England Missions 










Good Shepherd's, Padding- 




















ton Street .... 


19 


29 


22 


70 


26 


49 


56 


131 


201 


All Souls' Church House . 


3 


4 


112 


119 


10 


25 


8 


43 


162 


All Souls' Schools 










12 


95 


17 


124 


124 


Trinity Church House . 


4 


5 


60 


69 










69 


St. Mark's, Charlotte Street 


2 


i 


114 


123 


1 


3 




6 


129 


St. Matthew's, Salisbury St. 










9 


35 


48 


92 


92 


Blackbird Coffee Tavern, 




















Church Army . 










69 


75 


13 


157 


157 


Reeve Mission, East Street'. 










3 


28 


25 


56 


56 


St. Stephen's, Henry Street 


5 


20 


184 


209 


24 


59 


26 


109 


318 


St. Stephen's, Charlbert St. 










19 






19 


19 


Emmanuel, North Street . 


1 


5 


142 


148 


9 


30 


243 


282 


430 


St. Mark's Schools 


3 


20 


228 


251 










251 


Total .... 


37 


90 


862 


989 


182 


399 


438 


1,019 


2,008 



GREEK CHURCH 



Russian Chapel, Welbeck St. 



17 



23 



23 



97 



98 



THE EELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 



WESLEYAN METHODIST CHURCH 



CHURCH. 


MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


for the 
Day. 


Brunswick Chapel, Balcombe 

Street 

Victoria, Barrow Hill Road 
Hinde Street 


29 
64 

85 


43 

70 

131 


41 
72 
96 


113 
206 
312 


42 
47 
99 


79 
103 
225 


55 
87 
65 


17G 
237 
389 


289 
443 
701 


Total .... 


178 


244 


209 


631 


188 


407 


207 


802 


1,433 



PRIMITIVE METHODIST CHURCH 



Seymour Place 



31 



35 



45 



111 



26 



55 



BAPTIST CHURCH 



Rehoboth, Riding House St. 


14 


9 


1 


24 


8 


14 


4 


26 


50 


Welsh, Castle Street East . 


39 


31 


4 


74 


171 


159 


30 


360 


434 


Trinity, John Street . 


29 


83 


57 


169 


40 


114 


2 


156 


325 


John Street .... 


8 


3 


12 


23 


12 


21 


14 


47 


70 


Shouldham Street 


14 


26 


15 


55 


19 


37 


7 


63 


118 


Enon, Church Street . 


34 


28 


73 


135 


47 


100 


41 


188 


323 


Mount Zion, Hill Street 


66 


102 


63 


231 


88 


190 


35 


313 


544 


Abbey Road .... 


152 


239 


69 


460 


178 


385 


50 


613 


1,073 


Total .... 


356 


521 


294 


1,171 


563 


1,020 


183 


1,766 


2,937 



Baptist Mission 



Henry Street 



38 



43 



12 



31 



19 



62 



CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 



Paddington ChajDel, Maryle- 

bone Road 
Greville Place 
St. John's Wood Terrace . 


140 
48 
19 


176 
74 
24 


126 

45 
48 


442 

167 

91 


180 
64 
28 


292 

136 

70 


145 

30 

155 


617 
230 
253 


1,059 
397 
344 


Total .... 


207 


274 


219 


700 


272 


498 


330 


1,100 


1,800 



Congregational Missions 



North Street 

Earl Street .... 


3 
3 


2 
2 


72 

84 


77 
89 


"35 


"60 


"49 


144 


77 
233 


Total .... 


6 


4 


156 


166 


35 


60 


49 


144 


310 





PRESBYTERIAN" CHURCH 










Marlborough Place 
Upper George Street . 


188 
176 


356 

424 


62 
64 


606 
663 


111 
180 


258 
456 


19 

46 


388 
682 


994 
1,345 


Total .... 


363 


780 


126 


1,269 


291 


714 


65 


1,070 


2,339 





UNITARIAN 


CHURCH 










Little Portland Street . 
People's Hall, 46, Bell St. . 


93 


217 
3 


13 
36 


323 
39 


21 
9 


22 
17 


4 
21 


47 
47 


370 
86 


Total . . . . 


93 


220 


49 


362 


30 


39 


25 


94 


456 



WEST LONDON— MARYLEBONE 

BRETHREN 



99 



CHURCH. 


MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 


















for the 




Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Day. 


FitzroyHall, Little Portland 




















Street .... 


14 


41 


1 


5G 


12 


20 


5 


37 


93 


Hyde Park Hall, Stourcliffe 




















Street .... 


21 


19 


2 


42 


218 


381 


91 


690 


732 


Nutford Place Hall . 


28 


75 


5 


108 


31 


73 


12 


116 


224 


Lisaon Grove Hall, 77, 




















Church Street . 


3 


7 


1 


11 


5 


12 


10 


27 


38 


Welbeck Hall, Marylebone 




















Lane 


21 


29 


4 


54 


15 


41 


4 


60 


114 


Portman Rooms, Baker St. 


33 


58 


12 


103 


19 


50 


3 


72 


175 


Union Hall, Carlisle Street. 


8 


9 


4 


21 


14 


43 


17 


74 


95 


Total .... 


128 


238 


29 


395 


314 


620 


142 


1,076 


1,471 



SALVATION ARMY 



Charles Lane, High Street . 
Gt. Western Hall, Burne St. 
Gee's Court . . . . 

Total . . . . 



6 


3 


9 


18 


7 


13 


8 


28 


107 






107 


315 
3 


1 


54 


316 
57 


113 


3 


9 


125 


325 


14 


62 


401 



46 
423 

57 

526 



FOREIGN PROTESTANT 


SERVICES 








54, Great Titchfield Street 
(German) .... 








' 


11 


23 




34 


34 



ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH 



St. Charles Borromeo, Upper 




















Ogle Street 


113 


294 


149 


556 


31 


57 


25 


113 


669 


Our Lady of the Rosary, 
Marylebone Road 




















209 


572 


315 


1,096 


51 


171 


25 


247 


1,343 


Church of the Annunciation 




















(French Chapel), Little 




















George Street . 


50 


170 


23 


243 


26 


85 


6 


117 


360 


St. James", Manchester Sq. . 


.311 


792 


301 


1,404 


70 


174 


20 


204 


1,668 


Ch. of Our Lady, Grove Rd. 


205 


502 


332 


1,039 


95 


209 


91 


395 


1,434 


Total .... 


888 


2,330 


1,120 


4,338 


273 


696 


167 


1,136 


5,474 







OTHER SERVICES 










Ogle St. Mews Ragged Sch. 






1 


4 


38 


104 


146 


146 


Polytechnic, Regent St. 






1 


354 


455 


89 


898 


898 


Ethical Soc, Steinway Hall 


86 


166 


... 1 252 










252 


Theosophical Society, 19, 






j 












Avenue Road . 






1 


6 


16 


2 


24 


24 


Gray's Yard Ragged School 




... 






11 


25 


143 


179 


179 


Gray's Yard Ragged Church 


204 


73 




277 










277 


House of Rest, 10, Finchley 




















Road 










4 


31 




35 


35 


Spiritualists, 51, Mortimer 




















Street .... 










76 


149 


7 


232 


232 


Medical Mission, 12, Bell St. 










29 


41 


18 


88 


88 


Shaftesbury Inst., Bell St. . 










21 


81 


3 


105 


105 


London City Mission, Town- 




















shend Cottages . 






... 




10 


33 


24 


67 


67 


London City Mission, Duke 




















Street Hall 


4 


3 




7 


35 


50 


23 


108 


115 


London City Mission, Little 




















Church Street . 










16 


64 


14 


94 


94 


Total .... 


294 


242 




536 


566 


983 


427 


1,976 


2,512 



100 



THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 



DENOMINATIONAL TOTALS 



DENOMINATION. 


MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 

for the 

Day. 


Wen. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 1 Total. 


Church of England 
„ „ Missions 

WesleyanMeth. Church 

Primitive Meth. Church 

Baptist Church . 
„ Mission 

Congregational Church. 
„ Missions 

Presbyterian Church , 

Unitarian Church . 

Brethren 

Salvation Army . 

Foreign Prot. Services . 

Pioman Catholic Church 

Greek Church 

Other Services 

Jewish Church 


2,116 

37 

178 

31 

356 

3 

207 

6 

363 

93 

128 

113 

888 

17 

294 

1,388 


5,824 

90 

244 

35 

521 

2 

274 
4 
780 
220 
238 
3 

2,330 

6 

242 

763 


2,608 
862 
209 

45 
294 

38 
219 
156 
126 

49 

29 
9 

1,120 
624 


10,548 
989 
631 
111 

1,171 

43 

700 

166 

1,269 
362 
395 
125 

4,338 

23 

536 

2,775 


1,935 
182 
188 

26 
563 

12 
272 

35 
291 

30 
314 
325 

11 
273 

566 


5,067 
399 
407 

55 
1,020 

31 
498 

60 
714 

39 
620 

14 

23 
696 

983 


1,609 

438 

207 

5 

183 

19 

330 

49 

65 

25 

142 

62 

167 

427 


8,611 

1,019 

802 

86 

1,766 

62 

1,100 

144 

1,070 

94 

1,076 

401 

34 

1,136 

1,976 


19,159 
2,008 
1,433 

197 
2,937 

105 
1,800 

310 
2,339 

456 
1,471 

526 

34 

5,474 

23 

2,512 

2,775 


Grand Totals . 


6,218 


11,576 


6,388 


24,182 


5,023 


10,626 


3,728 


19,377 


43,559 



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Women £■ 

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R«d = Morning. 






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Borough of Paddington 



CHURCH OF ENGLAND 



CHURCH. 


MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldin. 


Total, 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Day. 


All Saints' .... 


42 


133 


88 


263 


12 


59 


35 


106 


369 


Christ Church, Harrow Ed. 


31 


93 


124 


248 


41 


110 


120 


271 


519 


Christ Ch., Lancaster Gate. 


249 


1,034 


100 


1,383 


126 


268 


48 


442 


1,825 


Emmanuel .... 


29 


43 


121 


193 


25 


70 


42 


137 


330 


Holy Trinity 


104 


304 


41 


449 


67 


154 


44 


265 


714 


St. Augustine's . 


123 


310 


180 


613 


157 


329 


97 


583 


1,196 


St. David's (Welsh Church) 


15 


18 


2 


35 


52 


64 


6 


122 


157 


St. James's .... 


79 


203 


133 


415 


67 


129 


44 


240 


655 


St. John the Evangelist's . 


87 


323 


121 


531 


70 


152 


61 


283 


814 


St. Jude's .... 


54 


75 


114 


243 


78 


152 


131 


361 


604 


St. Luke's . 


41 


114 


44 


199 


50 


87 


37 


174 


373 


St. Mary's, Paddington Gn. 


42 


105 


44 


191 


55 


78 


69 


202 


393 


St. Mary Magdalene's . 


74 


345 


29 


448 


78 


301 


36 


415 


863 


St. Matthew's 


201 


660 


84 


945 


113 


478 


65 


656 


1,601 


St. Michael and All Angels' 


112 


234 


70 


416 


68 


137 


32 


237 


653 


St. Paul's .... 


30 


67 


140 


237 


48 


127 


46 


221 


458 


St. Peter's .... 


79 


136 


241 


456 


134 


241 


97 


472 


928 


St. Saviour's 


119 


299 


284 


702 


82 


188 


82 


352 


1,054 


St. Stephen's 


159 


717 


80 


956 


124 


431 


65 


620 


1,576 


St. John's, Kensal Rise 


33 


34 


84 


151 


70 


102 


100 


272 


423 


St. Luke's, Fernhead Road. 


25 


30 


100 


155 


56 


110 


38 


204 


359 


St. Simon's .... 


39 


59 


103 


201 


52 


134 


59 


245 


446 


Total .... 


1,767 


5,336 


2,327 


9,430 


1,625 


3,901 


1,354 


6,880 


16,310 





Church of England Missions 








Emmanuel .... 

St. Martha's 

St. Jude's Institute 

St. Jude's Hall . 


* 4 
10 


1 
1 


27 

106 

48 


27 

ill 

59 


8 
20 
17 

2 


16 

55 

35 

2 


26 
79 
14 
90 


50 

154 

66 

94 


77 
154 
177 
153 


Total .... 


14 


2 


181 


197 


47 


108 


209 


364 


561 



WESLEYAN METHODIST CHURCH 



Sutherland Avenue 
Trinity Ch., Fernhead Rd. . 


84 
117 


86 
93 


75 
119 


245 
329 


88 
156 


160 
221 


47 

86 


295 
463 


540 
792 


Total .... 


201 


179 


194 


574 


244 


381 


133 


758 


1,332 



UNITED METHODIST EREE CHURCH 



Queen's Road 



29 



57 



24 



110 



35 



79 



23 



137 



247 



PRIMITIVE METHODIST CHURCH 



Harrow Road 
Kilburn Lane 


27 
33 


20 
24 


90 
140 


137 
197 


31 
49 


33 
99 


27 
71 


91 
219 


228 
416 


Total .... 


60 


44 


230 


334 


80 


132 


98 


310 


644 



101 



102 



THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 



BAPTIST CHURCH 







MORNING. 




EVENING. 


Total 

for tbe 

Day. 




Men. 


Women. 


Chldm. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Beulah 

Praed Street 
St. Peter'8 Park . 
Westbourne Park 
Westbourne Grove 


14 
29 
13 
300 
58 


18 

52 

8 

503 

124 


1 

20 

17 

107 

46 


33 

101 

38 

910 

228 


18 

37 

18 

640 

80 


22 
75 
31 

606 

228 


6 
17 
11 

57 
36 


46 
129 

60 

1,303 

344 


79 
230 

98 

2,213 

572 


Total .... 


414 


705 


191 


1,310 


793 


962 


127 


1,882 


3,192 



Norman Hall, Harrow Road 



Baptist Mission 



17 



126 



149 



39 



11 



57 



206 



CONGREQATIONAL CHURCH 



Craven Hill .... i 26 
Queen's Park, Harrow Koad i 179 


44 
193 


42 
175 


112 
547 


34 
394 


53 
701 


18 
132 


105 
1,227 


! 217 
! 1,774 


Total , . . .205 


237 


217 


659 


428 


754 


150 


1,332 


1,991 



PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 



St. Paul's, Westbourne Gr. 
Welsh, Shirland Road . 


38 
28 


107 
34 


23 168 
8 70 


35 
79 


75 
104 


6 
15 


116 
198 


284 
268 


Total .... 


66 


141 


31 238 


114 


179 


21 


314 


552 


CA 


THOLIC APOSTOLIC 


CHU3 


ICH 








Maida Hill West . 


82 139 


24 245 


103 


125 


16 


244 


489 


GREEK CHURCH 


St. Sophia's, Moscow Road. | 


58 63 1 20 141 




... 


... 


... 1 


141 


FOI 


lEIGN PROTESTANT 


SER\ 


riCES 








French Reformed, Mon- 
mouth Road 


11 


1 
43 1 4 58 


15 


22 


2 


39 


97 


SALVATION ARMY 


Barracks, Harrow Road 
Lancefield Street . 


30 
8 


32 

7 


33 

18 


95 
33 


71 
14 


105 
25 


89 
35 


265 
74 


360 
107 


Total .... 


38 


39 


51 


128 


85 


130 


124 


339 


467 


BRETHREN 


New Providence Hall . 
Hope Hall .... 


17 12 14 
21 16 9 


43 
46 


16 
20 


25 
33 


8 
57 


49 
110 


92 
156 


Total .... 


38 28 23 


89 


36 


58 


65 


159 


248 



WEST LONDON— PADDIXGTON 



103 



ROMAN CATHOLIC CHUUCH 



CHURCH. 




MORXIKG. 


i 




E VEX INC. 




Total 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


TotaL 


for the 
Day. 


Church of Our Lady of 

Lourdes and St. Vincent 

dePaul . . . . 

St. ilary of the Angels 

Schools : Cirencester Street 


77 

261 

21 


168 

887 

46 


95 
204 

22 


340 i 

1,352 i 

89 


8 
41 


30 
123 


59 
29 


97 
193 


437 

1,545 

89 


Total .... 


359 


1,101 


321 


1,781 


49 


153 


88 


290 


2,071 



OTHER SERVICES 



London City Mission, Boat- 




















men's Institute, Junction 




















Mews .... 










14 


21 


17 


52 


52 


Hall Park . . . . 










21 


21 




42 


42 


London City Mission, Am- 




















berlev Road 










12 


51 


7 


70 


70 


Brook Mews, North . 










16 


24 


26 


66 


66 


Mission Room, 15a, Cam- 




















bridge Place 










22 


32 


20 


74 


74 


Paddington Hall, Church St. 










10 


45 


13 


68 


68 


Paddington Wharves Miss. 










12 


26 


5 


43 


43 


Railway Miss., Kensal Rd. 










14 


17 


14 


45 


45 


West London Open Air, 




















Kensal Road 


10 


6 


1 


17 


6 


27 





38 


55 


Y.W.C.A., Porchester Rd. 












20 




20 


20 


Queen's Park Tabernacle . 


8 


8 


59 


75 


33 


43 


91 


167 


242 


Ranelagh Hall 










39 


89 


52 


180 


180 


Total .... 


18 


14 


60 


92 


199 


416 


250 


865 


957 



DENOMINATIONAL TOTALS 



DENOMIMATIOX. 



MORNING. 



Churcli of England 
„ „ Missions 

AVesleyan Meth. Church 

U. Meth. Free Church . 

Primitive Meth. Church 

Baptist Church 
„ Mission 

Congregational Church 

Presbyterian Church . 

Brethren 

Cath. Apostolic Church 

Foreign Prot. Services . 

Salvation Army . 

Greek Church 

Roman Catholic Church 

Other Services 

Je^^•ish Church 

Grand Totals . 



Men. Women. CMdm. Total. 



,767 
14 

201 
29 
60 

414 
6 

205 
66 
38 
82 
11 
38 
58 

359 
18 

873 



5,336 
2 

179 
57 
44 

705 
17 

237 

141 
28 

139 
43 
39 
63 
1,101 
14 

691 



2,327 

181 

194 

24 

230 

191 

126 

217 

31 

23 

24 

4 

51 

20 

321 

60 

262 



4,239 8,836 4,286 



Men. Women.! Chldm. TotaL 



9,430 
197 
574 
110 
334 

1,310 
149 
659 
238 
89 
245 
58 
128 
141 

1,781 
92 

1,826 



„ I 



1,625 
47 

244 
35 
80 

793 
7 

428 

114 
36 

103 
15 
85 

49 
199 



17,361 13,860 



3,901 
108 
381 

79 
132 
962 

39 
754 
179 

58 
125 

22 
130 

153 
416 



7,439 2,671 



1,354 

209 

133 

23 

98 

127 

11 

150 

21 

65 

16 

2 

124 



250 



6,880 
364 
758 
137 
310 

1,882 
57 

1,332 
314 
159 
244 
39 
339 

290 
865 



13,970 



Total 

for the 

day. 



16,310 
561 

1,332 
247 
644 

3,192 
206 

1,991 
552 
248 
489 
97 
467 
141 

2,071 
957 

1,826 



31,331 



h 


2 Population Roman Catholic ^ Other Services 

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Blue - Evening 



Population 



All Churches 



Church of England 



Nonconformist 



Roman Catholic 



Other Services 




Black = All Services 



Red ^ Morning 



City of Westminster 

CHURCH OF ENGLAND 



CHURCH. 



Abbey of St. Peter, Broad 

Sanctuary . 
Chapel Royal, Savoy . 
Guards' Chapel, Wellington 

Barracks .... 
Guards' Chapel, Chelsea Bks 
All Saints', EnnismoreGdns, 
Holy Trinity, Knightsbridge 
St. Peter's, Eaton Square 
St. Michael's, Chester Sq. 
St. Barnabas', Pimlico 
St. Martin-in-the-Fields 
St. Mary-le-Strand 
St. Clement Danes, Strand 
St. Paul's, Covent Garden 
St. John the Evangelist's. 

Drury Lane 
St. Mary the Virgin's, Char 

ing Cross Road . 
St. Michael's, Burleigh St. 
St. Peter's, Gt. Windmill St 
St. Philip's, Buckingham 

Palace Road 
St. Saviour's, Oxford Street 
Chapel of the Holy Name, 

Grosvenor Road 
St. James', Piccadilly . 
St. Philip's, Regent Street 
St. Margaret's, Broad Sanct, 
St. John the Evangelist's, 

Smith's Square . 
St. Peter's Chapel, Palace St, 
St. Saviour's, St. George" 

Square 
St. Anne's, Soho . 
St. Mark's, N. Audley St. 
Grosvenor Chapel, South 

Audley Street . 
St. John the Baptist's, Great 

Marlborough Street , 
St. George's, Hanover Sq. 
Holy Trinity, Vauxhall Bdg 
All Saints', Grosvenor Rd 
St. Stephen's, Rochester Row 
Belgrave Chpl., Belgrave Sq 
Christ Church, Down St. 
Christ Church, Victoria St 
St. Andrew's, Ashley Place 
St. Anselm's, Oxford Street 
St. Gabriel's, Warwick Sq 
St. George's, Albemarle St 
St. James the Less', More 

ton Street . 
St. John the Baptist's, Pim 

lico Road . 
St. John the Evangelist's. 

Wilton Road . 
St. Luke's, Soho . 
St. Mary's, Berkeley Square 
St. Mary's, Vincent Square 
St. Mary the Virgin's, Pim 

lico .... 
St. Mathew's, Gt. Peter St, 
Berkeley Chpl., Berkeley Sq 
St. Paul's, Knightsbridge 
St. Thomas', Regent Street 



MORNING. 



Men. Women. Chldrn. Total 



Total 



285 
42 

362 

437 

89 

494 

181 

185 

94 

90 

17 

35 

22 

16 

15 
47 
16 

18 
6 

4 

141 

25 

174 

154 
31 

117 

113 

53 

22 

21 
75 
56 
49 
66 
24 
79 
34 
69 
63 
88 
79 

45 

43 

103 
15 
25 
42 

30 
92 
24 
157 
55 



. 4,619 



18 
10 

21 
201 

16 
311 

391 
54 

275 

208 
138 

62 

36 

162 

44 

28 

84 

61 

171 

41 

146 

134 

254 

190 

80 

85 

314 
10 
66 
53 

116 
253 
29 
424 
134 

7,416 



361 


95 


39 


24 


122 


44 


11 


24 


236 


79 


297 


24 


552 


76 


616 


121 


278 


102 


129 


69 


15 


11 


29 


50 


26 


26 


15 


64 


14 


25 


36 


31 


20 


67 



23 



181 
97 

18 
57 

130 
381 

66 
45 
81 

12 

42 

22 

126 

150 

290 

3 

64 

79 

120 

187 

193 

27 

86 

176 

55 

27 

83 

138 

74 
230 

11 
129 

67 

4,402 
105 



741 
105 

528 
472 
404 
815 
809 
922 
474 
288 

43 
114 

74 

95 

54 
114 
103 

59 
16 

206 

439 

59 

542 

675 
466 

458 
366 
272 

96 

99 
259 
226 
227 
440 

88 
314 
154 
335 
384 
535 
296 

211 

304 

472 

52 

174 

233 

220 
575 
64 
710 
256 

16,437 



EVENING. 



Men. Women. Chldrn. Total 



222 
9 

20 

4 

27 

68 

174 

116 

63 

147 

31 

51 

32 

13 

31 
76 
43 

30 
68 



167 

9 

265 

160 
48 

75 

158 

37 

18 

24 
68 
42 
94 
75 
14 
41 
29 
44 
46 
76 
8 

29 

41 

59 

16 1 
33 

24 
45 
12 
75 
33 



824 
12 

41 

10 

56 

213 

263 

280 

173 

223 

31 

106 

64 

29 

38 
72 
51 

39 
51 

17 
275 

13 
455 

382 
71 

241 
302 

59 

38 

65 

116 

60 

112 

149 

39 

73 

62 

96 

76 

218 

14 

83 

155 

205 
26 
56 
84 

94 

186 

4 

210 

90 



3,099 6,702 



35 

103 

12 

56 

85 
63 

84 
66 
46 

13 

42 
22 
46 
74 
103 

"40 
31 
47 
38 
63 



50 

50 

54 

4 

23 

63 

20 
103 
10 
65 
32 

2,316 



Total 

for the 

Day. 



1,141 
36 

112 
23 

126 
303 
509 
471 
279 
448 
81 
200 
112 



109 
186 
129 

116 
126 

54 

545 

34 

776 

627 
182 

400 
526 
142 

69 

131 

206 
148 
280 
327 

53 
154 
122 
187 
160 
357 

22 

162 
246 

318 
37 
95 

180 

138 
334 
26 
350 
155 



1,882 
141 

640 

495 

530 

1,118 

1,318 

1.393 

753 

736 

12 i 

314 

186 

162 

163 

300 
232 

175 
142 

260 

984 

93 

1,318 

1,302 
648 

858 
892 
414 

165 

230 
465 
374 
507 
767 
141 
468 
276 
522 
544 
892 
318 

373 

550 

790 

89 

269 

413 

358 

909 

90 

1,060 

411 



106 



THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 



Church of England Missions 







MORNfKG. 






EVENING. 




Total 


CHURCH 






















Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Day. 


St. Margaret's, New TothiU 




















Street .... 


2 


3 


55 


60 










60 


St. Margaret's, Lewisham 
















1 




Street .... 










2 


16 


13 


31 


31 


Inns of Court, Drurv Lane . 










10 


5 


7 


2?! 


22 


St. Clement Danes, Clare 




















Market .... 








... 


1 


11 


2 


14 


14 


Bedfordbury Miss. Church 


11 


7 


121 


139 


6 


16 


17 


39 


178 


Mission of the Good Shep- 




















herd, Victoria Street 


4 


31 


74 


109 


33 


57 


41 


131 


240 


St. Stephen's, Rochester 




















Row 












27 


31 


58 j 


58 


St. John the Evangelist's, 
















1 




Horseferry Road 










47 


28 


16 


91 


91 


St. John the EvangeUat's, 




















Earl Street 






... 




2 


16 


8 


26 ! 


26 


St. John the Evangelist's 




















Institute .... 










2 




13 


15 


15 


St. Paul's Institute, Floral 




















Street .... 












18 




18 


18 


St. (Jabriel's Hall, Pimlico 










76 


135 


151 


362 


362 


St. Anne's Schools, Dean St. 


2 


2 


82 


86 










86 


Total .... 


19 


43 


332 


394 


179 


329 


299 


807 


1,201 



WESLEYAN METHODIST CHURCH 



Horseferry Road . 


32 


45 


68 ' 


145 


43 


80 


67 


190 


335 


Craven, Regent Street 


3 


1 


23 1 


27 


53 


132 


58 


243 


270 


St. James's HaU, Piccadilly 


344 


543 


40 


927 


800 


1,495 


111 


2,406 


3,333 


Claverton Street, Pimlico . 


45 


30 


47 1 


122 


56 


85 


33 


174 


296 


Conference HaU, Pimlico . 


75 


4 


10 1 


89 










89 


Gothic Hall, Thomas Street 


10 


13 




23 


24 


46 


5 


75 


98 


Total .... 


509 


636 


188 


1,333 


976 


1,838 


274 


3,088 


4,421 



UNITED METHODIST FREE CHURCH 



Victoria,"VauxhallBdge. Rd. 
Westmoreland St., Pimlico 


13 
29 


11 

40 


8 
93 


32 
162 


20 
54 


30 
146 


24 

57 


74 
257 


{ 106 
419 


Total .... 


42 


51 


101 


194 


74 


176 


81 


331 


525 



BAPTIST CHURCH 



Romney Street 
Carmel, Pimlico Road . 


25 
9 


35 
22 


78 
17 


138 
48 


50 
16 


71 
33 


27 
7 


148 
56 


28») 
104 


Total .... 


34 


57 


95 


186 


66 


104 


34 


204 


390 



Saptist Missions 



Bloomsbury Chapel Mission, 

Soho 

Miss. Room, Winchester St. 

Total . . . . 









. 


47 


103 


107 


257 


3 


3 




6 1 


5 


7 




12 


3 


3 




6 1 


52 


110 


107 


269 1 



WEST LONDON— WESTMINSTER 



107 



CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 





MORNING. 




EVENING. 




Total 
for the 


CHURCH. 




















Men. 


TVomen. 


Chldm. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Day. 


King's Weigh House, Gros- 


















1 


venor Square . 


118 


1 205 


35 


358 


229 


219 


10 


458 


816 


Westminster, Buckingham 




1 
















Gate 


41 


70 


115 


226 


66 


138 


27 


231 


1 457 


Eccleston, Eccleston Square 


61 


111 


75 


247 


99 


183 


28 


310 


557 


Orange Street, Leicester Sq. 


9 


13 


12 


34 


16 


34 


16 


66 


! 100 


St. Leonard's St., Pimlico . 





( 


10 


22 


20 


26 


82 


128 


J 150 


Total .... 


234 


1 406 


247 


887 


I 430 


600 


163 


1,193 


2,080 



Congregational Mission 



Bessboro' Mission, Ores- I 
venor Road 



18 



45 



23 



86 



86 



PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 



Cro\^-n Court, Drury Lane . 
Belgrave . . . . 
Welsh, Charing Cross Road 

Total . . . . 



46 


40 


27 


113 


90 


69 


7 


166 


40 


103 


36 


179 


36 


81 


24 


141 


67 


49 


21 


137 


216 


224 


46 


486 


153 


192 


84 


429 


342 


374 


77 


793 



279 
320 
623 



SOCIETY OF FRIENDS 



Meeting House, St. Mar- 
tin's Lane 



105 



41 



52 



198 



70 : 268 



BRETHREN 



Ebury Rooms, Ebury Street 

Pimlico Rooms, Winchester 

Street .... 


11 
10 


36 
13 


4 
6 


51 
29 


1 14 


24 


4 


42 


! 93 
29 


Total .... 


21 


49 10 


80 


14 


24 


4 


42 


122 



SALVATION ARMY 



Regent Hall, Oxford Street 
Regency St., Westminster . 


114 
34 


97 
13 


42 

38 


253 ' 573 

85 j: 40 


693 
73 


201 1.467 
52 165 


1,720 
250 


Total .... 


148 


110 


80 


338 : 613 


766 


253 1 1,632 


1,970 



CATHOLIC APOSTOLIC CHURCH 



Victoria St. 



15 



10 



52 



28 



15 



50 



102 



FOREIGN PROTESTANT SERVICES 



German Lutheran, Eccles- 








: 












ton Street .... 


10 


14 


9 


33 ; 










33 


French Protestant, Soho Sq. 


47 


17 


o 


66 , 


34 


29 




63 


129 


Italian, Frith Street . 










9 


5 


2 


16 


16 


Maison des Etraugers, Frith 








■ 












Street .... 










40 


14 


3 


57 


57 


Mission Fran5aise, Soho 








... 


30 


21 




51 


51 


Total .... 


57 


31 


11 


99 j 


113 


69 


5 


187 


286 



108 



THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 



ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH 



CHURCH. 


MORNING. 


EVENING. 1 Total 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Day. 


Farm Street, Mount Street 
Notre Dame de France, Lei- 
cester Square . 
Corpus Christi, Strand 
St. Patrick's, Soho Square . 
Assumption (Chapel of Royal 
Bavarian Embassy), Re- 
gent Street 
St. IMary's, Horseferry Rd, 
St. Peter and St. Edward's, 

Palace Street . 
Cathedral Chapter House, 
Ashley Place . 


303 

190 
143 
371 

205 
171 

214 

64 


617 

389 
219 
486 

301 
408 

340 

80 


128 

263 
134 

272 

159 
269 

163 

21 


1,048 

842 

496 

1,129 

665 
848 

717 

165 


144 

61 

25 

105 

39 
70 

63 


290 

164 

36 

133 

66 
143 

126 


59 

59 

8 

8-1 

36 

39 

45 

_ 


493 

284 

69 

322 

141 

252 

234 


1,541 

1,126 

565 

1,451 

806 
1,100 

951 

165 


Total . . - . 


1,661 


2,840 


1,409 


5,910 


507 


958 


330 


1,795 


7,705 



OTHER SERVICES 



Pimlico Rooms, Ebury Street 

Exeter Hall, Y.M.C.A., 
Strand .... 

Pear St. , Strutton Ground . 

One Tun, Old Pye Street . 

Conference Hall, Eccleston 
Street .... 

London City Mission, Chad- 
wick Street 

London City Mission, Ebury 
Street .... 

The Theistic Church . 


"2 
60 


... 
69 


■59 
"3 




61 i 

■■ 

1 
1 

132 


20 

31 
21 

17 

8 
15 

12 

54 


37 

57 
17 

12 

19 

38 
35 


31 

"37 
49 

5 

49 
3 


88 

31 

115 

83 

25 

34 

99 
92 


88 

31 

176 

83 

25 

34 

99 
224 


Total .... 


62 


69 


62 193 


178 


215 


174 


567 


760 



DENOMINATIONAL TOTALS 



DENOMINATION. 


MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 

for tha 

Day. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Church of England 


4,619 


7,416 


4,402 


16,437 


3,099 


6,702 


2,316 


12,117 


28,554 


„ „ Mis.sions 


19 


43 


332 


394 


179 


329 


299 


807 


1,201 


Wesleyan Meth. Church 


509 


636 


188 


1,333 


976 


1,838 


274 


3,088 


4,421 


U. Meth. Free Church . 


42 


51 


101 


194 


74 


176 


81 


331 


525 


Baptist Church 


34 


57 


95 


186 


66 


104 


34 


204 


390 


„ Missions . 


.3 


3 




6 


52 


110 


107 


269 


, 275 


Congregational Church. 


234 


406 


247 


887 


430 


600 


163 


1,193 


2,080 


„ Mission 


... 






... 


18 


45 


23 


86 


86 


Presbyterian Church . 


153 


192 


84 


429 


342 


374 


77 


793 


1,222 


Society of Friends 


105 


41 


52 


198 


27 


37 


6 


70 


268 


Brethren 


21 


49 


10 


80 


14 


24 


4 


42 


122 


(Salvation Army . 


148 


110 


80 


338 


613 


766 


253 


1,632 


1 1,970 


Cath. Apostolic Church 


27 


15 


10 


52 


28 


15 


7 


50 


102 


Foreign Prot. Services . 


57 


31 


11 


99 


113 


69 


5 


187 


286 


Jloman Catholic Church 


1,661 


2,840 


1,409 


5,910 


! 507 


958 


330 


1,795 


7,705 


Other Services 


62 


69 


62 


193 


! 178 


215 


174 


567 


760 


Jewish Church 


301 


86 


312 


699 


... 




... 


... 


699 


Grand Totals . 


7,995 


12,045 


7,395 


27,435 


6,716 


12,362 


4,153 


23,231 


50,666 



s 
a 
o 

IX, 



O 



c 








0] 




u 




bo 


ta 


■| 


2 


H 


g 


1 


1 




1 


O 

c 




o 


1 


u 


25 


oi 


O 



Cent. 



I R I I I 



\^^ 



90 



80 



70 



60 



50 



40 



30 



20 



10 



DIAGRAM 

SKe-witi^ Attendance. 
WESTMINSTER. 




Popul Roman Catholic 



Other Services 




Slue :- tveninf* 



Total 
'or the 
Day. 

1,23G 
234 
415 

1,921 

81 

704 

879 

417 

63;; 

700 
340 
298 
674 
569 
933 

1,042 
793 
685 
417 

3,900 

1,248 
423 
280 

1,699 
660 
827 

1,174 
880 
811 

24,873 



78 
38 
69 
41 
80 
307 
189 
41 
16 

859 



72 
802 
395 
261 

82 

1,612 



101 



Nonconformist 



Roman Catholic 



Other Services 




Black = AM Servii 



&tue ^ evoninf. 



Borough of Kensington 



CHURCH OF ENGLAND 



CHURCH. 



MORNING. 



Men. Women. Chldm. Total 



All Saints', Talbot Road . 

Christ Church, Talford Rd. 

Christ Church, Victoria Rd. 

Holy Trinity, Brompton 

St. Andrew's and St. Philips' 

St. Augustine's, Queen's Gate 

St. Barnabas' 

St. Clement's 

St. Columba's 

St. Cuthbert's 

St. George's . 

St. Helen's . 

St. James's . 

St. John's 

St. John the Baptist . 

St. Jude's . 

St. Luke's . 

St. Mark's . 

St. Mary The Bolton's 

St. Mary Abbott's 

St. Matthias' 

St. IVIichael and All Angels' 

St. Thomas' ... 

St. Paul's, Onslow Square 

St. Paul's, Vicarage Gate 

St. Peter's, Kensington Park 

St. Peter's, Cranley Gdns. 

St. Philip's, Earl's Court Rd 

St. Stephen's 

Total . 



101 

33 

61 

160 

8 

76 

132 

40 

55 

82 

43 

44 

94 

78 

131 

172 

108 

73 

54 

468 

154 

55 

50 

234 

92 

157 

170 

87 

87 



3,099 



429 

26 

234 

880 

4 

174 

358 

36 

179 

264 

96 

93 

228 

205 

233 

459 

256 

136 

161 

1,319 

427 

92 

15 

584 

298 

286 

560 

340 

375 



8,747 



200 
54 
30 

560 
13 
68 
57 
44 
40 

109 
36 
30 
51 
92 

239 

105 
41 

176 
52 

352 

209 
47 
32 
56 
39 
55 
81 

141 
78 



730 
113 
325 

1,600 
25 
318 
547 
120 
274 
455 
175 
167 
373 
375 
603 
736 
405 
.385 
267 

2,139 
790 
194 
97 
874 
429 
498 
811 
568 
540 



EVENING. 



Men. Women. Chldrn. Total 



97 
42 
13 
73 
13 
64 
70 
64 
57 
71 
39 
34 
62 
51 
90 
67 

103 
94 
38 

272 

108 
57 
61 

328 
48 
76 
63 
43 
65 



374 
45 

58 
195 

30 
286 
221 
139 
249 
126 

71 

61 
163 
110 
164 
206 
219 
157 

74 

1,013 

314 

127 

77 
464 
137 
186 
230 
178 
156 



3,087 14,933 I 2,263 5,830 



35 
34 
19 
53 
13 
36 
41 
94 
53 
48 
55 
36 
76 
33 
76 
33 
66 
49 
38 
476 
36 
45 
45 
33 
46 
67 
70 
91 
50 



506 
121 

90 
321 

56 
386 
332 
297 
359 
245 
165 
131 
301 
194 
330 
306 
388 
300 
150 
1,761 
458 
229 
183 
825 
231 
329 
363 
312 
271 



Total 

for the 

Day. 



1,847 9,940 



1,236 
234 
415 

1,921 
81 
704 
879 
417 
633 
700 
340 
298 
674 
569 
933 

1,042 
793 
685 
417 

3,900 

1,248 
423 
280 

1,699 
660 
827 

1,174 
880 
811 

24,873 



Rugby Boys' Club 
St. Barnabas' 
St. Clement's 
St. James' . 
St. John's . 
St. Luke's 
St. Martin's . 
St. Mary Abbott's 
St. Matthias' 

Total . 



Church of England Missions 



19 



29 



33 

185 

56 



274 



37 
197 

88 



322 



35 

5 

17 

7 

13 
26 
25 



138 



25 
28 
16 
19 
44 
35 
24 
12 



203 



43 

8 

24 

18 

11 

40 

41 

9 

2 



196 



78 
38 
69 
41 
43 
110 
101 
41 
16 



537 



78 
38 
69 
41 
80 
307 
189 
41 
16 

859 



WESLEYAN METHODIST CHURCH 



Clarence Place 


12 


19 


4 


35 


14 


20 


3 


37 


1 ^2 


Denbigh Road 


107 


127 


99 


333 


160 


258 


51 


469 


802 


Lancaster Road . 


70 


55 


40 


165 


73 


118 


39 


230 


; .395 


Warwick Gardens 


41 


50 


26 


117 


42 


85 


17 


144 


261 


Kensal Road 


9 


3 


29 


41 


10 


18 


13 


41 


82 


Total .... 


239 


254 


198 


691 


299 


499 


123 


921 


1,612 



Fowell Street 



PRIMITIVE METHODIST CHURCH 



16 



20 



109 



39 



28 



19 



15 



62 



101 



110 



THE EELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON. 



UNITED METHODIST FREE CHURCH 



CHURCH. 


MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Totel 

for the 

Day. 


Men. Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Middle Row, Kensal Road . 


4 5 


94 


103 










103 



BAPTIST CHURCH 



J'ethesda, Kensington Place 


10 


13 


38 


61 


23 


75 


27 


125 


186 


Grove Chapel, Drayton Gds. 


25 


39 


10 


74 


28 


58 


5 


91 


165 


Lad broke Grove . 


46 


52 


50 


148 


68 


112 


53 


233 


381 


Onslow Chapel 


49 


122 


74 


245 


46 


140 


26 


212 


457 


Talbot Tabernacle 


100 


159 


64 


323 


88 


241 


76 


405 


728 


Bosworth Road . 


2 


3 


46 


51 


21 


37 


57 


115 


166 


Talbot Hall, Portobello Rd. 


4 


9 


88 


101 


15 


25 


19 


59 


160 


Total .... 


236 


397 


370 


1,003 


289 


688 


263 


1,240 


2,243 





CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 








Horbury .... 
Kensington Chapel 
Netting Dale 
Golborne Road . 


39 

201 

6 

24 


63 

332 

6 

24 


43 

105 

4 

21 


145 

638 

16 

69 


45 

234 

18 

44 


87 

432 

42 

77 


25 
26 
32 
62 


157 

692 

92 

183 


302 

1,330 

108 

252 


Total .... 


270 


425 


173 


868 


341 


638 


145 


1,124 


1,992 



PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 



St. John's, Allen Street . . 

Emperor's Gate . 

Trinity, Kensington Pk. Rd. 

Total . . . , 



44 


105 


45 


194 


35 


56 


26 


117 


23 


71 


35 


129 


17 


63 


5 


85 


64 


91 


20 


175 1 


57 


112 


11 


180 


131 


267 


100 


498 


109 


231 


42 


382 



311 
214 
355 

880 





Presbyterian 


Missions 










188, Kensington Park Road 
161, Clarendon Road . 


2 


1 


18 


21 


7 


"17 


"ie 


"40 


21 
40 


Total .... 


2 


1 


18 


21 


7 


17 


16 


40 


61 



UNITARIAN CHURCH 



Essex Church 



24 



41 



117 



36 



40 



18 94 



211 





a 


AliVy 


LTIO]S 


r ARMY 










Queen's Road 

Portobello Road . 

184a, Kensington Park Rd. 


31 

28 


24 
22 


19 

37 


74 

87 


49 
65 

8 


29 
85 
14 


29 

32 

117 


107 
182 
139 


181 
269 
139 


Total .... 


59 


46 


56 


161 


122 


128 


178 


428 


589 



NEW JERUSALEM CHURCH 



The Mall 



21 



29 



51 



37 



40 



79 



130 



BRETHREN 



Hornton Street . 


29 


53 


8 


90 1 


73 


247 


27 


347 


437 


Portobello Rooms 


13 


14 


3 


30 i 


12 


17 


9 


38 


68 


Park Hall, Kensal Road . 


28 


43 


21 


92 


18 


35 


13 


66 


158 


Clarendon Rooms 


18 


22 


1 


41 : 


16 


18 


6 


40 


81 


St. Ervan's Road. 


4 


4 


1 


9 


4 


6 




10 


19 


Total .... 


92 


136 


34 


262 


123 


323 


55 


501 


763 



WEST LONDON— KENSINGTON 

DISCIPLES OF CHRIST 



ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH 



111 



CHURCH. 


MORNIXG. 


EVENING. 


Tot^il 

for the 

Day. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


ToUl. 


Men. 


Women. Chldrn. 


Total. 


West London Tabernacle . 


32 


64 


27 


123 


52 


129 27 


208 


331 



Our Lady of the Holy Souls 


152 


244 


343 


739 


47 


60 


82 


189 


928 


,, ,, „ Seven 




















Dolours .... 


227 


664 


247 


1,138 


85 


197 


63 


345 


1,483 


Our Lady of Victories (Pro- 




















Cathedral) 


237 


701 


113 


1,051 


45 


124 


10 


179 


1,230 


St. Francis of Assisi, Pot- 




















tery Lane. 


261 


338 


342 


941 


46 


103 


53 


202 


1,143 


Brompton Oratory 


267 


1,105 


292 


1,664 


157 


455 


34 


646 


2,310 


Our Lady of Mount Carmel 


276 


807 


106 


1,189 


66 


211 


22 


299 


1,488 


Total .... 


1,420 


3,859 


1,443 


6,722 


446 


1,150 


264 


1,860 


8,582 



OTHER SERVICES 



Gospel Hall, Kensal Road . 

London City Miss., Edge St. 
,, ,, ,, Apple- 
ford Road .... 

Spiritualists, 61, Blenheim 
Crescent .... 

London City Miss., Jubilee 
Hall 

Ethical Society, Kensington 
Town Hall 


6 
1 

2 
63 


24 
75 


4 
63 

16 
8 


34 
64 

18 
146 


13 
3 

5 

4 

10 


53 

27 

6 
4 

18 


29 
6 

11 
15 


95 
36 

22 

8 

43 


129 
36 

86 

8 

61 

146 


Total .... 


72 


99 


91 


262 


35 


108 


61 


204 


466 



DENOMINATIONAL TOTALS 



DENOMINATION. 


MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Day. 


Church of England 


3,099 


8,747 


3,087 


14,933 


2,263 


5,830 


1,847 


9,940 


24,873 


„ „ Missions 


19 


29 


274 


322 


138 


203 


196 


537 


859 


Wesleyan jMeth. Church 


239 


254 


198 


691 


299 


499 


123 


921 


1,612 


Primitive Meth. Church 


16 


3 


20 


39 


28 


19 


15 


62 


101 


U. jyieth. Free Church . 


4 


5 


94 


103 










103 


Baptist Church . 


236 


397 


370 


1,003 


289 


688 


263 


1,240 


2,243 


Congregational Church 


270 


425 


173 


868 


341 


638 


145 


1,124 


1,992 


Presbyterian Church . 


131 


267 


100 


498 


109 


231 


42 


382 


880 


„ Missions . 


2 


1 


18 


21 


7 


17 


16 


40 


61 


Unitarian Church 


24 


41 


52 


117 


36 


40 


18 


94 


211 


Salvation Army . 


59 


46 


56 


161 


122 


128 


178 


428 


589 


New Jerusalem Church 


21 


29 


1 


51 


37 


40 


2 


79 


130 


Brethren 


92 


136 


34 


262 


123 


323 


55 


501 


763 


Disciples of Christ 


32 


64 


27 


123 


52 


129 


27 


208 


331 


Roman Catholic Church 


1,420 


3,859 


1,443 


6,722 


446 


1,150 


264 


1,860 


8,582 


Other Services 


72 


99 


91 


262 


35 


108 


61 


204 


466 


Jewish Church 


224 


37 


96 


357 




... 






357 


Grand Totals . 


5,960 


14,439 


6,134 


26,533 


4,325 


10,043 


3,252 


17,620 


44,153 



other Services 




Blue =^ Evening 



Population 



All Churches 



Church of England 



Nonconformist 



Roman Catholic 



Other Services 



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BorouQ:li of Chelsea 



CHURCH OF ENGLAND 







MORNING. 






EVENING. 




Total 


CHURCH. 








































Men. 


■Women. 


Chldm. 


TotaL 


Men. 


"Women. 


Chldm. 


Total. 


Day. 


St. Luke's, Sidney Street . 


142 


391 


105 


638 


1 121 


316 


81 


518 


1,156 


Old Chelsea Church, Chevne 










1 










Walk 


32 


74 


191 


297 


37 


93 


248 


378 


675 


Park Chapel, Park Walk . 


41 


112 


43 


196 


45 


123 


33 


201 


397 


Holv Trinitv, Sloane Street 


349 


991 


103 


1,443 


217 


530 


61 


808 


2,251 


St. Jude's. Turk's Row 


33 


132 


51 


216 


i 26 


81 


38 


145 : 


361 


Chapel, Duke of York's 




















Schools .... 


35 


11 


362 


408 


16 


9 


360 


385 


793 


Royal Hospital Chapel 


161 


37 


27 


225 


24 


4 


14 


42 


267 


St. Saviour's, ^^ alton St. . 


79 


230 


120 


429 


57 


93 


76 


226 


655 


St. Simon's, Moore Street . 


37 


87 


42 


166 


19 


49 


26 


94 


260 


Christ Ch., Christchurch St. 


39 


117 


101 


257 


61 


126 


106 


293 


550 


St. John's, Tadema Road . 


65 


125 


114 


304 


74 


196 


110 


380 


684 


St. Mark's College Chajiel . 


109 


35 


36 


180 


100 


48 


37 


185 


365 


Total .... 


1,122 


2,342 


1,295 


4,759 


797 


1,668 


1,190 


3,655 


8,414 



Church of England Missions 



St. Peter's :Miss., Britten St. 


1 


6 


138 


145 


15 


68 


95 


178 


323 


Oakley ^Mission, Manor St. 


o 


4 


52 


59 


1 ^0 


81 


34 


125 


184 


St. Luke's Hall, Onslow 




















DweUincrs .... 








... 


10 


42 


39 


91 


91 


Ch. Armv. ^Marlborough Rd. 


6 


3 


33 


42 


12 


26 


13 


51 


93 


St. John's Hall. Dartrev Rd. 


4 


6 


173 


183 


47 


83 


249 


379 


562 


Clock House Schools . 


5 


1 


50 


56 


1 - 








56 


Total .... 


19 


20 


446 


48.5 


! 94 


300 


430 


824 


' 1,309 



WESLEYAN METHODIST CHURCH 



Chelsea Church, Town Hall 
Justice Walk 


4ti 


5'.) 


26 ' 
25 1 


131 1: 

30^ 


59 , 
5 


75 1 
8 . 


31 ! 

9 , 

1 


165 !l 

22 1' 


296 
52 


Total .... 


481 


62 j 


51 '■ 


161 i' 


64 1 


83 1 


40 j 


187 II 


348 



UNITED METHODIST FREE CHURCH 



Wesley Chapel, CoUege PI. 
Marlborough Square . 


9 
6 


1 
10 


6 
16 


16 
32 


13 . 
11 j 


1" i 
20 1 


11 

23 


41 
54 


57 
86 


Total .... 


15 


11 


22 


48 ;| 


24 


37 : 


34 


95 i 


143 



BAPTIST CHURCH 



Chelsea Chapel . 



59 152 26 



164 351 ! 183 6;>S i 935 



113 



114 



THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 

CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 



CHURCH. 


MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 

for the 

Day. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Markham Square. 

Welsh Chapel, Radnor 8t. . 

Edith Grove 


21 
39 


143 
22 
41 


74 
16 
47 


307 

59 

127 


159 
36 
74 


277 

59 

113 


65 
29 
61 


501 
124 
248 


808 
183 
375 


Total .... 


150 


206 


137 


493 


269 


449 


155 


873 


1,366 



PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 



St. Columbas, Pont Street 



123 



248 



46 



417 



41 



113 



21 



175 



592 



BRETHREN 



ManressaHall,TrafalgarSq. I 23 j ,31 I 19 



25 33 29 87 160 



CATHOLIC APOSTOLIC CHURCH 



College Street 



62 108 



18 188 



30 



58 



16 104 



292 



MORAVIAN CHURCH 



Clock House Schools, King's 
Road 



27 



34 



34 



SALVATION ARMY 



Riley Street Hall . 
Denyer Street Hall 


9 
13 


9 
13 


29 
8 


47 
34 


8 ! 24 26 
15 29 12 


58 
56 


105 
90 


Total .... 


22 


22 


37 


81 


23 


53 


38 


114 


195 



ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH 



Convent Chapel, 28, Beau- 
fort Street. 

Holv Redeemer'.s, Upper 
Cheyne Row 

St. Mary's, Cadogan Street . 


9 

IOC) 
198 


35 

280 
636 


44 

102 488 
203 1,037 


1 
2 25 

19 89 
36 112 


69 
40 


27 

177 

188 


71 

665 
1,225 


Total .... 


313 


951 


305 1 1,569 


j 57 ' 226 


109 


392 


1,961 



OTHER SERVICES 



Sydney Hall, Marlborough 


















i 


Place 










61 


31 


10 


102 


102 


Christian Scientists, Sloane 




















Tf-rrace .... 


90 


219 


• 33 


342 


60 


145 


6 


211 


553 


Chelsea Children's Mission, 








1 












25, Church Street 








1 


8 


23 


106 


137 


137 


London City Mission, Bed- 




















ford Hall .... 










7 


25 


15 


47 


47 


London City Mission, Lack- 




















land Hall .... 


11 


14 


10 


35 


23 


84 


282 


389 


424 


London City Mission, 




















Anne's Place 








... 


14 


30 


5 


49 


49 


Total .... 


101 


233 


43 


377 


173 


338 


424 


935 


1,312 



WEST LONDON— CHELSEA 
DENOMINATIONAL TOTALS 



115 



TiTTITCmVTT'M ATTHTC 


MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 




Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldin. 


Total. 


for the 
Day. 


Church of England 

„ „ Missions 
Wesleyan Meth. Church 
U. Meth. Free Church . 
Baptist Church 
Congregational Church 
Presbyterian Church . 
Brethren 

Cath. Apostolic Church 
Moravian Church . 
Salvation Army . 
Roman Catholic Church 
Other Services 


1,122 
19 
48 
15 
59 
150 
123 
23 
62 

*22 
313 
101 


2,342 
20 
62 
11 

152 
206 
248 
31 
108 

22 
951 
233 


1,295 
446 
51 
22 
26 
137 
46 
19 
18 

37 

305 
43 


4,759 
485 
161 

48 
237 
493 
417 

73 
188 

81 

1,569 

377 


797 
94 
64 
24 

164 

269 
41 
25 
30 
4 
23 
57 

173 


1,668 

300 

83 

37 

351 

449 

113 

33 

58 

3 

53 

226 

338 


1,190 

430 

40 

34 

183 

155 

21 

29 

16 

27 

38 

109 

424 


3,655 
824 
187 

95 
698 
873 
175 

87 
104 

34 
114 
392 
935 


8,414 

1,309 

348 

143 

935 

1,366 

592 

160 

292 

34 

195 

1,961 

1,312 


Grand Totals . 


2,057 


4,386 


2,445 


8,888 


1,765 


3,712 


2,696 


8,173 


17,061 



I 



Population i^oman Catholic 



Other Services 




Biac 



Blue = Evening. 



Population 



All Churches ^ Church of England 



Nonconformist 



Roman Catholic 



Other Services 



e s a 




: = AM Services 



Red = Morning- 



r 



Borough of Hammersmith 



CHURCH OF ENGLAND 



CHURCH 


MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


•Chldrn. 


Total. 


for the 
Day. 


St. Paul's, Queen Street 


158 


260 


214 


632 


121 


190 


70 


381 


1,013 


St. Peter's, Black Lion Lane 


51 


86 


129 


266 i 


47 


96 


80 


223 


489 


St. John the Evangelist's, 








1 












Glenthorne Road 


59 


87 


128 


274 I 


78 


175 


44 


297 


571 


St. Stephen's, Uxbridge Rd. 


69 


119 


193 


381 1 


68 


135 


51 


254 


6a5 


St. Mary's, Stamford Brook 








i 












Road 


45 


63 


80 


188 


46 


46 


22 


114 


302 


St. Matthew's, Sinclair Rd. 


88 


185 


146 


419 ! 


56 


155 


36 


247 


666 


St. Simon's, Shepherd'sBush 


102 


145 


51 


298 ' 


94 


160 


45 


299 


597 


St. Luke's, Uxbridge Road . 


51 


101 


125 


277 ' 


48 


86 


45 


179 


450 


St. Saviour's, Cobbold Road 


42 


60 


65 


167 


42 


92 


46 


180 


347 


Holy Trinity, Latimer Road 


23 


20 


76 


119 ' 


29 


61 


39 


129 


248 


St. Thomas', Godolphin Rd. 


60 


142 


98 


300 


90 


138 


Gl 


289 


589 


Holy Innocents', Paddens- 




















wick Road 


81 


158 


109 


348 ' 


77 


141 


49 


267 


615 


St. Gabriel's, Latimer Road 


18 


19 


60 


97 ; 


22 


53 


74 


149 


246 


St. Mark's (Mission), Queen's 




















Road 


4 


2 


92 


98 [ 


15 


23 


28 


66 


164 


St. Peter's Miss., Coll. Pk. 


13 


4 


44 


61 


31 


23 


33 


87 


148 


Total .... 


864 


1,451 


1,610 


3,925 


864 


1,574 


723 


3,161 


7,086 



Church of England Missions 



St. Mary's, Shepherd's Bush 
St. Saviour's, Cobbold Road 
St. Matthew's, Milsom Road 
St. Stephen's, Ellerslie Rd. 

Total .... 



3 


1 


69 


73 


9 


16 


8 


.33 


1 


2 


95 


98 










1 


4 
2 


95 
14 


100 
16 


( 


10 


17 


40 


5 


9 


273 


287 


16 


32 


25 


73 



106 
98 

140 
16 

360 



WESIiEYAN METHODIST CHURCH 



Rivereourt, King St. West . 
Shepherd's Bush Road 
McArthur Memorial, Askew 
Road 


52 
111 

93 


55 
123 

86 


89 
80 

208 


196 
314 

.387 


74 
95 

122 


69 
125 

152 


31 

36 

62 


174 
256 

336 


370 
570 

723 


Total .... 


256 


264 


377 


897 


291 


346 


129 


766 


1,663 



Wesleyan Methodist Mission 



BlytheRd., Shepherd's Bush 



10 25 42 42 



PRIMITIVE METHODIST CHURCH 



Dalling Road 



31 I 13 79 123 I 37 47 16 100 223 



WELSH CALVINISTIC METHODIST CHURCH 



Southerton Road . 



19 12 



31 



31 32 



117 



64 I 95 



118 



THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 



BAPTIST CHURCH 







MORNING. 






EVENING. 




Total 


CHURCH. 




















Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldm. 


Total. 


Day. 


West End, King St. West . 


Ill 


99 


81 


291 


115 


152 


48 


315 


606 


Avenue Rd., Goldhawk Kd. 


87 


98 


114 


299 


83 


146 


70 


299 


598 


Shepherd's Bush Taber- 




















nacle .... 


36 


43 


46 


125 


62 


106 


34 


202 


327 


Ux bridge Road Tabernacle . 


3D 


40 


71 


150 


44 


93 


56 


193 


343 


Strict BaptistMeetingRoom, 




















Manor Ter., College Park 


13 


18 


13 


44 ! 


14 


16 


5 


35 


79 


South Street Mission . 










8 


20 


12 


40 


40 


Christ Church, Blythe Road 


12 


21 


97 


i30 t 


14 


24 


27 


65 


195 


Total .... 


298 


319 


422 


1,039 ! 


340 


557 


252 


1,149 


2,188 



COlSrGREGATIOIQ'AL CHURCH 



Oaklands, Uxbridge Road . 
The Broadway 
Albion, Dalling Road . 
People's Mission, Olaf St. 

Total . . , . 



85 


108 


127 


320 


99 


133 


54 


286 


36 


31 


34 


101 


57 


58 


76 


191 


55 


67 


86 


208 


57 


77 


37 


171 


2 




37 


39 


37 


54 


67 


158 


178 


206 


284 


668 


250 


322 


234 


806 



606 
292 
379 
197 



1,474 



PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 



St. Andrew's, Shepherd'.s 

Bush 

College Park, Harrow Road 


76 
55 


93 
36 


53 
76 


222 
167 


82 
72 


105 
58 


33 
45 


220 
175 


442 
342 


Total .... 


131 


129 


129 


389 


154 


163 


78 


395 


784 



SOCIETY OF FRIENDS 



Meeting House, Lower Mall I 12 



16 



24 



BRETHREN" 



Gospel Hall, Overstone Rd. 
Park HaU, Uxbridge Road . 
UnionCourt Hall, Broadway 
Kenmont Hall, College Pk. 


12 

9 

20 

23 


14 
7 

18 
13 


8 
4 
8 
3 


34 
20 
46 
39 


'I 

21 
14 


14 
9 

13 
11 


9 

11 

3 

8 


36 
24 
37 
33 


70 
44 
83 

72 


Total .... 


64 


52 


23 


139 


52 


47 


31 


130 


269 




SAIiVATIO]S 


r ARMY 










Haydn Park Road, Shep- 
herd's Bush 
Waterloo Street . 


5 
47 


6 

27 


25 
.36 


36 
110 


10 

86 


17 

82 


10 
47 


37 
215 


73 
325 


Total .... 


52 


33 


61 


146 96 


99 


57 


252 


398 




ROMAN CATHO 


Lie CHUR( 


::;h 








Holy Trinity, Brook Green . 
St. Stephen's, Starch Green 


359 
129 


634 
203 


412 
145 


1,405 

477 


76 
15 


146 
45 


87 
12 


309 
72 


1,714 
549 


Total .... 


488 


837 


557 


1,882 


91 


191 


99 


381 


2,263 



WEST LONDON— HAMMERSMITH 



119 



OTHER SERVICES 




DENOMINATIONAL TOTALS 



DENOMINATION. 

Church of England 

„ „ Missions 

Wesleyan Meth. Church 
„ „ Mission 

Primitive Meth. Church 
Welsh Cal.Meth.Church 
Baptist Church 
Congregational Church 
Presbyterian Church . 
Society of Friends 
►Salvation Army . 
Brethren 

Ptoman Catholic Church 
Other Services 
Jewish Church 



Grand Totals 



MORNING. 



Men. Women. Chldrn. Total 



864 
5 

256 

31 

19 

298 

178 

131 

12 

52 

64 

488 

21 

127 



1,451 

9 

264 

13 

12 

319 

206 

129 

3 

33 

52 

837 

14 

78 



1,610 
273 
377 

79 

422 

284 

129 

1 

61 

23 

557 

113 

83 



. 2,546 3,420 4,012 9,978 2,365 



3,925 

287 
897 

123 

31 

1,039 

668 
389 
16 
146 
139 
1,882 
148 
288 



EVENING. 



Men. Women. Chldm. Total 



864 


1,574 


16 


32 


291 


346 


7 


10 


37 


47 


31 


32 


340 


557 


250 


322 


154 


163 


5 


2 


96 


99 


52 


47 


91 


191 


131 


183 



723 

25 

129 

25 

16 

1 

252 

234 

78 

1 

57 

31 

99 

122 



3,161 

73 

766 

42 

100 

64 

1,149 

806 

395 

8 

252 

130 

381 

436 



Total 

for the 

Day. 



3,605 I 1,793 i 7,763 



17,741 



3 



s 

M 

u 



9 

a 
o 



J! 

bfi 






o 
•S 



Per 
Cent 



' Total 
Total 
Chur 


Noni 
Rom 


LUU ! 1 1 




1 




\ 




\ . . 


1 1 


T ^ 




tl 


-^_ 1 i^ 


. _ _ 1 .-_ 


-]-- 




-4- - - - — f — 


on - , 1. ..-.„ 


.zL __:: 


JU *■ \T — T" — — — — — f— 




-4 - . 




-44 U H-- — --- — 


1 


-j-^:— zi-i 1 TA, 




T Til 


AGRAM 


J_JJ 


r ci_ 




Qn_::i - Shew 


ing' Attendance. T 


oV — X 








\ HA. 


MME-IvSMITH. 






p., 


.-_-j»_ 


1 








\ 1 


1 1 




I i_ 


/u — "^ — ~ — ~ — ---^ -._-. — 


— P> 


' 


, 


1 


1 






1 




\ 




_+- *- f- 




\ 








fin . r""'J7, ."'^ , 


1 1 




~r" , 


1 


i 






1 1 




\ 








T 










i 






dU Z~~ """' 




, 




4- - 










1 


\ 










- - _)-_|_ _ 






Al\ L— 









1) 


"1 - --f- - 


I 




\ 








\ 




\ ^ 




\ 




\ 




:{(\~-^ l-^ d X--- 


...i.L,__. ._ ... . 1 






\ 




















" 




- . . I. . . - 








^n i . + 


1 


^U — ^ 


1 "T~^ ~^" 








[ 




1 






■^^ 


- _f_ . . _. 


s 


" -p- "•"" 


- " it ■ " '''v^ 




^Sj 




in_ — _____Z^ 




2y„_« V^ 




,^ 




=t 1- - "~ - - ^^«=»i 




1 






■^ *» 




^ "^ 




"^ 






qI ' 1 1 1 ' 1 1 1 1 1 1 HTl 1 M M 1 1 1 1 


t -^-E"_ZII 



Other Services 




90 



80 



DIAGRAM 

Shewing' Analysis of Attendance. 
HAMMUKSMITH. 




Blue = Evening 



Total 
'or the 
Day. 

771 
651 
932 
398 

69G 

724 

390 
194 

715 

678 

303 
306 
552 
793 

496 

8,599 



9 

208 

30 

105 

17 

439 

95 

903 



378 
778 

59 

1,215 



30 



All Churches 



Church of England 



Nonconformist 



Roman Catholic 



Other Services 




r\ 



Borough of Fulham 



CHURCH OF ENGLAND 



CHURCH. 


MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 

for the 

Day. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldm. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldm. 


Total. 


All Saints', Putney Bridge . 


138 


176 


94 


408 


126 


201 


36 


363 j 


771 


St. Alban's, INIargrav-ine Rd. 


35 


71 


361 


467 


46 


72 


66 


184 ' 


651 


St. Andrew's, May Street . 


132 


336 


53 


521 


84 


267 


60 


411 


932 


St. Augustine's, Lillie Road 
St. Clement's, Fulham 


41 


35 


95 


171 


49 


85 


93 


227 


398 




















Palace Road . 


65 


57 


33-1 


456 


70 


108 


62 


240 


696 


St. Dionis', Parson's Green 


94 


105 


180 


379 


105 


149 


91 


345 


724 


St. Etheldreda's, Fulham 




















Palace Road 


64 


68 


76 


208 


62 


74 


46 


182 


390 


St. James', Walham Green 


21 


32 


68 


121 


20 


27 


26 


73 


194 


St. Mary's, Hammersmith 




















Road 


115 


221 


98 


434 


66 


142 


73 


281 


715 


St. Matthew's, Wandsworth 




















Bridge Road 


48 


56 


148 


252 


91 


133 


202 


426 


678 


St. Michael's, Town Mead 




















Road 


15 


1 


103 


125 


21 


i 


150 


178 i 


303 


St. Oswald's, Walham Gn. . 


41 


16 


100 


157 


34 


48 


67 


149 


306 


St. Peter's, Reporton Road 


51 


62 


174 


287 


62 


120 


83 


265 i 


552 


St. John's, Walham Green . 


71 


139 


257 


467 


82 


155 


89 


326 


793 


Christ Church, Wandsworth 




















Bridge Road 


63 


74 


95 


232 


81 


120 


63 


264 


496 


Total .... 


994 


1,455 


2,236 


4,685 


999 


1,708 


1,207 


3,914 


8,599 



Church of England Missions 



St. Clement's, Fulham 




















Palace Road 










2 


,3 


4 


9 


1 9 


St. Andrew's, May Street . 


7 


5 


196 


208 










208 


St. Mary's Protestant Hall 










4 


12 


14 


30 


30 


Langford Hall, Broughton 




















Road 


.> 


4 


56 


63 


3 


15 


24 


42 


105 


Good Shepherd, Walham 




















Avenue .... 










4 


9 


4 


17 


17 


Parson's Green . 


6 


3 


88 


97 


26 


47 


269 


342 


439 


St. George's, Fane Street . 










17 


31 


47 


95 


95 


Total .... 


16 


12 


340 


368 1 


56 


117 


362 


535 


903 



WESIiEYAN METHODIST CHURCH 



Fulham Road, Walham Gn. 

Fulham Road, Munster Pk. 

German Chapel, Walham 

Green .... 

Total .... 



64 
129 


57 
128 


74 
202 


195 
459 


67 
131 


75 
147 


41 
41 


183 
319 


378 

778 


14 


8 


2 


24 


17 


15 


3 


35 


59 


207 


193 


278 


678 


215 


237 


85 


537 


1,215 



Wesleyan Methodist Mission 



Cassidy Rd., Walham Gn. 



11 



121 



12 



30 



122 



THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OP LONDON 

UNITED METHODIST FREE CHURCH 



CHURCH 




MORNING. 




EVENING. 


Total 




Men. 


Women. 


Chldm. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


ClUdm. 


Total. 


for the 
Day. 


Ebenezer, North End Road 
Walham Grove, Walham Gn. 


9 
34 


3 
21 


10 
52 


22 

107 


14 
43 


12 

38 


7 
32 


33 
113 


55 
220 


Total .... 


43 


24 


62 


129 


57 


50 


39 


146 


275 



METHODIST NEW CONNEXION 



Dawes Rd., Walham Green 
Castletown Road . 



271 
50 



Total . . . . 1 .321 



120 
100 



220 



1.36 
76 



212 



527 
226 



753 



167 
53 



165 

86 



220 



251 



55 



376 
150 



526 



Bethel, North End Road . 


26 


17 


59 


102 


1 ^^ 


36 


5 


72 


174 


PRIMITIVE METHODIST CHURCH 


Bayonne Road 
Wandsworth Bridge Road . 


9 
32 


10 
19 


25 
76 


44 

127 


12 
1 38 


24 
43 


22 
32 


58 
113 


102 
240 


Total .... 


41 


29 101 1 171 


1 50 


67 


54 


171 


342 


BAPTIST CHURCH 


Dawes Road 
Ebenezer, Lillie Road . 


90 
22 


69 
28 


154 1 313 
21 1 71 


66 
19 


71 
26 


61 
10 


198 
55 


511 
126 


Total .... 


112 


97 


175 384 


85 


97 


71 


253 


637 


Baptist Mission 


Rosaline Road . 


7 


... 1 27 i 34 


11 


17 


18 


46 ! 


80 


CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 



903 
376 



1,279 



PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 



Wel8h,EfBeRd.,WalhamGn.| 29 



10 



13 



52 



43 



33 



10 



86 



138 



DISCIPLES OF CHRIST 



Tasso Tabernacle, Grey- 
hound Road 

TwjTiholm House, Fulham 
Cross .... 

Munster Park Chapel . 


19 

60 
12 


13 46 78 

71 .57 188 
12 j 7 31 


46 

.39 
14 


71 , 53 

66 1 43 
24 25 


170 

148 1 
63 i 


248 

3.36 
94 


Total .... 


91 


96 


110 1 297 


99 


161 121 


381 1 


678 



BRETHREN 



Gospel Hall, High Street . 
North End Gospel Hall . . 
Hall, 733, Fulham Road . 
575, Fulham Road 


12 

25 

24 

9 


8 
21 
20 
14 


4 24 

11 ■ .57 

44 

8 31 


6 
27 
25 
11 


4 
25 
18 
17 


8 
10 

"14 


18 1 42 
62 ! 119 
43 1 87 
42 1 73 


Total .... 


70 


63 


23 156 


69 


64 


32 


165 ll 321 



WEST LOm)OX— FULHAM 

SALVATION ARMY 



123 



CHURCH. 


MORNING. 1 


EVENING. 


Total 

for the 

Day. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 1 

i 


Men. 


Women. | Chldm. 


Total. 


Dawes Road, Fulham Cross 
Biillow Road 


35 
18 


29 
4 


64 
70 


128 
92 


57 
31 


89 
30 


89 
45 


235 
106 


363 
198 


Total .... 


53 


33 


134 


220 


88 


119 


134 


341 


561 



ROMAW CATHOLIC CHURCH 



St. Thomas', Rylston Road 
Holy Cross, Asliington Rd. 


201 
137 


481 
243 


523 
185 


1,205 
5G5 


40 
25 


167 
48 


209 
51 


416 
124 


1,621 
689 


Total .... 


338 


724 


708 


1,770 


1 65 


215 


260 


540 


2,310 



OTHER SERVICES 



London City Mission, Eel- 




















brook Hall 










4 


18 


13 


35 


35 


London Citv Mission, St. 




















Oswald's Road . 










18 


30 


33 


81 


81 


London City Mission, Corn- 




















wall Street 


4 


1 


48 


53 


J 


22 


27 


56 


109 


London City Mission, Est- 




















court Street 










15 


33 


21 


69 


69 


London Citv iMiss., Ismalia 




















Road 










11 


18 


22 


51 


51 


London City !Miss., Barclay 




















Hall, Effie Road 










9 


12 


5 


26 


26 


Y.M.C.A., "Fairlawn," 




















Fulham Road . 










21 


7 


3 


31 


31 


Railway Mis.s., Lillie Road 


22 


16 


78 


116 


65 


87 


23 


175 


291 


Colvey Hall (Spiritualists) . 










28 


39 


6 


73 


73 


Total .... 


26 


1- 


126 


169 


1 178 


266 


153 


.597 


766 



DENOMINATIONAL TOTALS 



DENOMINATION. 


MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldm. 


Total. 


Day. 


Churcli of England 


994 


1,455 


2,236 


4,685 


999 


1,708 


1,207 


.3,914 


8,599 


„ „ Mission.s 


16 


12 


340 


368 


56 


117 


362 


535 


903 


Wesleyan Meth. Church 


207 


193 


278 


678 


215 


237 


85 


537 


1,215 


„ „ Missions 






... 


• •■ 


t 


11 


12 


30 


30 


U. Meth. Free Church . 


43 


24 


62 


129 


57 


50 


39 


146 ; 


275 


Meth. New Connexion . 


26 


17 


59 


102 


31 


36 


5 


72 


174 


Primitive Meth. Church 


41 


29 


101 


171 


50 


67 


54 


171 


342 


Baptist Church . 


112 


97 


175 


384 


85 


97 


71 


253 


637 


„ Mission 


i 




27 


34 


11 


17 


18 


46 


80 


Congregational Church. 


321 


220 


212 


753 


220 


251 


55 


526 


1,279 


Presbyterian Church . 


29 


10 


13 


52 


43 


33 


10 


86 


138 


Disciples of Christ 


91 


96 


110 


297 


99 


161 


121 


381 


678 


Brethren 


70 


63 


23 


156 


69 


64 


32 


165 


321 


Salvation Army . 


53 


33 


134 


220 


88 


119 


134 


341 


561 


Roman Catholic Church 


338 


724 


708 


1,770 


65 


215 


260 


540 


2,310 


Other Services 


26 


17 


126 


169 


178 


266 


153 


597 


766 


Grand Totals . 


2,374 


2,990 


4,604 


9,968 


2,273 


3,449 


2,618 


8,340 


18,308 




27 nmyzu 



Populatio) Roman Catholic 



Other Services 




Blue = Evening. 



31 



p 



Population 



All Churches 



Church of England 



Nonconlormist 



Roman Catholic 



Other Services 




Black = All Services 



Blue = Evening 



City of London 



CHURCH OP ENGLAND 



/-itJTTRr'p" 


MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 


OllUKUH. 


















for the 




Men. 


ft'omen. 


Dhldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Day. 


Cathedral Church of St. Paul 


475 


465 


72 


1,012 


689 


560 


76 


1,325 


2,337 


All Hallows' Barking . 


28 


24 


36 


88 


29 


37 


35 


101 


189 


All Hallows', London Wall 


8 


6 


19 


33 


5 


5 


14 


24 


57 


All Hallows', Lombard St. . 


15 


11 


13 


39 


24 


28 


15 


67 


106 


Christ Church, Newgate St. 


18 


16 


17 


51 


16 


17 


25 


58 


109 


Holy Trinity, Gough Sq. . 


24 


35 


35 


94 


31 


52 


18 


101 


195 


St. Alban's, Wood Street . 


6 


1 


6 


13 


10 


5 


8 


23 


36 


St. Alphege, London Wall . 


9 


7 


21 


37 


9 


8 


20 


37 


74 


St. Andrew's, Holborn 


52 


54 


27 


133 


107 


107 


39 


253 


386 


St. Andrew Undershaft 


23 


10 


27 


60 


19 


11 


23 


53 


113 


St. Andrew-by-the-Ward- 




















rolHJ 


16 


20 


21 


57 


20 


19 




56 


113 


St. Anne and St. Agnes' . 


8 


2 


10 


20 


12 


3 


14 


29 


49 


St. Austin's, Old Change . 


13 


3 


10 


26 


9 


6 


11 


26 


52 


St. Bartholomew-the-Great. 


20 


24 


15 


59 


34 


69 


oo 


125 


184 


St. Bartholomew-the-Less . 


21 


45 


17 


83 


9 


7 


!«> 


28 


111 


St. Benet's (Welsh Church) 


5 


5 




10 


44 


70 


^■^ 


127 


137 


St. Botolph's, Aldgate 


29 


23 


"28 


80 


29 


24 


38 


91 


171 


St. Botolph's, Bishopsgate . 


65 


58 


37 


160 


65 


95 


4.S 


203 


363 


St. Botolph's, Aldersgate . 


68 


40 


22 


130 


57 


57 


f5 


139 


269 


St. Bride's, Fleet Street . 


21 


14 


27 


62 


24 


27 


?i 


75 


137 


St. Clement's, Eastcheap . 


9 


3 


9 


21 


10 


9 


^9 


31 


52 


St. Dunstan in the East 


12 


9 


27 


48 


14 


17 


27 


58 


106 


St. Dunstan in the West 


42 


48 


59 


149 


54 


62 


.3.5 


151 


300 


St. Edmund the King and 




















Martyr .... 


27 


32 


20 


79 


34 


48 


18 


100 


179 


St. Ethelburga's,Bishopsgate 


21 


15 


19 


.55 


26 


28 


28 


82 


137 


St. Giles', Cripplegate . 


33 


18 


78 


129 


32 


23 


29 


84 


213 


St. Helen's, Bishopsgate 


13 


8 


17 


38 


16 


13 


15 


44 


82 


St. James' Garlickhythe 


17 


10 


16 


43 


21 


29 


11 


61 


104 


St. Katherine Coleman 


10 


4 


11 


25 


7 


6 


15 


28 


53 


St. Katherine Cree 


11 


16 


15 


42 


16 


30 


16 


62 


104 


St. Lawrence Jewry . 


37 


27 


30 


94 


83 


73 


33 


189 


283 


St. Magnus the Martyr 


10 


13 


3 


26 


9 


4 




13 


39 


St. Margaret's, Lothbury . 


24 


18 


39 


81 


23 


26 


"27 


76 


1.57 


St. Margaret Pattens' . 


28 


14 


16 


58 


37 


30 


12 


79 


137 


St. Martin's, Ludgate 




15 


13 


9 


37 


12 


15 


11 


38 


75 


St. Mary Abchurch 




10 


3 


15 


28 


9 


6 


12 


27 


55 


St. Mary Aldermary 




22 


20 


14 


56 


19 


29 


10 


58 


114 


St. Mary-at-Hill . 




22 


18 


58 


98 


305 


163 


76 


544 


642 


St. Mary-le-Bow . 




13 


16 


2 


31 


22 


17 




39 


70 


St. Marj' the Virgin's 




13 


2 


12 


27 


13 


6 


7 


26 


53 


St. Mary Woolnoth 




20 


18 


9 


47 


15 


16 


9 


40 


87 


St. Michael's, Cornhill 


39 


29 


31 


99 


60 


54 


29 


143 


242 


St. Michael's Paternoster 




















Royal .... 


12 


8 


20 


40 


25 


27 


23 


75 


115 


St. Mildred's, Bread Street 


6 


8 




14 


4 


8 


5 


17 


31 


St. Nicholas Cole Abbey . 


21 


37 


'6 


64 


70 


138 


13 


221 


285 


St. Olave's, Hart Street 


23 


32 


15 


70 


26 


51 


20 


"97 


167 


St. Peter's, Cornhill . 


34 


14 


15 


63 


25 


22 


14 


61 


124 


St. Peter-le-Poer . 


14 


4 


25 


43 


13 


5 


16 


34 


77 


St. Sepulchre's, Holborn 


28 


13 


80 


121 


40 


56 


41 


137 


258 


St. Stephen's, Coleman St. . 


22 


31 


28 


81 


25 


44 


23 


92 


173 


St. Stephen's, Walbrook 


28 


23 


18 


69 


23 


18 


17 


58 


127 


St. Swithin's, London Stone 


15 


6 


11 


32 


19 


10 


15 


44 


76 


St. Vedast's, Foster Lane . 


11 


6 


7 


24 


15 


4 


6 


25 


49 


Temple Church . 


221 


208 


26 


455 


63 


36 


21 


120 


575 


St. Thomas of Aeon (Mer- 




















cers' Chapel) 










13 


9 


10 


32 


32 


Total . 




1,807 


1,607 


1,220 


4,634 


2,440 


2,339 


1,148 


5,927 


10,561 



125 



126 



THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 



CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 



CHURCH 


MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 




Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


for the 
Day. 


City Temple, Holborn Via- 
duct 

Silver Street, Falcon Square 
Bishopsgate Street Chaj^el . 


2,0.54 
20 
35 


1,332 

27 
26 


77 
20 
17 


3,463 
67 
78 


1,750 
28 
72 


1,626 

46 

113 


169 
24 
13 


3.545 

98 

198 


7,008 
165 
276 


Total .... 


2,109 


1,385 


114 


3,608 


1,850 


1,785 


206 


3,841 


7,449 



BAPTIST CHURCH 



' Mill Yard " Seventh Day 
Baptist .... 



10 



10 



18 



28 



SOCIETY OP FRIENDS 



Devonshii-e House, Bishops- 
gate Street 



20 



13 



36 



10 



46 



FOREIGN PROTESTANT SERVICES 



Dutch Ch., Austin Friars . 45 



35 



87 



87 



WELSH CALVINISTIC METHODIST CHURCH 



NewJewin Chapel, Fann St. 33 



10 



48 I 146 



95 



18 259 



307 



MORAVIAN CHURCH 



Fetter Lane. 



15 



25 



43 



15 



23 



66 



BRETHREN 



Fleur-de-Lis Court 



18 



15 



39 



17 



24 



13 



54 



93 



OTHER SERVICES 



Billingsgate Christian Miss., 

19, St. Mary-at-Hill . 
Ethical Society, South Place 


118 


"93 


163 


'374 


11 


14 


11 


36 


36 
374 


Total .... 


118 


93 


163 


374 


11 


14 


11 


36 


410 



DENOMINATIONAL TOTALS 





MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 

for the 

Day. 


DBNOMINATION. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Church of England 


1,807 


1,607 


1,220 


4,634 


2,440 


2,339 


1,148 


5,927 


10,561 


Congregational Church 


2,109 


1,385 


114 


3,608 


1,850 


1,785 


206 


3,841 


7,449 


Baptist Church 


3 


3 


4 


10 


10 


5 


3 


18 


28 


Society of Friends 


20 


13 


3 


36 j 


8 


1 


1 


10 


46 


Foreign Prot. Services . 


45 


35 


7 


87 




• ■• 






87 


Welsh Cal.Meth. Church 


33 


10 


5 


48 


146 


95 


18 


259 


307 


Moravian Church . 


15 


25 


3 


43 


8 


15 




23 


66 


Brethren 


18 


15 


6 


39 


17 


24 


13 


54 


93 


Other Services 


118 


93 


163 


374 


11 


14 


11 


36 


410 


Jewish Church 


2,371 


459 


720 


3,550 






... 


... 


3,550 


Grand Totals . 


6,539 


3,645 


2,245 


12,429 


4,490 


4,278 


1,400 


10,168 


22,597 





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The Problem of North London 

BY WALTER E. WAEREN, LL.B. 

Intkoductory Note 

The task that lies before me is to describe the religious influences 
affecting North London — so far, at least, as they are operative 
through the Churches. 

The area is a large one, reaching westwards beyond Regent's 
Park to Hampstead Cemetery and the confines of Kilburn ; east- 
wards to the borders of Haggerston and the City boundary at 
Finsbury Circus ; and from Drury Lane, Strand, in the south, far 
away to the summit of Highgate Hill in the north. 

From east to west it is over five miles in extent, as the crow 
flies ; and from north to south over four miles ; while the total 
area includes over fifteen square miles. 

North London embraces six important boroughs, which resemble 
the pieces of a child's wooden picture-puzzle, dovetailing into one 
another — the long and straggling borough of St. Pancras, touching 
Oxford Street and Holborn on the one side and Highgate on the 
other, with the wealthy borough of Hampstead on its west, 
dreary and depressing Islington on its east, the progressive 
borough of Stoke Newington farther north-east, between which 
and Holborn lies the low and larcenous borough of Finsbury ; 
and lastly, at the foot of all, as if supporting all, the stolid, 
squalid borough of Holborn. 

In dealing with this vast area and its population of 865,000, 
I propose to take each borough separately, describe its area, its 
rateable value, its population, and the occupations and status of 
its residents, adding any other features of municipal or general 
interest. I then propose, in the case of each borough, to 
enumerate the places of worship, giving the different denomina- 
tions, the attendances at each on Sunday morning and evening, 
comparing and contrasting one denomination with another, and 

127 



128 THE EELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 

adding, where I deem desirable, some passing observations upon 
the work and worship carried on at particular places. 

When it is remembered that the printing space at my disposal 
is necessarily limited, it must be manifest to all how impossible 
it is to do justice to every detail, or to do more than glance at 
each district and aim at accuracy of statement where adequate 
description would involve infringement of such space. I shall be 
content if, within the limits allotted to me, I succeed in furnishing 
suf&cient material to drive my readers to supplement the informa- 
tion by individual inquiry. 

When I have reviewed the religious work of the several 
boroughs concerned, I shall conclude the whole with a few plain 
reflections upon the methods adopted, the men at work, and the 
probable causes of failure or success. 

STOKE NEWINGTON 

The borough of Stoke Newington takes in the parish of 
Stoke Newington and the urban district of South Hornsey, " or 
so much thereof as may be incorporated with the County of 
London." The following will give an approximate idea of the 
area covered. Starting from Finsbury Park Station, the northern 
boundary runs along Seven Sisters Road to Green Lanes and 
New River Road and the neighbourhood of Stamford Hill. The 
eastern boundary runs from Amhurst Road down Beltham Road 
to Stoke Newington Station, and thence by High Street and 
Stoke Newington Road, whence it proceeds in a north-westerly 
direction along Bolcyn Road, Green Lanes, Mount Grove, and 
Blackstock Road to Finsbury Park Station — that is to say, the 
western boundary of Stoke Newington. Within this area are the 
main thoroughfares of Lordship Lane and Manor Road, Green 
Lanes and Woodberry Down. 

It is well provided in some parts with open spaces, having 
Finsbury Park (116 acres) along its northern boundary, and 
Clissold Park (57 acres) towards the centre of its area — both 
parks under the control of the L.C.C. That portion known as 
South Hornsey is fully built upon, and has no agricultural land ; 
but the valuation of such land in the remaining area is £97. 
In Stoke Newington parish the population is 52 per acre, or 62"5 
without open spaces; in South Hornsey it is 74 per acre, or 88 
without open spaces. At the last census the total population of 



THE PEOBLEM OF NOETH LONDON 129 

tlie entire district was 51,247. There is very little overcrowding 
in any part. The death-rate in 1901 was 13-1. The rateable 
value for 1901-2 was £344,154. Both in rateable value and in 
population this is the smallest borough in London. There are 
948 one-room tenements, and 1,600 two-room tenements in the 
borough. The poorer classes dwell towards the eastern and 
south-eastern quarters; but otherwise the population is largely 
upper middle class, with a few very well-to-do around Clissold 
Park. 

The total aggregate Sunday attendance at all places of worship 
throughout this borough is 16,500 — i.e., one in three of the entire 
population. One person in every six of the whole population 
attends at Sunday morning service, and one in six in the 
evening. 

The Church of England has eleven places of worship 
(including three missions). The "Wesleyans and Baptists have 
each four, and the Congregationalists three, places of worship. 

Generally speaking, the population of this borough comprises 
that kind of middle class family whose habit is to attend some 
place of worship ; and many of the wor-king class follow their 
example. There are three places of worship, different in belief 
and locality, whose congregations are about equal in number. 

At St. Andrew's (Church of England), in Bethune Eoad, the 
Sunday attendances are frequently 700, mainly middle class, with 
a fair proportion of the better working class. The services are 
greatly appreciated by the congregation, which includes half as 
many men as women ; and the church is one where both classes 
work together with a common desire to carry on the high 
traditions of the Church and its organisations, and maintain 
its parochial powers. The music is excellent, and the general 
Church work highly beneficial, owing to the absence of class 
distinctions. 

At the Finsbury Park end of the borough the Weslej^an 
Methodist Church has attendances equally good. Here there is no 
mistake about the feeling which pervades the place. Everyone is 
welcome. The service is all aglow from platform to pew — reading, 
singing, preaching, praying, all are enjoyed and entered into by 
the entire congregation. One is carried away by the very spirit 
of the place ; by the striking individuahty of the preacher ; by 
the stirring worshipfulness of the congregation. The church owes 
its achievements to its deep devotional spirit, and its realisation 

9 



130 THE EELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 

of religious service. The continuity of its work does not seem to 
suffer through the circuit-system of the ministry. 

But the largest normal attendance in the whole borough is 
undoubtedly at "Woodberry Down Baptist Chapel, where the 
services are bright, the teaching practical, and the institutions 
well organised and sustained. This church received a great impact 
to its usefulness during the recent ministry of the E-ev. Gr. Hay 
Morgan, to whose able leadership, untiring zeal, and fine personality 
its present flourishing state is very largely due. 

At the large church of St. Mary's, in Church Street, everything 
has been done, from an aesthetic and artistic point of view, to 
make the service pleasing and conducive to worship. The parochial 
work is effectively organised, and other institutions of a social and 
educational character are well maintained. 

Another church equally vigorous and successful is that belonging 
to the Baptists at Devonshire Square. Founded in 1638, in the City 
of London, it was removed to Stoke Newington in the seventies 
of the last century. With a good evangelical preacher it is able 
to show the best-attended week-night services in Northern London. 
Its Christian Endeavour Society is a great strength and useful 
organism. Such, too, is the spiritual vigour and zeal of the 
church that Walford Hall is supported and officered by the 
members of its congregation. Its membership is nearly 800, and 
it has six local peachers. 

Nor must the Congregationalists be overlooked. Their strongest 
place in this district is at Abney Chapel, in Church Street. Here, 
again, the church is an historic one — an old Independent Cause, 
founded in 1662. Its name is taken from one of its first helpers, 
Sir Thomas Abney. A church full of good works, with a member- 
ship of 530; its energies overflow towards those in other parts, 
principally finding outlet in social mission work among the poor 
of Hackney. 

Other denominations are represented in the borough, but have 
a following comparatively small. 

The Roman Catholic body may be said to have no influence here, 
some of the services at their only church not mustering fifty persons. 

There are few missions in Stoke Newington, notwithstanding 
the strength of the Churches, 

Throughout the borough the Wesleyans and Baptists are 
numerically as strong as one another, while the Congregationalists 
are only half their number. 



THE PEOBLEM OF NORTH LONDON 131 

It is a happy sign that at most of the churches of all denomina- 
tions in the district an increasing number of the working class 
population attend, and, in some places, they share personally the 
active work of their particular place. Throughout the whole 
borough it may be confidently asserted that Nonconformity is 
vigorously in the ascendant. 

HAMPSTEAD 

The borough of Hampstead lies to the west of St. Pancras, 
and has an area of about three and a half square miles. The 
southern boundary runs by St. Edmund's Terrace, near Primrose 
Hill, north-westwards along Avenue Road, Acacia Road, AVoronzow 
Road, Queen's Road, and Finchley Road, down Boundary Road 
and G-reville Place to High Road, Kilburn, and away as far as 
Cricklewood. Here it turns north-east near Cricklewood Road, 
taking in Temple Park, across Finchley Road and Hampstead 
Heath, joining up the north-west corner of St. Pancras boundary 
near Ken (Caen) Wood. The eastern boundary is, as far as it 
goes, the same as the western boundary of St. Pancras — namely, 
a line dividing Parliament Fields from Hampstead Heath, along 
Maitland Park, across Haverstock Hill and Adelaide Road and 
Primrose Hill to a point near Albert Road, where it joins up with 
the southern boundary at St. Edmund's Terrace. Within this area 
there are 350 acres of open space (16^ per cent, of the whole area), 
including Hampstead Heath, the finest and most natural open space 
in London. 

The population has rapidly increased during the last fifty years. 
In 1861 it was 12,000, in 1881 it was 45,450, and in 1901 it was 81,942. 
Between 1896 and the present year 1,000 houses have been built. 
The population increases mostly in West End Hampstead, where 
during the last ten years it has grown twentyfold. The borough, 
with few exceptions, is entirely residential, the average rateable 
value of houses being as high as £76. In 1801 there were only 
691 houses ; to-day there are over 10,000. Yet there is very little 
overcrowding — 10*3 per cent, in 1891, which has since somewhat 
decreased. The death-rate in 1896 was 11*2 per 1,000, and is now 
10'6 per 1,000 — the lowest in all London. In 1901 the rateable 
value of the borough was £876,166, of which £602 was the valuation 
of land. In 1903 the rateable value is £986,006, of which £1,627 
is the valuation of agricultural land. 



132 THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 

Only in the side or back streets of the town itself is there any 
poverty, or in the west end of the district bordering the High Road, 
Kilburn, in which quarter alone are lodgings obtainable. Generally 
speaking, the residents are people of independent means, City and 
colonial merchants, and people of all talents and professions — 
including medicine, law, divinity, drama, journalism, literature, 
science and art, and music. In the west end, however, the 
inhabitants are either tradesmen carrying on small businesses, 
or the miscellaneous collection of working-class folk, including 
cabmen, builders' labourers, and a sprinkling of City clerks and 
assistants. 

The high-class shops of the district are situated in Finchley 
Road and High Street, Hampstead, while public-houses are chiefly 
conspicuous by their absence. 

Municipally Hampstead is well to the fore. Men of public spirit 
and business intelligence serve as its councillors. Four swimming 
baths and fifty private baths, opened in 1888, are greatly appre- 
ciated, while the baths' gymnasium for winter use has brought 
delight to the athlete and a net gain of £1,000 to the borough 
funds. Public libraries abound in every part, that erected at 
the corner of Finchley Road and Arkwright Road being one of 
the finest in London. The borough has adopted municipal electric 
lighting, which supplies current for the greater portion of the 
district, with a maximum demand rate of charge of twopence. 

Hampstead is, undoubtedly, one of the most lovely spots of 
London. With its glorious Heath, its free winds on that Heath, 
the rural scenes of hill and wood and water, its green fields, great 
parks, and country lanes, it stands the peerless and the picturesque 
of Northern London. Its very highways are beautiful, undulating 
from north to south and from east to west, forming infinite points 
of view, and commending to us the lines of Leigh Hunt : 

Streets, lulls, and dell, trees overhead now seen, 
Now down below, with smoking roofs between. 

It is a place of great historic interest; the very names of its 
localities are reminiscent of old nobility and greatness. Who has 
not heard of Belsize House and Lane ; of Rosslyn House and 
HiU; and of Haverstock Hill? If it had nothing greater than 
The Spaniards and Jack Straw's Castle, would not these recall the 
departed days of Charles Dickens and John Forster? But here 
in the beautiful Vale of Health lived old Leigh Hunt, lapped in 



THE PROBLEM OP NORTH LONDON 133 

the nature that he loved. Here Byron and Shelley roamed, here 
Keats lived and bloomed, and here were haunts of good Sir 
Richard Steele. Hampstead! the very name is rich in memories, 
multitudinous as its trees and old as the windy Heath. 

Nor is this beauteous borough deaf or indifferent to the serious 
call. There are within its borders fifty-one places of worship. 
Twenty-three are Church of England, six are Baptist, three Con- 
gregationalist, four Presbyterian, three "Wesleyan, two Unitarian, 
two Salvation Army, and two are Roman Catholic. 

The total aggregate attendance at all religious places throughout 
the entire borough is 20,940. That is to say, one person in four 
of the total population. The total attendance in the morning at 
all places is 11,676 (including 2,825 children), and in the evening 
about 9,264 (including 1,368 children). In other words, a little 
more than one in eight in the morning, and a little less in the 
evening. At these gatherings the women are nearly twice as 
many as the men ; but then there are five women to every three 
men in Hampstead, and domestics are redundant in the borough. 

Of the Church of England centres, seven are missions, very 
poorly attended, and sixteen are regular churches. The total 
aggregate number of people attending these latter churches 
throughout the Sunday is 9,925, of whom one-fifth are children. 
The largest Church of England congregation is at St. John's, 
Church Row, where the morning attendance was 695 (including 
283 children), and the evening 507 (including 172 children). At 
Christ Church the morning attendance is 497 (including 114 
children), in the evening about 412 (including about 64 children). 
After these, four or five places have an attendance between 
400 and 500 (including children). At the remaining Church of 
England places, attendances range from 100 to 300, of whom 
quite one-third are children. 

Of late, religious activities of every kind in Hampstead have 
increased, and feuds obtain. Between High Church and Low the 
battle rages ; while the foes to Romanism and to Ritualism have 
helped to augment and federate the forces. All Church of England 
places of worship have experienced a large accession to their 
numbers. Nor is this to be wondered at, when we observe that 
the Roman Catholics, at their chief place of worship — the Church 
of the Sacred Heart — have a morning attendance of 1,095, including 
693 women and 258 children. 

Among Nonconformist places of worship in the borough only 



134 THE EELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 

one could come anywhere near such an attendance — namely, the 
Congregational church, Lyndhurst Road. There the usual attend- 
ance reaches 900, excluding children. From every point of view 
this is by far the best attended place in Hampstead. Here Dr. 
Horton reigns; here are forces of great good. With a preacher 
whose message is ever fresh and uplifting, a spirituality that 
moulds good men, and with a social organism of religious energy 
and enterprise, the influence of such a centre is incalculably great. 

Among the Baptists the best attendances are found far apart 
— at Brondesbury Chapel on the western border, and at Heath 
Street Chapel in the town. In both places the work is well 
organised, the worship devout, the services are bright and helpful. 
At Brondesbury the congregation is middle class, and drawn 
entirely from the surrounding district, where the working class 
daily increases. Attendance : Sunday morning, 221 ; and in the 
evening, 387. At Heath Street the attendance is slightly smaller. 
This chapel, built in 1862, has two towers as a noticeable feature 
of its architecture. In the building which preceded it George White- 
field preached in 1739, and thus records his visit : " The audience 
was of the politer sort " — a reputation which the church maintains. 

The Presbyterians have not yet gained a very strong hold in 
Hampstead ; their strength is rather in the adjoining district of 
St. John's Wood. Their largest attendances in Hampstead are at 
Rondu Road, Cricklewood, where they number 187. The Unitarian 
gatherings are about the same. In Hampstead it is not surprising 
to find the Salvation Army restricted in their sphere of influence, 
and their largest meetings rarely exceed 100. 

Most of the denominations are on the best of terms with one 
another. The poor are too well looked after, and the tendency is 
to kill their courage by misinformed and misdirected kindness. 
Many churches of all denominations successfully conduct asylums 
for the aged, and give instruction to the young in the varied round 
of daily life. Throughout the borough religious life and social 
work appear to thrive and give expression to their strength in an 
infinite variety of ways. 

ISLINGTON 

The borough of Islington covers an area of four and three- 
quarter square miles, nearly the whole of which is built over. Its 
southern boundary starts at King's Cross terminus, runs by Penton- 
ville Road across Caledonian Road, and, by back streets making its 



THE PROBLEM OF NORTH LONDON 135 

way to the Angel, proceeds down City Road to Vincent Terrace. 
From this spot the eastern boundary runs round Arlington Street, 
across the New North Road, along Southgate Road, across Balls 
Pond Road, along Boleyn Road, Matthias Road, Green Lanes, 
Blackstock Road, Stroud Green Road, to Stapleton Hall, across 
Mount View Road to a little farther north. From there the 
northern boundary runs by Crouch Hill and Hornsey Lane to 
"Waterlow Park. From Waterlow Park to King's Cross terminus 
the western boundary of Islington is the eastern boundary of 
St. Pancras, passing along Dartmouth Park Hill, Brecknock Road, 
and York Road to King's Cross. This large area includes the 
districts of Holloway, Highbury, Canonbury, and Barnsbury, and 
the well-known thoroughfares of Caledonian Road, Holloway Road, 
Upper Street, St. Paul's Road, and Essex Road. 

In 1801 the population was 10,200, in 1841 it was 65,690, in 1881 
it was 282,860, and in 1901 it stood at 334,991. It is the largest 
population of all the London boroughs, and yet so badly off for 
open spaces that their total does not exceed 40 acres — only 1 acre 
of open space to every 8,375 persons. The largest open space, 
Highbury Fields, only occupies 27^ acres. Overcrowding in 1891 
was 20-25 — a percentage a little above the average of all London, 
The death-rate in 1899 was 18-1 per 1,000, and in 1901 it was 
16-98 per 1,000. 

The rateable value in March 1900 was £1,830,662, and in March 
1902 it was £1,912,943. 

The borough contains 12,955 tenements of one room each, and 
18,934 of two rooms — facts eloquent of the poverty that prevails. 
There are baths and washhouses, much patronised, in different 
quarters, but no free libraries within the borough. Of the many 
well-to-do people formerly resident in Islington, only a few remain, 
in Highbury, or the better sort of middle class in Canonbury. 
Driven out by the influx of the working classes, the rich have seen 
their fine old houses falling beneath the housebreaker's hammer, and 
yielding place to cheap-and-nasty dwellings. To-day the borough 
is invaded by those whose work is ever fitful and requires constant 
change of residence. Every day the borough is becoming more a 
caravanserai of ever-shifting lodgers, in consequence of its near- 
ness to Central London and the increasing work of great railway 
centres. No one can fail to observe it. Whether one alights from 
a 'bus at the Angel and penetrates the backs of High Street and 
Upper Street, or travels in and out of the side streets branching 



136 THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 

off the Caledonian Road, in the region of Pentonville and Bemerton 
and Beaconsfield Streets, or along the Seven Sisters Road — it is 
both real and certain that poverty, vice, and low life are there, 
potent with evil and pitiful to the last degree. Vice and the 
poverty that is no vice dwell together. 

How different from the Islington whose gardens Goldsmith 
knew and loved to visit ! Where is now the Merrie Islington, 
with lovely fields and leafy lanes, where Charles Lamb lived, and 
Johnny Gilpin galloped through ? Where is now that Highbury 
Barn, so noted for its ale and cakes ; or Cream Hall, whereat our 
grandsires gathered, hot and dusty, on a shining summer afternoon, 
to quaff new milk, eat custards cool, and cakes delicious, dipped in 
frothing cream ? Where is Canonbury, that " suitable resort for 
invalids, on account of its purity of country air and the convenience 
of an easy sixpenny stage every hour to the city"? 

Throughout the whole borough there are 160 places of worship, 
which command an aggregate Sunday attendance of 71,000 people — 
31,000 in the morning, and 40,000 at night. The aggregate atten- 
dance, therefore, represents one in four of the total population. 
In the morning one person in ten goes to a place of worship, in 
the evening one in eight, and, as is usually the case, the greater 
number are women. 

The Church of England alone have sixty-seven places of worship. 
Their congregations are large, the Sunday services bright and 
helpful, and their social and parochial work is maintained with 
enthusiasm and intelligence. The most successful Church of 
England centres are in Highbury and Holloway among the better 
part of the middle classes, where an ordinary attendance reaches 
700 and 800, including from 100 to 200 children. 

At St. Augustine's, Highbury ; St. James', Holloway ; St. Mary 
Magdalene's, Holloway ; St. John's, Upper Holloway, the congre- 
gations are, in every case, well over 700, and are drawn from the 
middle class portion of the population. Everything is done to appeal 
to the sense of good taste. Here a building sesthetically appointed, 
good singing, a bright and well-ordered service, conducted by one 
who liappily knows how to avoid tiring his audience, and how 
effectively to sustain their interest and sometimes to arouse their 
enthusiasm. The whole thing runs on rhythmically. At another 
it is the "ritual" of the whole service that commands the congre- 
gation and evokes the devotional spirit. While at others success 
is due in no little measure to the fact that the minister studies 



THE PEOBLEM OF NORTH LONDON 137 

the interests of the outside world, and does not forget that his 
congregation is largely composed of men who toil and spend 
six-sevenths of their lives in the City mart. In these churches 
the congregation are not only listeners, but enthusiastic workers, 
visiting the poor, ministering to the sick, and speaking comfortable 
words to the afflicted. 

In Essex Road and the vicinity of Finsbury Park the attend- 
ances run to 400 and 500, mainly middle class. In these, also, 
methods similar to those I have just described are employed 
successfully upon a smaller scale. In other parts of the borough 
the attendance is too meagre to call for attention. 

The largest concourse of worshippers at any place in the 
district is the morning service in one of the Roman Catholic 
buildings — either St. Joseph's Retreat, Highgate Hill, or St. John 
the Evangelist's, Duncan Terrace, in each of which the attendance 
reaches over 1,200. But this, of course, is due to the celebration 
of Mass ; for in the evening the congregations fall as low as 200 ; 
while at the Sacred Heart, Eden Grove, HoUoway, where the 
morning attendance for Mass is over 800, the evening congregation 
is less than 150. 

The nearest approach to these great gatherings is to be 
found among the Baptists in Upper Holloway, where the normal 
evening attendance is from 1,100 to 1,200. The sincerity and 
industry of the officers, the many eager workers, the systematic 
methods adopted, the endless variety of work and aims suitable 
for every kind of worshipper, all go to make it a living centre of 
religious usefulness. A great spirit pervades the place and work 
— the spirit of sympathetic helpfulness born of an experience 
gained by mixing with the outer world of things and men. No one 
can hear such a man as the minister of this church without being 
impressed with his whole-hearted sincerity. No attempt at "effect," 
no appeal to the sensational, no repetition of familiar phrases ; but 
a call to the highest and best in man, a reference to the world 
of fact, an argument based on daily experience and sound judg- 
ment, and a conclusion satisfying the deepest needs and stirring 
the holiest desires of the human heart. 

Throughout the whole area of Islington there is nothing 
quite like it among any other religious body, nothing so 
great or magnetic, nothing so successful in its achievement. 
If the Baptists had no other gathering, the}'- would be well 
represented; but they have other places, scattered well over 



138 THE BELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 

the district, some of which, as in Highbury Hill and Essex Road, 
are well attended. 

The Congregationalists have also a very strong hold in Islington. 
They have fifteen churches and four missions, whose total aggre- 
gate Sunday attendances amount to considerably over 11,500. At 
some churches the Sunday attendance reaches 1,000, while at others 
it ranges from 300 to 800. The Congregationalists are more and 
more giving the lead in North London, both in methods and kinds 
of organisation, especially in the well-to-do parts of the district. 
The best gathering is at Finsbury Park Congregational Church, 
where the Sunday evening attendance reaches 876 adults. These 
are mostly shopkeepers, shop assistants, artisans, mechanics, and 
clerks, resident in and around Seven Sisters Road. It is a thrilling 
sight to watch the crowds of people pouring into this church on 
a Sunday evening. The preacher, like his predecessor, has studied 
his people, and caught their ears and hearts. They are an audience 
good-hearted, industrious, and impressionable ; fond of tea-meetings 
and hymns with good swinging tunes, and not averse from a sally 
of wit or flash of sparkling humour. 

A totally different class of audience is that which gathers in 
the southern extremity of the district, at Union Church, Upper 
Street. This church was formerly the scene of the labours of 
the late Dr. AUon, whose success in improving the musical portion 
of worship is so well known. By his great gifts he gathered about 
him a large and influential congregation from the surrounding 
neighbourhood. The church still retains its fame for excellent 
singing ; its vitality is still very vigorous. Although many who 
once worshipped there have removed from the neighbourhood, the 
numbers are well maintained, 786 being present at Sunday morning 
worship. The preaching is effective, and appeals especially to an 
intellectual audience. 

Similar vitality attends the work at other Congregational 
churches in Upper Street and Junction Road, Holloway. Two other 
churches of this body may not be passed in silence. If we turn 
to Highbury Quadrant, we find a robust and healthy state of things. 
Attendances, morning and evening, 5112 and 650 adults. Here again 
it is the man who draws. Robust in mind and body, he preaches 
a valorous faith in God and love of men. As scholar and author 
he appeals to people who think and read. He seeks to actualise 
for men the comradeship of Christ. And while his sermons are 
full of spiritual force, they are lit with brilliant epigram and apt 



THE PROBLEM OF NOETH LONDON 139 

quotation, and never fail to awaken interest, quicken thought, 
and stimulate to action. 

Going farther north in the district, we reach New Court, 
Tollington Park, a church of historic value, capable of holding 
1,200 to 1,400 people. The congregation is wholly composed of 
middle-class residents and tradespeople. I can well remember the 
over-crowded assemblies of this church, fourteen or sixteen years 
ago, under the leadership of the Rev. Ossian Davies, whose Druidic 
fervour impressed the mind and heart. Rhetoric, poetry, argument, 
personal experience, living conviction, divine passion and com- 
passion — all shot like well-winged arrows, or falling magnificently 
as white snow before a winter wind. And for a few years, too, 
this church has been the scene of the Rev. G. Campbell Morgan's 
successful labours. From pulpit steps to doors, and from floor 
to gallery — full to overflowing, morning and evening, with no hope 
for late-comers. 

In each case, unquestionably, it has been the personality of the 
man that has secured these extraordinary attendances. And 
although the numbers have not been anything like as great since 
the departure of Dr. Campbell Morgan, they are still very good. 
The place has acquired a kind of spiritual goodwill in the neigh- 
bourhood — its people religiously resort to it, and even week-night 
services are well attended. 

If we turn to the Presbyterians, here again we find that the 
best-sustained church is that which has the most competent 
preacher and leader — namely. Crouch Hill, Holly Park : the congre- 
gation, mainly upper middle class residents of the district; an 
effective preacher, broad-minded, good-natured, and sociable ; the 
church running to no extremes, but doing all its work with 
religious politeness. 

The Salvation Army have a good Sunday evening attendance 
of 635 at Junction Road, Holloway; and of the undenominational 
services the largest gathering (331) is at Holloway Road Hall on 
Sunday evenings. 

ST. PANCRAS 

The borough of St. Pancras, with its straggling area and its 
struggling population, includes every class and condition. It 
is one of the largest London boroughs, and covers more than 
four square miles. Let us define the district. Starting from a 
point near the juncture of Rathbone Place and Oxford Street, the 



140 THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 

western boundary of St. Pancras runs along Ratlibone Place and 
Charlotte Street, across the Broad Walk at Regent's Park to 
Albert Road, Primrose Park and Hill, by Ainger Road and 
Maitland Park Road to Gospel Oak, and almost due north, dividing 
Hampstead Heath and Parliament Hill, past Ken Wood and 
Mansfield House to Hampstead Lane. The northern boundary runs 
thence eastwards, keeping a line a little south of Hampstead Lane 
along to Highgate Hill. The eastern boundary proceeds south- 
wards from Highgate Hill by Dartmouth Park Hill, Brecknock 
Road, York Road to King's Cross terminus (G.N.R.), crossing 
over Pentonville Road and joining King's Cross Road, up to 
Calthorpe Street and Mount Pleasant. The southern boundary 
goes by Mount Pleasant into Gray's Inn Road, along Guilford 
Street to Russell Square, round Bernard Street, across Coram 
Street to Tavistock Street, on to Tottenham Court Road and the 
point near Oxford Street from which we started. 

In 1901 the population of St. Pancras was 236,284. 

With little exception it is a poor and densely populated borough, 
its highways of noisy traffic fed with numberless streets of the 
meanest kind. Lodging-houses of a low class abound, and an 
infinite swarm of petty shops compete with a few large stores. 
More than 11 per cent, of its area is open space — namely. 
Parliament Hill, 180 acres ; Waterlow Park, 30 acres ; Regent's 
Park, 45 acres ; besides smaller open spaces under local control. 
Moreover, many parts of the borough, such as Kentish Town, 
Somers Town, Chalk Farm, and Euston Road, are ever suffering 
through the continual development of great railways in their midst 
and the extension of business premises, every opportunity of 
buying up adjoining properties being eagerly sought and secured. 
The large population is consequently congested into close 
quarters, and overcrowding prevails. In 1891, over 35 per cent, 
of the people were living in small tenements with more than two 
persons in a room. 

The death-rate in 1899 was 20-3 per 1000; in 1901 it was 18*1 
per 1000, the decrease being partly due to the clearing away of 
some insanitary and crowded dwellings. 

By far the worst parts of the borough are the neighbourhoods 
off Hampstead Road and St. Pancras Station, the side streets off 
Euston Road and Gray's Inn Road, Burton Crescent, Charlotte 
Street, the streets to the north of High Street, Camden Town, 
and some parts of Somers Town. 



THE PEOBLEM OF NOETH LONDON 141 

Here the conditions of existence are disheartening to a degree : 
ugly, squalid dwellings filled with every unpleasant odour, and 
densely packed with every kind of dirty people ; loafers and casual 
labourers herding with poor prostitutes; carmen and railway men 
working long hours for little wages and large families ; all huddled 
together in couples of stifling rooms, backed with the deadest of 
walls and faced with the dullest of streets. Here dirty men's dirtier 
wives keep low lodgings and maintain a dirty state of chronic 
intoxication ; here the dirty streets are full of dirty and ansemic 
children ; here, though rents are high, rooms are rarely vacant ; 
here fresh air never enters and pure winds never blow, the flowers 
refuse to bloom ; here all things degrade and die — only the evil 
that men do lives on, and little babes are blessed with early 
death ; here souls go to hell and no one cares. 

The richer and healthier parts of the borough are near Eegent's 
Park, Highgate Hill, Dartmouth Park Eoad, Tufnell Park ; and, 
in the southern portion, Endsleigh Gardens, Tavistock, Woburn 
and Gordon Squares ; while in the more central portions of the 
district, Camden Town and Kentish Town, the people are mostly 
of the lower middle class — shopkeepers, tradesmen, and artisans — 
City clerks and shop assistants also finding easy lodgings here. 
The great railways in the borough bring their workers to this 
part. Houses once bright with better folk still persist, and 
through the Camden and the Kentish Towns one feels, in frequent 
places, that indescribable air of faded gentility forever associated 
with one Wilkins Micawber — a former resident. 

On the other hand, the rich and well-to-do of Eegent's Park 
or Endsleigh Gardens keep themselves to themselves and neither 
mix nor intermeddle with the poor. 

This being the general character of the people, let us see how 
they respond to religious agencies. Throughout the borough of 
St. Pancras there are 116 places of worship. The total Sunday 
morning attendance is 20,146, including 7,293 children. The total 
evening attendance is 22,010, including 6,288 children. In other 
words, one person in every twelve of the entire population attends 
Sunday morning worship ; and one person in eleven attends evening 
service. There are forty-five Church of England places of worship, 
of which thirty-six are regular churches scattered well over the 
entire area. The total Sunday morning attendance at these is 
8,931, including 3,876 children ; the total evening attendance is 
8,277, including 2,096 children. So that one adult in fifty attends 



142 THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 

tlie Church of England on Sunday morning, and about one adult in 
thirty-eight on Sunday evening. 

The parish church of St. Pancras, situated in the wealthy part, 
has a congregation which numbers 668 (including 283 children) in 
the morning and 832 in the evening — mainly of the more fashionable 
class; and at St. Mary Magdalene's, Osnaburgh Street — another 
well-to-do district — the morning attendance is 706 (including 268 
children), and in the evening 379. Both are very High, and both 
lay great stress on first-class music. These are the largest attend- 
ances at any Church of England place of worship in the borough. 
At St. Michael's, which dominates the Hill at Highgate, where, again, 
music and sestheticism play their part, the Sunday morning attend- 
ance is just over 500, but in the evening only 279. At All Hallows', 
Gospel Oak, a church of superb proportions, the attendance is 442 
in the morning and 453 in the evening, and the congregation is 
composed of the well-to-do middle class. For the rest, throughout 
the borough we find Church of England buildings large and 
empty, the attendances being anything from 250 down to 25. At 
the eight Church of England missions the attendances are never 
greater than fifty or sixty adults ; but frequently from five to 
fifteen, all told. 

Of the many other denominations there are seventy Noncon- 
formist places of worship, the total attendance at which outnumbers 
the total attendance at the Church of England alone by between 
5,000 and 6,000. Among the most active and prominent of these 
other denominational bodies, eleven churches are Baptist, ten are 
Congregational, eight are Presbyterian, seven are Wesleyan, three 
are Salvation Army, and eighteen Undenominational missions. 
With a few notable exceptions all these places of worship are 
very poorly attended. 

At Park Square Chapel, Regent's Park, under the able leadership 
of Mr. Gauge, the Baptist cause flourished considerably. The 
morning attendance is 627, and in the evening 768. The services 
are inspiring and instructive, and addressed to all classes of 
people. The congregation is drawn largely from parts beyond 
the borders, and comprises all kinds of middle-class folk, some 
very well-to-do, as well as many students for the ministry. The 
place is known far and wide as a good centre of religious life, 
and draws many outsiders by its well-deserved and well-sustained 
reputation. 

Again, at Highgate Road the Baptists are in full force. Morning 



THE PROBLEM OF NORTH LONDON 143 

attendances, 693 ; evening, 444. Congregation, largely working 
middle class and well-disposed. The singing is clieerj^, the preach- 
ing fresh and pointed ; and a spirit of mutual goodwill pervades the 
place. 

At Maitland Park and St. Aloysius', Somers Town, both Roman 
Catholic places, morning Mass accounts for the numbers. The 
Sunday morning attendance at Maitland Park is 1,179, and in the 
evening only 364 ; at St. Aloysius' the morning attendance is 765, 
and in the evening 303. 

In Kentish Town and Camden Town the Wesleyans are the 
strongest — in fact, the only strong — body in every respect, in 
spiritual vigour, enthusiastic work, and self-support. Their church 
and work in Prince of "Wales Road are the best and brightest in 
all the district; in every department the young people take a 
growing and active part, and everything throbs with life and goes 
with a swing. Their ministers have but to ask, and the thing is 
done. Yet, even here, the largest attendances do not exceed 500, 
including children. 

For the rest, the attendances are very poor and discouraging, 
whether we look at the Congregational body, mustering at most 
an audience from 200 to 350, and at least from 50 to 15 ; or at 
the Presbyterians, with their largest gatherings of 443 (including 
96 children) at Regent Square, and their smallest of 60 (including 
half children) at common Kentish Town ; or at the Salvation Army, 
with their good work at Burton Hall. However, the Salvation 
Army at Chalk Farm have an excellent Sunday evening atten- 
dance, mustering 612 (including 178 children). The Unitarians 
have comparatively no following in St. Pancras. Of the eighteen 
undenominational missions little can be said of an encouraging 
nature, so far as meetings go, beyond the fact that numbers of 
children attend them. 

The great mass of poor people of St. Pancras are unaffected 
by the religious centres in their midst. Religious meetings and 
services do not attract them. For the most part, they live a 
miserable, struggling existence from week to week, over-tired by 
their daily labour or the lack of it, depressed by the deadening 
sense of their dull surroundings, careless of most matters beyond 
their own door or the public-house, and generally suspicious of 
anything in the nature of a homily or good advice. 



144 THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 



HOLBORN 

This borough includes the united parishes of St. Giles-in-the- 
Fields and St. George, Bloomsbury ; St. Andrew, Holborn-above- 
the-Bars ; and St. George-tho-Martyr, and the Liberty of Saffron 
Hill, with Lincoln's Inn, Gray's Inn, Staple Inn, and so much of 
Furnival's Inn as is outside the City of London. 

The borough of Holborn geographically lies at the feet of the 
borough of St. Pancras. Taking a point at the juncture of Francis 
Street and Tottenham Court Road, we find that the northern 
boundary of Holborn runs along Francis Street, Byng Street, 
across Coram Street and Russell Square, by Guilford Street and 
Doughty Street to Mount Pleasant, Warner Road, and Clerkenwell 
Road as far as Farringdon Road. The eastern boundary goes 
along Farringdon Road, and skirting the City boundary by High 
Holborn, makes its way into Cursitor Street and Carey Street. 
From this last-named point the southern boundary encloses Lin- 
coln's Inn Fields, and proceeds across Drury Lane to Castle Street, 
where the western boundary commences, and continuing by Charing 
Cross Road, Oxford Street, and Tottenham Court Road, arrives at 
Francis Street, from which we started. 

This area covers 409 acres, and includes the well-known 
thoroughfares of New Oxford Street and High Holborn, and the 
historic open spaces of Lincoln's Inn Fields and Gray's Inn. In 
area Holborn is the smallest borough of London, and presents the 
extreme contrasts of great opulence and abject poverty. It is 
crowded with business premises and the houses of the poor. The 
population in March 1901 was 69,390, but at the end of that j'ear 
it was estimated at 61,033. Even when the Lincoln's Inn Fields 
and Gray's Inn are included, there are only nine acres of open 
space throughout the entire borough. There is consequently much 
overcrowding — 166 persons to the acre. In 1901 in St. Giles 
29*8 per cent, of the whole population lived more than two in a 
room, and in the parish of Holborn 384 per cent. The death- 
rate is very high — namely, 24-9 for the Holborn parishes, 19*9 in 
St. Giles, and for the whole borough 22 per 1,000, as contrasted 
with 11 '6 for Hampstead. A very large portion of the borough 
is undergoing structural demolition and alteration, displacing many 
of the residents, and substituting for their residences premises used 
for business only, or for residential purposes as high-class flats. 



THE PEOBLEM OF NOETH LONDON 145 

We liave the wealthy in Bedford Square and Eussell Square, 
spreading along Southampton Eow and thereabouts, mostly inde- 
pendent. North of Oxford Street the residents are frequently 
independent or among the professional classes, as in Great Eussell 
Street, John Street, and the neighbourhood of Bedford Eow; in 
other parts tradesmen, shop assistants, dressmakers, hotel waiters, 
etc., reside ; on the south of Oxford Street, market porters, Jewish 
tailors, carters, waiters, labourers, theatrical employes, charwomen, 
washers, and many whose callings are obscure. Some of the worst 
and poorest parts are around Drury Lane and the streets and alleys 
between Drury Lane and Carey Street. 

The aggregate Sunday attendance at places of worship, how- 
ever, is one person in every four of the entire population. Li the 
morning one person in eight attends public worship, in the evening 
one in nine. The Church of England have thirteen places of 
worship in Holborn and four missions ; the Eoman Catholics have 
three. The aggregate attendance at the Church of England services 
in their thirteen churches is the same as the aggregate attendance 
at the three Eoman Catholic churches. In point of numbers these 
two bodies stand first in Holborn. 

Of the position of the Eoman Catholics there can be no question. 
At the chief church — St. Peter's, Clerkenwell — the total attendance 
on Sunday reaches 3,000 — i.e. 2,067 at morning Mass and 933 at 
their evening service. The astonishing fact is that out of 2,067 
attendants more than 850 are men, and out of the 933 in the 
evening nearly 400 are men. 

The largest attendances in Church of England places of worship 
are at St. Alban's, Brooke Street — a fashionable church with every 
attraction of ritual and art — and at St. George's, in Hart Street ; 
but at neither of these does any attendance go beyond 570. For 
the rest, all the other churches of the Church of England have but 
small attendances, and High Church ways prevail. The proximity 
to the City and the general conditions of the district make an 
attendance of 200 or 300 a good congregation. 

The Baptists in Holborn have their best gathering on the 
western border of the borough — namely, at Bloomsbury Chapel, 
a little under 500 in the morning and a little above in the 
evening. No doubt these attendances are due not only to 
the good organisations and well-filled pulpit, but also to its 
popularity as a place for holding spring and autumn assemblies 
of the denomination. The congregation includes a large number 

10 



146 THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 

of people engaged at shops and other business premises in the 
neighbourhood. 

Another Baptist church is in John Street, Bedford Row, for- 
merly the scene of Baptist Noel's activities, possessing a fine and 
capacious building, well lit with electricity, comfortably seated, 
bright in services, enthusiastic in local work, and well organised ; 
but the attendances do not exceed 195 in the morning, 312 at night. 
The congregation is entirely middle class. The surroundings and 
conditions under which any religious work in this part of the 
district is done are such as to need heroic effort and relentless 
persistence. This church is hampered by the distinctions of its past 
and the difficulties of the present. That part of the population 
which is not continually shifting is perpetually indifferent. 

The new Baptist church at Kingsgate Street, Southampton Row, 
hitherto a small but worthy cause, is more likely to become a centre 
of great religious activity in the future, owing to its close proximity 
to the spacious new premises recently erected in Southampton Row 
for the general work of this denomination. 

The "Wesleyan Methodists have a church in Great Queen Street. 
The building is both large and old, with double galleries running 
round its sides, and is capable of accommodating 2,(X)0 people ; yet 
the Sunday attendances are a deplorable sight — in the morning not 
more than 140, and in the evening 250 at most. This place 
peculiarly illustrates the difficulties which beset the three-year 
system of the "Wesleyan Methodist Church. With a neighbourhood 
among the worst in London, and with local obstacles of a distressing 
kind, only permanent and persistent work by the same man, 
year in and year out, could hope to achieve anything here in 
the nature of success. 

There is no Congregational church or mission throughout the 
entire borough, and of the ten other missions that are carried on, 
the most conspicuous for successful endeavour are those known 
as Fox Court and Field Lane, where the aim of the work is to 
rescue, guide, and guard the child-life of the neighbourhood. 

When compared together numerically, the Church of England, 
the Roman Catholics, and the Nonconformists may be likened to 
three forces which keep things equally balanced all round — no 
one power outweighing the other. 



THE PEOBLEM OF NORTH LONDON 147 

FINSBURY 

The borongli of Finsbnry lies between Hoxton and Islington 
on its north, and east, St. Pancras, Holborn, and the City of London 
on its west and south sides. Starting from the juncture of 
Farringdon Road and Charterhouse Street, the southern boundary 
of the borough of Finsbury runs by the Central Meat Market, 
Charterhouse Street, Carthusian Street, across Aldersgate Street, 
Fann Street, across Golden Lane and Whitecross Street, down 
Ropemaker Street to South Place. From South Place the eastern 
boundary line is formed by Wilson Street and Paul Street. The 
northern boundary runs along Cowper Street, City Road, Liver- 
pool Road, Richard Street, Denmark Road, and AVynford Road. 
Thence the western boundary goes by steps down Southampton 
Street, South Place, Winchester Street, Collier Street, and North 
Street, along King's Cross Road and Farringdon Road to the point 
from which we first started. This area includes the well-known 
thoroughfares of Clerkenwell Road, Old Street, Goswell Road, 
St. John's Street, Pentonville Road, the historic Charterhouse — 
where Thackeray received his early training, and which he has 
made so famous, as " Greyfriars," in the pages of his inimitable 
works — St. John's Gate, Clerkenwell Close and Green, the ancient 
burial ground of Bunhill Fields, and the shades of the once 
famous St. Chad's and Sadler's Wells — haunts of delight in other 
days, scenes reminiscent of illustrious lives. 

To-day the place has fallen on evil times ; no green and grassy 
lawns give comfort to the footfarer, but shoddy squares and 
hovel homes look through lean cheeks on every hand. Poverty 
pervades. Vice is resident and regnant. There is no natural or 
artificial beauty anywhere, no sight to soften the dismal dirtiness, 
no sound to alleviate the depressing misery of its vice. The 
borough includes the parishes of Clerkenwell and St. Luke, a 
small part of Holborn district, namely the parish of St. Sepulchre 
and the liberty of Glasshouse Yard, and the extra parochial place 
of the Charterhouse. 

The whole borough is fully built over, and is densely populated — 
172 persons to the acre, as contrasted with 64 for all London. 
Overcrowding prevails. In 1901 in the Holborn parishes 38 per 
cent, of the population were overcrowded ; in St. Luke nearly 
39 per cent. ; and in Clerkenwell over 44 per cent.,— living in small 
tenements with more than two persons in a room. Nearly 80 per 



148 THE EELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 

cent, of the population live in tenements of less tlian five rooms, 
and 85 per cent, of the buildings throughout the entire area 
consist of such tenements. There are few open spaces in Finsbury. 
The total area is 588 acres ; the total area of open spaces is sixteen 
acres — for a population of 101,463. Result — death-rate is very high : 
namely, in Clerkenwell, in 1901, 20 per 1,000; in St. Luke 23-7 per 
1,000; and for the whole borough, 21-3 per 1,000— the third highest 
death-rate in London. The population reached its climax in 1861, 
and has been since declining. But while the population steadily 
decreases, the area available for residence decreases still more 
rafjidly owing to the continual extension and development of 
business premises on every hand. The rateable value is very high 
£956,627, and is on the increase. In area the borough is the 
smallest in London, with the exception of Holborn. It has 
libraries in Clerkenwell, St. Sepulchre, and Glasshouse Yard ; a 
fine town hall in Rosebery Avenue ; and Northampton Institute, 
which is both an acquisition and a redeeming feature. 

In Clerkenwell the making and dealing in watches, jewelry, 
precious stones, and metal-work occupy a great number of the 
residents ; in other parts of the borough saddlery, printing, and 
tailoring ; while the poorest are market porters, newspaper runners, 
ice-cream vendors, mantle-makers, and matchbox-makers. St. Luke 
is as noted for its thieves as Clerkenwell is for its watches, and 
Saffron Hill for its Italians. St. Luke is the worst criminal quarter 
of London — Banner Street, Central Street, Whitecross Street, 
Coster's Buildings, and Sunday Market. 

Let us see how this multitude attend to religious worship. The 
population is 101,463, of whom less than one in fourteen attend any 
place of worship on Sunday morning, and less than one in eight at 
night. 

The Church of England has twenty places of worship within the 
borough. Its largest congregation is St. Luke's, Old Street, mostly 
children; and at none of its churches can it muster more than 
seventy or eighty men at any one service. Some of these churches 
are very old, and some historic— for example, the Charterhouse ; 
some are very High and ritualistic, such as the Holy Redeemer, 
in Clerkenwell, and St. Clement's, in City Road ; in few can it 
be truly said that the religious influence is great or really successful. 
A variety of unavailing attempts are made to enlarge the attend- 
ance — among others, a lantern service on Sunday evenings, as at 
St. James', Clerkenwell. So far as numbers are concerned, the 



THE PR0BLE:\I of XORTH LONDON 149 

three Church of England missions are a complete failure. Clearly, 
Finsbury is not a " church "-going people, in spite of the total 
attendance throughout the borough, which is only large in con- 
sequence of the numerous churches scattered about. 

Unquestionably the two greate.st bodies of religious influence 
in the borough of Finsbury. rivalling one another in real enthusiasm 
and spiritual vigour, are the Bapjtists and the Wesleyans. 

The Baptists have only five places within the borough, yet have 
a total aggregate Sunday attendance of over 4,000. Out of these, 
in the matter of attendances at services, three of them run each 
other very close, averaging from 1.000 to 1,200 at each place for 
the whole day. These are AVoodbridge Chapel, Vernon Chapel, 
King's Cross Road, and Great Arthur Street Chapel. 

Woodbridge Baptist Chapel doubtless owes its great success to 
the great and indefatigable efforts of Mr. J. Groom. One of its 
main objects is a mission to the flower-girls ; and its congregation 
is drawn entirely from the working-class population. The place 
and its workers form a hive of religious industry and usefulness. 

Vernon Chapel, King's Cross Road, is a centre of religious 
work well known to those who live around Pentonville and Gray's 
Inn Road. Its pastor — a man of the people, robust in belief 
and happy in his labours — throws all the force of his life's full 
energies into the uplifting of human souls and fitting them for the 
fulfilment of the daily duties of an exemplary and idealistic 
citizenhood. More and more the members of his flock are of the 
surrounding neighbourhood. This is as it should be. "With a 
membership of many hundreds, and a weekly attendance of many 
hundreds more, and a religion as practical as it is pure and true, 
it is no wonder that the Christian life is felt here to be a real 
and potent thing. The main principle presented throughout all 
the work that is done is that Christ is all-sufficing for every life. 
A ii.-cful missionary enterprise is the outcome of this religious life ; 
outdoor meetings ; visits and ministrations to the very poor and 
the outcast, resulting not infrequently in the reclamation and 
reformation of those visited to high ideals and holy living. 

Much the same sort of good work is carried on at Great Arthur 
Street Baj)ti.st Chapel, where the attendances are equally great. 
There the minister, with dauntless hope and radiant faith, has 
given fresh life to a waning work ; has recalled to renewed service 
dormant energies ; and recharged with inspiring courage hearts 
and minds that had grown dull and grey. 



150 THE EELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 

Nor can one omit, in passing, the gracious work of " good 
Mr. Reuben May," as he is known, in the dispensation of free 
food to the poorest of the poor. His own account sa3'^s over a 
million destitute men and women from all parts of the world 
have received temporal relief and heard the gospel preached to 
them. Can this be all in vain ? 

When we turn to the Wesleyans we find here, also, three 
equally large and successful centres of work. 

There is Wesley's Chapel — the Methodist cathedral and shrine, to 
which prilgrims and visitors come from all the ends of the earth. 
The congregation is continually increased by the presence of inter- 
ested strangers. The church has only a small membership, but all 
are active workers, and throw themselves into the maintenance of a 
most effective missionary work in the shape of a Sunday school, 
where the attendance runs from 1,000 to 1,600 at each gathering. 

Again, the Central Mission, carried on by the Wesleyans in 
St. John's Square, is vigorous, educative, and uplifting. At a 
Sunday morning service the attendance is well over 600, and in 
the evening reaches 769 — making a total attendance for the day 
of 1,289 people, mostly drawn from the surrounding neighbourhood. 

Once more, there is the Leysian Mission, in Errol Street — the good 
work of the Rev. J. E. Wakerley — founded and sustained by the brains, 
sympathies, and energies of the bright intellects of the Leys School, 
Cambridge. The mission has an excellent musical force, which is 
much enjoyed by the congregation on Sundays and week-days 
alike ; and the religious and social influence of men direct from 
Cambridge renders the work successful and cheering. The very 
lowest and most abandoned are visited and dealt with; while those 
who will be rescued find ready hands stretched out to them. New 
buildings are now being erected at a very considerable outlay, to 
carry on this good work, in City Road. 

Among Congregationalists the most successful and important 
work is that carried on at Claremont Hall, Pentonville Road. It 
is conducted under the auspices of the London Congregational 
Union. Its Sunday evening services, which are the best, are 
attended by between 600 and 600 people, and the gathering is 
increasing. It is a work much needed, carried on in a centre de- 
plorable for its destitution and degradation, and it happily reaches 
the very poor as well as others. Varied and multitudinous are the 
efforts and industries at this place throughout the whole of the week, 
all tending to create and deepen the life of comradeship and service. 



THE PROBLEM OF NORTH LONDON 151 

Nor can this review omit to mention tlie work of tlie Friends 
at Bunhill Fields, the site of the Friends' burying ground, where 
the tombstone of their leader, George Fox, is still to be seen. 
The adult school at this place — a work of truly devout and 
educational endeavour — which meets at eight o'clock every Sunday 
morning, has a regular attendance of over 450 men. It has been 
rightly described as " an oasis in a desert of sin and misery." 

The Roman Catholics are strong at St. Peter and St. Paul, Roso- 
man Street, the strength mainly consisting in attendance at Sunday 
morning Mass, to the number of 1,250; as against an evening attend- 
ance of 267, equally divided between men, women, and children. 

A few missions of a wholly undenominational character, 
scattered through the borough, muster from 200 to 300 at their 
Sunday evening meetings, relying more especially upon their 
visits and social intercourse throughout the week for good results 
of their labours. 



CONCLUDING NOTE 

We have now completed our rajoid survey of North London. It 
remains to sum uj) as briefly as possible its obvious results, and to 
make a few concluding observations on the whole. 

The first outstanding fact is this, that the Free Churches are 
right to the front in the North of London. In every respect — in 
point of numbers, in strength of organisation, in new adventure, in 
spiritual tone and vigour, and in influence upon the public conduct 
and conscience — they lead the way. Their people believe in the 
goodness, greatness, and permanence of their cause, and consequently 
they support it through thick and thin. 

Out of a total of over 400 places of worship throughout the whole 
district, more than half belong to Nonconformist bodies, and a little 
less than half to the Church of England. Out of the aggregate 
attendance at all places throughout entire North London, the 
Church of England are many, many thousands behind the Non- 
conformist total. In average attendances at their places of worship 
the Church of England are a long way from the top. They are 
content to go their way, without enterprise, without adventure. 
They initiate no new methods for new times, and when we find new 
ways at work among them — as occasionally happens — they are 
ways already well tried by other denominations. So that in North 
London it may be said Nonconformity leads and the Church of 



152 THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 

England follows — but follows slowly. The Church of England, in this 
part at least, makes no appeal to the conscience, save through its 
prayers and written service. The living appeal of the living man to 
living men is so subordinated to litany and liturgy that its effect 
is almost valueless. " People, be good," is an excellent summary 
of a Church of England sermon — at least, in North London, 
notwithstanding certain bright exceptions. 

The Church of England as a body, of course, have a larger total 
attendance than any other religious body in the North, but then 
they have nearly four times as many buildings as any other 
denomination throughout the district, while their average atten- 
dance is considerably lower than most others. If we seek the 
seven strongest bodies to compare and contrast with one another, 
they are the Church of England, Baptists, Congregationalists, 
Roman Catholics, Wesleyans, Presbyterians, and the Salvation 
Army ; and that is the order of their numerical strength. That 
is to say, the total attendance at Church of England places through- 
out North London is greater than the total attendance at Baptist 
places ; and the total attendance at Baptist places is greater than 
that at Congregationalist ; and so on. The next body, in point 
of numbers, would be the Unitarians, but as their total attendance 
does not exceed 1,400 throughout the whole district (as against the 
Salvation Army's 4,300), I prefer to omit them in this comparison 
of figures. Indeed, it is necessary to omit to mention a great many 
smaller bodies scattered throughout the district — such as the United 
Methodists, with a total Sunday attendance of 1,400, the Primitive 
Methodists with 1000, the Friends with 700, and a few others with 
still less ; not because they have no influence, but in order to deal 
more fully with those religious forces that have the largest following. 

For average attendances at their own places of worship the 
Roman Catholics stand first in North London ; they have fifteen 
places of worship, and an aggregate attendance of 16,800, which 
gives an average attendance of 1,053 at each place. The Wesleyans 
have twenty-nine places, and an average attendance of 541. The 
Congregationalists have forty places, and an average attendance 
of 525. The Baptists have fifty places, and an average attendance 
of 442. The Church of England have over 180 places, and an 
average attendance of only 4(X). The rest are very much smaller. 

Turning to the Free Churches, we find that the Congre- 
gationalists and Baptists foot it together. Their numbers are 
pretty equal, and their forces and organisations correspondingly 



THE PEOBLEM OF NORTH LONDON 153 

strong and progressive. Next to these come tlie Wesleyans, con- 
siderably less in number than the two denominations just mentioned, 
but possessing increasing vigour and strength, and continually 
growing. After these come the Presbyterians, with but a third 
the number of the Baptists or Congregationalists, yet robust and 
influential and a power in North London. The Salvation Army, 
with a total Sunday attendance of only 4,300 throughout the 
whole of North London, cannot yet have found their element. 
They have virtually no place in Hampstead, Finsbury, and Holborn ; 
very little in Stoke Newington. Their chief quarters are in 
Islington and St. Pancras. Their exclusion from Hampstead is not 
to be wondered at ; but in the boroughs of Holborn and Finsbury 
the widest of fields are open to them. Even in St. Pancras they 
are restricted to Chalk Farm, their only place of any importance 
in a borough that extends from Holborn to Highgate Hill, and from 
Regent's Park to Gray's Inn Road. 

The boroughs of Islington, St. Pancras, Finsbur}'-, and Holborn, 
afford great opportunities for the Salvation Army to come in and win. 

The strength of the Roman Catholics is narrowly confined 
within certain areas. In Stoke Newington they do not count. 
They are strongest in Holborn and Islington, and there exclusively 
in Clerkenwell and Duncan Terrace— among the illiterate Irish and 
Italians — and at Highgate Hill, among a certain section of the rich 
and occasional visitors from other parts. The Congregationalists 
are strongest throughout Islington and Hampstead, where their 
influence may be said to be dominant. In Stoke Newington they 
are comparatively meagre, where the Baptists are very strong. 
Throughout the whole of St. Pancras and Finsbury they have 
scarcely any permanent place of real substance ; while in Holborn 
they have no place at all. The Baptists, on the other hand, have 
their greatest influence and force in Stoke Newington, Finsbury, and 
Holborn. They have little power in St. Pancras, and no good 
centres there, except at the two extremes of the borough — one in the 
west, one in the far north. In Hampstead they have only two places 
of importance, one in the extreme west and one in the east of the 
borough ; in neither place is the church well filled. Throughout the 
wilderness of Islington the Baptists have scattered many places, but 
none of them are great centres of religious life, save always the 
illustrious exce^Dtion of Upper Holloway. All things taken 
together, they are wonderfully at work in Finsbury, while in 
Holborn they have at least three centres most promising and 



154 THE EELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 

progressive, which may be made to throb with abundant life. Both 
denominations — the Congregationalists and Baptists — are together 
gathering in the people who live in North London. Of the two 
it may be that the Congregationalists are socially a little superior, 
but taking the whole of the North throughout there is not much 
to choose in that respect. During the last ten or fifteen years the 
Baptists have considerably improved their financial position, their 
people are better off, their churches are better built, and their 
ministers better prepared, and somewhat better paid. Both de- 
nominations show every sign of becoming together the ruling and 
dominant religious jDOwers of North London, flanked and supported 
by the worthy aid of the Wesleyans. Greater attention is being 
paid to the importance of the most thorough equipment of the men 
into whose hands the charge of their Churches is to be given ; and 
better men, in every conceivable sense of the epithet, are being 
sought and obtained for the work. Mental alertness and elasticity, 
deep religious conviction, good sense, sound judgment, accurate 
thinking, a spirit of devotion, a knowledge of business affairs, 
inexhaustible enthusiasm for work, strength of character, and stabi- 
lity of conduct — all these qualities and more are being drilled and 
pressed into the service of these denominations, with results cal- 
culated to lift the Free Church movement in North London on to 
a totally different plane, within the next decade. 

But at this moment we are rather concerned with the imme- 
diate present. And the question is, What are the causes of 
failure or the secrets of success in the case of the present 
condition of the Churches in North London ? 

To such a question no general answer is available. The cause 

of failure or success at one church is not the cause of failure 

or success at another church. It is not possible to particularise, 

yet it is difficult to enumerate the causes in a way which omits 

no kind of church. The great attendance at some few churches 

is largely due to the general well-to-do air of the place and of 

the minister, to good music and architecture. This applies mainly 

to places possessed by the Church of England, but it also applies 

to some centres of Nonconformity. In respect of these, the 

couplet of Alexander Pope is as fresh as if it had appeared in 

yesterday's daily : 

... As some to church repair 

Not for the doctrine, but the music there. 

Again, in commercial affairs we hear of the " good-will " of 



THE PEOBLEM OF NORTH LONDON 155 

a business — i.e., the benefit wbicli the business derives from the 
habit wbicli its customers have of resorting to the old firm. 
That is an asset in the value of the business. There are some 
churches among all denominations where their people have a 
habit of resorting to the old place. When a transfer takes 
place, they still resort. They only leave when the goods are 
not up to sample in any respect. I call that a kind of spiritual 
"good- will." To it some Churches owe their middling success. 

In other instances, a thriving missionary work carried on with 
a glow and enthusiasm worthy of great admiration, largely con- 
duces to maintain the forces of the Church. The Church and 
mission act and re-act upon one another. The Church supplies 
workers ; the mission sometimes su|)plies converts, or at least an 
occasional attendance. But, for the most part, the mission 
enlarges the sympathies of the Church workers, welds them into 
a kind of co-operative brotherhood, and by increasing the energies 
and output of the Church tends to attract worshippers to a 
centre where religious life and activity are abundantly expressed. 
In some cases efficient and full organisation of Church work is 
a strong element of success ; in others, the devotional spirit or 
the strong espousal of particular views. 

In the case of Roman Catholic places the overwhelmingly large 
gatherings in a few centres are entirely due to the celebration 
of Mass. Everything begins and ends with that. 

In by far the majority of instances where a Church is strong 
and influential it will invariably be found that a good man is at 
the heart and head of affairs. Indeed, it is foolish and a sign of 
insensibility to blink at the fact that the presence of a thoroughly 
good man is the life and mainspring of a Church, and that the 
presence of an idle or incompetent man (however angelic or saintly) 
at the head of things is sooner or later the clog and death of a 
Church. 

These, then, in brief, are mainly the various causes of success 
in North London : good music, " good-will," good instruction, good 
organisation, good workers, good missionary enterprise, good sur- 
rounding conditions, good men at the head. In the expression 
"good men," I use the word "good" not as meaning religious or 
devout— for without that quality a man is never fit for his work — 
but I rather employ the word in the sense of thorough equipment, 
fitness to organise and to instruct, to lead and "manage" others. 

"What are the causes of failure in many of these churches ? 



156 THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 

Here again it is impossible to give any general answer, nor is the 
cause of failure the exact opposite of the cause of success. 

With regard to the Church of England, where they fail in North 
London it may be attributable to a variety of reasons. Frequently 
the whole service is left to an underpaid and incompetent curate 
or two, who lack enthusiasm and are glad when the business is 
over ; while the affliction of the service is increased by a pathetic 
call for funds to repair a dilapidated, ill-lit building, or to support 
the sustenance of the very curates whose dulness we deplore. 

If the attendances at church, or the sort and amount of district 
visitation done by the clergy, be any guide to religious influence, 
it may be confidently asserted that the Church of England has 
but a very slim hold upon the vast majority of the inhabitants 
of St. Pancras and some parts of Islington, and such influence 
as they have there is waning. 

Too often the services are miserably dull — except for the music — 
the reading execrable, and the exhortation a poor platitude, the whole 
matter degenerating into a gentlemanly, kid-glove performance. 

In other places the surrounding conditions are terribly against 
Church work of any kind — run on ordinary lines. Poverty, apathy, 
dirt, and distress are overwhelming. Some other than the stereo- 
typed performances of most denominations will have to be adopted 
if success is to be achieved in these quarters. Again, in some 
districts, too many places of the same denomination exist in close 
proximity; the forces are divided, and disappointment ensues. 

I would here say to every denomination that it is infinitely more 
helpful to congregation and to workers to have one or two 
thoroughly good centres, well placed, where things thrive and throb, 
than a dozen meagre little gatherings in large buildings, which 
discourage everyone concerned. Better to have one central place 
with a full thousand, than have that thousand divided up into ten 
hundreds and distributed among ten places each capable of holding 
ten times the attendance. Numbers beget numbers ; numbers 
inspire, infect, uplift. 

Again, neither in the Church of England nor in many of the 
other denominations is there any serious attempt to " expound 
the Scriptures.'" A passage is read from the Bible— read in a way 
that would make most of us howl with horror and pain if it were 
Shakespeare or Milton, but anything is good enough for the Bible 
—and no attempt is made to give it its proper setting or to annotate 
its luminous sayings. 



THE PROBLEM OF NOETH LONDON 157 

In some instances the system is at fault. Take tlie Wesleyan 
cause in Great Queen Street, Holborn. The very neighbourhood 
needs a hero to work in it and hve in it. But it is hopeless and 
foolish to suppose that your hero is to be resident or non-resident 
there for a brief period of three years, and then flit, leaving such 
people to get on as best they can with a new man who is expected 
to take up the work just where the other one left it. No, no ! that 
will never fill the double-decker galleries of Great Queen Street. 
Your hero must live there for life, and learn his people if he would 
win them. 

Lack of good organisation, faulty and effete methods, lack of 
energy and enthusiasm (which mean lack of real live faith), and 
a dreadful want of worthy men — these are some further causes of 
failure in North London. 

The problem presented by many churches left empty and helpless 
by the change of surrounding conditions is one that needs courage 
and intelligence, but ought to be faced. A London daily paper lately 
said : " To the business man with a utilitarian turn of mind, the sight 
of a nearly empty church occupying an area worth thousands, or 
even tens of thousands of pounds, is simply a source of irritation. 
Like the disciple of old, he exclaims, ' To what purpose this waste ? 
This site might be sold for much, and used to found a new church 
in the suburbs.' " 

The observation is a just one, but I differ entirely from the 
underlying assumption — namely, the impossibility of filling them. 
If any church cannot be made to succeed, certainly let it be 
used, or its site sold, for the next best purpose. 

In this place I am not concerned with City churches, although 
I think there is an open course and way of filling them to the 
doors. And no one deplores more than I do the demolition of 
the loveliest structures other and greater men have given us. 

But so far as North London is affected I am convinced it is 
not less churches, but more, that will be wanted in the immediate 
future. There is no lack of people to fill and flood all the 
churches. The fields are already white unto harvest. The harvest 
is plenteous, but the labourers are few. The great lack is the lack 
of men. Better men and braver methods — those are the great 
needs of North London where success is wanting. 

People are tired of listening to platitudes, and the droning of 
colourless creeds. They are weary of the monotony of singing 
doggerel rhymes and saying perfunctory prayers. Most of aU, 



158 THE EELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 

they feel unmoved by the travesty of the gospel perpetually 
presented in some quarters. It is a plaster-image Jesus, terrible 
or inane in aspect, that men so frequently have put before them, 
instead of the living Christ brought face to face with living 
men to help, to heal, and to dwell with them. 

Six or seven churches in Gray's Inn Road and aU of them. 
three-parts empty ; while the neighbourhood swarms with life, 
but no one ready to use it ! 

Throughout the poor parishes of the north there are a few 
sturdy workers — mostly independent of the Churches— who under- 
stand and help to raise the poor. But for the most part these 
parishes are left utterly alone by the Churches, without comrade- 
ship, but for some mild little mission feebly organised and incom- 
petently conducted. Very few of the religious workers among 
the poor in these parishes are really in earnest, and fewer still 
have the least idea of the needs and natures of the people, or 
care to study them scientifically and patiently, as they would 
study animals or other objects, with a view to adopting methods 
likely to make for successful ends. And so, everywhere, 

The hungi-y sheep look up, and are not fed, 

But swol'n with wind and the rank mist they draw, 

Rot inwardly, and foul contagion spread; 
Besides what the grim wolf with privy paw 

Daily devours apace — and nothing said. 

It is the same with other classes ; many of the ministers in 
charge of other churches have no knowledge of the kind or 
quantum of difficulties against which City men have daily to 
contend ; and, therefore, no sympathy ; and, therefore, cannot give 
courage or help for City trouble and toil. 

The sight of a dull black coat and the whitest of ties will 
never suffice for the sadness and hunger men ever endure. But 
the touch of a soul that has suffered and felt, and has gathered 
strength out of sorrow — that is a living force to bind and to lift. 
What infinite, untold loss lies at the doors of dull, incompetent 
pastors ! — the men who are lazy in body and brain, who lack 
imagination, and are content if once a week they can rise to the 
supremo effort of lazily delivering their barren souls of ill-con- 
ceived, half-formed creatures plaintively known as " sermons." 
No originality, no life, not even consecutiveness of thought, a mental 
aberration upon a text or passage taken at random, interspersed 
with familiar phrases that have no bearing on the subject-matter 



THE PROBLEM OF NORTH LONDON 159 

in hand ; and all of it emptied out, like a pail of odds and ends, 
over the helpless heads of the hearers. 

We are always hearing the cry, " Back to Jesus ! " Yes, 
but when will it be ? Jesus used his brains and his body for 
men ; he lived and died for men. These men do none of it. He 
fastened on individual souls and saved them with the strength of 
His own great soul. He healed bodies, broke down customs and 
conventions, gave great hope to the sad, Hved with the poor, lifted 
His voice aloud against the wrongs of the rich, set His face against 
sin, and bled and died to destroy it. These men do none of it. 

I know one man who has been in the ministry nearly forty 
years. He has no message of helpfulness, is unacquainted with 
the needs and ways of men around him, and finds it the utmost 
difficulty to prepare two sermons a week. If he has always been 
as insurpassably dull and as supremely deadening as I have known 
him during the last decade, the pity is he was never set to 
hoe the ground. And many are like unto him. 

When will these ministers be done with their random texts 
and tags of belief, and give heed to the accurate study and 
reading of some portion or book of the Bible ? When shall they 
read this Book as the record of human souls in their struggle 
towards the Light ? And when will they study souls as they 
work and wrestle to-day ? When shall the Scriptures be taught^ 
and the living Book unmasked as a loving Faith for men ? 
When will they break up the monotony of forms, and beat out 
new paths of practical help ? 

Oh, this work so incomparably great, so unspeakably mighty, 
richer than earth's best love, braver than all our contriving, 
when will men fear to touch it unless they can bring the best it 
can have, the travail sweat of mind, the toil of body and soul, 
and the agony throes of the spirit ? 

I still beheve in heroism, in a ghostly heroism of souls that 
will do and adventure for Christ, of men and women great enough 
to go down and live with men and win them by the witchery of a 
true and timeless comradeship — a chivalrous comradeship of souls, 
a mighty multitude of brave folk, full of faith in God and men, 
a sort of holy friarhood of men, working to leaven and lift the 
world, forever charmed and cheered by the courage of Christ, 
by- 

The glow of a presence, a vision of wonder, 
The crowning of hope, the face of the King. 



160 THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 

For the multitudinous host of men will wander and never 
rest till they find somewhere the true and holy Church of the 
comradeship of love. 

The other evening, when the lamp was lit, my little girl told 
me a "good-night" story of her own invention. She said a little 
boy had left his home and wandered through narrow lanes, alone, 
unhapp3^, away and away, until at length he came out into a big 
and busy place that went to the great, deep sea. And there near 
the shore were seven great churches, and some were full and 
some were empty. And the little boy went in and out of the 
churches, all unhappy, in the daytime and the night, not knowing 
where to go, until in one of them he saw the head and face of 
his father. And there he rested. 

Even so we poor waifs that wander through alley and street 
may never rest, until, in the midst of life's busiest way, within 
sound of its turbulent sea, in the one great Church of Love, we 
look on the face of Our Father. 



Borough of Stoke Newingtoii 



CHURCH OP ENGLAND 



CHURCH. 


MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 

for the 

Day. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


St. Andrew's, Bethune Rd. 


181 


372 


143 


696 


175 


309 


57 


541 


1,237 


All Saints', Green Lanes 


68 


71 


81 


220 


80 


112 


48 


240 


460 


St. Faith's, Londesboro' Rd. 


55 


68 


58 


181 


52 


84 


26 


162 


343 


St. John's, Brownswood Pk. 


48 


97 


54 


199 


60 


106 


27 


193 


392 


St. Mary's, Church Street . 


173 


277 


81 


531 


184 


332 


116 


632 


1,163 


Old Parish Church, Ch. St. 


79 


132 


49 


260 


93 


174 


31 


298 


558 


St. Matthias', Wordsworth 




















Road 


58 


71 


121 


250 


55 


128 


81 


264 


514 


St. 01ave's,'Woodberry Down 


121 


250 


105 


476 


97 


209 


42 


348 


824 


Total .... 


783 


1,338 


692 


2,813 


796 


1,454 


428 


2,678 


5,491 



Church of England Missions 



Holy Redeemer, 106, Ch. St. 
Holy Redeemer, Defoe Rd. 
St. Mary's, 2, Chapel Place 


"22 


"30 


234 


286 


9 

47 

4 


9 

126 

6 


163 
69 


181 

242 

10 


181 

528 

10 


Total .... 


22 


30 


234 


286 


60 


141 


232 


433 


719 



WESLEYAN METHODIST CHURCH 



Green Lanes 
Finsbury Park 
Amhurst Park 
Matthias Road . 


92 

218 
85 
32 


132 
231 

85 
9 


59 

181 

99 

95 


283 
630 
269 
136 


96 

183 

85 

55 


151 

269 

91 

168 


38 

43 

75 

118 


285 
495 
251 
341 


568 
1,125 

520 
477 


Total .... 


427 


457 


434 


1,318 


419 


679 


274 


1,372 


2,690 



UNITED METHODIST FREE CHURCH 



Victoria Grove, High Street 14 9 58 81 13 24 82 119 200 



PRIMITIVE METHODIST CHURCH 








Castle Street 


34 


21 


74 


129 


44 


59 


39 


142 


271 


BAPTIST CHURCH 


iDevonshire Square Chapel . 
Woodberry Down Chapel . 
Bouverie Road 
Wordsworth Road 

Total .... 


176 

143 

12 

15 


219 

152 

20 

22 


205 

179 

38 

33 


600 

474 

70 

70 


199 

227 

17 

29 


410 

362 

31 

56 


82 
164 

27 
17 


691 

753 

75 

102 


1,291 

1,227 

143 

173 


346 


413 


455 


1,214 


472 


859 


290 


1,621 


2,835 








161 










11 





162 



THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 



congregationaIj church 



CHURCH. 


MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 

for the 

Day. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


ToUl. 


j Men. 


Women. 


Chldm. 


Total. 


Raleigh Memorial, Albion 

Road 

Abney Chapel, Church St. . 
Webh Chapel, Barrett's Gr. 


46 
147 

7 


201 
4 


94 

141 

1 


190 

489 

12 


1 

45 

112 

16 


89 

251 

24 


33 
62 
14 


167 

425 

54 


357 

914 

66 


Total .... 


2W) 


255 


236 


691 


173 


364 


109 


646 


1,337 



PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 



Manor Road . 



116 173 



82 371 112 149 



19 280 651 



SOCIETY OF FRIENDS 



Meeting House, Park Street 



37 



58 



103 



21 



51 



UNITARIAN CHURCH 



Newington Green 



33 



26 



107 



166 



24 



35 



21 



80 



BRETHREN 



Hall, Defoe Road 

Abney Hall, 35a, Church St. 


19 
19 


29 
29 


8 
5 


56 
53 


20 
16 


29 

27 


3 52 

4 47 


j 108 
100 


Total .... 


38 


58 


13 


109 


36 


56 


7 99 


208 



SALVATION ARMY 



85, High Street . 
Milton Road 


32 

27 


49 
54 


33 

72 


114 
153 


50 
38 


131 
143 


68 
100 


249 
281 


363 
434 


Total .... 


59 


103 


105 


267 


88 274 


168 


530 


797 



ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH 



Our Lady of Good Counsel, 
Bouverie Road . 



118 



164 



63 



345 



17 



29 



53 



OTHER SERVICES 



Spiritualists, 99, Wiesbaden 

Road 

Walford Hall, Walford Rd. 


7 
5 


5 
5 


25 
92 


37 
102 


98 
16 


110 
56 


20 
43 


228 
115 


265 
217 


Total .... 


12 


10 


117 


139 


114 


166 


63 


343 


482 



NORTH LONDON— STOKE NEWINGTON 



163 



DENOMINATIONAL TOTALS 



DENOMINATION. 


MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 

for the 

Day. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Church of England 


783 


1,338 


692 


2,813 


796 


1,454 


428 


2,678 


5,491 


„ „ Missions 


22 


30 


234 


286 


60 


141 


232 


433 


719 


Wesleyan Meth. Church 


427 


457 


434 


1,318 


419 


679 


274 


1,372 


2,690 


U. Meth. Free Church . 


14 


9 


58 


81 


13 


24 


82 


119 


200 


Primitive Meth. Church 


34 


21 


74 


129 


44 


59 


39 


142 


271 


Baptist Church . 


346 


413 


455 


1,214 


472 


859 


290 


1,621 


2,835 


Congregational Church 


200 


255 


236 


691 


173 


364 


109 


646 


1,337 


Presbyterian Church . 


116 


173 


82 


371 


112 


149 


19 


280 


651 


Society of Friends 


37 


58 


8 


103 


24 


27 




51 


154 


Unitarian Church 


33 


26 


107 


166 


24 


35 


21 


80 


246 


Brethren 


38 


58 


13 


109 


36 


56 


7 


99 


208 


Salvation Army . 


59 


103 


105 


267 


88 


274 


168 


530 


797 


Roman Catholic Church 


118 


164 


63 


345 


17 


29 


7 


53 


398 


Other Services 


12 


10 


117 


139 


114 


166 


63 


343 


482 


Jewish Church 


108 


152 


83 


343 


... 






... 


343 


Grand Totals . 


2,347 


3,267 


2,761 


8,375 


2,392 


4,316 


1,739 


8,447 


16,822 



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other Services 




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Roman Catholic 



Other Services 




Borough of Hampstead 



CHURCH OF ENGLAND 



CHURCH. 


MOKNING. 


EVENING. 


Total. 

for the 

Day. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Cbldrn. 


Total. 


All Souls' . . . . 


55 


168 


71 


294 


53 


162 


33 


248 


542 


Christ Church 


106 


277 


114 


497 


90 


258 


64 


412 


909 


St. Mary the Virgin's . 


79 


224 


104 


407 


62 


149 


30 


241 


648 


Emmanuel Church 


101 


215 


109 


425 


68 


223 


49 


340 


765 


St. Cuthbert's 


65 


106 


47 


218 


45 


80 


24 


149 


367 


St. James's .... 


87 


167 


105 


359 


80 


181 


32 


293 


652 


St. John's, Downshire Hill. 


49 


111 


12 


172 


39 


84 


2 


125 


297 


St. John's, Church Row 


129 


283 


283 


695 


137 


198 


172 


507 


1,202 


St. Luke's .... 


83 


124 


93 


300 


74 


143 


63 


280 


580 


St. Mary's .... 


99 


300 


32 


431 


118 


302 


32 


452 


883 


St. Paul's, Avenue Road 


93 


197 


82 


372 


49 


99 


39 


187 


559 


St. Peter's .... 


101 


249 


48 


398 


30 


72 


23 


125 


523 


St. Saviour's 


43 


73 


23 


139 


45 


59 


22 


126 


365 


St. Stephen's, Hmpstd. Gn. 


58 


121 


122 


301 


53 


134 


55 


242 


543 


St. Stephen-the-Martyr's . 


56 


66 


18 


140 


33 


46 


20 


99 


239 


Trin. Church, Finchley Rd. 


87 


348 


46 


481 


85 


351 


34 


470 


951 


Total .... 


1,291 


3,029 


1,309 


5,629 


1,061 


2,541 


694 


4,296 


9,925 



Church of England Missions 



St. Augustine's . 

St. Cuthbert's 

St. James's . 

St. Saviour's 

Trinity 

Bickersteth Memorial Hall 

North End . 

Total . 



23 



46 



119 
45 



194 



42 



142 
79 



263 



112 



12 
30 
24 

48 
15 
36 
47 



212 



171 



15 
95 

68 

100 

32 

80 

105 



495 



15 

95 

68 

142 

32 

222 

184 



758 



WESLEYAN METHODIST CHURCH 



Quex Road . 

High Street, Hampstead 

Gospel Oak . 

Total . 



197 



225 



106 

37 

100 



243 



282 
119 
264 



665 



230 

62 

117 



409 



147 
134 
208 



489 



96 



409 
217 
368 



994 



691 
336 

632 



1,659 



BAPTIST CHURCH 



Brondesbury Chapel . 
Ebenezer Chapel, Kilburn . 
Ebenezer Chapel, New End. 
Heath Street Chapel . 

Total . . . . 



195 



101 
17 
15 

120 



253 



98 



221 i 

43 

29 
253 



546 



121 
14 
11 
97 



243 



233 
25 
20 

148 



426 



46 



84 



387 
44 
31 

291 



753 



608 
87 
60 

544 



1,299 



Baptist Mission 



Brondesbury Hall 



66 
165 



70 



22 



77 



75 



174 



244 



166 



THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 

CONGREaATIONAIi CHURCH 



CHURCH. 


MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 

for the 

Day. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldm. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Lyndhurst Road . 
New College Chapel . 
West Hanipstead Church . 


329 
43 
63 


469 
68 
59 


90 

"40 


888 
111 
162 


325 
25 
81 


541 

61 

102 


28 
"27 


894 

86 

210 


1,782 
197 
372 


Total .... 


435 


596 


130 


1,161 


431 


704 


55 


1,190 


2,351 



PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 



Oxenden Church . 
Trinity Church . 
Mission Hall, Frognal Lane. 
Rondu Road, Cricklewood . 


35 1 35 
40 64 
34 70 
46 86 


86 
15 
33 
55 


156 
119 
137 
187 


44 
46 
28 
62 


66 

94 

23 

101 


11 
5 
6 

23 


121 
145 

57 
186 


277 
264 
194 
373 


Total .... 


155 255 


189 


599 


180 


284 


45 


509 


1,108 



PRIMITIVE METHODIST CHURCH 



Ebenezer Church, Mill Lane. 



15 



20 



28 



63 



22 



45 



22 



89 



152 





UNITARIAN- 


CHURCH 










Rosslyn Hill Chapel . 
Quex Road, Kilburn . 


45 
16 


89 
17 


4 
3 


138 
36 


27 
18 


37 
28 


1 
2 


65 

48 


203 
84 


Total .... 


61 


106 


7 


174 


45 


65 


3 


113 


287 



SALVATION ARMY 



Oriel Hall . 
Barracks, Ridge Mews 

Total . 



21 
2 


24 

1 


10 

4 


55 

7 


26 
19 


78 
16 


17 
22 


121 

57 


23 


25 


14 


62 


45 


94 


39 


178 



176 
64 



240 



SOCIETY OF FRIENDS 



Willoughby Road 



14 



20 



20 



BRETHREN 



Gospel Hall, Fleet Mews . 
192, Broadhurst Gardens . 


18 
42 


4 

47 


2 
21 


19 
110 


25 
25 


37 
37 


24 

20 


86 
82 


105 
192 


Total .... 


55 


51 


23 


129 


50 


74 


44 


168 


297 



ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH 








Church of the Sacred Heart. 
St. Mary's, Holly Place , 


244 
63 


593 
139 


258 
45 


1,095 
247 


54 


167 


36 


257 


1,352 
247 


Total .... 


307 


732 


303 


1,342 


54 


167 


36 


257 


1,599 



London City Mission, King's 

College Mews . 
Hampstead Ethical Society. 

Total . . . . 



OTHER SERVICES 



"32 


"23 




"55 


9 


35 


4 


48 


32 


23 




55 


9 


35 


4 


48 i 



48 
55 



103 



NORTH LONDON— HAMPSTEAD 



167 



DENOMINATIONAL TOTALS 



DENOMINATION. 


MOllNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Day. 


Church of England 


1,291 


3,029 


1,309 


5,629 


1,061 


2,541 


694 


4,296 


9,925 


„ „ Missions 


23 


46 


194 


263 


112 


212 


171 


495 


758 


Wesleyan Meth. Church 


197 


225 


243 


665 


409 


489 


96 


994 


1,659 


Baptist Church . 


195 


253 


98 


546 


243 


426 


84 


753 


1,299 


„ Mission 


3 


1 


66 


70 


22 


77 


75 


174 


244 


Congregational Church. 


435 


596 


130 


1,161 


431 


704 


55 


1,190 


2,351 


Presbj^terian Church . 


155 


255 


189 


599 


180 


284 


45 


509 


1,108 


Primitive Meth. Church 


15 


20 


28 


63 


22 


45 


22 


89 


152 


Unitarian Church. 


61 


106 


7 


174 


45 


65 


3 


113 


287 


Salvation Army . 


23 


25 


14 


62 


45 


94 


39 


178 


240 


Society of Friends 


5 


14 


1 


20 










20 


Brethren 


55 


51 


23 


129 


50 


74 


44 


168 


297 


Roman Catholic Church 


307 


732 


303 


1,342 


54 


167 


36 


257 


1,599 


Other Services 


32 


23 




55 


9 


35 


4 


48 


103 


Jewish Church 


361 


317 


220 


898 










898 


Grand Totals . 


3,158 


5,693 


2,825 


11,676 


2,683 


5,213 


1,368 


9,264 


20,940 



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50 



40 



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20 



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Population Roman Catholic 



Other Services 




BlacH 



Blue — Evening 



Population 



All Churches ^ Church of Bns:land ^ Nonconformist 



Roman Catholii 



Other Services 




Borough of Islington 



CHURCH OF ENGLAND 



CHURCH. 


MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 

for the 

Day. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldm. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women 


Chldm. 


Total. 


Christ Church, Highbury . 


53 


151 


66 


270 


58 


123 


76 


257 


527 


St. Augustine's, Highbury . 


168 


390 


220 


778 


236 


466 


20 


722 


1,500 


St. John's, Highbury . 


64 


110 


66 


240 


80 


196 


34 


310 


550 


St. Saviour's, Aberdeen Pk. 


72 


84 


49 


205 


49 


64 


27 


140 


345 


St. Barnabas', Holloway 


48 


70 


56 


174 


69 


113 


49 


231 


405 


Emmanuel, Holloway . 


40 


28 


25 


93 


38 


61 


54 


153 


246 


St. James', Holloway . 


164 


265 


48 


477 


286 


518 


62 


866 


1,343 


St. Mary ilagdalene's, Hol- 




















loway .... 


131 


165 


109 


495 


211 


433 


104 


748 


1,243 


St. Stephen's, Upper Hol- 




















loway .... 


20 


32 


24 


76 


34 


73 


54 


161 


237 


St. David's, Holloway . 


24 


24 


71 


119 


36 


62 


33 


131 


250 


St. Luke's, West Holloway 


77 


128 


62 


267 


79 


141 


48 


268 


535 


St. Mary's, Upper Street . 


64 


180 


39 


283 


90 


162 


74 


326 


609 


All Saints', King's Cross 


26 


22 


39 


87 


44 


58 


60 


162 


249 


Holy Trinity, CloudesleySq. 


94 


110 


156 


360 


96 


290 


90 


476 


836 


St. Andrew's, Thornhill Sq. 


67 


69 


83 


219 


69 


155 


124 


348 


567 


St. Bartholomew's, Shep- 




















perton Road . 


9 


11 


76 


96 


18 


25 


40 


83 


179 


St. James the Apostle's, 




















Prebend Street 


27 


25 


65 


117 


32 


67 


74 


173 


290 


St. John the Baptist's, 




















Cleveland Road 


33 


57 


29 


119 


49 


127 


44 


220 


339 


St. Jude's, Mildmay Park . 


113 


228 


95 


436 


101 


246 


38 


385 


821 


St. Matthew's, Essex Road 


41 


72 


84 


197 


66 


155 


54 


275 


472 


St. Matthias', Caledonian 




















Road .... 


8 


14 


68 


90 


20 


44 


36 


100 


190 


St. Michael's, Bingfield St. 


39 


46 


2&5 


370 


40 


78 


71 


189 


559 


St. Peter's, Devonshire St. . 


67 


92 


186 


345 


80 


203 


71 


354 


699 


St. Philip's, Arlington Sq. . 


34 


43 


106 


183 


50 


115 


106 


271 


454 


St. Stephen's, Canonbury 




















Road 


35 


62 


55 


152 


72 


119 


90 


281 


433 


St. Thomas', Barnsbury 


30 


30 


40 


100 


51 


98 


25 


174 


274 


St. Paul's, Essex Road 


137 


232 


136 


505 


122 


266 


163 


551 


1,056 


St. Thomas', Finsbury Pk. 


121 


188 


186 


495 


95 


281 


67 


443 


938 


St. Clement's, Barnsbury . 


33 


50 


51 


134 


61 


115 


56 


232 


366 


St. Mary's, Hornsey Rise . 


91 


146 


68 


305 


77 


145 


30 


252 


557 


St. Matthew's, City Road . 


40 


53 


127 


220 


62 


84 


99 


245 


465 


St. Peter's, Dartmouth Pk. 




















HiU 


60 


97 


115 


272 


102 


209 


150 


461 


733 


St. Anne's, Finsbury Park . 


55 


64 


61 


180 


47 


77 


127 


251 


431 


St. Andrew's, Highgate 


91 


181 


79 


351 


97 


218 


48 


363 


714 


St. George's, Tufnell Park . 


116 


208 


104 


428 


96 


201 


38 


335 


763 


St. Mark's, Tollington Park 


84 


130 


87 


301 


84 


199 


44 


327 


628 


St. Savioiur's, Tollington Pk. 


137 


179 


112 


428 


109 


258 


56 


423 


851 


St. John's, Upper Holloway 


144 


214 


274 


632 


183 


410 


159 


752 


1,384 


AU Saints', Tufnell Park . 


101 


125 


73 


299 


123 


219 


48 


390 


689 


St. Paul's, Upjaer Holloway 


81 


118 


55 


254 


79 


167 


45 


291 


545 


St. Padarn's (Welsh), Horn- 




















sey Road .... 


4 


3 


6 


13 


1" 


17 


16 


50 


63 


Total .... 


2,843 


4,496 


3,826 


11,165 


3,408 


7,058 


2,704 


13,170 


24,335 



169 



170 



THE EELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 



Church of England Missions 







MORNING. 






EVENING. 




Total 


rHTTRHH 






















Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Day. 


St. George's, Holloway 


4 


4 


(il 


69 


10 


26 


31 


67 


136 


St. Mary's, Hornsey Road 


9 


11 


94 


114 


50 


45 


11 


106 


220 


St. Anne's, Palmerston Rd 


6 


•> 


92 


100 


4 


5 


98 


107 


207 


St. John's, Holloway . 










11 


2(i 


7 


44 


44 


St. Paul's, Hollowaj' . 


14 


7 


61 


82 


23 


18 


117 


158 


240 


St. Luke's, North Road 


1 


3 


30 


34 


20 


19 


24 


63 


97 


St. Matthew's, Upper Hoi 




















loway 


3 


G 


80 


89 


6 


23 


20 


49 


138 


St. Andrew's, Highgate 


4 


3 


39 


46 


12 


21 


25 


58 


104 


St. Peter's Schls., Highgat 


:» ') 


5 


212 


219 










219 


St. Stephen's Hall, Hollowa 


Y 2 




45 


47 










47 


St. Andrew's, East Street 










2 


8 


65 


75 


75 


St. George's, Holloway 


2 


1 


24 


27 


1 


4 


40 


45 


72 


St. John's, Twyford Street 










5 


4 


80 


89 


89 


St. Mark's, Hornsey Road 


4 


f! 


73 


83 


20 


35 


22 


77 


160 


St. Matthew's Church Room 




















Ecclesbourne Road . 










1 26 


60 


52 


138 


138 


St. Barnabas', Queenslanc 




















Road. 


2 


3 


52 


57 


26 


25 


105 


156 


213 


St. John's, Highbury . 










3 


11 


8 


22 


22 


St. James', Britannia Rov 










3 


2 


46 


51 


51 


St. Jude's, King Henry St 










5 


22 


9 


36 


36 


St. John the Baptist, Jams 




















Street 










18 


34 


19 


71 


71 


St. Jude's Schools, King 




















Henry's Walk . 


1 


7 


80 


88 


7 


3 


63 


73 


161 


St. James' Lecture Hall 




















Eden Grove 


(5 


7 


93 


100 


34 


65 


44 


143 


249 


AH Saints' Mission (St. Johr 




















the Evangelist's), Copen 




















hagen Street) . 


f) 


2 


113 


121 


16 


44 


80 


140 


201 


All Saints', Thornhill Bdge 




















Place 


4 


4 


95 


103 


9 


28 


150 


187 


290 


St. David's, Holloway 










7 


4 


39 


50 


50 


All Saints', Crinan Street 










11 


24 


31 


66 


66 


Wall Street Mission . 










13 


24 


12 


49 


49 


Rosemary Street Mission 


3 


8 


100 


111 


24 


129 


66 


219 


330 


Total . 


73 


79 


1,344 


1,496 


366 


709 


1,264 


2,339 


3,835 



WESLEYAN METHODIST CHURCH 



Archway Road 
Holly Park . 
Hornsey Road 
Gillespie Road, Highbury 
Liverpool lioad . 
Windsor Street . 
Drayton Park 
Caledonian Road . 
Mildmay Park 

Total . 



94 
106 
43 
10 
64 
13 
24 
52 
128 



534 



125 

123 

58 

11 

77 

8 

50 

34 

119 



605 



223 

^^58 

100 

98 

126 

32 

65 

65 

154 



921 



442 
287 
201 
119 
267 
53 
139 
151 
401 



2,060 



107 
97 
94 
27 
93 
16 
50 
57 
97 



638 



185 

130 

196 

45 

170 

32 

86 

88 

161 



1,093 



81 
25 

117 
19 

101 

9 

59 

68 

73 



asz 



373 
252 
407 

91 
364 

57 
195 
213 
331 



2,283 



PRIMITIVE METHODIST CHURCH 



Anatola Road, Dartmouth 




















Park Hill . 


32 


13 


97 


142 


60 


73 


32 


165 


307 


Durham Ro.ul, Holloway . 


19 


9 


39 


67 


23 


29 


6 


58 


125 


Caledonian Road . 


39 


26 


30 


95 


69 


130 


52 


251 


346 


Ellwood St., Highbury Vale 


15 


10 


20 


45 


18 


14 


10 


42 


87 


Miss. Chaiwl, Horn.sey Rd. 


13 


21 


10 


44 


26 


58 


19 


103 


147 


Total .... 


118 


79 


196 


393 


196 


304 


119 


619 


1,012 



NORTH LONDON— ISLINGTON 

UNITED METHODIST FREE CHURCH 



171 



CHUECH. 


MORNING. 




EVENING. 




Total 

for the 

Day. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Charlotte St., Caledonian 
Road 


58 


43 


85 


180 


188 


228 


15 


431 


617 



METHODIST NEW CONNEXION 



Packington Street 



28 



24 



40 



92 



51 



63 



32 



146 



238 



WELSH CALVINISTIC METHODIST CHURCH 



Sussex Road, Holloway 
Wilton Squai-e 


33 
48 


27 
28 


14 
19 


74 
95 


84 
117 


114 

99 


22 
16 


220 
232 


294 
327 


Total .... 


81 


55 


33 


169 


201 


213 


38 


452 


621 



BAPTIST CHURCH 



Elthorne Road, Hornsey . 


13 


23 


31 


67 


15 


26 


4 


45 


112 


Cross Street .... 


48 


49 


55 


152 


57 


83 


42 


182 


334 


Highbury Place . 


58 


61 


41 


160 


47 


90 


10 


147 


307 


Salters' Hall, Essex Road . 


90 


120 


75 


285 


112 


250 


110 


472 


757 


Wilton Square 


12 


10 


15 


37 


13 


37 


12 


62 


99 


Brewery Road 


63 


54 


102 


219 


94 


1.54 


81 


329 


548 


Highbury Hill . 


58 


86 


272 


416 


87 


139 


76 


302 


718 


Hornsey Road 


23 


32 


15 


70 


32 


89 


25 


146 


216 


Tollington Park . 


9 


7 


3 


19 


9 


16 


1 


26 


45 


Upper Holloway . 


177 


275 


262 


714 


330 


523 


290 


1,143 


1,857 


Hazelville Road . 


38 


45 


83 


166 


69 


104 


29 


202 


368 


Providence Place Hall 


12 


5 


46 


63 


21 


38 


19 


78 


141 


Lavina Grove 










7 


38 


8 


53 


53 


Total .... 


601 


767 


1,000 


2,368 


893 


1,587 


707 


3,187 


5,555 



Baptist Missions 



Goodinge Road, Fakenham 
Street .... 
Drovers' Hall, North Road 
Rupert Road, Holloway 


1 


7 


'47 


"55 


6 
31 
28 


11 
35 

78 


9 
53 
39 


26 
119 
145 


26 
119 
200 


Total .... 


1 


7 


47 


55 


65 


124 


101 


290 


345 



CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 



Arundel Square . 


30 


45 


95 


170 


62 


85 


85 


232 


402 


Barnsbury Street 


27 


47 


39 


113 


146 


230 


121 


497 


610 


Britannia Row 


18 


21 


64 


103 


30 


73 


36 


139 


242 


Caledonian Road . 


33 


23 


53 


109 


50 


90 


89 


229 


338 


Hare Court .... 


103 


107 


37 


247 


99 


70 


14 


183 


430 


Offord Road 


27 


42 


61 


130 


39 


59 


40 


138 


268 


Gifford Street Hall . 


12 


13 


25 


50 


58 


112 


229 


399 


449 


River Street 


7 


1 


11 


19 


25 


34 


27 


86 


105 


Union, Upper Street, N. 


222 


249 


315 


786 


195 


293 


120 


608 


1,.394 


Upper Street, N. 


101 


121 


100 


322 


127 


201 


392 


720 


1,042 


Camden Road 


30 


57 


17 


104 


50 


108 


21 


179 


283 


Junction Road, Holloway . 


124 


134 


158 


416 


169 


279 


58 


506 


922 


New Court .... 


270 


287 


177 


734 


239 


362 


32 


633 


1,367 


Highbury Quadrant . 


234 


278 


68 


580 


292 


358 


33 


683 


1,263 


Finsbury Park 


180 


204 


105 


489 


339 


537 


07 


943 


1,432 


Total . . . . 


1,418 


1,629 


1,325 


4,372 


1,920 


2,891 


1,364 


6,175 


10,547 



172 



THE EELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 



Congregational Missions 



CHURCH. 


MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


ToUl. 


Day. 


Lennox Road 

Blenheim Road, Holloway . 

Myrtle Street 

Morton Road Hall 


5 
12 
10 


2 
15 
13 


59 

(;9 

102 


66 

96 

125 


44 
30 
32 
19 


69 
68 
69 
38 


140 
58 
41 

329 


253 
1.56 
142 
386 


319 
252 
267 
386 


Total .... 


27 


30 


230 


287 


125 


244 


568 


937 


1,224 



CAT.vnsrisTic ijstdependent church 






Regent Street, Thane Villas 
Aged Pilgrims' Asj'lum, 
Hazelville Road 


45 


51 


15 


111 


5-1 
8 


102 

48 


28 


184 
56 


295 
56 


Total .... 


45 


51 


15 


111 


62 


150 


28 


240 


351 



PRESBYTERIAK" CHURCH 



Crouch Hill, Holly Park . 


283 


313 


184 


780 


297 


410 


67 


774 


1,554 


Caledonian, Holloway Road 


24 


23 


10 


57 


48 


71 


18 


137 


194 


Trinity Ch. Rd., Canonbury 


17 


24 


36 


77 


41 


75 


33 


149 


226 


Grosvenor Road, Highbury 




















New Park 


76 


99 


29 


204 


74 


78 


7 


1.59 


363 


Colebrooke Row . 


113 


118 


23 


254 


169 


227 


33 


429 


683 


Total .... 


513 


577 


282 


1,372 


629 


861 


158 


1,648 


3,020 





Presbjrterian 


Missions 










Andover Rd., Hornsey Rd. 
Thrift Hall, Grovedale Rd. 


14 
4 


16 
5 


105 

88 


135 

97 


57 

7 


88 
11 


170 
22 


315 
40 


450 
137 


Total .... 


18 


21 


193 


232 


64 


99 


192 


355 


587 



BRETHREN 



Eversleigh Street Hall, Tol- 




















lington Park 


11 


14 


o 


27 


12 


13 


10 


35 


62 


HazelviUe Room, Holloway 


35 


64 


24 


123 


34 


59 


21 


114 


237 


Pembroke Street Hall 


7 


13 


3 


23 


8 


16 


19 


43 


66 


Park Hall, Blackstock Rd. 


19 


22 


(5 


47 


21 


25 


6 


52 


99 


Wedinore St. Meeting Room 


7 


4 




11 


6 


13 


6 


25 


36 


Park Street Hall . 


53 


82 


26 


161 


42 


94 


23 


159 


320 


Terret's Place Room . 


15 


19 


5 


39 


8 


25 




33 


72 


Barnsbury Road Room 


14 


12 




26 


15 


21 


6 


42 


68 


Junction Road Christian 




















Assembly Rooms 


18 


12 


11 


41 


21 


52 


31 


104 


145 


Canonbury Hall . 


2 


3 


2 


7 


8 


16 


1 


25 


32 


Duncombe Road . 


6 


5 


1 


12 


11 


9 


5 


25 


37 


Total .... 


187 


250 


80 


517 


186 


343 


128 


657 


1,174 



SOCIETY OP FRIENDS 



Meeting House, Mercer's 
Road, Holloway 



20 



12 



36 



15 



12 



27 





UNITARIAN 


CHURCH 










Highgate Hill 
Upper Street 


35 
29 


90 
30 


21 
5 


146 
64 


40 
32 


51 
32 


13 
11 


104 
75 


250 
139 


Total .... 


64 


120 


26 


210 


72 


83 


24 


179 


389 



NORTH LONDON— ISLINGTON 



173 



CHRISTADELPHIAH" CHURCH 



CHURCH. 


MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Cbldrn. 


Total. 


for the 
Day. 


Wellington Hall, Almeida 
Street .... 
Barnsbury Street Hall 
Mornington Hall . 
WortleyHall 


17 
26 
30 
25 


29 
24 
32 
24 


2 
4 
5 
6 


48 
54 
67 
55 


25 
20 
25 
27 


27 
21 
36 
32 


5 

3 

8 

14 


57 
44 
69 
73 


105 

98 
136 

128 


Total . . . . 


98 


109 


17 


224 


97 


116 


30 


243 


467 



SANDEMANIAN CHURCH 



Furlong Rd. Meeting Room 

Highbury Crescent Meeting 

Room .... 


10 
16 


17 
17 


9 
12 


36 
45 


13 

5 


19 
8 


5 
12 


37 
25 


73 
70 


Total .... 


26 


34 


21 


81 


18 


27 


17 


62 


143 





NEW 


JERUSALEM CHURCH 








Camden Road, Holloway . 
Devonshire Street 


54 

7 


62 
6 


40 
19 


156 
32 


45 
16 


48 
21 


1 

20 


94 
57 


250 
89 


Total .... 


61 


68 


59 


188 


61 


69 


21 


151 


339 



FOREIGN PROTESTANT SERVICES 



Fowler Road, Cross Street . 



63 



38 



18 



119 



26 



31 



58 





CATHOLIC APOSTOLIC ( 


CHURCH 








Gloucester Road . 
Duncan Street 


• 


63 

78 


72 
87 


34 
35 


169 
200 


47 
43 


49 
48 


13 
33 


109 
124 


278 
324 


Total . 


141 


159 


69 


369 


90 


97 


46 


233 


602 



SALVATION ARMY 



Almeida Street . 


29 


22 


53 


104 


63 


118 


28 


209 


313 


Junction Road, Holloway . 


101 


62 


94 


257 


106 


257 


272 


635 


892 


Ronalds Road 


44 


38 


30 


112 


59 


132 


93 


284 


396 


Hornsey Road , 


2 


1 


15 


18 


3 


1 


60 


64 


82 


Finsbury Park Hall, Station 




















Road 


29 


18 


8 


55 


54 


97 


13 


164 


219 


Temperance Hall, Church 




















Passage, Upper Street . 


2 




37 


39 


2 


6 


48 


56 


95 


Total .... 


207 


141 


237 


585 


287 


611 


514 


1,412 


1,997 



EVANGELISTIC MISSIOl^ SERVICES 



Conference Hall, Mildmay 
Park 



236 



309 



43 



588 



763 



1,687 



275 



2,725 



ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH 



St. Joseph's Retreat, High- 
gate Hill .... 

Sacred Heart, Eden Grove, 
Holloway .... 

St. John the Evangelist's, 
Duncan Terrace 


383 
256 

347 


570 
367 
469 


280 
238 
404 


1,233 

861 

1,220 


110 
41 

67 


176 

72 
110 


43 
35 
33 


329 
148 
210 


1,562 
1,009 
1,430 


Total .... 


986 


1,406 


922 


3,314 


218 


358 


111 


687 


4,001 



174 



THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 



OTHER SERVICES 



CHURCH. 


MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 

for the 

Day. 


Men. 


Womei 


1. Chldrn 


Total. 


Men. 


Women 


Chldm 


Total. 


Railway Miss., Goodwin St 










20 


18 




38 


38 


Gospel Samaritan, Grove 




















Koad .... 


4 


4 


2 


10 


7 


22 


5 


34 


44 


Holloway Road Hall . 










78 


120 


127 


331 


331 


Myddleton Hall, Almeida 




















Street .... 










36 


Go 


17 


118 


118 


Ruffords Row Mission, Cole- 




















brooke Row 


2 




18 


20 


11 


20 


3 


34 


54 


Seventh Daj' Adventists, 




















Buncombe Road 










19 


24 


7 


50 


50 


Jubilee Hall (for the Blind), 




















Hanley Road . 










17 


52 


2 


71 


71 


^Medical jNIiss., Windsor St. 










25 


43 


182 


250 


250 


Hornsey Rd. Mission Room 










5 


11 


2 


18 


18 


Bethan, Drayton Park 










10 


32 


3 


45 


45 


Y.M.C.A., 198, Upper St. 










10 


11 


2 


23 


23 


Palmer's Place Mission, 




















Drayton Park . 


8!) 


6 




95 


17 


26 


47 


90 


185 


Albany Place Mission . 


4 


1 


'72 


77 


11 


25 


20 


56 


133 


St. Thomas' Hall, Gillespie 




















Road 


2 


1 


G 


9 


8 


8 


4 


20 


29 


Ethical Soc, Stanley Hall . 


58 


32 


20 


110 










110 


Spiritualists, 19, Stroud Gn. 




















Road. .... 










7 


7 


1 


15 


15 


Spiritualists, 51, Monsell 




















Road 










10 







12 


12 


Deaf and Dumb Services 


11 


"s 


... 14 


10 


9 


"3 


22 


36 


Total .... 


170 


47 


118 


335 


301 


501 


425 


1,227 


1,562 


DENOMINATIONAL 


TOTALS 








MORNING. 1 


EVENING. 




Total 


TIRKOMTTCATTOM 


) 






for the 
Day. 


xjinxj \jj3i.xi^t .a.± i.\ji^ . 


Men. 


Women. Chldm. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 1 Chldm. 


Total. 


Church of England 


2,843 


4,496 i 3,826 


11,165 


3,408 


7,058 2,704 


13,170 


24,335 


„ „ Missions 


73 


79' 1,344 


1,496 ! 


366 


709 


1,264 


2,339 


3,835 


Wesleyan Meth. Church 


534 


605 921 


2,060 1 


638 


1,093 


552 


2,283 


4,343 


Primitive Meth. Church 


118 


79 


196 


393 


196 


304 


119 


619 


1,012 


U. Meth. Free Church. 


58 


43 


85 


186 


188 


228 


15 


431 


617 


Meth. New Connexion. 


28 


24 


40 


92 


51 


63 


32 


146 


238 


Cal. Meth. Meth. Church 


81 


55 


33 


169 


201 


213 


38 


452 


621 


Baptist Church 


601 


767 1 


1,000 


2,368 


893 


1,587 


707 


3,187 


5,555 


„ Missions . 


1 


7{ 


47 


55 


65 


124 


101 


290 


345 


Congregational Church 


1,418 


1,629 ! 


1,325 


4,372 


1,920 


2,891 


1,364 


6,175 


10,547 


,, Missions 


27 


30 


230 


287 


125 


244 


568 


937 


1,224 


Cal.IndependentChurch 


45 


51 


15 


111 


62 


150 


28 


240 


351 


Presbyterian Church . 


513 


577 


282 


1,372 


629 


861 


158 


1,648 


3,020 


„ Missions . 


18 


21 


193 


232 


64 


99 


192 


355 


587 


Brethren 


187 


250 


80 


517 


186 


343 


128 


657 


1,174 




20 


12 


4 


36 


15 


12 


... 


27 


63 


Unitarian Church 


64 


120 


26 


210 


72 


83 


"24 


179 


389 


Christadelphian Church 


98 


109 


17 


224 


97 


116 


30 


243 


467 


Sandemanian Church . 


26 


34 


21 


81 


18 


27 


17 


62 


143 


New Jerusalem Church 


61 


68 


59 


188 


61 


69 


21 


151 


339 


Foreign Prot. Services . 


63 


38 


18 


119 1 


26 


31 


1 


58 


177 


Cath. Apostolic Church. 


141 


159 


69 


369 , 


90 


97 


46 


233 


602 


Salvation Army . 


207 


141 


237 


585 ' 


287 


611 


514 


1,412 


1,997 


Evan. Mission Services 


236 


309 


43 


588 


763 


1,687 275 


2,725 


3,313 


Roman Catholic Church 


986 


1,406 


922 


3,314 


218 


358 111 


687 


4,001 


Other Services 


170 


47 I 


118 


335 1 


301 


501 425 


1,227 


1,562 


Jewish Church 


500 


379 1 


266 


1,145 


1 - 


... 


1,145 


Grand Totals . 


:»,117 1 


1,535 j] 


1,417 a 


2,069 ] 


10,940 


19,559 9,434 ; 


39,933 I 


72,002 



Population Roman Catholic 



Other Services 




Roman Catholic 



Other Services 




Borough of St. Pancras 



CHURCH OF ENGLAND 







MORNING. 






EVENING. 




Total 


CHURCH. 


















for the 




















Men. 


Women. 


Chldm. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Day. 


All Hallows, Gospel Oak . 


72 


187 


183 


442 


109 


276 


08 


453 


895 


All Saints', Gordon Square . 


17 


15 


20 


52 


19 


30 


13 


02 


114 


St. Ann's, Highgate Rise . 


52 


181 


60 


293 


62 


60 


21 


149 


442 


Holy Trinity, Highgate Hill. 


70 


89 


74 


233 


113 


243 


100 


456 


689 


Holy Trinity, Gray's Inn Rd. 


25 


21 


27 


73 


45 


68 


32 


145 


218 


Chapel of the Boys' Home, 




















Regent's Park Road. 


22 


41 


124 


187 


7 


21 


106 


134 


321 


Christ Church, Albany St. 


58 


148 


244 


450 


56 


144 


45 


245 


695 


Kentish Town Parish Ch. . 


80 


127 


153 


360 


116 


256 


113 


485 


845 


St. Pancras Holy Cross, 




















Euston Road . 


31 


46 


137 


214 


39 


95 


36 


170 


384 


Christ Church, Somers Town 


14 


22 


40 


76 


19 


39 


23 


81 


157 


St. Andrew's, Maiden Road 


49 


52 


81 


182 


60 


137 


41 


244 


426 


St. Bartholomew's, Gray's 




















Inn Road .... 


25 


25 


38 


88 


15 


48 


21 


84 


172 


St. Bede's, Hampstead Rd. 










2 


8 


11 


21 


21 


Old St. Pancras, St. Pancras 




















^ Road 


33 


29 


90 


152 


36 


78 


39 


153 


305 


St. Katherine's Chapel, 




















Gloucester Gate 


44 


58 


66 


108 










168 


St. Barnabas', Kentish Town 




















Road 


38 


60 


44 


142 


62 


149 


5U 


261 


403 


St.^Benet and All Saints', 




















Kentish Town . 


49 


75 


89 


213 


54 


89 


53 


196 


409 


St. John the Evangelist's, 




















Haverstock Hill 


9 


14 


22 


45 


9 


18 


18 


45 


90 


St. John the Evangelist's, 




















Fitzroy Square 


14 


33 


52 


99 


34 


65 


74 


173 


272 


St. Jude's, Gray's Inn Road. 


31 


35 


105 


171 


35 


91 


58 


184 


355 


St. James's, Hampste;id Rd. 


49 


29 


95 


173 


30 


52 


44 


126 


299 


St. Mary's, Somers Town . 


24 


20 


51 


95 


33 


40 


31 


104 


199 


St. Mary Brookfield's, Dart- 




















mouth Park Hill 


61 


107 


154 


322 


73 


120 


69 


202 


584 


St. Mary Magdalene's, 




















Osnaburgh Street 


214 


224 


268 


706 


73 


257 


49 


379 


1,085 


St. Mark's, St. Mark's Sq. . 


.60 


146 


85 


297 


100 


185 


55 


340 


637 


St. Martin's, Kentish Town 


55 


86 


42 


183 


88 


186 


59 


333 


516 


St. Matthew's, Oakley Sq. . 


28 


45 


135 


208 


32 


69 


45 


140 


354 


St. Michael's, Highgate Hill 


124 


236 


167 


527 


88 


130 


61 


279 


806 


St. Michael's, Camden Road 


47 


67 


240 


354 


39 


128 


27 


194 


548 


St. Luke's, Kentish Town . 


56 


130 


94 


280 


88 


180 


24 


298 


578 


St. Paul's, Camden Square . 


66 


232 


87 


385 


102 


248 


128 


478 


863 


St. Pancras Parish Church . 


143 


242 


283 


608 


184 


350 


298 


832 


1,500 


St. Peter's, King's Cross 


14 


17 


42 


73 


17 


30 


35 


88 


161 


St. Saviour's, Fitzroy Sq. . 


12 


23 


13 


48 


28 


100 


59 


187 


235 


St. Stephen's, Camden 




















Town Parish Church 


29 


31 


98 


158 


28 


49 


74 


151 


309 


St. Silas' Mission Church, 




















Maiden Road . 


7 


6 


26 


39 


7 


28 


14 


49 


88 


St. Thomas', Camden Town 


41 


44 


149 


234 


75 


114 


101 


290 


524 


Foundling Hospital 


144 


200 


197 


541 










541 


Total .... 


1.913 


3,143 


3,875 


8,931 


1,983 


4,199 


2,095 


8,277 


17,208 



175 



176 



THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 



Church of England Missions 



WESLEYAN METHODIST CHURCH 



CHURCH. 


MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 

for the 

Bay. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldm. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Women. 


Total. 


St. Martin's Hall, Kentish 
Town .... 

Old St. Pancras Ch. House . 

St. Andrew's Hall, Kentish 
Town . . . . 

St. Barnabas' Room, Prince 
of Wales Road . 

St. Michael's Mission, Cam- 
den To^vn .... 

St. Thomas' Church House, 
Camden Town . 

Holy Trinity Miss. Church, 
Ferdinand PI. , Chalk Farm 

St. Saviour 'sHall, EustonRd . 


1 

5 


5 
11 

... 


"88 
80 


91 
96 


5 
14 

8 

5 

G 
18 


11 
11 

27 

8 
38 


24 

20 

40 
16 

160 

7 


40 

45 

75 

21 

174 
63 


40 
94 

45 

96 

75 

21 

174 
63 


Total .... 


6 


16 


168 


190 


56 


95 


267 


418 


608 



Falkland Rd., Kentish Tn. 


114 


142 


107 


363 


139 


195 


58 


392 


755 


Prince of Wales' Road. 


153 


128 


102 


383 


149 


233 


73 


455 


838 


Stanhope Street . 


16 


11 


63 


90 


31 


47 


186 


264 


354 


Camden Street 


24 


26 


58 


108 


90 


140 


44 


274 


382 


Liverpool St., King's Cross. 
Cleveland HaU,ClevelandPl. 


71 


64 


44 


179 


82 


113 


30 


225 


404 










49 


144 


39 


232 


232 


People's HaU, Somers Town 










26 


40 


19 


85 


85 


Total .... 


378 


371 


374 


1,123 


566 


912 


449 


1,927 


3,050 







BAPTIST 


CHURCH 










Bassett St., Kentish Town . 


42 


47 


52 


141 


49 


125 


44 


218 


359 


Berkley Road, Chalk Farm. 


22 


25 


62 


109 


47 


85 


16 


148 


257 


Camden Road 


89 


152 


78 


319 


99 


168 


8 


275 


594 


Highgate Road . 


167 


264 


162 


593 


162 


225 


57 


444 


1,037 


Old Baptist Union, Camden 




















Town .... 


5 


7 


28 


40 


8 


19 


13 


40 


80 


Pratt Street, Camden Town 


10 


9 


6 


25 


7 


14 


5 


26 


51 


Regent's Park, Park Sq. E. 


211 


321 


95 


627 


277 


457 


34 


768 


1,395 


Henrietta St., King's Cross. 


15 


27 


49 


91 


19 


61 


37 


117 


208 


Strict Baptist, Gower Street 


77 


86 


23 


186 


89 


126 


12 


227 


413 


Arthur Street 


6 


15 


39 


60 


37 


39 


9 


85 


145 


Tolmer's Square Institute . 


19 


27 


11 


57 


34 


89 


13 


136 


193 


Total .... 


663 


980 


605 


2,248 


828 


1,408 


248 


2,484 


4,732 



Baptist Missions 



Regent's Park Mission 

Chapel, Druramond Street 
Havelock Hall, Gough St. 
Falkland Hall . 




.... 




... 


24 

8 

17 


57 
34 
49 


16 
17 
16 


97 
59 

82 


97 
59 

82 


Total .... 










49 


140 


49 


238 


238 



congregationaij church 



Bedford, Camden Town 


13 


5 


26 


44 


15 


36 


23 


74 


118 


Gospel Oak, Southampton 




















Road 


35 


42 


42 


119 


76 


80 


12 


168 


287 


Kentish Town 


79 


74 


50 


203 


115 


173 


56 


344 


547 


Maitland Park Road . 


53 


60 


69 


182 


40 


69 


27 


136 


318 


Park Chapel, Camden Town 


75 


106 


81 


262 


126 


250 


84 


460 


722 


St. Paul's, Kentish Town . 


53 


65 


74 


192 


69 


110 


26 


205 


397 


Whitfield Tabernacle, Tot- 




















tenham Court Road . 


58 


71 


33 


162 


83 


131 


39 


253 


415 


Tolmer's Square . 
Highgate Chapel, Highgate 


37 


36 


104 


177 


57 


81 


46 


184 


361 




















116 


126 


70 


312 


81 


92 


30 


203 


516 


Total .... 


519 


585 


549 


1,653 


662 


1,022 


343 


2,027 


3,680 





NORTH LONDON-ST. PANCRAS 

Congregational Mission 






177 


CHURCH. 


MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 

for the 

Day. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Lyndhiirst Mission 
Kentish Town . 


Hall, 


54 






54 


67 


101 


33 


201 


255 



PRESBYTERIAN" CHURCH 



Canic''-n Road 

Trini.y, Kentish Town Rd. 

Somers. Town 

Regent Square . 


SO 

14 

3C. 

131 


109 
19 
22 

216 


21 

27 

100 

96 


210 

60 

158 

443 


52 

21 

73 

103 


113 
37 

180 
168 


22 

12 
72 
19 


187 

70 

325 

290 


397 
130 
483 
733 


Total .... 


261 


366 


244 


871 


249 


498 


125 


872 


1,743 





Presbyterian 


Missions 










Medical Mission Hall, 






















King's Cross . 












20 


52 


10 


82 


82 


Regent Square Hall 


4 


3 




27 


34 


22 


52 


16 


90 


124 


District Mission Hall, 






















Kentish Town . 












62 


137 


110 


309 


309 


Hanover St. Hall, Kentish 






















Town .... 












11 


29 


30 


70 


70 


Aldenham Institute . 












37 


45 


23 


105 


105 


York Road, Kentish Town . 












11 


23 


11 


• 45 


45 


Total .... 


4 


3 


27 


34 


163 


338 


200 


701 


735 



PRIMITIVE METHODIST 


CHURCH 








Grafton Rd., Kentish Town 
New Camden Town . 


18 

72 


13 

57 


12 
35 


43 
164 


30 
90 


38 
135 


36 
35 


104 
260 


147 
424 


Total .... 


90 


70 


47 


207 


120 


173 


71 


364 


571 



CATHOLIC APOSTOLIC 


CHURCH 








jordon House, Highgate 
jrordon Sq., King's Cross 

Total .... 


43 
122 


58 
149 


40 
34 


141 
305 


42 
110 


60 
105 


38 
61 


140 

276 


281 
581 


165 


207 


74 


446 


152 


165 


99 


416 


862 




UNITARIAN 


CHURCH 










Dlarence Rd., Kentish Town 
flhyl Street, Kentish Town. 


15 

4 


12 
4 


10 

85 


37 
93 i 


19 
11 


20 
59 


15 
42 


54 
112 


91 
205 


Total .... 


19 


16 


95 


130 


30 


79 


57 


166 


296 



NEW JERUSALEM CHURCH 



Airgyle Square, King's Cross 36 



41 



10 



87 



23 



25 



52 



139 



FOREIGN PROTESTANT 


SERVICES 








jrerman, St. Mary's, Fitzroy 
Square .... 
jerman, Leighton Crescent 
Scandinavian 


80 

"ii 


67 
"l 


14 


161 
"12 


120 

24 

9 


123 

20 

1 


16 
3 


259 
47 
10 


420 
47 

22 


Total .... 


91 


68 


14 


173 


153 


144 


19 


316 


489 



12 



178 



THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 



BRETHREN 





MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 
for the 


CHURCH. 




















Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Day. 


Rochester Hall, Rochester 




















Road 


5 


4 


4 


13 


10 


22 


2 


34 


47 


Great College Street . 


6 


7 


31 


44 


7 


20 


9 


36 


80 


Gospel Hall, Hawley Road. 


5 


7 


4 


16 


8 


3 


16 


27 


43 


Haverstock Rooms 


11 


19 


9 


39 


9 


17 


7 


33 


72 


Wilkin Street Schools . 


31 


43 


18 


92 


25 


54 


22 


101 


193 


Total .... 


58 


80 


66 


204 


59 


116 


56 


231 


435 


DISCIPLES or CHRIST 


Hope Chapel, Prince of 




















Wales' Road . 


23 


17 


3 


43 


14 


33 


13 


60 


103 




S 


AIJVA 


lTION 


ARMY 










lA, Belmont Street, Chalk 




















Farm Road 


97 


106 


69 


272 


174 


260 


178 


612 


884 


Chapel Street, Somers Town 


4 


2 


5 


11 


6 


22 


15 


43 


54 


Burton Hall .... 


15 


9 


11 


35 


19 


34 


15 


68 


103 


Total .... 


116 


117 


85 


318 


199 


316 


208 


723 


1,041 


I 


lOMA 


N CA 


.THOI 


AC CHURC 


H 








Our Lady Help of Christians, 




















Kentish Town . 


207 


339 


132 


678 


31 


55 


18 


104 


782 


St. Dominic's Priory, Mait- 




















land Park .... 


305 


520 


354 


1,179 


99 


196 


69 


364 


1,543 


St. Aloysius', Somers Town 


203 


342 


220 


765 


65 


141 


97 


303 


1 1,068 


St. Ann's, Regent's Park . 


28 


61 


57 


14G 


14 


20 


35 


69 


215 


Total .... 


743 


1,262 


763 


2,768 


209 


412 


219 


840 


3,608 






OTHE 


R SE 


RVICES 










Lismore Gospel Hall . 


4 


3 




7 


10 


26 


14 


50 


57 


London City Mission, 39, 




















Grafton Terrace 


29 


19 


7 


55 


37 


43 


48 


128 


183 


London City Mission Hall, 




















Chalk Farm 










18 


18 


4 


40 


40 


Mission Hall, Carlton Road 










8 


19 


30 


57 


57 


Litcham St., Kentish Town 










4 


3 


59 


66 


66 


Y.M.C.A., 17, Camden Rd. 














32 


32 


32 


London City Mission, near 




















Gospel Oak station . 










12 


39 


8 


59 


59 


Rochester Hall, Railway 




















Arch, Kentish Town 










10 


3 


272 


285 


285 


People's Gospel Hall, Dart- 




















mouth Park Hill . 


12 


13 


84 


109 


23 


32 


41 


96 


205 


London Cabman's Hall, 




















Gray's Inn Road 


2 


1 


26 


29 


31 


52 


31 


114 


143 


Clarendon Hall, Somers Tn. 










11 


43 


11 


65 


65 


Stanhope Street Institute . 










19 


39 


8 


66 


66 


Maiden HaU. 


54 


51 


50 


155 


85 


135 


45 


265 


420 


Zion Tabernacle (Dr. 




















Dowie's) .... 


52 


50 


28 


130 


46 


69 


21 


136 


266 


Kentish Tn. Ragged Schools 




2 


27 


29 


1 


2 


76 


79 


108 


Spiritualists, Caversham Rd. 










3 






3 


3 


,, Judd Street . 










3 


11 




14 


14 


London City Mission, 




















Cromer Street . 










23 


40 


20 


83 


83 


London City Mission, Mid- 




















hope Hall .... 










15 


17 


2 


34 


34 


Culross Hall. 










6 


8 


11 


25 


25 


Total .... 


153 


139 


222 


514 


365 


599 


733 


1,697 


2,211 



NOETH LONDON- ST. PANGEAS 



179 



DENOMINATIONAL TOTALS 



DENOMINATION. 


MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldm. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldm. 


Total. 


for the 
Day. 


Church of England 


1,913 


3,143 


3,875 


8,931 


1,983 


4,199 


2,095 


8,277 


17,208 


„ „ Missions 


6 


16 


168 


190 


56 


95 


267 


418 


608 


Wesleyan Meth. Church 


378 


371 


374 


1,123 


566 


912 


449 


1,927 


3,050 


Baptist Church 


663 


980 


605 


2,248 


828 


1,408 


248 


2,484 


4,732 


„ Missions . 










49 


140 


49 


238 


238 


Congregational Church. 


519 


585 


549 


1,653 


662 


1,022 


343 


2,027 


3,680 


„ Missions 


54 






54 


67 


101 


33 


201 


255 


Presbyterian Church . 


261 


366 


244 


871 


249 


498 


125 


872 


1,743 


„ Missions . 


4 


3 


27 


34 


163 


338 


200 


701 


735 


Primitive Meth. Church 


90 


70 


47 


207 


120 


173 


71 


364 


571 


Cath. Apostolic Church 


165 


207 


74 


446 


152 


165 


99 


416 


862 


Unitarian Church 


19 


16 


95 


130 


30 


79 


57 


166 


296 


New Jerusalem Church 


36 


41 


10 


87 


23 


25 


4 


52 


139 


Foreign Prot. Services . 


91 


68 


14 


173 


1.53 


144 


19 


316 


489 


Brethren 


58 


80 


66 


204 


59 


116 


56 


231 


435 


Disciples of Christ 


23 


17 


3 


43 


14 


33 


13 


60 


103 


Salvation Army . 


116 


117 


85 


318 


199 


316 


208 


723 


1,041 


Roman Catholic Church 


743 


1,262 


763 


2,768 


209 


412 


219 


840 


3,608 


Other Services 


153 


139 


222 


514 


365 


599 


733 


1,697 


2,211 


Jewish Church 


48 


32 


72 


152 










152 


Grand Totals . 


5,340 


7,513 


7,293 


20,146 


5,947 


10,775 


5,288 


22,010 


42,156 



I 



Other Services 




'Ota] 
r the 
3ay. 

66 
112 

331 
172 

186 

374 
789 
662 

64 
865 
588 
203 

342 

4,654 



49 
79 



53 
103 



284 



394 



139 

045 



340 
507 



031 



Blue = Evening 



216 
504 
111 
30 



361 



Nonconformist 



Roman Catholic 



Other Services 




Borough of Holborn 



CHURCH OF ENGLAND 



CHURCH. 


MORXIXG. 


EVENING. 1 


Total 

for the 

Day. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldm. 


Total. 


Hen. 


Women. 


Chldm. 


Total 


Gray's Inn Chapel 
Lincoln's Inn Chapel . 
St. Giles'-in-the-Fields 
Seven Dials ]\Iission Church 
Christ Church, Endell Street 
Holy Trinity, Little Queen 

Street ". . . . 
St. George's, Hart Street . 
Christ Church, Woburn Sq. 
St. John the Evangelist's 

(French) .... 
St. Alban's, Brooke Street . 
St. John's, Red Lion Square 
St. Peter's, Cross Street 
St. George the Martyr's, 

Queen Square . 


29 
52 
44 
19 
23 

46 
96 
42 

8 

197 

64 

25 

39 


30 
44 
34 

18 
28 

60 

216 

93 

10 
339 
118 

30 

64 


7 
16 
69 
28 
26 

74 
100 
108 

17 

35 

121 

24 

67 


66 
112 
147 

65 

77 

180 
412 
243 

35 
571 
303 

79 

170 


"32 
38 
31 

57 

102 

49 

7 
99 
54 
25 

■ 43 


87 
48 
56 

107 
209 
101 

4 

159 

180 

69 

91 


"65 
21 
22 

30 

66 

169 

18 
36 

51 
30 

38 


184 
107 
109 

194 
377 
319 

29 
294 

285 
124 

172 


66 
112 
331 
172 
186 

374 
789 
562 

64 
865 

588 
203 

342 


Total .... 


684 


1,084 


692 


2,460 


537 


1,111 


546 


2,194 


4,654 





Church. 


of 


England Missions 








St. George's, Ormond Yard 
St. Peter's, Onslow Street . 
Christ Church Hall, Her- 

brand Street 
Holy Trinity, Ashley Bldgs. 


"4 

2 
1 


"5 

2 
3 


"'70 

49 

77 


"'79 

53 
81 


5 
""4 


3 
"14 


41 
"*4 


49 
"22 


49 
79 

53 
103 


Total .... 


7 1 


10 


196 


213 


9 


17 


45 


71 


284 



WESLEYAN" llETHODIST CHUBCH 



Great Queen Street 



45 



52 



40 



137 



119 



107 



31 



257 



394 



BAPTIST CHURCH 



Soho Chapel, Shaftesbury 








1 












Avenue .... 


15 


25 


6 


46 ' 


22 


62 


9 


93 


139 


Bloomsbury Chapel, Shaftes- 




















bury Avenue 


174 


190 


105 


469 ' 


202 


280 


94 


576 


1,045 


Kingsgate Chapel, South- 








! 










340 


ampton Row 


48 


60 


32 


140 


Oi 


104 


39 


200 


John Street .... 


26 


76 


93 


195 

1 


68 


176 


68 


312 


507 


Total .... 


263 


351 


236 


850 


349 


622 


210 


1,181 


2,031 



Baptist Missions 



Xeal Street .... 
Olympic Theatre, Wych St. 
28, Brooke Street . 
Seven Dials .... 


"60 


"46 


T08 


'214 


4 

77 
4 
5 


6 206 

110 103 

6 101 

21 ! 4 


216 

290 

111 

30 


216 

504 

111 

30 


Total .... 


60 


46 


108 


214 


90 


143 j 414 


647 


861 



181 



182 



THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 

rOREIGN PROTESTANT SERVICES 



CHURCH. 


MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 


Men. 


Women. Chldrn. 


To.al. 


Men. 


Woi. en. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


for the 
Day. 


Swiss Church, Endell Street 


52 


127 


4 


183 


22 


30 


1 


53 


236 



SALVATION ARMY 



52, Eagle Street 



11 



12 



23 



ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH 



St. Etheldreda's, Ely Place 
St. Peter's, Clerkenwell Rd. 
St. Anselm and St. Cecilia's, 
Sardinia Street . 


134 
873 

193 


193 
741 

364 


176 
453 

217 


503 
2,067 

774 


60 
383 

32 


52 
470 

96 


26 
80 

24 


138 
933 

152 


641 
3,000 

926 


Total .... 


1,200 


1,298 


846 


3,344 


475 


618 


130 


1,223 


4,567 



OTHER SERVICES 



London Medical Mission, 
Short's Gardens 

London City Miss., Work- 
men's Hall 

London City Miss., Shaftes- 
bury Hall .... 

Fox Court Mission 

Field Lane Miss., Vine St. 

Albert Youth's Institute, 
Lamb's Conduit Street 

Church of Humanity, 
Chapel Street . 

Bessbrook Home, Queen's 
Square .... 

36, Gray's Inn Road (New 
and Latter House of 
Israel) .... 

Total . . . . 









... 


3 


31 


12 


46 










5 


6 


1 


12 


'"e 


"3 


"35 


"44 


35 
31 

7 

18 


45 
35 
55 


27 
158 
250 

2 


107 
224 
312 

20 


4 


10 


2 


16 










63 


2 


... 


65 


69 


1 


1 


71 








- 


5 


6 


5 


16 


73 


15 


37 


125 


173 


179 


456 


808 



DENOMINATIONAL TOTALS 



DENOMINATION. 


MORNING. 


EVEMNG. 


Total 

for the 

Day. 


Men. 


Women 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Church of England 


684 


1,084 


692 


2,460 


537 


1,111 


546 


2,194 


4,654 


„ „ Mi,ssif»ns 


7 


10 


196 


213 


9 


17 


45 


71 


284 


We.sleyan Meth. Church 


45 


52 


40 


137 


119 


107 


31 


257 


394 


Baptist Church 


263 


351 


236 


850 


349 


622 


210 


1,181 


2,031 


„ Missions . 


60 


46 


108 


214 


90 


143 


414 


647 


861 


Foreign i'rot. Services . 


.02 


127 


4 


183 


22 


30 


1 


53 


236 


Salvation Army . 


5 


4 


2 


11 


9 


12 


2 


23 


34 


Roman Catholic Church 


1,200 


1,298 


846 


3,344 


475 


618 


130 


1,223 


4,567 


Otlier Services 


73 


15 


37 


125 


173 


179 


456 


808 


933 


Grand Totals . 


2,389 


2,987 


2,161 


7,r,37 


1,783 


2,839 


1,835 


6,457 


13,994 



Population Roman Catholic 



Other Services 



Cmnt 




Blad 



Blue - Evening 



Population 



All Churches ^ Churcfa of England 



Nonconformist 



Roman Catholic 



Other Services 




i«r^ 



Borough of Finsbury 



CHURCH OF ENGLAND 







MORNING. 






EVENING. 




Total 


CHURCH. 








































Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldm. 


Total. 


Day. 


Chapel of the Charterhouse 


49 


9 


1 


59 










59 


Holy Redeemer, Clerkenwell 


42 


94 


137 


273 


28 


92 


6 


126 


399 


St. James', Clei-kenwell Gn. 


40 


125 


127 


292 


80 


153 


58 


291 


583 


St. John the Baptist's, St. 




















John's Square . 


18 


17 


29 


64 


30 


56 


33 


119 


183 


St. Peter's, Clerkenwell 


30 


42 


62 


134 


44 


87 


112 


243 


377 


St. Mark's, Pentonville 


43 


56 


54 


153 


55 


97 


72 


224 


377 


St. Philip's, Granville Sq. . 


25 


37 


115 


177 


16 


35 


41 


92 


269 


St. James', Pentonville Hill 


21 


24 


21 


66 


18 


35 


22 


75 


141 


St. Silas', Penton Street 


31 


33 


156 


220 


40 


69 


58 


167 


387 


All Saints' Mission Church, 




















White Lion Street . 


28 


34 


61 


123 


25 


44 


77 


146 


269 


St. Paul's, Bunhill Row . 


22 


21 


47 


90 


34 


53 


34 


121 


211 


St. Mary Charterhouse, Gol- 




















den Lane .... 


39 


50 


99 


188 


37 


129 


73 


239 


427 


St. Thomas Charterhouse, 




















Goswell Road . 


33 


27 


53 


113 


30 


42 


30 


102 


215 


St. Clement's, Gity Road . 


45 


91 


134 


270 


28 


75 


48 


151 


421 


St. Paul's, Goswell Road . 


37 


30 


94 


161 


59 


102 


74 


235 


396 


St. Barnabas', King's Sq. . 


10 





20 


35 


16 


27 


86 


129 


164 


St. Luke's, Old Street . 


44 


64 


218 


326 


47 


113 


33 


193 


519 


Total .... 


557 


759 


1,428 


2,744 


587 


1,209 


857 


2,653 


5,397 



Church of England Missions 



St. Mark's Schools, Brewer 




















Street .... 










12 


20 


23 


55 


55 


St. James' Schools, Collier 




















Street .... 




1 


49 


50 










50 


St. Peter's Mission, 195, 




















Goswell Road . 










4 


16 


1 


21 


21 


Total .... 




1 


49 


50 


16 


36 


24 


76 


126 



WESLEYAN METHODIST CHURCH 



Wesley's Chapel, City Road 
Central Miss., St. John's Sq. 
Welsh Chapel, City Road . 
Leysian Mission, Errol St. . 
Radnor Street Mission 

Total . . . . 



117 


118 


48 


283 


154 


211 


51 


416 


147 


105 


268 


520 


208 


391 


170 


769 


11 


5 


4 


20 


50 


66 


13 


129 


47 


18 


60 


125 


127 


139 


66 


332 


5 


7 


36 


48 


43 


68 


962 


1,073 


327 


253 


416 


996 


582 


875 


1,262 


2,719 



699 

1,289 

149 

457 

1,121 

3,715 



PRIMITIVE METHODIST CHURCH 



Winchester Street 



20 



22 



63 105 



183 



30 



64 



31 125 



230 



184 



THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 



BAPTIST CHUBCH 



CHUKCH. 


MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 

for the 

Day. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Woodbridge Chapel 
Mount Zion, Chadwell 
Street .... 
Vernon, King's Cross Road 
Great Arthur Street Chapel 
Spencer Place Chapel . 


68 

51 
114 
612 

12 


105 

89 

18G 

30 

17 


181 

16 
83 
10 
37 


354 

156 

383 

652 

66 


168 

64 
215 
322 

71 


355 

133 

382 

80 

102 


276 

17 
156 

12 
133 


799 

214 
763 
414 

306 


1,153 

370 
1,136 
1,066 

372 


Total .... 


857 


427 


327 


1,611 


840 


1,052 


594 


2,486 


4,097 



Baptist Missions 



Zion Sunday School, 
John's Street Road . 

Mount Zion School, 
White Lion Street . 


St. 
71, 


3 


1 


35 


39 


2 

18 


5 
39 


199 
42 


206 
99 


206 
138 


Total . 


3 


1 


35 


39 


20 


44 


241 


305 


344 



CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 



Claremont Hall, Penton- 




















ville Road 


21 


19 


17 


57 


107 


191 


227 


525 


582 


Welsh Tabernacle, Penton- 




















ville Road .... 


59 


25 


8 


92 


220 


225 


33 


478 


570 


Whitfield's Tabernacle, 




















Tabernacle Street . 


18 


24 


13 


55 


28 


46 


20 


94 


149 


Total .... 


98 


68 


38 


204 


355 


462 


280 


1,097 


1,301 



Congregational Missions 



Hope Mission 
Sermon Lane Mission . 


10 
24 


3 
11 


39 
3 


52 
38 


20 
74 


33 
129 


239 
36 


292 
239 


344 

277 


Total .... 


34 


14 


42 


90 


94 


162 


275 


531 


621 > 



COUNTESS OF HUNTINGDON'S CONNEXION 



Spa Fields Chajx^l, Lloyd 
Square .... 



12 18 



48 



78 



43 64 



74 



181 



UNITARIAN CHURCH 



George Row, St. Luke's 



9 51 



69 



23 57 



71 151 





SOCIETY OP 


FRIENDS 










Bunhill Fields Memorial 
Buildings .... 
Peel Meeting House . 


62 

7 


33 
2 


17 
2 


112 
11 


42 

17 


74 
25 


184 
46 


300 

88 


412 
99 


Total .... 


69 


35 


19 


123 


59 


99 


230 


388 


511 



BRETHREN 



Hall, 346, Goswell Road . 
Red, White and Blue In- 
stitute, 7, Gumming St. . 


7 






7 


n 

3 


30 
17 


14 
5 


55 
25 


62 
25 


Total .... 


7 






7 


14 


47 


19 


80 


87 



NORTH LONDON- FINSBURY 

SALVATION" ARMY 



185 





MORNING. 




EVENING. 




Total 


CHURCH. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldm. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldm. 


ToUl. 

1 


Day. 


116a, Pentonville Koad 
9, Bowling Green Lane 


8 
2 


13 

7 


22 


43 
9 


21 
10 


40 
11 


27 
3 


88 
24 


131 
33 


Total .... 


10 


20 


22 


52 


31 


51 


30 


112 


164 



ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH 



St. Peter and St. Paul's, 

Eosoman Street 
St. Joseph's, Lamb's Bldgs. 

Total . 



512 
30 



542 



439 
96 



535 



299 
85 



384 



1,250 
211 



1.461 



81 



81 



98 



267 



267 



1,517 
211 

1,728 



OTHER SERVICES 



Latter Day Saints, Town 




















Hall 










36 


45 


18 


99 


99 


Ragged School Mission, 




















Collier Street . 










3 


6 


148 


157 


157 


Mildmay Miss., 158, King's 




















Cross Eoad 










30 


38 


8 


76 


76 


"Fox and Knot" School, 




















Charterhouse Street . 








„.. 


8 


12 


204 


224 


224 


Christian Community, Gee 




















Street .... 










22 


37 


24 


83 


83 


German Y.M.C.A., Fins- 




















bury Square 










16 






16 


16 


London City Miss., " Lamb 




















and Flag". 


3 


1 


57 


61 


33 


78 


155 


266 


327 


London City Miss., North- 




















ampton Hall 










6 


11 


2 


19 


19 


Total .... 


3 


1 


57 


61 


154 


227 


559 


940 


1,001 



DENOMINATIONAL TOTALS 



DENOMINATION. 


MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldm. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Day. 


Church of England 


557 


759 


1,428 


2,744 


587 


1,209 


857 


2,653 


5,397 


„ „ Missions 




1 


49 


50 


16 


36 


24 


76 


126 


Wesleyan Meth. Church 


327 


253 


416 


996 


582 


875 


1,262 


2,719 


3,715 


Primitive Meth. Church 


20 


22 


63 


105 


30 


64 


31 


125 


230 


Baptist Church 


857 


427 


327 


1,611 


840 


1,052 


594 


2,486 


4,097 


„ Missions . 


3 


1 


35 


39 


20 


44 


241 


305 


344 


Congregational Church 


98 


68 


38 


204 


355 


462 


280 


1,097 


1,301 


„ Missions 


34 


14 


42 


90 


94 


162 


275 


531 


621 


Countess of Hunting- 




















don's Connexion 


12 


18 


48 


78 


43 


64 


74 


181 


259 


Unitarian Church 


9 


9 


51 


69 


23 


57 


71 


151 


220 


Society of Friends 


69 


35 


19 


123 


59 


99 


230 


388 


511 


Brethren 


7 






7 


14 


47 


19 


80 


87 


Salvation Army . 


10 


20 


22 


52 


31 


51 


30 


112 


164 


RomaniCatholic Church 


542 


535 


384 


1,461 


81 


98 


88 


267 


1,728 


Other Services 


3 


1 


57 


61 


154 


227 


559 


940 


1,001 


Grand Totals . 


2,548 


2,163 


2,979 


7,690 


2,929 


4,547 


4,635 


12,111 


19,801 




$ 



80 



DIAGRAM 

Shewing Attendance. 
FINSBURY 




1 



Other Services 




Population 



All Churches ^ Church of Engrland 



Nonconformist 



Roman CatholJf 



Other Services 




Black = All ServiceB 



Rod - Morning 



c 



3 

a. 
o 

PL, 



2 

o 






s 

"si 
c 



U 
C 

S 

o 

Qi 



90 



80 



70 



60 



50 



40 



50 



20 



10 



fTT ^ 1 ' ' — ^ 


\+ ■' - -t 1 


V .; 


i~L ' T 


irt_, _... 


in~i 


i" " 


itit " 


' 


.j: .,,,,.,,■ 


\ .-+..... 


\ 


... 1 1 ^ 






111 A f" L> A \A 


JlJ a. JilKJ' b .j\ Irk 




\ '_L CL ' .r yk. ^^ i 


\ orie'w^inR 7A.ttenclan.ce. 


' ', " ' ■ 




TOTAIJ^ FOR NORTH LONDON. I 




l\ ; ] 


\' ' i ' ■ ' i ' 1 




\ i ' 


\ i 1 


1 1 ! 1 : 1 i 


I'll' ' ■ ' 


I 1 


\ 1 


1 ' 


1 \ 


I 1 


j I 


\ 


\ 


\ 


V ' ' 




\ 1 


I 


1 


j 1 


I 


\ 


\ 


\ 


\ 1 




I 


I 1 


1 


I 


1 


1 


1 






1 


I 1 


1 1 j 


I 1 


I 


\ I 


I i 1 


1 I 


I ( 1 


' r T" ' "^■~ 


\ i 


I 


1 1 


1 1 


1 1 1 1 


1 1 ! 


■ 


- -~H- --U-j ^ ■ ^ 


^, ^s^ ^ """T --^ - -t- ^^ 




^ 


— h— 1 V 1 " " _j__ 


A. |_ 1 


^^ 


^^ 


j ^ 


^ ^ 1 


\ 1 


S, ' '^, .^-v 




— --- s,^ 


^ 


rS . 


^ ^ 


1 V 


. ^ w 


—4 I \ ■ 


-t±;^-:rT^' i :"^..t7" . ,;, ~^~ ^^- ^""n V t", ,. . 



Total Population 


Popul 

c 

IL 


t Roman 

c 


c 
«. 

E 

c 


Catholic 

1 

IE 








u 

c 

1 

< 

13 
I 


< 


other 

c 
u 




Services 

e 

i 


1 




ci-lt lOOrp 


n — r — r 


j 




-" 




MM 


1 1 


r^ I M i 






\ 






! 1 




^^ 








( 




M n^ ! 






' i 






1 







1 i 


1 










1 ! I\ i ! 






1 i 














DIAGRAM 

Ke-wing Analysis of Attendance. 










\: 


1 


\ 








90 -tp-^ 


1 






— 1— r- 










_ 






ll- 


1 ! i 






! 




A \ 


1 ' 1 


{ 








1 


1 






i 




^ 






A 




; TOTALS FOR NORTH LONDON 


- 








\i 






1 






1 1 






1 






k -^ — r 


1 


ill! 


















\ 


_P-^J_L 






i 






^ tr^" 


Li 


























\ 














\ 




^ 70 — \- 


— ) 1— M — 1— 


\ 


--- 








^ 
















\ 














\ 




z lul 


1- 4- t^fi- 
1 — 1 — 1 














































I 






























\ 




















1 ! 


T 






























\ 


















{.J -^ 1 










_j 






_j 




, 




II 




\ 
















oO — 1 — 1 


1 ■ 






























\ 


















i 1 




























\ 


















w -j— ^ 


\ ' 1 








1 


















\ 


















(u — ^ 


\ 1 1 


\ \ 
























\ 




















jt"t] 




1 1 


- 


















\ 


. \ 






_L. 










W i^o ^- 




\ \ 






! 1 




















\ ' 


T "^ 






1 






u H 


! 1 I 


1 1 
























\ ' 


















2 " 


1 


\ 1 




1 










































< 


—It 1— H 


1 1 




/ 


\ 


















\ 




















Q ir. 1 i 


! \ \ 




/ 


\ 


k_ 














J, 


.\ 




















540 ! 

I'll 


|\ 1 1 


\ 1 


/ 




"^\ 
















\ ' 




I i 












I i J/-^ 


V 




/ 




\ 














\ . 












>^ 






\ '^<<^ 


I 


r\ 






V 


j 








\\ 










/ 


y 


\ 




— '-' ,H^— !""!- 


\ 


/ 




/ 


^_^ 




N 










\\ 








y 












! : ' 






\y^ 


\ 




^ 










\ 




^^ 


r- 










< ou — 


.^4_ 






y 








N 




^ 










w 




















iV 


/ 










\ 




V 








^ 




















1^ 














\, 


\ 


















.-^ 






""HL 








1 










s 








1 










^y 






Ort 






















\ 




J 






V ' ' ' 


^ 


^ 






JU "1 — 
































\ L-r 






ij 




"T 




1 1 












1 




1 


i 








\y 






— 




1 


-^^ \ \ ^ h 




















; 1 










y^ 










1 1 i 






















1 
















— — i 






in ! ! 


i ill! 










\ ' 


























l(J-r-t" 








.^"^ 




>. 






























1 1 


i 1 ! 




^ ^"^ 


i 


' S 


















1 












J i 


-1 — 1 — — 1 — >- - 


















s 


















































































, _L 




i 




1 


















1 










U 




















B 


lu 


e 




Ev 


^en 


inj 























All Churche 



Church of Eng^land 



Nonconformist 



Roman Catholic 



Other Services 




The Problem of South London 

BY CHAELES F. G. MASTERMAN, M.A. 

It is to tlie student of opinion and social change that this great 
enterprise of the numbering of the religions of London will prove 
of lasting value. Only advertisement, cynicism, or vulgar curiosity 
benefits from the announcement that Mr. A's church (heralding 
itself as exercising enormous spiritual influence) gathers four hundred 
worshippers every Sunday, or that Mr. B's church (proclaiming a 
similar success) gathers forty. The tabulated results of the Census 
have already been used as the basis for crude and ill-informed 
deductions ; they will form the material in the future for the 
demonstration of all manner of preconceived ideas. But this is the 
common fate of statistics. Let the figures be taken for what they 
profess to be — the record of the numbers of attendance, men, women, 
and children, at morning and evening service on certain Sundays 
in the years 1902-3 in every public religious edifice in London. These 
figures have been accepted by all to be correct ; the fairness, 
accuracy, and impartiality of the enterprise has evoked generous 
acknowledgment. There is no claim made that these figures give 
adequate basis for comparison of the spiritual influence of different 
individual churches or of the aggregate of organised religions. One 
church, in a poor district, attracts a congregation by a distribution 
of cocoa and slabs of bread at the commencement or the conclusion 
of the service. Another, in a comfortable suburb, fills its pews with 
an audience to whom church-going is the custom and the fashion, 
a display of smart clothing, the occupation of a seat hired by the 
year, or a method of killing the boredom of an idle Sunday. A 
third, hidden in a back street, gathers together thirty or forty poor 
men and women who support the expenses with their scanty earnings, 
and meet for edification or for worship outside the sphere of both 
fashion and material benefit. There is no common denominator of 
religious aspiration which will measure three such congregations 
as these ; but in the dispassionate estimate of figures they are 

187 



188 THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 

of necessity weiglied together as if each individual attendance were 
of similar account. 

Yet the figures themselves are of quite extraordinary interest 
and value — an interest and value which will increase as the memories 
of London in 1903 fade into an almost fabulous past. They have 
stamped in permanent form certain facts of the spiritual energies 
of this strange and perplexing city in this particular period of 
change. Corrected by personal knowledge, and retranslated from 
their bloodless skeleton of information into terms of human effort, 
tenacity, and aspiration, they become charged with a romance and 
significance paralleled by few other such tables of numbers and 
names. 

By a most happy coincidence, while the Census was in progress, 
there appeared an attempt to estimate the religious life of the 
people of London by methods other than the statistical. Mr. 
Charles Booth's investigation in seven .volumes will remain as a 
permanent companion for the historical student to the figures 
published by the Daily News. His results, as might have been 
anticipated from an investigation of individual estimate and 
impression, have not been received with so universal an acceptance. 
Comments, often angry, have been evoked by the somewhat 
sweeping strictures of his investigators. The personal impression 
of curate or minister seems often to have formed the main basis of 
judgment. Pretentiousness, noisiness, vulgarity, produce emphatic 
condemnation ; the critics would have done well to remember that 
pretentiousness, noisiness, and vulgarity have often been associated 
with a real and vigorous religion. Mr. Booth deliberately (I am 
inclined to think, rightly) rejected the statistical method as 
misleading in the estimation of something so elusive and intangible 
as spiritual influence. But as a corrective to many of his statements 
the Census figures are quite invaluable. No serious student can 
neglect either the one or the other. Read first the seven volumes 
of Mr. Booth ; examine and analyse the figures of this Census ; 
make yourself personally familiar with at least a few selected 
districts of different types — the wealthy, the suburban, the artisan, 
the poor : you will then be in position to offer at least some 
tentative suggestions towards an estimate of the religious condition 
of this great congeries of cities which we term London. 

I have few criticisms to offer of the methods of enumeration 
adopted. The Census gives all the essential figures, and, by a happy 
ingenuity, certain additional facts with regard to double attendance, 



THE PEOBLEM OF SOUTH LONDON 189 

etc., of very considerable interest. One would liave liked for 
scientific purposes a complete statistic of all attendance — afternoon 
meetings, early morning services, cliildren's Sunday schools, as well as 
the two main services of the day. I was one of those who wrote to 
the promoters at the commencement, appealing for the enumeration 
of the early morning services, and I am grateful for the samples 
given, which are most instructive ; though I regret that it was not 
possible to give these complete for all the twenty-nine boroughs 
of London. The children question was bound to prove a difficulty ; 
though it is impossible to see what other course could have been 
pursued, it cannot be said that the difficulty has been entirely 
overcome. The method has been to count everything in the nature of 
a children's service, to omit everything in the nature of a Sunday 
school.* But there is no sharp line of division between the one and 
the other — Sunday schools are held in church or chapel, or the " cate- 
chism " occupies the functions in one parish which the Sunday 
school occupies in the other. The result is to produce figures on 
the surface misleading. One district collects its children in a Sunday 
school, and finds only its adults enumerated. Another collects its 
children in a catechism, and finds its statistics of attendance enor- 
mously swollen. Repeated entries in the Census figures — such as 4 
adults, 154 children ; 3 adults, 69 children ; 13 adults, 323 children — 
show that we are really here reckoning a Sunday school substitute, 
a population which in other districts escapes the enumerators. 

Fortunately, however, such a difficulty does not affect the main 
results, though it may influence the gross totals, and the comparison 
(if such a fatuous task be attempted) between the total adherents 
of the varied religions of London. The Sunday school and the 
Sunday attendance of children at church in all the poorer districts 
serve a purpose quite distinct from that of religious instruction. 
Children go whose parents are of all religions and of none ; 
streets containing not a single adult worshipper will contribute their 
swarms of clean and intelligent infants. The selection of the 
school, as far as I have been able to investigate it, seems entirely 
haphazard — nearness, excellence of the annual treat, the lateness 

* It is important that the method adopted in regard to the enumeration of 
children should be clearly understood. Neither morning nor afternoon Sunday 
schools were enumerated. At the close of the morning Sunday school three courses 
are open to the children, — (A) to go into the church, and thus form part of the 
congregation ; (B) to have a special service of their ow^n ; i(C) to go home. The 
children following either course A or B were enumerated ; the children following 
course C were not enumerated. [Editor.] 



190 THE EELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 

of assembling, and the laxity of discipline being apparently the 
chief attractive elements. Certainly the last thing thought of is 
the nature of the religion taught. I have no doubt that Sunday 
schools conducted by mild-mannered and generous Buddhists in 
South London (provided they were white in colour — we have 
an aversion to foreigners) would draw large and appreciative 
audiences. The whole question of the virtue or viciousness of 
the Sunday school system as at present conducted amongst " the 
poor" is one on which, indeed, I have strong opinions, but 
irrelevant to the present discussion. Let it be enough to say 
that, in the case of the children, causes other than religious 
are so manifest and disturbing, that in my discussion of the 
religion of South London in connection with these figures I shall 
consider the statistics of the attendance of adults only. 



I am probably prejudiced in favour of mine own people ; but I 
must confess that to me the statistics of South London, deemed 
by the ignorant the least romantic of all coagulations of human 
beings in the civilised world, seem to me far the most illuminating 
of the series. In South London especially it is possible to isolate 
two most interesting classes, whose general characteristics are well 
worthy of study. Here collected in bulk is the new race of city 
toilers, the aggregation of artisans and working people created by 
the nineteenth century drift to the towns. Here also in bulk is 
the suburban resident living his peculiar and specialised life, also 
a creation of very recent economic change. East London has 
also a great stretch of manual workers, but here the problem 
is confused by the great influx of aliens. South of the river we 
are typically and aggressively English — stolid, patient, not con- 
spicuously intelligent, conscious of our superiority to the heathen 
and the foreigner. At the other end of the scale wealth and culture 
do not form disturbing elements. Wc have pools of secure material 
comfort on the frontiers of our kingdom ; but wealth for the most 
part gathers together its goods and departs to the squares and 
terraces of the west, endeavouring there to forget that it once 
inhabited a suburban villa. Our social classes run into each other 
with no clearly defined boundaries ; it would be a mistake to draw 
the line sharp and clear between them. But for purposes of 
investigation we can collect them together into four main groups, 



THE PROBLEM OF SOUTH LONDON 191 

and can endeavour to learn what light the Census can throw on 
their particular religious conditions. 

First we may note the " poor " in the proper sense of the term : 
those, in Sir Henry Campbell-Bannerman's now famous phrase, living 
" on the verge of hunger " if not " on the verge of starvation." 
These are the subjects of Messrs. Booth and Rowntree's dismal 
statistics, the class who only emerge above the political horizon 
when some energetic statesman is composing a moving perora- 
tion or essaying a new policy. They are the forlorn multitude 
of those who have failed. They are numerous in South London, 
forming great wedges and masses in Southwark and Bermondsey, 
spreading along the riverside east and west, and collecting in 
scattered pools or isolated streets in all the other boroughs. They 
form the ready prey of church and mission ; each particular district 
in which they herd is swarming with rival agencies essaying their 
bodily sustenance and the salvation of their souls. A continuous 
vast river of charitable help pours through the channels of these 
missions into every corner and crevice of their homes ; bread, 
clothing, boots, vegetable soup, grocery tickets, monetary assistance, 
fall sometimes, like the rain of heaven, upon the just and unjust, 
sometimes only upon those who are willing to make a decent 
return in attendance at public worship or mothers' meetings. This 
source of supply is eked out in most cases with casual labour or 
the more desolating forms of unskilled employment, with outdoor 
relief, with the products of home industries, the earnings of 
school children, and the munificent wage earned by the free 
non-unionist labour of women. The children are innumerable ; 
the death rate of infants is high, but a sujBS.cient number survive to 
ensure the transmission of the rickety type, stunted physique and 
fragile or diseased constitution, to the generations of the future. 
The individuals rise or fall, but the class remains, a stagnant pool 
of low-grade life which is slowly extending its borders, and swelling 
its multitudes to a bulk which finally will compel attention to the 
menace of its futility. 

The second class makes up the matrix of which the great mass 
of South London is composed. It is the class of decent working 
men, from the highly paid artisan to the better paid labourer — 
the "poor" as they appear to the rich, lumping into one common 
category all below the status of retail tradesmen. It more than 
fills the block dwellings and cottages in which it is housed, and 
it is continually flowing over through leaks and gaps into the 



192 THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 

suburbs which form its southern borders, to the infinite disgust 
of the original inhabitants of these desirable regions. It works 
for the most part beyond the river, and spends much of its 
leisure in journeys to and fro. It is on the whole contented with 
its life ; but its intelligence and vitality seem partially sapped 
by its crowded city existence, and it exhibits none of the somewhat 
aggressive social and political vigour which is exhibited by a 
similar class in other cities of England. At present it is largely 
country bred ; it still shows traces of the open air and the life 
of the fields. But each year the rural elements diminish, the urban 
increase. It is a race passing in bulk through the greatest change in 
the life of humanity, the change in which nature vanishes from 
the horizon and is replaced by the perpetual presence of man. It re- 
presents at the present a stage in this transition, with stability, acquies- 
cence, and the peculiar city characteristics not yet fully attained. 

The third class is one often overlooked, whose neglect has 
originated some of the more absurd generalisations in connection 
with this Census and other similar efforts. In all the boroughs, 
poor as well as rich, lining all the main roads and many of the side 
streets is the class of tradesmen who minister to the needs of the 
vast populations which are hidden behind. These form a prosperous 
bourgeois class, possessing considerable vigour and enterprise, and 
very sharply divided in interest and outlook from the poor and 
the artisan who do business with them. In the poorest boroughs 
they form an aristocracy of wealth; in the wealthier boroughs 
they are less conspicuous, and there are social grades from which 
they are excluded. But they are numerous in all, and in all offer 
a very marked contribution to the religious life of South London. 

Lastly, in the outlying districts we find the suburban dweller, 
forming, with his brother on the hills of North London, a class 
of quite peculiar and specialised life and characteristics. He is a 
product of those economic conditions which have made London 
the banking centre and clearing house of the world. He is a 
dependent of the City, to which he journeys every morning. He 
leads an entirely sedentary existence, writing other men's letters, 
adding other men's accounts, each a cog or link in the machinery 
of other men's ideas. The energy pent up in this remarkable toil 
is reserved for the hours of freedom ; there is a real home life, 
strong family affection, little gardens and ornamented villas, 
ambition for the children. A certain artificiality distinguishes 
such an existence, a divorce from reality which only intrudes 



THE PROBLEM OF SOUTH LONDON 193 

at intervals of love or suffering or death. Vigour may be more 
conspicuous tlian breadth of outlook or intellectual agility, and 
there are often set up quite astonishing standards of " respect- 
ability " in politics and religion. But there are compensating 
elements in a widespread material comfort, enjoyment of simple 
pleasures, and (as we shall see) a very real and active religious 
life, probably stronger here than in any other class of the 
community. It is here that the churches and chapels are crowded, 
that their activities blossom out on week-days into mutual 
improvement associations, debating clubs, and innocuous amusement. 
The orthodox religions receive a willing adherence which has 
resisted successfully all the disintegrating forces of changes in 
thought and environment. This is the class beyond all others 
where the particular characteristics find expression in the edifices 
it has reared for its worship and the nature of the services it 
generously maintains within them. 

II 

Let us see what light the Religious Census will throw upon the 
spiritual condition of this world of working humanity in South 
London. Although it would be quite inaccurate to judge the influ- 
ences exercised from particular churches by the simple comparison of 
the numbers of worshippers ; and although, as I shall hope to show later, 
the spiritual enthusiasm focussed in the Sunday gatherings diffuses 
through great numbers who never or rarely are actually present; 
yet on the whole I think certainly in these districts we may say 
that the organised religious and ethical bodies stand practically for 
all the active spiritual enterprise of South London. Once I had 
expected it otherwise — thinking that the widespread break-up of 
faith and the influence of destructive criticism would have created 
a large class of persons unable conscientiously to attach themselves 
to church or chapel, but eager for ethical progress and the assertion 
of the supremacy of the things of the spirit. But all experience 
has failed to discover any number of such individuals. Many, indeed, 
pass through a stage in which all definite religions are judged 
and condemned as insincere or untrue ; but either interest in all 
ultimate questions vanishes, or the inquirer in time finds himself 
drawn to some congregation or fellowship. Even those who are 
unable to make any positive spiritual affirmation may unite 
in some ethical society. The influence of these bodies, indeed, 

13 



194 



THE EELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 



containing some of the most sincere and devoted of men and women, 
is altogether under-estimated by the meagre numbers of attendance. 
Outside there is much vague social discontent, and often a feeling 
of bitterness against all organised religions. But such feelings, 
however praiseworthy, are not in themselves guarantees of spiritual 
or moral energy. The man who will abstain from church-going, 
and informs you with complacency that his religion is that of 
the Sermon on the Mount, is usually distinguished by little but an 
amiable unwillingness to do conscious injury to those who have not 
injured him, and by a determination at least not to love himself less 
than his neighbour. As symbols and representatives of whatever 
spiritual life still remains in South London, we may quite confidently 
limit our outlook to the religious bodies who are dealt with in the 
Census returns. 

To come then to the facts. Let us first consider the bare aggregate 
of numbers. In the appended table, I have taken the borough 
populations from the census return of 1901 ; the attendance numbers 
are those of the actual Census. 





Totals. 1 


Males ovek 16. 


Females over 15. 


Children under 15. 




Pop. 


Census. 


Pop. 


Census. 


Pop. 


Census. 


Pop. 


Census. 


Battersea . 
Bermondsey 
Camberwell 
Deptford , 
Greenwich . 
Lambeth . 
Lewisham . 
Southwark . 
Wandsworth 
Woolwich . 


168,215 
129,-368 
255,604 
110,179 
93,475 
298,188 
125,951 
203,373 
226,899 
116,137 

1,727,389 


26,130 
27,635 
64,046 
19,569 
25,105 
62,304 
41,375 
40,117 
54,925 
31,511 


53,427 
41,404 
79,206 
35,308 
30,056 
96,429 
36,925 
67,905 
67,115 
41,655 


6,806 
5,824 

15,856 
5,392 
5,6.33 

16,881 

10,232 
9,137 

14,984 
8,282 


58,625 
41,987 
92,743 
38,543 
31,810 
112,462 
51,347 
67,703 
91,956 
36,446 


10,399 

8,355 
25,265 
7,348 
9,078 
27,246 
18,585 
12,369 
24,696 
11,099 


56,163 

45,977 
83,655 
36,328 
31,609 
89,297 
37,679 
67,765 
67,828 
38,036 


8,925 
13,456 
22,925 

6,829 
10,394 
18,177 
12,558 
18,611 
15,245 
12,130 


Totals . 


392,717 


549,430 


99,027 


623,622 


154,440 


554,337 


139,250 



These figures, I think, may be accepted as in substance correct 
for South London. A few of our residents may pilgrimage over the 
river to St. Paul's or the Abbey or the City Temple ; a few who live 
to the north may enter our unknown regions to visit Mr. Meyer's 
great church or the Newington Tabernacle of Mr. Spurgeon. But 
on the whole we are a self-contained community, with the river as 
an effective barrier. Our first conclusion is therefore as follows : 

In South Londooi one man out of every twelve^ and one luoman 
out of every ten, attends some form of Divine worship each Sunday 
morning; and one man in evei'y ten, and one luoman in every seven, 
attends each Sunday evening. 



THE PROBLEM OF SOUTH LONDON 195 

And if we may accept the figures given by the superintendent 
— apart from his ingenious experiment I have no means of judging 
"whether this estimate be correct — of 38 per cent, making a double 
attendance, we can lead on to the further statement : 

In South London one man out of every six, and one woman out of 
every five, attends some place of luoi'ship at least once every Sunday. 

I must confess that this is a far larger proportion than I should 
have anticipated. Living amongst a population which has practically 
abandoned church-going, I had mechanically interpreted my own 
experience into the larger whole : the twelfth man who goes off 
to church at eleven o'clock on Sunday morning had escaped my 
vision. As a rough estimate I should have given anything from 
one to four per cent, as the total actively Christian population of 
South London. One is grateful to the census if for this alone — 
the revelation of larger numbers of attendance than one had dared 
to hope — however much later examination may show such attend- 
ance to be meaningless and conventional. 

Let us pass from these massed aggregates which mean little, 
to the more interesting and difficult analysis of classes — to the 
attempt to estimate how these worshipers are divided amongst the 
main grades of society in South London. Here is the ready field 
of wild deduction. Many critics knowing dimly that Southwark 
(say) is poor and Chelsea wealthy, have concluded that the 
statistics of the borough of Southwark show the statistics of 
church attendance of the poor, and those of the borough of Chelsea 
that of the rich. Some have thus discovered a fixed proportion 
of church-goers in all classes : others will tell you confidently of 
the demonstration by such numbers of the strength of some 
particular denomination amongst the poor or the rich. Such crude 
deductions are entirely erroneous. On the one hand, a poor 
borough may contain places of worship which attract well-to-do 
worshippers from a wide area. Southwark, for example, contains 
an Anglican and a Roman Catholic cathedral, as well as the 
great chapel made famous through the English-speaking world 
by the pastorate of Charles Spurgeon, whose enormous audience 
of 3,625 represents a similar cathedral gathering. In the poorest 
district of Lambeth, again, is the great church presided over 
by Mr. F. B. Meyer, which draws a well-to-do and intelligent 
audience from all the southern suburbs. And on the other 
hand, such a statement altogether neglects the comfortable class 
of tradesman and the middle class who live in all the poorer 



196 THE EELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 

boroughs, and provide perhaps the most ardent adherents of 
many flourishing religions. Anyone intimate with such a district 
will know that it is this class in the main which contributes 
such worshippers as the churches and chapels are able to gather 
together in working-class districts. The places of worship line 
the main thoroughfares : their frequenters are respectable, well- 
dressed men and women, the dwellers in those main thoroughfares 
and the better-class squares and streets that remain undestroyed. 
Investigate every place of worship down (say) Walworth Road 
from the " Elephant " to Camberwell Green — the heart of a 
poor district. In all the varied centres of religion, whose 
buildings are thickly studded at close intervals, you will find no 
signs of obvious poverty. In the districts behind, in some obscure 
gathering of Primitive Methodists or Bible Christians, you may 
discover the class you are seeking. But in all central South 
London I have only seen the poor in bulk collected at two places 
of religious worship — Mr. Meakin's great hall in Bermondsey, and 
St. George's Roman Catholie cathedral at Southwark — an object 
lesson in (amongst other things) the wisdom of the permission of 
the late Archbishop of Canterbury for the use of incense " for 
fumigatory purposes." In South London as a whole — apart from 
certain isolated and exceptional instances — I have no hesitation in 
saying it is the middle classes that attend church and chapel, the 
working classes and the poor who stay away. 

This can be illustrated by comparison, not of the large areas 
of the boroughs, but of some definite working-class area with 
some suburban district. I have been at some pains to make such 
a comparison, whose figures are appended. The working-class 
area I have chosen is a triangular patch in the centre of South 
London, bounded by three great thoroughfares. It is a normal 
crowded district with which I am personally familiar, varying from 
the lowest poverty to the comparative comfort of skilled industry, 
and bounded by the middle-class shopkeepers of the main roads. If 
anything, it should be unusually favoured in its religious effort, 
for it is the scene of some very interesting experiments ; several 
of the public-school and Cambridge College missions are here, 
and the well-known Browning Hall settlement. The churches are 
high, low, and broad ; the clergy are Tory, Radical, and Socialist ; 
they include amongst them borough councillors, guardians, and 
two of the best known Radical parsons of London. All types of 
Nonconformity are represented, including a flourishing Baptist and 



THE PROBLEM OF SOUTH LONDON 



197 



a flourishing Wesleyan Chapel. Here are the figures of population 
and attendance : 



Working-Class District * 



Holy Trinity .... 
Sylvester Street (Brethren) . 

St. Andrew's .... 
St. Andrew's Mission 
Brunswick Church . 
Welsh Calvinistic Meth. Church 

St. Matthew's .... 
Murphy Memorial Cong. Church 
Almshouse Chapel (Baptist) . 

St. Mary Magdalene 

Pilgrim Fathers Cong. Church 
Haddon Hall Baptist . 
Surrey Square Baptist . 
St. George's Hall, Prim. Meth. 

The Lady Margaret 

Wesleyans (Rodney Road) . 

St. John's 

Walworth Road Baptist 
New Surrey Tabernacle 
Victory Place Institution 

St. Peter's 

Wellington Mission 
Sutherland Chapel 
Mission Hall, Horsley Street 
Salvation Army, South Street 

St. Stephen's, AYalworth 

All Saints' 

Pembroke Mission . 
Mina Road Brethren 

St. Mark's 

Browning Hall 
Baptist Church, East Street . 
Prim. Meth. Chapel, East Street 
Working Men's Mission, York St. 
Richmond Street Mission 



Totals 



Pop. 



9,781 
7,430 

5,288 
20,142 

5,290 
10,963 

14,324 

6,278 
13,609 

6,156 



99,261 



Ch. or England. 



Morn. 



80 
87 

65 
45 

56 
75 



71 
146 



52 



32 

18 



47 



BTening. 



152 



164 
34 



172 
144 

107 
149 



94 
172 



95 

70 
78 



84 



774 1,515 1,159 3,096 



Nonconformist. 



46 
34 



44 



51 

66 

20 

168 



104 



183 

198 

15 



28 



90 



39 

21 
21 

7 



Evening. 



105 
166 



170 

58 



178 

290 

63 

253 



562 



359 

294 

39 



62 
40 
21 



101 



95 
66 
83 

22 
69 



To compare with this I have chosen a suburban district in 

* In addition to these there was an attendance of 663 at the Roman Catholic 
Church of the English Martyrs, which I have not added in, as the attendance is not 
strictly local, and I have no figures for Roman Cathohc attendances in my suburban 
district. 



198 



THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 



South Dulwich and Forest Hill, which is as yet comparatively free 
from the inroad of the working man: 

Suburban District 





Pop. 


Ch. of England. 


NONCONFOKMIST. 




Morn. 


Evening. 


Morn. 


Evening. 


*St. Peter's, East Dulwich 
Emmanuel Cong. Church 

St. Barnabas', Dulwich Park . 
Duhvich College Chapel _ 
Christ Church Presbyterian . 

All Saints', West DuL^vICH . 

*St. Stephen's, South Dulwich 

*St. Augustine's, Honour Oak . 

St. John's Pres. Cburch, Devon Kd. 

St. Paul's, Forest Hill 

*HoLY Trinity, Sydenham . 

Forest Hill Congreg. Church . 
Sydenham Baptist Church 
Wesleyan Chapel, High Street 

Schools 

Baptist, Eaglan Street . 

Park Hall 

St. Philip's, Sydenham 

*St. Bartholomew's, Sydenham . 

St. Matthew's 

Congreg. Church, Jews' Walk 


7,413 
3,314 

3,663 

2,855 
4,117 

673 
2,730 

3,073 

4,258 


283 

371 
293 

626 
306 
283 

215 
304 

321 

497 
184 


286 

405 
177 

418 
148 
224 

254 
171 

43 

243 

405 
229 


415 
110 

389 

69 
150 
149 

55 
10 

158 


491 
179 

284 

103 
212 
166 

7*4 
133 


Total 


32,096 


3,683 


3,003 


1,505 


1,642 



The figures for the two districts thus compare as follows : 
Adult Attendance 





Pop. 


Church. 


Noncon- 
formist. 


Total. 


Percentage 
of Poi). 


Working-Class District .... 
Suburban District 


99,261 
32,096 


2,289 
6,686 


4,255 
3,147 


6,644 
9,833 


6-5 
306 



The figures become more striking, perhaps, if areas of equal popula- 
tion are compared. The single parish of St. Mary Magdalene, Old Kent 
Road, contains almost as large a population as five of the suburban 
parishes, marked *. But the church attendances are strikingly different. 

Adult Attendance 





Pop. 


Church. 


Noncon- 
formist. 


Total. 


Percentage 
of Pop. 


St. Mary's, Walworth .... 
*Five Dulwich and Sydenham Parishes . 


20,142 
21,373 


189 
3,320 


1,089 
2,858 


1,278 
6,178 


6 

29 



THE PEOBLEM OF SOUTH LONDON 199 

When it is further remembered that the suburban district 
undoubtedly also supplies worshippers to a number of churches and 
chapels outside its borders, and that by scraping off a layer of 
middle-class houses from the main streets of Walworth you would 
probably diminish your church attendance by at least two-thirds, 
I think I may be said to have presented an interesting illustration 
of the difference in habits of church attendance between the 
prosperous and the poor.* 

An isolated example such as this is indeed not conclusive. 
But I would ask any critic still doubtful to work out similar 
calculations from the Census returns. Let him compare Bermondsey 
with Lewisham, inner with outer Lambeth, Deptford with Black- 
heath — he will find similar results. The results were, indeed, well 
known to those familiar with the life of the poor, and are continually 
asserted in Mr. Booth's investigation. The new city race of 
workers is developing apart from the influences of religion ; the 
spiritual world has vanished from their vision ; the curtain of their 
horizon has descended round the little life of toil and struggle 
which constitutes their immediate universe. Here and there, widely 
scattered, you may find a successful religious community of the 
poor ; but these are mere isolated instances in a great area of grey 
indifference. The energy, determination, and devotion put forth 
by adherents of all the religious bodies to convert some portion of 
this vast multitude, is one of the most noticeable displays of self- 
sacrificing effort to be found in modern England. Every expedient 
is essayed, from the guilds and fraternities, processions and banners 
of "advanced" churches to the antics of "Jumping Jack" or 
" Salvation Joe " of a different school of Christianity. The wealthier 
members of the varied religions generously pour subscriptions and 
material gifts for the same arduous task. The best of the younger 
members of the Church of England undertake work amongst the 
poor, and certainly the standard of the clergy in the central districts 
where the churches are empty need not fear comparison with the 
standard in the outlying suburbs where the churches are crammed. 
If the works done in South London to-day, one is inclined to 

* The working-class area I have chosen is perhaps unusually forlorn : it is the 
area which the late Charles Haddon Spurgeon once stated was " breaking his heart." 
The suburban area I first selected was a district in Norwood, in which there happened 
to be no Nonconformist churches. This being so entirely exceptional, I was com- 
pelled to select another locality. I need hardly say I have no wish to use these 
figures to compare the division of attendance between the different denominations 
(such a comparison might be entirely misleading), but merely to compare the aggregate 
attendance at worship between the middle class and the poor. 



200 THE EELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 

assert, had been done in Sodom and Gomorrah, they would have 
repented in sackcloth and ashes. To all this the great unknown 
multitude remains entirely unresponsive. So far as a conscious 
spiritual life is concerned the results seem almost negligible. The 
key to the heart of South London has not yet been found ; its 
interminable streets and desert of crowded dwellings wait for some 
outpouring of the spirit as yet withholden ; and against its amiable 
acquiescence and passive resistance to the exhortations, threatenings, 
and promises of the churches all these energies beat themselves 
in vain. 

Amongst the third class of residents— the middle classes, stretching 
in a kind of skeleton framework through the cities of labour, so 
strangely members of this unique community, yet alien from all its 
hopes and desires, we can recognise a strong and vigorous religious 
life. It develops mainly an individualistic gospel ; stern ; a doctrine 
that every man should help himself, and that if he fails it is his 
own fault. It recognises an "old-fashioned" teaching — heaven and 
hell as realities, unaffected by the destructive influences of modern 
ideas. Here, if anywhere, is the survival in London of the Puritan 
element, the distrust of worldly pleasures, the looking forward 
to the salvation of the elect, escaping, though hardly, from a world 
destined for everlasting fire. This population fills the great Baptist 
tabernacles which occupy so conspicuous a position in the religious 
life of South London. It is interesting to see how its existence 
causes a reversal of the standards recognised elsewhere — clergymen, 
for example, repeatedly explaining to Mr. Booth that their wealthy 
people were "too well off" for the Church of England, or that 
the edifice is "placed in a wealthier part among people who are 
dissenters or nothing." " These churches," is the verdict on one 
district and one religious body — it may be extended to all, — " are 
mainly supported by the lower middle class ; with the working class 
their difficulties begin, and in the streets that show a really poor 
element all religious efforts fail, here as elsewhere." The summary 
of a particularly successful Baptist tabernacle in the Peckham 
Road is written large over the whole of South London. " Few are 
rich, for the rich have left the neighbourhood ; none are poor, 
for the poor do not come, and a mission started for their sake has 
not been a success. But as a middle-class organisation the church 
is the centre of a vigorous congregational life." In these districts 
at least. Nonconformists form the aristocracy, and the Church and 
the Roman Catholics work with a lower social stratum. 



THE PEOBLEM OF SOUTH LONDON 201 

In our fourtii class — the residents of the suburbs — we have 
perhaps the largest proportion of church attendance in any district 
of London. Practically the whole population attends religious 
service on Sunday; places of all religions are crowded with over- 
flowing congregations. The disintegrating influences which have 
swept over society and the West have here as yet scarcely penetrated. 
Sunday amusement is still sternly discouraged. Sunday is made 
as unpleasant a day as is possible for the ungodly who refuse to 
recognise the obligations of worship. The record everywhere is of 
activity and enterprise ; munificent sums have been spent on new 
buildings and endowments. Church attendance is the fashion, pews 
are rented for families ; the chief difficulty is to provide accom- 
modation for the increasing populations. Adjacent to each other, 
indeed, we have here in South London two populations, each 
inhabiting an entirely separate universe. In the centre the 
minister may talk with the tongue of man and angel, and 
the church remains deserted ; in the suburbs he may roll out 
commonplace platitudes, and the church is crammed. " A certain 
class will come to church," is the summary of one minister, 
" provided you do not positively repel them ; while another class 
cannot be induced to come at all." In the suburbs we hear 
of districts in which " almost everyone in this neighbourhood 
go to some place of worship " ; others where " you have only 
to build a church and it will be filled, unless you drive the 
people away." 

"We are now in a position to gather up a further summary of 
the Census conclusions : 

In South London the poor (except the Roman Catholic poor) do not 
attend service on Sunday, though there are a few churches and missions 
which gather some, and forlorn groups can he collected by a liberal 
granting of relief. 

The working man does not come to church. A few small com- 
munities of Primitive Methodists, Baptists, Salvationists, and similar 
bodies, as a general rule represent his contribution to the religious life 
of the nation. 

The tradesmen and middle class of the poorer boroughs exhibit an 
active religioiis life, mainly gathered in the larger Nonconformist bodies, 
especially the Baptists. 

The residents in the suburbs crowd their churches and chapels, and 
support tvith impartiality and liberality all forms of organised 
religion. 



202 THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 

III 

Before dealing with any conclusions, I would briefly note some 
further points of interest in connection with the Census figures. I 
can but touch the fringe of some questions, which, indeed, demand 
a far fuller treatment than they can here receive. 

First, I think the statistics conclusively demonstrate the complete 
failure of what I may call the " mission " system. The original 
conception was an idea of a very attractive simplicity. The parish 
church or the mother chapel was to be the place of meeting of a 
cultured and comfortable audience, often paying for the seats, and 
edified by the ministrations of a cultured and comfortable pastor. 
" The poor will not come to church." Their presence in the pews, 
if they found their way in, would, indeed, be a little embarrassing. 
So in the poor part of the parish a " mission-hall " is built, where 
the curate or the faithful laymen of the church may extemporise 
popular and breezy addresses, and conduct with the aid of an 
harmonium popular and breezy hymns. The mother congregation 
will contribute generously to this necessary supplement to their 
efforts, the lady members will assist in the singing or become 
district visitors, and the hall will be a centre for the liberal dis- 
tribution of meat, clothing, and coals. One may perhaps rejoice 
at the complete failure of this fundamentally vicious system, as 
revealed by these figures. Mr. Booth brought a sweeping indictment 
against the whole collection of shabby, dilapidated mission-halls 
of tin or drab brick, which he found offered as homes for the 
spiritual nourishment of the poor. And in practically every borough 
the attendance of adults at these lamentable erections is found to 
be approaching the vanishing point. Rarely does it reach a hundred. 
43, 34, 16 in the Anglican, 8 in the Baptist, 41, 41 in the 
Congregational, I find the mission-hall attendance in one district. 
In another are ten Baptist missions with an average morning adult 
attendance of 7, and evening of 33 ; in another five Anglican with 
a morning average of 13, and evening of 50. Not on such lines, 
it may safely be asserted, will the good news of the kingdom of 
God come to the working populations of South London. 

A second noteworthy feature is the power seemingly possessed 
by the old parish churches to gather congregations within their 
walls. The}' stand, for the most part, of a Georgian or early 
Victorian architecture, like great ships washed by the flood of 
humanity which has swept around them ; built for a time when 



THE PROBLEM OF SOUTH LONDON 203 

Walwortli was a fashionable suburb, or Woolwich a flourishing 
self-centred country town. They awaken memories of a vanished 
past, before the great torrent of poverty swept down on the fields 
and marshes and destroyed, like the lava stream, all green trees 
and every living thing. Something, however, of their quaintness 
and old-world atmosphere seems to have clung around them. The 
services themselves are nearly all of the "moderate" type, most 
characteristic of an Established Church and early Victorian religion. 
Nearly all these parish churches, with their type of worship now 
almost superseded by modern, energetic innovations, exhibit a 
noteworthy number of Sunday attendances. 

A third item is the manifest tendency of the Nonconformist 
worshippers to collect together into strong centres— that centralising 
system which is inevitable where preaching is so emphasised and 
the stimulus and guidance of the pulpit so much desired. I have 
no doubt the tendency implies loss as well as gain— that the smaller 
chapels round, which are emptied to swell the great congregations, 
must inevitably suffer from depression and a sense of failure. In 
Woolwich, for example, we may note Mr. Wilson's great tabernacle, 
with an adult attendance of 1,669 ; and ten other Baptist chapels 
dividing 1,520 between them, or an average at each service of 
76 persons. In Southwark Mr. Spurgeon attracts a magnificent 
congregation of 1,064 adults in the morning and 1,954 in the 
evening ; the seven adjacent Baptist chapels obtain between 
them 873 in the morning and 1,769 in the evening, an average 
of 188 per service ; while the adjacent four Congregational churches 
are occupied by but 628, or an average of 78. Mr. Meakin's great 
hall in Bermondsey, again, with its 1,217 evening attendance, pre- 
sents a sharp contrast to adjacent Wesleyan churches with con- 
gregations of 12, 130, and 19, and to the desolate condition of 
churches and chapels of other bodies in the same desolate region. 
Undoubtedly there are high compensating advantages : the power 
of the great preacher is multiplied ; the stimulus of these vast 
multitudes is invaluable to the bodies of Christians scattered 
and small in the surrounding indifference ; the sight of the con- 
gregation of the Newington Tabernacle singing hymns on Sunday 
evening on the steps of the great edifice is a guarantee to the 
heedless stream which passes by that there are some who still 
believe in their religion. But work under the shadow of these 
cathedral gatherings in the humbler chapels is a depressing 
experience : the congregation slowly melts away, as the old 



204 THE EELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 

faithful depart and the younger members are drawn to more 
obvious attractions. I know of few more depressing sights than 
the gathering of the few score dejected faithful scattered through 
buildings of size and pretension from which all the life has 
departed. 

The parochial system of the Established Church, with its 
strong emphasis on local ties, is a resistent against this tendency 
in the Anglican community ; the comparatively unimportant place 
occupied by the preacher is another. Undoubtedly, however, the 
Anglican attendances suffer as well as the Nonconformist from 
the attractive influences of these gigantic tabernacles and mission- 
halls. One is driven more and more to the conclusion that under 
present conditions the percentage of attendance at church to 
population in South London is about a fixed number. You may, 
by special effort of preaching, music, or excitement, draw a large 
and active congregation ; but you have done so by emptying the 
churches of your neighbours. The water is not increased in 
quantity, but merely decanted from bottle to bottle. In the cases 
mentioned above, the great chapels with their allied branches and 
their immense activity, I can very gladly testify from personal 
knowledge to the vast amount of real spiritual enthusiasm and 
benefit which they diffuse. There are, however, other popular 
attractive services which must be received with less unqualified 
praise. South London is comparatively free — happily free, accord- 
ing to Mr. Charles Booth — from some of the more sensational 
gigantic efforts that advertise special methods of " getting hold of 
the lapsed masses." However praiseworthy in intention, experience 
has led me to doubt whether on the whole the harm done is not 
at least equal to the good. At the time of the Census a special 
effort was being made in Camberwell to reach the outsider by 
services at Peckham Theatre. The Census records the immense 
attendance of 3,764. The promoters were innocently satisfied with 
their efforts, and held that a great work was being accomplished. I 
happen to have seen the other side. People who had attended 
humble churches and chapels, often miles away, were drawn to 
this new spiritual excitement. In many cases they never returned 
to their old membership, finding the old methods humdrum and 
unstimulating. I am sure I am in agreement with the majority 
of the ministers of South London when I say that experience has 
driven us profoundly to distrust the large " undenominational " 
mission, with its lavish charities and sensational appeals, the 



THE PROBLEM OF SOUTH LONDON 205 

special advertisement and religious excitement, and all efforts to 
reach " the outcast who has never heard of the Gospel " (who does 
not exist in South London) by the satisfaction of his stomach or 
the adaptation of the methods of the circus and the music-hall. 

Another feature of interest is the evidence of the progress of 
ritualism and " advanced " doctrine amongst the suburbs of South 
London, This was a surprise to me. I had thought its energies 
mainly exhibited amongst the rich who were attracted by its 
ceremonial and the poor who welcomed its gospel of Socialism and 
fellowship. But here are strong churches among the middle 
classes — churches mostly built in recent years, and by the worship- 
pers themselves without external assistance — evidently providing 
something which their congregations desire. Here, if anywhere, is 
to be found the ritualistic grocer whom Sir William Harcourt once 
challenged his ecclesiastical opponents to produce. The suburbs, I 
should have thought, would have remained the last home of 
Protestantism, and certainly around the northern boundaries of 
London they remain entirely faithful to the evangelical tradition. 
But all through the south, from Wandsworth to Woolwich, we find 
a string of largely attended " Catholic " churches. Of such are 
St. Stephen's, Lewisham, with its daughter church, gathering 1,548 
adult worshippers every Sunday ; St. George's, Perry Hill, with its 
735 ; and St. Peter's, West Norwood, with its 879. Brixton remains 
faithful to its historical past, but Clapham has changed its first 
love. Its sympathies, asserts a Nonconformist minister, are now 
" Conservative and Ritualistic and Roman Catholic," and the 
famous Clapham Sect would be astonished at the services at the 
parish church and its missions, and positively appalled by such as 
those at Christ Church, Wandsworth Road. Nearer the centre are 
such vigorous communities as the Ascension, Lavender Hill, one of 
the few churches which Mr. Booth whole-heartedly praises, with 
884 worshippers ; and St. John's, Kennington, with its ten curates 
and its vast organisation and an attendance of 1,138 adults. In 
Dulwich the church is High ; in Streatham there are many 
advanced churches. All new districts of mixed population seem 
to be eificieiit fields for these newer energies. It is a noteworthy 
factor in the estimation of the changing aspects of London's 
religious life, a movement still progressing towards an end no one 
can clearly foresee. 

Space forbids the discussion of many other points of interest 
in these figures. There is the smaUness of number and magnitude 



206 THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 

of congregation of the Roman Catliolic churches, revealing both 
the poverty of this body in South London and the readiness of 
its members to travel considerable distances to fulfil their obligations 
of attendance at Mass. There is the astonishing blossoming out 
of offshoots and branches of the main stream of Christian life 
into all kinds of quaint minor sects, each with its own specific 
doctrine and place of meeting. These become most pronounced 
in the suburbs, as in Camberwell, where we find the New Jerusalem 
Church with 45 morning worshippers, the Calvinistic Independents 
with 153, the Christadelphians with 49, besides such less con- 
spicuous bodies as the Holiness Gospel Mission with 15, the 
Christian Band Hall with 70, and two branches of Spiritualists 
with 13 and 39 adherents. Again there is evidence of the 
comparative failure of " undenominational " services, with a series 
of minute attendances ; the inability of the Salvation Army to 
attract inside audiences ; and the great contrast, in the case of the 
"Wesleyan Methodists, between attendances at the new centres of 
the forward movement and the old circuit chapels. Almost every 
group of Christians will find subjects for grave consideration in 
this immense investigation. 

Finally, it may be asked. What is the relation between these 
figures of attendance and actual religious influence ? How far can 
the activity of a Church in districts be measured by or limited to 
the number of adherents here given ? This is a question largely 
a matter of personal impression for which there are no exact 
data. My own opinion is that, in translation into the world of 
real values, the numbers for the central districts are considerably 
too small, those for the suburban considerably too large. This is 
due, on the one hand, to the far wider diffusive influence of the 
Church in the poorer districts than that which is represented by 
the handful of worshippers ; and on the other, to what I might 
call the greater religious intensity of the worshippers who do 
attend where church-going is out of fashion than of those who 
attend where it is the recognised custom. The Church in South 
London is a great engine of civilisation. There is a vast network 
and machinery of social organisation — clubs, guilds, boys' brigades, 
mothers' meetings, improvement societies. It may indeed be 
questioned how far a Church is justified in turning its energies 
from its definite spiritual mission to the more practical work of 
the provision of pleasure and the amelioration of the hard life of 
the poor. But certainly it is undoubted that civilisation would 



THE PROBLEM OF SOUTH LONDON 207 

be considerably delayed were this apparatus removed ; that this 
activity has earned for the Church the friendliness and toleration 
of vast populations still impervious to its spiritual message, and a 
few years ago in an attitude of open hostility. An overwhelming 
proportion of the children attend catechism and Sunday school and 
are launched into life with such cloudy religious conceptions as these 
institutes are able to provide. The clergy are frequent and often 
welcome visitors; each individual is present at service at least 
at his baptism, his marriage, and his funeral ; and occasionally 
on other special occasions — harvest festivals, confirmations, and 
the last night of the year. The services of the minister of religion 
are requisitioned in times of trouble or illness, and few would 
willingly die without at least one visit from the clergyman. All 
this means a real if diffusive influence ; rehgious ideas are still 
" in the air " ; and the message of the Church, the consciousness 
of sin, the need for repentance, and the expectation of future 
judgment, have not yet entirely vanished from the mental horizon 
of South London. 

I should be inclined to assert again that, in quality, our attendance 
within the congested area more than compensates for the quan- 
tity of the region beyond. We come, if at all, because our religion 
is real, and amid the manifested contempt of our neighbours. In 
the smaller churches and chapels at least there are no meretricious 
attractions to lead us thus to defy public opinion. Suburban 
religion is largely of a different character. Much of it is the 
mere conventional homage to the accepted gods of the community. 
And even the section that is honest and deliberate is often partly 
lacking in certain essentials of an active and aggressive Christian 
endeavour. It upholds a decent life and a clean moral standard, 
with much individual personal piety. But it is far too content 
to limit its outlook to its own family or church, heedless of the 
great chaos of confusion and failure which lies at its very doors. 
It regards with disapproval and often with contempt this world 
of poverty with its dumb demand for aid ; it is generous in charity, 
but no appeal for justice in the name of the forgotten poor goes 
forth with united voice from the churches of South London. It is 
content to cultivate its own garden, to save its own soul ; it is loth 
to identify its interests with those of its less successful neighbours. 
The challenge, " Which think ye was neighbour to him that fell 
amongst thieves ? " remains unaccepted. For this neglect of obvious 
Christian duty its loss is at least as great as the loss of those it 



208 THE EELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 

declines to aid. It becomes more and more cut off from the 
great realities to which a real religion has always appealed. It 
draws the line tight round its own border, and endeavours to 
satisfy with missions and gifts of money the obligation of personal 
service and of a campaign for justice to all the desolate and op- 
pressed. It has remained up till now unaffected by destructive 
criticism and the changes of thought and outlook which have so 
ravaged the orthodox religions in other regions. But there are 
not wanting signs of the approach of the disturbance ; it has 
still to pass through a time of trial in which it will be tested to 
its foundations. Materialism, the lust for pleasure, the modern 
impatience with a definite creed, are slowly creeping in to this 
vigorous suburban area ; and the negative assertions of science 
and biblical criticism are creating centres of local disquietude. 
If the prevailing type of religion largely withers before such 
forces as these, it will be because it has set itself apart in 
comfort, content with a personal creed of salvation; because it 
has felt no passionate impulse to assert a common fellowship 
with the less fortunate who are lying at its doors — no call to 
right the wrongs which, in the words of a great modern reformer, 
" cry continually into the ears of the Lord God of Sabaoth." 

We have enough facts, I think, to justify us in the statement 
that the religious life of England occupies a quite unparalleled 
position amid that of the nations of Western Europe. In the case of 
all other countries, religion has been practically abandoned by the 
rich and successful, and is still grasped with tenacity and devotion 
by the masses of the poor. In the cities, indeed, amongst the male 
populations of the working classes, the historical faiths of Chris- 
tianity have been replaced to a large extent by the newer creed 
of Socialism. But Socialism, with its sense of fellowship, its demand 
for the merging of the individual life in the success of the cause, 
its uplifting of an ideal condition of justice, and its effort towards 
a day of better things in many ways provides a background 
to life and the vision of a larger horizon which is one of the 
main functions of religion. But in England exactly the reverse 
conditions prevail. The claims of religion are still acknowledged 
by the rich and governing classes ; they are altogether inoperative 
amongst the lives of the poor. No Socialism or dreams of a 
renovated society have entered the chambers left empty by their 
absence. Few can doubt that it is we who are the losers by this 
difference. Religion to the rich is a by-product — a luxury or a 



THE PROBLEM OF SOUTH LONDON 209 

plaything ; religion to the poor is an essential ingredient of lives 
at the best stunted and confined, oppressed by the perplexities of 
existence and limited by the day's toil or the evening's pleasure. 
It is not an encouraging picture which is finally stamped upon our 
minds by our investigation of human life in South London. It 
is a vision of vast and shadowy multitudes of human beings 
driven by some blind impulse to the struggle for material comfort 
and the needs of a day. Happiness is there, family affection, the 
play of children, even ambition and a high moral standard. 
But it is the life of a day with a narrowed outlook. There is 
light to work by, but no clear glory of dawn or sunset. At the 
end comes nightfall, with no vision beyond. Vague hope of a 
better time for the children seems rarely to develop into a 
conscious effort after the attainment of a new social order ; vague 
acknowledgment of a phantom and tenuous life beyond the grave 
is the sole representative of that hunger for immortality which in 
every age has refused to acquiesce in the visible ruin of death. 
Those who have lived with and learnt to love the peoples of 
South London, with their indomitable cheerfulness, pluck, and 
endurance, will be the first to affirm that their predominant need 
is this sense of a larger life, without which human existence is as 
that of the gnat or the midge ; this uplifting of the material 
surroundings to show, if but for a moment, an encompassing 
spiritual horizon ; and an ideal cause able to illuminate even the 
scene of contemporary failure with a kind of glory. 

IV 

It is interesting to note how, in the discussion of remedies for 
the ineffectiveness of religion in modern England as revealed by 
this Census, almost all critics plunge straightway into the question 
of machinery. The worship of machinery, as Matthew Arnold 
continually asserted, is a national characteristic of Englishmen. 
And each observer appears to hold that if that particular section 
of the machine in which he can detect a flaw could be repaired, 
or if a particularly up-to-date invention replaced some antiquated 
adjustment, the machinery of the Churches would once again 
grind out religious enthusiasm. With one it is the edifice ; he 
deplores the cold Gothic building, repellent to the poor; he would 
substitute large lighted halls of the remarkable and dignified style 
characteristic of the later nineteenth century, with plenty of 

14 



210 THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 

carpets, paint, and colour. "Witli another it is the edifices them- 
selves ; let the leaders of religion come out into the street, he 
holds, and the problem is solved. "With one again it is the 
service, antiquated, unintelligible to the vulgar ; collect a band, 
he urges, sing the " Holy City " and other moving modern 
melodies, weave into your prayers allusions to politics and 
incidents of the day. "With another it is the sermon ; the minister 
is too cold, or speaks with stammering tongue. Let us place a 
great preacher in every pulpit, and the masses will vehemently 
fight for entrance to our churches. Some advocate, some deprecate, 
the methods of the theatre ; some would abolish pews altogether, 
and let the men stand ; some see the inevitable advance of religion 
if pews are made more comfortable. Each one has convinced 
opinions as to what " the poor " will come to— the large hall, 
the small mission, the street corner. Few seem to care to face 
the question what we have to offer " the poor " when they 
come. 

All this would be very relevant if we could recognise large 
populations with real desire after religious devotion on the one 
hand, and a Church with a living message which can satisfy this 
desire on the other. The whole problem would then exhibit itself 
as a consideration of the method by which the one can be most 
effectively brought in contact with the other. But the conditions 
are just the opposite. On the one hand we have masses to whom 
the spiritual world has no meaning, and from whose lives the 
very fundamental bedrock effects of religion seem to have 
vanished ; on the other we have Churches whose faith has grown 
cold, and whose good news sounds far removed from anything 
approaching the passionate enthusiasm of other Christian centuries. 
Were this indeed present, the problem of machinery would soon 
be solved. Preachers would be speaking with a conviction itself 
eloquent ; the services would take on themselves a character of 
infectious courage ; the people would themselves build, as always 
in the past, edifices reflecting in the very stones the characteristics 
of their faith ; religion would impetuously flood out from their 
limited spaces into the common ways of men. And until such a 
wind of the spirit can animate the dry bones of religious organi- 
sation with some such violent life, all conscious modifications of 
machinery become but attempts at creating the soul by the body, 
the artificial galvanising from without of an organism from which 
the inner life has fled. 



THE PROBLEM OF SOUTH LONDON 211 

Yet, even with such imperfect message as we have, it is well 
to criticise the vessels in which it is conveyed ; more especially 
if these be but particular survivals of antique furniture, or 
symbols of class distinction and a dead faith. How far and 
in what particulars, we may profitably inquire, is the message 
of our Churches in South London hampered by its methods of 
deliverance. 

First in regard to the services. Undoubtedly we are here 
suffering from the dead hand of the past. The morning and 
evening services of the Church of England, as normally per- 
formed, with their complicated and mysterious variations of 
canticles, prayers, and irrelevant readings of Scripture, are alto- 
gether bewildering to those not intimately familiar with the 
books from which they are compiled. The reformers of the 
sixteenth century endeavoured to restore the worship to the people 
in the vulgar tongue. Unfortunately, the Reformation was in 
essence aristocratic, never, as the Reformation abroad, awakening 
response from the masses of the population. The churches passed 
from the hands of the people, who ceased to take a pride in 
them ; the Church services became more and more an inheritance 
of a limited aristocracy ; the search for something more warm, 
human, and inspiring contributed largely to create the great 
independent bodies which in all the subsequent centuries have 
formed minor centres of worship. I have no hesitation in saying 
that, for the majority of the poor, our services are as incom- 
prehensible as if still performed in the Latin tongue. The 
central service of the Roman Church, indeed, with its dramatic 
and appealing character, is far more intelligible even to the 
humblest worshipper. The Reformation gave us the essentials 
of the Mass in the English Communion service, a service for 
dignity and beauty quite unparallelled. The monkish matins were 
never intended for this formal parade on one day of the week, 
swollen by elaborate music into intolerable dimension. Anyone 
concerned with the religious life of the poor will welcome most 
heartily the increased honour paid to the feast of the Lord's 
Supper in recent years, and the progress towards its restoration 
to the central position of the Sunday worship. Such a change 
alone would, I believe, remove one of the chief obstacles to 
Church attendance. 

One may welcome also the renewed efforts after light, colour, 
and beauty; the introduction of symbolic action, procession, and 



212 THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 

some elements of movement and drama into the drabness of our 
churciies. Religion is independent of sucli adventitious aids, and 
the essentials must never be lost in the attractions of sensuous 
imagery. But I am sure that, in the acres of desolate hideousness 
of the streets of our working populations, all the appeals of sense 
and sound and colour should be associated with a worship which 
is to lift the minds of tired men and women to some other vision 
than that of their material meanness. I should like to see the 
churches of the wealthy studiously plain ; not vulgar, indeed, 
like the "up-to-date" religious edifice, a building which will serve 
as a record and a warning to future ages of the condition of 
religion in twentieth-century England ; but with whitewashed walls 
and scant decoration ; that in weekly worship they may contrast 
this simplicity with the splendour of their own homes, and 
acknowledge a different standard of reality to man and to God. 
And I would see the churches of the poor rich with colour and 
light — with great paintings on all the walls and the freest use of 
every artistic appeal— that these also might learn from day to 
day that the monotony and material horror of the grey streets 
in which they are confined, and the grey lives to which they are 
destined, is not a destiny which was designed for them, nor a 
bondage from which they will never be freed. 

In passing from the performance to the character of the 
service, we are confronted with a manifest difficulty. Living in a 
transitory time of order, and with a vision limited to our own 
settled and decent lives, much of the language used by men who 
dwelt amongst the enduring facts of human existence appears 
to us archaic and meaningless. "Agony and bloody sweat;" 
" widows and orphans and all that are desolate and oppressed ; " 
"battle, murder and sudden death;" "the hour of death and the 
day of judgment," — how faint and far away it all seems to the 
rational and settled life of suburban London ! The difficulty will 
endure but for a time ; the persistence of comfort during which 
man can live in a world of illusion has never existed but for a 
few generations. Here, if anywhere, the absence of sj^mpathetic 
imagination, and the faithlessness of the Churches to the larger 
vision, has produced an aspect of make-believe. If once these 
congregations could be roused to apprehension of something 
of the real world outside — of Ireland or South Africa in the 
immediate past, of Macedonia in the immediate present, of the life 
of the poorest always — these exclamations and cries of vehement 



THE PEOBLEM OF SOUTH LONDON 213 

appeal would become cHarged with an awful significance, a demand 
urged with violence in the name of fear and pity for the 
vindication of the government of a righteous God. 

And as with the service, so with the sermon. I would not 
reiterate the demand for " good preaching," which seems to me 
utterly to confuse the purposes of the services of the Church. 
We meet, not for edification, but for worship — to confess our sins, 
to obtain spiritual succour, to renew the visible guarantee of 
fellowship. Eloquence will instruct everywhere, in the pulpit as 
in the market-place. But the crowds that run after a popular 
preacher, that purchase his portraits and finger his clothes and pry 
into his family life and the contents of his larder, seem to me 
somehow alien from the sincerest forms of religion. Yet there is 
no doubt we laymen have a right to appeal for better preaching : 
that the pulpit in many cases is not only not an attractive, but is 
actually a repellent, force. We have no right to demand eloquence, 
but we may demand sincerity, the frank facing of difficulty, 
freedom from the conventional machinery of the popular exposition 
of doctrine. The prevailing theology, even more perhaps than 
the prevailing liturgy, is wrapped up in an ancient language. 
The very terms are technical — grace, justification, conversion, 
perseverance. They flow out glibly from the student who has 
soaked himself in their historical meanings ; they are Grreek to 
the general. They were once living realities for which men fought 
and gladly died; they still symbolise realities, the permanent 
elements of the life history of the soul; but they are wrapped 
around in cobwebs and the complications of a technical system, 
frozen into sterility; and they have no more meaning and no 
more appeal to the audience at whom they are thrown in such 
profusion than the details of the performance of the Mosaic ritual, 
or the genealogies of the legendary heroes of the Hebrew Bible. 
We want neither edifying lessons drawn from the wanderings of 
Israel or the Book of Joshua ; nor brilliant " word-painting " of 
some of the scenes described in the Bible with a more appealing 
eloquence ; nor the exposition of the machinery of schemes of 
salvation once real from which the life has departed; but some 
message concerning the things of the spirit, delivered in simplicity 
and humility and sincerity to men who would fain be simple and 
humble and sincere. 

There are many other questions of machinery which invite 
discussion. There is the corrupting effect of the association of 



214 THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 

" charity " (so called) with the spiritual efforts of the Churches, 
so dismally emphasised in Mr. Charles Booth's researches. There 
is the complete failure of the Sunday schools either to implant 
intelligible religious ideas or to foster a desire for spiritual 
communion and worship. There is the (as I think) deplorable 
theory that some special kind of popular "hall" is necessary for 
the development of the religion of " the poor " ; that by massing 
these into huge aggregations you may encourage their reviving 
energies, save the expense of too lavish "plant," and use your 
single successful evangelist to the best advantage. But I must 
hurry on from these attractive topics to the last subject of 
investigation — the spirit that lies behind the machinery, and its 
influence on the religious life of London. 

On the side of the working peoples this is certainly a period of 
unusual difficulty. The uprooting from the country and the trans- 
ference to the town has caused a general confusion and disorder. 
Man has not yet clearly apprehended his position or appreciated 
its possibility. He has been " dumped " down in some casual 
street, unknown to his neighbours, unconnected with a corporate 
body or fellowship. He goes through his life in a kind of con- 
fused twilight, dimly wondering what it all means. Material 
comfort and security is inevitably under these conditions his main 
interest ; the memories of a life which is independent of the hard, 
visible, tangible boundaries become daily dimmer, as he clangs the 
hammer, or heaves merchandise, or manipulates continually hard 
material things. I think we may safely affirm that this creation 
of a city race is in no small degree responsible for the present 
manifest failure of appeal of all spiritual creeds. 

But the failure is none the less considerable from the side of 
the Churches. We come from outside with our gospel,- aliens with 
alien ideas. The Anglican Church represents the ideas of the 
upper classes, of the universities, of a vigorous life in which bodily 
strength, an appearance of knowledge, a sense of humour, occupy 
prominent places. The large Nonconformist bodies represent the 
ideals of the middle classes, the strenuous self-help and energy which 
have stamped their ideas upon the whole of Imperial Britain. Each 
lives in poor districts, in them, not of them; each totally fails to 
apprehend a vision of life as reared in a mean street, and now 
confronting existence on a hazardous weekly wage from a block- 
dwelling or the half of a two-storied cottage. Our movements and 
inexplicable energies are received with a mixture of toleration 



THE PROBLEM OF SOUTH LONDON 215 

and perplexity. "We are recognised as meaning well, but our 
aims and ideals never become clearly intelligible. " What is he 
after?" "What does he get?" "What is behind it all?"— are 
questions I have heard frequently asked as some church has 
bourgeoned out into fresh and ingenious enterprise. Sometimes 
we are interpreted as pursuing some deep game of party politics; 
sometimes as a kind of unofficial policemen paid by the rates and 
taxes ; more often perhaps as possessed of a kind of exuberant 
energy which must somehow find relief in religious services and 
mothers' meetings. Funds from outside raise churches and chapels ; 
funds from outside provide clubs and material relief. We appear 
and we vanish. After a few months of this perplexing enthusiasm 
the curate or minister is called to another sphere of work, and 
disappears from the universe of those who had just, perhaps, 
commenced to realise that he possesses some traits of ordinary 
humanity. If we could only apprehend how entirely baffiing and 
irrational all this must appear to those who are looking out of, 
instead of into, the abyss, our surprise, I think, would be less at 
the vastness of our failure than at the magnitude even of our 
poor success. 

Connected with this divergence we must recognise how scantily 
up to the present the Churches and missions have identified 
themselves with those demands of Labour which, from the 
bottom of his heart, the working man knows to be just. The 
battles of the past for social amelioration — with shame let us 
confess it — have been fought apart from, and often with the open 
opposition of, the larger religious organisations. " All the Churches 
are against me," Lord Shaftesbury notes at the outset of his 
great campaign for the salvation of the child-life of England ; and 
the bitterest opposition to such social reformers as Charles Kingsley 
came from the official Christian communities. Are we better than 
our fathers ? Factory law, the right of combination, free trade, 
sanitary dwellings, humane poor law — these were slowly and 
painfully accomplished without the assistance of the Churches. 
The needs are as insistent to-day. Decent housing and a home, 
shorter hours of labour, a living wage, opportunities of life, the 
development of common interests in the municipal community — 
where in such questions of fundamental justice as these are the 
united voices of the Christian community demanding the recog- 
nition of a universal responsibility in the name of the common 
fellowship? Undoubtedly it is because a certain section of the 



216 THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 

Higli Cliurcli party have fearlessly proclaimed this social gospel 
of a visible kingdom of God that they have earned, to a degree 
so perplexing to many who deplore their doctrines, the respect 
and friendship of the leaders of labour and the devotion of the 
poor. The High Church clergymen have no monopoly of devoted 
work, nor do they give in charity more than the missions which 
endeavour to stem their influence. The working man has no affection 
for elaborate ritual ; he accepts with resignation, as part of an 
inexplicable activity, the ornaments, the processions, and the 
ceremony. If they processioned round their churches standing on 
their heads, he would accept it with the same acquiescence. But 
they have gone down and lived amongst the people; they have 
proclaimed an intelligible gospel of Christian Socialism ; they have 
demanded not charity, but justice. The campaign has earned them 
a storm of obloquy from the world of orthodox religion ; it has 
earned them the affection of the poor. Such a life as that of Father 
Mackonoche, or Father Lowder, or, in recent times, Father Dolling, 
with his continual appeal for "a chance" for "my people," has 
struck the popular imagination, and evoked a pathetic gratitude. 
I am aware that this social message is not the whole Gospel, not 
perhaps the most important part of the Christian message. But 
it is far the hardest part to get uttered, and it is the message which 
the times imperatively demand. The cry for justice provokes a bitter 
indignation in quarters where the plea for charity evokes a ready 
response. It is not unnatural that many successful enterprises 
doing much good work should hesitate to alienate their supporters 
and subscribers with the more difficult and revolutionary teachings 
of the New Testament. But I am entirely convinced that no message 
which does not contain as an integral and essential part of its 
proclamation this hope of a visible social salvation will fall upon 
any but deaf ears amongst the working populations of our great 
cities. 

Let us fairly face realities. It is we professing Christians, as 
has been a little cynically asserted, who are the chief obstacles 
to the spread of Christianity in England. Those outside the 
Church are continually confronting the charters of our creed 
and the weekly profession of our intentions with the dull and 
uninspired acquiescence of our daily lives. Small wonder that 
they conclude on the whole that they cannot understand what 
we are after, and that what they can understand they don't 
admire. They see us as eager and tenacious of social and 



THE PROBLEM OF SOUTH LONDON 217 

monetary success as those wlio make no profession of iinworldliness. 
They note our great charities, but they note an equal if not greater 
charity in the unbeliever ; in such a class as, for example, the 
players of a theatre, which many of us profess to despise. In many 
quarters the advice has been traditional amongst the workmen to 
avoid a " Christian " employer. They discern us as kindling into 
occasional spasmodic violence, not at social wrong or the enormous 
suffering of the world, but when we accuse one particular Church of 
attempting to overreach the others in the distribution of public funds. 
They find us noisily advertising our own wares and proclaiming 
the shoddiness of our neighbours ; devoting at least as much 
energies to the undermining of their efforts as to the establishment 
of our own. They note large numbers of actively professing 
Christians who manifest no obvious fruits of the spirit ; who are 
querulous or exacting masters or mistresses, whose lives pass in 
a cold routine of self-centred business ; who are far removed from 
that eager and passionate enthusiasm of humanity to which St. 
Paul affixed the great name of charity. The verdict may be 
superficial — it neglects, and unfairly neglects, the other side of 
the picture : but that it is a verdict endorsed explicitly and 
implicitly by a vast proportion of the population of South 
London, I have no doubt whatever. 

Religion has rejoiced in the clear knowledge of God and 
forgotten the fellowship of man. And the punishment has been, 
not the overthrow of its outward prosperity, but the slow with- 
drawal of that revelation of which it seemed to possess so secure 
a certainty. So that now we walk for the most part blindly, in 
the twilight, with no clear vision of a spiritual world and an 
unseen Father. The way back to the unclouded height may be 
through the humble and deliberate search after that fellowship 
which has been offended and denied. Confronted with the Census 
of attendance at Sunday worship and the daily life of the Churches, 
I can offer no more sensational advice to myself and to others 
than a renewed study of the New Testament and the first message 
of the gospel. Teaching so familiar as to become meaningless 
may suddenly assume a new significance. The feast to which 
first are to be called the friendless and poor ; the " Inasmuch " 
with its triumph and its mysterious warning ; the strange and 
solitary revelation of future judgment for a rich man who lived 
happily with want and misery lying unnoticed at his doors; the 
woes pronounced on the complacent orthodox religions, so entirely 



218 THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 

convinced tliat they are fulfilling every jot and tittle of the law; 
these have a meaning for Christianity in England at the dawn of 
the twentieth century. Assuredly it is as well that the old gospel 
should be given a trial before we proclaim the necessity for a new. 
There need never be despair of the future of religion. Humanity, as 
a great philosopher affirmed, is not destined permanently to inhabit 
ruins. A world that is forgetting God does not involve a God 
who is forgetting the world. It may well be that the next 
movement of spiritual advance will arise from without, not from 
within the churches ; as so many of the great restorative movements 
of the past generation, whose divine origin and guidance were 
unrecognised by the members of the organised Christian community. 
But one may very confidently affirm that the time of frost and 
present cold will break up before the warmth of another spring. 
The Church by its unfaithfulness to its great calling may prolong 
the misery and increase the confusion of time ; no human wilful- 
ness or weakness can for ever delay the restitution of all things 
and the triumph of the end. For South London there remain 
a purpose and high meaning ; a new dawn will one day illuminate 
its desolation ; each life of its bafEed multitude, perishing, as it 
seems, unheeded and alone, is destined at last to find the purpose 
of its being in union with the Infinite, at once its origin and 
its goal. 



Borough of Wandsworth 

CHURCH OF ENGLAITD 



CHURCH. 


MORNING. 


1 EVENING. 


Total 


















for the 




Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Day. 


All Saints', Putney 


45 


153 


108 


306 


46 


96 


36 


178 


484 


All Saints', Wandsworth 


77 


87 


75 


239 


66 


99 


47 


212 


451 


Holy Trinity, Roehampton. 
All Saints', New Park Road 


87 


192 


142 


421 


35 


70 


53 


158 


579 


42 


87 


39 


168 


26i 


48 


19 


93 


261 


Holy Trinity, Putney Heath 


88 


239 


70 


397 


33 


39 


27 


99 


496 


St. Augustine's, Tooting 


15 


19 


142 


176 


26 


43 


38 


107 


283 


St. Alban's, Streatham Park 


117 


197 


125 


439 


58 


73 


37 


168 


607 


St. Andrew's, Eai'Isfield 


67 


99 


98 


264 


115 


163 


84 


302 


626 


St. Anne's, Wandsworth 


203 


335 


179 


717 


255 


344 


97 


696 


1,413 


St. Barnabas', Southfields . 










15 


18 


27 


60 


60 


St. Faith's, Wandsworth . 


"37 


"51 


152 


240 


43 


85 


68 


196 


436 


St. John the Evangelist's, 




















Putney Hill . 


91 


191 


82 


364 


59 


73 


32 


164 


528 


St. Mary's, Summers Town 


21 


2G 


78 


125 


35 


47 


76 


158 


283 


St. Mary-the- Virgin's, Put- 




















ney 


84 


138 


209 


431 


89 


159 


118 


366 


797 


St. Mary Magdalene's, 




















Wandsworth Common 


151 


266 


163 


580 


73 


148 


46 


267 


847 


St. Michael and All Angels', 




















Southfields 


45 


113 


102 


260 


59 


76 


64 


199 


459 


St. Paul's, Augustus Road . 


71 


130 


65 


266 


17 


16 


19 


52 


318 


St. Stephen's, Putney . 
Christ Ch., Wandsworth Rd. 


134 


308 


131 


573 


77 


153 


34 


264 


837 


63 


101 


112 


276 


49 


90 


32 


171 


447 


St. John the Evangelist's, 




















Clapham Road . 


30 


67 


51 


148 


29 


45 


22 


96 


244 


St. Peter's Almhouse 




















Chapel, Wandsworth 










7 


15 


2 


24 


24 


Church of the Ascension, 




















BalhamHill . 


148 


307 


121 


576 


105 


170 


31 


306 


882 


St. Nicholas, Tooting . 


70 


153 


335 


558 


68 


120 


78 


266 


824 


St. John the Divine's, Bal- 




















ham 


91 


176 


104 


371 


68 


108 


45 


221 


592 


St. John's, Eardley Road . 


42 


70 


32 


144 


40 


85 


24 


149 


293 


St. Mary's, Balham High Rd. 


133 


337 


201 


671 


117 


193 


135 


445 


1,116 


St. Stephen's, Clapham Park 


68 


134 


94 


296 


49 


65 


25 


139 


435 


Holy Trinity, Clapham Com. 


180 


334 


127 


641 


132 


212 


50 


394 


1,035 


St. James', Clapham Park . 


155 


330 


190 


675 


134 


209 


67 


410 


1,085 


St. Paul's, Clapham 


83 


185 


105 


373 


98 


176 


76 


350 


723 


St. Peter's, Clapham . 


81 


147 


64 


292 


70 


166 


39 


275 


567 


St. Saviour's, Wandsworth 




















Road 


71 


115 


56 


242 


61 


75 


15 


151 


393 


St. Thomas', Streatham Hill 


50 


108 


33 


191 


48 


85 


32 


165 


356 


Christ Ch., Streatham Hill 


84 


229 


92 


405 


60 


105 


31 


196 


601 


St. Margaret's, Streatham 




















Hill ..... 


68 


182 


84 


334 


45 


126 


20 


191 


525 


All Saints', Streatham. 


38 


70 


87 


195 


19 


53 


34 


106 


301 


Immanuel, Streatham Com. 


297 


412 


209 


918 


82 


174 


63 


319 


1,237 


Magdalen Chapel, Leigham 




















Court Road 


62 


263 


47 


372 


20 


164 


4 


188 


560 


St. Andrew's, Streatham 




















Common .... 


61 


117 


109 


287 


56 


97 


62 


215 


502 


St. Anselm's, Streatham 


48 


74 


86 


208 


30 


49 


17 


96 


304 


St. Leonard's, Streatham . 


170 


380 


170 


720 


134 


266 


53 


453 


1,173 


St. Paul's Mission Church, 




















Streatham. 










8 


32 


9 


49 


49 


Holy Trinity, Up. Tooting . 


210 


390 


226 


826 


220 


454 


117 


791 


1,617 




3,678 


7,312 


4,695 


15,685 


2,876 


5,084 


2,005 


9,965 


25,650 



219 



220 



THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 



Church of England Missions 



CHURCH. 


MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 

for the 

Day. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Bendon Valley Mission 
St. Michael's, Southfields . 
All Saints', Wandsworth 

Plain 

St. Andrew's, Ilarlsfield Rd. 
St. Anne's, Garratt Lane . 
St. Nicholas', Tooting . 
St. Stephen's, Balham Hill . 
St. Stephen's, Putney Bridge 

Road 

St. James' Schools, Clapham 

Park Road 
Immanuel, Streatham Com. 
St. Anne's, Clapham . 
Holy Trinity, Tooting. 


4 

"l 
6 

8 

3 

'"9 
12 


3 

"2 
6 

8 

7 

'" 7 
20 


119 

90 

i'68 
136 

53 

95 

167 
245 


126 
90 

171 
148 

69 
105 

183 

277 


6 
10 

5 
5 

15 
6 

11 

11 

"10 
"9 


19 
23 

17 

4 

14 

5 
18 

34 

"25 
"32 


10 
6 

18 

174 

8 

18 

10 

54 

'"5 
"47 


35 
39 

40 
183 
37 
29 
39 

99 

"40 
"88 


161 
129 

40 

3M 

185 

29 

39 

168 

105 

40 

183 

365 


Total .... 


43 


53 


1,073 


1,169 


88 


191 


350 


629 


1,798 



WESLEYAN METHODIST CHURCH 



High Road, Upper Tooting 


96 


119 


64 


279 


53 


73 


21 


147 


426 


East Hill, Wandsworth 


110 


147 


159 


422 


191 


241 


33 


465 


887 


Up. Richmond Rd., Putney 


106 


153 


78 


337 


127 


128 


28 


2&^ 


620 


Balham Hill. 


22 


36 


48 


106 


18 


38 


19 


75 


181 


High Street, Clapham. 


144 


165 


77 


38G ] 


107 


152 


22 


281 


667 


High Road, Streatham 


124 


158 


197 


479 ! 


82 


150 


32 


264 


743 


Total .... 


608 


778 


623 


2,009 


578 


782 


155 


1,515 


3,524 



"Wesleyan Methodist Missions 



Emmanuel, Tooting . 
North Street, Wandsworth . 
Eardley Road, Streatham . 
South Street, Wandsworth . 


26 

19 
4 


13 

"25 
4 


109 

iio 

56 


148 

154 
64 


44 
16 
30 

8 


27 
27 
40 
20 


22 
35 
61 
12 


93 

78 

131 

40 


241 

78 
285 
104 


Total .... 


49 


42 


275 


366 


98 


114 


130 


342 


708 



PRIMITIVE METHODIST CHURCH 



High Street, Wandsworth . 
Balham Grove 
Tooting Vestry Hall . 
Angles Road, Streatham 


30 

30 

8 
6 


21 

44 

5 

7 


10 

43 

73 

6 


61 
117 

86 
19 


30 
41 
22 

7 


29 
83 
23 

18 


8 
18 
19 

6 


67 

142 

64 

31 


128 

259 

150 

50 


Total .... 


74 


77 


132 


283 


100 


153 


51 


304 


587 



UNITED METHODIST FREE CHURCH 



Park Crescent, Clapham 

Park Road 
Riggindale Rd., Streath.am. 


34 
20 


30 
26 


40 
21 


104 

67 


31 
66 


52 
88 


6 
19 


89 
168 


193 
235 


Total .... 


54 


56 


61 


171 


97 


135 


25 


257 


428 



SOUTH LONDON— WANDSWORTH 



221 



BAPTIST CHURCH 



CHURCH. 


MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 
for tha 




















Men. 


Women. 


Chldm. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Day, 


East Hill, Wandsworth 


184 


190 


244 


618 


158 


249 


38 


445 


1,063 


Earlsfield, Magdalen Road . 
Werter Road, J?utnev • 


34 


30 


42 


106 


42 


50 


20 


112 


218 


48 


86 


80 


214 


79 


137 


35 


251 


465 


Southfields, Merton Road . 


20 


21 


48 


89 


26 


35 


37 


98 


187 


West Hill, Wandsworth . 


33 


34 


34 


101 


29 


41 


11 


81 


182 


Victoria, Wandsworth 


107 


111 


93 


311 


131 


178 


50 


359 


670 


Longley Rd. , Lower Tooting 


25 


35 


110 


170 


45 


56 


23 


124 


294 


Ramsden Road, Balham 


82 


109 


102 


293 


125 


206 


29 


360 


653 


Trinity, Balham . 


24 


22 


24 


70 


17 


25 


5 


47 


117 


Ebenezer, Clapham 


20 


48 


18 


86 


31 


54 


25 


110 


196 


Grafton Square^ Clapham . 
Zion's Hill, S. Lambeth 


60 


64 


150 


274 


74 


108 


113 


295 


569 


28 


30 


18 


76 


29 


51 


4 


84 


160 


Le%vin Road, Streatham 


22 


39 


58 


119 


23 


49 


18 


90 


209 


Providence, Streatham 


7 


16 


11 


34 


8 


22 


5 


35 


69 


Salem, New Park Road 


59 


96 


48 


203 


52 


106 


16 


174 


377 


Trinity Road 


122 


213 


134 


469 


69 


143 


15 


227 


696 


Total . . . . 


875 


1,144 


1,214 


3,233 


938 


1,510 


444 


2,892 


6,125 



Baptist Missions 



Wardley St., Garratt Lane. 
Bedford Hill, Balham . 
Lyham Road, Brixton. 


"3 
9 


'"7 


"1 
2 


1 
"11 1 
11 


9 
5 
8 


25 
9 

... 


16 

'"4 


50 
14 
12 


50 
25 
23 


Total .... 


12 


7 


3 


22 


22 


34 


20 


76 


98 



CONGREaATIONAL CHURCH 



Earlsfield Rd,, Garratt Lane 


34 


31 


63 


128 


70 


120 


54 


244 


372 


East Hill, Wandsworth 


198 


230 


104 


532 


152 


181 


29 


362 


894 


High Road, Upper Tooting 


156 


206 


122 


484 


91 


137 


21 


249 


733 


High Street, Tooting . 


67 


72 


111 


250 


88 


142 


36 


266 


516 


Grafton Square, Clapham . 
Queen's Place, Wandsworth 


163 


251 


85 


499 


164 


175 


62 


401 


900 




















Road 


8 


1 


86 


95 


9 


26 


41 


76 


171 


Streatham Hill . 


56 


79 


92 


227 


42 


49 


3 


94 


321 


High Road, Streatham 


98 


124 


33 


255 


45 


68 


8 


121 


376 


Total .... 


780 


994 


696 


2,470 


661 


898 


254 


1,813 


4,283 



Congregational Missions 



Thomsett Rd., Garratt Lane 










3 


2 


90 


95 


95 


Belmont Road, Clapham . 
Broadwater Road, Tooting . 


27 


5 


104 


136 










136 










3 


14 


41 


58 


58 


Blackshaw Road, Summers 




















Town .... 


9 


2 


38 


49 


6 


11 


7 


24 


73 


Memorial Hall, Wandsworth 










15 


9 


6 


30 


30 


Garratt Lane Mission . 


3 


1 


92 


96 


10 


19 


10 


39 


135 


Victoria Hall 


18 


21 


34 


73 


21 


39 


17 


77 


150 


Total .... 


57 


29 


268 


354 


58 


94 


171 


323 


677 



UNION CHURCH (BAPTIST AND CONGREGATIONAL) 



Ravenna Road, Putney 



83 124 



41 248 



64 



90 



26 180 



428 



222 



THE EELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 

Union Church Mission 





MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 

for the 

Day. 




Men. 


Women. 


Chldm. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Oxford Rd. Institute, Putney 


2 




60 


62 


18 


27 


17 


62 


124 



UNION CHURCH (BAPTIST AND PRESBYTERIAN) 



Wandsworth Rd. Tabernacle 



10 



14 



30 



14 



28 



50 



80 



PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 



Merton Road, Wandsworth 
Briar Walk, Putney . 
St. Peter's, Upper Tooting . 
Trinity, Streatham 


49 

47 

12.5 

70 


56 

79 

147 

140 


25 
59 
66 
72 


130 
185 
338 
282 


37 
27 
94 
43 


42 
38 
78 
64 


8 
14 
11 

7 


87 

79 

183 

114 


217 
264 
521 
396 


Total .... 


291 


422 


222 


935 


201 


222 


40 


463 


1,398 



SOCIETY OF FRIENDS 



Meeting House, 31, High St. 



26 



35 



SALVATION ARMY 



Balham 

Tooting .... 
Clapham .... 
South Street, Wandsworth . 


20 

7 

12 

44 


18 

8 

10 

31 


27 

5 

89 


38 

42 

27 

164 


24 

7 

19 

67 


67 
16 
24 
96 


11 

14 

6 

35 


102 
37 
49 

198 


140 
79 
76 

362 


Total .... 


83 


67 


121 


271 


117 


203 


66 


386 


657 



BRETHREN 



Waldron Gospel Hall, 




















Wandsworth 


7 


7 


1 


15 


7 


21 


10 


38 


53 


Longley Rd., Lower Tooting 


24 


10 


14 


48 


22 


14 


14 


50 


98 


Narbonne Avenue, Clapham 




















Common .... 


44 


73 


29 


146 


33 


38 


15 


86 


232 


Mitcham Lane . 


20 


25 


5 


50 


12 


20 




32 


82 


Balham Grove 


48 


61 


17 


126 


31 


41 


6 


78 


204 


Pinfold Road, Streatham . 


19 


33 


15 


67 


14 


19 


3 


36 


103 


Loat's Road, Clapham Park 




















Road 


2 


2 


2 


6 


3 


5 




8 


14 


Carfax Square, Clapham 




















Park Road 


25 


30 


12 


67 


23 


20 


13 


56 


123 


Total .... 


189 


241 


95 


525 


145 


178 


61 


384 


909 



FREE EPISCOPAL CHURCH 



Emmanuel, Upper Rich- 
mond Road, Putney. 



26 


40 


27 


93 


15 


39 


8 


62 



155 



SOUTH LONDON— WANDSWORTH 

BIBLE CHEISTIAK" CHUKCH 



223 



CHURCH. 


MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 

for the 

Day. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Mon. 


Women. 


Chldm. 


Total. 


Wirtemberg St. , Clapham . 


11 


16 


18 


45 


22 


19 


5 


46 


91 



UNITARIAN CHURCH 



East Hill, Wandsworth 



44 



53 38 



135 



50 50 



16 



116 



251 



ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH 



St. Joseph's, Roehampton . 


80 


106 


42 


228 


19 


16 


13 


48 


276 


St. Thomas of Canterbury's, 




















West Hill. 


173 


311 


230 


714 


36 


48 


31 


115 


829 


Church of the English Mar- 




















tyr, Streatham . 


196 


467 


219 


882 


23 


78 


6 


107 


989 


Church of the Holy Ghost, 




















Wandsworth Common . 


169 


337 


181 


687 


28 


71 


47 


146 


833 


Convent Chapel of the 




















Blessed Sacrament . 


36 


43 


39 


118 










118 


Our Lady of Good Counsel 




















and St. Anthony 


36 


78 


60 


174 


5 


12 


13 


30 


204 


St. Mary, ClajDham Park . 


535 


828 


380 


1,743 


156 


301 


50 


507 


2,250 


Sacred Heart, ClajDham Pk. 


5 


62 


1 


68 


5 


73 


5 


83 


151 


Our Lady of Compassion . 


30 


63 


26 


119 


22 


18 


13 


53 


172 


Total .... 


1,260 


2,295 


1,178 


4,733 


294 


617 


178 


1,089 


5,822 



OTHER SERVICES 



Sefton Hall, Putney . 




1 




10 


27 


26 


63 


63 


Eltringham, 264, York Rd. 








7 


10 


3 


20 


20 


Granville, Merton Road 


13 


4 


41 


58 


20 


31 


19 


70 


128 


HomeMission, Garratt Lane 


11 


7 


28 


46 


9 


8 


15 


32 


78 


Bethany, Southfields . 


6 


4 


24 


34 


16 


11 


8 


35 


69 


162, High Street, Tooting . 












13 


17 


3 


33 


33 


Bethel, Balham New Road . 












16 


12 


4 


32 


32 


Shaftesbury, Wandsworth 






















Common .... 












2 


3 


18 


23 


23 


Y.W.C.A., 42, Disraeli Rd. 














56 




56 


56 


London City Mission, 344, 






















York Road, Wandsworth 












4 


13 


9 


26 


26 


London City Mission, Asso- 






















ciation Rooms, South St. 












6 


17 


8 


31 


31 


London City Mission, Lait- 






















wood Road, Balham 












7 


21 


34 


62 


62 


London City Mission, Bro- 






















mell's Road, Clapham 












3 


7 


1 


11 


11 


London City Mission, 






















Grange Road, Clapham . 












9 


16 


2 


27 


27 


Young Men's Mission, 525, 






















Wandsworth Road . 












15 


12 




27 


27 


Down Lodge, West Hill 












69 


108 


41 


218 


218 


Clapham Assembly Rooms 
(Spiritualist) 
































24 


33 


1 


58 


58 


London City Mission, Piatt 






















Hall 












35 


52 


48 


135 


135 


Total .... 


30 


15 


93 


138 


265 


454 


240 


959 


1,097 



224 



THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 



DENOMINATIONAL TOTALS 



DENOMINATION. 


MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


for the 
Day. 


Church of England 


3,678 


7,312 


4,695 


15,685 


2,876 


5,084 


2,005 


9,965 


25,650 


„ „ Missions 


43 


53 


1,073 


1,169 


88 


191 


350 


629 


1,798 


Wesleyan Meth. Church 


608 


778 


623 


2,009 


578 


782 


155 


1,515 


3,524 


„ „ Missions 


49 


42 


275 


366 


98 


114 


130 


342 


708 


Primitive Meth. Church 


74 


77 


132 


283 


100 


153 


51 


304 


587 


U. Meth. Free Church . 


54 


56 


61 


171 


97 


135 


25 


257 


428 


Baptist Church 


875 


1,144 


1,214 


3,233 


938 


1,510 


444 


2,892 


6,125 


„ Missions . 


12 


7 


3 


22 


22 


34 


20 


76 


98 


Congregational Church 


780 


994 


696 


2,470 


661 


898 


254 


1,813 


4,283 


„ Missions 


57 


29 


268 


354 


58 


94 


171 


323 


677 


Union Churches . 


91 


134 


115 


340 


90 


131 


71 


292 


632 


Presbyterian Church . 


291 


422 


222 


935 


201 


222 


40 


463 


1,398 


Society of Friends 


9 


9 


8 


26 


5 


4 




9 


35 


Salvation Army . 


83 


67 


121 


271 


117 


203 


66 


386 


657 


Brethren 


189 


241 


95 


525 


145 


178 


61 


384 


909 


Free Episcopal Church . 


26 


40 


27 


93 


15 


39 


8 


62 


155 


Bible Christian Church 


11 


16 


18 


45 


22 


19 


5 


46 


91 


Unitarian Church . 


44 


53 


38 


135 


50 


50 


16 


116 


251 


Roman Catholic Church 


1,260 


2,295 


1,178 


4,733 


294 


617 


178 


1,089 


5,822 


Other Services 


30 


15 


93 


138 


265 


454 


240 


959 


1,097 


Grand Totals . 


8,264 


13,784 


10,955 


33,003 


6,720 


10,912 


4,290 


21,922 


54,925 



I 

3 
a 
o 

0^ 



p 



90 



o 



s 








iS 




o 






■g 


1 


u 

E 


•s 


^ 


O 


4> 


j: 


c 
o 


g 


u 



i 



1_L 



DIAGRAM 

SKe-wir^ Attendance. 




Population 



3 
a. 
o 

Oh 



Roman Catholic 


u 

c 




"O 




c 




V 






c g 


< 


4) ^ 




S 2 

*-• k-i ■— * 


c 


5: :^ U 


H 



Other Services 



6 




population 



All Churches 



Church of Eni^laad 



Nonconformist 



Roman Catholic 



Other Services 




r 



Borough of Lambeth 



CHURCH OF ENGLAND 



CHURCH. 


MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 
for the 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldin. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldin. 


Total. 


Day. 


Christ Church, Brixton Rd. 


186 


325 


99 


610 


377 


726 


155 


1,258 


1,868 


St. Andrew's, Stockwell Gn. 


82 


115 


117 


314 


107 


275 


144 


526 


840 


St. Anne's, S. Lambeth Rd. 


37 


81 


186 


304 


66 


129 


62 


257 


561 


St. Augustine's, Clapham 




















Road .... 


58 


99 


44 


201 


59 


107 


94 


260 


461 


St. John the Divine's, 




















Brixton . . . • 


216 


321 


152 


689 


261 


340 


51 


652 


1,341 


St. John the Evangelist's, 




















Brixton .... 


69 


141 


90 


300 


109 


200 


66 


375 


675 


St. James', KnatchbuU Rd. 


75 


80 


69 


224 


69 


88 


46 


203 


427 


St. Jude's, Dulwich Road . 


69 


156 


83 


308 


87 


229 


67 


383 


691 


St. Mark's, Kennington 


142 


150 


116 


408 


383 


473 


126 


982 


1,390 


St. Matthew's, Brixton Hill 


138 


242 


152 


532 


177 


237 


152 


566 


1,098 


St. Matthias', Up. Tulse Hill 


56 


115 


68 


239 


72 


129 


32 


233 


472 


St. Michael's, Stockwell 




















Park Road 


59 


110 


68 


237 


55 


132 


29 


216 


453 


St. Paul's, West Brixton . 


67 


124 


177 


368 


109 


252 


170 


531 


899 


St. Saviour's, Lambert Rd. 


112 


199 


111 


422 


111 


249 


45 


405 


827 


St. Stephen's, S. Lambeth . 


32 


52 


45 


129 


37 


98 


63 


198 


327 


All Saints', S. Lambeth 


88 


140 


114 


342 


59 


303 


108 


470 


812 


St. Barnabas', S. Lambeth . 


37 


100 


40 


177 


54 


101 


31 


186 


363 


All Saints', "West Dulwich . 


238 


388 


257 


883 


109 


309 


65 


483 


1,366 


Christ Church, Gipsy Hill . 


175 


429 


112 


716 


130 


443 


35 


608 


1,324 


St. Jude's Mission Church, 




















Gipsy Hill 


15 


32 


27 


74 


21 


55 


25 


101 


175 


St. Luke's, West Norwood . 


111 


248 


105 


464 


117 


248 


59 


424 


888 


Holy Trinity, Tulse Hill . 


142 


282 


151 


575 


104 


214 


51 


369 


944 


St. Saviour's, Heme Hill 




















Road 


39 


77 


128 


244 


46 


120 


81 


247 


491 


St. Matthew's, Denmark 




















Hill 


120 


185 


83 


388 


200 


376 


78 


654 


1,042 


St. Peter's, West Norwood . 


151 


251 


95 


497 


115 


272 


48 


435 


932 


St. Andrew's, Coin Street . 


50 


48 


99 


197 


102 


149 


82 


333 


530 


St. Thomas', Westminster 




















Bridge Road . 


19 


38 


50 


107 


21 


53 


11 


85 


192 


St. John's, Waterloo Road . 


22 


18 


21 


61 


42 


63 


51 


156 


217 


Holy Trinity, Carlisle St. . 


18 


31 


68 


117 


36 


96 


55 


187 


304 


St. Mary's, Lambeth Road . 


72 


110 


105 


287 


86 


207 


80 


373 


660 


St. Philip's, Kennington Rd. 


55 


86 


93 


234 


53 


98 


77 


228 


462 


St. Anselm's Mission Ch., 




















Kennington Road . 


14 


10 


64 


88 


34 


56 


38 


128 


216 


Emmanuel, Kennington Rd. 


14 


19 


40 


73 


35 


82 


54 


171 


244 


St. Mary-the-Less', Princess 




















Road 


13 


22 


120 


155 


26 


55 


64 


145 


300 


St. Peter's, Upper Kenning- 


















1 


ton Lane .... 


69 


121 


292 


482 


36 


112 


41 


189 


671 


St. James', Kennington 




















Park Road 


15 


9 


13 


37 


17 


34 


16 


67 


104 


Church of the Epiphany, 




















Clapham Road 


39 


67 


100 


206 


61 


107 


79 


247 


453 


Emmanuel, West Dulwich . 


78 


146 


133 


357 


79 


141 


67 


287 


644 


Total .... 


2,992 


5,167 


3,887 


12,046 


3,662 


7,358 


2,598 


13,618 


,25,664 

1 



22? 



15 



226 



THE^EELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 
Church of England Missions 



CHURCH. 


MORNING. 




EVENING. 




Total 

for the 

Day. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Jersey Home Institute 


4 




40 


44 










44 


British Home for Incurables, 




















Norwood .... 










19 


43 


4 


66 


66 


St. Paul's Beehive, Brixton 










18 


44 


19 


81 


81 


St. Paul's Hall, Brixton . 










3 


6 


23 


32 


32 


St. Saviour's Institute, 




















Brixton .... 










13 


60 


23 


96 


96 


St. Silas', Dawlish Street . 


2 


4 


65 


71 


17 


39 


66 


122 


193 


St. Stephen's, Layham 




















Cottages .... 




1 


27 


28 


3 


7 


8 


18 


46 


St. Luke's, West Norwood . 










18 


26 


43 


87 


87 


St. Thomas', Waterloo Rd. . 


3 


3 


30 


36 


6 


22 


66 


94 


130 


St. Saviour's, Brixton . 










20 


80 


10 


110 


110 


Emmanuel Hall, West Nor- 




















wood 










10 


67 


122 


199 


199 


St. Mark's, Bolton Street . 


2 


5 


60 


67 


6 


6 


27 


39 


106 


St. Mark's, Montford Place 


11 


6 


55 


72 


12 


8 


21 


41 


113 


St. Paul's, Lowden Road 


4 


4 


90 


98 


11 


46 


62 


119 


217 


St. Matthew's, Parochial Hall 


5 


4 


158 


167 


17 


28 


44 


89 


256 


St. Peter's, Vauxhall Schs. 


1 


5 


44 


50 










50 


St. Peter's, Men's Mission . 


20 






20 


14 






14 


34 


St. Thomas' Mission, Lower 




















Marsh .... 










4 


17 


7 


28 


28 


St. Thomas', Burdett Street 










5 


12 


61 


78 


78 


St. Thomas', Frazier Street 




1 


59 


60 




... 






60 


Emmanuel, Distin Street . 










6 


19 


9 


34 


34 


Holy Cross, Lothian Road . 










1 


21 


27 


49 


49 


St. John's, Parochial Hall . 


3 


2 


102 


107 










107 


Total .... 


55 


35 


730 


820 


203 


551 


642 


1,396 


2,216 



WESLEYAN METHODIST CHUHCH 



Brixton Hill. 


107 


140 


80 


327 


111 


179 


33 


323 


650 


Roupell Park 


157 


185 


152 


494 


133 


184 


65 


382 


876 


StudleyRoad 


59 


90 


58 


207 


101 


146 


34 


281 


488 


Mostyn Road 


78 


84 


48 


210 


i 115 


156 


45 


316 


526 


Westow Hill, Up. Norwood 


66 


65 


74 


205 


1 69 


122 


60 


251 


456 


Knight's Hill Road, West 




















Norwood .... 


30 


30 


71 


131 


' 29 


38 


34 


101 


232 


Lambeth Chapel . 


62 


59 


57 


178 


122 


205 


107 


434 


612 


Total .... 


559 


653 


540 


1,752 


680 


1,030 


378 


2,088 


3,840 



Wesleyan Methodist Missions 



Lyham Road, Brixton 


14 


9 


51 


74 


23 


52 


72 


147 


221 


Dulwich Road 


8 


8 


52 


68 


16 


39 


9 


64 


132 


Vauxhall Walk . 


9 


13 


92 


114 


16 


32 


17 


65 


179 


Bethel Street, W. Norwood 


4 




20 


24 


3 


2 


35 


40 


64 


Springfield Hall, Wands- 




















worth Road 


108 


105 


283 


496 


389 


590 


487 


1,466 


1,962 


Topaz Street 


4 




58 


62 


6 


1 


105 


112 


174 


Total .... 


147 


135 


556 


838 


453 


716 


725 


1,894 


2,732 



SOUTH LONDON— LAMBETH 



227 



BAPTIST CHURCH 



CHURCH. 


MORNING. 1 


EVENING. 


i Total 
' for the 
Day. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Brixton Tabernacle 


38 


32 


24 


94 i 


45 


67 


2 


114 


208 


Brixton Hill 


25 


29 


5 


59 


28 


72 


26 


126 


185 


Gresham, Barrington Road 


58 


67 


83 


208 


90 


163 


41 


294 


502 


Kenyon, Solon Road . 


82 


102 


165 


349 


80 


175 


62 


317 


666 


Raleigh Park, Brixton Hill 


17 


15 


24 


56 


23 


41 


16 


80 


136 


Rehoboth Chapel, Clapham 


12 


18 


5 


35 


12 


24 


2 


38 


73 


Russell Street, Brixton 


13 


17 


8 


38 


28 


56 


25 


109 


147 


Stoekwell, S. Lambeth Rd. 


46 


48 


54 


148 


.59 


91 


35 


185 


333 


Wynne Road, Brixton 


55 


91 


130 


276 


80 


150 


31 


261 


537 


Chatsworth Road, West 




















Norwood .... 


265 


380 


243 


888 


335 


545 


170 


1,050 


1,938 


Gipsy Road, Norwood 


48 


53 


91 


192 


82 


141 


47 


270 


462 


Gipsy Road Tabernacle 


22 


28 


42 


92 


64 


104 


41 


209 


301 


Denmark Hill 


8 


4 


26 


38 


6 


16 


25 


47 


85 


Providence, West Norwood 


10 


11 


11 


32 


23 


35 


11 


69 


101 


Denmark Place . 


108 


120 


165 


393 


133 


236 


89 


458 


851 


Vauxhall, Kennington 


26 


20 


31 


77 


29 


45 


33 


107 


184 


Dugdale-street, Camberwell 


10 


11 


5 


26 


15 


33 


27 


75 


101 


North Brixton 


12 


21 


14 


47 


25 


46 


36 


107 


154 


Regent Chapel, Kennington 




















Cross 


14 


6 


12 


32 


28 


43 


10 


81 


113 


Lansdowne Hill, West Nor- 




















wood 


133 


223 


05 


421 


118 


271 


39 


428 


849 


Total . . . . 


1,002 


1,296 


1,203 


3,501 


1,303 


2,354 


768 


4,425 


7,926 



Baptist Missions 



Sidney Road, Stoekwell 
Strathleven Road, Brixton . 
Gothic Hall, Stoekwell 
Upton Hall, Oakley Street . 
Upper Kennington Lane . 
Millstead Hall . 
Centenary Memorial Hall . 
Y.M.L, Acre Lane 


13 
'" 8 

3 
9 


7 

"23 

"2 
2 
8 


3 

"3 

l'35 
65 

87 


23 i 

... 1 

34 

140 
70 - 
104 


13 
2 
11 
15 
6 
3 
8 
5 


18 

9 

32 

19 

16 

5 

7 


1 

"ie 
"5 

52 
74 
44 


32 
11 
59 
34 

27 
60 
89 
49 


55 

11 

93 

34 

167 

130 

193 

49 


Total .... 


36 


42 


293 


371 


63 


106 


192 


361 


732 



CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 



Brixton Independent . 
Claylands Road, Clapham . 
Loughborough Park . 
Stoekwell Green . 
Trinity, Brixton Hill . 
Wheatsheaf, S. Lambeth . 
Lothian Road 
Chapel Road, W. Norwood 
Park Road, West Dulwich . 
Christ Church, Westminster 

Bridge Road 
Christ Church, Hawkstone 

Hall (Children's Service) . 

Total .... 



342 


383 


200 


925 


422 


564 


92 


85 


331 


508 


111 


168 


40 


53 


46 


139 


58 


76 


59 


80 


301 


440 


96 


176 


67 


69 


60 


196 


62 


110 


30 


20 


43 


93 


62 


107 


14 


18 


19 


51 


9 


17 


31 


22 


40 


93 


32 


46 


34 


53 


36 


123 


26 


52 


271 


301 


180 


752 


433 


679 


6 


5 


102 


113 


4 


3 


986 


1,089 


1,358 


3,433 


1,315 


1,998 



74 
30 
29 
172 
43 
66 

3 
13 

4 

182 
74 



1,060 

309 

163 

444 

215 

235 

29 

91 

82 

1,294 

81 



690 4,003 



1,985 
817 
302 
884 
411 
328 
80 
184 
205 

2,046 

194 



7,436 



Congregational Missions 



Moffatt Institute, Kenning- 
ton Lane .... 
Caine Hall, Kennington Ln. 


14 
3 


9 

2 


107 
84 


130 
89 


33 
24 


69 
40 


225 
36 


327 
100 


457 
189 


Total .... 


17 


11 


191 


219 


57 


109 


261 


427 


646 



228 



THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 

PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 





MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 


CHURCH. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Day. 


Trinity, CLipham Road 
St. Cuthbert'.s, W. Norwood 
Kennington Road 


2G0 
47 
11 


380 
33 
14 


63 
26 
19 


703 

106 

44 


204 
30 
32 


247 
46 
76 


44 
16 
33 


495 

92 

141 


1,198 
198 
185 


Total .... 


318 


427 


108 


853 


266 


369 


93 


728 


1,581 



PRIMITIVE METHODIST CHURCH 



Dorset Road 


9 


4 


21 


34 


20 


37 


31 


88 1 


122 


Emmanuel, West Bi-ixton . 


22 


13 


22 


57 


25 


48 


16 


89 1 


146 


Hamilton R., W. Norwood . 


20 


11 


19 


50 


20 


33 


16 


69 


119 


Knight's Hill Road, West 




















Norwood .... 


13 


19 


19 


51 


22 


37 


20 


79 


130 


Warham Street, Kennington 
















1 




Park 


23 


13 


63 


99 


26 


32 


8 


66 1 


165 


Total .... 


87 


60 


144 


291 


113 


187 


91 


391 ! 


682 



UNITED METHODIST FREE CHURCH 



Fentiman Road . 
Paradise Rd., Olapham Rd. 
Railton Road, Heme Hill . 
South ville, Wandsworth Rd. 


52 

49 

48 

1 


37 

47 

77 


62 
67 

98 

7 


151 
163 
223 

8 


62 

85 
81 
17 


82 
113 
176 

24 


59 

74 

138 

25 


203 

272 

395 

66 


354 
435 
618 

74 


Total .... 


150 


161 


234 


545 


245 


395 


296 


936 


1,481 



UNITARIAN CHURCH 



Effra Road, Brixton 



26 



37 



20 



83 



18 



32 



51 



BIBLE CHRISTIAN CHURCH 



Waterloo Road . 
Royal Victoria Hall . 


33 


35 


90 


158 


96 
364 


147 
501 


114 
249 


357 
1,114 


515 
1,114 


Total .... 


33 


35 


90 


158 


460 


648 


363 


1,471 


1,629 



CHRISTADEIiPHIAN CHURCH 



Gresham Road, Brixton 



46 



56 



56 158 



59 



56 



27 



142 



SALVATION ARMY 



Loughborough Hall 


23 


22 


28 


73 


49 


63 


110 


222 


295 


Cornwall R<jad, Brixton 


63 


58 


56 


177 


96 


184 


95 


375 


552 


Stockwell Green . 


11 


16 


22 


49 


8 


33 


15 


56 


105 


Dunbar Street, W. Norwood 


14 


13 


18 


45 


19 


42 


19 


80 


125 


Lower Kennington Lane . 


50 


17 


32 


99 


105 


139 


55 


299 


398 


Broad Street, Albert Em- 


5 


7 


6 


18 


9 


14 


11 


34 


52 


bankment .... 




















Cornwall Rd„ Stamford St. 


1 


4 




5 


8 


12 


10 


30 


35 


Bolney Street, S. Lambetli . 


1 


4 




5 


5 


13 


5 


23 


28 


Total .... 


168 


141 


162 


471 


299 


500 


320 


1,119 


1,590 



SOUTH LONDON-LAMBETH 

BKETHREN 



229 





MOBNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 

for the 

Day. 




Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


S. Island PL, Brixton Rd. . 
Clive HaU, West Dulwich . 
St. Gothard'sRd., Gipsy HI. 
TunstaUHall 

Offley Road .... 
Montford Place . 
Lothian Road 
Loughborough Junction 
New Cut, Waterloo Road . 


"28 

6 

47 

33 

22 

"19 
29 


"50 

6 

36 

17 

31 

"20 
29 


"ii 

24 

10 

20 

7 

14 
12 


"89 
36 
93 
70 
60 

"53 

70 


16 
22 
8 
32 
32 
23 
16 
15 
39 


14 

37 
13 
27 
20 
27 
20 
34 
35 


8 

3 

6 

8 

19 

7 

16 

24 

30 


38 
52 
27 
67 
71 
57 
52 
73 
104 


38 
141 

63 
160 
141 
117 

52 
126 
174 


Total .... 


184 j 189 j 98 


471 


1 193 


227 


121 


541 


1,012 



NEW JERUSALEM CHURCH 



Bvurton Road 
Holland Road 


20 
8 


13 
10 


3 
14 


36 
32 


13 


15 


5 


33 


69 
32 


Total .... 


28 


23 


17 


68 1 


13 


15 


5 


33 


101 



ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH 



Corpus Christi, Brixton HI. 
St. Patrick's, Waterloo Rd. 
St. Anne's Schs., Vauxhall 


122 

13 

211 


219 

54 

217 


143 

86 

196 


484 
153 
624 


25 

3 

15 


62 

9 

41 


26 
55 
46 


113 

67 

102 


597 
220 
726 


Total .... 


346 


490 


425 


1,261 


43 


112 


127 


282 


1,543 



OTHER SERVICES 



London City Miss., Lyham 




















Road, Brixton . 










8 


28 


26 


62 


62 


London City Mission, Elgin 




















Hall, West Norwood 










15 


49 


19 


83 


83 


Lond. City Mis., Rommany 




















Road, West Norwood 










15 


34 


21 


70 


70 


Southesk St., Stockwell Rd. 










7 


10 


7 


24 


24 


Wandsworth Road Railway 








*.• 


51 


54 


39 


144 


144 


Clapham Road Y.M.C.A. . 










3 


3 


38 


44 


44 


Lambeth Walk . 










2G 


49 


7 


82 


82 


Auckland Hill, W. Norwood 










20 


23 


21 


64 


64 


Beardell Street, Norwood . 










4 


3 


19 


26 


26 


Martell Road, W. Dulwich . 










7 


10 


4 


21 


21 


Shaftesbury Inst., Brixton . 


7 


9 


21 


37 


13 


29 


53 


95 


132 


Sussex Road, Brixton . 


19 


18 


8 


45 


29 


56 


10 


95 


140 


Spiritualists, Mayall Road . 










7 


8 


1 


16 


16 


Peculiar People, Kennington 




















Park Road 


4 


6 


1 


14 


5 


7 


2 


14 


28 


Y.W.C.A., Brixton Road . 












20 




20 


20 


White Hart Square Mission 


3 


2 1 54 


59 


10 


18 


16 


44 


103 


Total .... 


36 


35 84 


155 


220 


401 


283 


904 


1,059 



230 



THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 
DENOMINATIONAL TOTALS 





MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 


DENOMINATION. 


















lor titiO 




Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Day. 


Church of England 


2,992 


5,167 


3,887 


12,046 


3,662 


7,358 


2,598 


13,618 


25,664 


„ „ Missions 


.55 


35 


730 


820 


203 


551 


642 


1,396 


2,216 


Wesleyan Meth. Church 


559 


653 


540 


1,752 


680 


1,030 


378 


2,088 


3,840 


„ „ Missions 


147 


135 


556 


838 


453 


716 


725 


1,894 


2,732 


Baptist Church . 


1,002 


1,296 


1,203 


3,501 


1,303 


2,354 


768 


4,425 


7,926 


„ Missions . 


36 


42 


293 


371 


63 


106 


192 


361 


732 


Congregational Church 


986 


1,089 


1,358 


3,433 


1,315 


1,998 


690 


4,003 


7,436 


„ Missions 


17 


11 


191 


219 


57 


109 


261 


427 


646 


Presbyterian Church . 


318 


427 


108 


853 


266 


369 


93 


728 


1,581 


Primitive Meth. Church 


87 


60 


144 


291 


113 


187 


91 


391 


682 


U. Meth. Free Church. 


150 


161 


234 


545 


245 


395 


296 


936 


1,481 


Unitarian Church 


26 


37 


20 


83 


18 


32 


1 


51 


134 


Bible Christian Church 


33 


35 


90 


158 


460 


648 


363 


1,471 


1,629 


Christadelphian Church 


46 


56 


56 


158 


59 


56 


27 


142 


300 


Salvation Army . 


168 


141 


162 


471 


299 


500 


320 


1,119 


1,590 


Brethren 


184 


189 


98 


471 


193 


227 


121 


541 


1,012 


New Jerusalem Church 


28 


23 


17 


68 


13 


15 


5 


33 


101 


Roman Catholic Church 


346 


490 


425 


1,261 


43 


112 


127 


282 


1,543 


Other Services 


36 


35 


84 


155 


220 


401 


283 


904 


1,059 


Grand Totals . 


7,216 


10,082 


10,196 


27,494 


9,665 


17,164 


7,981 


34,810 


62,304 



J*' 



c 


a 


^ 




u 


o 




!V) 




'^ 




O 


s 




o 


a 


, , 


(I) 


.2 


X 


d 
&• 




^ 


U 




Is 


^ 


c 

o 

o 

c 




o 


o 




c 

2 


o 



) 70 



. 60 




S 40 



Population Roman Catholic 



Other Services 




Population 



All Churches 



Church of England 



Nonconformist 



Roman Catholic 



Other Services 




Black s All Sepvlcea 



Borough of Camberwell 



CHURCH OF ENGLAND 







MORNING. 






EVENING. 




Total 


CHURCH. 


















for the 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Day. 


St. Mary's (Welah), Cam- 




















berwell New Road . 


9 


8 


18 


35 


42 


52 


46 


140 


175 


Camden Church, Peckham 




















Road 


90 


182 


63 


335 


98 


209 


77 


384 


719 


Emmanuel, Camberwell Rd. 


36 


47 


204 


287 


61 


130 


78 


269 


556 


St. Giles', Church Street . 


133 


210 


134 


477 


97 


158 


82 


337 


814 


Corpus Christi, Canterbury 




















Road 


29 


33 


249 


311 


58 


136 


85 


279 


590 


Christ Church, Old Kent 




















Road 


45 


76 


49 


170 


63 


131 


38 


232 


402 


All Saints', Sumner Road . 


36 


30 


48 


114 


70 


130 


55 


255 


369 


St. Andrew's, Glengall 




















Road 


21 


32 


108 


161 


32 


93 


45 


170 


331 


St. Chrysostom's, Hill St. . 


48 


88 


133 


269 


80 


202 


106 


388 


657 


St. Jude's, Meeting House 




















Lane 


40 


97 


35 


172 


72 


170 


42 


284 


456 


St. Mark's, Harders Road . 


57 


72 


206 


335 


61 


127 


56 


244 


579 


St. Bartholomew's, Verney 




















Road 


45 


63 


324 


432 


75 


142 


161 


378 


810 


St. George's, Wells Street . 


65 


77 


149 


291 


85 


198 


186 


469 


760 


*St. Luke's, Rosemary 




















Road 


76 


89 


272 


437 


110 


245 


48 


403 


840 


St. Mai'k's, Cobourg Road . 


40 


97 


58 


195 


48 


148 


81 


277 


472 


St. Philip's, Avondale Sq. . 


58 


33 


109 


200 


15 


68 


70 


153 


353 


St. Barnabas', Dulwich 


141 


230 


168 


539 


149 


256 


99 


504 


1,043 
566 


Dulwich College Chapel 


129 


164 


58 


351 


68 


109 


38 


215 


St. Peter's, Dulwich Com- 




















mon 


104 


179 


74 


357 


111 


184 


67 


362 


719 


St. Paul's, Heme Hill . 


120 


209 


98 


427 


93 


139 


58 


290 


717 


St. Stephen's, South Dul- 




















wich 


110 


196 


62 


368 


52 


96 


26 


174 


542 


St. Saviour's, Coplestone 




















Road 


63 


123 


72 


258 


76 


166 


66 


308 


566 


St. Clement's, East • Dul- 




















wich 


140 


148 


295 


583 


91 


211 


76 


378 


961 


St. John the EvangeUst's, 




















East Dulwich Road . 


51 


89 


73 


213 


148 


378 


131 


657 


870 


St. Augustine's, Honor Oak 




















Park 


91 


192 


91 


374 


74 


150 


59 


283 


657 


All Saints', Blenheim Grove 


91 


141 


38 


270 


94 


201 


34 


329 


599 


St. Antholin's, Nunhead 






















63 


56 


118 


237 


121 


201 


107 


429 


666 


St. Mary Magdalene's, St. 




















Mary's Road 


101 


189 


113 


403 


117 


244 


136 


497 


900 


Cheltenham College Mission 




















Church .... 


43 


76 


148 


267 


76 


204 


105 


385 


652 


St. Silas', Nunhead 


54 


76 


131 


261 


69 


130 


87 


286 


547 


Total .... 


2,129 


3,302 


3,698 


9,129 


2,406 


5,008 


2,345 


9,759 


18,888 



The figures for children in the morning inchule 200 of Lord Rodney's Cadet Corps. 

231 



232 



THE 



RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 

Church of England Missions 



CHURCH. 


MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 

for the 

Day. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


St. iMichael and All Angels, 

Toulon Street . 
All Saints', Elfin Road 
Emmanuel, Brisbane Street 
Corpus Christi, Manor Grove 
Christ Church, Lower Park 

Road 

All Saints' Parochial Hall, 

Sumner Road . 
St. Chrysostom's Hall, Gold- 
smith Road 
St. Jude's Parochial Hall, 

iSIeeting House Lane 
St. IMark'.s Hall, Kempshead 

Road 

St. Mark's HaU, Cobourg 

Road 

St. Barnabas' Schools, East 

Dulwich .... 
St. Saviour's Mission, Chou- 

mert Road 
St. Clement's Parish Room, 

Barry Road 
All Saints', Victoria Place, 

High Street 
St. Mary's Hall, St. Mary's 

Road 

Trinity College Mission, 

Albany Road . 
Trinity College Mission, 

New Church Road . 
St. Mary Magdalene's Schls. 


45 

2 
3 

12 
2 
4 
4 

13 

4 

4 

4 

7 
1 


34 

'2 

1 
2 
6 

11 
3 
9 

18 

2 

3 

5 

15 
1 


58 
"51 

69 
96 
137 
323 
146 
142 
118 

58 

133 

154 

258 
57 


137 

■53 

... 
72 
101 
155 
336 
1.53 
155 
149 

64 

140 

163 

280 
59 


28 

17 

5 

3 
3 

8 
1 

2 

8 

5 

19 

11 

30 

63 
16 


73 
35 
18 

20 

2 

20 

3 

14 

4 

54 

19 

55 

105 
34 


92 
30 
37 

12 
74 
13 
18 
124 

18 

57 

81 

15 

37 

66 
34 


193 

82 
60 

35 
79 
41 
19 
129 

40 
66 

154 
45 

122 

234 
84 


330 
82 
60 
53 

35 
151 
142 
174 
465 
153 
155 
189 

66 

218 

185 

285 

514 
143 


Total .... 


105 


112 1,800 


2,017 


219 


456 


708 


1,383 


3,400 



WESLEYAN METHODIST CHURCH 



Hatcham Manor Chapel 
Queen's Road, Peckham 
Oakley Place 

Half Moon Lane, Dulwich . 
Barry Road, East Dulwich . 


14 

89 

78 

30 

189 


9 
94 

78 

43 

218 


130 
321 
143 
48 
213 


153 
504 
299 
121 
620 


34 
130 

97 

50 

175 


51 
200 
163 

85 
296 


65 

101 

97 

45 

243 


150 
431 
357 
180 
714 


303 
935 
656 
301 
1,334 


Total .... 


400 


442 


855 


1,697 


486 


795 


551 


1,832 


3,529 



Wesleyan Methodist Missions 



270, Southampton Street . 
Stafford Street, Peckham . 
114, Lordship Lane 


12 
"1 


10 
'4 


18 
"51 


40 
"56 


25 

7 
18 


37 

4 

41 


25 

159 

14 


87 

170 

73 


127 
170 
129 


Total .... 


13 


14 


69 


96 


50 


82 


198 


330 


426 



PRIMITIVE METHODIST CHURCH 



Sumner Road, Peckham 
308, St. .Tames Road . 
Crystal Palace Road . 


7 
21 
17 


"10 
15 


20 
72 
67 


27 

103 

99 


11 
33 
39 


6 
40 
57 


12 
36 
61 


29 
109 
157 


56 
212 
256 


Total .... 


45 


25 


159 


229 


83 


103 


109 


295 


524 



SOUTH LONDON— CAMBERWELL 

UNITED METHODIST FREE CHURCH 



METHODIST NEW CONNEXION 



233 





MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 


CHURCH. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldm. 


Total. 


Day. 


Hill Street, Peckham . 
Bellenden Road, Peckham . 


12 
31 


9 
31 


21 
92 


42 
154 


17 

38 


28 
73 


14 
26 


59 
137 


101 
291 


Total .... 


43 


40 


113 


196 


55 


101 


40 


196 


392 



"Zion,"Neate Street . . 8 
Ivydale Road, Nunhead . 29 


5 

38 


26 
90 


39 
157 


18 
40 


41 
80 


24 

86 


83 
206 


122 
363 


Total .... 37 


43 


116 


196 


58 


121 


110 


289 


485 



BAPTIST CHURCH 



Camberwell New Road 


34 


32 


62 


128 


54 


86 


57 


197 


325 


Mansion House Square 


18 


16 


53 


87 


25 


102 


42 


169 


256 


South London Tabernacle . 


181 


221 


211 


613 


286 


505 


211 


1,002 


1,615 


Mizpah, 140, Peckham Rd. 


8 


8 


7 


23 


6 


9 


4 


19 


42 


Peckham Park Road . 


98 


133 


62 


293 


120 


256 


43 


419 


712 


Peckham Tabernacle, High 




















Street .... 


25 


35 


19 


79 


52 


87 


44 


183 


262 


Miss. Church, Peckham Pk. 


9 


9 




18 


15 


36 


14 


65 


83 


Rye Lane Chapel, Peckham 


246 


276 


157 


679 


242 


577 


207 


1,026 


1,705 


Cottage Green, Wells Street 


39 


68 


43 


148 


65 


146 


26 


237 


385 


Albany, Wells Street . 


3 


1 


3 


7 


2 


3 


7 


12 


19 


James Grove Chapel . 


5 


3 


58 


66 


31 


62 


190 


283 


349 


Maze Pond, Old Kent Road 


68 


78 


123 


269 


109 


181 


274 


564 


833 


Heme Hill Church, Winter- 




















brook Road 


31 


40 


36 


107 


49 


76 


37 


162 


269 


Barry Road, Duhvich . 


8 


12 


33 


53 


16 


25 


20 


61 


114 


Lordship Lane, Dulwich 


82 


98 


129 


309 


113 


261 


283 


657 


966 


Amott Road, East Dulwich 


22 


15 


82 


119 


25 


39 


15 


79 


198 


" Zion," Heaton Road 


15 


8 


44 


67 


17 


20 


9 


46 


113 


Honor Oak Church 


73 


86 


100 


259 


54 


86 


19 


159 


418 


Peckham Rye Tabernacle . 


133 


131 


229 


493 


144 


266 


192 


602 


1,095 


Edith Road, Peckham 


52 


77 


163 


292 


53 


134 


121 


308 


600 


Nunhead Gi-een . 


27 


45 


36 


108 


32 


66 


10 


108 


216 


Total .... 


1,177 


1,390 


1,650 


4,217 


1,510 


3,023 


1,825 


6,358 


10,575 



Baptist Missions 



100, Edmund Street . 


3 


2 


33 


38 1 


13 


17 


18 


48 


86 


Leipsic Road 


1 


2 


72 


75 


17 


36 


47 


100 


175 


66, Peckham Park Road . 


3 




52 


55 


8 


14 


23 


45 


100 


Haymerle Road . 


14 


8 


219 


241 


6 


7 


122 


135 


376 


Wells Street Schools . 


8 


4 


35 


47 


34 


39 


97 


170 


217 


Relf Road, Peckham . 


3 




17 


20 


7 


9 


18 


34 


54 


Gordon Road, Peckham 


3 




35 


38 


10 


19 


43 


72 


110 


Stanley Hall, Tappesfield 




















Road .... 


1 




20 


21 


2 


1 


75 


78 


99 


Chapel House, Nigel Road . 










17 


23 


6 


46 


46 


Homeward Mission, Hind- 




















man Road .... 


10 


7 


48 


65 


18 


33 


72 


123 


188 


Total .... 


46 


23 


531 


600 


132 


198 


521 


851 


1,451 



234 



THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 



CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 





MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 

for the 

Day. 




Men. 


Women. Chldrn. 1 Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Camberwell Green Church . 

Hanover Chapel, Peckham . 

Clifton Chapel, Asylum Rd. 

Free Church, Culmore Rd. . 

Marlborough Chapel, Old 
Kent Road 

Emmanuel Church, Duhvich 

East Dulwich Grove Chapel 

Peckham Rye Church, Lin- 
den Grove 

Heme Hill Church . 


201 
86 

133 
18 

99 
192 

127 

71 


217 
97 

157 
12 

89 
223 
190 

74 


168 

45 

210 

28 

177 
226 
172 

85 


586 

228 

500 

58 

365 
641 
489 

230 


287 

113 

178 

26 

128 
186 
155 

109 
13 


443 

138 

294 

39 

168 
305 
322 

145 
22 


47 

16 

315 

36 

207 
161 
139 

37 

2 


777 
267 
787 
101 

503 
652 
616 

291 
37 


1,363 
495 

1,287 
159 

868 
1,293 
1,105 

521 
37 


Total .... 


927 


1,059 


1,111 


3,097 


1,195 


1,876 


960 


4,031 


7,128 





Congregational 


Missions 










Waterloo Street . 


4 


5 


55 


64 


17 


54 


54 


125 


189 


Collyer Memorial Hall, 




















Peckham .... 


5 


1 


24 


30 










30 


Meeting House Lane . 










16 


36 


55 


ib7 


107 


Busmen's Service, Camber- 




















well Green Church . 










20 


31 


13 


64 


64 


Evelina Hall, Nunhead 


3 


2 


87 


92 


3 


9 


21 


33 


125 


Total .... 


12 


8 


166 


186 


56 


130 


143 


329 


515 



PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 



Christ Church, East Dul- 
wich Grove . . 
Hamilton, Brunswick Sq. . 
St. James', E. Dulwich Rd. 


45 
86 
64 


65 
105 

78 


53 
44 
33 


163 
235 
175 


94 
87 
49 


122 
92 

87 


34 

9 

19 


250 
188 
155 


413 
423 
330 


Total .... 


195 


248 


130 


573 


230 


301 


62 


693 


1,166 



SOCIETY OF FRIENDS 



Meeting House, Hanover St. 

Albert Road HaU 

Blue Anchor Lane, Peckham 


37 
5 


21 
1 


27 85 
66 72 


25 

12 

3 


36 
9 

7 


14 
54 
43 


75 

75 
53 


160 

147 

53 


Total .... 


42 


22 


93 157 


40 


52 


111 


203 


360 



BRETHREN CHURCH 



"Lighthoase," George St. 


3 


5 


22 


30 


10 


13 


9 


32 


62 


" Bethel," 92, Peckham Rd. 


6 


8 




14 


8 


15 


12 


35 


49 


Clavton Hall, Peckham 


35 


21 


11 


70 


25 


38 


23 


86 


156 


Christians' Meeting Room, 




















Radnor Street . 


8 


3 




11 


9 


5 




14 


25 


College Hall, Queen's Road 


21 


9 


5 


35 


1 


11 


4 


22 


57 


Gospel Hall, Princes Terr. 


5 


1 


1 


( 


24 


56 


32 


112 


119 


South Grove Hall, Peckham 


20 


24 


11 


55 


41 


69 


23 


133 


188 


Go8[«l Hall, 243, Rve Lane 


21 


28 


13 


62 


22 


25 


60 


107 


169 


Scylla Road Hall, >runhead 


72 


111 


24 


207 


59 


83 


18 


160 


367 


Total .... 


191 


213 


87 


491 


205 


315 


181 


701 


1,192 



Brethren Mission 



Crown Street, Camberwell . 



11 



219 



238 



SOUTH LONDON- CAMBERWELL 



235 



SALVATION AKMY 



CHURCH. 


MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Day. 


George St. , Camberwell Gn. 

Shawbury Road, E. Dulwich 

Arthur Street 

Fenham Road, Peckham 

Verney Road 

Nunhead Green . 


62 
31 
22 
25 
8 
45 


31 
17 
5 
16 
11 
29 


53 
36 
15 

56 

7 

50 


146 
84 
42 
97 
26 

124 


114 
39 
36 
40 
15 
69 


205 
70 
50 
74 
17 

110 


51 
70 
96 
32 
17 
36 


370 
179 
182 
146 
49 
215 


516 
263 
224 
243 
75 
339 


Total .... 


193 


109 


217 


519 


313 


526 


302 


1,141 


1,660 



UNITARIAN CHURCH 



Avondale Road, Peckham . 20 16 20 56 I 29 28 i 17 i 74 ! 130 



NEW JERUSALEM CHURCH 



Flodden Road 



24 



21 



16 



61 



20 



21 



46 107 



CALVINISTIC INDEPENDENT CHURCH 






Grove Chapel 

Aged Pilgrims' Chapel, 
Sedgemoor Place 


86 


77 


72 


235 


76 
4 


109 

18 


19 


204 
22 


439 

22 


Total .... 


86 


77 


72 


235 


80 


127 


19 


226 


461 



CATHOLIC APOSTOLIC CHURCH 



Camberwell New Road 



110 



122 



54 



286 



82 



75 



30 



187 



473 



FOREIGN PROTESTANT SERVICES 



Windsor Road (German) 



26 



28 



57 



57 





CHRISTADELPHIAN CHURCH 








Peckham Public Hall, 

Lane . . . . 

Surrey Masonic Hall . 


Rye 


"27 


"22 


"6 


"55 


16 
13 


13 
15 


7 
3 


36 
31 


36 

86 


Total . 




27 


22 


6 


55 


29 


28 


10 


67 


122 



EVANGELISTIC MISSION SERVICES 



Crown Theatre, Peckham . 
Free Salvationists, Avenue 

Road 

Nunhead Christian Band . 

Total . . . . 











973 


2,087 


704 


3,764 


54 
44 


28 
26 


43 
55 


125 
125 


70 

58 


79 
71 


65 
74 


214 
203 


98 


54 


98 


250 


1,101 


2,237 


843 


4,181 



3,764 

339 
328 

4,431 



ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH 



Sacred Heart, Camberwell 




















New Road 


321 


552 


536 


1,409 


177 


286 


131 


594 


2,003 


Our Lady of the Seven 




















Dolours, Peckham . 


366 


618 


523 


1,507 


158 


221 


134 


513 


2,020 


St. Anthony of Padua, Lord- 




















ship Lane .... 


126 


183 


106 


415 


19 


48 


28 


95 


510 


Total .... 


813 


1,353 


1,165 


3,331 


354 


555 


293 


1,202 


4,533 



23G 



THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 

OTHER SERVICES 





MORNING. 1 


EVENING. 


Total, 
for the 


CHURCH. 




















Men. 


Women. 


Cbldm. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldm. 


Total. 


Day. 


Camberwell Mission, Toulon 








1 












Street .... 


2 


1 


57 


60 


42 


38 


397 


477 


537 


Children's Rlission, Dalwood 




















Street .... 


1 


o 


59 


62 


4 




102 


106 


168 


Holiness Gospel Mission, 




















88, Ulverscroft Road 


7 


8 




15 


3 


5 




8 


23 


Christ Church, Reedham St. 


8 


3 


27 


38 


10 


16 


18 


44 


82 


Temperance Hall, Caroline 




















Street .... 










15 


17 


17 


49 


49 


Orchard Mission, Batchelors' 




















Hall Place 


4 


1 


33 


38 


26 


41 


104 


171 


209 


Albany Institute, 371, Al- 




















bany Road 


3 


4 


40 


47 


7 


14 


19 


40 


87 


Goldie Street Mission . 










28 


69 


134 


231 


231 


Ethical Society, Surrey 










! 










Masonic Hall . 


21 


1 


1 


23 


i 68 


38 


2 


108 


131 


Spiritualists, 139, Peckham 










1 










Road 


11 


2 




13 


32 


19 


4 


55 


68 


Spiritualists, Surrey Masonic 










1 










Hall 


20 


19 


2 


41 


28 


42 


2 


72 


113 


Kimioton Ro.id, Caml)erwell 


6 


1 


65 


72 


10 


12 


11 


33 


105 


. Total .... 


83 


42 


284 


409 


273 


311 


810 


1,394 


1,803 



DENOMINATIONAL TOTALS 





MORNING. I 


EVENING. 


Total 




Men. 


Women, j 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Day. 


Church of England 


2,129 


3,302 


3,698 


9,129 


2,406 


5,008 


2,345 


9,759 


18,888 


„ „ Missions 


105 


112 


1,800 


2,017 


219 


456 


708 


1,383 


3,400 


Wesleyan Meth. Church 


400 


442 


855 


1,697 


486 


795 


551 


1,832 


3,529 


„ „ Missions 


13 


14 


69 


96 


50 


82 


198 


330 


426 


Primitive Meth. Church 


45 


25 


159 


229 


83 


103 


109 


295 


524 


IT. Meth. Free Church . 


43 


40 


113 


196 


55 


101 


40 


196 


392 


Meth. New Connexion . 


37 


43 


116 


196 


58 


121 


110 


289 


485 


Baptist Church . 


1,177 


1,390 


1,650 


4,217 


1,510 


3,023 


1,825 


6,358 


10,575 


„ Missions . 


46 


23 


531 


600 


132 


198 


521 


851 


1,451 


Congregational Church 


927 


1,059 


1,111 


3,097 


1,195 


1,876 


960 


4,031 


7,128 


„ Missions 


12 


8 


166 


186 


56 


130 


143 


329 


515 


Presbyterian Church . 


195 


248 


130 


573 


230 


301 


62 


593 


1,166 


Society of Friends 


42 


22 


93 


157 


40 


52 


111 


203 


360 


Brethren 


191 


213 


87 


491 


205 


315 


181 


701 


1,192 


„ Mission . 






... 


... 


8 


11 


219 


238 


238 


Salvation Army . 


193 


109 


217 


519 


313 


526 


302 


1,141 


1,660 


Unitarian Church . 


20 


16 


20 


56 


29 


28 


17 


74 


130 


New Jerusalem Church 


24 


21 


16 


61 


20 


21 


5 


46 


107 


Cal.IndependentChurch 


86 


77 


72 


235 


80 


127 


19 


226 


461 


Cath. Apostolic Church 


110 


122 


54 


286 


82 


75 


30 


187 


473 


Foreign Prot. Services . 


26 


28 


3 


57 


... 




... 


... 


57 


Christadelphian Church 


27 


22 


6 


55 


29 


28 


10 


67 


1 122 


Evan. Mission Services 


98 


54 


98 


250 


1,101 


2,237 


843 


4,181 


4,431 


Roman Catholic Church 


813 


1,353 


1,165 


3,331 


.354 


555 


293 


1,202 


4,533 


Other Services 


83 


42 


284 


409 


273 


311 


810 


1,394 


1,803 


Grand Totals . 


6,842 


8,785 


12,513 


28,140 


9,014 


16,480 


10,412 35,906 


64,046 



o 


J3 




U 


^ 




3 


"rt 


C 




o 


;-! 


Q- 


£ 



bo 



: Total 
Tota 

Non 
Ron 
Oth 


uv» — n — 1 i 1 


1 it 'THTtZ 3 "" j • - ^- 


^ =^ 4= =r= -^ ^- n ^-rr^ 


i __4J— ^ ^__^__^ ^. M r- 1 ' 1 ' 1 1 1 ' 


A-n" ' " r " ~ 


^_L_ 1 1.^ 


\ 1 1 ^J 1 . 1 1 


I i 1 




-'U \ ■ ' ■ : 1 ! 


X 1 ' 1 1 — t— ~^ " i 1 i 


\ 111'-" n- 1 ! ! 1 1 




1 T^V t A .^-^ "W^ A. "%. M 


\ 1 1 1 A ilTj A 1^ 


\ ly I jS^Kji K .J\ i^L j^ 




1 1 O "¥ • ^ A .L ^ 1 


,^,^ -* T"^ ~| — oxiewinft y\Uenciance. 1 , i 


,^() \ j ■ -H 


t 1 ^~* A Ik^ Vt XT' T> A1 r 17* ¥ ¥ — 1 


1 Cy\Mr>JL,iKWJLJLL. 




^\ - "^ itT3L""TE T- "itr±L_"-=E:r" 


M'\l 'I'lll M'nllllilMniil|iNiiMl!llN 




/U 


\ ___„.. ^ .. ^ 


itllllt Zt . - -H ._f_ 


1 I ZT'lU --- -t~ 


\ , 1 1 _l ,1 l_ , , 


IT' irT" Hull" ii -jz _^ . _i_ _(_ 


- "TT" — 1 1 _^ , _, ^ . 


" " " ' .._... _|_ 






' A» 1 


- - i__ --__.. 4= - -. =f- 


- ^ f=+- =PH=- =f= =^ ..._. 






I 


" i_" ■■■" v_ ■ _^ { __^ _i _l_ 






ol) 1 ^ i ' 




1 


1 


\ ■ i " ■ ■ " 


\ 


\ 


+ — ^- A ■ ■ 


i ^ ij ,_■_ _ ,_, _. 


in 1 I , , , . ,..i ._ 1— - 


lU \ 


\ 


\ ^ 


\ _(_ 


\ 


_j — ^. -j— 


1 


, 1 1 




■ZCi \ , 1. _ __4 . 




:: _. \ _ _ 








V 


>, " "• 1 i 


y 


■v 


'^n S 


^{j ' ..1^.-4— — _ _ _j_j —1 — - — -I- 


>, ■ ^ 


\i 


\ 


\ 


v 


> ^ \. 


\ ^"^^v 


\ ^ ^^ 


M\ ^. -^ ^. 


^^ -^- ^ ^^ ^ --4- 


^'^ \ ■ --\- 


X 


X 




N, . 


it -- - . . ^ 


._ . x 




qLLL — 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 , ii 1 1 1 1 1 1 li^-rl 1 1 1 1 1 1 Ttti i 1 h-w 



^j':;f 27 0CTVJ 



Populad Roman Catholic 



Other Services 



Per 



a. 
o 

Oh 



U 



100 



90 



80 



H 70 
Z 

o 

0i60 
w 

W 50 

o 

2 

< 

Z 40 

U 

< 50 



20 



10 






ly 



1 1 - -i^-1 ' i i 1 1 1 ' ' 


\ I. 1 1 .... i 1 i i 




\ 


\< 1 1 1 1 Tf^ ¥ A ^~* 'W^ A ^ ^ 1 


U-i-^-^-j-+! DIAGRAM - -+- 


LJ 1 _ 1 L i kcvirin^ y^.nal'v^i^ r»f /Vttc^ «-»«-! a «>k^«^a -1 




\ i —i— 1 


1 ^ A M RP~ R AATF" 1 1 '' 




y : I ^ ^ 




1 ^ ill! 




\ 1- 1 \ 1 


\ 1 1 1 1 1 


\ t \ \ 


_ jx-t "'^''' z^ ^- i— 4'"^ it' ~ ^ 


.....„_ L__ , .J . __. . I -"±±17 it ~h 


~ - ^ -^ X t-- \\ 7 


__„. ir_^ _ t . - , ■ ii 11 " i: r 


v' \ f -1^-^- T _cj t it T 


IT ^V " i "X X ' ' ' M 


W X / 


il "tt ^' — il" '^ r 


_^^.L.J Ji__ 1 , it "" it 




\ , L /\\ I \\ // 


_^ \ _| ~\ 1 .'^ {\ 1 _[ \ \ , , 1 / / 


\ ] 1 \ \ L-iZ- \ 1 1 / / 


\ L^*^ '^^l \ / ^ \1 i i 


j^J^""^ _[A_j\ / S \ 1 / /I 


■^ Vi/ 1 \i i// 


1' > Z'*'*^.^ \\ ri 


I , j A /] /_ \ "^-^ il 1 //i 


L L j/ \\ // 


-t— A > 1 i A 


1 1 J \ ."^ i V I Z 1 




1 \ ll 1 r-t— '•' 


1 1 . 1 1 1 i^ 1.— -■"t"'^ ^ 


-t- -1 1 .\ -J . 1 ^ ^ \ / 


T ^ ^^i IJ^ ^<li 1 ■ ^ — ^^, " '^ — ^ ' / 


-1 \.. J^<^' ^ \ / 


-tj-1 4Xl X T"^ \ / 


tT" X^ ^- T^-^^ F +T ' " -f^"^ A- 




1 - M f ! "^ ^^ r '^ 


blue = Evening 



All Churches 



Church of Engriand 



Nonconformist 



Roman Catholic 



Other Services 



o I- S 



H S S 



H S S 




Black = All SepvicBB 



Red •= Morning 



Blue = Evening 



Borough of Lewisham 



CHURCH OF ENGLAND 



CHURCH. 


MORNING. 


EVENING. ' 


Total 

lor TJIlB 






















Men. 


Women. 


Chldm. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Day. 


Holy Trinity, Lee 


79 


104 


49 


232 


40 


104 


38 


182 


414 


St. Andrew's, Catford. 


59 


98 


192 


349 


74 


154 


91 


319 


668 


Good Shepherd, Lee . 


102 


176 


200 


478 


91 


159 


67 


317 


795 


St. Mildred's, Lee 


71 


184 


103 


358 


65 


129 


39 


233 


591 


St. Augustine's, Grove Park 


58 


98 


45 


201 


61 


75 


17 


153 


354 


St. Saviour's, Brockley Hill 


75 


103 


156 


334 


66 


136 


41 


243 


577 


St. Lawi-ence's, Catford 


115 


189 


304 


608 


166 


219 


127 


512 ; 


1,120 


St. Mark's, Clarendon Road 


51 


143 


42 


236 


62 


126 


37 


225 


461 


St. Mary's, High Street 


195 


465 


479 


1,139 


212 


532 


126 


870 1 


2,009 


St. S\vithin's, Hither Green 


62 


99 


216 


377 


68 


148 


84 


300 ; 


677 


St. Stephen's, High Street . 


140 


316 


239 


695 


176 


516 


56 


748 


1,443 


Church of the Transfigura- 




















tion, Algernon Road 


44 


116 


210 


370 


59 


181 


73 


313 


683 


Christ Church, Forest Hill . 


92 


208 


142 


442 


132 


295 


104 


531 


973 


St. Paul's, Forest Hill. 


68 


147 


61 


276 


86 


168 


43 


297 


573 


St. George's, Perry Hill 


119 


212 


242 


573 


111 


293 


83 


487 


1,060 


Holy Trinity, Sydenham . 


97 


207 


90 


394 


55 


116 


21 


192 


586 


St. Bartholomew's, Syden- 




















ham 


119 


378 


151 


648 


103 


302 


60 


465 


1,113 


St. Matthew's, Sydenham . 


55 


129 


122 


306 


Gl 


168 


53 


282 


588 


Christ Ch., Lower Sydenham 


61 


110 


121 


292 


55 


112 


64 


231 


523 


St. Philip's, Sydenham 


86 


235 


130 


451 


53 


192 


51 


296 


747 


St. Michael and All Angels', 




















Lower Sydenham 


38 


43 


149 


230 


27 


64 


24 


115 


345 


Southend Hall Chapi^l 


28 


38 


40 


106 


13 


19 


15 


47 


153 


All Saints', Blackheauh 


72 


150 


144 


366 


58 


94 


36 


188 


554 


Church of the Ascension, 




















Blackheath 


56 


104 


76 


236 


25 


41 


28 


94 


330 


Christ Church, Lee 


44 


233 


153 


430 


70 


194 


66 


330 


760 


St. Margaret's, Lee 


137 


356 


239 


732 


129 


283 


65 


477 


1,209 


Boones Almshouse Chapel, 




















Lee 


13 


46 


27 


86 


15 


53 


27 


95 


181 


St. Cyprian's, Brockley 


94 


147 


210 


451 


123 


231 


116 


470 


921 


St, Hilda's, Crofton Park . 


56 


60 


197 


313 


39 


103 


62 


204 


517 


Total .... 


2,286 


4,894 


4,529 


11,709 


2,295 


5,207 


1,714 


9,216 


20,925 




Chu 


reh of 


Englt 


md M 


Lssions 










Holy Trinity, Forest Hill . 










10 


33 


42 


85 


85 


St. Michael's, Bell Green . 


"2 


1 


100 


103 


10 


24 


30 


64 


167 


Church of the Ascension, 




















Lethbridge Road 










3 


13 


20 


36 


36 


St. Mark's Schools 


"1 


" io 


141 


152 










152 


Total .... 


3 


11 


241 


255 


23 


70 


92 


185 


440 


WI 


5SLE"S 


'AN ] 


VLETH 


GDIS': 


P CHI 


JRCH 








Burnt Ash Hill . 


11 


28 


15 


54 


8 


21 


5 


34 


88 


Brockley Rise . 


61 


68 


43 


172 


68 


118 


26 


212 


384 


Rushey Green, Catford 


104 


135 


91 


330 


105 


180 


35 


320 


650 


Wildfell Road, Catford 


15 


7 


65 


87 


18 


24 


37 


79 


166 


Albion Road, Lewisham 


60 


76 


107 


243 


89 


118 


59 


266 


509 


Hither Green Lane 


102 


93 


148 


343 


118 


162 


57 


337 


680 


High Street, Sydenham 


67 


82 


81 


230 


105 


161 


54 


320 


550 


Lower Sydenham Road 


25 


22 


24 


71 


23 


37 


33 


93 


164 


The Avenue, Blackheath 


39 


68 


144 


251 


45 


70 


18 


133 


384 


Merritt Rd., Crofton Park . 


2 


3 


7 


12 


7 


6 


20 


33 


45 


Total .... 


1 582 


725 


1 1,793 


586 


897 


344 


1,827 


3,620 



237 



238 



THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 

PRIMITIVE METHODIST CHURCH 



CHURCH. 


MOBNING. 


EVENING. 


ToUl 

for the 

Day. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. Chldrn. 


Total. 


Stanstead Road, Forest Hill 


38 


27 


74 


139 


42 


66 


32 


140 


279 



METHODIST NEW CONNEXION 



Trinity, Forest Hill 



36 41 



45 122 



41 90 25 156 



UNITED METHODIST FREE CHURCH 



278 



Brownhill Road, Catford 



10 11 28 49 14 t 25 36 I 75 124 



WELSH CALVINISTIC METHODIST CHURCH 



Undercliffe Road, Lewisham 17 11 



32 



21 29 15 65 



97 



BAPTIST CHURCH 



'High Road, Lee . 


55 


87 


137 


279 


73 


111 


83 


267 


546 


Brownhill Road, Catford . 


53 


47 


77 


177 


50 


70 


23 


143 


320 


Baring Road, Lee 


47 


59 


99 


205 


67 


134 


86 


287 


492 


Zion, Forest Hill . 


27 


24 


14 


65 


23 


39 


8 


70 


135 


CoDege Park Chapel, 




















Lewisham. 


16 


40 


19 


75 


19 


59 


14 


92 


167 


Albacore Crescent 


6 


1 


17 


30 


13 


21 


7 


41 


71 


Brightside Rd., Hither Grn. 


34 


28 


49 


111 


34 


53 


26 


113 


224 


Catford Hill. 


40 


39 


34 


113 


37 


81 


26 


144 


257 


Sydenham Chapel, Forest 




















Hill 


58 


92 


75 


225 


80 


132 


27 


239 


464 


Perry Rise, Sydenham 


69 


87 


174 


330 


54 


118 


51 


223 


553 


Dacre Park, Lee . 


21 


26 


46 


93 


19 


45 


22 


86 


179 


Raglan Street 


21 


34 


8 


63 


27 


47 


11 


85 


148 


Total .... 


447 


570 


749 


1,766 


496 


910 


384 


1,790 


3,556 



Baptist Mission 



Crofton Park, Brockley Rd. 



54 



62 



62 



CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 



Burnt Ash Road, Lee . 


65 


115 


.32 


212 


62 


118 


13 


193 


i 405 


High Street, Lewisham 


238 


346 


143 


727 


260 


407 


77 


744 


1,471 


Torridon Road, Catford 


52 


46 


68 


166 


65 


93 


69 


227 


393 


Stanstead Road, Catford 


74 


85 


51 


210 


59 


98 


34 


191 


401 


Queen's Road, Forest Hill . 


32 


37 


7 


76 


33 


70 


8 


111 


187 


.lews' Walk, Sydenham 


73 


85 


69 


217 


47 


86 


20 


153 


370 


Lee Road, Blackheath. 


196 


304 


265 


765 


253 


397 


118 


768 


1,533 


Algernon Road, Lewisham . 


34 


46 


28 


108 


26 


47 


24 


97 


205 


Total .... 


764 


1,064 


653 


2,481 


805 


1,316 


363 


2,484 


4,965 





Congregational Missions 










Ladywell, Prospect Place . 

Hither Green, Nightingale 

Grove .... 

Park Hall, Sydenham Park 


4 

4 
5 


8 
"5 


48 

42 
70 


60 

46 

80 


13 

18 


28 
23 


34 

28 


75 
69 


135 

115 
80 


Total .... 


13 


13 


160 


186 


31 


51 


62 


144 


330 



SOUTH LONDON— LEWISHAM 

PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 



239 



Brockley Rise 
Norfolk Hall, Catford 
42, Gilmore Road 
Priory Room, Albacore Cres 
Hither Green Hall 
Gospel Hall, Loampit Vale 
Mayow Hall, Sydenham 
Welcome Hall, Blackheath 

HiU . 
Victoria Hall, Lee Green 

Total . 



CHURCH. 


MORNING. 

1 


EVENING. 


Total 

for the 

Day. 


Men. 


Women. Chldrn. Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Devonshire Rd., Forest Hill 
Ewart Road, Forest Hill . 


178 
4 


211 
2 


129 
223 


518 
229 


112 
25 


172 
64 


33 

92 


317 
181 


835 
410 


Total .... 


182 


213 


352 


747 


137 


236 


125 


498 


1,245 


UNITARIAN CHURCH 


High Street, Lewisham 


21 23 


17 j 61 


45 


52 


4 


101 


162 


BRETHREN 





8 


10 


3 


21 


5 


9 


7 


21 




5 


10 


3 


18 


11 


8 


2 


21 




24 


23 


13 


60 


14 


16 


8 


38 


. 


36 


40 


18 


94 


24 


31 


18 


73 




21 


10 


7 


38 


13 


9 


11 


33 




34 


45 


34 


113 


22 


37 


17 


76 


h 


29 


45 


14 


88 


32 
16 


63 
31 


16 
23 


111 
70 




10 


7 


6 


23 


33 


43 


73 


149 




167 


190 


98 


455 


170 


247 


175 


592 



42 

39 

98 

167 

71 

189 

199 

70 
172 

1,047 



BIBLE CHRISTIAN CHURCH 



Torridon Road, Catford 
Stanstead Rd., Forest Hill 
High Road, Lee . 

Total . . . , 



12 


10 


47 


69 


18 


34 


31 


83 


38 


39 


43 


120 


49 


62 


18 


129 


41 


35 


54 


130 


43 


74 


16 


133 


91 


84 


144 


319 


110 


170 


65 


345 



Wastdale Road, Forest HiU 
Avenue Road 
Southend Lane . 

Total . . . . 



13 


6 


12 


31 


21 


38 


52 


111 


50 


24 


33 


107 


55 


79 


98 


232 


8 


3 


37 


48 


1 10 


25 


28 


63 


71 


33 


82 


186 


1 86 


142 


178 


406 



152 
249 
263 

664 



DISCIPLES OF CHRIST 








Glenfarg Boad, Catford 


6 11 1 20 1 37 


7 1 14 


35 


56 


93 


FOREIGN PROTESTANT SERVICES 


Dacres Road, Forest Hill 
(German) .... 


57 


65 


16 


138 


9 


48 


1 


58 


196 


SALVATION ARMY 



142 
339 
111 



592 



ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH 



St. Winifrede's, Lee . 
St. Saviour's, High Street 
Our Lady and St. Phihp 

Sydenham Road 
St. Mary Magdalene's, 

Brockley . 

Total . 





14 
105 


62 
139 


29 
76 


105 
320 


"l6 


"72 


"16 


! 
104 




79 


192 


90 


361 


36 


100 


29 


165 




91 


168 


142 


401 


54 


55 


32 


141 




289 


561 


337 


1,187 


106 


227 


77 


410 



105 
424 

526 

542 

1,597 



240 



THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 



OTHER SERVICES 







MORNING. 






EVENING. 




Total 


CHURCH. 


















Men. 


Women. 


Chldm. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


for the 
Day. 


London Citj' Mission, Willow 




















Walk .... 


9 


7 


100 


116 


7 


17 


33 


57 


173 


London City Mission, Em- 




















manuel, Maddin Road 










44 


87 


32 


163 


163 


London City Mission, School 




















of Art, Sj'denham Hill . 










6 


26 


4 


36 


36 


Gai-field Church Miss., Lee 










6 


8 


2 


16 


16 


Gospel Hall, Bradford Road 


14 


20 


52 


86 


25 


28 


39 


92 


178 


People's Hall, Boone Street 


10 


9 


14 


33 


25 


55 


19 


99 


132 


St. Germain's Hall, Silk 




















Mills Path 










10 


22 


81 


113 


113 


Ravensbourne Hall, Lewis- 




















ham Bridge 


22 


30 


4 


56 


23 


34 


7 


64 


120 


Miss. Room, Shrubbery Rd. 


1 


3 


55 


59 


16 


36 


61 


113 


172 


Total .... 


56 


G9 


225 


350 


162 


313 


278 


753 


1,103 



DENOMINATIONAL TOTALS 



DENOMINATION. 



Church of England 

„ „ Missions 

Wesleyan Meth. Church 
Primitive Meth. Church 
Meth. New Connexion 
U. Meth. Free Church 
Welsh Cal.Meth.Church 
Baptist Church . 

„ Mission 
Congregational Church 
„ _ Missions 
Presbyterian Church 
Unitarian Church. 
Brethren 

Bible Christian Church 
Disciples of Christ 
Foreign Prot. Services 
Salvation Army . 
Roman Catholic Church 
Other Services 

Grand Totals . 





MORNING. 






EVENING. 




Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


2,286 


4,894 


4,529 


11,709 


2,295 


5,207 


1,714 


9,216 


3 


11 


241 


255 


23 


70 


92 


185 


486 


582 


725 


1,793 


586 


897 


344 


1,827 


38 


27 


74 


139 


42 


66 


32 


140 


36 


41 


45 


122 


41 


90 


25 


156 


10 


11 


28 


49 


14 


25 


36 


75 


17 


11 


4 


32 


21 


29 


15 


65 


447 


570 


749 


1,766 


496 


910 


384 


1,790 


6 


2 


54 


62 




... 






764 


1,064 


653 


2,481 


805 


1,316 


363 


2,484 


13 


13 


160 


186 


31 


51 


62 


144 


182 


213 


352 


747 


137 


236 


125 


498 


21 


23 


IV 


61 


45 


52 


4 


101 


167 


190 


98 


455 


170 


247 


175 


592 


91 


84 


144 


319 


110 


170 


65 


345 


6 


11 


20 


37 


7 


14 


35 


56 


57 


65 


16 


138 


9 


48 


1 


58 


71 


33 


82 


186 


86 


142 


178 


406 


289 


561 


337 


1,187 


106 


227 


77 


410 


56 


69 


225 


350 


162 


313 


278 


753 


5,046 


8,475 


8,553 


22,074 


5,186 


10,110 


4,005 


19,301 



Total 

for the 

Day. 



20,925 
440 

3,620 

279 

278 

124 

97 

3,556 
62 

4,965 
330 

1,245 
162 

1,047 

664 

93 

196 

592 

1,597 

1,103 



41,375 



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other Services 




tal 
the 

y- 
r90 

576 
36 

280 
148 
219 
363 

351 
592 
704 
917 
368 
444 

388 



185 
173 
259 

617 



174 
252 
550 
566 
483 

,025 



16 



51 



268 



142 



Population 



All Churches 



Church of England 



Nonconformist 



Roman Catholic 



Other Services 




Blue s Evening 



C) 



Borough of Deptford 





CHURCH 


OP 


ENGLAND 










CHURCH. 


MORNING. 


EVENING. 1 


Total 

for the 

Day. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldin. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldm. 


Total. 


St. Luke's, Evelyn Street . 


59 


54 


176 


289 


140 


189 


172 


501 


790 


St. Paul's, High Street 


37 


36 


68 


141 


68 


106 


61 


235 


376 


St. Barnabas', Eveljm Street 


6 


1 




i 


19 


10 




29 


36 


Emmanuel, Ravensbourne 




















Street .... 


22 


38 


49 


109 


27 


85 


59 


171 


280 


Christ Church, Church St. . 


11 


8 


43 


62 


12 


37 


37 


86 


148 


St. Mark's, Edward Street . 


26 


19 


26 


71 


i 42 


57 


49 


148 


219 


All Saints', New Cross Rd. 


62 


68 


156 


286 


109 


168 


100 


377 


663 


St. John's, Lewisham High 




















Road 


114 


167 


72 


353 


151 


259 


88 


498 


851 


St. Peter's, Wickham Road 


228 


235 


144 


607 


354 


469 


162 


985 


1,592 


St. Catharine's, Pepys Rd. . 


86 


110 


110 


306 


123 


182 


93 


398 


704 


St. James', St. James' Road 


108 


145 


85 


338 


168 


349 


62 


579 


917 


*St. Michael's, Knoyle St. . 


39 


12 


166 


217 


39 


61 


51 


151 


368 


*St. George's, Foxberry Rd. 


41 


80 


83 


204 


64 


149 


27 


240 


444 


Total .... 


839 


973 


1,178 


2,990 


1,316 


2,121 


961 


4,398 


7,388 



Mission Churches belonging to St. James', Hatcham. 



Church of England Missions 



All Saints', 36, Kender St. . 
St. John's, Harton Street . 
*St. James', Pagnell Street 

Total . . . . 



7 


4 


69 


80 


12 


42 


51 


105 


15 


7 


28 


50 


41 


53 


29 


123 










50 


73 


136 


259 


22 


11 


97 


130 


103 


168 


216 


487 



185 
173 
259 



617 



Attached to St. James', Hatcham. 



WESLEYAN METHODIST CHURCH 



Deptford Park Church, 




















Evelyn Street . 


19 


17 


60 


96 


24 


30 


24 


78 


174 


High Street .... 


34 


22 


52 


108 


39 


68 


37 


144 


252 


Harefield Road . 


101 


79 


92 


272 


96 


136 


46 


278 


550 


KittoRoad .... 


84 


86 


89 


259 


109 


157 


41 


307 


566 


New Cross Road . 


72 


54 


111 


237 


80 


131 


35 


246 


483 


Total .... 


310 


258 


404 


972 


348 


522 


183 


1,053 


2,025 



Wesleyan Methodist Mission 



14, Foxwell Street 



16 



16 



METHODIST NEW CONNEXION 



Victoria Chapel, Grove St. 



18 24 



4 I 17 I 27 || 51 



UNITED METHODIST FREE CHURCH 



Brunswick Chapel, St. 
John's Road 



24 



32 I 56 



112 


36 


75 


45 


156 



268 



PRIMITIVE METHODIST CHURCH 



Besson Street, New Cross 



16 



11 



35 62 



16 24 40 I 80 I 142 



241 



16 



'24-2 



THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 



BAPTIST CHURCH 



CHURCH. 


MORNING. 


1 EVENING. 


Total 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


1 Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


for the 

1 Day- 


Octavius Street . 
Ilderton Road 
'■ Zion," New Cross Road . 
Florence Road Hall . 
Brockley Road . 


16 

81 

46 

5 

117 


17 
55 
34 
16 
131 


62 

135 

50 

4 

43 


95 
271 
130 

25 
291 


j 29 
: 121 
! 59 

.1 


57 

186 

86 

22 

182 


21 

210 

15 

40 


107 
517 
160 
36 
311 


202 

788 

! 290 

' 61 

602 


Total .... 


265 


253 


294 


812 


305 


533 


293 


1,131 


1 1,943 



Baptist Mission 



Creek Street 



44 



48 ! 



23 



43 



92 



158 



CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 



High Street .... 
Napier Street, New Cross . 
Lewisham High Road . 
Ludwick Road Hall 


59 

13 

246 

2 


62 

6 

276 

5 


87 

42 

171 

108 


208 

61 

693 

115 


103 
27 

256 
37 


163 

47 

384 

76 


50 

9 

172 

166 


316 

83 

812 

279 


! 524 

144 

1,505 

394 


Total .... 


320 


349 


408 


1,077 


423 


670 


397 


1,490 


2,567 



Congregational Mission 



Besson Street 



64 



68 



12 



56 



74 



PBESBYTERIAN CHURCH 



People's Hall, 

Broadway . 
Brockley Road 


Deptford 


"78 


"81 


i07 


266 


11 
93 


30 
132 


42 

83 


83 
308 


83 
574 


Total . 


78 


81 


107 


266 


104 


162 


125 


391 


657 



SOCIETY OF FRIENDS 



Meeting House, 144, High 
Street .... 



10 



18 



10 



17 



UNITARIAN CHURCH 



General Baptist Church, 
Church Street . 



9 


6 


17 


1 


24 



BRETHREN 



(jrospel Hall, ]<]dward Place 
(iospelMiss., 19, Wilson St. 
238a, Malpas Road 
:Medical Miss., 188, High St. 

Total . . . . 



8 


5 


5 


18 


12 


20 


14 


46 










7 


25 


34 


66 


4 


7 




14 


8 


7 




15 




... 




... 


10 


39 


150 


199 


15 


12 


5 


32 


37 


91 


198 


326 



NEW JERUSALEM CHURCH 








Warwick Street . 


5 


1 6 


12 1 7 


9 


8 


24 


36 


SALVATION ARMY 


Mary Ann's Building.s, 
High Street . 


19 ! 10 


31 60 


68 


70 


112 


250 


310 



SOUTH LONDON— DEPTFORD 

FOREIGN PROTESTANT SERVICES 



243 



] 

CHURCH. 




MORNING. 




EVENING. 


Total 

for the 

Day. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldm. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldm. 


Total. 


High Street, Deptford 






11 


16 


8 


35 


35 


ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH 


ABSumption, High Street . 


383 


426 


329 


1,138 


54 


67 1 


43 1 


164 


1,302 


OTHER SERVICES 


Railway IVlission, Amer- 




















sham Grove 


19 


10 


18 


47 


55 


58 


54 


167 


214 


Deptford Ragged School, 
Griffin Street . 




















8 


16 


240 


264 


16 


43 


361 


420 


684 


Mission Room, 6S, Cornbury 




















Road 










6 


8 


11 


25 


25 


London City IVlission, 2, 




















Cornbury Road 










11 


18 


19 


48 


48 


London City Mission, 156, 




















Evelyn Street . 










13 


31 


43 


87 


87 


London City Miss., Shaftes- 




















bury Hall, Charles Street 


1 




49 


50 


9 


10 


17 


36 


86 


London City Miss., Evelyn 




















Miss. Hall, Staunton St. . 


2 


2 


38 


42 


27 


51 


21 


99 


141 


London City Miss., Living- 




















stone Mission Room, 1a, 




















Hamilton Street 










1 


4 


2 


7 


7 


Temperance Hall, Albany 




















Street .... 










17 


23 


15 


55 


55 


St. Catherine's, Protestant 




















Schools .... 


4 


6 


52 


62 










62 


Prohibition Chui-ch 


3 


5 


2 


10 


'" 1 


"8 


4 


"19 


29 


Total .... 


37 


39 


399 


475 


162 


254 


547 


963 


1,438 


DE 


:noiv 


UNA 


Tior 


4AL 


TOT 


-ALS 








DENOMINATION. 


MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 

for the 

Day. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldm. 


Total. 


Church of England 


839 


973 


1,178 


2,990 


1,316 


2,121 


961 


4,398 


7,388 


„ „ Missions 


22 


11 


97 


130 


103 


168 


216 


487 


617 


Wesleyan Meth. Church 


310 


258 


404 


972 


348 


522 


183 


1,053 


2,025 


„ „ Mission 


... 








3 


6 


8 


16 


16 


Meth. New Connexion . 


4 


2 


18 


24 


6 


4 


17 


27 


51 


U. Meth. Free Church . 


24 


32 


56 


112 


36 


75 


4.5 


156 


268 


Primitive Meth. Church 


16 


11 


35 


62 


16 


24 


40 


80 


142 


Baptist Church 


265 


253 


294 


812 


305 


533 


293 


1,131 


1,943 


„ Mission . 


3 


1 


44 


48 


23 


43 


92 


158 


206 


Congregational Church. 


320 


349 


408 


1,077 


423 


670 


397 


1,490 


2,567 


„ Mission 


2 


2 


64 


68 


6 


12 


56 


74 


142 


Presbyterian Church . 


78 


81 


107 


266 


104 


162 


125 


391 


657 


Society of Friends 


10 


8 


• .. 


18 


4 


10 


3 


17 


35 


Unitarian Church 


2 


6 


1 


9 


6 


17 


1 


24 


33 


Brethren 


15 


12 


5 


32 


37 


91 


198 


326 


358 


New Jerusalem Church 


5 


1 


6 


12 


7 


9 


8 


24 


36 


Salvation Army . 


19 


10 


31 


60 


68 


70 


112 


250 


310 


Foreign Prot. Services . 






... 


... 


11 


16 


8 


35 


35 


Roman Catholic Church 


383 


426 


329 


1,138 


54 


67 


43 


164 


1,302 


Other Services 


37 


39 


399 


475 


162 


254 


547 


963 


1,438 


Grand Totals . 


2,354 


2,475 


3,476 


8,305 


3,038 


4,873 


3,353 


11,264 


19,569 



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70 



60 



50 



40 



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20 



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other Services 




Other Services 




Borough of Greenwich 





CHURCH OF 


ENGLAND 










CHURCH. 


MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 
for the 




















Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Day. 


St. Alphege's, London St. . 


166 


219 


165 


550 


179 


299 


140 


618 


1,168 


St. Mary's, King William St. 


17 


31 


61 


109 


32 


85 


76 


193 


302 


St. Paul's, Devonshire Road 


4.5 


82 


163 


290 


34 


78 


39 


151 


441 


St. Peter's, Bridge Street . 


10 


28 


16 


54 


21 


53 


32 


106 


160 


Holy Trinity, Blackheath 




















Hill 


53 


59 


166 


278 


60 


124 


65 


249 


527 


St. John's, Blackheath 


139 


143 


39 


321 


39 


98 


18 


155 


476 


Christ Church, E. Greenwich 


95 


151 


293 


539 


133 


261 


123 


517 


1,056 


St. George's, Westcombe Pk. 


54 


96 


72 


222 


62 


103 


70 


235 


457 


St. Michael and All Angels', 




















Blackheath 


1.30 


336 


85 


551 


106 


249 


37 


392 


943 


St. Luke's, Charlton . 


54 


112 


43 


209 


51 


121 


35 


207 


416 


St. Paul's, Charlton . 


46 


91 


103 


240 


71 


125 


51 


247 


487 


St. Thomas', Charlton . 


45 


55 


71 


171 


64 


91 


139 


294 


465 


Holy Trinity, New Charlton 


24 


44 


119 


187 


29 


67 


70 


166 


353 


St. James', Kidbrooke. 


127 


279 


104 


510 


96 


205 


49 


350 


860 


St. Germain's Chapel, Black- 




















heath 


G7 


155 


68 


290 


52 


95 


35 


182 


472 


St. Andrew's, E. Greenwich 


22 


33 


81 


136 


49 


69 


60 


178 


314 


St. Nicholas', Deptford 


41 


31 


112 


184 


44 


103 


80 


227 


411 


Herbert Hospital Chapel, 




















Shooter's Hill Road 


8 


12 


15 


35 


13 


22 


25 


60 


95 


Hospital Chapel, Greenwich 


103 


35 


1,055 


1,193 


8 


6 


1,023 


1,037 


2,230 


Seamen's Hosp., Greenwich 


46 


28 


5 


79 


15 


8 


2 


25 


104 


Morden College Chapel, 








! 












Blackheath 


22 


11 


1 


34 


7 


13 


2 


22 


56 


Total .... 


1,314 


2,031 


2,837 


6,182 


1,165 


2,275 


2,171 


5,611 


11,793 



Church of England Missions 



Marshall Memorial Hall, St. 




















John's Park 










6 




34 


40 


40 


Christ Church, 80, Old 




















Woolwich Road 










6 


18 


15 


39 


39 


Christ Church, 72, Blackwall 




















Lane 










1 


3 


15 


19 


19 


St. George's, Farndale Road 


8 


7 


130 


151 


16 


38 


85 


139 


290 


St. Paul's, 49, Roan Street . 










4 


7 


7 


18 


18 


Holy Trinity, Bennett Street 


3 


2 


115 


120 










120 


St. John's, Furzefield Road 


8 


12 


113 


133 


23 


43 


38 


i'04 


237 


St. Paul's, Charlton . 




2 


28 


30 


2 


7 


3 


12 


42 


St. Alphege, Hyde Vale 


2 


3 


27 


32 










32 


St. Peter's Iron Room . 










6 


1 


37 


44 


44 


St. Mary's Mission 


2 


2 


27 


31 


19 


31 


37 


87 


118 


Total .... 


23 


28 


446 


497 


83 


148 


271 


502 


999 



WESLEYAN" METHODIST CHURCH 



London Street 


54 


37 


123 


214 


79 


77 


47 


203 


417 


Sunfields Memorial Church, 




















Blackheath 


57 


88 


227 


372 


75 


149 


79 


303 


675 


Victoria Hall, Woolwich Rd. 


24 


31 


222 


277 


86 


164 


154 


404 


681 


Charlton Vale Church, 




















Woolwich Road 


29 


24 


129 


182 


46 


43 


27 


116 


298 


Total .... 


164 


180 


701 


1,045 


286 


433 


307 


1,026 


2,071 



245 



246 



THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 

Wesleyan Methodist Mission 



CHURCH. 


MORNING. 




EVENING. 


i Total 

for tho 

Day. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Hughes Fields, Deptford . 


1 


1 


51 


53 


6 


20 


21 


47 


100 



PRIMITIVE METHODIST CHURCH 



Creek Road, Deptford. 



62 



79 



13 



40 



59 



138 







BAPTIST CHURCH 










Devonshire Road . 
South Street. 
Lewisham Road . 
Woolwich Rd.,E. Greenwich 
Shooter's Hill Road . 


41 
120 
73 
38 
65 


53 

147 

115 

49 

91 


26 
96 

106 
48 

100 


120 
363 
294 
135 
256 


39 
143 
97 
58 
79 


58 
273 
164 

88 
125 


18 
48 
67 
46 
37 


115 
464 
328 
192 
241 


235 

827 
622 
327 

497 


Total .... 


337 


455 


376 


1,168 


416 


708 


216 


1,340 


2,508 



Baptist Mission 



66, Cold Bath Street 



30 



34 



13 



27 



12 



52 



86 



CONQREGATIONAIi CHURCH 



Maze Hill Church, Park PI. 
Greenwich Road . 
PubHc Hall, Charlton Village 
Rothbury Hall, East Green- 
wich 


69 
49 
12 

41 


75 
44 
11 

24 


69 
48 
16 

136 


213 

141 

39 

201 


92 
41 

18 

65 


113 
65 
25 

86 


48 
26 
10 

83 


253 

132 

53 

234 


466 

273 

92 

435 


Total .... 


171 


154 


269 


594 


216 


289 


167 


672 


1,266 



Congregational Missions 



Armada Street, Deptford . 

Trinity Hall, Pender Street, 

Deptford .... 


2 
6 


1 54 
9 190 


57 
205 


9 
12 


7 131 
15 28 


147 
55 


204 
260 


Total .... 


8 


10 244 


262 


21 


22 


159 


202 


464 





PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 








St. Mark's, South Street . 
Vanbrugh Park, Blackheath 


57 
35 


76 
42 


114 
29 


247 
106 


39 
29 


79 
38 


19 
14 


137 

81 


384 
187 


Total .... 


92 


118 


143 


353 


68 


117 


33 


218 


571 



BRETHREN" 



King George Street . 


97 


121 


81 


299 


101 


183 


55 


339 


638 


Circus Street 


43 


65 


22 


130 


31 


56 


22 


109 


239 


Marlborough Hall, Old 




















Woolwich Road 


33 


22 


13 


68 


41 


70 


40 


151 


219 


Alexandra Hall, Blackheatli 


36 


94 


16 


146 


42 


125 


10 


177 


323 


Bennett Hall, Blackheath . 


17 


29 


6 


52 


12 


20 


5 


37 


89 


Gospfil Hall, Charlton . 


8 


9 


4 


21 


14 


20 


9 


43 


64 


338, Woolwich Road . 


14 


6 


42 


62 


20 


15 


36 


71 


133 


Straights Mouth . 


12 


12 


7 


31 


12 


13 


40 


65 


96 


Total .... 


260 


358 


191 


809 


273 


502 


217 


992 


1,801 



SOUTH LONDON— aREENWICH 

SALVATION ARMY 



247 



CHURCH. 


MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 


Mtin. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


ToUl. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


for the 
Day. 


Pender Street, Deptford 
Blackwall Lane . 
Woolwich Road, Charlton . 
Blackheath Hill . 


2 

6 

18 

6 


2 

10 
8 
4 


8 
16 

42 
8 


12 
32 

68 
18 


14 

5 

27 

9 


13 
17 
55 
16 


7 

6 

84 

12 


34 

28 

166 

37 


46 

60 

234 

55 


Total .... 


32 


24 


74 


130 


55 


101 


109 


265 


395 



ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH 



Our Lady, Star of the Sea, 

Croom's Hill . 
St. Joseph's, E. Greenwich 
St. Mary's, Blackheath 
Herbert Hospital Chapel . 


137 

124 

70 

4 


221 

181 

157 

15 


162 

180 

117 

3 


520 

485 

344 

22 


53 
46 
20 


114 
90 

40 


32 
105 

55 


199 
241 
115 


719 

726 

459 

22 


Total .... 


335 


574 


462 


1,371 


119 


244 


192 


555 


1,926 



OTHER SERVICES 



London City Mission, 194, 










1 










Trafalgar Road. 










14 


27 


10 


51 


51 


London City Miasion, Du- 














1 






pree Road .... 


1 


2 


73 


82 


U 


25 


1 49 


88 


170 


London City Mission, Tun- 




















nel Lane .... 










7 


14 


58 


79 


79 


London City Mission, 12, 
















1 




Randel Place . 










11 


27 


36 


74 


74 


South London Christian 




















Mission, 65, South Street 


12 


12 


21 


4;') 


30 


34 


13 


77 


122 


Working Lads' Institute, 




















Bridge Street . 










4 


11 


183 


198 


198 


Blissett Street . 


4 


1 


35 


40 


7 


13 


18 


38 


78 


Sundome Hall, Charlton 


17 


16 


32 


65 


32 


53 


65 


150 


215 


Total .... 


40 


31 


161 


232 


119 


204 


432 


755 


987 



DENOMINATIONAL TOTALS 





MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 




Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Day. 


Church of England 


1,314 


2,031 


2,837 


6,182 


1,165 


2,275 


2,171 


5,611 


11,793 


„ „ Missions 


23 


28 


446 


497 


83 


148 


271 


502 


999 


Wesleyan Meth. Church 


164 


180 


701 


1,045 


1 286 


433 


307 


1,026 


2,071 


„ „ Mission 


1 


1 


51 


53 


6 


20 


21 


47 


100 


Primitive Meth. Church 


8 


9 


62 


79 


6 


13 


40 


59 


138 


Baptist Church 


337 


455 


376 


1,168 


416 


708 


216 


1,340 


2,508 


„ Mission 


2 


2 


30 


34 


i 13 


27 


12 


52 


86 


Congregational Church 


171 


154 


269 


594 


216 


289 


167 


672 


1,266 


„ Missions 


8 


10 


244 


262 


21 


22 


159 


202 


464 


Presbyterian Church . 


92 


118 


143 


353 


68 


117 


33 


218 


571 


Brethren 


260 


358 


191 


809 


; 273 


502 


217 


992 


1,801 


Salvation Army . 


32 


24 


74 


130 


! 55 


101 


109 


265 


395 


Roman Catholic Church 


335 


574 


462 


1,371 


, 119 


244 


192 


555 


1,926 


Other Services 


40 


31 


161 


232 


1 119 


204 


432 


755 


987 


Grand Totals . 


2,787 


3,975 6,047 


12,809 


' 2,846 


5,103 


4,347 


12,296 


25,105 



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DIAGRAM 

SKe-wing' Analysis of Attendance. 



Borough of Woolwich 



CHURCH OF EWGLAND 



CHURCH. 




MORNING. 




EVENING. 


Total 
for the 




















Men. 


Women. 


Chldin. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Day. 


Holy Trinity, Beresford St. 


34 


44 


60 


138 


47 


72 


43 


162 


300 


St. John's, Wellington St. . 


39 


51 


34 


124 


44 


81 


47 


172 


296 


St. Mary's, Church Street . 


110 


146 


302 


558 


106 


206 


237 


549 


1,107 


*St. George's, New Road . 




250 


306 


556 


273 


370 


137 


780 


1,336 


St. Michael and All Angels', 




















Station Road . 


68 


88 


128 


284 


70 


138 


49 


257 


541 


St. John's, North Woolwich 


33 


21 


134 


188 


39 


47 


69 


155 


343 


All Saints', Ripon Road 


106 


187 


91 


384 


129 


281 


75 


485 


869 


St. James', Plumstead 


70 


83 


163 


316 


88 


137 


156 


381 


697 


Royal Dockyard Church 


17 


20 


18 


55 


18 


22 


39 


79 


134 


St. John's, Plumstead . 


42 


45 


106 


193 


61 


123 


69 


253 


446 


St. Mark's, Plumstead 


70 


91 


118 


279 


126 


231 


138 


495 


774 


St. Margaret's, Plumstead . 


91 


143 


328 


562 


113 


240 


206 


559 


1,121 


St. Paul's, Plumstead . 


29 


25 


58 


112 


54 


84 


72 


210 


322 


St. Nicholas', Plumstead 


35 


37 


73 


145 


52 


86 


125 


203 


408 


Jhrist Ch., Shooter's Hill . 


31 


58 


99 


188 


27 


53 


64 


144 


332 


Holy Trinity, Eltham . 


62 


131 


114 


307 


63 


74 


42 


179 


486 


All Saints', New Eltham 


29 


49 


75 


153 


33 


89 


58 


180 


333 


St. Andrew's, Mottingham . 


31 


83 


54 


168 


19 


59 


31 


109 


277 


St. John's, Eltham 


54 


144 


134 


332 


73 


202 


97 


.372 


704 


St. Peter's, Lee . 


45 


97 


116 


258 


46 


67 


74 


187 


445 


Chm-ch of the Ascension, 




















Plumstead 


15 


19 


123 


157 


26 


39 


87 


152 


309 


Total .... 


1 1,011 


1,812 


2,634 


5,457 


1,507 


2,701 


1,915 


6,123 


11,580 



* The attendance of men at the Parade Service in the morning was 2,307. As the attendance was stated by one 
of the chaplains to be compulsory we did not include it. 



Church of England Missions 



St. John's, Ritter Street 


12 


11 


110 


133 


10 


38 


82 


130 


268 


Soldiers' Institute, Welling- 




















ton Street .... 










7 


3 


4 


14 


14 


St. Martin's, Back Lane 


5 


1 


74 


80 


17 


26 


30 


73 


153 


All Saints', Herbert Road . 


5 


5 


165 


175 


16 


28 


59 


103 


278 


St. Paul's, Glenside Road . 










2 


3 


42 


47 


47 


Total .... 


22 


17 


349 


388 


52 


9.S 


217 


367 


755 



WESLEYAN" METHODIST CHURCH 




249 



250 



THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OP LONDON 

Wesleyan Methodist Mission 



CHURCH. 


MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


for the 
Day. 


Soldiers' Home, William St. 


... 1 ... 




36 


26 


11 


73 


73 



PRIMITIVE METHODIST CHURCH 



Eglinton Road 

Glyndon Road, Plumstead . 


19 
84 


17 
59 


40 
149 


76 

292 


22 
84 


30 
111 


19 
108 


71 
303 


147 
595 


Total .... 


103 


76 


189 


368 


106 


141 


127 


374 


742 



UNITED METHODIST FREE CHURCH 



Crescent Road, Plumstead . 



18 



20 



34 



72 



48 



61 



62 



171 



243 



BAPTIST CHURCH 



Woolwich Tabernacle, 




















Beresford Street 


235 


176 


235 


646 


506 


703 


389 


1,598 


2,244 


"Carmel," Anglesea Road . 


30 


40 


37 


107 


41 


70 


24 


135 


242 


" Enon," High Street . 


37 


35 


77 


149 


52 


68 


42 


162 


.311 


Queen St. Chapel, Samuel 




















Street .... 


35 


44 


50 


129 


46 


90 


150 


286 


415 


Conduit Road, Plumstead . 


29 


30 


47 


106 


35 


50 


42 


127 


233 


Plumstead Tabernacle, 




















Maxey Road 


18 


14 


11 


43 


18 


29 


10 


57 


100 


Station Road, Plumstead . 


57 


09 


221 


347 


119 


164 


2.33 


.516 


863 


High Street, Eltham . 


13 


17 


142 


172 


15 


21 


4 


40 


212 


Joseph Street, Woolwich . 


25 


14 


38 


77 


42 


48 


93 


183 


260 


Union Church, Park Road, 




















Plumstead 


26 


24 


35 


85 


29 


47 


29 


105 


190 


People's Hall, Francis St. . 


2 




69 


71 


7 


19 


67 


93 


164 


Total .... 


507 


463 


962 


1,932 


910 


1,309 


1,083 


3,302 


5,234 



CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 



Rectory Place 


81 


83 


106 


270 


134 


204 


77 


415 


685 


Welsh Church, Parsons Hill 


7 


2 


1 


10 


30 


29 


11 


70 


80 


Silvertown Church, North 




















Woolwich .... 


3 


1 


42 


46 


5 


8 


38 


51 


97 


Viewland Road . 


49 


.52 


83 


184 


79 


96 


94 


269 


453 


New Eltham Church, Foots 




















Cray Road 


15 


17 


35 


67 


12 


22 


10 


44 


1 111 


High Street, Eltham . 


80 


92 


52 


224 


62 


139 


51 


252 


476 


Total .... 


235 


247 


319 


801 


322 


498 


281 


1,101 


1,902 



Congregational Mission 



Rectory Place, Lower Pel- 
lipar Road 



37 



40 



14 



26 



66 







PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 








New Road . 

St. Andrew's, Anglesea 


Rd! 


119 
61 


60 

76 


43 
GO 


222 
197 


62 

82 


100 
144 


17 
29 


179 
265 


401 
452 


Total . 


180 1 136 


103 419 


144 


244 


46 


434 


853 



SOUTH LONDON— WOOLWICH 

UNITARIAN CHURCH 



261 



Beresford Street . 

Union Street Schools . 

26, High Street, Plumstead 

Total .... 



45 


24 


33 


102 


2 




30 


32 


26 


13 


105 


144 


73 


37 


168 


278 1 



CHORCH. 


MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 

for the 

Day. 


Men. 


Women.lchldrn. 1 Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Plumstead Common Road . 


10 


6 9 1 25 


28 


24 


17 


69 


94 


BIBLE CHRISTIAN CHURCH 


Herbert Road 

Park Place, Eltham . 


34 
11 


50 
11 


48 
11 


132 
33 


32 
12 


49 
15 


20 
9 


101 
36 


233 
69 


Total .... 


45 


61 


59 


165 


44 


64 


29 


137 


302 


SALVATION ARMY 



354 

32 

343 



729 



BRETHREN 



Gospel Hall, Nightingale 




















Vale 


41 


63 


34 


138 


41 


71 


72 


184 


322 


Gospel Hall, Elizabeth St., 




















North Woolwich 


9 


5 


2 


16 


18 


10 


19 


47 


63 


Perseverance Hall, Plum- 




















stead 










14 


12 


34 


60 


60 


Inverness Hall, Plumstead . 


23 


17 


4 


44 


26 


15 


4 


44 


88 


Richmond Hall, Plumstead 


27 


18 


9 


54 


33 


64 


38 


135 


189 


Plum Lane Hall, Plumstead 




















Common .... 


19 


20 


17 


56 


19 


26 


23 


68 


124 


Gospel Hall, Plumstead 


16 


5 


33 


54 


16 


11 


26 


53 


107 


Gospel Hall, New Eltham . 










13 


28 


16 


57 


57 


Lecture Hall, Eltham . 


22 


22 


9 


53 


23 


29 


14 


66 


119 


Total .... 


157 


150 


108 


415 


202 


266 


246 


714 


1,129 



ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH 



St. Mary's, Eltham 

St. Patrick's, Plumstead 

St. Peter's, Woolwich . 


31 
162 
752 


115 
201 

781 


148 
259 
832 


294 

622 

2,365 


11 

59 
193 


29 

54 

332 


23 

83 
147 


63 
196 
672 


357 

818 

3,037 


Total .... 


945 


1,097 


1,239 


3,281 


263 


415 


253 


931 


4,212 



OTHER SERVICES 



Soldiers' Home, 31, Hill St. 










31 


35 


23 


89 


89 


Cage Lane Miss., Plumstead 


2.i 


18 


54 


99 


52 


81 


75 


208 


307 


Plumstead Gospel Mission, 


1 


















Ripolson Road . 


! 11 


4 


32 


47 


11 


13 


37 


01 


108 


W.M.C.A., St. James' PI., 


1 


















Plumstead 


... 








43 






43 


43 


Perseverance Hall, Plum- 




















stead 










20 


21 


18 


59 


59 


People's Hall, Plumstead . 


48 


26 


122 


196 


77 


75 


232 


384 


580 


Peculiar People, Brewery 




















Road. . - . . 


12 


5 


27 


44 


13 


9 


9 


31 


75 


Total .... 


98 


53 


235 


386 


247 


234 


394 


875 


1,261 



252 



THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 



DENOMINATIONAL TOTALS 





MORNING. 


EVENING. 1 


Total 


DENOMINATION. 


















for the 




Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Day. 


Church of England 


1,011 


1,812 


2,634 


5,457 


1,507 


2,701 


1,915 


6,123 


11,580 


„ „ Missions 


22 


17 


349 


388 


52 


98 


217 


367 


755 


Wesleyan Meth. Church 


368 


249 


472 


1,089 


413 


415 


373 


1,201 


2,290 


„ „ Missions 




• .. 




... 


36 


26 


11 


73 


73 


Primitive Meth. Church 


103 


76 


189 


368 


106 


141 


127 


374 


742 


U. Meth. Free Church . 


18 


20 


34 


72 


48 


61 


62 


171 


243 


Baptist Church 


507 


463 


962 


1,932 


910 


1,309 


1,083 


3,302 


5,234 


Congregational Church. 


235 


247 


319 


801 


322 


498 


281 


1,101 


1,902 


„ Missions 


3 


... 


37 


40 


6 


14 


6 


26 


66 


Presbyterian Church . 


180 


136 


103 


419 


144 


244 


46 


434 


853 


Unitarian Church. 


10 


6 


9 


25 


28 


24 


17 


69 


94 


Bible Christian Church. 


45 


61 


59 


165 


44 


64 


29 


137 


302 


Salvation Army . 


73 


37 


168 


278 


145 


165 


141 


451 


729 


Brethren 


157 


150 


108 


415 


202 


266 


246 


714 


1,129 


Ptoman Catholic Church 


945 


1,097 


1,239 


3,281 


263 


415 


253 


931 


4,212 


(3ther Services 


98 


53 


235 


386 


247 


234 


394 


875 


1,261 


Jewish Church 


34 




12 


46 




... 




... 


46 


Grand Totals . 


3,809 


4,424 


6,929 


15,162 


4,473 


6,675 


5,201 


16,349 


31,511 



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CHURCH OF ENGLAND 



CHURCH. 


1 MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 
for the 




















j Men. 


Women. 


Chldvn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Day. 


All Saints' .... 


55 


114 


96 


265 


81 


161 


74 


316 


581 


Christ Church 


33 


43 


83 


156 


48 


133 


86 


267 


423 


Church of the Ascension 


151 


282 


336 


769 


122 


335 


70 


527 


1,296 


St. Andrew's 


28 


18 


161 


207 


51 


89 


89 


229 


436 


St. George's .... 


24 


42 


116 


182 


37 


101 


40 


178 


360 


St. John's .... 


28 


32 


79 


139 


49 


117 


48 


214 


353 


St. Mark's .... 


\ 80 


139 


44 


263 


106 


241 


43 


390 


653 


St. Mary's Parish Church . 


1 48 


84 


76 


208 


90 


165 


114 


369 


577 


St. Mary le Park. 


! 40 


85 


74 


199 


39 


78 


41 


158 


357 


St. Paul's .... 


1 62 


158 


185 


405 


74 


216 


66 


356 


761 


St. Peter's .... 


! 30 


34 


55 


119 


70 


124 


151 


345 


464 


St. Philip's .... 


1 33 


33 


141 


207 


50 


79 


98 


227 


434 


St. Saviour's 


27 


40 


75 


142 


41 


79 


61 


181 


323 


St. Stephen's 


31 


48 


56 


135 


37 


82 


68 


187 


322 


St. Michael's 


65 


99 


85 


249 


68 


155 


85 


308 


557 


St. Luke's .... 


123 


240 


162 


525 


128 


262 


86 


476 


1,001 


St. Matthew's 


69 


97 


62 


228 


74 


129 


61 


264 


492 


St. Barnabas' 


186 


222 


209 


617 


199 


416 


83 


698 


1,315 


Total .... 


1,110 


1,810 


2,095 


5,015 


1,364 


2,962 


1,364 


5,690 


10,705 



Church of England Missions 



St. John and St. Paul's 










2 


6 


10 


18 


18 


St. Bartholomew's 


16 


34 


191 


241 


45 


112 


53 


210 


451 


St. James' .... 


1 


2 


57 


60 


1 


12 


13 


26 


86 


Caius Mission Church . 


13 


8 


108 


129 


31 


35 


32 


98 


227 


All Saints .... 










2 


2 


4 


8 


8 


St. Stephen's 










4 


6 


141 


151 


151 


St. Philip's .... 










3 


8 


8 


19 


19 


Total .... 


30 


44 


356 


430 


88 


181 


261 


530 


960 



WESLEY AN 


METHODIST CHURCH 








Bridge Road W. Chapel . 
Queen's Road Chapel . 
Bromwood Road . 


37 
173 
125 


138 
165 
136 


74 

446 

75 


249 
784 
336 


52 

388 
328 


181 
336 
402 


39 
893 
133 


272 

1,617 

863 


521 

2,401 
1,199 


Total .... 


335 


439 


595 


1,369 


768 


919 


1,065 


2,752 


4,121 



Mission Hall, Nine Elms . 



Wesleyan Methodist Mission 

.. I ... I ... I ... 1 23 I 29 



28 



80 



80 





CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 








Bridge Road 
Lavender Hill 
Milton Hall. 


41 

140 

24 


39 

146 

15 


28 

204 

41 


108 

490 

80 


73 
210 

47 


81 
313 

58 


35 
99 
47 


189 
622 
152 


297 

1,112 

232 


Total .... 


205 


200 


273 


678 


330 


452 


181 


963 


1,641 



253 



254 



THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 



BAPTIST CHURCH 



CHURCH. 




MORNING. 


■ 


EVENING. 


Total 
for the 




















Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Day. 


Battersea Chapel 


67 


36 


81 


184 


50 


78 


62 


190 


374 


Tabernacle, Battersea Park 




















Road .... 


100 


89 


128 


317 


181 


295 


171 


647 


964 


Providence Chapel 


24 


28 


40 


92 


21 


40 


17 


78 


170 


Chatham Road 


22 


23 


31 


76 


35 


41 


14 


90 


166 


Northcote Road, Wands- 




















worth Common 


138 


165 


115 


418 


202 


361 


79 


642 


1,060 


Total . . • . 


351 


341 


395 


1,087 


489 


815 


343 


1,647 


2,734 



Baptist Missions 



Surrey Lane Chapel . 
Plough Road 

Church of Christ, Battersea 
Park Road 








9 

7 

13 


12 
3 

18 


33 
4 

16 


54 
14 

47 


54 
14 

47 


Total .... 






... 


29 


33 


53 


115 


115 





PRESBYTERIAN 


CHURCH 










Clapham Trinity Church 
Mission .... 
St. Andrew's 


11 

58 


13 
51 


39 
43 


63 
152 


i 

26 
69 


60 
68 


25 
11 


111 

148 


174 
300 


Total .... 


69 


64 


82 


215 


95 


128 


36 


259 


474 





PRIMITIVE METHODIST 


CHURCH 








Grayshot Road . 
New Road . 
Plough Road 




22 
11 
19 


16 

7 

17 


21 
51 

77 


59 

69 

113 


48 
20 
31 


54 
18 
40 


14 
20 
19 


116 
58 
90 


1 175 
127 
203 


Total . 


52 


40 


149 


241 


99 


112 


53 


264 


505 



UNITED METHODIST FREE CHURCH 



Battersea Park Road . 
Church Road 

Mallinson Road, Wands- 
worth Common 


11 

12 

35 


5 
6 

37 


29 
42 

60 


45 
60 

132 


18 
14 

67 


26 
16 

80 


38 
39 

19 


82 
69 

166 


127 
129 

298 


Total .... 


58 


48 


131 


237 


99 


122 


96 


317 


554 



REFORMED EPISCOPAL CHURCH 



St. Jude's 



45 



60 



30 



135 



24 



58 



10 



92 





ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH 








Our Lady of Mount Carmel 

and St. Joseph 
Sacred Heart of Jesus 


144 
156 


242 
213 


245 
317 


631 
686 


47 
69 


74 
96 


17 
117 


138 
282 


769 
968 


Total .... 


300 


455 


562 


1,317 


116 


170 


134 


420 


1,737 



BRETHREN" 



122, High Street . 
Howard Street . 
Doddington Grove 


39 

59 

6 


36 
3 
2 


14 
13 


89 

75 

8 


24 

29 

8 


49 
17 
15 


21 

32 

4 


94 

78 
27 


183 

153 

35 


Total .... 


104 


41 


27 


172 


61 


81 


57 


199 


371 



SOUTH LONDON— BATTERSEA 

SALVATION ARMY 



255 







MORNING. 




1 EVENING. 


Total 

for the 

Day. 




Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


CUdrn. 


Total. 


Barracks, Queen's Road 
Barracks, High Street 


23 
38 


46 
25 


54 
43 


123 
106 


32 
64 


48 
96 


60 
93 


140 
253 


263 
359 


Total .... 


61 


71 


97 


229 


96 


144 


153 


393 


622 



WELSH CALVINISTIC METHODIST CHURCH 



Beauchamp Road 



15 



11 



11 



37 



63 



64 



16 



143 180 



OTHER SERVICES 



Excelsior Mission Room 










4 


10 


14 


28 


28 


!Missn. Room, 104, High St. 


8 


o 


2 


15 


5 


6 


4 


15 


30 


" Lighthouse," 1, Park Grn. 


12 


5 


7 


24 


13 


19 


14 


46 


70 


Oake Mission, 139a, Plough 




















Road .... 


8 


17 


4 


29 


9 


12 


10 


31 


60 


Protestant IVIission, St. 




















Philip's Street. 


5 


5 


11 


21 


6 


11 


11 


28 


49 


Pentecostal Speke Hall 


85 


85 


47 


217 


83 


203 


54 


340 


557 


Railway Mission, 100, 




















Plough Road . 










11 


17 


24 


52 


52 


Wandsworth Road 










24 


55 


20 


99 


99 


Battersea Park Road . 






... 




9 


10 


2 


21 


21 


Victoria Mission Room, 




















Renshaw Street 










7 


11 


19 


37 


37 


Ethical Society . 


13 


5 


29 


47 










47 


Spiritualists, Henley Hall . 


7 


3 




10 


18 


26 




44 


54 


Total .... 


138 


125 


100 


363 


189 


380 


172 


741 


1,104 



DENOMINATIONAL TOTALS 



DENOMINATION. 


MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 

for the 

Day. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldm. 


Total. 


Men. 1 Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Church of England 
„ „ Missions 

Wesleyan Meth.Church 
„ „ Mission 

Congregationall Church 

Baptist Church . 
„ Missions . 

Presbyterian Church . 

Primitive Meth.Church 

U. Meth. Free Church. 

Reformed Epis. Church 

Roman Catholic Church 

Brethren 

Salvation Army . 

Welsh CaLMeth.Church 

Other Services 


1,110 

30 

335 

205 
351 

"69 

52 

58 

45 

300 

104 

61 

15 

138 


1,810 
44 
439 
... 

200 
341 

"64 
40 
48 
60 

455 
41 
71 
11 

125 


2,095 
356 
595 

273 
395 

"82 

149 

131 

30 

562 

27 

97 

11 

100 


5,015 

430 

1,369 

678 
1,087 

215 
241 
237 
135 
1,317 
172 
229 
37 
363 


1,364 ! 2,962 

88 1 181 
768 j 919 

23 1 29 
330 1 452 
489 ' 815 

29 1 33 

95 i 128 
99 1 112 
99 1 122 

1 24 ■ 58 

' 116 170 

61 1 81 

96 144 
63 64 

189 380 


1,364 

261 

1,065 

28 

181 

343 

53 

36 

53 

96 

10 

134 

57 

153 

16 

_172 


5,690 
530 

2,752 

80 

963 

1,647 
115 
259 
264 
317 
92 
420 
199 
393 
143 
741 


10,705 

960 

4,121 

80 

1,641 

2,734 

115 

474 

505 

554 

227 

1,737 

371 

622 

180 

1,104 


Grand Totals. 


2,873 


3,749 


4,903 


11,525 


3,933 6,650 


4,022 14,605 


26,130 



!!^'t iOOrp 




Populat Roman Catholic 



Other Services 




All Churches 



Church of England 



Nonconformist 



Roman Catholic 



Other Services 



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Borough of Southwark 



CHURCH OF ENGLAND 





MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 
for the 


CHURCH. 




















Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Day. 


St. Saviour's, London Bdg. 


9G 


99 


219 


414 


176 


203 


63 


442 


856 


Christ Church, Blackfriars . 


3G 


32 


60 


128 


69 


95 


69 


233 


361 


All Hallows, Pepper Street 


63 


161 


353 


577 


19 


76 


21 


116 


693 


St. Peter's, Sumner Street . 


29 


31 


41 


101 


28 


59 


22 


109 


210 


St. George the Martyr's, 




















Borough High Street 


79 


63 


153 


295 


94 


127 


64 


285 


580 


St. Stephen's, St. Stephen's 




















Square .... 


14 


13 


20 


47 


28 


60 


48 


136 


183 


St. Mary Magdalene's, 




















Massinger Street 


26 


19 


149 


194 


50 


94 


129 


273 


467 


St. Alphege's, Lancaster St. 


48 


44 


178 


270 


37 


118 


50 


205 


475 


St. Michael's, Lant Street . 


31 


20 


76 


127 


48 


53 


29 


130 


257 


St. Jude's, St. George's Rd. 


11 


17 


39 


67 


21 


41 


33 


95 


162 


St. Paul's, Westminster 




















Bridge Road . 


30 


24 


29 


83 


73 


150 


59 


282 


365 


Holy Trinity, Trinity Sq. . 


37 


43 


32 


112 


57 


95 


52 


204 


316 


St. Andrew's, Nw. Kent Rd. 


38 


49 


114 


201 


47 


117 


49 


213 


414 


St. Matthew's, Nw. Kent Rd. 


34 


31 


181 


246 


72 


100 


124 


296 


542 


Lady Margaret's, Chatham 




















Street .... 


34 


22 


192 


248 


44 


63 


110 


217 


465 


All Saints', Surrey Square . 


17 


15 


74 


106 


34 


36 


50 


120 


226 


All Souls', Grosvenor Park . 


27 


40 


34 


101 


52 


92 


50 


194 


295 


St. Mark's, East Street 


22 


25 


65 


112 


22 


62 


30 


114 


226 


St. Paul's, Lorrimore Sq. . 


55 


90 


217 


362 


94 


199 


91 


384 


746 


St. Peter's, Liverpool Street 


42 


29 


182 


253 


46 


52 


180 


278 


531 


St. Stephen's, Boyson Road 


24 


28 


108 


160 


36 


59 


90 


185 


345 


St. Agnes', Farmer's Road . 


118 


167 


163 


448 


106 


198 


81 


385 


833 


St. Mary Newingtou, Ken- 




















nington Park Road . 


69 


75 


92 


236 


54 


102 


37 


193 


429 


St. John's, Larcom Street . 


40 


35 


126 


201 


71 


78 


41 


190 


391 


St. Gabriel's, Newington 




















Butts 


11 


7 


14 


32 


28 


32 


42 


102 


134 


St. Alban's, Manor Place . 


17 


13 


47 


77 


27 


35 


23 


85 


162 


Pembroke Miss., Barlow St. 


11 


7 


94 


112 


25 


53 


22 


100 


212 


Wellington College Mission, 




















Etherdon Street 


68 


78 


430 


576 


74 


98 


70 


242 


818 


Total .... 


1,127 


1,277 


3,482 


5,886 


1,532 


2,547 


1,729 


5,808 


11,694 



Chureh of England Missions 



St. Peter's Schs., Emerson St. 


1 


5 


58 


64 


1 


1 


23 


25 1 


89 


St. George's, Chapel Court . 










2 


3 


166 


171 ! 


171 


Holy Trinity Schools, Swan 
















i 




Street .... 


5 


13 


151 


169 










169 


St. Paul's Schools, West- 




















minster Bridge Road 


4 


2 


102 


108 


41 


3 


17 


61 i 


169 


St. Paul's, Lorrimore Street 










7 


5 


34 


46 


45 


St. John's, Wadding Street 










5 


9 


14 


28 


28 


St. Andrew's Hall, Theobald 




















Street .... 










17 


17 


6 


39 


39 


Total .... 


10 


20 


311 


341 


73 


38 


259 


370 


711 



257 



17 



258 



THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 



WESLEYAN METHODIST CHURCH 



CHURCH. 


MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldm. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Ohldrn. 


ToUl. 


for the 
Day. 


Stamford Street . 
Locksfields, Rodney Road . 
Southwark, Chapel Place . 
Walworth, Camberwell Rd. 


14 

59 
86 
88 


18 
45 
58 
81 


27 
249 
147 
168 


59 
353 
291 
337 


15 

211 

84 

95 


28 
351 
133 
120 


11 

484 
269 
346 


54 

1,046 

486 

561 


113 
1,399 

777 
898 


Total .... 


247 


202 


591 


1,040 


405 


632 


1,110 


2,147 


3,187 



Wesleyan Methodist Mission 



Grove Mission, Great Guild- 
ford Street 



39 



38 123 



200 



53 



82 



147 



282 



482 



PRIMITIVE METHODIST 


CHURCH 








East Street .... 
New Surrey Chapel, Black- 
friars Road . . 


15 
63 


6 
32 


17 
109 


38 
204 


21 
144 


62 
144 


61 
535 


144 

823 


182 
1,027 


Total .... 


78 


38 


126 


242 


165 


206 


596 


967 


1,209 



METHODIST 


NEW CONNEXION 








Brunswick, Great Dover St. 
Walworth Road Hall . 


26 20 

9 2 


73 

59 


119 

70 


41 

7 


64 
15 


54 
29 


159 
51 


278 
121 


Total .... 


35 1 22 


132 


189 


48 


79 


83 


210 


399 



WELSH CALVINISTIC METHODIST CHURCH 



Falmouth Road 



23 



11 



12 



46 



93 



73 



58 



224 



270 



BAPTIST CHURCH 



Borough Road 


50 


33 


38 


121 


83 


94 


38 


215 


336 


East Street .... 


17 


4 


25 


46 


24 


42 


13 


79 


125 


Arthur Street 


54 


65 


61 


180 


89 


203 


29 


321 


501 


Metropolitan Tabernacle, 




















Newington Butts 


481 


573 


361 


1,415 


739 


1,215 


256 


2,210 


3,625 


Walworth Road . 


82 


101 


76 


259 


136 


223 


60 


419 


678 


Surrey Tabernacle, Wansey 




















Street .... 


91 


110 


40 


241 


101 


193 


11 


305 


546 


Upton, Lambeth Road 


115 


142 


140 


397 


172 


302 


70 


544 


941 


Haddon Hall, Bermondsey 




















New Road . . . _ 


36 


30 


159 


225 


91 


199 


122 


412 


637 


Total .... 


926 


1,058 


900 


2,884 


1,435 


2,471 


599 


4,505 


7,389 



Baptist Missions 



Working Men's, Colling- 




















wood Street 


25 






25 


31 


34 


33 


98 


123 


Working Men's, 4, York St. 


7 




1 


8 


12 


10 


17 


39 


47 


Victory Place Institute 


8 


7 


145 


160 


15 


24 


296 


335 


495 


Richmond St., East St. 


3 


5 


41 


49 


19 


50 


363 


432 


481 


Surrey Square 

Surrey Gardens Memorial 


13 


7 


150 


170 


20 


43 


24 


87 


257 




















Hall, Penrose Street 


5 


5 


101 


111 


23 


49 


111 


183 


294 


Almshouse Chapel, Station 




















Road 










23 


35 


16 


74 


74 


Horsley Street Mission 










36 


4 


139 


179 


179 


Total .... 


61 


24 


438 


523 


179 


249 


999 


1,427 


1,950 



SOUTH LONDON— SOUTHW ARK 

CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 



Congregational Missions 



UNITARIAN" CHURCH 



259 





MORNING. 


EVENING. 


ToUl 


CHURCH. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldm. 


Total. 


Day. 


Sutherland Chapel, Wal- 
worth Road 

Pilgrim Fathers' Chui'ch, 
New Kent Road 

Welsh Church, Southwark 
Bridge Road 

Murphy Memorial, New 
Kent Road 


13 

28 
32 
21 


15 
23 
29 
23 


39 

85 

9 

104 


67 
136 

70 
148 


22 

41 

100 

54 


41 

57 

113 

116 


21 

17 

15 

304 


84 
115 

228 
474 


151 
251 
298 
622 


Total . . . . 


94 


90 


237 


421 


217 


327 


357 


901 


1,322 



Colliers Rents 


1 


4 


89 


94 


22 


76 


55 


153 


247 


Lorrimore Road . 


1 


6 


21 


28 


4 


5 


4 


13 


41 


Kent Street Schools, Ami- 




















cable Row 


6 


1 


83 


90 


12 


15 


171 


198 


288 


Castle Yard Sehs., Holland 




















Street .... 


5 


3 


62 


70 


5 


8 


199 


212 


282 


Mansfield Street Schools, 




















Boro' Road 


4 


2 


45 


51 


48 


14 


332 


394 


445 


The Mint Schs., Harrow Rd. 


3 


2 


53 


58 


8 


18 


177 


203 


261 


Jurstan Hall, Gerridge St. . 


7 


5 


87 


99 


14 


23 


341 


378 


477 


Robert Browning Settle- 




















ment (Incorporated) 


25 


14 


138 


177 


43 


52 


322 


417 


594 


Total .... 


52 


37 


578 


667 


156 


211 


1,601 


1,968 


2,635 



Stamford Street 



21 



117 



16 



32 



63 



111 



228 



BIBLE CHRISTIAN CHURCH 



Quinn Square 



33 



37 



BRETHREN 



Beresford Street . 
Silvester Street . 
Mina Road, Old Kent Road 


54 

6 

45 


95 ! 14 

3 1 1 

45 38 


163 

10 

128 


43 

"50 


95 

"'ei 


21 

"'27 


159 

138 


322 

10 

266 


Total .... 


105 


143 : 53 


301 


93 


156 


48 


297 


598 





SALVATION AR] 


MY 










74, South Street . 
195, Union Street 
26, Newington Causeway . 


1 ! 6 

3 4 

27 23 


1 
1 
9 


8 

8 

59 


8 

4 

44 


13 

7 
51 


2 
"34 


23 

11 

129 


31 
19 

188 


Total .... 


31 


33 


11 


75 


56 


71 


36 


163 


238 



ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH 



St. George's Cathedral, St. 




















George's Road . 


646 


623 


676 


1,945 


111 


133 


68 


312 


2,257 


English Martyrs, Northamp- 




















ton Street .... 


172 


312 


468 


952 


49 


130 


173 


352 


1,304 


Church of the Most Precious 




















Blood, Worcester Street . 


218 


292 


350 


860 


15 


40 


21 


76 


936 


Total .... 


1,036 


1,227 


1,494 


3,757 


175 


303 


262 


740 


4,497 



260 



THE EELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 



OTHER SERVICES 



CHURCH. 


MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 
for the 


















Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Day. 


Anchor Brewery Hall, Emer- 




















son Street .... 










30 




2 


41 


41 


South London Mission, 




















Scovell Road . 










7 


10 


164 


181 


181 


South London Cabdrivers' 




















Miss., 213, Walworth Rd. 


7 


2 


1 


10 


13 


10 


9 


32 


42 


Christian Community, 179, 




















Tabard Street . 










7 


14 


94 


115 


115 


Holiness Mission, 218, Old 




















Kent Road 


4 


5 




9 


4 


10 


2 


16 


25 


King's Own Miss., Roy. Rd. 


6 


14 


214 


234 


26 


68 


133 


227 


461 


Lighthouse Mission, 19, 




















Glenham Street 










10 


15 


229 


254 


254 


Home Hall, Holland Street 


"l8 


"l8 


101 


137 


26 


58 


139 


223 


360 


Hope Hall, Friar Street 


3 


1 


97 


101 


9 


18 


18 


45 


146 


Shaftesbury Hall, Trinity St. 














22 


46 


12 


80 


80 


Lansdowne Place Schools, 
























Laws Street 














24 


57 


574 


655 


655 


Borough Market Hall, 9, 
























Park Street 














8 


14 


18 


40 


40 


London City Mission, Farm 
























House Miss., Harrow St. 














6 


27 


10 


43 


43 


London City Miss., Library 
























Street .... 














16 


31 


32 


79 


79 


London City Miss., Townley 
























Street . . . . 














4 


21 


8 


33 


33 


London City Miss., Arcadia 
























Hall, Warren Place . 


' 












6 


17 


14 


37 


37 


London City Mission, 81, 
























Webber Street . 












' 


8 


20 


18 


46 


46 


Red Cross Hall, Whitecross 
























Street .... 














124 


41 


15 


180 


180 


King's Court Mission . 














14 


36 


11 


61 


61 


Peculiar People, Bath Street 


7 


5 




12 


7 


8 


5 


20 


32 


Peculiar People, Garden Row 


10 


7 


"3 


20 


15 


14 


3 


32 


52 


Total .... 


55 




52 


416 


523 


395 


535 


1,510 


2,440 


2,963 



DENOMINATIONAL TOTALS 



DENOMINATION. 



Church of England 
„ „ Missions 

Wesleyan Meth. Church 
,, „ Mission 

Primitive Meth. Church 

Meth. New Connexion . 

Welsh CalMeth.Church 

Baptist Church 
„ Missions . 

Congregational Church. 
J, Missions 

Unitarian Church 

Bible Christian Church 

Salvation Army . 

Brethren 

Roman Catholic Church 

Other Services 

Jewish Church 

Grand Totals . 



MORNING. 



Men. Women. Chldrn. Total 



1,127 
10 

247 
39 
78 
35 
23 

926 
61 
94 
52 
8 
3 
31 

105 

1,036 

55 

116 



4,046 



1,277 
20 
202 
38 
38 
22 
11 

1,058 
24 
90 
37 
21 
1 
33 
143 

1,227 
52 
63 



4,357 



3,482 

311 

591 

123 

126 

132 

12 

900 

438 

237 

578 

88 

33 

11 

53 

1,494 

416 

129 



9,154 



5,886 
341 

1,040 

200 

242 

189 

46 

2,884 
523 
421 
667 
117 
37 
75 
301 

3,757 
523 
308 



17,557 



Men. Women. Chldrn. Total 



1,532 

73 

405 

53 

165 

48 

93 

1,435 

179 

217 

156 

16 

56 

93 

175 

395 



5,091 



2,547 

38 

632 

82 

206 

79 

73 

2,471 

249 

327 

211 

32 

"71 
156 
303 
535 



8,012 



1,729 

259 

1,110 

147 

596 

83 

58 

599 

999 

357 

1,601 

63 

36 

48 

262 

1,510 



9,457 



5,808 
370 

2,147 
282 
967 
210 
224 

4,505 

1,427 
901 

1,968 
111 

163 

297 

740 

2,440 



22,560 




DIAGRAM 

SKewir*^ Attendance. 




other Services 




Roman Catholic 



Other Services 




Black = Alt Services 



Red ^ Morning. 



etue - Evening 



Borough of Bermondsey 



CHURCH OF ENGLAND 





MORNING. 






EVENING. 




Total 


















for the 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Day. 


6 


4 


45 


55 


6 


6 


22 


34 


89 


61 


00 


175 


291 


56 


107 


85 


248 


539 


43 


84 


46 


173 


76 


235 


85 


396 


569 


39 


36 


146 


221 


56 


53 


86 


195 


416 


17 


10 


93 


120 


13 


31 


31 


75 


195 


25 


16 


32 


73 


120 


151 


233 


504 


577 


19 


47 


132 


198 


26 


109 


41 


176 


374 


31 


46 


105 


182 


56 


95 


53 


204 


386 


45 


58 


98 


201 


65 


114 


89 


268 


469 


14 


19 


121 


154 


22 


39 


50 


111 


265 


70 


68 


23S 


376 


93 


146 


78 


317 


693 


29 


38 


71 


138 


36 


65 


51 


152 


290 


28 


25 


112 


165 


17 


32 


19 


68 


233 


16 


23 


87 


126 


25 


42 


41 


108 


234 


75 


117 


139 


331 


103 


147 


69 


319 


650 


10 


9 


49 


68 


13 


26 


49 


88 


156 


24 


49 


168 


241 


26 


56 


45 


127 


368 


72 


106 


332 


510 


69 


151 


75 


298 


808 










10 


34 


27 


71 


71 


4 


5 


108 


117 


53 


87 


115 


255 


372 


628 


815 


2,297 


3,740 


941 


1.729 


1,344 


4,014 


7,754 



St. Olave's, Tooley Street . 
St. John's, Tower Bridge Rd. 
St. Mary Magdalene's, Ber- 
mondsey Street 
Christ Church, Parker's Row 
St. Anne's, Thorburn Square 
St. Crispin's, Southwark 

Park Road 
St. Hugh's, Crosby Row 
Clare College Mission, Ab 

bej-field Road . 
St. Luke's, Grange Road 
St. Paul's, Kipling Street 
St. James', Jamaica Road 
St. Augustine's, Lynton Rd 
St. Mary's, Rotherhithe 
AU Saints', Lower Road 
Christ Church, LTnion Road 
Holy Trin., Rotherhithe St 
St. Barnabas', Plough Road 
St. Katharine's, Eugenia Rd 
St. Paul's, Beatson Street 
St. Andrew's, Abbey Street 

Total .... 



Chiirch of England Missions 



St. John's, Tooley Street . 


3 


3 


147 


153 










153 


St. Crispin's, Cherry Gn. St. 


( 





129 


141 


27 


44 


289 


360 


501 


Llewellyn, New Church St. 




... 






9 


28 


26 


63 


63 


St. James', Alexis Street . 




2 


16 


18 


6 


17 


18 


41 


59 


College House, 47, Rother- 




















hithe Street 










3 


4 


60 


67 , 


67 


Christ Church Schools, Para- 




















dise Street 










10 


28 


20 


58 


58 


St. Katharine's, Eugenia Rd. 










t 


3 


127 


137 


137 


Grigg's Place, Grange Walk 
St. Peter's, Purbrook Street 


19 


9 


i64 


192 


20 


55 


31 


106 


298 










9 


29 


32 


70 


70 


C.M.S. Medical Mission, 




















Riley Street . 










2 


25 


28 


55 1 


55 


Oxford Medical Mission, 




















Abbey Street . 










12 




2S 


40 


40 


Clare College Mission . 


3 


t 


191 


201 










201 


Total .... 


32 


26 


647 


705 


105 


233 


659 


997 


1,702 



WESLEYAN METHODIST CHURCH 



Leroy Street 
Great Central Hall 
Lower Road, Rotherhithe 
Silver Street, Rotherhithe 

Total . 



147 

43 

9 



199 



125 

36 

6 



167 



346 

111 

38 



495 



618 

190 

53 



861 



4 

563 

56 

11 



S : 199 211 

ri4 1.110 I 2,387 

74 411 I 541 

S , 41 60 



634 



211 

3,005 
731 
113 



804 1,761 3,199 ' 4,060 



261 



262 



THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 



UNITED METHODIST FREE CHURCH 



CHURCH. 


MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldm. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


for the 
Day. 


Upper Grange Road . 
Manor Chapel 
Albion Street 


26 
85 
16 


24 

68 

9 


64 

154 

81 


114 
307 
106 


36 

295 
20 


65 

384 
36 


31 
203 

27 


132 

882 
83 


246 

1,189 

189 


Total .... 


127 


101 


299 


527 


351 


485 


261 


1,097 


1,624 





PRIMITIVE METHODIST 


CHURCH 








St. George's Hall, 

Road . 
Union Road . 


Old Kent 


104 
12 


64 
11 


338 
35 


506 
58 


131 
15 


122 
24 


446 
15 


699 
54 


1,205 
112 


Total . 


116 


75 


373 


564 


146 


146 


461 


753 


1,317 



BAPTIST CHURCH 



Lynton Road 

Abbey Street 

Drummond Road . 

Spa Road .... 


22 
36 
40 
10 


23 
28 
42 
14 


46 
43 
62 
14 


91 
107 
144 

38 


27 
61 
41 
19 


39 

89 

117 

37 


7 
42 
90 

8 


73 
192 

248 
64 


164 
299 
392 
102 


Total .... 


108 


107 


165 


380 


148 


282 


147 


577 


957 



Baptist Mission 



Arthur's Mission, Snowfields 



59 



68 



12 



15 



230 



325 



CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 



Union Chapel 
Jamaica Road 
Southwark Park Chapel 

Total . 



34 


29 


80 


143 


61 


73 


507 


641 


15 


17 


24 


56 


33 


63 


32 


128 


11 


11 


21 


43 


12 


17 


21 


50 


60 


57 


125 


242 


106 


153 


560 


819 



784 

184 

93 



1,061 



UNION CHURCH (CONGREGATIONAL-BAPTIST) 



Maynard Road 



19 



10 



81 



110 



29 



36 



57 



122 



232 







BRETHREN 












Camilla Room 
Midway Place Chapel . 
Anchor Hall 


18 

11 

2 


16 
8 
3 


6 

17 

2 


40 
36 

7 


19 

23 

2 


23 

37 

6 


8 

51 

2 


50 
111 

10 


90 

147 

17 


Total .... 


31 


27 


25 


83 


44 


66 


61 


171 


254 



PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 



Southwark Park Road 



47 45 



176 I 69 I 97 44 210 ! 386 



FOREIGN PROTESTANT 


SERVICES 








Norwegian, Rotherhithe St. 
Finnish, London Street, 
Plough Road . 


13 

8 


6 

5 


4 


19 
17 


5 






5 


24 
17 


Total .... 


21 


" 


4 


36 


5 






5 


41 



SOUTH LONDON— BERMONDSEY 

UNITARIAN CHURCH 



263 





MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 

for the 

Day. 




Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Fort Road .... 








17 


13 


14 


44 


44 



SALVATION ARMY 



Hickman's Folly, Dockhead 

Bermondsey Street 

Lower Road .... 

Total . . . . 



28 



19 



26 



73 



33 



11 
10 
15 



36 



53 



19 
62 
41 



122 



40 

78 

77 



195 



EVANGELICAL MISSION SERVICES 



Lower Road, Rotherhithe . 
Ark Church, Rotherhithe . 


193 
12 


176 
13 


209 
59 


578 

84 


359 
11 


403 

27 


118 
13 


880 
51 


1,458 
135 


Total .... 


205 


189 , 268 


662 


370 


430 


131 


931 


1,593 



ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH 



Immaculate Conception, 




















Rotherhithe Street . 


5 


76 


23 


104 


1 


3 


11 


15 


119 


St. Peter and All Angels, 




















Paradise Street . 


153 


201 


257 


611 


20 


56 


62 


138 


749 


Our Lady and St. Joseph, 




















Mehor Street . 


147 


340 


376 


863 


44 


116 


74 


234 


1,097 


Holy Trinity, Parker's Row 


347 


747 


560 


1,654 


45 


170 


78 


293 


1,947 


Total .... 


652 


1,364 


1,216 


3,232 


110 


345 


225 


680 


3,912 



OTHER SERVICES 



Melior Street Mission . 


3 




94 


97 


26 


59 


64 


149 


246 


St. Olave and St. John's In- 




















stitute, Tooley Street 










15 


30 


30 


75 


75 


Gelding Street Mission 




2 


25 


27 


9 


18 


14 


41 


68 


BermondseyRagged Schools, 
Gedling Street . 




























48 


46 


105 


199 


199 


Stephen the Yeoman Ragged 




















School .... 










15 


28 


405 


448 


448 


Mildmay Mission, 97, New 




















Church Street . 










19 


47 


9 


75 


75 


Percy Hall, 172a, Abbey St. 


1 




48 


49 


11 


29 


20 


60 


109 


St. Winifred's Hall, Lower 




















Road 


5 




151 


156 


52 


65 


59 


176 


332 


St. Winifred's Institute, 




















Orange Place . 


25 


7 




32 










32 


Seamen's Mission, 6, Cathay 




















Street .... 


5 


5 




10 


4 


5 


7 


16 


26 


Seamen's Chapel, Derrick St. 


3 


1 


24 


28 


5 


5 


9 


19 


47 


Sailor's Rest, Derrick Street 










3 


5 


16 


24 


24 


Working Men's Mission, 




















Abbey Street . 


4 


2 


64 


70 


8 


13 


6 


27 


97 


Grange Miss., 47,TheGrange 


5 


5 


92 


102 


18 


24 


20 


62 


164 


London City Mission, 118, 




















Weston Street . 










12 


21 


9 


42 


42 


London City Mission, Blue 




















Anchor Lane . 


9 






9 


10 


26 


13 


49 


58 


London City Mission, 24, 




















Paradise Street. 










112 


24 




136 


136 


Total .... 


60 


22 


498 


580 


367 


445 


786 


1,598 


2,178 



264 



THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 



DENOMINATIONAL TOTALS 



DENOMINATION. 

Church of England _ . 

„ „ Missions 

Wesleyan Meth. Church 
U. Meth. Free Church 
Primitive Meth. Church 
Baptist Church 

„ Mission 
Congregational Church 
Union Church 
Brethren 

Presbyterian Church 
Foreign Prot. Services 
Unitarian Church . 
Salvation Army . 
Evan. Mission Services 
Roman Catholic Church 
Other Services 

Grand Totals . 



MORNING. 


EVBNING. [ 


Men. 


Women. 


Cbldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


628 


815 


2,297 


3,740 


941 


1,729 


1,344 


4,014 


32 


26 


647 


705 


105 


233 


659 


997 


199 


167 


495 


861 


634 


804 


1,761 


3,199 


127 


101 


299 


527 


351 


485 


261 


1,097 


116 


75 


373 


564 


146 


146 


461 


753 


108 


107 


165 


380 


148 


282 


147 


577 


4 


5 


59 


68 


12 


15 


230 


257 


60 


57 


125 


242 


106 


153 


560 


819 


19 


10 


81 


110 


29 


36 


57 


122 


31 


27 


25 


83 


44 


66 


61 


171 


47 


45 


84 


176 


69 


97 


44 


210 


21 


11 


4 


36 


5 






5 




• • • 


... 




17 


13 


14 


44 


28 


19 


26 


73 


33 


36 


63 


122 


205 


189 


268 


662 


370 


430 


131 


931 


652 


1,364 


1,216 


3,232 


110 


345 


225 


680 


60 


22 


498 


580 


367 


445 


786 


1,598 


2,337 


3,040 


6,662 


12,039 


3,487 


5,315 


6,794 


15,.596 



Total 

for the 

Day. 

7,754 

1,702 

4,060 

1,624 

1,317 

957 

325 

1,061 

232 

254 

386 

41 

44 

195 

1,593 

3,912 

2,178 

27,635 



t'f m) 



\ 




Populatioi Roman Catholic 



c 


Other 


Services 




rt 








-0 








c 








V 
















< 




c 


a 






V 


i. 


a 


c 


B 


13 


H 




o 






other Services 




(S,*; 100 



90 



80 



70 



m 



50 



40 



30 



20 



10 



c 


3 


cd 




o 


o 






o 


3 




Pc] 


e 


1 


a. 
o 


o 


^ 


U 


a, 
15 


<B 


1 

3 


s 


G 


o 


Q 


J3 


o 


o 


f- 


H 


O 


Z 


oi 




DIAGRAM 

SKe-wing A.ttendance. 
TOTALS FOR SOUTH LONDON. 




other Services 




Black = 



P 



Blue = Evening 



Population 



All Churches 



Church of England 



Nonconformist 



Roman Catholic 



Other Services 




BiRok = All Sepvtces 



r-x 



TABLE 
SHOWING ATTENDANCE AT JEWISH SYNAGOGUES 

IN LONDON 



BOROUGH. 


STNAQOGUi 


3. Men. 


Women 


Chldm. 


Total. 


Stepney. 


Brick Lane, Spitalfields 


. 1,217 


89 


438 


1,744 










Sly Street, Cannon Street 


Road . . 116 


17 


53 


186 










Scarborough Street . 


82 


11 


47 


140 










St. Mary Street 


83 


2 


31 


116 










179, Hanbury Street 


54 


15 


57 


126 










Glory of Jacob, Fieldgat( 


3 Street . . 107 


5 


81 


193 










Limehouse, 236, Burdett 


Road . . 64 


8 


27 


99 










192, Whitechapel Road 


91 


16 


26 


133 










Wilkes Street . 


154 


16 


133 


303 










Lodz, Davis Mansions 


71 


5 


30 


106 










Sandys Row, Spitalfields 


310 


40 


121 


471 










113, New Road. 


271 


12 


139 


422 










Gun Street, Spitalfields 


82 


10 


53 


145 










Greenfield Street 


329 


36 


86 


451 










Fashion Street . 


134 


24 


61 


219 










Kiever, New Court . 


157 


2 


61 


220 










29, Fournier Street . 


80 


35 


26 


141 










45, Commercial Road 


150 


26 


55 


231 










Booth Street, Spitalfields 


207 


22 


136 


365 










Old Montagu Street . 


150 


61 


59 


270 










Fieldgate Street 


502 


48 


171 


721 










Dunk Street 


145 


29 


50 


224 










Cannon Street Road . 


547 


36 


503 


1,086 










Peace and Tranquillity, I 


>uckle Street . 47 






47 










Vine Court 


321 


"22 


"26 


369 










Old Castle Street 


270 


51 


130 


451 


M 








Great Garden Street 


409 


188 


219 


816 










Great Alie Street 


172 


14 


80 


266 










18, Princelet Street . 


189 


37 


64 


290 


» 








16, Princelet Street . 


200 


30 


40 


270 


>» 








German, Spital Square 


187 


33 


122 


342 


, 








East London, Stepney Gr 


een . . . 649 


92 


236 


977 










Artillery Street 


198 


21 


139 


358 










Hamboro', Union Street . 


214 


53 


62 


329 


City of London 




Great Synagogue, St. Jan 


les' Place . 1,021 


155 


427 


1,603 


,, 




Spanish and Portuguese, ] 


3evis Marks . 544 


43 


226 


813 


,, 




New Synagogue, Great St 


Helens . . 754 


261 


55 


1,070 






Polish, Carter Street 


52 




12 


64 


St. Pancras . 




Caversham Road 


48 


"32 


72 


152 


Hampstead . 




West End L .ne 


361 


317 


220 


898 


City of Westminster . 


St. Alban's Place . 


155 


34 


187 


376 


I) 


21, Maiden Lane 


26 


18 


25 


69 


i> 


Green's Court, Golden Sqi 


lare. . . 120 


34 


100 


254 


Stoke Newington . 


Princess Road . 


108 


152 


83 


343 


St. Marylebone . 




Upper Berkeley Street . 


627 


320 


164 


1,111 


M 




Central, Great Portland S 


treet . . 525 


210 


307 


1,042 


>> 




St. John's Wood, Abbey 1 


load . . 236 


233 


153 


622 


Islington 




39, Mildmay Park . 


53 


30 


13 


96 


„ 






Lofting Road . 


141 


74 


60 


275 


)> 






Poets' Road, Highbury . 


306 


275 


193 


774 


Hackney 






Devonshire Road 


228 


74 


257 


559 


,, 






Wellington Road, Dais ton 


92 


16 


68 


176 


,, 






Jews' Home, Wells Street 


25 


23 




48 


?) 






Birkbeck Road, Dalston . 


227 


79 


185 


491 


Paddington . 






Lauderdale Road 


156 


113 


62 


331 


>) 






Chichester Place 


389 


274 


95 


758 


>i 






St. Petersburgh Place 


328 


304 


105 


737 


Southwark . 






Vowler Street . 


116 


63 


129 


308 


Hammersmitl 


1 




Brook Green 


127 


78 


83 


288 


Kensington . 






Kensington Park Road . 


224 


37 


96 


357 


Woolwich 






Royal Assembly Rooms . 


34 




12 


46 


Poplar . 






East India Road 


28 


"1 


43 


72 




East Ham and Manor Par 


k . . . 57 


16 


39 


112 




Forest Gate, West Ham . 


42 


1 


25 


68 




Walthamstow . 
Grand Totals 


48 


2 


22 


72 










. 15,157 


4,375 


7,080 


26,612 



265 



Table showing Ratio of Attendance for each Borough 





BOROUGH. 


ALL AGES. 


MEN. 


WOMEN. 


DATE. 


Morning. 


1 
Evening. ■ 


Morning. 


Evening. 


Morning. 


Evening. 


1902. , 
Nov. 30 


Kensington 


1 in 6 


1 in 9 


1 in 8 


1 in 11 


1 in 5 


1 in 8 


» " 


Hampstead 


„ 7 


„ 8 


» 7 


» 8 


„ 7 


„ 7 


Dec. 7 


Battersea. 


» 14 


» 11 


„ 18 


„ 13 


„ 16 


.. 8 


»» » 


Paddington 


» 8 


„ 10 


„ 10 


„ 11 


,, 8 


„ 9 


„ 14 


St. Pan eras 


„ 11 


„ 10 


„ 14 


„ 13 


» 11 


„ 7 


1903. 
Jan. 4 


Lambeth . 
"Wandsworth . 


„ 10 
» 6 


» 8 
„ 10 


„ 13 
» 8 


» 9 
» 9 


„ 11 
,, 6 


„ 6 
„ 8 


» 11 


Westminster City . 


» 6 


» 7 


„ 8 


„ 9 


„ 6 


» 6 


„ 25 


Islington . 


„ 10 


„ 8 


„ 11 


» 9 


„ 10 


„ 6 


Feb. 1 


Southwark 


» 11 


„ 9 


„ 16 


„ 13 


,, 15 


„ 8 


» 8 


Poplar 


„ 13 


„ 10 


„ 20 


„ 13 


„ 18 


» 8 


„ 15 


Stoke Newington . 


„ 6 


„ 6 


„ 6 


» 6 


,, 3 


» 2 


„ 22 


Camberwell . 


„ 9 


» 7 


„ 11 


» 8 


„ 10 


„ 5 


Mar. 1 


Bermondsey . 


„ 10 


» 8 


„ 17 


„ 11 


„ 13 


,, 7 


„ 8 


Marylebone . 


» 5 


n 6 


,, 6 


„ 8 


» 5 


„ 5 


„ 15 


Lewisham 


,, 5 


„ 6 


» 6 


„ 6 


» 6 


» 5 


„ 22 


Hackney , 


„ 8 


„ 7 


„ 10 


„ 9 


» 9 


„ 5 


„ 29 


Greenwich 


„ 7 


„ 7 


„ 10 


„ 10 


» 8 


„ 6 


April 5 


Woolwich 


» 7 


,, 7 


„ 10 


„ 9 


„ 8 


» 5 


„ 19 


Bethnal Green 


„ 17 


» 9 


„ 25 


„ 13 


„ 23 


„ 8 


„ 26 


Deptford . 


„ 13 


» 9 


„ 15 


» 11 


„ 15 


„ 7 


May 3 


City of London 


„ 2 


n 2 


„ 1 


» 2 


„ 2 


„ 2 


„ 10 


Finsbury . 


„ 13 


» 8 


„ 13 


» 11 


„ 16 


„ 7 


n 17 


Chelsea . 


„ 7 


,, 8 


„ 10 


» 12 


„ 6 


M 8 


» 24 


Shoreditch 


„ 16 


» 11 


» 22 


„ 18 


„ 19 


„ 10 


June 7 


Molborn . 


„ 7 


» 9 


» 9 


„ 12 


„ 7 


„ 7 


,, 14 


Hammersmith 


,, 11 


» 14 


» 13 


„ 14 


n 12 


» 11 


» )> 


Fulham . 


„ 13 


„ 16 


,, 17 


„ 18 


„ 16 


» 14 


» 21 


Stepney . 


., 8 


„ 12 


» 7 


„ 15 


„ 12 


» 10 



266 



Table showing the Attendances of Men and Women in the Established, 
the Nonconformist, and the Roman Catholic Churches 



Date. 


BOROUGH. 


EST AS 


_.-_;_7^^D 


xoxcox 


FOKJaST. 


F.OMAX CATHOLIC. 




Me2. 


Wc-j^. 


M.'.. 


W;-ei:. 


Men. 


Wc=:.i. 


1 y02. 
>;ov. 30 


Kensington 


5,519 


14,509 


, 2,569 


4,420 


1,866 


5,009 


)• )J 


Hampsiead 


2,487 


5,828 


■ 2,591 


3,804 


361 


899 


Dec. 7 


Battersea. 


2,592 


4,997 


3,471 


4,272 


416 


625 


)> >) 


Paddington . 


3,4-53 


9.347 


3,090 


4,490 


408 


1.254 


» 14 


St. Pancra^. 


3,958 


7,453 


5,S1I 


8,391 


952 


1,674 


1903. 
Jan. 4 


Lambeth . 
Wandsworth . 


6,912 
6,685 


13,111 
12,640 


1 9,324 
6,450 


13,097 
8,675 


389 
1,554 


6Ci2 
2,912 


M 11 


Westminster City . 


7,916 


14,490 


4,086 


5,749 


2,168 


3,798 


„ 25 


Islington . 


6,690 


12,342 


11,192 


16,061 


1,204 


1,764 


Feb. 1 


Southwark 


2,74-2 


3.SS2 


4,618 


6,307 


1,211 


1,530 


n ^ 


Poplar . 


2,109 


3,754 


3,336 


4,127 


495 


a5S 


„ 15 


Stoke Xewington . 


1,661 


2,963 


2,709 


4,099 


135 


193 


„ 22 


Camberwell 


4,859 


8,878 


9,474 


14,126 


1,167 


1,908 


>rar. 1 


Bermondsey . 


1,706 


2.S03 


' 2.929 


3,376 


762 


1,709 


„ s 


Marylebone 


4,270 


11.3S0 


3.545 


5,S02 


1,161 


3,026 


„ 15 


Lewisham 


4,607 


10,182 


; 5,012 


7,233 


395 


7SS 




Hackney . 


4,097 


8,065 


7,782 


12,675 


893 


1,490 


.. -29 


Green-wich 


2,585 


4,482 


2,435 


3,543 


454 


81S 


April 5 


Woolwich 


2,592 


4,628 


4,103 


4,672 


1,208 


1,512 


» 19 


Betbnal Green 


1,775 


2,620 


2,242 


3,382 


244 


262 


„ -26 


Deptford . 


2,2S0 


3,273 


2.476 


3,289 


437 


493 


May 3 


City of London 


4,247 


3.946 


4,2S2 


3,411 


... 


... 


„ 10 


Finsbury . 


1,160 


2.005 


3.537 


3,844 


683 


633 


» 17 


Chelsea . 


2,032 


4.330 


1,146 


2,020 


370 


1,177 


„ 24 


Shoreditch 


1,272 


2.517 


1,S40 


2,609 


477 


600 


June 7 


Holborn . 


1,237 


2.222 


1,014 


1.494 


1,675 


1,916 


» 14 


Hammersmith 


1,749' 


3,066 


1 2,304 


2.656 

■ 


579 


1,02^ 


>> ?> 


Fulham . 


2,065 


3.292 


' 1,975 


i.b'-:--^ 


403 


939 


„ 21 


Stepney . 


3,150 


4.912 


, 5,586 


6,572 


1,S48 


3,357 



267 



Table showing State of Weather for each 
Enumeration, Population of each Borous 
and Ratios 



Borough on Day of 
;h, Total Attendances, 



BOROUQH. 


WEATHER. 


POPULATION. 


ATTENDANCES 
AT CHURCH. 


RATIO. 


City of London 




Wet 


26,332 


22,597 


1 in 1-16 


Marylebone 




Fine 


130,661 


43,559 


„ 3-00 


Stoke Newington . 




Showery 


51,156 


16,822 


„ 3-04 


Lewisham 




Fine 


125,951 


41,375 


„ 3-04 


Westminster City . 




Dull 


181,353 


50,666 


„ 3-58 


Woolwich. 




Dull 


116,137 


31,511 


„ 3-68 


Greenwich 




Fine 


93,475 


25,105 


„ 3-72 


Hampstead 




Wet 


80,947 


20,940 


„ 3-86 


Kensington 




Wet 


174,023 


44,153 


„ 3-90 


Hackney . 




Fine 


215,870 


54,931 


„ 3-92 


Camberwell 




Showery 


255,604 


64,046 


„ 3-99 


Chelsea . 




Wet 


70,190 


17,061 


„ 4-11 


Wandsworth . 




Unsettled 


226,899 


54,925 


„ 413 


Holborn . 




Fine 


58,290 


13,994 


„ 4-16 


Paddington 




Fine 


142,690 


31,331 


„ 4-55 


Islington . 




Showery 


328,994 


72,002 


„ 4-57 


Berniondsey 




Fine 


129,.368 


27,635 


„ 4-68 


Lambeth .... 




Wet 


298,188 


62,304 


„ 4-78 


Stepney . 




Fine 


294,524 


58,142 


„ 5-06 


Southwark 




Damp 


203,373 


40,117 


„ 5-06 


Finsbury . 




Fine 


101,119 


19,801 


„ 5-10 


St. Pancras 




Wet 


231,687 


42,156 


„ 5-49 


Deptford .... 




Very wet 


110,179 


19,569 


„ 5-63 


Poplar .... 




Fine 


165,352 


28,953 


„ 5-71 


Bethnal Green . 




Fine 


127,501 


20,696 


„ 616 


Hammersmith . 




Very wet 


110,682 


17,741 


„ 6 23 


Battersea . 




Fine 


168,215 


26,130 


„ 6-43 


Shoreditch 




Fine 


115,796 


16,791 


„ 6-89 


Fulham .... 




Very wet 


135,748 


18,308 


„ 7-41 



268 



Table showing Contribution of each Church in each Borough to 

Total Attendances 



Date. 


BOKOUGH. 


Established 
Chubch. 


Noncon- 
formist. 


Roman 
Catholic. 


Othke Total 
Services. Attendances. 


1902. 
Nov. 30 


Kensington . 


25,732 


9,016 


8,582 


823 


44,153 


» » 


Hampstead . 


10,683 


7,657 


1,599 


1,001 


20,940 


Dec. 7 


Battersea 


11,665 


11,624 


1,737 


1,104 


26,130 


>J 5> 


Paddington , 


16,871 


9,465 


2,071 


2,924 


31,331 


« 14 


St. Pancras . 


17,816 


18,369 


3,608 


2,363 


42,156 


1903.' 
Jan. 4 


Lambeth 
Wandsworth . 


27,880 
27,448 


31,822 
20,558 


1,543 

5,822 


1,059 
1,097 


62,304 
54,925 


,, 11 


Westminster City . 


29,755 


11,747 


7,705 


1,459 


50,666 


„ 25 


Islington 


28,170 


37,124 


4,001 


2,707 


72,002 


Feb. 1 


Southwark . 


12,405 


19,944 


4,497 


3,271 


40,117 


» 8 


Poplar . 


11,476 


13,162 


2,372 


1,943 


28,953 


„ 15 


Stoke Newington . 


6,210 


9,389 


398 


825 


16,822 


„ 22 


Camberwell . 


22,288 


35,422 


4,533 


1,803 


64,046 


Mar. 1 


Bermondsey . 


9,456 


12,089 


3,912 


2,178 


27,635 


M 8 


Marylebone . 


21,167 


11,608 


5,474 


5,310 


43,559 


,. 15 


Lewisham 


21,365 


17,310 


1,597 


1,103 


41,375 


„ 22 


Hackney 


18,609 


29,492 


3,312 


3,518 


54,931 


„ 29 


Greenwich . 


12,792 


9,400 


1,926 


987 


25,105 


April 5 


Woolwich 


12,335 


13,657 


4,212 


1,307 


31,511 


„ 19 


Bethnal Green 


7,992 


10,613 


729 


1,362 


20,696 


„ 26 


Deptford 


8,005 


8,824 


1,302 


1,438 


19,569 


May 3 


City of London . 


10,561 


8,076 




3,960 


22,597 


„ 10 


Finsbury 


5,523 


11,549 


1,728 


1,001 


19,801 


» 17 


Chelsea . 


9,723 


4,065 


1,961 


1,312 


17,061 


„ 24 


Shoreditch . 


7,118 


7,926 


1,409 


338 


16,791 


June 7 


Holborn 


4,938 


3,556 


4,567 


933 


13,994 


» 14 


Hammersmith 


7,446 


7,160 


2,263 


872 


17,741 


>» )> 


Fulham . 


9,502 


5,730 


2,310 


766 


18,308 


„ 21 


Stepney . 


14,891 


20,623 


8,402 


14,226 


58,142 




429,822 


416,977 


93,572 


62,990 


1,003,361 



269 



TABLE 

SHOWING CONTRIBUTION OP EACH BOROUGH 

TO TOTAL ATTENDANCES 







MORNING. 


EVENING. 




BOROUGH. 










Total for 
















1 


the Day. 




Men. 


Women. 


Childrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Childrn. 


Total. 


Kensington . 


5,960 


14,439 


6,134 


26,538 


4,325 


10,043 


3,252 


17,620 


44,153 


Hampstead . 


3,158 


5,693 


2,825 


11,676 


2,683 


5,213 


1,368 


9,264 


20,940 


Battersea 


2,873 


3,749 


4,903 


11,525 


3,933 


6,650 


4,022 


14,605 


26,130 


Paddington . 


4,239 


8,836 


4,286 


17,361 


3,860 


7,439 


2,671 


13,970 


31.331 


at, Pancras . 


5,340 


7,513 


7,293 


20,146 


5,947 


10,775 


5,288 


22,010 


42,156 


Lambeth 


7,216 


10,082 


10,196 


27,494 


9,665 


17,164 


7,981 


34,810 


62,304 


Wandsworth 


8,264 


13,784 


10,955 


33,003 


6,720 


10,912 


4,290 


21,922 


54,925 


Westminster City. 


7,995 


12,045 


7,395 


27,435 


6,716 


12,362 


4,153 


23,231 


50,666 


Islington 


9,117 


11,535 


11,417 


32,069 


10,940 


19,559 


9,434 


39,933 


72,002 


Southwark . 


4,046 


4,357 


9,154 


17,557 


5,091 


8,012 


9,457 


22,560 


40,117 


Poplar . 


2,650 


2,866 


7,011 


12,527 


3,813 


6,401 


6,212 


16,426 


28,953 


Stoke Newington . 


2,347 


3,267 


2,761 


8,375 


2,392 


4,316 


1,739 


8,447 


16,822 


Camberwell . 


6,842 


8,785 


12,513 


28,140 


9,014 


16,480 


10,412 


35,906 


64,046 


Bermondsey . 


2,337 


3,040 


6,662 


12,039 


3,487 


5,315 


6,794 


15,596 


27,635 


Marylebone . 


6,218 


11,576 


6,388 


24,182 


5,023 


10,626 


3,728 


19,377 


43,559 


Lewisbam . 


5,046 


8,475 


8,553 


22,074 


5,186 


10,110 


4,005 


19,301 


41,375 


Hackney 


6,417 


8,834 


10,451 


25,702 


7,310 


14,258 


7,661 


29,229 


54,931 


Greenwich . 


2,787 


3,975 


6,047 


12,809 


2,846 


5,103 


4,347 


12,296 


25,105 


Woolwich 


3,809 


4,424 


6,929 


15,162 


4,473 


6,675 


5,201 


16,349 


31,511 


Bethnal Green 


1,532 


1,778 


3,907 


7,217 


2,893 


4,779 


5,807 


13,479 


20,696 


Deptford 


2,354 


2,475 


3,476 


8,305 


3,038 


4,873 


3,353 


11,264 


19,569 


City of London 


6,539 


3,645 


2,245 


12,429 


4,490 


4,278 


1,400 


10,168 


22,597 


Finsbury 


2,548 


2,163 


2,979 


7,690 


2,929 


4,547 


4,635 


12,111 


19,801 


Chelsea 


2,057 


4,386 


2,445 


8,888 


1,765 


3,712 


2,696 


8,173 


17,061 


Shoreditch . 


1,630 


1,982 


3,304 


6,916 


2,033 


3,860 


3,982 


9,875 


16,791 


Holborn 


2,389 


2,987 


2,161 


7,537 


1,783 


2,839 


1,835 


6,457 


13,994 


Hammersmith 


2,546 


3,420 


4,012 


9.978 


2,365 


3,605 


1,793 


7,763 


17,741 


Fulbam 


2,374 


2,990 


4,604 


9,968 


2,273 


3,449 


2,61S 


8,340 


18,308 


Stepney 


12,692 


7,412 


14,100 


34,204 


6,312 


9,131 


8,495 


23,938 


58,142 


Grand Totals 


133,322 


180,513 


185,106 


498,941 


133,305 


232,486 


138,629 


504,420 


1,003,361 



270 



TABLE 

SHOWING DENOMINATIONAL TOTALS 

FOR LONDON 





MORNING. 1 


EVENING. 


Total 
for the 


DENOMINATION. 




















Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Ken. 


Women. 


Chldm. 


Total. 


Day. 


Church of England 


46,343 


84,602 


74,698i 


205,643 


48,396 


96,680 


45,477 


190,553 


396,196 


,, ., Missions 


740 


887 


13,152 


14,779 


2,928 


6,048 


9,871 


18,847 


33,626 


Baptist Church 


12,291 


14,532 


14,581 


41,404 


16,496 


28,173 


12,562 


57,231 


98,635 


,, Missions . 


280 


199 


2,547 


3,026 


971 


1,781 


4,042 


6,794 


9,820 


Congregational Church . 


13,106 


14,728 


12,265 


40,099 


16,700 


24,439 


10,590 


51,729 


91,828 


,, Missions 


399 


242 


3,559 


4,200 


1,211 


2,209 


6,087 


9,507 


13,707 


Wesleyan Meth. Church 


8,400 


8,997 


12,490 


29,887 


12,058 


18,248 


12,637 


42,943 


72,830 


,, ,, Missions 


387 


241 


1,149 


1,777 


770 


1,131 


1,631 


3,532 


5,309 


Presbyterian Church . 


3,692 


5,084 


2,841 


11,617 


3,927 


5,861 


1,516 


11,304 


22,921 


,, Missions . 


43 


37 


381 


461 


264 


516 


616 


1,396 


1,857 


Salvation Army . 


2,275 


2,138 


2,514 


6,927 


4,411 


6,668 


4,396 


15,475 


22,402 


Brethren . . . 


2,544 


2,995 


1,313 


6,852 


2,783 


4,522 


2,655 


9,960 


16,812 


Evan. Mission Services . 


1,006 


969 


1,625 


3,600 


3,012 


5,886 


2,602 


11,500 


15,100 


Primitive Meth. Church 


1,379 


999 


3,261 


5,639 


2,216 


2,832 


2,794 


7,842 


13,481 


U. Meth. Free Church . 


907 


914 


1,745 


3,566 


1,581 


2,429 


1,572 


5,582 


9,148 


Unitarian Church . 


456 


741 


^685 


1,882 


536 


748 


433 


1,717 


3,599 


Cath. Apostolic Church 


671 


829 


285 


1,785 


562 


622 


263 


1,447 


3,232 


Bible Christian Church 


214 


237 


392 


843 


686 


962 


540 


2,188 


3,031 


Society of Friends . 


560 


416 


444 


1,420 


304 


521 


742 


1,567 


2,987 


Foreign Prot. Services . 


597 


552 


165 


1,314 


550 


510 


119 


1,179 


2,493 


Welsh Cal. Meth. Church 


209 


114 


80 


403 


604 


577 


193 


1,374 


1,777 


Meth. New Connexion . 


166 


149 


410 


725 


235 


393 


272 


900 


1,625 


Disciples of Christ. 


152 


188 


160 


500 


172 


337 


196 


705 


1,205 


Christadelphian Church 


171 


187 


79 


437 


185 


200 


67 


452 


889 


New Jerusalem Church 


175 


183 


109 


467 


161 


179 


45 


385 


852 


Cal. Independent Church 


131 


128 


87 


346 


142 


277 


47 


466 


812 


Free Episcopal Churches 


71 


100 


57 


228 


39 


97 


18 


154 


382 


Sandemanian Church. . 


26 


34 


21 


81 


18 


27 


17 


62 


143 


Moravian Church . 


15 


25 


3 


43 


12 


18 


27 


57 


100 


Roman Catholic Church 


18,784 


32,884 


22,012 


73,680 


5,071 


9,890 


4,931 


19,892 


93,572 


Other Services 


17,132 


6,182 


11,996 


35,310 


6,304 


9,705 


11,671 


27,680 


62,990 


Grand Totals . 


133,322 


180,513 


185,106 


498,941 


133,305 


232,486 


138,629 


504,420 


1,003,361 



271 



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Total Attendance of Men 
Church of England 
Nonconformist 


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Roman Catholic 
Other Services 


Total Population of Women 
Total Attendance of Women 
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Other Services 

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WEST LONDON 



TOTALS 




Blue = Nonconformist 
orshippers reside in otlier Boroughs. 



Blue (Dotted)- Other Service 



EAST LONDON 



SOUTH LONDON 



NORTH LONDON 



■WEST LONDON 




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H F.ng)..nd Red (Oottedl =Roman Catholic Blue Nonconfor 

NOTE.— The extraurdlniry ratio ol Church Attendance for the City of London Is due to the fact that L ' malority of worshipper* reside In other Boroughs. 



Blue (Dotted) Otner Ser 



r> 



Facts and Forces not Enumerated 

BY THE REV. HENRY MANN 

There are forces at work in the religious world that escape the most 
vigilant enumerator. The counting of worshippers can at best be 
but a rough indication of the outward influences at work in any 
particular, Church. No tale of numbers can possibly gauge the 
strength of those subtle spiritual forces which are surprisingly 
indifferent to a mere collection of faces. Perhaps in the last 
analysis it may be found that a small congregation of men and 
women whose hearts burn with an unquenchable zeal for the 
establishment of the kingdom of God are doing more to bring 
about that great consummation than the great crowd who flock to 
hear a popular preacher. There is sometimes a mischievous fallacy 
in numbers. A crowd is not a church. Once, at least, a handful 
of fishermen, despised by the hierarchy, succeeded in turning the 
world upside down. It is as untrue in Church work as in war that 
" God is always on the side of the big battalions." 

It was not in the minds of the originators of the Church Census 
to take cognisance of the secret workings of the Spirit of truth. 
Their endeavour was to try and discover how far the organised 
Churches were influencing the people to attend their ministrations, 
and whether the power of the Church as an instrument of righteous- 
ness was estimated at its true value by the body politic. In this 
laudable aim the only possible test was the test of numbers. By 
an enumeration of the worshippers an approximation could be 
obtained of the hold the Church had secured on the mind of the 
nation, the scope of the inquiry being restricted to the ordinary 
public services. Obviously, the scheme had its limitations. It was 
not found practicable to include all the operations of a Church's 
activity. Had this been possible, and the enumeration covered the 
week-days and the whole of Sunday, it would have been found that 

273 18 



274 THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 

the ramifications of tlie Church's influence penetrate into quarters 
of our national life little suspected. 

It is the object of this paper to supply some facts untouched 
by the enumerator. 

The work of the Church among the young is only touched by 
the Census when the morning scholars happened to be drafted 
into the church for the public service, or where a special service 
was being held for young people at the same hour as the public 
service. This necessarily shut out of view a huge slice of Church 
influence and work, a work to which increasing attention is being 
paid, and for which the most energetic churchmen of both schools 
are continually perfecting their machinery. During the last twenty- 
five years the greatest proportion of the additions to Church mem- 
bership in the Free Churches has come from the Sunday schools, 
while during the same period the number of those added to the 
Church by the old-time method of " conversion " has sensibly 
diminished. Some time ago a leading religious journal had a series 
of articles and a long correspondence on " The Dearth of Modern 
Conversions." The impression of the controversy that lingers 
longest is that the Churches' hope for their permanence and growth 
lies in their closer attention to Sunday-school work. The intima- 
tion has not been lost sight of. The Sunday-school methods are 
being brought up to date, and the most progressive Churches are no 
longer content to leave this all-important work to the inexperienced 
and the untrained. 

The same remark applies to the Anglican and Roman Catholic 
schools. By far the largest number of candidates for confirmation 
in the Episcopal Church come from the Sunday schools or the guilds 
that have adopted the methods of St. Sulpice ; while the careful and 
persistent oversight of the young in the Roman Communion has 
almost passed into a proverb. In the Anglican Sunday schools, 
Bible-classes, and guilds in the London and Rochester dioceses there 
are over half a million registered members. In the auxiliaries of 
the Sunday School Union covering the same area, and in the Free 
Church schools not affiliated with the Union, there are over 600,000 
scholars registered. The average attendance at schools and guilds 
has been variously computed at anything between 65 and 75 per 
cent, of the registered membership. At the lowest reckoning we 
have nearly three-quarters of a million of young people in constant 
attendance on Sundays for the purpose of receiving religious 
instruction. It is only fair to assume that the young people who 



FACTS AND FOECES NOT ENUMERATED 275 

are thus instructed during the most impressionable period of their 
lives are as capable of receiving moral and religious impetus as 
those of older years who are reckoned as having attended divine 
service. 

Yet by the terms of their instructions the Census enumerators 
were compelled to leave this great and far-reaching work untouched. 
But no estimate of the value of the Church's work among the 
populace can approach anything like accuracy that leaves it out 
of view. 

The same is to be said of two movements, either under the 
direct control of, or associated with, the Church, which have had 
a rapid development during the last twenty years — the Pleasant 
Sunday Afternoon and the Adult School movement. As these two 
movements are being dealt with by other writers, only a few words 
are necessary here. 

The former movement aims professedly at reaching the ordinary 
non-church-goer. Its title contains an implied protest against the 
supposed dulness of the English Sabbath to the man to whom 
a Church service makes no strong appeal. While lacking the 
usual reverence that is expected at a service for Divine worship, 
the P.S.A. contains a strong element of devotion; and while the 
addresses and musical accompaniments may not always have a 
religious flavour, the religious atmosphere is never wanting. The 
movement may be fairly described as religious in the true sense 
of the word, and many instances have been known of the man 
first attracted by the free-and-easy method of the P.S.A. being 
drawn into closer association with Church life and organisation. 
"We do not think we are overstating the case when we say that 
this movement in certain districts has succeeded in attracting the 
outsider when the ordinary service of the Church has failed. At 
any rate, in estimating the work of the Church in the world this 
movement cannot be left out of the reckoning. That it is popular 
may be seen from the fact than an attendance of five or six 
hundred is by no means uncommon ; that it is powerful for good 
may be gauged by the number of its members whose lives have 
been transformed. 

The Adult School movement is making its way quietly yet 
perceptibly, as befits an organisation largely controlled and inspired 
by the Society of Friends. In fact, the movement suffers to some 
extent by its modesty. Meeting in the early morning, with no 
parade or ostentation, but simply inspired by a desire to study in 



276 THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 

co-operation tlie "Word of God, this movement is doing more to 
fashion religious opinion and mould religious character than many 
of the Churches. It may be a surprise to many of our readers to 
know that the membership of these classes has grown into 
thousands during the last decade, and is still making rapid 
progress. The affiliated schools are virile and enthusiastic. This 
movement must necessarily be included in any estimate of the 
religious forces of London. 

Still restricting our view to the Sabbath day, notice must be 
taken of the morning and evening prayer-meetings, and, in the case 
of the Methodists, the class-meeting. While it may be readily 
granted that during recent years both the prayer-meeting and the 
class-meeting have sadly declined in numbers, they are by no means 
the least influential of the inner forces of the Church's life. It is 
probable that in London the week-night class-meeting in the 
Wesleyan and other Methodist Churches has been to a great extent 
superseded b}^ the Sunday morning class-meeting, or has given 
way, among young people, to the Wesley Guild and the Christian 
Endeavour meeting. Whether this be so or not, the Sunday class- 
meeting is a favourite means of grace to many Methodists, and 
in the most aggressive churches manifests a real spiritual vitality. 
The Sunday evening prayer-meeting may be generally regarded as 
a continuation of the public service, but the same cannot be said 
of the morning meeting for prayer. This is a separate service 
entirely, and in some churches is regarded, and rightly so, as an 
important feature of the day's work. Though the attendances are 
necessarily restricted, the influence of such gatherings is felt at all 
the subsequent activities of the day. 

Again, the Census enumerators were debarred from taking 
cognisance of what is a feature in many Congregational and Baptist 
churches, viz. the " Social Hour," usually held in the lecture-hall 
or church parlour. The aim of this gathering is to give the pastor 
and officers an opportunity of coming into more direct personal 
contact with strangers than is possible in the public service, and 
to give young people an opportunity of forming friendships and 
relieving the monotony of a day that drags somewhat wearily. The 
gathering is of a free and homely character, light refreshments are 
handed round, the pastor and deacons mix freely with their guests, 
and the hour is closed with family prayer. It must not be supposed 
that the frequenters of the " Social Hour " are always those who 
have been present at the preceding public service. Undoubtedly 



FACTS AND FORCES NOT ENUMERATED 277 

a goodly number of worshippers accept the invitation extended from 
the pulpit, but many find their way to the social gathering who 
scrupulously avoid the public worship. And who shall say that 
upon them the religious influence of the Social Hour is wasted ? , 

Turning back to the early part of the day, the religious work 
of the Boys' Brigades calls for a short notice. While criticisms 
have been made upon the military side of this movement, the 
religious side calls for merited commendation. One of the 
regulations of each company is that the members attend a 
Sunday morning or week-day parade for Bible study. Anghcan 
workers in this movement speak in glowing terms of the influence 
of this instruction in forming habits of devotion and reverence 
among a somewhat raw human material. 

A phase of Church work that is rarely made public is the 
systematic lodging-house visits, and the voluntary services con- 
ducted in workhouses and infirmaries. Churches m the City and 
suburbs regularly draft some of their workers on Sunday evenings 
to the adjacent buildings, to conduct services in the courtyards 
or in the rooms. The general public has no conception of the 
large numbers of people who are thus ministered unto-people 
who are too indifferently clad, or too wearied or frail, to venture 
into public places, but who welcome in their own neighbourhoods 
a homely and unofficial service. In one church known to us the 
Census returns suffered by at least one hundred worshippers 
because the workers were engaged in quarters unknown and 
unsuspected by the enumerators. Similarly, bands of workers go 
forth on Sunday afternoons to minister to the poor and destitute 
in workhouses and workhouse infirmaries. 

Perhaps the greatest religious activity untabulated is that of 
outdoor preaching. This form of propaganda is carried on m 
London to an extent unknown in the provinces. It is not without 
reason that the superintendent of the Census pleads for an 
extension and an improved quality of this form of work. Many 
Churches have realised its value, and prosecute the work more 
or less efficiently; but in its crudest form it is a great factor m 
the religious life of the community. Let the inquirer proceed o 
any of the public parks on Sunday afternoons, or take a walk 
through any of the main thoroughfares on Sunday evenmgs, and 
for a? least six months during the year he will come across 
bands of earnest men and women, giving testimony, smgmg 
gospel songs, uttering fervent appeals, and in their own way 



278 THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 

declaring tlie good news of the kingdom. Occasionally he will be 
arrested by the proclamation of the truth by men who have 
cultivated aU the arts of outdoor oratory, and not unfrequently 
will listen to a discourse that has already done duty within doors. 
It is to the praise of many ministers that they lead their flocks 
to these open-air pastures. It is manifestly impossible to gauge the 
number of outsiders who are attracted by these al fresco preachings, 
but their number must be very considerable. At least, the man 
in the street has an opportunity of hearing the Word, and 
though immediate results are not always apparent, the seed must 
find a lodging occasionally in good ground. At any rate, it was 
the Master's method, and His modern disciples, to some degree, 
though not as extensively as might be, are following it. In order to 
illustrate the far-reaching character of this work, the superintendent 
of the Census has given in the appendix the numbers attending 
several typical open-air gatherings. Obviously it would be difficult, 
if not impossible, for the enumerators to cover the whole ground. 

Bare mention must suffice of other agencies doing their work 
out of the gaze of the public, as tract distribution, the Home 
Sunday School, the Mission to Goalies, the Navvy Mission, the 
Barmaids' Mission, the Midnight Meeting movement, and others. 
In each of these, Sunday is found to be the best day for the 
operations of the workers. 

No review of religious life and work would be complete that 
did not include the multifarious activities of the Churches during 
the days of the week. The mid-day services in some of the City 
churches call the broker, merchant, clerk, or warehouseman to a 
short diet of worship, and not in vain. From the City Temple 
with its thousands, to St. Bride's, Fleet Street, with its score, and 
at least thirty other churches and chapels with congregations of 
varying magnitude, the life of the Spirit is projected into the 
bustling and tumultuous life of the world. The morning and 
evening service at St. Paul's and the collegiate churches, the 
Lenten and Advent special series of services, the feast days and 
patronal saints' days observed with befitting reverence, touch the 
life of the religious-minded Londoner into finer issues. 

Neither must it be forgotten that many mothers and housewives 
are debarred by domestic duties from attendance at the house 
of God on Sundays. For these, in many churches, provision is 
made on Monday afternoon ; and the Women's Own, the Mothers' 
Meeting, the Women's Guild, and other similar agencies have a 



FACTS AND FORCES NOT ENUMERATED 279 

registered attendance, wliicli in some instances mounts up into 
the hundreds. 

The work of the agents employed by the London City Mission 
in their visitations and impromptu services should not pass 
■without recognition. And in the same connection, the excellent, 
though unrecorded, work of the various Deaconesses and Sisters 
of the poor now associated with so many churches, both Established 
and Free, ought not to be overlooked. The pastoral visitations 
of the clergy and Nonconformist ministers, in so many instances 
carried out with systematic regularity, are an important factor in 
estimating the non-public ministrations of Christian workers. 

A single sentence must sufhce for the mid-day prayer-meetings 
at the Y.M.C.A.s carried on all the year round, and also for the 
training colleges and schools for Bible study at the Sunday 
School Union and other centres, the influences of which cannot be 
calculated. 

Perhaps of all the week-night agencies of the Church, the 
Society of Christian Endeavour is the most influential for good. 
In some Churches it is the one great driving force ; in many it is 
the organisation that shows signs of greatest vitality ; and in all 
it is the only training-ground for the workers of the future. In 
the Wesleyan Methodist Church the corresponding society is the 
"Wesley Guild. It is safe to say that in these two societies many 
thousands of young people in London find their deepest satisfactions, 
and realise their highest aspirations. 

The Pleasant Evening movement has become a power in some 
Churches, and has succeeded in attracting men and women for 
whom a distinctly devotional service has no charms. Some of these 
"Evenings" are attended by hundreds of working men and their 
wives. 

We can only mention the literary and mutual improvement 
societies, recreative clubs and guilds in association with many 
churches, the members of which necessarily come under more or 
less well-defined religious influence. 

This rapid survey of religious activity out of the purview 
of the enumerators may serve to some extent to correct the 
tendency to fall into an attitude of pessimism when estimating the 
value and power of the Church's hold upon the masses. 



The Daily News Census (1902-3) compared 
with the British Weekly Census (1886) 

BY JANE T. STODDART 

When Dr. Robertson NicoU was planning the first numbers of the 
British Weekly in the autumn of 1886, the idea occurred to him 
of taking a religious census of the attendance at London churches. 
Major Colquhoun, of Lyons, who had previously superintended a 
similar but much smaller work in Glasgow, undertook the general 
charge of the enumeration. On Sunday, October 24th, 1886, about 
fifteen hundred churches and chapels were visited, the number of 
persons employed amounting to several thousands. The day was 
bright, though cold, and there is every reason to believe that the 
attendance was fully up to the average. A census of the mission- 
halls was taken on the last Sunday of November 1887. In this case 
the results were furnished by the persons in charge of the halls. 
The figures in each case were accepted by all parties as 
substantially correct. Amongst those who wrote to thank the 
editor were Mr. GTladstone and Dean Farrar. Dr. Walsham How, 
then Bishop of Bedford, wrote : " We all owe you a great debt of 
gratitude for the census of attendance at public worship which 
you have made with so much pains and with such an evident 
desire to be strictly accurate. Such a laborious work could not 
be carried through without some errors or omissions, but these 
seem to be comparatively few, and will, I have no doubt, be 
corrected when your work appears in a final form. I think the 
result is distinctl}'- encouraging, and I heartily sympathise with 
your hopeful deduction from the statistics you have collected." 

The population of " Smaller London " in 1881 amounted to 
3,816,483. By 1901 it had increased to rather more than 4,500,000. 
In the various places of worship, including missions, the British 
Weekly estimated an attendance of 1,167,312; the Daily News of 
1,003,361. Although the population of the London area has 

280 



CENSUS OF 1902-3 COMPARED WITH CENSUS OF 1886 281 

increased by some 500,000 during the last seventeen years, there 
has, nevertheless, been a decrease of over 160,000 in church 
attendances. I propose in this article to compare the results of 
the British Weekly Census with those presented by the Daily Neivs^ 
and to examine in detail the figures of the larger religious com- 
munities. An absolutely confident assertion is rendered difficult 
by the fact that, while the 1886 Census was taken on one fine 
Sunday, the Daily News Census was spread over many months, 
including the entire winter, and some of the Sundays were wet 
or foggy. Had the Daily News Census been taken only on fine 
Sundays it is probable that the results would have been better. 
The development of the week-end habit since 1886 no doubt 
partially explains the falling off in certain west-end boroughs. 



A DETAILED COMPARISON 
I.— THE CHUUCH OF ENGLAND 

When the British Weekly Census was taken, the Church of England 
in London had a great preponderance over all forms of Noncon- 
formity put together. The most startling feature of the Daily 
News Census is the decrease of worshippers in the Established 
Church. The Guardian, commenting on Dr. Robertson Nicoll's 
figures as given in the paper he read in July 1902 at Sion College, 
says : " If his calculations are correct, the outcome is, that, while 
the population of the London area has increased by some 500,000 
during the last seventeen years, there has, nevertheless, been a 
decrease of something like 150,000 in the attendances. This 
decrease is almost confined to the Church of England, for whereas 
Nonconformity shows a falling off from 369,000 to 363,000 (in round 
numbers) the Church attendances have diminished from 535,000 to 
396,000, excluding mission-halls. In other words, religious worship 
generally has not kept pace with population, and in the Church 
of England there are only three worshippers in 1902-3 for every 
four who were found there in 1886. The figures which concern 
the Church are so remarkable that we hope that they will form 
the subject of a special inquiry by the authorities of the dioceses 
of London and Rochester. The Wesleyan Methodist Conference, 
we notice, has appointed a Committee to inquire into the statistics 
affecting Wesleyan Methodism, and a joint committee might well 



282 



THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 



be appointed by the Bishops to whom the spiritual oversight of 
the metropolis is entrusted." 

The number of worshippers at the Anglican churches for 
the morning and evening services realised in 1886 the total of 
535,715, exclusive of missions. The Daily News gives a total 
of 396,196, excluding missions. The decline of nearly 140,000 in 
the Anglican figures would of itself account for the total decrease 
which has taken place in the last sixteen years. In 1886 the 
number of Nonconforming worshippers at the two services, ex- 
cluding missions and the Salvation Army, was 369,349, the Church 
of England having thus a majority over all Nonconformists of 
about 165,000. The Daily News Census gives the total Noncon- 
formist figures, excluding missions and the Salvation Army, as 
363,882. The Free Churches, as Dr. Nicoll has pointed out, have 
not quite held their ground, but they have held it so nearly that 
the numerical distance between them and the Church of England 
has almost disappeared. " The Daily News estimates that the 
Church of England and her missions number 429,822 worshippers, 
while the Nonconformist Churches and their missions, including 
the Salvation Army, which has a total attendance of 22,402, 
number 416,977. For one Church of England worshipper there 
is practically another Nonconformist worshipper." 

A. THE CHURCH OF ENGLAND IN THE RICHER 

BOROUGHS 

In the borough of Kensington we find that in the parish 
church of St. Mary Abbott the attendance had increased from 
3,800 in 1886 to 3,900 in 1902-3. Under Canon Somerset Penne- 
father the work of St. Mary Abbott's and its daughter churches 
is maintained as earnestly and successfully as in the time of 
Bishop Carr Glyn. The figures of several other Kensington 
churches are less encouraging, as will be seen from the following 
table : 



KENSINGTON. 


1886. 


1902-3. 


St. Stephen's 

St. Philip's, Earl's Court Road 
St. Peter's, Cranley Gardens .... 
St. Peter's, Kensington Park .... 
St. Paul'.s, Onslow Square .... 
St. Mary's, Boltons 


1,407 
1,752 
1,683 
1,433 
2,970 
1,457 


811 

880 
1,174 

827 
1,699 

417 



CENSUS OF 1902-3 COMPARED WITH CENSUS OF 1886 283 

In tlie borough of Hampstead the census was taken in bad 
weather. A notable decline here was at Christ Church, a well- 
known Evangelical centre, which had amongst its former Vicars 
Bishop Bickersteth, of Exeter, and the Rev. G. F. Head, now of 
Clifton. Here the numbers in 1886 were 2,325 for the day. In 
1902-3 they were only 909. At St. Stephen's, Hampstead Green, 
the attendance in 1886 was 1,372, in 1902-3 only 643. At Trinity 
Church, Finchley Road, the British Weekly figures were 2,050 for 
one day, those of the Daily News only 951. 

Paddington is another wealthy borough. Its churches were 
visited by the Daily News enumerators on Sunday, December 7th, 
1902, a cold, but dry, clear day. In Paddington the Church of 
England has a considerable preponderance in numbers over the 
other denominations, but the decrease at many leading Anglican 
places of worship was significant as compared with 1886. The 
following comparative table for Paddington shows, amongst other 
things, how seriously the week-end habit is affecting West London : 



PADDINGTON. 



St. Michael's .... 
St. James's .... 
Christ Church, Lancaster Gate 
St. Matthew's, Bayswater 
Holy Trinity Church 
St. Mary's, Paddington Green . 
St. Stephen's .... 
Emmanuel Church . 
St. Paul's ..... 
St. Augustine's .... 
St. Saviour's .... 
St. Mary Magdalene's 



1886. 



1902-3. 



1,638 


653 


1,215 


655 


2,888 


1,825 


2,524 


1,601 


2,346 


714 


626 


393 


2,605 


1,576 


642 


330 


1,270 


458 


1,651 


1,196 


2,050 


1,054 


2,105 


863 



In the borough of St. Maeylebone the Church of England 
worshippers, while still in a large majority over those of other 
denominations, show a decline in seventeen years of 6,000; 
the highest figures for the entire Borough were those of Holy 
Trinity, an Evangelical church which is prospering greatly 
under the ministry of the Rev. E. Grose Hodge. Generally 
speaking, it may be said that energetic, modern-minded clergy- 
men, like the Eev. H. Eussell Wakefield, of St. Mary's, Bryanston 
Square, gather round them a good congregation, but that where 
the preaching has no popular attractions the tendency to decline 
is emphasised. 



284 



THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 



The comparative table for this borough presents some features of 
interest : 



ST. MARYLEBONE. 


1886. 


1902-3. 


Church of St. Mary-le-bone 


2,647 


1,537 


All Souls', Langhani Place 








1,699 


1,451 


Christ Church, Stafford Street 








805 


656 


All Saints', Margaret Street 








930 


734 


Holy Trinity Church, Marylebone Road . 








1,498 


1,713 


St. Andrew's, Wells Street 








2,023 


1,072 


St. Cyprian's, Dorset Square 








231 


147 


St. Barnabas', Bell Street .... 








444 


239 


St. James's, Westmoreland Street . 








1,007 


209 


St. Luke's, Nutford Place 








748 


367 


St. Mark's, Hamilton Terrace .... 








2,366 


1,202 


St. Mary's, Bryanston Square . 








647 


1,057 


St. Mark's, IMarylebone Road . 








340 


729 


St. Matthew's, Carlisle Street . 








119 


181 


St. Paul's, Great Portland Street 








677 


360 


St. Paul's, Portman Square 








2,556 


1,097 


St. Peter's, Vere Street .... 








1,342 


1,607 


St. Thomas's, Orchard Street . 








673 


536 


Church of the Annunciation, Quebec Street 








1,101 


931 


All Saints', Finchley Road 








1,731 


683 


Emmanuel Church, Maida Hill . 








909 


656 


Brunswick Church, Upper Berkeley Street 








617 


1,222 



B. MIDDLE-CLASS AND POORER BOROUGHS 

The decline in the Established Church is fairly uniform all 
over London, affecting rich, middle class, and poor districts. In 
Battersea, for example, where the Daily News Census was taken in 
clear, cold weather, the totals for the Anglican and Free Churches 
were almost exactly equal. The Church of England had an attend- 
ance for the day of 11,665 ; the Free Churches of 11,624. The 
accompanying table shows where the decrease has been most 
seriously felt: 



BATTERSEA. 



St. Philip's 

St. Saviour's 

St. George's 

St. Michael's, Battersea Rise 

Christ Church . 



1886. 



928 

670 

457 

1,305 

1,033 



1902 3. 



434 
323 
360 
557 
423 



Camberwelx, may be considered a middle-class borough, and 
there the total Anghcan attendance was 22,288 ; the Nonconformist, 
35,422. Here, again, there is in the Church of England a general 



I 



CENSUS OF 1902-3 COMPARED WITH CENSUS OF 1886 285 

tendency towards reduction, and in some cases an almost inexplic- 
able decline. Why is it, we must ask, tliat at the important and 
prominently situated church of St. Giles the attendance has sunk 
from 1,982 to 814? What accounts for the decline at St. Jude's 
from 1,300 to 456, and at St. Luke's, the Ritualist centre, where the 
Rev. H. B. Chapman toiles heroically amongst the poor, from 
1,678 to 840 ? 



CAMBERWELL. 


1886. 


1902-3. 


Camden Church, Peckham Road . 


1,039 


719 


Emmanuel Church . 








760 


556 


St. Giles's, Church Street 








1,982 


814 


Christ Church, Old Kent Road 








731 


402 


St. Andrew's, Glengall Road . 








400 


331 


St. Chrysostom's, Hill Street . 








574 


657 


St. Jude's, Meeting House Lane 








1,300 


456 


St. Mark's, Coburg Road 








333 


472 


St. George's, Well Street . 








866 


760 


St. Luke's, Rosemary Road 








1,678 


840 


Dulwich College Chapel . 








835 


566 


St. Philip's, Avoudale Square . 








532 


353 


St. Peter's, Duhvich. 








1,023 


719 


St. Paul's, Heme Hill . 








827 


717 


St. Stephen's, Dulwich . 








606 


542 


St. Clement's, Dulwich . 








1,367 


961 


St. John's, East Dulwich . 








1,956 


870 


All Saints', Blenheim Grove . 








1,080 


599 


St. Antholin's, Nunhead Lane 








1,571 


666 


St. Mary Magdalene's 






1,779 


900 



Poplar is a poor, crowded, despondent borough, on which many 
efforts have been spent during these seventeen years. The obscure 
little church of St. Saviour's had, for a short while, as its vicar one 
of the greatest saints and leaders of modern England— Robert 
Radclyffe Dolling, and if life had been spared him to fulfil such a 
ministry as Dr. Clifford's, he might have revolutionised East London. 
Mr. and Mrs. Gladstone watched with keen solicitude over the infant 
fortunes of St. Frideswide's Oxford Mission, and the present Bishop 
of Bloemfontein, Dr. Chandler, spent years of arduous service as 
Rector of Poplar. In 1886 the leading AngHcan church of the 
Borough, St. Stephen's, North Bow, had a total attendance of 
1 809. These figures were reduced under the present Census to less 
than one-half. The following table is interesting as showing that 
the only slight increases are recorded at Christ Church, Isle of Dogs, 
and St. Saviour's, where the Rev. M. N. Trollope is proving an 
admirable successor to Father Dolling. 



286 



THE EELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 



POPLAR. 


1886. 


1902-3. 


All Hallows', Bromley 


342 


253 


All Hallows', East India Docks 








1,259 


547 


All Saints' .... 








1,093 


701 


St. John's, Isle of Dogs . 










846 


443 


Christ Church, Isle of Dogs 










367 


430 


St. Gabriel's, Bromley 










637 


511 


St. Luke's, Millwall 










525 


386 


St. Mark's, Victoria Park 










400 


362 


St. Matthias', High Street 










468 


390 


St. Michael's, Bromley . 










925 


647 


St. Paul's, Old Ford 










144 


76 


St. Saviour's, Northumberland Street 






467 


582 


St. Stephen's, North Bow 






1,809 


831 


St. Stephen's, East India Dock Road 






630 


435 



Bethnal Green is one of the poorest and most crowded of 
London districts, and here the most popular clergyman is the 
Rev. J. E. Watts Ditchfield, Vicar of St. James-the-Less. The 
British Weekly Census gave the numbers at this church as 580 : 
the Daily News reports them as 1,699. This does not include the 
Men's Meeting on Sunday afternoons, which is, perhaps, the most 
successful feature of Mr. Watts Ditchfield's work. One of Mr. 
Booth's assistants reckoned the attendance as 600. After St. 
James-the-Less, the highest figures are those of St. Matthew's, 
the parish church, of which the Bishop of London was Rector 
during his Headship of Oxford House. The figures at St. Matthew's 
were 1,274 in 1886, and 682 in 1903, and the decHne is doubtless 
explained by the harvest festival which was held on the earlier 
Sunday. Still, it is disappointing, when one considers that so 
eminent a man as the present Bishop of London has given some of 
his best years to the parish, that the number of worshippers has not 
increased more rapidly. Seventeen years ago the Rev. H. B. 
Bromby, a well-known High Churchman who succeeded Mr. (after- 
wards Dean) Randall as Vicar of All Saints', Clifton, drew at 
St. John the Evangelist's a congregation of 1,161. The Daily 
News figures here are only 312. 

In Mr. Charles Booth's earlier volumes on " The Life and 
Labour of the People," he placed St. Saviour's, Southwark, " on 
her wretched throne " among the poverty-stricken districts south 
of the river. Southwark was visited by the Daily News in February 
1903 in clear, seasonable weather, and it was discovered that 
the total Anglican attendance for the day was 12,405 ; the Non- 
conformist, 19,944. A comparison with 1886 reveals again an 



CENSUS OF 1902-3 COMPARED WITH CENSUS OP 1886 287 



ominous decline in numbers. In some churches, as the table 
shows, the attendance has fallen off by more than one-half. 



SOUTHWARK. 


1886. 


1902-3. 


Christ Church, Blackfriars Road 


772 


361 


All Hallows,' Pepper Street . 






380 


693 


St. Peter's, Sumner Street 






217 


210 


St. Saviour's 






1,078 


856 


St. George the Martyr's . 






1,223 


580 


St. Stephen's 






220 


183 


St. Alphege's, Lancaster Street 






829 


475 


St. Michael's, Lant Street 






94 


257 


St. Jude's 






43.5 


162 


Holy Trinity Church, Trinity Square 
St. Andrew's, New Kent Road 






347 

829 


316 

414 


St. Matthew's, New Kent Road 






434 


542 


All Saints', Surrey Square 






1,403 


226 


All Souls', Grosvenor Park 






311 


295 


St. Mark's, East Street . 






402 


226 


St. Paul's, Lorrimore Square . 






1,003 


746 


St. Agnes', Kennington . 






882 


833 


St. Gabriel's, Newington . 






491 


134 


St. Mary's, Kennington Park Road . 






1,172 


429 



In the borough of Islington the tendency to decline is not 
less conspicuous. It may be partly explained by the loss of such 
popular preachers as the late Prebendary Gordon Calthrop, of 
St. Augustine's, and the Rev. E. A. Stuart, of St. James's, 
Holloway, in 1886, but now of St. Matthew's, Bayswater. 



ISLINGTON. 


1886. 


1902-3. 


Christ Church, Highbury Grove 


834 


527 


St. Augustine's, Highbury New Park 
St. John's, Highbury Vale 






2,022 


1,500 






961 


550 


St. Saviour's, Aberdeen Park . 








893 


345 


St. Thomas's, Finsbury Park . 








575 


938 


St. George's, Tufnell Park 








1,578 


763 


St. Mark's, Tollington Park . 








1,085 


628 


St. Mary's, Hornsey Rise 








1,541 


.557 


St. Paul's, Upper Holloway . 








1,056 


545 


St. Stephen's, Upper Holloway 








497 


237 


All Saints', Tufnell Park . 








908 


689 


St. Philip's, Arlington Square . 








474 


454 


St. Barnabas' .... 








1,192 


405 


St. Paul's, Essex Road . 








1,225 


1,056 


St. James's, Holloway 








2,647 


1,343 


Holy Trinity Church, Cloudesley Square 




1,232 


836 


St. Stephen's, Canonbury Road 


997 


433 



In Hackney the Church of England has lost, roughly speaking, 
over 5,000 during seventeen years, while the Nonconformists have 
gained about 1,000. This is exclusive of the Salvation Army, 



288 



THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 



which on the Sunday of the Daily News Census drew 2,549 
persons to its Congress Hall in Clapton. The Anglican figures 
of Hackney are rather curious. The total attendance in this 
borough, according to the Daily News Census, was 18,609 for the 
Anglicans, and 29,492 for the Nonconformists. 



HACKNEY. 


1886. 


1902-3. 


St. John's, Mare Street 


2,056 


1,470 


Christ Church, Clapton . 








508 


314 


St. James's, Clapton 








836 


897 


St. Thomas's, Cla ^ton 








664 


659 


St. Michael's, Stoke Newington 








1,800 


959 


St. Matthew's, Upper Clapton 








1,672 


1,181 


All Saints', Clapton Park 








1,297 


765 


All Souls', Clapton Park . 








723 


554 


St. Barnabas', Homerton . 








588 


394 


Holy Trinity Church, Dalston 








926 


292 


St. Bartholomew's, Dalston 








879 


502 


St. Mark's, Dalston . 








1,522 


802 


St. Philip's, Dalston . 








775 


753 


St. Michael's, London Fields . 








643 


541 


Eton Mission Church 








512 


659 


St. Luke's 








2,613 


600 


Christ Church, Victoria Park . 








542 


392 


St. Augustine's .... 








769 


486 


Church of St. John of Jerusalem 








1,350 


685 



The City churches constitute a problem by themselves, and 
the only point worth noting for the purpose of our comparison is 
the decline at St. Paul's Cathedral from 4,705 in 1886 to 2,337 in 
1903. This may be partially accounted for by the fact that rain 
fell heavily on the Sunday in May, 1903, when the Daily News 
enumerators visited the Cathedral. The bad weather did not, 
however, prevent the assembling of 7,000 persons at the City 
Temple, where the Rev. E,. J. Campbell was beginning his 
pastorate. 



II.— THE THREE GREAT NONCONPORMIST BODIES 
—BAPTISTS, CONGREGATIONALISTS, AND 
WESLEYAN METHODISTS 



A. THE BAPTISTS 



4 



Students of the Daily News Census have frequently remarked 
that the Baptists appear to be the one really growing religious 
body in the metropolis, and so keen an observer as Mr. Charles 
Booth was deeply impressed by their progress, especially in poor 



CENSUS OF 1902-3 COMPAEED WITH CENSUS OP 1886 289 

and crowded neighbourhoods. Wander where we may, there is 
nowhere a symptom of Baptist decline. 

In Paddington we noted the retrogression of the Church of 
England, and at the chief Wesleyan church there is also a falling 
off from 1,403 in 1886 to 540 in the recent census. Dr. Clifford's 
church, on the other hand, shows an attendance almost precisely 
the same for both years, and it now holds a recognised position 
as the most crowded place of worship in the borough. 

In Islington, where the Free Churches had a majority, the 
highest numbers for the day were found at Upper Holloway Chapel 
(the Rev. J. R. Wood), and as Mr. Wood pointed out at the time, 
there were 5,000 more male worshippers in the Free Churches of 
Islington than in the churches of the Establishment. 

In SouTHWARK the Metropolitan Tabernacle stood first with 
3,626 for the day. Seventeen j'^ears ago the numbers approached 
11,000. The change is accounted for by the withdrawal of C. H. 
Spurgeon's great personality, and the rebuilding of the Tabernacle 
on a smaller scale. The Strict Baptist chapel in Wansey Street 
has sunk from 1,366 to 646. 

The Baptists show but slight progress in Greenwich, although 
the figures tend to rise. But at Woolwich there is the great 
Tabernacle presided over by the Rev. J. Wilson, Vice- 
President of the Baptist Union. Here the numbers have doubled 
in the course of seventeen years. The Tabernacle is far ahead of 
all the other Protestant churches. The cause was founded in 
1873, and when the former Census was taken, Mr. Wilson had his 
church at Parson's Hill. The foundation-stone of the New 
Tabernacle was laid in 1895 by the Rev. J. A. Spurgeon, in 
memory of his brother, Charles Haddon Spurgeon. In all his 
journeyings round London there was no work to which Mr. Booth 
gave more enthusiastic praise than that of Woolwich Tabernacle. 

A quiet and steady growth is observable even in the least 
promising districts. Thus at Chelsea Chapel, under the Rev. J. 
Spence, the Baptist figures have been nearly doubled. 

In East London the Baptists are making satisfactory progress. 
The Poplar and Bow Tabernacle, which dates from 1888, showed an 
attendance of 1,236. When Pastor Tildsley came to the work here, 
five years ago, he found the pulpit and galleries closed, and a 
morning congregation of forty-four. Now the Tabernacle stands 
first in the list of Protestant churches. At Berger Hall the 
numbers have gone up from 290 to 1,208. 

19 



290 



THE EELiaiOUS LIFE OF LONDON 



The Baptists are prosperous in Hackney, especially at Hackney- 
Downs Chapel, Chatsworth Road, Clapton, and Ashwin Street, 
Dalston. 

They are flourishing also in Camberwell, where the important 
Peckham E-ye Tabernacle shows an attendance of 1,096. The 
South London Tabernacle (the Rev. E. Roberts) has more than 
doubled its figures, while Rye Lane, under the Rev. J. W. Ewing, 
has progressed in every direction, and has actually increased its 
membership by 200 or 300 between the two enumerations. The 
apparent falling off is due to the fact that a Sunday School Anni- 
versary was held when the British Weekly Census was taken, while 
that of the Daily News was of the attendance at the ordinary services. 

Baptist Comparative Figures 



Westbourne Park 

Upper Holloway 

Metropolitan Tabernacle . 

Surrey Tabernacle . 

Devonshire Square, Stoke Newingt 

Woodberry Down 

Abbey Road, St. John's Wood 

Woolwich Tabernacle 

Shoreditch Tabernacle 

Chelsea Chapel 

Bloomsbury Chapel . 

Regent's Park .... 

Highgate Road .... 

Chatsworth Road, West Norwood 

Hackney Downs 

Chatsworth Road, Clapton 

Ashwin Street, Dalston . 

South London Tabernacle 

Peckham Park Road 

Peckham Rye Tabernacle 

Rye Lane, Peckham. 

Lordship Lane, Dulwich . 



1886. 



2,479 
2,010 
10,589 
1,365 
2,202 

943 
1,451 
1,124 
2,501 

506 
1,331 

750 
1,266 
1,008 

912 

164 
1,463 

661 
1,097 

2,485 
708 



1902-3. 



2,213 
1,857 
3,625 

546 
1,291 
1,227 
1,073 
2,244 
1,766 

935 
1,045 
1,395 
1,037 
1,938 
1,191 

609 
1,247 
1,615 

712 
1,095 
1,705 

966 



» Founrted 1895. 



B. THE CONGREGATIONALISTS 

The Congregationalists are strongest in north, west, and central 
London. Although Kensington and Hampstead were visited on a 
very wet and stormy Sunday, the figures at Mr. Home's church 
show an increase of several hundreds upon those of 1886 ; while the 
attendance at Dr. Horton's was only slightly diminished. 

In Lewisham decided progress is shown in the two largest Con- 
gregational churches — High Street, where the Rev. John Eames is 



CENSUS OF 1902-3 COMPARED WITH CENSUS OF 1886 291 

carrying on, with marked success, the work of the Rev. Morlais 
Jones ; and Lee Road, Blackheath, under the Rev. R. Fother- 
ingham. 

The largest figures for the whole of London were those of the 
City Temple, where, on a wet, dismal day, 7,008 persons assembled 
to take part in the opening of Mr. Campbell's ministry. The City 
Temple figures provided nearly one-third of the grand total of 
22,597 for the City. 

In the western districts, such as Hammersmith, Fulham and 
Shepherd's Bush, the Congregationalists, in common with other 
Free Churches, have gained little accession of strength since the 
earlier census. If we turn, on the other hand, to Islington we 

find remarkable signs of prosperity. At four important churches 

Finsbury Park, Union Chapel, New Court, and Highbury Quadrant — 
the attendances were well over a thousand, although still under 
those of 1886. At Junction Road, Upper Holloway, and at Upper 
Street, the numbers show a considerable rise. 

In Camberwell and Peckham there is decided growth at several 
chapels. Excellent progress has been made at East Dulwich Grove, 
under the Rev. Albert Swift, the friend of Dr. Campbell Morgan. 
Emmanuel Church, Barry Road, Dulwich, was organised in 1889, 
under the Rev. A. A. Ramsey, and it has a congregation of over 
600, with an attendance of adults more numerous than that of 
any other church in the district. 

For Congregationalist decline we must turn to such East End 
districts as Poplar and Spitalfields, from which the Free Church 
population has largely ebbed away. Residents in these crowded 
neighbourhoods cannot be drawn into the ordinary middle-class 
chapel. They prefer the bright, homely services at the halls, the 
lively singing, the picturesque Gospel address, the kindly hand- 
grasp when they come and leave, and the certainty that shabby 
clothes will not be noticed. 

Congregationalists are very strong in Hackney, where the entire 
Free Church attendance is given by the Daily News as 29,492, as 
compared with 18,609 for the Anglicans. The most successful 
church in the district is that of the Rev. J. Morgan Gibbon, the 
eloquent Congregational minister of Stamford Hill. In seventeen 
years the numbers here have more than doubled, and are now 
amongst the largest in London. Progress is also registered at 
Lower Clapton, Upper Clapton Road, and Rectory Road, Stoke 
Newington. The large congregation at Clapton Park, under the 



292 



THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 



Eev.' H. Harries, shows practically the same attendance as formerly 
under the late Rev. W. J. Woods. 

Congregational Comparative Figures 



Allen Street, Kensington 

Lyndhurst Road, Hampstead 

Lavender Hill, Battersea , 

Paddington Chapel . 

Lee Road, Blackheath 

High Street, Lewisham . 

City Temple 

Markham Square, Chelsea 

Finsbury Park . 

Union Chapel . 

New Court 

Highbury Quadrant . 

Junction Road . 

Upper Street, Islington . 

Barnsbury Chapel , 

Camberwell Green . 

Hanover Chapel, Peckham 

Clifton Chapel . 

East Dulwich Grove 

Emmanuel Church, Barry Road 

Lower Clapton, Amhurst Road 

Stamford Hill .... 

Upper Clapton Road 

Rectory Road, Stoke Newington 

Clapton Park .... 

Brixton Independent Church . 

Christ Church, Westminster Bridge Road 



1886. 



1,063 

2,022 

656 

634 

1,134 

1,246 

3,740 

1,399 

2,191 

1,636 

2,379 

1,351 

351 

667 

476 

866 

947 

1,247 

410 

558 
1,061 
613 
758 
1,504 
2,086 
2,114 



1902-3. 



1,330 

1,782 
1,112 
1,059 
1,533 
1,471 
7,008 

808 
1,432 
1,394 
1,.367 
1,263 

922 
1,042 

610 
1,363 

495 
1,287 
1,105 
1,293 

854 
2,455 

904 

773 
1,495 
1,985 
2,046 



Founded 1889. 



C. THE WESLEYAN METHODISTS 

Wesleyan Methodism in London has been revolutionised during 
the past seventeen years, and a detailed comparison with the 
British Weekly Census is almost impossible. Thus, at Battersea, 
where the Anglicans and Nonconformists have each an attendance 
of over 11,000, the largest figures were those of Queen's Road 
and Broomwood Road Wesleyan Methodist Chapels. 

Inthe Borough of Camberwell the Wesleyan Methodists have 
three important churches, where the attendance is always large. 

In Poplar there is a decline at the Wesleyan Methodist chapels 
in Old Ford Road and East India Dock Road. 

Wesleyan Methodist work at Bermondsey has developed marvel- 
lously under the leadership of the Rev. Henry T. Meakin. The 
highest Daily News figures for the borough were those at the 
Great Central Hall. Over 3,000 persons attended here during the 



CENSUS OF 1902-3 COMPAEED WITH CENSUS OF 1886 293 

day. Only two other Nonconformist cliurclies appear to be 
actually growing in Bermondsey ; those are Union Chapel (Con- 
gregational) and Manor Chapel (United Methodist Free Church). 
The Primitive Methodist Hall, under the Rev. James Flanagan, 
another great work which has developed since the British Weekly 
took its Census, had an attendance of 1,205. 

In Deptford a new Wesleyan Methodist mission was opened 
in October 1902, and is under the care of the Rev. J. Gregory 
Mantle, That such a mission was needed is shown by the com- 
parative figures of New Cross Chapel and Harefield Road Chapel. 

In Central London the highest Wesleyan Methodist figures are 
those of the Central Mission, St. John's Square, which is under the 
able superintendence of the Rev. John E. Wakerley. 

In Shoreditch the Rev. J. R. Ackroyd is carrying on a 
hopeful work. On the other hand, the historic chapel of Great 
Queen Street (Holborn) appears to be losing ground. 



Wesleyan Methodist Comparative Figures 





1886. 


1902-3. 


Queen's Road, Battersea .... 


1,338 


2,401 


New Cross 






1,196 


483 


Harefield Road .... 






1,038 


550 


City Road 






1,221 


699 


Central Mission, St. John's Square 






575 


1,289 


Radnor Street Mission . 






318 


1,121 


New North Road .... 






580 


704 


Great Queen Street .... 






922 


394 


Hinde Street, Manchester Square . 






584 


701 


St. James's Hall, Piccadilly . 






*... 


3,333 


Barry Road, East Dulwich 






1,453 


1,334 


Queen's Road, Peckham . 






1,370 


935 


Oakley Place, Old Kent Road . 






801 


656 



* Services began in 1S87. 



If the Wesleyan Methodists, in the seventeen years under review, 
had been quietly carrying on the work of their regular churches, 
the grand totals of their figures would have been as disappointing 
as those of the Church of England. The Forward Movement 
has saved London Methodism. A new world has been called into 
existence to redress the balance of the old. 



The Settlement Ideal 

BY PHILIP WHITWELL WILSON, B.A. 

In the England of Jane Austen, of Granford^ and of John Halifax, 
Gentleman, the people either lived on the land or in small com- 
munities. The well-to-do and the poor met on terms which savoured 
of feudalism, and in which there was undue condescension on the 
one hand, complemented by subservience on the other hand. 
Society was based upon caste, and caste represented birth. There 
were few opportunities for men and women to alter their status. 
They died as they were born— either nobles, or gentry, or manu- 
facturers, or tradesmen, or artisans, or labourers. Everyone knew 
his neighbours. Everyone paid to a neighbour the exact honours 
due to that neighbour's position. A town was a complete micro- 
cosm, with its rich, its poor, its parsons, its city fathers, its ladies 
bountiful, its charities, its prejudices, traditions, and magistrates. 
"Where there was misery, all were bound to see it, if not to deplore 
it. There could be no festivity which all did not in a measure 
share. 

Such was the condition of London itself until the industrial 
revolution led to an immense increase in the size of the city. Then, 
year by year, the population sorted itself with pitiless accuracy, 
so that we have now reached a point where there are vast areas 
occupied wholly by the rich, other areas entirely devoted to the 
comparatively well-to-do, and where, finally, there are huge 
agglomerations of the working classes, living chiefly in the southern 
and eastern districts, without any admixture of leisured families, 
and with hopelessly inadequate opportunities for public worship, 
for which, indeed, the desire has rapidly evaporated. All the 
social inequalities of the countryside remained, and, indeed, were 
accentuated by geographical demarcation. But the old respect 
of the poor for the rich died into a dangerous and sullen indiffer- 
ence ; while the old belief that the rich were in some paternal 
fashion responsible for the well-being of the poor was shattered by 

294 



THE SETTLEMENT IDEAL 295 

a disintegrating process which placed an actual physical gulf, 
miles broad, between the man who used to be squire or millowner 
and the man who used to be retainer. Human obligations were 
abrogated ; suspicion succeeded to loyalty ; and there slowly 
developed a mob, erratically led, and this mob used to appear 
at Trafalgar Square when trade was bad. 

Philanthropy meant well, but it was closely fettered, first, to 
existing religions, and second, to existing political systems. The 
unemployed might have coal tickets and blankets, but only on 
certain conditions. He must 'show signs of interest in religion, 
and he must be grateful as if for a boon. No provision was made 
for the turbulent, yet hungry, pervert who had the independence 
to shout, from the top of a chair, that he had a right to the 
blanket and to the coal ticket, and that the Christianity which 
gave as alms to the poor what already belonged to the poor, 
and had been created by the labour of the poor, was a sham and 
a fraud. 

Moreover, among the well-to-do there were many vigorous 
persons who were dissatisfied with methods which placed society's 
services to the poor in the hands of a paid professional philan- 
thropist, and which so reduced the whole duty of the millionaire 
to the easy but valueless task of signing a certain number of 
cheques per annum, and expecting in return evidences of con- 
versions or, at any rate, of free breakfasts. Many of these 
malcontents were not prepared to undertake Christian work on 
any of the accepted lines. Their impulse to do good arose, not 
from faith in a dogma, but from an incoherent himian sympathy. 
They did not wish to enter Whitechapel or Canning Town as 
missionaries visiting the heathen, or as saved preaching to unsaved. 
They were merely men and women, with no pretensions to piety, 
who wanted to establish neighbourly relations with other men 
and women. The friendship of rich for rich was good, but it 
was not sufficient to satisfy minds which were saturated with the 
teaching of Kingsley, Ruskin, Carlyle, and latterly, Tolstoy. 
Nothing would serve but relations between diverse classes, based, 
not on the old castes, but on conditions which admitted to the 
poor full independence of mind in all matters theological, political, 
and social. 

This was what Canon and Mrs. Barnett realised when they 
founded Toynbee Hall. As conceived by them, the university 
settlement is simply a place of residence for men and women who 



296 THE RELiaiOUS LIFE OF LONDON 

wish to enlarge their acquaintanceship. The object of residence is 
not, primarily, to work, but to live among the slum-dwellers, as they 
are, much to their own disgust, sometimes described even by such 
experts as the late Father Dolling. Theoretically, a man might 
be admirably suited to settle at Toynbee who had no capacity for 
organisation, but who spent his time 'solely in human intercourse 
with anyone he happened to meet. It is quite an error to imagine 
that the poor man's lawyer, the free exhibitions of pictures, the 
educational facilities, the library, the debates, the dramatic enter- 
tainments, the excursions, or even the municipal enterprises carried 
on by settlement associates, constitute the essence of the movement. 
These are the external manifestations of a certain ideal of citizen- 
ship, the note of which is not ecclesiasticism, individualism, 
socialism, evangelicalism, Liberalism, or Toryism, but brotherhood — 
an immense trust in the value of human contact, as such. The 
human revival which has given us a new vehicle of literary ex- 
pression in the novel — that revival which may be traced in our 
newspapers, painting, medical science, architecture, and especially 
in our politics — has added the university settlement to the number 
of our Churches. There we find a reverence for man which ia 
the truest living expression of man's reverence for God. 

A university settlement does not pretend to be a hermitage for 
the ascetic. The residents admit that they enjoy the creature 
comforts to which they would be used at home. There is no 
attempt to forestall the jealousy which the less fortunate might 
feel towards those who are manifestly better off. On fundamental 
grounds such jealously cannot be defended, and to pander to it 
would be on this account an error in ethics. But as a matter of 
experience, it may now be said without fear of contradiction that 
what irritates the handworkers in a nation is not inequahty of 
wealth or of education, but the contempt which talks of the lower 
orders, or even the scarcely less exasperating pity which would 
apply the phrase, " the submerged tenth," to multitudes of honest 
wage-earners. These are just as respectable as the bankers of 
Lombard Street, and, as a rule, they have acquired a wholly un- 
suspected faculty of piercing the conventional compromises of 
clubs, drawing-rooms, and leading articles, so as to arrive at the 
actual moral pivot of a particular problem. A host of witnesses 
would corroborate the statement, founded upon the memory of 
many delightful evenings among workers of all trades and most 
races, that to a sympathetic friend the dock labourer or the 



THE SETTLEMENT IDEAL 297 

unmanageable emissary of the Social Democratic Federation will 
unburden his mind of ideas at times so extraordinarily shrewd, 
if also perverse, that they constitute a wholly unlooked-for liberal 
education. I once asked a company of working men, many of 
them unskilled, what they would do with £10,000 a year if they 
had it. Here are some of the replies. 

(1) I would give nothing away in charity. It always does 
harm. I should, on principle, spend every penny on myself. 

(2 — A boy, aetat. say sixteen years.) I would first build good 
cottages for my relations, then I would gradually build good 
cottages for other people. 

(3) I would spend the money in buying up big playgrounds 
around every elementary school in the metropolis. 

(4) I would reserve for myself a sufficient income to enable me 
to travel and enjoy life. The rest I would spend on some great 
scheme of social investigation and in propagating my ideas. 

What, I wonder, would some of our preachers say to a man 
who declared that love had been tried for two thousand years, that 
the result was Limehouse and the Isle of Dogs, that it was therefore 
time to abolish love and to put in its place a social system founded 
on justice ? That was what was actually passing within the mind 
of a unit among " the lapsed masses." How, again, would we meet 
the protest by a Jew that it was unfair of Jesus to claim credit 
for all the sayings in the Sermon on the Mount, since these had 
been borrowed or stolen from Socrates, from Buddha, or the Rabbis ? 
All quite absurd, no doubt ; but such clear sayings of real children, 
who have never, in the literary sense, entered the shades of 
"Wordsworth's prison-house, whose sense of right and wrong, however 
imperfect may be their obedience thereto, has never been blurred 
by the sophistries of respectabihty, open great controversies. The 
publicans and the sinners are now, as our Lord found them, by 
far the most instructive conversationalists. A university settlement 
is a place where one goes, not to teach, stiU less to enrich the poor, 
but to sit at their feet and return, having at last seen life whole. 
A lady settler, who sought refuge from her blinding successes at 
the University of Cambridge, once remarked that, after staying 
and working among South Londoners, a visit to Bond Street gave 
her a peculiar feeling. She expressed it by saying that the people 
there struck her as being quite mad. Their talk, their attitudes, 
their displays of costume — in fact, all their ostentatious little habits 
—seemed to be the result of pure delusion as to what the world 



298 THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 

really is. Tliey resembled the willow pattern on a tea-cup. Those 
philanthropists who regard settlements as channels for conferring 
benefits on the poor have got hold of the wrong end of the stick. 
The people who have chiefly to thank settlements have been the 
residents themselves, many of whom exercise an enormous influence 
on the press and in public life as a whole. 

These inner considerations are apt to be entirely overlooked, 
both by the conscientious sightseer who accurately examines the 
architecture of settlements, even eating an inexpensive dinner 
therein, and by the statistician who seeks to estimate matters 
objectively. Such people ask "whether the poor have been 
improved." They do not appreciate the reply that for the first 
time in the recent history of London the poor are respected and 
understood. Let us instance a few of the traditions which have 
been reversed by the new knowledge thus arrived at. It used to 
be a commonplace among Christian workers that the poor are utterly 
untouched by " high-class literature." Penny readings were 
regarded as dismal failures. It now transpires that the poor are 
of all people the ones who appreciate the very best when it is 
offered them. The folk who surge round Toynbee and Mansfield 
have loan collections of pictures and other exhibits several 
times a year. Hundreds of thousands visit these exhibitions, and 
we may fairly ask what record in this respect have the suburbs. 
At Toynbee the late Professor Gardiner used for many years to 
give weekly lectures on history. His audience always ran into 
hundreds ; yet his was hardly a theatrical style, nor did he either 
write or speak to amuse. Immense crowds have been gathered 
by the authorities of Oxford House to listen to Shakespeare acted 
without scenery, despite the fact that payment was demanded at 
the door. Yet, owing to lack of stage-glitter, the entertainments 
would have failed to fill a West-End theatre for a week. How 
many public-school boys would spend a whole winter learning 
Twelfth Night with a view to a single performance, as was 
the case with a boys' club very far East indeed, the members of 
which were keeping body and soul together on an average wage 
of, say, five shillings a week ? "We are told that it is impossible 
to convert Jews to Christianity ; but I could produce many 
instances to show that the Jews are perfectly ready to enter 
patiently and seriously into the teaching of Jesus, but they will 
not be dictated to, nor do they see any reason why they should 
pay particular attention to many of the sermons being preached 



THE SETTLEMENT IDEAL . 299 

in the metropolis. Having friends among the Jews, I think I now 
understand why they remain apart. Yet when there was a 
proposal to found a Jewish Toynbee Hall, the idea was spon- 
taneously vetoed because the existing institution had so completely 
won the sympathy of the Hebrew colony — which, by the way, 
has greatly reduced crime in the neighbourhood, by supplanting 
Christians. 

There is a fixed impression that the poor will only do things for 
pay — and hence, of course, the tipping system. Settlements, founded 
upon the equality of friendship, have, within their province, 
annihilated this wicked superstition. They have been the strong- 
holds of the Charity Organisation Society, which, albeit somewhat 
too dogmatic in maintaining its theories, has yet substituted personal 
service for the old cash means. Yet, when first the habit of doling 
out relief was dispensed with, the result was that an indignant 
proletariat broke certain windows. "What ! Religion without half- 
a-crown towards the latest funeral — impossible ! 

It has been said, not without protest, that classes of people 
come to church for what they can get. In the old sordid sense 
this is not true of settlements, which scatter many blessings, but 
not coin. Hospitality is dispensed, but always on the basis of 
host and guest, never on the basis of fortunate and unfortunate. 
The motive is not pity, but a genuine desire for mutually beneficial 
intercourse. 

Settlements illustrate the old story that the wicked city cannot 
be destroyed so long as there are ten righteous men within it. 
Those who take an active part in the movement are, after all, only 
a handful — perhaps one solitary worker to twenty or thirty thousand 
of London's inhabitants. It is not that thousands of impetuous 
aristocrats have invaded Shoreditch and failed to create a Paradise. 
On the contrary, a very, very few individuals, some of them 
exceptionally endowed with literary and organising abihty, but 
some of them armed only with consecration to the needs of men, 
have permeated hitherto unapproachable regions with an influence 
out of all proportion to the numbers who wield it. It is not 
suggested that even a definitely Anglican settlement like Oxford 
House has filled places of worship, or added greatly to the explicit 
religious "attendances" of the neighbourhood. But, whatever may 
be true of individuals, society as a whole will not unite for the 
higher purposes of devotion without first having learnt what are 
the common obligations of daily life. I am certain that the poor 



300 THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 

of the metropolis are being won for religion. But I am also certain 
that the religion will be a new phase, not recognised as religion 
by many of the Churches, but nevertheless the true expression of 
that personal service — man on behalf of man — which is our best 
tribute to the Creator. No one can estimate the good which falls 
to a populous parish when it contains one citizen whom aU parties, 
creeds and castes can respect. 

In this brief essay I have deliberally ignored the details of 
settlement. Nothing is less scientific, nothing more misleading, 
than the habit of piecing together a judgment on a settlement 
from what a casual inspection discloses of the cleanliness wrought 
by a swimming-bath, the courtesy engendered by boys' clubs, 
the liberality of thought resulting from personally conducted tours 
to Cambridge or Milan, the fluency learnt in debate, the caligraphy 
taught in a continuation school, or the doctor's bills reduced by 
sending children to the country. I have tried to explain the still 
misunderstood spirit which generates these activities, a spirit which 
is utterly different form that which animates those who still form 
the overwhelming majority of the most self-sacrificing Christian 
workers. The settlement ideal, which does not claim to be 
original, is powerfully affecting all the existing denominations. 
The public-school missions provide points of contact with the 
Episcopal Church. These quasi-parochial incumbencies are the 
outcome of an effort, originated by Thring, of Uppingham, to 
awaken a sense of social duty among pubHc-school boys who might 
subsequently be expected to take prominent parts in the government 
of the British Empire. College missions embody a similar notion. 
The great Leysian Mission in the City Road, or the Whitefield's 
enterprise in the Tottenham Court Road, whatever be the final 
record of these efforts, do already show how, apart from the 
regular settlements at Bermondsey, Mansfield, etc., a new range 
of objects is presenting itself to the Free Churches. Not that an 
institutional church is equivalent to a settlement. The differences 
are real and fundamental. But the same human, as opposed to 
a theological or doctrinal, atmosphere plays over all. 

That settlements have greatly enriched that school of inquiry 
of which Rowntree, Sherwell, and Booth are leaders; that, in 
addition, settlements have taught the poor what are the functions, 
what the responsibilities, of local government ; that settlement 
workers have borne the burden and heat of elementary school 
management, of charity organisation, of boys' and girls' clubs. 



THE SETTLEMENT IDEAL 301 

of sanitary inspection, of children's country holiday funds, and of 
countless other thankless tasks, many of them ignored by Exeter 
Hall, — will not be denied even by the pessimist who glooms from 
his "Abyss." 

The real limitation of settlements arises undoubtedly from their 
celibate character. Men working through one community, and 
women working through a second, are not able to cover the whole 
field of opportunity as would be the case, possibly, if husband 
and wife and family were as a unit to live among the poor, with 
other similar units in touch. In many cases doctors and clergy 
do already dwell beyond their social pale ; but they are present 
in a professional capacity, which is not quite what we are seeking. 
Mothers and fathers who cling to Lewisham and Hampstead argue 
that they are ready to sacrifice themselves, but not their children. 
It is, however, a question whether some of the condemned districts 
are less healthy, given good food, than the more favourite suburbs ; 
and in any case, the fears for the nursery are sometimes an excuse 
rather than a reason. And here let me not be misunderstood. 
From experience, one has every reason to know how hopeless is 
the prospect for one isolated family living in a neighbourhood 
long deserted by the comfortable. But half a dozen households, 
forming among themselves a calling acquaintance, and actuated 
by the settlement ideal, might achieve great results without loss 
of happiness by sacrificing the artificial joys of Bayswater and 
Kensington. "We cannot hope to sweep away the selfishness which 
herds all the wealthy into their own elysium, but there might be 
exceptional families, touched by the miserable isolation of the 
teeming multitudes who really make the nation, that would agree 
to migrate beyond the half-lights and compromises of middle-class 
existence, to the strange region where vice is ugly and goodness 
heroic. How far they would have to live within some central 
institution, how far support such an institution from the outside, 
are speculations beyond the scope of these remarks. We are 
told that to send the boys and the girls to their several clubs, 
the fathers to their debate, the mothers to their " meeting," is 
not to break up the home, since no home exists ; but this only 
shows what a distance we have yet to travel towards our Utopia. 



Men's Services in the Church of England 

BY THE REV. J. E. WATTS DITCHFIELD 

The difficulties in the way of reaching the great mass of men 
in London are enormous. It is not that they are atheistic or even 
antagonistic to the claims of Christ. Atheism has not the hold 
on the great mass of the working men which many suppose. 
Indifference there is, deep and real, but not atheism. Agnosticism 
appears to be increasing among the upper and middle classes, 
but atheism has been at a very low ebb since the death of Mr. 
Bradlaugh and the conversion of Mrs. Besant to theosophy. 
Nor are the masses avowedly opposed to Christianity. Striking 
proof of this was afforded at the last Board School election, 
when not a candidate was elected on a secularist ticket. The 
fact is that the Church has not, as a rule, laid itself out to attract 
and win men. There has been some occasion given for the 
assertion that the Church is only for women and children. The 
time usually selected by clergy for visiting, viz. the afternoon, 
absolutely prevents their holding intercourse with husbands or 
elder sons. The men, who are the most difficult to reach, very 
often have the least effort made to reach them. Services are 
held in which the man from the corner is utterly lost, and 
sermons preached that would have to be carefully translated 
before he could understand half a dozen sentences. Again, 
working men are conspicuous .by their exclusion from official 
positions. Would it not be well to return to the idea of the 
primitive Church with respect to qualifications for office in the 
Church — " men filled with the Holy Ghost " ? Are there no men 
able to do for the Church what Burns, Burt, Crook, have done 
for their trade-unions ? 

The kind of day which Sunday is rapidly becoming, thanks largely 
to the National Sunday League's efforts — a day of pleasure for 

302 



MEN'S SERVICES IN THE CHURCH OF ENGLAND 303 

tliose who need it least, and a day of toil to those whose work 
during the week causes them to need it most — adds to the diffi- 
culties of attracting men to church. 

Further, the fearful over-crowding, a disgrace to the Christian 
community of London, the irregularity of employment, the wretched 
wage for work which turns, in thousands of cases, the home into 
a workshop; the temptations which abound on all hands — drink, 
impurity, gambling, and crime — all tend to make London a city 
in which men are more and more difficult to reach. This fact 
has of late years begun to be more fully realised. Special 
efforts of an organised character have been frequently made to 
reach women and children, but the work to reach men, until a 
comparatively recent period, was confined to either the founding 
of a club, with " religion " left out or so diluted as to make it 
powerless for good, or the holding of services or meetings of 
such a spasmodic nature as to make them valueless as regards 
the men for whom they were intended. But during the last 
dozen years services for men only have sprung up in all quarters 
of London with varying results. 

As one who has taken some interest and some share in this 
movement, I would venture to make some criticism and offer 
some suggestions concerning it. The day has gone by for 
seriously treating opposition to all separate services for men and 
women. Such are necessary if subjects are to be treated fully 
which in these days require plain speech. But to be really 
useful, let the service be held weekly, and not monthly. A month 
is too long, for impressions soon wear off, and men should be 
got into the habit of regular Sabbath observance. Let this work 
have the first place in the parochial machinery. Where this has 
been done men's services have invariably been successful, but where 
given a subordinate position they have as invariably been failures. 

The man who puts children first will fail in two ways. He 
will not reach men, neither wiU he be likely to largely retain 
children as they grow up, for the lack of men in his church 
will have convinced the children (while they are children) that 
it is unmanly to go to Church. On the other hand, if he gets 
the men they will see that the children attend Sunday school, 
who in their turn will be more likely to become church-goers 
as they grow older. Again, let the service be for " Men," not 
for working or any other class. The world and politics divide 
men into classes. It is the work of the Church to unite. 



304 THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OP LONDON 

But what ought such a service to be like? Surely bright, 
happy, not too conventional, yet thoroughly earnest, devotional, 
and in the highest sense religious. It must be strictly of a con- 
gregational nature. Great attention must be given to the music. 
The introduction of an orchestra will be found to be far more 
useful than the organ alone. Sankey's enlarged edition is by far 
the best for such a service, there being no Church hymn-book 
in existence, all hymn-books in use being merely unofficial 
compilations. The service should consist of four hymns, a lesson 
(read if possible by a member of the committee), and a shortened 
liturgy. iTho latter should be printed, and be strictly congre- 
gational in character. The objection to a "form of prayer" 
soon vanishes if it is one which men can understand and easily 
follow. The address should be a plain, homely talk, strictly of 
a gospel character, bearing upon everyday life. There must 
be no sickly sentimentalism, but Christ must be preached— not 
merely Christ crucified and dead, but Christ living and active 
in the life of men, now, in 1903. It is the gospel men need — the 
pure, simple gospel as told by our Lord in the streets and lanes 
of Palestine ; not the gospel in the language of the school-men, 
but in the language of Him about whom we preach. Let positive 
truth be taught, but 'not controversially. The subjects should 
be varied from week to week to suit all comers, and the manu- 
script left at home. Fancy John Burns reading his speeches, or, 
for that matter, St. Peter on the day of Pentecost ! The speaker 
should be as straight and direct and personal as possible. Hit 
hard, but never be hard ; serve up the address hot. A very popular 
feature at my own service has been the putting of questions 
in boxes at the doors of the Church, bearing on Scriptural 
difficulties, Christian evidences, and Church ritual. These once 
in six weeks have been taken into the pulpit and answered, 
instead of an address. This plan really suits the mass of men 
more than discussion week by week. Theoretically the latter 
may seem the better plan, but after a week or two a few " talkers," 
who will talk for the sake of talking, weary men with their 
repetition, and the gathering falls flat. 

If such a service is to succeed it must be the men's own 
service, and not the parson's. Its basis should be democratic 
in the right sense of the word. At both Holloway and Bethnal 
Green the committee number over seventy, and this large com- 
mittee is divided into sub-committees, having charge of some 



MEN'S SEEVICES IN THE CHURCH OF ENGLAND 305 

department of work. The clergyman in charge must sink the 
parson in the man, and the more he is the man the more he 
will be the parson. He must set everybody to work, and be the 
example of everyone in work. There must be no scruple as to 
advertising. The church bell is all right, but some people are 
deaf and must be got at through the eye. The old policy of 
bygone days of building churches costing £10,000 and then 
objecting to spend £50 to fill them has been most disastrous. 
Posters, cards, handbills must be used largely and wisely. The 
brass band and open-air speaking are necessary adjuncts, but 
with regard to the latter let the best men attainable speak. 
There must be no bribery or patronising airs, neither must party 
politics be discernible either in the clergy or Church. If the 
National Church is to be maintained, it can only be on the 
lines that the Church is the Church of all parties. 

But the religion taught must take cognisance of a man's life 
on every day of the week. Clubs, societies, social gatherings, and 
entertainments there must be, but not without forming a con- 
necting link between them and the Christian life. In connection 
with St. James-the-Less there are sick, loan, thrift, coal, book, and 
Christmas clubs, reading and game rooms, cricket, tennis, cycling, 
rambling, football associations, etc., these all worked by the 
general committee through sub-committees. As an auxiliary a 
medical mission has been formed, which treated over ten thousand 
attendances last year. Also a working men's hotel with sleeping 
accommodation for seventy-five men, chiefly of the coster and 
labouring classes, care being taken to avoid the casual. Plans 
are now out for the erection of a home for young men of the 
clerk type. In these ways the social life is not lost sight of, 
but the gospel story occupies the first place. 

The results of a men's service such as I have described 
may be difficult to tabulate. At the one with which I am 
connected at Bethnal Green the following may be noted : 

(a) Attendance. Over twelve hundred men on the roll. 

(6) Moral influence. Decrease in drinking in the neighbour- 
hood, a change in the appearance of the men and in the character 
of the homes. 

(c) It has done much for the Church : 

1. It has broken down prejudice. A man, a shoemaker, whom 
I tried to get hold of always met me with the remark, " How 
is it that the Archbishop of Canterbury gets £15,000 a year ? " 

20 



306 THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 

"We got him to the service, and the last time I called to see 
him he had the Archbishop's photograph over his stall. 

2. It has assisted financially. Whether help was wanted for 
Church work at home or abroad, for Robin Dinners, for the 
sick, it matters little. If there is a good case, help is willingly 
given. 

3. It has increased the attendance at the ordinary services, 
and this very largely. The numbers recorded by the Daily News 
speak for themselves. 

4. It has influenced the work among women, and more especially 
among children. A "Women's Service in church on a Monday 
evening numbering over 800 members, a Sunday school with 1,400 
children, and a Young Men's Bible-class of over 260, show the 
influence of men attending Church. 

5. It has reared for the Church real workers. Ninety per cent. 
of our male workers are the result of the service. 

6. Many men come forward for Confirmation. The proportion 
of adults confirmed has been one of the most striking features 
of the work. 

7. The number of communicants increased from 26 in 1897 to 
697 in 1903 on Easter Day. 

Surely these results, together with the unreckonable instances 
of change of heart, are such as to justify the existence of this 
special movement, and to show that such methods of work, in 
connection with the Church of England, can be effectual in 
reaching the masses of men in our large towns. Each church 
should have, in addition to its ordinary services, other services 
of a less ornate and less learned and theological style for direct 
mission-work. Between these and the ordinary services there 
must be a strong connecting link. They must not be in any way 
out of harmony with, or antagonistic to, the rest of the Church 
work and services, but must be of such a nature that they easily 
become stepping-stones to full Church membership. The Master 
has sent us, the Master has given us the task, and it must be 
done. It was the lost sheep He sought, and it must be the 
lost ones whom we must find and meet and bring. Will one be 
missing ? And if He ask the reason, what will it be ? Will 
it satisfy Him ? Will it satisfy us then ? 

The best men, doing their best, 

Know peradventure least of what they do, 



Week-Evening Services 

BY CHAELES T. BATEMAN 

The figures revealed by tlie Daily News Census have proved that 
attendance at public worship in the Metropolitan area is a 
declining quantity. It therefore follows almost as a matter of 
course that the week evening-service suffers in proportion, and 
those competent to form an opinion agree that such is the case. 
Before discussing the reasons for this position it should be 
remembered that the term "week-evening service" applies either 
to a gathering for worship or exhortation, or both, and does 
not include the social meetings which are now a growing feature 
of Church life. 

These services, as conducted by the various Churches, possess 
well-defined characteristics. Both Ritualistic and Evangelical 
sections of the Church of England adopt a shortened form of 
service, usually without a sermon or address. The "Wesleyan 
Methodists and the other Methodist bodies generally hold a 
preaching service in their chapels, which is conducted by one of 
the circuit ministers or by a lay preacher. Then there are class- 
meetings, to which we shall refer again, varying in number 
according to the extent of the membership. The Congrega- 
tionalists, Baptists, and Presbyterians arrange a prayer-meeting 
in their schoolroom or mission-hall, at which the minister gives 
an address rather than a sermon. The Salvation Army, when 
the corps is large, meets every night in the week, and all the 
gatherings have strongly marked features. The Christian Endeavour 
movement is responsible for societies organising meetings every week 
of a distinctly religious nature, whilst the Y.M.C.A. and the Y.W.C.A. 
respectively arrange meetings for the young people of both sexes, 
with the purpose of stimulating their faith and devotion. 

The Daily News enumerators have made a census return of the 
week-evening services in twenty-nine places of worship within 
the Metropolitan area. These were visited quite indiscriminately 

307 



308 THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 

and without reference to district or attendances. (The complete 
statistics will be found in Appendix G.) 

In eleven churches — Free as well as Established — attended by- 
representatives of the middle classes the attendances were as 
follows : 

Men 157 

Women 363 

Children _43 

Total 563 

Included in the list were fifteen services frequented by repre- 
sentatives of the working classes, and here the figures show the 
following totals : 

Men 195 

Women 501 

Children 115 

Total 811 

An analysis of these statistics illustrates — (1) that in the artisan 
districts as compared with the middle class there is a slight falling 
off on the part of the men, due probably to late arrival home ; 

(2) that the women are in exact proportion in each class ; and 

(3) that in artisan districts the children attending week-evening 
services are twice as numerous as in middle-class districts. 

Of the twenty-nine instances, the attendance at five exceeds one 
hundred ; only in one case does the attendance exceed two hundred. 

Comparing the figures upon a denominational basis we find 
that there are in the list seven services conducted by the Church 
of England, with the following totals : 

Men 69 

Women 259 

Children 40 

Total 368 

There are also twenty-one services conducted by Free Church- 
men giving totals as follows : 

Men 359 

Women . 772 

Children 190 

Total 1321 

The serious decline in the number of worshippers attending 
Church of England services on Sundays is naturally reflected in 



I 



WEEK-EVENING SERVICES 309 

the week-evening services. These are given to a large extent 
without exhortation, and the question arises whether the Church 
does not miss an opportunity of enforcing the ethical side of 
Christianity when her ministers neglect to " exhort with all loving 
kindness." 

Amongst Methodists it is a subject of regret that the class- 
meeting is losing its relative importance in the general organisa- 
tion of the Church, and that in consequence the attendance is 
declining. At one time such attendance was necessary to member- 
ship, but to-day absence is condoned on various grounds. The 
Methodist class-meeting depends largely upon the ability of the 
leader, and in the right hands possesses much spiritual influence. 
In a sentence, it may be said that the class-meeting has proved 
in the past one of the most potent spiritual forces amongst the 
Methodists. 

The Baptists and Congregationalists usually hold a church- 
meeting once a month. The leaders of both Churches regret 
the fact that this gathering has in numerous cases lost the 
characteristics of " discipline " which it once possessed. To-day it 
has become more of a routine gathering for the admission of 
members and the ratification of suggestions by the deacons. There 
are few churches which administer the "grace of discipline" as 
adopted a generation or two since. Then drunkenness, slander, 
dishonesty, immorality were openly censured at the church-meeting, 
and the offender either dismissed or " disciplined." To appreciate 
the former conditions one should read Dr. John Brown's " Life of 
Bunyan." When admonished to-day the rebuke is usually delivered 
privately. The effects of this decline are to be found in greater 
toleration and catholicity, less heresy-hunting, and little or no 
attempt to impose dogma. In some respects these tendencies are 
admittedly good ; but the question has often been raised whether 
the lack of "discipline" has not assisted in creating a laxer 
atmosphere in the Churches. 

In some churches the purely religious week-evening service 
has entirely disappeared, and in its place lectures, social entertain- 
ments, or meetings of a similar kind have been substituted. It is 
generally found, however, that though large numbers attend these 
gatherings, and though outsiders are attracted, the church itself 
does not benefit in proportion either in numbers or influence. It 
is noteworthy that the Baptists, who have been described by 
Mr. Charles Booth as the most virile of the Free Church bodies. 



310 THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 

cling^tenaciously to the spiritual aspects of their week-evening 
service. 

With respect to the Jews, Dr. H. Adler, Chief Rabbi of the 
United Hebrew Congregations, informs me that in nearly all the 
synagogues in London — as well as in the large provincial congre- 
gations — services are held every day, both morning and evening. 
These are attended by persons during their year of mourning for 
their parents and on the anniversary of the death of those parents. 
The attendance is not large in the "West End, as people have a 
long distance to go to their places of business, but in the East 
End attendance is fair. 

A few particulars may here be quoted concerning week- 
evening services which, compared to the general conditions of 
things, must be considered as successful. 

At St. Paul's, Onslow Square, where Prebendary Webb- 
Peploe is vicar, a Saturday night prayer-meeting has taken place 
without intermission for twenty-seven years. It is held in the 
church room, and there are usually 300 present. On special 
occasions the numbers are increased to 400, and I am assured 
that an average of at least 300 is regularly maintained. Pre- 
bendary Webb-Peploe considers this gathering to be the " life 
centre " of the zealous work at St. Paul's, Onslow Square. Some 
years ago an addition to the church room was made necessary 
to accommodate those who wished to attend. There is also a 
"Wednesday week-evening service held in the church, when the 
attendance is one-seventh or one-eighth of the Sunday's attendance — 
which averages about 1,600. During Lent or Advent the number 
increases to one-fifth or one-sixth of the Sunday's attendance. The 
Prebendary informs me he "finds that by announcing a good 
spiritual subject for a series of addresses in Lent, a considerably 
larger congregation is brought together." 

The Rev. Thomas Spurgeon, at the MetropoHtan Tabernacle, 
holds two week-evening gatherings — on Monday evenings a prayer- 
meeting, and on Thursday evenings a preaching service. These 
take place in the lecture-hall underneath the Tabernacle, and, on 
an average, an attendance of about four to five hundred is secured. 
For the most part the congregation belongs to the middle class, 
with women in a slight majority. There are no adventitious 
attractions for the services, which are of an essentially worshipful 
character. At the preaching service Mr. Spurgeon's church officers 
usually support him on the platform. No instrument is used for 



WEEK-EVENING SERVICES 311 

the purpose of leading the singing, but, as on Sundays, a precentor 
raises the tunes. The sermon may be described as characteristic 
of the traditions of the place. 

The services in connection with Christ Church, Westminster 
Bridge Eoad (Rev. F. B. Meyer, B.A.) are held from 8.30 until 
9.30 on Thursday evenings in the church itself. There is, probably, 
no building connected with the Free Churches which possesses 
greater ecclesiastical characteristics. Some Nonconformists might 
deny that these assist devotion, but the solemnities invariably 
attaching to a building designed on such a pattern, with lofty 
columns, a pulpit that would not disgrace a cathedral, and a softly 
pealing organ, supply something restful and soothing to the mind 
after the strain and rush of the day's business. Mr. Meyer, on 
the occasion of my visit, was taking a course of homilies on the 
life of Job, and had probably about three hundred persons in his 
congregation. The singing was bright and hearty. 

The prayer-meeting conducted every Saturday evening by the 
Rev. George Freeman, of Westbourne Grove Baptist church, is 
another of the few instances of success attending a week-evening 
service. For years the pastor has gradually developed this 
gathering, until there is now a regular attendance of 300. The 
remarkable point is that the membership of the church itself 
cannot be described as large. 

With respect to the Salvation Army, I am assured by a respon- 
sible officer that, taking an average, its week-day meetings are as 
well attended to-day as in the past, and that there is no decline in 
numbers. Moreover, to a greater extent than before, the spiritual 
and mental equipment of the "soldiers" is provided by a series 
of week-evening gatherings specially organised for their benefit. 
For some time General Booth has addressed to the local corps 
a weekly letter on spiritual matters, which is read at these 
meetings. 

The Rev. W. Carlile of the Church Army informs me that his 
own personal opinion is that the Church Army's week-night con- 
gregations are on the increase. This, he says, is due to the value 
placed on open-air work, and the efforts being taken to make 
that work more effective. Special care is given to the training of 
their evangelists and mission-nurses in this department. During 
the week there is generally one meeting of a devotional nature 
for workers and other professed Christians, and the rest of the 
time is given up to efforts to reach the outsider. 



312 THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OP LONDON 

From the London City Mission authorities I learn that their 
missionaries hold 171 week-evening meetings, with a gross attend- 
ance of 8,434. This gives an average of about 50, but I cannot 
say whether this shows decline or increase. 

It must not be forgotten also that there is a tendency — which 
is distinctly to the good — to increase the number of mid-day 
services. These are now held at different seasons in several City 
churches, and in some cases are largely attended. In connection 
therewith many well-known clergymen have given addresses and 
short sermons, which are undoubtedly appreciated by the ordinary 
City worker during his luncheon hour. The afternoon service at 
St. Paul's Cathedral draws large numbers, and one often finds the 
space under the dome filled by a cosmopolitan gathering. The 
services at Westminster Abbey are not so largely attended as 
those at St. Paul's. Again, the mid-day service conducted by the 
Rev. R. J. Campbell, M.A., at the City Temple, is unique. To 
gather 3,000 people on Thursdays, between 12 and 1 o'clock, has 
not been achieved by any other London minister or clergyman. 

That there are many causes to account for the decline of the 
week-evening service must be immediately patent to those 
aware of the conditions under which Londoners pursue their 
calling. "Man goeth forth unto his work and to his labour 
until the evening," applies with equal force to-day in the Metro- 
politan area as it did in Palestine in the Psalmist's time. The City 
man leaves his home in the suburbs between 6 and 10 in the morn- 
ing, according to his position on the social ladder, and returns to it 
between the hours of 6 and 9 in the evening. He then requires a 
meal, and there naturally follow the amenities of home life, which 
demand some place in the day's time-table. These points enforce 
the fact that the distance Londoners journey to and from their place 
of business militates against attendance at week-evening services. 

Another important reason is the multiplication of religious 
interests within the past two decades. The Churches have now 
answered the criticism of a former generation that they were too 
"heavenly minded," by providing institutes, clubs, and social 
agencies to an extent never dreamt of fifty years since. In all 
large churches— whether Established or Free— the organisation 
is now complex, and sometimes even diffuse. This naturally saps 
the energies of workers, and largely diminishes the ability of 
those connected with the church to be present at the ordinary 
week-evening gatherings. 



WEEK-EVENING SEEVICES 313 

Tlie suggestion also occurs as to the power of the Church itseK 
to foster devotion and true worship which is the raison d'etre of 
the week-evening service. Many Free Church leaders are alive 
to the want of reverence manifest in their week-day gatherings, 
and are urging their members not to exhibit public meeting 
manners in their week-day assemblies for worship. This tendency, 
if allowed to grow, naturally prepares the way for a disinclination 
to attend devotional meetings during the week. 

There is evidently no special attractive power in the week- 
evening services for outsiders ; the attendance is made up almost 
entirely from the Sunday's congregations. Unless marked indi- 
viduahty occurs in their organisation they do not increase either 
in numbers or influence. They have unfortunately, in too many 
cases, become a declining quantity ; nor, for many reasons, can 
the young people be induced to attend them. Thus it is that, 
principally amongst the Free Churches, the Young People's Society 
of Christian Endeavour and the Wesley Guild have been started 
in order to solve this problem. In London I am informed that 
there are 650 Christian Endeavour societies, with an average 
attendance of 30 to 35. The question is often asked whether the 
Christian Endeavour supplies the religious needs of the young, 
and at the same time assists in building up the Church, or 
whether, all things considered, the week-evening service is not 
best adapted for the purpose. Some ministers complain that the 
Christian Endeavour forms a Church within a Church and fosters 
sectional interests. Others again maintain that the Christian 
Endeavour has proved the saving influence in the Church. But 
the application of these remarks in either direction generally 
rests with the minister. 

Briefly, the lessons to be learnt from the situation are : 

(1) That the week-evening services are attended by about 
one-tenth of the congregation present on a Sunday. 

(2) That they are not an increasing quantity, and do not 
attract outsiders. 

(3) That those which are best attended depend upon 
essentially spiritual characteristics for their success. 



Missionary Efforts in the Metropolis 

BY CHARLES T. BATEMAN 

The Census returns, wliilst proving the difficulty which the 
ordinary Christian agencies experience in holding their people 
together under religious influences, also show that the Churches 
are practically powerless to attract the outside masses. Their 
converts are mainly young people from the Sunday schools or 
other kindred associations. The immense battalions of non- 
churchgoers are before the eyes of Christians, and even at their 
church doors, degenerating into materialism on the one hand and 
paganism on the other. 

Companies of men and women connected either with the 
Established or the Free Churches are endeavouring to combat 
these evils by undenominational agencies formed to promote 
missions and to conduct mission services. Two of the most 
important are the Evangelisation Society (21, Surrey Street, 
Strand) and the Open-Air Mission (11, Adam Street, W.C). 

The Evangelisation Society was established (1864) thirty-nine 
years since, and now employs between two hundred and fifty 
and three hundred lay evangelists, at work in all parts of the 
country. During the past year the Society supplied ninety- 
nine places in London with preachers, who remained in the 
district for at least fifteen to twenty-two days. Its distinctive 
notes are (1) its undenominational character ; (2) the employ- 
ment of lay evangelists ; (3) the sound business-like element upon 
its executive ; and (4) the insistence upon " those elementary 
principles of divine truth about which all Evangelical Christians 
agree,", expressed by the five "R's": (a) Ruin by the Fall; 
(h) Redemption by Christ ; (c) Reception by faith of the work of 
the Cross ; (d) Regeneration by the Holy Ghost ; and (e) Respon- 
sibility of all who hear the message of salvation. Its general 
income varies from £11,000 to £12,000 per year. 

314 



MISSIONARY EFFORTS IN THE METROPOLIS 315 

"Rob Roy" — Mr. John MacGregor — founded the Open-Air 
Mission just fifty years ago. Since 1853 it has, with increasing 
support, widened its sphere of operation, and now endeavours to 
" hold services and special missions wherever the masses assemble 
out of doors." Lord Shaftesbury and Sir Arthur Blackwood 
were keenly interested in this branch of Christian work. 
To-day Lord Kinnaird is one of its foremost helpers. Taking 
one year as a basis, the Society has visited 214 districts 
in London, where open-air meetings have been held. As an 
example of the Society's activity the visits of the Open-Air 
Mission Male Choir to places like Leicester Square, with a view 
to attracting those who frequent the theatres and music-halls in 
that district, may be mentioned. Some of the preachers have 
occupied the open-air pulpit at St. Mary's, "VVhitechapel, whilst 
others have conducted dinner-hour services outside Woolwich 
Arsenal, or at big gatherings such as football and cricket 
matches, and occasions when large crowds have assembled. The 
Society possesses an annual income of about £3,000, and has 
enrolled 917 members and voluntary helpers. 

There are also a large number of smaller missions, formed for 
the purpose of reaching special sections of London's millions. 
The policeman, the cabman, the railway servant, the costermonger, 
the theatrical employe, and the flower-girl are, for instance, 
considered in this way. 

The Salvation Army, established in 1865, was in its early days 
a great mission movement. No one would deny that it ranks 
in that category to-day ; the first flush of enthusiasm, however, 
has passed away. It has settled down into the ordinary religious 
life of the nation, and is no longer a sort of revivalistic Ishmael 
with its hand against all conventions and respectabilities. To-day 
it is not penalised by the authorities on account of its street 
processions. A Salvation lass in her poke bonnet is no longer 
an object of ridicule and abuse. A red jersey with its " blood 
and fire " motto causes no more comment than an archdeacon's 
gaiters. This conventionalising of methods, though inevitable, 
has naturally lessened its power on the public mind, and to-day 
other great Churches are in exactly the same position : the Wesleyan 
Methodist Church supplies a ready illustration. The Army is doing 
excellent work which none of the Churches specifically attempt; 
yet it must be admitted that it lacks the power it possessed in 
the first years of its existence of rousing the populace. 



316 THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 

In addition to these agencies there are numbers of unattached 
lay agents of all degrees of ability and education who offer their 
services as missioners. Some of them are sincere and earnest, 
if unlettered, men, who undoubtedly possess the evangelistic spirit, 
though they lack adequate mental equipment. Their pay is only 
moderate, and from a financial standpoint there is little inducement 
for them to continue in the work. From careful inquiries one finds 
that there is but a small percentage of unworthy men — from a moral 
standpoint — amongst them. The " unattached " missioners include 
a large number of Plymouth Brethren, who are continually breaking 
away from old associations and starting missions on their own 
account. These as a rule develop into regular causes, and soon 
lose the mission characteristics. 

There is a general tendency to-day, however, for the Churches 
to set apart their own missioners. The larger and better organised 
bodies contend that the " converted thief " or the " converted this 
or that " is not the best agent for prosecuting mission-work. They 
find that there is as much necessity for the missioner to possess 
culture and education as their ordinary ministers. Men are now 
definitely allocated to this work by the Established, the Wesleyan 
Methodist, and the Presbyterian Churches. In the latter's official 
handbook it is stated that presbyteries or congregations desiring 
the services of these brethren must apply to the Home Mission 
Committee. Though the government of the Congregational and 
Baptist Churches is on an independent basis, they have recog- 
nised missioners at the call of individual churches. 

In addition, the Church of England has now a virile " Army " 
established by the Rev. Wilson Carlile, on a basis similar to that 
of the Salvation Army. It possesses an Evangelistic Department, 
which has the selection and training of working men and working 
women for spiritual propagandist work amongst the masses in the 
Metropolis. The National Free Church Council is also alive to this 
mission-work. The employment of three well-known missioners — 
"Gipsy Smith," Mr. W. R. Lane, and the Rev. J. Tolefree Parr 
— is included in its general organisation. These three gentlemen 
conduct missions in London as well as in other parts of the country. 

At the great central missions established by the Wesleyan 
Methodists, and now latterly by the Congregationalists, there are 
agencies of an Evangelistic character, such as street-corner 
preaching, propagandist work in the parks and other crowded 
resorts, whilst the evening service on Sundays possesses revival 



MISSIONARY EFFORTS IN THE METROPOLIS 317 

characteristics. There is usually a penitent form or inquiry room, 
and gospel invitations are freely and earnestly given during the 
service. 

But alas ! all these efforts seem but the drop in the ocean. 
That London cannot be roused easily is a truism. It covers so 
large an area, includes so many millions of people, and is so 
entirely without the sense of corporate life that the ordinary 
machinery for reaching the public ear in the Metropolis is 
absolutely powerless to stir the populace as a whole. This applies 
as much to politics and great moral questions as to religious 
propaganda. It has become increasingly manifest that partial and 
sectarian attacks upon the irreligion and indifference of London 
life are only influencing the merest fringe of the vast city. To 
obtain substantial and enduring results there seems needed some 
effective organisation" which at stated intervals could place the 
gospel message before the people in such a way as to arouse 
the whole of London, at one and the same time. 

Such an effort would cost £30,000 to £40,000. It would require 
(a) absolute union between Christian workers of all denominations ; 
(6) a committee of business men whose reputation stood high in 
the City, and who would superintend the details of a huge organi- 
sation ; (c) the selection of the largest available — and neutral — 
buildings in certain well-defined centres ; and (d) " live " Churches 
to look after results. 

At present there appears little chance of attaining the 
first condition. The Education struggle has made union in 
Christian work well-nigh impossible. Free Churchmen have to 
a great extent removed the reproach concerning their own 
dissensions by uniting in the work of the National Free Church 
Council, but there still remains, unfortunately, keen division between 
the Established and the Free Churches. 

To consider the effect of a mission on the gigantic scale 
now outlined, one must go back a quarter of a century since 
when Messrs. Moody and Sankey were pursuing their London 
campaign. This occurred in 1875, and has never been equalled 
for its widespread organisation and results. During the four 
months of their mission the following statistics were reported : 
in Camberwell Hall they held sixty meetings, which were 
attended by 480,000 people ; in Victoria Hall there were forty-five 
meetings, attended by 400,000; in the Royal Haymarket Opera 
House there were sixty meetings, attended by 330,000 ; in Bow Road 



318 THE EELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 

Hall sixty meetings, attended by 600,000 ; in the Agricultural Hall 
there were sixty meetings, attended by 720,000. In all they held 
285 meetings, which were attended by over two and a half millions 
of people. The mission cost £28,396 19s. 6cZ., nearly all of which 
was subscribed before the close of the meetings. 

It is matter of history that these American evangelists 
originally aroused controversy, criticism, and ridicule. But from 
the first, men like the late Lord Shaftesbury and Lord Cairns, 
Charles Haddon Spurgeon, Dr. Moffatt, and Dr. Hannay, appeared 
on the platform, and gave their sympathetic countenance and 
support. Even Archbishop Tait, though he did not officially 
sanction the work, expressed in an indirect way his approval in 
the following passage : " But looking to the vast field that lies 
before us, and the overwhelming difficulties of contending with 
the mass of positive sin and careless indifference which exists 
on all sides against the progress of the gospel, I, for my part, 
rejoice that, whether regularly or irregularly, whether according 
to the divine scriptural and perfect way, or imperfectly with 
certain admixtures of human error, Christ is preached, and 
sleeping consciences are aroused." 

Messrs. Moody and Sankey secured what has never been 
obtained since on such comprehensive lines — the support of 
ministers of every denomination. At the farewell meeting held 
in the Mildmay Conference Hall, there were present 188 clergy- 
men, 164 Congregational ministers, 85 Baptist ministers, 81 Wes- 
leyan Methodist ministers, 39 Presbyterian ministers, 8 United 
Methodist Free Church ministers, 7 Primitive Methodist ministers, 
3 members of the " Brethren," 2 members of the Countess of 
Huntingdon's Connexion, 2 members of the Society of Friends, 
3 representatives of the Free Church of England and the Bible 
Christians, and 20 others whose connections were not known. 

Twenty-eight years have passed away since that time, and to 
an impartial observer there are abundant evidences of the genuine 
and satisfactory nature of that campaign. The foreign mission- 
field discovered many able recruits in consequence, whilst there 
was probably not a single Protestant Church which did not 
benefit from its results. 

There have been other missions since. There was the Million 
Pledges Crusade at the beginning of this century, which failed 
to achieve the intention conveyed by its title. Going back 
fifteen to twenty years the Blue Ribbon Missions were another 



MISSIONARY EFFOETS IN THE METEOPOLIS 319 

phase of the Gospel Temperance movement. Within recent times 
the only special religious effort to bear comparison with the 
Moody and Sankey campaign is that of the Simultaneous Mission, 
organised by the National Free Church Council in 1900. In 
conception and management this mission was confined to the Free 
Church bodies. It was carefully organised; a system of visitation 
was adopted so that the outside masses could be invited to the 
meetings ; weU-known ministers from all parts of the country 
took part; the Churches were thoroughly roused, and the mission 
closed with beneficial results to the various neighbourhoods 
forming the centres of the work. It was calculated that on each 
of the days of the mission (with the probable exception of the 
Saturdays) there were 200,000 persons at the meetings. 

Two or three drawbacks were admitted in connection with the 
Simultaneous Mission. The time allotted did not permit of the 
best results being obtained. Just as the workers were realising 
their opportunities and responsibilities the mission closed. Again 
the church buildings were not the most suitable places for the 
meetings. A haU under neutral conditions would have proved 
of greater service. 

One does not wish to dogmatise on such a subject as missions, 
but there appears ground for emphasising the statement that the 
appalling indifference to Christianity, the widespread vice and the 
awful results of the drink traffic in the metropolitan area, demand 
missionary efforts on a large, comprehensive, and thoroughly 
organised scale. Judging by the campaign in 1876, two results 
would accrue from the adoption of this suggestion — the gathering 
in of the masses and the quickening of the Churches. It is 
difficult to say which of these two objects is the more im- 
portant. 



The P.S.A. Movement 

BY THE REV. EBEN. GOOLD, M.A. 

The P.S.A. is the name of a movement that has been wonderfully 
successful and greatly blessed in bringing back to the House of 
God the " lapsed masses." From one point of view it may be 
said to represent a protest against dulness, coldness, and rigid 
formalism in a religious service, and to recall the brightness and 
joyousness and brotherliness of religion and worship — " Her ways 
are ways of pleasantness " ; " Sing praises, for it is pleasant " — and 
as such the P.S.A. has had a distinctly marked influence upon 
public worship. If it be admitted that it is open to criticism, 
the name has by its novelty aroused curiosity and proved 
successful in drawing probably a quarter of a million of men 
who had been deaf to every other invitation ; and not only 
drawing them, but also uniting them in societies or " brother- 
hoods " for the uplifting and saving of their fellows. 

The P.S.A. was first started by Mr. John Blackham, of West 
Bromwich, in 1876, and had its origin in the Moody and Sankey 
Birmingham Mission of that year. The idea of the venerable 
founder was to form a Bible Class that should be so attractive, 
so full of life, so helpful, that it should interest and hold a mass 
of men>— " a thousand and one" was the aim. The Moody meetings 
were none the less serious because they were bright; and the 
ideal of the P.S.A. is that of a high-toned religious service or 
meeting, free from conventionalities, brief in all its parts and 
simple and plain, bright with the joyful note of praise and 
brotherly in spirit. The three B's — Brief, Bright, Brotherly — are 
as much a part of the name as the letters P.S.A. An alternative 
name by which the movement is known throughout the Black 
Country, the A.B.C. — "Adult Bible Class" — stands as a witness 
to the first intentions of the founder. In the first ten years the 
progress of the movement was chiefly among the Methodist 

320 



THE P.S.A. MOVEMENT 321 

churclies in tlie Black Country, while large meetings were estab- 
lished in Derby under Mr. Edwin Hodder, in Leicester under 
Mr. Howard Lloyd, and in Nottingham under Alderman Mellors, 
in each case in large public halls. 

From about the year 1890, when attention was drawn to the 
movement from the Congregational Union platform, a great 
extension took place, chiefly among Congregational churches in 
the large towns of the north — Liverpool, Leeds, Hanley, 
Manchester, Ashton-under-Lyne, and throughout Lancashire and 
Yorkshire ; and since then all over the country from Aberdeen 
to Brighton and St. Austell. In London, Tottenham took the 
lead, followed by Kingsland, the Edinboro' Castle, Christ Church, 
"Westminster Bridge Road, Acton, and other places. 

The history of the movement in London has not been so 
uniformly successful as in the provinces. There are special 
difficulties in reaching the London working man. He moves his 
residence more frequently than his brother in the country, and 
the chasm between him and the churches is deeper and broader. 
In the country, nearly every man has been himself a Sunday 
scholar, he sends his children to Sunday school, and he retains 
some family or friendly connection with the chapel, but this 
condition applies to a much smaller extent to London. Still, 
this must not be exaggerated, for where the P.S.A. has been 
started, and run on lines that experience has proved successful in 
the country, it has been successful in London. 

At one critical period of its growth in London the P.S.A. was 
sorely tried in two directions. On the one hand, discussions on 
social and political problems were introduced which tended to 
wrangling rather than to brotherliness, and the meetings came 
to grief. On the other hand, an exaggerated stress and a mis- 
interpretation were put upon the word " pleasant," and some 
provided an afternoon entertainment with songs, recitations, and 
orchestral pieces, with a hymn or two, reading, prayer, and an 
address thrown in. Both these abuses have long since spent 
themselves ; but they tended to give the P.S.A. a bad name in 
London, and to alienate the sympathies of those who should have 
been its best supporters. 

Another feature of the work in London must be noted. The 
distinctive work of the P.S.A. has been the reclaiming of men 
to religion and worship. Men form the larger proportion of 
absentees from worship, and it is among men that religious 

21 



322 THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 

work is most needed and most difficult. The particular genius of 
the P.S.A. has been to face this great fact and apply itself to 
its remedy. The result has been that men have flocked literally 
in their thousands to the P.S.A. All over the country there are 
scattered at least twelve hundred societies or " brotherhoods," and 
in each one there are many willing to bear witness that the 
P.S.A. has been the means of a change of life and character 
to them. The men have come to feel " at home " at their 
P.S.A., and regard it as their own meeting. There is an " atmo- 
sphere" in the P.S.A. quite different from that of an orthodox 
service or a mixed meeting. There may be theoretic objections 
to sectional gatherings, but facts prove that men who are 
untouched by all ordinary religious agencies may be got to a 
men's service, when nothing wiU induce them to attend a " mixed" 
service. 

Now in the progress of the movement in London, this experi- 
ence has been largely ignored, and mixed meetings abound, of 
which the one at Dawes Road, Fulham, with about eight hundred 
members, is, I believe, the only great success in London. It 
should be noted here that in the country exactly similar meet- 
ings and societies are founded for women and worked by women 
on Monday (P.M.E.) or Tuesday (P.T.E.) evenings. These 
are as great a success as the men's societies, and being dis- 
tinctive, do a special work which no mixed meetings can do. I 
believe I am right in saying that there is not a single such 
society in London, though there are at Christ Church and at 
Fulham Monday afternoon gatherings (P.M.A.) for women upon 
somewhat similar Hues. I call attention to this, partly to differ- 
entiate between the P.S.A. as a mission to men and the P.S.A. 
as an unconventional afternoon service for anyone — each good in 
its own way, but they remain two different ways,— and also to 
account for a new name, originated in, and almost whoUy confined 
to, London — the " Men's Own." The " Men's Own " societies are 
P.S.A.s that adhere to the "men only" ideal of the P.S.A. The 
late Mr. Hurndall, of Bow, was a leader in this work, and I 
believe was the originator of the new title. The London " Men's 
Own " societies are conducted on precisely the same lines as the 
great P.S.A.s of Lancashire and the Midlands. Unlike many 
London P.S.A.s, they also keep their doors open " all the year 
round," recognising the two facts that working men do not get 
a couple of months' holiday in the summer, and also that they 



THE P.S.A. MOVEMENT 323 

need the stimulus of a helpful service as much in August and 
September as at any other time of the year. 

There are seventy societies on the roll of the London P.S.A. 
Federation, but this probably does not represent one-third of the 
total number of the societies in London. That at IKord (1,200 
men) is probably the largest, and there may be haK a dozen 
numbering between 600 and 1,200; but the majority have 
between 50 and 150 members. They are connected with all 
denominations and with none. 

A large number of agencies group themselves around the 
Sunday afternoon service. Usually members pay a penny a week 
and receive a book at the end of twenty-six or thirteen weeks — 
a unique work by which thousands of books get into the homes 
of the people. There is a Provident (Friendly) Society, with a 
very excellently arranged sickness department on the popular 
dividing principle, and slate clubs, helping hand, holiday saving, 
coal, and other funds abound. The P.S.A. calls forth an army 
of workers from its ranks for this and other social work, and in 
several cases social clubs are being successfully run. 

A P.S.A. brotherhood demands great energy, common-sense, 
grit, absence of " side," of pew rents, of ecclesiastical form and 
theological phraseology, and above all, the presence and exhibi- 
tion of the spirit of brotherliness. Given these, and men will 
come together and unite in the worship of the great Father. 
Their needs are real and are not to be trifled with. They do 
not want sensationalism, none are so keenly sensitive to detect 
the hollowness of mere clap-trap. To offer this is to provide 
stones for the hungry. They want strong, straight, warm- 
hearted words of hope and help and courage to carry them 
through life. Their hearts hunger for light and truth and 
sympathy, for the bread of life, and if the churches of London 
would open their doors on a Sunday afternoon and approach the 
men around them in the simple, true spirit of the Master, their 
buildings would not be large enough to hold those who would 
flock to them. 



The Children of the Slums 

Their Relation to the Churches 
BY THE REV. HENRY T. MEAKIN 

Some of the most significant and interesting information given 
in the Daily News Census is, to me, that relating to the children. 
Of the total attendance of about one million at the various places 
of worship for the day, nearly one-third were children. In the 
morning the children far outnumbered the men and exceeded 
the number of women; and though at the evening services the 
children were outnumbered by the women, their number again 
exceeded that of the men. Casual readers of the Census have 
simply noticed the total attendances given in the Daily News, and 
newspapers have only copied the total figures, but those who 
have studied the details will have seen how, at many places of 
worship, the children have saved the situation ; they have often 
given a respectable appearance in point of numbers to the 
returns, when the paucity of attendance of adults would have 
been distressingly discouraging. Throughout the metropolitan 
area the attendance of the children was 37"1 per cent, of the total 
in the morning, and 27*4 per cent, in the evening. The following 
figures, at a glance, will show the percentage of children as they 
affect the five principal denominations : 



DENOMINATION. 


MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Adults. 


Chldm. 


Total. 


Per- 
centage 

of 
chldm. 


Adults. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Per- 
centage 

of 
chldin. 


Church of England . 
Roman Cath. Church 
Baptist Church 
Congregational Ch. 
Wesleyan Meth. Ch. 


132,621 
51,668 
27,517 
28,475 
18,025 


87,810 
22,012 
17,157 
15,824 
13,639 


220,431 
73,680 
44,674 
44,299 
31,664 


39-8 
29-9 
38-4 
357 
431 


154,210 
14,961 
47,465 
44,559 
32,207 


55,512 
4,931 
16,260 
16,677 
14,268 


209,722 
19,892 
63,725 
61,236 
46,475 


26-4 
24-8 
25-5 
27-2 
307 



324 



THE CHILDEEN OF THE SLUMS 



325 



The percentage of children in the Wesleyan Methodist Church 
attendances is conspicuous, being much above the general average, 
and higher than in the other four Churches singled out for com- 
parison. The proportion of "Wesleyan Methodist adults to the total 
will, of course, be correspondingly less. 

It is pertinent to my subject to ascertain, if possible, the pro- 
portion of children tabulated in the poorer boroughs, as compared 
with better-class districts, and I have collected the following 
information on this point. Southwark and Bermondsey will repre- 
sent the former, and Kensington and Paddington the latter: 



BOROUGH. 


Xumber of chil- 
dren above 5 
and tinder 16. 


CHILDREN'S ATTENDANCB. 


Morning. 


Percentage. 


Evening. 


Percentage. 


South^-ark 
Bermondsey 
Kensington 
Paddington 


46,462 
31,869 
28,729 
24,552 


8,930 
6,469 
5,977 
3,883 


19-2 1 
20-3 ' 
20-8 • 
15-6 


9,026 
6,792 
2,966 
2,493 


19-4 
21-3 
10-3 
10-2 



It will be seen that the children of the poor districts attend 
religious services in the morning in as good a proportion as those 
in the well-to-do districts, and that in the evening their attendance 
is twice as good. This is interesting, because in the poorer districts 
the Saturday night and Sunday morning marketing militate against 
Sunday morning attendances ; and it shows, further, that the 
example of the " Oncers," as Mr. Gladstone described them, is, in 
the wealthier districts, sadly followed by the children. In con- 
sidering, therefore, the poorer children's relation to the Churches, 
we can start out with the valuable information obtained by the 
Daily News, that that relation is closer and better sustained than 
it is in the case of parents in a higher social scale. The irreligion 
of the suburbs in this rsspect is greater than that of the slums. 
The rich man's child, in matters of church attendance, is more 
neglected than the poor man's child: and I would like to see an 
article by some suburban pastor on the children of the well-to-do 
and their relation to the Churches. It is a subject at least as 
pressing in importance as mine. 

But here it is for me to fix attention upon the number of 
children in the poorer districts tabulated in the Daily News Census. 
If we adopt the generally accepted proportion of one-third of the 
morning returns for '• Twicers" we shall find in Southwark that 12,009 
children out of 46,462 between the ages of live and sixteen are 



326 THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 

included in the Census returns, and in Bermondsey 8,948 out of 
31,869 — i.e., in the two districts about 27 per cent, of such children. 
The attendance of adults in the same districts on the same basis 
is about 12 per cent., or less than half that of the children. Then 
the character of the children enumerated has to be borne in mind. 
I shall be safe in saying that they are not to any large extent 
what may be termed slum children. "Who ever sees the ill-clad 
in any number in ordinary Sunday schools, much more in ordinary 
services, even in the poorer districts? Anybody familiar with the 
slums will know that at the hour when Sunday schools are being 
held, the streets, courts, and alleys are alive with youngsters to 
whom Sunday makes no difference in clothing or cleanliness. Even 
the so-called Ragged Schools do not reach the ragged children to 
any extent, and it has often seemed to me a mistake to cling 
to the repellent name of Ragged Schools in connection with the 
modern institutions known by that name. I am afraid it is a 
name, like many other fanciful designations of childlife, that 
arrests the attention and provokes the , sympathy of outsiders 
more than it reaches and influences the booid fide slum child. 

Experience drives me to the conclusion that the vast majority 
of the 73 per cent, of children in the poorer districts not 
enumerated in the Daily Neivs Census are practically outside the 
Churches, and have little relationship to them except in an occa- 
sional and a charitable sort of way. These constitute the problem 
of the slums, and may be divided into two sections : (1) those 
under thirteen or fourteen years of age, supposed to be under 
the control of the School Board ; (2) those freed from School 
Board control and without regular employment. The life of the 
former is, to begin with, not favourable to the influence of 
ordinary church and chapel instruction. From early infancy the 
youngsters have to take care of themselves. Mothers have to 
go out to work, or, what is worse, have to slave at home under 
the sweating system — or what is worse still with some, they 
spend their time in visits to the public-house. Then the children 
are left to roll about the doorsteps, or, as they begin to walk 
and run, to roam about the slums in which they are brought 
up ; and at night they naturally make the outside of the drink 
shops their rendezvous, where the gas lamps give the brightest 
light, and where the excitement is always the greatest. With 
such an upbringing and all its accompaniments of irreligion and 
vice, it is not natural to expect children to find their way to 



THE CHILDEEX OF THE SLUMS 327 

churcli or chapel institutions. The young folk early in life 
develop a v,-Ul and Tray of their o-^vn, which lead in quite an 
opposite direction. Mischief develops into sheer destructiveness 
and theft. Anything left unguarded is looked upon as a target 
for attack, or to be seized as loot and spoil. The "vrindows of an 
empty house are very soon broken, and such a house in a few 
days becomes a wreck. "Windows of institutions, through which 
inmates are not constantly on the look out, must be protected with 
wire ; and buildings in course of erection have to be watched. 
The other day I saw a heap of cinders tipped outside some works : 
in a short space of time the heap was swarming with ragged 
children, who were carrj-ing off the cinders for fuel in old sacks 
and tins and ever}' conceivable receptacle, and the whole heap soon 
disappeared. It would be impossible to deliver coal in some parts 
of London in bulk as it is done in the country : there would be 
no difficulty in getting it in, only it would be got into the wrong 
places. And people pass in crowds and do not interfere. 

Then such of the slum children as do get to Sunday school 
find its discipline irksome and its working unattractive. The class 
system into which they are forced in the day school is objectionable 
to them on a Sunday, where, too, the provision of class-rooms is 
meagre, and not comparable to that in the Board School. As a 
matter of fact the Sunday school is rarely patronised by the slum 
children, except, perhaps, when the school treats are anticipated. 
Besides, the clothing question, coupled with the independence and 
indifference generated in the minds of the children, creates a 
gulf for them between the sltuns and the Churches. 

With regard to the second section — the children freed from 
School Board control — the problem in the slums is even more 
difficult and dangerous. The influence of the Churches is confined 
to individual cases, but on the vast majority it is practically nil. 
There are some Churches which provide recreative and educational 
auxiliaries, but I fear that these are not used by the people for 
whom they were intended. These clubs and classes are mostly 
utilised by the young men and women whose thinking faculties 
are not dormant, and, consequently, whose social position is higher 
than that of the loud, giggling, rough element so famihar in our 
streets. And the two classes do not and will not mix either in 
churches, settlements, or social institutions. It is a great blot on 
our educational system that boys and girls should have their freedom 
from Board School control by reaching a low age limit, or before 



328 THE RELIGIOUS LITE OF LONDON 

they have the prospect of some employment. How the freedom 
is used, newspaper readers know in the outbursts of Hooliganism 
with which the streets adjacent to the slums are often infested. 
But the whole story is not always reported. In Holloway gaol 
waiting room I sat next a mother who had come to see a son 
who had been arrested with other ruffians for a murderous attack 
in Lambeth Walk. She told me he was the second boy of hers 
who had been led into the company of Hooligans. The first, in 
fear of arrest, had committed suicide, and she feared the other 
would follow his example. 

There is another and better side to slum-dom which I would 
fain depict. Beneath the turbulent and vicious element there are 
often elements of human sympathy and kindness not surpassed 
in higher circles. There is a neighbourliness foreign to the West 
End, which is exhibited particularly towards the children. Sick 
and hungry children in a court or alley seem to belong to every- 
body thereabout, and the genuine sorrow of a family touches the 
people next door, and next door but one, and farther and farther 
on. A funeral hearse in such a locality wiU attract a larger and 
more sympathetic crowd than anything else, and rough women will 
wipe tears from their faces at the sight of a white little coffin under 
the seat of an undertaker's composite hearse. No songs have been 
more popular amongst the children than " Skylark," which depicts 
angelic interest in a departed mother, and " Everybody's loved by 
someone," which tells of the waif's lonely lot and adoption. I am 
told that these have emanated from the music-halls, and have been 
conveyed to the slums in barrel-organs ; if so, theirs be the credit 
for touching chords of sympathy in human hearts beating beneath 
rags, when Church hymns and tunes and official religion have 
often too grievously failed. 

The duty of the Churches towards the slum children is an urgent 
problem ; on its solution will depend the continuance of the slums 
and the life of the Churches. I shall be counted heterodox if I 
question the accuracy of the reports of so-called wholesale conversions 
of slum adults. We do believe in the possibility. Nothing is im- 
possible to God. But the conversion " of the man from the bottom " 
is a rarity of one's experience. In cases of converts supposed to be 
from the gutter it generally transpires that they have been the sub- 
ject of early religious influence. The converts of modem missions 
are of this character. The slum adults have had no such advantage, 
and lack spiritual perception and responsiveness. How can it be 



THE CHILDREN OF THE SLUMS 329 

otherwise when they are brought up in such terrible environments ? 
The practical and common-sense method, therefore, for the Church in 
dealing with the slums lies in the direction of the children. In them 
are the possibilities of a better state of things, social and religious, 
and through them the Church has the best chance of fulfilling its 
mission, I know the child of the well-to-do ; I know the child of 
the slum. Given equal conditions of affectionate training and 
influence the possibilities of all that is beautiful and happy are as 
great in the latter as in the former. It has been proved in one 
of the happiest episodes of my own domestic life. Anyone else 
may prove it by the personal rescue of orphaned little children from 
amongst the poorest populations. But this bears on the duty of the 
individual Christian, which we cannot here discuss at length, 

I will outline one or two things indicating what I think the re- 
lationship of the Churches to the slum children in the future must be. 
The Church must co-operate more vigorously in sweeping away 
slum-dom altogether. " These things have been, therefore these 
things must be," must be discarded as a body- and soul-destroying 
error of the Christian's creed. Church workers in slum neigh- 
bourhoods are more familar than any others with the inhuman 
conditions under which thousands in this City are obliged to 
live. They see them daily with all their concomitant evils and 
sufferings, in which the children are the worst sufferers. Yet what 
poor use the Church is making of its evidence ! Is it because 
the selfish interests of its members and supporters are involved in 
the reformation ? Shame upon us if this be so. May such Churches 
perish with the slums ! 

The question of the employment of children, and the curtailment 
of their education is a pressing question for the Churches. 

The growing drinking habits of women, the child bearers, and the 
trainers of our children, is a kindred question. In one public-house 
in Old Kent Road on a Saturday 2,442 women entered, and 369 of 
them had babies in arms. 

The Church must have a combined social and religious pro- 
gramme for the children. Child-life in all its aspects must be taken 
more distinctly under the wings and expenditure of the Church. 
I would like to see a great mission-hall in every slum locality 
devoted wholly to the child-life and youth of the neighbourhood. 
There should be hearty religious services, free from stereotype and 
formalism ; there should be playgrounds and amusements conducted 
under the auspices of the Church, and summer and winter recreations 



330 THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 

calculated to develop both the body and mind. The parks are 
outside the reach of the poorest children ; they are generally far 
away from the localities in which they live. Southwark Park, for 
instance, is not now in the Southwark borough, and is nearly 
two miles away from the scene of the Bitter Cry of outcast 
London. And slum children, even of an advanced age, do not 
travel so far. 

The best men in the Churches, with aptitude for winning the 
affection of children, should be appointed to work these mission 
centres. By the best men I don't mean the most " heavenly 
minded," and I don't exclude the spiritually minded. The more 
Christlike the men the more will they keep to the front those 
spiritual results without which all else will be vain. But such men 
will none the less enter into the fun and frolic and amusements 
which happily cannot be separated from child-life, and will give an 
exhibition of that Christianity which ought to be as attractive to 
children and young people, as Christ made Himself attractive to the 
children of His day. 

Depend upon it the Church that will lay itself out for some such 
flank movement for the benefit of the children of the slums wiU do 
more in a few years than all the orthodox, commonplace, spasmodic, 
religious frontal attacks will accomplish in centuries. 

The cost of men and money will be great, but on earth and 
in heaven it will be insignificant compared with the blessed results 
which will accrue to the Churches themselves, and to the poor slum 
children of this great City whose lot is a disgrace to this twentieth 
century of the Christian era. 



The Adult-School Moyement 

BY WILLIAM CHARLES BEAITHWAITE 

The Adult School is one of the most notable religious developments 
of the last century — a successful attempt to help the Hves of men 
and women by means of a common-sense Christianity with the starch 
taken out and brotherliness put in. The Quaker philanthropist 
Joseph Sturge gave the initial impulse to the movement about the 
year 1846 ; it quickly rooted itself in Birmingham, and spread to 
Sheffield, Bristol, and other centres. London was only reached in 
the year 1879, and while enough has been done, as the Census figures 
show, at Bunhill Fields, "Westminster, Wood Green, Kentish Town, 
Walthamstow, Croydon, and elsewhere, to prove the value of the 
movement in the Metropolis, it is only now gaining a footing in 
London, and we must turn to other parts of the country for the best 
evidence of its wonderful success. In Birmingham to-day we find 
schools at 65 centres, with a membership of about 13,000 ; and in 
Leicester and the county there are now 100 schools, with 8,000 
members. Taking the whole country, we have about 700 schools, 
with a total membership of 60,000. Birmingham — and, indeed, the 
whole movement — owed much to the late William White, who was 
a true brother of men, and since his death three years ago the 
work has been extended with great enthusiasm as a memorial to 
him, worthier than any monument of marble. This missionary 
spirit has led to schools being started in the worst slums of the 
city; in five cases disused public-houses have been made use of, 
and re-opened "under entirely new management," the old custom 
being successfully attracted to the new institution. The Leicester- 
shire work shows how the whole of England could be covered 
with a network of schools. A dozen years ago there were only 
eight schools in the whole of the county, with about 600 members ; 
now the movement in the county extends by one school a month 
as a minimum, and sometimes by two or three. 

331 



332 THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 

"What, you ask, is an Adult School ? The name is unassuming 
enough, and prepares you at once for something that is homely and 
brotherly. Chas. Booth says : " To the common stock of missionary 
enterprise the Society of Friends has contributed the Adult School, 
and the example set is now being followed in many quarters. It has 
a strictly democratic constitution, and forms a kind of religious 
co-operative society, based on a Biblical debating club, from which 
it aims at producing a true social brotherhood." 

This description may serve, though the phrase " Biblical debating 
club " needs correction. The central idea of the school work is not 
a Biblical " debate," but the free, reverent, and practical study of 
the Bible, conducted with full opportunity for discussion. The 
basis of a school is the practical teaching of Jesus Christ. Its 
object is to manufacture men after His pattern. It has no test of 
membership, except a wish to help and to be helped. It stands for 
brotherhood, and takes in artisan and aristocrat, AngHcan and 
Agnostic alike. Associated with a school will be found various 
helpful agencies, such as savings funds, libraries, night-schools, 
social clubs, sick, benefit and coal societies, lectures, and technical 
classes. The whole institution is designed to promote brotherliness, 
to assist the development of mental and spiritual faculties along true 
educational lines, and to arouse the feeling of personal responsibility. 
These are the true antidotes to the selfishness, indifference, and 
craving for excitement that we deplore to-day. It is of national 
importance that the masses of men who make and unmake the 
government of the country should be helped, as Adult Schools are 
helping them, in all that fosters intelligence, forms character, and 
inspires to brotherly service. Freedom is dependent on free 
spirits. 

If you go to a successful Adult School you will find yourself 
in an exhilarating atmosphere. The hour of meeting is early — • 
7.30 a.m. on Sunday morning in many Birmingham Schools, 8.30 
or 9.0 in other places. The members welcome each other with 
hearty handshakes, and the school opens with a hymn and prayer. 
Then comes, in most cases, a half-hour occupied with payments 
into sick-clubs, etc., elementary writing and reading lessons, and 
short, bright talks on topics of interest. The Bible-class follows, 
many schools taking a series of carefully chosen lessons prepared 
year by year by the Friends' First-day School Association. These 
Bible-lessons are the central feature of an Adult School. Oppor- 
tunity is given for different points of view to be put forward by 



THE ADULT-SCHOOL MOVEMENT 333 

tlie members, and for difficulties to be stated. The leader of the 
class guides the discussion and keeps it practical and helpful, but 
is careful not to monopolise the time. After the Bible-lesson there 
is a brief, final service, in which all the classes join together ; 
notices are given out, short reports are made of visits to other 
schools, and sympathy is expressed with any scholars in trouble, 
which often takes a very practical form in cases of serious distress. 
The school breaks up in time to allow members to get to a place 
of worship, being conducted with a view to supplementing, not 
superseding, the ordinary organisations of the Churches. 

The secret of the success of the movement Hes in its homeUness 
and brotherliness, in its attempt to make life and religion one, and 
in the active work it finds for all its members. Dr. R. F. Horton 
says of it : " The humble Adult-School movement has been reading 
a significant lesson to the Church. Acting on the principle of the 
New Testament, expecting great things from brotherly love and 
mutual edification, it has begun to touch men who remain indifferent 
to the sterilised, formal, and inarticulate society which sometimes 
passes as a Church, and it has evoked an intense enthusiasm even 
from men who have long been nominally members of the Church, 
but never before understood the blessedness of having fellowship 
one with another, and so experiencing the cleansing power of 
Christ." 

Nursed to strength under the quiet care, of the Society of Friends, 
the wonderful fitness of Adult Schools for the working-day life of 
our great centres of population has only been widely recognised 
during the last few years. Leicestershire, with its hundred schools, 
supported by men and women belonging to almost every denomina- 
tion, has shown the possibiHty of an Adult-School England, and 
for this end the National Council of Adult-School Associations is 
actively working. 

A visit to one of the larger London schools will soon bring 
any inquirer into touch with the interest and Hfe of this great 
movement. 



i 



^^_,^ 





The Problem of Greater London 

BY GEORGE HAW 

For an hour or more I have been sitting with the figures for 
Greater London before me, meditating on their meaning. Com- 
pared with those of London they have a fresh and favourable look. 
Only after removing one or two factors do you find that, in all 
that concerns the higher life of the people. Greater London is but 
repeating the problems of London. 

Church-goers in London are divided into five classes by Mr. 
Charles Booth in his " Religious Influences." These are the wealthy, 
the upper middle class, the lower middle class, the regular wage- 
earners, and the poor. Of church-goers in Greater London you 
might say they consist of two classes only — the upper middle class 
and the lower middle class. That is simply because suburban 
London in the main consists of these two classes. You get the 
same thing all the kingdom over. The residential suburbs of all 
cities fill the churches. It is in the nature of things, therefore, to 
find a higher proportion of church-goers in Greater London than 
in London itself. The thing that calls for serious thought is, that 
where the wage-earning class is pouring into Greater London, 
there church attendance declines. 

Nearly everybody moves out of London who can. An old 
social reformer, who has served the people in the slums through 
some of the best years of his life, told me on the eve of his giving 
up the work at last that a person serves London best by leaving 
it. It is the counsel of despair. It is as though a man tried to 
run away from himself. Rather should those who seek Christian 
or social progress declare that a person serves London best by 
staying behind to help others to get away. 

"Why? Because all the strong and prosperous people are 
running away from the inner belt of London as fast as they can ; 

337 22 



338 THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 

forgetting it, denying it, owning no responsibility for it, leaving it 
to the weaker, poorer, more weary ones. The manufacturers, their 
managers, and all the staff who take salaries as distinct from 
wages, come in the mornings and go away in the evenings, and 
admit no responsibility, social or religious, for the crowded districts 
where their workplaces lie and their workpeople live. Even the 
tradesman goes away when he " succeeds." The chronic poor and 
the smaller wage-earners are left stranded, a class by themselves. It 
is a terrible thing, the way London is separating itself into harsh 
divisions of class, into cities of the poor and cities of the rich. It 
is far more terrible to see how Greater London is aggravating the 
evil. Never was this evil so widespread as at the present hour. 
As the population grows the evil grows. 

These things have to be considered before you can understand 
the situation in Greater London. The good church record in 
Greater London has to be weighed with the less satisfactory 
record in London. The classes from whom church members of all 
denominations are mostly drawn are filling the suburbs, having 
deserted the classes in the dim grey streets who, since the great 
days when the common people heard Him gladly, have found it 
easier to drift into indifference or unbelief than to heed the modern 
methods of calling them to righteousness. 

It is sad to see that suburban London now no longer missions 
slum London, as was its wont. The wealthy churches of the well- 
to-do districts just inside London, such as Hampstead, Putney, and 
Stoke Newington, are generally more generous in maintaining 
mission centres in the inner districts than the more modern wealthy 
churches farther out in the new suburbs of Greater London. The 
great Wesleyan Missions in Central London get their best support 
in money and workers, not from the suburbs of the capital, but 
from the provinces. 

To dwellers in the suburbs, London is something only to be 
associated with the season-ticket and the office ; not with church 
life, nor with Christian and social responsibilities to the people who 
cannot dwell in suburbs. The sweltering city is so far off that its 
cry is drowned, its people are forgotten, its children largely left to 
grow up unheeded and unwarned ; but not all the ease and com- 
placency, not all the social amenities and literary societies and 
ladies' sewing meetings that gild and gladden the life of the 
flourishing churches of suburban London, can atone in the smallest 
way for the neglect of the great grey masses left behind. Some 



THE PEOBLEM OF GREATER LONDON 339 

of these suburban cliurclies only look so healthy because they have 
deserted the wounded. It was Napoleon's method with his armies, 
when he wanted the populace to see how well they looked. 

The mistake lies not in leaving London, for, above all other 
things, London wants its overcrowded population spread out 
more. Rather does the mistake lie in forgetting that the people 
left behind are without the means and leisure to keep church 
organisations alive unless helped by others ; hence the spiritual 
desolation and decay that creep over them. 

The suburbs themselves are now repeating precisely the same 
evils. People who a dozen years ago fled from Kentish Town 
to Willesden, or from Mile End to Leyton, or from "Walworth to 
Norbury, are now going farther afield — the "Willesden people to 
Hendon and Harrow, the Leyton people to Woodford and Seven 
Kings, the Norbury people to Sutton and Wimbledon. Why? 
Because Willesden and Leyton and Norbury are ceasing to be 
suburbs ; they have been invaded by working people, and are fast 
becoming working-class districts. 

Observe that where the working classes are crowding into 
Greater London, and the middle classes deserting them as they 
deserted them before, the church attendance is at its lowest. It 
stands at about the same proportion as in the working-class quarters 
of Inner London. If anything, it shows a tendency to be lower. 
The same grave portent resulting from class deserting class is 
repeating itself. Willesden is now as poor in its church attendance 
as Stepney or Southwark or St. Pancras. This last-named borough, 
comprising, as it does, Camden Town, Somers Town, and Kentish 
Town, has supplied a good deal of Willesden's growing population. 
Willesden is, in fact, becoming another St. Pancras; in its church 
life it has already become so. 

Turn now to another working-class quarter of Greater London. 
West Ham, which was a rural hamlet fifty years ago, has now 
a worse church attendance than either overcrowded Holborn or 
insalubrious Bermondsey. East Ham, which had no existence 
"when middle-aged men of to-day were children, is a fraction worse 
than West Ham. Its church|^attendance is lower than Lambeth's, 
or Hackney's, or that at Woolwich ; although in each of these 
London boroughs the working classes predominate. In Tottenham 
the attendance is worse than it is in the East End districts of 
Poplar and Stepney, or in other London working-class centres 
like Deptford and Finsbury. It shows something like the same 



340 THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 

ratio as Battersea and Shoreditcli. Further, the Census reveals 
that fewer people proportionately go to church in "Walthamstow 
and Leyton than in Greenwich and Camberwell, where again 
working people make up the bulk of the population. 

It may seem fairly satisfactory that in a big industrial borough 
like West Ham 1 in 4*80 of the inhabitants goes to a place of 
worship. But how many of the worshippers are working people ? 
A meagre proportion only. West Ham has still a large number 
of middle-class residents — that is, the class that makes up the 
majority of church-goers. These people form the bulk of the 
inhabitants at Forest Gate and Upton Park. Separate these 
districts in West Ham from its working-class quarters of Stratford 
and Canning Town and Silvertown, and the meagre church record 
would then be something to marvel at. Take a church census in 
West Ham ten years hence, when the middle classes, who are 
now running away from it as fast as they can, will have almost 
entirely disappeared, and you will find the number of worshippers 
shrunken like a plant stricken by blight. 

Far quicker than in London itself, this decay of church life is 
spreading among the working-class districts of Greater London. 

All round the eastern and north-eastern fringe of London the 
populous towns which have sprung up in recent years represent 
little more than huge dormitories for the London worker, who can 
find no accommodation within the great city itself. Between them 
these outside towns have a population equal to that in the East 
End. In many respects they are repeating the social evils of 
the East End, without some of the redeeming influences which 
you find at work there. Canning Town, Plaistow, Leyton, Stratford, 
AValthamstow, Tottenham, Wood Green, Edmonton, and Enfield 
are little else but the sleeping abode of Londoners. As such they 
have developed problems of the gravest kind, which the Churches 
as yet only vaguely understand, and certainly have not yet begun 
to solve. 

Many of these places, as we have seen, have become wholly 
communities of one class. All of them, representing the overflow 
from the overcrowded quarters of London, are essentially London 
in character. Their former individuality as rural hamlets has all 
been swept away by the untiring tide from London. You look 
in vain to-day for the Edmonton of John Gilpin and Keats, the 
Plaistow of Elizabeth Fry, the Walthamstow of William Morris, 
or the peaceful Enfield lanes so much beloved of Charles and 



THEi:PEOBLEM OF GREATEE LOKDON 341 

Mary Lamb. Everywhere you find the lanes now lined with 
houses. In all these suburbs the streets and houses are London 
streets and houses, often just as shabby, just as mean, just as 
monotonous. Their inhabitants are London people, inasmuch as 
they depend absolutely upon London for their livelihood. Except 
West Ham, the districts named, unlike an ordinary provincial 
town, have hardly any manufactories or trade-centres of their 
own. Nearly all the men and lads, nearly all the girls who go 
out to work, scramble every morning of the week into London, 
and go scrambling back in depressing crowds at night, counting 
Sunday a solacing respite. Their problems are not so much 
problems of housing as problems of transit. "Walthamstow and 
Tottenham in particular are concerned not so much with how to 
accommodate their people in houses like London as with how 
to accommodate their people in trains. The struggle in the early 
mornings at the railway stations for seats, and even for standing 
room, the overcrowding of the workmen's trains, and the stampede 
when they empty their human freight on the platforms at Liver- 
pool Street are daily scenes that might well make angels weep. 

"We are permitting a new East End to grow up outside the 
East End. One of these outside districts, Tottenham, although a 
town as it were but of yesterday, has been described as the Bethnal 
Green of Greater London. That is what it is fast becoming, many 
of its local rulers being in entire agreement on this point. 
"Tottenham," a former chairman of its local authority told me, 
" has practically become another Bethnal Green. Formerly it was 
a middle-class residential place, but almost all the good houses 
have been removed to make way for working-class dwellings. 
The place fell a prey to the jerry-builder when cheap railway 
fares were introduced, and the evils then committed have never 
been remedied." 

All this goes to show the seriousness of the problem presented 
to the Churches by the working-class towns springing up around 
London. It is, as I have shown, but the problem of Inner London 
over again. 

Sunday in the working-class quarters of Greater London is 
very much like a Sunday in Inner London. It comes first as a 
welcome respite from the daily grind. It opens with an idle 
morning divided between nap and newspaper. After a late dinner 
the afternoon sees a saunter, sometimes with wife and children, 
through the streets, or a walk to Epping Forest or Alexandra 



342 THE EELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 

Park, or Wormwood Scrubbs, or Hackney Marshes, or by the 
banks of the Lea. An early supper and a pipe close the day. 
Occasionally there comes a whole day's outing with the National 
Sunday League's excursions, or the evening is spent at a concert 
or a labour lecture in the town hall or in a theatre or club-room. 

The old working men's Radical Clubs of London, with a secular 
or political lecture on Sunday morning, followed by convivial 
gatherings round the bar in the afternoon, and a magic-lantern 
or music-hall entertainment in the evening, do not seem to be 
repeating themselves in Greater London. That is simply because 
working men are ceasing to be Radicals. In place of the Radical 
Clubs Greater London is substituting Labour and Socialist organisa- 
tions, and even Labour churches and Labour Sunday schools ; and 
all these various organisations are at their busiest on Sundays. 

To the other non-church-goers in the working-class quarters of 
Greater London, who take but small part in these movements, 
Sunday is the great day for visiting and receiving friends. In 
the late hours of Sunday night the trams and trains of the 
suburbs are far more crowded than on any week-night, because 
of the numbers returning from their visits or outings. The 
electric trams at East Ham on the one side and at Ealing on 
the other are simply besieged on Sunday evenings, while the late 
suburban trains on the South-Western, the Great Northern, and 
the Great Eastern, can often be seen so crowded that third-class 
passengers have to content themselves with standing room. 

That very large section of the working classes represented 
roughly by clerks, shop assistants, and warehousemen, who feel a 
sense of pride at being able to afford to live out of London, 
diligently spend their Sundays in this way — that is, by visiting 
and entertaining friends. Games and concerts in their little 
parlours beguile many a Sunday night. Thoughts of taking part 
in public worship are as far from their minds as thoughts of 
taking part in pubHc life. Sunday morning is a time for tending 
their tiny gardens. The treat of the afternoon is the cigar after 
dinner. Sunday evening, as we have seen, is given up to friends. 

Let it be repeated then, the Churches have very slight hold 
on these huge and ugly dormitories which are being built around 
London. The Nonconformists show the best returns. They have 
by far the great majority of worshippers in Willesden, West Ham, 
East Ham, Leyton, Walthamstow, Tottenham, Wood Green, and 
Edmonton — that is, in all the working-class towns of Greater 



1 



THE PROBLEM OF GBEATER LONDOK 343 

London. On the other hand, those suburbs which are almost 
wholly confined to the well-to-do, Hke E-ichmond, Barnes, Sutton, 
Carshalton, Surbiton, Teddington, New Southgate, Hampton, and 
the Moleseys, give the Church of England the big majority. In 
other wholly middle-class suburbs like Kingston, Croydon, Barnet, 
and Wimbledon, Anglicans and Nonconformists are about equal. 

But this is not the time for making denominational comparisons, 
nor for beHttling a grave problem by reducing it to the level of 
the Church and Chapel controversy. Here, in the failure to reach 
the common people, is laid bare the failure of all Churches. Here 
is something that places the whole Christian Church under a 
bitter reproach. 

How to remove that reproach ought to be the first consideration. 
"Why are the many indifferent ? The great mass of workpeople 
are not averse to Christianity. Rather is it that they feel they 
have little in common with the churches and with the general 
body of church-people. The Labour world, with its separate 
organisations, is almost wholly cut off from the religious world 
and its organisations. "While both are fast becoming the two most 
powerful organisations in the country, they are drifting farther 
apart from each other every year. Labour feels, and openly gives 
expression to the feeling, that the Church is a capitalist organi- 
sation. The church-going employer and the stay-away trade 
unionist are alike suspicious of each other. 

So wide has the gulf become that workpeople have themselves 
started Labour churches. The teaching at these places differs 
but little from that at the ethical societies. Nowhere have the 
Labour churches shown lasting vitality. Frequently they have 
ended in dismal failure. But they indicate a desire for a church, 
a yearning of the soul that is rising above the material things for 
which Labour strives and becoming vaguely conscious of the 

One far-off divine event, 

To which the whole creation moves. 

This desire for a separate Church only serves to mark afresh 
the failure of existing Churches to meet the people's needs. That 
failure comes largely, because in the work of administration the 
Churches do not as a rule admit the labouring classes. In most 
Churches to-day, with the exception, perhaps, of the Primitive 
Methodist, workpeople feel that in spite of their innate energy, 
their desire for service, their ability for organisation, they have 



344 THE EELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 

no call to take part in the administrative work. They may be 
welcomed as members, as that part of the congregation that has 
to be preached at, but they are not to be admitted into the 
counsels of the Church, nor to figure at the annual conferences, 
nor have any voice in the general scheme of government. 

The Salvation Army teach the Churches a lesson here. The 
Salvationists reach the people through the people ; they make all 
their converts workers. Maybe one of the reasons whj the 
Salvation Army cannot themselves point to a growing member- 
ship in recent years is because of the generous way they have 
fed both Anglican and Nonconformist Churches. Tens of thousands 
of worshippers enumerated under various Churches have first been 
got hold of by the Salvation Army. 

Here surely is one way to win back the people to the Churches. 
Give them an interest. Make them responsible for something. A 
Church with working men sharing its responsibilities and taking 
part in its official as well as in its spiritual life would of a 
certainty lay hold of the people. Such a Church would make use 
of working men in order to bring in working men, even as Christ 
made use of working men to send His gospel through all ages to 
all mankind. 



District of Richmond 



CHURCH OF ENGLAND 







MORNING. 






EVENING. 




Total 


CHURCH. 


















for the 
Day. 




Men. 


Women. 


Chldm. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldm. 


Total. 


St. Anne's, Kew Green 


94 


255 


124 


473 


100 


196 


39 


335 


808 


St. Peter's, Petersham . 


43 


86 


63 


192 


22 


71 


21 


114 


306 


Christ Church, Kew Road . 


53 


113 


136 


302 


49 


139 


39 


227 


529 


Holy Trinity, Townsend Rd. 


73 


176 


65 


314 


69 


179 


49 


297 


Gil 


Church of St. John-the- 




















Divine, Kew Road . 


107 


259 


161 


527 


74 


235 


125 


434 


9G1 


St. Luke's, Kew Road . 


38 


121 


133 


292 


35 


77 


38 


150 


442 


St. Mary Magdalene's George 




















Street .... 


95 


240 


167 


502 


78 


200 


67 


345 


847 


St. Matthias', Richmond.Hl. 


130 


368 


55 


553 


82 


268 


35 


385 


938 


Hickey's Almshouse Chapel 


49 


122 


16 


187 


36 


92 


6 


134 


321 


Total .... 


682 


1,740 


920 


3,342 


545 


1,457 


419 


2,421 


5,763 





Chtireh, of England Missions 










The Hall, Lr. Mortlake Rd. 

Railway Miss. Hall, Sheen 

Dale 


1 




14 


15 


31 
25 


30 
9 


64 
17 


125 
51 


125 
66 


Total .... 


1 




14 


15 


56 


39 


81 


176 


191 



BAPTIST CHURCH 



Duke Street .... 
Salem, Parkshot, Kewfoot 

Road 

Ebenezer, Jocelyn Road . . 


46 

13 
14 


71 

17 
20 


41 

32 
2 


158 

62 
36 


53 

21 
17 


117 

39 

27 


12 

9 

7 


182 

69 
51 


340 

131 

87 


Total .... 


73 


108 


75 


256 


91 


183 


28 


302 


558 



CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 



Bethlehem Chapel, Ormond 

Road 

Vineyard .... 
St. Paul's, Raleigh Road . 


14 

78 
23 


15 

101 

30 


1 

5 1 
74 
107 i 


34 
253 
160 


16 

62 

28 


22 

130 

55 


5 
31 
44 


43 
223 

127 


77 
476 
287 


Total .... 


115 


146 


186 1 


447 


106 


207 


80 


393 


840 



WESLEYAN METHODIST 


CHURCH 








College Chapel, Richmond 

Hill 

Kew Road .... 
Battenberg Road . 
Cambridge Road, Kew 


50 

52 

5 

15 


70 

55 

4 

15 


35 
73 
39 
32 


155 

180 

48 

62 


48 
62 
26 
14 


88 

101 

26 

31 


32 
16 
32 

15 


168 

179 

84 

60 


323 
359 
132 
122 


Total .... 


122 


144 


179 


445 


150 


246 


95 


491 


936 



345 



346 



THE RELiaiOUS LIFE OF LONDON 

PRIMITIVE METHODIST CHURCH 



CHURCH. 


MORNING. 




EVENING. 




Total 

for the 

Day. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 
20 


Women. 
48 


Chldrn. 
14 


Total. 


Sheen Road .... 


10 


14 


20 


44 


82 


126 



PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 



Little Green . 



40 



61 



30 



131 



36 



42 



13 



91 



BRETHREN 



Channing Hall, Friars Lane 10 



16 



31 



21 



25 55 



SALVATION ARMY 



Kewfoot Road 



14 



28 



26 I 



44 



UNITARIAN CHURCH 



Free Church, Ormond Road 



12 



13 



20 



45 



ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH 



Loretto Chapel, 14, Kew 

Gardens Road . 
St. Elizabeth, Vineyard 

Total .... 



32 

105 



137 



65 
166 



231 



103 



124 
347 



471 



57 



107 



60 



67 



28 
203 



231 



OTHER SERVICES 



Christian Miss., 205, Sandy- 
combe Road 

London City Miss., Evelyn 
Road 

Total .... 



13 



13 



68 



28 
108 



136 



42 



43 
203 



246 



DENOMINATIONAL TOTALS 



DENOMINATION. 


MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 

for the 

Day. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Church of England 

„ „ Missions 
Baptist Church 
Congregational Church 
Wesleyan Meth. Church 
Primitive Meth. Church 
Presbyterian Church . 
Brethren 

Salvation Army . 
Unitarian Church. 
Roman Catholic Church 
Other Services 


682 

1 

73 

115 

122 

10 

40 

10 

8 

12 

137 

5 


1,740 

108 

146 

144 

14 

61 

16 

6 

13 

231 

6 


920 
14 

75 

186 

179 

20 

30 

5 

14 

20 

103 

2 


3,342 

15 

256 

447 

445 
44 

131 
31 
28 
45 

471 
13 


545 

56 

91 

106 

150 

20 

36 

9 

9 

'57 
68 


1,457 

39 

183 

207 

246 

48 

42 

21 

26 

167 
136 


419 
81 
28 
80 
95 
14 
13 
25 
9 

'67 
42 


2,421 

176 

302 

393 

491 

82 

91 

55 

44 

231 
246 


5,763 

191 

558 

840 

936 

126 

222 

86 

72 

45 

702 

259 


Grand Totals . 


1,215 


2,485 


1,568 


5,268 


1,147 


2,512 


873 


4,532 


9,800 



District of Barnes 



CHURCH OP ENGLAND 



CHURCH. 


MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 

for the 

Day. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Wonjen. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Holy Trinity 

St. Mary's .... 
St. Michael and All Angels' 
St. Mary's, Mortlake . 
Christ Church, East Sheen . 


34 

120 
55 
82 
55 


68 
270 
121 
109 
140 


71 
206 
IGO 
257 

97 


173 
596 
336 
448 
292 


25 
76 
81 
61 
43 


40 
191 
223 
104 

67 


39 
77 
108 
51 
49 


104 
344 
412 
216 
159 


277 
940 
748 
664 
451 


Total .... 


346 


708 


791 


1.845 


286 


625 


324 


1,235 


3,080 



BAPTIST CHURCH 



Stanton Road 



15 



18 



38 



71 



19 



55 



19 



93 



164 



CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 



Vernon Road, Mortlake 



46 48 



95 189 



42 



73 35 150 



339 



Congregational Mission 



South Worple Way 



12 11 



23 23 



WESLEYAN METHODIST CHURCH 



White Hart Lane 



37 32 70 139 39 78 36 153 292 



BRETHREN 



High Street, Mortlake 



18 12 13 



33 ! 51 



SALVATION ARMY 



Railway Street 



12 11 13 30 54 66 



ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH 



St. Mary Magdalene's, Mort- 
lake 



126 



175 I 136 
347 



437 



50 



155 



592 



348 



THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 



OTHER SERVICES 



CHURCH. 


MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 

for the 

Day. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Ptople'.s Mission 
Merthyr Terrace 

Welcome Mission 
Railway Street . 


Hall, 
Hall', 


1 


1 


30 


38 


11 
13 


12 
30 


25 
17 


48 
GO 


86 
60 


Total . 


7 


1 


30 


38 


24 


42 


42 


108 


146 



DENOMINATIONAL TOTALS 



DENOMINATION. 


MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women, j Chldm. 


Total. 


Day. 


Church of England 
Baptist Church 
Congregational Church 
„ Mission 
Wesleyan Meth. Church 
Brethren 

Salvation Army . 
Eoman Catholic Church 
Other Services 


346 
15 

46 

37 

8 

4 

126 

7 


708 
18 
48 

32 

7 

5 

175 

1 


791 
38 
95 

70 

3 

3 

136 

30 


1,845 

71 

189 

139 
18 
12 

437 
38 


286 
19 
42 
12 
39 
12 
11 
48 
24 


625 
55 
73 
11 
78 
13 
13 
50 
42 


324 
19 
35 

36 

8 
30 
57 
42 


1,235 
93 

150 
23 

153 
33 
54 

155 

108 


3,080 
164 

339 
23 

292 
51 
66 

592 

146 


Grand Totals . 


589 


994 


1,166 


2,749 


493 


960 


551 


2,004 


4,753 



District of Sutton 



CHUBCH OF ENGLAND 



CHURCH. 


MORNING. j 


EVENING. 1 


Total 


Men. 


Women. Chldm. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


for the 
Day. 


St. Nicholas', High Street . 
All Saints', Benhilton . 
Christ Church, Ch. Ch. Pk. 
St. Barnabas', St. Barnabas 
Road 


159 
120 
103 

75 


386 
183 
253 

136 


119 
264 
101 

206 


664 
567 
457 

417 


149 
192 
129 

72 


342 
243 
241 

159 


104 

185 

99 

57 


595 
620 
469 

288 


1,259 

1,187 

926 

705 


Total .... 


457 


958 


690 


2,105 


542 


985 


445 


1,972 


4,077 





Church of England Missions 










Christ Church, Belmont 
St. Barnabas', Harold Road 
Good Shepherd, Colling- 
wood Road 


11 
1 


13 
9 


26 
166 


50 
176 


13 

4 

14 


26 
8 

46 


33 

7 

39 


72 
19 

99 


122 
19 

275 


Total .... 


12 


22 


192 


226 


31 


80 


79 


190 


416 



BAPTIST CHUBCH 



High Street . . . . 
Trinity, Langley Park Road 
Belmont . . . . 

Total . . . . 



49 


79 


47 


175 


49 


113 


8 


170 


3 


10 


5 


18 


1 7 


10 


2 


19 


4 


12 


18 


34 


7 


18 


9 


34 


56 


101 


70 


227 


63 


141 


19 


223 



345 
37 



450 



CONGREGATIONAIi CHURCH 



Carshalton Road 
Benhill Street 

Total . 



50 


110 


98 


258 


42 

8 


86 
22 


22 
34 


150 
64 


50 


110 


98 


258 


50 


108 


56 


214 



408 
64 



472 



WEST.EYAN METHODIST CHURCH 


Carshalton Road . 


. 1 67 1 96 41 204 


72 


119 


22 


213 1 


417 


UNITED METHODIST FREE CHURCH 


Marshall's Road . 


27 


24 1 69 120 30 63 j 


23 


116 II 


236 


PRIMITIVE METHODIST CHURCH 


Lind Road . 


. j 23 1 24 55 1 102 1 30 45 | 


25 


100 1 


202 



349 



350 



THE EELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 

BRETHREN 





MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 

for the 

Day. 


CHURCH. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldm. 


Total. 


Hall, Cheam Road 

The Room, 32, High Street 


23 
5 


32 
3 


12 
2 


67 
10 


13 
3 


41 

7 


7 
10 


61 
20 


128 
30 


Total .... 


28 


35 


14 


77 


16 


48 


17 


81 


158 



SALVATION ARMY 



Citadel, Benhill Street 



17 



19 



47 



83 



31 



51 



63 



145 



228 



ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH 



Our Lady of the Rosary, 
Carshalton Road 



98 115 


60 273 


31 



44 



25 



100 



373 



OTHER SERVICES 



Brickfields Mission Hall, 
Crown Road 



5 


2 


6 


13 


8 


24 


24 


56 



69 



DENOMINATIONAL TOTALS 



DENOMINATION. 


MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 

for the 

Day. 


Men. 


Women 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldm. 


Total. 


Church of England ^ . 
„ „ Missions 
Baptist Church . 
Congregational Church 
Wesleyan Meth. Church 
U. Meth. Free Church 
Primitive Meth. Church 
Brethren 

Salvation Army . 
Koman Catholic Church 
Other Services 


457 
12 
56 
50 
67 
27 
23 
28 
17 
98 
5 


958 
22 

101 

110 
96 
24 
24 
35 
19 

115 
2 


690 
192 
70 
98 
41 
69 
55 
14 
47 
60 
6 


2,105 

226 

227 

258 

204 

120 

102 

77 

83 

273 

13 


542 
31 
63 
50 
72 
30 
30 
16 
31 
31 
8 


985 

80 

141 

108 

119 

63 

45 

48 

51 

44 

24 


445 
79 
19 
56 
22 
23 
25 
17 
63 
25 
24 


1,972 

190 
223 
214 
213 
116 
100 

81 
145 
100 

56 


4,077 
416 
450 
472 
417 
236 
202 
158 
228 
373 
69 


Grand Totals . 


840 


1,506 


1,342 


3,688 


904 


1,708 


798 


3,410 


7,098 



District of Carshalton 



CHtmCH OF ENaiiAND 



CHURCH. 


MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


TotaL 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldm. 


Total. 


for the 
Day. 


All Saints' .... 
Church of the Good Shep- 
herd, Stanley Park Road 
St. Andrew's, The Wrythe . 


93 

16 
9 


207 

34 
24 


234 

43 
29 


534 

93 
62 


91 

15 
12 


209 

40 
45 


73 

33 
31 


373 

88 
88 


907 

181 
150 


Total .... 


118 


265 


306 


689 


118 


294 


137 


549 


1,238 



"WESLEYAH" METHODIST CHURCH 



Palmerston Road 



45 



52 



20 



15 



42 



94 



UNITED METHODIST TREE CHURCH 



North Street 



22 



23 



50 



95 



26 



47 



34 



107 



202 



FREE EPISCOPAL CHURCH 



Public Hall, High Street . 16 15 14 45 38 | 36 17 91 136 



BRETHREN" 



Hall, West Street 



11 



8 12 



31 



24 27 



60 



91 



DENOMINATIONAL TOTALS 





MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 

for the 

Day. 




Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Church of England 
Wesleyan Meth.Church 
U. Meth. Free Church 
Free Epis. Church 
Brethren 


118 

6 

22 

16 

11 


265 

1 

23 

15 

8 


306 
45 
50 
14 
12 


689 
52 
95 
45 
31 


118 

7 

26 

38 

9 


294 
20 
47 
36 
24 


137 

15 
34 

17 
27 


549 
42 

107 
91 
60 


1,238 

94 

202 

136 

91 


Grand Totals . 


173 


312 


427 


912 


198 


421 


230 


849 


1,761 



351 



Borough of West Ham 



CHURCH OF ENGLAND 



CHUBCH. 



All Saints', Church Street . 
St. Mary's, Plaistow . 
Christ Church, High Street, 

Stratford . . . . 
St. Paul's, Maryland Road, 

Stratford . . . . 
St. James', Forest Gate 
St. Saviour's, Forest Gate . 
St. Mark's, Forest Gate 
Emmanuel, Forest Gate 
Holy Trinity, Oxford Road, 

Stratford . . . . 
St. John the Evangelist's, 

Broadway, Stratford 
St. Peter's, Upton Lane 
St. Thomas', Rokeby Street 
Holy Trinity, Barking Road 
St. Luke's, Boyd Road 
St. Matthew's, Ethel Road . 
St. Mark's, Silvertown 
St. Alban and the English 

Martyrs', Canning Town . 
St. Matthias', Canning Town 
Church of the Ascension, 

Silvertown 
St. Gabriel's, Canning Town 
St. Philip's, Barking Road . 
St. Andrew's, Barking Road 
St. Martin's, Barking Road 
St. Matthew's, Dyson Road 



Total 





MORNING. 






EVENING. 




Total 
for the 


















Men. 


Women. 


Chldm. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Day. 


146 


214 


121 


481 


167 


273 


108 


548 


1,029 


53 


97 


343 


493 


89 


218 


166 


473 


966 


6 


17 


88 


111 


11 


39 


44 


94 


205 


113 


166 


62 


341 


152 


250 


119 


521 


862 


42 


39 


93 


174 


73 


94 


43 


210 


384 


76 


68 


55 


199 


73 


189 


100 


362 


561 


38 


42 


19 


99 


43 


51 


21 


115 


214 


80 


173 


288 


541 


130 


329 


101 


560 


1,101 


34 


54 


102 


190 


62 


134 


77 


273 


463 


57 


129 


149 


335 


81 


178 


107 


366 


701 


G5 


108 


93 


266 


80 


178 


81 


339 


605 


33 


13 


69 


115 


38 


74 


57 


169 


284 


75 


98 


230 


403 


135 


197 


280 


612 


1,015 


35 


43 


112 


190 


57 


112 


57 


226 


416 


26 


41 


178 


245 


51 


142 


169 


362 


607 


25 


14 


83 


122 


35 


38 


55 


128 


250 


4 


3 


48 


55 


14 


19 


42 


75 


130 


31 


27 


189 


247 


37 


87 


44 


168 


415 


30 


38 


128 


196 


54 


86 


83 


223 


419 


42 


31 


223 


296 


35 


43 


55 


133 


429 


64 


124 


242 


430 


37 


139 


83 


259 


689 


46 


158 


272 


476 


70 


261 


448 


779 


1,255 


17 


31 


67 


115 


18 


52 


51 


121 


236 


112 


168 


131 


411 


124 


209 


76 


409 


820 


1,250 


1,896 


3,385 


6,531 


1,666 


3,392 


2,467 


7,525 


14,056 



Church of England Missions 



Holbrook Road Hall . 










9 


29 


12 


50 


50 


Manor Road Mission . 


3 


1 


43 


47 


5 


23 


27 


55 


102 


;St. Paul's, Chandos Road, 




















Stratford .... 


21 


23 


244 


288 


42 


104 


76 


222 


510 


St. Paul's, Leyton Road 










25 


37 


24 


86 


86 


St. Matthew's, Vicarage Lane 


6 


3 


160 


169 


26 


68 


56 


150 


319 


St. Mark's, Windmill Lane 


18 


23 


43 


84 


37 


73 


30 


140 


224 


St. Aidan's, Ward Road 


5 


4 


13 


22 


11 


26 


37 


74 


96 


St. Catherine's, Chapman 




















Road. .... 


8 


8 


143 


159 


14 


44 


67 


125 


284 


St. Jude's, Stephen's Road . 


7 


4 


194 


205 


26 


50 


47 


123 


328 


St. Barnabas', Eastwood Rd. 


3 


4 


43 


50 


15 


18 


36 


69 


119 


St. Thomas', Plaistow. 


3 


5 


185 


193 


20 


45 


82 


147 


340 


St. Luke's, Canning Town . 


4 




46 


50 


5 


4 


17 


26 


76 


St. Faith's, Canning Town . 


2 


5 


136 


143 


9 


22 


43 


74 


217 


St. Cyprian's, Canning Town 


9 


9 


186 


204 


29 


70 


81 


180 


384 


St. Stephen's, Cedars Road, 




















Stratford .... 


8 


24 


65 


97 


27 


44 


31 


102 


199 


St. Mary's, Plaistow . 


3 




91 


94 


4 


8 


73 


85 


179 


St. Saviour's, 365, Railway 




















Arches .... 


2 




72 


74 










74 


Total .... 


102 


113 


1,664 


1,879 


304 


665 


739 


1,708 


3,587 



352 



aBEATER LONDON— WEST HAM 



353 



BAPTIST CHURCH 



CHURCH. 




MORNIXG. 






EVENING. 


! 


Total 

for the 

Day. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Carpenter's Road, Stratford 


.52 


22 


43 


117 


54 


49 


23 


126 


243 


Major Road, Stratford 


42 


52 


115 


209 


69 


112 


155 


336 , 


545 


The Grove, Stratford . 


51 


41 


90 


182 1 


78 


88 


20 


186 


368 


Woodgiange, Romford Road 


151 


182 


193 


526 


230 


469 


126 


825 


1,3.51 


West Ham Lane Tabernacle 


41 


54 


48 


143 


52 


97 


277 


426 


569 


Gurney Road, Stratford 


45 


51 


67 


163 


51 


92 


77 


220 


383 


Jireh, Sebert Road 


33 


24 


8 


65 


29 


.38 


13 


80 


145 


Upton Cross Lane 


24 


21 


22 


67 


32 


48 


.37 


117 


1 184 


Claremont House 


17 


6 


8 


31 


16 


9 


9 


34 


1 65 


Edith Road Tabernacle 


38 


.35 


67 


140 


45 


47 


33 


125 


1 265 


Providence, Canning Town 


6 


2 


9 


17 


5 


12 


7 


24 


i 41 


Silvertown, Wythes Road . 


29 


29 


48 


106 


36 


70 


81 


187 


! 293 


Tidal Basin .... 


G 


9 


21 


36 


i 12 


24 


25 


61 


i 97 


Barking Road Tabernacle . 


65 


65 


228 


3.58 


126 


222 


96 


444 


1 802 


Total .... 


I 600 


593 


967 


2,160 


835 


1,377 


979 


3,191 


1 5,351 



CONQREGATIONAL CHURCH 



Plaistow Chapel, Balaam St. 


137 


161 


292 


590 


' 239 


327 


183 


749 


1,339 


The Grove . . . . 


148 


176 


157 


481 


i 232 


392 


180 


804 


1,285 


"Brickfields," Union Road. 


47 


35 


78 


160 


1 49 


75 


95 


219 


379 


Canning Town, Barking Rd. 


69 


106 


88 


263 


163 


202 


70 


435 1 


698 


Sebert Road 


146 


202 ; 


140 


488 


148 


307 


o8 


513 1 


1,001 


Romford Road 


114 


162 


115 


391 


i 111 


154 


32 


297 


688 


Chapel Street 


1 


1 


44 


46 


i 3 


1 


65 


69: 


115 


East Road .... 


15 


12 


18 


45 


1 24 


22 


19 


65 


110 


Victoria Dock Road . 


23 


18 


62 


103 


1 36 


89 


51 


176 


279 


Union, Custom House 


o 




14 


16 


i ^ 


3 


11 


19 


3^3 


Greengate, Barking Road . 


30 


29 


184 


243 


J '■' 


101 


104 


278 


521 


Total . . . . 


732 


902 


1,192 


2,826 


1 1,083 


1,673 


868 


3,624 


6,450 



Congregational Missions 



Mansfield Hall, Barking Rd. 
Southern Road 
Watson Street 
Mission-hall, Swanscombe 
Street .... 


'"2 
5 


■•■5 


125 i 
66 1 


127 
76 


37 
30 
22 

69 


80 
48 
37 

81 


27 

130 

54 

50 


144 ; 

208 ' 
113 1 

200 


144 
335 

189 

200 


Total .... 


7 


5 


191 


203 

1 


1.58 


246 


261 


665 


868 



WESLEYAN METHODIST CHURCH 



The Grove, Stratford . 


156 


112 


120 


388 , 


168 


209 


116 


493 


881 


Barking Road 


86 


99 


201 


386 


104 


177 


126 


407 


793 


Broadway, Plaistow . 


121 


124 


172 


417 


144 


205 


162 


511 


928 


Woodgrange Road 


156 


203 


97 


456 


248 


337 


341 


926 


1,382 


Albert Road, Silvertown 


16 


17 


65 


98 ■ 


19 


29 


21 


69 


167 


Total .... 


535 


555 


655 


1,745 II 


683 


957 


766 


2,406 


4,151 



Wesleyan Methodist Mission 



354 



THE RELiaiOUS LIFE OF LONDON 



UNITED METHODIST FKEE CHURCH 



CHURCH. 


MORNING. 


EVENING. 


ToUl 

for the 

Day. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Totel. 


Field Road .... 
Bridge Road, Stratford 
Harold Road, Stratford 
Shirley St., Canning Town 


77 

8 

71 

11 


45 
6 

87 
10 


98 

8 

200 

201 


220 

22 

3.58 

222 


132 
10 

114 
37 


204 
17 

212 
41 


113 

8 

187 

57 


449 

35 

513 

135 


669 

57 

871 

357 


Total .... 


167 


148 


507 


822 


293 


474 


365 


1,132 


1,954 



PRIMITIVE METHODIST CHURCH 



Chapel Street, Stratford 


14 


11 


14 


39 


1 28 


33 


18 


79 


118 


Stratford New Town . 


13 


11 


63 


87 


26 


29 


23 


78 


165 


Cobbold Road, Forast Gate 


20 


14 


16 


50 


24 


23 


10 


57 


107 


Upton Lane .... 


32 


36 


143 


211 


59 


83 


51 


193 


404 


Stratford Road . 


55 


41 


199 


295 


72 


105 


139 


316 


611 


Steele Road .... 


3 


1 


45 


49 


9 


11 


30 


50 


99 


Barking Road 


48 


35 


204 


287 


115 


197 


261 


.573 


860 


Tidal Basin .... 


17 


6 


33 


56 


41 


51 


70 


162 


218 


Charles Street, Plaistow 


7 


4 


40 


51 


17 


14 


34 


65 


116 


Total .... 


209 


159 


757 


1,125 


391 


546 


636 


1,573 


2,698 



WELSH CALVINISTIC METHODIST CHURCH 



Romford Road 



10 



26 



29 



30 



12 



71 



PRESBYTERIAM" CHURCH 



Trinity Church, Maryland 
Point .... 
Hack Road, Tidal Basin . 
Tate Road, Silvertown 


100 119 
42 .39 
39 31 


62 
48 
37 


281 
129 
107 


92 
49 
35 


111 
59 
49 


56 
.38 
18 


259 
146 
102 


540 
275 
209 


Total .... 


181 189 


147 


517 


176 


219 


112 


507 


1,024 



FREE EPISCOPAIj CHURCHES 



St. Alethia's, Park Avenue 
St. John's, Plashet Roc-id 
Christ Ch. , J^rlliara Grove. 


14 
29 
12 


9 
47 
13 


"61 

7 


23 

137 

32 


"31 
14 


"54 
26 


"'23 

7 


'ibs 

47 


23 
245 

79 


Total .... 


55 


69 


68 


192 


45 


80 


30 1 155 


347 



NEW JERUSALEM CHURCH 



Plashet Road 



19 



24 



49 



26 



34 



31 



91 140 



SOCIETY OP FRIENDS 



Meeting House, North St. . 
}5arclay Hall, Green Street . 


17 
17 


7 
8 


7 
84 


31 
109 


7 
45 


6 
74 


21 
1,53 


34 

272 


1 65 
.381 


Total .... 


34 


15 


91 


140 


52 


80 


174 


306 


446 



GREATER LONDON— WEST HAM 

BRETHREN 



355 







MORNING. 




EVENING. 




Total 


CHURCH. 


















Men. 


Women. 
24 


Chldrn. 


Total. 
56 


Men. 
40 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


TotaL 


Day. 


The Hall, North Street 


32 


32 




72 


128 


Upton Room, 205, Plashet 
Road 




















Xj 


50 


•M 


115 


50 


73 


45 


168 


283 


Lower Road, Plaistow . 


55 


55 


M 


144 


64 


82 


57 


203 


347 


Bignold Road Hall . 


48 


41 


90 


179 


66 


116 


69 


2.51 


430 


Beaumont Road Hall . 


20 


15 


20 


55 


30 


26 


45 


100 


155 


Total .... 


190 


185 


174 


549 


250 


328 


216 


794 


1,343 



EVANGELISTIC MISSION SERVICES 



Conference Hall, West Ham 
Lane 



474 



585 



301 



1,360 



1,360 



DISCIPLES OP CHRIST 



Amity Road Hall 



13 12 20 45 



15 18 



8 41 



86 



FOREIGN PROTESTANT SERVICES 



German Church, Star Lane 5 4 1 10 



5 19 29 



UNITARIAN CHURCH 



Weat Ham Lane, Stratford 
Upton Lane .... 


8 
13 


4 
16 


15 

8 


27 
37 


11 
16 


19 
20 


20 
9 


50 
45 


77 
82 


Total .... 


21 


20 


23 


64 


27 


39 


29 


95 


159 



SALVATION ARMY 



Angel Lane, Stratford 
Upper Road, Plaistow 
Fox Street, Canning Town . 


65 
47 
53 


56 
38 
12 


150 
86 
59 


271 
171 
124 


> 159 
65 
65 


275 
96 

77 


252 
57 
56 


686 
218 
198 


957 
389 
322 


Total .... 


165 


106 


295 


566 


289 


448 


365 


1,102 


1,668 



ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH 



St. Francis, Grove Crescent 


426 


484 


211 


1,121 


39 


84 


41 


164 


1,285 


St. Anthony, Khedive Road 


511 


735 


712 


1,958 


240 


369 


127 


726 


2,684 


St. Margaret and All Saints', 




















Barking Road . 
St. Anne^, Custom House . 


355 


265 


424 


1,044 


58 


79 


61 


198 


1,242 


52 


50 


136 


238 


16 


25 


38 


79 


317 


St. Mary and St. Fxlward's, 




















Silvertown 


319 


202 


355 


876 


61 


58 


69 


188 


1,064 


Total .... 


1,663 


1,736 


1,838 


5,237 


414 


605 


336 


1,355 


6,592 



366 



THE EELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 



OTHER SERVICES 



i^tlTTD/^TJ 


MORNING. 


EVENING. i 


Total 

fnr thf\ 


CHUBCH. 


















lUI ItllKJ 




Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Day. 


London City Mission, 118, 




















Balaam Street . 










12 


23 


8 


43 


43 


London City Mission, North 




















Street, Stratford 










25 


48 


17 


90 


90 


Railway Mission Hall, Ley- 




















ton Road .... 










223 


274 


127 


624 


624 


Spiritualists, 3, Wells Street, 




















Stratford .... 


4 







10 


19 


29 


2 


50 


60 


Spiritualists, Dames Road . 
Cnristian Israelites, Dames 










13 


18 


9 


40 


40 




















Road 


10 


9 





25 


11 


23 


8 


42 


67 


Zion's Watch Tower, 7'J, 




















Woodgrange Road . 










68 


62 


14 


144 


144 


Ridley Hall, Upton Lane . 


11 


"13 


59 


"83 


51 


160 


60 


271 


354 


li'ree Ragged Sch., Chapel St. 


3 


2 


G4 


69 


10 


47 


29 


86 


155 


Victoria Dock Road Hall . 


6 




10 


16 


14 


15 


15 


44 


60 


Louisa Ashburton Hall, Vic- 




















toria Dock Road 










100 


181 


170 


451 


451 


Peculiar People, Oriental 




















Road .... 


21 


11 


36 


68 


16 


12 


16 


44 


112 


Peculiar People, Church St., 




















Canning Town . 


52 


68 


47 


167 


47 


35 


56 


138 


305 


Sailors' Home, Barking Rd. 










22 


16 


9 


47 


47 


Spiritualists, Workmen's 




















Hall, West Ham Lane . 










14 


10 


38 


62 


62 


Spiritualists, 2, Braemar Rd. 










26 


38 


8 


72 


72 


Christian Miss., Canning Tn. 


"l2 


"'5 


"31 


"48 


16 


29 


26 


71 


119 


Francis Street Hall, North 




















Street .... 


2 




85 


87 


10 


28 


24 


62 


149 


Latter Day Saints, Work- 




















men's Hall, W. Ham Lane 










20 


37 


10 


67 


67 


Total .... 


121 


108 


344 


573 


717 


1,085 


646 


2,448 


3,021 


DE 


:noa 


AINA 


TlOf 


^AL 


TOT 


ALS 










MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 

for th6 


DENOMINATION. 






















Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldm. 


Total. 


Day. 


Church of England 


1,250 


1,896 


3,385 


6,531 


1,666 


3,392 


2,467 


7,525 


14,056 


„ „ Missions 


102 


113 


1,664 


1,879 


304 


665 


739 


1,708 


3,587 


Baptist Church 


600 


593 


967 


2,160 


835 


1,377 


979 


3,191 


5,351 


Congregational Church 


732 


902 


1,192 


2,826 


1,083 


1,673 


868 


3,624 


6,450 


„ Missions 


7 


5 


191 


203 


158 


246 


261 


665 


868 


Weslcyan Meth. Church 


535 


555 


655 


1,745 


683 


957 


766 


2,406 


4,151 


„ „ Mission 


4 


3 


25 


32 


27 


44 


51 


122 


154 


U. Meth. Free Church . 


167 


148 


507 


822 


293 


474 


365 


1,132 


1,954 


Primitive Meth. Church 


209 


1.59 


757 


1,125 


391 


546 


636 


1,573 


2,698 


Welsh Cal.Meth.Church 


10 


9 


7 


26 


29 


30 


12 


71 


97 


Presbyterian Church . 
Free Episcopal Church 


181 


189 


147 


517 


176 


219 


112 


507 


1,024 


55 


69 


68 


192 


45 


80 


30 


155 


347 


New Jerusalem „ 


19 


6 


24 


49 


26 


34 


31 


91 


140 


Society of Friends 


34 


15 


91 


140 


52 


80 


174 


306 


446 


Brethren 


190 


185 


174 


.i49 


250 


328 


216 


794 


1,343 


Evan. Mission Services . 


... 








474 


585 


301 


1,360 


1,360 


Disciples of Christ 


13 


12 


'20 


45 


15 


18 


8 


41 


86 


Foreign Prot. Services . 


5 


4 


1 


10 


8 


6 


5 


19 


29 


Unitarian Church . 


21 


20 


23 


64 


27 


39 


29 


95 


159 


Salvation Army . 


165 


106 


295 


566 


289 


448 


365 


1,102 


1,668 


Roman Catholic Church 


1,663 


1,736 


1,838 


5,237 


414 


605 


336 


1,355 


6,592 


Other Services 


121 


108 


344 


573 


717 


1,085 


646 


2,448 


3,021 


Jewish Church 


42 


1 


25 


68 








... 


68 


Grand Totals . 


6,125 


6,834 


12,400 


25,359 


7,962 


12,931 


9,397 


30,290 


55,649 



District of East Ham 





CHURCH OP 


ENGLAND 














MORNING. 






EVENING. 




Total 


CHURCH. 


















for the 
Day. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldm. 


Total. 


St. Barnabas', Browning Rd. 


40 


47 


150 


243 


100 


175 


139 


414 


657 


St. Mary the Virgin, Ch. 




















Road 


25 


27 


45 


97 


44 


78 


86 


208 


305 


St. Mary Magdalene's, High 




















Street .... 


41 


50 


4{! 


137 


55 


128 


96 


279 


416 


St. Alban'a, Wakefield St. . 


23 


28 


116 


167 


55 


93 


130 


278 


445 


St. Stephen's, Green Street 


73 


120 


229 


422 


191 


379 


230 


800 


1,222 


St. Edmund's, Halley Road 


40 


77 


10(j 


223 


65 


162 


117 


344 


567 


St. Michael and All Angels', 
















! 




Romford Road . 


153 


101 


185 


439 


83 


177 


146 


406 1 


845 


St. Bartholomew's, Barking 




















Road 


50 


45 


150 


245 


130 


201 


159 


490 


735 


All Saints', Hampton Road 


90 


84 


141 


315 


195 


303 


155 


653 


96 


Total .... 


541 


579 


1,168 


2,288 


918 


1,696 


1,258 


3,872 


6,160 





Church of England Missions 










St. Mary's, Southborough 
















1 




Road 










10 


19 


11 


40 


40 


St. Michael and All Angels', 




















Beckton Road . 


10 


24 


42 


76 


54 


95 


46 


195 


271 


St. Michael and All Angels', 
















1 




Rutland Road . 


24 


45 


119 


188 


63 


130 


86 


279 


467 


St. Cuthbert's, Florence Rd. 






... 




7 


19 


( 


33 


33 


Total .... 


34 


69 


161 


264 


134 


263 


150 


547 1 


811 







BAPTIST CHURCH 










Little Ilford Tabernacle 
New Beckton Chapel . 
Plashet Grove 
Manor Pk., High Street, N. 


34 
16 
95 
65 


28 

4 

70 

66 


77 

38 

122 

50 


139 

58 

287 

181 


47 

34 

173 

72 


73 

57 
290 
181 


50 

76 

222 

135 


176 

167 
685 
388 


315 
225 
972 
569 


Total .... 


210 


168 


287 


665 


326 


601 


489 


1.416 


2,081 







Baptist Missions 












358, Catherine Rd., E. Ham 
Dock St., North Woolwich 


12 
o 


5 


7 
29 


24 
31 


11 
14 


11 
31 


8 
70 


30 
121 


54 
152 


Total .... 


14 


5 


36 


55 


25 


42 


84 


151 


206 



CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 



Welsh 


9 


8 


4 


21 


23 


10 


10 


49 


70 


Coleridge Avenue 

Manor Park .... 


30 
31 


13 
25 


85 
45 


128 
101 


44 
41 


67 
75 


122 
31 


233 
147 


361 
248 




65 


34 


90 


189 


98 


105 


57 


260 


449 


Wakefield Street . 


58 


41 


196 


295 


100 


166 


104 


370 


665 


Total .... 


193 


121 


420 


734 


306 


429 


.324 


1,059 


1,793 



357 



358 



THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 



WESLEYAN METHODIST CHURCH 



CHURCH. 


MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 

for the 

Day. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldm. 


Total. 


Green Street, Upton Park . 
Abbot's Park 
Barking Road 
Romford Road . 


130 

19 
130 


102 
10 
18 

117 


185 
64 
92 

143 


417 

83 

129 

390 


358 
13 
24 

255 


515 
29 
56 

460 


205 
52 
75 

388 


1,138 

94 

155 

1,103 


1,555 
177 
284 

1,493 


Total .... 


288 247 484 


1,019 


650 


1,060 


780 


2,490 


3,509 



UNITED METHODIST FREE CHURCH 



Romford Road . 

High Street .... 


49 
60 


49 
52 


34 

130 


132 
242 


134 

180 


204 71 

294 247 

1 


409 
721 


541 
963 i 


Total .... 


109 


101 


164 


374 


314 


498 


318 


1,130 


1,504 



PRIMITIVE METHODIST CHURCH 



Elizabeth St., N. Woolwich 


4 




30 


34 


10 


7 


31 


48 


82 


High Street, South 


38 


14 


135 


187 


57 


99 


151 


307 


494 


Romford Road 


30 


31 


93 


154 


48 


86 


96 


230 


384 


Plashet Grove, Upton Park 


30 


29 


84 


143 


43 


56 


59 


158 


301 


Gas Works Hall, Beckton . 


9 


6 


86 


101 


14 


18 


22 


54 


15.J 


Katherine Road . 


3 


2 


30 


35 


6 


6 


11 


23 


58 


Total .... 


114 


82 


458 


654 


178 


272 


370 


820 


1,474 



Primitive Methodist Mission 



Boleyn Road 



13 



29 46 11 43 67 121 i 167 



PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 



East Avenue 



123 101 128 352 1 165 290 195 650 1,002 



FREE EPISCOPAL CHURCHES 



Shrewsbury Road (Free 

Church of England) . 4 5 
Christ Church, Carlyle Rd. 12 7 


47 
7 


56 
26 


5 
22 


30 
32 


21 
10 


56 
64 


112 
90 


Total .... 1 16 


12 


54 


82 


27 


62 


31 


120 


202 



BRETHREN 



566, Romford Road, Manor 
Park 



22 



17 



23 



62 



23 



38 



19 



80 



142 





SALVATION ARMY 










409, Catherine Road . 
1, Holme Road . 
Greenliill Grove, Manor Pk. 


8 
17 
86 


9 25 
10 25 
36 60 


42 
52 

182 


12 
38 
81 


26 

38 
129 


30 
16 

105 


68 

92 

315 


110 
144 
497 


Total .... 


111 


55 


110 


276 


131 


193 


151 


475 


751 



GREATER LONDON— EAST HAM 

BOMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH 



359 



CHUKCH. 




MORNING. 




EVENING. i 


Total 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Day. 


St. Nicholas', Manor Park . 
Our Lady of Compassion, 
Castle Street . 


21 

89 


63 
164 


22 
163 


106 
416 

522 j 


2 
31 


4 
52 


10 
44 


16 
127 


122 
543 


Total .... 


110 


227 


185 


33 


56 


54 


143 


665 



OTHER SERVICES 



Spiritualists', 449, High St. 








... 


30 


36 


6 


72 


72 


South Borough Road . 










16 


17 


14 


47 


47 


Mizpah Miss., King's Road 


1 




17 


18 


6 


... 


39 


45 


63 


London City Miss., Plashet 




















Lane 


7 




14 


21 


11 


13 


19 


43 


64 


Plashet Gospel Miss., Park 




















Road 


23 


14 


17 


54 


29 


66 


48 


143 


197 


Bonny Downs Gospel Miss. 


2 




57 


59 


3 


2 


173 


178 


237 


Total .... 


33 


14 


105 


152 


95 


134 


299 


528 


680 



DENOMINATIONAL TOTALS 





MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 




Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Day. 


Church of England 


541 


579 


1,168 


2,288 


918 


1,696 


1,258 


3,872 


6,160 


„ „ Missions 


34 


69 


161 


264 


134 


263 


150 


547 


811 


Baptist Church . 


210 


168 


287 


665 


326 


601 


489 


1,416 


2,081 


„ Zvlissions . 


14 


5 


36 


55 


25 


42 


84 


151 


206 


Congregational Church 


193 


121 


420 


734 


306 


429 


324 


1,059 


1,793 


Wesleyan Meth. Church 


288 


247 


484 


1,019 ' 


650 


1,060 


780 


2,490 


3,509 


U. Meth. Free Church . 


109 


101 


164 


374 


314 


498 


318 


1,130 


1,504 


Primitive Meth. Church 


114 


82 


458 


654 


178 


272 


370 


820 


1,474 


„ „ Mission. 


13 


4 


29 


46 


11 


43 


67 


121 


167 


Presbyterian Church . 
Free Episcopal Church. 


123 


101 


128 


352 


165 


290 


195 


650 


1,002 


16 


12 


54 


82 


27 


62 


31 


120 


202 


Brethren 


22 


17 


23 


62 


23 


38 


19 


80 


142 


Salvation Army . 


111 


55 


no 


276 


131 


193 


151 


475 


751 


Roman Catholic Church 


110 


227 


185 


522 


33 


56 


54 


143 


665 


Other Services 


33 


14 


105 


152 


95 


134 


299 


528 


680 


Jewish Church 


67 


16 


39 


112 


_ 




... 




112 


Grand Totals . 


1,988 


1,818 


3,851 


7,657 


3,336 


5,677 


4,589 


13,602 


21,259 



District of Ilford 





CHURCH OF 


ENGL 


AND 














MORNING. 






EVENING. 




Total 
for the 


CHURCH. 


















Men. 


Woiuea. 


Chldm. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Day. 


St. Clement's, South Pk. Av. 


218 


312 


'212 


742 


207 


399 


110 


716 


1,458 


St. Peter's, Aldborough 




















Hatch .... 


22 


23 


36 


81 


32 


28 


14 


74 


155 


St. John's, Aldborough Rd., 




















Seven Kings 


55 


84 


160 


299 


72 


140 


121 


333 


632 


St. Lawi-ence's, Barkingside 


1 


•) 


45 


48 


1 ( 


11 


14 


32 


80 


St. Mary's, High Road 

St. Alban's, Albert Road . 


9'.t 


120 


167 


386 


152 


215 


109 


476 1 


862 


5() 


114 


414 


584 


1 83 


172 


07 


322 


906 


St. Mary's Hospital, Ilford 




















HiU . ... . 


82 


118 


45 


245 


86 


183 


39 


308 


553 


Holy Trinity, Barkingside . 
St. James', Little Heath, 


17 


35 


97 


149 


27 


24 


35 


86 


235 




















Chadwell .... 


34 


37 


67 


138 


1 46 


47 


12 


105 


243 


St. Paul's, Atholl Road, 




















Goodmayes 


25 


39 


47 


111 


47 


77 


38 


162 


273 


Total .... 


609 


884 


1,290 


2,783 


759 


1,296 


559 


2,614 


5,397 





Church of England Missions 










Beehive Miss., Beehive Ln. 
Roden Street 


9 
4 


16 
2 


52 
59 


77 
65 


21 

6 


43 
14 


34 
29 


98 
49 


175 
114 


Total .... 


13 


18 


111 


142 


27 


57 


63 


147 


289 



BAPTIST CHURCH 



High Street .... 


83 


119 


145 


347 


104 


194 


62 


360 


707 


Chadwell Heath Lane, Rom- 










1 










ford Road .... 


15 


8 


32 


oo 


19 1 


47 


32 


98 


153 


Cranbrook Road . 


97 


94 


113 


304 


102 i 


172 


45 


319 


i 623 


Cleveland Road . 


23 


26 


37 


80 


92 1 


37 


6 


65 


151 


Cameron Road, Seven Kings 


58 


55 


oo 


168 


63 j 


94 


30 


187 


355 


Total .... 


276 


302 


382 


960 


310 ! 


544 


175 


1,029 


1,989 





CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 








High Road .... 
Christ Ch., Cranbrook Rd. 


296 299 
25 25 


391 986 
34 84 


413 
17 


584 i 
41 


147 
12 


1,144 
70 


2,130 
154 


Total .... 


321 


324 


425 


1,070 


430 


625 1 


159 


1,214 


2,284 





"WESIiEYAN METHODIST 


CHURCH 








High Street . 
Blythwood Road, 

Kings 
Cleveland Hall . 


Seven 


188 
105 


195 

107 


156 
79 


539 
291 


234 

113 
108 


289 

160 
94 


82 

55 
107 


605 

328 
309 


1,144 

619 
309 


Total . 


293 


302 


235 


830 


455 


543 


244 


1,242 


2,072 



300 



GREATER LONDON— ILFORD 

UNITED METHODIST FREE CHURCH 



361 



CHURCH. 




MORNING. 




EVENING. 


Total 

for the 

Day. 


Men. 


'Womeu. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 

283 

121 

31 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Ilford Lane .... 
Barkingside .... 
Central Hall, Seven Kings . 


70 
14 
14 


81 

19 

4 


132 
88 
13 


108 
26 
20 


161 
37 
21 


115 
21 
11 


384 
84 
52 


667 
205 

83 

1 


Total .... 


98 


104 1 233 


435 


154 


219 


147 


520 


955 



PRESBYTERIAN" CHURCH 



Albert Road . 



80 



103 



79 



262 



87 



140 



46 



273 



535 



Hall, Clement's Road . 
Loxford Assembly 'Hall, 
Ilford Lane 

Total . . . . 



BRETHREN 



44 


46 


17 


107 


7 


8 


26 


41 


51 


54 


43 


148 



33 
6 



39 



71 



21 



100 

31 

131 




EVANGELISTIC MISSION SERVICES 



Church, Grange Road . 
Town Hall . . . . 
Ilford Tabernacle 
Gospel HaU, St, Mary's Rd. 
Gospel Hall, Birkbeck Road 


9 

"21 
6 
2 


5 

"11 

10 

3 


71 

"25 

71 

115 


85 

"57 

87 

120 


17 

285 

23 

8 

14 


14 
402 
46 
17 
26 


44 

162 

11 

7 
25 


75 
849 
80 
32 
65 


160 

849 
137 
119 

185 


Total .... 


38 


29 


282 


349 


347 


505 


249 


il,101 


1,450 



CHRISTADELPHIAN CHURCH 



Scrafton Road 



16 



14 



26 



42 



DISCIPLES OF CHRIST 



Men's Institute, Barkingside 


5 


7 


7 


19 


6 


10 


3 


19 


38 


SALVATION ARMY 


Hall, Clement's Road . 


62 


26 


82 170 


104 


132 


30 


266 


436 


ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH 


St. Peter and St. Paul's, 
High Road 


232 337 


191 j 760 


124 


191 


59 


374 


1,134 


OTHER SERVICES 


Ilford Spiritualists, Clock 
House Hall 








29 


8 


3 


40 


40 



362 



THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 



DENOMINATIONAL TOTALS 





MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 

for the 

Day 




Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


■Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Churcli of England 

„ „ Missions 
Baptist Church 
Congregational Church 
Wesleyan Meth. Church 
V. Meth. Free Church . 
Presbyterian Church . 
Brethren 

Evan. Mission Services 
Christadelphian Church 
Disciples of Christ 
Salvation Army . 
Roman Catholic Church 
Other Services 


609 

13 

276 

321 

293 

98 

80 

51 

38 

7 

5 

62 

232 


884 

18 

302 

324 

302 

104 

103 

54 

29 

5 

7 

26 

337 


1,290 

111 

382 

425 

235 

233 

79 

43 

282 

4 

7 

82 

191 


2,783 
142 
960 

1,070 
830 
435 
262 
148 
349 
16 
19 
170 
760 


759 

27 

310 

430 

455 

154 

87 

39 

347 

14 

6 

104 

124 

29 


1,296 

57 

544 

625 

543 

219 

140 

71 

505 

9 

10 

132 

191 

8 


559 

63 

175 

159 

244 

147 

46 

21 

249 

3 

3 

30 

59 

3 


2,614 

147 

1,029 

1,214 

il,242 

520 

273 

131 

1,101 

26 

19 

266 

374 

40 


5,397 

289 

1,989 

2,284 

2,072 

955 

535 

279 

1,450 

42 

38 

463 

1,134 

40 


Grand Totals . 


2,085 


2,495 


3,364 


7,944 


2,885 


4,350 


1,761 


8,996 


16,940 



District of Wanstead 



CHURCH OP ENGLAND 



CHURCH. 


MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 

for the 

Day. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


St, Mary'B, St. Mary's Av. 
Christ (Jh., Wanstead Place 
Holy Trinity, Hermon Hill 


87 

141 

66 


115 
240 
113 


101 
188 
127 


303 
569 
306 


58 

202 

85 


113 
413 
139 


41 
68 
64 


212 

683 

288 


515 

1,262 

594 


Total .... 


294 


468 


416 


1,178 


345 


665 


173 


1,183 


2,361 



Church of England Mission 



St. John the Evangelist's, 
Nightingale Green . 



21 



33 



36 



90 



90 



BAPTIST CHURCH 



Wellington Road . 
Aldersbrook Road, Wan- 
stead Flats 

Total . . . . 



12 

8 



20 



19 



18 
33 



51 



90 



18 


29 




54 


7 


14 


13 


34 


25 


43 


20 


88 



95 

83 



178 





CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 








Grove Road .... 


84 1 116 

1 


54 254 80 152 


25 


257 


511 


WESIiEYAN METHODIST CHURCH 


Hermon Hill 


42 60 


27 129 


35 53 


14 


102 


231 


UNITED METHODIST FREE CHURCH 


Cambridge Park . 


30 36 41 j 107 


51 73 


34 


158 


265 


SOCIETY OP PRIENDS 


Meeting House, 
Road. 


Bushwood 

48 


54 


13 115 


10 


3 




13 


128 



DENOMINATIONAL TOTALS 



DENOMINATION. 


MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 
1,178 

"90 
254 
129 
107 
115 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Day. 


Church of England 

„ „ Mission 
Baptist Church . 
Congregational Church 
Wesleyan Meth. Church 
U. Meth. Free Church . 
Society of Friends 


294 

20 

84 
42 
30 
48 


468 

19 
116 
60 
36 
54 


416 

51 
54 
27 
41 
13 


345 
21 
25 
80 
35 
51 
10 


665 
33 
43 

152 

53 

73 

3 


173 

36 
20 
25 
14 
34 


1,183 

90 

88 

257 

102 

158 

13 


2,361 
90 

178 
511 
231 
265 
128 


Grand Totals . 


518 


753 


602 


1,873 


567 


1,022 


302 


1,891 


3,764 



363 



District of Leyton 



CHURCH OF ENGLAND 







MORNING. 






EVENING. 




Total 


CHURCH. 


















for the 
Day. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldm. 


Total. 


St. Marj^'s, Church Road . 


107 


140 


98 


345 


170 


318 


74 


562 


907 


St. Philip's, Brewster Road 


5 


11 


120 


136 


20 


58 


44 


122 


258 


St. Paul's, Essex Road 


32 


72 


69 


173 


27 


84 


32 


143 


316 


St. John the Bapt., High Rd. 


123 


192 


171 


486 


161 


322 


121 


604 


1,090 


All Saints', Capworth Street 
Holy Trinity, Birkbeck Rd. 


36 


49 


1.33 


218 


56 


101 


50 


207 


425 


63 


113 


6.33 


809 


82 


197 


76 


355 


1,164 


St. Andrew's, Colworth Rd. 


210 


353 


160 


723 


251 


477 


68 


796 


1,519 


St. Catherine's, Fairlop Rd. 


54 


82 


32 


168 


88 


127 


26 


241 


409 


St. Augustine's, May villeRd. 


31 


49 


105 


185 


48 


64 


60 


172 


357 


St. Margaret's, Woodhouse 




















Road 


39 


104 


98 


241 


68 


176 


121 


365 


606 


St. Columba's, Janson Road 


78 


81 


257 


416 


127 


209 


105 


441 


857 


Christ Church, Francis Rd. 


52 


49 


185 


286 


97 


144 


72 


313 


599 


St. Luke's, Ruckholt Road . 


23 


33 


123 


179 


40 


80 


54 


174 


353 


Total .... 


853 


1,328 


2,184 


4,365 


1,235 


2,357 


903 


4,495 


8,860 



Church of England Missions 



St. Alban's, Leslie Road 


28 


23 


124 


175 


50 


79 


56 


185 


360 


St. Edward's, Scots Road . 










4 


15 


6 


25 


25 


Russell Mission, Goldsmith 




















Road .... 










4 


20 


78 


102 


102 


Victoria Room, High Road 


13 


25 


36 


74 










74 


Y.W.C.A., Peark's Stores, 




















High Road 












15 




15 


15 


Holy Trinity, 48, Cranfield 




















Road 










2 


7 


5 


14 


14 


St. Augustine's Hall, May- 




















ville Road 


1 


3 


64 


68 










68 


St. Margaret's Mission, 




















Pevensey Road 


1 




52 


53 










53 


Total .... 


43 


51 


276 


370 


60 


136 


145 


341 


711 



BAPTIST CHURCH 



Vicarage Road 
Cann Hall Road 
Fairlop Road 
Goldsmith Road 
Harrow Green 

Total . 



64 

80 

200 

9 

71 

424 



67 
68 
305 
11 
70 



521 



98 

130 

112 

5 

76 



421 



229 
278 
617 
25 
217 



1,366 



93 

124 

204 

9 

106 



536 



155 
169 
311 
14 
163 



55 

129 

37 

5 

38 



812 



264 



303 
422 
552 
28 
307 



1,612 



Baptist Missions 


Hall, Lea Bridge Gardens . 
AshvilleHall 


2 
4 


2 
2 


43 
127 


47 
133 


6 
15 


16 

28 


18 
102 


40 
145 


87 
278 


Total .... 


6 


4 


170 1 180 


21 


44 


120 


185 


365 



364 



GEEATER LONDON— LEYTON 



365 



CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 



CHURCH. 




MORNING. 




EVENING. 


Total 

for the 

Day. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


1 Men. 


Women. 


Chldin. 


Total. 


Fetter Lane Ch., Union Rd. 
Grange Park Road 
High Road .... 
Ramsay Rd., Forest Gate . 


29 

65 

189 

16 


41 

76 

217 

10 


182 

101 

83 

32 


252 

242 

489 

58 


88 

141 

223 

; 34 


134 

213 

368 

41 


82 
75 
65 
26 


304 
429 
656 
101 


556 

671 

1,145 

159 


Total .... 


299 


344 


398 


1,041 


486 


756 


248 


1,490 ! 2,531 



WESIiEYAN METHODIST CHURCH 



Mary Fletcher Memorial, 




















High Road 


104 


108 


70 


282 


195 


274 


46 


515 


797 


Knott's Green 










1 




65 


66 


66 


High Road .... 


161 


ieo 


230 


551 


213 


299 


76 


588 


1,139 


Cann HaU Road . 


16 


15 


30 


61 


42 


58 


63 


163 


224 


Total .... 


281 


283 


330 


894 


451 

1 


631 


250 


1,332 


2,226 



UNITED METHODIST FREE CHURCH 



Grove Green Road 



12 



49 i 65 



27 76 141 



PRIMITIVE METHODIST CHURCH 



High Road 



46 



38 



196 



280 



121 



61 



259 



539 



PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 



Hainault Road 



44 



38 



38 



120 



49 



50 



14 



113 



233 



BRETHREN 



Leyton Hall, Goldsmith Rd. 
HaU, Acacia Road 
Crownfield Hall, Crownfield 
Road 

Total .... 



27 
27 


24 
32 


39 
22 


90 
81 


28 
38 


52 
41 


16 

28 


96 
107 


18 


17 


5 


40 


9 


17 


6 


32 


72 


73 


66 


211 


75 


110 


50 


235 



186 
188 



EVANGELISTIC MISSION SERVICES 



Central Hall, Ferndale Rd. 


44 


60 


53 


157 


106 


230 


48 


384 


541 


Christian Mission, Mel- 




















bourne Road 


34 


28 


23 


85 


28 


35 


11 


74 


159 


Hall, Montague Road . 


2 


4 


30 


36 


13 


20 


15 


48 


84 


Beachcroft Hall, Beachcroft 




















Road 










13 


27 


4 


44 


44 


Total .... 


80 


92 


106 


278 


160 


312 


78 


550 


828 



SALVATION ARMY 



High Road .... 
Cann Hall Road . 
Southwell Grove Road 


88 
19 
28 


81 
10 
11 


90 
36 
25 


259 
65 
64 


151 

27 
40 


236 
32 
76 


126 
57 
19 


513 
116 
135 


772 
181 
199 


Total .... 


135 


102 


151 


388 


218 


344 


202 


764 


1,152 



366 



THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 

ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH 





MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 

for the 

D*y. 


CHURCH. 


Men. 


Women. 


Ohldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


St. Joseph's, Vicarage Road 


76 


123 


89 


288 


56 


99 


64 


219 


507 



OTHER SERVICES 



L.C. Mission, Barclay Hall, 

High Road 
Grange Park Hall, Grange 

Park Road 
L.C. Mission, Aylmer Road 


2 
3 


3 

2 


95 
41 


100 
40 


39 

5 
14 


66 

7 
45 


G3 

91 
32 


168 

103 
91 


268 

149 
91 


Total .... 


5 


5 


136 


146 


58 


118 


186 


362 


508 



DENOMINATIONAL TOTALS 



DENOMINATION. 


MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldm. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldm. 


Total. 


Day. 


Church of England 

„ „ Missions 
Baptist Church 

„ Missions . 
Congregational Church 
Wesleyan Meth. Church 
U.Meth. Free Church. 
Primitive Meth. Church 
Pi-esbyterian Church . 
Brethren 

Evan. Mission Services 
Salvation Army . 
Roman Catholic Church 
Other Services 


853 
43 

424 
6 

299 

281 
12 
46 
44 
72 
80 

135 

76 

5 


1,328 

51 

521 

4 

344 

283 

4 

38 

38 

73 

92 

102 

123 

5 


2,184 
276 
421 
170 
398 
330 

49 
196 

38 

66 
106 
151 

89 
136 


4,365 
370 

1,366 
180 

1,041 
894 
65 
280 
120 
211 
278 
388 
288 
146 


1,235 

60 

536 

21 

486 

451 

17 

77 

49 

75 

160 

218 

56 

58 


2,357 
136 
812 

44 
756 
631 

32 
121 

50 
110 
312 
344 

99 
118 


903 

145 

264 

120 

248 

250 

27 

61 

14 

50 

78 

202 

64 

186 


4,495 
341 

1,612 
185 

1,490 

1,332 
76 
259 
113 
2351 
560 
764 
219 
362 


8,860 
711 

2,978 
365 

2,531 

2,226 
141 
539 
233 
446 
828 

1,152 
507 
508 


Grand Totals . 


2,376 


3,006 


4,610 


9,992 


3,499 


5,922 


2,612 


12,033 


22,025 



District of Walthamstow 



CHURCH OF ENGLAND 



CHURCH. 


MORNING. 


BVENIXG. 


Total 

for the 

Day. 


Men. 1 VTomen. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


St. Mary's, Church HiU . 
St. Michael and All Angels', 

Palm^rston Road 
St. PtsLer'a, Epping Forest . 
St. Saviour's, MarkhouseRd. 
St. Stephen's, Grove Road . 
St. Luke's, Greenleaf Road 
St. Gabriel's, Havant Road 
St. John's, Chingford Road 
St. Andrew's, St. Andrew's 

Road 

All Saints', Church Aventie, 

Higham Park . 
St. James', St. James St. . 
St. Barnabas', Stafford Road 


208 

103 
43 

108 
60 
41 
34 
22 

17 

28 

40 

125 


311 

155 
94 
125 
lOG 
30 
68 
31 

19 

39 

67 

137 


174 

393 
58 

206 
66 

117 
59 
63 

27 

.58 
263 
314 


693 

651 
195 
439 
232 
188 
161 
116 

63 

125 
370 
576 


270 

130 
56 

165 

100 
58 

118 
34 

21 

46 

50 

163 


476 

.'^26 
97 

337 

173 
90 

212 
48 

37 

71 
181 
356 


98 

117 
34 

133 
54 
29 

157 
54 

52 

20 
247 
217 


844 

573 
187 
635 
327 
177 
487 
136 

110 

137 

478 
736 


1,537 

1,224 
382 

1,074 
559 
365 
648 
252 

173 

262 

848 
1,312 


Total .... 


829 


1,182 


1,798 


3,809 


1,211 


2,404 


1,212 


4,827 


8,636 





Church of England Missions 










St. Paul's, Courtney Road, 




















Blackhorse Road 


22 


41 


163 


226 


18 


64 


50 


132 


358 


St. Stephen's, Western Rd., 
Lea Bridge Road 




















1 


4 


.32 


37 










37 


St. Mark's, Shernhall Street 


29 


31 


109 


169 


16 


67 


27 


iio 


279 


St. Andrew's, Chingford 




















Lane, Woodford 










19 


46 


31 


96 


96 


Total .... 


52 


76 


304 


432 


53 


177 


108 


338 


770 



BAPTIST CHURCH 



Higham Hill Chapel, St. 




















Andrew's Road 


14 


16 


12 


42 


28 


48 


30 


106 


148 


Zion, Maynard Road . 


20 


18 


38 


76 


27 


.30 


7 


64 


140 


Forest Road Hall, Hervey 




















Park Road 


18 


11 


71 


100 


31 


50 


29 


110 


210 


Blackhorse Road . 


63 


55 


118 


230 


66 


1.39 


35 


240 


476 


Wood Street 


9 


8 


20 


37 


12 


19 


24 


oo 


92 


Spurgeon Memorial, Erskine 




















Road 


14' 


10 


25 


49 


17 


35 


34 


86 


135 


Boundary Road . 


97. 


1134 


74 


305 


99 


209 


59 


367 


672 


Total .... 


235 


252 


358 


845 


280 


530 


218 


1,028 


1,873 







Baptist Missions 












Mission, Board School, 

Greenleaf Road 
Mission (Boundary Road), 

Marsh Street . 


7 
2 


9 

1 


14 
35 


30 
38 


15 


24 


20 


59 


89 
38 


Total .... 


9 


10 


49 


68 


15 


24 


20 


59 


127 



367 



368 



THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 



CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 





MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 

for the 

Day. 


CHURCH. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Spruce Hills Chapel . 
Trinity, Orford Road . 
Mai-sh St. Church, High St. 
Wood St. Church, Valentin 

Road. 
Free Chui-ch, Hale End 


19 
108 
110 

32 
51 


15 

124 

96 

42 
65 


146 
91 
65 

81 
164 


180 
.323 
271 

155 

280 


40 
113 
179 

48 
66 


68 
166 
253 

84 
121 


76 
30 
67 

31 
36 


184 
309 
499 

163 
223 


364 
632 
770 

318 
503 


Total .... 


320 


342 


547 


1,209 


446 


692 


240 


1,378 


2,587 



Congregational Missions 



Marsh St. Mission, High St. 
South Grove Hall, Mark- 
house Road 
Church Hill Road 

Total . . . . 



5 


1 


71 


77 


1 20 


46 


109 


175 I 


5 
2 


3 
3 


28 
26 


.36 
31 


41 
21 


47 
32 


34 
24 


122 

77 


12 


7 


125 


144 


82 


125 


167 


374 





WESLEYAN METHODIST 


CHURCH 








Church Hill . 
Blackhorse Road . 


. 


80 
72 


88 
62 


86 
158 


254 
292 


218 280 
113 148 


40 
234 


538 
495 


792 

787 


Total . 


152 


150 


244 


546 


331 


428 


274 


1,033 


1,579 



UNITED METHODIST FREE CHURCH 



Lloyd Pk. Hall, Forest Rd. 
Lighthouse, Markhouse Rd. 

Shernhall Street . 


17 

68 

109 


4 

80 

112 


62 
347 
118 


83 
495 
339 


44 
259 
115 


71 
689 
180 


50 
80 
80 


165 

1,028 

375 


248 

1,523 

714 


Total .... 


194 


196 


527 


917 


418 


940 


210 


1,568 


2,485 



PRIMITIVE METHODIST 


CHURCH 








Gloucester Road . 
Wadham Rd., Chapel End 
Hawthorn Road . 
High Street .... 


16 

5 

19 

57 


6 

8 

18 

40 


107 
34 

54 
72 


129 
47 
91 

169 


19 

8 
28 
60 


24 
16 

35 
63 


18 

6 

29 

46 


61 

30 

92 

168 


190 

77 

183 

337 


Total .... 


97 


72 


267 


436 


115 


138 


98 


351 


787 



PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 



Prospect Hill 



33 



33 



28 



94 



51 



73 



20 



144 



BRETHREN 



Gospel Hall, St. Andrew's 

Road .... 
Hall, Folkestone Road 
Gospel Hall, Selhorne Road 
Christian Mission, Collin 

wood Road 
New Room, Maude Road 
St. John's Road Schools 
Workmen's Hall . 
Maynard Road School . 

Total . 



144 



122 



129 



41 
239 



395 



16 

141 

12 

9 
22 
7 
3 
5 

215 



27 

214 

17 

13 

27 
6 
5 

11 

320 



41 
34 

18 

.38 

38 

124 

162 

126 

581 



84 

389 

47 

60 

87 

137 

170 

142 

1,116 



GREATER LONDON— WALTHAMSTOW 

SALVATION ARMY 



369 



CHURCH. 


MORNING. 


BVEXING. 


Total 

for the 

Day. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. Chldrn. 


Total. 


HaU, High Street 

Hall, Higham Hill Road . 


81 
44 


74 
23 


144 
100 


299 
167 


132 
52 


204 
45 


297 
43 


633 
140 


932 
307 


Total .... 


125 


97 


244 


466 


184 


249 


340 


773 


1,239 



ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH 



Our Lady and St. George, 
Shernhall Street 



147 



274 



205 



626 



32 



21 



120 



746 



OTHER SERVICES 



Navvies' Institute, Station 
Road 

Conway Hall, High Street . 

Gosport Mission Hall, 43, 
Gosport Road . 

Railway Mi.ss. , Brandon Rd, 

Total .... 



5 


1 


64 


70 


19 


37 


36 


92 


162 










17 


27 


15 


59 


59 


3 




12 


15 


4 




7 


11 


26 










8 


15 


27 


50 


50 


8 


1 


76 


85 


48 


79 


85 


212 


297 



DENOMINATIONAL TOTALS 



DENOMINATION. 


MORNING. 


1 EVENING. 


Total 

for the 

Day. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldiu. 


Total. 


1 Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Church of England 
„ „ Missions 

Baptist Church 
„ Missions . 

Congregational Church 
„ Missions 

Wesleyan Meth. Church 

U. Meth. Free Church . 

Primitive Meth. Church 

Presbyterian Church . 

Brethren 

Salvation Army . 

Roman Catholic Church 

Other Services 


829 

52 

235 

9 

320 

12 

152 

194 

97 

33 

144 

125 

147 

8 


1.182 

76 

252 

10 

342 

7 

150 

196 

72 

33 

122 

97 

274 

1 


1,798 
304 
358 

49 
547 
125 
244 
527 
267 

28 
129 
244 
205 

76 


3,809 

432 

845 

68 

1,209 

144 

546 

917 

436 

94 

395 

466 

626 

85 


i 1)211 

1 53 

280 

15 

446 

• 82 

'• 331 

1 418 

j 115 

i 51 

215 

i 184 

32 

48 


2,404 
177 
530 

24 
692 
125 
428 
940 
138 

73 
320 
249 

67 

79 


1,212 

108 

218 

20 

240 

167 

274 

210 

98 

20 

581 

340 

21 

85 


4,827 
338 

1,028 
59 

1,378 
374 

1,033 

1,568 
351 
144 

1,116 
773 
120 
212 


8,636 

770 
1,873 

127 
2,587 

518 
1,579 
2,485 

787 

238 
1,511 
1,239 

746 

297 


Grand Totals . 


2,357 


2,814 


4,901 


10,072 


3,481 


6,246 


3,594 


13,321 


23,393 



24 



District of Woodford 



CHURCH OF ENGLAND 



CHURCH. 


MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 

for the 

Day. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldm. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldm. 


Total. 


St.Mary'B.High Road, South 

Woodford. 
St. Paul's, Woodford Bridge 
All Saints', High Road, 

Woodford Wells . 


118 
41 

96 


299 

72 

165 


167 
113 

86 


584 
226 

347 


89 
73 

92 


234 
106 

259 


170 
47 

49 


493 
226 

400 


1,077 
452 

747 


Total .... 


255 


536 


366 


1,157 


254 


599 


266 


1,119 


2,276 





Church of England Missions 










Christ Church, Burlington 
Place, Woodford Wells . 

St. Philip and St. James', 
Grove Hill, S. Woo<lford . 


25 


10 


84 


... 
119 


5 
44 


24 

51 


27 
38 


56 
133 


56 
252 


Total .... 


25 


10 


84 


119 


49 


75 


65 


189 


308 



George Lane, S. Woodford . 



25 



BAPTIST CHURCH 

92 1: 



22 



45 



42 



56 



26 



124 



216 



CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 



Ray Lodge Chaijel, Snakes 

Lane 

BrownhillRd., Woodford Gn. 
George Lane, S. Woodford . 

Total .... 



28 


30 


51 


109 


50 


77 


36 


1 
163 j 


272 


84 


109 


76 


269 


1 (i2 


98 


11 


171 


440 


97 


112 


81 


290 


89 


171 


22 


282 1 


572 


209 


251 


208 


668 


201 


346 


69 


616 


1,284 



Hall, Brunei Road, Wood- 
ford Bridge 

Granville Hall, Woodford 
Lower Road 

Total .... 



Congregational Missions 



20 



15 



20 



15 



72 107 



72 107 



1 


46 


39 


112 


219 


7 


23 


68 


98 ; 


98 


34 


69 


107 


210 ; 


317 



WESLEYAN METHODIST CHURCH 


Derby Road, S. Woodford . 


63 


74 99 


236 1 


51 


89 


21 


16l' 


397 


UNITED METHODIST FREE CHURCH 


Manor Road, Woodford Gn. 


80 145 1 76 301 117 


192 j 


21 


330 


631 



370 



GREATER LONDON— WOODFORD 



371 



BRETHKEN 



CHURCH. 


MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 


Men. 1 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Day. 


Room No. 3, Wilfrid La\vson 
Hotel .... 

Grove Road Mission, Grove 
Road, South Woodford . 


15 

48 


13 

70 


19 
158 


47 
276 


14 

90 


15 
168 


8 
33 


37 
291 


84 

567 


Total .... 


63 


83 


177 


323 


104 


183 


41 


328 


651 



SALVATION ARMY 



Hall, DaisyRd., S.Woodford 16 18 14 



48 



48 36 



40 



124 



ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH 



St. Thomas of Canterbury, 
High Rd. , Woodford Wells 87 



141 



72 



300 



92 



134 



60 286 580 



OTHER SERVICES 



Mission. Hall, Home Lane 



20 22 



22 



DENOMINATIONAL TOTALS 



DENOMINATION 


MORNING. j 


EVENING. 


Total 

for tbe 

Day. 




Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Churcli of England 

„ „ Missions 
Baptist Church . 
Congregational Church 
„ Missions 
Wesleyan Meth. Church 
U. Meth. Free Church . 
Brethren 

Salvation Army . 
Roman Catholic Church 
Other Services 


255 
25 
25 

209 
20 
63 
80 
63 
16 
87 
1 


536 
10 
22 

251 
15 
74 

145 
83 
18 

141 
1 


366 

84 
45 

208 
72 
99 
76 

177 
14 
72 
20 


1,157 
119 

92 
668 
107 
236 
301 
323 

48 
300 

22 


254 
49 
42 

201 
34 
51 

117 

104 
48 
92 


599 
75 
56 

346 
69 
89 

192 

183 
36 

134 


266 
65 
26 
69 

107 
21 
21 
41 
40 
60 


1,119 
189 
124 
616 
210 
161 
330 
328 
124 
286 


2,276 
308 
216 

1,284 
317 
397 
631 
651 
172 
586 
22 


Grand Totals . 


844 


1,296 


1,233 


3,373 


992 


1,779 


716 


3,487 


6,860 



District of Kingston 



CHURCH OF ENGLAND 





MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 

for the 

Day. 




Men. Women. Chldrn. 


Total, j Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


TotaL 


All Saints', Church Street . 
St. Peter's, Norbiton . 
St. Paul's, Queen's Road . 
St. John's, Kingston Vale . 
St. John the Evangelist's. 

Springfield Road 
St. Luke's, Burton Road 


97 116 76 

X(l 128 j 157 
U 87 : 120 
L'l 32 : 18 

:;9 U] 132^ 

117 207 ; 113 

1 


289 ' 120 

365 . 115 

248 52 

71 2;) 

282 ;i;-) 
437 174 


256 

245 

116 

?A 

159 
452 


132 

1.35 

112 

18 

61 
167 


508 
495 
280 

«i 

255 
793 


797 

860 
' 528 

152 
1 

537 
1,230 


Total .... 


395 ! 681 616 1,692 !' 525 


1,262 


625 


2,412 


4,104 


Church of England Missions 








GoodShepherd,Canbury A\ . 
St. Peter's, Norbiton . 





... 1 




27 
8 


60 
11 


62 
36 


149 
55 


149 

55 


Total .... 








35 71 


98 


204 


204 


BAPTIST CHURCH 


Providence, Cowhaze Road . 
Bunyan Tabernacle, Queen 

Elizabeth Road 
Union Street 
Zion, London Road 


12 

74 
53 
10 


30 

104 
56 
12 


17 

154 

38 
11 


59 

332 

147 

33 


17 34 

106 282 
49 104 

i 12 13 

1 


5 

125 
37 
14 


56 

513 

190 

39 


115 

845 
3:37 

72 


Total .... 


149 


202 


220 


571 


184 433 


181 


798 


1,369 


CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 


Eden Street . . . . 50 | 71 | 43 j 164 72 | 143 


49 


264 


428 


WESLEYAN METHODIST CHURCH 


Eden Street .... 
London Rd., King.gton Hill 


02 
23 


38 
29 


85 
39 


185 i 87 1 155 
91 1 45 ! 48 


65 
30 


307 
123 


492 
214 


Total .... 


85 ■ 67 


124 


276 1 132 ! 203 


95 


430 


706 


PRIMITIVE METHODIST CHURCH 


Richmond Road . 
Victoria Road, Norbiton 


29 1 23 
35 1 35 


33 
40 


85 
110 


50 101 
41 63 


37 
35 


188 
139 


273 

249 


Total .... 


64 58 


73 


195 


91 


164 


72 


327 


522 


PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 








Grove Crescent Road . . j 41 


62 


34 137 


32 


64 


23 


119 


256 


SOCIETY OP FRIENDS 


Meeting House, Eden Street 


11 


10 1 ... 


21 


17 


19 


14 


50 


71 



372 



GEEATER LONDON— KINGSTON 

BRETHREN 



SAIiVATION" ARMY 



St. James' Road HaU 



68 



125 



23 



216 



91 



87 



47 



225 



ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH 



OTHER SERVICES 



DENOMINATIONAL TOTALS 



373 



CHURCH. 


MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 

for the 

Day. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldm. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldm. 


Total. 


Gospel Hall, Apple Market 
Hall, Fife Road . 
25, Market Square 


11 

43 

6 


3 

59 
6 


14 
36 


28 

138 

12 


14 

48 

4 


28 

68 

6 


11 
41 


53 

157 
10 


81 

295 

22 


Total .... 


60 


68 


50 


178 


66 


102 


52 


220 


398 



441 



St. Agatha's, W'yndham Rd. 

St. Raphael's, Portsmouth 

Road 


68 
62 


110 
126 


54 
16 


232 
204 


18 
33 


.58 
65 


30 
14 


106 
112 


338 
316 


Total .... 


130 


236 


70 


436 


51 


123 


44 


218 


654 



London City Miss., Walter 

Street .... 

Mission HaU, Clarence St. 








12 
10 


20 
20 


10 
1 


42 
31 


42 
31 


Total .... 




i 




22 


40 


11 


73 


73 





MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 


DENOMINATION. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldm. Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldm. 


Total. 


Day. 


Church of England 

„ „ Missions 
Baptist Church . 
Congregational Church 
Wesleyan Meth. Church 
Primitive Meth. Church 
Presbyterian Church . 
Society of Friends 
Brethren 

Salvation Army . 
Roman Catholic Church 
Other Services 


395 

*l"49 
50 
85 
64 
41 
11 
60 
68 

130 


681 

202 
71 
67 
58 
62 
10 
68 
125 
236 


616 1,692 

220 ' 571 
43 \ 164 

124 276 
73 195 
34 1 137 

... 1 21 
50 i 178 
23 216 
70 436 


525 
3o 

184 
72 

132 
91 
32 
17 
66 
91 
51 
22 


1,262 

71 

433 

143 

203 

164 

64 

19 

102 

87 

123 

40 


625 
98 

181 
49 
95 
72 
23 
14 
52 
47 
44 
11 


2,412 
204 
798 
264 
430 
327 
119 

50 
220 
225 
218 

73 


4,104 
204 

1,36a 
428 
706 
522 
256 
71 
398 
441 
654 
73 


Grand Totals . 


1,053 


1,580 


1,253 3,886 


1,318 


2,711 


1,311 


5,340 


9,226 



District of Ham 

CHURCH OP ENGLAND 





MORNING. 




i 


EVENING. 


' 


Total 
f 01' the 


CHURCH. 


Men. Women. Chldm. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldm. 


Total. 


Day. 


St. Andrew's, Ham Common 


40 91 


107 


238 


^^i 


155 


121 


351 


589 



District of Teddington 





CHURCH OF 


ENGLAND 












MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 


CHURCH. 


Men. 


Women. 


Ohldm. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Day. 


St. Albans', High Street . 
Old St. Mary's, High Street 
St. Peter and St. Paul's, 

Broad Street . 
St. Mark's, Fairfax Road . 


134 
5 

44 

20 


185 
16 

150 

27 


91 
196 

194 

79 


410 
217 

388 
132 


272 

114 
13 


276 

276 

47 


101 

131 
45 


649 

521 
105 


1,059 
217 

909 
237 


Total .... 


209 


378 


560 


1,147 


399 


599 


277 


1,275 


2,422 



BAPTIST CHURCH 



Church Road 


107 


109 101 


317 


152 


210 


143 


505 


822 


WESLEYAH" METHODIST CHURCH 


Hampton Road . 


31 


29 


34 94 


34 61 


22 


117 


211 


Jj'KEE EPISCOPAT. CHURCH 


Christ Church, Station Road 81 


112 


185 


378 


113 


252 


79 


444 


822 


SALVATION ARMY 


Queen's Road 


2 


5 1 


8 


6 


19 


7 


32 


40 



ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH 



Sacred Heart, Kingston Rd. 



49 



104 



50 203 



19 



53 



16 



88 291 







OTHER SERVICES 










London City Miss., Queen's 

Road 

Gaspel Mission, Ful well Rd. 










7 
25 


14 
50 


7 
51 


28 
126 


28 
126 


Total .... 


... 








32 


64 


58 


154 


154 



DENOMINATIONAL TOTALS 



DENOMINATTON" 


A 


MORNING. 




EVENING. 




Total 

for the 

Day. 




. Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldm. 


Total 


Cliurch of England 
Baptist Church 
\yesleyan Meth. Churcli 
Free Episcopal Church . 
Salvation Army . 
Roman Catholic Church 
Other Services 


209 

107 

31 

81 

2 

49 


378 
109 
29 
112 
5 
104 
... 


560 

101 
34 

185 
1 

50 


1,147 

317 

94 

378 

8 

203 


399 

152 

34 

113 

6 

19 

32 


599 
210 
61 
252 
19 
53 
64 


277 
143 
22 
79 
7 
16 
58 


1,275 
505 
117 
444 
32 
88 
154 


2,422 
822 
211 
822 
40 
291 
154 


Grand Totals . 


479 


737 931 


2,147 


755 


1,258 


602 


2,615 


4,762 



374 



District of Hampton 





CHURCH OF 


ENGLAND 










CHURCH. 


MORNING. 




EVENING. 




Total 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldm. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


for the 
Day. 


St. Mary's, Thames Street . 
St. James', Park Road 
Chapel Royal, Hampton Ct. 


46 

112 

45 


62 

137 

91 


74 

118 

21 


182 

367 
157 


82 
82 
55 


164 

167 

99 


47 

77 
30 


293 
326 
184 


475 
693 
341 


Total .... 


203 


290 


213 


706 


219 


430 


154 


803 


1,509 



CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 



High Street, Hampton Hill 



28 



79 



134 



20 



48 



33 



101 



235 



WESLEYAN METHODIST CHURCH 



High Street . 



12 



50 



14 



26 



14 



PRIMITIVE METHODIST CHURCH 



54 



125 



Wolsey Road 



12 



26 



43 



10 



13 



30 



73 



DENOMINATIONAL 


TOTALS 








DENOMINATION. 


MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Day. 


Church of England 
Congregational Church 
Wesleyan Meth. Church 
Primitive Meth. Church 


203 

28 

9 

12 


290 

27 

12 

5 


213 
79 
.50 
26 


706 

134 
71 
43 


219 
20 
14 

7 


430 

48 

. 26 

10 


154 
33 
14 
13 


803 

101 

54 

30 


1,509 
235 

125 
73 


Grand Totals . 


252 


334 


368 


954 


260 


514 


214 


988 


1,942 



District of Hampton Wick 

CHURCH OF ENGLAND 



CHURCH. 


MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 

for the 

Day. 


Men. 


Women. Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldm. 


Total. 


St. John's, Church Grove . 


79 


117 1 77 


273 


96 


192 


69 


357 


630 



BAPTIST CHURCH 



Assembly Rooms, Park Rd. 



13 27 



27 





DENOMINATIONAL 


TOTALS 












MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 




Men. 


Women. 


Chldm. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldm. 


Total. 


Day. 


Church of England 
Baptist Church 




79 


117 


77 


273 


96 
6 


192 

8 


69 
13 


;357 

27 


630 

27 


Grand Totals . 




79 I 117 


77 


273 


102 


200 


82 


384 


657 



375 



District of East and West Molesey 



CHURCH OP ENGLAND * 





MORNING. ! 


EVENING. 


Total 

for the 

Day. 


CHURCH. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldm. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldm. 


Total. 


St. Paul's, Palace Road 
St. Mary the A^'irgin, Church 
Road 


35 

50 


72 
115 


80 
134 


187 
299 


38 
65 


92 
205 


38 

88 


168 
358 


355 
657 


Total .... 


85 


187 


214 


486 


103 


297 


126 


526 


1,012 



West Molesey Pari-sh Church was closed for repairs on day of Census. 



BAPTIST CHURCH 



Walton Road 



12 



14 



23 



35 



WESLEYAN METHODIST CHURCH 



Manor Road . 



26 



30 



78 134 



43 



64 



43 150 



284 



DENOMINATIONAL TOTALS 



MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 

for the 

Day. 


DENOMINATION. 

Men. 


Women. 


Cbldm. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldm. 


Total. 


Church of England . 85 
Baptist Church . . | 6 
Wesleyan Meth. Church I 26 


187 

6 
30 


214 

"78 


486 

12 

134 


103 

7 

43 


297 
14 
64 


126 

2 

43 


526 

23 

150 


1,012 

35 

284 


Grand Totals. .i 117 


223 


292 


632 


153 


375 


171 


699 


1,331 



376 



District of Wimbledon 



CHURCH OF ENGLAND 



CHURCH. 


MORNING. 1 


EVENING. ! 


Total 
for the 




















Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldm. 


Total, j 


Day. 


iSt. Mary's .... 


107 


130 


39 


276 


221 


383 


76 


680 


956 


All Saints', Herbert Road . 


60 


52 


180 


292 


79 


194 


114 


387 


679 


Holy Trinity, Merton Road 


89 


99 


101 


289 


78 


196 


89 


363 


652 


Emmanuel, Ridgway . 


118 


318 


105 


541 


114 


287 


22 


423 


964 


Christ Church, Copse HiU . 


79 


177 


56 


312 


52 


214 


62 


328 


640 


St. John the Baptist's, Spen- 




















cer Hill . . . . 


85 


169 


51 


305 


68 


109 


26 


203 


508 


St. Mark's, Alexander Road 


85 


125 


123 


333 


89 


213 


66 


368 


701 


St. Matthew's, Durham Rd. 


27 


35 


27 


89 


32 


72 


52 


156 


245 


St. Andrew's, Herbert Road 


13 


31 


32 


76 


19 


49 


34 


102 


178 


St. Peter's, Haydon's Road . 


23 


31 


91 


145 


31 


76 


68 


175 


320 


Total .... 


686 


1,167 


805 


2,658 


783 


1,793 


609 


3,185 


5,843 



BAPTIST CHURCH 



Queen's Road 


157 


165 


153 


475 


214 


453 


229 


896 


1,371 


Merton Road 


34 


43 


25 


102 


51 


76 


8 


135 


237 


Haydon's Road . 


22 


15 


47 


84 : 


32 


56 


72 


160 


244 


Norman Road 


17 


16 


28 


61 i 


15 


37 


28 


80 


141 


Old Baptist, Durham Road . 


8 


9 


1 


18 


13 


13 


3 


29 


47 


Total .... 


238 


248 


254 


740 


325 


635 


340 


1,300 


2,040 



CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 



Worple Road . . . 1 120 
Christ Church, Alwyn Road ! 59 
Dundonald Road Hall . . 2 


128 74 

58 40 

2 55 


322 

157 
59 


158 

101 

12 


239 

145 

32 


45 

57 
25 


442 

303 

69 


764 
460 

128 


Total .... 181 


188 169 


538 


271 


416 


127 


814 


1,352 



WESLEYAN METHOBIST CHURCH 



Worple Road 

Worple Road, Raynes Park 


73 
44 


88 
43 


86 
110 


247 
197 


96 
70 


167 
118 


72 
124 


335 
312 


582 
509 


Total .... 


117 


131 


196 


444 


166 


285 


196 


647 


1,091 



PRIMITIVE METHODIST CHURCH 



Quicks Road . 



16 



17 



43 



76 



31 



42 ! 19 



92 



168 



PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 



Mansel Road 



61 i 62 21 I 144 

377 



63 



14 



153 



297 



378 



THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 



BRETHREN 



CHURCH. 


MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 

for the 

Day. 


Men. 


Women. Chldm. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Central Hall, 37, Worple Rd. 
Haydon Hall, North Road . 
Room, Cross Road 
Room, 43, High Street 


22 
8 

17 
5 


24 3 

9 
12 12 

9 8 


49 
17 
41 
22 


19 

19 

20 

8 


50 
30 
30 
12 


< 
32 
16 
18 


76 
81 
66 
58 


125 
98 

107 
60 


Total .... 


52 


54 23 


129 


66 


122 


73 


261 


390 



SALVATION ARMY 



Kingston Road . 



42 



22 



54 118 



135 195 300 630 



ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH 



Sacred Heart, Darleston Rd. 
St. Mary's, Russell Road . 


243 
40 


505 

82 


181 
79 


929 
201 


168 160 
10 19 


79 
109 


407 
138 


1,336 
339 


Total .... 


283 


587 260 


1,130 


178 179 


188 


545 


1,675 



OTHER SERVICES 



Second Adventiats' Hall, 




















Broadway .... 


10 


2 


24 


'M 


20 


23 


6 


49 


85 


London City Mission, 16, 
Thornton Road. 




























7 


28 


11 


46 


46 


London City Mission, 58, 
Hartfield Road . 




























8 


32 


n 


49 


49 


Mission, Russell Road . 


12 


13 


23 


48 


18 


19 


21 


58 


106 


Total .... 


22 


15 


47 


84 


53 


102 


47 


202 


286 



DENOMINATIONAL TOTALS 



DRKOAfTVATTOV 


MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 

for the 

Day. 




Men. 


Women. 


Chldm. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldm. 


Total 


Church of England 
Baptist Church . 
Congregational Church 
Wesleyan Meth. Church 
Primitive Meth. Church 
Presbyterian Church . 
Brethren 

Salvation Army . 
Roman Catholic Church 
Other Services 


686 

238 

181 

117 

16 

61 

52 

42 

283 

22 


1,167 

248 

188 

131 

17 

62 

54 

22 

587 

15 


805 

254 

169 

196 

43 

21 

23 

54 

260 

47 


2,658 
740 
538 
444 
76 
144 
129 
118 

1,130 
84 


783 

325 

271 

166 

31 

63 

66 

135 

178 

53 


1,793 
635 
416 
285 
42 
76 
122 
195 
179 
102 


609 

340 

127 

196 

19 

14 

73 

300 

188 

47 


3,185 
1,300 
814 
647 
92 
153 
261 
630 
545 
202 


5,843 

2,040 

1,352 

1,091 

168 

297 

390 

748 

1,675 

286 


Grand Totals . 


1,698 


2,491 


1,872 


6,061 


2,071 


3,845 


1,913 


7,829 


13,890 



District of Surbiton 



CHURCH OP ENOLAND 





MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 
for the 


CHURCH. 




















Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Day. 


St. Mark's, Victoria Road . 


92 


174 


79 


345 


82 


260 


60 


402 


747 


St. Andrew's, Maple Road . 


81 


200 


134 


415 


64 


192 


37 


293 


708 


Christ Church, King Charles 




















Road 


66 


169 


57 


292 


55 


149 


64 


268 


560 


St. Matthew's, Kingsdown 




















Road 


86 


166 


78 


330 


117 


372 


195 


684 


1,014 


St. Paul's, Hook . 


36 


37 


63 


136 


68 


110 


83 


261 


397 


Total .... 


361 


746 


411 


1,518 


386 


1,083 


439 


1,908 


3,426 



Church of England Mission 



St. Matthew's.Red Lion Lane 



18 



24 



30 



72 



72 



BAPTIST CHURCH 



Oakhill Road 
Balaclava Road Hall . 


20 
25 


42 
37 


24 
20 


86 
82 


28 77 
35 63 


25 
26 


130 
124 


216 
206 


Total .... 


45 


79 


44 


168 


63 


140 


51 


254 


422 



CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 



Surbiton Park, Maple Road I 52 



56 



112 



220 



36 



75 



24 



135 



355 





WESiiEYAN METHODIST 


CHURCH 








EweU Road . 
Hook . 




51 63 88 


202 


102 
3 


191 
5 


103 
6 


396 
14 


598 
14 


Total . 


51 03 


88 


202 


105 


196 


109 


410 


612 



DENOMINATIONAL 


TOTALS 










MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 


DENOMINATION. 


Men. 


Women. Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Day. 


Church of England 

„ „ Mission 
Baptist Church 
Congregational Church, 
Wesleyan Meth. Church 


361 

45 
52 
51 


746 

"79 
56 
63 


411 

44 
112 

88 


1,518 

168 
220 
202 


386 
18 
63 
36 

105 


1,083 
24 

140 
75 

196 


439 
30 
51 
24 

109 


1,908 

72 

254 

135 

410 


3,426 

72 

422 

355 

612 


Grand Totals . 


509 


944 


655 


2,108 


608 


1,518 


653 


2,779 


4,887 



379 



District of Esher and the Dittons 



CHURCH OF ENGLAND 





MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 
for the 


CHURCH. 




















Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Day. 


St. Mary's, Church Road . 


66 


113 


77 


256 


102 


234 


113 


449 


705 


Christ Church, Esher . 


88 


138 


70 


296 


82 


187 


73 


342 


038 


West End Church, Esher . 










6 


22 


5 


33 


33 


Holy Trinity, Claygate 


22 


35 


58 


115 


65 


105 


79 


249 


364 


St. Nicholas', Thames Ditton 


25 


65 


37 


127 


38 


113 


38 


189 


316 


All Saints', Weston Green 


13 


23 


32 


68 


! 23 


70 


37 


130 


198 


Total .... 


214 


374 


274 


862 


316 


731 


345 


1,392 


2,254 



BAPTIST CHURCH 



Park Road, Esher 
Ebenezer, Claygate 


? 


12 i 3 
6 15 


24 

28 


12 
6 


25 \ 9 
12 1 32 


46 

50 


70 
78 


Total .... 


16 18 18 


52 


18 


37 j 41 


96 


148 



CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 



Thames Ditton 



21 



8 14 43 21 30 11 62 105 



WESLEYAN METHODIST CHURCH 



Wolsey Road, Esher . 


8 


9 


1 


18 


12 


16 


^i 


35 


53 


PRIMITIVE METHODIST CHURCH 


Providence PI. , Long Ditton 


2 


4 


6 


12 8 


7 


4 


19 


31 


NEW JERUSALEM CHURCH 


Weston Green 


4 


1 


8 13 


10 


19 


28 


57 


70 


SOCIETY OF FRIENDS 


Meeting House, Claremont 
Lane, Esher 


1 7 ... 


8 








8 




OTHER SERVICES 








Mission Hall, Providence 
Place, Long Ditton . 


5 12 14 31 


11 32 


4 


47 


78 



380 



GREATER LONDON— ESHER AND THE DITTONS 381 



DENOMINATIONAL TOTALS 



DENOMINATION. 



Church of England . 214 

Baptist Church . . 16 

Congregational Church . j 21 

Wesleyan Meth. Church ! 8 

Primitive Meth. Church ; 2 

New Jerusalem Church ! 4 

Society of Friends . ; 1 

Other Services . . 5 

Grand Totals . .271 



MORNING. 



Men. Women. Chldrn. Total 



374 
18 

8 
9 
4 
1 
7 
12 



433 



274 

18 

14 

1 

6 

8 

14 



862 
52 
43 
18 
12 
13 
8 
31 



335 1,039 





EVENING. 




Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


316 


731 


345 


1,392 


18 


37 


41 


96 


21 


30 


11 


62 


12 


16 


7 


35 


8 


7 


4 


19 


10 


19 


28 


57 


11 


32 


4 


47 


i 396 


872 


440 


1,708 



Total 

for the 

Day. 

2,254 

148 

105 

53 

31 

70 

8 

78 



District of Maiden and Coombe 

CHURCH OF ENGLAND 



CHURCH. 


MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


for the 
Day. 


St. John's, Old Maiden 
Christ Church, New Maiden 


35 
109 


50 
172 


27 
140 


112 
421 


81 
155 


124 
342 


77 
154 


282 
651 


394 
1,072 


Total .... 


144 


222 


167 ' 


533 


236 


466 


231 


933 


1,466 





Church of England Missions 










Christ Church, Kingston Rd. 


1 14 


34 


34 


82 


82 



BAPTIST CHURCH 



liinffston Road 



37 37 I 51 125 44 73 54 171 296 



CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 



Maiden Road 



41 



54 54 149 64 92 62 218 367 



WESLEYAN METHODIST CHURCH 



Coombe Road 



31 



27 



42 



100 



47 



64 



51 



162 



262 



FREE EPISCOPAL CHURCH 



Trinity, New Maiden 



11 



38 



15 



21 



43 



81 



DENOMINATIONAL TOTALS 



DENOMINATION. 



Church of England 

„ „ Missions 

Baptist Church 
ConOTegational Church. 
Wesleyan Meth. Church 
Free Episcopal Church 

Grand Totals . 



MORNING. 


EVENING. 1 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


144 


222 


167 


533 


236 


466 


231 


933 


... 








14 


34 


34 


82 


37 


37 


51 


125 


44 


73 


64 


171 


41 


54 


54 


149 


64 


92 


62 


218 


31 


27 


42 


100 


47 


64 


51 


162 


4 


11 


23 


38 


7 


15 


21 


43 


257 


351 


337 


945 


412 


744 


453 


1,609 



Total 

for the 

Day. 

1,466 

82 
296 
367 
262 

81 

2,554 



Borough of Croydon 



CHURCH OF ENGLAND 



CHUBCH. 


MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 
for the 




















Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Day. 


St. John the Baptist's, 




















Church Street . 


258 


558 


187 


1,003 


425 


848 


165 


1,438 


2,441 


St. Matthew's, George Street 
St. Luke's, Portland Road . 


200 


505 


90 


795 


240 


545 


38 


823 


1,618 


41 


88 


111 


240 


37 


111 


88 


236 


476 


Holy Ti'iuity, Selhurst Rd. . 
St. Saviour's, Campbell Rd. 


74 


114 


152 


340 


85 


200 


111 


396 


736 


107 


297 


220 


624 


164 


348 


227 


739 


1,363 


St. Mark's, Albert Street . 


78 


207 


239 


524 


111 


241 


99 


451 


975 


St. Peter's, St. Peter's Road 


49 


163 


104 


316 


54 


137 


49 


240 


556 


All Saints', Beulah Hill . 


119 


302 


176 


597 


89 


136 


98 


322 


919 


St. Andrew's, Southbridge 




















Road 


102 


269 


258 


629 


106 


351 


56 


513 


1,142 


Holy Innocents', Selhurst 




















Road. . . . . 


73 


236 


47 


366 


81 


260 


48 


389 


745 


St. John the Evangelist's, 




















Shirley .... 


65 


87 


104 


256 


74 


102 


51 


227 


483 


St. Martin's, Morland Road 


34 


56 


112 


202 


52 


97 


135 


284 


486 


St. Margaret's, Chevening 




















Road 


46 


113 


63 


222 


37 


107 


30 


174 


396 


Christ Church, Sumner Rd. 


68 


134 


96 


298 


54 


114 


44 


212 


510 


St. Michael and All Angels', 




















Poplar Walk . 


156 


359 


130 


636 


131 


391 


87 


609 


1,244 


St. Paul's, Thornton Heath 


83 


173 


270 


526 


76 


190 


95 


361 


887 


St. Alban's, Thornton Heath 


97 


226 


96 


419 


85 


322 


77 


484 


903 


St. James', St. James' Road 


94 


154 


146 


394 


99 


235 


113 


447 


841 


St. Mary Magdalene's, Can- 




















ning ftoad .... 


81 


188 


120 


389 


64 


149 


60 


273 


662 


St. Augustine's, S. Croydon 


95 


163 


193 


451 


248 


491 


181 


920 


1,371 


Emmanuel, Normanton Rd. 


92 


180 


127 


399 


79 


144 


65 


288 


687 


St. John the Evangelist's, 




















Auckland Road. 


184 


398 


90 


672 


189 


411 


48 


648 


1,320 


St. Philip's, Norbury . 


32 


54 


48 


134 


33 


47 


50 


130 


264 


Tot.al .... 


2,228 


5,024 


3,169 


10,421 


2,613 


5,976 


2,015 


10,604 


21,025 



Church, of England Missions 



St. Luke's, Princess Road . 


11 


15 


77 


103 


22 


90 


94 


206 


309 


St. Andrew's, Old Town 










32 


,32 


.32 


96 


96 


St. Hugh's, Drummond Rd. 










13 


25 


35 


73 


73 


Christ Church Hall, Purley 










20 


16 


2 


38 


38 


St. Stephen's, Thornton 




















Heath .... 










11 


61 


74 


146 


146 


St. George's, South Norwood 










30 


108 


100 


238 


238 


Holy Trinity, Lahore Road 
St. Matthew's, Cross Road . 


3 


1 


139 


143 


11 


17 


41 


69 


212 


11 


2 


103 


116 


30 


98 


54 


182 


298 


Pitlake Mission, Cornwall 




















Road 


8 


11 


72 


91 


13 


38 


46 


97 


188 


Welcome Hall, Scarsbrook 




















Road 


34 


36 


211 


281 


203 


392 


107 


702 


983 


Stanley Grove 

Good Shepherd, Union Rd. 


19 


45 


96 


160 


57 


133 


107 


297 


457 


1 


3 


80 


84 


3 


15 


24 


42 


126 


St. Alban's, Thornton Heath 


4 


2 


150 


156 










156 


Total .... 


91 


115 


928 


1,134 


445 


1,025 


716 


2,186 


3,320 



382 



GREATER LONDON— CROYDON 



383 



BAPTIST CHURCH 



CHURCH. 


MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 
for the 




















Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 
510 


Day. 


Providence, West Street 


188 


202 


45 


435 


204 


254 


52 


945 


Beulah, Thornton Heath 


49 


63 


243 


356 


60 


110 


27 


197 


552 


Salem, Windmill Road 


9 


11 


/ 


27 


14 


23 


4 


41 


68 


Tamworth Road . 


51 


54 


48 


153 


53 


100 


16 


169 


322 


Derby Road .... 


40 


44 


94 


178 


42 


62 


21 


125 


303 


West Croydon Tabernacle . 
Brighton Road 


215 


301 


92 


608 


248 


565 


224 


1,037 


1,645 


64 


91 


110 


265 


53 


118 


30 


201 


466 


Morland Road 


6 


3 


19 


28 


16 


23 


25 


64 


92 


Croham Road 


I 52 


60 


44 


156 


45 


74 


17 


136 


292 


Woodeide Chapel . 


34 


31 


67 


132 


36 


69 


29 


134 


266 


Central Hill. 


50 


84 


15 


149 










149 


Holmeedale Road, Norwood 


57 


77 


58 


192 


67 


129 


1 25 


221 


413 


Total . . . . 


815 


1,021 


842 


2,678 


838 


1,527 


470 


2,835 


5,513 







Baptist Missions 












Boston Road 
Pawsom Road 
Selhurst Place 


2 
6 
2 


1 
1 
1 


66 

87 

3 


69 1 

94 

6 


27 
22 


66 

74 

9 


119 

91 

6 


212 

187 

18 


281 

281 

24 


Total .... 


10 


3 


156 


169 


52 


149 


216 1 


417 


586 



CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 



Salem Pump Pail . 

George Street 

London Road 

Canning Road 

Trinity, Dingwall Roatl 

Aberdeen Road . 

St. Aubyn's, Norwood. 

Godstone Road . 

Selhurst Road 

Thornton Heath . 

Stanger Road, S. Norwood , 

Westbrook Road . 

Total . 



11 


25 


37 


73 , 


23 


40 


28 


91 


164 


156 


248 


299 


703 i 


206 


339 


52 


597 


1,300 


90 


115 


258 


463 


72 


196 


27 


295 


758 


59 


114 


42 


215 


63 


101 


35 


199 


414 


. ! 30 


47 


13 


90 


35 


52 


6 


93 


183 


39 


51 


48 


138 


42 


49 


6 


97 


235 


. ' 121 


265 


146 


522 


120 


303 


87 


510 


1,032 


36 


46 


38 


120 


35 


54 


23 


112 


232 


50 


69 


46 


164 


61 


90 


19 


170 


334 


68 


86 


58 


212 


72 


107 


55 


234 


446 


40 


62 


58 


160 


79 


119 


43 


241 


401 


3 


3 


65 


71 


34 


69 


57 


160 


231 


703 


1,121 


1,107 


2,931 


842 


1,519 


438 


2,799 


5,730 



WESLEYAN METHODIST CHURCH 



London Road 


112 


137 


220 


469 


261 


443 


194 


898 


1,367 


Thornton Heath . 


70 


63 


55 


188 


87 


116 


69 


272 


460 


Lower Addiscombe Road . 


64 


92 


133 


289 


57 


105 


34 


196 


485 


Brighton Road . 


47 


60 


30 


137 


44 


63 


25 


132 


269 


Burdett Road 


29 


28 


48 


105 


39 


50 


40 


129 


234 


Woodside Green . 


14 


10 


29 


53 


13 


11 


42 


66 


119 


South Norwood Hill . 


141 


206 


171 


518 


191 


352 


118 


661 


1,179 


Total . . . . 


477 


596 


686 


1,759 


692 


1,140 


522 


2,354 


4,113 



UNITED METHODIST FREE CHURCH 



MoffattRoad 

Old Town .... 


47 
12 


49 
13 


51 
12 


147 
37 


56 
14 


84 
18 


56 
16 


196 

48 


343 

85 


Total . . 


59 


62 


63 


184 


70 


102 


72 


244 


428 



384 



THE EELIGIOUS LIFE OF LONDON 





PRIMITIVE METHODIST 


CHURCH 








CHURCH. 


MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 

for tbe 

Day. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldm. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Cherry Orchard Road . 
Portland Road 
Woodville Road . 
Land Street . 




34 

8 

35 

41 

118 


37 

4 

17 

37 

95 


94 
21 

.56 

7 


165 
33 

108 
85 


50 

9 

30 

48 


51 
19 
34 
72 


43 
21 
30 
26 


144 
49 
94 

146 


309 

82 

202 

231 


Total . 


178 


391 


137 


176 


120 


433 


824 



PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 



St. George's, Oakfield Road 
St. Andrew's, Westow Street 
St. Paul's, Croham Road 
St. George's Mission . 
New Town Mission 

Total . . . . 



51 


85 


20 


156 


39 


82 


14 


135 


73 


128 


51 


252 


56 


136 


14 


206 


71 


109 


24 


204 


60 


87 


3 


150 










31 


94 


67 


192 


18 


22 


56 


96 


20 


26 


10 


56 


213 


344 


151 


708 


206 


425 


108 


739 



SOCIETY OF FRIENDS 



Meeting House, Park Lane . 



65 



68 



26 



159 



21 



29 



50 



BRETHREN 



Lower Coombe Street . 


58 


89 


31 


178 


65 


127 


26 


218 


396 


Denmark Road . 


28 


32 


34 


94 


50 


69 


117 


236 


330 


29, London Road . 


42 


53 


15 


110 


29 


58 


19 


106 


216 


Lower Addiscombe Road . 


22 


24 


100 


146 


36 


62 


56 


154 


300 


Fairfield Hall . 


22 


33 


11 


66 


25 


26 


10 


61 


127 


Leslie Park Road. 


11 


27 


6 


44 


8 


19 


9 


36 


80 


Park Road, Norwood . 


27 


55 


12 


94 


39 


73 


23 


135 


229 


Clifton HaU. 


11 


14 


2 


27 


9 


24 


19 


.52 


79 


Strathmore Road . 


31 


33 


25 


89 


20 


39 


26 


85 


174 


GillettRoad. 


9 


14 


7 


30 


13 


31 


24 


68 


98 


96, Leighton Street East . 










4 


9 


53 


66 


66 


Total .... 


261 


374 


243 


878 


298 


537 


382 


1,217 


2,095 





UNITARIAN 


CHURCH 










Wellesley Road . 
Dennett Hall 


44 


50 


6 


100 


73 
9 


76 
10 


19 

8 


168 

27 


268 
27 


Total .... 


44 


50 


6 


100 


82 


86 


27 


195 


295 



SALVATION ARMY 



Citadel, Elis David Road . 


44 


28 


54 


126 


147 


203 


147 


497 


623 


Cobden Road 


9 


9 


53 


71 


28 


39 


50 


117 


188 


High St., Thornton Heath . 


29 


9 


53 


91 


50 


80 


78 


208 


299 


Bynes Road .... 


9 


13 


10 


32 


10 


20 


23 


53 


85 


Grace Road .... 


8 


5 


13 


26 


11 


19 


12 


42 


68 


Carberry Road . 


31 


53 


41 


125 


59 


126 


98 


283 


408 


Total .... 


130 


117 


224 


471 


305 


487 


408 


1,200 


1,671 



ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH 



St. Marys, Wellesley Road 
Faithful Virgin, Central Hill 


294 
178 


473 420 
312 488 


1,187 
978 


101 
44 


204 
166 


158 
436 


463 
646 


1,650 
1,624 


Total .... 


472 


785 


908 


2,165 


145 


370 


594 


1,109 


3,274 



GREATER LONDON— CROYDON 



386 



OTHER SERVICES 







MORNING. 




EVENING. 


Total 


CHURCH. 






















Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Day. 


Holiness Mission, Gloucester 


















Road 


17 


20 


17 


54 


21 


25 


27 


73 


127 


28, Old Town 


7 


7 


1 


15 


10 


7 




17 


32 


Thornton Heath . 


24 


23 


61 


110 


51 


94 


53 


198 


308 


Temperance Hall, Mint Wlk. 


12 


3 


71 


86 


105 


135 


47 


287 


373 


Temperance Hall, RoUe- 








1 












stone Road 










10 


30 


61 


101 


101 


London City Mission, Port- 




















land Road .... 








... 


33 


r.9 


33 


125 


129 


London City Mission, Glou- 




















cester Road 










10 


31 


31 


72 


72 


London City Mission, Cairo 




















Road 










22 


58 


38 


118 


118 


Railway Miss., W. Croydon 










71 


101 


43 


215 


215 


Gospel Hall, Wilford Road. 










9 


26 


62 


97 


97 


Lighthouse Mission, Wil- 
ford Road .... 




























22 


27 


13 


62 


62 












80 


57 


6 


143 


143 


Love Lane, South Norwood 




... 






8 


10 


15 


33 


33 


Croydon Ethical Society 


16 


24 


3 


43 




... 






43 


Haling Road Hall 


12 


16 


120 


i 148 


104 


216 


115 


435 


.583 


Total .... 


88 


95 


273 


456 


556 


876 


544 


1,976 


2,432 



DENOMINATIONAL TOTALS 





MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 
for the 






















Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Day. 


Church of England 


2,228 


5,024 


3,169 


10,421 


2,613 


5,976 


2,015 


10,604 


21,025 


„ „ Missions 


91 


115 


928 


1,134 


445 


1,025 


716 


2,186 


3,320 


Baptist Church 


815 


1,021 


842 


2,678 


838 


1,527 


470 


2,835 


5,513 


„ Missions . 


10 


3 


156 


169 


52 


149 


216 


417 


586 


Congregational Church . 


703 


1,121 


1,107 


2,931 


842 


1,519 


438 


2,799 


5,730 


Wesleyan Meth. Church 


477 


596 


686 


1,759 


692 


1,140 


522 


2,354 


4,113 


U. Meth. Free Church . 


59 


62 


63 


184 


70 


102 


72 


244 


428 


Primitive Meth. Church 


118 


95 


178 


391 


137 


176 


120 


433 


824 


Presbyterian Church . 


213 


344 


151 


708 


206 


425 


108 


7.39 


1,447 


Society of Friends 


65 


68 


26 


159 


21 


29 


... 


50 


209 


Brethren 


261 


374 


243 


878 


298 


537 


382 


1,217 


2,095 


Unitarian Church . 


44 


50 


6 


100 


82 


86 


27 


195 


295 


Salvation Army . 


130 


117 


224 


471 


305 


487 


408 


1,200 


1,671 


Roman Catholic Church 


472 


785 


908 


2,165 


145 


370 


594 


1,109 


3,274 


Other Services 


88 


95 


273 


456 


556 


876 


544 


1,976 


2,432 


Grand Totals . 


5,774 


9,870 


8,960 


24,604 


7,302 


14,424 


6,632 


28,358 


52,962 



25 



Rural District of Croydon 



CHURCH OF ENGLAND 



CHURCH. 


MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 
for the 




















Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Day. 


St. Mary's, Addington 


27 


27 


55 


109 


36 


35 


34 


105 


214 


St. Mary the Virgin, Merton 


156 


236 


173 


565 


117 


168 


68 


353 


918 


St. Saviour's, Raynes Park . 


19 


52 


104 


175 


20 


62 


23 


105 


280 


St. Lawrence's, Morden 


25 


36 


35 


96 


14 


21 


11 


46 


142 


Christ Church, Mitcham 


89 


97 


121 


307 


101 


200 


77 


378 


685 


St. Peter and St. Paul's, 




















Mitcham .... 


91 


127 


138 


356 


93 


129 


126 


348 


704 


St. Mark's, Mitcham . 


75 


121 


86 


282 


213 


279 


51 


543 


825 


All Saints', Beddiugton 




















Corner .... 


21 


15 


37 


73 


20 


47 


38 


105 


178 


St. Mary the Virgin, 




















Beddington 


98 


137 


56 


291 


142 


200 


33 


375 


666 


St. Michael's, Bandon Hill . 


58 


107 


78 


243 


44 


118 


65 


227 


470 


Holy Trinity, Wallington . 


82 


161 


121 


364 


62 


140 


49 


251 


615 


Total .... 


741 


1,116 


1,004 


2,861 


862 


1,399 


575 


2,836 


5,697 



Church of England Missions 



St. Mary's, Addington Hills 
St. Mary's, Merton 
Rock Terrace, Mitcham 


"l6 


"14 


"27 


"57 


7 

20 

6 


8 
50 
27 


13 
34 
64 


28 

104 

97 


28 

161 

97 


Total .... 


16 


14 


27 


57 


33 


85 


111 


229 


286 



BAPTIST CHURCH 



Crown Road, Morden . 


8 


9 


26 


43 


25 


45 


63 


133 


176 


London Road 


9 


9 


29 


47 


27 


38 


40 


105 


152 


Clarendon Grove, Mitcham. 


18 


16 


17 


51 


25 


33 


8 


66 


117 


"Lonesome" 










23 


50 


31 


104 


104 


Queen's Road, Wallington . 


62 


io2 


94 


258 


90 


155 


35 


280 


538 


Shirley Hills 










10 


8 


12 


30 


30 


Total .... 


97 


136 


166 


399 


200 


329 


189 


718 


1,117 



CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 



Morden Road, Merton. 
Zion, Mitcham . 


6 
15 


2 

11 


26 
25 


34 

51 


9 
23 


8 
33 


28 
17 


45 

73 


79 
124 


Total .... 


21 


13 


51 


85 


32 


41 


45 


118 


203 



WESLEYAN METHODIST 


CHURCH 








Clyde Road, Wallington 
High Street, Merton . 


31 
32 


61 
25 


51 
81 


143 
138 


32 

28 


68 
48 


17 
40 


117 
116 


260 
254 


Total .... 


63 


86 


132 


281 


60 


116 


57 


233 


514 



38G 



GEEATEE, LONDON— CROYDON 

UNITED METHODIST FREE CHURCH 



387 



CHURCH. 


MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 

for the 

Day. 


Men. 

15 
38 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 

71 
166 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldm. 


Total. 


High Street, Collier's Wood 
East Side, Mitcham Green . 


16 
52 


40 
76 


33 
54 


41 
75 


65 
53 


139 
182 


210 
348 


Total .... 


53 


68 


116 


237 


87 


116 


118 


321 


558 



PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 



Woodcote Road, Wallington 54 



99 



60 



213 



54 



102 



24 



180 



393 



BRETHREN 



Gosi)el Hall, Beddington 
Corner .... 
Ross Road, Wallington 
Clifton Road, WalUngton . 


11 
26 
35 


9 100 
30 10 
45 27 


120 

66 

107 


10 
24 
30 


12 
35 
49 


9 
13 
21 


31 

72 

100 


151 
138 
207 


Total .... 


72 


84 137 


293 


64 


96 


43 


203 


496 



SALVATION ARMY 



Gladstone Road, Mitcham 



10 



17 



23 



17 



10 



50 



67 



ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH 



St. Peter and St. Paul's, 
Mitcham .... 



59 



69 



183 



19 



21 



67 



250 



OTHER SERVICES 



Hope Mission Hall, Merton 
Masonic Hall, Merton . 
Coleville Mission, Collier's 
Wood .... 


70 
3 


41 
6 


30 
6 


141 
15 


59 
34 

12 


134 

47 

17 


89 
5 

7 


282 
86 

36 


423 

86 

51 


Total .... 


73 


47 


36 


156 


105 


198 


101 


404 


560 



DENOMINATIONAL 


TOTALS 










MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 
for the 


DENOMINATION. 




















Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Day. 


Church of England 


741 


1,116 


1,004 


2,861 


862 


1,399 


575 


2,836 


5,697 


„ „ Missions 


16 


14 


27 


57 


33 


85 


111 


229 


286 


Baptist Church . 


97 


136 


166 


399 


200 


329 


189 


718 


1,117 


Congregational Church. 


21 


13 


51 


85 


32 


41 


45 


118 


203 


Wesleyan Meth. Church 


63 


86 


132 


281 


60 


116 


57 


233 


514 


U. Meth. Free Church . 


53 


68 


116 


237 


87 


116 


118 


321 


558 


Presbyterian Church . 


54 


99 


60 


213 


54 


102 


24 


180 


393 


Brethren 


72 


84 


137 


293 


64 


96 


43 


203 


496 


Salvation Army . 


10 


3 


4 


17 


23 


17 


10 


50 


67 


Roman Catholic Church 


59 


69 


55 


183 


19 


27 


21 


67 


250 


Other Services 


73 


47 


36 


156 


105 


198 


101 


404 


560 


Grand Totals . 


1,259 


1,735 


1,788 


4,782 


1,539 


2,526 


1,294 


5,359 


10,141 



District of Penge 



CHURCH OF ENGLAIirD 



CHURCH. 


MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 

for the 

Day. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Christ Church, Franklin Rd 


38 


35 


35 


108 


43 


76 


35 


154 


262 


Holy Trinity, Anerley Rd. 




















Anerley 


92 


132 


90 


314 


84 


112 


29 


225 


539 


St. John the Evangelist's 




















Beckenhani Road 


128 


13G 


134 


398 


100 


139 


61 


300 


698 


St. Paul's, Hamlet Road 




















Anerley 


97 


229 


16 


342 


53 


163 


50 


266 


608 


Total . 


355 


532 


275 


1,162 


280 


490 


175 


945 


2,107 



Church of England Missions 



St. John's Parochial Hall, 




















Maple Road 










51 


125 


55 


231 


231 


Holy Trinity Mission, Mel- 




















vin Road .... 










10 


27 


86 


123 


123 


Christ Church Miss., Green 




















Lane 


4 


1 


51 


56 


4 


18 


8 


30 


86 


Total .... 


4 


1 


51 


56 


65 


170 


149 


384 


440 



BAPTIST CHURCH 



Baptist Tabernacle 



138 172 133 443 159 287 56 502 945 



CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 



Anerley Road, Anerley . 92 



106 62 



260 



99 



122 



21 242 



502 



WESLEYAN METHODIST CHURCH 



Station Road, Anerley 



128 



117 108 



353 



178 



211 



74 



463 



816 



PRIMITIVE METHODIST CHURCH 



Mosslea Road, Penge 



28 18 23 69 33 52 31 116 185 



NEW JERUSALEM CHURCH 



^Valdegrave Road, Anerley 13 16 10 39 17 29 2 48 87 

388 



GREATER LONDON— PENGE 

BRETHREN 



389 



CHURCH. 


MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 

for the 

Day. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women, j Chldrn. 


Total. 


Green Lane Hall, Penge . 


22 


21 


13 


56 


20 


17 10 


47 


103 



SALVATION ARMY 



Citadel, Maple Road . 



75 



43 I 63 181 141 229 171 541 



722 



ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH 



Holy Child and St. Anthony 
of Padua, Genoa Road 



60 



107 



21".) 



16 I 35 15 



66 285 



DENOMINATIONAL TOTALS 



DENOMINATION. 


MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 

for the 

Day. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 1 Total. 


Church of England 

„ „ Missions 
Baptist Church . 
Congregational Church 
Wesleyan Meth. Church 
Primitive Meth. Church 
New Jerusalem Church 
Brethren 

Salvation Army . 
Roman Catholic Church 


355 

4 
138 
92 
128 
28 
13 
22 
75 
60 


532 

1 

172 

106 

117 

18 

16 

21 

43 

107 


275 
51 

133 
62 

108 
23 
10 
13 
63 
52 


1,162 

56 

443 

260 

353 

69 

39 

56 

181 

219 


280 

65 
159 

99 
178 

33 

1 17 

• 20 

141 

16 


490 

170 

287 

122 

211 

52 

29 

17 

229 

35 


175 

149 

56 

21 

74 

31 

2 

10 

171 

15 


945 

384 

502 

242 

463 

116 

48 

47 

541 

66 


2,107 
440 
945 
502 
816 
185 
87 
103 
722 
285 


Grand Totals . 


915 


1,133 


790 


2,838 


1,008 


1,642 


704 


3,354 


6,192 



District of Beckenhani 



CHURCH OP ENGLAND 



CHURCH. 


MORNING. 




EVENING. 




Total 

for the 

Day. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldm. 


Total. 


Clirist Church 


92 


198 


60 


350 


95 


223 


40 


358 


708 


iH. Barnabas', Oakwood Av. 


37 


65 


62 


164 


30 


59 


33 


122 


286 


St. George's, High Street . 


132 


227 


128 


487 


1 139 


268 


46 


453 


940 


St. Paul's, New Beckenham 


84 


124 


53 


261 


1 49 


60 


13 


122 


383 


Holy Trinity, Cator Road . 


149 


293 


128 


570 


286 


495 


61 


842 


; 1,412 


St. Mai-y's, Shortlands 


82 


134 


Ol 


273 


34 


56 


28 


118 


1 391 


St. James', Elmer's End 


18 


28 


43 


89 


14 


29 


23 


66 


1 155 


St. Michael and All Angels', 




















Ravenscroft Road . 


88 


129 


156 


373 


69 


164 


61 


294 


667 


Total .... 


682 


1,198 


687 


2,567 


716 


1,354 


305 


2,375 


4,942 



Church of England Missions 



Holy Trinity, Mosslea Road 
St. George's, Artliur Road . 
St. Mary's, Shortlands 

Total . . . . 



2 




22 


24 


14 


40 


15 


69 


7 


3 


47 


57 


26 


52 


45 


123 










12 


18 


84 


114 


9 


3 


69 


81 


52 


110 


144 


306 



93 

180 
114 



387 



BAPTIST CHURCH 



Elm Road 



105 



145 



338 



159 



275 



35 



469 



807 



CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 



Crescent Road 

Langley Road, Elmer's End 


96 
31 


137 
15 


132 
42 


365 

88 


94 
44 


110 
68 


10 
41 


214 
153 


579 
241 


Total .... 


127 


152 


174 


453 


138 


178 


51 


367 


820 



Congregational Mission 



Shortlands 



34 



36 



14 



34 



15 



63 



99 



Bromley Road 



WESLEYAN METHODIST CHURCH 



31 


54 


30 


115 


29 


57 


5 


91 



206 



BRETHREN 



Public Hall, High Street 
Clock House Hall 

Total . 



16 
3 


11 

7 


1 


28 
10 


19 
9 


34 
25 


4 


57 
40 


19 


18 


1 


38 


28 


59 


10 


97 



390 



85 

50 



135 



GEEATER LONDON— BECKENHAM 

ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH 



39X 



CHURCH. 




MORNING. 






EVENING. 




Total 

for the 

Day. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Church of the Transfigura- 
tion, Wickham Road 


21 


44 


5 


70 


11 


16 


27 


97 



OTHER SERVICES 



Mission Hall, Arthur Road 
Old Beckenham Mission, 
Bromley Road . 










25 
21 


32 
30 


56 
8 


113 
59 


113 
59 


Total .... 










46 


62 


64 


172 


172 



DENOMINATIONAL TOTALS 



DENOMINATION. 


MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 

for the 

Day. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Church of England 

„ „ Missions 
Baptist Church 
Congregational Church 
„ Mission 
Wesleyan Meth. Church 
Brethren 

Koman Catholic Church 
Other Services 


682 

9 

105 

127 

1 

31 

19 

21 


1,198 
3 

145 

152 

1 

54 

18 

44 


687 

69 

88 

174 

34 

30 

1 

5 


2,567 

81 

338 

453 

36 

115 

38 

70 


716 
52 
159 
138 
14 
29 
28 
11 
46 


1,354 

110 

275 

178 

34 

57 

59 

16 

62 


305 
144 
35 
51 
15 
5 
10 

*64 


2,375 

306 

469 

367 

63 

91 

97 

27 

172 


4,942 
387 
807 
820 
99 
206 
135 
97 
172 


Grand Totals . 


995 


1,615 


1,088 


3,698 


1,193 


2,145 


629 


3,967 


7,665 



District of Bromley 



CHURCH OP ENGLAND 



CHURCH. 


MORNING. 


EVENING, 


Total 

for the 

Day. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldvn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Parish Church, Church Road 


192 


300 


127 


619 


278 


550 


70 


898 


1,517 


St. Mark's, Westmoreland 




















Road 


54 


105 


90 


249 


44 


79 


35 


158 


407 


St. John's, Park Road . 


66 


137 


120 


323 


86 


227 


43 


356 


679 


St. Luke's, Bromley Common 


85 


129 


245 


459 


101 


154 


40 


295 


754 


Holy Trinity, Bromley 




















Common .... 


54 


47 


82 


183 


49 


72 


42 


163 


346 


St. George's, Bickley . 


78 


132 


108 


318 


58 


99 


42 


199 


517 


Christ Church, Bromley Pk. 


41 


30 


9 


80 


18 


39 


10 


67 


147 


St. Mary's, College Road . 


106 


234 


97 


437 


105 


151 


32 


288 


725 


Total .... 


676 


1,114 


878 


2,668 


739 


1,371 


314 


2,424 


5,092 





Church of England Missione 










Widmore Mission, Nightin- 




















gale Lane .... 


12 


24 


129 


165 


40 


61 


40 


141 


306 


Parish Institute, St. Mary's, 




















Plaistow .... 






... 




34 


80 


56 


170 


170 


jNIission Room, Farwig Lane 










6 


13 


17 


36 


36 


Christ Church Hall, High- 


















land Road 


1 


1 


54 56 










56 


Total .... 


13 


25 


183 221 


80 


154 


113 


347 


568 



BAPTIST CHURCH 



Park Road .... 
Gravel Road, Bromley Com- 
mon 

College Slip, Bromley . 


51 

13 
10 


103 

14 
12 


81 

19 
1 


235 

46 
23 


81 

18 
14 


169 

32 
25 


128 

2 
2 


378 

52 
41 


613 

98 
64 


Total .... 


74 


129 


101 


304 


113 


226 


132 


471 


775 



Baptist Mission 



Salisbury Road, Bromley 
Common .... 



3 


3 


58 64 


10 


10 


21 


41 



CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 



Widmore Road 



190 


250 


46 


486 


150 


211 


24 


385 



WESLEYAN METHODIST CHURCH 



High Street . 
Tylney Road 

Total . 



43 
35 

78 



130 



44 

80 


175 
157 


48 
47 


79 
96 


6 

58 


133 
201 


124 


332 


95 


175 


64 


334 



392 



GREATER LONDON— BROMLEY 



393 



Wesleyan Methodist Missions 



CHURCH. 


MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 

for the 

Day. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldm. 


Tota). 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldm. 


Total. 


Farwig Lane 

Keston 


57 
3 


83 
5 


166 
36 


306 
44 


64 

7 


212 
13 


44 
5 


320 
25 


626 
69 


Total .... 


60 


88 


202 


350 


71 


225 


49 


345 


695 



PBIMITIVE METHODIST CHURCH 



Bloomfield Road 



31 



27 



46 



104 



33 



22 



62 



166 



PRESBYTERIAM" CHURCH 



Freeland's Road 



60 



110 



37 



207 



76 



156 



19 251 



458 



BRETHREN 



Hall, East Street . 
Hall, Freeland's Grove 
Hall, Sherman's Road . 

Total . 



35 



54 



20 


10 


30 


6 


46 


42 


21 


26 


4 


51 


35 


8 


12 




20 


97 


39 


68 


10 


117 



66 
93 
55 



214 



SALVATION ARMY 



Hall, Walter's Yard, High 
Street . . . . 



23 



18 



19 



60 



48 



53 



107 



167 



ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH 



St. Joseph's, Plaistow Lane 



33 



15 



136 



14 



41 



177 



OTHER SERVICES 



Iron Room, Great Elm Road 
London City Mission, Chat- 
terton Road 


4 
3 


8 
4 


59 
92 


71 
99 


56 49 
18 43 


15 
39 


120 
100 


191 
199 


Total .... 


7 


12 


151 


170 


74 


92 


54 


220 


390 



DENOMINATIONAL 


TOTALS 








DENOMINATION. 


MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 

fov the 

Day. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldin. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Church of England 


676 


1,114 


878 


2,668 


739 


1,371 


314 


2,424 


5,092 


„ „ Missions 


13 


25 


183 


221 


80 


154 


113 


347 


568 


Baptist Church 


74 


129 


101 


304 


113 


226 


132 


471 


775 


„ Mission . 


3 


3 


58 


64 


10 


10 


21 


41 


105 


Congregational Church 
Wesleyan Meth. Church 


190 


250 


46 


486 


150 


211 


24 


385 


871 


78 


130 


124 


332 


95 


175 


64 


334 


666 


„ „ Missions 


60 


88 


202 


350 


71 


225 


49 


345 


695 


Primitive Meth. Church 


31 


27 


46 


104 


33 


22 


7 


62 


166 


Presbyterian Church . 


60 


110 


37 


207 


76 


156 


19 


251 


458 


Brethren 


35 


54 


8 


97 


39 


68 


10 


117 


214 


Salvation Army . 


23 


18 


19 


60 


48 


53 


6 


107 


167 


Roman Catholic Church 


33 


88 


15 


136 


14 


27 




41 


177 


Other Services 


7 


12 


151 


170 


74 


92 


54 


220 


390 


Grand Totals . 


1,283 


2,048 


1,868 


5,199 


1,542 


2,790 


813 


5,145 


10,344 



District of Chislehurst 



CHURCH OF ENGLAND 





MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 




Men. 


Women. 


Chldm. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldm. 


Total. 


Day. 


St. Nicholas' 

Chribt Ch. , Lower Camden . 

Church of the Annunciation, 

West Chislehurst 
St. John theBaptist's.Mill PI. 


61 
71 

78 
35 


155 
132 

110 
96 


69 

85 

210 
47 


285 
288 

398 
178 


93 
51 

48 
46 


118 

88 

121 
101 


6 

25 

48 

27 


217 
164 

217 
174 


502 
452 

615 
352 


Total .... 


245 


493 


411 


1,149 


238 


428 


106 


772 


1,921 



WESLEYAN METHODIST CHURCH 



Chislehurst Common 



52 


59 


54 


165 


54 


92 


18 


164 



329 



SALVATION ARMY 



White Horse Hill 



10 



8 21 



21 



ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH 



St. Mary's, Crown Lane 



20 35 14 69 



20 89 



DENOMINATIONAL TOTALS 





MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 




Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldm. 


Total. 


Day. 


Church of England 
Wesleyan Meth. Church 
Salvation Army . 
Roman Catholic Church 


245 
52 

20 


493 
59 

35 


411 
54 

14 


1,149 
165 

69 


238 

54 

3 

7 


428 
92 
10 

7 


106 

18 

8 

6 


772 

164 

21 

20 


1,921 

329 

21 

89 


Grand Totals . 


317 


587 


479 


1,383 


302 


537 


138 


977 


2,360 



394 



District of Enfield 



CHURCH OF ENGLAND 



CHURCH. 


MORNING. 


EVENING. 


Total 
for the 




















Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Chldrn. 


Total. 


Day. 


St. Andrew's, Market Place 


69 


174 


216 


459 


142 


268 


82 


492 


951 


St. Michael's, Chase Side . 


44 


52 


142 


238 


60 


100 


60 


220 


458 


St. John the Baptist's, Clay 




















Hill . . . . . 


30 


40