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Full text of "Remains, historical & literary, connected with the palatine counties of Lancaster and Chester"

ESTABLISHED 




-' 









M.DCCC.XLIII. 



FOR THE PUBLICATION F 

HISTORICAL AND LITERARY REMAINS 

CONNECTED WITH THE PALATINE COUNTIES OF 

LANCASTER AND CHESTER 



JAMES CROSSLEY, ESQ., F.S.A. 



THE REV. F. R. RAINES, M.A., F.S.A., Hon. Canon of Manchester, Vicar of 
Milnrow, and Rural Dean. 

Council. 

WILLIAM BEAMONT, ESQ. 

THE VERY REV. GEORGE HULL BOWERS, D.D., Dean of Manchester. 
THE REV. THOMAS CORSER, M.A., F.S.A., Rector of Stand, and Rural 

Dean of Prestwich. 
JOHN HARLAND, F.S.A. 
EDWARD HAWKINS, F.R.S., F.S.A.. F.L.S. 
THOMAS HEY WOOD, F.S.A. 
WILLIAM ADAM HULTON, ESQ. 
EGERTON LEIGH, ESQ. 

THE REV. JOHN HOWARD MARSDEN, B.D., Canon of Manchester. 
THE REV. JAMES RAINE, M.A., Preb. of York, Fellow of Durham University. 



ARTHUR II. HEYWOOD, ESQ. 



WILLIAM LANGTON, ESQ. 



RULES OF THE CHETHAM SOCIETY. 

1. That the Society shall be limited to three hundred and fifty members. 

2. That the Society shall consist of members being subscribers of one pound annually, such subscrip- 
tion to be paid in advance, on or before the day of general meeting in each year. The first general meeting 
to be held on the 23rd day of March, 1843, and the general meeting in each year afterwards on the 1st day 
of March, unless it should fall on a Sunday, when some other day is to be named by the Council. 

3. That the affairs of the Society be conducted by a Council, consisting of a permanent President and 
Vice-President, and twelve other members, including a Treasurer and Secretary, all of whom shall be 
elected, the first two at the general meeting next after a vacancy shall occur, and the twelve other 
members at the general meeting annually. 

4. That any member may compound for his future subscriptions by the payment of ten pounds. 

5. That the accounts of the receipts and expenditure of the Society be audited annually, by three 
luditors, to be elected at the general meeting; and that any member who shall be one year in arrear of 
iis subscription, shall no longer bo considered as belonging to the Society. 

6. That every member not in arrear of his annual subscription, be entitled to a copy of each of the 
rorks published by the Society. 

7. That twenty copies of each work shall be allowed to the editor of the same, in addition to the 
ne to which he may bo entitled as a member. 

Applications and communications to be addressed to the PRESIDENT, 6, Booth Street, Piccadilly, 
[anchester, or to the HONORARY SECRETARY, Manchester and Salford Bank, Motley Street, Manchester. 



$uirttcatton nf tfie Cfietjam 



For the Year 1843-4. 

VOL. 

I. Travels in Holland, the United Provinces, England, Scotland, and Ireland, 1634-1635. By Sir 
William Brereton, Bart. Edited by EDWARD HAWKINS, Esq., F.R.S., F.S.A., F.L.S. pp. viii, 206. 

II. Tracts relating to Military Proceedings in Lancashire during the Great Civil War. Edited and 
Illustrated from Contemporary Documents by GEORGE ORMEUOD, D.C.L., F.R.S., F.S.A., F.G.S., 
author of " The History of Cheshire." pp. xxxii, 372. 

III. Chester's Triumph in Honor of her Prince, as it was performed upon St. George's Day 1610, in 
the foresaid Citie. Reprinted from the original edition of 1610, with an Introduction and Notes. 
Edited by the Rev. THOMAS CORSER, M.A. pp. xviii, 36. 

1844-5. 

IV. The Life of Adam Martindale, written by himself, and now first printed from the original manu- 
script in the British Museum. Edited by the Rev. RICHARD PARKINSON, B.D., Canon of Manchester. 
pp. xvi, 246. 

V. Lancashire Memorials of the Rebellion, 1715. By SAMUEL HIBBERT-WARK, M.D., F.R.S.E., &c. 
pp. x, 56, and xxviii, 292. 

VI. Potts's Discovery of Witches in the county of Lancaster. Reprinted from the original edition of 
1613 ; with an Introduction and Notes by JAMES CROSSLEY, Esq. pp. Ixxx, 184, 52. 

1845-6. 

VII. Iter Lancastrense, a Poem written A.D. 1636, by the Rev. Richard James. Edited by the Rev. 
THOMAS CORSER, M.A. pp. cxii, 86. Folding Pedigree. 

VIII. Notitia Cestriensis, or Historical Notices of the Diocese of Chester, by Bishop Gastrell. Cheshire. 
Edited by the Rev. F. R. RAINES, M.A., F.S.A. Vol. I. pp. xvi, 396. Plate. 

IX. The Norris Papers. Edited by THOMAS HEYWOOD, Esq., F.S.A. pp. xxxiv, 190. 

1846-7. 

X. The Coucher Book or Chartulary of Whalley Abbey. Edited by W. A. HULTON, Esq. Vol. I. 
pp. xl, 338. Plate. 

XI. The Coucher Book or Chartulary of Whalley Abbey. Vol. II. pp. 339-636. 

XII . The Moore Rental. Edited by THOMAS HEYWOOD, Esq., F.S.A. pp. Ixx, 158. 



Publications of the_ Chetham Society. 3 

1847-8. 

VOL. 

XIII. The Diary and Correspondence of Dr. John Worthington. Edited by JAS. CROSSLEY, Esq. Vol. I. 
pp. viii, 398. 

XIV . The Journal of Nicholas Assheton. Edited by the Rev. F. R. RAINES, M.A., F.S.A. pp. xxx, 164. 

XV. The Holy Lyfe and History of Saynt Werburge, very frutefull for all Christen People to rede. 
Edited by EDWARD HAWKINS, Esq. pp. xxviii, 10, 242. 



-9- 

XVI. The Coucher Book or Chartulary of Whalley Abbey. Vol. III. pp. xli-liv, 637-936. 

XVII. Warrington in 1465. Edited by WILLIAM BEAMONT, Esq. pp. Ixxviii, 152. 

XVIII. The Diary of the Rev. Henry Newcome, from September 30, 1661, to September 29, 1663. 
Edited by THOMAS HEYWOOD, Esq., F.S.A. pp. xl, 242. 

1849-50. 

XIX. Notitia Cestriensis. Vol. II. Part I. Lancashire, Part 1. pp. iv, 160, xxviii. 

XX. The Coucher Book or Chartulary of Whalley Abbey. Vol. IV. (Conclusion}, pp. Iv-lxiii, 937- 
1314. 

XXI. Notitia Cestriensis. Vol. II. Part II. Lancashire, Part II. pp. Ixxvii, 161-352. Plate. 

1850-1. 

XXII. Notitia Cestriensis. Vol. II. Part III. Lancashire, Part III. (Conclusion), pp. 353-621. 

XXIII. A Golden Mirrour ; conteininge certaine pithie and figurative visions prognosticating good 
fortune to England, &c. By Richard Robinson of Alton. Reprinted from the only known copy of 
the original edition of 1589 in the British Museum, with an Introduction and Notes by the Rev. 
THOMAS CORSER, M.A., F.S.A. pp. xxii, 10, 96. 

XXIV. Chetham Miscellanies. Vol. I. Edited by WILLIAM LANGTON, Esq. : containing 

Papers connected with the affairs of Milton and his Family. Edited by J. F. MARSH, Esq. pp 46. 
Plate. 

Epistolary Reliques of Lancashire and Cheshire Antiquaries, 1653-73. Communicated by GEORGE 
ORMEROD, D.C.L., F.R.S., F.S.A., and F.G.S. pp. 16. 

Calendars of the Names of Families which entered their several Pedigrees in the successive 
Heraldic Visitations of the County Palatine of Lancaster. Communicated by GEORGE ORMEROD, 
D.C.L., F.R.S., F.S.A., and F.G.S. pp. 26. 

A Fragment, illustrative of Sir Wm. Dugdale's V isitation of Lancashire. From MSS. in the 
possession of the Rev. F. R. RAINES, M.A., F.S.A. pp. 8. 

1851-2. 

XXV. Cardinal Allen's Defence of Sir William Stanley's Surrender of Deventer. Edited by THOMAS 
HEYWOOD, Esq., F.S.A. pp. c, 38. 

XXVI. The Autobiography of Henry Newcome, M.A. Edited by RD. PARKINSON, D.D.,F.S.A. Vol.1. 
pp. xxv, 184. 

XXVII. The Autobiography of Henry Newcome, M.A. Vol. II. (Conclusion}, pp. 185-390. 



4 Publications of the Chetham Society. 

1852-3. 

VOL. 

XXVIII. The Jacobite Trials at Manchester in 1694. Edited by WILLIAM BEAMONT, Esq. pp.xc, 132. 

XXIX. The Stanley Papers, Part I. The Earls of Derby and the Verse Writers and Poets of the six- 
teenth and seventeenth centuries. By THOMAS HEYWOOD, Esq., F.S.A. pp. 64. 

XXX. Documents relating to the Priory of Penwortham, and other Possessions in Lancashire of the 
Abbey of Evesham. Edited by W. A HULTON, Esq. pp. Ixxviii, 136. 



1853-4. 

XXXI. The Stanley Papers, Part II. The Derby Household Books, comprising an account of the 
Household Regulations and Expenses of Edward and Henry, third and fourth Earls of Derby ; 
together with a Diary, containing the names of the guests who visited the latter Earl at his houses 
in Lancashire : by William Farrington, Esq., the Comptroller. Edited by the Rev. F. R. RAINES, 
M.A., F.S.A. pp. xcviii, 247. Five Plates. 

XXXII. The Private Journal and Literary Remains of John Byrom. Edited by RICHARD PARKINSON, 
D.D., F.S.A. Vol. I. Part I. pp. x, 320. Portrait. 

XXXIII. Lancashire and Cheshire Wills and Inventories from the Ecclesiastical Court, Chester. 
The First Portion. Edited by the Rev. G. J. PICCOPE, M.A. pp. vi, 196. 



XXXIV. The Private Journal and Literary Remains of John Byrom. Vol. I. Part II. pp. 321-639. 

XXXV. The House and Farm Accounts of the Shuttleworths of Gawthorpe Hall . Edited by JOHN 
HARLAND, Esq., F.S.A. Part I. pp. 232. Frontispiece. 

XXVI. The Diary and Correspondence of Dr. John Worthington. Vol. II. Part I. pp. 248. 



1855-6. 

XXXVII. Chetham Miscellanies. Vol. II. Edited by WILLIAM LANGTON, Esq. : containing 

The Rights and Jurisdiction of the County Palatine of Chester, the Earls Palatine, the Chamber- 
lain, and other Officers. Edited by JOSEPH BROOKS YATES, F.A.S., G.S., and P.S. pp. 37. 

The Scottish Field. (A Poem on the Battle of Flodden.) Edited by JOHN ROBSON, Esq. pp. xv, 28. 

Examynatyons towcheynge Cokeye More, Temp. Hen. VIII. in a dispute between the Lords of the 
Manors of Middleton and Radclyffe. Communicated by the Rev. F. R. RAINES, M.A., F.S.A. pp. 30. 

A History of the Ancient Chapel of Denton, in Manchester Parish. By the Rev. JOHN BOOKER, 
M.A., F.S.A. ^.viii,148. Three Plates. 

A Letter from John Bradshawe of Gray's Inn to Sir Peter Legh of Lyme. Edited by WILLIAM 
LANGTON, Esq. pp. &. 

Facsimile of a Deed of Richard Bussel to Church of Evesham (for insertion in vol. xxx,). 

XXXVIII. Bibliographical Notices of the Church Libraries of Turton and Gorton bequeathed by 
Humphrey Chetham. Edited by GILBERT J. FRENCH, Esq. pp. 199. Illustrated Title. 

XXXIX. The Farington Papers. Edited by Miss FFARINGTON. pp. xvi, 179. Five plates of Signatures. 



Publications of the Chetham Society. 5 

1856-7. 

VOL. 

XL. The Private Journal and Literary Remains of John Byrom. Vol. II. Part I. pp. 326 and two 

Indexes. 

XLI, The House and Farm Accounts of the Shuttleworths of Gawthorpe Hall. Part II. pp. 233-472. 
Portrait. 

XLII. A History of the Ancient Chapels of Didsbury and Chorlton, in Manchester Parish, including 
Sketches of the Townships of Didsbury, Withington, Burnage, Heaton Norris, Reddish, Levenshulme, 
and Chorlton-cum-Hardy: together with Notices of the more Ancient Local Families, and Particulars 
relating to the Descent of their Estates. By the Rev. JOHN BOOKER, M.A., F.S.A. pp. viii, 337; 
Seven Illustrations. 



1857-8. 

XLIII. The House and Farm Accounts of the Shuttleworths of Gawthorpe Hall. Part III. . x, 
473-776. 

XLIV. The Private Journal and Literary Remains of John Byrom. Vol. II. Part II. pp. 327-654. 
Byrom Pedigrees, pp. 41 and three folding sheets; Index, pp. v. 

XLV. Miscellanies : being a selection from the Poems and Correspondence of the Rev. Thos. Wilson, 
B.D., of Clitheroe. With Memoirs of his Life. By the Rev. CANON RAINES, M.A., F.S.A. . xc, 
230. Two Plates. 



1858-9. 

XLVI. The House and Farm Accounts of the Shuttleworths of Gawthorpe Hall. Part IV. ( Con- 
clusion), pp. 777-1171. 

XLVII. A History of the Ancient Chapel of Birch, in Manchester Parish, including a Sketch of the 
Township of Rusholme : together with Notices of the more Ancient Local Families, and Particulars 
relating to the Descent of their Estates. By the Rev. JOHN BOOKER, M.A., F.S.A. pp. viii, 255. 
Four Plates. 

XL VIII. A Catalogue of the Collection of Tracts for and against Popery (published in or about the 
reign of James II.) in the Manchester Library founded by Humphrey Chetham; in which is 
incorporated, with large Additions and Bibliographical Notes, the whole of Peck's List of the 
Tracts in that Controversy, with his References. Edited by THOMAS JONES, Esq. B.A. Part I. 
pp. xii, 256. 



1859-60. 



XLIX. The Lancashire Lieutenancy under the Tudors and Stuarts. The Civil and Military Govern- 
ment of the County, as illustrated by a series of Royal and other Letters; Orders of the Privy Council, 
the Lord Lieutenant, and other Authorities, &c., &c. Chiefly derived from the Shuttleworth MSS. 
at Gawthorpe Hall, Lancashire. Edited by JOHN HARLAND, Esq., F.S.A. Part I. pp. cxx, 96. 
Seven Plates. 

L. The Lancashire Lieutenancy under the Tudors and Stuarts. Part II. (Conclusion), pp. 97-333. 

LI. Lancashire and Cheshire Wills and Inventories from the Ecclesiastical Court, Chester. The Second 
Portion, pp. vi, 283. 



6 Publications of tJie Chetham Society. 

1860-1. 

VOL. 

LII. Collectanea Anglo- Poetica : or, A Bibliographical and Descriptive Catalogue of a portion of a Col- 
lection of Early English Poetry, with occasional Extracts and Remarks Biographical and Critical. 
By the Rev. THOMAS CORSER, M.A., F.S.A., Rural Dean; Rector of Stand, Lancashire; and Vicar 
of Norton, Northamptonshire. Part I. pp. xi, 208. 

LIII. Mamecestre: being Chapters from the early recorded History of the Barony, the Lordship or 
Manor, the Vill Borough or Town, of Manchester. Edited by JOHN HARLAND, Esq., F.S.A. Vol. I. 
pp. 207. Frontispiece. 

LIV. Lancashire and Cheshire Wills and Inventories from the Ecclesiastical Court, Chester. The Third 
Portion. (Conclusion), pp. v, 272. 

1861-2. 

LV. Collectanea Anglo-Poetica. Part II. pp. vi, 209-456. 
LVI. Mamecestre. Vol. II. pp. 209-431. 

LVII. Chetham Miscellanies. Vol. III. Edited by WILLIAM LANGTON, Esq. : containing 

On the South Lancashire Dialect, with Biographical Notices of John Collier, the author of Tim 
Bobbin. By THOS. HEYWOOD, Esq. pp. 84. 

Rentale de Cokersand : being the Bursar's Rent Roll of the Abbey of Cokersand, in the County 
Palatine of Lancaster, for the year 1501. Printed from the Original. Edited by the Rev. F. R. 
RAINES, M.A., F.S.A. pp. xviii, 46. 

The Names of all the Gentlemen of the best callinge w th in the countye of Lancastre, whereof choyse 
ys to be made of a c'ten number to lend vnto her Ma'?" moneye vpon privie seals in Janvarye 1588. 
From a manuscript in the possession of the Rev. F. R. RAINES, M.A., F.S.A. pp. 9. 

Some Instruction given by William Booth Esquire to his stewards John Carington and William 
Rowcrofte, upon the purchase of Warrington by Sir George Booth Baronet and William Booth his 
son, A.D. MDCXVIII. Communicated by WILLIAM BEAMONT, Esq. pp. 8. 

Letter from Sir John Seton, Manchester y e 25 M'ch, 1643. Edited by THOMAS HEYWOOD, Esq., 
F.S.A. pp.15. 

The Names of eight hundred inhabitants of Manchester who took the oath of allegiance to Charles 
II. in April, 1679. Communicated by JOHN HARLAND, F.S.A. pp. 8. 

The Pole Booke of Manchester, May y e 22 d 1690. Edited by WILLIAM LANGTON, Esq. pp. 43. 
Hap jand folding Table. 



1862-3. 



LVIII. Mamecestre. Vol. III. (Conclusion.) pp. xl, 433-627. 

LIX. A History of the Chantries within the County Palatine of Lancaster : being the Reports of the 
Royal Commissioners of Henry VIII., Edward VI., and Queen Mary. Edited by the Rev. F. R. 
RAINES, M.A., F.S.A. Vol. I. pp. xxxix, 168. 

LX. A History of the Chantries within the County Palatine of Lancaster, &c. Vol. II. (Conclusion), 
pp. 169-323. 



1863-4. 



General Index to the Remains Historical and Literary published by the Chetham Society, vols.I-XXX. 
pp. viii, 168. 

LXI. I. Abbott's Journal. II. An Account of the Tryalls &c. in Manchester in 1694. Edited by the 
Rt. Rev. ALEXANDER Goss, D.D. ^.xix, 32; xxi, 42; 5. 

LXII. Discourse of the Warr in Lancashire. Edited by WILLIAM BEAMONT, Esq. pp. xxxiv, 164. 
Two Plates. 



Publications of tlie Chetham Society. 7 

1864-5. 

VOL. 

LXIII. A Volume of Court Leet Records of the Manor of Manchester in the Sixteenth Century. 
Compiled and edited by JOHN HARLAND, F.S.A. pp. xix, 208. Frontispiece. 

LXIV. A Catalogue of the Collection of Tracts for and against Popery, Part II. To which are added 
an Index to the Tracts in both editions of Gibson's Preservative, and a reprint of Dodd's Certamen, 
Utriusque Ecclesise. Edited by THOMAS JONES, Esq. B.A. pp. x, 269, 17. 

LXV. Continuation of the Court Leet Records of the Manor of Manchester, A.D. 1586-1602. By JOHN 
HARLAND, Esq. pp. viii, 128. 

1865-6. 

LXVI. The Stanley Papers. Part III. Private Devotions and Miscellanies of James seventh earl of 
Derby, K.G., with a Prefatory Memoir and Appendix of Documents. Edited by the Rev. CANON 
RAINES, M.A., F.S.A. Vol.1, pp. i-ccviii. Four Plates. 

LXVII. The Stanley Papers. Part III. Vol. 2. pp. ccix-cccxcv. Four Plates. 

LXVIII. Collectanea relating to Manchester and its Neighbourhood, at various periods. Compiled 
arranged and edited by JOHN HARLAND, F.S.A. Vol. I. pp. viii, 258. 

1866-7. 

LXIX. The Admission Register of the Manchester School, with some Notices of the more distinguished 
Scholars. Edited by the Rev. JEREMIAH FINCH SMITH, M.A., Rector of Aldridge, Staffordshire, 
and Rural Dean. Vol. I., from A.D. 1730 to A.D. 1775. pp. viii, 253. 

LXX. The Stanley Papers. Part III. Vol. 3. (Conclusion.; pp. 112 and 65. Frontispiece. 
LXXI. Collectanea Anglo-Poetica. Part III. pp. x, 282. 

1867-8. 

LXXII. Collectanea relating to Manchester and its Neighbourhood. Vol. II. pp. viii, 252. 

LXXIII. The Admission Register of the Manchester School, with some Notices of the more dis- 
tinguished Scholars. Edited by the Rev. JEREMIAH FINCH SMITH, M.A., Rector of Aldridge, 
Staffordshire, and Rural Dean. Vol. II., from A.D. 1776 to A.D. 1807. pp. v, 302. 

LXXIV Three Lancashire Documents of the Fourteenth and Fifteenth Centuries, namely : I. The 
Great De Lacy Inquisition, Feb. 16, 1311. II. Survey of 1320-1346. III. Custom Roll and Rental 
of the Manor of Ashton-under-Lyne, 1421. Edited by JOHN HARLAND, Esq., F.S.A. pp. xih, 140. 



C/uvlcs Simms and Co., Prin/ers, Manchester. 



REMAINS 



HISTORICAL & LITERARY 



CONNECTED WITH THE PALATINE COUNTIES OF 



LANCASTER AND CHESTER. 



PUBLISHED BY 



THE CHETHAM SOCIETY. 



VOL. LXXIV. 



PRINTED FOR THE CHETHAM SOCIETY. 
M.DCCC.LXVm. 



r 

..y 



JAN 0.6 .1989. 

^u. 




Sfi 



i\%5 




COUNCIL FOB 1867-8. 

JAMES CROSSLEY, ESQ., F.S.A., PRESIDENT. 

REV. F. R. RAINES, M.A., F.S.A., HON. CANON OF MANCHESTER, 

VICE-PRESIDENT. 
WILLIAM BEAMONT. 

THE VERY REV. GEORGE HULL BOWERS, D.D., DEAN OF MANCHESTER. 
REV. THOMAS CORSER, M.A., F.S.A. 
JOHN HARLAND, F.S.A. 
EDWARD HAWKINS, F.R.S., F.S.A., F.L.S. 
THOMAS HEYWOOD, F.S.A. 
W. A. HULTON. 
EGERTON LEIGH, JUN. 
REV. JOHN HOWARD MARSDEN, B.D., CANON OF MANCHESTER, 

DISNEY PROFESSOR OP CLASSICAL ANTIQUITIES, CAMBRIDGE. 
REV. JAMES RAINE, M.A. 
ARTHUR H. HEYWOOD, TREASURER. 
WILLIAM LANGTON, HON. SECRETARY. 




THREE LANCASHIRE 
DOCUMENTS 

OF THE 

FOURTEENTH AND FIFTEENTH 
CENTURIES, 

COMPRISING 

I. THE GREAT DE LACY INQUISITION, FEB. 16, 1311. 
II. THE SURVEY OF 1320-1346. 

III. CUSTOM ROLL AND RENTAL OF THE 

MANOR OF ASHTON-UNDER-LYNE, 

NOVEMBER n, 1422. 



EDITED BY 

JOHN HARLAND, F.S.A. 



PRINTED FOR THE CHETHAM SOCIETY. 
M.DCCC.LXVIII. 



INTRODUCTION. 



UNDER the feudal system, as developed in England 
from the period of the Norman conquest, all land 
was held directly or indirectly of the king, who was the 
supreme lord of all the territory of the kingdom. When 
the king granted a tract of land to any noble, or knight, 
he required that certain services should be rendered to 
him in return. These services being usually military, 
the contribution of men and arms and horses to the king 
in his wars, it became necessary from time to time that 
the king should know the quantity and quality of the 
land, and the amount of service renderable, in respect of 
every holding of land throughout his kingdom. The means 
of ascertaining these particulars, though various, were to 
some extent alike in their general principle and their orga- 
nization of machinery. A general survey throughout the 
kingdom being commanded, it was effected by certain high 
commissioners, few in number, calling to their aid the chief 
functionaries in counties, the earls or counts, and the 
sheriffs ; and these in turn apportioned out the task among 
the hundredors of each wapentake or hundred ; these again 
subdividing the labour ; so that ultimately the great survey 



IV INTRODUCTION. 

was effected by an aggregation of juries of inquiry in every 
lordship or manor, nay even in every village throughout the 
land. Such was the character of the great Survey of all the 
lands throughout England, made twenty years after the 
Norman conquest, and commonly known as the Domesday 
Survey, which was completed in the year 1086, and has 
remained ever since the oldest register extant of the value, 
tenure and services of the lands therein described. It is 
stated by an old chronicler 1 that William the Conqueror 
caused this surrey to be made in imitation of the policy of 
Alfred the Great, who, at the time he divided the kingdom 
into counties, hundreds and tithings, had inquisition taken 
and digested into a register, called, from the place in which 
it was deposited, the Roll of Winchester. However this 
may be, we find that the task of making the great Norman 
survey of England was entrusted to four commissioners, 
styled the king's justiciaries, who seem to have associated 
with themselves some principal person or persons in each 
shire. The inquisitors were to inquire, upon the oaths of 
the sheriffs of counties, the lords of each manor, the pres- 
byters or priests of every church, the reeves of every 
hundred, the bailiffs and six villeins of every village, into 
the name of the place; who held it in the time of king 
Edward the Confessor ; who was the present possessor ; how 
many hides of land there were in the manor; how many 
carucates, carves or plough-lands in demesne; how many 
homagers ; how many villeins ; how many cotarii ; how many 
servi ; what freemen ; how many tenants in socage ; what 

1 Ingulphus. 



INTRODUCTION. V 

quantity of wood; how much meadow and pasture; what 
mills and fish-ponds ; how much added or taken away ; what 
the gross value in king Edward's time; what the present 
value ; and how much each freeman or soc-man had or has. 
All this was to be estimated first, as the estate was held 
in the time of the Confessor ; secondly, as it was bestowed 
by the Conqueror ; and thirdly, as its value stood at the 
taking of the survey. The jurors were further to state 
whether any advance could be made in the value. These 
very numerous inquisitions being taken all over the country, 
the record of each was sent by the justiciaries to Winchester, 
and there the whole were arranged, classed, methodized, and 
entered in a register, such as we now see it in the admirable 
photographic fac-similes of the original Domesday survey. 

Such was the record of the first great English survey of 
the lands of the kingdom in the eleventh century, and it 
long remained the great authority on all the subjects em- 
braced in its inquiry. But various causes would naturally 
arise in course of time to render other inquiries desirable or 
necessary, either extending over the entire kingdom, or over 
a county, a hundred or wapentake, an honor or great lord- 
ship, or even limited to a single manor. Traces remain of 
several such inquiries as to Lancashire in the thirteenth 
century. In the printed copy of the Testa de Nemll 
(fol. 808) is an entry recording an inquisition of the county 
of Lancaster which sets forth that, 

This is an Inquisition made by the oath of the faithful knights 
of the tenements given and alienated within the Lime, in the 
county of Lancaster, to wit by Roger Gerneth de Burg, Robert 



vi INTRODUCTION. 

de Lancaster, Adam de Middleton, Richard de Burg, Walter 
Fitz-Osbert, Walter Fitz-Swane, William de Wynewyc, Richard 
Fitz-Swane, Richard Fitz-Robert, William Blundel, Robert de 
Anielsdale, Richard de Orhull (Orrell), Richard de Perpont, Alan 
de Rixton, William de Radeclive, Alexander de Pilkington and 
Henry de Trafford. 

From the names of these seventeen knights who held this 
undated inquisition, we are enabled to limit the time at 
which it was taken to some year within the eight years 
1200-1207. Again, we find a perambulation of the forests 
of Lancashire was made by twelve knights, and recorded 
in 1227 or 1228. 

As early as the reign of Henry II. that king instituted 
justices in eyre, or justices itinerant, who were to go through 
all the counties of England 2 with a general commission wider 
than the special one usually given to justices of oyer et 
terminer. For instance, it was a function of the justices 
in eyre to inquire of knights' fees, escheats, wardships, 
marriages, presentations to churches, the usurpation of the 
rights of the crown, as well as into any oppressions and 
frauds of the king's ministers and officers. The mode of 
procedure was for the justices in eyre, in each county in 
which they held their court, to deliver to the hundredors, 
or officers in charge of each hundred or wapentake, certain 
articles of inquiry, termed " Capitula Itineris" to which the 
hundredors had to make written replies or returns. 3 During 
the turbulent reign of Henry III., the revenues of the crown 

2 The king divided the kingdom into six parts or districts, and 
assigned three justices to each such district. 

3 Sracton, lib. ii. foil. 116, 117. 



INTRODUCTION. Vli 

had been considerably diminished by tenants in capite alien- 
ating without license, and by ecclesiastics, as well as laymen, 
withholding from the crown, under various pretexts, its just 
rights, and usurping the right of holding courts and other 
jura regalia. Numerous exactions and oppressions of the 
people had also been committed in this reign by the nobility 
and gentry claiming the rights of free chase, free warren 
and fishery, and demanding unreasonable tolls in fairs and 
markets ; and again by sheriffs, escheators, and other officers 
and ministers of the crown, under colour of law. Edward I., 
who was on his return from the Holy Land on the death of 
his father, did not reach England till towards the end of 
the second year of his reign, and these abuses remained 
uncorrected till his return. One of the first acts of his 
administration after his arrival, was to institute an inquiry 
into the state of the demesnes, and of the rights and revenues 
of the crown, and concerning the conduct of the sheriffs and 
other officers and ministers who had defrauded the king and 
severely oppressed the people. The " Capitula Itineris" would 
have embraced nearly all these abuses ; but it was found 
that the circuit of the justices itinerant generally once in 
seven years would not return till the sixth year of this 
new reign (1278), and it was necessary to afford a speedy 
remedy to the crown and the subject. The king, therefore, 
on the i ith October, in the second year of his reign (1274), 
appointed special commissioners for the whole kingdom, as 
appears from the patent rolls of this year, 4 whereon are 

4 " De inquirendo per totum regnum de omnibus libertatibus ac de 
articulis eorundem." 



INTRODUCTION. 

enrolled thirty-five articles of inquiry. Twelve other articles 
not on the patent rolls are among the returns, making in 
all forty-seven articles. The commissioners made their return 
in the third year of the reign (1275), and then it became 
necessary for the court of exchequer to have in one view 
such part of the returns as affected the rights of the crown 
and the abuses of its officers. To this end certain rolls were 
drawn up, containing a selection under the denomination of 
" Extracts," and thus the crown was furnished with evidence, 
upon the oath of a jury of each hundred and town of every 
county, as to the various matters under inquiry. From 
these sources the public records termed " Rotuli Hundred- 
orum " were compiled, and have been printed in two thick 
folio volumes ; but it is not a little remarkable that these 
hundred rolls, as printed, do not contain any entry or extract 
relative to the county of Lancaster, though the inquiries 
were made some seventy-six years before the creation of 
the duchy of Lancaster, and the vesting of its jura regalia 
in its duke for the time being. It may be added that the 
first chapter of the statute of Gloucester (6 Edward I., 
1278), as to the liberties, franchises, quo warranto, Sec., was 
founded upon the previous inquiries under this commission. 
Immediately after the passing of the statute of Gloucester, 
the circuit of the justices in eyre returned, and they had the 
rolls delivered to them, to inquire into the matters therein 
set forth ; and it would seem that in many cases these later 
inquiries were made before the same juries of the hundreds 
who had made the returns to the royal commissioners. 5 

8 See Introduction to Rotuli Hundredorum. 



INTRODUCTION. i x 

The enumeration of the various inquiries respecting land, 
its tenure and services, during the latter part of the thir- 
teenth century, would not be complete were we to omit to 
mention what is generally known as " Kirkby's Inquest " of 
Yorkshire in the years 1284-5, a general survey of York- 
shire in its several wapentakes, conducted by Sir John de 
Kirkeby, then the king's treasurer. There were also the 
pleas of quo warranto inquiries by what warrant lords, 
knights, and others claimed to hold manors and estates, 
and to exercise certain priviliges and franchises, and to 
enjoy certain immunities. These Placita de quo warranto 
were held before Hugh de Cressingham and his brother 
justiciaries, as regards Lancashire, in Trinity term (May and 
June) 1292. 

The statute "Extenta Manerii," passed in 1276, rendered 
it imperative to survey or "extend" manors under its 
provisions, and to this legislative act we are inclined to 
attribute the survey of a considerable part of Lancashire, 
including the barony, lordship, or manor of Manchester in 
1320-46, and the extent of the manor in 1322. Indeed, 
it is not improbable that to this statute we owe the later 
portions of the Testa de Nemll (A.D. 1325-30) and some 
parts, at least, of the Birch Feodary (ranging from A.D. 
1307 to 1380), and of the Lansdowne Feodary (1349-51). 

A more limited kind of inquiry was that made after the 
death of any baron, lord, knight, or other tenant in capite 
of the crown. These were termed Inquisitiones post mortem, 
and they were usually held before the sheriff of a county, or 
the king's escheator, who summoned a jury, whose finding 



X INTRODUCTION. 

as to the possessions of the deceased, the name, kinship, and 
age of the heir, &c., were all recorded on the inquisition, 
which was returned by the presiding officer to the king's 
chancery or exchequer. Of this class of inquiries was the 
celebrated "De Lacy Inquisition" of 1311, the first of the 
three records printed in the present volume. It was not, 
however, of the ordinary character, but included the whole 
estates of the earl of Lincoln, and amongst others, the entire 
extent of the honor of Clitheroe. 6 It was also taken with 

6 The modern honor of Clitheroe, the seat and centre of which is the 
castle of Clitheroe, is of great extent, and covers a large tract of 
country, both in Lancashire and Yorkshire. That part of the honor 
which is in Lancashire has for its lord his grace the duke of Buccleuch. 
It comprises the whole of the hundred of Blackburn, being that portion 
of the county which, by " the Representation of the People Act, 1867," 
forms the parliamentary north-eastern division of Lancashire. The 
honor also includes the boroughs of Clitheroe, Blackburn, and Burnley. 
The manor of Tottington comprising the two quarters of Tottington- 
higher-end and Tottington-lower-end in the hundred of Salford, is 
also within the honor of Clitheroe. A considerable area within the 
honor is copyhold, and held either of the wapentake of Blackburn, or 
of one of the several forests or manors within it, for which courts are 
held half-yearly at Easter and Michaelmas. The Yorkshire portion of 
the honor, of which Charles Towneley of Towneley, esq., is now the lord, 
is called " the Wapentake or Liberty of Bowland," and comprises the 
several townships of the higher and lower divisions of the Forest of 
Bowland, Slaidburn, Newton, Easingtou, Grindleton, "West Bradford, 
Waddington, Bashall and Great Mitton. The townships of Slaidburn, 
Newton, Grindleton and West Bradford, are principally copyhold, and 
held of the manor of Slaidburn. The steward of the honor, Dixon 
Robinson, esq., by virtue of his office, is coroner for the Liberty of 
Bowland. The official residence of the steward is at Clitheroe castle, 
where the court rolls are kept. Some of these date as far back as the 
reign of Henry the Seventh. 



INTRODUCTION. x i 

much more care, accuracy, and minuteness of specification 
than was usual in these inquiries, for the reason given in 
page 3. It is now printed for the first time. 

The second record in the volume is of the nature of an 
extent or survey which probably, in its perfect state, included 
every hundred of Lancashire. Of the original record nothing 
is known ; and the portions of the document now first printed 
are derived from a copy made late in the sixteenth century. 
It is remarkable that there is not known to exist anv full 

t 

survey of Lancashire at all resembling in character " Kirkby's 
Inquest" of Yorkshire, of 1284-5, which has just been 
printed for the first time by the Surtees Society. It cannot 
be doubted that under the special commission of Edward I. 
in 1 274, Lancashire was included ; yet, in the hundred rolls, 
the product of that commission, Lancashire finds no place. 

It may be suggested that this survey, so far as parts of it 
have reached us, like the Testa de Nevill, the Birch and 
the Lansdowne Feodaries, all, so far as they can be traced, 
relating to the fees and the land during the first half of the 
fourteenth century, may be fragments of some general 
record of survey, at least as to Lancashire, the original of 
which has long since perished. The Testa de Nevill 7 has 
been printed by direction of the Record commissioners, and 
a copy of its Lancashire portions is also to be found in 
Gregson's Portfolio of Fragments, where is also printed a 
copy of Birch's MS. Feodary. A copy of the Lansdowne 

7 Besides the list of inquisitions for the whole county, already noticed, 
the Testa contains like lists for every hundred or wapentake except 
Lonsdale. 



xii INTRODUCTION. 

Feodary, 9 has been printed in Baines's History of Lanca- 
shire', 9 and to these is now first added this MS. extent 
or survey, taken within the years 1320-46. Though 
the portion of it now printed only includes three of the 
six hundreds of Lancashire (all that remains of Salford 
hundred being printed in Mamecestre), viz., West Derby, 
Amounderness, and Lonsdale, yet, as far as it extends, 
there can be no doubt that it is a valuable addition to our 
scanty and meagre records of the state of land tenures in 
Lancashire in the earlier part of the fourteenth century. 

The third document in the volume is a record of survey 
of a different kind, what is termed a Rentale, rental or 
rent-roll of a manor. This was usually a long and narrow 
parchment roll, wherein the rents of a manor were written 
down, and by which the lord's bailiff collected such rents at 
the terms at which they were fixed to be payable. The 
Rental usually contained the quantities of land in each 
holding; the land and tenements let to each tenant; the 
names of the tenants ; the several rents apportioned and for 
what time, usually a year ; and the times of payment, which 
varied in different manors, some being at two, some at three, 
terms in the year, and others, and this most generally, at 
the four quarterly terms of Lady-day, Nativity of John the 
Baptist, St. Michael's-day, and the Birth of the Lord, or 
March 25th, June 24th, September 29th, and December 
25th. One example of the old manorial rental will be 
found in Mamecestre, 10 being the rental of Thomas West, 

8 See Lansdowne MSS., cod. 559, fol. 23. 
9 Edition of 1836, vol. iv. p. 756. 10 Vol. iii. p. 476. 



INTRODUCTION. x iii 

lord la Warre and baron of Mamecestre, of his manor of 
Mamecestre, in May 1473. 

The Rental in the present volume is that of Sir John 
de Ashton, knight, of his manor of Ashton-under-Lyne, in 
November 1422, thirty years earlier than that of Man- 
chester. Besides the rental proper, this document contains 
the arrangement of the forms or benches in Ashton parish 
church, for the wives, daughters, and servants of the manor 
of Ashton-under-Lyne. It also contains a rental of the lands 
and tenements which Sir John Assheton gave to his son and 
heir, Thomas de Assheton, on his marriage ; the yearly rent 
thereof being gL is. jd., and the total of Sir John's own 
rental zjl. iis. nf</. making the total rental of the manor 
so far as set down, 36^ 145. 6f</., to which, however, must 
be added the value of all the boon services and presents. 



CONTENTS. 



Page. 

THE GEE AT DE LACY INQUISITION, FEBBUABY 1 6, 1311 i 

Index Nominum et Locorum 24 

SURVEY OF 1320-46 28 

"Wapentake of "West Derby 30 

of Amounderness 44 

of Lonsdale 67 

Index Nominum et Locorum 88 

CUSTOM ROLL AND RENTAL OF THE MANOB OF ASHTON- 

UNDEE-LYNE, 1422 93 

Index Nominum et Locorum 134 

SUPPLEMENTAEY INDEX 139 



I. THE GREAT DE LACY 
INQUISITION, 

FEBR UAR Y i6M, 131 1. 



A BRIEF notice seems desirable of the great man and power- 
ful noble, of whose Lancashire possessions at his death the 
following Inquisition forms a catalogue. 

The first of the great de Lacy family, Ilbert de Laci, 1 came into 
England with the Conqueror. On this " Norman adventurer," as 
Dr. Whitaker styles him, William I. conferred the great fee of 
Pontefract ; and his son Robert de Lacy was at one time lord of 
the whole hundred or wapentake of Blackburn. This Robert left 
two sons, Ilbert and Henry, who successively held the vast pos- 
sessions of the family in this county, and Henry was succeeded by 
his son Robert; who, dying on the 2ist June 1193, without issue, 
the last male of his family, devised his extensive estates, consist- 
ing of sixty knights' fees, to his uterine sister Aubrey, daughter 
of Robert de Lizours ; who, marrying Richard Fitz-Eustace, lord 
of Halton and constable of Chester, took the estates to that family ; 
and his grandson Roger, the terror and scourge of the Welsh, and 
for his ferocity of temper called " Hell," assumed the name of de 
Lacy. His son John married Margaret, daughter and coheiress of 
Robert (son of Saber de Quincy, earl of Winchester) and his wife 
Hawys, fourth sister and coheiress of Kandal de Blundeville, earl 
of Chester and Lincoln; from whom, in the distribution of his 
lands and honours, she received the earldom of Lincoln, which 
descended to her daughter Margaret, the wife of John de Lacy. 
By patent of 23rd November 17 Henry III. (1232) the king re- 
granted this earldom to her husband, John de Lacy ; whose son 

1 The name was originally de Lasci, probably from a place called Lassi, in the 
department of Calvados, in Normandy. 



2 THE GREAT DE LACY 

Edmund, dying in the life-time of his mother, never assumed the 
title of earl of Lincoln. He married Alice de Saluces, daughter 
of a nobleman of Provence, and died June 5th 1258; leaving as 
his successor, his son and heir, Henry de Lacy, "the last and 
greatest man of his line ; " of whom we take the following account 
from Dr. Whitaker's History of Whalley : 

He was the confidential friend and servant of Edward L, whom he 
seems not a little to have resembled in courage, activity, prudence, and 
every other quality which can adorn a soldier 2 or a statesman. In 1290 
he was appointed first commissioner for rectifying the abuses which 
had crept into the administration of justice, especially in the Court of 
Common Pleas, an office which he filled with exemplary fidelity and 
strictness. In 1293 he was sent ambassador to the French king to 
demand satisfaction for the plunders committed by the subjects of 
France upon the goods of the English merchants. After the death of 
Edward earl of Lancaster, he was appointed Commander-in-chief of the 
army in Gascony, and viceroy of Aquitaine. In 1297 or 1298 he raised 
the siege of the castle of St. Catherine, near Toulouse, and expelled 
the French from the confines of that country. In July 1298 lie led 
the vanguard at the memorable battle of Falkirk, against the Scots 
under Wallace. He was appointed one of the two commissioners to 
open the parliament at Carlisle on the 2oth January 1307, the last 
year of the reign of Edward I., and in this parliament he had the pre- 
cedence of all the peers of England (after the prince of Wales, who 
was also earl of Chester). By a rare fortune, after the death of his 
old master, he seems to have retained the confidence of his son, Edward 
II. He received from his sovereign, in recompense of his services, the 
honor of Denbigh, in Wales, and styled himself in consequence, (in 
addition to his other titles) " Dominus de Eoos et Rowennock." Over 
the gate of Denbigh castle, in a niche, his statue in robes is still pre- 
served. As lord of the honor of Clitheroe, the many remaining evidences 
of this earl's transactions, prove him to have been active and munificent. 
Besides many grants of inferior consequence, he rewarded his seneschal 
or steward, Oliver de Stansfeld, with the manor of Worsthorn, and the 
de la Leghs and Middlemores with the manor of the grange of Cli- 
viger ; he confirmed and extended the privileges of his borough of 
Clitheroe ; and he gave to the monks of Stanlaw the advowson of the 
parish church of Whalley, with its dependencies ; procured the removal 
of their abbey to that fertile and beautiful site ; attended the trans- 
lation in person, and laid the first stone of their conventual church. 

2 Though not a long-liyed man, his sendees began with the reign of Edward I. 
and continued beyond it. In 1273 (i Edward I.) he besieged and took the castle of 
Chartley in Staffordshire, on behalf of the king. 



INQUISITION. 3 

He married Margaret (or Alice) daughter of Sir William Longespee, 
by whom he enjoyed all the lands of the earl of Salisbury, without that 
title. By this lady he had two sons, Edmund, and John, both of whom 
died young, and two daughters, Alice and Margaret. Margaret died in 
her father's life-time. In 1294, despairing of male issue, Henry de Lacy 
surrendered all his lands to the king, who regranted them to this earl 
for the term of his life, and after his decease to Thomas earl of Lancas- 
ter, and Alice his wife and the heirs of their bodies; failing of which 
they were to remain over to Edmund the king's brother (a remarkable 
proof of the earl's attachment to the royal family), and to his heirs for 
ever. By this act the honor of Clitheroe became united to the earldom 
of Lancaster. The great earl died at his house of Lincoln's Inn, on the 
5th February 1310, aged 60 years, and was interred in St. Paul's cathe- 
dral. Over his remains was placed a magnificent tomb, with a statue 
of the earl cross-legged, and in linked or chain mail ; which perished 
with many others in the great fire of London, but which had been en- 
graved by Hollar. Henry de Lacy left as his sole heiress, his surviving 
daughter Alice, who had married in her father's life-time Thomas 
Plantagenet, earl of Lancaster, and carried along with her an inheri- 
tance even then estimated at ten thousand marks, or 6,666 a year. 
Thus the honor of Clitheroe .and the vast estates in Lancashire of the 
succeeding race of so-called Lacys, passed from them to the Planta- 
genets. 

Dr. Whitaker characterises this document as " that most exact 
record, the inquisition after the death of Henry de Lacy, the last 
earl of Lincoln, taken A.D. 1311." After explaining that inqui- 
sitions post mortem are of little value except for the purpose of 
finding an heir, as their descriptions of quantities of land are 
almost always in round numbers, which mast generally be false, 
the Dr. adds : " But after the death of the last earl of Lincoln, 
leaving only a daughter, on whose decease without male issue the 
vast estates were settled upon the crown, it was thought necessary 
to make a strict and accurate survey, and for the jurors to find 
with equal exactness according to the result. To this circumstance 
we are indebted for one of the most valuable documents from which 
the History of Whalley has been compiled. There is indeed ano- 
ther general Inquisition of the honor of Clitheroe, after the death 
of Henry, duke of Lancaster [who died March 24, 1361], but it 
is comparatively slight and inaccurate." 

No copy in Latin of the original Inquisition is known to exist ; 
and consequently this document, now first printed, can be given 
only in an evidently old translation. This is of an official character ; 



4 THE GREAT DE LACY 

being recorded in an old MS. book, entitled, "The Book of the 
Honor of Clitheroe," penes Dixon Robinson, esq., the Castle, Cli- 
theroe. 

In the " Calendarium Inquisitionum post Mortem, sive Escceta- 
rum,'' 1 vol. i. pp. 242-244, is a very meagre abstract of the whole 
Inquisition; enumerating Henry de Lacy's possessions in Lan- 
cashire, as well as those in eighteen other English counties, and 
in Wales and its marches. It is little more than a list of local 
names; but it serves, as regards Lancashire, as a corroborative 
outline of the places named in the following translation; and 
shows, for instance, that the " Dennon " or " Donnon " of the 
translation, is identical with " Donnom," or Downham. 



INQUISITION taken after the Render of Henry de Lacy late 
Earl of Lincoln of Lands Tenements &f held of the King 
in Com' Lancaster the i6 th Febry 4 Edwardi 2 di . 

THE JURY say that Henry de Lacy Earl of Lincoln had no 
Lands or Tenements in Fee in Chief of the King, But that 
he held all his Lands and Tenements in the County of Lancaster 
immediately of the King by the Service of 14 Knights' Fees and 
^ part of Knight's Fee and by the Rent of 105 s : 8 d payable 
yearly to the Castle Guard of Lancaster and a certain Fee called 
Sak fee and doing Suit to the Court held at Torn every-6 weeks. 
That King Edward I st granted to the said Earl of Lincoln and the 
Heirs of his Body all the Lands and Tenements hereafter men- 
tioned, Remainder to Thomas- Son of Edmond the King's Brother 
and to Alice his wife and the Heirs of their Bodies, Remainder to 
the Right Heirs of the said Thomas. 

That he was seised of the Castle of Clyderhowe with the Moat 
and Ditches, nothing worth above the Reprises. 

Also of an Orchard under the Castle with a Croft, the Herbage 
of which is Yearly worth '. ij d 

There are also 20 Acres of Demean Lands demised to several 
Tenants at Will, each Acre Yearly worth 4 d Somme ...... vj s viij d 



INQUISITION. 5 

4^ Acres of Meadow Yearly worth iijs 

A Watermill Yearly worth yj 1 xiii 3 iiij d 

A Fair on Saint Mary Magdalene's day, the Toll and Profits 
thereof are Yearly worth yj s viij d 

The Toll of Clyderhow, Blakeburn and Bowland Yearly worth 

iiij 1 xiij s iiijd 

There are 20 Acres and 3 Roods of Demean Lands which Adam 
Russel holds by Grant of the said Earl of Lincoln for Life at the 
Yearly Rent of xx s iij d 

The said Earl of Lincoln held the Advowson of the Chappel in 
Clyderhou Castle Yearly worth xiiij 1 vj s viij d 

There is a 3 weeks free Court, the Pleas and Profits thereof are 
Yearly worth C s 

The Burgesses of Clyderhou held all their Burgages and the 
Rent of the s d Town in Fee Farm by Grant from the said Earl of 

Lincoln, paying Yearly at Michaelmas vj 1 xiij s iiij d 

Summe of the whole... xxiiij 1 xviij 3 vj d 

' The said Earl held at Standene a Capital Messuage worth... xij d sunden. 

80 Acres of Land in Demean Yearly worth xxvj s viij d 

36 Acres of Meadow Yearly worth xxiiij 8 

Several Pasture Yearly worth v s 

He also held at Penhilberton 16 Oxgangs of Land in Bondage, Penhuiton. 

which pay Yearly at the Feast of S* Gyles [Sep. 1] v 1 vj s viij d 

William Querderey of Holes [holds] 30 Acres of Waste Land, 

paying Yearly xx s 

Richard Ryding holds 20 Acres of Land at Will and pays vj s viij d 
There were also 12 Acres of Land in the hands of divers Ten- 
ants at Will, who pay yearly.. iiij 8 

Henry de Blakeburn holds a certain Mansion there with the Fee 

by Grant and pays to the Lord Yearly v 1 xiijj d 

The said Earl held at Worston 30 Acres of Land in Demean worston. 

demised to several Tenants who pay Yearly xv s 

5 Acres of Meadow paying Yearly v s 

The said Earl held there 13 Oxgangs of Land which he held in 

Bondage payable at the Feast of S* Gyles, Yearly worth ... xxvj 3 



6 THE GREAT DE LACY 

6 Cottages Yearly worth .......................................... ... iij s 

He also held there 48 Acres of Heirable Land demised to divers 
Tenants at Will Yearly worth ....................................... xvj 8 

A Watermill Yearly worth ................................. xiij s iiij d 

William de Heris held of the said Earl 1 8 Acres of Land paying 
Yearly ..................................................................... ij s 

Thomas de Clogh held of the said Earl an Oxgang of Land, 
Yearly worth .............................................................. . ij s 

Adam Son of Wyot held an Oxgang of Land and payed yearly 
two Collars of Greyhounds worth 3 ................................... j d 

William Son of Thomas held an Oxgang of Land and payed 
yearly ................................................................... .. ij s 

Hugh Son of Ralph held 2 Oxgangs of Land and payed yearly 



3 Dr. Whitaker, in the addenda to his History of Whalley (ed. 1818, p. 534), 
prints an original charter of John de Lacy, the second of that name, probably of 
about the year 1220, to the following effect : " I, John de Lasey, Constable of Chester, 
&c., have given &c. to Guido or Guy, son of Thomas de Cherltou, a bovate [or oxgang] 
of land in the Vill of Wortheston, which William reeve of that Vill by Custom held 
of me. Rendering therefor yearly to me and my heirs for all service and demand, 
two collars for greyhounds [leporarios] at the feast of Saint Oswald. Witnesses : 
Sir Hugh Botiller \_Pincerna] and Alan the clerk, then Seneschals, Henry de Not- 
tingham, Colin de Quartermar', Ebrard Tyas, Baldwin Tyas, Walter de Ludham," 
&c. Then the same Guido, who had assumed the local name of Worston, called 
in the inquisition " Wyot," makes a grant to Adam his son : " I, Ydo de Wors- 
ton, &c., give to Adam my son all my land with meadow, in the territory of 
Worston, to be held as I held it of John de Lasey, rendering therefor yearly, two 
dog-collars [as above] at the feast of St. Giles (Sep. i). For this grant the said Adam 
has given to me a solid tooth of silver [dentem solidi argenti] in my necessity. [May 
not the word which Dr. Whitaker read "dentem" be an abbreviated form ofducentem 1 
Then the meaning would be two hundred shillings in money.] Witnesses : Adam de 
Blakeburn, then Steward of Blakeburnshire, Hugh Fitz-Hugh, Constable of the 
Castle of Clyderhow, Adam Noel, John de Heriz, Walter de Wadington, Walter de 
Standen, Hugh Querderay," &c. These charters, which are contained in a small box, 
apparently coeval with the older, are accompanied by two dog-collars which have 
evidently not been used. It seems probable, therefore, that they were constantly 
kept by the owners of the estate, in order to make the render if demanded, and so 
save a forfeiture. They are studded with brass nails and fringed with green silk. 



INQUISITION. 7 

Hugyn held of the said Earl an Oxgang of Land and payed 

yearly iij 3 vj d 

Hugh Son of Thomas held an Oxgang of Land and payed yearly 

xviij d 
Adam de Craven held an Oxgang of Laud by y e yearly Service 

of j d 

Sum . . iiij 1 xj s vj d 

In Dennou he held 107 Acres of Heirable Land of the Demeans Donnon. 
devised to divers Tenants at Will of which 60 Acres pay Yearly xl s 

and 75 Acres of the same pay Yearly xix 3 

He held there 10 Acres of Meadow Yearly worth xx s 

He had there certain Villeins [natives] who held 10 Oxgangs of 
Land in Bondage the Rents and Services thereof are Yearly worth 

XXX s 

The said Bondmen pay out of the Bondages aforesaid iij s in 
Common out of every Customary Rent at Midsumer. 

There are certain Cottagers who hold 9 Tofts and pay yearly 

iiij 8 vj d 

There is a Watermill yearly worth xxvj 8 viij d 

There are certain Free Tenants who hold certain Tenements of 
the said Earl by a certain Rent payable at S* Gyle's (viz*) 

Walter de Waddington for 4 Oxgangs and 20 Acres of Land xij d 
Henry de Donnon Clerk for 3 Tofts and 2 Oxgangs of Land 

ij s ix d ofe: 

Henry Son of Henry for 2 Oxgangs of Land ij s viij d 

Alan Son of Robert for a certain Assart ij s vj d 

Thomas de Chatburn for a Toft j s vj d 

Hugh de Donnou for one Oxgang and g part of an Oxgang ij s 
The Heir of Richard Clark for an Oxgang of Land and a cer- 
tain Assart v s iiij d 

Henry de Donnon for a Toft and Acre of Land and one Mea- 
dow j d 

Halmoat of Penhilburton, Worston and Doiinon are always held 

in one and is worth Yearly xx s 

Sum... ix 1 xj d 



8 THE GREAT DE LACY 

In Colne there is a certain Capital Messuage, worth nothing 
Yearly above the Reprises. 

There are 151 Acres of Land in Demean devised to divers Ten- 
ants who pay Yearly at the Feast of S* Giles ix 1 iij s viij d 

Held there 10 Oxgangs and 5 of Land in Bondage which pay 

yearly xxxj s vj d 

And each Oxgang pays Yearly iiij d for work neglected to be done. 

There are 14 Tofts in the hands of the Tenants at Will which 
pay Yearly vij 8 

There are at Colne and Walfreden 2 Watermills and Fulling 
Mill worth v 1 vj s viij d 

The Halmoat of Colne and Walfreden with the Members are 
Yearly worth xx s 

There are certain Free Tenants who hold of the said Earl 138 
Acres of Land and pay for the same certain Rents. 

Sum Total., xix 1 xiiij 8 x d 

Great Marsden. He held in Great Merclesdeue 335 Acres of Land in the hands 
of diverse Tenants at Will which payed yearly at S* Gyles's Feast 

Cxj s viij d 
There were certain Cottagers there who held 4 Tofts at Will 

and payed Yearly ij s 

There were 12 Customary Tenants who held 12 Oxgangs and ^ 

in Bondage and payed Yearly xxxvij 8 vj d 

Each Oxgang paying for neglected work vj d . 

The said Customary Tenants pay Yearly for their Fishery there 

x d q > 
Sum... vij 1 xviij 8 iij d ob: 

Little Mersden. In Little Merclesdone he held 243 Acres and ^ of Land demised 
to several Tenants who pay yearly at the Feast of S* Gyles xiiij 1 xiiij d 

There are 2 Cottagers who pay for 2 Cottages Yearly viij d 

There are 4 Customary Tenants holding 3 Oxgangs and ^ of 

Land in Bondage who pay for the same Yearly x s vj d 

And for works neglected iiij d for each Oxgang. 

Sum... iiij 1 xiij s vj d 



INQUISITION. 



9 



In Briercliffe there are 166 Acres and ^ of Land demised to Bri 
several Tenants at Will who pay for the same Yearly lv s vj d 

Robert Son of Mokok of Briercliffe held of the said Earl of 
Lincoln there 63 Acres of Land in Fee and payed yearly ... xxj 3 

Adamde Walleseeching 4 held freely of the said Earl 51 Acres of 

Land and payed for the same Yearly xvij 8 

Sum... iiij 1 xiij 8 vj d 

In Brunneley there are 354 Acres i Rood and of Land demised Bn 

to several Tenants at Will who pay for the same Yearly Cxviij 8 j d ofc: 
There are 12 Cottagers holding 10 Oxgangs of Land in Bondage 

paying yearly I 8 

And for Works neglected iij 8 iiij d . 

There are there certain Cottagers holding 12 Cottages and paying 

Yearly for the same xij s 

There is a Windmill Yearly worth above Reprises C 8 

A Fulling Mill Yearly worth v s 

There are certain Free Tenants who hold divers Tenements 

paying a Rent certain every year at the Feast of S* Gyles [viz.] 

Oliver de Stainsfeld for 50 Acres of Land j d 

Adam Son of Clark for one Oxgang of Land vij 8 

John de Wheteacker for 8 Acres of Land iiij 8 

Thomas de Ryelands for 20 Acres of Land iiij 8 

Adam de Holdene for 6 Acres and i Rood of Land... iij 8 v d ob: 

Dowen de Heley for 13 Acres of Land iij 8 

And de Towneley of Brounshaghs and Towneley by the 

Homage and Service P Year of xviij 8 iij d 

And to do one Suit at Cliderhou Court holden from 3 weeks to 3 

weeks. 

Sum... xvj 1 viij 8 iij d 

In Haberingham there are 248 Acres and A of Land demised to H 

! Eves. 

divers Tenants at Will who pay Yearly for the Same ... iiij 1 ij s x d 

4 Perhaps Wallsuohes. 



IO THE GREAT DE LACY 

Adam de Holdene and Henry de Breretwisle hold 2 Oxgangs of 

Land there freely and pay Yearly yj s 

Sum... iiij 1 viij 8 xj d 

In Padiham there are 99 Acres of Land demised to divers Ten- 
ants at Will who pay at the Feast of S* Gyles xxxiij 8 ij d 

There are 25 Customary Tenants who hold 2 1 Oxgangs of Land 

in Bondage and pay Yearly for the same vij 1 iiij d 

And for Works neglected viij d . 

There is a Windmill worth yearly xl s 

There are certain Free Tenants who hold of the said Earl seve- 
ral Tenements by a certain Yearly Rent. 

John de Wheteacker for 44 Acres of Land xxv 8 

Richard Son of Mawe for 25 Acres and viij 8 vj d 

Payable at the Feast of S* Gyles and vj d payable at Midsummer. 

Sum... xij 1 xix s ij d 

In Ightenhill there is a Capital Messuage of no value above 
Reprises. 

There are 8 Acres of Land in Demean Yearly worth ... ij s viij d 

One Acre of Meadow Yearly worth , xij d 

A Park in Circumference i . . . . ^ [sic] the Moss and Herb- 
age is Yearly worth xij d 

52 Acres and 2 Roods of Land demised to several Tenants at 

Will Yearly worth . 1 s v d 

The Hallmot there with a perquisite called Thistaltake 5 yearly 

worth xl s 

Sum... yj 1 xiiij 8 j d 

5 Thistlelache. Lache usually means a miry hollow ; but here it is a name for a 
profit or portion of revenue, and it is probably only a form of tack or take. In the 
manor of Halton, also belonging to the Lacies, was a revenue or profit called Thistle- 
take. It is understood to mean a payment exacted by lords of manors, for the depas- 
turing of drove-beasts upon their commons, even if they stayed no longer than to crop 
a thistle. See Whitaker's Whalley, edition of 1818, p. 219. 



INQUISITION. 1 1 

In Troudene there are 5 Vaccaries the Herbage and Agistments Trawdcn 

of each are Yearly worth x s 

Sum... v s 
In Penhill there are 1 1 Vaccaries the Herbage and Agistments p en huit 

of each worth Yearly x s 

In Rossendale there are 1 1 Vaccaries, the Herbage and Agist- 

ments are Yearly worth . x s 

Sum Cx 8 

Sum xiij 1 x s 

The Pannage of Penhill sometimes is nothing worth but com- 
monly one year with another is worth yj s viij d 

The Agistments and Winter Herbage of Troweden, Rossendale, 
Penhill, Hoddesden and Romesgrave, are Yearly worth... xxix 3 viij d 

The Agistments and Winter 6 Herbage in the same places are 
Yearly worth xl 8 

The Profits of Hay sold there for each Cart load carried off j d 
sum one Year with another vj s viij d 

The Profits of the Iron Mine of Weel and the Woods raised and 
Yearly sold in the said Forests, one year with another 7 ... ix s iiij d 

Sum... iiij 1 xij s iiij d 

There is a Capital Messuage worth nothing above Reprises. [ 

There are 30 Acres of Land in Demean Yearly worth x s 

1 06 Acres and ^ and ^ a Rood demised to divers Tenants at- 

Will, who pay Yearly at the Feast of S* Gyles xxxv s vj d oft: 

There are 4 Vaccaries, the Herbage and Agistments of which 

are worth Yearly x s 

Sum... xls 

6 Dr. Whitaker alters this evidently erroneous term to "Summer" which would 
clearly he worth more than the Winter agistment and herbage, just before stated to 
be worth 29*. Sd. 

7 This entry Dr. Whitaker renders "Profits of old wood, charcoal, &c. sold for the 
use of iron forges," &c. and this seems a more correct rendering of the obscure original. 
No such place is known as Weel, and no iron-mine has been known to exist for cen- 
turies. 



on. 



1 2 THE GREAT DE LACY 

There is a Watermill Yearly worth above .Reprises xx s 

The Hallmot is Yearly worth by Estimation x s 

Sum... Cxv 9 vj d ob: 

ciiviger. In Clivachre there are 80 Acres of Land demised to divers 

Tenants who pay Yearly for the same at the Feast of S* Gyles 

xxvj s viij d 
There is a Watermill Yearly worth xx 8 above 

Reprises at Michaelmas. 
There are certain Free Tenants who hold of the said Earl divers 

Tenements by a certain Rent payable at the Feast of S* Gyles 

(viz*) 

Gilbert de la Legh for 140 Acres of Land xlvj s xj d 

William de Middlemen for 60 Acres of Land xxj 8 

Henry Son of Holekyn for 17^ Acres of Land iiij 8 vj d 

Adam Son of Robert for 6 Acres of Land ij s 

Richard de Colnekole for 6 Acres ij s 

Jordan de Lykteenes for i Acre vj d 

Dyk de Birchess for 10 Acres of Land iij s ij d 

Adam de Grimeschagh for 12 Acres of Laud iiij 8 ij d 

Robert de Grimeschagh for 12 Acres of Land iiij 8 ij d 

Robert de Grimeschagh for 10 Acres of Land iij s j d 

John Son of Matthew for 20 Acres v s iiij d and a 

Pair of Gloues j d 

Adam de la Legh for 60 Acres xviij s ij d ob: 

William de Dinely for 16 Acres v s 

Henry de Kouhope for 10 Acres iij s iij d 

Major de Wolpitgrave for 6 Acres ij 3 

William Son of Robert for 6 Acres [blank] 

Pok de Lenneclogh for 12 Acres iiij s vj d 

John de Hargreves for 20 Acres vij 8 ob: 

Stephen of the Grange for 18 Acres vj s vj d oft: 

Dyk of the Gate for 16 Acres iiij 8 vj d 

John del Yhates for 6 Acres vj s 

Mokock de la Lowe for 10 Acres... xviij d ob: 



INQUISITION. Ij 

John Son of Gilbert for 10 Acres j vj d ob: 

William Topping for 6 Acres . ijs 

Mokock del Moreclogh for 6 Acres js 

Tibbi de Ormerode for 20 Acres , ij d 

Adam de Ormerode for 8 Acres j s j d ob: and 

One Pound of Pepper, price js 

Geffery Son of John for one Messuage and 2 Acres of Land j s j d 

John de la Legh for 20 Acres of Land iiij 8 vij d 

Dik Son of Mocock of Brerecroft for 20 Acres vj s and a 

Pair of Gloves at the price of j d 

Adam Smith for 1 6 Acres iij 8 viij d and a 

Pair of Spurrs at the price of j d ob: 

Henry de Heley for 8 Acres of Land j s v d 

Adam of the Bridge for 20 Acres xix d ob: 

Robert del Holm for 8 Acres of Land vij 8 

The Agistments of Cattle in the Common Pasture of Clivacher 

are worth one Year with another xij d 

Sum... xj 1 vj 8 xj d ob: 

In Haslingden there are 186 Roods and one Acre of Land 

demised to divers Tenants at Will who pay for the same at the 

Feast of S* Gyles ... lxj s j d 

There is a Watermill yearly worth above reprises at Mich' as... x s 
There are certain Free Tenants who held of the said Earl divers 

Tenements by certain rents payable yearly at the Feast of S* 

Gyles. 

S r Robert de Holand for a piece of Land called Ewode ...... v s 

Robert de Holdene for 40 Acres of Land xiij 8 j d ob: 

Adam de Holdene for 60 Acres of Land ij s 

The Abbot of Kirkstall held of the said Earl ^ a Carrucate of 

Land by the service of ix d cfc at Midsummer and suit of the 3 weeks 

court held at Claderhou. 

Oliver de Stainesfeld held of the said Earl the Hamlet of Wors- Worsthom. 

thorn by the Homage and Service of j d 

Sum... iiij 1 xij 9 j d 



1 4 



THE GREAT DE LACY 



Hapton. The Heir of S r Edmund Talbot held a Caracat of Land in Hap- 

ton of the said Earl by the service of ^ of Knights Fee and the 
yearly rent of j s j d at Midsummer and suit to the 3 weeks court at 
Clyderhou 

Berdtwiseii. Henry de Lacy of Crumbe Wellekoyefh 8 held the Hamlet of 
Berdtwisell viz* 

| a carucat of Land by the Homage and service of...iiij d a year 
at the said Feast and suit to the aforesaid court. 

Symondstone. Robert de Holdene held of the said Earl in Symondston an 
Oxgang of Land in Thaynage and by the yearly rent of iij s ij d ob: 
at the Feast of S* Giles and suit to the 3 weeks Court of Clyderhou. 

Ellen de Lahady held of the same an Oxgang of Land in Thay- 
nage paying yearly iij s j d ob: at 

the said Term and suit to the Court aforesaid. 

Geffery de Symondston held an Oxgang of Land in Thaynage 

by the yearly rent of , xix d ob: at 

the said Term and suit to the said Court 

Alyott de Symondston held ^ an Oxgang of Land in Thaynage 
and paid xix d c^ per annum and suit to the said Court. 

John Sou of John de Symondstone held an Oxgang of Land in 
Thaynage and paid yearly a pair of Spurrs of the value of...j d ob: 
and Suit to the aforesaid Court. Sum... xiiij 8 x d q., 

Huncotes. The said Earl held in Huncotes 309 Acres and 9 Roods of Land 

demised to several Tenants at Will who pay yearly at the Feast 

of Saint Gyles Ciij s iij d 

John de Sholesworth held there of the said Earl freely 10 Acres 

of Land and payed yearly at the said Term xx d 

John de Clayton held 20 Acres and paid yearly j s 

The said John and John paid for their Tenements to the said 

Earl for Castle Guard at Midsummer ij s 

Sum...Cvij s ij d 

8 This is probably the same place called in another part of this Inquisition " Cro- 
melywellothem." See under Spotland, infrd. 



INQUISITION. ! r 

There are certain Tenants and Thaynes in Reved who held of R ee d. 
the said Earl divers Tenements by certain Yearly Rents payable 
at S* Gyles's Feast and Suit to Clyderhou Court (viz*) 

John del Holt for an Oxgang of Land ijs vj d 

The said John for a piece of Land called Laysinglands x d 

Adam del Clogh for 3 Oxgaugs and of Land iiij 8 yj d 

William Sou of Henry de Clyderhou for an Oxgang of Land in 
Thaynage Yearly ijs iij d 

Mino de Aluetham held of the said Earl a Carucat of Land in Aitham. 
Aluetham and Clayton upon the Moores by the service of ^ of ciayton on y 

Knight's Fee and the Yearly Rent of iij s iiij d 

at Midsummer and Suit to Clyderhou 3 weeks Court. 

Robert de Risseton held a Carucate of Land in Chirche of the church. 

s d Earl freely by the Yearly Rent of iij 8 at the 

Feast of S fc Gyles and Suit to the said Court. 

William de Radecliff held 2 Carucats of Land in Thaynage at 

the Yearly Rent of , x d at the s d 

Time and Suit to the said Court. 

Johanna late the wife of Edmund Talbot held two Carucates of Rishton. 
Land in Risseton by i of a Knight's Fee the Yearly Rent of j s and 
Suit of Court aforesaid. 

William de Haskayth held 2 Carucats of Land by the service of 

of a Knights Fee and the Yearly Rent of ij s vj d and 

Suit of the Court aforesaid. 

John Hilton held a Carucate and ^ in Bakburne freely by Bkckbume. 
Homage. 

S r Henry de Bury held Levesay in Thaynage and paid Yearly Livesey. 

xxix 8 
at the Feast of S* Gyles and did Suit of the Court aforesaid. 

John de Plesyngton and Adam de Tokholes held Tockholes in Tockhoies. 
Thaynage and does one Suit to the aforesaid Court. 

The Heirs of Samlesbury and of Keuersdale hold one Carucate [Over 
in Ondrewent 9 by the Service of Knight's Fee and Suit of Court 
of Clyderhou. 

9 This is probably Ou'drewent, meaning Over Darwen. 



1 6 THE GREAT DE LACY 

Nether Darwent. S r Adam Banestre held 2 Carucates of Land in Nether Derwent 

and paid yearly ij s x d 

Walton. S r John de Langeton held 2 Carucates of Land in Walton by 

the Service of iiij s a year 

at Midsummer and Suit to the Court aforesaid. 
Keuresdaie. Alexander de Keuresdeale held a Carucat in Keuresdale by the 

Service of ix s a year 

at the Feast of S* Gyles 
Samksbury. Lady Cecill de Evyhus and Lady Elizabeth de Holland held one 

Carucat in Samlesbury in Thayuage and paid yearly xij s 

Meiore. Nicholas de Evyas held ^ a Carucate of Land in Melore by the 

Service of & of a Knight's Fee and paid yearly viij d 

Houghton. Richard de Haughton held \ a Carucate of Land 10 by T V of a 

Knight's Fee and paid yearly viij d oft: and 

Suit to the aforesaid Court. 
ciayton. S r Adam de Huddelstone held Clayton and Billinghton by the 

Billington. a n ^ 

Service of x s yearly 

at the Feast of S* Gyles and. iij d at 

Midsummer and Suit to the Court aforesaid. 
witton. Richard Son of Geffery de Chaterton held one Carucat in Witton 

by the Service of | of a Knight's Fee and the rent of ij s per 

Ann. at Midsummer. 

Adam Haldeley held an Assart and payed yearly ... j d and Suit 

to the aforesaid Court. 
Maiesbury Hugh de S lSic.~\ held Maiesbury 11 and Little Penhilton in 

Little Penhilton. L J J 

Thaynage and paid yearly xxiij 8 x d at 

S* Giles's Feast and Suit of the Court aforesaid. 
Dynkeiey. Roger de Clyderhou held an Oxgang and of Land in Dynkeley 

in Thaynage and payed ij s ob: and Suit of 

Court. 
Bernard de Hackyng in Whelpishire [held] an Oxgang of 

Land in Thaynage and paid yearly jx d and Suit 

of Court. 

10 The Cat. Inq.p. m. calls this, " one carucate of land in Ockleshill," (for Eccleshill). 
11 The Cal. Inq. p. m. shows this to be Salesbury. 



INQUISITION. 1 7 

Henry de Bradhill held an Oxgang of Land and there in 

Thaynage and paid yearly js iij d and Suit 

of Court. 

Henry de Boulton held one Oxgang in Thaynage by y e Rent of 
j s p Ann. and Suit of Court. 

John Son of Walter de Bradhill held there 2 Oxgangs of Land 

in Thaynage and payd yearly ... j s and suit 

of Court. 

S r Adam de Banestre held of the said Earl one Carucate in [A ug hton.j 
Aughton by the Service of | of Knight's Fee and the Yearly 

Rent of , jx d at 

Midsummer and Suit of Court. 

S r William Banastre held one Carucate of Land in Dolleworth Diiiwonh. 

by Homage and the Rent of ij s at the 

Feast of S* Gyles. 

Allan de Caterhall held one Carucate in Little Mitton by the Mitton.. 

Service of J of Knight's Fee and the Yearly Rent of x d at 

Midsummer 

Robert de Shirburne S r Henry de la Lee and Thomas de Ardern wiswair. 
held a Carucate of Land in Wiswall by the of a Knight's Fee 

and paid yearly j s iiij d and 

Suit to Court. 

Roger Noell held 2 Carucats of Land in Great Merley by the G 
Service of j of a Knight's Fee and the Rent of xx d 

William de Heris held one Carucate 'of Land in Little Merley Little 
by the Service of | of a Knight's Fee and the Rent of jx d 

William de Pothover held 2 Carucates of Land in Folrigge by Fowiri 
the Service of of a Knight's Fee, and Suit to the Court aforesaid. 

Henry de Henethirn held a Carucate in Hannethirn in Thay- Henth 

nage paying yearly iij s at the 

Feast of S 1 Gyles and Suit to the Court aforesaid. 

Henry Son of the aforesaid Henry held a Carucate of Land in 

Thaynage paying yearly iij s and doing 

Suit to the Court aforesaid. 



i8 



THE GREAT DE LACY 



Hugh Son of John de Twisleton held one Carucate of Land in 
Thaynage paying yearly at the Feasts of S* Martin and Pentecost 

XX s 

uinebothes. John Son of Bonne held 8 Acres of Land in Ulnebothes paying 

yearly at the Feast of S* Gyles ............................. .......... xij s 

Berdewith. Alan Distefthing held 20 Acres in Berdewith paying yearly iij 8 yj d 

and doing Suit to the Court aforesaid. 

John de Blakeburn held 28 Acres of Land and at Will paying 

yearly ............................................................... xiiij 8 iij d 

Sneiieshou. The Wife of Richard Son of Hamelot, the Wife of Adam de 

Stridholme, Hamme Son of Adecok, Dole Swoffillullinge held 29 

Acres of Land at Will in Sneiieshou by a Yearly Kent payable at 

y e Feast of S* Gyles. [Sic.'] 

John Son of John de Stauden held 60 Acres by a Grant from 

the Earl paying yearly ................................................... ij s 

Fishery in The said Earl had a separate Fishery in Riblewater in Samewell 

Ribblewater, i n i 11 i i "j 

Sameweiiand and Sale well yearly worth ............................................ xii d 

Salewell. 

Pool at Mitton Thomas Soroys paid Yearly to the Earl by Attachments of the 
Pool at Mitton Mill .................................................. iiij" 

Danyscoies. John de Danyscoles held 20 Acres in Danyscoles paying yearly 

vjs 

Saiesbury. Richard de Tyndiheved held n Acres in Salesbury paying 

Yearly ............................ ....................................... j d 

Richard le Sorris held freely a Watermill paying yearly yj s viij d 
Joppa of the Hall of Schippen held a piece of Land in Schippen 
paying yearly ................... ......................................... j d 

Sum..^ 1 xv s jx d 

The following held their Tenements as part of the Dower of the 
Lady Alice de Lacy but did Suit to the 3 weeks Court at Clyderhou 
(viz*) 

Thomas de Osbaldestone for his Tenements in Osbaldestone and 
Baldwestone. 

Ralph de Clayton for his Tenements in Dighton. 



Balderstone. 



INQUISITION. 1 9 

Thomas son of Kutte for his Tenements in Schippen. 

There is a Capital Messuage Yearly Worth yj d 

100 Acres of Land demised to divers Tenants at Will, who pay 
Yearly at the Feast of S* Gyles xxxiij 8 iiij d 

There are 8 Oxgangs of Land, demised to divers Tenants at 
Will, who pay yearly xxiiij 8 

There is a Park called Musbirry, the Herbage and Agistments MusWrry Park. 
thereof Yearly worth. xiij 8 iiij d 

There is a several Pasture Yearly worth x s 

A Watermill Yearly worth above reprises xx s 

There is a free Court Yearly worth by Estimation xx s 

S r Henry de Bury held of the Earl of Lincoln the Manner of Manner of Bury. 
Bury by the Service of a Knight's Fee and Suit to the 3 weeks 
Court at Tottyngton. 

Roger de Midleton held of the said Earl the Mannor of Midleton Manner of 
by y e Service of one Knight's Fee and Suit to the Court aforesaid. 

Henry de Trafford held of the said Earl the Mannor of Chadre- Mannor of 
den by the Service of one Knight's Fee and Suit to the Court 
aforesaid. 

Adam de Prestwiche held of the said Earl the Mannor of Alkring- Mannor of 
ton by the Service of of a Knight's Fee and Suit to the Court 
aforesaid. 

Henry de Bury held ^ the Mannor of Shotlesworth by the Ser- Mannor of 

.., Shotlesworth. 

vice of. xy d p Ann. 

payable at Easter and Michaelmas. 

Richard de Radcliff held 20 Acres of Land in Tottington by the xottington. 

Service of iij s at the 

said Terms. 

Robert de Bradeschagh held of the said Earl freely a Pasture in 

the said Town by the Homage and Service of. xij d a year 

at the said Terms . 

Roger de Chadreton held 12 Acres in the said Town by Homage 

and a pound of Cuminseed Yearly of the Value of j d oft: 

^ 1 vj s iij d 



20 



THE GKEAT DE LACY 



Capleton. 



In Capleton 12 there are 6 Messuages lying Waste each Yearly 

worth j s vij d 

Sum... vj s vj d 

The said Earl of Lincoln held there the part of a Watermill 
Yearly worth, payable at the Feast of S fc Martin [Nov. n]... iiij 8 

A Weekly Market on Wednesday which together with the 
Stallage and Toll is Yearly worth xx s 

A Fair on the Feast of S 4 Simon and Jude [Oct. 28] Yearly 
worth x s 

There is a 3 weeks Court worth yearly by Estimation xxvj 3 viij d 

There are certain Free Tenants who hold of the said Earl divers 
Tenements by certain Yearly Rents payable at the Feast of S* 
Martin in the Winter. [Nov. n.] 

John de Balschagh for the Service of Ratchedale Fee <P Year 

xxvj 8 viij d 

John de Eland for one Carucate in Hundresfeld, the Homage 
and Service of lx 8 

Henry de Lacy of Cromelywellothem for \ a Carucate in Spot- 
land the Homage of xx s 

The Abbot of Whalley for one Oxgang of Land in Castleton vj 8 

John de Byrom [Byron] for 6 Acres of Land in Butterworth the 
Homage and Service of ij 8 

Geffery de Chadreton for an Oxgang of Land in Wolfstanesthe- 
ton 13 the Homage and Service of xij d 

Roger de Pilkerington for an Oxgaug of Land in Pilkington 
the Homage and Service of xij d 

Certain Oxgangs of Land called Berkothill 14 demised at Will 

for xx 3 

Sum... jx 1 v s vj d 



Penwortham. In Penwotham there is a Capital Messuage Yearly worth .. 

12 This is a clerical error for Castleton, as is shown by the CaZ. Inq. p. m. 
13 In the Cal. Inq. p. m. this is called Wolfstanesclive. 
14 Berknockhill. Inq. p. m. 



Rochdale. 

Hundresfield. 

Spotland. 

Castleton. 
Butterworth. 



Wolfstanes 
theton. 



Pilkington. 



Berkothill. 



INQUISITION. 21 

There are 24 Acres of Meadow Demean Yearly worth ... Ixxij 8 

The said Earl held a certain Fishery in Bible-Water. Yearly Fishery in 

f. Ribble- Water. 

worth yj 1 xiij 8 mj d 

There are certain Cottages demised at Will some of which pay 

yearly at Michaelmas xviij d 

Others xiij d 

There are certain Free Tenants who hold of the said Earl divers 

Tenements for Life, paying a certain Yearly Rent at Michaelmas. 

Walter Clark for an Assart xij s 

Walter White for a Cottage and an Assart x 8 

[Blank] Elliot for an Assart .., iiij 8 vj d 

Adam Wiot for an Assart iij 8 

William de Spenser for an Assart iiij 8 

Adam Pokelt for an Assart iij s j d 

Robert Son of Molle for an Assart yj 8 

Thomas de Leyland for an Oxgang of Land xij d 

Adam Ploket for an Assart between Ynynpoll and the Land of 

William del Schales xx 9 

Adam Doristall for 3 Assarts xj 9 

William del Schales for 3 Assarts vj 8 

William de Spencer for an Assart ij 8 

The Prior of Penwortham for an Assart at Will xij d 

Sum.,, xiiij 1 xviij 3 

The Heirs of William de la Mare held of the said Earl their Langton. 

Tenements freely in Langeton by the Service of 1 s p annum 

at Michaelmas. 

William de Cowderey held of the said Earl Otrepoll Fishery in otrepoi Fishery. 
Fee Farm, paying Yearly xxvj viij d 

Alan de Mels payed to the said Earl Yearly 

By Custom the said Earl had an Ancient Rent in the Town of Meis. 
Mels, Yearly worth ij s 

He had at Galwath Lands Yearly xij d 

Thomas de Sutton held freely there 3 Oxgangs of Land, paying 
Yearly ij d q> 



22 THE GREAT DE LACY 

Meb. The Prior of Penwortham held of the said Earl an Oxgaug of 
Land in Mels by the Service of -fa of a Knight's Fee and the 
Rent of j d ofe:c| > 

Dokesbury and The said Earl had an Ancient Yearly Rent payable out of the 

Towns of Dokesbery and Addington at Michaelmas of iij 8 

And out of the Towns of Stangdish and Langhe the Ancient 
Custome Yearly ij 8 

Stangdish and And the Lord of the said Towns of Staudish and Langhe do 

Langhe. 

Suit to the 3 weeks Court at Penwortham. 

Sum... iiij 1 xiij 8 

Frekleton, Adam de Freckleton held of the said Earl, Frekleton, Newton, 

Etheiieswkk, Ethelleswick and Wayngham 15 by the Service of a Knight's Fee and 

and Wayngham. . ... 

paid Yearly at Mich' as for Sakfe iiij 8 and did 

Suit to Penwortham Court. 
Warton, S r Thomas de Bethom held of the said Earl his Tenements in 

Bretherton, 

and Newsom. Warton, Brethertou, and Newsom by'the Service of a Knight's 

Fee and payed Yearly by [? for] Sakfe xviij d and Suit 

to the Court aforesaid. 

Byrkedaie, Nicholas de Eton and Johanna his Wife. Daughter and Heir of 

Clackton, 

Bretherton. Richard de Stokeford held of the said Earl Byrkedeale, the Moiety 
of Clackton and Bretherton by the Service of \ a Knight's Fee, 
and the Yearly Rent for Sakfe xxij d ob: 

Gunoifmores, Richard de Hokton held of the said Earl Gunolfmores and 

Whitehill in 

Whitehill in the Wood by the Service of one Knight's fiee the 

Yearly Rent of ij 8 and 

Suit to the Court aforesaid. 

i. The said Earl held a certain free 3 Weeks Court in Penwortham 
the Pleas and Profits thereof by computation Yearly worth ... xl 8 
The Fees of the Serjeanty of the said Court demised at the Will 

of the Lord payable at Michaelmas Yearly worth vj s viij d 

Sum... lvj s ob: 

15 In Cal. Inq. p. m. this is Whitingham. 



INQUISITION. 23 

The Lands, Tenements and Fees, which the said Earl held in 

Widnes. 

A certain place for a Capital Messuage Yearly worth ij s widnes. 

There are 96 Acres of Land in Demean demised to divers Tenants 

at Will payable at Midsumer and Christmas Yearly worth... Ixiiij 8 

There are 16 Oxgangs of Land in Bondage w ch pay yearly . vivj s 

And each Oxgang pays at Mich' as for Works in Sumer excused 

yd 

Sum... iiij s viij d 

I 
And each Oxgang of Land pays yearly at Christmas for a certain 

Service called le Brede iij d . Sum iiij 3 

Sum... iiij 1 iiij s viij d 

In Upton there are 8 Oxgangs of Land in Bondage, which pay Upton. 
Yearly xvj 8 

There is a Windmill and a Watermill Yearly worth. . xxvj s viij d 

At Witnes there is a free 3 Weeks Court, the Pleas and Profits widnes. 
by computation amounting to vj s viij d 

Richard de Donnyngton, held of the said Earl 24 Acres of Land 
in Widnes by the Service p Ann. at Lady Day of ij s viij d 

Richard de Denton and Roger Son of Ralph held of the said 
Earl two Acres of Land and a Watermill by the Service p Ann. of x s 

Sum... Ixxvj 8 

Gilbert le Norreys and his Partners held of the said Earl theTownofSotton. 
Town of Suttoii by the Service of one Knight's Fee and iij s vj d for 
Sakfe at Christmas and Midsummer and Suit to the 3 weeks Court 
at Widnes. 

Alan le Norreys held of the said Earl the Town of Eccleston Kccieston. 
by the Service of one Knight's Fee and the Rent of... iij s vj d for 
Sakfe and Suit to the Court aforesaid. 

S r Robert de Latham held of the said Earl Knowsley, Raby, K,,O si, y , R : .b>. 



2 4 



THE GREAT DE LACY 



Huxtonand Huxtou and Talbok 16 by the Service of one Knight's Fee and an 

Talbok. J 

half. 

Little Crosseley. Richard Molineux de Crosseley 17 held of the said Earl Little 
Crosseley by the Service of | of a Knight's Fee and the Yearly 

Rent of ij s viij d for 

Sakfe and Suit to the Court aforesaid. 

S r Thomas de Both held of the said Earl the town of Kyrkeby 
by the Service of T V of a Knight's Fee. 18 

16 Roby, Euxton and Tarbock. 

J " This is Little Crosby, as in Cat. Inq. p. m. 

18 Here the translation ends, but the Cat. Inq. adds the following to these fees : 
" Maghale [Maghull] Vill, Asteley Vill, Appletone, two acres of land for a passage 
over the Mersey, beyond the waters of Wynnes [? Widnes] as far as to Routore 
[? Ruucorn] and thence by custom, without anything to be given therefor." 



Town of 
Kyrkeby. 



INDEX NOMINUM ET LOCORUM. 



A BBOT of Kirkstall, 13. 

** of Whalley, 20. 

Adam of the Bridge, 1 3. 

son of Clark, 9. 

son of Robert, 12. 

son of Wyot, 6. 

Addington, 22. 

Adecok, 18. 

Alan, son of Robert, 7. 

Alice ; wife of Thomas, son of Edmond, 

the king's brother, 4. 
Alkrington manor, 19. 
Altham, 15. 

Aluetham, Mino de, 15. 
Ardern, Thomas de, 17. 
Aught on, 17. 

T3ALDERSTONE, 18. 
*-^ Balschagh, John de, 20. 
Banestre, sir Adam de, 16, 17. 

sir William, 17. 

Berdeurith, 18. 
Berdtwisell, 14. 
Berkothill, 20. 



Bethom, sir Thomas de, 22. 
Billington, 16. 
Birchess, Dyk de, 12. 
Slackburtie, 15. 
Blakeburn, Henry de, 5. 

John de, 17. 

Bonne, 18. 

Both, sir Thomas de, 24. 

Boulton, Henry de, 17. 

Bowland, 5. 

Bradhill, Henry de, 17. 

John, son of Walter de, 17. 

Bradeschagh, Robert de, 19. 

Breretwisle, Henry de, 10. 

Bretherton, 22, bis. 

Brierclijfe, 9. 

Sruneley, 9. 

Bury, sir Henry de, 15, 19. 

Henry de, 19. 

Bury manor, 19. 
Butterworth, 20. 
Byrkedale, 22. 
Byrom, John de, 20. 



INQUISITION. 



(^APLETON (Castleton), 20. 
^-* Castleton, 20. 
Caterliall, Allan de, 17. 
Chadreton, Roger de, 19. 

- Geffery de, 20. 
Chadreden manor, 19. 

Chaterton, Richard, son of Geffery de, 16. 

Chatburn, Thomas de, 7. 

Church, 15. 

Clackton, 22. 

Clark, Eiehard, his heir, 7. 

- Walter, 2 1 . 
Clayton, 16. 

Clayton on the Moors, 15. 
Clayton, John de, 14. 

- Ealphde, 18. 
Cliviger, 12. 
Clogh, Adam del, 15. 

- Thomas de, 6. 
Clyderhou, Roger de, 16. 

- William, son of Henry de, 15. 
Clyderhowe, 4. 

Colne, 8. 

Colnekole, Richard de, 12. 
Cowderey, William de, 21. 
Craven, Adam de, 7. 
Crosseley \_Crosby], Little, 24. 



., 1 8. 
Danyscoles, John de, 18. 
Darwent, Nether, 16. 

- Over, 15. 
Dennon, 7. 

Denton, Richard de, 23. 

Dighton, 18. 

Dik, son of Mocock, 13. 

Dik, or Dyk, of the Gate, 12. 

Dilworth, 17. 

Dinely, William de, 12. 

Distefthing, Alan, 18. 

Dokesbury, 22. 

Donnon (or Dennon), Henry de, 7, 

Hugh de, 7 . 
Donnyngton, Richard de, 23. 
Doristall, Adam de, 21. 
Dynkeley, 16. 

ECCLHSTON, 23. 
Edward L, king, 4. 
Eland, John de, 20. 
Ellen de Lahady, 14. 
Elliot, , 21. 
Ethelleswick, 22. 



Eton, Nicholas de, 22 ; Johanna, wife of, 

22. 

Evyas, Nicholas de, 16. 
Evyhus, lady Cecill de, 16. 

T^ISHERY, Otrepol, 21. 

in Riblewater, 18. 

Fowlridge, 17. 
FrecJcleton, 22. 
Freckleton, Adam de, 22. 

GATE, Dyk of the, 12. 
Galwath, 21. 
Geffery, son of John, 13. 
Grange, Stephen of the, 12. 
Grimeschagh, Adam de, 12. 

Robert de, 12, bis. 

G-unolf mores, 22. 

HASERGHAM Eaves, 9. 
Hackyng (in Whelpishire), Bernard 
de, 1 6. 

Haldeley, Adam, 16. 
Hamelot, 18. 

Hamme, son of Adecok, 18. 
Hapton, 14. 
Hargreves, John de, 12. 
Haskayth, William de, 15. 
Haslingden, 13. 
Haughton, Richard de, 16. 
Heley, Dowen de, 9. 

Henry de, 13. 

Henry, son of Henry, 7. 

son of Holekyn, 12. 

Henethirn (Henthorn) Henry de, 17. 

Henry son of Henry de, 17. 

Henthorns, 17. 

Heris, William de, 6, 17. 

Hilton, John, 15. 

Hoddlesden, n. 

Holand, sir Robert de, 13. 

Holland, lady Elizabeth de, 16. 

Holdene, Adam de, 9, 10, 13. 

Robert de, 13, 14. 

Holekyn, 12. 

Holm, Robert del, 13. 

Holt, John del, 15. 

Hokton, Richard de, 22. 

Houghton, 16. 

Huddelstone, sir Adam de, 16. 

Hugh, son of Ralph, 6. 

son of Thomas, 7. 

de S , 16. 

Hugyn, 7. 



26 



THE GREAT DE LACY 



Huncotes, 14. 
Hundresfeld, 20. 
Huxton, 24. 

T GSTENHILL, 10. 



T OHANNA, late wife of Edmund Tal- 
J hot, 15. 

daughter and heir of Richard de 

Stokeford ; wife of Nicholas de Eton, 

22. 

John, son of Bonne, 13. 

son of, Gilbert, 18. 

son of Matthew, 12. 

Joppa, of the hall of Schippen, 18. 

T/" EUERSDALE, Alexander de, 16. 

-* *- , heirs of, 15. 

Keuresdale, 16. 

Kirkstall, Abbot of, 13. 

Knowsley, 23. 

Kouhope [Cowhope], Henry de, 12. 

Kutte, Thomas, son of, 19. 

Kyrkeley, 24. 

F ACY, Henry de, earl of Lincoln, 4 
* ' et scepe. 

of Crumbe Wellekoyem, 14. 

Cromelywellothem, 20. 

lady Alice de, 18. 

Lahady, Ellen de, 14. 

Langeton, 21. 

Langeton, sir John de, 16. 

Langhe, 22. 

Latham, sir Robert de, 23. 

Lee, sir Henry de la, 17. 

Legh, Adam de la, 12. 

Gilbert de la, 12. 

John de la, 13. 

Lenneciogh, Pok de, 12. 
Leyland, Thomas de, 21. 
Lincoln, earl of (vide Lacy). 
Livesey, 15. 
Lykteenes, Jordan de, 12. 

IV/T ALESBUBT, 16. 

*" Mare, William de la, heirs of, 21. 

Marsden, Great, 8. 

Little, 8. 

Mawe, 10. 
Mearlay, Great, 17. 

Little, 17. 

Mels, 21, 22. 



Melore, 16. 

Mels [Meols], Alan de, 21. 

Midleton manor, 19. 

Midleton, Roger de, 19. 

Middlemen, William de, 12. 

Mitton, Little, 17 ; mill, pool at, 18. 

Mokock of Briercliffe, 9. 

de la Lowe, 12. 

del Moreclogh, 13. 

of Brerecroft, 13. 



Molineux de Crosseley, Richard, 24. 
Molle, Robert, son of, 21. 
Musbirry park, 19. 



*-^ Newton, 22. 
Noell, Roger, 17. 
Norreys, Alan le, 23. 
- Gilbert le, 23. 

ORMERODE, Adam de, 13, 22. 
- Tibbi de, 13, 22. 
Osbaldeston, 18. 
Osbaldestone, Thomas de, 18. 
Otrepol fishery, 21. 



10. 

-^ Penhulton, 5, n. 
- Little, 1 6. 
Penwortham, 20, 22. 
Penwortham, prior of, 21, 22. 
Pilkington, 20. 
Pilkerington, Roger de, 20. 
Plesyngton, John de, 15. 
Ploket, Adam, i 
Pokelt, Adam, ) 21 
Pok de Lenneciogh, 12, 
Polhover, William de, 17. 
Prestwiche, Adam de, 19. 

(^)UERDEREY [Corduroy?], William, 
\ 5- 






23. 



Radcliff, Richard de, 19. 
RadecHff, William de, 15. 
Reed, 15. 

Rillewater fishery, 21. 
Richard, son of Mawe, 10. 

- son of Hamelot ; his wife, 18. 
Sishton, 15. 

Risseton, Robert de, 15. 

Robert, son of Mokok of Briercliffe, 9. 

- del Holm, 13. 



INQUISITION. 



Rochdale, 20. 
Roger, son of Ealpb, 23. 
Romesgrave, 11. 
Rossendale, 1 1 . 
Kussell, Adam, 5. 
Ryding, Richard, 5. 
Ryelands, Thomas de, 9. 

,'Hughde, 1 6. 

Salesbury, 18. 
Samlesbury, 16. 
Samlesbury, heirs of, 15. 
Schales, William del, 21. 
Schipen, 1 8, bis. 

Schippen, Joppa of the hall of, 18. 
Shirburne, Robert de, 17. 
Smith, Adam, 13. 
Snelleshou, 18. 
Sholesworth, John de, 14. 
Shotlesworth manor, 1 9. 
Sorris, Richard le, 18. 
Soroys, Thomas, 18. 
Spenser, William de, 21, bis. 
Spotland, 20. 
Stand en, 5. 

Standen, John son of John de, 18. 
Standish, 22. 

Stainesfeld, Oliver de, 9, 13. 
Stephen of the Grange, 12. 
Stokeford, Richard de, ; Johanna, his 

daughter and heir, 22. 
Stridholme, Adam de ; his wife, 18. 
Sutton, 23. 

Sutton, Thomas de, 21. 
Swoffillullinge, Dole, 18. 
Symondston, Alyott de, 14. 

Geffery de, 14. 

John, son of John de, 14. 

Symondstone, 14. 

'"TALBOK, 24. 

* Talbot, sir Edmund ; his heir, 14. 
Edmund ; Johanna, late his wife, 15. 



Thomas, son of Edmond, the king's bro- 
ther, 4. 

son of Kutte, 19. 

Tibbi de Ormerode, 13. 

Tockholes, 15. 

Tokholes, Adam de, 15. 

Topping, William, 13. 

Totiington, iq. 

Townley, de, 9. 

Trawden, 10. 

Trafford, Henry de, 19. 

Twisleton, Hugh, son of John de, 18. 

Trndeheved, Richard de, 18. 

T T LNEBOTHES, 18. 
v Upton, 23. 

WADINGTON, Walter de, 7. 
Walfreden, 8. 

Walleseeching, Adam de, 9. 
Walton, 16. 
Warton, 22. 
Wayngham, 22. 
Whalley, abbot of, 20. 
Wheteacker, John de, 9, 10. 
Whilpshire, 16. 
White, Walter, 21. 
Whitehill in the Wood, 22. 
Widnes, 23, bis. 

Wife of Richard, son of Hamelot, 18. 
William, son of Robert, 12. 
son of Thomas, 6. 



Wiot, Adam, 21. 
Wiswall, 17. 
Witton, 1 6. 
Wolfstanestheton, 20. 
Wolpitgrave, major de, 12. 
Worsthorn, 13. 
Worst on, 5. 
Wyot, 6. 

V7HATES, John del, (vide Gate). 12. 



II. SURVEY OF 1320-1346. 



IN the year 1848 a very curious MS. was entrusted by a gentle- 
man of Manchester to the Rev. Canon Raines, with full per- 
mission for the Chetham Society to make any use of it they might 
deem desirable. It is imperfect, having originally consisted of 
twenty-four leaves of folio foolscap, but three (foil. 4, 5, 6), relating 
to Manchester were wanting. There is no title to the document, 
but its last leaf has the following endorsement : 

No. 15. Edward II. An old copy, in 1575 or 1580, of the Boundary, 
Rents, and other curious matters in and concerning the manor of Manc'r 
and other manors and places in Com: Lane. 

The first sentence of the text, however, explains the nature of 
the document, which appears to have been copied from some ancient 
roll, and gives the names of the two surveyors, and the date of the 
survey, as regards the manor of Manchester : 

Mamecestre. In this roll are contained Memoranda touching the 
manor and demesne of Mamecestre, made by the help of John de Hul- 
ton and Adam de Radcliffe, and of all the bordars and others in the 
same place, in the month of June in the i3th year of the reign of King 
Edward son of King Edward, {i.e. i$ih. Edward II., June 1320.] 

So far as this document relates to the barony and manor of 
Manchester, it was printed both in the original Latin and in trans- 
lation, in Mamecestre, vol, ii. pp. 274-299. The other portions, 
now first printed, relate only to three hundreds in Lancashire, 
West Derby, Amounderness, and Lonsdale, and contain nothing 
as to those of Salford, Leyland, and Blackburn. To the hundreds 
of West Derby and Amounderness, no date is affixed, and it might 
be taken that the survey as to these was made either in 1320, or 
some time between that year and 1346 inclusive. But the survey 
as to Lonsdale begins thus : 

WAPENTAKE OF LONSDALE. An Extent of the Rent and Eees there, 
made before the aforesaid William and William, on Monday next after 
the feast of the Nativity of S* John the Baptist, in the year of the 



SURVEY OF 1320-1346. 29 

reign of King Edward the Third after the Conquest, the 2oth, [i.e. 
26th June 1346]. 

In no former part of this imperfect document do there occur any 
names to which " the aforesaid William and William " can apply. 
It can only be assumed, therefore, that this is an extent or survey 
of the hundreds of West Derby and Amounderness, in some year 
ranging between 1320 and 1346, and that of Lonsdale on the 26th 
June 1346. We print it as in the original Latin, with a transla- 
tion on the opposite pages. 

A careful comparison of this " Survey" (now first printed) with 
the imperfect document entitled "Tenent: Duci Lancastr:" 19 
printed in Gregson's Portfolio of Fragments, from the MSS. of 
Thomas Birch, esq., of Birch, and also called " The Birch Feodary, v 
will serve, notwithstanding the inaccuracy of the Birch MS. as 
printed, to corroborate, check, or correct (as the case may be) the 
" Survey " as here printed. Sir Peter Leycester assigned the 
Birch Feodary to the reign of Edward II. (1307-1327) ; Mr. Greg- 
son thinks it was made in 1311, or soon after the death of Henry 
de Lacy, earl of Lincoln, in 1310. It is in fact of various dates; 
and not of the same time or times as the survey in the text, as the 
Christian names of many, and the surnames of some of the tenants 
differ from those in the " Survey." Any important variations will 
be pointed out in foot notes to the " Survey." 

19 Henry, first duke of Lancaster, held the duchy 1351-1361. 



3O SURVEY OF 1320-1346. 

WAPPEN: DE WEST DERBYE. 

Villat ibm tenet de dno p vna caruc: terre in socag 1 red p 
aim 9 xx s t. natai dni, Annunc: bete Marie, Nat J. Bapt et 
Michis; et post decessii teuen? duplit reddit noie releu. 
debent etiam sectam Com) et wappen: et potur) fuic: et ibut 
cu baft com) et wappen: vsq> px villat ad testificl distr) quociens 
et c. p curru suu acciderrit cu aliis vicinis suis vnd Johes 

xs. iijt. 

de Ditton, tenet medietat vift p d. caruc. terre. Hugo de 

\\1JS. 

Ditton ix am ptem et xviij am ptem caruc. Thomas filius Stephi 
vj. ptem caruc. hug fiysher xij am ptem caruc. Joh henrson 
xij am ptem caruc. 



Robtus be Blackeburne de Gerstange tenet maneriu de Gers- 
tange de iure Elene vxis sue rl p ann 9 iiij 1. vt supra xx s et 
forinc. sect com. et wappen. et ibit cu balliuis vt supra. 

Wiftus de Ormeston de leghe tenet maneriu de Westleeghe 
p iiij ta pte et xx ma pte feod militf et poturl ministr vt supra 
et sect vt supra et ibit vt supra. 

Symon de Walton tenet iij bouat terre in Thingewall p 
xx ma pte feod milit^ p ann 9 iiij t. vt supra vj s viij d . Idem 



WAPENTAKE OF WEST DERBY. -, l 



WAPENTAKE OF WEST DERBY. 

DITTON. The same village is held of the Lord for one carve of 
land in socage paying yearly twenty shillings at the terras of 
Christmas, the Annunciation of the Blessed Mary, the nativity of 
St. John Baptist, and Michaelmas; and after the decease of a 
tenant, double shall be paid in the name of a relief. They owe 
also suit to the county and the wapentake and puture service, and 
they go with the bailiffs of the county and the wapentake as far as 
the next village to witness distraints, as often as it shall happen to 
come to their turn, with others their neighbours. 20 Whereof John 

IOS. 

de Ditton holds a moiety of the village for half a carve of land. Hugh 

3S. 4*. 

de Ditton the ninth part and the eighteenth part of a carve. Thomas 

i8rf. i8<t. 

son of Stephen the sixth part of a carve. Hugh Fysher, the twelfth 
part of a carve. John Henrysou, the twelfth part of a carve. 

GERSTANG. Robert de Blackburne, of Gerstange, holds the 
manor of Gerstang in right of Ellen his wife, paying yearly at 
the four terms as above twenty shillings, and foreign suit to the 
county and wapentake, and he goes with the bailiffs as above. 

WEST LEIGHE. William de Ormeston of Leghe holds the 
manor of Westleighe by the fourth part and the twentieth part of 
a knight's fee and puture to the officers as above, and suit as 
above, and goes as above. 

THYNGEWALL. Symon de Walton holds three oxgangs of land 
in Thingewall by the twentieth part of a knight's fee, [paying] 

20 This sentence is very obscure in the contracted Latin. 



32 SURVEY OF 1320-1346. 

Symon ten 9 iiij boua? terr 9 in Walton p <fuian2 vidit administr 9 
bait regf . 

Symon de Walton tenet de douo regf Jonis ij caruc. terre 
in ffornebye in socag* r 9 p ann 9 xxiiij 8 viij d iiij. ?. p onibus et 
duplit reddit noie releu put custu erit et ibit cu baft vt supra. 

ijj.iiijrf. _ ijj. \u]d. 

Radus de Bechom ten j caruc. terre in socag et Jones Dam- 
port j. caruc. terre in fornebye p luicl militf cu at tenentibus 
in Wodeplumpton infra wapen. de Amondernesse r 9 p ann 9 
int se iiij. ?. iiij 8 viij d et pctur vt supra. 



Crossebye. Thomas Moleneux et p ten 9 sui ten 9 ifcm xj bouat terr 9 in socag 1 
red p ann iiij I. vts upra xxvij 3 vj d . Sect com. et wapen. releu 

xs. 

et eund cu baft vt supra vnde idm Thomas iiij bouat terre. 

xi. xviijrf. 

Ricus Blundell iiij bouat terre. Dns Com. p manu Rici del 
Wall j. bouat. Robtus de Wyresdale, Rogerus Dolyni] [? Bolyrnl] 

iijj. 

et Margeria fit Thorn Jordanson int se j bouat. Wiftus Rogerson 
et Johes del Dale et Henri Wodewarde j bouat iij s . 



SEFTON CU MEMBRIS. 

Sefton. Ricus Molineux ten 9 v. caruc. terr 9 in Sefton j caruc. terr 9 

in Thorneton et ij caruc. terr 9 in Kerden p fuic d. feod militf 
r 9 p ann 9 p ward castr 9 lancastr 9 et Sakefe 1. Nat. J. bapt. xj s 



WAPENTAKE OF WEST DERBY. 33 

yearly at the four terms as above six shillings and eight pence. 
The same Symon holds four oxgaugs of land in Walton by serjeanty, 
namely, to attend upon the king's bailiffs. 

FORNEBYE. Symon de Walton holds of the gift of King John 
two carves of land in Fornebye, in socage, paying yearly twenty- 
four shillings and eight pence, at the four terms, for all [services] 
and he pays double in the name of a relief as custom, and he goes 

2S. ^d. 

with the bailiffs as above. Ralph de Bethom holds one carve of land 

2S ^d. 

in socage, and John Damport one carve of land in Pomebye by 
knight's service with the other tenants in Wood Plumpton, within 
the wapentake of Amounderaess, paying yearly amongst them, at 
the four terms, four shillings and eight pence, and puture as above. 
CROSSEBYE. Thomas Moleneux, and by his tenants, holds there 
eleven oxgangs of land in socage, paying yearly at the four terms as 
above twenty-seven shillings and sixpence, suit to the county and 
wapentake, relief, and to go with the bailiffs as above. Whereof 

IOS. T-Of. 

the same Thomas [holds] the original land. Richard Blundell, 

is. fxi. 

four oxgaugs of laud. The lord the Earl by the hand of Richard 
of the Wall, one oxgang. Robert de Wyresdale, Roger Bolymer, 

3 s - 

and Margery, daughter of Thomas Jordanson, amongst them one 
oxgang. William Rogerson, and John of the Dale, and Henry 
Wodeward, one oxgang, three shillings. 

SEFTON WITH ITS MEMBERS. 

SEFTON. Richard Molineux holds five carves of land in Seftou, 
one carve of land in Thorneton, and two carves of land in Kerdeu, 
by service of half a knight's fee, paying yearly for ward of the 



34 SUEVEY OF 1320-1346. 

et sec? com. et wapen. p maims Thorn: Demand: [? Bsemand] 
tenentis sui. 



Douniither- Idm Ricus ten. 9 iij caruc. terr 9 in Dounlitherlande in socag 1 

lande. 

red p ann 9 iiij ~i. vt supra xx s . 



Boteii. Radus de Bethome ten 9 villam de Botell in Teynage red p 

ann 9 vt supra viij 8 viij d releu et potur et cestr 9 [? castr 9 ] distr 9 

baft vt supra. 
Bykcrstath. Adam de Bykerstath ten 9 vitt rbm et d. caruc. terre in socag 

red p ann 9 iiij. I. vt supra V s releu sect com. et wap. et potur 

vt supra. 

pounho- Ricus de dounholande ten 9 ii caruc. d. terr 9 in Dounholande et 

lande. 

Pfhtr 9 et med de barton p foic iiij. ptf feod militf red p ann 9 
iiij. ?. vt supra put ipemet cognou xviij 3 sect. com. et wapen. et 
potur vt sup". 

xxd. 

Thingewall. Witt fit Jofc de Thingewall ten j bouat terr . Rogerus de 

vs. 

Thingewall iij boua? in Thingewall p xx ma pte feod militf red 
p anS vj s viij d iiij ?. et potur 9 ministr 9 et eund cu balliuis in recod 
vt sup". 

Meiiynge. VniSs ten 9 et abbas de Cokersaude ten 9 iiij car. terr in 
Mellinge et Conescoughe in socag 1 red p ann 9 x s iiij 1. vt sup" 
potur et eund cu balliuis et releu vt supra. 



WAPENTAKE OF WEST DERBY. 35 

Castle of Lancaster and sake-fee at the term of the nativity of St. 
John Baptist, eleven shillings and suit to the county and wapentake 
by the hand of Thomas Baemand his tenant. 

DowN-LiTHERLAND. The same Richard holds three carves of 
land in Doun-litherlaude in socage, paying yearly at the four terms 
as above twenty shillings. 

BOTELL. Ralph de Bethome holds the village of Botell in 
thanage, paying yearly as above eight shillings and eight pence, 
relief and puture, and attending the distraints of bailiffs as above. 

BYKERSTATH. Adam de Bykerstath holds the same village and 
half a carve of land in socage, paying yearly at the four terms as 
above five shillings, relief, suit to the county and wapentake, and 
puture as above. 

DOWN-HOLANDE. Richard de Dounholande holds two and a half 
carves of land in Douiiholande and Pintr. [? Pemberton] and a 
moiety of Barton by service of the fourth part of a knight's fee, pay- 
ing yearly at the four terms as above, as he acknowledges, eighteen 
shillings, suit to the county and wapentake, and puture as above. 

2od. 

THINGEWALL. William son of John de Thingewall holds one 

y - . 
oxgang of land, Roger de Thingewall three oxgangs, in Thingewall, 

by the twentieth part of a knight's fee, paying yearly two shillings 
and eight pence, at the four terms, and puture to the officers, and 
going with the bailiffs in distraining as above. 

MELLYNQE. All the tenants and the Abbot of Cokersande hold 
four carves of laud in Mellyuge and Conescoughe in socage, paying 
yearly ten shillings, at the four terms as above, puture, and going 
with the bailiffs, and relief, as above. 



36 SURVEY OF 1320-1346. 

Adm? de Houghton miles ten 9 vj caruc. terr 9 cu membris 
in Rauenismeles Ainolnesdale et octo denar 9 reddit in burgo de 
Preston p fuici med et x a ptis feod militf cu vtraq3 le lee vt 
patet alibi red p ann 9 t. miclilis xxvj s viij d vltra iij s iiij d p le lee vt 
patet alibi in wapen. de Amondernesse. 



Newton cu Robtus de Langton miles ten 9 x caruc. terr 9 in Newton infra 

membns. 

Makerfelde cu membris p fuic vnius feod militf red p ann 9 
p warda castr 9 lane. t. Nat. J. Bapt. x s sect, wapen. Et sicut 
membra lauton, Kenean, Sotheworth, Breburye, Croft, Mydleton, 
hogton, Goldeburn, Assheton, haydoke, Billinge cu Wyustan- 
leghe, Orett, Pembton, Adbursham, hyndeleghe, Ins, Wygan, cu 
advocacoe ecciie de Wygan, Wynewhyke cu hulme. 

Haghe. Mabill de bradschaghe her 9 hug 9 le Norreis ten 9 maneriu de 

haghe p xx a pte feod militf r 9 p ann 9 p warda castr 9 lane. t. 
Michis x d et sect com. et wapeu. potur vt supra. 

Boide. Wittus botiller ten 9 maneriu de bulde in socag r 9 p aun 9 t. 

xs. 

pasche et Micnis et sec? com. et wapen. p manus Ric. bulde 
tenetis sui. 

9 



Wiftus ten maneriu de Weryngton cu mebris vidit 

cu raebris. 

Sankye, Peuketh, Ryxton, Glasebrocke, Culcheth, Tyldesley, 
Penyngton, Bedford, Athyrton, Halsale, Ins, Lidiate cu Egger- 



WAPENTAKE OP WEST DERBY. 37 

RA.VENSMELES. Adam de Houghton, knt., holds six carves of 
land with the members in Ravensmeles, Aluolnes-dale, and eight 
pence rent in the borough of Preston, by service of half and one 
tenth part of a knight's fee, with both the Lees, 21 as appears 
elsewhere, paying yearly at the term of Michaelmas twenty-six 
shillings and eight pence beyond the three shillings and four 
pence for the Lee, as appears elsewhere, in the wapentake of 
Amounderness. 

NEWTON, with its Members. Robert de Langton, knt., holds ten 
carves of land in Newton-in-Makerfelde, with members, by the 
service of one knight's fee, paying yearly for ward of the Castle of 
Lancaster, at the term of St. John Baptist, ten shillings, suit to the 
wapentake. And so as to the members, Lauton, Kenean, Sothe- 
worthe, Breburye, Croft, Mydleton, Hogton, Goldeburn, Assheton, 
Haydoke, Billinge with Wynstanleghe, Orell, Pemberton, Adburs- 
ham, Hyndeleghe, Ins, Wygan, with the advowson of the church 
of Wygan, Wynewhyke with Hulme. 

HAGHE. Mabel de Bradschaghe, heir of Hugh le Norreis, holds 
the manor of Haghe by the twentieth part of a knight's fee, paying 
yearly for ward of Lancaster Castle, at Michaelmas term, ten 
pence and suit to the county and wapentake, puture as above. 

BOLDE. William Botiller holds the manor of Bulde in socage, 

IOS. 

paying yearly at the terms of Easter and Michaelmas, and suit to 

the county and wapentake by the hand of Richard Bulde his tenant. 

WERINGTON with Members. The same William holds the manor 

81 The Lea, near Preston, was anciently known as the English Lea and the French Lea. 



38 SURVEY OF 1320-1346. 

garth, d. caruc. terr 9 In barton, et ij caruc. terr 9 in Thorneton p 
fuic ij feod et d. et vj pt feod militf r 9 p ann 9 t. nat. J. bapt. p 
warda castr lane, xxvj 8 viij d vnde vj s p sakefee. Idm Wiftus r 9 
Dfio p dicto manerio de halsale t. natal Dni j libr 9 cumm. vt j d 
ob. p sec? com. et wapen. p manus Otonis de halsale tenetf sui 
et alia sect p raanerio de Ins p manus Wifti Bludell teuetis sui. 



Idm Wiftus botiller ten 9 maneriu de Wyndehull p ij caruc. 
terr 9 p fuic iij ptf feod militf ij u r 9 et sect vt sup". 



Burtonwode. Idm Wiftus ten 9 burtonwode in socagp r 9 p ann 9 . 't. pasche j d . 

Wydnesse. Dnus rex de hered Alic. nup comitisse Lincolne ten 9 maneriu 
de Wydenesse cu membris vidit iij caruc. terr 9 in Appolton ij 
caruc. terr 9 in Croynton v caruc. terr 9 in magna Wolston et pua 
iiij caruc. terr 9 in Eccleston, iiij caruc. terr 9 in Sutton, ij caruc. 
terr 9 in Raynhull, iiij caruc. terr 9 in Cuerdesleghe, iij caruc. terr 9 
in Robye, ij caruc. terr 9 in huytoii, iiij caruc terr 9 in Torbocke, 
ij caruc. in kirkebye, ij caruc. in pua Crossebye, j caruc. terr in 
Mael, j caruc. terr 9 in Astleye, p fuic iij feod et d. et x a ptf et xx a 
pt feod militf r 9 p ann 9 p warda castr 9 et sakefee t. nat. J. bapt. 



WAPENTAKE OF WEST DERBY. 39 

of Werington with its members, namely, Sankeye, Penketh, Ryxton, 
Glasebrocke, Culcheth, Tyldesley, Penyugton, Bedford, Athyrton, 
Halsale, Ins, 22 Lydiate with Eggergarth, half a carve of land in Bar- 
ton, 23 and two carves of land in Thornetou, by service of two and a 
half fees and one sixth part of a knight's fee, paying yearly at the 
term of the nativity of St. John Baptist, for ward of Lancaster Castle, 
twenty-six shillings and eight pence, of which six shillings is for sake- 
fee. 24 The same William pays to the lord for the said manor of Hal- 
sale, at Christmas term, one pound of cummin or three half-pence 
for suit to the county and wapentake, by the hand of Otho de Hal- 
sale, his tenant, and other suit for the manor of Ins, by the hand 
of William Blundell, his tenant. 

WYNDEHULL. The same William Botiller holds the manor of 
Wyndehull for two carves of land by service of one third part of a 
knight's fee, 2.1. rent, and suit as above. 

BURTON WODE. The same William holds Burtonwode in socage, 
paying yearly at Easter term one penny. 

WYDNESSE. The Lord the King, of the heir of Alice, late 
Countess of Lincoln, holds the manor of Wydenesse with its mem- 
bers, viz., three 25 carves of land in Appolton, two carves of land 
in Croynton, 26 five carves of land in Great Wolston and Little, four 
carves of land in Eccleston, four carves of land in Sutton, two carves 
of laud in Raynhull, four carves of land in Cuerdesleghe, 27 three 



22 In the Birch Feodary this is named Ince Blundell ; and after Egargarth it names 
Windhull. 

23 Four oxgangs. Birch MS. M The Birch Feodary has 163. 8cZ. for sak-fee. 

28 Four carves. Birch. x Cramton [Cronton]. Ibid. * Knowsley. Ibid. 



40 SQRVEY OF 1320-1346. 

xxx s sect com. et wapen. p Wydnes alia sec? p Eccleston p 
manus tenetis sui ibm aliam sect p pua Crosseleye p manus tentf 
et iiij^ 111 sect p Astleye p manus tenetf ibm. 



Isabella regina Angl. ten. de hered Alic. nup comitisse Lincolne 
iij caruc. terr 9 in Esshbye de Kyrkedale de dfio de Penwortlfm 
p luic. iiij te ptf et xx a ptf feod militf r. p ann 9 1. J. bapt. vj* 
de eadem villa ibm put comptii est p antiques rotulos compoi 
et t. iij 8 p warda castr 9 et sacke fee. 



Vpeiither- Ricus Walshe ten 9 i caruc. terr 9 in Vpelitherlonde cu advocaoe 

londe. 

ecciie de Asshton ad eandem Vpelitherlonde spectand in socagf 
r. p ann 9 x s iiij I. vt sup" p onibus. 



Thomas de lathum miles ten 9 maneriu de lathum qd est iij car. 
terr 9 cu advocar 9 prioratus de burschoghe et eccfte de Ormes- 
kirke in Tynage_r. p ann 9 iiij t. xx s releu sect com. et wappen. 



WAPENTAKE OF WEST DERBY. 41 

carves of land in Robye, two carves of land in Huyton, four carves 28 
of land in Torbocke, two carves of land in Kirkebye, two carves in 
Little Crossebye, one carve of land in Mael, 29 one carve of land in 
Astleye, by service of three and a half fees and one-tenth part and 
one-twentieth part of a knight's fee, paying yearly for castle-ward 
and sake-fee at the term of the nativity of John Baptist thirty 
shillings, suit to the county and wapentake for Wydnes, other suit 
for Eccleston, by the hand of his tenant there, other suit for Little 
Crossebye, by the hand of his tenant, and a fourth suit for Astley, 
by the hand of his tenant there. 

KYRKEDALLE. Isabella, Queen of England, holds of the heir 
of Alice, late Countess of Lincoln, three carves of land in Esshbye 
de Kyrkedale, of the Lord of Penwortham, by the service of 
the fourth part and the twentieth part of a knight's fee, paying 
yearly at the term of St. John Baptist, six shillings, and for the 
same vill there, as is reckoned by ancient rolls, accounts, and 
terms, three shillings for castle- ward and sake- fee. 

UP-LITHERLONDE. Richard Walshe holds one carve of 
land in Up Litherlonde, with the advowson of the church of 
Asshtou, 30 to the same Up Litherlonde belonging, in socage, 
paying yearly ten shillings at the four terms as above for all 
[demands] . 

LATHUM. Thomas de Lathum, knight, holds the manor of La- 
thum, which is three carves of land, with the advowson of the priory 

28 Three carves. Birch. 

19 Maghull for half a carve, New Crosby three carves. Ibid. 
* Aughton. Ibid. 



42 SUEVEY OF 1320-1346. 

et potur 9 vt supra vnde prior de burschoge ten 9 med terr 9 
supradict. 



Thomas de lathum miles ten 9 iij. caruc. terre in hurdelton 
et Scaresbreke p fuic. iij. ptiu et xx a ptis feod militf red p ann 9 
p warda castri t. sci. mart viij 8 . 

vpehoiande. Rofetus de holande ten 9 maneriu de Vpeliolande cu advocar 9 
prioratus ifcm in socag 9 r. p ann 9 xij s t. natal, drii et faciet sect et 
potur 9 vt supra. 

chiidewaii. Jones de la Warr ten'' viftam de Childwall Dalton et Allertou 
p fuic d. feod militf et redd, put continetur in aliis maneriis in 
wapen. de Saleford. Itm debet ij. sect. com. et wapen. vidtt 
una p Dalton p manus dno de holand et j. p Allerton p manus 
Johis Grelle. 



Sunt ifem iiij burgag. que Rofetus de holaude ten 9 , r. iiij. I. p 

n 9 iiij 8 . 

jf Sum tol reddtf Wapen. de Derbye xvij 11 x s j d . 



ann 9 iiij 8 



WAPENTAKE OF WEST DERBY. 43 

of Burschoghe, and the church of Ormeskirke, in thanage, paying 
yearly at the four terms, twenty shillings, relief, suit to the county 
and wapentake, and puture as above, whereof the prior of Burschoge 
holds the moiety of the above-named land. 

SCARESBREKE. The same Thomas de Lathum, knight, holds 
three carves of land in Hurdelton 31 and Scaresbreke, by service 
of the third part and the twentieth part of a knight's fee, pay- 
ing yearly for castle-ward at the term of St. Martin, eight shillings. 

UP-HOLANDE. Robert de Holande holds the manor of Up- 
holande, with the advowsoii of the priory of the same, in socage, 
paying yearly twelve shillings at the Christmas term, and doing 
suit and puture as above. 32 

CHILDEWALL. John de la Warr 33 holds the vill of Childwall, 
Dalton, and Allerton, by service of half a knight's fee, and pays 
therefor as is provided as to other manors in the wapentake of 
Saleford. Also he owes two suits to the county and wapentake, 
viz., one for Dalton, by the hand of the Lord of Holande, and one 
for Allerton, by the hand of John Grelle. 

CHORLEGHE. There are there four burgages which Robert de 
Holande holds, paying at the four terms yearly four shillings. 

To wit. The sum total of the rents of the wapentake of Derby, 
ijl. IQS. id. 

31 Lathum. Sirch. 

32 The abbot of Holland holds the maiior with appurtenances by the service of 
i id. Sirch. 

33 John, the first of his family who was a baron of Mamecestre, ruled 1307-134? 5 
his great grandson, John, 1371-1398. 



44 SURVEY OF 1320-1346. 



Indt. 



f t Mart viij 8 

Natalis dni lxv s xj d ob. 

Annunc. bete Mar liij s xj d ob. 

Pasc v s . j d 

J. bapt vij u vij d ob. 

Michis Ixxyj 8 v d ob. 



WAPPEN: DE AMONDERNESSE. 

LythumTnf Prior Dunotm p wrekke marf hendo in manerio suo de lythum 

ad voluntat'. 

ad voluntatem r. p aim ?. micfais iijs iiij d . 



Kb'etent' Isabella regina Angl. ten? iij caruc. terr 9 et iij am ptem j caruc. 

Warton. 

p iij a pte vnius feod militC quas Radus de Bethom miles et 
Thomas fit Gilbert de Singelton tenent de eadem p mediu in 
Wartoii r. p ann 9 p ward castr 9 lane. iij s iiij d ?. nat. J. Bapt. 
vidlt de her 9 Alic 9 nup comitisse lincoln 9 . 



Eadm ten 9 j. feod militf in ffrikelton, Wythyngh"m, Ethelis- 
wyke, et Newton in man 9 Radi de ffrikelton tentf sui, r. p ann 9 
t. nat. J. bapt. p warda castr 9 x s vt est de hered diet Alic 9 nup 
comitisse lincome. 



ciaghton. Eadm t. ij caruc. terr 9 de hered eiusdem Alic. comitisse lincolne 



WAPENTAKE OF AMONDERNESSE. 45 



Of which at 



f, 3. d. 

Term of Martinmas ....... o 8 o 

Christmas ..................... o 65 u^ 

Annunc. of the Blessed Mary o 53 n 



the Terms j Easter .......................... 05 

John Baptist ................. 7 

Michaelmas .................. o 76 



WAPENTAKE OF AMONDERNESSE. 

LYTHUM, Tenant-at-Will. The prior of Durham for having 
wreck of the sea in his manor of Lythum at will, paying yearly at 
Michaelmas term three shillings and fourpence. 

WARTON, Free Tenants. Isabella, Queen of England holds 
three carves of land and a third part of a carve, for the third part of 
one knight's fee, of which Ralph de Bethom, knight, and Thomas, 
son of Gilbert de Singelton hold of the same, by moiety in "War- 
ton, paying yearly for castleward of Lancaster three shillings and 
fourpence at St. John Baptist, namely, of the inheritance of Alice, 
late countess of Lincoln. 

FRIKELTON. The same holds one knight's fee in Frikelton, 
Wythyngham, Etheliswyke, and Newton, in the hand of Ralph 
de Frikelton, her tenant, paying yearly at the nativity of John 
Baptist for castleward, ten shillings, as it is of the heir of the said 
Alice, late countess of Lincoln. 

CLAGHTON. The same holds two carves of land of the heir 



46 SURVEY OF 1320-1346. 

in Claghton p fuic. quit ptf feod militf r. p ann 9 p warda castr 9 
lane, et t. ij s ij d . 



ciiftoncu Witt de Clifton ten 9 ii caruc. ter 9 in Westbye, ii caruc. in 

raembns ' " 

flylde plupeton magn" et pua iij caruc. terr in Salwicke et Clyfton 
ij caruc. terr 9 in barton in socag* r. p ann 9 t. natat dni Antic, bete 
Mar. J. bapt. et sci Micnis xl s et releu cu acciderit et sect com. 
et wapen. 



Bryminge Eadus de Bethom miles ten 9 ij caruc. terr 9 in Bryminge et 
Kilgrymesargh p iiij pt vnius feod milit r. p ann ?. nat. J. bapt. 
p warda castr 9 lane. ij s yj d . 



Staimyn. Thomas Gosenarghe ten 9 ij caruc. ter 9 in Stalmyn in socag 
r. p ann 9 iiij t. vt supra vj s viij d releu sect com 9 et wapen. et potur 9 
vt supra. 

Nichus Botiller ten 9 ibm j car. terr 9 in socag 1 r. p ann 9 iij* iiij d 
iiij t. vt sup" et releu et sect com. et wapen. et potur 9 fuiauc vt 
sup" quas sectas diet Thomas p eo fecit que est pcett ten 9 eiusdem 
Thome. 

Asshton. Adam de Hoghton miles ten 9 medietat maSij de Assh- 



WAPENTAKE OF AMONDERNESSE. 47 

of the same Alice, countess of Lincoln, by service of the fifth 
part of a knight's fee, paying yearly for castleward of Lancaster, 
and at, &c., the terms, two shillings and twopence. 

CLIFTON, with Members. William de Clifton holds two carves 
of land in Westbye, two carves in Fylde Plumpton, Great and 
Little, three carves of land in Salwicke and Clifton, two carves of 
land in Barton, in socage, paying yearly at the terms of Christmas, 
the Annunciation of the Virgin, St. John Baptist, and St. Michael, 
forty shillings, and relief when he shall die, and suit to the county 
and wapentake. 

BBYMINGE AND ),,,,, ,, ., 

KiLGRYMESARGHE.{ Eal P h de Bethom, knt., holds two carves 

of land in Bryminge and Kilgrymesarghe by the fourth part of a 
knight's fee, paying yearly at the term of St. John Baptist, for 
castleward of Lancaster, two shillings and sixpence. 

STALMYN. Thomas Gosenarghe holds two carves of land in 
Stalmyn, in socage, paying yearly at the four terms as above, six 
shillings and eightpence, relief, suit to the county and wapentake, 
and puture as above. 

Nicholas Botiller holds there one carve of land in socage, paying 
yearly three shillings and fourpence, at the four terms as above, 
and relief, and suit to the county and wapentake, and puture, and 
serjeanty as above, which suits the said Thomas made for him, 
which is parcel of the land of the same Thomas. 

ASSHTON. Adam de Hoghton, knt., holds a moiety of the 
manor of Asshton by service of one twelfth part of one knight's 



4$ SURVEY OF 1320-1346. 

ton p fui8 xij a ptf vnuis feod militf r. p ann 9 iiij t. vt supra 
iij s ix d . 

Edm de Haydoke ten 9 pt j caruc. ter 9 in socag r. p ann 9 ij s vj d 
iiij t. vt sup" releu vt sup". 

Thomas Trauers ten 9 ptem dictf caruc. terr 9 in Asshton in socag 
r. p ann 9 iiij t. iij s iiij d . 

Wiftus lawrenc ten 9 ptem die? caruc. terr 9 ibm in socag r. p 
ann 9 d: ?. v d vltra fuic pdict et releu vt supra. 



Alston. Gilbertus de Sothe worth de iure vxis sue et Robtus de holande 

ten 9 iiij p? vnius caruc. ter 9 in Alston in socag 1 r. p ann 9 iiij t. 
iij s et releu vt supra. 



Thomas de Lathum ten 9 iiij tam ptem diet caruc. in socag 1 ibm 
r. p ann 9 xij d d. t. et releu vt supra. 

Rybbciton. Thomas Trauers et Wiftus laurenc 9 ten 9 in? se vnam caruc. 
ter in Rybbleton in socag r. p ann 9 viij s iiij t. et sect com et 
wapeS et releu vt supra. 



\1)S. 

Alanus del More de ffysshewyke j mess, et xxij acr terr Wittus 

viijrf. 

de ffysshewyke j mess, vj acr ter\ Galfr de Aykensaw d. mess. 

viijrf. ob. ixs. 

iiij acr et d. ter. Adam fil Simon j mess, et vj acr' ter 9 . Beatrix 

vijrf. ob. 

del Ruddinge iiij acr et d. ter Thomas del Ruddinge j mess, et 
ix acr 9 ter 9 xv d . Adm de Burye iiij acr 9 ter 9 ix d . laurentius 



WAPENTAKE OF AMONDERNESSE. 40 

fee, payiiig yearly at the four terms as above three shillings and 
ninepence. 

Edmund de Haydocke holds part of one carve of land, in socage, 
paying yearly two shillings and sixpence at the four terms as above, 
relief as above. 

Thomas Travers holds part of the said carve of laud, in Asshton, 
in socage, paying yearly at the four terms three shillings and four- 
pence. 

William Lawrence holds part of the said carve of land there, in 
socage, paying yearly at the said terms, fivepence beyond the afore- 
said service, and relief as above. 

ALSTON. Gilbert de Sotheworth, in right of his wife, and Robert 
de Holande, hold a fourth part of one carve of land in Alston, in 
socage, paying yearly at the four terms three shillings, and relief 
as above. 

Thomas de Lathum holds a fourth part of the said carve, in 
socage, paying yearly twelve pence, at the said terms, and relief as 
above. 

RYBBELTON. Thomas Travers and William Laurence hold be- 
tween them one carve of land in Rybbelton, in socage, paying 
yearly eight shillings, at the four terms, and suit to the county 
and wapentake, and relief as above. 

7*. 

FYSWYKE. Alan of the More of Fysshewyke one messuage and 

&/. 
twenty-two acres of land, William de Fysshewyke one messuage and 

six acres of land, Geoffrey de Aykensaw half a messuage and four 

%\d. 9*. 

and a half acres of land ; Adam, son of Simon, one messuage and 

l\d. 

six acres of land ; Beatrice of the Ruddinge four and a half acres 



50 SURVEY OF 1320-1346. 

Trailers xiiij acr 9 ter 9 ij s v d tenent Ixx acr 9 p fuian? essend fforest 
in lonesdale Amondernesse et Derbeshyr r. p ann 9 xv iiij d ?. 
Annunc. et Michis et releu vl sup". 



Thomas fit Ade Banestr 9 ten 9 i caruc. ter 9 in Syngelton pua fuic? 
fianc 9 essend baft regf in wapen. Amondernesse et Blakeburne- 
shire ij u r. p ann 9 . 

Thomas fil Ade Banastr 9 ten 9 villam de Broghton que est vna 
caruc. ter 9 p fuic x* ptf vnius feod militf vt d. r. p ann 9 I. 
mictiis viij 3 . 

Id:ni Thomas fil Ade banastr 9 ten 9 halghton que est d. caruc. 
ter 9 p fuic xx a ptf feod milite vt d. r. p ann 9 d. t. ij s . 



Idm Thomas ten 9 billesbourghe que est di. d. caruc. ter 9 p fuic 
xx a ptf feod milite vt d. r. p ann 9 iiij t. ij 8 . 

Dns Rex ten 9 j caruc. ter 9 in Gayrestange in Wyresdale p iiij 4 * 
pt feod militf et dd. deber 9 escaet drii p mortem Wifti de Compcy 
qui obijt sine hered et tu r. p ann 9 I. Nat. J. bap? ij s vj d . 



WAPENTAKE OF AMONDERNESSE. 51 

of land ; Thomas of the Ruddinge, one messuage and nine acres of 
land, fifteenpence ; Adam de Burye, four acres of land, ninepence ; 
Laurence Travers, fourteen acres of land, two shillings and five- 
pence. They hold seventy acres by serjeanty of conveying [?] in 
the forests in Lonesdale, Amondernesse, and Derbyshire, paying 
yearly fifteen shillings and fourpence, at the terms of the Annun- 
ciation and Michaelmas, and relief as above. 

LITTLE SYNGELTON. Thomas, son of Adam Banestre holds one 
carve of land in Little Syngelton, by service of serjeanty in con- 
veying the king's bailiffs in the wapentake of Amondernesse and 
Blackeburneshire, paying 2l. yearly. 

BROUGHTON. Thomas, son of Adam Banestre holds the vill 
of Broughton, which is one carve of land, by service of the tenth 
part of one knight's fee as aforesaid, paying yearly at Michaelmas 
term eight shillings. 

HALGHTON. The same Thomas, son of Adam Banestre, holds 
Halghton, which is half a carve of land, by the service of the 
twentieth part of a knight's fee as aforesaid, paying yearly at the 
terms two shillings. 

BYLLESBOURGH. The same Thomas holds Billesbourghe, which 
is a half carve of land, by service of the twentieth part of a knight's 
fee as aforesaid, paying yearly at the four terms two shillings. 

WYRESDALE. The lord the king holds one carve of land in 
Gayrestang in Wyresdale by the fourth part of a knight's fee, and 
the said land ought to escheat to the lord on the death of William 
de Compcy, who died without heir, &c., then paying yearly at the 



5 2 SURVEY OF 1320-1346. 



Jones fil Thome Ryggemayden ten 9 j caruc. d. ter 9 ibm p fuic 
iiij te pt feod milit r. p ann 9 d. ?. ij s yj d . 

hameiton. Wiftus de Shireburne teu 9 iij car. ter 9 in Hamelton in socag* r. 
p ann 9 iiij ?. xl s releu vt supra. 

wodepiup- Johes de Damport Jun 9 ten 9 caruc. ter 9 in Wodeplupton viij*" 1 
ptem j caruc. ter 9 in Bryninge et Kelgrismarghe in wapen. de 
Amondernesse, et j caruc. ter 9 in fornbye in wapen. de Derby e 
p j feod militf r. p ann 9 p dictis tens in wodeplupton iiij t. xvij s vj d 
et releu p eisdem ten 9 vt supra. 



ciyderhowe. Isabella regina Angl. ten 9 de hedit Alic. comitisse lincolne 
castru de Ciyderhowe cu membris r. p ann 9 p ward castri lane. 
t. nat J. bap? 1 s . 



Abbas de Cockersande ten 9 d. caruc. ter 9 in Midelarghe in 
Tynage r. p ann 9 viij 3 iiij ?. 



ten 9 ibm v caruc. ter 9 in Newebyggynge in socag* r. p 
ann 9 iiij t. vt supra xx s . 

withton cu Comes de Oxund f?l ten 9 piscarl vocat maram de merton r. p 

membns. L J 



WAPENTAKE OF AMONDERNESSE. 53 

term of the nativity of St. John Baptist two shillings and 
sixpence. 

John, son of Thomas Ryggemayden holds one and a half carve 
of land there by the service of the fourth part of a knight's fee, pay- 
ing yearly at the said term two shillings and sixpence. 

HAMELTON. William de Shireburne holds three carves of land 
in Hamelton, in socage, paying yearly at the four terms forty 
shillings, relief as above. 

WODEPLUMPTON. John de Damport the younger holds one 
carve of land in Wodeplumptou, the eighth part of a carve of land 
in Bryminge and Kelgrimsarghe, in the wapentake of Amonder- 
nesse, and one carve in Forneby, in the wapentake of Derby, 
by one knight's fee, paying yearly for the aforesaid holdings in 
Wodeplumpton, at the four terms, seventeen shillings and sixpence, 
and relief for the same holding as above. 

CLYDERHOWE. Isabella, queen of England, holds of the inheri- 
tance of Alice, countess of Lincolne, the castle of Clyderhowe, with 
its members, paying yearly for ward of the castle of Lancaster, at 
the term of the nativity of St. John Baptist fifty shillings. 

MIDELABGHE. The abbot of Cokersande holds half a carve of 
land in Midelarghe, 34 in thanage, paying yearly eight shillings at 
the four terms. 

NEWEBYGGYNGE. The same holds there five carves of land in 
Newebyggynge, in socage, paying yearly at the four terms as above 
twenty shillings. 

WITHTON, with Members. The Earl of [Oxford ?] holds the 

34 Michlarge Birch. 






54 SURVEY OF 1320-1346. 

ann 9 michis x s vel j auster soor. Idm comes ten 9 ij caruc. ter 9 in 
Withton iij caruc. ter 9 in Marton pua et iij caruc. ter 9 in Treweles 
ij caruc ter 9 in Westsome et Moulbroke, p d. feod militf r. p 
ann 9 t. midiis xiij 8 iiij d et sec? com. et wapen. et potur) et c. 



Idm r. p dictis iij caruc. ter 9 in Westsome et Moulbroke vltra 
red $d iiij ?. iiij s . 

Idm ten 9 iiij caruc. ter 9 in Outroucliffe que sunt pceft diet caruc. 
ter 9 in Withton cu membris r. p ann 9 t. nat J. bapl p warda 
castr 9 lane. v s . 

Jones fii Eici de Hakenshow j caruc. d. Abbas de Cokersande 
j caruc. ter 9 Johes laurenc d. caruc. terre in hokenshowe p iij 
caruc. in toto p fuian2 r. p ann 9 ij balistas vel iiij 3 . 



Abbas de Whalleve ten 9 v caruc. ter 9 in hornderne vel Newton. 

membns. 

v 1 Stayninge p d. feod militf r. p ann 9 ?. na? J. bapt p warda 
castr 9 lane. v s et sec? com. et wap. 



le . Adam de houghton ten 9 vt m c^ lee ij caruc. ter 9 p ftiic. iij a ptf 

feod militf put alias dedit releu antecessori dni r. p ann 9 p warda 
castri ?. michis iij 8 iiij d . 



WAPENTAKE OF AMONDERNESSE. 55 

fishery called the Merton marsh [or mere] paying yearly at Michael- 
mas ten shillings or one soar-hawk. The same earl holds two 
carves of land in Withton, 35 three carves of land in Little Marton, 
and three carves of land in Treweles, two carves of land in West- 
some and Moulbroke, for half a knight's fee, paying yearly at the 
Michaelmas term thirteen shillings and fourpeuce, and suit to the 
county and wapentake, and puture as above. 

The same pays for the said three carves of laud in Westsome 
and Moulbroke, beyond the rent aforesaid, at the four terms, four 
shillings. 

WITHTON. The same held four carves of laud in Outroucliffe, 
which are parcel of the said carve of land in Withton with mem- 
bers, paying yearly at the term of the nativity of St. John the 
Baptist for castleward of Lancaster, five shillings. 

HAKENSHOWE. John, son of Richard de Hakenshow, one 
and a half carve; the abbot of Cokersande one carve of land; 
John Laurence half a carve of land in Hokenshowe, for three 
carves in all, by serjeanty, paying yearly two cross-bows or four 
shillings. 

HORDERNE, with Members. The abbot of Whalley holds five 
carves of land in Horderne, or [? and] Newton, or Stayninge, for 
half a knight's fee, paying yearly at the term of the nativity of St. 
John Baptist, for castleward of Lancaster, five shillings, and suit 
to the county and wapentake. 

LEE. Adam de Houghton holds in both Lees two carves of 
land by service of the third part of a knight's fee according as 

35 Weton. Birch. 



^ 6 SURVEY OF 1320-1346. 



Jofees de Staynolfe ten 9 iiij bouat ter 9 iiij 8 vj d . Rogerus de 
Northcrosse j mess, j bouat ter 9 vij d ofc. Adam le knyght v 
acr 9 iiij d . Thomas fit Robt Saynolfe j mess, j bouat ter 9 vij d ob. 
Wiftus laurenc iiij* 3 p j bouat ter 9 xvj d . Thomas Trauers quart 
pt j bouat ter 9 xvj d Johes Botiller iiij 1 * 111 ptem vnius bouat ter 9 et 
Ricus Doggeson v acr ter 9 vj d tenet in toto j caruc. ter 9 in Thornton 
loco vocat Staynolfe in drangage r. p anu 9 v s t. anuc et Mich. 
Et est consuetud drang meiend cibu et potur) p fit dni et eoi 
nutric equu et canu dni. 



Thomas banastr 9 ten 9 j caruc. ter 9 Johes fil laurenc de Thorton 
j car. ter 9 in Thornton et Staynolfe, nup Robti Wyndewhike 
in Tynage r. p ann 9 iiij t. vt sup" xiij 3 releu et sect coin et wapen. 



Wiftus de heton ten 9 in Thornton loco quid: broune j caruc. ter 9 
in socag* r. p ann 9 ij t. x s releu sect com et wapen. etc. vt supra. 

Adam de hoghton miles et pcenax sui ten 9 maneriu de Gose- 
narghe qd est j caruc. et d. que fac. iij am ptem et viij am ptem feod 
militf vn Richus Botiller et Wiftus de Clifieton tenent vj* 5 " 11 ptem 



WAPENTAKE OF AMONDERNESSE. 57 

others, he gives relief for predecessors to the lord, paying yearly 
for castle ward, at Michaelmas, three shillings and fourpence. 

THORNTON. John de Staynolfe holds four oxgaugs of land, four 
shillings and sixpence; Roger de Northcrosse one messuage one 
oxgang of land, sevenpence halfpenny; Adam, the knight, five 
acres, fourpence ; Thomas, sou of Robert S [t] aynolfe, one messuage 
one oxgang of land, sevenpence halfpenny; William Laurence, a 
fourth part of one oxgang of land, sixteen pence ; Thomas Travers, 
a fourth part of one oxgang of land, sixteen pence ; John Botiller, 
a fourth part of one oxgang of land [? sixteen pence] ; and Richard 
Doggeson, five acres of land, sixpence. They hold in all one carve 
of land in Thornton, in a place called Staynolfe in drengage, 
paying yearly five shillings at the Annunciation and Michaelmas. 
And it is the custom for the drenches, when mowing, to have food 
and puture for the children of the lord and their nurse, and for 
the horses and dogs of the lord. 

Thomas Banastre holds one carve of land ; John, son of Laurence 
de Thornton, one carve of land in Thornton and Staynolfe, late of 
Robert Wyndewhike [Win wick], in thauage, paying yearly at the 
four terms as above thirteen shillings, relief, and suit to the 
county and wapentake. 

William de Heton holds in Thornton in the place of a certain 
Broune, one carve of laud in socage, paying yearly at two terms 
ten shillings relief, suit to the county and wapentake, &c., as above. 

GOSENARGHE. Adam de Hoghton, knt., and his parceners hold 
the manor of Gosenarghe, which is one and a half carve, which 
makes the fourth part and the eighth part of one knight's fee, 



5 8 SURVEY OF 1320-1346. 

pfatf Adm tertiam pt v pt p cart dni E. nup com. p x" pt 
feod [militf] Nicftus de Longeforde tertiam ptem v ptiu et Ricus 
Katerall tertiam ptem v ptiu r. p aim 9 iiij t. vt sup* xij s et sect 
com. et wapen. que possnt p fidei et recog pfat dni Ade de 
houghton. Itm r. dno p pYatff ten 9 t. michis j austr. vi soo^ 



Grymysargh. Idm ten 9 d. caruc. ter 9 in Grymesarglie in Tynage r. p ann 9 
iiij t. vt supra iij s releu etc. vt supra. 



Merton Will Botillcr ij pt et Nichus Botiller iij am ptem tenet tertiam 

magna. 

ptem feod vnius militf in magna merton r. p ann 9 vn t. uat J. 
bap? p warda castri iij s et t. michis p eisdem v s . 



hodreshale. Rofetus de Hodreshale ten 9 ij boua? ter 9 in hodreshale in socag 1 
r. p ann 9 iiij L v s et releu vt supra. 

Laton cu Wiftus Botiller ten 9 i feod militf in laton wardebroke magna 

tnembris. J 

Bisph"m que sunt x caruc. ter 9 r. p ann 9 I. na? J. bapt. X s et sci 
Michis vj s viij d p warda castr. xvj s viij d sec? com. et wapen. et 
poturl vt sup" et vj s viij d vocat sakfee. 



WAPENTAKE OF AMONDERNESSE. 59 

whereof Richard Botiller and William de Clifleton hold the sixth 
part, the aforesaid Adam a third part and fifth part, by a charter of 
the lord E. the late earl, for the tenth part of a fee ; Nicholas de 
Longeforde a third part of a fifth part, and Richard Katerall a third 
part of a fifth part, paying yearly at the four terms as above twelve 
shillings, and suit to the county and wapentake, which may be 
[due] by fealty and acknowledgment of the aforesaid Sir Adam 
de Houghton. Also rendering to the lord for the said holdings 
at Michaelmas one hawk or soar-hawk, or six shillings and 
eightpence. 

GRYMYSARGH. The same hold half a carve of land in Gryme- 
sarghe, in thanage, paying yearly at the four terms as above three 
shillings, relief, &c., as above. 

GREAT MERTON. William Botiller two parts and Nicholas 
Botiller a third part, hold the third part of one knight's fee in Great 
Merton, paying yearly at one term, the nativity of St. John Baptist, 
for castleward three shillings, and at Michaelmas term for the 
same five shillings. 

HODRESHALB. Robert de Hodreshale holds two oxgangs of 
land in Hodreshale, in socage, paying yearly at the four terms five 
shillings, and relief as above. 

LATON, with Members. William Botiller holds one knight's 
fee in Latoii, Wardbroke, 36 and Great Bispham, which are ten 
carves of land, paying yearly at the terms the nativity of St. John 
Baptist ten shillings, and St. Michael six shillings and eightpence ; 
for castleward sixteen shillings and eightpence, suit to the county 
36 Warbrcck. Birch. 



60 SURVEY OF 1320-1346. 

jf Sm" redd: tocius Wappend de Amondernesse xiij u xvj s ij d . 

I Natalis dni xlix s x d ob. 

Indef. J Afiuc lxys ob - 

J. bapt xlix 8 x d ob. 

^Michis cxj 8 iij d ob. 

Km de warda castri t. nat. J. bapt iiij u xvij s 

Km de warda castrl t michis v s iiij d 

Km de Sakefe t. michis yj s viij d 



ffORESTA DE QUERNEMORE, vidlt ex pte Mireschoghe &c., 

Bonesilver. 

Est ibm quod consue? vocat bonesilver vidlt tam pro mesS 
blad p capi? ten 9 non tenet qua p asiamente de diuers artictis 
q. r. debet p cotfa? etc. si forte talia capita non sumit [? sumunfj 
vidlt ?. pasche t. micnis vij d ob. 

Sm de bonesiluer vij d ob. ij I. 



WAPENTAKE OF AMONDEBNESSE. 6 1 

and wapentake, and puture as above, and six shillings and eight- 
pence called sake-fee. 

To wit. Sum of the whole rent of the wapentake of Amonder- 
nesse, 13^. 165. id. 

f s. d. 

Christmas 49 io 

Whereof I Annunciation 65 9^ 

the Terms j o hn Baptist 4910$ 

^Michaelmas in 3^ 

Also for castleward at the term of the nativity of St. John 

Baptist 4 17 o 

Ditto ditto St. Michael o 5 4 

Also for sake-fee at the term of St. Michael 068 

FOREST OF QUERNMORE,viz.,on the side of Mireschoghe,&c., 

Bonesilver. 

There is there what by custom is called bonesilver, viz., as well 
for messuages, corn, not held by tenure in capite, as for easement 
of divers articles which ought to pay for common, &c., if perchance 
such capite does not exist [or, if it happen that they are not taken 
in fee], viz., at Easter and at Michaelmas, 1\d. 

Sum of the bonesilver, 7?d. at two terms. 



62 SURVEY OF 1320-1346. 

WAPEN: DE LONNESDALE. 

Extent redd: et feod ibra fact coram f>fat Wifto et Wifto die 
lunse px post ffh n. sci J. bapt ano R.Rf. tertij post 
conquestu xx. 



hornebye. Robtus de Nevill miles ten 9 j feod militf in Mellinge et 
hornebye. 

Tatham. Thomas de Bar [vel Dar 9 ] ten 9 iij caruc. ter 9 in Irebye et 
Tatham p fuic iiij pt et xx a pt feod militf vn 9 . Robtus de 
Tatham ten 9 liiij am ptem et Edm Tatham liiij am ptem, r. p ann 9 
I. Nat. Dni, Pasch. Nat. sci J. bapt. et Michis xviij 8 et sect com. 
et wapen. et potur 9 fuianc. 



Wittus de Dacr miles ten 9 iij caruc. in Halton et Aghton p 
fianc essendi forest drii vbiqj infra com. lane. r. p ann 9 t pasc. et 
michis vj u ix s iiij d vu 9 xl d de vna plac pastur. vocat Shiderorde 
nup Rogeri Hexh"m. 



best. Prior de Kartmell ten 9 j mess, et x acr. ter 9 in hest quatuor 

tenent de hest, tenet iiij bouat ter 9 de escaet dni p sor 9 nup 
Thorn de hest r. p ann 9 vltra ui2 content sup eoxd tenen. ibm 
iiij t. vt supra viij s . 



WAPENTAKE OF LONSDALE. 6j 

WAPENTAKE OF LONNESDALE. 

An extent of the rent and fees there made before the aforesaid 
William and William, on Monday next after the feast of 
the nativity of St. John the Baptist, in the year of the 
reign of king E. the third after the conquest, the aoth 
[26th June, 1346]. 

HORNEBYE. Robert de Nevill, knight, holds one knight's fee in 
Mellinge and Hornebye. 

TATHAM. Thomas de Bar [? Dacre] holds three carves of land 
in Irebye and Tatham by service of the fourth part and twentieth 
part of one knight's fee. Robert de Tatham holds a fifty-fourth 
part, and Edmund Tatham a fifty-fourth part, paying yearly at 
the terms of Christmas, Easter, the nativity of John the Baptist, 
and Michaelmas, eighteen shillings and suit to the county arid 
wapeutake, and puture and serjeanty. 

HALTON. William de Dacre, knight, holds three carves of 
land in Haltou and Aghton by serjeanty in conveying of the lord's 
foresters everywhere within the county of Lancaster, paying 
yearly at the terms of Easter and Michaelmas 61. gs. \d., with 
forty pence for one plot of pasture called Shiderorde, late of Roger 
Hexham. 

HEST. The prior of Kartmell holds one messuage and ten acres 
of land in Hest. Four tenants of Hest hold four oxgangs of land 
of the escheat of the lord by the sister of the late Thomas de Hest, 
paying yearly beyond the service thrown upon their tenants there, 
at the four terms as above, eight shillings. 



64 SURVEY OF 1320-1346. 

WAPEN: DE LONNESSDALE. 

Boiton. Johes ffrannceys ten 9 iiij pte ville de bolton in socag* r. p 

ann 9 xj s viiij d iiij t. vt supra et sect corn! et wapen. dabit releu 
et potur 9 fuianc vt supra. 

voiuntat. Witt de Welles ten 9 de dno ad voluutat x acr. ter 9 in Bolton 
nup adquisit dfim de qd Simoie de Thornbrandheved r. p ann 9 
vltra luic apud boltou content iiij t. vt supra p onibus. 

skertom Decem bouatax de Skerton r. p ann' vltra fuic content nup 

eo^ tenen 9 apud Skerton pro ten 9 que tenet de Dno ad volunta? 
ifera t. pasc. et micnis vij 8 ix d . 

boiron. Wittus de bolron ten 9 j mess, et Ix acr. ter 9 in bolron in 

fuianc in veniend vnu cementar 9 p opibus castri du dno placuerit 
cap 9 p dieto j d que quidem opa arren? ad v s p ann 9 iiij t. vt sup" 
et sect com. et wapen. et sect moti de loon xvj grno. 



Estiine. Thomas de Walton ij pi et Alic. de Slene tenet iij pt vnius 

caruc. ter 9 in Estiine p fuianc metend et carpent quotiens ulte 
fuit p ope castri cap. p diem j d que quidem opa relax p xl d p 
ann 9 t. pasc. et micnis et releu vt sup". 



Mat Alic. ten 9 iiij pte dee caruc. ter 9 in Estiine in socag 1 r. p 
ann 9 iiij d I, Michis. 



WAPENTAKE OF LONSDALE. 65 

WAPENTAKE OF LONNESDALE. 

BOLTON. John Franceys holds the fourth part of the vill of 
Bolton in socage, paying yearly eleven shillings and eightpence, at 
the four terms as above, and suit to the county and wapentake : he 
gives relief and puture-serjeant as above. 

At will. William de Welles holds of the lord at will ten acres 
of land in Bolton, lately purchased by the lord of a certain Simon 
de Thorubrandheved, paying yearly beyond service at Bolton per- 
formed, at the four terms as above, for all [demands], 

SKEBTON. Ten oxgangs of Skerton, paying yearly beyond the 
service laid upon their tenants at Skerton, for the tenements which 
are held of the lord, at the will of the same, at the terms of Easter 
and Michaelmas, seven shillings and ninepence. 

BOLRON. William de Bolron holds one messuage and sixty 
acres of land in Bolron, in serjeanty, in coming with one mason 
for the works at the castle, whilst the lord pleases, at per head per 
day, one penny, which works amount to five shillings yearly at the 
four terms as above, and suit to the county and wapentake, and 
suit to the mill of Loon to the sixteenth grain. 

ESTLINE. Thomas de Walton [holds] two parts, and Alice de 
Slene holds three parts of one carve of land in Estline, by serjeanty, 
reaping and carpentry, the quota of the latter being for work at the 
castle, one penny per head per day, which said work is released 
for forty pence per annum at the terms of Easter and Michaelmas, 
and relief as above. 

The aforesaid Alice holds a fourth part of the said carve of land 
in Estline in socage, paying yearly fourpence at Michaelmas term. 



66 SURVEY OF 1320-1346, 

Thorishoime. Johes Pies ten. 9 j caruc. ter 9 in Thorisholme in socag r. p anu 9 
viij s t. pasc. et michis et releu vt supra. 

skerton. Johes Pies ten 9 xx acr. ter 9 in Skerton in socag 1 r. p aun 9 

vjs v iijd ?. pasc. et Michis et releu vt supra. 

Jones laurens ten 9 xxij acr. ter 9 in Skerton in socag 1 r. p 
ann 9 vj s viij d ?. pasc. et michis, et releu vt supra et sect mofi 
de loon. 

Abbas de ffourneux ten 9 j toftu et xxv acr. ter 9 in Skerton 
in socag 1 rd p ann 9 iij s iiij d ij t. 

Gersyngham. Johes de Twisilton laurenc balerig Cecil de Sotheworth tenet 
j bouat ter 9 in Gersingham p f ianc forest de Kawode et Quern- 
more ij 11 cap. 

Thomas de Gersingh a m Wiftus del Grene Alanus Hugeson 
henr 9 haylegh benedcs Adamson Cecill de Sotheworth Wift fil 
Wifti de lokehaghe et Johes de hanyngton tenet in? se vna caruc. 
ter 9 in Gersynghm p viij a pt feod militf in dj in Gersyngh"m r. 
p aun 9 iij 8 iiij d ij ?. 

> 
Skerton. Prior lane, ten 9 iiij acr. ter 9 in Skerton in socag 1 r. p ann 9 

xx d t. pasc. et Michis. 



WAPENTAKE OF LONSDALE. 67 

THORISHOLM. John Perles holds one carve of land 37 in Thoris- 
holme in socage, paying yearly eight shillings at Easter and 
Michaelmas terms, and relief as above. 

SKERTON. John Perles holds twenty acres of land in Skerton 
in socage, paying yearly six shillings and eightpence, at Easter and 
Michaelmas terms, and relief as above. 

John Laurens holds twenty-two acres 38 of land in Skerton in 
socage, paying yearly six shillings and eightpence at Easter and 
Michaelmas terms, and relief as above, and suit to the mill of Loon. 

The abbot of Fourneux holds one toft and twenty-five acres of 
land in Skerton in socage, paying yearly three shillings and four- 
pence 39 at the two terms. 

GERSYNGHAM. John de Twisilton, Laurence Balerig, Cecil de 
Sotheworth, hold one oxgang of land in Gersingham by serjeanty 
of the forests of Kawode and Querumore, zl. to the chief, or [by 
capite] . 

Thomas de Gersingham, William of the Grene, Adam Hugeson, 
Henry Haylegh, Benedict Adamson, Cecill de Sotheworth, William, 
son of William de Lokehaghe, and John de Hanyngton, hold 
amongst them one carve of land in Gersyngham by the eighth 
part of a knight's fee in the said Gersyngham, paying yearly 
three shillings and fourpence at the two terms. 

SKERTON. The prior of Lancaster holds four acres of land in 
Skerton in socage, paying yearly twenty-two pence at Easter and 
Michaelmas terms. 

37 Alan Perkcs holds twenty acres. Birch. ^ Thirty acres. Ibid. 

39 Six shillings and eightpence. Ibid. 



68 SURVEY OF 1320-1346. 

Sum redd x n xiiij 8 iij d . 

Natal, dni x s x d 

IndL \ P as ^ iiif xvj* j d ob. 

nat J. bap? x 8 x d 

( Michis iiij 11 xvj 8 v d ob. 

ADHUC WAPPENT DE LONNESDALE. 

Johes de Croft ten 9 j caruc. et d. ter 9 in socag 1 r. p aun 9 x 8 
iiij ?. vt supra et releu vt supra sect com. et wap. et potur 9 
fianc vt supra. 

Jones de Croft ij s yj d Isabell de vrswicke ij s vj d et Johes de 
Clayton ij s vj d tenent raedietat j caruc. d et j bouat terr 9 in Kellet 
supiori in socag r. p ann 9 vij s yj d iiij t. vt supra et releu vt supra. 



Wiftus de Dacr miles ten 9 alteram medietat dcox ten 9 in 
Kellet in socag r. p ann 9 vnu espuarl sooa vel xij d t. Michis et 
releu vt supra red sol. dno p ann 9 p manus Alic. de Sleude ten 
in Estline. 

Mideiton. ' Wiftus de burghe de Midelton ten 9 in Midelton j caruc. 
ter 9 que fac. viij boua? p fui2 xv a pt feod militf r. p anu 9 p 
warda castr 9 viij d ob. ?. nat J. bapt. et sect com. et wapen. et 
potur 9 fuianc vt supra. 



Whereof at 
the terms 



WAPENTAKE OF LONSDALE. 69 

Sum of the Rents, io/. 145. -$d. 

. s. d. 

Christmas o 10 10 

Easter 4 16 i^ 

Nativity of John Baptist... o 10 10 



I, Michaelmas 4 16 5^ 

FURTHER IN THE WAPENTAKE OF LONNESDALE. 

D ALTON. John de Croft holds one and a half carve of land in 
Dalton in socage, paying yearly ten shillings at the four terms as 
above, and relief as above, suit to the county and wapentake, and 
puture-serjeaut as above. 

KELLET. John de Croft, two shillings and sixpence; Isabella 
de Urswicke, two shillings and sixpence ; and John de Clayton, 
two shillings and sixpence, hold the moiety of one and a half carve 
and one oxgang of land in Upper Kellet, in socage, paying yearly 
seven shillings and sixpence at the four terms as above, and relief 
as above. 

William de Dacre, knight, holds the other moiety of the said 
tenements in Kellet in socage, rendering yearly one soar-hawk or 
twelve pence at Michaelmas term, and relief as above, rendering 
payment to the lord yearly by the hand of Alice de Slevede, tenant 
in Estline. 

MIDELTON. William de Burghe de Midelton holds in Midelton 
one carve of land, which makes eight oxgangs, by service of a 
fifteenth part of a knight's fee, paying yearly for castleward eight- 
pence halfpenny at the term of the nativity of John the Baptist, 
and suit to the county and wapentake, and puture-serjeant as above. 



JO SURVEY OF 1320-1346. 

Mideiton. Tho. de Rygmayden ten 9 ifcm iiij bouat ter 9 p d. came, ter 9 vfi 
j bou in manu Abbatf de Cokersande in socag 1 r. p ann 9 iiij t. 
vt supra vj s viij d et releu vt supra. 

Wiftihs fil Wifti Robtson ?en 9 ij bou ter 9 in Mideiton in socag 
r. p ann 9 iiij 1. vt supra iij s iiij d et releu vt supra. 

Johes fil Rogeri tenet ix acr. ter 9 in Mideiton in socag r. p 
ann 9 iiij 1. vt supra xvj d et releu vt supra. 

Wiihis Elisson ten 9 j bou ter 9 in Mideiton in socag r. p anil 9 
iiij ?. vt supra xx d et releu vt supra. 

Wiftus fil Edi de Nevill ten 9 iij boual et d et j acr. ter 9 ifcm in 
socag r. p ann 9 iiij t. vj s ob. et releu vt supra. 

Abbas de Cokersand ten 9 iiii bou ter 9 et d in Mideiton in socag 1 

v O 

r. p ann 9 iiij ?. vij s vij d ob. 

Bare. Wiftus de Dacre miles ten 9 med vnius caruc. ter 9 in bar 9 in 

socag 1 r. p ann 9 iiij ?. vt supra viij 8 et releu vt supra et potur 9 
fianc. 

Thomas de "Walton et Simon de Bolton ten 9 aliam med eiusdm 
caruc. in bar 9 r. p ann 9 iiij ?. vt supra viij s et potur 9 et <fuian<? 
vt supra. 



WAPENTAKE OF LONSDALE. 7 x 

MIDELTON. Thomas de Rygmayden holds four oxgangs of land, 
for half a carve of land, one oxgang in the hand of the abbot of 
Cokersande, in socage, paying yearly at the four terms as above 
six shillings and eightpence, and relief as above. 

William, son of William Robertson, holds two oxgangs of land 
in Midelton in socage, paying yearly at the four terms as above 
three shillings and fourpence, and relief as above. 

John, son of Roger, holds nine acres of land in Midelton in 
socage, paying yearly at the four terms as above sixteen pence, 
and relief as above. 

William Elisson holds one oxgang of land in Midelton in socage, 
paying yearly at the four terms as above twenty pence, and relief 
as above. 

William, son of Edward de Nevill, holds three and a half oxgangs 
and one acre of land there in socage, paying yearly at the four 
terms six shillings and a halfpenny, and relief as above. 

The abbot of Cokersand holds four and a half oxgangs of land 
in Midelton in socage, paying yearly at the four terms seven 
shillings and sevenpence halfpenny. 

BARE. William de Dacre [?] knight, holds the moiety of one 
carve of land in Bare in socage, paying yearly at the four terms as 
above eight shillings, and relief as above, and puture-serjeant. 

Thomas de Walton and Simon de Bolton hold the other moiety 
of the same carve in Bare, paying yearly at the four terms as 
above eight shillings and puture-serjeant as above. 40 

*> Birch gives the names of the three tenants in Bare, Eandle de Dacre, and Simon 
and John de Bolton. 

L 



72 SURVEY OF 1320-1346. 

hestifm. Thomas de barre ten 9 ij caruc. ter 9 in hestlfm supiori p fuianc? 

sonand cornu suu contra advent dni in primo ingru dfii infra com. 
et egru extr 9 r. p ann 9 ?. pasc. et Michis iij s iiij d et sect com. et 
wapen. et potur 9 fuianc vt supra. Itm r. dfio ex consuet p ann 9 
q. d " cowmale" t. Michis viij s ix d . 



Puiton. Thomas Gentill ten 9 villat de Pulton p j caruc. ter 9 in socag* 

r. p ann 9 iiij t. vt supra xv s et releu vt supra. 

Katon. Johes de Kullewenne de iure Agri vxis sue Wiftus de Lancastr 

de halghill de iure Alicie vxis sue ten 9 villat de katon p ij caruc. 
ter 9 in socag r. p ann 9 iiij t. vt supra xx s et releu vt supra. 



Tim Johes et Wiftus r. dno p liceS assartandi quand plac 
pascuar 9 voca? linneldale que est pceft ten 9 de katon vt supra 
1. pasc. et Michis vj s viij d p oinibus. 

haiton. Thomas de Falerton ten xvj acr. ter 9 in halton p estim 9 r. p 

ann 9 t. pasc. et michis iij s iiij d vidlt p fuianc essend forestr 9 de 
Quernmore et alibi in fores?. 



WAPENTAKE%F LONSDALE. 73 

HESTHAM. Thomas de Barre holds two carves of land in Higher 
Hestham by serjeanty, and the sounding of his horn against the 
coming of the lord, on the first entrance of the lord within the 
county, and his departing out of it, paying yearly at Easter and 
Michaelmas three shillings and fourpence, and suit to the county 
and wapentake, and puture-serjeant as above. Also paying to the 
lord by custom yearly what is called " Cowmale " 41 at Michaelmas 
eight shillings and ninepence. 

PULTON. Thomas Gentill holds the village of Pulton for one 
carve of land in socage, paying yearly at the four terms as above 
fifteen shillings, and relief as above. 

KATON. John de Kullewenne, in right of Agnes his wife, 
William de Lancaster, of Halghill, in right of Alice his wife, 
hold the village of Katon for two carves of land in socage, paying 
yearly at the four terms as above twenty shillings, and relief as 
above. 

Also, John and William pay to the lord for license to assart a 
certain plot of pasturage ground called Linneldale, which is parcel 
of the holding of Katon as above, at Easter and Michaelmas terms, 
six shillings and eightpence for all [service] . 

HALTON. Thomas de Falerton 42 holds sixteen acres of land in 
Halton, 43 by estimation, paying yearly at Easter and Michaelmas 
terms three shillings and fourpence, viz., by serjeanty of convey- 
ing the foresters from Quernmore and elsewhere in the forests. 

41 Commate and Commicle in Birch, who suggests it may mean commuta the mewing 
of hawks, or canum muta, keeping a pack of harriers. The Birch MS. says the sound- 
ing of the horn is to be at Eavenscroft. That MS. gives the locality Heesham. 
42 Furleton. Birch. tt Eight acres in the said green. Ibid. 



74 SURVEY OF 1320-1346. 

Abbas de ffourneux ten 9 maneriu de Aldinglfm in ffourneux 
nup Michis fflemynge p xvj pt feod militf vt dj. r. p ann 9 t 
Micnis x 1 * et ai forinc. vt intelligitur. 

Sum redditus xv 11 ix s vj d . 

I Nataf Dni ........................ xxiij 3 ix d ob. 

Ind t \ P .............................. xxxS yd k* 

J. Bap? ......................... xxiij 3 ix d ob. 

^Micnis ................. ......... xj u xj s v d ob. 

Km p warda castr 9 viij d ob. ?. Nat J. bapt. 

Itm Cowmale viij 8 ix d t. Michis. 

ADHUC WAPPEN: DE LONNESDALE. 

Abbas de ffourneux: ten 9 iij caruc. ter 9 p estim 9 in Stapilteru 
in feodi firm) r. p ann 9 iiij ?. xl 8 . 



Abbas ten 9 apud Skerton xvj acr. vocat bonneflat in 
socag 1 r. p ann 9 1. pasc. et michis iiij 3 . 



Boiton. I3m Abbas apud bolton iij acr. ter 9 et d. acr. prat in socag r. p 

ann 9 iiij f. vj d . 

Idm Abbas ten 9 apud Bolton xix acr. ter 9 iiij acr. prat voca? 
Wodehulme in socag 1 r. p ann 9 iiij I. xij d . 



WAPENTAKE OF LONSDALE. 



75 



FOURNEUX. The abbot of Fourneux holds the manor of Alding- 
ham in Fourneux late of Michael Fleming, for the sixteenth part 
of a knight's fee as aforesaid, paying yearly at Michaelmas lol., and 
other foreign [rent] as is understood. 

Sum of the Rent, 15^. 9$. 6d. 



Whereof at 
the terms 



f s. d. 

Christmas 23 95 



Easter 30 5^ 

John the Baptist 23 9^ 

^Michaelmas ill. n 5^ 

Also, for castleward S^d. at the term of the nativity of St. John 
the Baptist. 

Also, Cowmale 8s. qd. at Michaelmas term. 

FURTHER IN THE WAPENTAKE OF LONNESDALE. 

STAPILTERUM. The abbot of Fourneux holds three carves of 
land by estimation, in Stapilterum, 44 in fee-farm, paying yearly at 
the four terms forty shillings. 

SKERTON. The same abbot holds at Skerton sixteen acres called 
Bonneflat 45 in socage, paying yearly at Easter and Michaelmas 
terms four shillings. 46 

BOLTON. The same abbot [holds] at Bolton three acres of land 
and half an acre of meadow in socage, paying yearly at the four 
terms sixpence. 47 

The same abbot holds at Bolton nineteen acres of land, four 

44 Staplethorn. JBirch. ** Conesland in Bewmonfc. Ibid. 

46 Twenty -five acres, six shillings and eightpence. Ibid. 

47 Thirty acres, six shillings and eightpence. Ibid. 



7 6 SURVEY OF 1320-1346. 



viuerston. Idm Abbas ten ' meet ville de Vluerston cu mebris p xij a pt 
feodi militf et p warda castr 9 1. Nat J. bapt. x d . 



Keiiet. Robtus de holaud miles ten 9 iij caruc. ter in Kellet infer 5 

p fuianc administrand in offic bafti regf et wappen. de lonnesdale 
r. p ann 9 t. Micnis ex comf que dj Cowmale ix s viij d . 



ciaghton. Wiftus Doggeson ten 9 j bou ter 9 in Claghton in socag 1 r. p 
ann 9 iiij t. vt supra et releu. 

Jones de Croft de Dalton ten 9 ij bou et ij pt j bou ter 9 ifcm in 
socag 1 r. p ann 9 iiij t. vt supra xij d et potur 9 et releu vt supra. 

Henr 9 de Croft ten 9 iij bou ter ibm in socag 1 r. p ann 9 iiij 
I. vt supra xvij d et sect com. et wap. releu et potur 9 vt supra. 

Edm de hornebye ten 9 iij bou ter 9 ibm in socag r. p ann 9 iiij t. 
vt supra xvij d et sect com. et wap. releu et potur 9 vt supra. 

Boiton. Prior Lancastr 9 ten 9 xl acr. ter 9 p iiij pt ville de Bolton in socag* 

r. p ann 9 iiij t. vt supra ix s x d sect com. et wap. releu et potur 9 
vt supra. 



WAPENTAKE OF LONSDALE. 77 

acres of meadow called Wodehulme in socage, paying yearly at the 
four terms twelve pence. 

ULVERSTON. The same abbot holds a moiety of the vill of 
Ulverston with members, for the twelfth part of a knight's fee, and 
for castleward, at the term of the nativity of St. John the Baptist, 
teupence. 

KELLET. Robert de Holande, knight, holds three carves of 
land in Lower Kellet by serjeanty of administering the office of 
bailiff of the king, and [suit to] the wapentake of Lonnesdale, 
paying yearly at Michaelmas term, of grant, what is called Cow- 
male nine shillings and eightpence. 

CLAGHTON. William Doggeson holds one oxgang of land in 
Claghton in socage, paying yearly at the four terms as above [a 
blank] and relief. 

John de Crofte of Dalton holds two oxgangs and two parts of 
one oxgang of land there in socage, paying yearly at the four 
terms as above, twelve pence, and puture, and relief as above. 

Henry de Croft holds three oxgaugs of land there in socage, 
paying yearly at the four terms as above seventeen pence, and suit 
to the county and wapentake, relief and puture as above. 

Edmund de Hornebye holds three oxgangs of land there in 
socage, paying yearly at the four terms as above seventeen pence, 
and suit to the county and wapentake, relief and puture as above. 

BOLTON. The prior of Lancaster holds forty acres of land for 
the fourth part of the vill of Bolton in socage, paying yearly at the 
four terms as above nine shillings and tenpence, suit to the county 
and wapentake, relief and puture as above. 



78 SURVEY OF 1320-1346. 

Johes Williamson ten 9 ij acr. ter 9 ibm in socag 1 r. p ann 9 iiij t. 
vt supra ij d releu potur 9 vt supra. 

Cecill de Sotheworth ten 9 xl acr. ter 9 et prat ibm in socag* 
r. p ann 9 iiij t. vt supra viij s viij d sect com. et wap. releu potur 9 
vt sup". 

Sidodra de Calholme ten 9 j acr. ibm in socag* r. p ann 9 iiij t. vt 
supra ret et pot vt supra. 

Johes de Barton ten 9 x acr. ter 9 ibm in socag r. p ann 9 iiij ?. 
vt supra xviij d rel sect com. et wap. et pot vt supra. 

Jones fit Simois de Bolton ten 9 xl acr. ter 9 ibm in socag 1 
r. p ann 9 iiij ?. vt supra v s vj d sect com. et wap. potur 9 vt supra. 

Johes fit Bici de Caldefielde ten v acr. ter 9 ibm in socag r. p 
ann 9 iiij ?. vt supra x d releu et potur 9 vt supra. 

Jacobus fit Wilti Jamesson ten 9 viij acr. ter 9 ibm in soc: r. p 
ann 9 iiij t. ij d releu et potur 9 vt supra. 

Jacobus Hose ten 9 viij acr. ter 9 ibm in soc r. p anil 9 iiij t. vj d 
ret et potur 9 vt supra. 

Adam Gilbartson ten 9 x acr. ter ibm in soc r. p ann 9 iiij t. vij d 
releu et potur 9 vt supra. 

Johes de Wodeholme ten 9 iij acr. ter 9 ibm in soc r. p ann 9 iiij t. 
iij d releu et potur 9 vt supra. 



WAPENTAKE OF LONSDALE. 79 

John Williamson holds two acres of land there [Bolton] in 
socage, paying yearly at the four terms twopence, relief [and] pu- 
ture as above. 

Cecil de Sotheworth holds sixty acres of land and meadow there 
in socage, paying yearly at the four terms as above eight shillings 
and eightpence, suit to the county and wapentake, relief, puture, &c. 

Sidodra de Calholme holds one acre of land there in socage, 
paying yearly at the four terms as above, relief, and puture, &c. 

John de Barton holds ten acres of land there in socage, paying 
yearly at the four terms as above eighteen pence, relief, suit to the 
county and wapentake, and puture, &c. 

John, son of Simon de Bolton, holds forty acres of land there in 
socage, paying yearly at the four terms as above five shillings and 
sixpence, suit to the county and wapentake, puture, &c. 

John, son of .Richard de Caldefielde, holds five acres of land 
there in socage, paying yearly at the four terms, &c., tenpeuce, 
relief and puture, &c. 

James, son of William Jamesson holds eight acres of land there 
in socage, paying yearly at the four terms, &c., twopence, relief 
and puture, &c. 

James Hose holds eight acres of land there in socage, paying 
yearly at the four terms sixpence, relief and puture, &c. 

Adam Gilbartson holds ten acres of land there in socage, paying 
yearly at the four terms sevenpence, relief and puture, &c. 

John de Wodeholme holds three acres of land there [Bolton} 
in socage, paying yearly at the four terms threepence, relief and 
puture, &c. 



80 SURVEY OF 1320-1346. 

Wiftus Jordanson ten 9 x acr. ter 9 ibm in soc r. p ann 9 iiij t. x d 
releu et potur 9 vt supra. 

Johes Doggeson ten 9 iij acr. ter 9 ibm in socag 1 r. p ann 9 iiij t. 
vj d releu et potur 9 vt supra. 

Thomas de Hakelaker ten 9 ij acr. ter 9 ibm in soc r. p ann 9 iiij 
t. vj d releu et potur 9 vt supra. 

Johes fit Tho 9 de Rommesbouth ten 9 x acr. ter 9 ibm in socag* 
r. p ann 9 iiij 1. x d releu et potur 9 vt supra. 

Johanna, Smythes wyfe, ten 9 d. acr. ter 9 ibm in soc r. p ann 9 
iiij t. ij d et potur 9 vt supra. 

Johes de Claph a m ten 9 j acr. ter 9 ibm in soc r. p ann 9 iiij t iij d 
releu et potur 9 vt supra. 

Johes de Haryngton ten 9 xij acr. ter 9 ibm in soc r. p ann 9 iiij t . 
xvj d releu et potur 9 vt supra. 

Wiftus de Slene ten 9 vj acr. terr 9 in soc r. p ann 9 iiij ?. vj d p 
oinibus et releu. 

Abbas de Laycester red dno p emend pa3 et fuic cii vie fc p 
cart Th 9 nup com! lane, vj 8 viij d I. Michis. 



Tho. de Tweuge ten 9 ij caruc. ter 9 in Ellehale, d caruc. ter 9 in 
Scotford p fuic iiij 16 ptf feod milit^ r. p ann 9 t. Nal J. bap? xx d 
viz. p warda castri. 



WAPENTAKE OF LONSDALE. 8 1 

William Jordanson holds ten acres of land there in socage, pay- 
ing yearly at the four terms tenpence, relief and puture, &c. 

John Doggeson holds three acres of land there in socage, pay- 
ing yearly at the four terms sixpence, relief and puture, &c. 

Thomas de Hakelaker holds two acres of land there in socage, 
paying yearly at the four terms sixpence, relief and puture, &c. 

John, son of Thomas de Eommesbouth [? Romeshawe] holds 
ten acres of land there in socage, paying yearly at the four terms 
tenpence, relief and puture, &c. 

Johanna or [Joan], Smythe's wife holds half an acre of land 
there in socage, paying yearly at the four terms twopence, and 
puture, &c. 

John de Clapham holds one acre of land there in socage, paying 
yearly at the four terms threepence, relief and puture, &c. 

John de Haryngton holds twelve acres of land there in socage, 
paying yearly at the four terms sixteen pence, relief and puture, &c. 

William de Slene holds six acres of land there in socage, paying 
yearly at the four terms sixpence for all [demands], and relief. 

COKERHAM. The abbot of Laycester pays to the lord for the 
amending [assise] of bread and ale made by charter of Thomas 
late Earl of Lancaster, six shillings and eightpence at Michaelmas 
term. 

ELLEHALE. Thomas de Twenge [or Twyns] holds two carves 
of land in Ellehale, half a carve of land in Scotford, by service of 
a fourth part of a knight's fee, paying yearly at the term of the 
nativity of John the Baptist twenty pence, viz., for castleward. 



82 SURVEY OF : i 320 -i 346. 

Sum red iiij n ix s vij d . 

Natal dno ................. xix* viij d ob. 

XX J S ^ ob< 



Inde I. 

Na? 3. bap! ................. xix 8 viij d ob. 

..................... xxviij 3 iiij d ob. 



Km p ward castr 9 ij s vj d I Nat. 3. bapt. 
Km Cowmale ix s viij d ?. Michis. 

ADHUC WAPPEN: DE LONNESDALE. 

warton. Maria de sco Paulo comitisse Pembroch ten 9 j car. ter 9 

vij d ob. Jolandremau iij caruc. ter 9 in Warton in lyndeheued j 
caruc. ter 9 in berwicke v d j car. ter 9 Cornford Tho s de Roos ten 9 
j car. ter 9 in Jolanercoyners v d Margeria de Crofte d car. ter 9 ij d 
ob. in Siluerdale. 

Jones de Crofte j caruc. ter 9 v d in Tikwitmyre Adomarus 
Darcye j car. ter 9 in Whitinton p fuic d. feod et vj te ptf j feod 
militf r. p ann 9 ij s vj d t. na?. J. bapt. p warda castri. 



Adomarus Darcy r. dfio p dca car. ter 9 in Whitinton vt supra 
iij 8 iiij d iiij ?. et sec? com. et wap. et potur 9 



Wittus de Morthinge j car. ter 9 et Johes de hodleston j car. 
in Whitinton q 9 sunt ten 9 p fui2 mit vt supra et sect com. et wap. 



WAPENTAKE OF LONSDALE. 83 

Sum of the Bent, 4/. 9*. yd. 

C *. d. 

Christmas 19 8| 

Whereof at I Caster 21 8| 

the terms 1 Nativity of John Baptist 19 8| 

[_ Michaelmas 28 4! 

Also, for castleward 2s. 6d. at the nativity of John Baptist. 

Also, Cowmale gs. 8d. at Michaelmas term. 

FURTHER IN THE WAPENTAKE OF LONNESDALE. 

WARTON. Mary de St. Paul, countess of Pembroke, holds one 
carve of land, sevenpence halfpenny ; Jolanderman, three carves of 
land in Warton and Lyndeheued, one carve of land in Berwick, five- 
pence ; one carve of land in Cornford ; Thomas de Roos holds one 
carve of land in Jolanercoyners, one penny; Margery de Croft, 
half a carve of land, twopence halfpenny, in Silverdale. 

John de Crofte, one carve of land, fivepence, in Tikwitmyre; 
Adomar Darcye one carve of land in Whitinton, by service of half 
a fee and the sixth part of one knight's fee, paying yearly two 
shillings and sixpence at the term of the nativity of John the 
Baptist for castleward. 

WHITINTON. Adomar Darcy pays to the lord for the said carve 
of land in Whitinton, as above, three shillings and fourpence at 
the four terms, and suit to the county and wapentake, and 
puture. 

William de Morthinge one carve of land, and John de Hodleston 
one carve in Whitinton, which are held by knight's service as above, 



84 SURVEY OF 1320-1346. 

mottn fulr 9 de loon r. sol 9 p aim 9 xx 8 1. pasc et michis u 1 hie q} 
010 psor [?] et in casu. 

Lancaster. Joftes laur 9 de Assheton ten 9 iiij acr. j rod: ter 9 vij d ob. q3 Prior 
lane, j acr. iij d Jones laurens de lancastr 9 ij acr. vj d Joftes mercer 
ij acr. et d. vij d ob. Robtus de bolron ij acr. vj d Wiftus fil Ade 
Symondesson iij acr. et d. x d ob. Robtus de Wasshington ij rod 
j d ob. Cecill relict Johis Cort j acr. iij d . Robtus Cooke j acr. j 
rod iij d ob. q*. Wiftus de Slene j acr. irj d . Wiftus de Balerstoii j 
acr. iij d viz in le miliiefelde r. p quati} acr. iij d et sic p ann 9 in toto 
vt supra ij I. 



p) xx s quos vift de Warton r. sot dno p ass. pan! et fuic ii 11 q3 
in manu marie de sco paulo ad firm) de dno rege et tu quiet p 
ostenc clam) in itiSe. 



Sum redd viijs iiijd. 



Ind t. 



Natat dno. 



J. bapE 
Michis 



t xx s de molo de loon. 
> et p^ut xx s de vift de warton 
non cont infra sumam. 



Hm p ward castr ij 8 vj d t. Nat J. bapt. 



WAPENTAKE OF LONSDALE. 85 

and suit to the county, and wapentake, and to the fulling-mill of 
Loon, rendering payment yearly, twenty shillings at Easter and at 
Michaelmas terms, or all that which proceeds and by chance [?] . 

LANCASTER. John Laurence, of Assheton, holds four acres 
one rod of land, eightpence three farthings ; the prior of Lancaster, 
one acre, threepence ; John Laurence, of Lancaster, two acres, six- 
pence; John [the] mercer, two acres and a half, sevenpence half- 
penny; Robert de Bolron, two acres, sixpence; William, son of 
Adam Symondesson, three acres and a half, tenpence halfpenny ; 
Robert de Wasshington, two rods, three halfpence ; Cecily, relict 
of John Cort, one acre, threepence ; Robert Cooke, one acre one 
rod, threepence three farthings ; William de Slene, one acre, three- 
pence; William de Balerston [? Balderston], one acre, threepence; 
viz., in the Milne field, paying for each acre threepence, and so 
yearly for all as above, at the two terms. 

WARTON. [! Received] twenty shillings which the villagers of 
Warton render payment to the lord for the assise of bread and ale, 
2/. which is in the hand of Mary de St. Paul [countess of Pem- 
broke], to farm, of the lord the king, &c. 

Sum of the Rent, 8*. 46?. 



Whereof 



r 



Christmas... .010 



attheH Easter 34 

terms I John Baptist .. o 10 



20*. of the mill of Loon and 
> 2os. of the vill of Warton, 
not contained in the sum. 



^Michaelmas ... 3 

Also for castleward 2s. 6d. at the term of the nativity of John 
Baptist. 



86 SURVEY OF 1320-1346. 

WAPPEN: DE LONNESDALE. 

Sum redd totius wappen. xxxj 1 - xx d . 

Natat dni lv 8 ij 



Pasc.. , .. vii 11 xi s vii d ob. 

Indef. 4 .1-2 

J. Bapt lv s ij d q} 

! Michis xvij u xix s viij d ob. 

Sum ward castr 9 v s viij d ob. 
Sum del Cowmale xviij 8 v 4 



(FlNIS.) 



WAPENTAKE OF LONSDALE. 

WAPENTAKE OF LONNESDALE. 

Sum of the Rent of the whole Wapentake, 31^. i*. 8rf. 

f s. d. 

I Christmas ........................ 55 2^ 

Whereof at I Easter ........................ jL 7 | 

the terms 1 John Baptist ..................... 55 2| 

(.Michaelmas .................. ijl. 19 8| 



Sum of the castleward, 5*. 
Sum of the cowmale, 185. 56?. 



(THE END.) 



SURVEY OF 1320-1346. 



INDEX NOMINUM ET LOCORUM. 



A DAM, son of Simon, 49. 

** the knight, 57. 

Adamson, Benedict, 67. 

Adbwrsham, 37. 

Aghton, 63. 

Alan del More of Fishwick, 49. 

Aldingham, 75. 

Allerton, 43. 

Alnolnesdale, 37. 

Alston, 49. 

AMOUNDEBNESS WAPEUTAKB, pp. 45-61. 

Appleton, 39. 

Ashton (Aughton) advowson, 41. 

AssMon, 47, 49. 

Ashton-in-Makerfield, 37. 

Astley, 41. 

Atherton, 39. 

Aykensaw, Geoffrey de, 49. 

"DEMAND, Thomas, 35. 
*-^ Balerig, Lawrence, 67 
Balerston (Balderston), William de, 85. 
Banastre, Thomas f. Adam, 51 ter, 57. 
Bar, or Bare, or Dacre, Thomas de, 63, 7 3. 

William de, knight, 71. 

Bar or Bare, 7 1 bis. 

Barton, John de, 79. 

Barton (West Derby), 35, 39. 

Barton (Amounderness), 47. 

Beatrice of the Budding, 49. 

Bedford (Leigh), 39. 

Berwick (BorwicTc), 83. 

Bethom, Ralph de, 33, 35, 45, 47. 

Billing e, 37. 

Billesborough, 51. 

Bispnam, Great, 59. 

Blackburne, Robert de (Gtarstang), 31. 

Ellen, wife of, 31, 



Blundell, Kichard, 33. 

William, 39. 

Boldeburn, 
Bolron, 65. 
Bolron, Kobert de, 85. 

William de, 65. 

Bolton, Simon de, 71, 79. 

John f. Simon, 79. 

Bolton-le-Sands,6$ bis, 75 bis,"]"] multis, 

8 1 multis. 

Bolymer, Roger, 33. 
Botell (Bootle), 35. 
Botiller, John, 57. 

Nicholas, 47, 59. 

Richard, 59. 

William, 37 bis, 39 ter, 59 bis. 

Bradschaghe, Mabel de, 37. 
Brebury (? Arbury), 37. 
Broughton (near Preston), 5 1 . 
Broune, a certain, 57. 
Bryninge 47 , 53. 
Bulde, Richard, 37. 
BuUe (Bolde), 37. 
Burghe, William de, 69. 
Burscough, prior of, 43. 
Burscough priory, advowson, 43. 
Burtonwood, 39. 
Burye, Adam de, 51. 
Bykerstath, Adam de, 35. 
ByJcerstath (Bickerstaffe), 35. 

/^*ALDEFIELDE, John, f. Richard de, 

^ 79- 

Calholme, Sidora de, 79. 
Caton (Katon), 73. 
Cawood forest, 67. 
Childewall, 43. 
Chorlegh, 43. 



INDEX. 



S 9 



Clapham, John de, 8 1 . 

Clayton, John de, 69. 

Claughton, 45, 77 quater. 

Clifton, William de, 47, 59. 

Clifton, 47 Its. 

Clyderhowe castle, 53. 

Cockerham, 81. 

Compcy, William de, 51. 

Cooke, Eobert, 85. 

Cornford (Carnforth), 83. 

Cort, Cicely, relict of John, 85. 

Cokersand, abbot of, 35, 53 bis, 55, 71 bis. 

Croft, Henry de, 77. 

John de, 69 bis, 77, 83. 

Margery de, 83. 

Crofte, 37. 
Crosseby 33. 

Little, 41. 

Croynton (Crouton), 39. 

CulchetTi, 39. 

Conescowgk (Cunscouah) , 35. 

Cunsleghe or Cuerdesley (Knowsley), 39. 

DACRE, William de, knight, 6 3, 69, 7 1 . 
Thomas, 63. 

Dale, John of the, 33. 

Dalton, 43, 69. 

Damport, John, 33, 53. 

Darcye, Adomar, 83 bis. 

DEKBT, WEST, WAPENTAKE, pp. 31-45. 

Ditton, Hugh de, 31. 

John de, 31. 

Zritton, 31. 
Doggeson, John, 8 1 . 

Richard, 57. 

William, 77. 

Dounholande, Richard de, 35. 
Down-Holland, 35. 
Down-Litkerland, 35. 
Durham, prior of, 45. 

17 ARL of , 33, 53, 55 ter, 59. 

* ' Eccleston (in Widnes), 39. 
Edmund, Earl of Lancaster, 59. 
Edward III., king, 63. 
Eggergarth, 39. 
Elisson, William, 7 1 . 
Mlehale (Ellel), 81. 
Esshebye de Kirkdale, 41. 
Estline (Sline), 65 bis. 
Etheliswyke, 45. 

T7ALERTON, Thomas de, 73. 

* Field Plumpton, Great and Little, 47 



FishwicTc, 49. 

Fleming Michael, 75. 

Fishwick, Alan of the More of, 49. 

William de, 49. 

Forneby (Formby), 33, 53. 

Fourneux (Furuess), abbot of, 67, 75 

quinquies, 77. 

Fourneux (Furness), 67, 75 quinquies. 
Franceys, John, 65. 
Frikelton, Ralph de, 45. 
FriJcelton (Freckleton), 45. 
Fysher, Hugh de, 31. 

/^ENTILL, Thomas, 73. 

^^ Gerstang, (Garstang), 31, 51, 53. 

Gersingham (Gressingham), 67 ter. 

Gersingham, Thomas de, 67. 

Gilbartson, Adam, 79. 

Glazebrook, 39. 

Goldburn, 37. 

Goosnargh, 57. 

Gosenargh, Thomas, 47 ter. 

Grelle, John, 43. 

Grene, William of the, 67. 

Grimsargh, 59. 

\JAGHE (Haigh), 37. 

-* -* Hakelater, Thomas de 8 1 . 

Hakenshow, John, f. Richard de, 55. 

Hakenshow (Hackensall), 55. 

HalgJiton (? Houghton), 51. 

Halsale, Oto de, 39. 

Halsall, 39. 

Halton, 63, 71. 

Hamelton (Hambleton), 53. 

Hanyngton (orHaryngton), JoLn de, 67,8 1 . 

Haylegh, Henry, 67. 

Haydock, Edmund de, 49. 

Hay dock, 37. 

Hest, 63. 

Hestham (Hey sham), 71. 

Heton, William de, 57. 

Henry son, John, 31. 

Hest, Thomas de, the sister of, 63. 

Hexham, Roger, 67. 

Hoghton, 37. 

Holande, lord of, 43. 

Robert de, 43 bis, 49, 77. 

Hodreshale, Robert de, 59. 
Hodresale, (Hothersall) , 59. 
Hodleston, John de, 83. 
Horderne, 55. 
Hornebye, Edmund de, 77. 
Hornby, 63 bis. 



9 



SURVEY OF 1320-1346. 



Hose, James, 79. 

Houghton, or Hoghton, sir Adam de, knt., 

37, 47, 55. 57, 59 s **- 
Hugeson, Adam, 67. 
Hulme (in Winwick), 37. 
Hurdleton (? Latham), 43. 
Huyton, 41. 
Hyndelegh (Hindley), 37. 

TNS(Ince), 37, 39. 

A Ireby, 63. 

Isabella, queen of England, 41, 45, 53. 

T AMESSON, James, f. William, 79. 
J John, the king, 33. 
John, f. Roger, 7 1 . 

of the Dale, 33. 

Jolanderman 83. 

Jolanercoyners, 83. 

Jordanson, Margery, daughter of Thomas, 

33- 
William, 81. 

KARTMELL (Cartmel), prior of, 63. 
Katerall (Caterall), Richard, 59 bit. 
Eaton (Caton), 71. 
Kawode (Cawood) forest, 67. 
Kellet, Upper, 69 bis. 

Lower, 77. 

Kenean (Kenyon), 37. 

Kerden (Cuerden), 33. 

Kilgrimesargh (Kellamergh), 47, 53. 

King, the, 39, 51. 

Kirkby, 41. 

Kirkdale, 41. 

Kulwenne (Culwen), John de, 73 bis. 

Agnes, wife of John de, 7 3 bis. 

LANCASTER, E., late earl of, 59. 
Thomas, late earl of, 81. 

prior of, 67, 77. 

William de, 7 3 bis. 

Alice, wife of, 7 3 bis. 

Lancaster, 85. 

Langton, Robert de, knight, 37. 

Latham, Thomas de, 41, 43, 49. 



Lathom, 41. 

Laton-cum- Wardebroke (Layton-with- 

Warbreck), 59. 
Lauton, 37. 

Lawrence, John (Hakenshow), 55. 
(Skerton), 67. 

(Assheton), 85. 

(Lancaster), 85. 

William, 49 Us, 57. 

Laycester, abbot of, 81. 

Lees, loth (? English and French Lea), 

37, 55- 

Leigh (see West-leigh) . 
Lincoln, Alice, countessof, 39,41,45,47,53. 
Linneldale, 73. 
Litherland, Up, 41. 
Lokehalghe, William f. William de, 67. 
Longforde, Nicholas de, 59 bis. 
Loon, mill of, 65, 85. 
LONSDALE WAPENTAKE, pp. 63-87. 
Lydiate, 39. 

Lyndheved (Lindeth), 83. 
Ly thorn, 45. 

~\I\AEL (Maghult), 41. 
1V1 Helling, 35, 63. 
Mercer, John le, 85. 
Merton, Great, (Marton), 59. 

Little, 55. 

Mere (Marton), 55. 

Midlarghe, 53. 
Milne-field (Lancaster), 85. 
Middleton, 37, 69, 71 quinquies. 
Moleneux, Thomas, 33 bis. 
Molineux, Richard, 33, 35. 
Morthinge, William de, 83. 
Moulbroke (Mowbreck), 55. 
Myrescoughe (Myerscough), 61. 

NEVILL, sir Robert de, knight, 63. 
William f. Edward de, 7 1. 

Newton, 55. 

43 Newton (in Malcerfield), 37, 45. 
Noreis, Hugh le, 37. 
Northcrosse, Roger de, 57. 
Newbiggin, 53. 



48 Members of Newton-in -Maker field : Lauton (Lowton), Kenean (Kenyou), Sud- 
worth (Southworth), Brebury (Arbury) Croft, Middleton, Hoghton, Goldburn, Ash- 
ton-in-Makerfield, Haydock, Billinge-with-Winstanley, Orrell, Pemberton, Adburs- 
ham, Hindley, Ins (Ince), Wigau, Winwick- with-Holms (Hulme). 



INDEX. 



9 1 



/^\RMESTON, William de (of Leghe),3 1. 

^-^ Ormskirk church, 43. 

Orrell, 37. 

Out Rawdiffe, 55. 

Oxford (?), earl of, 53, 55 ter. 

p EMBERTON '(?), 35, 37. 

-- Pembroke, countess of, (Mary de St. 

Paul), 83, 85. 
Penketh, 39. 
Pennington, 39. 
Penwortham, the lord of, 41. 
Perles, John, 65 bis. 
Preston, 37. 
Pulton (Poulton), 76. 
Plumpton, Great and Little (Fylde), 47. 

/~ UERNMORE FOREST,6i t 67, 73- 



"D ATENSMEOLS, 37. 

** Ribbleton, 49. 

Richard of the Well, 33. 

Raynhull (Rainhill), 39. 

Sixton, 39. 

Robertson, William, f. William, 71. 

Roby, 41. 

Rogerson, William, 33. 

Rommesbouth, John, f. Thomas de, 81. 

Roos, Thomas de, 83. 

Rudding, Beatrice of the, 49. 

- Thomas of the, 5 1 . 
Rygemayden, John, f. Thomas, 53. 

- Thomas, 7 1 . 



47. 

** Sankey, 39. 
Scarisbrick, 43. 
Scotford, 8 1. 
Sefton, 33. 

Shiderorde {pasture in Salton), 63. 
Shireburne, William de, 53. 
Silver dale, 83. 

Singelton, Thomas f. Gilbert de, 45. 
Singleton, Little, 5 1 . 
Skerton, 65, 67 tfer, 75. 
Slene [or Sieve], Alice de, 65 bis. 
- William de, 81, 85. 



Slevede, Alice de, 69. 
Smythe, Joan, 81. 
Sothworthe, Cecil de, 67 bis. 

Gilbert de, 49. 

wife of, 49. 

Southworth, 37. 
Stalmine, 47. 
Staynolfe, John de, 57. 

Thomas f. Robert de, 57. 

Stapilterum, (Stapletkorri), 75. 

Stayning, 55. 

Staynolfe, 57. 

Sutton, 39. 

Symondesson, William f. Adam, 85. 

^TATHAM, Edmund de, 63. 

Robert de, 63. 

TatAam, 63. 
Thingewall, Roger de, 35. 

William, f. John de, 35. 

Thingivall, 31, 35. 
Thornbrandheved, Simon de, 65. 
Thornton, John, f. Lawrence de, 57. 
Thornton, 33, 39, 57 bis. 
Thomas, f. Stephen, 31. 
Tikwitmyre, 83. 
Torbock, 41. 
Torrisholme, 67. 
Travers, Thomas, 49 bis, 57. 
Lawrence, 51. 



Treweles (Treales), 55. 
Twenge (or Twyns), Thomas de, 81. 
Twisilton, John de, 67. 
Tyldesley, 39. 

ULVERTSON, 77. 
Upholland, 43. 

Upholland Priory, advowson, 43, 
Uplitherland, 41. 
Urswicke, Isabella de, 69. 

WALL, Richard of the, 33, 
Walshe, Richard, 41. 
Walton, Simon de, 31, 33 bis. 

Thomas de, 65, 71. 

Warre, John de la, 43. 
Wardbroke (Warbreck), 59. 
Walton, 33. 
49 Warrington, 37. 



49 Members of Warriugton : Sankey, Penketh, Rixton, Glazebrook, Culcheth, 
Tildesley, Pennington, Bedford, Athertou, Halsall, Ince, Lydiate-with-Eggergarth, 
Barton, and Thornton. 



SURVEY OF 1320-1346. 



Warton, 45, 83 bis, 85. 
Wasshington, Robert de, 85. 
Welles, William de, 65. 
WEST DEBBY WAPENTAKE, pp. 31-45. 
Westby, 47. 
West-leigh, 31. 
Westsome, 55. 
Whalley, abbot of, 55. 
Whitinton (Whittingtori), 83 bis. 
80 Widnes, 39. 
Wtgan, 37. 

William and William, 63. 
Williamson, John, 79. 
37- 



Witliton (Weeton) 53, 55 Us. 
Wodeholme, John de, 79. 
Wodehulme (meadoiv), 77. 
Wodeward, Henry, 33. 
Wood Plumpton, 33, 53. 
Wolston, Great and Little, 39. 
Wyersdale, Kobert de, 33. 
Wyndewhike, Kobert, 57. 
Wyndehull (Windle-with-Sardshaw) , 39. 
WynestanlegJie ( Winstanley) , 37. 
WynewTiyJce (Win wick- with- Hulme), 37. 
Wyresdale, 51, 53. 
WytMngJiam, 45. 



60 Members of Widnes : Appelton, Croenton, Wolston Great and Little, Eccleston, 
Sutton, Rainhill, Cundesley (Knowsley), Koby, Huyton, Torbock, Kirkby, Little 
Crosaby, Maghull, and Astley. 



93 



No. III. CUSTOM ROLL AND RENTAL 

OF THE MANOR OF ASHTON- 

UNDER-LYNE, 1422. 



IN the year 1822, the late Dr. Hibbert [afterwards Dr. Hibbert- 
Ware], F.R.S., &c., read before the Society of Scottish Anti- 
quaries, in Edinburgh, a dissertation entitled " Illustration of the 
Customs of a Manor in the North of England during the Fifteenth 
Century/' which was printed in their Volume of Transactions for 
that year. Dr. Hibbert subsequently printed separately as an Ap- 
endix, "The Custom Roll and Rental of Ashton-under-Lyne,"- 
the manor referred to in his paper, which was not inserted in the 
society's transactions on account of its great length ; and of this 
Appendix he states, "a very few copies were printed for private 
circulation." As this record, in its printed form, is exceedingly 
rare, it has been thought desirable to reprint it in the present 
volume, with this difference, that originally it was an Appendix to 
the Dr.'s dissertation, now it is the text, and Dr. Hibbert' s obser- 
vations follow in the form of notes. 

Dr. Hibbert states that he possessed a copy only of the original, 
in which the orthography had not been preserved. This copy was 
formerly in the possession of one of his ancestors, but at the earnest 
solicitation of the family most concerned it was presented to them. 
The documents were collected in what was called " a book/' and 
they are here reprinted from the Appendix already referred to. 



94 



CUSTOM ROLL AND RENTAL OF THE 



CUSTOM-ROLL and RENTAL of the Manor of Assheton-under- 
Lyne, printed verbatim from a transcript in the possession 
of DR. HIBBERT, entitled, " A Copy of an Old Manuscript, 
possessione JOXJE, HARROP DE BARSLEY anno 1749. Nunc 
possessione Ralf. Assheton. Bar. de Middelton" 51 

AT the feast of Martyn in Wynter, the year of the King Henry 
(the sixth after the conquest) the First, 52 all the tenants of 
the lordship of Assheton- under-liue, taking their tenements to 
farm for 20 wynter terme, at John of Assheton, knight, the whiche 
came out of Normandy at the same feast, with all the services, 
customs, and usages, as after is in this same book written and 
rehearsed, and as it has been used and customed of old time ; and 
every man to pay his farm at. two times in the year, as the rental 
of this said book makes mention. 

The service of the said tenants is this, y* they shall give their 
pressents at Yole ; every present to such a value as it is written and 
sett in the rental ; and the lord shall feed al his said tenants and 
their wifes upon Yole Day at y e dinner, if them like for to come ; 
but the saied tenants and their wifes, though it be for their ease 
not to come, they shal send neither man nor woman in their name, 
but if he^ be their son other their daughter dwellyng with them, 
unto the dinner. For the Lord is not bounden to feed save al only 
the gud man and the good wife. Also every tenant that plough 
has, shall plow two days, and he that half plough has shall plow 
a day, whether the Lord be leiver in wheat seeding other in lenten 
seeding ; and every tenant harrow a day with their harrow in seed- 

61 It is to be lamented that the ancient orthography of the manuscript has not 
been faithfully preserved ; but I prefer following the transcript rather than correct 
any error of this description that cannot be confirmed by a reference to the original 
document. S. H. 

52 Wednesday, November i ith, 1422. This feast is the anniversary of the ordina- 
tion of St. Martin, bishop of Tours, usually described in records as " St. Martin in 
Winter." Ed. 



MANOR OF ASSHETON-UNDER-LYNE. 



95 



ing time when they bin charged. And they shall cart every tenant 
ten cartful of turve fro Doneamraoss, Eone [? unto] Ashton, and 
shear four days in harvest, and carte a day corne ; and they shall 
pay a principal at their death, that is, to wit, the best beast they 
have, which other deed [?] next after Holy Kirk. 

Also the said tenants shall muller [pay toll for grinding] their 
come growing upon the said tenements at the Lords milne to the 
sixteenth vessel, and they shall go to none other milne to muller 
their corn growing on their tenements, but to the Lords miliie ; 
and if they buy corn, the which is dryed with the Lords ffewel, 
they shall muller it at the Lords milne to the i6th vessel, and all 
other corn that they buy they shall muller to the Lovesucken, 53 
which is to the 24th vessel, and go to none other milne if the corn 
be brought within the said Lordship. 

This is the whole rental of tenants at will of the said Lordship 
of Assheton, and the value of their presents at Yole, the year and 
day aforesaid, the which rent shall be payed at 2 terms of the year, 
that is for to wit, the ton half at the ffeast of St John Baptist, and 
tother half at the ffeast of St Martyn ith Wynter. 

Rentale tenent. ad voluntatem de dom de Assheton, anno Regni 
Regis Hen r Sexti primo. 

Magot, that was the wife of Richard of Hadfield, has taken that 
place which her husband held to the Dome terme, with the ser- 
vices, customes, and usages that longes to the tenants of the said 
Lordshippe of Assheton, yielding yearly for the said place at the 
feasts of Midsummer and Martinmas, 39 shillings and 6d. and at 
y e Yole aforesaid, a present to the value of 20 pence. 

John of Holliu worth has taken the place that he held with the 
saied service, customes, and usages, yielding yearly therefore at 

53 Soken is the miller's toll. " Great soken had this miller." Love-soken is a 
favour-token, paying for 24 measures the soken or multure for 16. Ed. 

O 



9 6 



CUSTOM ROLL AND RENTAL OF THE 



the feasts aforesaid, 38 shillings and id. and at the Yole, a present 
to the value of 16 pence. 

Chrystopher the Vernon, has taken certain land within Shepley, 
and in Doneam Moss, with the service of 4 days sheering, paying 
yearly 15 shillings and 4 pence. 

William the Walker has taken the tenement that he ere held, 
and the moorhey in the ryecroft, with the service, customs, and 
usages aforesaid, yielding yearly, at the feasts aforesaid, 22 shil- 
lings and 10 pence, and at the Yole a present the value of 8 pence. 

Robert the Walker has taken the tenement that he ere held, 
with the services, customs, and usages aforesaid, yielding yearly, 
at the feasts aforesaid 22 shillings and 10 pence, and for the Walk 
Milii 26 shillings and 8d. and at Yole a present to the value of 



John of the Edge has taken the land lying to the miln, with 
the service and customs aforesaid, yielding yearly, at the feasts 
aforesaid, 13 shillings and 4 pence, and a present at Yole to the 
value - 

Roger Unton has taken the place that Jack Coke held, except 
the land that lyes beyond the fold that Richard Unton holds, yeild- 
ing yearly a whole service and 10 shillings and a - present. 

Roger le Smith, for a meadow in the over Ryecroft field, 3 shil- 
lings and 40?. 

Syssot, that was the wife of Patrick, for a house and garden at 
the miln, she shall shear 4 days in harvest, and she shall give a 
principal at her dying ; and for her term, she shall pay 2 shillings, 
and a present at Yole, to the value of ^d. 

Malkyn, y* was the wife of Dicon Hoggerson, for her teuem* at 
the milne, 46?. 

Merget of Stayley, for the kilne, 5 shillings. 

Robert of Chadwick, for his tenement he shall do the service as 
other cottages done, and pay 5 shillings, and a present to the value 
of \d. 

Alys, that was Pole wife, the same service for a cottage, and 
shall pay i2d. and a present, the value ^d. 



MANOR OF ASSEETON-UNDER-LYNE. 



97 



Marget of Stanley, the same service, and 2 shilling and a pre- 
sent, y e value ^.d. 

Syssot, that was the wife of Dycon Wilson, the same service 
and 2 shilling, and a present to the value \d. 

Alys Hanson, the same service and 2 shilling, and a present to 
the value 46?. 

Nanne of the Windebank, the same service and is. and a present 
to the value of 46?. 

Tho s . of White Leigh, the same service and 5 shillings, and a 
present, the value 46?. 

John Ffulsstaffe, for his cottage, a service and 4 shillings, for 
Lusley 2d. 

The same John, for lands in Colwel, 12 shillings. 

Elyn Wilkyn doghter, for her cottage, a service and 2 shillings. 

Robyn Ffulsstaffe, a whole service, the present 146?. and 325. and 
6t?., for Lusley id. 

The wife of Peryn, for her cottage, a service and is. 

Elyn of Hulme, for her cottage, a service and 2*. 

William of Buckley, for a cottage, a service and is. 

Nanne, that was the wife of Robyn Jackson, for a cottage, a 
service and is. 

Jone, that was the wife of Atkyn Tumson, for a cottage, a service 
and is. 

William Somaster, for a cottage, a service and is. 

William Richards son of Bardsley, for a cottage, a service and 25. 

John of Haworth, for a cottage a service and 2 shillings. 

Roger the Smith, for a cottage, a service and los. and $d. 

Syssot, that was the wife of Thomas the Cook, a service and 6*. 
and 8d. 

Robert Unton, for his tenement, a whole service, the present 
ioc?. and js. and 6d. For Lusley 

Jenkyn Cocker, for his tenement and croft at the town end that 
Richard of Oldome held, 20*. 

Hobbe Adamson, for his tenement, a whole service and the 
pressent nd., and us. and 6d. 



98 CUSTOM ROLL AND RENTAL OF THE 

Roger the Baxter, for a cottage, a service and 8*. and id. 

The same Roger for land in Wollowe, 25*. 

The same Roger for the bake house, 6*. and Sd. 

Robyn Somayster, for his cottage and the vyner stedes, a service 
and is. 

Adam of the Holde, for a cottage, a service and 45. 

William the Arrowsmith, for a cottage, a service and 4$. 

Marget, that was the wife of John the Hind, for a cottage, a 
service, and 2s. 

Roger the Smyth, for the smithey, 2s. 

John Spakeman, for a cottage, a service and is. 

Jak the Spencer, bailey, shall answer of the profits and the 
farms of the booths, the shops and the mealhouse, ids. 

The same John Spencer, bailey, shall answer of the profits of 
the toll, of the fairs, and y e markets. 

Elyn the Rose, for a cottage, a service and 2s. 

Jenkyn of the Wood, for his tenement, a whole service and the 
present at (Yole) i2d. and the (farm) at 205. and 6d. 

The same Jkn. for his holding in the basket feilds, 135. and ^.d. 

Richard Uiiton, for his tenement and the Rhodes feild in the 
Thanes Kerr, and for land that was Jak the Cook's, by the pool, 
265. and Sd. 

William of Bardesley, for his tenement, a whole service, the 
present lod. and the farm 285. and lod. 

John of Hogh, for his tenement, the service of 4 days shereing 
and a principal, the farm 145. 

William of the Woodfield, for his cottage, a service, the present 
6d. His farm Hanlawe 165. and ^d., for Lusley \d. 

Thomas Robynson, for his tenement, a whole service, the pre- 
sent 156?. the farm 365. and id., for Lusley jd. 

Raufie Bardesley, a whole service, the present 156?. the farm 
34*. and 6d>, for L. 6d. [perhaps Lusley. T. P.] 

William the Cocker, for his tenement, a whole service, the pre- 
sent 146?. the farm ijs. and 8c?., and for L. Sd. 

Rich d . de Bardesley of Hurst, the over end of the old thane's 
kerr, the which the lord marled x s . 



* 

MANOR OF ASSHETON-UNDEB-LYNE. 



99 



Jack Johnson, for his tenement, a whole service, the present x d . 
the farm 295. and 6d., for L. i6d. 

William of Bardisley of Hazlehurst, a whole service, the present 
206?. the farm is. 6d., for L. jd. 

William of the Wood feild, for a lond at Erley, 4$. 

John of Heghrode, for an intake in the Bastall, is. 

The same John, for William feild, IDS. 

Thomlyn of the Leghes of Hazlehurst, for his tenement, a whole 
service, the present i$d. the farm 325. and 26?. for L. 46?. 

Richard the Smith, for his tenement, a whole service, the pre- 
sent 156?. the farm 34$. and Sd. for L. 46?. 

Richard of Bardesley of Hurst, for the old thanes Carr, 30*. 

Hugh of Gaytcliffe, for his tenement, a whole service, the pre- 
sent 6d. the farm Ss. 6d. for L. \d. 

Jack the Mercer, for his tenement, a whole service, the present 
96?. the farm 8*. and 6d., for L. 6d. 

Jak the Spencer, for his tenement, a whole service, the present 
yd. the farm 175. and 6d., for L. id. 

The same for Hobryding, 6s. and Sd. 

John of Lyngards, a whole service, the present gd. the farm 17*. 
and 66?., for L. Sd. 

Thomas Sanderson, for his tenement a whole service, the present 
Sd. the farm 255. and 6d. for L. jd. 

Robyn Sanderson, for his tenement, a whole service, the present 
1 2e?. the farm 335. and 6d., for L. \d. 

Jak le Mercer, for Wollawe, iSs. 

Robyn Robynson, for his tenement, a whole service, the present 
ioc?. the farm 295. and 26?. 

Tomlyn Diconson, for his tenement, a whole service, the present 
6d., the farm js. and 6e?., for L. 46?. 

Nichol Saunderson, for his tenement, a whole service, the pre- 
sent 6c?. the farm 165. and 26?., for L. 26?. 

John Saunderson, for his tenement, a whole service, the present 
76?. the farm us. and 6d., for L. 56?. 

Jak the Hind, for his tenement, a whole service, the present Sd. 
the farm 195. and 66?., for L. 6d. 



IOO CUSTOM ROLL AND RENTAL OF THE 

Wilkyn Robynson, for his tenement, a whole service, the pre- 
sent i%d. the farm 295. and 6d. for L. x d . 

Jak of the Leghes, for two parts of Mossley, a whole service, 
the present 2od. the farm 39$. and 6d. for L. 6d. 

The same Jak for Knolle's Meadow, and the hay croft, 55. 

The same Jak for certain land in the Moor Hey, 6s. and Sd. 

Adam Wilson, for his tenement, 4 days [? shearing] and a 
principal, the farm 205. and \d. 

The wife of Wilkyn Atkynson, and John, her son, for her tene- 
ment, a whole service, the present I2d. the farm 285. Sd. for 
L. gd. 

John the Slater, for his tenement, a whole service, the present 
Sd. the farm 165. and 6d. for L. Sd. 

James of Meltham, for his tenement, a whole service, the pre- 
sent i$d. the farm 365. and 6d. for L. nd. 

Richard Lyngards, for his tenement, a whole service, the pre- 
sent gd. the farm 21*. and 6d. for L. x d . 

Dycon Wilkynson, for hys tenement, a whole service, the pre- 
sent Sd. the farm 145. and 6d. for L. x d . 

William Sclatter, for his tenement, a whole service, the present 
6d. the farm IDS. and 6d. for L. 2d. 

Rauf Johnson, for his tenement, a whole service, the present 
Sd. the farm i6s. and 6d. for L. 6d. 

Roger the Cropper, for his tenement, a whole service, the present 
96?. the farm 22s. and 6d. for L. Sd. 

William the Walker, for his tenement, a whole service, the pre- 
sent Sd. the farm 155. and 2d. for L. ^d. 

Thomas of Meltham, for his tenement, a whole service, the pre- 
sent 156?. the farm 385. and Sd. for L. 2d. 

Rauf of Cartnal, for his tenement, a whole service, the present 
I4?. the farm 415. and lod. for L. lod. 

Robert the Wright, for his tenement, a whole service, the pre- 
sent 2od. the farm 56*. and nd. for L. x d . 

Dycon Robynson, for his tenement, a whole service, the present 
Sd. the farm 22$. for L. 6d. 



MANOR OF ASSHETON-UNDER-LYNE. ioi 

Adam of Bardesley, for his tenement, a whole service, the pre- 
sent qd. the farm 195. and 6d. for L. $d. 

Richard of Bardesley, for H olden, i6d. 

Robin the Cropper, for his tenement, a whole service, the pre- 
sent i$d. the farm 365. 

John Burdytan, for his tenement, a whole service, the present 
x d . the farm 235. and 6d. 

Thurstan of Bardesley, for his tenement, a whole service, the 
present jd. the farm 155. and 6d. 

Robert le Wright, for Wollawe 135. and 4^. 

George of Bardesley, for his tenement, a whole service, the pre- 
sent x d . the farm 265. and ^d. 

Christopher of Bardesley, for the More that he haldes, 2s. 
and 6d. 

William of the Cross, for his tenement, with two Doles of the 
Dede Carr, a whole service, the present yd. the farm 135. and lod, 

William of Cowleshagh, for his tenement, a whole service, the 
present 6d. the farm 9$. and 6d. 

Thomas of Claydon, for lands that he holdes within Tauuton, 3*. 

John the Byron, Knyght, for Whitworth Lauds in Droyladen, 
during the lifes of Richard Unton, and Alice, his wife, the rent 
yearly xx 1 . 

Thomas Curtnal, for a barn in the town of Assheton, 25. and 6d. 

John of the Edge, for both the corn mills, to pay at Saint Holyn 
Day and Myghelmas, and the Lord to hald up the milns at his 
costes, as it has been customed, the farm at the days aforesaid, 
165. and \d. 

Thomas of the Leghes, and Syssot, that was the wife of Dycon 
of Hollinworth, for the 'tone half of the intake in Palden Wood, 
135. and \d. 

The same Thomas of the Leghes, for an intake besyde Alt Hey, 

105. 

John of the Winterbotham, for the marled earth next Rhodes 
Fields, for ten yeare terme, the farm 265. and 8d. 
John of Ainsworth, for the Rydde Legh, gs. and 6d. 



102 CUSTOM ROLL AND RENTAL OF THE 

Richard of Lyngards, for the lond that Thomlyn Cropper marled 
in Alt Hey, for this xx year, the farm 195. and Sd. 

Syssot, that was the wife of Jak of Barsley, for a cottage in the 
parke, a service, the farm is. 

A place of lond in Wordel in Rachedall, the farm 205. 

Christopher of Belfeild, for lond in Clegge in Rachedall, 155. 
the which land was afterward changed for the Coppydhurst in 
Oldome pareshe. 

The place that was Ranlyn's of Ashton, 1 3*. ^.d. 

John of Assheton, 225. 

Thomas of Cloghed, for the Soureker, 4*. and ^.d. 

William of Lawton, 5*. 

The third part of Mossley, xx shillings. 

The turvery of Asheton Moss by estimation yearly, 5 pounds. 

P r . John Buron for parcel of the moss, 165. 

For the Heath Barn and croft, 4$. 

The Gyst Ale of the Town of Assheton. 

Mergret, that was the wife of Hobbe the Kynge, for hyr fine, 
35. and \d. 

Hobbe Adamson for his fine, 35. and 46?. 
Roger the Baxter for his fine, 35. and ^d. 
Robert Somayster for his fine, 35. and ^d. 
Jenkyn of the Wode for his fine, 35. and \d. 
Thomas of Curtnall for his fine, 3*. ^d. 

The tolle of the fairs and the market by estimation, 2 marke. 
The courts and the fines by estimation, 405. 
The serviz of all the tenants by estimation 

The londs and the tenements, the which is had within the lordship 
of Assheton for term of life. 

Rauf of Assheton, and Robyn of Ashton, have the Sour Carr- 



MANOR OF ASSIIETON-UNDER-LYNE. 



103 



guld Rode and stane rynges, for terme of their lives. Rauf of the 
gifte of John Assheton, Knyghte, the elder, and Robyn of the 
gifte of John Asshton, Knyghte, the younger, the farm. The same 
Rauf and Robyn have a place in the town of Ashton, and the gar- 
den thereto longing, for terme of their lifes, the farm. 

John the Cook has a tenement in the town of Ashton, for the 
term of life, the farm. 

John of the Wood has a parcel of the Basketfeild, for the terme 
of life, the farm. 

Richard Unton has a house and a croft in Ashton, the farm. 

The third part of Mosseley. 

The free tenants that maken fine yearly, for the making of the 
milne, were, &c. 

The place of Shepley pays every year i6d. 
The place of Richard of Mostoii in Auden Shagh, i6d. 
The place of Nichol of Hurst, i6d. 

The extent of the Demesnes of Assheton, and the park yearly 
over the rep'se. 

Rental Liber. Tenent. de Dom de Assheton sub Lima, anno 
Suprando. solvend. ad sex Terminos ann. fyc. 

s. d. 

Raulin of the Wood, and his for their londs in Au- 
denshaw, the which were William of Ald- 

winshagh's 3 6 

The Heir of Rich d . of Moston, for his londs in 

Aldwinshagh 3 6 

Richard the Hunt and Wilkyn Tyrr for an intake . o 3 

Richard the Hunt for the half of Beckingham Field 4 o 

The Heir of Piers of Shepley, for Shepley 3 7 

Robert of the Rasbotham, for the Rasbotham o 5 

John of the Heghrode for his tenements 7 i 



104 CUSTOM ROLL AND RENTAL OF THE 

s. d. 
The Heir of Tho s . of Stavely for the bestal and 

hurst 2 i 

The same Heir for the Three Houses . o 6 

The same Heir of Stavely, and the Heir of Thomas 
of Trafford, & others, for Ashton Lands & 

Palden Wood 4 o 

Thomas of the Leghes, John of the Knolles, Eichard 
of Hollinworth, John of the Aspenhagh for 

their tenements in Leghes o 6 

The Heir of Adam of Leghes for his tenement in 

Leghes o 10 

The same Heir of Adam of the Leghes for an Intake 

in Palden Wood 3 4 

John of the Knolles for the Rhodesfield 6 10 

The same John for his part of an Intake in Paulden 

Wood 4 6 

Richard of Hollinworth for his part of an Intake in 

Palden Wode 4 6 

John of the Aspinhalgh, and his wife, for y r part of 

an Intake in Palden Wood 4 6 

Adam of Fetlawe for the light Birches i o 

The Heir of Hobbe of the Lees for the Knolles ... 2 o 

Adam Wilson Dogeson for the Blackenows i yf 

The Heir of William of Lusley for William Field. . i o 
Richard of Bardesley for his tenement in Hurst ... o 5 . 

Nicol of Hurst for his tenement in Hurst o 5 

Thomas of Clay don for Taunton 3 6 

Richard of Bardesley for Bardesley the Aspes of 

Limehurst 5 to 

Peirs of Worsley for the Rughohs and the Wood- 
field 2 o 

Richard the Byron, Knight, for the Woodhouse ... i o 
The same Richard for Lond in Sunderlaud .. .06 



MANOR OF ASSHETON-UNDER-LYNE. 105 

s. d. 
The Heir of Thomas of Hadfield, Knight, for Sun- 

derland 2 o 

Richard of Bardesley for Bardesley a Rose. 

Somtot^ 13 d . ob 2 3 

Sum tot redditus 27 : I2s: life?. 
Absque Omnibus servitiis & excenuis, Anglice Presands. 

Libi. Tenentes de termino Annunciatoris Beatse Mariae sup- 
rado, &c. 

Nichus del Hurst pro tenemen suo in Hyrst qd. 

Richardus de Moston p ten. suo in Aldwinshagh . . . gc?. 

Petrus de Shepley p Shepley jd. ob. 

William de Aldwinshagh p ten. suo in Aldwinshagh. 96?. 
Ricus fil. Johis. de Berdesly p ten. suo in Hyrst ... id. fY 

Robertus de Rasbotham Le Rasbotham id. f 

Johes. del Heghrode p ten. suo izd. 

Thos. de Claydon p Taunton 6d. 

William de Lusley pro William Feild %d. 

Tho s . de Stanely p le Hyrst, (*i yd. 

The same Tho s . p le 3 Houses %d. 

Libi. tenent. de termo. Pentecost. 

Petrus de Trafford p Alston Londes and Palden 
Wood x d . 

Idem Petrus de terra in Sherewinde $d. 

Heres Ade de Mossley p Aston Landes and Palden 
Wood $d. 

Adm. Wilson Doggeson p le Knolles 6d. 

Heres Roberti le p Palden Wood and Ashton Londs 6d. 

Adam de Tetlawe p light Birches I2d. 



106 CUSTOM ROLL AND RENTAL OF THE 

Tho 3 . del Leghes and socii sui p lez leghes %d. 

Adam del Leghes p lez nether Leghes 2d. 

Libi. Tenent. de Termino Scti. Johis. Bapt. 

Wills, de Aldwinshagh p ten. suo in Aldwinshagh qd. 

Ricus de Moston p ten. suo in Aldwinshagh 9</. 

Petrus de Shepley p Shepley jd. ob. 

Ricus de Hunt p Half Beckingtonfield 4$. 

Robtus. de Rosbotham p Rosbotham id. ^ 

Johes dell Heghrod p ten. suis 2id. 

Wills, de Lusley p William Field -$d. 

Ricus Fil. Johis. de Berdesley p ten. suo in Hyrst id. YY 

Nichus de Hyrst p ten. suo in Hyrst yd. 

Ricus de Berdesley p les Aspes 2ss. 

Idem Ricus p Old Alt <)d. 

Idem Ricus, p Bardesley id.Rosam. 

Johes dell Knolles p Rhodes Feild 3*. 56?. 

The same John for an Intake in Palden Wood 2s. ^d. 

Ricus de Hollinworth, for an Intake in Pal- 
den Wood 2s. & 36?. 

Johes de Aspenhalgh, for an Intake in Pal- 
den Wood 2s. & 36?. 

Tho s . of Stanely for three Houses 36?. 

Ricus Byron miles p. le Woodhouse I2d. 

Idem Ricus p Sunderland 6d. 

Thomas de Clayden p Taunton 6d. 

Libi. tenent. de termino Scti Michi d Archi. 

William de Aldwinshagh p ten. suo in Aldwinshagh gd. 

Ricus de Moston p ten. suo in Aldwinshagh yd. 

Petrus de Shepley, p Shepley jd. ob. 

Johnes de Rasbothum, ^ Rasbothum i d. YY 



MANOR OF ASSHETON-UNDER-LYNE. 107 

Johes del Heghrode, s^ ten suo is. lid. 

Willis de Lusley, <^ William Feild 36?. 

Adm. Wilson Doggeson, ^ le Knolles 6d. ob ^ 

Adm. de Leghes for an Intake in Paldeii 

Legh 35. 4.6?. 

Tho s . del Leghes for an Intake in Palden 

Legh 35. 46?. 

Ricus Fil. Johis de Berdesley, ^ ten. suo in 

Hyrst ic?. Yi 

Nichus del Hyrst, ten. suo in Hyrst qd. 

Tho s . de Clayden, <$ Taunton 25. 

Petrus de Worseley, ^ le Rugheghs and 

Woodfield 2s. 

Heres Thorns de Hatfield milit. <$> Sunderland 2s. 

Johes del Knolles, <^- redy Legh 35. 5^?. 

Idem Johes, for an Intake [in] Palden Wood. 2s. 46?. 
Ricus de Hollingworth, for an Intake in Palden 2s. %d. 
Johes del Aspinhalgh, for an Intake in Palden 2s. %d. 

Libi. tenent. de termino Sancti Martini. 

Ricus de Moston, f>- ten suo in Aldwinshagh 6d. 

Petrus de Shepley, p Shepley I2d. 

Thomas de Staneley, ^ three Houses %d. 

Petrus de Trafford, ^ terra in Sherewinde 36?. 

Idem Petrus, ^ Alston Londs and Palden Wood. lod. 

Hseres Ade de Mosley, p Alston Londs and Pal- 
den Wood 50?. 

Heres Robti Dane, ^ Palden Wood and Alston 
Londs 6d. 

Thomas del Leghes and socii sui, p Lez Leghes... 36?. 

Adm. del Leghes ; p le nether Leghes 6d. 

Idem Adam, ^ le Leghes 2d. 

Heres Roberti del Leghes, ^ le Knolles 2*. 



108 CUSTOM ROLL AND RENTAL OF THE 

Libi. tenent. de termo. Natal. Dmi. 

Willielmus de Aldwinshagh, ^ ten. suo in Ald- 
winshagh. gd. 

Ricus de Moston, <$ ten. suo in Aldwinshagh gd. 

Ricus le Hunt, <$ William terre for an intake ... 36?. 

Petrus de Shepley, p Shepley %d, ob. 

Robertus de Rosbothum, ^ Rosbothum id. ^ 

Johannes del Heyrode, ^ ten. suis iSd. 

Willielmus de Lusley, ^ Willm. Feild %d. 

Thomas de Staneley, <$ three houses %d. 

Idem Thomas, p le Bestal id. 

Adam Wilson Doggeson, p la Knolles 6d. 

Richardus Filius Johannes de Bardesley, p ten. 

suo in Hyrst id. Y? 

Nichus de Hyrst ^ ten. suo in Hyrst gd. 

Thomas de Staveley, ^ ten. le Hyrst gd. 

Tho s . de Clayden, ^ Taunton 6d. 

The tenants-at-will of the said lordship of Assheton have taken 
their holdings and their places, xx. wynter terme, as it is afore 
rehearsed, and in this form, y fc if any tenant or tenants list not hold 
their places, nor their holdings, within their term that the sit in, and 
they like to give up their places or their holdings, at the Martinmas, 
the lord shall receive them at the Martinmas next after, with this, 
that s d tenent or tenents leave their places, their houses, and their 
closes able as they ought to be, and their land in the field as able 
and as good a tenant for to take, as it was at their takyng in the 
beginning of their terme of years ; and if they do not, it shall be 
overseen, and the houses and the closes shall be overseen by 4 or 6 
men sworne, the which shall be taken by the lord and his officers ; 
and they shall set by their conscience what would repair the houses 
and the closes; and, if the lord belikes, he shall take the mone 
that is set, and repair the houses and the closes ; and if the lord 



MANOR OF ASSHETON-UNDER-LYNE. 



109 



like not so to do, the tenant that is to come shall take it if him 
like ; and, if he like not, the 4 or the 6 men sworn shall take the 
money that they have set, and repair the houses and closes able as 
they ought to be repaired ; and this rule and custom shall be had 
when as ever any tenant removes, be it within the terme, or at the 
terme end ; and, as touching the lond that lies to the place, these 
4 or six men sworn shall set by their consciences what they hold 
the land worse yearly a tenant for to take, than it was at taking of 
tenant that removes ; and as many years as is behind of his term 
of so meikle shall the tenant answer to the Lord, if he removes fro 
his place within his terme, according to the sum set by the sworn 
men ; but it shall be well understanden, that if the tenant hold his 
land unto the terme, and remove unto another place at the term 
end, the houses and the closes shall be seen in the form as is be- 
foresaid, but the lands in the fields shall not be seen or set as is 
before rehearsed, unless the tenant by fraud, aud upon purpose, 
erede his land of miss and unreasonably, or done to his holding 
other diverse harmers upon malice and for evil will. 

Also, the tenauts-at-will of the said lordship shall muller at the 
16 vessel, and go to none other miln but to the lord's mimes; and 
which of them that is found guilty of going to any other milne, 
they shall be highly amerced, and make fine at the lord's will; 
and the free tenants that oghen soken to the miln, shall muller as 
their chartours will, and as they have been accustomed of old time. 
And the free tenants and the tenants-at-will shall give the milner 
his service at all times, as it has been accustomed aforetime always ; 
and if there be any default in the milner's service that may be 
proved lawfully, he shall be punished highly by the lord at his courts, 
as the law and the custom will, and as has been used aforetime ; 
and the customs of the milne shall be kept, every man to keep his 
grist, as has been used aforetime ; and when the Lord's corn come 
to the milne, he shall put all men out of their grist, and take their 
corn out of the hopper, if there be any therein, and his corn shall 
be ground next before all men, whent it comes to the miln without 



I 10 CUSTOM ROLL AND RENTAL OF THE 

muller, or paying service to the miluer, but as his lyst if he likes 
and curtasy to give to the said milner. 

The free tenants of the Lordship of Asshetou have granted to 
John of Assheton, for to be infeoffed in the Hall Mole [mote] of 
Ashton, after the customs and the burgales of the aforesaid town, to 
term of their lives out taken, that they will not swear upon the in- 
quest between the tenants at will at the suit of party, but they will 
swear between free tenants and tenants at will ; that is, to wit, 6 
of the free tenants, and 6 of the tenants at will, and also between 
the Lord and free tenants, and the tenants at will ; and also the 
aforesaid free tenants, and all tenants graunts for to hold the 
ordinances and the customs before time made and used, and the 
which afterward are to be made by the graunt of them to the 
Lords profit, and the tenants aforesaid. And the foresaid free 
tenants, and the tenants at will of the manor of Asshton, grants 
to John of Assheton, Knight, that if any of them be convicted by 
inquest of any trespass done to others in his beginning, and of his 
own wrong, that then the Lord of the town, by his Bailey, shall 
distrain him by his goods by great distresse, unto the time that 
he have amended it reasonably to the party grieved, and also 
to the Lord for the trespass at his will, and the trespasser have 
goods within the Lordship : and if that he have none, then the 
Lord of the town, or his Bailey, shall take him with strength of 
the foresaid free tenants, and tenants at will, and set him in the 
stocks unto the time that he have amended unto the party grieved, 
and to the Lord. And also they graunt the aforesaid free tenants, 
and tenants at will, and all that dwells in the foresaid town, that 
if any strange man of any other town or towns come within the 
foresaid town, for to do any harm to any tenants resident within 
the town, that anon all the tenants and residents aforesaid, within 
the foresaid town, shall rise with their neighbours to take and 
arrest the foresaid trespasser unto their power, after that they be 
warned by their neighbours, or by the Lord's Bailey, or by any 
man fro that time that there be knowing of such a misdoer ; and if 



MANOR OF ASSHETON-UNDER-LYNE. 1 1 1 

any of the foresaid tenants and residents refuses so to do in the 
form aforesaid, then will all the tenants and the residents aforesaid, 
that afterward of that deed, or any of them, be convicted in the 
Lord's court by inquest, that he so convicted shall give to the 
Lord 405. within 15 days then next following, and that the Lord's 
Bailey shall raise the forfeit 405. of the goods of them that are 
convicted; and also they grant, that if any of them resette or 
maintain any strange man after that day, knowing that he have 
done trespasse to any tenant or resident aforesaid, within the town 
aforesaid, then he shall give to the Lord of the town 405. of his 
good, to be raised by the Bailey in the town aforesaid, after that 
he be convicted by the inquest. And also the tenants at will 
grant to the foresaid John of Asshton, Knight, that if any of them 
were rebel, and would not be justified after the custom and ordi- 
nance of the aforesaid town, that he shall not maintain him, nor 
help him, but he shall remove him out of his service, and he shall 
loose his love. Also the aforesaid tenants and residents will, and 
grantyn that if there be any fighter among them, the which shall 
fight with another in his beginning, after that he be convicted by 
the inquest, then he convicted shall give to the Lord half a mark 
the first time ; and if he will not be chastysed by that, the second 
time he shall give the Lord a mark, after that he be convicted by 
the inquest ; and if he will not be chastysed by that, the third time 
he shall give the Lord 2os. after that he be convicted by the in- 
quest, to be raised by the Lord's Bailey. Also they give and 
grantyn, that if there be aiiy tenant or resident within the foresaid 
town that have resetted any fighter with other in his beginning, 
that the resetter, after he be convicted by the inquest, shall amend 
it to the party greived, and he shall give to the Lord the pains 
sette upon him as before is written. 

This is the covenant made between John of Assheton, Knight, 
and the tenants of the town of Asshton, of their swine, y e year of 
the reign of King Richard the Second after the conquest, the third ; 
that the aforesaid tenants shall have their swine going in the 
demesnes of the aforesaid town, fro the latter end of harvest unto 

Q 



1 1 2 CUSTOM ROLL AND RENTAL OF THE 

sowing time, out taken the little park and hall yards, so that the 
aforesaid swine be ringed fro the foresaid latter end of harvest unto 
the foresaid time of sowing. And the foresaid tenants shall keep 
their swine that do no harm to the lord, nor to their neighbours, 
in the places out taken, that is to say, fro seeding time to harvest 
be in, and this covenant to be fulfilled ; the aforesaid will then, 
when so any swine be taken in any default aforesaid, that he that 
owns the swine shall loose to the lord \d. ; each tenant of them 
aforesaid shall have as many swine as it is written and underneath, 
that is, to witt, every tenant of the tenants aforesaid, of the said 
town, that brews to sell, and the miller, shall hold 3 swine ; and 
every tenant of the tenants aforesaid that holds land in the fields 
shall hold 2 swine ; and every tenant of the tenants aforesaid that 
holds no land shall have one swine. The free tenants-at-will of 
the Lordshipe of Ashton, the year of the reign of King Henry the 
fourth after the conquest, the first, grantyn to John of Assheton, 
Knight, in his plain Hall Court, the Tuesday next before the 
Assion. of our Lord, that if any free tenant or tenants, that owe 
muller to the mill, sell their corn growing upon their tenements, 
and buy corn of others, and with the same corn bought, come to 
the milne and muller not but to the love-suckeu of that corn 
bought, and of this they bin convicted in the lord's court by in- 
quest, they shall pay to the lord xx p. [pence] the which shall be 
raised of their goods by the lord's bailey. 



[Arrangement of Forms in the Kirk of Assheton, establishing the 
order of Rank and Precedence, to be observed among the 
Wives, Daughters, and Female Servants, of the Manor of 
Assheton-under-LyneJ] 

At the first Form upon the north side of Assheton kirk, 

Uxor Thomse de Claydon, Ux r Rodi de Berdysley, Ux r de Sun- 
derland, Ux r Radulphi de Wood, and their servant and other gen- 
tills strangers. 



MANOR OF ASSHETON-UNDER-LYNE. 1 1 3 

At the first Form on the south side the kirk, 

Ux r Hsered. Henrici de Moston, Ux r de Shepley, Ux r Johannis 
de Heghrode, Ux r Rhodi de Hunt, and the servant women of the 
hall and other gentills strangers. 

At the second Form on the south side, 

Ux r Rad. de Bardisley de Hunt, Ux r Adse de Leghes, Ux r Rici 

de Hurt, Ux r William Tyrr, Ux r De Blakeknolles, and their 

tenants. 

The iii d Form on the south side, 

Ux r Tho ae . de Leghes, Ux r Joh s . de Knolles de Leghes, Ux r 
Tenenti de Barsley, Ux r De Rasbotham, Ux r Adse De Wilson de 
Knolles, Ux r Joh s . de Aspinhalgh, Ux r Rodi de Hollinworth, and 
their s 

At the 4th Form of the south side, 

The tenants of Rauf of Stayley, the tenants of Peter of the Lus- 
ley, the tenants of Tho s . de Claydon, the tenants of Shepley, the 
tenants of John of the Heghrode. 

The fifth Form upon the same side, 

The tenants wynches of Sir John the Byron that dwellyn with 
him. 

The 6th Form of the same side, 

To the parson's tenants, Ux r Thomae Higson, Ux r Tho ae . de 

Curtnal, Carol Jenkyn daughter, Ux r Ux r Joh s . de 

Berdesley, and the tenants of the Woodhouse, and the strangers 
to the other Form. 



The second Form on the north side, 

Ux r Johannis de Leghes, Ux r Will 1 de Bardisley de Ha, Ux r 
Roberti de Wright de Alt Hill, Ux r Rodi de Hadfield de Aldwin- 
shagh, Ux r De Soureker, and their servants. 



114 CUSTOM ROLL AND RENTAL OF THE 

The third Form on the north side, 

Uxor Radi de Bardisley, Ux r Radi de Curtnal, Ux r Tho 3 *. de 
Meltham, Ux r Jacobi de Meltham, arid their servants. 

Ux r Tenent. Rad 1 Asshetou de Ashton. 

The 4th Form on the same side, 

Ux r Roberti le Cropper, Ux r Tho ae . de Hazilhurst, Ux r Johannis 
de Hollinworth, Uxor Thomae Robinson, Uxor Reg 1 , le Baxter, 
and their servants. 

The 5th Form on the same side, 

Ux r Rhodi le Smyth, Ux r William le Cocker, Ux r Robti Ful- 
staffe, Ux r Johan is . de Wood, Ux r Robti Adamson. and their 
servants. 

The 6th Form on the same side, 

Ux r John 3 , le Spencer, Ux r Robt 1 de Walker, Ux r Willi mi . le 
Berdisley de Holdome, Ux r Johannis Jameson, Ux r Will 1 . Robin- 
son, and their servants. 

The 7th Form on the same side, 

Uxor de Milne, Ux r Robti Somdyst, Ux r Robti Robinson, Ux r 
Gregorii de Berdesley, Ux r Robti Saunderson, Ux r Johannis de 
Lyme. 

The ist Form upon the north in the nether end of the Kirk. 

Ux r Will 1 . Adkynson, Ux r Robti. de Lyndgards, Ux r John de 
Lyndgards, Ux r Roger le Cropper, Ux r Joh s le Slater, Ux r Joh s . 
le Slater, Ux r Joh ls Burdetan, Ux r Thurstan de Bardisley, Uxor 
Will 1 , de Cross, and their serv ts . 

The 2d Form on the same side, 

Ux r Adae de Bardisley, Ux r Willi le Walker de Rycroft, Ux r 
Robti Robynson, Ux r Willi et Robti le Walker, Ux r Radi Joneson, 
Ux r Rodi Wilkinson, Ux r Johis. Sanderson, Ux r Nichi Sanderson, 
Ux r Tho ae . Adamson, Ux r Willi le Sclater, and their servants. 



MANOR OF ASSHETON-UNDER-LYNE. i i e 

The 3d Form on the same side, 

Ux r Tho ae . de Sanderson, Ux r Robti Unton, Ux r Will', de Cow- 
leshaw, Ux r Rodi Unton, Ux r Johis de Merler, Ux r Hugh de Gate- 
cliffe, Ux r Willi de Woodfield, Ux r Roger le Smith, Ux r Tho ae . le 
Cooke, Ux r Robti le King, and their Servants. 

The 4th Form also of the same side, 

Ux r Johis le Coke, Ux r Tho s . de Whitelegh, Ux r Johis Ffulstaffe, 
Ux r Robti de Chad wick, Uxor Patric Margree de Stay ley, Ux r 
Rodi Willison, Alice Hanson, Nanna Windebank, Elen Wilkin 
Doghter, Ux r Perin, Ux r Henrici the Baxter, and their servants. 

The 6th Form of the same side, 

Ux r Adoe de Held, Ux r Willi le Arrowsmith, Ux r Johis le Hynd, 
sen. Elinor le Rose, Ux r Will m . Somdyst, Ux r Willi de Bardesley, 
Ux r Johannis de Howarth, Ux r Henrici Spake Man, Ux r Willi 
de Bulkeley, Ux r Robti Jackson, Ux r Adae Thomson, and their 
servants. 

The other void Forms for servants and strangers. Jankyne of 
the Winterbotham has tane the marled earth in the Rodes Field, 
x years terme, the term beginning at the Martinmas, the year of 
King Henry the sixth, the second ; paying therefor yearly at the 
term aforesaid, 2 marks ; and John of Aynsworth, and Thomlyn of 
the Leghes of Hasleworth, are his borrows y* he shall well and 
truly pay his farm during the said term. 

[Here take notice page 29, 30, and 31, being only a repetition 
of the seats in Church, is wanting in this copy, being of no 
moment. 54 ] 

This is the Rental to Tho s . of Assheton, son and heir to Sir 
John Assheton, of the lands and tenements, the which the said 
John give him at his marriage, within the Lordship of Assheton, 
and to his wife, as their deed makes mention : 

54 Remark made by the Transcriber. 



I i 6 CUSTOM ROLL AND RENTAL OF THE 

Richard of Hadfield, for his tenement in Aldwinshaw, a service, 
the service ids. 

John of Hollinworth, for the Birchenshaw, a service, the farm of 
the Bircheushaw, 26s. 

William of Bardisley the younger, for the Olde House Carr, a 
service, the farm 205. 

Thomas of Jenkinson, of the Bardesley, for the Old Thenes Carr, 
the farm 30$. 

Tho s . Saunderson, for his tenement, in the farm, x. 

Thomlyn Diconson, for his tenement, a service, the farm 
thereof, viii s . 

Magot, that was the wife of Jenkyn the Cropper, for lands in 
Wollowe, the farm iii s . 

Robert Saunderson, for the Childerscroft in Wollowe, the farm... 

Thomlyn the Tailor, for his tenement, at the waterhouses in 
Harper Wallowe, a service, y e farm xxx s . 

Gregory of Bardisley, for his tenement at the water houses in 
the farm xxiii 3 . 

Tho 3 . of the Leghes, Richard of Hollinsworth, for their lands in 
Palden Legh, the farm xxii s . and vii d . 

L. s. d. 

This settlement as made out makes 927 

To which add the sum total of Sir John's rent 27 12 nf 



makes, 36 14 6\ 
Besides services and presents. 



MANOR OF ASSHETON-UNDER-LYNE. 



117 



DR. HIBBERT'S OBSERVATIONS ON THE CUSTOM 
ROLL AND RENTAL. 



[The dissertation from which the following extracts are taken was 
read before the Society of Scottish Antiquaries in 1822. We 
have copied those passages only which relate to Ashton, and 
omitted those which refer to Scottish customs^] 

SIR John of Assheton, who lived in the reign of Henry the Sixth, 
was, as his rent roll expressed, of Norman descent. At the period 
in which this knight was settled upon the estate of Assheton, tenures 
had assumed that definite form, to which was applied the term socage, 
a word of obscure etymology, supposed to denote privilege or liberty, 
in contradistinction to the indeterminate services of more ancient feuds. 
The feudal system had, at the same time, been materially aided in its 
progress towards a civil establishment, by the necessity imposed upon 
feudatories of dispensing with the military obligations of a part of their 
dependants, to whom was committed the care of cultivating the land, 
and of accepting in lieu of them the labours of husbandry, or a return 
of corn, cattle, or money. Landed possessors were thus enabled to 
attend to their military duties, disengaged from occupations that were 
considered in a chivalric age as base and dishonourable. The territory 
of Assheton, having been honoured by the residence of the Lord, had 
long acquired the appellation of Manor ; Manerium a manendo. The 
relations of landlord and tenant, as expressed in the rent roll of Sir 
John of Assheton, were clear and explicit ; while the degree of faithful- 
ness with which services were performed, was determined by the juris- 
diction of the Lord's court. In describing, therefore the customs of 
this manor, I shall notice in order, ist, The rental and obligations which 
accrued from tenants at will ; 2dly, Those which accrued from free 
tenants ; $dly, Those which arose from tolls, fines, or festivals ; and 
4thly, The conditions under which all the tenants were bound to the 
Lord in the jurisdiction of the Court Baron. 



I i 8 CUSTOM ROLL AND RENTAL OF THE 

My first object then is to describe the rental and obligations which 
resulted from tenants at will. Sir John of Assheton's tenants of this 
description were bound to him by obligations of a base or servile 
nature, yet determinate, and, therefore, properly comprehended un- 
der the name of Villanum Socagium. They were excluded from par- 
taking in the honours of the "tented field," being destined, on the 
manor of their lord, to perform the duties of civil and agricultural 
drudgery. Thus, the opprobrium cast upon such menial employments 
as ploughing the lord's lands or carting the lord's fuel and manure, 
originating from the high sense entertained, in this early period, of 
military allegiance, is transmitted to later times, in the debasing ideas 
that the name of villein, originally nothing more than a feudal term, 
never fails to excite. The conditions upon which lands were rented to 
tenants at will are related with much perspicuity. They were to be 
taken, as it is stated, " for twenty winter terms," the rent to be paid at 
two periods of the year. Any tenement might be given up by a year's 
notice to the lord, at the rent day of Martinmas, on the condition that 
it was resigned in as good condition as when first entered upon ; if not, 
the lord or his officers might direct four or six sworn men to visit the 
houses and closes occupied by the tenant, who was held responsible for 
the sum that they might adjudge as necessary for the repair, as well as for 
the deterioration that the land might have sustained. A visit of this 
kind might indeed be made whenever a tenant removed from his pos- 
sessions at the end of his term ; but in such a case the land was ex- 
cepted from the assessment, unless it had been injured from design or 
from malice. The largest farm that appears to have been taken yielded 
the annual rent of 39*. 6d. sterling; the lowest tenements, which were 
for cottages, paid no more than two shillings each. 

The particular services of the tenants at will may now be enume- 
rated ; the first of them being the return of a present to the lord, at 
Tole or Christmas, for the sake of partaking in the annual feast of the 
great hall. The origin of this service is a subject of interesting inquiry. 
The Scandinavians who peopled the province of Normandy, and after- 
wards became the conquerors of England, knew no other tribute in the 
country from which they emigrated, than one which was of the nature of 
a capitation tax. It is not improbable, then, that, in subduing England, 
they subjected their newly acquired Saxon vassals to the same impost 



MANOR OF ASSHETON-UNDER-LYNE. 1 1 Q 

to which they themselves had been accustomed, by inserting it in their 
rentals. We accordingly find traces of this, the most ancient of all 
duties, in the old rent rolls of many manors in England. The English 
mode of collecting such a capitation tax was by requiring from tenants 
an annual present at Christmas, that was spent in providing a treat in 
which both the landlord and his vassals partook. The custom, as it 
appears in Sir John of Assheton's rental, is described page 94 supra. 

In some manor-houses of Lancashire, once dedicated to these annual 
scenes of festivity, may be observed an elevation of the floor at the extre- 
mity of the great hall, or, in the place of it, a gallery which stretches 
along one side of the room, with the intention that it should accommo- 
date the lord and his family, so that they might not be annoyed by the 
coarse rustic freedoms, which the tenants would be too apt to take with 
them, during the hours of their conviviality. In a hall, then, of this 
kind, contrived in the manor-house of Assheton, we may imagine the 
large Yole fire to be kindled ; while in a gallery or raised floor, Sir John 
of Assheton, his lady, and family, together with his kinsmen, Elland of 
Brighouse and Sir John the Byron, are feasting apart, yet attentive to 
the frolics or old songs of the company below. It was on these occa- 
sions that peg-tankards were used, and horns that bore the names of 
the Saxons and Danes whom the Normans had ousted out of their 
possessions. Of such trophies was the horn of Wolfus the Saxon, the 
Aylesbury horn, the Bibblesdale horn, the Aston horn, the Pusey horn 
once belonging to Canute, or the Wassel horn of Eobert de Eaglesfield. 
Of the description of ale that flowed merrily on these occasions, we 
know little ; but there can be no doubt that it was as good as King 
Henry the VIII. 's ale, which contained in it neither hops nor brim- 
stone. 55 We may suppose then that, on annual festivals like these, 
the wooden bowl, or horn, would pass freely through the hands of Sir 
John of Assheton's tenants-at-will ; among whom were such personages 
as Hobbe Adamson, Hobbe of the Leghes, William the Arrowsmith, 
Eoger the Baxter, Eoger le Smith, Jack the Spencer, Jack the Hind, 
Elyn Wilkyn daughter, Elyn the Eose, and the widows Mergot of 
Stayley, Peryn's wife, and Nan of the Windy Bank, who owed suit and 
service, all clad in their best hoods and brown woollen jackets and 

55 It was an order of King Henry VIII. to his household, that there should be 
neither hops nor brimstone in the King's ale. 

R 



I 2O CUSTOM ROLL AND RENTAL OF THE 

petticoats. The ancient musical instruments used in Lancashire were, 
a kind of fiddle, not of the present form, and a stringed instrument 
called the Virginals. The provincial songs of that period, few of which 
were less than half an hour in length, rehearsed the deeds of Lancelot 
du Lake, and his conquest of the Giant Tarquin, at the castle of Man- 
chester ; Ranulph of Chester, and his wars in the Holy Land ; or the 
war-like feats and amorous prowess of the renowned Cheshire hero, Roger 
de Calverley. In order to preserve, as much as possible, the degree of 
decorum that was necessary at such meetings, there was frequently 
introduced a diminutive pair of stone stocks, of about eighteen inches 
in length, for confining within them the fingers of the unruly. This 
instrument was intrusted to the general prefect of manorial festivities, 
named the King of Misrule, whose office it was to punish all who 
exceeded his royal notions of decency : Accordingly, such a character 
appears among the list of Sir John of Assheton's tenants, under the 
name of Hobbe the "King. It has been observed, that these entertain- 
ments were not supported by the munificence of landlords, but by the 
several contributions of tenants, rendered under the name of Presents ; 
on which account, a festivity of this kind, that was wrung from the 
pockets of vassals, acquired, in derision, the appellation of Drink-lean. 
The Widow Mergot, who occupied one of the largest farms, gave for a 
present twenty pence. Robert Fulstafle, who, for his house and lands, 
paid 32^. 6</., rendered for his share of the feast, 14^. Jack the Hind, 
who had a tenement of the yearly rent of 19$. 6d., paid %d. Alys, that 
was Pole's wife, annually paid for her dwelling and lands i zd. and a 
present of ^d. The assessments appear so disproportionally levied, 
that they were probably in many cases considered in other services. 
Some of the cottagers are wholly free from this demand. It is evident, 
from an examination of the presents collected for these drink-leans, as 
they appear in Sir John of Assheton's rent-roll, that if they did not 
leave a handsome surplus to the lord, they would at least repay the 
expences of the table. Accordingly, it is not improbable that the name 
of landlord was originally attached to the host of an inn, as a satirical 
allusion to the memorial landlord, who never provided a dinner for his 
guests, without receiving for it an adequate recompense. 

It is impossible to say when these annual celebrations were discon- 
tinued in England ; but that they did not cease without some regret on 



MANOR OF ASSHETON-UNDER-LYNE. m 

the part of the tenants, is evident, from the custom being perpetuated 
to modern times in a manor of the south of England, by a sort of mock 
representation of the ceremonies that once took place on such occasions. 

At present, says a celebrated Antiquary, " the Whitson Ales are conducted in the 
following manner : Two persons are chosen, previously to the meeting, to be lord 
and lady of the ale, who dress as suitably as they can to the characters they assume. 
A large empty barn, or some such building, is provided for the lord's hall, and fitted 
up with seats to accommodate the company. Here they assemble to dance and regale, 
in the best manner their circumstances and the place will afford ; and each young 
fellow treats his girl with a ribband or favour. The lord and lady honour the hall 
with their presence, attended by the steward, sword bearer, purse bearer, and mace 
bearer, with their several badges or ensigns of office. They have likewise a tram 
bearer or page, and a fool or jester dressed in a party coloured jacket, whose ribaldry 
and gesticulation contribute not a little to the entertainment of some part of the 
company. The lord's music, consisting of a pipe and taber, is employed to conduct 
the dance. Some people think this custom is a commemoration of the ancient Drink- 
lean, a day of festivity formerly observed by the tenants and vassals of the lord of the 
see within his manor ; the memory of which, on account of the jollity of these meet- 
ings, the people have preserved ever since. The glossaries inform us that this Drink- 
lean was a contribution of tenants towards a potation, or ale, provided to entertain 
the lord or his steward." 56 

In the next place, those particular services of villein socage may be 
detailed, which were considered so particularly degrading as to be ab- 
horrent to the feelings of all who were entitled to bear arms. In the 
manor of Assheton, every tenant-at-will was thus commanded : " He 
that plough has, shall plough two days. He that half plough has, shall 
plough a-day, whether the lord be liever in wheat seeding, or in lenton 
seeding ; and every tenant harrow a-day with their harrow in seeding 
time, when they bin charged. And they shall cart, every tenant ten 
cartful of turve from Doneam Moss to Assheton, and shere four days in 
harvest, and cart a day corn." This service, so profitable to the lord, 
was familiarly called Boon-work. Hence an old adage, still retained in 
the north of England, when a man is supposed to be working for 
nothing, " that he has been served like a boon-shearer." Yet it is not 
improbable that some small return was generally made for such labour. 
A friend of mine has informed me that, in a MS. relating to the dis- 

56 See Mr. Douce's description of sculptures on the outside of St. John's Church, 
Cirencester, in Carter's Ancient Sculptures, vol. ii. p. 10. 



I 22 CUSTOM ROLL AND RENTAL OF THE 

bursements of an old family in Lancashire, mention is made of gloves 
that were given to certain boon-shearers. 

Another service of Sir John Assheton's tenants was, that "they 
should pay a principal at their death, to wit, the best beast they have." 
This is evidently a heriot. It is almost unnecessary, on the present 
occasion to remark, that the word Tieriot has been variously derived from 
the Latin kerus, intimating that it was a tribute belonging to the lord ; 
while Sir Henry Spelman finds a Saxon original for the word, signifying 
a horse, because that animal constituted the first heriot. In the earliest 
period of feudality, a superior possessed an uncontrouled dominion over 
the entire property of his vassal ; yet, when slain in battle in the com- 
pany of his lord, a remission was made, in consideration of his faithful 
services, of any further claim upon his property than what might remain 
on the field. This usually consisted of a horse, which was accepted as 
a release, or a heriot. The principal of heriotism, thus introduced, was 
subsequently extended to that class of dependents who were retained in 
their lord's employ to perform the baser services of the manor. As 
their property, therefore, consisted of cattle, or of implements of hus- 
bandry, the heriot due to the lord was the best beast, cow or horse, of 
which the tenant might die possessed. This condition being fulfilled? 
every further claim upon the goods of the deceased was remitted. It is 
easily, then, to be conceived, that, in proportion as feudality acquired a 
civil establishment, this oppressive relic of ancient military subjection 
would be found particularly galling. In the manor of Assheton there 
are many traditional stories still remaining on the subject of such 
heriots or principals. A tenant's boy, on the death of his father, was 
driving an only cow to the manor-house of certain adjoining demesnes, 
named Duckinfield. He was met by the lord of the place, with whose 
person and rank he was unacquanted, who questioned him whither he 
was taking his beast ? "I am driving it as far as Duckinfield, for the 
heriot," replied the boy. "My father is dead, we are many child- 
ren, and have no cow but this. Don't you think the devil will take 
Sir Eobert for a heriot when he dies ?" The lad was fortunately ad- 
dressing a humane landlord. " Eeturn home," said the knight. " Take 
the cow back to thy mother; I know Sir Eobert, I am going to 
Duckinfield myself, and will make up the matter with him." 

But, besides the obligation of a heriot due to Sir John of Assheton, 



MANOR OF ASSHETON-UNDER-LYNE. 



123 



there were other claims upon the property of a deceased tenant. He 
was commanded "to pay a principal at his death, to wit the best 
beast he had;" but as it is added in the rent-roll, "which other deed 
next after holy kirk." This latter clause alludes to a description of 
ecclesiastical heriots, known by the name of Mortuaries, or Corse Pre- 
sents, from the circumstance that they were brought to church along 
with the corpse. The custom arose from posthumous bequests being 
rendered in lieu of neglected tithes ; these by frequent usage, being 
converted into regular church-dues. When, therefore, the acknowledg- 
ment of a heriot was accepted by a feudal lord, in satisfaction of the 
right which he claimed to the property of a deceased tenant, by virtue 
of the dominion assumed over his person, the clergy also were willing 
to accept of a similar composition, in requital of the demands which 
they had upon his soul for undischarged oblations. Hence, a mortuary 
was termed, in the laws of Canute, Soul Scot, or Symbolum Animce. 

The mortuary, in the order of its exaction, took the precedence of the 
heriot ; and a requital of the demands which the kirk was supposed to 
possess over the soul of a deceased vassal, was paramount to the lord's 
claim over his person. 

Another service of Sir John of Assheton's tenants, was their obliga- 
tion to grind at the lord's mill. This was in a popular sense called 
Socome, sucken or solcen. 

In the manor of Assheton, a tenant of the name of John of the Edge, 
seems to have been the Milner, who was engaged to pay for his two 
mills the annual rent of i6s. ^d.; the mills "to be held up (or repaired) 
at the costes of the lord." The i6th vessel, to which the tenants were 
to muller their corn, was the miller's remuneration, and often called 
his toll. It would also appear, that the corn, which was consumed on 
the manor, was allowed to be dried by the lord's fuel ; and that grain 
purchased in a dry state from other manors, where the lord's fuel would 
be consequently saved, was liable to a toll of only the 24th part, which 
was hence named Love-sucken, meaning a privileged obligation. The 
ordinances of the lord's court relating to the mill were as follows : 
There was a law to prevent an evasion of the toll ; for, if any one sold 
the corn growing upon his own tenement, and secretly bought corn from 
other tenants of the lord, if he offered the same to the miller as corn 
that had been produced on another manor, and that not having been dried 



I2 4 



CUSTOM ROLL AND RENTAL OF THE 



by the lord's fuel, was only liable to the toll of the Love-socome ; such 
an offender, if convicted in the lord's court, was liable to a penalty of 
twenty -pence. The regulations of a more general nature directed, that 
all the free tenants, who " owed soken " to the mill, should muller as 
their charters expressed ; but the tenants-at-will should be restricted 
to the 1 6th vessel. If any tenant also owing socome [soke] went to 
any other mill but the lord's he was to be highly amerced, and was to 
pay a fine. The miller was to have his service (or toll) at all times ; 
and, if there was any default in him that could be proved, he was to be 
severely punished. The last regulation of the mill strikingly elucidates 
the feudal manners of the i$th century, since it enforces the conces- 
sion that is expected on all occassions to the convenience of a superior. 
The tenants are formally warned, that " when the lord's corn comes to 
the miln, he shall put all men out of their grist, and take their corn 
out of the hopper, if there be any therein ; his corn shall be ground 
next before all men when it comes to the miln, without muller or pay- 
ing service to the milner, but as his lyst if he likes, and curtasy to give 
to the said milner." 

Attached to these ordinances, was a covenent between Sir John of 
Assheton and his tenants, relative to the keeping of swine. These 
animals were allowed to range in the demesnes of the town, from the 
latter end of August until sowing time, provided that they were pro- 
perly ringed and did no harm ; in default whereof, the owner was to 
loose him to the lord 4^., or by this sum redeem him from poundage. 

The brewer who brewed to sell, and the miller, were allowed to keep 
three swine ; the tenants who had land in the fields, two swine ; and he 
who held no land might have one swine. 

Having given a view of the rent and services required from Sir John 
of Assheton's tenants-at-will, the relations in which his free tenants 
stood to him may be in the second place explained. In the tenures now 
to be described, we are presented with an illustration of what is termed 
by the lawyers liberum socagium, or free socage, where the obligations 
are not only certain but honourable. A numerous list of free tenants 
swell the manor roll of Sir John of Assheton, who, for the most part 
deriving their names from the paternal lands that they occupied, are 
declared absque omnibus servitiis et exceniis, ( Anglice, presents) liberi. 
In this list no appellations can be detected that denote any menial oc- 



MANOR OF ASSHETON-UNDER-LYNE. 

cupations of life ; while, among the tenants-at-will, we find mention 
made of such individuals as William the Walker, (or renter of a falling 
mill), John the Slater, Robbin the Cropper, Robert le Wright, or Wil- 
liam the Arrow-smith. 57 It also appears, that the Lord of the Manor 
took every occasion to announce the wide line of distinction that sub- 
sisted between the rank of the free tenants and that of the lowly 
tenants-at-will. An ordinance is to be found in his book of customs, 
settling the degree of precedence that was to be observed among their 
wives, daughters, and women servants, while upon a Sabbath they ar- 
ranged themselves on the forms of the Parish Kirk ; a regulation of 
this kind being well calculated to preserve the peace of the Church 
from being disturbed with the disputes of these females, in their demand 
for places suitable to the several spheres of life in which they moved. 

The lands originally granted to Sir John of Assheton's tenants, were 
either with a view to personal service in the field of battle, the obligation 
being rather understood than expressed, or they were grants of mere 
accommodation to the owners of contiguous manors ; a slight acknow- 
ledgment in money being all that was demanded in return. The highest 
annual rent paid by a free tenant, (John of the Highrode), was 'js. \d. ; 
the lowest rendered by Thomas de Staneley, was a penny, if we except 
a yearly tribute for a tenure paid by Richard de Bardsley, which con- 
sisted of a rose. This estate had been granted to Sir John of Asshe- 
ton's brother, of the order of Saint John of Jerusalem. The profits of 
it, therefore, were handed over by Richard be Bardsley, for the support 

5 ' That a distinct profession of an arrow smith should exist in a small town like 
Assheton, can create no surprise if we refer to what Drayton has affirmed of the 
Lancashire Bowmen. 

** Besides her natives have been anciently esteemed, 
For Bowmen near our best, and ever have been deemed 
So loyal that the guard of our preceding kings 
Of them did most consist." 

Also in the ancient poem of Flodden Field, Lord Stanley is made to address the 
followers whom he led from the counties of Lancashire and Cheshire, after the 
following manner : 

" My Lancashire most lively wights, 

And chosen men from Cheshire strong ; 
With sounding bow your feathered flights, 
Let fiercely fly your foes among." 



I 2 6 CUSTOM ROLL AND RENTAL OF THE 

of the knights hospitallers in the Holy Land, where the grand master 
of the order resided ; a rose being at the same time all that was exacted 
by Sir John, as a yearly acknowledgment that the grant had emanated 
from the Lordship of Assheton. This donation appears to have been 
presented by a female, who, from the circumstance, acquired the name 
of.JElyn the Rose. 

In the third place we may notice the other sources of the lord's in- 
come, as derived from tolls, fines, &c. The turbary of an adjoining 
Moss brought him in, by estimation, 5/. 165. annually ; the toll of the 
fairs yielded two marks ; the courts and fines 405. ; and, as Sir John 
appears to have neglected no means to augment his income, he drew 
from the gyst-ale, or gysing feast (an annual festival of the town of 
Assheton), a sum of 205. which was collected from the conductors of it, 
who were, Margret the widow of Hobbe the King, Hobbe Adamson, 
Eoger the Baxter, Eobert Somayster, Jenkin of the Wood, and Thomas 
of Curtnall. For an account of the gyst-ale, I have in vain searched 
among the large mass of popular antiquities collected by Brand and 
Ellis. A veteran, however, of this almost obsolete feast, who had 
known it in better days, has furnished me with some curious particulars 
regarding its mode of celebration. These guisings (or more properly 
disguisings) , termed also marlings, were celebrated in the spring, after 
the fields had been manured with marie, an operation preparatory to 
the sowing of wheat. They were the principal feasts or ales in Lanca- 
shire ; and the disorders which never failed to ensue from them are 
transmitted at the present day in the modern provincial acceptation of 
the word Marlock, which, in this county, denotes a great disturbance or 
riot of any kind. For the celebration of the gyst-ale of a township, a 
contribution was raised from all ranks of society. The lord of the 
manor, the esquire, or the farmer, whose bounty might be supplicated, 
came forward and announced the sum that he intended to give. The trea- 
surer of the feast exclaimed "a largesse!" The populace, with one 
voice, demanded "from whom?" The sum was not then actually pub- 
lished ; but it was vauntingly proclaimed that the donor, who had al- 
ways on these occasions the title of lord prefixed to his name, had 
contributed a part of several thousand pounds. After the collection 
had been made, an immense garland was formed of every flower the 
season afforded, being also decked with a profusion of ribbons ; but the 



MANOR OF ASSHETON-UNDER-LYNE. i 27 

number and variety of the silver, or silver plated vessels, which were 
suspended from every part of it, constituted its chief attraction. The 
villagers, who were overwhelmed with rustic finery, then formed them- 
selves into a procession, in which they were attended by an Arbiter 
Elegantiarum, named the King. The Fool was an indispensable charac- 
ter ; a grotesque cap, a tail hanging to the ground, the usual appendage 
of a bell behind, and a formidable mask, constituted the peculiarities of 
his apparel. He was in more ancient times mounted on a hobby ; and 
his office, which was a lucrative one from the money he collected, was 
named Hobriding. Thus, in the manor roll of Assheton, Jack the mer- 
cer paid to his lord for such a privilege the annual sum of 6s. 8^. In 
a later period these guisings, from the circumstance of taking place in 
several populous villages at one time, have provoked such a desire for 
pre-eminence, that the inhabitants have spared no expence in prolonging 
them, or in giving to them the greatest eclat ; they have undergone in 
the same spring frequent repetitions ; and, while the contributions have 
been repeated, the poor have been exposed during the remainder of the 
year to considerable penury. The sum thus collected amidst the rival- 
ship of contending townships has been immense; a single village 58 having 
been known to expend in one season from two to three thousand pounds. 
It was probably owing to the ruinous expence which attended these 
festivals, that they were suffered to become extinct. 

Sir John's unappreciable income consisted of presents which he re- 
ceived at Tule ; of heriots ; of the personal services of ploughing, rea- 
ping, and carting turf. But the amount of his certain income as drawn 
from free tenants and tenants-at-will, from the obligations to grind at 
the lord's mill, from tolls and fairs, from the liberty of cutting turf at 
the moss, and from an annual festival celebrated in the town of Asshe- 
ton named the G-yst-Ale, amounted to the sum of 36/. 14^. 6f</. ster- 
ling, out of which he made a settlement to his son and heir, of lands 
and tenements, to the annual value of gl. 2$. *]d. upon the occasion of 
his marriage with a daughter of Sir John the Byron. He also gave 
some houses and lands to a few favourite servants for the term of their 
lives, as, John the Cook, John of the Wood (the owner of a basket-field), 
and to others ; while to two of his sons he gave places and gardens in the 

58 Eccles. 



128 CUSTOM ROLL AND RENTAL OF THE 

town. Another grant to the last mentioned individuals, Rauf of Asshe- 
ton and Robyn of Assheton, merits much attention. It is stated that 
they " have the Sour Carr Gruld rode and stane rynges for the term of 
their lives, Rauf of the gift of John of Assheton, knight, the elder, and 
Eobyn of the gift of John of Assheton, knight, the younger," This 
donation evidently alludes to the privilege of Child-riding, a custom 
that, in Scotland at least, is of great antiquity, having been intended to 
prevent lands from being over-run with the weeds, which, from their 
yellow colour, were named goals, or gulds.* 9 

A large portion of low wet land in the vicinity of Assheton was, in 
John of Assheton's days, named the Sour Carr (Carr being synoni- 
inous with the Scottish word Carse, and the well known term sour im- 
plying an impoverished state of the carr.) It had been overrun with 
corn marigolds, named, as in Scotland, Carr-gulds. These were con- 
sidered so destructive to the growth of the corn, that the lord of the 
manor was compelled to enforce some rigorous measures for their 
extirpation. A manorial regulation, therefore, existed, called Carr-guld 
riding. Ralph of Assheton, Sir John's son in consequence of a second 
marriage, and Robin his brother, were, on a certain day in the spring } 
invested with the power of riding over the lands of the Carr, named 
the Carr-guld Road of levying fines for all carr-gulds that were found 
among the corn; and, until the penalties were paid, of punishing 
transgressors by putting them into the stocks, or stone rings, or by 
incarceration. It appears that Ralph of Assheton became, by his alli- 
ance with a rich heiress, the lord of the neighbouring manor of Middle- 
ton, and soon afterwards received the honour of knighthood ; being, at 
the same time, entrusted with the office of vice-constable of the kingdom, 
and, it is added, of lieutenant of the tower. Invested with such authori- 
ties he committed violent excesses in this part of the kingdom. In 
retaining also for life the privilege granted him in Assheton of Gruld 
riding, he, on a certain day in the spring, made his appearance in this 
manor clad in black armour (whence his name of the Black Boy), moun- 
ted on a charger and attended with a numerous train of his own followers, 
in order to levy the penalty arising from the neglect of clearing the 
land from Carr-gulds. The interference of so powerful a knight be- 

59 Corn Marigolds, Chrysanthemum Segetum. Linn. 



MANOR OF ASSHETON-UNDER-LYNE. 



129 



longing to another lordship could not but be regarded by the tenants 
of Assheton as the tyrannical intrusion of a stranger ; and as Sir Ralph, 
sanctioned by the political power given to him by Henry VI., exercised 
his privilege with the utmost severity, the name of the Slack Boy is at 
the present day regarded with no other sentiments than those of horror. 
Tradition has, indeed, still perpetuated the prayer that was fervently 
ejaculated for a deliverance from his tyranny : 

Sweet Jesu, for thy mercy's sake, 

And for thy bitter passion, 
Save us from the axe of the tower, 

And from Sir Ralph, of Assheton. 

Upon the death of the Child Eider of Assheton, Sir John's heir and 
successor abolished the usage forever ; and reserved from the estate a 
small sum of money for the purpose of perpetuating, in an annual cere- 
mony, the dreaded annual visits of the Black Boy. This i kept up at 
the present day. An effigy is made of a man in armour ; and since Sir 
Ralph was the son of a second marriage (which, for this reason, had 
been esteemed by the heir of Sir John as an unfortunate match), the 
image is deridingly emblazoned with some emblem of the occupation of 
the first couple that are linked together in the course of the year. The 
Black Boy is then fixed on horseback, and, after being led in procession 
round the town, is dismounted, made to supply the place of a shooting- 
butt, and, all fire-arms being in requisition for the occasion, he is put 
to an ignominious death. 

OUT fourth and last object of attention relates to the jurisdiction of the 
manor now under, consideration. In the earliest history of Norman 
tenures the Lord of Assheton had the absolute power of life and death ; 
strong dungeons were constructed near the manor house, the remains 
of which still appear ; and a meadow adjoining the town, that still bears 
the name of Gallows field, was selected for a summary place of execu- 
tion. But as civil liberty gained ground in the country, the conditions 
of jurisdiction, under which all the tenants became bound to a superior, 
were considerably ameliorated in the institution of the lord's court, or, 
as it was originally named, the Court Baron ; so that, in time, a seat of 
justice of this kind was accounted so inseparable an ingredient in a 



1 30 CUSTOM ROLL AND RENTAL OF THE 

manor, as to render it liable to be forfeited if it did not contain tenants 
sufficient to make up a jury or homage. The free tenants and tenants- 
at-will granted, therefore, to Sir John of Assheton, to be justified in 
the great Hall Mote of Assheton, according to the customs, ordinances, 
and burgales of the town. They engaged not to swear upon an inquest 
between the tenants-at-will, at the suit of party, but between six of the 
free tenants and six of the tenants-at-will, or between the lord and the 
same number of tenants. Any one convicted of unprovoked trespass 
done to others was to suffer a distraint of goods ; or, in failure of pos- 
sessing goods within the lordship, was to be taken by the lord or his 
bailey, "with the strength of the free tenants and tenants-at-will," and 
to be set in the stocks, until he had made a resonable amendment to 
the aggrieved party, and to the lord at his will. If any strange man of 
any other town came to do harm to any tenants of Assheton, then, 
anon, all the residents, upon being duly warned, were to rise, take and 
arrest the trespasser unto their power ; and if any of the tenants and 
residents refused so to do, or if any of them resetted or maintained 
any strange man, knowing that he had done trespass, he was, upon con- 
viction, to give the lord 405. within fifteen days following, or the bailey 
might raise the amount by a distrain upon his goods. If, also, there 
was any fighter among the tenants and residents, who should " fight 
with another in his beginning," he was, on being found guilty, to give 
the lord half a mark ; for the second offence to pay a mark ; and for 
the third, twenty shillings: any resetter, also, was upon conviction 
bound to amend it to the party grieved, and to give the lord the pains 
set upon him. These edicts were well calculated for a quarrelsome 
state of society, and may be applicable to the natives of Assheton at 
the present day ; since the fighters of Sir John's time, as well as the 
resetters, appear to have transmitted a large portion of their respective 
virtues to their posterity. Such were the laws of the court baron ; 
and the consequence of any person refusing to be justified by them was, 
that the lord would remove him out of his service, so that he should 
loose his love, i. e. redeem it by proper concession or punishment. 

Some idea may be now formed of the ancient conditions of freeholders 
and tenants-at-will. Tracing the latter through all the degrading 
obligations of vassalage, through presents, boon- work, heriots, or 



MANOR OF ASSHETON-UNDER-LYNE. 



'3' 



mortuaries, little are we inclined to wish for a revival of what are 
improperly named " the good old times." In an iron age, like that of 
Henry VI. the profession of arms was the most enviable of all distinc- 
tions ; it gave to an individual that rank in society and those privileges 
which could be obtained on no other condition ; while husbandry lan- 
guished under the opprobrium of villainage. To these grievances may 
be added, the wanton tyranny of the feudal tyrant himself, which too 
often outstretched the salutary laws that were made to restrain his un- 
provoked aggressions. It is truly remarked by the ingenious author 
of Ivanhoe, in his letter to Dr. Dryasdust of York, that, when the 
worthy person whom he addresses " is placed in his own snug parlour, 
and surrounded by all the comforts of an Englishman's fireside, he 
is not half so much inclined to believe that his own ancestors led a 
very different life from himself, that the shattered tower, which now 
forms a vista from his window, held a baron who would have hung him 
up at his own door without any form of trial, that the hinds, by 
whom his little pet farm is managed, would, a few centuries ago, have 
been his slaves, and that the complete influence of feudal tyranny once 
extended over the neighbouring village, where the attorney is now a man 
of more importance than the lord of the manor." 



AFTER-WORDS, BY THE EDITOR. 

A few words may be added to what Dr. Hibbert-Ware has said 
of the names in this Rental, and these may be classed as (I) 
Personal, and (II) Local names. Personal names consist of (i) 
Christian or Baptismal names, and (2) of Surnames ; often of a 
mixture of both. The surnames are often (3) local from the place 
held, or else (4) taken from the trade, occupation, or office of the 
holder. 

The names under (i) are a large class, of which it is only neces- 



132 



CUSTOM ROLL AND RENTAL OF THE 



sary to notice the surnames made out of Christian names, usually 
by adding the word "son." Thus, Adam Wilson Doggeson, is 
Adam the son of Will the son of Dodge (a corruption of Dodd's, 
from Dodd or Dodds, an Anglo-Saxon name, perhaps the same as 
Dot). Dicon Hoggerson = Richard the hog-herd's son, Diquon 
being an early Norman nurse-name of Richard. Hanson, Jenkin- 
son, and Jak, Jakson, are Flemish in origin, Hans = John; so 
is Jenkyn = Jan-kin, or little John. Jak, Jack, Jackson, may 
be either from John or James in its form of Jac-obus. Hobbe is 
a form of Robert; Hodge of Roger; whence Hobson, Hodgson. 
Hobbe Adamson is Robert the son of Adam. Thomlyn and 
Tomkyn are alike nurse-names of Thomas. Thomas Sanderson 
is Thomas the son of Sander or Alexander. Robin is a diminutive 
of Robert. Thus Wilkyii Robynson = Little Will the son of Robert. 
Atkynsou is Atty's or Arthur's son. Rawlins, Rawlinson are from 
Ralph, Rauf. Piers (French Pierre) is a form of Peter. 

Local names (3) are also a large class, and originally all names 
of places described features of the place itself. It may suffice to 
name a few, those ending in leghe, or ley, denoting open places, 
usually meadow, pasture, or grass land, e.g. the White Legh, 
Buckley, Bardesley, the Leghes, and the Nether (lower) Leghes; 
Worsley (originally the Worked-ley), Shepley = the sheep-ley, 
Staneley and Stanley, the stony-ley; Lusley, perhaps the lussom, 
beautiful or pleasant ley. Colwel = Coldwell; Carr, a marshy 
place, the Old Thane's Carr is a relic of Saxon times, while the 
Dede Carr may mean the dead swamp. Names del Wood, del 
Wood-field, del Leghes, del Cross, always denote the definite 
article " of the ;" while de signifies " of" only, as de Hollinworth, 
del Knolles. Great varieties of spelling of the same names occur, 
and this may often be discovered by comparing the names of the 
free tenants in one part of the Rental with what should be the 
same names in another part, as that where the rents are classed as 
payable at different terms, as Lady Day (March 25), Pentecost or 
Whitsuntide, St. John Baptist (June 24), Michaelmas (Sept. 29), 



MANOR OF ASSHETON-UNDER-LYNE. 



133 



Martinmas (Nov. u), and the Nativity of the Lord or Christmas; 
or in the list of wives, &c., to be seated iu Ashton church, where 
the husbands' names vary from those in the Rental. Thus Ro- 
byn Somayster is changed into Robert Somdyst. The form of 
u Rhodi " in the list of seats should often be read " Richardi." 
The Christian names of the women are few ; Margaret, in its varied 
forms, and Syssot being the most frequent. Malkyn also occurs, 
i.e. little Mall or Mary. Joan is, of course, Jane. 

(4) The surnames derived from trade, occupation or office, are 
also numerous. Robert the Walker holds the Walke Milne or 
fulling-mill; Roger le Baxter, the bakehouse; Roger the Smith; 
Thomas and John, the Cook ; Jenkyn and William, the Cocker ; 
Jak the Spencer (i.e. steward or clerk of the kitchen) is the Bai- 
ley or bailiff of the lord, who had to account for the profits of 
the booths, the shops, and the mealhouse, as well as for the tolls, 
the fair and markets of the manor; Jack the Mercer; Jak the 
Hind or farm bailiff; John the Slater; Roger le Cropper, Robin 
the Cropper; Robert le Wright; Richard the Hunt or Hunter; 
William the Arrowsmith ; Hobbe the King (of misrule), &c., in- 
dicate the occupations of one class of tenants. Among the local 
names, many are still extant in and around Ashton-under-Lyne, 
as Hadfield, Aldwinshagh (Audenshaw), Hurst, Shepley, Lusley, 
which appears by an assessment of 1617 to have comprised (with 
lanes) 421 Lancashire acres. Many of the tenants paid a few 
pence yearly in respect of Lusley, and probably it was a grazing 
common. Erley may mean the ered or ploughed ley. Hob- 
ryding, Robert's ridding, clearing or assart. There were two 
corn mills, both held by John of the Edge. The Claydons then 
held Taunton ; the Byrons held the Whitworth lands in Droylsden; 
and many of the tenants had intakes or parcels of intakes in Pal- 
den Wood, the Alt Hey, &c. The Sour Acre and the Sour Carr- 
guld Rode, with the Stone Rings, are sufficiently explained by 
Dr. Hibbert-Ware. The Bestal was perhaps a stall or shed for 
cattle. Blackenows are the Black Knolls or little hills ; Alt Hey ; 



134 



CUSTOM ROLL, ETC., OF ASSHETON-UNDER-LYNE. 



Mossley; the Ras- or Ros-botham, the rasp or sudden bottom; 
Aspenhalgh, the hough or hill of the Aspeus or poplars. Cowle- 
shagh is perhaps Cole's little wood Cole is a baptismal name, 
occurring in Domesday. Hollinworth, the farm or homestead in 
the hollies. Chadwick, the village or hamlet of Cead or Chudde. 
The Sherewinde is literally cut-wind. Rugheghs = the rough eas 
or eyes, water meadows. Redy Legh, the reedy meadow. Alto- 
gether this Custom Roll and Rental presents a curious catalogue 
of Lancashire personal and local names in the early part of the 
fifteenth century. 



INDEX NOMINUM ET LOCORUM. 



A DAMSON, Hobbe, 97, 102, 119, 126, 
132. 

the wife of Robert, 1 14. 

the wife of Thomas, 114. 

Adkynson, the wife of William, 1 14. 
Ains worth, John of, 101, 115. 
Aldioinshagh, Aldioinshaw ; see Auden- 

thaw. 
Aldwinshagh, William of, 103, 105, 106, 

108. 

Alston Londes, \ 
Alston Londs, j 10 - 5 ' IO7 ' 
Alt Hey, 101, 102, 133. 
Alt Hill, 113. 
Arrowsinith, William the, 98, 119, 125, 

133 ; the wife of, 115. 
Aspenhalgh, 134. 

Aspenhafgh, 1 Joh f, of th /' "4. Io6 > IO 7 ; 
Asjinhalgh, J tbe wife of, 113. 
Ashton, \ 
Asheton. I T , . 
Asshtoni [John of, 102, no. 

Assheton, / 

sir John of, knt., 94 et scepe; the 

brother of, 125. 



Ashton, Ralph or Rauf of, 102, 103, 114 

128, 129. 

Ralph, bar. de Middelton, 94. 

Ranlyn of, 102. 

Robin of, 102, 103, 128. 

Thomas of, 1 15. 

Ashton-under-Lyne, 93 et scepe. 

KirJc, 111, 113, 114, 115, 125, 133. 

hall at manor house, no, 112, 119, 

129. 

lands, 104, 105. 

moss, 1 02. 

park, 103. 

Aspes, the ; see Limehurst. 
Atkynson, John, ico. 

the wife of Wilkyn, 100. 

Auden Shagh, {.103, 105, 106, 107, 108, 
Audenshaw, } 113, n 6, 133. 
Aynsworth ; see Ainsworth. 

T>AKE-HOUSE, 98, 133. 

*-* Sardesley, \ 

Bardisley, ^94, 104, 105, 106, 132. 

Barsley, ) 

Bardesley, Adam of, 101 ; the wife of, 114. 

Christopher of, 101. 



INDEX. 



'35 



Bardesley, Q-eorge of, 101. 

Gregory of, 1 16 ; the wife of, 1 14. 

the wife of John of, 113. 

the wife of Ralph of, 1 14. 

Raufie, 98. 

Richard of, 101, 104, 105, 106, 125 ; 

the wife of, 112. 
Richard son of John of, 105, 106, 

107, 108. 

Syssot wife of Jak of, 102. 

Thurstan of, 101 ; the wife of, 114. 

William of, 98, 1 16 ; the wife of, 1 15. 

the wife of the tenant of, 113. 

of Ha, the wife of William of, 113. 

of Hazlehurst, William of, 99. 

of Holdome, the wife of William of, 

114. 

of Hunt, the wife of Ralph of, 113. 

of Hurst, Richard of, 98, 99. 

Basket Feilds, 98, 103. 

Bastall; see Bestal. 

Baxter, the wife of Henry the, 115. 

Roger the, 98, 102, 119, 126, 133; 

the wife of, 114. 
Beckingham Field, 103. 
Beckingtonfield, 106. 
Belfeild, Christopher of, 102. 
Berdesley, Berdesly, Berdisley, Berdys- 

ley ; see Bardesley. 
Bestal, the, 99, 104, 108, 133. 
Birclienshaw, the, 116. 
Birches, the Light, 104, 105. 
Blackenows, the, 104, 133. 

Blakeknolles, the wife of , 113. 

Booths, the, 98. 

Buckley, 132. 

Buckley, William of, 97. 

Bulkeley, the wife of William of, 115. 

Burdetan, ITT LI. -r e 

Burdytan,) Jolm > IOI; thewifeof > "4- 

Buron, John, 102. 

Byron, sir John tbe, knt., 101, 113, 1 19 ; 

the daughter of, 127. 
Richard the, knt., 104, 106. 

f^HADWICK, 134. 

^-' Chadwick, Robert of. 96 ; the wife 

of, 115- 

Childerscroft in Wolloice, 116. 
Clayden, } Thomas of, 101, 104. 105, 106, 
Claydon, j 107, 108, 113 ; the wife of, 

112. 

Clegge in Bacliedall, 102. 
Cloghed, Thomas of, 102. 



Cocker, Jenkyn, 97, 133. 

William the, 98, 133; the wife of, 

114. 

Coke ; see Cook. 
Colwel, 97, 132. 
Cook, John the, 96, 98, 103, 127, 133; 

the wife of, 115. 
Thomas the, 133; Syssot, wife of, 

97, "5- 

Coppydhurst, 102. 
Corn mills, 95, 96, 101, 103, 109, 112, 

123, 124, 127, 133. 
Cowleshagh, 134. 

Cowleshagh, ) William of, 101 ; the wife 
Cowleshaw, j of, 115. 
Cropper, Magot wife of Jenkyn the, 116. 

the wife of Robert the, 114. 

Robin the, roi, 125, 133. 

Roger the, 100, 133; the wife of, 114. 

Thomlyn, 102. 

Cross, William of the, 101 ; the wife of, 

114. 

Curtnall } Raufof > I0 5 the wife of, 114. 

Thomas of, 101, 102, 126 ; the wife 

of, 113. 

T~)ANE, the heir of Robert, 107. 
*-^ Dede Carr, 101, 132. 
Diconson, Thomlyn, 99, 116. 
Dogeson, ) Adam Wilson, 104, 105, 107, 
Doggeson, J 108, 132. 
Doneam Moss, 95, 96, 121. 
Droyladen [Droylsden], 101, 133. 

TI^DGE, John of the, 96, 101, 123, 133. 
*- Erley, 99, 133. 

I7ETLAWE, Adam of; see Tetlawe. 
Ffulsstaffe, ) John, 97; the wife of, 
Fulstaffe, j 1 15. 

Robert, 120 ; the wife of, 114. 

Robyn, 97. 

f^ATECLIFFE,)Hugh of, 99; the 
^J" GaytcliiTe, j wife of, 115. 

HADFIELD, 133. 
Hadfield, Richard of, 1 16 ; Magot 
wife of, 95. 

the heir of Thomas of, knt., 105, 107. 

of Aldwinshagh, the wife of Richard 

of, 113. 

, 98. 



1 36 CUSTOM ROLL, ETC., OF ASSHETON-UNDKR-LYNE. 



Hanson, Alice or Alys, 97, 115. 

Harper Wollowe, 116. 

Harrop of Barsley, Joan, 94. 

Hatfield ; see Hadjleld. 

Haworth, John of, 97. 

Haycrqfl, the, 100. 

Hazilhurst, the wife of Thomas of, 114. 

Hazlehurst, 99. 

Heath Barn, 102. 

Heghrode ; see Heyrode. 

Held, the wife of Adam of, 115. 

Heyrode, John of the, 99, 103, 105, 106, 

107, 108, 113, 125 ; the wife of, 113. 
Highrode ; see Heyrode. 
Higson, the wife of Thomas, 113. 
Hind, Jak the, 99, 119, 120, 133. 

Marget wife of John the, 98. 

sen., the wife of John the, 1 15. 

Holryding, 99, 133. 

Hoggerson, Dicon, 132 ; Malkyn, wife of, 

96. 

Hogh, John of, 98. 
Holde, Adam of the, 98. 
Holden, 101. 

HollingwortM Johnof 5 Ij6 . thewife 
Hollmsworth, \ f ' yjl 
Hollinworth, J 
Richard of, 104, 106, 107, 116; the 

wife of, 113. 

Syssot wife of Dycon of, 101. 

Hollinworth, 134. 

Howarth, the wife of John of, 115. 

Hulme, Elyn of, 97. 

Hunt, Richard of, 106 ; the wife of, 113. 

Richard the, 103, 108, 133. 

Hurst, 104, 105, 106, 107, 108, 133. 
Hurst, Nichol of, 103, 104, 105, 106, 107, 

108. 

Hurt, the wife of Richard of, 113. 
Hynd ; see Hind. 
Hyrst ; see Hurst. 

T ACKSON, Nanne wife of Robyn, 97. 

J the wife of Robert, 115. 

Jameson, the wife of John, 114. 
Jenkinson of the Bardesley, Thomas of, 

116. 

Jenkyn, the daughter of Carol, 113. 
Johnson, Jack, 99. 

Rauf, 100. 

Joneson, the wife of Ralph, 114. 

KILNE, the, 96. 
King, Hobbe the, 120, 133; Mar- 



gret the widow of, 126; Mergret the 

wife of, 102. 

King, the wife of Robert the, 115. 
Knolles, the, 104, 105, 107, 108, 113. 
Knolle's Meadow, 100. 
Knolles, John of the, 104, 106, 107. 

of Leghes, the wife of John of, 1 1 3. 

Kynge ; see King. 

T AWTON, William of, 102. 
J ' Lees ; see Leghes. 
Leghes, the, 104, 106, 107, 113, 132. 
the Nether, 106, 107, 132. 



Leghes, Adam of the, 106, 107 ; the heir 

of, 104; the wife of, 113. 

Hobbe of the, 119; the heir of, 1 04. 

Jak of the, 100. 

the wife of John of, 113. 

the heir of Robert of the, 1 07 . 

Thomas of the, 101, 104, 106, 107, 

116; the wife of, 113. 

of Hasleworth, Thomlyn of the, 1 15. 

of Hazlehurst, Thomlyn of the, 99. 



Limehurst, the Aspes of, 104, 106. 
Lusley,<)i, 98, 132, 133. 
Lusley, Peter of the, 1 1 3. 

William of, 105, 106, 107, 108 ; the 

heir of, 104. 

Lyme, the wife of John of, 1 14. 
Lyndgards, IJohn of, 99; the wife of, 
Lyngards, j 114. 

Richard of, 100, 102. 

the wife of Robert, 114. 

MARGREE of Stayley, the wife of 
Patrick, 115. 
Mealhouse, the, 98. 
Meltham, James of, 100 ; the wife of, 1 14. 

Thomas of, 100; the wife of, 114. 

Mercer, Jack the, 99, 127, 133. 

Mergot, widow, 120. 

Merler, the wife of John of, 115. 

Middlefon, 94, 128. 

M iln, Milne or Mill, the ; see Corn mill*. 

Milne, the wife of, 114. 

Moor Hey, 96, 100. 

Mosley, \ 

Mosseley, MOO, 102, 103, 134. 

Mossley, ) 

Mossley, the heir of Adam of, 105', 107. 

Moston, the wife of the heir of Henry of, 

"3- 

Richard of, 103, 105, 106, 107, 108 ; 

the heir of, 103. 



INDEX. 



137 



C\LD Alt, 106. 

^ Olde House Carr, 1 16. 

Olde Thanes Carr, see Thane's Carr. 

Oldome, 102. 

Oldome, Eichard of, 97. 

T^ALDEN, 107. 

-* Leyh, 107, 116. 

Wood, 101, 104, 105, 1 06, 107, 133, 
Park, the, 102, 103. 
Parson, the tenants of the, 113. 
Patrick, Syssot wife of, 96. 
Paulden Wood ; see Paldeii Wood. 
Perin or Peryu, the wife of, 97, 115, 119. 
Pole, Alys wife of, 96, 120. 

"D ACHEDALL, 102. 
* Basbot/tam, the, 1 103, 105, 106, 
Rasbothum, J 108, 134. 

Kasbotham, the wife of, 113. 

John of, 1 06. 

Robert of the, 103, 105, 106, 108. 

Redy Legh, 101, 107, 134. 

Rhodes Fields, 98, 101, 104, 106, 115. 

Richards of Bardsley, William son of, 97. 

Robert of , the heir of, 105. 

Robinson. 1 -p. 
Robynson,} 1 ^ 0011 ' 100 - 

the wife of Robert, 1 14. 

Robyn, 99. 

Thomas, 98 ; the wife of, 114. 

Wilkyn, 100, 132. 

the wife of William, 114. 

Rodes Field ; see Rhodes Fields. 
Rosbotham, Rosbothum ; see Rasbotham. 
Rose, Elinor or Elyn the, 98, 115, 119, 

126. 

Rugheqhs. } ,, 
Rughohs, ' (^104,107,134. 

Rydde Legh ; see Redy Legh. 
Syecrqft, 96. 

C ANDERSON or Saunderson, John, 
*-' 99 ; the wife of, 1 14. 

Nicholas, 99 ; the wife of, 1 14. 

Robert, 116 ; the wife of, 114. 

Robyn, 99. 

Thomas, 99, 116, 132 ; the wife of, 

"5- 
Sclater or Sclatter, William, 100; the 

wife of, 1 14. 
Shepley, 96, 103, 105, 106, 107, 108, 132, 

'33- 
Shepley, the tenants of, 113. 



Shepley, the wife of, 113. 

Peter of, 105, 106, 107, 108. 

the heir of Piers of, 103. 

SJierewlnde, 105, 107, 134. 

Slater, John the, 100, 125, 133; the wife 

of, 114. 

Smith, Richard the, 99 ; the wife of, 114. 
Roger the, 96, 97, 98, 1 19, 133 ; the 

wife of, 115. 
Smithey, the, 98. 
Smyth ; see Smith. 
Somaster, Somayster or Somdyst, Robert, 

102, 126, 133 ; the wife of, 114. 

Robyn, 98, 133. 

William, 97 ; the wife of, 115. 

Somdyst ; see Somaster. 

Soureker, 102, 133. 

Soureker, the wife of, 113. 

Sour Car rguld Rode, 102, 128, 133. 

Spake Man, the wife of Henry, 115. 

Spakeman, John, 98. 

Spencer, Jak the or John, 98, 99, 119, 

133; the wife of, 114. 
Staneley, 132. 
Staneley, \ 

Stanely, ^Marget of, 97. 
Stanley, J 

Thomas of, 105, 106, 107, 108, 125. 

Stane rynges, 103, 128, 133. 

Staveley, ) Thomas of, 108 ; the heir of, 

Starely, J 104. 

Stayley, Merget of, 96, 119, 120. 

Rauf of, 113. 

Sunderland, 104, 105, 106, 107. 
Sunderlaiid, the wife of, 112. 

HTAILOR, Thomlynthe, 116. 

Taunton, 101, 104, 105, 106, 107, 
i8, 133- 

Tetlawe, Adam of, 104, 105. 
Thane's Carr or Kerr, 98, 99, 116, 132. 
Thomson, the wife of Adam, 115. 
Three Houses, the, 104, 105, 106, 107, 108. 
Trafford, Peter of, 105, 107. 

the heir of Thomas of, 104. 

Tumson, Jone wife of Atkyn, 97. 

Tyrr, Wilkyn, 103. 

the wife of William, 113. 

T JNTON, Alice, 101. 

^ Richard, 96, 98, 101, 103; 

the wife of, 1 15. 

Robert, 97 ; the wife of, 1 15. 

Roger, 96. 



CUSTOM ROLL, ETC., OF ASSHETON-UNDER-LYNE. 



r, Chrystopher the, 96. 
Yyner stedes, 98. 



Robert the, 96, 133; the 
wife of, 1 14. 

- William the, 96, 100, 125 ; the wife 
of, 114. 

- of Ryecroft, the wife of William 
the, 114. 

Walk miln ; see Corn mills. 
WaterTiouses in Harper Wollowe, 116. 
White Legh, 132. 
Whitelegh or White Leigh, Thomas of, 

97, the wife of, 115. 
Wilkin or Wilkyn, Elyn the daughter of, 

97, 115, 119. 
Wilkinson or Wilkynson, Dycon, 100. 

- the wife of Richard, 1 14. 
William Field orterre, 99, 104, 105, 106, 

107, 108. 

Willison, the wife of Richard, 115. 
Wilson, Adam, 100. 

- Syssot wife of Dycon, 97. 



Wilson of Knolles, the wife of Adam of, 

"3- 

Windebank, \Nanne or Nanna of the, 
Windy Bank, J 97, 115, 119. 
Winterbotham, Jankyne of the, 115. 

John of the, 101. 

Wode ; see Wood. 

Wollau-e or Wollowe, 98, 99, 101, 116. 
Wood, Jenkyn of the, 98, 102, 126. 
John of the, 103, 127 ; the wife of, 

114. 

the wife of Ralph of, 112. 

Raulin of the, 103. 

Woodfield, the, 104, 107. 

Woodfield, William of the, 98, 99 ; the 

wife of, 115. 

Woodhouse, the, 104, 106. 
Woodhouse, the tenants of the, 113. 
Wordel in Sachedall, 102. 
Worseley or Worsley, Piers of, 104, 107. 
Worsley, 132. 

Wright, Robert the, 100, 101, 125, 133. 
of Alt Hill, the wife of Robert, 113. 



139 



SUPPLEMENTARY INDEX. 



A LAN the clerk, 6. 

*"* Ales ; see Gyst ale. 

Amounderness, hundred of, 28, 29. 

Anielsdale, Eobert de, vi. 

Appletone, 24. 

Arrow-smith, 125. 

Asteley vill, 24. 

Ashton, sir John de, knt., xiii. 

Ashton-under-Lyne, xiii. 

church, arrangement of seats in, 

112-15, 125. 

lordship, tenants of; see Tenants. 

Assheton, Thomas of, xiii; rental of 

tenants of, 11516. 

r> ASHALL, x. 

*-* Berknockhill, 20. 

Birch, Thomas (of Birch), 29. 

Birch Feodary, The, ix, xi, 29. 

Black Boy of Ashton, 128-9. 

Blackburn, x ; hundred or wapentake of, 

x, i, 28. 

Blakeburn, Adam de, 6. 
Blundel, William, vi. 
Blundeville, Hawys de, i. 

Randal de, i . 

Bolton, John de, 71. 

Boon work or Boon shearing, 121. 

Botiller, sir Hugh, 6. 

Bowland, wapentake or liberty of, x ; 

Forest of, x. 

Brighouse, Elland of, 1 19. 
Buccleuch, duke of, x. 
Burg, Richard de, vi. 

Roger Gerneth de, v. 

Burnley, x. 

/^*ALVERLEY, Roger de, 120. 
^-" Capitula Itineris, vi, vii. 
Carlisle, parliament at, 2. 
Chartley, castle of, 2. 
Cherlton, Ghiido or Guy de, 6. 



Cherlton, Thomas de, 6. 
Chester, constable of, i, 6. 

- earl of, i, 2. 

- Ranulph of, 120. 

Clitheroe, honor of, x, 2, 3, 4; castle of, x, 

6. 

Cliviger, manor of the grange of, 2. 
Clyderhow; see Clitheroe. 
Conesland in Bewmont, 75. 
Corse presents ; see Mortuaries. 
Cowmale, custom of, 73. 
Cressingham, Hugh de, ix. 

"H\ACRE, Randle de, 71. 
* ' Denbigh castle, 2. 
Dennon or Downham, 4. 
Domesday Survey, iv-v. 
Drink-lean, custom of, 118-21. 
Duckinfield, 122. 

T^ASINGTON, x. 

*-* Eccles, 127. 

Eccleshill, 16. 

Extenta Manerii, statute of, ix. 



battle of, 2. 

* Fighters, in, 130. 
Fitz-Eustace, Aubrey, i . 

- Richard, i. 

- Roger, i. 
Fitz-Hugh, Hugh, 6. 
Fitz-Osbert, Walter, vi. 
Fitz-Robert, Richard, vi. 
Fitz-Swane, Richard, vi. 

- Walter, vi. 

/^ALLOWS Field at Ashton, 129. 

*J Great Mitton, x. 

Gregson's Portfolio of Fragments, xi, 29. 

Grindleton, x. 

Guld riding, custom of, 128-9. 

Gyst ale or Gysing feast, 102, 126-7. 



140 



SUPPLEMENTARY INDEX. 



HALL MOTE (or court baron) of 
Ashton, no, 112, 130. 
Halton, i, 10. 
Heeshanij 73. 

Heriot, 95, 96, 98, 100, 122, 123, 127. 
Heriz, John de, 6. 

Hibbert-Ware, Dr., 93, 94, 117, 131. 
Hobriding, 127. 
Hulton, John de, 28. 

T NQUISITIONES post mortem, ix. 

\7 lEKEBY'S (sir John de) Inqiiest 
iv. of Yorkshire, ix, xi. 

LACI ; see Lacy. 
Lacy, Alice, 2, 3. 
Lacy, Edmund de, 2, 3. 

Henry de, i . 

Henry de, 2, 3, 29 ; account of, by 

Dr. Whitaker, 2-3. 

Ilbert de, i. 

John de, i, 3, 6. 

Margaret, i, 3. 

Margaret (or Alice), 3. 

Kobert de, i. 

Eoger de, i . 

Lake, Lancelot du, 1 20. 
Lancaster, Edward earl of, 2. 

Henry duke of, 3, 29. 

Robert de, vi. 

Thomas Plantaganet, earl of, 3 ; his 

wife Alice, 3. 

Land, tenure of, under feudal system, iii. 
Lansdowne JTeodary, 27*0, ix, xi. 
Lasci, Lasey ; see Lacy. 
Lassi, Normandy, i. 

Legh, de la, 2. 

Leycester, sir Peter, 29. 

Ley land, hundred of, 28. 

Lincoln, earl of ; see Blundeville ad Lacy. 

Lizours, Aubrey, i. 

Robert de, i . 

Roger, i . 

Longespee, Margaret (or Alice), 3. 

sir William, 3. 

Lonsdale, hundred or wapentake of, 28, 29. 
Lovesucken ; see Soken. 
Ludhani, Walter de, 6. 

MAGHALE [Maghull] vill, 24. 
Mamecestre, manor of, ix, 28. 



Manchester, castle of, 1 20. 
Marlings ; see Gyst ale. 

Middlemore, , 2. 

Middleton, Adani de, vi. 

Mortuaries, 123. 

Muller [atoll], 95, 109, no, 112, 123, 124. 

NAMES of persons and places, deri- 
vation of, 131-4. 
Newton, x. 
Noel, Adam, 6. 
Nottingham, Henry de, 6. 

QRHULL [Orrell], Richard de, vi. 

PERKES, Alan, 6 7 . 

-*- Perpont, Richard de, vi. 
Pilkington, Alexander de, vi. 
Placita de quo warranto, ix. 
Pontefract, fee of, i. 
Principal, payment of a ; see Heriot. 

fVUARTERMAR', Colin de, 6. 
V^ Querderay, Hugh, 6. 
Quincy, Hawys, i. 

Margaret de, I . 

Robert de, i. 

Saber de, i. 

"D ADCLIFFE, Adam de, 28. 
I*- Radeclive, William de, vi. 
Raines, rev. canon, 28. 
Ravenscroft, 73. 
Rebels, in, 130. 
Eentale, xii. 
Resetters, in, 130. 
Rixton, Alan de, vi. 
Robinson, Dixon, x, 4. 
Eotuli Hundredorum, viii, xi. 
Routore [? Runcorn], 24. 

C ALESBURY, 16. 

*^ Salford, hundred of, x, 28. 

Salisbury, earl of, 3. 

Saluces, Alice de, 2. 

Slaidburn, x ; manor of, x. 

Soken or Socome, 95, 109, 112, 123, 124. 

Soul scot ; see Mortuaries. 

Standen, Walter de, 6. 

Stanlaw, 2. 

Stansfeld, Oliver de, 2. 

Stocks, the, no, 120, 128, 130. 



SUPPLEMENTARY INDEX. 



Strangers, no, 130. 

Swine, regulations concerning, 111-12,1 24. 

TENANTS of Ashton lordship, free, 
* 103-8, 109-12, 124-25, 130. 
at will, service of, and conditions of 

tenancy, 94-5, 108-12, 118-24, 130; 

rental and presents of, 95-102. 

for life, 102-3. 

Tenants of Thomas Assheton, rental of, 

115-16. 

Testa de Nevill, v-vi, x, xi. 
Thistlelache or Thistletake, 10. 
Tottington, manor of, x. 
Towneley, Charles (of Towneley), x. 
Trafford, Henry de, vi. 
Trespassers, no, 130. 
Turvery [Turbary], 102, 126. 
Tyas, Baldwin, 6. 
Ebrard, 6. 

\lyTADDINGTON, x. 
v v Wadington, Walter de, 6. 
Warre, Thomas West lord la, xii. 



West Bradford, x. 

West Derby, hundred of, 28, 29. 

Whalley, abbey of, 2 ; church of, 2. 

Whitaker, Dr., i, 10, ir. 

'a History of Whalley, extracts from, 

2-3. 6 - 

Whitingham, 22. 
Whitson ales, 121. 
William, reeve of Wortheston, 6. 
William and William, 28, 29. 
Winchester, earl of ; see Quincy. 
Winchester, Roll of, iv. 
Windhull, 39. 
WolfstanescUve, 20. 
Worsthorn, manor of, 2. 
Worston, Adam de, 6. 

G-uido or Ydo de, 6. 

Worston or Wortheston, Till of, 6. 
Wynewyc, William de, vi. 
Wynnes [? Widnesl, 24. 
Wyot ; see Worston, Adam de. 



Y 



POLE day, annual feast on, 94, 98, 
118-21. 



Charles Simms and Co., Printers, Manchester. 



Ctoentp4ourtf) Report 



OF THE 



COUNCIL OF THE CHETHAM SOCIETY, 

Head at the Annual Meeting, held, by permission of the Feoffees, 

in the Audit Room of Chetham's Hospital, on the 18th of 

March, by adjournment from the 1st, 1867. 



THE first of the publications for the year 1866-7, and the sixty-ninth 
in the Chetham Series, is The Admission Register of the Manchester 
School, with some Notices of the more distinguished Scholars. Edited by the 
Kev. JEREMIAH FINCH SMITH, M.A. Rector of Aldridge, Staffordshire, 
Vol. 1. 

Every one at all accustomed to such researches must be well aware how 
difficult it is, after a long lapse of time, to collect and ascertain with suffi- 
cient fulness and exactness the facts connected with the biography of the 
scholars of any particular school. Most fortunately, the history of the 
scholars of the Manchester Free Grammar School has been undertaken by 
one (himself the son of a late most deservedly respected high master) who, 
in addition to the other qualifications for such a work, is possessed of those 
of untiring industry and undaunted perseverance. Wherever there was a 
possibility of obtaining information his inquiries have been assiduously made. 
Undiscouraged by failure in one channel he has, where practicable, con- 
stantly tried another ; and a better proof cannot be afforded, both of the 
extent of his applications to all available sources, and the general success 
with which they have been attended, than the present volume, which 
extends from 1730 to 1775, and gives biographical notices of more than 
four hundred scholars. The succeeding one, which will bring the Register 



nearer to the time of living contemporaries of many of the scholars, will b 
anxiously looked for by all who have examined the first portion of the 
work, which shows in the most striking manner from what various social 
elements the school derived its pupils, and in how many different modes of 
life they afterwards became distinguished. The Register, when completed, 
cannot but take a permanent place as a necessary and most agreeable 
work of reference, and as a faithful and extensive biographical register and 
record of scholars, there has been nothing yet published, with regard to 
the alumni of any other school in the kingdom, of the same elaborate and 
satisfactory character. 

The second book for the year 1866-7, and the seventieth in the Chetham 
series, is " The Stanley Papers, Part III. Vol. 3, containing the Private 
Devotions and Miscellanies of James Seventh Earl of Derby, K.G. Edited 
by the Rev. F. R. RAINES, M.A., F.S.A., Honorary Canon of Manchester, &c. 

The Memoir of James Earl of Derby, by Canon RAINES, and which occu- 
pies with the Appendix the two previous volumes of the Third Part of the 
Stanley Papers, has been already noticed in the Report of the Council for 
the year 1865-6. That most interesting and attractive biography, in which 
every fact, circumstance, and document, which the unwearied diligence of 
the reverend author could collect respecting its illustrious subject, has found 
a place, is followed in this concluding volume by the Earl's Prayers and 
Meditations, and his History of the Isle of Man. The former show how 
deep, fervent, and constant his religious feelings and convictions were; the 
latter how keen and penetrating was his insight into character, how solid 
and well-weighed his matured judgment in civil affairs. Had he given us 
Charles and the principal personages of his court, either in his earlier or 
later day, struck off with the same vigorous and happy power of graphic 
delineation with which he has represented the comparatively-speaking unin- 
teresting officials of the Isle of Man, what an invaluable addition would 
have been afforded to the grand historical gallery of that most eventful reign. 

It is impossible to conclude the notice of this volume without returning 
the thanks of the Council and of the members of the CHETHAM SOCIETY to 
Canon RAINES the donor, also it should be mentioned, of the fac-simile 
plate of the Countess of Derby's autograph letter for the very careful and 
judicious manner in which he has performed the responsible duties of Bio- 



3 

grapher and Editor, and for the ample justice which he has rendered to the 
memory of one of the noblest characters which English history has to 
boast of. 

The third and last publication for the year 1866-7, and the seventy-first 
in the Chetham Series, is "Collectanea Anglo-Poetica, or a Bibliographical 
and Descriptive Catalogue of a portion of a Collection of early English 
Poetry, with occasional extracts and remarks, biographical and critical. By 
the Hev. THOMAS CORSER, M.A., F.S.A. &c. Part 3." 

It will, the Council are sure, afford the members pleasure to find that 
Mr. Corser's very valuable work is making, if not rapid, at least steady and 
certain progress. The present volume begins with Breton and ends with 
Chamberlaine, and contains one hundred notices. Those of Breton's 
voluminous works, (and which, unequal as they are, will always interest 
from their occasional poetical beauties,) extend from p. 1 to p. 96, and afford 
a much more complete view of the writings of this author, several of which 
are exceedingly rare, than has hitherto been given. The remaining articles 
in B, and the commencing ones in C, include several poetical volumes which 
will be new even to those who are well acquainted with early English 
poetry, and the reader will find much to deserve his attention in the bio- 
graphy of the various authors, the well-selected extracts from their works, 
and the accurate bibliographical information which is so abundantly supplied. 
It is scarcely necessary to say that the present volume is characterized by 
the same care, exactness and research which were so conspicuous in the 
preceding ones, and it only remains to be wished that no circumstances may 
occur to retard Mr. Corser's future progress; and that a work so important 
in itself, and affording so fitting a memorial of himself and his library, may 
be prosecuted without interruption to its close. 

All the three volumes enumerated, for the year 1866-7, have now been 
issued to the members. 

The Council have great regret in adverting to the loss which their body 
and the Society have sustained by the death of Mr. THOMAS HEYWOOD, of 
Hope End during the last year. From the commencement of the CHETHAM 
SOCIETY he had taken a warm interest in its proceedings and success. To 
the latter he contributed in no slight degree by the various works in the 
Chetham series, in which he so efficiently performed the duties of editor. 



For this office he was indeed eminently adapted. The range of his infor- 
mation was so extensive, and he had the power of presenting the results 
of his reading and observation in so lucid, condensed and attractive a form 
that the introductions to the works edited by him will always be referred to 
with undiminished pleasure. To be able to infuse life and spirit into mate- 
rials which are the acquisition of original research is one of the highest 
merits of the historical antiquary, and to this merit Mr. THOMAS HEYWOOD 
could undoubtedly lay claim. It is therefore greatly to be lamented that 
he did not devote a portion of his leisure to the production of a work of 
larger extent on some one of the many subjects which engaged his atten- 
tion, and which might have afforded in a greater degree than scattered 
specimens, however elegant, learned, or satisfactory, can do, a just idea of 
the acquirements and capacity of a very able and accomplished contributor 
to the great common fund of historical literature and philology. 

The first of the publications for the year 1867-8, being No. 72 in the 
Chetham Series, is the second volume of the Collectanea relating to Man- 
chester and its Neighbourhood, at various periods. Compiled, arranged, 
and edited by JOHN HARLAND, Esq., F.S.A., vol. 2, which is now ready 
for delivery. The further publications contemplated, or in progress, are : 

1. Collectanea Anglo-Poetica, Part 4. By the Rev. THOMAS CORSER, 
M.A., F.S.A. 

2. The Visitation of Lancashire in 1532. Edited by WILLIAM LANGTON, 
Esq. 

3. The Register of the Manchester Free Grammar School, with Notices 
and Biographies of distinguished Scholars. Edited by the Rev. J. FINCH 
SMITH, M.A., Rector of Aldridge. Vol. 2. 

4. A Collection of Ancient Ballads and Poems, relating to Lancashire. 
Edited by JOHN HARLAND, Esq., F.S.A. 

5. Worihingtoris Diary and Correspondence. The concluding part. 
Edited by JAMES CROSSLEY, Esq., F.S.A., President of the Chetham 
Society. 

6. Documents relating to Edward third Earl of Derby and the Pil- 
grimage of Grace. By R. C. CHRISTIE, Esq., M.A. 

7. The Great De Lacy Inquisition of 1311. The Boundary Rents and 
other curious matters in and concerning the Manor of Manchester, and other 



Manors and Places in Com. Lane. ; and the Custom Roll and Rental of the 
Manor of Ashton-under-Lyne. Edited by JOHN HARLAND, Esq., F.S.A. 

8. Tracts printed in the Controversy between Sir Thomas Mainwaring 
and Sir Peter Leicester, as to the legitimacy of Amicia,\daughter of Hugh 
Cyveliok, Earl of Chester, 1673-9. Collected and republished, with an 
Introductory Preface and Review of the Controversy. 

9. Diary of John Angler, of Denton, from the original Manuscript, with 
a reprint of the Narrative of his Life, published in 1685 by Oliver Hey wood. 

10. A Selection from Dr. John By r orris unprinted Remains in Prose 
and Verse. 

11. A new Edition of the Poems Collected and Published after his 
Death, corrected and revised, with Notes, and a Prefatory Sketch of 
his Life. 

12. The later Heraldic Visitations of Lancashire. 

13. Hollinworth' s Mancuniensis. A new Edition. Edited by CANON 
RAINES. 

14. A Volume of Extracts, Depositions, Letters, fyc., from the Con- 
sistory Court of Chester, beginning with the Foundation of the See. 

15. Extracts from Roger Dodsworth's Collections in the Bodleian 
Library at Oxford relating to Lancashire. 

16. Annales Cestrienses. 

17. Chetham Miscellanies. Vol. 4. 

18. Lancashire and Cheshire Funeral Certificates. 

19. A General Index to volumes XXXI. to LX. of the Publication* 
of the Chetham Society. 



The Treasurer in Aceount with the Chetham Society for the year ending 28#i February, 1867. 



DR. 



CR. 



4 Subscriptions of 1861-62 (19th yearl, re- 
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69 Subscriptions of 1865-66 (23rd year), re- 
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57 Collected 67 

12 Outstanding. 

8 Subscriptions of 1866-67 (24th year;, ac- 
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275 Collected since 275 

[48 Life Members. 

2 Commuted into Life Membership... 20 
17 Now in arrear. 



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LIST OF MEMBERS 

FOR THE YEAR 1867 1868. 



The Members, to whose names an asterisk is prefixed, have compounded for their Subscription*. 



A CKERS, James, Prinknash Park, near Gloucester 
-<nL Adams, George Edward, MA., F.S.A., Rouge- 
dragon, College of Arms, London 
Agnew, Thomas, Manchester 
Ainsworth, Ralph F , M.D., Manchester 
Allen, Joseph, Tombland, Norwich 
Andrews, Thomas, Bolton 
Armitage, Samuel, Pendleton, Manchester 
Armstrong, Rev. Thomas Alfred, M.A., Ashton Par- 
sonage, Preston 
Ashton, John, Warrington 
Ashworth, Henry, The Oaks, near Bolton 
Aspland, Alfred, Dukinfield 

*Aspland, Rev. R. B., Well Street, Hackney, London 
Athenaeum Club, London 
Athenaeum, Liverpool 
Athenaeum Library, Boston, U.S. 
*Atherton, Miss, Kersall Cell, near Manchester 
Atherton, James, Swinton House, near Manchester 
Atkin, William, Little Hulton, near Bolton 
Atkinson, William, Ashton Heyes, near Chester 
Avison, Thomas, F.S.A., Liverpool 
Ayre, Thomas, Trafford Moss, Manchester 

BAGSHAW, John, Manchester 
Bain, James, 1, Haymarket, London 
Baker, Thomas, Brazennose Street, Manchester 
Bannerman, John, York Street, Manchester 
*Barbour, Robert, Bolesworth Castle, near Chester 
Barker, John, Broughton Lodge, Newton in Cartmel 
Barlow, Mrs., Greenhill, Oldham 
Barratt, James, Lymm Hall, near Warrington 
Barthes & Lowell, 14, Great Marlborough Street, Lon- 
don 

Bartlemore, Miss, Beechwood, Rochdale 
Barton, Richard, Caldy Manor, Birkenhead 
Barton, Samuel, Whalley Range, Manchester 
Beamont, William, Orford Hall, Warrington 
Beever, James F., Manchester 
Bentley, Rev. T. R, M.A., St. Matthew's Rectory, 

Manchester 
Berlin Royal Library 

Beswicke, Mrs., Pyke House, Littleborough 
Birchall, Rev. Jos., M.A., Church Kirk, Accrington 



Birmingham, Borough of, Central Free Library, Bir- 
mingham 

Birley, Hugh, Moorlands, near Manchester 
Birley, Rev. J. S., M.A., Halliwell Hall, Bolton 
Birley, Thomas H., Hart Hill, Eccles, Manchester 
Blackburn Free Public Library and Museum 
Blackburne, John Ireland, Hale, near Warrington 
Bolton Public Library, Bolton-le-Moors 
Booker, Rev. John, M.A., F.S.A., Sutton, Surrey 
Booth, Benjamin W., Swinton, near Manchester 
Booth, John, Greenbank, Monton, Eccles 
Booth, William, Holly Bank, Cornbrook, Manchester 
Boston, U. S., Public Library 
Bourne, Cornelius, Stalmine Hall, Fleetwood, near 

Preston 

Bower, Miss, Old Park, Bostol, Abbey wood, London S.E 
Bowers, The Very Rev. G. H., D D., Dean of Manchester 
Brackenbury, Miss, Brunswick Terrace, Brighton 
Bradshaigh, W. R. H., Coolree House, near Wexford 
Bradshaw, John, Jun., Manchester 
Brazenose College, Oxford 
Bridgeman, Hon. and Rev. George Thomas Orlando, 

M A., Rectory, Wigan. 
Bridson, J. Ridgway, Crompton Fold, Bolton, and Belle 

Isle, Windermere 
Brierley, Rev. James, M A., Mosley Moss Hall, Congle- 

ton 

*Brooke, Thomas, Armitage bridge, near Huddersfield 
Brooks, W. Cunliffe, M.A., Barlow Hall, Manchester 
Brown, Mrs., Winckley Street, Preston 
Browne, William Henry, Chester 
Buckley, Edmund, M.P., Dinas Mowddwy 
Buckley, Nathaniel, F.L.S., Rochdale 
Bunting, Thomas Percival, Manchester 
Bury Co-operative Society, Bury, Lancashire 

CAINE, Rev. William, M.A., Chaplain New Bailey, 
M anchester 
Cassels, Rev. Andrew, M.A., Batley Vicarage, near 

Dewsbury 

Chad wick, Elias, MA., Pudlestone Court, Hereford- 
shire 

Chichester, The Bishop of 
Christie, R. C., M.A., Owen's College, Manchester 



LIST OF MEMBERS. 



Christ's College Library, Cambridge 
Churchill, William, Brinnington Lodge, near Stockport 
Clare, John Leigh, Liverpool 
Clarke, Archibald William, Manchester 
Clegg, Thomas, Manchester 
Cooke, Thomas, Rusholme Hall, near Manchester 
Corser, Rev. Thomas, M.A., F.S.A., Stand, near Man- 
chester 

Cottam, S., Manchester 
Coulthart, John Ross, Ashton-under-Lyne 
Crawford and Balcarres, The Earl of, Haigh Hall, near 

Wigan 

Cross, William Assheton, Red Scar, Preston 
Crosse, Thomas Bright, Shaw Hill, near Chorley 
Crossley, George F., Beech Tree Bank, Prestwich 
Crossley, James, F.S.A., Manchester, President 
Crossley, Croslegh Dampire, Scaitclifle House, Tod- 

morden 
Cunningham, William Alexander, Manchester 

DARBISHIRE, Samuel D., Pendyffryn, near Conway 
Darwell, Thomas, Manchester 
Dean, Rev. Thomas, M.A., Warton, near Lancaster 
Dearden, Thomas Ferrand, Rochdale 
Derby, The Earl of, Knowsley, Prescot 
Delamere, The Lord, Vale Royal, near Northwich 
Devonshire, The Duke of, Holker, Cartmel 
Dilke, Sir C. W., Bart , 76, Sloane Street, London 
Dixon, Jas., Ormskirk 
Dobson, William, Chronicle OESce, Preston 
Doxey, Rev. J. S , Milnrow, Rochdale 
Durnford, The Ven. Richard, M.A., Rectory, Middle- 
ton, Archdeacon and Hon. Canon of Manchester 

EARLE, Frederic William, Edenhurst, near Huyton 
Eccles, Richard, Wigan 
Eckersley, Thomas, Wigan 
Egerton, Sir Philip de Malpas Grey, Bart., M.P., Oulton 

Park, Tarporley 

Egerton, The Lord, Tatton Park, Knutsford 
Ellesmere, The Earl of, Worsley Hall 
Ellison, Cuthbert E., Worship Street, London 
Ethelston, Rev. Hart, M.A.,CheethamHill, Manchester 

FEILDEN, Joseph, M.P., Witton, near Blackburn 
*Fenton, James, M.A., F.S.A., Norton Hall, 
Mickleton Chipping Campden, Gloucestershire 
Fernley, John, Southport 
Ffarington, Miss, Worden Hall, near Preston 
Fielden, Samuel, Centre Vale, Todmorden 
Fisher, William, Lancaster Banking Co., Preston 
Fishwick, Major, Carr Hill, Rochdale 
Fleming, William, M.D., Rowton Grange, Chester 
*Fort, Richard, M.P., Read Hall, Padiham 
Forster, John, Palace Gate House, Kensington, London 
Frere, W. E., 42, Clarges Street, London 

/^i ARNETT, Wm. James, Quernmore Park, Lancaster 
VT Gibb, William, Swinton Lodge, Manchester 
Gladstone, Murray, F.R.A.S., Broughton, Manchester 
Gladstone, Robert, Highfield, near Manchester 



Goss, Right Rev. A., D.D., St. Edward's College, Liver- 
pool 

Greenall, Gilbert, M.P., Walton Hall, near Warring- 
ton 

Greenhalgh, Rev. Henry Canon, Weldbank, Chorley 

HADFIELD, George, M.P., Manchester 
Hailstone, Edward, F.S.A., Horton Hall, Brad- 
ford, Yorkshire 

Hardman, Henry, Bury, Lancashire 
Hardy, William, F.S A., Duchy of Lancaster Office, Lon- 
don 

Hargreaves, George J., Piccadilly, Manchester 
Harland, John, F.S.A., Cheetham Hill, near Man- 
chester 

Harris, George, F.S. A., Registrar of the Court of Bank- 
ruptcy, Manchester 
Harrison, William, Rock Mount, St. John's, Isle of 

Man. 

Harrison, William, F.S.A., FG.S., F.R.S., Antq. du 
Nord, Samlesbury Hall, near Preston, and Galli- 
greaves Hall, near Blackburn 
Harter, James Collier, Leamington 
'Harter, William, Hope Hall, near Manchester 
Hatton, James, Richmond House, near Manchester 
Healey, Henry, Smallbridge, Rochdale 
Heelis, Stephen, Manchester 
'Henderson, Rev. John, Parsonage, Colne 
*Henry, W. C., M.D., F.R.S., Haffield, near Ledbury 
Heron, Rev. George, M.A., Carrington, Cheshire 
Heywood, Arthur Henry, Manchester, Treasurer 
Heywood, Sir Thos. Percival, Bart., Doveley's, Ash- 
bourne 
Heywood, James, F.R.S., F.G.S., 26, Palace Gardens, 

Kensington, London 

Heywood, Thomas, Pendleton, near Manchester 
Heywood, Rev. Hy. R., M.A., Swinton, Manchester 
Hickson, Charles, Manchester 
Higson, James, Ardwick Green North, Manchester 
Higson, John, Birch Cottage, Lees, near Oldham 
Hilton, William Hughes, Booth Street, Manchester 
Hoare, P. R., Kelsey Park, Beckenham, Kent 
Holden, Thomas, Springfield, Bolton-le-Moors 
Holdsworth, John, Eccles 
Hoghton, Sir Henry de, Bart. 
Hornby, Rev. George, B.D. 
Hornby, Rev. William, M.A , St. Michael's, Garstang, 

Hon. Canon of Manchester 

Howard, Edward C., Brinnington Hall, Stockport 
Howarth, Henry H., Castleton Hall, Rochdale 
Hughes, Thomas, F.S. A., Grove Terrace, Chester 
Hull, William Winstanley, The Knowle, Belper 
*Hulton, Rev. C. G., M.A., Emberton, Newport Pagnel, 

Bucks 

Hulton, W. A., Hurst Grange, Preston 
Hume, Rev. A., LL.D., D.C.L., F.S.A., Liverpool 
Hutchinson, Robt. Hopwood, Tenter House, Rochdale 

I NDEPENDENT College, Manchester 



LIST OF MEMBERS. 



J AC SON, Charles R., Barton Lodge, Preston 
Jervis, Thomas B., Ambleside 
Johnson, Jabez, Pennington Hall, near Manchester 
Johnson, W. R., The Cliffe, Wybunbury, Nantwich 
Jones, Jos., Abberley Hall, Stourport 
Jones, Win. Roscoe, Athenaeum, Liverpool 
Jones, Thomas, B.A., F.S.A., Chetham Library, Man- 
chester 
Jordan, Joseph, F.R.C.S., Manchester 

KAY, Samuel, Oakley House, Weaste, Manchester 
Kemp, George Fawke, Kochdale 
Kennedy, Jno. Lawson., Ai dwick Hall, Manchester 
Kershaw, John, Cross Gate, Audenshaw, near Man- 
chester 
King, Eev. Richard, B.A., County Asylum, Prestwich 

LANGTON, William, Manchester, Hon. Secretary 
Law, Wm. Bent House, Littleborough, Rochdale 
Leeds Library 

Lees, Rev. William F., M.A., Sedlow Parsonage, Reigate 
Legh, G. Cornwall, M.P., F.G.S., High Legh, Knutsford 
Leigh, Egerton, Joddrell Hall, Congleton 
Leigh, Henry, Patricroft 

Leigh, Miss, The Limes, Hale, near Warrington 
Lingard, John R., Stockport 
Lingard, Rev. R. R., M.A , Tay Bank, Dundee 
Litler, H. W., Oldham 
Lowndes, Edward C., Preston 
Loyd, Edward, Lillesden, Hawkhurst, Kent 
*Loyd, Lewis, Monks Orchard, Bromley, Kent 
Lycett, W. E., Manchester 
Lyon, George, Manchester 

McCLURE, William, Piccadilly, Manchester 
MacKenzie, John Whitefoord, Edinburgh 

Makinson, A. W., 18, Abingdon Street, Westminster 

Manchester Free Library 

* Manchester, The Bishop of 

Mann, Robert, Manchester 

Mare, E. R. Le, Manchester 

*Marriott, John, Liverpool 

Marsden, Rev. J. H., B.D., Canon of Manchester 

Marsden, G. E., Manchester 

*Marsh, John Fitchett, Warrington 

Marshall, William, Penwortham Hall, Preston 

Marshall, Frederick Earnshaw, Ditto 

Marshall, John, Ditto 

Mason, Hugh, Groby Lodge, Ashton-under-Lyne 

Massie,>Rev. E., M.A., Gawsworth Rectory, near Con- 
gleton 

Master, The Ven. Archdeacon, M.A., Croston 

Mayer, Joseph, F.S.A., Lord-street, Liverpool 

Melbourne Public Library 

Mellor, Thomas, F.R.C.S., Oxford Road, Manchester 

Miller, James, Manchester and Liverpool District Bank, 
Manchester 

Monk, John. Q.C., The Temple, London 

Moreland, James, Bookseller, Manchester 

Mosley, Sir Oswald, Bart., Rolleston Hall, Staffordshire 

*Moss, Rev. John James, Otterspool, Liverpool 



Moult, William, Parkside, Prescot 
Murray, James, Manchester 

NAYLOE, Benjamin Dennison, Altrincham 
Neild, Jonathan, .Tun., Rochdale 
Newall, Henry, Hare Hill, Littleborough. 
Newall, W. S., Ackworth House, Pontefract 
Newbery, Henry, Docklands, Ingatestone, Essex 
Nicholson, James, F.S.A., Thelwall Hall, Warrington 

ORMEROD, George, D.C.L., F.R.S., F.S.A. F.G.S., 
Sedbury Park, Gloucestershire 
Ormerod, Henry Mere, Manchester 
Owen, John, Stietford Road, Hulme, Manchester 

*T>ARKER, Robert Townley, Cuerden Hall, near 
Preston 

Parker, Rev. Arthur Townley, M.A., Hon. Canon of 
Manchester, Royle, Burnley 

Parkinson, Miss, Ann's Hill, Cockermouth 

Parkinson, Colonel, Eppleton Hall, Fence Houses, 
Durham 

*Patten, Rt. Honble. J. Wilson, M.P., Bank Hall, War- 
rington 

Pedder, Richard, Preston 

Peel, George, Brookfield, Cheadle 

Peel, Jonathan, Knowlmere Manor, near Clitheroe 

Ferris, John, Lyceum, Liverpool 

Philippi, Frederick Theod., Belfield Hall, near Rochdale 

'Philips, Mark, The Park, Manchester 

Piccope, Rev G. J., M.A., Yarrell, Wansford, North- 
amptonshire 

Picton, J. A., F.S.A. , Clayton Square, Liverpool 

Pierpoint, Benjamin, Warrington 

Pitcairn, Rev. J. P., M.A., Vicarage, Eccles 

*Platt, John, M.P., Werneth Park, Oldham 

Porrett, Robert, F.R.S., F.S.A., &c., 49, Bernard Street, 
Russell Square, London 

Prescott, J. B. 

Price, Rev. Henry H., M.A., Ash Parsonage, Whit- 
church, Salop 

RADFOED, Richard, Manchester 
Radford, Thomas, M.D., Higher Broughton, near 

Manchester 

Raine, Rev. James, M.A., York 
Raines, Rev. F. R., M.A., F.S.A., Vicar of Milnrow and 

Hon. Canon of Manchester, Vice President 
Ramsbotham, James, Crowboro' Warren, Tunbridge 

Wells 

Reiss, Mrs., Broom House, near Manchester 
Renaud, Frank, M.D., Piccadilly, Manchester 
Reynolds, Rev. George W., Diocesan Church Building 

Society, Manchester 
Rhodocanakis, Le Prince, G.G., F.S.R.R., Higher 

Broughton, Manchester 
Rickards, Charles H., Manchester 
Rigby, Samuel, Bruch Hall, Warrington 
Roberts, Chas. H. Crompton, Sunnyside, Upper Avenue 

Road, Regent's Park, London 
Roberts, Alfred Wm., Larkficld, Rochdale 



LIST OF MEMBERS. 



Robinson, Dixon, Clitheroe Castle, Clitheroe 

Eobson, John, M.D., Warrington 

Bochdale Library 

Royds, Albert Hudson, Rochdale 

Royle, Alan, Hartford Hill, near Northwich 

Rushton, James, Forrest House, Newchurch 

SALISBURY, Enoch Gibbon, Glan Aber, Chester 
Satterfield, Joshua, Alderley Edge, near Manchester 

Schofield, Wm. Whitworth, Buckley Hal!, Rochdale 

Scholes, Thomas Seddon, Dale Street, Leamington 

Sharp, John, Lancaster 

Sharp, Thomas B., Whalley Range, Manchester 

Sharp, William, 102, Piccadilly, London 

Shaw, George, St. Chad's Upper Mills, Saddleworth 

Shepherd's Library, Preston 

Shuttleworth, Sir J. P. Kay, Bart., M.D., Gawthorpe 
Hall, Burnley 

Simms, Charles S., Manchester 

Simpkin, William, Spring Street, Bury 

Simpson, John Hope, Bank of Liverpool 

Simpson, Rev. Samuel, M.A., Thelgreaves, near Lan- 
caster 

Sion College, The Master of, London 

Skaife, John, Union Street, Blackburn 

Skelmersdale, The Lord, Lathom House, near Onnskirk 

Smith, Rev. J. Finch, M.A., Aldridge Rectory, near 
Walsall 

Smith, J. R., Soho Square, London 

Smith, Feredey, Manchester 

Sowler, R. S., Q.C., Manchester 

Sowler, John, Manchester 

Spafford, George, Brown Street, Manchester 

Standish, W. S. C., Duxbury Hall, Chorley 

*Stanley, The Lord, Knowsley, Prescot, and The 
Albany, London 

Stanley of Alderley, The Lord, Alderley, Congleton 

Sudlow, John, Manchester 

Swindells, G. A. Ancoats Grove, Manchester 

nPABLEY, The Lord de, Tabley House, Knutsford 
-*- Tate, Wm. James, Manchester 
Tatton, Thos., W. Withenshaw Hall, Cheshire 
Taylor, James, Todmorden Hall, Todmorden 
Taylor, James, Whiteley Hall, Wigan 
Taylor, John, Moreton Hall, Whalley 
Taylor, Mrs. T., Knutsford 
Taylor, Thomas Frederick, Wigan 
Teale, Josh., F.R.C.S., Salford 



Thicknesse, Rev. F. H., M.A., Hon. Canon of Man- 
chester, Deane Vicarage, Bolton 
*Thompson, Joseph, Woodlands, Fulshaw 
Thompson, James, Chronicle Office, Leicester 
Thorley, George, Manchester 
Threlfall, Richard, Hollowforth, Preston 
Tootal, Edward, The Weaste. Eccles 
Tonge, Rev. Richard, M.A., The Rectory, Heaton 

Mersey 

Townend, John, Shadsworth Hall, Blackburn 
Towneley, Colonel Chas ., F.S. A.,Towneley Park, Burnley 
Trafford, Sir Humphrey de, Bart., Trafford Park, Man- 
chester 

Turner, Thomas, F.R.C.S , Manchester 
Turner, Rt. Rev. W., D.D., Crescent, Salford 
Tweedale, A. A., Spring Cottage, near Rochdale 

VAUGHAN, John, Lingard, Stockport 
Vitre, Edward Denis de, M.D., Lancaster 

WANKLYN, James H., Manchester 
Wanklyn, William Trevor, Manchester 
Warburton, H. E. Egerton, Arley Hall, near Northwich 
Ward, Edmund, Holly House. Prescot 
Ward. Jos. Pilkington, Whalley Range, Manchester 
Ware, Titus Hibbert, Hale Barns, Altrincham 
Westhead, Joshua P. B., Lea Castle, Kidderminster 
Westminster, The Marquis of, Eaton Hall, Chester 
Wheeler, Benjamin, Manchester 

Whitaker, Rev. Robert Nowell, M.A., Vicar of Whalley 
Whitaker, W. W., St. Ann's Street, Manchester 
Whitehead, James, M.D., Manchester 
Whitelegg, Rev. William, M.A., Hulme, Manchester 
Whittaker, Rev. Robt, M.A., Leesfield, Oldham 
Wilkinson, Eason Matthew, M.D., Manchester 
Wilkinson, T. T.. Cheapside, Burnley 
Wilton, The Earl of, Heaton House, near Manchester 
Wood, Richard Henry, F.S.A., Grumpsall, Manchester 
Wood, William Rayner, Singleton, Manchester 
Woods, Albert W., F.S.A., Lancaster Herald, College of 

Arms, London 

Wood, Richard, Clarks Villa, Lower Crumpsall, Man- 
chester 
Worthington, Edward, 23, Ladbroke Garden, London 

"X70RK Subscription Library, York 
i Young, Sir Charles G., F.S.A., Garter King of 
Arms, London 



The Honorary Secretary requests that any change of address may be communicated to him 

or to the Treasurer. 



DA Chetham Society, Manchester, 

670 Eng. 

L19C5 Remains 



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