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ST 



State of Connecticut 

REPO RT OF 

The State Tuberculosis Commission 

FOR THE PERIOD 

Beginning October 1, 1918, and Ending June 30, 1920 



iV^ 



%\ -2^0 




^tak of G^nnnecticut 

PUBLIC DOCUMENT No. 53 



REPORT 



OF THE 



State Tuberculosis Commission 

TO THE GOVERNOR 



For the Period Beginning October 1 , 1918 
and Ending June 30, 1 920 



PRINTED IN COMPLIANCE WITH STA TUTE 



HARTFORD 

Published by the State 

1920 



Publication 

Approved by 

The Board of Control 



REFORMATORY PRESS 
CHESHIRE. CONN. 



STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION 

Dr. Stephen J. Maker, New Haven Term expires July 1, 1923 
Wallace S. Allis, Norwich Term expires July 1, 1925 

Arthur R. Kimball, Waterbury Term expires July 1, 1921 

Secretary 
George I.Allen, Middletown. 



CONTENTS. 

Page 

"The Seaside" at Night Frontispiece 

On "The Seaside's" Sunny Beach Facing page 8 

"The Seaside" by Day Facing page 20 

Statistics of Meriden Sanatorium ' 36 

Statistics of Shelton Sanatorium 41 

Statistics of Hartford Sanatorium 50 

Statistics of Norwich Sanatorium 59 

Statistics of "The Seaside", Niantic, Sanatorium 62 

Taking the Cure at "The Seaside" Facing page 65 

Medical Report of Five Sanatoria 64 

Report of the Secretary 76 



REPORT 

OF THE 

State Tuberculosis Commission 

i>tate of (5onnecticiit 

To His Excellency, the Governor of Connecticut, and the Mem- 
bers of the General Assembly: 

In compliance with the requirements of the law of the 
state, we herewith submit to you a report of our activities 
during the past twenty-one months. These months, of 
course, run back to the time of the Great War and include 
the whole troublous time of reconstruction. 

During this time, there has been a shattering of so many 
political institutions and of so many political and social 
beliefs, that it w^ould seem desirable in this, the first aft- 
er-the-war report of the State Tuberculosis Commission, 
to make a frank survey of our present status and of the 
status of our five State Tuberculosis Sanatoria. 

OUR VARIOUS ACTIVITIES. 

In no other state, so far as we know, is there a central 
official body like the State Tuberculosis Commission of 
Connecticut, of whom so much is expected, or to whom so 
much authority is given. Briefly, our duties as outlined 
by the state are (1) to erect, maintain, and manage the 
State sanatoria; (2) to keep the General Assembly in- 
formed as to the tuberculosis situation in Connecticut; 
(3) to publish for the enlightenment of the general public 
articles on the more important recent developments in the 
anti-tuberculosis campaign; (4) to supply to the- factories 
and stores and schools of the state, placards and tracts 
summarizing the essential truths about the best methods 
of preventing the spread of tuberculosis in factories, 
stores and schools; (5) to encourage the making of pub- 
lic addresses on tuberculosis. As a corollary to these stat- 
utory requirements and in order to keep Connecticut in 
the front of the fight against tuberculosis, the Commission 
has, during the past few years, exerted itself in the estab- 
lishment of tuberculosis clinics and dispensaries and con- 
sultation services in various parts of the state. After 



6 STATE OF CONNECTICUT. 

these local anti-tuberculosis agencies have been estab- 
lished we have assisted in their functioning by loaning to 
them, at various specified hours of the week, the exceed- 
ingly valuable services of the tuberculosis experts on our 
sanatoria staffs. Dr. Stockwell and Dr. Strobel have done 
this work of diagnosis and consultation at New Britain and 
Bristol ; Dr. Dinnan and Dr. Gibson at Meriden and Mid- 
dletown; Dr. Lynch at Bridgeport, Fairfield, Stratford, 
Milford, Derby, Stamford and Greenwich ; Dr. Campbell 
at Norwich, New London, Danielson, Putman and 
Willimantic. In the difficult zone of the diagnosis of 
suspected tuberculous bone conditions, we hope, in the 
near future, to offer to the state the assistance of the 
experts of The Seaside. More and more every year this 
sort of field work against tuberculosis is receiving the ac- 
claim of all the advanced students of the great problem. 
It is the work that the Framingham demonstration has 
proven most worth while. It is the best fruit of all the so- 
called tuberculosis surveys that have been begun within 
the last few years. As the results have shown, it is a 
work that has not been better done anywhere than in Con- 
necticut. 

Of course, we do not deserve credit for all of this work 
done in Connecticut. In New Haven there are in opera- 
tion two tuberculosis dispensaries; one connected with the 
New Haven Hospital and the other with Grace Hospital. 
Moreover, the New Haven Visiting Nurse Association 
has a permanent staff of fourteen tuberculosis nurses, of 
whose work no praise would be excessive. In Hartford 
there is an independent tuberculosis clinic and consider- 
able case finding and follow-up work is done by nurses 
3f the Hartford Society for the Prevention of Tuberculosis. 
Waterbury has an independent tuberculosis clinic. And 
at all the cities and towns we have mentioned as places 
assisted by our sanatoria physcians, the main burden of 
the upkeep of the tuberculosis clinics and dispensaries and 
consultation is borne by the local authorities or by the 
local organization that acts as our agent for the sale of 
Christmas seals. 

ARE WE SAVING LIVES? 

Six years ago, in our report of 1914, we raised the ques- 
tion of whether our activities resulted in an appreciable 
saving of lives in Connecticut. A paragraph of that re- 
port is still to the point: 



THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION. 7 

"In considering the reduction of the death rate in Con- 
necticut from tuberculosis during recent years the scof- 
fers sometimes remark that the general death rate from 
all diseases has declined in about the same proportion as 
the tuberculosis death rate. Even if that were true — and 
it is not — it should be borne in mind that the anti-tubercu- 
losis agitation has not only saved the lives of citizens in- 
fected with tuberculosis, and of citizens who otherwise 
would be infected with tuberculosis, but it has been a 
principal agency, perhaps the principal agency, in the de- 
velopment of the whole modern campaign for cleanliness 
— for clean food and drink, clean homes, clean factories, 
clean stores, clean streets, clean theatres, clean trains, 
clean trolley cars — yes, even clean lives. It is only fair, 
then, to assume that a large share of the reduction in the 
general death rate is ascribable to the anti-tuberculosis 
crusade. But from whatever point of view one looks at 
the figures, they are interesting and heartening." 

In 1884, out of every 100,000 people in the state 215 
died of consumption. In 1913, out of the same number 
only 122 died of consumption; in 1918, only 126; and in 
1919, only 101. Thus it will be seen that proportionately 
to population, there were not half so many 
deaths from consumption in Connecticut last year 
as there were in 1884. Again it will be .seen 
that the preventing of 114 deaths in every 
100,000 means an annual saving of the lives of nearly 
1,500 residents of Connecticut. Another point to be borne 
in mind is that the consumption has been very frequently 
described as "a disease of over crowding;" but in Connec- 
ticut in 1884, there were only 762.120 people in the state 
and last year there were twice as many, or about 1,300- 
000, and yet the death rate from tuberculosis was not 
half as large last year as it was in 1884. 

In Connecticut in 1884, out of every 100 deaths from all 
causes, 13 died from tuberculosis of the lungs and 14.5 
from all kinds of tuberculosis. In 1913 only 9.3 of every 
100 deaths were caused by tuberculosis of all kinds. In 
1918, because of the enormus number of deaths from 
influenza, the deaths from tuberculosis, although numer- 
ically greater than in 1913 or 1919, fell to the low rate of 
7.4 per hundred of all deaths. In 1919, 9.1 of every 100 
deaths from all causes were due to tuberculosis. 

The average consumption death rate for Hartford 
County for the 35 years previous to 1913, was 167 per 
100,000 of population; in 1913, the rate per 100,000 was 



8 STATE OF CONNECTICUT. 

only 115; in 1918 it rose to 124; and last year it dropped 
to 113. 

The average consumption death rate for New Haven 
County for the 35 years previous to 1913 Avas 181 per 100,- 
000 of the population; in 1913, the rate per 100,000 was 
only 123 ; in 1918 it rose to 127 ; in 1919 it dropped to 103. 
The average consumption death rate for New London 
County for the 35 years previous to 1913 was 181 per 
100,000 of population; in 1913 was 145; in 1918 it rose 
to 192 per 100,000, and last year it fell to 169 per 100,000. 
The average consumption death rate for Fairfield 
County for the 35 years previous to 1913 was 167 per 
100,000 of population ; for 1913 the rate per 100,000 was 
only 139; in 1918 it fell to 120, and in 1919 it dropped 
further to 105. 

The average consumption death rate for Windham 
County for the 35 years previous to 1913 was 161 per 
100,000 of population ; in 1913 it was only 77 per 100,000 
in 1918 it was 74; and in 1919 it rose to 81. 

The average consumption death rate for Litchfield 
County for the 35 years previous to 1913 was 131 per 
100,000 of population ; in 1913 it was only 88 per 100,000 ; 
in 1918 it was 85; and in 1919 it dropped to 55. 

The average consumption death rate for Middlesex 
County for the 35 years previous to 1913 was 131 per 
100,000of population; in 1913 it was 128 per 100,000; 
in 1918 it rose to 158; and in 1919 it dropped to 126. 
The average consumption death rate for Tolland Coun- 
ty for the 35 years preceding 1913 was 135 per 100,000 
of population'; in 1913 it was only 70 per 100,000; in 
1918 it rose to 81, and last year it dropped to the lowest 
rate in the state, only 41 per 100,000 of population. 

"THE SEASIDE." 

. In our last report we told of our purchase of the unused 
White Beach Hotel at Crescent Beach, Niantic, and of our 
intent to utilize the property for the caring of children af- 
flicted with bone and glandular tuberculosis. We could 
not, at the time of writing that report, foresee that our 
proposed conversion of the old hotel into a home for our 
ailing little ones woud meet with more than a perfunctory 
opposition from our Crescent Beach neighbors; but, as 
all who had to do with the last General Assembly, or 
who even read the newspaper accounts of the legislative 
happenings of the winter and spring of 1919, were made 
to realize, our innocent project was assailed bitterly, 



THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION. 9 

continuously, openly, and underhandedly from the be- 
ginning of the session to its very last day, and only on this 
day did the contemners of our efforts to heal our crippled 
children admit that their efforts to harden the great heart 
of Connecticut were vain. For our victory we owe very 
special gratitude to the newspapers of the state, to Gov- 
ernor Holcomb, to Attorney-General Healy, to Comptrol- 
ler Webster, and to members of the Board of Finance and 
the Committee on Approiations. Of course, we had 
the support of all the humanitarian and social organiza- 
tions of the state, and we would hereby thank them, one 
and all for the valuable time they and their representa- 
tives spent in holding meetings and attending legislative 
hearings concerning this matter of securing a bit of Con- 
necticut's beach for the cure of some of Connecticut's 
crippled children. Of course, now that "The Seaside" 
is open and is operating at full capacity, to the great de- 
light of the very people who were most bitter in opposing 
its establishment, it is easy to see, and easier to say, that 
the opposition that we encountered in the last legislature 
was based on misinformation and that the leaders of this 
opposition were not as inhuman as their doings and say- 
ings of the winter and spring of 1919 make them appear 
to be; nevertheless, glad as we are of their present and 
anxious as we are for their future approval as well as for 
that of the whole state, we cannot dismiss the subject 
without asking them to realize, and asking the whole state 
to realize, that if their bitter opposition in the last Gen- 
eral Assembly had succeeded, there would not be in 
Connecticut now, nor for a great many years, any such in- 
stitution. a.s The Seaside. We, therefore, commend to the 
gratitude and regard of the state all those fine officials 
and citizens and organizations who fought so valiantly 
for the right and for the children's right, as to make the 
long-talked-of and long-prayed-for Seaside an actually 
functioning institution. 

'THE SEASIDE FUNCTIONING." 

When the morning sun takes his earliest peep out of 
the East at the Connecticut shore and Long Island Sound, 
one of the first places to attract his attention is a short 
stretch of shining white beach to the west of McCook's 
bluff at the mouth of the Niantic River. And when the 
evening sun is sinking behind the western horizon, his last 
farewells are made to the tower and flag-pole of a big 
white building with glass enclosed verandas that stands 



IQ STATE OF CONNECTICUT. 

Dn a little elevation one hundred yards back of the little 
stretch of white beach. That beach and that building are 
The Seaside. 

Headlands to the east and west distant five or six miles, 
protect it from the fury of all but southerly storms, and 
enframe the succession of continually changing and fasci- 
nating ocean views that are to be had from three sides of 
the building and from all parts of the grounds. A dozen 
miles to the south lie Gull Island and Little Gull Island, 
and Plum Island; and beyond them rolls the Atlantic 
Ocean. 

After many irritating delays and disappontments, the 
Seaside received its first patients in January of 1920. 
The severity of the wintry weather of the following weeks, 
the impassible condition of the roads of the state and the 
dfficulties of the managers of the steam and trolley line 
operated to keep the number of patients down very low 
until spring, but by July 1st the institution had received 
45 patients, which is about as many as under present 
conditions it can accommodate. The institution has 58 
beds but it is necessary to keep in reserve a few rooms for 
the isolation of cases of measles or other contagious dis- 
eases sure to occur occasionally among 45 children under 
14 years of age. 

It is so short a time since the opening of the institution 
that it would be impossible to make in this report any def- 
inite statement as to the eifect of the treatment to which 
the children are subjected at the Seaside; but it is only 
fair to say that the apparent results are good, surprisingly 
good ; so good, in fact, as to convert into enthusiastic 
friends of the institution phj^scians who, until they saw 
for themselves, were doubting Thomases. 

The treatment to which the children are subjected is 
heliotherapy; treatment by more or less continuous sun- 
baths, that is, by the exposure of the whole body to the 
sunlight. This is not the place to discuss this treatment 
in detail; but to readers. who are interested, the Commis- 
sion will furnish explanatory pamphlets. And we hope 
that before the Assembly adjourns, as many as possible of 
the members will honor The Seaside with a visit, and ob- 
serve for themselves, the wonderful things the sunlight 
is doing, winter as well as summer, to the little wards of 
the state, in this new Connecticut institution. 



THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION. 11 

A REVOLUTIONARY DOCTRINE. 

Until the last few years, it was generally accepted 
that human tuberculosis was simply a contagious disease 
and that, when an adult developed symptoms of tubercu- 
losis, he did so because he had recently been infected 
by inhaling the germs of tuberculosis fresh from the 
breath or sputum of somebody else who had tuberculosis. 
During the last few years, this theory has received some 
severe blows, and now it is a question, and a very impor- 
tant question — how^ much longer it can stand. The first 
blow w^as struck by Calmette of France and his followers, 
who claimed that they had proved that pulmonary tuber- 
culosis could not be caused by the inhaling of the germs of 
the disease, but that pulmonary tuberculosis could be 
caused and always was caused by the taking of the 
germs of the disease into the stomach and bowels, 
whence they were carried by the blood to the lungs. The 
second blow, or rather the second series of blows, was 
struck by a host of authorities in various countries, nota- 
bly by Von Behring in Germany, Fishberrg in America, 
and H. Battey Shaw of England. According to these au- 
thorities and their followers, practically all civilized hu- 
man beings are infected with tuberculosis during child- 
hood, and practically all tuberculosis in adult human be- 
ings is the result, not of recent infection, but is the belat- 
ed developments of the infection of childhood. This rev- 
olutionary theory is far from being generally accepted, 
but its mere discussion has had the effect of forcing us all 
to realize the importance of making more serious efforts 
to control the tuberculosis of children. 

MERIDEN SANATORIUM FOR CHILDREN ONLY. 

In order to keep Connecticut in the lead in this new 
movement for the saving of children, we have decided to 
transform the State Sanatorium at Meriden into a sana- 
torium for children only. In the beginning of the sana- 
torium era, Connecticut, like all other communities re- 
ceived tuberculous adults and children without discrim- 
ination in all her sanatoria. As the number of children 
increased, and it became necessary to consider the estab- 
lishment of schools in the sanatoria, it was decided to 
send the girls of school age to Meriden, and the boys of 
school age and all the infants to Hartford. According to 
our new plans, the plans adopted this year, all the chil- 
dren suffering with pulmonary tuberculosis will be sent to 



12 STATE OF CONNECTICUT. 

Meriden, and all children suffering with bone and gland- 
ular tuberculosis will be sent to The Seaside at Niantic. 
The new arrangement has met with the enthusiastic 
approval of all the organizations and officials of the state 
with whom we have had an opportunity to discuss the 
matter. The only dissatisfied ones, that we know, are 
the physcians and nurses at the Hartford sanatorium. 
They were sorry to see the children go, — even to Meri- 
den. The new arrangement has made it necessary to 
plan at Meriden a building somewhat different from the 
one we had in mind when we asked the last General As- 
sembly for our appropriation. We have taken this matter 
up with the Board of Control and received its assent to our 
change of plan. 

GENERAL HOSPITALS SHOULD HELP. 

In our report for the years 1913 and 1914 we first called 
the attention of the General Assembly to the absurd 
and dangerous state of panic into which the appearance 
of a tuberculosis patient threw most of the directors and 
phj^sicians of general hospitals. In that report, and in 
subsequent reports, we advocated as strongly as we knew 
how, that, for the sake of the patient, for the sake of the 
patient's friends, for the sake of the community, and for 
the sake of the coming generation of doctors, the general 
hospitals of the state M'ho received a bonus from the 
State Treasury, should be compelled to provide a small 
ward or building in which the emergency and dying cases 
of pulmnary tuberculosis could be cared for. 

Our views on this matter were received with approval 
by most of the best tuberculosis authorities of the country, 
and by certain of the teachers of the great medical schools 
of the country, who were becoming alarmed at the fact 
that so many thousands of young doctors who, in late 
years had been empowered to practise medicine, were 
deplorably ignorant of that most important of human dis- 
ease, tuberculosis of the lungs. 

But in spite of the fact that two yiears after the appear- 
ance of our first oflHcial protest agains the phthisiphobiac 
attitude of the general hospitals, the National Tubercu- 
losis Association passed a resolution calling on all the gen- 
eral hospitals of the country to provide suitable accommo- 
dations for emergency and late cases of tuberculosis; here- 
tofore, very little progress has been made toward a con- 
summation of this greatly needed reform. The managers 



THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION. 13 

of the general hospitals of the country include many of 
the most eminent and influential people of the country, 
and they have not yet been convinced of the urgent need 
of this reform. And, like most eminent and influential 
people, they are conservative and they would prefer to see 
the proposed reform tried out in some other institution 
than theirs. 



APPROVED BY THE SURGEON GENERAL. 

Nevertheless, "the truth goes marching on," and we 
have been greatly heartened by two recent accessions 
to the cause. The first is Surgeon-General Hugh S. Gum- 
ming, of the United States Public Health Service, and the 
second is The Modern Hospital, the American monthly 
publication that has, perhaps, the greatest influence on 
the managers and proponets and architects of the general 
hospitals of the country. Surgeon-General Gumming, in 
an official public pronouncement, recommends that every 
general hospital should admit tuberculous patients and 
provide separate wards for them. "This provision," he 
says, "would insure earlier diagnosis, would make pos- 
sible the training of internes, would popularize treatment 
in the home climate, would provide convenient facilities 
for the observation and prompt treatment of patients, 
and would develop a sharpened perception and higher 
degree of skill by which the family doctor would 
make earlier diagnosis, and even forestall the de- 
velopment of clinical tuberculosis in the adult be- 
fore a definite diagnosis is possible." In endorsing the 
Surgeon-General's proposal that every general hospital 
in the country set aside' a ward or wards for the definite 
purpose of treating tuberculosis. The Modern Hospital, 
of July 1st, 1920, says, in its leading editorial, that the 
question "should now be kept before the public, the med- 
ical profession, and those who are responsible for hospital 
administration until it is properly disposed of. The con- 
tribution of hospitals to the public service would thus be 
greatly enhanced, the tuberculosis clinics would be 
strengthened, the public mind would be swept free of 
harmful misconceptions and hospital internes, into whose 
hands the whole public health movement of the future 
eventually must be committed, would not enter into prac- 
tice, as they often do to-day, lacking in the power to make 
an accurate diagnosis and a reasonably correct prognosis 
in cases of pulmonary tuberculosis." Hitherto the.repre- 



14 THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION. 

sentatives of the general hospitals of the state have op- 
posed the suggestion that they receive tuberculosis pa- 
tients, (1) because of the public's fear of the disease, (2) 
because of the ordinary physcian's fear of the disease, (3) 
because of the ordinary nurse's fear of the disease, (4) 
because of the lack of room in the existing general hospi- 
tals, and (5) because of the expense involved in providing 
a special ward for sufferers from tuberculosis. As reasons 
1, 2 and 3 are simply a confession of ignorance on the part 
of their public, their doctors and their nurses, the very 
kind of ignorance that it is the duty of hospital authorities 
to cure, there would seem to be need at this time of con- 
sidering only reasons 4 and 5. The answer to reason 4 is : 
the Connecticut general hospital that will promise to re- 
ceive tuberculosis patients as soon as somebody provides 
it with another small ward or building will not long lack 
the desired ward or building. The Connecticut public does 
not permit its hospitals to be crippled for lack of build- 
ings or equipment. As to reason 5, in our last report we 
said : 

"The expense of caring for these emergency cases 
ought to be borne in part by the State and in part by the 
town or city. It seems to us that after considering this mat- 
ter and when considering requests for financial assistance 
from the various general hospitals of the state, the com- 
mittee on appropiations could wisely formulate a bill de- 
fining the conditions under which the State would help to 
pay the hospitals for the care of these emergency cases 
of tuberculosis. The number of these cases would never 
be large in any one hospital, but the suitability of the 
care and treatment given ought to have the sanction of 
the State Tuberculosis Commission and, of course, we 
would always be eager to receive into the sanatoria pa- 
tients from the hospitals who showed any promise of im- 
provement." 

WE PROFFER ASSISTANCE. 

During the past year the Commission has been called 
upon by the State Board of Charities for an opinion as to 
the suitability of the accommodation for tuberculous in- 
mates provided at the State Prison at Wethersfield. With 
this request of course we gladly complied. We refer to it 
now because it brings up again the question of whether 
it should not be the right and duty of all the state insti- 
tutions where tuberculous criminals, lunatics or imbeciles 



THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION. 15 

are confined, to call on us for such diagnostic and ad- 
visory assistance as we, through our staff of tuberculosis 
experts can easilj^ give. 

OUR NEW LAUNDRY. 

During the past year, a central laundry plant, intended 
to give service to all five of our sanatoria, was established 
at Hartford. It is already in successful and economical 
operation, and doing the work for the sanatoria at Hart- 
ford, Meriden and Shelton. Our system of motor-truck 
transport works smoothly thus far, but because of our re- 
membrance of the condition of the state roads during the 
stormy months of last winter, we are loath to do much 
boasting at this time. Probably before the adjournment 
of the General Assembly we shall know whether or not 
our central laundry is capable of giving as much assist- 
ance to all our sanatoria as we expected. 

Because of the limitation of our appropriation we were 
obliged to erect a wooden laundry building, and of a much 
more flimsy type than we desired, but the equipment of 
the building is of the most approved and modern kind 
and, under the skilled management of Mr. Ernest Little, 
the work turned out by the deft women and smoothly 
working machines, is of a kind that rejoices the patients 
and staffs of the sanatoria. 

OUR INFLUENZA EXPERIENCES. 

The first wave of influenza, in the fall of 1918 and 
winter of 1919, carried sickness and death to the inmates 
of the Hartford and Norwich Sanatoria, and the second 
wave, in the winter of 1920, to the inmates of the sana- 
toria at Meriden and Shelton. This mysterious epidemic 
spared neither the sick nor the well at our institutions. 
It was no more severe with the patients than with the at- 
tending physicians or nurses, but, of course, when it at- 
tacked patients whose hearts' energy was already worn 
thin with tuberculosis, its assault proved fatal more fre- 
quently than when it attacked the sturdy help or the am- 
bulant patients. Like most authorities who have studied 
their cases, we hesitate to come to any definite conclusions 
in regard to the manner of infection or methods of treat- 
ment. However, our best results have been in the insti- 
tutions in which the cases were given a simple alkaline 
treatment and in which little or none of the blatantly 
advertised coal-tar derivatives were employed. 



16 STATE OF CONNECTICUT. 

COLLECTIVE BUYING. 

We have continued our practise of purchasing such 
staples as butter, eggs, flour, sugar, canned goods, linen 
and cotton goods, paper goods, beds and bedding, by ask- 
ing for bids at our office in the Capitol, for all the sana- 
toria and awarding the bids to the lowest responsible bid- 
ders. During the past two years, the bidding for canned 
goods has not been very spirited, but in all the other lines 
the results have been satisfactory. For instance, because 
of our early purchase of sugar in carload lots, we are 
still using, at two sanatoria, sugar for which we paid only 
9% cents a pound. 

DR. JAMES B. DINNAN. 

It is our sad duty to report that on October 3rd, 1919, 
Dr. James B. Dinnan, the superintendent of the Meriden 
Sanatorium, died of typhoid fever. He had been super- 
intendent of this institution since its opening. Its great 
success, despite the many handicaps of the first years, was 
due chiefly to his ability, his kindness, his enthusiasm and 
his cheerful and unwavering confidence not only in his 
own institution but in all of the state's anti-tuberculosis 
work. He was called upon several times to assist the 
Commission in restoring the crumbling management or 
morale of some of the other institutions, and his loyal as- 
sistance in making over the old White Beach hotel into 
the Seaside, is something for which we cannot be too 
grateful. Dr. Dinnan was 38 years old, a native of New 
Haven and a graduate of Yale Medical School. During 
the last year of his life- he had become greatly interested 
in tuberculosis research work and his papers at local and 
national society meetings were beginning to attract the 
attention of leading anti-tuberculosis workers of the coun- 
try. 

A GRAVE INJUSTICE. 

Cannot something be done by the General Assembly 
to prevent the town authorities of the state from classify- 
ing as "paupers", and publishing as "paupers," their tu- 
berculous townsmen and townswomen whom they send 
to the sanatoria and for whose maintenance at the sana- 
toria the towns pay about one-fourth the actual cost? 
The State incurs the other three-fourths of the cost of 
maintenance of these patients,but she does not treat them 



THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION. 17 

or classify or publish them as "paupers." The State treats 
them and classifies them as sick citizens who come at 
her invitation to partake of the healing powers that she 
possesses, and that she feels it her duty to administer im- 
partially to the sick poor and to the sick rich. Of the mo- 
tives that impel a consumptive to go to the sanatoria, per- 
haps the most common one is his desire to regain his 
health but usually combined with this motive and very of- 
ten the most forceful motive of the two, is his desire to 
save the members of his household, especially the child- 
ren of his household, from the dangers of contracting the 
disease from which he himself suffers. However, many 
poor but clean and proud consumptive parents prefer to 
nsk even this danger, rather than expose their child to the 
contumely in later life of the charge that his or her father 
or mother was a "town pauper." This practise of so many 
of the towns of the state is not only a grave injustice to 
the individual patient, and a cause of rankling bitterness 
in the hearts of his children, but it interferes with the suc- 
cess of our whole campaign against tuberculosis. It leads 
to concealment of cases and refusals of treatment, and it 
compels the hundred or more social and charitable or- 
ganizations of the state to expend for the payment of pa- 
tients' board at the sanatoria, contributed funds that 
ought to be used for the tuberculosis educational and nur- 
sing work of the w^hole community, or perhaps for the 
support and safeguarding of dependent families of pa- 
tients. And the children in the sanatoria for whom the 
towns or cities pay part-maintenance, these children who, 
through our ignorance or heedlessness — that is, through 
the ignorance or heedlessness of the adults of the towns 
and cities of the state — have been infected with this ter- 
rible disease, is it fair to brand them in the town and city 
records as paupers? Is it humane? Is it christian? Is it 
social? Isn't it dishonest? And to put the argument on 
the most selfish basis does it pay to be dishonest even with 
the children? 



THE HARTFORD SANATORIUM. 

The Hartford Sanatorium, situated about five miles 
south of the State Capitol, on the ridge just west of the 
Berlin turnpike, continues to be one of the largest of our 
sanatoria. In our last report, we referred to the fact that 
the war had robbed uss of the highly prized services of 
our Hartford Superintendent. We are glad to be able to 



18 STATE OF CONNECTICUT. 

say in this report that Dr. Stockwell has come back to us 
as Superintendent at Hartford. His executive efficiency 
and his progressiveness are recognized by all who have 
become interested in Connecticut's anti-tuberculosis cam- 
paign. Since his enlistment, the new central laundry has 
been erected on the grounds of the Hartford institution, 
and since his return we have exchanged all the children 
patients at Hartford for adult patients from the Meriden 
Sanatorium. 

The building in which the male help have been housed 
at Hartford has been for several years too crowded for 
comfort. Extensive repairs, inside and out are now im- 
perative. It is our opinion that it will be wiser to enlarge 
and repair the building at the same time. We have ask- 
ed for an approiation of $7,500 for this purpose. That 
sum will permit us to double the size of the present 
building. 

The increasing knowledge of the importance of sun- 
baths in the treatment of tuberculosis, even in the treat- 
ment of selected cases of pulmonary tuberculosis, has cre- 
ated a demand at all the sanatoria for increased facil- 
ities for the using of this powerful but easily available 
remedy. A suitable heliotherapy platform at Hartford 
would cost about $600. Every year the X-ray is coming 
into more general use. As yet, the Hartford Sanatorium, 
has no X-ray apparatus. We need $2,500 to cover the 
cost of purchase and installation of one of the smaller ma- 
chines. 

At Hartford, as at all of the sanatoria, and in fact at 
all institutions, one of the most difficult adminintrative 
problems is the securing and retaining of suitable nurses. 
The nurses' home at Hartford is rather crowded and has 
no sleeping porches, and, therefore, is not as attractive 
as it should be to the modern tuberculosis nurse. Seeing 
in her patients the result of overcrowding, and knowing 
the benefit they derive from sleeping in the open, she nat- 
urally demands sun and fresh air for herself. To pro- 
vide sleeping porches at the nurses' home we shall need 
$3,000. 

In order to make advantageous use of the buildings 
and beds at the Hartford Sanatorium, it will be necessary 
to add to them, a small" women's shack," that is, a build- 
ing for the housing of the early and milder female cases. 
These cases are now cared for on the upper floor of what 
was heretofore the shack for women and children. On 
the first foor of this building the beds are now occupied 



THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION. 19 

bv moderately sick women and girls. For administrative 
reasons and medical reasons, it is greatly to be desired 
that the "almost well" cases and "hardly sick" cases 
should live in a building separate from "the bed cases." 

THE MERIDEN SANATORIUM. 

It is difficult to speak of Meriden Sanatorium without 
speaking of the big genial Dr. Dinnan, who was its Super- 
intendent from its opening, and who, as we have related 
above, died last October. His successor is Dr. Cole B. Gib- 
son for two years Dr. Dinnan's assistant, a young physi- 
cian whose executive capacity was not only clear to us 
but was utilized and highly approved by the arm.y author- 
ities during the war. Our expectations as to the future 
of the Meriden Sanatorium, in its new role of a sanator- 
ium for children only, are very high. It would be hard to 
find in the stale a location for such an institution more 
sightly or more convenient than the wooded face of the 
Meriden mountain where the white buildings of the 
Meriden State Tuberculosis Sanatorium for Children now 
nestle among the trees. 

At all the sanatoria the superintendents again make re- 
3[uests for an appropriation for "recreation halls." And 
undoubtedly proper recreation hall buildings would add 
to the attractiveness of all the sanatoria. We have hesi- 
tated about endorsing these requests because of the ex- 
pense involved and because these buildings have not been 
an essential. At the Shelton Sanatorium we have provid- 
ed a recreation hall by making over for that purpose, the 
whole first floor of what was formerly used as a nurses' 
home ; the upper floor is now being used for the housing 
of male help. In the other institutions there are no places 
of assem.bly except the large dining rooms and the little 
central rooms in the various shacks. The arguments in 
favor of establishing these recreation halls at the Hart- 
ford, Norwich and Meriden sanatoria are a little stronger 
this year than heretofore because of the increased oppor- 
tunities nowadays for entertainment. Thanks to the gen- 
erosity of the National officers of the Knights of Colum- 
bus and other friends of the sanatoria, three of the insti- 
tutions are now equipped with fine moving picture ma- 
chines, and in the fourth, Hartford, the proprietors of the 
local theatres bring their own machines and films to de- 
light the patients. Of course, it would be safer, more san- 
itary, and less disturbing to the machinery of the sana- 



20 STATE OF CONNECTICUT. 

toria to have these and similar entertainments given in a 
proper assembly hall than in the general dining room. 
The Meriden Sanatorium has a special claim to make in 
the matter of the need of a recreation building. As Mer- 
iden, in the future, will have only children patients, it will 
be necessary to have some proper place apart from the 
dormitory buildings where such children as are able may 
go to school. A new assembly hall of some kind would 
fill all the school needs of the institution. If the General 
Assembly sees fit to authorize us to carry out this program 
of recreation halls, we will need $12,500 for Meriden and 
$10,000 each for Hartford and Norwich. Other of the 
Meriden Sanatorium needs are $1,500 for outfitting a 
playground, and $10,000 for the equipment of the new 
children's building already authorized. 

THE NORWICH SANATORIUM. 

The Sanatorium at Norwich, the newest in construc- 
tion and by some of the out-of-the-state experts consider- 
ed to be the most modern and most attractive tuberculosis 
sanatorium in this part of the world, still retains its hold 
on popular favor. As Dr. Hugh B. Campbell is its super- 
intendent and has been its superintendent from the begin- 
ing, it is needless to say that to him much of the success of 
the institution is due. In spite of the fact, already men- 
tioned, that his services as a tuberculosis specialist are in 
great demand by the hospitals and clinics and private 
physicians of the eastern part of the state, he continues to 
have intimate control of every patient in the sanatorium. 

The special construction demands of the Norwich San- 
atorium for the next two years are not many ; $2,500 for 
enlarging the old farm house in order to better accommo- 
date the help and make it possible to employ as an assist- 
ant, a married physcian ; $4,000 for an enlargement of the 
kitchen with a bake room. The question of recreation 
hall and heliotheraphy platform we have already dis- 
cussed. 

THE SHELTON SANATORIUM. 

The Shelton Sanatorium, on one of the hills overlooking 
the Housatonic valley, has, perhaps, the most command- 
ing location of any of the sanatoria and because of its 
proximity to several large and growing cities, it is prob- 
ably destined to become the largest institution of its 
kind in the state. Dr. Edward J. Lynch continues to be 



THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION. 21 

its superintendent. He has been exceptionally success- 
ful in interesting the public-spirited and charitable 
people of Connecticut in the welfare of the institution 
under his charge. And it has been very comforting to the 
Commission to see that his skill as a tuberculosis expert 
receives more and more recognition every year from the 
m.edical authorities of Bridgeport and the adjacent towns. 
Shelton needs a new garage that will cost $2,300 and 
a new barn that will cost $6,500. It has a recreation 
hall, but like the other institutions, it needs a heliother- 
apy platform at a probable cost of $600. 

THE SEASIDE NEEDS. 

The superintendent of the Seaside, Dr. John F. O'Brien, 
has had several years of special training and practice in 
the care and treatment of crippled children. Under his 
management we expect great things from the Seaside. 

For the Seaside we ought to have an appropriation of 
$15,000 for the erection of a suitable cottage for the su- 
perintendent. At present Dr. O'Brien's family of five per- 
sons is crowded into the little six-room cottage that was 
part of our original $12,000 purchase. We have spent 
several hundred dollars in transforming it from an un- 
plastered, unheated summer Ijouse into one in which it is 
possible to live during the winter; but, of course, it is not 
satisfactory and it will not be possible to keep as superin- 
tendent any physician of the caliber of Dr. O'Brien unless 
we provide him and his family a respectable and comfort- 
able home. The small building in which he is now housed 
will be the greatest possible service to us as a detention 
and isolation ward. We need here, also, $20,000 to build 
quarters for nurses and help. These could be provided by 
a small building on the site of the present dilapidated 
barn. For the building of two short stretches of cement 
roadwav, one leading to the office and the other to the 
kitchen,"^ we will need $3,800.00. 

SANATORIA UNDER PRIVATE MANAGEMENT. 

There are two tuberculosis sanatoria in the state — 
Gaylord Farm Sanatorium at Wallingford, and Wildwood 
Sanatorium at Hartford — not established and not man- 
aged by the State. Both these institutions receive sub- 
stantial assistance from the state — about $5 a week per 
patient. The former has a capacity of about 130 beds and 
is under the supervision of a former member of the Com- 



22 STATE OF CONNECTICUT. 

mission. It has an enviable record among institutions of 
this kind and has been of emphatic assistance in the cam- 
paign against tuberculosis in this country. Wildwood 
Sanatorium., with a capacity of about 50 beds, is under the 
management of the Hartford Hospital and assumes a 
work which, in our judgment, every leading general hos- 
pital in the state should assume. We report both of these 
institutions in good condition and well managed. 



COMMUNITY SUPPORT. 

As we have noted in our previous reports, the support 
given the work of the Commission by the press of the 
sta1:e and by various organizations and individuals has 
been emphatic and continuous. By gifts and entertain- 
ments and visitation, the sick patients in our institutions 
have been cheered and helped. In this connection we 
cannot urge too strongly that all the citizens and tax- 
payers of the state take time to inform themselves as to 
just what is done in our various sanatoria. We are fre- 
quently reminded that the people in general know little 
about these institutions which they have all helped to 
build. Even the physicians of the state are too often ig- 
norant of the work and regulations of the sanatoria. It 
would, we believe, be of great value to the cause if com- 
mittees of the State Legislature and individual members 
would visit all our institutions. We desire to call special 
attention to the lists of names of the more generous 
friends of the sanatoria. These lists are printed at the 
close of this narrative portion of our report. 

One of the pleasant experiences of the past two years 
has been the opportunity of welcoming, at the various san- 
atoria, the large delegation of officers and prominent 
members of The Employees' Tuberculosis Relief Asso- 
ciation of New Haven, who have paid regular visits to all 
of the sanatoria, called on their own members who were 
patients, carefully inspected everything in the buildings 
and on the grounds and, on their return to New Haven, 
made detailed and interesting reports to their association. 
As this association represents about half of the population 
of New Haven and embraces in its membership many of 
the ablest men of the state, it isn't necessary to say that 
we are anxious for its approval and that we listen eager- 
ly to the constructive criticism that it sometimes gives us. 
We would be proud to have visits from representatives 
of the other similar organizations of the state. " 



THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION. 23 

THE CHRISTMAS SEALS. 

In most states the sale of Christmas seals has been man- 
aged by a voluntary organization called a State Tubercu- 
losis Association. This association usually has a board of 
directors or an executive committee that appoints some- 
body as executive secretary. This functionary appoints a 
staff of clerks and, for the upkeep of his headquarters and 
for purposes of a central publicity, usually exacts fromthe 
local agents throughout the state, that is from the local 
volunteer organizations who actually sell the seals, a large 
proportion — tM^enty to sixty per cent. — of their gross in- 
come from the Christmas campaign. Because of the wide 
range of the functions assigned by the statute to the Con- 
necticut State Tuberculosis Commission and the evident in- 
tention of the Connecticut Assembly to give the state con- 
trol of the tuberculosis campaign to the State Tuberculosis 
Commission, the National Tuberculosis Association six 
years ago, at a time when the amount of money produced 
by the Christmas seal sale was very low, asked us to 
undertake the management of the seal .campaign. We 
complied with this request, took over the control of the 
few old agencies, established twenty new agencies, and 
carried on a campaign that in the first year brought Con- 
necticut into the first half dozen states classified accord- 
ing to per capita receipts. We have bettered our record 
ever since. Last year in Connecticut there were more than 
$80,000 worth of these little Christmas tokens sold. This 
represented a per capita sale of more than six seals. How 
creditable a result this was may be gathered from the fol- 
lowing table : 

Per Capita National Standing. 

Year. Total Sale. Sale, (Based on Population.) 

1914 $17,353.11 1.556 Third 

1915 25,645.32 2.095 Second 

1916 32,908.36 2.644 Second 

1917 43,602.24 3.446 Second 

1918 (Seal sale was abandoned because of numerous war drives. The 
American Red Cross supplied the fund from its treasury.) 

1919 82,324.94 6.3 Second 

According to the terms of our contract with the Nation- 
al Tuberculosis Association, about ten per cent, of the 
gross income from the sale of the Christmas seals was sent 
to the New York office to reimburse it and the American 
Red Cross for the expenditures for clerks, postage, print- 
ing and publicity. For our expenses in conducting the 
campaign in Connecticut, in supplying stationery, films 



24 STATE OF CONNECTICUT. 

speakers and literature, in some years we have retained 
5 per cent, of our agents' income and in some years we 
have retained nothing. As we explained in last year's re- 
port, we succeded in paying our bills from the surplus of a 
mail order campaign that we conducted from our office 
over such distant or thinly populated parts of the state as 
could not be covered by local agencies. And none of this 
surplus was used by us until it was flrst offered for anti- 
tuberculosis work to the authorities of the towns from 
which it was derived. The net results of our management 
of the Christmas Seal campaign were : 

A. Our sales of Christmas Seals in Connecticut were 
among the highest in the country. 

B. Our expenses in conducting the Christmas seal sale 
in Connecticut w^ere altogether the lowest in the country. 

C. In no other state in the country did the local agen- 
cies have for local use so large a proportion of the funds 
they raised by the sale of Christmas seals. 

There has been in many of the other states so much 
wasted energy in the attempt to control the tuberculosis 
situation that Connecticut's method has attracted consid- 
erable attention lately. Some of the authorities hesitate 
to adopt the Connecticut method because (1) they fear 
that a State Tuberculosis Commission would become so 
overburdened with routine duties as to deprive it of 
the powers of vision and initiative necessary for leader- 
ship, and because (2) they fear the public would not 
give personal and enthusiastic support to a campaign 
conducted by state officials, no matter how capable 
they might be. Our experience in Connecticut demon- 
strates that such fears are groundless. Connecticut's 
sanatoria continue to be among the best in the 
country, but no other state has done better work 
in the establishment of clinics, dispensaries, tuberculosis 
nursing agencies, expert consultation service, employees' 
tuberculosis relief associations, nor in adaptation of tuber- 
culosis measures to new scientific information, nor in ef- 
forts to dispel the darkness that still envelops the whole 
problem of tuberculosis. And as to the fear that the pub- 
lic would not join in a campaign led by state officials, 
we can only say this: 

No private or non-official organization in any state has 
ever had, or could ever have, greater or more spontaneous 
or more generous and sympathetic support from the gen- 
eral public and from various civic, religious fraternal, 
labor and anti-tuberculosis organizations, than has been 



THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION. 25 

given to us in the past ten years. We have not attempted 
to interfere with the management of these various better- 
ment organizations, but our suggestions a to the best ways 
of fighting tuberculosis have been heard and followed 
with an impulsive and frank loyalty and earnestness that 
has left us humble a well as grateful. 

We would say to the hesitating authorities of the other 
states: Fear not. The Connecticut way is the best way. 
And in fact the Connecticut method must have a strong 
appeal to every serious tuberculosis student. In discuss- 
ing in the July number of the "American Review of Tuber- 
culosis," the work of the Rockefeller Commission for the 
Prevention of Tuberculosis in France. Dr. Bernard Lang- 
don Wyatt says : 

"The generally accepted principle of centralization 
of control and de-centralization of operation was adhered 
to with most satisfying results." 

That's it. That's the Connecticut method — "centrali- 
zation of control and de-centralization of operation." 

OUR OFFICE STAFF. 

This report would not be complete if it did not acknowl- 
edge the debt we owe to our office staff, who at all times 
in the year, but especially in the "rush" times of the year, 
have given us their heartiest and most enthusiastic sup- 
port, and have never flinched when called upon to do ex- 
tra work before or after hours. Much of the success of 
which we are so proud, and of which we get the credit, 
would not have been possible without just such loyalty 
and vigilance and executive ability as were displayed by 
Miss Cummings, Miss Baird and Mr. Sedgwick. 

FRIENDS OF THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS SANATORIA. 
HARTFORD. 

Mrs. Du Vernitt Butterfield, 122 Mrs. Crowther, 36 Sisson Ave., 

Garden St., Hartford, Conn. Hartford, Conn. 

The Hartford Tuberculosis Socie- The Travelers' Girls' Cl^b Trav- 

ty, Hartford, Conn. ^^ers^ Building, Hartford, 

^^'o: ^: S- ,]5"f^^"' ^^^ ^'^^ Mrs.'^milenbeck, Chester, Conn. 
Street, Middletown, Conn. ^^.^ j^j j^ Samuels, 128 Collins 

Rev. J. Dooley, 157 Hillside Ave., St., Hartford, Conn. 

Hartford, Conn. The Ladies' Guild, Trinity 

The Hungarian Ladies' Circle, Church, Hartford, Conn. 

182 State Street, Hartford, Mrs. Edwin Strong, Hartford, 

Conn. Conn. 

The Goodwin Drug Co., Hartford, The Hartford Times, Hartford, 

Conn. Conn. 



26 



STATE OF CONNECTICUT. 



Mr. James Clancy, Palace The- 
atre, Hartford, Conn. 

Mr. Jones, Secretary Musicians' 
Union, Palace Theatre Orches- 
tra, Hartford, Conn. 

St. Anne's Guild, New Haven, 
Conn. 

Mrs. Mooney, Deep Wood, West 
Hartford. Conn. 

Rev. Paul H. Barber, 198 Farm- 
ington Ave., Hartford, Conn. 

The American Red Cross, Bureau 
of Supplies, 100 Washin^on 
Street, Boston Mass. 

Mrs. F. E. Lewis, Ridgefield, 
Conn. 

Miss Helen Taksar, 700 Grand- 
view Teri'ace, Hartford, Conn. 



Miss Sara A. Carroll, Visiting- 
Nurses' Association, New Ha- 
ven, Conn. 

Miss May O'Gorman, New Haven, 
Conn. 

Miss Josephine Smith, New Ha- 
ven, Conn. 

Y. W. C. A., Hartford, Conn. 

Hartford Tuberculosis Fund, 
Hartford, Conn. 

St. Vincent DePaul Society, 
Hartford, Conn. 

Rev. William F. O'Dell, Elm- 
wood, Conn. 

Rev. Peter Dolan, 157 Hillside 
Ave., Hartford, Conn. 



MERIDEN. 



Hon. E. Kent Hubbard, Middle- 
town, $5.00. 

Miss Anna Sands, Meriden, $5.00. 

Hon. John Buckley, Hartford. 

Dr. S. J. Maher, New Haven, can- 
dy and magazines. 

Miss Indiana Thomas, Meriden, 
Victrola records. 

Girls' Friendly Society, Meriden, 
baskets, candy, fruit and cut 
flowers. 

Miss Hall, Meriden, kindergarten 
materials, magazines. 

Tuberculosis League of Hartford. 
$100 for entertainment and 
building stage. 

Central Labor Unit)n, Meriden, 
$300 Amusement Fund. 

Central Labor Union, Meriden, 
organization of city bands and 
oi'chestra and other amusement 
companies for entertainment. 

St. Ann's Guild, New Haven, 
Christmas stockings for child- 
ren. 

Mrs. George Wilcox, Meriden, cut 
flowers. 



Mrs. George Curtis, Meriden, 
candy, cigarettes and toys. 

Mr. J. E. Ritchie, New Haven, 
books of fiction. 

Mr. J. Sternberg, Meriden, mag- 
azines and cut flowers. 

Women's Temperance Union, 
Meriden, cut flowers. 

New Haven Employees' Relief 
Association, magazines, books, 
materials for sewing class. 

Meriden City Band, P. Azzolina, 
director of concerts. 

Meriden Military Band, P. Rus- 
sette, director of concerts. 

Royal Arcanum Minstrels, en- 
tertainments. 

All Saints Church, Meriden, pot- 
ted flowers. 

E. W. Simmons, New Haven, 
through Shartenburg & Robin- 
son, two sewing machines. 

Jas. A. McNamara, New Haven, 
$5.00. 

Wm. McGowan, Waterbury, 
$10.00. 



CLGERYMEN ON CALL. 



Rev. John Lynch, Rev. Patrick 
McCarty, Rev. Thos. E. Mc- 
Garry, Rev. Thos. Martin, Rev. 
D. Ricci, Rev. A. Van Oppen, 
Rev. N. F. Schneider, Rev. 
John Ceppa, Rev. George Bar- 
talewski. Rev. Oscar Clauson, 



Rev. S. F. Glaser, Rev. Paul 
Kirsh, Rev. A. J. Lord, Rev. 
Victor G. Mills, Rev. A. T. 
Randall, Rev. D. R. Johns, Rev. 
F. S. Lippit, Rev. Fred Saund- 
ers, Rev. P. Saurusitis. 



I 



THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION. 



27 



NORWICH. 



A fund of $524.70 collected at 
Christmas time, 1918, by Mrs. 
F. A. Byrnes and Mrs. Mary 
A. Richards of Norwich for 
the benefit of the patients at 
Christmas and the holidays 
throughout the year. 

A fund of $1,041.72 collected at 
Christmas time, 1919, by the 
ladies mentioned above for the 
same purpose. 

Proceeds of about $50 from the 
sale of chocolate by Mrs. M. 
F. Dougherty of Norwich for 
the benefit of the patients. 

Proceeds of about $150 from a 
dance and whist given by 
White Ci-oss Council, No. 13, 
Knights of Columbus, Norwich, 
for the benefit of the patients. 

Proceeds of about $55 from a 
dance given by the clerks of 
Peterson's Candy Shop, Nor- 
wich, to be applied toward the 
purchase of an X-ray machine. 

The Evening Record. 

Utley & Jones. 

Del Hotf Hotel. 

James C. MacPherson. 

Chas. Slosberg & Son. 

The Manhattan Co. 

Woolworth & Co. 

Baird Tire & Supply Co. 

J. H. Perkins. 

Hourigan Bros. 

Providence Bakerv. 

Ring & Sisk. 

Disco Bros. 

J. P. Barstow & Co. 

Church & Allen. 

Joseph Connor & Sons. 

City Lunch & Martin House. 

Shea & Burke. 

Geo. A. Kepler. 

Rumford & Co. 

Mrs. Edwin Fay. 

J. A. Ferguson. 

The Boston Cafe. 

Geo. P. Madden. 

Hagberg & Son. 

A fund of $425.10 collected from 
ex-patients and friends for a 
moving picture machine. 

A moving picture machine, Vic- 
trola and about a hundred rec- 
ords from the Committee on 
War Activities of the Knights 
of Columbus. 



Loan of moving picture films 
weekly by Mr. Al Craig, man- 
ager of the Davis Theatre, 
Norwich. 

Library of about three hundred 
books of late Nellie Carpenter, 
Putnam. 

Several concerts by the Lotus 
Quartet. Boston, and the Bass 
Cleff Club, Norwich. 

The Cranston Co. 

Otis Library. 

St. Rose's Guild, New Haven. 

Employees' Tuberculosis Relief 
League, New Haven. 

Geduldig's Greenhouses. 

Girls' Community Club. 

Pasnik Co. 

The Hamilton Co. 

Peterson's, Inc. 

The Jordan Co. 

The Mohican Co. 

The Geo. Kies Co. 

Murphy and McGari-y. 

The Cosgrove Co. 

Reid & Hughes Co. 

The Marlin-Rockwell Corp. 

Norwich Chapter, American Red 
Cross. 

John F. Tompkins. 

The Porteous & Mitchell Co. 

Lee & Osgood Co. 

The Bulletin Co. 

The Bliss Co. 

Troy Steam Laundry. 

Preston Bros. 

Frisbie & McCormick. 

Bishop, Bidwell & Co. 

Stoddard, Gilbert & Co. 

Peck, Mc Williams & Co. 

Cummings and Ring. 

The Swift Co. 

The Plaut-Cadden Co. 

Armour & Co. 

James J. Drudy. 

Lawton Mills. 

Direct Importing Co. 

Loyal Circle of King's Daughters. 

Norwich Electric Co. 

Max Gordon Co. 

Smith's Pharmacy, Inc. 

The M. C. Swan Co. 

A. G. C. Club, Jewett City. 

The J. C. Worth Co. 

The Talking Machine Shop. 

The K. B. Club, Jewett City. 

Enphernian Circle of King's 
Daughters. 



28 



STATE OF CONNECTICUT. 



B. Natural Musical Club. 

J. M. Young & Son. 

Friedburg & Son. 

Eaton-Chase Co. 

Don Houghton. 

P. J. Morley. 

P. B. Storage Battery & Weld- 
ing Co. 

Wm. Friswell Co. 

Noi'wich Brick Co. 

M. Sussman Silverburg & Son. 

Schwartz Bros. 

The Barstow Co. 

Mara & Eggleton. 

St. Agnes' Guild of Christ 
Cb'.irch. 

Smith, the Florist. 

Casper Graff. 

St. Andrew Altar Society. 

The Tennyson Club. 



Sellas Spa. 

Wauregan Hotel. 

Rathbon's Drug Store. 

The Brockton Shoe Co. 

C. Bell. 

W. R. Perkins. 

Girls of Park Congregational 

Church. 
xMrs. J. P. Casey. 
Mrs. J. N. Rosenburg. 
Rev. Richard Graham. 
Rev. J. P. Broderick. 
Rev. P. J. Cuny. 
Rev. Miles Galvin. 
Rev. Daniel F. Sullivan. 
Rev. Alexander Abbott. 
Rev. M. McLean Goldie. 
Rev. I. V. Macielewski. 
Miss Anna Hield, New London. 



SHELTON. 
Miscellaneous. 



Mrs. Franklyn Farrell, Ansonia, 
Conn., ice cream, candy, Easter 
cards, 2 crates oranges, 2 
crates grapes, 2 cases jam. 

Miss M. E. Lathrop, Derby, 
Conn., candy. 

Mrs. Geo. C. Bryant, Ansonia, 
Conn., cornucopias. 

Ladies of St. Ann's Guild, New 
Haven, Conn., Christmas stock- 
ings. 

Mr. and Mrs. Comlcy, Bridge- 
port, Conn., phonograph rec- 
ords. 

Rev. John Connors, New Haven, 
Conn., phonograph records. 

Ansonia Lodge of Elks, Ansonia, 
Conn., Victrola and records. 

Ansonia Lodge of Elks, Ansonia, 
Conn., moving pictux'e ma- 
chine. 

Mrs. John B. Russ, Shelton, 
Conn., phonograph records. 

Knights of Columbus, Shelton, 
Conn., moving picture ma- 
chine. 

Mrs. Richard H. Hubbell, Shelton, 
Conn., sewing machine. 

Hubbell Brothers, Derby, Conn., 
war photographs. 

Mr. Becker, New Milford, Conn., 
flowers. 

Red Cross, Ridgefield Branch 
Ridgefield, Conn., 14 rolls 



gauze, 2 bolts sheetings, 49 
rolls medicated cotton, 30 rolls 
tape, 5 rolls cotton batting. 

Mrs. Catherine Cook, Shelton, 
Conn., flowers. 

Ladies' Refreshment Committee 
for Soldiers' Night, Shelton, 
Conn., 18 loaves of cake. 

Red Cross, Derby and Shelton 
Branch, Derby, Conn., piano, 
cabinet for surgical dressings. 

American Red Cross, Bureau of 
Supplies, Boston, Mass., 3 
cases gauze, 3 cases surgical 
dressings. 

Webster Hose Co., Ansonia, 
Conn., 3 months' moving pic- 
ture film service. 

Mr. Jeremiah Flanagan, Ansonia, 
Conn., 2 crates of oi-anges. 

Mrs. C. J. Florm, Ansonia, Conn., 
flowers. 

Dr. F. J. Peck, Ansonia, Conn,, 
flowers. 

Mr. Thos. H. Kneen, Ansonia, 
Conn., flowers. 

Mr. Archibald Davidson, Ansonia, 
Conn., flowers. 

Mrs. W. J. Chegwidden, Derby, 
Conn., piano. 

Charter Hose Co., Ansonia, 
Conn., 3 months' moving pic- 
ture film service. 



THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION. 



29 



Banquet Committee for Armis- 
tice Day, Derby, Conn., re- 
freshments. 

Mrs. Fred Warr, Ansonia, Conn., 
piano. 

A friend, phonograph records. 

Miss Johnson, New Haven, Conn., 
phonograph records. 

Mrs. Anne E. Bassett, Ansonia, 
Conn., candy and Christmas 
decorations. 

Mrs. Rutherford Trowbridge, 
New Haven, Conn., pop-corn 
balls. 

St. Ann's Guild, New Haven, 
Conn., box of Christmas gifts. 



Mrs. Elsie Scovill, Washington, 

D. C, Victrola and records. 
Mrs. R. H. Hubbell, Shelton, 

Conn., Christmas decorations 

and records. 
Shelton Welfare Committee, 

Shelton, Conn., refreshments. 
Salvation Army, Ansonia Branch, 

Ansonia, Conn., refreshments. 
Eastei'n Star Lodge, Derby, 

Conn., refreshments. 
Scovill Mfg. Co., Waterbury, 

Conn., 1 box plants and stand. 
Friend A. Russ' Fund and 

friends. Shelton, Conn., X-ray, 

$5,000.00. 



ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS. 
Books and Magazines. 



Mrs. S. A. Warner, Ridgefield, 

Conn. 
Mrs. Henry Kaiser, Ansonia, 

Conr. 
Mrs. H. Keeler, Shelton, Conn. 
Mrs. E. S. Sperry, Derby, Conn. 
Mrs. R. S. Gardner, Derby, Conn, 
Hubbell Brothers, Derby, Conn. 
Miss Emma Thorpe, Shelton, 

Conn. 
Miss Annie Larkin, Ansonia, 

Conn. 
Mrs. Anne E. Bassett, Ansonia, 

Conn. 
VIr. John H. Hine, Ansonia, Conn. 
Miss Dorothy Byrant, Ans()nia, 

Conn. 
Mrs. Franklyn Farrell, Ansonia, 

Conn. 
Mrs. W. E. Clark, Ansonia, 

Conn. 
Employees' Tuberculosis Relief 

Association, New Haven, Conn. 



B. Russ, Shelton, 



Mrs. John 

Conn. 

Plumb Memorial Library, Shel- 
ton, Conn. 
Mrs. Mary Gardner, Derby, 

Conn. 
Miss M. E. Lathrop, Derby, Conn. 
Salvation Army, Ansonia Branch, 

Ansonia, Conn. 
Mrs. Edson L. Bryant, Ansonia, 

Conn. 
Mrs. D. E. Brinsmade, Shelton, 

Conn. 
Miss N. A. O'Brien, Waterbury, 

Conn. 
Scovill Manufacturing Company, 

Waterbury, Conn. 
Mrs. Emma Mock, Ansonia, 

Conn. 
Mrs. W. A. Tolles, Ansonia, 

Conn. 



Clothing. 



The Needlework Guild of Amer- 
ica, Bridgeport, Conn. 

Mrs. C. H. Cook, Shelton, Conn. 

Mr. and Mrs. Comley, Bridge- 
port, Conn. 

Mi.^3 Dorothy Bryant, Ansonia, 
Conn. 

Miss Curtiss, Shelton, Conn. 

Shelton Branch of Red Cross, 
Shelton, Conn. 

Vv'omen's Relief Corps, Derby, 
Conn. 

Mrs. C. J. Florin, Ansonia, Conn. 



Deiby Branch of Red Cross, 
Derby, Conn. 

Mrs. Frederick S. Seeley, Bridge- 
port, Conn. 

Mrs. Edson L. Bryant, Ansonia, 
Conn. 

Mrs. Anne E. Bassett, Ansonia, 
Conn. 

Miss Cora M. Bennett, Shelton, 
Conn. 

Mrs. V. H. Perry, Shelton, Conn., 

Mrs. A. M. Marsh, Southport, 
Conn. 



30 



STATE OF CONNECTICUT. 



Entertainment. 



March 10, 1919, Minstrel Show, 
Chorus of 40 and orchestra, 
Ansonia, Lodge of Elks, An- 
sonia, Conn. 

April 11, 1919, Moving pictures 
and orchestra, Ansonia Lodge 
of Elks, Ansonia, Conn. 

May 16, 1919, Minstrel Show, 
Ansonia Lodge of Elks, An- 
sonia, Conn. 

December 1, 1919, Minstrel Show- 
by M. M. D. A. O. F., Ansonia, 
Conn. 

January 7, 1920, Concert by Mrs. 
J. B. Russ, Mr. Pidge, Mrs. Oli- 
ver Lewis, Mrs. Rosetta Prof- 
fit, Shelton, Conn. 

January 9, 1920, Minstrel Show 
by Farrell Foundry Employ 
ees, Ansonia, Conn. 

May 23, 1919, Entertainment by 
Mrs. John B. Russ and Com- 
munity Club Girls, Shelton, 
Conn. 



June 6, 1919, Concert by Lotus 
Quartette, Boston, Mass. 

August 22, 1919, Minstrel Show, 
Ansonia Lodge of Eagles, An- 
sonia, Conn. 

September 30, 1919, Band Con- 
cert by Ansonia Band, with 
Mrs. William Howard, soloist, 
Ansonia, Conn. 

November 20, 1919, Concert by 
Ida E. Hipelius, Edna Bears 
and Joseph Hipelius, New Ha- 
ven, Conn. 

January 26, 1920, Concert by 
Van Slyke's Orchestra, Bridge- 
port, Conn. 

May 21, 1920, Concert by 
Bridgeport Singing Orchestra, 
Bridgeport, Conn. 

June 1, 1920, Concert by Miss 
Ida E. Hipelius and Miss Edna 
Bears, New Haven, Conn. . 

June 24, 1920, Moving Picture 
Entertainment by Maurice J. 
Culhane, Shelton, Conn. 



THE SEASIDE. 



Mrs. Alden, New Haven, Conn. 

Miss Roberta Allen, New Haven, 
Conn. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. S. Allis, Nor- 
wich, Conn. 

Mr. and Mrs. Anderson, Passaic, 
N. J. 

Mrs. Rosemary Anderson, New 
New London, Conn. 

Mrs. A. F. Bishop, Niantic, Conn. 

Mrs. Bradley, New Haven, Conn. 

Mrs. Britt, New Haven, Conn. 

Mrs. Broadhurst, New Haven 
Conn. 

Mrs. Simeon Brooks, Chester, 
Conn. 

Dr. Hugh B. Campbell, Norwich, 
Conn. 

Miss Agnes Champion, Niantic, 
Conn. 

Miss Tillie Cassel, Waterbury, 
Conn. 

Mrs. Andrew Champion, Flan- 
ders, Conn. 

Mrs. Etta S. Chapman, Flanders, 
Conn. 

Mrs. M. E. Chapman, Flanders, 
Conn. 



Mrs. George Clark, Niantic, 
Conn. 

Mrs. Sarah E. Colgan, The Sea- 
side Sanatorium. 

Mr. W. D. E. Colgan, Hartford, 
Conn. 

Mrs. Coroley, Cresent Beach, 
Conn. 

Miss Gregory, New Haven, Conn. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harrington, South- 
bridge, Mass. 

Mr. Johnson, Danielson, Conn. 

Mrs. Emma Jones, Niantic, Conn. 

Mrs. Mai-y Kelly, Waterbury, 
Conn. 

Mrs. J. W. Knox, Hartford, 
Conn. 

Miss Louise Long, Niantic, Conn. 

Mrs. J. J. McPartland, New Ha- 
ven, Conn. 

Mrs. Martel, Springfield, Mass. 

Mrs. Oscar Maurer, New Haven, 
Conn. 

Miss Virginia Merritt, Cresent 
Beach, Conn. 

New Haven Sunshine Society, 
New Haven, Conn. 

Niantic Sunshine Society, Nian- 
tic, Conn. 



THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION. 



31 



Mr. P. J. O'Rielly, Bridgeport, 

Conn. 
Mr. William Pathe, Scranton, Pa. 
Mrs. Louise Perkins, Waterford, 

Conn. 
Mrs. Poor, New London, Conn. 
Miss Kathleen Reen, Hartford, 

Conn. 
Mrs. E. L. Roberts, Waterford, 

Conn. 
St. John's Auxiliary, Niantic, 

Conn. 
Mrs. Minnie Samuels, Hartford, 

Conn. 
Miss Ruth Samuels, Hartford, 

Conn. 
Mrs. Marion R. Davis, Niantic, 

Conn. 
Miss Nana Davis, Niantic, Conn. 
Miss Nora Doohan, Hartford, 

Conn. 
Mr. Homer Dorman, Niantic, 

Conn. 
Mrs. William Egan, Hartford, 

Conn. 
Mrs. Eldredge, Niantic, Conn. 
Mrs. J. E. Ei'ckman, Portsmouth, 

N. H. 



Mi's. E. R. Faucher, New Haven, 
Conn. 

Miss L. A. French, Boonton, 
N. J. 

Mrs. Getchel, Niantic, Conn. 

Miss Katherine Gilbert, New 
Haven, Conn. 

Miss Margaret Gillis, Waterbury, 
Conn. 

Mrs. D. C. Saunders, New Ha- 
ven, Conn. 

Miss Gladys Scoville, New Lon- 
don, Conn. 

Mrs. Sewell, Passaic. N. J. 

Mrs. F. Smith, Flanders, Conn. 

Mrs. Louise M. Stevens, Niantic, 
Conn. 

Miss Taber, Waterbury, Conn. 

Miss Thayer, New York City. 

Mrs. Thomas, Niantic, Conn. 

Mrs. Hymen Weiner, New Brit- 
ain, Conn. 

Dr. Thomas E. Weldon, South 
Manchester, Conn. 

Dr. Frank E. Wilson, New Lon- 
don, Conn. 

Dr. Oliver E. Winship, New Lon- 
don, Conn. 



One of our pleasant duties in this report is to acknowl- 
edge the receipt of a fe\v entirely unsolicited private con- 
tributions to a fund for the benefit of our little patients 
at the Seaside. These friends of the Seaside were : 

Mrs. J. C. Knowlton, New Haven, New Haven Branch, The Nation- 
Conn, al Association for the Advance- 
Mr. Luke A. Daniels, New Ha- ment of Colored People. 

ven, Conn. Mrs. Jonathan Godfrey, Bridge- 
Mrs. M. B. Williams, Hartford, port, Conn. 
Conn. 



ADDITIONAL DONORS TO THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS 
COMMISSION. 



Mrs. Henry L. Wade, Middle- 
bury. 

Mr. A. Ware Merriam, Farm- 
ington. 

Mr. Angus Park, Hanover. 

Dr. Fred Sumner Smith, Ches- 
ter. 

Mr. Whitney Palache, Farm- 
ington. 

Miss Anne M. Hyde, Middle 
Haddam. 

Dr. M. J. Kelly, Windsor 
Locks. 



Mr. J. V. Adams, Pleasant 

Valley. 
The Atwood Machine Co., 

Stonington. 
Mr. H. C. Brooks, Chester. 
Mr. Howell Cheney, Madison. 
Mr. C. G. Cheney, Essex. 
The Misses M. & I. Eldridge, 

Norfolk. 
Mr. E. L. Selden, Hadlyme. 
Mr. Edward Sargent, Madison. 
D. & H. Scovil, Inc., Hig- 

ganum. 



32 



STATE OF CONNECTICUT. 



Mrs. Clai-k Donaldson, Guilford. 

Mrs. Mary L. Putnam, Crom- 
well. 

Mr. E. H. Sloan. Broad Brook. 

Mr. James T. Fitton, Wethers- 
field. 

Mr. Edgar T. Glass, Madison. 

Mr. W. S. Morris, Wethers- 
field. 

Mr. Frank S. Buttei*worth, 
Madison. 

Herman Roser & Son, Glaston- 
bury. 

The Cyril Johnson Woolen Co., 
Stafford. 

Mr. A. R. Carpenter, Bloom- 
field. 

Mr. Graham C. Woodruff, 
Westport. 

M. S. Brooks & Sons, Chester. 

Chas. W. House Sons, Union- 
ville. 

Mr. W. F. Bishop, Jr., Cannon- 
dale. 

Mr. J. F. Reynolds, Noi-th Ha- 
ven. 

The Stiles & Reynolds Co., 
North Haven. 

Mr. A. H. Mullikin, New 
Canaan. 

Mr. Wm. J. Galbraith, Somers. 

Mrs. Dora E. Wheeler, Boston, 
Mass. 

Mr. Anson Moran, North Wil- 
ton. 

Mr. S. E. Jennings, Mystic. 

Mrs. W. E. Hinchcliff, Cole- 
brook. 

Miss Mary Bacon, Kent. 

Standard Card Clothing Co., 
Stafford. 

Mrs. W. Brown, New Canaan. 

Miss Helen Neylon, New Ca- 
naan. 

Mr. A. J. Needham, Stafford 
Springs. 

Dr. E. M. Cowan, Westport. 

Mr. F. W. Warner, Wethers- 
fieid. 

Mr. Newton Osborn. Newing- 
ton. 

Mr. W. H. Ludington, Old 
Lyme. 



Mr. F. M. Peasley, Cheshire. 

Mr. Wm. Spicer, Noank. 

Mr. J. H. Trumbull, Plainville. 

Mr. Julian Street, Norfolk. 

Mr. J. Ralph Howe, Uncasville. 

The Reverend Kenneth Mack- 
enzie, Westport. 

Cromwell Plall, Inc., Cromwell. 

Mr. F. D. Leach, Windsor 
Locks. 

The Ellison Construction Co., 
Deep River. 

Mr. George Roberts, Twin 
Lakes. 

The Eastern Loungo Co., New 
Milford. 

The Tiley Pratt Co., Essex. 

Mr. Fred H. Thrall, Windsor. 

Mr. Julius Day, Madison. 

Mr. Wm. C. Skinner, Jr., Farm- 
ington. 

Mrs. R. C. Williams, Avon. 

Mr. Turney Soule, New Mil- 
ford. 

Mr. Robert L. Coe, Middlebury. 

Mr. H. K. Welch, East River. 

Miss Elizabeth Cockroft, Sau- 
gatuck. 

Old Saybrook Inn, Old Say- 
brook. 

Mr. Samuel P. Williams, Madi- 
son. 

Nabyan Woolen Co., Stafford. 

Dr. C. H. Peck, Newtown. 

Mr. R. Preusser, Middlebury. 

Mr. G. L. Bidwell, Windsor. 

Mrs. Anna E. Wilkins, Westport. 

Miss May B. Lord, West Gran- 
by. 

Mr. H. L. Merry, Hadlyme. 

Mr. Samuel J. Miller, Cannon- 
dale. 

Mr. Fred Wiley, Stafford. 

Mrs. John Wallace Riddle, 
Farmington. 

Morgan & Dickinson, Windsor. 

Mr. John F. Maizon, South 
Windsor. 

Mr. S. E. Gage, West Morris. 

Mr. F. J. Hallenback, Chester. 

Mr. Everett T. House, Farming- 
ton. 

Pratt Read & Co., Deep River. 



\ 



THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION. 33 

SANATORIUM EMPLOYEES. 

In compliance with Section 185 of the General Statutes, 
we append the following list of employees at the various 
sanatoria,, whose compensation is not less than $450.00 
per annum. 

MERIDEN SANATORIUM EMPLOYEES. 
Superintendent, $2,000.00 with board for self and fam- 
ily. 

Resident physician, $1,200.00 with board for self and 

family. 

Head Nurse, $1,140.00 with board. 
Steward, $1,080.00 with board. 
Four Nurses, $780.00 v/ith board. 
Three Nurses, $720.00 with board. 
One Nurse, $600.00 with board. 
Bookkeeper, S720.00 with board. 
Teacher, $780.00 with board. 
Chef, $1,500.00 with board. 
Pastrv Cook, $660.00 with board. 
Watchman, $660.00 with board. 
Engineer, $780.00 with board. 
Carpenter, $1,976.00 with board. 
Chauffeur, $720.00 with board. 
Painter, $660.00 with board. 
Yardman, $660.00 with board.. 
Maid, $540.00 with board. 
Kitchen man, $480.00 with board. 
Laborer, $480.00 with board. 

SHELTON SANATORIUM EMPLOYEES. 

Superintendent, $2,700.00 with board for self and 
family. 

Resident Physician, $1,200.00 with board for self and 
family. 

Head Nurse, $1,080.00 with board. 

Three nurses, $900.00 with board. 

Two nurses, $780.00 with board. 

Two nurses, $720.00 with board. 

One nurse, $660.00 with board. 

Secretary, $900.00 with board. 

Stenographer, $780.00 without board. 

Housekeeper, $900.00 with board. 

Chef, $1,480.00 with board. 

Second cook, $600.00 with board. 

Infirmary cook, $540.00 with board. 



34 STATE OF CONNECTICUT. 

Engineer, $1,020.00 with board. 
Watchman, $720.00 with board. 
Fireman, $720.00 with board. 
Farmer, $1,200.00 with board. 
Two farm hands, $540.00 with board. 
One farm hand, $480.00 wnth board. 
Poultry man, $720.00 with board. 
Carpenter, $540.00 with board. 
Orderly, $600.00 with board. 
Four orderlies, $480.00 with board. 
Maid, $480.00 with board. 
Kitchen man, $540.00 with board. 
Kitchen man, $480.00 with board. 
Storeroom man, $540.00 with board. 
Driver, $480.00 with board. 

HARTFORD SANATORIUM EMPLOYEES. 

Superintendent, $3,000.00 with board for self and 
famih^ 

Resident physician, $1,800.00 with board. 
Head nurse,\si,080.00 with board. 
Housekeeper, $900.00 with board. 
Bookkeeper, $900.00 with board. 
Teacher, $720.00 with board. 
Stenographer, $540.00 with board. 
Seven nurses, $660.00 with board. 
Nurse, $900.00 with board. 
Three nurses, $720.00 with board. 
Nurse, $600.00 with board. 
Chef, $1,200.00 with board. 
Pastry cook, $780.00 with board.- 
Second cook, $780.00 with board. 
Storekeeper, $900.00 with board. 
Two chauffeurs, $780.00 with board. 
Driver, $660.00 with board. 
Watchman, $660.00 with board. 
Fireman, $660.00 with board. 
Waiter, $660.00 with board. 
Waiter, $600.00 with board. 
Waitress, $480.00 with board. 
Two maids, $480.00 with board. 
Kitchen man, $600.00 with board. 
Kitchen man, $540.00 with board. 
Three orderlies, $480.00 with board. 
Farmer, $1,480.00 with board. 
Teamster, $720.00 with board. 
Laborer, $720.00 with board. 
Laborer, $660.00 with board. 



THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION. 35 

Laborer, $480.00 with board. 

Laundry foreman, $2,600.00 without board. 

Laundry fireman, $1,300.00 without board. 

Eight laundresses, $15.00 per week without board. 

Laaundress, $480.00 with board. 

NORWICH SANATORIUM EMPLOYEES. 
Superintendent, $3,000.00 with board for' self and fam- 
ily. 

Resident physcian, $1,200.00 with board. 

Secretary, $840.00 with board. 

Stenographer, $480.00 with board. 

Two nurses, $840.00 with board. 

Two nurses, S780.00 with board. 

Eight nurses, $720.00 with board. 

Attendant. $480.00 with board. 

Barber, $720.00 without board. 

Housekeeper, S840.00 with board. 

Chef, $1,140.00 with board. 

Kitchen man, $660.00 with board. 

Assistant chef, $780.00 with hoard. 

Waiter, $480.00 with board. 

Maid $480.00 with board. 

Farmer, $1,548.00 with part maintenance. 

Carpenter, $840.00 with board. 

Laborer, $720.00 with board. 

Storekeeper, S900.00 with board. 

Engineer, $960.00 with board. 

Baker, $26.00 per week without board. 

Fireman, $25.00 per week with board. 

Watchman, $25.00 per week with board. 

Three laborers, $25.00 per week with board. 

Teamster, $27.00 per week with board. 

Maid, $10.00 per week with board. 

Laborer, $24.50 without board. 

THE SEASIDE EMPLOYEES. 
Superintendent, $2,500^00 with board for self and • 
family. 

Head nurse, $1,080.00 with board. 
Nurse, $720.00 with board. 
Nurse, $840.00 with board. 
Three nurses, $600.00 with board. 
Bookkeeper, $840.00 with board. 
Cook, $840.00 with board. 
Fireman, $1,080.00 with board. 
Watchman, $720.00 with board. 
Orderly, $480.00 with board. 



36 STATE OF CONNECTICUT. 

Financial Report of the Meriden State 
Sanatorium, Meriden, Conn. 

DR. COLE B. GIBSON v Superintendent 

DR. WILLIAM CARROLL Assfstant Physician 

MISS MAUD M. WHITE Head Nurse 

MRS. ETHEL M. BAVIER Secretary 

EDWARD F. TRACY Steward 

REPORT FOR THE YEARS ENDING JUNE 30, 1919, AND FOR 
JUNE 30, 1920. 

Institution Receipts: Years 1918-19 1919-20 
Board of Patients: 

Towns and cities $10,490.93 $13,590.83 

Associations 3,177.29 5,247.79 

Individuals 2,299.90 2,900.94 



$15,968.12 $21,739.56 

Total receints for board, October 1, 1919 to June 30, 

1920 ^. $37,707.68 

Miscellaneous recepts: 

Clothing $209.80 $722.47 

Telephone and stamps .... 6.27 18.12 

Sales of grease ■ 64.41 74.85 

Miscellaneous sales 494.76 799.38 



$775.24 $1,614.82 
Total miscellaneous receipts for board, October 1, 1919 

to June 30, 1920 $2,390.06 

To bills of institution paid by State Tuberculosis Com- 
mission : 

Construction $55.62 

Equipment $2,665.56 560.00 

Maintenance 82,297.94 95,512.79 



$84,963.50 $96,128.41 
Total of all bills paid by State Tuberculosis Commission 

October 1, 1918 — June 30, 1920 $181,091.91 

Cash book balance October 1, 1918 704.42 



(Total receipts from all sources $221,894.07 

PAYMENTS. 

Years 1918-1919 1919-1920 

To Secretary of State Tuber- 
culosis Commission $15,796.04 $20,640.58 $36,346.62 

Sundries Account: 

Miscellaneous $1,164.80 $619.30 

Refunds 242.12 196.63 

Clothing 209.80 722.47 



$1,616.72 $1,538.40 $3,155.12 



THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION. 37 

Bills paid bv check of State , 

Tuberciilo?is Commission $84,963.50 $96,128.41 $181,091.91 

Cash book balance July 1, 

1920 1,300.42 



Total $221,894.07 

RESOURCES AND LIABILITIES. 

Resources. 

Years 1918-1919 1919-1920 

Cash on hand and in bank .... $627.39 $1,300.42 
Bills due on patients' board: 

Towns and cities 1,524.15 728.42 

Associations 356.09 91.60 

Individuals 253.44 

$2,761.07 $2,120.44 
Total $4,881.51 

Liabilities. 

Due State Tuberculosis Commission from institution as 

per resources $4,881.51 

ANALYSIS OF EXPENSES. 

Construction account: 

Additional infirmary bed 

accommodations $55.62 

Total $55.62 

Equipment account: 

Dental equipment $375.00 

Miscellaneous equipment $2,665.56 185.00 

Total $3,325.56 

MAINTENANCE. 

Years 1918-1919 1919-1920 
Salaries, wages and labor: 
General administration 

and office $8,231.46 $12,092.99 

Medical 6,902.22 9,938.11 

Farm, stable* and grounds 3,820.49 6,921.41 

$18,954.17 $28,952.51 
Total $47,906.68 

Food: 

Meat $9,136.09 $13,897.60 

Eggs 1,864.20 3,041.70 

Butter 2,496.78 2,832.45 

Milk 6,385.90 10,059.39 

Fish 658.97 880.13 

Flour 1,001.80 3,450.51 

Sugar 655.70 854.54 



38 STATE OF CONNECTICtJT. 

Vegetables 1,096.70 836.52 

Fruit 153.35 1,805.78 

Canned goods 4,511.87 102.68 

Tea and Coffee 603.57 600.10 

Miscellaneous 2,355.27 3,528.21 

$30,920.20 $41,889.61 
Total $72,809.81 



Light, heat and power: 

Coal $8,719.92 $1,554.33 

Electric light 1,374.05 2,054.29 

Gasoline, oil and wood .. 606.86 58.33 

Gas 760.38 1,439.06 

Pump engine repairs 

Electric power 416.73 434.94 

Sundries • 34.11 

$11,877.94 $5,575.06 

Total $17,453.00 



Farm, stable and grounds: 

Carriage and harness re- 
pairs $93.22 $38.60 

•Horses 361.02 

Automobiles: repair and 

supplies 687.31 4,483.82 

Sundries 168.52 556.11 

$1,310.07 $5,078.53 
Total $6,388.60 



Repairs to buildings: 

Lumber, etc $1,930.18 $204.94 

Plumbing 1,398.64 236.76 

Grounds 60.24 

Sterilizer 

Refrigerating plant 241.43 160.72 

Painting 617.49 277.00 

Sundries 242.74 

$4,187.74 $1,182.40 

Total ' $5,370.14 



Repairs and replacements of equipment: 

Repairs to fixtures $111.37 $651.45 

Furniture 103.70 1,176.56 

Bedding and linen 2,616.01 309.00 

Crockery and silverware 542.18 52.22 

Miscellaneous 268.81 410.07 

$3,642.07 $2,599.30 

Total $6,241.37 



1 



7HE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION. 39 

Miscellaneous: 

Telephone and telegraph $501.00 $544.40 

Printing and stationery .. 84.84 38.23 

Transportation 236.53 296.24 

Laundry 2,937.27 3,726.17 

Insurance 554.05 1,475.44 , 

Miscellaneous office ac- 
count 790.28 301.49 

Housekeeping supplies .. 1,159.45 161.46 

Medicines and hospital 

supplies 3,761.69 2,165.48 

Water 781.59 863.22 

Sundries 61.07 79.54 

Sewer 155.34 

School supplies 349.39 21.15 

Dentistry and other hos- 
pital 33.25 172.64 

Clothing and materials .. 389.92 

$11,405.75 $10,235.38 

Total $21,641.13 

Total maintenance $177,810.73 

MAINTENANCE RESOURCES. 

Years 1918-1919 1919-1920 
Goods on hand: 

Fuel $1,600.60 $1,607.40 

Stockroom 3,464.26 5,425.22 

Drugs 525.00 1,043.95 



$5,589.86 $8,076.57 

RECAPITULATION AND PER CAPITA. 

Oct. 1, 1918 July 1,1919 

Stock on hand $ 6,500.45 $ 5,589.86 

Total maintenance 82,297.94 95,512.79 



$88,798.39 $101,102.65 
Stock on hand 5,589.86 8,076.57 



83,208.53 


$92,026.08 




$175,234.61 


27.117 


38.515 


$3,068 


$2,426 


$21,476 


$16,982 




19.229 



Actual maintenance, total .... 
Total number hospital days .. 

Cost per patient per day 

Cost per patient per week .... 
Average per week for two years 

VALUATIONS. 

Thirty-one and one-quarter acres of land $ 6,755.00 

Infirmary building with connecting passageway 33,000.00 

Two-storv, thirty-two bed shack 10,400.00 

Dining hall 11,000.00 

One-storv twenty-four-bed shack 15,800.00 

Nurses' home 31,000.00 

Superintendent's cottage „ 5,800.00 



40 STATE OF CONNECTICUT. 

Store room 2,000.00 

Barn 3,500.00 

Shed ..; -. 550.00 

Water tank 1,390.00 

Pump house 721.41 

Wagons and carriages 75.00 

Motor trucks 1,986.70 

Passenger automobile 1,388.00 

Hose 75.00 

Beds and bedding, etc 8,084.97 

Carpets, rugs, etc 740.03 

Crockery, glassware, cutlery, etc 2,333.47 

Dry goods and small wares . 784.92 

Fire hose and extinguisher (apparatus and alarm) 4,633.50 

Kitchen and household wares 3,146.10 

Table linen, napkins, etc 1,134.50 

Merchandise on hand 5,425.22 

Furniture and household supplies 26,589.77 

Coal 1,400.00 

Oil 52.00 

Steam cooking apparatus 991.00 

Steam tables 357.50 

Meat grinder 156.75 

Laboratory 285.65 

Incinerator 1,735.00 



$183,291.59 



MIE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION. 4I 

Financial Report of the State Tuberculosis 
Sanatorium at Shelton. 

DR. EDWARD J. LYNCH Superintendent 

DR. HENRY J. SCHROEDER Resident Physician 

MISS CATHERINE R. KESSACK Head Nurse 

RALPH B. ROGERS Secretary 

MI^S EMMA L. CLAUBERG Stenographer 

MRS. HILDA A. GORDON Housekeeper 

CARL 0. H. JOHNSON Engineer 

WILLIAIVI L. BEMONT..... Farmer 

REPORT FOR YEARS ENDING JUNE 30, 1919, AND 
JUNE 30, 1920. 

CASH ACCOUNT. 

Institution Receipts: Years 1918-19 1919-20 

Board of patients: 

Tov/ns and cities $9,718.88 $10,849.74 

Associations 4,369.57 8,478.68 

Individual patients 8,397.40 10,858.37 



$22,485.85 $30,186.79 
Total receipts for board October 1, 1918 — June 30, 1920 $52,672.64 

Miscellaneous receipts: 1918-1919 1919-1920 

Miscellaneous sales $16.98 $995.37 

Total miscellaneous sales October 1, 1918-June 30, 1920 $1,012.35 

To bills of institution paid by State Tuberculosis Commission: 

1918^1919 1919-1920 

Construction $6,710.98 $1,767.00 

Maintenance 92,002,47 127,238.09 

Equipment 12,780.47 1,185.00 



$111,493.92 $130,189.46 

Total of all bills paid by State Tuberculosis Commis- 
sion, October, 1st, 1918-June 30, 1920 $241,683.38 

Received on outstanding accounts 2,000.77 



Total receipts from all sources $297,369.77 

Cash on hand October 1st, 1918 ,.... i, 012. 06 



Grand total of all receipts ' $298,381.83 

PAYMENTS. 

1918-1919 1919-1920 

To Secretary of State Tuber- 
culosis Commission, pa- 
tients' board $23,587.80 $30,212.11 

To Secretary State Tubercu- 
losis Commission, miscel- 
laneous account 16.98 995.37 

To refunds, patients' board .. 638.56 526.94 



42 STATE OF CONNECTICUT. 

Outstanding accounts, checks 
not received from secre- 
tary 220.06 

Bills paid bv checks of State 

Tuberculosis Commission.. 111,493.92 130,189.46 

Cash book balance July 1, 

1920 500.00 

$135,737.26 $162,644.57 
Total expenditures October 1st, 1918-June 30, 1920 .... $298,381.83 

RESOURCES AND LIABILITIEG. 
Reaources. 

Cash on hand and in bank July 1, 1920 $500.00 

Accounts receivable; 

Towns-cities $2,086.90 

Associations 966.26 

$3,053.16 
Less advance .payment on 

Patients' board 616.34 

$2,436.82 

Office account (not received 

from Secretary) 220.06 



$3,156.88 
Liabil'.t'es. 

Due State Tubei-culosis Commission from 

institution as per resources $3,156.88 

ANALYSIS OF EXPENSES. 
1918-1919 

Ccnstruciicn: 

Incinerator ; $52.84 

Infirmary 1,213.14 

Alteration of shacks 745.00 

Sleeping porches 3,000.00 

Water supply 1,700.00 

Total $6,710.98 

Equipment (infirmary) : 

Eurniture 134.90 

Dishes 75.50 

Hospital supplies 214.43 

Linoleum 86.13 

Bedding 63.38 

" Total $574.34 

Equipment (miscellaneous) : 

Fire protection $6,234.07 

Water supply 1,507.43 

Bedding 945.44 

Beds 167.00 



THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION. 43 

Pool table 31.02 

Hot water heater 175.00 

Electric fixtures 146.00 

Furniture 1,054.05 

Plumbing 390.00 

Electric food cars 337.00 

Screens 963.77 

New nurses' home 254.65 

Total $12,206.13 

MAINTENANCE. 

1918-1919 

Salaries, wages and labor: 
General, administration 

and office $7,393.84 

Medical services 8,960.11 

Farm, stable and grounds 3,383.42 

Total $19,737.37 

Food 

Meat $7,642.11 

Eggs 1,069.80 

Butter 2,281.18 

Milk 9,278.80 

Fish 820.86 

Flour 1,403.28 

Sugar 780.16 

Vegetables 414.83 

Fruit 458.74 

Canned goods 4,532.11 

Tea and coffee 581.93 

Miscellaneous 1,958.26 

Total $31,222.06 

Light, heat and power: 

Coal 12,642.41 

Electric light 1,323.85 

Pump and engine repairs 132.96 

Electric power 530.92 

Refrigerator 73.25 

Total $14,703.39 

Farm, stable and grounds: 

Poultry $1,099.30 

Carriage and harness re- 
pairs 12.35 

Horses 389.00 

Farming tools 74.88 

Fertilizer and seeds 468.60 

Sundries 154.27 

Auto truck 415.91 

Live stock 50.00 

Total $2,664.31 



44 STATE OF CONNECTICUT. 

Repairs to buildings and grounds: 

Buildings 733.10 

Plumbing 897.62 

Heating 170.67 

Grounds 122.37 

Total $1,923.76 

Repairs and replacement of equipment: 

Repairs to fixtures 304.37 

Furniture 414.45 

Bedding and linen 3,211.61 

Crockery and silverware 180.34 

Kitchen furnishings 255.35 

Miscellaneous -equipment 1,302.75 

Total $5,668.87 

Miscellaneous: 

Telephone and telegraph 598.44 

Printing and stationery .. 551.76 

Ti"ansportation 393.35 

Laundry 4,644.90 

Mechanics, supplies 52.11 

Insurance and bonding .. 2,777.27 
Miscellaneous office ex- 
pense 125.87 

Housekeeping supplies .... 1,377.67 

Hospital supplies 5,107.97 

Medicine 453.37 

Total 16,082.71 



Total expense for maintenance 92,002.47 

ANALYSIS OF EXPENSES. 
1919-1920 

CONSTRUCTION. 
Gravel and binder for roads and grading $1,767.00 

EQUIPMENT. 

Automobile $1,000.00 

Miscellaneous equipment 185.00 

$1,185.00 



MAINTENANCE. 



Salaries, wages and labor: 

Medical $4,948.00 

Administration 3,052.13 

Kitchen and dining room 6,913.56 

Domestic 1,095.85 

Ward service (male) 3,556.01 

Ward service (female) .... 4,530.22 

Engineering department .. 2,705.51 



THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION. 45 

Repairs 550.00 

Farm 3,172.99 

Stable, garage and 

grounds 19.33 

$30,543.60' 



Food: 

Butter $3,108.30 

Butterine 482.65 

Beans 275.73 

Bread, crackers, etc 291.02 

Cereals, rice, meal, etc 760.27 

Cheese 176.80 

Eggs 3,109.50 

Flour 3,817.37 

Fish (fresh, cured and 

canned) 1,168.85 

Fruit (fresh) 299.15 

Fruit (dried and pre- 
served) 2,427.11 

Lard and substitutes 640.16 

Macaroni and spaghetti .. 102.45 

Meats 16,134.84 

Milk 12,291.77 

Molasses and syrups 118.15 

Peanut butter, pie filling, 

etc 10.50 

Potatoes 2,216.10 

Seasoning and condiments 312.31 

Sugar .*. 9,517.58 

Tea, coffee, cocoa, etc 499.22 

Vegetables (fresh) 432.37 

Vegetables (canned) 789.10 

Yeast and baking powder 161.40 

Sundries 901.69 

Freight and express 68.24 

Total $60,112.63 

Clothing and clothing materials : 

Clothing $29.45 

Dry goods 7.20 

$36.65 



Furnishings and household supples : 

Carpets, rugs, etc $28.70 

Dry goods and small wares 184.08 

Furniture and upholstery 659.00 
Kitchen and household 

wares 652.36 

Laundry, supplies and ma- 
terials 6,552.07 

Lavatory supplies and dis- 
infectants 667.41 

Table linen, etc 254.90 

Freight and express 97.22 



$9,490.35 



46 STATE OF CONNECTICUT. 

Heat, light and power: 

Coal : $8,632.96 

Electricity 2,926.96 

Operating supplies for 

boiler 285.47 

Sundries 45.00 

Freight and express 31.92 



Ordinary Repairs: 

Cement, lime, crushed 


2.25 


Hardware, iron and steel 


357.56 
461.07 


Paint, oil, glass, etc. 

Plumbing and supplies .... 

Roofing material 

Tools and machines 

Boilers 


4,473.67 

984.60 

12.00 

2.35 

110.88 



$11,922.31 



Farm and Stable: 

Carriage and wagon and 

repairs 54.79 

Fencing material 79.40 

Fertilizer 108.50 

Harness and repairs 45.20 

Horses 521.75 

Poultry, feed, etc 1,757.30 

Other live stock 36.00 

Poultry brooders 74.25 

Road work and materials 9.63 

Stable and barn supplies 6.95 

Tools and machinery 34.75 

Trees, vines and seeds .... 73.97 

Sundries 18.26 

Freight and express 3.56 



Office and Incidental Expense, Travel: 

Insurance '. 936.81 

Religious instruction 102.00 

Auto repairs and supplies 1,667.93 

Printing and binding 155.45 

Stationery and office sup- 
plies 327.41 

Telephone and telegraph 849.23 



5,404.38 



$2,824.31 



Grounds : 

Sundries $32.50 

Medical and General Care: 

Entertainments 19.93 

Ice and refrigeration 70.59 

Medicine (supplies and 

apparatus) 1,591.02 

Sputum cups, etc 57.43 

Tobacco, pipes, etc . 10.00 

Freight and express 14.22 



$1,763.19 



THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION. 47 

Travel 30.32 

Sundries 10.60 

Freight and express ' 28.42 

$4,108.17 

Total expense for maintenance (1919-1920) $127,238.09 

MAINTENANCE RESOURCES. 

Goods on hand: July 1, 1919. July 1, 1920. 

Fuel $3,500.00 $600.00 

Stock room 11,093.73 17,501.92 

..Drugs 450.00 500.00 

Farm products 450.00 

$15,493.73 $18,601.92 

PER CAPITA. 

Recapitulation and per capita: 
Stock on hand Oct. 1, 

1918 $7,245.40 (7-1-19) $15,493.73 

Maintenance expense, 

1918-19 92,002.47 (19-20) 127,238.09 



$99,247.87 $142,731.82 

Stock on hand, July 1 

1919 15,493.73 (7-1-20) 18,601.92 



Actual maintenance expense $83,754.14 $124,129.90 

Total number of hospital days 37,666 50,612 

Cost per patient per day .. $2,223 $2,362 

Cost per patient per week 15.561 18.935 

Average for two years 17.248 

VALUATIONS. 

Land $28,517.00 

Sewer 10,695.33 

Infirmary 121,243.00 

Cottage No. 1 10,000.00 

Cottage No. 2 13,000.00 

Cottage No. 3 600.00 

Shacks No. 1 and 2, dining hall and runs.... 51,419.00 

Women's shack 15,000.00 

Recreation hall and help's quarters 7,000.00 

Superintendent's cottage 12,000.00 

Disinfecting room and morgue 1,198.00 

Pumping stations 3,000.00 

Water towers and pipes 10,841.49 

Carriage house and workshop 200.00 

Incinerator $ 950.00 

Poultry department 3,000.00 

Barn and stable 1,500.00 

Auto truck 400.00 

Live stock 670.00 

Equipment of all 33,580.00 

Coal in stock 600.00 

Drugs and similar supplies 500.00 

Merchandise on hand 17,501.92 

$343,415.74 

$99,247,87 $158,225.55 



48 STATE OF CONNECTICUT. 

REPORT OF THE FARM. 
(July 1, 1919, to June 30, 1920) 

Products delivered to sanatorium : 

Potatoes, at market price $286.00 

Fruit, at market price 53.40 

Vegetables, at market price 814.70 

Wood, at market price 240.00 

Stock (pigs) 670.00 

Stock (guinea pigs) 26.25 



Sales: 

Produce outside $29.50 

Pigs 90.00 



Income (delivered to sanatorium) : 

Eggs (3,118 doz., at market price) $1,715.17 

Chickens (1,588 lbs., at market price) 635.20 



$2,089.92 



119.50 



Total receipts $2,209.42 

Expenses : 

Labor $1,457.00 

Expenses (farm stable and grounds) .. 972.00 



$2,429.00 
Loss $219.58 

POULTRY REPORT 
(October 1st, 1918, to June 30th, 1919) 

Stock on hand July 1st, 1919: 

425 hens $637.50 

500 pullets 500.00 

500 chicks 250.00 

$1,387.50 



$2,350.37 



Total $3,737.87 

Expenditures: 

Labor, feed and supplies $1,718.45 

Stock on hand Oct. 1st, 1918: 

250 yearlings, at market price 375.00 

800 chicks, at market price 1,200.00 

3,293.45 



Gain $444.42 

POULTRY REPORT 

(July 1st, 1919, to June 30th, 1920) 

Stock on hand July 1st, 1920: 

250 hens and pullets $500.00 

800 chicks 800.00 

1,300.00 



THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION. 49 



Income (delivered to sanatorium) : 

Eggs (2, 734doz., at market price) 1,777.10 

Chickens (792 lbs., at market price) .. 371.00 



2,148.10 



Total $3,448.10 

Expenditures : 

Labor $675.00 

Feed and supplies 1,621.30 

Stock on hand, July 1st, 1919: 

425 hens 637.50 

500 pullets 500.00 

100 chicks 50.00 

3,483.80 



Loss ". $35.70 



50 STATE OF CONNECTICUT. 



Financial Report of the State Tuberculosis 
Sanatorium at Hartford. 

DR. WILLIAM M. STOCKWELL Superintendent 

DR. GEORGE L. BUNNELL Resident Physician 

MISS KATHLEEN N. REEN Head Nurse 

MISS MARY B. KEYES Housekeeper 

MISS FLORENCE BRINDLEY Bookkeeper 

MISS EMILY M. WEATHERHEAD Stenographer 

MISS ELISABETH LIGHTFOOT Teacher 

FRANCIS T. ROBERTS Engineer 

REPORT FOR YEARS ENDING JUNE 30, 1919, 
AND JUNE 30, 1920. 

CASH ACCOUNT. 

Institution Receipts: Years 1918-19 1919-20 
Board of patients: 

Towns $15,221.68 $20,463.56 

Associations 5,170.54 7,560.34 

Individtials 4,406.87 7,351.48 

$24,799.09 $35,375.38 
Total receipts for board, Oct. 1, 1918-June 30, 1920 .... $60,174.47 

Miscellaneous receipts: 

Cothing $949.65 $931.84 

Telephone and telegram .. 17.36 49.98 

Transportation 2.35 

Construction payroll 36.86 

Miscellaneous sales 1,993.11 2,440.14 

$2,962.47 $3,458.82 
Total miscellaneous receipts, Oct. 1, 1918-June 30, 1920 $6,421.29 

To bills of institution paid by State Tuberculosis Commission : 

Years 1918-1919 1919-1920 

Construction $4,824.49 $25,328.06 

Equipment $380.00 591.00 

Maintenance 108,907.65 136,360.70 

$114,112.14 $162,279.76 

Total of all bills paid by State Tuberculosis Commission $276,391.90 
Cash on hand October 1, 1918 644.71 



Total receipts from all sources $343,632.37 



THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION. 51 

PAYMENTS. 
Year 1918-19. 1919-20 

To Secretary of State Tuberculosis Commission: 

Patients'^ board $24,656.79 $34,827.31 

Miscellaneous sales 2,010.47 2,490.12 . 

Refund on patients' board 372.-52 462.56 

Due from Comptroller, 

weekly pajToll 36.86 

Transportation 2.35 

Purchase of clothing 949.65 931.84 

Bills paid by State Tuber- 
culosis Commission $114,112.14 $162,279.76 

Cash on hand July 1, 1920 500.00 

$142,140.78 $201,491.59 
Total expenditures, October 1, 1918-June 30,1920 $343,632.37 

RESOURCES AND LIABILITIES. 

Resources. 

Cash on hand July 1, 1920 .... $500.00 
Accounts receivable : 

To^vns and cities 1,833.32 

Associations 938.30 

$3,271.62 
Less advance payment on pa- 
tients' board 250.79 

$3,020.83 

Liabilities. 

Due State Tuberculosis Com- 
mission from institution 
as per resources 3,020.83 

ANALYSIS OF EXPENSES. 

Year 1918-19. 1919-20 

Equipment, not including replacement of any kind: 

Dental equipment $375.00 

Miscellaneous equipment 5.00 $591.00 



$380.00 $591.00 
Total $971.00 

Constructon : 

Coal bins $800.00 

Poultry plant 451.22 

Sewage plant 3,400.73 

Storeroom 172.54 

Additional infirmary bed ac- 
commodations $328.06 

Laundry 25,000.00 



$4,824.49 $25,328.06 

Total $30,157.55 

Total expenses for equipment and construction $36,123.55 



52 STATE OF CONNECTICUT. 

MAINTENANCE. 

Years 191S-19. 1919-20. 
Salaries, wages and labor: 
General administrative 

and office $11,850.47 

Medical 'service 11,251.88 

Farm, stable and grounds 2,425.51 

Medical $5,521.43 

Administration 3,435.94 

Kitchen and dining room 

service 7,035.71 

Domestic 1,625.78 

Ward (male) 4,476.05 

Ward (female) 7,007.56 

Industrial 638.72 

Engineering 2,188.11 

Laundry 4,957.67 

Farm 3,031.98 

Stable, garageand grounds 1,252.07 

$25,527.86 $41,171.02 
Total $66,698.88 

Food: 

Meat $9,246.32 $13,328.40 

Eggs 3,373.50 5,831.97 

Butter 2,770.34 3,790.50 

Milk 9,207.05 15,318.35 

Fish 846.14 1,112.23 

Flour 2,028.73 4,669.45 

Sugar 3,964.67 3,993.91 

Vegetables 861.67 524.50 

Fruit 800.98 1,571.89 

Canned goods 5,736.67 230.30 

Tea and coffee 787.64 628.94 

Miscellaneous 2,449.98 977.10 

Beans 188.99 

Bread, crackers, etc 251.22 

Cereals, rice, meal 690.24 

Cheese 100.02 

Lard 122.73 

Macaroni and spaghetti .. 112.86 

Molasses and syrups 87.47 

Peanut butter 4.34 

Potatoes > 1,532.25 

Seasoning and condiments 324.07 

Yeast and baking powder 215.09 



$42,073.69 $55,606.82 
Total $97,680.51 

Furnishings and Household Supplies: Equipment: 

Repairs to fixtures $743.86 

Furniture 1,499.42 $837.95 

Beddmg and linen 6,183.98 374.03 

Crockery and silverware .. 1,157.55 210.92 

Kitchen furnishings 50.79 518,66 

Medical equipment 5.13 



THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION. 53 

Miscellaneous 1,905.00 748,51 

Carpets, rugs, etc 425.50 

Dry goods and small 

wares 114.15 

Laundry supplies and ma- 
terials 42.54 

Lavatory supplies and 

disinfectants 277.70 

Electric lamps 296.84 

Freight and express 2.17 

$11,545.73 $3,848.97 
Total $15,394.70 

Heat, light and power : 

Coal $11,253.00 $4,857.96 ' 

Electric lights 1,208.76 

Gasoline, oil and wood .... 584.69 832.18 

Electric power 860.43 

Freight on coal 55.50 

Electricity 2,927.41 

Sundries 85.30 

$13,906.88 $8,758.35 
Total $22,665.23 

Ordinary repairs : 

Buildings $176.00 

Plumbing 14.49 $325.61 

Sewers 97.10 

Brick 2.00 

Cement, lime, etc 25.95 

Eectrical work and sup- 
plies 72.82 

Hardware, iron and steel 197.06 

Labor 96.25 

Lumber 9.77 

Paints, oils, glass, etc 280.17 

Steam fittings and sup- 
plies 126.11 

Tools and machines 197.14 

Boilers 208.85 

Sundries 1,141.16 

Freight and express 3.29 

$287.59 $2,686.18 
Total , $2,973.77 

Farm and stable: 

Poultry $28.95 $307.40 

Carriage and harness re- 
pairs 86.45 85.00 

Horses 725.20 

Farm tools 45.23 

Fertilizer and seeds 838.50 701.24 

Sundries 404.15 7.30 

Auto 1,528.01 

Blacksmithing and sup- 
plies 86.67 



54 



STATE OF CONNECTICUT. 



Grain, etc •.. 615.73 

Hay 394.19 

Labor 80.00 

Spraying materials 23.35 

Stable and barn supplies .. 3.75 

Tools and machinery 126.84 

Freight and express .35 

$3,656.49 $2,431.82 

Total $6,088.31 

Medical and general care : 
Laboratory supplies and 

apparatus $18.31 

Manual training supplies 17.34 
Medical supplies and ap- 
paratus $4,315.04 2,645.41 

School books and supplies 6.36 16.00 

Sputum cups, etc 25.50 

Tobacco 4.75 

Water 1,009.44 1,120.56 

$5,330.84 $3,847.87 

Total $9,178.71 

Office and incidental expense: 

Automobiles $7,185.00 

Auto repairs and supplies 1,720.41 

Printing and binding $124.43 424.13 

Postage 25.14 

Advertising 49.94 

Stationery and office sup- 
plies ..* 436.50 232.15 

Telephone and telegram 303.35 437.00 

Travel 44.19 56.14 

Sundries 103.09 

Freight and express 495.26 

$908.47 $10,728.26 

Total $11,636.73 

Miscellaneous: 

Grounds (trees) $52.-00 

Insurance and bonding .... $1,146.72 2,194.35 

Laundry and supplies 4,523.38 6,023.31 

Freight 5.00 

Labor 1.50 

Repairs 5.25 

$5,670.10 $8,281.41 

Total $13,951.51 

Total expenses for maintenance $245,2.68.35 



THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION. 



55 



MAINTENANCE RESOURCES. 

Goods on hand: 

Fuel $5,616.81 

Stockroom 16,346.79 $18,531.59 

Bedding and linen 6,151.55 3,423.13 

Drug and lavatory sup- 
plies 4,711.43 3,907.00 

Total $32,826.58 $25,861.72 

PER CAPITA. 

Recapitulation and per capita : 
Stock on hand Oct. 1, 

1918 $14,365.15 $32,826.58 

Maintenance expense 108,907.65 136,360.70 

Total $123,272.80 $169,187.28 

Stock on hand July 1, 

1919 32,826.58 25,861.72 

Maintenance expense $90,446.22 $143,325.56 

Maintenance less sales .... 1,993.11 2,440.14 

Actual maintenance ex- 
pense $88,453.11 $140,885.42 

Total number of hospital days 41,026 58,253 

Cost per patient per day $2,156 $2,418 

Cost per patient per week .... $15.09 $16,926 

Average for two years $16,008 

VALUATIONS. 

Land $5,000.00 

Dormitories 65,500.00 

Dwelling houses 24,100.00 

Barns and storehouses 4,150.00 

Sheds and icehouses 450.00 

Other buildings, including barns 39,356.95 

Vehicles 7,870.00 

Live stock 2,982.50 

Merchandise on hand 36,172.89 

Tools and appliances 4,408.65 

Furniture and equipment 11,112.01 

Drugs and other similar supplies 3,907.00 

Total $205,010.00 



REPORT OF THE FARM, 1919. 

Products delivered to sanatorium: 

1 bushel beets $1.50 

4 bushels of peppers, at $1.75 .... 7.00 

470 lbs. cabbage at $.08 37.60 

7 bushels of tomatoes at $2.00 .... 14.00 

2 bushels carrots, at $1.75 3.50 



55 STATE OF CONNECTICUT. 

12 bushels parsley, at $1.00 12.00 

4,212 lbs. pork, at $.38 1,600.56 

2 tons oats, at $50.00 100.00 



Total $1,776.16 



October 1, 1918, to June 30, 1919 

Inventory September 30, 1918: 

Miscellaneous tools $412.90 

Hogs 1,800.00 

Pigs 405.00 

Hog houses and runs 284.46 

Total inventory $2,902.36 



Expenses for 1919: 

Salaries $1,819.13 

Horses 362.60 

Fertilizer, seeds, etc 838.50 

Blacksmith 86.45 

Tools 45.23 

Rent of land 135.00 

Sundries 224.15 



Total expenses $3,511.06 

Total expense and inventory $6,413.42 

Receipts for 1919: 

Vegetables, at market price S75.60 

Pork, 4,212 lbs., at 38c 1,600.56 

2 tons oats, at $50.00 100.00 



Total receipts $1,776.16 

Sales: 

Plants $5.00 

Guinea pigs 42.00 

Hogs 855.90 



Total sales $902.90 

Total sales and products $2,679.06 

Inventory : 

Wagons 250.00 

Fertilizer 50.00 

Horses 600.00 

Poultry 361.50 

Hogs 1,200.00 

Miscellaneous tools 267.40 

Hog houses and runs 225.00 



Total inventory $2,953.90 

Total inventory, sales and products $5,632.96 

Deficit $780.46 



THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION. 57 

REPORT OF THE FARM, 1920. 

Products delivered to sanatorium: 

17 bushels beets, at $1.25 $21.25 

5 bushels string beans, at $1.10 .... 5.50 

3,934 lbs. cabbage, at $.06 236.04 

50 bushels carrots, at $1.65 82.50 

530 doz. corn, at $.25 132.50 

21/2 bbls. kale, at $3.75 9.38 

3 bushels kohlrabi, at $2.00 6.00 

2^^ bushels peppers, at $2.25 5.63 

15 baskets peaches, at $1.10 16.50 

904 lbs. pumpkins, at $.05 45.20 

72 doz. summer squash, at $1.60 .... 115.20 

398 lbs. Hubbard squash, at $.061/2 .. 25.87 

480 bunches radishes, at $.04 19.20 

198 baskets tomatoes, at $.55 108.90 

465 lbs. rhubarb, at $.08 37.20 

134 bushels turnips, at $1.95 261.30 ' 

545 bunches rareripes, at $.09 49.05 

24 doz. lettuce, at $1.25 30.00 

84 doz. cucumbers, at $.22 18.48 

9 bushels onions, at $2.50 22.50 

517 bushels potatoes, at $3.50 1,809.50 

359 bushels field corn, at $.80 287.20 

147 bushels sweet corn, at $.80 117.60 

3,854 lbs. pork, at $.30 1,156.20 

Total $4,618.70 



REPORT OF THE FARM. 

July 1, 1919, to June 30, 1920 

Inventory, June 30, 1919: 

Wagons $250.00 

Fertilizer 50.00 

Horses 600.00 

Poultry 361.50 

Hogs : 1,200.00 

Miscellaneous tools 267.40 

Hog houses and runs 225.00 



Total inventory ' $2,953.00 

Expenses for 1920: 

Horses $400.00 

Salaries 2,021.32 

Blacksmithing and supplies 86.67 

Carriage and wagons and repairs 85.00 

Fertilizer and seeds 701.24 

Grain, hav, etc 1,009.92 

Poultry 307.40 

Tools 126.84 

Rent of land 180.00 

Sundries 34.75 



Total expense $4,953.14 

Total expense and inventory .... $7,906.14 



58 STATE OF CONNECTICUT. 

Receipts for 1920: 

Vegetables, at market price $3,462.50 

Pork, 3,854 lbs., at 30c 1,156.20 

Total receipts $4,618.70 

Sales : 

Plants $7.25 

Guinea pigs 12.00 

Hogs 771.00 

Miscellaneous sales 5.80 

Total sales $796.05 

Total sales and products $5,414.75 

Inventory: 

Wagons $285.00 

Hogs ....' 2,000.00 

Poultry 382.50 

Miscellaneous tools 336.55 

Sundries 150.20 

Hog houses and runs 500.00 

Total inventory $3,654.25 

Total inventory, sales and products $9,069.00 

Gain $1,162.86 



THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION. 59 

Financial Report of the State Tuberculosis 
Sanatorium at Norwich. 

DR. HUGH BAIRD CAMPBELL Superintendent 

DR. M. M. TEPLITZ Resident Physician 

MISS CLARA M. CHRISTOPH Secretary 

MR. E. J. DEEGAN Stenographer 

MISS MIRIAM M. CAMPBELL Housekeeper 

CASH ACCOUNT. 

Institution Receipts: 1918-19. 1919-20. 
Board of paAients: 

Towns $4,481.03 $9,562.13 

Associations 3,082.12 8,763.90 

Private 9,041.94 14,245.10 



Total receipts for board Oct. 1, 1918-July, 1920 $49,176.22 

Miscellaneous receipts: 
Miscellaneous sales: 

270.58 761.14 1,031.72 

To bills of institution paid by State Tuberculosis Com- 
mission : 

Maintenance $91,239,51 $122,247.13 

Equipment 25,932.25 1,185.00 

Construction 6,107.56 2,500.00 



$123,279.32 $125,932.13 
Total of all bills paid by State Tuberculosis Commission $249,211.45 

Cash due from State Tuberculosis Commission : 

Weekly payroll — Sept. 30, 1918 10.50 

Office account — Sept. 30, 1918 6.01 

Cash on hand — Sept. 30, 1918 202.04 



Total receipts from all sources $299,262.94 

PAYMENTS. 

1918-19. 1919-20. 
To Secretary State Tuberculosis 

Commission $14,942.8,6 33,415.69 

Bills paid by the State Tubercu- 
losis Commission $123,279.32 125,932.13 

Due on weekly payi'oll 516.74 

Due on office account 81.40 

Refund on patients' board 281.92 687.88 

Cash on hand June 30, 1920 500.00 



$138,504.10 $161,133.84 
Total payments $299,637.94 



60 STATE OF CONNECTICUT. 

RESOURCES AND LIABILITIES. 
Resources. 

Cash on hand June 30, 1920 $500.00 

Bills due from towns and cities 946.76 

Bills due from associations 331.77 

Bills due from private patients 7.83 



$1,786.30 



Liabilities. 



Due State Tuberculosis Commission from 

Institution as per resources $1,786.36 



ANALYSIS OF EXPENSES. 

New equipment, not including replacement of any kind: 

1918-19 1919-2.0 

Dental $375.00 

Screens 1,081.00 

Automobile $1,000.00 

Miscellaneous 24,476.25 185.00 

$25,932.25 $1,185.00 
Total $27,117.25 

Construction : 

Infirmary $2,652.00 

Additional storeroom 1,227.74 

Superintendent's cottage 2,212.72 

Barn — Insurance fund 15.10 

Glass sash $2,500.00 

$6,107.56 $2,500.00 
Total $8,607.56 

Maintenance: 

1918-19. 1919-20 

Salaries $24,485.47 $41,285.97 

Office and travel 1,441.35 1,836.19 

Food 29,791.25 50,518.42 

Clothing and materials 22.54 23.26 

Furnishing and household 

supplies 6,086.04 3,665.49 

Medical and general.. 5,728.55 4,041.48 

Heat, light and power 8,135.46 7,947.25 

Farm and stable 1,215.86 1,030.65 

Grounds 257.32 225.18 

Ordinary repairs 7,713.36 3,119.85 

Laundry 4,163.93 6,883.55 

Insurance 1,849.64 681.07 

Auto repairs 248.74 964.77 

Religious services 24.00 

$91,239.51 $122,247.13 
Total maintenance $213,486.64 



THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION. 61 

MAINTENANCE RESOURCES. 

Goods on hand: 1918-19. 1919-20. 

. Fuel $4,986.71 $3,000.00 

Stockrooms 10,196.82 12,759.86 

Bedding and linen 3,036.63 3,394.45 

Drugs 441.43 650.18 

Total $18,661.59 $19,804.49 

PER CAPITA. 

Recapitulation and per capita: 

Stock on hand Oct. 1, 1918... $16,980.73 (7-1-19) $18,661.59 
Total maintenance 91,239.51 122,247.13 

$108,220.24 $140,908.72 

Stock on hand 7-1-19 18,661.59 (7-1-20) 19,804.49 

$89,558.65 $121,104.23 

Maintenance less sales 270.58 761.14 

Total $89,288.07 $120,343.09 

Total number of hospital days 28,991 50,930 

Cost per patient per day $3,079 $2,362 

Cost per patient per week $21.55 $16,534 

Average for two years $19,042 

VALUATIONS. 

Thirty-one acres $11,000.00 

Buildings 137,300.00 

Live stock and vehicles 2,200.00 

Equipment, including beds and bedding, 
linens, household supplies and farm 
equipment 36,589.50 

Total $187,089.50 

REPORT OF FARM, 1918-20. 

Products delivered to sanatorium: 

Vegetables, at market pi'ices $650.10 

Potatoes, at market price 1,428.00 

$2,078.10 

Services rendered : 

Teams and services 2,520.00 

Sales 34.50 



$4,632.60 

Expenses: 

Labor $3,495.70 

Expenses 2,246.41 

5,742.11 



Farm deficit $1,109.51 



62 STATE OF CONNECTICUT. 

Financial Report of The Seaside, 
Niantic, Conn. 

DR. JOHN FRANCIS O'BRIEN Superintendent 

MRS. SARA E. COLGAN Head Nurse 

MR. JOHN H. ADAMS Secretary 

REPORT FOR THE YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1920. 
CASH ACCOUNT. 

Institution Receipts: 

Board of patients: 

Towns and cities $830.59 

Associations 500.17 

Individuals 482.62 

Total receipts for board Dec. 27, 1919-June 30,1920.... $1,813.38 

Miscellaneous receipts: 

Telephone, miscellaneous sales, etc $21.00 

Total miscellaneous receipts $21.00 

To bills of institution paid bv State Tuberculosis Commission: 

Maintenance .' $14,383.76 

Equipment 14,378.19 

Construction 19,868.01 

Total of all bills paid by State Tuberculosis Commission 48,629.96 

Total receipts from all sources . $50,464.34 

PAYMENTS. 

Refunds on patients' boai'd $1.71 

Bills paid by State Tuberculosis Com- 
mission $48,629.96 

Cash on hand June 30, 1920 1,832.67 

Total expenditures, Dec. 27, 1919-June 30, 1920 $50,464,34 

RESOURCES AND LIABILITIES. 
Resources. 

Cash on hand, June 30, 1920 $924.66 

Accounts receivable: 

Towns and cities 421.60 

Associations 174.35 

Individuals 32.05 

$1,552.66 

Liabilities. 

Due State Tuberculosis Commission from 

institutions as per resources $1,552.66 



THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION. 63 

ANALYSIS OF EXPENSES. 

Equipment not including replacement of any kind : 

Children's equipment $11,407.04 

Miscellaneous 2,971.15 

$14,378.19 

Construction : 

Children's Seaside 19,868.01 



Total expenses for equipment and construction $34,246.20 

MAINTENANCE. 

Salaries and wages $5,490.27 

Office and travel 1,004.88 

Food 3,249.59 

Clothing and material 29.04 

Furnishing and household supplies 511.88 

Medical and general 615.55 

Heat, light and power 1,751.66 

Ordinary repairs 16.18 

Insurance 962.48 

Automobile 67.92 

Laundry 684.31 



Total expenses for maintenance $14,383.76 

PER CAPITA. 

Recapitulation and per capita: 

Maintenance expenses $14,383.76 

Total number of hospital days 3,963 

Cost per patient per week $25,298 

Cost per patient per day $3,614 



64 



STATE OF CONNECTICUT. 



Medical Report of Five Sanatoria. 

ONE YEAR, NINE MONTHS— OCTOBER 1, 1918, TO JUNE 30, 
1919; JULY 1, 1919, TO JUNE 30, 1920. 

TABLE 1 Population. 

MERIDEN STATE TUBERCULOSLS SANATORIUM. 

1918-1*919 1919-1920 





Male 


Female 


Total 


Male 


Female 


Total 


Beginning 


59 


49 


108 


58 


51 


109 


Admitted 


89 


47 


136 


91 


50 


141 


Discharged 


43 


27 


70 


51 


32 


83 


Died 


43 


22 


65 


36 


20 


56 


Remaining 


58 


51 


109 


62 


49 


111 


Daily Average.... 


54 


46 


100 


f 59 


46 


105 



SHELTON STATE TUBERCULOSIS SANATORIUM. 

1918-1919 1919-1920 





Male 


Female 


Total 


Male 


Female 


Total 


Beginning 


71 
216 
136 
56 
95 
69 


32 
128 
73 
36 
51 
34 


103 
344 
209 
92 
146 
103 


95 

181 

138 

63 

75 

86 


51 
157 
112 
40 
56 
52 


146 


Admitted 


338 


Discharged 

Died 


250 
103 


Remaining 


131 


Daily Average... 


138 



HARTFORD STATE TUBERCULOSIS SANATORIUM. 

1918-1919 1919-1920 



Male Female 


Total 


Male 


Female 


Total 


Beginning 


98 42 


140 
170 

82 

72 


113 
140 
90 
47 
116 
116 


43 
96 
53 
43 
43 
43 


156 


Admitted 


113 57 
51 31 

47 25 


2^6 


Discharged 

Died 


143 
90 


Remaining 


112 44 156 


159 


Daily Average... 


119 41 


150 


159 



Total died not included in discharged. 



THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION. 



65 



NORWICH STATE TUBERCULOSIS SANATORIUM. 

1918-1919 1919-1920 



1 Male 


Female 


Total 


Male 

i 


Female 


Total 


Beginning 

Admitted 

Discharged 


45 1 42 

148 1 64 
66 38 


87 88 
212 211 
104 i 150 


43 
90 
69 
19 
45 
43.3 


131 
301 
219 


Died 

Remaining 

Daily Average... 


39 
88 
67.5 


25 
43 
38.6 


64 
131 
106.1 


62 
87 
95.9 


81 
132 
139 



Total died not included in discharged. 



THE SEASIDE, 1919-1920. 



1919-1920 



Total 




Beginning , 

Admitted 

Discharged .... 

Died 

Remaining , 

Daily Average 



TABLE 2 — Hospital Days. 



1918-19 



1919-20 



July ;. 

August 

September 
October .... 
Xovember 
December . 
January ... 
February 

March 

April 

May 

June 



13,679 
13,852 
14,937 
15,352 
13,849 
15,461 
15,571 
16,200 
15,899 



Meriden Sanatorium ] 27,117 

Shelton Sanatorium 37,666 

Norwich Sanatorium j 28,991 

Hartford Sanatorium ! 41,026 

The Seaside : 



16,848 
17,097 
16,284 
16,943 
16,244 
17,269 
17,495 
15,857 
16,786 
16,583 
17,541 
17,326 



Total 


1 134,800 


1 202,273 




Total Hospital Days. 






1 1918-19 


1919-20 



38,515 
50,612 
50,930 
58,253 
3,963 



66 



STATE OF CONNECTICUT. 



TABLE 3 — Length of Stay of Discharged Patients 



1918-19 



1919-20 



Under 3 months 

3 months to 6 months 
6 months to 1 year.. 

1 year to 2 years 

2 years and over 

Total •. 



268 

98 

60 

30 

9 



351 

150 

124 

60 

15 



465 



700 



Length of Stay of Patients Who Died. 





1918-19 


1919-20 


Under 3 months 


175 
51 
25 
21 
21 


149 


3 months to 6 months 


77 


6 months to 1 year 


47 


1 year to 2 years 


38 


2 years and over 


19 


Total 


293 


330 







THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION. 



67 



TABLE 4 Condition of Patients on Admission. 

MERIDEN STATE TUBERCULOSIS SANATORIUM. 

1918-1919 1919-1920 





Male 


Female 


Male 


Female 


2 yrs. 
Total 


Incipient 

Moderately advanced 

Far advanced 

Bone 


6 

27 
48 
4 


2 
2 


9 

8 

26 

3 

? 





5 
32 

43 

7 
1 

1 
2 


13 
8 

23 
5 

1 




33 

75 

140 

19 


Renal 

Glandular 

Non-tuberculous 


1 
2 
3 


Not treated 


4 


Total 


89 


47 


91 


50 


277 



SHELTON STATE TUBERCULOSIS SANATORIUM. 
1918-1919 1919-1920 



Male Female 



Male 



Female 



i. yrs. 
Total 



Incipient I 18 | 15 

Moderately advanced ! 164 | 79 

Far advanced j 28 30 

Acute miliary { I 

Surgical ! 6 I 3 

Non-tuberculous i . 1 1 

Total I 216 I 128 



10 
126 

39 

1 
5 



111 

34 

2 
2 



181 



157 



51 

480 

131 



12 



682 



HARTFORD STATE TUBERCULOSIS SANATORIUM. 

1918-1919 1919-1920 





Male 


Female 


Total 


Male 


Female 


! Total 


Incipient 


6 
25 
66 

6 
9 

1 


3 
5 

44 

2 
3 




9 1 
30 
110 



8 
12 



1 



25 

95 

4 
8 

8 



14 
78 

2 
1 

1 





Moderately advanced 
Far advanced 


39 

173 


Acute 





Bone 


6 


Glandular 


9 


Surgical 





Non-tuberculous 


9 


Total 


113 


57 


170 


140 


96 


236 



NORWICH STATE TUBERCULOSIS SANATORIUM. 
1918-1919 1919-1920 





1 Male 

1 


1 Female 


Male 


Female 


2 yrs. 
Total 


Incipient 

Moderately advanced 

Far advanced 

Bone 

Non-tuberculous 


1 8 
1 75 
1 62 
1 3 
1 


5 

39 

18 



2 


18 

119 

71 



3 


11 
61 

16 

2 


42 
294 
167 

3 

7 


Total 


1 148 


64 


211 


90 


513 



68 



STATE OF CONNECTICUT. 



TABLE 5 Condition of Patients on Discharge. 

MERIDEN STATE TUBERCULOSIS SANATORIUM. 

1918-1919 1919-1920 



Male 


Female 


Male 


Female 2 y«. 


Apparently arrested i 2 

Improved | 28 

Unimproved 9 

Died 4 

Non-tuberculous 


4 1 
10 
13 






6 

29 

16 






3 
21 
8 




15 

88 

46 

4 




Total 1 86 


49 


87 


52 


274 



SHELTON STATE TUBERCULOSIS SANATORIUM. 
1918-1919 1919-1920 





Male 


Female 


Male 


Female 


2 yrs. 
Total 


Apparently arrested 

Improved 

Unimproved 

Died 

Non-tuberculous 


14 . 

72 

50 

56 




4 
30 
36 
36 

3 


8 
79 

46 

63 

5 


3 
45 

56 

40 

8 


29 
226 

188 

195 

16 


Total I 


192 


109 


201 


152 


654 



HARTFORD STATE TUBERCULOSIS SANATORIUM. 

1918-1919 1919-1920 



Male 1 Female Total 


Male Female Total 


Apparently arrested 4 

Improved 27 

Unimproved ' 19 

Died \ 47 

Non-tuberculous ....J 1 


4 
14 
13 
25 




8 
41 
32 
72 

1 


8 
20 
58 
47 

4 


2 

18 
32 
43 

1 


10 
38 
90 
90 

5 


Total ! 98 


56 


154 


137 


96 


233 



NORWICH STATE TUBERCULOSIS SANATORIUM. 
1918-1919 1919-1920 





Male 


Female 


Male Female 


2 yrs. 
Total 


Apparently arrested 

Improved 

Unimproved 

Non-tuberculous 


2 
37 
27 




3 
23 
10 

2 


10 2 

88 39 

50 26 

2 2 


17 

187 

113 

6 


Total 


66 


38 


150 69 


323 



THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION. 



69 



TABLE 6 — Civil Condition of Patients. 



Male 



Female 



Total 



Married | 580 

Single [ 567 

Widowed i 52 

Divorced | 14 

Separated | 1^ 

Total I 1214 



333 


913 


330 


897 


38 


90 


13 


27 





1 



714 



1928 



TABLE 7 — Ages of Patients Admitted. 



Male 



Female 



Total 



Under 14 years I 77 

14 to 20 years i 107 

21 to 30 .years j 363 

31 to 40 years 315 

41 to 50 years ! 225 

51 to 60 years j 93 

Over 60 years j 34 

Total I 1214 



69 


146 


133 


240 


270 


633 


168 


483 


44 


269 


23 


116 


7 


41 



714 



1928 



70 



STATE OF CONNECTICUT. 



TABLE 8 — Nativity of Patient, Father and Mother. 

Total for 1 year 9 months. 



Patient 



Father 



Connecticut 678 

United States 1 330 

A-lbania I 1 

Armenia 1 4 

Austria-Hungary I 112 

Belgium j 2 

Bohemia -i 4 

Canada , 33 

China 1 

Denmark j 2 

England | 32 

Finland ] 10 

France i 4 

Galacia i 5 

Germany ! 28 

Greece ] 30 

Holland I 

Ireland | 112 

Italy ! 208 

Jamaica | 1 

Lithuania i 6 

Macedonia 1 

Norway 2 

Nova Scotia i 2 

Persia | 8 

Poland 106 

Portugal 6 

Roumania i 3 

Russia I 121 

St. Helena Island ! 

Scotland ; I 9 

Slavonia I 1 

Sweden , 40 

Switzerland } 3 

Syria | 9 

Turkey ' 2 

Unknown 12 

Wales ; 1 

West India 0^ 

Total foreign I 920 

Total native J 1008 

Total I 1928 



193 

242 

1 

6 

149 

1 

5 

73 

2 

6 

60 

14 

11 

5 

82 

29 

2 

331 

257 

1 

9 

1 

7 

1 

8 

123 

7 

6 

149 



14 

1 

64 

3 

9 

7 

46 

2 

1 



Mother 



1493 
435 



223 

219 

1 

6 

155 

1 

5 

74 

1 

6 

63 

12 

7 

5 

80 

29 

1 

333 

255 

1 

9 

1 



124 

7 

6 

144 

1 

13 
1 

65 
3 
9 
9 

40 
3 




1486 
442 



1928 



1928 



THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION. 



71 



TABLE 9 — Residence of Patients. 



I 



Total for 
21 months 

Addison 1 

Ansonia 29 

Abington 1 

Allingtown 1 

Avon 1 

Ballouville 1 

Baltic 2 

Beacon Falls 4 

Bethel 1 

Blbomfield 1 

Branford 10 

Bridgeport 235 

Bridgwater 1 

Bristol 33 

Brooklyn 2 

Berlin 1 

Burnside 3 

Central Village 2 

Chester 2 

Collinsville ■. 3 

Cromwell 5 

Canton 1 

Cheshire 1 

Cos Cob 1 

Danbury 26 

Danielson 6 

Deep River 2 

Derby ..- 5 

Devon 2 

East Hartford 9 

East Haven 3 

East Haddam 1 

East Hampton 1 

East Lyme 1 

Eastern Point 1 

East Portchester 1 

East Windsor 1 

East Norwalk 1 

East Morris 1 

Ellington 1 

Enfield 2 

Essex 1 

Fairfield 9 

Fair Haven 1 

Forestville 2 

Glastonbury 10 

Glenbrook 3 

Granby 3 

Guilford 2 

Greenville 3 

Greenwich 1 

Groton 7 

Hamden 2 



Total for 
21 months 



Hampton 

Hartford 

Huntington ... 

Ivoryton 

Kensington .... 

Willingly 

Lakeville 

Leete's Island 

Litchfield 

Lisbon 

Long Hill 

Manchester .... 

Madison 

Meriden 

Middlebury ... 
Middletown ... 

Milford 

Milldale 

Moosup 

Mt. Carmel ... 

Mystic 

Naugatuck 

New Britain ... 



1 

1 

7 

2 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

3 

61 

2 

20 

7 

1 

7 

1 

6 

20 

78 

New Haven 371 



i New London 

j New Milford 

j Newtown 

Norfolk 

j Norwich 

, Norwalk 

I New Canaan 

North Grosvenordale. 

North Haven 

'■ North Stonington 

North Westchester.... 

Noroton 

Oakville 

i Occum 

I Orange 

Plainfield 

Plainville 

Pomfret 

Portland 

Putnam 

i Ridgefield 

Rockville 

Saybrook 

Saugatuck 

Sandy Hook 

Seymour 

Shelton 

Somers 

Somersville 



76 
1 
3 
1 
84 
19 
3 
2 
2 
3 
1 
4 
4 
1 
1 
8 
2 
2 
1 
9 
1 
9 
1 
1 
1 
9 
7 
1 
1 



72 



STATE OF CONNECTICUT. 



Total for 
21 months 

Southington 9 

South Manchester 11 

South Norwalk 13 

Southport 1 

South Windsor ;.. 3 

Stafford Springs 3 

Stamford 53 

Stevenson 1 

Stony Creek 2 

Stonington 7 

Stratford 11 

Taftville 7 

Terryville 5 

Thomaston 5 

Thompsonville 5 

Torrington 32 

Uncasville ..: 1 

Union City 5 

Wallingford 17 

Wai'ehouse Point 4 

Warrenville 1 

Waterbury 169 



Waterford 

Watertown 

Waterville 

West Allington. 

Westbrook 

West Cornwall . 

West Hartford 

West Haven 

Westpoii; 

Westville 

Wethersfield .... 

Whitney ville ... 

Willimantic 

Windsor 

Windsor Locks . 

Windsorville ... 

Woodbury 

I Woodmont 

] Woodstock 

i Yalesville 

Yantic 



Total f or 
21 months 

2 
1 



1 
1 
1 
1 

13 
2 
1 
3 
1 

19 
3 
3 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 



THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION. 



73 



TABLE 10 — Occupation of Patients. 




Male 


Female 


Total 


Accountant 1 


3 





3 


\ctoi* . . 


1 

4 


1 



2 


Assembler 


4 


Attendant ! 


6 





6 


\uto Decorator ' 


1 1 

2 

8 







1 


Baker 


2 


Bartender 


8 


Barber 


9 
1 






9 


Barrel worker 


1 


Belt maker 


1 





1 


Blacksmith 


6 





6 


Boatman 


1 





1 


Bookkeeper 


3 


10 


13 




2 





2 


Brakeman 


5 





o 


Braid maker 


1 





1 


Brass woi'ker 


10 





10 




1 





1 


Buffer 


7 





7 


Butcher 


4 





4 


Cabinet maker 


1 





1 




1 





1 


Carpenter 


25 





25 




1 


1 


2 


Chauffer 


1 





1 




1 


1 


2 


Cleaner 


3 





3 


Clergyman 


1 





1 


Clerk : 


33 


27 


60 




21 


8 


29 


Clockmaker 


1 





1 


Cigarmaker 


4 





4 


Caretaker 


1 





1 




2 





2 


Conductor 


6 





6 


Commercial artist 


1 





1 


Cook 


7 


2 


9 




2 

1 






2 


Corset cutter 


1 




1 





1 


Cooper 


1 





1 


Dentist 


1 





1 


Dentist helper 


1 





1 


Dishwasher 


2 
2 






2 


Draughtsman 


2 





3 


5 



5 


Driller 


3 




3 





3 


Drop forger 


1 





1 




2 





2 


Electro plater 


1 





1 


Electrician 


1 





1 




2 





2 


Engineer 


8 





8 


E ngr aver 


2 





2 




2 





2 



74 STATE OF CONNECTICUT. 

TABLE 9 — Residence of Patients. — Continued. 



Male 



Female 



Total 



Factory hand 

Farm hand 

Filer 

Finisher 

Fireman 

Furniture upholsterer. 

Fisherman 

Foreman 

Forger 

Foundryman 

Game keeper 

Garage helper 

Gardener 

Granite cutter 

Grinder 

Grocer 

Gunsmith 

Hatter 

Housewife 

Housework 

Horse trainer 

Inspector 

Insurance agent 

Janitor 

•Jitney driver 

Junk dealer 

Laborer 

Lathe hand 

Laundry man 

Lithographer 

Linotype operator 

Lock maker 

Loom fixer 

Lunch man 

Machinist 

Machine operator 

Marine engineer 

Mason 

Merchant 

Messenger 

Metal polisher 

Meter reader 

Mill hand 

Motorman 

Moulder 

Mechanic , 

Newsdealer , 

Night watchman 

No occupation , 

Nurse 

Nursemaid 

Orderly 

Oysterman 

Packer 

Painter 

Paper ruler 



131 


97 


228 


35 


1 


36 


2 





2 


1 





1 


7 





7 


1 





1 


1 





1 


8 1 





8 


4 





4 


1 





1 


1 





1 


1 





1 


5 





5 


3 





3 


22 





22 


6 





6 


3 





3 


8 





8 





324 


324 





•70 


70 


8 





8 


8 


3 


11 


3 





3 


10 


1 


11 


2 





2 


2 





2 


201 





201 


1 





1 


2 





2 


1 





1 


1 





1 


3 





3 


1 





1 


1 





1 


57 





57 


35 


2 


37 


1 





1 


3 





3 


3 





3 


2 





2 


1 





1 


1 





1 


16 


7 


23 


2 





2 


14 





14 


12 





12 


2 





2 


2 





2 


20 


12 


32 





13 


13 





2 


2 


3 





3 


2 





2 





1 


1 


14 





14 


1 





1 



THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION. 



75 



I 



TABLE 10 — Occupation of Patients. — 


Continued. 






Male 


Female 


Total 


Pattern maker 

Paymaster 


1 

1 

1 

4 i 

1 

1 

3 
16 

3 

3 

1 

1 

3 

6 
54 

3 

3 

9 

5 

1 

1 

1 

1 

5 

1 



2 


13 
13 

4 

1 

1 



8 

6 

4 
13 
10 

9 
35 



1 

1 

1 

9 

1 
18 





7 

24 

5 

3 



1 





" ! 

i 







2 
58 


1 


4 




1 

1 
5 

2 


5 







6 


2 


7 
1 
1 

7 


3 


1 

1 


Peanut vendei" 1 


1 


Peddler 1 

Photographer 


4 

1 


Piano maker 

Plater 

Plumber 

Polisher 1 


1 

3 

16 

3 


Policeman 

Porter 

Pool room proprietor 

Printer ' 

Pupils 

Restaurant proprietor 


3 
1 
1 
3 
8 
112 
3 
3 


Rubber worker 

Sailor 

Saloon keepei' 


10 
5 

1 


School teacher 

Sheriff ' *. 


5 

1 


Shoemaker 


1 
5 


Silver finisher 


1 

1 


Singer 


2 

1 




18 


Soldier 


13 


Stage hand 


6 
1 


Station man 

Stenographer 


1 
5 


Student 


8 
6 




4 


Solderer 


13 


Tanner 


10 
9 


Teamster 

Telephone operator 


35 
6 


Threader 


1 
1 


Tobacco sox'ter 


3 


Tool maker 


9 


Waiter 


1 
25 


Warper 


1 


Ward maid 

Watchman 

Weaver 


1 

7 

31 

5 


Watchmaker 

Winder 


3 
3 



76 STATE OF CONNECTICUT. 



Report of the Secretary. 

BEGINNING OCTOBER 1, 1918, AND ENDING JUNE 30, 1919. 
MAINTENANCE. 

Receipts. 

Cash on hand October 1, 1918.... $5,513.14 

Maintenance appropriation $228,758.62 

Transferred from laundiy appro- 
priation to Maintenance ap- 
propriation, October 11, 5,000.00 

Emergency appropriation 100,000.00 

Board of patients, Hartford 

Sanatorium.: 24,656.79 

Board of patients, Meriden Sana- 
torium 15,571.56 

Board of patients, Norwich Sana- 
torium 14,673.08 . . 

Board of patients, Shelton Sana- 
torium 23,603.80 

M^isc. receipts, Hartford Sana- 
torium 2,010.47 

Misc. receipts, Meriden Sanato- 

, rium 134.48 

Misc. receipts, Norwich Sana- 
torium ....; 269.78 

Misc. receipts, Shelton Sana- 
torium 16.98 

$414,695.56 

Total $420,208.70 



Disbursements. 

Maintenance of Hartford Sana- , 

torium $108,907.65 

Maintenance of Meriden Sana- 
torium 82,297.94 

Maintenance of Norwich Sana- 
torium 91,239.51 

Manitenance of Shelton Sana- 
torium 92,002.47 

$374,447.57 

Balance, ca.sh on hand June 30, 

1919 $3,44S.81 

Balance, maintenance appropria- 
tion 42,155.97 

Cash advanced on office account 156.35 

$45,761.13 

^ Total $420,208.70 



THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION. 77 

CONSTRUCTION 

Expended to 

Appropriation. June 30, '20. Balance. 

Coal bins $1,000.80 $800.00 $200.00 

Hartford poultry plant 462.60 451.22 11.38 

Hartford sewage plant 4,280.76 3,400.73 880.03 

Incinerator, Norwich and Shelton 1,273.00 1,273.00 

Laundry 25,000.00 25,000.00 

Additional infirmary accommoda- 
tions at Norwich 2,773.60 2,652.00 121.60 

Norwich isolation rooms 1,200.87 1,200.87 

Norwich superintendent's cottage 2,117.05 2,212.72 

Norwich superintendent's cottage 95.67 
(transferred from Shelton in- 
firmary appropriation.) 

Additional storeroom facilities 1,432.80 1,378.68 54.12 

Shack alteration 959.44 745.00 214.44 

Completion of Shelton infirmary.. 1,334.21 1,213.14 121.07 

Stable and wagon shed, Shelton 966.98 966.98 

Shelton water supply 1,763.00 1,700.00 63.00 

Sleeping porches 3,000.00 3,000.00 

Total construction appropriation $47,695.98 

Disbursements. 

Total expended on construction appropriation $17,553,49 
Balance, cash on hand 30,106.49 



Total $47,695.98 

EQUIPMENT 

Expended to 
Appropriation. June 30, '20. Balance. 

Auto trucks $107.97 $107.97 

Dental equipment 1,500.00 $750.00 750.00 

Miscellaneous equipment 39,875.90 38,266.94 1,608.96 

Equipment Shelton infirmary 1,539.25 574.34 964.91 

Total equipment appropriation $43,023.12 

Disbursements. 

Total expended on equipment appropriation.. $39,591.28 
Balance cash on hand 3,431.84 



Total $43,023.12 

Note : The following balances of appropi'iations were 
transferred to Miscellaneous Equipment Appropriation by 
order of the Boai'd of Control : 

Balance — Glass sash appropriation $15.34 

" Norwich isolation rooms 1,200.87 

" Incinerator 1,220.16 

." Root cellar 284.81 

" Shack alterations 214.44 

Stable and wagon sheG 966.98 

" Shelton water supply 63.00 

Auto trucks 107.97 

" Hartford sewage plant 880.03 

" Norwich additional infirmary.... 121.60 

" Shelton infirmai'y equipment.... 964.91 

" Shelton infirmary 25.40 



Total $6,065.51 



78 STATE OF CONNECTICUT. 

SALARIES AND EXPENSES OF COMMISSIONERS, 
SECRETARY AND COMMISSION OFFICE. 

Receipts. 

Commissioners' salary appropriation $8,854.14 

Commissioners' expense appropriation 2,016.67 

Secretary's salary appropriation 2,000.00 

Commission office expense appropriation 2,451.11 

Total $15,321.92 

Disbursements. 

Dr. Stephen J. Maher, salary •. $1,874.97 

Dr. Stephen J. Maher, expense 300.00 

Wallace S. Allis, salary 1,874.97 

Wallace S. Aliis, expense 300.00 

Arthur R. Kimball, salary 1,874.97 

Arthur R. Kimball, expense 300.00 

George I. Allen, Secretary, salary 1,499.94 

Commission office expense 2,451.11 

Total $10,475.96 

Balance of appropriation reverted to State 
treasury : 

Balance — Commissioners' expense $1,116.67 

" Commissioners' salary 3,229.23 

" Secretai-y's salary 500.06 

Total $4,845.96 



I 



Total $15,321.92 

BEGINNING JUNE 30, 1919 AND ENDING JUNE 30,1920. 

MAINTENANCE. 

Receipts. 

Cash on hand July 1, 1919 $3,448.81 

Maintenance appropriation $796,000.00 

Board of patients at Hartford 

Sanatorium 34,827.31 

Board of patients at Meriden San- 
atorium 20,994.36 

Board of patients at Norwich San- 
atorium 32,989.09 

Board of patients at Shelton San- 
atorium 30,212.09 

Misc. receipts, Hartford Sanato- 
rium 2,490.12 

Misc. receipts, Meriden Sanato- 
rium 649.22 

Misc. receipts, Norwich Sanato- 
rium 429.50 

Misc. receipts, Shelton Sanatorium 992.47 

Credits on cancelled checks 1,109.34 

Maintenance appropriation, 1917- 

1919 42,155.97 



962,849.47 



Total $966,298.28 



THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION. 79 

Disbursements. 

Maintenance of Hartford Sana- 
torium $136,360.70 

Maintenance of Meriden Sanato- 
rium 95,512.79 

Maintenance of Norwich Sana- 
torium 122,247.13 

Maintenance of Shelton Sanato- 
rium 127,238.09 

Maintenance of The Seaside 14,383.76 

Maintenance of Hartford Sanato- 
rium, 1917-19 appropriation 5,278.31 

Maintenance of Meriden Sanato- 
torium, 1917-19 appropria- 
tion 10,547.49 

Maintenance of Norwich Sanato- 
rium, 1917-19 appropriation 1,413.17 

Maintenance of Shelton Sanato- 
rium, 1917-19 9,403.42 

$522,384.86 

Balance, cash on hand June 30, 

• 1920 $12,266.61 

Balance, maintenance appropria- 
tion 417,218.74 

Balance, maintenance appropria- 
tion 1917-19, reverted to 
Treasurer's oflRce 9,952.69 

Cash advanced on office account 273.13 

443,913.42 

Total $966,298.28 

CONSTRUCTION. 

Expended to 
Appropriation. June 30, '20. Balance. 

Hartford poultry plant $1,000.00 $1,000.00 

Additional infirmary bed accom- 
modations, Meriden and Hart- 
ford 3,000.00 $383.68 2,616.32 

Meriden fire protection 5,000.00 5,000.00 

Meriden infirmary 75,000.00 75,000.00 

Meriden wagon shed 500.00 500.00 

Norwich glass sash 2,500.00 2,500.00 

Roads and grading, Shelton 3,000.00 1,767.00 1,233.00 

Additional storeroom, 1917-19.... 54.12 21.60 32.52 

Children, 1917-19 19,878.47 19,868.01 10.46 

Laundry plant, 1917-19 25,000.00 25,000.00 

Total construction appropriation $134,932.59 

Disbursements. 

Total expended on construction appropriation $49,540.29 

Balance, cash on hand 85,349.32 

Reverted to State Treasurer's office 42.98 

Total $134,932.59 



80 STATE OF CONNECTICUT. 

EQUIPMENT. 

Expended to 
Appropriation. June 30, '20. Balance. 

Automobile $2,000.00 $2,000.00 

Dental, 1917-19.. 750.00 750.00 

Children's Seaside 12,000.00 11,407.04 $592.96 

Appropriation, 1917-19, miscel- 
laneous 1,608.96 1,327.00 281.96 

Miscellaneous 25,000.00 4,579.15 20,420.85 

X-Ray, Meriden and Norwich 3,500.00 3,500.00 

Total equipment appropriation $44,858.96 

Disbursements. 

Total expended on equipment appropriation $20,063.19 

Balance, cash on hand 24,513.81 

Reverted to State Treasurer's office 281.96 



Total $44,858.96 

SALARIES AND EXPENSES OF COMMISSIONERS, 
SECRETARY AND COMMISSION OFFICE. 

Receipts. 

Comptroller's reserve for Commissioners' sal- 
aries $15,000.00 

Comptroller's reserve for Commissioners' 

expenses 3,000.00 

Comptroller's reserve for Secretary's salary 5,000.00 

Comptroller's reserve for Commission office 

expense 6,000.00 

Total $29,000.00 

Disbursements. 

Dr. Stephen J. Maher, salary i!;2,500.00 

Dr. Stephen J. Maher, expenses 400.00 

Wallace S. Allis, salary 2,500.00 

Wallace S. Allis, expenses 400.00 

Arthur R. Kimball, salary 2,500.00 

Arthur R. Kimball, expenses 400.00 

George I. Allen, Secretary, salary 2,500.00 

Commission office expenses 2,687.18 

$13,887.18 

Balance on Commissioners' salary appro- 
priation $7,500.00 

Balance on Commissioners' expense appro- 
priation 1,800.00 

Balance on Secretary's salary appropriation.. 2,500.00 

Balance on Commission office expense appro- 
priation 3,312.82 

15,112.82 

Total $29,000.00 



THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION. 81 

STATEMENT OF RED CROSS FUND OF 1919. 

Receipts. 

National Tuberculosis Association, Red Cross 

Fund $53,037.02 

Miscellaneous receipts 1,317.22 

Other sources 4,526.02 



$58,880.26 



Disbursements. 

Executive salaries $2,620.82 

Stenographers 448.20 

Clerks 32.84 

Traveling expenses, field secretary 377.22 

Office supplies, stationery, etc 702.00 

Postage, express, etc 462.44. 

Literature and printed matter 1,756.30 

Conferences and institutes 339.87 

Modern health crusade 2,193.36 

Educational — motion pictures 19.16 

Equipment of dispensaries, sanatoria, etc.... 7,963.76 

Maintenance of dispensaries 63.25 

Payment for patients in sanatoria 54.86 

Seal campaign expenses 2,978.87 

Miscellaneous expenses 1,200.28 

Distributed to Local Associations as fol- 
lows: 

Ansonia 1,445.32 

Beacon Falls 75.00 

Branford 231.30 

Bristol 577.00 

Bridgeport 4,600.00 

Danbury 355.86 

Fairfield 942.75 

Griswold 108.41 

Hamden 168.32 

Hartford 2,725.52 

Litchfield 200.00 

Manchester 600.00 

Meriden 1,980.00 

Middletown 487.03 

Milford 100.00 

New Britian 3,006.25 

New Haven 6,645.84 

New London 980.33 

Norwalk 941.47 

Norwich 422.06 

Seymour 200.00 

Stamford 1,816.91 

Torrington 799.76 

Vernon 278.20 

Wallingford 2,000.00 

Waterbury 4,600.00 

West Haven 502.54 

Winchester : 100.00 

Windham 776.96 



$58,880.26