Skip to main content

Full text of "Report .."

See other formats




W STORAGE 



&tate of (Connecticut 
Public Document No. 53 






State of Connecticut 

REPORT OF 

The State Tuberculosis Commission 

FOR THE PERIOD 
Beginning July 1, 1922, and Ending June 30, 1924 



l 1 X2 -|^ 



^tate of QJmutecticut 

PUBLIC DOCUMENT No. 53 



REPORT 



OF THE 



State Tuberculosis Commission 

TO THE GOVERNOR 



For the Period Beginning July 1 , 1 922 
and Ending June 30, 1924 



PRINTED IN COMPLIANCE WITH STATUTE 



HARTFORD 

Published by the State 
1924 






Publication 

Approved by 

The Board of Control 



REFORMATORY PRESS 
CHESHIRE, CONN. 



STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION. 

Dr. Stephen J. Ma her, New Haven Term expires July 1, 1929 
Wallace S. Allis, Norwich Term expires July 1, 1925 

Arthur R. Kimball, Waterbury Term expires July 1, 1927 

Secretary 

George I. Allen, Middletown 



CONTENTS 

Page 

Narrative, 5 

Friends of the State Tuberculosis Sanatoria, 27 

Sanatoria Employees, - 47 

Medical Report of Five Sanatoria, 52 

Financial Report, Hartford Sanatorium, _.. 63 

Financial Report, Meriden Sanatorium, 71 

Financial Report, Norwich Sanatorium, 75 

Financial Report, Shelton Sanatorium, 81 

Financial Report, The Seaside, 88 

Report of Secretary, _ _ 93 



ILLUSTRATIONS 

Facing Page 

Frontispiece — At Laurel Heights, 1 

The Sun Bath Hour at Cedar Crest, _ 13 

A Winter Hike at Undercliff, 24 

Laurel Heights Infirmary, 40 

The Seaside Marching Company, 65 

The Flag Drill at The Seaside, 65 

The Seaside, 88 



REPORT 

OF THE 

State Tuberculosis Commission 

^tatc of Connecticut 

To His Excellency, the Governor of Connecticut, and the 
Members of the General Assembly: 

In compliance with the requirements of the statutes 
of Connecticut, we hereby submit to you a report of our 
activities of the past two years. We hope that this, our 
report, will not only interest but please you. It must 
interest you because of the large sums of the State's money 
of which it is an accounting, and because of the large 
number of citizens of Connecticut whose welfare, — whose 
lives even, — depend on our wise expenditure of these 
large sums of money. 

Our expectation that it will please you is based on the 
fact that it shows (1) that Connecticut has kept step with 
the progressive spirit of the times in generously caring 
for such of her citizens as have been stricken by man- 
kind's great enemy, tuberculosis; and (2) that Connecti- 
cut's fight against tuberculosis not only continues to be 
as successful as that made by any other community in 
the world, but that in some matters of organization and 
tactics and equipment Connecticut's superiority is appar- 
ent and recognized. 

In this matter of control for instance, most states of 
America and Europe are still endeavoring to lead their 
forces up to the enemy, tuberculosis, over the soft roads 
and bogs of amateur effort and voluntary association. 
The cult of amateurism is well enough in play, and militia 
are desirable in times of peace, but in actual war the 
amateur and the volunteer must give way to the profes- 
sional soldier and to state control. Therefore it is, that 
many of the other states are beginning to realize that 
Connecticut's plan of entrusting its antituberculosis cam- 
paign to a small commission and of holding that com- 
mission responsible for doing in Connecticut all that hu- 
man beings can do to stop the tubercle bacillus, is much 
the simplest and most efficient plan yet devised for the 
purpose. 



NARRATIVE 



OUR CENTRAL CONTROL 



The tuberculosis authorities of other states realize 
thoroughly the wisdom of our plan of having separate 
sanatoria for children and for adults. The failure of 
many of them to follow our example in establishing chil- 
dren's sanatoria has been due to the lack of a strong 
central control of the sanatoria of their state, a control 
that would have authority to consider the tuberculosis 
needs of the state as a whole, and authority to decide on 
the special character of work to be done at each sana- 
torium. 

In most states, the cities or counties erect sanatoria, 
and, conduct them independently of one another. Be- 
cause of this fact, a well considered state program is 
difficult of accomplishment. Of course it may be retorted, 
that in Connecticut a compact community of less than two 
million people, it is easier to have a smoothly working 
central control of the tuberculosis activities of the state, 
than it would be in such states as New York or Texas. 
Perhaps so, but whether easy or difficult of attainment, 
central control is a goal worth striving for. 

COLLECTIVE BUYING 

The fact that we have in our care five state institutions 
in which the maintenance needs are very similar, makes 
it imperative that we do as much collective buying as 
possible. For most of our staple requirements, such as 
linen, beds, bedding, cutlery, silverware, printing, butter, 
eggs, flour, sugar, tea, coffee, fruits and vegetables, we 
invite bids from the large dealers of the state or country, 
and award the contracts accordingly. For some other 
articles, such as coal and fresh and smoked meats, we have 
found it wiser and more economical to permit the superin- 
tendents of the various sanitoria to secure frequent bids, 
from the large dealers in the nearby towns. 

OUR CAMPAIGN OF EDUCATION 

The statutes require not only that we select the sites 
for sanatoria, and erect and conduct such sanatoria, but 
they require also that we keep the general assembly ac- 
quainted with the progress of the war against tuberculosis, 
and that we carry our educational antituberculosis cam- 
paign especially to the schools, to the general public and 
to the factories of the state. 



NARRATIVE 7 

It must be evident to every reader of the newspapers 
and magazines, and to every patron of the moving picture 
theatres that we have been diligent in complying with this 
section of the state law. We have frequent requests from 
the tuberculosis authorities of other states for our litera- 
ture and the photographs and lantern slides of scenes at 
our sanatoria, particularly at our children's sanatoria. 

One feature of educational work to which general 
attention is seldom called is that done by the physicians 
of our sanatoria in conducting or supervising tuberculosis 
clinics in various towns. Sometimes we have feared that 
we were open to criticism for giving our superintendents 
or their assistants so much work outside of the sanatoria 
but the work is so important and has so much to do with 
the prevention of new cases of tuberculosis in families, 
schools, factories, and stores that we have not felt able to 
refuse the petitions of the various benevolent organiza- 
tions of men and women who wish to organize, or who 
have organized these dispensaries or clinics. Of course 
we recognize, and our physicians recognize that their first 
duty is to the sanatorium patients, and that if these out- 
side demands for help continue to increase in number we 
may be obliged to devise some new method of answering 
them. These tuberculosis clinics are of importance not 
only for the patients who attend them, but they also have 
an important educational effect on the communities in 
which they are established. 

Perhaps, we may be forgiven if we refer here to the 
fact that in the tuberculosis journals of this country, and 
of England frequent recognition is given of the pre-emi- 
nence of the Connecticut State Sanatoria in the matter of 
tuberculosis research. 

WHAT'S IN A NAME? 

This classic question has been asked a good many times 
during the past dozen years by the physicians of the state. 
Perhaps to his own surprise, and usually to the consterna- 
tion of his patient and his patient's family, the physician 
discovers that his patient has tuberculosis and he advises 
that his patient apply immediately for admission to one 
of the splendid sanatoria that Connecticut has provided 
for its tuberculous sick. He tells the patient and the 
patient's family of the increasing renown of the institu- 
tions at Hartford, Shelton and Norwich, and of the sur- 
prising cures that have taken place at these sanatoria. 



8 NARRATIVE 

He urges the importance of beginning immediately the 
serious treatment of the treacherous disease He di- 
lates on the atmosphere of cheerfulness that prevades 
these sanatoria. He emphasizes the skill and sympathy 
of the doctors and nurses. He gives glowing accounts 
of the interesting life of the patients at the sanatoria. He 
almost persuades himself that he would like to spend his 
own vacation at one of these wonderful institutions. And 
then to his dismay he finds that he has failed to impart 
much of his rapture to his listeners. 

"Why not?" he asks. "Don't you believe me? Do 
you doubt my diagnosis of your sickness? Or do you 
think I have overdrawn the charm of the sanatoria?" 

Hesitatingly, the patient's family admits that it believes 
everything the physician has said, but that it cannot bring 
itself to consent to let its beloved and proud brother or 
sister or father or mother or son or daughter go for treat- 
ment to an institution bearing so offensive a name as 
"The Hartford 'State Tuberculosis Sanatorium," or "The 
Shelton State Tuberculosis Sanatorium" or "The Norwich 
State Tuberculosis Sanatorium." 

"What is offensive about these names?" the innocent 
doctor asks. 

He is quickly informed that the incorporation of the 
word "state" in the names of an institution conveys the 
idea that it is a penal place or at least a place to which 
people are committed by order of the court, and that the 
same idea is conveyed and perhaps strengthened by the 
naming of an institution after a city or town. If one 
hears or reads that somebody has been sent even by his 
physician to a state institution at Wethersfield, Cheshire, 
Middletown, Meriden, Norwich, East Lyme, or Mansfield, 
the first thought that comes to the mind of the hearer or 
reader is not a pleasant one. The doctor impatiently 
asks — 

"What's in a name?" The patient, however, instead 
of taking his advice, calmly decides to try living on a 
farm in Connecticut or in some other state, or to go to 
some low-grade but well-named private sanatorium, per- 
haps hundreds or thousands of miles away, in either event 
greatly jeopardizing his or her chances for recovery, and 
impoverishing himself and his family. 

We of the State Tuberculosis Commission have, long 
been aware of the existence of this little psychological 
problem and this year we decided to attempt its solution. 
We asked the school children of the state to suggest suita- 



NARRATIVE 9 

ble popular names for the three sanatoria, Hartford, 
Shelton and Norwich, and offered a little prize for the 
successful competitors. There were several hundred actual 
competitors. The winner for the Shelton prize was Carl 
Shilkowski, 212 Division Avenue, Shelton. The name 
chosen was Laurel Heights. 

The name of the winner of the Hartford prize was 
Marjorie Hale of 1650 Broad Street, Hartford, and her 
suggestion was Cedarcrest. 

Of course, for official, legal and business purposes it 
will, for the present at least, be necessary to retain the 
old names of the institutions, but the popular names 
chosen for popular use, "Laurel Heights" and "Cedar- 
crest" have already been received with approval by the 
newspapers, the physicians, the nurses, the patients, and 
the tuberculosis organizations of the state. None of the 
names offered for the Norwich Sanatorium was deemed 
satisfactory. Another competition for the Norwich name 
will be conducted during the coming winter. 

OUR SLOW PROGRESS AT NIANTIC 

At the last session of the General Assembly, we made 
known the crying need that there was of enlarging The 
Seaside at Niantic. The original purchase by the state 
six years ago consisted of about two and a half acres of 
land having a ninety-seven foot frontage on a beautiful 
white beach at the eastern end of Crescent Beach. On 
these two acres stood a three story wooden summer hotel 
called the White Beach Hotel. This hotel, a failure 
financially, had been closed and for sale for two years. 

Along the beach, to the west of the White Beach Hotel 
property, were a score or more of attractive summer cot- 
tages occupied in the season by owners or lessees from 
various parts of the country. Facing the sea, to the east 
of the White Beach Hotel property was a large tract of 
approximately eighteen acres, extending from the beach 
to the tracks of the New Haven Railroad. On this 
property, stood an old frame house, unoccupied by its 
owners except for eight or ten of the fifty-two weeks of 
the year. 

The purpose of the state in purchasing this hotel 
property was to provide a place suitable for treating 
with sunbaths in all months of the year, such children of 
Connecticut, as are crippled with bone or glandular 
tuberculosis. After many vicissitudes, political and social, 



10 NARRATIVE 

serious and ludicrous, this purpose of the State had been 
finally accomplished, and the great heart of Connecticut 
rejoiced. In spite of the fact that The Seaside was the 
first state institution of its kind in America, and that many 
of the leaders of the medical profession were yet skepti- 
cal of the power of continuous sun-baths to cure bone 
tuberculosis, the success of the institution was immediate, 
and in a few months a "waiting list" of patients began to 
form. 

"A waiting list" is a very serious problem for a state 
institution that offers to the public, relief from pain and 
hope of cure, not available elsewhere. Even the most 
enthusiastic of the medical friends of The Seaside lost 
much of their enthusiasm when they found that they could 
not secure the admission of their patients to the new 
institution for months and sometimes a year after his 
or her application had been filed. 

Visitors to The Seaside from every walk in life, saw 
the crowded building, learned of our waiting list, mar- 
velled at the cures taking place under their eyes, and 
impatiently asked why the state did not secure some of 
the great stretch of adjacent land east of the institution 
and erect on this idle land additional fireproof buildings 
for the development of the splendid work now done in 
the cramped quarters of the made-over summer hotel. 

Before the sitting of the last General Assembly, we 
approached the owners of this tract of land east of the 
state property, to learn the price they set on the whole or 
part of this property. After considerable delay, the 
owners came together for a conference on our request 
and replied to us that the land "was not for sale in whole 
or in part." 

After discussion of the situation with the Attorney 
General, we decided to ask the General Assembly for an 
appropriation for the securing of the needed land by 
purchase or condemnation. Our request to the General 
Assembly was bitterly opposed by the owners of the 
property, but in the last days of the session, an appropria- 
tion of one hundred thousand dollars was made for the 
erection of the new building, and another of twenty-five 
thousand dollars for the purchase of the land. The State 
Tuberculosis Commission and the State Comptroller were 
"directed to acquire such adjacent land as said Commision 
required." 

In November 1923, we notified the State Comptroller 
that we, the State Tuberculosis Commission, required a 



NARRATIVE 11 

section of this land approximately 200 feet wide. As 
representing himself and us, the State Comptroller en- 
deavored to induce the owners of the needed land to come 
to an amicable agreement as to the value of the land 
needed. He failed utterly. Therefore, in order to com- 
ply with the expressed will of the General Assembly, we 
were obliged to call to our aid the State's right of eminent 
domain over the land of the state. In November 1923, 
we handed over all the papers in the case to the Attorney 
General of the State together with the unanimous vote 
of the Commission that it "required" the above mentioned 
200 foot strip east of the present property of the state. 
Because of the great burden of work imposed on the office 
of the Attorney General by the prosecution in court of 
the scores of cases of medical frauds unearthed last year, 
a serious consideration of our request was not possible 
until the summer. And then the Attorney General de- 
cided that our unanimous vote, as to our requirements 
of this 200 foot section of land, would better have added to it 
the signature of the State Comptroller. We, therefore, 
have again passed a formal vote as to our need of the 
200 feet and with the added signature of the State Comp- 
troller have handed it to the Attorney General. We 
understand that action by the courts will soon be had. 

WHY TUBERCULOSIS EXPERTS ARE FEW 

In one scene of a recent Irish play which had a three 
years run in Dublin, London and America, there is enacted 
a violent family quarrel over the question of what should 
be done with the tempermental youngest son who, because 
of his sporting proclivities, had failed six years in succes- 
sion to pass his medical examinations at Trinity College, 
but who had succeeded in wasting in riotous living most 
of the family's savings. One indignant brother suggested 
that he be shipped immediately to Australia, Canada, or 
Alabama or to some such semi-barbarous region. An- 
other advised getting the prodigal a job cleaning streets. 
The pacifist of the group, however, urged that even though 
the young man had neither the brains nor the character 
necessary to become a doctor, it would still be easy, if the 
family pooled its influences to have the spendthrift ap- 
pointed "a tuberculosis officer or some other of those 
things that don't need to know anything." 

As a matter of fact, it is not so many years since a some- 
what similar view of tuberculosis experts was prevalent 



12 NARRATIVE 

in many parts of this country and even in some parts of 
Connecticut. The physician who paid special attention 
to tuberculosis was looked upon by the laity as a profes- 
sional relative of the corner faker. By many of the 
doctors he was regarded as a graceless interloper who 
was trying to steal their patients. 

"He knows well enough" they said, "that for chronic 
coughs, with wasting and weakness, there is nothing to 
do but to wrap the patients in flannels, stuff them with 
cod liver oil, and advise them to make their wills." 

His friends dolefully shook their heads when his name 
was mentioned. They deplored his abandoning of the 
straight and narrow way that leads to medical success, 
and his heeding, instead, of the promptings of the wild 
hope of curing or preventing consumption. 

Nowadays, perhaps, the pendulum has swung a little 
too far the other way. It may be that now the tubercu- 
losis expert has more honor from his fellow physicians, 
from his friends, and from the general public than he 
really deserves. But if that be so, the fault lies not with 
him but with his former critics. Their criticism of the pio- 
neer tuberculosis experts had the effect (1) of limiting the 
number of those who made special studies of tuberculosis, 
to those physicians who at some time or other had them- 
selves shown symptoms or signs of active tuberculosis; 
and (2) of causing all the seeking for knowledge of the 
origin and treatment of tuberculosis to be confined to a 
few inadequately endowed laboratories and sanatoria; 
and (3) of destroying all incentive for the ordinary recent 
medical graduate to perfect himself in the science and art 
of diagnosing and treating tuberculosis, that most common 
of human diseases; and (4) of causing the development 
of two generations of ordinary physicians who did all 
they could, not only to exclude cases of tuberculosis from 
their private practice but also — a much more serious 
matter — to bar cases of tuberculosis of the lungs from the 
hospital wards over which they had control; and finally 
(5) of causing the public to greet with extraordinary 
honor and gratitude those comparatively few physicians 
who devote their time and thought to the curing and 
preventing of tuberculosis. 

THE NEED OF MORE TUBERCULOSIS EXPERTS 

Every week's issue of the medical journals of the coun- 
try contain advertisements that indicate how widespread 



-NARRATIVE 1. 

is the demand for capable doctors for the medical staffs 
of the tuberculosis sanatoria of the country, and how 
scarce are the physicians qualified to respond to this de- 
mand. 

In Connecticut, we have not suffered so much as some 
other states but we have not been entirely trouble-free. 
Our principal trouble conies from the fact that other 
states take our assistant physicians by offering them high- 
er positions, usually as superintendents of sanatoria. The 
nation-wide reputation for excellence that has come to the 
Connecticut sanatoria in the last few years has, of course, 
and properly, been reflected about the heads of our medi- 
cal and nursing staffs, and has increased the market value 
of their service to boards of directors of institutions in 
other states. 

In view of this insistent demand for capable sanatorium 
doctors and nurses, we neither expect nor desire to retain 
indefinitely in subordinate positions in our sanatoria, 
physicians and nurses who are capable of superintending 
the activities of other and often larger institutions. It 
seems to us, however, that we ought to provide more 
attractive quarters at several of the sanatoria for assis- 
tant physicians and other important members of the staffs. 
At Meriden, for instance, the first assistant physician and 
his wife and two children are forced to live in a few poorly 
lighted rooms on the second floor of the old infirmary 
building, while the second assistant physician and his wife 
occupy two small rooms in the crowded nurses' home. 
At Shelton we have been obliged to house the chief assis- 
tant physician and his wife in a small building, originally 
erected for a garage. At Hartford, we have a satisfac- 
tory building for the first assistant physician, but the sec- 
ond assistant physician and his family are crowded into 
a few rooms in the back of the infirmary building. At 
Norwich, there are satisfactory quarters for one assistant 
physician, but it will be necessary soon to have a second 
assistant physician at this institution and his coming will 
necessitate a revising of the present arrangement of the 
quarters of the staff and the other help. At the Seaside, 
at present, the superintendent has no assistant, and the 
consideration of the whole matter of staff accommodations 
at this institution must be deferred until the command of 
the General Assembly as to the acquiring of adjacent 
land is obeyed. Our ideas as to how these various de- 
fects in the housing of our staffs should be remedied we 



14 NARRATIVE 

will present to your honorable body in requests for special 
appropriations for Shelton, Meriden, and Norwich. 

OUR SANATORIA SCHOOLS 

At both of our sanatoria for children we conduct 
schools. We employ five competent graduated and cer- 
tificated teachers, four at Undercliff and one at The Sea- 
side. Not every good teacher of the ordinary school is 
capable of doing good work with children sick or crippled 
with tuberculosis. It is, therefore, a matter of great 
satisfaction to us that we are able to report that the re- 
sults obtained by our staff of teachers have received the 
approval of inspectors of the State Department of 
Education, and of other competent pedagogic critics. 
Several of our pupils have successfully taken the High 
School examinations of various cities. Very interesting 
reports have come to us from teachers of public schools, 
of the good impressions our cured and bronzed and happy 
children have made on the minds and morale of the rest 
of the pupils. 

WHY SANATORIA? 

''Many tuberculosis patients die in sanatoria. They 
could do no worse at home. Many tuberculosis patients 
recover, at home. They could do no better in sanatoria. 
Why then sanatoria?" 

In some such words, skeptical citizens occasionally ex- 
press their views of the great work that Connecticut, for 
the past dozen years, has been conducting at her state 
tuberculosis sanatoria. 

Why Sanatoria? Because without sanatoria, a thous- 
and sick citizens of Connecticut who are now, bravely 
and hopefully fighting for their lives under conditions 
most favorable for success, would be forced to make their 
fight under conditions that the experience of civilization 
has shown to be least favorable for success. Yes, tubercu- 
lous patients die at sanatoria and yes, tuberculous pa- 
tients will continue to die at sanatoria until somebody 
discovers a specific that will cure tuberculosis, as quinine 
cures malaria, or as morphine cures pain. But yes, also, 
tuberculous patients are cured at sanatoria and they are 
cured in numbers proportionately larger than in the prac- 
tice of any private physician. Of the patients who come 
to Connecticut's tuberculosis sanatoria, the very sick, 
whether rich or poor, are benefited by the opportunity 



NARRATIVE 15 

offered to them, to make the most of the few chances of 
recovery that remain to them. One of the essentials of 
the modern treatment of cases of tuberculosis whether 
they be early cases or advanced cases, is good food attrac- 
tively served, and plenty of it. Although our sanatoria 
make no attempt to vie with the metropolitan hotels in 
the matter of china and napery and polylingual waiters, 
we pride ourselves on the fact that no hotels serve to their 
guests better bread, meats, fruits, vegetables, eggs, milk, 
cereals or canned goods than we supply to Connecticut's 
patients at her five sanatoria. We buy the best in the 
market and we buy in the best markets. We employ the 
best chefs that we can find, and we exercise a close super- 
vision of the food as it comes to us from the wholesalers 
and as it appears on the tables and trays of our patients. 

It is the unanimous verdict of patients, nurses and 
physicians, who come to our institutions from sanatoria 
in other parts of the country that the table of Connecti- 
cut's sanatoria, affords at least as substantial and attrac- 
tive fare as that provided in the most pretentious and 
expensive private sanatoria of the land. 

Another essential in the modern treatment of tubercu- 
losis is a healthful and cheerful and restful environment. 
That is a very fortunate patient indeed who can find in his 
own home such advantages of environment as Connecticut 
supplies to her sanatoria patients. The sanatoria are 
delightfully situated on the summit or sides of beautiful 
hills that command views of great valleys and winding 
rivers and near or distant cities, and that afford to patients 
hopefully fighting their way back to health and useful- 
ness, wonderful and ever changing pictures of fields and 
woods and sky. 

CONNECTICUT'S KINDLY CITIZENS 

In addition to these gifts of nature to the Connecticut 
Sanatoria, it should be remembered that the organized 
and unorganized friends of the various sanatoria are con- 
stantly bestirring themselves to increase the happiness 
and fortitude of the patients. Thanks to the efforts of 
these friends of ours, all the sanatoria are now provided 
with radio outfits, and radio outfits that function. All 
the sanitoria except The Seaside have splendid moving- 
picture apparatus, and weekly performances of the 
best films; frequent theatrical entertainments by pro- 
fessional and amateur artists; concerts by the most famous 



16 NARRATIVE 

of the bands and orchestras of the state ; wonderful holi- 
day pageants devised and carried out by the patients 
and members of the staffs, Of course, the two hundred 
and fifty children at Undercliff and The Seaside are the 
special beneficiaries of the sympathy and love of the big 
hearted people of Connecticut. At Christmas time it is 
worth the while of any man or woman to visit either or 
both of these institutions to see for himself or herself how 
vain are the preachings of those who assert that there is 
no Santa Claus. 

We would call attention to the pages of this report on 
which our superintendents give the names of the princi- 
pal benefactors of their several institutions. 

SWISS AND CONNECTICUT SANATORIA COMPARED 

In connection with the conference of the International 
Union against Tuberculosis held last in August 1924 in 
Lausanne, the Swiss medical and railroad authorities and 
the Swiss hotel proprietors arranged, for the benefit of 
the conference, "a voyage of information" to all the fam- 
ous tuberculosis sanatoria of the Alps. One of the mem- 
bers of the Connecticut Tuberculosis Commission, (Dr. 
Maher) had the good fortune, as a Director of the Ameri- 
can National Association and as a member of the Council 
of the International Union, to attend this conference, and 
to take part in this voyage of information. Perhaps a 
few of his observations at the conference and the subse- 
quent "voyage" would be of interest to the members of 
the General Assembly: 

The great private Swiss sanatoria for pulmonary tu- 
berculosis are sumptuous hostelries, four to eight stories 
in height, in which some of the rooms are provided with 
verandas, and some have no such provision. The sana- 
toria at Davos, Leysin and Montana are erected on the 
upper slopes of great mountains and of course afford 
splendid, awe-inspiring views of neighboring peaks and 
valleys. The sanatoria at Arosa stand in a deep and 
lovely chalice a mile and a half above the level of the 
sea. In this massive mountain cup, the light of the sun 
and the moon and the stars, and the creeping mists and 
the sudden rains and the whirling snows make such scenic 
effects as only Milton or Dante dreamt. In the matter 
of grandeur and sublimity, such sites so far outclass the 
locations of the Connecticut sanatoria as to make one 
hesitate about instituting comparisons. 



NARRATIVE 17 

Nevertheless it must be remembered that tuberculosis 
sanatoria are erected for the benefit of sick men, women 
and children and not for the purpose of stimulating poets, 
musicians or painters and that even the most enthusiastic 
of good livers tire of a continuous diet of partridge. At 
Swiss sanatoria, as at all other sanatoria, the most im- 
portant part of the treatment of the tuberculosis patients 
is a combination of protracted rest and unfaltering 
courage. 

Standing in the presence of cloud-piercing, glacier- 
clad mountains, it is difficult for the most self-sufficient 
of men to preserve intact his faith in his ego, his belief 
in his own importance, or in the value of his own efforts. 
How much more difficult is it for the patient who, 
month after month from his bed of fever, and of coughing, 
and of weakness, and of homesickness, gazes only at the 
massive and solemn heights that surround the temporary 
prison to which his doctor and his sickness have commit- 
ted him. 

How much more easy is it for the patient at any of 
Connecticut's sanatoria to keep flying high the banner 
©f his battle for life ! Whether at Cedarcrest, or at 
Laurel Heights or at Norwich, he is only a few hundred 
feet above the sea. Enchanting and not depressing views 
of valley and rivers ; a sweet and varied countryside ; 
kaleidoscopic but intimate and kindly sunrises and sun- 
sets; comforting knowledge of the proximity of family 
and friends, and of their confidence and sympathy: all 
tend to hearten him and to make more certain his victory. 

Switzerland may have more winter sunshine than Con- 
necticut, but, the year around, Connecticut has at least 
as much sunshine as Switzerland, and has it in more di- 
gestible portions. She seldom has the long continued 
periods of summer rain and cold and fog that are so fre- 
quently the despair of Swiss tourists and Swiss hotel 
keepers. Therefore, so far as the single matter of en- 
vironment is concerned, there would seem to be no good 
reason why a Connecticut citizen sick with tuberculosis 
should prefer a Swiss sanatorium to a Connecticut sana- 
torium. 

The facts that many of the first tuberculosis sanatoria 
of importance were erected in Switzerland and that these 
sanatoria quickly attracted to the Alps, wealthy consump- 
tives not only from the other countries of Europe but 
also from all the lands washed by the western and the 
eastern oceans, soon produced a wide-spread tradition 



18 NARRATIVE 

that for such tuberculosis patients as could afford the 
cost, Switzerland because of its incomparable mountain 
climate, its incomparable sanatoria and its incomparable 
specialists, was the place of choice, the place that offered 
the best promise of cure or, at least, of prolongation of 
life. 

In recent years, most of the countries of civilization 
have gone more or less deeply into the matter of erecting 
sanatoria to care for their consumptive citizens and the 
tradition as to Switzerland's superiority to all other lands 
has lost much of its hold on the minds of modern physi- 
cians. In England, however, the belief in the efficacy of 
a winter's stay in Switzerland as a treatment for tubercu- 
losis, is still strong. But the gloom and moisture of Eng- 
land in winter are considered a hardship even by the 
healthy natives, and, undoubtedly, benefits occur to many 
of the rich tuberculous English men and women who 
spend their winters on the white and sunny Swiss moun- 
tains. 

The Swiss physicians and indeed some physicians of 
other countries still insist that the question of altitude is 
of importance in any discussing of the relative merits of 
tuberculosis sanatoria. Possibly it is, but the great ma- 
jority of tuberculosis authorities, nowadays consider 
that altitude is an almost negligible matter, and that the 
success of a sanatorium in curing its patients depends on 
such matters as the skill, and devotion of its medical offi- 
cers and, its nursing staff, and on the degree of cheeriness 
and discipline that pervades the place, and very little if 
at all, on the number of hundred or thousand feet above 
the level of the sea, at which the institution is built. It 
is true that there is a very general agreement that a 
sanatorium for tuberculosis of the lungs, should not be 
erected on the shore, but the reason for this general 
agreement is that at the shore, it is difficult to protect 
inflamed lungs from the strong winds, and the frequent 
fogs that blow in from the ocean. In order to avoid these 
dangers however, it is not necessary to go to mountain tops. 
In fact most mountainous areas have less sunshine and 
more damp days, more wind storms than midland dis- 
tricts on lower levels. Perhaps there may be discovered 
better sites for tuberculosis institutions than those occu- 
pied by the Connecticut institutions but at present the 
burden of proof lies with the discoverers. 

Now as to the "incomparable specialists of Switzer- 
land," there can be no questioning of the skill and ex- 



NARRATIVE l'J 

perience of such men as Dr. Amrien of Arosa, Dr. Hudson 
of Montana, Dr. Nauman of Davos, and Dr. Rollier of 
Leysin. Their fame is secure. Any attempt in such a 
public document as this to compare them with the physi- 
cians on whom Connecticut depends to superintend her 
tuberculosis sanatoria, would be indelicate and possibly 
biased, but it is only fair to say that the patients in 
Swiss sanatoria receive no more thorough and scientific 
study than do the patients in Connecticut sanatoria, and 
that no sanatorium physician in Switzerland has access 
to better laboratory and x-ray equipment than have the 
physicians at the Connecticut sanatoria ; and that in some 
of the Swiss sanatoria the scientific instrumental equip- 
ment is inferior to the equipment of certain Connecticut 
sanatoria. 

In another matter, the matter of tuberculosis research, 
the work of the medical officers of the Connecticut sana- 
toria is equal to that of the physicians of the Swiss 
sanatoria. Considerable time and energy is employed 
by several of the Swiss experts in collecting meteorologi- 
cal data, and in studying the effects of altitude on the 
composition of the blood and on various symptoms of con- 
sumption. This work is rather frankly for the purpose 
of bolstering up the stumbling theory of the beneficial 
effects of mountain air on tuberculosis of the lungs. 
There is also some studying of the use of sunlight on pul- 
monary cases, and of the uses and abuses of artificial 
pneumothorax, and of the meaning of the number of blood 
platelets in the several stages of consumption. Com- 
pared with the work reported at the conferences of the 
Connecticut sanatoria, this Swiss research work, interest- 
ing and important though it is, does not seem discouragingly 
monumental. 

THE SUNLIGHT CURE IN SWITZERLAND 

Of course, the bright particular star in the Swiss medi- 
cal firmament just now is Dr. Rollier. He it was who 
startled the medical world by curing bone and glandular 
tuberculosis with continuous sun baths of the whole body. 
It is the fame of these sunlight cures of Dr. Rollier that 
brings to his sanatoria at Leysin medical visitors from 
every corner of the earth. At this little factitious town of 
Leysin there are now sanatoria, public and private, that 
accommodate several thousand patients. The results in 
surgical tuberculosis obtained at these sanatoria by the 



20 NARRATIVE 

use of sun bathing and rest, are certainly marvellous, 
and justify the acclaim that has come to Dr. Rollier and 
to Leysin. 

But even in this matter of heliotherapy the same results 
with the same methods are achieved by Connecticut at 
the Seaside Sanatorium at Niantic. At Leysin, moreover, 
there is in the summer months a decided slowing of the 
sunlight curing of the exposed patients because of the 
absence of both the sunshine and the snow. At Niantic, 
the little cripples have a good share of sunlight at all 
seasons of the year and at Niantic the beautiful, white 
beach, and the silvery sea, which do the work of the snow 
at Leysin, smile back at the sun in the summer as well 
as in the winter. It would seem therefore, that as the 
development of The Seaside progresses, there will no lon- 
ger be any reason why even the wealthiest Connecticut 
father, need seek at Leysin a cure for his crippled boy or 
girl. The cure will be always available at The Seaside 
at Niantic. 

OUR FIRE HAZARDS 

In one point, most Swiss sanatoria, and in fact most 
European sanatoria, as well as many American sanatoria, 
surpass the Connecticut sanatoria. They are built of 
brick, or stone, or steel and stucco whereas the Connecti- 
cut sanatoria are all of wood construction. The dangers 
of housing sick and crippled patients in highly inflam- 
mable buildings, has been of course obvious to us and we 
have endeavored to minimize these dangers as much as 
possible by the ordinary precautions of hydrants, fire 
drills, fire escapes, and by limiting the height of all new 
buildings to two stories. Thus far we have been fortu- 
nate. During the fifteen years since the first Connecticut 
sanatorium was erected we have had only two serious 
fires. In one, the barn at the Norwich Sanatorium was 
destroyed, and in another, the Doctor's cottage at Shelton 
was reduced to ashes in one hour. However, we have 
had several close calls. Small outbreaks due to chimney 
sparks, to defective flues, to lightning and to forest and 
grass fires have been quickly controlled by the little fire 
departments of the various institutions. We may not 
always be so successful. On a stormy winter night, even 
a small blaze would be a very ugly problem for night 
watchmen and nurses, and if it were not solved immediately, 
the possibilities are almost too harrowing to contemplate. 



NARRATIVE 21 

On account of its sudden awakening to the fire hazards 
of its overcrowded public institutions, our neighboring- 
state of New York is issuing bonds of fifty millions of 
dollars, to rebuild and enlarge its asylums and hospitals. 
We are not prepared to make any suggestions along that 
line to the General Assembly at this time. The devising 
of a fixed policy on so important and far reaching a sub- 
ject, seems to us to be more properly a matter for the 
consideration of His Excellency, the Governor, and the 
General Assembly itself. 

We are strongly of the opinion, however, that in the 
future, any appropriations for new buildings should be 
large enough to enable us to erect structures of brick or 
stone or other fire proof material. 

A NEGLECTED DUTY 

For the last ten years, we have been protesting in our 
reports to the General Assembly, against the barring of 
emergency and bleeding tuberculosis patients from the 
general hospitals of the state. We have insisted that the 
hysterical fear of contact with cases of tuberculosis dis- 
played by the directors and doctors of so many of the 
general hospitals, was cruel, and unjustifiable and a scien- 
tific scandal. We have shown that our position in this 
matter was supported by the National Tuberculosis 
Association, by the great medical teachers, and by the 
medical authorities of the army. It is only fair to report 
that a few of the best of our state hospitals have rescinded 
or modified their prohibition of cases of pulmonary tuber- 
culosis, and we are hopeful that in time, the still timid 
or recalcitrant general hospitals will come into the open, 
and do their whole duty to the sick citizens of the state. 
In this connection it is interesting to note the following 
resolution passed at the meeting of the National Associa- 
tion held in Atlanta last June. 

"Resolved, That the National Tuberculosis Association 
reaffirms its belief in the need of admitting cases of pul- 
monary tuberculosis to general hospitals in order to per- 
mit of a more intensive training of the young medical 
men of the country in this important field." 

HARTFORD — (Cedarcrest) 

The experiment begun four years ago, of erecting here 
a central laundry which would care for the needs of this 



22 NARRATIVE 

and other sanatoria has succeeded beyond our expecta- 
tion. The work is done more cheaply and more satis- 
factorily than ever before. 

In view of the possible expansion of the Hartford 
Sanatorium, we have secured estimates of the cost of 
adjoining lands, which we propose to submit to the 
Finance Board, and the General Assembly for their 
consideration. 

Dr. William M. Stockwell, the capable and sympathetic 
superintendent has at present two competent medical 
assistants, Dr. Forhan and Dr. Teplitz. The headnurse, 
Miss Reen has been in the service of the state for ten 
years. Her tact and skill have won the praise of all who 
know of her work. Miss Brindley continues her loyal 
and careful service as secretary. 

Thanks to the appropriations made by the last General 
Assembly for the enlargement of some of the old build- 
ings, the capacity of Cedarcrest has been increased to 204 
beds, thus making it the largest tuberculosis institution 
in the state. Such members of the General Assembly as 
have not recently seen this sanitorium will be surprised to 
note the improvement and enlargement that have taken place 
here. 

SHELTON— (Laurel Heights) 

The present approach to the Shelton Sanatorium from 
the Bridgeport-Shelton highway is tortuous and difficult. 
We have long looked with covetous eyes at a narrow strip 
of land running straight away from the State's property 
down an easy incline to the turnpike. Thanks to the 
intervention of some of our neighborhood friends the 
owners have made an offer of this strip of land to the 
state at a nominal figure. The State Highway Depart- 
ment has given its hearty approval of the proposed road, 
ft seems likely, therefore, that in the near future, Laurel 
Heights will have a driveway from the state road, some- 
what in keeping with the beauty of the site on which the 
sanatorium buildings stand. 

Since the addition of the heliotherapy platform to the 
great infirmary building and the repainting of all the 
buildings, the well recognized attractiveness of this in- 
stitution has been markedly increased. Dr. Edward J. 
Lynch, the energetic and popular superintendent, and Dr. 
George L. Bunnell the chief medical assistant, Miss 
Catherine Kessack the headnurse and Mrs. Hilda Gordon 
as housekeeper, have all been long in the service of the 



NAKRATIVE 23 

State, and to all of them is due a good share in the credit 
that comes to the institution at Laurel Heights for success- 
ful results and modernity of methods. 

NORWICH 

As we explained at the last session of the General 
Assembly, a vital need at this institution was a new sew- 
age system. After meeting and solving many perplexing 
problems, we finally succeeded in installing a new system 
that gives satisfaction to ourselves and our neighbors. 

The buildings at Norwich at present occupy all the 
available space on the summit of the roll of land owned 
by the State. When the original thirty acres were pur- 
chased twelve years ago, the Commission had hopes of 
soon securing for protection and expansion, the wooded 
property to the north. For various reasons it has not 
been possible to realize this expectation. Now, however, 
because of the urgent need of erecting a new helps' 
quarters and a new ward for women to the north of the 
main building, we have again approached the owners of 
the desired property, and they have agreed to sell to the 
state a piece of land 5 acres in size, a plot large enough 
for our present needs. We will submit the matter in 
detail to the Board of Finance and the General Assembly. 

Dr. Hugh B. Campbell is still superintendent at Nor- 
wich. Because of changes in his staff he has been obliged 
for months twice during the two years, to look after the 
detailed medical work of the institution as well as the 
important executive and laboratory work. Yet during 
all the time the Norwich Sanatorium retained its repu- 
tation of being one of the best in the country, and his 
tuberculosis clinics in the neighboring towns of New Lon- 
don and Windham Counties continued to function as well 
as ever. For the supervising of the more intimate 
mechanism of the sanatorium, much credit is due to Miss 
Miriam Campbell, the housekeeper, to Miss Viola Corn- 
sick, the headnurse, and to Miss Clara M. Christoph, the 
secretary, and to the institution's excellent staff of techni- 
cians and nurses. 

MERIDEN— (Undercliff ) 

Since the erection of the new fire-proof reception build- 
ing at Undercliff, this institution not only has an added 
appearance of dignity and permanancy, but one of its 
most difficult administrative problems, the keeping out 



24 NARRATIVE 

of infectious childhood disease, has been greatly simpli- 
fied. Dr. Gibson, the capable and alert superintendent 
of UnderclifF, has continued to attract favorable attention 
by his reports of the studies of pulmonary tuberculosis 
in children, made during the two years, by himself and 
his first assistant Dr. Carroll. Because of the increasing 
number of patients it was found necessary to appoint 
a second assistant to Dr. Gibson. The appointee was 
Dr. Andor Banyai. The headnurse at Undercliff for the 
past 14 years has been Miss Maude M. White. Her wise 
and gracious management of her staff and her young 
patients, has of course had much to do with the acknowl- 
edged success of the institution during all these years. 

THE SEASIDE 

The bronzed and laughing but more or less crippled 
children who, winter and summer, swarm naked, over the 
beach and the lawn of the State's sanatorium at Niantic, 
now so well known as The Seaside, continue to attract 
the attention not only of the medical authorities of this 
and other countries, but also the attention of social and 
political authorities. Nowhere else in the world is there 
a more thorough and logical use made of the power of 
sunlight to cure bone and glandular tuberculosis, and 
nowhere else are the results better. 

The two justifiable criticisms to be made of The Seaside 
are that it is too small and that the children should be 
housed in modern fireproof buildings. Elsewhere in this 
report we have explained in detail the reasons for the 
existence of these criticizable conditions at The Seaside. 
We expect that before the rising of the General Assembly 
these reasons will no longer exist. 

The fact that in spite of its scant accommodations, The 
Seaside has been so great a success, is due in part to the 
enthusiasm and skill of Dr. John F. O'Brien, the super- 
intendent. He has been ably seconded by Miss Rippen 
the headnurse, and by a group of patient and tender 
assistant nurses. Dr. O'Brien has been much in demand 
by the medical societies of other states, who wish to hear 
from him, at first hand, of the wonderful cures wrought 
by Connecticut at The Seaside. 

However, in the last analysis, the success of The Sea- 
side is due chiefly to the prompt and thorough and in- 
telligent support that the people of the state, as a whole, 
gave, and still give, to the institution, and to the medical 








A WINTER HIKE AT UNDERCLIFF 



NARRATIVE 25 

philosophy on which it is based. The people of the 
state, through their representatives in the General Assem- 
bly have repeatedly refused to be moved by intimidation, 
or by cajolery, from their purpose of making The Seaside 
at Niantic, a success, so great a success that in a few years 
from all the states in the Union will come medical pil- 
grimages to learn Connecticut's methods of straightening 
and curing the crumbling bones of her tuberculous chil- 
dren. Already these pilgrimages have begun; but they 
have onl3 r begun. 

OUR CENTRAL OFFICE 

Much of the success of our central control is due to the 
diligence and acuity of our assistant secretaries Miss 
Julia L. Cummings and Miss Mabel Baird, who in our 
office in the Capitol care for the admission of patients, 
give us frequent trial balances, prepare regular digests 
not only of the per capita cost of maintenance at all the 
institutions, but issue to us and to all the superintendents, 
comparative reports of the cost per patient per pound 
of every staple of diet, and of the pay rolls of the various 
departments of all the sanatoria. We are pleased to 
know that these analyses of our expenditures, have re- 
ceived the warm approval of members of the Board of 
Finance, and of the Board of Control. 

LIVES SAVED 

In the year 1849, the first year of which reliable statis- 
tics are to be had, the Connecticut death rate from con- 
sumption was 276 per hundred thousand inhabitants. In 
the year 1870 it was 226 per hundred thousand. In 1882, 
the year of Koch's discovery of the tubercle bacillus the 
Connecticut death rate from consumption was 224 per 
hundred thousand. In the year 1890, it was 206 per hun- 
dred thousand. In the year 1900, it was 169 per hundred 
thousand. In the past year (1923) it was 78 per hundred 
thousand. And if to the deaths from consumption, the 
deaths from all other forms of tuberculosis were added, 
the total tuberculosis death rate for Connecticut for the 
past year, would be only 89 per hundred thousand. 

These remarkable figures are deserving of study. They 
do not permit us to claim that the present low Connecticut 
death rate is due entirely to the educational and other 
efforts of the State Tuberculosis Commission. The de- 
cline in the death rate begun not only long before there 
was any effort made to organize a campaign against 
tuberculosis, but also long before Koch's discovery of the 



26 NARRATIVE 

cause of the disease. It is true that the decline in the 
last century was very much less than in recent years, but 
it must be admitted that for seventy years there was 
slowly developing in Connecticut and in many other parts 
of the civilized world, a powerful something that was 
hostile to consumption and to the tubercle bacillus. In 
spite of the fact that certain families and racial groups, 
perhaps cleaner, better housed, better clothed and better 
fed than their neighbors may yet have more tuberculosis 
than their neighbors, it is generally agreed that within any 
racial group or fairly homogeneous community, the power 
that has done most to lessen the ravages of tuberculosis 
has been cleanliness, ever increasing cleanliness, increasing 
scientific cleanliness, public and private. This increasing 
cleanliness has been dependent partly on the increasing 
wealth, but chiefly on the increasing knowledge of the 
whole community. 

It has been the purpose of the leaders of the anti-tuber- 
culosis campaign in Connecticut so to increase the knowl- 
edge of tuberculosis in every corner of the state, that the 
morbidity and mortality from the disease will fall to 
the lowest possible level. The statistics quoted in the 
beginning of this chapter would seem to show that the 
efforts of these leaders are succeeding. 






THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION 



27 



FRIENDS OF THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS SANATORIA. 

CEDARCREST. 

Donations of Books and Magazines. 



Rev. Paul Barbour, Hartford. 
Major Main, Salvation Army, 

Hartford. 
Mr. and Mrs. H. B. Whitmore, 

Hartford. 
Rev. William O'Dell, Elmwood. 
Mrs. L. B. Denison, Hartford. 
H. B. Peterson, Bennington, Vt. 
Miss Elsie Packer, Hartford. 
Hartford Council Catholic Women 
Diocesan Bureau of Social Service. 
Mrs. J. M. Hudson, Hartford. 
Mrs. James Daley, Hartford. 
Mrs Fred Atwater, Bridgeport. 
Rev. H. H. McClean, Hartford. 
Mrs. C. Loveland, Hartford. 
Mrs. James A. Wilson, Hartford. 
The L. Ray Sisters, New York. 



Elizabeth Kearny, Hartford. 

Mr. George M. Smith, Hartford. 

Mrs. Norman Stevens, Hartford. 

Mr. G. W. Woodward, Hartford. 

Mrs. J. J. Carroll, Hartford 

Dr. O. R. Witter, Hartford. 

Rev. William Grime, Hartford. 

St. Vincent De Paul Society, 
Hartford. 

Visiting Nurse Association, Hart- 
ford. 

Christ Church Cathedral, Hart- 
ford. 

Mr. George Holt, Newington Junc- 
tion. 

Rev. S. R. Colladay, Hartford. 

Mrs. Maurice B. Welch, Hart- 
ford. 



Fruit, Candy, and Cigarettes. 



Mrs. W. T. Wells, Newington. 
The American Legion, Hartford. 
Hartford Council Catholic Women, 

Hartford. 
Diocesan Bureau of Social Ser- 



vice, Hartford. 

Ladies Auxiliary, American Legion 
Post No. 85, Simsbury. 

Ladies Auxiliary, American Le- 
gion, Hartford. 



Flowers and Plants. 



Mrs. Margaret Loomis, New Bri- 
tain. 

Mr. John I. Taylor, Hartford. 

Diocesan Bureau of Social Ser- 
vice, Hartford. 

Mrs. Louise Drake, Hartford. 

Mrs. H. N. Anderson, Hartford. 



Ladies Auxiliary, American Le- 
gion, Post No. 85, Simsbury. 

The American Legion, Hartford. 

Mr. Charles Elwin, Newington. 

Mrs. Myron Stockwell, New Bri- 
tain. 

Mayor and Mrs. Norman B. 
Stevens, Hartford. 



Clothing. 



Traveler's Girls Club, Hartford. 
Hartford Council Catholic Women, 

Hartford. 
Mrs. James A. Wilson, Hartford. 
The L. Ray Sisters, New York. 



Women's Guild, Immanuel Church, 
Hartford. 

St. Vincent DePaul Society, Hart- 
ford. 

Mrs. C. Loveland, Hartford. 

Mrs. James Daley, Hartford. 



28 



STATE OF CONNECTICUT 



Miscellaneous. 



The Elks Club, Hartford, $200.00. 

Diocesan Bureau of Social Service, 
Hartford, pictures, victrola 
records, playing cards and 
games, Christmas tree decora- 
tions, jardinieres, note paper, 
perfumes and sachet powder. 

South Park Church, Hartford, 
piano, presented through the 
efforts of Miss Mary Connor, 
Hartford. 

Miss Dorothy Hapgood, Hartford, 
Christmas place cards for pa- 
tients' trays. 

Rev. Paul Barbour, Hartford, 
games. 

Traveler's Girls Club, Hartford, 
newspapers, Hartford Times 
and Hartford Courant. 

Mrs. C. Loveland, Hartford, cards 
and jellies. 

Mrs. James Daley, Hartford, pic- 
ture. 



Mrs. Charles Barnum, Hartford, 
musical instrument and records. 

Miss Mary Connor, Hartford, pic- 
tures. 

The Willing Workers, Terryville, 
Conn., hot water bags. 

The American Legion, Hartford, 
jellies. 

Mr. C. L. Pierce, New Britain, 
piano lamp. 

Miss Marie Gagelman, New York 
City, money to patients' fund. 

Mrs. Christine Loomis, New Bri- 
tain, money to patients' fund. 

Hartford Council of Catholic 
Women, Christmas decorations, 
pictures, and bric-a-brac for 
dining room and recreation 
hall. 

The Citizens' Club of Hartford, 
through the Radio Club of 
Hartford and the Hartford 
Times, Radiophone and Tusco 
set complete. 



Entertainments. 



Traveler's Girls Club, Hartford. 

Max-Murphy Minstrels, Hartford. 

The Catholic Daughters, New Bri- 
tain. 

The Kirk ham Soap Co., through 
Citizen's Entertainment Com- 
mittee, Hartford, moying pic- 
tures. 

Billings & Spencer and Knights 
of Columbus, Hartford. 

Murphy's Entertainers, Hartford, 
minstrel show. 



Hartford Academy of Music, Hart- 
ford, musical entertainment. 

Jewish Council of Women, Hart- 
ford, entertainment and ice 
cream. 

Under the auspices of the Citizen's 
Entertainment Committee, the 
following entertainments were 
given: Hygrade Minstrels, Ep- 
pie's Entertainers, Mack's Min- 
strels, Knights of Columbus 
Minstrels. 



Through the kindness of Mr. James E. Dillon, 282 Washington 
Street, Hartford, arrangements were made to have the band, which 
furnishes the music at the Muncipal Dancing Pavilion, at Colt's Park, 
give a concert at the Sanatorium, every rainy evening during the 
months that the pavilion is in use. 

The Citizen's Entertainment Committee of Hartford, through Mr. 
James Dillon, Secretary, has furnished most of our entertainments. 
Through this same Committee, Mr. Allan C. Morrison, proprietor of the 
Majestic Theater, has furnished the patients with moving -pictures 
every Saturday night. Over one hundred patients at the Sanatorium 
have seen the Majestic pictures each Saturday evening, before they 
were shown the following week at the picture house. For the further 
success of the evenings' entertainments we are indebted to Mr. Jack 
Kerns, and Mr. William Radigan operators at the theater, and Mr. 
Charles Jackson, pianist, who so generously donated their services. 



THE STATE TUEERCULOSIS COMMISSION 



29 



The following feature pictures were shown at the Sanatorium : 
Main Street; Suzanna; Truxton King; Shiek of Araby; The Super 
Sex; Jacqueline or Blazing Barriers; The Buster; A Lady's Name; 
Her Only Way; Darling of the Rich; The Mollycoddle; The Abysmal 
Brute; The Shock; Trifling with Honor; Strangers of the Night; The 
French Doll; Three Angels; .If Winter Comes; Lone Star Ranger; 
Eternal Struggle; Desire; The Eagle's Feather; Held to Answer; Long 
Live the King; Soft Boiled; St. Elmo; The Silent Command; Hospi- 
tality; Pleasure Mad; Fashion Row; Mile-a-Minute Romeo; Cameo 
Kirby; Man Life Passed By; Hunchback of Notre Dame; The White 
Sister; Scaramouche; Courtship of Miles Standish; Thy Name is 
Woman; The Fool's Awakening; The Heart Bandit; Uninvited Guest; 
Happiness; Half-a-Dollar Bill; Sherlock, Jr;'Boy of Flanders; Shooting 
of Dan McGrew; North of Hudson Bay; Mademoiselle Midnight; 
Women Who Give. 



Visiting Clergymen. 



Rev. William F. O'Dell, Elmwood. 

Rev. John A. Dooley, Hartford. 

Rev. J. Raymond Kennedy, Hart- 
ford. 

Rev. Andrew J. Kelly, Hartford. 

Rev. Walter Casey, Hartford. 

Rt. Rev. Chauncey B. Brewster, 
Hartford. 



Rt. Rev. E. Champion Atcheson, 

Middletown. 
Rev. William Grime, Hartford. 
Rev. Paul H. Barbour, Hartford. 
Rev. H. H. McClean, Hartford. 
Rev. S. R. Colladay, Hartford. 



UNDERCLIFF. 

Donations of Books, Magazines, Toys and Games. 



Mrs. George H. Wilcox, Meriden, 

Conn. 
Mrs. Sherwood, Sec'y., Child Wel- 
fare League, Devon, Conn. 
Rev. Leslie B. Briggs, Milford, 

Conn. 
Mrs. Burton Collyer, Meriden, 

Conn. 
Mr. Harry L. Day, Meriden, Conn. 
Miss Alice Bannint, Jolly Workers 

Club, Ivoryton, Conn. 
Mrs. Fred Rees, Meriden, Conn. 
D. M. Read Company, Bridgeport, 

Conn. 
Ives Manufacturing Company, 

Bridgeport, Conn. 
Mrs. G. D. Lane, Meriden, Conn. 
Miss Jean Manning, Sound Beach, 

Conn. 
Mrs. Joseph Hackett, Meriden, 

Conn. 
Mr. Arthur L. Peale, Scoutmaster, 

Troop No. 1, Norwich, Conn. 
Miss Dora Coleman, Meriden, 

Conn. 



Miss Mary Hoi-an, Meriden, Conn. 

Mrs. J. Pepin, Club No 3, How- 
land's Dry Goods Co., Bridge- 
port, Conn. 

Mrs. John Coleman, Meriden, 
Conn. 

Mrs. E'. H. Birch, Meriden, Conn. 

Mrs. William H. Gibson, Meriden, 
Conn. 

Mr. Harry H. Smith, Meriden, 
Conn. 

Mr. S. Hussey Reed, Supervising 
Agent, Schools of Bozrah, Pres- 
ton, and Ledyard ; Norwich, 
Conn. 

Mrs. Fred P. Fenner, Meriden, 
Conn. 

Mrs. E. F. Pierce, Meriden, Conn. 

Mrs. Frederick H. Kobs. Meriden, 
Conn. 

Mr. Charles A. Learned, Meriden, 
Conn. 

Mrs. Caroline Nagel, Meriden, 
Conn. 

Visiting Nurse Association, New 
Haven, Conn. 



30 



STATE OF CONNECTICUT 



Grade VII, Div. B., West Grammar 
School, Meriden, Conn. 

Mrs. Harry H. Hertweck, Meriden, 
Conn. 

Social Service Department, Muni- 
cipal Hospital, Hartford, Conn. 

Lindstrom Tool & Toy Company, 
Bridgeport, Conn. 

Mrs. F. Weber, Meriden, Conn. 

Grade VII, Div. A., West Grammar 
School, Meriden, Conn. 



Mrs. K. A. Pierce, Meriden, Conn. 

"Crusaders," Mrs. B. L. Sage, 
Meriden, Conn. 

Mr. F. G. Lundquist, East Hamp- 
ton, Conn. 

Mr. Henry D. Neale, Bridgeport, 
Conn. 

Mr. Clarence Bradley, Meriden, 
Conn. 

Drs. Downey & Downey, Meriden, 
Conn. 

Dr. Roy L. Leak, Supt. State Hos- 
pital, Middletown, Conn. 



Donations of Cash. 



Mrs. Charlotte Du V. Butterfield, 

Hartford, Conn. 
Miss E. Betteridge, Meriden, Conn. 
Meriden Central Labor Union, 

Meriden, Conn. 
Mr. W. S. Alexander, Meriden, 

Conn. 
Mr. J. F. Allen, Meriden, Conn. 
Mr. Harris Bartlett, Meriden, 

Conn. 
Mr. Henry Bibeau, Meriden, 

Conn. 
Mr. Samuel Bradford, Meriden, 

Conn. 
Dr. E. T. Bradstreet, Meriden, 

Conn. 
Mr. E. J. Burke, Meriden, Conn. 
Mr. Alexander Bush, Meriden, 

Conn. 
Mr. Robert G. Church, Meriden, 

Conn. 
Mr. W. B. Church, Meriden, Conn. 
Mr. H. N. Clark, Meriden, Conn. 
Mr. Charles Cuno, Meriden, Conn. 
Mr. Frank Cushing, Meriden, 

Conn. • 

Mr. Harry Day, Meriden, Conn. 
Mr. C. K. Dercherd, Meriden, 

Conn. 
Dr. E. J. Degnan, Meriden, Conn. 
Mr. Oscar Dossin, Meriden, Conn. 
Mr. Thomas P. Dunne, Meriden, 

Conn. 
Mr. Harold Fishke, Meriden, 

Conn. 
Mr. Charles Flagg, Meriden, Conn. 
Mr. C. R. Gardiner, Meriden, 

Conn. 
Mr. Charles Gearing, Meriden, 

Conn. 



Mr. Joseph Greenbacker, Meriden, 

Conn. 
Mr. Reed Gwillim, Meriden, Conn. 
Mr. Howard Hall, Meriden, Conn. 
Mr. Lorenzo Hamilton, Meriden, 

Conn. 
Mr. David Higgins, Meriden, Conn. 
Mr. Clair Huse, Meriden, Conn. 
Mr. Jack Hutchinson, Meriden, 

Conn. 
Mr. Hollis Immick, Meriden, 

Conn. 
Dr. Leo Loftus, Meriden, Conn. 
Mr. William Luby, Meriden, Conn. 
Mr. Victor E. Lucchini, Meriden, 

Conn. 
Mr. Harry Lyman, Meriden, Conn. 
Mr. Raymond M. Lynch, Meriden, 

Conn. 
Mr. Charles Lyon, Meriden, Conn. 
Mr. Frederick Manning, Meriden, 

Conn. 
Dr. Thomas P. Murdoch, Meriden, 

Conn. 
Mr. Charles Phelps, Meriden, 

Conn. 
Mr. Frank Reed, Meriden, Conn. 
Mr. Frederick Rees, Meriden, 

Conn. 
Mr. John Roberts, Meriden, Conn. 
Mr. Frank Sands, Mei'iden, Conn. 
Mr Albert Savage, Mei'iden, 

Conn. 
Mr. William Schaal, Meriden, 

Conn. 
Mr. William Schenck, Meriden, 

Conn. 
Mr. Michael Schwarz, Meriden, 

Conn. 



THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION 



31 



Mr. Harold Scott, Meriden, Conn. 
Mr. Douglas Smith, Meriden, 

Conn. 
Mr. Wayne Smith, Meriden, Conn. 
Mr. Roger W. Squire, Meriden, 

Conn. 
Mr. William Squire, Meriden, 

Conn. 
Mr. Harry Stockwell, Meriden, 

Conn. 
Mr. Reginald Tracy, Meriden, 

Conn. 



Mr. Edward Tredennick, Meriden, 

Conn. 
Mr. P. K. Van Yorx, Meriden, 

Conn. 
Mr. Robert Walker, Meriden, 

Conn. 
Mr. E. C. Wilcox, Meriden, Conn. 
Mr. Horace Wilcox, Meriden,, 

Conn. 
Mr. Lewis A. Miller, Meriden;, 

Conn. 



Donations of Candy. 



Sunday School Teachers, St. An- 
drew's Church, Meriden, Conn. 

Miss Mary A. Curran, New Haven, 
Conn. 

Mrs. Charlotte DuV. Butterfield, 
Hartford, Conn. 

Sunshine Club, Smith-Murray 
Company, Bridgeport, Conn. 

Ryan's Specialty Shop, Hartford, 
Conn. 

Mr. George B. Wilkinson, Meriden, 
Conn. 



Women's Club, Mrs. W. R. Ban- 
nister, Meriden, Conn. 

Mr. Harry Lyman, Meriden, Conn. 

Miss Anna M. Barrett, Meriden, 
Conn. 

Ye Olde Colony Inn, Meriden, 
Conn. 

Grade VII, Div. A., West Grammar 
School. Meriden, Conn. 

Mrs. Irving Hough, Meriden, 
Conn. 

Caldwell Company, Meriden, Conn. 



Miscellaneous Donations. 



Siemon Hard Rubber Corp., 
Bridgeport, Conn., phonograph 
records. 

Workingman's Tuberculosis Fund, 
Hartford, Conn., moving picture 
machine, booth, piano. 

Mrs. Jacob Kabatynick, Middle- 
town, Conn., clothing. 

Miss Dorothy Hapgood, Hartford, 
Conn., Christmas cards. 

D. M. Read Company, Bridgeport, 
Conn., dolls. 

S. S. Kresge Company, Meriden, 
Conn., valentine cards. 

Conn. Council Catholic Women, 
Meriden, Conn., valentine cards 
and stamps, Easter baskets. 

Mrs. R. C. Blatchley, Meriden, 
Conn., flowers. 

Men's Club, All Saints Church, 
Meriden, Conn., flowers. 

The Employees, Eastern Malleable 
Iron Co., Bridgeport, Conn., 
baseball bats and balls, etc. 

Miss Geraldine M. Addams, North 
Canton, Conn., periodical pa- 
pers. 



Mrs. William H. Gibson, Meriden, 

Conn., rubber plant. 
Miner, Read & Tullock Company, 

Meriden, Conn., nuts. 
Mr. Constant Decherd, Meriden, 

Conn., barrel of apples. 
Mrs. Joseph H. Davis, Waterbury, 

Conn., matzoths. 
Mrs. F. S. Lippitt, Meriden, Conn., 

flowers. 
Mrs. Frederick H. Kobs, Meriden, 

Conn., phonograph. 
Mr. Charles A. Learned, Meriden, 

Conn., flowers. 
Mr. W. R. Bowes, Bristol, Conn., 

scissors, "cut outs." 
Mrs. Frederick Foster, Meriden, 

Conn., postal cards, etc. 
Mrs. Caroline Nagel, Meriden, 

Conn., gifts. 
Mrs. Homer Curtiss, Meriden, 

Conn., Sunday School class, 

postal cards. 
Mr. Charles Cuno, Meriden, Conn. 

sleds. 
Public Health Association, North 

Haven, Conn., oranges. 



32 



STATE OF CONNECTICUT 



Visiting Nurse Association, New 

Haven, Conn., dolls. 
Mrs. C. D. Peck, Sound Beach, 

Conn., subscription to "John 

Martin" magazine. 
Camera Shops, Meriden, Conn., 

Easter cards, favors. 
Mrs. Albert Dahlman, Meriden, 

Conn., doll and doll carriage. 
Miss Catherine Zeipke, Meriden, 

Conn., phonograph records. 
Mrs. K. A. Pierce, Meriden, Conn., 

bicycle. 



Girls Friendly Society, All Saints 
Church, Meriden, Conn., gifts. 

Miss Ruth Ohl, Campfire Girls, 
Center Congregational Church, 
Meriden, Conn., Christmas, 
stockings. 

Sister Mary, Incarnate Ward, Ens- 
ley, Alabama, pictures. 

A friend, Meriden, Conn., piano. 

A friend, Meriden, Conn., piano. 



Entertainment. 



New Departure Band, Bristol, 
Conn., concert. 

Old Guard Band, Middletown, 
Conn., concert. 

Women's Club, Meriden, Conn., 
Christmas entertainment. 

"Good Fellows," Meriden, Conn., 
Christmas entertainment. 

Rotary Club, Meriden, Conn., 
Christmas entertainment. 

Manager King, Community Play- 
house, Meriden, Conn., theater 
parties. 

"Sons of Italy," Meriden, Conn., 
entertainment at circus. 

Director George Matz, Hartford, 
Conn., band concert. 

Mr. Frank L. Ray, Mgr., Reo Ser- 
vice Station, Mei'iden, Conn., 
transportation to shore. 

LeBal Tabarin, East Hartford, 
Conn., musical entertainment. 

Mr. James Dillon, Park Dept., 
Hartford, Conn., entertainment. 

Manager Cotter, Poli's Theater, 
theater party. 

B. P. 0. E., Meriden, Conn., min- 
strel show and gifts; entertain- 
ment at circus. 

Miss Mildred U. Hill and pupils, 
Meriden, Conn., dancing pro- 
gram. 

Mr. Curtiss Johnson, Christmas 
entertainment. 



Mr. Foster Johnson, Christmas en- 
tertainment. 

Mr. Laurence Southwick, Christ- 
mas entertainment. 

Miss Mildred U. Hill, Christmas 
entertainment. 

Mr. Leroy McCafferty, Christmas 
entertainment. 

Miss Peterson, Christmas enter- 
tainment. 

Mr. John Stoddard, Christmas en- 
tertainment. 

Mr. William Sakee, Christmas en- 
tertainment. 

Mr. William Bennett, Christmas 
entertainment. 

Mr. Sanford Cooke, Christmas en- 
tertainment. 

Mr. Harvey Byron, Christmas en- 
tertainment. 

Mr. Fred Bannister, Christmas en- 
tertainment. 

Dr. John E. Stoddard, Christmas 
entertainment. 

Conn. Council of Catholic Women, 
Christmas entertainment. 

Mr. George Diehl and talent, Meri- 
den, Conn., entertainment. 

Mr. Robert Ryan, Meriden, Conn., 
seashore party. 

High School Jazz Orchestra, Meri- 
den, Conn., entertainment. 



Visiting Clergymen. 



Reverend Francis J. Lippitt. 
Reverend Michael Martin. 
Reverend John Ceppa. 
Reverend Paul Kirsh. 



Reverend Albert J. Lord. 
Reverend Thomas McGarry. 
Reverend Dominic Ricci. 
Reverend Victor Mills. 



THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION 



33 



Through St. Joseph's Church and 
the Connecticut Council of Cath- 
olic Women, Sunday School in- 
struction has been provided by 
the following: , 

Miss Margaret Martin 

Miss Dorothy Lynch 

Miss Gertrude O'Connor 

Miss Rose M. Gorman 

Miss Eileen Fitzgerald 

Miss Eleanor M. Hagarty 



Miss Mary M. Rohaley. 

Through All Saints' Episcopal 
Church, Sunday School instruc- 
tion has been provided by the 
following: 

Reverend Francis Lippitt 

Mrs. H. G. Manley 

Mr. C. L. Upham 

Reverend Stanley Shirt 

Mr. T. H. Lowe" 

Mr. A. B. Jennings. 



NORWICH SANATORIUM. 
Donations of Books and Magazines. 



Mrs. F. W. Lester, Norwich, Conn. 

Mrs. John Blackmar, Norwich, 
Conn. 

Dorothy Atwood, Wauregan, Conn. 

Mrs. Battersby, Norwich, Conn. 

Cranston Company, Norwich, 
Conn. 

Bryant Electric Company, Bridge- 
port, Conn. 

Mrs. W. R. Perry, Jewett City, 
Conn. 

Patrick Sweeney, Norwich, Conn. 

Mrs. J. Cisco, Norwich, Conn. 

Miss Hield, New London, Conn. 

Mrs. Edgar, New London, Conn. 

Mrs. Comstock. 

Mrs. Oliver Johnson, Norwich, 
Conn. 

Mrs. Twomey, Norwich, Conn. 

Mrs. White, Norwich, Conn. 

The Misses Aiken, Norwich, Conn. 

Mrs. William Peck, Norwich, 
Conn. 



Mary L. Bishop, Norwich, Conn. 
Conn. Council Catholic Women, 

Norwich, Conn. 
The Misses Cadden, Norwich, 

Conn. 
Mrs. Alfred R. Fletcher, Hartford, 

Conn. 
Mrs. Charles Gordon, Norwich, 

Conn. 
Philip Johnson, Norwich, Conn. 
Mrs. George Carroll, Norwich, 

Conn. 
J. P. Corcoran, Norwich, Conn. 
Miss Laura Dowd, Norwich, Conn. 
Mrs. Snodgrass, Norwich, Conn. 
Mrs. Armstrong, Norwich, Conn. 
Library Association, Hartford, 

Conn. 

Mrs. P. 

Conn. 

Shea's News Stand, 
Conn. 



J. Johnson, Norwich, 
Norwich, 



Conn. Council Catholic 
Norwich, Conn. 

John Porteous, Norwich, Conn. 

Mohican Company, Norwich, 
Conn. 

Peterson Candy Company, Nor- 
wich, Conn. 

Perkins Candy Company, Nor- 
wich, Conn. 



Fruit and Candy 

Women 



J. C. Worth & Company, Norwich, 

Conn. 
Hebrew Society, Norwich, Conn. 
Mrs. Jordan, Norwich, Conn. 
Miss Mary Porteous, Norwich, 

Conn. 
Mrs. Rosenberg, Norwich, Conn. 
Mrs. Abraham Levine, Norwich, 

Conn. 



Flowers and Plants 

Osgood, Norwich, 



Mrs. C. H. 

Conn. 
Mrs. Otto Ernst, Norwich, Conn 



Father Guerriero, Norwich, Conn. 
Rose Lodge I. O. B. B. No. 898. 
Norwich, Conn. 



STATE OF CONNECTICUT 



Mr. and Mrs. C. A. Pereue, Nor- 
wich, Conn. 

C. H. Osgood, Norwich, Conn. 

Yantic Church, Norwich, Conn. 

Mrs. C. B. Carpenter, Norwich, 
Conn. 



Mrs. Walter Skelly, Norwich, Conn. 

Harriet Frisbie Mitchell, in mem- 
ory of Archibald Mitchell, Jr., 
Norwich, Conn. 



Miscellaneous Donations. 



Mrs. E. W. Lester, Norwich, 

Conn., sweater. 
Mis. Eleanor Fish, Norwich, Conn., 

clothing. 
Mrs. McGuire, Norwich, Conn., 

six tickets for entertainment at 

Slater Hall. 
Dorothy Atw r ood, Wauregan, 

Conn., quartz lamp. 
Taftville Red Cross, Taftville, 

Conn., four afghans, ten shawls. 
Bridgeport Die & Machine Co., 

Bridgeport, Conn., 12 victrola 

records. 
Cosgroves, Norwich, Conn., 1 pr. 

comfy slippers. 
Boston Store, Norwich, Conn., 3 

pr. w r oolen socks, 10 pr. cotton 

socks, 5 shirts, lpr. kid gloves, 

4 prs. woolen gloves, 8 ties. 
Self Service Shoe Store, Norwich, 

Conn., victrola records. 
Mrs. Winifred Ci - epeau, Norwich, 

Conn., victrola records and 

needles. 
Troop No. 1, Boy Scouts of 

United Congregational Church, 

Norwich, Conn., 12 records. 
Mrs. Rosenberg, Norwich, Conn., 

took patients out for ride. 
Chas. B. Carpenter, Norwich, 

Conn., use of automobile. 



Sodalitas United Congregational 

Church, Norwich, Conn., val- 
entine favors. 
Miss Woodmansee, Norwich. 

Conn., zigsaw puzzles. 
Joseph Worth, Norwich, Conn., 

victrola records. 
Mrs. Charles Haskell, Norwich. 

Conn., victrola records. 
Tate & Neilan, New London, 

Conn., 4 doz. caps. 
Cosgrove Shoe Store, Norwich, 

Conn., 1 pr. slippers. 
Boston Store, Norwich, Conn., 

8 pr. silk hose ; 2 pr. silk and 

wool hose; 6 bow ties; 8 pr. 

bed socks; 4 shirts; 5 under- 

vests. 
Women's Club, New London, 

Conn., 180 caps. 
Mrs. Fred Sales, Norwich, Conn., 

victrola records. 
Abraham Levine, Norwich, Conn., 

4 qts. ice cream. 
Mrs. C. Whitman, Groton, Conn., 

6 caps. 
B. P. O. E.. Norwich, Conn., ice 

cream, cakes and flags. 
Jewish Organization, Norwich, 

Conn., ice cream. 
Conn. Council Catholic Women, 

Norwich. Conn., maybaskets. 



Entertainments. 



Christ Episcopal Church, Norwich, 
Conn. 

United Congregational Church, 
Norwich, Conn. 

St. Patrick's Roman Catholic 
Church, Norwich, Conn. 

Conn. Council Catholic Women, 
Norwich. Conn. 

Ponemah Wheel Club, Taftsville, 
Conn. 

St. Mary's Roman Catholic Church, 
Norwich, Conn. 

Blue Ribbon Syncopators, Nor- 
wich, Conn. 



Kel Patch's Society Orchestra, 
New London, Conn.. 

Grace Sage, reader, Boston, Mass. 

Mi'n! rod Pearson, concert soprano, 
New York City. 

Lotus Quartette, Boston, Mass. 

Abraham Davidson, Broadway 
Theater, Norwich, Conn., week- 
ly movies. 

Daugherty's Orchestra, Norwich, 
Conn. 



THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION 
Church Services Conducted Throughout the Year. 



35 



Rev. Richard R. Graham, Christ 

Episcopal Church. 
St. Patrick's Roman Catholic 

Church, Rev. M. H. May, Rector, 



Rev. Miles P. Galvin, Rev. Rocco 
Guerriero. 



LAUREL HEIGHT.-. 



Flowers. 



Mr. J, D. Healey, City Market, 

Derhy, Conn. 
Mr. H E. Whitney, 531 Housa- 

tonic Ave., Stratford. 
Mrs. Hedley P. Carter, 24 No. Cliff 

St.. Ansonia. 
Mr. Henry Cliff, Supt. of Parks, 

Bridgeport. 



Mr Richard Randall, Shelton, (Re- 
moved to Newark, X. J.) 

Mis. Clarence X. Peck. 62 Cedar 
St., Seymour, (In Memory of 
Rev. Mr. Woodford. Seymour.) 

Mr. Wesley B. Crowell, (57 High- 
land Ave.. Middletown. 



Books and Magazines. 



(Books) 



(Shelton Library) Plumb Memo- 
rial Library, Shelton, Conn. 

Xiirses and other employees of the 
Welfare Building-, Bridgeport. 

Employees of Salts Textile Co., 
Bridgeport. 

Mr. H. D. Neale, 805 William St., 
Bridgeport. 

Bridgeport Public Library, Bridge- 
port, Conn. 

Mrs. David R. Bowen, 5 Clover St., 
Ansonia. 

Mrs. Otto Hagen, Mt. Pleasant St., 
Shelton. 

Mr. W. A. Holgate, 709 Noble 
Ave., Bridgeport. 



Mrs. H. R. Bacon, 28 Academy 

Hill, Derby. 
Dr. Mary E. Commerford, 121.", 

Chape] St., New Haven. 
Miss Belle Holcomb Johnson, Conn. 

Public Library Committee, State 

Capitol. Hartford. 

The Bible Institute Colportaye 

Assoc, 826 K. LaSalle St., 

Chicago. 
District Nurse Association, Derbv. 
Mrs. W. W. Radcliffe, 215 Coram 

Ave., Shelton. 
Howard & Barber Co., Derby, 

Conn. 



(Magazines) 



Miss Maude Van Ness Bradley, 
223 Minerva St., Derby. 

Mr. L. M. Parsons, 223 Minerva 
St., Derby. 

Mrs. O. R. Kreinberg, 750 Haw- 
thorne Ave., Derby. 

Mr. Geo. C. Allis, Albs & Co., 
Derby, Conn. 

Mrs. Frances Patchen, 188 Min- 
erva St., Derby. 

Christian Science Society, Bridge- 
port. 

Mr. Clarence Hctchkiss, Derby. 



Mr. Paul J. Mester, Derby, Conn. 

Mrs. P. B. O'Sullivan, Derby, 
Conn. 

Mr. H. C. Chamberlin, 152 Nor- 
ton St., New Haven. 

Mrs. D. E. Brinsmade, 292 Coram 
Ave.. Shelton. 

Mrs. M. M. Echardt, 24 Grove St., 
Shelton. 

Miss Mary Melby, Elim Park, 
Shelton. 

Mr. W A. Holgate, 709 Noble 
Ave.. Bridgeport. 



36 



STATE OF CONNECTICUT 



Mi Rstella J. Beach, 66 Howe 

Ave., Shelton. 
Mr. Her.ry D. Neale, 805 William 

St , Bridgeport. 
l>i'. G. A. Shelt an. 40 White St., 

Shelton. 
Mrs. David R. Bowen, 5 Clover St., 

Ansonia. 
Mrs. Eugene Beach, 146 Olivia St., 

Derby. 
Mrs. W. W. Radcliffe, 215 Coram 

Ave., Shelton. 



Mrs. A. R. Bartlett, 66 Howe Ave., 

Shelton. 
Mrs. V. H. Perry, Hillside Ave., 

Shelton. 
Dr. Stephen J. Maher, 212 Orange 

St., New Haven. 
Miss Ada Shelton, Greystone, 

Derby. 
Mrs. N. Baldwin, 34 Anson St., 

Derby. 



Victrola Records. 



Mr. C. F. Seimon, Seimon Hard 
Rubber Co., Bridgeport. 

Mrs. F. G. Neuberth, 86 Cottage 
St., Ansonia. 

Mrs. O. R. Kreinberg, 750 Haw- 
thorne Ave., Derby. 

Mr. Daniel Northup, c/o R. N. 
Bassett Co., Shelton. 



Miss Mary Sudela, 93 Center St., 

Shelton. 
ETRA Sunshine Club, Rowland's 

Dry Goods Co., Bridgeport. 
Mrs. R. T. Tobin, 21 Atwater Ave., 

Derby. 



Clothing. 



Mrs. M. L. Gilbert, 152 Derby 
Ave., Derby. 

Miss Maude Van Ness Bradley, 
223 Minerva St., Derby. 

Mr. L. M. Parsons, 223 Minerva 
St.. Derby. 

Mrs. Geo. H. Buck, 105 Minerva 
St., Derby. 

King's Daughters, Shelton Con- 
gregational Church, (Mrs. R. S. 
Little.) 

Mrs. A. B. Beers, Jr., Branch 
Sec'y- Needlework Guild of 
America, 753 Fairfield Ave., 
Bridgeport. 

Mrs. Fiances Patchen, 188 Min- 
erva St., Deri 

Mrs. Carrie Camp and Miss Mary 
Bristol, 48 Cottage St., Ansonia. 

Miss Minnie L. Lading, 1161 Kos- 
suth St., Bridgeport, Conn. 
. W. A. Gordon, 82 Myrtle St.. 
ton. 

Mrs. John Sinsabaugh, 208 Coram 
Ave., Shelton. 

Mrs. Geo. H. Scranton, 238 Coram 
Avi : on. 

B. H. Wetherby, 48 Howe 
Ave.. Shelton. 

Mr-. Edith 1. Burnett, .",5 Elm St., 
Seymour. 



Hubbell Bros. Co., Derby, Conn. 
Mrs. D. E. Brinsmade, 292 Coram 

Ave., Shelton. 
Ladies Aid Society, St. James 

Church, Derby. 
Shelton-Derby Red Cross, Mrs. C. 

N. Downs, 304 Elizabeth St., 

Derby. 
Mrs. Frederick S. Seeley, 63 

Brooklawn Ave., Bridgeport. 
Mr. H. D. Neale, 805 William St., 

Bridgeport. 
Mrs. Emma Howard, 129 Minerva 

St., Derby. 
Mrs. Gertrude Wallace, Ansonia. 
Mrs.. W. E. Andrews, 30 Fairmount 

Place, Shelton. 
Mrs II. M Chaffee, Monroe St., 

Shelton. 
Mrs. M. M. Echardt, 24 Grove St., 

Shelton. 
Mrs. H. F. Wanning, 36 Fairmount 

Place, Shelton. 
Mrs. F. W. Shelton, 214 Prospect 

Ave, Shelton. 
Mrs. Wm. Wainman, 162 "Prospect 

Ave., Shelton. 
Mrs. Miles H. Kelchar, 11 Maple 

., Derby. 
Mrs. W. W. Radcliffe, 215 Coram 

Ave., Shelton. 






THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION 



37 



Food, Fruit, Candy and Ice Cream. 



Mrs. Franklin Farrell, 10 No. Cliff 

St., Ansonia. 
Derby-Shelton Red Cross, Mrs. C. 

N. Downs, 3u4 Elizabeth St., 

Derby. 
Huber Ice Cream Co., Bridgeport. 
Echo Hose Hook & Ladder Co., 

Shelton 
Mr. and Mrs. Walter Wood, 380 

Willow St., We. i y. 

Mrs. Rutherford Trowbridge, 46 

Hillhouse Ave., New Haven. 
Mrs. Anne E. Bassett, 70 No. Cliff 

St., Ansonia. 
Mrs. Edson L. Bryant, 70 No. Cliff 

St., Ansonia. 
Mrs. Geo. C. Bryant, 75 No. Cliff 

St., Ansonia. 
Miss M E. Lathrop, 31 Atwater 

Ave., Derby. 



Mrs. J. B. Russ, Millcroft, Hunt- 
ington, Conn. 

Mr. J. D. Healey, City Market, 
Derby. 

Mr. J. Titcomb, State Game Com- 
mission, State Capitol, Hart- 
ford. 

Mr. Philip W. Diebert, Short 
Beach, Conn. 

Mr. C. B. Burr, 20 Academy Hill, 
Derby. 

P. J. Mester, Derby. 

New Haven Visiting Nurse Asso- 
ciation, 35 Elm St., New Haven. 

School Children, Barnard School, 
Miss Mary J. Mooney, Princi- 
pal. 

Mrs. Helena R. Stillman, 215 
Coram Ave., Shelton. 



Miscellaneous Donations. 



Mrs. H. L. Stocking, Cedric Ave., 
Derby, 1 bed and bed clothing. 

Mrs. Rutherford Trowbridge, 46 
Hillhouse Ave., New Haven, and 
Mrs. Anne E. Bassett, 70 No. 
Cliff St., Ansonia, paper nap- 
kins at Xmas. 

Mrs. H. R. Bacon, 28 Academy 
Hill, Derby, 1 stereoscope and 
v.ews. 

Mrs. J. H. Brewster, 47 Seymour 
Ave., Derby, 1 folding chair. 

Community Club, Derby, Christ- 
mas tree decorations. 

Dr. John F. McGrath, 6 Franklin 
St., Ansonia, tooth paste. 

Dr. Edw. Harvey, Seymour, 1 
Electro surgical machine and 
1 Ultra Violet Ray apparatus. 

Church of the Good Sheperd, Shel- 
ton, Palm for Palm Sunday. 



Mrs. Emma Forcoz, 65 Eagle St., 
Bridgeport, Mrs. Hainsworth 
and other friends, 1 new Ruby 
sewing machine for women's 
shack. 

Mrs. Clarence H. Peck, 62 Cedar 
St., Sevmour, 1 square piano. 

Mr. W T . G. Bryant, Bead Chain Co., 
Bridgeport, 1 radio set for wom- 
en's shack. 

American Legion, Shelton, Christ- 
mas boxes for ex-service men. 

Shelton Reading Circle, Shelton, 
Christmas gifts for patients in 
women's infirmary and women's 
shack. 

Sunshine Club, Bryant Electric 
Co., Bridgeport, Christmas gifts 
for former employees of Bryant 
Electric Company. 



Money Received for Patients' Amusement Fund. 

Friend A. Russ Fund, Derby, (for radio set) $700.00 

Mr. Frank H. Gates, 117 Derby Ave., Derby, (for fumed oak 

Sterling piano.) 600.00 

City of Shelton 200.00 

City of Derby 200.00 

City of Ansonia 200.00 

New Haven Community Chest 100.00 



38 ST *Ti: OF CONNECTICUT 



Co. I. Shelton Home Guard, Mr. C. R. Kaddiland, Treas 123.05 

Kiwanis Club, Shelton 47.00 

Mr. Edw. E. Gardner, 230 (dram Ave., Shelton 29. 95 

Colleced by Mr. Peter P. Anton, P. O. Box 191, Shelton .... 88.55 

Mr. David Thomas, 74 Sea SI., New Haven 7.00 

Russian Sts. Peter and Paul Benefit Society, Harry Patynok, 

Treas., 27 Lester St., Ansonia 25.00 

Mr. Wm. F. Kelly, Racebrook Rd., Orange", (for Patients' 

Christmas Fund. ) 5^00 



$2,325.55 
Weekly moving picture films, free of charge, from the distributors 
in New Haven; services of operator paid out of Amusement Fund. 

Entertainments. 

Sept. 10 1922— Band concert. .Juno 25, 1923 — Enterta'nment, 

Harvey Huliliell Co. Rand, Mr. Thos. Wrigley, Shelton and 

Bridgeport. Mr. Roy Woods, Derby. 

Oct. 2, 1922 Band concert, July 22, 1923 — Band concert, 
Coast Artillery Rand, Bridge- Warner Bros. Co. Band, Bridge- 
port, conveyed to Sanatorium in port, conveyed to Sanatorium in 
truck furnished by General Elec- truck of Bridgeport Brass Co. 
trie Co., Bridgeport. Aug. 5, 1923— Band concert, 

Oct. 22, 1922- -Rand concert, Prof. Pierini's Marine Band, 
Bridgeport Musical Union, Bridgeport, conveyed to Sana- 
Bridgeport, torium in truck of Bryant Elec- 

Dec. 2. 1922- Minstrel show, Mrs. trie Co., Bridgeport. 

R. M. Campbell, and friends, 59 Aug. 12, 192:! — Concert, Swedish 

Roanoke Ave., Bridgeport Singing Society, Bridgepoi't. 

(Kindness of Mr. H. I). Neale,) Oct. 9, 1923— Entertainment by 

Miss E. F. Bishop, 172 Court- Mr. Thos. M. Hughes, and 

land ,st.. Bridgeport gave the friends, X09 Campbell Ave., 

use of her automobile to bring West Haven. 

troupe to Sanatorium. n ov . ];!i 19*23— Minstrel show, 

Dec. 21. 1922— Minstrel show, American Legion, Shelton. 

employees of General Electric p,,,.. , ;< 1923 — Entertainment, Mr. 

Co., Bridgeport. Henry D. Neale, and friends, 

Dec. 22, 1922 Minstrel show, 805 William St., Bridgeport. 

Derby Lodge of Red Men. u . n . s l9 24— Concert, Miss Sadie 

Feb. 14, 1923— Minstrel show, Dillon, Miss Edith Proudman, 

Fellowcraft Club, Ansonia. Mrs. Geo. Taylor and Mrs. 

Apr. '.». 1 !)2-", — Moving pictures, Vaughan Wheeler, all of Bridge- 

Kirkham Sua)) Company. por , Mrs. Frederick Fish. 

Apr. 28', 1923— Minstrel show, South). ort and Mr. Lewis Gran- 

Sigma lota Phi Club, Mr. Sid- iss, Fairfield, conveyed to Sana- 

nev R. Stapleu, Sec'y, 527 Hunt- tormm in automobiles furnished 

ington Rd.. Bridgeport. by Locomobile Co., Bridgeport 

Apr 29,1923 Concert by McDer- and Mulhns, Scott & Redgate, 

rnotl S sters of Scotland. Bridgeport. 

.June 10, 1D2:; Concert, Miss Ida Apr. 5, 1924 — Concert by Laurel 
Hipelius, Mis- Edna Beers and Glee Club, Bridgeport, Mr. Geo. 
Mr. Jos. Hipelius of New Haven Hargraves, 11 Booth St., Bridge- 
ami Mr. ('has. Marvin, Derby. port. 



THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION 39 

Apr. 25, 1924 — Concert, Miss May 28, 1924— Concert by Gow's 

Catherine Waterbury, Miss Melodv Men, 8 Burtvifle A.ve 

Helen Hall, Miss Harriet Kim- Derbv! 

merlin, Miss Lillian Merz and T _ .,„„. „ 

Mr. John Jackson, all of Bridge- Ju " e . 6 >J* 2 *—C°™ ert > recital b y 

p 0r t Miss Elizabeth Murphy of Hud- 

Mav 2.' 1924— Concert, Mr. Ralph s .°" Fal ] s ' .^- Y. Miss Mabel M. 

Scala, Mr. Stanley Bogash, Miss Allen of Ridgefield and Dr. E. J. 

Grace Jepson, Mr. Frank Foti, Lynch, Shelton. 

all of Bridgeport, and Miss June 10, 1924 — Concert, Miss 

Mary Scala of New York City, Lillian Jones, Miss Ethel Pigg, 

conveyed to Sanatorium in Miss Ethel Fuller, Miss Frances 

Bridgeport City car. O'Neil and Mr. Jos. Weiler, all 

May 13, 1924 — Concert, Mack & of Bridgeport and Mrs. R. 

Morse Orchestra, Shelton. Adams Rosan of Milford, con- 

Mav 23, 1924— Concert, Mr. Harry }" e - ved to Sanatorium in automo- 

Uroft, Miss Nellie Fox, Mr. and bile furnished by Miss Elizabeth 

Mrs Earl Clark and Miss Janice *. Bishop, 1(2 Courtland St., 

Clark, all of Bridgeport, con- Bridgeport. 

veyed to Sanatorium in auto- June 11, 1924 — Entertainment by 

mobiles furnished by Mullins, employees of Sargent & Co., 

Scott & Redgate, Bridgeport. New Haven. 



Religious Services. 

Rev. Frank S. Morehouse, Church Rev. Mr. Chamberlin and mem- 

of the Good Shepherd, Shelton. bers of his parish, M. E. Church, 

Mr Ernest Lutters, Maltbv St. „ Stratford. 

n . e\ -\<. Rev. Andrew Plunkett, St. Joseph's 

Extension, Shelton. Church) shelton , 

Berean Memorial Church, Bridge- R ev . j h n Dillon, St. Joseph's 

port. Church, Shelton. 



THE SEASIDE. 

Radio and Radio Cabinet. 

The Past Master Ass'n of the B. P. O. Elks, New Haven, Conn. 

Victrola. 

Sunshine Clubs No. 1 and 2 of The Howland Dry Goods Co., Bridge- 
port, Conn. 

Victrola Records. 

The Bridgeport Dye and Machine Mr. Silas Maxson Jr., 233 Bank 

Co, 174 Elm St., Bridgeport, St., New London, Conn. 

^ Nehantic Girl Scouts, Niantic, 

Conn - Conn. 



40 



STATE OF CONNECTICUT 



Donations of Cash. 



Ever-Ready Circle of Kings 
Daughters, Norwich, Conn. 

ph C. Ivers, Treasurer, 
B. P. O. Elks of Bridgeport, 
Elks Club, Bridgeport, Conn. 

Two Friends. 

Mr. Thomas Fitch. Jr., 222 Conn. 
Ave., Mew London, Conn. 

Miss Isnbelle Feutchwanger, 473 
Edg< H Ave., New Haven, 
Conn. 

Mr. G. Harold Gilpatric, State 
Capitol, Hartford, Conn. 

A Friend. 

Mr. Edward A. Healey, 294 Hick 
Street, Brooklyn, New York. 

Sunday School Class of the First 
Congregational Church, Port- 
land. Conn. 

Intermediate Young Peoples So- 
ciety, First Congregational 
Church, Bristol, Conn. 

Woodcraft Physiological Club, 
New London, Conn. 

Mr. John Manwarring, Oswegat- 
chie, Waterford, Conn. 

Nehantic Girl Scouts, Niantic, 
Conn. 



Mr. Charles H. Osgood, Norwich, 
( Jonn. 

Mr. Albert Ryfre, 54 Pine Street, 
Chicopee Falls, Mass. 

Ladies of Cresent Beach, Mrs. Min- 
nie Samuels, President, 128 Col- 
lins St., Hartford, Conn. 

Sunday School Children, of the 
First Congregational Church, 
Portland, Conn. 

Enlisted Men of Submarine Base, 
New London, Conn. 

Sunshine Club, No. 1 and 2, of the 
Howland Dry Goods Co., Bridge- 
port, Conn. 

Winthrop Willing Workers, Peep 
River, Conn. 

Mrs. P. T. Walden, 210 St. Ronan 
St., New Haven, Conn. 

Mrs. Harry H. Walker. 107 Feder- 
al Street, New Londor, Conn. 

The Women's Auxilliary of the 
Lawrence and Memorial Asso- 
ciated Hospital, New London, 
Conn. 

Mr. Frances De Gange, 28 Ocean 
Ave., New London, Conn. 



Clothing, Boots and Overshoes. 



American Needlework Guild of 
Bridgeport, Conn. 

Mr. Charles V. Barrington, Vice- 
Pres., Jenkins Bros., Bridge- 
port, Conn. 

Mr. W. G. Bryant, Pres.. The Bead 
Chain Mfg. Co., Bridgeport, 
Conn. 

Mr. Dana Barnes, Bristol, Conn., 
(Sewing, Bloomers and Gowns.) 

Mrs. Catherine A. Cook, 59 Bridge- 
port Ave., Shelton, Conn. 

Mr. Jonathan Godfrey, The Oaks, 
Brooklawn, Bridgeport, Conn. 

Mr. W. T. Hinks, 152 Park Place. 
Bridgeport, Conn. 

Intermediate Young Peoples So- 
ciety. First Congregational 
Church of Bridgeport, (Sewing, 
Gowns and Bloomers. ) 

Wilbur Mcl.eod Memorial of St. 
Andrews Church, Hartford, 
( inn. 



Kings Daughters of the First 
Church, New London, Conn., 
(Sewing, Gowns and Bloomers.) 

Mrs. Edward B. Lowry, Southing- 
ton, Conn. 

Ladies Auxiliary, Montauk Ave., 
Baptist Church, New London, 
Conn., (Sewing, Gowns and 
Bloomers.) 

Dr. E. J. Lynch, Supt. Shelton 
State Sanatorium, Shelton, 
Conn. 

Miss Frances Meeker, 430 John 
St., Bridgeport, Conn. 

Mr. Sumner Simpon, Pres. Ray- 
bestos Co., Bridgeport, Conn. 

Sunshine Clubs No. 1 and 2 of the 
Howland Dry Goods Co.* Bridge- 
port, Conn. 

Sunshine Clubs of the Rockwell 
Co., Bridgeport, Conn. 

Sunshine Club of the General 
Electric Co., Bridgeport, Conn. 



THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION 



41 



Thalia Club of the Y. W. League, 
Bristol, Conn., (Sewing, Bloom- 
ers. ) 



Mr. W. R. Webster, Vice Pres., 
Bridgeport Brass Co., Bridge- 
port, Conn. 



Ice Cream, Fruit and Candy. 



Mrs. Abringer, Summer Rest 
Farm, Niantie, Conn. 

B'nai Brith Bible School, New 
London, Conn. 

St. Patricks Boy Scouts, Norwich, 
Conn. 

Boston Candy Kitchen, State and 
Union Sts, New London, Conn. 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Brown, Mar- 
ion, Conn. 

Mr. Frank Byrne, Roger St., Hart- 
ford, Conn. 

Mrs. Garrett Busch, 229 DeKalk 
Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert B. Bone, 273 
Orange St., New Haven, Conn. 

Mr. Harold McPherson Bone, 273 
Orange St., New Haven, Conn. 

Mr. Stephen Bond, Niantie, Conn. 

Crowley Club, New London, Conn. 

Mr. J. J. Cruttenden, Niantie, 
Conn. 

Miss Edna Collins, 353 Sixth Ave., 
Brooklyn, New York. 

Senator and Mrs. Geoi'ge W. 
Christoph, Warehouse Point, 
Conn. 

Mr. E. R. Clark, 182 Pearl St., 
Hartford, Conn. 

Employees Health Protective 
League, Bristol, Conn. 

Mrs. William Eagan, Summer Rest 
Farm, Niantie, Conn. 

Mr. Edmund Gaberman, 48 Russell 
St., Hartford, Conn. 

Mr. B. Harris, Pres. Harris Con- 
struction Co., Stamford, Conn. 

Mr. N. Hilliar, Crescent Beach, 
Conn. 

Mrs. Frank Hartman, East Haven, 
Conn. 

Mrs. Minnie Hefflon, Niantie, 
Conn. 

Humphrey-Cornell Co., New Lon- 
don, Conn. 

Wilbur McLeod Memorial of St. 
Andrews Church, Hartford, 
Conn. 

Mrs. Alice Johnson, Niantie, Conn. 



Mr. Johnson Papy, c/o Geometric 
Tool Co., Blake and Valley Sts., 
New Haven, Conn. 

Kings Daughters of First Church, 
New London, Conn. 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Lockwood, 
Crescent Beach, Conn. 

Mrs. H. H. O'Niel, Ye Faire Har- 
bor Broad, New London, Conn. 

Miss Reskler, Summer Rest Farm, 
Niantie, Conn. 

Mr. and Mrs. S. C. Parker, c/o 

Howland Dry Goods Co., Bridge- 
pore, Conn. 

Rev. George W. Potter, Niantie, 
Conn. 

Methodist Episcopal Sunday 
School Class. Niantie, Conn. 

Mrs. Walter Rehn, 16 Perry St., 
New London, Conn. 

State Farm, Miss Helen Hazard, 
Supt., Niantie, Conn. 

Mrs. Minnie K. Samuels, 128 Col- 
lins St., Hartford, Conn. 

Ladies of Crescent Beach, Mrs. 
Minnie Samuels, 128 Collins St., 
Hartford, Conn. 

Children of the Beth Israel Sun- 
day School, Hartford, Conn. 

Enlisted Men of Sub. Base, New 
London, Conn. 

Mrs. A. F. Shaw, Crescent Beach, 
Conn. 

Mr. Paul Sheldon, 60 Prospect St., 
Hartford, Conn. 

Sunshine Clubs No. 1 and 2 of the 
Howland Dry Goods Co., Bridge- 
port, Conn. 

The Sunshine Club of the Ameri- 
can Chain Co., Bridgeport, 
Conn. 

Sunshine Club of Warner Bros. 
Co., Bridgeport, Conn. 

Sunshine Club of General Electric 
Co., Bridgeport, Conn. 

Master William J. Sheehan Jr., 
Cor. Whitney Ave. and Willow 
St., New Haven, Conn. 

Mr. E. J. Vaughn, 60 Prospect St., 
Hartford, Conn. 



42 



STATE OF CONNECTICUT 



Visiting Nurses Association, 35 
Elm St., New Haven, Conn. 

Mr. G. Villane, c/o Bradley, Smith 
Co., 102 Hill St., New Haven, 
Conn. 



Master John Wright, 47 Lemuel 
Ave., Chicopee Falls, Mass. 

Mrs. Andrew J. Wholey, 15 Park 
St., Norwich, Conn. 



Baseballs, Gloves and Bats. 



American Hardware Stores, 

Bridgeport, Conn. 
Ailing Rubber Co., Mr. K. E. Os- 

born, Manager, Bridgeport, 

Conn. 
Mr. W. G. Bryant, Pres., Bead 

Chain Co., Bridgeport, Conn. 
The B. P. O. Elks of New Haven, 

Conn. 
A. J. Hildreth Co., 248 Fairfield 

Ave., Bridgeport, Conn. 



The Howland Dry Goods Co., 
Bridgeport, Conn. 

Meigs and Co., Mr. F. D. Bell, 
Mgr., Bridgeport, Conn. 

Mr. Henry D. Neale, Sec. Employ- 
ees Tub. Relief Ass'n., 805 
Williams St., Bridgeport, Conn. 

The Sportsmans Store, Fairfield 
Ave., Bridgeport, Conn. 

Sport Center, Mr. I. E. Weisen, 
Mgr., 79 Fairfield Ave., Bridge- 
port, Conn. 



Flowers. 



Mrs. Etta B. Chapman, Niantic, 

Conn. 
Mr. George Fisher, Florist, State 

St., New London, Conn. 



Ladies of Crescent Beach, Mrs. 
Minnie K. Samuels, 128 Collins 
St., Hartford, Conn. 



Toys, Books, Games and Magazines. 



The Alpha Sorority, Torrington, 
Conn. 

Mrs. Wallace S. Allis, 305 Broad- 
way, Norwich. 

Mrs. Mary Anderson, Waterford, 
Conn. 

B'nai Brith Bible School, New Lon- 
don, Conn. 

Troop No. 1 Boy Scouts of United 
Congregational Church, Nor- 
wich, Conn. 

Harriet M. Brownell, East Hamp- 
ton, Conn. 

Mrs. Viggo Bird, Goshen Point, 
Waterford, Conn. 

Kings Daughters (Dorcas Circle) 
Jewett City, Conn. 

Pupils of Center Hill School, Cen- 
ter Hill, Conn. 

Mrs. Susie Coroley, Niantic, Conn. 

Mrs. R. B. Chute, 410-2nd St., 
Greenport, N. Y. 

Children of Trinity Church School, 
Hartford, Conn. 

Crowley Club, New London, Conn. 

Mrs. Arthur B. Caulkins, Granite 
Street, New London, Conn. 



Mrs. Catherine A. Cook, 59 
Bridgeport Ave., Shelton, Conn. 

Mrs. James Clark, Niantic, Conn. 

Miss Bessie Connolley, Old Lyme, 
Conn. 

Camp Fire Girls, Groton, Conn. 

Congregational Sunday School 
Class, Niantic, Conn. 

Mrs. L. Cade, R. F. D. No 1, Hack- 
ensack, N. J. 

Miss Elizabeth Cade, Areola, N: J. 

Derby-Shelton Community Girls 
Club, Shelton, Conn. 

Dr. Frank M. Dunn, Broad St., 
New London, Conn. 

Eastern Ave. School, Springfield, 
Mass. 

Employees Health Protective 
League, Bristol, Conn. 

Elks Club of New Haven, New 
Haven, Conn. 

Mr. Henry D. Neale, Sec. Employ- 
ees Tub. Relief Ass'n., 805 
William St., Bridgeport, Conn. 

Mrs. Fields, Black Point, Conn. 



THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION' 



43 



Mr. Roger Farrell, 15 Linden St., 
New London, Conn. 

Girls Choir of Trinity Church, 
Hartford, Conn. 

Mr. Ernest S. Fuller, Somers, 
Conn. 

Mrs. George Gurney, 16 Perry St., 
New London, Conn. 

Mrs. Sarah Greening, 86 Lewis St., 
Stratford, Conn. 

Girl Scouts of New Milford, New 
Milford, Conn. 

Mrs. Mary Gardiner, 18 Blackhall 
St., New London, Conn. 

Mr. A. Glass, c/o Prudential In- 
surance Co., New London, Conn. 

Mr. J. E. Haviland, Pine Grove, 
Xiantic, Conn. • 

C. W. Hoggart, 345 Broad St., 
New London, Conn. 

Miss Hutchinson, Bristol, Conn. 

Miss Margaret miliar, R. F. D. 
No. 1, Waterford, Conn. 

Miss G. E. Harrington, 13 Ash- 
croft Road, New London, Conn. 

Miss Dorothy Hapgood, South 
Marshall St., Hartford, Conn. 

Mrs. G. W. Harrison, 552 W. 
141st. St., New York, N. Y. 

Pupils of Worthington Hooker 
School, New Haven, Conn. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles D Harring- 
ton, 20 South St., Southbridge, 
Mass. 

Miss Helen Hutchinson, Graham 
St., Bristol, Conn. 

Howland Dry Goods Co., Bridge- 
port, Conn. 

Miss Anne Hartigan, 788 Washing- 
ton Ave., Bridgeport, Conn. 

Miss Annie Hield, Prospect St., 
New London, Conn. 

Mrs. George Ingalls, Crescent 
Beach, Niantic, Conn. 

Immanuel Lutheran Sunday 
School, Mr. William R. Pahl, 
Chairman, Meriden, Conn. 

Ives Mfg. Corp., Mr. H. C. Ives, 
Pres., Bridgeport, Conn. 

Wilbur McLeod Memorial of St. 
Andrews Church, Hartford, 
Conn. 

Junior League of Lawrence Me- 
morial Hospital,, 15 Hunting- 
ton St., New London, Conn. 

Miss Julia Kelly, Niantic, Conn. 



Kings Daughters of St. James 
Church, 9 Prospect St., New 
London, Conn. 

Master Donald Keefe, New Lon- 
don, Conn. 

Master Roger Keefe, New London, 
Conn. 

Mr. N. Searle Light, Director of 
Rural Education, State Board of 
Education, Hartford, Conn. 

Master Thomas R. Lynch, 43 
Washington St., New London, 
Conn. 

The Lindstrom Tool and Toy Co., 
50 Silliman Ave., Bridgeport, 
Conn. 

Miss Helen Lynch, 43 Washing- 
ton St., New London, Conn. 

Miss Mary F. McKay, 23 Spauld- 
ing St., Norwich., Conn. 

Master Morgan McGuire, New 
London, Conn. 

Miss Helen McFarland, 152 Canner 
St., New Haven, Conn. 

A Friend, Mystic, Conn. 

Miss Evelyn L. MacMillan, 66 
Smith Ave., Norwich, Conn. 

Miss Dorothy Miller, 84 Clinton 
Place, Hackensack, N. J. 

Mrs. G. A. Miller, 84 Clinton Place, 
Hackensack, N. J. 

Nehantic Girl Scouts, Mrs. L. M. 
Stevens, Niantic, Conn. 

Niantic Sunshine Society, Niantic, 
Conn. 

Mrs. Plumb, Bristol, Conn. 

Mr. and Mrs. S. C. Parker, c/o 
Howland Dry Goods Co., Bridge- 
port, Conn. 

Mrs. Grace Parsons, Somers, 
Conn. 

Mrs. Elmer J. Peabody, R. F. D. 
No. 1, Waterford, Conn. 

The Philokalia Club, Hartford, 
Conn. 

Mrs. Walter Rehn, 16 Perry St., 
New London, Conn. 

Mr. Samuel Rogers, Niantic, Conn. 

Mrs. L. D. Robinson, 33 Algon- 
quin St., Dorchester, Mass. 

Mr. E. Tyler Rogers, 56 Broadway, 
Norwich, Conn. 

Mrs. E. C. Roberts, 38 Vander- 
beck Place, Hackensack, N. J. 

Mrs. S. Hussy Reed, Supervisor of 
Schools, 5 Garden St., Norwich, 
Conn. 



44 



STATE OF CONNECTICUT 



Mrs. Minnie K. Samuels, 128 Col- 
lins St., Hartford, Conn. 

Enlisted Men of Sub. Base, New 
London, Conn. 

Miss Stevens, Bristol, Conn. 

Kindergarten Class of Saltonstall 
School, Truman St., New Lon- 
don, Conn. 

Sunshine Clubs, No. 1 and No. 2 of 
The Howland Dry Goods Co., 
Bridgeport, Conn. 

Miss E. R. Sanford, 17 Perry Ave., 
Shelton, Conn. 

The Sunshine Club of the Ameri- 
can Chain Co., Bridgeport, 
Conn. 

Sunshine Club of Rockwell Co., 
1140 Main St., Bridgeport, 
Conn. 

Sunday School Class of Second 
Congregational Church, Live 
Wires, Jewett City, Conn. 

Somers Congregational Sunday 
School, Somers, Conn. 

The Sodalitas of the United 
Church of Norwich, Norwich, 
Conn. 



Sunshine Club of Warner Bros. 

Co., Bridgeport, Conn. 
Mrs. C. A. Sackett, 94 Glenwood 

Ave., New London, Conn. 
Mr. and Mrs. J. D. Stewart, Louis- 
ville, Kentucky. 
Mrs. Melville Sueden, 248 Moore 

St., Hackensack, N. J. 
Miss Dorothy Shea, 164 Bacon 

Ave., New Haven, Conn. 
The Beatrice Mansfield Branch 

Sunshine Society, New London, 

Conn. 
Miss Ruth E. Tubbs, Pine Grove, 

Niantic, Conn. 
Visiting Nurses Association, 35 

Elm St., New Haven, Conn. 
Children of Grade 6, Windham 

Street School, Willimantic, 

Conn. 
Miss Elizabeth P. Welch, Somers, 

Conn. 
Miss Helen M. Withington, 152 

Canner St., New Haven, Conn. 



Miscellaneous Donations. 



Mr. F. A. Bennett, State Highway 
Dept., Hartford, Conn., cart. 

Christian Science Church, 10 
Granite St., New London, Conn., 
newspapers. 

Mrs. Walter Conklin, Meadow 
Brook Farm, Uncasville, Conn., 
cookies. 

Mr. Robert B. Chappell, County 
Game Warden of State Fish and 
Game Association, 111 Hunting- 
ton St., New London, Conn., 
venison. 

Daughters of Veterans, Anne 
Roger Lyon Tent No. 1, New 
London, Conn., flag. 

Executive Officers of Submarine 
Base, New London, Conn., flag. 

Mr. J. E. Haviland, Pine Grove, 
Niantic, Conn., watch for pa- 
tient. 

Mrs. Arthur G. Howard, Canada, 
cookies. 

Mrs. Chester K. Hale, Portland, 
Conn., jelly and jam. 



Mrs. Merrill, Crescent Beach, 
Niantic, pencil sharpeners. 

Mr. Henry D. \ T eale, Sec. E. T. R. 
A., 805 William St., Bridge- 
port, trimmings for Christmas 
tree. 

Mr. and Mrs. S. C. Parker, c/o 
Howland Dry Goods Co., Bridge- 
port, Conn., flag's, two large 
lawn swings. 

Miss J. N. Rippin, 334 Crown 
Street, New Haven, crayons 
and pencils. 

Ladies of Crescent Beach, Mrs. 
Minnie K. Samuels, 128 Collins 
St., Hartford, Conn., sleds. 

Sunshine Clubs No. 1 and No. 2 of 
The Howland Dry Goods Co., 
Bridgeport, Conn., croquet set, 
Christmas tree trimmings, wag- 
on. 

Miss Lillian M. Vanderwerken, 25 
Highland St., Stamford, Conn., 
honey. 



THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION" 



45 



Entertainments. 



St. Patricks Boy Scouts, Norwich, 
Conn., minstrel. 

Barnum and Bailey and Ringling 
Bros. Circus, Mr. Fred J. Brad- 
ner, Director, Bridgeport, Conn. 

Muscania Musical Club, Mr. Rich- 
ard Benvenuti, Director, 9 Chel- 
sea St., New London, Conn., 
concert. 

Through the efforts of The B. P. O. 
Elks of New Haven an enter- 
tainment was given by: 

Mr. Hyman J. Bumstein, 15 Syl- 
van Ave., New Haven, violinist. 

Mrs. J. D. Beebe, 563 Winthrop 
Ave., New Haven, vocal solos. 

Miss Margaret Connor, 4 Terrace 
Ave., New London, vocal solos. 

Mr. John Cavallaro, 26 Irving 
Place, New Haven, banjoist. 

Mr. Joseph R. Gordon, 112 Hobart 
St., New Haven, pianist. 

Mr. D. J. Lyons, 132 Howe St., 
New Haven, vocal solos. 

Crowley Club, 42 Jay St., New 
London, Christmas carols sung 
by all members. 

Mr.' Chas F. Chittenden, 293 
Huntington St., and Mr. Perry 
B.Kenyon, State St., New Lon- 
don, Conn., presented a slight 
of hand performance. 

Mr. H. W. Ganmons, Manager, 
Community Theater, New Lon- 
don, Conn., dancing by girls of 
Mrs. Ballentyne Penfield's 
School; music by Buckley and 
W. M. I. School orchestras and 
vocal selections by Mr. H. W. 
Gammons. 

Through the kindness of the B. P. 
O. Elks of New London: 

1st. Moving picture films were 
furnished for two years. 

2nd. A Hallowe'en party was 
given. 

3rd. All the children were gener- 
ously remembered at Christmas. 

4th. A valentine party was given. 



5th. The Sells Floto and Barnum 
circuses gave miniature per- 
formances after which ice 
cream, pop corn and peanuts 
were distributed. 

Concert by 102nd Infantry Band 
of New Haven under the direc- 
tion of Mr. A. R. Tita. 

Through the efforts of Mr. William 
White of New London, a concert 
was given by the combined or- 
chestras of Nathan Hale and 
Harbor Grammar Schools under 
the direction of Mrs. Percy G. 
Huddle, Fort St., Groton, Conn. 

Through the kindness of Mr. 
Walter T. Murphy, Mgr., Capi- 
tol Theater, New London, 
Conn., The Fairy Tale Fogies 
and the Juvenile Varieties were 
presented by: 

Miss Lou Jollet, 57 Columbia Ave., 
Woodhaven, L. I. 

Mr. Jack Lewis, Strand Theater 
Bldg., Broadway and 47th St., 
New York City. 

Mr. Harry Lewis, 5328 Illinois 
Ave., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

Mr. Nick Nazaroff, 275 E. 10th 
St., New York, N. Y. 

Miss Catherine Rogers, 1918 Arch 
St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Mr. and Mrs. Don Sherwood, 558 
Ave. C, Bayonne, N. J. 

New Britain Sunshine Society, 
New Britain, Conn., May party. 

Niantic Sunshine Society, Niantic, 
Conn., valentine party, Easter 
party, May party. 

Sunshine Clubs No. 1 and 2 of The 
Howland Dry Goods Co., Bridge- 
port, Conn., valentine party. 

Charter Oak Branch Sunshine So- 
ciety, Hartford, Conn., valen- 
tine party, candy. 

Mr. Harry T. Shurts, 34 Bristol 
St., New London, Conn., acted 
as Santa Claus. 

Concert by the 169th Infantry 
Band under direction of Mr. 
Tissalle. 



46 STATE OF CONNECTICUT 

Visiting Clergymen. 

Rev. George Warren Potter, Nian- Rev. Henry A. Link, Black Hall, 

tic, Conn. Conn. 

Rev. E. A. Flynn, Niantic, Conn. 



THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION 47 

SANATORIUM EMPLOYEES. 

In compliance with Chapter 10, Section 181 of the Gener- 
al Statutes, we append the following list of employees at 
the various sanatoria, whose compensation is not less than 
$450.00 per annum. 

CEDARCREST EMPLOYEES. (HARTFORD) 

Superintendent $4,000.00 with maintenance for self and 
family. 

Two Resident Physicians, $1,800.00 with maintenance 
for self and family. 

Head nurse $1,200.00 with board. 

Bookkeeper, $1,200.00 with board. 

Dentist, $480.00 without board. 

Engineer, $1,200.00 with board. 

Stenographer, $720.00 with board. 

One nurse, $960.00 with board. 

Two nurses, $900.00 with board. 

Seven nurses, $840.00 with board. 

Two nurses, $780.00 with board. 

Four nurses, $720.00 with board. 

One attendant, $540.00 without board. 

Two orderlies, $540.00 without board. 

One orderly, $480.00 without board. 

Five orderlies, $540.00 with board. 

One orderly, $480.00 with board. 

Chef, $1,500.00 with board. 

Pastry cook, $780.00 with board. 

Server, $840.00 with board. 

Second cook, $900.00 with board. 

Asst. cook, $660.00 with board. 

Two waiters, $540.00 with board. 

One waiter, $480.00 with board. 

One waiter, $480.00 without board. 

One maid, $600.00 with board. 

One maid, $480.00 with board. 

One maid, $540.00 with board. 

Waitress, $540.00 with board. 

Seven kitchen helpers, $540.00 with board. 

One steamntter, $540.00 with board. 

Two painters, $600.00 without board. 

Laundryman, $480.00 without board. 

Storekeeper, $1,020.00 with board. 



48 STATE OF CONNECTICUT 

One chauffeur, $720.00 with board. 
One chauffeur, $600.00 without board. 
One carpenter, $1,740.00 without board. 
One carpenter, $1,029.00 without board. 
Watchman, $780.00 with board. 
Fireman, $660.00 with board. 
Houseman, $600.00 with board. 
Farmer, $1,500.00 with board. 
Teamster, $780.00 with board. 
Three laborers, $720.00 with board. 
Laborer, $600.00 with board. 
Laundry foreman, $2,600.00 without board. 
Laundry fireman, $1,300.00 without board. 
Three laundresses, $936.00 without board. 
Three laundresses, $884.00 without board. 
Six laundresses, $832.00 without board. 
One laundryman, $1,170.00 without board. 



UNDERCLIFF EMPLOYEES. (MERIDEN) 

Superintendent, $3,500.00 with maintenance for self and 

family. 

Resident physician, $2,200.00 with maintenance for self 

and family. 

Resident physician, $1,800.00 with maintenance for self 

and family. 

Head nurse, $1,380.00 with board. 

Asst. head nurse, $1,140.00 with board. 

One nurse, $1,080.00 with board. 

Three nurses, $900.00 with board. 

Five nurses, $840.00 with board. 

Dentist, $480.00 expenses and meals, 2 days per month. 

Steward, $1,380.00 with board. 

Bookkeeper, $1,080.00 with board. 

Stenographer, $600.00 with board. 

Telephone operator, $480.00 with board. 

One teacher, $1,680.00 with meals. 

Three teachers, $1,200.00 with board. 

Attendant, $540.00 with board. 

Chef, $1,500.00 with meals. 

Pastry cook, $1,020.00 with board. 

Waitress, $540.00 with board. 

Waiter, $660.00 with board. 

Maid, $660.00 with board. 



THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION 49 

Maid, $600.00 with board. 
Kitchen helper, $660.00 with board. 
Kitchen helper, $540.00 with board. 
Five kitchen helpers, $480.00 with board. 
Orderly, $720.00 with board. 
Orderly, $600.00 with board. 
Orderly, $540.00 with board. 
Three janitors, $540.00 with board. 
Three janitors, $480.00 with board. 
Laborer, $720.00 with board. 
Two laborers, $540.00 with board. 
Painter, $900.00 with meals. 
Engineer, $1,200.00 with meals. 
Carpenter, $1,200.00 with meals. 
Night watchman, $660.00 with board. 
Fireman, $720.00 with board. 
Chauffeur, $1,080.00 with board. 
Foreman of grounds, $780.00 with board. 
Teamster, $600.00 with meals. 

NORWICH SANATORIUM EMPLOYEES. 

Superintendent, $4,000.00 with maintenance for self and 
family. 

Resident physician, $1,800.00 with maintenance for self 
and family. 

One X-Ray and laboratory technician, $1,200.00 with 
maintenance. 

One X-Ray technician, $720.00 with maintenance. 

One laboratory technician, $720.00 with maintenance. 

Secretary, $1,200.00 with maintenance. 

Head nurse, $1,200.00 with maintenance. 

One nurse, $1,020.00 with maintenance. 

Four nurses, $960.00 with maintenance. 

Four nurses, $900.00 with maintenance. 

One nurse, $840.00 with maintenance. 

One attendant, $900.00 with maintenance. 

Three attendants, $840.00 with maintenance. 

Four attendants, $720.00 with maintenance. 

One orderly, $660.00 with maintenance. 

One orderly, $540.00 with maintenance. 

Five orderlies, $420.00 with maintenance. 

One orderly, $360.00 with maintenance. 

One orderly, $300.00 with maintenance. 

One orderly, $600.00 with maintenance. 

Two ward maids, $420.00 with maintenance. 



50 STATE OF CONNECTICUT 

Housekeeper, $1,200.00 with maintenance. 
Dietitian, $900.00 with maintenance. 
Chef, $1,350.00 with maintenance. 
Asst. chef, $900.00 with maintenance. 
One kitchen man $660.00 with maintenance. 
One kitchen man, $540.00 with maintenance. 
One waiter, $600.00 with maintenance. 
One waiter, $480.00 with maintenance. 
Seven waiters, $420.00 with maintenance. 
One maid, $600.00 with maintenance. 
One seamstress, $660.00 with maintenance. 
One painter, $830.00 with maintenance. 
One laborer, $540.00 with maintenance. 
One laborer, $420.00 with maintenance. 
Storekeeper, $1,020.00 with maintenance. 
Engineer, $1,320.00 with maintenance. 
Carpenter, $900.00 with maintenance. 
Farmer, $1,548.00 part maintenance. 
Stenographer, $1,170.00 part maintenance. 
Fireman, $1,196.00 no maintenance. 
Two laborers, $1,196.00 no maintenance. 
One laborer, $1,404.00 no maintenance. 
One laborer, $1,302.00 no maintenance. 
Baker, $1,352.00 no maintenance. 
Maid, $780.00 with maintenance. 

LAUREL HEIGHTS EMPLOYEES. (SHELTON) 

Superintendent, $4,000.00 with maintenance. 
Resident physician, $2,200.00 with maintenance for self 
and family. 

Head nurse, $1,200.00 with board. 
Secretary, $1,080.00 with board. 
Stenographer, $900.00 without board. 
Housekeeper, $1,080.00 with board. 
Two nurses, $960.00 with board. 
Six nurses, $900.00 with board. 
Nurse, $840.00 with board. 
Three nurses, $720.00 with board. 
Four nurses, $600.00 with board. 
Chef, $1,500.00 with board. 
Second cook, $1,020.00 with board. 
Baker, $1,440.00 without board. 
Infirmary cook, $600.00 with board. 
Kitchen helper, $720.00 with board. 



THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION 51 

Kitchen helper, $600.00 with board. 
Two kitchen helpers, $480.00 with board. 
Special diet cook, $480.00 with board. 
Maid, $600.00 with board. 
Orderlv, $540.00 with board. 
Chauffeur, $900.00 with board. 
Engineer, $840.00 with board. 
Two firemen, $600.00 with board. 
Teamster, $480.00 with board. 
Three farm hands, $480.00 with board. 
Watchman, $780.00 with board. 
Farmer, $1,200.00 without board. 
Laborer, $720.00 with board. 
Carpenter, $600.00 with board. 
Painter, $900.00 with board. 

THE SEASIDE EMPLOYEES. 

Superintendent, $3,500.00 with maintenance for self and 
family. 

Head nurse, $1,200.00 with board. 

Teacher, $1,020.00 with board. 

Five nurses, $780.00 with board. 

One nurse, $600.00 with board. 

Three nurses helpers, $460.00 with board. 

Two maids, $480.00 with board. 

Waiter, $480.00 with board. 

Kitchen helper, $480.00 with board. 

Chef, $1,200.00 with board. 

Steward and bookkeeper, $1,300.00 part maintenance. 

Janitor, $780.00 with board. 

Orderly, $780.00 with board. 

Engineer, $840.00 with board. 

Watchman. $720.00 with board. 



52 



STATE OF CONNECTICUT 



Medical Report of Five Sanatoria 

TWO YEARS— JULY 1, 1922 TO JUNE 30, 1923; AND JULY 1, 1923 
TO JUNE 30, 1924. 

TABLE 1 — Population. 
CEDARCREST. 
1922-23 1923-24 



Male 


Female 1 Total || Male 

1 II 


Female 


Total 


Beginning 


95 
169 
113 
56 
95 
92 


69 
108 
79 
36 
62 
60 


164 
277 
192 
92 
157 
152 


95 

150 

85 

43 

117 

103 


62 
92 

64 
27 
63 
56 


157 


Admitted 


242 


Discharged 


149 


Died 


70 


Remaining 


180 


Daily Average .... 


159 



UNDERCLIFF 
1922-23 



1923-24 



1 

I Male 
1 


1 

Female | Total 1 
1 1 


Male 


Female 


Total 


Admitted | 67 


79 
71 
60 
5 
84 
83 + 


170 
138 
123 
12 
171 
165 


87 

67 

64 

3 

87 
79 + 


84 
65 

58 
3 
88 
84 + 


171 

132 


Discharged | 63 

Died I 7 

Remaining | 87 

Daily Average ....( 82 + 


122 

6 

175 

163 



NORWICH SANATORIUM 
1922-23 



1923-24 





1 

1 Male 
1 


1 

Female 
1 


Total 


Male 


Female 


Total 




1 108 


1 58 


166 


100 


55 


155 




1 158 


82 


240 


181 


83 


264 


Discharged 


| 114 


67 


181 


118 


70 


188 


Died 


| 52 


18 


70 


61 


14 


75 


Remained 


1 100 


55 


155 


102 


54 


156 


Daily Average ... 


,| 106 


| 53 


159 


95 


55 


150 



THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION 



53 



LAUREL HEIGHTS 
. 1922-23 



1923-24 



I 

| Male 

I 

Beginning | 81 

Admitted j 190 

Discharged j 133 

Died | 55 

Remaining j 83 

Daily Average ....J 88 



Female 



I 
Total | 



68 


149 


113 


303 


80 


213 


30 


85 


71 


154 


68 


156 



Total 




THE SEASIDE 







1922-23 






1923-24 




Male 


1 

Female | 


Total 


Male 


Female 


Total 


Died 

Remaining 


39 

1 11 
! 14 
| 1 
| 35 
| 36 


19 | 

6 

2 1 

1 
22 
21 1 


58 
17 

16 
2 

57 
57 


35 

12 
9 

38 
37 


22 
4 
6 

20 
21 


57 
16 

15 

58 


Daily Average ... 


58 



TABLE 2 — Hospital Days 



1922-23 



July 

August ... 
September 
October ... 
November 
December 
January ... 
February . 

March 

April 

May 

June 

Total 



22,112 
22,275 
20,622 
20,765 
20,548 
21,081 
21,067 
19,371 
21,717 
21,036 
21,528 
20,554 
252,676 



1923-24 

21,129 
21,040 
19,851 
20,684 
20,071 
20,837 
21,209 
20,308 
21,923 
21,609 
22,370 
21,741 
252,772 



Total Hospital Days 



1922-23 



Cedarcrest I 55,496 

Undercliff I 60,783 

Norwich Sanatorium 58,101 

Laurel Heights 57,243 

The Seaside 21,053 



1923-24 



58,273 
60,053 
55,097 
58,108 
21,241 



54 



STATE OF CONNECTICUT 



TABLE 3 — Length of Stay of Discharged Patients 



1922-23 



1923-24 





• 






287 

152 

153 

80 

53 


266 




159 




134 




88 




44 




725 


691 



Length of Stay of Patients Who Died 



1922-23 



Under 3 months 

3 months to 6 months 
6 months to 1 year .... 

1 year to 2 years 

2 years and over 



124 
40 
35 
26 
26 



1923-24 



125 
47 
38 
19 
24 



Total 



251 



253 



TABLE 4 — Condition of Patients on Admission 

CEDARCREST 

1922-23 1923-24 





Male | 


Female | 


Male 


Female 


2 yrs. 
Total 


Incipient 


17 

70 

78 

3 

1 



15 

39 

53 

1 



o 


12 

37 

99 





2 


13 

14 

64 



1 



57 


Far Advanced 


160 
294 


Surgical 


4 


Non-Tuberculous 


2 
2 


Total 


169 


108 


150 


92 


519 



UNDERCLIFF 





1922-23 


1923-24 






Male 


I 
Female 


Male 


Female 


2 yrs. 
Total 


Pulmonary Adult Type .... 

Moderately Advanced .. 
Far Advanced 


1 

5 
1 
1 

3 

6 

26 

11 

1 
2 
1 
10 



3 
1 
5 

7 

10 

17 

6 

2 





11 

1 3 


4 
1 


2 

8 

18 

14 

3 

1 

2 

14 




4 
2 
3 

8 

11 

13 

8 

2 

1 

2 

15 

2 


16 
5 
9 


Pulmonary Juvenile Type.. 
Hilar 


20 


Parenchymal 


35 


Glandular 


74 


Bone 


39 


Tuberculous Otitis 

Non-Tuberculous 


8 

4 

5 

50 


No Diagnosis 


5 


Total 


67 


| 65 


67 


71 


270 



THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION 



55 



NORWICH SANATORIUM 
1922-23 



1923-24 



Male I Female 



Male 



Female 



2 yrs. 
Total 



Incipient I 8 7 

Moderately Advanced | 31 17 

Advanced I 103 49 

Far Advanced | 8 3 

Bone I 2 

Glandular | 1 2 

Non-Tuberculous [ 3 

Not Determined | 3 2 

Lung Abcess | 1 

Genito U rinary | 0^ 

Total | 158 | 




31 



335 
15 
3 
4 
7 
7 
2 
2 



82 



504 



LAUREL HEIGHTS 





1922-23 


1923-24 






1 1 

Male I Female 1 

1 1 1 


Male 


Female 

] 


2 yrs. 
Total 


Surgical 


1 18 4 
| 69 44 
1 95 | 58 

..1 3| 3| 
..I 5 I 4| 


15 
56 
77 
5 
12 


7 

' 52 

81 

3 

9 


44 

221 

311 

14 




30 


Total 


..| 190 113 | 


165 


152 


620 



THE SEASIDE 





1922-23 








1923-24 






1 

| Male 

i 


1 

I Female 


II 
II 


Male 


1 

| Female 


2 yrs. 
Total 


Bone 


I 10 


1 - 
1 .- 

! 
1 


5 

1 


II 

1 

II 
II 
II 


9 

3 


1 3 

1 

1 


27 


Gland 




4 


Skin 






Renal 






Peritonitis 






Rickets 






Non-Tuberculous 


1 1 


2 


Total 


1 11 


1 


6 


II 


12 


4 


33 



TABLE 5 — Condition of Patients on Discharge 

CEDARCREST 

1922-23 1923-24 



1 1 II 

Male | Female | Male 

1 I II 


Female 1 2 yrs. 
Total 


Apparently Arrested | 3 4 

Improved | 64 j 57 | 45 


7 
29 
28 
27 


14 

195 


Unimproved j 46 22 | 36 


132 


Died | 56 | 36 || 43 


162 


Total | 169 | 115 || 128 


91 


503 



56 



STATE OF CONNECTICUT 



UNDERCLIFF 
1922-23 



1923-24 



Male 



Apparently Arrested 

Improved 

Unimproved 

Died 

Non-Tuberculous .... 

Not Treated 

Totals 



31 

24 

2 

7 
6 



70 



Female 



24 

21 

5 

5 

10 



65 



Male 



29 

31 

3 

3 

1 



67 



Female 



28 

25 

2 

3 

3 



61 



2 yrs. 
Total 

112 

101 

12 

18 
20 



263 



NORWICH SANATORIUM 

1922-23 



1923-24 



1 1 II 1 

Male | Female || Male | Female 2 yrs. 

1 1 II | Total 


Apparently Arrested „ 1 1 

Improved 43 

Unimproved I 23 

Non-Tuberculous 1 


2 

16 
25 
19 
2 
3 
18 



19 
63 
26 
2 
8 
61 



17 
31 
19 
2 
1 
14 


3 

92 
162 

87 
6 


Not Treated | 7 


19 


Died 1 52 


145 


Total 166 


85 


179 


84 


514 



LAUREL HEIGHTS 
1922-23 



1923-24 



i I 

Male | Female 



Male 



Female 



2 yrs. 
Total 

61 

173 
166 

1S7 

30 

617 



Apparently Arrested I 21 

Improved | 53 

Unimproved | 53 

Died 55 

Non-Tuberculous ' 6 

Total ! 188 



13 
32 
31 
30 

4 



49 
42 
51 
12 



110 



162 



19 
39 
40 

51 



157 



THE SEASIDE 
1922-23 



Male 



Apparently Cured 

Improved 

Unimproved 

Died 

Non-Tuberculous 
Total 



15 



Female 



9 1 

3 | 1 

1 

1 I 1 

1 I 



1923-24 



Male | Female 



2 yrs. 
Total 



.20 
7 

2 

2 

2 

33 



THE STATE Tl'BEKCULOSIS COMMISSION 
TABLE 6 — Civil Condition of Patients 



Widowed 

Divorced or Separated 
Total 



o5 

9 

1168 



34 



778 



TABLE 7 — Ages of Patients Admitted 



57 





Male 


[ Female | 


Total 


Married 


494 
610 


304 
432 


798 


Single 


1042 



80 

17 

1946 



Under 14 years 
14 to 20 years 
21 to 30 years 
31 to 40 years 
41 to 50 years 
51 to 60 years 
Over 60 years . 



Male 



Total 



135 
136 
265 

274 

206 

98 

50 

1164 



Female 

~T3T 

158 

257 

148 

58 

26 

6 

784 



Total 

266 

294 
522 
422 
264 
124 
56 
1948 



TABLE 8 — Nativity of Patient, Father and Mother 

Total for Two Years, 1922-1924 





Patient 


Father 


Mother 


Connecticut - 


883 

367 

2 

5 

2 

61 
2 
2 
2 
1 

34 
5 
6 

35 
6 
8 

19 

15 
1 

94 

149 

1 

22 
3 
5 
3 


290 
265 
3 
6 
2 
111 
3 
4 
1 

80 
5 
8 

62 

9 

• 10 

84 

18 

1 

279 

294 

1 

31 
6 
6 
7 


277 


United States 


276 


Albania 


2 


Armenia 


6 


Assyina 


2 


Austria Hungary 


112 


Belgium , 


3 


Bohemia 


4 


British West Indies , 


1 


British Columbia 




Canada 


68 


Czecko-Slavokia 


25 


Denmark 


6 


England 


54 


Finland 


9 


France 


10 


Germany 


76 


Greece 


] 7 


Holland 


1 


Ireland 


306 


Italy 


273 


Japan 


1 


Lithuania 


32 


Norway 


3 


New Foundland 


6 


Nova Scotia 


4 



3TATE OF CONNECTICUT 



TABLE 8 — Nativity of Patient, Father and Mother (Continued) 
Total for Two Years, 1922-1924 



Persia 

Poland 

Portugal 

Roumania 

Russia 

Scotland 

Spain 

Sweden 

South America 

Switzerland ■ 

Syria 

Turkey 

Unknown 

Wales 

Total Native 
Total Foreign 
Total 



1 

Patient 

1 


Father 


Mother 


1 3 


2 
142 

5 

5 
87 
21 

2 
65 

4 

11 

2 

31 

2 

555 

1391 

1946 


2 


83 


130 


j 4 


5 


3 


5 


! 58 


90 


| 8 


17 


| 2 


2 


I 36 


60 


1 2 




1 


3 


6 


9 


| 2 


3 


| 3 


37 


| 2 


4 


| 1250 


553 


j 696 


1393 


I m« 


1946 



TABLE 9 -R«id« 



of Patients 



Total for Two Years, 1922-1924 



Addison 

Ansonia 

Ashford 

An dover 

Beacon Falls 

Bethel 

Bozrah 

Branford 

Bridgeport 237 



1 
30 

1 
1 
1 
5 
1 
3 



Bristol 

Brooklyn 

Burlington 

Canton 

' heshire 

< hester 

Colchester 

Cromwell 

Dan bury , 

Darien 

Derby 

East Granby .. 
East Hampton 
East Hartford 

East Haven ... 

East Lyme 

Last Windsor . 

Enfield 

Essex 



53 
1 
1 
4 
1 
1 
2 
2 

24 
6 
9 
2 
3 

10 
3 
3 
4 
5 
4 



Fairfield ..... 
Fair Haven . 
Farmington 
Glastonbury 
Greenwich . 
Griswold ... 

Groton 

Guilford 

Haddam 

Hamden 



1 

1 

4 

14 

6 

5 

3 

1 

13 

Hartford 224 



Hebron 

Killingly 

Lebanon 

Ledvard 

Litchfield 

Lyme 

Madison 

Manchester ... 

Mansfield 

Meriden 

Middlebury ... 
Middletown ... 

Milford 

Montville 

Naugatuck 

New Britain ... 
New Hartford 



1 
1 
] 
1 
2 
1 
3 

23 
2 

66 
2 

34 
9 
4 

11 

56 
3 



THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION 



59 



TABLE 1) — Residence of Patients (Continued) 



New Haven 347 

Newington 2 

New London 50 

New Milford 3 

Newtown , 3 

North Canaan 1 

North Haven 1 

Norwalk 24 

Norwich 83 

Orange 1 

Oxford ] 

Plainfield 12 

Plainville 5 

Plymouth 8 

Pomfret 1 

Portland 3 

Putnam 21 

Ridgefield 5 

Roxbury 1 

Sali bury 1 

Saybrook 2 

Sevmour 2 

Shelton 10 

Simsbury 3 

Somers 1 

Southbury 1 

Southing-ton — 13 

South Windsor 3 

Sprague 6 

Stafford 3 



Stamford (33 

Sterling l 

Stonington .. 11 

Stratford ] 2 

Suffield 1 

Thomaston 3 

Thompson 2 

Torrington 8 

Trumbull 1 

Vernon ] 4 

Voluntown l 

Wallingford ]5 

Washington 2 

Waterbury 196 

Waterford 10 

Watertown 2 

Westbrook 2 

Westerly 1 

West Hartford 2 

West Haven 15 

Westport 5 

Wethersfield 4 

Willington 1 

Winchester 6 

Windham 12 

Windsor 4 

Windsor Locks 2 

Woodbury 1 

Woodstock 2 



TABLE 10 — Occupation of Patients 



Female 



Total 



Accountant 

Assembler 

Auto Mechanic 

Agent 

Baker 

Banker 

Barber 

Bartender 

Blacksmith 

Boatman 

Bookkeeper 

Bootblack 

Box Maker 

Brakeman 

Brass Worker ... 

Brick Laver 

Buffer .' 

Butcher 

Carpenter 



1 


1 


9 


4 


1 


5 


4 





4 


1 


o 


1 


2 





2 


2 


1 


3 


10 





10 


1 





1 


2 





2 


2 





2 


2 


13 


15 


1 





1 


2 


1 


o 

o 


2 





2 


8 





8 


3 





3 


7 





7 


6 





6 


24 





24 



60 



STATE OF CONNECTICUT 



TABLE 10 — Occupation of Patients (Continued) 



Chauffeur 

Cigar Maker 

Clerk 

Clock Maker 

Conductor 

Contractor 

Cook 

Coremaker 

Cotton Mill Worker 

Cutler 

Dietitian .... 

Dishwasher 

Draftsman 

Drop Forger 

Druggist 

Electrician 

Electrical Engineer 
Elevator Operator . 

Engineer 

Engraver 

Errand Boy 

Expressman 

Factory Hand 

Farmer 

Fireman 

Fisherman 

Foreman 

Fruit Dealer 

Gardener 

Glazier 

Granite Cutter 

Grinder 

Grocer 

Guard 

Gunsmith 

Hatter 

Hostler 

Housewife 

House Maid 

Inspector 

fron Worker 

Janitor 

Kitchenman 

Laborer 

Laundry Worker ... 

Lineman 

Linotype Operator 

Lockmaker 

Machine Operator . 

Machinist 

Mail Carrier 

Mail Clerk 



Male 

23 
6 
50 
3 
3 
1 
12 
3 
4 
4 

1 
2 
2 
1 
9 
2 
1 
6 
1 
2 
1 
160 
30 
10 
2 
12 
1 
6 
1 
1 
7 
4 
1 
1 
8 
1 


7 
2 
6 
5 
144 
1 
1 
1 
3 
29 
31 
1 
1 



Female | Total 







35 











3 



1 























71 





























261 

89 

6 









3 







5 





1 



23 
6 

85 
3 
3 
1 

12 
3 
7 
4 
1 
1 
2 
2 
1 
9 
2 
1 
6 
1 
2 
1 
231 

30 

10 
2 

12 
1 
6 
1 
1 
7 
4 
1 
1 
8 
1 
261 

89 

13 
2 
6 
5 
144 
4 
1 
1 
3 

34 

31 
1 
2 



THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION 
TABLE 10 — Occupation of Patients (Continued) 



61 



Manager 

Mason 

Meter Reader 

Mechanic 

Mechanical Engineer :. 

Milkman 

Milliner 

Model Experimenter 

Motorman 

Multigraph Operator 

Musician 

Music Teacher 

Miner 

Moulder 

Newsdealer 

No Occupation 

Nurse 

Orderly 

Painter 

Packer 

Pattern Maker 

Peddler 

Photographer 

Physical Director 

Plater 

Plumber 

Polisher 

Policeman 

Porter 

Poultryman 

Printer 

Pupil Nurse 

Park Superintendent 

Reporter 

Restauranteur 

Rubber Worker 

Sailor 

Salesman or Saleswoman 

Seamstress 

Secretary 

Shoe Maker 

Silver Worker , 

Silk Mill Worker 

Steeple Jack 

Stenographer 

Steward 

Spinner 

Storekeeper 

Street Cleaner 

Street Inspector 

Student 



! ! 
| Male 

1 1 


Female 


Total 




4 
3 
1 
6 
1 
2 

1 
2 

4 

2 
5 
1 

48 

2 

21 

1 
3 
3 

o 

5 
4 
7 
1 
6 
1 
7 

1 
1 
1 
4 
3 
24 

1 
2 
2 
7 
1 

2 
5 
2 
1 
1 
145 







o 
o 

4 



1 

1 

2 




51 
8 


1 



1 







5 






15 
7 



5 


15 





172 


4 




3 


| 


1 




6 


' 


1 




2 


1 


4 




1 




2 




1 




5 




2 




2 




5 




1 




99 




8 




2 




21 




1 




1 




3 




3 




1 




5 




4 




1 7 




1 




6 




1 




7 




5 




1 




1 




1 




4 




3 




39 




1 7 




| 1 




1 2 




2 




12 




1 




15 




2 




5 




2 




1 




1 




1 317 







62 STATF OF CONNECTICUT 

TABLE 10 — Occupation of Patients (Continued) 



Tailor 

Teacher 

Teamster 

Telegraph Operator 
Telephone Operator 

Tinner 

Tool Maker 

Truck Driver 

Undertaker 

Valet 

Waiter 

Watchman 

Watch Maker 

Weaver 

Wood Worker 



Male 


Female 


24 





2 


2 


11 





• 


3 





7 


1 





19 





3 





1 





1 





9 


7 


5 





1 





9 


1 


2 






Total 

24 
4 

11 
3 
7 
1 

19 
3 
1 
1 

16 
5 
1 

10 
2 



THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION * 63 

Financial Report of the State Tuberculosis 
Sanatorium at Hartford 

Dr. William M. Stockwell Superintendent 

Dr. Max M. Teplitz Resident Physician 

Dr. Neil K. Forhan Resident Physician 

Miss Kathleen M. Reen Head Nurse 

Miss Florence A. Brindley Secretary 

Miss Mildred M. Schwartz Stenographer 

REPORT FOR YEARS ENDING JUNE 30, 1923, AND 
JUNE 30, 1924 

CASH ACCOUNT 
RECEIPTS 
Years 1922-23 1923-24 

Miscellaneous Receipts 

Telephone and Telegraph .... $98.23 

Miscellaneous Sales 866.10 $917.55 

Insurance on Pump House .. 1940.19 



$964.33 $2857.74 

Total Miscellaneous Receipts, July 1,1922 — June 30, 1924 $3,822.07 

Received from Comptroller: 

Office Account $30.82 $47.03 

Payroll 13.42 36.17 

44.24 83.20 $127.44 

Received from State Comptroller: 

Petty Cash Account $1,00000 $1,000.00 

To Bills of Institution Paid bv State Comptroller: 

Construction $19,716.02 17,500.00 

Equipment 2,318.30 221.27 

Maintenance 157,875.73 154,471.43 



$179,910.05 $172,192.70 

Total of all Bills Paid bv State Comptroller $352,102.75 

Cash on Hand July 1, 1922 $448.45 

Total Receipts from all Sources $357,500.71 

PAYMENTS 

Years 1922-23 1923-24 
To State Tuberculosis Commission Office: 

Petty Cash $500.00 

Miscellaneous Sales $957.02 917-55 

Insurance 1940.19 

Due from Comptroller, 

Office Account 47.03 29.29 

Payroll 36.17 25.2-5 

Bills Paid by State Comp- 
troller 179,910.05 172,192.70 

Cash on Hand July 1, 1924 945.46 



$180,950.27 $176,550.44 
Total Expenditures July 1, 1922 — June 30, 1924 $357,500-71 



64 STATE OF CONNECTICUT 

RESOURCES AND LIABILITIES 
Resources 

Cash on Hand July 1, 1924 .. 945.46 

Due from Comptroller: 

Office Account 29.29 

Payroll 25.25 



$1,000.00 
Liabilities 

Due State Treasurer from In- 
stitution as per Resources $1,000.00 

ANALYSIS OF EXPENSES 

Years 1922-23 1923-24 

Equipment, not Including Replacement of any Kind: 
Male Help Living Quarters $559.50 

Miscellaneous Equipment .. 1,758.80 $221.27 



$2,318.30 $221.27 
Total $2,539.57 

Construction : 

Nurses' Home Sleeping 

Porch $3,000.00 

Heliotherapy Platform 599.28 

Recreation Hall 9,131.01 

Addition to Nurses' Home .. $17,500.00 

Fire Protection 6,985.73 



$19,716.02 $17,500.00 

Total $37,216.02 

Total Expenses for Equipment and Construction $39,755.59 

.MAINTENANCE 

Years 1922-23 1923-24 
Salaries, Wages and Labor: 

Medical $9,480.00 $9,159.40 

Administration 3,330.00 3,181.27 

Kitchen and Dining Room .. 10,327.64 10,945.79 

Domestic 2,039.40 2,918.58 

Ward (Men) 5,368.89 5,642.52 

Ward (Women) 9,761.69 10,721.43 

Engineering 2,177.50 2,748.44 

Farm 3,899.33 4,285.97 

Stable, Garage and Grounds 2,566.83 3,381.11 



$48,951.28 $52,984.51 
Total $101,935.79 




THE SEASIDE MARCHING COMPANY 




THEFLAG DRILL AT THE SEASIDE 



THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION 



65 



Travel, Transportation and Office: 

Advertising 6.00 8.63 

Postage 25.00 15.00 

Printing 236.60 

Stationery, Office Supplies .. 211.35 297.30 

Telephone and Telegraph .... 562.48 450.10 

Travel 127.16 112.66 

Sundries 96.35 116.33 

Freight 271.36 235.04 

$1,536.30 $1,235.06 

Total $2,771.36 

Food: 

Flour $681.86 $3,199.91 

Cereals, Rice, Meal, etc 408.54 431.46 

Bread, Crackers, etc 178.91 185.59 

Peas and Beans 791.80 450.60 

Macaroni and Spaghetti 69.13 56.10 

Potatoes 163.39 1,935.00 

Meat 12,644.80 12,238.56 

Fish 1,301.38 1,226.36 

Butter 3,020.60 3,238.85 

Peanut Butter 1.80 1.80 

Cheese 111.99 199.04 

Coffee 492.00 469.50 

Tea 182.96 207.00 

. Cocoa 23.00 20.09 

Milk (Whole) 13,120.28 13,161.88 

Milk (Condensed) 48.33 97.85 

Eggs 2,808.93 2,505.75 

Sugar 993.52 1,328.06 

Fruit 5,362.68 6,555.01 

Lard and Substitutes 292.41 311.21 

Molasses and Syrup 29.25 85.85 

Vegetables 2,583.45 3,056.72 

Seasoning and Condiments 524.91 447.73 

Yeast, Baking Powder 223.66 194.72 

Sundry Foods 1,194.00 1,329.68 

$47,253.58 $52,934.32 

Total $100,187.90 

Furnishings and Household Supplies: 

Beds, Bedding, etc $1,286.54 $2,266.50 

Carpets, Rugs, etc 208.21 

Crockery, Glassware, etc 477.13 709.94 

Dry Goods and Small Wares 134.98 383.98 

Electric Lamps 170.08 174.54 

Furniture 33.75 

Kitchen and Household 

_ Wares 1,355.19 1,243.38 

Lavatory Supplies and Dis- 
infectants 558.30 602.82 



66 STATE OF CONNECTICUT 

Table Linen, Paper Napkins 

etc 990.66 578.77 

Sundries 657.70 610.24 

Freight 3.95 

Fire Hose and Extin- 
guishers 72.00 

$5,914.74 $6,603.92 

Total $12,518.66 

Medical and General Care: 

Fire Hose $25.95 

Clothing 136.29 

Toilet and Other Articles ... 190.00 

Tobacco $8.05 6.35 

Patients Boarded Out 28.00 

Laboratory Supplies 254.75 67.20 

Medicines and Supplies 1,269.00 1,153.94 

Sputum Cups, etc 630.50 1,117.39 

Hospital Supplies 1,224.59 1,766.67 

Water 1,034.00 1,048.02 

Sundries 1,014.99 492.91 

Paper Goods 344.73 

$5,463.88 $6,349.45 

Total $11,813.33 

Heat, Light and Power: 

Coal $13,293.73 $11,304.94 

Electricity 2,722.73 2,719.87 

Gas Machine 67.73 51.48 

Sundries 113.75 109.00 

$16,197.85 $14,185.29 

Total $30,383.14 

Farm and Stable: 

Road Work $158.00 

Trees, Seeds, etc 39.73 $99.44 

Blacksmithing and Supplies 22.50 
Carriage and Wagon Re- 
pairs 26.10 300.25 

Fertilizers 185.75 99.05 

Grain, etc 257.38 400.15 

Rent 660.00 600.00 

Hay 327.59 627.84 

Harness and Repairs 90.75 

Other Live Stock (Poultry) 679.71 606.75 

Spraying Materials 24.75 

Stable and Barn Supplies .. 5.95 

Tools, Implements 223.16 34.75 

Sundries 62.35 22.80 

$2,763.72 $2,791.03 

Total $5,554.75 



THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION 67 



Ordinary Repairs: 

Roofing Materials 


$1.25 

3.00 

219.13 

873.65 
301.05 

1,032.42 
957.00 

1,661.05 

365.59 

560.99 

357.75 

22.59 

92.35 

567.73 


$111.01 

11.00 

435.86 

217.52 
345.55 
330.69 
416.10 

36.69 
589.65 
327.97 
824.83 
176.24 

59.00 
531.17 
230.47 
241.42 
104.72 




Electrical Work and Sup- 




Hardware, Iron and Steel ... 




Lumber 




Paint, Oil, etc 

Steam Fitting and Supplies 
Tools, Machines, etc 

Tank 

Flour Bin 




Boilers, Repairs 








Total 


$7,015.55 


$4,989.89 


$12,005.44 


Automobiles : 

Auto Supplies 


$621.45 
617.03 


$3,092.50 
378.55 
656.87 


Gas and Oil 








Total 


$1,238.48 


$4,127.92 


$5,366.40 
$2,979.08 


Insurance : 

Insurance and Bonding , , ,, 
Total 


$2,143.80 


$835.28 


Laundry: 

Repairs to Building 

Motor Vehicles 


$53.34 
883.34 
509.28 
1.92 
4,927'.00 
606.19 
391.63 
194.45 

34.80 
539.98 

70.00 
180.87 

83.59 

20.16 


$366.40 

5,149.73 
452.36 
425.26 
174.66 

485.28 

211.80 
15.52 
60.75 


Auto Repairs 




Hardware, Iron and Steel .. 

Payroll 

Laundry Supplies 

Electricity 

Water 

Smoke Stack 




Insurance , 




Boilers Repaired 

Machines Repaired 




Total 


$8,496.55 


$7,341.76 


$15,838.31 


Grounds 


10,900.00 


93.00 






Total 






$10,993.00 
$312,347.16 


Total Expenditures for Maintenance 





(38 STATE OF CONNECTICUT 

MAINTENANCE RESOURCES 

Years 1922-23 1923-24 
Goods on Hand: 

Fuel $6,280.73 $6,017.05 

Stockroom 12,503.47 19,700.62 

Bedding and Linen 505.73 250.65 

Drug and Laboratory Sup- 
plies 850.00 900.00 

Total $20,139.93 $26,868.32 

PER CAPITA 

Recapitulation and Per Capita: 

Stock on Hand July 1, 1922 $14,702.33 $20,139.93 (7/1/23) 
Maintenance Expense 157,875.73 154,471.43 

Total $172,578.06 $174,611.36 

Stock on Hand July 1, 1923 $20,139.93 $26,868.32 (7/1/24) 

Maintenance Expense $152,438.13 $147,743.04 

Less Sales 964.33 2,857.74 

Actual Maintenance Expense $151,473.80 $144,885.30 
Total Number of Hospital 

Days 55,496 58,273 

Cost per Patient per Day $2,729 $2,485 

Cost per Patient per Week $19.10 $17,395 

Average for Two Years $18.25 

VALUATIONS 

1923-24 

Land $5,000.00 

Dormitories 69,876.38 

Dwelling Houses 49,532.37 

Barns and Storehouses 4,450.50 

Sheds and Ice Houses 500.09 

Garage 1,163.18 

Other Buildings 97,498.42 

Vehicles 5,902.97 

Live Stock 2,337.75 

Merchandise on Hand 25,968.32 

Tools and Appliances 28,195.21 

Furniture and Equipment 34,611.06 

Drugs and Other Similar Sup- 
plies 1,374.40 

Total $326,410.65 



THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION 69 

REPORT OF THE FARM 

Years 1922-23 1923-24 

Produce Retained at Sanatorium : 

Vegetables @ Market Price $2,949.13 $1,167.70 

Fruit @ Market Price 49.28 35.98 

Chicken @ Market Price .... 182.75 

Pork @ Market Price 866.38 616.16 

Services to Sanatorium 

(Team and Farm Help) .. $4,130.00 $4,100.00 

Cash Sales: 

Hogs $541.00 $592.72 

Plants 5.00 

Miscellaneous Sales 1.00 31.80 

Total Receipts $8,719.54 $6,549.36 

Expenditures in Operation of Farm 

Years 1922-23 1923-24 

Salaries $3,899.33 $4,285.97 

Roadwork 158.00 

Trees, Seeds, etc 39.73 99.44 

Blacksmithing and Supplies ... 22.50 

Carriage and Wagon Repairs 26.10 300.25 

Fertilizers 185.75 99.05 

Grain, etc 257.38 400.15 

Rent 660.00 600.00 

Hay 327.59 627.84 

Harness and Repairs 90.75 

Other Live Stock (Poultry) .... 679.71 606.75 

Spraying Materials 24.75 

Stable and Barn Supplies 5.95 

Tools and Implements 223.16 34.75 

Sundries 62.35 22.80 

Total Expenditures $6,663.05 $7,077.00 

Total Income from Farm $8,719.54 $6,549.36 

Total Cost of Operation $6,663.05 ' $7,077.00 

(Gain) (Loss) 

$2,056.49 $527.64 

Total Gain in Operation of Farm for Two Years $1,528.85 

Farm Inventory June 30, 1922 $3,631.80 
Gain on Operation of Farm, 

June 30, 1923 2,056.49 

$5,688.29 
Less Inventory, June 30, 1922 $3,916.63 

Net Gain 1922-23 $1,771.66 



70 STATE OF CONNECTICUT 

Farm Inventory June 30, 1924 $4,133.30 

Less Inventory .. 

June 30, 1923 .... . $3,631.80 

Less Loss on 

Farm Operation.. 527.64 4,159.44 

Net Loss 1923-24 $26.14 



Net Gain for Two Years Ending June 30, 1924 $1,745.52 

Itemized Inventory June 30, 1923 June 30, 1924 

Wagons $218.50 $162.00 

Hogs 973.00 860.00 

Poultry 621.00 708.00 

Miscellaneous Tools 391.20 534.25 

Sundries 201.10 599.30 

Horses 400.00 400.00 

Hog Houses and Runs 500.00 500.00 . 

Guinea Pigs 255.00 288.75 

Rabbits 72.00 81.00 



Total $3,631.80 $4,133.30 



THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION 71 

Financial Report of the State Tuberculosis 
Sanatorium for Children at Meriden 

Dr. Cole B. Gibson Superintendent 

Dr. William E. Carroll Resident Physician 

Dr. Andor Banyai Resident Physician 

Miss Maude M. White Head Nurse 

Miss Gertrude H. Nichols Secretary 

Miss Ernestine M. Germain Stenographer 

Samuel E. Chase Steward 

REPORT FOR THE YEARS ENDING JUNE 30, 1923, AND FOR 

JUNE 30, 1924 

RECEIPTS 

Years 1922-23 1923-24 
Miscellaneous Receipts: 

Miscellaneous Sales $78.59 $138.71 

Rebates and Allowances 99.43 



$178.02 138.71 
Total Miscellaneous Receipts $316.73 

Received from Comptroller : 

Petty Cash Account $1,000.00 

To Bills of Institution Paid by State Comptroller: 

Construction $12,479.86 $14,966.14 

Equipment 4,871.70 

Teachers' Salaries 4,260.00 

Maintenance 148,618.86 151,276.25 



$170,230.42 $166,242.39 

Total of all Bills Paid by State Comptroller $336,472.81 

Cash Book Balance, July 1, 1922 $469.03 



Total Receipts for all Sources $432,860.63 

PAYMENTS 

To Secretary of State Tuberculosis Commission : 

Petty Cash Account $500.00 

Miscellaneous Sales $178.02 138.71 

Sundries 22.62 

Bills Paid by State Comp- 
troller 170,230.42 166,235.39 

Cash Balance, July 1, 1924 .... 946.41 



Total $170,408.44 $167,843.13 

Total Payments $338,258.57 



72 STATE OF CONNECTICUT 

RESOURCES AND LIABILITIES 

Resources 

Cash on Hand, July 1, 1924 .... $946.41 

Due From Comptroller's Office 53.59 



$1,000.00 
Liabilities 

Due State Treasurer from Institution as per Resources .... $1,000.00 

ANALYSIS OF EXPENSES 

Construction Account: 

Recreation Hall and School 

Building $12,479.86 

Reception Ward ..«. $14,966.14 



Total $27,446.00 

Equipment Account: 

Infirmary Equipment $2,234.74 

Miscellaneous Equipment ... 1,442.46 

Children's Playground 1,194.50 



Total $4,871.70 

Teachers' Salaries Account 84.260.00 

Total Expenses Construction, Equipment, etc $36,577.70 

MAINTENANCE 

Salaries, Wages and Labor: 
General Administration and 

Office $18,508.04 $17,547.81 

Medical 14,959.65 26,590.04 

Farm, Stable and Grounds .. 7,488.00 8,241.94 

$40,955.69 $52,379.75 

Total $93,335.48 

Food: 

Meat $10,063.27 $11,491.23 

Eggs 3,064.50 2,889.60 

Butter 3,337.60 3,017.78 

Milk 16,666.60 16,975.83 

Fish 794.75 932.49 

Flour 138.09 476.30 

Sugar 1,311.66 1,500.86 

Vegetables 2,257.88 2,697.06 

Fruit 901.68 758.71 

Canned Goods 5,395.76 6,607.67 

Tea and Coffee 501.72 665.46 

Miscellaneous 3,470.61 2,696.10 

$47,904.12 $50,709.09 
Total $98,613.21 






THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION 73 

Light, Heat and Power: 

Coal $11,167.05 $13,338.55 

Electric Light 2,347.29 2,059.64 

Gasolene, Oil and Wood 

Gas 1,678.72 1,690.38 

Pump and Engine Repairs .. 46.00 35.02 

Electric Power 1,116.60 1,273.24 

Sundries 280.03 160.25 

$16,635.69 $18,557.08 

Total $35,192.77 

Farm, Stable and Grounds: 

Carriage and Harness Re- 
pairs $160.75 $17.60 

Horses 

Automobiles, Repair and 

Supplies 2,540.61 1,118.23 

Sundries 396.51 603.79 

$3,097.87 $1,739.62 

Total $4,837.49 

Repairs to Buildings: 

Lumber, etc $661.59 $44.68 

Plumbing 442.69 146.05 

Grounds 5,963.79 67.10 

Sterilizer 

Refrigerating Plant 711.22 297.66 

Painting 5,859.10 356.34 

Sundries 2,631.33 4,480.44 

$16,269.72 $5,392.27 

Total $21,661.99 

Repairs and Replacements of Equipment: 

Repairs to Fixtures $416.32 $620.24 

Furniture 1,120.53 1,242.06 

Bedding and Linen 3,309.69 2,641.11 

Crockery and Silverware .... 794.25 269.25 

Miscellaneous 1,155.95 580.67 

$6,796.74 $5',353.33 

Total $12,150.07 

Miscellaneous: 

Telephone and Telegraph .. $423.53 $468.59 

Printing and Stationery 383.45 201.63 

Transportation 384.22 374.05 

Laundry 8,496.33 7,341.81 

Insurance 967.49 1,271.26 

Miscellaneous Office Ac- 
count 60.33 69.31 

Housekeeping Supplies 1,113.92 1,533.30 

Medicines and Hospital Sup- 
plies 2,476.82 2,297.10 

Water 1,297.13 1,413.40 



74 STATE OF CONNECTICUT 

Sundries 138.34 528.79 

Sewer 159.58 140.85 

School Supplies 512.26 359.24 

Dentistry and Other Hos- 
pital 39.00 71.63 

Clothing and Materials 506.63 1,074.11 

$16,959.03 $17,145.07 
Total $34,104.10 

Total Maintenance $299,885.11 

MAINTENANCE RESOURCES 

Goods on Hand : 

Fuel $5,953.50 

Stockroom $8,616.09 10,559.99 

Drugs 500.00 500.00 



1,116.09 $17,013.49 



RECAPITULATION AND PER CAPITA 

Stock on Hand $8,759.50 $9,116.09 

Total Maintenance 148,618.86 151,276.25 



$157,378.36 $160,392.34 
Stock on Hand 9,116.09 17,013.49 



Actual Maintenance Expense $148,262.27 $143,378.85 

Total Number of Hospital 

Days 60,774 60,053 

Cost per Patient per Day $2,439 $2,387 

Cost per Patient per Week .... $17,073 $16,709 

Average per Week for Two Years $16,891 

VALUATIONS 

Thirtv-one and one-quarter acres of land $8,443.75 

Infirmary Building 26,928.00 

Two-storv, thirty-two bed shack 9,360.00 

Dining Hall 15,711.00 

One-story, twenty-four bed shack 14,220.00 

Nurses' Home 29,450.00 

Superintendent's Cottage 5,620.00 

Store room 1,900.00 

Barn 3,839.25 

New Infirmai*y 64,488.55 

Incinerator 1,240.16 

Recreation and School Building 11,608.00 

Paint Shop 500.00 

Unfinished Reception Ward 25,000.00 

Beds and bedding 10,528.00 

Carpets and rugs 875.14 



THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION 75 

Crockery, glassware, cutlery 2,655.07 

Kitchen and household wares 3,979.30 

Table linen, napkins, towels, etc 2,426.78 

Furnishings, household supplies, etc 14,250.99 

Steam cooking apparatus 991.00 

Steam tables 200.00 

Meat Grinder 156.75 

Potato Peeler 300.00 

Dishwashers 692.00 

Bread mixer 640.00 

Dry goods 1,219.16 

Wagons 90.00 

Pumps 1,460.00 

Ice machine 1,800.00 

X-ray 1,925.00 

Fire protection apparatus 6,949.65 

School books and supplies - 1,531.55 

School building equipment 1,322.03 

Playground equipment 1,500.00 

Laboratory equipment 900.00 

Power lawn mower 247.00 

Water tanks, etc 2,901.00 

Motor truck 1,032.50 

Passenger automobile 978.75 



Total $279,860.48 

Financial Report of the State Tuberculosis 
Sanatorium at Norwich 

Dr. Hugh Baird Campbell Superintendent 

Dr. Stephen Aczel Resident Physician 

Miss Viola R. Comsick Head Nurse 

Miss Clara M. Christoph Secretary 

Miss May Geary Stenographer 

Miss Miriam M. Campbell Housekeeper 

CASH ACCOUNT 

Years 1922-23 1923-24 

Miscellaneous Receipts: 

Miscellaneous Sales $393.47 $564.61 $958.08 

To Bills of Institution Paid by State Comptroller: 

Maintenance $163,430.40 $168,936.77 

Construction (Sewer) 19,735.54 



$163,430.40 $188,672.31 

Total of all Bills Paid by State Comptroller $352,102.71 

Received from State Comptroller — Petty Cash $1,000.00 

Cash Due from State Comptroller: 

Weekly Pay Roll 7/1/22 $203.97 

Office Account 7/1/22 32.34 

Cash on Hand 7/1/22 801.15 

Total Receipts from all Sources $355,098.25 



76 STATE OF CONNECTICUT 

PAYMENTS 

Years 1922-23 1923-24 
Secretary State Tuberculosis 

Commission $517.80 $429.89 

Bills Paid by State Comp- 
troller 163,430.40 188,672.31 

State Comptroller-Petty Cash 500.00 

Due on Weekly Pay Roll 22.94 

Due on Office Account 266.43 

Cash on Hand June 30, 1924 1,258.48 

$163,948.20 $191,150.05 

Total Payments $355,098.25 

RESOURCES AND LIABILITIES 
Resources 

Cash on Hand June 30, 1924 $1,258.48 

Liabilities 

Due State Treasurer from Institution as per Resources .... $1,258.48 

MAINTENANCE 

Years 1922-23 1923-24 
Salaries: 

Medical $21,707.02 $22,983.42 

Administration 4,184.55 4,895.00 

Kitchen and Dining Room .. 10,626.85 10,409.20 

Domestic 1,559.27 1,858.35 

Ward Service (Male) 5,245.81 5,692.94 

Ward Service (Female) 445.10 890.22 

Industrial 840.00 790.00 

Engineering 3,751.23 4,169.01 

Repairs 878.29 2,653.34 

Farm 2,534.50 3,159.55 

Stable, Garage and Grounds 1,792.82 1,493.76 

$53,565.44 $58,994.79 

Total $112,560.23 

Travel, Transportation and Office Expense: 

Advertising $12.00 

Postage $60.00 50.00 

Printing and Binding 199.39 140.00 

Stationery and Office Sup- 
plies 204.42 255.82 

Telephone and Telegraph .... 885.96 907.70 

Travel 182.61 246.59 

Sundries 5.70 88.12 

Freight .50 

$1,538.58 $1,700.23 

Total $3,238.81 



THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION 



77 



Food: 

Flour $1,936.83 $1,355.76 

Cereal, Rice, Meal, etc 511.29 537.67 

Bread, Crackers, etc 221.20 220.58 

Peas and Beans 204.90 123.90 

Macaroni 59.50 61.22 

Potatoes 950.85 1,583.95 

Meat 17,071.74 17,000.23 

Fish 1,618.70 1,766.26 

Butter 3,140.73 3,943.20 

Butterine 95.10 

Cheese 128.81 112.82 

Coffee 405.00 521.61 

Tea 146.18 114.69 

Cocoa 14.00 

Milk 12,208.10 11,740.90 

Eggs 2,365.64 2,552.38 

Sugar 975.63 1,281.88 

Fresh Fruit 729.54 1,065.82 

Dried Fruit 765.79 1,634.18 

Lard 313.96 404.42 

Molasses • 105.09 82.83 

Fresh Vegetables 762.07 1,231.94 

Canned Vegetables 3,800.48 3,314.20 

Seasoning 76.28 80.29 

Yeast 265.36 254.55 

Sundry Food 2,591.89 3,191.88 

Freight 109.92 76.07 

$51,564.58 $54,253.23 

Total $105,827.81 

Furnishing and Household Supplies: 

Bed, Bedding, etc 4,661.38 1,638.55 

Carpets, Rugs, etc 47.20 28.48 

Crockery, Glassware, etc. .. 538.51 760.12 

Dry Goods and Small Wares 143.12 

Electric Lamps 37.80 77.83 

Fire Hose and Extinguishers 42.55 

Furniture, Upholstery 1,155.13 574.46 

Kitchen and Household 

Wares 2,562.32 2,546.16 

Laundry Supplies 528.71 304.35 

Lavatory Supplies 26.00 161.26 

Table Linen, etc 2,424.57 3,041.26 

Sundries 542.73 645.46 

Freight 125.24 77.90 

$12,792.71 $9,898.38 

Total $22,691.09 



78 STATE OF CONNECTICUT 

Medical and General Care: 

Ice and Refrigeration $2.90 

Laboratory Supplies and 

Apparatus 724.09 $498.31 

Medicines, Supplies and 

Apparatus 5,543.66 6,301.85 

Medical Attendance 12.50 

Sputum Cups, etc 1,062.50 

Water 580.34 583.09 

Sundries 588.44 968.08 

Freight 90.66 62.78 

$8,605.09 $8,414.11 
Total $17,019.20 

Heat, Light and Power: 

Coal $11,001.49 $9,752.90 

Electricity 2,167.14 2,137.16 

Power 513.88 469.22 

$13,682.51 $12,359.28 
Total $26,041.79 

Farm: 

Fertilizers $56.00 $146.50 

Grain 157.15 167.15 

Hav 11.25 

Harness and Repairs 23.30 13.50 

Horses 72.55 70.85 

Tools 10.00 

Trees, Vines, Seeds, etc 19.30 75.09 

Sundries 24.88 40.81 

Freight 17.06 

$391.49 $513.90 
Total $905.39 

Garage, Stable and Grounds: 

Auto Supplies $47.19 

Fertilizers 257.35 

Grain $11.10 

Horses 1.50 5.65 

Labor 20.00 

Roadwork and Material 306.07 268.03 

Spraying Material 12.50 

Tools, Implements, Ma- 
chines, etc 256.98 

Trees, Vines, Seeds, etc 76.25 69.45 

Sundries 145.46 2,902.76 

Freight 3.93 6.15 

$1,127.23 $3,263.14 
Total $4,390.37 






THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION 79 

Repairs, Ordinary: 

Cement, Lime, Crushed 

Stone, etc $127.45 $19.93 

Electrical Work and Sup- 
plies 1,227.29 621.36 

Hardware, Iron, Steel etc. .. 233.59 493.55 

Lumber 3,153.74 1,789.73 

Paints, Oil, Glass, etc 1,072.89 819.57 

Plumbing Supplies 950.65 1,764.17 

Roofing Materials 36.86 

Steam Fitting and Supplies 10.48 

Tools, Machines, etc • 3.64 11.85 

Boiler Repairs 216.25 1,908.71 

Sundries 472.43 1,989.02 

Freight 15.65 126.55 

$7,510.44 $9,554.92 

Total $17,065.36 

Miscellaneous: 

Auto Supplies $3,533.90 $1,009.91 

Insurance 479.77 157.01 

Laundry 8,595.66 8,778.37 

Religious Instruction 33.00 39.50 

$12,642.33 $9,984.79 

Total $22,627.12 



Total Maintenance $332,367.17 

MAINTENANCE RESOURCES 

Years 1922-23 1923-24 
Goods on Hand: 

Furnishings, Machinery and 

Tools $31,616.64 $44,270.21 

Automobiles 3,160.00 2,100.00 

Live Stock 600.00 500.00 

Maintenance Stores 7,574.45 10,820.80 



Total $42,951.09 $57,691.01 



80 STATE OF CONNECTICUT 



PER CAPITA 



Recapitulation and Per Capita: 

Stock on Hand 7/1/22 $45,078.23 $42,951.09 (7/1/23) 

Total Maintenance 163,430.40 168,936.77 

$208,508.63 $211,887.86 

Stock on Hand 7/1/23 $42,951.09 $57,691.01 (6/30/24) 

Maintenance $165,557.54 $154,196.85 

Less Sales $393.47 $564.61 

$165,164.07 $153,632.24 

Credit-Flour to Niantic $325.80 $432.15 

Actual Maintenance $164,838.27 $153,200.09 



Total Number of Hospital 

Days 58,101 55,097 

Cost per Patient per Day $2.83 $2.76 

Cost per Patient per Week .... $19.81 $19.32 

Average for Two Years $19.56 

VALUATIONS 

Land, 31 Acres $11,000.00 

Buildings 182,803.93 

Live Stock and Vehicles 2,600.00 

Furnishings, Machinery and Tools 44,270.21 

Maintenance Stores 10,820.00 

Total $251,494.14 

REPORT OF FARM 

RECEIPTS 

Years 1922-23 1923-24 
Produce Retained at Sanatorium: 

Vegetables at Market Price $754.65 $648.58 
Services to Sanatorium 

(Team and Farm Help) 2,489.40 2,502.00 

Cash Sales 15.00 111.15 

Total Receipts $3,259.05 $3,261.73 

EXPENDITURES IN OPERATION OF FARM 

Years 1922-23 1923-24 

Salaries $2,534.50 $3,159.55 

Expenses 1,063.26 600.10 

Total Expenditures $3,597.76 $3,759.65 



THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION 81 

Total Income $3,259.05 $3,261.73 

Total Cost 3,597.76 3,759.65 



Total Loss $338.71 $497.92 

Total Loss for Two Years $836.63 

Farm Inventory 6/30/23 $2,152.65 

Less Loss on Operation of 

Farm $338.71 

Less Inventory 6/30/22 $2,852.65 $3,191.36 



Net Loss $1,038.71 

Farm Inventory 6/30/24 $1,688.25 

Less Inventory 6/30/23 $2,152.65 

Less Loss on Operation of 

Farm ' 497.92 $2,650.57 

Net Loss $962.32 

Net Loss for Two Years $2,001.03 

ITEMIZED INVENTORY 

Years 1922-23 1923-24 

Horses $600.00 $500.00 

Wagons and Harness 200.00 180.00 

Tools and Implements 200.00 300.00 

Auto Truck 1,000.00 500.00 

Sundries 152.65 208.25 

Total $2,152.65 $1,688.25 

Financial Report of the State Tuberculosis 
Sanatorium at Shelton 

Dr. Edward J. Lynch Superintendent 

Dr. George L. Bunnell Resident Physician 

Miss Catherine Kessack Head Nurse 

Mrs. Hilda H. Gordon Housekeeper 

Ralph B. Rogers Secretary 

Miss Emma Clauberg Stenographer 

REPORT FOR THE YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1923 AND FOR 

JUNE 30, 1924 

CASH ACCOUNT 
Years 1922-23 1923-24 

Miscellaneous Receipts: 

Miscellaneous Sales $1,700.40 $1,364.09 

Petty Cash 1,000.00 

Total $1,700.40 $2,364.09 

Total Miscellaneous Receipts July 1, 1922 to June 30, 1924 $4,064.49 



82 STATE OF CONNECTICUT 

To Bills Paid by Comptroller: 

Maintenance $157,616.53 $169,876.68 

Construction 600.00 3,800.00 

Equipment 1,160.34 4,195.00 

$159,376.87 $177,871.68 

Total of all Bills Paid by Comptroller $337,248.55 

Cash on Hand June 30, 1922 977.16 



Total Receipts from all Sources $342,290.20 

PAYMENTS 

Years 1922-23 1923-24 

To Secretary State Tubercu- 
losis Commission $1,720.95 $942.22 

To Comptroller — Petty Cash 500.00 

Bills Paid by Comptroller 159,376.87 177,871.68 

Payroll and Office Account 

Payments 537.09 

Cash on Hand June 30, 1924 1,341.39 



Total $161,597.82 $180,692.38 



TotalExpenditures $342,290.20 

RESOURCES AND LIABILITIES 
Resources 

Cash on Hand July 1, 1924 $1,341.39 

Liabilities 
Due State Treasurer from Institution as per Resources .... $1,341.39 

ANALYSIS OF EXPENSE 

Years 1922-23 1923-24 



Construction : 

Heliotherapy Platform 

Addition to Infirmary Build- 
ing 


$600.00 


$3,800.00 




Total 


$600.00 


$3,800.00 


$4,400.00 


Equipment: 

Miscellaneous Equipment .... 
Fire Protection 


$312.40 
847.94 


$515.00 
$3,680.00 




P^lectric Elevator 










$1,160.34 


$4,195.00 


$5,355.34 



THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION 



83 



MAINTENANCE 

Years 1922-23 1923-24 
Salaries, Wages and Labor: 

Medical $8,206.63 $8,849.93 

Administration 4,966.14 5,435.03 

Kitchen and Dining Room 8,312.07 8,768.06 

Domestic 1,452.40 1,383.84 

Ward Service (Male) 6,219.35 7,050.34 

Ward Service (Female) 6,363.45 7,562.93 

Engineering Department .... 3,167.56 3,347.22 

Repairs 1,280.00 1,900.00 

Farm 3,597.12 3,267.40 

Stable, Garage and Grounds 1,050.00 

$43,564.72 $48,614.75 

Total $92,179.47 

Travel, Transportation and Office : 

Advertising $18.09 

Printing and Binding 231.85 

Stationery and Office Ex- 
pense 381.70 $752.24 

Telephone and Telegraph .. 534.44 554.76 

Travel 121.17 62.93 

Insurance 4,555.91 164.87 

$5,843.16 $1,534.80 

Total $7,377.96 

Food : 

Flour $1,338.76 $1,182.02 

Cereal, Rice, etc 700.65 665.16 

Bread and Crackers 409.33 385.97 

Peas and Beans, Dried and 

Canned 172.34 100.15 

Macaroni and Spaghetti ..». 72.50 64.54 

Potatoes 1,287.72 1,024.90 

Meat 15,914.17 18,846.56 

Fish — Fresh - Cured and 

Canned 1,092.81 1,178.52 

Butter 3,030.64 3,644.66 

Cheese 209.31 243.11 

Coffee 388.30 452.16 

Tea 138.32 125.10 

Cocoa 55.30 22.00 

Whole Milk 14,894.55 16,299.61 

Evaporated Milk 25.50 22.50 

Eggs 3,401.10 2,367.84 

Sugar 239.10 1,367.05 

Fruit, Fresh 1,064.40 1,077.04 

Fruit, Dried 3,127.50 1,185.46 

Lard and Substitutes 640.80 507.70 

Molasses and Syrup 99.30 79.13 

Vegetables, Fresh 816.84 1,357.88 

Vegetables, Canned and 

Dried 3,146.56 3,617.73 



84 STATE OF CONNECTICUT 

Seasoning and Condiments 494.11 762.10 

Yeast, Baking Powder etc. 323.56 176.70 

Sundry Food 1,263.59 1,293.04 

Freight 157.06 46.43 

$54,504.12 $58,095.66 

Total $112,599.78 

Clothing and Materials: 

Clothing (Outer) $38.76 $351.00 

Clothing (Under) 25.35 

$64.11 $351.00 

Total $415.11 

Furnishings and Household Supplies: 

Beds, Bedding, etc $1,911.04 $3,167.37 

Carpets, Rugs, etc 415.38 136.02 

Crockery, Glassware, Cut- 
lery, etc 852.82 1,269.52 

Drv Goods and Small Wares 258.99 198.51 

Electric Lamps 118.67 172.11 

Furniture, Upholstery, etc. 38.30 1,100.42 
Kitchen and Household 

Wares 632.65 604.15 

Laundrv 8,496.36 7,341.79 

Lavatory Supplies 286.42 285.87 

Kitchen. Range 1,062.81 

Table Linen, Paper Nap- 
kins, etc 5,436.34 1,953.26 

Sundries 1,991.45 2,069.31 

Freight '. 186.96 112.40 

$20,625.38 $19,473.54 

Total $40,098.92 

Medical and General: 

X-Ray $1,314.19 $614.19 

Entertainment 48.75 2.30 

Ice and Refrigeration 149.92 277.66 

Laboratory Supplies 643.31 561.26 

Medicine, Supplies and Ap- / 

paratus 3,205.14 3,841.30 

Sputum Cups etc 306.25 

Matches, etc , 10.00 

Sundries 9.62 

Freight 100.17 114.64 

Guinea Pigs 140.29 

$5,471.10 $5,867.89 

Total : $11,338.99 

Heat, Light and Power : 

Bituminous Coal $1,874.19 $2,107.57 

Anthracite Coal 9,240.22 16,949.79 

Electricity 3,934.20 5,180.00 



THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION 85 

Electric Range 290.00 

Operating Supplies 497.52 493.53 

Sundries 9.50 

Freight 37.95 

$15,836.13 $24,778.34 

Total $40,614.47 

Farm : 

Bedding and Material $232.15 

Blacksmithing $62.18 173.25 

Carriage and Wagon Re- 
pairs 23.65 

Fertilizer 147.00 

Grain, etc 1,306.70 1,269.82 

Hay 67.50 33.55 

Harness and Repairs 239.60 48.45 

Horses 325.00 

Other Live Stock 190.00 

Road Work and Materials 51.16 
Tools, Implements, Ma- 
chines, etc 68.51 60.86 

Trees. Vines, Seeds 75.25 353.30 

Sundries 206.63 181.90 

Labor not on Payroll 52.00 22.50 

Motor Lawn Mower 245.00 

$2,545.18 $2,890.78 

Total $5,435.96 

Garage : 

Automobiles $1,752.00 $1,000.00 

Auto Repairs and Supplies 1,742.24 1,479.19 

$3,494.24 $2,479.19 

Total $5,973.43 

Ordinary Repairs: 

Electrical Work $404.77 $577.90 

Hardware, Iron and Steel 921.19 1,579.73 

Lumber, etc 747.55 963.50 

Paint, Oil and Glass 471.24 1,065.60 

Plumbing and Supplies 345.51 1,569.62 

Roofing Material 10.35 

Tools, Machines 11.50 

Boiler Repairs 46.28 

Engine Repairs 34.38 

Brick Pump House 1,610.00 

Roof for Reservoir 1,100.00 

$5,668.39 $5,790.73 

Total $11,459.12 

Total Expense for Maintenance $327,493.21 



86 STATE OF CONNECTICUT 

MAINTENANCE RESOURCES 

Years 1922-23 1923-24 
Goods on Hand: 

Fuel $2,000.00 $3,000.00 

Stock Room 11,630.00 12,302.26 

Bedding and Linen 3,500.00 3,850.00 

Drugs 400.00 500.00 

$17,530.00 $19,652.26 

PER CAPITA 

Recapitulation and Per Capita: 

Stock on Hand July 1, 1922 $21,277.12 (7/1/23) $17,530.00 

Total Maintenance 157,616.53 169,876.68 

$178,893.65 $187,406.68 

Stock on Hand July 1, 1923 17,530.00 (7/1/24) 19,652.26 

$161,363.65 $167,754.42 

Less Sales 1,700.40 1,364.09 

Actual Maintenance Expense $159,663.25 $166,390.43 

Total Number of Hospital 

Days 57,243 58,105 

Cost per Patient per Day $ 2.78 $2.86 

Cost per Patient per Week .... $19.56 • $20.02 

Average for Two Years $19.79 

VALUATION 

Land (77 acres) $17,000.00 

Buildings 228,718.24 

Live Stock and Vehicles 5,703.00 

Furnishings, Machinery and Tools 36,675.93 

Maintenance Stores 19,652.26 



Total $307,749.43 

REPORT OF THE FARM 

RECEIPTS 

Years 1922-23 1923-24 
Produce Retained at Sanatorium: 

Eggs $610.80 $732.50 

Poultry 217.86 369.90 

Vegetables 2,299.83 2,325.18 

Fruit 122.78 100.24 

Hav 360.00 600.00 

Wood 50.00 40.00 

Fertilizer 375.00 468.00 

Rye 82.50 125.00 

Vinegar 28.40 

Straw 60.00 80.00 



THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION 87 

Services to Sanatorium 

(Team and Farm Help) 2,155.33 2,303.33 

Cash Sales: 

Produce 7.50 8.75 

Hogs 1,678.60 1,250.34 

Total Receipts $8,020.20 $8,431.64 

Expenditures in Operation of Farm 

Labor $3,223.00 $3,455.00 

Expenses 2,001.36 2,125.19 

Total Expenditures $5,224.36 $5,580.19 

Total Income from Farm $8,020.20 $8,431.64 

Total Cost of Operation 5,224.36 5,580.19 

(gain) (gain) 

$2,795.84 $2,851.45 

Total Gain on Operation of Farm for Two Years Ending 

June 30, 1924 $5,647.29 

Farm Inventory June 30, 1923 $5,625.65 $2,795.84 (gain) 

Farm Inventory June 30, 1922 5,159.50 456.15 

Inventory Gain 456.15 $3,251.99 

(net gain) 
Farm Inventory June 30, 1923 $5,625.65 $2,851.45 (gain) 

Farm Inventory June 30, 1924 5,129.50 496.15 



Inventory Loss $496.15 $2,355.30 

(net gain) 
Net Gain for Two Years Ending June 30, 1924 $5,607.29 



ITEMIZED INVENTORY 

Years 1922-23 1923-24 

Horses $850.00 $800.00 

Hogs 1,033.50 950.00 

Poultry 1,585.50 800.00 

Wood 78.00 102.00 

Rye 25.00 67.50 

Hay and Straw 300.00 600.00 

Vinegar 54.00 60.00 

Equipment 1,499.65 1,750.00 



Total $5,625.65 $5,129.50 



88 STATE OF CONNECTICUT 

Financial Report of The Seaside, 
Niantic, Conn. 

Dr. John F. O'Brien Superintendent 

Miss Nellie B. Rippen Head Nurse 

George P. Wargo Secretary and Steward 

Miss Helen R. Farrell Teacher 

REPORT FOR THE YEARS ENDING JUNE 30, 1922 AND 

JUNE 30, 1924 

CASH ACCOUNT 

RECEIPTS 

Years 1922-23 1923-24 

To Bills of Institution Paid by State Comptroller: 

Maintenance $52,748.20 $54,425.62 

Equipment 11,808.38 16,806.95 

Construction 27,691.51 

Teachers' Salary 915.16 

$93,163.25 $71,232.57 
Total of all Bills Paid $164,395.82 

Miscellaneous Receipts: 

Miscellaneous Receipts $99.86 $71.35 

Petty Cash 500.00 

Cash on Hand June 30, 1924 205.57 

$99.86 $776.92 

$876.78 

Total of Receipts from all Sources $165,272.60 

PAYMENTS 

Payments : 

To State Comptroller $250.00 

To Secretary State Tubercu- 
losis Commission 34.95 

Purchase of Clothing 20.05 65.00 

Due Office Account 18.60 

Total of Bills Paid bv State 

Comptroller 93,163.25 71,232.57 

Cash on Hand June 30, 1924 488.18 

$93,183.30 $72,089.30 
Total Payments $165,272.60 




B2S2 ; t I 




THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION 89 

RESOURCES AND LIABILITIES 

Resources 

Cash on Hand June 30, 1924 $488.18 

Liabilities 

Due State Comptroller from Institution as per Resources .. $488.18 

ANALYSIS OF EXPENSES 

Years 1922-23 1923-24 

Equipment, not Including Replacement of anv Kind: 

Miscellaneous Equipment .... $11,808.38 $16,806.95 

Total $28,615.33 

Construction: 

Well and Windmill $3,500.00 

Superintendent's Cottage .... 391.51 
Cenment Road around Insti- 
tution 3,800.00 

Nurses' and Helps' Home .... 20,000.00 



Total $27,691.51 

Teachers Salary $915.16 

Total Expenditures for Equipment, Construction, etc $57,222.00 

MAINTENANCE 

Salaries : 

Medical $3,400.00 $3,770.00 

Administration 1,300.01 1,299.99 

Kitchen and Dining Room 

Service 1,902.66 2,082.33 

Domestic 448.06 667.10 

Ward Service (Male) 586.96 954.83 

Ward Service (Female) 6,596.23 6,862.76 

Industrial and Educational 1,107.00 

Engineering Department .... 1,154.76 1,199.84 

Repairs 551.56 691.45 

$15,940.24 $18,635.30 

Total $34,575.54 

Travel, Transportation and Office Expense : 

Advertising $4.20 6.80 

Postage 8.80 25.90 

Printing and Binding 83.79 5.04 

Stationery and Office Sup- 
plies 67.11 96.41 

Telephone and Telegraph .... 535.85 427.38 

Travel 85.70 36.75 

Miscellaneous 32.63 11.50 

Freight 4.62 



$822.70 $609.78 
Total $1,432.48 



90 STATE OF CONNECTICUT 

Food: 

Flour $151.09 $294.50 

Cereals, Rice, Meal, etc 196.16 191.72 

Bread, Crackers, etc 57.49 75.98 

Peas and Beans, Canned 

and Dried 293.43 414.15 

Macaroni and Spaghetti 43.80 29.20 

Potatoes 441.60 505.80 

Meat 3,173.77 3,209.50 

Fish, Fresh, Cured and 

Canned 365.79 300.50 

Butter 645.45 732.81 

Cheese 67.26 167.89 

Coffee 142.21 154.50 

Tea 18.72 19.80 

Cocoa 58.70 21.68 

Whole Milk 3,143.47 3,900.47 

Evaporated Milk 8.60 5.35 

Eggs 973.29 993.40 

Sugar 670.22 780.81 

Fresh Fruit 576.21 483.25 

Dried and Preserved Fruit .. 2,777.01 2,700.43 

Lard 161.00 213.41 

Molasses and Syrup 115.60 102.50 

Fresh Vegetables 496.11 473.23 

Canned and Dried Vege- 
tables 263.73 760.05 

Peanut Butter and Other 

Foods 5.50 143.18 

Condiments and Relishes .... 451.96 414.70 

Yeast, Baking Powder, etc. 130.33 130.67 

Sundrv Foods 232.43 205.82 

Freight 8.00 10.13 

$15,668.93 $17,435.43 
Total $33,104.36 

Clothing and Material: 

Clothing (Outer) $54.00 $61.93 

Dry Goods for Clothing 391.38 262.73 

Leather and Shoe Finding .. 10.70 .15 

Socks and Small Wares 5.00 8.41 

Sundries 5.54 

Freight 2.81 

$466.62 $336.03 

Total $802.65 

Furnishings and Household Supplies: 

Beds and Bedding $1,426.47 $137.54 

Carpets, Rugs, etc 131.18 2.00 

Crockery, Glassware, Cut- 
lery 272.13 622.84 

Dry Goods and Small Wares 357.93 492.98 

Electric Lamps : 36.48 80.72 

Fire Hose and Extinguishers 56.00 90.00 



THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION 91 

Furniture, Upholstery, etc. 225.56 283.00 

Kitchen and Household 

Wares 319.91 194.34 

Laundry Supplies 353.02 190.13 

Lavatory Supplies and Dis- 
infectants 142.23 161.40 

Dishwashing Machine 433.00 

Table Linen, Paper Nap- 
kins, Towels 635.79 855.70 

Sundries 56.67 72.35 

Freight 21.31 43.74 

$4,467.68 $3,226.74 

Total $7,694.42 

Medical and General Care : 
Books, Periodicals, Games, 

etc $1.76 

Entertainments $21.64 4.92 

Ice and Refrigeration 291.91 240.49 

Laboratory Supplies and 

Apparatus 99.50 21.00 

Medicines, Supplies and 

Apparatus 1,163.77 1,273.74 

Medical Attendance (Extra) 95.00 

School Books and Supplies 15.04 81.64 

Water 7.25 

Sundries 137.05 223.54 

Freight 49.14 21.77 

$1,880.30 $1,868.86 

Total $3,749.16 

Laundry : 

Laundry $3,461.53 $4,815.88 

Total $8,277.41 

Insurance : 

Insurance $867.23 $790.00 

Total $1,657.23 

Heat Light and Power: 

Anthracite Coal $2,267.97 $2,023.57 

Freight and Cartage 856.95 911.68 

Wood 14.00 

Electricity 1,359.95 1,305.42 

Oil .95 2.85 

Sundries 5.04 2.25 



$4,504.86 $4,245.77 
Total $8,750.63 



92 STATE OF CONNECTICUT 

Garage, Stable and Grounds: 

Motor Vehicles $1,742.86 

Motor Vehicle Repairs and 

Supplies 930.85 $902.47 

Fertilizers 2.60 

Grain 22.55 21.40 

$2,698.86 $923.87 
Total $3,622.73 

Repairs Ordinary: 

Brick $9.50 

Cement, Lime, etc $15.15 

Electrical Work and Sup- 
plies 30.29 41.10 

Hardware, Iron and Steel 

etc 36.84 169.23 

Labor not on Payroll 145.25 65.35 

Lumber, etc 115.21 56.28 

Paints, Oil, Glass, etc 260.11 172.54 

Plumbing and Supplies 236.44 108.49 

Roofing Materials 1.40 

Steam Fittings and Supplies 5.25 

Tools 28.65 

Relaying Tile Pipe in Tile 

Field 1,017.00 

Painting Sanatorium 800.00 

Sundries 114.12 42.17 

Freight 4.49 32.35 

$1,969.25 $1,537.96 
Total $3,507.21 

Total Maintenance $107,173.82 

PER CAPITA 
Recapitulation and Per Capita: 

Stock on Hand (7/1/22) .... $2,934.53 $4,535.35 (7/1/23) 

Maintenance Expense 52,748.20 54,425.62 

Total $55,682.73 $58,960.97 

Stock on Hand (7/1/23) .... 4,535.35 3,022.92 (7/1/24) 

Actual Maintenance Expense $51,147.38 $55,938.05 
Total Number of Hospital 

Days 21,053 21,241 

Cost per Patient per Day $2,381 $2,633 

Cost per Patient per Week $16,667 $18,431 

Average Cost for Two Years $17.55 

VALUATION 

Three and one-half acres of land $4,500.00 

Buildings 102,000.00 

Vehicles 700.00 

Equipment including beds and bedding, linens, household 

supplies, etc 28,022.92 



THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION 93 

Report of the Secretary 

BEGINNING JULY 1, 1922 AND ENDING JUNE 30, 1923 
MAINTENANCE 

Maintenance Appropriation, Balance July 1, 1922 $805,381.77 

Total Expenditures to June 

30, 1923 $681,187.02 

Balance 124,194.75 



Total $805,381.77 

CONSTRUCTION AND EQUIPMENT APPROPRIATIONS 

Total Construction, Equipment and Special Appropriations 

Balance, July 1, 1922 $103,820.41 

Balance Expended to 

July 1, 1922 June 30, 1923 Balance 

Hartford Sanatorium (Cedarcrest) 
Male Help's Living Quar- 
ters and Equipment $694.16 $559.50 $134.66 

Sleeping Porch for Nurses 

Home 

Heliotherapy Platform 

Recreation Hall 

Meriden Sanatorium (Undercliff) 
Equipment for Infirmary .... 
Making and Equipping 

Children's Playground .... 
Recreation Hall and Equip- 
ment 

Norwich Sanatorium: 

Sleeping Porch for Superin- 
tendent's Cottage 

Recreation Hall 

Shelton Sanatorium (Laurel Heights) 

Garage 

Heliotherapy Platform 

The Seaside: 

Well and Windmill 

Nurses' and Helps' Home .... 
Superintendent's Cottage .... 
Cement Road around Insti- 
tution 

Special Appropriations: 

Miscellaneous Equipment .. 

Fire Protection, Cedarcrest, 

Norwich and Laurel 

Heights Sanatoria 

Salaries of Teachers, Meri- 
den and Seaside 

DISE 
Total Expended on Con- 
struction, Equipment and 

Special Appropriations 

Balance 

Total $103,820.41 



3,000.00 
600.00 


3,000.00 
599.28 


.72 


10,000.00 


9,131.01 


868.99 


7,019.28 


2,234.74 


4,784.54 


1,500.00 


1,194.50 


305.50 


12,500.00 


12,479.86 


20.14 


82.71 




82.71 


10,000.00 




10,000.00 


nts; 

72.12 




72.12 


600.00 


600.00 




3,500.00 

20,000.00 

463.93 


3,500.00 

20,000.00 

391.51 


72.42 


3,800.00 


3,800.00 




15,322.04 


15,322.04 




7,833.67 


7,833.67 




6,832.50 

CEMENTS 


4,865.16 

$85,511.27 
18,309.14 


1,967.34 



94 STATE OF CONNECTICUT 

SALARIES AND EXPENSES OF COMMISSIONERS, SECRETARY 

AND COMMISSION OFFICE 

Commissioner's Salary Appropriation $7,500.00 

Commissioner's Expense Appropriation 1,800.00 

Secretary's Salary Appropriation 2,500.00 

Commission Office Expense Appropriation .. 3,120.95 



Total $14,920.95 

DISBURSEMENTS 

Dr. Stephen J. Maher, Salary $2,500.00 

Dr. Stephen J. Maher, Expenses 400.00 

Wallace S. Allis, Salary 2,500.00 

Wallace S. Allis, Expenses 400.00 

Arthur R. Kimball, Salary 2,500.00 

Arthur R. Kimball, Expenses 400.00 

George I. Allen, Secretary 2,500.00 

Commission Office Expenses 3,120.64 



Total $14,320.64 

Balance Commissioners' Expense Appro- 
priation $600.00 

Balance, Commission Office Expense Appro- 
priation .31 



$600.31 



Total $14,920.95 



Report of the Secretary 

BEGINNING JULY 1, 1923 AND ENDING JUNE 30, 1924 

MAINTENANCE 

Maintenance Appropriation $1,471,000.00 

Total Expenditures to June 

30, 1924 $698,798.93 

Balance 772,201.07 

Total $1,471,000.00 



CONSTRUCTION AND EQUIPMENT APPROPRIATIONS 
Total Construction, Equipment and Special Appropriation $212,480.00 

Expended to 
Appropriation June 30, 1924 Balance 

Hartford Sanatorium (Cedarcrest) 
Addition to Nurses' Home 

and Equipment $17,500.00 $17,500.00 

Meriden Sanatorium (Undercliff ) 
Reception Ward and Equip- 
ment 42,500.00 14,966.14 $27,533.86 

Norwich Sanatorium: > 

Sewer System 20,000.00 19,735.54 264.46 



THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION 95 

Shelton Sanatorium: 

Addition to Infirmary Build- 
ing 3,800.00 3,800.00 

Electric Elevator 3,680.00 3,680.00 

The Seaside: 

Fire Proof Infirmary 100,000.00 100,000.00 

Special Appropriation: 

Miscellaneous Equipment .. 25,000.00 17,543.22 7,456.78 

DISBURSEMENTS 

Total Expended on Con- 
struction, Equipment and 
Special Appropriations .. $77,224.90 

Balance, Cash on Hand 135,255.10 

Total $212,480.00 



SALARIES AND EXPENSES OF COMMISIONERS, 

SECRETARY AND COMMISSION OFFICE 

Commissioners' Salary Appropriation $15,000.00 

Commissioners' Expense Appropriation 3,000.00 

Secretary's Salary Appropriation 5,000.00 

Commission Office Expense Appropriation .. 6,000.00 



Total $ 29,000.00 

DISBURSEMENTS 

Dr. Stephen J. Maher, Salary $2,500.00 

Dr. Stephen J. Maher, Expenses 400.00 

Wallace S. Allis, Salary 2,500.00 

Wallace S. Allis, Expenses 400.00 

Arthur R. Kimball, Salary 2,500.00 

Arthur R. Kimball, Expenses 400.00 

George I. Allen, Secretary 2,500.00 

Commission Office Expenses 3,764.03 



Total $14,964.03 

Balance, Commissioners' Salary Appropri- 
ation $7,500.00 

Balance Commissioners' Expense Appropri- 
ation 1,800.00 

Balance, Secretary's Salary Appropriation 2,500.00 

Balance, Commission Office Expense Appro- 
priation 2,235.97 

$14,035.97 
Total $29,000.00