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S^tatc of Connecticut \ 

PUBLIC DOCUMENT No. 53 



REPORT 



OF THE 



State Tuberculosis Commission 



M» 



For the Period Beginning July 1, 1924 
and Ending June 30, 1926 



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^Mt of (CottttBCttcut 

PUBLIC DOCUMENT No. 53 



REPORT 



OF THE 



State Tuberculosis Commission 

TO THE GOVERNOR 



For the Period Beginning July 1, 1924 
and Ending June 30, 1926 



PRINTED IN COMPLIANCE WITH STATUTE 



HARTFORD 

Published by the State 

1926 



Publication 

Approved by 

The Board of Control 



The Pyne Printery Inc. 

195 Pearl Street, 

Hartford, Conn. 



STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION 



Dr. Stephen J. Maher, New Haven Term expires July 1, 1929 
Wallace S. Allis, Norwich Resigned August 1, 1926 

Arthur R. Kimball, Waterbury Term expires July 1, 1927 

Secretary 
George I. Allen, Middletown 

Assistant Secretary 
Julia L. Cummings, Hartford 



CONTENTS 

Page 

Narrative, 7 

Friends of the State Tuberculosis Sanatoria, 37 

Sanatorium Employees, 62 

Medical Report of Five Sanatoria, 66 

Financial Report, Cedarcrest, Hartford, 79 

Financial Report, Undercliff, Meriden, 86 

Financial Report, Uncas-On-Thames, Norwich, 91 

Financial Report, Laurel Heights, Shelton, 97 

Financial Report, The Seaside, Niantic, 103 

Report of Secretary, 108 



REPORT 

OF THE 

STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION 

To His Excellency John H. Trumbull, the Governor of Cop- 
necticut, and to the Members of The General Assembly : 

We the members of the State Tuberculosis Commission 
hereby tender to you a narrative and statistical report of 
our activities of the last two years. We are required by 
statute to do this. We do it gladly. We hope you will find 
it interesting. We hope it will make you proud of the 
commanding position that Connecticut holds in the war on 
tuberculosis. We hope it will make you feel that the large 
sums of money that Connecticut has appropriated for her 
effort to conquer this most insidious and most powerful 
enemy of mankind, have been wisely spent. 

Fortunate citizens who have had little or no personal or 
family, or business acquaintance with the tubercle bacillus 
frequently ask — 

"Has Connecticut more or less tuberculosis than other 
states of the world ? Are there now fewer consumptives in 
Connecticut than there were in the last century? In this 
matter of deaths from tuberculosis how do the various parts 
of Connecticut compare with one another?" 

In previous reports, we have answered most of these ques- 
tions, but such questions always have a present importance. 
Therefore, before going further in our report, we will try to 
give direct answers to them. 

At our request the following interesting table was pre- 
pared for us at the headquarters of the National Tubercu- 
losis Association. The figures unfortunately are not all for 
the same years, but they were the latest available in 
October, 1926. 



NARRATIVE 

DEATH RATES FROM TUBERCULOSIS— ALL FORMS,— 

FOR VARIOUS COUNTRIES 

Death Rate Per 100,000 Population 



Country 


Rate 


Year 


Australia 


61 


1924 


Austria 


284 


1920 


Belgium 


106 


1923 


England 


106 


1924 


France 


201 


1919 


Germany 


115 


1923 


Ireland 


146 


1922 


Italy 


142 


1922 


Japan 


193 


1924 


Netherlands 


106 


1923 


New Zealand 


62 


1923 


Scotland 


116 


1924 


Sweden 


146 


1924 


Switzerland 


180 


1920 


United States, Registration Area 


91 


1924 


Connecticut 


81 


1924 


Connecticut 


74 


1925 



The atrtached map does not, of course, answer all the 
questions that might be asked as to the comparative salu- 
brity of the eight counties of Connecticut, but the figures 
that it furnishes are decidedly interesting and deserving of 
study. We published somewhat similar maps in previous 
reports. In order to make easy a comparison between the 
figures supplied by the earlier maps and the figures found 
on the present map, we would call attention to the following 
short table : 



Counties 


Year 


Density of Popula- 


Tuberculosis death 






tion 


per Sq. Mile 


rate 


per 100,000 


Hartford 


1905 




324 




160 




1917 




449 




110 




1925 




515 




77 


New Haven 


" 1905 




488 




150 




1917 




729 




126 




1925 




761 




68 


New London 


1905 




126 




160 




1917 




145 




120 




1925 




154 




78 


Fairfield 


1905 




314 




190 




1917 




515 




130 




1925 




568 




71 







NARRATIVE 








9 


Counties 


Year 


Density of Popula- 


Tuberculosis 


death 






tion 


per Sq. 


Mile 


rate 


per 100,000 


Windham 


1905 
1917 
1925 




92 
105 
106 






170 
130 

47 




Litchfield 


1905 
1917 
1925 




73 
86 
85 






140 
80 
52 




Middlesex 


1905 
1917 
1925 




114 
137 
118 






240 

90 
66 




Tolland 


1905 
1917 
1925 




58 
67 
67 






120 

120 

51 





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NARRATIVE 11 

THE DUTIES OF THE COMMISSION 

One of the duties imposed by statute on the State Tuber- 
culosis Commission is that of making annually to every 
one of the State Sanatoria, at least ten visits tvi^o weeks 
apart. This lavi^ was passed when there were only three 
State Sanatoria. Now that there are five State Sanatoria, 
the law of course still holds. We are proud to report that 
we have all made many more than these required fifty visits 
a year to the sanatoria. In fact, fifty visits a year would 
not be enough to properly supervise the State's five sana- 
toria. The continual progress of the work, the need of con- 
sidering the many new weapons introduced every year for 
fighting tuberculosis; the need of studying for the benefit 
of all humanity, the cause and progress and treatment of the 
disease among our 800 patients ; the need of seeing that the 
intricate and costly sanatoria are functioning smoothly and 
efficiently; that the state's money is not wasted in any of 
the thousand ways that are possible in institutions which 
have such large pay rolls, and in which, in order to preserve 
the morale of the staff, a certain amount of discretionary 
power must be allowed to the executive officers; the need 
of knowing the sanatoria from the inside, and not merely 
from the outside ; all these matters mean that without seri- 
ous and continual visitations of the sanatoria, a member of 
the Tuberculosis Commission could not possibly do his duty 
to the State. 

We are sorry to report, that last July, Mr. Wallace S. Allis 
of Norwich, who for the last nine years, has been a mem- 
ber of the State Tuberculosis Commission, tendered his 
resignation. Mr. Allis found that he could no longer spare 
from his large law practice, the time necessary for the work 
of the Commission. Mr. Allis' services to the State during 
his term of office were invaluable. Not only in strictly 
legal matters but, also, because of his cool judgment, and 
his long and varied experience in managing large estates, 
and because of his familiarity with institutional detail, we 
came to defer to his opinion in many of the myriad prob- 
lems that annually confront the Tuberculosis Commission. 

"WHY MORE BEDS?" 

"How do you explain this?" Fifteen years ago when 
there were in Connecticut many times as many people sick 
with consumption as there are today, the State got along 
very comfortably with less than two hundred sanatorium 
beds. Now however, when the state has provided four or 
five times the former number of sanatorium beds, you bring 



12 NARRATIVE 

in plans for more and more beds, and more and more build- 
ings. Always more ! When will you have enough buildings, 
and enough beds?" 

Such are the very proper questions sometimes put to us 
by Committees of the General Assembly to whom we go 
with plans for proposed new buildings at the various sana- 
toria. 

Of course the answer is, we ask for more buildings and 
more beds because we must have them in order to satisfy 
the increasing and insistent demands of the physicians, of 
the friends, and of the societies of the tuberculous patients 
of the state. It is true that there are less than half as many 
tuberculous patients in the State now as there were when 
the first State Sanatorium was built. It must be borne in 
mind however, that this present attitude of the general pub- 
lic toward State Sanatoria is entirely different from that 
of fifteen years ago. Then the State Sanatoria were looked 
upon as thinly veneered almshouses, institutions necessary 
perhaps, but suitable only for caring for the wretched tuber- 
culous men and women who were without friends, or 
money, or personal pride, or knowledge of decent living, and 
who should be segregated somewhere to prevent them from 
endangering the health of the community. Nowadays, it is 
well known that the State Sanatoria of Connecticut, have 
no superiors, and that on their lists of patients are 
physicians and clergymen, and editors, and professors, and 
lawyers, and actors. The result has been a continually in- 
creasing demand for accommodation, by the doctors and 
friends of the tuberculous sick of the State. 

Nevertheless, even if the specific cure of tuberculosis for 
which we, like the rest of the world, are impatiently waiting 
and working, does not appear for a few years more, we are 
confident that Connecticut need never erect another tubercu- 
losis sanatorium. It will be necessary undoubtedly to in- 
crease the capacity of some of the present sanatoria. The 
Seaside and Laurel Heights for example, but Connecticut is 
now one of the few States of the Union that provides as 
many Sanatorium beds as it has deaths from tuberculosis. 
This is the ideal ratio which the International and National 
authorities urge all civilized states to strive to attain. Not 
many attain it. 

OUR EXPERTS IN COURT 

Because of the greatly increased number of claims for 
compensation, that tuberculosis employees nowadays make 
against their employers, there has been presented to us dur- 



NARRATIVE 13 

ing the past two years, a difficult problem of justice and 
public policy. 

The present compensation law makes the employer liable 
for his employees' tuberculosis, not only in cases in which 
the employee proves that his tuberculosis was caused by his 
employment or originated during the time of his employ- 
ment, but also in cases in which the employee can show that 
his tuberculosis was "aggravated" by his employment, or 
was "aggravated" during the time of his employment. 

Again, the relation of dusty occupations to the causation 
or to the "aggravation" of tuberculosis is at present a 
very contentious subject, but a subject of the greatest im- 
portance to judicial decision in claims for compensation by 
consumptive employees. In many of these cases, where 
clever trial lawyers have found conflicting medical opinions 
on the subject, the superintendents of the State tuberculosis 
sanatoria have been summoned by one side or the other to 
testify as experts, and their statements have invariably had 
great weight with the judges, or juries or compensation 
commissioners before whom the hearings were held. 

One unpleasant and unexpected result of such situations 
has been that the loser at the trial has protested bitterly 
that his defeat was due to the fact that he had not secured 
one of our sanatoria superintendents as an expert to bolster 
up his case. In fact, some of the labor organizations have 
already protested that because of the employer's financial 
ability to engage the services of the tuberculosis experts 
of the State Sanatoria, the consumptive employee seeking 
compensation does not have a fighting chance to win his 
case. 

It isn't necessary to defend our sanatoria physicians 
against the charge implied in such protests. Our physicians 
are men of honor, eager that truth should prevail, but their 
standing in the community and their authority in their 
sanatoria are hurt even by suspicion of bias. Therefore, 
they as well as we, would be glad to have the General 
Assembly, through its judiciary committee, originate a law 
fixing the conditions under which the tuberculosis experts 
employed by the State in its several sanatoria, may, and may 
not, be retained by plaintiff or defendant in disputed com- 
pensation cases. It might be wise even to fix the fees 
chargeable for the services of the sanatoria superintendents 



14 NARRATIVE 

in such cases; and to determine whether such fees should 
be paid to the state, or to the testifying superintendent. 

Of course, the superintendent who would refuse to assist 
one side or the other in one of these tuberculosis cases, could 
be easily forced by a subpoena to come to the hearing and 
to testify. But these increasingly frequent hearings are 
beginning to interfere with our physicians' proper work, 
which is the care of the patients in the sanatoria. Recently, 
two of the superintendents from the State sanatoria lost a 
whole day from their sanatorium duties in order to testify 
in a case in South Norwalk ; while a superintendent from the 
eastern part of the state, lost two days in order to testify 
in a case in Bridgeport. Therefore, for the sake of the sana- 
torium patients who need continual visitation ana encour- 
agement; and of the sanatorium patients who need to have 
frequent x-ray pictures of their lungs taken, and of the 
others who need periodical compression of their diseased 
lungs by artificial pneumothorax; and for the sake of the 
research work that continually clamors for attention in all 
the sanatoria ; and for the sake of realizing the expectations 
of the State that Connecticut's sanatoria shall be the best 
managed in this or any other country, we are anxious that 
our superintendents should not be frequently or needlessly 
dragged into court as expert witnesses. 

As to the broad question of the legal responsibility of 
employers, for their employees' tuberculosis, that is not for 
us to decide, but it is a matter that must be settled by the 
wisdom of the General Assembly. However, we ought to re- 
port that the fear is very generally expressed by the leaders 
of the anti-tuberculosis campaign, that if the present view 
of the responsibility of the employer is adhered to the 
results will be : 

1. Employers will not employ anybody who was ever sus- 
pected of having tuberculosis. 

2. Sanatorium ex-patients no matter how thorough their 
cures may have been, will be unable to secure employ- 
ment. 

3. Fearing unemployment when they recover, tuberculous 
patients will not go to sanatoria. 

4. This refusal of sanatorium treatment by the workers 
will result in new and frequent outbreaks of tubercu- 
losis in all parts of the State. 



NARRATIVE 16 

A FALSE PROPHECY 

"It won't be necessary to get a doctor to live on the sana- 
torium grounds. All we'll need on the grounds, will be one 
housekeeper, and one trained nurse, and a few cheap clean- 
ers and kitchen help. We can make arrangements with 
some medical practitioner in the neighborhood to answer 
emergency calls. Perhaps we could get this physician to 
visit the patients once a week, so that he would be legally 
qualified to sign death certificates." 

This was the substance of a speech made eighteen years 
ago at a meeting of the members of the large commission 
appointed by Governor Woodruff to investigate the tubercu- 
losis situation in Connecticut, and to advise the General 
Assembly what measures the State should take to amelior- 
ate the confessedly frightful conditions that then existed. 
One of the worst of these conditions was the panicky state 
of mind of the general public in regard to the unfortunate 
patients. The knowledge that the disease was caused by the 
tubercle bacillus, and that the sputum of the consumptive, 
if injected into guinea pigs invariably caused tuberculosis 
in these animals, had been told so many times and in such 
impressive ways, by gifted orators and writers and illus- 
trators, that the man suspected of being tuberculous was 
feared and shunned like a leper of old. 

The fact that the speaker whose opinion of the needs of 
the proposed Connecticut sanatoria as quoted at the begin- 
ning of this chapter, was a gentleman of influence, and ex- 
perience, and enthusiasm, makes it interesting to observe 
how far from the event, was his prophesy. This can best 
be done by visits to the present sanatoria of Connecticut, 
Let us go first to the state sanatorium at Hartford, now 
known as 

CEDARCREST 

The very name that this institution now bears is a strik- 
ing illustration, not only of the changed atmosphere of the 
place, but also of the change in the attitude of the public 
toward the place. When the institution was opened in 1910, 
and for several years afterward, it was weighted down with 
the awful name of "The Hartford County Home for the 
Care and Treatment of Persons Suffering from Tubercu- 
losis." This infliction was due to the phrasing of the 
original law authorizing the erection of the sanatoria in 
New Haven, Hartford and Fairfield Counties. During the 
first discussion in the General Assembly of 1909, one of the 
principal arguments advanced to show the need of sana- 



16 NARRATIVE 

toria, was an enumeration of the cases of tuberculosis that 
were then in the almshouses and county homes of the state. 
It was urged that the counties assisted by the state should 
provide "homes" in which these unfortunate victims of 
tuberculosis could be quarantined. The county authorities, 
however, were lukewarm or hostile to the plan. The State 
was obliged to shoulder the entire expense of the establish- 
ment of the proposed institutions. In the first statutes, the 
institutions were still referred to as "county homes," and 
the expectation still appeared that there would be a tubercu- 
losis "home" in every county in the state. 

Experience soon demonstrated that the county idea was 
unwise. The General Assembly of 1913 changed the names 
of the institutions to "state sanatoria." This helped a great 
deal, Connecticut's State Sanatoria soon faced the critical 
public and challenged comparison with the best of state 
sanatoria anywhere. 

Then came years of enlargement and development. The 
fame of the State Sanatoria of Connecticut spread. The 
national leaders of the anti-tuberculosis movement began 
to realize that at the Connecticut Sanatoria many of the 
administrative and scientific problems of tuberculosis con- 
trol were being solved in new and admirable ways. The 
great national and international publications devoted to 
tuberculosis began to contain reports of the papers read 
at the monthly conferences of the medical officers of the 
Connecticut State Sanatoria. It became apparent that not 
only were Connecticut's sanatoria in the front rank of state 
sanatoria, but that, with the single exception of their 
cheaper wooden buildings they were comparable with the 
most richly endowed private sanatoria, or the most famous 
national sanatoria. It seemed desirable for the psycho- 
logical reasons given in our report to the last General 
Assembly, to individualize the various sanatoria with dis- 
tinctive names. Therefore, the sanatorium at Hartford is 
now, Cedarcrest. 

The approach to this institution is by way of a well paved 
driveway from the State road a couple of miles south of 
Hartford. The superintendent of Cedarcrest is Dr. William 
M. Stockwell who has been in the service of the State as 
sanatorium superintendent since 1910. He is a native of 
Connecticut and a graduate of the University of Pennsyl- 
vania. His two capable assistants are Dr. Neil K. Forhan, 
formerly of the staff of the National Government's tubercu- 
losis sanatorium at Allingtown and Dr. Max Teplitz, for- 




A LIBRARY CORNER LAUREL HEIGHTS 




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NARRATIVE 17 

merly resident physician at state sanatoria in Pennsylvania. 
The present head-nurse is Miss Anna M. Walsh, w^ho has 
held similar positions at the famous White Haven sana- 
torium in Pennsylvania and at other institutions. Under 
Miss Walsh, are sixteen ward nurses and eight orderlies. 

Andrew Osborn, the Steward, has served the State 
efficiently for many years. 

The kitchen force consists of one chef, two assistant chefs 
and a pastry cook, and about ten waiters. In order to super- 
vise and care for the buildings and grounds an engineer, a 
carpenter, a farmer, a night watchman and laborers are 
employed. This list does not include the part-day services 
rendered by certain cured patients as laboratory technicians 
and male and female nurses. 

The number and character of the subordinate help at all 
the sanatoria is approximately the same; it will not be 
necessary to enumerate them again. 

At Cedarcrest, is in operation the big laundry that cares 
for three sanatoria west of the Connecticut river. Ever 
since its establishment five years ago, the laundry has been 
managed for the state by Mr. Ernest Little. On the laundry 
payroll, are always a dozen or more employees. 

Our next objective will be — 

LAUREL HEIGHTS 

This institution which at its birth bore the joyous name 
of "The Fairfield County Home for the Care and Treatment 
of Persons Suffering From Tuberculosis," and later was 
known as The Shelton State Sanatorium, now for the last 
few years is called Laurel Heights. It is delightfully located 
on the hill to the west of the River Road between Shelton 
and Stratford. It houses one hundred and sixty patients. 
Dr. Edward J. Lynch, the superintendent, is a native of 
Connecticut and a graduate of the University of Pennsyl- 
vania. He has been in the service of the State Tubercu- 
losis Commission about 15 years. He has been superintend- 
ent at Laurel Heights for eight years. Associated with 
him, as assistant, is Dr. George Bunnell, a graduate of Yale 
and Columbia, and of the United States Army medical 
service. The head nurse is Miss Katherine Kessak, for- 
merly of Phipps Institute, Philadelphia, and of Uncas-on- 
Thames. The housekeeper and dietitian is Mrs. George 
Bunnell, for many years one of the most valuable nurses at 
the institution. The secretary is Ralph B. Rogers. The 



18 NARRATIVE 

rest of the main staff consists of sixteen nurses, ten order- 
lies and six waiters. 

It has long been recognized that the site of the Shelton 
Sanatorium is one of the finest in the country. To enjoy 
the glorious view of the nearby hills and valleys, and of 
Long Island Sound, and on clear days, of Long Island itself, 
hundreds of motorists have for years risked the springs 
and tires of their machines to climb the old difficult ascent 
from the River Road to the sanatorium. Now, thanks to 
the last General Assembly, and to the sympathetic interest 
of Commissioner Macdonald of the State Highway Depart- 
ment, a visit can be made to Laurel Heights not only with- 
out straining one's vocabulary but, with ease and enjoy- 
ment. A new sixty-foot road that winds its graceful way 
through the virgin forest from the old turnpike to the 
entrance of the sanatorium grounds, was completed in June, 
1926. It makes a fine addition to the sanatorium. In this 
connection we ought to report that we owe a debt of grati- 
tude to one of our friendly neighbors who was at the time 
Attorney of the City of Shelton, Mr. William J. Curnias. 
Bj^ the exercise of great tact and kindness and persever- 
ance, he smoothed out for us some legal entanglements that 
threatened to block our new road project. He made no 
charge for his services. His sudden death from pneumonia 
in May was a great sorrow to us. 

There has been for some years a feeling among the 
physicians and health authorities of the western end of the 
state that the Laurel Heights Sanatorium was not as large 
as it should be. This feeling was intensified and it found 
voice, when the sanatorium waiting-list became a little 
longer than usual. Of the three sanatoria for adults, Laurel 
Heights is now the smallest. The physicians and health 
officials in the western part of the State argue that as the 
sanatorium at Shelton is located in the most thickly set- 
tled section of the State; and as it is the institution to 
which such great communities as New Haven, Bridgeport, 
Norwalk. Stamford, Greenwich, Shelton, Derby, Ansonia, 
Naugatuck, and Waterbury must send most of their tubercu- 
lous patients, Laurel Heights Sanatorium should be the 
largest in the State. 

Although we admit the force of this argument, we have 
been unwilling to increase the size of Laurel Heights Sana- 
torium, unless we could secure an increased water supply. 
Until the last year we have had plenty of clear cold water 
at Laurel Heights from the springs in the valley on the 
western side of the State's property. Lately, however, it 



NARRATIVE 19 

has become evident to us that we were working these springs 
so close to the limit of their capacity, that the fire hazard 
was growing, and that to put greater demands on them 
would be to invite disaster. The last General Assembly 
appropriated $16,000 for increasing the water supply and 
the fire protection at Laurel Heights. Our first thought was 
that by the further damming of the brook in the valley, we 
could possibly satisfy the needs of the situation; but when 
we learned that the Bridgeport Hydraulic Company, which 
owns the Shelton Water Company, was in the act of piping 
water from their great reservoirs to Shelton, we took the 
matter up with Mr. Albert Lavery, the President of the 
Bridgeport Hydraulic Company. He and his chief engineer, 
Mr. Senior and Mr. Daniel Brinsmade, the President of the 
Shelton Water Company visited Laurel Heights. 

They reported to us that it would cost the Bridgeport 
Hydraulic Company $30,000 to extend its present 12 inch 
main on the River Road from its present terminus to the 
entrance to Laurel Heights, the Bridgeport Hydraulic Com- 
pany would expect the Tuberculosis Commission to agree to 
reimburse the water company by the payment for 10 years 
of $3,000 a year as a carrying charge. 

We realize that we had no authority to bind the State to 
pay "carrying charges" for ten years. We submitted the 
matter to the State Board of Control. The State Board of 
Control promptly decided that it had no authority to bind 
the State to pay out money for ten years, and advised us 
to ask the General Assembly at the coming session, to pro- 
vide us with sufficient funds to properly finance the contract 
with the Bridgeport Hydraulic Company. This we propose 
to do. 

THE SEASIDE 

This unique institution has perhaps done more than any 
other in the state to give Connecticut its present reputation 
of being one of the foremost commonwealths of the world 
in the war against tuberculosis. The Seaside, however, is 
much the smallest of the State's sanatoria. It has only 
one physician on its staff. Its patients are only sixty in 
number. They have little influence and no money, and few 
claims to pulchritude. Winter and summer, indoors ajid 
outdoors they go about practically naked. Unclad they go 
to school. Unclad they skate on the ice, and battle in the 
snow. 

They are only children, laughing and playing children, but 
they differ from all other children, in that they are the 



20 NARRATIVE 

children crippled by tuberculosis, whom the State of Con- 
necticut is endeavoring, and endeavoring successfully, to 
cure w^ith the simple but proven remedy of sunlight. They 
are housed in the renovated summer hotel on the eastern 
end of Crescent Beach, that for many years before the 
Great War, w^as w^idely known as the White Beach Hotel. 
The location of the institution is ideal. Visitors come from 
all parts of America and from Europe to see and study the 
great work that Connecticut is doing here for her twisted 
children. As the General Assem.bly has indicated during 
its last two sessions, the people of the state are anxious to 
enlarge this work at The Seaside, and to provide for it, a 
modern one story structure capable of caring for at least 
twice as many patients as can be accommodated in the 
present wooden hotel building. We are sorry to be obliged 
to report that the indicated wishes of the State, have not 
been carried out because of the obstructive legal tactics of 
the present owner of a tract of land alongside of the State's 
property. 

The 1923 appropriation of $100,000 for the erection of the 
proposed new sanatorium building at The Seaside, and of 
$25,000 for the purchase of the necessary adjoining land 
and the 1925 appropriation of $30,000 for the purchase of 
necessary adjoining land ; all remain unexpended in the 
State Treasury. 

If the owner of this unused land that the State wishes to 
purchase, and that the last General Assembly directed the 
Governor to secure "by condemnation or otherwise," suc- 
ceeds in postponing a legal decision in the matter until after 
the first of next July, the appropriations of $100,000 for the 
erection of the building, and of $25,000 for the purchase of 
land, become null and void. -Then, of course, it would be 
necessary to begin all over again. However, the present 
General Assembly may be able to take such action as will 
make impossible any further obstructing of the State's de- 
cision to have the Seaside at Niantic a modern capacious 
fireproof institution, such an institution as rich, and gen- 
erous, and child-loving Connecticut may well be proud of. 

Dr. John F. O'Brien, a native of Connecticut, a gradu- 
ate of Yale and of the New York Hospital for Crippled 
Children is the Superintendent of The Seaside, Miss Jane 
Rippin is the head nurse, Mr. George Wargo is the book- 
keeper. The rest of the staff as shown in the statistical sec- 
tion of this report consists of one school teacher, five nurses, 
five ward maids, etc. 



NARRATIVE 21 



UNDERCLIFF 



Where the red of a few new buildings, and the white of 
many older buildings, shine through the trees in a long line 
across the face of the Meriden mountain, there is Undercliff , 
Connecticut's institution for children who have lung tubercu- 
losis. As our car climbs the winding road from Meriden, 
the scenes on either side of us, — the miles of terraced vine- 
yards, the square cottages of stucco or cement, the intensive 
cultivation of every foot of land, the troops of busy but 
laughing children black haired and brown eyed, the cheery 
deep-throated greetings from the passing teamsters, produce 
for a while the illusion that we are in Italy, perhaps across 
the Campagna at Albano or Frascati, or perhaps, in one 
of the Vesuvian villages near to Naples. 

A sharp turn in the road brings us to the narrow moun- 
tain shelf on which the sanatorium buildings stand. Now 
we are no longer in Italy, but in the wide spaces and quicken- 
ing atmosphere of Connecticut The Beautiful. There is no 
mistaking the picture. In the woods beyond the sanatorium 
buildings, hostile bands of youthful mimic Indians with 
wooden tomahawks, and guns, and toy-like bows and arrows, 
and vari-colored turkey and chicken feathers for head gear, 
are dodging from tree to tree, and uttering fierce guttural 
cries, that are supposed to be re-productions of the sounds 
uttered in battle by the Mohawks, Mohicans and Pequots 
of olden days. These pseudo Indians are some of the 
patients of Undercliff. An enthusiastic teacher in the 
Undercliff school had been telling her pupils of Connecticut's 
Indians, and we see the reaction on these supposedly sick 
youngsters. Their appearance as they come trooping over 
to us with noisy greetings is not that of weaklings. The 
autumn air is crisp with its threat of winter, but these lads 
wear almost as little clothing as the patients at the Seaside. 
It seems incredible that any of these Indians could at any 
time have had tuberculosis : but Dr. Gibson assures us that 
such was the diagnosis of the doctors who sent these child- 
ren to the sanatorium, and in most instances this diagnosis 
was confirmed by exhaustive examination after the children 
arrived in the sanatorium. Of course in this difficult mat- 
ter of diagnosing childhood tuberculosis mistakes are some- 
times made by busy family physicians, but these mistakes 
are soon rectified in the sanatorium. 

Dr. Gibson and his assistant Dr. Carroll and the head 
nurse Miss Maude White and the Chief Steward, Samuel E. 
Chase, conduct us through the institution. We see the fine 
six room one story school building; the swings, and slides, 



22 NARRATIVE 

and waves, and coasters, and horses, of the great play- 
grounds; the various scrupulously clean dormitories, 
kitchen, and dining room; and finally the infirmary where 
we are greeted by the wistful smiles of the coughing and 
fevered tots whose condition prevents them from joining 
in the sports and studies of the children whose cure is nearer 
at hand. Dr. Gibson tells us of some of the marvelous cures 
he has seen here during the last seven years. While he 
talks, four sprightly well dressed lads about 17 years of age 
come skylarking up the drive. They touch their hats as 
they pass. 

"See! There are four of our graduates!" exclaimed Dr. 
Gibson. "They were cured here. Then we gave them part- 
time work. As soon as they were able they returned to 
school. Now they go to the Meriden High School and con- 
tinue to do work here after school hours. Two of them were 
very sick when they entered Undercliff. Now we cannot 
find a trace of active trouble. We are all proud of their 
proven ability to earn their bread and butter, and at the 
same time to keep up in their studies in the High School." 

UNCAS-ON-THAMES 

After the publication of the last report, we asked the 
school children of the state for a second time, to suggest a 
picturesque name for the State sanatorium at Norwich. 
The prize was awarded to Richard Pulford, Grade 8 — Ander- 
son School, of Waterbury for his suggestion of Uncas-On- 
Thames. 

During the past two years, thanks to the generous wis- 
dom of the last General Assembly, this institution has 
undergone a wonderful transformation. A handsome brick 
one story infirmary capable of housing sixty women has 
been constructed on the south east corner of the wooded 
land above the older buildings. A brick dormitory for the 
employees of the sanatorium has been erected on the south 
west corner of the woods. On the southern slope of the hill, 
and in front of the older part of the institution there now 
rises a handsome field stone structure, the new administra- 
tion building. 

Even before these additions were made, the Norwich 
Sanatorium had a well deserved reputation for comeliness 
and modernity. We trust that during the Session of the 
General Assembly most of the members will find time to 
visit this institution which will then be proudly challenging 
inspection, under its new name and with its new accommo- 



NARRATIVE 23 

dations. We will not ask you to go there today because the 
grounds are yet awry with the ungathered refuse of the 
new construction. However, if we do not ask you today to 
view the physical Uncas-On-Thames, we would like to give 
you a glimpse of the soul of the place. 

A FIGHT FOR A LIFE 

At two o'clock on the morning of the fifth of last Feb- 
ruary, night nurses at Uncas-On-Thames hurriedly sum- 
moned Dr. Urquhart, the first assistant, to the bedside of 
a young woman patient in the infirmary. This young 
woman, although in the* institution only two months, had 
already caused the physicians and nurses much anxiety be- 
cause of her repeated hemorrhages. In the hope of stopping 
this bleeding, Dr. Campbell and his assistants, had, on sev- 
eral occasions, recourse to the treatment known as "artificial 
pneumothorax," that is the injection of air into the pleural 
cavity. This is, nowadays, a well-known and well accredited 
treatment for certain kinds of bleeding from the lungs. In 
this case, it was very successful, and until this early morn- 
ing of February fifth, the members of the staff were greatly 
elated over the patient's condition. 

Dr. Urquhart found now, however, that the trouble with 
the patient was not a hemorrhage, but, if possible, some- 
thing worse, a rupture of the diseased lung into the air-filled 
pleural cavity. The patient was in collapse. Her heart was 
pushed entirely from the left side and was beating very 
feebly and very fast on the right side of her chest. She 
had a temperature of 104. The next day, in spite of the 
closest attention from doctors and nurses, and the use of all 
ordinary treatment, and of the extraordinary treatment of 
deflating the pleural cavity and of removing therefrom three 
half -pints of air and five ounces of pure blood, the patient's 
condition continued to grow worse. Her friends were noti- 
fied in the morning that she was dying. They came to the 
sanatorium and tearfully waited for the end. In the even- 
ing the girl's temperature reached 106, and she seemed 
moribund. Dr. Campbell and his assistants held many con- 
sultations about the bed during the day, and almost up to 
midnight, but the blazing, continually mounting fever, and 
the waning pulse of the unconscious girl gave them no hope. 
They decided that it was foolish for the whole staff to re- 
main up merely to watch the patient die. Dr. Campbell and 
Dr. Urquhart sadly left the ward to go to their respective 
cottages. On the way they discussed again the unusual 
features of the case. One of the doctors suddenly suggested 



24 NARRATIVE 

that perhaps there had been a flooding of the patient's blood 
with pus at the time the lung ruptured into the pleural 
cavity. And then it occurred to them that some of the great 
surgeons of France had recently succeeded in washing pus 
out of the blood of apparently dying patients with enormous 
injections of salt water into the patient's veins. 

"Let us try it !" exclaimed the two doctors. 

"I am not sure that she will live long enough to permit 
her transfer to the operating room," added Dr. Campbell. 
"But we ought to try." 

"Yes, of course, and we'll do our best," exclaimed Dr. 
Urquhart with renewed fervor as he sent summonses for 
nurses and technicians while he, himself, supervised the 
preparation of the instruments and of the solutions neces- 
sary for the unusual operation. 

It was past one o'clock before word was finally given to 
the head nurse to have the limp, hot, almost pulseless form 
of the unfortunate girl brought in from the ward. With 
great tenderness she was laid on the operating table. The 
big glistening needle was pushed into the vein in her right 
arm, and the salt water began to flow into her blood vessels. 
Everybody in the operating room realized that the feared 
catastrophe might now occur at any moment. But, it didn't. 
The flow of the salt water was slow, and it was nearly two 
o'clock before the glass jar of salt water was emptied, and 
the three pints of salt water it had held, were mixed with 
the girl's circulating blood. And her condition? Well, it 
certainly was no worse. Her pulse was fast, but it had 
"more volume," the nurses said. Before they removed the 
patient from the table, she smiled once. In an hour her 
temperature had dropped from 106 to 103, and the pulse 
from, 160 to 119. At daybreak, the effect of the injection 
began to wear off, and the temperature rose to 105 and the 
pulse to 140. Two pints of the salt water were again injected 
into her veins. The temperature and pulse again improved. 
But again at 4 P. M. came the same fever and the same 
pulse rate. Another quart of salt water was poured into 
her veins. Again the short-lived improvement. Finally at 
8 o'clock in the evening, another quart of salt water brought 
the fever down to 100 and the pulse to 110. In a few hours, 
the temperature again rose one point, but she was now 
entirely out of danger, and she received no further treat- 
ments. 



NARRATIVE 35 

A later sanatorium note of the case says : 

"Temperature and pulse now both gradually receded until 
March 1st, when temperature and pulse reached normal, and 
they have remained normal since that time." 

The patient steadily improved during the succeeding 
weeks. In April, tubercle bacilli disappeared from her 
sputum, nor could they be found in the examinations made 
in May, June or July. Against the advice of the sanatorium 
physicians, she left the institution in July, without cough 
or other symptoms of disease. She has now been at work 
for several weeks, and she considers herself quite well. 

Dr. Campbell's Staff at Uncas-On-Thames consists of Dr. 
R. G. Urquhart, Dr. A. L. Labarge, assistant physicians; 
Miss Viola R. Comsick, head nurse ; Miss Clara M. Christoph, 
Secretary and Miss Miriam M. Campbell, house-keeper. 

FRIENDS OF THE SANATORIA 

To all those citizens and societies and musical and theat- 
rical organizations, who during the past years by contribu- 
tion of gifts and entertainments have done so much to 
lighten the load of our sick, we can say, merely, 

"We thank you. The patients thank you. Connecticut 
thanks you." 

We would, however, respectfully ask the members of the 
General Assembly to glance at the list of the friends of the 
sanatoria, published in the statistical part of this report. 
We are sure you will find this list interesting and heart- 
ening. 

OUR CENTRAL OFFICE 

The activities of our central office in the Capitol continue 
to be of increasing importance to the success of the State's 
war on tuberculosis. It is here that our collective buying 
for all sanatoria is done, admissions of patients to the sana- 
toria are m.ade, discharges from the sanatoria are recorded, 
comparative records and digests of the expenditures of the 
various sanatoria are prepared and studied, and issued to 
the members of the commission and to the superintendents 
of the several sanatoria. It is here also that the "follow- 
up'[ work of all the patients discharged from all the sana- 
toria is conducted. It is here that the extensive correspond- 
ence with tuberculosis authorities and organizations in 
various parts of the country is cared for. 



26 NARRATIVE 

CURING LUNGS BY COMPRESSING THEM 

The injection of air into the pleural cavity about a tuber- 
culous lung for the purpose of compressing the diseased 
lung, and thus expelling accumulated pus, or stopping a 
hemorrhage, is not a new treatment. As an emergency 
measure it was in use in Connecticut Sanatoria as early as 
1911. During recent years, however, its use as a routine 
measure has been advocated by many of the most eminent 
tuberculosis authorities of the world. In England, for in- 
stance, it is considered altogether the most valuable thera- 
peutic measure available to the physician who treats pulmo- 
nary tuberculosis. Several of our physicians have become 
so expert in the giving of this treatment that their superior 
skill is recognized by all the physicians of the state, and 
their services are sought in emergencies by the staffs of 
general hospitals. Usually the operation is not very difficult, 
but it is occasionally dangerous. The decision as to whether 
the condition of the patient makes it advisable or inadvis- 
able to do an "artificial pneumothorax" as the operation is 
called, is often difficult and calls for knowledge and judg- 
ment as well as technical skill. 

At Cedarcrest, the operation is at present reserved for 
emergencies. At Laurel Heights and at Uncas-On-Thames, 
however, it is given as a matter of routine on certain days 
of the month to classes of selected cases. Some of the cases 
have shown brilliant results, — results that evidently could 
not Jiave been accomplished in any other way. 

VERY SICK CONSUMPTIVES. DO THEY EVER RECOVER? 

Everybody knows that consumptives die at Sanatoria and 
everybody knows that incipient cases of consumption re- 
cover at Sanatoria, j'-et everybody occasionally asks such 
questions as: 

"Are any but the earliest cases of consumption ever cured 
at Sanatoria?" 

"Do any of the cases of consumption cured at Sanatoria, 
remain cured?" 

To provide answers to these queries we have asked the 
Superintendent at Hartford, Slielton and Norwich to send 
to us a few brief histories of cured cases. 

A FEW OF THE CURES AT CEDARCREST 

The following are from the records at Cedarcrest. 
Doctor Stockwell sent us a very much longer list, but for 



NARRATIVE 27 

the sake of brevity and interest, it seemed desirable to pub- 
lish one dozen of his more striking and detailed histories. 
Of course the exact classification of all patients at all the 
Sanatoria, will be found in the statistical portion of this 
report. 

Case No. 1220. Admitted February 11, 1915; male; mar- 
ried ; age 23 ; farm hand. Had had eight months treatment 
in another sanatorium and had left to go to work, suffered 
a relapse and for two months before admission was in bed 
at home. On admission, had advanced tuberculosis of both 
lungs. Sputum positive for tubercle bacilli. He made a 
rapid improvement and was discharged October 31, 1915 
with the disease arrested. For the past eleven years has 
been a head farmer, doing hard work. In 1918 had a very 
severe attack of Influenza but the tuberculosis did not light 
up. At the present time he is in excellent condition. 

Case No. 1467. Single; age 23; machinist; admitted 
August 28, 1915; ill with tuberculosis for a year. Advanced 
trouble in both lungs; sputum positive; twenty pounds 
underweight. In July, 1916 his sputum no longer showed 
tuberculosis germs, but there were still signs of the disease 
in his lung. Gradually improved; discharged September 19, 

1916 and placed on work-therapy. He later joined the Navy, 
went through the War without any return of his trouble 
and still remains in excellent health. He works every day 
at his trade of machinist. 

Case No. 612. Admitted June 10, 1913; male; married; 
factory helper. Advanced tuberculosis; sputum positive. 
Many hemorrhages for which lung was collapsed. Tubercu- 
lous larynx. In 1917 began to improve but continued to 
relapse until 1923. In November, 1924 had an attack of 
appendicitis ; recovered without operation. Improvement 
continued until January, 1925 when he was discharged, the 
disease arrested. He has been working continuously since 
that time as storekeeper. 

Case No. 912. Boy; six years; enlarged glands of the 
neck and enlarged tonsils ; following removal of the tonsils, 
lung symptoms appeared. Sun treatment cleared up glands. 
Discharged December 20, 1914 as an apparently arrested 
case. Cough returned 1916. Re-Admitted December 30, 

1917 with well defined tuberculosis of the upper left lob«. 
Sputum positive. The disease extended rapidly until it 
finally involved all lobes of both lungs. Under continuous 
sun treatment in 1920 the disease retrogressed. Discharged 



28 NARRATIVE 

October 21, 1921. Has been working continuously since. 
Served one enlistment in the United States Navy. At 
present well and happy at his job of machinist. 

Case No. 964. Male ; age 34 ; unmarried. Admitted June 
13, 1914 with advanced tuberculosis involving both lungs. 
By December, 1914 was able to walk two miles a day. Dis- 
charged April 30, 1915. He has been employed continuously 
since without return of symptoms. He is a waiter. 

Case No. 3056. Married; female; age 29; admitted 
March 26, 1921 with active tuberculosis of both lungs. A 
quick and beautiful recovery, left Sanatorium July 10, 1921 
to keep house. Since discharge, first child born. No symp- 
toms of tuberculosis in mother or child. 

Case No. 1328. Single ; age 21 ; male ; sent to Sanatorium 
from New Britain General Hospital for tuberculous hip 
abscess. The pus contained tubercle bacilli. In June the 
left lung became involved. Put on sun treatment in May, 
1915. By February, 1916, the hip was entirely healed, but 
the lung condition persisted. During 1916, he developed 
signs in the top of the other lung. In September, 1916 both 
lungs began to clear up. His convalescence was uninter- 
rupted; he was discharged September 20, 1918 with perfect 
motion of the hip, and the lung condition arrested. From 
the time of his discharge in 1918 until a year ago he was 
doing hard farm work. He then married and has been work- 
ing in the factory since; in excellent condition, had no re- 
turn of symptoms. 

Case No. 1764. Age 22; male; single; tobacco-factory 
hand. Admitted June 3, 1916 with the diagnosis of Tuber- 
culosis of right arm, right foot, and of tops of both lungs, 
weighed ] 13 pounds. Immediately placed on sun treatment. 
Pus from elbow and foot showed tubercle bacilli. Under sun 
treatment he showed astonishing improvement. By Janu- 
ary, 1917 his cough had gone, the elbow was beginning to 
heal, and foot showed improvement. By August, 1917, the 
elbow had healed, discharge had stopped from the ankle. 
On his discharge August 27, 1918 he had gained 55 pounds 
in weight ; he was walking, was able to use his right arm, 
and his lung condition was arrested. In the past eight 
years since his discharge, he has worked continuously, and 
at the present time he is in excellent condition. He is a 
hospital orderly. 

Case No. 475. Age 11; female; admitted November 7, 
1912; tuberculosis of entire right lung, and of top of left 



NARRATIVE 29 

lung; sputum positive for tubercle bacilli; many hemor- 
rhages. With ordinary sanatorium treatment she made a 
spectacular recovery, Discharged August 4, 1913. She has 
married and is in excellent physical condition, with no return 
of the symptoms. Does all her housevv^ork. 

Case No. 3117. Male; married; age 29; admitted May 
28, 1921. Hemorrhage in November, 1920. Active tubercu- 
losis involving the entire right lung. In the spring of 1923 
improved under sun treatment. Discharged January 31, 
1925 vi^ith the disease arrested. He has been at work con- 
tinuously since as a travelling salesman. 

Case No. 3304. Female ; single ; age 19 ; ill one year ; had 
had several hemorrhages. On admission had active tubercu- 
losis involving both lungs. A cavity soon developed in the 
right lung. In January of 1923 she began to improve 
rapidly. Since her discharge, June 30, 1923, she has mar- 
ried and had a child. At the present time her health re- 
mains good despite her household cares. 

Case No. 138. , Female; age 21; single; admitted August 
15, 1911, with a history of pulmonary hemorrhages, short 
breath, and tuberculosis of her larynx. She had lost 28 
pounds in weight. She made remarkable improvement and 
left April 9, 1912 with the disease arrested. She has been 
working continuously since as nurse, and at the present time 
she is in excellent condition. 

Case No. 1354. Admitted May 25, 1915; boy; age six 
years. Tuberculosis of spine; two operations. On admis- 
sion he was unable to do anything for himself, his back was 
curved and his legs flexed to the abdomen. Given intensive 
sun treatment ; did not respond ; his skin would not tan. He 
grew worse, showed changes in his lungs, and developed an 
ear tuberculosis. The outlook seemed hopeless. In the sum- 
mer of 1916 he was given tincture of chloride of iron. 
Within a week he began to tan. With his tan came a de- 
cided improvement in his general condition. By July 1919 
he was able to walk, and at the age of ten had shoes on, for 
the first time in his life. He was transferred in 1920 to 
Undercliff (the children's sanatorium) where his improve- 
ment continued to a cure. An interesting fact in connection 
with this case is that it was the first patient to whom tinc- 
ture of chloride of iron was given. Later this became our 
routine treatment in all sun patients who did not tan. He 
is now a regular attendant at school in his home town. 



30 NARRATIVE 

Case No. 1634. Male; age 16; single; admitted January 
23, 1916, with tuberculosis of the left upper lobe. Pleurisy 
with continuous fever. In February began to improve. In 
one month gained 22 pounds. On his discharge October 2, 
1916, had gained 35 pounds. Served in the Navy during the 
War. No return of symptoms. Works every day as ma- 
chine operator. 

SOME LIVES SAVED AT LAUREL HEIGHTS 

The following group of cases from Laurel Heights, has a 
special interest because of the fact that so many of the 
cured patients are now at work for the State and Dr. Lynch 
has a thorough and personal knowledge of their present 
condition. All these patients had tubercle bacilli in their 
sputum. Some were classified as advanced cases, but most 
of them were moderately advanced cases. None of them 
were incipient cases. All of them have remained free of 
symptoms of tuberculosis from the time of their discharge 
to the present, November, 1926. 

A. Y. — Female, age 27 years. Admitted December, 1923. 
Discharged May, 1925. Working on Sanatorium staff. 

S. G.— Male, age 20 years. Admitted July, 1923. Dis- 
charged July, 1924. Working on Sanatorium staff. 

E. C. — Female, age 38 years. Admitted July, 1920. Dis- 
charged March, 1922. Working on Sanatorium staff. 

E. G.— Male, age 19 years. Admitted March, 1920. Dis- 
charged January, 1922. Has worked on Sanatorium staff 
ever since. 

A. W.— Male, age 36 years. Admitted March, 1917. Dis- 
charged July, 1919. Has worked on Sanatorium staff ever 
since. 

J. B.— Male, age 36 years. Admitted May, 1923. Dis- 
charged May, 1924. Has worked on Sanatorium staff ever 
since. 

P. S. — Male, age 51 years. Admitted May, 1915. Dis- 
charged May, 1917. Has worked on Sanatorium staff as 
carpenter since discharge. 

S. Y.— Male, age 39 years. Admitted October, 1924. Ad- 
vanced hemorrhage case. Discharged April, 1926. 

J. S. — Female, age 26 years. Admitted February, 1922. 
Discharged June, 1924. 



NARRATIVE 31 

J. A. — Male, age 28 years. Admitted July, 1924. Hemor- 
rhage case. Discharged March, 1925. Worked as carpenter 
ever since. 

A. B. — Female, age 33 years. Admitted March, 1923. 
Hemorrhage case. Discharged October, 1923. Has been 
keeping house since. 

M. C. — Female, age 22 years. Admitted June, 1922. 
Hemorrhage case. Discharged April, 1924. Has been en- 
joying good health ever since. 

E. F. — Male, age 26 years. Admitted July, 1923. Ad- 
vanced hemorrhage case. Discharged January, 1924. Doing 
light work ever since. 

E. B. — Female, age 42 years. Admitted January, 1924. 
Discharged July, 1924. Has been taking care of home and 
children ever since. 

J. M. — Female, age 42 years. Admitted January, 1923. 
Discharged September, 1923. Has been keeping house for 
husband and children ever since. 

M. A. — Female, age 26 years. Admitted August, 1922. 
Discharged June, 1924. Has been working ever since. 

L. F. — Male, age 21 years. Admitted June, 1924. Dis- 
charged November, 1924. Has been working ever since. 

F. S. — Male, age 19 years. Admitted September, 1924. 
Hemorrhage case. Discharged January, 1925. Worked on 
Sanatorium staff for four months, and is now working as a 
gardener. 

M. S. — Female, age 23 years. Admitted November, 1924. 
Hemorrhage case. Discharged February, 1925. Has been 
keeping house for her husband and family since discharge. 

A. U. — Male, age 29 years. Admitted March, 1924. 
Hemorrhage case. Discharged October, 1925. Has been 
working since discharge. 

A. R. — Male, age 17 years. Admitted January, 1922. 
Hemorrhage case. Discharged May, 1925. Worked on 
Sanatorium staff for three months, and is now working out- 
side. 

C. N.— Male, age 33 years. Admitted March, 1924. Dis- 
charged May, 1925. Worked on Sanatorium staff for six 
months, and is now working at home as a gardener. 



32 NARRATIVE 

F. G.— Male, age 32 years. Admitted May, 1923. Dis- 
charged May, 1925. Is now working at home. 

L. D. — Female, age 38 years. Admitted January, 1924. 
Discharged October, 1924. Entered Rutland Training 
School. Did not graduate owing to illness in family, but is 
working as attendant on Sanatorium staff at the present 
time. 

B. M. — Female, age 29 years. Admitted October, 1924» 
Hemorrhage case. Discharged December, 1925. Entered 
Rutland Training School, where she is a nurse at the present 
time. 

E. H. — Female, age 16 years. Admitted April, 1925. Dis- 
charged April, 1926. Entered White Haven Training School, 
where she is an undergraduate nurse, at present time. 

N. B. — Female, age 27 years. Admitted November, 1924. 
Discharged April, 1925. Working on Sanatorium staff as 
seamstress. 

P. A.— Male, age 43 years. Admitted October, 1923. Ad- 
vanced case. Discharged September, 1925. Has been work- 
ing on Sanatorium staff, since discharge. 

N. D. — Female, age 39 years. Admitted March, 1920. 
Discharged September, 1922. Working on Sanatorium staff" 
as waitress ever since. 

E. A. — Male, age 27 years. Admitted July, 1918. 
Hemorrhage case. Discharged January, 1920. Working on 
staff as fireman at the present time. 

H. R. — Female, age 19 years. Admitted May, 1921. 
Hemorrhage case. Discharged May, 1923. Entered Rut- 
land Training School, where she remained for three years. 
Is now on the Sanatorium staff of nurses. 

H. T. — Female, age 26 years. Admitted September, 1916. 
Discharged November, 1917. Entered Rutland Training 
School. Remained there three years. Was on Sanatorium 
staff of nurses after graduation until marriage. Is enjoying 
the best of health at the present time. Has several healthy 
children. 

M. F. — Female, age 27 years. Admitted December, 1920. 
Discharged May, 1921. Entered Rutland Training School. 
Graduated, and is now on the Sanatorium staff of nurses. 



NARRATIVE 33 

F. K. — Female, age 16. Admitted October, 1916. Hemor- 
rhage case. Discharged February, 1917. Entered Rutland 
Training School. Graduated and was on the Sanatorium 
staff of nurses for several years. Is now doing private 
nursing. 

M. D. — Female, age 22 years. Admitted May, 1921. 
Hemorrhage case. Discharged November, 1921. Entered 
Rutland Training School, graduated, and was on the Sana- 
torium staff of nurses until September, 1926, when she left 
to be married. 

R. S. — Female, age 20 years. Admitted October, 1919. 
Discharged September, 1920. Entered White Haven Train- 
ing School, graduated, and is now living in California. 

P. L.— Female, age 26 years. Admitted March, 1920. 
Hemorrhage case. Discharged August, 1921. Entered Rut- 
land Training School, graduated, and is now doing private 
nursing. 

J. M. — Male, age 40 years. Admitted December, 1923. 
Advanced case. Discharged May, 1925. Worked on Sana- 
torium staff as painter for three months, and is now work- 
ing at home. 

A. W. — Female, age 35 years. Admitted February, 1925. 
Discharged July, 1925. Has been doing housework since 
discharge. 

A. B. — Female, age 21 years. Admitted January, 1925. 
Discharged October, 1925. Has been doing work at home 
since discharge. 

M. M. — Female, age 39 years. Admitted July, 1922. Dis- 
charged May, 1925. Has been working since discharge. 

I. R. — Female, age 27 years. Admitted October, 1924. 
Discharged March, 1925. Has been married, and is now 
doing own housework. 

V. M. — Male, age 39 years. Admitted December, 1923. 
Discharged March, 1925. Has been working since discharge. 

LIVES SAVED AT UNCAS-ON-THAMES 

Of these cases reported by Dr. Campbell, all had tubercle 
bacilli in their sputa, all had been diagnosed as advanced 
or moderately advanced cases, all have now been at work 
for more than two years, and all are now without symptoms 
of disease. That this last is a very remarkable statement 



34 NARRATIVE 

will be recognized by everybody who notes the kinds of 
work at which many of these former patients are now earn- 
ing their living. • 

P. G. — Male; age 35 years; at work as clerk since May, 
1917. 

F. H. — Male ; age 59 years ; at work as steward since Feb- 
ruary, 1917. 

J. T. — Male; age 57 years; at work as orderly since Dec- 
ember, 1921. 

R. F. — Male; age 58 years; at work in silk mill since 
July, 1919. 

W. Y. — Male ; age 52 years ; at work as waiter since May, 
1920. 

F. B. — Female; age 25 years; at work in office since Oct- 
ober, 1922. 

B. B. — Female; age 30 years; at work as Teacher since 
November, 1923. 

E. E. — Female; age 32 years; at work as nurse since 
June, 1914. 

W. G. — Male ; age 36 years ; at work in office since June, 
1916. 

F. G. — Male; age 31 years; at work as plumber since 
June, 1920. 

F. T. — Female; age 27 years; at work as stenographer 
since August, 1920. 

J. T. — Male ; age 45 years ; at work as street sweeper since 
June, 1913. 

A. McK. — Female ; age 32 years ; at work as teacher since 
July, 1923. 

H. R. — Mal«; age 30 years; at work as auto salesman 
since June, 1924. 

J. F. — Male; age 58 years; at work as laborer since Sep- 
tember, 1924. 

H. B. — Male; age 24 years; at work as chauffeur since 
March, 1924. 

E. B. — Male; age 25 years; at work as chauffeur since 
January, 1923. 



NARRATIVE 35 

F. M. — Male ; age 39 years ; at work as orderly since Janu- 
ary, 1922. 

W. H. — Male; age 33 years; at work as cook since Seo- 
tember, 1921. 

A. R. — Male ; age 22 years ; at work as waiter since March, 
1922. 

A. G. — Male ; age 23 years ; at work as painter since Nov- 
ember, 1922. 

H. M. — Male ; age 27 years ; at work as farmer since Dec- 
ember, 1920. 

S. L. — Male; age 39 years; at work as motorman since 
July, 1921. 

T. G. — Male; age 54 years; at work as machinist since 
May, 1915. 

J. D. — Male; age 50 years; at work as constable since 
January, 1914. 

L. B. — Female; age 26 years; at work as housewife since 
June, 1923. 

N. D. — Female; age 36 years; at work as nurse since 
June, 1916. 

D. M. — Male ; age 54 years ; at work as painter since Oct- 
ober, 1919. 

T. B. — Male ; age 32 years ; at work as painter since Feb- 
ruary, 1920. 

F. B. — Female; age 36 years; at work as domestic since 
August, 1918. 

S. W. — Female; age 40 years; at work as attendant since 
April, 1914. 

D. P. — Female ; age 29 years ; at work as telephone opera- 
tor since May, 1917. 

L. C. — Male ; age 48 years ; at work as janitor since July, 
1923. 

C. M. — Female; age 50 years; at work as waitress since 
June, 1916. 

B. P. — Female; age 46 years; at work as attendant since 
June, 1924. 



36 NARRATIVE 

D. G. — Female ; age 23 years ; at work as nurse since Janu- 
ary, 1921. 

J. G, — Female ; age 24 years ; at work as housewife since 
January, 1919. 

B. F. — Female; age 48 years; at work as lady's maid since 
April, 1924. 

W. C. — Male; age 36 years; at work as machinist since 
May, 1917. 

A. J. — Female; age 58 years; at work as attendant since 
April, 1914. 

P. L. — Male ; age 36 years ; at work as poultry man since 
June, 1914. 

C. L. — Male; age 27 years; at work as chauffeur since 
April, 1922. 

F. K. — Male ; age 23 years ; at work as X-Ray technician 
since November, 1919. 

J. D. — Male; age 49 years; at work as stage-hand since 
January, 1922. 

J. M. — Male; age 23 years; at work as drug store clerk 
since May, 1923. 

N. B. — Male; age 65 years; at work as tannery worker 
since September, 1923. 

H. C. — Male; age 26 years; at work as draftsman since 
November, 1923. 

P. C. — Male; age 29 years; at work as carpenter since 
May, 1924. 

H. M. — Male ; age 49 years ; at work as clerk since March, 
1924. 



THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION 



37 



FRIENDS OF THE 

STATE TUBERCULOSIS SANATORIA 

CEDARCREST 



Donations of Books and Magazines 



Miss Mary Connor, 197 Fairfield 

Ave., Hartford, Conn. 
Mrs. E. J. Maher, 147 Woodland 

St., Hartford, Conn. 
Mrs. George B. Meserole, Plants- 

ville. Conn. 

Hartford Council of Catholic 
Women 

Mr. Raymond Burnap, 207 Sis- 
son Ave., Hartford, Conn. Vet- 
erans Foreign War. 

Mr. E. C. Wilson, Hartford 
Times, Hartford, Conn. 

Mrs. 0. S. Sampson, 70 Webster 
St., Hartford, Conn. 

Mrs. Frank Newton, 50 Farming- 
ton Ave., Hartford, Conn. 

Mrs. Grace Dischert, 701 Weth- 
ersfield Ave., Hartford. Conn. 

Miss Julia Connor, 197 Fairfield 
Ave., Hartford, Conn. 

Miss Elsie Packer, Hartford, 
Conn. 

Mrs. Samuel Wells, 215 Monroe 
St., Hartford, Conn. 

Hayes-Velhage Post, American 
Legion Auxiliary, West Hart- 
ford, Conn. 



Miss Nellie Ryan, 36 Wethersfield 
Ave., Hartford, Conn. 

Connecticut Public ^Library Com- 
mittee, State Capitol, Hartford, 
Conn. 

Mrs. C. Loveland, Fairfield Ave., 
Hartford, Conn. 

Mrs. Thos. Spellacy, 91 Wethers- 
field Ave., Hartford, Conn. 

Mrs. Geo. Wilde, 120 Winthrop 
St., New Britain, Conn. 

Mrs. John C. Moran, 40 Washing- 
ton St., Hartford, Conn. 

Mrs. Harley Lyman, Gillett St., 
Hartford, Conn. 

Miss A. F. Peard, 33 Allen Place, 
Hartford, Conn. 

Mrs. Thos. Kane, 295 Washing- 
ton St., Hartford, Conn. 

Mrs. Lewis, 103 Pratt St., Hart- 
ford, Conn. 

George Holt, Newington Junction, 
Conn. 

Mrs. F. C. Tinsdale, Fairfield 
Ave., Hartford, Conn. 

Cheer Committee, Travelers In- 
surance Co., Hartford, Conn. 

Mrs. Fred Atwater, 454 Colorado 
Ave., Bridgeport, Conn. 



Fruit, Candy, Cigarettes and Ice Cream 

Mrs. James A. Wilson, 354 Knights of Columbus, New Haven, 



Laurel St., Hartford, Conn. 



Conn. 



Haye.-Velha.e Post, Amencan ^^I'^'^^/tl^^S'^'i^'itAtl 

Conn. 



Legion Woman's Auxiliary, 
West Hartford, Conn. 



Robert 0. Tyler Post No. 6, W. R. 
C, Hartford, Conn. 



Hanrahan Post No. 22, American 
Legion, Woman's Auxiliary, 
Unionville, Conn. 



38 



STATE OF CONNECTICUT 



Mrs. Irving Burnap, 165 Sisson 
Ave., Hartford, Conn. V. F. W. 

Jewish Ladies Council, Hartford, 
Conn. 

Herbert Baker, Trinity Church, 
Hartford, Conn. 



Hartford Council of Catholic 
Women. 

Mrs. Kate L. Merriman, 926 
Main St., Hartford, Conn. 

New Britain Council of Catholic 
Women. 



Flowers and Plants 



Miss Catherine Dillon, 664 Farm- 
ington Ave., Hartford, Conn. 

Mrs. W. A. Hitchcock, Farming- 
ton, Conn. 

Mrs. G. M. Holcomb, Farming- 
ton, Conn. 

Conn. Valley Garden Club, 1414 
Asylum Ave., Hartford, Conn. 



John Coombs Greenhouse, 110 
Benton St., Hartford, Conn. 

Miss Elsie Packer, Hartford 
Tuberculosis Society, Hartford, 
Conn. 



Hartford Council 
Women. 



of Catholic 



Clothing 



Mr. Herbert Baker, Trinity 

Church, Hartford, Conn. 
Miss Barbara Jareaux, St. Johns 

Church, Hartford, Conn. 
Mrs. C. Loveland, Fairfield Ave., 

Hartford, Conn. 
Mrs. James B. Cooley, 17 Denni- 

son St., Hartford, Conn. 
Mr. Hellyar, Bricklayers Union, 

Hartford, Conn. 



Mrs. C. H. Lawrence, 199 Sigour- 
ney St., Hartford, Conn. 

Women's Guild, Christ Church 
Cathedral, Hartford. Conn. 

Mrs. Samuel Lister, 50 Sanford 
Ave., Bridgeport, Conn. 

Mrs. Frank Newton, 50 Farm- 
ington Ave., Hartford, Conn. 

Mrs. Grace Dischert, 701 Wethers- 
field Ave., Hartford, Conn. 



Miscellaneous 



The Elks Club, Hartford, Conn. 

$200.00. 
Mrs. Edmund Fresher, 42 Stanley 

St., East Hartford, Conn. 

Money to patients* fund. 
Mr. Herbert Baker, Trinity 

Church, Hartford, Conn. Money 

to patients fund and Victrola 

Records. 
Mrs. Chas. Phelps, Rockville, 

Conn. Money to patients' 

fund. 

Miss Ruth Vail, Niantic, Conn. 
Box 456. Money to patients' 
fund. 

Hartford Council of Catholic 
Women, Hartford, Conn. Pic- 
tures, note paper, Christmas 
tree decorations, Victrola rec- 
ords, playing cards, Easter 
cards. 



Mrs. C. Loveland, Fairfield Ave., 
Victrola records, playing cards, 
Victrola. 

Bridgeport Die & Machine Co., 
170 Elm St., Bridgeport, Conn, 
Victrola records. 

The Siemon Company, Bridgeport, 
Conn. Victrola records. 

Rev. Stephen Crohol, Wilcox 
Road, New Britain, Conn. Vic- 
trola records. 

Mrs. J. G. Wood, 135 Columbus 
St., New Britain, Conn. Vic- 
ti'ola records. 

Knights of Columbus, New Haven, 
Conn. Tooth paste, tooth 
brushes, hair combs, playing 
cards, shaving brushes, 
matches, cold cream. 

Mrs. D. Sullivan. 34 Maplewood 
Ave., W^est Hartford, Conn. 
Pictures. 



THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION 



39 



Mrs. Frank Newton, 50 Farming- 
ton Ave., Hartford, Conn. Pic- 
tures. 

Mrs. Christine Loomis, 65 Lincoln 
St., New Britain, Conn. Money 
to patients' fund. 

Dixieland Orchestra, Mrs. T. D. 
Smith, Bond Annex, Hartford, 
Conn. Refreshments. 

Mr. J. B. Williams, Glastonbury, 
Conn. Toilet soap and talcum 
powder. 

Mrs. Stephen M. Yeaman, Hart- 
ford, Conn. Large pictures. 



Mrs. James A. Wilson, 354 Laurel 
St., Hartford, Conn. Pictures, 
two oil paintings, one-half 
dozen prints, electric light 
bulbs. 

Mrs. John C. Moran, 40 Washing- 
ton St., Hartford, Conn. Pic- 
tures. 

Jewish Ladies Council, Hartford, 
Conn. Ice cream and cookies. 

The American Legion, Hayes-Vel- 
hage. West Hartford, Conn. 
Fruit and cakes. 

U. S. Veterans Bureau Hospital 
No. 41, New Haven, Conn. Vic- 
trola. 



Entertainments 



Trinity Church, Young People's 
Fellowship, Hartford, Conn. 
Play. 

Council of Jewish Women, 12 
Vanderbilt Rd., Hartford, Conn. 
Entertainment. 

Aetna Life Insurance Co., Men's 
Club, Hartford, Conn. Enter- 
tainment. 

Choir of Christ Church, 45 Church 
St., Hartford, Conn. Carol 
singing, Christmas Eve. 

Citizens Entertainment Commit- 
tee, Hartford, Conn. Moving 
pictures. 

Mr. I. V. Christensen, 295 Asylum 
St., Hartford, Conn. Orchestra, 
New Year's Night, band con- 
cert. 

Arthur Chouinard, 182 Ward St., 
Hartford, Conn. Musical re- 
vue. 

Mrs. George Samuel Auerbach, 64 
Highland St., Hartford, Conn. 
Entertainment, Swedish Luth- 
eran Church Choir, Hartford, 
Conn. 

Strand Theater, Hartford, Conn. 
Moving picture. 

Palace Theater, Hartford, Conn. 
George Koenig, entertainment. 

Charles Dillon, Hartford, Conn. 
Moving pictures. 

The American Legion, Rau Locke 
Post, Women's Auxiliary, Hart- 
ford, Conn. Play. 



Mr. Herbert Baker, Christ 
Church, Hartford, Conn. Con- 
certs. 

Jewish Ladies' Council, Hartford, 
Conn. Entertainment. 

Girls' Friendly Society, Christ 
Church, Hartford, Conn. Play. 

Mr. George Dunn, Linden Apart- 
ments, Main St., Hartford, 
Conn. Entertainment. 

Ladies' Auxiliary American Le- 
gion Post, No. 5, through Miss 
Edith Laura Bartlett, 138 War- 
ren St., Meriden, Conn. Pianist, 
Edwin Gerchefski, entertain- 
ers. 

Mrs. Stella Yeaman Hobson, Prof. 
Leroy and Stanley Papciak, en- 
tertainment. 

The Rangers Athletic Club, New 
Britain, Conn. Minstrel show. 

Girls' Friendly Society, Trinity 
Church, Mr. Herbert Baker, 
Hartford, Conn. Play. 

Knights of Columbus, New 
Haven, Conn. Minstrel show. 

Conn. General Life Ins. Co., Hart- 
ford, Conn. Minstrel show. 

Mrs. T. D. Smith. Bond Annex, 
Hartford, Conn., with Dixieland 
Orchestra. 

Jack Barry, concert. Mr. Choui- 
nard and Mr. Logan, dancers. 

The Employees' Tuberculosis Re- 
lief Association, New Haven, 
Conn. Entertainment. 



40 



STATE OF CONNECTICUT 



The Citizen's Entertainment Committee of Hartford, through Mr. 
James Dillon, Secretary, have furnished most of our entertainments. 
Through this same committee Mr. Allan C. Morrison, proprietor of 
the Majestic Theater, has furnished the patients with Moving Pic- 
tures every Saturday night. The patients at the Sanatorium, where 
over 100 were able to attend the show each week, have seen the 
Majestic pictures every Saturday night before they were shown the 
following week at the picture house. Jack Kearns and William Radi- 
gan, operators at the theater, likewise gave their services and Charles 
Jackson, pianist, provided music to accompany the showing of the 
pictures. 

Band Concert from Municipal Dancing Pavilion through Mr. James 
E. Dillon, Director of Recreation, Hartford, Conn., every rainy night. 



Visiting Clergymen 



Reverend William F. O'Dell, Elm- 
wood, Conn. 

Reverend John A. Dooley, Hart- 
ford, Conn. 

Reverend J. Raymond Kennedy, 
Hartford, Conn. 

Reverend Andrew J. Kelly, Hart- 
ford, Conn. 

Rt. Reverend Chauncey B. Brew- 
ster, Middletown, Conn. 

Rt. Reverend E. Champion Atche- 
son, Hartford, Conn. 



Reverend S. R. Colladay, Hart- 
ford, Conn. 

Reverend Anthony Razasa, Hart- 
ford, Conn. 

Reverend Raymond Cunningham, 
Hartford, Conn. 

Reverend John F. Plumb, Hart- 
ford, Conn. 

Reverend Samuel A. Budde, Hart- 
ford, Conn. 



UNDERCLIFF 



Donations of Cash 



Dr. Stephen J. Maher, New 

Haven, Conn. 
Mrs. Charlotte Du V. Butterfield, 

Hartford, Conn. 
Miss Elizabeth Betteridge, Meri- 

den. Conn. 
Mr. Lewis A. Miller, Meriden, 

Conn. 
Employees Health Protective 

League, Bristol, Conn. 
Mrs. A. T. Carroll, East Orange, 

New Jersey. - 
Mr. H. B. Hall, Meriden, Conn. 
Mr. J. F. Allen, Meriden, Conn. 
Mr. Stephen Smith, Meriden, 

Conn. 
Mr. George V. Sheperd, Meriden, 

Conn. 
Mr. Alexander Bush, Meriden, 

Conn. 
Mr. C. K. Decherd, Meriden, Conn. 
Mr. Samuel Bradford, Meriden, 

Conn. 



Mr. Joseph Lacourciere, Meriden, 

Conn. 
Dr. E. J. Degnan, Meriden, Conn. 
Mr. Edward Tredenneck, Meriden, 

Conn. 
Mr. Hollis Immick, Meriden 

Conn. 
Mr. R. W. Squire, Meriden, Conn. 
Mr. W. S. Alexander, Meriden, 

Conn. 
Mr. Charles H. Cuno, Meriden, 

Conn. 
Mr. Henry Bibeau, Meriden, Conn. 
Mr. H. M. Fiske, Meriden, Conn. 
Mr. Wm. B. Church, Meriden, 

Conn. 
Mr. R. R. Gwillim, Meriden, 

Conn. 
Mr. Victor Lucchini, Meriden, 

Conn. 
Mr. Oscar Dossin, Meriden, Conn. 
Mr. Charles Flagg, Meriden, 

Conn. 



THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION 



41 



Mr. David Higgins, Meriden, 

Conn. 
Mr. H. E. Boardman, Meriden, 

Conn. 
Mr. Frank Gushing, Meriden, 

Conn. 
Mr. Harry Stockwell, Meriden, 

Conn. 
Mr. Wm. A. Schenck, Meriden, 

Conn. 
Mr. Charles Gearing, Meriden, 

Conn. 
Mr. B. I. Thompson, Meriden, 

Conn. 
Mr. W. H. Squire, Meriden, Conn. 
Mr. Douglas A. Smith, Meriden, 

Conn. 
Mr. Albert W. Savage, Meriden 

Conn. 
Mr. J. A. Hutchinson, Meriden, 

Conn. 
Mr. Charles G. Phelps, Meriden, 

Conn. 
Mr. John D. Roberts, Meriden, 

Conn. 
Mr. Joseph Greenbacker, Meriden, 

Conn. 
Dr. J. Leo Loftus, Meriden, 

Conn. 
Mr. Horace Wilcox, Meriden, 

Conn. 
Mr. Wayne Smith, Meriden, Conn. 
Mr. F. T. Manning, Meriden, 

Conn. 
Mr. Harris Bartlett, Meriden, 

Conn. 



Mr. Frank Sands, Meriden, Conn. 
Dr. Thomas P. Murdock, Meriden, 

Conn. 
Mr. R. J. Walker, Meriden, Conn. 
Mr. William Schaal, Meriden, 

Conn. 
Dr. E. T. Bradstreet, Meriden 

Conn. 
Mr. Emmett J. Burke, Meriden, 

Conn. 
Mr. Robert Church, Meriden, 

Conn. 
Mr. T. P. Dunne, Meriden, Conn. 
Mr. Lorenzo Hamilton, Meriden, 

Conn, 
Mr. C. L. Huse, Meriden, Conn. 
Mr. D. W. Luby, Meriden, Conn. 
Dr. H. De F. Lockwood, Meriden, 

Conn. 
Mr. Harry Lyman, Meriden, 

Conn. 
Mr. Raymond M. Lynch, Meriden, 

Conn. 
Mr. Charles L. Lyon, Meriden, 

Conn. 
Mr. Harold Scott, Meriden, Conn. 
Mr. Fred Rees, Meriden, Conn. 
Mr. Frank Reed, Meriden, Conn. 
Mr. R. P. Tracy, Meriden, Conn. 
Mr. E. S. Boyd, Meriden, Conn. 
Mr. H. N. Clark, Meriden, Conn. 
Mr. C. R. Gardinor, Meriden, 

Conn. 
Mr. John Roberts, Meriden, Conn. 



Victrola Records 

Mr. Robert Deaken, Meriden, Mrs. Henry Mumblo, Meriden, 

Conn. Conn. 

Siemon Rubber Company, Bridge- Mrs. M. E. Hotchkiss, Derby, 

port, Conn. Conn. 

Mrs. A. P. Wheeler, Meriden, Mrs. Patrick McGrath, Meriden, 

Conn. Conn. 



Donations of Books, Magazines, Toys and Gaines 



Mrs. William Willard, Torrington, 

Conn. 
Miss R. Lauter, Meriden, Conn. 
Ailing Rubber Co., Meriden, 

Conn. 
Mrs. G. B. Messerole, Plantsville, 

Conn. 
Grade VII, Class C; Lincoln 

Grammar School, Meriden, 

Conn. 



Mr. Fred K. Braitling, Bridge- 
port, Conn. 

Dr. Roy L. Leek, Supt. State Hos- 
pital, Middletown, Conn. 

Meriden Women's Club, Meriden, 
Conn. 

Miss Jean Manning, Sound Beach, 
Conn. 

Bryant Electric Co., Bridgeport, 
Conn. 



42 STATE OF CONNECTICUT 

Sportsmen's Association, Meriden, Mr. W. W. Gardner, Meriden, 

Conn. Conn. 

Mrs. L. H. Kraft, Meriden, Conn. Miss S. F. Ball, B. H. C. H. Club, 

Junior Girls' Club, First Cong. New York City, N. Y. 

Church, Meriden, Conn. Lindstrom Tool and Toy Co., 

Social Service Dept., Municipal Bridgeport, Conn. 

Hospital, Hartford, Conn. Boy Scouts, Troop No. 1, Nor- 

Smith-Murray Company, Bridge- wich. Conn. 

port. Conn. Mrs. Burton Collyer, Meriden, 

Mrs. Fred Weber, Meriden, Conn. Conn. 

Visiting Nurses, Relief of Tuber- Mrs. Holliday, Meriden, Conn. 

culosis, Stamford, Conn. Mrs. J. G. Rudolph, Meriden, 

Thursday Morning Club, First Conn. 

Cong. Church, Meriden, Conn. Mr. G. H. Wilcox, Meriden, Conn. 

Donations of Candy 

Women's Association, Center Mrs. C. D. Peck, Sound Beach, 

Cong. Church, Meriden, Conn. Conn. 

Mrs. Fred Weber, Meriden, Conn. Sunshine Club, Smith Murray Co., 

Lane's, Inc., Bridgeport, Conn. Bridgeport, Conn. 

Lodge No. 45, B. P. 0. E., Meri- Meriden Post, American Legion, 

den. Conn. Meriden, Conn. 

Miscellaneous Donations 

Victrola and Records 
Sunshine Club, Smith-Murray Co. Bridgeport, Conn. 

Playground Equipment, Ocean Wave 

Sunshine Club, American Chain Sunshine Club, General Electric 

Co., Bridgeport, Conn. Co., Bridgeport, Conn. 

Sunshine Club, Bryant Electric Sunshine Club, Remington Arms 

Co., Bridgeport. Conn. Co., Bridgeport, Conn. 

Radio Set 
Lodge No. 45, B. P. O. Elks, Meriden, Conn. 

Raincapes 

Sunshine Club, Smith-Murray Co., Sunshine Club, American Chain 
Bridgeport, Conn. Co., Bridgeport, Conn. 

Radio Sets 

Mrs. Dora R. Wheeler, Fairfield, Mr. Jonathan Godfrey, Bridge- 
Conn, port, Conn. 

Mr. Carl F. Siemon, Bridgeport, Mr. Charles V. Barrington, 

Conn. Bridgeport, Conn. 

Mr. A. H. Canfield, Bridgeport, Mr. James T. Patterson, Bridge- 
Conn, port. Conn. 



THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION 



43 



Mr. A. H. Bullard, Bridgeport, Mr. Sumner Simnson, Bridgeport, 

Conn. Conn. 

Mr. Edward A. Jennings, Bridge- Mr. William M. Wheeler, Bridge- 
port, Conn. port, Conn. 

Mr. W. Gerald Bryant, Bridge- 
port, Conn. 



Baseballs, Bats 
Mr. William Cairns, Remington Arms Co., 



Mrs. George Yeamens, 
Mr. David Higgins, 
Mrs. John Stokes, 
Mrs. Leslie Brown, 
Mrs. Anna Schultz, 
Mrs. A. Knopp, 



Phonograph 



Ice Cream 



Organ 



Dahlias 



Apples 



Matzos 



Easter Baskets 



Bridgeport, Conn. 

Meriden, Conn. 

Meriden, Conn. 

Meriden, Conn. 

Meriden, Conn. 

Meriden, Conn. 
Waterbury, Conn. 



"Crusaders," Main St. Baptist Conn. Council of Catholic Women, 

Church, Meriden, Conn. Meriden, Conn. 

Sunshine Club, Smith-Murray Co., Mrs. Albertine Farrell, New 

Bridgeport, Conn. Britain, Conn. 

Sunshine Club, Remington Arms 
Co., Bridgeport, Conn. 



Doll House 



Conn. State Reformatory, 
Cheshire, Conn. 



Miss Mildred Levine, 



Sunshine Club, Warner Bros. Co. 
Bridgeport, Conn. 



Croquet Sets 



Ice Cream and Fireworks 
Sunshine Club, Bridgeport Brass Co., 



Meriden, Conn. 



Bridgeport, Conn. 



Friends, "John Martin's Book" for two years. 



44 STATE OF CONNECTICUT 

Fireworks 
Exchange Club, Bridgeport, Conn. 

Radio Batteries 
Sunshine Club, Bridgeport Brass Co., Bridgeport, Conn. 

Hallowe'en Gifts 

Sunshine Club, Bryant Electric Sunshine Club, Smith-Murray Co., 
Co., Bridgeport, Conn. Bridgeport, Conn. 

Christmas Trees 
I. Limon & Sons, Meriden, Conn. 

Boy Scout Equipment 
Housatonic Council of Boy Scouts Derby, Conn. 

Flowers 
Blatchley's Flower Shop, Meriden, Conn. 

Socks and Stockings 
Mrs. A. G. Parmentier, ' Meriden, Conn. 

Stereoscopes and Views 
International Silver Co., Meriden, Conn. 

Orthopedic Brace for Patient 
Rotary Club, Meriden, Conn. 

Valentines 
Junior Red Cross, Naugatuck. Conn. 

Ehitertainments 

Dancing Class Recital 
Miss Mildred Upson Hill, and Class, Meriden, Conn. 

Entertainment at Circus, Twice 
Lodge No. 45, B. P. 0. Elks, Meriden, Conn. 

Concert 
Meriden Military Band, Meriden, Conn. 

Entertainments 

Bridgeport Brass Co., Mrs. Frederick Hill, 

Bridgeport, Conn. Meriden, Conn. 



THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION 45 

Matinee Invitation 
Mgr. John J. Galvin, Poli's Theater, Meriden, Conn. 

Minstrel Shows 

Boy Scouts, St. Augustine's Lodge No. 45, B. P. 0. Elks, 
Church, Bridgeport, Conn. Meriden, Conn. 



Christmas Entertainment 



Rotary Club, 



Meriden, Conn. 



Weekly Motion Picture Films 
Manager, Life Theater, Meriden, Conn. 



Visiting Clergymen 



Reverend Francis J. Lippitt. 
Reverend Jeremiah Duggan 
Reverend Micheal Martin 



Reverend Edward Duffy 
Reverend Thomas McGarry 
Reverend Dominic Ricci 



Through St. Joseph's Church and the Connecticut Council of Catholic 
Women, Sunday School instruction has been provided by the fol- 
lowing: 



Miss Margaret Martin 
Miss Gertrude O'Connor 



Miss Eileen Fitzgerald 
Miss Eleanor M. Hagarty 



Through All Saints' Episcopal Church, Sunday School instruction 
has been provided by the following: 



Reverend Francis Lippitt. 
Mrs. H. G. Manley. 
Mr. C. L. Upham. 



Mr. T. H. Lowe. 
Mrs. Francis Lippitt. 
Mr. Charles Vibert. 



UNCAS-ON-THAMES 
Books and Magazines 



Mrs. George Carroll, Norwich, 

Conn. 
Mrs. P. J. Battersby, Norwich, 

Conn. 
Mrs. Philip Johnson, Norwich 

Conn. 
Cranston and Co., Norwich, Conn. 
Mrs. H. Hasting, Norwich, Conn. 
Huntingon Home, Mrs. Snodgrass, 

Miss Dowd. Norwich, Conn. 
Mrs. Sarah Wells, Norwich, Conn. 
Mrs. Austin, Norwich, Conn. 
Mrs. H. B. Mowry, Sterling, 

Conn. 
L. E. Mosher, Norwich, Conn. 
Mrs. R. Graham, Norwich, Conn. 
Mr. F. Gilman, Norwich, Conn. 



Miss Marion Bishop, Norwich, 

Conn. 
John Johnson, Norwich, Conn. 
Mrs. George W. Carroll, Norwich, 

Conn. 
Mrs. C. Stamm, Norwich, Conn. 
Miss Helen Williams, Norwich, 

Conn. 
Miss Gaines, Norwich, Conn. 
Mr. Haskell, Norwich, Conn. 
Mrs. F. Gilman, Norwich, Conn. 
Mrs. C. F. Davis, Norwich. Conn. 
Miss C. F. Gilman, Norwich, 

Conn. 
Mrs. McCurdy, Norwich, Conn. 
Mr. Frank Hartung, New Haven, 

Conn. 



46 



STATE OF CONNECTICUT 



Mr. George Carroll, Norwich, 

Conn. 
Mr. H. Taft, Norwich, Conn. 
Mrs. Lewis Austin, Norwich, 

Conn. 
State Library, Hartford, Conn. 



Salvation Army, Norwich, Conn. 
Mrs. John Sales, Norwich, Conn. 
John P. Corcoran, Norwich, Conn. 
Rev. John J. Reilly, Norwich, 

Conn. 
Rev. J. E. Brown, Norwich, Conn. 



Fruit, Candy and Ice Cream 



May baskets, Connecticut Council 
of Catholic Women (Norwich). 

Valentine Favors, Ladies' Guild, 
Broadway Church (Unt. Cong.) 
Norwich, Conn. 

Ice Cream — Flag Day, Norwich 
Lodge of Elks. 

Ice cream — Washington Birthday, 
Norwich Lodge of Elks. 

Fruit, Miss Mary Porteous, Nor- 
wich, Conn. 

Valentine Favors, Sodalitas — 
United Congregational Church. 
Norwich, Conn. 

Ice cream, Mrs. Rosenberge, Nor- 
wich, Conn. 

Fruit, Ladies' Auxiliary Ameri- 
can Legion, Norwich, Conn. 

Ice cream, Women's Catholic 
Council of Norwich. 

Fruit, Mrs. Victoria Plant, Taft- 
ville. 

Hallowe'en Favors, New London 
Lodge of Elks. 

Fruit, Mrs. Perau, Norwich. Conn. 

Ice cream and fruit. Ladies' 
Home, Norwich (Hebrew Club). 

Fruit — Candy, Mrs. Mary Con- 
nors, Mrs. Wm. Coughlin, Nor- 
wich, Conn. 

Candy, Mr. and Mrs. Alex Jordon. 
Norwich, Conn. 

Christmas boxes. Conn. Council 
of Catholic Women, Norwich, 
Conn. 



Candy — Fruit, Conn. Council of 
Catholic Women, Norwich, 
Conn. 

Ice cream — New Year's, Norwich 
Lodge of Elks. 

Valentine Favors, Broadway 
Church, United Congregational. 
Norwich, Conn. 

Ice cream — Flag Day, Norwich 
Lodge of Elks. 

Ice cream and cake — Columbus 
Day, Norwich Lodge of Elks. 

Fruit, Catholic Women's Council 
of Norwich, Conn. 

Fruit and candy, Mrs. Henry, 
Willimantic, Conn. 

Favors — and candy. New London 
Lodge of Elks. 

Candy, Miss Barbara Wood, Los 
Angeles, Cal. 

Fruit — Candy, Norwich Council, 
K. of C. 

Fruit, Winefred Crepeau, Nor- 
wich, Conn. 

Ice cream. Ladies of Habadasso, 
Norwich, Conn. 

Candy, John P. Corcoran, Nor- 
wich, Conn. 

Fruit, Mr. Fred Stevens, Bridge- 
port, Conn. 

Candy — Fruit, Norwich Council, 
K. of C. 

Fruit and Candy, American 
Legion, Norwich, Conn. 

Fruit and Candy, Spanish War 
Veterans, Norwich, Conn. 



Flowers and Plants 



Mr. Otto Ernst, Norwich, Conn. 
Mrs. James Allen, Norwich, Conn. 
Mrs. Olice Robins, Norwich, 

Conn. 
Ad. Moran — Plant Cadden Co., 

Norwich, Conn. 
Christ Church — in memory of 

Rev. R. Graham, Norwich, 

Conn. 



Mrs. Richard Graham, Norwich, 
Conn. 

Miss Eunice Gulliver. Norwich, 
Conn. 

Mrs. C. A. Pereau, Norwich, 
Conn. 

Mrs. Frank A. Robinson, Nor- 
wich, Conn. 



THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION 



47 



Miss Mary Richards, Norwich, 
Conn. 

Mrs. Philip Johnson, Norwich, 

Conn. 
Maplewood Nursery, Norwich, 

Conn. 
Mrs. Fred Day, Norwich, Conn. 
Women's Auxiliary of Backus 

Hospital, Norwich, Conn. 
Mrs. Walter Skelly, Norwich, 

Conn. 

Mrs. James Purdon, Jr., Norwich, 
Conn. 



Miss Margaret Purdon, Norwich, 

Conn. 
Mrs. Otto Ernst, Norwich, Conn. 
Miss Isabelle Mitchell, Norwich, 

Conn. 
Miss J. Kirby, Plainfield, Conn. 
Mrs. Allen, Norwich, Conn. 
American Legion, Norwich, Conn. 
Mrs. A. Mitchell, 4th, Norwich, 

Conn. 
Waterman Brown, Preston, Conn. 



Miscellaneous Donations 



Records, Mr. and Mrs. L. G. Sales, 
Killingly, Conn. 

"T" Binders, American Legion 
Auxiliary of Norwich, Conn., 
through the kindness of Mrs. 
V. Plant. 

Twine and tinsel, Mr. C. E. Car- 
penter, Norwich, Conn. 

Games, Mr. Hugh Osgood, Nor- 
wich, Conn. 

Caps, Women's Club, New Lon- 
don, Mrs. C. W. Brown. 

Caps, American Legion Auxiliary 
of Norwich, Conn. 

Records, Maurice Friedman, Nor- 
wich, Conn. 

Records, Mrs. Hasting, Norwich, 
Conn. 

Tickets to Garden Party, Miss 
Agnes Bresnan, Norwich, Conn. 

Records, Mrs. Rosenberg, Nor- 
wich, Conn. 

Balloons, Lee and Osgood, Nor- 
wich, Conn. 

Caps, Mrs. H. Burr, Melrose, 
Mass. 

Men's Clothing, Mrs. Ozias Dodge, 
Norwich, Conn. 

Records, Bridgeport Dye and Ma- 
chine Co. 

Toys, B. S. of A. St. Patrick's 
Church, Norwich, Conn. 



Records, Troop No. 1, B. S. of A. 
United Cong. Church, Norwich, 
Conn. 

Smokes — for entertainment, Fa- 
gan's Smoke Shop, Norwich, 
Conn. 

1 set altar linen, 1 alb, 1 set 
candlesticks and crucifix. Conn. 
Council of Catholic Women, 
Norwich, Conn. 

Clothing, Boston Store, Norwich, 
Conn. 

Records and Games, Mrs. Philip 
Johnson, Norwich, Conn. 

Use of auto — supper for patients, 
Mr. C. E. Carpenter, Norwich, 
Conn. 

Records, Mrs. Prentice, Norwich, 
Conn. 

Sweater, Mrs. C. P. Davis, Nor- 
wich, Conn. 

Caps. Mrs. C. B. Whitman, Nor- 
wich, Conn. 

Patches, Miss A. Millia, Norwich, 
Conn. 

Sleeping Bag, Sheltering Arms, 
Norwich, Conn. 

Records, Winefred Crepeau, Nor- 
wich, Conn. 

Caps, Mrs. George Leipold, Nor- 
wich, Conn. 

Records, Mr. Fred Stevens, 
Bridgeport, Conn. 



Entertainments 



101 Ranch Circus— Col. Miller, 
through the courtesy of Nor- 
wich Lodge of Elks. 

Willimantic Elks Band— Willi- 
mantic. Conn. 



Kell Patch's Society Five — New 
London, through the kindness of 
New London Lodge of Elks, 
New London, Conn. 



48 



STATE OF CONNECTICUT 



1 Radio Set — American Legion 
Auxiliary of Norwich, New 
London, Mystic. 

D'Atri's Orchestra — Norwich, 
Conn. 

Palace Theater Orchestra — Nor- 
wich, Conn. 

Movies from Palace Theater — 
Harold Lloyd in the "Fresh- 
man." 

Lotus Male Quartette — Boston, 
Mass. 

Grace Sage — Reader, Boston, 
Mass. 

Leith's Musical Aces — Orchestra, 
Norwich, Conn. 

Italian — American Band, Nor- 
wich, Conn. 

Lion's Club — Minstrel Show, Nor- 
wich. Conn. 

American Legion Show — "Bim- 
bo," Norwich, Conn. 



Entertainers' Club of the Norwich 
Sanatorium, through Mr. A. V. 
Travers. 

Ponemah Wheel Club — Minstrel 
Show, TaftviJle, Conn. 

Rotary Club — Minstrel Show, 
Norwich, Conn. 

Taftville Maennichor Club of 
Taftville, Conn. 

Universalist Church — Concert, 
Norwich, Conn. 

Hodgie Alley — Paramount Cir- 
cuit. 

Collegiate Orchestra — Paramount 
Circuit. 

Manager, Hugh McAvoy of the 
Palace Theater of Norwich, to 
whom we are indebted for his 
many kindnesses in bringing 
first class vaudeville acts to the 
Sanatorium. 

Salvation Army Band — South 
Manchester, Conn. 



Visiting Clergymen 



Reverend J. Eldred Brown, 
Rt. Rev. Monsignor M. H. May. 
Reverend Miles Galvan. 
Reverend John J. Reilly. 
Reverend S. Iciek. 



Reverend Peter Sroka. 
Reverend John Topar. 
Reverend Shurtliff. 
Reverend N. Sokoloff. 
Reverend H. Hunzinger. 



Church Services conducted throughout the year, each Wednesday 
morning by Rev. J. Eldred Brown — for Protestants. 

Church Services conducted throughout the year, once a month 
for the Catholics by Rev. M. H. May, Rev. M. Galvan, Rev. J. Reilly. 



LAUREL HEIGHTS 
Money Received for Patients' Amusement Fund 

City of Ansonia $200.00 

City of Derby 200.00 

City of Shelton 200.00 

Derby Lodge of Elks No. 571 200.00 

Derby & Shelton Board of Trade 207.50 

Kiwanis Club 68.00 

New Haven Community Chest 200.00 

Huntington Fire Co.— F. E. Cawthra, Treas 29.70 

Alice Allcorn, 69 Guernsey St., Stamford 50.00 

Rev. Wm. J. Blake, St. Thomas Rectory, Post Road, Fairfield 21.00 

Robert Chatfield, Derby and Shelton 20.00 

Frank Gates, 117 Derby Avenue, Derby 35.00 

Hubbell Bros., Derby 10.00 

Chas. W. Sutter Post, No. 16, American Legion, Shelton, 

Conn. — Raymond Goad, Commander 275.00 

Total $1,716.20 





HEARTS ARE YOUNG AT UNDERCLIFF 





HEARTS ARE YOUNG AT UNDERCLIFF 





LEARNING TO STAND AGAIN 
(THE SEASIDE) 




WISTFUL WATCHERS 
(THE SEASIDE) 



THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION 



49 



Moving pictures every Thursday night through the kindness of 
Mr. Maurice Culhane, Shelton Theater. Films furnished free of 
charge through the New Haven Distributors. Licensed operator paid 
out of the Amusement Fund. 

Entertainments 



July 18, 1924— Concert, Gow's 
Melody Men, 8 Burtville Ave., 
Derby, Conn. 

July 22, 1924— Entertainment, 
Mr. Henry Benham, Maple St., 
Seymour, Conn. 

July 25, 1924 — Entertainment, 
Mrs. Vaughn Wheeler, 809 Wil- 
liam St., Bridgeport, Conn., Mr. 
L. Eugene Hebberd, 817 Wil- 
liam St., Bridgeport, Conn., 
Mrs. E. Clark, Huntington Rd.. 
Bridgeport, Conn.. Mrs. and Mr. 
Thos. Toulson, No. Main St., 
Stratford, Conn. Mr. Harry 
Toulson, Toulson Yarn Co., 
Stratford, Conn., furnished two 
cars to convey party. 

July 30, 1924 — Entertainment, 
Edward B. Dillon, 115 Carmel 
St., New Haven, Conn., and 
friends. 

Aug. 24, 1924 — Band Concert, 
Shrine Band, Pyramid Temple, 
A. A. O. N. M. S., Mr. Elmer 
A. Hooper, Potentate, 72 
Knowlton St., Bridgeport, Conn. 

Oct. 2, 1924— Edwin J. Boyle, 
blind singer and entertainer, 
songs and whistler. 

Oct. 15, 1924 — Entertainment, 
Alpha Players Club of Bridge- 
port, Conn., W. Raymond Kirk- 
by. Manager, 2842 Main St., 
Bridgeport, Conn. 

Nov. 25, 1924 — Minstrel Show, 
American Legion, Sutter Post 
No. 16, Shelton, Conn., Ray- 
mond Goad, Commander. 

Dec. 17, 1924— Entertainment, 
Edward B. Dillon, 115 Carmel 
St., New Haven, Conn., and 
friends. 

Dec. 19, 1924 — Entertainment, 
Mrs. John A. Hugo, 95 Ashley 
St., Bridgeport, Conn., Mrs. Ed- 
ward Leonard, 99 Ashley St., 
Bridgeport, Conn., Albert Tor- 
doff, 211 Goddard Ave., Bridge- 
port, Conn., Wilfred Neale. 191 
Sixth St., Bridgeport, Conn. 



Feb. 26, 1925— Minstrel Show, 
K. of C, Shelton, Conn. 

Mar. 18, 1925— Morse & Mack Or- 
chestra, Charles Morse, 50 
Maple St., Ansonia, Conn., 
Thomas J. McCarrick, 120 Cliff 
Ave., Shelton, Conn.; Soloist — 
Sherwood King, 180 Wakelee 
Ave., Ansonia, Conn., Mrs. 
Anthony Phoenix, Shelton, 
Conn.; Toe Dancing — Violet 
Clark, Ansonia, Conn.; Dancer 
— James Rumble, 1 George St., 
Shelton, Conn. 

Mar. 27, 1925— Entertainment, 
Sargent & Co., New Haven, 
Conn,. Mr. Chas. S. Seagrove, 
Pres. 

Apr. 1, 1925— Solos by Dr. E. J. 
Lynch accompanied by Miss 
Mabel Allen, of Ridgefield, at 
the piano. 

May 11, 1925— Minstrel Show, 
Overlook Cottage Park Club of 
Waterbury, Conn. 

May 25, 1925— Morse & Mack Or- 
chestra, Mr. Morse of Ansonia, 
Conn., and Mr. Thos. J. McCar- 
rick, Shelton, Conn. Mr. Ralph 
Rogers of Laurel Heights gave 
selections on ukelele. 

May 26, 1925— Concert, through 
kindness of Miss Belle Heusser, 
52 Perry Hill, Rd., Shelton, 
Conn. The following took part: 
— Stanley J. Need, Dorothy M. 
Todd and Harriet Pethick, Har- 
riett Prindle Hull, Shelton, 
Conn. 

June 22, 1925— Band concert, N. 
Y., N. H. & H. R. R. Co. Head- 
quarters Band. 

July 14, 1925 — 25-piece string 
orchestra, through kindness of 
Miss Belle Heusser, 52 Perry 
Hill Rd., Shelton, Conn. 

July 18, 1925 — Entertainment, 
through kindness of Henry 
Benham, Seymour, Conn. 



50 



STATE OF CONNECTICUT 



July 19, 1925— Knickerbocker 
Dance Orchestra, David W. 
Clark, 222 Garfield Ave., 
Bridgeport, Conn., Manager. 

Aug. 4, 1925— Morse & Mack Or- 
chestra. 

Aug. 16, 1925 — Entertainment, 
Knickerbocker Dance Orches- 
tra. Autos furnished by Carl 
Schmidt, 308 Lindley St., 
Bridgeport, Conn., and John W. 
Broadbent, 27 Parrott Ave., 
Bridgeport, Conn. 

Aug. 23, 1925— Pyramid Band of 
Shriners — Potentate, Wm. E. 
Parker, 167 Madison Ter., 
Bridgeport, Conn. 

Aug. 30, 1925— Miller's Orchestra, 
Elmer Miller, 430 Wilmot Ave., 
Bridgeport, Conn. 

Oct. 2, 1925— Minstrel Show, 
American Chain Co., Bridge- 
port, Conn. 

Oct. 19, 1925— Entertainment 
(Singing and Recitations) by 
the following: — Mr. and Mrs. 
Arthur Clifford, 68 Livingston 
PL, Bridgeport, Conn., Miss 
Nellie Fox, 29 Haddon St., 
Bridgeport, Conn., Miss Lorena 
Robbins, 189 Wells St., Bridge- 
port, Conn., Miss May White, 
20 West Ave., Stratford, Conn. 

Dec. 4, 1925 — Entertainment for 
patients and staff, as follows: — 
Music by Laurel Heights Or- 
chestra, Banjo and uke duet by 
Richard Hooper and Fred Need- 
ham, Solo by Rose Aresco, Irish 
Jig by Nettie Nelson, Violin 
song — Joseph Ando, Songs on 
ukelele — Ralph Rogers, 
Charleston exhibition — Tony 
Ruggiero, Kazoo solo — Domi- 
nick Lupo, Solo — Julia Lupo, 
Accordion solo — Joseph Bodie. 
Songs by Bernard J. Burgess. 

Nov. 21, 1925— Vaudeville Enter- 
tainment by troupe from J. 
Goggins Theatrical Agency, 23 
Church St., New Haven, 
through efforts of George L. 
Bradley, Secy. E. T. R. A., N. H. 

Dec. 7, 1925— Minstrel Show by 
Blessed Sacrament Church, 
Bridgeport, Conn. 



Dec. 18, 1925— Victrola Con- 
cert of Christmas music from 
the Messiah and other works 
by Fred Kirk, 58 Lindley St., 
Bridgeport, Conn. 

Dec. 21, 1925 — 5-piece orchestra, 
John Noonan, 98 No. Cliff St., 
Ansonia, Conn., Charleston 
Dance by Miss Violet Clark and 
Solos by Jack Nugent. Saw 
solo by Louis Maturo. 

Jan. 15, 1926 — Entertainment by 
Staff and Patients, as follows: 
— Music by Laurel Heights Or- 
chestra, Richard Hooper, pian- 
ist; William Morey, violinist; 
Louis Steiner, violinist; Fred 
Needham, uke player; Ralph 
Rogers, banjo mandolin; Jigs 
and reels on violin by Chauncey 
Ives, Songs on ukelele by Ralph 
Rogers, Song by Matthew 
Douglass, Banjo and uke duet 
by Fred Needham and Richard 
Hooper, Violin solo by Joseph 
Ando, Solo by Frank Imperato, 
Irish jig by Nettie Nelson. 

Jan. 24, 1926— Al Menard's Or- 
chestra, 557 Main St., Bridge- 
port, Conn. 

Jan. 26, 1926 — Entertainment by 
Staff and Patients. 

Feb. 20, 1926— Entertainment by 
Staff and Patients. 

Feb. 24, 1926— Entertainment, 
Joint concert by Dr. E. J. Lynch 
and the Bon-Ton Banjoists as- 
sisted at the piano by Hazel 
Bacher, one of the hospital 
staff; Tilly Mackinak, Shelton 
and Anthony Ruggiero of staff 
gave a "Charleston exhibit." 

Mar. 6, 1926 — Vaudeville enter- 
tainment by troupe from J. 
Goggin's Theatrical Agency, 
New Haven, through efforts of 
George L. Bradley, E. T. R. A., 
New Haven, Conn 

Mar. 7, 1926 — Entertainment, 
Singing and accompanist at 
piano: — James Saunders, 388 
Pequonnock St., Bridgeport, 
Conn., Officer Daniel Dunn, 421 
Hawley Ave., Bridgeport, Conn., 
Thomas Martin and Raymond 
Gerard, Bridgeport, Conn. 



THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION 



51 



Mar. 8, 1926 — Minstrel show 
through efforts of Mr. H. D. 
Neale, E. T. R. A., Bridp^eport, 
Conn. Mr. F. V. Quig-ley, 386 
Anson St., Bridgeport, Conn, 
(coached show) through efforts 
of Miss Aloy Dalton, care of 
D. M. Read Co., Sunshine Club, 
Bridgeport, Conn. 

Mar. 9, 1926— Bon Ton Banjoists 
(Mr. Ralph Rogers, Lyman 
Pope and Bush Bros.) and en- 
tertainment by patients and 
staff: — Frank Imperato, solo; 
Julia Lupo and Nettie Nelson, 
duet; Anthony Ruggiero, Philip 
Steinberg, Nettie Nelson. 
Charleston contest. 

Apr. 23, 1926— Concert, through 
efforts of Henry D. Neale, 
Secy., E. T. R. A., Bridgeport, 
Conn., Corinthian Fellowcraft 
Orchestra, Secy., George Hart, 
642 Atlantic St., Bridgeport, 
Conn., Mrs. Mary Hill Hinch- 
cliff, soprano soloist, William 
Miller, Rivercliff Drive, Devon, 
singing of Scotch songs. 

Apr. 28, 1926— Roy T. Woods and 
Albert J. Wall, Derby, magic 
performance. 

May 3, 1926 — Radio Revue, by 
American Legion. Members do- 
nated their cars to transport the 
cast and chorus to and from the 
institution. Moe Karlins, Shel- 
ton, entertained with ukelele 
specialties. Miss Naugatuck 
Valley appeared in person. 

May 15, 1926 — Vaudeville enter- 
tainment, by troupe from J. 



Goggin's Theatrical Agency, 
N. H. through efforts of Mr. 
George L. Bradley, E. T. R. A., 
New Haven, Conn. 

May 18, 1926— Novelty concert 
show. Men's Club of Christ 
Episcopal Church, Courtland 
Street, Bridgeport, Conn Cast: 
— Clement Matthew, Edwin Os- 
teyee, Ernest Craft, Jr., Miss 
Lillian Hartley, Charles Kessell, 
Jr., Kenneth Buckingham and 
A. C. Flather. Others enter- 
taining: — Arthur Clifford, care 
of A. W. Burritt Co., Bridge- 
port, Conn., Miss Mildred Fen- 
ton, 101 Waterman St., Bridge- 
port, Conn., Miss Frances Cul- 
lerton, 538 Carroll Ave., Bridge- 
port, Conn. 

June 29, 1926 — Entertainment 
(operatic, victrola concert, solo 
and violin) Edward H. Davis, 63 
Oakland Ave., Waterbury, 
Conn., Mr. and Mrs. Norman 
Neale, 47 Lexington Ave., 
Waterbury, Conn., Howard 
Tracey, Hewlett St., Water- 
bury, Conn., Miss Edna M. Boi- 
ler, 89 Mill Hill Ave., and Miss 
Edith Proudman, 337 Colorado 
Ave., Bridgeport, Conn. 

Nov. 6, 1925 — Entertainment, in 
Shelton High School Auditor- 
ium, for benefit of Laurel 
Heights Sanatorium; Miss 
Elizabeth Whiting, impersona- 
tor, Henry Rappa accompanied 
by Stanley Need, pianist, com- 
posed the list of entertainers 
that the American Legion of- 
fered for this benefit. 



DONATIONS 



Books and Magazines 

(Books) 



Miss Jennie E. Davis, Howland 
Dry Goods Co., Bridgeport, 
Conn. 

Mrs. Hatch, Shippan Point, Stam- 
ford, Conn. 

Conn. Public Library Committee, 
State Capitol, Hartford, Conn. 

Rowlands Sunshine Club, Bridge- 
port, Conn. 



Mrs. Jacob Klein, 837 Fairfield 

Ave., Bridgeport, Conn. 
D. M. Read, Sunshine Club, 

Bridgeport, Conn. 
Paul J. Mester, Derby, Conn. 
Matthew McNulty, 83 Wooster 

St., Shelton, Conn. 
Plumb Memorial Library, Shelton, 

Conn. 



52 



STATE OF CONNECTICUT 



Mrs. W. C. Radcliffe, 215 Coram 
Ave., Shelton, Conn. 

Mrs. McLaren Stevenson, 798 E. 
Broadway, Stratford, Conn. 

Miss Ruth Thompson, 157 Fair- 
view Ave., Bridgeport, Conn. 



Percy Thompson, 204 Howe Ave., 

Shelton, Conn. 
Miss Grace Whittemore, 13 

Franklin St., Ansonia, Conn, 



(Magazines) 



Mrs. D. E. Brinsmade, 292 Coram 

Ave., Shelton, Conn. 
Boston Store, Ansonia, Conn. 
Miss Harriet Blakeman, Oronoque, 

Conn. 
Mrs. David R. Bowen, 5 Clover 

St., Ansonia, Conn. 
H. < C. Chamberlain, 152 Norton 

St., New Haven, Conn. 
Mrs. Chas. E. Clark, 12 Clark 

Ave., Derby, Conn. 
The Comstock-Willett Company, 

Bridgeport, Conn. 
Mrs. Calderwood, Gordon Ave., 

Shelton, Conn. 
Miss E. Louise Ellis, New Haven 

Ave., Ansonia, Conn. 
Miss Lillian T. Glennon, Welfare 

Building, Bridgeport, Conn. 
John L. Greene, 216 Blake St., 

New Haven, Conn. 
Mrs. Hatch, Shippan Point, Stam- 
ford, Conn. 
Miss Mae E. Kiley, 365 Poplar 

St., New Haven, Conn. 
Mrs. Louis Kost, 112 Hawthorne 

Ave., Derby, Conn. 
Mrs. Oliver Keller, 230 Wakelee 

Ave., Ansonia, Conn. 



Kiwanis International, 164 W. 

Jackson Boulevard, Chicago, 

111. 
Mrs. W. K. Keirans, 1343 Chapel 

St., New Haven, Conn, 
Mrs. E. H. Lewis, 11 Clover St., 

Ansonia, Conn. 
Dr. Stephen J. Maher, 212 Orange 

St., New Haven, Conn. 
Mrs. M. C. Mahoney, 498 Howe 

Ave., Shelton, Conn. 
Mrs. Elmer Mock, 12 Clark Ave., 

Derby, Conn. 
Mrs. Mercer, 75 Garden St., An- 
sonia, Conn. 
Henry D. Neale, 96 Stillman St., 

Bridgeport, Conn. 
Order of DeMolay, Ansonia, Conn. 
Mrs. W. C. Radcliffe. 215 Coram 

Ave., Shelton, Conn. 
Miss E. Sanford, 17 Perry Ave., 

Shelton, Conn. 
Mrs. E. Schoonmaker, 22 William 

St., Ansonia, Conn. 
Mrs. Townsend, 117 Derby Ave., 

Derby, Conn. 
Mrs. C. E. Van Riper, 53 Garden 

St., Ansonia, Conn. 
Mrs. Grace Whittemore, 13 Frank- 
lin St., Ansonia, Conn. 



Clothing 



Mrs. George E. Barber, 91 At- 
water Ave., Derby, Conn. 

Mrs. J. J. Booth, 92 Prospect 
Ave., Shelton, Conn. 

Mrs. D. E. Brinsmade, 292 Coram 
Ave., Shelton, Conn. 

Mrs. J. Knight Bacon, 28 Acad- 
emy Hill, Derby, Conn. 

Derby and Shelton Red Cross. 

Mrs. C. N. Downs, 304 Elizabeth 
St., Derby, Conn. 

District Nurse Association (Fair), 
Ansonia, Derby and Shelton, 
Conn. 



Mrs. M. M. Eckhardt, 24 Grove 
Ave., Shelton, Conn. 

Mrs. W. A. Gordon, 82 Myrtle 
Ave., Shelton, Conn. 

Mrs. Henry R. Navlor, 314 Eliza- 
beth St., Derby, Conn. 

Needlework Guild of America 
(Mrs. F. L. Meeker, 430 John 
St., Bridgeport, Conn.) 

Miss Katherine Nettleton, 61 Sey- 
mour Ave., Derby, Conn. 

Stephen Palmer, River Rd., Shel- 
ton, Conn. 

Walter W. Radcliffe, 215 Coram 
Ave., Shelton, Conn. 



THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION 



53 



Mrs. Henry Schneider, 76 Wooster St. Marks Church, New Britain, 

St., Sheiton, Conn. Conn. 

Shelton Reading Club, Sheiton, Mrs. B. H. Wetherby, 48 Howe 

Conn. Ave., Sheiton, Conn. 



Flowers 

Mr. Henry Cliff, Supt. of ^arks, Mrs. John B. Russ, Millcroft, 
Bridgeport, Conn. Huntington. 

Miss Elizabeth M. Morehouse, Salvation Army, Ansonia, Conn. 

Maplehurst Flower Gardens, Mrs. D. E. Wakelee, Coram Rd., 
Greenfield Hill, Conn. Sheiton, Conn. 



Food, Fruit, Candy and Ice Cream 



J. D. Healey, Derby, Conn. 
Mr. Benjamin, Derby, Conn. 
Miss Mary C. Bristol, 48 Cottage 

St., Ansonia, Conn. 
Mrs. Anne Bassett, 70 No. Cliff 

St., Ansonia, Conn. 
Mrs. George Bryant, 75 No. Cliff 

St., Ansonia, Conn. 
Mrs. Carrie A. Camp, 48 Cottage 

St., Ansonia, Conn. 
Ladies' Auxiliary of American 

Legion, Sheiton, Conn. 
Mrs. Franklin Farrel, 10 No. 

Cliff St., Ansonia, Conn. 
Bruce Griffing, 231 Coram Ave., 

Sheiton, Conn. 
Huber Ice Cream Co., Bridgeport, 

Conn. 



Mrs. M. E. Lathrop, 31 Atwater 
Ave., Derby, Conn. 

Paul J. Mester, Derby, Conn. 

Mrs. John B. Russ, Millcroft, 
Huntington. 

E. Seccombe, Mt. Dora, Florida. 

Mrs. Rutherford Trowbridge, 46 
Hillhouse Ave., New Haven, 
Conn. 

Valley Chapter DeMolay, Anso- 
nia, Conn. (Mr. C. Denton 
Sweet, Scribe). 

J. Titcomb, State Game Commis- 
sioner, Hartford, Conn. 

Franklin L. Wheeler, Bradenton, 
Florida. 



Miscellaneous Donations 



Sentinel Office, Ansonia, Conn., 2 
"Evening Sentinels." 

Dr. Arthur LaField, Bridgeport, 
Conn., 2 dark room tanks. 

John B. Russ, Huntington, 1 bil- 
liard table. 

Mrs. Oliver Lewis, 16 Union St., 
Sheiton, Conn., Xmas napkins. 

Mrs. John B. Russ, Huntington, 
Xmas favors. 

Ladies' Auxiliary, Charles Sutter 
Post, American Legion, Sheiton, 
Conn., Xmas gifts. 

Kiwanis Club, Sheiton, Xmas tree 
and trimmings. 

Mrs. D. E. Brinsmade, Xmas 
favors. 

Mrs. C. N. Downs, 304 Elizabeth 
St., Derby, Conn., 1 electric cot- 
ton and gauze cutter. 



Rev. Frank S. Morehouse, Church 
of Good Shepherd, Sheiton, 
Conn., Palms for Palm Sunday. 

Salvation Army, Ansonia, Conn., 
Easter Post Cards. 

Mrs. W. J. Tonkin, 4 Holbrook St., 
Ansonia, Conn., 1 phonograph 
and records. 

Miss Grace Whittemore, 13 
Franklin St., Ansonia, Conn., 
3 pillows, 1 mattress, 1 heating 
pad and 1 electric bell. 

James Sexton, Stratford, Conn., 
55 paper fans. 

Salvation Army, Ansonia, Conn., 
"War Crys." 

Frank Tompkins, 16 Spring St., 
Sheiton, Conn., 1 pair fleece 
lined slippers, bandage dress- 
ings and absorbent cotton. 



54 



STATE OF CONNECTICUT 



E. T. R. A. Sunshine Club, 
Bridgeport, Conn., 1 grapha- 
nola. 

Henry Bresky and Son, Bridge- 
port, Conn., 3 Xmas trees. 



Shelton Reading Circle, Shelton, 
Conn., Xmas gifts for patients 
in Women's Infirmary and 
Women's Shack. 



Victrola Records 



Miss Harriet Blakeman, Oro- 

noque. 
Columbia Graphaphone Co., 

Bridgeport, Conn. 

Miss Jennie E. Davis, Rowland's 
Dry Goods Co., Bridgeport, 
Conn. 

E. T. R. A. Sunshine Club, 
Bryant Electric Co., Bridgeport, 
Conn. 



E. T.'R. A. Sunshine Club, How- 
land Dry Goods Co., Bridgeport, 
Conn. 

Mrs. D. H. Hotchkiss, 20 High 
St., Derby, Conn. 

Daniel Northrop, care of R. N. 
Bassett Co., Shelton, Conn. 

Siemon Hard Rubber Co., Bridge- 
port, Conn. 



Religious Services and Visiting Clergymen 



Rev. George H. Buck, St. James 
Church, Derby, Conn. 

Berean Memorial Church, Bridge- 
port, Conn. (Young Peoples' 
Society). 

Rev. Mr. Chamberlin and mem- 
bers of his parish, M. E. 
Church, Stratford, Conn. 

Rev. John Dillon, St. Joseph's 
Church, Shelton, Conn. 



Rev. Andrew Plunkett, St. 
Joseph's Church, Shelton, Conn. 

Mr. Ernest Lutters, Maltby ^t. 
Extension, Shelton, Conn. 

Rev. P. L. Manfredi, Holy Ro- 
sary Church, Ansonia, Conn. 

Rev. Frank S. Morehouse, 
Church of the Good Shepherd, 
Shelton, Conn. 

Rev. Joseph Studzinski, Derby, 
Conn. 



THE SEASIDE 

List of Donors 
Radio 
Grand Exalted Rulers B. P. 0. Elks of Connecticut. 



Victrola Records 



The Bridgeport. Die & Machine 
Co., 174 Elm St., Bridgeport, 
Conn. 

Mrs. William H. Dodez. 243 Park 
St., Bridgeport, Conn. 



Mr. Daniel Marsh, 36 Belleview 

Place, New London, Conn. 
Mrs. R. F. Smith, Norwich, Conn. 



Flowers 

Mr. Louis Hall, Niantic, Conn. Miss Rose Whipple, Savannah, 

Mr. and Mrs. Opperman, 32 Starr Georgia. 

St., New London, Conn. Miss Marion Whiton, 14 Perry 

St., New London, Conn. 



THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION 



55 



Donations of Cash 



Mr. and Mrs. Charles R. Butts, 

Norwich, Conn. 
Mrs. Charles O. Britton, Talcot- 

ville, Conn. 
Mr. R. H. Bissell, 150 E. 49th St., 

New York City. 
Cub Scouts of First Congrega- 
tional Church, Bristol, Conn. 
Employees' Health Protective 

League, Bristol, Conn. 
Miss Isabelle Feuchtwanger, 473 

Edgewood Ave., New Haven, 

Conn. 
Dr. G. R. Hertzberg, 40 South St., 

Stamford, Conn. 
Mrs. Chester K. Hale, Portland, 

Conn. 
Mr. Lucius M. Johnson, Hartford, 

Conn. Trust Co., Hartford, 

Conn. 

Ever Ready Circle Kings' Daugh- 
ters, Norwich, Conn. 

Mrs. John Manwaring, Osweget- 
chie, Waterford, Conn. 

Mrs. Jacob Munz, 5 Rockwell Ter- 
race, Norwich, Conn. 

Woodcraft Physiological Club, 
New London, Conn. 

Rotary Club of Norwich, Conn. 

Mr. Robert L. Smith, 301 Mon- 
tauk Ave., New London, Conn. 



The Beth Israel Sunday School, 
Hartford, Conn. 

Ladies of Crescent Beach, Hart- 
ford Residents. 

Winthrop Willing Workers, Deep 
River, Conn. 

Mrs. Harry H. Walker, 107 Fed- 
eral St., New London, Conn. 

Woman's Auxiliary of Lawrence 
and Memorial Associated Hos- 
pitals, New London, Conn. 

The sum of $221.00 was realized 
by a bridge whist given for the 
benefit of the Seaside Christmas 
Fund by the following New 
London ladies: 

Mrs. Frank B. Walker, chairman. 

Mrs. Jennie Gard. 

Mrs. Charles B. Whittlesey. 

Mrs. John C. Geary. 

Mrs. E. S. Tuttle. 

Mrs. William Savard. 

Mrs. Robert Horton. 

Mrs. Samuel Prentis. 

Mrs. Robert H. Keeler. 

Mr. Frank B. Walker, manager of 
the Mohican Hotel at New Lon- 
don, kindly gave the use of the 
ballroom for that purpose. 



Clothing and Sewing 



Mrs. C. M. Blackman, 1199 New 
Britain Ave., Elmwood, Conn. 

King's Daughters, Dorcas Circle, 
Jewett City, Conn. 

Congregational Guild of Congre- 
gational Church, Bristol, Conn. 

Girl's Friendly Society, Seabury 
Memorial Branch, Groton, Conn. 

Mrs. R. Gengenback, 2 Mill St., 
Bristol, Conn. 

Wilbur McLeod Memorial of St. 
Andrew's Church, Hartford, 
Conn. 

Oneca Chapter Order of Eastern 
Star, Uncasville, Conn. 

King's Daughters of First Con- 
gregational Church, New Lon- 
don, Conn. 



King's Daughters of St. James 
Church, Groton, Conn. 

King's Daughters of Second Con- 
gregational Church, New Lon- 
don, Conn. 

Dr. E. J. Lynch, Supt., Laurel 
Heights Sanatorium, Shelton, 
Conn. 

Mrs. Harold Manchester, 410 Bur- 
lington Ave., Bristol, Conn. 

Needlework Guild of America, 
Bridgeport, Conn. 

Ladies of Crescent Beach, Hart- 
ford Residents. 

Mrs. Agnes Wilson, 8 Mill St., 
Bristol, Conn. 



56 



STATE OF CONNECTICUT 



Ice Cream, Fruit and Candy, Etc. 



Mr. and Mrs. B. Anker, New 

Dom Hotel, Hartford, Conn. 
Master John Britt, Crescent 

Beach, Conn. 
St. Patrick's » Boy Scouts, Nor- 
wich, Conn. 
Mr. Byron Bugbee, Putnam, 

Conn. 
Master Harold and Miss Mary 

Biesemier, 427 Broad St., New 

London, Conn. 
Miss Waite Bush, Niantic, Conn. 
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Brown, 

Marion, Conn. 
Bradley and Smith Co., New 

Haven, Conn. 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert B. Bone, 273 

Orange St., New Haven, Conn. 
Mr. Stephen N. Bond, Niantic, 

Conn. 
Miss Sally Ann Creedon, Hart- 
ford, Conn. 
Junior Red Cross, New London, 

Conn. 
Children of St. Paul's Sunday 

School, Fairfield, Conn. 
Mrs. A. P. Chapin, 61 Central 

Ave., East Hartford, Conn. 
Crowley Club, New London, Conn. 
Mrs. P. Connerton, Hartford, 

Conn. 
Miss Genedick Clark, 403 Broad 

St., New London, Conn. 
Mrs. Flora C. Carpenter, 1612 

Park Ave., Bridgeport, Conn. 
Mrs. James Crawford, 118 Main 

St., Norwich, Conn. 
Mr. Izzy Dean, Ocean Beach, New 

London, Conn. 
Mr. Matthew E. Dowd, 42 Beacon 

St., Hartford, Conn. 
Junior Sunshine Society, Water- 
ford, Conn. 
East Lyme League of Women 

Voters, Niantic, Conn. 
B. P. O. Elks, Washington St., 

New London, Conn. 
Mr. Robert Filon, Crescent Beach, 

Conn. 
Miss Mary Jane Farrell, Crescent 

Beach, Conn. 
Master James Farrell, Crescent 

Beach, Conn. 
Miss Bertha Fitzgerald, 121 

Bayonet St., New London, 

Conn. 



Mrs. Samuel Goldschmidt, 227 Ox- 
ford St., Hartford, Conn. 

The Garden Club, Mrs. G. H. 
Brown, Secretary, Faire Har- 
bour Place, New London, Conn. 

Miss Ruth Glessenberg, 406 Bank 
St., New London, Conn. 

Mr. Edmund Gaberman, 48 Rus- 
sell St., Hartford, Conn. 

Misses Eunice H. and Charlotte 
C. Gulliver, 30 Huntington 
Lane, Norwich, Conn. 

Mrs. W. P. Haas, 257 No. Oxford 
St., Hartford, Conn. 

Mr. John Howland, Pres., How- 
land Dry Goods Co., Bridgeport, 
Conn. 

Miss Ruth Howland, Saybrook, 
Conn. 

Ladies' Auxiliary of Home Me- 
morial Hospital, 51 Federal St., 
New London, Conn. 

Hon. E. Kent Hubbard, Middle- 
town, Conn. 

Mrs. H. E. Haskins, 28 Elm St., 
Hartford, Conn. 

Mr. and Mrs. Chas. H. Haskell, 
Huntington Place, Norwich, 
Conn. 

Mrs. A. L. Hillyer, Crescent 
Beach, Conn. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles D. Harring- 
ton, 20 South St., Southbridge, 
Mass. 

Humphrey Cornell Co., Sparyard 
St., New London, Conn. 

Wilbur McLeod Memorial of St. 
Andrews Church, Hartford, 
Conn. 

Junior Girls' League of Wilbur 
McLeod Memorial of St. An- 
drews Church, Hartford, Conn. 

King's Daughters First Congre- 
gational Church, Waterford, 
Conn. 

Miss Arlene R. Lipton, 23 Hun- 
tington St., New London, Conn. 

Mrs. Henry Lawrence, Jerome 
Court, New London, Conn. 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Lockwood, 
Crescent Beach, Conn. 

Mr. Nathan Lubow, 37 Perry St., 
New London, Conn. 

Master Thomas McKone, Jr., 
Hartford, Conn. 



THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION 



57 



Mrs. Harriet Newcomb, Vauxhall 

St., New London, Conn. 
Mr. Henry D. Neale, 96 Stillman 

St., Bridgeport, Conn. 
Niantic Sunshine Society, Niantic, 

Conn. 
New Britain Sunshine Society, 

New Britain, Conn. 
N. L. Fruit and Produce Co., 376 

Bank St., New London, Conn. 
Mr. and Mrs. Opperman, 32 Starr 

St., New London, Conn. 
Mrs. Lloyd Patterson, 329 Aycrigg 

Ave., Passaic, N.J. 
Children of St. Paul's, Fairfield, 

Conn. 
Mr. and Mrs. S. C. Parker, Bridge- 
port, Conn. 
Miss Margaret Reardon, Crescent 

Beach, Conn. 
Mrs. Walter Rhen, 16 Perry St., 

New London, Conn. 
Mrs. J. Solomon, 11 Home St., 

New London, Conn. 
Mr. and Mrs. F. A. Skinner, 

Scotland Rd., Norwich, Conn. 
Mr. Frederick M. Salmon, State 

Comptroller, Hartford, Conn. 
Beth Israel Sunday School 

Children, Hartford. Conn. 



Enlisted Men of Submarine Base, 

New London, Conn. 
Mrs. Steinfirst, 32 Sherman St., 

Hartford, Conn. 
Mrs. Minnie K. Samuels, 61 Lan- 
caster Rd., Hartford, Conn. 
Charter Oak Branch Sunshine 

Society, Mrs. F. P. Holt, Pres., 

97 Elm St., Hartford, Conn. 
Mrs. Howard Soule, Crescent 

Beach, Conn. 
Mr. G. Villano, care of Bradley 

Smith Co., New Haven, Conn. 
Mr. Wallace, Manager, F. W. 

Woolworth Co., New London, 

Conn. 
Mr. Charles Williams, Niantic, 

Conn. 
Mrs. Wolff. 217 North Oxford St., 

Hartford, Conn. 
Women's League of First Church 

of Christ, New London. Conn. 
Mr. John Wadhams, Goshen, 

Conn. 
Mrs. E. D. Wilson, Westport, 

Conn. 
Rev. Henry Link, Blackball, 

Lyme, Conn. 



Baseballs, Gloves, Bats, Etc. 



Ailing Rubber Co., Mr, D. E. Os- 

born, Manager, Bridgeport, 

Conn. 
American Hardware Stores, Mr. 

Elmer K. Grumner, Manager, 

Bridgeport, Conn. 
Mr. Fred Braitling, 104 Silliman 

Ave., Bridgeport, Conn. 
Mr. W. G. Bryant, Pres., The 

Bead Chain Co., Bridgeport, 

Conn. 
Mr. R. E. Blinn, 962 Main St., 

Bridgeport, Conn. 
Mr. Stanley Bullard, Pres., Bul- 

lard Machine Tool Co., Bridge- 
port, Conn. 



The Howland Dry Goods Co., 
Bridgeport, Conn. 

Mr. C. G. Sanford, First National 
Bank, Bridgeport. Conn. 

Sport Center, Mr. S. Green. Man- 
ager, 79 Fairfield Ave., Bridge- 
port, Conn. 

A. G. Spalding Bros., Mr. Theo- 
dore Hunt, Manager, 248 Fair- 
field Ave., Bridgeport, Conn. 

Mr. William R. Thompson, care of 
Meigs & Co., Bridgeport, Conn. 

Mr. Peter C. Ward. 158 State St., 
New London, Conn. 

Mr. William Wheeler, American 
Chain Co., Bridgeport, Conn. 



Toys, Books, Cards, Games, Magazines, Etc. 



Mrs. Wallace S. Allis, 305 Broad- 
way, Norwich, Conn. 

Mrs. EUery Allyn, Waterford, 
Conn. 

Mrs. C. R. Andrews, 51 Pequot 
Ave., New London. Conn. 



Mrs. Helen D. Andrew, 11 W. 8th 

St., New York City. 
Sunbeam Circle of the First 

Waterford Baptist Church, 

Waterford, Conn. 



58 



STATE OF CONNECTICUT 



Boys and Girls of New London 

Church School, 38 Gorton St., 

New London, Conn. 
Brater's Picture Store, 102 Main 

St., New London, Conn. 
Scout Troop No. 1 of Norwich 

Congregational Church, Nor- 
wich, Conn. 
Master Harold and Miss Mary 

Biesmeir, 427 Broad St., New 

London, Conn. 
Mr. Fred Braitling, 104 Silliman 

Ave., Bridgeport, Conn. 
Mr. J. E. Burr, 71 Montauk Ave., 

New London, Conn. 
Mr. W. G. Bryant, Pres., Bead 

Chain Mfg. Co., Bridgeport, 

Conn. 
Mr. James P. Bradley, 1 Madi- 
son Ave., New York City. 
Mrs. James P. Bradley, Westport, 

Conn. 
Miss Bruce, care of Toy Dept., 

Jordan Marsh Co., Boston, 

Mass 
Mr. W.' H. Clark, 49 Woodland 

St., Hartford, Conn. 
Miss Anita Carrigan, 8 Stanton 

Ave., Norwich, Conn. 
Junior Red Cross, New London, 

Conn. 
Conn. Public Library Committee, 

Hartford, Conn. 
Children of Marion Grammar 

School, Marion, Conn. 
Crowley Club, New London, 

Conn. 
Children of Trinity Church, 122 

Sigourney St., Hartford, Conn. 
Miss Genedick Clark. 403 Broad 

St., New London, Conn. 
Mrs. James P. Clark, Niantic, 

Conn. 
Mrs. Flora C. Carpenter, 1612 

Park Ave., Bridgeport, Conn. 
Mrs. William H. Dodez, 243 Park 

St., Bridgeport, Conn. 
Dr. and Mrs. F. M. Dunn, Broad 

St., New London, Conn. 
Derby-Shelton Community Club, 

Shelton, Conn. 
Daughters of Veterans, Clara 

Barton Tent, Norwich, Conn. 
Mrs. J. H. Davis, Woodside Circle, 

Hartford, Conn. 

Mrs. W. L. Douglass, 144 Hemp- 
stead St., New London, Conn. 

Miss Shirley Dunn, 77 Blackball 
St., New London, Conn. 



Junior Sunshine Society, Quaker 

Hill, Waterford, Conn. 
E. R. Class of Huntington St., 

Baptist Church, 46 Huntington 

St., New London, Conn. 
Mrs. Mary Eaton, East Lyme, 

Conn. 
B. P. 0. Elks, New London, 

Conn. 
Mrs. Ellery Edwards, 58 Garfield 

Ave., New London, Conn. 
Mrs. C. C. Eggleston, 28 Center 

St., Bristol, Conn. 
Miss Mary Jane Farrell, Crescent 

Beach, Conn. 
First Congregational Church 

Sunday School, Bristol, Conn. 
Miss Sophie Franklin, 54 Spencer 

Ave., Waterbury, Conn. 
Miss Molly Flynn, Swarthmore 

Chautauqua, Swathmore, Pa. 
Rev. E. A. Flynn, Niantic, Conn. 
Girl Scout Troop No. 3, New 

London, Conn. 
Mrs. F. Gilmartin, 21 Williams 

St., New London, Conn. 
Mr. M. J. Garvey, 11 Imlay St., 

Hartford, Conn. 
Misses Eunice H. and Charlotte 

C. Gulliver, 30 Huntington 

Lane, Norwich, Conn. 
Pupils of 6th Grade, Harbor 

School, New London, Conn. 
Miss Ruth Howland, Saybrook, 

Conn. 
Mrs. M. J. Hasselman, Stow Cot- 
tage. Crescent Beach, Conn. 
Mrs. C. Hadlai Hull, 72 Vauxhall 

St.. New London, Conn. 
The Beginners Department, Con- 
gregational Church Sunday 

School, Bristol, Conn. 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles D. Harring- 
ton, 20 South St., Southbridge, 

Mass. 
Mrs. Caroline Jeynes, 418 E. 148th 

St., New York City. 
Wilbur McLeod Memorial of St. 

Andrews Church, Hartford, 

Conn. 
Mrs. Frank R. Johnson, 14 Alger 

Place, New London, Conn. 
Mrs. F. W. Johnson, 449 Central 

St., Saugus, Mass. 
Junior Girls' League of Wilbur- 

McLeod Memorial of St. 

Andrews Church, 59 Cabot St., 

Hartford, Conn. 



THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION 



o9 



Mr. C. S. Jewett, 38 Philips St., 
New London, Conn. 

King's Daughters, Second Congre- 
gational Church, New London, 
Conn. 

Children of Mary F. Benton 
School, New Haven, Conn. 

Masters Harry and Kent Larribee, 
210 Huntington St., New Lon- 
don, Conn. 

Master Grover N. Lassen, Jr., 36 
Brace Rd., West Hartford, 
Conn. 

Prof. Henry W. Lawrence, Conn. 
College, New London, Conn. 

Mrs. David Lieb, Conn. College, 
New London, Conn. 

Miss Arlene R. Lipton, 23 Hun- 
tington St., New London, Conn. 

Thomas R. Lynch, 43 Colton Ave., 
West Springfield, Mass. 

The Lindstrom Tool and Toy Co., 
50 Silliman Ave., Bridgeport, 
Conn. 

Dr._ E. J. Lynch, Supt., Laurel 
Heights Sanatorium, Shelton, 
Conn. 

Miss Helen McFarland, 152 Can- 
ner St., New Haven, Conn. 

Miss Mary Marloe, Saybrook, 
Conn. 

Mr. E. Frank Morgan, Pequot 
Laundry, Inc., New London, 
Conn. 

Mrs. D. H. Morse, Mohican Hotel, 
New London, Conn. 

Mr. F. B. Makepeace, Jr., 83 Glen- 
wood Ave., New London, Conn. 

Mrs. J. Munz, 5 Rockwell Terrace, 
Norwich Conn. 

Mrs. Elizabeth Murphy, 49 Kos- 
suth St., New Haven, Conn. 

Daughters of Veterans. Clara 
Barton Tent No. 7, Norwich, 
Conn. 

Norwich Free Academy Girls of 
Room 19. Norwich, Conn. 

New London Sunshine Society, 

New London, Conn. 
Mrs. Lloyd Patterson, 329 Aycrigg 

Ave., Passaic, N. J. 
Children of B. P. Learned Mission, 

19 Masonic St., New London, 

Conn. 
Mrs. C. C. Peck, 3 Post Hill Place, 

New London, Conn. 
Mr. Elsworth C. Powers, Fitch- 

ville. Conn. 



Public Health Nurses, Norwich, 
Conn. 

Rev. Herbert C. Plumb, East 
Lyme, Conn. 

Mr. Joseph L. Raub, 111 Golden 
St., New London, Conn. 

Mrs. L. D. Robinson, 33 Algon- 
quin St., Dorchester, Mass. 

Mr. and Mrs. F. A. Skinner, 
Scotland Rd., Norwich, Conn. 

Mr. Lawrence Smith, 553 Montauk 
Ave., New London, Conn. 

Mrs. R. F. Smith, Norwich, Conn. 

Mr. Frederick M. Salmon, West- 
port, Conn. 

Mr. William Skelton, 22 Bowen 
St., Newton Center, Mass. 

State Farm, Miss Helen Hazard, 
Supt., Niantic, Conn. 

Enlisted Men of Submarine Base, 
New London, Conn. 

Miss Catherine M. Sheehy, 164 
Pond St., Bristol, Conn. 

Mrs. G. E. Staub, New Milford, 
Conn. 

Mrs. Minnie K. Samuels, 61 Lan- 
caster Rd., Hartford, Conn. 

Charter Oak Branch Sunshine 
Society, Mrs. F. P. Holt, Pres., 
97 Elm St., Hartford, Conn. 

Mrs. M. Skinner, Norwich, Conn. 

Mrs. Ralph P. Thayer, Supt, Pri- 
mary Department, E. L. Bap- 
tist Church, East Lyme, Conn. 

Miss Sally Thomas. 2040 Pacific 
St., San Pedro, Cal. 

Miss Dora M. Talcot, 165 Hillside 
Ave., Nutlev. N. J. 

Mr. William M. Thayer, 427 Fort 
Washington Ave., New York 
City. 

Miss Louise F. Thayer, 94 Bran- 
ford St.. Hartford, Conn. 

M-'ss Ruth Tubbs, East Great 
Plains, Norwich, Conn. 

United Workers of Norwich, Nor- 
wich, Conn. 

Visiting Nurses' Association, 
Middletown, Conn. 

Visiting Nurses' Association, 
35 Elm St., New Haven, Conn. 

Women's Club, New London, 
Conn. 

Mr. Oscar T. W^ilson, 837 Bank 
St., New London. Conn. 

Mr. Wallace, Manager, F. W. 
Woolworth Co., New London, 
Conn. 



60 



STATE OF CONNECTICUT 



Miss Laura B. Woodworth, 
Quaker Hill, Waterford, Conn. 

Miss Edna Wells, 255 Montauk 
Ave., New London, Conn. 

Mr. Peter C. Ward, 158 State St., 
New London, Conn. 



Miss Helen W. Withington, 152 
Canner St., New Haven, Conn. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert B. Wyllie, 
West Hartford, Conn. 



Through the efforts of Mr. Henry D. Neale, Secretary of the Em- 
ployees' Tuberculosis Relief Association of Bridgeport, the following 
Sunshine Clubs have been organized: Howland Dry Goods Co., Sun- 
shine Clubs No. I-II, and III; General Electric Co., Sunshine Club; 
Remington Arms Co., Sunshine Club; Bridgeport Brass Co., Sunshine 
Club; Bullard Machine Tool Co., Sunshine Club; American Chain Co., 
Sunshine Club; Rockwell & Co., Sunshine Club; Jenkins Bros. Co., 
Sunshine Club; Hincks Bros. Co., Sunshine Club; Bryant Electric Co., 
Sunshine Club; D. M. Read Co., Sunshine Club; Bridgeport Hard- 
ware Mfg. Co., Sunshine Club; Warner Bros. Co., Sunshine Club. Each 
club has brought sunshine into the life of one or more of our patients 
by gifts on birthdays and holidays throughout the year. 

Entertainments 



Col. Charles Comfort, Commander 
118th Medical Regiment, New 
Haven, Conn. Band Concert 
under the leadership of Mr. 
Philip Azzolina. 

B. P. O. Elks, New London, Conn. 
— Circus, Sells Floto, and 
Hagenback and Wallace. 

Col. Lewis Field, Commander, 
102nd Infantry — Band concert 
by 102nd Infantry band under 
the leadership of Mr. Anthony 
R. Teta. 

Hagenback and Wallace C'rcus. 

Mrs. Percy G. Huddle, School 
Director of Music, Fort St., 
Groton, Conn. — Musical enter- 
tainment by Nathan Hale 
School Orchestra and Vocal 
Solos by children of 8th grade 
of Saltonstall School. 

Col. D. Gordon Hunter, Comman- 
der, 169th Regiment — Band 
concert under the leadership of 
Mr. William Tassillo. 

Niantic Sunshine Society, Mrs. M. 
R. Davis, Pres., Easter Party, 
Valentine Party. 



New Britain Sunshine Society, 
Mrs. George W. Corbin, Pres., 
49 Lexington St., New Britain, 
Conn., Easter Party, Valentine 
and St. Patrick's Parties. 

Mr. Horace Patch, Leader, Rose- 
mary St., New London, Conn. — 
Musical program by Kell 
Patch's Society Five Orchestra 
and solos by Miss Helen Down- 
ing and Miss Elizabeth Walters 
both of New London, Conn. 

The Swanee River Quartet, care 
of White Entertainment Bu- 
reau, 100 Boylston St., Boston, 
Mass. 

Mr. Harry Shurts, 34 Bristol St., 
New London, Conn. — Santa 
Claus. 

Mr. Frank Tice, Niantic, Conn. — 
Moving pictures at Orescent 
Beach Auditorium. 

Service League of Conn. College, 
New London, Conn., Miss Emily 
Warner, Pres. — Singing Christ- 
mas Carols. 

Lt. R. H. Whittaker and Troup, 
Submarine Base, New London, 
Conn. — Singing, Dancing, Com- 
edy. 



Miscellaneous 



Mr. Joseph Brown, Marion, Conn. 
— Evergreen Trees. 

Mr. John Donoghy, Crescent 
Beach, Conn. — Transporting 
children to motion pictures. 



B. P. O. Elks, New Haven, Conn. 

— Fireworks. 
Dr. Flaherty, Crescent Beach, 

Conn. — Transporting children 

to moving pictures. 



THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION 



61 



The Garden Club, Mrs. G. H. 

Brown, Secretary, New London, 

Conn. — Seeds and Evergreen 

Trees. 
Mr. A. E. James, Crescent Beach, 

Conn. — Transporting children 

to moving pictures. 
Hev. A. McGovern, Crescent 

Beach, Conn. — Transporting 

children to moving pictures. 
N. E. Nurseries, Mr. Baker, Supt., 

Cheshire, Conn. — Evergreen 

Trees. 



Miss Anna Nevins. Shaw farm, 
Waterford, Conn. — Evergreen 
Trees. 

Niantic Sunshine Society, Mrs. M. 
R. Davis, Pres. — Lighting 
Christmas Tree. 

Mr. S. C. Parker, Vice Pres., 
Howland Dry Goods Co., 
Bridgeport, Conn. — Lawn 
Swings. 

W. W. Perkins Post, Woman's Re- 
lief Corps No. 18, New London, 
Conn — Flag. 



Visiting Clergymen 
Rev. Henry Link, Lyme, Conn. Rev. E. A. Flynn, Niantic, Conn. 



62 STATE OF CONXECTICUT 



SANATORIUM EMPLOYEES 

In compliance with Chapter 10, Section 181 of the Gen- 
eral Statutes, we append the following list of employees at 
the various sanatoria, whose compensation is not less than 
$450.00 per annum. 

Three Superintendents, $4,500.00 with maintenance. 

Two Superintendents, $4,000.00 with maintenance. 

Two resident physicians, $2,500.00 with maintenance. 

Four resident physicians, $2,000.00 with maintenance. 

One resident physician, $1,800.00 with maintenance. 

Two head nurses, $1,500.00 with maintenance. 

One head nurse, $1,380.00 with maintenance. 

One head nurse, $1,320.00 with maintenance. 

One head nurse, $1,200.00 with maintenance. 

One secretary, $1,200.00 with maintenance. 

One secretary, $1,320.00 with maintenance. 

Two bookkeepers, $1,200.00 with maintenance. 

One laboratory technician, $1,820.00 without maintenance^ 

One laboratory technician, $1,600.00 with maintenance. 

One X-Ray worker, $780.00 with maintenance. 

One dentist, $2,400.00 without maintenance. 

One teacher, $1,680.00 part maintenance. 

Three teachers, $1,200.00 with maintenance. 

One teacher, $1,080.00 with maintenance. 

One teacher, $900.00 with maintenance. 

One stenographer, $1,144.00 part maintenance. 

One stenographer, $1,020.00 with maintenance. 

Two stenogra"phers, $720.00 with maintenance. 

Three stewards, $1,500.00 with maintenance. 

One steward, $1,080.00 with maintenance. 

Two housekeepers, $1,200.00 with maintenance. 

One engineer, $1,560.00 part maintenance. 

One engineer, $1,500.00 with maintenance. 

One engineer, $1,380.00 with maintenance. 

One engineer, $1,140.00 with maintenance. 



THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION 63 

One engineer, $900.00 with maintenance. 

Four nurses, $1,080.00 with maintenance. 

Eight nurses, $1,020.00 with maintenance. 

Five nurses, $960.00 with maintenance. 

Thirteen nurses, $900.00 with maintenance. 

Eleven nurses, $840.00 with maintenance. 

Eleven nurses, $780.00 with maintenance. 

One nurse, $720.00 with maintenance. 

One nurse, $600.00 with maintenance. 

One attendant, $1,200.00 part maintenance. 

Four attendants, $840.00 with maintenance. 

One attendant, $720.00 with maintenance. 

Four attendants, $600.00 with maintenance. 

One attendant, $540.00 with maintenance. 

One attendant, $480.00 with maintenance. 

One orderly and barber, $840.00 part maintenance. 

One orderly and barber, $780.00 with maintenance. 

One orderly and barber, $720.00 with maintenance. 

Three orderlies and barbers, $660.00 with maintenance. 

Five orderlies and barbers, $600.00 with maintenance. 

Nine orderlies and barbers, $540.00 with maintenance. 

Six orderlies and barbers, $480.00 with maintenance. 

Two orderlies and barbers, $480.00 part maintenance. 

One Chef, $1,680.00 part maintenance. 

One chef, $1,620.00 with maintenance. 

One chef, $1,550.00 with maintenance. 

One chef, $1,500.00 with maintenance. 

Two chefs, $1,350.00 with maintenance. 

One assistant cook, $1,440.00 without maintenance. 

Four assistant cooks, $1,080.00 with maintenance. 

One assistant cook, $1,140.00 with maintenance. 

One assistant cook, $1,020.00 with maintenance. 

One assistant cook, $900.00 with maintenance. 

One assistant cook, $600.00 with maintenance. 

One assistant cook, $480.00 with maintenance. 

One w^aiter, $960.00 with maintenance. 

Two waiters, $600.00 with maintenance. 

One waiter, $540.00 with maintenance. 

One waiter, $480.00 with maintenance. 



64 STATE OF CONNECTICUT 

One waitress, $600.00 with maintenance. 

Five waitresses, $540.00 with maintenance. 

Four waitresses, $480.00 with maintenance. 

Two maids, $780.00 with maintenance. 

One maid, $624.00 with maintenance. 

Five maids, $600.00 with maintenance. 

One maid, $540.00 with maintenance. 

Three maids, $480.00 with maintenance. 

One kitchen man, $820.00 with maintenance. 

Three kitchen men, $600.00 with maintenance. 

Seven kitchen men, $540.00 with maintenance. 

Eight kitchen men, $480.00 with maintenance. 

One chauffeur, $1,080.00 with meals. 

One chauffeur, $780.00 with maintenance. 

One chauffeur, $600.00 with maintenance. 

One truck driver, $780.00 with maintenance. 

One truck driver, $720.00 with maintenance. 

One truck driver, $480.00 with maintenance. 

One teamster, $1,300.00 without maintenance. 

One teamster, $780.00 with maintenance. 

One teamster, $600.00 with maintenance. 

One night watchman, $1,365.00 without maintenance. 

Four night watchmen, $780.00 with maintenance. 

One night watchman, $720.00 with maintenance. 

One janitor, $780.00 with maintenance. 

One janitor, $600.00 with maintenance. 

Six janitors, $540.00 with maintenance. 

Four janitors, $480.00 with maintenance. 

One steam fitter, $720.00 with maintenance. 

One fireman, $1,404.00 without maintenance. 

One fireman, $1,352.00 part maintenance. 

One fireman, $1,142.00 without maintenance. 

One fireman, $780.00 with maintenance. 

One fireman, $720.00 with maintenance. 

One fireman, $660.00 with maintenance. 

One farmer, $1,548.00 part maintenance . 

One farmer, $1,500.00 with maintenance. 

One farmer, $900.00 with maintenance. 

One laborer, $1,404.00 without maintenance. 




THE MEDALIST AT CEDARCREST 




A CRITICAL MOMENT AT CEDARCREST 



THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION 65 

One laborer, $1,300.00 without maintenance. 

One laborer, $1,196.00 part maintenance. 

One laborer, $1,092.00 without maintenance. 

Three laborers, $720.00 with maintenance. 

One laborer, $660.00 with maintenance. 

Two laborers, $600.00 with maintenance. 

One laborer, $540.00 with maintenance. 

Three laborers, $480.00 with maintenance. 

One carpenter, $2,288.00 without maintenance. 

One carpenter, $1,300.00 part maintenance. 

One carpenter, $960.00 with maintenance. 

One carpenter, $900.00 with maintenance. 

One assistance carpenter, $858.00 without maintenance. 

One assistance carpenter, $600.00 with maintenance. 

One assistance carpenter, $540.00 with maintenance. 

One assistance carpenter, $480.00 with maintenance. 

One laundry foreman, $2,600.00 without maintenance. 

One laundry man, $1,170.00 without board. 

One laundry man, $884.00 with maintenance. 

One laundry man, $480.00 with maintenance. 

Two laundresses, $962.00 without maintenance. 

One laundress, $936.00 without maintenance. 

Two laundresses, $910.00 without maintenance. 

Three laundresses, $884.00 without maintenance. 

Three laundresses, $858.00 without maintenance. 

One laundress, $832.00 without maintenance. 

One painter, $900.00 part maintenance. 

One painter, $840.00 with maintenance. 

One painter, $720.00 with maintenance. 

One plumber, $600.00 with maintenance. 

One foreman of grounds, $840.00 with maintenance. 

One storeroom clerk, $600.00 with maintenance. 

One seamstress, $600.00 with maintenance. 

One seamstress, $480.00 with maintenance. 



6G 



STATE OF CONNECTICUT 



MEDICAL REPORT OF FIVE SANATORIA 

TWO YEARS— JULY 1, 1924 TO JUNE 30, 1925; AND JULY 1, 
1925 TO JUNE 30, 1926 



TABLE 1— Population 

CEDARCREST 
1924-25 



1925-26 





Male 


Female 


Total 


Male 


Female 


Total 


Beginning 


117 
177 
108 
65 
121 
123 


63 
113 

77 
33 
66 
67 


180 
290 
. 185 
98 
187 
190 


121 
176 
115 
64 
118 
114 


66 
120 
85 
32 
69 
67 


187 


Admitted 


296 


Discharged 


200 


Died 


96 


Remaining 


187 


Daily Average 


181 







UNDERCLIFF 

1924-25 



1925-26 





Male Female 


Total 


Male 


Female 


Total 


Beginning 


87 
97 
68 
3 
107 
93 


88 
75 
69 
7 
83 
86 


175 
172 
137 
10 
190 
179 


107 
72 
77 
6 
96 
89 


83 
67 
77 
3 
80 
83 


190 


Admitted 


139 


Discharged 


144 


Died 


9 


Remaining 


176 


Daily Average 


172 

1 



UNCAS-ON-THAMES 
1924-25 



1925-26 





Male 


Female 


Total 


Male 


Female 


Total' 


Beginning 


102 
178 
134 
45 
101 
102 


54 
89 
58 
29 
56 
55 


156 

267 
192 
74 
157 
157 


101 

174 

124 

57 

1 94 

98 


56 
84 
58 
24 

58 
55 


157 


Admitted 

Discharged 


258 
182 


Died ._ 

Remaining 


81 
152 


Daily Average 


153 



THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION 
LAUREL HEIGHTS 

1924-25 1925-26 



67 



Male 


Female 


Total 


Male 


Female 


86 


66 


152 


89 


69 


170 


137 


P.07 


159 


184 


112 


89 


201 


114 


90 


55 


45 


100 


39 


44 


89 


69 


158 


95 


69 


95 


69 


164 


94 


70 



Beginning 

Admitted 

Discharged 

Died 

Remaining 

Daily Average 



158 
293 
204 
83 
164 
164 



THE SEASIDE 
1924-25 



1925-26 





Male 


Female 


Total 


Male 


Female 


Total 


Beginning 


38 
8 
5 


20 58 
6 14 
6 11 


39 
16 
12 

1 


20 
3 

7 


59 


Admitted 


19 


Discharged 


19 


Died 


2 i 2 


i 1 


Remaining 


39 i 20 ! 59 !! 42 


16 '■ 58 








1 


1 







TABLE 2— Hospital Days 



1924-25 



1925-26 



July 

August *.... 
September 
October .. 
November 
December 
January .. 
February 
March .... 

April 

May 

June 

Total 



22,894 


23,288 


23,121 


23,223 


22,385 


21,846 


23,356 


22,323 


22,666 


21,261 


23,318 


22,060 


23,450 


22,590 


21,249 


20,518 


23,344 


22,600 


22,164 


21,672 


23,467 


22,522 


22,598 


22,118 



274,012 



266,021 



68 



STATE OF CONNECTICUT 



TABLE 2— (Continued) 
Total Hospital Days 





1924-25 


1925-26 


Cedarcrest 


69,724 
65,406 
57,541 
59,946 
21,395 


65,918 


UnderclifF 


62,957 


Uncas-On-Thames 


55,996 


Laurel Heights „ 

The Seaside 


59,908 
21,242 







TABLE 3— Length of Stay of Discharged 


Patients 






1924-25 


1 


1925-26 


Under 3 months 


274 

185 

149 

62 

56 






280 


3 months to 6 months 


160 


6 months to 1 year 


136 


1 year to 2 years 


99 


2 years and over 


74 






Total 


726 






749 







Length of Stay of Patients Who Died 





1924-25 


1925-26 


Under 3 months 


126 
52 
59 
24 
23 


110 


3 months to 6 months 

6 months to 1 year 


50 
53 


1 year to 2 years 


37 


2 years and over 


20 






.Total 


284 


270 







TABLE 4 — Condition of Patients on Admission 

CEDARCREST 

1924-1925 1925-1926 



Male 



Female 



Male 



Female 



2 Years 
Total 



Incipient 

Moderately Advanced 

Far Advanced 

Non-Tuberculous 

Total 



5 


8 


6 


12 


28 


10 


25 


26 


143 


93 


144 


82 


1 


2 


1 





177 


113 


176 


120 



31 

89 
462 

4 

586 



THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION 



69 



TABLE 4— (Continued) 
UNDERCLIFF 
1924-1925 



1925-1926 



Male 


Female 


Male 


Female 


7 


4 


5 


3 


2 


3 


1 


2 


1 


6 


2 


3 


11 


9 


4 


3 


18 


12 


9 


10 


29 


15 


19 


20 


11 


7 


10 


11 


2 





3 


1 


1 





1 


2 


2 


1 


2 


1 


11 


14 


16 


10 


2 


4 





1 


97 


75 


72 


67 



2 Years 
Total 



Pulmonary Adult Type ... 

Minimal 

Moderately Advanced ... 

Far Advanced 

Pulmonary Juvenile Type 

Hilar 

Parenchymal 

Glandular 

Bone 

Peritoneal 

Tuberculous Otitis 

Miliary 

Non-Tuberculous 

No Diagnosis 

Total 



19 

8 

12 

27 

49 

83 

39 

6 

4 

6 

51 

7 



311 



UNCAS-ON-THAMES 
1924-1925 



1925-1926 



Male 


Female 


Male 


Female 


19 


8 


6 


5 1 


64 


30 


65 


31 1 


84 


40 


87 


46 1 


5 


2 


3 


1 





2 


2 


1 


2 


4 


8 


1 


4 


2 


2 


1 1 








1 


1 





1 

















1 


178 


89 


174 


84 I 
1 



2 Years 
Total 



Incipient 

Moderately Advanced 

Advanced 

Bone 

Glandular 

Non-Tuberculous 

Not determined 

Lung abscess 

Tuberculous eye 

Tuberculous kidney .... 

Total 



38 

190 

257 

10 

4 

14 

9 

1 

1 

1 

525 



LAUREL HEIGHTS 
1924-1925 



1925-1926 



Male 



Female 



Male 



Female 



2 Years 
Total 



Incipient 

Moderately advanced 

Far advanced 

Surgical 

Non-tuberculous 

Not treated 

Total 



10 


9 


10 


40 


49 


40 


106 


73 


1 93 


4 


1 





10 


4 


16 





1 





170 


137 


159 



8 
39 
74 

2 
11 





134 



37 

168 

346 

7 

41 

1 

600 



70 



STATE OF CONNECTICUT 
TABLE 4— (Continued) 

THE SEASIDE 
1924-1925 



1925-1926 





xMale 


Female j 


Male 


Female 


2 Years 
Total 


Bone 


6 
2 




4 
2 

"... 1 


10 
2 

"3 

"i 


3 


23 


Gland 


6 


Skin 




Peritonitis 


3 


Rickets 




Non-Tuberculous 


1 






Total 


8 


6 


16 


3 


33 







TABLE 5 — Condition of Patients on Discharge 
CEDARCREST 

1924-1925 1925-1926 



Male 


Female 


Male 


Female 


7 





9 


2 


58 


30 


35 


32 


43 


47 


63 


44 


65 


33 


64 


32 








8 


7 


173 


110 


179 


117 



2 Years 
Total 



Apparently Arrested 

Improved 

Unimproved 

Died 

Non-Tuberculous 

Total 



18 
155 
197 
194 

15 

579 



UNDERCLIFF 





1924-1925 




1925-1926 




Male 


Female j 


Male 


Female 


2 Years 
Total 


Apparently Arrested 


28 
37 
3 
3 




27 

36 1 
6 1 
7 




17 

49 

11 

6 






1 23 
1 35 

1 8 
1 3 
1 

1 


95 


Improved 


157 


Unimproved 


28 


Died 


19 


Non-tuberculous 





Not Treated 


1 






Total 


71 


76 


83 


1 70 


300 







THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION 



71 



TABLE 5— (Continued) 
UNCAS-ON-THAMES 
1924-1925 



1925-1926 





Male 


Female 


Male 


Female 


2 Years 
Total 


Apparently Arrested 


1 

75 
17 
33 
5 
3 
45 




28 

9 
14 

4 

3 1 
29 


1 
75 

1 12 
31 

1 

4 

57 


1 

39 
4 

12 

2 

24 


3 


Improved 


217 


Much Improved 


42 


Not Improved . .. . 


90 


Non Tuberculous 


10 


Not treated 


12 


Died 


155 






Total 


179 


87 1 


181 


82 


529 







LAUREL HEIGHTS 



1924-1925 



1925-1926 



Male 



Female 



Male 


Female 






11 


10 


46 


42 


40 


27 


39 


44 


17 


11 


153 


134 1 



2 Years 
Total 



Apparently Arrested 

Improved 

Unimproved 

Died 

Non-tuberculous 

Total 



11 
59 
34 
55 



6 
40 
39 
45 

4 



167 



134 



38 
187 
140 
183 

40 

588 



THE SEASIDE 
1924-1925 



1925-1926 



I 

Male ! Female 



1 

Male 


Female 


9 


4 


2 


2 


1 




1 




1 




14 


6 1 
i 



2 Years 
Total 



Apparently Cured 

Improved 

Unimproved 

Died 

Non-tuberculous . 

Total 



18 
8 
3 
3 
1 



33 



72 



STATE OF CONNECTICUT 

TABLE 6 — Civil Condition of Patients 





Male 


Female 


Total 


Married 


480 

681 

52 

14 


357 
419 

47 
5 


837 


Single 


1100 


Widowed „. 

Divorced or Separated 


99 
19 






Total 


1227 


828 


2055 







TABLE 7 — Ages of Patients Admitted 



Male 



Female 



Total 



Under 12 years 
12 to 20 years . 
21 to 30 years 
31 to 40 years . 
41 to 50 years . 
51 to 60 years . 
Over 60 years . 

Total , 



139 


107 


246 


192 


205 


397 


267 


285 


552 


250 


129 


379 


212 


70 


282 


117 


19 


136 


50 


13 


63 



1227 



828 



2055 



TABLE 8— Nativity of Patient, Father and Mother 

Total for Two Years, 1924-1926 





Patient 


Father 


Mother 


Connecticut 


977 

366 

2 

11 

73 

"2 

1 

43 

1 



9 

4 

39 

4 

4 

24 

15 

66 

134 

1 


275 

285 

2 

14 

136 

2 

2 

4 

82 

"i 

14 
8 

78 
5 
9 

83 

17 

261 

291 

1 


300 


United States 


276 


Albania . .. 


2 


Armenia 


14 


Austria 


140 


Assyria 


2 


Belgium 


3 


Bohemia 


4 


Canada t 


87 


Canal Zone 




Cape Verdi Island 


1 


Czecho Slovakia 


17 


Denmark 


4 


England 


72 


Finland 


9 


France 


10 


Germany 


71 


Greece 


17 


Ireland 


278 


Italy : 


274 


Jamaica 


1 



THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION 73 

TABLE 8— Nativity of Patient, Father and Mother — (Continued) 





Patient 


Father 


Mother 


Japan 


1 

22 

1 
2 
3 
6 

118 
1 

11 
4 

40 

12 
4 
2 

25 
4 
5 
5 

11 

2 

1343 

712 


1 

40 

5 

2 

5 

9 

195 

1 

11 

5 

71 

19 

1 

5 

54 

4 

6 

4 

44 

3 

560 

1495 


1 


Lithuania 


40 


New Foundland 


3 


Norway 


3 


Nova Scotia 


4 


Poland 


9 
195 


Porto Rico 


1 


Portugal 


11 


Roumania „ 

Russia 


6 
65 


Scotland 


21 


South America 


1 


Spain 


4 


Sweden 


49 


Switzerland 

Syria 


3 

8 


Turkey 


5 


Unknown - 

Wales 


42 
2 


Total Native 


576 


Total Foreign 


1479 






Total 


2055 


2055 


2055 







TABLE 9 — Residence of Patients 
Total for Two Years. 1924-1926 



Addison 1 

Ansonia 19 

Avon 1 

Beacon Falls 2 

Bethel 3 

Branford 5 

Bridgeport 233 



Canaan 1 

Danbury 27 



Bristol 

Brooklyn 

Burlington ... 

Bantam 

Bolton , 

Broad Brook 
Bethlehem .... 
Brookfield .... 
Canterbury .. 
Centerbrook 

Cheshire 

Chester 

Colchester .... 

Columbia 

Collinsville .. 

Coventry 

Cromwell 



67 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
3 
1 
1 
1 
1 
4 
1 
5 
1 
2 



Danielscn 

Darien 

Deep River 

Derby 

East Granby 

East Hartford ... 

East Haven 

East Hampton — 

East Lyme 

East Portchester 

Enfield 

Fairfield 

Farmington 

Forestville 

Gaylordsville 

Georgetown 

Glastonbury 

Glasgo 

Glenbrook 

Goodyear , 

Granby 

Greenwich 



9 
2 
2 
8 
1 
7 
2 
6 
1 
1 
1 

15 
1 
1 
1 
1 
8 
1 
1 
1 
2 

19 



74 



STATE OF CONNECTICUT 



TABLE 9 — Residence of Patients — (Continued) 



Total for Two Years, 1924-1926 



Grosvenordale 2 

Groton 6 

Guilford 2 

Haddam 2 

Hadlyme 1 

Hamden 3 

Hartford 246 

Highwood 1 

Jewett City 11 

Kensington 1 

Kent 1 

Killingly 1 

Lakeville 1 

Litchfield 1 

Long Hill 2 

Lyme 1 

Manchester 14 

Mansfield 1 

Meriden : 82 

Middlebury 2 

Middietown 33 

Milford 3 

Milton 1 

Mildale 1 

Montville 1 

Moosup 8 

Mt. Carmel 1 

Mystic 11 

Naugatuck 21 

New Britain 150 

New Canaan 1 

No. Franklin 1 

New Hartford 1 

New Haven 282 

New London 51 

New Milford 3 

New Preston 1 

Newtown 3 

Niantic 1 

Noank 2 

Noroton Heights 3 

Northfield 1 

North Haven -. 1 

Norwalk 21 

Norwich 78 

Occum 2 

Orange 2 

Pawcatuck 1 

Pequonnock 2 

Plainville 5 

Plainfield 6 

Plantsville 1 

Portland 3 

Putnam 4 

Ridgefield 4 



Riverside 1 

Rockville 11 

Salisbury 2 

Saybrook 2 

Seymour 9 

Sharon 1 

Shelton 18 

Simsbury 2 

Southbury 1 

Southington 7 

So. Manchester 3 

South Norwalk 12 

Southport 2 

South Windsor 1 

Stamford 63 

Sterling 1 

Stonington 1 

Stratford 22 

Suffield 3 

Taftville 1 

Tarriffville 2 

Terryville 2 

Thomaston 5 

Thompson •... 2 

Thompsonville 7 

Tolland 2 

Torrington 17 

Tracy 1 

Uncasville 3 

Union City 1 

Unionville 2 

Versailles 1 

Voluntown 2 

Wallingford 16 

Warehouse Pt 3 

Warrenville 2 

Waterbury 176 

Waterford 3 

Watertown 3 

Washington Depot 1 

W. Cornwall 1 

W. Hartford 2 

W. Haven 20 

W. Willington 2 

Westport 1 

Westerly, R. 1 8 

Winchester 6 

Willimantic 18 

Wilson 1 

Windsor 4 

Windsor Locks 6 

Woodbury 2 

Yalesville 2 

Total 2055 



THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION 
TABLE 10— Occupation of Patients 



75 



Male 


Female 


Total 


2 





2 


1 





1 


2 





2 


9 


7 


16 


1 





1 


1 





1 


7 





7 


2 





2 


1 





1 





2 


9 


9 





9 


5 





D 





1 


1 


4 


4 


8 





2 


2 


3 





3 


2 





2 


3 





3 


7 





7 


2 





2 


2 





2 


2 





2 


1 





1 


1 





1 


32 





32 





1 


1 





1 


1 


13 





13 


1 





1 


2 





2 


6 





6 


1 





1 


56 


30 


86 


5 


1 


6 


1 





1 


1 





1 


1 





1 


3 





3 


7 


4 


11 





1 


1 


6 


3 


9 


2 





2 


1 





1 


3 





3 





1 


1 


1 





1 


1 





1 


2 





2 


2 





2 





1 


1 


1 





1 


1 





1 


9 





9 



Accountant 

Art Student 

Ash Collector 

Assembler 

Attendant 

Auditor 

Auto Mechanic 

Baggage Handler ... 

Baker 

Bank Clerk 

Barber 

Blacksmith 

Book binder 

Bookkeeper 

Box maker 

Brakeman 

Brass worker 

Bricklayer 

Buffer 

Butcher 

Bus boy 

Calker 

Caretaker 

Car painter 

Carpenter 

Cashier 

Chambermaid 

Chauffeur 

Chef 

Chemist 

Cigar maker 

Civil Engineer 

Clerk 

Clerk in store 

Clergyman 

Coal peddler 

Collector 

Conductor 

Cook 

Corset ironer 

Cotton Mill worker 

Counter-man 

Cutler 

Deliyery Clerk 

Dental Hygienist ... 

Designer 

Die-Setter 

Dishwasher 

Draftsman 

Dressmaker 

Drop Forger 

Dye Setter 

Electrician 



76 STATE OF CONNECTICUT 

TABLE 10 — Occupation of Patients — (Continued) 



Male 



Female 



Total 



Electrical tester 

Electrotype Operator 

Engineer 

Errand Boy 

Expressman 

Factory forelady 

Factory foreman 

Factory hand 

Farmer 

Filer 

Fireman 

Footpress operator .... 

Forelady 

Foreman 

Fruit Dealer 

Gardener 

Glazier 

Golf Professional 

Grinder 

Grocer 

Gunsmith 

Hairdresser 

Harness maker 

Hatter 

Highway Supervisor .. 

Housewife 

House keeper 

House maid 

Inspector 

Interior Decorator 

Intern 

Iron worker 

Janitor 

Kitchen man 

Laborer 

Lacquerer 

Laundry Worker 

Lawyer 

Lineman 

Linotype Machinist .... 

Linotypist 

Lockmaker 

Machine Operator 

Machinist 

Mail Carrier 

Mail Clerk 

Manager 

Manager (club house) 

Mason 

Mechanic 

Mechanical Engineer . 

Messenger 

Metal worker 



1 
1 
1 
2 
1 

4 
111 

22 
1 
9 


2 
1 

10 
1 
3 

16 
3 
1 

1 
9 
1 




12 

1 
1 

10 
2 
115 

1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
4 

34 

29 
1 
2 
8 
1 
1 
3 
1 
1 
1 









1 


41 



1 
1 









1 




313 
1 

68 
7 
1 





2 
6 






16 













1 
1 
1 

2 
1 
1 

4 
152 

22 
1 
9 
1 
1 
2 
1 

10 
1 
3 

16 
3 
1 
1 
1 
9 
1 
313 
1 

68 

19 
1 
1 
1 

10 
2 
115 
2 
7 
1 
2 
1 
1 
4 

50 

29 
1 
2 
8 
1 
1 
3 
1 
1 
1 



THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION 

TABLE 10 — Occupation of Patients — (Continued) 



77 





Male 


Female 


Total 


Meter Man 


1 
1 
1 

10 
3 

22 

4 
1 

36 
1 


1 

11 
6 

25 
1 
2 
6 
2 
2 
1 

10 
1 
1 

18 
2 
1 
3 
7 

1 
1 
4 
1 
1 
5 


10 
1 
2 


1 

13 
7 
1 
5 
3 
1 
1 
2 





1 





1 




37 


20 
1 


4 


1 




1 








3 
4 






12 



7 
3 

2 


1 






1 


Meter Reader 


1 


Milliner 


2 


Millwright 


10 


Motorman 


3 


Moulder 


22 


Multigraph operator 


1 


Musician 


4 


Newsdealer 


1 


No Occupation 


73 


Night clerk 


1 


Nurse 


20 


Nurse maid 


1 


Oil torch worker 


1 


Orderly 


11 


Packer 


10 


Painter 


25 


Paper box maker 


1 


Paper mill hand 


3 


Pattern maker 


6 


Peddler 


2 


Plasterer 


2 


Plater 


2 


Plumber 


10 


Plush worker 


1 


Policeman 


1 


Polisher 


18 


Porter 


2 


Post Office Clerk 


1 


Press Operator 


3 


Printer 


10 


Pupil nurse 


4 


Reporter 


1 


Real Estate Dealer 


1 


Restauranteur 


4 


Reamer 


1 


Roofer's help 


1 


Rubber worker 


5 


Saleslady 


12 


Salesman 


10 


Sales manager 


1 


Sailor 


2 


Seamstress 


7 


Secretary 


3 


Ship caulker 


1 


Shipping clerk 


15 


Shoe maker 


7 


Shoe Operator 


1 


Silk mill worker 


6 


Silver Worker 


3 


Stationary Engineer 


1 


Steel Engravers 


1 


Steeple Jack 


2 



78 STATE OF CONNECTICUT 

TABLE 10 — Occupation of Patients— (Continued) 



Male 



Female 



Total 



Stenographer 

Steward 

Spinner 

Stock clerk 

Stoker 

Storekeeper 

Street Inspector 

Student 

Tailor 

Taxi driver 

Teacher 

Teamster 

Telegraph Operator . 
Telephone Operator . 

Tinsmith 

Tobacco Worker 

Tool maker 

Tool Setter 

Trainman 

Truck driver 

Truckman 

Tree warden 

Typist 

Undertaker 

Valet 

Waiter 

Waitress 

Ward Maid 

Watchman 

Watch maker 

Weaver 

Window cleaner 

Woolen Mill worker 

Wood chopper 

Wood worker 




2 
3 
6 
1 
3 
1 
172 
9 
2 
1 
6 
1 

1 
2 
8 
1 
2 

17 
6 
1 

1 
1 

10 


5 
2 

21 
2 
6 
3 



11 

2 




160 


4 

1 
5 

3 







1 




5 
2 


9 







11 
2 
5 
6 
1 
3 
1 
332 
9 
2 
5 
6 
2 
5 
1 
5 
8 
1 
2 

17 
6 
1 
1 
1 
1 

10 
5 
2 
5 
2 

30 
2 
6 
3 
8 



THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION 79 

FINANCIAL REPORT 
CEDARCREST, HARTFORD 

Dr. William M. Stockwell Superintendent 

Dr. Max M. Teplitz Resident Physician 

Dr. Neil K. Forhan Resident Physician 

Miss Anna M. Walsh Head Nurse 

Miss Florence A. Brindley Secretary 

Miss Mildred M. Schwartz Stenographer 

Andrew E. Osborne Steward 

REPORT FOR YEARS ENDING JUNE 30, 1925, AND 
JUNE 30, 1926 

CASH ACCOUNT RECEIPTS 

Years 1924-25 1925-26 

Miscellaneous Receipts $783.55 $1,504,21 

Insurance on Laundry Building 350.00 



$1,133.55 $1,504.21 

Total Miscellaneous Receipts July 1, 1924 — June 30, 1926 $2,637.76 

Received from Comptroller's Office: 

Office Account $29.29 $50.06 

Payroll 25.25 20.14 



$54.54 $70.20 $124.74 

To Bills of Institution Paid by State Comptroller: 

Construction $1,000.00 

Equipment 102.00 222,35 

Maintenance 173,017.73 174,304.27 

Special Appropriation 25,000.00 



$173,119.73 $200,526.62 

Total of all Bills Paid by State Comptroller $373,646.35 

Cash on hand July 1, 1924 945.46 

Total Receipts from all sources $377,354.31 

PAYMENTS 
Years 1924-25 1925-26 

To State of Conn. Treasury Department: 

Miscellaneous Sales $783.55 $1,504.21 

Insurance 350,00 

Due from Comptroller: 

Office Account 50.06 15.93 

Payroll 20.14 

Bills paid by State Comp- 
troller 173,119,73 200,526.62 

Cash on hand July 1, 1926.... 984.07 

$174,323.48 $203,030.83 
Total Expenditures July 1, 1924^une 30, 1926 $377,354.31 



80 STATE OF CONNECTICUT 

RESOURCES AND LIABILITIES 

Resources 

Cash on hand July 1, 1926 $984.07 

Due from Comptroller: 

Office Account 15.93 



$1,000.00 

Liabilities 

Due State Treasurer from: 

Institution as per Resources $1,000.00 

ANALYSIS OF EXPENSES 

Years 1924-25 1925-26 

Equipment (Miscellaneous).... $102.00 $222.35 

$102.00 $222.35 
Total $324.35 

Construction: 

Addition to Piggery $1,000.00 

Total $1,000.00 

Special Appropriation: 
Acquisition of Land adjoining Sanatorium 25,000.00 

Total 25,000.00 

Total Expenses for Equipment, Construction & Special 

Appropriation $26,324.35 

MAINTENANCE 

Years 1924-25 1925-26 

Salaries, Wages and Labor: 

Medical $9,986.04 $10,070.01 

Administration 3,482.63 3,845.34 

Kitchen and Dining Room.... 11,757.16 12,500.89 

Domestic 3,956.22 3,919.17 

Ward (Men) 6,944.29 7,542.57 

Ward (Women) 10,977.43 11,972.02 

Engineering 3,033.52 3,318.51 

Farm 5,004.38 5,222.59 

Stable, Garage and Grounds.. 4,761.05 4,571.45 

$59,902.72 $62,962.55 

Total ^ $122,86^.27 

Travel, Transportation and Office: 

Advertising $1.62 $4.59 

Postage 20.00 30.00 

Printing 278.86 277.16 

Stationery & Office supplies 167.44 172.42 

Telephone and Telegraph .... 487.16 466.15 

Travel 168.66 195.73 

Sundries 67.83 189.38 

Freight 206.86 179.42 

$1,398.43 $1,514.85 
Total $2,913.28 




H -J 

u 

li- a. 

\ii 
Q 



THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION 81 

Food: Years 1924-25 1925-26 

Flour $1,059.30 $2,482.97 

Cereals, rice, meal, etc 597.31 599.26 

Bread, crackers, etc 248.55 225.11 

Peas and beans 176.50 144.60 

Macaroni and spaghetti 71.72 97.80 

Potatoes 1,511.75 2.727.03 

Meat 16,449.19 17,661.74 

Fish 1,490.23 1,647.18 

Butter 3,833.35 4,141.76 

Peanut Butter 3.32 .66 

Cheese 288.41 206.52 

Coffee 797.50 664.88 

Tea 290.79 175.26 

Cocoa 36.50 35.25 

Milk (Whole) 15,791.52 15,703.24 

Milk (Condensed) 76.60 101.16 

Eggs 3,790.80 4,234.59 

Sugar 1,165.73 997.82 

Fruit 3,880.33 3,831.67 

Lard and Substitutes 342.01 396.04 

Molasses and Syrup 122.35 112.20 

Vegetables 2,075.64 2,847.95 

Seasoning and Condiments.... 579.29 549.58 

Yeast, Baking Powder 224.27 204.20 

Sundry Food 1,303.74 1,541.63 

$56,206.70 $61,330.10 

Total $117,536.80 

Furnishings and Household Supplies: 

Beds, bedding, etc $1,106.25 $3,413.76 

Carpets, rugs, etc 175.00 

Crockery glassware, etc 1,751.74 504.45 

Drygoods and small wares.... 211.56 106.98 

Electric Lamps 105.22 96.71 

Furniture 8.00 314.25 

Kitchen and Household 

wares 4,555.06 883.31 

Lavatory Supplies and Dis- 
infectants 734.07 616.96 

Table Linen, etc 517.33 1,627.00 

Sundries 417.26 734.37 

Freight 1.55 

Fire hose and Extinguishers 19.00 

$9,602.04 $8,297.79 

Total $17,899.83 

Medical and General care: 

Patients Boarded out $20.00 

Paper Goods 480.27 $262.29 

Laboratory Supplies 137.30 150.24 

Medicines 1,255.48 1,249.17 

Sputum cups 597.14 1,436.47 

X-ray Supplies 325.00 149.00 



82 



STATE OF CONNECTICUT 



Medical and General care (Continued): 

Years 1924-25 1925-26 

Water $953.32 $1,259.87 

Sundries 730.26 567.38 

Hospital Supplies 2,359.31 1,376.84 

Clothing 17.25 3.98 

Funeral Expenses 45.00 

Toilet articles 385.00 

Tobacco 14.15 

Photo Supplies 53.65 

$6,875.33 $6,953.04 

Total $13,828.37 

Heat, Light and Power: 

Coal $9,501.63 $9,263.64 

Electricity 3,252.14 3,904.55 

Gas Machine 60.78 

Sundries 87.88 107.50 

$12,902.43 $13,275.69 

Total $26,178.12 

Farm and Stable: 

Blacksmithing and Supplies $86.25 $66.45 

Grain, etc 335.56 281.25 

Trees, seeds, etc 83.37 77.07 

Carriages and Wagon Re- 
pairs 33.00 39.44 

Fertilizers 174.44 135.00 

Rent 300.00 

Hay 406.38 391.68 

Harness and Repairs 

Horses 600.00 

Other Live Stock (Pigs) 120.00 

Spraying Materials 23.81 

Stable and Barn Supplies 

Tools, implements 25.95 178.75 

Sundries 34.85 49.30 

Poultry feed 675.00 575.80 

$2,154.80 $2,538.55 

Total $4,693.35 

Automobiles: 

Auto Supplies $303.96 $535.67 

Gasoline and Oil 452.31 401.88 

Motor Vehicles 

$756.27 $937.55 

Total $1,693.82 

Ordinary Repairs: 

Brick $41.06 $4.25 

Cement, Lime, etc 444.88 187.49 

Electrical work and Supplies 302.64 195.20 



THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION 83 



Ordinary Repairs (Continued): 

Years 1924-25 1925-26 

Hardware, iron and steel $922.69 $442.82 

Labor 718.60 174.50 

Lumber 1,521.83 847.36 

Paint, oil, etc 753.46 471.81 

Plumbing and supplies 1,064.25 726.05 

Roofing Materials 393.69 1.50 

Steam fitting and Supplies.... 363.69 437.14 

Tools, machines, etc 290.59 319.49 

Boilers, repairs 54.42 721.72 

Sundries 314.75 167.80 

Repairs to pump 24.00 120.31 

Tank and smoke stack 888.92 

Motor repairs 22.70 



Total 


$7,210.55 


$5,729.06 


Insurance: 

Insurance and bonding 

Total 


$2,007.97 


$1,812.41 


Grounds: 

Roadwork and Materials 

Total 


$565.00 


$28.00 



$12,939.61 

$3,820.38 

$593.00 



Laundry: 

Payroll $5,309.79 $5,578.71 

Laundry Supplies 576.25 540.38 

Coal 269.59 582.85 

Electricity 414.53 401.80 

Boilers, repairs 10.78 2.23 

Auto repairs 417.83 286.86 

Freight .52 

Smoke stack 7.00 

Boiler House 5,931.19 

Insurance 193.20 240.83 

Water 158.89 203.76 

Repairs to motor 114.13 209.28 

Hardware 1.06 22.11 

Machines repaired 30.73 760.09 

Sundries 95.78 



$13,435.49 $8,924.68 
Total $22,360.17 

Total Expenditures for Maintenance $347,322.00 

MAINTENANCE RESOURCES 

Goods on Hand: Years 1924-25 1925-26 

Fuel $997.99 $4,953.97 

Stockroom 13,394.80 14,121.60 

Bedding and linen 382.90 449.40 

Drug and Laboratory sup- 
plies 975.00 973.45 



Total $15,750.69 $20,498.42 



fS4 STATE OF CONNECTICUT 

PER CAPITA 

Recapitulation and per capita: 

Years 1924-25 1925-26 

Stock on hand July 1, 1924.... $26,868.32 $15,750.69 (7/1/25) 
Maintenance Expense 173,017.73 174,304.27 

Total $199,886.05 $190,054.96 

Stock on hand July 1, 1924 $15,750.69 $20,498.42 (7/1/26) 

Maintenance Expense $184,135.36 $169,556.54 

Less Sales 1,133.55 1,504.21 

Actual Maintenance Expense.... $183,001.81 $168,052.33 

Total number of hospital Days 69,724 65,918 

Cost per patient per day $2,624 $2,549 

Cost per patient per week 18.37 17.84 

Average for two years $18.11 

VALUATIONS 

1925-26 

Land $30,000.00 

Dormitories 69,876.38 

Dwelling Houses 49,532.37 

Barns and Storehouses 4,450.50 

Sheds and Ice Houses 500.09 

Garage 1,163.18 

Other buildings 105,392.00 

Vehicles 2,340.00 

Live Stock 3,175.50 

Merchandise on hand 19,051.52 

Tools and Appliances 35,615.37 

Furniture and Equipment 32,039.61 

Drugs and other similar sup- 
plies 1,451.45 

Total $354,587.97 

REPORT OF THE FARM 

1924-25 1925-26 

Produce retained at Sanatorium: 

Vegetables @ market price.. $1,286.92 $1,458.19 

Fruit @ market price 40.36 78.09 

Pork @ market price 555.80 618.90 

Eggs and Poultry 740.00 680.00 

Services to Sanatorium: 

(team and Farm help) 3,880.00 4,100.00 

Cash Sales: 

Hogs 1,188.00 1,401.50 

Plants 7.00 

Miscellaneous Sales 65.00 



Total Receipts $7,756.08 $8,343.68 



THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION 85 

EXPENDITURES IN OPERATION OF B^ARM 

1924-25 1925-26 

Salaries $5,004.38 $5,222.59 

Blacksmithing and Supplies.... 86.25 66.45 

Trees, seeds, etc 83.37 77.07 

Carriages and wagon repairs.... 33.00 39.44 

Fertilizers 174.44 135.00 

Grain,. etc 335.56 281.25 

Rent 300.00 

Hay 406.38 391.68 

Horses 600.00 

Other live Stock (pigs) 120.00 

Spraying materials 23.81 

Tools and implements 25.95 178.75 

Poultry feed 675.00 575.80 

Sundries 34.85 49.30 

Total Expenditures $7,159.18 $7,761.14 

Total Income from Farm $7,756.08 $8,343.68 

Total cost of operation $7,159.18 $7,761.14 

Gain Gain 

$596.90 $582.54 

Total gain in operation of farm for two years $1,179.44 

Farm inventory June 30, 1925 $4,216.05 
Gain on operation of farm, 

June 30, 1925 596.90 

$4,812.95 
Less inventory June 30, 1924.... 4,133.30 

$679.65 

Net Gain 1924-25 $679.65 

Farm Inventory June 30, 1926 $5,817.21 

Gain on operation of farm 

June 30, 1926 582.54 



$6,399.75 
Less inventory June 30, 1925.... 4,216.05 



$2,183.70 

Net Gain 1925-26 $2,183.70 

Net Gain for two years ending June 30, 1926 $2,863.35 

ITEMIZED INVENTORY 

June 30, 1925 June 30, 1926 

Wagons $402.00 $361.80 

Hogs 960.00 1,320.00 

Poultry 975.00 725.00 

Miscellaneous Tools 469.75 426.19 

Sundries 297.30 353.72 

Horses 200.00 700.00 

Hog Houses and runs 500.00 1,500.00 

Guinea pigs 378.00 407.00 

Rabbits 34.00 23.50 



$4,216.05 $5,817.21 



86 STATE OF CONNECTICUT 



FINANCIAL REPORT 
UNDERCLIFF, MERIDEN 

Dr. Cole B. Gibson Superintendent 

Dr. William E. Carroll Resident Physician 

Dr, Andor L. Banyai Resident Physician 

Miss Maude M. White Head Nurse 

Miss Gertrude H. Nichols Secretary 

INIrs. Ella M. Christiansen Stenographer 

Samuel E. Chase Steward 

REPORT FOR THE YEARS ENDING JUNE 30, 1925, AND 
JUNE 30, 1926 

RECEIPTS 

Years 1924-25 1925-26 

Miscellaneous Receipts: 

Miscellaneous Sales 177.55 167.60 

Rebates and Allowances 2.67 



180.22 167.60 
Total Miscellaneous Receipts $347.82 

To Bills of Institution Paid by State Comptroller: 

Construction $27,533.86 9,239.77 

Equipment 2,913.03 

Maintenance 170,246.99 163,042.43 



200,693.88 172,282.20 

Total of all Bills Paid by State Comptroller 372,976.08 

Cash Due from State Comptroller for Office Account 53.59 

Cash Balance, July 1, 1924 946.41 



Total Receipts from all Sources $374,323.90 

PAYMENTS 

To Secretary of State Tuberculosis Commission: 

Miscellaneous Sales, Rebates.. $180.22 $167.60 $347.82 

From Office Account; Sundries 37.09 

Bills Paid by State Comp- 
troller $200,693.88 $172,282.20 $372,976.08 

Cash Balance, July 1, 1926 962.61 



Total Payments from all Sources $374,323.90 



THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION 87 

RESOURCES AND LIABILITIES 
Resources 

Cash on hand, July 1, 1926 $962.91 

Due from Comptroller's Office 37.09 $1,000.00 



Liabilities 

Due State Treasurer from Institution as per resources.... $1,000.00 

ANALYSIS OF EXPENSES 

Construction Account: 

Years 1924-25 1925-26 

Reception Ward $27,533.86 

School Building Addition .. 9,239.77 

Total $36,773.63 

Equipment Account: 

Miscellaneous Equipment.... $2,913.03 2,913.03 

Total $39,686.66 

MAINTENANCE 

Salaries, Wages and Labor: 

General Administration and 

Office $29,704.97 $34,156.93 

Medical 20,094.26 21,072.18 

Farm, Stable and Grounds.... 10,213.84 10,190.67 

$60,013.07 $65,419.78 
Total ^ $125,432.85 

Food: 

Meat $10,810.86 $12,895.82 

Eggs 3,435.05 3,914.70 

Butter 3,169.26 3,484.17 

Milk 16,840.80 17,248.85 

Fish 998.85 1,221.04 

Flour 675.88 1,239.03 

Sugar 1,163.39 1,116.24 

Vegetables 2,232.30 4,021.68 

Fruit 954.73 2,114.05 

Canned Goods 5,152.30 4,296.83 

Tea and Coffee 802.34 513.35 

Miscellaneous 3,451.07 4,200.03 

$49,686.83 $56,265.79 
Total $105,952.62 



88 STATE OF CONNECTICUT 

Light, Heat and Power: 

1924-25 1925-26 

Coal $22,393.86 $2,351.72 

Electric light 2,315.47 2,512.61 

Gas 1,682.75 1,942.51 

Pump and Engine Repairs .... 439.89 41.75 

Electric Power 1,202.11 1,211.54 

Sundries 323.22 244.77 

$28,357.30 $8,305.20 

Total $36,662.50 

Farm, iStable and Grounds: 

Automobiles $4,161.08 $1,666.61 

Sundries 383.92 346.54 

$4,545.00 $2,013.15 

Total $6,558.15 

Repairs to Buildings: 

Lumber, etc $343.70 $1,059.85 

Plumbing 265.27 535.11 

Grounds 695.51 157.61 

Refrigerating Plant 184.63 

Painting 1,318.90 645.91 

Sundries 706.69 1,325.40 

$3,514.70 $3,723.88 

Total $7,238.58 

Repairs and Replacements of Equipment: 

Repairs to fixtures $697.30 $565.92 

Furniture 609.78 1,505.79 

Bedding and Linen 340.09 5,378.99 

Crockery and Silverware 421.03 232.33 

Miscellaneous 272.78 * 849.79 

$2,340.98 $8,532.82 

Total $10,873.80 

Miscellaneous: 

1924-25 1925-26 

Telephone, Telegraph $458.40 $498.01 

Printing and Stationery 634.76 459.97 

Transportation 143.05 188.47 

Laundry 13,435.48 8,924.68 

Insurance 1,154.38 1,199.38 

Miscellaneous Office Account 341.89 356.75 

Housekeeping Supplies 1,284.32 1,525.61 

Medicines and Hospital Sup- 
plies 1,284.33 1,294.54 

Water 1,274.29 673.88 

Sewer 58.32 162.89 



THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION 89 

Miscellaneous (Continued): Years 1924-25 1925-26 

School Supplies 265.75 1,556.29 

Dentistry and Other Hos- 
pital 327.93 247.52 

Clothing and Materials 363.05 977.61 

Sundries 325.58 303.88 

X-ray Supplies 437.58 412.33 

$21,789.11 $18,781.81 
Total $40,570.92 

Total Maintenance $333,289.42 

MAINTENANCE RESOURCES 

Goods on Hand: 

Fuel $10,466.48 $7,063.15 

Stock Room 2,683.80 2,993.75 

Garage 92.50 82.00 

Kitchen 116.00 308.00 

Drugs 500.00 500.00 

$13,858.78 $10,946.90 

RECAPITULATION AND PER CAPITA. 

Stock on Hand $17,013.49 $13,858.78 

Total Maintenance $170,246.99 $163,042.43 



$187,260.48 $176,901.21 
Stock on Hand $13,858.78 $10,946.90 



Actual Maintenance Expense.... $173,401.70 $165,954.31 

Total Number of Hospital Days 65,406 62,957 

Cost per patient per day $2.65 $2,603 

Cost per patient per week $18.55 $18,221 

Average per week for two years $18,385 

VALUATIONS. 

Thirty-one and one-quarter acres of land $8,529.00 

Infirmary Building 26,392.41 

Two-storv, thirty-two bed shack 9,360.00 

Dining Hall 15,554.00 

One-story, twenty-four bed shack 13,935.00 

Nurses' Home 29,155.00 

Superintendent's Cottage 5,620.00 

Store Room 1,900.00 

Barn 3,878.00 

Two-story, sixty bed shack 63,844.00 

Incinerator 1,373.61 

Recreation and School Building 19,592.00 

Reception Ward 40,000.00 

Paint Shop 500.00 

Water Tanks, Roads, Retaining Walls 29,831.22 

Passenger Automobile 2,000.00 



90 STATE OF CONNECTICUT 

VALUATIONS— (Continued) 

Two Motor Trucks $1,100.00 

Beds and Bedding 10,855.80 

Carpets and Rugs 1,094.89 

Crockery, Glassware, Cutlery 1,998.19 

Kitchen and Household Wares 4,034.74 

Table Linen, Napkins, etc 3,690.56 

Furnishings, Household Supplies 14,084.51 

Steam Cooking Apparatus 991.00 

Steam Tables 200.00 

Meat Grinder 172.00 

Potato Peeler 300.00 

Dishwashers 1,017.00 

Bread Mixer 640.00 

Dry Goods 956.83 

Pumps, pump motors 1,766.00 

Ice Machine 1,810.00 

X-Ray 2,454.00 

Fire Protection Apparatus 7,099.50 

School Supplies 2,065.30 

School Building Equipment 2,340.28 

Playground Equipment 1,900.00 

Laboratory Equipment 1,000.00 

Power Lawn Mower 200.00 

Electric Washing Machines 300.00 

Pneumothorax Apparatus 64.20 

Moving Picture Machine and Booth 500.00 

Drugs and other Supplies 500.00 

Chef's Table 350.00 

Bake Oven 164.00 

Four Gas Ranges and Hoods 969.00 

Total .. : $336,082.28 



THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION 9] 



FINANCIAL REPORT 
UNCAS-ON-THAMES, NORWICH, CONN. 

Dr. Hugh Baird Campbell Superintendent 

Dr. A. Lasalle Laberge Resident Physician 

Dr. R. Glen Urquhart Resident Physician 

Miss Viola R. Comsick Head Nurse 

Miss Miriam M. Campbell Housekeeper 

Miss Clara M. Christoph Secretary 

Miss Helen Fitzgerald Stenographer 

CASH ACCOUNT 

Years 1924-25 1925-26 

Miscellaneous Receipts: 

Miscellaneous Sales $349.73 $458.24 $807.97 

Bills Paid by State Comptroller: 

Maintenance 183,541.04 184,915 56 

Sewer 264.46 

Miscellaneous Equipment 901.93 39.75 

Construction 45,552.80 

Land 4,000.00 



$184,707.43 $234,508.11 $419,215.54 

Due from State Comptroller— Weekly Pay Roll 266.43 

Office Account 22.94 

Cash on hand 7/1/24 1,258.48 



Total Receipts from all sources $421,571.36 

PAYMENTS. 

Years 1924-25 1925-26 

Secretary of State Tubercu- 
losis Commission 484.05 

Bills paid by State Comptroller: 

Maintenance 

Sewer 

Miscellaneous Equipment 

Construction 

Land 

Due on Weekly Pay Roll- 
Due on Office Account 

Cash on Hand 7/1/26 



183,541.04 


184,915.56 


264.46 




901.93 


39.75 




45,552.80 




4,000.00 




320.91 




71.64 




1,479.22 



$185,191.48 $236,379.88 
Total Payments $421,571.36 



92 STATE OF CONNECTICUT 

RESOURCES AND LIABILITIES 

Resources 
Cash on hand June 30, 1926 $1,479.22 

Liabilities 

Due State Treasurer from Institution as per Resources.... $1,479.22 

ANALYSIS OF EXPENSES 

Years 1924-25 1925-26 

Equipment, not Including Replacement of any kind: 
Miscellaneous $901.93 $39.75 

Construction: 

Administration, x-ray and 

Laboratory Building 13,301.71 

Infirmary for Women 21,369.46 

Employees' Building 10,881.63 

Special Account: 

Sewer System 264.46 

Acquisition of Land 4,000.00 

Total expenses, Construction, etc $50,758.94 

MAINTENANCE. 

Years 1924-25 1925-26 

Salaries: 

Medical $25,937.62 $29,032.94 

Administration 5,204.16 5,085.85 

Kitchen and Dining Room.... 10,270.19 ' 10,837.69 

Domestic 1,858.49 2,409.25 

Ward Service (Male) 5,417.19 4,694.63 

Ward Service (Female) 1,006.26 1,141.60 

Industrial 990.00 1,280.00 

Engineering 4,545.64 4,550.99 

Repairs 3,618.17 3,147.42 

Farm 3,635.14 4,019.36 

Stable, Garage and Grounds 1,901.26 2,243,09 

$64,384.12 $68,442.82 
Total $132,826.94 

Travel, Transportation and Office Expense: 

Years 1924-25 1925-26 

Postage $70.00 $76.96 

Printing and Binding ...„ 225.93 292.80 

Stationery and Office Sup- 
plies 315.88 333.45 

Telephone and Telegraph 943.75 812.23 

Travel 188.35 187.42 



THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION 



93 



Travel, Transportation and Office Expense (Continued): 

Years 1924-25 1925-26 

Sundries $27.06 $1.50 

Freight .50 1.00 

$1,771.47 $1,705.36 

Total 3,476.83 

Food: ^136.303.77 

Flour $67.91 $1,093.74 

Cereal, rice, meal, etc 508.28 588.19 

Bread, crackers, etc 286.25 220.65 

Peas and Beans 1,039.87 68.00 

Macaroni and spaghetti 63.01 48.30 

Potatoes 1,167.00 1,413.05 

Meat 18,218.28 18,926.22 

Fish 2,268.51 1,695.95 

Butter 4,906.94 5,050.19 

Cheese 188.33 136.80 

Coffee 772.98 771.29 

Tea 67.13 136.60 

Milk 12,456.44 14,130.37 

Eggs 1,999.27 2,583.97 

Sugar 936.04 861.76 

Fruit— fresh 1,280.16 1,216.75 

Fruit— dried and canned 1,363.27 1,865.59 

Lard 353.76 627.28 

Molasses 153.45 151.62 

Vegetables— fresh 1,362.35 1,757.73 

Vegetables— canned 2,213.04 2,719.73 

Sundry Food 4,095.74 2,967.15 

Seasonings 115.31 96.71 

Yeast 319.65 335.13 

Freight 101.40 131.25 

Cocoa 24.00 

$56,304.37 $59,618.02 

Total 115,922.39 



Furnishings and Household Supplies: 

Beds, Bedding, etc $1,033.44 $3,170.81 

Carpets, rugs, etc 232.65 117.65 

Crockery glassware, etc 463.65 632.03 

Dry goods and small wares.. 273.00 104^18 

Electric Lamps 51.52 321.85 

Fire hose and extinguishers 60.03 134.64 

Furniture, upholstery, etc... 224.13 179.14 

Kitchen and household wares 2,034.24 2,408.79 

Laundry Supplies 547.20 241.31 

Lavatory Supplies 199.76 30.00 

Table linen and bed linen 1,140.48 2,805.90 

Sundries 631.02 1,083.39 

Freight 149.33 85.87 

$7,040.45 $11,315.56 

Total 18,356.01 



94 STATE OF CONNECTICUT 

Medical and General care: 

Years 1924-25 1925-26 

Laboratory Supplies $132.92 $149.54 

Medicines, Supplies and ap- 
paratus :. 2,879.74 3,094.59 

Sputum cups 123.40 

Toilet articles 165.61 

Water 3,292.28 744.48 

Sundries 2,284.48 1,236.55 

Freight 56.52 72.34 

Drugs 2,030.85 2,701.84 

X-Ray 1,264.52 1,862.45 

Photographic Supplies 220.97 

Ice 49.26 

$11,990.57 $10,371.77 
Total $22,362.34 

Heat, Light and Power: 

Coal $12,306.19 $4,619.99 

Electricity 2,405.01 2,809.64 

Power 967.15 1,124.97 

$15,678.35 $8,554.60 

Total $24,232.95 

Farm: 

Fertilizer $75.00 $82.50 

Grain 437.15 342.80 

Harness and Repairs 11.70 27.05 

Horses 73.60 446.00 

Roadwork 203.33 10.00 

Trees, vines, seeds, etc 101.13 125.79 

Sundries 30.64 33.88 

Freight 6.39 .85 

Veterinary Services 5.55 

$944.49 $1,068.87 

Total $2,013.36 

Garage, Stable and Grounds: 

Trees, Seeds and Vines 385.00 

Roadwork 9.50 

Sundries 25.00 47.00 

Sewer 424.88 

$834.88 $56.50 

Total $891.38 

Repairs Ordinary: 

Cement, Lime stone, etc $34.80 $80.82 

Electrical Work 121.83 93.83 

Hardware, iron steel, etc 1,078.00 707.40 

Lumber 1,045.00 878.94 



THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION 95 

Repairs Ordinary (Continued): 

Years 1924-25 1925-26 

Paint, oil, glass, etc $555.19 $853.02 

Plumbing Supplies 1,584.54 1,687.42 

Roofing Materials 6,800.00 

Steam Fitting 40.00 

Tools 3.20 

Boiler Repairs 6.60 299.73 

Sundries 525.79 84.75 

Freight 24.96 24.87 

Refrigerator 6,517.31 

Sewer .• 242.09 

$11,534.02 $11,756.07 

Total $23,290.09 

Miscellaneous: 

Auto Supplies $1,638.40 $2,310.11 

Insurance 2,367.62 243 38 

Laundry 9,025.55 9,449.45 

Religious Instruction 26.75 18.25 

Patient's Clothing 4.80 

$13,058.32 $12,025.99 

Total Maintenance $25,084.31 

MAINTENANCE RESOURCES. 

Goods on Hand: 

Years 1924-25 1925-26 

Paint, Lumber and Hardware $259.55 $194.00 

Coal 4,096.90 1,550.00 

Bedding and Linen 7,500.00 8,500.00 

Drugs 613.92 700.00 

Maintenance Stores 9,174.07 9,396.03 

Total $21,644.44 $20,340.03 

PER CAPITA. 

Recapitulation and Per Capita: 

Stock on hand 7/1/24 $10,298.84 $21,644.44 (7/1/25) 

Total Maintenance 183,541.04 184,915.56 

$193,839.88 $206,560.00 

Stock on hand 7/1/25 21,644.44 20,340.03 (7/1/26) 

$172,195.44 $186,219.97 

Less Sales 349.73 458.24 

Actual Maintenance $171,845.71 $185,761.73 

Total number of hospital days 57,541 55,996 

Cost per patient per day $2.98 $3.31 

Cost per patient per week $20.86 $23.17 

Average for two years $22.01 



96 STATE OF CONNECTICUT 

REPORT OF FARM. 

Years 1924-25 1925-26 

Produce Retained at Sanatorium: 

Vegetables at market price $773.81 $1,077.71 

Services to Sanatorium: 

(Team and Farm help) 2,817.52 3,009.68 

Cash sales 50.00 60.00 



Total Receipts $3,641.33 $4,147.39 

EXPENDITURES IN OPERATION OF FARM. 

Salaries $3,635.14 $4,019.36 

Expenses 741.16 1,058.87 



Total Expenditures $4,376.30 $5,078.23 

Total Income $3,641.33 $4,147.39 

Total Cost $4,376.30 $5,078.23 



Total Loss $734.97 $930.84 

Total Loss for two years $1,665.81 

Farm Inventory 6/30/25 $1,300.00 

Less loss on operation of farm 734.97 

Less Inventory 6/30/24 1,688.25 2,423.22 

Net Loss $1,123.22 

Farm Inventory 6/30/26 2,280.00 

Less Inventory 6/30/25 1,300.00 

Less loss of operation of farm 930.84 2,230.84 

Net gain 49.16 



Net Loss for two years $1,074.06 

ITEMIZED INVENTORY. 

Years 1924-25 1925-26 

Horses $250.00 $400.00 

Wagons and harness 160.00 150.00 

Tools and Implements 400.00 450.00 

Auto Truck 300.00 1,100.00 

Sundries 190.00 180.00 



Total $1,300.00 $2,280.00 

VALUATIONS. 

Land, 41 acres $16,000.00 

Buildings 251,700.00 

Live Stock and Vehicles 3,055.00 

Furnishings, Machinery and Tools 87,365.06 

Maintenance Stores 9,246.03 



Total 367,366.09 




I 



A BRONZED APHRODITE 



THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION 97 



FINANCIAL REPORT 
LAUREL HEIGHTS, SHELTON 

Dr. Edward J. Lynch Superintendent 

Dr. George L. Bunnell Resident Physician 

Miss Catherine Kessack Head Nurse 

Mrs. Anne C. Bunnell Housekeeper 

Ralph B. Rogers Secretary 

Miss Estelle L. Simon Stenographer 

REPORT FOR YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1925 AND FOR 
JUNE 30, 1926. 

CASH ACCOUNT 
Miscellaneous Receipts: 

Years 1924-25 1925-26 

Miscellaneous Sales $962.52 $2,533.14 

Total Miscellaneous Receipts June 1, 1924 to June 30, 1926 $3,495.66 

To Bills Paid by Comptroller: 

Maintenance : $178,583.33 $176,149.22 

Construction 10,000.00 



$178,583.33 $186,149.22 

Total of all bills paid by Comptroller $364,732.55 

Cash due from Comptroller — office account and payroll.... 153.84 

Cash on Hand June 30, 1924 1,341.39 

Total Receipts from all Sources $369,723.44 

PAYMENTS. 

Years 1924-25 1925-26 

To Secretary State Tubercu- 
losis Commission $962.52 $2,533.14 

Bills Paid by Comptroller $178,583.33 $186,149.22 

Payroll and Office Account 

Payments 87.76 

Cash on hand June 30, 1926 1,407.47 



$179,545.85 $190,177.59 
Total Expenditures $369,723.44 

RESOURCES AND LIABILITIES 

Resources 

Cash on Hand July 1, 1926 $1,407.47 

Liabilities 

Due State Treasurer from Institution as per Resources.... $1,407.47 



OS STATE OF CONNECTICUT 

ANALYSIS OF EXPENSES 

Years 1924-25 1925-26 
Construction: 

Land $1,000.00 

New Road 9,000.00 

$10,000.00 
Total $10,000.00 

MAINTENANCE. 

Years 1924-25 1925-26 
Salaries, Wages and Labor: 

Medical $8,239.92 $8,364.93 

Administration 4,901,68 5,384.31 

Kitchen and Dining Room .... 9,343.04 9,690.00 

Domestic 1,728.98 1,700.00 

Ward Service (Male) 8,661.31 10,024.13 

Ward Service (Female) 7,668.38 8,612.99 

Engineering Department .... 3,150.00 3,480.00 

Repairs 2,215.00 2,024.50 

Farm 2,999.52 2,940.58 

Stable, Garage and Grounds 2,267.25 2,220.00 

$:5l,175.08 $54,441.44 

Total $105,616.52 

Travel, Transportation and Office: 

Printing and Binding $195.86 $118.79 

^Stationery and Office Sup- 
plies 427.58 634.66 

Telephone and Telegraph.... 552.70 601.66 

Travel 74.90 99.36 

Sundries 51.80 

Insurance ^ 4,413.38 467.12 

$5,716.22 $1,921.29 

Total $7,637.51 

Food: 

Years 1924-25 1925-26 

Flour $745.04 $3,319 94 

Cereal, Rice, etc 739.37 845.86 

Bread, Crackers, etc 509.87 574.24 

Peas and Beans, Dried and 

Canned 154.30 89.30 

Macaroni and Spaghetti 95.85 96.95 

Potatoes 2,416.79 2,035.75 

Meat 17,915.90 18,690.27 

Fish — Fresh-Cured and 

Canned 1.351.83 1,198.42 

Butter 3,318.52 4,114.44 

Cheese 279.29 216.95 

Coffee 749.00 579.56 

Tea 158.87 158.26 

Cocoa 28.00 89.80 



THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION 99 

Food (Continued): Years 1924-25 1925-26 

Whole Milk $15,700.25 $17,217.03 

Evaporated Milk 9.00 

Eggs 2,913.60 2,696.95 

Sugar , 964.82 707.73 

Fruit, Fresh 1,381.54 1,254.46 

Fruit, Dried 1,939.64 3,423.67 

Lard and Substitutes 457.76 418.42 

Molasses and Syrup 150.42 87.74 

Vegetables, Fresh 1,145.76 1,582.77 

Vegetables, Dried 2,611.92 2,525.86 

Seasoning and Condiments.... 856.67 633.88 

Yeast, Baking Powder, etc. .. 224.85 190.33 

Sundry Food 1,094.44 1,472.33 

Freight 37.55 134.05 

$57,950.83 $64,356.96 

Total $122,307.79 

Clothing and Materials: 

Clothing (Outer) $1,492.00 

$1,492.00 
Total $1,492.00 

Furnishings and Household Supplies: 

Beds, Bedding, etc $2,633.00 

Carpets, Rugs, etc $38.89 33.75 

Crockery, Glassware, Cut- 
lery, etc 744.93 154.27 

Dry Goods and Small Wares 228.22 284.00 

Electric Lamps 142.82 64.08 

Furniture, Upholstery, etc 515.86 263.28 

Kitchen and Household 

Wares 686.66 282.29 

Laundry 13,435.53 8,924.69 

Lavatory Supplies and Dis- 
infectants 656.16 440.26 

Table linen. Paper napkins, 

etc 2,427.76 5,576.79 

Sundries 1,848.17 1,908.78 

Freight 96.44 129.99 

$20,821.44 $20,695.18 

Total $41,516.62 

Medical and General Care: 
Laboratory Supplies and 

Apparatus $118.06 $258.67 

Medicines, Supplies and Ap- 
paratus 4,292.58 3,106.60 

Toilet and other Personal 

Articles 42.75 

X-ray 1,162.00 1,203.80 

Fluoroscope 730.00 

Freight 60.91 110.52 

$5,633.55 $5,452.34 

Total $11,085.89 



100 STATE OF CONNECTICUT 

Heat, Light and Power: Years 1924-25 1925-26 

Bituminous Coal $1,956.06 

Anthracite Coal $19,138.12 6,191.03 

Electricity 4,463.16 5,265.04 

Operating Supplies 106.47 482.99 

Refrigeration 1,183.97 81.16 

Sundries 12.50 

Freight 15.00 

$24,904.22 $13,991.28 

Total $38,895.50 

Farm: 

Blacksmithing and Supplies.. $186.85 $264.26 

Carriage and Wagon Repairs 1.45 

Fertilizer 98.00 

Grain, etc 1,128.03 1,881.89 

Harness and Repairs 26.15 60.00 

Other Live Stock 205.00 25.00 

Labor not on pay roll 5.00 10.50 

Tools, Implements, Machin- 
ery, etc 332.53 15.70 

Trees, Vines, Seeds, etc 107.77 875.33 

Sundries 303.43 76.79 

Roadwork and Materials 4.75 698.73 

Freight 25.00 

$2,299.51 $3,532.65 

Total $5,832.16 

Garage : 

Automobiles $1,667.50 

Auto Repairs and Supplies.... 1,052.89 1,496.43 

$2,720.39 $1,496.43 

Total $4,216.82 

Ordinary Repairs: 

Cement, Lime, etc $19.50 $104.73 

Electrical Work 613.12 328.46 

Hardware, Iron and Steel .... 2,119.67 977.58 

Lumber, etc 935.47 1,928.48 

Paint, Oil and Glass 1,724.13 1,551.67 

Plumbing and Supplies 1,049.59 524.95 

Steam Fitting and Supplies 40.00 33.82 

Tools, Machines 3.00 

Boilers, Repairs 164.37 

Dynamos, Repairs 47.05 

Engines, Repairs 527.66 

Sundries 118.53 

Freight 11.46 

$7,362.09 $5,461.15 

Total - $12,823.24 



THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION 



101 



Repairs and Renewals: 

Remodeling Refrigerator $3,308.50 

$3,308.50 
Total $3,308.50 

Total Expense for Maintenance $354,732.55 

MAINTENANCE RESOURCES 

Years 1924-25 1925-26 

Goods on Hand: 

Fuel $2,500.00 $2,712.50 

Stock Room 10,202.59 10,902.35 

Bedding and Linen 3,960.00 4,450.00 

Drugs 600.00 650.00 

$17,262.59 $18,714.85 

PER CAPITA. 

Recapitulation and Per Capita: 

Stock on Hand July 1, 1924 $19,652.26 (7/1/25) $17,262.59 
Total Maintenance 178,583.33 176,149.22 

$198,235.59 $193,411.81 

Stock on Hand July 1, 1925 17,262.59 (7/1/26) 18,714.85 

$180,973.00 $174,696.96 

Less Sales 962.52 2,533.14 

Actual Maintenance Expense $180,010.48 $172,163.82 
Total Number of Hospital 

Days 59,946 59,908 

Cost per Patient per Day $3.00 $2.87 

Cost per Patient per Week.... $21.00 $20.09 

Average for Two Years $20.55 

VALUATION 

Land (79% acres) $27,000.00 

Buildings 241,253.10 

Live Stock and Vehicles 6,476.50 

Furnishings, Machinery and Tools 41,623.50 

Maintenance Stores 18,714.85 

$335,067.95 
Total $335,067.95 



REPORT OF THE FARM 
Receipts. 

Years 1924-25 
Produce Retained at Sanatorium: 

Eggs $318.60 

Poultry 456.00 

Vegetables 1,446.69 



1925-26 



$687.60 

756.18 

1,428.62 



102 



STATE OF CONNECTICUT 



Produce Retained at Sanatorium (Continued): 

Years 1924-25 1925-26 

Fruit $169.75 $66.50 

Hay 450.00 560.00 

Wood 60.00 40.00 

Fertilizer 660.00 550.00 

Rye ., 50.00 65.00 

Vinegar 80.00 76.80 

Straw ?. 36.00 60.00 



Services to Sanatorium: 
(Team and Farm Help) 

Cash Sales: 
Produce 



$3,727.04 $4,290.70 
$1,796.04 $2,024.78 



Hogs 

Total Receipts 



$962.52 



$35 00 
2,319.04 



$6,485.60 $8,669.52 



Expenditures in Operation of Farm. 



Labor 

Expenses 



Total Expenditures 

Total Income from Farm. 
Total Cost of Operation ... 



$2,69405 
1,850.06 

$4,544.11 

$6,485.60 

4,544.11 



$3,037.18 
3,904.46 

$6,941.64 

$8,669.52 

6,941.64 



Farm Inventory June 30, 1925 
Farm Inventory June 30, 1924 

Inventory Gain 



(gam) (gam) 

$1,941.49 $1,727.88 

$6,285.96 $1,941.49 (gain) 

5,129.50 1,156.46 



$1,156.46 



Farm Inventory June 30, 1926 
Farm Inventory June 30, 1925 



$3,097.95 
(net gain) 
$6,820.50 $1,727.88 (gain) 
6,285.96 534.54 



$534.54 



Inventory Gain 

Net Gain for Two Years Ending June 30, 1926 



$2,262.42 
(net gain) 



Horses 

Hogs 

Poultry 

Wood 

Rye 

Hay and Straw 

Vinegar 

Fertilizer 

Guinea Pig? . 

Rabbits 

Equipment 



ITEMIZED INVENTORY. 

Years 1924-25 1925-26 

$600.00 $600.00 

1,012.50 2.130.00 

1,705.00 1,130.50 

80.00 40.00 

10.00 

516.00 666.00 

40.00 23.00 

200.00 40.00 

219.70 216.00 

100.00 200.00 

1,802.76 1,775.00 



Total 



$6,285.96 $6,820.50 



$5,360.37 



THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION 103 



FINANCIAL REPORT 
THE SEASIDE, NIANTIC, CONN. 

Dr. John F. O'Brien Superintendent 

Miss Nellie B. Rippin Head Nurse 

George P. Wargo Secretary and Steward 

Miss Helen R. Farrell Teacher 

REPORT FOR THE YEARS ENDING JUNE 30, 1924 AND 
JUNE 30, 1926 

CASH ACCOUNT 

Years 1924-25 1925-26 

Receipts: 

To bills of institution paid by 

State Comptroller for 

maintenance $54,521.54 $56,132.49 

Collections for telephone 

calls 38.21 57.52 

Reimbursement on Office 

Account 18.60 

Collections for clothing 202.24 

Cash on hand June 30, 1924 488.18 

Total $54,578.35 $56,880.43 $111,458.78 

PAYMENTS. 

Years 1924-25 1925-26 
To Secretary State Tubercu- 
losis Commission $44.99 

Purchase of clothing 199.69 

Refund on clothing 2.55 

Due on Office Account 235.92 

Due on Payroll 10.34 

Total of bills paid by State 

Comptroller for maintenance $54,521.54 $56,132.49 

Cash on hand June 30, 1926 311.26 

Total $54,521.54 $56,937.24 $111,458.78 

RESOURCES AND LIABILITIES. 
Resources 

Cash on hand June 30, 1926 $311.26 

Liabilities 

Due State Comptroller from institution as per resource. $311.26 



-104 STATE OF CONNECTICUT 

ANALYSIS OF EXPENSES. 

Maintenance. 

Salaries: 

Years 1924-25 1925-26 

Medical $3,740.00 $3,825.01 

Administration 1,349.99 1,500.00 

Kitchen and Dining Room.... 2,199.67 2,454.67 

Domestic 918.67 1,064.71 

Ward Service (Male) 1,112.00 1,138.92 

Ward Service (Female) 6,338.08 6,920.65 

Industrial and Educational.... 1,314.00 1,365.00 

Engineering Dept 1,250.00 1,253.93 

Repairs 769.53 780.00 



Food: 



$18,991.94 $20,302.89 $39,294.83 



Travel, Transportation and Office Expense: 

Advertising $6.25 $6.96 

Postage 48 48 42.80 

Printing and Binding 72.97 24.60 

Stationery and Office Sup- 
plies 118.08 295.06 

Telephone and Telegraph 418.46 406.92 

Travel 67.63 38.75 

Sundries 5.75 39.75 

Freight 1.39 



$737.62 $856.23 $1,593.85 



Flour $5.50 $367.19 

Cereals 155.12 173.26 

Crackers, Bread, etc 48.35 41.51 

Peas and Beans (Canned 

and Dried) 225.70 205.73 

Macaroni and Spaghetti 20.83 51.45 

Potatoes 280.75 743.94 

Meat 3,224.77 2,760.31 

Fish 406.31 375.85 

Butter 806.52 814.80 

Cheese 49.47 72.41 

Coffee 171.50 154.16 

Tea 49.11 18.01 

Cocoa 24.05 30.85 

Milk (Fresh) 4,350.95 4,380.00 

Milk (Condensed) 8.95 

Eggs 853.75 1,151.10 

Sugar 410.72 449.42 

Fruit (Fresh) 547.13 750.13 

Fruit (Dried and Preserved) 1,037.87 487.96 

Lard and Substitutes 208.79 240.09 

Molasses and Syrups 119.79 115.14 

Vegetables (Fresh) . 424.25 482.84 

Vegetables (Canned and 

Dried) 305.02 247.41 




THE SEASIDE SCULPTOR HIS STUDIO 



1 

I 



THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION 105 

Food (Continued): Years 1924-25 1925-26 

Peanut Butter and other 

foods $91.57 $293.46 

Condiments and Relishes 310.81 147.81 

Yeast Baking Powder, etc. .. 110.81 126.23 

Sundry Foods 121.46 21.90 

Freight 12.99 9.62 

$14,373.89 $14,721.56 $29,095.45 

Clothing and Material: 

Boots, Shoes and Rubbers $42.00 $12.65 

Clothing 171.50 

Dry Goods for clothing 216.55 401.58 

Socks and Small Wares 2.70 5.00 

Freight .74 2.44 

$261.99 $593.17 

Total $855.16 

Furnishings and Household Supplies: 

Beds, Bedding, etc $341.65 $1,515.60 

Carpets, Rugs, etc 5.63 49.47 

Crockery, Glassware, Cut- 
lery 85.76 183.54 

Dry Goods and Small Wares 358.18 258.78 

Electric Lamps 87.78 15.57 

Fire Hose and Extinguishers 405.00 

Furniture, Upholstery, etc. .. 187.66 450.95 

Kitchen and Household 

Wares 268.83 143.10 

Laundry Supplies and Ma- 
terials 95.50 124.62 

Lavatory Supplies and Dis- 
infectant 283.08 244.86 

Table Linen, Paper Napkins, 

etc 252.73 500.18 

Sundries 34.32 59.56 

Freight 18.21 28.97 

$2,424.33 $3,575.20 

Total $5,999.53 

Medical and General Care: 

Books, Periodicals, Games, 

etc $52.18 $3.05 

Entertainments 13.67 7.98 

Ice and refrigeration 123.60 188.30 

Laboratory Supplies and Ap- 
paratus 166.04 14.49 

Medicines, Supplies and Ap- 
paratus 2,104.17 1,438.74 

Medical Attendance (Extra) 97.50 

School Books and Supplies .. 14.49 106.14 



106 



STATE OF CONNECTICUT 



Medical and General Care (Continued): 

Years 1924-25 
Toilet and other Personal 

articles $7.56 

Sundries 247.40 

Freight 63.51 



Total 



1925-26 

$15.30 

108.28 

22.37 



$2,890.12 $1,904.65 



$4,794.77 



Heat, Light and Power: 

Coal 

Freight and Cartage 

Electricity 

Oil 

Sundries 



Total 



$3,525.16 
1,929.88 
1,451.46 

.90 


$942.82 
630.87 

1,533.39 
1.90 
4.20 




$6,907.40 


$3,113.18 


$10,020.58 



Grounds: 

Trees, Vines, Seeds, etc 

Automobiles, Repairs and 

Supplies 

Laundry 

Insurance 



$1,334.81 

4,940.16 

102.50 



$20.10 

2,646.41 
5,291.64 
1,008.27 



$20.10 

3,981.22 

10,231.80 

1,110.77 



Repairs Ordinary: 

Brick 

Cement, Lime, etc 

Electrical Work and Sup- 
plies 

Hardware, Iron, Steel, etc. .. 

Labor not on Payroll 

Lumber, etc., and Finished 
Product 

Paints, Oil, Glass, etc 

Plumbing and Supplies 

Roofing Materials 

Tents, Awnings, etc 

Tools, etc 

Sundries 

Freight ." 

Painting Tanks and Man- 
sard roof 

Painting side of Main Bldg. 

Cleaning Septic Tanks, Tile 
Field and trenches for 
field 



Total 



$144.08 

116.19 

14.50 

177.97 

238.98 

165.97 

475.00 

22.91 

24.42 

1.57 

10.44 

155.00 



$8.85 
35.20 

54.39 

163.87 

38.41 

32.64 
317.28 
197.17 



3.66 
13.72 



70.00 
1,164.00 



$1,547.03 $2,099.19 



$3,646.22 



Total expense for maintenance $110 654.03 



THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION 107 

PER CAPITA 

Recapitulation and Per Capita: 

Stock on hand July 1, 1924.... $3,022.92 $5,272.81 

Total Maintenance 54,521.54 56,132.49 

Total $57,544.46 $61,405.30 

Stock on Hand— 7-1-25-26 .... $5,272.81 $4,280.58 

Maintenance $52,271.65 $57,124.72 

Less collections for telephone 

toll calls 38.21 57.52 

Actual maintenance expense $52,233.44 $57,067.20 

Total number of hospital days 21,395 21,262 

Cost per patient per day $2.4418 $2,684 

Cost per patient per week $17.09 $18,788 

Average for two years $17.94 

VALUATIONS 

Three and one-half acres land $4,500.00 

Buildings 70,000.00 

Well, Tanks, Pipe line, etc 32,000.00 

Furnishings 21,873.57 

Maintenance Stores 4,280.58 

Machinery and Tools .. 3,126.43 

Motor Vehicles 2,438.44 

Total $138,219.02 



108 STATE OF CONNECTICUT 



REPORT OF THE SECRETARY 

BEGINNING JULY 1, 1924 AND ENDING JUNE 30, 1926 
MAINTENANCE 

Maintenance Appropriation, Balance July 1, 1924 $772,201.07 

Total Expenditures to June 

30, 1925 $764,178.13 

Balance 8,022.94 



Total $772,201.07 



Maintenance Appropriation, July 1, 1925 $1,539,200.00 

Total Expenditures to June 

30, 1926 $754,479.97 

Balance 784,720.03 



Total $1,539,200.00 

CONSTRUCTION AND EQUIPMENT APPROPRIATIONS 

Total Construction, Equipment and Special Appropria- 
tion $538,855.00 



Hartford Sanatorium (Cedarcrest) 
Addition to Sleeping Porch, 

Physician's Cottage 

Addition to Piggery ..... 

Acquisition of Land adjoin- 
ing Sanatorium 

Meriden Sanatorium (Undercliff) 
Reception Ward and Equip- 
ment 

Addition to School Building 
Male Employees' Building .. 
Supt's Cottage or Substitute 
Cleaning and Grading Play- 
ground 

Norwich Sanatorium (Uncas-on-Thames) 

Sewer System 

Administration, X-Ray and 
Laboratory 

Infirmary for Women and 

Equipment 

Employees' Building and 
Equipment 

Acquisition of Land adjoin- 
ing Sanatorium 

Additional Water Supply and 
Fire Protection 



Appro- 
priation 


Expended to 
June 30, 1926 


Balance 


$2,000.00 
1,000.00 


$i,ooo.66 


$2,000.00 


25,000.00 


25,000.00 




27,533.86 

9,500.00 

30,000.00 

12,500.00 


27,533.86 
9,239.77 


260.23 
30,000.00 
12,500.00 


1,500.00 




1,500.00 


ames) 
264.46 


264.46 




52,000.00 


13,301.71 


38,698.29 


60,000.00 


21,369.46 


38,630.54 


38,000.00 


10,881.63 


27,118.37 


4,000.00 


4,000.00 




17,000.00 




17,000.00 



THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION 109 

Appro- Expended to 

priation June 30, 1926 Balance 

Shelton Sanatorium (Laurel Heights) 
Acquisition of Land for Ap- 
proach to Sanatorium $1,000.00 $1,000.00 

Superintendent's Cottage 12,000.00 $12,000.00 

Additional Water Supply 16,200.00 16,200.00 

Building of Road 15,000.00 9,000.00 6,000.00 

The Seaside: 

Fire Proof Infirmary 100,000.00 ' 100,000.00 

The Seaside Land Bill 35,000.00 35,000.00 

Equipment of New Infirmary 25,000.00 25,000.00 
Acquisition of Land as 

"Tennis Court" 1,500.00 1,500.00 

Additional Fire Protection .. 5,400.00 5,400.00 

All Sanatoria: 

Miscellaneous Equipment .... 32,456.78 8,888.42 23,568.36 

Extension of Heliotherapy 

Treatment 15,000.00 15,000.00 

Total Expended on Con- 
struction, Equipment and 
Special Appropriation $131,479.31 

Balance, June 30th, 1926 407,375.79 

Total $538,855.10 



SALARIES AND EXPENSES OF COMMISSIONERS, 
SECRETARY AND COMMISSION OFFICE 

From July 1st, 1924 to June 30, 1925 

Appro- Expended to 

priation June 30, 1925 Balance 

Commissioners' Salary Appro- 
priation $7,500.00 $7,500.00 

Commissioners' Expense Ap- 
propriation 1,800.00 1,200.00 $600.00 

Secretary's Salary Appropria- 
tion 2,500.00 2,500.00 

Commission Office Expense Ap- 
propriation 2,235.97 2,235.97 

From July 1st, 1925 to June 30, 1926 

Commissioners' Salary Appro- 
priation $15,000.00 $7,500.00 $7,500.00 

Commissioners' Expense Ap- 
propriation 3,000.00 1,200.00 1,800.00 

Secretary's Salary Appropria- 
tion ...■ 5,000.00 2,500.00 2,500.00 

Commission Office Expense 

Appropriation 10,000.00 4,532.69 5,467.31 



K 



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