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OF EDUCA 



1960 



Maryland i'^oo. 
CoUe«e PmV, M<t 



n(? "^HT rr'^/^nr 



m 



STATE OF MARYLAND 

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



NINETY-FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT 

Of The 

Al^^s/la^^ . State Board of Education 

SHOWING CONDITION 

Of The 

Public Schools of Maryland 

For The 

Year Ending June 30, 1960 




BALTIMORE, MARYLAND 



/^^/Z'£^^l^<^ 



U 




Zj 

/^^ maryland directory 

^^^ / school officials 

MARYLAND STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION 

Name Address Term Expires 

Jerome Framptom, Jr., President Federalsburg 19fi4 

William A. Gnnter, Vice-president Cumberland ]9fi0 

Mrs. Kenneth S. Cole Chevy Chaise 1962 

Mrs. J. Wilmer Cronin Aberdeen 1966 

Dwight 0. W. Holmes Baltimore 1965 

George C. Rhoderick Middletown 1961 

Richard Schifter Bethesda 1963 

Thomas G. Pullen, Jr., Secretary-Treasurer 

MARYLAND STATE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 

STATE OFFICE BUILDING 

301 West Preston Street, Baltimore 1 

Name Office 

Thomas G. Pullen, Jr State Superintendent of Schools 

David W. Zimmerman Assistant State Superintendent 

William S. Sartorius Assistant State Superintendent in Administration, Finance, and Research 

W. Theodore Boston Director of Certification and Accreditation 

Helen M. Clark Director of Library Extension 

Herschel M. James Director of Vocational Education 

Robert C. Thompson Director of Vocational Rehabilitation 

Willis H. White Director of Instruction 

E. Drusilla Chairs Administrative Assistant II 

Dorothy E. Young Stenographer-Secretary 

Mrs. Janet L. Harrison Senior Stenographer 

Division of Instruction — WiLLIS H. WHITE, Director 

Paul E. HufBngton Assistant Director and Supervisor of High Schools 

*Mrs Genevieve S. Blew Supervisor of Instruction 

George M. Crawford Supervisor of Curriculum 

Mrs. Gladys T. Hopkins Supervisor of Curriculum 

Mrs. Grace A. Dorsey Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Mildred L. Sowers Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Herbert R. Steiner Supervisor of Physical Education 

Sarah L. Leiter Supervisor of Pupil Services 

Mrs. Geneva E. Flickinger Supervisor of Special Education 

Andrew W. Mason Supervisor of Special Education 

Thomas W. Pyles Supervisor of High Schools 

Lewin A. Wheat Supervisor of High Schools 

Beverly J. Sheain . Stenographer-Secretary 

Mrs. Beverly B. Armiger Senior Stenographer 

Mildred M. Faulstich Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Rosalind C. Lohrflnck Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Rena B. Levitz Senior Stenographer 

Agnes M. Roberts Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Oma R. McClung Senior T}'pist 

Division of Vocational Education — HersCHEL M. James, Director 

Harry M. McDonald Supervisor of Agriculture 

Dwight P. Jacobus Supervisor of Educational Services to Industry 

Evelyn F. Miller Supervisor of Home Economics 

*Mrs. Anormallee M. Way State Adviser for High School Homemakers Club 

Frank H. Nachman Counselor for Veterans On-the-Job Training Program 

Elizabeth McGinnity Stenographer-Secretary 

Lillian O. Erpenstein Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Hazel B. Wilkerson Senior Stenographer 

Florence M. Brady Junior Clerk 

Division of Certification and Accreditation — W. THEODORE BOSTON, Director 

James L. Reid Assistant Director and Supervisor of School Plant Planning 

M. Eleanor Rice Supervisor of Certification 

Helen L. Widmyer Supervisor of Accreditation 

Harold D. Reese Supervisor of Teacher and Higher Education 

* Part time 

2 



Name Office 

Eleanor G. Weagly Supervisor of School Lunch Program 

O. William Anthony Supervisor of Teacher Recruitment 

Ruth E. Hobbs Assistant Supervisor of Equivalence Examinations 

George A. Myers : Assistant Supervisor of School Lunch Program 

Charles O. Conlon Assistant Supervisor of Trade Schools 

Richard K. McKay Assistant Supervisor of Trade Schools 

Carroll L. Speck Assistant Supervisor of Certification 

Helen Ellis Stenographer- Secretary 

Elsie F. Forman Stenographer-Secretary 

Alice Algie Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Bessie R. Gale Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Miriam Rieger. Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Evelyn R. McClurkin Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Bessie S. Price Senior Stenographer 

Bessie I. Rones Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Mary L. Wallace Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Gertrude A. Gorrell Senior Clerk 

Mrs. Clara P. Haffner Senior Clerk 

Leah C. Dittmar Senior Clerk 

Mrs. Hanna Zusman Senior Clerk 

Division of Library Extension — HELEN M. Clark, Director 

Mae Graham Supervisor of School and Children's Libraries 

Nettie B. Taylor Supervisor of County and Institutional Libraries 

Doris L. Anderson Stenographer-Secretary 

Martha J. Keydash Senior Stenographer 

READER SERVICE.S 

400 Cathedral Street, Baltimore 1 

Eleanor Hocker Readers' Counselor 

Harry E. Foster Technical Counselor 

M. E. Naomi Johnson Associate Librarian 

Josephine M. Baldwin Assistant Librarian 

Mrs. Beverly B. Green Library Assistant 

Helen D. Trumbauer Senior Typist 

Verlena McDougal Junior Typist 

Aydelotte L. Meister Junior Clerk 

Louis Myers Service Worker 

Division of Administration, Finance, and Research 

William S. Sartorius, Assistant State Superintendent 

William L. Barall Supervisor of Finance 

Wesley N. Dorn Supervisor of Instruction (Research) 

R. Christine Hogan Supervisor of Research 

Howard E. Bosley Supervisor of Teachers College Business Management 

Charles V. Akeley Assistant Supervisor of Finance 

Bernard G. Geyer — Assistant Supervisor of Finance 

Mrs. Anne K. Carroll Assistant Supervisor of Research 

Helen D. George Editor 

Jesse C. Gawthrop Auditor 

Margaret E. Albaugh Administrative Assistant I 

Mrs. Genevieve J. Nekervis Statistician I 

Mrs. Virginia K. Goldsmith Statistician II 

Mrs. Verda McClow Statistician II 

Mrs. Mary E. Hoover Principal Account Clerk I 

Margaret F. Flahavan Principal Account Clerk II 

Mrs. Laura Gait.her Principal Account Clerk II 

Mrs. Mary B. Prince Principal Account Clerk II 

Phyllis E. Rodgers Principal Account Clerk II 

Mrs. Bessie Smith Principal -Account Clerk II 

Mrs. Ruth S. Friedland Stenographer-Secretary 

Carrye Hamburger Stenographer-Secretary 

Lenore Klein Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Dolores B. Jones Report Typist 

Mrs. Jane F. Hitchcock Statistical Clerk 

Mrs. Margaret P. Rappe Senior Typist 

Mrs. Ellen C. Gordon Senior Typist 

Mrs. Ruth V. Meyer Tabulating Equipment Operator 

Mrs. Doris A. Lombardi Key Punch Operator 

Lloyd E. Holmes Office Appliance Operator 

Division of Vocational Rehabilitation — ROBERT C. THOMPSON, Director 

W. Bird Terwilliger Assistant Director 

Lionel Burgess Supervisor of Case Services 



317068 



Name Office 

**George W. Keller Asst. Supvr. of Services for the Blind 

*Francl8 J. Borges Medical Consultant 

**John T. Goembel Craft Specialist 

Charlotte A. Sylvester Stenographer-Secretary 

Mrs. Florence B. Ackerman Principal Stenographer 

Anne Nusinov Principal Stenographer 

**Mrs. Joan A. DeWicki Senior Stenographer 



METROPOLITAN BALTIMORE OFFICE 
2 West Redwood Street, Baltimore 1 

Thomas D. Braun Supervisor 

J. Leo Delaney Assistant Supervisor 

Ernest C. Allnutt, Jr Counselor 

Myrtle E. Chell Counselor 

Mrs. Elizabeth B. Cochran Counselor 

James G. Dashiell Counselor 

J. Bruce Edemy Counselor 

Mrs. Sue H. Flowers Counselor 

Martha R. Harrison Counselor 

Harold B. Hayes Counselor 

William W. Lamprell Counselor 

I. D. Medinger Counselor 

William B. Melville Counselor 

Cliarles L. Reis Counselor 

Ruth W. Ring Counselor 

James D. Smyth Counselor 

M. Eugene Spurrier Counselor 

Lawrence E. Williams Counselor 

Emma Lueckert Stenographer-Secretary 

Mrs. Eva Dinowitz Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Mabel Dwyer Senior Stenographer 

Lillian Fox Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Frances S. Goodwin Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Louise T. Gregg Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Nancy H. Maslanka Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Helen M. McFadden ^ Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Eleanor M. Mosner 1 Senior Stenographer 

Bell Sklar Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Olive M. Mayo Receptionist 



EASTERN SHORE DISTRICT 

700 East Main Street, Salisbury 

Raymond H. Simmons Assistant Supervisor in Charge 

Jack R. Nichols Counselor 

1 — Joseph E. Guschke Counselor 

2 — Frank A. Tarbutton Counselor 

1 — Mrs. Sue S. Shores (half-time) Senior Stenographer 

2 — Mrs. Dorthy H. Slagle (half-time) Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Anne E. Bishop Senior Stenographer 

1 — P.O. Box 576, Easton Health Center, Centreville Road, Easton 

2 — Board of Education, Chestertown 



SOUTHERN MARYLAND DISTRICT 

4313 Hamilton Street, Hyattsville 

Merl D. Myers Assistant Supervisor in Charge 

Leslie B. Cole Counselor 

1 — Fedon G. Nides Counselor 

2 — Stanley I. Scher Counselor 

3 — Carroll Walsh Counselor 

3 — F. dePaul Whitehurst Counselor 

1 — Mrs. Jeannette D. Dart (half-time) Senior Stenographer 

2 — Mrs. Frances L. Winkler (half-time) Senior Stenographer 

3 — Mrs. Joan B. C. Clark Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Elizabeth Cruz Senior Stenographer 

1 — Speer Building, 3 Church Circle, Annapolis 

2 — Board of Education, La Plata 

3—26 South Perry Street, Rockville 

* Part time 

** Address: 2 West Redwood Street, Baltimore 

4 



WESTERN MARYLAND DISTRICT 

74 West Washington Street, Hagerstown 

Name Office 

H. Dorsey Devlin Assistant Supervisor in Charge 

Bernard F. Kelly Counselor 

Edward J. Shuck Counselor 

1 — John M. Cobun Counselor 

2 — Stanley Hamilton, Jr Counselor 

3 — William C. Hill Counselor 

1 — Mrs. Betty J. Ix)venstein (half-time) Senior Stenographer 

3— Mrs. Vivian A. Willins (half-time) Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Aifreda E. Coffman Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Annie G. McCarty Senior Stenographer 

1 — 111 Union Street, Cumberland 

2 — P.O. Box 121, Room 12, City Hall, Westminster 

3 — 115 East Church Street, Frederick 

DISABILITY DETERMINATIONS PROGRAM 

(Old Age and Survivors' Insurance) 

10 East Fayette Street, Baltimore 2 

Robert L. Burton Assistant Supervisor in Charge 

David Forsyth Junior Counselor 

Joseph M. Gazzam, III Junior Counselor 

Minnie Gerber Junior Counselor 

Morris L. Scherr Junior Co\mselor 

Kathleen E. Scheve Junior Counselor 

*Emidio A. Bianco, M.D Medical Consultant 

*Leonard Kotz, M.D Medical Consultant 

*S. J. Venable, M.D Medical Consultant 

Mrs. Octavia D. Hastings Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Mary Mason Senior Stenographer 

Margaret M. Quinn Senior Stenographer 

Betty L. Block Senior T>'pist 

Mrs. Anne Ryland Senior Typist 

Mis. Claire H. Pint! Senior Typist 

MARYLAND TEACHERS' RETIREMENT SYSTEM 

Board of Trustees and Office Staff 

STATE OFFICE BUILDING 

301 West Preston Street, Baltimore 1 

Hooper S. Miles, Chairman ^ State Treasurer 

Thomas G. Pullen, Jr., Vice-chairman . State Superintendent of Schools 

Mrs. Mary S. Ellis Principal, North Salisbury Elementary School, Wicomico County 

I^ouis L. Goldstein State Comptroller 

Willis H. White Director, Division of Instruction, State Department of Education 

.lohn P. Mannion Director 

C. G. Cristis Accountant 

Minnie M. Hamilton Administrative Assistant II 

Mrs. Ruth F. Connell Principal Account Clerk II 

Mrs. Edna Doyle Accounting Machine Operator 

Mrs. Enielia Kufer Accounting Machine Operator 

Mrs. Anna M. Novak Senior Typist 

Mrs. Anne Gill Senior Clerk 



PUBLIC LIBRARIES IN MARYLAND 

County Library Librarian 

Allegany Cumberland Free Public Library Mary G. Walsh 

La Vale Public Library Mrs. Ray C. Dickerson 

Westernport Public Library Mrs. Elizabeth Thomas 

Frostburg Public Library Mrs. Thelma McKay 

Anne Arundel Annapolis and Anne Arundel County Library, 

Annapolis Esther King 

Baltimore City Enoch Pratt Free Library Robert S. Ake. Jr., Ass't Dir, 

Baltimore Baltimore County Library, Towson Richard Minnich 

Calvert Calvert County Library Edward Hall 

Caroline Denton Public Library 

Federalsburg Community Library Mrs. William T. Meesick 

Ridgely Community Library Mrs. Paul Hoffman 

Carroll Davis Library, Westminster Margaret J. Hoefer 

Cecil Cecil County Library, Elkton Mrs. Dorothv W. Jefferson 

Charles Charlos County Library, La Plata Edward Hall 

* Part time 



County Library Librarian 

Dorchester Dorchester County Public Library, Cambridge Mrs. Margaret Henry 

Hurlock Free Public Library Mrs. Floyd N. Harper 

Vienna Public Library Mrs. Alan Webb 

Frederick C. Burr Artz Library, Frederick Josephine Etchison 

Einmitsburg Public Library Louise Sebold 

Thurmont Public Library Mrs. Ernest Hammaker 

Garrett Ruth Enlow Library of Garrett County, Oakland — Edith Brock 

Harford Harford County Library, Bel Air Roenna Fahrney 

Havre de Grace Public Library Mrs. Roswell Poplar 

Howard Howard County Library, Ellicott City Mrs. Lenna Burgess 

Kent Chestertown Public Library Cornelia Davie 

Montgomery Montgomery County Department of Public 

Libraries, Gaithersburg George B. Moreland 

Takoma Park Public Library Mrs. Ruth B. Pratt 

Prince George's Prince George's County Memorial Library, 

Hyattsville Elizabeth B. Hage 

Queen Anne's Queen Anne's County Library, Centreville Mrs. Elizabeth H. Baker 

St. Mary's St. Mary's County Memorial Library, Leonardtown_ Edward Hall 

Somerset Corbin Memorial Library, Crisfield Mrs. Gladys Daugherty 

Princess Anne Public Library 

Vaughn Hoffman Memorial Library, Rhodes Point Mrs. Doris Spriggs 

Tallxit Talbot County Free Library, Easton Mrs. David S. Stewart 

Washington Washington County Free Library, Hagerstown Roy Provins 

Wicomico Wicomico County Free Library, Salisbury Mrs. Fred Horsley, Jr. 

Worcester Berlin Public Library Mary Bailey 

Pocomoke City Public Library Mrs. Byron H. Ollendike 

Snow Hill Public Library Mrs. Paul C. Kenney 

PRESIDENTS OF STATE TEACHERS COLLEGES 

Earle T. Hawkins Towson William E. Henry Bowie 

R. Bowen Hardesty Frostburg Parlett L. Moore Coppin, Baltimore-17 

Wilbur Devilbiss Salisbury 

ADMINISTRATIVE AND SUPERVISORY STAFF 

ALLEGANY COUNTY 
108 Washington Street, Cumberland 

Name Office 

Ralph R. Webster Superintendent of Schools 

Richard T. Rizer Assistant Superintendent and Supervisor of High Schools 

Jack A. Petry Supervisor of High Schools 

Robert E. Pence Supervisor of Physical Education 

Arthur G. Ramey Supervisor of Transportation 

Margaret E. Doak Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mildred E. Willison Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Elizabeth I. Flake Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Frank E. Gamble Supervisor of Music Education 

Julius D. Lonnholm Supervisor of Vocational, Industrial, and Adult Education 

Theodore P. Foote Supervisor of Art Education 

Ruth C. McColly Supervisor of Home Economics 

Joseph T. Downey Supervisor of Maintenance 

Gladys Miller Eaton Supervisor of Cafeterias 

Homer S. Higgins Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Esther M. Carter Visiting Teacher 

Frederick H. Sheeley Visiting Teacher 

Eugene J. Hopkins^-. Visiting Teacher 

Elizabeth Dixon Pitcher Financial Secretary and Office Manager 

Maybelle V. Nine Secretary to the Superintendent 

ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY 

Green Street, Annapolis 

David S. Jenkins Superintendent of Schools 

Fred L. Alexander Administrative Assistant 

Mrs. Alice Torovsky Secretary to the Superintendent 

R. Harold McCann Assistant Superintendent — Administration 

Frank C. Gunderloy -Director of Construction 

Ernest H. Herklotz Supervisor of Purchasing 

Mrs. Madolyn R. Leonard Supervisor of Cafeterias 

Dennis W. Turner Supervisor of Maintenance 

Frank G. Baker, Jr Supervisor of Transportation 

Leonard Johnson Supervisor of Custodial Services 

Mrs. Mary Franke Assistant in Finance 

Ruth V. Dudderar Assistant Superintendent — Elementary Schools 

Richard R. Clopper Director of Senior High Schools 

Robert S. Shaffner Director of Junior High Schools 

Mrs. Eva M. Pumphrey Director of Curriculum 

6 



Name Office 

ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY (Conl'd) 

Leviah Daniel Supervisor of Instniction — -Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Winifred B. Fowler Supervisor of Instruction — Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Sarah V. Jones Supervisor of Instruction— Elementary Schools 

Carl Mauro Supervisor of Instruction — Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Virffinia D. Moore Supervisor of Instruction — Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Ruby G. Myers Supervisor of Instruction — Elementary Schools 

Everett Pettigrew Supei-visor of Instruction — Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Evelyn P. Reed Supervisor of Instruction — Elementary Schools 

H. Elizabeth Slater Supervisor of Instruction — Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Elizabeth B. Carroll Supervisor of Instruction — Secondary Schools 

Wayne M. Cornwell Supervisor of Instruction — Secondary Schools 

James W. Dunagan Supervisor of Instruction — Secondary Schools 

Annabelle E. Ferguson Supervisor or Instruction — Secondary Schools 

Mrs. Katherine K. Frantum Supervisor of Instruction — Secondary Schools 

Katharine Kibler Super\isor of Instruction — Secondary Schools 

Douglas S. King Supervisor of Instruction — ^Secondary Schools 

Edward Konick Supervisor of Instruction — Secondary Schools 

Betty J. Mitchell Supervisor of Instruction — Secondary Schools 

Dorothy Noble Supervisor of Instruction — Secondary Schools 

Roland Olson Supervisor of Instruction— Secondary Schools 

Joshua M. Potter Supervisor of Instruction — Secondary Schools 

Mrs. Glorious Shenton Supervisor of Instruction — Secondary Schools 

Doris Clements Supervisor of Home Economics 

Richard D. Carlson Supervisor of Industrial Arts 

Margaret A. Adams Supervisor of Music 

William J. Callaghan Supervisor of Physical Education 

Mary E. Wellham Supervisor of Art 

Grady L. Ballard Director of Personnel and Research 

Mrs. Ellen T. Elliott Assistant in Personnel 

Mrs. Eleanor B. Waring Director of Special Services for Children 

Mary E. Moss Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Mrs. Ruth P. Eason Supervisor of Special Education 

George E. Klinkhamer ^ Supervisor of Special Education 

Marne L. Groff School Psj'chologist 

L. Louise Duke School Psychologist 

John Malcolm School Psychologist 

Mrs. Flora Andrews Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Louise Beadle Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Mary C. Brown Visiting Teacher 

Alice Gilbert Visiting Teacher 

Jack Hogsten . Visiting Teacher 

B. Lewis Landton Visiting Teacher 

Joseph Parlett Visiting Teacher 

BALTIMORE CITY 

3 East Twenty-fifth treet, Baltimore 18 

George B. Brain Superintendent (Effective January 1, 1960) 

Edwin Stein Deputy Superintendent (.\cting Superintendent 

September 1 through December 31, 1959) 

Mary A. Adams Assistant Superintendent, Elementary Education 

Houston R. Jackson Assistant Superintendent, Staff Services 

William E. Lehr ,\ssistant Superintendent, School Facilities 

John W. Lewis Assistant Superintendent, Business Management 

Thomas A. Van Sant Assistant Superintendent, Secondary, Vocational, .\dult Education 

Robert O. Lloyd Administrative Assistant, General Administration 

Edward H. Goldstein Special Assistant, General Administration 

Richard L. Micherdzinski Director of Art Education 

Robert H. Nicholson Director of Cafeterias 

George F. Smith Director of Equipment and Supplies 

Edith V. Walker Director of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Pearl Goetz .Area Director of Elementary Education 

Helen Hermon Area Director of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Marion C. Johnson Area Director of Elementary Education 

Mrs. E. Romaine Jones Area Director of Elementary Education 

Eleanor R. Shank Area Director of Elementary Education 

Elmon L. Vernier Director of Health and Physical Education 

M. Bernice AViese Director of Library Services 

Emile H. Serposs Director of Music Education 

Walter A. Maccubbin Director of Personnel 

Angela M. Broening Director of Bureau of Publications 

Albert G. Packard Director of Educational Testing Service 

Leona C. Buchwald Director of Guidance and Placement Service 

Arthur Llchtenstein Director of Special Services for Pupils 

Vacancy Director of Research 

Vernon S. Vavrina Director of Secondary Schools 

William J. Hucksoll Director of Vocational Education 

Wilnier V. Bell Director of Adult Education 

Harrie M. Selzniek Director of Special Educaton 

L. Merle Smuck Supervisor of .\udio-Visual Education 

Mrs. Martha S. Baltz Supervisor of Cafeterias 

7 



Name Ofl'ice 

BALTIMORE CITY (Cont'd) 

John E. Wall Supervisor of Cafeteria Facilities 

II. Spilinan Burns Supervisor of Procurement of Supplies and Equipment 

Dwight S. Caskey Supervisor of Educational Equipment 

Irvin R. Brose Supervisor of Educational Supplies 

O. Eiig-cne Albright Supervisor of School Accounting 

Mrs. LaVerna W. Keed Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Rebecca E. Carroll Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Lillian H. Dantley Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. A. Katherine Gross Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Charlotte M. Hurtt Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Carolyn E. Motschiedler Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Catherine Brunner Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Marie B. Schmuck Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Lily W. Stevenson Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Margaret Freudenberger Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Anna M. Williams Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Edith E. Hale Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Doris Hammond Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Maria Hammond Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Jeannette Lewis Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs Lydia L. Atkins Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Helen A. Nitkoski Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Lucille Williams Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Margery Prout Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Vera Voung Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Bertha Goodman Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Katherine Buckley Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Mary Bulcken Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Jennette Caplan Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Ethel Cox Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Florence Dennis Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Lenore Dickman Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Irvin Epstein Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Evel.vn Josephson Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Evelyn Karas Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Rosalind Lee . Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Edna Maciekowich Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Alma Mc.\voy Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Wilbert Merchant Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mary Metz Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Elaine Nolan Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Idrlle Riefle Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Anne Rojer Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Edna Russell Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Sara Teiger Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Vera Carrington Supervisor of Elementray Education 

Mrs. Jean Eifert Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Vashti Jude Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Louis Tilden Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Anna Cella Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Dorotliy Diehl Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Mary Veloso Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Lillian B. Reid Supervisor of Art, Elementary Education 

Mrs. Mildred F. Wehrle Supervisor of Art, Elementary Education 

George F. Horn Supervisor of Art, Secondary Education 

Mrs. Virginia G. Timmons Supervisor of Art, Secondary Education 

Andrew T. Norgan Supervisor of Secondary Physical Education 

Mary Elizabeth McCoy Supervisor of Secondary Physical Education 

Ruth O. Cinsky Supervisor of Elementary Physical Education 

R. Evelyn Douglass Supervisor of Elementary Physical Education 

Dorothy V. Horine Supervisor of Elementary Physical Education 

Eloise Thomas Supervisor of Elementary Physical Education 

Leo C. Woods Supervisor of Elementary Physical Education 

Corwin H. Taylor Supervisor of Instrumental Music Education 

Don Regier Supervisor of Secondary School Vocal Music 

Mrs. Alice Rusk ..Supervisor (.\cting) of Library Services 

Mrs. Margaret A. Binns Supervisor of Elementary !Music Education 

Abia F. Jackson Supervisor of Elementary Music Education 

Constance Pawelek Supervisor of Elementary Music Education 

M. Eleanor Moore Supervisor of Elementary Music Education 

Delia V. Weber Supervisor of Elementary Music Education 

Mrs. Pauline D. Smith Supervisor of Art, Elementary Education 

Mrs. Alice S. Beer Supervisor of Music, Elementary Education 

Mrs. Elizabeth K. Walton Supervisor of Art, Elementary Education 

Mrs. Hildreth S. Lambert Supervisor of Guidance and Placement Service 

Herbert Stern Supervisor of Guidance and Placement Service 

Anna M. Schone Supervisor of Guidance and Placement Service 

Elizabeth Armstrong Supervisor of School Social Workers 

S. Butler Grimes, M.O Supervisor of Medical Services 

Mrs. Margaret Hisle Regional Supervisor of Secondary School Nurses 

Mrs. Ada C. Veney Regional Supervisor of Secondary School Nurses 

Clara E. Grether Supervisor of Research 

Herschel H. Newlin Administrative Supervisor of School Facilities 

8 



Name Office 

BALTIMORE CITY (Cont'd) 

Dorothy M. Kell Supervisor of English, Secondary Schools 

Leonard Woolf Supervisor of English, Secondary Schools 

Mrs. Josie G. Smith Supervisor of English, Secondarj' Schools 

h. Earl Wellemeyer . Supervisor of English, Secondary Schools 

Otto K. Schmied Supervisor of Foreign Languages, Secondary Schools 

Edward Biller, Jr. Supervisor of Geography, Secondary Schools 

Edna R. Carter Supervisor of History, Secondary Schools 

Frank Fairbank Supervisor of History, Secondary Schools 

Mrs. Edythe D. Mj'Crs Supervisor of History, Secondary Schools 

Eunice Bowers Supervisor of Mathematics, Secondary Schools 

William J. Gerardi Supervisor of Mathematics, Secondary Schools 

S. Leroy Taylor Supervisor of Mathematics, Secondary Schools 

Elra M. Palmer Supervisor of Science, Secondary Schools 

Alexina G. Stidham Supervisor of Science, Secondary Schools 

Sidney Blum Supervisor of Science, Secondary Schools 

Robert Bu.xbaum Supervisor of Science, Secondary Schools 

James Francey Supervisor of Vocational-Industrial Education 

James 0. Proctor Supervisor of Vocational Education for Adults 

K. Duncan Hyde Supervisor of Busitiess Education 

l<^oiest L. Lawton Supervisor of Distviliutive Educatidu 

Kellie S. Biickey Supervisor of Home Economics (On sabbatical leave, tiist semester) 

Mrs. Virginia V. Roeder Acting Supervisor of Home Economics 

-Mrs. Koma Stincheomb Supervisor of Special Education in Secondary Schools 

G. Edward Griefzu Supervisor of Vocational-Industrial Education 

Carl .1. White Supervisor of Industrial Arts 

Mrs. Katharine Whiteside-Taylor Supervisor of Parent Education 

William McK. Rawlings Supervisor of General .\dult Education 

Mrs. Lois T. Murray Supervisor of Special Education in Elementary Schools 

Louise Young Supervisor of Special Education 

Mrs. Lillian Maith Supervisor of Special P^ducation 

Mrs. Elsie Bevans Supervisor of Special Education 

Mrs. Sadie Douglass Supervisor of Special Education 

Mrs. Elsie Warrell Supervisor of Special Education 

David K. Davidson Supervisor of Special Education 

Frank Bennett __ Supervisor of Safety Education 

Mrs. Eleanora B. Kane Supervisor of Radio and TV Education 

Mrs. Suella Harrington Supervisor (.\cting') of Home Economics 

Ambrose Chlada, Jr. Supervisor of School Facilities 

Oscar L. Helm Supervisor, General Adult Education 

C. Wilson Knauff Supervisor of Stores, Accounting, and Distribution 

Wallace C. Kirk Supervisor of Educational Supplies and Equipment 

Charles A. Pertsch Senior District Supervisor of Maintenance 

James K. Legg District Supervisor of School Buildings 

Louis H. Reitz Senior Supervisor of Heating, Plumbing, and Ventilating Installations 

.Albert S. Valench Senior District Supervisor of School Buildings 

Milton B. Malan Supervisor of School Repair Shop 

Kaznier Grabarkiewicz Supervisor of Operations and Custo<]ial Training 

Albert W. Clark, Jr Supervisor of School Building Operations 

Edward A. Paris Supervisor of School Building Operations 

Louis Kopera Supervisor of School Building Operations 

Elmer P. .Jennings Supervisor of School Building Operations 

Sampson D. Ruffln Supervisor of School Building Operations 

.Joseph D. Scanlon Supervisor of School B\iilding Opprations 

Vornon H. Bvus Assistant Supervisor of Vocational Education 

Airs. Eloise Payne Assistant Supervisor of School Cafeterias 

Elizabeth C. Bonthron Regional Dietitian 

Maurice L. Reilly Business Manager, Cafeterias 

Gustav k. Brandt Senior Administrative Officer, Office Services 

Herman M. Perkins Director of School Buildings and Grounds 

Mrs. Helen C. Starr : Head, Department of Home Visitor Service 

Mrs. Barliara Levine Head, Department of Speech Correction 

Helen Knox Head, Department of Home and Hospital Instruction 

Ruth Richards Specialist in Personnel 

Louis A. Sedlak Specialist in Personnel 

Edith Pruss Specialist in Personnel 

Walter Miller Specialist in Personnel 

.lohn F. Giblette Specialist in Aptitude Testing 

Mrs. Cleo C. Ammen Specialist in Aptitude Testing 

Mary Jane Shapiro Specialist in Reading Analvsis 

Charles Cephas Specialist in School Social Work 

Mrs. Marjorie Everinghim Specialist in School Social Work 

Mrs. Dollie R. Walker Specialist in School Social Work 

Mrs. Eugenie Wheeler Specialist in School Social Work 

Maxwell J. Frankford Specialist in School Social Work 

Paul Yaffe Specialist in Psvchological Service 

Chester L. Kiser Specialist in Research 

Martin H. Raila Specialist in Research 

Leonore M. Coard Specialist in General Administration 

Thurston A. Atkins Specialist in Reseiirch 

Mrs. Minnie W. Graham Specialist in Americanization, Citizenship and Elem. Education 

Francis M. Froelicher Associate in Education for Older Adults 

Mrs. Margaret H. West Secretary to the Superintendent 

Hilda Snyder Secretary to the" Deputy Superintendent 

9 



BALTIMORE COUNTY 

Aigburth Manor, Towson 4 

(1) Sollers Point High School, Sparrows Point 19 

Name Ojjice 

Kdward O. Stapleton Superintendent of Schnols 

Homer 0. Elseroad Assistant Superintendent in Administration 

James B.C Toole, Jr Assistant Superintendent in Instruction 

William T. Willis, Jr Assistant Superintendent in Finance 

Morris R. Baker Engineer in Charge of Construction, Operation and Maintenance 

G. Alfred Helwig Director of Curriculum 

B. Melvin Cole Director of Elementary Education 

Norris A. King Director of Secondary Education 

Loyal W. Joos Director of Educational Research and Planning 

Charles M. DeWitt Director of Pupil Services 

Leon E. Grant Director of Purchasing 

Walter M. Gordon, Sr Director of Transportation 

Walter M. Snyder Director of Personnel 

William A. Marshall, 3rd Assistant Construction Engineer 

Preston L. Grimm Administrative Assistant to the Superintendent 

Vincent Brant Supervisor of High Schools 

Helen E. Hale Supervisor of High Schools 

Joseph B. Hillyard Supervisor of High Schools 

Mrs. Carey K. Sentz Supervisor of High Schools 

Jean C. Sisk Supervisor of High Schools 

Minnie H. Woolford Supervisor of High Schools 

Robert W. Gifford Supervisor of Junior High Schools 

Mrs. Margie B. Handy Supervisor of Junior High Schools 

Samuel D. Herman Supervisor of Junior High Schools 

Mrs. Stella H. Johnston Supervisor of Junior High Schools 

Jean R. Moser Supervisor of Junior High Schools 

Mrs. Louella H. Woodward Supervisor of Junior High Schools 

Josiah A. Blacklock Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Shirley V. Conner Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

M. Katherine Dost Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Clotilde Drechsler Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

(1) Mrs. Pauline J. Hobbs Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Jennie E. Jessop Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Hilda Kestner Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Anna G. Shepperd Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Olive T. Jobes Supervisor of Art 

M. Ethel Troyer Supervisor of Art 

John W. Craft Supervisor of Music 

Nicholas Geriak Supervisor of Music 

Thomas R. Lawrence Supervisor of Music 

Harold S. Martin Supervisor of Physical Education 

James L. Miller Supervisor of Physical Education 

Thomas M. Greene Supervisor of Business and Adult Education 

Paul P. Plevyak Supervisor of Business Education 

Arthur A. Dick Supervisor of Vocational Education and Industrial Arts 

William A. Odell Supervisor of Industrial Arts 

Mary E. Kelleher Supervisor of Home Economics 

Ralph E. Kessler Supervisor of Special Education 

Elliott E. Lapin Supervisor of Special Education 

Gloria L. Engnoth Supervisor of Special Education 

Charles E. Leiman Supervisor of Clinical Services 

Anna R. Meeks Supervisor of Guidance 

William E. Kline Supervisor of Testing 

Mrs. Ruthetta L. Gilgash Supervisor of School Lundi Program 

Mrs. Adele D. Tomey Supervisor of School Lunch Program 

Elizabeth D. Hodges Supervisor of Library Services 

Dorothy A. McGinniss Supervisor of Library Services 

Louise Ward Supervisor of Secondary Nursing Program 

William C. Feader Supervisor of Accounting 

Herman C. Burton Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Herd S. Eburg Supervisor of Plant Maintenance and Operation 

Ian Gordon Supervisor of Grounds Operation 

Henry Schleisener Supervisor of Grounds Development, Operations and Maintenance 

Mrs. "Margaret S. Farlow Supervisor of Teacher Certification 

Herbert G. Otter Assistant Supervisor, Plant Maintenance 

Donald E. Ouster Assistant Supervisor Plant Operations 

Thomas S. Bowyer Assistant Supervisor, Grounds Maintenance 

Gilbert Schiffman Reading Specialist 

Helen G. Huttenhauer Assistant in Publications 

*Merle S. Bateman . Assistant in Publications 

Karl V. Sloop Assistant in Audio-Visual Aids 

Fred C. Donovan Assistant in Transportation 

O. Thomas Dunnock Assistant in Transportation 

Karl F. Swem Assistant in Transportation 

Ray H. Wingerd Assistant in Transportation 

H. Erich Koch Assistant in Plant Operations 

* Part time 

10 



Name Office 

BALTIMORE COUNTY (Cont'd) 

\V. LfRoy Willis Assistant in Plant Opprations 

Sanford Scvel Landscape Architect 

Charles E. Jockel Assistant In Purchasing 

Thomas Wilhelni, Jr Assistant in Purchasinfj 

Kenneth C. Towle Assistant in Statistics and Research 

John H. Day, Jr Special Assistant 

William J. Kinllng Assistant in Child Accountinff 

John O. McLaulin Assistant in Educational Research and Planning 

A. Price Ransone Assistant in Educational Research and Planning 

E. Lyle Root Assistant in School Lunch Program 

Allen M. Sutton Assistant in Personnel 

Gertrude A. Wardell Library Cataloguer 

O. Barry Carpenter Assistant in Accounting 

Mrs. Olga D. Cooper Psychologist 

Mrs. Hermione H. Hawkins Psychologist 

David A. Loiry Psychologist 

Walter M. Musgrove Psychologist 

Marion H. Pelton Psychologist 

Sheldon K. Riggs Psychologist 

Roger E. Saunders Psychologist 

Mrs. Ruth E. Sherman Psychologist 

Eliza C. Merritt Social Worker 

David H. Black Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Edna S. Congdon Visiting Teacher 

Wanda S. Greene Visiting Teacher 

John J. Hart Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Marie J. Hunycutt Visiting Teacher 

Thomas J. Jordan Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Irma R. Kell Visiting Teacher 

Evelyn B. Maus Visiting Teacher 

(1) Mrs. Eliza S. RfcDaniel Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Vivian S. Mcintosh Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Francrs N. Osgood Visiting Teacher 

.\ngelo V. Qiiaranto Visiting Teacher 

Louis S. Sagi Visiting Teacher 

Helen-Louise Scarborough A'isiting Teacher 

Mrs. Elizabeth Z. Steiner Visiting Teacher 

Mary L. Stoll Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Kathryn R. Stonesifer Visiting Teacher 

Susan Summers Visiting Teacher 

Edna S. Warwick Visiting Teacher 

Afrs. Mary G. Wheeler Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Evel3Ti 0. Norton Financial Secretary to the Superintendent 

Mrs. Carol J. Day Secretary to the Superintendent 



CALVERT COUNTY 

Court House, Prince Frederick 

Maurice A. Dunkle Superintendent of Schools 

Jesse L. Starkey Director of Instruction 

Mrs. Thelma M. Cornish Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Mildred G. Finlon Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Lola M. Parks Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Lloyd J.Falk Supervisor of Maintenance 

*Walter R. Johnson Supervisor of Transportation 

Mrs. Virginia D. Parran Chief Bookkeeper 

E. Anne Yoe Secretary to Superintendent 



CAROLINE COUNTY 

Law Building, Denton 

Wilbur S. Hoopengardner Superintendent of Schools 

Beatrice Williams Supervisor of Instruction 

Lewis W. Davis Supervisor of Instruction 

Fred 0. Usilton Supervisor of Instruction 

James P. Hill Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Richard W. Hall Coordinator of Special Services 

Mrs. Bertha M. Williams Financial Secretary 

Mrs. Virginia M. York Secretary-Bookkeeper 

Mrs. Barbara J. Bacsak Secretary to Superintendent 

Mrs. Joyce Ann Morris Secretary 

Elizabeth Ann Thawley Secretary- 



Part time. Also serves as teacher at Calvert County Sr.Jr. High School. 

11 



CARROLL COUNTY 

Carroll County Offirc Builfling, Wrstininstcr 
Name Office 

Samuel M. Jonncss Superintendent of Schools 

John F. Wooden, Jr Supervisor of High Schools 

Gerald E. Richter Supervisor of High Schools 

Mrs. Maraget M. Bailer Supervisor of High Schools 

Ruth E. DeVore Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Charles E. Reck Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

**Mae Prince Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Josephine D. West Supervisor of Home Economics and Cafeterias 

*Philip S. Royer Supervisor of Music 

Maye E. Grimes Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Mrs. Dolores J. Snyder Visiting Teacher 

Roland F. Haifley Assistant in Custodial Service, School Lunch and Maintenance 

Maurice V. Wolfe Assistant in General Maintenance and Utilities 

Herbert M. Phillips Assistant in Transportation 

Curvin M. Seitz Financial Secretary 

*Mrs. Nadine Saylor Assistant Financial Secretary 

Mrs. Martha S. Gilbert Secretary to the Superintendent 

Mrs. Shirley C. Morningstar Receptionist and Stenographer 

Beverly J. Ritter Secretary to the Supervisors 

CECIL COUNTY 

308 Court House, Elkton 

Morris W. Rannels Superintendent of Schools 

Edwin B. Fockler Supervisor of High Schools 

William O. Graham Supervisor of High Schools 

Ernest W. Snodgrass Supervisor of High Schools 

Olive L. Reynolds Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Norman J. Moore Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Rachel E. Boyd Supervisor of Home Economics 

Edwin H. Barnes Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

James M. Renn Supervisor of Maintenance and Transportation 

Louis P. Wright Supervisor of Vocational and Industrial Arts 

Mrs. Mary A. Grouse Visiting Teacher 

Willard W. Taylor Bookkeeper and Financial Secretary 

Dorothy J. Moore Secretary to Superintendent 

Elaine J. Dawson Secretary 

Mrs. Adrienne L. Boyd Secretary 

Mrs. Ruth M. Diem Secretary 

Mrs. Marie L. Bruner Secretary 

Leslie L. Pippin Building Inspector 

CHARLES COUNTY 

Court Hou»e, Charles Street, La Plata 

C. Paul Barnhart Superintendent of Schools 

Edward C. Turner Supervisor of High Schools 

Mrs. Genevieve S. Brown Supervisor of High Schools 

Mrs. Christine E. Pearson Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Joseph O. Parks Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Cecelia G. Farrall Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Mrs. Georgia B. Lucas Visiting Teacher 

Margaret A. Posey Supervisor of School Lunch Program and Purchasing 

Mrs. Julia C. Totten Secretary to Superintendent 

Mrs. Marianne M. Canter Clerk 

Mrs. Mary Jane Frere Clerk 

Mrs. Marie T. Lancaster Clerk 

Peggv Lee Garner Clerk 

Mrs. ^Ann B. Thompson Clerk 

DORCHESTER COUNTY 

Court Lane, Cambridge 

James C. Busick Superintendent of Schools 

Albert S. Farver Supervisor of High Schools 

Evelyn E. Johnson Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Viola J. Comegys Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

John T. Comer, Jr Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

John A. Marshall, Jr Bookkeeper 

Mrs. Mary W. LeCompte Financial Secretary 

Mrs. Dorothy S. Stephens Secretary to Superintendent 

Wilbur Slacum Supervisor of Maintenance 



Part time. 

Part time. Also serves as teacher in Robert Moton Sr.-Jr. High School. 

12 



FREDERICK rOlINTV 

113 East Church Street, Fredrrirk 
Kame Office 

James A. Sensenbaugh Superintendent of Schools 

Harry V. Frushour Assistant Superintendent for Administration 

Quentin L. Earhart Assistant Superintendent for Instruction 

*Duval W. Sweadner Supervisor of Adult Education 

Frederick J. Brown, Jr Supervisor of High Schools 

Mrs. EveljTi F. S. Davis Supervisor of Junior High Schools 

Mrs. Louis F. Thompson Super\asor of Elenientar3' Schools 

Mrs. Alice M. Love Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Warren R. Evans Supervisor of Physical Education 

Janice Wickless Helping: Teacher 

Herman A. Hauver Coordinator of Pupil Services 

James L. Fisher Supervisor of Music 

Richard E. Summers Supervisor of Art 

Alice L. Robinson Supervisor of Library Service 

Mrs. Virginia D. Klos Supervisor of School Lunch Program 

Paul L. Hoffmaster Supervisor of Transportation 

Paul E. Fogle Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Joseph Rexroad Home Visitor 

Mary M. Fiery Home Visitor 

Edward J. Tomaszewski School Psychologist 

Mrs. Dorothy Nelson School Psychologist 

Tolbert F. Lawyer Supervisor of School Facilities 

II. D. Williams Assistant in Plant Operations 

William J. E. Null Assistant in Maintenance (Mechanical) 

Allen R. Gaddis, III Assistant in Administration 

Ruth R. Trout Assistant in Charge of Accounting 

Mrs. Pauline J. Bowlus Secretary to the Superintendent 

GARRETT COUNTY 

Fourth Street, Oakland 

Willard L. Havi'kins Superintendent of Schools 

Foster D. Bittle Supervisor of Junior-Senior High Schools 

Edwin W. Elias Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Caroline Wilson Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

John L. Fitzwater Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Oren T. Graser Supervisor of Maintenance 

Mrs. Margaret S. McComas Financial Secretary 

Lucille Tasker Secretary to Superintendent 

HARFORD COUNTY 

4S East Gordon Street, Bel Air 

Charles W. Willis Superintendent of Schools 

Benjamin S. Carroll Assistant Superintendent 

Howard B. Peters Director of Instruction 

C. Clark Jones Director of Personnel 

George B. Prettyman, Sr Director of Public Relations 

Alfonso A. Roberty Business Manager 

Violet A. Davis Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Hazel L. Fisher Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Helen M. Fisher Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Jane M. Gent Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Richard J. Williams Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

.Mden H. Halsey Supervisor of High Schools 

Mrs. Dorothy M. Rowe Supervisor of High Schools 

Thomas L. Smith Supervisor of High Schools 

-Vnnetta G. Wright Supervisor of High Schools 

John R. Walker Supervisor of Industrial Education 

W. Warren Sprouse Supervisor of Music 

.James H. Clow, Jr Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Charles C. McCullough Visiting Teacher 

Joseph F. Snee Visiting Teacher 

George N. Bollinger Administrative Assistant 

Howard R. Cheek Administrative Assistant 

Earle B. Wagner Administrative Assistant 

Ralph H. Morgan. Building Engineer 

Mrs. Alice W. Crowl Financial Secretary 

Mrs. Betty J. Messick Secretary to Superintendent 

HOWARD COUNTY 

Court House Annex, Ellicott City 

John E. Yingling Superintendent of Schools 

Mrs. Mary R. Hovet Supervisor of High Schools 

Frank B, Durigg Supervisor of High Schools 

* Part time 

13 



Navie Office 

HOWARD COUNTY (Cont'd) 

Wilhelmina E. Oldfield Supervisor of Elpmentary Schools 

Mary E. White Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Harry T. Murphy Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Gilbert E. Miller— I Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Irene M. Johnson Financial Secretary 

Mrs. Sara S. Snapp Secretary to Superintendent 

KENT COUNTY 

400 High Street, Chestertown 

Reade W. Corr Superintendent of Schools 

Robert J. Johnson Administrative Assistant 

Oarey E. Lacey Supervisor of High Schools 

Louise Hepbron Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

♦Mrs. Sara B. Chambers Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Madeleine Fennell Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Mrs. Clara M. Chaires Chief Bookkeeper and Clerk 

Mrs. Florence O. Ward Secretary to Superintendent 

MONTGOMERY COUNTY 

Box 231, Rockville 

C. Taylor Whittier Superintendent of Schools 

John A. Permenter Assistant Superintendent 

George L. Osterwise Director of Secondary Education 

Rodney Tillman Director of Elementary Education 

William A. Early Director of Curriculum Development 

Brian M. Benson Director of Finance 

William G. Pyles Director of Personnel 

Maxwell E. Burdette Director of Research 

Elaine Barnes Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Sonia Brenner Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

William Broomall Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Anne Caldwell Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

J. P. Causey Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Etheleen Daniel Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Agnes Drewry Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

William Evans Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mary L. Grau Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Ruth Gue Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Helen Johnson Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Lillian Klein Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Grace Kurtz Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Edda Larimore Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

M. Francis Mitchell Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

May Roderick Assistant Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Elsie Schurter Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Clare Stratemeyer Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Elizabeth Wilson Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Philip Arsenault Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Marion Beckwith Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Thomas Bilek Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Helen Bready Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Kieran Carroll Assistant Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

William Fleming Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Katherine Greaney Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Paul Henry Assistant Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Charles Proctor Assistant Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Jacob Rabinovich Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Richard Wagner Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Murray L. Andrews Super\'isor of Libraries 

**Genevieve S. Blew Supervisor of Foreign Languages 

Orescent J. Bride Supervisor of Physical Education 

Edmund T. Burke Supervisor of Science 

William C. Feddeman Supervisor of Industrial Education 

Noble V. Fritz Supervisor of Commercial Education 

Edmund S. Hoffmaster, Jr Assistant Supervisor of Science 

Charles T. Horn Supervisor of Music 

Rozelle Miller Assistant Supervisor of Elementary Special Education 

Mary Mohler Supervisor of Remedial Reading 

Leonard Oass Supervisor of Industrial Education 

**Chester Petranek Assistant Supervisor of Music 

Barbara Riley Assistant Supervisor of Physical Education 

Hazel Smith Assistant Supervisor of Music 

Marjorie St. Clair Supervisor of Art 

Mirian Tannhauser Supervisor of Elementary Special Education 

Louise S. Walker Supervisor of Audio-Visual Aids 

*Part time. Also Vice-principal at Garnett Elementary School. 
**Part time. 

14 



Name Office 

MONTGOMERY COUNTY (Cont'd) 

Julia Watkins Supervisor of Home Arts 

Sonley LeMay Assistant in Testing and Research 

T. Owen Knight Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Richard A. Cleveland Visiting Teacher 

Reno A. Continetti Visiting Teacher 

Robert F. Fioramonti Visiting Teacher 

Stanley E. Gaub Visiting Teacher 

Henry J. Giauque Visiting Teacher 

Jewel A. Green Visiting Teacher 

Robert C. Henley Visiting Teacher 

Weymouth H. Judkins Visiting Teacher 

Anne H. Medvick Visiting Teacher 

Edith P. Popenoe Visiting Teacher 

Geraldine Reynolds Visiting Teacher 

Joseph Sagneri Visiting Teacher 

Henry Shetterly Visiting Teacher 

Marjorie Van Dien Visiting Teacher 

Eileen D. Wilkinson Visiting Teacher 

Cecile Finley Chief Psychologist 

Margaret O. Battison Assistant Psychologist 

Benjamin M. Eves Assistant Psychologist 

Jane S. Harris Assistant Psychologist 

Pearl Haugh Assistant Psychologist 

Ruth Linn Assistant Ps.vchologist 

Blanches Rochmes Assistant Psychologist 

Ernest O. Young Assistant Psychologist 

M. S. H. Johnston Psychological Counselor in Special Education 

Helen Kohut Psychological Counselor in Remedial Reading 

Alexander M. Gottesman Administrative Assistant 

Dorothy B. Waleski Administrative Assistant for Information and Publications 

Helen Joseph Secretary to Superintendent 

George V. Menke Director of Buildings and Grounds 

Otho H. Hawk Supervisor of Buildings and Grounds 

James L. Mullinix Supervisor of Buildings and Grounds 

Corelli A. David Director of School Cafeterias 

Jane B. Boyd Supervisor of School Cafeterias 

June R. Odor Area Supervisor of School Cafeterias 

James H. Sheldon Director of Construction 

John S. Jenkins Architectural Assistant to Director of Construction 

Frank Snyder Administrative Aide to Director of Construction 

John T. Wise Supervisor of Custodial Services 

Vacant Director of Purchasing 

Anton Suttora Supervisor of Purchasing 

Lester J. Welch Director of Sites and Planning 

James E. Shade Population Analyst 

Earl L. Yates Assistant for Site Acquisition 

Richard N. Ream Director of Transportation 

Jack B. Powell Supervisor of Transportation 

Richard B. Grove Assistant Director of Finance 

V. Wilson Campbell . Supervisor of Accounting 

James B. Kline Senior Accountant 

Reginald J. Crockett Internal Auditor 

J. Gordon McDonald, Jr Supervisor of Insurance and Federal Aid 

H. Douglas Hall Supervisor of Payroll and I. B. M. 

Wilton L. Kennedy Assistant Supervisor of Payroll and I. B. M. 

Irma B. Dumford Supervisor of Personnel — Elementary 

Forrest G. Shearin Supervisor of Personnel — Supporting Services 

PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY 

Upper Marlboro 

William S. Schmidt Superintendent of Schools 

Rowannetta S. Allen Assistant Superintendent of Schools for Elementary Education 

George H. Robinson Assistant Superintendent of Schools for Secondary Education 

Thomas S. Gwynn, Jr Assistant Superitendent of Schools 

Edward S. Beach, Jr Administrative Assistant 

Robert Novak Dean, Prince George's Community College 

Margaret A. Beardsley Supervisor of Kindergartens 

Emma M. Bowman Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Eunice E. Burdette Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Rita M. Donovan Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

William W. Hall Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Leila V. Hardesty Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

A. Mildred Hoyle Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Elisabeth C. Kelly Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Thomas Johnson Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Elizabeth MeMahon Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Stella Spicknall Supervisor of Reading Clinic 

Mrs. Helen H. Brashears Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Nelda Davis Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Katherine Fossett Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

15 



Name Office 

PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY (Cont'd) 

Mrs. Katherine Grimes Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Mrs. Dora Kennedy Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Truman S. Klein Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Howard B. Owens Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Mrs. Mary Snouffer Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Carl McMlllen Coordinator of Adult Education Program and the Evening High School 

Mrs. Mary Beth Wackwitz Supervisor of Art Education 

Mary A. Thompson Supervisor of Health Education and Health Services 

M. Gladys Dickerson Supervisor of Home Economics 

Warren Smeltzer Supervisor of Industrial and Vocational Education 

Mrs. Louise B. Bennett Supervisor of Libraries 

Mrs. Frances H. Lynch Supervisor of Music 

Vincent C. Holochwost Supervisor of Physical Education 

Ada M. Warrington Supervisor of Physical Education 

C. Elizabeth Kieg Supervisor of Special Education 

Mrs. Frances R. Fuchs Assistant Supervisor of Special Education 

Eugenia Balsley Supervisor of Publications 

Francis Parker Coordinator Safety Education Activities 

Victor Rice Psychological and Testing Specialist 

Margaret Elliott School Psychologist 

Mrs. Martha Odell School Psychologist 

Ferdinand Cardano Helping Teacher 

Bruce Hoak Helping Teacher 

Mrs. Marilyn Krummel Helping Teacher 

John A. Woods Helping Teacher 

David Young Helping Teacher 

Marian E. Lobdell Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

George Charlesworth Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Mary Kay Gardner Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Elizabeth W. Hamilton Visiting Teacher 

Lillian L. Harvey Visiting Teacher 

Willie M. Henson Visiting Teacher 

Robert Jenkins Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Barbara R. Jones Visiting Teacher 

M. Dorothy Jump Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Arlene A. Korn Visiting Teacher 

Robert C. Nabors Visiting Teacher 

Harry Rose Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Charlotte Spencer Visiting Teacher 

Charles O. Wendorf Visiting Teacher 

Elmer K. Zeller Supervisor of Purchasing 

John G. Walker Supervisor of Personnel and Credentials 

Arthur E. Robinson Supervisor of Maintenance 

Alan Poole Assistant Supervisor of Maintenance 

Lorton Layman Assistant Supervisor of Maintenance 

Franklin B. Klase Assistant Supervisor of Custodial Services 

William H. Smith Senior Building Inspector 

Flora Schroyer Supervisor of School Lunch Program 

Mrs. Margaret Young Assistant Supervisor of School Lunch Program 

John W. Heim Supervisor of Transportation 

Russell O. Eckert Assistant Supervisor of Transportation 

Ruth Jeflferson Assistant Treasurer 

Mrs. Helen S. Bowie Secretary to Superintendent 

Mrs. Betty R. Collinson Assistant Secretary to the Board of Education 

QUEBIN ANNE'S COUNTY 

Centreville 

Harry C. Rhodes Superintendent of Schools 

John E. Miller Administrative Assistant 

Mrs. Alberta C. Browne Elementary Supervisor 

Mrs. Margaret S. Stack Elementary Supervisor 

John H. Webb Supervisor 

Mrs. Lola P. Brown Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Marie Shortall Financial Secretary 

Mrs. Frances Rampmeyer Typist 

Mrs. Martha A. Willis Typist 

ST. MARY'S COUNTY 

Leonardtown 

Robert E. King, Jr Superintendent of Schools 

James H. Ogden Assistant Superintendent of Schools and Supervisor of High Schools 

K. Violette Young Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Ralph S. Waters Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Harriet H. Reeder Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Mrs. Beulah S. Bennett Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Elberta W. Hayden Financial Secretary 

Paul T. Hannen Maintenance Engineer 

Howard G. Haverkamp Assistant Maintenance Engineer 

16 



Name Office 

ST. MARY'S COUNTY (Cont'd) 

Mrs. Dolores G. Rose Coordinator of Cafeteria Services 

Mrs. Marie B. Burroughs Stenographer 

Helen Marie Owens Stenographer 

Hattie M. Higgs Financial Assistant 

Marion R. Pilkerton Stenographer 

SOMERSET COUNTY 

Court House Annex, Princess Anne 

C. Allen Carlson Superintendent of Schools 

Mrs. Alice Mae C. Beauchamp Supervisor of Elementary Education 

John L. Bond Supervisor of Secondary Education 

Kermit A. Oottman Supervisor of Elementary and Secondary Education 

Charles O. Burns, Jr Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Mrs. Alva Bozman Laird Financial Secretary 

Mrs. Marian Tyler Colborn Stenographer-Typist 

TALBOT COUNTY 

Washington Street, Easton 

Raymond O. McCullough Superintendent of Schools 

Arthur R. Higginbottora Supervisor of High Schools 

Mrs. Lillian O. Davis Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Kathleen A. Francis Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Virginia S. G. Darrow Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

P. Kennard Wright Supervisor of Maintenance 

Robert W. Rausch Controller 

Mrs. Eileen H. Camper Stenographer 

Mrs. Betty M. Wilke Clerk 

WASHINGTON COUNTY 

Commonwealth Avenue, Hagcrstown 

William M. Brish Superintendent of Schools 

William C. Diehl Assistant Superintendent 

William L. Donaldson Director of Instruction 

Annilea H. Browne Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

M. Frances Grimes Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Alva D. Temple Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Douglas M. Bivens Supervisor of Senior High Schools 

Miriam L. Hoffman Supervisor of Music 

*Mrs. Anormallee M. Way Supervisor of Home Economics 

Alfred C. Roth, Jr Supervisor of Vocational and Industrial Arts 

H. Edwin Semler Supervisor of Physical Education 

Claude B. Brubeck Supervisor of Driver Education and Safety 

Catherine L. Beachley Supervisor of Guidance and Research 

Russell L. Kepler Supervisor of Plant OperatioiiK 

Delbert G. Summerville Supervisor of New Construction 

Joseph H. Vance Supervisor of Transportation 

E. Raye Francis Supervisor of School Lunch Program 

Robert F. Lesher Director of Public Relation? 

T. Wilson Cahall Coordinator (Closed-Circuit Television Project) 

John R. Brugger Chief Engineer (Closed-Circuit Television Project) 

George H. Ropp Instructional Supervisor (Closed-Circiut Television Project) 

James D. Morgan Testing (Closed-Circuit Television Project) 

V. Richard Martin Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

John E. McCue Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Frances H. Machen Visiting Teacher 

Charles W. Ridenour Visiting Teacher 

Mary E. Bycr Special Personnel Services 

F. Richard Cro\vther Chief Accountant 

Carl M. Mann Supervisor of Purchases 

WICOMICO COUNTY' 

Main Street, Salisbury 

Royd A. Mahaffey Superintendent of Schools 

Sheldon B. Dawson Assistant Superintendent 

Harold A. Fulton Director of Instruction 

Carl W. Dumire Supervisor of High Schools 

Frederick H. Spigler, Jr Supervisor of High Schools 

Martha E. Jones Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Louise li. Mitchell Supervisor of Elementarv Rchool^^ 

M.arie A. Dashiell Supervisor of Elementarv Schools 

Mrs. Cora G. Smith Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Charles R. Berry Visiting Teacher and Supervisor of Physical Education 

Branche H. Phillips, Jr Supervisor of Transportation and Research 

Joanna Lankford Fin.nnci.al Secretary 

•Part time 

17 



Name Office 

WICOMICO COUNTY (Cont'd) 

Mrs. Geneva D. Smith Bookkeeper 

Juanita L. Townsend Secretary to Superintendent 

Mrs. Louise L. Layfield Bookkeeper-Clerk 

Mrs. Dorothy F. Matthews Clerk -Steno^apher 

Mrs. Irma Lee M. Fooks Clerk-Stenographer 

Mrs. Janice W. Miles Clerk-Stenographer 

Mrs. Dolores K. Adair Clerk- Stenographer 

WORCESTER COUNTY 

Market Street, Snow Hill 

Paul D. Cooper Superintendent of Schools 

Paul S. Hyde Assistant Superintendent in Instruction 

Alfred S. Hancock Supervisor of Instruction 

Mrs. Louise S. Adkins Supervisor of Instruction 

Mrs. Annie B. Downing Supervisor of Instruction 

Wilbur A. Jones Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Clinton D. Cutright Visiting Teacher 

Benjamin W. Nelson Director of Special Services 

Elsie M. Dryden Clerk 

Mrs. Pauline S. Bowen Assistant Clerk 

Mary Elizabeth Bowen Assistant Clerk 

Mrs. Arvetta H. Taylor Assistant Clerk 



18 



CONTENTS 

Page 

Letter of Transmittal 20 

Legislation Affecting Education 21 

Notes from the Minutes of the State Board of Education 23 

Administrative Divisions of the State Department of Education 

Certification and Accreditation 37 

Instruction 44 

Library Extension 55 

Vocational Education 61 

Vocational Rehabilitation 66 

Dates of Opening and Closing Schools, Length of Session 70 

Enrollment, Teaching Staff, Number of Public and Nonpublic Schools. . 70 

Number Different Pupils in Public and Nonpublic Schools 71 

Grade Enrollment 72 

Education for Handicapped Children, Schools and Classes for Atypical 

Children 79 

Births in Maryland 87 

Withdrawals in Public Schools 90 

Average Number Pupils Belonging 91 

Nonpromotions in Public Schools 92 

High School Graduates: Number, Occupations, Colleges Attended 95 

High School Enrollment : by Subject 102 

High School Teachers : by Subject Taught 103 

Enrollment in Individual High School Subjects 104 

Teachers: by Sex, Size of School, Summer School Attendance, Certifica- 
tion, Preparation, Resignations, Turnover, Source 114 

Number and Size of Schools 130 

State Minimum Program 132 

Costs of Maryland Schools: 

Total, Per Cent from State 133 

Distribution of Tax Dollar 135 

Cost per Pupil 136 

Salaries 142 

Transportation 144 

Adult Education, Vocational Education 147 

School Lunch, Special Milk 154 

Capital Outlay, Bonded Indebtedness, Value of School Propei'ty. . . . 159 

County Levies, Assessments, Tax Rates 162 

Maryland State Teachers Colleges; Junior Colleges 167 

Contributions of Teachers to State Teachers' Retirement System 176 

Parent-Teacher Associations 177 

Baltimore City Summer Schools; High School Equivalence 178 

Library Extension, Aid to School Libraries 180 

Vocational Rehabilitation 182 

Financial Statements and Statistical Tables 184 

Index 232 

19 



January 1, 1961 



The Honorable J. Millard Tawes 
Government House 
Annapolis, Maryland 

Dear Governor Tawes : 

In accordance with the provision of the laws of Maryland, 
I have the honor to present to you herewith, the ninety-fourth 
"annual report covering all operations of the State department 
of education and the support conditions, progress and needs of 
education throughout the State" for the period beginning July 
1, 1959 and ending June 30, 1960. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Thomas G. Pullen, Jr. 
Secretary-Treasurer 
State Board of Education 
Baltimore, Maryland 



20 



Makylanu Statk Department of Education 21 

1960 MARYLAND 
LEGISLATION AFFECTING EDUCATION 

General Public School Construction Loan of 1956 

Chapter 5, Senate Bill 19, authorizes an increase in the rate of intei'est on 
the unissued certificates for the General Public School Construction 
Loan of 1956, The rate of interest will be increased from three and one- 
half to four per cent per annum. 

State Retirement Systems 

Chapter 12, Senate Bill 14, amends the formula for supplementary retire- 
ment payments to certain retired State employees and public school 
teachers. This Bill will increase the annual supplemental payments to 
retired teachers. The amount of the supplement depends upon the years 
of service and the amount of the pension. The ceiling for participation 
has been raised from $3,000 to $3,300. 

Teachers Retirement System 

Chapter 14, Senate Bill 16, amends the laws concerning optional retirement 
allowances. Whenever any member who is eligible for retirement dies 
in service, without having nominated a beneficiary, other than his 
spouse, leaving a spouse to whom he had been married for at least 
5 years and with whom he was living at the time of his death, the 
spouse shall be entitled to a retirement allowance equal to that which 
would have been paid the surviving spouse under Option II of Section 
113 of Article 77. The spouse may, however, if nominated as beneficiary, 
elect to receive the death benefits under the existing provisions of the 
law in lieu of Option II. 

Increase in State Aid to Public Schools 

Chapter 16, Senate Bill 26, increases the eleventh step on the State minimum 
salary scale for public school teachers from $5,000 to $5,300. In effect 
this Bill will give a $300 salary increase to every teacher with ten or 
more years of creditable experience. However, any political subdvision 
which is paying its teachers a maximum annual salary of $7,300 or 
more, may apply the $300 toward the payment of so-called merit 
increases. In addition, the per-pupil payments made to each local board 
of education are increased from $20 to $28 per year. 

Fire Drills 

Chapter 46, House Bill 47, requires the local superintendents of public 
schools to conduct at least 10 fire drills during every school year in the 
schools under their jurisdiction. A fire drill must be held at least once 
every 60 days. Adequate records of these drills are to be kept by the 
school principals and copies sent to the respective local superintendent 
of schools. 

Certification of Teachers 

Chapter 53, House Bill 112, permits the State Superintendent of Schools 
to enter into agreements with the educational authority of other states 
to provide for reciprocity in the certification of teachers. Provision is 
also made for the State Superintendent to accept for certification pur- 
poses the accreditation of a teacher preparation program in an out-of- 
State institution, if such accreditation has been granted by a recognized 
national accrediting agency. 



22 Ninety-Fourth Annual Report 

School Bus Stop Law 

Chapter 77, House Bill 157, permits motorists meeting or overtaking a school 
bus to continue without stopping, if the school bus has been pulled off 
the highway onto a specially constructed loading zone on the shoulder 
of the highway and if the flashing signals of the school bus are not in 
operation. 

The driver of a school bus must not pull off the highway to pick up 
or discharge passengers without activating his flashing stop signals, 
unless he pulls off into one of the specially constructed school bus load- 
ing zones. These special bus loading zones must be located only where no 
school child or teacher will have to cross the highway after being 
discharged. 

Bond Authorization — State Teachers Colleges 

Chapter 86, Senate Bill 2, authorizes the creation of a State debt of $20,268,- 
000 for capital improvements, maintenance, and equipment in certain 
State buildings. Funds from this Act are allotted to the five State 
teachers colleges as follows : 

Coppin State Teachers College $ 678,000 

State Teachers College at Bowie 104,300 

State Teachers College at Frostburg 600,000 

State Teachers College at Salisbury 78,100 

State Teachers College at Towson 149,900 

Total $1,610,300 

Workmen's Compensation 

Chapter 111, Senate Bill 25, provides for the appointment of a Governor's 
Committee to advise the Workmen's Compensation Commission on all 
phases of rehabilitation of injured workers filing claims for compensa- 
tion with the Committee. In addition, the Workmen's Compensation 
Commission would be required to employ a qualified rehabilitation coun- 
selor to review all reports of partial and total disability, select from 
such reports all cases where rehabilitation appears to be appropriate, 
and refer all such cases to the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation. 

Financing Public Schools 

Joint Resolution 16, Senate Joint Resolution 9, requests a complete restudy 
and re-evaluation of the philosophy and the practice of the financing 
of the public school system. 



Maryland State Department of Education 23 

NOTES FROM THE MINUTES OF THE STATE BOARD OF EDUCA- 
TION AND THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES OF THE STATE TEACHERS 

COLLEGES 

Au^st 26, 1959 

Announcement was made of the appointment of a State-wide 
committee, chaired by Dr. James A. Sensenbaiigh, to study adult 
education in Maryland. 

The State Superintendent reported that under Section 25 of 
Article 77 of the Annotated Code of Maryland, 1957 Edition, 
every private school or educational institution, however desig- 
nated, which charges tuition or fees for attendance, except those 
operated by bona fide church organizations, must secure a certifi- 
cate of approval issued by the State Superintendent of Schools 
before it may begin or continue to operate or function in this 
State. 

Church schools, as indicated in the above statement, are 
exempt from this requirement. This is also the case for institu- 
tions chartered by the legislature. 

It was pointed out that in spite of the exemption of church 
schools from the provisions of Section 24 of Article 77, the sec- 
ondary schools operated by church groups have almost without 
exception found it to be to their advantage to secure approval of 
the State Superintendent of Schools, and as a service to these 
schools such approvals have been granted upon request if they 
meet the standards for nonpublic secondary schools approved by 
the State Board of Education. 

Section 24 provides that no school, college or university, or 
professional school may award a certificate, degree, diploma, or 
any oflficial recognition "without having first obtained the assent 
of the State Board of Education and approval of said Board of the 
conditions of entrance, scholarship, and residence, upon which 
said certificate, diploma, or degree is issued." 

The Committee of the Board on the Teachers Colleges was 
directed to secure an appointment with the Governor in order to i 
talk with him about the serious problems facing the teachers col- 1 
leges — housing, salaries, curriculum, etc. \\,' 

The State Superintendent reported on the status of the de- 
velopment of public junior colleges in Maryland. He stated that 
studies have been made of the situation in Allegany County and 
on the Eastern Shore. The only areas in the State not covered by 
junior colleges are the Eastern Shore and Southern Maryland, 
except Charles and St. Mary's counties. Anne Arundel County 
may establish a junior college while Baltimore and Prince 
George's counties may each open an additional junior college. 

Other action of the State Board included : 

Authorized the State Superintendent to appoint a planning 
committee for the Maryland Conference on Education on Novem- 



24 Ninety-Fourth Annual Report 

ber 19 and 20, 1959, when the discussion would be on the basic 
purposes of the Cooperative Study of Public Education. Partici- 
pants in the conference were to be members of local boards of 
education; school superintendents; 300 lay representatives from 
the local political subdivisions; and representatives of the State 
Department of Education. 

Approved the renewal of the Maryland Plan for the Exten- 
sion of Library Services to Rural Areas under Public Law 597 for 
fiscal year 1960. The State Board complimented the Division of 
Library Extension on the growth of public libraries in Maryland, 
there being only seven counties without public libraries. The 
Board counted as one of its achievements in the past ten years the 
encouragement of the development of library services throughout 
Maryland. 

Approved the extension of the working relationship between 
the Division of Library Extension of the State Department of 
Education and the American Library Association's Library- 
Community Project for the next two years. 

Recommended enactment of legislation providing for a plan 
for operating a rehabilitation center and additional services to 
handicapped people. This plan would also provide for allocating 
federal funds to nonprofit organizations which may render 
similar services. 

Approved a plan for a study, financed under National De- 
fense Education Act of 1958, to determine area vocational train- 
ing needs of youth and adults in Maryland. 

Approved payment for teachers in the adult education pro- 
gram for classes operating more than four hours per week, at the 
proportionate rate of reimbursement. 

Approved a revised school medical record card, designed by a 
committee of representatives of the State education and health 
departments, the Baltimore City education and health depart- 
ments, the Medical and Chirurgical Faculty of Maryland, the 
Baltimore City Medical Society, and the Academy of Pediatrics. 

Adopted the following resolution on the death of Miss 
Dorothy W. Shires on August 1, 1959 : 

Resolulion on Miss Dorothy W. Shires 

Miss Dorothy W. Shires was an outstanding leader in public edu- 
cation in Mai-yland having served successively as teacher, principal, 
Principal of the Demonstration School at Frostburg State Teachers 
College, Supervisor of Elementary Education and Supervisor of Pupil 
Personnel in the State Department of Education, and Supervisor of 
Pupil Services in Baltimore County. In all of these positions she 
achieved outstanding success by virtue of her scholarship and ability 
to work effectively with people. 

Miss Shires was conscientious in all she did and possessed a rare 
and pleasing personality, which with her other personal traits won her 
the respect and friendship of those with whom she worked. She was 
able to pass on to her fellow workers the contagious enthusiasm which 
she held for almost everything she attempted. Hers was truly a posi- 
tive and friendly state of mind. 



Maryland State Department of Education 25 

The State Board of Education is deeply appreciative of the out- 
standing contribution which Miss Shires made to education in this 
State as a staff member of the State Department of Education. She 
was deeply concerned with the dignity and worth of every child and 
to that end gave counsel and help to numbei-less pupils and parents 
throughout the State. 

The State Board of Education and the State Department of Edu- 
cation are deeply grieved at her death on August 1, 1959, and express 
their sympathy to her family, friends, and colleagues. This resolution 
is ordered spread upon the minutes of the Board and a copy sent to her 
family. 

Approved the following budget requests for school year 
1960-61 in the amount of $7,660,771, an increase of $1,846,296 
over fiscal 1960: 

I960 
Appropria- 1961 

tion Request Increase 

State Department of Education 

(Headquarters) $ 861,9.58 $ 989,427 $ 127,469 

Vocational Rehabilitation 1,140,007 1,275,930 135,923 

State Teachers Colleges 3,812,510 5,395,414 1,582,904 

Total $5,814,475 $7,660,771 $1,846,296 

Rejected a plan to compel students at the teachers colleges 
to take out insurance of any kind and suggested that the colleges 
continue to offer voluntary plans. 

Approved the request of the President and faculty of the 
State Teachers College at Bowie that the new library there be 
named for Dr. Thomas G. Pullen, Jr. 

November 25, 1959 

Board members received copies of the report of the special 
committee on school bus safety which had been submitted to the 
Governor. This report compiles the findings and recommenda- 
tions made by separate State agencies with regard to the school 
bus-train accident in Garrett County on September 10, 1959, and 
includes in the appendix the report of the State Superintendent 
of Schools on "Public School Bus Transportation in Maryland" 
prepared on September 29, 1959. 

The Board's attention was called to two basic recommenda- 
tions of the special committee: (1) "there should be a State 
Supervisor of Transportation whose sole duty would be to ad- 
ministrate public school transportation programs at a State-wide 
level"; and (2) "at least one transportation supervisor should be 
provided in each county." 

The counties which have had transportation supervisors in 
the past have been paying the entire cost, but the Attorney Gen- 
eral of Maryland ruled on October 26, 1959, that under the law 
the words, "necessary costs of transporting pupils," include State 
participation in the cost of supervision on the local level. The 
Superintendents' Committee on Transportation is now working 



26 Ninety-Fourth Annual Report 

on rules, regulations, and procedures in respect to the selection 
and training of local transportation supervisors. 

At the State level, responsibilities in connection with the 
transportation program have been assigned as a part of the work 
of various individuals at various times; for a number of years 
the Assistant Superintendent in Administration, Finance, and 
Research has handled this work. In line with the recommenda- 
tion of the Governor's Special Committee, the following list of 
proposed duties and responsibilities of a State Supervisor of 
Transportation, prepared by the staff of the State Departmentt 
of Education, was presented to the Board : 

1. Assist local units in developing adequate pie-service and in- 
service training programs for school bus operators 

2. Assist local school systems in conducting transportation sui*- 
veys to evaluate county programs of public school transporta- 
tion in terms of safety, efficiency, and economy 

3. Collect and disseminate information on pupil transportation 

4. Study and report on experience in transportation programs of 
other states 

5. Give guidance and direction to local supervisors of transporta- 
tion 

6. Keep abreast of improvem.ents in the manufacture of school 
bus equipment and make recommendations, v^^hen needed, for 
changes in school bus standards 

7. Collect and analyze data on school bus accidents 

8. Evaluate school bus contracts and insurance programs 

9. Develop and recommend record and report forms used in the 
State-wide school transportation program 

10. Coordinate the efforts of other State agencies and groups 
responsible for and interested in school bus transportation 

11. Assist local units in developing adequate procedures and prac- 
tice in such areas as the following: 

regular and "spot" inspections of school bus equipment 

evacuation drills 

organization and training of student safety patrols 

annual examination of school bus drivers 

purchase and maintenance of school bus equipment 

selection of school bus operators and contractors 

planning and revision of school bus routes 

12. Make cost studies of pupil transportation which may be used 
by the State Superintendent of Schools in determining the 
approved cost of transportation 

13. Act as Secretary to the Superintendents' Committee on Trans- 
portation. 

14. Plan and conduct conferences relating to pupil transportation 

The State Supervisor of Transportation is expected to exert 
his leadership toward the goal that every child transported to 
public school by a local school system will ride in a safe vehicle 
driven by a competent driver. 

The Board authorized the State Superintendent to employ a 
State Supervisor of Transportation, to request a budget amend- 
ment for 1960, and to increase the State Department Head- 
quarter's budget for 1961 for the increases. 



Maryland State Department of Education 27 

The State Superintendent reported that a restudy is being" 
made of the program of g'eneral education at the State teachers 
colleges with Dr. A. J. Brumbaugh, Director of Higher Education 
for the Southern Regional Education Board, and Dr. Guy E. 
Snavely, former Executive Secretary of the American Associa- 
tion of Colleges, as consultants. 

The Board was advised that about fifteen years ago the first 
major revision of the curriculum at the teachers colleges was 
undertaken and about seven or eight years ago still further revi- 
sion was made of the total program at the teachers colleges in 
which the liberal arts and science programs were emphasized. 
The first class graduated with that program in full effect was the 
Class of 1958. About a year ago a committee was appointed to 
examine carefully the mathematics program. It has submitted a 
report to the State committee on curriculum, which represents 
the five colleges, and that committee is now studying those recom- 
mendations and trying to find a place for at least three more 
mathematics credits. 

Other action of the Board included : 

Approved the "Maryland Standards for the Approval of 
Public and Nonpublic Evening High Schools." 

Approved standards for the following nonpublic nonaca- 
demic schools: 

General Standards for Nonpublic Nonacademic Schools (I'evised) 

Standards for Schools of Beauty Culture (revised) 

Requirements for Dance Teachers' Certificates in Maryland Nonpublic 
Nonacademic Schools (new) 

Requirements for the Certification of Certain Teachers in Maryland 
Nonpublic Nonacademic Schools other than Directors of Schools, 
Dance Teachers, and Teachers of Beauty Culture (new) 

Approved the preparation of the following bill for presenta- 
tion to the 1960 Legislature which would add a new section (Sec- 
tion 100 A) to Article 77: 

The State Superintendent of Schools may, subject to the rules and 
reg-ulations of the State Board of Education, enter into agreements 
with the appropriate educational authority of other states in order to 
provide for reciprocity in the certification of teachers. The State 
Superintendent of Schools may, also, subject to the rules and regula- 
tions of the State Board of Education, accept for certification purposes 
the accreditation of a program for teacher preparation when such 
accreditation is granted by a recognized national accrediting agency 
and the institution preparing such teachers is located within a state 
other than Maryland. 

Approved the Aid to Education budget for fiscal 1961 in the 
amount of $84,291,554. 

Approved a revision of Section II.A.5 of the "Standards, 
Rules, and Regulations Governing the Provision of Special Pro- 
grams for Handicapped Children of School Age Who Are Resi- 
dents of Maryland" to provide up to six hours of home instruc- 



28 NlNETi'-FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT 

tion per week for each secondary pupil. Previously the maximum 
had been three hours, the same as that allowed for elementary 
pupils. 

Approved the following policy concerning salary paid in- 
structors and student tuition fees for the six-week summer ses- 
sion at the State teachers colleges : 

1. Teachers at the summer schools shall be paid at the rate of 
15 per cent of the Board's annual beginning base salary appropriate to 
their degree qualifications. 

2. Tuition at the rate of $15 per semester hour shall be charged 
students attending summer schools at the Maryland State teachers 
colleges. An additional $15 flat fee shall be charged nonresident 
students. 

Gave approval to permit the University of Maryland to hold 
the 1960 Summer Institute in Modern Foreign Languages at the 
State Teachers Colleges at Frostburg. 

February 24, 1960 

Dr. Thomas G. Pullen, Jr., was elected by the State Board for 
a four-year term as State Superintendent of Schools beginning 
June 1, 1960. On March 1, 1960, he would begin his nineteenth 
year in this position. 

The State Superintendent called attention to the fact that 
the General Assembly in 1949 directed that certain actions of the 
various State boards be reported to the Attorney General of 
Maryland for approval as to their legality and then, after adop- 
tion, filed with the Clerk of the Court of Appeals, the Secretary 
of State, and the Department of Legislative Reference. Since 
that time such actions of the State Board of Education have been 
referred to the proper authorities. 

Complete minutes of the meetings of the State Board of 
Education have always been sent to the authorities mentioned in 
the law. Recently some question arose as to the reporting of 
certain actions of the State Board of Education which are not 
clearly defined in the law. In an opinion dated December 4, 1959, 
the Attorney General stated : **In summary, I would say that if 
the subject matter of those rules, regulations, policies, procedures, 
standards, plans, etc. promulgated by the Department is such that 
it is to be enforced against the public, or is that to which the 
public or the Department is expected to conform, then they must 
be approved and filed." All the actions covered by this opinion 
which have been taken by the Board since the passage of the law 
are being examined to be sure that they have been reported, and 
hereafter there should be no question because of the specific state- 
ments in the Attorney General's opinion. 

Other action of the State Board included : 

Granted approval to Charles County Junior College and 
Prince George's Community College to award the Associate in 



Maryland State Department of Education 29 

Arts degree, beginning in June, 1960. These community junior 
colleges are now in their second year of operation, having started 
September, 1958. 

Special Session — May 4, 1960 

The Board met to continue discussion of the expansion of 
educational opportunity for the youth of Maryland in the field of 
higher education. For a number of years the Board has made 
various studies concerning the teachers colleges in the State. It 
has always operated on the premise that any action would be 
taken only after thorough consideration based on studies made 
by the staff of the State Department of Education with the help 
of the local school systems and outside consultants. One such 
study resulted in the inauguration of advanced work in two of the 
colleges leading to the master's degree in education. 

The release of the report of the Warfield Commission has 
focused attention on certain of these problems which the Board 
has been studying. However, whatever the Board does in refer- 
ence to the teachers colleges and the junior colleges will be done 
primarily as a result of the studies which have been made in the 
past several years and not because of something which has arisen 
in the last several months. 

The State Superintendent summarized the material in two 
reports, a refutation of the Warfield report and a suggested pro- 
gram for public higher education in Maryland. These reports 
had been prepared by the State Superintendent at the request of 
the State Board. 

May 25, 1960 

In the annual election of officers of the State Board of Educa- 
tion, Mr. Jerome Framptom, Jr., was re-elected president. Mr. 
George C. Rhoderick, a member of the State Board since 1956, 
was elected vice-president, succeeding Mr. William A. Gunter, 
now retired. Prior to his State Board membership Mr. Rhoderick 
had served for eighteen years as a member of the Frederick 
County Board of Education. Mr. William L. Wilson of Cumber- 
land was appointed by the Governor to succeed Mr. Gunter. The 
Board adopted the following resolution on Mr. Gunter : 

Resolution on Mr. William A. Gunter 

The State Board of Education wishes to express its sincere regret 
upon the retirement of Mr. William A. Gunter as a member and wishes 
to record in its minutes the esteem and respect with which its members 
have always regarded him. 

Mr. Gunter has been a colleague and friend to the members of 
the Board since he himself became a member in 1953. Therefore, the 
Board desires to extend its heartfelt appreciation to him for his serv- 
ices to public education in Maiyland during the past seven yeai's as a 
member and officer of the State Board. 



30 Ninety-Fourth Annual Report 

William A. Gunter was born in Frostburg, Maryland, on July 3, 
1892. In 1909 he was graduated from Beall High School in Frostburg. 
In 1913 he received the Bachelor of Arts and Master of Arts degrees 
from Dickinson College at Carlisle, Pennsylvania. In 1915 the Dickin- 
son School of Law awarded him the degree of Bachelor of Laws. Re- 
turning to Frostburg, he gained admission to the Maryland Bar and 
in 1915 began the practice of law. 

At the same time he proceeded to take an active part in community 
programs. A year after entering practice he was appointed City 
Attorney of Frostburg, an office he held until 1925. In 1927 he was 
elected to the Senate of the Maryland General Assembly, where he sat 
through 1929. In his last year as a member of the Upper House, he 
served as its minority floor leader. 

In the four decades he has been practicing law in Western Mary- 
land, William Arthur Gunter has become one of the State's most dis- 
tinguished citizens. He has given leadership to numerous important 
movements and has a reputation for contributions in the fields of edu- 
cation, health, and welfare, and various civic endeavors. At the present 
time, Mr. Gunter heads the law firm of Gunter and Geppert, in Cum- 
berland. 

The members of the State Board of Education extend to Mr. Gun- 
ter their gratitude for the contributions he has made to the cause of 
public education in Maryland and express their regrets upon his retire- 
ment from their membership. 

A report was made to the Board on progress under the Na- 
tional Defense Education Act of 1958. Under Title III, all 
twenty-four local school systems have participated by submitting 
projects for the purchase of equipment and materials in science, 
mathematics, and modern foreign language. 

Under Title V-A, all local units have submitted one or more 
projects to date. The following trends may be noted in the im- 
provement of guidance programs throughout the State : employ- 
ment of clerical assistants for counselors, use of machine-scoring 
services in testing programs, employment of counselors on an 
eleven-month basis, employment of additional counselors, and 
development of local and regional in-service education programs 
for counselors. Continued emphasis is being placed on the certi- 
fication of counselors, as well as on the selection of counselors 
with the necessary personal qualifications. Under Title VIII, 
seven schools on the high school and junior college level have been 
approved for area vocational programs. A State-wide survey is 
being conducted to determine vocational trade and technical edu- 
cation needs of youths, adults, and communities of the State. 

Under Title X, Maryland has participated in the improve- 
ment of statistical services by working with representatives of 
the local school systems to determine the purposes v^hich should 
be served by the collecting, processing, and dissemination of 
statistical data. Long-range plans, looking toward further 
mechanization of data processing, are being prepared. 

In response to a question raised by a member of the State 
Board concerning the length of the school day, the State Super- 
intendent reported that the Assistant Attorney General had ruled 
that the six hours required by law constitute a minimum and not 



Maryland Statk: Department of Education 31 

a maximum. It is the understanding, also, that recess and lunch 
hours are included in the six hours. 

The Board was advised that the $75,000 appropriated for 
adult education for 1960-61 is not restricted to vocational train- 
ing as this appropriation has been in prior years. 

The Board was informed that the State Teachers College at 
Towson had been selected as one of twenty colleges which will 
receive a grant for $10,000 from the Danforth Foundation. This 
grant is to be used during the next three summers to encourage 
the members of the faculty to continue summer study on either a 
pre-doctoral or post-doctoral basis. The entire decision as to who 
shall receive the grants, where they shall go, and how much shall 
be given to each faculty member is left entirely to the institution. 
The only restriction is that the grant shall be used for summer 
study in the field of the humanities and liberal arts. 
Other action of the Board included : 

Approved the Board's membership in the Associated State 
Boards of Education. This organization had been officially or- 
ganized and its constitution adopted on April 26, 1960. 

Approved staff changes in the State Department of Educa- 
tion which included : 

Nettie B. Taylor — From Supervisor to Director of Library 

Extension, effective September 1, 1960 

Geneva E. Flickinger — From Supervisor of Special Education to 
Supervisor of Adult Education, effective 
August 1, 1960 

Adopted the following resolution on the retirement of Miss 
Helen M. Clark as Director of the Division of Library Extension, 
effective September 1, 1960: 

Resolution on Miss Helen M. Clark 

Miss Helen M. Clark came to the State Department of Education 
in February, 1946, as Director of the Division of Library Extension. 
She w^as born in Martinsville, Indiana, and was graduated from the 
University of Indiana. She i-eceived a degree in library science from 
the University of Illinois. Prior to this appointment Miss Clark had 
been Assistant State Librarian at the Michigan State Library for three 
years. She had also held administrative positions with the Oregon 
State Library in Salem, and with the Enoch Pratt Free Library in 
Baltimore. 

Miss Clark has been instrumental in fostering the growth of 
library services in Maryland in two separate but related fields. In the 
area of public libraries. Miss Clark provided the competent leadership 
and the necessary stimulation to bring about a great expansion in the 
number and quality of free public libraries in the counties of this 
State. In the field of public school library work. Miss Clark's achiev- 
ments have been no less outstanding than her accomplishments in the 
area of public library work. Under her leadership, the public school 
libraries have greatly augmented the range and quality of their serv- 
ices to the schools in which they are located and to the community at 
large. 

Miss Clark has also worked steadily to develop and maintain the 
highest standards for all library personnel, to the end that each public 



32 NlNETi'-FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT 

school library will be staffed only with qualified and competent per- 
sonnel with a thorough professional backgi-ound. 

Miss Clark is a person of outstanding character. She is a re- 
sourceful and stimulating person whose leadership and organizational 
abilities have been recognized and praised by all of her associates. Her 
activities in connection with the Maryland Congress of Parents and 
Teachers have been most fruitful. 

The State Department of Education and the State Board of Edu- 
cation express to her their sincere appreciation for the many invalu- 
able contributions she has made to the Department and to the schools 
of the State and wish her many pleasant years filled with health and 
happiness. 

Approved having the Attorney General write a revision to 
Bylaw 62 to cover instructors at the State teachers colleges as well 
as teachers in the public schools. This Bylaw permits the State 
Superintendent, for good and sufficient reason and upon request 
of the local school systems, to make an exception to the provision 
of the Bylaw requiring employment of United States citizens only 
as teachers in the Maryland public school system. 

Approved an amendment to the State Plan for Further Ex- 
tension of Library Services to Rural Areas to provide funds for 
cooperative projects in two or more counties when funds are 
available after the regular allocation is made under this plan. 

Approved certain recommendations in the CR-4 record card, 
''Maryland Teacher Observation Record," as made by a special 
committee with Miss Sarah L. Leiter, State Supervisor of Special 
Services, as Chairman. 

Approved provisional accreditation for the Baltimore Col- 
lege of Commerce for a three-year period along with certain 
conditions. These included the provision that the College prepare 
a plan outlining the school's objectives together with the financial 
plan for implementing these goals over the next five years. This 
plan was to be re-evaluated and revised each year in light of the 
preceding year's experience. 

Approved the request of the State teachers college presidents 
to offer programs that will qualify graduates to teach in the sec- 
ondary schools of Maryland. 

Approved "Van Brokkelen Hall" as the new name for the 
present demonstration school building on the campus at the State 
Teachers College at Towson. The new demonstration school will 
continue to carry the name of "Lida Lee Tall School." Dr. 
Libertus Van Bokkelen headed Maryland's first State school sys- 
tem. His title was Superintendent of Public Instruction, and he 
held this position from 1865 to 1868. 

Special Session — June 6, 1960 

The Board met with the local school superintendents to con- 
sider the problem of teacher supply, need, and recruitment in the 
State of Maryland. Considering this a grave problem, the local 
superintendents, in addition to requesting this meeting, had also 



Maryland State Department of Education 33 

recommended that the 1960 Maryland Conference on Education 
be devoted to this topic. It was suggested by the Board that certi- 
fication requirements for teachers be added to the agenda for the 
Conference. 

The Board considered the report "Implementation of Foot- 
ball in the Intercollegiate Athletic Program at State Teachers 
College, Frostburg, Maryland" — April 20, 1960. Approval was 
given by the Board to the reintroduction of football at Frostburg, 
with the understanding that the program will be followed very 
closely by the Board and with the understanding that this pro- 
gram will in no way incur additional outlay by the State. 

Special Meetings — Jim." 22, I960: June 27. 1960 

The Board approved the following recommendations, con- 
cerning the State teachers colleges based on the report "Proposals 
for Implementing the Board's Recommendations Concerning 
Higher Education." 

The Program 

1. That, commencinp: with the 1960-61 academic year, "majors" 
in English, history, social studies, and geography be established at the 
State teachers colleges at Towson and Frostburg, permitting students 
to enroll in all four of the college years. Although nonteacher educa- 
tion students would be able to pursue their major fields in the senioi' 
year, secondary teacher education foi- 1960-61 would be limited to the 
first three years since the professional program for secondary school 
teachers will not be ready until the 1961-62 academic year. This same 
recommendation applies to the State Teachers College at Salisbury 
with the exception that for 1960-61 majors in geography would be 
limited to the freshman year. 

2. That in general, majors in biological and physical sciences and 
mathematics at the State teachers colleges at Frostburg, Salisbury, and 
Towson be limited to the freshman and sophomore years during the 
1960-61 academic year and be extended into the upper division gradu- 
ally according to the schedule for each college. 

3. That, at Bowie and Coppin, majors in English, history, and 
social studies be introduced in the 1960-61 academic year only in the 
lower division, with the upper-division work being introduced gradu- 
ally in accordance with the following time schedule; that geography 
"majors" might be started in these two colleges in the freshman year 
and extended to the other years gradually as appropriate additions 
are made to faculty, courses, library resources, and instructional 
facilities. 

4. That, before introducing majors in mathematics and the natural 
sciences at Bowie and Coppin, additional study be made as to adequacy 
of faculty, instructional facilities, library, and courses. 

5. That criteria be used to determine the readiness of a college 
to introduce programs for the preparation of high school teachers in 
particular fields. 

The Board and the college presidents agreed that the college 
faculties and the Board Committee on the State teachers colleges 
and representatives of the State Department of Education should 



34 NiNETv-FouKTJi Annual Report 

work very closely in determining the extent to which the criteria 
have been adequately met. These criteria included : 

Criterion I. The staff of the college should be adequate both quantitatively 

and qualitatively. 
Criterion II. The necessary instructional resource materials should be 

available. 

Criterion III. The course offerings should provide quantitative and qualita- 
tive opportunities. 

Criterion IV. Adequate physical facilities should be available to implement 
the program, and sufficient laboratory facilities, including 
space, equipment, and instructional materials, should be 
available for the courses offered without interfering with 
existing courses. 

(Note — For detail on these criteria see Board minutes of 
this date.) 

Pursuant to the authority vested in it by Article 77, Sections 
28 and 165 of the Annotated Code of Maryland, the Board of 
Trustees of the State Teachers Colleges hereby resolves : 

Professorial Rank 

1. A system of professorial rank in the State teachers colleges is to be 
established effective with the school year 1961-62. 

2. The salary scale for the State teachers colleges is to be based on 
that of the University of Maryland. 

3. The President of the State Board of Education is authorized to 
appoint a committee which will consider the problem of implement- 
ing the Board's decision and 

a. submit a preliminary plan for the consideration of the State 
Board of Trustees at the Board meeting on August 31, 1960; 

b. Submit a final plan for the consideration of the State Board 
of Trustees at a special Board meeting on October 26, 1960. 

Student Charges 

1. Tuition and fees 

a. That in view of the fact that the tuition and other fees for the 
present junior college have been in effect for some years and the 
students are expecting them to continue for next year, no change 
be made for the year 1960-61. 

b. That the tuition fee be set at $200 for nonteacher-education 
students of Maryland and $450 for out-of-state nonteacher- 
education students, beginning with the school year 1961-62, with 
the understanding that the Board will recommend to the pi'oper 
authorities that a cooperative study be made of the policies in 
respect to student charges — tuition, room and board, and other 
fees — for both teacher-training and nonteaching-training stu- 
dents at all public institutions of higher learning in the State. 

2. Room and Board 

a. That no change be made in the charges for room and board for 
the coming year for either the teacher-training student or the 
nonteacher-training student. As a matter of fact, there will be 
few if any nonteacher-training students staying in the dormi- 
tories. This has been the policy for several years, and until cer- 
tain changes are made, the policy should probably continue. 



Maryland State Department of Education 35 

b. That the charge for board be increased from $179 to $225 for 
the fiscal year 1961-62, with the understanding that this in- 
crease is for the purpose of increasing the budget for food. 

The Community College 

1. That the tei-m "community college" be used instead of "junior 
college." 

2. That community colleges be established in areas of the State not 
now served by those institutions. 

3. That a very careful study be made to determine whether or 
not the community colleges are meeting the needs of their service areas 
in terms of both terminal and transfer curricula. 

4. That, where they do not now exist, lay advisory boards for 
community colleges be established. 

5. That the State's financial support for public community col- 
leges be increased to insure that its contribution shall be at least one- 
third of the total operating cost, which is currently over $600 for each 
full-time equivalent student. 

6. That a study be made of building needs for present and pro- 
posed community colleges and that State financial assistance be pro- 
vided for their construction. 

7. That local boards of education be permitted to use the State's 
credit to borrow for community college buildings as they do for ele- 
mentary and secondary school facilities. 

8. That there be close liaison between the community colleges and 
the State teachers colleges, particularly in the matter of teacher educa- 
tion. 

9. That State aid for operating costs be applicable for students 
who attend summer sessions at the public community colleges. 

10. That local boards, which do not operate community colleges, 
give financial assistance to their students who must go to some other 
Maryland county if they wish to attend a public community college — 
an example of a plan currently in effect is that used by the Cecil 
County Board of Education. Cecil County students who attend Harford 
Junior College pay the same tuition rates which are charged Harford 
County residents, the tuition diffei-ential being paid by the Board of 
Education of Cecil County. 

11. That, commencing with the 1960-61 academic year, Associate 
in Arts degree recipients in transfer programs from the public com- 
munity colleges be permitted to transfer with full junior standing to 
the State teachers colleges without loss of credit. This would include 
both teacher-education and nonteacher-education students. 

12. The upper-division evening classes be scheduled at the State 
teachers colleges, primarily to permit transferees from community col- 
leges who were part-time students to continue their education on a 
part-time basis, if necessary, until they receive their four-year degrees. 
Courses scheduled in the evenings would be taught by full-time mem- 
bers of the regular college faculty. 

13. That the word "president" be used to designate the chief ad- 
ministrative officer of a public community college. 

14. That evei'y public community college must secure a certificate 
of approval issued by the State Superintendent of Schools, before it 
may begin or continue to operate or function in this State. 

15. That the State Superintendent prepare a proposal in the form 
of a legislative bill to establish junior colleges as a part of the public 
school system, to secure State aid for current expenses of junior col- 
leges, to permit a local board to use the State's credit to borrow for 
buildings, to permit a local board to give financial assistance to its 



36 Ninety-Fourth Annual Report 

students who must go to some other Maryland county if they wish to 
attend a public community college, and to cover such other items as 
the Board may deem wise. 

The Board authorized the State Superintendent to include 
a request in the 1961-62 State budget for the establishment of a 
Division of Higher Education in the State Department of Educa- 
tion. 

Other Board action included the appointment of Mr. Morris 
W. Rannels as State Supervisor of Public School Transportation, 
effective August 1, 1960. From 1952 until this appointment Mr. 
Rannels had served as superintendent of schools of Cecil County. 



Maryland State Department of Education 37 

division of certification and accreditation 

Certification 

As will be seen from TABLE 49, page 118, there has been a 
slight increase in the number of certificates issued to teachers, 
supervisors, and administrators during the academic year, 1959- 
60. In 1958-59 there were 4,200 certificates of all types issued, 
while in 1959-60 the number of certificates issued increased to 
4,407. When one considers that there were within the counties of 
Maryland 1,230 more teachers employed in 1959-60 than in 1958- 
59, we have an indication that the teaching staff of the State con- 
tinues to show gradually increasing stability. 

Of the total number of certificates issued 2,176 were emer- 
gency or other substandard certificates, while 2,231 certificates 
were issued to teachers who met the full qualifications for regular 
certification. Thus it can be seen that nearly half of the certifi- 
cates issued went to persons who did not meet the full qualifica- 
tions for teaching. Of the 2,176 teachers who were issued emer- 
gency or substandard certificates 1,463 had met the requirements 
for the baccalaureate degree. 

Over the past three years the percentage of teachers issued 
emergency or other substandard certificates but who held college 
degrees has ranged from 60 to 70 per cent. For the year 1959-60 
this percentage was 67.2 per cent. Some teachers in this category 
have excellent qualifications, and some have actually met Mary- 
land requirements for a regular certificate but have engaged in no 
recent formal study. Others have good subject-matter prepara- 
tion but lack some of the necessary professional preparation re- 
quired for full certification. Any holder of the emergency degree 
certificate can usually, with relatively little effort, qualify for 
regular certification in one of the various teaching fields. 

Accreditation 

Institutions of Higher Learning 

No new institutions of collegiate level have been added to the 
list of such institutions during the past academic year, although 
one institution formerly approved for the granting of the degree, 
Associate in Business Administration, was given approval for 
the granting of the Bachelor of Science Degree in fields of busi- 
ness study. 

The enrollment in the public community colleges continued 
to grow, and approval was given for the granting of the Associate 
in Arts Degree by the Prince George's Community College and 
the Charles County Junior College. 

Members of the Department served on committees of the 
Middle States Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools, 



38 Ninety-Fourth Annual Report 

which re-evaluated former accreditation of three institutions, 
considered one institution for original accreditation, and re- 
viewed the progress toward accreditation which had been 
achieved toward this objective on the part of a fifth institution. 

The study of the curriculum for the Maryland State teachers 
colleges was continued, and plans which would provide for the 
preparation of secondary school teachers at these institutions 
were prepared for presentation to the Board of Trustees. 

Nonpublic Academic Schools Below College Level 

The number and kind of academic schools below college level 
which were operating in the State in 1959-60 and which have 
been approved by the Department were as follows : 

Type of School Number 

Secondary 52 

Secondary-Elementary 7 

Secondary-Elementary-Kindergarten 1 

Secondary-Elementary-Kindergarten-Nursery School . 1 

Tutoring 6 

Special 13 

Elementary 4 

Elementary-Kindergarten 6 

Elementary-Kindergarten-Nursery School 4 

Primary 1 

Primary-Kindergarten 5 

Primary-Kindergarten-Nursery School 4 

Kindergarten 34 

Kindergarten-Nursery School 21 

Nursery School 29 

Total 188 



Nonpublic Secondary Schools 

The Maryland nonpublic academic schools are approved each 
year on the basis of the annual reports submitted by the schools 
and visits by members of the supervisory staff of this Depart- 
ment. 

On the approved list are 61 regular secondary schools and 6 
tutoring schools. Of these 67 schools, 44 are church-operated and 
23 are privately operated. 

There are other nonpublic schools in Maryland which are 
not on the list, since church-operated schools and private schools 
which have a charter from the Maryland Assembly are exempt 
from approval requirements. Any of these institutions may re- 
quest approval of the State Superintendent of Schools at its dis- 
cretion. 



Makyland State Department of Education 39 

Nonpublic Nursery Schools, Kindergarlens, Elementary Schools, 
and Special Schools 

These schools are operating in the following ways : 

Cooperatives with parents participating ;•.•••• ^^ 

Cooperatives administered by parents who do not participate 

daily 8 

Smaller centers (3 groups or less) 40 

Larger centers (more than 3 groups) , owned by individuals. . 12 
Schools governed by Board of Directors (two of these centers 

offer a summer program) 25 

Church-sponsored centers 4 

Others (sponsored by housing projects, civic groups, colleges, 

etc.) 14 

Total 135 

There were 19 centers which provided in addition to an edu- 
cational program a service for the full-day care of children of 
working parents. Twelve of these centers were approved in 
January, 1948, when the law went into effect. 

Enrollments in the nonpublic elementary and preschool 
centers during the two years 1958-59 and 1959-60, including new 
schools approved during each of these years, were as follows : 

Enrollment * 
Type of School 1958-59 1959-60 

Number of children in nursery schools 1,974 1,938 

Number of children in kindergartens 2,214 2,383 

Number of children in elementary schools. . . . 3,444 13,051 

Number of children in special schools 556 621 

Total 8,188 $7,993 

* Figures are those for all schools listed as operating during the year, 
including new schools and those removed from list during year and 
closed at end of year. 

t In the five schools terminating at eighth grade there were 183 chil- 
dren enrolled. 

t In the total enrollment there are 876 day care program children 
enrolled. Actually the total number of children attending centers where 
a day-care program is operated as a part of that center in addition 
to the approved part of the program is appreciably larger than the 
figure of 876. Many of the centers do not include in their annual 
reports the enrollment figures for children in the unapproved part of 
the operation. 

Nonpublic Specialized Schools 

In this classification 16 schools applied for approval and re- 
ceived certificates, and 27 schools received tentative approvals. 
Twenty-five schools closed in the period July 1, 1958, to June 30, 
1959. 

During the year revised general standards for nonpublic 
specialized schools were adopted by the State Board of Education 
and in conformity with the requirements of the law the schools 
concerned were given the opportunity to review the standards 
and raise objections if they desired to do so. With minor revisions 



40 Ninety-Fourth Annual Report 

the standards adopted by the Board were accepted, and the 
amended general standards together with the special standards 
for eight categories of schools will be presented to the State 
Board at its August, 1960, meeting. It is interesting to note that 
the great majority of the schools affected welcomed the standards 
and displayed great faith in the responsibility of the Department 
to promulgate standards which would operate to the advantage 
of all concerned, public and schools alike. 

Proposed legislation to license and bond solicitors for out-of- 
State schools was presented to the Governor, but at his request 
action on it was deferred until the 1961 regular session of the 
Legislature. 

Between July 1, 1959, and June 30, 1960, approximately 
29,000 students were enrolled in the nonpublic specialized schools 
and over 900 teachers were employed in these schools. 

High School Equivalence 

There were more applicants for the high school equivalence 
examination offered by the State Department of Education and 
a greater number (1,850) completed the test than in any previous 
year. However, the percentage of successful candidates was 
lower — only 951 (51.4 per cent) qualified for the Certificate. 
About a third of this number had repeated the examination at 
least once. 

Approximately 35 per cent of all applicants wish to attain 
the Certificate to be eligible for further education; 40 per cent 
wish to qualify for employment or promotion ; and 25 per cent for 
purely personal satisfaction. About 75 per cent of the candi- 
dates are men. Most of the women are interested in nurses' train- 
ing or substitute teaching. 

School Plant Planning 

The public school laws of Maryland require the approval of 
the State Superintendent of Schools for all purchase or sale of 
school sites, plans and specifications for school buildings, and for 
all contracts and change orders on school construction. During 
the past year the Assistant Director of the Division examined 
and recommended for approval the following : 

Deeds, 

Preliminary Final Right-of- Change 

Site Plans Plans Contracts Ways, Etc. Orders 

'!§' 94 95 175 94 309 

All proposals for school site purchases are co-ordinated with 
the long-range plans of the State Roads Commission, in order to 
avoid future conflict with that agency, since school attendance 
areas may be adversely affected by future highway locations. 



Maryland State Department of Education 41 

A State-wide survey of existing water supply sources and 
sewage disposal systems resulted in revision of the State Health 
Department Standards in these respects. It is estimated that the 
resulting savings in school construction funds will be consider- 
able. 

A staff member continued to work with the presidents of the 
State teachers colleges and with other State agencies in the de- 
velopment of long-range plans for capital improvements at the 
colleges. 

All phases of the work from the preparation of the current 
capital budget to the final inspection of the completed building 
was covered. Twenty-one sets of plans, 33 contracts, and 27 
change orders were recommended for approval by the State 
Board of Education during the past year. 

Teacher Recruitment 

To summarize the work in this field a report entitled Teacher 
Need and Supply in Marylmid Public Schools was issued in April, 
1960. This report served to emphasize the rather critical status 
of teacher supply presently confronting the Maryland public 
schools. 

The data in this study indicate that despite the multiple at- 
tacks being made upon the problem of securing an adequate 
supply of teachers and despite the tremendous efforts being ex- 
pended at the local level to secure enough qualified people to staff 
their classrooms, the teacher supply shortage has not been 
ameliorated to any important extent. The problem remains a 
critical one and even the most conservative estimates, based on 
the current rate at which we are attracting young people into the 
profession, indicate that the shortage of qualified classroom 
teachers will not be appreciably alleviated for some years to come. 

Teacher Education Scholarship Program 

The 1959-60 Teacher Education Scholarship examination 
was administered on Saturday, February 7, 1959, in twenty-five 
designated local test centers throughout the State. The twenty- 
fifth test center was established at the Talmudical Academy in 
Baltimore City to accommodate those students for whom Satur- 
day is the Sabbath Day. 

The test used was the Science Research Associates College 
Classification Test, Form A. Pre-test registration indicated that 
nearly 1,300 students were interested in taking the examination. 
Of the 993 students who actually sat for the examination 853 or 
86 per cent were placed on the eligible list. 

Section 284 of Article 77 of the Annotated Code of Maryland 
(1957 Edition), which is the legal basis for the Teacher Educa- 
tion Scholarship Program, provides for a basic number of 152 
scholarships to be awarded each year. However, all scholarships 



42 NlNET\-FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT 

vacated by their holders, for whatever reason, automatically be- 
come additional full four-year awards under the next phase of 
the pro-am. Consequently for the 1959-60 phase of the program 
there was a total of 230 scholarships available for distribution : 
152 of the basic annual awards plus 78 of the so-called replace- 
ment awards. 

The original 152 scholarship offers were made on March 19, 
1959. The 1959-60 phase of the Teacher Education Scholarship 
was terminated on December 3, 1959, when acceptance of the final 
award under the current program was received by this Depart- 
ment. Of the 853 eligible candidates, 644 were offered scholar- 
ships. Two hundred thirty students accepted and 414 declined. 
Of those declining, 68 declined by forfeit after having failed to 
respond to a certified communication within ten days of receipt. 
Another 59 of those who declined did so after having previously 
indicated acceptance of the scholarship offer. 

Driver Education 

The annual survey of driver education programs being car- 
ried on in the Maryland public schools reveals a sizeable increase 
in the number of schools offering programs, including both class- 
room and behind-the-wheel phases. The survey also shows a 
slight growth in the over-all number of pupils enrolled in driver 
education courses in the State. 

School Lunch and Direct Distribution of Commodities 

Program 

School Lunch Program and Special Milk Program 

Of the 1,001 public schools in the State, 955 were approved 
for participation in the School Lunch and Special Milk Programs 
during the 1959-60 school year. Applications were reviewed and 
approved as follows : School Lunch and Special Milk, 759 ; School 
Lunch only, 4 ; and Special Milk only, 192. All of the twenty-three 
counties in the State and Baltimore City participated in both 
programs. 

The application work, especially for the Special Milk Pro- 
gram, was not finished with the initial approving. The dairies 
not only were hesitant in giving a "firm" distributor cost for milk 
to the schools but also made changes in their original cost of milk 
in 1959-60 over 1958-59, varying from one cent to two cents. This 
resulted in a corresponding increase in the charge of milk to 
children and a decrease in participation for the school year. 

The rate of reimbursement in the school lunch program was 
reduced from .04 to .03 effective May 1, 1960. This was necessary 
because the number of lunches served was exceeding the available 
Federal funds for reimbursement of the lunches. For the entire 
year, however, the reimbursement rate was almost .04, since the 
supplementary payment was sufficient to make the May reim- 



Maryland State Department of Education 43 

bursement rate equal to the original .04 rate, with enough money- 
remaining to make the June rate slightly less than .04. 

State-wide there was a 2.3 per cent decrease in participation 
in the Special Milk Program in 1959-60 over 1958-59. The in- 
crease in distributor cost of milk to the school, wuth a resulting 
increase in the charge of milk to the child, seems to be the main 
cause for this decrease in participation (36,390,152 one-half pints 
consumed in 1958-59 and 35,555,378 one-half pints consumed in 
1959-60). 

Agreements covering the distribution of U. S. Department 
of Agriculture donated commodities were renewed. New agree- 
ments were made with a number of nonpublic schools eligible 
for participation. A few nonpublic schools discontinued the pro- 
gram. Other new schools began participation under sponsorship 
of the local board of education. 

New legislative action of the Congress directed use of 
$43,000,000 of customs revenue, for purchase of Section 6 type 
commodities, with emphasis on "red meats," for use of the Na- 
tional School Lunch Program participating schools. "Red meat" 
purchases were frozen turkey, frozen ground pork, frozen ground 
lamb, frozen ground beef, and canned pork and gravy. Other 
foods were purchased with these transferred funds. Approxi- 
mately $15,000,000 of National School Lunch Program appropri- 
ations were spent also for Section 6 commodities. 

Total purchases from the National School Lunch Act appro- 
priation and the transfer of custom funds amounted to $919,- 
254.05, as the share for Maryland schools. 

The total value of all foods distributed during the school 
year 1959-60 was $1,705,372.35, or a net dollar increase of ap- 
proximately 31 per cent, when compared with the school year 
1958-59. 

Foods were distributed to all eligible schools and schools 
systems, based on average daily participation, inventories on 
hand at the local level, and knowledge of past experiences in 
utilization. 



44 Ninety-Fourth Annual Report 

division of instruction 

Supervisory Assistance to the Counties and to Individual 

Schools in the Areas of Organization, Administration, 

AND Instruction 

Following a new pattern two State-wide conferences were 
held during the school year of 1959-60. The general theme, 
The Pupil — His Abilities, His Needs, and His Program, was de- 
veloped at both of these meetings by major addresses and small 
assembly discussions. The first one, for all secondary school prin- 
cipals and supervisors, was held on October 8 and 9, 1959. Par- 
ticular attention was given to promising administrative and in- 
structional practices designed to identify pupil abilities and 
needs, to modified programs for able pupils, to reading in the 
high schools, to developing programs for gifted and superior 
pupils and to meeting the needs of the slow learner. Dr. R. Free- 
man Butts, who had made a survey for the Maryland Self-Study 
Commission, analyzed "How Well Is Maryland's Secondary Edu- 
cation Program Meeting the Needs of the Pupil." Sir Geoffrey 
Crowther, Chairman of the Central Advisory Council for Educa- 
tion, England, addressed the conference on "Contrasts in British 
and American Education." 

The second meeting, for all elementary school principals and 
supervisors, was held on November 12 and 13, 1959. New chal- 
lenges in the elementary program were emphasized with partic- 
ular attention to the recognition that mechanization can become 
a real dilemma in the schools if technological means are used 
apart from personal contact with teachers, the need for more 
complete and intelligent individualization of instruction, and the 
learning process and its implications for the organization of the 
elementary school. 

Significant differences in the work of the Division for 1959- 
60 reflect the amount of time devoted to the various activities — 
this seems to shift with the specific emphasis — and in the nature 
of the participation in the activities. These differences seem to 
be due in great measure to (1), the increased school population 
resulting in a greater number of elementary school supervisors, 
(2) the changing duties of the supervisors in the local systems as 
more responsibility for direct classroom supervision is delegated 
to the school principals, (3) the emphasis upon curricular revi- 
sion in specific subject areas with, at the same time, concern for 
the total program and a need for balance, (4) changing proce- 
dures and use of more technological means in instruction — such 
as television, (5) the recognition that education of young children 
is changing and that these changes present problems and chal- 
lenges — in uses of materials, in in-service education, in organiza- 
tion of the elementary school, in teacher training, to mention 
only a few facets. 

Mathematics meetings for all supervisors and principals of 
elementary schools on the Eastern Shore were held in two centers 



Marvi,and Statk Departmknt of Education 45 

in January, March, and May at Salisbury and Centreville. About 
140 persons attended these meetings. The main purpose was to 
bring the elementary people up-to-date on the latest developments 
in the teaching of mathematics in the elementary school. Out- 
standing specialists — Dr. Foster Grossnickel, Dr. Mary Grau, and 
Dr. Glenadine Gibb, discussed content, procedures, and materials 
in the mathematics program. 

A workshop in mathematics was the out-growth of the math- 
ematics meetings. This workshop was held at the State Teachers 
College at Salisbury for two weeks, June 14-23. Dr. Marvin C. 
Volpel from State Teachers College at Towson was the Director 
and was assisted by Mr. Frank D. White and Mr. H. Allen 
Foutty, instructors at the State Teachers College at Salisbury. 
Two hundred and twenty teachers, principals, and supervisors 
attended this workshop and received from the State Department 
of Education two semester hours credit toward the renewal of 
their certificates. The workshop dealt with the content of the 
mathematics program, grade one through grade eight. 

The science program in the elementary schools received par- 
ticular attention. Dr. Gerald Craig, one of our consultant special- 
ists for this year, visited all of the Maryland counties. While the 
type of visits varied with the several counties, the general pat- 
tern included: observing the teaching of science and discussing 
the instruction with the teachers ; evaluating the present courses 
of study ; meeting with curriculum committees in revising the 
courses as to content, methods, and materials of instruction. 

In addition to the special emphasis on mathematics and 
science, continued attention was given to the program in language 
arts, social studies, music, art, health, and to the foreign language 
experiments. A number of the local school systems are studying 
the best use to be made of instruction by television, team teach- 
ing, and ungraded primary classes. 

In addition to the State-wide secondary school meetings, a 
number of major conferences were held in individual counties or 
in regional groups of counties. These meetings were concerned 
with curriculum development in mathematics, science, social 
studies, and English, as well as with the broad role of guidance 
and program planning for the more able pupil. Particular em- 
phasis was given to the teaching of modern foreign languages 
and to continued instruction in reading as a tool of learning. 

The general supervision of high schools in the counties con- 
tinued to be the responsibility of three supervisors in the Division 
of Instruction. At least one visit was made to each of the coun- 
ties, conferences were held with the central office staff, and the 
high school principal, and some classrooms were visited in most 
of the schools. The most pressing problem, noted in the smaller 
counties especially, was concerned with the selection and reten- 
tion of capable, certificated, qualified teachers. 



46 Ninety-Fourth Annual Report 

Emphasis during the year in the curriculum area continued 
to stress the enrichment of programs for the college-bound youth, 
especially the academically talented group. Typical senior high 
courses, e.g., mathematics, science, and foreign languages, were 
being offered to an increasing number of junior high school stu- 
dents. As a result of this trend, advanced course offerings were 
increasingly available to senior students, especially in the "larger 
high schools. The supervisory services and equipment and ma- 
terials made possible by the provisions of the National Defense 
Education Act were beginning to have a notable impact on the 
programs affected. 

A special feature of the year had to do with the survey of 
selected Maryland junior high schools by members of Dr. James 
B. Conant's staff under the direction of Dr. Matthew P. Gaffney. 
This survey, a phase of Dr. Conant's nationwide study of the 
junior high school, involved planning visits to some twenty repre- 
sentative junior or junior-senior high schools during a week in 
September and a week in May. The evaluations were mutually 
beneficial and most favorable to the schools visited. 

The High School Senior Survey of the Class of 1958 

The final report of the survey of the 1958 senior class was 
completed and published during the year. This study of an entire 
graduating class was the most comprehensive undertaking of its 
kind ever done in the State. Space here will not permit any ex- 
tensive reporting of findings; however, evidence gathered did 
support the following general conclusions : 

1. Maryland public high schools do offer the so-called "difficult" 
and rigorous courses. 

2. Students of this class generally enrolled in courses and subjects 
consistent with their interests, abilities, and post high school 
plans. 

3. Proliferation of subject offerings and enrollments is not of seri- 
ous proportion in Maryland's public high schools. 

The State Committee to Study the Maryland Public Secondary Schools 

The work of this State-wide committee, originally set up in 
January, 1959, continued at an accelerating pace during the cur- 
rent year. The statement on philosophy and goals was completed. 
Statements on the functions of the junior and senior high school 
were also prepared and accepted. In process of completion were 
subcommittee reports on organizational patterns of the high 
school, curriculum design, and history and issues in secondary 
education. The two statistical and evaluative studies — the follow- 
up survey of the class of 1958 and the drop-out survey to be con- 
ducted State-wide during 1960-61 were either well under way or 
the initial phases structured. 



Maryland State Department of Education 47 

Enrollment Trends in Mathematics, Science, and Foreign Language 

This survey, initiated in 1955 and continued annually to date, 
showed during- the current year the most marked enrollment in- 
crease of any year surveyed. Since 1955, with an over-all enroll- 
ment increase in grades 9-12 of 50 per cent in the Maryland county 
public high schools, enrollment increases in the college prepar- 
atory mathematics, science, and foreign languages had in every 
instance exceeded the 50 per cent over-all increase for the period 
under survey. The most marked increases were noted in the 
foreign languages, with the enrollment in French up 230 per 
cent, Spanish 123 per cent, and Latin 84 per cent. German is now 
being taught in four counties and Russian in one county. 

Secondary School Accreditation 

All Maryland public high schools are accredited by the State 
Department of Education. In addition to this approval, the local 
units encourage accreditation of their high schools by the Middle 
States Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools, the re- 
gional accrediting association which has functioned on a cooper- 
ative basis for several decades in this area. Prerequisite to such 
accreditation is a thorough self-evaluation by the school staff 
followed by an evaluation visitation by an impartial committee 
of competent educators. 

The last decade has witnessed greater progress in accredita- 
tion of Maryland high schools by the Middle States Association 
than in any comparable period prior to that time. As a matter 
of fact, during this decade 50 State public high schools have been 
evaluated and accredited by the regional accrediting association. 
This number is actually more than twice as many as had been 
previously approved in all the years of regional accreditation 
prior to 1949. 

Consultative Services and Cooperation in Curriculum De- 
velopment AND in the Development and Improvement 
OF Materials of Instruction 

The Division has participated with all of the local school 
systems in curriculum workshops and institutes which are con- 
tinuing to revise the local courses of study. These courses not 
only outline the content of the subjects but give suggestions for 
teaching and learning procedures and for the necessary materials 
of instruction. These workshops are often followed by in-service 
education programs for principals, teachers, and supervisors in 
the implementation of the courses of study. 

A number of the schools are giving consideration to a pro- 
gram of school evaluation, using such material as The Boston 
Elementary Evaluative Criteria. 



48 Ninety-Fourth Annual Report 

Improvement of Curriculum Materials 

The Supervisors of Curriculum have continued to work with 
the State Music Committee on the music bulletin which incorpo- 
rated the ideas developed at the Towson Curriculum Workshop 
in 1955 and the Frostburg Music Workshop in 1956. 

One of the supervisors of curriculum with the assistance of 
the Conversion Committee finished "Maryland's Rocks and Min- 
erals," Book 4 of the Conservation Series. The copy will be 
longer and there will be more illustrations than there are in the 
other three books of the Series. The photographs were supplied 
by the local units represented in the Maryland Picture Portfolio 
Series. The printer has the copy of the minerals bulletin and it 
is hoped it will be ready for distribution within a few months. 
Two sets of colored slides have been prepared to supplement the 
minerals bulletin — "Rocks and Minerals" and "The Geology of 
Maryland." "The Geology of Maryland" will be offered in film- 
strip as well as in slide form, and the commentary will be both 
printed and in tape-recording form. 

The 24 volumes of the Maryland Picture Portfolio Series 
were revised and offered for purchase in 1959 at $3.00 per volume. 
The local boards of education ordered sufficient copies to pay for 
the cost of printing the revised edition. 

The Supervisors of Curriculum spent considerable time in 
organizing curriculum materials at the Division of Library Ex- 
tension for the new State Curriculum Center which officially goes 
into operation January 1, 1961. A State Curriculum Center Com- 
mittee was appointed. In June, 1960, this Committee agreed 
upon a definition of the Center, the persons to be served in Mary- 
land, and some of the materials to be housed in the Center. 

The State Annual Preview was held on February 19, 1960. 
Representatives from the State Department of Education, State 
Audio-Visual Committee, and the local school systems attended. 
Thirteen films and seven filmstrips were purchased for the State 
Curriculum Center. 

The audio-visual collection of the Division of Library Exten- 
sion was divided into three groups: (a) The films that can be 
used by adults other than educators were given to the Enoch Pratt 
Free Library to circulate throughout the State; (b) The films, 
filmstrips, slides, and recordings that are usable for curriculum 
study and development were kept for the new State Curriculum 
Center; (c) The films, filmstrips, slides, recordings, and pictures 
that are usable in classrooms are to be distributed to the local 
units for instructional use. 

Several meetings were held with the Keep Maryland Beauti- 
ful and the Star-Spangled Flag House committees to discuss ma- 
terials that would be helpful to the public schools. Each commit- 
tee prepared a packet which was distributed to the public schools 
in Maryland. 



Maryland State Department of Education 49 

The Baltimore Sunpapers continued to supply each of the 23 
county boards of education and the library of the Maryland State 
Department of Education with free monthly prints (September 
until June) of the news film "Screen News Digest." 

Through the sponsorship of the Baltimore News-Post the 
junior and senior high schools of Baltimore, Harford, Anne 
Arundel, Howard counties and Baltimore City receive free 
monthly prints of the Current Affairs Filmstrips. 

Health and Physical Education 

The Supervisor of Physical Education and Recreation 
worked in most of the county units, helping largely with pro- 
grams in physical education, interschool sports, outdoor educa- 
tion, and health education. 

The Supervisor assisted smaller counties in inaugurating 
well-planned, in-service training programs for their physical 
education teachers. Some counties will combine their resources 
in a joint in-service training program. 

A number of county elementary schools have requested and 
received help from the Supervisor in designing hard-surface 
areas for greatest functional use. Hard-surface areas can be 
considered outdoor gymnasiums with many contributions for the 
physical education program. 

By request, the Supervisor served as a consultant in the 
physical education programs of Boys' Village in Cheltenham, 
Maryland Children's Center, and Forestry Camps for Boys. 

Inclement weather had detrimental effects on all of the 
athletic activities sponsored by the M.P.S.S.A.A. Snow and sleet 
fell during the 1959 State Cross Country Meet. However, oper- 
ated on a desegregated basis for the first time, it was conducted 
in a smooth fashion highly satisfactory to all participants and 
teachers. The semifinal and final games of the State Basketball 
Tournaments held at Bowie State Teachers College and the Uni- 
versity of Maryland had to be postponed one week because of 
blizzards. The 1960 State Track and Field Meet for Class B and 
C schools that was to be held at the University of Maryland had 
to be postponed one week because of severe rain storms. The 
Meet was re-scheduled to be held at Frederick High School. This 
Meet and the Class A Meet, held at Catonsville High School, were 
also conducted on a desegregated basis with identical satisfactory 
results. 

A three-day Workshop for Staflf Personnel of Outdoor 
Schools was sponsored in the fall of 1959. Dr. L. B. Sharp was 
procured as a consultant. The participants were greatly pleased 
with the results of the Workshop, the purposes of which were : 
how best to teach ecology ; the interrelationship in nature of plant 
life and living things; how to keep the program "school-cen- 
tered" ; how to use the outdoor laboratory with informal and un- 
structured approaches. 



50 NlNETi'-FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT 

Pupil Personnel and Parent Education Services 

The major responsibilities of the Supervisor of Pupil Serv- 
ices during- the 1959-60 school year v^^ere in the continuing de- 
velopment of the programs of guidance and pupil personnel and 
in the coordination of all pupil services as an essential component 
of the total educational program. The most significant develop- 
ment during this year in terms of its effect on school programs 
throughout the State in the years ahead is the acceptance by this 
Department and an increasing number of local units of the con- 
cept of a total program of pupil services, carefully planned and 
coordinated to enable each pupil to obtain maximum benefits from 
the instructional program. 

Guidance programs established in all of the local units con- 
tinue to grow in terms of local needs. The State Supervisor of 
Pupil Services and one of the State Supervisors of Special Educa- 
tion provided leadership by planning v^^ith local administrative, 
supervisory, and guidance personnel in the development of these 
programs. Consultative service v^as provided by these super- 
visors as requested, particularly in in-service education programs 
in the smaller school systems. One regional guidance conference 
was held for administrators and counselors. 

The pupil personnel program continues to be a strong pro- 
gram under effective local leadership. The pupil personnel 
workers have assumed leadership in helping to implement the 
concept of a broad program of pupil services and in working out 
coordination procedures. Parent education programs continue to 
be conducted in several of the local units. These programs vary 
in scope and effectiveness, but evaluation indicates there is a 
definite value in these parent groups. 

Psychological services are growing rapidly. During this 
year, 42 school psychologists were employed. The demand for 
these services has increased in direct proportion to our efforts 
to provide appropriate educational programs in terms of indi- 
vidual needs and abilities. 

The coordination of all pupil services has been a program re- 
quiring a great amount of leadership during this year. A State 
Conference of personnel engaged in pupil services, including 
guidance, health, pupil personnel, psychological and testing serv- 
ices, was held on October 7, 1959, in Baltimore. This was the 
first time a State conference had included school personnel and 
community agency personnel from these different disciplines. The 
theme of this meeting was "Our Challenge — Developing and Co- 
ordinating Educational Services — Guidance, Health, Psycholog- 
ical, Pupil Personnel, and Testing." 

A State Coordinating Committee including personnel in the 
State responsible for the coordination of pupil services in local 
school systems met with Dr. Harold Mahoney, Chief, Bureau of 
Pupil Personnel and Special Educational Services, Connecticut 



Maryland State Department of Education 51 

State Department of Education, as consultant. This group con- 
sidered existing programs and problems arising in effective co- 
ordination. 

Special Education 

Throughout the State, the year 1959-60 brought an increase 
of service to handicapped children and youth. For example, all 
local school systems but three had special classes for the educable 
mentally retarded, all but nine had special classes for the train- 
able mentally retarded, and over 8,000 pupils received speech 
therapy. In keeping with the new standard concerning classes for 
children with specific learning disorders, several local school sys- 
tems had special classes for children with aphasia, for children 
with general brain damage, and for children with such other 
disorders as strephosymbolia. 

The Maryland Association for Speech and Hearing (MASH) , 
composed of speech and hearing therapists of the Maryland public 
schools and sponsored by the Maryland State Department of Edu- 
cation, held a meeting in the Hampton Elementary School, Lu- 
therville, on Friday, April 1, 1960. Dr. Theodore D. Hanley, Pro- 
fessor of Speech, Purdue University, spoke on the National Study 
of Public School Speech and Hearing Services. MASH will no 
longer be sponsored by the State Department of Education, but 
it will take steps toward becoming a chapter of the American 
Speech and Hearing Association. The therapists' in-service pro- 
fessional development, however, is still the responsibility of the 
State Department of Education, which will continue to arrange 
an annual conference of the public school therapists for this pur- 
pose. 

A workshop, organized for teachers of educable mentally re- 
tarded youth of junior high school age, was held at the State 
Teachers College, Towson, the week of June 20-24, 1960. Dr. 
Helen Sullivan, Professor of Education, Boston University, 
served as consultant for two of the five days. 

In November, 1959, in connection with the Supervisors' Con- 
ference, the State Department of Education sponsored a meeting 
to discuss problems concerning special education in the Maryland 
public schools. The two chief items discussed were the education 
of preschool handicapped children, especially the Child's Ap- 
praisal Profile, and job placement of educable mentally retarded 
youth. 

The census of handicapped children and youth was taken for 
1959-60 with the cooperation of the local school systems. Because 
the large school systems have questioned the value of such a cen- 
sus, the matter was discussed in the State School-Health Council 
at its biannual meeting in May, 1960. As a result of the discus- 
sion, the Council appointed a committee to examine the law, to 
study the present procedures of taking the census, and to make 
recommendations to the State Department of Education. 



52 Ninety-Fourth Annual Report 

The Committee on the Education of the Superior and the 
Gifted, which was appointed by Dr. Pullen in January, 1959, has 
continued its work on the development of a bulletin containing 
policy statements and suggested programs. 

The Maryland Chapter of the Council for Exceptional Chil- 
dren held its annual meeting at the State Teachers College, Frost- 
burg, on Saturday, May 14, 1960. The main speaker was Dr. 
Charles Van Riper, Professor of Speech Pathology, Western 
Michigan University, Kalamazoo. He spoke on "The Roles of 
Thinking and Feeling in the Education of the Exceptional Child." 

The program of education of preschool severely handicapped 
children has continued to grow. While most of the applications 
in 1959-60 were for attendance at nonpublic schools, the number 
of programs provided by local school systems has shown a slight 
increase, 

A Committee on the Education of the Emotionally Handi- 
capped was appointed by Dr. Thomas G. Pullen, Jr., State Super- 
intendent of Schools, in April, 1960. The charge to the Com- 
mittee includes responsibility for studying (a) the methods 
which should be used in identifying the emotionally handicapped, 
(b) the various types of possible educational programs, (c) the 
personnel required for these programs, (d) the cost of the pro- 
grams, (e) the relationships which should be established, and (f ) 
evaluation measures. 

At the request of several local school systems which have 
educational programs for children with slight handicaps, a com- 
mittee was organized to study the relationship between public 
school programs and residential school programs. 

Institutional Programs 

For the fourth year this Department has made educational 
advisory service directly available to the various public institu- 
tions within the State which operate educational programs. 
Again, the State Department of Public Welfare was most active 
in availing itself of these services in behalf of the training schools 
for juvenile delinquents under its charge. 

The four training schools and the Maryland Children's 
Center were visited periodically for the purpose of giving these 
institutions technical assistance and consultation with respect to 
the various phases of the education program : curriculum de- 
velopment, teaching personnel, school plant, and liaison with 
local boards of education. 

Monthly professional meetings were held with the Directors 
of Education in the interest of strengthening the instructional 
programs of their in.stitutions and promoting professional growth 
of teachers. 

Curriculum Bulletin Number One entitled An Introduction 
to the Teaching of the Langv.age Arts in the Training Schools of 



Maryland State Department of Education 53 

Maryland was distributed to training school teachers. This bul- 
letin represents a forward step in the educational advancement 
of the schools and furnishes teachers with some practical guid- 
ance. The Curriculum Committee on Mathematics continued to 
meet regularly for the purpose of developing a coordinated mathe- 
matics guide. A workshop of four days was held in April at the 
Montrose School for Girls. Hopefully, the results of this work 
session will culminate in the publication of Curriculum Bulletin 
Number Two. 

Visits were made to the three forestry camps for boys located 
at Green Ridge, Lonaconing, and Meadow Mountain in Western 
Maryland. The possibility of extending and developing further 
the evening program of education at these camps was explored 
with the superintendent and camp directors. A specialist in out- 
door education was contacted to survey the camps during July 
and to make recommendations for a wider utilization of the boys 
in varied educational work projects. 

The Supervisor of Special Education attended meetings and 
participated in conferences sponsored by the State Department 
of Public Welfare. Assistance of an educational nature relating 
to physical facilities for the new Barrett School was provided. A 
tentative report of a proposed instructional program for the con- 
templated training school for two hundred older boys was pre- 
pared. 

Consultative service was furnished to the Maryland State 
Penitentiary in connection with its annual teacher training in- 
stitute. The preliminary planning of the program was a coopera- 
tive endeavor with the Director of Education. The participants 
in the institute included teachers not only from the Penitentiary 
but also from the Maryland Reformatory for Women, Maryland 
House of Correction, Maryland Reformatory for Males, and the 
Patuxent Institution. A professional staff of instructors was re- 
cruited to conduct this important teacher training program. 

National Defense Education Act 

Title III of this Act provides for federal financial assistance 
to the State for strengthening instruction in science, mathe- 
matics, and modern foreign languages. Title V provides similar 
assistance for strengthening programs in guidance and counsel- 
ing. 

Science and Mathematics 

Continued efforts have been directed toward implementation 
of NDEA, Title III, in the areas of Science and Mathematics. 
These have involved the formation and processing of projects, 
and related supervisory activities for the improvement of in- 
struction. 

Conscientious efforts have been made to maintain a balanced 
program and to treat developments in these specific areas as part 



54 Ninety-Fourth Annual Report 

of a continuous and long-range process for the improvement of 
instruction long typical of Maryland's educational program. 

Guidance and Counseling 

The federal funds provided by the National Defense Educa- 
tion Act for the guidance programs this year amounted to 
$245,448. The impact of this program continues to be highly 
significant. Expansion of existing programs to provide more 
services for a greater number of individual pupils has been the 
most meaningful result. 

During this year, 503 counselors were employed in the State, 
421 full time, 82 part time. This represents 61 more counselors 
than were employed last year. Of these counselors 72.5 per cent 
are now fully certified. 

There continues to be a very close working relationship be- 
tween the State Department of Education, the local units, the 
counselor educators, and the professional guidance organizations 
in the State. This is one of the major strengths of the guidance 
program as it has developed and is developing in the State. A 
State Committee representing all of these different groups has 
been established this year to study effective ways of evaluating 
guidance programs. 



Maryland State Department of Education 55 

DIVISION OF LIBRARY EXTENSION 

The year 1959-60 was a time of study and planning for an- 
ticipated changes in the lending services of the Division of 
Library Extension. Several study committees in the past had 
recommended that the Department of Education investigate the 
desirability of having the book lending services of the Division of 
Library Extension transferred by contract to the Enoch Pratt 
Free Library. Careful consideration of this proposal led to the 
conclusion that the increasingly specialized requests for supple- 
mentary books and other materials could best and more economic- 
ally be met through the resources of the Enoch Pratt Free Library 
rather than through the building up of the book collection of the 
Division of Library Extension. According to plans developed by 
the Department and the Enoch Pratt Free Library and approved 
by the State Board of Education, the contract for the Enoch Pratt 
Free Library to become the State Resources Center will become 
effective July 1, 1960. 

The contract states : 

"Pratt Library shall extend to the State of Maryland through 
authorized public libraries, State-supported hospital and correctional 
institutions and to individuals in certain cases as defined by mutual 
agreement between the Pratt Library and the Department of Educa- 
tion the privilege of borrowing from the collection of the Pratt Library 
circulating materials, including books, pamphlets, films, duplicate copies 
of periodicals. 

"It is the intent of the agreement that the Pratt Library shall 
become a State resource center for adult books infrequently needed, 
expensive, or too specialized for usual purchase by other libraries. 
Recent adult books of the type referred to as 'best sellers,' recent popu- 
lar fiction, and materials in current general demand are the responsi- 
bility of the local library. 

"Public libraries and certain school and college libraries have been 
supplied by the Enoch Pratt Free Library with supplies of request 
forms, copies of film catalogs, and current monthly lists of books added, 
and the pertinent regulations regarding loans of books, films, and 
other materials. There are special regulations for film use. Borrow- 
ing libraries will make their own regulations and procedui'es to insure 
maximum use, adequate care, and prompt return of materials." 

Committees of librarians in the State met with the staff of 
the Division of Library Extension and developed a plan for the 
distribution of the some 100,000 books and other materials in the 
Division collection. It was decided that juvenile books would be 
allocated directly to the public libraries in the State and a sched- 
ule was set up for selection by the libraries. The adult film col- 
lection and the materials on Maryland history were turned over 
to the Enoch Pratt Free Library to be made available throughout 
the State. The State Library in Annapolis received several hun- 
dred books appropriate for its purposes. Books, pamphlets, and 
periodicals in education and related fields became a part of the 
Department's professional or curriculum library. The remainder 
of the collection is being distributed to public libraries that pre- 
pare and present joint plans for the sharing in the use of the 



56 Ninety-Fourth Annual Report 

books among two or more county library systems. It is expected 
that the selection and distribution of the collection will be com- 
pleted in December, 1960. 

During 1959-60, the Division of Library Extension loaned 
65,508 books, periodicals and audio-visual materials. Approxi- 
mately 70 per cent of the loans were made to public libraries to 
meet requests for additional or specialized material. Juvenile 
books accounted for 43 per cent of all loans, most of these being 
bulk loans for extended periods of time. Most of the requests for 
adult books were for specific materials and were for a one-month 
period. Audio-visual materials and exhibits accounted for 18 per 
cent of all loans. 

A collection of some 800 new juvenile books was scheduled 
for exhibit in most counties to give teachers, parents, librarians, 
and children an opportunity to see and examine these new ma- 
terials and to serve as an aid in selection and purchase for school 
and public libraries. A special exhibit was prepared for the State 
Convention of the Maryland Congress of Parents and Teachers. 

School Libraries 

Undoubtedly the most important development in school 
libraries in 1959-60 was the publication by the American Library 
Association of the long awaited standards. The new standards 
are truly a landmark, as it is the first time that national educa- 
tion associations and the national library association have worked 
together in the formulation of standards for school libraries. 

They had an immediate impact in Maryland as the philos- 
ophy expressed in them is the same as that generally accepted 
here — that the school library is an essential part of instruction. 
They will also serve in helping schools evaluate their own pro- 
gram and to determine goals for future growths. 

As instruction makes greater demands on library materials 
and services, funds for the purchase of materials and personnel 
increase. Many large high schools now have two or more librar- 
ians. In some counties and in Baltimore City a clerical assistant 
rather than a second librarian is employed. 

Some counties are experimenting with school libraries open 
in the late afternoon or early evening; there were experiments 
during the summer in keeping elementary school libraries open 
during vacation months. 

There is an increasing trend for county-wide studies of li- 
brary service. Cecil County conducted a thorough study of all 
of its school libraries, with recommendations for improvement of 
service made at all levels, from the local school to the County 
Board of Education; Howard and Carroll counties made studies 
of their elementary school libraries ; Frederick County school li- 
brarians made a study, going back five years, showing progress 
and needs; Baltimore County school librarians evaluated their 



Maryi^nd Statk Department of Education 57 

own libraries in terms of the new standards and established both 
immediate and long-term goals for the improvement of the serv- 
ice in relation to instruction. Several pieces of action research 
have been done which have benefited not only the local school but 
other librarians and school administrators. 

The fact that elementary school libraries are increasing in 
number seems to show that elementary teachers are finding them 
essential to their classroom teaching, since it is usually the class- 
room teacher who must assume additional responsibilities if there 
is a central elementary school library. Baltimore City, Baltimore, 
Frederick, and Montgomery counties are employing elementary 
school librarians ; outside of these units, there are only a few in 
the State. 

The theme for the three regional meetings of school librar- 
ians sponsored by the State Department of Education was The 
Library in the Instructional Program. Twenty-one per cent of 
the total attendance was comprised of school administrators in- 
terested in the topic and in improving the libraries in their own 
areas. 

Publications 

1959 SUPPLEMENT TO AUDIO-VISUAL CATALOG 1957 

MARYLAND LIBRARIES 1958-59, a mimeographed copy of the 
Division's report and statistics about libraries 

23 COUNTY LIBRARIES 1960— OUR GOAL, a reprint from the 
Maryland Parent-Teacher, November, 1959, which tells of 
gains in Maryland public library services, urges citizen in- 
terest in getting county libraries established in the six coun- 
ties without them, and explains the aims, methods of opera- 
tion, and distribution of rural library development funds 
under the Library Services Act. 

Public Libraries 

Plans for library development moved ahead and became 
clarified through the work of several study committees composed 
of librarians and trustees in the State. 

The Area Library Committee appointed by the State Super- 
intendent of Schools in November, 1959, was charged with "form- 
ulating specific steps for the establishment of area libraries and 
making recommendations on: (a) Criteria for establishment; 
(b) suggested geographical location; (c) financial support; (d) 
method of operation." It met regularly during the year. Consult- 
ant to the Committee was Miss Marian Moshier, recently retired 
Director of Library Extension in New York State. The report 
of the Committee prepared and submitted in July, 1960, recom- 
mends the establishment of area library reference, information, 
and consultant services in five or six of the existing public 



58 Ninety-Fourth Annual Report 

libraries in the State whose book resources and geographical lo- 
cation make it feasible for them to provide additional services to 
the smaller county libraries in an area. The report further recom- 
mends local control and administration of the additional services 
and a formula for State financial support to the local libraries 
for these added functions. 

Federal Library Services Act Funds 

Since 1957 Maryland has received Federal funds annually 
for the development and improvement of public library services 
in rural areas. Funds have been allocated equally to existing 
county libraries, and special establishment grants have been 
made to newly established county libraries. Calvert, Carroll, and 
Worcester counties have established county libraries and received 
special grants under this program. Beginning in July, 1960, 
Allegany County will establish county-wide library service and 
become eligible for such funds. 

During this period the amount of funds available has ex- 
ceeded the Maryland formula for the distribution of funds. For 
this reason and in order to incorporate and encourage current 
trends in cooperative practices among libraries, a committee of 
librarians was appointed to study and make recommendations for 
an amendment to the existing plan. The Committee's report 
adopted by the State Board of Education, recommended that in 
1960-61: (1) Supplementary funds be used to help finance co- 
operative plans and projects developed by two or more county 
libraries for the improvement of rural library service and (2) 
funds be used to provide additional services and consultant staff 
in the Division of Library Extension. The Committee further 
recommended that in 1960-61 the entire plan be reviewed and 
revised for the next five years, if the Federal Library Services 
Act is extended for that period of time. 

Conferences 

I. The annual conference for library trustees and public 
library administrators of State-aided libraries was well attended 
on January 15, 1960, at the Southern Hotel. Each county library 
and Baltimore City were represented. Mr. Emerson Greenaway, 
Director of the Free Library of Philadelphia, spoke on "Total 
Library Service for Maryland." This was followed by a panel dis- 
cussion of "How Is Maryland Working toward Total Library 
Service" and small discussion groups posing questions to the 
panel. Mrs. Ramond A. Young, President of the American As- 
sociation of Library Trustees of Columbia, Missouri, spoke on the 
"Trustee Responsibility in Total Library Service for Maryland," 
and Dr. Thomas G. Pullen, Jr., State Superintendent of Schools, 
followed with "How Can Maryland Accomplish Total Library 
Service." Dr. Pullen presided in the morning and Mr. Jerome 



Maryland State Department of Education 59 

Framptom, Jr., President of the State Board of Education, pre- 
sided at the luncheon and afternoon session. 

II. On May 4 and May 11, 1960, at the Talbot County Free 
Library, Easton, the Division sponsored an in-service training 
institute in the use of reference books for the non-professional 
library workers in the eastern part of the State. Miss Mary N. 
Barton, retired head of the Reference Department of the Enoch 
Pratt Free Library, was the instructor. Thirty-two people at- 
tended and were advised on how to help the public to use refer- 
ence books, such as encyclopedias, dictionaries, almanacs, atlases, 
and books of bibliography and biography. The response was en- 
thusiastic, and it is planned to give a similar course in other parts 
of the State next year. 

III. On May 25 and 26, 1960, the Division of Library Exten- 
sion and the Adult Services Section of the Maryland Library As- 
sociation jointly sponsored an institute on "Aging in the Modern 
World: The Public Library's Role." About 50 librarians at- 
tended. Panelists and speakers included : Mr. Gerald Monsman, 
Executive Director, Maryland Commission on Aging; Dr. Earl 
Moses, Professor of Sociology, Morgan College ; Dr. Mason Lord, 
Medical Director, Old Age and Chronic Disease Division, Balti- 
more City Hospitals; Miss Noeta Larson, Chief, Welfare Branch, 
Old Age and Survivors Insurance, U.S. Social Security Adminis- 
tration, Woodlawn; Mrs. Mildred Atkinson, Director, Christian 
Social Relations, The Council of Churches and Christian Educa- 
tion of Maryland-Delaware, 14 West Madison Street, Baltimore ; 
Dr. S. Ross Taggert, Assistant County Health Officer, Prince 
George's County, 3269 Worthington, N.W., Washington, D. C. 
and Dr. John Walker Powell, Fund for Adult Education. This in- 
stitute was one in a series designed to improve the adult education 
services of public libraries. 

IV. A leadership training institute for librarians and leaders 
of study-discussion programs was held in the fall of 1959. This 
institute for practicing leaders of existing groups focused on the 
availability and use of "packaged" programs and on the purposes 
and values of discussion groups. Consultant was Dr. John Walker 
Powell, the author of many books and articles on discussion 
groups and currently with the Fund for Adult Education. 

Highlights 

The Charles County Public Library received a Dorothy Can- 
field Fisher Award of $1,000 given by the Book of the Month 
Club to each of nine libraries for progress in developing library 
service in a small county area. 

Trustees of Maryland public libraries have organized into a 
formal group known as the Maryland Association of Public Li- 
brary Trustees and have become a section of the Maryland Li- 
brary Association. 



60 Ninety-Fourth Annual Report 

The Maryland Library Association and the Maryland Asso- 
ciation of Public Library Trustees have developed a plan for the 
improvement of the financial support formula for public libraries, 
for a State Aid incentive for library buildings, and for area 
library services. They plan to seek legislative action at the 1961 
meeting of the General Assembly. The enactment of this legisla- 
tion vi'ould be a major step in the improvement of public libraries. 

New library buildings have been completed or are under 
construction in Bel Air and Havre de Grace in Harford County, 
in Little Falls and Gaithersburg in Montgomery County, and in 
Princess Anne in Somerset County. Plans for new buildings are 
being developed in Wicomico, Washington, Baltimore, and How- 
ard counties. 



Maryland State Department of Education 61 

division of vocational education 

Adult Education 

The unprecedented change in technical subject matter makes 
it imperative that farmers keep well informed on the findings of 
most recent research. While the enrollment in adult education in 
agriculture is not increasing to a marked degree, the quality and 
nature of instruction has shown great improvement. The content 
of this program naturally is based on the farming problems of the 
community. In addition to the usual range of problems there has 
been a persistent demand for help in the areas of farm mechanics 
and farm management. Excellent courses in both of these areas 
have been provided wherever and whenever they have been re- 
quested. 

Increasing enrollment in adult programs indicates a growing 
interest in all phases of home economics. The major emphasis 
in program development is obtained in these features of the pro- 
gram : 

1. An increased variety of course offerings 

2. Additional classes available in convenient neighborhood centers 

3. Additional offerings in short series classes of 6 to 10 sessions 

4. Additional in-service education program for teachers 

5. Development of curriculum material 

The resurgence of home sewing is erasing all income distinc- 
tions. This is reflected in the great demand for classes in all 
phases of clothing construction. During 1959-60 approximately 
6,000 adults were enrolled in classes in clothing construction, meal 
preparation and services, home crafts, interior decoration and 
design, home management, millinery, family finance, and con- 
struction of draperies and slipcovers. 

Enrollments during the year 1959-60 indicate an increase in 
the number of classes and an increase in the number of men and 
women engaged in Trade and Industrial Training. The enroll- 
ment in this area was spread over trade and technical classes 
which were planned and operated for the purpose of increasing 
the student's knowledge of a particular trade, improve his skills, 
and introduce him to more modern methods. 

A special two-year technician training program, which pro- 
vides training in electronics, machine tool design, and is supple- 
mented by related subjects, such as science, blueprint reading, 
and shop mathematics, was offered as preparatory and in-service 
education. 

Distributive education is intended to help individuals em- 
ployed in distributive occupations to improve their efficiency. The 
number of workers in these occupations is second to the number 
of workers in manufacturing. 

There has been a trend for distributive education to move 
into the areas of insurance, finance, and real estate ; also, to move 
up to management and supervisory levels of instruction. 



62 Ninety-Fourth Annual Report 

The Fire Service Extension program has grown consistently. 
Last year 21 of the 23 counties had one or more fireman training 
classes. The total enrollment was 1,865. Of this number, 1,594 
were in the basic program, and the remaining 271 were in ad- 
vanced programs and sections. In 1960 there was a total of 80 
classes for this basic training and 14 advanced training programs. 

The Tax Assessors program has contributed much to the pro- 
fessionalization of assessing practices and in bringing Maryland 
to the top level of performance in this area. Last year's program 
enrolled 42 individuals and among the presentations and topics, 
the following were offered : 

Importance of Equalizing Real Estate Tax Distribution 
Basic Law of Assessments 
Better Public Relations 

The Department of Industrial Education, University of 
Maryland, is currently carrying on an extensive study in connec- 
tion with "Direct Camera-to-Receiver Television" instruction in 
the technical areas of woodworking, machine shop, sheet metal, 
electricity, electronics, graphic arts, and welding. The problem 
of this study is to investigate the effectiveness and possibilities of 
the direct camera-to-receiver television hook-up in a single class- 
room or laboratory. It is proposed that the study will operate on 
individual teacher involvement in which the instructor uses the 
equipment in special instances to illustrate or magnify operations 
or processes not easily visible by the whole class. In this respect 
the television facility becomes a "close scrutiny" observer for the 
whole class, permitting the students to see more clearly that 
which needs to be seen. It is an exploratory study involving 
actual teaching situations in the technical areas. The study should 
have implications for both vocational and industrial arts educa- 
tion. 

Vocational Agriculture 

The vocational agricultural program in Maryland, while 
showing no increase in enrollment, has made progress during the 
current year. There has been a marked improvement in facilities, 
particularly for farm mechanics. School farms, land laboratories, 
and demonstration plots are being used more effectively — in many 
cases to demonstrate new principles and practices established by 
research. A wide variety of Future Farmers of America activi- 
ties helps to develop rural leadership and provide motivation for 
teaching and learning. Adequate local support and financing en- 
able the State F.F.A. Association to be an effective force in reach- 
ing rural Maryland boys. In addition to a wide variety of local 
activities, three to four hundred boys annually participate in the 
State F.F.A, convention in late June, while forty boys annually 
attend the National F.F.A. convention in Kansas City. Progres- 
sive advancement through the various degrees of this organiza- 
tion has greatest possible merit in stimulating scholarship and 
outstanding accomplishments. 



Maryland State Department of Education 63 

Home Economics 

Supervisors and teachers have worked toward an improved 
instructional program in a variety of interesting ways. Five 
major emphases were evident in curriculum development 
throughout the State : a study of the most effective ways to help 
students develop the competencies needed for home and family 
living in our contemporary society; the effective progression of 
learning experiences from one level to the next ; greater emphasis 
in the area of child growth and development; development of 
learning experiences for a wide range of abilities ; the develop- 
ment of a closer home-school relationship, especially through the 
home experience program. 

The program of work emphasis for Future Homemakers of 
America and New Homemakers of America clubs dealt with the 
teen-age consumer. Chapters planned and carried out various 
types of projects to help young people develop greater economic 
competency. The following represent various types of projects in 
which club members participated : conducted a survey of sources 
of income and teen-age spending habits ; planned and purchased 
small equipment for a new home economics department; took 
field trips to stores and manufacturing companies; invited spe- 
cialists to talk on credit and installment buying ; developed guides 
for selecting wisely home furnishings and clothing. 

Trade and Industrial Education 

Thirty-eight different trade curricula are offered in the vari- 
ous schools of the State, with smaller schools sometimes offering 
only one or two and larger schools as many as 30. 

Part-time cooperative training programs operate as a part 
of trade and business education programs. Through these pro- 
grams the schools are able to provide preparatory training in occu- 
pational areas where the school does not have proper instructional 
facilities and also in areas where employment opportunities do not 
justify a day-trade program. 

Educational services to industry, business, and labor provide 
assistance in planning and developing education and training pro- 
grams peculiar to establishment needs. Programs are concerned 
with areas as related instruction for apprenticeship, on-the-job 
training for veterans, management and supervision, human and 
industrial relations, safety, teacher and leadership training. Such 
programs may also employ and demonstrate the use of various 
techniques such as group dynamics, incident processes, brain- 
storming. 

Technical Education 

The extremely rapid technological change in the State is pre- 
senting important new challenges to vocational education. A 
State-wide survey is being conducted to determine vocational 



64 Ninety-Fourth Annual Hepoht 

trade and technical education needs of youth, adults, and com- 
munities of the State. The State-wide study will consist of a 
sampling of a representative number of firms in the 46,000 units 
covered by the Unemployment Compensation Division of Employ- 
ment Security by counties and occupational groups. The study 
will attempt to identify educational needs in new and emerging 
occupations, as well as annual employment needs in those occupa- 
tions where employment requires preparatory and extension edu- 
cation. 

During the year the greatest consumer of time has been pre- 
paratory work on the vocational education survey of Maryland. 
June 30 found vocational-interest questionnaires returned from 
a random sampling of ninth and twelfth graders and the industry 
questionnaire printed and mailed to 5,000 employers in the State. 
During the month of July interviewers were employed to conduct 
a follow-up to the employer questionnaire and assist in the collec- 
tion of technician data. 

Title III of the George-Barden Act has encouraged a re- 
evaluation of the youth program of industrial education and 
brought into focus the needs and possibilities. It has provided 
an opportunity for the organization and operation of preparatory 
and technical education at post-secondary adult levels. It has 
enabled the establishment of terminal, technical programs in 
community colleges and the offering of extension courses for up- 
grading employees in technical occupations. 

The implementation of Title III Programs has encouraged 
the use of Advisory Committees and a closer liaison between in- 
dustry and personnel. It has given substantial assistance in the 
procurement of equipment and improvement of facilities for more 
advanced technical education. Advisory committees are of great 
help in the planning and organization of new programs. The 
larger areas, such as Baltimore City, have an advisory committee 
for each curriculum offering. 

Veterans Training 

The veterans' apprenticeship, institutional on-f arm training, 
and on-the-job training programs that began in 1946 for the 
purpose of restoring lost educational opportunities to service 
men and women whose educational and vocational programs were 
interrupted because of active service in the armed forces were 
continued during 1959-60 under the jurisdiction and guidance of 
this Department. Many additional veterans were enrolled in all 
types of courses. Types of training offered were preparatory, re- 
fresher, supplemental, and specialized. During the year the 
number of establishments requesting approval diminished as 
there are fewer veterans that were eligible. Under present legis- 
lation persons that were not in the armed forces on or before 
January 31, 1955, are not eligible for educational benefits upon 
being discharged from service. 



Maryland State Department of Education 65 

During- 1959-60 approximately 600 visits were made for the 
purposes of supervision and assisting employers and veterans. 
Employers were assisted in setting up new programs and investi- 
gation of discrepancies brought to the attention of this Depart- 
ment by the Veterans Administration were investigated, and re- 
viewed, and reports were completed. In general, assistance was 
given to any employer or veteran in the State that requested it. 

Practical Nurse Education 

The high school program in practical nurse education at the 
Mergenthaler Vocational-Technical High School, Baltimore, 
began in September, 1958. In September, 1959, a twelfth-grade 
group entered the South Baltimore General Hospital, the cooper- 
ating agency, on a full-time basis for clinical experiences. This 
group was graduated from Mergenthaler Vocational-Technical 
High School on June 3, 1960. 

At present plans are being made to re-activate the adult pro- 
gram. This program would be offered for the upgrading of 
nurses' aides at Sinai Hospital. The teacher-coordinator and 
people from the hospital have developed a program which is at 
present before the Maryland State Board of Examiners of Nurses 
for approval. 



66 Ninety-Fourth Annual Report 

DIVISION OF VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION 

The major emphasis of the Vocational Rehabilitation pro- 
gram during the fiscal year 1959-60 followed the broad lines of 
staff development, exploration and appraisal of the nature and 
extent of the rehabilitation program in Maryland, orientation of 
staffs of cooperating agencies, encouragement of research, and 
increase in services to disabled persons. 

In the latter area several creditable advances were made in 
case production and case load increases which indicate greater 
efficiency and broadened services. The number of disabled per- 
sons rehabilitated was 1,413 and the number served was 5,743, an 
increase of 71 rehabilitants and 342 cases served over the previous 
year. The number of new referrals, 3,719, was an increase of 285 
over the previous year and, added to the 5,190 cases carried over 
from the year before, brought the total case load to 8,909, or an 
increase of 652 persons. These increases indicate that individuals 
and agencies are aware of the services available to the disabled 
through the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation. 

The total cost of the Vocational Rehabilitation program in 
Maryland in 1960 was $1,036,534, of which $584,809.19 was Fed- 
eral funds and $451,724.81 was State funds. 

Disability Determinations 

The Disability Determinations Unit of the Division since 

1955 has been faced from time to time with changed demands in 
administering evaluation standards, not only by amendments to 
the Social Security law but also as a result of judicial decisions 
on appealed cases. According to the 1960 Annual Report of the 
U. S. Department of Health, Education and Welfare, "Largely as 
a result of the addition of disability benefits to the program in 

1956 requests for hearings increased 512 per cent in 3 years. 
. . ." As a consequence, a tightening of standards in securing 

needed adequate and pertinent medical data, a more careful and 
critical analysis and evaluation of the medical evidence, and a 
more logical treatment of that evidence in arriving at conclusions 
reached in the disability determinations have increased both the 
work load involved and the need for technical proficiency of the 
staff. 

To meet the increased demands of the work load, the major 
objective of the year was to reduce the length of time required 
to process cases through the agency by improving internal pro- 
cedures, improving preparation of case material before referral, 
and speeding up the gathering of medical evidence for determina- 
tion purposes and increasing medical consultative time. 

The internal procedures were improved by adding one coun- 
selor and increasing the medical advisory service and more rigid 
and extracting training of the staff on the job. 



Maryland State Department of Education 67 

To improve the preparation of case material before referral, 
determinations personnel visited Social Security District offices 
to outline the needs for securing the various types of medical 
evidence needed to support the allegations of disability made in 
the application. 

The speeding up process in gathering medical evidence was 
attained through increasing the number of medical examiners 
who evaluate clients and spreading the examinations to more 
doctors and securing evaluation of applicants with respiratory 
and cardiac impairment through the Cardio-pulmonary Labora- 
tory at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. 

During the year the Disability Determinations Program 
processed 4,886 new disability claims, reviewed 656 appealed de- 
cisions, evaluated 364 claims to determine if disability was con- 
tinuing, and handled 758 other cases which involved special prob- 
lems of an adjudicative or administrative nature. 

Vending Stands 

In the Vending Stand Program, licensed by the State Board 
of Education, under which vending stands are operated by blind 
persons in Federal buildings within the State, one new stand was 
opened during the year, bringing the total to eighteen. The cost of 
this program was $13,966.21 divided between State and Federal 
funds. 

Cooperation M'ith Other Agencies 

This was the final year of a three-year study of the vocational 
rehabilitation of chronically ill psychiatric out-patients, con- 
ducted by the Henry Phipps Psychiatric CHnic of the Johns Hop- 
kins Hospital under a grant from the Federal Office of Vocational 
Rehabilitation, and in cooperation with the Maryland Division of 
Vocational Rehabilitation. The purposes of the study were : 

1. To increase the understanding of the rehabilitation process and 
to obtain leads regarding criteria for selecting patients for 
different treatment programs, and 

2. By studying the Vocational Rehabilitation Service psychiatric 
population and evaluating treatment results, to ascertain 
w^hether a psychiatric service facility associated vi^ith the Voca- 
tional Rehabilitation Division would be justified. 

The Division participated in the study by assigning a coun- 
selor to the project and by referring to the project rehabilitation 
clients in need of specialized rehabilitation services. In the light 
of the results achieved with the limited number of clients in- 
volved, the study indicated that persons handicapped by mental 
illness, particularly in cases of chronic and long-standing dis- 
ability, might be served most effectively through a psychiatric 
facility associated with the Division in which there could be pro- 
vided an integrated program of group therapy, occupational ther- 
apy, and psychological, social, and rehabilitation counseling 
services. 



68 Ninety-Fourth Annual Report 

Another activity in the field of psychiatric rehabilitation was 
the fourth Annual Institute of Region III of the OfRce of Voca- 
tional Rehabilitation, which was conducted at Spring Grove State 
Hospital. Previous institutes in this series had been held in North 
Carolina and the District of Columbia, where several counselors 
from the Division had attended, but the Division was able to 
participate more extensively and profitably in this one because of 
its proximity and the fact that many of the staff and consultants 
were from Maryland institutions from which our counselors re- 
ceive numerous referrals for rehabilitation services. The purpose 
of these institutes is to train counselors who work, particularly in 
hospital settings, with persons handicapped through the effects 
of mental illness. As there is each year an increase in the number 
of such persons referred to the Division, it is important that the 
counseling staff become proficient in working with this group, 
who do not always respond to the traditional rehabilitation pro- 
cedures developed in working with the physically handicapped. 
The knowledge gained in these institutes is also valuable to gen- 
eral rehabilitation counselors who may not be particularly in- 
volved in serving the mentally ill since a large percentage of all 
persons with handicaps show some psychological effects of their 
disabilities. 

In another area, the rehabilitation of disabled persons of 
school age, the Metropolitan Baltimore district office intensified 
its program of vocational rehabilitation orientation for guidance 
counselors in the public school system of Baltimore City. Rehabil- 
itation supervisors and counselors met on several occasions with 
public school guidance counselors to discuss the philosophy, serv- 
ices, and procedures of Vocational Rehabilitation and the nature 
and extent of disabilities which may be handicapping in their ef- 
fects. It is hoped that through these informal conferences the 
school counselors have arrived at a better understanding of the 
program of Vocational Rehabilitation so that they may be alert 
to identify pupils with handicaps who might profit from the serv- 
ices of the Division. Early referral and guidance by rehabilitation 
counselors before handicapped children are graduated from high 
school is of the utmost importance, and the cooperation of the 
school guidance counselors is extremely valuable. 

Annual Staff Conference 

At a meeting of the supervisory staff in December, 1959, six 
areas of study were selected as representative of our most urgent 
problems, and a chairman was designated for a committee to pre- 
pare material in each of these areas. The six dealt with The Older 
Worker, The Mentally Handicapped, Services for the Blind, 
Workmen's Compensation, Severely Disabled, and Rehabilitation 
Centers and Workshops. In addition, committees were appointed 
to submit for discussion statements on Legislation, Research and 
Experimentation, and Public Relations. 



Maryland State Department of Education 69 

Workmen's Compensation 

The General Assembly of 1960 amended the vocational re- 
habilitation law to strengthen cooperation between the Division 
and the Workmen's Compensation Commission. Provision was 
made for the establishment of an Injured Workers' Rehabilitation 
Committee to advise the commission on employment problems 
facing their claimants. This committee is composed of the Chair- 
man of the Workmen's Compensation Commission, the State Di- 
rector of Vocational Rehabilitation, an employer, an employee, a 
physician, and a representative of a casualty insurance company. 
Authorization was given in the law for placing on the Commis- 
sion's staff a rehabilitation counselor to work in cooperation with 
the Division. 

It shall be the duty of the rehabilitation counselor to select 
from reports of permanent-partial and permanent-total disability 
all cases where vocational rehabilitation appears to be appropri- 
ate and to refer all such cases to the Division of Vocational Re- 
habilitation within sixty days after the date of injury, or as soon 
thereafter as is possible under the circumstances. Upon request 
of the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation, the Workmen's 
Compensation Commission shall make available a complete med- 
ical evaluation, including prognosis of work potential, of any 
worker whose case has been referred by the Commission. 

Television 

In an effort to give recognition to those disabled persons who 
have become adjusted in suitable employment, and to inspire and 
encourage others, the State Department of Education and tele- 
vision station WMAR-TV, Channel 2, Baltimore, inaugurated a 
public service program entitled "Comeback," on February 27, 
1952. With the exception of one summer vacation period and a 
few schedule conflicts, the telecast has appeared regularly every 
other week since that time. The series celebrated its eighth an- 
niversary on February 24, 1960, at which time several former 
guests were honored. 

Television viewers want programs that combine public in- 
formation, education, and human interest; and since all of these 
elements can be found in the stories of courageous people who 
have overcome the vocational handicap of the disabling effects of 
accident and disease, "Comeback" follows a pattern that stresses 
sincerity and simplicity, and recognizes handicapped people as 
persons who hold a vital place in society and who are essential to 
the well-being of their community. 



70 



Ninety-Fourth Annual Report 



TABLE 1 — Actual Days Schools Were Open: Opening and Closing Dates: 
Maryland Public Schools: Year Ending June 30, 1960 





Number 


Date of 


Date of 




Number 


Date of 


Date of 




Actual 


Opening 


Closing 




Actual 


Opening 


Closing 


Local Unit 


Days 


Schools 


Schools 


Local Unit 


Days 


Schools 


Schools 




Schools 


September 


June 




Schools 


September 


June 




Were Open 


1959 


1960 




Were Open 


1959 


1960 


Allegany 


180 


9 


10 


Harford 


181 


8 


17 


Anne Arundel 


183 


8 


17 


Howard 


180 


10 


17 


BaltimoreCity 


181 


8 


17 


Kent 


180 


8 


13 


Baltimore. . . . 


182 


8 


17 










Calvert 


180 


3 


10 


Montgomery 


180 


8 


23 










Pr. George's . 


181 


8 


22 


Caroline 


180 


8 


10 


Queen Anne's 


180 


8 


15 


Carroll 


181 


8 


16 


St. Mary's.. . 


180 


9 


16 


Cecil 


180 


8 


10 


Somerset 


181 


8 


7 


Charles 


180 


9 


15 










Dorchester. . . 


181 


1 


10 


Talbot 


180 


8 


10 










Washington. . 


180 


9 


10 


Frederick .... 


181 


8 


16 


Wicomico. . . . 


181 


8 


10 


Garrett 


180 


2 


13 


Worcester . . . 


180 


8 


10 



TABLE 2 — Fall Enrollment, Teaching Staff, Number of Schools: Public and 
Nonpublic: State of Maryland: Year Ending June 30, 1960 



Type of School 



Grand Total 



High 



ENROLLMENT 



Total 

Public* . . . 
Nonpublic 



708,512 
581,834 
126,678 



454,671 
349,152 
105,519 



253,841 

232,682 

21,159 



TEACHING STAFF 



Total 

Public* . . . 
Nonpublic 




10,795 



NUMBER OF SCHOOLS 



Total 

Public* . . . 
Nonpublic 




353 

258 
95 



*Includes enrollment, teaching staff, and number of elementary schools at State Teachers Colleges. 
tExcludes duplicates. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



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t-" oT 00 o in eo" •^" o" o" cc 
cococoTfTfinmininin 



NoONcoinostDcDinTt 

NOOiOKOOOOO-^tOt- 

a-^o_cc 00 c- N 00 ec to^t- 
00* oo" o in (m" .-r o" !-<" CO in" 
coco-^-^inininininin 



<NO!0 0". in3:— <.-iN— I 

0000OC000(ML-tDcC-H 

N in c<i_oo_in 'C c-^oo^-tf (M_ 
oo" o" to" co" •-<"—'" fJ m" t>" oT 
ccin-^ininininininin 



— ■^N-^cct^Neccot- 
ininmtoo-. i-iiMoinoi 



<^i-(,-(,-ilM(NNIN 



4;o WTf 05 

■ij nj liw w< •-- ---l CO N CO C5 

t- o> o cjoq c-_^o "-"^c-^o 
00 o 05 oo" Tf* -4' c-* n" in* .-T 
Ttt^OiNinooocoinoo 
cococo-^-^-^inininin 



• M CO •^ in "^ c- 00 ai 



iMNr:coco<oc<i«Dj-. 00 
oooinoiniM(Mt-coN 



r)<.-(OOr-llOCOaiOO.H 

■*-^i-iff4Ti">iiin!Oeoco 



inNinoo<-<i>-!iit-.-Hi> 
ovON-HinoO'-icja-. 00 

C0»-l«O!Dr-lr-I.Hi-l 



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o ca o_oo !£> Ti<_in en in ;o_ 

oT — <" CO* to oT 00 (^ CO o oT 
CJcocococoeocOTfinTji 



NtooomMcotooico-H 
ot^co^inininoo-^-H 



cococo-^co-^-^ininTf 



0!Oooo(Noioo-*coin 
a;coa:oojinaiinino 



coco-^co-^-^inininin 



cooooaitot-oot-oot~ 
o-ftf-^cocoini-itoej 
;ct--*inino«050c-co 



Nooeacoinastotoin'* 

NOOJOitOOOOOTjitOt- 
O: O CO 00_^t> N 00 OT !0_C-__ 

oooooinwi-TorHco'in 
coco^-^inininininin 



N O 'vD a: m J: -^ -H N •-I 
OOOOOCOOOC^t-tOCO'H 

<N in N oo_^ in tD_ c-_ oo_ ■^^^ N 
00* o to" co" -h" ^ m" m" t-* 05" 
co-^-^ininininininin 



^•*(M-*coc-iNeoeoi- 
inmintoos'^Noinoi 



1-1,-1,-lr-li-lr-INNC^OJ 



^in(M'^oocoin5io5'-i 
ocoeJcot-oooo-Hinoj 



M-^tOOOOlO-HCOTfTl" 
NNNNNCOCOCOeOCO 



o-HucO'S'intot-oojs 



oto-<too-^oooas«0'^ 
oat-o-Ht-tocooooeo 
en en -^in OT oi^oo^o N o 
NcvfeJNNNinwTfin 



inot-WNt-ooc-o^ 
inint-t-tDoooiNino 

N -H o to 05 to ^to t- eo 
cJeo'^-^int-'oour^in 



-#ininiM-*-*oot-o>m 

MC-int-ltDNOtOOtO 

to in in 00 ai t- in to in th 
■* in to* t-" oT o N TjT OT* -H 

-HrlrHr-lr-INNNlMCO 



O^TfcOtr-COCOOOtOt- 

^(Mt-coot-oooin 



i-t-HMNNMcacococo 



NMNNNcocoeococo 



e<ioo->i<.Hi>-<]<NcO'-in 

OVCOOC-tOTHNOOtO-H 

oo_^c-_o^rH i-Heo_co_^eo_eoeo_^ 
■"t* to* 00* (D N to oT 00* o tC* 
eoNNcococoeoeo-*-* 



OOOCOtOWCTsO-^NOS 

t-tDoooiOiOOCTiineoco 
c-_ co_ o_ [> w ^_ to tO_^ CO O)^ 
to" 00" -h" e<r t-" o oT o in •-< 
M(Ncococo-*eO'*-<)'in 




COCOOOOOC-OOrHNinM 



Nosoot-^HmosOTPW 

NNCO-^tOb-OOO^HCO 
tHi-li-Hi-trHr-ii-tWNN 



Oi-iNco-^mtoc-ooos 



Si 3 



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Maryland State Department of Education 



73 



00 .-te<3 tooo 



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t- TO t- m o_ 0'*m_t~c-_ 



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86 



Ninety-Fourth Annual Report 



TABLE 18— Number of Pupils*: Maryland Schools for Atypical Children 
and Institutions: Fall of 1959 



Number of Pupils 



Name and Location 



Nursery 
School 



Kinder- 
garten 



Ele- 
mentary 



High 



Special 



Total 
Number 

of 
Different 
Teachers 



Barrett School for Girls, Glen 
Burnie 

Benedictine School for Excep- 
tional Children, Ridgely 

Boys' Village of Maryland, Inc., 
Cheltenham 

Children's Rehabilitation Insti- 
tute, In-Patient Dept 

Children's Rehabilitation Insti- 
tute, Out-Patient Dept 

Friendly School, Baltimore 

Houses of Good Shepherd (2), 
Baltimore 

Linwood Children's Farm, EUi- 
cott City 

Marc Nursery School, Bethesda . 

Maryland School for Blind, Bal- 
timore 

Maryland School for Deaf, Fred- 
erick 

Maryland Training School for 
Boys, Loch Raven 

Montrose School for Girls, Reis- 
terstown 

Rosewood State Training School, 
Owings Mills 

St. Elizabeth's Home, Baltimore 

St. Francis' School of Special 
Education, Baltimore 

St. Maurice School, Bethesda. . . 

St. Vincent's Infant Home, Bal- 
timore 

School of the Chimes, Baltimore 

Searchlight Training Centers (2), 
Baltimore 

Twin Maples, Baltimore 

United Cerebral Palsy Nursery 
Treatment Center, Silver 
Spring 



34 
9 



62 
4 



90 

221 

50 

37 
25 

32 

6 

136 
95 

320 
20 

211 



70 



67 
26 



17 



29 



61 
63 
89 
60 



75 
18 



3 
2 

36 

27 

20 

9 

16 
1 

9 
3 

5 
12 

7 
3 



12 



♦Figures furnished by principals of schools. 

Note: These enrollments are also shown in TABLES IV and V. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



87 



TABLE 19— Total Resident Births in Maryland: 1930-1959 



Total Resident Births in Maryland 



Local Unit 



1950 


1951 


1952 


1953 


1954 


1955 


1956 


1957 


1958 


55,992 


61,081 


63,165 


64,523 


67,445 


69,205 


72,108 


76,127 


75,997 


1.803 


1,824 


1,785 


1,729 


1,577 


1,586 


1,583 


1,664 


1.634 


2,873 


2,969 


3.132 


3,444 


3,811 


3,840 


4,036 


4,574 


4,762 


21,382 


22,630 


22,775 


22,748 


23,523 


23,291 


23,782 


25,067 


24,464 


6,661 


7,489 


7,937 


8,547 


9,057 


9.699 


10,701 


11,740 


11,759 


400 


405 


427 


432 


431 


471 


413 


473 


421 


417 


396 


432 


431 


405 


423 


460 


393 


465 


771 


818 


1,019 


888 


921 


984 


995 


1,079 


1,095 


756 


801 


901 


958 


1,054 


1,163 


1,261 


1,437 


1,252 


746 


782 


684 


825 


877 


937 


891 


986 


987 


559 


630 


585 


597 


632 


588 


616 


625 


616 


1,342 


1,464 


1,438 


1,430 


1,519 


1,533 


1,597 


1.607 


1,577 


530 


508 


497 


467 


448 


448 


470 


420 


470 


1,419 


1,645 


1,789 


1,724 


1,855 


1,982 


1,917 


2,008 


2,042 


569 


597 


581 


615 


660 


698 


708 


734 


762 


313 


285 


318 


317 


354 


387 


320 


360 


373 


4,740 


5,478 


6,113 


6,275 


6,708 


7,053 


7,394 


7,593 


7,614 


5,508 


7,020 


7,250 


7,566 


7,687 


8.072 


8,997 


9,416 


9,761 


311 


298 


334 


279 


335 


386 


357 


322 


355 


883 


916 


881 


1,029 


1,116 


1,085 


1,046 


1,124 


1,118 


436 


432 


446 


427 


477 


429 


433 


388 


404 


427 


435 


458 


451 


431 


499 


470 


472 


453 


1,697 


1,714 


1,794 


1,771 


1,869 


1,967 


1,929 


1,935 


1,957 


894 


980 


1,002 


1,019 


1,061 


1,094 


1,144 


1,149 


1,091 


555 


565 


587 


554 


637 


590 


588 


561 


565 



1959 



Total State 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel . 
Baltimore City 
Baltimore. . . . 
Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester. . . 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery . . 
Prince George's 
Queen Anne's. 
St. Mary's. ... 
Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington . . . 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



77,165 

1,667 

5,058 

23,893 

11,993 

457 

435 

1.110 

1.281 

975 

560 

1.602 
444 

2.121 
857 
375 

7,848 

10,224 

362 

1,430 

403 

467 
1,894 
1,141 

568 



88 



Ninety-Fourth Annual Report 



TABLE 20— White Resident Births in Maryland: 1950-1959 









White Resident Births in 


Maryland 






Local Unit 
























1950 


1951 


1952 


1953 


1954 


1955 


1956 


1957 


1958 


1959 


Total State 


43,599 


47,992 


50,146 


50,918 


53,204 


54,548 


56,382 


59,122 


58,862 


59,538 


Allegany 

Anne Arundel. . , 
Baltimore City. . 

Baltimore 

Calvert 


1,769 

2,196 

14,168 

6,036 

148 


1,792 

2,322 

14,938 

6,932 

160 


1,758 

2,467 

14,989 

7.382 

186 


1,691 

2,734 

14,628 

7,999 

196 


1,540 

3,033 

14,949 

8,560 

169 


1,553 

3,137 

14,366 

9,209 

190 


1,554 

3,324 

14,032 

10,203 

175 


1,638 

3,752 

14,305 

11,146 

196 


1,608 

3,934 

13,380 

11,260 

183 


1,643 

4,197 

12,577 

11,495 

197 




319 
725 
695 
407 
317 


300 
778 
737 
397 
350 


325 
922 
834 
387 
342 


313 
840 
883 
457 
324 


301 
881 
979 
476 
370 


311 
912 
1,067 
527 
337 


352 

942 

1,173 

494 

327 


278 

1,016 

1,341 

560 

358 


346 

1,040 

1,153 

558 

349 


307 


Carroll 


1,055 


Cecil 


1,176 


Charles 

Dorchester 


549 
336 


Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 


1,189 
529 

1,241 
463 
231 

4,402 

4,775 

200 

659 

240 


1,304 
507 

1,426 
480 
204 

5,122 

6,157 

197 

690 

226 


1,306 
497 

1,557 
480 
224 

5,794 

6,430 

231 

675 

243 


1,282 
466 

1,493 
499 
209 

5,899 

6,705 

190 

812 

223 


1,369 
448 

1,625 
561 
258 

6,343 

6,782 

226 

877 

264 


1,388 
448 

1,763 
582 
257 

6,720 

7,108 

254 

831 

225 


1,431 
470 

1,695 
589 
215 

7,010 

7,880 

226 

798 

219 


1,468 
420 

1,755 
613 
244 

7,208 

8,290 

205 

831 

197 


1,438 
470 

1,804 
649 
247 

7,234 

8,650 

239 

844 

205 


1,431 
444 

1,858 
743 
252 


Montgomery 

Prince George's . 
Queen Anne's . . . 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 


7,450 
9,042 

243 
1,120 

192 


Talbot 


290 

1,647 

628 

325 


281 

1,684 

686 

322 


293 

1,769 

733 

322 


301 

1,731 

735 

308 


270 

1,825 

736 

362 


337 

1,925 

771 

330 


301 

1,882 

774 

316 


321 

1,882 

797 

301 


308 

1,909 

773 

281 


324 


Washington .... 

Wicomico 

Worcester 


1,835 
769 
303 



Maryland State Department of Education 



89 



TABLE 21— 


Colored Resi 


den I U 


irths in Maryland: 


1950-1959 




Local Unit 


Colored Resident Births in Maryland 




1950 


1951 


1952 


1953 


1954 


1955 


1956 


1957 


1958 


1959 


Total State 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel . . . 
Baltimore City. . 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 


12,393 

34 

677 

7,214 

625 

252 

98 

46 

61 

339 

242 

153 

1 

178 

106 

82 

338 
733 
111 
224 
196 

137 

50 

266 

230 


13,089 

32 

647 

7,692 

557 

245 

96 

40 

64 

385 

280 

160 

1 

219 

117 

81 

356 
863 
101 
226 
206 

154 

30 

294 

243 


13,019 

27 

665 

7,786 

555 

241 

107 

97 

67 

297 

243 

132 

232 
101 
94 

319 
820 
103 
206 
203 

165 

25 

269 

265 


13,605 

38 

710 

8,120 

548 

236 

118 

48 

75 

368 

273 

148 
1 
231 
116 
108 

376 
861 
89 
217 
204 

150 

40 

284 

246 


14,241 

37 

778 

8,574 

497 

262 

104 

40 

75 

401 

262 

150 

230 
99 
96 

365 
905 
109 
239 
213 

161 

44 

325 

275 


14,657 

33 

703 

8,925 

490 

281 

112 

72 

96 

410 

251 

145 

2i9 
116 
130 

333 
964 
132 
254 
204 

162 

42 

323 

260 


15,726 

29 

712 

9,750 

498 

238 

108 

53 

88 

397 

289 

166 

222 
119 
105 

384 
1,117 
131 
248 
214 

169 

47 
370 
272 


17,005 

26 

822 

10,762 

594 

277 

115 
63 
96 

426 
267 

139 

253 
121 
116 

385 
1,126 
117 
293 
191 

151 

53 

352 

260 


17,135 

26 

828 

11,084 

499 

238 

119 

55 

99 

429 

267 

139 

238 
113 
126 

380 
1,111 
116 
274 
199 

145 

48 

318 

284 


17,627 

24 

861 

11,316 

498 

260 

128 
55 
105 
426 
224 

171 

263 
114 
123 

398 
1,182 
119 
310 
211 

143 


Charles 

Dorchester 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery. . . . 
Prince George's . 
Queen Anne's. . . 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 


Washington .... 

Wicomico 

Worcester 


59 
372 
265 



90 



Ninety-Fourth Annual Report 



TABLE 22 
Withdrawals* from Public Schools; Counties of Maryland: Year Ending June 30, 1960 





Total 


Withdrawals by CodeI 


Local Unit 


Transferred to 
Other Schools 


W7 


W13 


W5 


W6 


W8 


W9 


WIO 


Wll 


W12 






Wl 


W2 


W3&4 


W14 



ELEMENTARY 



Total Counties . . . 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel 
Baltimore. . . . 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester. . . 
Frederick .... 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery . 

Prince George 
Queen Anne's. 
St. Mary's. . . 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington . . 
Wicomico. . . . 
Worcester. . . . 



21,411 


8,095 


308 


12,366 


64 


56 


146 




25 


27 


318 


5 




571 


286 


11 


246 


1 


4 


5 




1 


2 


15 






2,833 


1,097 


24 


1,631 


10 


3 


22 




2 


1 


43 






3,751 


1,236 


84 


2,309 


13 


7 


51 




1 




49 


1 




170 


75 




90 




2 


1 














189 


53 




126 


1 




2 




1 




5 






421 


177 




224 


5 


1 


3 






1 


10 






808 


276 


5 


512 


3 


1 


7 




1 


1 


2 






433 


125 


8 


279 


3 




6 






2 


10 






182 


48 




123 


1 








3 


1 


6 






669 


355 


5 


279 




4 


6 








20 






168 


57 


1 


88 




6 






4 




9 


3 




1,257 


482 


8 


736 


3 


2 


5 






1 


20 






460 


123 


3 


325 






2 




i 




6 






131 


34 




90 




1 






2 


i 


3 






2,944 


1,228 


83 


1,582 


3 


5 


5 




4 


8 


25 


i 




3,940 


1,495 


57 


2,291 


12 


10 


22 




2 




51 






123 


25 




92 


2 




1 






i 


2 






585 


114 


14 


449 


1 




2 








5 






147 


16 




122 


1 


3 


1 




i 


i 


2 






121 


50 




64 




2 


1 




2 




2 






867 


492 


4 


342 


4 


4 


2 






4 


15 






411 


197 


1 


200 


1 




2 






2 


8 






230 


54 




166 




i 








1 


8 







HIGH 



Total Counties. . . 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel 
Baltimore. . . . 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester. . . 
Frederick . . . . 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery . 

Prince George 
Queen Anne's 
St. Mary's. . . 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington . . 
Wicomico. . . . 
Worcester .... 



13,672 


1,735 


76 


4,768 


334 


46 


262 


307 


4,855 


46 


539 


72 


613 


472 


72 


1 


119 


8 


4 


6 


15 


168 




32 




46 


1,744 


168 


8 


623 


76 


5 


38 


25 


653 


3 


76 


10 


59 


2,680 


266 


14 


899 


45 


10 


85 


97 


1,080 


10 


50 


16 


108 


105 






23 


5 




1 




58 




7 


7 


4 


144 


9 




55 


6 


1 


1 


4 


62 




3 




3 


314 


35 




87 


8 




22 


4 


119 




20 




18 


366 


40 


1 


122 


6 


3 


5 


6 


154 


1 


4 


4 


18 


244 


16 




97 


3 


2 


1 




94 


1 


19 




11 


139 


11 




55 


5 


1 


4 




44 




9 




9 


453 


77 


2 


116 


13 


1 


6 


5 


184 


3 


17 


9 


14 


150 


3 




50 


2 






2 


63 




20 


1 


7 


654 


97 




244 


9 


3 


12 


13 


211 


2 


27 


5 


31 


250 


6 




113 


8 




5 


7 


74 


1 


14 


2 


20 


94 


6 




27 


9 


1 


1 


1 


34 




5 




10 


1,720 


327 


32 


713 


30 


3 


32 


42 


372 


17 


61 


9 


78 


2,492 


422 


10 


879 


66 


2 


15 


55 


847 


2 


86 




108 


168 


1 




74 








2 


81 




7 


2 




237 


9 


3 


125 


5 


1 


2 


4 


70 




10 




8 


117 


3 




22 


4 


3 


5 




60 




7 


2 


11 


110 


5 


1 


24 


2 


1 


1 


1 


58 




9 


2 


6 


623 


150 


4 


164 


20 


2 


8 




235 


5 


18 


1 


16 


254 


9 




78 


4 


2 


9 


10 


98 


1 


26 




15 


142 


3 




59 




1 


3 


14 


36 




12 


2 


12 



* Withdrawals who did not re-enter during 1959-60 the school from which they withdrew — excluding kindergarten, 
t Codes: Wl — Transferred — Public school in county W6 — Armed services 

W2 — Transferred — Nonpublic school in county W8 — Age 16 or over 

W344 — Transferred — Outside county W9 — Mental 

W7— Committed to institution " WIO— Physical 

W13- -Death Wll— Economic 

W5 — Special case W12 — Marriage 

W14 — Suspended 



Maryland State Department of Education 



91 



TABLE 23 — Average Number Belonging per Teacher and Principal: 
State of Maryland: 1951-1960 



Average Number Belonging per Teacher 
AND Principal 



Year and 










Local Unit 


Total 


Elementary* 


High 




1951 


28.1 
27.6 
27.5 
27.4 
26.8 

26.8 
26.3 
25.1 
24.6 
24.2 


33.0 
32.2 
31.9 
31.5 
30.4 

30.4 
30.0 
28.0 
27.3 
26.9 


21.9 
21.7 
21.8 
22.0 
22.0 

22.0 
21.7 
21.5 
21.4 
21.2 




1952 




1953 

1954 

1955 




1956 

1957 

1958 

1959 




1960 





BY LOCAL 


UNIT, 1959-1960 




Allegany 

Anne Arundel 

Baltimore City 

Baltimore 

Calvert 


24.4 
24.8 
24.8 
23.7 
25.4 


26.3 
28.9 
27.9 
25.3 
29.2 


22.7 
20.5 
21.3 
21.9 
20.5 




22.8 
23.1 
24.1 
24.8 
25.0 


28.9 
27.2 
27.9 
29.1 
28.3 


17.6 


Carroll 

Cecil 


19.5 
20.0 


Charles 

Dorchester 


20.3 
21.7 


Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 


23.5 
25.2 
25.0 
23.9 
22.0 


26.3 
26.8 
27.6 
26.7 
26.6 


20.8 
23.3 
22.2 
20.7 
17.6 


Montgomery 

Prince George's 


22.7 
24.8 
22.0 
24.8 
23.3 


24.5 
27.4 
26.5 
. 28.5 
26.8 


20.7 
21.8 


Queen Anne's 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 


17.8 
20.4 
19.8 


Talbot 

Washington 

Wicomico 

Worcester 


23.2 
24.0 
25.5 
22.1 


26.9 
25.8 
28.6 
25.2 


19.4 
22.2 
21.8 
18.7 



♦Excludes kindergartens and elementary schools at State Teachers Colleges. 



92 



Ninety-Fourth Annual Report 



TABLE 24 — Number and Per Cent Nonpromotions : Maryland County High 
School Pupils: June Net Roll, 1960 



Local Unit 



June Net Roll 



Total 



Promoted 



Not Promoted 



Per Cent 
Not Promoted 



Total Counties . . . 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel 
Baltimore. . . . 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester. . . 
Frederick. , . . 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery. 

Prince George 
Queen Anne's 
St. Mary's . . . 
Somerset .... 
Talbot 

Washington. . 
Wicomico. . . . 
Worcester . . . 



165,828 

7,489 

15,335 

33,739 

1,429 

1,743 

4,495 
3,516 
2,776 
2,557 
6,021 

1,929 
6,487 
2,782 
1,303 
27,397 

26,134 
1,409 
2,107 
1,766 
1,654 

7,922 
3,783 
2,055 



156,048 

7,311 

14,515 

31,604 

1,373 

1,705 

4,322 
3,147 
2,497 
2,443 
5,758 

1,857 
6,061 
2,689 
1,228 
26,070 

23,802 
1,300 
1,994 
1,603 
1,556 

7,689 
3,563 
1,961 



9,780 

178 

820 

2,135 

56 

38 

173 
369 
279 
114 
263 

72 

426 

93 

75 
1,327 

2,332 

109 

113 

163 

98 

233 

220 
94 



5.9 

2.4 
5.3 
6.3 
3.9 
2.2 

3.8 
10.5 
10.1 

4.5 

4.4 

3.7 
6.6 
3.3 

5.7 
4.8 

8.9 
7.7 
5.4 
9.2 
5.9 

2.9 
5.8 
4.6 



Note: Policy of promotion and nonpromotion varies in the different counties. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



93 



TABLE 25 — Causes of Nonproniolion: Maryland County Elementary Pupils" 

June Net Roll", 1960 





Total 

Not 

Promoted 


Per Cent 

Not 
Promoted 


Number not Promoted by Cause 


Local Unit 


Personal 
Illness 


Irregular 
Atten- 
dance! 


Imma- 
turityj 


All Other 
Causes 


Total Counties 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel 


10,059 

130 

1,173 

2,663 

293 

112 

280 
336 
338 

72 
79 

125 

466 

135 

64 

1,183 

1,245 
110 
230 
123 
280 

127 
380 
115 


4.3 

1.6 
5.0 
5.7 
11.1 
4.5 

4.9 
6.2 
7.9 
2.2 
1.0 

4.6 
5.1 
3.2 
3.4 
3.0 

3.3 
5.3 
6.7 
5.1 
11.8 

1.3 
6.3 
3.7 


181 

5 

21 

35 

4 

2 

1 
14 
3 
2 
2 

33 
2 
6 

15 

14 

1 
5 
1 
4 

2 

7 
2 


360 

13 
42 
29 
21 
2 

8 
17 
58 

1 
8 

3 

19 

8 

3 

45 

48 

16 
4 
5 

4 
6 


8,784 

111 

1,098 

2,072 

266 

107 

271 

305 

270 

69 

69 

89 
378 
120 

61 
1,020 

1,180 
109 
207 
114 
270 

118 
367 
113 


734 

1 
12 


Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 


527 
2 
1 


Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester 


7 


Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 


67 

1 

103 




3 


Queen Anne's 

St. Mary's 


2 


Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington .... 


4 

1 

3 






Worcester 





♦Excludes kindergarten and pupils attending elementary schools at State Teachers Colleges, 
tlrregular attendance due to unfortunate home conditions, 
timmaturity— social, intellectual, emotional. 



94 



Ninety-Fourth Annual Report 



TABLE 26 — Number and Per Cent of Nonpromotions in First Grade "* 
Counties of Maryland: June Net Roll, 1960 





First Grade Enrollment 


Number and Per Cent not Promoted 


Local Unit 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Number 


Per Cent 




Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total Counties. . 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel . 
Baltimore. . . . 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 


42,548 

1,320 

4,394 

8,424 

507 

472 

994 

1,078 

795 

567 

1,267 

458 

1,644 

756 

366 

7,225 

7,039 
410 
689 
431 
437 

1,590 
1,138 

547 


22,175 

667 

2,298 

4,402 

281 

237 

517 
572 
411 
296 
651 

236 
880 
391 
181 
3,686 

3,752 
214 
347 
232 
238 

828 
576 
282 


20,373 

653 

2,096 

4,022 

226 

235 

477 
506 
384 
271 
616 

222 
764 
365 
185 
3,539 

3,287 
196 
342 
199 
199 

762 
562 
265 


3,413 

71 

422 

769 

78 

43 

77 
149 
88 
29 
33 

36 

116 

71 

486 

513 

24 
89 
47 
76 

18 

131 

47 


2,214 

43 

266 

506 

52 

27 

54 
86 
54 
18 
20 

16 
81 
44 

318 

344 
14 
58 
32 
50 

10 
85 
36 


1,199 

28 

156 

263 

26 

16 

23 
63 
34 
11 
13 

20 
35 
27 

'i68 

169 
10 
31 
15 
26 

8 
46 
11 


8.0 

5.4 
9.6 
9.1 
15.4 
9.1 

7.7 

13.8 

11.1 

5.1 

2.6 

7.9 
7.1 
9.4 

6^7 

7.3 

5.9 

12.9 

10.9 

17.4 

1.1 

11.5 

8.6 


10.0 

6.4 
11.6 
11.5 
18.5 
11.4 

10.4 

15.0 

13.1 

6.1 

3.1 

6.8 

9.2 

11.3 

8^6 

9.2 

6.5 

16.7 

13.8 

21.0 

1.2 
14.7 
12.8 


5.9 

4.3 
7.4 
6.5 
11.5 
6.8 

4.8 
12.5 


Charles 

Dorchester. . . . 
Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 


8.9 
4.1 
2.1 

9.0 
4.6 

7.4 


Montgomery. . 

Prince George's 
Queen Anne's . 
St. Mary's.. . . 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington. . . 

Wicomico 

Worcester. . . . 


4.7 

5.1 
5.1 
9.1 
7.5 
13.1 

1.0 
8.2 
4.1 



* Excludes pupils in first grade of elementary schools at State Teachers Colleges. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



95 



TABLE 27— Public High School Graduates: State of Marylaiul— 1951-60: 
by Local Unit— Year Ending June 30, 1960 



Year and Local Unit 



High School Graduates 



Total 



Boys 



Girls 



BY YEAR, 1951-1960 




1950-51 

1951-52 

1952-53 


12,101 
12.352 
13,356 
14,070 
15,161 

16,767 
17,122 
18,380 
20,462 
23,854 


5,637 
5,741 
6,256 
6,670 
7,313 

8,019 
8,368 
8,891 
9,861 
11,560 


6,464 
6,611 
7,100 


1953-54 


7,400 


1954-55 


7,848 


1955-56 


8,748 


1956-57 

1957-58 

1958-59 

1959-60 


8,754 

9,489 

10,601 

12,294 



BY LOCAL UNIT, 1959-60 



Allegany 

Anne Arundel . . 
Baltimore City. 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester . . . . 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery . . 
Prince George's 
Queen Anne's. . 
St. Mary's. . . . 
Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington . . . 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



989 


496 


493 


1,552 


731 


821 


5,222 


2,627 


2,595 


3,694 


1,723 


1,971 


154 


72 


82 


186 


92 


94 


531 


262 


269 


385 


161 


224 


290 


127 


163 


334 


162 


172 


662 


298 


364 


250 


125 


125 


725 


349 


376 


323 


152 


171 


149 


77 


72 


3,126 


1,564 


1,562 


2,818 


1,340 


1,478 


149 


73 


76 


201 


106 


95 


193 


86 


107 


220 


92 


128 


1,024 


495 


529 


448 


222 


226 


229 


128 


101 



96 



Ninety-Fourth Annual Report 



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Maryland State Department of Education 



103 



TABLE 34 — Number of Different Individuals Teaching and Number of Public High 
Schools Offering Each Subject: Counties of Maryland: Fall of 1959 





Core 


Arts and 
Crafts 


English 


Mathe- 
matics 


Social 
Studies 


Science 


Latin 


French 


Spanish 


Business 
Educat'n 


Local Unit 


Number 
of 


Number 
of 


Number 
of 


Number 
of 


Number 
of 


Number 
of 


Number 
of 


Number 
of 


Number 
of 


Number 
of 




2 

i 


1 




1 

CO 


k4 


■i 


1 


1 


1 

1 


j3 





2 

i 


CO 



t/3 


i 


1 


Cm 

1 


■i 


1 

147 

5 
10 
21 
2 
2 

7 
4 
4 
3 
6 

1 
7 
5 
3 
20 

16 
4 
4 
5 
3 

7 
4 
4 


88 

2 

•7 
tl5 

"i 

'3 

i 

'4 
1 

120 

"27 

1 
1 

3 
1 

1 


i 

56 

2 
*5 

tio 

'i 

'3 
i 

'3 

1 

J9 

"15 

1 
1 

2 

1 
1 


i 

458 

18 
31 
60 
9 
17 

20 
16 
10 

8 
18 

5 

26 
7 
9 

62 

65 
9 

10 
8 
8 

19 
13 
10 


■i 


02 


Total Counties 


958 

29 

22 

330 

6 

13 
1 

12 
5 

65 

18 
75 
26 

i 

272 
3 
3 
15 
3 

51 

'8 


118 

10 
4 

18 
3 

8 
1 
4 
2 
9 

4 

7 
5 

i 

21 
1 
1 
6 
1 

10 

'2 


104 

i 

38 
4 

15 
'5 

'7 

3 
11 
1 
1 
2 

6 

1 
4 
1 
1 

2 

1 


64 

i 

17 
3 

10 

'5 

'4 

2 
6 
1 

1 
2 

4 

1 
2 
1 

1 

2 

1 


1,373 

78 
234 
116 
19 
27 

46 
41 
34 
20 
30 

15 
42 
19 
23 
309 

112 
24 
25 
14 
16 

51 
47 
31 


181 

11 
13 
15 
3 

7 

12 

7 
7 
5 
7 

2 
7 
5 
4 
22 

18 
4 
5 
7 
3 

8 
5 
4 


1.415 

56 

180 

261 

17 

16 

43 
40 
32 
14 
59 

17 
57 
26 
18 
205 

164 
15 
19 
22 
17 

70 
44 
23 


211 

11 

15 

23 

3 

7 

15 
7 
8 
4 

10 

4 
7 
6 
4 
22 

25 
4 
5 
7 
3 

12 
5 
4 


1.215 

56 
211 
102 
18 
28 

40 
40 
27 
25 
22 

10 
34 
24 
23 
295 

80 
17 
19 
20 
18 

37 
43 
26 


169 

10 
13 
11 
3 

7 

12 

7 
7 
5 

7 

2 
7 
5 
4 
22 

12 
4 
5 

7 
3 

7 
5 
4 


1.115 

41 
79 
254 
13 
21 

43 
37 
29 
17 
48 

18 
46 
23 
16 
142 

90 
14 
22 

28 
15 

63 
34 
22 


207 

11 

11 

23 

3 

7 

15 

7 
8 
5 
10 

4 

7 

6 

4 

22 

24 
4 
5 

7 
3 

12 
5 
4 


117 

7 
5 
20 
2 
3 

2 
2 
3 
3 
6 

1 
6 
3 
1 
27 

11 

'i 

1 
3 

6 
4 


90 

6 
4 
13 
2 
3 

2 
2 
3 
3 
6 

1 
5 
3 

1 
18 

6 

i 

1 
2 

5 
3 


191 

5 
19 
27 
2 
2 

7 
4 
4 
3 

7 

2 
9 
5 
3 
36 

21 
5 
4 
5 
4 

8 
4 
5 


131 
6 


Anne Arundel. . . . 

Baltimore 

Calvert 


7 
11 
2 


Caroline 

Carroll 


4 


Cecil 


5 




4 


Dorchester 

Frederick 

Garrett 


4 
6 

2 


Harford 


7 




3 


Kent 


4 


Montgomery 

Prince George's.. . 

Queen Anne's 

St. Mary's 


15 

11 
4 
5 
5 


Talbot 

Washington 

Wicomico 

Worcester 


3 

7 
4 
4 



Local Unit 



Agri- 
culture 



Industrial 
Work 



Home 
Eco- 
nomics 



Number 
of 



Physical 
Education 



Number 
of 



Art 



Number 
of 



Music 



Number 
of 



Driver 
Educa- 
tion 



Number 
of 



Library 



Number 
of 



Guidance 



Number 
of 



Adminis- 
tration 
Supervi'n 



Number 
of 



Total Counties . 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel 
Baltimore. . . . 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester . . . 
Frederick. . . . 

Oarrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery . 

Prince George' 
Queen Anne's. 
St. Mary's. . . 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington. . 
Wicomico. . . . 
Worcester. . . . 



725 

28 
48 
120 



4 

7 
6 
4 
134 22 



110 



240 

10 
25 
46 



154 



448 

20 
36 
83 
5 
10 

23 
10 
11 
6 
22 

5 

17 
10 



96 
7 

ie 10 
'4 '4 



13 11 
9 5 
5 4 



* Includes one teacher and one school teaching German. 

t Includes one teacher teaching Russian and one school teaching both Spanish and Russian. 
t Includes four teachers teaching German and four schools teaching both Spanish and German. 
° Includes two teachers teaching German and two schools teaching both Spanish and German. 



104 



Ninety-Fourth Annual Report 






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t-oo inoq in 
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16,159 

34,905 

1,486 

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4,607 
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2,506 
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2,875 
1.356 
27,745 


27,117 
1,536 
2,179 
1,827 
1,719 


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9,972 

19,550 

36,835 

2,530 

2,515 


4,781 
4,069 
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2,726 
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2,242 
7,211 
3,504 
1,358 
29,602 


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6,308 

10,850 

30,499 

1,307 

1,527 


4,024 
3,182 
2,491 
2,042 
5,068 


1,619 
4,834 
2,453 
1,217 
15,566 


18,288 
1,264 
1,945 
1,541 
1,557 


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102,489 
110,951 
119,648 
130,122 
143,696 




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1,401 
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2,143 


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2,711 
3,291 
4,165 


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5,233 
6,601 
9,017 


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651 

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597 

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5,567 


8,552 
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621 
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112 



Ninety-Fourth Annual Report 



TABLE 43 — Pupils Enrolled in Driver Education and Training: 
County High Schools: Fall of 1959 



Maryland 



Year and 


Driver Education* 


Driver TRAiNiNCf 


Local Unit 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


1955-56 

1956-57 

1957-58 

1958-59 


414 
1,311 

970 
1,191 
1,301 


180 
619 
472 
571 
666 


234 
692 
498 
620 
635 


5,174 
5,719 
6,772 
6,464 
6,583 


2,308 
2,611 
3,247 
3,158 
3,114 


2,866 
3,108 
3,525 
3,306 


1959-60 


3,469 







BY LOCAL UNIT, FALL OF 1959 



Allegany 

Anne Arundel 

Baltimore 

Calvert 


i20 

34 
920 

60 
5 

36 

io 

il6 


62 

24 
465 

38 

17 
5 

55 


58 

10 
455 

22 

5 

19 
5 

61 


416 
1,618 

i26 

57 

86 
651 

141 
1,303 

916 

32 

148 

143 

386 
560 


235 

iei 

50 
22 

45 
314 

55 
612 

414 
17 
48 

63 

202 

270 


181 
851 


Caroline 




Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 


76 


Dorchester 

Frederick 

Garrett 


35 

41 
337 


Howard 

Kent 


86 


Montgomery 

Prince George's 

Queen Anne's 

St. Mary's 


691 

502 

15 

100 


Talbot 

Washington 

Wicomico 

Worcester 


80 

184 
290 







* Driver Education — Classroom instruction only. 

t Driver Training — Classroom instruction and behind-the-wheel training or behind-the wheel training 
only. 



Maryland State Department of Education- 



US 



TABLE 44 — Pupils Reported as Members of Glee or Choral Clubs, Orchestras, 
or Bands: Maryland County High Schools: Fall of 1959 



Year and 


Glee 


OR Choral 


Clubs 


Orchestras, Bands 


Local Unit 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


1955-56 


12,181 
12,983 
10,425 
12,222 
12,336 


3,744 
4,386 
3,075 
3,767 
3,778 


8,437 
8,597 
7,350 
8,455 
8,558 


10,152 
11,121 
12,802 
12,970 
14,701 


6,795 
7,262 
8,317 
8,353 
9,479 


3,357 


1956-57 

1957-58 


3,859 
4,485 


1958-59 


4,617 


1959-60 


5,222 







BY LOCAL UNIT, FALL OF 1959 



Allegany 

Anne Arundel 

Baltimore 

Calvert 


1,107 
736 

2,814 
230 
162 

416 
207 
132 
137 
851 

275 

440 

51 

242 

1,668 

1,594 

109 

50 

68 

69 

550 
134 
294 


423 

192 

911 

78 

48 

131 
68 
34 
32 

269 

82 
127 

71 
495 

476 
34 
20 
34 
25 

136 
31 
61 


684 
544 
1,903 
152 
114 

285 
139 
98 
105 
582 

193 

313 

51 

171 

1,173 

1,118 
75 
30 
34 
44 

414 
103 
233 


686 

1,171 

2,663 

180 

219 

487 
207 
412 
271 
761 

471 
682 
221 
128 
2,093 

1,922 

225 

52 

74 

132 

962 
317 
365 


326 
703 
1,780 
109 
143 

312 
154 
274 
151 
513 

260 

394 

144 

70 

1,472 

1,299 

115 

19 

38 

70 

663 
234 
236 


360 

468 

883 

71 


Caroline 


76 


Carroll 

Cecil 


175 
53 


Charles 


138 


Dorchester 

Frederick 

Garrett 


120 

248 

211 
288 




77 


Kent 

Montgomery 

Prince George's 

Queen Anne's 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 


58 
621 

623 
110 
33 
36 


Talbot 

Washington 


62 

299 
83 




129 







114 



Ninety-Fourth Annual Report 



TABLE 45 — Number and Per Cent of Men Teachers: 
Public Schools of Maryland: 1923-1960 





Number and Per Cent Men Teachers 


Year Ending 
June 30 


Total 


Elementary 


High 




Number 


Per Cent 


Number 


Per Cent 


Number 


Per Cent 


1923 

1928 


1,048 
1,136 
1,347 
1,613 
1,464 

2,965 
3,263 
3,628 
3,885 
4,406 

4,818 
5,114 
5,612 
6,127 
6,932 


14.2 
13.8 
16.1 
18.6 
16.6 

23.9 
24.5 
25.3 
25.1 
26.2 

27.0 
26.7 
27.3 
28.4 
30.2 


591 
574 
617 
766 
561 

604 
709 
822 
866 
1,019 

1,098 
1,074 
1,175 
1,373 
1,488 


9.3 
8.4 
9.4 
11.5 
8.8 

8.8 
9.5 

10.2 
9.8 

10.6 

11.0 
10.2 
10.3 
11.7 
12.3 


457 
562 
730 
847 
903 

2,361 
2,554 
2,806 
3,019 
3,387 

3,720 
4,040 
4,437 
4,754 
5,444 


43.3 
39.6 


1933 


41.4 


1938 

1943 


41.8 
36.8 


1951 


42.7 


1952 


43.3 


1953 

1954 


44.9 
45.4 


1955 

1956 


46.7 
47.3 


1957 

1958 

1959 


46.9 
48.5 
48.4 


1960 


50.4 



Maryland State Department of Education 



115 



TABLE 46 — Number and Per Cent of Schools, Teachers, Pupils: One-Teacher* 
Elementary Schools: Counties of Maryland : 1923-1960 





One Teacher Elementary Schools* 


Year Ending 
June 30 


Number of 

One-Teacher 

Schools 


Per Cent of 
Total Ele- 
mentary 
Schools 


Per Cent of 
Total Ele- 
mentary 
Teachers 


Pupils in One- 
Teacher 
Schools 


Per Cent of 
Total Ele- 
mentary 
Pupils 


1923 


1,496 

1,206 

740 

560 

275 

103 
75 
59 
50 
30 

24 
23 
17 
11 
12 


69.9 
65.1 
53.2 
48.1 
31.4 

14.4 

10.9 

8.7 

7.5 

4.5 

3.7 
3.9 
2.1 
1.2 
1.8 


39.6 
31.7 
20.3 
15.4 
7.8 

2.4 
1.5 
1.1 
0.8 
0.5 

0.3 
0.3 
0.3 

0.1 
0.1 


t 
t 
t 
t 
7,546 

2,617 
1,926 
1,450 
1,295 
753 

595 
584 
410 
278 
300 




1928 




1933 

1938 




1943 

1951 

1952 


5.8 

1.8 
1.2 


1953 

1954 


0.9 
0.7 


1955 

1956 

1957 

1958 

1959 

1960 


0.4 

0.3 
0.3 
0.2 
0.1 
0.1 











BY LOCAL UNIT, 1959-1960 



Dorchester 
Somerset . . 
Talbot.... 



36.0 

11.8 

8.3 



7.6 
2.2 
1.1 



241 
39 
20 



7.2 
1.6 
0.9 



* Schools having a one-teacher organization of grades one to five or more. 
t Data unavailable. 



116 



Ninety-Fourth Annual Report 



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118 



Ninety-Fourth Annual Report 



TABLE 49 — Number of Certificates Issued to Maryland Teachers, Principals, 

Administrative and Supervisory Personnel in the County Schools by the 

Maryland State Department of Education: 1957-58, 1958-59, 1959-60 



Grade of Certificate 



Number of Certificates Issued 



1957-58 



1958-59 



1959-60 



Total Number of Certificates Issued . 



Administration and Supervision 

Administration and Supervision 

High School Supervision , 

Elementary Supervision 

Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Supervisor of Special Subjects 

Supervisor or Director in Special Areas. 
Visiting Teacher 



County Librarian. 



High School 

Principal 

Academic 

Special 

Vocational 

Junior High School. 
Nonpublic 



Elementary 

Principal 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education . . 

Bachelor of Science in Special Subjects 

Bachelor of Science for Kindergarten Teaching. 

Advanced First Grade 

Nonpublic Bachelor of Science 



Emergency Certificates 
Degree 

Administration and Supervision. 

High School 

Elementary School 



Nondegree 

Administration and Supervision. 

High School 

Elementary School 



Provisional Certificates . 



Substitute Teachers' Certificates 

Degree 

Nondegree 



4,229 



4,200 



4,407 



10 


1 




12 


6 


10 


7 


11 


3 


2 


1 




6 


7 


1 


36 


48 


45 


3 


11 


10 


9 


4 


5 


15 


26 


24 


400 


497 


657 


286 


418 


349 


42 


62 


56 


132 


153 


150 


71 


37 


53 


35 


43 


42 


623 


612 


674 


57 


67 


63 


71 


79 
1 


75 


36 


22 


14 


20 


30 


28 


698 


659 


693 


726 


761 


742 


1 




2 


55 


30 


40 


505 


324 


337 


206 


158 


170 


60 


38 


68 


105 


94 


96 



Maryland State Department of Education 



119 









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126 



Ninety-Fourth Annual Report 







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128 



Ninety-Fourth Annual Report 



TABLE 59 

Certificate Status of Elementary Teachers* New to Maryland County 
Public Schools: 1959-60 





Total 


Regular 


Emergency 


Substitute 


No 


Local Unit 


B.S. 


Jr. 
H.S. 


H.S. 


1st 


Degree 


Non- 
degree 


Non- 
degree 


Certi- 
ficatet 


Total Counties 

Per Cent 


1,755 
100.0 

17 

211 

380 

15 

14 

20 
31 
19 
14 
69 

9 

76 

31 

9 

287 

384 
17 
37 
13 
14 

38 
25 
25 


o638 
36.3 

9 
55 

179 
4 
2 

5 
5 
9 
5 
24 

6 

31 

2 

2 

114 

118 

11 

6 

8 

5 

13 

9 
16 


8 
0.4 

1 

'l 

1 

2 

1 

2 


21 
1.2 

2 

1 
1 

2 

2 
1 
1 
1 

5 

4 

i 


2 
0.1 


6696 
39.7 

5 

88 

106 

6 

5 

5 

10 

7 

5 

30 

is 

18 

4 

151 

189 

5 

13 

2 

8 

11 
4 
6 


c289 
16.5 

3 
60 

74 
3 
5 

9 

12 

2 

1 

12 

1 
15 
9 
2 
2 

47 

1 

15 

i 

10 
4 
1 


24 

1.4 

1 

7 

2 

5 

2 
3 

3 

1 


77 
4.4 


Allegany 

Anne Arundel. . . . 

Baltimore 

Calvert 




i 
1 


' '7 

10 

2 

1 


Carroll 




Cecil 


1 






Dorchester 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery 

Prince George's. . . 
Queen Anne's .... 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington 

Wicomico 

Worcester 


2 
1 

'9 

1 

i9 

20 

i 

3 



* All figures exclude transfers between and within local units. 

t "No certificate" includes teachers who stayed in service a short time making certification impractical. 

a Includes two with principal's certificates; twenty-two with therapists' or psychologists' certificates. 

6 Includes throe with principals' certificates; three with provisional certificates. 

c Includes one with a provisional certificate. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



129 



TABLK 60 

Certificate Status of Higli School Teachers* New to Marylaiicl Counts 
Public Schools: 1939-60 





Total 


Regular 


Ele- 
mentary 


Emerge.ncy 


Substitute 


No. 


Local Unit 


H.A. 
H.S. 
Voc. 


Jr. 
H.S. 


B.S. 


Degree 


Non- 
degree 


Degree 


Non- 
degree 


Certi- 
ficatet 


Total Counties 

Per Cent 


1,846 
100.0 

32 

237 

348 

17 

34 

50 
45 
28 
24 
43 

10 
81 
40 
19 

277 

375 

21 

37 

7 

16 

50 
28 
27 


0876 
47.4 

16 

96 

185 

8 

18 

22 
18 
11 
4 
16 

3 

50 

15 

4 

166 

186 

8 

13 

1 

6 

15 
9 
6 


138 
7.5 

6 

11 

43 

2 

2 

4 
2 
2 
2 
10 

4 
4 

9 

15 
5 

7 
4 
6 


22 
1.2 

1 
5 
3 

i 

2 

1 
2 

2 

1 
2 

i 

1 


6654 
35.4 

6 

100 

87 

3 

13 

14 
20 
13 
13 
15 

6 
22 
16 

12 
87 

142 

6 

22 

4 

10 

22 
11 
10 


c76 
4.1 

2 

12 

15 

4 

1 

2 
3 
1 

1 

3 
3 
2 
3 

13 
2 

1 

4 
3 

1 


7 
0.4 

i 

2 
1 

i 

1 

i 


22 
1.2 

1 

7 

3 
1 
1 
3 

1 

1 
3 

1 


51 
2 8 


Allegany 

Anne Arundel ... 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 


1 

11 

6 

4 

1 

2 

1 

i 


Kent 

Montgomery 

Prince George's. . . 
Queen Anne's .... 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington 

Wicomico 

Worcester 


8 
13 

1 
2 



* All figures exclude transfers between and within local units. 

t "No certificate" includes teachers who stayed in service a short time making certification impractical. 

a Includes one with a principal's certificate. 

b Includes two with principals' certificates; twelve with provisional certificates. 

c. Includes two with provisional certificates. 



130 



Ninety-Fourth Annual Report 



^ 



TABLE 61 — Number of Public Schools: Number of Teachers and Principals: State of 
Maryland : Year Ending June 30, 1960 



Number of 
Teachers 

AND 

Principals 


J2 


>> 

a 

M 

■a 


-a 
a 
s 

a 


5 


o 

a 


_> 


1 


■3 




J 
1 


1^ 

s 




1 


1 


1 

a 


-0 



a 


1 

§ 

a 



1 

c 


c 

■< 

a 
3 


V, 


1 


1 


1 
S 




■§ 








< 


<3 


■< 


m 


« 


U 


u 


1 








te 





K 


W 


w 


(Lh 


cy 


CQ 


CO 


H 


is 


is 


^ 



ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS 



All Schools 


810 
14 


29 


58 


143 


76 


12 


10 


18 


18 


12 


25 
9 


31 


16 


21 


13 

1 


11 


86 


99 


10 


17 

1 


17 
2 


12 

1 


41 


19 


16 


1.0- 1.9 




2.0- 2.9 


40 
35 


1 
2 


1 
1 


'i 


1 


3 


1 




i 




2 
5 


4 
3 


4 
2 




1 
1 


2 
4 




3 




3 
1 


3 
2 


'i 


5 

4 


'3 


4 


3.0- 3.9 


2 


4.0- 4.9 


33 




2 


2 




1 


1 


1 


1 




1 


2 


2 




1 






4 






2 


1 


5 


3 


2 


5.0- 5.9 


25 


2 


3 


2 


1 




1 


2 




1 


1 


2 








1 




2 




2 




2 


2 






6.0- 6.9 


37 


1 








2 


3 


1 


2 


3 


2 


3 


2 






1 




4 




2 


2 


3 


3 






7.0- 7.9 


33 


3 




2 


1 






1 


2 


1 




3 


1 










4 




2 


1 




3 




1 


8.0- 8.9 


20 


2 






2 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 














2 


1 




2 


1 




2 






9.0- 9.9 


36 


3 




3 


2 


2 




3 


3 




1 


1 


2 










6 






2 








2 


10.0-10.9 


32 


2 




1 


1 






2 








4 










3 


6 




1 




1 


2 






11.0-11.9 


35 


4 




6 


3 






1 


1 


2 


1 








2 




2 


7 






1 


1 








12.0-12.9 


32 






11 


1 










1 


1 




1 








2 


5 






1 




2 




1 


13.0-13.9 


40 


2 




7 










3 






3 


2 




1 




4 


5 










3 




2 


14.0-14.9 


31 


2 




3 


2 






2 














2 




10 


3 




1 




1 


1 






15.0-15.9 


32 


1 




4 


3 




2 




2 












1 




4 


7 




1 




1 








16.0-16.9 


30 


1 


3 


2 


3 














2 










5 


8 










3 






17.0-17.9 


30 




2 


6 


1 














1 










7 


9 




1 






1 






18.0-18.9 


25 




2 


7 


4 
























3 


4 










1 






19.0-19.9 


20 






5 


2 








i 






1 










4 


3 










2 






20.0-20.9 


18 




2 


4 


1 














1 






2 




4 


2 










1 






21.0-21.9 


15 
23 




6 
2 


1 
5 


2 
3 
























2 
3 


2 

8 
















22.0-22.9 




23.0-23.9 


20 




3 


6 


3 
























3 


2 
















24.0-24.9 


15 




4 


5 


2 








1 
















4 


















25.0-25.9 


16 






4 


2 
























5 


1 
















26.0-26.9 


14 

7 






3 
5 


4 

1 
























3 
1 


1 
















27.0-27.9 




28.0-28.9 


3 






1 


























2 


















29.0-29.9 


15 






4 


6 
























3 


2 
















30.0-30.9 


14 






7 


4 
























3 


















31.0-31.9 


14 




1 


5 


5 


















2 
























32.0-32.9 


7 






5 


1 










































33.0-33.9 


8 






3 


2 
























2 


















34.0-34.9 


9 
32 




'2 


3 
20 


5 

8 
























1 
2 


















35.0 and over 







JUNIOR, JUNIOR-SENIOR, 


SENIOR, AND VOCATIONAL SCHOOLS 
















All Schools 


258 
2 


9 


12 


51 


23 


3 


7 


14 


7 


8 


5 


10 


4 

1 


7 


5 


4 


22 


28 


4 


5 


7 

1 


3 


11 


5 


4 


1.0- 2.9 




3.0- 4.9 


5 






1 






1 






2 






1 


























5.0- 6.9 


5 






1 








2 




1 






















i 










7.0- 8.9 


10 






4 








2 




1 






















1 










9.0-10.9 


8 












3 


3 




































11.0-12.9 


13 






3 














1 


1 








2 








i 


i 










13.0-14.9 


7 






5 
















1 
























i 




15.0-16.9 


7 






1 














1 


1 












2 


i 










1 




17.0-18.9 


8 






1 






1 


1 








1 
















i 




1 


1 






19.0-20.9 


10 












1 


2 




1 


















i 


2 










1 


21.0-22.9 


10 

7 

22 






'3 








i 

1 


2 

1 


i 


i 


2 






2 

i 




2 


"5 


1 
'i 




2 




2 

1 
3 




1 


23.0-24.9 




25.0-29.9 




30.0-34.9 


25 
12 
12 
11 
11 


2 




4 

1 
2 
3 

1 








1 
i 


2 
1 


1 
1 


2 


2 






1 
1 




1 
'5 


3 
4 
2 
3 
3 










2 


i 
1 


i 


35.0-39.9 


1 


40.0-44.9 




45.0-49.9 




50.0-54.9 




55.0-59.9 


10 








3 














2 










3 












i 


i 




60.0-64.9 


6 








2 
























2 












1 






65.0-69.9 


10 






1 


4 
























4 


















70.0-74.9 


5 
8 
8 
4 
6 


1 
1 


2 


1 

1 
3 
2 
1 


1 
2 
2 
1 
2 
























2 

i 

1 


i 

1 
'2 


.. 














75.0-79.9 




80.0-84.9 




85.0-89.9 . . 




90.0-94.9 




95.0-99.9.. 


5 

11 






3 
9 


1 
1 
























'i 


1 
















100.0 and over 





Maryland State Department of Education 



131 



TABLE 62— Number of Public Schools: Average Number Belonging: State of Maryland: 

Year Ending June 30, 1960 











>. 




























."= 
















Average 
Number 


1 


1 


3 


O 


<u 














Jd 












8 


a 








c 


o 




Belonging 


4 


M 

a 
a 
< 


1 

"a 
CQ 


b 


> 

6 


a 


a 
1 


1 


1 


1 


■I 


1 


1 


73 
O 


a 




c 


a 


c3 


2 
1 
eg 




J 


■§ 

o 

1 


o 

is 



elementary schools 



All Schools 


*810 

14 
39 
41 
24 
32 
33 
30 
27 
35 
42 
27 
29 
33 
42 
31 


29 

1 

2 

2 
1 
3 
3 
3 
3 
2 

i 

2 
2 


58 
'2 

i 

5 
2 
3 
4 
3 
2 
3 


143 

i 

1 
1 

i 

1 

3 
2 
2 
2 
4 
10 
4 


76 

i 

1 
2 

'i 

2 
2 
4 
2 
2 
2 
1 
2 


12 
3 

i 

1 
1 

1 
2 

2 


10 

'i 
i 

2 
2 

i 

1 
1 


18 


18 

"i 
1 

2 
2 

2 
2 
2 
1 
1 


12 


25 

6 
4 
6 

2 


31 

4 
2 
2 
3 
4 
1 
2 

3 

1 
1 

2 
3 


16 

'4 

3 

1 
2 
1 

'i 
1 

i 

2 


21 


13 

1 


11 

2 
4 

i 

1 


86 

i 

1 

i 

2 

1 

3 

's 

4 

7 
7 


99 

2 

1 
2 

6 
1 
5 
1 
6 
10 
4 
4 
6 
8 
5 


10 

i 
1 

1 
1 

1 

2 

1 

i 

1 


17 


17 

2 

2 
3 
1 
2 
1 

2 
2 

i 

1 


12 

1 

i 

1 
1 

4 

i 

i 

1 
1 


1 

41 

5 
4 
5 
3 
1 
3 
3 

2 

i 

3 

1 

1 


19 

3 

2 
1 
1 
1 

"i 

1 

2 

i 

1 
1 


16 


30 or less 


1 


31— 60 





61— 90 


3 


91— 120 


?. 


121— 150 




151— 180 




181— 210 




211— 240 




241— 270 




271— 300 




301— 330 




331— 360 




361— 390 




391— 420. . 




421— 450 




451— 480 


32 






5 


3 








1 
















10 


6 










2 






481— 510 


23 






2 


3 








1 
















1 


6 










2 






511— 540 


20 






2 


2 
























3 


5 










1 


I 




541— 570 


27 






7 


2 








1 
















9 


2 












1 




571— 600 


28 




4 


5 


6 














2 












7 










3 






601— 660 


35 




6 


10 


3 
























5 


6 










1 






661— 720 


26 




4 


5 


4 
























5 


4 
















721— 780 


32 
23 




2 


14 

7 


5 

8 
























7 
4 


1 












1 




781— 840 




841— 900 


16 






7 


5 
























3 


















901— 960 


12 






6 


4 










































961—1020 


12 






4 


4 
























3 














I 




1021—1080 


13 
6 
5 






10 
5 
4 


1 
1 
























2 

i 


















1081—1140 




1141—1200 




1201 and over 


21 




2 


15 


3 
























1 





















JUNIOR, 


JUNIOR-SENIOR, 


SENIOR, AND VOCATIONAL HIGH SCHOOLS 














All Schools 


•258 
4 


9 


12 


51 

1 


23 


3 


7 
1 


14 


7 


8 
1 


5 


10 


4 


7 


5 


4 


22 


28 


4 


5 


7 
1 


3 


11 


5 


4 


50 or less 




51— 100 


6 
11 
16 






1 
2 
4 






3 


1 
3 
3 


"\ 


2 
1 




i 


2 






'2 










2 
1 


i 








101— 150 




151— 200 




201— 250 


13 


3 




6 














1 


2 




























251— 300 


1 






1 








1 






















1 










2 




301— 350 


6 






1 








1 








i 














1 














351— 400 


12 












2 


1 
























3 


1 




1 




2 


401— 450 


10 






1 










1 


1 


1 








2 






















451— 500 


7 














1 


1 
















2 








1 




i 






501— 600 


17 






1 








1 


1 




1 


2 






i 












1 




4 






601- 700 


23 






5 




1 






1 


2 


2 


1 






1 






7 










1 




1 


701— 800 


14 
9 


2 




2 
1 




1 






2 


1 




1 






1 
















2 




1 


801— 900 




901—1000 


10 

12 
7 




3 
1 


2 
2 


























3 
4 














1 

1 




1001—1100 




1101—1200 




1201—1300 


8 








2 
























3 


















1301—1400 


5 

9 

7 




2 


1 
1 


2 
3 
2 






' [ 








1 

1 










1 
2 

1 












i 

1 






1401 — 1500 




1501—1600 




1601—1700 


7 






3 


2 
























2 


















1701—1800 


7 




3 


1 


2 
























1 


















1801—1900 


2 
5 
5 
3 
2 


1 
1 




i 

2 

1 




















•■ 






"i 
i 


















1901—2000 




2001—2100 




2101—2200 




2201-2300 




2301—2400 


5 

1 

8 






3 

1 

7 












































2401—2500 




2501 and over 





• A total of nine seventh grades which are housed in elementary school buildings but offer a junior high school curriculum (two in 
Allegany, four in Anne Arundel, one each in Carroll, Howard, and Washington^ are included in the number of elementary schools but 
excluded from the number of high schools. 



132 



Ninety-Fourth Annual Report 



TABLE 63— State Aid for Minimum Program*: Maryland Public Schools- 
Grades 1-12: Year Ending June 30, 1960 





Cost of Minimum Program 


State Aid for 
Minimum Program 


Local Unit 


Totalt 


Minimum 
Salaries 


Other 

Current 

Expense 

Cost 


Trans- 
portation 


Amountt 


Per Cent 


Total State 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel. . . 
Baltimore City J. 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 


$125,510,837 

4,051,772 

8,600,631 

31,090,125 

17,523,563 

1,076,077 

1,238,292 
2,584,749 
2,346,319 
1,914,941 
1,583,854 

3,357,681 
1,442,683 
3,873,670 
1,784,642 
909,965 

15,128,738 

13,747,073 

1,044,791 

1,385,565 

1,183,595 

1,103,597 
4,599,579 
2,461,087 
1,477,667 


$93,138,751 

2,933,930 

6,260,724 

24,752,100 

13,034,350 

682,940 

830,753 
1,833,037 
1,649,680 
1,288,020 
1,069,290 

2,396,027 

874,350 

2,570,972 

1,227,586 

611,523 

11,530,889 

10,450,726 

681,195 

917,035 

803,595 

763,457 
3,321,814 
1,674,746 

980,012 


$23,284,688 

733,483 
1,565,181 
6,188,025 
3,258,587 

170,735 

207,688 
458,259 
412,420 
322,005 
267,323 

599,007 
218,587 
642,743 
306,897 
152,881 

2,882,722 

2,612,681 

170,299 

229,259 

200,899 

190,864 
830,453 
418,687 
245,003 


$8,997,859 

376,382 
774,027 
150,000 
1,230,144 
222,244 

198,312 
286,528 
284,219 
304,174 
247,241 

361,314 
335.994 
659,724 
249,340 
143,506 

708,350 
680,827 
192,153 
237,952 
179,101 

149,239 
447,008 
329,380 
250,700 


$60,729,562 

2,753,037 
5,556,506 
8,643,240 
5,256,927 
882,536 

959,222 
1,519,384 
1,619,455 
1,514,717 
1,028,828 

1,034,378 
1,155,196 
3,516,075 
1,051,051 
618,245 

6,772,674 
8,294,709 

715,521 
1,045,689 

982,714 

664,045 
2,713,715 
1,570,537 

861,161 


48.4 

67.9 
64.6 
27.8 
30.0 
82.0 

77.5 
58.8 


Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 


69.0 
79.1 
65.0 

60.6 
80.1 
64.9 
58.9 
67.9 


Montgomery. . . . 
Prince George's. 
Queen Anne's. . . 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 


44.8 
60.3 
68.5 
75.5 
83.0 

60.2 


Washington . . . . 

Wicomico 

Worcester 


59.0 
63.8 
58.3 



* The minimum program in calculating State Equalization aid includes the following: 

(a) total minimum salaries of the allowed number of teachers and principals as determined by State 

law; 

(b) other current expense including the cost of operation and maintenance and the cost of instruction 

other than the salaries of teachers, principals, and supervisors; and 

(c) the cost of approved transportation to public schools. 

t "Tuition applicable to Bylaw II included in these columns only. 
t Baltimore City data based on fall (1959J calculation. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



133 



% 



(J 

tt 



a 





Capital 
Outlay 


$4,776,355 

3,430,589 

1,955,727 

2,335,232 

834,802 


31,768,013 
40,596,878 
43,516,284 
49,316,960 
44,094,549 


49,737.925 
51.509,069 
64,210,477 
63,016,337 
63,292,965 




a 


$789,311 
2,131,699 
3,142,211 
3,739,854 
3,776,207 


6,133,501 

7,751,625 

9,850,293 

12,023,860 

14,217,276 


15,893,439 
20,758,922 
21,274,818 
25,502,907 
29,006,335 




§ 
w 

X 

S 
o 

£ 

Z 

u 
o 

e: 




t- 1^ ■* t> Tf 


"* t- O « — 1 


ID CO C tr- 31 


in31-<t X 31 
t- t- t- !D!D 


X31IN — (N 


t- X c cc ;d 
in in ;o in in 




..tTjlTjcOO 


en ot>to in 


fax -^f 31 CD 


OOC -H — 


ejco N Nco 


TT -* rf CO •* 


a 


"3 

o 


oioie^eoto 


c- CO CO so-* 


N 31 CD tC in 


CO 31 ino 31 
M-^<Meo(M 


X t^ in in Tji 

CO CO CO CO CO 


X CD in 31 X 

CO CO coco CO 


1; 

O 


—• CO in o -o 


31 -■ -HNt- 


in ifl" c m -H 


oj t- -<inco 


CO ?) — CO w 


coco fj in in 


c 
_o 

N C 

S 3 
est, 

O" 


XXI t- COO 


XNN-fl't- 


t- into 01 ^ 


-HMco in w 


rfiOTCN-i 


^ CO CO TO CO 


Current Expenses by Source of Funds 


"3 

a 
o 


$9,659,104 
12,871,451 
13,597,045 
14,061,439 
16,339,959 


41,709,350 
48,309,472 
56,929,029 
62,340,665 
70,528,549 


73,863,335 

85,660,022 

99,207,426 

106,948,851 

118,516,339 


"3 

0) 

o 


$46,966 

69,150 

80,139 

209,722 

245,787 


2,080,125 
2,380,208 
2,457.252 
2,632,578 
4,005,882 


5,418,321 
7,001,761 
7,357,815 
7,317,219 
9,600,637 


a; 


$3,058,180 
3,207,088 
4,616,690 
6,196,636 
6,960,882 


27,659,372 
30,241.963 
32,458,006 
35,859,919 
39,123,482 


48,932,296 
54,309,097 
58,847,915 
74,347,087 
80,201,896 


5 

o 


$12,764,250 
16,147,689 
18,293,874 
20,467,797 
23,546,628 


71,448,847 

80,931,643 

91,844,287 

100,833,162 

113,657,913 


128,213,9,52 
146,970,880 
165.413.156 
188.613,157 
208,318,872 






o 

CO 

z 

D 














CO X CO 00 CO 

C^IMCOCO Tj« 

o^ o^ o% o^ ^ 


-J ejco •* in 
in in in m m 

31 31 31 31 31 


X t- X 31 O 

in in in m CD 

31 31 31 31 31 



134 



Ninety-Fourth Annual Report 



TABLE 65 — Source of Current Expenses: Maryland Public Schools: 
Year Ending June 30, 1960 



Local Utnr 



Total State: 
Including Teachers' 

Retirement 

Excluding Teachers 
Retirement 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel. . . 
Baltimore City . . 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery . . . . 
Prince George's. . 
Queen Anne's. . . . 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



Total 
Current 
Funds 



$208,318,872 
193,706,037 

5,013,207 

11,548,869 

t50,889,014 

28,940,768 

1,298,494 

1,520,376 
3,220,730 
3,050,128 
8,442,839 
1,903,824 

4,882,468 
1,545,510 
5,343,213 
2,259,636 
1,112,436 

30,050,789 

21,356,067 

1,321,537 

1,795,542 

1,316,770 

1,346,448 
6,814,934 
2,930,640 
1,801.798 



State 



*$80,201,896 

65,622,977 

2,844,568 

5,805,088 

tI10,268,230 

5,943,638 

902,546 

996,045 
1,578,923 
1,646,692 
1,558,154 
1,059,844 

2,160,199 
1,171,550 
2,629,934 
1,103,684 
649,617 

t7,633,102 
8,737,893 
751.892 
1,081,280 
1,015,415 

702,937 
2,857,425 
1,622,828 

901,394 



Federal 



$9,600,637 

9,600,637 

113,644 
tl,076,877 
824,529 
910,550 
58,831 

35,933 

61,970 

270,463 

290,630 

32,786 

268,525 
36,975 

789,051 
62,338 
31,835 

t2,518,856 

1,517,179 

36,230 

371,744 

17,105 

23,533 
153,098 
65,731 
32,224 



Local Levy 
and Other 
Local Funds 



•$118,516,339 

118,482,423 

2,054,995 

4,666,904 

t39,796,255 

22,086,580 

337,117 

488,398 

1,579,837 

1,132,973 

594,055 

811,194 

2,453,744 

336,985 

1,924,228 

1,093,614 

430,885 

19,898,831 

11,100,995 

533,415 

342,518 

284,250 

619,978 
3,804,411 
1,242,081 

868,180 



Per Cent from Each Source 





Stat* 




Fed- 








Equal- 
ization 


Other 


Total 


eral 


13.4 


25.1 


38.5 


4.6 


14.4 


19.5 


33.9 


4.9 


35.9 


20.8 


56.7 


2.3 


27.9 


22.4 


50.3 


9.3 




20.2 


20.2 


1.6 


1.5 


19.0 


20.5 


3.2 


48.6 


20.9 


69.5 


4.5 


45.3 


20.2 


65.5 


2.4 


27.3 


21.7 


49.0 


1.9 


34.0 


20.0 


54.0 


8.9 


44.3 


19.5 


63.8 


11.9 


35.3 


20.4 


55.7 


1.7 


24.5 


19.7 


44.2 


5.5 


55.5 


20.3 


75.8 


2.4 


29.5 


19.7 


49.2 


14.8 


27.6 


21.2 


48.8 


2.8 


36.6 


21.8 


58.4 


2.9 


9.5 


15.9 


25.4 


8.4 


21.0 


19.9 


40.9 


7.1 


37.0 


19.9 


56.9 


2.7 


39.3 


20.9 


60.2 


20.7 


54.5 


22.6 


77.1 


1.3 


31.1 


21.1 


53.2 


1.7 


23.7 


18.2 


41.9 


2.3 


33.7 


21.7 


55.4 


2.2 


29.2 


20.8 


50.0 


1.8 



Local 
Funds 



56.9 

61.2 

41.0 
40.4 
78.2 
76.3 
26.0 

32.1 
49.1 
37.1 
24.3 
42.6 

50.3 
21.8 
36.0 

48.4 
38.7 

66.2 
52.0 
40.4 
19.1 
21.6 

46.1 
55.8 
42.4 

48.2 



* Includes $14,612,835 for Teachers' Retirement as follows: $4,121,953 State money and $33,916 local money in Baltimore City balance 
of $10,456,966 State money not distributed to the twenty-three counties in this table. 
t Excludes $4,121,953 State money and $33,916 local money for retirement of teachers. 
J Excludes receipts from state and/or Federal funds applicable to preceding year received after June 30, 1959. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



135 



TABLE 66^Per Cent Distribution of School Expenditures by Maryland Local Boards of 
Education: Year Ending June 30, 1960 



Local Unit 



Adminis- 
tration 



Current Expenses 



Super- 
vision 



Salaries 

of 

Principals 

and 
Teachers 



Books, 
Materials, 
and 
Other 
Costs of 
Instruc- 
tion 



Operation 



Mainte- 
nance 



Other 
School 
Services 



Fixed 
Charges 



Capital 
Outlay* 



INCLUDING COST OF TRANSPORTATION 



Total State 


2.4 


1.8 


66.0 


7.3 


8.5 


4.2 


8.6 


1.2 


24.6 


Allegany 


1.8 


1.7 


67.0 


4.4 


8.8 


3.3 


10.9 


2.1 


7.7 


Anne Arundel . . 


2.0 


2.5 


67.1 


6.4 


7.3 


3.1 


9.8 


1.8 


29.9 


Baltimore City. 


2.1 


2.1 


68.1 


7.9 


9.4 


4.5 


5.1 


0.8 


16.4 


Baltimore 


2.2 


2.0 


66.9 


7.3 


8.3 


5.0 


7.3 


1.0 


31.3 


Calvert 


3.0 


2.0 


58.7 


5.0 


5.8 


5.5 


19.0 


1.0 


16.9 


Caroline 


3.2 


1.7 


61.7 


6.1 


6.5 


4.2 


15.1 


1.5 


30.5 


Carroll 


1.8 


1.9 


68.4 


4.7 


5.8 


4.4 


11.7 


1.3 


7.0 


Cecil 


2.1 
1.9 


1.9 
1.3 


62.8 
62.2 


5.9 
5.7 


9.6 
8.2 


4.6 
3.1 


11.7 
16.9 


1.4 
0.7 


19.6 


Charles 


6.2 


Dorchester 


1.8 


1.3 


62.1 


4.0 


8.3 


6.1 


14.8 


1.6 


0.6 


Frederick 


2.5 


2.2 


63.4 


6.8 


6.3 


6.4 


11.2 


1.2 


25.6 


Garrett 


2.3 


1.5 


61.4 


4.4 


5.0 


2.9 


21.5 


1.0 


5.1 


Harford 


2.6 


1.8 


60.9 


6.4 


7.3 


3.1 


17.0 


0.9 


10.7 


Howard 


2.0 


1.6 


67.5 


4.2 


5.7 


4.0 


14.4 


0.6 


21.4 


Kent 


3.0 
3.2 


2.5 
1.4 


64.4 
67.6 


4.6 
6.8 


6.5 
8.7 


3.0 
3.7 


15.2 
7.2 


0.8 
1.4 


20.2 


Montgomery . , . 


30.5 


Prince George's. 


1.7 


1.3 


67.3 


6.6 


9.5 


4.5 


7.5 


1.6 


37.4 


Queen Anne's . . 


2.7 


1.6 


60.7 


5.8 


6.5 


3.3 


18.3 


1.1 


6.6 


St. Mary's 


2.2 


1.1 


59.1 


7.9 


7.5 


5.4 


15.9 


0.9 


15.4 


Somerset 


2.1 


1.9 


67.2 


3.9 


6.0 


2.9 


15.1 


0.9 


21.7 


Talbot 


2.9 

t6.2 


1.6 
1.6 


65.4 
60.4 


4.8 
6.7 


7.2 
8.0 


3.3 
3.9 


13.4 
11.7 


1.4 
1.5 


4.1 


Washington .... 


20.1 


Wicomico 


2.0 


1.6 


65.2 


6.0 


6.8 


3.3 


13.9 


1.2 


20.8 


Worcester 


2.0 


1.9 


62.5 


5.8 


7.2 


3.6 


15.9 


1.1 


7.9 



EXCLUDING COST OF TRANSPORTATION 



Total State 


2.5 


1.9 


70.4 


6.4 


8.9 


4.4 


4.2 


1.3 


25.5 


Allegany 


2.0 


1.9 


72.8 


4 8 


9.5 


3.6 


3.2 


2.2 


8.3 


Anne Arundel . . 


2.1 


2.7 


72.0 


6.7 


7.9 


3.3 


3.3 


2.0 


31.3 


Baltimore City . 


2.1 


2.2 


71.0 


5.2 


9.4 


4.5 


4.8 


0.8 


16.5 


Baltimore 


2.3 


2.1 


69.5 


7.6 


8.6 


5.2 


3.7 


1.0 


32.1 


Calvert 


3.7 


2.4 


71.0 


6.0 


7.0 


6.6 


2.0 


1.3 


19.7 


Caroline 


3.7 


1.9 


70.8 


7.1 


7.5 


4.8 


2.5 


1.7 


33.5 


Carroll 


1.9 


2.1 


75.0 


5.2 


6.4 


4.8 


3.2 


1.4 


6.8 


Cecil 


2.3 


2.1 


69.2 


6.4 


10.6 


5.1 


2.7 


1.6 


21.2 


Charles 


2.1 


1.5 


71.2 


6.6 


9.4 


3.5 


4.9 


0.8 


7.1 


Dorchester 


2.0 


1.5 


71.4 


4.6 


9.5 


7.0 


2.1 


1.9 


0.7 


Frederick 


2.7 


2.3 


68.1 


7.3 


6.8 


7.0 


4.6 


1.2 


27.0 


Garrett 


2.9 


1.8 


76.0 


5.4 


6.2 


3.5 


2.9 


1.3 


6.3 


Harford 


2.9 


2.0 


69.6 


7.3 


8.4 


3.5 


5.3 


1.0 


12.0 


Howard 


2.2 


1.8 


75.9 


4.7 


6.5 


4.5 


3.7 


0.7 


23.5 


Kent 


3.4 


2.8 


73.9 


5.3 


7.4 


3.5 


2.7 


1.0 


22.5 


Montgomery . . . 


3.3 


1.5 


69.3 


6.9 


9.0 


3.8 


4.8 


1.4 


31.0 


Prince George's . 


1.7 


1.4 


69.7 


6.8 


9.9 


4.7 


4.1 


1.7 


38.2 


Queen Anne's . . 


3.1 


1.8 


70.7 


6.7 


7.6 


3.9 


5.0 


1.2 


7.6 


St. Mary's 


2.5 


1.3 


68.4 


9.2 


8.7 


6.2 


2.7 


1.0 


17.4 


Somerset 


2.4 


2.3 


77.8 


4.4 


6.9 


3.4 


1.7 


1.1 


24.3 


Talbot . 


3.3 

t6.6 


1.8 
1.7 


73.6 
64.7 


6.5 
7.2 


8.1 
8.6 


3.7 
4.1 


2.5 
5.5 


1.5 
1.6 


4.5 


Washington .... 


21.2 


Wicomico 


2.3 


1.8 


73.5 


6.7 


7.7 


3.7 


2.9 


1.4 


22.8 


Worcester 


2.4 


2.2 


72.7 


6.7 


8.3 


4.1 


2.3 


1.3 


9.1 



* Percentages obtained by dividing capital outlay by the sum of capital outlay and current expenses excluding 
debt service. 

t Includes Ford Foundation TV project. 

Note: Appropriations of State and Baltimore City funds for the retirement of teachers are not included. 



136 



Ninety-Fourth Annual Eeport 



TABLE 67 — Cost per Public Dav School Pupil Belonging: 
Counties of Maryland: 1923-1960 



Current Expenses: 





Cost per Pupil Belonging for Current 






Expenses 




Year Ending 








June 30 










Total* 


Elementary 


High 


1923 


$ 43.00 


$ 34.84 


$90.79 


1928 


52.62 


42.91 


93.51 


1933 


51.89 


42.51 


79.32 


1938 


61.12 


50.70 


87.59 


1943 


71.16 


60.39 


100.46 


1951 


186.34 


141.80 


214.60 


1952 


206.80 


162.26 


240.20 


1953 


216.17 


172.94 


246.25 


1954 


226.44 


181.55 


252.69 


1955 


242.47 


200.26 


260.41 


1956 


261.58 


215.59 


286.13 


1957 


265.61 
285.80 


342.41 
249.75 


299.29 


1958 


325.15 


1959 


313.02 


289.45 


358.23 


1960 


342.89 


293.00 


374.15 



* Administration, fixed charges, and kindergartens are included in the total but excluded from ele- 
mentary and high costs. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



137 



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138 



Ninety-Fourth Annual Report 



TABLE 69 — Cost per Pupil Belonging: Current Expenses*: 
Maryland Public Day Schools: Year Ending June 30, 1960 









All Schools 


























Administra- 
tion 


Fixed 










1 






Charges 


L(x;.4L Unit 


Tota 


It 


Elementary 1 


High 1 










Cost 


Rank 


Cost 


Rank 


Cost 


Rank 


Cost 


Rank 


Cost 


Rank 


Total State 


$333.79 




$285.48 




$372.16 




$8.42 




$4.15 




Allegany 


311.05 


20 


271.27 


15 


327.76 


22 


5.79 


21 


6.64 


1 


Anne Arundel . . 


288.07 


24 


248.72 


23 


318.29 


24 


5.91 


20 


5.39 


4 


Baltimore City . 


315.44 


15 


266.19 


18 


366.51 


13 


6.97 


14 


2.69 


22 


Baltimore 


344.51 


5 


301.18 


3 


376.05 


9 


7.98 


10 


3.60 


14 


Calvert 


314.45 


17 


263.56 


19 


369.77 


11 


9.73 


7 


3.26 


17 


Caroline 


348.83 


4 


271.37 


14 


417.63 


3 


11.44 


3 


5.25 


6 


Carroll 


307.43 


22 


242.77 


24 


366.45 


14 


5.54 


23 


3.98 


11 


Cecil 


330.87 
332.24 


10 
9 


269.07 
287.47 


17 
8 


394.36 
377.92 


5 

7 


7.01 
6.41 


13 

17 


4.83 
2.30 


8 


Charles 


23 


Dorchester 


314.87 


16 


274.58 


13 


342.10 


20 


5.56 


22 


5.19 


7 


Frederick 


343.35 


6 


293.60 


5 


376.22 


8 


8.78 


8 


4.10 


10 


Garrett 


319.64 


13 


296.77 


4 


325.29 


23 


7.59 


11 


3.35 


16 


Harford 


325.34 


11 


288.70 


7 


347.87 


19 


8.75 


9 


2.94 


19 


Howard 


314.41 


18 


270.36 


16 


358.66 


15 


6.31 


18 


1.99 


24 


Kent 


337.65 
417.88 


8 
1 


276.14 
359.54 


12 
1 


393.57 
450.95 


6 
1 


10.21 
14.51 


4 
2 


2.92 
6.14 


20 


Montgomery. . . 


2 


Prince George's. 


319.28 


14 


276.67 


11 


353.85 


17 


5.51 


24 


5.37 


5 


Queen Anne's . . 


361.23 


3 


292.61 


6 


425.48 


2 


10.05 


5 


3.96 


12 


St. Mary's 


313.90 


19 


260.87 


20 


374.98 


10 


6.85 


15 


2.87 


21 


Somerset 


309.52 


21 


258.17 


21 


356.28 


16 


6.44 


16 


2.98 


18 


Talbot 


324.89 


12 


281.20 


10 


352.03 


18 


9.73 


6 


4.56 


9 


Washington.. . . 


362.99 


2 


305.91 


2 


367.48 


12 


t23.49 


1 


5.73 


3 


Wicomico 


291.72 


23 


251.13 


22 


330.58 


21 


6.05 


19 


3.55 


15 


Worcester 


339.41 


7 


282.90 


9 


396.52 


4 


7.05 


12 


3.92 


13 



♦Excludes home teaching of handicapped children, junior colleges, adult education, veterans' training, 
and federal funds for school lunch and special milk. Also excludes kindergartens and Teachers' Retire- 
ment System — per pupil costs of which are shown below: 





Per Pupil Cost 


Local Unit 


Total Including 

Kindergartens 

and Retirement! 


Teachers' 
Retirement 
System Only 


Total State 

Anne Arundel . . 
Baltimore City . 

Baltimore 

Caroline 

Montgomery , . . 
Washington. . . . 
Worcester 


$350.27 

288.39 
323.70 
344.38 
345.87 
383.30 
356.38 
335.37 


$25.31 
25^25 



tExpenditures for administration and fixed charges are included here but excluded from elementary 
and high costs. 

JIncludes $13.75 per pupil for Ford Foundation TV project. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



139 



TABLE 70 — Cost per Pupil Belonging — Grades 1-12: INIaryland Public Day 
Schools: Year Ending June 30, 1960 





Total 

Current 

Expenses* 


Instructional Service 


Operation 


Mainte- 
nance 




Local Unit 


Super- 
visiont 


Salaries of 
Principals 

and 
Teachers 


Other 


Other 
School 
Services 


Total State 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel. . . . 
Baltimore City . . . 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester 

Frederick 

Garrett 


$321.22 

298.62 
276.77 
305.78 
332.92 
301.46 

332.14 
297.91 
319.04 
323.52 
304.11 

330.47 
308.69 
313.65 
306.11 
324.52 

379.24 
308.40 
347.22 
304.18 
300.09 

310.60 
333.75 
282.13 
328.44 


$6.40 

5.55 
7.34 
7.22 
7.05 
6.36 

6.00 
6.05 
6.43 
4.54 
4.10 

7.65 
4.79 
6.07 
5.10 
8.52 

6.46 
4.38 
5.88 
3.65 
6.09 

5.20 
6.09 
4.80 
6.56 


$230.31 

213.39 
197.59 
229.82 
238.19 
186.44 

217.53 
214.84 
211.05 
213.32 
198.44 

224.82 
200.14 
206.68 
217.55 
221.87 

291.18 
221.14 
226.22 
187.88 
209.82 

216.39 
226.42 
193.09 
214.17 


$19.40 

13.43 
17.81 
14.67 
23.39 
15.47 

21.47 
14.42 
19.43 
18.96 
12.47 

23.50 
13.81 
20.76 
12.92 
14.02 

27.85 
19.69 
21.45 
24.74 
11.63 

15.78 
25.28 
17.42 
19.47 


$29.53 

27.82 
21.64 
31.63 
29.54 
18.42 

23.26 
18.18 
32.41 
28.00 
26.44 

22.43 
16.34 
24.91 
18.56 
22.25 

39.16 
31.34 
24.21 
23.94 
18.64 

23.90 
30.44 
20.19 
24.71 


$14.81 

10.54 
9.01 
15.12 
17.66 
17.38 

14.89 
13.77 
15.55 
10.59 
19.57 

22.93 
9.33 
10.41 
12.89 
10.43 

16.71 
14.78 
12.44 
17.13 
9.12 

10.76 

14.77 

9.80 

12.25 


$20.77 

27.89 
23.38 
7.32 
17.09 
57.39 

48.99 
30.65 
34.17 
48.11 
43.09 

29.14 
64.28 
44 82 


Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery 

Prince George's . . 
Queen Anne's .... 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington 

Wicomico 

Worcester 


39.09 
47.43 

15.88 
17.07 
57.02 
46.84 
44.79 

38.57 
30.75 
36.83 
51.28 



* E.xcludes administration, fixed charges, kindergartens, and federal funds for school lunch and special 
milk 

t Consists of salaries and travel. 

See TABLES VI and XIX for basic data. 



140 



Ninety-Fourth Annual Report 



TABLE 71 — Cost per Pupil Belonging — Grades 1-6: Maryland Publ 
Elementary Schools: Year Ending June 30, 1960 



ic 





Total 


Instructional Service 
















Other 


Local Unit 


Current 




Salaries of 




Operation 


Mainte- 


School 




Expenses* 


Super- 
visiont 


Principals 
and 


Other 




nance 


Services 








Teachers 










Total State 


$285.48 


$5.99 


$205.70 


$15.39 


$26.25 


$14.10 


$18.05 


Allegany 


271.27 


4.70 


196.02 


10.14 


25.36 


9.23 


25.82 


Anne Arundel . . 


248.72 


4.80 


182.11 


13.48 


20.85 


7.69 


19.79 


Baltimore City . . . 


266.19 


7.42 


199.21 


12.50 


25.90 


14.92 


6.24 


Baltimore 


301.18 


7.05 


220.36 


18.60 


26.41 


17.43 


11.33 


Calvert 


263.56 


6.47 


161.46 


11.30 


18.59 


16.11 


49.63 




271.37 
242.77 


5.25 
4.41 


172.59 
174.58 


14.53 
7.87 


19.45 
15.10 


14.06 
10.87 


45.49 


Carroll 


28.94 


Cecil 


269.07 


2.66 


184.46 


14.24 


25.03 


9.70 


32.98 


Charles 


287.47 


3.62 


185.15 


18.97 


23.65 


8.94 


47.14 


Dorchester 


274.58 


4.76 


174.83 


10.13 


23.53 


21.21 


40.12 


Frederick 


293.60 


7.26 


195.88 


18.94 


22.12 


22.11 


27.29 


Garrett 


296.77 


5.45 


191.52 


10.87 


15.67 


10.46 


62.80 


Harford 


288.70 


5.75 


190.22 


17.74 


21.95 


10.24 


42.81 


Howard 


270.36 


4.26 


193.95 


10.09 


16.54 


6.93 


38.59 


Kent 


276.14 
359.54 


8.33 
6.11 


183.51 
265.17 


11.32 
19.88 


19.48 
37.32 


8.06 
15.93 


45.44 


Montgomery 


15.13 


Prince George's. .. 


276.67 


3.90 


198.73 


17.52 


29.17 


14.83 


12.52 


Queen Anne's. . . . 


292.61 


5.68 


191.19 


14.92 


19.00 


7.91 


53.91 


St. Mary's 


260.87 


2.57 


163.18 


16.95 


22.53 


12.50 


43.14 


Somerset 


258.17 


5.28 


179.16 


9.57 


16.62 


7.36 


40.18 


Talbot 


281.20 


5.19 


188.19 


12.56 


24.97 


11.42 


38.87 


Washington 


305.91 


6.17 


208.66 


17.34 


28.47 


13.98 


31.29 


Wicomico 


251.13 


3.95 


172.89 


15.73 


16.91 


9.10 


32.55 


Worcester 


282.90 


5.57 


186.71 


14.41 


20.53 


11.37 


44.31 



* Excludes administration, fixed charges, kindergartens, and federal funds for school lunch and special 
milk. 

t Consists of salaries and travel. 

See TABLES VI and XX for basic data. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



141 



TABLE 72— Cost per Pupil Belonging — Grades 7-12: IVlaryland Public High 
Schools: Year Ending June 30, 1960 





Total 

Current 

Expenses* 


Instructional Service 


Operation 


1 

Mainte- 
nance 




Local Unit 


Super- 
vision! 


Salaries of 
Principals 

and 
Teachers 


Other 


Other 
School 
Services 


Total State 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel. . . . 
Baltimore City . . . 

Baltimore 

Calvert 


$372.16 

327.76 
318.29 
366.51 
376.05 
369.77 

417.63 
366.45 
394.36 
377.92 
342.10 

376.22 
325.29 
347.87 
358.66 
393.57 

450.95 
353.85 
425.48 
374.98 
356.28 

352.03 
367.48 
330.58 
396.52 


$6.97 

6.44 
11.10 
6.90 
7.04 
6.17 

7.05 
8.09 
12.11 
5.92 
3.25 

8.15 
3.88 
6.54 
6.33 
8.79 

6.96 
5.07 
6.17 
5.42 
7.17 

5.21 
6.00 
6.11 
8.06 


$265.38 

231.90 
220.49 
276.80 
262.41 
231.46 

280.76 
263.66 
251.12 
255.83 
228.79 

260.72 
212.13 
229.27 
252.26 
276.62 

328.22 
253.24 
276.43 
228.25 
250.91 

256.14 
247.94 
224.68 
255.22 


$25.12 

16.94 
24.21 
18.01 
29.90 
22.97 

31.22 
22.55 
27.24 
18.96 
15.49 

29.15 
17.89 
24.89 
17.08 
17.88 

39.22 
22.79 
30.80 
37.47 
14.40 

20.33 
34.89 
20.08 
27.02 


$34.19 

30.44 
22.82 
40.41 
33.80 
18.11 

28.62 
22.01 
43.55 
34.56 
30.19 

22.82 
17.29 
28.98 
21.53 
26.20 

41.78 
34.46 
31.67 
26.25 
21.35 

22.39 
32.83 
25.32 
30.95 


$15.84 

11.94 
10.96 
15.41 
17.98 
19.67 

16.06 
17.38 
24.36 
13.07 
17.47 

23.93 
7.76 
10.63 
21.63 
13.82 

17.83 
14.69 
18.93 
24.70 
11.47 

9.83 
15.72 
10.89 
13.57 


$24.66 

30.10 
28.71 
8.98 
24.92 
71 39 


Caroline 


53.92 


Carroll 

Cecil 


32.76 
35 98 


Charles 


49 58 


Dorchester 

Frederick 

Garrett 


46.91 

31.45 
66.34 


Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery 

Prince George's. . . 
Queen Anne's .... 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington 

Wicomico 

Worcester 


47.56 
39.83 
50.26 

16.94 
23.60 
61.48 
52.89 
50.98 

38.13 
30.10 
43.50 
61.70 



* Excludes administration, fixed charges, and federal funds for school lunch and special milk. 

t Consists of salaries and travel. 

See TABLES VI and XXI for basic data. 



142 



Ninety-Fourth Annual Report 



TABLE 73 — Average Annual Salary per Teacher and Principal: 
Public Schools of Maryland: 1923-1960 



Year Ending 


Average Annual Salary per Teacher and Principal 


June 30 


Total 


Elementary 


High 


1923 


$1,243 
1,408 
1,453 
1,556 
1,775 

3,621 
3,886 
3,947 
4,093 
4,163 

4,465 
4,719 
4,944 
5,247 
5,493 


$1,156 
1,320 
1,398 
1,487 
1,648 

3,601 
3,858 
3,891 
4,020 
4,104 

4,450 
4,684 
4,821 
5,079 
5,436 


$1,671 


1928 


1,830 


1933 


1,659 


1938 

1943 


1,784 
1,994 


1951 


3,646 


1952 

1953.. 


3,919 
4,019 


1954 

1955 

1956 


4,186 
4,237 

4,482 


1957 


4,760 


1958 

1959.. 


5,092 
5,447 


1960 


5,556 



Maryland State Department of Education 



143 



TABLE 74 — Average Salary* per Teacher and Principal: Maryland Public Schools: 

Year Ending June 30, 1960 





All Schools 


Elementary 


High 


Local Unit 


Total 


Teachers 


Prin- 
cipals! 


Total 


Teachers 


Prin- 
cipals! 


Total 


Teachers 


Prin- 
cipals! 


Total State 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel. . 
Baltimore City. 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil .... 


$5,493 

5,162 
4,792 
5,623 
5,578 
4,661 

4,895 
4,921 
5,018 
5,228 
4,930 

5,235 
5,028 
5,094 
5,157 
4,842 

6,528 
5,404 
4,957 
4,599 
4,840 

4,971 
5,372 
4,872 
4,714 


$5,364 

5,079 
4,666 
5,450 
5,447 
4,519 

4,795 
4,805 
4,898 
5,125 
4,813 

5.109 
4,956 
5,011 
5,031 
4,722 

6,439 
5,264 
4,831 
4,469 
4,711 

4,835 
5,265 
4,763 
4,588 


$8,212 

6,718 
7,593 
9,361 
10,118 
6,417 

6,663 
7,048 
6,787 
7,077 
6,274 

7,466 
5,992 
7,278 
7,325 
6,323 

8,907 
8,294 
6,396 
6,433 
6,169 

6,539 
7,038 
6,695 
6,341 


$5,436 

5,094 
5,144 
5,463 
5,481 
4,624 

4,915 
4,731 
5,075 
5,314 
4,921 

5,079 
5,102 
5,163 
5,131 
4,835 

6,375 
5,361 
5,012 
4,584 
4,732 

4,996 
5,302 
4,890 
4,676 


$5,273 

4,994 
4,989 
5,251 
5,303 
4,464 

4,826 
4,572 
4,939 
5,236 
4,782 

4,870 
5,027 
5,069 
4,991 
4,641 

6,254 
5,172 
4,887 
4,448 
4,604 

4,816 
5,176 
4,763 
4,531 


$7,860 

6,283 
7,223 
9,001 
9,828 
6,065 

6,360 
6,793 
6,417 
6,663 
5,957 

7,177 
5,800 
6,900 
6,982 
6,178 

8,554 
7,946 
5,983 
5,964 
5,889 

6,268 
6,601 
6,335 
5,908 


$5,556 

5,225 
4,424 
5,811 
5,692 
4,707 

4,879 
5,089 
4,957 
5,137 
4,939 

5,387 
4,938 
5,018 
5,186 
4,849 

6,712 
6,454 
4,904 
4,615 
4,946 

4,945 
5,444 
4,852 
4,757 


$5,463 

5,152 
4,346 
5,677 
5,612 
4,585 

4,768 
5,003 
4,856 
5,010 
4,843 

5,326 
4,876 
4,950 
5,076 
4,791 

6,652 
5,364 
4,780 
4,492 
4,814 

4,853 
5,353 
4,762 
4,646 


$9,211 

7,878 

9,325 

10,158 

11,039 

7,470 

6,959 
7,525 
7,900 


Charles 

Dorchester 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 


7,550 
7,160 

8,980 
6,633 
8,350 
8,080 
6,975 


Montgomery . . . 
Prince George's 
Queen Anne's. . 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington 

Wicomico 

Worcester 


10,266 
9,551 
7,325 
7,725 
6,529 

7,533 
8,382 
7,920 
7,750 



* Grades 1 through 12 only; kindergartens and junior colleges are excluded. 

t Includes all principals having two or more assistants without regard to division of time between teaching and 
administration. 



144 



Ninety-Fourth Annual Report 



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147 



TABLFj 78 — National Defense Education Act: Expenditures by Local Units and 
State Department of Education : State of Maryland : Year Ending June 30, 1960 



Local Unit 



Expenditures Under National Defense Education Act 



Total Federal 
Funds 



Title 
III* 



Title 

V* 



Title 
VIII* 



Title 
X* 



Total State 

State Department of Education 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel 

Baltimore City 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery 

Prince George's 

Queen Anne's 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



$860,711 

31,682 

3,715 

121,496 

97,203 

96,743 

15,983 

11,134 

5,569 

26,370 

11,794 

5,850 

19,245 
4,766 
58,288 
14,578 
13,733 

117,524 

88,656 

25,431 

17,488 

6,059 

9,164 
16,395 
20,717 
21,128 



$597,874 

19,573 

3,715 

111,681 

18,977 

57,303 

12,195 

10,642 

5,389 

20,157 

11,794 

3,925 

17,552 
4,270 
43,278 
13,347 
11,279 

69,025 
62,283 
22,240 
15,948 
6,059 

9,164 
16,305 
12,707 
19,066 



$155,934 
3,765 



9,815 
23,016 
23,044 

3,788 

492 

180 

6,213 



1,925 

1,693 
496 
8,434 
1,231 
2,454 

28,122 

26,373 

3,191 

1,540 



90 
8,010 
2,062 



$99,860 
1,301 



$7,043 
7,043 



55,210 
16,396 



6,576 



20,377 



* Title III — Science, Mathematics, and Modern Foreign Language. 
Title V — Guidance, Counseling, and Testing. 
Title VIII — Area Vocational Education — ^Technical. 
Title X — Improvement of Statistical Services of State Educational Agencies. 



148 



Ninety-Fourth Annual Report 



TABLE 79 — Federal Funds Alloted and Expended in Maryland; 
Vocational Education: Year Ending June 30, 1960 



Type of 
Vocational Program 



Balance, 
July 1, 1959 



1959-60 
Allotment 



1959-60 
Expenditures 



Balance, 
June 30, 1960 



Total 

Agriculture 

Trades and Industry 

Home Economics 

Teacher Training and Supervision 
Distributive Occupations 



*$32,973 



141 
*30,663 



2,169 



$541,591 

117,176 

268,562 

104,253 

15,618 

35,982 



$544,329 

116,199 

274,876 

104,253 

15,618 

33,383 



$30,235 

1,118 
24,349 



4,768 



* Corrected balance includes refund receipt of $200. 



TABLE 80 — Expenditures for Administration and Supervision and Teacher 
Training in Vocational Education: State of Maryland: Year Ending June 

30, 1960 





Type of Vocational Program 


Source of Expenditures 


Total 


Agriculture 


Trades and 
Industry 


Home 
Economics 


Distributive 
Occupations 


Total 

State and University Funds . 


$37,440 
41,590 

26,790 
30,940 

10,650 
10,650 


$15,771 
15,771 

10,196 
10,196 

5,575 
5,575 


$6,841 
6,841 

5,458 
5,458 

1,383 
1,383 


$13,971 
18,121 

10,279 
14,429 

3,692 
3,692 


$857 
857 


State Administration and 
Supervision 

State Funds 


857 
857 


Teacher Training 

University of Maryland 

Funds 









Maryland State Department of Education 



149 



TABLE 81 — Expenditures of Federal Vocational Funds in Maryland: 
Year Ending June 30, 1960 





Type of Vocational Program 


Type of Expenditures 


Total 


Agriculture 


Trades and 
Industry 


Home 
Economics 


Distributive 
Occupations 


Total 


$544,329 

333,222 
99,089 
31,912 
33,696 

4,820 
10,650 

30,940 


$123,275 

100,244 
7,260 

5,575 
10,196 


$278,003 

195,658 

41,006 

4,879 

24,799 

4,820 
1,383 

5,458 


$109,668 

37,320 
48,258 

' 5,969 

3,692 
14,429 


$33,383 


Instruction in Schools 


Adult Education. . 


2,565 

27,033 

2,928 


Cooperative and Continuation 


Instruction by the University of 
Maryland 

Volunteer Fireman. 


Teacher Training and 

Guidance 

State Administration and 

Supervision 


857 



150 



Ninety-Fourth Annual Report 






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Maryland State Department of Education 



151 



TABLE 83 — Adult Education: Receipts and Expenditures: State of Maryland: 
Year Ending June 30, 1960 





Receipts for Adult Education from 
Sources Other than Local 


Expenditures for Adult 
Education 


Local Unit 


Total 


Federal 


State 


Fees from 
Attendance 


Total 


Salaries 


Expenses 


Total State 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel . . . 
Baltimore City . . 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 


$198,712 

4,611 

2,909 

24,518 

21,567 

331 

1,657 
113 

2,510 
877 

1,119 

2,511 
485 
6,387 
1,626 
1,007 

75,525 

43,924 

1,065 

611 

280 

663 
2,284 
1,919 

213 


$30,984 

1,038 

' 594 

' 877 
408 

18,813 

7,005 

803 

341 

140 

459 

"506 


$64,529 

2,040 

1,524 

24,518 

9,341 

331 

255 

"985 
877 
479 

1.785 

485 

2,612 

1,218 

229 

8,406 

5,396 

262 

270 

140 

204 
1,807 
1,152 

213 


$103,199 

2,571 
1,385 

12,226 

364 

113 

1,525 

"46 

726 

2,89'7 

"-779 

48,306 
31,523 

' 477 
261 


$646,367 

10,606 

5,074 

427,052 

67,999 

572 

1,237 
2,027 
2,445 
821 
1,103 

6,154 
535 
7,401 
2,037 
1,526 

68,741 

21,491 

1,065 

517 

280 

813 

14,329 

2,236 

306 


$577,154 

10,427 

4,237 

385,815 

51,043 

572 

1,036 
1,796 
2,406 
821 
1,073 

5,901 

535 

7,398 

2,027 

834 

60,879 

20,966 

1,065 

509 

280 

663 

14,329 

2,236 

306 


$69,213 

179 

837 

41,237 

16,956 

201 
231 


Cecil 


39 


Charles 

Dorchester 

Frederick 

Garrett 


" 30 
253 


Harford 

Howard 

Kent 


3 

10 

692 


Montgomery .... 
Prince George's . 
Queen Anne's .... 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot . 


7,862 
525 

"8 
150 


Washington 

Wicomico 

Worcester 





152 



NlNRTY-FOTIRTII ANNUAL REPORT 



TABLE 84 — Adult Education Classes: Number of Teachers and Enrollment hy 
Subject: State of Maryland: 1959-60 





Number 

of 
Teachers 


Enrollment 


Local Unit 


Total 


Agri- 
culture 


Home 
Economics 


Trades and 
Industry 


Business 
Education* 


General 


Total State 


1,132 

26 

16 

559 

168 

4 

5 

13 

16 

4 

6 

11 
3 

24 
6 
8 

134 

64 

6 

4 

2 

4 
37 
10 

2 


43,512 

884 

410 

26,798 

4,176 

91 

155 
255 
360 
111 
161 

246 

47 

1,048 

128 

222 

4,892 

2,129 

135 

97 

30 

74 
788 
251 

24 


293 

44 

54 
■34 

"ii 

32 

7 
"34 

"i? 

31 
15 
14 


5,979 

487 

15 

1,085 

612 
27 

61 
15 
182 
21 
22 

46 

132 
15 

17 

2,098 

891 

57 

57 

26 
44 
55 
14 


7,917 

95 

74 

6,020 

746 

"22 

"si 

86 

"26 
16 
67 

49 
169 

'sie 


8,408 

223 

211 

4,105 

1,181 

64 

40 

48 

166 

90 

74 

114 
36 

381 
97 
54 

585 

542 

44 

40 

13 

17 
147 
126 

10 


20,915 
35 


Anne Arundel .... 
Baltimore City . . . 

Baltimore 

Calvert 


110 

15,588 

1,637 






Carroll 

Cecil 


170 
12 






Dorchester 

Frederick 

Garrett 






477 






Kent 


84 


Montgomery 

Prince George's. .. 
Queen Anne's. . . . 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington 

Wicomico 

Worcester 


2,153 
527 

"66 
56 



* Includes Distributive Occupations. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



153 



TABLE 85— Adult Education Program: Title of Courses Offered: 
State of Maryland: 1959-60 



Title of 
Course 



Agkiculture 

Agriculture 

Farm Business Management .... 

Farm Mechanics 

Farm Practices 

Vocational Agriculture Welding. . 
Young Farmers 

Total 

Home Economics 

Clothing Construction, Tailoring. 

Cooking, Party Food 

Crafts 

Furniture Upholstering, Repairin 

Home Economics 

Home Management, Furnishing. 

Interior Decorating 

Millinery 

Rug Making 

Self Improvement 

Sewing 

Slip Covers 

Total 

Tradhis and Industry 

Auto Mechanics 

Harboring 

Blueprint Reading 

Building Trades 

Chemistry for Fire Fighters 

Cosmetology 

Electric Code 

Electricity 

Electronics 

Industrial Safety 

Machine Shop 

Mathematics 

Mechanical Drawing, Drafting. . 

Plumbing 

Printing Trades 

Radio and TV 

Related English 

Steam Fitting Apprentice 

Supervisory, Management 

Training 

Tailoring 

Welding 

Woodworking 



Number of 
Classes 



128 

6 

2 

3 

5 

9 

8 

12 

10 

8 

71 

4 

266 



10 
4 
6 

16 
3 
9 
4 

46 

30 
9 

17 
5 
3 
7 
9 
8 
3 
3 



Title of 
Course 



Trades and Industry — Continued 
Other Trades 

Total 

Di.sTRiBUTivE Occupations 

Bu-siness Education 

Investments 

Salesmanship and Retail Trades . 

Total 

Business Education 

Accounting and Bookkeeping. . . . 

Business English 

Commercial .\rithmetic and Law. 

Office Machines 

Office Practice 

Shorthand 

Typing 

Other Business Courses 

Total 

General 

Americanization 

Art, Arts and Crafts 

Braille 

Ceramics 

Driver Education 

Elementary Education 

English, Writing 

French 

General Industrial Training 

Income Tax 

Informal Noncredit Program. . . . 

Mathematics 

Music, Singing 

Parent Education 

Physical Education, Dancing 

Psychology 

Public Speaking 

Russian 

Secondary Education 

Spanish 

Technical 

Wood Shop, Woodwork 

Other General Courses 

Total 



Number of 
Classes 



9 
234 



18 

4 

3 

9 

11 

73 

153 

3 

274 



33 

66 

5 

13 

2 

22 

6 

11 

11 

2 

4 

8 

6 

56 

13 

5 

5 

13 

186 



23 
5 



511 



154 



Ninety-Fourth Annual Report 



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IBS 



TABLE 87 — Participation and Reimbursement Paid: Special Milk Program: 
Maryland Public Schools: 1959-60 



Year 
Local Unit 


Number of 

Approved 

Schools 

Participating 

in Program 


Per Cent of 
Total Schools 

in State 
Participating 

in Program 


Total Number 

of One-Half 

Pints Milk 

Reimbursable 


Reimburse- 
ment 
Paid 


1955-56 

1956-57 


772 
818 
874 
914 
943 


82.2 
85.6 
89.5 
92.7 
94.2 


21,833,604 
26,390,908 
28,715,326 
36,390,152 
35,555,378 


$ 820,471 
983,689 


1957-58 

1958-59 


1,080,048 
1,286,797 


1959-60 


1,354,115 



BY LOCAL UNIT, 1959-60 



Allegany 

Anne Arundel . 
Baltimore City. 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery. . . 
Prince George's 
Queen Anne's. . 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington. . . . 

Wicomico 

Worcester 




94.1 

100.0 

100.0 

94.8 

93.3 

100.0 

100.0 

95.8 

86.7 

63.3 

100.0 
83.3 
96.0 
100.0 
100.0 

95.3 
97.6 
92.9 
68.4 
65.0 

80.0 
100.0 
100.0 

50.0 



996,057 
2,964,383 
7,729,250 
6,208,583 

167,060 

203,758 
527,506 
427,425 
562,521 
232,191 

410,716 
283,045 
1,190,970 
696,556 
271,546 

6,055,011 

4.483,583 

186.024 

280,494 

113,334 

178.380 
668,053 
532,602 
186,330 



39,842 

116,033 

273,118 

241,769 

5,756 

7,358 
21,100 
15,479 
21,564 

8,834 

16,054 
10,989 
47,568 
27,774 
7,747 

233,844 

176,029 

7,194 

10,721 

3,645 

7,027 
26,368 
21,186 

7.116 



156 



Ninety-Fourth Annual Report 



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Minto—ito coCT:ot-05 •^mint-to c-JcO'-Nto com-Hrt" 



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3 0) 0! 

r I- t- 

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a; a) S S jj 

2; « t3 o 01 



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5Ci<; Ca 

c- 



:e =2 



•s E "n 
•So" 



_. <i<pqcQO OOOOQ feOaSM SlXO'crjw H^^^ 



£2 
E.E 

3 " 

ctP3 
*- C 

■O O 



^._3 



a o 



J. § 

^'"o6 
ca o°E 



E 3«i- 

5 c o 
5o 

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'3 c« c 
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«« >i 

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a o 



Maryi^np State Department of EmrcATiox 



157 



TABLE 89 — Participation ami Types of Lunches Served: National Sch«M»l 
Lunch Program: Maryland Piihlic Schools: 1959-60 



Local U>jit 



Number of 

Approved 

Schools 

Participating 

in Program 



Per Cent of 
Total Schools 

in State 
Participating 

in Program 



Average 

Daily 

Participation 



Per Cent of 
Total Average 
Number Be- 
longing in State 
Participating 
in Program 



Total 

Number of 

Type A* 

Lunches 

Served 



Total State 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel . 
Baltimore City 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester .... 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery. . 
Prince George's 
Queen Anne's. . 
St. Mary's. . . . 
Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington . . . 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



758 

32 
62 
83 
85 



8 
23 
21 
11 
18 

31 
11 
23 
17 



94 

107 

10 

12 

7 

11 
45 
20 
11 



75.5 

94.1 
88.6 
45.6 
87.6 
53.3 

72.7 
100.0 
87.5 
73.3 
60.0 

86.1 
61.1 
92.0 
94.4 
61.5 

87.9 
84.9 
71.4 
63.2 
35.0 

73.3 
90.0 
90.9 
55.0 



170,286 

9,840 

9,846 

13,673 

29,420 

926 

2,042 
5,172 
3,671 
1,539 
2,330 

8,706 
2,445 
8,412 
3,505 

875 

22,243 

23,832 

1,938 

1,863 

990 



30.7 

62.5 
25.1 
9.1 
36.2 
22.7 

47.8 
50.4 
40.5 
21.6 
39.1 

63.2 
51.5 
53.4 
50.0 
27.1 

33.2 
36.7 
54.6 
33.0 
•23.5 



1,472 


36.2 


10,316 


57.6 


3,457 


34.9 


1,773 


34.0 



28,152,218 

1,604,920 
1,638,882 
2,284,183 
4,892,852 
151,948 

333,075 
857,339 
610,416 
250,061 
381,202 

1,432,269 
403.391 

1,397,746 
579,683 
144,230 

3,677,383 

3,970,067 

320,917 

297,617 

161,798 

244,300 

1,655,292 

569,492 

293,155 



;. protein, Ji c. vegetables and 'or fruit, I serving bread, 2 Isps. butter or 



* Type K—li pt. milk, 2 oz 
fortified margarine. 



158 



Ninety-Fourth Annual Report 



TABLE 90 — Capital Outlay Expenditures by Maryland Local Boards of 
Education: Year Ending June 30, 1960 





Total 


Expenditures for Capital Outlay 


Local Unit 


Elementary 


High 


Administration 
Buildings 


Total State 


$63,292,965 

419,509 

4,919,034 

9,988,390 

13,187,125 

263,231 

666,955 
213,395 
742,837 
162,701 
11,413 

1,677,711 

83,609 

640,165 

615,382 

281,264 

13,185,549 

12,755,321 

92,962 

327,290 

364,941 

57,030 

1,712,500 

769,579 

155,072 


$22,769,886 

154,695 
1,480,986 
3,253,446 
4,891,643 

119,235 

201,450 

2,429 

67,554 

58,942 

1,147 

543,704 

83,609 

224,194 

194,823 

45,939 

5,879,390 

4,250,775 

28,716 

203,834 

166,235 

45,863 
566,590 
177,111 
127,576 


$39,984,922 

262,562 
3,438,048 
6,702,965 
8,273,028 

142,282 

465,505 

210,966 

673,655 

99,031 

10,266 

1,128,518 

4i'5,69i 
420,559 
235,325 

6,906,474 

8,469,621 

48,974 

123,456 

198,491 

10,221 

1,143,607 

380,669 

25,608 


$538,157 


Allegany 


2,252 




31,979 




22,454 


Calvert 

Caroline 


1,714 


Carroll 

Cecil 


1,628 




4,728 


Dorchester 

Frederick 


5,489 


Garrett 

Harford 


" 880 






Kent 

Montgomery 

Prince George's 

Queen Anne's 


399,685 
34,925 
15,272 


St. Mary's 


2i5 


Talbot 

Washington 

Wicomico 


946 
2,303 
11,799 


Worcester 


1,888 



Maryland State Department of Education 



159 



TABLE 91 — Value* of Maryland Public School Property per Pupil Belonging: 
Year Ending June 30, 1960 





Total 


Elementary 


High 


Local Unit 


Total 
Value 


Average 
per Pupil 


Total 
Value 


Average 
per Pupil 


Total 
Value 


Average 
per Pupil 


Total State 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel . . 
Baltimore Cityf. 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 


$605,764,874 

17,658,341 

41,195,576 

134,109,551 

92,126.757 

2.981,100 

3,797,000 

11,278,350 

15,818,900 

7,308,292 

8,629,450 

13,824,874 
4,712,160 

21,836,457 
4,784.640 
2.963,900 

8.'^. 7 18.032 

76.961.158 

3.445.075 

5.699,150 

3,851,118 

6,317,900 
21,963,033 
14,246,560 

6,537,500 


$1,049.03 

1,121.26 
1,050.43 

814.88 
1,132.11 

729.55 

876.36 
1,099.96 
1,743.92 
1,026.13 
1,448.16 

1,004.12 
993.33 

1,386.96 
682.59 
917.45 

1,113.83 
1,184.89 

970.88 
1,009.32 

913.60 

1,552.12 
1.192.72 
1.439.63 
1.197.22 


$297,933,085 

5,731,908 
19,118,375 
65,369,463 
43,594,890 

1,717,100 

1,715,026 
5,997,850 
6,249,700 
3,708,198 
3,466.950 

6,652.374 
2.412.000 
9.524.882 
2.431,065 
1,271,687 

54,416,721 

35.429,733 

1.524.350 

2.802.650 

1,236,475 

2,902,938 

11,544,566 

6,443,684 

2,670,500 


$854.36 

705.43 
816.64 
622.31 
929.65 
653.39 

670.77 
1,055.51 
1,146.04 

865.77 
1,034.11 

872.64 
873.94 
1,046.00 
582.81 
669.49 

1,144.90 
926.27 
729.28 
800.03 
512.17 

1,219.21 

1,119.57 

1,067.61 

830.17 


$307,831,789 

11,926,433 
22,077,201 
68,740,088 
48,531,867 
1,264,000 

2,081,974 
5,280,500 
9,569,200 
3,600,094 
5,162.500 

7.172.500 
2.300,160 
12,311,575 
2,353,575 
1.692.213 

29,301,311 

41,531,425 

1,920,725 

2,896,500 

2,614,643 

3,414,962 

10,418,467 

7,802,876 

3,867,000 


$1,345.81 

1.564.47 
1.396.66 
1.154.66 
1.407.45 
866.82 

1.172.53 
1,155.22 
2.645 18 


Charles 

Dorchester 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 


1.268.04 
1.980.78 

1.167.23 
1,159.41 
1.854.68 
829.25 
1.271.29 


Montgomery . . . 
Prince George's. 
Queen Anne's . . 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 


1.060.77 
1,555.35 
1,317.19 
1,351.42 
1,451.69 

2.021.29 
1.285.82 
2.021.26 
1.847.23 


Washington .... 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



* Value based on 100 per cent of the insured valuation for each school building and the equipment 
thereof. Value of sites has been excluded. 

t Baltimore City shows value of buildings and equipment as carried by the Bureau of Accounts and 
Disbursements; this valuation does not constitute the basis for insurance. 



160 



Ninety-Fourth Annual Report 



TABLE 92 

Maryland Public School Bonded Indebtedness Related to Assessed Valuation: 

June 30, 1960 



Local 


School Bonded Indebtedness as of 
June 30, 1960 


1959 Assessed 

Valuation 

Taxable at 

Full Rate for 

County 

Purposes 


Assessed 
Valuation 
per Dollar 

of School 
Bonded In- 
debtedness 


Per Cent 

School 

Bonded In- 


Unit 


Total 


County 
Bonds 


State 
Loan* 


debtedness 

is of Assessed 

Valuation 


Total State 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel . . . 
Baltimore City . . 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 


$391,630,707 

5,614,604 

29,687,211 

1-82,723,000 

95,224,837 

1,942,577 

2,312,975 
2,933,376 
7,775,510 
2,210,092 
3,776,111 

10,468,658 
1,746,823 
9,799,828 
3,717,767 
1,424,472 

57,826,577 

43,289,709 

1,676,098 

1,441,627 

2,040,766 

2,778,282 

12,202,855 

6,469,835 

2,547,117 


$306,407,707 

2,080,000 
26,171,000 
82,723,000 
78,120,000 

1,174,000 

1,575,000 
500,000 

5,020,000 
374,000 

3,191,300 

7,065,000 
1,175,000 
9,033,000 
2,120,000 
900,000 

33,626,407 

32,198,000 

1,090,000 

1,350,666 

2,160,000 
8,475,000 
5,027,000 
1,260,000 


$85,223,000 

3.534,604 
3,516,211 

17,104,837 
768,577 

737,975 
2,433,376 
2,755,510 
1,836,092 

584,811 

3,403,658 
571,823 
766,828 

1,597,767 
524,472 

24,200,170 
11,091,709 

586,098 
1,441,627 

690,766 

618,282 
3,727,855 
1,442,835 
1,287,117 


$8,322,230,306 

tl67,473,527 

1377,092,757 

12,912,871,058 

1,554,852,093 

24,610,695 

34,984,792 
133,302,631 
92,991,560 
48,718,865 
71,102,589 

169,583,330 
35,563,225 

164,592,360 
90,511.479 
36,922,308 

1,097,388,540 

710,889,995 

41,467,971 

41,702,683 

24,932,903 

57,098,195 

t238,367,825 

116,049,695 

79,159,230 


$21 

30 
13 
35 
16 
13 

15 

45 
12 
22 
19 

16 
20 
17 
24 
26 

19 
16 
25 
29 
12 

21 
20 
18 
31 


4.7 

3.3 
7.9 
2.8 
6.1 
7.9 

6.6 
2.2 


Cecil 


8.4 


Charles 

Dorchester 

Frederick 

Garrett 


4.5 
5.3 

6.2 

4.9 


Harford 

Howard 

Kent 


5.9 
4.1 
3.9 


Montgomery .... 
Prince George's . . 
Queen Anne's .... 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 


5.3 
6.1 
4.0 
3.5 
8.2 

4.9 


Washington 

Wicomico 

Worcester 


5.1 
5.6 
3.2 



* General School Construction Loan. 

t Includes sinking fund balance of $1,570,032. 

X Exc udes valuation of Federal Housing Authority. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



161 



'ABLE 93 — Maryland Public School Bonded Indebtedness* and Interest 
Payments per Pupil Belonging: June 30, 1960 



Local U.vit 


School 

Bonded 

Indebtedness 


Interest 
Payments 


Local Unit 


School 

Bonded 

Indebtedness 


Interest 
Payments 


Total State 


$678.20 

356.51 
756.98 
502.64 
1,170.18 
475.40 

533.84 
286.09 
857.19 
310.31 
633.69 

760.35 


$18.13 

8.15 
21.80 
13.33 
34.53 
11.89 

15.65 
6.37 

22.95 
6.25 

15.98 

16.73 


Garrett 


$368.23 
622.44 
530.39 
440.93 

769.35 
666.48 
472.35 
255.31 
484.13 

682.54 
662.69 
653.78 
479.66 


$ 8.37 






17.73 


Allegany 

Anne Arundel 

Baltimore City 


Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery 


12.46 
10.30 

18.59 


Calvert 


Prince George's 

Queen Anne's 

St. Mary's 


17.73 




8.78 
6.22 


Carroll 




8.71 


Cecil 

Charles 


Talbot 


19.05 






18.17 






15.76 






12.42 









* Includes General School Construction Loan. 



162 



Ninety-Fourth Annual Report 



TABLE 94 
Calculated School Tax Rates and Published Tax Rates: State of Maryland: 1959-60 





Calculated Public School Tax Rates* 


Published 

Tax 

Ratest 


Additional 
Rates in 


Local Unit 


Total 


Current 
Expenses 


Capital 
Outlay 


Debt 
Service 


Districts and 

Incorporated 

Places! 


Total State 


$1.71 

1.51 
1.69 
1.41 
1.86 
1.82 

1.86 
1.33 
1.71 
1.61 
1.32 

1.73 
1.33 
1.42 
1.42 
1.43 

2.49 
1.96 
1.56 
1.27 
1.30 

1.52 
1.61 
1.64 
1.45 


$1.35 

1.15 
al.l3 

1.30 
al.36 
al.39 

1.37 

1.05 

01.19 

al.36 

1.09 

al.48 
0.98 
al.06 
al.l3 
al.l2 

al.85 
al.34 

1.21 
aO.95 

1.21 

1.09 
01.31 

1.06 
al.09 


$0.08 
0.01 

6! 13 
0.08 

0.09 
0.09 
0.01 
0.02 

0.01 
0.04 
0.02 
0.03 
0.01 

0.32 
0.14 
0.03 
0.09 
& 

o^oe 

0.12 


$0.28 

0.35 
0.56 
0.11 
0.37 
0.35 

0.40 
0.19 
0.51 
0.23 
0.23 

0.24 
0.31 
0.34 
0.26 
0.30 

0.32 
0.48 
0.32 
0.23 
0.09 

0.43 
0.30 
0.52 
0.24 


$2.22 
cl.98 
3.34 
2.16 
2.10 

2.03 
1.80 
2.08 
1.35 
1.85 

1.70 
2.00 
1.64 
1.75 
2.00 

2.48 
2.30 
1.90 
1.80 
2.00 

2.23 
1.89 
1.96 
1.70 




Allegany 


$0.08— $1.56 


Anne Arundel" 

Baltimore City" 

Baltimore" 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll" 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester" 

Frederick" 

Garrett" 


1.25— 1.55 

0.75—1.25 

0.25— 1.15 
0.50— 0.85 
0.20— 1.33 

0.50 
0.10— 1.50 

0.10— 1.65 
40 — 90 


Harford" 

Howard" 

Kent" 


1.05— 1.20 
0.20—0.85 


Montgomery 

Prince George's 

Queen Anne's" 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington" 

Wicomico 


0.06— 0.98 
0.25— 1.61 
0.20— 0.78 

0.90 
0.80— 1.45 

0.95— 1.15 
0.35— 0.85 
0.40— 1.23 
0.90— 1 40 







* Calculated by dividing tax funds received by Local Boards of Education by total assessed valuations as used in 

calculation of State aid payments. 
t Rates are tor fiscal period on which district operates. State property tax and special service levies are excluded. 
i Figures are from reports made to State Fiscal Research Bureau. 
" Calendar year fiscal period 

a Excludes federal funds authorized by Public Law 874 as amended, 
b Less than Ic per hundred. 
c Average rate of eight election districts which vary from $1.74 to $2.02. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



163 



TABLE 95 
Local Revenue Appropriations: Maryland Public Schools: 1959-60 



Local Unit 



Local 
Revenue* 



Appropbiationb for Public ScHOOLsf 



All School 
Purposes 



Current 
Expenses 



Capital 
Outlay 



Debt 
Service 



Per Cent op Total Revenue 
Appropriated for Public Schools 



All 
School 
Purposes 



Current 
Expenses 



Capital 
Outlay 



Debt 

Service 



Total State 

Allegany 

Anne Arundelt . 
Baltimore Cityt 

Baltimoret 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll} 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester t. . . . 

Frederick} 

Garrettt 

Harford} 

Howard} 

Kent} 

Montgomery. . . 
Prince George's. 
Queen Anne's}. 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington}. . . 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



$328,726,136 

6,555,243 
«12,605,40I 
142,050,079 
46,971,636 

1,030,633 

1,440,607 
3,882,406 
3,134,120 
1,765,253 
2,491,920 

5,613,530 
1,670,218 
4,501,930 
2,604,800 
1,236,565 

42,717,217 

28,400,297 

1,154,017 

1,716,848 

1,023,354 

2,028,774 
7,130,686 
4,319,056 
2,681,546 



1145,163,422 

2,604,159 

6,379,505 

42,359,264 

27,632,116 

467,561 

690,235 

2,153,745 

1,658,902 

855,317 

935;460 

2,821,253 

547,790 

2,386,109 

1,286,423 

543,601 

27,715,995 

14,250,704 

656,468 

575,044 

347,598 

892,920 
4,260,096 
1,950,580 
1,192,577 



$114,906,007 

1,994,222 

4,464,490 

39,084,591 

20,292,434 

358,754 

507,099 

1,549,674 

1,155,603 

720,092 

776,999 

2,466,305 

371,262 

1,871,863 

1,013,374 

416,714 

20,548,341 

9,710,972 

495,046 

428,080 

323,675 

640,182 
3,567,181 
1,253,977 

895,077 



$7,204,691 
5,000 



25,000 

1,840,880 

20,000 

34,813 

340,254 

10,838 

10,000 



14,421 
29,675 
18,096 
31,151 
10,387 

3,552,070 

1,018,088 

25.522 

41.675 

1,023 



75,798 
100,000 



$23,052,724 

604,937 

1,915,015 

3,249,673 

5,498,802 

88,807 

148,323 
263,817 
492,461 
125,225 
158,461 

340,527 
146,853 
496.150 
241,898 
116,500 

3,615,584 

3,521,644 

135,900 

105,289 

22,900 

252,738 
692,915 
620,805 
197,500 



44.1 

39.7 
50.6 
29.8 
58.8 
45.3 

47.9 
55.5 
52.9 
48.5 
37.5 

50 3 
32 8 
53.0 
49.4 
43.9 

64.9 
50.2 
56.9 
33.5 
33.9 

44.0 
59.7 
45.2 
44.5 



34.9 

30.4 
35.4 
27.5 
43.2 
34.8 

35.2 
39.9 
36.9 
40.8 
31.2 

43.9 
22 2 
41.6 
38.9 
33.7 

48.1 
34.2 
42.9 
25.0 
31.6 

31.5 
50.0 
29.0 
33.4 



2.2 
0.1 



3.9 
1.9 



2.4 



0.3 
0.6 



0.3 
1.8 
0.4 
1.2 
0.8 

8.3 
3.6 
2.2 
2.4 
0.1 



1.8 
3.7 



7.0 

9.2 
15.2 

2.3 
11.7 

8.6 

10.3 
6.8 

15.7 
7.1 
6.3 

6.1 
8.8 
11.0 
9.3 
9.4 

8.5 
12.4 
11.8 
6.1 
2.2 

12.5 
9.7 

14.4 
7.4 



* Figures from State Fiscal Research Bureau: include taxes, licenses and permits, and fines and forfeitures. 

t Figures from annual financial reports of Local Boards of Education adjusted to conform to county's fiscal period. 

} County operates on calendar year. Revenue here reported is that of 1959. 

» Includes $598,402 revenue of the Anne Arundel County Sanitary Commission in 1958-59; no report was received for 1959-60. 

>> Less than 0.1 per cent. 



164 



NlNETi'-FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT 



TABLE 96 

1939-60 Valuation of Property Assessable at Full Rate for County Purposes: 

State of Maryland 





Total 
Assessable 

at 
Full Rate' 


CouNTT Commissioners 


Federal 
Housing 
Authority 


State Tax 
Commission fb 


Classes 
A through J 


Local Unit 


Total 


Real Estate 


Personal 
Property 


Motor 
Vehicles t 


Total State 


$8,377,297,716 

167,509,877 

377,342,397 

2,967,381,338 

1,554,852,093 

24,610,695 

34,984,792 
133,302,631 
92,991,560 
48,718,865 
71,102,589 

169,583,330 
35,563,225 

164,592,360 
90,511,479 
36,922,308 

1,097,388,540 
710,889,995 
41,467,971 
41,702,683 
24,932,903 

57,098,195 
238,638,965 
116,049,695 

79,159,230 


16,389,145,704 

118,875,577 

314,467,757 

1,974,244,338 

1,261,240,635 

21,276,395 

27,969,022 
100,980,421 
66,699,660 
39,277,585 
51,431,105 

122,415,920 
24,664,795 

119,154,740 
71,457,569 
29,592,208 

981,091,870 

605,480,445 

35,477,731 

33,656,863 

19,726,073 

47,309,015 
169,520,375 
86,285,655 
66,849,950 


$6,184,194,944 

113,564,202 

308,603,777 

1,923,798,778 

1,241,025,910 

20,256,190 

25,649,977 
92,463,574 
58,537,180 
36,194,075 
45,691,145 

101,902,070 
21,160,905 

110,159,881 
68,695,414 
25,876,053 

967,960,720 

596,283,405 

30,570,207 

31,148,691 

18,218,890 

43,341,815 
158,192,275 
82,775,749 
62,124,061 


$204,950,760 

5,311,375 

5,863,980 

50,445,560 

20,214,725 

1,020,205 

2,319,045 
8,516,847 
8,162,480 
3,083,510 
5,739,960 

20,513,850 
3,503,890 
8,994,859 
2,762,155 
3,716,155 

13,131,150 
9,197,040 
4,907,524 
2,508.172 
1,507,183 

3,967,200 
11,328,100 
3,509,906 
4.725.889 


$55,067,410 

36,350 

249,640 

54,510,280 

271', 146 


11,933,084,602 

48,597,950 

62,625,000 

0938,626,720 

293,611,458 

3,334,300 

7,015,770 
32,322,210 
26,291,900 

9,441,280 
19,671,484 

47,167,410 
10,898,430 
45,437,620 
19,053,910 
7,330,100 

116,296,670 

105,409,550 

5,990,240 

8,045,820 

5,206,830 

9,789,180 
68,847,450 
29.764.040 
12.309,280 


$269,223,268 


Allegany 

Anne Arundel" 

Baltimore City" 

Baltimore" 

Calvert 

Caroline 


6,661,428 
18,954,717 
52,732,859 
52,080,185 

1,509,214 

2,644,076 


Carroll" 


7,757,194 


Cecil 


4,517,452 


Charles 

Dorchester" 


5,185,296 
3,407,551 

8,560,294 




2,312,075 


Harford" 


- 8,974,543 
5,093,629 


Kent" 


1,861,217 


Montgomery 

Prince George's 

Queen Anne's" 


30,637,661 

28,167,717 

1,817,304 

3,412,892 




1,875,425 


Talbot 

Wa.shington" 


2,573,952 
9,649,079 
5,455,714 




3,381,794 







* Excludes classes A through J motor vehicles. 

t Data are for the year ended December 31, 1959, adjusted as of October 1960. 

+ Estimated by dividing net receipts after distribution to incorporated towns and places by the county tax rate. 

" Fiscal period ends December 31; all others end June 30. 

a Includes assessment for tools and machinery and inventories of manufacturers as required by Baltimore City Ordinance number 

643. Ordinance number 1340 provides that this assessment be removed over a four year period beginning 1959. 
h Includes assessments for some government property which is in litigation. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



165 





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166 



NiNETY-FOTIRTII ANNUAL REPORT 



TABLE 98 
Assessable Wealth Back of Each Maryland Public School Pupil Belonging: 

1959-60 



Local Unit 


Total Basis Assessable at 

Full Rate for County 

Purposes" 


Number of 

Pupils 
Belongingt 


Wealth per Pupil 


Total State 


$8,377,297,716 

167,509,877 

377,342,397 

12,967,381,338 

1,554,852,093 

24,610,695 

34,984,792 
133,302,631 
92,991,560 
48,718,865 
71,102,589 

169,583,330 
35,563,225 

164,592,360 
90,511,479 
36,922,308 

1,097,388,540 

710,889,995 

41,467,971 

41,702,683 

24,932,903 

57,098,195 
238,638,965 
116,049,695 

79,159,230 


554,870 

15,749 

39,201 

150,860 

81,325 

4,086 

4,274 
10,253 
9,071 
7,122 
5,959 

13,768 
4,744 

15,744 
7,010 
3,231 

67,005 

64,952 

3,548 

5,647 

4,215 

4,071 

17,917 

9,896 

5,222 


$15,098 


Allegany 

Anne Arundel* 


10,636 

9,626 

19,670 




19,119 


Calvert 


6,023 




8,185 


Carroll* 


13,001 


Cecil 


10,251 




6,841 


Dorchester* 

Frederick* 

Garrett* 

Harford* 


11,932 

12,317 

7,496 

10,454 




12,912 


Kent* 


11,427 




16,378 




10,945 


Queen Anne's* 


11,688 


St. Mary's 


7,385 




5,915 


Talbot 


14,025 


Washington* 


13,319 


Wicomico 


11,727 




15,159 







* Calendar year (1959). 
t Excludes kindergarten pupils. 
t See footnote "a" on TABLE 96. 
° See footnote "b" on TABLE 96. 



I 



Maryland State Department of Education 



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170 



Ninety-Fourth Annual Report 



TABLE 102 

Enrollment by College and Class: Maryland State Teachers Colleges: 

Fall of 1959 



Class 



Grand 

Total 



Bowie 



CopriN Frostburg Salisbury Towson 



teacher training 



Total 


3,140 
1,096 


352 
106 


360 
95 


721 
308 


332 
134 


1,375 


Freshmen .... 


453 


Sophomores . . 


863 


97 


113 


209 


92 


352 


Juniors 


581 


77 


82 


108 


52 


262 


Seniors 


582 


65 


65 


96 


54 


302 


Fifth Year.... 


18 


7 


5 






6 



JUNIOR COLLEGE 



Total 


226 






77 


65 


84 


Freshmen .... 
Sophomores . . 


151 
75 






49 
28 


48 
17 


54 
30 



OTHER STUDENTS 



E.Ktension or 
Evening. . . 



Elementary School 



138 
742 



48 
203 



34 
207 



56 
215 



Maryland State Department of Education 



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174 



Ninety-Fourth Annual Report 



TABLE 106 
Cost per Student at Maryland State Teachers Colleges: 1951-1960 



Year 

E^fDING 



Average 
Enroll- 
ment 



Current Expenses 



Total 



Paid by 
Students 



Paid by 

State 



Average Annual Cost per 
Student 



Total 



In Student 
Fees* 



To 

State 



BOWIE 



1951 
1952 
1953 
1954 
1955 
1956 
1957 
1958 
1959 
1960 



218 
262 
331 
343 
338 
321 
301 
305 
330 
346 



$226,790 
261,264 
316,737 
351,712 
363,046 
388,296 
435,714 
454,809 
472,120 
513,573 



$33,750 
32,810 
59,506 
72,599 
75,092 
71,585 
70,800 
72,839 
91,132 
92,985 



$193,040 
228,454 
257,231 
279,113 
287,954 
316,711 
364,914 
381,970 
380,988 
420,588 



$1,040 
997 
957 
1,025 
1,074 
1,210 
1,447 
1,491 
1,431 
1,484 



155 


$885 


125 


872 


180 


777 


211 


814 


222 


852 


223 


987 


235 


1,212 


239 


1,252 


276 


1,155 


269 


1,215 



COPPIN 



1954 
1955 
1956 
1957 
1958 
1959 
1960 



236 
267 
295 
289 
317 
347 
352 



$159,193 
172,823 
199,662 
238,292 
262,896 
286,047 
332,064 



$8,103 
9,625 
9,148 
10,352 
11,179 
13,584 
12,529 



$151,090 
163,198 
190,514 
227,940 
251,717 
272,463 
319,535 



$674 
647 
677 
825 
829 
824 
943 



$34 
36 
31 
36 
35 
39 
35 



$640 
611 
646 
789 
794 
785 
908 



FROSTBURG 



1951 

1952 


339 
338 
373 
394 
458 
564 
548 
533 
659 
799 


$316,664 
318,342 
402,258 
418,682 
459,180 
484,506 
585,568 
660,283 
741,680 
865,201 


$57,636 
42,462 
88,372 
58,716 
57,667 
65,589 
63,651 
75,669 
114,939 
163.727 


$259,028 
275,880 
313,886 
359,966 
401,513 
418.917 
521,917 
584,614 
626,741 
701,474 


$934 
942 
1,078 
1,063 
1,003 
859 
1,068 
1,239 
1,125 
1,083 


$170 
126 
237 
149 
126 
116 
116 
142 
174 
205 


$764 
816 


1953 


841 


1954 


914 


1955 


877 


1956 


743 


1957 


952 


1958 


1,097 


1959 


951 


1960 


878 



SALISBURY 



1951 

1952 


200 
174 
234 
250 
338 
362 
313 
337 
343 
381 


$268,942 
282,935 
349,424 
343,124 
386,826 
416,580 
450,320 
494,967 
510,803 
543,933 


$38,999 
22,765 
54,129 
41,983 
64,918 
68,945 
51,424 
49,515 
62,672 
85,709 


$229,943 
260,170 
295,295 
301,141 
321,908 
347,635 
398,896 
445,452 
448,131 
458,224 


$1,345 
1,626 
1,493 
1,372 
1,144 
1,151 
1,439 
1,469 
1,489 
1,428 


$195 
131 
231 
168 
192 
191 
164 
147 
183 
225 


$1,150 
1,495 


1953 


1,262 


1954 


1,204 


1955 

1956 


952 
960 


1957 


1,275 


1958 


1,322 


1959 


1,306 


I960 


1,203 







TOWSON 



1951 
1952 
1953 
1954 
1955 
1956 
1957 
1958 
1959 
1960 



879 

855 

851 

893 

1,033 

1,170 

1,233 

1,232 

1,345 

1,434 



$633,145 

757,257 

842,915 

962,662 

1,024,421 

1,120,202 

1,239,538 

1,370,552 

1,483,923 

1,605,057 



$107,164 
92,816 
121,076 
135,050 
173,733 
180,904 
196,399 
210,037 
278,001 
283,139 



$525,981 

664,441 

721,839 

827,612 

850,688 

939,298 

1,043,139 

1,160,515 

1,205,922 

1,321,918 



$720 

886 

990 

1,078 

992 

957 

1,005 

1,112 

1,103 

1,119 



$122 
109 
142 
151 
168 
154 
159 
170 
207 
197 



$598 
777 
848 
927 
824 
803 
846 
942 
896 
922 



* In accordance with Chapter 6 of the Laws of 1945, tuition for teacher training students at the Teachers 
Colleges was eliminated as of September, 1945. Beginning in 1957-58 board is $266 at Bowie, Frostburg, 
Salisbury, and Towson, for teacher training students planning to teach in Maryland. Junior college 
students who are residents of Maryland pay $150 additional; out-of-state students pay $400 for either 
junior college or teacher education curriculum. 



Maryland State Department of EnucATinx 



17:", 



TABLE 107— Source of Expenditures*: Maryland Stale Teachers Colleges; 
Year Ending June 30, 1960 





Orand 
Total 


Total Expenditures for Current Expenses Paid dt 


State 
Teachers 
College 


State 


Students 


General Adminis- 
tration 


Instruction 


Dietary Services 


Plant Operation 
and Maintenance 




State 


Students 


State 


Students 


State 


Students 


State 


Students 


Total 


$ 

3,859,828 


$ 

3,221,739 


% 
638.089 


$ 
461.238 


$ 

4,014 


$ 

1,882,650 


$ 

131,067 


$ 
213,239 


$ 

360,564 


S 

664.612 


S 

142,444 


Bowie 


513,573 


420,588 


92.985 


64,762 




199,375 


3,414 


30,873 


59,063 


125,578 


30,508 


Coppin 


332,064 


319,535 


12,529 


48.884 


554 


200,466 


160 


20,155 


10,576 


50,030 


1,239 


r'rostburg . . 


865.201 


701,474 


163,727 


91,052 


510 


428,976 


28,802 


38,552 


96.255 


142,894 


38,160 


Salisbury. . . 


543,933 


458,224 


85.709 


67,998 




245.865 


24,035 


30,926 


47.406 


113,435 


14,268 


Towson .... 


1,605,057 


1,321,918 


283.139 


188.542 


2,950 


807,968 


74,656 


92,733 


147,264 


232,675 


58,269 



' Current year cash disbursements and encumbrances less budget credits. 



TABLE 108 — Inventories of Mar>land State Department of Kdiication, Teachers' 
Retirement System, and State Teachers (Colleges: June 30, 1960 



Departmrnt or College 


Total 


Land and 
Improvements 


Buildings 


Equipment 


Total 

State Department of Education 


$17,571,371 

363,189 

27,626 

3,068,868 
1,533,543 
4,331,360 
2,718,385 
5,528,400 


S2,010,010 

248,806 
379,758 
586,241 
165,288 
629,917 


$13,212,715 

2,514,761 
960,484 
3,364,178 
2,289,709 
4,083,583 


$2,348,646 
363,189 


Teachers' Retirement System 

State Teachers College, Bowie 


27,626 

305,301 
193,301 


State Teachers College, Frostburg 


380,941 


State Teachers College, Salisbury 

State Teachers College, Towson 


263,388 
814,900 



176 



Ninety-Fourth Annual Report 



TABLE 109 — Maryland Teachers' Retirement System: Members in Active 
Service and Their Contributions: Year Ending June 30, 1960 



County or Institution 



Amount Contributed 


Members in 


Year Ending 


Active Service 


July 31, 1960 


May 31, 1960 


$5,717,797.90 


16,550 


5,492,954.90 


15,929 


189,758.80 


669 


395,263.20 


1,212 


1,097,957.40 


3,083 


42,292.50 


149 


57,539.40 


197 


116,780.30 


394 


114,178.20 


354 


91,202.00 


295 


61,162.70 


216 


183,037.40 


566 


55,531.60 


183 


194,195.50 


608 


88,764.20 


274 


45,105.00 


151 


1,298,998.80 


3,005 


842,686.60 


2,439 


49,027.70 


170 


47,981.90 


158 


52,068.70 


179 


53,150.90 


178 


236,943.90 


799 


111,797.80 


404 


67,530.40 


246 


$224,843.00 


621 


$106,483.40 


267 


11,624.50 


30 


10,441.80 


24 


24,226.10 


61 


12.663.40 


35 


47,527.60 


117 


$80,942.60 


242 


44,266.20 


156 


36,676.40 


86 


$37,417.00 


112 


1,273.20 


4 


9,164.10 


30 


11,475.20 


34 


3,776.20 


12 


3,191.00 


12 


8,.537.30 


20 



Grand Totai 

Total Counties 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery 

Prince George's 

Queen Anne's 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington (including Junior College) 

Wicomico 

Worcester 

Total Schools and Departments 

Teachers Colleges 

Bowie 

Coppin 

Frostburg 

Salisbury 

Towson 

Departments 

County Libraries 

Education 

Retirement 

Other Schools 

Barrett School for Girls 

Md. School for the Deaf 

Md. Training School for Boys 

Montrose School for Girls 

Rosewood State Training School 

St. Mary's Seminary — Junior College. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



177 



TABLE 110 — Parenl-Teachcr Associations: Maryland County Public Schools: 
Year Ending June 30, 1960 



Local Unit 


Total Number 
Schools 


Number Having 

Parent-Teacher 

Associations 


Per Cent Having 

Parent-Teacher 

Associations 


Total Counties 


820 

34 

70 
97 
15 
11 

22 
24 
15 
30 
36 

18 
25 
18 
13 

107 

125 
14 
19 
20 
15 

50 
22 
20 


809 

29 
70 
97 
15 
11 

21 
24 
15 
29 
36 

17 
25 
18 
13 
107 

125 
14 
17 
20 
15 

50 
22 
19 


98.7 




85.3 


Anne Arundel 

Baltimore 


100.0 
100.0 


Calvert 

Caroline 


100.0 
100.0 


Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 


95.5 
100.0 
100.0 


Dorchester 

Frederick 


96.7 
100.0 


Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 


94.4 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 


Montgomery 

Prince George's 

Queen Anne's 


100.0 

100.0 
100.0 


St. Mary's 


89.5 




100.0 


Talbot 

Washington 


100.0 
100.0 


Wicomico 


100.0 


Worcester 


95.0 



178 



Ninety-Fourth Annual Report 



TABLE 111— Enrollment in Baltimore City Summer Schools: 1951-1960: 
By Type of School: 1960 





Number 

of 
Schools 


Total 
Enroll- 
ment 


Net Roll at End of Session 




School Year 


Total 


Taking 


Number of 
Principals 


Type of School 


Review 
Work 


Advance 
Work 


and 
Teachers 


All Schools 

1950-51 

1951-52 

1952-53 

1953-54 

1954-55 

1955-56 

1956-57 

1957-58 

1958-59 

1959-60 

Secondary 

Demonstration .... 


5 
5 
5 
5 
5 

5 

4 
5 
5 
5 

4 

1 


4,010 
4,145 
4,234 
4,726 
5,454 

5,870 
6,385 
5,864 
6,361 
6,741 

6,594 
147 


3,628 
3,710 
3,945 
4,373 
4,990 

5,257 
5,686 
5,410 
5,735 
6,030 

5,890 
140 


2,990 
3,258 
3,564 
3,954 
4,586 

4,943 
5,501 
5,245 
5,589 
5,873 

5,873 


638 
452 
381 
419 
404 

314 
185 
165 
146 
157 

17 
140 


78 
80 
80 
80 
84 

87 

88 

101 

102 

106 

100 
6 



Maryland State Department of Education 



179 



TABLE 112— High School Equivalence: State of Maryland: 1951-1960 



Year Ending 


Number of Applicants Who 


Total Number 
of 


June 30 


Completed 
Examination* 


Earned 
Certificate 


Earned Certificate 
through USAFIt 


Certificates 
Issued 


1951 

1952 

1953 

1954 

1955 

1956 

1957 

1958 

1959 

1960 


912 

779 

1,005 

1,377 

1,495 

1,476 
1,603 
1,802 
1,681 
1,850 


648 
527 
700 
887 
885 

854 
954 
963 
867 
951 


291 
580 
613 
837 
717 

967 
740 
837 
722 
712 


939 
1,107 
1,313 
1,724 
1,602 

1,821 
1,694 
1,800 
1,589 
1,663 



* Indicates re-tests. 

t United States Armed Forces Institute. 



180 



Ninety-Fourth Annual Report 









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Maryland State Department of Education 



181 



TABLE 114 — Amount of and per Pupil Expenditures i>y Boards of Education 

from Public Funds for School Library Books: State of Maryland: 

Year Ending June 30, 1960 





Public Expenditures for School Library Books 


Local Unit 


Amount 


Per Pupil Belonging 




Total 


Elementary 


High 


Total 


Elementary 


High 


Total State 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel. . . 
Baltimore City. . 

Baltimore 

Calvert 


$718,902 

11,388 

38,004 

113,901 

177,574 

6,904 

7,785 

16,479 

12,670 

8,382 

5,354 

18,465 
5,963 

23,922 
5,983 
4,314 

95,589 

77,099 

3,709 

5,949 

3,699 

7,614 
46,907 
13,581 

7,667 


$366,369 

5,300 
16,001 
58,522 
95,832 

4,481 

2,734 
5,423 
6,957 
5,041 
1,942 

8,631 
3,775 
12,255 
2,265 
2,735 

43,352 

46,259 

2.074 

3,422 

1,801 

4,380 

21,696 

7,058 

4,433 


$352,533 

6,088 
22,003 
55,379 
81,742 

2,423 

5,051 
11,056 
5,713 
3,341 
3,412 

9,834 
2,188 
11,667 
3,718 
1,579 

52,237 

30,840 

1,635 

2,527 

1,898 

3,234 

25,211 

6,523 

3,234 


$1.29 

.72 

.97 

.75 

2.18 

1.69 

1.82 
1.61 
1.40 
1.18 
.90 

1.34 
1.26 
1.52 
.85 
1.33 

1.43 
1.19 
1.05 
1.05 
.88 

1.87 
2.62 
1.37 
1.47 


$1.12 

.65 

.68 

.64 

2.05 

1.71 

1.09 

.95 

1.27 

1.18 

-.58 

1 13 
1.37 
1.35 
.54 
1.44 

1.10 

1.21 

.99 

.98 

.75 

1.84 
2.21 
1.17 
1.42 


$1.54 

.80 
1.39 

.93 
2.37 
1.66 


Caroline 

Carroll 


2.84 
2.42 


Cecil 


1.58 




1.18 


Dorchester 

Frederick 

Garrett 


1.31 

1.60 
1.10 


Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery. . . . 
Prince George's. 
Queen Anne's . . . 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington 

Wicomico 

Worcester 


1.76 
1.31 
1.19 

1.89 
1.15 
1.12 
1.18 
1.05 

1.91 
3.11 
1.69 
1.54 



182 Ninety-Fourth Annual Report 

TABLE 115 — Vocational Rehabilitation Services Rendered: 
Year Ending June 30, 1960 



State of Maryland: 



Local Unit 


Total 

Number 

Cases 


Rehabili- 
tated 


Being 
Followed 
on Jobs 


Training 
Completed 


Being 
Prepared 
for Jobs 


Surveyed: 
Under Ad- 
visement 


Closed: 

Other 

Services 


Total State 


5,743 

155 

224 

2,412 

485 

41 

59 
109 
105 
103 

88 

208 
36 
85 
36 
28 

344 

397 

33 

94 

50 

49 
340 
216 

46 


1,413 

44 

55 

540 

119 

5 

14 
11 
34 
33 
14 

101 

14 

29 

8 

5 

88 
86 
13 
18 
13 

12 
95 
52 
10 


147 

■5 
73 
11 

1 

' 3 
1 
3 

2 

1 

' i 
1 

10 

10 

1 

6 

1 

11 

6 


880 

22 

22 

441 

49 

6 

5 
11 
14 
12 
11 

10 
7 
2 
5 
5 

65 

77 
2 

14 
6 

6 
59 
25 

4 


1,239 

27 

44 

520 

164 

6 

15 
26 
19 
16 
20 

36 
6 

24 
7 
6 

80 
81 

6 
17 

9 

8 
59 
34 

9 


1,355 

45 
65 
515 
90 
11 

18 
48 
24 
21 
21 

39 

7 

13 

15 

6 

76 
89 
7 
24 
18 

10 

108 

66 

19 


709 


Allegany 

Anne Arundel 

Baltimore City .... 


17 

33 

323 

52 


Calvert 


12 




7 


Carroll 

Cecil 


10 
13 




18 


Dorchester 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery 

Prince George's. . . . 

Queen Anne's 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington 

Wicomico 

Worcester 


20 

21 

2 

17 

"5 

25 
54 

4 
15 

4 

12 

8 

33 

4 



PERSONAI- CHARACTERISTICS OF CLIENTS SERVED 



Characteristic 


Total 


Rehabili- 
tated* 


Othert 


Characteristic 


Total 


Rehabili- 
tated* 


Othert 


Total Number 


5,743 

1,533 
1,079 
1,228 
1,070 
833 

73 
320 
938 
2,017 
1,526 
468 
146 


1,413 

325 
279 
320 
260 
229 

14 

69 

237 

500 

383 

125 

33 

28 

11 

13 

709 

204 

145 

147 

94 

53 

61 


4,330 

1,208 
800 
908 
810 
604 

59 

251 

701 

1,517 

1,143 

343 

113 

74 

16 

113 

2,636 
525 
337 
304 
255 
121 
152 


Race 

White 


3,858 

1,881 

4 

3,850 
1,893 

2,695 

2,100 

948 

604 
5,139 
1,186 

3,953 
597 


1,042 

370 

1 

945 
468 

578 
613 
222 

252 

1,161 

245 

916 
95 


2,816 


Age 

Under 21 




1,511 


Other . 


3 


21—30 

31—40 

41 — 50 


Sex 

Male . . . 


2,905 


Over 50 


Female 


1,425 


Education 

None 

1—3 

4—6 

7—9 

10—12 

H.S. Graduate . . . 
13 — 14 


Marital Status . . . 

Single 

Married 

Other 

Employment 
History (at Survey) 

Employed 

Unemployed 

Never Worked 

Worked at Some 
Time 


2,117 

1,487 

726 

352 


15—16 

College 

Unknown 


102 

27 

126 

3,345 
729 
482 
451 
349 
174 
213 


3,978 
941 

3,037 


Dependents 



1 

2 

3 

4 


Number on Welfare 
(at Survey) 


502 


5 

Over 5 









* Clients who were rehabilitated into employment during year (1,413). 
t Clients who were still receiving service at end of year (3,621). 



Maryland State Department of Education 



183 



TABLE 116 — Cost «f Vocalicmal Kchabililalioii Case Services Rendered: 
State of Maryland: Year Ending June 30, 1960 



Type of Service 



Number of 
Clients 



Average 
Cost 



Total 
Expenditures 



Total Expenditure 

Examinations 

Medical 

Psychiatric 

Psychological 

Surgery and Treatment 

Medical 

Psychiatric 

Surgical 

Dental 

Physical and occupational therapy 

Prosthetic Appliances 

Artificial limbs 

Braces 

Hearing aids 

Glasses and artificial eyes 

Surgical appliances 

Wheel chairs, hand and power operated . 

Hospitalization and Convalescent Care 

Hospitalization 

Convalescent home care 

Nursing care in client's residence 

Training and Training Materials 

Personal adjustment training 

Educational institutions 

Employment 

Correspondence 

Tutorial 

Training materials 

Maintenance and Transportation 
Maintenance 

Training 

Medical or physical restoration 

Placement 

Medical care 

Transportation 

Training 

Medical or physical restoration 

Placement 

Occupational Tools and Equipment (Clients) 

Miscellaneous (Other) 



5,606 



1,705 
37 
157 



107 

24 

133 

74 
77 



163 
86 
57 
122 
140 
22 



162 

1 

18 



103 

668 

12 

41 

93 

353 



451 

13 

41 

3 



407 

136 

81 

116 

3 



$20.11 
62.07 
44.81 



49.85 
206.58 
143.43 
138.43 
116.94 



285.85 
61.31 

193.75 
22.46 
58.52 
80.62 



335.22 
300.00 
249.46 



60.46 

243.55 

196.87 

106.42 

85.73 

32.21 



248.16 

266.52 

46.59 

13.37 



47.76 

14.61 

6.33 

120.76 

54.45 



$575,388.26 



34,293.42 
2,296.80 
7,034.52 



5,334.20 

4,958.00 

19,076.06 

10,243.63 

9,004.14 



46,593.51 
5,272.66 

11,043.86 
2,740.40 
8,193.09 
1,773.69 



54,306.38 

300.00. 

4,490.34 



6,227.78 
162,690.43 
2,362.50 
4,363.26 
7,973.25 
11,369.92 



111,922.20 

3,464.72 

1,910.15 

40.10 



19,437.25 

1,987.32 

513.12 

14,008.20 

163.36 



184 



Ninety-Fourth Annual Report 



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Maryland State Department of Education 



185 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

Maryland State Teachers Colleges: Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1960 



Source or Purpose 



Bowie 



COPPIM 



Frostburg Salisbury 



TOWSON 



RECEIPTS 



Balance Forwarded from 1958-59. 

General Fund Appropriation 

Special Fund Appropriation 

Appropriation Cancellations and 


$459 

410,717 

95,576 

■*(1,992) 
3,664 
11,010 
11,102 


$318,4i4 
12,871 

*(153) 
565 

3,632 


$1,144 
696,626 
167,832 

*(1,598) 

7,611 

41,449 

4,848 


$4,046 
461,200 
101,606 

1,706 

1,989 

21,369 

246 


$29,182 

1,320,889 

288,924 

107 


Budget Credits 


8,601 


Non budgeted Receipts 


76,532 
2,168 






Total Funds Available. . 


$530,536 


$334,729 


$917,912 


$592,162 


$1,726,403 



DISBURSEMENTS 



General Administration 

Salaries and Wages 


$58,308 

1,975 
189 

317 

615 

1,404 

567 

1,102 
285 


$39,925 

2,051 

1,744 

195 

666 
1,386 
1,207 

1,275 

1,167 
201 


$72,775 

5,478 
236 

862 

4,656 

3,760 

258 

466 

1,718 
736 


$60,667 

2,4i7 
593 

482 
2,345 
1,101 

246 
612 


$161,177 


Technical and Special Fees .... 


2,486 
10,450 


Travel 


952 


Motor Vehicle Operation and 


198 




5,070 


Supplies and Materials 

Equipment — Replacement 

Equipment — Additional 

Grants, Subsidies, and 


8,588 

'707 

2,168 




1,241 






Total 


$64,762 

$184,872 
1,800 

432 

3,558 
920 

4,746 
2,166 
4,857 


$49,817 

$177,249 
1,913 

1,290 

'675 
6,291 

13',33i 


$90,945 

$409,105 
11,641 

2,200 

1,285 
2.907 

12,170 
279 

17,798"' 


$68,463 

$243,499 
7,055 

I'OSO 

792 
1.278 
5,850 

472 
9,482 


$193,037 


Instruction 


$746,523 


Technical and Special Fees .... 


73,874 
934 


Travel 


3,521 


Motor Vehicle Operation and 
Maintenance 


2,072 
6,629 


Supplies and Materials 

Equipment — Replacement 

Equipment — Additional 


16.192 

2,686 

33,116 


Total 


$203,351 

$38,925 
52",73i 

'i96 
1,567 


$200,749 

$14,805 
10',583 

910 

415 

3,717 

308 


$457,385 

$53,702 
83,948 

3,i55 
304 


$269,478 

$35,861 
38,669 

2,169 

2,332 

140 

592 


$885,547 


Dietary Services 


$112,966 


Technical and Special Fees. . . . 
Food 


2,522 
121,134 


Motor Vehicle Operation and 
Maintenance 


126 




2,635 


Supplies and Materials 

Equipment — Replacement 

Equipment — Additional 


4,526 

405 

1,508 


Total 


$93,419 

$97,065 

18,106 

1,154 

27,730 

5,188 

6,500 

342 


$30,738 

$30,188 

4,642 

77 

10,267 

2,424 

1,627 


$141,109 

$115,723 

10,860 

1,176 

33,417 

13,167 

101 

4,767 

2,805 


$79,763 

$73,881 
12,850 

1,164 
24,190 

8,267 
543 
244 


$245,822 


Plant Operation and Maintenance 


$191,305 


Technical and Special Fees .... 

Fuel 

Motor Vehicle Operation and 
Maintenance 


96 
25,720 

1,276 
47,539 


Supplies and Materials 

Equipment — Replacement 

Equipment — Additional 

Land and Structure 


23,845 
1,633 
2,172 






Total 

Total Program E.xpenditures. . . . 

Refunds 

Activities Association 


$156,085 

$517,617 

967 

5,4.^3 

3,665 

440 

180 


$49,225 
$330,529 


$182,016 

$871,455 

4,326 

20,052 

16,950 

i2i 


$121,139 

$538,843 
2,692 
7,329 
8,077 
3,165 
106 


$293,586 

$1,617,992 

6,624 

22,255 


Athletic Association 

.Application Fees 


21,900 
10,730 
10.493 






Total Disbursements . . . 

Une.xpended Balance Re- 
turned to Treasury. . . 

Balance, June 30, 1960 . 


$528,322 

$1,909 
$305 


$330,529 

$2,100 
$2,100 


$912,904 

$2,514 
$2,494 


$560,212 

$20,852 
$11,098 


$1,689,994 

$7,253 
$29,156 



* Denotes red figure. 

Note: Disbursements for Summer School at Towson and Salisbury are included under appropriate 
items in Instruction and Dietary Services. 



186 



Ninety-Fourth Annual Report 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

Maryland State Department of Education: Headquarters and Vocational 

Rehabilitation: Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1960 



Source or Purpose 



Headquarters 



Vocational 
Rehabilitation 



RECEIPTS 



Balance Forwarded from 1958-59. . , 

General Fund Appropriation 

Federal Fund Appropriation 

Appropriation Cancellations 

Budget Credits 

Nonbudgeted Receipts 

Net Transfers 

Total Funds Available 



$38,255 

832,161 

84,553 

*(18,603) 

2,338 

22,464 

48,020 



$1,009,188 



$45,133 

468,269 

773,174 

*'(28,992) 

4,524 



$1,262,108 



DISBURSEMENTS 



Salaries 

Technical and Special Fees 

Communication 

Travel 

Motor Vehicle Operation and Maintenance, 

Contractual Services 

Supplies and Materials 

Equipment — Replacement 

Equipment — Additional 

Grants, Subsidies, and Contributions 

Fixed Charges 

Total 

Salaries 

Technical and Special Fees 

Communication 

Travel 

Motor Vehicle Operation and Maintenance 

Contractual Services 

Supplies and Materials 

Equipment — Replacement 

Equipment — Additional 

Grants, Subsidies, and Contributions 

Fixed Charges 

Total 

Salaries 

Technical and Special Fees 

Communication 

Travel 

Motor Vehicle Operation and Maintenance 

Contractual Services 

Supplies and Materials 

Equipment — Replacement 

Equipment — Additional 

Grants, Subsidies, and Contributions 

Total 

Salaries 

Technical and Special Fees 

Communication 

Travel 

Contractual Services 

Supplies and Materials 

Equipment — Replacement 

Equipment — Additional 

Grants, Subsidies, and Contributions 

Fixed Charges 

Total 

* Denotes red figure. 



Departmental and 

Financial 

Administration 

$201,442 

12,612 

6,885 

10,815 

1,877 

17,692 

4,939 

1,850 

5,344 



2,750 



$266,206 

Supervisory and 

Consultative 

Services 

$247,765 

18,963 

7,889 

15,118 

4,300 

28,664 

4,858 

567 

892 

4,104 



$333,120 

Administrative 

Services 

$164,486 

18,753 

4,731 

6,082 

2,156 

3,237 

4,964 

1,427 

733 



$206,569 

Library 

Extension 

Services 

$59,996 

2,873 

2,757 

1,041 

11,472 

1,026 



18,106 
1,287 



Administration 

$46,344 

1,096 

1,514 

1,670 

428 

129 

649 

301 

240 

3,509 

389 

$56,269 
Placement 

and 

Guidance 

$313,089 

7,177 

10,273 

19,225 

559 

3,729 

548 

775 

21,665 

27,876 

$404,916 

Case 
Services 



$577,843 



$577,843 

Disability 

Determinations 

(O.A.S.I.) 

$65,269 

68,613 

1,636 

2,674 

106 

855 

116 



6,792 
4,800 



$98,557 



$150,861 



Maryland State Department of Education 



187 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT— (Continued) 

Maryland State Department of Education: Headquarters and Vocational 
Rehabilitation : Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1960 



Source or Purpose 



Headquarters 



Vocational 
Rehabilitation 



disbursements 





$904,452 
24,171 


Specialized 

Facilities for the 

Blind 

$11,363 


Total Program Expenditures 


$1,201,252 






Total Disbursements 

Unexpended Balance Returned to 


$928,623 

46,105 
$34,460 


$1,201,252 
9,611 


Balance, June 30, 1960 


$51,245 







FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

Maryland State Teachers Colleges: Loans lo Students* — Title 11-ISational 
Defense Education Act: Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1960 



Source or Purpose 



Bowie 



COPPIN 



Frostburg Salisbury 



TOWSON 



RECEIPTS 



Balance, July 1, 1959 


$6,831 

$1,123 
3,916 


$487 

$788 
11,805 


$5,195 

$1,718 
12,226 


$2,602 


$11,102 


Receipts: 

State Funds 


$248 
694 


$2,195 


Federal Funds 


17,415 






Total Funds Available. . 


$11,870 


$13,080 


$19,139 


$3,544 


$30,712 



DISBURSEMENTS 



Loans to Students 

Balance, June 30, 1960. 



$6,398 

$5,472 



$12,600 
$480 



$7,333 
$11,806 



$2,490 
$1,054 



$21,565 
$9,147 



Note: Tliis program accounted for as "Miscellaneous Funds" by State Comptroller. 



188 



Ninety-Fourth Annual Report 



Construction Accounts at Maryland State Teachers Colleges: 



Source ob Purpose 



1 General Construction Loan of 1951: 

2 Boiler plant and steam distribution . 

3 Library building 

4 Boiler plant, steam, and electrical. . 



5 General Construction Loan of 1953: 

6 Exterior of main bldg. and Newell Hall. 

7 Completion of .sanitary sewer and water. 

8 Equipment for gymnasium 



9 General Construction Loan of 1954: 

10 Equipment for residence hall 

11 Equipment for residence hall 

12 Equipment for residence hall 

13 Roads, walks and parking area. . . 

14 Equipment for library building. . . 



15 General Construction Loan of 1955: 

16 Supplement residence hall for 100 women 

17 Supplement residence haU for 75 men . 

18 Supplement resident hall for 75 women 

19 Equipment for library building 

20 Purchase of additional land 

21 Acquisition of land and improvements. 

22 General Construction Loan of 1956: 

23 Equipment for women's residence hall. 

24 Site improvement, drainage, parking . . 



25 General Construction Loan of 1957: 

26 Constructon of parking facilities 

Construction of library building 

Planning for laboratory school 

Construction of laboratory school 

Site improvement, including roads 

Expansion of athletic facilities 

Planning for gymnasium 

Convert old library to student bldg 

Remodel old library for class rooms 

Refurbishing exterior of Newell Hall. . . . 

Primary metering 

Construction of laboratory school 

Construction of incinerator 

Construction of auditorium-gymnasium. 
Site improvement and utilities 



41 General Construction Loan of 1958: 

42 Aquisition of land and properties 

43 Land 

44 Equipment new library 

45 Site improvements 

46 Construction of playing field 

47 Equipment new laboratory school 

48 Installation of showers and toilets, . . . . 

49 Site improvement 

50 Completion of auditorium 

51 Equipment new laboratory school 

52 Site improvement 

53 Equipment for student center 

54 Equipment new gymnasium 

55 Plans and specifications for new library . 



56 General Construction Loan of 1959: 

57 Acquisition of land 

Remodeling of old laboratory school. 

Replacement of existing boilers 

New laboratory school 

Construction, laboratory school 

Remodeling of main building 

Construction of dining hall 

Site improvement 

Laboratory school 

Construction of gymnasium 

Construction — president's residence. . 

Utilities — president's residence 

Construction of library 

Laboratory school 



TOTAL. 



Bowie 



Balance, 

July 1, 

1959 



J285 



1,855 
8,115 



578 



11,014 

30,014 

852 



23,808 

25,000 

4,907 



$106,428 



Addi- 
tional 
Available 



1510,000 
43,000 



$553,000 



Dis- 
bursed 



$1,084 
610 



664 
13,690 

852 



17,.528 
15,941 
1,677 



78,323 
34,160 



$164,529 



Balance, 

June 30, 

1960 



S285 



,505 



578 



10,350 
16,324 



6,280 
9,059 
3,230 



431,677 
8,840 



$494,899 



COPPIN 



Balance, 

July 1, 

1959 



$190,809 
19,412 



45,637 



1,242 
18,590 
5,500 



$281,190 



Addi- 
tional 
Available 



$4 



3.50,000 
7,500 



$357,504 



Dis- 
bursed 



$130,933 

12,782 



14,262 
5,500 



460 



$260,431 



Balance, 

June 30, 

1960 



$59,876 
6,630 



19,017 



261 
4,328 



281,111 
7,040 



$378,263 



* Denotes a red figure. t Includes the following amounts reverted; Line 9-$194; ll-$5; 13-$4 ; 19— $70; 21-$45; 23-$20; 31-$160; 
34-$465; 50-$4,516; total-$5,479. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



189 



Fiscal Year En 


di 


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une 30, 1960 


























Frostudrg 


Salisbury 


Towson 




Balance, 


Addi- 




Balance, 


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June 30, 


Julj 


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June 30, 


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1959 


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59 Available 


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1960 


19 


59 Available 


bur 


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1 
2 
3 


$356 




$ 


09 $247 


















4 


















$4 


584 '.'.'.'. 


$4, 


584 '.'.'.'. 


5 

fi 

8 
9 






















4 


786 




2, 


087 $2,699 


206 






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06 






















10 
































11 


338 






t3 


38 '.'.'.'. 






















12 


522 








22 






















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2 


579 '.'. 




1', 


366 l'279 


15 


























16 






























17 


1,216 








40 l',i76 
























18 


1,215 








40 1,175 
























19 
20 












2 


70 '. 
497 




7 


$2,496 














21 
























,546 




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22 
23 
24 

25 
26 












20 


t20 




4 


ois 


4, 


018 :;:: 


27 
28 
29 
30 
31 


323, i 44 
33,846 
9,459 






323,1 
33,2 
t9,4 


44 

64 582 

59 
























32 














6 


066 






6,606 














33 
34 














19 


371 $ 


999 


10,869 


9,501 




465 '.'. 




t 


465 




35 
























12 


978 




3. 


596 9.382 


36 
























4 


939 




4, 


939 


37 
38 
39 
40 
























699 
1 


494 
345 




515, 
1, 


941 183,553 
168 177 


41 
42 
43 
44 


55,938 


13 


2 


n',r 


76 43,994 


























40 

46 

47 


23,666 






10,7 


00 12.906 


























48 


194 








194 


























49 














18 


533 




5,579 


12,954 














50 














4 


516 




t4,516 
















51 


























31' 


166 '.'. 






'.'.'. 3i',ioo 


52 
53 
54 
55 


























33 


734 






790 32,944 


56 

57 


























•(43 


966) $44,3 


50 




282 102 


58 




























50,000 




50,000 


59 




























. . . 195,000 


9, 


452 185,548 


60 
61 




























... 170,0 


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170, 


000 




62 
63 






540,66 


6 


234,3 


69 305,631 


























64 






50,000 




50,000 


























65 






110,000 


101> 


44 8,156 


























66 
















'. '. '. 436,500 


99,297 


337,263 














67 
















45,000 


53 


44,947 














68 
69 
70 
















3,500 




3,500 














71 


$450,034 


$700,032 


$726.( 


11 $424,055 


$51 


Oil $485,999 


$120,415 


$416,595 


$756 


596 $459,350 


$719 


162 $496,784 



190 



Ninety-Fourth Annual Report 



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205 



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lOt- coo-^ oci — -^o occoOccc-1 — cociac — 

COO"^ — ^' C^CCM-^i— CifltCOt^ lOtOCJi^tO 

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»0 T-^«0 -^C^ CMCOCO-^C^ WSCCCICC'-' 
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Ninety-Fourth Annual Report 






ccc: CO— '*c cc-^^-ccco ecMcoOo; cogcc^coqs locccc'^ 



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r^ic^" coc^ioaoos cor-cot^os *oc^ao^- 



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Maryland State Department of Education 



207 






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222 



Ninety-Fourth Annual Report 



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224 Ninety-Fourth Annual Report 

TABLE XXIII — Enrollineiit by Subject, Excluding Duplicates: Each 



Local Unit 
Name of High School 


Total 
Enroll- 
ment 


Core 


English 


Social 
Studies 


Scie 


ice 


Mathe- 
matics 


Latin 




B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B G 


B 


G 


B 


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B 


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86,220 

3,904 
120 
289 
108 
915 
369 
959 
366 
491 
107 
104 
76 

8,136 

499 

1,027 

482 

888 

864 

763 

312 

821 

509 

509 

919 

203 

21 

256 

38 

25 

17,630 

1,095 

1,019 

1,327 

708 

981 

876 

607 

510 

416 

787 

837 

747 

51 

135 

747 

687 

696 

660 

739 

1,064 

849 

911 

1,181 

749 
327 
365 
57 

933 
270 
178 
190 
90 
86 
96 
23 


85,169 

3,819 
115 
225 
113 
916 
376 
991 
377 
429 

94 
108 

75 

7,971 
570 
994 
480 
894 
862 
752 
331 
750 
465 
454 
861 
220 
23 
234 
52 
29 

17,307 

1,157 

1,012 

1,264 

811 

969 

894 

599 

489 

421 

745 

824 

704 

69 

115 

731 

662 

616 

626 

698 

1,055 

796 

857 

1,193 

737 

326 

350 

61 

876 

260 

154 

193 

80 

101 

71 

17 


28,966 

496 
28 
50 

'29 
31 
46 

155 
27 
39 
15 
76 

423 

339 

'2i 

'38 
25 

10,596 
'20 

373 
307 
284 
467 
678 
747 
51 
135 
747 
687 
696 
660 
739 

1,064 
849 
911 

1,181 

185 
73 
82 
30 


27,277 

367 
9 

28 

'26 
10 
23 

144 

14 

39 

5 

75 

391 

287 

'23 

'52 

29 

10,080 
'i2 

329 
287 
280 
399 
651 
704 
69 
115 
731 
662 
616 
626 
698 

1,055 
796 
857 

1,193 

182 
51 
93 
38 


57,2. 

3,4( 
( 

2. 
1( 
8 
3 
9 
2 
4 

7,7 
4 

1,0 
4 
8 
8 
7 
3 
8 
5 
1 
9 
2 

2 

7,0 

1,0 

1,0 

1,3 

7 

9 

8 

2 

2 

1 

3 

1 

5 
2 
2 

9 
2 
1 
1 


i4 57,882 

)8 3,452 
)2 106 
59 197 
)8 113 
56 896 

58 366 
13 968 

1 233 
34 415 

38 55 

59 103 

M 7,580 

39 570 
27 994 
SI 480 
50 894 
34 862 

53 752 
12 331 
21 750 
39 465 
70 167 

19 861 

33 220 

56 234 

29 7,222 
94 1,156 
18 1,012 
07 1,252 
07 811 
81 969 
74 893 

34 270 
03 199 
32 141 

20 346 
59 173 

64 555 

54 275 
83 257 
27 23 

32 875 
70 260 
78 153 
90 193 
89 80 
86 101 
96 71 
23 17 


54,420 54,673 

3,341 3,312 
92 106 
217 186 
108 113 
851 832 
369 376 
890 932 
207 198 
435 406 
68 55 
104 108 

7,543 7,420 
490 553 
878 871 
477 477 
888 894 
861 862 
763 751 
308 315 
821 750 
509 465 
170 167 
919 861 
203 220 

256 234 

6,969 7,188 

1,079 1,153 

1,018 1,012 

1,327 1,264 

707 811 

981 969 

809 847 

234 270 

203 202 

132 141 

320 346 

159 173 

556 541 

246 261 

283 257 

27 23 

929 855 
270 260 
174 146 
190 180 
90 80 
86 101 
96 71 
23 17 


63,871 

3,288 
117 
218 
108 
754 
310 
810 
273 
411 
107 
104 
76 

5,593 
386 
758 
415 
766 
822 
543 
274 
477 
231 
362 
559 

16,103 
882 
788 
992 
587 
811 
641 
564 
478 
386 
670 
837 
747 
51 
135 
747 
687 
696 
660 
739 
1,064 
849 
911 
1,181 

679 

292 

330 

57 

810 
202 
156 
179 
68 
86 
96 
23 


57,863 

3,020 
114 
183 
113 
722 
273 
756 
280 
302 

94 
108 

75 

4,890 
383 
547 
332 
744 
658 
518 
262 
393 
226 
333 
494 

14,388 
704 
566 
701 
490 
541 
522 
487 
410 
421 
602 
822 
704 
69 
115 
731 
662 
616 
626 
698 

1,055 
796 
857 

1,193 

628 

265 

302 

61 

717 
178 
112 
171 
67 
101 
71 
17 


74,163 67,568 


4,036 
313 

'i? 

'98 
25 
98 
19 
56 

155 
59 

47 

'32 

17 

707 
131 
112 
73 
70 
77 
72 
48 

'64 
40 

'26 
29 

'26 

'35 

40 
37 

"3 

68 
36 
21 

ii 


5,263 




3,263 

92 

221 

69 

806 

283 

807 

296 

417 

107 

89 

76 

7,394 
359 
709 
426 
816 
802 
753 
266 
821 
509 
509 
919 
203 
21 
256 

'25 

14,930 
853 
725 
891 
658 
811 
704 
574 
451 
368 
678 
814 
747 
51 
135 
747 
687 
696 
660 
739 

849 
911 

656 

291 

308 

57 

769 
194 
134 
167 
69 
86 
96 
23 


2,979 

87 
177 

86 
708 
280 
760 
302 
307 

94 
103 

75 

6,588 
315 
521 
344 
823 
639 
675 
235 
750 
465 
454 
861 
220 
23 
234 

'29 

13,524 
717 
536 
703 
552 
627 
587 
523 
409 
376 
603 
824 
704 
69 
115 
731 
662 
616 
626 
698 

796 

857 

1,193 

010 

256 

293 

61 

728 
187 
108 
175 
69 
101 
71 
17 


412 


2 Flintstorie Sr.-Jr 

3 Mount Savage Sr.-Jr. . . 

4 Oldtown Sr.-Jr 

5 Allegany Sr.-Jr 

6 Bruce Sr.-Jr 

7 Fort HiU Sr.-Jr 

8 Valley Sr.-Jr 


26 

iis 

33 
126 
51 


9 Beall Sr.-Jr 


67 


10 Cresaptown Jr 

11 Beall Elem.-Jr 

12 Penn. Ave. Elem.-Jr. . . 


181 




55 


15 Glen Burnie Sr 

16 Arundel Sr 


59 


17 Bates Sr.-Jr. 




18 Brooklyn Park Sr.-Jr... 

19 Severna Park Sr.-Jr 

20 Southern Sr.-Jr 


45 

22 

1,058 


22 Arundel Jr. 


23 George Fox Jr 


24 Marley Jr 


25 Bates Annex Jr 

26 High Point Annex Jr... 

27 North Glen Annex Jr. . . 

28 Overlook Elem.-Jr 

29 Solley Elem.-Jr 




173 


32 Dundalk Sr 


115 


33 Kenwood Sr 


86 


34 Milford Mill Sr 

35 Parkville Sr 


105 
109 


36 Towson Sr 


98 


37 Franklin Sr.-Jr 

38 Hereford Sr.-Jr 

39 Sollers Point Sr.-Jr 

40 Sparrows Point Sr.-Jr. . 

41 Towsontown Jr 


78 

ioo 

56 






44 Carroll Manor Jr 


'2! 


46 Dumbarton Jr 

47 Dundalk Jr 


35 


48 Golden Ring Jr 

49 Middle River Jr 

50 North Point Jr 

51 Parkville Jr. 


'43 


52 Stemmers Run Jr 

53 Sudbrook Jr 


'39 


54 Calvert 


51 


55 Calvert Sr.-Jr 

56 W.S.Brooks Sr.-Jr... 


43 

"8 


58 Caroline 


82 


59 North Caroline Sr 

60 Federalsburg Sr.-Jr. . . . 

61 Lockerman Sr.-Jr 

62 Preston Sr.-Jr. . . . 


41 
30 

'ii 


63 Denton Jr 








65 RidgelyJr 





Maryland State Department of Education 



225 



Maryland County Public High School: Fall of 1959 











'Agriculture 


Industrial 


Home Economics 




1 










Frencl 




Spanish 










Business 
Subjects 


Physical 
Education 


Music 


Art — Arts 




* 


t 




t 






and Crafts 












Gen. 


Voc. 


Arts 


Edu. 


General 


Voc. 












B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


B 


B 


G 


B 


B 


G 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 




3,497 


8,479 


3,733 


3,408 


273 


3,129 


48,034 


382 


2,994 


72 41,305 


3,802 


9,202 23,251 


73,147 66,990 


44,227 


46,586 


34,248 33,023 


1 


74 


140 


94 


115 


72 


50 


1,856 




172 




1,563 


512 


425 


956 


2,667 


2,451 


2,548 


2,755 


1,627 


1,651 


2 












50 


38 








43 


51 






96 


95 


95 


102 






3 


'26 


'i7 










174 








115 


22 


'22 


'35 


190 


159 


156 


190 


iss 


ieo 


4 










'72 




19 








39 


49 






108 


109 


45 


74 


15 


25 


5 


'17 


'31 


'72 


'99 






370 




'34 




368 


46 


'si 


i63 


612 


538 


682 


787 


351 


371 


6 


11 


15 










198 




35 




155 


79 


60 


188 


249 


244 


292 


241 


179 


198 


7 






22 


'ie 






464 




52 




399 


121 


63 


282 


646 


578 


581 


676 


388 


401 


8 


"9 


'28 










248 








149 


66 


131 


159 


239 


250 


247 


251 


183 


194 


g 


17 


49 










238 




'si 




201 


78 


68 


129 


240 


201 


221 


204 


222 


188 


10 














107 








94 








107 


94 


107 


94 






11 






























104 


108 


104 


108 


i64 


ios 


12 






























76 


75 


18 


28 






13 


721 


941 


°164 


°170 




36 


5,099 


2 


244 




3,724 


534 


394 


2,224 


6,674 


5,583 


4,076 


4,385 


3,449 


3,166 


14 


101 


135 


31 


27 






220 










133 


40 


335 


335 


254 


86 


220 


53 


80 


15 


145 


164 










440 


"i 


i94 




385 




124 


483 


589 


282 


208 


436 


199 


153 


16 


81 


85 


51 


'26 






252 








131 


■98 


63 


140 


449 


410 


155 


135 


126 


79 


17 


32 


69 


26 


90 






762 




'56 




531 


54 


25 


413 


455 


330 


589 


580 


57 


51 


18 


133 


141 


°42 


°13 






626 








350 


148 


64 


559 


595 


442 


288 


332 


486 


440 


19 


98 


123 


14 


14 






636 


"i 






471 


58 


28 


148 


679 


617 


444 


462 


380 


371 


20 


38 


52 








36 


205 








156 


43 


50 


146 


291 


208 


217 


217 


112 


137 


21 


49 


91 










504 








425 








820 


748 


438 


424 


383 


324 


22 














509 








465 








502 


453 


509 


465 


509 


465 


23 


"32 


'47 










398 








350 








509 


454 


394 


349 


412 


333 


24 


12 


34 










547 








460 








907 


827 


205 


207 


189 


175 


25 






























203 


220 


203 


220 


203 


220 


26 






























21 


23 


21 


23 


21 


23 


27 






























256 


234 


256 


234 


256 


234 


28 
















;:: ... 












38 


52 


38 


52 


38 


52 


29 






























25 


29 


25 


29 


25 


29 


30 


1.329 


1,784 


«872 


o755 


13 


83 


9,685 


14 


t327 


67 


8,717 




1,252 


4,270 


17.224 


16,819 


11,450 


11,764 


10.744 


10,272 


31 


96 


123 


128 


78 






638 








551 




305 


659 


832 


873 


137 


275 


66 


102 


32 


105 


102 


42 


27 










179 




299 




118 


647 


989 


1,000 


81 


203 


103 


86 


33 


68 


108 


113 


95 






744 




tll4 




513 




154 


888 


1,266 


1,167 


119 


324 


134 


76 


34 


101 


212 


69 


71 






363 






'26 


286 




152 


467 


708 


810 


105 


154 


97 


124 


35 


68 


84 


130 


95 






630 






34 


341 




88 


561 


981 


969 


239 


346 


63 


59 


36 


95 


171 


o202 


a209 






280 


"4 


'68 




308 




141 


371 


783 


804 


124 


237 


86 


120 


37 


47 


55 






is 


'45 


319 








273 




52 


196 


659 


605 


388 


401 


368 


325 


38 


61 


65 








38 


260 


"i 






209 




52 


159 


510 


489 


395 


346 


320 


309 


39 


35 


26 










230 




'35 




239 




6 


54 


415 


421 


316 


265 


199 


228 


40 


98 


103 










518 




t31 




356 




62 


220 


787 


745 


493 


491 


516 


420 


41 


82 


102 


'56 


'34 






487 








446 




122 


48 


836 


822 


806 


740 


633 


641 


42 


28 


39 










508 








431 








747 


704 


726 


704 


683 


643 


43 














31 


"9 




"7 


47 








51 


69 


51 


69 


51 


69 


44 


"26 


■42 










89 








69 








135 


115 


135 


115 


113 


110 


45 


25 


47 


"45 


'72 






467 








487 








747 


731 


696 


664 


728 


704 


46 


70 


111 


32 


23 






422 








395 








687 


662 


598 


643 


657 


604 


47 


38 


43 










434 








390 








687 


608 


696 


616 


669 


586 


48 






'47 


'36 






419 








377 








660 


626 


660 


626 


635 


612 


49 


■57 


'60 










456 








413 








739 


698 


739 


698 


739 


698 


50 


49 


65 










593 








572 








1,064 


1,055 


1,064 


1,055 


1,064 


1,055 


51 


52 


55 










540 








478 








849 


796 


835 


779 


804 


722 


52 


32 


44 


'14 


'2! 






523 








508 








911 


857 


911 


857 


911 


857 


53 


96 


127 










734 








729 








1,181 


1,193 


1,136 


1,156 


1,105 


1,122 


54 


31 


62 








74 


183 








342 


125 


153 


215 


668 


536 


448 


446 


352 


61 


55 


22 


34 










94 








134 


21 


67 


122 


271 


177 


172 


190 


119 




56 


9 


28 








74 


89 








208 


104 


86 


93 


340 


298 


276 


256 


176 




57 






























57 


61 






57 


'ei 


58 


28 


48 


13 


13 




222 


713 








572 


46 


202 


358 


796 


749 


568 


573 


262 


268 


59 


23 


38 








106 


189 








125 




108 


196 


186 


169 


70 


85 


57 


79 


60 






'is 


'i3 




36 


151 








127 




35 


90 


148 


156 


100 


98 






61 


"5 


'io 








51 


140 








81 


'46 


39 


48 


188 


179 


190 


172 






62 












29 


28 








50 




20 


24 


69 


56 


3 


29 






63 














86 








101 








86 


101 


86 


101 


'86 


ioi 


64 














96 








71 








96 


71 


96 


71 


96 


71 


65 














23 








17 








23 


17 


23 


17 


23 


17 



226 Ninety-Fourth Annual Report 

TABLE XXIII — Continued — Enrollment by Subject, Excluding Duplicates: Each 





Total 










Social 






Mathe- 






Local Unit 


Enroll- 


Core 


English 


Studies 


Science 


matics 


Latin 


— 


ment 


























Name of High School 






























B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


66 Carroll 


2,285 
170 


2,322 
170 


302 


306 


1,983 
170 


2,016 
170 


1,959 
153 


2,015 
169 


2,012 
146 


1,887 
116 


1,905 
99 


1,860 
117 


58 


82 


67 Francis Scott Key Sr. . . 




68 Mount Airy Sr 


141 


148 






141 


148 


141 


148 


88 


103 


105 


109 






69 North Carroll Sr 


221 


235 






221 


235 


215 


235 


164 


160 


146 


137 






70 Westminster Sr 


434 


483 






434 


483 


434 


483 


385 


362 


292 


314 


'53 


69 


71 Robert Moton Sr.-Jr. . . 


82 


96 


'si 


27 


51 


69 


51 


69 


78 


86 


72 


83 






72 Sykesville Sr.-Jr 


287 


247 






287 


247 


286 


247 


276 


201 


258 


188 






73 Taneytown Sr.-Jr 


184 


201 






184 


201 


184 


201 


177 


174 


167 


170 


"5 


is 


74 Charies Carroll Jr 


46 


53 


46 


53 










46 


53 


46 


53 






75 Elmer A. Wolfe Jr 


56 


41 


56 


41 










56 


41 


56 


41 






76 Hampstead Jr 


60 


82 


21 


32 


'39 


'56 


■39 


■56 


60 


82 


60 


82 






77 Manchester Jr 


94 


86 


35 


23 


59 


63 


59 


63 


94 


86 


94 


86 






78 Mount Airy Jr 


85 


84 


66 


73 


19 


11 


19 


11 


85 


84 


85 


84 






79 New Windsor Jr 


68 


57 


43 


48 


25 


9 


25 


9 






68 


57 






80 Westminster Jr 


353 


330 






353 


330 


353 


330 


353 


330 


353 


330 






81 Johnsville Elem.-Jr. . . . 


4 


9 


"i 


"9 










4 


9 


4 


9 






82 Cecil 


1,805 


1,874 


15 


21 


1,790 


1,853 


1,789 


1,852 


1,647 


1,535 


1,559 


1,525 


38 


76 


83 Elkton Sr 


185 
252 


234 
248 






185 
252 


234 

248 


185 
251 


234 
247 


125 
220 


114 

198 


111 

187 


113 
203 


12 


27 


84 Bohemia Manor Sr.-Jr. 




85 G.W.Carver Sr.-Jr... 


92 


91 


'i5 


'21 


77 


70 


77 


70 


92 


91 


80 


81 






86 North East Sr.-Jr 


299 


353 






299 


353 


299 


353 


270 


298 


285 


308 


"8 


17 


87 Perryville Sr.-Jr 


220 


239 






220 


239 


220 


239 


204 


186 


196 


196 


18 


32 


88 Rising Sun Sr.-Jr 


367 


398 






367 


398 


367 


398 


346 


337 


310 


313 






89 Elkton Jr 


390 

1,416 
193 


311 

1,473 
217 


343 
89 


329 

87 


390 

1,073 
104 


311 

1,144 
130 


390 

1,020 
86 


311 

1,127 
132 


390 

1,210 
146 


311 

1,281 
190 


390 

1,191 
192 


311 

1,173 
197 


98 




90 Charles 


88 


91 Bel Alton Sr.-Jr 




92 La Plata Sr.-Jr 


396 


401 






396 


401 


396 


401 


331 


312 


308 


276 


'34 


'37 


93 Lackey Sr.-Jr 


333 
315 


350 
323 


i69 


ise 


333 

146 


350 
167 


333 
111 


347 
151 


323 
231 


296 
301 


299 
213 


290 

228 


60 


47 


94 Pomonkey Sr.-Jr 




95 Glasva Jr 


33 
39 


32 
41 






33 
39 


32 
41 


33 
39 


32 
41 


33 
39 


32 

41 


33 
39 


32 

41 






96 Hughesville Jr 




97 MalcoJmJr 


72 


75 


50 


■52 


22 


23 


22 


23 


72 


75 


72 


75 






98 Nanjemoy Jr 


35 


34 


35 


34 










35 


34 


35 


34 


"4 


"4 


99 Dorchester 


1,247 


1,259 


197 


150 


1,050 


1,109 


1,000 


1,067 


1,035 


1,006 


1,049 


952 


41 


85 


100 Cambridge Sr 


303 


338 






303 


338 


289 


335 


212 


205 


228 


204 


12 


33 


101 Mace's Lane Sr.-Jr. . . . 


359 


316 


86 


'54 


273 


262 


239 


233 


284 


276 


301 


245 






102 No. Dorchester Sr.-Jr.. 


274 


273 


111 


96 


163 


177 


162 


177 


242 


218 


219 


203 


'27 


38 


1 03 So. Dorchester Sr.-Jr. . . 


107 


115 






107 


115 


106 


105 


93 


90 


97 


83 


2 


14 


104 Cambridge Jr 


204 


217 






204 


217 


204 


217 


204 


217 


204 


217 






105 Frederick 


3,180 


3,071 


1,931 


1,764 


1,248 


1,307 


1,071 


1,093 


2,674 


2,394 


2,697 


2,506 


185 


255 


106 Frederick Sr. 


671 


693 






670 


693 


574 


559 


534 


504 


398 


398 


72 


105 


107 Brunswick Sr.-Jr. 


260 


285 


i62 


i67 


98 


118 


98 


118 


250 


222 


213 


223 






108 Thurmont Sr.-Jr 


354 


307 


214 


179 


140 


128 


97 


96 


245 


151 


305 


242 


'32 


'33 


109 Middletown Sr.-Jr 


362 


364 


215 


186 


147 


178 


118 


149 


326 


313 


310 


289 


17 


44 


110 Emmitsburg Sr.-Jr 


130 


100 


83 


56 


47 


44 


47 


44 


78 


73 


126 


91 


4 


9 


Ill Walkersville Sr.-Jr 


174 


144 


91 


78 


83 


66 


74 


47 


137 


101 


144 


122 






1 1 2 Lincoln Sr.-Jr 


102 
296 


119 
266 


39 
296 


39 
266 


63 


80 


63 


80 


78 
275 


91 
234 


74 
296 


82 
266 


14 




113 Elm Street Jr 


"12 


114 Liberty Jr 


87 
744 


93 
700 


87 
744 


93 
700 










53 

698 


57 

648 


87 
744 


93 
700 


46 




1 15 West Frederick Jr 


■52 


116 Garrett 


1,044 
400 


971 
366 


552 

162 


485 
139 


492 
238 


486 
227 


467 
213 


434 
175 


882 
328 


737 

282 


859 
306 


702 
239 


20 
20 


24 


117 No. Garrett Sr.-Jr 


24 


118 So. Garrett Sr.-Jr. . . 


571 


558 


317 


299 


254 


259 


254 


259 


481 


408 


480 
40 


416 






119 Kitzmiller .Jr. 


40 


28 


40 


28 










40 


28 


28 






120 Route 40 Jr. 


33 
3,373 


19 
3,382 


33 
2,035 


19 
1.957 


1,338 


1,425 


1,267 


1,273 


33 
2,515 


19 
2,319 


33 

2,854 


19 
2,754 


237 




121 Harford 


300 


122 Aberdeen Sr.-Jr 


584 


601 


347 


357 


237 


244 


237 


244 


462 


372 


525 


498 


53 


62 


123 Bel Air Sr.-Jr 


976 


1,015 


579 


542 


397 


473 


357 


385 


812 


810 


850 


872 


81 


129 


124 Edgewood Sr.-Jr 


508 


472 


306 


284 


202 


188 


202 


188 


374 


329 


430 


380 


40 


35 


125 Havre de Grace Sr.-Jr. 


411 


468 


256 


280 


155 


188 


137 


188 


278 


281 


344 


335 


31 


40 


126 North Harford Sr.-Jr. . 


525 


526 


341 


313 


184 


213 


184 


164 


343 


318 


401 


407 


32 


34 


127 Central Consol. Sr.-Jr. . 


209 


165 


133 


98 


76 


67 


65 


53 


151 


118 


189 


151 






128 Havre de Grace 






























Consol. Sr.-Jr 


160 


135 


73 


83 


87 


52 


85 


51 


95 


91 


115 


111 







Maryland State Department of Education 



227 



Maryland County Pub] 


icH 


igh School : Fall 


f 1959 


















Agriculture 


Industrial 


Home Economics 












Fre 


nch Spanish 










Business Physical 
Subjects Education 


Music 


Art- 
andC 


-Arts 






1 




t 






>afts 






Gen. 


Voc. 


Arts 


Edu. 


General 


Voc. 












B 


G B 


G 


B 


B 


B 


G 


B 


B 


G 


G 


B G B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


66 1 


92 262 ... 






152 


1,342 




35 




1,228 


118 


443 715 2,111 


2,093 


1,637 


1,788 


966 


862 


67 


17 19 ... 






76 


98 








98 


13 


50 101 145 


149 


91 


115 






68 


27 25 ... 






34 


85 








104 


11 


68 118 134 


115 


81 


115 






69 


26 39 ... 






42 


112 








121 




112 129 220 


220 


123 


194 






70 


50 100 ... 








270 




'. '35 




177 


54 


120 203 300 


336 


190 


192 


'49 


ios 


71 


7 14 ... 








64 








38 


40 


7 35 82 


96 


82 


96 


15 


11 


72 


43 44 ... 








186 








115 




55 72 284 


243 


143 


164 


67 


65 


73 


22 21 ... 








123 








143 




31 57 180 


192 


161 


170 


52 


41 


74 










15 








25 




46 


53 


46 


53 


31 


28 


75 


















41 




56 


41 


56 


41 


56 




76 










'60 








82 




60 


82 


60 


82 






77 










43 








41 




94 


86 


94 


86 


'si 


■45 


78 . 










41 








40 




85 


84 


85 


84 


44 


44 


79 










68 








31 




68 


57 


68 


57 


68 


26 


80 










177 








172 




353 


330 


353 


330 


529 


488 


81 . 






















4 


9 


4 


9 


4 


9 


82 


99 82 87 


86 




70 


1,319 


1 


3 ... 




1,123 


157 


286 630 1,577 


1,413 


800 


824 


462 


493 


83 


6 10 19 


16 






66 


1 


3 ... 






70 


88 234 120 


94 


22 


28 


13 


29 


84 


37 31 ... 






29 


186 








i4i 


25 


62 93 187 


160 


77 


68 


85 


91 


85 










91 








53 


26 


16 32 92 


91 


68 


65 






86 


'.'. '.'.'. U 


is 






249 








253 


25 


40 85 250 


229 


156 


181 


'76 


'97 


87 


18 10 ... 








178 








191 


11 


26 71 166 


184 


166 


151 






88 


54 


57 




4i 


221 








221 




54 115 372 


344 


132 


184 


140 


i46 


89 


38 31 ... 








328 








264 




390 


311 


179 


147 


148 


130 


90 


69 95 ... 




47 


239 


574 


4 


... 




651 


87 


210 422 1,134 


1,022 


819 


855 


333 


224 


91 


10 19 ... 






80 


102 








79 


38 


10 40 151 


144 


154 


150 


30 




92 


21 29 ... 






56 


91 








228 




109 168 292 


208 


182 


201 


126 


"5 


93 


11 10 ... 








132 








142 




70 116 289 


254 


215 


186 


98 


97 


94 


27 37 ... 






92 


146 


'4 


6 '.'.'. 




54 


'49 


21 98 226 


238 


149 


186 


65 


122 


95 






'is 












32 




33 


32 


4 


6 


14 




96 






28 


11 










41 




39 


41 


39 


41 






97 










'72 








75 




72 


75 


66 


75 






98 . 










31 












32 


30 


10 


10 






99 1 


63 172 ... 






120 


605 








613 




231 416 1,108 


1,065 


760 


786 


317 


368 


100 


85 78 ... 








145 








181 




141 203 249 


287 


117 


159 


113 


151 


101 


44 44 ... 






'78 


194 








190 




10 87 339 


300 


263 


240 






102 


34 50 ... 






42 


169 








169 




70 80 219 


178 


176 


170 






103 










97 








73 




10 46 97 


83 










104 






















204 


217 


204 


2i7 


204 


217 


105 2 


03 249 24 


27 




323 


1,616 




2 ... 




1,513 


28 


459 784 2,898 


2,535 


1,812 


1,956 


1,331 


1,195 


106 1 


26 134 ... 






127 


2831 


2 ... 




290 




261 398 474 


335 


103 


155 


64 


74 


107 


10 27 ... 








66 








52 




83 93 225 


235 


92 


123 


53 


50 


108 


20 21 ... 






59 


155 








136 




50 131 348 


284 


230 


258 


189 


158 


109 


24 


27 




77 


127 








140 




28 113 321 


279 


184 


227 


163 


161 


110 


10 11 ... 








88 








84 




130 


100 


100 


91 


125 


72 


111 


23 35 ... 






'60 


71 








90 




36 34 171 


124 


103 


117 






112 










101 








46 


'28 


1 15 102 


119 


28 


27 


'24 


'37 


113 


i4 21 '.'.'. 








189 








154 




296 


266 


220 


263 


251 


229 


114 










87 








93 




87 


93 


87 


93 






115 . 










449 








428 




744 


700 


665 


602 


462 


4i4 


116 


72 71 ... 






177 


543 








498 


86 


148 361 756 


532 


554 


611 


357 


293 


117 








108 


255 








229 




58 152 267 


226 


226 


264 






118 


72 'n '.'.'. 






69 


288 








269 


'86 


90 209 416 


259 


328 


347 


284 


246 


119 






















40 


28 






40 


28 


120 






















33 


19 






33 


19 


121 3 


14 364 °88 


75 




166 


2,020 


3 


7 ... 


5 


1,538 




495 1,140 2,480 


2,192 


2,047 


2,118 


1,502 


1,623 


122 


92 77 °43 


23 






332 








239 




112 147 410 


375 


213 


273 


297 


337 


123 1 


09 139 28 


37 




'49 


565 








462 




104 349 727 


629 


602 


628 


523 


516 


124 


29 22 17 


15 






347 




i '.'.'. 




194 




77 169 385 


326 


338 


307 


133 


123 


125 


31 48 ... 








240 


3 


s ... 




207 




62 208 307 


294 


243 


300 


234 


252 


126 


27 41 ... 






ii7 


258 








231 




64 197 315 


303 


344 


370 


112 


211 


127 


17 23 ... 








134 








93 




32 46 180 


133 


165 


113 


83 


58 


128 


9 14 ... 








144 






5 


112 




44 24 156 


132 


142 


127 


120 


126 



228 Ninety-Fourth Annual Report 

TABLE XXIII — Continued — Enrollment by Subject, Excluding Duplicates: Each 



^ 


Local Unit 
ame of High School 


Total 
Enroll- 
ment 


Core 


English 


Social 
Studies 


Science 


Mathe- 
matics 


Latin 




B 


G 


B 





B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


129 HnwARn 1 


1,459 
326 
389 
204 
279 
239 
22 

656 
284 

96 
186 

90 

13,932 

988 
1,107 
828 
819 
949 
511 
235 
272 
659 
169 
719 
750 
587 
735 
596 
539 
510 
580 
711 
490 
610 
568 

13,618 
1,237 
720 
958 
358 
1,008 
226 
379 
932 

288 
349 
571 
529 
561 
629 
332 
660 
527 
529 
339 
205 
71 
475 
43S 
344 
465 
344 
143 


1,416 
350 
351 
240 
248 
193 
34 

700 
290 
99 
204 
107 

13.802 

964 
1,166 
828 
778 
831 
572 
211 
224 
628 
172 
709 
769 
646 
644 
563 
572 
507 
526 
714 
522 
658 
598 

13,501 

1,112 

796 

1,047 

425 

1,114 

185 

431 

894 

332 
344 
593 
516 
493 
620 
330 
601 
496 
551 
349 
187 
62 
433 
401 
318 
429 
282 
16C 


645 

178 
80 
194 
171 
22 

14 

'14 

8,659 

63 
249 
932 

188 
268 
367 
529 
561 
629 
332 
660 
527 
529 
339 
205 
71 
475 
439 
344 
465 
344 
143 


589 

i43 
97 
174 
141 
34 

1 

"'i 

8,259 

45 
266 
894 

216 
257 
353 
516 
493 
620 
330 
601 
496 
551 
349 
187 
62 
433 
401 
318 
429 
282 
16C 


814 
326 
211 
124 

85 
68 

656 
284 

96 
186 

90 

13,915 

988 
1,105 
828 
819 
949 
511 
235 
272 
658 
169 
719 
750 
587 
721 
596 
539 
510 
580 
711 
490 
610 
568 

4,958 
1,237 
720 
957 
358 
1,008 
163 
130 

100 

81 

204 


827 
350 
208 
143 
74 
52 

700 
290 
99 
204 
107 

13,799 

963 
1,166 
828 
778 
831 
572 
211 
224 
628 
172 
709 
769 
646 
643 
563 
572 
507 
525 
714 
522 
658 
598 

5,241 
1,112 

796 
1,047 

425 
1,114 

140 

164 

116 

87 

240 


738 
251 
211 
123 

85 
68 

656 
284 

96 
186 

90 

12,673 

704 
930 
673 
664 
761 
435 
201 
257 
591 
169 
650 
750 
587 
721 
596 
539 
505 
574 
711 
486 
601 
568 

4,486 
1,011 
534 
830 
341 
964 
163 
129 
26 

103 

81 

204 

ioo 


756 
279 
208 
143 
74 
52 

700 
290 
99 
204 
107 

12,544 

717 
965 
617 
586 
697 
489 
182 
212 
602 
167 
607 
769 
646 
643 
563 
572 
503 
523 
714 
522 
650 
598 

4,512 
876 
550 
893 
409 

1,025 

140 

162 

14 

116 

87 

240 


1,262 
228 
354 
151 
268 
239 
22 

599 
254 

96 
163 

86 

8,320 

773 
879 
632 
580 
673 
448 
175 
165 
338 
92 
412 
372 
301 
351 
272 
287 
223 
286 
325 
221 
288 
227 

6,099 
912 
495 
691 
262 
800 
204 
191 
280 

138 
162 
252 
129 
170 
154 

80 
175 
155 
141 
110 

39 

26 
111 
116 

88 
135 

83 


1,191 
215 
313 
194 
242 
193 
34 

613 

253 

87 

175 

98 

7,246 

607 
715 
566 
455 
495 
410 
111 
141 
337 
106 
382 
335 
300 
272 
254 
272 
199 
242 
334 
205 
236 
272 

5,265 
570 
399 
522 
268 
665 
122 
194 
354 

123 
144 
273 
122 
142 
147 

73 
169 
139 
156 
103 

32 

15 
116 
115 

84 
135 

83 


1,221 
263 
304 
144 
268 
220 
22 

539 

227 
73 

154 
85 

12,323 

828 
846 
642 
606 
794 
301 
159 
225 
537 
124 
631 
750 
587 
721 
596 
510 
508 
579 
711 
490 
610 
568 

11,969 
807 
545 
741 
241 
729 
180 
371 
761 

243 
287 
524 
520 
561 
629 
332 
660 
527 
529 
339 
205 
71 
456 
439 
344 
455 
330 
143 


1,113 
194 

283 
176 
242 
184 
34 

571 
228 

71 
175 

97 

11,158 

574 
519 
642 
393 
511 
305 
162 
194 
487 
140 
563 
769 
646 
643 
563 
524 
507 
525 
714 
521 
658 
598 

10,241 
380 
441 
465 
157 
476 
90 
383 
671 

252 
235 
512 
509 
493 
620 
330 
601 
496 
551 
349 
187 
62 
420 
401 
318 
423 
259 
160 


6i5 
34 
20 

ii 

4 

"4 

1,059 

147 
109 
123 

59 
126 

28 

'24 

93 
23 
37 
33 
42 
41 
31 
30 
58 
26 
29 

424 
112 
52 
126 

123 

"6 
5 


113 


130 




62 


131 




33 


132 
133 
134 


Harriet Tubman Sr.-Jr. 
Ellicott City Jr 


'is 


135 Lisbon Elem.-Jr 

136 KifpjT 


18 


137 
13« 
139 


Chestertown Sr.-Jr 

Rock Hall Sr.-Jr 




140 


OaVna Sr.-Jr 


18 


141 MnNTfinMF.RV 


1,227 


142 


Bethesda-Chevy 
Chase Sr 


174 


143 
144 
145 


Montgomery Blair Sr.. 
Walter Johnson Sr 


130 
120 
79 


146 




105 


147 
148 


Rich. Montgomery Sr. . 


34 


149 
150 
151 
152 
153 


Damascus Sr.-Jr 

Gaithersburg Sr.-Jr. . . . 

Poolesville Sr.-Jr 

Sherwood Sr.-Jr 

Belt Jr 


'45 

'96 
41 


154 




54 


155 
156 


Edwin W.Broome Jr.. . 


31 
43 


157 




35 


158 
159 


Montgomery Hills Jr.. . 


39 
26 


160 
161 
162 


North Bethesda Jr 

TakomaPark Jr 


64 
50 
61 


163 


.'(litrn Jr . 




164 Prince George's 

165 Bladensburg Sr 

166 Hiirh Point Sr. 


492 
102 

78 


167 
168 


Northwestern Sr 

0\on Hill Sr 


160 


169 




142 


170 






171 
172 

173 


Douglass Sr.-Jr 

Fairmont Hgts. Sr.-Jr. 
Frederick Sasscer 
Sr.-Jr 




174 

175 
176 
177 
178 
179 
180 


Gwynn Park Sr.-Jr.. . . 

Surrattsville Sr.-Jr 

Benjamin Stoddert Jr. . 

Bladensburg Jr 

Buck Lodge Jr 

District Heights Jr. . . . 


4 
6 


181 
182 


Greenbelt Jr 

Hvattsville Jr 




183 
184 


John Hanson Jr 




185 
186 
187 
188 


Lakeland Jr 

Maryland Park Jr 

Mt. Rainier Jr 

Oxon Hill Jr 




189 
190 


RoUingcrest Jr 




191 













Maryland State Department of Education 



229 



Maryland County Public High School: Fall of 1959 


























Agriculture 1 Industrial 


Home Economics 


















French 


Spanish 










Business 
Subjects 


Physical 
Education 


Music 


Art- 
and ( 


-Arts 




» 




t 


i 






>afts 










Gen. 


V 


3C. Arts 


Edu. 


General 


Voc. 
















B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


] 


3 B 


G 


B 


B 


G 


G 


B G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


129 


141 


138 


28 


30 


*26 




t80 820 


1 


37 




556 


41 


149 390 


1,275 


1,086 


806 


862 


94 


174 


130 


59 


56 










39 195 








98 




77 226 


200 


128 


60 


130 


45 


81 


131 


37 


20 






*26 




t41 241 


"i 






161 




54 118 


354 


304 


166 


166 


42 


80 


132 


12 


20 










82 




'37 




84 


'4i 


18 46 


182 


179 


125 


168 






133 


19 


24 


'28 


'36 






... 152 








99 






279 


248 


194 


171 


"7 


is 


134 


14 


18 










150 








114 






238 


193 


239 


193 






135 




























22 


34 


22 


34 






136 


73 


107 










91 412 








446 




105 225 


573 


624 


500 


560 


188 


176 


137 


53 


71 










66 150 








140 




45 110 


214 


226 


165 


189 






138 


7 


10 










42 








58 




16 44 


96 


98 


81 


87 


'65 


'43 


139 


13 


26 










25 140 








171 




29 40 


173 


193 


178 


188 


70 


88 


140 














80 








77 




15 31 


90 


107 


76 


96 


53 


45 


141 


1,252 


1,828 


°814 


"865 


*66 




39 7,372 


209 


tS87 




5,299 


268 


1,607 3,312 


11,718 


10,778 


4,608 


5,105 


2,923 


3,639 


142 


146 


264 


°198 


°211 






.504 


10 


t26 




125 




227 414 


773 


632 


180 


316 


63 


181 


143 


160 


184 


"167 


°205 






617 


61 


m 




304 


'45 


216 497 


570 


446 


160 


208 


104 


223 


144 


132 


242 


°139 


°181 






463 


2 






265 




150 269 


655 


522 


188 


282 


75 


197 


145 


98 


89 


59 


62 






506 


57 


n84 






178 


184 554 


562 


415 


156 


267 


38 


88 


146 


190 


212 


°109 


°88 






587 


54 






sis 




163 372 


660 


512 


195 


198 


109 


197 


147 


35 


62 


24 


29 






251 




'68 




181 


'25 


192 276 


411 


417 


93 


211 


61 


62 


148 














64 




tl47 




64 


8 


10 45 


188 


163 


63 


50 


50 


58 


149 


'23 


'3i 






*28 




34 202 








149 




36 53 


227 


152 


154 


124 


126 


102 


150 


11 


19 


'38 


'24 


24 




52 275 


"3 


i37 




230 




108 215 


559 


500 


217 


258 


75 


86 


151 


12 


22 






14 




53 42 








49 




37 55 


131 


147 


32 


56 


35 


44 


152 


23 


34 


'53 


56 






282 


is 


'37 




151 


'i2 


64 241 


631 


528 


226 


240 


115 


160 


153 


33 


53 










348 








369 






750 


769 


248 


264 


154 


136 


154 


56 


71 










315 


"i 






319 






587 


646 


160 


172 


112 


154 


155 


25 


20 


'27 


'is 






673 








598 






735 


644 


587 


587 


596 


574 


156 


49 


63 










259 








243 




'48 ioi 


567 


466 


213 


175 


102 


139 


157 


45 


73 










.. 237 


"i 






217 




70 80 


539 


572 


210 


280 


150 


198 


158 


51 


87 










222 








232 






492 


503 


189 


171 


83 


105 


159 


31 


56 










290 








268 






564 


520 


167 


134 


118 


126 


160 


67 


91 










299 








295 




'76 '86 


526 


544 


361 


301 


172 


193 


161 


41 


76 










429 


"4 






414 






483 


513 


412 


424 


313 


305 


162 


24 


79 










. . 255 


1 






267 




'26 '54 


591 


651 


191 


169 


132 


163 


163 














252 








244 






517 


516 


206 


218 


140 


148 


164 


919 


1,062 


°1328 


°1060 






52 7,993 


7 


tl3l3 




7.149 


1,403 


1,243 3,997 


10,597 


9,497 


5,417 


5,520 


5,943 


5,353 


165 


76 


74 


"228 


°144 






197 




tl069 






369 


193 781 


346 


144 


94 


120 


79 


153 


166 


92 


104 


°210 


°141 






367 








i64 


124 


220 457 


492 


410 


83 


215 


62 


120 


167 


114 


129 


229 


145 






460 


"5 






32 


254 


208 842 


639 


507 


210 


238 


111 


149 


168 


64 


83 


138 


118 






143 


2 








215 


135 254 


193 


149 


46 


31 


26 


54 


169 


146 


158 


198 


123 






214 








'37 


252 


304 881 


400 


181 


109 


173 


74 


93 


170 


49 


38 


33 


17 






139 








40 


26 


59 108 


170 


108 


26 


52 


55 


52 


171 






38 


42 






78 218 








266 


98 


10 64 


299 


268 


220 


261 


230 


271 


172 


52 


62 


26 


44 






560 




t244 




516 


65 


46 212 


755 


773 


483 


430 


531 


468 


173 






42 


32 






50 156 








195 




27 105 


266 


278 


170 


208 


133 


152 


174 


'35 


■35 










24 257 








245 




41 143 


330 


295 


157 


114 


96 


93 


175 


77 


78 


'38 


'38 






272 








250 




150 


493 


486 


337 


340 


178 


179 


176 


27 


27 


















472 






517 


512 


260 


251 


529 


256 


177 


44 


42 










'.'. 466 








442 








542 


475 


164 


153 


262 


231 


178 


33 


47 










537 








518 








508 


520 


270 


263 


172 


170 


179 


11 


13 


'22 


'2i 






299 








296 








252 


257 


123 


118 


129 


139 


180 






54 


46 






574 








539 








628 


594 


366 


333 


440 


412 


181 


25 


■53 










316 








491 








512 


481 


320 


286 


509 


276 


182 


30 


51 










499 








500 








529 


551 


258 


247 


182 


203 


183 


19 


36 










215 








209 








339 


349 


267 


298 


409 


417 


184 














166 








155 








205 


187 


107 


97 


98 


90 


185 


"3 


"s 










71 








62 








71 


62 


56 


57 


60 


52 


186 






7 


'is 






451 








409 








470 


427 


279 


330 


341 


238 


187 






22 


38 






434 








378 








439 


383 


175 


133 


259 


224 


188 


'22 


'24 










90 








185 








344 


318 


303 


280 


454 


391 


189 






is 


'35 






441 








391 








455 


423 


289 


264 


303 


258 


190 






25 


61 






308 








257 








260 


199 


146 


109 


101 


87 


191 














143 








160 








143 


160 


99 


119 


120 


125 



230 Ninety-Fourth Annual Report 

TABLE XXIII — Continued — Enrollment by Subject, Excluding Duplicates: Each 



Local Unit 
Name of High Schoal 



Total 
EnroU- 
ment 



Core 



English 



B 


G 


B 


87 


70 


672 
260 


87 


70 


126 
114 
172 


57 


57 


1,048 
204 


57 


57 


58 
391 
203 
192 


364 


334 


541 


142 


140 


88 


22 


25 


23 


21 


22 


34 


63 


45 


216 


85 


75 


104 


31 


27 


65 
11 


96 


116 


740 
435 


96 


116 


134 
171 


1,820 


1,692 


2,432 
325 
770 
733 


106 


89 


160 


113 


118 


117 


120 


98 


187 


41 


35 


140 


270 


228 




435 


374 




392 


426 




298 


269 




45 


55 


1,937 
509 
133 
127 
469 
699 


149 


127 


910 
169 


122 


109 


76 
341 


27 


is 


324 



Social 
Studies 



Science 



Mathe- 
matics 



Latin 



192 Queen Anne's 

193 Centreville Sr.-Jr 

1 94 Kennard Sr.-Jr 

195 Stevensville Sr.-Jr 

196 Sudlersville Sr.-Jr 

197 St. Mart's 

198 Banneker Sr.-Jr 

199 Carver Sr.-Jr 

200 Great Mills Sr.-Jr 

201 Leonardtown Sr.-Jr. . . . 

202 Margaret Brent Sr.-Jr. . 

203 Somerset 

204 Crisfield Sr.-Jr 

205 Deal Island Sr.-Jr 

206 Marion Sr.-Jr 

207 Somerset Sr.-Jr 

208 Washington Sr.-Jr 

209 Woodson Sr.-Jr 

210 EwellJr 

211 Talbot 

212 Easton Sr.-Jr 

213 Robert Moton Sr.-Jr.. . 

214 St. Michaels Sr.-Jr 

215 Washington 

216 Boonsboro Sr 

217 North Hagerstown Sr.. 

218 South Hagerstown Sr. . . 

219 Clear Spring Sr.-Jr 

220 Smithsburg Sr.-Jr 

221 Williamsport Sr.-Jr 

222 Hancock Sr.-Jr 

223 Boonsboro Jr 

224 North Potomac Jr 

225 South Potomac Jr 

226 Washington Jr 

227 Hancock Elem.-Jr 

228 Wicomico 

229 Wicomico Sr 

230 Mardela Sr.-Jr 

231 Pittsville Sr.-Jr 

232 Salisbury Sr.-Jr 

233 Wicomico Jr 

234 Worcester 

235 Pocomoke Sr.-Jr 

236 Snow Hill Sr.-Jr 

237 Stephen Decatur Sr.-Jr, 

238 Worcester Sr.-Jr 



759 
260 
213 
114 

172 

1,105 
204 
115 
391 
203 
192 

905 

230 

45 

55 

279 

189 

96 

11 

836 
435 
230 

171 

4,252 
325 

770 
733 
266 
230 
307 
181 
270 
435 
392 
298 
45 

1,937 
509 
133 
127 
469 
699 

1,059 
169 
198 
341 
351 



777 
255 
194 
161 
167 

1,075 
174 
109 
423 
170 
199 

922 
250 
59 
55 
239 
200 
101 
18 

883 
469 
254 
160 

3,975 
289 
720 
708 
261 
242 
236 
167 
228 
374 
426 
269 
55 

1,975 
546 
133 
123 
465 
708 

1,081 
183 
193 
341 
364 



707 
255 
124 
161 
167 

1,017 
174 
52 
423 
169 
199 

588 
110 
34 
33 
194 
125 
74 
18 

767 
469 
138 
160 

2,283 



1,975 
546 
133 
123 
465 
708 

954 
183 
84 
341 
346 



649 
238 
126 
113 

172 

1,045 
204 
58 
391 
200 
192 

512 
84 
23 
35 
178 
116 
65 
11 

729 
429 
134 
166 

2,225 
325 
642 
671 
151 
106 
175 
155 



499 
133 
125 



900 
169 
75 
338 
318 



685 
234 

124 
161 
166 

1,014 
174 
52 
423 
166 
199 

564 
106 
34 
31 
176 
125 
74 
18 

746 
466 
138 
142 

2,094 
275 
639 
640 
145 
120 
135 
140 



1,929 
535 
130 
123 
465 
676 

952 
183 
83 
341 
345 



624 
224 

150 
104 
146 

1,003 
192 
108 
375 
187 
141 

765 
203 
45 
53 
227 
146 



770 
390 
230 
150 

3,496 
276 
516 
482 
186 
217 
276 
152 
270 
410 
392 
274 
45 

1,635 
344 
117 
121 
395 
658 

850 
167 
184 
276 
223 



640 
224 
144 
138 
134 

942 
138 
98 
386 
152 
168 

776 
207 
59 
41 
220 
143 



787 
401 
244 
142 

3,127 
230 
414 
446 
201 
191 
180 
134 
228 
366 
426 
256 
55 

1,591 
314 
112 
100 
419 
646 

883 
158 
157 
284 
284 



622 
206 
213 
74 
129 

937 
142 
99 
360 
151 
185 

851 
227 
45 
45 
277 
162 



710 
382 
181 
147 

3,456 
204 
591 
472 
192 
195 
235 
152 
270 
410 
392 
298 
45 

1,561 

312 

95 

94 

373 

687 



155 
148 
265 
280 



653 
219 
194 
123 

117 

845 
126 
95 
346 
132 
146 

847 

220 

59 

43 

240 

180 

87 

18 

714 
391 
194 
129 

3,064 
158 
454 
410 
194 
199 
172 
146 
228 
366 
426 
256 
55 

1,602 
307 
104 
99 
391 
701 

859 
132 
137 
284 
306 



228 
48 
85 
57 
18 

20 



341 
55 
131 
110 

28 



272 
60 



70 
142 



* Includes the following number of girls taking General Agriculture: Howard: Glenelg Sr.-Jr. — 10; Montgomery: Damascus Sr.-Jr. — 12; 

Total— 22. 
t Includes the following number of girls taking Vocational Agriculture: Frederick: Thurmont Sr.-Jr. — 2; Howard: Glenelg Sr.-Jr. — 1; 

Total— 3. 
t Includes the following number of girls taking Industrial Education: Baltimore: Dundalk Sr. — 4; Kenwood Sr. — 10; Sparrows Point 

Sr.-Jr. — 17; Montgomery: Bethesda-Chevy Chase Sr. — 14; Montgomery-Blair Sr. — 24; Wheaton Sr. — 61; Carver Sr.-Jr. — 41; 



Maryland State Department of Education 



231 



Maryland County Public High School : 


Fall of 1959 




























Agriculture 


Industrial 


Home Economics 


















French 


Spanish 










Business 
Subjects 


Physical 
Education 


Music 


Art- 
and C 


Arts 




• 


t 




X 






rafts 












Gen. 


Voc. 


Arts 


Edu. 


General 


Voc. 
















B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


B 


B 


G 


B 


B 


G 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


192 


87 


117 


14 


24 




179 


346 ... 






372 


153 


138 


226 


615 


630 


374 


462 


95 


103 


193 


20 


15 


14 


24 




63 


145 








103 


79 


75 


77 


218 


227 


133 


177 


95 


103 


194 


35 


50 








80 


110 








70 


74 


32 


38 


153 


137 


175 


149 






195 


21 


31 










91 








134 




22 


62 


101 


139 


12 


54 






196 


11 


21 








36 










65 




9 


49 


143 


127 


54 


82 






197 


113 


143 


22 


24 




143 


391 








560 


61 


136 


302 


1,028 


937 


539 


560 


324 


323 


198 


8 


11 








82 


108 








44 


50 


16 


54 


204 


174 


181 


122 


41 


19 


199 


5 


13 










78 








36 


11 


5 


16 


107 


102 


79 


71 


33 


54 


200 


57 


88 










120 








204 




36 


107 


359 


359 


128 


191 


109 


121 


201 


43 


31 


















124 




43 


57 


170 


110 


67 


57 


72 


49 


202 






22 


24 




'ei 


85 








152 




36 


68 


188 


192 


84 


119 


69 


80 


203 


61 


85 






28 


103 


401 








569 




177 


236 


874 


869 


544 


585 


43 


52 


204 


15 


14 










171 








238 




75 


98 


220 


226 


181 


238 






205 


























11 


12 


45 


59 






'22 


"25 


206 


4 


"5 






















26 28 


53 


53 


ii 


is 


10 


9 


207 


21 


30 


'. '. 






69 


i34 








i39 








260 


213 


176 


145 






208 


18 


33 






28 


34 










91 




■35 


'54 


189 


199 


105 


107 






209 


3 


3 


'. 








% 








101 




30 


44 


96 


101 


71 


82 






210 






























11 


18 






ii 


'is 


211 


180 


189 








107 


398 








427 


62 


135 


216 


623 


617 


411 


403 


183 


67 


212 


92 


116 








51 


165 








215 




92 


146 


349 


330 


197 


166 


94 




213 


16 


19 








56 


106 








130 


62 




21 


113 


135 


96 


140 






214 


72 


54 










127 








82 




'43 


49 


161 


152 


118 


97 


89 


'67 


215 


182 


277 


134 


113 


13 


236 


2,779 


56 


246 




2,359 


99 


330 


1,085 


3,486 


2,920 


2,279 


2,333 


1,456 


1,370 


216 


15 


24 








68 


162 








76 


27 


67 


103 


177 


133 


104 


78 


13 


7 


217 


51 


106 


96 


'gi 






412 




i67 




327 




57 


358 


642 


460 


153 


193 


43 


51 


218 


71 


88 


38 


22 




62 


290 


■3 


79 




229 


'37 


40 


361 


446 


395 


156 


213 


110 


68 


219 


12 


21 










75 








83 




68 


99 


200 


162 


110 


120 


82 


70 


220 


15 


17 






13 


46 


140 


■53 








65 


35 


7 


39 


171 


148 


161 


169 






221 


8 


3 








60 


159 










129 




59 


72 


250 


172 


170 


160 






222 


10 


18 










101 










98 




32 


53 


160 


98 


63 


83 






223 














270 










228 








270 


228 


241 


214 


ios 


ii3 


224 














435 










374 








435 


374 


410 


366 


410 


366 


225 










' '. 




392 










426 








392 


426 


392 


426 


392 


426 


226 














298 










269 








298 


269 


274 


256 


298 


269 


227 














45 










55 








45 


55 


45 


55 






228 


109 


116 


48 


46 




120 


938 


1 


33 




888 




276 


487 


1.475 


1,310 


656 


684 


1,037 


1,043 


229 


37 


40 


48 


46 




36 


165 


1 


33 




77 




169 


316 


180 


97 


68 


117 


68 


72 


230 


14 


18 








25 


102 








98 




29 


46 


107 


91 


72 


87 


88 


69 


231 


12 


19 










107 








71 




17 


31 


122 


108 


79 


87 


101 


73 


232 


46 


39 








43 


235 








302 




61 


94 


412 


388 


81 


30 


323 


341 


233 












16 


329 








340 








654 


626 


356 


363 


457 


488 


234 


85 


147 


3 


5 


8 


67 


629 








598 


22 


208 


284 


790 


732 


574 


651 


260 


247 


235 


4 


14 


3 


5 






132 








126 




21 


62 


143 


125 


111 


93 


88 


63 


236 


23 


32 










145 








127 




44 


58 


160 


129 


110 


132 


14 


34 


237 


37 


68 






"s 


'i7 


227 








199 




113; 108 


257 


236 


158 


216 


42 


42 


238 


21 


33 








50 


125 








146 


'22 


30 56 


230 


242 


195 


210 


116 


108 



Gaithersburg Sr.-Jr.— 11; Prince George's: Bladensburg Sr.— 16; Fairmont Heights Sr.-Jr.— 48; Total— 246. 
° Includes the following number taking German: Anne .\ruiidcl: Brooklyn Park Sr.-Jr.— 42 boys— 13 girls; Harford: Aberdeen Sr.-Jr.— 

1 boy; Montgomery; Bethesda-Chevv Chase Sr.— 50 bovs-29 girls; Montgomery Blair Sr.— 28 boys— 23 girls; Walter Johnson 

Sr.— 26 boys— 20 girls; Northwood Sr.— 27 boys— 12 girls; Prince George's: Bladensburg Sr.— 62 boys— 19 girls; High Point Sr.— 

46 boys— 13 girls; Total: 282 boys— 129 girls. 
a Includes the following number taking Russian: Baltimore: Towson Sr.— 25 boys— 39 girls. Total: 64. 



INDEX 



Academic course, each high school, 216-223 
Accreditation and certification, 37-43 
Administration 

Cost per pnpil, 138 

Expendituros, 206 

Per cent for, 1 3!) 

Superintendents, 2, 0-18, 201, 206 
Adult education, 149, 151-153, 209 
Agriculture 

Adult education, 148-149, 151-153 

Enrollment. 102, 109 

Each high school, 224-231 

Federal aid, 147-151 

Schools offering, 103, 224-231 

State supervision, 2 

Teachers, 103 
Aid from State and/or Federal funds 

Counties and Baltimore Citv, distrilnition by 
type of fund, 132-134, 184. 202-203 

State teachers colleges, 174-175, 184-185 

Vocational education, 147-151, 184, 203 

Vocational rehabilitation, 183184, 186 
Appropriations 

County, 133-134, 163, 184, 204 

State, 133-134, 184, 210 
Art, high school 

Enrollment, 102, 110 

Each high school, 224-231 

Schools offering, 103, 224-231 

Teachers, 103 
Assessable basis, 164-166 
Attendance 

Average dailv. 199 

Each high school, 216-223 

Per cent of, 199 

Summer school pupils, Baltimore City, 178 

Teachers at summer school. 117 

Workers (see Pupil persoiuiel) 
Atypical children, 79-86 
Auxiliary agencies (see Other school services) 

B 

Bands, orchestras, glee clubs, 113 
Basic aid per classroom unit, 184, 202 
Belonging, average number, 199 
Each high school, 216-223 
Per teacher, 91 
Birth rates, 87-90 

Board of Education, State, 2, 184. 186 
Boards of Ed\ication, counties, 6-18 
Bonds outstanding, school, 160 
Books and instructional materials 
Cost per pupil 

Elementarv, 140 
High, 141 
Expenditures 

All schools. 207. 213 
Elementary, 214 
High, 215 
Per cent of current expense budget, 135 
Boys and girls 
Enrollment 

Nonpublic, 192-198 
Piiblic, 191 
Graduates, high school, 95-101, 216-223 
Budget(s) 

Baltimore City, county, local, 133-134, J63 
State public scliool, 184 
State teachers colleges, 184-185 
Buildings 

Cost (see Capital outlav) 
Number of, 130-131, 190 
Value of school, per pupil, 159 
Business education 
Adult. 152-153 
Enrollment, 102, 111, 150, 152-153 

Each high school, 224-231 
Schools offering, 103, 224-231 
Teachers, 103 



Capital outlay, school, 133, 135, 158 

By site, building, equipment, 212 
Certificate status, teachers, 128-129 
Certificates held by county teachers, 116, 118, 

120-121, 128-129 
Certification and accreditation, 37-43 
Classes 

Evening schools, 152-153 
Size of, 91 

Special for handicapped, 79-86 
Summer school, Baltimore City, 178 
Clerks, county schools, 200 
Colleges 

High school graduates 

of 1959 entering, 97-101 
of 1960 entering State teachers colleges, 
96, 216-223 
Junior, 170, 172-173 
State teachers, 167-172, 174-175, 184-185, 

188-189 
Training teachers appointed in Maryland, 116 
Commercial (see Business education) 
Consolidation 

Decrease in one-teacher schools, 115 
Transportation of pupils, 144-146 
Construction accounts. State teachers colleges, 

188-189 
Contents, table of, 19 
Core program, high school 
Enrollment, 102 

Each high school, 224-231 
Schools offering, 103, 224-231 
Teachers, 103 
Cost per pupil 

Administration, 138 
Elementary and high, 139-141 
By type of school, 138 
Transported, 144-145 
Costs (see Expenditures) 

County superintendents, directors, supervisors, 6-18 
Courses in individual high schools, 216-223 
Crippled children, services for, 79-83, 85-86 
Current expenses 

Cost per pupil, 137-141 
Expenditures 

All schools, 205 

By source of funds, 133-134 
By type of school, 213-215 



D 



Dates, opening and closing of schools, 70 

Davs in session, 70 

Debt service, 160-161, 163, 211 

Tax rate for, 162 
Disbursements (see Expenditures) 
Distributive education, 148-150 
Driver education and training, high school 

Enrollment, 112 

Schools offering, 103 

Teachers, 103 



E 

Elementary schools, supervision, 201 
Emergency certificates, 118, 120-121 
Employment of high school graduates, 97-98 
English, high school 

Enrollment, 102 

Each high school, 224-231 

Schools offering, 103, 224-231 

Teachers, 103 
Enrollment 

Adult. 152 

Atypical children, 79-86 

Elementary, 70-78, 191-198 

Grade or year, 72, 74-78 



232 



Index 



233 



E — (Continued) 

HJKh school 

Course, each school, 216-223 
Subjects. 102, 104-113 

Each school, 224-231 
Year, 72, 74-78 

Each school, 216-223 
Increase in, 71 
Nonpublic, private and parochial, 70-71, 192- 

198 
Number of different pupils, 71, 191 
Public, 70-73, 75 
State teachers college, 169-172 
Subject, 102, 104-113 

Each school, 224-231 
Summary, 70-71 

Summer schools, Baltimore Citv, 178 
Equalization fund, 134, 202 
Equivalence examinations, 179 
Evening schools and courses 
Enrollment, 152 

Expenditures, 148-149, l.Jl, 209 
Expenditures, 205-215 

(see also Administration, Instruction, Opera- 
tion, Maintenance, Fixed charges. Other school 
services. Payments to adjoining units, Current 
expenses. Debt service. Capital outlay) 
Elementary schools, 214 
Evening schools, 148-149, 151, 209 
Health, 209 
High schools, 215 
Libraries, 207 

Rehabilitation, 183, 186-187 
Salaries 

All schools, 207, 213 
Elementary, 214 
High, 215 
Vocational, 148-151 
State teachers colleges, 174-175, 184-185, 

187, 188-189 
Total, by major classifications. 184, 205 
Transportation, 144-145, 209 
Vocational, Federal, 148-151 



H — (Continued) 

Hospital schools, 79-80, 82 

Institutions for, 80, 86 

Opportunities for education of, 79-86 

Preschool, 85 

Receipts from State for, 80, 85, 1S4, 202 

Transportation of, 80 
Health expenditures, all schools, 209 
Hearing, conservation of, 79, 81. 83-84 
High school equivalence examinations, 179 
High schools 

Disbursements, 215 

Individual, 216-223, 224-231 

Supervision, 201 
Home economics 

Adult, 148-149, 152-153 

Enrollment, 102, 109 

Each high school, 224-231 

Federal aid, 148-149. 151 

Schools offering, 103, 224-231 

Teachers, 103 
Home instruction of pupils, 79-80, 82 
Hospital instruction of pupils, 79-80, 82 



Incorporated towns, levy for, 162 
Industrial arts (see Trades and industries) 
Instruction, division of, 44-54 
Cost per pupil, 139141 
Expenditures, 213-215 

Salaries, supervision, books, etc., 207 
State teachers colleges, 174-175 
Per cent of current expense budget, 135 
Inventories, State teachers colleges, 175 



Janitors, repair, utilitv men, 201 
Junior colleges, 170, 172-173, 201 



Failures (see Nonpromotions) 
Fall enrollment, 70, 72-78 
Federal aid 

Vocational education, 147-151 

Administration and supervision, 148-149 
Salaries of teachers, 148-150 
Fees in State teachers colleges, 174-175, 184-185 
Financial statements 

State public schools, 184, 202-215 

State teachers colleges, 184-185, 187, 188-189 
First grade nonpromotions, 94 
Fixed charges, 135, 210 
French, high school 

Enrollment, 102, 108 

Each high school, 224 231 

Schools offering, 103, 224-231 

Teachers, 103 



German (see French) 

Glee clubs, bands, orchestras, 113 

Grade enrollment, 72, 74-78 

Graduates 

High school, 95-101 

Entering State teachers colleges, 96, 98, 

100 
From each school. 216-223 
Occupations of, 97-98 
State teachers college, 167-168 
Guidance, teachers of, 103 

H 

Handicapped children 

Expenditures, 80, 85, 184 
Home instruction, 79-80, 82 



Kindergartens, 72, 74-78 
Nonpublic, 192-198 



Languages (see English, French, etc.) 

Latin (see French) 

Legislation, 21-22 

Length of school session. 70 

Letter of transmittal, 20 

Levies, county, 163 

Librarians, county, 5 

Libraries 

Expenditures. 180-lSl. 184 

Public, 5, 180, 184 

School, 181, 207 
Library extension, 55-60, 186 
Lip reading classes, 84 
Loans to students, college, 187 
Lunch program, school, 154-157, 203, 209 

M 

Maintenance 

Cost per pupil, 1391 41 

Expenditures, 208, 213-215 

Per cent of current expense budget, 135 
Materials of instruction (see Books and instruc- 
tional materials) 
Mathematics, high school 

Enrollment, 102, 107 

Each high school. 224-231 

Schools offering, 103, 224-231 

Teachers, 103 
Medical examinations, bus drivers, 202 
Men teachers, 114, 200 
Mentally handicapped children, 79-S3, 85-86 



234 



Index 



M — (Continued) 

Milk program, special, 155, 203, 209 
Minimum program. State, 132 
Minutes, State Board, 23-36 
Music high school 

Enrollment, 102, 110 

Each high school, 224-231 

Orchestras, bands, glee clubs, 113 

Schools offering, 103, 224-231 

Teachers, 103 



N 



National Defense Education Act, 147, 203 
Night schools (see Evening schools. Adult educa- 
tion) 
Nonpromotions 

Elementary, 93-94 

First grade, 94 

High school, 92 
Number belonging, 199 

Each high school, 216-223 

Per teacher, 91 
Numljer of different pupils, 71, 191 
Numl>er of schools 

For atypical children, 86 

Having one teacher, 115, 190 

Nonpublic, 70, 192-198 

Public. 70, 190 

Elementary, 115, 130-131, 190 
High, 130-131, 190 



o 



P — (Continued) 

Pupils 

Atypical, 79-86 

Nonpublic, 70-71, 76-78, 192-198 

One-teacher schools, 115 

Per teacher, 91 

Public school 

Enrollment, 70-73, 75, 191 
Number attending, 199 
Nimiber belonging, 199 
Per cent of attendance, 199 

Transported, 144-145 



R 

Receipts from 

All sources, 204 
Federal government, 203 
Evening schools, 151 
Teachers' salaries, 147-151 
Vocational education, 147-151 
State, 202 

Distributed by tvpe of fund. 133-134. 

184, 202 
Evening schools, 151 
Total and per cent, 133-134 
Teachers colleges, 174-175, 184-185 
Rehabilitation, vocational, 3-5, 66-69, 182-183, 

184, 186 
Repair, utility men, janitors, 201 
Resignations, teachers, 122-123 
Retarded children, programs for, 79-86 
Retirement system for teachers, 5, 176, 184 
Russian (see French) 



Occupations of high school graduates, 97-98 
One-teacher schools 

Decrease in, 115 

Number belonging in, 115 

Number of, 115, 190 
Operation 

Cost per pupil, 139-141 

Expenditures, 208, 213-215 

Per cent of current expense budget, 135 
Orchestras, bands, glee clubs, 113 
Other school services 

Cost per pupil, 139-141 

Expenditures, 209, 213-215 

Per cent of current expense budget, 135 



Parent-teacher associations, 177 

Parochial and private schools, 70-71, 76-78, 192- 

198 
Part-payment of salaries, 202 
Payments to adjoining units, 210 
Pensions (see Retirement system for teachers) 
Physical education and health, 209 
Physical education and recreation, high school 

Appropriations for, 184 

Enrollment, 102, 110 

Each high school, 224-231 

Schools offering, 103, 224-231 

Teachers, 103 
Physical examinations (see Medical examinations) 
Physically handicapped children, 79-86 
Preparation, teachers, 116, 119 
Preschool handicapped, 85 
Presidents of State teachers colleges, 6 
Professional and clerical staffs, county, 201 
Private and parochial schools, 70-71, 76-78, 192- 

198 
Property, valuation of 

Counties and Baltimore Citv, 104-165 

School, 159 
Psychology (see Social studios) 
Pupil personnel, 6-18 

Supervisors of, 201 
Salaries, 209 



Salaries 

Per cent of school budget, 135 
Superintendents', 206 
Supervisors', 207 

Pupil personnel, 209 
Teachers' 

Average per teacher, 142-143 
Cost per pupil for, 139-141 
Total 

Elementary, 214 
High, 215 
Vocational, 147-151 
School lunch program, 154-157, 203, 209 
Schools 

For atypical children, 86 
Number of, 70-71, 115, 130-131, 190, 192- 
198 
Science, high school 

Enrollment, 102, 106 

Each high school. 224-231 
Schools offering, 103, 224-231 
Teachers, 103 
Session, length of, 70 
Sex of teachers, 114, 200 
Size of 

Classes, 91 
Schools 

Each high scliool, 216-223 
Elementarv, 115, 130-131 
High, 130-131 
Teaching staff, 70-71. 115, 200 
Social studies, high school 
Enrollment, 102, 105 

Each high school, 224-231 
Schools offering, 103, 224-231 
Teachers, 103 
Spanish (see French) 
Special classes for handicapped, 79-86 
Special high school teachers, 103 
Special milk program, 155, 203, 209 
State 

Aid to schools, 133-134 

Minimum program, 132 

Showing various funds, 184, 202 



Index 



235 



S — ( Continued ) 

Board of Education, 2 

Excerpts from minutes of, 23-36 

Department of Education, 2-5, 184, 186 

Public school budget, 184-186 

Teachers colleges, 6, 96, 98, 100, 167-172, 
174-175, 184-185, 187, 188-189, 216-223 

Teachers' retirement system, 176, 184 
Stenography, typing, bookkeeping (see Business 

education) 
Subjects studied in high schools, 102-113 

Each high school, 224-231 
Summer school attendance 

County teachers, 117 

Pupils, Baltimore Citv, 178 
Superintendents. 2, 6-18, 201 
Supervisors, supervision 

Cost per pupil, 139-141 

Cost, salaries, expenses. 2(i7 

By type of school, 213-215 

Names of, 2-5. 6-18 

Number of. 201 

Per cent of current expense budget, 135 

Salaries of, 207, 213-215 

State, 2-5 



T — (Continued) 

Sex of, 114, 200 

Special subjects, high school. 103 

Summary, elementary and high, public and 
nonpublic, 70-71 

Summer school attendance, 117 

Training institutions, 167-172, 174-175, 184- 
185, 187, 188-189 

Turnover of. 122-127 
Teachers' retirement system 

Financial statements. 176, 184 

Staff. 5 

Teachers' contributions to, 176 
Trades and industries (Industrial arts) 

Adult. 148-149. 151-153 

Enrollment. 102. 109, 150 

Each high school, 224-231 

Federal aid. 147-151 

Schools offering. 103. 224-231 

Teachers, 103 
Training centers. State teachers colleges, 169-171 
Transmittal, letter of, 20 
Transportation of pupils 

Cost, total and per pujiil. 144-145, 209 

Per cent transported. 144-145 

Handicapped, 80 
Turnover in teaching staff, 122-127 



Tal)le of contents, 19 

Taxalde basis, 164-166 

Tax dollar, distribution of school, 135 

Tax rates, county, 162 

Teacher (s) 

Academic, high school, 103 
Average salary, 142-143 
Certificate status, 128-129 
Certification, 37-43. 116, 118, 120-121 
Colleges, 6, 96, 98, 100, 167-172, 174-175, 

184-185, 187, 188-189, 216-223 
Number of, 200 

For each high school subject, 103 
In each high school, 216-223 
In schools of each type 
Atypical, 86 

Nonpublic, 70-71, 192-198 
Public, 70-71, 200 
Summer schools, Baltimore Citv, 178 
Of atvpioal children, 81, 84, 86 
Preparation, 116, 118 
Pupils per, 91 
Resignations, 122-123 
Salaries, average, 142-143 



Value of 

Assessable property, 164-166 
School property, 159 
Vocational education 
Division of. 61-65 
Enrollment 

Day schools. 102. 109. 150, 224-231 
Evening schtwls, 151-153 
Federal aid, 147-150, 184, 203 
A'ocational rehabilitation, 3-5, 66-69, 182-183, 
184, 186 

w 

Wealth back of cacli pupil belonging, 166 
Withdrawals 

Pupils, 90 

Teachers. 122-123 



Year, length of school, 70 



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