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Maryla 



Coiicjre ruxki, ivid. 



DC m CIRCIJL^TE 



STATE OF MARYLAND - 

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



NINETY-FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT 



Of The 



/WAv'j/rva^^ State Board of Education . 



SHOWING CONDITION 



Of The 



Public Schools of Maryland 



For The 



Year Ending June 30, 1961 




BALTIMORE, MARYLAND 






MARYLAND DIRECTORY 
SCHOOL OFFICLVLS 



^ "^^ MARYLAND STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION 

yame Address Term Expires 

Jerome Framptom, Jr., President Federalsburg 1964 

George 0. Rhoderick, Jr., Vice-president Middletown 1961 

Mrs. Kenneth S. Cole Chevy Chase 1962 

Mrs. J. Wilmer Cronin Aberdeen 1966 

Dwight 0. W. Holmes Baltimore 1965 

Richard Schifter Bethesda 1963 

William L. Wilson Cumberland 1967 

Thomas G. Pullen, Jr., Secretary-Treasurer 

MARYLAND STATE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 

STATE OFFICE BUILDING 
301 West Preston Street, Baltimore 1 

Name Office 

Thomas G. Pullen, Jr State Superintendent of Schools 

David W. Zimmerman Assistant State Superintendent 

William S. Sartorius Assistant State Superintendent in Administration, Finance, and Research 

W. Theodore Boston Director of Certification and Accreditation 

Nettie B. Taylor Director of Library Extension 

Herschel M. James Director of Vocational Education 

Robert C Thompson Director of Vocational Rehabilitation 

Willis H. White Director of Instruction 

E. Drusilla Chairs Administrative Assistant II 

Dorothy E. Young Stenographer-Secretary 

Mrs. Anne M. Rvland Senior Stenographer 

Walter Blackwell ChafTeur I 

Division of Instruction — WiLLls H. WHITE, Director 

Paul E. Huffingrton Assistant Director and Supervisor of High Schools 

*Mrs. Genevieve S. Blew Supervisor of Instruction 

George M. Crawford Supervisor of Curriculum 

Mrs. Gladys T. Hopkins Supervisor of Curriculum 

Mrs. Grace A. Dorsey Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Mildred L. Sowers Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Herbert R. Steiner Supervisor of Phj-sical Education 

Sarah L. Leiter Supervisor of Pupil Services 

Mrs. Geneva E. Flickinger Supervisor of Adult Education 

.Andrew W. Mason Supervisor of Special Education 

Mrs. Rozelle J. Miller Supervisor of Special Education 

Thomas W. PyleB-_ Supervisor of High Schools 

l.pwin A. Wheat Supervisor of High Schools 

Beverly J. Sheain Stenographer-Secretary 

Mrs. Beverly B. Armiger Senior Stenographer 

Mildred M. Faulstich Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Esther R. Furman Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Janet L. Harrison Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Rosalind C. Lohrfinck Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Rena B. Levitz Senior Stenographer 

Agnes M. Roberts Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Oma R. McClung Senior T3T)ist 

Division of Vocational Education — HersCHEL M. James, Director 

Harry M. McDonald Supervisor of Agriculture 

Dwight P. Jacobus Supervisor of Educational Services to Industry 

Evelj-n F. Miller^_ _. Supervisor of Home Economics 

*Mrs. Anormallee M. Way State Adviser for High School Homemakers Club 

Frank H. Nachman Counselor for Veterans On-theJob Training Program 

Elizabeth McGinnity Stenographer-Secretary 

Lillian O. Erpenstein Senior Stenographer 

Sandra R. Bush Senior Stenographer 

Florence M. Brady Junior Clerk 

Division of Certification and Accreditation — W. THEODORE BOSTON, Director 

James L. Reid Assistant Director and Supervisor of School Plant Planning 

AI. Eleanor Rice Supenisor of Certification 

Helen L. Widmyer , __ Supervisor of Accreditation 

Harold D. Rppse _ Supervisor of Teacher and Higher Education 

' Part time 

2 



Eleanor G. Weagly Supervisor of School Lunch Program 

C. AV'illiain Antliony Supervisor of Teacher Recruitment 

Ruth E. Hobbs Assistant Supervisor of Equivalence Examinations 

George A. Myers Assistant Supervisor of School Lunch Program 

Charles O. Conlon Assistant Supervisor of Trade Schools 

Richard K. McKay Assistant Supervisor of Trade Schools 

Carroll L. Speck Assistant Supervisor of Certification 

Helen Ellis Stenographer-Secretary 

Elsie F. Forman Stenographer-Secretary 

Alice Algie Senior Stenographor 

Mrs. Bessie R. Gale Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Miriam Rieger. Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Evelvn R. McClurkin Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Bessie S. Price Senior Stenographer 

Bessie L Rones Senior Stenographer 

Helen D. Wvsocki Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Gertrude A. Gorrell Senior Clerk 

Mrs. Verlena Miller Senior Clerk 

Leah O. Dittmar Senior Clerk 

Mrs. Hanna Zusman Senior Clerk 

Helen T>. Trumbauer Senior Clerk 

Division of Library Extension — NETTIE B. TAYLOR, Director 

>fae Graham Supervisor of Public School Libraries 

Doris L. Anderson Stenographer-Secretarj- 

Martha J. Keydash Senior Stenographer 

STATE CURRICULUM CENTER 

400 Cathedral Street, Baltimore 1 

Eleanor Hocker Counselor 

M. E. Naomi Johnson Associate Librarian 

Mrs. Margaret J. Smith Library Assistant 

Louis Myers Service Worker 

Division of Administration, Finance, and Research 

William S. S.a.rtorius, Assistant State Superintendent 

William L. Barall Supervisor of Finance 

Wesley N. Dorn Supervisor of Instruction (Research) 

R. Christine Hogan Supervisor of Research 

Howard E. Bosley Supervisor of Teachers College Business Management 

Morris W, Rannels Supervisor of Transportation 

Charles V. Akeley Assistant Supervisor of Finance 

Bernard G. Geyfer Assistant Supervisor of Finance 

Mrs. Anne K. Carroll Assistant Supervisor of Research 

Helen D. George Editor 

.Jesse C. Gawthrop -- Auditor 

Margaret E. Albaugh Administrative Assistant I 

Mrs. Genevieve J. Nekervis Statistician I 

Mrs. Virginia K. Goldsmith Statistician II 

Mrs. Verda McClow Statistician II 

Mrs. Marv E. Hoover Principal Account Clerk I 

Margaret" F. Flahavan Principal Account Clerk II 

Mrs. Laura Gaither Principal Account Clerk II 

Mrs. Mary B. Prince Principal Account Clerk II 

Phyllis E. Rodgers Principal Account Clerk II 

Mrs Dorothy M. Norris Principal Account Clerk II 

Mrs. Ruth S. Friedland Stenographer-Secretary 

Carrye Hamburger Stenographer-Secretary 

Lenore Klein Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Dolores B. Jones Report Typist 

Mrs. Susan T. Brownfield Statistical Clerk 

Mrs. Clara P. Haffner Senior Tj-pist 

Mrs. Ellen C. Gordon - Senior Typist 

Mrs. Ruth V. Meyer Tabulating Equipment Operator 

Mrs. JoAnn Calvert Key Punch Operator 

Lloyd E. Holmes Office Appliance Operator 

Division of Vocational Rehabilitation — ROBERT C. THOMPSON, Director 

W. Bird Terwilliger Assistant Director 

Lionel Burgess Supervisor of Case Seriioes 

**George W. Keller Asst. Supvr. of Services for the Blind 

'Francis J. Borges Medical Consultant 



Part time 

Address: 2 West Redwood Street, Baltimore 



Kaine OSice 

Charlotte A. Sylvester Stenographer-Secretary 

MrB. Florence B. Ackerman Principal Stenographer 

Anne Nusinov Principal Stenographer 

METROPOLITAN BALTIMORE OFFICE 

2 West Redwood Street, Baltimore 1 

Thomas D. Braun Supervisor 

J. Leo Delaney Assistant Supervisor 

Ernest O. Allnutt, Jr Counselor 

Myrtle E. Chell Counselor 

Mrs. Elizabeth B. Cochran Counselor 

James G. Dashiell Counselor 

J. Bruce Edemy Counselor 

Mrs. Sue H. Flowers Counselor 

Martha R. Harrison Counselor 

Harold B. Hayes Counselor 

William W. Lamprell Counselor 

I. D Medinger Counselor 

William B. Melville Counselor 

Charles L. Reis Counselor 

Ruth W. Ring Counselor 

Morris L. Scheir Counselor 

James D. Smyth Counselor 

M. Eugene Spurrier Counselor 

Lawrence E. Williams Counselor 

Emma Lueckert Stenographer-Secretary 

Mary E. Farnandis Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Mabel Dwyer ■- Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Mary J. Rvman Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Frances S. "Goodwin .^Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Louise T. Gregg Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Nancy H. Maslanka -.-Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Vivien L. Sener Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Eleanor M. Mosner Senior Stenographer 

Bell Sklar Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Olive M. Mayo Receptionist 

EASTERN SHORE DISTRICT 

700 East Main Street, Salisbury 

Raymond H. Simmons Assistant Supervisor in Charge 

Jack R. Nichols Counselor 

1 — Joseph E. Guschke Counselor 

2 — Frank A. Tarbutton Counselor 

1 — Mrs. Ruth K. Lunsford (half-time) Senior Stenographer 

2 — Mrs. Dorthy H. Slagle (half-time) Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Anne E. Bishop Senior Stenographer 

1 — P.O. Box 576, Easton Health Center, Centreville Road, Easton 

2 — Board of Education, Chestertown 

SOUTHERN MARYLAND DISTRICT 

4313 Hamilton Street, Hyattsville 

Merl D. Myers Assistant Supervisor in Charge 

Leslie B. Cole Counselor 

1 — Fedon G. Nides Counselor 

2 — Stanley I. Scher Counselor 

3 — Carroll Walsh Counselor 

3 — F. dePaul Whitehurst Counselor 

1 — Mrs. Jeannette D. Dart (half-time) Senior Stenographer 

2 — Mrs. Frances L. Winkler (half-time) Senior Stenc^rapher 

3 — Mrs. Joan B. C. Clark Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Elizabeth Cruz Senior Stenographer 

1 — Speer Building, 3 Church Circle, Annapolis 

2 — Board of Education, La Plata 

3 — 26 South Perry Street, Rockville 

WESTERN MARYLAND DISTRICT 

74 West Washington Street, Hagerstown 

H. Dorsey Devlin Assistant Supervisor in Charge 

Bernard F. Kelly Counselor 

Edward J. Shuck Counselor 

1 — John M. Cobun Counselor 

2— Stanley Hamilton, Jr Counselor 

3— William C. Hill Counselor 

4 



\aine Office 

WESTERN MARYLAND (Cont'd) 

1- -Mrs. Betty J. Loveiislein (half-time) Senior Stenographer 

2 — Mrs. Eleanor B. Gorsuch (half-time) Senior Stenographer 

3 — Mrs. Elizabeth K. Baker (half-time) Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Alfreda E. Coffman Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Annie G. McCarty Senior Stenographer 

1 — 111 Union Street, Cumberland 

2 — P.O. Box 121, Room 12, City Hall, Westminster 

3—115 East Church Street, Frederick 

DISABILITY DETERMINATIONS PROGRAM 

(Old Age and Survivors' Insurance) 

10 East Fayette Street, Baltimore 2 

Robert L. Burton Assistant Superivisor in Cliarge 

David Forsyth Junior Counselor 

Arthur W. Rees Junior Coimselor 

Minnie Gerber Junior Counselor 

Kathleen E. Scheve Junior Counselor 

*Hilary O'Herlihy, M.D Medical Consultant 

* Mahniud Thanier, M.D Medical Consultant 

*S. J. Venable, M.D Medical Consultant 

Mrs. Octavia D. Hastings Senior Stenographer 

Klizabrtli De Polo Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Julia A. Fanning Senior Ste'iogmphev 

Betty L. Block Senior Typist 

MARYLAND TEACHERS' RETIREMENT SYSTEM 

Board of Trustees and Office Staff 

STATE OFFICE BUILDING 

301 West Preeton Street, Baltimore I 

Hooper S. Miles, Chairman State Treasurer 

Thomas G. Pullen, Jr., Vice-chairman State Superintendent of Schools 

Mrs. Mary S. Ellis Principal, North Salisbury Elementary School, Wicomico County 

Louis L. Goldstein State Comptroller 

Willis H. White Director, Division of Instruction, State Department of Education 

John P. Mannion Director 

C. G. Cristis Accountant 

Edgar T. Pfaff Administrative Assistant 11 

Mrs. Ruth F. Connell Principal Account Clerk II 

Mrs. Mildred Scott Senior Account Clerk 

Mrs. Edna Doyle Accounting Machine Operator 

Mrs. Emolia Kufer .\ccountinff Machine Operator 

Eva Shagogue Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Anna M. Novak Senior Typist 

Mrs. Anne Trhlik Senior Clerk 

PUBLIC LIBRARIES IN MARYLAND 

County Library Librarian 

Allegany Allegany County Library Mary G. Walsh 

.\nne Anindel Annapolis and Anne Arundel County Library, 

Annapolis Esther King 

Baltimore City Enoch Pratt Free Library Edwin Castagnji, Director 

Baltimore Baltimore County Library, Towson Richard Minnicli 

Calvert Calvert County Library Edward Ilall 

Caroline Denton Public Library 

Federalsburg Community Library Mrs. William T. Mcssick 

Ridgely Community Library Mrs. Paul Hoffman 

Carroll Carroll County Public Library, Westminster Margaret J. Hoefer 

Cecil Cecil County Library, Elkton Mrs. Dorothy W. Jefferson 

Charles Charles County Library, La Plata Edward Hall 

Dorchester Dorchester County Public Library, Cambridge Mrs. Margaret Henry 

Hurlock Free Public Library Mrs. Floyd N. Harper 

Vienna Public Library Mrs. Alan Webb 

Frederick C. Burr Artz Library, Frederick Josephine Etchison 

Emmitsburg Public Library Louise Sebold 

Thurmont Public Library Mrs. Ernest Hammaker 

Garrett Ruth Enlow Library of Garrett County, Oakland.- Edith Brock 

Harford Harford Coimty Library, Bel Air Roenna Fahmey 

Howard Howard County Library, Ellicott City Mrs. Lenna Burgess 

Kent Chestertown Public Library Cornelia Davis 

• Part time 



Count]/ Library Librarian 

Montgomery Muntgomery County Department of Public 

Libraries, Gaithersburg George B. MorelanJ 

Takoma Park Public Library Mrs. Ruth B. Pratt 

Prince George's Prince George's County Memorial Library, 

Hyattsville Elizabeth B. Hage 

Queen Anne's Queen Anne's County Library, Centreville Mrs. Mary M. Hoopes 

St. Mary's St. Mary's County Memorial Library, Leonardtown_ Edward Hall 

Somerset Corbin Memorial Library, Crisfield Mrs. Gladys Daugherty 

Princess Anne Public Library . 

Talbot Talbot County Free Library, Easton Mrs. Elizabeth H. Baker 

Washington Washington County Free Library, Hagerstown Roy Provins 

Wicomico Wicomico County Free Library, Salisbury Mrs. Fred Horsley. Jr. 

Worcester Worchester County Library Mrs. Dorothy G. Moore 

PRESIDENTS OF STATE TEACHERS COLLEGES 

Rarle T. Hawkins Towson William E. Henry Bowie 

R. Bowen Hardesty Frostburg Parlett L. Moore Coppin, Baltimore-17 

Wilbur Devilbiss Salisbury 

ADMINISTRATIVE AND SUPERVISORY STAFF 

ALLEGANY COUNTY 
108 Washington Street, Cumberland 

Name Office 

Ralph R. Webster Superintendent of Schools 

Richard T. Rizer Assistant Superintendent and Supervisor of High Schools 

.lack A. Retry Supervisor of High Schools 

Robert E. Pence Supervisor of Physical Education 

.\rthur G. Ramey Supervisor of Transportation 

Margaret E. Doak Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mildred E. Willlson Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Elizabeth I. Flake Supervisor of Elementary Education 

LaVern J. Hahn Supervisor of Music Education 

Julius D. Lonnholm Supervisor of Vocational, Industrial, and Adult Education 

Theodore P. Foote Supervisor of Art Education 

Ruth C. McColly Supervisor of Home Economics 

Joseph T. Downey Supervisor of Maintenance 

Gladys Miller Eaton Supervisor of Cafeterias 

Homer S. Higgins Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Esther M. Carter Visiting Teacher 

Glenn U. Hanna Visiting Teacher 

Eugene J. Hopkins Visiting Teacher 

Elizabeth Dixon Pitcher Financial Secretary and Office Manager 

Helen B. Dickerhoff Secretary to the Superintendent 

ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY 

Green Street, Annapolis 

David S. Jenkins Superintendent of Schools 

Fred L. Alexander Administrative Assistant 

Mrs. Alice Torovsky Secretary to the Superintendent 

R. Harold McCann Assistant Superintendent — Administration 

Frank C. Gunderloy -Director of Construction 

Ernest H. Herklotz Supervisor of Purchasing 

Mrs. Madolyn R. Leonard Supervisor of Cafeterias 

Dennis W. Turner Supervisor of Maintenance 

Frank G. Baker, Jr Super\-isor of Transportation 

Larry Bonari Assistant Supervisor of Transportation 

Leonard Johnson Supervisor of Custodial Services 

Henry G. Weaver Assistant Supervisor of Custodial Services 

Mrs. Mary Franke Assistant in Finance 

Ruth V. Dudderar Assistant Superintendent — Elementary Schools 

Richard R. Clopper Director of Senior High Schools 

Robert S. Shaffner Director of Junior High Schools 

Mrs. Eva M. Pumphrey Director of Curriculum 

Leviah Daniel Supervisor of Instruction — Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Winifred B. Fowler Supervisor of Instruction — Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Sarah V. Jones Supervisor of Instruction — Elementary Schools 

Carl Mauro Supervisor of Instruction — Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Virginia D. Moore Supervisor of Instruction — Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Ruby G. Myers Supervisor of Instruction — Elementary Schools 

B\'erett Pettigrew Supervisor of Instruction — Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Evelyn P. Reed Supervisor of Instruction — Elementary Schools 

H. Elizabeth Slater Supervisor of Instruction — Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Elizabeth B. Carroll Supervisor of Instruction — Secondary Schools 

Wayne M. Cornwell Supervisor of Instruction — Secondary Schools 

6 



Name ^ffl"" 

ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY (Cont'd) 

Janif^s W. Dunao'an Supervisor of Instruction — Secondary Schooli" 

Annabelle' E. Ferguson Supervisor of InstriiPtion — Sccondarv Schools 

Mrs Katherine K. Frantum Supervisor of Instruction — Secondary Schools 

Katharine Kibler 1 Supervisor of Instruction — Secondary Schools 

Douglas S. King-I_I Supervisor of Instruction — Secondary Schools 

Edvyard Konick" Supervisor of Instruction — Secondary Schools 

Betty J. Mitchell II Supervisor of Instruction — Secondary Schools 

Dorothy Noble I Supervisor of Instruction — Secondary Schools 

Roland Olson _Z Supervisor of Instruction — Secondary Schools 

Joshua M. Potter I Supervisor of Instruction — Secondary Schools 

Mrs. Glorious Shenton Supervisor of Instruction — Secondary Schools 

Doris Clements Supervisor of Home Economics 

Uichard D. Carlson^I I I Supervisor of Industrial Arts 

Margaret A. Adams .^"P'^T'Tr.*'] ^Y^^'^ 

William J Callaghan Supervisor of Physical Education 

Mary E. Wellham Supervisor of Art 

Grady L Ballard Director of Personnel and Research 

Mrs. Ellen T. Elliott Assistant in Personnel 

Mrs. Eleanor B. Waring Director of Special Services for Children 

Mary E. Moss Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Mrs. Riith P. Eason Supervisor of Special Education 

Geoi-'^e E Klinkhamer Supervisor of Special Education 

Marn^e L. Groff School Psychologist 

John Malcolm School Psychologist 

lay Orr Visiting Teacher 

Esther Hamilton I Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Mary C. Brown Visiting Teacher 

Alice Gilbert Visiting Teacher 

Jack Hogsten , Yl^'M'^S Teacher 

B. Lewis Landton Visiting Teacher 

Joseph Parlett Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Annie Witheridge Visiting Teacher 



BALTIMORE CITY 
3 East Twcnly.fifth Street, Baltiinoit- 18 

George B Brain Superintendent of Schools 

Edwin Stein Deputy Superintendent 

Mary A. Adams Assistant Superintendent, Elementary Education 

Houston R. Jackson Assistant Superintendent, Staff Services 

William E. Lehr Assistant Superintendent, School Facilities 

John W. Lewis Assistant Superintendent, Business Management 

Vernon S. Vavrina Assistant Superintendent, Secondary, Vocational, Adult Education 

Roberto! Lloyd Administrative Assistant, General Administratior. 

Edward H. Cioldstein Special Assistant, General Administration 

Richard L. Micherdzinski Director of Art Education 

Robert H. Nicholson Director of Cafeterias 

(Jeorge F. Smith Director of Equipment and Supplies 

Edith V. Walker Director of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Pearl Goetz Area Director of Elementary Education 

Helen Hermon Area Director of Eleinentarv Education 

Mrs. Marion C. Johnson Area Director of Elementary Education 

Mrs. E. Romaine Jones Area Director of Elementary Education 

Eleanor R. Shank Area Director of Elementary Education 

Elmon L. Vernier Director of Health and Phys'cal Education 

M. Bernice Wiese Director of Library Services 

Emile H. Serposs Director of Music Education 

Walter A. Maccubbin Director of Personnel 

Angela M. Broening Director of Bureau of Publications 

Albert 0. Packard Director of Educational Testing Service 

Leona C. Buchwald Director of Guidance and Placement Service 

Arthur Lichtenstein Director of Special Services for Pupils 

Orlando F. Furno Director of Research 

William J. Hucksoll Director of Vocational Education 

Wllmer V. Bell Director of Adult Education 

Harrie M. Selznick Director of Special Educaton 

Charles Golab Director of School Buildings and Grounds 

Alexina C. Stidham Administrative Assistant, Secondary, Vocational, Adult Education 

Lavinia W. Keagle Special Assistant, Special Education 

L. Merle Smuck Supervisor of Audio-Visual Education 

Mrs Eloise Payne Supervisor of Cafeterias 

Elizabeth C. Bonthron Supervisor of Cafeterias 

John E. Wall Supervisor of Cafeteria Facilities 

H. Spilman Burns Supervisor of Procurement of Supplies and Equipment 

Dwight S. Caskey Supervisor of Educational Equipment 

Irvin R. Brose Supervisor of Educational Supplies 

O. Eugene Albright Supervisor of School Accounting 

Mrs. LaVerna W. Reed Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Rebecca E. Carroll Supervisor of Elementary ICducation 

7 



Name Office 

BALTIMORE CITY (Cont'd) 

Mrs. Lillian H. Daiilley Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. A. Katherine Gross _-_.__ Supervisor of Elementary Efiucation 

Charlotte M. Hurtt Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Carolyn E. Motschiedler Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Catherine Brunner Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Marie B. Schmuck Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Lily VV. Stevenson Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Margaret Freudenberger _ _ Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Anna M. Williams Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Edith E. Hale _. Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Doris Hammond . ^ _ ..Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Maria Hammond Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Jeannette Lewis Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Lydia L. Atkins Suijcrvisor of Elomentary Education 

Helen A. Nitkoski . _ Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Lucille Williams Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Margery Prout Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Calvin Carrington Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Edith Corcoran Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Katherine Buckley ^ Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Mary Bulcken .. Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Jennette Caplan Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Ethel Cox Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Florence D. Bailey Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Lenore Dickman Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs Ethel Hooker Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Evelyn Josephson _ Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Evelyn Karas ..Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Ada Johnson Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Edna Maciekowich __ Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Alma McMahon Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Gwendolyn Seaborne Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mary Mete Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Elaine Nolan . Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Idelle Riefle __ Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Anne Royer Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Edna Russell Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mi-s. Sara Teiger Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Vera Carrington Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Jean Eifert Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Vashti Jude Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Louise Tilden Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Anna Cella Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Dorothy Diehl Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Mary Veloso- Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs Madessa H. Wallace __ Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Lillian B. Reid Supervisor of Art, Elementary Education 

ifrs. Pauline D. Smith Supervisor of Ait, Elementary Education 

George F. Horn _ Supervisor of Art, Secondary Education 

Mrs. Virginia G. Timjnons Supervisor of Art, Secondary Education 

Mrs. Elizabeth W'alton Supervisoi- of Art, Elementary Education 

Andrew T. Norgan Supervisor of Secondary Physical Education 

Mary Elizabeth McCoy Supervisor of Secondary Physical Education 

Ruth O. Cinsky Supervisor of Elementary Physical Education 

R. EveljTi Douglass Supervisor of Elementary Physical Education 

Dorothy V. Horine Supervisor of Elementary Physical Education 

Eloise Thomas Supervisor of Elementary Physical Education 

Leo C. Woods __ Supervisor of Elementary Physical Education 

Corwin H. Taylor Supervisor of Instrumental Music Education 

Don Regier _ Supervisor of Secondary School Vocal Music 

Mrs. Alice Rusk Supervisor of Library Services 

Lillie G. Patterson Supervisor of Library Services 

Olive Mumford Supervisor of Library Services 

Mrs. Margaret A. Binns Supervisor of Elementary Music Education 

Abia F. Jackson Supervisor of Elementary Music Education 

Constance Pawelek Supervisor of Elementary Music Education 

Mrs. Eleanor M. Downs Supervisor of Elementary Music Education 

Delia V. Weber Supervisor of Elementary Music Education 

Mrs. Alice S. Beer . Supervisor of Elementary Music Education 

Mrs. Hildreth S. Lambert Supervisor of Guidance and Placement Service 

Herbert Stern Supervisor of Guidance and Placement Service 

Anna M. Schone Supervisor of Guidance and Placement Service 

William C. McClean Supervisor of Personnel 

Elizabeth Armstrong Supervisor of School Social Workers 

Paul Yaffe Supervisor of Psychological Services 

Clara E. Grether Supervisor of Research 

Herschel H. Newlin Administrative Supervisor of School Facilities 

Dorothy M. Kell Supervisor of English, Secondary Schools 

Leonard Woolf Supervisor of English, Secondary Schools 

Mrs. Josie G. Smith Supervisor of English, Secondary Schools 

8 



Name Office 

BALTIMORE CITY (Cont'd) 

L. Earl Wellemeyer — ._ Supervisor of Eiitflisli, Spcoiidary Schools 

Otto K. Schmied Supervisor of Foreign Lanf^uages, Secondary Schools 

Thomas D. Troy Supervisor of Foreign Languages, Secondary Schools 

Edward Biller, Jr. Supervisor of Geography, Secondary Schools 

Zelda B. Brenner Supervisor of History, Secondary Schools 

Franli Fairbank _. Supervisor of History, Secondary Schools 

Mrs. Edythe D. Myers Supervisor of History, Secondary Schools 

Eunice Bowers Supervisor of Mathematics, Secondary Schools 

William J. Gerardi .. . Supervisor of Mathematics, Secondary Schools 

S. Leroy Taylor _. _ Supervisor of Mathematics, Secondary Schools 

Elra M. Palmer Supervisor of Science, Secondary Schools 

-Mrs. Dorothy H. Fader Supervisor of Science, Secondary Schools 

.Sidney Blum ,_ Supervisor of Science, Secondarj- Schools 

Robert Bu.xbaum __ Supervisor of Science, Secondary School 

.James Francey Supervisor of Vocational-Industrial Education 

.lames O. Proctor Supervisor of Vocational Education for Adults 

K. Duncan Hyde _ Supervisor of Business Education 

Forest L. Lawton Supervisor of Distributive Education 

Nellie S. Buckej' Supervisor of Home Economics 

Mrs. Suella Harrington Supervisor of Home Economics 

Stanley J. Pawelek Supervisor of Industrial Arts 

Mrs. Koma Stinchcomb Supervisor of Special Education in Secondary Schools 

G. Edward Griefzu Supervisor of A'^ocational-Industrial Education 

Carl J. White .-_ Supervisor of Industrial Arts 

Mrs. Katharine Whiteside-Taylor Supervisor of Parent Education 

William McK. Rawlings Supervisor of General Adult Education 

.Mrs. Lois T. Murray Supervisor of Special Education in Elementary Schools 

Louise Young _ Supervisor of Special Education 

.Mrs. Lillian Maith Supervisor of Special Education 

Mrs. Elsie Bevans Supervisor of Special Education 

Mrs. Sadie Douglass Supervisor of Special Education 

Mrs. Elsie Warrell Supervisor of Special Education 

Helen Knox Supervisor of Special Education 

Mrs. Florence Owings Supervisor of Special Education 

Frank Bennett Supervisor of Safety Education 

Mrs. Eleanora B. Kane Supervisor of Radio and TV Education 

.\mbrosp Chlada, Jr Supervisor of School Facilities 

Oscar L. Helm — Supervisor, General .\diilt Education 

C. Wilson Knauff _- Supervisor of Stores, AccountiTig, and Distribution 

Wallace C. Kirk Supervisor of Educational Supplies and Equipment 

Charles A. Pertsch -_ Senior District Supervisor of Maintenance 

James K. Legg District Supervisor of School Buildings 

Louis H. Reitz Senior Supervisor of Heating, Plumbing, and Ventilating Installations 

.\lbert S. Valench Senior District Supervisor of School Buildings 

Milton B. Malan^-_ Supervisor of School Repair Shop 

Kazmer Grabarkiewicz Supervisor of Operations and Custodial Training 

.John P. Lockwich Supervisor of Operating Engineers 

Sampson D. Ruffin Supervisor of School Building Operations 

John D. Scanlon Supervisor of School Building Operations 

William T. Dorsry Supervisor of School Custodians 

Albert W. Clark. Jr. _ ^ Supervisor of School Building Operations 

Edw-ard A. Paris _ _ _^ Supervisor of School Building Operations 

Louis Kopera __ Supervisor of School Building Operations 

Elmer P. Jennings . __ Supervisor of School Building Operations 

Ernest Gambrill Supervisor of School Building Operations 

•Ubert F. Hartka Supervisor of School Building Operations 

Vernon H. Bvtis Assistant Supervisor of Vocational Education 

Jack F. Bocher Supervisor of TransiKirtation 

Maurice L. Reilly __ _ _ _ Business Manager. Cafeterias 

Gustav A. Brandt Senior Administrative Officer, Office Services 

Mrs May Richardson __ , Regional Cafeteria Manager 

Mrs. Helen C. Starr ... _ _ Head. Department of Home Visitor Service 

Mrs. Barbara Levine Head, Department of Speech Correction 

Ruth Richards _ _ Specialist in Personnel 

Louis A. Sedlak Specialist in Personnel 

Edith Pruss Specialist in Personnel 

Walter Miller Specialist in Personnel 

.John F. Giblette Specialist in Aptitude Testing 

Mrs. Cleo C. Ammen . _ Specialist in Aptitude Testing 

Mary Jane Shapiro _ Specialist in Reading Analvsis 

Charles Cephas . _ . Specialist in School Social AVork 

Mrs. Marjorie Everinghini Specialist in School Social Work 

Mrs. Dolhe R. Walker.- Specialist in School Social W'ork 

Mrs. Eugenie Wheeler _ Specialist in School Social W^ork 

Ma.xwell J. Frankford Specialist in School Social W'ork 

Chester L. Kiser Specialist in Research 

Martm H Raila^ Specialist in Research 

Leanore M. Coard - V-TV.V- Specialist in Personnel 

Mrs. Minnie W. Graham Specialist m Americanization, Citizenship and Elem. Education 

Francis M. Froelicher Associate in Education for Older Adults 

Mrs. Margaret H. West Secretary to the Superintendent 

9 



BALTIMORE COUNTY 

AigLurlh Manor, Towson 4 
( 1 ) Soll.rs Point High Scliool, Sparrows Poiiil 19 

Name Office 

Edward G. Stapleton Superintendent of Schools 

Joshua R. Wheeler Assistant Superintendent in Administration 

Horner O. Elseroad Assistant Superintendent in Instruction 

William T. Willis, Jr Assistant Superintendent in Finance 

Morris R. Baker Engineer in Charge of Constiuction, Operation and Maintenance 

G. Alfred Helwig Director of Curriculum 

B. Melvin Cole Director of Elementary Education 

Norris A. King Director of Secondary Education 

Loyal W. Joes Director of Educational Research and Planning 

Charles M. DeWitt Director of Pupil Services 

Leon E. Grant Director of Purchasing 

Walter M. Gordon, Sr. Director of Transportation 

Walter M. Snyder Director of Personnel 

William A. Marshall, 3rd Assistant Construction Engineer 

Preston L. Grimm Administrative Assistant to llie Superintendent 

Vincent Brant Supervisor of High Schools 

Helen E. Hale Supervisor of High Schools 

Joseph B. Hillyard Supervisor of High Schools 

Mrs. Carey K. Sentz Supervisor of High Schools 

Jean C. Sisk Supervisor of High Schools 

Mary R. Childs Supervisor of High Schools 

Jean R. Moser Supervisor of High Schools 

Robert W. Gifford Supervisor of Junior High Schools 

Mrs. Margie B. Handy Supervisor of Junior High Schools 

Samuel D. Herman Supervisor of Junior High Schools 

Mrs. Stella H. Johnston Supervisor of Junior High Schools 

Mervin L. Keedy Supervisor of Junior High Schools 

Mrs. Mary E. Saterlie Supervisor of Jiinicir Higli Scliools 

Mrs. Louella H. Woodward Supervisor of Junior High Schools 

Josiah A. Blacklock Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Shirley V. Conner Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

M. Katherine Dost Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Olotilde Drechsler Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

(1) Mrs. Pauline J. Hobbs Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Gene M. Hastings Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Hilda Kestner Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Eleanor B. Requard Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Olive T. Jobes Supervisor of Art 

M. Ethel Troyer Supervisor of Art 

John W. Craft Supervisor of Music 

Nicholas Geriak Supervisor of Music 

Thomas R. Lawrence Supervisor of Music 

Harold S. Martin Supervisor of Physical Mucation 

James L. Miller Supervisor of Physical Education 

Thomas M. Greene Supervisor of Business and Adult Education 

Paul P. Plevvak Supervisor of Business Education 

Arthur A. Dick Supervisor of Vocational Education and Industrial Arts 

William A. Odell Supervisor of Industrial Arts 

Mary E. Kelleher Supervisor of Home Economics 

Ralph E. Eessler Supervisor of Special Education 

Elliott E. Lapin Supervisor of Special Education 

Gloria L. Engnoth Supervisor of Special Education 

Charles E. Leiman Supervisor of Clinical Services 

Anna R. Meeks^ Supervisor of Guidance 

Emma E. Williams Supervisor of Guidance 

William E. Kline Supervisor of Testing 

Mrs. Ruthetta L. Gilgash Supervisor of School Lunch Program 

Mrs. Adele Tomey W^oronka Supervisor of School Lunch Program 

E. Lyle Root Supervisor of School Lunch Program 

Elizabeth D. Hodges Supervisor of Library Services 

Dorothy A. McGinniss Supervisor of Library Services 

Mrs. Louise W. Erlbeck Supervisor of Secondary Nursing Program 

William O. Feader Supervisor of Accounting 

Herman C. Burton Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Mildred E. Jones Supervisor of Visiting Teachers 

Herd S. Eburg Supervisor of Plant Maintenance and Operation 

Ian Gordon Supervisor of Grounds Operations 

Henry Schleisener Supervisor of Grounds 

Mrs. Margaret S. Farlow Supervisor of Credentials 

Herbert O. Otter Assistant Supervisor, Plant Maintenance 

Donald E. Ouster Assistant Supervisor Plant Operations 

Thomas S. Bowyer Assistant Supervisor, Grounds Maintenance 

Gilbert SchifFman Supervisor of Reading 

Helen G. Huttenhauer Assistant in Publications 

*Merle S. Bateman Assistant in Publications 

Karl V. Sloop Assistant in Audio-Visual Aids 

• Part time 

10 



Name Office 

BALTIMORE COUNTY (Cont'd) 

Fred C. Donovan Assistant in Transportation 

C. Thomas Dunnock Assistant in Transportation 

Karl F. Swem Assistant in Transportation 

Ray H.' Wingerd Assistant in Transportation 

Wiiliara F. Stammer Assistant in Transportation 

H. Erich Koch Assistant in Plant Operations 

William C. Strasser Specialist in Educational Information 

John H. Day, Jr Assistant in Educational Information 

Charles T. Mahaa Assistant in Real Estate and Records 

Jack L. 6'Donnell Mechanical Assistant, Engineering 

Andrew L. Bareham Assistant in Grounds Maintenance 

Charles F.' Beyer Assistant in firounds Maintenance 

Edgar J. Price Assistant in Groimds Operation 

W. LeRoy Willis Assistant in Plant Operations 

C. H. Brown, Jr Architectural Assistant 

Edward R. Clemons _-__Assistant Landscape Architect 

Charles E. Jockel Assistant in Purchasing 

Thomas Wilhelm, Jr Assistant in Purchasing 

Kenneth C. Towle Assistant in Statistics and Research 

John H. Day, Jr Special Assistant 

William J. Kinling Assistant in Child Accounting 

John C. McLaulin Assistant in Educational Researcli and Planning 

A. Price Ransone Assistant in Educational Research and Planning 

Allen M. Sutton Assistant in Personnel 

Joe H. Leckrone Assistant in Personnel 

Gertrude A. Wardell Library Cataloguer 

C. Barry Carpenter Assistant in Accounting 

Mrs. Olga D. Cooper Psychologist 

Mrs. Hermione II. Hawkins Psychologist 

David A. Loiry Psychologist 

Walter M. Musgrove Psychologist 

Marion H. Pelton Psychologist 

Sheldon K. Riggs Psychologist 

Roger E. Saunders Psychologist 

Mrs. Ruth E. Sherman Psychologist 

Arthur M. Green Psychologist 

Jordon Lawrence Psychologist 

Gloria M. McDowell Psychologist 

David H. Black Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Edna S. Congdon Visiting Teacher 

Wanda S. Greene Visiting Teacher 

John J. Hart^ Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Marie J. Hunycutt Visiting Teacher 

Thomas J. Jordan Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Irma R. Kell Visiting Teacher 

Evelyn B. Maus Visiting Teacher 

(1) Mrs. Eliza S. McDaniel Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Vivian S. Mcintosh Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Frances N. Osgood Visiting Teacher 

Angelo V. Quaranto Visiting Teacher 

Louis S. Sagi Visiting Teacher 

Helen-Louise Scarborough Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Elizabeth Z. Steiner Visiting Teacher 

Mary L. StoU Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Kathryn R. Stonesifer Visiting Teacher 

Susan Summers Visiting Teacher 

Edna S. Warwick Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Mary G. Wheeler Visiting Teacher 

F. Richard Keyton Visiting Teacher 

Delores M. Strauss Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Evelyn C. Norton Financial Secretary to the Superintendent 

Mrs. Carol J. Day Secretary to the Superintendent 



CALVERT COUNTY 

Court House, Prince Frederick 

Maurice A. Dunkle Superintendent of Schools 

Douglas M. Bivens, Jr Director of Instruction 

Mrs. Thelma M. Cornish Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Mildred G. Finlon Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Lola M. Parks Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Lloyd J. Falk Supervisor of Maintenance 

♦William J. Middleton Supervisor of Transportation 

Mrs. Virginia D. Parran Chief Bookkeeper 

!•■.. .\nne Yoe Secretary to Superintendent 

* Part time. 

11 



CAROLINE COUNTY 

Law Building, Denton 

Name Office 

Wilbur S. Hoopengardner Superintendent of Schools 

Louise C. Dennison Supervisor of Instruction 

Lewis W. Davis Supervisor of Instruction 

Fred G. Usilton Supervisor of Instruction 

Frederick H. Sheeley Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Richard W. Hall Supervisor of Transportation and Special Services 

Mrs. Bertha M. Williams Financial Secretary 

Mrs. Virginia M. York Secretary-Bookkeeper 

Mrs. Barbara J. Bacsak Secretary to Superintendent 

Mrs. Mvrtle Jane Good Secretary 

Klizabeth Ann Thawley _ Secretary 

CARROLL COUNTY 

Carroll County Office Building, Westiiiiiister 

Samuel M. Jenness Superintendent of Schools 

John F. Wooden, Jr Supervisor of High Schools 

Evon F. Bowers Supervisor of High Schools 

Mrs. Maraget M. Bailer Supervisor of High Schools 

Fred L. Engle Supervisor of High Schools 

Ruth E. DeVore Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Charles E. Reck Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

**Mae Prince Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Josephine D. West Supervisor of Home Economics and Cafeterias 

*Philip S. Royer Supervisor of Music 

Maye E. Grimes _ Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Mrs. Dolores J. Snyder Visiting Teacher 

Mary E. Huber Visitingr Teacher 

Roland F. Haifiey Assistant in Custodial Services, School Lunch and Maintenance 

Maurice V. Wolfe Assistant in General Maintenance and Utilities 

Charles E. Ecker Supervisor of Transportation 

* Herbert M. Phillips Assistant in Transportation 

Curvin M. Seitz - Financial Secretary 

Mrs. Nadine Saylor Assistant Financial Secretary 

Mrs. Martha S. Gilbert Secretary to the Superintendent 

Treasa Bear Receptionist and Stenographer 

Mrs. Pauline D. Peterson Secretary to the Supervisors 

CECIL COUNTY 

308 Court House, Elkton 

Robert A. Gibson Superintendent of Schools 

Edwin B. Fockler Supervisor of High Schools 

William C. Graham Supervisor of High Schools 

W'alter J. Finn Supervisor of High Schools 

Mrs. Evelyn P. Kay Supervisor of Eleir?entary Schools 

Norman J. Moore_l Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Rachel E. Boyd Supervisor of Home Economics 

Edwin II. Barnes Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

James M. Renn Supervisor of Maintenance 

Samuel H. Dixon Supervisor of Transportation 

Louis P. Wright Supervisor of Vocational and Industrial Arts 

Mrs. Mary A. Crouse Visiting Teacher 

Willard W. Taylor Bookkeeper and Financial Secretary 

Dorothy J. Moore Secretary to Superintendent 

Elaine J. Dawson Secretary 

Mrs. Adrienne L. Boyd Secretary 

Mrs. Ruth M. Diem Secretary 

Mrs. Marie L. Bruner Secretary' 

Mrs. Barbara A. Halligan Audiometrist 

Leslie L. Pippin Building Inspector 

CHARLES COUNTY' 

Court House, Charles Street, La Plata 

C. Paul Barnhart Superintendent of Schools 

Edward C. Turner Supervisor of High Schools 

Mrs. Genevieve S. Brown Supervisor of High Schools 

Mrs. Christine E. Pearson Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Joseph C. Parks Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Cecelia O. Farrall Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Mrs. Georgia B. Lucas ■. Visiting Teacher 



Part time. 

Part time. Also serves as triiclier in Robert ItP»(fl»n Sr.-Jr. High School. 

12 



A'ame Ofjice 

CHARLES COUNTY (Cont'd) 

Margaret A. Posey Supervisor of School Lunch Program and Purchasing 

Mrs. Julia C. Totten Secretary to Superintendent 

Mrs. Marianne M. Canter Clerk 

Mrs. Mary Jane Frere Clerk 

Mrs. Hazel J. Gary ^ Clerk 

Peggy Lee Garner Clerk 

Mrs. Ann B. Thompson Clerk 

DORCHESTER COUNTY 

Court Lane, Cambridge 

James C. Busick Superintendent of Schools 

Albert S. Farver Supervisor of High Schools 

Evelyn E. Johnson Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Viola J. Comegys Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

John Armstrong Supervisor of Transportation 

John T. Comer, Jr Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

John A. Marshall, Jr Bookkeeper 

Mrs. Mary W. LeCompte Financial Secretary 

Mrs. Dorothy S. Stephens Secretary to Superintendent 

Charlotte Jean Cantwell Stenogiapher 

FREDERICK COUNTY 

113 East Church Street, Frederick 

James A. Sensenbaugh Superintendent of Schools 

Harry V. Frushour Assistant Superintendent for Administration 

Quentin L. Earhart Assistant Superintendent for Instruction 

*Duval W. Sweadner Supervisor of Adult Eiducation 

Frederick J. Brovfn, Jr Supervisor of High Schools 

Mrs. Evelyn F. S. Davis Supervisor of Junior High Schools 

Mrs. Louise F. Thompson Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Alice M. Lonc Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Warren R. Evans Supervisor of Physical Education 

Janice Wickless Helping Teacher 

Herman A. Hauver Coordinator of Pupil Services 

James L. Fisher Supervisor of Music 

Richard E. Summers Supervisor of Art 

Alice L. Robinson Supervisor of Library Service 

Mrs. Virginia D. Klos Supervisor of School Lunch Program 

* Mary A. Nuce Supervisor of Home Economics 

Paul L. Hoffmaster Supervisor of Transportation 

Paul E. Fogle Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Joseph Rexroad Home Visitor 

Mary M. Fiery Home Visitor 

Mrs. Dorothy Nelson School Psychologist 

Tolbert F. Lawyer Supervisor of School Facilities 

H. D. Williams Assistant in Plant Operations 

William J. E. Null Assistant in Maintenance (Mechanical) 

Allen R. Gaddis, III Assistant in Administration 

Mrs. Pauline J. Bowlus Secretary to the Superintendent 

GARRETT COUNTY 

Fourth Street, Oakland 

Willard L. Hawkins Superintendent of Schools 

Foster D. Bittle Supervisor of Junior-Senior High Schools 

Edwin W. Elias Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Caroline Wilson Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

John L. Fitzwater Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Robert R. Martin Supervisor of Transportation 

Oren T. Graser Supervisor of Maintenance 

Mrs. Margaret S. McComas Financial Secretary 

Lucille Tasker Secretary to Superintendent 

HARFORD COUNTY 

45 East Cordon Street, Bel Air 

Charles W. Willis Superintendent of Schools 

Benjamin S. Carroll Assistant Superintendent 

Howard B. Peters Director of Instruction 

C. Clark Jones Director of Personnel 

George B. Prettynian, Sr. Director of Public Relations 

Alfonso A. Roberty Business Manager 

* Part time 

13 



Name Office 

HARFORD COUNTY (Cont'd) 

Viokt A. Du\ is Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Hazel L. Fisher Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Helen M. Fisher Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Jane M. Gent Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Kichard J. Williams Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Alden H. Halsey Supervisor of High Schools 

Mrs. Dorothy M. Rowe Supervisor of High Schools 

Thomas L. Smith Supervisor of High Schools 

Annetta G. Wright Supervisor of High Schools 

John R. Walker Supervisor of Industrial Education 

W. Warren Sprouse Supervisor of Music 

James H. Clow, Jr Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Charles C. McCuUough Visiting Teacher 

Joseph F. Snee Visiting Teachei 

(Jeorge N. Bollinger Administrative Assistant 

Howard R. Cheek Supervisor of Transportation 

Earle B. Wagner Administrative Assistant 

Edward J. Plevyak Administrative Assistant 

Ralph H. Morgan Building Engineer 

Mrs. Alice W. Growl Financial Secretary 

Ann L. Campbell Secretary to Superintendent 

HOWARD COUNTY 

Court House Annex, Ellicott City 

John E. Yingling Superintendent of Schools 

Mrs. Mary R. Hovet Supervisor of High Schools 

Frank B. Durigg Supervisor of High Schools 

Wilhelmina E. Oldfield Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mary E. White Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Harry T. Murphy Supervisor of Transportation 

Gilbert K. Miller Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Walter D. Phelan - Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Irene M. Johnson Financial Secretary 

Mrs. Sara S. Snapp Secretary to Superintendent 

KENT COUNTY 

400 High Street, Chestertown 

Rpade W. Oorr Superintendent of Schools 

Robert J. Johnson_ Administrative Assistant 

Carey E. Lacey Supervisor of High Schools 

Louise Hepbron Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

*Mr8. Sara B. Chambers Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Madeleine Fennel! Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

** George S. Rose Supervisor of Testing and Guidance 

Mrs. Clara M. Chaires Chief Bookkeeper and Clerk 

Mrs. Florence C. Ward Secretary to Superintendent 

MONTGOMERY COUNTY 

Box 231, Rockville 

C. Taylor Whittier Superintendent of Schools 

John A. Permenter Assistant Superintendent 

Richard E. Wagner Acting Director of Secondary Education 

James C. Craig Director of Elementary Education 

William A. Early Director of Personnel 

Paul A. Henry Director of Administrative Services 

I.oster J. Welch Director of School Facilities 

Brian M. Benson Director of Financp 

Maxwpll E. BunJette Director of Research 

Elaine Barnes Director of Educational Services 

Sonia Brenner _ Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

William Broomall Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Anne Caldwell Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Theophil I. K. Muellen .Supervisor of Elementarv Schools 

Etheleen Daniel Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Agnes Drewry Supervisor of Elementarv Schools 

William Evans Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mary L. Grau Supervisor of Elementarv Schools 

Marion O. Rockwood Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Lillian Klein Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Martha Ann Satterfield Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Edda Larimore Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

•Part time. Also Vice-principal at Garnett Elementary School. 
**Part time. 

14 



Name Office 

MONTGOMERY COUNTY (Cont'd) 

M. Francis Mitchell Supervisor of Pvlementary Schonlp 

Elsie Scliurter Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Clare Stratcnieyer .. Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Elizabeth Wilson Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Philip Arsenault Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Marion licckwith Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Thomas Bilek Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Sue M. Brett Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Kieran Carroll Assistant Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

William Fleming' Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Katherine Greaney Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Leadore 1). I)u Bois Supervior of Secondary Schools 

Charles Proctor Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Jacob Rabinovich Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Ernest W. Snodgrass Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

William F. Brennan Assistant Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Thomas W. Stevenson Assistant Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Murray L. Andrews Supervisor of Libraries 

**Genevieve S. Blew Supervisor of Foreign Langiiases 

Crescent J. Bride Supervisor of Physical Education 

Edmund T. Burke Supervisor of Science 

William C. Feddeman Administrative Supervisor of Secondary Education 

Noble V. Fritz _ __ Supervisor of Commercial Education 

Edmund S. Hoffmaster, Jr Assistant Supervisor of Science 

Charles T. Horn Supervisor of Music 

Mary Mohlor Supervisor of Remedial Reading 

Leonard Oass Supervisor of Industrial Education 

Chester Petranek Assistant Supervisor of Music 

Barbara Riley Assistant Supervisor of Physical Education 

Hazel Smith Assistant Supervisor of Music 

Marjorie St. Clair Supervisor of Art 

Mirian Tannhauser Administrative Supervisor in Special Education 

Elizabeth Engel Assistant Supervisor in Special Education 

Louise S. Walker Supervisor of Audiovisual Aids 

James W. Jacobs Curriculum Coordinator 

Mary H. Watson Administrative Assistant to Assistant Superintendent 

Helen M. Johnson Supervisor of In-Service Education 

John P. Causey Assistant Director of Elementary Education 

Ruth S. Cue Assistant Director of Elementary Education 

Helen P. Bready Assistant Director of Secondary Education 

Bob R. Nichols Assistant Director of Secondary Education 

Kenneth W. Rollins Supervisor of Guidance 

Julia Watkins Supervisor of Home Arts 

T. Owen Knight Administrative Supervisur of Pupil Personnel 

Richard A. Cleveland . ^_ Visiting Teacher 

Reno A. Continetti Area Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

liobert F. Fioramonti Visiting Teacher 

Mildred P. Clement \isiting Teaclicr 

Henry J. Giauque_ Visiting Teacher 

Jewel A. Green . Visiting Teaclier 

Robert C. Henley Area Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Weymouth H. Judkins Area Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Anne H. Medvick _ Visitinp Teacher 

Edith P. Popenoe Area Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Geraldine Rej-nolds _. Visiting Teacher 

Joseph Sagneri ... _ Visiting Teacher 

Henry Shetterly — Visiting Teacher 

Marjorie Van Dien . Visiting Teacher 

Eileen D. Wilkinson Visiting Teacher 

Edward A. Hebda Visiting Teacher 

William B. Prigg .. Visiting Teacher 

Cecile Finley _ - _ Chief Psychologist 

William H. Ashbaugh Psychologist 

Gilbert Ghitelman _ Psychologist 

Charlotte M. Sinios Psychologist 

George Usdansky _ Psychologist 

Margaret O. Battison . Assistant Psychologist 

Miller Eves Psychologist 

Jane S. Harris Assistant Psychologist 

Pearl Haugh Assistant Psychologist 

Ruth Linn Assistant Psychologist 

Blanches Rochmes Psychologist 

Ernest O. Young -_ Assistant Psychologist 

M. S. H. Johnston Psychological Counselor in Special Education 

Helen Kohut Psychological Counselor in Remedial Reading 

Alexander M. Gottesman Administrative Assistant 

Dorothy B. Waleski Assistant for Information and Publications 

Helen Joseph Secretary to Superintendent 

George V. Mcnke Director of Operations and Safety 

Otho H. Hawk _ Supervisor of Buildings and Grounds 

•*Part time 

15 



Name ^IT'^'^^ 

MOMGOMElfk <:<»LMV (C.iiiM) 

Jiimes Ij. Mullinix Supervisor of Maintenaiico 

Corelli A. David Director of School Cafeterias 

Jane B. Boyd Supervisor of School Cafeterias 

June R Odor Area Supervisor of School Cafeterias 

James H. Sheldon II I Director of Construction 

John S. Jenkins Architectural Assistant to Director of Construction 

Frank Snyder ^ - Administrative Aide to Director of Construction 

Edward T. Michaels Director of Purchasing 

Anton Suttora Supervisor of Purchasing; 

James R. Shade, Jr Director of PlanninK 

Robert F. Bierly Population Analyst 

Earl L Yates S't^ Acquisition Aide 

Richard N. Ream -" Director of Transportation 

Jack B. Powell Assistant Director of Transportation 

Richard B Grove Assistant Director of Finance 

V. Wilson Campbell" Supervisor of Accounting 

James B. Kline Senior Accountant 

Reginald J. Crockett Internal Auditor 

J. Gordon McDonald, Jr. Supervisor of Insurance and Federal Aid 

H. Douglas Hall Supervisor of Payroll and I. B. M. 

Wilton L. Kennedy Assistant Supervisor of Payroll and I. B. M. 

Irma B. Dumford Supervisor of Personnel — Elementary 

Forrest G. Shearin. Jr Assistant Supervisor of Personnel — Secondary 

Gertrude G. Justison Assistant Supervisor of Appraisal and Accounting 

Rufus C. Browning Assistant Director of Personnel 

Malovve C. Ausen Personnel Assistant in Statistics and Reports 

Anne D. Langen T Personnel Assistant in Certification 

Anne A." TaclTett Personnel Assistant in Elementary 

Max K Emerson" Transportation Area Supervisor 

Robert E. Elliott Transportation Area Supervisor 

Charles Wyatt Transportation Area Supervisor 

Jerome L. Offutt Supervisor of Operations and Safety 

Roberta S. Abel Field Supervisor of Seliool Lunch 

Gardner B. Jordan Director of Sites Acquisition 

William H. Melton Supervisor of Maintenance 

Arnold A. Adams Administrative Aide to Director of Construction 

Robert Kaufman Senior Accountant 

Samuel M. Goodman Supervisor of Research 

William O. N. Scott Supervisor of Testing 

Robert McCord Coordinator of Professional Advancement Program 

PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY 

Upper Marlboro 

William S. Schmidt ___^^^^ Superintendent of Schools 

Rowannetta S. Allen Assistant Superintendent of Schools for Elementary Education 

George H. Robinson Assistant Superintendent of Schools for Secondary Education 

Thonias S Gwvnn Jr - \ssistant Superintendent of Schools 

Edward S.' Beach, Jr._--ILI ---—Administrative Assistant 

Robert Novak Dean, Prince George's Community College 

Margaret A. Beardslev Supervisor of Kindergartens 

Emma M Bowman—"- Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Eunice E Burdette Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Rita M Donovan Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Williarti W Hall Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

leila V Hardestv Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

A Mildred Hoyle" Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Elisabeth C. Kelly Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Thomas Johnson Supervisor of E ementary Schoo s 

Elizabeth McMahon Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Stella Spicknall Supervisor of Reading Clinic 

Mrs Helen H. Brashears Supervisor of Secondary Schoo s 

Nelda Davis Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Katherine Fossett _ I- Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Mrs. Katherine Grimes Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Mrs Dora Kennedy Supervisor of Secondary Schoo s 

Truman S Klein Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Howard B. Owens'I-I-H-IH Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Mrs Mary Snouffer - - Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Russell Olson Coordinator of Adult Education Program and the Evening High School 

Mrs Mary Beth Wackwitz - -- Supervisor of Art Education 

Marv A Thompson Supervisor of Health Education and Health Services 

M. 'Gladvs Dickerson -.-»-.- ^^!Pr'''^i'V^ ?°™^, Economics 

Warren Smeltzer Supervisor of Industrial and Vocational Education 

Mrs Louise B. Bennett Supervisor of Libraries 

Mrs. Frances H. Lynch Supervisor of Music 

Mis. Marilyn Krummel Supervisor of Music 

Vincent C. Holochwost Supervisor of Physica Education 

Ada M. Warrington Supervisor of Physical Education 

16 



Name Office 

PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY (Cont'tl) 

C. Elizabeth Rieg Supervisor of Special Education 

Mrs. Frances H. Fufli> - Assistant Supervisor of Special Education 

Mrs. Margaret Conanf Coordinator of Parent Study Program 

Eugenia Balsley - - Supervisor of Publications 

Francis Parker Coordinator Safety Education Activities 

Victor Rice Coordinator of Testing and Researcli 

Stanley Jacobson Supervisor of Psychulofjical Services 

Betty Howard _^ School Psychologist 

Mrs. Martha Odell - — _ School Psychologist 

Ferdinand Cardano _ Helping Teacher 

Bruce Hoak _ Helping Teacher 

Helen Bow-man Helping Teacher 

John A. Woods-- Helping Teacher 

David Young Helping Teacher 

Marian E. Lobdell .. Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Charles O. Wendmf Assistant Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Mrs. Mary Kay Gardner Visiting Teaclier 

Mrs. Elizabeth W. Hamilton Visiting Teacher 

Lillian L. Harvey - Visiting Teacher 

Willie M. Henson Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Barbara R. Jones Visiting Teacher 

M. Dorothy Jump Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Arlene A. Korn Visiting Teacher 

Robert C. Nabors Visiting Teacher 

Harry Rose _- Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Charlotte Spencer Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Elizabeth M. Bower Visiting Teacher 

Donald R. Burgess Visiting Teacher 

Harry P. Fauber Visiting Teacher 

Julian P. King Visiting Teacher 

Elmer K. Zeller - Supervisor of Purchasing 

D. Carl McMillen Supervisor of Personnel and Credentials 

Arthur E. Robinson Supervisor of Maintenance 

Alan Poole Assistant Supervisor of Maintenance 

Lorton Layman Assistant Supervisor of Maintenance 

Leon Stout - Assistant Supervisor of Maintenance 

Franklin B. Klase Supervisor of Custodial Services 

William H. Smith - Senior Building Inspector 

Flora Schroyer Supervisor of School Lunch Program 

ilrs. Ann Hall Assistant Supervisor of School Lunch Program 

John W. Heim Supervisor of Transportation 

Russell O. Eckert — _ — Assistant Supervisor of Transportation 

Anthony R. Miller — Assistant Supervisor of Transportation 

Ruth Jefferson _- _ -Assistant Treasurer 

Mrs. Helen S. Bowie Secretary to Superintendent 

Mrs. Betty R. Collinsmi „ Assistant Secretary to the Board of Education 

<JIIKE> ANNE'S COUNTY 

C<nitr<ville 

Harry C. Rhodes _ Superintendent of Schools 

John E. Miller Supervisor of Transportation and High Schools 

Mrs. Alberta C. Browne Elementary Supervisor 

Mrs. Margaret S. Stack Elementary Supervisor 

John H. Welib Higli School Supervisor 

Mrs. Lola P. Brown _ Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Marie Shortall Financial Secretary 

Mrs. Frances Rampmoyer Typist -Stenographer 

Donna Harrington ' Stenographer 

ST. .MARY'S COUNTY 

Leonardtown 

Robert E. King, Jr.- Superintendent of Schools 

James H. Ogden Assistant Superintendent of Schools and Supervisor of Instruction 

Richard L. Holler Supervisor of Instruction 

E. Violette Young Supervisor of Instruction 

Ralph S. Waters Supervisor of Instruction 

Harriet H. Reeder- Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Mrs. Beulah S. Bennett _ Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Elberta W. Haydeii Financial Secretary 

Paul T. Hannen_ _- ... ^ Maintenance Engineer 

Howard G. Haverkanip .-. — Assistant Maintenance Engineer 

Mrs. Dolores G. Rose Coordinator of Cafeteria Services 

Mrs. Marie B. Burroughs - Stenographer 

Helen Marie Owens_ Stenographer 

Hattie M. Higgs- - . _. Financial Assistant 

Marion R. Pilkerton „ Stenographer 

17 



SOMERSET COUNTY 
Court House Annex, Princ<-5S Anne 

yame. Office 

John L. Bond Superintendent of Schools 

Mrs. Alice Mae C. Beauchamp Supervisor of Elementary Education 

George F. CarrinRton .^Supervisor of Secondary Education 

Kermit A. Cuttman Supervisor of Elementary and Secondary Education 

Charles O. Burns, Jr Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Clarence N. Bauglian Supervisor of Transportation 

Mrs. Alva Bozman Laird Financial Secretary 

Mrs. Marian Tyler Colborn Stenographer-Typist 

Mrs. Eliza))Ptli H. Murray Stenographer-Typist 

TALBOT COUNTY 

Washington Street, Easton 

Serald E. Richter Superintendent of Schools 

Arthur R. Higginbottom Supervisor of High Schools 

Mrs. Lillian C. Davis Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Kathleen A. Francis Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Virginia S. G. Darrow Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

P. Kennard Wright Supervisor of Maintenance 

Robert W. Rausch Controller 

Mrs. Eileen H. Camper Stenographer 

Mrs. Betty M. Wilke Clerk 

WASHINGTON COUNTY 

Commonwealth Avenue, Hagerstown 

William M. Brish Superintendent of Schools 

William C. Dielil Assistant Superintendent 

William L. Donaldson - Assistant Superintendent 

Carl R. Beer Supervisor of Senior High Schools 

C. Scott Couchnian Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Annilea H. Browne Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

M. Frances Grimes Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Alva D. Temple Supervisor of Junior High Schools 

Douglas M. Bivens Director of Curriculum and Supervision 

Miriam L. Hoffman- Supervisor of Music 

*Mrs. Anormallee M. Way Supervisor of Home Economics 

Alfred C. Roth, Jr - Supervisor of Vocational and Industrial Arts 

H. Edwin Semler Supervisor of Physical Education 

Claude B. Brubeck Supervisor of Driver Education and Safety 

Catherine L. Beacliley ^- Supervisor of Guidance and Research 

Kussell L. Kepler Director of Plant Operations 

Delbert G. Sumnnvvillc Supervisor of Maintenance .Tnd Construction 

W. Harland Biuys Supervisor of Plant Operations 

Joseph H. Vaiifc _ Supervisor of Transportation 

E. Raye Francis Supervisor of School Lunch Program 

Robert F. Leslier Supervisor of Audiovisual 

T. Wilson Cahall Administrative Assistant 

John R. Brugger Chief Engineer (Closed-Circuit Television Project) 

George H. Ropp Instructional Supervisor (Closed-Circuit Television Project) 

James D. Morgan Supervisor of Testing 

V. Richard Martin Director of Pupil Personnel 

.Tohn E. McCue- Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Frances H. Machen Visiting Teacher 

James R. Lemmert Visiting Teacher 

Mary E. Byer Visiting Teacher 

F. Richard Crowther Director of Finances 

Carl M. Mann Director of Purchases 

Mrs. Lois R. Malott Secretary to Superintendent 

WICOMICO COUNTY 

Main Street, Salisbury 

Royd A. Mahaffey Superintendent of Schools 

Sheldon B. Dawson Assistant Superintendent 

Harold A. Fulton Director of Instruction 

Carl W. Dumire Supervisor of High Schools 

Frederick H. Spigler, Jr Supervisor of High Schools 

Martha E. Jones Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Louise L. Mitchell Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Marie A. Dashiell Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Cora G. Smith Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Charles R. Berry Visiting Teacher 

Branche H. Phillips, Jr Supervisor of Transportation 

Joanna Lankford Financial Secretary 

*Part time 

18 



yame Office 

WICOMICO COUNTY (Cont'd) 

Mrs. Geneva D. Smith Bookkeeper 

Juanita L. Townsend Secretary to Superintendent 

Mrs. Louise L. Layfield Bookkeeper-Clerk 

Mrs. Dorothy F. Matthews Clerk-Stenographer 

Mrs. Sally A. Bennett Clerk-Stenographer 

Mrs. Janice W. Miles » Clerk-Stenographer 

Mrs. Shirley A. Davis Clerk-Stenographer 

WORCESTER COUNTY 

Market Street, Snow Hill 

Paul D. Cooper Superiiiiciident of Schools 

Paul S. Hyde Assistant Superintendent in Instruction 

Alfred S. Hancock ; Supervisor of Instruction 

Mrs. Ijouise S. Adklns Supervisor of Instruction 

Mrs. Annie B. Downing Supervisor of Instruction 

Wilbur A. Jones Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Ernest G. Holland Visiting Teacher 

Benjamin W. Nelson Supervisor of Transportation 

Clinton D. Cutright Supervisor of Maintenance and Purchasing 

Elsie M. Dryden Clerk 

Mrs. Pauline S. Bowen Assistant Clerk 

Mary Elizabeth Bowen Assistant Clerk 

Mrs. An-etta H. Taylor Assistant Clerk 



19 



CONTENTS 

Page 

Letter of Transmittal 22 

Legislation Affecting Education 23 

Notes from the Minutes of the State Board of Education 28 

Administrative Divisions of the State Depai-tment of Education : 

Certification and Accreditation ^9 

Instruction 46 

Vocational Education 59 

Library Extension 62 

Vocational Rehabilitation 67 

Dates of Opening and Closing Schools, Length of Session 72 

Enrollment, Teaching Staff, Number of Public and Nonpublic Schools. . 72 

Number Different Pupils in Public and Nonpublic Schools 73 

Grade Enrollment 74 

Education for Handicapped Children, Schools and Classes for Atypical 

Children 81 

Births in Maryland 89 

Withdravv^als in Public Schools 92 

Average Number Pupils Belonging 93 

Nonpromotions in Public Schools 94 

High School Graduates : Number, Occupations, Colleges Attended 97 

High School Enrollment : by Subject 105 

Enrollment in Individual High School Subjects 106 

Teachers: by Subject Taught, by Sex, Size of School, Summer School 
Attendance, Certification, Preparation, Resignations, Turnover, 

Source 116 

Costs of Maryland Schools : 

Total, Per Cent from State 148 

State Minimum Program 146 

Distribution of Tax Dollar 147 

Cost per Pupil 148 

Salaries 154 

Transportation 156 

Adult Education, Vocational Education 159 

School Lunch, Special Milk 166 

Capital Outlay, Bonded Indebtedness, Value of School Property. . . . 171 

County Levies, Assessments, Tax Rates 174 

Maryland State Teachers Colleges; Junior Colleges 179 

Contributions of Teachers to State Teachers' Retirement System 188 

Parent-Teacher Associations 189 

High School Equivalence 190 

Maryland Public Libraries 191 

Vocational Rehabilitation 192 

Financial Statements and Statistical Tables 194 

Index 242 

21 



January 1, 1962 



The Honorable J. Millard Tawes 
Government House 
Annapolis, Maryland 



Dear Governor Tawes: 



In accordance with the provision of the laws of Maryland, 
I have the honor to present to you herewith, the ninety-fifth 
"annual report covering all operations of the State department 
of education and the support, conditions, progress and needs of 
education throughout the State" for the period beginning July 
1, 1960 and ending June 30, 1961. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Thomas G. Pullen, Jr. 
Secretary-Treasurer 
State Board of Education 
Baltimore, Maryland 



22 



Maryland State Department of Education 23 

1961 MARYLAND LEGISLATION AFFECTING EDUCATION 

REGULAR SESSION 

School Loans 

Chapter 2, House Bill 82, authorizes a $1,600,000 bond issue for school con- 
struction in Wicomico County. 

Chapter 213, Senate Bill 237, authorizes a $25,000,000 bond issue for school 
construction in Baltimore City. 

Chapter 216, Senate Bill 343, authorizes a $500,000 bond issue for school con- 
struction in Howard County. 

Chapter 399, Senate Bill 383, authorizes a $3,500,000 bond issue for school 
construction in Harfoi'd County. 

Chapter 410, Senate Bill 434, authorizes a $5,000,000 bond issue for school 
construction in Frederick County. 

Chapter 414, Senate Bill 446, authorizes a $2,000,000 bond issue for school 
construction in St. Mary's County. 

Chapter 424, Senate Bill 480, authorizes a $1,500,000 bond issue for school 
construction in Charles County. 

Chapter 432, Senate Bill 556, authorizes the ci'eation of a State debt of 
$20,000,000 to supplement the financing of the construction of public 
school buildings and facilities by the several local political subdivisions 
in the State. 

Chapter 491, House Bill 236, authorizes a $1,000,000 bond issue for school 
construction in Dorchester County. 

Chapter 515, House Bill 443, authorizes a $10,000,000 bond issue for school 
construction in Anne Arundel County. 

Chapter 553, House Bill 664, authorizes a $750,000 bond issue for school con- 
struction in Cecil County. 

Chapter 893, House Bill 486, authorizes a $10,000,000 bond issue for school 
construction in Prince George's County. 

Chapter 901, House Bill 754, authorizes a $506,500 bond issue for school con- 
struction in Caroline County. 

Chapter 902, House Bill 807, authorizes a $5,000,000 bond issue for school 
construction in Allegany County. 

Library Legislation 

Chapter 191, House Bill 68, includes certain employees of the Enoch Pratt 
Free Library, the Department of Public Libraries of Montgomery 
County, and the Washington County Free Library in the Teachers' 
Retirement System. 

Chapter 292, Senate Bill 438, authorizes the County Commissioners of Wi- 
comico County to appropriate $50,000 over a five-year period to the 
Wicomico County Free Library, Inc. 

Chapter 896, House Bill 677, authorizes the County Commissioners of Anne 
Arundel County to appropriate $200,000 to finance the construction of 
a public library building and library facilities provided such funds are 
matched by the Annapolis-Anne Arundel Public Library Association. 

Chapter 899, House Bill 697, authorizes the County Commissioners of Charles 
County to appropriate $225,000 to finance the construction of a public 
library building. 

Chapter 904, House Bill 876, authorizes the County Commissioners of Prince 
George's County to appropriate $60,000 to finance the construction of a 
public library building and facilities in the Tenth (Laurel) Election 
District of the County. 

Retirement 

Chapter 111, Senate Bill 9, permits the Board of Trustees of the Teachers' 
Retirement System to set the rate of interest from time to time from a 
minimum of 3 per cent to a maximum of 4 per cent. Said regulation 
applies only to teachers who joined the system on or after July 1, 1955. 



24 Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 

Chapter 112, Senate Bill 10, sets regular interest rates at 4 per cent for those 
persons who were members of the State Employees' Retirement System 
on or before June 30, 1955. It permits the Retirement Board of Trustees 
to set the rate of interest from a minimum of 3 per cent to a maximum 
of 4 per cent. 

Chapter 184, House Bill 352, repeals a set of obsolete local laws for Allegany 
County relating to an old Teachers' Retirement Fund. 

Chapter 191, House Bill 68, (See under "Library Legislation.") 

Chapter 395, Senate Bill 368, permits persons to transfer between actuarial- 
based State pension systems upon paying into their present system 
certain contiibutions. 

Chapter 563, House Bill 696, authorizes the County Commissioners of Gar- 
rett County to make supplementary retirement payments to certain 
retired i)ublic school teachers. 

Chapter 571, House Bill 774, increases the supplementary pensions paid to 
certain retired public school teachers in Baltimore County. The amount 
to be paid is raised from $2,000 to $2,400 per year or 40 per cent of 
their highest average wage during any 5-year period of service, which- 
ever sum is larger. 

Joint Resolution 21, Senate Joint Resolution 31, requests the Legislative 
Council to study the feasibility of the State's undertaking to pay a 
certain pai"t of the contribution of each State employee to the Employee's 
Retirement System. 



General Legislation Affecting Education 

Chapter 26, Senate Resolution 41, urges the State Board of Education to 
revise the oath taken by all public school teachers in the State. 

Chapter 134, Senate Bill 211, authorizes any local board of education in the 
State to establish a community college, defines what constitutes such 
a college, and provides for the administration and financing of these 
colleges. 

Chapter 145, Senate Bill 272, increases the individual allowances from $100 
to $200 per year for members of the Garrett and Wicomico county boards 
of education. 

Chapter 172, House Bill 190, increases the individual expense allowance 
from $100 to $200 per year for members of the Somerset County Board 
of Education. 

Chapter 188, House Bill 8, provides for a deputy State superintendent of 
schools who shall represent the State Superintendent of Schools in the 
latter's absence. 

Chapter 257, House Bill 508, repeals an unnecessary power of the Cecil 
County Board of Education with reference to the sale of certain prop- 
erty to the Jacob Tome Institute, this power having been exercised and 
the action completed. 

Chapter 268, House Bill 70, provides for an increase of $4.00 in the fee for 
motor vehicle instruction and examination permits. The funds thus 
accumulated are to be used by the State Department of Education to 
provide for driver education for public high school students in the 
several political subdivisions. 

Chapter 299, Senate Bill 481, establishes the Charles County Youth Com- 
mission. The Youth Commission is to study the services available to 
and the needs of the youth in the County. The County Superintendent 
of Schools is a regular member of the Commission. 

Chapter 322, Senate Bill 215, provides for the regulation, licensing, and 
bonding of persons engaged in soliciting for certain nonpublic schools. 
All solicitors for nonpublic schools located within or without the State 
are required to apply to the State Superintendent of Schools for an 
annual permit. 



Maryland State Department of Education 25 

Chapter 349, Senate Bill 505, requires the County Commissioners and the 
Board of Education for Allegany County to provide full educational 
programs and facilities for retarded and handicapped children through 
the school term ending after the eighteenth birthday of such children. 

Chapter 355, Senate Bill 74, provides that all Legislative scholarships to 
be awarded from the Third Legislative District of Baltimore City shall 
be avi^arded after a competitive examination by officials of the institu- 
tion concerned. 

Chapter 358, Senate Bill 94, authorizes the State Department of Education 
to impose certain restrictions upon degree-granting institutions to pre- 
vent the issuance of substandard degrees. 

Chapter 361, Senate Bill 101, raises the State minimum salary schedule for 
public school teachers from $3200-$5300 to $360045700. The salary 
scale for supervisors is increased from $5400-$6800 to $6200-$7800. Basic 
aid per pupil is increased from $28 to $40, and the local tax rate prerequi- 
site to sharing in the Equalization Fund is raised from 75 cents to 
87 cents on each $100 of assessable property. Funds received by the 
local units from motor vehicle license fees (A-J) are no longer con- 
sidered in calculation of Equalization and Incentive Funds. The Incen- 
tive Fund is increased from $20 to $22 per pupil. In addition each local 
school system is entitled to receive $70 per pupil for increased enroll- 
ments over the previous year. 

Chapter 373, Senate Bill 212, authorizes the creation of a State debt of 
$5,000,000 to be used exclusively for the purpose of supplementing the 
financing of the construction of public community college facilities in 
the several political subdivisions of the State. 

Chapter 374, Senate Bill 221, eliminates the restrictive definition of handi- 
capped children from Section 244 of Article 77. Removal of the restric- 
tive definition will permit the State to assist in paying for the education 
of such children who are over age eighteen. 

Chapter 375, Senate Bill 223, permits the State Board of Education to co- 
operate with other departments and agencies, both public and private, 
in providing vocational rehabilitation and in developing the necessary 
facilities and services. 

Chapter 381, Senate Bill 280, requires certain signalling lights on all new 
vehicles. Stop signals need be visible only from the rear except in the 
case of school buses. 

Chapter 412, Senate Bill 443, creates a State Scholarship Board to adminis- 
ter the proposed Federal Scholarship Program. In addition, 608 general 
State scholarships are established, which program of awards is also to 
be administered by the State Scholarship Board. 

Chapter 429, Senate Bill 519, increases the individual expense allowance 
from $100 to $250 per year for members of the Queen Anne's County 
Board of Education. 

Chapter 430, Senate Bill 535, provides a $500,000 matching State grant to 
Mt. St. Mary's College for construction of a science laboratory. 

Chapter 433, Senate Bill 557, increases the individual expense allowance 
from $100 to $200 per year for members of the Dorchester County Board 
of Education. 

Chapter 451, House Bill 347, increases from 30 to 45 acres the limitation on 
the power of county boards of education to acquire land by condemnation 
for school purposes. 

Chapter 463, House Bill 540, provides for the establishment and operation of 
an Insurance Fund for the rebuilding of county-owned public buildings, 
including school buildings in Prince George's County. 

Chapter 476, House Bill 24, provides that certain unclaimed funds of non- 
residents of the United States shall be paid to the local political subdi- 
visions for the use of the public schools. 

Chapter 493, House Bill 243, provides that members of the instructional staff 
at each of the five State training schools shall not be included in the 
classified service of the State. 



2G NiNETY-F'iFTH ANNUAL REPORT 

Chapter 519, House Bill 458, authorizes the Superintendent of Schools of 
Prince George's County, the Maryland State Police, and/or the Prince 
George's County Police to approve the location of school bus loading 
zones in that County. 

Chapter 525, House Bill 496, provides for public transportation of nonpublic 
school children in Baltimore County. The County board of education is 
authorized to establish new bus routes if necessary. 

Chapter 538, House Bill 569, increases the individual expense allowance from 
$250 to $600 per year for members of the Cecil County Board of 
Education. 

Chapter 549, House Bill 659, increases from $300 to $500 the amount of 
educational assistance which may be paid to certain war orphans by 
the State Board of Education. 

Chapter 552, House Bill 663, authorizes the Cecil County Board of Educa- 
tion to sell two school properties to the County Commissioners. 

Chapter 592, House Bill 40, amends Section 268 of Article 77 to clarify a 
reference to Maryland State College at Princess Anne. 

Chapter 601, House Bill 201, requires that the Montgomery County public 
school budget be submitted to the County Commissioners at least 45 days 
before the usual date for levying County taxes. 

Chapter 635, Senate Bill 495, authorizes the establishment of the St. Mary's 
County Youth Commission. The Commission is to make provisions for 
the recreational, educational, and health needs of youth in the County. 
The County Superintendent of Schools is a designated member of the 
Commission. 

Chapter 657, Senate Bill 362, increases from 6 to 7 the number of members 
on the Baltimore County Board of Education and increases from 3 to 5 
the number of members on the Cecil County Boai'd of Education. 

Chapter 663, Senate Bill 526, requires the Attoi-ney General to review peri- 
odically the surety bonds given by persons accepting scholarships in 
education and to require the Attorney General to take appropriate ac- 
tion should the obligations incurred under the bond not be properly 
discharged. In addition, all such scholarship holders must render the 
promised State service within five years after leaving college. 

Chapter 664, Senate Bill 537, permits legislators and other appointing au- 
thorities to transfer right of appointment to certain State scholai'ships 
to other legislators and appointing authorities. In addition it requires 
that State scholarships be awarded on or before July 1 of each year. 

Chapter 700, House Bill 251, amends Sections 2(a), (50), and 265 "of Article 
661 to require all vehicles used as school buses to be registered as such 
by the Department of Motor Vehicles. 

Chapter 845, House Bill 853, provides for school crossing guards in Anne 
Arundel County and places them under the supervision of the Board of 
Police Examiners. 

Chapter 867, House Bill 757, repeals an obsolete Charles County law relat- 
ing to the establishment and supervision of McDonogh Institute, the 
manual training school for the County. 

Chapter 885, Senate Bill 196, authorizes 'the creation of a State debt of 
$18,180,000 for capital improvements, maintenance, and equipment in 
certain State buildings. Funds from this Act are allotted to the five 
State teachers colleges as follows: 

Coppin State Teachers College $ 155,000 

State Teachers College at Bowie 107,700 

State Teachers College at Frostburg 222,300 

State Teachers College at Salisbury 191,000 

State Teachers College at Towson 390,000 

Total $1,066,000 



Maryland State Department of Education 27 

Chapter 888, House Bill 16, increases the minimum salary schedule for 
county superintendents of schools from $8000-$10,000 to $10,000-$14,000. 
The County Commissioners of the several counties are given the power 
to approve or disapprove portions of such salaries in excess of the State 
schedule. 

Chapter 889, House Bill 42, amends Section 173 of Article 77 to change 
references to "normal schools" to "teachers colleges." 

Chapter 907, House Bill 967, increases from $300 to $480 per year the indi- 
vidual expense allowance for members of the Anne Arundel County 
Board of Education. 

Joint Resolution 26, House Joint Resolution 29, requests tlie Governor to 
appoint a commission to study the expansion of public higher education 
in Maryland. 

Joint Resolution 49, House Joint Resolution 9, requests a Commission to 
study the problem of physical fitness of Maryland youth and to make 
recommendations to the State Board of Education. 

SPECIAL SESSION 

Chapter 11, House Bill 3, authorizes a $750,000 bond issue for junior college 
construction in Washington County. 



28 Ninp:ty-Fifth Annual Report 

NOTES FROM THE MINUTES OF THE STATE BOARD OF 
EDUCATION AND THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES OF THE STATE 
TEACHERS COLLEGES 

Special Meeting — July 18, 1960 

The Board met in special session to formulate an opinion on 
the subject of financial support for public schools. 

The State Superintendent in an introductory statement re- 
minded the Board that the cooperative study of financing public 
education in the State has been going on for nearly three years 
under the sponsorship of the State Department and the local 
school systems. It has been discussed in meetings of the State 
Board and in meetings all over the State. All the school superin- 
tendents are in favor of the plan proposed. The plan proposed as 
a result of this study, the so-called Mort Plan, reported in detail 
in Education for Our Times, A State Action Program, issued by 
the State Department of Education in May, 1959, merely extends 
the Equalization Plan so that one county may have as good a 
program as another if it makes the same effort. In brief, the 
proposal is that : 

The State should share in the total cost of education as authorized 
by law. 

Each local school system should be able to provide the same quality of 
education for the same tax effort. 

The State's share should average approximately 50 per cent on a State- 
wide basis. Each local unit's percentage share will depend on its 
relative tax ability and its educational need. 

The State's share should be based on equalized assessments and on 
equitable measures of need. 

The motion was carried by the Board to accept in principle 
the financial plan as presented, subject to modifications which 
will include some type of flexible minimum and maximum to be 
specifically incorporated following further study and agreement 
by the Board. 

The Board agreed to meet in the evening of August 31, 1960, 
for the purpose of considering the specific proposal for a flexible 
minimum and maximum to be incorporated in the plan. The 
staff of the State Department was asked to prepare a report on 
the plans for the Board's consideration. 

August 31, 1960 

The Board was informed that Bylaw 16 had been reviewed 
by the Assistant Attorney General and found that "it is broad 
enough to permit those counties which keep their financial rec- 
ords on an accrual basis to report on an accrual basis." 

Action of the State Board included : 

Decision that all resolutions of the State Board of Educa- 
tion for formal approval be written in the form of resolutions 
and that each be numbered by year and resolution number. 



Maryland State Department of Education 29 

Appointment of six rather than three committees of the 
State Board to work with the State Superintendent of Education 
and his staff to consider matters and make recommendations to 
the State Board. These committees, each with one member and 
with the President of the Board as ex-officio member of each, 
covered the following fields — State Department of Education 
headquarters, public schools, higher education — as well as other 
problems involving the educational program beyond the high 
school level — vocational rehabilitation, public libraries, and ad- 
vanced planning. 

Adoption of revised standards for nonpublic schools offering 
instruction in the following specialized areas — art, barbering, 
beauty culture, business, dance, drafting, electronics, flight, 
music, and practical nursing. Following the November 25, 1959, 
meeting of the State Board of Education when General Statidards 
for No7ipublic Schools Offermg Instriictioyis in Specialized Areas 
were adopted, copies of these standards were distributed to in- 
terested schools. Among the changes proposed in a subsequent 
meeting by representatives of these schools was the desirability 
of presenting all standards applicable to a given type of school 
in one document. The documents were developed in this form. 

Adoption of Maryland Standards for No7ipublic Schools — 
Nursery Schools and Kindergarteyis , and revocation of all pre- 
viously existing standards applying to nonpublic nursery schools 
and kindergartens. "Proposed Standards for Nonpublic Nursery 
Schools and Kindergartens" had been presented to the Board 
for preliminary review at the meeting in February of 1960. A 
meeting was held with the owners of such schools and their sug- 
gestions were incorporated into the standards. In addition, cer- 
tain changes were made in order to expand and clarify some of 
the sections of the bulletin which had not been thoroughly under- 
stood. 

Approval of the budget requests for Headquarters 
($1,111,842), Vocational Rehabilitation ($1,498,774), and the 
State Teachers Colleges ($6,044,064) amounting to $8,654,680, 
an increase of $2,117,150 over the appropriation for fiscal year, 
1961. 

Approval of the appointment of Mrs. Rozelle J. Miller as 
Supervisor of Special Education, effective September 1, 1960, to 
succeed Dr. Geneva E. Flickinger now Supervisor of Adult Edu- 
cation. 

Approval of a revision of Bylaw 62 which now reads as 
follows: "Only citizens of the United States shall be employed 
as teachers in the public school system in the counties or ad- 
mitted to or be employed by the State Teachers Colleges. For 
good and sufficient reason, however, the State Superintendent of 
Schools, upon request of the local school system, or in the case of 
the State Teachers Colleges, upon the request of the president, 
may make an exception to the provision of this bylaw, but he 
shall report all such exceptions to the State Board of Education." 



30 NiNETY-FiFTii Annual Report 

Special Meeting — October 11, 1960 

The Board approved with some modification the Balanced 
Partnership (Mort) Plan for financial support of public educa- 
tion in Maryland. This plan is the result of several years of study 
by the superintendents of schools, the State Board of Education, 
the State Department of Education, and lay groups, with Dr. 
Paul R. Mort of Columbia University as consultant. With the 
modification, approved by the Board, State aid would be limited 
in each local school system to support of an expenditure per pupil 
unit not greater than $20 more than the preceding year at what- 
ever per cent as a State-wide average the State Legislature may 
determine. 

Special Meeting — October 26, 1960 

The Board approved a plan, subject to several suggestions 
of its members to be finalized at the November meeting, to make 
a transition to professorial rank in the State teachers colleges. 
This plan resulted from proposals of a committee of State 
teachers college presidents and members of the State Department 
of Education appointed at the request of the State Board to study 
this transition. 

November 30, 1960 

Each member of the Board was given a copy of the revised 
policies on professorial rank at the State teachers colleges, which 
it approved at a special meeting on October 26, 1960, but which 
needed some clarification and rewording. The revised policies 
follow : 

1. That as a general rule not more than 55 per cent of the faculty 
occupy the ranks of Professor and Associate Professor, and that 
not more than 30 per cent of the faculty occupy the rank of Professor 

2. That the criteria be applied to current faculty in determining rank 
status for the year 1961-62, except that retroactive requirements 
such as "70 hours in the teaching field" and "Master's plus 45 hours" 
shall not be used in the 1961-62 transition 

3. That in the transition from the 1960-61 scale to the 1961-62 scale, 
each faculty member be guaranteed one increment in the rank to 
which he is transferred 

Criteria for Professorial Rank 

Professor 

1. The earned doctorate, including at least 70 semester hours of credit 
in graduate and undergraduate courses in the subject field which 
the person teaches 

2. Eight years of successful teaching experience, five years of which 
shall be at the college level. In unusual circumstances research or 
other comparable professional activity may be accepted as fulfilling 
a part of the required years of teaching. 

3. Demonstrated proficiency in teaching 

4. Demonstrable evidence of continuing interest in the area of special- 
ization through such activities as scholarly research, productive 
activity, and participation in professional societies 

5. Evidence of superior service in such areas as assuming committee 
responsibilities, working with students individually or in groups. 



Maryland State Department of Education 31 

performing assigned administrative duties, cooperating effectively 
with professional colleagues, participating and leading in civic and 
community activities 

Associate Professor 

1. Doctor's degree noi'mally required. In unusual circumstances an 
individual may be considered if he has the Master's degree plus 45 
hours in the subject field which he teaches. 

2. Five years of successful teaching experience with at least three 
years at the college level. In unusual circumstances research or 
other comparable professional activity may be accepted as fulfilling 
a part of the required years of teaching. 

3. Demonstrated proficiency in teaching 

4. Demonstrable evidence of continuing interest in the area of special- 
ization through such activities as scholarly research, productive 
activity, and paxiicipation in professional societies 

5. Evidence of commendable service with such areas as assuming com- 
mittee responsibilities, working with students individually or in 
groups, performing assigned administrative duties, cooperating 
effectively with professional colleagues, participating and leading 
in civic and community activities 

Assistant Professor 

1. Doctor's degree is desirable. Minimum requirement Master's plus 
30 semester hours in the subject field which the person teaches. 
Under unusual circumstances individuals holding the Master's 
degree may be considered. 

2. Teaching experience is desirable. 

3. Marked growth in quality of teaching 

4. Demonstrable evidence of continued growth in such areas as re- 
search, scholarly activities, and participation in pi'ofessional 
societies 

5. Evidence of ability and willingness to participate in such ai"eas as 
assuming committee responsibilities, working with students indi- 
vidually or in groups, pei-forming assigned administrative duties, 
cooperating effectively with professional colleagues, participating 
and leading in civic and community activities 

Instructor 

1. Master's degree in the subject field which the person teaches. Under 
unusual circumstances individuals with a Bachelor's degree may be 
considered. 

2. Teaching experience is desirable but not required. 

3. Evidence of potential in college teaching 

4. Demonstrated interest in, and undex'standing of, scholarly research 
productive activity, and professional societies 

5. Promise of ability and evidence of willingness to participate in such 
areas as assuming committee responsibilities, working with students 
individually or in groups, perfoi'ming assigned administrative duties, 
cooperating effectively with professional colleagues, participating 
and leading in civic and community activities 

The state Superintendent reported that the Council of Chief 
State School Officers would hold its annual meeting in Baltimore 
during the week of November 5, 1961. The organization is com- 
posed of one school official from each of the fifty states as well as 
Guam, American Samoa, Canal Zone, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin 
Islands. The United States Commissioner of Education and cer- 
tain members of his staff usually are in attendance, as are certain 
representatives from various state departments interested in the 



32 Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 

subject under discussion. The deliberations of this Council are 
of considerable importance and national concern. 

It is planned that a part of the program will be devoted to a 
study of the organization and operation of the Maryland State 
Department of Education. 

Action of the State Board included : 

Authorization for the State Superintendent to make appoint- 
ments of classified employees to the State Department of Educa- 
tion, subject to final confirmation by the State Board of Educa- 
tion. (Resolution No. 1960-lE) 

Authorization for the State Superintendent to make appoint- 
ments of classified employees to the State teachers colleges, sub- 
ject to final confirmation by the Board of Trustees of the State 
Teachers Colleges. (Resolution No. 1960-lT) 

Approval of professional staff of the State Department of 
Education to pursue such graduate study during the regular 
school year and during summer sessions as may be necessary to 
qualify for higher degrees ; and authorization for the State Super- 
intendent to approve such programs of graduate study and the 
administrative arrangements related thereto upon proper ap- 
plication by a staff member. (Resolution No. 1960-2E) 

Approval of the 1962 consolidated budget request in the 
amount of $117,731,519 which includes the total public school 
budget of $102,210,128. The consolidated request is an increase 
of $5,682,100 over the 1961 appropriation. (Resolution No. 1960- 
3E) 

Authorization for the State Superintendent to initiate a 
study designed to explore the possibility of setting up a State- 
wide system of 12-month employment of selected teachers; the 
funds for making this study to be solicited from a foundation 
interested in such a project; and the local school superintendents, 
the Maryland State Teachers' Association, and the Maryland 
Congress of Parents and Teachers to be fully consulted in con- 
nection with the aforesaid study. (Resolution No. 1960-4E) 

February 22, 1961 

Members of the Board were given copies of the Report on 
Teacher' Education Scholarship Program, 1960. A condensed 
summary follows : 

Number 1960 

Applicants who took the qualifying test 958 

Eligible candidates 754 

Scholarships available 233 

a. For current phase 152 

b. For replacements 81 

Applicants offered scholarships 703 

Accepting 233 

Declining — total 470 

Declining by forfeit 59 

Declining after acceptance 69 

Awards made from State-wide eligible list 43 

Total number of scholarships in force 608 



Maryland State Department of Education 33 

Dr. William M. Brish, Chairman of the State Committee on 
Educational Television, submitted to the Board a report: "The 
Use of Television for Instructional Purposes — A Viewpoint." As 
stated in this report: "Education today faces responsibilities 
that are both old and enduring and new and perplexing. The 
tempo of our way of life has speeded up. We now live in a cul- 
ture that is acquiring new knowledge at a tremendous pace and 
is applying at an ever increasing rate the discoveries of science 
to industry, business, transportation, communication, and to all 
the aspects of everyday living. As a result, many new resources 
have quickly become a regular and accepted part of our lives. 
... Do media which have brought about spectacular improve- 
ment in communications have implications for teaching pro- 
cedures and school organization? Can television make a worth- 
while contribution to the education program? Will it help to 
expand the educational opportunities for pupils? Is it a resource 
that can improve the quality of instruction? Not only are ques- 
tions such as these being asked in many school systems all over 
the United States, but many projects, experiments, and studies 
involving the use of television for instruction are actually being 
conducted. These projects vary in size from installations in a 
single school building to a network linking all the schools of a 
large system. As a result, many pupils are now regularly receiv- 
ing some part of their formal education by television." 

Several television projects are now being conducted in Mary- 
land : 

1. The Eastei'n Shore Project 

2. The Greater Washington Area Project 

3. The Baltimore TV Activities 

4. The Washington County Closed-Circuit Educational Television 
Project 

5. Baltimore County Activities 

In general, the use of television for instructional purposes in 
Maryland and elsewhere indicates that it has both potentials and 
limitations that affect its contribution to the school program and 
that these are an outgrowth of the nature of the medium itself. 
When television is used, the potentials and limitations indicate 
that: 

a. There must be careful planning by studio teachers, classroom teach- 
ei's, and the supervisory staff. 

b. It should be coordinated M^ith the other experiences of the school day. 

c. Pupils need to understand how to use television as an educational 
experience. 

d. The televised lesson should be more than a passive experience for 
the pupil. 

e. New procedures must be developed to handle situations growing 
out of the limitations of television. 

In order to broaden interest among the various school sys- 
tems of the State in the use of television for instructional pur- 
poses, the State Committee on Educational Television is prepared 
to offer suggestions or advice to school systems ; provide current 
information about the status of State and national projects ; 
participate upon request in local workshops or professional meet- 



34 NixETY-FiFTH Annual Report 

ings ; arrange for demonstrations, visits, or field trips ; hold a 
State-wide meeting for leaders in the various school systems in- 
terested in exchanging views about using television ; and assist 
in developing plans for a State program if it becomes desirable. 

Dr. David W. Zimmerman reported that this committee, 
which is composed of superintendents, supervisors, principals, 
people working directly with educational television projects in 
the State, and representatives of the State Department of Educa- 
tion, was appointed by the State Superintendent of Schools more 
than a year ago and charged with the responsibility of evaluating 
what has been accomplished in this area and developing a point 
of view for the public school systems of the State in order to 
assist them in charting the direction for this new medium of 
education. The State Superintendent pointed out that national 
committees and committees in other states are trying to deter- 
mine the place of educational television in the public school pro- 
gram, that there are many problems in connection with the use of 
television, and that at this time no one is sure which is the best 
procedure. He added that he hoped the State Committee could 
recommend a program which the State Board of Education could 
foster and support after exploring all possibilities. 

The Board agreed that this is an area in which it and the 
State Department of Education should exercise some degree of 
leadership and requested the committee to complete its study as 
soon as possible so that additional studies of costs might be made 
and the Board might make suggestions to the counties for a 
desirable educational television program. 

Dr. Zimmerman reported that he and Dr. Pullen had met 
with Dr. Philip H. Coombs and Dr. Lester A. Nelson of the Fund 
for the Advancement of Education in New York to explore the 
possibilities of a study of better utilization of staff, including 
twelve-month employment of teachers, in the local school systems 
of Maryland and the extent to which the Fund might be inter- 
ested in working with the State Department of Education and 
the local school systems in such a study. Both Dr. Coombs and 
Dr. Nelson indicated that they would be interested in discussing 
this matter with school people in the State, and Dr. Zimmerman 
and Dr. Pullen are now planning a meeting of the State Com- 
mittee on Staff Utilization and the superintendents. 

Action of the State Board included : 

Approval and adoption of the revision of Maryland stand- 
ards for communitv and junior colleges. (Resolution No. 1961- 
lE) 

Approval in principle of certain items from the proposed re- 
quirements for certification of teachers. This action was taken 
in view of the fact that local school superintendents are now re- 
cruiting teachers for another year. The proposed requirements 
for the certification of teachers were presented to the Board at 
its November, 1960, meeting. Revisions have been made since that 
time, and these proposals, which provide a basic plan for certifi- 



Maryland State Department of Education 35 

cation, were given to the members of the Board, with the sugges- 
tion that possibly sometime in the early part of April a special 
meeting be held to consider them, since the members of the Board 
had not had an opportunity to study them carefully prior to this 
meeting. 

The State Superintendent reported that he had presented to 
the school superintendents at their meeting on December 16, 
1960, a clarifying opinion concerning the purpose and use of 
cumulative records of pupil progress. At his request, the Board 
approved the incorporation of this statement into the minutes of 
the State Board of Education so that it may be a matter of public 
record. The statement follows : 

The public school system is dedicated to the purpose of providing 
the best possible educational program for each individual pupil. This 
program is developed on the basis of comprehensive information con- 
cerning the ability, interests, and needs of the pupil. A good teacher 
must know and understand each pupil he teaches in order to help the 
pupil learn successfully. A system of cumulative records, including 
progress reports, subject grades, test scores, medical records, psycho- 
logical reports, and selective guidance notes, is necessary in order to 
provide for the systematic gathering and use of information concerning 
the pupil. Accordingly, the State Board of Education has prescribed 
certain uniform record forms to be used by the local school systems in 
setting up such a system for pupils. These forms and the manual for 
their use \yere developed by the staff of the State Department of 
Education in cooperation with representatives from each local school 
system. 

In helping the pupil to learn, the teachers and other school per- 
sonnel work closely with parents, interpreting to them information 
about the pupil's ability and achievement in school and receiving in 
turn information about the pupil's development which the parents 
think may be helpful. The pupil's cumulative I'ecords may be used as 
a basis for mutual exchange of information with parents and are avail- 
able to the parents or legal guardians for discussion in a conference 
with appropriate school personnel. School administrators and teachers 
recognize that in the education of children they act as the agent of the 
parents or legal guardians and that parents or legal guardians are 
entitled to full information about the child. Indeed the best interests 
of the child can be served by the full cooperation of parent and school. 

Special Meeting — April 19, 1961 

Mr, Wilbur S. Hoopengardner, chairman of the Superin- 
tendents' Committee on Certification, led the discussion of the 
"Proposed Requirements for Certification" as revised through 
February 22, 1961. At the February meeting the Board requested 
that the proposed requirements be sent to the local school super- 
intendents, with the request that they discuss them with the 
members of their local boards of education. At its February 
meeting the Board had also approved in principle, because of the 
time element, the section of the requirements headed "Based on 
Credit." 

The Board gave general approval in principle to the plan as 
presented in the certification report. Prior to the May meeting 
when this subject would also be considered, three Board mem- 



36 Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 

bers were requested to meet with the Superintendents' Com- 
mittee on Certification to revise the material in light of the 
discussion of this special meeting and in light of any further 
questions the members of the Board might direct to this special 
committee. 

May 31, 1961 

In the annual election of officers of the State Board of 
Education, Mr. Jerome Framptom, Jr., was re-elected president. 
Mrs. Kenneth S. Cole, a member of the State Board since 1956, 
was elected vice-president, succeeding Mr. George C. Rhoderick, 
Jr., whose term expired. Mr. C. William Hetzer of Williamsport 
was appointed by the Governor to succeed Mr. Rhoderick. The 
Board adopted the following resolution on Mr. Rhoderick : 

Resolution on Mr. George C. Rhoderick, Jr. 

The State Board of Education wishes to express its sincere regret 
upon the retirement of Mr. George C. Rhoderick, Jr., as a mem- 
ber of the Board and as its vice-president. The Board desires to have 
recorded in its minutes this expression of the high regard and respect 
which its members have accorded him since he first became a member 
of that body. 

Mr. Rhoderick has been diligent and untiring in carrying out his 
duties as a member of the Board. Therefore, in consideration of his 
outstanding abilities and accomplishments, the Board wishes to extend 
its warm appreciation to him for his services to public education in 
Maryland during the past four years. 

George C. Rhoderick, Jr., was born in Middletown, Maryland, 
on July 26, 189.5. In 1914 he was graduated from Middletown High 
School. He entered The Johns Hopkins University College of En- 
gineering in 1915. In 1918 he was accepted for military sei'vice and was 
sent to Kelley Field, Texas, where he taught in radio school for the 
duration of the First World War. 

Mr. Rhoderick is sole owner of a publishing business in Middle- 
town which includes three weekly newspapers, The Valley Register, 
Middletown; Community Reporter, Mt. Airy; and Catoctin Enterprise, 
Thurmont. 

In 1936 Mr. Rhoderick was appointed to the Frederick County 
Board of Education where he served with distinction for eighteen years. 
He was president of the Board for nine years, and under his direction 
the excellent system of modern public schools in the county began to 
evolve. 

At the present time, Mr. Rhoderick is a member of the Governor's 
Maryland Civil War Centennial Commission and is active in many areas 
of community service and welfare. He has given unstintingly of his 
time and enei-gy to many such public endeavors. 

The members of the State Board of Education are indeed grateful 
to Mr. Rhodei'ick for the unique contributions he has made on behalf 
of public education in Maryland and again wish to express their deep 
regret upon his retirement from their membership. 

The State Superintendent presented to the Board an opinion 
dated March 8, 1961, by the Assistant Attorney General, James 
0' C. Gentry, which states: "At your request I have reviewed 
Section 165 of Article 77 which provides, 'the Board of Trustees 
shall authorize the course or courses of studies to be offered, in- 
cluding courses for observation and practice in teaching.' This 



Maryland State Department of Education 37 

office is of the opinion that the above provision merely requires 
that the Board of Trustees authorize the general or over-all pro- 
gram of study, not the specific subjects to be taught." 

The State Superintendent announced officially the accredita- 
tion of the State Teachers College at Bowie by the Middle States 
Association. 

The State Board approved the request of Dr. William E. 
Henry, President of Bowie, in accordance with the desire of his 
faculty and students, that the new Laboratory School at Bowie be 
named in honor of the late Charlotte B. Robinson, music in- 
structor at the college for thirty-seven years. 

Other action of the State Board included : 

Appointment of Dr. David W. Zimmerman to the position of 
Deputy State Superintendent of Schools, effective June 1, 1961. 

Dr. Zimmerman was made Assistant Superintendent in 
Finance and Research on March 1, 1950, and on August 31, 1955, 
his title was changed to Assistant State Superintendent and his 
duties broadened. The Attorney General ruled on October 26, 
1959, that the Assistant State Superintendent of Schools, by vir- 
tue of Section 46, Article 77 of the Annotated Code of Maryland, 
is de facto the deputy of the State Superintendent of Schools. The 
General Assembly of 1961 changed Section 46 so as to authorize 
the title of Deputy State Superintendent of Schools. 

Adoption of amendments to the State Plan for Further Ex- 
tension of Library Services to Rural Areas — Resolution No. 1961- 
3E (See section on Division of Library Extension for further 
details.) 

Grant to the University of Baltimore full authority to award 
the Bachelor of Arts degree to qualified candidates. (Resolution 
No. 1961-4E) 

Grant to Xaverian College, Silver Spring, full authority to 
award the Associate in Arts degree to qualified candidates. 
(Resolution No. 1961-5E) 

Approval of the new "Requirements for Teacher Certifica- 
tion" — Resolution No. 1961-6E. (See section on Certification for 
further details.) 

Prior to this action, Mr. Wilbur S. Hoopengardner, Chair- 
man of the Superintendents' Committee on Certification, re- 
minded the Board that at the special meeting of April 19, it had 
discussed the "Proposed Requirements for Certification" as re- 
vised through February 22, 1961, and had given general approval 
in principle to the plan as presented in the report. However, the 
Board had made suggestions concerning the report, and a com- 
mittee of the Board had been appointed to meet with the Super- 
intendents' Committee on Certification to revise the material in 
the light of the discussion. The committee held two meetings to 
consider a draft of a revised report. Mr. H. Orville Berwick re- 
ported that the Committee on Teacher Education and Profes- 
sional Standards of the State Teachers' Association had approved 



38 Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 

the proposed requirements in principle. The State Superin- 
tendent cautioned the Board that it is not possible to make an 
instrumentality such as this perfect in the beginning and that 
from time to time it might be necessary for the State Superin- 
tendent to ask the Board to make modifications in the require- 
ments. 

Repeal of Bylaw 16 which required each county board of edu- 
cation to go beyond the requirements of Section 72 of Article 77 
by preparing a statement of receipts and expenditures by in- 
dividual schools. Section 72 requires each county board of educa- 
tion to publish and distribute an annual report on the condition 
and needs of each respective local school system. (Resolution 
No. 1961-8E) 

As the Board of Trustees of the State Teachers Colleges, ap- 
proval of the 1963-1967 capital improvements budget in the 
amount of $21,807,490 which includes sub-budget totals for each 
of the five State teachers colleges. (Resolution No. 1961-lT) 

As the Board of Trustees, authorization for each of the presi- 
dents of the State teachers colleges to require all students to pay 
a curriculum fee of $10 per semester. (Resolution No. 1961-3T) 



Maryland State Department of Education 39 

DIVISION OF CERTIFICATION AND ACCREDITATION 

The services of the Division of Certification and Accredita- 
tion for the year 1960-61 may be reported generally under six 
broad headings : 

1. Certification of teachers 

2. Accreditation of educational programs 

3. School plant planning 

4. High school equivalence certificates 

5. School lunch program 

6. Teacher recruitment 

Certification 

As v^ill be seen from TABLE 49, page 123, the number of cer- 
tificates issued to teachers, supervisors, and administrators dur- 
ing the academic year 1960-61 has continued to increase. In 1959- 
60 there were 4,407 certificates of all types issued, while in the 
academic year 1960-61 there were 5,124 certificates issued in the 
over-all certification of teachers for the State. Since there were 
within the counties of Maryland 1,306 more teachers employed in 
1960-61 than in 1959-60, while only 717 additional certificates 
were issued, there is an indication that the percentage of teacher 
turnover continues to show some decrease for the State as a 
whole. Of the total number of certificates issued, 2,329 were 
emergency or other substandard certificates, while 2,795 certifi- 
cates were issued to teachers who had full qualifications for regu- 
lar certification. Thus it can be seen that 45.5 per cent of the 
certificates issued were based upon qualifications which failed to 
meet the full requirements for regular certification. However, of 
the 2,329 teachers who were issued emergency or other substand- 
ard certificates, 1,659 had met the requirements for the bac- 
calaureate degree. Over the past several years the percentage of 
teachers issued emergency or other substandard certificates but 
who held college degrees has ranged from 60 to 70 per cent. For 
the year 1960-61 this percentage is 71.2. Some teachers in this 
category have excellent qualifications and some have actually 
met Maryland's requirements for a regular certificate but have 
engaged in no recent formal study. Others have good subject 
matter preparation but lack some of the necessary professional 
preparation required for full certification. Any holder of the 
emergency or provisional degree certificate can usually with rela- 
tively little effort qualify for regular certification in one of the 
various teaching fields. 

On May 31, 1961, the State Board of Education adopted new 
basic certification requirements designated as Bylaw 77. Pro- 
posals for revision of the requirements for special teaching areas 
were also developed and are under further study by various 
groups and will probably be adopted during the 1961-62 school 
year. Among the changes in certification procedures adopted, two 



40 Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 

new approaches to certification are particularly significant. 
Graduates of institutions accredited by the National Council for 
the Accreditation of Teacher Education who are recommended 
by the college may be issued a Standard Professional Certificate 
without reference to the detailed course work included in the 
students' college programs. Reciprocity with states within the 
Northeast Reciprocity Compact Area for the issuance of the 
Standard Professional Certificate at both the elementary and 
secondary levels has also been provided. 

Accreditation 

Institutions of Higher Learning 

Two new junior college programs were given initial ap- 
proval to operate in the State during the past academic year. One 
institution, formerly offering baccalaureate degrees in Law and 
Commerce only, was given conditional approval for the issuance 
of the B.A. degree, subject to review within a three-year period. 
Approval for the awarding of the Associate in Arts degree was 
granted to one nonpublic junior college. 

Members of the Department served on the committee of the 
Middle States Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools 
which re-evaluated former accreditation of one college of the 
State. One additional State institution was given initial accredi- 
tation by Middle States during the academic year as a result of a 
review of progress on recommendations made in a previous evalu- 
ation. The Department reviewed the proposed program for two 
prospective institutions at college or university level on which 
action was withheld pending further development of the plans for 
operation. 

During the academic year the Maryland State Board of Edu- 
cation approved programs for the preparation of secondary 
school teachers at three of the State teachers colleges. The State 
Board of Education also approved the awarding of Bachelor of 
Arts and Bachelor of Science degrees to nonteacher education 
students for the three above-mentioned State teachers colleges. 
During the year the teachers colleges have continued study and 
development of the curriculum in order to meet present needs. At 
the close of the academic year the State-approved colleges and 
universities could be classified as follows: 15 two-year colleges 
and 29 four-year colleges and universities, 21 of which were 
approved for teacher education. 

Nonpublic Academic Schools Below College Level 

The number and kind of academic schools below college level 
which were operating in the State in 1960-61 and which had been 
approved by the Department were as follows : 



Maryland State Department of Edi'cation 41 

Type of School INuniber 

Secondary 52 

Secondary-Elementary 8 

Secondary-Elementary-Kindergarten 1 

Secondary-Elementary-Kindergai-ten-Nursery 

School 1 

Tutoring- 6 

Special 18 

Elementary 4 

Elementary-Kindergarten 5 

Elementary-Kindergarten-Nursery School 4 

Primary 1 

Primary-Kindergarten 5 

Primary-Kindergarten-Nursery School 4 

Kindergarten 37 

Kindergarten-Nursery School 19 

Nursery School 32 

Total 197 

Nonpublic Secondary Schools 

On the approved list of nonpublic academic secondary 
schools there are 62 regular secondary schools and 6 tutoring 
schools. Of these 68 schools, 45 were church-operated and 23 
were privately operated. There are other nonpublic schools in 
Maryland which are not on the list since church-operated schools 
and private schools which have a charter from the Maryland 
Assembly are exempt from approval requirements ; however, any 
of these institutions may request approval of the State Superin- 
tendent of Schools at their discretion. 

INoiipuhlic Nursery Schools, Kindergartens, Elenu>nlary Schools, 
and Special schools 

These schools are operating in the following ways : 

Cooperatives with parents participating 34 

Cooperatives administered by parents who do not participate 

daily 12 

Smaller centers (8 groups or less) 36 

Larger centers (more than 3 groups), owned by individuals. 10 
Schools governed by board of directors (two of these centers 

offer a summer program ) 28 

Church-sponsored centers 6 

Others (sponsored by housing projects, civic groups, colleges, 

etc.) 15 

Total 141 

There were 20 centers which provided, in addition to an 
educational program, a service for the full-day care of children 
of working parents. Twelve of these centers were approved in 
January, 1948, when the law requiring approval went into effect. 
Enrollment in the nonpublic elementary and preschool centers 



42 NiNETY-P'iFTH ANNUAL REPORT 

during the two years 1959-60 and 1960-61, including new schools 
approved during each of these years were as follows : 

Enrollment * 

Type of School 1959-60 1960-61 

Nursery schools 1,938 1,888 

Kindergartens 2,383 2,34") 

Elementary schools 3,051 f 3,122 

Special schools 621 839 

Total 7,993 % 8,194 

* Figures are those for all schools listed as operating during the 
year, including new schools and those removed from list during year 
and closed at end of year. 

t In the five schools terminating at eighth grade there were 181 
children enrolled. 

t In the total enrollment there were 1,338 day-care children en- 
rolled. Actually the total number of children attending centers where 
a day-care program is opei-ated as a part of that center in addition 
to the approved part of the program is appreciably larger than the 
figure of 1,338. Many of the centers do not include in their annual 
reports the enrollment figures for children in the unapproved part 
of the operation. 

Nonpublic Specialized Schools 

In this classification eight schools applied for approval and 
received certificates and 28 schools received tentative approvals. 
Thirty-one schools closed in the period July 1, 1959, to June 30, 
1960. During the period of this report consultants were engaged 
in connection with the approval of electronics courses and courses 
in automation. Experts from television stations, industry, the 
Federal Communications Commission, and the Johns Hopkins 
Research Laboratories were among those consulted. In August 
of 1960 the State Board of Education approved the revised stand- 
ards for nonpublic specialized schools. At the same time teacher 
certification standards were approved. In the spring of 1961 the 
Legislature passed legislation requiring the licensing of solicitors 
for certain nonpublic schools. Standards have been developed for 
use in the licensing of solicitors and are awaiting final approval 
of the State Law Department and the State Superintendent of 
Schools. During the year new legislation pertaining to the opera- 
tion of schools in beauty culture was enacted. In May of 1961 a 
State-wide meeting of beauty school owners and operators was 
held under the sponsorship of the Department for the purpose of 
study of the new legislation and discussion of operating pro- 
cedures resulting therefrom. A representative of the Division 
attended the annual convention of the National Association of 
State Approval agencies in Charleston, South Carolina. During 
the academic year July 1, 1960, to June 30, 1961, approximately 
32,600 students were enrolled in the nonpublic specialized schools 
and approximately 1,000 teachers were employed in these schools. 



Maryland State Department of Education 43 

High School Equivalence 

As of June 30, 1961, the equivalence program completed its 
twentieth year. At the close of the first ten-year period, June, 
1951, approximately 7,000 certificates had been issued. The 
number more than doubled during the next ten-year period and 
now totals 23,520. 

Several business firms and industrial plants are offering 
study courses to prepare employees for the examination, and at 
the penal institutions, where courses are offered as rehabilitation 
therapy, a special examination is given at least once annually. 

School Plant Planning 

During the past year the Assistant Director of the Division 
examined and recommended for approval the following: 

Sites 45 Contracts 106 

Preliminary plans 113 Deeds, right of ways, etc. 128 

Final plans 96 Change orders 3.32 

Consultative services were provided by the Division to super- 
intendents and architects in the broad aspects of school plant 
planning. The Assistant Director of the Division also served as 
coordinator of the teachers college construction program, work- 
ing with the college presidents and various State agencies in 
developing master plans, immediate and long-range capital pro- 
grams and budgets, educational specifications, and architectural 
planning for individual buildings and the supervision of their 
construction. 

Teacher Recruitment 

During the 1960-61 school year the public schools of Mary- 
land required a total of 1,413 high school teachers in the various 
subject areas to fill vacant positions and to staff new classrooms. 
However, the teacher preparation institutions of the State were 
able to supply only 749 teacher graduates to meet that demand. 
The most severe shortages continued to exist in the fields of 
mathematics and the physical sciences. During the same period, 
the public schools needed 1,270 elementary teachers to staff their 
classrooms. A total of 553 prospective teachers were graduated 
from State colleges and universities in June, 1960. As in the past, 
the shortages in teaching personnel, on both the high and ele- 
mentary school levels, were met by recruiting out-of-State 
teachers, former teachers, and by employing teachers with emer- 
gency or provisional certificates. 



44 Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 

Teacher Education Scholarship Program 

The 1960 Teacher Education Scholarship examination was 
administered on Saturday, February 27, 1960, in twenty-five 
State-wide test centers. For the first time since 1957 the same 
examination was used for both the Teacher Education Scholar- 
ship Program and the General Scholarship Program. Students 
made their choice of scholarship at the time of registration. 

Pre-test registration indicated that 1,847 students were in- 
terested in sitting for the examination. The test was actually 
administered to 1,548 students at the various test centers. A 
breakdown of the registration data for the 1,548 students is as 
follows : 

Type of Registration No. 

Teacher Education only 468 

Senatorial only 590 

Teacher Education and Senatorial 490 

1,548 
Total Teacher Education 958 

Of the 958 Teacher Education candidates 754, or 79 per cent, 
were placed on the eligible list. 

The first scholarship offers were sent out on April 4, 1960, 
including scholarship openings accrued from previous years. A 
total of 233 Teacher Education scholarships were available for 
distribution. Of the 754 eligible candidates, 703 were offered 
scholarships. Two hundred thirty-three students accepted and 
470 declined. Sixty-three of those declining did so by forfeit, and 
69 declined after having previously indicated acceptance of the 
offer. 

The 1960 phase of the Teacher Education Scholarship Pro- 
gram was terminated on November 28, 1960, when acceptance of 
the final award was received by the Department. 

Driver Education 

The 1961 session of the Maryland General Assembly enacted 
legislation which will provide special financial support for public 
school driver education programs. It is believed that this legis- 
lation will have a most salutary effect on the quantitative and 
qualitative growth of driver education programs in this State. 

School Lunch and Direct Distribution of Commodities 

Program 

School Lunch and Special Milk Programs 

To insure the lowest possible distributive cost to the schools 
participating in the School Lunch and Special Milk Programs, 
reimbursements were paid during the 1960-61 school year on the 



Maryland State Department of Education 45 

applicable fraction of a cent. The desired result in that dis- 
tributor cost of milk remained more stable was achieved. For the 
most part there was also a decrease in distributor costs of milk 
to the schools. State-wide, there was a 5.2 per cent increase in 
participation in the Special Milk Program in 1960-61 over 1959- 
60. For the School Lunch Program there was a State-wide in- 
crease of 8.7 per cent in participation over the previous year. 
With the exception of two counties, all counties and Baltimore 
City shared in this increase in participation. Due to the increased 
participation it was necessary to reduce the rate of reimburse- 
ment to the local school units from $.04 to $.025, effective April 1, 
1961. A later supplementary payment was made to the local 
units, and the over-all reimbursement per lunch for the entire 
year was approximately $.0375. 

Direct Distribution of Commodities Program 

For the school year July 1, 1960, to June 30, 1961, 851 
schools participated in the program of distribution of U. S. De- 
partment of Agriculture donated commodities. This program was 
administered and supervised through the local boards of educa- 
tion and through direct contact with the participating nonpublic 
schools. Current agreements covering the distribution of U. S. 
Department of Agriculture donated commodities were renewed 
except for the agreement with the Department of Catholic 
Education. In the interest of more direct and less complicated 
administrative procedures in handling the work with the schools 
of the Baltimore Diocese of the Roman Catholic Church, indi- 
vidual agreements were obtained from the schools formerly 
sponsored and administered through the Department of Catholic 
Education. 

Foods were distributed to all eligible schools and school sys- 
tems based on average daily participation, inventories on hand at 
the local level, and knowledge of past experiences in utilization. 



46 Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 

division of instruction 

Supervisory Assistance to the Counties and to Individual 

Schools in the Areas of Organization, Administration, 

AND Instruction 

The annual Maryland Conference on Secondary Education, 
attended by high school supervisors and principals from all local 
units, was held on March 23 and 24, 1961. Dr. Jerome S. Bruner, 
Professor of Psychology, Harvard University, set the stage for 
the conference in the opening session when he discussed recently 
developed concepts of the psychology of learning. In subsequent 
sessions, applications of these principles were developed in the 
fields of English, mathematics, and the fine arts. Panel discus- 
sions in each of these areas were stimulated by nationally known 
authorities including Dr. Joseph Mersand, Past President of the 
National Council of Teachers of English ; Dr. Howard O. Fehr, 
Head of the Department of Teachers of Mathematics, Teachers 
College, Columbia University ; and Dr. Edwin Ziegfield, Head of 
the Department of Fine and Industrial Arts, Teachers College, 
Columbia University. 

The Maryland Conference on Elementary Education, which 
was held this year on April 13 and 14, 1961, is one means by 
which supervisors and administrators in the State keep abreast 
with new developments in the elementary school. The speakers, 
all eminent educators actively engaged in study and revision of 
elementary school programs, gave the newest developments in 
selection of subject matter and the organization of schools for 
most effective learning. Specific subject areas receiving special 
emphasis at this Conference were social studies, language arts, 
science, and mathematics. 

Revision of Curriculum 

Revision of curriculum continues to be a major concern in 
practically all of the school systems. This year many of the 
counties continued revision of the elementary school social studies 
courses. This was usually done with careful study of the high 
school program in order that the result might be a continuous 
sequence from grade one through grade twelve. Particular atten- 
tion is being directed to concepts and values relating to conserva- 
tion of resources, world interdependence, dignity and worth of 
the individual, and responsibility for achieving democratic 
action. There is also much emphasis on broadening the content 
to include the geographical, economical, political, historical, and 
cultural aspects of each problem selected for study. 

Science and mathematics courses for all grades are also re- 
ceiving considerable attention in most school systems. 

Language arts continues to receive attention in many of the 
systems. New procedures and materials are being used in teach- 



Maryland State Department of Education 47 

ing pupils to read. Most systems recognize the ever present need 
to place more emphasis on oral and written English. 

Assistance in Accreditation 

Individual high schools scheduled for evaluation by the 
regional accrediting association were assisted in their prepara- 
tions for this service. Also, two members of the Department staff 
participated on invitation of one local unit on a committee to con- 
duct a detailed evaluation of a junior high school in that school 
system. 

Along with helping the high schools in preparing for their 
evaluation, the Division assisted with several less formalized 
evaluations. Using the Boston Elementary Evaluative Criteria 
several elementary schools were evaluated in St. Mary's and Anne 
Arundel counties. There were special projects carried out by 
using the services of a number of State supervisors plus several 
local supervisors and local elementary school principals to form 
a visiting committee. These committees spent two days in each 
school and then gave written reports including commendations 
and recommendations for the particular school's use. 

In-service Education of Teachers 

Programs for the in-service education of principals, teachers, 
and other local staff members were marked by their variety and 
number during the year. Most of these programs were for sev- 
eral days' duration. 

All the local systems recognize the value of in-service educa- 
tion for teachers. Such education involves teachers in course of 
study revision, in study, in experimentation, in working with 
specialists, and in evolving new and better techniques of teach- 
ing. The practice of giving school time for in-service education 
is growing; some systems give one half day per month, others 
three or more days each school year. Many systems use the last 
two weeks in June for in-service work. 

The child study program continues as a phase of the in- 
service programs for the teachers in the State. In many instances 
the responsibility of leadership for the program has now been 
assumed by the local school systems. The State Department of 
Education provided consultant service from the Child Study In- 
stitute at the University of Maryland to four local school systems. 
There is need to encourage a renewed interest in child study. Op- 
portunities are being provided for the many new teachers who 
have entered the local school systems in the past five years to get 
information on child growth and development and the techniques 
for understanding the pupils in their classrooms. 

Interest continues in the changing emphasis in mathematics, 
and again particular attention was focused on the improvement 
of the teaching of arithmetic in the elementary school. During 



48 NiNETY-P'iFTii Annual lli-:roRT 

June a series of two- week workshops for classroom teachers were 
sponsored by this Department. One workshop was held in Salis- 
bury for all teachers of the first, second, and third grades in 
Wicomico and Somerset counties ; another was held in Snow Hill 
for Worcester County. Both of these followed last year's work- 
shop on general content and this year the emphasis was on the 
content for the primary grades with much consideration and 
thought given to procedures and materials. A third workshop 
for elementary and junior high school teachers of Allegany and 
Garrett counties was held at the State Teachers College at Frost- 
burg. The purpose was to develop a better understanding of some 
of the basic principles of mathematics that are required in teach- 
ing the newer materials in arithmetic. As knowledge and uses of 
mathematics develop and changes in curriculum are proposed, the 
need for more in-service education will continue to increase. 

A two-week institute on elementary school mathematics for 
principals, supervisors, and administrators sponsored coopera- 
tively by this Department and Anne Arundel County was held at 
the Severna Park High School in Anne Arundel County. The 
consultant-lecturers for the workshop were mathematicians and 
psychologists directly involved in the outstanding experimental 
mathematics projects currently being conducted in this country. 
More than 175 participants from 19 local school systems and 
teacher-training institutions attended. 

The Use of Television in Instruction 

Television continues to be used as a means of enriching class- 
room activities and also in direct teaching, especially in art, 
music, French, and science. The programs in the State, with the 
exception of the nationally known experiment in Washington 
County, are telecast from local commercial stations in Baltimore 
City, Washington, D. C, and Salisbury. These programs are 
watched not only by the pupils in the classrooms but also by par- 
ents. Direct teaching has as its "raison d'etre" the fact that many 
elementary teachers at the present time need additional informa- 
tion and skills in some subjects such as a foreign language, music, 
and art; and local school systems cannot furnish all of the special 
teachers needed in these areas. 

The television teacher can be a specialist in the subject with 
time to develop lesson materials and procedures and thus is able 
to present rich and varied lessons. As the programs have pro- 
gressed, however, it has become apparent that success with this 
medium is in the hands of the regular classroom teacher. Pupils, 
if they are to really profit by television, do not just "watch" a 
program ; there must be preparation for each lesson and constant 
follow-up. This requires a technique on the part of the classroom 
teacher new and different from that usually followed when he is 
in direct control of material to be presented to the class. It also 



Maryland State Dkpaktment of Education 49 

requires a way of learning on the part of the pupil which is dif- 
ferent from that when he is face to face with his instructor. 

State-wide Studies 

Members of the Division of Instruction were actively in- 
volved, along with professional representatives from the local 
units, in a number of State-wide studies which were initiated, 
continued, or concluded during the past year. Of paramount im- 
portance among these was the completion of the report of the 
State Committee to Study Maryland Public Secondary Schools 
under the chairmanship of Dr. David W. Zimmerman, Deputy 
State Superintendent of Schools. This report, the result of a two- 
year, comprehensive analysis of the State's high school program, 
will be distributed locally in the fall of 1961 for critical study by 
superintendents, central staff members, high school principals 
and teachers, teacher-training institutions, boards of education, 
and interested citizens. Based upon a revised expression of philo- 
sophical beliefs and objectives and in the light of the current 
major controversies in secondary education, it presents principles 
and policies for the guidance of local school systems in the organ- 
ization, administration, and services of their schools, including 
detailed treatments of each area of the curriculum. Contributing 
to the preparation of this report, in addition to members of the 
Department staff, were representatives from each of the twenty- 
four local school systems. 

Consultant service was rendered by Dr. Matthew P. Gaff ney, 
formerly Larsen Professor of Education, Harvard University; 
Dr. Will French, Emeritus Professor of Education, Teachers 
College, Columbia University; Dr. William T. Gruhn, Professor 
of Education, University of Connecticut ; and Mr. Harry Spencer, 
Director of Instruction, Floral Park, New York. Dr. Vernon 
Anderson, Dean of the College of Education, University of Mary- 
land, and Dr. Wilbur Devilbiss, President, State Teachers College 
at Salisbury, met frequently with the Committee and provided 
invaluable assistance. 

A related report on high school standards, designed to com- 
plement the foregoing, is now in the process of preparation by a 
second State Committee appointed in the spring of 1961. It is 
anticipated that this report will be ready for initial release in 
about one year. 

In striving for an effective educational program there is need 
to examine constantly what all of the schools are doing and to 
make revisions which more nearly meet changing economic, po- 
litical, and social conditions. It seems appropriate at this time to 
make a State-wide study of elementary schools and to give careful 
thought to goals, principles of learning, the nature of the ele- 
mentary school child, and the learning he needs for the world in 
which he is living and will live in the future. A steering com- 
mittee composed of supervisors, principals, members of the 



50 Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 

Division of Instruction at the State Department of Education, 
and the Maryland Superintendents Committee on Supervision 
and Curriculum was organized this year. This committee has 
drafted tentative plans for a study of elementary schools which 
should get under way in 1961-62. 

Consultative Services and Cooperation in Curriculum 

Development and in the Development and 

Improvement of Materials of Instruction 

In addition to the assistance rendered to the local school sys- 
tems by members of the Division of Instruction, arrangements 
were made with colleges and other agencies both in and out of 
the State to have resource people with highly specialized knowl- 
edge and skill serve as consultants. By this means more and 
better consultant service for teachers was provided in literature, 
language arts, social studies, science, and other areas. In addi- 
tion to regional meetings, consultants worked with many individ- 
ual school systems in the areas of language arts, mathematics, 
and social studies. 

One of the highly important activities this year has been the 
improvement of science education in grades one through twelve. 
This included working with high school science teachers in class- 
room observations and faculty meetings, assisting in the selection 
of science equipment and the development of science projects 
for school science fairs, providing for county and school groups 
other consultant help in science, and attending county and re- 
gional conferences for science teachers. 

At the elementary level lectures and demonstrations on the 
teaching of science have been given. The supervisors have served 
as consultants for a number of school committees working on 
elementary science, planning school science fairs, and demon- 
strating how to use science kits and science tables to improve 
learning in science. 

The New Curriculum Center 

Considerable time was spent in organizing curriculum ma- 
terials at the Division of Library Extension for the new State 
Curriculum Center. The State Committee for the Curriculum 
Center met a number of times to consider the following : 

Definition of the Curriculum Center 
Persons to be Served 
Materials in the Center 
Services of the Center 
Personnel of the Center 

Improvement of Curriculum Materials 

The new bulletin, Music in Our Maryland Schools, was pub- 
lished and introduced in numerous counties. Meetings were held 



Maryland State Department of Education 51 

in three areas of the State (Eastern Shore, Tri-counties, Howard 
County) to introduce this bulletin to teachers, principals, and 
supervisors. Consultants and members of the State Music Com- 
mittee presented the philosophy of the teaching of music in Mary- 
land public schools and suggestions of ways to implement the use 
of the bulletin. 

The fourth book of the Conservation Series, Maryland's 
Rocks and Minerals, went to press. A script of "The Geology of 
Maryland," which will supplement Maryland's Rocks ayid Min- 
erals in both filmstrip and slide form, was prepared. The com- 
mentary is both printed and in tape recording form. 

An Audiovisual Catalogue consisting of the audiovisual ma- 
terials housed in the new State Curriculum Center was prepared 
and is being printed. 

A meeting of the State Coordinating Committee was held to 
evaluate materials for the 1961 List I, the Supplement, List II, 
and to discuss distribution policies. The group agreed that List 
II should be revised and should consist of materials which were 
developed by the Maryland non-State agencies and were useful to 
schools. 

The Baltimore Siuipapers continued to supply each of the 23 
county boards of education and this Department with free 
monthly prints (September until June) of the news film "Screen 
News Digest." 

The Baltimore News-Post continued to sponsor free monthly 
prints of the Current Affairs Filmstrips to the junior and senior 
high schools of Baltimore, Harford, Anne Arundel, and Howard 
counties and Baltimore City. 

Health and Physical Education 

In addition to rendering usual services to school units 
through workshops, conferences, and visitations, the Supervisor 
of Physical Education and Recreation served on an Elementary 
School Playground Committee in Montgomery County and a com- 
mittee that is evaluating the physical education, interschool and 
intramural programs in Baltimore County. He also worked 
closely with the State Committee to Study the Maryland Public 
Secondary Schools and a subcommittee of the Maryland Asso- 
ciation for Health, Physical Education and Recreation to study 
tirne allocation given to physical education in all Maryland po- 
litical subdivisions. 

Plans were completed by Towson and Frostburg State 
Teachers Colleges for instituting major programs in secondary 
school physical education in the fall of 1961. At present Mary- 
land schools are experiencing a critical shortage of trained 
women physical education teachers. It is hoped the two new 
Maryland college training programs will in time meet most of the 
need. 



52 Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 

Health 

As co-chairman of the Maryland State School Health Coun- 
cil, the Supervisor of Physical Education and Recreation assisted 
a subcommittee in studying and making recommendations con- 
cerning the law which requires an annual census of handicapped 
children. The report of the subcommittee has been submitted to 
the State Superintendent of Schools. 

Iiilerschool Sporls 

A subcommittee of the Maryland Public Secondary Schools 
Athletic Association completed an evaluation study of the struc- 
ture, organization, and activities of the Association. The purpose 
was to improve the State high school athletic program. 

The Supervisor of Physical Education and Recreation served 
as Health Chairman of the Maryland Congress of Parents and 
Teachers. Among other duties in this connection he planned and 
conducted a workshop for local P.T.A. health chairmen respon- 
sible for administering it. General acceptance of and satisfaction 
with the way the Association is meeting its responsibilities and 
functions were revealed. However, desirable changes that should 
be made became evident. For example, an overwhelming ma- 
jority of school people indicated the Association should, as soon as 
possible, organize district track and field meets to be held prior 
to the State meets. This was accomplished for the first time in 
1961 when seventeen district meets were held. Only boys who 
qualified in district meets participated in the two State meets, 
one for Class AA and A schools, another for Class B and C 
schools. The number of boys who participated in Association 
sponsored meets was, of course, greatly increased over other 
years. The entire 1961 expanded track program was conducted 
smoothly and successfully. Excellent cooperation was received 
from the counties and schools. 

For the first time in many years a clinic for football coaches 
was sponsored by the Association. Approximately 120 coaches 
and principals attended the two-day meetings. The coaching staff 
of the University of Maryland served as lecturers and consult- 
ants. A similar clinic is planned for next year. Forty-nine mem- 
ber schools sponsored football in the fall of 1960. 

Outdoor Education 

Washington County inaugurated an Outdoor School on a 
pilot basis in the spring of 1961. Close cooperation was received 
from the Frederick County Outdoor School. The few classes that 
were accommodated in the starting program used a camping 
facility. Camp Airy, procured by the Washington County Board 
of Education. 

Prince George's County employed a consultant. Dr. L. B. 
Sharp, to make recommendations on several tracts of land pres- 



Maryland State Department of Education 53 

ently owned, and others which might be acquired, for their po- 
tential use in outdoor education programs. 

Cecil County sent a pilot group to the Harford County Out- 
door School. Those counties which have outdoor schools, estab- 
lished for more than one year, are Frederick, Harford, and Cal- 
vert. 

The Supervisor of Physical Education and Recreation as- 
sisted Mr. Andrew Mason and Dr. L. B. Sharp, consultant, in an 
evaluation study of the programs of the three forestry camps 
operated by the Maryland State Department of Welfare. 

Pupil Personnel and Parent Education Services 

During the 1960-61 school year programs of pupil services — 
guidance, health, psychological, pupil personnel, and school social 
work services — continued to grow steadily. This Department 
emphasized the development and coordination of these services 
as closely inter-related functions which are an integral part of 
the total instructional program. The Supervisor of Pupil Services 
and one of the Supervisors of Special Education worked in a 
cooperative and consultative relationship with the directors of 
pupil services and the supervisors of guidance, health, psycho- 
logical, pupil personnel, and school social work services in the 
local school systems to provide State-wide leadership in this area. 

Significant achievements during the year were : 

Coordination of Pupil Services 

Emphasis was given to provision for local supervisory lead- 
ership, coordination with community resources, appraisal of ex- 
isting services, and study of automatic data processing as related 
to school records. 

Six local units now have directors of pupil services with 
supervisors in the area of pupil services responsible to them. This 
pattern of organization is proving particularly effective in the 
large school systems. Planned programs of coordination with 
local administrative and teaching personnel are carried out. 
Other local units have made a definite effort to coordinate serv- 
ices by close cooperation of the supervisors responsible for these 
programs. 

State-wide committees were established to discuss the possi- 
bilities of using automatic data processing not only for pupil 
accounting records but also for the cumulative record and in- 
dividual pupil schedules. Many local units are experimenting 
with programs designed to make the keeping of records more 
effective and their use more meaningful. 

Guidance 

Emphasis was given to provision for local supervisory lead- 
ership, provision of additional counseling services for pupils, and 



54 Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 

evaluation of existing guidance programs. Ten full-time guidance 
supervisors in the local units assumed responsibilities during the 
past year. 

Psychological Services 

Emphasis was given to further definition of the function of 
the psychologist working in the local school system and to the 
development of an organized group of psychologists employed by 
local boards of education. 

There are 42 psychologists employed in the local school sys- 
tems. The psychologist is being used increasingly as a consultant 
and is working with teachers in the prevention of problems as 
well as in diagnosis and individual evaluation. 

Pupil Personnel Services 

Emphasis was given to the coordination of pupil personnel 
services with those services offered by community agencies and 
to the implementation of the team concept within the local school 
system. Continued emphasis was given to preventive work with 
students through early identification and referral of those stu- 
dents who have problems of adjustment. Particular emphasis 
was given to work with the student who plans to drop out of 
school before the completion of the secondary school program. 

In each local school system definite programs were carried 
out involving school personnel and personnel from community 
agencies. In the small units where specialized personnel are not 
available through the school program, community resources were 
used extensively. 

Pupil personnel workers participated actively in the State- 
wide study of drop-outs, A joint project with the Employment 
Service was continued during this year in an attempt to follow-up 
students who drop out of school and help them with effective job 
placement. A State-wide committee is being organized to give 
particular attention to this problem. 

Parent Education 

There were many parent education groups in the State dur- 
ing the past year. Local units continue to assume responsibility 
for this program, with this Department providing consultant 
service as requested. 

Special Education 

Continued efforts have been directed toward development of 
new services and the improvement of existing programs for 
atypical children throughout the State. All local school systems 
now have at least one special class. Five classes have been or- 
ganized in local systems that previously had no special classes 



Maryland State Department of Education 55 

and over 12,000 pupils received speech therapy. Services were 
increased for children v^ith specific learning disorders such as 
aphasia, strephosymbolia, and perceptual dysfunctions. Work- 
shops, conferences, and committees continued to provide means 
by which programs can be improved. 

A workshop for teachers of educable and trainable retarded 
was organized. This workshop was held at Towson State Teach- 
ers College, June 19-23. Four outstanding specialists, nationally 
known in the field of special education, acted as consultants. One 
hundred sixty-three teachers, principals, and supervisors par- 
ticipated in the conference. 

A plan was worked out with the University of Maryland and 
Southern Regional Education Board to implement their contrac- 
tual arrangement to provide scholarships to George Peabody 
College for Maryland's teachers of the partially sighted and blind. 

Adult Education 

The Committee on Adult Education continued its study of 
adult education in Maryland. In addition to outside consultants, 
the Committee heard representatives from such groups and or- 
ganizations as the Maryland Congress of Parents and Teachers ; 
the Extension Service, the University of Maryland ; YMCA ; the 
Baltimore Muse"m of Art ; The Enoch Pratt Free Library ; labor ; 
and the C & P Telephone Company. The Committee will present 
recommendations to the State Superintendent of Schools some- 
time during 1961-62. 

The availability of State funds for programs of nonvoca- 
tional adult education, though publicized at a late date, caused 
several local school systems to re-examine their offerings. No 
doubt, some additional nonvocational programs will be developed 
in 1961-62. 

A workshop for State Directors of Adult Education was held 
under the auspices of the U. S. Office of Education in Washington 
in June, 1961. 

A project in liberal adult education was initiated in Calvert 
County. Participants included the local superintendent of schools, 
his entire supervisory staff, the local health doctor, and several 
community leaders. The project took the form of a seminar, with 
emphasis on reading, study, and discussion of basic questions 
relating to the nature of man. 

The Baltimore County Public Schools were awarded a grant 
of $4,000 from the Fund for Adult Education for the purpose of 
further developing their programs of liberal adult education and 
public responsibility. The grant was made for the year 1961-62 
on nomination of the State Superintendent of Schools to the Na- 
tional Association of Public School Adult Educators. As part of 
this program, Baltimore County has added another supervisor 
of adult education to its staff. 

Civil Defense has recently been introduced into programs of 



56 NlNETY-FXFTlL ANNUAL IvKl'OKT 

adult education. The question of Maryland's position on this 
matter should be discussed and, if considered feasible, a program 
should be developed. 

The relationship of adult education to the role of the aging 
population is being considered. It is especially important to con- 
sider what unique features this group of senior citizens presents 
in planning programs of adult education. 

Another area of concern is that of the mental health of 
adults. This area is likewise being explored. 

Institutional Programs 

The principal responsibilities of the Supervisor of Special 
Education for Institutions during the school year 1960-61 have 
been in providing technical advice, guidance, and supervision to 
the educational programs of various State institutions, especially 
the institutions for juvenile delinquents operated by the State 
Department of Public Welfare. 

Consultative visits were made at planned intervals to the 
Barrett School for Girls, Boys' Village, Maryland Training 
School for Boys, Maryland Children's Center, and Montrose 
School for Girls. Training school education was stressed with 
particular emphasis being given to curriculum development, ef- 
fective teaching techniques, in-service training, integration, and 
school budgets. 

The first annual preschool conference for all the training 
school teachers of Maryland was held on September 1, 1960, at 
the Maryland Training School. The general theme of the con- 
ference was "Training School Education Moves Forward" and 
was concerned not only with the abilities and needs of delinquent 
children but also with the role of the teacher in the training 
school. The conference afforded training school teachers an op- 
portunity for hearing well-known speakers in training school 
work, for sharing school practices, for discussing problems of 
mutual interest, and for considering various ways in making 
their educational program more meaningful. 

An in-service training program for the purpose of promoting 
the professional growth of the teachers at the Barrett Training 
School for Girls was organized during the second semester. The 
weekly sessions gave attention to basic training school philosophy, 
objectives of Barrett School, needs of delinquent girls, human 
relationships, framework for the curriculum, lesson planning, 
demonstrations in teaching arithmetic, language arts, science, 
social studies, home economics, and cosmetology, different means 
of recognizing achievement, and the extension of present cur- 
riculum offerings. 

A one-day reading clinic was held for the school staff at 
Boys' Village. The theme of the clinic was "Helping Training 
School Boys to Read and to Like Reading." 



Maryland State Department of Education 57 

Dr. L. B. Sharp, Professor of Outdoor Education at Southern 
Illinois University, Carbondale, Illinois, helped to survey the 
three boys forestry camps located in Western Maryland with re- 
spect to the over-all camp program. Dr. Sharp's findings, con- 
clusions, and recommendations were incorporated in a report 
and submitted to the Department of Welfare for deliberation and 
possible implementation. 

National Defense Education Act 

Science and Mathematics 

Two phases of Title III of the National Defense Education 
Act were in continuous operation throughout the year to 
strengthen science and mathematics instruction. One of these 
was concerned with supervisory and related services from the 
State Department of Education and the other was concerned with 
the administration of local acquisition programs for science and 
mathematics equipment, and minor remodeling. 

As a part of the first phase, twenty-three regional confer- 
ences were held in five areas of the State for science and mathe- 
matics teachers. The purpose of these sessions was to provide 
opportunities to discuss newest developments, content, and pro- 
cedures of instruction in science and mathematics. 

Assistance was provided local school systems in their 
continual appraisal and further development of science and 
mathematics programs in both elementary and secondary schools. 
Special attention is being given to planned, sequential science 
programs, in grades 1-12 ; in-service programs for teachers ; and 
consideration of the many new science and mathematics curricu- 
lum programs now under development. Pilot projects were de- 
veloped to organize, test, and develop new methods, techniques, 
and procedures for improving science and mathematics instruc- 
tion. 

Acquisitions under this program indicate considerable in- 
creases in laboratory facilities, and specialized equipment as 
integral parts of improved instructional programs in science and 
mathematics. A greater variety of learning experiences, as well 
as increased student participation in experimental procedures, 
becomes available through these acquisition programs. 

Modern Foreign Languages 

During the year 1960-61, continued efforts were made to 
implement N.D.E.A., Title III, in the area of modern foreign 
language instruction. These efforts were concerned with super- 
visory and related services of the State Department of Education 
as well as with the administration of local acquisition programs 
for modern foreign language equipment and minor remodeling. 

Conferences and workshops throughout the State provided 



58 Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 

opportunities to demonstrate and to discuss the newest develop- 
ments in materials and methods of instruction in modern foreign 
language. 

Assistance was provided local school systems in their con- 
tinuing evaluation and further development of foreign language 
programs. Special attention was given to planning sequential 
programs ; in-service programs for teachers ; and consideration of 
improved instructional materials. 

Experimental materials in French and Spanish were de- 
veloped and distributed to help teachers meet the new goals of 
language as communication. The audio-lingual concept became 
more widely accepted. More and more schools offered a minimum 
sequence of three years of the same language. 

Guidance and Counseling 

During this year, Title V-A funds were used primarily to 
provide additional counselors and clerical personnel in the local 
school systems. Additional counseling time was provided by em- 
ploying the counselors during the summer months. The employ- 
ment of clerical personnel freed the counselor from routine 
duties to devote more time to working with the students. Coun- 
selor-pupil ratio in the State continues to be well above the de- 
sired 300 to 1. 



Maryland State Department of Education 59 

division of vocational education 

Agriculture 

Practices and procedures in agricultural education have re- 
flected the unprecedented changes in agriculture and its related 
occupations. With the increased cost of machinery, farm 
mechanics instruction has increased tremendously in importance. 
Ornamental horticulture has assumed a new importance in the 
suburban counties and has possibilities of bringing vocational 
agriculture into an area and an occupation which is new. The 
steady increase in the number and per cent of part-time farmers 
necessitates a revamping of agriculture subject matter and sub- 
ject matter distribution. The high cost of farms and equipment 
has decreased the number of vocational agriculture graduates 
who actually buy farms, but it has increased considerably the 
number of father-son partnerships. There is a rapid increase in 
the in-service training of teachers in local workshops and also 
advanced college training. The general pattern of farming is 
changing rapidly in various sections of the State ; thus increased 
emphasis is being given on adapting the course of study to local 
needs. 

Membership in the Future Farmers of America and the New 
Farmers of America has changed very little in the past ten years. 
While there are fewer chapters now, consolidation has increased 
the size of many of these chapters. Activities in these organiza- 
tions are on three levels — local, state, and national. A wide 
variety of activities on all three levels has been made possible 
through most liberal aid and financing by several foundations and 
organizations. These activities are designed to aid boys to ever 
greater accomplishments. Splendid motivation is provided 
through a series of degrees through which a boy may advance 
according to his achievements. An over-all objective is the de- 
velopment of student leadership. Members are being given in- 
creased responsibilities for the directing and planning of their 
own activities. The culminating activities for the year's work in 
these organizations are the annual State Conventions held at the 
University of Maryland and Maryland State College respectively. 

Trade and Industrial Education 

Due to the rapid change in technology in trade and industry, 
special emphasis has been placed on such courses as electrical 
technology, industrial electronics, machine design, mechanical 
and aircraft technology, industrial electric tool design technology, 
mechanical technology, and laboratory technology. 

Part-time cooperative training programs have increased in 
number and variety of offerings to meet the ever changing needs 
in industry. 

A completely new venture in the trade and industrial educa- 



60 Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 

tion field was that of a pilot program for small business, con- 
ducted in Washington County. This was a cooperative program, 
sponsored by the Washington County Board of Education, Ha- 
gerstown Chamber of Commerce, Hagerstown Manufacturers' 
Bureau, Hagerstown Retailers' Bureau, in cooperation with the 
Small Business Administration. Eight consecutive weekly ses- 
sions of two hours each were conducted, with a representative of 
industry or business the keynote speaker at each. These pro- 
grams were taped and 16-mm, sound motion pictures were made 
available through the Vocational Division to those interested in 
developing a similar program. 

Educational Services to Industry 

A vocational interest survey of Maryland employers was 
made during the summer of 1960. Questionnaires were sent on 
a random sample basis to approximately 5,000 employers repre- 
senting the major business and industry groups in the State. 
Follow-up interviews were made with those employers who in- 
dicated that they employed technicians. This survey has provided 
information that will be used in planning vocational courses to 
meet the projected requirements of business and industry in 
Maryland. 

Vocational educators from Pennsylvania, West Virginia, and 
Virginia met with Maryland in a staff -improvement program at 
Hancock, Maryland, devoting one series of sessions to "Improv- 
ing the Day-trade Program," and "Supervisory Training Tech- 
nique of Job Instruction." 

In cooperation with the Maryland Society of Training Di- 
rectors, a management program was conducted for the Baltimore 
chapter of the American Society of Life Underwriters. A com- 
prehensive examination was administered by the College of Life 
Underwriters. 

In-service training programs for supervisors were developed 
and conducted for the A. L. Mathias Company, industrial food 
service managers, and the Church Home and Hospital. 

The annual spring meeting of the Maryland Vocational Asso- 
ciation was held at Aberdeen Proving Grounds in cooperation 
with the U.S. Army Ordnance School. More than two hundred 
industrial education teachers attended the concurrent teaching 
demonstrations centered on the latest teaching aids. 

The new Vocational Rehabilitation Center at Rosewood 
State Training School requested assistance in its teacher train- 
ing program for their trade teachers. These State employers are 
trade qualified but have no teaching experience requirement for 
the position. A basic program for developing skills in "job analy- 
sis" and "job instruction" was instituted. 



Maryland Statk Department of Education 61 

Home Economics Education 

As part of the continuous effort to have instructional pro- 
grams keep pace with the changing needs of individuals and 
families, special thought and attention were given to the follow- 
ing phases of the program : 

In the day-school program greater emphasis was given to the 
areas of housing and family relationships through in-service programs 
on both State and local levels. 

Increased attention in the teaching of foods and nutrition to 
understanding the basic principles in regard to health, economics, 
management, and the role food plays in family living rather than the 
preparation of a standard product. 

Inci'eased attention in the teaching of clothing and textiles to 
achieving a balance between garment construction and other aspects 
of clothing construction. More time is being devoted to buymanship, 
wardrobe planning, care, management, aesthetic qualities, and the 
perfoiTnance characteristic of textiles. 

The program of work in the homemakers clubs for students was 
built around the topics of family unity and family fitness, and the 
State project was devoted to developing a greater understanding of 
senior citizens. In carrying out the program of work the chapter 
members planned and conducted many worthwhile activities for senior 
citizens in their respective communities. 

A workshop in the area of Child Development and Family Rela- 
tionships was held for supervisors and teacher educators to define the 
competences that are needed by teachers for effective teaching in these 
two areas in the secondary school program. 



G2 Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 

DIVISION OF LIBRARY EXTENSION 

Changes in the pattern of lending services and in the per- 
sonnel of the Division of Library Extension characterized the 
activities of 1960-61. With the inauguration of the State-wide 
lending services of the Enoch Pratt Free Library in Baltimore 
through contract with the Department of Education, the special- 
ized information and resources of one of the country's greatest 
public libraries became available to all citizens of the State. Re- 
quests are made through local public libraries. The change placed 
heavier responsibility on local libraries to provide the ephemeral 
and general current material and the books for children, since 
these materials are not available through the Pratt Library con- 
tract services. 

The bulk of the book collection of the Division of Library 
Extension was dispersed to existing county public libraries to 
augment local book resources ; a smaller group of specialized 
books was given to the State Library in Annapolis, and the Mary- 
land material and general film collection were allocated to the 
Pratt Library for use in filling requests throughout the State. 
The professional library of educational materials for members of 
the Department and the curriculum materials center for use of 
educators throughout the State were separated from the original 
collection and organized into two library collections. 

Members of the Division staff participated in a number of 
professional assignments, conferences, and study groups, without 
as well as within the State. Miss Mae Graham, Supervisor of 
School Libraries, was a member of the special committee of the 
Study Commission of Chief State School Officers which developed 
the policy bulletin. Responsibilities of State Department of Edu- 
cation for School Library Services, published bv the Council of 
Chief State School Officers. 

The Division made arrangements for the collection, "Books 
on Exhibit," containing some 800 new juvenile books to be 
scheduled throughout the counties of the State through the local 
boards of education. This collection provides an opportunity for 
librarians, teachers, parents, and the general public to see and 
examine current materials as an aid to selection and purchase. 
Lists of book and film acquisitions by the Pratt Library were 
distributed to local libraries as a part of the contract services. 

Public Libraries 

Public library activities within the State were centered on 
two primary goals : the establishment of new county libraries and 
the strengthening of existing libraries through cooperative ar- 
rangements among neighboring libraries. 

The first goal of complete State-wide library service came 
nearer to achievement this vear when the boards of countv com- 



Maryland State Department of Education 63 

missioners in Caroline, Dorchester, and Kent counties voted to 
provide sufficient funds to establish county public libraries under 
the provisions of the 1945 public libraries law. During the spring 
of 1961 these counties began the organization of county library 
service, leaving only Frederick and Somerset counties without 
such services. These new county libraries as well as others within 
the State are being strengthened at the outset by policy decisions 
to cooperate with neighboring counties in sharing special re- 
sources and services. 

The Allegany County Library came into being in July, 1960, 
coordinating the resources and services of the Cumberland, 
Frostburg, and La Vale public libraries and initiating county- 
wide bookmobile service in the spring of 1961. The Worcester 
County Library coordinated the services of the four existing pub- 
lic libraries in the countv and initiated bookmobile service in the 
fall of 1960. 

A significant development has been the cooperative activities 
that have been undertaken by neighboring county libraries in 
various parts of the State. These projects are demonstrating in 
Maryland what has been proved in other parts of the country — 
that libraries can plan and work together to improve the total 
library service — that better use can be made of funds, of staff 
with special abilities, and of books. The first of those projects 
began in Southern Maryland where the three library boards of 
Charles, St. Mary's, and Calvert counties agreed to try to solve 
some of their problems of staff through cooperation. They formed 
the Southern Maryland Regional Library Association, jointly 
employed a library administrator for the three counties, 
set up centralized cataloging and processing, and are developing 
together other services and resources. An executive committee 
composed of the presidents of the three boards decides on policies 
affecting the multicounty operation. Library policies for a single 
county are still determined by the local boards. Each county 
library is operated as an independent unit except for the activi- 
ties and services that the three agree should be performed by the 
Association and for which each county pays a certain amount 
into the joint fund. At present the regional association staff is 
composed of one chief library administrator, one part-time cata- 
loger, and two clerk-typists. A position of assistant library 
administrator has been authorized by the Association, and appli- 
cants are being interviewed for this new position. This coopera- 
tive arrangement has allowed this area of about 85,000 people to 
gain strength by sharing. Books move freely from one county 
to another, board members and staff members meet and confer 
on common problems, people are aware of libraries in Southern 
Maryland, both library use and local library appropriations have 
increased markedly. County commissioners are beginning to see 
the values of this cooperative arrangement, are no longer so 
afraid that one county's money may be spent to the advantage 



64 Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 

of another county. The people involved in this venture are con- 
vinced that it is working successfully and that the further im- 
provement of library service in Southern Maryland will be ac- 
complished through the Association. 

Another significant project began less than a year ago on 
the Eastern Shore when Wicomico and Worcester counties de- 
cided to make maximum joint use of the books transferred from 
the Division of Library Extension by setting up an area refer- 
ence center called the Lower Shore Area Library Center. This 
center has as its purpose the supplying of collections of books 
from the center to the libraries in the two counties, the answering 
of reference questions referred to it by the two libraries, the 
preparation of exhibits and display materials, and eventually the 
ordering, cataloging, and processing of all books for the two 
counties. In January the new Dorchester County Library joined 
in the project. Plans have been made to set up centralized proces- 
sing for the three counties and to expand the plan and purchase 
the basic equipment that would make it possible for this center 
to perform the ordering, cataloging, and processing of books for 
all the counties on the Eastern Shore. If the other libraries on 
the Shore decide to take advantage of this possibility, it will be of 
great value in improving library services by freeing the profes- 
sional librarians from time-consuming, routine tasks that could 
be done elsewhere. At the present time the Lower Shore Center 
is located in the basement of the State Teachers College, Salis- 
bury ; has a staff of one cataloger, one full-time and one part-time 
clerk; and is operated through a contractual agreement among 
the three boards. 

Cooperative projects in other sections of the State have in- 
cluded in-service training sessions for staff, sharing of books and 
other materials, joint book lists and exhibits, and the sharing of 
experienced professional staff members. 

These cooperative projects have been financed partially 
through Federal Library Services Act funds. The LSA has been 
extended another five years, 1961-66. Within that period libraries 
can begin and firmly establish better services through new coop- 
erative patterns. Because of the need for growth through cooper- 
ation, a committee appointed by the State Superintendent of 
Schools recommended revision of old plan for the use of these 
funds. For the next five years the major portion of Federal LSA 
funds will be used for cooperative projects. Many libraries in 
Maryland will be able to attain standards of high quality service 
only through the cooperative arrangements that will make spe- 
cialized materials, staff, and services available on a regional 
basis. 

Conferences 

Conferences held this year were focused on needed staff 
training and on planning for further library development. 

In December the public library administrators met at the in- 



Maryland State Department of Education 65 

vitation of the Department of Education and decided to form an 
autonomous association known as the Maryland Association of 
Public Library Administrators. Miss Elizabeth Hage, Director, 
Prince George's County Memorial Library, was elected chairman. 
The group, with the cooperation of the Division of Library Ex- 
tension, held two one-day meetings — one to discuss the public 
library legislation and the other to discuss the lending services of 
the Enoch Pratt Free Library under the contract with the De- 
partment of Education and the changes in the use of Federal 
Library Services Act Funds. 

Two regional conferences on selection and use of reference 
books were held for staffs of local county libraries. About forty 
persons attended the sessions at Cumberland and Salisbury. Con- 
sultant for both conferences was Miss Mary Barton, former 
Head, Reference Department, Enoch Pratt Free Library. 

"Public Library Work with Children" was the theme of a 
one-day State-wide conference for all public library staffs. The 
program was prepared by a committee of librarians under the 
chairmanship of Miss Mae Graham of the Division of Library 
Extension. Principal speaker was Mrs. Ruth Hill Viguers, editor, 
Horn Book Magazine. About seventy persons from all over the 
State attended. 

A conference on "Public Library Development" for trustees 
and librarians on the Eastern Shore was held in June to bring 
new trustees and librarians together to discuss library services 
and cooperative plans. Miss Ruth Warncke, Assistant Professor 
of Library Science, Western Reserve University, was the con- 
sultant and speaker. About forty trustees and seven librarians 
from the 7 county libraries on the Eastern Shore attended. 

Other Highlights 

Mr. P. D. Brown, Trustee, Charles County Public Library, 
was awarded a national trustee citation by the American Library 
Association at its annual conference. The citation emphasizes his 
outstanding contribution to library development in Southern 
Maryland and the State and his efforts to secure improved legis- 
lation for public libraries. 

School Libraries 

National recognition of the school library as a part of in- 
struction and the concept of the school library as an integrated 
materials center provided both school administrators and li- 
brarians with the impetus and the direction they needed to make 
1960-61 the most successful year so far in the development of the 
school library program in the State. 

The Division of Library Extension sponsored two meetings 
for principals, supervisors, and librarians to discuss The School 
Library as an Instuctional Materials Center and one for school 
library supervisors and directors of instruction to discuss the 
same topic. 



66 Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 

The Supervisor of School Libraries worked with study com- 
mittees in Frederick, Howard, and Montgomery counties where 
they were making detailed, statistical studies of the status of 
their libraries and recommendations for improvement. She also 
worked with all the school librarians in Caroline County who are 
developing a manual of uniform organization for the schools in 
the county. 

The supervisors of public and school libraries made a joint 
survey of all school libraries in St. Mary's County, with recom- 
mendations to the Superintendent of Schools and to the County 
Library Board. 

Interest in elementary school libraries continues to grow, 
and a large percentage of the supervisor's time is spent with ele- 
mentary supervisors and principals throughout the State. Alle- 
gany, Anne Arundel, Carroll, Cecil, Charles, Dorchester, Garrett, 
Harford, Howard, Kent, Queen Anne's, St. Mary's, Talbot, and 
Worcester counties asked for assistance with these programs. 

Tangible evidences of growth : 

1. Increased appropriations for library materials 

2. Increased personnel 

a. Second librarians and/or clerical assistants in large schools 

b. Increased number of elementary school librarians 

c. Appointment of school library supervisors in Anne Arundel and 
Howard counties in June, 1961 

d. Organization of a Division of Instructional Materials in Mont- 
gomery County, with increased staff 

3. Central processing and cataloging 

a. Central processing and cataloging for all libraries in Baltimore 
City and Montgomery County 

b. Central processing and cataloging for basic collections in the 
new schools of Baltimore and Frederick counties 

4. High morale 

a. Active membership of school libx-arians in the Maryland Library 
Association and the Association of School Librarians of 
Maryland 

b. Attendance of thirty Maryland school librarians at a five-day, 
non-credit course at Columbia University on the subject, "Audio- 
Visual Services and the School Library" 

c. Attendance by more than thirty school librarians at summer 
school at the University of Maryland or Western Maryland Col- 
lege where library science courses were offered. Attendance by 
at least ten others at graduate library schools out of the State 

These tangible evidences of growth seem to indicate trends 
for the future : 

1. The school library will be generally accepted as part of the school's 
instructional program and as an integrated materials center. 

2. The school library program will begin in the elementary school and 
extend through the senior high school. 

3. School systems will continue to look for cooperative methods of 
purchasing and processing library materials in order to decrease 
costs and increase efficiency in use. 

4. Local school library leadership at the school system level will con- 
tinue to increase. 

5. School librarians will have inci-eased responsibility to assist teach- 
ers as well as pupils in knowledge and use of materials. 



Maryland State Department of Education 67 

DIVISION OF VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION 

This was another year of gradual but continuous develop- 
ment of vocational rehabilitation services to persons with dis- 
abling conditions heretofore thwarted in their endeavor to join 
the ranks with their neighbors in suitable and satisfactory em- 
ployment. The case load persisted in growth. Of a total of 5,925 
persons served, 1,491 were rehabilitated. Both of these groups 
were higher than last year when 5,743 persons were served and 
1,413 were rehabilitated. New cases advance to new totals year 
after year, with 3,834 being referred in 1961, an increase of 115 
over last year's number of 3,719. The new cases added to those 
carried over from the preceding year, amounting to 5,439, 
brought the total number in the case load up to 9,273. A greater 
awareness of the effectiveness of vocational rehabilitation serv- 
ices is constantly being promoted by the proof of more success- 
fully rehabilitated persons. 

The total cost of the vocational rehabilitation program in 
Maryland in 1961 was $1,049,520.26, of which $602,142.82 was 
Federal funds and $447,377.44 was State funds. The total ex- 
penditures amounted to less than $1,137,215.52, which would 
have been the cost to maintain the rehabilitants on welfare for 
one year, about one-third less than their annual earnings of 
$3,439,592. 

Perhaps the outstanding feature of the work in fiscal year 
1961 was the effort of the Division to expand and improve serv- 
ices in the five districts * of the State. 

Southern Maryland 

In Prince George's County the Division cooperated with the 
County Health Department and the local Society for Mentally 
Retarded Children in establishing a diagnostic clinic. Through 
the use of this facility clients of the Division, as well as other 
mentally retarded children, may have the benefit of thorough so- 
cial and vocational evaluation. 

The Division also cooperated with the Prince George's 
County Hospital in inaugurating a work evaluation program 
under which rehabilitation clients are given an opportunity to 
try out on various jobs in a hospital setting under close super- 
vision. This program has facilitated the satisfactory placement 
of a number of disabled persons. 

In Montgomery County, the Washington Sanatorium and 
Hospital opened a Prosthetic and Orthotic Clinic staffed by quali- 
field physiatrists, orthotists, physical therapists, occupational 
therapists, and a counselor of the Division who was given special 
training in this field. Through this clinic it is possible to provide 



* District Offices: Southern Maryland — Hyattsville; Western Mary- 
land — Hagerstown; Eastern Shore — Salisbury; Metropolitan Baltimore; 
Disability Determinations (OASI). 



68 Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 

the best in services to amputees and other orthopedically handi- 
capped clients without the necessity of their traveling to Balti- 
more. 

Through a grant from the Office of Vocational Rehabilita- 
tion, U. S. Department of Health, Education and Welfare, the 
Montgomery County Health Department, in cooperation with the 
Tuberculosis Association and the Heart Association, established 
a program for training occupational therapy aides to relieve the 
acute shortage of trained personnel in hospitals and nursing 
homes throughout the county. Division staff members partici- 
pated in the planning and organization of this program. 

Western Maryland 

In the western part of the State, the Division extended to 
Springfield State Hospital a more intensive program of vocational 
rehabilitation counseling by adding to the existing service 
another day and one-half of counselor time. This has resulted in 
making service available to all those in the convalescent area, as 
well as to those referred through social service. It has been pos- 
sible for counselors to see more disabled persons and to work out 
more rehabilitation plans for patients preparing to be discharged 
from that mental hospital. In addition, a typing class has been 
started, using existing equipment, and approximately forty pa- 
tients are being taught the rudiments of typing or being given 
intensive brush-up training. This program has proven to be 
successful, as it has resulted in vocational success in several 
cases, in addition to the immeasurable therapeutic effect on all 
students. 

During the year, the Division also extended vocational re- 
habilitation services to the Clifton T. Perkins Hospital and began 
working with those patients who are considered to be severely 
mentally ill to the extent of maximum security necessity. Among 
cases accepted by the Division, there have been good results in 
training and placement. 

Eastern Shore District 

In cooperation with the Governor's Committee to Promote 
Employment of the Handicapped and the Maryland State Divi- 
sion of Employment Security, there were conducted in two East- 
ern Shore counties this past year Job Clinics for handicapped 
workers. In Wicomico County, seventy-five employers from both 
large and small companies actively participated in interviewing, 
evaluating, and placing of the handicapped persons referred. In 
Cecil County, forty-five employers cooperated. 

In cooperation with the Maryland Workshop for the Blind 
and the local Lions Club, a small workshop was set up in Easton 
for blind workers whose potential is not good enough for indus- 
trial or outside employment. Making use of a visiting teacher 



Maryland State Department of Education 69 

from the workshop, training was given to a small number of such 
blind workers from Talbot, Kent, Queen Anne's, and Dorchester 
counties. Instruction was in crafts, leather work, and chair 
caning, with the principal costs to the Division being trans- 
portation and supplies. The building, maintenance, and its equip- 
ment were donated by the Easton Lions Club. While this opera- 
tion is small in the number of trainees, it has served an unmet 
need, and it is expected that it will have further trainees next 
year. 

Two joint civic club dinners and programs in the observance 
of National Employ and Physically Handicapped Week were 
sponsored. In Elkton the sponsorship was by Kiwanis, Lions, and 
Rotary, with Mr. E. K. Foster, Vice-President and Group Exec- 
utive of Bendix Corporation, as the principal speaker. In Salis- 
bury, this affair was sponsored by the Rotary Club, with Mr. 
Chester Troy, Chairman of the Maryland Governor's Committee, 
giving the main address. Successfully rehabilitated workers at- 
tend both meetings as special guests. 

Metropolitan Baltimore District 

The Metropolitan District focused its major emphasis this 
year on directing staff efforts and professional skill to consolidate 
gains that had been made in areas already being served. 

In the area of the mentally handicapped, a counselor was 
assigned to the out-patient clinics of Crownsville and Springfield 
State hospitals, to insure continuity of the programs for clients 
which had been started during their hospitalization. Another 
counselor was assigned to work at Rosewood State Training 
School to evaluate patients for the purpose of selecting those 
who could benefit from vocational rehabilitation services. Still 
another counselor, working at Spring Grove State Hospital, par- 
ticipated in a pilot study being conducted to rehabilitate nar- 
cotics. 

Cooperation with the Richmond Professional Institute in 
supervising rehabilitation counseling trainees was continued. 

One of the counselors who has worked closely with the Heart 
Evaluation Clinic in Baltimore served on a National Committee 
for Workshop Evaluation Clinics of the American Heart Asso- 
ciation. 

The orientation classes for medical students to the field of 
vocational rehabilitation was continued at the University of 
Maryland School of Medicine and extended to the nursing stu- 
dents at Mercy, Bon Secours, St. Agnes, Sinai, and Union Mem- 
orial hospitals and to public health nurses. 

Additional counseling time assigned to Baltimore County 
permitted an extension of services to more people in that area. 



70 Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 

Disability Determinations 

The Disability Determinations Unit of the Division proc- 
essed 17 per cent more cases in 1961 than during the previous 
year. This increase was brought about largely by amendments to 
the Social Security laws, which became effective during Sep- 
tember, 1960. At that time, the age requirements for eligibility 
to disability benefits were eliminated. The result was a substan- 
tial increase in applications from younger disabled persons. The 
history of legislation to date suggests that the Social Security 
Disability Program has not yet been stabilized from its con- 
servative beginning in 1954. 

During the year, the Unit assisted the Bureau of Old Age 
and Survivors Insurance in publicizing its disability program by 
contacting local medical societies and other medical groups. The 
purpose was to explain the implications of adjudication as related 
to medical evidence and the need for detailed medical reports. 
The film, "Disability Decision," which was made available by the 
Bureau, was shown to medical societies, hospital staffs, and the 
staffs of State institutions. 

Miscellaneous Activities 

Each year larger numbers of severely disabled persons, in- 
cluding the mentally retarded, are referred to the Division. Since 
no adequate rehabilitation center facilities are available in Mary- 
land, continued use has been made of the Woodrow Wilson Re- 
habilitation Center of the Virginia Division of Vocational Reha- 
bilitation. At the Center, vocational evaluation, physical therapy, 
occupational therapy, work adjustment, and vocational training 
were obtained for mentally retarded, paraplegic, and other se- 
verely disabled clients of the Division. 

A study of the possibilities of establishing a sheltered work- 
shop in the upper counties of the Eastern Shore was initiated by 
the Chestertown local office. Participants have been health de- 
partments, boards of education, and county superintendents of 
schools from Caroline, Cecil, Kent, and Queen Anne's counties. 
The local welfare departments and Division of Employment Se- 
curity from these same counties participated, as well as repre- 
sentatives from the ministerial associations, the Veterans Admin- 
istration Hospital at Perry Point, and the Upper Eastern Shore 
Association for the Mentally Retarded, and heart associations. 
A Steering Committee of persons from each of these counties has 
subsequently met and is continuing its study on the desirability 
of establishing such a rehabilitation facility for the Upper East- 
ern Shore areas. 

A vocational rehabilitation counselor was employed by the 
Workmen's Compensation Commission to implement the legisla- 
tion passed in 1960, and a plan for improved referrals was put 
into effect with the Division's Metropolitan Baltimore office. 



Maryland State Department of Education 71 

"Comeback" completed its ninth consecutive year as a sus- 
taining public service program on WMAR-TV, Channel 2. 

Rehabilitation Center at Rosewood 

The establishment of a Rehabilitation Center at the Rose- 
wood State Training School under the Department of Mental 
Hygiene provided an additional rehabilitation facility. Under a 
director of education, it provided a training program of job 
experiences in shoe repairing, food service, upholstery, sewing, 
and home mechanics to prepare patients for employment as part 
of the rehabilitation program in the hospital. A trained voca- 
tional rehabilitation counselor directed and supervised the hos- 
pital rehabilitation program, and a clinic team consisting of a 
psychologist, a social worker, an industrial therapist, a medical 
adviser, and a vocational rehabilitation counselor screened the 
patients into the program and made recommendations as to the 
types of work activities in which the patients participated. 

A counselor from the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation 
served on this clinic team and, in addition, acted as a consultant 
in recommending realistic practices and in establishing accept- 
able standards. Through close cooperative efforts with this newly- 
created facility in the field of mental disability, many more pa- 
tients can be rehabilitated into employment in the community. 



72 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



TABLE 1 — Actual Days Schools Were Open: Opening and Closing Dates: 
Maryland Public Schools : Year Ending June 30, 1961 





Number 


Date of 


Date of 




Number 


Date of 


Date of 




Actual 


Opening 


Closing 




Actual 


Opening 


Closing 


Local Unit 


Days 


Schools 


Schools 


Local Unit 


Days 


Schools 


Schools 




Schools 


September 


June 




Schools 


September 


June 




Were Open 


1960 


1961 




Were Open 


1960 


1961 


Allegany 


180 


7 


13 


Harford 


180 


7 


16 


Anne Arundel 


180 


6 


16 


Howard 


180 


8 


17 


BaltlmoreCity 


180 


6 


15 


Kent 


180 


6 


15 


Baltimore .... 


180 


7 


16 










Calvert 


180 


6 


14 


Montgomery 


180 


6 


16 










Pr. George's. 


180 


6 


21 


Caroline 


180 


6 


12 


Queen Anne'.s 


181 


6 


13 


Carroll 


180 


6 


16 


St. Mary's. . . 


180 


7 


16 


Cecil 


180 


6 


16 


Somerset .... 


181 


6 


9 


Charles 


180 


7 


17 










Dorchester . . . 


180 


1 


9 


Talbot 


181 


6 


16 










Washington. . 


180 


7 


14 


Frederick .... 


180 


7 


16 


Wicomico . . . 


182 


6 


9 


Garrett 


180 


6 


9 


Worcester . . . 


180 


6 


9 



TABLE 2— Fall Enrollment — Grades N-12, Teaching Stafl", Number of Schools: 
Public and Nonpublic: State of Maryland: Year Ending June 30, 1961 



Type of School 


Grand Total 


Elementary 


High 


ENROLLMENT 


Total 

Public* 

Nonpublic 


739,647 
607,580 
132,067 


467,910 
358.479 
109,431 


271,737 

249,101 

22,636 


TEACHING STAFF 


Total 

Public* 


29,271 

24,663 

4,608 


13,668 


11,655 


Nonpublic 








NUMBER OF SCHOOLS 


Total 

Public* 

Nonpublic 


tl,434 

tl,031 

t403 


1,194 
827 
367 


365 

267 

98 



* Includes enrollment, teaching staff, and number of elementary schools at State Teachers Colleges. 
t Excludes duplicates. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



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74 



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75 





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t-N'^-jt- oit-eooooi coinoinin cD'^jiojo 

OOOCDtDt- -H;DiO^O THrH'^.Hrt 0>(M i-H "-H 

■^"oT oo'^'io co"'* ■^"to'co'' co''t-'"c3>n'>t cooo'c-rin 



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76 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 





CI 


32,345 

1.286 
2.020 
7,889 
5,482 
182 

242 
684 
450 
389 
357 

841 
290 
827 
376 
160 

4,343 

3,689 

162 

430 

227 

224 

1,031 

513 

251 


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35,525 

1.180 
2.295 
8.958 
6.039 
183 

251 
590 
448 
440 
375 

907 
264 
955 
433 
191 

4.763 

4,080 

214 

539 

224 

232 

1.169 

544 

251 


o 


41.939 

1,312 

2,623 

11,525 

7.202 

223 

269 
700 
620 
511 
393 

1,090 
298 
990 
518 
201 

5.346 

4,569 

255 

584 

258 

262 

1,292 

578 

320 


o 


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51,159 

1,606 

3,586 

13,034 

8,495 

304 

338 
943 
740 
622 
464 

1,383 
367 

1.324 
658 
243 

6.466 

5.993 

295 

719 

337 

349 

1,786 

724 

383 


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53.507 

1,652 
3,914 
13.939 
8,158 
335 

384 
1,058 
873 
638 
579 

1,429 
401 

1.513 
585 
315 

6,641 

6,392 

314 

511 

409 

364 

1,815 

828 

460 


- 


55,050 

1,516 

3,694 

15,837 

8,101 

349 

393 
972 
874 
696 
570 

1,272 
43S 

1,52S 
710 
307 

0.495 

6,421 

357 

567 

390 

364 

1,751 

961 

487 




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88 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



TABLE 18— Number of Pupils*: Maryland Schools for Atypical Children 
and Institutions: Fall of 1960 



Name and Location 



Number of Pupils 



Nursery 
School 



Kinder- 
garten 



Ele- 
mentary 



High 



Special 



Total 
Number 

of 
DiflFerent 
Teachers 



Barrett School for Girls, Glen 
Burnie 

Benedictine School for Excep- 
tional Children, Ridgely 

Boy's Village of Maryland, Inc. . . 

Cerebral Palsy Nursery Treat- 
ment Center, Silver Spring. . . 

Children's Rehabilitation Insti- 
tute, In-Patient Dept 

Children's Rehabilitation Insti- 
tute, Out-Patient Dept 

Friendly School, Baltimore 

Houses of Good Shepherd (2), 
Baltimore 

Linwood Children's Farm, EUi- 
cott City 

Marc Nursery School, Bethesda . 

Maryland School for Blind, Bal- 
timore 

Maryland School for the Deaf, 
Frederick 

Maryland Training School for 
Boys, Loch Raven 

Montrose School for Girls, Reis- 
terstown 

Rosewood State Training School, 
Owings Mills 

St. Francis' School for Special 
Education, Baltimore 

St. Maurice School, Bethesda 

St. Vincent's Infant Home, Bal- 
timore 

School of the Chimes, Baltimore. 

Searchlight Training Centers (.3), 
Baltimore 



18 



32 



11 



34 
20 



210 

7 

55 

25 

79 

157 
90 

265 
73 

152 



74 
46 



30 



20 



62 
42 
76 
62 



85 
61 



9 

4 

39 

27 

24 

16 

17 

10 
5 

3 
11 

14 



♦Figures furnished by principals of schools. 

Note: These enrollments are also shown in TABLES IV and V. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



89 



TABLE 19— Total Resideut Births in Maryland: 1951-1960 



Local Umit 



Total State 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel , . 
Baltimore City. 

Haltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester .... 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery. . . 
Prince George's 
Queen Anne's. . 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington . . . 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



Total Resident Births in Maryland 



61,081 

1,824 

2,969 

22,630 

7,489 

405 

396 
818 
801 
782 
630 

1,464 
508 

1,645 
597 
285 

5,478 

7,020 

298 

916 

432 

435 

1,714 

980 

565 



1952 



63.165 

1,785 
3.132 

22,775 

7,937 

427 

432 
1,019 
901 
684 
585 

1,438 
497 

1,789 
581 
318 

6,113 

7,250 

334 

881 
446 

458 
1,794 
1,002 

587 



1953 



64,523 

1,729 
3,444 

22,748 

8,547 

432 

431 
888 
958 
825 
597 

1,430 
467 

1,724 
615 
317 

6,275 
7,566 

279 
1,029 

427 

451 
1,771 
1,019 

554 



1954 



67,445 

1.577 

3,811 

23,523 

9,057 

431 

405 
921 
1,054 
877 
632 

1,519 
448 

1,855 
660 
354 

6,708 

7,687 

335 

1,116 

477 

431 
1,869 
1,061 

637 



69, 205 

1,586 

3,840 

23,291 

9,699 

471 

423 
984 
1,163 
937 
588 

1,533 
448 

1,982 
698 
387 

7,053 
8,072 

386 
1,085 

429 

499 
1,967 
1,094 

590 



1956 



72,108 

1,583 

4,036 

23,782 

10,701 

413 

460 
995 
1,261 
891 
616 

1,597 
470 

1,917 
708 
320 

7,394 
8,997 

357 
1,046 

433 

470 
1,929 
1.144 

588 



1957 



76,127 

1,664 

4,574 

25,067 

11,740 

473 

393 

1,079 

1,437 

986 

625 

1,607 
420 

2,008 
734 
360 

7,593 
9,416 

322 
1,124 

388 

472 
1,935 
1,149 

561 



1958 



75,997 

1.634 

4,762 

24,464 

11,759 

421 

465 

1,095 

1.252 

987 

616 

1,577 
470 

2,042 
762 
373 

7.614 
9.761 

355 
1,118 

404 

453 
1,957 
1,091 

565 



1959 



77,165 

1,667 

5,058 

23,893 

11,993 

457 

435 

1,110 

1,281 

975 

560 

1,602 

444 

2,121 

857 
375 

7,848 
10,224 

362 
1,430 

403 

467 
1,894 
1,141 

568 



1960 



77,496 

1,690 

5,185 

23,262 

12,047 

458 

436 
1,095 
1,287 
1,023 

547 

1,662 
449 

2,121 
861 
385 

8,199 
10,572 

351 
1,413 

452 

426 
1,895 
1.134 

546 



90 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



TABLE 20— White Resident Births in Maryland: 1951-1960 



Local Unit 






White Resident Bibths in 


Maryland 








1951 


1952 


1953 


1954 


1955 


1956 


1957 


1958 


1959 


1960 


Total State 


47,992 


50,146 


50,918 


53,204 


54,548 


56,382 


59,122 


58,862 


59.538 


60,093 


Allegany 

Anne Arundel, . . 
Baltimore City. . 

Baltimore 

Calvert 


1,792 

2,322 

14,938 

6,932 

160 


1,758 

2,467 

14,989 

7,382 

186 


1,691 

2,734 

14,628 

7,999 

196 


1,540 

3,033 

14,949 

8,560 

169 


1,553 

3,137 

14,366 

9,209 

190 


1,554 

3,324 

14,032 

10,203 

175 


1,638 

3,752 

14,305 

11,146 

196 


1,608 

3,934 

13,380 

11,260 

183 


1,643 

4,197 

12,577 

11,495 

197 


1,671 

4,361 

11,998 

11,605 

195 


Caroline 

Carroll 


300 
778 
737 
397 
350 


325 
922 
834 
387 
342 


313 

840 
883 
457 
324 


301 
881 
979 
476 
370 


311 
912 

1,067 
527 
337 


352 

942 

1,173 

494 

327 


278 

1,016 

1,341 

560 

358 


346 

1,040 

1,153 

558 

349 


307 

1,055 

1,176 

549 

336 


304 
1,034 


Cecil 


1,190 


Charles 

Dorchester 


567 
298 


Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 


1,304 
507 

1,426 
480 
204 

5,122 

6,157 

197 

690 

226 


1,306 
497 

1,557 
480 
224 

5,794 

6,430 

231 

675 

243 


1,282 
466 

1,493 
499 
209 

5,899 

6,705 

190 

812 

223 


1,369 
448 

1,625 
561 
258 

6,343 

6,782 

226 

877 

264 


1,388 
448 

1,763 
582 
257 

6,720 

7,108 

254 

831 

225 


1,431 
470 

1,695 
589 
215 

7,010 

7,880 

226 

798 

219 


1,468 
420 

1,755 
613 

244 

7,208 

8,290 

205 

831 

197 


1,438 
470 

1,804 
649 
247 

7,234 

8,650 

239 

844 

205 


1,431 
444 

1,858 
743 
252 

7,450 
9,042 

243 
1,120 

192 


1,488 
449 

1,868 
749 
274 


Montgomery. . . . 
Prince George's . 
Queen Anne's , . . 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 


7,768 
9,489 

236 
1,146 

239 


Talbot 


281 

1,684 

686 

322 


293 

1,769 

733 

322 


301 

1,731 

735 

308 


270 

1,825 

736 

362 


337 

1,925 

771 

330 


301 

1,882 

774 

316 


321 

1,882 

797 

301 


308 

1,909 

773 

281 


324 

1,835 

769 

303 


271 


Washington .... 

Wicomico 

Worcester 


1,851 
758 
284 



Maryland State Department of Education 



91 



TABLE 21— Colored Resident Births in Maryland: 1951-1960 



Local Uvit 


Colored Resident Births in Maryland 




1951 


1952 


1953 


1954 


1955 


1956 


1957 


1958 


1959 


1960 


Total State 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel. . . 
Baltimore City.. 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 


13,089 

32 

647 

7,692 

557 

245 

96 

40 

64 

385 

280 

160 

1 

219 

117 

81 

356 
863 
101 
226 
206 

154 

30 

294 

243 


13,019 

27 

665 

7,786 

555 

241 

107 

97 

67 

297 

243 

132 

232 

101 

94 

319 
820 
103 
206 
203 

165 

25 

269 

265 


13,605 

38 

710 

8,120 

548 

236 

118 

48 

75 

368 

273 

148 
1 
231 
116 
108 

376 
861 
89 
217 
204 

150 

40 

284 

246 


14,241 

37 

778 

8,574 

497 

262 

104 

40 

75 

401 

262 

150 

230 
99 
96 

365 
905 
109 
239 
213 

161 

44 

325 

275 


14,657 

33 

703 

8,925 

490 

281 

112 

72 

96 

410 

251 

145 

2i9 
116 
130 

333 
964 
132 

254 
204 

162 

42 

323 

260 


15,726 

29 

712 

9,750 

498 

238 

108 

53 

88 

397 

289 

166 

222 
119 
105 

384 
1,117 
131 
248 
214 

169 

47 

370 

272 


17,005 

26 

822 

10,762 

594 

277 

115 

63 

96 

426 

267 

139 

253 
121 
116 

385 
1,126 
117 
293 
191 

151 

53 

352 

260 


17,135 

26 

828 

11,084 

499 

238 

119 

55 

99 

429 

267 

139 

238 
113 
126 

380 
1,111 
116 
274 
199 

145 

48 

318 

284 


17,627 

24 

861 

11,316 

498 

260 

128 
55 
105 
426 
224 

171 

263 
114 
123 

398 
1,182 
119 
310 
211 

143 

59 

372 

265 


17,403 

19 

824 

11,264 

442 

263 

132 
61 

97 


Charles 

Dorchester 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 


456 
249 

174 

253 

112 
111 


Montgomery 

Prince George's . 
Queen Anne's. . . 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 


431 
1,083 
115 
267 
213 

155 


Washington .... 

Wicomico 

Worcester 


44 
376 
262 



92 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



1 ABLE 22 
Withdrawals* from Public Schools: Counties of Maryland: Year Ending June 30, 1961 





Total 


Withdrawals by CodeI 


Local Unit 


Transferred to 
Other Schools 


W7 


W13 


W5 


W6 


W8 


W9 


WIO 


Wll 


W12 






Wl 


W2 


W3&4 


W14 



ELEMENTARY 



Total Counties 


21,514 

604 

2,898 

3,522 

154 

183 

369 
859 
363 
140 
646 

137 

1,311 

431 

123 

3,336 

3,816 
177 
597 
135 
125 

890 
496 
202 


8,210 

311 

916 

1,218 

60 

50 

105 
277 
108 
50 
339 

42 

498 

74 

35 

1,562 

1,533 
46 
99 
34 
44 

526 

240 

43 


283 

6 

45 
48 

3 

8 
2 

5 
11 

92 

43 

8 

5 

6 

1 


12,402 

264 

1,859 

2,152 

87 

125 

246 
561 
232 
86 
276 

82 

768 

330 

84 

1,614 

2,155 

123 

474 

97 

67 

330 
239 
151 


51 

1 
8 
9 
3 
1 

3 

1 
2 

"i 
"i 

6 
9 

i 

1 

1 

3 


63 

4 

13 

9 

i 

4 
4 

3 
3 

6 

10 
3 
1 

1 

i 


162 

3 
20 
42 

2 

11 

3 

4 

2 
16 

2 

1 
9 

22 

io 

1 
3 

7 
4 




37 

i 

2 
3 

i 

2 

7 

.'.2 

6 

4 
1 
2 
1 
1 

3 

i 


22 

4 

1 

i 

2 

i 

9 

1 

2 

1 


282 

15 

32 

41 

4 

4 

9 
6 
6 
4 
16 

4 

18 

9 

3 

32 

39 

4 
2 

1 
5 

14 
8 
6 


2 

1 






Anne Arundel 

Baltimore 

Calvert 






' 


Carroll 






Cecil 








Dorchester 

Frederick 




Garrett 




Harford 








Kent 




Montgomery 

Prince George's .... 

Queen Anne's 

St. Mary's 




Talbot 




Washington 




Worcester 









HIGH 



Total Counties 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 


13,729 

426 

1,751 

2,550 

112 

133 

321 
474 
247 
139 

444 

129 
685 
253 
114 
1,834 

2,396 
140 
316 
144 
127 

582 
243 
169 


1,844 

54 
219 

276 

io 

49 
51 
18 
10 
83 

2 

105 

10 

3 
377 

383 

5 

15 

5 

5 

151 
8 
5 


88 

7 
9 
9 

2 

12 

1 

2 

i 

24 
10 

4 

"i 

6 


5,084 

100 

678 

854 

30 

50 

106 

206 

86 

48 

103 

64 
321 
120 

34 
793 

909 
59 

184 
38 

27 

138 
74 
62 


347 

10 

70 

82 

3 

2 

3 
11 

4 
8 
5 

3 
6 
6 
2 
46 

44 
3 
3 
5 
3 

19 
5 

4 


45 

2 
5 

7 

1 
1 

i 
1 

2 

3 

7 

9 
1 

2 
2 

1 


254 

2 
22 
89 

3 

17 
2 
2 

'i 
ii 

4 

2 

36 

25 

2 

10 

1 

6 

10 

3 


258 

8 
40 

87 

1 

3 

1 

6 

3 
5 

4 

1 

44 

36 
2 
3 

1 

4 
7 
2 


4,470 

165 

566 

925 

65 

59 

95 
165 
103 

49 

171 

36 

174 

82 

51 

343 

819 
48 
73 
60 
73 

212 
95 
41 


37 

4 
10 

1 

2 
1 

6 

i 
li 

i 


619 

38 

70 

90 

9 

1 

22 

5 

18 

13 

21 

12 
29 
15 
9 
61 

75 
4 

24 
9 

10 

29 
24 
31 


86 

4 

28 

3 

2 

i4 
i 

i2 

1 
14 

1 

3 


577 

40 
64 
89 

8 

20 
17 
14 
11 
22 

5 
23 
12 

9 
76 

85 
4 
7 

15 

7 

15 

17 
17 


20 

4 
2 


Charles 




Dorchester 

Frederick 


3 


Garrett 


3 




3 






Kent 




Montgomery 

Prince George's. . . . 

Queen Anne's 

St. Mary's 


4 


Talbot 




Washington 


"i 


Worcester 









* Withdrawals who did not re-enter during 1960-61 the school from which they withdrew — excluding kindergarten, 
t Codes: Wl — Transferred — Public school in county W6 — Armed services 

W2 — Transferred— Nonpublic school in county W8 — Age 16 or over 

W3&4— Transferred — Outside county W9— Mental 

W7 — Committed to institution WIO— Physical 

W13— Death Wll— Economic 

W5— Special case W12— Marriage 

W14 — Suspended 



Maryland State Department of Education 



93 



TABLE 23 — Average Number Belonging per Teacher and Principal: 
State of Maryland: 1952-1961 



Year and 


.\VERAGE Number Belonging 
AND Principal 


^ER Teacher 


Local U.vit 


Total 


Elementary* 


High 


1952 

1953 

1954 


27.6 
27.5 
27.4 
26.8 
26.8 

26.3 
25.1 
24.6 
24.2 
23.9 


32.2 

31.5 
30.4 
30.4 

30.0 
28.0 
27.3 
26.9 
26.6 


21.7 
21.8 
22.0 


1955 


22.0 


1956 

1957 


22.0 
21.7 


1958 

1959 


21.5 
21.4 


1960 

1961 


21.2 
21.0 


BY LOCAL 


UNIT, 1960-1961 




Allegany 


24.8 
24.5 
24.6 
23.2 

24.5 

22.3 
23.5 
23.9 

24.6 
25.4 

22.6 
25.1 
24.3 
23.8 

22.4 

22.7 
24.5 
22.0 
24.5 
23.6 

23.6 
24.3 
25.4 
22.6 


26.6 
26.9 
27.5 
24.9 
28.6 

29.1 
27.9 
27,5 
28.6 
29.4 

24.8 
25.8 
27.2 
26.0 
26.4 

25.3 
27.5 
26.0 
28.5 
27.5 

27.4 
26.0 
28.5 
26.1 


23.1 


Anne Arundel 


21 6 


Baltimore City 


21.3 


Baltimore 


21.4 


Calvert 


19 5 


Caroline 


16 9 


Carroll 


19 7 


Cecil 


20 


Charles 


20 5 


Dorchester 


21 8 


Frederick 


20 5 


Garrett 


24.3 


Harford 


21 3 




21 2 


Kent 


18 5 


Montgomery 


19.9 




21 3 


Queen Anne's 


18 


St. Mary's 


20.1 


Somerset 


19 7 


Talbot 


19 7 


Washington 


22 5 


Wicomico 


21.9 




18 8 







♦Excludes kindergartens and elementary schools at State Teachers Colleges. 



94 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Eeport 



TABLE 24— Number and Per Cent Nonpromo lions: Maryland County High 
School Pupils: June Net Roll, 1961 





June Net Roll 




Local Unit 


Total 


Promoted 


Not Promoted 


Per Cent 
Not Promoted 


Total Counties 


179,280 

7,815 

16,646 

36,868 

1,512 

1,801 

4,697 
3,654 
2,931 
2,698 
6,381 

1,968 
6,946 
3,141 
1,349 
30,741 

28,581 
1,467 
2,285 
1,770 
1,665 

8,190 
4,058 
2,116 


170,357 

7,600 

15,964 

35,079 

1,477 

1,758 

4,527 
3,374 
2,628 
2,599 
6,117 

1,889 
6,565 
3,012 
1,254 
29,538 

26,357 
1,352 
2,119 
1,657 
1,609 

7,956 
3,879 
2,047 


8,923 

215 

682 

1,789 

35 

43 

170 
280 
303 
99 
264 

79 
381 
129 

95 
1,203 

2,224 

115 

166 

113 

56 

234 

179 

69 


5.0 


Allegany 

Anne Arundel 


2.7 
4.1 


Baltimore 

Calvert 


4.9 
2.3 


Caroline 

Carroll 


2.4 
3.6 


Cecil 


7.7 




10.3 


Dorchester 

Frederick 


3.7 
4.1 


Garrett 


4.0 


Harford 


5.5 


Howard 


4.1 


Kent 


7.0 


Montgomery 

Prince George's . . 


3.9 

7.8 


Queen Anne's . .... 


7.8 


St. Mary's 


7.3 




6.4 


Talbot 


3.4 


Washington 


2.9 




4.4 


Worcester 


3.3 







Note: Policy of promotion and nonpromotion varies in the different counties. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



95 



TABLE 25 — Number, Per Cent, and Causes of Nonpromotion : 
County Elementary Pupils*: June Net Roll, 1961 



Maryland 



Local Unit 



Total 

Not 

Promoted 



Per Cent 

Not 
Promoted 



Number not Promoted by Cause 



Personal 
Illness 



Irregular 
Atten- 
dance! 



Imma- 
turityt 



All Other 
Causes 



Total Counties. . . . 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel . 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery. . . 

Prince George's 
Queen Anne's . . 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington . . . . 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



10,130 



4.2 



136 


1.7 


1,254 


5.1 


2,769 


5.7 


296 


10.7 


86 


3.5 


252 


4.3 


467 


8.4 


423 


9.7 


80 


2.4 


60 


0.8 


169 


6.2 


436 


4.7 


134 


3.0 


46 


2.4 


872 


2.1 


1,427 


3.5 


69 


3.3 


262 


7.4 


145 


5.9 


225 


9.4 


142 


1.5 


282 


4.6 


98 


3.1 



2 

24 

87 

2 

1 



352 

3 

45 
49 
14 

7 

14 
22 
57 



5 

18 

1 

3 

30 

31 

1 

27 

7 

7 

1 
1 
6 



8,791 

129 
1,169 
2,065 

280 
78 

238 

427 

358 

75 

56 

159 
319 
128 
41 
772 

1,370 

64 

227 

130 

211 

130 

275 

90 



2 

16 

568 



95 

2 

1 

59 

9 

3 
8 
2 

10 



♦Excludes kindergarten and pupils attending elementary schools at State Teachers Colleges, 
tirregular attendance due to unfortunate home conditions, 
ilmmaturity — social, intellectual, emotional. 



96 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



TABLE 26 — Number and Per Cent of Nonproniotions in First Grade" 
Counties of Maryland : June Net Roll, 1961 





First Grade Enrollment 


Number and Per Cent not Promoted 


Local Unit 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Number 


Per Cent 




Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total Counties . . 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel. 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 


45,254 

1,323 

4,700 

8,959 

544 

423 

1,039 

1,443 

817 

615 

1,333 

440 

1,753 

833 

362 

7,549 

7,716 
438 
686 
459 
434 

1,678 

1,117 

593 


23,758 

681 

2,464 

4,680 

287 

225 

556 
878 
410 
317 
735 

217 
934 
411 
184 
3,873 

4,084 
225 
366 
263 
233 

850 
585 
300 


21,496 

642 

2,236 

4,279 

257 

198 

483 
565 
407 
298 
598 

223 
819 
422 
178 
3,676 

3,632 
213 
320 
196 
201 

828 
532 
293 


3,710 

79 

514 

829 

75 

34 

98 

219 

130 

35 

21 

44 

134 

84 

327 

654 
13 

100 
46 
83 

36 
97 
58 


2,404 

56 

335 

538 

46 

23 

71 
136 
90 
24 
16 

27 
90 
50 

2i7 

409 

6 

65 

30 

45 

26 
61 
43 


1,306 

23 

179 

291 

29 

11 

27 
83 
40 
11 
5 

17 
44 
34 

lio 

245 

7 

35 

16 

38 

10 
36 
15 


8.2 

6.0 
10.9 

9.3 
13.8 

8.0 

9.4 

15.2 

15.9 

5.7 

1.6 

10.0 

7.G 

10.1 

4 '3 

8.5 

3.0 

14.6 

10.0 

19.1 

2.1 
8.7 
9.8 


10.1 

8.2 
13.6 
11.5 
16.0 
10.2 

12.8 

15.5 

21.9 

7.6 

2.2 

12.4 

9.6 

12.2 

5^6 

10.0 
2.7 
17.7 
11.4 
19.3 

3.1 
10.4 
14.3 


6.1 

3.6 
8.0 
6.8 
11.3 
5.5 

5.6 

14 7 


Charles 

Dorchester .... 
Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 


9.8 
3.7 
0.8 

7.6 
5.4 
8.1 


Montgomery. . 

PrinceGeorge's 
Queen Anne's . 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington . . . 

Wicomico 

Worcester .... 


3.0 

6.7 
3.3 

10.9 
8.2 

18.9 

1.2 
6.8 
5.1 



* Excludes pupils in first grade of elementary schools at State Teachers Colleges. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



97 



TABLE 27— Public High School Graduates: State of Maryland— 1952-61 : 
by Local Unit — Year Ending June 30, 1961 



Year and Locai, Unit 



High School Graduates 



Total 



Boys 



Girls 



BY YEAR, 1952-1961 




1951-52 


12,352 
13,356 
14,070 
15,161 
16,767 

17,122 
18,380 
20,462 
23,854 
26,923 


5,741 
6,256 
6,670 
7,313 
8,019 

8,368 

8,891 

9,861 

11,560 

13,142 


6,611 


1952-53 

1953-54 

1954-55 

1955-56 


7,100 
7,400 
7,848 
8,748 


1956-57 


8,754 


1957-58 

1958-59 


9,489 
10,601 


1959-60 

1960-61 


12,294 
13,781 



BY 


LOCAL UNIT, 196( 


-61 




Allegany 


1,091 
1,768 
6,169 
4,124 
176 

231 
631 
396 
315 
351 

719 
279 
800 
336 

154 

3,704 

3,227 

156 

220 

217 

216 
906 
500 
237 


584 

837 

2,945 

1,982 

89 

129 
304 
178 
146 
179 

337 
142 
397 

170 
81 

1,862 

1,547 

76 

115 

110 

105 
462 
252 
113 


507 


Anne Arundel 


931 


Baltimore City 


3,224 




2,142 
87 


Calvert 


Caroline 


102 


Carroll 


327 


Cecil 


218 


Charles 


169 


Dorchester 


172 


Frederick 


382 


Garrett 


137 




403 


Howard 


166 


Kent 


73 


Montgomery 


1,842 




1,680 


Queen Anne's 


80 


St. Mary's 


rio5 


Somerset 


[107 
ill 


Talbot 


Washington 


444 


Wicomico 


248 


Worcester 


124 







98 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



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104 



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106 



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Anne Aru 
Baltimore 


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Prince Ge 
Queen An 
St. Mary" 
Somerset 
Talbot . . 


l2s 
.Sg§ 

111 



Maryland State Department of Education 



107 





o 


00 t-0S05O00 
•>* U5 <0 C- N 

* 


Consumer 
Problems 

and 
Economics 


eo lO ■n- «5 !0 c- 


1 1 ^ 

hi 

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rH-Hrt IN(N(N 




cote -(-q-eoo 
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111 


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93 

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108 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 





*-• 
o 


• in lO -H O! la 

•iMt-;oeOrH 

•M MTjiOOin 




••J" O t- ^ t- N 

Tj" ;o 05 o lo o» 
t- 00 iH CO in 1(5 


.si 

C D 

^1 


00«>->*005t- 

in rH o o to o 




.<)< Oi m ri in TO 
ciNcccn-^in 


1 
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asoo^inaio 

in ;c t- a^ o o" 


o 

s 


HH 


(M^eo«ot-iM 

«0 [- N «D t- IM 

<N CO CO •* 00 o_ 


- 


thoojncon 

OOOJiH lOt> lO 
0_0_rt__CO__05^tC 

oooco'"«o'«o't-'' 

rHIMNOaiNIN 


g 

o 


a IS 


Tjiootomcooj 
corH t-«o —1 in 
in t-;_c-__co oo_^__ 
o'eo-inTf co-c-" 


SO 


in u5 c; Oi '-H oi 
oococ^c- o 00 
t>o_TH-*co_a-^ 

^roOOOOC'r-TrH 
rHNOJCaCOCO 


fa. 


00 00 !0 ,-1 00 -f 
O CO «D T)< ^ C5 

,H inco_^05_o_co_ 
in^^-^jTioineJ 

r-IIMNCa(MN 


^1 


r)' 00 CO CO •* to 

CO in .-H lo to c:i 
«>_in.Hco_^iHcJ 

OO^^IMfJCC 




OitDOOrt «0 to 
OOCOO ^(MO 

CO t^^^^*"!^ 
i>"o c--'inci-^ 

00 --l -H (N(N CO 


9 

> 




to' t-' 00 (jj 6 ^ 
to lO U3 in to to 

iratoi-ooaio 
inusin in irt to 

O^ ^ O G^ 9^ O 



o; o -^H,-! wioinNto tooeaooca inO'^Tj'co m m 
.<)"a> •tO'^ co5tD.*ni (Nino5-^in nio,-icico m n 

COl^' C^r-lfHCOt-lN OlOrH CO' 



OC-'ttOtO OOTfCDO t-t-CONt- CJ00CO--tO t-N-- 

int^o^coio oototooi -^ooc^ai c^f" "" " 

N .^ 00 Oirl ^ 0-1 r-1 L- C- 



00-*tr-IMCO 0150rfl>J05 0-. tOlOOSO incO-^OitO OICO-* 



t^iniAino c-tocot>i-' 

(Mr^^i-HCO 



toinoiiot- 



iMoOin 

eON'-i 



ojoot-ooc- 03T)<ooinm O'^Tt^qo-. otot-o^^ 'J'Ojo 
o to CO ^ C-- tooot^oco otocooin cowo^toto to^a'co 
o<ioo5iMN toin'^'^o cooiniMin coc<icotac^ mt-co 



>HtOtOu50S (3> in Oi Tf 1-1 t-,-(OC0lO 

asinr-<(3^o •"ts'cotoaio toinco-^-^ 



a: to -a" CO en cci^tocato^^ co^^oa •* co c^ mmco 
7-^ cJ in 



uj 00 c] tj' -^ ooinooooo oco--*'^'* 

tOOltDCOO-. O-^IMt-O; Oi-lOrHO 



ooo toinco 



-co o oiin o ooo 
■ C-. oi o to 00 iM o; 

•(M-^TfcO t-ooco 



r-l ,-1 to 



■00 CO CO 



a: oot-inn .*Ttt-cooo 



6,559 

11,536 

33,171 

1,358 

1,571 


Ti<,-c inoooo 

O00IN'>)>T-( 

co_^co__to_^o<i_in 
^"coiNNin 


tot-oe^to 

■^ CO 00 -t .-1 

T-TinNrHOO 


12,631 
1,320 
2,210 
1,670 
1,548 


tOi# in 
cain-'3' 
ooiot-_ 

to"co"TH 


tr-iOCOOCO 
OirtOOtOt- 

int tOi-H CO in 

tOr-TcOtHrH 
^CO 


lO t-OOIMiO 

.-100 CO too 

CO_^CO_tO_^NiO 

•<d<'co''NeJio' 


t- to 05int- 

■^ t-o.*oo 


t-cointo Oi 

CO IM 1-1 t- ■51' 

c-coc<itoin 


00 00-^ 
to loin 
oo_ioc-_^ 
to-co'^-T 



s< 



S ^^.5 - 






O C 






SSficSKira raoj-^-ft, "LUi^L'^k^ l-.i-'jJoto fclKlKr 

<j«<imoo ouoQp^ oWWW§ euaKwH ^^^ 



Maryland State Department of Education 



109 















•* 




• • --^ Oi lO 


J3 


• • • wfl'oo 


O 


• ■ — ^ 


Ix.H 


^M-^t--*a> 


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P5 






m o> •* in 1(5 1- 


y? o^ Oi X -^ t' 




SEtf 




1 ^ 


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o i 


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M a) 


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•Eg 




i-i-H NNcoec 


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c 








Cq lO t] o t- vO 




■;3 


t^ r^ in t^ OiOO 






— 1 ^ 00 00 too 




M 


1-' rH fH rt N IN 


H 






















m 


c 


t^ C^ N -H Ift ^ 


o 


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T)< Tl- 1- 00 T* CO 




Oh 


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as 
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to S 






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in in in in in to 




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■-< 


rH 


1 



Oic<itooc-H otoinooco t-oa^^'-' o—ioejt- 
ooN^^inc^i i^co-'i'as''^ cr-oin»-Hin t-toxt-to 
Ttoin-^^ f-'Oii-i -^ inw^to c* 



incaot-to ooNi-N'H •»i'W5i>toco 



cof-tojino ooosoointo 



toxo^inoi oint^r^oo 
COOCOC^'I' ococitoo 
i-HCOtr- --I --I 



O tCNcO 00 .-(■<a"tO 



O tOCJ'^ (MOO 

■CJ M toco ■* Tf 



■--. ■OO.-l 



00--00OtO tXMCOCOO: 
■^OCOOOOO -HtOCOCOt- 

Tfoo; eo^'H'-ico 



to Oi -If a-, to 

(NC- — I 00 00 

COOO w 



rieaooto otoin 
CO t~ in 00 Oi t- 1- c^ 



00 --( rH 



1-1 "t c- CO to ooomTfr 
CTiinoO'^t:- int-Oitc; 



t- (N — -* 00 

c- -H intoo 
t- oj e^ (N 1-1 



P N -rH ■ It rH rH 



CO -^rH 
IM rH 



ootoooot- 'tco-'j'( 

C-tOtO-^rt N!O00< 
i^COeJNtO iMtONi 



5tO t-OrHOOO 

>to o o>'^ into 

■1 in 00 MrH rH 

rH (m" 



(NrH t- OO'f 

int-o moo 
in co__QO_^iN CO 

rHCo'to" 



ooincot-Tt« rHincooto ooooo^in oi-^in 
O'^T)<t-05 otoi-iojt- eocoo>oo cotON 
oootoujco ■^eotoc^to cow*^co rnto-^ 



^ 9i 9^ 9i CO 



a^a^r^ ^0^ xooot-o CO t-- to to in 'd'Ot- 

t^toOOOi NNOOtO O^TfOStO OitOOO 

0500i>ino -^inc-coo cocomcoco toajTf 



rH Tt 



'CONMiO tOrHO^lMO 



00 o^ t- 00 1- 



rH t- iniH O 

a-^M_^i<f rHin 
cif CO c^N in 



Tft-comco iMxto 

OitOXrHt- XOJCONtO XrH(M 

inrHIXtOCO M^-TX^ 

itrH rH i-TrH tc'co'-H 



inrHTf (MCO 
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to_^(N t-_e<i_o^ 

rH to'lM'rH to" 



"^osrHcot^ lOt-t-rHco o5ioeot-c- tocotot-o tooi(>] 



cqxinxt- COXU300X rncoNrnin t-ousNX 



tO^'HX^cO^^Hj 

tO'l(5-*rHrH 

rHCO 



O^NK*rHin 



toe<j^05^to_co_ 

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XC-CO 
t-_i*X 

to'co"' 



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110 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 





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112 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 








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Maryland State Department of Education 



113 



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121 
357 
586 
911 
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114 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



TABLE 43 — Pupils Enrolled in Driver Education and Training: 
County High Schools: Fall of 1960 



Maryland 



Year avd 


Driver Education* 


Driver Training! 


Local Unit 


Total 


Boys Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


1955-56 


414 
1,311 

970 
1,191 
1,301 
2,470 


180 
619 
472 
571 
666 
1,285 


234 
692 
498 
620 
635 
1,185 


5,174 
5,719 
6,772 
6,464 
6,583 
6,987 


2,308 
2,611 
3,247 
3,158 
3,114 
3,515 


2,866 


1956-57 

1957-58 


3,108 
3,525 


1958-59 


3,306 


1959-60 

1960-61 


3,469 
3,472 







BY LOCAL UNIT, FALL OF 1960 



Allegany 

Anne Arundel 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 


93 


hi 


42 


472 
1,640 


268 
844 


204 
796 


CarroU 

Cecil 

Charles 


522 
960 

i46 
488 


289 

5i6 

59 
240 


233 

444 

87 
248 


iso 

578 

61 
1,744 


93 

29 i 

25 
883 




Dorchester 

Frederick 


87 


Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 


287 


Kent 


36 


Montgomery 


861 


Prince George's 

Queen Anne's 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 


34 

isi 


63 


15 
68 


747 
189 
161 

i43 


341 
91 

74 

ii 


406 
98 
87 

72 


Washington 

Wicomico 

Worcester 


96 


48 


48 


319 
753 


171 
363 


148 
390 



* Driver Education — Classroom instruction only. 

t Driver Training — Classroom instruction and behind-the-wheel training or behind-the wheel training 
only. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



115 



TABLE 44 — Pupils Reported as Members of Glee or Choral (^liihs. Orchestras, 
or Bands: Maryland County High Schools: Fall of 1960 



Year and 


Glee or Choral Clubs 


Orchestras, Bands 


Local Unit 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


1955-56 


12,181 
12,983 
10,425 
12,222 
12,336 
13,319 


3,744 
4,386 
3,075 
3,767 
3,778 
4,033 


8,437 
8,597 
7,350 
8,455 
8,558 
9,286 


10,152 
11,121 
12,802 
12,970 
14,701 
16,506 


6,795 
7,262 
8,317 
8,353 
9,479 
10,505 


3,357 
3,859 
4,485 
4,617 
6,222 
6,001 


1956-57 

1957-58 

1958-59 

1959-60 

1960-61 



BY LOCAL UNIT, FALL OF 1960 



Allegany 

Anne Arundel . . 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester . . . . 
Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery. . . 

Prince George's 
Queen Anne's. . 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington . . . 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



931 

1,148 

3,112 

245 

231 

416 
153 
159 
124 
734 

258 
499 
170 
339 
2,094 

1,362 

30 

32 

130 



840 
177 
135 



308 
304 
916 
105 
60 

170 
40 
42 
68 

256 

84 
130 

68 
118 
646 

392 

8 

17 

61 



175 
37 
28 



623 

844 

2,196 

140 

171 

246 

113 

117 

56 

478 

174 
369 
102 
221 
1,448 

970 
22 
15 
69 



665 
140 
107 



872 

1,148 

2,566 

126 

302 

495 
372 
403 
266 
745 

246 
642 
301 
253 
2,609 

2,890 

192 

166 

41 

203 

1,112 
289 
267 



412 

757 

1,658 

78 

178 

318 
234 
216 
147 
473 

127 
373 
181 
144 
1,869 

1,850 

103 

91 

27 

129 

731 
220 
189 



460 
391 

908 

48 

124 

177 
138 
187 
119 
272 

119 

269 
120 
109 
740 

1,040 
89 
75 
14 

74 

381 
69 
78 



116 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



TABLE 45-^Nuiiiber of Different Individuals Teaching and Number of Public High 
Schools Offering Each Subject: Counties of Maryland: Fall of 1960 





Core 


Arts and 
Crafts 


English 


Mathe- 
matics 


Social 
Studies 


Science 


Latin 


French 


Spanish 


Business 
Educat'n 




Number 


Number 


Number 


Number 


Number 


Number 


Number Number 


Number Number 


Local Unit 


of 




of 


of 




of 


of 




of 




of 1 of 


of 1 of 




2 




M 




OT 




2 




M 




E 




y 




01 




M 




r 






ja 


•S 


JS 




J= 




J3 




JS 




JZ 




JS 


1 


ji 




j: 




^ 
















































^ 




ja 




ji 




J3 




*a 




ji 


S 


ji 










H 






H 


CO 


H 


& 


H 


eg 


H 


CQ 


H 


^ 


H 


^ 


^ 


^ 


& 


H 


03 


CO 


Total Counties. . . . 


1,006 


114 


108 


67 


1.483 


196 


1,494 


220 


1,281 


176 


1,207 


216 


113 


96 


233 


161 


99 


80 


410 


122 


Allegany 


25 


8 






84 


11 


59 


11 


59 


10 


47 


11 


7 


6 


5 


5 


2 


2 


19 


6 


Anne Arundel... 


40 


2 


2 


2 


258 


13 


191 


13 


241 


13 


89 


12 


6 


4 


16 


10 


*5 


*5 


37 


7 


Baltimore 


354 


20 


42 


18 


121 


15 


275 


25 


111 


13 


294 


24 


22 


16 


43 


24 


t25 


t25 


73 


13 


Calvert 


8 


4 


3 


3 


25 


4 


18 


4 


17 


4 


12 


4 


3 


2 


3 


2 






10 


2 


Caroline 










31 


7 


15 


( 


26 


1 


19 


7 


3 


3 2 


2 


1 


1 


12 


4 


Carroll .. . 


13 

ii 


7 
'4 


13 
'6 


9 
6 


49 
42 
41 


12 

7 
8 


41 
39 
33 


13 

7 
8 


43 

47 
35 


12 

7 


39 
36 
33 


14 

7 
8 


1 
3 
2 


1 9 
3 4 

2 4 


7 
4 
4 


'2 


'2 


18 
19 


- 




6 


Charles 


11 4 


Dorchester 


7 


2 






24 


6 


21 


6 


25 


6 


19 


6 


2 


2 


3 


3 






8 4 


Frederick 


73 


8 


5 


3 


29 


/ 


55 


10 


27 


7 


52 


10 


6 


6 


9 


7 


1 


1 


19 6 


Garrett 


9 


3 


4 


2 


24 


3 


15 


4 


19 


2 


19 


4 


1 


1 










5 


2 


Harford 


80 


7 


10 


(i 


45 


7 


75 


7 


40 


7 


51 


7 


6 


5 


10 


7 


4 


3 


25 


1 


Howard 


22 


5 






24 


5 


26 


6 


29 


5 


26 


6 


3 


3 


5 


5 


1 


1 


8 


3 


Kent. . 


'i 


'i 


3 
2 


2 
2 


23 
319 


4 
24 


18 
210 


4 
24 


23 

279 


4 
24 


16 
159 


4 
24 


2 
24 


2 
20 


3 
53 


3 

24 


120 


i2 


6 
65 


4 


Montgomery . . . 


15 


Prince George's . 


291 


25 


6 


6 


140 


26 


181 


31 


86 


13 


99 


28 


10 


9 


30 


23 


°30 


"22 






Queen Anne's... 


3 


1 


4 


2 


25 


4 


14 


4 


17 


4 


17 


4 






4 


4 


1 


1 


8 


4 


St. Mary's 










27 


5 


24 


5 


25 


5 


23 


5 






5 


4 


2 


2 


9 


5 


Somerset 


9 


5 


1 


1 


16 




24 


7 


19 


/ 


25 


7 


1 


1 


5 


5 






9 


5 


Talbot 


2 
43 


1 
9 


6 


4 


15 
52 


3 
9 


17 
79 


3 

12 


17 
35 


3 

7 


15 
63 


3 
12 


1 

6 


1 
6 


3 
8 


3 

7 


3 


2 


9 
18 


3 


Washington .... 




Wicomico 






1 


1 


48 


5 


41 


5 


41 


5 


34 


5 


4 


3 


4 


4 


2 


1 


13 


4 


Worcester 


io 


2 






21 


4 


23 


4 


20 


4 


20 


4 






5 


4 






9 


4 



Agri- 
culture 



Number 
of 



Local Unit 



Industrial 
Work 



Number 
of 



Home 
Eco- 
nomics 



Number 
of 



Physical 
Education 



Number 
of 



Art 



Number 
of 



Music 



Number 
of 



Driver 
Educa- 
tion 



Number 
of 



Library 



Number 
of 



Guidance 



Number 
of 



Adminis- 
tration 
Supervi'n 



Number 
of 



Total Counties. . 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel. 
Baltimore . . . . 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester . . . 
Frederick . . . . 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery. 

Prince George' 
Queen Anne's. 
St. Mary's . . . 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington . . 
Wicomico . . . . 
Worcester. . . . 



30 12 
10 5 
4 



430 


208 


816 


20 


9 


31 


34 


12 


55 


70 


25 


145 


6 


3 


7 


8 


7 


16 


20 


14 


32 


13 


7 


20 


8 


7 


20 


5 


4 


15 


14 


10 


37 


5 


2 


13 


16 


7 


26 


8 


5 


15 


5 


4 


8 


58 


24 


149 


82 


31 


134 


5 


4 


8 


6 


T> 


12 


4 


4 


13 


6 


3 


6 


23 


12 


30 


8 


5 


16 


6 


4 


8 



280 164 



510 


217 


19 


11 


38 


13 


89 


25 


6 


4 


11 


7 


27 


14 


12 


1 


15 


8 


9 


5 


27 


10 


7 


3 


20 


7 


13 


6 


8 


4 


59 


24 


85 


31 


8 


4 


6 


5 


5 


5 


5 


3 


26 


12 


9 


5 


6 


4 



111 



261 


208 


368 


11 


9 


10 


15 


13 


29 


51 


24 


75 


5 


4 


5 


7 


7 


I 


15 


14 


15 


7 


i 


8 


6 


6 


8 


5 


5 


5 


12 


10 


13 


3 


3 


4 


7 


6 


12 


5 


5 


5 


4 


4 


5 


41 


24 


71 


29 


29 


51 


4 


4 


5 


4 


4 


5 


6 


() 


5 


3 


3 


4 


12 


12 


14 


5 


5 


8 


4 


4 


4 



506 1 219 



181 rj 



* Includes one teacher and cue school teaching German, 
t Includes one teacher and one school teaching Russian. 
t Includes four teachers and four schools teching German. 
° Includes two teachers and two schools teaching German. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



117 



'I'ABLK 16 — Number and Per Cent of Men 'I'eacliers: 
Public Schools of Maryland: 1923-1961 







Number 


AND Per C 


ENT Men Teachers 




Year Ending 
June 30 


Total 


Elementary 


High 




Number 


Per Cent 


Number 


Per Cent 


Number 


Per Cent 


1923 

1928 

1933 

1938 

1943 

1952 

1953 

1954 

1955 

1956 

1957 

1958 

1959. 


1,048 
1,136 
1,347 
1,613 
1,464 

3,263 
3,628 
3,885 
4,406 
4,818 

5,114 
5,612 
6,127 
6,932 
7,446 


14.2 
13.8 
16.1 
18.6 
16.6 

24.5 
25.3 
25.1 
26.2 
27.0 

26.7 
27.3 
28.4 
30.2 
30.2 


591 
574 
617 
766 
561 

709 

822 

866 

1,019 

1,098 

1,074 
1,175 
1,373 
1,488 
1,869 


9.3 
8.4 
9.4 
11.5 
8.8 

9.5 
10.2 

9.8 
10.6 
11.0 

10.2 
10.3 
11.7 
12.3 

14.4 


457 
562 
730 
847 
903 

2,554 
2,806 
3,019 
3,387 
3,720 

4,040 
4,437 
4,754 
5,444 
5,577 


43.3 
39.6 
41.4 
41.8 
36.8 

43.3 
44.9 
45.4 
46.7 

47.3 

46.9 
48.5 
48 4 


1960 

1961 


50.4 
47.9 



118 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



TABLE 47 — Number and Per Cent of Schools, Teachers, Pupils: One-Teacher* 
Elementary Schools: Counties of Maryland: 1923-1961 





One Teacher Elementary Schools* 


Year Ending 
June 30 


Number of 

One-Teacher 

Schools 


Per Cent of 
Total Ele- 
mentary 
Schools 


Per Cent of 
Total Ele- 
mentary 
Teachers 


Pupils in One- 
Teacher 
Schools 


Per Cent of 
Total Ele- 
mentary 
Pupils 


1923 

1928 


1,496 

1,206 

740 

560 

275 

75 
59 
50 
30 
24 

23 
17 
11 
12 
10 


69.9 
65.1 
53.2 
48.1 
31.4 

10.9 
8.7 
7.5 
4.5 
3.7 

3.9 
2.1 
1.2 
1.8 
1.3 


39.6 
31.7 
20.3 
15.4 
7.8 

1.5 
1.1 
0.8 
0.5 
0.3 

0.3 
0.3 
0.1 
0.1 
0.1 


t 
t 
t 
t 
7,546 

1,926 

1,450 

1,295 

753 

595 

584 
410 
278 
300 
281 




1933 




1938 

1943 


5.8 


1952 


1.2 


1953 


0.9 


1954 


0.7 


1955 


0.4 


1956 

1957 

1958 


0.3 

0.3 
0.2 


1959 


0.1 


1960 


0.1 


1961 


0.1 







BY LOCAL UNIT, 1960-1961 



Dorchester 


8 


33.3 


7.1 


228 


6.6 


Somerset 


1 


8.3 


1.1 


20 


0.8 


Talbot 


1 


9.1 


11 


33 


1.3 



* Schools having a one-teacher organization of grades one to five or more. 
t Data unavailable. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



119 



TABLE iS^Nvimber of Public Schools: Number of Teachers and Principals: 
Maryland: Year Ending June 30, 1961 



State of 



Number of 
Teachers 

AND 

Principals 


S 

JS 
< 


a 
% 
< 


-a 

a 

3 

a 
< 


>> 
O 

1 

a 
n 


a 
n 


> 
6 


a 

J 


1 
6 


1 


1 


1 

-a 

o 
Q 


.id 


1 


1 


1 

o 


W 


1 
1 


O 

a 


c 
■< 

a 

3 
C 




1 

CO 


1 


1 

be 

g 
IS 

1 


1 















ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS (1-6) 




























Ul Schools 


823 

12 


29 


59 


145 


78 


13 


9 


18 


18 


12 


24 

8 


29 


16 


21 


13 


11 


92 


105 


10 


17 

1 


16 

1 


12 

1 


i 


3 19 


14 


1.0- I.fl 




2.0-2.9 


33 


1 


1 


1 




i 










2 


3 


4 












i 


3 


3 






6 .. 


i 


3.0- 3.9 


43 


2 


1 


2 


i 






1 






6 


3 


3 






\ 


.. 


2 


2 




2 






3 3 


3 


4.0-4.9 


31 




4 


1 






1 










1 








1 


.. 


3 






2 






8 3 


2 


5.0- 5.9 


22 
29 


2 

1 


1 
2 


2 




1 
1 


3 


2 




i 

3 


1 
2 


1 
1 


i 

1 






■ 


"i 


6 
2 


"i 




1 
1 






1 .. 

2 1 




6.0- 6.9 




7.0- 7.9 


33 


2 


4 


2 


1 


1 


1 


2 




1 




2 


2 


2 








3 


1 




2 






3 1 




8.0- 8.9 


34 
37 


5 
2 


3 
3 


2 
4 


1 
4 


4 


1 


1 
2 




i 




2 


1 
1 








6 

1 


4 

7 






1 






1 .. 

2 .. 




9.0- 9.9 




10.0-10.9 


28 


3 


1 






1 




3 


2 






4 










5 


3 


i 










1 2 




11.0-11.9 


36 


2 


3 


8 








1 






2 


1 












5 


2 




3 






3 1 




12.0-12.9 


45 




3 


11 


3 


1 




1 




3 






i 








2 


12 












3 .. 




13.0-13.9 


40 




1 


3 


3 


] 














2 








14 


6 


i 










1 2 




14.0-14.9 


35 


2 


2 


7 


1 






1 






.. 


3 










7 


5 












1 2 




15.0-15.9 


35 




3 


4 


2 




2 


1 














2 






5 


6 


i 










2 .. 




16.0-16.9 


29 




4 


5 










2 


















6 


6 












2 .. 




17.0-17.9 


28 




1 


4 


4 






2 




















4 


6 














1 1 


2 


18.0-18.9 


20 






1 


2 


























6 


6 














1 1 




19.0-19.9 


26 






9 


1 


























7 


V 














1 .. 




20.0-20.9 


19 




2 


5 


2 


























2 


5 














1 .. 




21.0-21.9 


18 




4 


5 


1 


























2 


2 


















22.0-22.9 


21 




5 


5 


4 


























4 


3 


















23.0-23.9 


23 




5 


4 


4 


























5 


2 


















24.0-24.9 


12 






2 


4 


























2 




















25.0-25.9 


15 




3 


6 


1 


























2 


2 


















26.0-26.9 


10 






1 


4 


























1 




















27.0-27.9 


15 






6 


4 


























2 


i 


















28.0-28.9 


12 
13 
12 
12 






6 
5 
9 
4 


1 
5 

1 
5 


























1 
3 
2 

1 


2 


















29.0-29.9 




30.0-30.9 




31.0-31.9 




32 0-32.9 


11 
5 






3 
3 


6 
2 














































33.0-33.9 




34.0-34.9 


6 
23 






2 
13 


3 

8 


























i 
















i 




35.0-and over 







JUNIOR. JUNIOR-SENIOR, 


SENIOR, AND VOCATIONAL SCHOOLS (7-12) 














All Schools 


267 
3 


9 


13 


50 
1 


25 


4 


7 


14 


7 


8 


5 


10 


4 
1 


8 


5 


4 


24 


31 


4 


5 


7 

1 


3 


11 


5 


4 


1.0- 2.9 




3.0- 4.9 


6 






2 






i 


i 




i 






1 


























5.0- 6.9 


4 














1 




2 






















i 










7.0- 8.9 


8 






i 




2 


i 


2 


















.. 








1 










9.0-10.9 


8 






1 








3 




1 




i 




























11.0-12.9 


11 


3 




1 






2 










1 








2 










i 










13.0-14.9 


6 






4 
















1 
















i 












15.0-16.9 


/ 






4 








































2 




17.0-18.9 


5 


























1 










i 








1 






19.0-20.9 


10 












1 






i 


















1 


2 


i 










21.0-22.9 


9 












1 




i 










i 










1 


1 






i 




2 


23.0-24.9 


11 


i 




1 






















2 












2 




2 






25.0-29.9 


20 
24 


2 




4 
3 


'i 


1 
1 


1 




2 

1 


2 


1 
2 


2 
2 






2 




1 


2 
3 


i 








3 
2 






30.0-34.9 




35.0-39.9 


18 


1 


2 


1 










2 


1 




1 




i 


1 






6 














2 


40.0-44.9 


15 






2 


1 


















1 






3 


6 
















45.0-49.9 


11 




1 


1 


2 


















2 








2 












2 




50.0-54.9 


13 




1 


2 


2 
























3 


















55.0-59.9 


8 




2 


1 
















i 




2 


















i 






GO.0-64.9 


8 




1 




1 














1 










3 












1 






65.0-69.9 


9 








4 
























5 


















70.0-74.9 


5 








2 
























2 


















75.0-79.9 


7 


2 


i 


1 


3 










































80.0-84.9 


11 




3 


2 


2 










































85.0-89.9 


7 




1 


2 


2 










































90.0-94.9 


6 






4 


1 










































95.0-99.9 


4 






2 


1 










































100.0 and over 


13 






10 


2 











































120 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



TABLE 49 — Number of Public Schools: Average Number Belonging: State of Maryland: 

Year Ending June 30, 1961 



AVBBAQB 

Number 


1 




-S 


O 














S 


J4 












1 
g 


e 
a 








1 


o 




Belonging 


5 


c: 

1 


a 
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60 

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ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS (1-6) 














All Schools 


•823 

13 
36 
46 
25 
25 
33 
34 
38 
31 
39 
42 
35 
48 
41 
27 
26 
25 
23 
27 
24 
42 
27 
31 
22 
22 
10 
9 
7 
3 
6 
6 


29 

1 

2 

2 
1 
2 
5 
3 
3 


59 

3 
1 

1 
5 
2 
1 
6 
2 
3 
1 
2 
3 
2 
2 
1 
1 
2 
1 
2 
11 
3 
2 
1 

'i 


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'4 
2 

i 

1 

2 
2 
2 
2 
3 
6 
8 
7 
2 
9 
2 
4 
5 
7 
11 
10 
9 
7 
13 
5 

4 
2 
3 
5 


78 

i 
2 

'2 
2 
1 
5 
2 
2 
2 

'2 
3 
2 
3 
5 
4 
3 
3 
9 
7 

6 . 
5 . 
2 . 
1 . 

1 . 

2 . 
1 . 


3 9 

3 ;. 


18 


18 

i 

1 
2 

'i 
2 
2 


12 
'2 


24 

4 
6 
6 

'i 
2 

'i 

i 

1 


29 16 21 13 

1 

2 4 11 
4 1 .. 1 
2 2 11 

"2 1 '.'. '.'. 
2 2 2.. 
2 1 .. .. 
111.. 
2 .. 1 .. 

2 .. 1 3 
111.. 

3 2 1.. 
2 .. 2 3 
1 .. 1 .. 

'2 ;.' .. 'i 

1 .. 1 .. 
.... 11 
....11 


11 

'2 
4 

1 


92 

i 

i 
3 
2 

6 
4 
7 
7 
7 
9 
5 
3 
4 
5 
3 
3 
9 
4 
4 
3 
1 

'i 


105 10 17 16 12 

3 .. 1 1 1 
1 13 2.. 
12 13 1 

1 .. .. 1 1 

2 .. 12 2 
5 2 113 

5 .. 1 1 .. 

4 .. 4 2 .. 
2 .. 1 .. 1 

8 2 

9 1.. 1 .. 

4 .. .. 2 1 
9 1 1 .. 1 

6 1 

7 .. 1 .. 1 

5 .. 1 .. .. 
7 .. 1 .. .. 

4 

8 

2 

6 

4 


43 19 

'5 '.'. 

5 3 

6 3 
3 .. 

2 2 

3 .. 
3 1 


14 


30 or less 

31— 60 


1 
1 


61— 90 

91— 120 


2 


121— 150 


1 
2 2 
1 2 

4 i 

1 .. 

i '.'. 
1 ., 


2 

1 
1 
1 
1 

'i 
i 




151— 180 

181— 210 

211— 240 

241— 270 

271— 300 




301— 330 

331— 360 

361— 390 




391— 420 




421— 450 




451— 480 

481—510 




511—540 




541— 570 




571— 600 




601— 660 




661— 720 

721— 780 

781— 840 




841— 900 




901— 960 




961—1020 




1021—1080 




1081—1140 

1141-1200 




1201 and over 





JUNIOR, JUNIOR-SENIOR, 


SENIOR, AND VOCATIONAL HIGH SCHOOLS (7-12) 












All Schools 


*2G7 

2 

12 
9 
9 
13 
7 
5 
12 
10 
8 
21 
14 
26 
8 
15 

1? 
4 

11 
6 
7 
5 
8 
3 
S 
8 
2 
2 

'4 

8 


9 

'3 

•■ 

'2 

i 
1 


13 
2 

'2 


50 
3 


25 


4 
'2 

'2 


1 

1 
2 

2 


14 
1 


7 

'2 
'3 


8 
'3 

'i 

'i 

i 

1 
1 


5 
'2 


10 

'2 
2 


4 
'2 


8 

i 

1 

i 

1 
2 

'2 


5 

'i 

1 
1 
1 

1 


4 
'2 


24 

3 

2 
1 
5 
3 


31 


4 

'i 

• j 


5 

i 

i 
2 


1 

'2 

1 

i 

1 
1 


3 

'i 


11 

i 

'2 
3 

1 

1 

'2 


5 
i 

'2 
'i 


4 






51— 100 




101- 150 

151— 200 

201— 250 

251— 300 

.301—350 




351— 400 

401— 450 . 


1 
1 


451— 500 




501— 600 

601— 700 

701— 800 

801— 900 

901—1000 


'i 

1 


1001—1100 




1101—1200 




1201—1300 






1301—1400 




1 
i 




1401—1500 

1501—1600 

1601—1700 

1701—1800 

1801—1900 




1901—2000 




2001—2100 

2101—2200 




2201—2300 




2301—2400 

2401—2500 




2501— and over 





* A total of five seventh grades which are housed in elementary school buildings but offer a junior high school curriculum ftwo in Al- 
legany, one each in Dorchester, Howard and Washington) are included in the number of elementary schools but excluded from the number 
of high schools. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



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Maryland State Department of Education 



123 



TABLE 52 — Number of Certificates Issued to Maryland Teachers, Principals, 

Administrative and Supervisory Personnel in the County Schools by the 

Maryland State Department of Education: 1958-59, 1959-60, 1960-61 



Grade of Certificate 



Number of Certificates Issued 



1958-59 



1960-61 



Total Number of Certificates Issued 

Administration and Supervision 

Administration and Supervision 

High School Supervision 

Elementary Supervision 

Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Supervisor of Special Subjects 

Supervisor or Director in Special Areas 

Visiting Teacher 

County Librarian 

High School 

Principal 

Academic 

Special 

Vocational 

Junior High School 

Nonpublic 

Elementary 

Principal 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education . 

Bachelor of Science in Special Subjects 

Bachelor of Science for Kindergarten Teaching 

Advanced First Grade 

Nonpublic Bachelor of Science 

Emergency Certificates 
Degree 

Administration and Supervision 

High School 

Elementary School 

Nondegree 

Administration and Supervision 

High School 

Elementary School 

Provisional Certificates 

Substitute Teachers' Certificates 

Degree 

Nondegree 



4,200 



4,407 



5,124 



1 




5 


6 


10 


10 


11 


3 


10 


1 




2 


7 


1 


7 


48 


45 


90 


11 


10 


20 


4 


5 


15 


26 


24 


23 


497 


657 


781 


418 


349 


447 


62 


56 


83 


153 


150 


158 


37 


53 


67 


43 


42 


61 


612 


674 


831 


67 


63 


72 


79 


75 


97 


1 






22 


14 


26 


30 


28 


38 


659 


693 


734 


761 


742 
2 


873 


30 


40 


26 


324 


337 


345 


158 


170 


179 


38 


68 


14 


94 


96 


120 



124 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



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128 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



TABLE 57 

Status of Certification of New Elementary School Teachers (1-6)! 
Maryland Public Schools: 1960-61 



LocAi, Unit 



Total 



Regular 



B.S. 



Jr. 
H.S. 



H.S. 



Other 



Emergency 



Degree 



No 
Degree 



Substitute 



No 
Degree 



Aides 



No 
Certi- 
ficate* 



Total State : Numbert . 
PerCent . . 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel . . . . 
Baltimore CityJ. . 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery 

Prince George's . . 
Queen Anne's . . . . 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



2,265 
100.0 

20 
205 
422 
397 

25 

18 
39 
39 
26 
9 

69 
11 
76 
46 
15 

467 

402 

8 

45 

12 

18 
31 
38 
20 



913 
40.3 

18 

55 

161 

220 

15 



5 
12 
13 

7 

27 

4 

44 

11 

5 

196 

126 

7 

10 

7 

6 
16 
28 
12 



5 
0.2 



15 

0.7 



884 
39.0 

2 

85 

141 

108 

5 

10 
10 
11 
11 
1 

27 

3 

27 

20 

6 

233 

194 

1 

17 

4 

10 
6 

7 

7 



341 
15.0 



54 

109 

51 

4 



21 
0.9 



10 
0.4 



76 
3.5 



25 
21 



* "No certificate" includes teachers who stayed in service a short time making certification impractical. 
t Total State figures exclude transfers between local units. 

t "Elected" and "probationary" teachers are included under regular certificates, special substitutes 
under "other". 



Maryland State Department of Education 



129 



TABLE 58 

Status of Certification of New High School Teachers (7-12) ; 
Maryland Public Schools: 1960-61 



Local Unit 



Total 



Regular 



ha 

HS 
Voc 



Jr. 
H.S. 



Elementary 
BS 



Other 



Emergency- 



Degree 



No 
Degree 



Substitute 



Degree 



No 
Degree 



No. 
Certi- 
ficate* 



Total State: Numbert 
Per Cent. 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel. . . , 
Baltimore Cityt. . 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery 

Prince George's . 
Queen Anne's . . 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



2,227 
100.0 

25 

248 

400 

392 

23 

24 
59 
47 
25 
18 

61 
11 

87 
41 
14 

368 
367 

15 
35 
14 

16 
50 
34 
33 



1,166 


151 


52.4 


6.8 


7 


11 


132 


8 


213 




222 


63 


11 




13 


2 


23 


2 


20 


3 


10 




8 


1 


29 


16 


2 


1 


53 


8 


22 




9 




216 


5 


196 


29 


11 




15 


1 


3 


3 


6 


1 


24 


3 


20 


2 


19 


4 



21 


724 


0.9 


32.5 


1 


5 


3 


83 


2 


148 


6 


80 


2 


7 


1 


7 




27 




21 




13 




9 




13 




8 




19 


1 


14 




4 


4 


115 


4 


116 




4 




18 




7 




9 




19 


1 


9 




9 



66 
3.0 



10 
0.4 


26 
1.2 


5 


2 
8 

7 
1 


1 


1 

1 


1 






1 


2 


2 


1 






2 




1 



63 

2.8 



27 
10 



* "No certificate" includes teachers who stayed in service a short time making certification impractical. 
t Total State figures exclude transfers between local units. 

t "Elected" and "probationary" teachers are included under regular certificates, special substitutes 
under "other". 



130 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 









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136 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



TABLE 65 — Number and Per Cent <>f Teachers Who Withdrew from Maryland 
Public Schools: Summer 1960 and School Year, 1960-61 



Local Unit 



Total 



Number Per Cent 



Elementary (1-6) 



Number Per Cent 



High (7-12) 



Number Per Cent 



Total State* 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel. . 
Baltimore City. 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery. . . 
Prince George's 
Queen Anne's . , 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington . . . . 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



3,515 



55 


8.6 


345 


20.6 


687 


11.1 


558 


15.3 


38 


21.7 


41 


21.0 


93 


20.4 


69 


17.6 


46 


15.5 


27 


11.4 


103 


16.4 


24 


12.8 


124 


18.3 


65 


20.7 


29 


19.6 


493 


15.1 


559 


19.6 


20 


11.9 


70 


28.6 


27 


14.9 


35 


20.0 


79 


10.6 


60 


15.1 


51 


21.5 



1,881 



14.9 



31 


10.3 


169 


18.9 


306 


9.5 


330 


17.1 


20 


21.1 


17 


18.9 


41 


18.1 


31 


15.0 


25 


16.4 


11 


9.7 


53 


16.4 


13 


13.3 


65 


19.0 


40 


24.5 


15 


20.0 


309 


17.6 


328 


22.0 


6 


7.1 


46 


36.2 


11 


12.3 


18 


19.8 


35 


9.1 


33 


15.3 


20 


16.4 



1,634 



14.2 



24 


7.1 


176 


22.5 


381 


13.0 


228 


13.2 


18 


22.5 


24 


22.9 


52 


22.7 


38 


20.5 


21 


14.5 


16 


12.9 


50 


16.4 


11 


12.2 


59 


17.6 


25 


16.5 


14 


19.2 


184 


12.2 


231 


16.9 


14 


16.7 


24 


20.3 


16 


17.4 


17 


20.2 


44 


12.2 


27 


14.8 


31 


26.9 



* Transfers between units are excluded from State total. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



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Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 





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142 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



TABLE 71 
Number and Per Cent of Teachers New* to Maryland Public Schools: 1960-61 





All Teachers 


New Teachers 










Total 


Elementary (1-6) 


High (7-12) 


Local Unit 




Elemen- 
































Total 


tary 


High 


Number 


Per Cent 


Number 


Per Cent 


Number 


Per Cent 


Total State 


24,101 


12,587 


11,514 


t4,492 


tl8.6 


t2,265 


tl8.0 


t2,227 


tl9.3 


Allegany 


638 


302 


336 


45 


7.1 


20 


6.6 


25 


7.4 


Anne Arundel. . 


1,675 


893 


782 


453 


27.0 


205 


22.9 


248 


31.7 


Baltimore City. 


6,156 


3,221 


2,935 


822 


13.3 


422 


13.1 


400 


13.6 


Baltimore 


3,654 


1,930 


1,724 


789 


21.6 


397 


20.6 


392 


22.7 


Calvert 


175 


95 


80 


48 


27.4 


26 


26.3 


23 


28.7 


Caroline 


195 


90 


105 


42 


21.5 


18 


20.0 


24 


22.9 


Carroll 


455 


226 


229 


98 


21.5 


39 


17.3 


59 


25.8 


Cecil 


391 


206 


185 


86 


22.0 


39 


18.9 


47 


25.4 


Charles 


297 


152 


145 


51 


17.2 


26 


17.1 


25 


17.2 


Dorchester 


237 


113 


124 


27 


11.4 


9 


8.0 


18 


14.5 


Frederick 


627 


323 


304 


130 


20.7 


69 


21.4 


61 


20.0 


Garrett 


188 


98 


90 


22 


11.7 


11 


11.2 


11 


12.2 


Harford 


677 


342 


335 


163 


24.1 


76 


22.2 


87 


26.0 


Howard 


314 


163 


151 


86 


27.4 


45 


27.6 


41 


27.1 


Kent 


148 


75 


73 


29 


19.6 


15 


20.0 


14 


19.2 


Montgomery. . . 


3,268 


1,757 


1,511 


835 


25.5 


467 


26.6 


368 


24.3 


Prince George's . 


2,857 


1,488 


1,369 


769 


26.9 


402 


27.0 


367 


26.8 


Queen Anne's. . . 


168 


84 


84 


23 


13.7 


8 


9.5 


15 


17.9 


St. Mary's 


245 


127 


118 


80 


32.7 


45 


35.4 


35 


29.7 


Somerset 


181 


89 


92 


26 


14.4 


12 


13.5 


14 


15.2 


Talbot 


175 


91 


84 


34 


19.4 


18 


19.8 


16 


19.0 


Washington .... 


745 


384 


361 


81 


10.9 


31 


8.1 


50 


13.9 


Wicomico 


398 


216 


182 


72 


18.1 


38 


17.6 


34 


18.7 


Worcester 


237 


122 


115 


53 


22.4 


20 


16.4 


33 


28.7 



* Teachers are considered "new" if they were not teaching in Maryland units the preceding year. 

i Transfers between units are included in individual unit totals and percentages but excluded from State total. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



143 









cats 
N a 

2[i< 






$4,776,355 

3,430,589 

1,955,727 

2,335,232 

834,802 


40,590,878 
43,516,284 
49,316,960 
44,094,549 
49,737,925 


51,509,009 
64,210,477 
63,016,337 
63,292,905 
69,335,601 




$789,311 
2,131,699 
3,142,211 
3,739,854 
3,770,207 


7,751,625 

9,850,293 

12,023,860 

14,217,276 

15,893,439 


20,758,922 
21,274,818 
25,502,907 
29,006,335 
32,834,165 


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>0 ^ N --I -^ 


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$9,059,104 
12,871,451 
13,597,045 
14,001,439 
16,339,959 


48,309,472 
56,929,029 
62,340,605 
70,528,549 
73,863,335 


85,000,022 

99,207.420 

106,948,851 

118,516,339 

133,314,043 


846,966 

69,150 

80,139 

209,722 

245,787 


2,380,208 
2.457,252 
2,632,578 
4,005,882 
5.418,321 


7,001,761 
7,357,815 
7,317,219 
9,000,637 
12,258,159 


$3,058,180 
3,207,088 
4,606,690 
6,185,186 
6,950,720 


29,980.235 
32,159,406 
35,202,775 
38,559,018 
48,285,737 


54,665,634 
59,329,750 
76,034,849 
82,627,283 
91,916,040 


$12,764,250 
16,147,689 
18,283,874 
20,456,347 
23,536,400 


80,609,915 

91,545,087 

100,176,018 

113,093,449 

127.567,393 


147,327,417 
165,894,991 
190,300,919 
210,744,259 
237.488,842 












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144 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



TABLE 73 — Source of CurrcMil F>xpenses: Marjland I'ublic Schools: Year Ending June 
30, 1961 (Includes the followinjj programs: day school, including kindergarten; handi- 
capped children; Federal funds for school lunch and special milk; junior college; adult 
education; and J'eachers Retirement and Social Security for teachers paid direct by 

State.) 



Local Unit 



Total 
Current 
Funds 



State 



Federal 



Local Levy 
and Other 
Local Funds 



Per Cent from Each Source 



State 



Equal- 
ization 



Other 



Total 



Fed- 
eral 



Total State 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel. 
Baltimore City 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester .... 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery 
Prince George's 
Queen Anne's 
St. Mary's .... 
Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington . . 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



$237,488,842 

5,645,854 
14,213,415 
62,480,932 
36,023,490 

1,527,358 

1,775,194 
3,730,732 
3,619,428 
2,868,875 
2,174,499 

5,859,774 
1,747,531 
6,623,940 
2,861,414 
1,301,440 

38,444,149 

26,524,149 

1,520,711 

2,185,914 

1,511,485 

1,495,358 
7,733,988 
3,478,093 
2,141,119 



J91,916,040 

3,336,906 
7,240,814 
18,438,297 
9,610,219 
1,114,191 

1,214,784 
1,948,159 
2,058,624 
1,908,028 
1,272,474 

2,698,099 
1,338,216 
3,363,519 
1,402,866 
765,778 

11,869,846 
11,457,456 
884,386 
1,302,225 
1,184,264 

821,489 
3,531,766 
2,021,490 
1,132,144 



$12,258,159 

1S9,.^63 
1,102,091 
770,880 
856,858 
91,980 

31,413 
66,336 

268,732 
274,870 
29,655 

291,716 
37,104 
832,742 
199,191 
46,491 

3,245,885 

2,876,598 

28,602 

405,310 

19,526 

28,483 
465,101 
49,494 
49,538 



$133,314,643 

2,119,385 

5,870,510 

43,271,755 

25,556,413 

321,187 

528,997 

1,716,237 

1 ,292,072 

685,977 

872,370 

2,869,959 

372.211 

2,427,679 

1,259,357 

489,171 

23,328,418 

12,190,095 

607,723 

478,379 

307,695 

645,386 
3,737,121 
1,407,109 

959,437 



12.0 


26.7 


38.7 


5.2 


30 9 


28.2 


59.1 


3.3 


22.0 


28.9 


50.9 


7.8 


1.5 


28.0 


29.5 


1.2 


0.9 


25.8 


26.7 


2.4 


44.6 


28,4 


73.0 


6.0 


41.2 


27.2 


68.4 


1.8 


23.3 


28.9 


52.2 


1.8 


29.7 


27.2 


56.9 


7.4 


39.7 


26.8 


66.5 


9.6 


31.7 


26.8 


58.5 


1.4 


19,6 


26.4 


46.0 


5.0 


49.3 


27.3 


76.6 


2.1 


24.5 


26.3 


50.8 


12.6 


21.6 


27.4 


49.0 


7.0 


30.1 


28.7 


58.8 


3.6 


7 2 


23.7 


30.9 


8,4 


16.3 


26 9 


43.2 


10. S 


31.7 


26.4 


58.1 


1.9 


33.4 


26.2 


59 6 


18.5 


48.8 


29.5 


78.3 


1.3 


26.0 


28.9 


54.9 


1.9 


20.4 


25.3 


45.7 


6.0 


29.4 


28.7 


58.1 


1.4 


25.3 


27.6 


52.9 


2.3 



56.1 

37.6 
41.3 
69.3 
70.9 
21.0 

29-S 
46,(1 
35,7 
23,9 
40,1 

49.0 
21.3 
36.6 
44.0 
37.6 

60.7 
46,0 
40,0 
21,9 
20,4 

43,2 
48,3 
40,5 
44. s 



Maryland State Department of Education 



145 



TABLE 74 — Source of Current Expenses: Maryland Public Schools: Year Ending June 
30, 1961 (Includes the following programs: day school, including kindergarten; handi- 
capped children; Federal funds for school lunch and special milk; junior college; and 

adult education.) 



Local Unit 



Total 
Current 
Funds 



State 



Federal 



Local Levy 

and Other 

Local Funds 



Per Cent from Each Source 



State 



Equal- 
ization 



Other 



Total 



Fed- 
eral 



Local 
Funds 



Total State 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel . 
Baltimore City 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester .... 

Frederick ..... 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery . . 
Prince George's 
Queen Anne's. 
St. Mary's .... 
Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington . . . 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



$218,724,254 

5,225,047 
13,227,195 
56,955,978 
33,336,189 

1,419,378 

1,641,567 
3,459,513 
3,342,562 
2,655,931 
2,026,901 

5,439,117 
1,621,083 
6,135,975 
2,648,254 
1,201,785 

35,237,173 

24,501,972 

1,414,356 

2,065,427 

1,394,872 

1,378,391 
7,191,749 
3,222,403 
1,981,436 



$73,151,452 

2,916,099 
6,254,594 
12,913,343 
6,922,918 
1,006,211 

1,081,157 
1,676,940 
1,781,758 
1,695,084 
1,124,876 

2,277,442 
1,211,768 
2,875,554 
1,189,706 
666,123 

8.662,870 
9,435,279 
778,031 
1,181,738 
1,067,651 

704,522 
2,989,527 
1,765,800 

972,461 



$12,258,159 

189,563 
1,102,091 
770,880 
856,858 
91,980 

31,413 
66,336 
268,732 
274,870 
29,655 

291,716 
37,104 
832,742 
199,191 
46,491 

3,245,885 

2,876,598 

28,602 

405,310 

19,526 

28,483 
465,101 
49,494 
49,538 



$133,314,643 

2,119,385 

5,870,510 

43,271,755 

25,556,413 

321,187 

528,997 

1,716,237 

1,292,072 

685,977 

872,370 

2,869,959 

372,211 

2,427,679 

1,259,357 

489,171 

23,328,418 

12,190,095 

607,723 

478,379 

307,695 

645,386 
3,737,121 
1,407,109 

959,437 



13.1 


20.4 


33.5 


5.6 


33.4 


22.4 


55.8 


3.6 


23.7 


23.6 


47.3 


8.3 


1.7 


21.0 


22.7 


1.3 


1.0 


19.8 


20.8 


2.6 


48.0 


22.9 


70.9 


6.5 


44.6 


21.3 


65.9 


1.9 


25.1 


23.4 


48,5 


1.9 


32.1 


21.2 


53.3 


8.0 


42.9 


20.9 


63.8 


10.4 


34.0 


21.5 


55.5 


1.5 


21.2 


20.7 


41.9 


5.4 


53.1 


21.6 


74.7 


2.3 


26.5 


20.4 


46.9 


13.6 


23.3 


21.6 


44.9 


7.5 


32.6 


22.8 


55.4 


3.9 


7.8 


16.8 


24.6 


9.2 


17.6 


20.9 


38.5 


11.7 


34.0 


21.0 


55.0 


2.0 


35.3 


21.9 


57.2 


19.6 


52.9 


23.6 


76.5 


1.4 


28.2 


22.9 


51.1 


2.1 


22.0 


19.5 


41.5 


6.5 


31.8 


23.0 


54.8 


1.5 


27.3 


21.8 


49.1 


2.5 



40.6 
44.4 
76.0 
76.6 
22.6 

32.2 
49.6 
38.7 
25.8 
43.0 

52.7 
23.0 
39.5 
47.6 
40.7 

66.2 
49.8 
43.0 
23.2 
22.1 

46.8 
52.0 
43.7 
48.4 



146 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



TABLE 75 — State Aid for Minimum Program*: Maryland Public Day Schools — 
Grades 1-12: Year Ending June 30, 1961 





Cost of Minimum Program 


State Aid for 
Minimum Program 


Local Unit 


Totalt 


Minimum 
Salaries 


Other 

Current 

Expense 

Cost 


Trans- 
portation 


Amount! 


Per Cent 


Total State 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel. , . 
Baltimore City. . 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 


$136,169,688 

4,189,499 

9,476,260 

33,230,548 

19,150,582 

1,187,321 

1,335,960 
2,760,344 
2,527,542 
2,071,872 
1,673,800 

3,631,311 
1,479,496 
4,237,085 
2,001,911 
950,824 

16,885,502 

15,308,555 

1,093,134 

1,514,525 

1,246,445 

1,149,058 
4,841,722 
2,669,986 
1,556,406 


$101,053,928 

3,036,487 

6,868,851 

26,489,346 

14,257,969 

763,800 

890,785 
1,946,728 
1,771,745 
1,401,869 
1,128,120 

2,590,526 

898,190 

2,816,215 

1,371,804 

643,518 

12,867,369 
11,624,811 

713,535 
1,004,283 

839,975 

787,554 
3,503,893 
1,812,010 
1,024,545 


$25,263,482 

759,123 
1,717,213 
6,622,337 
3,564,491 

190,950 

222,696 
486,682 
442,936 
350,468 
282,030 

647,631 
224,547 
704,054 
342,951 
160,880 

3,216,842 

2,906,202 

178,384 

251,070 

209,994 

196,889 
875,973 
453,003 
256,136 


$9,751,604 

385,367 
889,644 
118,865 
1,327,676 
232,448 

220,187 
317,123 
312,861 
318,859 
263,484 

391,712 
343,057 
716,555 
286,236 
143,666 

795,556 
772,766 
199,599 
257,495 
196,476 

164,579 
461,471 
362,724 
273,198 


$67,689,163 

2,827,721 

6,005,682 

11,075,096 

6,081,393 

976,264 

1,045,917 
1,622,416 
1,723,450 
1,646,171 
1,097,030 

2,160,600 
1,179,172 
2,733,771 
1,140,890 
629,341 

7,594,437 
9,093,230 
743,202 
1,143,448 
1,040,040 

671,215 
2,838,887 
1,709,226 

910,564 


49.7 

67 5 
63.4 
33.3 
31.7 
82.2 

78.3 
58.8 
68.2 


Charles 

Dorchester 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery. . . . 
Prince George's . 
Queen Anne's. . 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington. . . . 

Wicomico 

Worcester 


79.5 
65.5 

59.5 
79.7 
64.5 
57.6 
66.2 

45.0 
59 4 
68.0 
75 . 5 
83.4 

58.4 
58.6 
64.0 
58.5 



* The minimum program in calculating State Equalization aid includes the following: 

(a) total minimum salaries of the allowed number of teachers and principals as determined by State 

law; 

(b) other current expense including the cost of operation and maintenance and the cost of instruction 

other than the salaries of teachers, principals, and supervisors; and 
fc) the cost of approved transportation to public schools. 
t Tuition applicable to Bylaw 11 included in these columns only. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



147 



TABLE 76— Per Cent Distribution of School Expenditures by Maryland Local Boards of 
Education: Year Ending June 30, 1961 



Local Unit 



CuRREhfT Expenses 



Adminis- 
tration 



Super- 
vision 



Salaries 

of 

Principals 

and 
Teachers 



Books, 
Materials, 
and 
Other 
Costs of 
Instruc- 
tion 



Operation 



Mainte- 
nance 



Other 
School 
Services 



Fixed 
Charges 



INCLUDING COST OF TRANSPORTATION 



Total State 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel . 
Baltimore City 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester. . . . 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery . . 
Prince George's 
Queen Anne's. . 
St. Mary's .... 
Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington ... 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



2.3 

1.8 
2.1 
2.1 
2.2 
3.0 

2.7 
1.4 
2.1 
1.8 
2.0 

2.1 
2.3 
2.2 
1.8 
3.0 

3.1 
1.7 
2.5 
2.3 

1.8 



1.9 

1.7 
2.2 
2.3 
2.0 
1.8 

1.6 
2.1 
1.7 
1.2 
1.0 

2.1 
1.4 
1.9 
1.4 
2.6 



65.7 

68.0 
66.9 
69.2 
66.5 
60.2 

62.5 
68.4 
64.2 
63.0 
62.0 

63.1 
61.3 
62.3 
66.7 
63.4 

61.0 
67.7 
62.6 
56.8 
65.8 

66.3 
61.5 
65.8 
62.7 



8.7 

4.1 
7.0 
8.2 
8.4 
4.9 

6.0 
4.2 
6.7 
7.2 
3.8 

9.1 
3.9 
7.7 
4.9 
5.2 

15.0 
6.9 
5.5 
7.6 
3.8 

4.7 
9.9 
5.2 
6.0 



8.6 

8.7 
7.7 
9.4 
9.0 
6.0 

6.4 
6.1 
9.4 
8.0 



6.9 
5.1 
7.1 
5.6 

7.0 



6.7 



3.1 
2.5 
4.1 



4.3 
4.9 
4.0 
3.1 
5.8 

5.9 
2.7 
3.5 
5.1 
3.5 

3.5 
5.1 
4.8 
8.2 
3.8 

2.4 
3.8 
3.5 
3.4 



7.5 

11.0 
9.6 
3.9 
6.4 

18.0 

15.6 
12.2 
11.6 
14.6 
14.9 

10.0 
22.3 
14.4 
14.0 

14.4 

5.0 

6.7 

16.2 

15.3 

15.6 

14.1 

9.8 

13.8 

16.3 



1.2 

1.6 
2.0 
0.8 
0.9 
1.5 

0.9 
0.7 
1.4 
1.1 

1.7 

0.8 
1.0 
0.9 
0.5 
0.9 

1.5 
1.6 
0.6 
1.1 
0.9 

0.5 
1.6 
1.2 
1.1 



EXCLUDING COST OF TRANSPORTATION 



Total State 


2.4 


2.0 


68.9 


9.1 


9.0 


4.3 


3.1 


1.2 


33 3 


Allegany 


1.9 


1.9 


73.7 


4.4 


9.4 


3.4 


3.6 


1.7 


15 


Anne Arundel . . 


2.3 


2.4 


72.0 


7.5 


8.2 


2.6 


2.8 


2.2 


31.3 


Baltimore City 


2.1 


2.3 


69.4 


8.3 


9.5 


4.1 


3.5 


0.8 


20.3 


Baltimore 


2.3 


2.0 


69.1 


8.7 


9.3 


4.8 


2.8 


1.0 


31.5 


Calvert 


3.5 


2.2 


72.0 


5.9 


7.2 


5.4 


2.0 


1.8 


35.9 


Caroline 


3.1 


1.8 


72.4 


7.0 


7.4 


5.0 


2.3 


1.0 


24.1 


Carroll 


1.6 


2.3 


75.3 


4.6 


6.7 


5 5 


3.2 


0.8 


9.4 


Cecil 


2.3 


1.8 


70.8 


6.3 


10.4 


4.5 


2.4 


1.5 


7.6 


Charles 


2.0 


1.4 


71.7 


8.2 


9.1 


3.6 


2.7 


1.3 


17.7 


Dorchester 


2.3 


1.1 


71.4 


4.4 


10.1 


6.7 


2.0 


2.0 


0.2 


Frederick 


2.3 


2.2 


67.9 


9.8 


7.4 


6.3 


3.2 


0.9 


25 9 


Garrett 


2.9 


1.8 


76.8 


4.9 


6.3 


3.3 


2.7 


1.3 


2.8 


Harford 


2.5 


2.1 


70.7 


8.7 


8.1 


4.0 


2.8 


1.1 


28.8 


Howard 


2.0 


16 


75.1 


5.5 


6.2 


5.8 


3.3 


0.5 


24.5 


Kent 


3 3 


3.0 


72.0 


5.9 


8.0 


4.0 


2.7 


1.1 


13.7 


Montgomery . . . 


3.3 


1.9 


62.6 


15.4 


9.2 


3.6 


2.5 


1.5 


31.8 


Prince George's. 


1.8 


1.3 


70.0 


7.2 


9.4 


5.3 


3.4 


1.6 


26.0 


Queen Anne's. . . 


2.8 


2.0 


73.0 


6.5 


7.1 


5.6 


2.3 


0.7 


16.3 


St. Mary's 


2.7 


1.6 


65.1 


8.7 


8.4 


9.4 


2.9 


1.2 


20.1 


Somerset 


2.1 


2.1 


76.6 


4.4 


7.6 


4.4 


1.7 


1.1 


24.4 


Talbot 


3.3 


1.8 


75.4 


5.4 


8.5 


2.7 


2.3 


0.6 


2.5 


Washington .... 


t2.9 


2.1 


66.1 


10.7 


9.3 


4.2 


3.0 


1.7 


12.6 


Wicomico 


2.1 


1.7 


74.2 


5.8 


8.0 


4.0 


2.8 


1.4 


21.1 


Worcester 


2.2 


2.2 


73.0 


7.1 


7.8 


3.9 


2.5 


1.3 


8.2 



* Percentages obtained by dividing capital outlay by the sum of capital outlay and current expenses excluding 
debt service. 

t Excludes Ford Foundation TV project. 

Note: Expenditures by State and Baltimore City for retirement of teachers and expenditures by State for Social 
Security for teachers are not included. 



148 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



TABLE 77 — Cost per Pupil Belonging — K-12: Current Expenses* — Including 
Transportation: Maryland Public Day Schools: Year Ending June 30, 1961 





All Schools 


Adminis- 
tration t 


Fixe 
Charg 




Local Unit 


Total including 
Teachers' 
Retirement 
and Social 
Security tt 


Total excluding 
Teachers' 
Retirement 
and Social 
Security tt 


Elementary 

(K-6)t 


High 

(7-12) 


d 




Cost 


Rank 


Cost 


Rank 


Cost 


Rank 


Cost 


Rank 


Cost 


Rank 


Cost 


Rank 


Total State 


$389.07 

347.89 
335.53 
376.08 
408.53 
352.90 

399.87 
345.61 
380.79 
378.58 
355.17 

402.16 
363.91 
390.57 
370.42 
387.75 

472.54 
371.65 
412.72 
357.39 
351.67 

359.28 
390.37 
334.30 
391.54 


21 
23 
12 
3 
19 

5 
22 
10 
11 

18 

4 
15 

7 
14 

9 

1 
13 

2 
17 
20 

16 

8 

24 

6 


1357.34 

321.39 
311.85 
341.83 
377.23 
327.72 

369.35 
319.98 
351.35 
349.61 
330.77 

372.55 
337.13 
360.86 
342.28 
357.53 

430.80 
342.54 
383.47 
337.40 
324.34 

330.75 
360.93 
309.36 
362.02 


21 
23 
14 
3 

19 

5 

22 
10 
11 
17 

4 
16 

8 
13 

9 

1 
12 

2 
15 
20 

IS 

24 
6 


$301.22 

284.97 
266.16 
282.19 
325.62 
264.13 

292.15 
255.27 
289.43 
308.45 

285.98 

325.20 
317.77 
320.28 
300.78 
295.38 

352.12 
291.47 
328.50 

286.71 
269.85 

278.19 
317.57 
269.29 
298.98 


17 
22 
18 
3 
23 

12 
24 
14 

8 
16 

4 
6 
5 
9 
11 

1 
13 

2 

15 
20 

19 

7 

21 

10 


$405.85 

335.99 
345.35 
409.02 
415.85 
400.23 

443.88 
382.86 
412.67 
383.90 
357.09 

403.83 
336.05 
387.10 
380.41 
409.43 

494.19 
385.55 
432.72 
385.95 
377.27 

376.91 

377.78 
344.26 

428.77 


24 

21 
8 
5 

10 

2 
15 

6 
14 
20 

9 
23 
11 
16 

1 
13 

3 
12 

18 

19 

17 

22 

4 


$8.31 

5.87 
6.75 
7.24 
8.56 
9.72 

10.21 
4.78 
7.54 
6.45 
6.70 

8.16 
7.98 
8.11 
6.15 
10.77 

14.56 
6.04 
9.51 
7.97 
5.79 

9.90 
10.13 
5.97 
7.05 


22 

16 
14 

8 
6 

3 

24 
13 

18 
17 

9 
11 
10 
19 

2 

1 
20 

7 

12 
23 

5 
4 
21 
15 


$4.47 

5.13 
6.46 
3.30 
3.63 
4.94 

3.13 
2.24 
4.83 
3.97 

5.87 

3.18 
3.58 
3.57 
1.71 
3.48 

6.84 
5.62 
2.27 
3 59 
2.97 

1.66 
6.01 
3.93 
4.05 






6 


Anne Arundel 


2 




17 




12 


Calvert 


7 




19 


Carroll 


22 


Cecil 


8 


Charles 


10 




4 




18 


Garrett 


14 


Harford 


15 




23 


Kent 


16 




1 




5 




21 




13 




20 


Talbot 


24 




3 




11 




9 







* Excludes home teaching of handicapped children, junior colleges, adult education, veterans' training, and Federal funds for school 

lunch and special milk. 
t Expenditures for administration and fixed charges are included here but excluded from elementary and high costs. 
} Half-time kindergarten pupils, where applicable, are expressed in full-time equivalents in arriving at per pupil costs. 
° State payments for Teachers' Retirement and Social Security are not included in this column. 
Note: Excludes per pupil costs for Ford Foundation TV project in Washington County. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



149 



TABLE 78 — Cost per Pupil Belonging — K-12; Current Expenses* — Excluding 
Transportation: Maryland Public Day Schools: Year Ending June 30, 1961 





All Schools 


Adminis- 
tration t 


Fixe 
Charg 




Local Unit 


Total including 
Teachers' 
Retirement 
and Social 
Security tt 


Total excluding 
Teachers' 
Retirement 
and Social 
Security! t 


Elementary 
(K-6)t 


High 

(7-12) 


d 

esr 




Cost 


Rank 


Cost 


Rank 


Cost 


Rank 


Cost 


Rank 


Cost 


Rank 


Cost 


Rank 


rotal State 


$372.20 

322.37 
313.44 
374.93 
393.85 
298.67 

348.64 
315.39 
347.66 
334.40 
311.24 

375.19 
294.64 
346.23 
331.67 
343.92- 

M\.2\ 
359.82 
357.61 
313.43 
305.53 


15 
19 
4 
2 
23 

8 
17 

9 
13 
20 

3 
24 
10 
14 

HI 
1 

6 
7 

18 
21 

16 
5 
22 
12 


$340,47 

295.87 
289.75 
340.68 
362.55 
273.50 

318.13 
289,75 
318,21 
305,43 
286,84 

345.58 
267,85 
316,51 
303,53 
313,71 

419,47 
330,72 
328,35 
293,45 
278,20 

290,32 
334.42 
273,81 
310.25 


15 

18 

4 

2 

23 

9 
19 

8 
13 
20 

3 

24 
10 
14 
11 

1 
6 

7 

16 
21 

17 
5 
22 
12 


$286.51 

261.46 
248,61 
280.66 
315.47 
220.48 

243,42 
227.05 
256,91 
263,72 
245,76 

298,71 
249,48 
273.97 
264,34 
251,56 

342,25 
283,13 
272,05 
245,16 

228,18 

241,55 
291.26 
237,21 
254,73 


U 

16 

6 

2 

24 

19 
23 
12 
10 

17 

3 
15 

7 
9 
14 

1 
5 
8 

18 
22 

20 

4 

21 

13 


$385,93 

308,44 
316,71 
408,47 
395,33 
327.18 

389,24 
350,21 
378 63 
340,52 
308,69 

376,30 
265,46 
345,34 
338,51 
365,61 

480,70 
368,89 
379,51 
337,88 
325,09 

331,15 
351,03 
303,55 
365,73 


22 
20 
2 
3 

18 

4 

12 

6 

14 

21 

24 
13 
15 
10 

1 
8 
5 
16 
19 

17 

11 

23 

9 


$8,31 

5.87 
6,75 
7,24 
8,56 
9.72 

10,21 
4,78 
7.54 
6,45 
6,70 

8,16 
7,98 
8.11 
6,15 
10,77 

14,56 
6,04 
9.51 

7,97 
5.79 

9,90 
10,13 
5,97 
7.05 


22 
16 
14 
8 
6 

3 

24 
13 

18 
17 

9 
11 
10 
19 

2 

1 
20 

7 
12 
23 

5 
4 
21 
15 


$4.47 

5.13 
6,46 
3,30 
3,63 
4,94 

3,13 
2,24 
4.83 
3.97 

5,87 

3,18 
3,58 
3,57 
1.71 
3.48 

6,84 
5.62 
2.27 
3,59 

2,97 

1,66 
6,01 
3,93 
4,05 




Allegany 


6 
2 


Baltimore City 

Baltimore 


17 
12 


Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 


7 

19 
22 


Cecil 


8 




10 




4 


Frederick 

Garrett 


18 
14 
15 


Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery 

Prince George's 

Queen Anne's 


23 
16 

1 
5 

21 
13 




20 


Talbot 


318.85 
363.86 
298.75 
339.77 


24 


Washington 


3 




11 




9 







* Excludes home teaching of handicapped children, junior colleges, adult education, veterans' training, and Federal funds for school 

lunch and special milk, 
t Expenditures for administration and fixed charges are included here but excluded from elementary and high costs. 
t Half-time kindergarten pupils, where applicable, are expressed in full-time equivalents in arriving at per pupil costs. 
° State payments for Teachers' Iletirement and Social Security are not included in this column. 
Note: Excludes per pupil costs for Ford Foundation TV project in Washington County. 



150 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



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154 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



TABLE 83 — Average Annual Salary per Teacher and Principal: 
Public Schools of Maryland: 1923-1961 



Year Ending 


Average Annual Salary per Teacher and Principal 


June 30 


Total 


Elementary 


High 


1923 


$1,243 
1,408 
1,453 
1,556 
1,775 

3,886 
3,947 
4,093 
4,163 
4,465 

4,719 
4,944 
5,247 
5,493 
5,852 


$1,156 
1,320 
1,398 
1,487 
1,648 

3,858 
3,891 
4,020 
4,104 
4,450 

4,684 
4,821 
5,079 
5,436 
5,715 


$1,671 


1928 


1,830 


1933 . 


1,659 


1938 


1,784 


1943 


1,994 


1952 


3,919 


1953 


4,019 


1954 


4,186 


1955 


4,237 


1956 


4,482 


1957 


4,760 


1958 


5,092 


1959 


5,447 


I960 


5,556 


1961 


5,999 







Maryland State Department of Education 



155 



TABLE 84 — Average Salary* per Teacher and Principal: Maryland Public Schools: 

Year Ending June 30, 1961 





All Schools 


Elementary 


High 


Local Unit 


Total 


Teachers 


Prin- 
cipalst 


Total 


Teachers 


Prin- 
cipals! 


Total 


Teachers 


Prin- 
cipalst 


Total State 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel. . 
Baltimore City . 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 


$5,852 

5,494 
5,069 
6,183 
5,931 
4,814 

5,205 
5,206 
5,368 
5,541 
5,263 

5,403 
5,267 
5,597 
5,513 
5,117 

6,592 
5,779 
5,299 
4,714 
5,040 

5,190 
5,686 
5,205 
5,191 


$5,714 

5,403 
4,937 
5,999 
5,802 
4,649 

5,097 
5,091 
5,244 
5,434 
5,139 

5,274 
5,188 
5,501 
5,374 
4,978 

6,469 
5,626 
5,166 
4,575 
4,910 

5,065 
5,581 
5,100 
5,071 


$8,830 

7,174 

8,093 

10,181 

10,470 

6,872 

7,200 
7,348 
7,275 
7,573 
6,700 

7,805 
6,257 
8,200 
7,971 
6,687 

9,984 
8,831 
6,865 
7,021 
6,387 

6,748 
7,293 
7,027 
6,850 


$5,715 

5,436 
5,035 
5,837 
5,829 
4,759 

5,360 
5,000 
5.415 
5,719 
5,331 

5,307 
5.244 
5,653 
5,508 
5,117 

6,448 
5,732 
5,412 
4,703 
4,965 

5,103 
5,563 
5,232 
5,170 


$5,531 

5,325 

4,857 
5,593 
5,648 
4,586 

5,273 
4.800 
5.273 
5.662 
5.200 

5,108 
5,132 
5,544 
5.342 
4.923 

6,273 
5,526 
5,287 
4,584 
4,847 

4,904 
5,432 
5,109 
5,034 


$8,477 

6,708 
7,664 
9,893 
10,208 
6,428 

6,780 
7,241 
6,883 
6,900 
6,331 

7,483 
6,310 
7,741 
7,658 
6,489 

9,527 
8,443 
6,428 
5,973 
6,011 

6,484 
6,899 
6,659 
6,417 


$5,999 

5,545 
5,107 
6,577 
6,044 
4.882 

5,083 
5,382 
5,317 
5,357 
5,203 

5,496 
5,297 
5,540 
5.518 
5.118 

6.744 
5,829 
5,188 
4,725 
5,113 

5.279 
5.812 
5,176 
5.213 


$5,90 

5,467 
5,025 
6,448 
5,968 
4,722 

4,961 
5,325 
5,215 
5,194 
5.088 

5.425 
5.255 
5,459 
5,409 
5,028 

6,667 
5,729 
5,055 
4,605 
4,969 

5,210 
5,725 
5,091 
6,107 


$9,799 

8,405 
10,005 
10,809 
11,275 

7,873 

7,620 
7,650 
8,450 
8,163 
7,500 

9,200 
6,125 
9,314 
8,720 
7,283 

11,675 

10,128 

7,850 

8,150 

6,871 

8,200 
8,400 
8,280 
8,150 


Charles 

Dorchester 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery. . . 
Prince George's 
Queen Anne's . . 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



* Grades 1 through 12 only; kindergartens and jimior colleges are excluded. 

t Includes all principals having two or more assistants without regard to division of time between teaching and 
idministration. 



156 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



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59,077 
63,709 
70,177 
78,659 
85,051 


91,476 

96,893 

105,718 

114,897 

121,006 


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81,310 
88,395 
95,230 
98,601 


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134,576 
145,019 
158,572 
173,889 
183,652 


192,126 
201,969 
215,414 
228,495 
234,933 


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2,179,005 
2,352,888 
2,492,851 
2,771,772 


3,090,008 
3,586,717 
4,020,983 
4,274,998 
4,845,628 


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31.25 
30.63 
31.88 
33.18 


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$2,364,813 
2,541,055 
2,707,937 
3,035,637 
3,268,055 


3,712,436 
3,911,221 
4,217,269 
4,514,918 
4,947,464 


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$32.66 
32.55 
31.91 
31.79 
32.91 


35.41 
37.12 
38.24 
38.47 
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$4,395,220 
4,720,060 
5,060,825 
5,528,488 
6,039,827 


6,802,444 
7,497,938 
8,238,252 
8,789,916 
9,793,092 




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1951-52... 
1952-53... 
1963-64... 
1954-65... 
1965-56... 


1956-57... 
1957-68... 
1958-59... 
1959-60... 
1960-61 . . . 



Maryland State Department of Education 



157 











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158 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 




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Maryland State Department of Education 



159 



TABLE 88 — National Defense Education Act: Expenditures by Local Units and 
State Department of Education : State of Maryland : Year Ending June 30, 1961 



Expenditures Under National Defense Education Act 



Local Unit 



Total Federal 
Funds 



Title 
III* 



Title 

V* 



Title 
VIII* 



Title 

X* 



Total State 

State Department of Education . 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel 

Baltimore City 

Baltimore 

Calvert 



Caroline. . . 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles . . . , 
Dorchester . 



Frederick . 
Garrett . . 
Harford. . 
Howard . . 
Kent 



Montgomery . . 
Prince George's . 
Queen Anne's . . . 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 



Talbot 

Washington . 
Wicomico . . 
Worcester. . 



$1,038,501 
34,142 

24,346 
172,433 
148,320 
119,484 

21,588 

10,995 
9,770 

14,663 
9,949 
5,844 

33,903 
6,788 
65,660 
11,577 
12,385 

136,532 

88,792 

5,564 

19,049 

2,822 

11,861 
30,448 
18,653 
22,943 



$664,798 

16,509 

13,589 
146,402 
47,188 
82,822 
17,508 

7,213 
8,396 
7,162 
9,949 
1,079 

24,348 
3,094 

44,782 
7,690 
9,599 

88,360 
59,147 

2,240 
14,865 

2,822 

8,733 
11,018 
11,370 
18,913 



$254,807 

4,631 

10,757 
26,031 
41,620 
25,885 
4,080 

3,782 
1,374 
7,501 

4,765 

9,555 
3,694 
11,679 
3,887 
2,786 

28,554 

29,645 

3,324 

4,184 



3,128 

12,632 

7,283 

4,030 



$113,054 
7,160 



59,512 

10,777 



$5,842 

5,842 



9,189 



■ Title Ill^Science, Mathematics, and Modern Foreign Language. 
Title V — Guidance, Counseling, and Testing. 
Title VIII — Area Vocational Education — Technical. 
Title X — Improvement of Statistical Services of State Educational Agencies. 



160 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



TABLE 89 — Federal Funds Alloted and Expended in Maryland: 
Vocational Education: Year Ending June 30, 1961 



Type of 
Vocational Program 


Balance, 
July 1, 1960 


1960-61 
Allotment 


1960-61 
Expenditures 


Balance, 
June 30, 1961 


Total 


$30,235 

1,118 
24,349 

4,768 


$572,323 

114,524 

304,596 

104,253 

15,566 

33,384 


$558,173 

114,718 

285,859 

104,253 

15,566 

37,777 


$44,385 


Agriculture 


924 
43,086 


Home Economics 




Teacher Training and Supervision . 
Distributive Occupations 


375 



TABLE 90 — Expenditures for Administration and Supervision and Teacher 
Training in Vocational Education : State of Maryland : Year Ending June 

30, 1961 





Type of Vocational Program 


Source of Expenditures 


Total 


Agriculture 


Trades and 
Industry 


Home 
Economics 


Distributive 
Occupations 


Total 

State and University Funds. . 
Federal Funds 


$43,556 
47,856 

31,947 
36,247 

11,609 
11,609 


$16,345 
16,345 

10,145 
10,145 

6,200 
6,200 


$12,025 
12,025 

10,779 
10,779 

1,246 
1,246 


$14,497 
18,797 

10,334 
14,634 

4,163 
4,163 


$689 
689 


State Administration and 
Supervision 

State Funds 


689 




689 


Teacher Training 

University of Maryland 













Maryland State Department of Education 



161 



TABLE 91 — Expenditures of Federal Vocational Funds in Maryland: 
Year Ending June 30, 1961 





Type of Vocational Program 


Type of Expenditures 


Total 


Agriculture 


Trades and 
Industry 


Home 
Economics 


Distributive 
Occupations 


Total 


$558,173 

244,445 

105,926 

121,920 

33,206 

4,820 
11,609 

36,247 


$121,756 

97,750 
7,661 

6,200 
10,145 


$288,986 

108,378 
49,537 
88,278 
25,948 

4,820 
1,246 

10,779 


$109,654 

38,317 
46,500 

6,040 

4,163 
14,634 


$37,777 


Instruction in Schools 

Day Schools 




Adult Education 


2,228 


Cooperative and Continuation 
Supervision. . . 


33,642 
1,218 


Instruction by the University of 
Maryland 

Volunteer Fireman 


Teacher Training and 
Guidance ... 




State Administration and 
Supervision 


689 







]r,2 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



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Maryland State Department of Education 



163 



TABLE 93 — Adult Education: Receipts and Expenditures: Slate of Maryland; 
Year Ending June 30, 1961 





Receipts for Adult Education from 
Sources Other than Local 


Expenditures for Adult 
Education 


Local Unit 


Total Federal 


State 


Fees from 
Attendance 


Total 


Salaries 


Expenses 


Total State 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel. . . . 
Baltimore City. . . 

Baltimore 

Calvert 


$500,196 

14,516 

6,170 

273,391 

55,352 

575 

1,597 
3,821 
3,335 
1,395 

1,247 

8,009 
535 

5,809 
569 

1,907 

79,834 

20,734 

369 

336 

280 

576 

17,711 

1,822 

306 


$194,769 

6,109 

779 

*142,329 

14,924 

204 

527 
542 
856 
168 
604 

2,817 
127 

461 
16,725 

6,918 
637 
102 


$111,018 

5,520 

3,479 

34,301 

25,103 

371 

617 
2,674 
1,283 
1,227 

629 

3,902 
408 

2,556 
569 

1,071 

8,370 

6,074 

369 

336 

280 

576 

10,148 

951 

204 


$194,409 

2,887 

1,912 

96,761 

15,325 

453 

605 

1,196 

' U 

1,290 

3,253 

435 

54,739 
14,660 

645 
234 


$892,617 

10,476 

4,201 

618,699 

70,487 

70 

1,194 
3,493 
1,738 
1,443 
1,232 

5,178 
474 
8,298 
1,055 
1,627 

88,191 

48,247 

2,076 

978 

280 

3,722 

17,292 

2,166 


$840,283 

10,476 

3,987 

585,915 

58,514 

70 

1,144 
3,126 
1,621 
1,443 
1,232 

5,130 

474 

8,298 

1,055 

896 

83,483 

47,277 

2,076 

978 

280 

3,350 

17,292 

2,166 


$52,334 

32,784 
11,973 


Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery .... 
Prince George's . . 
Queen Anne's. . . . 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington 

Wicomico 

Worcester 


50 
367 
117 

48 

73i 

4,708 
970 

372 



* Fees received for Korean Veterans. 



164 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



TABLE 91 — Aihill Education Classes: Number of Teachers and Enrollment by 
Subject: State of Maryland: 1960-61 











Emrollment 








Number 
of 














Local Unit 
















Teachers 


Total 


Agri- 


Home 


Trades and 


Business 


General 








culture 


Economics 


Industry 


Education* 




Total State 


1,297 


46,548 


542 


8,113 


4,315 


9,298 


24,280 


Allegany 


26 


968 


32 


540 


132 


191 


73 


Anne Arundel . . . 


17 


375 




24 


33 


146 


172 


Baltimore City . . . 


590 


23,637 




2,183 


2,047 


4,480 


14,927 




208 


7,035 




944 


760 


1,151 


4,180 


Calvert 


1 


21 








21 




Caroline 


7 


150 




58 




51 


41 


Carroll 


10 


260 


20 


41 


41 


158 




Cecil 


10 


176 


24 


32 




120 




Charles 


6 


208 


12 


61 




135 




Dorchester 


6 


124 


30 


25 




69 




Frederick 


19 


706 


42 


45 


35 


261 


323 


Garrett . . 


4 

48 

4 


61 

1,231 

61 


11 
34 


160 
13 


loi 

16 


50 

434 

32 






502 


Howard 




Kent 


6 

148 


171 
5,991 


15 
131 


2,927 


16 
95 


97 

775 


43 


Montgomery 


2,063 


Prince George's. . . 


90 


3,809 




781 


435 


719 


1,874 


Queen Anne's ... 


11 


263 


80 


100 


30 


38 


15 


St. Mary's 


6 


147 


48 


45 




54 




Somerset 


2 


43 






12 


31 




Talbot 


6 


93 


31 


17 




45 




Washington 


61 


784 


17 


61 


562 


144 




Wicomico 


U 


234 


15 


56 




96 


67 


Worcester 

















* Includes Distributive Occupations. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



165 



TABLE 95 — Adult Education Program: Title of Courses Offered: 
State of Maryland: 1960-61 



Title of 
Course 



Number of 
Classes 



Agriculture 

Agriculture 

Arc Welding 

Vocational Agriculture. 

Young Farmers 

Other Agriculture 



Total . 



Home Economics 

Clothing 

Cooking 

Crafts 

Family Living 

Flower Arrangement 

Furniture Upholstering, Repairing 

Home Economics 

Interior Decorating 

Millinery 

Nursing 

Rug Making 

Self Improvement 

Sewing 

Slip Covers 

Other 



Total . 



Trades and Industry 

Apprenticeship Training Course . 

Auto Mechanics 

Barbering 

Blueprint Reading 

Building Trades 

Cosmetology 

Electric Code 

Electricity 

Electronics 

Food Service 

Industrial Safety 

Machine Shop 

Mathematics 

Mechanical Drawing, Drafting . . 

Plumbing 

Printing Trades 

Radio and TV 

Related English 

Steam Fitting 

Supervisory, Management 

Training 

Tailoring 

Welding 

Woodworking 

Other Trades 



Total , 



14 
6 
4 
2 
3 

29 



181 

7 

3 

6 

5 

3 

4 

13 

19 

13 

9 

28 

37 

5 

3 

336 



2 

10 

2 

6 

18 

13 

5 

40 

10 

3 

2 

11 

5 

5 

6 

9 

9 

13 

5 

6 

11 

10 

3 

6 

210 



Title of 
Course 



Distributive Occupations 

Business Education 

Real Estate 

Supervisory Management 

Total 



Business Education 

Accounting and Bookkeeping . 

Business English 

Commercial Arithmetic and Law 

Investment Planning 

Office Machines 

Office Practice 

Shorthand 

Typing 

Total 



General 

Americanization 

Apprentice Training 

Art, Arts and Crafts 

Boiler Operation and Safety 

Ceramics 

Driver Education 

Elementary Education 

English, Writing 

French 

General Industrial Training 

German 

Greek 

Home Furnishing 

Italian 

Mathematics 

Music, Singing 

Navigation and Seamanship 

Parent Education 

Physical Education 

Psychology 

Russian 

Secondary Education 

Sewing 

Spanish 

Technical 

Woodshop 

Other General Courses 

Total 



Number of 
Classes 



23 

8 

7 

14 

10 

14 

69 

165 

310 



54 

21 

55 

10 

19 

8 

55 

113 

21 

15 

5 

1 

3 

1 

77 

4 

3 

83 

4 

16 

18 

171 

4 

22 

99 

30 

4 



166 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 






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Maryland State Department of Education 



167 



TABLE 97 — Participation and Reimbursement Paid: Special Milk Program: 
Maryland Public Schools: 1960-61 



Year 
Local Unit 


Number of 

Approved 

Schools 

Participating 

in Program 


Per Cent of 
Total Schools 

in State 
Participating 

in Program 


Total Number 
of One-Halt 
Pints Milk 

Reimbursable 


Reimburse 
ment 
Paid 


1955-56 


772 
818 
874 
914 
943 
960 


82.2 


21.8.33.604 


$ 820,471 


1956-57 

1957-58 

1958-59 


85.6 26,390,908 
89.5 28,715,326 

92.7 36.390.1.52 


983,689 
1,080,048 
1,286,797 
1,354,115 
1,436,762 


1959-60 

1960-61 


94.2 
93.5 


35,555,378 
37,398,754 



BY LOCAL UNIT, 1960-61 



Allegany 

Anne Arundel. . 
Baltimore City. 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery. . . 
Prince George's 
Queen Anne's . . 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington . . . . 

Wicomico 

Worcester 




94.1 
100.0 
98.9 
96.1 
87.5 

100.0 

100.0 

83.3 

86.7 

62.1 

100.0 
83.3 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 

89.7 
99.3 
92.9 
68.4 
68.4 

78.6 

94.1 

100.0 

72.2 



1,015,887 
3,298,396 
8,749,509 
6,612,117 
166,452 

198,174 
479,152 
427,264 
468,299 
220,090 

392,101 
274,003 
1,186,665 
731,769 
208,346 

6,209,982 

4,703,467 

160,588 

285,312 

98,778 

160,955 
676,051 
524,768 
250,629 



40,635 

130,052 

318,992 

248,506 

6,096 

7,144 
19,315 
15,639 
18,442 

8,322 

15,350 
10,581 
46,374 
29,073 
6,965 

246,226 
185,698 

6,193 
11,092 

3,198 

6,438 
26,691 
20,879 

8,851 



168 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



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Maryland State Department of Education 



169 



TABLE 99 — Participation and Types of Lunches Served: National School 
Lunch Program: Maryland Puhlic Schools: 1960-61 



Local Unit 


Number of 

Approved 

Schools 

Participating 

in Program 


Per Cent of 
Total Schools 

in State 
Participating 

in Program 


Average 

Daily 

Participation 


Per Cent of 
Total Average 
Number Be- 
longing in State 
Participating 
in Program 


Total 

Number of 

Type A* 

Lunches 

Served 


Total State 


793 

32 

67 

88 

92 

9 

8 
23 
20 
12 
18 

32 
11 
25 

17 
10 

96 

118 

10 

12 

8 

11 

45 

20 

9 


77.2 

94.1 
93.1 
47.6 
90.2 
56.3 

80.0 
100.0 
83.3 
80.0 
62.1 

91.4 
61.1 
100.0 
94.4 
76 9 

82.7 
87.4 
71.4 
63.1 
42.1 

78.6 
88.2 
90.9 
50.0 


186,533 

10,071 

9,935 

14,894 

32,639 

1,053 

2,150 
5,477 
3,825 
1,721 
2,295 

9,185 
2,583 
8,652 
3,674 
1,290 

25,477 

28,324 

2,028 

2,074 

1,106 

1,563 

11,115 

3,579 

1,823 


32.2 

63.4 
23.9 
9.7 
38.0 
24.5 

49.4 
51.8 
40.7 
23.4 
37.9 

64.7 
54.7 
52.7 
48.5 
39.1 

35.0 
40.8 
55.8 
34.4 
25.9 

38.1 
61.3 
34.9 
34.0 


30.611,974 

1,644,222 
1,626,044 
2,505,945 
5,272,909 
169,934 

348,646 
908,673 
632,712 
277,353 
374,963 

1,491,153 
425,877 

1,414,461 
605,566 
214,596 

4,197,224 

4,708,190 

333,850 

322,673 

187,109 

260,952 

1,791,148 

584,430 

313,344 


Allegany 

Anne Arundel. . . . 
Baltimore City. . . 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 


Kent 

Montgomery . 
Prince George's 
Queen Anne'.s . 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



* Type A — J 2 pt. milk, 2 oz. protein, ^ c. vegetables and/or fruit, 1 serving bread, 2 tsps. butter or 
fortified margarine. 



170 



NiNRTY-FiFTii Annual Report 



TABLE 100 — Capital Outlay Expenditures by Maryland Local Boards of 
Education: Year Ending June 30, 1961 



Local Unit 



Total 



Expenditures for Capital Outlay 



Elementary 



High 



Administration 
Buildings 



Total State. 



Allegany 

Anne Arundel , . 
Baltimore City. 

Baltimore 

Calvert 



Caroline. . . 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles ... 
Dorchester . 



Frederick . 
Garrett . . 
Harford . . 
Howard. . 
Kent 



Montgomery. . . 
Prince George's . 
Queen Anne's . 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 



Talbot 

Washington. 
Wicomico. . 
Worcester . . 



$69,335,601 

72,383 

5,608,033 

14,422,910 

14,787,495 

663,608 

449,507 
326,297 
248,360 
501,060 
3,284 

1,765,866 
37,408 

2,192,647 
763,603 
167,784 

16,030,974 

8,330,516 

236,693 

452,334 

385,996 

31,684 
939,138 
766,759 
151,262 



$25,493,085 

18,672 

1,374,184 

4,887,549 

4,646,107 

264,786 

38,114 

87,332 

13,566 

137,734 

894 

577,368 
37,127 
800,058 
693,866 
111,083 

6,833,892 

3,264,552 

81,364 

303,838 

308,049 

12,981 
774,433 
195,182 

30,354 



$42,374,401 

51,561 
4,233,849 

9,475,424 

10,126,169 

390,228 

411,393 
238,965 
232,684 
354,704 
1,745 

1,188,498 
281 

1,392,589 
69,737 
56,701 

8,113,164 

4,792,656 

155,329 

148,496 

72,151 

18,215 
161,211 
571,523 
117,128 



$1,468,115 

2,150 

59,937 

15,219 

8,694 



2,110 

8,622 

645 



1,083,918 
273,308 



5,796 

488 

3,494 

54 

3,780 



Maryland State Department of Education 



171 



TABLE 101 — Value* of Maryland Public School Properly per Pupil Belonging: 
Year Ending June 30, 1961 



Local Unit 



Total 



Total 
Value 



Average 
per Pupil 



Elementary 



Total 
Value 



Average 
per Pupil 



High 



Total 
Value 



Average 
per Pupil 



Total State 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel. . 
Baltimore Cityt 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery . . . 
Prince George's . 
Queen Anne's. . . 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington . . . . 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



$682,258,728 

18,096,821 

48,959,252 

146,962,613 

103,969,094 

3,648,600 

3,782,000 

11,431,149 

16,478,150 

8,350,089 

8,200,800 

17,337,405 
4,712,160 

23,940,540 
4,784,640 
3,322,900 

104,563,094 

84,220,673 

3,686,875 

5,799,459 

4,347,618 

6,253,415 
24,754,181 
16,916,200 

7,741,000 



$1,131 


78 


1,139 


57 


1,175 


95 


873 


35 


1,210 


39 


850 


75 


858 


10 


1,080 


48 


1,752 


53 


1,136 


00 


1,355 


39 


1,220 


43 


998 


25 


1,457 


97 


631 


52 


1,007 


46 


1,292 


16 


1,212 


30 


1,014 


10 


961 


88 


1,018 


94 


1,525 


41 


1,323 


58 


1,650 


04 


1,418 


75 



$327,233,791 

6,079,126 
20,778,751 
70,617,595 
48,813,156 

2,031,600 

1,700,026 
6,072,927 
6,252,400 
3,727,769 
3,345,300 

8,095,655 
2,412,000 
11,877,584 
2,431,065 
1,560,687 

59,600,963 

38,307,506 

1,566,150 

3,549,050 

1,501,475 

3,498,015 

12,363,631 

7,681,860 

3,369,500 



$914.32 


763 


14 


845 


99 


667 


26 


1,008 


93 


739 


62 


662 


96 


1,047 


76 


1,111 


95 


855 


80 


1,011 


00 


1,051 


22 


891 


45 


1,274 


31 


555 


61 


815 


83 


1,193 


28 


948 


84 


735 


49 


971 


84 


612 


75 


1.459 


33 


1,191 


12 


1,254 


22 


1,023 


63 



$355,024,937 

12,017,695 
28,180,501 
76,345,018 
55,155,938 
1,617,000 

2,081,974 
5,358,222 
10,225,750 
4,622,320 
4,855,500 

9,241,750 
2,300,160 
12,062,956 
2,353,575 
1,762,213 

44,962,131 

45,913,167 

2,120,725 

2,250,409 

2,846,143 

2,755,400 

12,390,550 

9,234,340 

4,371,500 



$1,449.53 

1,518 44 
1,650.66 
1,222.67 
1,470.19 
1,048.71 

1,129.60 
1,120.12 
2,705.51 
1,543.60 
1,771.05 

1,420.76 
1,141.69 
1,699.10 
735.29 
1,272.08 

1,451.61 
1,577.83 
1,408.00 
946.58 
1,566.91 

1,618.44 
1,488.62 
2,237.43 
2,019.63 



* Value based on 100 per cent of the insured valuation for each school building and the equipment 
thereof. Value of sites has been excluded. 

t Baltimore City shows value of buildings and equipment as carried by the Bureau of Accounts and 
Disbursements; this valuation docs not constitute the basis for insurance. 



172 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



TABLE 102 

Maryland Public School Bonded Indebtedness Related to Assessed Valuation: 

June 30, 1961 



Local 
Unit 



School Bonded Indebtedness as of 
June 30, 1961 



Total 



County 
Bonds 



State 
Loan* 



1960 Assessed 

Valuation 

Taxable at 

Full Rate for 

County 

Purposes 



Assessed 
Valuation 
per Dollar 

of School 
Bonded In- 
debtedness 



Per Cent 
School 
Bonded In- 
debtedness 
is of Assessed 
Valuation 



Total State I $414,335,626 



Allegany 

Anne Arundel . 
Baltimore City . 

Baltimore 

Calvert 



Caroline. , . 
Carroll .... 

Cecil 

Charles. . . . 
Dorchester. 



Frederick . 
Garrett . . . 
Harford. . 
Howard . . 
Kent 



Montgomery . 
Prince George's 
Queen Anne's. . 
St. Mary's .... 
Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington . . . 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



5,128,807 
34,935,367 
86,695,000 
90,497,715 

2,768,293 

3,017,061 
2,643,386 
7,307,002 
2,013,296 
3,591,982 

10,207,891 
1,619,437 

12,806,216 
4,225,639 
1,432,837 

65,181,449 

52,004,625 

1,567,127 

1,575,239 

2,253,612 

2,548,124 

11,962,914 

6,006,597 

2,346,010 



$330,897,249 

1,919,000 
31,818,000 
86,695,000 
75,219.000 

2,074,000 

2,360,000 
400,000 

4,720,000 
325,000 

3,075,300 

6,855,000 

1,075,000 

12,139,000 

1,963,000 

850,000 

42,586,949 

38,141,000 

1,040,000 



1,650,000 

2,015,000 
8,075,000 
4,742,000 
1,160,000 



$83,438,377 

3,209,807 
3,117,367 



15,278,715 
694,293 

657,061 
2,243,386 
2,587,002 
1,688,296 

516,682 

3,352,891 

544,437 

667,216 

2,262,639 

582,837 

22,594,500 
13,863,625 

527,127 
1,575,239 

603,612 

533,124 
3,887,914 
1,264,597 
1,186,010 



$8,777,767,742 

tl 75,772,230 

t435,951,832 

t2,839, 186,688 

1,629,118,265 

27,286,770 

36,587,657 

143,360,452 

103,484,435 

52,117,802 

71,697,280 

189,068,183 

38,881,135 

189,328,746 

105,904,527 

40,582,398 

1,252,138,455 

814,019,105 

43,350,101 

48,075,079 

26,465,319 

61,319,480 

1244,968,175 

125,513,608 

83,590,020 



$21 

34 
12 
33 
18 
10 

12 
54 
14 
26 
20 

19 
24 
15 
25 
28 

21 
16 
28 
31 
12 

24 
20 
21 
36 



4.7 

2 9 
8.0 
3.1 
5.5 
10.1 

8.2 
1.8 
7.1 
3.9 
5.0 

5.4 
4.2 
6.8 
4.0 
3.5 



4 1 

4.9 
4.8 
2.8 



* General School Construction Loan. 

t Excludes valuation of Federal Housing Authority. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



173 



TABLE 103 — Maryland Public School Bonded Indebtedness* and Interest 
Payments per Pupil Belonging: June 30, 1961 





School 






School 




Local Unit 


Bonded 


Interest 


Local Unit 


Bonded 


Interest 




Indebtedness 


Payments 




Indebtedness 


Payments 


Total State 


$687 33 


$18 92 


Garrett 


$343 . 07 
779.90 


$ 8.05 
16.28 








Harford 


Allegany 


322 96 


7.46 


Howard 


557.74 


13.77 


Anne Arundel 


839.11 


23.44 


Kent 


434.42 


12.04 


Baltimore City 


515.20 


12.69 








Baltimore 


1,053.55 


33.30 


Montgomery 


805.49 


21 30 


Calvert 


645.49 


19.71 


Prince George's 


748.57 


21.32 








Queen Anne's 


431.05 


11.87 


Caroline 


684.54 


17.60 


St. Mary's 


261.26 


5.54 


Carroll 


249.85 


5.72 


Somerset 


528.17 


14.21 


Cecil 


777.13 


21.08 








Charles 


273.90 


8.61 


Talbot 


621.57 


17.74 


Dorchester 


593.67 


15.01 


Washington 


639.65 


18.46 








Wicomico 


585.89 


15.64 


Frederick 


718.56 


21.93 


Worcester 


429.97 


11.24 



Includes General School Construction Loan. 



174 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



TABLE 104 
Calculated School Tax Rates and Published Tax Rates: State of IVIaryland : 1960-61 





Calculated Public School Tax Rates* 


Published 

Tax 

Ratest 


Additional 
Rates in 


Local Unit 


Total 


Current 
Expenses 


Capital 
Outlay 


Debt 
Service 


Districts and 

Incorporated 

Places! 


Total State 


$1.79 

1.36 
1.73 
1.60 
1.88 
2.09 

1.84 
1.67 
1 72 
1.59 
1.38 

1.61 
1.23 
1.52 
1.45 
1.56 

2.32 
2.06 
1.55 
1.26 
1.41 

1.38 
1.74 
1.63 
1.49 


$1.46 

al.l4 
al.29 
1.46 
01.46 
al.37 

1.33 

1.29 

al.20 

01.33 

1.13 

ol.31 
0.97 
al.26 
al.l4 
al.l5 

al.90 
al.49 

1.22 
O0.91 

1.15 

0.98 
O1.40 

1.10 
al.ll 


$0.04 
0.01 

6!63 

0.07 

0.05 
0.17 
0.03 
0.13 

0.02 
0.02 

o!63 

0.11 

0.10 
0.16 
0.04 
0.08 
0.06 

0.01 
0.05 
0.05 
0.10 


$0.29 

0.21 
0.44 
0.14 
0.39 
0.65 

0.46 
0.21 
0.49 
0.13 
0.25 

28 
0.24 
0.26 
0.28 
0.30 

0.32 
0.41 
0.29 
0.27 
0.20 

0.39 
0.29 
0.48 
0.28 


$2.20 

b2.16 

3.60 

2.54 

2,17 

2.35 
1.95 
2.42 
1.65 
1.85 

1.88 
2.35 
1.61 
1.85 
2.00 

2.53 
2.42 
2.00 
1.80 
2.25 

2.10 
1.89 
1.96 
1.80 




Allegany 

Anne Arundel" 

Baltimore City" 

Baltimore" ... 


$ .08— $1.54 
1.25— 1.55 


Calvert 


.75— 1.25 
.25— 1.15 


Carroll" 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester" 

Frederick" 

Garrett" 

Harford" 

Howard" 

Kent" 

Montgomery 

Prince George's 

Queen Anne's" 

St. Mary's 


.50— .85 
.35— 1.33 
.50— .65 
.10— 1.50 

.10— 1.65 

.40— .90 

1.00— 1.15 

.20—' .85 

.06— .80 
.25— 1.77 
.20— .74 

.90 
.70— 1.45 


Talbot 


.95— 1.15 


Washington" 

Wicomico 

Worcester 


.35— .85 
.40— 1.23 
.90— 1.40 



♦ Calculated by dividing tax funds received by Local Boards of Education by total assessed valuations as used in 

calculation of State aid payments, 
t Rates are for fiscal period on which district operates. State property tax and special service levies are excluded. 
t Figures are from reports made to State Fiscal Research Bureau. 
" Calendar year fiscal period. ■ 

a Excludes federal funds authorized by Public Law 874 as amended. 
b Average rate of eight election districts which vary from $1.95 to $2.34. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



175 



TABLE 105 
Local Revenue Appropriations: Maryland Public Schools: 1960-61 



Local Unit 



Local 
Rbvbnub* 



Appboprutions fob Public ScHOOLsf 



All School 
Purposes 



Current 
Expenses 



Capital 
Outlay 



Debt 
Service 



Per Cent op Total Revenue 
Appropriated for Public Schools 



All 
School 
Purposes 



Current 
Expenses 



Capital 
Outlay 



Debt 
Service 



Total Stato 

Allegany 

Anne AruiidcU . 
Baltimore City J 

Baltimore t 

Calvert 

Caroline 

CarrolU 

Cecil 

Charles 

DorchesterJ. . . . 

Frederickt 

Oarrettt 

Harfordt 

Howardt 

Kentt 

Montgnmory . . . 
Prince (ieorge's. 
()ueen Anne'sJ • 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington J. . . 

\Vioomico 

Worcester 



$363,509,513 

6.941,433 

15,393,036 

150.341,682 

57,097,494 

1,112,036 

1,594,459 
4,344,752 
3,668.366 
2,054,928 
2,563,392 

6,451,760 
1,876,256 
5,236,806 
3.067,052 
1,382,369 

46,982,656 

32,013.430 

1,. 544,951 

1.913,439 

1,137,076 

2,145.792 
7,335.429 
4,446.676 
2,864,243 



$1.58,238,615 

2,459,338 

7,480,052 

45,109,778 

31,692,702 

588,217 

713,520 
2,219,995 
1,841,630 

904,771 
1,019,720 

3.109.991 

471.549 

2.843,492 

1.547,999 

613.456 

28.798,429 

17,08.5,788 

702,557 

621,776 

386,798 

882.648 
3,773,090 
2.087,106 
1,284,213 



$128,301,925 

2,067,322 

5.541,533 

41,326,299 

23,825,363 

385,107 

513,086 

1,721.841 

1,285,059 

754,980 

839,065 

2,584,667 

348,856 

2,253,553 

1,206,788 

464,759 

23,579,409 

12,370,363 

549,275 

449.2,56 

315,750 

621,337 
2,936,774 
1 .406.580 

954,903 



$4,702,963 
1.5,100 



1,305,491 
20,000 

21,000 
190,775 
29.380 
75,754 



27,200 
14,900 
1 8,096 
35.647 
26.344 

1,292,005 

1,326,558 

14,945 

39,769 

16,363 i 



9,500 
70.407 
63,719 
90.000 



$25,233,737 

376,916 
1,938,519 
3,783,479 
6,561,848 

183,110 

179,434 
307,379 
527,191 
74.037 
180,655 

498,124 
107,793 
,571.843 
305.564 
122,353 

3,927,015 

3,388,867 

138.337 

132,751 

54,685 

251,811 
765,909 
616,807 
239.310 



43.5 

35.4 
48.6 
30.0 
55.5 
52.9 

44.7 
51.1 
50.2 
44.0 
39.8 

48.2 
25.1 
54 3 
50.5 
44.4 

61.3 
53.4 
45.5 
32.5 
34.0 

41.1 
51.4 
46.9 

44.8 



35.3 

29.8 
36.0 
27.5 
41.7 
34.6 

32.2 
39.6 
35.0 
36.7 
32.7 

40.1 
18.6 
43.0 
39 3 
33.6 

50.2 
38.7 
35.5 
23.5 

27.8 

29.0 
40.0 
31.6 
33.3 



0.2 



2.3 

1.8 

1.3 
4.4 
0.8 
3.7 



0.4 
0.8 
0.4 
1.2 
1.9 

2.7 
4.1 
1.0 

2.1 
1.4 

0,4 
1.0 
1.4 
3.1 



6.9 

5.4 

12.6 
2.5 
11.5 
16.5 

11.2 
7.1 

14.4 
3.6 

7.1 



5.7 
10 9 
10.0 

8.9 

8.4 
10.6 
9 
6.9 

4.8 

11.7 
10.4 
13.9 
8.4 



* Fjgures from State Fiscal Research Bureau: include taxes, licenses and permits, and fines and forfeitures. 

t Figures from annual financial reports of Local Boards of Education adjusted to conform to county's fiscal period. 

t County operates on calendar year. Revenue here reported is that of 1960. 



176 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



TABLE 106 

1960-61 Valuation of Property Assessable at Full Rate for County Purposes: 

State of Maryland 





Total 


County Commissioners 


Federal 
Housing 
Authority 


State Tax 
Commissionf 


Classes 


Local Unit 


Assessable 

at 
Full Rate* 


Total 


Real Estate 


Personal 
Property 


A through J 

Motor 

Vehicles J 


Total State 


$8,832,905,932 

175,812,040 

436,226,634 

2,893,688,528 

1,629,118,265 

27,286,770 

36,587,657 
143,360,452 
103,484,435 
52,117,802 
71,697.280 

189,068,183 
38,881,135 
189.328.746 
105,904,527 
40,582,398 

1,252,138,455 
814,019,105 
43,350.101 
48,075,079 
26.465,319 

61.319.480 
245,289,913 
125,513,608 

83,590.020 


$6,863,597,452 

125,584,630 

365,050,032 

1,996,037,988 

1,348,442,035 

23,428,590 

29,202,087 
109,077,292 
74,663,585 
42,268,912 
52,782,170 

137,744,833 
26,612,085 

140,254,066 
84.337.767 
32,534,048 

1,088.817.675 
694.108.635 
36,656.121 
37,661.289 
20.863.879 

51.234.740 
182.848,475 
92,918,338 
70.468.180 


16.665.265.029 

120,160,230 

358,820,207 

1,951,844,958 

1.330.138,840 

22,170,970 

26.748.201 
99.429.215 
68,641,475 
39,644,372 
47,597,910 

114,151,148 
22,818,242 

131.884.629 
80,562.837 
28,612,833 

1,075,716,780 

685,115.445 

32.946,945 

35,176,939 

19,318,937 

47,319,875 
171,687,015 
89,061,542 
65,695,484 


1198,332,423 

5,424,400 
6,229,825 
44,193,030 
18,303,195 
1,257,620 

2,453,886 
9,648,077 
6,022,110 
2,624,540 
5,184,260 

23,593,685 
3,793,843 
8,369,437 
3,774,930 
3.921.215 

13,100.895 
8,993,190 
3,709,176 
2,484,350 
1,544,942 

3,914,865 
11,161,460 
3,856,796 
4,772,696 


$55,138,190 

39,810 

274.802 

54.501.840 

32V.738 


$1,914,170,290 

50.187.600 

70.901.800 

a843,148.700 

/)280,676,230 

3.858,180 

7.385.570 
34.283,160 
28,820,850 

9,848,890 
18,915,110 

51,323,350 
12,269,050 
49,074,680 
21,566,760 
8,048,350 

163,320.780 
119.910,470 

6,693,980 
10,413,790 

5,601.440 

10,084,740 
62,119,700 
32,595.270 
13.121.840 


$266,832,194 




7.461.000 


Anne Arundel" 

Baltimore City" 


19,358,206 
50,234,778 
47,226,752 


Calvert 


1,615,392 


Caroline 


2,589,425 


Carroll" 


7,261,410 


Cecil 


4,116,426 


Charles 


4,620,879 


Dorchester" 


3,474,824 
8,207.726 




2,062,787 




9,801.801 




5.338,838 




1,889,813 


Montgomery 

Prince George's 

Queen Anne's" 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 


33,664,071 

28,988,017 
2,079,550 
3,746,105 
1,487,727 

2,636,131 


Washington" 


9.823,108 
5,765.803 




3,381,625 







* Excludes classes A through J motor vehicles. 

t Data are for the year ended December 31, 1960, adjusted as of October 1961. 

i Estimated by dividing net receipts after distribution to incorporated towns and places by the county tax rate. 

" Fiscal period ends December 31; all others end June 30. 

o Includes assessment for tools and machinery and inventories of manufacturers as required by Baltimore City Ordnance number 643. 

Ordnance number 1340 provides that this assessment be removed over a four-year period beginning 1959. This figure also includes 

assessments for some government property which is in litigation. 
h Includes assessments for some government property which is in litigation. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



177 



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178 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



TABLE 108 
Assessable Wealth Back of Each Maryland Public School Pupil Belonging: 

1959-60 



Local Unit 


Total Basis Assessable at 

Full Rate for County 

Purposes 


Number of 

Pupils 
Belongingt 


Wealth per Pupil 


Total State 


$8,832,905,932 

175,812,040 

436,226,634 

12,893,688,528 

''1,629,118,265 

27,286,770 

36,587,657 

143,360,452 

103,484,435 

52,117,802 

71,697,280 

189,068,183 

38,881,135 

189,328,746 

105,904,527 

40,582,398 

1,2.52,138,455 

814,019,105 

43,350,101 

48,075,079 

26,465,319 

61,319,480 
245,289,913 
125,513,608 

83,590,020 


579,841 

15,880 

41,611 

154,288 

85,844 

4,289 

4,352 
10,580 
9,403 
7,350 
6,051 

14,206 
4,720 

16,420 
7,576 
3,298 

72,727 

69,472 

3,636 

6,029 

4,267 

4,100 
18,127 
10,252 

5,363 


$15,233 


Allegany 

Anne Arundel* 


11,071 
10,483 


Baltimore City* 

Baltimore* 

Calvert .... 


18,755 

18,978 

6,362 


Caroline 


8,407 


Carroll* 

Cecil 


13,550 
11,005 




7,091 




11,849 




13,309 


Garrett* . 


8,237 


Harford* 


11,530 


Howard* 


13,979 


Kent* 


12,305 


Monlgomerv 


17,217 


Prince George's 


11,717 




11,922 


St. Mary's 


7,974 


Somerset 


6,202 


Talbot 


14,956 


Washington* 


13,532 


Wicomico 


12,243 




15,586 









* Calendar year (1960). 
t Excludes kindergarten pupils. 
t See footnote "a" on TABLE 106. 
° See footnote "b" on TABLE 106. 



Maryland State Departisient of Education 



179 



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180 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



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182 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



TABLE 112 

Enrollment by College and Class: Maryland State Teachers Colleges; 

FaU of 1960 



Class 



Grand 
Total 



Bowie 



Coffin 



Frostburg 



Salisbury 



TOWSON 



Teacher Training 



Total 


3,504 


389 


351 


907 


352 


1,505 


Freshman .... 


1,328 


180 


75 


363 


149 


561 


Sophomore . . . 


913 


66 


109 


268 


98 


372 


Junior 


725 


79 


89 


181 


56 


320 


Senior 


518 


56 


69 


95 


49 


249 


Fifth Year.... 


20 


8 


9 






3 



Arts and Science 



Total 


245 






105 


57 


83 


Freshman .... 


175 






74 


41 


60 


Sophomore . . . 


66 






27 


16 


23 


Junior 


4 






4 






Senior 















Other Students 



Total 


142 

31 
21 
69 
21 




.... 


54 

"45 
9 


36 

"24 
12 


52 


Extension : 

Graduate .... 

Undergraduate 
Nurses 


31 

21 


Other 









Camfus School 



Elementary 



783 



120 



215 



213 



235 



Maryland State Department of Education 



183 



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184 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



Table 114 — Enrollment in Arts and Science at Maryland State Teachers Colleges 
by County : Fall of 1960 



Area 



Total State 

Out-of -State 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel . . 
Baltimore City. 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester .... 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery. . . 
Prince George's 
Queen Anne's. . 
St. Mary's .... 
Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington . . . 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



Grand 
Total 



245 



5 
32 

47 



1 
22 
11 



Bowie 



COPPIN 



Frostburg 



105 
3 



88 
2 



Salisbury 



57 

4 



10 



21 

9 



TOWSON 



3 
32 
45 



Maryland State Department of Education 



185 



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186 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



TABLE 116 
Cost per Student at Maryland State Teachers Colleges: 1952-1961 



Year 
Ending 



Average 
Enroll- 
ment 



Current Expenses 



Total 



Paid by 
Students 



Paid by 
State 



Average Annual Cost per 
Student 



In Student 
Total Fees* 



To 
State 



BOWIE 



1952 
1953 
1954 
1955 
1956 
1957 
1958 
1959 
1960 
1961 



262 
331 
343 
338 
321 
301 
305 
330 
346 
380 



$261,264 
316,737 
351,712 
363,046 
388,296 
435,714 
454,809 
472,120 
513,573 
580,229 



$32,810 
59,506 
72,599 
75,092 
71,585 
70,800 
72,839 
91,132 
92,985 
98,844 



$228,454 
257,231 
279.113 
287,954 
316,711 
364,914 
381,970 
380,988 
420,588 
481,385 



$997 
957 
1,025 
1,074 
1,210 
1,447 
1,491 
1,431 
1,484 
1,527 



$125 
180 
211 
222 
223 
235 
239 
276 
269 
260 



$872 

777 

814 

852 

987 

1,212 

1,252 

1,155 

1,215 

1,267 



COPPIN 



1955 
1956 
1957 
1958 
1959 
1960 
1961 



267 
295 
289 
317 
347 
352 
354 



$172,823 
199,662 
238,292 
262,896 
286,047 
332,064 
410,974 



$9,625 
9,148 
10,352 
11,179 
13,584 
12,529 
12,982 



$163,198 
190,514 
227,940 
251,717 
272,463 
319,535 
397,992 



$647 
677 
825 
829 
824 
943 

1,161 



$36 


$611 


31 


646 


36 


789 


35 


794 


39 


785 


35 


908 


37 


1,124 



FROSTBURG 



1952 
1953 
1954 
1955 
1956 
1957 
1958 
1959 
1960 
1961 



338 
373 
394 
458 
564 
548 
533 
659 
799 
1,002 



$318,342 
402,258 
418,682 
459,180 
484,506 
585,568 
660,283 
741,680 
865,201 

1,054,647 



$42,462 

88,372 

58,716 

57,667 

65,589 

63,651 

75,669 

114,939 

163,727 

203,947 



$275,880 
313,886 
359,966 
401,513 
418.917 
521,917 
584,614 
626,741 
701,474 
850,700 



$942 
1,078 
1,063 
1,003 
859 
1,068 
1,239 
1,125 
1,083 
1,053 



$126 
237 
149 
126 
116 
116 
142 
174 
205 
204 



$816 
841 
914 
877 
743 
952 

1,097 
951 
878 
849 



SALISBURY 



1952 


174 


$282,935 


$22,765 


$260,170 


$1,626 


$131 


$1,495 


1953 


234 


349,424 


54,129 


295,295 


1,493 


231 


1.262 


1954 


250 


343,124 


41,983 


301,141 


1,372 


168 


1.204 


1955 


338 


386,826 


64,918 


321,908 


1,144 


192 


952 


1956 


362 


416,580 


68.945 


347,635 


1,151 


191 


960 


1957 


313 


450,320 


51.424 


398,896 


1,439 


164 


1.275 


1958 


337 


494,967 


49.515 


445,452 


1,469 


147 


1.322 


1959 


343 


510,803 


62.672 


448,131 


1,489 


183 


1,306 


1960 


381 


543,933 


85.709 


458,224 


1,428 


225 


1,203 


1961 


393 


617,078 


99,357 


517,721 


1.570 


253 


1,317 



TOWSON 



1952 
1953 
1954 
1955 
1956 
1957 
1958 
1959 
1960 
1961 



855 
851 
893 
1,033 
1.170 
1,233 
1,232 
1.345 
1,434 
1,563 



$757,257 
842.915 
962,662 
1,024,421 
1,120,202 
1,239,538 
1,370,552 
1,483,923 
1,605,057 
1,833,698 



$92,816 
121,076 
135,050 
173,733 
180,904 
196,399 
210.037 
278.001 
283,139 
310,910 



$664,441 

721,839 

827,612 

850,688 

939.298 

1.043.139 

1.160.515 

1.205.922 

1,321.918 

1,522,788 



990 
1,078 
992 
957 
1,005 
1,112 
1,103 
1,119 
1,173 



$109 


$777 


142 


848 


151 


927 


168 


824 


154 


803 


159 


846 


170 


942 


207 


896 


197 


922 


199 


974 



* In accordance with Chapter 6 of the Laws of 1945, tuition for teacher training students at the Teachers 
Colleges was eliminated as of September, 1945. Beginning in 1957-58 board is $266 at Bowie, Frostburg, 
Salisbury, and Towson. for teacher training students planning to teach in Maryland. Junior college 
students who are residents of Maryland pay $150 additional; out-of-state students pay $400 for either 
junior college or teacher education curriculum. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



187 



TABLE 117 — Source of Expenditures*; Maryland State Teachers Colleges: 
Year Ending June 30, 1961 





Grand 
Total 


Total Expenbitdbes for Current Expenses Paid bt 


State 
Teachers 
College 


State 


Students 


General Adminis- 
tration 


Instruction 1 Dietary Services 


Plant Operation 
and Maintenance 




State 


Students 


State 


Students 


State 


Students 


State 


Students 


Total 


$ 

4,496,626 


1 

3,770,586 


$ 

726,040 


534,326 


$ 

12,124 


S 

2,250,569 


$ 

168,402 


$ 

248,853 


$ 

387,929 


s 

736,838 


$ 

157,585 


Bowie 


580,229 


481,385 


98,844 


76,190 277 


240,911 


2,657 


35,110 


62,776 


129,174 


33,134 


Coppin 


410,974 


397,992 


12,982 


58,121 




257,437 


245 


17,263 


12,017 


65,171 


720 


Frostburg . . 


1,054,647 


850,700 


203,947 


109,769 


6,727 


511,106 


36,939 


61,017 


115,696 


168,808 


44,585 


Salisbury. . . 


617,078 


517,721 


99,357 


81,591 




284,671 


32,541 


31,136 


47,597 


120,323 


19,219 


Towson .... 


1,833,698 


1,522,788 


310,910 


208,655 


5,120 


956,444 


96,020 


104,327 


149,843 


253,362 


59,927 



* Current year cash disbursements and encumbrances less budget credits. 



TABLE 118 — Inventories of Maryland State Department of Education, Teachers' 
Retirement System, and State Teachers Colleges: June 30, 1961 



Departmrnt or College 


Total 


Land and 
Improvements 


Buildings 


Equipment 


Total 


$20,277,268 

390,726 

29,468 

3,515,691 
2,064,347 
4,901,462 
3,332,998 
6,042,576 


$2,269,204 

281,257 
397,451 
733,013 
180,615 
676,868 


$15,189,020 

2,907,708 
1,402,671 
3,724,335 
2,677,051 
4,477,255 


$2,819,044 


State Department of Education 

Teachers' Retirement System 


390,726 
29,468 


State Teachers College, Bowie 


326,726 


State Teachers College, Coppin 


264,225 


State Teachers College, Frostburg 

State Teachers College, Salisbury 

State Teachers College, Towson 


444,114 
475,332 
888,453 







188 



NiNKTY-FlFTH ANNUAL REPORT 



TABLE 119— Maryland Teachers' Retirement System: Members in Active 
Service and Their Contributions : Year Ending June 30, 1961 



County or Institution 



Amount Contributed 


Members in 


Year Ending 


Active Service 


July 31, 1961 


May 31, 1961 


$10,390,090 


19,850 


$9,327,897 


17,589 


201,728 


665 


450,260 


1,273 


2,611,016 


3,452 


50,513 


172 


65,018 


205 


127,175 


401 


134,682 


386 


103,598 


307 


68,889 


224 


199,962 


610 


61,089 


189 


235,269 


666 


104,541 


293 


47,617 


145 


3,204,605 


3,715 


986,219 


2,698 


54,365 


173 


52,888 


172 


55,912 


181 


56,022 


177 


256,037 


813 


123,073 


422 


77,419 


250 


$1,062,193 


2,261 


$140,218 


288 


13,660 


32 


18,539 


27 


30,520 


66 


15,800 


38 


61,699 


125 


$97,297 


292 


55,191 


196 


38,589 


86 


3,143 


9 


374 


1 


$824,678 


1,681 


1,384 


4 


10,244 


31 


11,453 


33 


3,848 


12 


68,778 


160 


4,476 


14 


9,556 


22 


714,939 


1,405 



Grand Total . . . 
Total Counties . 



Allegany 

Anne Arundel . . 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery . . . 
Prince George's. 
Queen Anne's . . 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington .... 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



Total Schools and Departments . 



Teachers Colleges . 



Bowie .... 
Coppin . . . 
Frostburg . 
Salisbury . 
Towson . . . 



Departments. 



County Libraries 

Education 

Forests and Parks 

Research and Education . 

Other Colleges and Schools. 



Barrett School for Girls 

Md. School for the Deaf 

Md. Training School for Boys 

Montrose School for Girls 

Morgan State College 

Rosewood State Training School . . . . 
St. Mary's Seminary-Junior College . 
University of Maryland 



Maryland State Department of Education 



189 



TABLE 120 — Parent-Teacher Associations: Maryland County Public Schools: 
Year Ending June 30, 1961 



Local Unit 


Total Number 
Schools 


Number Having 

Parent-Teacher 

Associations 


Per Cent Having 

Parent-Teacher 

Associations 


Total Counties 


842 

34 

72 

102 

16 

10 

23 
24 
15 
29 
35 

18 
25 
18 
13 
116 

135 
14 
19 
19 
14 

51 
22 
18 


832 

30 

72 

102 

16 

10 

22 
24 
15 
29 
35 

18 
25 
18 
13 
116 

135 
14 
17 
19 
14 

50 
21 

17 


98.9 


Allegany 


88.2 


Anne Arundel 


100.0 


Baltimore 


100.0 


Calvert 


100.0 


Caroline. ... 


100 


Carroll 

Cecil 


95.7 
100.0 


Charles 


100.0 


Dorchester 

Frederick 


100.0 
100.0 


Garrett 


100.0 




100.0 


Howard 

Kent 


100.0 
100.0 




100.0 


Prince George's 


100.0 


Queen Anne's 


100.0 


St. Mary's 


89.5 


Somerset 

Talbot 


100.0 
100.0 


Washington 

Wicomico .... 


98.0 
95.5 


Worcester 


94.4 



190 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



TABLE 121— High School Equivalence: State of Maryland : 1952-1961 



Year Ending 


Number of Applicants Who 


Total Number 
of 


June 30 


Completed 
Examination* 


Earned 
Certificate 


Earned Certificate 
through USAFIt 


Certificates 
Issued 


1952 


779 
1,005 
1,377 
1,495 
1,476 

1,603 
1,802 
1,681 
1,850 
1,940 


527 
700 
887 
885 
854 

954 
963 
867 
951 
1,002 


580 
613 
837 

717 
967 

740 
837 
722 
712 
833 


1,107 


1953 ... . 


1,313 


1954 


1,724 


1955 


1,602 


1956. . 


1,821 


1957 


1,694 


1958 


1,800 


1959 


1,589 


I960 


1,663 


1961 


1,835 







* Indicates re-tests. 

t United States Armed Forces Institute. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



191 



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192 Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 

TABLE 123— Vocational Rehahiliation Services Rendered: State of Maryland: 
Year Ending June 30, 1961 



Local Unit 


Total 

Number 

Cases 


Rehabili- 
tated 


Being 
Followed 
on Jobs 


Training 
Completed 


Being 
Prepared 
for Jobs 


Surveyed: 
Under Ad- 
visement 


Closed: 

Other 

Services 


Total State 


5,925 

142 

221 

2,505 

541 

47 

64 

170 

108 

85 

94 

160 
34 
74 
40 
34 

355 

408 

31 

92 

54 

55 
364 
200 

47 


1,491 

47 

52 

586 

115 

11 

12 
42 
34 
31 
18 

73 

6 

24 

14 

9 

99 
86 
14 
22 

15 

17 

107 

46 

11 


140 

"2 

71 

12 

2 

5 

"6 
2 

"3 

17 
10 

"3 

"3 

4 


963 

29 

28 

460 

60 

7 

8 
11 
22 
12 
17 

9 

7 
7 
3 
7 

64 
70 

5 
20 

4 

10 
66 
30 

7 


1,211 

26 

54 

518 

154 

4 

8 
28 
21 
10 
20 

30 

13 

19 

8 

4 

76 
94 
4 
16 
12 

7 
59 
22 

4 


1,407 

28 

70 

554 

106 

20 

19 
72 
20 
22 
23 

29 

4 
19 
11 

7 

79 
96 
6 
22 
15 

12 

105 

54 

14 


713 


Allegany 

Anne Arundel 

Baltimore City .... 


12 

15 

316 

94 


Calvert 

Caroline 


3 
17 


Carroll 


12 


Cecil 


11 


Charles 

Dorchester 

Frederick 

Garrett 


4 
14 

19 
4 


Harford 


5 


Howard 


4 


Kent 


4 


Montgomery 

Prince George's. . . . 

Queen Anne's 

St. Mary's 


20 

52 

2 

9 

8 


Talbot 

Washington 

Wicomico 

Worcester 


9 

24 
44 
11 



PERSONAL CHARACTERISTICS OF CLIENTS SERVED 



Characteristic 


Total 


Rehabili- 
tated* 


Othert 


Characteristic 


Total 


Rehabili- 
tated* 


Othert 


Total Number 


5,925 

1,547 
1,117 
1,294 
1,136 
831 

71 

340 

910 

2,084 

1,563 

520 

192 

96 

34 

115 

3,625 
705 
498 
435 
275 
165 
222 


1,491 

349 
293 
358 
278 
213 

11 

70 

214 

538 

400 

153 

49 

35 

13 

8 

834 

190 

143 

146 

81 

45 

52 


4,434 

1,198 
824 
936 
858 
618 

60 

270 

696 

1,546 

1,163 

367 

143 

61 

21 

107 

2,791 
515 
355 
289 
194 
120 
170 


Race 

White 


3,989 

1,928 

8 

3,879 
2,046 

2,735 
2,174 
1,016 

443 
5,482 
1,233 

4,249 
697 


1,105 

384 

2 

976 
515 

588 
661 
242 

214 

1,277 

266 

1,011 
173 


2,884 


Age 

Under 21 

21—30 

31—40 

41 — 50 


Negro 

Other 

Sex 

Male 

Female 

Marital Status 

Single 

Married 

Other 

Employment 

History (at Survey) 

Employed 

Unemployed 

Never Worked . . . 

Worked at Some 

Time 

Number on Welfare 
(at Survey) 


1,544 
6 

2,903 


Over 50 


1,531 


Education 

None 


2,147 


1—3 


1,513 


4—6 

7—9 

10—12 

H.S. Graduate . . . 
13—14 


774 
229 


15—16 


4,205 


College 


967 


Unknown 

Dependents 




3,238 

524 


1 




2 




3 




4 




5 




Over 5 









* Clients who were rehabilitated into employment during year (1,491). 
t Clients who were still receiving service at end of year (4,434). 



Maryland State Department of Education 



198 



TABLE 124^Cost of Vocational Rehabilitation Case Services Rendered : 
State of Maryland: Year Ending June 30, 1961 



Type of Service 



Number of 
Clients 



Average 
Cost 



Total 
Expenditures 



Total Expenditure 

Diagnosis 

Medical 

Psychiatric 

Psychological 

Occupational 

Surgery and Treatment 

Medical 

Psychiatric 

Surgical 

Dental 

Physical and occupational therapy 

Prosthetic Appliances 

Artificial appliances 

Braces 

Hearing aids 

Glasses and artificial eyes 

Surgical appliances 

Wheel chairs, hand and power operated . . 

Hospitalization and Convalescent Care 

Hospitalization 

Convalescent home care 

Nursing care 

Training and Training Materials 

Personal adjustment training 

Educational institutions 

Employment 

Correspondence 

Tutorial 

Training materials 

Maintenance and Transportation 
Maintenance 

Training 

Medical or physical restoration 

Placement 

Medical care 

Transportation 

Training 

Medical or physical restoration 

Placement 

Occupational Tools and Equipment (Clients) 

Miscellaneous (Other) 



6,494 



1,731 

56 

181 



94 
28 
135 

78 

77 



161 

78 

66 

120 

132 

26 



161 



95 

606 

12 

40 

114 

322 



394 

16 

35 

6 



384 

109 

75 

113 

6 



$19.77 
46.07 
45.43 
68.71 



45.05 
298.25 
153.27 
131.85 
112.09 



291.89 
71.90 

199 . 69 
24.29 
77.23 

119.76 



312.14 



67 


98 


250 


86 


228 


26 


96 


57 


64 


21 


34 


67 


281 


13 


63 


30 


33 


78 


32 


17 


53 


60 


18 


20 


6 


51 


64 


05 


38 


48 



$563,211.14 



34,216.73 
2,580.02 
8,223 . 15 
2,267.55 



4,234.64 

8,351.00 

20,692.00 

10,284.08 

8,630.58 



46,994.38 
6,608.06 

13,179.63 
2,914.68 

10,193.79 
3,113.71 



50,254 . 73 
4,236! 75 



6,457 . 79 
152,022.03 
2,739.08 
3,862.92 
7,320.38 
11,163.19 



110,765.18 

1,012.77 

1,182.17 

193.00 



20,582.93 

1,983.44 

488.05 

7,237.87 

230.86 



194 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



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Maryland State Department of Education 



195 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

Maryland State Teachers Colleges: Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1961 



Source or Purpose 



Bowie 



COPPIN 



Frostburg Salisbury 



Towson 



receipts 



Balance Forwarded from 1959-60 
General Fund Appropriation. . . . 

Special Fund Appropriation 

Appropriation Cancellations and 

Additions 

Budget Credits 

Nonbudgeted Receipts 

Net Transfers 

Total Funds Available. . . 



$305 
488,970 
103,509 

* (1,366) 

3,408 

12,630 

7,399 



$2,100 

399,478 

13,215 

968 

928 

2,835 

3,393 



$614,855 



$422,917 



$2,494 
823,031 
205,894 

(1,775) 
10,135 
52,359 
27,669 



$1,119,807 



$11,098 
511,108 
107,570 

*(7,033) 

2,322 

23,076 

8,110 



$29,156 

1,503,531 

317,039 

1,222 

8,386 

80,376 

20,240 



$656,251 $1,959,950 



DISBURSEMENTS 



General Administration 


$67,832 


$45,212 


S96.095 


$72,721 

2,43 i 
640 

644 
2,799 
1,453 

340 

371 
663 


$178,516 


Technical and Special Fees .... 


2,804 
130 

440 
1,907 


2,024 1,211 

2,160 6,446 

352 1 382 


3,000 
11,554 


Travel 


1,360 


Motor Vehicle Operation and 


810 
1.697 


714 
6,138 
2,679 
1,134 

555 

1,740 
1.082 


331 




5,256 


Supplies and Materials 

Equipment — Replacement .... 

Equipment — Additional 

Grants, Subsidies, and 


1,670 1,325 
150 842 
466 2,243 

789 1,242 
319 190 


8,722 

401 

1,525 

2,820 




1,181 








Total 


$76,507 

$218,253 
1,650 

440 

3,196 
702 
5,524 
4,270 
6,636 


$58,097 


$118,176 


$82,062 $214,666 


Instruction 


$215,441 
1,895 

1,047 

937 
9,615 

27,955 


$469,279 


.«287 .'ISO ii;87fi l.-lfi 


Technical and Special Fees .... 

Communication 

Travel 

Motor Vehicle Operation and 

Maintenance 

Constructual Services 

Supplies and Materials 

Equipment — Replacement .... 
Equipment — Additional 


25,665 7,620 

50 

2,178 1,129 

1,493 398 
2,709 1,694 

16,250 6,055 
4,935 3,336 

27,089 10,145 


85,123 
1,053 
3,311 

2,130 
7,335 

19,586 
5,426 

52,180 


Total 

Dietary Services 

Salaries and Wages 

Technical and Special Fees .... 

Food 

Motor Vehicle Operation and 

Maintenance 

Constructural Services 

Supplies and Materials 

Equipment — Replacement. . . . 
Equipment — Additional 


$240,671 

$40,458 
55,269 

459 

1,432 

506 


$256,890 

$15,540 
12,024 

1,665 
640 


$549,598 

$64,583 

4,518 

108,014 

3,591 
3,335 


$317,807 

$36,616 
38,614 

2,281 
2,376 
1,054 


$1,052,280 

$112,347 

2,527 

129,754 

139 
2,948 
7,203 
1,206 
2,242 


Total 


$98,124 


$29,209 


$184,041 

$136,497 

634 

10,908 

946 
43,695 
11,511 

228 
6,715 


$80,341 


$258,366 


Plant Operation and 
Maintenance 


$102,942 


$37,101 


$80,323 


$200,127 


Technical and Special Fees .... 

Fuel 

Motor Vehicle Operation and 

Maintenance 

Constructural Services 

Supplies and Materials 

Equipment — Replacement .... 
Equipment — Additional 


21,470 

1,243 

28,282 

5,290 

3,046 

127 


5,155 

148 

14,100 

3,336 

3,050 

618 


13,597 

670 

31,154 

6,732 

956 

518 


1,483 
31,491 

1,891 

43,800 

25,074 

5,450 

4,218 


Total 

Total Program Expenditures. . 

Refunds 

Activities Association 


$162,400 

$577,702 
1,981 
6,137 
4,070 
tl30 


$63,508 

$407,704 

1,256 


$211,134 $133,950 1 $313,534 

$1,062,949 $614,160 $1,838,846 

4,422 1,221 6,909 

25,455 14,437 23,200 

20,450 1 23,850 




; 7,301 15,740 


Other Expenditures 


t52 , 


356 118 12,192 






Total Disbursements 

Unexpended Balance Re- 
turned to Treasury .... 

Balance, June 30, 1961 ... 


$590,072 

$18,284 
$6,499 


$408,954 

$6,079 
$7,884 


$1,113,632 

$1,874 
$4,301 


$637,237 

$4,388 
$14,626 


$1,920,737 

$12,380 
$26,833 



* Denotes red figure. 
t Transferred to General Fund. 

Note: Disbursements for Summer School at Frostburg, Salisbury, and Towson are included under 
appropriate items in Instruction and Dietary Services. 



196 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

Maryland State Department of Education : Headquarters and Vocational 

Rehabilitation : Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1961 



Source or Purpose 



Headquarters 



Vocational 
Rehabilitation 



RECEIPTS 



Balance Forwarded from 1959-60 . 

General Fund Appropriation 

Federal Fund Appropriation 

Appropriation Cancellations 

Budget Credits 

Nonbudgeted Receipts 

Net Transfers 

Total Funds Available 



$34,460 

896,351 

87,291 

* (17,513) 

2,721 

21,789 

65,122 



$51,245 
462,888 
810,642 
* (35,450) 
3,598 



3,937 



$1,090,221 



$1,296,860 



DISBURSEMENTS 



Salaries 

Technical and Special Fees 

Communication 

Travel 

Motor Vehicle Operation and Maintenance. 

Contractual Services 

Supplies and Materials 

Equipment — Replacement 

Equipment — Additional 

Grants, Subsidies, and Contributions 

Fixed Charges 

Total 

Salaries 

Technical and Special Fees 

Communication 

Travel 

Motor Vehicle Operation and Maintenance 

Contractual Services 

Supplies and Materials 

Equipment — -Replacement 

Equipment — Additional 

Grants, Subsidies, and Contributions 

Fixed Charges 

Total 

Salaries 

Technical and Special Fees 

Communication 

Travel 

Motor Vehicle Operation and Maintenance 

Contractual Services 

Supplies and Materials 

Equipment — Replacement 

Equipment — Additional 

Grants, Subsidies, and Contributions 

Total 

Salaries 

Technical and Special Fees 

Communication 

Travel 

Contractual Services 

Supplies and Materials 

Equipment — Replacement 

Equipment — Additional 

Grants, Subsidies, and Contributions 

Fixed Charges 

Total 



Departmental and 

Financial 

Administration 

$212,866 

12,451 

7,314 

9,466 

1,902 

17,431 

6,232 

1,399 

4,775 

9 

3,002 



$276,847 

Supervisory and 

Consultative 

Services 

$305,988 

34,246 

8,639 

17,597 

4,851 

8,165 

6,617 

3,441 

4,826 

3,992 

1,200 



$399,562 

Administrative 

Services 

$174,550 

19,476 

4,929 

6,861 

2,242 

5,602 

3,738 

4,004 

995 



$222,397 

Library 

Extension 

Services 

$6,152 

50 



34 

75,025 

134 

5,255 
525 



$87,175 



Administration 

$50,842 

16 

1,567 

1,639 

423 

259 

525 

522 

361 

3,735 

398 



$60,287 
Placement 

AND 

Guidance 

$331,130 

9,239 

10,853 

18,161 



193 

3,417 

740 

1,782 

22,372 

28,126 



$426,013 



Case 
Services 



$ 581,693 



$581,693 

Disability 

Determinations 

(O.A.S.I.) 

$67,531 

85,771 

1,488 

2,386 

173 

1,498 

28 

1.054 

6,968 

4,800 



$171,697 



* Denotes red figure. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



197 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT— (Continued) 

Maryland State Department of Education: Headquarters and Vocational 
Rehabilitation: Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1961 



SOXmCE OR PtJRPOSE 



Headquarters 



Vocational 
Rehabilitation 



DISBURSEMENTS 



Grants, Subsidies, and Contributions 


$985,981 
$20,783 


Specialized 

Facilities for the 

Blind 

$8,258 

$1,247,948 










Total Disbursements 

Unexpended Balance Returned to 

Treasury 

Balance, June 30, 1961 


$1,006,764 

$56,464 
$26,993 


$1,247,948 

$18,170 
$30,742 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

Maryland State Teachers Colleges: Loans to Students — Title II-National 
Defense Education Act: Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1961 



Source or Purpose 


Bowie 


COPPIV 


Frostburg 


Salisbury 


TOWSON 


RECEIPTS 


Balance, July 1, 1960 

Receipts: 

State Funds 


$5,472 

832 
7,366 


$480 

1,242 
10,910 


$11,806 

1,740 
15,255 


$1,054 

411 
3,335 


$9,147 
2,911 




26,107 






Total Funds Available. . 


$13,670 


$12,632 


$28,801 


$4,800 


$38,165 


DISBURSEMENTS 


Loans to Students 


$12,838 
$832 


$11,619 
$1,013 


$22,550 
$6,251 


$3,398 
$1,402 


$21,895 


Balance, June 30, 1961 


$16,270 



Note: This program accounted for as "Miscellaneous Funds" by State Comptroller. 



198 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



Construction Accounts at 


Maryland State Teachers Colleges: 




Bowie 


COPPIN 


Source or Purpose 


Balance, 

July 1. 

1960 


Addi- 
tional 
Available 


Dis- 
bursed 


Balance, 

June 30, 

1961 


Balance, Addi- 
July 1, tional 
1960 Available 


Dis- 
bursed 


Balance, 

June 30, 

1961 


1 General Construction Loan of 1951 : 

2 Boiler plant and steam distribution 


$285 

'ill 
7,.505 

578 

10,350 
16,324 

6,280 
9,059 
3,230 

43l'677 
8,840 


1 

1 

$19,300 
50,000 
35,000 


*$285 

*77i 
978 

*578 

10,350 
9,800 

.... 

i',iii 

9,059 
3,230 

359,437 
8,796 

5,095 
2,591 
1,898 


$6,527 
6,524 

5,i69 

72,240 
44 

14,205 
47,409 
33,102 


$59,876 
6,630 

19,017 




$10,659 
5.967 

16,369 

*26i 
3,785 

278,7 ii 
7.040 

32.43 i 




4 General Construction Loan of 1953: 

5 Extension of main bldg.and Newell Hall. . . 

6 Equipment for gymnasium 

7 General Construction Loan of 1954: 

8 Equipment for residence liall 




10 General Construction Loan of 1955: 

11 Supplemental residence hall for 100 women 

12 Supplemental residence hall for 75 men. . . . 

13 Supplemental residence hall for To women . 




15 General Construction Loan of 1957: 

16 Construction of parking facilities 






18 Site improvements, including roads 




20 Convert old library to student bldg 

21 Refurbishing exterior of Newell Hall 

22 Construction of laboratory school 




24 Construction of auditorium-gymnasium . . . 


$49,217 
663 


26 General Construction Loan of 1958: 

27 Acquisition of land and properties 

28 Land 


2,648 




1 










'26i 
4,328 

28l',iii 
7,040 


$38,000 
615.000 
25.000 








32 Equipment new laboratory school 

33 Installation of showers and toilets 




35 Equipment new laboratory school 










543 


39 General Construction Loan of 1959: 




41 Remodeling of old laboratory school 


























48 Construction of gymnasium 




49 Construction — president's residence 




51 Construction of library 


2,400 






53 General Construction Loan of 1960: 

54 Equipment for new laboratory school 

55 Site improvement, new laboratory school. . 

56 Improvements to athletic field 






57 Equipment — dining hall and student 




58 Purchase of land and improvements 

59 Remodeling old laboratory school 

60 Construction of roadway, sidewalks 

61 Construction of women's residence haU. . . 




63 Construction of roads, walks, parking areas 

64 Modernize and extend fire alarm system . . . 

65 Extend electrical distribution system 

66 Rewire adm. and old campus school bldgs. . 

67 Construction of two exits— auditorium .... 

68 Enclose stairways in women's dormitory.. . 

69 Plans and specifications for infirmary 

70 Plans and specifications for add'l dininghall 

71 Survey and plans for add'lathletic field 






5.569 


74 Construction of laboratory school 






155.060 459,940 
25,000 




1 






76 TOTAL 


$494,899 


$104,300 ' S413.979 1 $185,220 1 


$378,263 I $678,000 


$510,283 $545,980 












1 











' Includes the following amounts reverted: line 2- 
49— $1; total— $2,449. 



-$120;5— $349;6— $74:11— $531;12— $397;13— $535;23— $32;33— $194;37— $216; 



Maryland State Department of Education 



199 



Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1961 






















Frostiiuhg 


Salisbury 


Towson 




Balance, 

July 1. 

1960 


Addi 

tiona 

Availa 


Dis- 
ble ^'^^'^ 


Balance, 

June 30, 

1961 


Balance, 

July 1. 

1960 


Addi- 
tional 
Available 


Dis- 
bursed 


Balance, 

June 30, 

1961 


Balance. 

July 1, 

1960 


Addi- 
tional 
Available 


Dis- 
bursed 


Balance. 

June 30, 

1961 


1 
2 
3 

4 
5 
6 

7 
8 
9 

10 
11 
12 
13 
14 

15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 

26 

27 
28 
29 
30 
31 
32 
33 
34 
35 
36 
37 
38 

39 
40 
41 
42 
43 
44 
45 
46 
47 
48 
49 
50 
51 
52 

53 
54 
55 
56 

57 
58 
59 
60 
61 
62 
63 
64 
65 
66 
67 
68 
69 
70 
71 
72 
73 
74 
75 


1 
1 

43 
12 

305 
50 

8 


$247 

',176 
.175 

582 

,994 

,900 
194 

631 
000 
156 


$20,00 
60,00 
35,00 
60,00 

425,00 


'. *1 
*1 

12 

263 
41 
3 

) 13 
) 54 
) 

) 50 
) 101 


$247 

',i76 
,175 

424 
'194 

isy 

520 
131 

831 
900 
5 
352 
938 


43 

42 
8, 
5 

6. 

5, 

34, 

9, 

323, 


582 

994 
476 

442 
480 
025 

169 
100 
995 
648 
062 


$2,490 

6,666 
9.501 

12,954 

337,203 

44,947 

3,500 


$3 

75 


i66 

000 


$895 

6,666 

439 

1 2,923 

332,061 

*44,947 

3,500 

2,969 
2,404 


$1,595 
9,662 

"31 

5,262 

isi 

72,596 


$2,699 
l',279 

9.382 

183.553 

177 

31,106 
32.944 

102 
50,000 
185,548 


$25 

15 

40 

13 

22 

1 

3 

5 

25 


000 
000 
000 
300 
000 
600 
000 
000 
000 


*$2,699 

7.883 
183,547 

*177 

12.i52 
21.041 

3.469 
146,660 

25,666 
736 

7,511 
10,290 
18,813 

1,034 

2,621 
23,889 


$l',279 

1,499 
6 

18.948 
11,003 

102 
46,591 
38.888 

14,264 
32,489 
3,010 
3,187 
566 
3,000 
2,979 
1,111 


76 


$424,055 


$600,00 


) $544,082 1 


$479,973 


$416,595 


$78,100 1 


$406,078 


$88,617 


$496,784 


$149,900 


$466,862 


$179,822 



200 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



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221 



TABLE XVII— Disbursements for Debt Service: Maryland Public Schools: 
Year Ending June 30, 1961 



Local Unit 



Total Debt 
Service 



School Construction Debt Service 



Long-term County Bonds 



Redemption Interest 



State Loan 



Redemption Interest 



Total State 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel . 
Baltimore City , 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester .... 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery . . 
Prince George's 
Queen Anne's. . 
St. Mary's .... 
Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington ... 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



*$32,834,165 

604,319 
2,727,776 
5,763,786 
7,587,303 

258,807 

248,492 
350,548 
666,745 
260,048 
*278,160 

782,301 
197,411 
760,983 
415,486 
139,341 

4,778,783 

4,367,048 

152,125 

149,770 

147,803 

302,893 

1,008,204 

623,615 

262,418 



t$14,195,458 

161,000 
1,353,000 
3,628,000 
2,901,000 
tlOO,000 

90,000 
100,000 
300,000 

49,000 
116,000 

210,000 
100,000 
394,000 
157,000 
50,000 

1,449,458 

2,057,000 

50,000 



145,000 
400,000 
285,000 
100,000 



t$9,110,582 

47,869 

914,169 

2,135,786 

2,503,951 

164,506 

61,096 

7,500 

125,175 

10,153 

79,806 

212,928 
26,688 

254,490 
56,433 
22,575 

989,456 

1,055,735 

25,788 



48,062 

63,275 
245,298 
131,480 

28,363 



$7,227,622 



324,797 
398,844 



1,826,122 
74,284 

80,914 
189,990 
168,509 
147,797 

68,129 

260,767 
59,385 
99,612 

154,128 
49,635 

1,605,670 
829,084 

58,971 
116,387 

87,154 

85,157 
262,941 
178,238 
101,107 



$2,297,293 



70,653 
61,763 



356,230 
20,017 

16.482 
53,058 
73,061 
53,098 
11,015 

98,606 
11,338 
12,881 
47,925 
17,131 

734,199 

425,229 

17,366 

33,383 

12,587 

9,461 
99,965 
28,897 
32,948 



* Includes $3,210 principal paid on short-term loan for current expenses not included in other columns. 
t Includes $15,000 principal and $6,675 interest on long-term current expense loan. 



222 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



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232 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 





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3 CO »0 CD ■* CO (N <M 



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cocooo o CD OS r- CO c^ OS ^^ 

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CO oo OS o) c^ lO CO CO CO O oo CO ■* »c icoor-o 



40 -^ Cq CO !-« CO O -^ 1-1 C^ "5 1-t -^ 1-H 



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Maryland Statr Department of Education 



233 



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234 Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 

TABLE XXIII — Enrollment by Subject, Excluding Duplicates: Each 



X 


Local Unit 
ame of High School 


Total 
Enroll- 
ment 


Core 


English 


Social 
Studies 


Science 


Mathe- 
matics 


Latin 




B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B G 


B G 


B j 


G 




)3, 333 91,467 
4,051 3.937i 


n,647 
470 

'58 
25 

172 
43 
29 
44 
99 

760 

293 

467 

11,798 

"8 
22 
369 
464 
325 
588 
589 
579 
47 
964 
556 
742 
458 
1,111 
755 
825 
731 
922 
875 
868 

199 
62 
62 
44 
31 

.. 


J9,576 
377 

'28 
19 

ieo 

32 
15 
36 

87 

662 

249 
413 

11,264 

"e 

12 
302 
479 
297 
521 
582 
514 

49 
965 
542 
729 
422 
1,130 
665 
736 
722 
873 
808 
910 

167 
47 
52 
36 
32 


31,634 

3,570 
102 
112 
954 
954 
385 
215 
238 
468 
72 

"76 

8,036 
1,025 
344 
470 
337 
925 
574 
424 
845 
143 
1,021 
792 
928 
208 

7,431 
881 
832 
275 
811 
957 
1,099 
1.333 
204 
201 
109 
328 

290 

ill 

607 

284 

274 

17 

32 

95S 
302 

18S 
81 

196 
76 
93 
22 


31,856 58,55l|. 


.8,400 69,774 ( 


)3,522 

3,149 
95 
110 
741 
809 
290 
304 
189 
322 
106 
87 
96 

5, 45 J 
55J 
224 
38- 
22c 
634 
38( 
38. 
76( 
36( 
67i 
39; 
47 

15,73 
42 
56 
IS 
48 
57 
56 
68 
42 
62 
43 
71 
58 
79 
4 

96 
54 
72 
53 
1,13 
66 
73 
72 
87 
80 
91 

64 
27 
23 

6 

76 

2C 

16 

7 

13 
6 
£ 

1 


81,938 


r4,076 


3,945 
334 

'91 
98 
40 
27 
15 
63 

1.56 
71 

'43 

'21 
21 

801 
105 
74 
28 
66 
63 
84 
70 

'59 

'26 
37 

'26 

56 
55 

'45 
'i2 

35 
35 

78 
62 

"2 
14 


4,864 


1 A 


i 


3,558 


3,469 


1 
3,372 
107 
123 
950 
875 
379 
176 
201 
395 
70 

■96 

7,734 
881 
335 
528 
323 
929 
620 
385 
845 
135 
988 
738 
851 
176 

7,471 
890 
907 
298 
877 
940 
1,031 
1,249 
203 
188 
142 
333 

361 

ii2 

597 
296 
228 
31 
42 

92C 
276 
185 
93 
177 
62 
96 
2' 


3,410 
72 
104 
870 
850 
316 
290 
202 
410 
116 
99 
81 

6,078 
742 
294 
393 
243 
696 
493 
424 
741 
389 
704 
424 
535 

17,437 
680 
677 
190 
608 
706 
823 
975 
526 
648 
407 
801 
589 
842 
47 
964 
556 
742 
569 
1,111 
755 
825 
731 
922 
875 
868 

711 

318 

269 

61 

63 

809 
230 
164 
73 
151 
76 
93 
22 


3,319 

87 
90 
812 
814 
294 
312 
223 
402 
116 
99 
70 

7,805 

749 

282 

355 

275 

892 

) 465 

424 

)l 804 

) 610 

! 1,021 

i 792 

5 928 

208 

1 17,641 
5 698 
■ 783 
- 189 
5 638 
9 728 
5 881 

2 997 
9 495 

3 646 
9 390 

3 818 
2 589 

7 824 
9 47 

5 964 
2 556 
9 742 

4 569 
1,111 

5 755 

6 825 

2 731 

3 922 

8 875 
868 

7 735 
7 312 

4 299 
2 61 
4 63 

2 765 

6 187 
165 

7 66 
4 156 
2 76 

6 93 

7 22 


3,162 
93 
98 
789 
783 
269 
311 
198 
332 
106 
87 
96 

7,088 
557 
212 
309 
231 
814 
457 
385 
822 
548 
988 
738 
851 
176 

16,031 
589 
661 
191 
560 
588 
576 
712 
417 
608 
394 
722 
582 
771 
49 
965 
542 
729 
531 
1,130 
665 
736 
722 
873 
808 
910 

647 

271 

235 

67 

74 

71C 
16S 
16£ 
7C 

ir 

62 
9f 
2' 


404 


2 
3 
4 
5 
6 


Oldtown Sr.-Jr 

Flintstone Sr.-Jr 

Fort Hill Sr.-Jr 

Allegany Sr.-Jr 


IO2I 

112 

1,012 

979 

385 

387 

281 

497 

116 

99 

81 

8,798 
1,025 
344 
471 
337 
926 
574 
717 
845 
610 
1,021 
792 
928 
208 

19,232 
881 
832 
277 
811 
957 
1,108 
1,355 
573 
665 
434 
916 
589 
869 
47 
964 
556 
742 
569 
1,111 
755 
825 
731 
922 
875 
868 

806 

346 

336 

61 

63 

95S 
302 

18f 
81 

19f 
7f 
9S 
25 


107 
123 
985 
973 
379 
394 
238 
449 
106 
87 
96 

8,601 
996 
336 
537 
3.55 
938 
620 
634 
884 
548 
988 
738 
851 
176 

18,742 
891 
910 
298 
877 
940 
1,039 
1,262 
505 
667 
439 
854 
582 
815 
49 
965 
542 
729 
534 
1,130 
665 
736 
722 
873 
808 
91C 

76S 

347 

28C 

67 

74 

92C 
27f 
19£ 

9r 

17 
65 
9( 
2" 


107 
123 
955 
954 
379 
234 
206 
434 
70 

'96 

7,931 
996 
333 
537 
355 
935 
618 
385 
884 
135 
988 
738 
851 
176 

7,477 
891 
910 
298 
877 
940 
1,033 
1,249 
203 
188 
142 
333 

301 

ii2 

601 

300 

228 

31 

42 

920 
276 
195 
93 
171 
62 
96 
27 


102 
112 
954 
915 
385 
183 
230 
435 
72 

'si 

7,927 
958 
345 
460 
333 
915 
574 
424 
826 
143 

1,021 
792 
928 
208 

7,414 
875 
821 
277 
811 
957 
1,097 
1,333 
204 
201 
109 
328 

290 

iii 

607 

284 

274 

17 

32 

943 
302 

179 
81 
190 

76 
93 
22 


i25 
123 
22 


7 
8 
9 


VaUey Sr.-Jr 

Mt. Savage Sr.-Jr 

Beall Sr.-Jr 


44 
15 
75 


10 
11 
12 

13 A 


Cresaptown Jr 

Penn. Ave. Elem.-Jr . . . 
Beall Elem.-Jr 


187 


14 
15 


Glen Burnie Sr 


82 


16 




38 


17 
18 
19 
20 


Southern Sr.-Jr 

Severua Parle Sr.-Jr .... 
Brooklyn Sr.-Jr 


'25 
42 


21 






22 
23 


George Fox Jr 




24 






25 






26 


R-itPS .Tr 






926 


28 
29 
30 


Catonsville Sr 

MilfordMiUSr 


107 
79 
47 


31 




78 


32 




91 


33 


Dundalk Sr 


79 


34 




75 


35 
36 
37 
38 
39 
40 
41 


Hereford Sr.-Jr 

Ridgelv Jr.-Dulaney Sr. 
SoUers Point Sr.-Jr... 
Sparrows Point Sr.-Jr 

Catonsville Jr 

Johnnycake Jr 


'50 

16 
59 


42 




28 


43 




13 


44 

45 
46 
47 


Dumbarton Jr 

Towsontown Jr 

North Point Jr 


53 
65 


48 




58 


49 
50 


Golden Ring Jr 

Park-villp .Tr 


'28 


51 Stemmers Run Jr 

52 Middle River Jr 

53 Cat.vekt 


46 


54 
55 
56 


Calvert County Sr.-Jr. . 
W. S. Brooks Sr.-Jr . . . . 


38 

"8 


57 Mt. Harmony Jr 

58 OABnLiNi? 


99 


59 
60 
61 
62 
63 
64 


North Caroline Sr 

Lockerman Sr.-Jr .... 

Preston Sr.-Jr 

Federakburg Sr.-Jr.. . 
Greensboro Jr 


74 

io 

15 


65 


Ridgely Jr 


















' 









Maryland State Department of Education 23c 

Maryland County Public High School: Fall of 1960 













Agriculture 


Industrial 


Home Economics 














French 


Spai 


ish 










_ Business 
Subjects 


Physical 
Education 


Music 


Art— Arts 






• 


t 




t 






and Crafts 










Gen. 


Voc. 


Arts 


Edu. 


General 


Voc. 














B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


B 


B 


G 


B 


B 


G 


G 


B 


G 


B G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


10,085 


13286 


4,485 


3,954 


442 


3,238 


52,936 


353 


2,916 


9 


145,302 


3,46 


3 10,075 


23,476 80,389 


73,585 


48,136 


50,699 


36.233 


35,226 


1 


125 


191 


105 


112 


65 


40 


2,037 




136 




1.706 


52 


3 458 


1,001 2,795 


2, .582 


2,539 


2,718 


1,843 


1,842 


2 








... 1 65 




15 








47 


4 


3 


102 


104 


48 


87 


30 


41 


ii 








. 




'46 


45 








43 


5 


2 




88 


100 


88 


112 






4 






'•28 


8 






535 




'45 




443 


11 


9 '7i 


289 


661 


600 


515 


542 


397 


373 


5 


'ii 


'25 


77 


104 






443 




25 




417 


4 


9 121 


231 


636 


582 


620 


706 


407 


464 


(•) 


34 


42 










217 




27 




161 


11 


5 108 


184 


262 


238 


277 


246 


191 


196 


7 


8 


24 


... 








225 








155 


7 


8 115 


119 


275 


253 


263 


268 


218 


217 


S 


52 


50 










189 








128 


2 


21 


31 


221 


188 


178 


232 


180 


155 


fl 


20 


50 










252 




'39 




206 


4 


7 22 


147 


254 


228 


254 


236 


240 


213 


10 














116 








106 








116 


106 


116 


106 






11 






























99 


87 


99 


87 


'99 


'87 


12 








... 






















81 


96 


81 


96 


81 


96 


13 


889 


1,153 


°230 


°158 




39 


4,839 


8 


229 




4,250 


25 


2 479 


1,678 


7,061 


6,022 


3,820 


4,339 


3,276 


2,774 


14 


148 


162 










421 




180 




117 


23 


3 149 


441 


642 


235 


143 


424 


175 


159 


15 


28 


48 


'74 


41 






108 








73 




7 74 


119 


323 


268 


60 


70 


39 


15 


16 


116 


165 


35 


23 






155 








83 


1 


2 91 


265 


312 


254 


104 


230 


60 


61 


17 


51 


52 








'39 


153 








223 




47 


117 


241 


182 


215 


227 


124 


135 


18 


122 


201 


'39 


'28 






493 


"8 






593 




77 


248 


723 


678 


479 


492 


623 


463 


19 


133 


154 


"60 


°10 






324 








180 




28 


259 


127 


128 


59 


61 


16 


18 


20 














424 








385 




. 




717 


634 


132 


127 


149 


119 


21 


■74 


i27 


22 


'56 






633 




'49 




613 




'13 


229 


454 


384 


544 


607 


76 


35 


22 


10 


7 










370 








350 








600 


541 


328 


283 


328 


292 


23 


23 


33 










681 








639 








998 


9.55 


227 


367 


163 


146 


24 


97 


100 










507 








476 








792 


738 


778 


721 


778 


721 


25 


87 


104 










570 








518 








924 


849 


543 


554 


537 


434 


26 


























. 




208 


176 


208 


176 


208 


176 


27 


1,866 


2,469 


"1193 


•1023 


37 


279 


11,315 


11 


t362 


7 


} 10,006 




, 1,212 


4,246 


19,092 


18,556 


12,488 


12,792 


12,075 


11,378 


28 


77 


115 


112 


73 






689 








507 




228 


545 


849 


850 


137 


226 


78 


102 


29 


184 


291 


80 


68 






347 








266 




147 


405 


832 


902 


114 


154 


85 


108 


30 


26 


53 


19 


17 






174 




'46 




75 




76 


203 


272 


293 


35 


44 


26 


41 


31 


123 


239 


•167 


M57 






236 


"4 


44 




239 




196 


285 


811 


877 


109 


209 


106 


132 


32 


116 


113 


126 


103 






498 




34 


'6 


J 308 




65 


451 


957 


940 


109 


307 


78 


55 


33 


130 


111 


77 


37 




24i 


447 




t77 




331 




92 


697 


1,076 


1.029 


147 


229 


213 


101 


34 


120 


144 


169 


101 






686 




1112 




408 




180 


806 


1,295 


1,153 


120 


342 


123 


72 


35 


121 


123 






'37 


'38 


285 








230 




53 


124 


573 


505 


403 


328 


355 


285 


36 


102 


123 


■58 


■42 






394 








357 




41 


129 


665 


667 


505 


462 


411 


430 


37 


22 


25 










276 




'28 




246 




10 


90 


434 


439 


366 


370 


326 


332 


38 


104 


110 










532 




t27 




382 




48 


235 


916 


854 675 


656 


629 


546 


39 


38 


73 


'74 


'86 






381 








401 








589 


578 


525 


491 


511 


507 


40 


72 


85 


38 


55 






601 






" 


544 




'45 


m 


860 


805 


566 


612 


595 


525 


41 














47 


"7 






i 49 








47 


49 


47 


49 


47 


49 


42 


i22 


148 


'39 


'37 






591 








f)34 








964 


965 


884 


868 


869 


800 


43 


30 


43 










384 








360 








556 


542 


.556 


.542 


555 


530 


44 


80 


144 


'36 


'2i 






489 








491 








742 


729 


714 


690 


657 


613 


45 


64 


99 


48 


26 






325 








328 




'31 


'75 


567 


535 


462 


428 


463 


430 


46 


72 


86 










697 








745 








1,111 


1,130 


1,111 


1,130 


1,111 


1,130 


47 


37 


39 


'34 


'57 






489 








439 








755 


665 


755 


665 


687 


583 


48 


27 


57 










542 








494 








825 


736 


822 


728 


825 


736 


49 


20 


21 


'59 


'88 






461 








469 








731 


722 


715 


686 


705 


696 


50 


90 


134 


23 


17 






639 








605 








922 


873 


868 


858 


877 


797 


51 


32 


39 


34 


38 






622 








620 








875 


808 


875 


808 


875 


808 


52 


57 


54 










483 








478 








868 


910 


868 


910 


868 


910 


S3 


42 


66 








95 


347 








373 




116 


193 


701 


553 


463 


490 


231 


133 


54 


24 


32 










235 








212 




56 


104 


275 


179 


154 


144 






55 


18 


34 








'95 


112 








156 




60 


89 


302 


233 


246 


210 


107 




56 






















5 








61 


67 




62 


61 


■59 


57 








... 






















63 


74 


'63 


74 


63 


74 


58 


39 


42 


20 


19 




209 


642 








609 




218 


397 


823 


791 


615 


696 


275 


279 


59 


16 


24 








107 


172 








110 




138 


199 


225 


204 


127 


1781 84 


94 


60 


23 


18 








60 


98 








109 




25 


109 


152 


173 


150 


183 




61 












21 


36 








61 




23 


38 


74 


79 


15 


20 




62 






'26 


'19 




21 


145 








144 




32 


51 


181 


150 


132 


130 






63 














76 








62 








76 


62 


76 


62 


76 


'62 


64 














93 








96 








93 i 96 


93 


96 


93 


96 


65 














22 








27 








22 


27 


22 


27 


22 


27 



236 Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 

TABLE XXIII — Continued — Enrollment by Subject, Excluding Duplicates: Each 





Total 










Social 






Mathe- 






Local Unit 


Enroll- 


Core i 


English 1 


Studies 


Science | 


matics 


Latin 


— 


ment 




1 






















Name of High School 






























B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 




2,392 

184 


2,475 
201 


350 


297 


2,032 
184 


2,170 
201 


2,003 
165 


2,162 
199 


2,200 
150 


2,104 
153 


1,983 
111 


1,933 
128 


27 


76 


67 Francis Scott Kcv Sr . . . 




68 Westminster Sr 


487 


540 






487 


540 


487 


540 


440 


438 


329 


349 


27 


76 


69 North Carroll Sr 1 


227 


249 






227 


249 


222 


243 


174 


173 


144 


144 






70 Mount Airy Sr 


129 


163 






129 


163 


124 


163 


106 


118 


1001 


103 






71 Taneytown Sr.-Jr 


202 


204 






202 


204 


202 


204 


177 


165 


177. 


169 






72 SykesviUe Sr.-Jr 


280 


280 






280 


280 


280 


280 


270 


231 


250; 


222 






73 Robert Moton Sr.-Jr... 


94 


111 


44 


42 


50 


69 


50 


69 


94 


99 


83 


91 






74 Charles Carroll Jr 


44 


43 


44 


43 










44 


43 


44 


43 






75 Manchester Jr 


99 


80 


39 


20 


60 


60 


60 


60 


99 


80 


99 


80 






76 Westminster Jr 


339 


308 


13 


6 


316 


294 


316 


294 


339 


308 


339 


308 






77 Hampstead Jr 


72 


70 


33 


20 


39 


50 


39 


50 


72 


70 


72 


70 






78 New Windsor Jr 


69 


62 


52 


50 


17 


12 


17 


12 


69 


62 


69 


62 






79 Elmer A. Wolfe Jr . . . . 


60 


56 


60 


56 










60 


56 


60 


56 






80 Mount Airy Jr 


106 


108 


65 


60 


41 


48 


41 


48 


106 


108 


106 


108 






81 Cecil 


1,914 
206 
247 


1,970 
207 
255 






1,913 
206 
246 


1,970 
207 
255 


1,903 
197 
245 


1,961 
200 
253 


1,732 
139 
222 


1,649 
121 
217 


1,689 
142 
201 


1,582 

87 

207 


48 
2 


85 


82 Elkton Sr 


12 


83 Bohemia Manor Sr.-Jr. 




84 Perry ville Sr.-Jr 


250 


298 






250 


298 


250 


298 


214 


224 


229 


249 


29 


37 


85 North East Sr.-Jr 


341 


369 






341 


369 


341 


369 


315 


300 


299 


300 


17 


36 


86 Rising Sun Sr.-Jr 


386 


389 






386 


389 


386 


389 


358 


335 


334 


287 






87 G.W.Carver Sr.-Jr.... 


82 


78 






82 


78 


82 


78 


82 


78 


82 


78 






88 Elkton Jr 


402 

1,524 

428 


374 

1,523 
423 


336 


285 


402 

1,188 
428 


374 

1,237 
423 


402 

1,125 
428 


374 

1,176 
423 


402 

1,310 
369 


374 

1,315 
329 


402 

1,273 
336 


374 

1,186 
279 


88 
32 




89 Charles 


73 


90 La Plata Sr.-Jr 


34 


91 Bel Alton Sr.-Jr 


190 


226 


53 


48 


137 


177 


125 


166 


156 


198 


168 


174 






92 Pomonkey Sr.-Jr 


353 


320 


186 


152 


167 


168 


116 


125 


258 


283 


261 


251 






93 Lackey Sr.-Jr 


360 
42 


352 
32 


42 


32 


360 


352 


360 


345 


334 
42 


303 
32 


315 
42 


280 
32 


56 


39 








36 
46 


37 
49 






36 
46 


37 
49 


36 
46 


37 
49 


36 
46 


37 
49 


36 
46 


37 
49 






96 Hughesville Jr 




97 Malcolm Jr 


69 

1,371 
323 

281 


84 

1,321 
344 
283 


55 

1.59 

60 


53 
142 
"55 


14 

1,212 
323 
221 


31 

1,179 
344 

228 


14 

1,187 
322 
219 


31 

1,143 
343 
227 


69 

1,165 
238 
227 


84 

1,083 
222 
225 


69 

1,132 
232 
212 


84 

980 
204 
202 


47 
30 
17 






78 


99 Cambridge Sr ... 


40 


1 00 No. Dorchester Sr.-Jr . . 


38 


101 So. Dorchester Sr.-Jr .. , 


114 


105 






114 


105 


114 


104 


109 


79 


92 


65 






102 Mace's Lane Sr.-Jr ... . 


377 


324 


99 


87 


278 


237 


256 


204 


315 


292 


320 


244 






103 Cambridge Jr 


223 
53 


222 
43 






223 
53 


222 
43 


223 
53 


222 
43 


223 
53 


222 
43 


223 
53 


222 
43 






104 St. Clair Elem.-Jr 




105 Frederick 


3.374 

673 

68 

355 


3,228 

648 

82 

385 


2,066 
206 


1,945 
205 


1,308 

673 

68 

149 


1,283 

648 

82 

180 


1,133 

564 

68 

124 


1,131 

537 

82 

173 


2,871 

511 

60 

302 


2,647 

461 

58 

328 


2,831 

403 

17 

310 


2,669 

363 

58 

311 


213 
67 


256 


106 Frederick Sr 


64 


107 Lincoln Sr 




108 Middletowii Sr.-Jr 


46 


109 Emmitsburg Sr.-Jr .... 


127 


101 


79 


57 


48 


44 


48 


44 


108 


85 


119 


95 






no Thurmont Sr.-Jr 


362 


325 


227 


206 


135 


119 


99 


90 


317 


267 


321 


270 


38 


44 


Ill Brunswick Sr.-Jr 


273 


278 


165 


167 


108 


111 


106 


107 


227 


207 


226 


218 






112 Walkersville Sr.-Jr ... . 


311 


289 


184 


19C 


127 


99 


124 


98 


296 


265 


242 


240 


5 


5 


113 Elm Street Jr 


304 

812 


259 

772 


304 

812 


259 

772 










252 
709 


209 
678 


304 
800 


259 
766 


33 
56 


31 


114 West Frederick Jr 


66 


115 Liberty Jr 


89 


89 


89 


89 










89 


89 


89 


89 








1,051 
403 


1,009 
356 


225 
1.56 


183 
122 


822 
245 


825 
233 


824 
245 


825 
233 


951 
375 


795 
276 


918 
342 


777 
275 


19 
19 


32 


117 No. Garrett Sr.-Jr 


32 


118 So. Garrett Sr.-Jr 


579 


592 






577 


592 


579 


592 


507 


458 


507 


441 






119 Route 40 Jr 


26 
43 

3,619 
1,078 


28 
33 

3,588 
1,077 


26 
43 

2,045 
450 


28 
33 

1,992 
406 


1,566 
628 


1,596 
671 


1,473 
579 


1,511 
616 


26 
43 

2,698 
913 


28 
33 

2,539 
849 


26 
43 

3,253 
937 


28 
33 

3,008 
862 


233 

75 




120 Kitzmiller Jr. . . 






280 


122 Bel Air Sr.-Jr 


1 102 


123 Edgewood Sr.-Jr 


521 


515 


3H 


324 


199 


191 


207 


189 


328 


310 


508 


411 


35 


35 


1 24 Havre de Grace Sr.-Jr . . 


43f 


472 


283 


292 


155 


181 


14C 


181 


302 


301 


38f 


389 


56 


59 


125 Aberdeen Sr.-Jr 


674 


67S 


422 


446 


252 


232 


251 


232 


497 


462 


597 


590 


4^ 


52 


126 Central Consol. Sr.-Jr.. 


222 


171 


134 


112 


8f 


5S 


8C 


5C 


172 


122 


195 


149 






127 North Harford Sr.-Jr.. 


522 


525 


346 


315 


176 


21( 


15C 


191 


344 


356 


m 


46^ 


23 


32 


1 28 Havre de Grace 






























Consolidated Sr.-Jr. . 


164 


149 


96 


97 


68 


52 


66 


52 


141 


138 


155 


143 







Maryland State Department of Education 
Vlaryland County Public High School: Fall of 1960 



237 







Agriculture 


Industrial 


Home Economics 












French 


Spanish 










Business 
Subjects 


Physical 
Education 


Music 


Art Arts 




„ 1 




T,j 






and Crafts 








Gen. 


Voc. 


Arts 


Edu 


General 


Voc. 










B G 


B 


G 


B 


B 


B |g 


B 


B G 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


66 


185 


245 


. . 1 


1 


123 


1,485 




40 




1,27c 


166 


433 


830 


2,183 


2,130 


1,747 


1,994 


79£ 


704 


67 


IE 


22 








59 


117 








lie 


44 


46 


117 


158 


138 


164 


185 






6S 


45 


89 










358 




'40 




242 


41 


152 


207 


348 


373 


186 


272 


'67 


ii4 


69 


2(1 


36 








"31 


132 








138 




92 


1,50 


219 


214 


128 


207 






70 


25 


27 








33 


65 








82 


'i< 


49 


119 


118 


115 


62 


117 






71 


28 


35 










135 








107 


17 


41 


58 


201 


198 


183 


173 


'42 


37 


72 


42 


31 










164 








131 




35 


63 


255 


255 


141 


202 


70 


69 


73 




5 










73 








38 


'45 


18 


26 


94 


110 


94 


111 


21 


23 


74 














25 








25 








44 


43 


44 


43 


19 


18 


75 














47 








43 








99 


80 


99 


80 


52 


37 


76 














182 








161 








339 


308 


339 


308 


339 


308 


w 














72 








70 








72 


70 


72 


70 


















69 








28 








69 


62 


69 


62 


'69 


34 


n 






















56 








60 


56 


60 


56 


60 




50 














'46 








44 








106 


108 


106 


108 


60 


'64 


ii 


120 


131 


88 


83 




t88 


1,393 


1 


t21 




1,217 


111 


348 


706 


1,649 


1,593 


921 


922 


394 


367 


§2 


47 


50 










100 




t21 






47 


95 


207 


145 


95 


29 


26 


26 


20 


^? 


26 


31 








'24 


173 


"i 






isi 


24 


45 


78 


211 


198 


85 


90 


82 


83 


i4 


15 


14 










222 








217 


14 


37 


74 


211 


251 


165 


165 






i5 






38 


33 






226 








243 




74 


137 


234 


236 


201 


192 


126 


136 


!6 






50 


50 




t64 


250 








247 




91 


191 


377 


371 


181 


223 






!7 














82 








50 


26 


6 


19 


79 


68 


72 


60 






!8 


32 


36 










340 








309 








392 


374 


188 


166 


160 


134 


39 


101 


117 






53 


245 


517 








661 


93 


219 


406 


1,222 


1,084 


823 


874 


460 


250 


)0 


30 


26 








59 


94 








251 




105 


174 


310 


219 


220 


235 


148 


5 


^ 


14 


18 








71 


89 








82 


'46 


5 


30 


165 


182 


87 


93 


40 




12 


42 


57 








100 


182 








43 


53 


43 


94 


233 


232 


159 


199 


181 


iss 


3 


15 


16 








41 








144 




66 


108 


321 


253 


166 


145 


77 


61 


i4 












42 
















42 


28 


42 


32 






5 










22 












'37 








36 


37 


36 


37 


'14 




16 










31 


'is 










49 








46 


49 


46 


49 






17 














'69 








55 








69 


84 


67 


84 




'29 


18 


151 


181 








115 


657 






2 


546 


54 


213 


395 


1,255 


1,106 


897 


917 


394 


401 


19 


75 


87 










169 








182 




130 


167 


312 


284 


162 


197 


139 


160 


K) 


30 


42 








'4i 


191 








175 




66 


102 


215 


180 


192 


215 






1 














97 








51 




11 


48 


105 


81 






32 


io 


2 


'46 


52 








'74 


200 






"2 


138 


'54 


6 


78 


347 


296 


267 


240 






3 






























223 


222 


223 


222 


223 


222 


4 






























53 


43 


53 


43 






15 


261 


321 


44 


45 




t293 


1,823 








1,754 




601 


865 


3,009 


2,641 


1,957 


2,112 


1,483 


1,301 


i6 


121 


134 








104 


292 








279 




290 


401 


440 


296 


112 


120 


74 




7 














63 








61 






16 


68 


82 


47 


56 


19 


ifi 


8 






44 


'45 




'59 


146 








122 




'54 


117 


288 


247 


230 


275 


164 


194 


9 


"s 


7 










98 








101 








127 


101 


103 


82 


79 


57 





6 


9 








t55 


197 








153 




'95 


iei 


362 


325 


222 


264 


192 


150 


1 


38 


61 










77 








58 




87 


98 


241 


234 


90 


121 


64 


47 


2 


45 


65 








75 


118 








215 




75 


72 


294 


254 


226 


292 


173 


177 


3 


15 


18 










186 








169 








304 


259 


276 


236 


246 


209 


4 


28 


27 










557 








507 








796 


754 


562 


577 


472 


426 


5 














89 








89 








89 


89 


89 


89 






6 


78 


71 








190 


577 








487 


131 


128 


342 


736 


542 


608 


678 


367 


274 


7 












118 


263 








231 




21 


107 


272 


196 


238 


262 






8 


'78 


'l\ 








72 


314 








256 


i31 


107 


235 


395 


285 


344 


388 


298 


2i3 


9 






























26 


28 


26 


28 


26 


28 

































43 


33 






43 


33 


il 


368 


440 


154 


107 




185 


2,072 


11 


40 


4 


1,656 




556 


1,193 


2,648 


2,335 


2,199 


2.351 


1 , 403 


1 , 659 


2 


133 


170 


69 


63 




66 


610 


1 






457 




149 


363 


807 


686 


632 


631 


542 


579 


3 


28 


32 


32 


14 






322 


3 






232 




56 


200 


381 


336 


336 


372 


112 


113 


4 


43 


58 










214 




'46 




196 




73 


184 


320 


298 


238 


274 


245 


266 


» 


107 


82 


53 


'so 






384 


"2 






307 




98 


124 


4901 


481 


350 


454! 


307 j 


342 


( 


12 


21 










132 






"4 


93 




55 


45 


205: 


147 


181 


160 


80 


61 


r 


28 


52 








ii9 


286 








250 




73 


232 


303 


279 


339 


368 


116 


215 


t 


17 


25 










124 


5 






121 




52 


45 


142 


108 


123 


92 


91 


83 



238 Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 

TABLE XXIII — Continued — Enrollment by Subject, Excluding Duplicates: Each 



Local Unit 
Name of High School 



Total 
Enroll- 
ment 



Core 



B G 



English 



Social 
Studies 



Science 



Mathe- 
matics 



Latin 



129 Howard , 

130 Howard Count V Sr.... 

131 GlenelgSr.-Jr.", 

1 32 Harriet Tubman Sr.- Jr 

133 Waterloo Jr 

134 EUicott City Jr 

135 Lisbon Klem.-Jr 



136 Kent 

137 Galena Sr.-Jr 

138 Chestertown Sr.-Jr . 

139 Garnett Sr.-Jr 

140 Rock Hall Sr.-Jr .. . 



141 Montgomery 

142 Rich. Montgomery Sr. 
Bethesda-Chevy 

Chase Sr 

Walter Johnson Sr . . . 

Gaithersburg Sr 

Montgomery Blair Sr . 

Wheaton Sr 

Northwood Sr 

Poolesville Sr.-Jr 

Sherwood Sr.-Jr 

Damascus Sr.-Jr 

Robert Peary Sr.-Jr. . . 

Springbrook Jr 

Edwin W. Broome Jr. 

Leland Jr 

Western Jr 

North Bethesda Jr . . . 

Gaithersburg Jr 

Takoma Park Jr 

Montgomery Hills Jr. 

Kensington Jr 

Eastern Jr 

SligoJr 

Colonel Joseph Belt Jr 
Newport Jr 



143 

144 
145 
146 
147 
148 
149 
150 
151 
152 
153 
154 
155 
156 
157 
158 
159 
160 
161 
162 
163 
164 
165 



166 Prince George's 

167 High Point Sr 

Bladensburg Sr 

Suitland Sr 

170 Surrattsville Sr 

171 OxonHiUSr 

DuValSr 

Northwestern Sr 

Central Sr 

Frederick Sasscer 

Sr.-Jr 

Laurel Sr.-Jr 

177 GwynnParkSr.-Jr.. . 

178 Douglass Sr.-Jr 

Fairmont Hgts. Sr.-Jr. 

Beltsville Jr 

Bladensburg Jr 

Suitland Jr 

Benjamin Stoddert Jr. 
Francis Scott Key Jr. . 

Surrattsville Jr 

Laurel Jr 

Oxon HiU Jr 

John Hanson Jr 

Kent Jr 

Hyattsville Jr 

Mt. Rainier Jr 

Rollingcrest Jr 

Maryland Park Jr 

Glenridge Jr 

Greenbelt Jr 

196 Buck Lodge Jr 

197 Lakeland Jr 



168 
169 



172 
173 
174 
175 

176 



179 
180 
181 
182 
183 
184 
185 
186 
187 
188 
189 
190 
191 
192 
193 
194 
195 



1,681 
370 
416 
219 
272 
366 
38 

685 
101 
309 
172 
103 

15,619 
687 

1,039 
961 
458 

1,169 
867 
890 
179 
660 
288 
399 
390 
769 
537 
702 
774 
371 
494 
571 
689 
620 
702 
711 
692 

14,954 
733 
936 
878 
389 
437 
653 

1,000 
155 

272 
238 
363 
426 
983 
351 
576 
516 
469 
441 
370 
173 
431 
367 
270 
588 
495 
506 
491 
652 
470 
350 
69 



1,563 
352 
382 
237 
231 
331 
30 

732 
111 
298 
215 
108 

15, 459 
670 

1,030 
947 
478 

1,265 
848 
791 
193 
652 
270 
355 
390 
687 
547 
744 
757 
387 
511 
689 
653 
672 
744 
672 
607 



629 

147 
99 
188 
157 
38 



4,, 5.34 


9,761 


779 




754 




903 




424 


140 


474 




609 


236 


1,061 




217 




,306 


174 


216 


73 


343 


251 


481 


313 


920 


983 


329 


351 


618 


576 


419 


516 


467 


469 


417 


441 


345 


370 


189 


173 


390 


431 


367 


367 


275 


270 


,541 


588 


414 


495 


445 


506 


462 


491 


613 


652 


439 


470 


349 


356 


68 


69 



550 

128 
100 
157 
135 
30 



9,124 



131 



181 
82 
219 
310 
918 
329 
518 
419 
467 
417 
345 
189 
390 
367 
275 
541 
414 
445 
462 
613 
439 
349 



1,052 
370 
269 
120 
84 
209 



685 
101 
309 
172 
103 

15,595 
687 

1,039 
961 
457 

1,167 
867 
889 
179 
660 
288 
399 
390 
756 
537 
702 
767 
371 
494 
571 
689 
620 
702 
711 
692 

5,191 
733 
934 
878 
249 
43 
317 

1,000 
155 



1,012 
352 
253 
137 
74 
196 



732 
111 
298 
215 
108 



1,080 
347 
319 
120 
85 
209 



685 
101 
309 
172 
103 



1,017 1,477 

322 286 



15,450 13,967 
670 



1,030 
947 

478 
1,264 
848 
791 
193 
652 
270 
355 
390 
684 
547 
744 
752 
387 
511 
589 
653 
672 
744 
672 
607 

6,408 
779 
754 
903 
293 
474 
373 

1,061 
217 

125 
134 
124 
171 



772 

698 

414 

801 

689 

637 

161 

573 

27 

378 

386 

756 

537 

695 

769 

367 

489 

571 

689 

614 

702 

711 

692 

4,648 
541 

814 
854 
249 
433 
274 
858 
148 

97 
171 

96 
113 



288 

13 

74 

196 



732 
111 
298 
215 
108 

13, 596 
580 

724 
662 

388 

847 

652 

515 

177 

526 

248 

330 

387 

684 

547 

744 

756 

38 

507 

589 

653 

670 

744 

672 

607 

4,817 
721 
595 
882 
291 
458 
330 
780 
217 

125 
136 
112 
170 



365 
180 
253 
3.56 
38 

587 
98 
250 
149 
90 

9,765 
465 

779 
730 
328 
900 
596 
708 
113 
428 
1271 
2241 
183 
316 
273 
359 
352 
143 
261 
279 
526 
293 
360 
373 
649 



576 
742 
373 
347 
463 
696 
132 

120 

201 
167 
162 
400 
92 
171 
128 
167 
128 



102 
106 
72 
361 
164 
160 
139 

150 

98 
20 



1,303 
207 
320 
198 
222 
326 
30 

655 
102 
264 
200 



!,751 
422 

693 
662 
315 
810 
440 
537 
113 
386 
124 
206 
183 
302 
243 
360 
285 
200 
226 
261 
469 
317 
346 
327 
.534 



6,851 5,7 
434 335 



285 
517 
285 
295 
461 
498 
148 

119 
147 
137 
191 
380 
96 
143 
127 
140 
127 



107 
103 
73 
363 
140 
149 
129 

i63 
107 
25 



1,493 
299 
376 
172 
253 
355 
38 

592 
82 
274 
143 
93 

13, 820 
390 

849 
781 
285 
860 
665 
655 
141 
562 
247 
376 
390 
756 
537 
702 
774 
371 
494 
571 
689 
620 
702 
711 
692 



1,291 
204 
311 
198 
222 
326 
30 

620 
84 
246 
193 
97 

12, 253 
347 

584 
536 
298 
575 
396 
428 
145 
461 
200 
328 
389 
684 
647 
744 
757 
387 
511 
589 
653 
672 
744 
672 
607 



13,268 


11,316 


337 


51C 


373 


42 


623 


28C 


68 


635 


38C 


57 


377 


298 


15 


360 


201 


31 


463 


341 


33 


749 


569 


84 


105 


90 


11 


228 


233 




208 


136 




310 


250 


6 


406 


427 




782 


726 




351 


329 




676 


518 




503 


415 




457 


464 




441 


417 




363 


340 




162 


187 




431 


390 




367 


367 




270 


275 




588 


541 




495 


414 




496 


439 




476 


449 




652 


613 




470 


439 




345 


347 




69 


68 





Maryland State Department of Education 
Maryland County Public High School: Fall of 1960 



239 



French 



Spanish 



B G B G 



Agriculture 



Industrial 



Gen. 



tl 
Voc. Arts 



B B 



t 
Edu. 



Home Economics 



General 



Voc. 



B G 



Business 
Subjects 



Physical 
Education 



235 
83 
64 
43 
19 
26 



80 

'39 
30 

11 

4,765 



368 
336 

39 
286 
1 
205 

55 
123 

73 

83 
158 
222 
241 
283 
340 

64 
174 
247 
288 
245 
330 
197 
194 

1,320 
156 
100 
129 
100 
1.34 

70 
178 

23 

1 
47 
34 

'84 
21 
40 

'27 
31 



'1056 



°193 
°224 
48 
"215 
106 
°146 

'48 



'1270 
°170 
°131 
167 
38 
103 
165 
220 
26 

46 
2 

'37 
23 



'1008 
65 

°204 
°223 

51 
°229 

81 
°115 

■46 



'1088 
°108 
°112 
135 
53 
82 
89 
194 
29 

44 

12 

42 
56 



*116 



t57 



927 
182 
341 
193 
89 
122 



367 
91 

102 
95 
79 



164 7,739 
359 



535 
504 
165 
623 
506 
605 
50 
321 
217 
155 
187 
308 
206 
305 
334 
163 
237 
241 
292 
302 
382 
379 
363 



145, 



,706 
337 
224 
275 
121 
179 
213 
567 
45 

100 
130 
219 
306 
598 
351 
.524 
286 
457 
439 
363 
162 
240 
195 
174 
562 
468 
478 
476 
494 
309 
345 
69 



11 
1 


29 




836 
127 
319 


10 






185 




29 




94 
111 

420 
89 
118 
139 
74 


241 


t655 




5,267 


2 


tl47 




239 


11 


t32 




102 


8 






328 




tll2 




93 


66 


tioo 




271 


70 


t225 




115 


38 






229 
52 


22 


39 




117 
115 

118 


2 






180 
273 


7 






175 
280 
262 
190 


8 

"i 
1 






277 
270 
249 
348 
366 
306 


5 






312 


16 


tlll7 




8,017 
50 


3 


1:894 




104 


■9 






113 


4 






20 
34 

110 
114 
211 
292 




t223 




603 
329 
473 
402 
464 
416 
340 
187 
221 
218 
275 
499 
398 
394 
449 
450 
436 
347 
68 



234 
37 



1,453 
102 
353 
201 
106 
186 
132 
207 
65 



120 
23 
45 

48 
4 

1,674 
200 

229 
179 
128 
253 
92 
170 
27 
65 
29 
22 



1,642 
216 
237 
349 

40 
175 

79 
203 



526 
257 



171 
35 
72 
60 
4 

3,384 
418 

378 

293 

279 

547 

390 

307 

60 

240 

72 

28 



70 



103 



4,170 
353 
744 
650 
199 
305 
258 
780 
187 

121 
96 

175 
96 

200 



1430 
195 
366 
376 
182 
273 
38 

590 
101 
224 
162 
103 

13,284 
558 

834 
746 
333 
636 
579 
505 
168 
561 
250 
373 
383 
756 
519 
680 
622 
371 
489 
545 
663 
620 
690 
711 
692 

12,587 
419 
427 
440 
337 
233 
481 
664 
108 

261 
205 
338 
402 
788 
344 
576 
516 
454 
440 
363 
173 
416 
367 
268 
588 
495 
496 
487 
639 
467 
326 
69 



1,208 
114 
331 
309 
193 
231 
30 

629 

11 

226 

184 

108 

12,146 
489 

760 

457 

240 

532 

420 

438 

141 

475 

186 

347 

389 

684 

530 

707 

640 

387 

49 

566 

610 

664 

709 

672 

606 

11,264 
369 
410 
201 
246 
183 
508 
516 



286 
157 
275 
413 
708 
308 
518 
417 
463 
411 
340 
189 
36: 
367 
274 
541 
414 
439 
451 
605 
430 
318 



Music 



Art — Arts 
and Crafts 



1,025 


1,042 


416 


88 


116 


53 


366 


331 


228 


142 


181 


41 


152 


172 




239 


212 


94 


38 


30 




495 


498 


255 


90 


100 


52 


185 


193 


86 


148 


164 


61 


72 


41 


56 


4,630 


4,934 


2,267 


77 


137 


38 


195 


369 


76 


245 


345 


70 


112 


172 


39 


184 


204 


137 


221 


190 


63 


165 


241 


94 


35 


79 


37 


175 


221 


82 


64 


132 


71 


117 


126 


84 


129 


116 


76 


279 


239 


163 


449 


376 


184 


235 


235 


90 


362 


343 


164 


154 


126 


53 


103 


119 


51 


192 


164 


138 


233 


201 


89 


192 


184 


120 


225 


194 


126 


292 


264 


110 


195 


157 


112 


6,984 


7,131 


6,509 


95 


196 


62 


94 


123 


102 


96 


240 


130 


79 


91 


48 


59 


52 


41 


133 


142 


119 


195 


342 


164 


30 


57 


41 


179 


183 


144 


85 


88 


50 


163 


149 


211 


256 


243 


196 


549 


523 


595 


239 


197 


318 


333 


301 


272 


290 


257 


275 


239 


235 


224 


269 


252 


299 


363 


340 


363 


112 


134 


136 


303 


248 


214 


208 


218 


197 


218 


223 


183 


356 


348 


232 


267 


199 


282 


339 


353 


286 


382 


362 


274 


415 


391 


429 


354 


334 


253 


229 


252 


306 


55 


58 


63 



240 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



TABLE XXIII — Continued — Enrollment by Subject, Excluding Duplicates: Each 



Local Unit 
Name of High School 



Total 
EnroU- 
ment 



198 Queen Anne's 

199 Sudlersville Sr.-Jr 

200 Centreville Sr.-Jr 

201 Kennard Sr.-Jr 

202 Stevensville Sr.-Jr 

203 St. Maey's 

204 Leonardtown Sr.-Jr 

205 Banneker Sr.-Jr 

206 Margaret Brent Sr.-Jr . 

207 Great Mills Sr.-Jr 

208 Carver Sr.-Jr 

209 Somerset 

210 Washington Sr.-Jr 

21 1 Marion Sr.-Jr 

212 Woodson Sr.-Jr 

213 Crisfield Sr.-Jr 

214 Deal Island Sr.-Jr 

215 Somerset Sr.-Jr 

216 EwellJr 

217 Talbot 

218 Easton Sr.-Jr 

219 Robt. R. Moton Sr.-Jr . 

220 St. Michael's Sr.-Jr.... 

221 Washington 

222 South Hagerstown Sr . . 

223 BoonsboroSr 

224 North Hagerstown Sr . . 

225 WilUamsport Sr.-Jr. . . . 

226 Clear Spring Sr.-Jr 

227 Hancock Sr.-Jr 

228 Smithsburg Sr.-Jr 

229 Boonsboro Jr 

230 South Potomac Jr 

23 1 North Potomac Jr 

232 Washington Jr 

233 Hancock Elem.-Jr 

234 Wicomico 

235 Wicomico Sr 

236 Mardela Sr.-Jr 

237 Pittsville Sr.-Jr 

238 Salisbury Sr.-Jr 

239 Wicomico Jr 

240 Worcester 

241 Pocomoke Sr.-Jr 

242 Snow Hill Sr.-Jr 

243 Stephen Decatur Sr.-Jr, 

244 Worcester Sr.-Jr 



776 
171 
258 
218 
129 

1,200 
205 
208 
214 
433 
140 

930 
188 

62 

99 
237 

57 
266 

21 

859 
451 
223 
185 

4,370 
754 
349 
821 
333 
270 
170 
242 
256 
387 
457 
274 
57 

2,070 
530 
135 
112 
520 
773 

1,099 
178 
205 
326 
390 



169 
256 
198 
166 

1,236 
198 
176 
219 
503 
140 

921 
212 

48 
100 
235 

55 
251 

20 

879 
475 
235 
169 

4,0.59 
742 
303 
752 
2.50 
254 
176 
234 
216 
395 
421 
272 
44 

2,110 
551 
147 
122 
523 
767 

1,103 
183 
198 
353 
369 



Core 



368 
82 
26 
26 

142 
33 
59 



127 
127 

44 
135 
256 
387 
457 
274 

57 



406 
139 



341 
84 
26 
25 

134 
25 
47 



106 
106 

1,699 



92 
110 

49 
100 
216 
395 
421 
272 

44 



English 



357 

iio 

247 



681 
171 
258 
123 
129 

1,200 
205 
208 
214 
433 
140 

562 
106 
36 
73 
95 
24 
207 
21 

756 
451 
120 
185 

2,506 
754 
349 
821 
206 
143 
126 
107 



2,070 
530 
135 
112 
520 
773 

693 
178 
66 
326 
123 



Social 
Studies 



Science 



70fi 


658 


660 


169 


171 


168 


256 


241 


220 


116 


123 


116 


165 


123 


156 


1,236 


1,189 


1,226 


198 


205 


198 


176 


208 


176 


219 


203 


209 


503 


433 


503 


140 


140 


140 


580 


572 


584 


128 


106 


128 


22 


30 


16 


75 


73 


78 


101 


92 


97 


30 


24 


30 


204 


226 


215 


20 


21 


20 


773 


769 


789 


475 


470 


505 


129 


120 


129 


169 


179 


155 


2,357 


2,359 


2,227 


742 


754 


742 


303 


349 


298 


752 


657 


640 


1.58 


195 


146 


144 


143 


132 


127 


146 


138 


131 


115 


131 


2,110 


1,951 


2,012 


,551 


490 


506 


147 


131 


145 


122 


110 


120 


523 


501 


503 


767 


719 


738 


745 


665 


737 


182 


177 


181 


88 


66 


88 


353 


299 


346 


122 


123 


122 



650 
153 
214 
179 
104 

1,119 
169 
185 
210 
419 
136 

833 
168 

53 

86 
208 

57 
240 

21 

774 
387 
223 
164 

3,656 
558 
310 
542 
290 
168 
140 
217 
256 
387 
457 
274 
57 

1,793 
377 
113 
103 
453 
747 

897 
176 
182 
294 
245 



Mathe- 
matics 



670 
146 
225 
164 
135 

1,091 
181 
141 
186 
459 
124 

837 
192 

44 

93 
200 

54 
234 

20 

774 
401 
235 
138 

3,170 
441 
252 
431 
199 
169 
148 
182 
216 
395 
421 
272 
44 

1,761 
352 
118 
94 
455 
742 



165 
159 
297 
227 



606 
117 
223 
152 
114 

994 
165 
150 
182 
379 
118 

830 
161 

56 

95 
224 

47 
226 

21 

670 
381 
159 
130 

3,647 
584 
219 
618 
233 
205 
142 
215 
256 
387 
457 
274 
57 

1,714 
306 
133 
102 
414 
759 



166 
190 
285 
319 



Latin 



591 
115 
201 
152 
123 

939 
154 
118 
150 
397 
120 

795 
173 

45 

91 
204 

41 
221 

20 

693 
383 
186 
124 

3,235 
483 
195 
497 
173 
184 
160 
195 
216 
395 
421 
272 
44 

1,704 
297 
105 
105 
433 
764 

866 
145 
148 
266 
307 



246 
66 
52 
83 
19 
17 



399 
112 
66 
161 
23 
24 



1 



300 
62 



* Includes the following number of girls taking General Agriculture: Howard: Glenelg Sr.-Jr. — 4; Montgomery: Damascus Sr.-Jr. — 29; 

Total— 33. 
t Includes the following number of girls taking Vocational Agriculture: Cecil: Rising Sun Sr.-Jr. — 3; Frederick: Thurmont Sr.-Jr. — 1 ; 

Howard: Glenelg Sr.-Jr.— 1 ; Total— 5. 
I Includes the following number of girls taking Industrial Education: Baltimore: Dundalk Sr. — 7; Kenwood Sr. — 15; Sparrows Point 

Sr.-Jr.— 10; Cecil: Elkton Sr.— 8; Montgomery: Bethesda-Chevy Chase Sr.— 13; Gaithersburg Sr.— 63; Montgomery Blair Sr.— 29: 

Richard Montgomery Sr. — 3; Wheaton Sr. — 75; Prince George's: Bladensburg Sr. — 15; Fairmont Heights Sr.-Jr.— 40: Total— 278. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



241 



Maryland County Public High School: Fall of 1960 




























Agriculture 


Industrial 


Home Economics 


















French 


Spanish 










Business 


Physical 
Education 


\J(ici/» 


Art— Arts 
and OrAfts 












* 


„ t 




r.J 






Subjects 
















Gen. 


Voc. 


Arts 


Edu. 


General 


Voc. 
















B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


B 


B 


G 


B 


B 


G 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


198 


105 


132 


4 


11 


42 


96 


389 








324 


143 


163 


239 


679 


670 


440 


469 


141 


126 


199 


18 


13 








45 










54 




31 


80 


166 


137 


75 


107 


36 


30 


200 


23 


36 


4 


'ii 




51 


m 








96 


'82 


74 


81 


203 


211 


165 


159 


105 


96 


201 


41 


55 






42 




135| . . . 






82 


61 


40 


29 


198 


182 


145 


123 






202 


23 


28 










98 








92 




18 


49 


112 


140 


55 


80 






203 


175 


205 


47 


45 




129 


573 








758 


59 


165 


375 


1,106 


1,050 


614 


723 


567 


603 


204 


36 


42 


















134 




35 


26 


170 


151 


89 


110 


93 


98 


205 


29 


8 








'86 


122 








79 


'42 


14 


77 


174 


111 


106 


125 


86 


71 


206 






27 


'32 




43 


134 








164 




48 


122 


210 


202 


99 


119 


80 


89 


207 


98 


124 


20 


13 






203 








292 




46 


117 


420 


486 


203 


252 


212 


265 


208 


12 


31 










114 








89 


17 


22 


33 


132 


100 


117 


117 


96 


80 


209 


150 


166 






25 


88 


396 








564 




177 


241 


899 


884 


575 


595 


46 


37 


210 
211 


19 


37 






25 


27 










89 




23 


52 


188 


207 


133 


129 






6 


7 






















30 


18 


60 


47 


14 


13 


is 


i2 


212 


13 


7 










'99 








166 




16 


33 


99 


99 


61 


62 






213 
214 
215 
216 


40 


35 










168 








224 




77 


97 


217 


219 


207 


223 






'72 


'so 








'ei 


129 








isi 




31 


41 


57 
257 
21 


54 

238 
20 


ieo 


i68 


'33 


'25 


217 


171 


194 






18 


112 


297 








260 


82 


145 


231 


713 


690 


344 


267 






218 


62 


93 








66 


146 








138 




97 


147 


321 


316 


115 


94 






219 


32 


34 






'is 


46 


66 








57 


'82 




13 


221 


233 


156 


118 






220 


77 


67 










85 








65 




'48 


71 


171 


141 


73 


55 






221 


350 


424 


146 


116 


20 


245 


2,866 


53 


259 


20 


2,517 


25 


372 


962 


3,554 


3,042 


2,560 


2,607 


1,771 


1,654 


222 


82 


128 


38 


32 




67 


337 


5 


60 


2 


278 




85 


266 


469 


402 


178 


237 


111 


91 


223 


22 


28 








75 


162 








114 


'i4 


73 


89 


177 


193 


97 


113 


22 


19 


224 


76 


106 


108 


'84 






452 




igg 




366 




55 


322 


660 


525 


172 


192 


54 


61 


225 
226 


9 


8 








'65 


123 






'is 


119 




73 


85 


251 


181 


185 


161 


132 


92 


14 


21 










82 








97 




33 


78 


234 


151 


270 


254 


78 


87 


227 


12 


23 










110 








123 




45 


81 


161 


124 


60 


148 






228 


16 


8 






'26 


'38 


169 


'48 






72 


'ii 


8 




171 


118 


167 


154 






229 
230 
231 
232 
233 


119 


102 










256 








216 








256 


216 


256 


216 


256 


2i6 














387 








395 








387 


395 


387 


395 


387 


395 














457 








421 








457 


421 


457 


421 


457 


421 














274 








272 








274 


272 


274 


272 


274 


272 














57 








44 








57 


44 


57 


44 






234 
235 


119 


140 


87 


89 




113 


1,389 


1 


28 




1,300 




346 


592 


1,579 


1,350 


934 


1,073 


987 


1,055 


39 


46 


87 


89 




31 


183 


1 


28 




72 




196 


330 


202 


80 


81 


144 


71 


89 


236 
237 


27 


24 








25 


82 








97 




24 


50 


111 


110 


87 


117 


100 


76 


12 


27 










90 








87 




21 


49 


100 


95 


59 


87 


94 


86 


238 
239 


41 


43 








'46 


318 








382 




105 


163 


459 


401 


313 


350 


314 


311 












11 


716 








662 








707 


664 


394 


375 


408 


493 


240 
241 


120 


198 






43 


51 


583 








499 


40 


176 


333 


794 


717 


458 


477 


184 


191 


41 


57 










100 








93 




20 


63 


151 


121 


76 


59 


72 


70 


242 


22 


27 










95 








89 




36 


58 


176 


142 


74 


53 


27 


41 


243 


30 


69 






'43 




247 








192 




73 


99 


251 


264 


135 


173 


48 


52 


244 


27 


45 








'si 


141 




1 


125 


'46 


47 


113 


216 


190 


173 


192 


37 


28 



Includes the following number takmg German: Anne Arundel: Brooklyn Sr.-Jr.— 60 boys— 10 girls; Montgomery: Bethesda-Chevy Chase 
br.— 43 boys— 27 girls; Montgomery Blair br.— 41 boys— 27 girls; Northwood Sr.— 41 boys— 16 girls; Walter Johnson Sr.— 47 boys— 33 girls; 
Prince George s: Bladensburg Sr.— 35 boys— 14 girls; High Point— 54 boys— 15 girls; Total— 321 bovs— 142 girls. 
» Includes the following number taking Russian: Baltimore: Towson Sr.— 6 boys— 16 girls. 



INDEX 



Academic course, each high school, 226-233 
Accreditation and certification, 39-45 
Administration 

Cost per pupil, 148-149 

Expenditures, 216 

Per cent for, 147 

Superintendents, 2, 6-19, 211, 216 
Adult education, 161, 163-165, 219 
Agriculture 

Adult education, 160-161, 163-165 

Enrollment, 105, 111 

Each high school, 234-241 

Federal aid, 160-163 

Schools offering, 116, 234-241 

State supervision, 2 

Teachers, 116 
Aid from State and/or Federal funds 

Counties and Baltimore City, distiibvition 
by type of fund, 143-146, 194, 212-213 

State teachers colleges, 186-187, 194-195 

Vocational education, 159-163, 194, 213 

Vocational rehabilitation, 192-193, 196-197 
Appropriations 

County, 143-145, 175, 194, 214 

State, 143-145, 194, 212 
Art, high school 

Enrollment, 102, 112 

Each high school, 234-241 

Schools offering, 116, 234-241 

Teachers, 116 
Assessable basis, 176-178 
Attendance 

Average daily, 209 

Each high school, 226-233 

Per cent of, 209 

Teachers at summer school, 122 

Workers (see Pupil personnel) 
Atypical children, 81-88 
Auxiliary agencies (see Other school services) 



B 

Hands, orchestras, glee clubs, 115 
Basic aid per classroom unit, 194, 212 
Belonging, average number, 209 
Each high school, 226-233 
Per teacher, 93 
Birth rates, 89-91 

Board of Education, State, 2, 194, 196 
Boards of Education, counties, 6-19 
Bonds outstanding, school, 172 
Books and instructional materials 
Cost per pupil 

Elementary, 152 
High, 153 
Expenditures 

All schools, 217, 223 
Elementary, 224 
High, 225 
Per cent of current expense budget, 147 
Boys and girls 
Enrollment 

Nonpublic, 202-208 
Public, 201 
Graduates, Iiigh school, 97-104 
Budget 

Baltimore (Mtv, county, local, 143-145, 175 
State public school, 194 
State teachers colleges, 194-195 
Buildings 

Cost (see Capital outlay) 
Number of, 119-120, 200 
Value of school, per pupil, 171 
Business education 
Adult, 164-165 

Enrollment, 105, 113, 162, 164-105 
Each high school, 234-241 
Schools offering, 116, 234-241 
Teachers, 116 



Capital outlay, school, 143. 147. 170 
By site, building, equipment, 222 
Certificate status, teachers 126-129 
Certificates held by county teachers, 121, 123, 126- 

129 
Certification and accreditation, division of, 39-45 
Classes 

Evening schools, 164-165 
Size of, 93 

Special for handicapped, 81-88 
Clerks, county schools, 210 
Collies 

High school graduates 

of 1960 entering, 99-104 
of 1961 entering State teachers colleges, 
98 
Junior, 182, 184-185 
State teachers, 179-184, 186-187, 194-195, 

198-199 
Training teachers appointed in Maryland, 121 
Commercial (see Business education) 
Consolidation 

Decrease in one-teacher schools. 118 
Transportation of pupils, 156-158 
Construction accounts. State teachers colleges, 

198-199 
Contents, table of, 21 
Core program, high school 
Enrollment, 105 

Each high school, 234-241 
Schools ofi'ering, 116, 234-241 
Teachers, 116 
Cost per pupil 

Administration, 148-149 
Elementary and high, 151-153 
By type of school, 148-149 
Transported, 156-157 
Costs (see Expenditures) 
County superintendents, directors, supervisors, 

6-19 
Courses in individual high schools, 226-233 
Crippled children, services for, 81-85, 87-88 
Current expenses 

Cost per pupil, 148-153 
Expenditures 

All schools, 215 

By source of funds. 143-145 
By type of school, 223-225 



D 



Dates, opening and closing of schools, 72 

Days in session, 72 

Debt service, 172-173, 175, 221 

Tax rate for, 174 
Disbursements (see Expenditures) 
Distributive education. 160-162, 164-165 
Driver education and training, high school 

Enrollment, 114 

Schools offering, 116 

Teachers, 116 



E 

Elementary scliools, supervision, 211 
Emergency certificates, 123,126-129 
Employment of high school graduates, 99 101 
English, high school 

Enrollment, 105 

Each high school, 234-241 

Schools offering, 116, 234-241 

Teachers, 116 
Enrollment 

Adult, 164 

Atypical children, 81-88 

Elementary, 72-80, 201-208 



242 



Index 



243 



E — ( Continued ) 

Grade or year, 74, 76-80 
High school 

Coiiree, each school, 226-233 
Subjects, 105-115 

Each school, 234-241 
Year, 74, 76-80 

Each school, 226-233 
Increase in, 73 
Nonpublic, private and parochial, 72-73, 78- 

80, 202-208 
Xuniber of ditfeieiit pupils, 73, 201 
Public, 72-75, 77 
State teachers college, 181-184 
Subject, 105-115 

Each school, 234-241 
Summary, 72-73 
Equalization fund, 144145, 212 
Equivalence examinations, 190 
livening schools and courses 
Enrollment, 164 

Expnditures, 160-161, 163, 219 
Expenditures, 215-225 

(see also Administration, Instruction, Operation, 
Maintenance, Fixed charges, Other school serv- 
ices. Payments to adjoining units. Current ex- 
penses. Debt service. Capital outlay) 
Elementaiv schools, 224 
Evening schools, lGO-161, 163, 219 
Health, 219 
High schools, 225 
Libraries, 217 

Rehabilitation, 193, 196-197 
Salaries 

All schools, 217, 223 
Elementary, 224 
High, 225 
Vocational, 160-163 
Stete teachers colleges, 18G187, 194-195, 197, 

198-199 
Total, by major classifications, 194, 215 
Transportation, 156-157, 219 
Vocational, Federal, 160-163 
Experience of teachers, 130-135 



H 

Handicapped children 

Expenditures, 82, 87, 194 

Home instruction, 81-82, 84 

Hospital schools, 81-82 84 

Institutions for, 82, 88 

Opportunities for education of, 81-88 

Preschool, 87 

Receipts from State for, 82, 87, 194, 212 
Health expenditures, all scliools, 219 
Hearing, conservation of, 81, 83, 85-86 
High school equivalence examinations, 190 
Hiyh schools 

Disbursements, 225 

Individual, 226-233, 234-241 

Supervision, 211 
Home economics 

Adult, 160-161. 164-165 

Enrollment, 105, 111 

Each higli school, 234-241 

Federal aid, 100-163 

.Schools offering, 116, 234-241 

Teachers, 116 
Home instruction of pupils, 81-82. 84 
Hospital instruction of pupils, 81-82, 84 



Incorporated towns, levy for, 174 
Industrial arts (see Trades and industries) 
Instruction, division of, 46-58 
Cost per pupil, 151-153 
Expenditures, 223-225 

Salaries, supervision, books, etc., 217 
State teachers colleges, 186-187 
Per cent of current expense budget, 147 
Inventories, State teachers colleges, 187 



Janitors, repair, utility men, 211 
Junior colleges, 182, 184-185, 212 



Failures (see Nonpromotions) 
Fall enrollment, 72, 74-80 
Federal aid 

Vocational education, 159-163 

Administration and supervision, 160-161 
Salaries of teachers, 160-162 
Fees in State teachers colleges, 186-187, 104-195 
Financial statements 

State public schools, 194, 212-225 

State teachers colleges, 194-195, 198-199 
P'irst grade nonpromotions, 96 
Fixed cliargps, 147149, 220 
I'leiirli, high school 

Enrollment, 105, 110 

Each higli scliool, 234-241 

Schools offering, 116, 234-241 

Teachers, 116 



Oerman (see French) 

Glee clubs, bands, orchestras, 115 

Grade enrollment, 74, 76-80 

Graduates 

High school, 97-104 

Entering State teachers colleges, 98101, 

103 
From each school, 226-233 
Occupations of, 99-101 
State teachers college, 179-180 
Guidance, teachers of, 116 



K 

Kindergartens, 74, 76-80 
Nonpublic, 202-208 



Languages (see English, French, etc.) 

Latin (see French) 

Legislation, 23-27 

Length of school session, 72 

[.otter of transmittal, 22 

Levies, count.v, 175 

I^ibrarians, county, 6-6 

Libraries 

Expenditures, 191. 194 

Public, 5-6, 191, 194 

School, 217 
Library extension, division of, 62-66 
Lip reading classes, 86 
Loans to students, college, 197 
Lunch program, school, 166-169, 213, 219 



M 

Maintenance 

Cost per pupil, 151-153 

Expenditures, 218, 223-225 

Per cent of current expense budget, 147 

Materials of instruction (see Books and instruc- 
tional materials) 



244 



Index 



M — (Continued) 

Mathematics, high school 

Enrollment, 105, 109 

Each high eehool, 234-241 

SchoolB offering, 116, 234-241 

Teachers, 116 
Medical examinations, bus drivers, 212 
Men teachers, 117, 210 
Mentally handicapped children, 81-85, 87, 
Milk program, special, 107, 213, 219 
Minimum program. State, 146 
Minutes, State Board, 28-38 
\liisic high school 

Enrollment, 105, 112 

Each high school. 234-241 

Orchestras, bands, glee clubs, 115 

Schools offering, 116, 234-241 

Teachers, 116 



N 

National Defense Education Act, 159, 213 
Night schools (see Evening schools. Adult educa- 
tion) 
Nonpromotions, 

Elementary, 95-90 

First grade, 96 

High school, 94 
Number belonging, 209 

Each high school, 226-233 

Per teacher, 93 
Number of different pupils, 73, 201 
Number of schools 

For atypical children, 88 

Having one teacher, 118, 200 

Nonpublic, 72, 202-208 

Public, 72, 200 

Elementary, 118, 119-120, 200 
High, 119-120, 200 



o 

Occupations of high school graduates, 99-101 
One-teacher schools 

Decrease in, IIS 

Number belonging in, 118 

Number of, 118, 200 
Operation 

Cost per pupil, 151-153 

Expenditures. 218, 223-225 

Per cent of current expense budget, 147 
Orchestras, bands, glee clubs, 115 
Other school services 

Cost per pupil, 151-153 

Expenditures, 219, 223-225 

Per cent of current expense budget, 147 



I'areiit-tcacluT associations, 189 

Parochial and private schools, 72-73, 78-80, 202- 

208 
Part-payment of salaries, 212 
Payments to adjoining units, 220 
Pensions (see Retirement system for teachers) 
Physical education and health, 219 
Physical education and recreation, high school 

Appropriations for, 194 

Enrollment, 105, 112 

Each high school, 234-241 

Schools offering, 116, 234-241 

Teachers, 116 
Physical examinations (see Medical examinations) 
Physically handicapped children, 81-88 
Preparation, teachers, 124-125 
Preschool handicapped, 87 
Presidents of Stat« teachers colleges, 6 
Professional and clerical staffs, county, 211 



P — ( Continued ) 

Private and parochial schools, 72-73, 78-80, 202- 

208 
Property, valuation of 

Counties and Baltimore City, 176-177 
School, 171 
Psychology (see Social studies) 
Pupil personnel, 6-19 
Supervisors of, 211 
Salaries, 219 
Pupils, 

Atypical, 81-88 

Nonpublic, 72-73, 78-80, 202-208 

One-teacher schools, 118 

Per teacher, 93 

Public school 

Enrollment, 72-75, 77. 201 
Number attending, 209 
Number belonging, 209 
Per cent of attendance, 209 
Transported, 156-157 

R 

Receipts from 

All sources, 214 
Federal government, 213 
Evening schools, 163 
Teachers' salaries, 159-162 
Vocational education, 159-162 
State, 212 

Distributed by type of fund, 143-145, 

194-212 
Evening schools, 163 
Total and per cent, 143-145 
Teachers colleges, 186-187, 194-195 
Rehabilitation, vocational, 3-5, 67-71, 192-193, 

194, 196-197 
Repair, utility men, janitors, 211 
Resignations, teachers, 136-137 
Retarded children, programs for, 81-88 
Retirement system for teachers, 5, 188, 194 
Russian (see French) 



Salaries 

Per cent of school budget, 147 
Superintendents', 216 
Supervisors', 217 

Pupil personnel, 219 
Teachers' 

Average per teacher, 154-155 
Cost per pupil for, 151-153 
Total 

Elementary, 224 
High, 225 
Vocational, 160-163 
School lunch program, 166-169, 213, 219 
Schools 

For atypical children, 88 

Number of, 72-73, 118, 119-120, 200, 202-208 
Science, high school 

Enrollment, 105, 108 

Each high school, 234-241 
Schools offering, 116, 234-241 
Teachers, 116 
Session, length of, 72 
Sex of teachers, 117, 210 
Size of 

Classes, 93 
Schools 

Each high school, 226-233 
Elementary, 118, 119-120 
High, 119-120 
Teaching staff, 72-73, 118, 210 
Social studies, high school 
Enrollment, 105-107 

Each high school, 234-241 
Schools offering, 116, 234-241 
Teachers, 116 



Index 



245 



S — (Continued) 

Spanish (see French) 

Special classes for handicapped, 81-88 

Special high school teachers, 116 

Special milk program, 167, 213, 219 

State 

Aid to schools, 143-145 

Minimum program, 146 
Showing various funds, 194, 212 
Board of Education, 2 

Excerpts from minutes of, 28-38 
Department of Education, 2-5, 194, 196-107 
Public school budget, 194-197 
Teachers colleges, 6, 98, 101, 103, 179-181, 

186-187, 194-195, 197, 198-199 
Teachers' retirement Gj'stein, 188, 194 
Stenography, typing, bookkeei^ing (see Business 

education) 
Subjects studied in higli schools, 105-115 

Each high school, 234-241 
Summer school attendance 

County teachers, 122 
Superintendents, 2, 6-19, 211 
Supervisors, supervision 

Cost per pupil, 151-153 
Cost, salaries, expenses, 217 

By tj-pe of school, 223-225 
Names of, 2-5, 6-19 
Number of, 211 

Per cent of current expense budget, 147 
Salaries of, 217, 223-225 
State, 2-5 



Table of contents, 21 

Taxable basis, 176-178 

Tax dollar, distribution of school, 147 

Tax rates, county, 174 

Teacher(s) 

Academic, high school, 116 
Average salary, 154-155 
Certificate status, 126-129 
, Certification, 39-45, 121, 123, 126-129 
Colleges, 6, 98, 101. 103, 179-184, 186-187 

194-195, 197, 198-199, 226-233 
Experience, 130-135 
Number of, 210 

For each high school subject, 116 
In each high school, 226-233 
In schools of each type 
Atypical, 88 

Nonpublic, 72-73, 202-208 
Public, 72-73, 210 
Of atypical children, 83, 86, 88 
Preparation, 124-125 



T — ( Continued ) 

Pupils per, 93 

Resignations, 136-137 

Salaries, average, 154-155 

Sex of, 117, 210 

Special subjects, high school, 116 

Summary, elementary and high, public and 
nonpublic, 72-73 

Summer school attendance, 122 

Training institutions, 179-184, 186-187, 194- 
195, 197, 198-199 
Turnover of, 136142 
Teachers' retirement system 

Financial statements, 188, 194 

StaiT, 5 

Teachers' contril)Ulion8 to, 188 
Trades and industries (Industrial arts) 

Adult, 160-161, 163-165 

Enrollment, 105, 111, 162 

Each high school, 234-241 

Federal aid, 159-163 

Schools offering, 116, 234-241 

Teachers, 116 
Training centers. State teachers colleges, 181-183 
Transmittal, letter of, 22 
Transportation of pupils 

Cost, total and per pupil, 156-157, 219 

Per cent transported, 156-157 
Turnover in teaching staff, 136-142 



Value of 

Assessable property, 176-178 
School property, 171 
Vocational education 
Division of, 59-61 
Enrollment 

Day schools, 105, 111, 162, 234-241 
Evening schools, 164-165 
Fedeial aid, 159-163, 194, 213 
Vocational rehabilitation, 3-5, 67-71, 192-193, 194, 
196 



w 

Wealth back of each pupil belonging, 178 
Withdrawals 

Pupils, 92 

Teachers. 136-137 



Year, length of school, 72 



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